Jouett (DLG 29) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1970

Page 1 of 160

 

Jouett (DLG 29) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 160 of the 1970 volume:

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" USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USSJOU USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USSJOUE IS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT )UETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT US T USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USSJOl JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT I T USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USSJOl S JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT JETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USSJOUE JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT USS JOUETT II THE JOUETT HERITAGE VOLUME II A PICTORIAL RECORD OF A DLG FROM JULY 1068 TO FE8RUARY 1070 DEDICATED TO THE MEN WHO SERVED ABOARD HER THE JOUETT HERITAGE JAMES EDWARD JOUETT was born 7 February 1826 near Lexington, Kentucky. He was the son of the celebrated painter Matthew Harris Jouett, and Margaret Henderson Allen. He was appointed Midshipman 10 September 1841. In the so called " Berribee War " on the coast of Liberia in 1843, he served in DECATUR in the squadron under Matthew C. Perry. He was on the east coast of Mexico in JOHN ADAMS during the Mexican War, being one of those landed to defend Point Isabel. After a year at the new Naval School at Annapolis, he was passed midshipman and sent to the Mediterranean in ST. LAWRENCE. He later cruised the Pacific in LEXINGTON and ST. MARYS. During 1858-1859 he was a lieutenant on board steamer M. W. CHAPIN in the Paraguay Expedition. Jouett was captured by Confederates at Pensacola on the outbreak of the Civil War. He escaped and joined the Union blockade at Galveston where he distinguished himself the night of 7 November 1861. Leading a boat expedition from SANTEE, he captured the Confederate crew of the armed schooner ROYAL YACHT. Though wounded several times in hand-to-hand combat, he brought off the crew as prisoners and burned the Confederate schooner. For this action he received a letter of commenda- tion. He was given command of METACOMET, one of the fastest gunboats in Farragut ' s squadron. In the Battle of Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864, Farragut ' s flagship Hartford and METACOMET were lashed together. At the critical moment, Farragut, in the port shroud of HARTFORD, gave his historic command, " Damn the torpedoes! Four bells! Captain Drayton, go ahead! Jouett, full speed! " A little later METACOMET was sent after Confederate gunboats. By fast pursuit and skillful navigation in hazardous shoal water, Jouett riddled gunboats GAINES and captured SELMA. His dashing exploits won praise from Farragut and Jouett was advanced thirty numbers in rank for heroism in battle. After varied service ashore and afloat, Jouett took command of the North Atlantic Squadron in 1884. During this duty he is credited with inaugurating the custom of all hands saluting the colors when they are raised or lowered. In 1889 he commanded a naval force of eight ships and 1,648 men sent to re-open transit, across the Isthmus of Panama, that had been interrupted by revolt against Columbia. Through vigorous measures he established free passage for trains of the Panama railroad and thus brought about failure of the insurrection. Rear Admiral Jouett retired in 1890 and was voted full pay for life under an Act of Congress. After a short stay in Orlando, Florida, he spent his remaining years near Sandy Springs, Maryland in a house he