Yankton College - Okihe Yearbook (Yankton, SD)

 - Class of 1943

Page 1 of 104

 

Yankton College - Okihe Yearbook (Yankton, SD) online yearbook collection, 1943 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 104 of the 1943 volume:

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She had many friends, sincere ones, who admired and respected and loved her. "Music, the highest of the arts, comes closest to expressing the un- expressible in life's impenetrable mystery." Miss Hohf had that excep- tional gift of being able to express thoughts through music. At Yankton College Miss Hohf was an associate professor of music and the director of the women's glee club. For ten years she was a soloist with the Congregational Church choir. Always a loyal member of the community, she was active in social, church, and musical life, and it was with deep sorrow her friends learned of her passing. S M... . .lr-un,-... -f........:..4..1 . M h1.,, r 4 , l 5 - , . -ff, -'g:Ti'::"',"j 'jLY::.3n.g2, . - -- ,, ,.. J ,M 9- 1 1 N 1 1 1 I 1 I I . 'Baffin ,. ,,. ., . :EJ is 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i i ,!, C WARD 1 I I ' 1 ! I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H LL 4 .f I H x 4 1 'X-. , 5 , -' - xx 3, tfflw t-QM" I , ' 'As' -Qqiyixz K, 11,21 'Zin' J. ,V, ,1V- +R wrwir-5, a..1 114 r 1 Ulf ' if " 9 ,. . 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V I 'ZZ' 5 ffff 4--LVL " iw-ff - if- ' 5 41.,V " f "" ' VL , . , ' 'V f., ,Z VV 'V--,fl V g.,' V141 - . M . , V: ,3:,,3QQ'sf-73.-, - f ' f " . .. ' ' ig, .Va " . ' 'I' 2, Vf " V,- :"'1v "'75 Q.V2 f'V1fi.1f.Df'Q 53- f' 11V:f2' V 41f':?.:'h:i ' ,"1.V3-,Z ."Zf2f'3,s5f3"'3i'mi1j,i: 'ggi ,W ' " I ' f' 1 .- In f' fy " .sfzejq ff 1.V:1:Vi,., ., ' -fC,b.:5. K if - 4-Q' 'V W- :gi fs - fi." V- + V 'Va 1 ' ' V 2,1 jg V .4521 V Vip ,,,, 5, -ff-V," 1 IV-' 4' V- ,Q-:'ff ' A ' .' , V' 1 W ' 4 ,-" x -5 ' ,-in ,1-V3 Vx: ,, 5 f ff, Q- ff U: 2, V: Q - Aqfr' ' , Vg.'j'5.v -1 :V .f :.-:1.j: 1, we V 4 V 'V A ' ' " "Q 3: 'Sf V F' I-!l " 35i'i':,-sf , I BRARY CRANE GYMNASIUM ww, , LOOK HALL I C Qin... - , - ..x 1 N-fav:-Q A ,- - "L- N ' ' if , I ' X , f N-f x ' A , .u- Q' , if ' ., , av ,N fggff I, " Q, :QM'f.z,m,WfffffWffwwffwWmMN Q 1 ' M THE G TE OF Y. Q X x-if y s '21-f' .-aan KI GSBURY HALL ,, -,f:3zgg',4,5.,. ., ., lffzxnktun Olullege Qaxrkinzr, ginnih Dakniu rx ' 1,3-u.L-'+J,Lx.uu..Jv LA-Al-I ' Mm Qgswm W WA Nw ' M Y- Q-Q35 9.A+.Jb-1.+AQZxAN'bb AJJ-z' . V+-X51 dvd Ar M kmfifw-mf wifi 'NJN' Li 'B-JV PQ uv , 5 qwm ,iKNJQwkw Qbywwrhwwfw -1 A ' xiijv- .zi'3L1W m,g.J P fg'jiJ-Sw Mwip -wb QQMMAQ 'Q , , WRWM 3, x5"'5S,iPL9J'X,,g,,4t,JQo5l"340-fl A '1 I I VICE-PRESIDENT GEORGE H. DURAND PRESIDENT JOSEPH L. McCORlSON,JR DEAN WILLIAM C. LANG Dean of Men, Professor of History and Lecturer in Sociology I ' DEAN M. A. STEWART rrrz' Dean of the College M Professor of Classical Languages and Literature DEAN EDWARD SAYLER Dean of the School of Theology, Professor of Sociology DEAN CLARA P. SWAIN Dean of Women, Professor in English Language and Literature and Instructor in Personnel Administration Q I I W s - 1 Q 1 ,, . Q ff 1 AUSTIN P. LARRABEE LEE N' DAILEY Professor of Biology and Lecturer in Professor of Music, Geology rl 'Sb 1 f FRANCES A. DUNHAM ROS.-XMOND L. BURGI Professor of Romance Languages Instructor in Latin, German, English - ' ' . C.-XV.-XGE GREGG M' EVANS Profs-ujiiihiflilistliirvxEconomics, and Professor of Chemistry and Physics 'A Political FCICIICC 5944! 3.4. 5' 17' J, k X I H ff 4 fi 7 Q27 5 . Q ff, ', 1 1 Mlizyw , fy g,!,,,, , ' 'ffff JW fmwf K ?f Q. cg fffj f . A f , f-gy I f 2 X fi .,.,., , ,g' 1.1"f3'5fl,:ft , 4, Q - az Z ' :f-rfx:--:,,:, 2 y , fy V2 I 4 'f 'f , fp ,f ,,,,, r. ..,, . ,.,... , ,. ,MW .,v, ,,,,., 7 .fa . 1 .,.-:I " .f 'f-ff. 6 ,412 5 - 1-' ,, ' wf'Qq5,4,,f . MQW ,J ' ,- ,fgr-n:Qf ,ay of S 4 a 'i fg ' V , f f 7 , f .111-af: ,4,.- - -Wes'--1-Qfzfiya' , f"v', , X' , ' 4 V, yf ' ' 'lii fz X S HELEN E. MINER HERBERT C. MCMURTRY Librarian and Curator of Historical Professor of Philosophy and Psychology Records r", Q Q. T if 'rrri I L I ' Q . 1 'src w : ss ,rf ' 'K W h tk It .L ., MANO STUKEY Instructor in Men's Physical Education RUSSELL M. EIDSMOE Professor of Education - . 2 MRS. EDITH L. HERINGTON Instructor in Women's Physical Education RICHARD de LAUBENFELS Instructor in Dramatics i 41 ffm 7,1 Qxywafavff-..,, ffm 4-fl JA if M I I f M91 gt , 427- 7' Zifhf 9 2 , f, 5 ' fi' 4 'f gg, 2-r-,. A N -1 r rl 1 r J f 1 1 1 1 ,. 1 " 1 af , , 1 ,. M 'rr ft f- Q I if :'-L '. . 'W "", -'gif 'P it! - L Y, ng , ' .v ff L' 5 sf ' ' WOLFGANG LIEPE GEORGE J. EISENACH Professor of German Language and Professor of Church History Literature 04:44. , , , '.. , Q . ' 'W-r'?: MARY E- PROUDFIT RUTH PINNIQLL DURU'I'llli.-X M. Nlssax Instructor in Violin -. . . . . Assxstant Professor of Musxc Instructor nn Plano and 'Iheory DUN E. ALKI X GILMORE WARNER RE . A ' P -- : , '. Professor of Mathematics ssocxate rofessor of the l,ng.,l1sh Language and Lnterature 1 ww vm? nv A Z ,,: . HANS JANSSEN ROBERT W. FEYERHARM Associate Professor of Economics Secretary and Treasurer of the College LUCILE HATZ LOUIS A. REITHER PETER V. HANSEN Assistant Secretary and Treasurer Assistant to the Secretary and Treasurer Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds MRS. JOY M. REITHER MRS. ALFREDA PAGE Dil'CCt0l' Of L00k Hall Director of Kingsbury Hall l13 l N 'I s-L I ,1 -x . , l l 1 I 1 l r il E . El 1 1. 4 '1 ll f 1 .1 WE-QQ' ' , ' ' l l . l I i i 1 i i l i 1 1 i i I I l l LOOK HALL HOUSE COUNCIL Wilbert Hiller, Bob Burchfield, Ralph Cobb, Mrs. Reither, Leo Borin, Charles Foreman, Keith Warne Walter Zeeb, President STUDENT BODY OFFICERS Leighton Borin, President, Eleanor Hamilton, Secre- tary, Walter Zeeb, Vice-president, Dean Stewart, Faculty Advisor June Lagendyk President, Mavis Clark, C 'ha LEFT-SECOND SEMESTER KINGS- BURY HALL HOUSE C'Ol'NClI, Ellen Larsen, Dorothea Rose, Marv l-fllen Garvey. Miss Swain, Ruth Ann Gerhard, Lorls Reinmuth, President, Lee .-Xlling, RIGHT-FIRST SEMICSTICR lltJl'Sl-N COUNCIL getty Ruth FIYHI1. Lavon Lueck. Mitt Wain' Mary BVYIHI. Erma Swanson STLDENT SENATE Mavis Clark, Marion Palmer, Lois Shefte, Eleanor Hamilton, Dalton Treick, President, Doris Kings- bury, Leo Borin, Leighton Borin, Dorothy Habel. Dean Stewart Charged with the responsibility of keeping student affairs in smooth running order are the self-govern- ing agencies of the campus-The Student Senate, the Student Association otiicers, and the house councils of Kingsbury Hall and Look Hall. Here students practice principles of democracy- the kind of principles which involve important re- sponsibilities as well as privileges. Although holding one of these positions occupies a good deal of time. and involves quite some worry. there are rewards in the form of successful student projects such as the recreation center project, which Leighton and Dalton steered through a rather rough channel. This is Yankton Colleges contribution to democracy! E v X 5 Nuukiuu QXHUBQ1: lgnukinu, jmxih Pahala 'MWA NVJJFWX-Xwwb pu-fv ,Juil- - ',.3:J,Qf.,5,Nff.9J-fm .mw.,,:b., w ky-AJVAJ wi wg My Aw . M-Qu, M Wv M Ww1iQfM V N Q-A V,,.Qp,,b""'X' NW-+P s., , N s f'X N'V"j"L' QQ WW "- L, sM,,,1sQ".fLL ES ya 'I ,, ' -0.11-f QSf,'aT,ML9,a,',k,Mwwfg ' 0' 9V'J'A"wQ3'M, dial 4,-L QW MMS QW' S sk QQQQJ3' 5' 5 ,0',,.?9'M",,.,QX qw . W-""' , .f -p 0' 1- 1 ' 4 ' ' . , . ,, ,v .- . f 4 - n JEAN AB ERLE ANONA ANDERSON KATHRYN BERRY NIEALS MILTON BUECHLER Watertown WILLARD ACERS Yankton Parker DALE BARROWS Stickney GERTRUDE BEDNAR Dupree Armour IVAN BGRRVIAINY Stickney FRANK BRADY Ynnkton Bowdlc 1 MASON CBOB5 D-RLY F Rapid city XY.-XLTE R DOBLER Bethune. Colo BRUCE EL IxER Lead ROLLAND FRIBOURCHOUSE Xvflllkfilll EDXVIN GUXIKI' Rlnrtin, N. Rik 1 lf YIRGH C R hIZlI'ShlZllHi Orr bi J RUSS Lenno A ELI. GREENl"lEl,l7 x I.-XRY HAN EY Huron Al,YlN H.-XSS Chndron, N ebr. FRANCES HINES BIGELOXV Pierre J ANICE JUNKER Yankton BETTY J rm' H Exxixosox Burke FLORENCE KIDVVELL Custer BARBARA KI E H LBAUCH Avon ROBERT KCLARICH Riallard, Iowa CORINNE LARSEN RICH YVess ington Springs FRED LITTAU VVhite River ELEANOR LGTH RUP Yankton TRESSA IWCFARLIN Mason City, Iowa THECDORE MAZUR Wagner RALPH MEDECK Yankton ,qv 'VEZZZTV N i 1 2 F , Q 2 3 i 2 i s I , i ii 1 ii s I E 5 1 R EQ A 5, r 5. i ii if' i 5. ,i 'E 2 V 'ii I . al Ii! me I 1 fb. iii .i Z! ii 'ii ri , i ai' I. wg ti ld iii ,i iii ii: iw :Q ij H il ii ii' iii ,,, 05305, 'WN- in-A ! 1, ,Aff W P V 5 L 4 To , K If , A . QW VIOLA MUGCK Parkston PATRICIA PATTERSON TAYLOR Parkston . T H EODORA POTTS Nlobridge RUTH POVVELL Sioux Falls RALPH REED Cannon Ball, N. Dali. HELEN RILEY Yankton JoHN SCHEER Follett, Texas KEITH SCHXVEIGERT Colome ,IGH N SMITH Stickney ,I UAN ITA STEXVART Sioux Falls --5 Stickncy IJ.-XIV R lf X CE SVVAXSQN Alccsrer MILDRED SUTERA Talwor 3 ROBERT UNGIQR 2, TWA w ICISSKIP 1-A XVICBICR Scotlnml CLASS OF 1943 - OFFICERS President ............. Robert Martelle Vice-president ..... XVulter Zeeb Secretary ..... .. Mary Ellen Burns Senior officers with that mercenary gleam in their eyes JEAN BANKS Yankton Aristonian society 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4, Student Senate 3, XVho's XVho 4. LEIGHTON BORIN New Underwood Debate 1, 2, 3, 4, Extemp. 2, 3, 4, Oratory 2, Intramural basketball 3, 4, Province champ de- bate team 2, Superior debate team Pi Kappa Delta national tourney, Garden Terrace club 3, 4, Flannagan debate prize 2, 3, 4, Riggs Extemp. prize, Steadman achievement award, Pioneer Day manager 3, President of student association 4, YMCA 1, 2, 3, 4, VVho's VVho 3, 4, Lay Ora- tory winner, Our Town 1, Band 1, Macbeth 2, Howling 30 3, 4. ROBERT BURCHFIELD Lane Football 2, 3, 4, Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Track 1, 2, 3, Member of social board 2, Y club 1, 2, 3, 4, Howling 30 4, Vice-president Look Hall 4. MARY ELLEN BURNS Redfield Our Town 1, Family Portrait 2, Abe Lincoln in Illinois 3, The Contrast 4, Garden Terrace club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, Vice-President 4, Extemp. 4, Oratory 3, Class secretary 4, Aristonian society 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-president 2, 4, May Fete 1, 2, Kingsbury Hall house council 3. TORMAIN CARLSON Ig T Ethan 3 Howling 30 3, 4, YMCA cabinet 4, Class presi- Q, W M, , dent 3, Intramural basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Who's Who 4, Abe Lincoln in Illinois 3, The Contrast 4. ig VV:'i 1'2r P Z iisl Ww w-W"iiZi'i-1 'i'i'1 7 ORP HA RAE CHENEY Spirit Lake, Iowa May Fete 2 3, Congo. choir 1 2, Sodale society - ,tsrt 1, 2, 3, 4, ,President 4, Kingsbury Hall house VV ZZIVZ council 2, WAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Howling 30 2, 3, 4- ' 4 N 1,4 l E I n i l li li '5 . il 'l 1+ i Z l it . i a lg i 5 E E x , E Q E t 2 i , ll 'A il l i', . 