Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN)

 - Class of 1933

Page 1 of 176

 

Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1933 Edition, Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1933 Edition, Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1933 Edition, Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1933 Edition, Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1933 Edition, Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1933 Edition, Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1933 Edition, Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1933 Edition, Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1933 Edition, Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1933 Edition, Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1933 Edition, Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1933 Edition, Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 176 of the 1933 volume:

,L 4'gf'f5:z"I'f ' 5 ?"r ' fl 3 I , v .' . I" 1 's '-ffl 1. ,r Q ' 4 s 5 V, -.A ' .Z f 1 J ' . . w , ,- .'g .-. .Phu X . . . 3 . 1' Q 'X . ' .- - I. ,Jo . r ov' .tuxv 4" , . . in I-Ik. , ug. r, A l I 1 A ,L 4'gf'f5:z"I'f ' 5 ?"r ' fl 3 I , v .' . I" 1 's '-ffl 1. ,r Q ' 4 s 5 V, -.A ' .Z f 1 J ' . . w , ,- .'g .-. .Phu X . . . 3 . 1' Q 'X . ' .- - I. ,Jo . r ov' .tuxv 4" , . . in I-Ik. , ug. r, A l I 1 A 1 1 11 2114 ' 1111? 1 11 E' 5 1111 1 X 11 111112 1,1 11112 111112 1' 4 351: 1119 321115 , 11 51f 91111614 511181 1121 51111111 e1 . 11112 23111111 11112 11g 1112111 1111 1? 2162111 2 E 11111111 1 1151111111 ,111 11 1111111211 211111111 11.1 3111111?' 21111111 411111 1111111115 11372 :11111 11111111 111144 711111, 11 11111f 111164 2115111 211112 211111112 11515111 111111 21111114 21 11111 111112 21 Q1 111115 311315 -1111 11111, my 111 11111 my I 11 fig? 2111! 11? 111111 21111112 4111111 ,, 1 6 51111111 31741 11111119 isyu 11116 21912 112 5141? 5115114 QJ11111? 1111111 i1111111E 44151: 111151 211 1 216192 31 1 41111112 511115 A111 1121 41111 f111511f M13 4111411 21111f 51 111 M11 11 11 511,111 1 ,v 12 5111215 1111112 4412 'f 111212 1, 11111112 11 41111: s 11 51115 9111: '11 11 ,,1 1 7111! my 51 2 1111! 5111: .111 2511215 117 1111111 44111111 :' f 14151-1 711111, 1' 111111 211111 2 , 117 1111112 1111111 ff 111111511 11116 11211213 21111119 .1111 2311412 M1113 1112 2511111115 ' 2111111112 2i11?11 21111115 611121 ' I e , 5 11 51 211111 111 E1 gg 51115 1111119 315 5111111 111115 44111 1111511 111g 1 .1114 51111111 9111111 1 ' 11 11111111 2311115 , 1111, 5135115 C 116,15 1 21111615 111111 1 1 1' 5 -2 51111 1 11111 1 111-1,1 ,1 1111 .1111 Q11 1 1 , 1 1? l 21111: 6116? 111 - 112 31111111 --, :11111 , , v i 1 1 l 1 I ' 2 1 - f , 1 ,:11, 21 1' 5 1 I "1 211615 21?1' 5,111 , 11 un -111 4 2155 ' ' . 511111 1' 1 311111, 1 0 1'1111f 'I . . W 1 I A I - 1 I 1 11 1 ' COPYRIGHT 1933 C. KENDALL COLE IR., Editor and ROBERT H. RHODEHAMEL, Business Manager ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ S W Cl Cl 1933 Published by The junior Class of Wabash College Crawfordsville, Indiana FOREWORD The Editors of the 1931 Wabash turned their thoughts to the outward and forward looking as- pects of the college. The Editors of the 1932 Wa- bash glanced backward and reviewed the first one hundred years of the college. We, the Editors ot the 1933 Wabash, stop and look around us in somewhat the manner of today. We have tried to use a modern theme without going so far as the modernistic. We have made some necessary changes in the composition of the yearbook and in doing so hope that we have not broken too far away from the conventional scholastic deportment. W 7Z Z, i' ,f 1 252 .W , 1 Z 'ZZ ,W Z Z Z , Z4 , , 4 1 if 745 Z, 0, ,, 1 W - Z L 72 ,ZZ , Z, ZZ? ,EZ :yr X! Z Z Z - f Z Z Z Z J 4 Z X , W Z , A Z If Z , , Z 7 , if Z' 1 ff Z ,N Z., 1 ,A Z Z ZZ yr fZ4 ,,, ZZ Z Z Z Z I Z Z Z 1 Z Z Z Z Z Z fl 7 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ x M Z5 Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z ZZ sZ is VZ Z lil Z ,yy ZZZ 2,fsZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ,, ZZ ZZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z 9 5 Z ZZ Z Z as ibl " ll' ZZQZ il'Z1:Z 2 ZQSZ a ZZ MZ A111 9:1 'Z E1 il Z DEDICATION To the Senior Class of 1933, from whom we have usurped the editorial appointments because of change in policy of the Publications Board, this book is dedicated with apologies, due respect, and best wishes. THE PLAN The Divisional System of Concentration went into ef- fect with the freshman class of l928--the graduating class of l932. The chief features of the Plan are the generaliza- tion of courses during the freshman and sophomore years, the concentration in one of the four divisions-Science, For- eign Language, Social Science, English-rather than in one particular subject, and the comprehensive examination at the end of the senior year. These features and others of the Plan are given detailed treatment in a speech delivered by President Hopkins at Columbia University and reprinted on page eight by special permission of President Hopkins and the Columbia University Press. We may be criticized for our somewhat scattered pre- sentation of the Plan, but we believe that its sequence in the book follows almost the same course as does the Plan itself in relation to the four years of College. The student first encounters the Plan at the beginning of his college course: he again comes in contact with it shortly after the half-way point, and it is very much in evidence at the close of the college career. X N 'px sc :NR .MV 5: cy. 155 -A , X1 sNNmSX N, A ,. f -N--5. s X QQ X -- ' 'tic 2. N V A-S-:X 1: "WN XI W , 1. , . s. .. X ggi WN. ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ' ZZ ZZ ZZ M M M M M M M M M ZZ ZZ ZZ ff ZZ M M ZZ M M ZZ M ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ M M M ZZ M ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ M ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ M ZZ M ZZ ZZ M ZZ ZZ M M ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z A contents caiiege atiwietics activities organizations centenniai THE WABASH COLLEGE PLAN PRESIDENT LOUIS B. HOPKINS Sometimes people who visit us are disappointed not so much because of our shortcomings as because of their own misunderstanding. Some have been disappointed because Wabash College is located in Crawfordsville in- stead of Wabash, Indiana. Others regret that the College is situated on Sugar Creek, and not "on the banks of the Wabash". The location of the College has to do with the whole educational program, however. Craw- fordsville was first settled in l822. Wabash College was founded in l832. Thus, for one hundred years, or for almost the entire life of the community, Crawfordsville has been a college town. Crawfordsville has a population of l0,000. The College is located on the edge of this interesting and dis- tinctive town in a heavily timbered tract of land. It is the only privately endowed, nonsectarian, liberal arts college for men in our section of the country. We have an enrollment of 4OO students, a Faculty of 32 members, an endowment of S2,200,000, a library of 71 ,OOO volumes, and no stadium. We offer no graduate courses and grant only the one degree of Bachelor of Arts. With this background you can perhaps visualize the College asl speak of its plans and program and the point of view out of which these have developed. An undergraduate at Wabash, in a letter to a high-school senior, wrote: "l shall speak in terms of the benefits the individual derives from the Col- lege, for after all it is what we ourselves get out of the College that in- terests us and influences our decisions." This undergraduate has written in a sentence the gauge by which we measure our whole educational plan- "the benefits the individual will derive from the College". We strive to offer the opportunity for the highest possible development of the individual, and everything we do is evaluated in terms of its effect on the individual. We claim no monopoly of the idea. We have no undue pride of auth- orship. We borrow ideas freely from other institutions. If any institution has worked out a course or adopted a device that we believe will improve our technique, we adopt it. We have been so liberal in accepting other peopIe's ideas that I cannot possibly give credit where credit is due. Nev- ertheless. the combination of other foIk's ideas with a few of our own has given us a plan which is in perfect harmony with the past history of Wabash College, and with the opportunity that lies ahead of us as a non-coeduca- tional college of liberal arts located in the heart of the Central West. This brings me to the first essential in our educational plan. We are agreed that we shall attempt only one type of education, that is, an under- graduate course in liberal arts. We believe this type of education con- tributes directly to clear thinking as well as to sound knowledge, and that both are important in individual development. lf we are going to do all we can to provide opportunity for the highest possible development of each student, we must keep our enrollment down to a number with which it is possible for us to work on a personal basis. I do not mean a situation in which some one or two teachers and an adviser know the student, but rather a group in which it is possible and reasonable for all of us actually to know each other. l am not unmindful of many things we must sacrifice if we adhere to this principle of so restricted an enrollment. From the financial standpoint alone, it restricts income unless general endowment can be increased to re- lieve the pressure for more funds. However, in my opinion the answer to this problem lies not in increasing our enrollment in order to get more money, but in doing so good a job of education that friends with money will desire to help us in our work. lC0ntinued on page 86l i l. W 'NX SiS l College I" kv .r i is , o.' vw'- I I Ivan F5 '-J F I Q r I' , I I i 'A 1 , :Ili L I L 'H 4 ,. N 9 -9 K! 'I I.. Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ifiis Z si ,Z ZZ ZZ ZZZ . ,Mig :WZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Wi' fifiiif M is :E Administration X P R E S I D E N T O F B 0 A R D HON. 1AMEs PUTNAM coonmcn, A.M., LL.D. President, Board of Trustees: Wabash Col lege, A.M.g Wabash College. LL.D.g Univer sity of Notre Dame, LLD. Governor of Indi ana, 1917-19213 Indiana Bar Association, Phi Kappa Psi. sl my 2 Z M ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ fZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ fZZ ZZZ P R E S l D E N T LOUIS BERTRAM HOPKINS, Litt.D., LL.D President, lSabin Foundationl: Dartmouth College, AM., Hanover College, Litt.D.1 De- Pauw University, LL.D.: Marietta College, LL.D. Delta Kappa Epsilon. GEORGE VALENTINE KENDALL, A.M. Ever since his undergraduate years at Brown, Dean Kendall has occupied himself with the Drama and the Elizabethans of English Literature. l-le is the driving force behind the Scarlet Masque. can ex- press himselt in terms never before used, and has a Phi Beta Kappa key which he never wears. I, 1 "4 ,f EV , 227 1 fi V 4 53 ff' LZ? A fy fa- N N NNm NX XX x 35 y ssgk BQSHNQHE tt . 4 fi vegas S Q as X. we 'gui ' if x Ns W - X 4, . hh x -. 1 -.r nfc s,-Nw--u r. as gs: Q,-5-,h .4 , ix- X - 3 x . XX ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ R E G l S T R A R FREDERICK CARL DOMROESE, A.M Professor Domroese is an admitted lover of the German language per se: he will recite Die Lorelei at mere mention of the name. l-le plays a violin, paints remarkably well, collects stamps for their color effects, and has a Phi Beta Kappa key which he wears only to meetings of that erudite group. ff ' ., I fw "fl:-inf! Seated: Chase Harding, Louis B. Hopkins, Russell T. Byers, Charles N. Williams, Mat- thias L. Haines, Albert B. Anderson, Evans Woolen, Eben H. Wolcott, Clair McTurnan, james P. Goodrich. Standing: Isaac C. Elston, jr., Edward E. Ames, George B. Luckett, joseph j. Daniels, Oscar P. Welborn, Harold Taylor. OFFICERS IAMES P. GOODRICH, LL.D, ............,... President CHASE HARDING, A.lV1. ....-..... -. ..-. Vice-President OSCAR P, WELBORN, AM, ,,........ - .,..-. Secretary IAMES GILKEY WEDDING, Sc.B. ............ Treasurer FERGUSON REDDIE ORMES, AM. .......... Comptroller BOARD OF TRUSTEES cf ff? 12 ge? YZ 4 fl Z Z if ff Z 1 Z K "" x x " x .. N X xx X wxsQsssssXQs S s N' st N 1 2213, jf ,ki 12 , ,ff gf mm k Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ? I ZZ ZZ sZ3' Z ,Z Z! Z Z3 f Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 531313 5 Z333 32 2 3Z3i ZZ313Z Z Z Z3 33,3Z :Z :133 13 Z E3 MZ 5331231 233 3,23 23133Z' Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 4 Z gg Z ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZZ ZZZ 233333Z 2331? WM! Z13'3ZZ Z33ZZ ,313 lr' 11333 33Z Z333sZ 931235 Z33313: 5323231 Z .313 1 3,4 1 13,3 iv A 3, W E 13: 33ZZ 1 33,Z3 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ,Z Z -X Z X Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z f Z 'Z I ZZZ 4 ,Z A263351 Z my ZZ 3313? :Af 1 Z MZ' 2131 3233? y QZZ 233 333fZ 91332 3333? Z,'313'33:g SENIOR COUNCIL OFFICERS PAUL E. ANDERSON ...................... President ROBERT L. SQUIRE ................... Vice-President W. LESLIE BURROUCI-IS -.- ................. Secretary C. LISLE BEAMER ........................ Treasurer Burroughs, Anderson, Davis, Beamer, LaFoIle'rte, O'DeIl Squire, Kostanzer, Nelson, Wrona, Powers, Keenan, Bales Y. BURDETTE HALL, President FRED B, COFFMAN, Vice-President ROBERT C. HARMAN, Secretary-Treasurer SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z x Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z ji! Zi Ziff ZZ ZQZZ W N Division 1 MATICS ATHE : M : PHYSICS : BOTANY iSTRY CHEM GY LO ZOO i LLOYD BRELSFORD HOWELL, Php. Professor of Chemistry: Wabash, A.B.Q University of illinois, A.M., PhD. Lambda Chi Alpha, Sigma Xi, Phi Lambda Omega. American Chemical Association. 722 My 47 4 fi ,112 ,ag 7 7 V '4 Af , if ' f , 24 X 1 Z Z 1 Z 5 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z Z 14 Z: Q2 Zi Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z XZ 111161 aff ZZZ ZZZ :ZZ Z WZ 1, Z Z121 Z ZZ Z Z ,ZZ ,W was ZZWUEZ 261615 11551 1112 f Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z f Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 7, ,Z ,Z A Z111Z Iwi! WZ ZW ZZ-'Z uh! MZ 1 We ZZ 131 111ZZ 21i1Z1Z MZ 114113Z '11 111111 Z111211Z My Z ZZ ' Z11Z 91116 ,W 216 216 :1Z 111155 2211362 ZZZ 21 12 Zi 1111112 :1 1x1 1, 1121.