named " Anchorage. " He died 30 September 1902 and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia. USS JOUETT (DLG-29) was commis- sioned at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, on December 3, 1966, under the command of Captain Robert S. Hayes. JOUETT has an overall length of 547 feet; beam 54 feet 9 inches, and displaces 7900 tons. She is armed with a twin Terrier Asroc launcher, a 5 ' 754 caliber gun mount and two 3 " 50 caliber single gun mounts, and two MK 32 torpedo launchers. JOUETT ' s sensors in- clude an advanced bow-mounted sonar and three-dimensional air search radar in- tegrated with the Navy Tactical Data Com- puter System. Her complement includes 23 officers and 373 enlisted men in addition to a staff of 22. A member of the DLG-26 class, JOUETT combines greater search capa- bility (radar sonar), greater fire power (missiles guns anti-submarine torpedoes), and greater command facilities (NTDS communications) than has ever been built into a warship of comparable size. DLG-29 first saw action in the Western Pacific starting January 1968. As one of the Navy ' s vanguard ships in the Viet- namese war, JOUETT guided air strikes on North Vietnam and rescued 8 pilots from North Vietnam and offshore. With missiles and interceptors under her con- trol, she successfully countered several enemy attacks. For effective service in hostile conditions, the ship earned the Navy Unit Commendation. JOUETT returned in July 1968 to the world she had helped protect. - - - - . - ■ ; J R A ESTRICTED MVAILABILITY USS JOUETT returned from her very successful first Westpac deployment on July 18, 1968 and entered a phase of " restricted availability " . Most of the crew went on leave or to schools, and 6 officers and 104 enlisted men were transferred upon arrival-abcut one quarter of the ship ' s company. To the few left aboard, the ship seemed strangely silent and empty. In the following months JOUETT began to return to normal readiness. Along with old hands returning from schools and leave, 8 new officers and 68 new enlisted men came aboard. New commitments and new deadlines approached. DEPENDENTS On November 16, families of new crew members and of old hands joined JOUETTfora CRUISE Saturday cruise, and a taste of the Navy man ' s life. Captain Hayes conned the ship for the last time during the Dependents ' Cruise. On November 27, 1968, Captain Robert C. Barnhart Jr. became the second Commanding Officer of the JOUETT, relieving Captain Robert S. Hayes .... Captain Hayes was presented with JOUETT ' s original Commissioning Pennant on leaving the ship. Change of Command His new duty station is in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy in Washington. t THANKSGIVING DAY 1968 Captain Barnhart ' s first mission as Commanding Officer of the JOUETT was an unexpected one. On the day following the change of command, the minesweeper USS ACME, a thousand miles from San Diego, reported a crewman dangerously ill and in need of immediate evacuation. Commander First Fleet chose JOUETT to do the job. The crewmembers were recalled from their Thanksgiving dinners, and two and a half hours after the orders reached the ship, JOUETT was underway. JOUETT proceeded westward at 27 knots throughout the night and following morning. A helicopter, hurriedly flown aboard as the ship left California, was launched when JOUETT was 135 miles from the minesweeper. In the gathering darkness, HM1 Hortman was hoisted into the helicopter and landed on JOUETT ' s flight deck. Hortman was given immediate attention in JOUETT ' s sickbay. He was brought ashore late next night, and recovered successfully. 