5 , 14 ly 1 ,s ll l, '- r l i' , 4 l l li , 1 , it ' ,V , l f 1 'l v l ,i ,, 4 l i l 4 1 all 1, V Lx . I 1 l ,il i 1+ ', l 1 1 l 1 1 l' ,L 7, gli' MAVIS CLARK - Redfield Our Town 1, Minick 1, May. Fete 1, 2, 3, Aris- tonian society 1, 2, 3, 4, High Tor 2, Family Portrait 2, Abe Lincoln in Illinois 3, HMS Pina- fore 3, Garden Terrace club 3, 4, Secretary 4, YWCA cabinet 3, 4, Kingsbury house council 3, Congo. choir 3, Stranger 4. Student senate 4, Love from a CATHERINE CULLOM Rapid City Sioux Falls College 1, 2, Sodale society 3, 4, Garden Terrace club 4, Taming of the Shrew 3 Squaring the Circle 4, The Contrast 4. ' OSWALD ELBE Racine, Wis. YMCA 1, 2, 3, Ministerial club 1, 2, 3, 4, Ger- man club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4, Goose Quill 3, Student senate 3, Dramatics 1, 2, 4. JANICE FIESELER Rapid City Aristonian society 1, 2, 3, 4, Greyhound 4, Stu- dent 1, 2, 3, 4, Garden Terrace club 4. BETTY LOU FISHBECK Yankton Drake prize 1, VVho's VVho 4, Yankton College Scholar 4, Sodale society 1, 2, 3, 4. HUGO FLAIG Fredonia, N. D. YMCA 1, 2, 3, 4, German club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice- presrdent 4, Ministerial club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice- president 4, Men's glee club 1, 2, 3, Dramatics 1, 3, 4. CHARLES FOREMAN Lead Football 4, Intramural basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain winning team 4, Softball 1, 2, 3, Howl- ing 30 3, 4, Greyhound Pack 2, 3. HERBERT FREIER Tripp Men's glee club 1, Howling 30 3, 4, President 4, Intramural basketball C, 4, German club 1. BETTY GOLD Yankton ' Sodale society 1, 2, 3 4 . y 0 ' NORMAN GROSS Bowdle , Class president 1, Student senate 2. BllSlI1f55 manager of Student 4, Y club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 4, Football 2, 3, 4, Co-captain 4. Iziaskethall 1, 2, 3, 4, Track 1, 2, King Henry IV ff - V --A easmse 41-19 1 uma" . .' It til I ' his rm Y 1 .ri 'up 4 '4'-'JJ .r "-'wi "' " XVALTER GROSSMAN Boston, Mass. YMCA 3, 4, lRC 3, 4, Vice-president 4. ALBERT H VVarden, XVa ELEANOR HAMILTON Sioux Falls Sioux Falls College 1, 2, Coronation Lady 4, Carnival queen 3, Secretary of Student Associa- tion 4, Howling 30 3, 4, Secretary 4, Sodale society 4, Vice-president 4, Social board 4, House council 4, YXVCA cabinet 4, HMS Pinafore 3. OERSCH sh. ERNVIN H UETH ER Yvessington Eastern Normal 1, 2, Football 3, 4, Track 3, 4, Freshman basketball coach 4, Men's glee club 3, German club 3, 4, Y club 3, 4, YMCA 3, 4, HMS Pinafore 3, Abe Lincoln in Illinois 3, The Contrast 4. LEROY H UETH ER Wessington Eastern Norma l 1, 2, Football 3, 4, Track 3, ' Director intramural basketball 4, Y club 3, 4, HMS Pinafore 3, German club 3, 4. fi 2 ..,.. .. , . ., . -.f.,,.,:,- ,est . . .1 0 4 if 1 - t , ,.,,, ........ f......,, A 1 ,Q V THEODORE JACOBSON Beresford ., A Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Orchestra 2, 3, 4, Muscats 2, 3, :'i' '4 Z l. t,,. ,,, , ' M 1,54 ,.,, 4 .ESV French club 2, Quartette 3, 4. ' IRENE KELLER , Yankton Clarke College 1, 2, 3, Sodale society 4. ARTHUR KREBS Hosmer Ministerial club 1, 2, 3, 4, German club 1, 2, 3, 4. JUN E LAGEN DYK Avon WAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-president 4, Sigma Mu 2, ' 3, 4, YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4, Aristonian society 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer May Fete 1, 4, 0 3, Kingsbury house council 4, Congo. choir 1. ELLEN LARSEN Hurlev - Sioux Falls College 1, 2, Abe Lincoln in Illinois 3, Love from a Stranger 4, Garden Terrace club 3, 4, Sodale society 3, 4, Student 3, 4, Kingsbury house council 4, YWCA Cabinet 3, 4. fx., . , -V ef- f .. .1 -1- -.m zavez kftf.-1 4:SE':fi"3i L E ,..,,,,z, , -: , 1 1,3 A LAVON LUECK Redfield K. b h , h ' 1 Dramatics 4, ings ury ouse tg Oli. Oichesis 2, 3, 4, 11 2: 3: 4: Ma Fete 1 2,'3, 4, Aristonian society 1 2, 3, 4, Secgetary 2,1 4, Howling 30 3, 4, Trojan Women 4. RGBERT MARTELLE Beresford Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Men's glee club 1, 2, Orchestra 4, Congo. choir 1, 2, Howling 30 4, Class presi- dent 4, French club 2, Muscats 2, Manager Col- legiana 4, Quartette 3, 4, VVho's Who 4. ROBERTA NELSON Yankton Macbeth 1, Family Portrait 2, Taming of the Shrew 3, Squaring the Circle 4, Orchestra I., 2, 3, 4, Garden Terrace club 3, 4, Sodale society 1: 2: 3: 4: 11 21 37 4' WARREN NIELSON Yankton High Tor 2, King Henry IV 2, Abe Lincoln in Illinois 3, Squaring the Circle 4, Garden Terrace club 4, Band 1, 2, 3, Muscats 2, 3. WALLACE PATTEN Mobridge Howling 30 4, Men's glee club 1, 2, 3, Business manager 3, Garden Terrace club 3, 4, President 4, Abe Lincoln in Illinois 3, High Tor 2, Family Portrait 2, HMS Pinafore 3. NEIL PETERS Viborg Student senate 1, Men's glee club 1, 2, 3. Presi- dent 3, Henry IV 2, German club 2, 3, Abe Lincoln in Illinois 3, HMS Pinafore 3, Taming of the Shrew 3, Howling 30 4, Pioneer Day manager 4, Quartette 3. 4. RICHARD PIEPER Yankton HANS POPPE Yankton German club l, 2, 3, 4, 5, Ministerial club 1, 2, 3. 4. 5, Secretary 3, YMCA l, 2, 3, 4, 5. OU' Town 2. LGRIS REINMUTH , Alcester glur Town 1, XVAA I.. 2, 3, 4, Student l, 2, 4, O 85,1 Eete 1, 2, 3, 4, Aristonian society l, 2, 3, 4, b rc esis 2, 3, 4, XVonien's glee club 2, 3, Kings- - Ury house council 3, President 4, llowling 30 3, 4, Editor Greyhound 4, XVho's NVhn 4, ...A BENJARIIN RIEGER Hehron, N. D. German club 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Ministerial club 2, 3,- 4, 5, Secretary 3, Macbeth 2, High Tor 3, Look Hall house council 4. GEGRGE SCHISSLER Greeley, Colo. FRED SCHNEIDER Portland, Ore. YMCA 2, 3, 4, 5, Menls glee club 3, 4, Mixed chorus 5, Theology quartette 3, 4, 5, Band 3, German club 2, 3, 4, 5, President 5, Ministerial club 2, 3, 4, 5. - HENRY SCHNEIDER Portland, Ore. German club 1, 2, 3, 4, Ministerial club 2, 3, 4, President 4, Garden Terrace club 4, YMCA 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 4, Mixed chorus 4. ERMA SYVANSON Alcester Kingsbury house council 1, 2, President 4, Howl- ing 30 3, 4, Garden Terrace club 3, 4, Aristonian society 1, 2, 3, 4, YYVCA cabinet 3, 4, May Fete 2, 3, May Queen 4, Class secretary 2, Social board 4, Taming of the Shrew 3. DALTON TREICK Alcester Band 1, Howling 30 3, 4, President Student senate 4, Intramural basketball 3 4 Dramatics 2, 3. KEITH WARN E Lake Preston Look house council 4. JANE YOUNG Yankton ' IRC 3, 4, Secretary of class 1, 3, Student senate 3, Secretary 3, VVho's Who 3, 4, YWCA cabinet 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4, Congo. choir 1, Aristonian society 1, 2, 3, 4, Band 1, Howling 30 3, 4, Miss Pioneer 4. WALTER ZEEB Scotland Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Co- captam 4, Track 1, 2, 3, YMCA president 3, Look Hall president 4, Howling 30 2, 3, 4, Y club 1, 2, 3, 4, Class president 2 Vice-president 41 WhO,S 4. , MASON BURCHFIELD JERRY CAMPBELL EMILEE ALLING ROBERT AUGUST MARY BRYAN Lane Spencer, Iowa k Hartford, Conn. Avon, Conn- Sm: my Q 5 LLAX WILLIS CANFIELD RALPH COBB BETTY CORNWALL DALE COULSON JOHS QOISLEY Humboldt Scotland Yankton Rivera, Calif. CO! 3 , V . - - 7 CLASS OF 1944 OFFICERS President ....... ............. .... R a lph Cobb "' Vice-president .... Mary Bryan Secretary ..... .... I .ynne Stout E "Kibbee" dictates to Mary in thc ala- sence of his regular secretary, l.ynnc . . N I I Q. I I I I I I I I I I I I 1414, , ,MX iv PAULINE DORY HARLYN FISHER FRED FOREMAN W'atertown Artesian Lead HERBERT FYLLING Beresford .,-rv , ,. 4.--A. RUTH ANN GERHARD Plankinton BARBARA GLEASON LILLIAN HAINES CHMSTOPHER HLLDEBRAND BARBARA KUHN MILTON LAIB Redfield Maurine Great Bend, Kansas Belvidere Odessa, Wash. HELEN MCKELVEY MARION PALMER ANNIE BATES Rec Heights Yankton ESYCHIUC MARGARET POTTS Mob rid ge VIOLET REIERSON Canton I -I II I I.: I II I, II I I I l .I lr u I .Ig 'Q I I III Iv I 5 I 1 II I I I I I I II If I I . I III II I I' II I4 I I I I FI . I I: II I I ,I I I I I I II I I i, I I I I I I . P' I I I I I I I I I I I , I Q GORDON ROGET ELIZABETH SPENCER LYNNE STOUT WARD VAN OSDEL LENORE VVALPOLE Yankton Kansas City, Mo. Sioux Falls Mission Hill Rapid City ROBERT WILLIAMS MARTHA VVRIGHT Lead Pierre I -A:,:j,I,j,.:,.k.T: A',AA T, ,A . - I- , p l I AA. sf, .H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' Rs-b Q 1 1... 17" K, ff, ,. , , v ',',,f2.f1f, , 73 www, 8 tr' CLASS OF 1945 SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS-President Jack Gold, Secretary Mary Ellen Garvey, Vice-president Bob Gibson. LOIS BATES, Redaeld .... EDITH BINDER, Tabor .... LEo BoR1N, New Underwood .... SHIRLEY BOSLAND, Waubay .... NORMAN COLEMAN, Alexandria .... MICHAEL DARROW, Chicago, 111. ' RUTH DITTRICH, Stickney .... DOLORES EISENMAN, Yankton .... HOPE ELLINGER, Scotland . . . JOHN ERICKSON, Scribner, Neb ..... BURTON EVERS, Wagner .... BURNELL FLINT, Viborg. BETTY RUTH FLYNN, Plankinron .... IRENE FREIER, Tripp .... MARY ELLEN GARVEY, Gayville . . . . MARY LOU GERLINGER, Sioux Falls . . . . ROBERT GIBSON, Redfield . . . . ROBERT GILMAN, Yankton. - JOHN GOLD, Yankton .... ROLAND GUNSCH, Elgin, N. Dak ..... ALFRED HAAR, Freeman. Aff f , 'Q 4 ' KW 519 'KW Kis- fffiff' I fgiffh f 'M 12,25 444371 ,arf QW, g Aa, f V f Lv vgfg, Q f,,.' ,f 4' ,r:11.fflfff.',f 'Q' "L" J' .11 DOROTHY HABEL, Huron . . WILBERT HILLER, Fredonia, N. Dak ..... LUCILLE HINS, PGFIKSIOU . . . . ELMER -IESKE, Odessa, Wash. . . . . LAWRENCE JURRENS, Avon . . . . GEORGE KULPACA, Lead- WAYNE LIVINGSTON, Yankton .... VIVIAN MEANS, Yankton .... ERVVIN MINDT, Blue Grass, N. Dak ..... DOROTHY NASH, Platte .... BETTY Alcester. HAROLD RUFF, Elgin, N. Dak ..... VIOLA SACKMANN, I LEREFF, Fort Morgan, Colo ..... JOHN SE.,G, T THADRA STERLING, Yankton .... VIVIAN THOMPSO NORMA JEAN UNGER, Stickney .... THOMAS WICK Leipzig, N. Dak. 1 MAE PALMER, Armour .... XVAYNE REINMUTH. Inderwood, N. Dak ..... FLORENCE SCHIL- orrington, Conn ..... ROBERT SHEEHY, Chicago. Ill- N, Yankton .... RAYMOND TIEDE, Trip! v.... S, Yankton .... HERBERT ZllXlMERlNl.-KN, New v 5, SVSJ-zu. f- 0 ' 'Ga I A -ek ,Q ' A1 i, . .. 9' 3- 4 . 'P ,gs I N, s A .ISSN " G if - 499- VV' me-n Dn- lf .f ,fi , ,p CLASS OF 1946 FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS-Vice-president Jack Robinson, Secretary Marv Agness Eiford, President Neville Robinson. 4 DEAN ALSETH, Lake Preston .... JAMES ANDERSON, Yankton .... ROBERT ANDREWS, Lead . . . ELTON BACON, Deadwood .... DARYL BERNARD, Jefferson .... DAVID BESSELIEVRE, Pierre. KENNETH BIEL, java .... FRAZIER BLANDON, Osawatomie, Kansas .... HARRY BOCKHORST, St. LOUIS, Mo ..... DeVVAYNE BROVVN, Alexandria . . .. DONNA BUNKER, Yankton .... WILLIAM DAVID- SON, Yankton. PATRICIA DONALDSON, Yankton .... JEROME DOVER, St. Louis, Mo ..... EDWARD EAGEN, Tor- fingwfl, Conn ..... LOUISE ELBE, Racine, Wis ..... MARY ELFORD, Roscoe .... CHARLES ERICKSON, Scribner, Neb, MARIE HARKCOM, Rapid City .... HERMAN HEMPEL, Lincoln, Neb ..... ROBERTA HILL, Ipswich. i ' -f -as-::::s1.s:z:ss 'i .. A 1 X I ' 9 0 Ni Q X. A z I 0 Q M? 'Og ix X X X X bi I y Q ' vw A a , if 1 I S I ' X W 4 f 1 Q X 7 C .9 W -4 ox , fl 4,5595 5 a N N N322 is slzw xg at or M fit I , f X f My K 5 by fx B46 Q' xi ' X J SQ px ,Q 4.3 'Q ,,, s '24 giyi 1 , 4. -M any vs xy X yeas, to gc X ,N a' I ' w M .-ff : I -,-- 1 warg-:g:1..:5 ir 1111:-1 'r+'Q1:1:1:::a,. t v ,,,. . 1 .s:3:.. 1 2:55 5g'.:.:-if 3 322 ' 1,,f.,f1 I 1-:qw . xv. . ,1 135,,Q:ygz1z':g:gsgs5Q2ggg 'f 152353552-qggsffifg. gig - :V 1 1 Wa! I , 1 ff I I 1 'gg If , f xo . 0 Y s -,-hw.. 'K f 2 ff . ynfi , E if 1,1 V 3 1. Y ' ' 'I 'Nr Or W1 :PQ 2l'u4f'f if , . 1 414. . -rf-'rs 1 , , , ,,:,--1,1-: A f 57 V ' ' 1 ,,f.:1: 1- -f sig.: - '-Q 'i:. . f ,. ff aa W ,Zigi ,A I' Al A: f i Z, Q 9 X, ' 4 , f , g sf 1 , ja, , 37 fv 2, 4 41f5iZ5f2Ei5E1:Lg3:'Q , 'g.E:I,.gf"-' T-23.19 ,- , , " ffv. ' 'f1'Ev:r5,, ,, v:31jf'1 Q1 " J! gegs,.:1,:Q.,: " ,S ' 51357-jrf "22:1g5Er',-.:1.,f' -:Q-Q-,-or-sz, ,,.:.-:31" .f" Q, K X f J f I I , , , ,mg 0, K f f 1 1,1 1 ,I 1, f ,W X X 1 'i 'l i 1 30 GERALD HILLBERG, Lead I ,i ,.,, V ,.,, .VAA,. ' V , it L '- 3 A. I i I ' ' it fill? F .1 5 fp 1 X j u , 5 ' Q. 47 4 W., . . . . EDWIN HUBER, Carson, N. Dak. . . . . DORIS KINGSBFRY, Kimball . . . ELEANOR KIRSCHENMAN, Marion .... RUBEN KOEHLER, Brush, Conn ..... VIRGIL KOENIG, Yilnkwn- ROBERT KURVINK, Canton .... HEN MONA LONDON, Colome .... RITA LUBITS, Yankton . . . JOSEPI RY LAMPING, St. Louis, Mo ..... LUCY LIST, Yankton . . IINE LI'T'I', Niolirnra, Nelw. KENNETH MADOLE, Mankato, Minn ..... BERNICE MAYER, Roscoe . . . I.ORlC'I"I'.AX MIEIIZR, IVhite land. Lake . . . LAWRENCE NELSON, Yankton .... LEOLA NEVVLON, Colome .... BIELV.