-"111 51112119 112111 1 iiiwif :1111Z .,1 ,V 1,1111 971 1' ?111111Z 251.511 321122Z Nxwmm, il' Z Z :sewer mx w ,Sak ZZZ E. G. STANLEY BAKER Instructor in Zoology: DePauw University, A.B.g University ofCl'1icagog Indiana Academy of Scienceg American Association for Ad- vancement of Science. ALBERT REIFF BECHTEL Rose Professor of Botany: University of Pennsylvania, AB.: Cornell University, PHD. Botanical Society of America, Indiana Acad- emy of Science. GEORGE ERN EST CARSCALLEN Associate Professor of Mathematics: Wa- bash, A.B.g University of Illinois, A.lVl. Math- ematical Association of America-President, Indiana Section. OC' GEORGE WILLIAM HORTON Peck-Williams Professor of Physics: Illi- nois Wesleyan, B.S.g University of Wisconsin, lVl.S.p Northwestern University. Tau Kappa Epsilon, Sigma Xi, American Physical Society, American Association of Physics Professors. RALPH B. HOWARD Instructor in Physics: Wabash, AB., Uni- versity of Illinois. Tau Kappa Epsilon, Phi Beta Kappa. WILLIS HUGH IOHNSON Associate Professor of Zoology: Wabash, AB.: University of Chicago, lvl.S., Ph.D. Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Kap- pa Alpha, Sigma Xi, Indiana Academy of Sci- ence, American Association for the Advance- ment of Science. 5? A 41 ,Z zu 3 nfl di.: fer. ' 1 Q . ,C 4 If 41, .V 1 ff ZZZ ZZ7 Z Z1Z1 ZZ. f:1 ZZ Z ZZ Z1Z 71 Z, Z1 ZZ Z as Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 2 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZEZ ZZZ Z1ZZ ZEHYZ Z1111Z ZZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ as Z1 ZZ1 ZZZ ZZZZ Z151ZZf ZZZZZ 7164 1-,ZZ IM' Z111Z ZZZZ 1 Z ZVZ Z Z, Z, 1 ZZ , EEZ i161 Z1 Z , f 3151213 311111Z .11 111114 112111114 1111111 '11? Z ,. Z 611 1 ZZZ1 Z 111 11 Z Z 211 ? 11125 11,3 11111 iw 11111 1114111 1111115 Z11111Z1 Z11111' Z ZZ WZ Zffs Z 162 'ZH WZ: 513117114 911111 1112 -111 11, 211115 Z 111 11: 1911111 1155117 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z1ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ' Z ZZ sZl1Z sZ1?Z Z:11ZZ ,114 Z 111111Z s111ZZ MZ, Z11Z1Z Z1Z1Z M6112 11751 g11ZZ f'Z1Z ZZZ ZZ :11 111 1111 Z 21ZZ ZZZZ ZZZZ ZZZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ Zi1Z1Z Z, Z, Z11Z1Z: am ZZZZ, :Z W 11 1Z1' 41 :ZZ f 111l1Z 2111112611 1111111Z11 12111122 2111119 2111 11Z Z1 Z Z1 1, Z111ZZ Z1111Z 21 12116 21121113 2111257 11121211 :1-Z W 21 '111Z 1, 12 GZ 1 my 1! Zl11ll1Z '11191l1? 11.1,Z M15 :JZFQZ 1, ,V Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z Z ZZ WZ nf!! iZ11Z ZZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZZ ZZ ZZZ' Zff W1 111111 Z1111Z1Z Z, 5111 Z A1llZ Z Z11 Z Z1,1,Z ZZ ZZZ ZZZZ Z IOSEPH CRAWFORD POLLEY Thornton Professor of Mathematics: Yale, AB., A.lVl.g Cornell University, Ph.D. Lamb- da Chi Alpha, Sigma Xi. FREDERICK C. M. SMITHSON Associate Professor of Chemistry: Illinois Wesleyan, AB., lVl.S.g University of Chicago, Ph.D. Phi Lambda Epsilon, Sigma Xi, Amer- ican Chemical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science. LOYAL S. SUTER Instructor in Botany: Wabash, AB. I IOHN P. Auc TKE INDIANAPOLIS French Club, l, 2, German Club, 2, 3, 4, Alpha Pi, 2, 3, 4, Football, l, 2, 3, 4, "W" Men's Club. I LLOYD M. AULT AXA SPENCER Sphinx Club, Baseball, l, 2, Football Manager, 4, Alpha Pi, German Club, l, 2, "W" Men's Club. l GEORGE M. BALDWIN KE CONNEAUT. OHIO Sphinx Club, Baseball, 2, 3, Alpha Pi, 3, 4, Cer- man Club, Zoology Assistant, 3, 4, Bachelor, 2, News Bureau, 2. ii i. lm - :ii fx: Z i lil i ,iii , M if S .mix il 5 me lla: 2 :Wi itll l 1-if: :Z all izlll 52111311 111115 will 155535 We i :lui :Es ll: in . ri. , ii z 3:14 if ZW: tiller 7245: WE will iz, ii lim' 1 gg 1, We 1 ,i , i,,- 1. Ei, gfflfi 3235215 ,423 Mgt: Wil 2395? flllgl lafilsif Wil liligilll fir, W? 2,122 igiagf fi 56,5 1335 Wil W fi 41191: '42 ? fy, ri xi 44' W2 my ming NMS EW, Wiz H502 lyiil fiat 222' V7 :ZZ W4 -if me M sgsigii W M 22222 We W" dgg 515112 A l S 1' ,6 4 V M14 2222 ld glial? :gm ,wr 1:43115 we We iillilill .fy will .N 1-,-:sir :Mai Magix xg if mil 1, sf si :iz if ffl wi s fe: si , f Z7 .Maxi . V levi 2 2531652 53552 53543 iw QW 1' if H14 13212 N99 iff 1111411 'W If! 1 new 412: I 615313 im: :Ai-is iw aw 50212: Miz Milf Wi? 3226 1692 W iilgii 12355 any sim? Wiz 152 zllgiylgi 26:53 iw is, 5101! 1-,fgw ,jg MA!! fliqhll if 49 ' ' 9 wx iifllil l' Zig 255232 jiiiil-4 33:19 2222 1 iii! 2755 gi ll? Mig llf illllif i 51: 1-my 41 13: ilgilf 35112323 .9 125553: 'V WWF all: , llllai .M M, Hill? me figs? my egg: H1 'E Willa lilies 2132? new wil.: QM! Iglfiaa lil? !-lily: .144 95345 QM 5322? 5355? 73355 i,,f1' its Eff? E lg 536 rgf' sy ii FV ala lf, ,, Vlidf ll ll W1 .3 1- iyizi agar ,ia 7 giigigigsi liliisl 2 il 1'l2"i1,: Egg' 1 We is 75532 his 4, ,,f,, bfi' lift: We sages: We Will iw ey, S elif? Zllii 22252. iii ii l 4 l ifilllill ll lgilj il, Wig la N ,,,, mug' li fl i 2 ll is Sllfsirl l We W 1323342 fl ll il 1 lx il l l Zim W my nw mari We alilgf MW wif ZW 227 'W 4 6 Mlm 5522 Nail agile :pw il:lW 6625 1 if ggi! ,, f F245 Sli ll :wi emi M912 5222? wlisf ziifisigl giaizsiil mm: 9536955 1353224 Mgfllgf 3 was gif-25 digit? ,if :Vid ai? isis gi 1: z iii 2334 iii 1 ,gig ZW 2? W :ai fl 51623 153112222 5 ,4 f, J ,al -1' ral aaiiiai 1: 1:7 fa if fi l l :Zi 32 ,gi ii, ff-it 114 3536 5? 