Boody Junior High School - Beacon Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY)

 - Class of 1940

Page 10 of 62

 

Boody Junior High School - Beacon Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 10 of 62
Page 10 of 62



Boody Junior High School - Beacon Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 9
Previous Page

Boody Junior High School - Beacon Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 11
Next Page

Search for Classmates, Friends, and Family in one
of the Largest Collections of Online Yearbooks!



Your membership with E-Yearbook.com provides these benefits:
  • Instant Access to Millions of Yearbook Pictures
  • High-Resolution, Full Color Images Available Online
  • Search, Browse, Read, and Print Yearbook Pages
  • View College, High School, and Military Yearbooks
  • Browse our digital annual library spanning centuries
  • Support the Schools in our Program by Subscribing

Page 10 text:

these fiery words, he went out the door, slamming it behind him. Here was a rival Jim wasn't going to like, although they were not of the same school. lt so happened that Jim was half-back of Hard- ing University, and these two schools were to clash on the opening day of the football season, now very near. With these thoughts in mind, Jim was in for a lot of trouble. ll At the Phi Delta dance that night, Jim and Marjory were having a grand time together dancing, dining, talking. In the middle of the next dance, Jim and Marjory strode to the open door which led to the balcony. They looked wonderful standing there - just the two of them, heads together, each whispering words that thrilled the other. Suddenly Jim said, "Marj, l must tell you something." "Yes, Jim," answered the girl. "Well, er-I-I love you!" "Why, Jim," exclaimed the girl in a surprised voice. "l'm sorry, Marjorie, but I,-well, -er, l mean, -er, gee, l had to say it Marj. l've loved you from the first moment l saw you." As he said this, he moved closer to Marjorie. "Oh Jim. I was waiting for you to say that all night. I love you too, Jim." The girl's voice made the stars above twinkle even bright- er. The moon and the stars in the sky smiled down on a boy and a girl. For that moment the world was all theirs. lll ln the meantime, Bob Larsen, a very angry and determined fellow, was talking to a girl. "Barbara, you go to this school. Use your tac- tics, but no matter how you do it, get Jim Marvin away from my GlRL." He emphasized the last two words. The next afternoon Jim was coming out of the Physiology class when he was accosted by a beautiful, black-haired girl, the dangerous Barbara. She would start her scheme right now. She passed Jim and let her books fall. Jim, unsuspecting of the trouble he was getting into, stooped down and picked them up. Barbara's eyes flashed into his, but instead of feeling the grand effect that Marjorie had given him, Jim felt an uneasiness grip him. "Oh, thank you, big boy,' said the girl, "thank you very much." Oh, oh, thought Jim. One girl yesterday, another today. That was bad. The girl continued, "Would you care to walk me to my house? I live just a few blocks from the school." "Well-" started Jim, but before he could finish, the girl put her

Page 9 text:

"Er-er- I- I mean -er- you see, I, no she-no we both were walking along the campus when I bumped into her. Very clumsy of me, don't you think?" He forced a laugh that seemed to come from the morgue. "Who is her, suh? What is yo' all talkin' about?" asked the puz- zled servant. lt occurred to Jim for the first time that he had forgotten to read the name above the address in the purse. He opened the purse and showed the card to the maid. "Oh, yo' mean Miss Marj'," said the maid. "She ain't come back yit." The Dean' wasn't in either, so Jim chose to wait. Ten minutes later he heard the maid say, "There's someone to see yo' Miss Marj'." The girl was surprised to see Jim. Her eyes sparkled as she stared at him, adding to Jim's admiration of the girl. "Why, hello," said the girl, addressing Jim. "Hello, Miss Hastings," answered Jim. "You must have dropped this when we collided tonight on the campus." The girl was amused at Jim's uneasiness. "Oh, thank you," she said sweetly. "How can l ever repay you?" Here was the chance Jim was waiting for. "Well," he said, "l- er- er- would like to take you to the Phi Delta Fraternity dance tonight. That is, if you have nothing else to do." "Thanks, very much, er- I didn't quite get your name, Mister-" "Marvin, Jim Marvin," responded Jim. "Well, l'm sorry, Mister Marvin, but Bob Larsen is taking 'me out tonight," continued Marjory, somewhat disappointed. A new voice suddenly interrupted the two excited people, saying, "Yeh, she's going with me. Wanna make somethin' out of it?" It was Bob Larsen. Marjory was angry at the sudden and rude intrusion. "Why, Bob- by," she said, "how could you be so vulgar. Oh! I wouldn't go with you now for anything. Get outI" Bob looked at Marjory with an air of surprise, and then rather angrily said, "Why, you little-" He could not finish. Jim lashed out with both fists flying. He connected most of the time, and finally landed one on Bob's jaw. Down went Bob. He slowly arose from the floor a moment later, and started for the door. "Can you imagine," he started. "A girl like that taking such a punk in favor of me, the greatest football half- back of State University. l'll get you for this, l'll get you!" With I 8



Page 11 text:

arm in his, and in a second they were walking together. Jim, gentle- man that he was, took her books and carried them with his. As they neared the girl's home, Jim noticed Marjory's house around the cor- ner. Barbara also noticed this, and gripped his arm tighter than be- fore. As they passed the house, Jim almost bowled over when he saw Marjory coming from the gate. 'I think I had better be going now," he stammered. Just then Marjory saw them. Barbara saw this and took out a handkerchief and faked that she was crying. "Boo-hoo. You do not like little Bobbie." With these words, she put her head on Jim's shoulder and started weeping. Poor Jim. He didn't know what to do. Barbara saw she had done her part, and suddenly she said, "You do not like Bobbie! I don't like you. Good-bye.." She smiled to herself and left Jim there alone. He walked over to Marjory and said, "Marj, I don't even know the girl. You must believe me." He looked at Marjory, who gazed past him with her nose pointed high. She looked even prettier like that. It made him love her more. She started to walk down the street at a quick pace. Jim had to run to get up to her. "Marj, listen to me," he pleaded. Fire came into Marjory's eyes. "You, you, you flirt. Don't you dare speak to me again for as long as you live. Go with your little Bobbie, go ahead." Tears rolled down her pretty face as she finished speaking. "And don't you call me anything but Miss Hastings, Mr. Marvin." "But Marj, you don't understand." Jim's tone was imploring. "Call me that again, will you?" With these words, Marjory slapped Jim and ran down the street. Jim was a very dejected fellow, standing there without Marjory. How could this happen to him while he was so happy? Yes, Jim walked home very sadly that night-a night of complete joy and success to Bob Larsen. Jim never dreamed of getting revenge very soon on the fellow who caused all this. IV It was Sunday. This was the starting day of the football season for Harding University. Its first opponent was State College. Hard- ing Stadium was a colorful one that day, banners flying, cheer-leaders inspiring the immense crowd which had gathered at the Stadium. These anxious people were certain of seeing a wonderfulgame from start to the final boom of the gun. They were expecting something else too. The story of Jim's affair with Marjory and of Bob's win- I0

Suggestions in the Boody Junior High School - Beacon Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) collection:

Boody Junior High School - Beacon Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 46

1940, pg 46

Boody Junior High School - Beacon Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 53

1940, pg 53

Boody Junior High School - Beacon Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 27

1940, pg 27

Boody Junior High School - Beacon Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 53

1940, pg 53

Boody Junior High School - Beacon Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 40

1940, pg 40

Boody Junior High School - Beacon Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 25

1940, pg 25

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.