-X OSXVALD, SUM' HOWARD OWENS, Sturgis . . . SHIRLEY POLKINHORN, Armour . . . DOLORES PRICIIIQIM, Freenian. W1 A .fi 5 51- vz 1 33, ,f if I BILL RAMLET,'Hurley .... NEVILLE ROBINSON, Redfield .... SUZANNE ROBINSON, Pierre . . . DOROTHEA ROSE, Sioux Falls .... ERXVIN SCIIFTZ. Elgin, N. Dak ..... ELMER SCHMIDT, Streeter N. Dak. . WALTER SCHMIDT, Herreid .... EARL SCI-IRANK, Corsica .... HAROLD SCHULER, Tripp . . LOIS SHEFTE, Volga .... ERNEST SPRENGER, Elgin, N. Dak ..... LILO STARK, Detroit, Mich. LEATRICE SUNDSTROM, Beresford .... MARSHALL THOMAS, Interior .... JAMES TINKER, Red- field .... KATHLEEN TREICK, Alcester .... ELAINE VVEIDENBACH, Scotland .... WILFRED WIEC- zoR12K, sfickney. ' GEORGIA ANN VVILSON, Roscoe .... MURIEL VVHELPLEY, Davis .... FRANCES ZEEB, Scotland . . . ELMA BARNES, Yankton CSpecial Studentl. CLASS OF i42 BURTON BARNARD, Cumberland, Md. BETTY BATES, Redfield JOHN BECKER, American Falls, Idaho MERLIN FOERSTER, Sioux City, Iowa EDWARD UGREENOUGH, Gayville DONALD GROSS, Bowdle ELSIE GROSS, Sliosnoni, Wyo. FRANKLIN HAJJAR, Brooklyn, N. Y. MERLIN HANSEN, Yankton A VERLE HEITER, Emery MYRON MECKEL, Woliondol FRED MEIER, Chancellor NORMA JEAN MEIGHN, Yankton GLADYS MOBERG, Sioux Falls MORGAN SMITH, Yankton CLYDE VOLL, Menno ELIZABETH WILLIAMS, Wagner RUSSELL ZIEGAHN, Valley Springs ' CLASS OF ,43 RUTH VONDRACEK, Yankton CLASS OF ,44 EDWARD HEUER, Yankton BEATRICE KELLER, Yankton BERNICE KELLER, Yankton CARLETON KENYON, Yankton BETTY JANE LIEWER, Yankton REINHOLD OPP, Medina, N. D. POSAGE DUE' CLASS OF ,4S KATHLEEN DEMPSEY, Tripp RUTH DONAHUE, Clark DONALD DUGOVIC, Yankton ROBERT HOGAN, Yankton JOHN NADENICEK, Yankton WILLIAM TSCHETTER, Yankton A THEODORE WHITESIDES, Clear'Lake 4 CLASS OF '46 HAROLD BOWYER, Yankton DOROTHY BURKHEAD, Yankton ANTHONY CACEK, Tabor FORREST ERICSON, Alcester CLARENCE GACKLE, Parkston HAROLD OAONON, Yankton THEODORE GULIFORD, Hoioingion, Kon. WILLIAM GUNDERSON, Fi-onnonf, Neb. ERWIN HAUCK, Loom-ville JOHN HOLLIDAY, Yankton ORDELL HUSBY, Yankton AL JOHNSON, Yankton , VIRGINIA KAISER, Ynnlnon KENNETH KJELDSETH, Yankton VVINIFRED LIEPE, Ynnlnon MARLYS MAXYVELL, Arlington DOROTHY METZ, Yankton BETTE OSBORNE, Philip MARION PESICKA, Ynnlnon JOHN ROBINSON, Scotland DARYL RUEB, Tynilnll MARVIN TIELRE, Yankton SPECIALS GRACE SCHEER, Yankton MARY TRIERXVEILER, Yankton " "1 n.f:i.14 .' 1- .f f, -- . . "M M-M-'.vc 2mii ..n.-,-.11,,, 'PI' . iuil1Xlii'l.Tl1Q.LL1llP5qIC Q:uxkiuu, .'3nxxilxmnku1zx X D I , bis JL, ww mgkxb 4 MmWwWR MM -tkjak VN Ivo - ... - s 5 :S fe' WX 'Wki'ijfEA 5,1 'MA www My M.,f.ifiQW. wmsww W B Q . I AN mwg, , fm -1' - NH-ilk!!! 15""0?"fY'hf'Uv5LL3'JL"cVQ.,,,Q ' PQ,o.AA-SJ,,v-f-l9kxMAJvLxWJQA44LY4L4,k!x6Ad wwwwumw. +4 WM, W 0, Xixlift A9 U'i"'Nm -ATSJIA' F ' 'a- . SMH-f3"MXij .F,,AS,.IQI+fv-G" +9-113: .. B T - Q,9gx5L-.0-f-WJ-'-f""41' v49+ MWMQWJW 5330 42 A fb' ,W - Wwml M WM time X , - , 5q4xn,v.-Jw- '93-f F xx u-mn' 'ijuA,DwI1 Mak MQ N Jwgwui 'TSTX-'Y . WfQ-AW'lQgkX wwuqn M So-+-L4QU'MQDV"'ofXALLxx 1, s.,...3., wnxjll O., 'J Jaw, Vwsw pf LMKRIMSUJSTMM Ml Wx f' "f3:...f-f..XQ,.i,--'--Q",--' .. , A. :l,V1VZA, , F ,A.. 1. is fi: '. f f f: C 51 ., r Q-N4 I VIN-iii Ikl 'li wh to i-il!-lui. Y ll1u'lYn l i, xk K. Ny, . 111 1 QUCQ X lx ' ' e'afl1?E'g,ir0Le XRSKX, il'1hi'chliClll'k.ross and lm ll Sit ' ang , b Nom ' aww .wan LCC ' St-uIXdlng ' Club Founded in 1904 by Nlajor John L. Griliith, the Y club of Yanlcton college has been one of the most active organizations on the campus during its 39 years of existence. This year the club probably' has the fewest num- ber of members on record. Before the war the enrollment was nearly up to par. NVith the initiation held recently the ranks of the club rose to II mem- bers. Seven neophytes braved the initiation rumors this year and entered the sacred portals of the club. 2 To further the interest in the annual athletic contests between the Yankton college Greyhounds and the Dakota Wesle5'an Tigers, students of the two organizations conceived the idea of playing for trophies. With this point in mind, they made wooden figures of a slab of bacon and a cut of ham. The bacon was designated as the football prize, being at stake when the two teams met on the gridiron on Armistice day. The bacon was made by a group of Look Hall men in IQ3I, while the ham was made by a group of students. At present Yankton has the bacon and Wesleyfan has the ham. The ham is at stake each time the two teams battle on the hardwood courts. Q Q X 1 E l 1 1 5 5 , 5 1, ' . 2:2551 ' ' , - ' f 1, 14-,4 I' , ,145 '. ' ' .P f ' wx:-1'1.-u,, 11. ...L . V ' ' ff 'ff , ..A, .. ,. . ::2j-5:f:g1g.:gg11QE'g:g...zz '-''lf:3f"-Eif:2:Q-Q..,i:i12.E:s:E.::-:.gi.g.:1-3 ' ,f " 'a2i'2.w1,5' ' . 4 ' . - .,2.:5.-zgzra-ng:-YW. ps- -. . iff? - " 4 . .w " - , - 1 'V " ' , '.. .ff1. :1::-- -ff A ,. ,- " Q - - 'A . ,W ,. 3' 1' Y-ggzgzf.-1. ,zqyga-9-W..zz-A. . 1.34-1 ..,1 .- A 2 ' HI' CH" " ,.....-.,.,.M--www--1742. - 1 ...me-2' "5-:A K ., -..zz -, -s we!! fo . -Q 2- , -- if ,' 9' Q,,., , ' ' m 'rf ' Z,1"',fy1i" :A g Y , IVV ' F f "" 'r A Coach Mano VV. Stukey M.- l '11 W4 Q s . Q . N 45 39 34. 'a Q3 1. S S Q , ' Sag, ' . EFOIII row I E ufchfie1d,'B5fr50 fight: Delm 5. -X avid ar NCI Gig-n0:l,1'.?g2f Frazioer Eglngilged GUIifO1'fi02'naIa4EI5ldDOnleyv Harold S n Homday, NorII?E1nD5 Wayne Brown Kgrvinkb Chulerf Ervin Hueth B ross, Han- , brig H., er, ob Y Bockhorst ldenbrand, V. and Vlfalter Zeegrgfl Koenig Har Id . ' 0 SEASON'S RECORD NVQ SEPT. IQ1SOUthCI'f1 Qrlwherej . . - . -I1 24.-Buena Vista QHHGH . - 6 GCT. 2-Northern QHHQU . . - - -18 IO-AllgllSt2ll121 Q'l'hereB ..... .. 6 I6-yV6StCl'I1 Union C Hcrcj ..... . . . 117 24-VVayne QHCVQ, HomccomingU .. .. 0 NOV. I1--VVCSICQTIII Qr1illC1'C7 ......... . .. 7 Co-captain Norm Gross 'l'O'l'.-XLS oS 36 Tl I ey 6 0 6 17 O 22 7 ,....1- ot? X rs ssc. QNX!! rw 5 S X FN NX 1 X f' . sl- X. . 1 X N- , X Q X1 my-X if-XA - :QX s,T:dg,'-X-f'- I ' 5 ' A XX N r ' " if A i ' X'-X -'f-:f-X,N:f,a- - I 'A e is li N1 YN? X' N A' : 55 .fffii iz? X Q, X xx X X X XXXXXXXX 5 sw-W XXX Xt:-X - -XX--sem.-weak.-,X.sX3ss m:e:f4,--- ze..-+111-:-f--. . V ss gg ss X X A -is-5 7 is X s Ns? 3 x Xt- 5 XX1-X W1 -r . NC 1- '- fge :fl eggs-.Sr-T313.'Xf'-:5Iq.,-1,-'gnhxg'G5j':iI:1.Qf:f:gX' 2-2-,' , K Sv : 2,274"1:5I?:YE22525355IEEIE-EEE'E'f:31:7-2.5.5 sus?vXYSRxs?QSXi-sSQTX 7fvXiTifSX1-- .X XX X X a t X. X :'X'fs:-gs, XX X X XXX X X XX. X Xxx X XXXX Xt X X X X X- s X N X sg XX sX New .. XxX. . , sX-X . ... . X e sk X X 5 7 XY' Q F1"fSS95XSN9i-' XXX X F lisfisi ii 7 1 X X N 35' :SWE ,5:if1:::3:5Ei?2::e-:, z J so s so - es X s Sl fhX-NNT ' ' A ' ii":'3i .X,. X Q57 .Qu -if X XQQX S I X X ,XX 'fif-Sf' ""' X Q QQ X Q "M--15 f - Q Xxwnis :XX-XX -ESX1-Qs kQu N X sw X-fxXbXXXxXs-Q 1 N wits X 5- ms r-:XX -XXXX-XX--Xxsxgs NN X :WX-f XXX-S f Q1 X X X S X x X XX-::XXo5X.X 1 WX sssww-X.Q XXX X X X Fw' X - -' X News Nam-Xt.-X XQNX f ssxt - he X ww Xgr XXXXXXMX X .XX X X X Xi - s -X QXXN ,:XXX- X X A T ff? X Q? X X x X X- X X A Xxx ix Q XX 5 XX - X X X 5 ,X K XX I 5 Q X X we S 7 A X N X X lf? X111 gs XXfiXfs4i-sfifif-X X is r i -'N -xvx f X T ff XgXX,XX,X ,X A, QYQQFIN-X Xx - Q XXKQXX Xs- X X, X Y XXX5 3 51 1 -.x . I -WXXXXQQQ i fsllfi ' sf xk-k' 3' '-fE'l1f- 2 X- X A.- ,sm 2, Q S X an Q g r -xr 5 0 -' 3? Back . Robin ww' Student M Jerry Dove es Foreman efb Fyllin L AE Son Char! anager H Srukey. r, Srudem M ,Aljohnso S, eR0y Hu h imager jack Bacon, Ha? er, Neville Co-captain Walt Zeeb Obmson and Cold Bowyer oach Mano' Using "bring your team over and play my freshmen" as a battle-cry, Coach Mano Stukey launched the Greyhounds on their 1942 grid campaign with a none too cheery picture staring at them from over the horizon. As early as football season the war had begun to take its toll of all available manpower, and Coach Stukey was forced to start the season with only a handful of experienced material. But the 'Hounds came through the season with an impressive record. With Frazier "Spider" Blandon, Ted "Chalky" Guliford, John "Rabbit" Holliday, freshman negro stars, Walt Zeeb and the two Huethers lugging the pigskin, the 'Hounds wound up their season with four wins, two losses and one UC. High spots during the year were the contests with the Augustana Vikings and the Dakota Wesleyan Tigers. In the battle with the Vikings, the underdog Greyhounds gave the highly rated Vikings all the football that they wanted during the first half, but the weight and reserve power of the Auggies told the story. After the score read 6-6 at halftime, the Vikings came back to grab a 27-6 win. The 7-7 tie with the Dakota Wesleyan Tigers was perhaps the "sweetest" achievement during the season. Although victory would have been even "sweeter'i' the deadlock enabled Yankton to retain pos- session of the prized "Bacon." qt' ,.-., -..V .- ,..nv..,4,- ..t,v,-.... 2.. -- v -:-- " ' ' i:s , :1f,,..M.,,.- r ,,,-.fL:: -2" " '.?Ll1Ij..L :l':9':.'f::1gL- ,..uz Reading from left to right.: Coach Mano Stukey, Bud Kurvink, jack Robinson, Bob Williams, Fred Foreman, Walt Zeeb, Wardie Van Osdel, Bob Burchiield, Bill Ramlet, Ted Guliford, Harold Schuler, Mason Burchfield, Norm Gross, Student Manager Herb Fylling and pictured 'in front of the team is "Skookum," Coach Stukey's dog. SEASON'S RECORD We They , We They DEC. 3-Morningside CTherel ..... 26 44 FEB. 2-Southern Normal fThereQ H43 37 15-Buena Vista CHerel ....... 44 36 I2-Dakota VVesleyan CHerel . . .36 39 17-Western Union CHereD .... 34 3Q 13-Dakota VVesleyan Cl-lerel . .35 33 JAN. 12-Southern Normal CHereD . . .52 29 I9-Huron fl-lerel ........... 34 44 I9-Southern Normal Qrfherel . .52 37 20-Huron CHereJ ........... 30 18 22-Huron C'I:herel ..... S ..... 54 37 26-Dakota VVesleyan QTherel 48 23-Huron QFI herel .......... 31 41 27-Dakota VVesleyan CTherel . .20 38 25-Southern Normal CHereD ..39 36 - . 29 Western Union CTherel ...4O 41 ,r'f', J, .' Gross H ,. , .,.., ,. , V 322341,-y1,f -,5,g,f:g,q.g14wr, ,rqq 2, .lx 'H is .. TOTALS 6oo 607 .2 If ., ' - W E T as 3 i . . P S s K 5 fs V435 X U I . rx QR 1+ .5 f sl I Ib it WN .N 4 Robinson B. Burclilielil M. Burchficld x .-A qw-Q : Y' -.2 '31 . -fi ... - x . iii XI" . '-'QT :S gg- fr f . fi 5 F .lik ff ' 3 1 33 Q1 .Qs if X i 3- E ' A .2 ' gr if S. .. . -T255 W: , K N :V W X . F 53 ' e:Afs.1:g :5-if - . .. . sl I P i K P 5 EX is W X. X sxgfsgllhlw-1-..jH Z -r . -extw -: 2. eegsgvix -. .' rf f tisixs . ,,,, if 24 1 t W X X . xx. N .K .mfs-A -P X x 33, . 3 .X ' Qu j Yi . X 5. X. . .. X. s . Van Osdel Kllrvillk Guliford Zeeb Not available: Bob Williams and Fred Foreman Riddled by sickness and injuries most of the year, and further handicapped by the man power situation, the Yankton college Greyhounds dropped enough counters through the mesh to finish their season with eight wins and eight losses ,Walt Zeeb and Bob Burchfield held the forward positions, Jack Robinson occupied the pivot spot and Bob Williams and Norman Gross were entrenched' in the guard slots. Bud Kurvink, VVardie Van Osdel, Fred Foreman, Chalky Guliford and Mason Burchfield made up the second five, and at times showed up exceptionally well Q Plans were under foot for a while to send the team to the National tourney at Kansas City. As a means of securing the necessary funds for the proposed trip, the team engaged the Navy Flier's quintet in an exhibition game and emerged the victors. However, the team did not go to the cage classic, so the funds raised will probably be used by a team in the future 7 1 . me' ...,.,- ja., ,,., ,. -. . In . .NV C V V - , .,., ,.4. ., I .1 g N -M-,,,w,,,,,..., W--- ....