17 W 2: mf Mig as stay 2 5557 gi- W W aff W EV' W is if 1: We em may News 2 ll: ir iiiiiiilil 93533532 sgfvigg il 'fill' 5 ig 2 2 l 1 l , , I CALVIN T. BEAVER AXA GLENWOOD Alpha Pig Botany Assistant, 43 Vice-Pres. Plan-Hel- lenic Council, Vice-Pres. Freshman Class, Band, l, 2, French Club, 2. l LOUIS H. BREADING AXA WARSAW Sphinx Club, Secretary, Blue Key, Secretaryg Cheer- leader, 2, 3, 4, Baseball, lg Bachelor, lg German Club, 2, Alpha Pi, President, Scarlet Masque. l RALPH A. CANINE OMEGA cRAwFoRDsvlu.E Band, l, 2, 3, 45 Orchestra, lg Alpha Pi, 3, 4, Bot- any Assistant, 4. I TED CARMACK fb.IH ROCKVILLE Sphinx Club, French Club, l, 2, 3, German Club, 3, 4, Alpha Pi, 2, 3, 4, Zoology Assistant, 3, 4, Woods Hole Scholarship, l933. l WILLIAM F. CASSEL ic: DAYTON Sphinx Club, President, Pan-Hellenic Council, Sec- retary, Sophomore Class, Yearbook, l, News Bureau, l, 2, Bachelor, l, Caveman, 3, Alpha Pi, 3, -lg French Club, 2. l WILLIAM W. DAVIS OMEGA PARKERSBURG. w. vA. Omega President, French Club, 3, 4, German Club, 2, 3, 4, Alpha Pi, 3, 4, Senior Council. 44' ff 1 Z 1 f 7 1 4 ,gi .- 4,3 , . 4 ,,., ,, sg. ' I 4, ff 2? . 54 WL , 147, 4 , ,f 1576 f X 4' 4, ' , ,Z 7 , 1 V112 ZZ? ,f IP 4 X 1 7 4 Z Q1 fi if if ff? i 1 1 13 133 1 1 1 13 13: 23 3 X 3 1 1' i 1 111.13 1 1 1 131 5 313 . 11313 31 1 3 5333 3 31311111 3 3 5'3lf33 3331.3 2111 113 313331 333353"33 3 333, 4 1 3 13 13,11 33311313 3333311 3113313 23333 111311113 23113113 '11'1,1 519333315 3.1 313 6331 1111133 Wifi? IJ331333313 3331333 E33"3333i 2333333 E3 13: 139123 13 313 137113 1.1311 134111 51113113 136133 x13..31 1133331 31333131 43213733 5311133 2319133 51333 3 11364 '1133 13,1111 1 55533 2155 34411 1331313 Q13 21311 ff: ,1w1: W: 7,1111 13353 4333: 3'1'91' X943 -111,3 43131 113333 111111314 AM 33333383 536113 333139 13:4 413531331 'Ulf 113132 ,417 :341 31314133 531331313 1333 3335 23111313 133910 2311133133 131134 ,11111' 53933 334.111 331111 11311 ff: i1l31f :WZ 14313113 133413 32393 232323 33931 11196 51121111 1137 33333 2337 :W 1331! .MQ 13337 1533? 1131331 WJ 31114 4 113 3 11, 33313: 21333 Z11113 1133335 21313132 Wig 3333936 1111114 53433 : My 3,113 11111311 513535333 2333333 3121163 11311335 21133133 11 1333: ' 5" 23131133 333 11131311 5157 2623333 if 313 391143313 13 '35 I '3 21111113 1133112 -111131: 111333, 31333133 233333 :WV 7 3313 1131 X 15 1331? W1 my We 131 HW 284 33314 3133313 3131333 5314 1113133 3173 11131 li 213113 ,Ze 33233? 553125 3314 3113313 1131? 533333 2 1115 23212 1 36 63513 1333133 31331332 213313335 3133313133 133313: ,191114 '314 W' 33115 133 333335 ' 12 '33733 2 231613 3 31311133 13331131 23313334 :33313f 11113111 2113333 53131333 3131313 :QM 111113 113131 Mfg 15111 .1343 M33 :114 QQ3311' 2 363 mg 1 3 3 33532 331,133 M3136 :11331'1! fl3333': 33333335 4313313 3 333331 i3333l35 fggg 2 311 13 7 f 1 3,131 13 3 '36 933395 111131 43391335 131333 2313333 113333132 25332 51131343 313316 H3352 2313132 33? 3 233311313 1 1331 21531331 21333 2111 1 3323 1 11113 313331153 3 z13131,r 1 31333 3 11 1131111 1,1131 113133 111113 533315 3 113 533313 1 2 333 21 3 325,35 E 3 1333 33 3 333,11 3 16 232113 3 ' 1 2 1 3131 1 :H1y1i1 1114333 1 11i 333, X5 33l 113131331 333313333 1,3 1113 133331'311 1131111 ,13111 3333333333 2 3 33, 13 ' 3 I if , 21313 1 4133313113 11.1 391313 K QW' 3 3 33 :4131113133 133111331 2333 1313 M1133 2321133 2623133 71115135 11311: 14533135 19331111 2533313 M4353-3: 31213343316 1131313333 E313 s33y3114 5111117 2431, 2331111315 5933136 EW! 341616 H3194 233132 3,331g131 56613 33323333 31333333 73313312 33233133 11g11g133f am? V111 523323333 1931331 im? 4,13 :iw 7353323 Z113133 43321313 1113133 4131143 239133131133 121111911 3331311 WW 34335 43635 2333252 1631233 113333335331 3233333335 2433333 113131513 711113633 We M31 131131131 535353333 533322313 3535333 911W M1 M413 4432 ?333315 231313 2:1334 4311.11 11353311 113m 431421 A1332 :3a133g: 23313156 f13333f 3331357 331331312 11131131 63311113 :'5331113y '331"'1 1,1 9 i1 3 13 3313 31131133 11111315 3311313133 31133133313' 113113312 "WW 3314152 23333316 M1211 411-W H3343 , 133333 2,3233 333333 MZ? 231312 133133332 333133133 31 3111333 23193133313 1111211 311111443 331111123 211311113 1333333 31313123 31 53533333 231 1 113111 36113113 1391131 E'f533l lll333ll F931 1 M31 3 13331 ,1 . 151115 N WAYN E HAF N ER om ECA PORTLAND Band, l, 2, 3, 4, Spanish Club, l, 2, Alpha Pi, Cer- man Club, 3, 4. . URDETTE HALL KE CRAWFORDSVILLE Sphinx Club, Presfd:nt, Senior Class, Intramural Ath- letic Director, 4, Physical Educ. Assistant, 3, Basket- ball, I, 2, 3, 4, "W" lVlen's Club, Cross Country, 3, 4. ORA A. HARVEY OMEGA cRAwFoRnsvii.i.E German Club, 2, Alpha Pi, 3, 4, Chemistry Assist- ant, 4. l ROBERT L. HOPKINS 11: cAYucA Alpha Pi, 3, 4, French Club, l, 2, Physics Assistant, 4, Bachelor, l, News Bureau, l. l SELWYN F. HUSTED Plrrssoko Magnolia A. C1 M., l, 2, Alpha Pi, 3, 4, German Club, 3, 4. l FRANCIS 0. LAMB .vm ELKHART Band, l, 2, 3, 4, Orchestra, l, 2, 3, Alpha Pi, 3, 4, German Club, 2, 3, 4, French Club, 3, Treasurer, Pan- Hellenic Council, Secretary, Freshman Class, Chemistry Assistant, 2, 3. 'Q ' YN XNNYA 'XYYYEER' ack - QQSFN AVR cms 3 "Z 4, Z of 1 ' N Sf .-X AV ,Q 5-Yj1fQQs,x, X11 will-' -N, A 1 l ,.