13 ' 68 " The men of JOUETT again went all- out for their families at the ship ' s Christmas party held during Christmas in-port period. Santa Claus threw his weight around, but no one seemed to mind. flMl » r ™ NEW EQUIPMENT ARRIVES On returning from schools and leave, the crew found " yardbirds " laying wires, installing new equipment, and leaving indescribable messes in what had been well-tended spaces. 16 And in the following months the crew settled down to the task of rebuilding battle efficiency. New men began to learn their jobs on the team. . . New equipment was mastered. 17 " Now if you turn this one J o ) f USS JbOETT Is 1 V L-„ w VJJ -n V- c 19 20 Weapons loadout increases Operators improve In -he first months of ' 69, JOUETT participated in a full range of local exercises, which incluied several successful practice missile shoots. 22 Following one exercise, JOUETT helped recover one of the slippery Ryan target drones. SHIP ' S 24 PARTY 25 Rear Admiral Kinney, Commander Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla Eleven, broke his flag aboard JOUETT for Fleet Exercise " Bell Jangle " . He watched from the bridge as JOUETT got underway to achieve the final edge of effectiveness. 26 Vice Admiral Roeder, Commander First Fleet, visited JOUETT and Rear Admiral Kinney for a day ' s exercises at sea. CLEAN SWEEP The Clean Sweep results came in the Spring. FOR THE " E II In her first competitive training cycle, JOUETT came out Number One. As Com- mander First Fleet presented the coveted Battle Efficiency " E " to the Commanding Officer, he commended the entire ship ' s com- pany for having won this competition on the first try, and also for having been awarded every one of the Departmental Excellency awards that can be given to a ship of JOUETT ' s class. The Ryan award for outstanding missilery was presented by the Ryan Corporation president for having shot down a target drone with a practice missile. 29 And then it was time for JOUETT to prepare for Westpac meals. . . HANDS II and microbes. THE LIST Smallpox Tetanus Typhoid Yellow Fever Cholera Plague Influenza S»CK BftY j 33 ■■Ml 35 G5 „ -mBfcam2m m i ii mm JfH i I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 iih! ; ■ ■ --:■ • " " - 35 37 THE TRACK TO WESTPAC SAN DIEGO HAWAII 3 C On 28 August 1969, Captain Arthur T. Emerson, Jr. was relieved as Com- mander Destroyer Squadron One. Blue Ribbon change aboard JOUETT The New COMDESRON ONE Captain Albert L. Stickles II F I R S T S S I Enroute to the first line period JOUETT received orders to divert and main- tain surveillance of a trawler thought to be attempting to land supplies for the Vietcong in the Mekong Delta. After bringing aboard specialists and playing cat and mouse for several days, the ship was ordered to continue on her original mission. DA NANG, VIETNAM A brief one night stop in Danang for the war zone briefings prepared the appre- hensive crew for the tasks ahead. LjrM L 42 JOUETT ' S FIRST LINE PERIOD TONKIN GULF 43 £3 w« - • ' " " — ST; ■ •7 -ntiiW " ™T -. _ THE MISSION JOUETT with the special capabilities for computerized tracking through the Naval Tactical Data System and because of her far reaching Missile Battery was assigned for the majority of the cruise as PIRAZ Station Ship in the Gulf of Tonkin. Additionally, with a helicopter detachment embarked, she stood ready to come to the rescue of any pilot forced down. Fortunately, it turned out that she was not required to use her helo rescue capabilities this year. As always our gun batteries and ASW batteries were eternally vigilant for what might be required of them in the war zone. HER CAPABILITIES Strike Support Search and Rescue Flight Following Picket Ship Anti Air