Berkeley Hall School - Yearbook (Beverly Hills, CA)

 - Class of 1963

Page 10 of 82

 

Berkeley Hall School - Yearbook (Beverly Hills, CA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 10 of 82
Page 10 of 82



Berkeley Hall School - Yearbook (Beverly Hills, CA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 9
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Berkeley Hall School - Yearbook (Beverly Hills, CA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 11
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SECOND GRADE by David Drake, Agnes Montgomery, Julie Warner The Second Grade has been learning the Carden method this year. They learn to spell without having to study each word and pronounce words at first sight. Mrs. Iwert pronouncesp a word and the students repeat it, then they sound it out and spell it. Another way is by dictation. Mrs. Iwert reads a sentence and the stu- dents repeat it. Then they write the sentence word by word, syllable by syllable. When the election was held this year for Governor, the Second Grade also held an election, only it was for the President of their class. They had a voting stamp, booth, elec- tion box, and tallies. All class projects are done by the students themselves without the help of their teacher. A project they have been doing is on grain. There are headings on the wall such as wheat, oats, and corn. Under the heading they put different kinds of cereal box tops. Some of the ones they had were: Shredded Wheat was under wheat Alpha Bits and Quaker Oats were . under oatsg and Cornflakes and Trix were under corn. KINGS OF THE PRIMARY by Susan Attridge, Lyn Kendrick, and Nancy Kohler This year the Third Grade class has made great strides in achieve- ment under Mrs. Upton. The day be- gins,like other classes, with open- ing exercises consisting of the Flag Salute, a hymn, and the Daily Prayer. Every child in the room gets a chance to choose the hymn and lead the exercises. Their favorite subjects are French, art and Cbelieve it or notJ arithme- tic. The Third Grade is not techni- cally a Carden class but it does in- A clude some Carden activities. Their has been enhanced that they operate reading it its reading interest by the library themselves. A librarian is elected every three weeks to keep the books in order and check them out. Ccontinued next columnjf CANNOT COMPLAIN by Ken Crow, Carol Mau, Randy Rice It is typical for all children to complain about homework. Mrs. Hill, the Fourth Grade teacher, has con- quered this problem by graphically pointing out the ratio of homework to play at home. Among other things done are five reports during the year. The first four deal with the study of Califor- nia and the last with science.Along with the first four reports, the children are required to hand in a diorama of life during this period or a map. These reports are the basis for the assemblies they give. The year is made much more inter- esting when the Fourth Graders proudly display their hobbies.They include such skills as model build- ing, collections such as those of stamps and coins,and many others. Writing and English are practiced when papers on the pupils' vaca- tions are written. These along with the required pictures are given as a momento to the parents at the end of the year. In Mrs. Hill's opinion, this is the most creative class she has had. This is exemplified by the dioramas, maps, and scenes which are created by the pupils. GCONTINUED..Third Grade Monitors are chosen every week to take care of the room's scrapbook. To this, members of the class contri bute pictures and articles concern- ing their studies. The girls have organized a Brownie Troop and they have enjoyed making paper mache' puppets and putting on shows. This is the first troop since our own and they also plan to plant a tree. with all these privileges,though, their conduct is shown on a behav- ior music chart. Each pupil has his picture on a note on the chart and it moves forward or backward accord- ing to his conduct. The students carry on their class- room in a businesslike manner, and thanks to the excellent discipline of Mrs. Upton, they are well on their way to becoming nKings of the Campus.n



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NINTH GRADE BEHIND THE FIFTH GRADE? by Kim Austin, George Burnette, Ronald Krisel HMrs. O'Connor, will I be able to graduate to the Fifth Grade next year?H was the question asked after three members of the Ninth Grade visited the Fifth Grade and spoke to their teacher, Mrs. McGee. The reason for the question was a fifteen minute class of French taken by the Fifth Grade. The difficulty of it startled me. I saw words I had never laid eyes upon! The members of the class are par-f ticipating in an HArithmetic Race.n It consists of class work only.Every time a student hands in a perfect paper, he may color in a square after his name and put a gold star in the center if it was a test. United States History is another subject of interest. The class begins with Columbus and travels through history until they reach the present. They must also learn to spell and place on a map, all the states of the United States. Another chart upon the wall is a Book List. After a student reads a book on his own, a black star is placed after his name. When a student: has given an oral or written book report, he receives a red star. The most interesting chart is the one entitled HRecess Partners.H The purpose of this chart is to make new friends and see the good qualities in them. Each week a person has a new recess partner who plays with him for one week. Some other activities of the Fifth Grade are meetings with the Sixth Grade for singing on Fridays. Assem- blies have been given on Social Studies, Bird Pictures and Parts of Speech. WORKING IN A TREE HOUSE by Janalee Meyhaus, Don McCarty, Bonnie Nance In the Sixth Grade many interest- ing and unusual things happen. With Mrs. Henry these thirty-one enjoy living in a Htree housen where they not only see the sycamores sprout in the spring and many different kinds of birds, but have fun re- trieving a paper or two that Hacci- dentally flew out the window.n Each year they elect two boys for the daily job of raising and lower- ing the flag. Bruce Larson and Jon Thomas were chosen this year. For this they receive a letter of appreciation at Graduation. Sixth Grade pupils find new exper- iences and new problems: Dancing lessons are given by Mrs. Baker in preparation for the Sixth Grade In- vitational. Next in importance are country reports. They have the privilege of attending a few Junior High assemblies, the Thanksgiving Service, and they celebrate their last Play Day. Here each learns to multiply and divide decimals and fractions.This is seldom accomplished without an occasional noon spent in the room. A sneak preview of history from the first real civilization down to modern times is given. A new world, the world of French, under Mr. Dishian's guidance is entered. In art, under Mrs. Richards, the Sixth Grade makes world globes, masks, and clay figures. In science, under Mr. Richards, they study natural science. In music, helped by Mrs. Purtle, they learn to sing in harmony. Mrs. Jeffries teaches the girls the hula and the boys a stick dance. What a wonderful grade this is! CONTINUED..First Grade they learn rules of spelling, of each vowel, and what each says. This makes the children sound out words. There are no pictures in the Carden book. This helps each pupil to form his own picture in his mind. The students also have a science of animals. They draw pictures of cows in the air or fish in the meadow for the purpose of distinguishing the habits of animals and on what they feed. Once every two weeks, as a reward for corrected workbooks, some students have the privilege of an art period. An occasional party is even allowed.

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