- .lk Z ' Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z f ,. F X, :faq if Q74 we ,f fZ' Z 'ff f Za, Z 2 Z Z Z Z Z Z 2 Z Z Z f , 5 lf Zu 5 l l ir , gi fl? Zz Z Z3 Z ii? if wwf 155 'C Zgaiif ZVZZ 1 Z , Z Z I Z ya Z4 WZ Zf Z Q Z Z, :fm Z 5 1 Z if ,ZZ ZZ mmm Z. 'E ZZ Z Z wi W4 ff' X ff 7 Z Z 4 l 41, ff Ms I ,Z ZEEEJZ ,1 ,gg H' as Z, Z fi 1, 1. 5 Zi ,. 551315335 'im Zsiii .,1,,,, 'ZM11 Z 1 ,,,11,1 My 4 ',,,,,1 7:4 ,W ,,:,1i if fzlil' M 4A-- ,---- l WAYNE F. LIVENGOOD OMEGA Hii.i.sBoRo Band, l, 2, 3, 4, Orchestra, l, 2, 3, 4, Alpha Pi, 3, 4, Zoology Assistant, 3, 4, Woods Hole Scholarship, 1932. I 1. ROBERT 0'DELL OMEGA CRAWFORDSVILLE Senior Council, Alpha Pi, German Club. l ELMER C. PETERSON BK GLADSTONE, MICH. Sphinx Club, Blue Key, Baseball, l, 2, 3, 4, Football, l, 2, 3, 4, German Club, l, 2, "VV" Men's Club. 'fb I R. PERRY REYNOLDS ATA CARRETT Indiana University, l, 23 German Club, 3, 43 Alpha Pi, 3, 4. I STUART D. SMITH duly COLUMBIA CITY Blue Key: Sphinx Club, President, Alpha Pig Vice- President, Sophomore Class, Band, lg Football, l, 2, 3. 4, Basketball, l, 2, 33 Baseball, l, 2, 3, 4, lVIen's Club. l ROBERT F. VAN CLEAVE LADOGA A. C. C., DePauw, DePauw, l, 23 German Club, 3, 43 Alpha Pi, 3, 4, Physics Assistant, 4. l DONALD H. WINCERT OMEGA NEW ROSS Phi Beta Kappa, French Club, 2, 33 Alpha Pi, 3, 4. ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z 3Z ZZ Z QZZ3 Z f, 155 ' ZZ ZZ ZZ Z3Z'Z M111 M4131 131135335 23313339 11111314 ,V , ZZ 2113334 1333133134 5331323339 233333312 233313332 1:13391 f33Z3333ZZ 4141-1gZ 2 '33sZ 1 M A 1:11 i33 13 313 5,315 311 N 139 3'3W 110 ,Z 13- 3' 14 313112 32 .1113 1, 134-33'S3Z -':13ZZ I ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 2 4 QZ 2333 ,fm W' Z Z mx? Z3 3 235 Z' 1331 .11 ,Z1-,Z Z11313 Z31311 Z93313 Z3 Za 2' 31:33 4 M11 23 36 35 QZZUZ QZZ 2Zf ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZS ZZ Z Z A Z' 12 aZ13Z Q33 Z Z M2133 3Z' 3' 13 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z x 'Z Z R 23932 :Zin W 233133 s11Z1: 31 3 '13 ZZ 123m V1 Z 11, 13 3336 E3 32323 9 :Z 913 :Z 0 .4 ZZ 3 Z3 Division 2 :ITAUAN REEK : G : LA11N NISH SPA Ah! GERNA CPI FREN Q-Q55-. CLARENCE ELDREDCE LEAVENWORTH, Ph.D. Professor of Romance Languages: Hamilton College, AB.: Yale, AM.: University of Chi- cago, Pl1D.g University of Paris: Columbia Universitv. Delta Upsilon, Phi Beta Kappa. 4 ' ,N : Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z X Z. Z Zlil Z lZ f 1 1 322' MZ g5isZ Asif Z ZZ ZZ Hill! ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ X x ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Zil Z 1 Z Z lZ ii NEVA I. CHAPMAN Assistant Professor of Mathematics and German: University of Michigan, AB. FREDERICK CARL DOM ROESE Professor of German: Butler University, AB., Michigan University, A.lVl. Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa. BENIAMIN SINCLAIR ELDRIDGE Instructor in Spanish: Wabash, AB. Delta Tau Delta. Z--'mi' f sw. ANNIE CRIM LEAVENWORTH Assistant Professor of French and German: Smith College, AB.: University of Munich. HENRY CLOSE MONTGOMERY Assistant Professor of Classics: Hanover College, AB.: University of Illinois, A.lVl.: University ot Vienna. Phi Delta Theta, Phi Kappa Epsilon, Phi Eta. IAMES HARVEY OSBORNE Associate Professor of Latin and Mathe- matics, Emeritus: Wabash, A.B., A.M., L.l-l.D. Phi Kappa Psi, Phi Beta Kappa. Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z gf Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z Z ZZ Z ZZ ZZ gm ZZZ Z 2, ,, Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z :Z 'Z ZZ :Zz :Z I Z Z. ZZ Z, Z A,.,. WN Nc , Zl' :ly 'Z 4 Z ZZ ZZ argl, Z 7 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZV Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ?ZZ :WZ :MZ we Z Z. ZZ I Z Z ZZ :Zi lg I illlili Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z If Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 'Z Zu? yr Z Z QM ,Z ZZZZ u 1AMEs Y. BALES ATA CRAWFORDSVILLE Sphinx Clubg Pi Delta Epsilon, Senior Councilg Edi- tor, Caveman, 33 German Club, 3, 4, French Club, 3, 45 Senior Basketball Manager, "W" lVlen's Club. I C. LISLE BEAMER CANTON, OHIO Senior Council, Treasurerg French Club, 2, 3, 43 Ger- man Club, 3, 4. I DWIGHT S. DODSON oMEcA CRAWFORDSVILLE -ag l THOMAS L. HUDSON WAYNETOWN Alpha Pi, 2, 3g German Club, 2, 3, 4. I RAYMOND E. IARVIS CRAWFORDSVILLE Spanish Club, l, 2, 43 Bachelor, l, 23 French Club, 4. I WILLIAM I. ROBISON Hull FRANKFORT President, French Club, 43 Presudent, Spannsh Club, 4. I ROBERT I. STAFFORD OMEGA CRAWFORDSVILLE French Club, 3, 4, Botany Assustant, 3. ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ m Z Z ZZ f Z Z ff Z ZZ ZQZ Z Z aj ZZ Z 54 Z Z 'Z 5 Ei, Z f ZZ ZZZ AZ 2553 ,Z ZH ZZZZ if ,Z H44 1: f Aff' My Zig 4451 4:555Z g555Z Zag ,55:5,4 qty as ZZ Z5 5' 2555554 255555Z 25555Z QZZ z555Z5 MZ Z55Z55 55255556 Zn i5::55s5s ZZ 15555552 ,MZ 15555: v ,MZ 45555553 :555m my Z542 ZZZ ZZ W 55556552 2555552 ZZZ SZZ 25Z5Z Z5?5555g E5G55Z ZW' 15554 MW 155555 15515554 4555 155555525555 145-55 252555Z ?'55:55s: 1555552 ,Z 5,-f 5455-5: -5:-wr mv 45555, 25562 155455 455W 555mm ,.,,,., 1554.3 8535552 Z 2522 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ wx X f Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Ei ZZ ZZZ gf! if ZZ , If f WZ i555fs 255W f Z Z Z Z Z Z Division 3 RELIGION GY L0 : PSYCHO Y PH ILOSO PH OMICS N 0 EC RY HISTO A " w 7 K"l"c FCEM 'W FERGUSON REDDIE ORMES, A.M. Professor of Economics: Colorado College AB.: University of Chicago, A.M.: Yale, AB Alpha Sigma Phi, American Association of In structors in Accounting. Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ Z ZZ Z Z Zi Z ANk Z Z Z , Z 232223Z ZZZZ 'Z ZZ WZQSZ ZZ: ,Z Zyiu gf my ZZ ,Zu 9, ZZ, ,Zag ZZ3: 1, ZiZ3i.Z ZZ Zi336'23Z aug 3Z ZZ EZ Z Z ZZZ3 Z3 Z ,Ly 7i!'3'3l' 921333 flhil' Z Z 23133 3 MZ' 933:13 3: ,l313,3 ZZ3, W 3:9 23913345 . hw .MZ 'Z Z322Z Z Z Z: Z: Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z3 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z. ,Z ZZ? ZZZ ZZZZ, ZZ IWW ZZZ: Z Z ZZ Z Z ZZ f 2331 if :3ZZ3Z 1, 4, ZZ IWZ ZZZZ ZQEZFZ 1:6314 WZ ZZ Z :ZZ i33fZZ 53i,3335Z r13s3:1:13Z 5,333 Z Z33 233 ZZ 933937 i33'3Z f3l3J3 233335Z 3333: X ZZNZ QEZZ ZZZ: Z ,Zg ZZ: ,:'3:13Z ZZ Z ZZHEZ ZWZ ZZ! ' Z ZZ 1333 3 Z ,4 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z N XX ZZ352? ZZ X ZZZ wax 'Z Z32Z Z32Z ROBERT WALLACE BRUCE Associate Professor of Psychology: Wa- bash, A.B.g University of Chicago, A.lVl., Ph.D. Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Delta Kappa. ALONZO ERWI N GOLDSBERRY Instructor in History: Wabash, AB., But- ler University, A.lVl. Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Kappa Phi. THEODORE GREGORY GRON ERT Professor of History: University of Wis- consin, A.B., A.lVl., Ph.D. Phi Gamma Mu, Phi Eta, American Historical Association. .ri 2. 1 OBED SIMON IOHNSON Professor of Religion and Philosophy: Carleton College, AB.: Oberlin Theological Seminary, B.D.g University of California, Ph.D. IAMES IAM I ESON PATTERSON Instructor in Economics, Director of Re- creational Activities: Northwestern Univer- sity, B.S.g Columbia University. Sigma Chi, Delta Sigma Pi, Beta Gamma Sigma. IOHN DOREN TOMLINSON Assistant Professor of Political Science: Northwestern University, BS.: Columbia University, A.M. Delta Upsilon, Sigma Delta Chi. 4 4 i Z Z 2 1 1111 31 1511 4 ,411 9 1, 111415, 111 11151211 1 1 11111 1111 E1 1' 1111 11 11114 1114 51,1111 glllll 11 '11 11 1 111 11,1 1111 5 111111 2111114 '14, 51157 1411 414? 111 1 11117 1 , 111152 111111 19114111 141 444411 11111 11 51111111 1611 flllllil 111411 24314 11 1 1611111 11 1 1114111111 11117 114114 :Vi 1141111 W4 111111 4494 1111 21495 111 111261 1111 11111111 11414 5642 11111 14711 711111, W1 :11111 W 11 111 233 11? 11 4144 4414 1154 31912 11144 W 411441 af 41141 1114 f? 5111172 W 215191 11114 Z4 111? 414' 1114? 4111! 4! 11416 23411 111415 W? 3511 31141115 444 21411114 1117 4311? 115 212412 91 11511 ZW 1111? 411V 4411? 11? 14114 41d 441114 nj 1 4114 M! 11172 if? 1152 11 2111111 " 1111112 2? 41115 61! 4.144 1411? 4141 1111 444 11111 44114 214113 12 1141112 2 111111 2114111 11151 11 14 111211 11511 5111 11? 59141 411114 ,142 4141 11114 1 113 21? Nj .1111 144f aff 1144 111151 2441 1111121 444111 4111111 11414111 2411111 11944 14111 1117 14 41144 111311 f1514 ,111 111m 11 1 1111155 111231 11111111 11114141 1111114114 1111111 11111 11111111 1141115 11112111 12151 511115111 111141 5166 11111 12414 11 1' 145 11,21 141411 411111 11 5111165 21111 1111? 1411111 11131 11? 1111111 W 1111111 Z4 1114.11 I 14141 11441 111411 144. ,,f Q1 11 if l 111 1,111 11441-1 1111141 121151111 1115? 114111 1126 91121 'ZZ 115 1311? 4y1 1141111 11141 111111 11172 211111 A14 .fv 125 W 1:1 1 'f 1111? 111144 5111 151112 5112111 2114111 1111! 15116 411111 41 311111 4? 11111 if 11111 111111 111112 51114111 11211111 21114111 1111111 yw 111111 ff' 111111 -111111 4661 11 111151111 11 1 5111 111111 B 4111 111111 1 Vi 1111111 221121 11211 511111, 111111 1111145 11111 111 11 1 1 111111111 I 1111 1 14111 11 15111111 1 111g11111, 11' 11f1 1111 111 11,11 1 1 11 11 1'111111I 11 11 111 1,1 11111111 11111 '1 11 1 4 311 11 1. 11 11111111 1 li 11 ,1 mm 2 1 1111 11111 21111 15 144 1 A 114 412 4 444-4 i1ll1111 111 ' 21 591 111 1511 13: 351511591 1166941 114 1,1 16111 51111141111 111111113 11 1111114 11111115 1 ,,,,. 14 14144 54122 may "Ml 4 1111142 v1111111g 11 '14 11 .1411 V414 M14 26422 145414 111111 1? 4 2111111112 1111 111g 111 1 14 211 5 1211? E4 146 14 4412 15141115 14141 2121111 41111111 44711 ,fr X.- : 114141 1511 44 1411 f W1 4 114141 1 141211 X411 6544 llllifgll 114111 1'f -4 X 11114 11211131 MW 4414 Zlgllg 5111131 51l'111'1 1 I W -1 11 1411 1111111111 F549 1144144 114419 M114 141441 1421114 111g11 1 11111 1 1 11115 2 351' 112315 We My 2 111K 1 1111 i1 1 " 1 Q! 1144111 11 11421 1 . 14. 1 111' ,1. 