Warfare Anti Submarine Warfare Gun Fire Support AN EXTENSION TO JOUETT ' S CAPABILITIES Our Enemy Enemy radar contacts demanded the 24 hour efforts of the entire JOUETT crew. 50 I DO THE VERY BEST I KNOW HOW - THE VERY BEST I CAN; AND I MEAN TO KEEP DOING SO UNTIL THE END. IF THE END BRINGS ME OUT ALL RIGHT, WHAT IS SAID AGAINST ME WON ' T AMOUNT TO ANYTHING. IF THE END BRINGS ME OUT WRONG, TEN ANGELS SWEARING I WAS RIGHT WOULD MAKE NO DIFFERENCE. A. LINCOLN T. v-r " vV 51 OUR HELO i 2K£ - » 52 During the first line period we celebrated the 500th accident free Helo landing. OUR DUTY HUMOR MISSILE SHOOT SASEBO JAPAN A BRIEF STOP 59 • • - Our first Look at another land The people of Nagasaki built this statue to symbolize and appeal for ever- lasting world peace in August of 1955. The right hand pointing to the sky tells of the atomic threat. The left one stretching out horizontally shows tran- quil peace. Its solidly built body is the dignity of God. The gentle face is the symbol of divine love. The fast closed eyes pray for the repose of the war victims ' souls, while the folded right leg shows meditation or quiescence and the bent left one shows help or movement. P E A C E S T A T U E BY SEIBO KITAMURA Hearts of oak are our ships. Hearts of oak are our men. e always are ready: Steady boys, steady: We ' LL FIGHT AND WE ' LL CONQUER. Again and again. BY DAVID GARRICK 64 SEA OF JAPAN 65 FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE 6G WE WATCHED... 67 AND WATCHED... WHILE THE WORK WENT ON. Behold, now, another providence of god. a ship comes into the HARROR. BY WILLIAM BRADFORD 70 Y OKOSUKA J APAN A LONG DESERVED LIBERTY 71 73 7b Our life is closed -our life begins The long, long anchorage we leave. The ship is clear at last -she leads! She swiftly courses from the shore. Joy I SHIPMATE --JOY. BY WALT WHITMAN 76 JOUETT ' S SECOND LINE PERIOD TONKIN GULF 77 REFUELING... " The smoking lamp is out while alongside the oiler. " 78 1 iKa I !i r I D S H P 32 s T A T I N 83 V E R T R E P Vertical replenishment was a rapid means of filling our storerooms and was an all-hands evolution to move the many tons of stores that we received. fr auF ' w SuBIC B AY PHILIPPINES H OME AWAY FROM HOME While JOUETT was in port in Subic, the USS PEACOCK (MSC-198), a minesweeper, which was proceeding to her homeport in Sasebo, Japan, unexpectedly received orders to return to Subic Bay. PEACOCK was ordered to moor alongside JOUETT. This arrangement served two purposes. Besides making it possible for PEACOCK to moor safely rather than anchor, JOUETT provided the means to go ashore, since the PEACOCK, 144 feet long, does not have liberty boats. Due to the lack of liberty boats to shuttle men back and forth between the base landing and the ship, liberty would have otherwise been nearly impossible. Many a sailor aboard the minesweeper was grateful to JOUETT. What made this incident all the more unusual was that JOUETT ' s Executive Officer, Commander Nicholas Brown, had formerly been PEACOCK ' S skipper back in January, 1960. 90 r it r- - II ' ■ » I 1 1 f BHi Una - 3 ft. Bl 91 JOUETT ' S THIRD LINE PERIOD TONKIN GULF 93 HER THIRD YEAR 94 AND TIME GOES 95 $ f 96 97 99 CmtfJMh ' 69 nn Christmas Trees Santa Toon KAOHSIUNG TAIWAN HONG KONG B.C.C. At long last 103 . ' Zr ' TV - . - ii " T - r , T»»- y w ... - Si -- _ — ■tf- g ' f W9H m T - " ■ ■ IT - f ' 1 SM - «! While in Kao Hsiung, we were visited by the Senior Class from the Republic of China Naval Academy. WE MET THE PEOPLE - ?2!V » _ - ' J---Jfc; % ■ j.-- -..