-- - - , 'PTT 'WP 77477-ET'-v"" H ' ' -..'.,,,,H 1.71: .giaim-,ie .,uQ-r ' ,, 4 u 'wmv r +f-.-'pw fv ' .,,.--,t .,. W- H, ..,i.1a,,,,,,.,... 5 u ,W 3:1-if" if "-i:-ivlilf ' Atl' "6'r':ZL:':'.f:v? , V. - .- V' ' 'ia . f Milli .2 , Z 1 f if , i , -M.: . 2- '-1142-2-ws-' '- . 1' ' ' Q, MM- Wx- -' 1'-fs:v'.WQ!2? 745"fx 0'?'f1G.1 , . ' - ' wg. .e ' ff AQ If H ,.A, 9 P' ' 5i,c1:7,"':f"'7f"f- 'f'3:5'f,3ZJ ilgllf' 9f'j,,5,Cz ,q,4z4,,.4,. .VM 4 , , ,W mf 4311 f , 1 fff,'rfQ4'1f V, ,f f L . f, ' 'tk , . ., '1ffvf0' "i,.,.,,L,g,,, fig.-.4if-iffQ:5'Ef-213:1,:,2-it F131--jzlf' "h' ' age , ' V , f 1 'M' Q' - Q'f"ff55'fCf:-57217"f3ZA'fZ-" 27'!'ff':5':f3' I 1 ' , "ur . ,5i.,"f' 4'7f""f."'i1'f.1'f?7i'3I77" ' F 'f ' -' SH -, 59792 7 V' " ' 'V::E',f"' ,2' , I " .- fl "" I as I f WW. f,, , ,In g f . ,gt , f Q! g , -'lf tf 'A' ff:f" ' i 1:3 ,f fe-5' fy .2 , s if f . ,,', Q , , f ': '-v' ' :pw sf I V - ' ,fe '-,f.:f,a u '-'- fl ,I , ' , 45 VM. E. ,I 1, Q-..i.:5:1,,,, H V, f ,3:,f:.' , ' ' f VVVV lr I 'ff - up ' 'Q L'-i I ' - if 529' I K ' ' ' 3 ' Vw, '.z-f1,2'vz, - 1 ' 'K ' K ,J "-' "H, ff:-7",', 9 '5'f'f'f"' ' H ' f i ' , - I ? ' f ,f , ,- ' I i'??'1fEv:-41.94-ieiw sffaweififzzsm 'xii ,l f 'FV :f2i'v:iff' 'Yi dz. ' - .. 0 46V 'M Wwe .m,,n... -st r I wiki, JK-4 l .NV 1. THE WINNER! ! 3. HALF MILE KING 2. DIG IN, WALT 4. SAILING, SAILING Yankton college's perennial conference track champi0I1S did not get a chance to defend their title last season as the conference meet was cancelled after Augustana dropped out of the loop to join the North Central league. The invita- tional meet was also abandoned, but Ralph Cobb, 'Hound half mile king, and Virgil Grace, distance standout, were both given opportunities to hand up new conference and invita- tional records in their respective events. This year an even worse fate befell Yankton's cinder aspects. lVIost of the returning material was snatched aW.HY when the Enlisted Reserve Corps were 'called into SCYVICC lVIarch 4. This stroke caused the abandoning of the tr21Ck program at Yankton this year. S 40 ti is-'df-"?42FP"7!i,'if.A.1'5l 1 ,.n7tx,Cl.,,, , ,J "wwf" I- ,s....x ,A .,.., A W f ' ff, N s xx fg 4-54--is Gordon Rfgef ffchalkyv Guiifofd Yanktcn sent three gladiators to the arena at the Sioux City Golden Gloves tourney and one of them-Ted "Chalky" Guliford-returned a champion. The team was com- posed of Gordon Roget, welterweight and team organizer, Guliford, 160 pound class, and Harold Bowyer, heavyweight. Roget lost a decision in the first round of the tourney. Bowyer drew a bye and advanced to the semi-finals where he lost on a technical knockout. Guliford drew a first round bye to move into the seco-nd round, where he piled up two victories. After his first win, "Chalky" came back two hours later to beat out the quickest victory in the history of the tourney, flattening Rex Kratz of Whiting, la., in 165 secondsof the first round. Advancing to the semi-finals he gained a decision and . Went on to the finalshwhere he copped the crown. Pl X a s t Q. 4. I il 'I l lu tl li 'Q 'I .l 1 'l ,l . i 'v i 4 i ii ni li ,L fl? ii, 'ul i ii ,. rl lm if Vi fs l 'ii it la li l 1 P. ,. . 'P 'V rl ,ii ,1 -. :Il .41 il ll l I if S L 1 . i r l 'i il ,J li l ii in v. I. if Ll yi, f. 'i .. ii ll . ,. ': -i I 1 i 4 JZ f I i HOWLING 30 - Fr011t POW: Wright, Palmer, Flynn, Bryan, Young, Lueck, Unger. Second row: Reinmuth, Swanson, Dittrich, Gleason, Hamilton, Habel, tha, and Cheney. af S1609 Back row: August, Anderson, Freier, Patten, Martelle, Carlson, Treick, Leo Borin, Leighton Borin, CaSe5l' X Q0 Cbeerkadeitjty utmamra - a BO-0 in Peters, Kulpaca, Cobb. Th Hfrlip Smile th I 'br as 2 .V 5? C' . 'Pr . F1-ef at wo CS1dent.,,eI' the 11.1-or One of the activity goals to which every Yanktonite aspires is to be elected to Howling 30, the college pep club. Elections to this organization, which has a member- ship of fifteen girls and fifteen boys, are held each spring, members being elected by the student body from a list of nominees drawn up within the society itself. This year under the guidance of Prexy Herb Freier Howling 30 presented enter- tainment during the halves of several basketball games. VVhenever it was possible this yellow-sweatered gang sat in a body at football and basketball games and served as backbone of the cheering. As cheerleaders, Martha Wright, Bob August, and "Casey" Anderson propelled the cheering so that it would be the most effective psychologically both for the team and for spectators. The cheerleaders are nominated and elected by the student body in the spring elections and hold their positions throughout the following school year. title, '-if Ss K X S , GARDEN TERRACE CLUB MEMEERs-Darrow, Patten, Gib- A Class in rnake-up son bchnxeder, Heuer, Sieg, Neilsen, de Laubenfels, August, Von- dracek Burns, Larsen, Gerhard, Vllalpole, Nelson, Swanson, Cullom Fisher. Membership to the Garden Terrace Club, honor- ary dramatics organization, can only be gained through hours of hard work on production, by being in plays, and by being able to recite Hamlet's speech to players. Coffee and doughnuts feature their meetings, alongiwith interpretations and skits put on by the members. Formals and parties after plays are mixed in with work on any dramatic production. Director Richard de Laubenfels, through classes in acting, production, direction, and drama, creates actors, make-up men, costume designers, stage crews and actors for the Well rounded dramatics program that is carried on through the year. One need not, however, be a student in one of his classes to partici- pate in the all college productions. Traditionally, a Shakespearian play and Com- mencement go hand in hand at Yanlcton College. The production of "Taming of the Shrew" provided en- tertainment and true Shakespearian drama on the Garden Terrace stage in the spring of 1942. Martha Wright, the shrew, was effectively tamed by Ray Fitzgerald, aided and abetted by his faithful eman, Grumio, played by Bruce Ecker. The play was put on in true Shakespearian style, according to stage, direction, costumes, and productionf The 1943 Commencement play was "Trojan Women." The Taming of the Shrew f 152 f 2 HMS Pinafore The Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, HH. M. S. Pinaforel' was the 1941 initial per- formance of the dramatics department and conservatory combined. Beautiful lighting and scenery created a superb background for the sailor lads and beruffled lassies, along with the solo Work of Donald Glattly, Pauline Dory, Jack Stewart and Walt Dobler. Humor and good fun pervaded the Whole production, ably helped along by Buttercup, played by Betty Mae Palmer. The partrayal of "Abe Lincoln in lllinois," by Robert Sherwood, brought this great American life close to the audience that attended this doublecasted production. The character of Lincoln was simply and powerfully portrayed by Bob Daly and VVillis Stanage. Ann Rutledge, played by Lenore Walpole, and Nlary Todd Lincoln, character- ized by Mary Ellen Burns and Betty Cutts, made clear the influence and effect these two Women had upon this American. Supported by backwoodsmen, politicians and homely friends, this production will long be remembered by all who saw it. Abe Lincoln in Illinois 4 sin' I1 'fri The Contrast 5 B S K .,V , , xr rf 1- -----W ,-. .v H V Vqvxf ,I ,V,,,. ., ,,,. ,.'...1...5.l3:A':,. Squaring The Circle The early American stage was renewed again in the production of "The Contrast" complete with curtain bows and colonial grammar. The experienced cast, headed by Mr. de Lauben- fels, director, taking the part of Dimple, depicted the shallowness of the so-called gentleman in contrast with the true American, i Col. Manly, played by Leo l Borin. In this melodrama, prov- ing that right will always triumph, the hero of the Rev- olution gained the hand of Miss Charlotte, Lenore Wal- pole, daughter of Mr. Van Rough, played by Ervin Hu- ether. Supporting characters adding to the contrast of indi- viduals, were Mary Ellen Burns, Kay Cullom, Lois Bates, Jack Gold, and Norman Carl- son. l "Love from a Stranger," the first play of the year, a murder mystery, found excellent audience response. The powerful dramatic scenes were well controlled by John Sieg and Kathleen Dempsey. Character parts were played by Jack Gold, Ellen Larsen, Martha Wright, Winfred Liepe, and Mavis Clark. The "Squaring of the Circle" by Kataev, a Russian comedy, brought many laughs from the audience as ,Roberta Nelson, Chris Hildenbrand, Bob Gibson and Marian Palmer took up living in communistic har- mony in one room. Bill Gunderson's in- terpretation of the poet, together with a fine supporting cast, made this one of the most successful plays of the year. l k l 4 I l l l l I , I 4... '1,.'1- ., ,.,., .. ..,, ,V.A.., . .,., . 1 'XQ- .... zizkfief W S' st " 51555 .sI:ffz::iE1f'5'f1 5 .5 141- . r ' .. ,, ,.., V 'afar at Hr -W tw my 4 .,..4:,.:,g14,,-- V -Q 4'-- M-Ylaiwazr: -5 735: ..., .. -si? -rf W -' -'15 ' " , va' 2, ,. ' , 1 LQ? 'iiilf-5fg2s.ff-5-'" :i i .-.- .' y 12 ,.,,,, , QQ-.- , 1 K ' 1, Wm' r fmfwf ..,. fig: 1-:5:2:2'Z'I ' . ' 'al-g':2.i,g.,1,,, W, ff-' , , ,. , -M "" --1 "" , 3 ,ggfgizgzgz V. , . W- 4:.:.,,,Z3:gg5315355, ,.,. ,. A .:.,,'.4,,-5 X , K I., . ., f 5 rf- - , . , ,,, TOWER OF 'CONN f 5 ' gl 34 I A x fm r A4 4'-. L GIRLS' GLEE CLUB Back row: Ruth Mueller, Barbara Kiel- bauch, Florence Kidwell, Marjorie Moles- worth, Elizabeth Evans, Mildred Sutera, Neva Hinman, Viola Mogck. Middle row: Loris Reinmuth, Betty Williamson, Melba Jucht, Margaret Potts, Juanita Stewart, Lillian Haines, Theodora Potts, Dorothy Odemark. Front row: Pauline Dory, Betty Jury, Delphine Allen, Mildred Johnson, Janice Junker. MEN'S GLEE CLUB l Back row: Wallace Patten, Walter Dobler, Jack Stewart, LeRoy Huether, John Keach, Rolland johnson, Neil Peters, Director Glattly. Middle row: Odin Rose, Bruce Ecker, Hugo Flaig, Bob Gibson, i Erwin Huether, Keith Griffiths, Paul Hammond. Front row: Burnell Flint, Ray Fitzgerald, Lyman Bates, Kenneth Lewis, Fred Schneider, Edwin Gomke. Under the direction of Dr. Lee N. Dailey, the Conservatory of Rlusic is one of Yankton's most prized possessions. Here one may take ind-ividual lessons in voice, piano, organ, and band and orchestra instruments under the able tutorage of Dr. Dailey, Rliss Ruth Pinnell, Miss Mary Ellen Proudlit, and Miss Dorothea Nissen. Because of inability to secure transportation facilities, the regular glee club tours had to be cancelled. But during the 1941-42 school year the clubs rehearsed faithfully. and both the girls, under the direction of the late Wiiiif1'ed Hohf, and the boys, under the direction of Burtis Preston and Donald Glattly, presented spring concerts in Forbes Hall. This year, instead of the regular glee clubs, a mixed chorus was organized and directed by Miss Ruth Pinnell. Their contribution to the Christmas Yesper Service was a worthy one. C Y - s I P aulle . .' 5. l i E -ss 1' .-'A 1 4 . '. ,i, v-v4""" h air between fresh ii of .. kes 21 breiith "cis ta big A unique addition to the "Con" was made last year when the Annie C. Tennent Memorial Center was established. Here in the "blue room," music lovers can relax and thrill to the strains of truly great music. A sigh of pleasure escaped Yankton students when during Thursday chapels senior recitalist Betty Lou Fishbeck ap- peared to play one of her brilliant piano solos. GershWin's "Rhapsody in Blue," played in duet form by Betty Lou and Mary Louise Milliken, will be particularly remembered. Pauline Dory, senior voice recitalist, has done outstanding Work as one of the soprano soloists of the conservatory. Her clear voice will linger in memory for a long time to come. 