Central Junior High School - Reflector Yearbook (Saginaw, MI)

 - Class of 1929

Page 16 of 44

 

Central Junior High School - Reflector Yearbook (Saginaw, MI) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 16 of 44
Page 16 of 44



Central Junior High School - Reflector Yearbook (Saginaw, MI) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 15
Previous Page

Central Junior High School - Reflector Yearbook (Saginaw, MI) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 17
Next Page

Search for Classmates, Friends, and Family in one
of the Largest Collections of Online Yearbooks!



Your membership with E-Yearbook.com provides these benefits:
  • Instant Access to Millions of Yearbook Pictures
  • High-Resolution, Full Color Images Available Online
  • Search, Browse, Read, and Print Yearbook Pages
  • View College, High School, and Military Yearbooks
  • Browse our digital annual library spanning centuries
  • Support the Schools in our Program by Subscribing

Page 16 text:

THE ANNUAL REFLECTOR slam' A umm Geography HY we study Geography. - A great many say, "Why do we study geography?" One reason is to understand the trade relations between countries of the world. The United States must know where to buy surplus -wool. We might go to' China for it. Would we get it there? No! of course not but we could get silk, tea, and a variety of other things. We do not only want to know the location of places but also what people are producing. , Traveling is another reason for study- ing geography. A great many people from all parts of the world travel. However they would enjoy their trip much more if they knew the conditions of the people and the kind of place visited. Almost every country one goes to has some different crop. Naturally you would want to know what this crop is. Usually when your father or mother's work is done they read the paper. Maybe it is telling about a ship wreck about 20 degrees south latitude and 35 degrees east longitude, Would you know where it was without a map? No! Not exactly but you would know just about where it was. Suppose you saw an articletellingaboutSydney,Austral- ia.Would you wonder where it was? Why no, you say, "It is a big wool port in the southeastern part of Australia." These are only a few of the manv reasons for study- ing geography putl will leave it to you to find them either in class or at home. What we have been doing in geography. When we first came to Central Junior we wondered why we were studying about our country when we already had done so in the fifth grade. We soon stopped worry ing for we found out and the reason proved quit interesting. We found that while we were studying the United States we were taking in all of the Economic regions and also like regions in other countries of the world. When we studied the middle west our problem was: "Is the Middle West the most independent civilized section as geographers have said?" In studying about the problem we also took the com- peting countries. Later when we studied about cotton we took in Egypt,China and India besides United States. Most of the countries where cotton is grown we found are between 30 degrees north and 30 degrees south of the equator. During our study of cotton we decided that Great Britain leads in the manufacture of this industry. She is buy- ing most of her raw cotton from us. We already know that Great Britain has a great PAGE TWELVE

Page 15 text:

T1-is ANNUAL REFLECTOR " - .. ' 'V , I . ' - 'rvnf :mm- , Authors We Have Studied In our 7A home room in 201 we have studied about famous authors and their works. Our literature class has read stor- ies from Hawthorne, Irving, Shakespeare, O'Henry, Dickens and some poems by famous poets. Probably the most interesting work was the study of excerpts from Dickens. We studied from a great many of his books. Washington Irving, spoken of as "The FatherofAmerican Literature," contributed "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." This story brought out the keen humor Irving pos- sessed. We' read "The Great Stone Face," a fan- tastic story by Hawthorne. Shakespeare provided "The Tempest," and "As You Like It." Both are made into story form by Charles and Mary Lamb, originally plays from Shakespeare. O'Henry QWi1liam Sidney Porterj gave us "The Gift of the Magi." And now about the authors themselves. O'Henry was a Carolinian. Hawthorne, from New England, gives us in his stories many wonderful descriptions of his native soil, as did Irving who lived along the Hud- son near New York. Dickens, Shakespeare, Charles and Mary Lamb were all from England. Bob Swiss A hors Why Don't I Get GSA" Many stutents are discouraged because they find on their cards marks which in their mind are lower than they deserve. How unfair the teacher is, is our first thought. But is the teacher at fault? Read how teachers mark and maybe you will think you are wrong. See if you check up. Are you obedient? Have you the right attitude? Is your work neat? Is your work done without much assis- tance? Do you show interest in your work? Have you perseverance? If you are 10075 in all these things it's likely you'll get "A," QIWJD She: So the poor boy sprained his ankle, how on earth did he do it? He: He fell out of the window. He was flipping a cigarette butt out and forgot to let go. R K O Teacher: Tommy if you had 50 cents and you loaned father 30 cents and your brother 20 cents how many cents would you have? Tommy: Iwouldn't have any sense. PAGE ELEVEN



Page 17 text:

T1-In ANNUAL REFLECTOR ami-:jr la mlouv many possessions. They wanted to be ready so they could get raw cotton in case of war or any other hinderance so they have been experimenting with some kinds of cotton. They have just about or will soon be our r'val. Even so we are not worryng about it because they are not raising cotton in all their possessions. What few places they have that grow cotton do not have as good soil or climate as we have. Just lately we took Australia as we were studying about the sheep raised on the great plains in the United States. We found that leading ports of wool were: Melbourne, Sydney, and Adelaide. Most of the sheep are raised west of the moun- tains.Rabbits are a terrible pestto the sheep because they eat most of their grass. The men in Australia catch hundreds and hundreds of them at a time. After they are killed they are sent to England. Their flesh is eaten and the fur is used to make felt. Rabbit is quite an important export but we did not make a study of it. We are just now studying about forests. So far we found they are mostly in Alaska, Europe, Central Africa, South America and the United States. When we have finished the course we hope to have a general idea of the trade relations of the outstanding countries. Helen Fay Pity the Poor Letter E Some one has decided that the letter "E" is the most unfortunate letter in the English alphabet because it is always out of cash, forever in debt, never out of danger, and in hell all the time. No little credit is due, however, in that it is never in war, always in peace, and we are deeply indebted to this little letter since it is the beginning of existence, and the commencement of ease, and the end of trouble. Without it there would be no meat, no life, and no heaven, it is the center of honesty, and although it starts off in error it ends by making love perfect. S ll I Fred R.: "Say, Bill, take a look at this fine picture I have here of Colonel Lindbergh. Bill D. lafter looking for a moment at the picturel: Why, this ain't no picture of Lindy. It's just a blank piece of paper." Fred R.: "Dongone it, he must have hopped off again." Q X ll Telephone Operator: "I have your party. Deposit five cents, please." Souse: "Whazzat?" Operator: "Please deposit your money." Souse: "Listen, girlie, Wat I wan's a conversation from a fren: not financial advice from a stranger? PAGE THIRTEEN

Suggestions in the Central Junior High School - Reflector Yearbook (Saginaw, MI) collection:

Central Junior High School - Reflector Yearbook (Saginaw, MI) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

1927

Central Junior High School - Reflector Yearbook (Saginaw, MI) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Page 1

1932

Central Junior High School - Reflector Yearbook (Saginaw, MI) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

1935

Central Junior High School - Reflector Yearbook (Saginaw, MI) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

1939

Central Junior High School - Reflector Yearbook (Saginaw, MI) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

1956

Central Junior High School - Reflector Yearbook (Saginaw, MI) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 32

1929, pg 32

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.