-- oywF I- ' HOMEWARD BOUND " Such is the patriot ' s boast, where ' er we roam His first, best country ever is, at home " Oliver Goldsmith 109 SUBIC BAY, P. 7300 MILES TO GO G U A A Raffle HffflHHt . — lj 1 HAWAII, U.S.A 2305 MILES TO GO HOME to , £ s . i SAN DIEGO EL rr T » ipk ' go ■3 i ' r Ms- iV-.t » % TvS I TT " j ' i OHi)w Fy r i fe-.L» « ' IS JftVUCOMEJ " rtlJKJOUETTi f ' JT THE MEN OF JOUETT JOUETT ' S FIRST Commanding Officer DECEMBER 1966 TO NOVEMBER 1969 CAPTAIN ROBERT S. HAYES, U.S. NAVY Born in Columbus, Ohio on 5 July 1922, Captain Hayes received his early education in the public schools of New Kensington, Pennsylvania. He attended Washington and Jefferson College for one year prior to entering the U.S. Naval Academy in August 1941. He was graduated and commissioned an Ensign of the Line in June 1944. His first sea service was in the USS SANTA FE (CL-60) during which he participated in the amphibious invasion of Iwo Jima, carrier air strikes against the Philippines, Okinawa, and Tokyo; and finally the occupation of Japan. During the initial carrier strikes against the Japanese homeland the SANTA FE came to the rescue of the badly damaged and burning aircraft carrier, USS FRANKLIN, only fifty miles from the enemy shoreline. For this alongside rescue, during which over eight hundred crew members were taken aboard, the SANTA FE was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation. Captain Hayes remained in the SANTA FE until after the day when she reported for inactivation at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. He next reported for duty on the Staff of Commander Battleships- Cruisers, Pacific Fleet. Subsequent sea tours included service in the Atlantic Fleet as Operations Officer of USS PERRY (DD-844); Executive Officer USS NEW (DD-818); Commanding Officer USS HEMMINGER (DE-746); Communications Officer, Staff Commander Amphibious Group Four; Operations Officer, Staff Commander South Atlantic Amity Force; and Commanding Officer, USS POWER (DD-839)! Service ashore included tours as Assistant Communications Officer, Staff Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic at Norfolk, Virginia; and Strategy and Tactics Reviewing Officer, Staff U.S Naval War Colleqeat Newport, Rhode Island. Captain Hayes is a graduate of the Applied Communications Course of the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School; the Command and Staff Course of the U.S. Naval War College, and the Intensive French Language Lourse of the Defense Language Institute. He has received a Master of Arts Degree in International Relations from Boston University. Prior to reporting to the USS JOUETT, Captain Hayes was Head of the Foreign Languages Department at the U.S. Naval Academy. JOUETT ' S SECOND Commanding Officer NOVEMBER 1969 TO CAPTAIN ROBERT C. BARNHART, JR., U.S. NAVY Born in Johnston, Pennsylvania, on 17 September 1920, Captain Barnhart attended Valley Forge Military Academy for two years prior to entering the U.S. Naval Academy in August 1941. He was graduated and commissioned a line Ensign in June 1944. His first duty at sea was in the USS ASTORIA (CL-90) during operations in the Western Pacific which included the bombardment of Iwo Jima, the invasion of Okinawa, and strikes against the mainland of Japan. Captain Barnhart next reported to the USS LE YTE (CV 32) where he served as Assistant Communications Officer. He served as Gunnery Officer of USS HARWOOD (DDE 861) and later as prospective Gunnery Officer on USS Wl LLIS A. LEE (DL-4). Following a tour as Executive Officer of USS HANSON (DD-832), where he also served as Acting Commanding Officer, Captain Barnhart commanded USS NEWELL (DER-322) for eleven months. Captain Barnhart has attended the Navy Electronics Material School in Treasure Island, California; instructed Naval Science