'V' - .- -..f.f:.,.,.- ., ., ,...a,-,..,'. .,.,51-f-, ,..,f.,-..-7 , ., V The Blue Room P ianfst Bett y Lou Fishbeck Coloratura Pauline Dory p 5 -.-' 3'-'ATI-r.'.t'.rq':'.t :.-,- gb:...:a.:::J air.: . 1322 Ja- Y ,,, x:,f,Ai, :rn 1:5 J01, Cady fo, n gets 1. 3 L35 shot J y Q? L ' t ihe rushe? to mee The SM T aeadlme THE STAFF Loris Reinmuth . . . .................. ............ E ditor Robert August ...... Business Manager - - , ...... S r Editor Editor and Business Manager Wayne Livingston .... Por 5 John Erickson ...... - - - Photographer Janice Fieseler --'-"' ' Art Dorothy Metz, Ellen Larsen, Ruth Ann Gerhard, Herbert Fyl- ling, Lee Alling, Dorothy jean Burkhead, june. Lagendyk With Loris Reinmuth at the wheel the Greyhound bus tore uncertainly along, as the handful of workers, with no back seat driving, did more than admire the scenery. t The heat of the Greyhound room Cfourth floor of Xvardl during warm Weather andthe iciness when it was chilly outdoors, plus the scarcity of equipment with which to work proved some detriment to Loris and her gang. Long days and long nights Cabout deadline timel at work were etched on the memories of the staff. Since this will probably be the last animal for the duration, it should be more I valuable than preceding ones, even though its quality is inferior to others. . SV C bu ' Xi ul l . 'y Yilulux . . K 0 X x 2 X, , . 0 xX . Killah GW .vm f urwn W? i K xxen- X 83225 I X neg! X ts S xg X sxsqxw - , Y gg X. , XX X XXX as XXXQ X- X33 X -x. -Q .QS XXX, X uv' ' 1 X I 15 s Student Staff Although it wobbled precariously during the second semester, the Student, in the deft hands of the editor, Lee lough. Alling, struggled and strained and managed to keep on bring- Editor Lee. irlg newsy notices, corny columns, and prolific profundities to the avid guys and gals of Yankton College. Changing hands a few times, the business managership was worried about by Norman Gross, Burton Evers, and again Norm Gross. These fellows, assisted at various times by Robert Hogan, Norm Coleman, and Jerry Campbell, did their best to keep the Student on its feet. The freshman issue, published by that class in the spring, gave evidence that the lowly frosh had as much originality and sparkle as the older Writers. Special contributors were Ellen Larsen, Martha Wright, Jerry Campbell, Lynne Stout, John Erickson, Dorothy Metz, David Besselievre, and Mary Bryan, copy was prepared by Mavis Clark and Mary Bryan, proof-reading was done by Jerry Campbell. Reporters Were: drama, Harlyn Fisher, art, Janice Fieselerg library, Dorothy Metz, education, Dorothea Rose, deans, offices, Louise Elbeg debate, Lois Shefteg theology, Erwin Mlndt, societies, Lavon Lueck Lenore Walpole, dormitories, Mary Bryan, John Erickson YWCA Mary Lou Gerlinger , seniors, Loris Reinmuth , juniors, I Vnne Stout, sophomores, Shirley Bosland freshmen, Mary Agnes Elford personnel and presidents offices, Jean Burkhead personals and exchanges, Annie Pates, assemblies, Ruth Ann Gerhard, and sports, Wayne Livingston . ' s l I I I , . 7 3 1. ' 4 . , 1 u . 7 , y . . . . - , . . . . ,32 2 ... t ,ff,t,-.Q , ma-u.. t1f,..,f,,,,,,, ,,.,.,......-,. V ' Former Business Manager John Scheer and present manager Gross get together during johnnies fur Round about noon on Friday 1 Above -- Back row: Dr. Lang, Leo Borin, Jack Gold Neville Robinson, Harri Janssen. Front row: Winfred Liepe, Mary Ellen Burns, Bob August, Bob Gibson. ,, .ti J fi Above left-Robinson, August, Liepe, Janssen Left-Gold, Mary Lou Gerlinger, Burns, Lois Shefte, Borin. Dr. Lang's forensics squads made excellent records during both the 1941-42 and 1942-43 seasons. Most important forensics accomplishment in IQ4l-42 was Bob Daly's winning first place in the National Old Line Uratorical contest. This year participants included Mary Lou Gerlinger, Lois Shefte, Mary Ellen Burns, Leo Borin, Jack Gold, Leighton Borin, lVinfred l,iepe, Neville Robinson, Harri Janssen, Bob Gibson, and Bob August. 'liournantents were attended at Omaha, Aber- deen, Lincoln, and Sioux City. ln addition to an exceptional debate record made by the teams, admirable individual honors were won. Leo Borin won first place in the lnter- state Gratorical contest making him eligible to enter national competition, and Jack Gold won first place in peace oratory in the sante contest. His oration will be sent tO the national contest to be in written competition with winners from other states. n .Related to a certain extent to liorensics is the lnternational Relations club. Keep- lng informed on current world problems is the aim of the members of this organization. In order to further this aim, group discussions and lectures bv authorities on such prob- lems are sponsored. ' Dr. Lang acted as advisor of the club glml Hob ,'hlI'1llSl as president. Other officer? Were: vice-president, Walter Grossman, and secretary'-trt-asurer, Mary l.ou Gerlinger. 1ST SEMESTER YXVCA CABINET-Back row: Hamilton, Dittrich, Pates, Haines. Middle row: Larsen, Miss Swain, Young, President, Unger. Front row: Swanson, Gerlinger, Clark, Palmer. Not in picture, Helen McKelvey. The outstanding work done by the YWCA and the YRICA this year was the carrying out of Religious Emphasis week, February 17-19. Two outstanding religious leaders, Dr. Ralph Hyslop and Dr. Paul Reynolds, led the chapel meetings and in- formal group discussions for the three days. Another project of these groups was the drive for money for the World Student Service Fund. On the lighter side, the YWCA was kept busy sponsoring the weekly blue Monday teas, and such special teas as the tea for Miss Pioneer and the Mother's Day tea. Their Christmas pageant in the Kingsbury Hall parlors was very effective. YMCA CABINET-Standing: N. Robinson, Mindt, F. Foreman, H. Schneider, Whitesides. Sitting-August, Cobb, Leo Borin, Zeeb, Hildebrand, President, Owens, Dover. i' TOP-ZND SEMESTER YWCA CABINET -Back row: Potts, Gerlinger, Donaldson, Campbell, Rose, McKelvey, Unger. Front row: Hill, Miss Swain, Palmer, President, Young. CENTER-Blue Monday about 4:30 in Kingsbury. BOTTOM-Christmas pageant. 51 Basketball beauties With Uncle Sam's plea for healthier, stronger men and women, Yankton College organized its physical fitness program under the leadership of Coach Stukey and Nlrs. Herington. All the athletic equipment was put in use by the physical Fitness enthusiasts. Basketball during winter months proved a popular pastime for the girls, while during fair weather archery enticed many to try their skill with a bow and arrow. Rlodern dance classes were taught to ex- press moods and emotions through the dance. Mrs. Edith l-lerington directs this activity as well as all the others for women. fi' M 1 Lillian S bull S eye form Modern dancers create mood Ns LIN: SIGMA MU MEMBERS-Mrs. Heiington june Lagendyk Grace Scheer, Helen McKelvey. Sigma lVIu, honor society for girl athletes, was organized at'YC in 1928. Girls having earned IOOO points by taking part in various sports are eligible for membership and are accorded the privilege of wearing the "YC" insignia. The Women's Athletic Associa- tion is a national organization whose purpose is to promote good sportsmanship and to develop physi- cal fitness. One hundred points makes one eligible for membership in this group. Work in modern dance is culminated in the production of the May Fete, which is given in Garden Terrace Theatre just before commencement by the women s athletics department. Cupid Venus and Psyche in scenes from 1942s May Fete MINISTERIAL CLUB AND FACULTY-Back row: Albert Hoersch, Reinhold Opp, Walter Schmidt, Henry Schneider, Fred Schneider, Herbert Zimmerman Erwin Mindt. Third rowf Elmer Schmidt, Kenneth Biel. Milton Laib, Harold Ruff, Wil: bert Hiller, Hugo Flaig, Oswald Elbe, Reuben Koehler. Second row: Roland Gunsch, Dr. Clay Palmer, Prof. George Eisenach Dr. Edward Sayler, Dean, Dr: Wolfgang Liepe, Elmer Jeske. Ernest Sprenger, George Schiss- ler. Front row: Herman Hem- PSI' Hans POPPC, Benjamin Rieger, Edwin Huber, Arthur Krebs, Ervin Schatz. Chief of the organizations for theological students is the Ministerial club. This group consists of prospective ministers of the German Congregational Church and meets twice a month to discuss professional problems. A vocal quartette chosen from members of this group sings a number of times dur- ing the year ror Tuesday chapels and visits nearby churches. D Officers are: President, Henry Schneider, Vice-president, Hugo Flaig, Secretary- treasurer, Reinhold Opp. One of the most interesting events of the year is the annual Christmas play pre- sented by the German club. In addition to the play, the club sponsors a Christmas party and a picnic in the spring. All students who have completed a course in German are eligible to join this or- ganization. There were about 25 members in the club this year. Officers were: President, Fred Schneider, Vice-president, Hugo Flaig, Secretary, Grace Scheer, Treasurer, Oswald Elbe. GERMAN CLUB-Back row: Kenneth Biel, Winfred Liepe, Ervin Schatz, George Schissler, Wilbert Hiller, Hugo Flaig, Oswald Elbe, Milton Laib. Mid- dle row: Roland Gunsch, Prof, Eisenach, Grace Scheer, Reuben Koehler, Loretta Meier, Dr. Liepe, Margaret Potts, Dr. Say- ler, Henry Schneider. Front row: Edwin Huber, Arthur Krebs, Harold Ruff, Elmer Jeske, Her- bert Zimmerman, Harri Janssen, Fred Schneider, Reinhold Opp. V '. 4 . , , WV 'Mew A- , f ' U ' ' V, K -4.-. 4 ,A , Q 7 '...1, "'n.. ,- " , ffm ' T E XXI Xi Qlullngc to E111 1 lgzuxkhxxx, ?5uxvH1'jDnkoizv. x L + + Nm K 3 BMX Wm ML' ' N, b,AfsNJ ' X ' W ' m!XQ,,L,JX35Lb-,5p65sA!owN,,xs MUWAWVWEN WJWWV CV . xp-9-X9-f k MWEJKQW WM Mi HQ:wkM7, .y Q if XA E W? 5155 Www WS YWNTX Elk' 3 '1 V Q- QNX ' vv-JK OJ" NL 'Afro HAWK mit MU Msfkwximgf W wwwwwgxk-fm X JM UQ 'Vi WMS VM Q NVQ, SH ,L . . - 351,-JJ,-f. H---M49-Lnggg - - ' ' ,Q-...,-in-' Lil Olson demonstrates the first step 56 Desk Girl Lucille 4, , ,: ,L 1 0 1. V r X x Life J . , Y , I . . mf-..+..,k-f---1' and ste? Erfxmbe, 2 cl, umm Ji huh 2 Like ham and eggs are Kingsbury Hall and certain characteristic scenes: Pajama-clad girls creeping down the hall to join a party of midnight snackers. Sleepy-eyed lasses dashing to a 7 :45 class. The eleven o'clock rush to Assistant Dean Barbara Gleason for light cuts to be used for late studying. Wash days and rooms strung with non-mentionables. Five buzzes and a conference with Miss Swain over some misdemeanor. Inspection day and Qpen House with their accom- panying eves of furniture-filled halls. Closed parlors Monday' and Thursday evenings with the freedom found only in a group of a single sex. And do they like it? just ask them! looks easy for these gals all Qx N ' tcm l A Fotblllden In Look Hall the scenes have a masculine slant: Pajama-clad boys boldly tearing down the hall to a well advertised bull session. Grouchv fellows up at 7210 making it to breakfast at 7:14143 just as Leo is about to close the door. Lights on in scattered rooms until the wee small hours. Saturdays and fellows oil to work at Pennev's, Gur- ney's, the airport, or other various and sundry places. A gentle reminder from Rlrs. Reither that there is just a little too much noise. Open House and a general cleaning consisting of, among other things, the taking down of the too risque posters. Bowling, pool, and ping-pong at certain hours when the recreation center rules say that gals are not allowed. Likewise, just ask them how they like it! JV , 9 am W h rare moment of study an ai They , .. -V , ae......., lam 'I .J HA, 'f "K A '0 f, k af wal? ,' , , P I 2 I ,' . A 4, ,Q ' ' in ' 1 a "" f "4 ' 'ahh ,V Zip 'mu A , ef ' 7 , 1, f' , E , . -4 Ffosh Pray for victor .Y Yankton College's way of saying, "Hi, Frosh! We like you-let's get acquainted!" is wrapped up in a package labelled initiation. This package has a number of articles in it, including the belt line, green caps and buttoning, Kangaroo court, and praying for victory. Although their knee joints may get creaky from button- ing, their eyes get tired from searching wildly in the latest joke books for something to bring a hearty laugh rather than a dry, "Do you think that's funny ?" from an upper- classman at their table in the dining hall, or towards the last of the initiation period they have some difficulty in sitting down comfortably, the freshmen take their initiation hardship in a spirit of fun. In fact, there is real enjoyment for the sophomore, junior, or senior in looking back upon the antics of his own freshman initiation. '1'oP To liO'l"l'UM Gunderson displays his champion beard. 