University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA)

 - Class of 1964

Page 9 of 144

 

University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 9 of 144
Page 9 of 144



University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 8
Previous Page

University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 10
Next Page

Search for Classmates, Friends, and Family in one
of the Largest Collections of Online Yearbooks!



Your membership with E-Yearbook.com provides these benefits:
  • Instant Access to Millions of Yearbook Pictures
  • High-Resolution, Full Color Images Available Online
  • Search, Browse, Read, and Print Yearbook Pages
  • View College, High School, and Military Yearbooks
  • Browse our digital annual library spanning centuries
  • Support the Schools in our Program by Subscribing

Page 9 text:

Dedication- - - - - - The class of 1964 dedicates this year's Chips to a man who through his helpfulness, unselfish devotion of time, and sincere honesty has given constant in- spiration. Dr. lohn Sin-gler is a native of South Bend, Indiana Where he received his early education. His pre-den- tal Work was completed at Notre Dame and the Uni- versity of Michigan. A 1939 graduate of Loyola Den- tal School, Dr. Singler practiced in his home town until called into the service in 1942. He transferred from the Dental Corps into the Paratroopers While in the Army. Claiming hunting and fishing as hobbies he is the father of four boys and a girl. Dr. Singler has taught at P CS S since his appointment to the faculty in 1952. With great pride We dedicate this book to you Dr. Singler and again say THANK YOU.

Page 8 text:

I ! 4



Page 10 text:

Dean's Message Of the health services dentistry is the most sen- sitive to family income. Increases in the amount of money available to families has very definitely increased the proportion of the population seeking care and can be expected to continue to do so. As the development of dental insurance plans and prepayment plans increase, the proportion cf the population seeking dental care will grow greater. Irrespective of this, the determination of the precise number of the dentists or dental schools subject to such a variety of variables that the validity of any figure calculated is seriously compromised. There is no question that increases in dental manpower must and should occur but the incumbent must bear a close relationship to the demand for dental service. It is far more important that the profession at- tempts to increase its potential or capacity for core before attempting to increase its numbers: as a corollary it is equally important that the profession utilize all preventive measures before increasing its manpower. There is no question that the preval- ence of periodontal disease does call for an in- crease in the number of periodontists. However, it also calls for implementation of teaching staffs and an implementation of research in dental schools to increase the proficiency of students in periodontal treatment. With respect to dental caries a restraining in- fluence on its prevalence is the first order of busi- ness, not increasing manpower. Increased instruc- tion in the use of topical fluorides, dietary fluorides, and water fluoridation are badly needed. There are twenty-two communities in California fluoridat- ing at the present time. Twenty-two cities cover a population of approximately one and one-half mil- lion. Another six or seven million Californians consume fluoridated water between 0.3 parts per million and 2 parts per million in those areas where the fluoride ion has a natural occurence in water. There are several steps within the practice of dentistry and within dental education that may be taken to increase the efficiency with which the pro- fession renders care. Fifty per cent of the practicing dentists have between 800 and 900 patients. Only ten per cent have more than two thousand patients. This is by no means compatible with the potential capacity for dental care that actually exists. The dental practitioner is solely responsible for dental treatment and all decisions and iudgments related to it. However, this does not prevent him from utilizing a dental assistant and in such a man- ner has to increase his potential for care. The in- crease in work load achieved above the normal is spoken of as a dental equivalent. An increase of fifty per cent in work load is the equivalent of one and one-half dentists. lt is well documented that the effective utilization of qualified auxiliary personnel, additional oper- atories, and modern operative procedures will per- mit a marked increase in the available dental service for more patients. In quantitative terms, one dental assistant can increase the patient load by about one-third and two assistants with two oper- atories may increase the patient service by at least sixty-five per cent. The trend as evidenced in the data from the American Dental Association indicates a substan- tial rise annually in the percentage of dentists who are utilizing one or two auxiliary personnel and the result of increase in activity. Assuming that every nonsalaried dentist who practices will have at least one full-time assistant and that twenty per cent will have at least two assistants by l975, then eighty per cent of the nonsalaried dentists could increase their potential load by at least one-third by employ- ing a second dental assistant. The estimated total of dentists that will be needed by 1975 is ll8,l42. If eighty per cent of the dentists increase their ef- ficiency as indicated above they could increase their number in terms of equivalent dentists by an additional 25,455 lf this is added to the ll8,l42 dentists needed in 1975 a sum of 143,597 dentists results. This is 10,000 more in total of dental equiv- alents than is required in the 1975 estimate. Continuing education and research in educa- tional methods ultimately lend themselves to in- creased efficiency and practice. The dental school has the obligation for providing opportunity for such study throughout the professional life of the practitioner.

Suggestions in the University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) collection:

University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

1917

University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

1941

University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1944 Edition, Page 1

1944

University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

1955

University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

1961

University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

1965

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.