at Cornell University; and served as a Company Officer and a Battalion Officer at the U.S. Naval Academy. He also graduated from the Naval War College in Washington, D.C. in 1963. After serving in the Strategic Plans Division, Command Policy Branch, in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Captain Barnhart assumed command of USS TURNER JOY (DD-951) in July 1963. He was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon and Bronze Star with Combat " V " for meritorious service in an engagement with North Vietnamese motor torpedo boats which attacked TURNER JOY in the Gulf of Tonkin on 4 August 1964. Captain Barnhart had just completed a three-year tour in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations as the Assistant for Programs and Budget, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Logistics), when he assumed command of USS JOUETT (DLG-29) in November 1968. Captain Barnhart is married to the former Paula Jeane Gay of Los Angeles, California. They have three sons and one daughter. Robert, 21, has attended two years of college at Wofford University in Spartanburg, South Carolina, and plans to continue his undergraduate studies in California. Randall, 18, is attending the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. Annette, 10, and Gary, 8, are currently residing with their parents in San Diego, California. 179 JOUETT ' S SECOND E XECUTIVE FFICER APRIL 1968 TO OCTOBER 1969 COMMANDER JOHN A. WALKER, USN Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 26 September 1933, Commander Walker attended Germantown Academy for twelve years. He then attended Princeton University as an NROTC Regular, graduating and being commissioned an Ensign of the line in June 1955. His first sea service was in USS RANDOLPH (CVA-15) during which he participated in two Mediterranean deployments, including the Suez crisis of 1956. He next reported to USS ALTAI R (AKS-32), homeported in Barcelona, Spain, as Operations Officer. Subsequent sea tours included service in the Atlantic Fleet as Operations Officer, USS LAFFEY (DD-724) and on the Staff of Commander Cruiser Destroyer Division Twelve as Surface Operations Readiness and Training Officer. Service ashore included tours as U.S. Liaison Officer to Her Majesty ' s Canadian Communication School in Nova Scotia, Canada and on the staff of Commander Service Force U S Pacific Fleet in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. JOUETT ' S THIRD Executive Officer OCTOBER 1969 TO PRESENT COMMANDER NICHOLAS BROWN, USN Born in Providence, Rhode Island, on 1 July 1932, Commander Brown attended Groton School and three years of Harvard University before entering the U.S. Naval Academy in 1952. Graduating with distinction in 1956, he was then ordered to duty as First Lieutenant aboard the USS MITSCHER (DL-2) out of Newport, Rhode Island. Tours followed on the staff of COMCRUDESFLOT 4 in Norfolk, and then in Sasebo, Japan, as Executive Officer of USS WIDGEON (MSC-208), Commanding Officer of ' USS ESTERO (AKL-5), and Commanding Officer of USS PEACOCK (MSC-198). In 1962 he was selected as an Olmsted Scholar and took a master ' s degree in International Relations at the Institute of Political Studies of the University of Paris. Commander Brown then went back to sea, first as Operations Officer an d then as Executive Officer of USS INGRAHAM (DD-694), homeported in Newport, R.I. INGRAHAM formed part of the first destroyer squadron to be deployed from the East Coast to the waters off Vietnam. Ordered in 1967 to London as NATO Infrastructure Officer on the staff. of Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe, he was subsequently assigned as Flag