'l'he trzulitionzil belt line. Tinker' shows his l't'lll'IlUlIS to the belt line. 'N' shmain girls take their braids and green caps 1 K . . iv with ll grin. a 1' X gf Q X ,4,,,,,- ' .. ,i Jet' 'Q ,: ia., " ,A .. U-'.4 - '- f 1,1 ,. f A P r , x ,. -f "xi ' 14. A I P 1 l 'Q ' N . -min . .x kxc Lux . wit l Solid scnmllllll heh Fun for participants and fun for the audience is Yankton's all-college production, Collegiana, where students may imitate faculty, and faculty turn around and imitate students and all get a hig laugh from it. Suave Jim Humeston master-of-ceremonied 1942's Collegiana and go-getter Bart Martelle steered Col- legiana, 1945. This all-star night when hands swing, songs sing, speeches speak, and original drama turns into melodrama. the night when YC really lets down her hair, is a product of hull and Cflt sessions plus hard work, with the ultimate goal a gala night. MC Jim puts in a sober word or two g l l Stud O 7 ln llollgie ents anilous Y r T. .11-.. N ,...,1..........,. .- ......-.l'l'I.'Tl'5i',:'T" a 3 1 l I a i l : 1 , 4 3 4 l l 1 1 . 1 ,l rl H l 1 ll l l 5 I l 1 l 1 l l Q l 1 Z E : . , I 1 1 1 1 1 li ri W N .R ., ft .a V ' 1, he wif ' . V jf -ij.-,V.-A V V az, - . V, Q VV. 1:3-.1. ee. ,W V - I- ix: - 3 .V 2-.iii,::Q22:f4a'ii?'-f?+'?'V-f Tk Vf ' x-1. .- Mx.-,.9,.2f.1. .1-vV,..rVs . Q .,, . , . V r V"k ' VV qln. . VV. V .VZ .V ,A,, .V ,.,., .-'127-9a:,'.E-V' .,. .2.::"5s.sS1's.:,.VsQ,f'f2'v- 1, " ,- 'V ' '23 1. -Ve--,.',15,, v, F1 -.QIQN-ef ka, 'W '- :V V. ,ff V. . " i .I ' .V V f . . - , ,..,- 3-,3,,.,.- . Vg, V. V VV '-gms-ia: , " K ' . is-ff" V .::3:s V':. ...af 'i,gQ324'fi,s ',1'gV1.,v ,. -VVVg. .., .. ,V ' 2 V V.. .V ,...:1a?f'.,2a'sww:'.v ' as--.f'. 'fr .ff -aw V.'V1-1::,..V,:f.'1:-.-we :z -- ' fi-. 'V P ' ,:V . V me V+' ..-f:-:v1V1.sa.:.-i.r.i"fr1:V-11 'L" . i' , . ,VV ,4,v V . V V., .,,.,.. viz -- N 3' - ' W.-, A V ' 4' Z V 1 ' H f-:wb-:-----V 9 ., . ,,V:-.,,.,V.-.V:mia-V.,. . 1 evfillf' ' 2::. N1-2.1 -ff, 4. , ' V .12 ' v .E-2-ff ' , f Vs V QV V,.,..v:. fi ' ' sts-.+:-fur -.:-- 45314-'1' 2-1. sf-: V ' :-aa ..::.VV,,.,.:V,. ,L Vp V V 1, , yi ga . V ' 121 Qc-VH . ' 3' .ar "f 2 . . f . , is V K , ,. sr. as V . - V- f . - . ' 'S . ' " n V , '..,.,.1:.z-:X "1 V ' ' 1, M-3:-2':V'V, V ' .'i'f V' . V ' .:.51 V VV ,x f. QQ 5 ap. V Ffa V . fi? - wV?LWVg , ,V-1,,4,4y - , 1 ff 1 . V25 . , 1 V 3' :I Surrounded by a colorful lndian summer, Pioneer Day of 1941 lived up to its glorious heritage. Miss Gertrude Bednar of Dupree, chosen by the student body as Queen of the day, reigned with dignity and grace. The ceremony of coronation, conducted by Leighton Borin, Pioneer Day manager, followed the style of the past few years in maintaining simplicity through- out. A background of music was effectively contributed by Bliss Bertha Ask, college organist. As the curtain closed upon the scene of Miss Pioneer and her attendants, the homecoming day of Yankton College officially opened. The gay and original parade which followed displayed industry and ingenuity on the part of the students. ln addition to these outstanding events, the Yankton Greyhounds played the traditional football game with the Augustana Vikings. Even defeat at the hands of the rival team could not dampen the festive spirit of the college, and the hnal hours at the Kron and dance chimed in to make Pioneer Day of 1941 as successful as the previous ones. xv ' L 'J V-alt, W ,,,,,,v A. .. 1111 ,'4, V, D 223 , if LL!" nffxlzil, Q, f p HSA' i 'Tn 'fi' ?f5ff?"421 0 if f i A f2',.g,,,p,fW'z,, "ff, X, f ,, K " f a is Hx .fs g .W F4 . r 4 W- -' .,.. -4 ' ,. ' . 1, if 'J . . Li 'tv QM 47 - b 7, , M Q --at 'Ar af .. 1-4 I ln true pioneer manner, the homecoming day of IQ42 es- caped some of the patterned ideas and gained a new personality. Neil Peters. as manager of the day, crowned Nliss Pioneer, .lane Young of Yankton, at the coronation service in the morning. Nliss Young accepted her throne with queenly poise, and became Girl of Pioneer Day. 'lihe ceremony varied from the former coronations particularly in the final moments: the background organ music, played by Miss Jeanette Hansen of the Conserva- tory, gradually swelled into a crescendo, bringing the audience to its feet to sing "Girl of Pioneer Day" as the curtain slowly closed, revealing at the last the tableau of the Queen alone standing in a Hood of light. The parade which marched through the streets of Yankton was colorful, and paved the way for the gaiety of the afternoon and evening. Regardless of the defeat of the Greyhounds by the Braves, the day remained a triumph for Miss Pioneer and her Yankton College kingdom. finding with an enjoyable banquet and dance, Pioneer Day of 1042 will be remembered as another in a long line of successful Yankton College events. xg ,Q Vin saga.-. V V084 It ,,..- ...nv-1 r .-4m Km ix as Q i t A 1 --U 3 cil15"'i , 1-P. mmm l 1 s i 1 V l I l l is ,. i 4 I v l 1 l 1 I l 1 a l Back row: Reinmuth, Gleason, Swanson, Clark, Burns, Schmidt, Meier, Elbe. Middle row: Pates, McKelvey, Reierson, Dory, Kuhn Lueck, Scheer, Lagendyk. Front row: VVhelpley, Potts, VVeidenbach Mrs. Herington, Sponsor, Alling, Stark, Treick, Elford, Sundstrom OFFICERS FIRST SEMESTER President .......... .....- J CHD B21Ul'iS Vice-president ..... Mary Ellen Burns Secretary-treasurer ..... .... L avon Lueck SECOND SEMESTER President ...... ....... L ee Alling Prexy Banks i Vice-president ..... .. Barbara Gleason Prexy Alling Secretary-treasurer .... .. . Florence Shillereff Having been accused of heing quite useless during the past few years, the .-Xristonian Society decided to do something to overcome this idea. So after their very important Work of making the freshmen feel at home was over, they resolved not to go to sleep for the remainder of the Year. ln addition to cooperating with the Sodales in putting on a formal, sponsoring' the annual initiation hanquet, huddy dance, and hreakfast, the society organized a hay ride and sponsored a picnic. Director this year of the Aristonians was lklrs. llerington. www :El 54-.tjfg I Wpg- " "IE - Wfvpyawl. I .5 . i '- I ' ' A f H jj 't ... , V ,, ,zg4p,y,',f ' ,egg .. ,Il t ' f I , XM, 744157 -1 ia n ff' fxf . G, 1 I X ,ffygggg 5 ffm Qvgf ... , K QQAX i.g.5'f:i K .No X Ssfili fish 3 C QM QQ -1 5 f , ff,v,'f:f9 , fgww Q 4,91 , X 1 I .X , . Q X if vALCw22bM4ef2' . ' P,f"'g"',5'.'P , 71 f . ' ' 'M ' I , f ' ' A V me . s '- A rg Prexy Walpole FIRST SEMESTER President .... Vice-president .... Secretary-treasurer ... SECOND SEMESTER ' a President ............. Vice-president ..... Secretary-treasurer . . ,k.,?q: -f . , I T T Back row: Hill, Bryan, Burkhead, Unger, Shefte. Middle row: Gar- vey, Haines, Bosland, Preheim, Kingsbury. Front row: Rose, -. Gerhard, Vvalpole, Habel, Metz. OFFICERS Orpha Rae Cheney Eleanor Hamilton .. Dorothy Habel . Lenore Walpole .. Marion Palmer .. Lillian Haines ' Prexy Cheney The Sodales include in their social program an initiation dinner, the rarebit, usually held at a Sodale's home in Yankton, the sweetheart swing, the luncheon during Com- mencement week, and in cooperation with the Aristonians, the society formal IU the spring. The girls in this society also help in the orientation of the freshmen. Sodale advisor is Miss Dunham. 1 QUEES up Erma Swanson, 1943 queen, was also Kingsbury Hall house president during her senior year. She served on the house council, on the YWCA cabinet, was a member of Howling 30, Garden Terrace club, and was active in girls' athletics. COS NW LP3 s0S X096 Reigning over the May Fete held in Garden Terrace Theatre each year is the May Queen,, who is chosen in a student election. Connie Larson Rich, 1942 queen, was active in various campus organiza- tions. She served on the YWCA cabinet, on the Kingsbury Hall house council, and was Kingsbury Hall house president during her senior year. MA y QUEEN . ERM.-1 SXVANSONY Qmillllfgn . x, W , ,f 3 W-an f'gb!XvANv,,T,- A cg , , WLVQAWWMXYN WMM mnJ.,,Jo-'fob-AF"BNYu"'U Kiwxbmwkxdxgww- QQ-l'f'L WA 'WL Xilkfwfw KM Wwgf' If fwww N-awvx tm 'K ,nf VFX' ww . Jwjnw U kliTEti3'gw,,, Qjtgkuhi MW PM 5. x,-I-J fi ii' Q F! 1 - S o-1 ALAXMAJUWW' VJ-l.Jx.JL.f sfv-f'9"'4 UQ-llvlf Wk 2 Qgfgmfksi L. . I M351 f Q X 1 2 ' ' 15 .... , ' f f' f 422 pl , Affc Q Eleanor Hamilton-Representzitive Senior VVomz1n Although Eleanor was here but two years, she qnieklx' heeznne so ritxil ll pant of Yginkto College that it was hard to helieve that she haul not spent her entire tour years of college lite here To have known her longer would he to hzive hurl even more respeet for her. 'lihe qualities npon which the Students hzlsecl their ehoiee of I'tlDl't'St'Ill'1llilYt' seniors were: seholaistie gihiliti, personal. ity, consideration for others, clepenclzlhility, sehool spirit, persongil nezitness, eoopeiqltion, sense ol humor, initiative, leadership, :incl poise. Q . 1 4 1 1 1 1 . "VUE X' ' ' -Manga' 5, . 27' - . f -... 1 .J ,- if-X ' 1 , 1 ' .. f"1: I f X ' "'vv,,.gM X X ,. f .V lv, if I I . Qs Leighton Borin-Representative Senior Man As he Went about his duties as student association president, it was impossible not to be startlingly aware of Leighton's determination, his loyalty, his intelligence, and his appealing per- sonality. lt was "Lights" to Whom students turned when they Wanted a job done well. This trust is living proof of Leighton's character. 2 IX. lf rl l11 '1 ,, .13 i 1 1 al I 1 1 ,l l ll 1 I 1 1 ii il 1 1 fl 1 1 1 ,1 1,111 1i i 11 11 11 1 1 1 11' 1l 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1,1 1 ' 15 1? l l r 11 1! 1 11 I 1 .11 11g if1 11, l I l I Z 1 l1 1 1 fl 1 'l 1 il lie l 1 1 131 li '11 lil 1 111 ill . 1, M li il ?l 7i,1 11111 l ali? !11 I 11' mi 11 1 1'l if fl il di 1 ,l 1 ,I 1 if 2 la .gill 51 f 1 M 3 i1 11 5? Q l ll 1191 111i li li V 1 11 fi 1 1 Q 1 ROBERT UNGER WILLARD ACERS FLORENCE KIDXVELL QUTSTANDING YANK IVAN BORMANN More commonly known as Snipe, he did much to enliven campus life. White-jacketed as headwaiter in the dining room, tuxedoed as mana- ger of Collegiana, or just plain college fellow, Snipe did equally as well in everything he attempted. Possessing a personality with a big plus sign beside it was Bob Unger, honor student, president of Howling 30, and president of his senior class. His exceptional leadership was rec- ognized in Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. . ,-.' s, , if f if ff f 'YV ft 1 g 14? ag 5 GERTRUDE BED NAR Miss Pioneer of 1941 and all it personifies fit "Dick" Bednar to a T. Dick's quiet influence was felt all over the campus, from student association meetings, which as vice president she occasionally directed, to YWCA meetings of which or- ganization she was president. Q : ' . gf' f f '-like ,.,. 