Arcata High School - Advance Yearbook (Arcata, CA)

 - Class of 1917

Page 10 of 108

 

Arcata High School - Advance Yearbook (Arcata, CA) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 10 of 108
Page 10 of 108



Arcata High School - Advance Yearbook (Arcata, CA) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 9
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Page 10 text:

that we have never been able to get ahead of the demands of modern high school education. We have attempted to keep the traditional subjects up to their former standard, making additional provisions so that a student may qualify for entrance to any of the colleges of the University of California. We have doubled the possible units of work to be done in commercial subjects, in drawing and in science. The work in music, making a modest beginning four years ago, has grown to include a regular course in theory and harmony and another in orchestra. We have not been able thus far to undertake work in manual training, domestic science, and physical education, courses for which there has been a persistent demand on the part of pupils and patrons. The need of vocational or pre-vocational work in high school, of the type to correspond with the industries of the locality, and large enough in scope to enable each pupil to give from one-fourth to one-half or more of his high school period to direct preparation for a vocation, is unquestioned. We have at our door a State Normal School, which means that a large number of our students will prepare for teaching. There are definite require- ments for Normal School entrance in accordance with which we must adjust our curriculum. We have a considerable number preparing to enter training schools for nurses, the requirements for which are high school graduation with certain prescribed subjects, provision for which must be made in our course of study. Humboldt Bay region with its railroad and water-shipping facilities is destined to develop rapidly as a commercial and manufacturing center. This means a corresponding increase in the need for young people trained for business and technical pursuits. The agricultural and live stock industries have great possibilities for the scientifically trained young man. Northern California offers increasing opportunities for those equipped to take up scientific forestry in its manifold phases. The development of water power and all that goes with it is another industry that will claim the atten- tion of the young people now in our schools. Thus have I enumerated a few of the many occupations in our own region that will require technically trained young people. Our high school should contribute its part for their equipment. If we do not train our own boys and girls to take the lead in these industries, they will have to give place to those trained elsewhere. The high school is the avenue that leads to all these occupations. The nature of the technical work and the sentiment of business men demand high school training as a pre-requisite to employ- ment. It gives a general knowledge and should give the basic elements of the training needed in their vocation. It gives the young people a vision that frees them from the fetters of narrow-mindedness and slothfulness. It trains them in the principles of co-operation, commonly known as the ability to get along with their fellow beings. Perhaps the social and moral training in our high schools derived from drill in the class room, from the student-body activities, and from the athletic field, constitute the most import- ant element in the preparation of our young people to take their places in the world. 8

Page 9 text:

A Resume A. O. Cooperrider The ready response of the people of Arcata and vicinity to anything that will further the 1 Q 1 interests of the high school is ample evidence that they are interested in the school and anx- ious that it succeed. The fact that it was organized twenty-three years ago, when a comparatively small number of California com- 4. ,:, munities had high schools, is another proof of the strong sentiment here in favor of giving the boys and girls every possible educational advantage. Knowing that the people are in sympathy with the school, and that they have faith in what it is doing and destined to do for the youth of this community, has made us feel keenly the responsibility resting upon us. It has been our aim to promote the growth begun in the earlier years of the school, a growth not only in numbers but also in traditions, variety of courses, general influence and repu- tation. We have endeavored to study the A. o. coopemuer, Principal needs and adopt the best available means for Science satisfying those needs. When the present seniors entered four years ago, they came a class of thirty-five. It was immediately evident that a force of five teachers could not efficiently handle the work with the enrollment now above one hundred, and a sixth teacher was promptly authorized by the Board. This enabled us to organize first year science work, to give increased attention to commercial work, draw- ing, language and music. A new difficulty now confronted us in the way of lack of room. A second story had been added to the building a few years previous, and further expansion in that direction was not possible. With a few make-shifts we managed to get along for two years, when a much needed assembly hall was completed. It proved, however, that these were only temporary measures of relief. Whether from an increase in the number of teachers, with the consequent increase in variety of courses offered, or from a general recognition of the need of high school training, the fact remains that instead of an entering class of 'thirty-five in 1913, we had to provide for a freshman class of fifty- five in 1915, the year the assembly hall was completed, and a like number of first year students appeared again in 1916. It was necessary to secure a teacher for part time in 1915 and she was employed for full time in 1916. For the year ending in june, 1913, the average attendance was ninety-two. This increased by june, 1914, to ninety-seven, and in June, 1915, it averaged ninety-eight. In 1916 it jumped to one-hundred and twenty-three, and for the first eight months of the present school year the attendance averages one hundred and thirty-six. The figures above show that while we have increased the number of teachers from five to seven, and increased the room and other facilities, these increases have not kept pace with the growth in attendance. We feel 7



Page 11 text:

SHIRLEY M. RUSSELL Drawing, German, Algebra ERA CHAMBERLIN, Vice-Principal English, French MABEL BRISCOE Commercial, History 9

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