Louise S McGehee School - Spectator Yearbook (New Orleans, LA)

 - Class of 1942

Page 9 of 68

 

Louise S McGehee School - Spectator Yearbook (New Orleans, LA) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 9 of 68
Page 9 of 68



Louise S McGehee School - Spectator Yearbook (New Orleans, LA) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 8
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Page 9 text:

THE SPEc'rA'roR Seven responsibility which constitutes an executive. Connie's likability and versatility have helped her to be a good Prefect. This year study halls and libraries have been better than any year before due to Connie's understanding and organizing study hall keepers. She also had the fore- sight to see that Iuniors should be trained for next year, and the last part of school made all study hall keepers Iuniors. But the best and most important thing about all three of them is that they work in perfect harmony. And so they're leaving. But because they have been together since the grammar school, because they are known and liked by all the stu- dents-and the faculty as well and because they are real friends as well as leaders and executives, they are leaving the school in excellent condi- tion for next year's class. And they are also leaving with the knowledge that they have done their iob and done it well. . Ed. '42 I think it was Burke who said "We stand where we have an immense view of what is, and what is past. Clouds, indeed, and darkness, rest upon the future . . I can not help but feel how applicable that is to me at this moment, and especially during these last three weeks of school. I'm afraid I'm looking upon Iune 10th more as a commencement than graduation. Yet, I don't want to leave McGehee's even ,though I know I am old enough, am supposed to have finished my work, and have re- ceived all I can from high school. Ignoring the fact entirely that I have gotten my credits,I feel that I have left so much undone. There are thous- ands of opportunities I have let slip by for making a friend, or learning a little more about Cicero, for instance. I'm afraid I've appreciated the faculty and realized how grand a person each one is, too late. I've seemed to have stressed the wrong things, and had the knack of being in on all mischief and deviltry for the last seven years. And often it's been a lot more serious than merely mischief. Yet despite all my ingratitude, this school has given me something which I shall never be without-even yet I can not estimate its value. For at last, I have a measuring stick for life. Over a period of seven years at Mc- Gehee's impressions have slowly been penetrating my brain, unwilling and unknown to me. Values have formed about thousands of little things and all kinds of people. Even though I may not always follow my pre- cepts I do know what is right and what should be done. And so next year, I will be able to "try my wings" as it were, see how much of my theories work in practice and make a fresh start. That's why I call Iune 10th Commencement, but I shall never forget that from which I am graduating. Patsy Gibbens '42

Page 8 text:

Six THE SPECTATOR see or realize now. As you've probably guessed, I'm speaking of our three main Student Body officers, Patsy, Dottie and Connie. Iust to sum up a few of the things they've done-. Last year we know that Student Body government went on the rocks, that the students were not fit to govern themselves, and that the incoming Seniors, our class, were not fit to run the school. However, we were put on probation and officers were chosen, who could not officially be installed in office for six weeks, until we proved that we could govern ourselves and they proved capable of governing us. We can only imagine their responsi- bility, and how they felt those six weeks. We know that they did one of the best jobs of starting school that has been done in a long time. They wrote a complete new handbook in which information, rules, and explanations were stated in full. They enforced the "Little Sister" plan which proved a help later on, and they had students taking Student Body tests until each had passed it. After the six weeks were up and it was decided that student govern- ment should continue, they were sworn in. When Connie, Dottie and Patsy took that oath, it meant somthing more and something a little different. They knew what their offices were and they knew that they had worked to get them. They also knew that if it was humanly possible, they were going to be good officers. ' After they were officially in office, they re-wrote the constitution, changing it in some parts, taking out old rules, and adding new ones. They made student council offences clearer, calling the important ones "honor offences" and those not so important "rules". Some of those rules are locking the lockers, leaving books in lockers only, and not eating on the second floor or in the loft. These rules are not new. They have been in existence for many years, yet to some students they are new, for this is the first year that they have really been enforced. This is only because of the ceaseless efforts of Dottie, Connie and Patsy- Connie's calling people down from the loft who are eating, and coming downstairs to eat with them, Dottie's hauling her books down from Senior Study Hall and making others do likewise, and Patsy's call for quarters which immediately stopped the locker problem. They hammered and persuaded and argued--and set these rules into practice. Individually, they are what the three officers of the school should be -and even more than that. Dottie, with a little humor and a good deal of common sense and understanding, has been what is known as a Stu- dent Council President. Patsy, who is something of a riot usually, can hold a Student Body meeting as well as Mrs. Yancey holds an English class. Patsy organizes, executes, and circulates: and has the individual



Page 10 text:

E ght Senior Class

Suggestions in the Louise S McGehee School - Spectator Yearbook (New Orleans, LA) collection:

Louise S McGehee School - Spectator Yearbook (New Orleans, LA) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

1941

Louise S McGehee School - Spectator Yearbook (New Orleans, LA) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 12

1942, pg 12

Louise S McGehee School - Spectator Yearbook (New Orleans, LA) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 44

1942, pg 44

Louise S McGehee School - Spectator Yearbook (New Orleans, LA) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 30

1942, pg 30

Louise S McGehee School - Spectator Yearbook (New Orleans, LA) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 48

1942, pg 48

Louise S McGehee School - Spectator Yearbook (New Orleans, LA) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 10

1942, pg 10

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