Secretary to the CinC. His last assignment prior to reporting to JOUETT in October 1969 was as aide and Flag Lieutenant to the Commander in Chief, Pacific, at Honolulu. D E S S Q T U R A D Y R E N R N E UtaiL CAPTAIN ALBERT LOUIS STICKLES II, USN He C e a nSd V. Zs e o eZe T™ " ™ ' " " " ' ™ ° f Dr " atha Stick.es. o T? z: r i z, si.rp.oir 4 m i943 ' captain stickies - - - - • — J Z BylSoTr Z T ASS ' Stan H N h aVI9 p at0r and th6n " AsS ' Stant Gunner V Officer. He ROOSEVELT (CVA-42) as Assistant Gunnery Officer ' L ' e enant and Damage Control Officer and later to USS F. D. Sci rD l e X ' -Sr ISTStS fofi a SS ti™? T ' " 3 M «» ° f Aug U r;9 6 rTts s rf d ni a e n d d b s y er t w d o «ri!ri ss.Aj?LT Ann ? f For i s r coiie9e from aw 1959 - the rank of Captain on 1 September 1963 COMSIXTHFLT as Surface Warfare and ASW Officer. He attained In September 1964 he assumed command of the USS NITRO He is entitled to wear the oSw camion S hn A V n P ° f rtSmo c uth - Vir 9 inia has one son in the U.S. Navy, Albert L. Ill 122 Chaplin E. Murray LTW. Rietzel LCDR J. Engelhardt LCDR R. Wellborn, Jr. LT H.Schleicher Doctor J. Lausterer Des Ron One Staff YNC R. Bonetti ST1 C. Young RM2 W. Shirey YN3T. Jacobs RMCS V. Rheinlander 123 ENGINEERING OFFICER LCDR C. JAFFEE D E P A R T M E N NAVIGATION OFFICER LT P. JOHNSON H E A D S SUPPLY OFFICER LCDR E. WITHROW OPERATIONS OFFICER LCDR K.JOHNSON WEAPONS OFFICER LCDR L. MERVINE 124 RD IVISION EMCS R.SIade LT C. Geiger SFC G. Fraser FN C. Scott EN3J. Reynolds EN2 V. Kramer 7 MM1 K. Minton MM2 T. Prior FN D.Williams MM3 J. Stadden FA P. Woodard FN B. Beeson EN3P. Lerma EN1 J. Zabka t N G I N E E R I N G D E P A R T M E N T 125 EMFN D. Dreyer FN R. Lutz EM2 A. Guidera EM3 L. Neckers EM2 M. Hallmark EM3 M. Pleasant EM1 R. Pierce EM3S. Waites ICFN J. Koceja IC3 J. Davidson IC2T. Smith IC3 G. Hammerstone ICFN G. Conners IC3 L.Wilson IC2S. Gobat IC1 J. Lee 126 MR3 M. Sears DCFN D. Fogarty DCFN R. Marstall DC2G. Phelps DC2 L Blaisdell FN G. Carnevale FN L. Drohlich SFM2 K. Poirier FN J. Eisenhower SFM2 G. Kratch SFP2 E. Laplante SFM3 A. Sanchez 127 BTCS R. Orcutt BTC E. McKibben LTJG W. Ballantine BTC I. Best B FN J. Jaworski BT1 G. Brackenridge FN R. Coonts FN J. Camire FN C. Ciaccio BT3 M. Vicknair BT3 J. Matthews D (VISION BT3 J. Granier BT2 R. Weldon BT1 G. Wise BT3 J. Hoffman FN D. Godwin FN C. Hanson BT3 M. Magdalany FN J. King FN P. Graham BT3 J. Calhoun BT2 J. Young BT3 J. Zocco FN M. Wong BT3 F. Minikle 129 1 ■ A. J i 1 ft 1 ' i T 1 f t . D [VISION FN D.Witten FN J. Algerio FN D. Dolby MM2 D. Wegner MM2 P. Heisig FN L. Williams MM3 R. McNeil MM2 F. Kerr M2 K. Pope FN G. Carter FN R. Thomas MM3 K. Richardson MM2 J. Hulke MM1 C.Sims FN J. Gollinger MM2 F. Davis MM3 R. Edwards A V I G A N A D M I N D E P T NXD (VISION MMCM J. Pattison YNC H. Allen LTJG P. Petracek QMC R. Rohr SN V. Snider PN2 R. Burris YN3 R. Corbin YN3 J. Lunday YNSN P. Hannan YI I1 W. Kelderman PCSN M. Smith QM3C. Gahran SN E. Bunchkowski QMSN B. Peterson QM2 E. Dowling QM2 G. Huesman 132 p E R A T I N S D Ol RDCST. Crew LT C. Whiffen LT J. Barr LTJG F. Probst RD3 A. Crowe RD1 D. Degroat RD2 R. Kappenberg RD2 D. Sweet RD3 M. Garvey RD3S. Gillespie RDSN W. Moore RD1 C. Strake RD3 H. Lewis RD3 R. Stinette RD3 K. Dine RD3 J. Castrop RD3 A. Bradley RD3N. Black RD3 J. Johannes RDSN D. Zaborag SN F. Romano RD3 D.Wright RD3 T. Springer RD2 R. Stogsdall D IVISION RD1 D. White RD1 S. Nokielski RD1 W. Stamnitz RD3 S.Scott RD3J. Buck RD3 J. Nemo RD3T. Storm RD3C. Glover RDSN P. Rogers RD2 F. Kearney RD3 M. Holwell RD2 B. Rettzo RD2 B. Harding RD3M. Hirl RD1 R. Nalwalker RD3 J. McCann RDSN J. Roberts RD1 J. Papandreu RD3 J. Jeffries RD3 