1 , . 3.942 3.25522552":i1Es422:,aEs2,isi1: " '-WL, 41, f:g:g1gsfi1:2.yv2:1::.,:':w:2':2f1--55.4 ' 1- J sr T - ' A star athlete was Willie in football and basketball. Making the all- conference teams in both sports is a record not to be brushed over lightly. Besides that, his sports- manship made him truly one of the best liked men on the campus. JOHN SMITH As president of the student associa- tion, John used his speaking ability to fine advantage to inject in the student body the spirit that he wanted to prevail. In addition to this man-sized job, John was gradu- ated magna cum laude and took a very active part in forensics and dramatics. The strains of "Indian Love Call" and other songs she used to sinft so beautifullv in the parlors. in chapel on Thursday. in the Con- gregational Choir, and in the showf-r room will long linger in the Eiemorles of all those who heard er. 'B TON PERSONALITIES t 2 at i -we W x s , W- X. N A x N his I N .aw ii :.N".'ijX-,. -E .QIXNVZQQWST-1-1-g-1 -'vi' K "V"xI '.. -Q X1 YQ-is X NY x 0, sa X - . S wx NORMAN CARLSON His dry humor and enviable per- sonality coupled with an unusually keen mind made sandy-haired. Norm one of the best-liked fellows on the campus. Norm majored in chem and math, and was active in dra- matics. ROBERT MARTELLE More than one person has found Bart's ready sympathy on call. His understanding mind has made him outstanding in college scholastics. As senior class prexy and Col- legiana '43 manager, Bart had poise and an emceeing ability which we will long remember. , 'zwfff NEIL PETERS A personable Pioneer day of '42 manager, Pete, of the Bookstore Petes, gave us an outstanding home- coming filled with surprises. For adept management of anything, "Pete can't be beat." DALTON TREICK Tall, suave, and silent, Dalton Treick, advanced chemistry expert, made on us an impression which time will not obliterate. Girls and guys both go for "Dots," and maybe that isn't an attribute! JANE YOUNG "Sweet" really describes our Miss Pioneer of 1942. Jane, YWCA president, '42-'43, majored in b1- ology. Her sincere thoughtfulness for others and her intriguing per- sonality attracted a multitude of friends. WALTER ZEEB Whenever a touchdown or a win- ning basket from the hardcourt must be made, or whenever some- body needs help with his math, Boots is the one who is called on. Genuine friendliness is one of his outstanding characteristics. fy..,,,f. , lf, ,,4, ,WWW GL., v-'1',.,,f-f-,Zu 'fi 242 f' M ...., f wry M VVVV k ., f -.........,,-...., 'Q?ff,,.44fmu,xg5,-, , 9 2 f Q 'A ,X - l - oe 5 Sk Il o ii' I w Superman to the rescue Wheres I1 le Abner? Llghts holdlng forth Its Frae hehmd them goggles Burch, Ruth 'lnd Bill Where you mu one you saw all. You Qhould Nlllllf-lllCliy kids. vs -1 X wwf 1 Q if 4 155'-5: 4 Lizzy- 'I 1 Q 1. A touch of Connecticut Picnickers 2. One of those Pioneer day A happy day lunches just nature lovers 3. Eaglets Jim and Red Local Stickney boys make good! 5 4. Let's play house Faculty Corner at Fiske , S. Looking from Look Big Boy Blue 6. What's the attraction, girls? Whatls your trouble, Bruce? 'UCLK "'-,j'ic" ' M -0 W , ,X -s ' - Y ta Z Z , .au 1 . r .f.,.,A.-s .,,, a at .mx 5- t X , . 3. -. - X' .. JF' x if l lf ywfh-w,,M., l Looks sorta complicated, Dr. Evans just three of our Naval Cadets Belt Line-Them were the days Smokestack of YC heating plant Charles the Pious Brother Fred Here comes the Navy, or does it? Q. N 2 1 I .we-'Q"" N X N QRRXYRX xXXN XXX N xv X Xxx Xxx X-X W e 1 X , .Ns .- NVQ --f "wif, K + . NNW. X V Q sf X 4 , 1 1 1 1 1 l 1 1 1 1 1 1 ,.nqQ-,I 'Z " I as-g . 1. What, no smiles? 2. Pat joined the Heiney club too. 3. Willie and Ed 4. The famed Mustache Club 5. Those books are just for looks . Al Haar-man-about-town 6 7. View from Old Middle 8 . Nice posing, Betty 11 ll 1 ' 11 +11 l l 1 111 1 V1 1 lf 11 fl lil ' ll "1 111 1 111 1, 1, lii il 'sl 115 , ll 11, Look behind! Isn't that the Q Mailman? 1 What can we say-for or 1 about? Cameraman's joy Refreshments for Miss Pioneer and attendants -1 Hit the mark, Mary 1 Kingsbury Hall Women, 1942 Q Z ,, 1 131 ,1 73 ll 1 1 L1 111 1 1 ,' .,- 1 r0.,e,vv Q' -'V f 59:4 ' ' 'hvfhoff?.?2'1f4,,-:yi.a73':5,:,':1-'gm V 3 ,V 7 W1 W f f , ff 1. The voice of South Dakota 2. Some playmate, Lucy 3. Prexy in full dress 4. A swell fellow from St. Louis 5. High on a windy hill 6. Where are you going, Florence? 7. Looking down on the world V gr! 1.5, lg X ,X X i I ' - ,. . - ' v -,Q-I. 1 V 'M , ' -g ,.",' R ., , f xx, -'Z -. . .,.,- i Q . - V-QU Q--in v it - ., ' up ni- 1 -,, w.- H lg! tr' K Ni' - 5 . :M ,, ave? l 1. N Ah, Tom, an inspiring sight He dood it Two happy people Solid comfort YC's chain gang Johnny, Burnsie, and Kenny Aren't they cute P an iixr. ' I 1 'x v V I O ' -TN"'4'f-viii rr. . X ..? fs ax. Q. - 1. xx A . 3 ir S -trys gaQYiTfrf' Q. ' sr :nik N s 1, s. X s I -N-GY rxN..,jw Q it L ax. X 1 . .Q SV ii 1 .. ' .sassy tr X fl' -i:'MXT -Cf? k :sip isa. t x 'V a. -525 ' gif' , i- if i3"Ti" i "K' . tx X? VK if 1 ko sg Q 1 ,.: Qixai ,. J K, W .Ny -Q U F. .jigp ge-' FE.-F- --,.-.. , Y .ii in , 'fer 1, .1 E ,Q x DAL - -X ,sn , 1 ' it 1. elm- ,Af W fm 'Ne Ref Chummy little group You had a hard time explaining that one, june These YC lads are versatile Pipe the haircuts ' Need anything be said? Eliza, crossing the ice Nicely posed, girls When johnny comes sailing home .-iw-iw .s'f K ' 'iqig ,V 1... he , J, ','2 we is rf'v:'e:-f-fxfr-2 " a t f x . . Q 'E .IS l :iv I 018-ug iv 1-.... gf. Q -'XL v' ,A l 1 X . . FI, I f f wr, , ,A Q N M a ff- " '-'- 9215, "?3'i3:fli:E5?: ',,:.-2-mi' , ' 4, tri rg., "E:I.-'21:1:2 'J' .-f:'1:j.11'1-V' f V ' A mgg21QW""' ' - ig f' "'i' uf, f, 5 ,fag-" r, rf 1 ff a 7 to , '-4 .4 f 12 iv fl-' f f :vj,. f Mg 15"'4v'1 ff '. 4 , .4 my, .Ll if ff .:.:,i.I -fa,',fi.4-4--1.2 . f K' wif- ,- ,, :.2:.-i::51:?s2z A V y .- .,..-, Vv.f - ..,.',v11,,.,. ' ' ' vw., Ji,:,1.E::2?H1'c5-1-1-fc' 'A' -5-':, , ..am,,,1.::,,-Q,.',1.-fmzlfzf-':, ffez- fir - .1--1:-:,:E:2F21":3:2 ,. yi , ' r .,-c iff-f' EIFai25?2'.':I2i,2'.:f2.-fi: ' - A '-:fr 5Zu5:eisE12.122115.': 5' 4-1.--1,-:-111 1 ' , V 1 " V45F1'f-f3?c-1.+sE'2'::Q?- .V -Wi 52-1-31-55 .yy vez.-,1 . fa - 1 ' 11' mr' , . ,1 1.4. ,,,. f' , "l, 1 . Three of the freshman crop . Daly of the silver tongue 11. Isn't that the limit? 12. Why Janice-twins? 13 9 10 14 15 16 . Advertisement from . We four Dead end kids Ain't she cute? Esquire , ,. fx- ,.. f , U- ' "',- Q, -,-.,,,.. 76 Y. C.'s FAVORITE TWOSOMES , I, ., . riff .4 a ,125 I 3 A XA 'v X. M S ' . AXXXXYX S x ,UW Q 1 5 Q? "" ,.f34', H 715 J . I ,Q-,ff h5T3g,K:,:,gd5- rv , V' q :ii-,352-fright . 1 , 6 5Hg lj il u X: 1 x U Qfuukhnx, jiunih 'Qukuiu wvL 1Gi?4,gl 3"""JQ FSHJUJV Q.9JvJ"l""'L' cv-fN'9zfg.f wi ,Q , ww E K X ' -, k'l'i'6' s -, ,L . ' X . . M N - 5 W , x l u , Xyal- X ,F x, .L , , v B WW MW xv-J Vqv"Tff"s.,.f-15-4.J NLWXN 7 ' ,I .B-Gas-JS-F'iL"' iQQ,TiE3vMf'MNfiElQWQx X an QZW'g' 05, CLJN5-fx fklwgig W W u-'U-9'+ n Q-J-9-x'55"'?'L gwz gli X x N xg-"'NQVAAx 'Q M MQMQA spfXh"'T3Il-PM VMI' Q.:-v-gf" Xlfxv.--9 'fy5NL3"Xul3Cf Q.uiff,9i5.?-'Wg-f W wX'5--f, 'vi . Y. C. ARMED SERVICE MEN AND WOMEN Willard Acers David R. Akers Glen Allen Charles A. Alseth Elvin Amen Ivan Anderson Dale Austin Elton F. Bacon Thomas H. Baker Paul Barber Thomas B. Barnard Dale Allen Barrows john Barrows Calvin Bates I Delbert M. Bates Lyman F. Bate's Bernard Beck Jess L. Bennett Robert Bicknell William Bicknell Robert Bigelow Louis George Billars Frazier Blandon Harry Bockhorst Leighton Borin Ivan Bormann Byron Boschma Wm. Emil Brewer Joseph Brewer James Brown Milton Buechler Bob Burchfield Donald Burghum Fred Burgi Howard Bussey Devore Cheney Harlan Cheney Ralph Cobb Clarence Cowman Mason Gerald Daly Robert Danford B. T. Daniels David P. Darling Jack Davidson John S. Donley Jerome Dover Allison Dunham Bruce Ecker Frank Ecker Vernon Ellingson John Erickson Burton Evers Eugene Farrell Charles Foreman Fred Foreman Merlin Foerster Gerald Frain Donald Frick Rolland Fribourghouse Harold C. Gagnon Stephen Garbier Ralph E. Gosmire Virgil Grace Robert Graham Woodrow Greeno Donald Gross y Robert Gross Paul Grossheusch Paul Grow Robert Gunderson Harold Gunvordahl Ralph V. Gunvordahl Deloss Gurney Alfred Haar Franklin Hajjar A. T. Halleman Merlin Hansen Seward L. Hart Earl Hazen Ray Hebbert Jack Heires Verle Heiter Oliver Heitman Clifford Henningson Ed Heuer Robert Hogan Dural Hodge Joseph Hohenthaner Josephine Hohf Robert Howie James Hughes Malcolm Hylan Donald Ingebritson Elliot Johnson George Johnson Richard Johnson Bertel ,Tones Elmer Kambeck Edward Keehr Carleton Kenyon Lawrence Kidwell Virgil Koenig Robert Kolarich ,Iames Kotalik Robert E. Krieger George Kulpaca Robert Kurvink Milton Kussman Robert E. Kylius Allen Laird Henry Lamping Leslie Larson Robert Lewis Fred Littau Tohn Martin Paul Mattern Maynard Mikuska Tom Mf:Nutt Hugh McVay Charlotte Morgan Ruehen Mueller Robert Nash ,lohn Nadenicek Eugene Nedland Robert F. Nelson Harlan Nelson Wayne Nicholas Claude Niesen Albert J. Novak Harriet Oaks Gerald O'Conrvell Milton Partridge Wallace D. Patten Ernest Peschl Neil Peters Henry Praed Henry Potter Robert J. Quinn Wm. R. Ramlet Ivan Rasmussen Don Rasmussen Ralph Reed Lincoln Rice Gordon Rich Robert Rich Arlene Roberts Peter Rabinak John K. Robinson William ,Robinson Kenneth Rock Eugene Sackett John Scheer Ambrose P. Schenk Donald P. Schrader Harold Schuler Keith Schweigert Leon Scoblic Robert Scoblic Robert Seeley William J. Seig Robert Sheehy Verlin Sherburne Richard Sherman D. J. Sinclair Victor Sinclair Cullen Six Vincent Skalf Robert W. Slowey Merrill J. Sly Dale Sly John Smith Morgan Smith La Verne Snoxells Verne Stortvedt Oscar Stradinger Allen Sutera Percy Sutley Lawrence Swanson Win A. Swenson Byron G. Taft L. F. Thomas Ernest Thomas Wayne Thornburg W. R. Tiede ' Gerald Tupper Iohn Turner Leo F. Valder Lewis Van Osdel Keith XVarne T. K. VVarner Robert H. VVarren Eugene White Herman VVigoclsky Carl Youngworth VValter Zeeb Russell Ziegahn Oscar Stradinger '41 Jim Hughes '44 Jim Humeston '43 Bob Kolarich '42 Lyman Bates '43 John Smith '42 ""U - Ld' ' V 'EN One of Yankton's contributions to the war effort is her service in providing an eight-Weeks pre-flight and primary flight training for naval cadets. Although the pro- gram Was rather irregular throughout the year, the new airport makes possible its furtherance on a regular schedule. Three different groups of cadets completed their courses here-included in the number were several Yankton grads and former students. Co-ordinator of the program is Dr. Gregg Evans. BACK ROW: Bangston, Instructor, Garlock, Jensen, Vashro, Rubbert, Bates FRONT ROW: Bierman, Instructor, Buechler, Sherman, Bormann, McGregor, Raymond E i l '4 'E 5 E 'l a l gy ..,. KL INK. .JEJIWNFZ ?'.C'T"!"' VE. . S --..- ,. .J?JET,S?' rT'.'.? W "T-7 -SF Fl lQ!lfQIll'l1lll ITC! gi. - ' .q'grqnnuuo- - ,quam fv' prwidilrltldtllrnusqnruirvr ' vlyiudhsrl I W. ,,,, ,,,...J ABOVE-Back row: XYoolf, Instructor, Schnohriech, Hallquist, Pearson. Middle row: Blair, Munson, Dr. Evans, Co-ordinator, Kopische, Bierman, Instructor. Front row: Mikutowski, VVilliams, Alm, Pearson. BELOVV-Back row: Sedio, Ellingson, Hill, Lerohl, Moeller, Ott, Engebretson, Monk, Grey, McCormick, Mechanic. Middle row: Carlson, Hughes, Foss, Dineen, Lovre, Cowell, Nearman, Renning. Front row: Tuttle, Instructors Gustav, XVoolf, Blondell, Chief Instructor Bierman, Instructor Meirose, Swanlund. 