R. Walters RD3D. Dinneen RD3 M. Dickenson RD3 R. Edwards RD1 J. Bilbo 133 — — I 1 f • m SgflW Zm mg+ . - -Tty ,W r - - . «i HI v mJ m B == OND DSC W. Smith WO W. Gutridge IVISION DS1 S. Hill DS1 J. Christenson DS1 S. Domnisse DS2 R. Koehn DS1 M. Carl DS1 G. Mclntyre DS3 J. O ' Connor DS2 J. Shepley DS2 C. Hollyfield DS2 G. Guild DS1 B. Spencer 134 OED ■VISION ETC J. Bunn LTJG E. Wicklander ETR3 J. Novak ETR3 R. Wies ET1 L. Cunningham ETN2 R. Spore ETN2 J. Chaison ET1 D. Cannon ETN3 B. Wilson ETN3G. Appier ETN2 W. Wray 135 RMSN L. Willbanks RMSN P. Corry RMSN B. Wheeler RM3C. Ocon RM3P. Harris RM3 R. Remington RM3W. Szczesny RM3W. Long RM1 M. Dutton RM3 D. Segurson RM3 R. Morehouse OCD (VISION SMC J. Williams LT K. White RM2T. Cahill RM2 D. Newberry RM3 D. Green RM3 J. Stein RMSN S. Reyes RMSA S. Harder SN M. Esh SM2S. lorio SMSN H. Aleman SM3 J. Guardino SMSN J. Schwartz SM1 A. Boyd CSC C. Knight LTJG G. Neumann SKCS M. Valencia SN K. Freiberg SK3T. Blake SK3B. Vande Lune SN R. Schultz SK2C. Small SKI D. Folger SN S. Gerard SK2 M. Peterson SN G. Cote SK3G. Shour SK1 F. Mosley s u p p L Y D E P A R T M E N T 137 SJHB3 D. Runion SK3 R. Buck SHB2 A. Rampulla SN C. Gaines SN J. Kortlang TN I. Custodio SH3G. Dukas SN D. Orear SH1 H. Sawyers TN R. Calilong TN D. Calixto TN R. Gutierrez TN L. Cruz TN R. Frias TN E. Caoagdan SD2 B. Ordonez SD3 D. Amagan SD1 E. Corpuz SD2 R. Dimaya CS2 W. Simonsen CSSN T. Fergueson CSSN F. Smith CSSN D. Short CSSN D. Franchino FN P. Pain MM1 J. Hagar SA T. Dowling SN J. Camier SA J. Dowling SA C. Jones CS1 K. Reed CS3 J. Jacks CS2 L. McElfish CSSN R. Connelly CS3D. Gay SN D. Holland DCFN D. Fogarty RDSN D. Rogers FN J. Gollinger FN W. Geimke FN R. Harris FOX FTMC J. Smith FTMC R. Fritz ENS F. Ryan LCDR H. Hewlett ENS W. Yaro D IVISION GMCS N. Durkin GMMC C. Gunnerson LTJG G. Smith LTJG C. Brown GMG3 K. Marmet GMG2 J. Scammel GMG3 G. Smith SN K. McClory GMM3 C. West GMM1 D. Lantrip GMM3 D. Blake GMM3 J. Kehrer GMMSN C. Chacon GMM3 D. Sisk FTM2 R. Dunlap GMM3 K. Buchholz FTM1 M. Stubblefield ASD (VISION LT D. Wallace STCS D. Sides STC P. Feeley STGSN D. Miller STG2 R. Deweese SN D. Kelly STGSN D. Pitz STG3 S. Styverson STG3 C. Lawless STG3 W. Thatcher STG2 J. Green STG3 W. Semenkow STG2 D. Carty STG2 K. Johnson 143 STG3B. Ludwig STG2 J. Jones STGSN J. Blanton ST1 V. Greenwood STG2 E. Byrne STG3 R. Mehling STGSN M. Cox STGSN F. Edwards STGSN K. Anson TM3 J. Marcantel TM1 T.Tapia BMC A. Ferguson LTJG J. Terney Deck D SN D. Forehand SN S. Ennis SA M.Szalai SN R. Hume SN J. Miranda SN R. Dean BM3 R. Wilson ■VISION 1 1 i r 4 m BM3 R. Emond SN J. Hutchins BM3C. Groth SN L. Hall SN D. Keema SN R.Cole SN J. Cobb SN D. Dack SN V. Lekanoff SN J. Gray 145 SA R. Quiggle SN J. Hutchins SN B. Levos SN M. Tyle SN R. Feyl SN B. Fields BM3 C. Groth BM3D. Viera SN R. Noonkester SA C. Rylander SN T. Elenbaum SN R. Hartman SA T. Dowling SA K. Nelson BM2 M. 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Suggestions in the Jouett (DLG 29) - Naval Cruise Book collection:

Jouett (DLG 29) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Page 1

1968

Jouett (DLG 29) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1971 Edition, Page 1

1971

Jouett (DLG 29) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1973 Edition, Page 1

1973

Jouett (DLG 29) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1975 Edition, Page 1

1975

Jouett (DLG 29) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Page 138

1970, pg 138

Jouett (DLG 29) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Page 125

1970, pg 125

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
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