34wm572aff'f fffi' gf ' f , f ' I I ..--0.11-:xg .....,. T. ...- , . . ,,,..1-..- I ' I I I I I, I I I I I I I I I I E I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I K . I I 1 1 lx I I I I I 1 1 I I I I I , I I I . I I I I I I 4 I I I I I I In I I I I I I I I 1 I . I , . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Qfrnhtnn 60112532 32 akhm fauth Bakutu 3 U QM by II-I'Y-9'-I-A figs- 'R www Lv-""XE9III,, WW I-WJ' IM V QQXNJJNIX QIMI 43: My-IMG . WWII, ww ,MM 1 vi QQIJ'-JJ' Nx ' f I ,MII wg, IfI3l3 931 .,yL,.M, vmwwfxzwni. Gd' ' vo 34.4 :E "Rib sl MQNL s. 'Ak f,,'1,w.p--f .?wwA'IIA"'X SMMMRLMQQYPSBA KIQIQQQSIN WM Marww A, ,.,-- SIIQWJW ffl AUTOGRAPHS AUTOGRAPHS "UNM Nu-,,. . --.N ...D ,.,., .,,- K N , X -,Vw N I A 0 W-M M Q . ,. . V ,. .- ftfii fa h k'4,3:'::.T 474::2i : - L " -, c , V T -.- ,,,,-7Q'?9'4F1'1nnvLi1:4q dVERTI5lQg Cangli M8115 9 4 KTon's Bu miss Houses Q lll, H up 4, .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ,, ,, ,I 'gm M ml M in un an M "'I Im un Q I 15 x l ! g HOGAN 5 BROWNBILT GEO. E. JOHNSUN, MD- 1 . SHOE STURE 314 Walnut street Airstcp - Robles 'I III' Illu llil .III , I N ,,', , M 4. 4. .. .. .. .. .. .. ,, .gn Im IIII II" - IIII H H l'lI l"l lI" l I M Im In -I H l U ,T T. .. .. -- -- -- .. .. ,, Q Best XVishes COFUPIEYC Iifgiufance from i Yankm - n - PM 61, 3 Kfal-xT1Nc3 CREANIERY in llll H ,, , ,, ,, ,, 4. Q.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ,. ,, ,, .gm '.'l un nu lm mi N M ,,, ,,, ,. .. .. .. .. H -T if H " " " " " " " 'C 0 -f -f if 2 l ' BALFANYWSLUNCH Meet the B:1lf:myBoys - ' . and i Yankton lim Hamburgers .Lu .... .. .. .. . .. .g. .1 .. .. .. .. .. . Often un u s ..,-n :- E ir Congratulations tu the Clam uf 11143 X'ZU1kfUll fullvgv Hits Ir, Kult in WAR :md PH.-XCIS The STl'IJICXT BODY t .!,l nn :sofa 4 THE GLOBE ' Yun- i Phone 600 G. N. Hintgen S S 1 Wallbaunfs Drugs mart ty es Sincere Quality Clothing and Shoes Drugs - - -- Lunches , 3 for Men .lu un nu fi' f un- , ,,,, ,,,, ml ,gp In I- Ji "" I Ivll lllu uunnf ulll llll ..,. ..,, ,.,, ,,,, , , , , s . . O CCNGRATULATIQNS .IOC V1H8tlCf1 81 CO. GREYHOUND STAFF f on This War-time Q of YEARBooK E 1 . . . 5 5 Your P umbing and Heating Repairs a Norman Gross, Business Mgr. Yankton, S. D. Phone 703 Q My Ca'QjfeffilQQftlEC1fifjineSS Mgmt Q, L - '-'- --5' '5' "" s "" "" "" "" "" . "" "" 'P of Ilrl I llnl III1 lulu uvun nuuu lunn uauu uuuu u I u I ueuu nuun f I u u u of: To Make Your Home Last See Your Lumber Dealer First O Upkeep-Repairs-and Minor Alterations Are Permissible C We Are "Fix-up" Headquarters S Horticuituris-t Durand 3 I 5? ,, ,,, ,,, ,,, M, 1... nu un nu un Iw TVN" "" "" 'Q' 3 I . , YANKTON LAUNDRY - 4 i Thompson Yards, Inc. I Quality Work T u -,I gig qu uu nn un un 'nn 'nu un Mun inllll 'llll llll " "" 4' 'I'- 133. , 5 1 l.A. o ' - ,-.- -.-.-,-. ::. 4::,:, ::::-::. ..:, ' ' ,A 3 E I : 'I' ' jjjQ51j,jEq ,VWI an I I f l"" :" l" ':'4' i"' ' ':' ' I i I 3 P Q We 15:4 2' 2 1 - 4.1: "Very interesting," Dr. Savage I'III IIII IlII IIII llll IIII IIII IIII IIII IIII Illl IIII I1II COLLEGE CAFE The Best Eating Place in Yankton lIII llll Illl IIII Y IIII IIII llll Illl Il IIII IIII llll llll MII lil! llll IIII IIII IIII IIII IIII llll III! NUI ,mr H am nn an ll l THE ELITE BEAUTY SHOP E. M. MOREHOUSE MD 314 Walnut St Yankton R. E. WALPOLE, State Mgr The Ohio National Life Insurance Co Inter-City Bus Line Pure Ice Companv "The Ice House 1o1 Capitol Phone - - 2621 I . -1- -1- 'P 4- -1- "' Phone 666 Phone 666 and 24 Hour Seri ice THE W YELLOW CAB MOON THEA rt Young, P 114 East Third X 'mkton u Illl IIII IIII IIII -IIII Illl IIII IIII llll IIII llll IIII llll llll I+ +I! llll' IIII Nll IIII Ill! llll llll ll 4 ""'Ns-uwisq. - N1-w - ,,. ,.....a,.. , "' ' "- '- -- .4-B.-lun-.-., ...A . ,,,. Q , ,ng - -My - ' " ' "'-4""" "- ,,: .v4q,'-4' ,!,m ll fffvtvff-t!1sv:z24?,9h?' 55, I ,- , I I More than ever should this book be a constant reminder of the happy days spent at 5 YANKTON COLLEGE . . especially to you who interrupted your education to enter the services of our government Will A. Beach Printing Co SINCE 1888 Sioux Falls, south Dakota I I Lithographers, Printers, Book Binders, School 8: Office Outfitters 3 Producers of THE GREYHOUND I I- I I I I I M 54 un' una!! illilliIIillillllM -nm-nrfln 'ml 101 'Ill' rn 'HH-I lm HIL-Inf' M1 - I I I I I I I I I. I I I II I I II I I I I I II II III I II QI gi ,I .'I I' II III .II III II II -I II I I .1 ,FI I I IQI II I I I I II I I I I I I I II II II I II I I 'I II I II I I I I I I I I hi II III I --.N ..,, .,.rr -H aw-.. .... .r-a...,u.. ,... ..,,,-.---....--,i....r - .,,f ,, I r, 1 ,. .. I . W., F u nu nn un un nu uu nn nu-an llll nn nu W " Hearty Congratulations To The Class of 1943 X X Fantle Brothers Company Department Stores 4. .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .-.. -l-. ---- a c .-,- .-.- .-.l ---' 5 '--1 ---- -f-- -'--. H n - -1 - -1 - M ' - H -f - H I- - - -- -- -- -1- -x- ---' --'- '-'- --" "" - ' ' ' ' "" "" ' 'H "ir Q" "" " M "' W" " " 'i' 4 A Yankton They All Stop at Congratulates "The DNP" YANKToN coLLEoE ' On its contribution to the community in time of War as in time of peace. A The Chamber of Commerce The Depot Cafe of Yankton P Q, un nu sitio aiu: nu nn un lt!! + ll ll llll llll llll llll llll llll llll- SIIII llll llll llll llll llll llll llll llll' llll llll llll llll ll llll ll + GURNEY'S WNAX PHOTO - STUDIO - Gurney Yankton, Building South Dakota 24 Hour Service ll llll llll llll llll ll llll llll-lillll llll -' nu i ....... . . , i,-5, ,, 1 if - rf . ., , , . .,,.A.. ., A-. nm un nu nu nu nu un nn III-lill llll Illl nu nu lm nn nu nu nn mr un- , + "" o "" 1- WNAX EXTENDS T0 YANKToN COLLEGE THE HAND OF FELLOWSHIP lCU?0i9I NAX Broadcasting Co 570 on Your Radio Dial :P .... .... .... -..- -lll "-' - - "" "'- -'-- 1 I I - 'P +- ' in C 55 9 B 99 i 4 Yankton s est PHONE M X 5 , L 51 5',4Z,:4"'Jmj X My E ,Q F-JA 'H1?'d,,L ,',., -,,.,f. ., i ' " CLEAN Enf BUY WAR BONDS Q 1 1 E s 'P L i 91 , af.aaa , ., . . ,., .H V ...V. .- f..-,, ,.-.fWf--T--- ,ew--fd f-11 ---' '-""7'rr"i":":"""""" vsx,-fb A - ,,,,, I, ,. A .-,, ,, . .,, ., V.,-,H - - -.- i- ' -- -- ---"' - YA TO COLLEC Founded 1881 Accredited by The North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools Regents of the University of the State of New York The American Association of University Women THE YANKTON IDEAL "If a college did nothing else in this Western land than, by its sharp contrast with eager haste for wealth and power, to show by its quiet, patient, long continued following of something that did not immediately pay, that life had another and possibly a wiser interpretation, this result alone would justify all that is done to build it up. nfs it a small thing to turn a man or woman aside from mere gain to the building up of character? Is it nothing to train up citizens that can fnd no temptation in wealth to make them neglect duty? Is it wasted time to ft men to do things thoroughly, just for the sake of doing them, even though they may never be paid ever so remotely for it? "What can be nobler than to found an institution that, by the simple force of its daily life, shall go out among the young and call each one to a higher life than he could have found without it!" -From tlze inaugural address of Dr. Joseph Plfvard, founder and first president of Yanlzton College. THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY THE SUMMER SCHOOL JOSEPH LYLE MQCORISON, JR. President 5' 4 ? I ,.,.,,.1,..V-L, Hgh. L. Mika. 1.5.5 -f 1 . We Cater to You Students and Your Friends Buy Bonds and ., ,r1r. MGRE BONDS aa J K 0 N.. i THE PRESTO CAFE House of Cutts ' Z Chinese, Italian and American Dishes can nn -- I, ,ig -IP 'Z' U EIC TUDIO 306 West 3rd Phone 584 YANKTON, S. D. We'11 Satisfy You Specialists in Photographs Appointments Framing Sundays and Copym? , F inishin Evenings Kodak g ,ree 69- I l 3 Essentials to Success . . . 1. Education 2. Application to Duties 3. Thrift and Saving A college education prepares you for life's battles,'but your banker helps you to conserve the fruits of your 1ife's labors Consult Your Banker , THE AMERICAN STATE BANK FIRST DAKOTA NATIONAL BANK Members of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ul, un un nu un un nu ., ,W nn lm nu nn nu nn nn nu nn nn nu nn nu nn u n nn nn un nu nn nn nu nn n nn nn nu un nn 'I' 4' 'I' - : The I0 Ellen shop Robert R. Cihaki Fashion Center for The Equitable Life Assurance WOIHCH and MiSSCS Society of the United States Your Inspection Welcome Res. Ph. 2823 A Bus. Ph. 826 ' Yankton, S. Dak. Yankton, South Dakota Ill "" "" ' ni' 'im' "" " "" "" ff' PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS They Also Made This Book Possible un 'IN we lygcgx ff if S0CleU' Of Upper Douglas Street Quartet Martelle, Peters, Jacobson, Gross 4.-ul an as ,,,, ,, 'b I We wish to express our thanks and appreciation to the following who have aided wholeheartedly in making this war-time annual possible: The VVill A. Beach Printing Company The College Administration Dean M. A. Stewart a The Yankton College Student Body Q And especially to those dozens Who are 5 obliged to do those seemingly insignifi- E cant tasks which make a Work of this na- E ture possible. Q The GRI-3YHoUND Staff l I We thank you -4, .rv I I 1316 wg... ,- - U.. 1' 1. , 1 1 1 1 1 11 a . ' 1.f.3wgi.: Q13 , ft '1 1 J ' . I ,ix v I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 .,,,.1, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I . .1 1 11 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 'I 1 1 4 1 1 1 ai 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 '1 1 1, . 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 21 1 I1 R . 1 11 1 11 1 1 1 .1 '1 I1 1 1 4 g . J. 1 i 1 1 .1 ' ..... " '- :P-lik. .: .. -xx . W , ,,,- Q ., -1--A-1 1 , , i- A . . I 1' 4' I1i.5,1f1fETEi1?-.15T", "f 1 'K W ' , 1 , . 5 1 , , , ! Q l lf r ii ' I A i Q t E234 , A - P . . 7, wi' 55 11, g ' 1 X.-' 1v,..1,,. mm. , A , -..W ., , 4 . b - . ... X ,, . . L, V xv. . . k,,. , . A '-I -- 1 - s Quan.. - Jf4'v. .V V , . M , A , ,. , - '..,- ,,g ts 4 v A 1 Tm. - l 1 uh k 1 V W I , , -3 fsiff. .gy ,:.5gj.f.f!,.Lf1H,,g!f,. Swan!! - W , - ,, Y ,Mi Y . .4 ,- V, I r ' ' I 7- ,...g ,, ,f I ' 'f '- ,, . ol' ,-. gh. V K , . f 1 n , r K , V 1 1 1 1 i 3 f, X , I. ' 1 . 1 I , , 14 If I H, ' -.,, ,, ,X A MA , 4- Am ., , A A A.,....a. " ' X' " ,Y .L-'Y-f "' . ..-..,-...-.: N. -1 ws.-:.' .-'-'zgfw-qu-'-'rr': sf- - ' 4 ., ,,,...-. , .,,,.w WV . 7- -. - - f. V-I--4 .-:-1.1: - - -. . f 5 , , .s1,-11-fE'::'R-7 1-- .1 : - ' b ":' - . wfl' -H Q. ' 'f"Af:'-2572 me 'H .'.- --.Amr .. -, A -'ff -'-2 - fx: .' ' A , - -. .,, "'-'gg V 13, . 34, , . , . V, fy I-0+-N-, V Y v --A-Y--A'-H -- - f -f fv-- Y, V -'V--'-W F' " - - ' ' -


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Yankton College - Okihe Yearbook (Yankton, SD) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

1919

Yankton College - Okihe Yearbook (Yankton, SD) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

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Yankton College - Okihe Yearbook (Yankton, SD) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

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Yankton College - Okihe Yearbook (Yankton, SD) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

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Yankton College - Okihe Yearbook (Yankton, SD) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

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