1, 411511 3,1211 31411 41141: l LORENTZ H. ADOLFSON KZ CHICAGO, ILL. Phi Beta Kappag Blue Keyg Tau Kappa Alphag Cer- man Club, 2, President, 3, 41 Debate Squad, 3, 4g Speakers Bureau, 3, 43 Evans Oratorical, 3, 4, lst prize, 43 Baldwin Oratorical, 3, lst prizeg Peace Contest, 3, lst prizeg lst prize in State Oratoricalg 2nd prize in National Oratorical, l PAUL E. ANDERSON BK BRooKF1E1.o, ILL. Sphinx Clubg President, Senior Councilg International Relations Clubg French Club, I, 2. l FRED B. COFFMAN AXA RoAc1-:DALE Sphinx Clubg Vice-Pres., Senior Classy Senior Coun- cilg Football, lg Basketball, l, 2, 3, 43 "W" Men's Club. f-31' n THOMAS CREIGH, ln. fiJ1'.X HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. Princeton, l, 25 Scarlet Masque, 3, 43 French Club, 33 Sophomore Basketball Manager. l RUSH B. FREEMAN cpm BICKNELL l CLARENCE N. CINGERICH KE CHICAGO. ILL. Football, l, 2, 3, "VV" Men's Club, German Club. 2, 3, 45 Scarlet Masque, 3, 4. 11131111 112111 111, H3515 -111' 11191 .4 9 1 .,1 1,111 We 16111 1 641 1111111 1 l i 1 111: 4161111 141211 121111 11111111 1111111111 1149: Z E 311932 1111111 12511 W 1 1161 1111611 612 11 111 117 af 14" 1 11' 1111 1111? 11 M11 11422 314112 11112 '9161 1 QM? 4 1 71 EW? 14113 My 51115 111111511 1141161 11541 My 1116 1 111' , W 1124 1161141 21161123 1111511111 1124 W .1111'1 P 111111161 111111 211 QW 1151513 1151513 1592? 3653 15452 111212 -111.11 11-11, 1 9 9 1' 24111 I W 511 111111 1 111V 1 1 l 1 112 L V Z1 1 15111: 1 1 1111111 1 1 11? 1 1612 11111115 E917 1111! ,1111,f 11221115 1 1111112 1 1 11,6 1111314 1 1111 1 111531 311155 1151? 11111311 441114, 111151111 11111432 if 3 '11 51 gl 1111111411 11141, 51? X, 22115 15114 3114? 61111121 af W 1911? I ' I l E 1111! . 1 1151? -1111115 me '11 1 11 1 1111 , .111 11g 11111 15 .1111 1, 5111 11 ,411 1 14, 1 1,1 1 31 M 1471 ,f Z 1,1 I M111 141 7 1a Q1 :192 , 11 1111111 f1111 11 1 1111 511151 Jr' 1,1 ,I 24'1: ,1 1111 1211 51121111 111111 4211 111111, W. 11111111 44151 21111 1119? 911111111 91111 21111115 311114 1114111 111111111 :11"1" 111191111 11111111 1111111111 215111 211111111111 11111 111111111 5211 1:11 111111 111141 41111 .1151 14115 1' 1' QW 391514 1111161111 1,1 .,, 41 " 1 1116 311111 , 1 1:4 We 1 ,,, . 111 4111 4,1 4, 11 1115 1, . 421 1. 91111111 1162 g 11 I 111111 1 1141 111111 411, 3711 11151515 11211 11 171' jllglllll 1111 ZZ? W 1111111111 .11111f 11 :111111f ff 5111511 My ggi 117111 211111111 Z' W if 1 9141111 211112 1111116 s"1ff 211141 '14 1,1 11411711 W4 1 4' 1 5 1 1117 2,7 s f .1110 2155 We 11111 1515? J ff 11 1151? if '11 111 111 16111 1116 1111 5151 ,I 11 1 ll11'1111: 5111216 265 61611 51111 11 if W1 1 X11 21,112 2111311 111141, 321' 11: 4 1: 1 1 55 11,2 11111 111 '41 fp 4 1 21' Z 1 1? 11 11 4 'E 111193 Q3 ,4 W We .11 112111 141, 'Z 11 1111! 12,1311 Q ll 5111 MZ 11111111 111215 l ROBERT C. HARMAN ATA SARATOGA Spanish Club, l, 2g Band, l, Z, 45 Football, l, 2, 35 Baseball, 2, 33 Basketball, l, 2, 3, 45 "W" lVlen's Clubg Secreta ry, Senior Class. I HENRY K. IEWELL Michigan U., lg lllinois U., 3, 4. l MAX L. KEENAN AXA Sphinx Clubg Football, lg Squad, 4. DANVILLE, ILL. 23 French Club, 33 Band, PRINCETON Scarlet lvlasqueg Debate A NW, 'n I IOHN M. KITCHEN B911 INDIANAPOLIS Blue Key, Tau Kappa Alpha, Tennis, 3, 4, "W" Men's Club, Bachelor, l, 2, French Club, 2, 3, Speak- ers Bureau, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President junior Class, Hays Oratorical, lst prize, 2, Evans Oratorical, lst prize, 2nd prize, State Oratorical, 3, Winner of Hays All-College Debate Award. I RAYMOND E. KOSTANZER, lr. BGII CRAWFORDSVILLE Senior Council, Bachelor, I, German Club. I IOSEPH C. LAFOLLETTE oMscA cRAwFonosvu.Ls Senior Council, Baseball, l, 2, 3, 4, "W" Men's Club, Spanish Club, 2, 3, Treasurer, Independent Men. ig ll! 'Z 1Z 1Z l fl Z 1!f Z 1,5 Z11111 Q11 1 '11 ZZ' 11111111 1141111 11 Z Z 9592333 If 11515 l151ll1 W Z Z Z Z 1 X Z Z Z Z Z Z K EEZ W' 1 1 ,, 'Z .11 Z' 11916 Z1 1 Z M 11 f W 1, Zi 1, xl., Z1111 135 11121 ,111-11 1 1,1 131 1111 112 1111111152 QZ' 1 Zi ,Z KZ X ZZ Z ZZ ZZ1 I 0143 ZZ M Ng! AZ 11111 :ZZ llllllfl! 1Z" Z 1 fm? y Q1 :ZZ WZ ,, Z1 My 12111 ZZ fill? Q57 1 111 2,11 11111111 111 211111111 ZZ1 1121152 ZZE11 Wil 11 Z111111 liil' "" ll1llll1l 1111151 ggw Z 1, 2111212 1 1 1111 : 1114 513615 lil 111111 X Z Z Ns i 1 1 2 1 wifi 4 Z ZW: ZZ5611 Z1 Z 111111Z 11 XV ZZ Z f11'11Z 55131312 ZZZ 111Z1Z 11 11511 ilul ill 5531 Z1 Z1 62 ZZ? 511 X ZZ Z i ' ZZ 1 139 11 Z 1 11 1 2 31? N11 1' 1 Eiillii 1 3 fab' 1 ' 1 115 1 1 111 L 1 11 115 ,. Z1 111121 l ROBERT R. NEAL BQII SPRINGFIELD, lu.. Scarlet Masque, l, 2, 3, 45 Football, 2, 33 "W" lvlen's Club. l EDWIN R. NELSON K2 HAMMOND Sphinx Clubg Blue Key, Presidentg President, Fresh- man Club, 3: Spanish Club, lg Senior Council. Captain, 4, "W" lvlen's Club, Scarlet Masque, lg Ger- man Club, 3, Spanish Club, lg Senior Council. I RICHARD O. OLSON KE CHICAGO, ILL. Scarlet Masque, 3, 4. I HEMAN R. POWERS 41113 ST. CHARLES, ILL. Sphinx Clubg Senior Council, News Bureau, lg Year- book, lg Scarlet Masque, Spanish Club, Football, 2, 3, Captain, 45 "W" Men's Club. I 0. LAWRENCE SERVIES CRAWFORDSVILLE Hays Oratorical, l. l ALAN A. SIGRIST TKE FORT WAYNE Sphinx Club: Swimming Team, lg Spanish Club. l, Vice-President, 23 Band, l, 2, 3, 43 Sophomore Basket- ball Managerg Caveman, 3, 4. n 1. QUENTIN sMi'rH d1l'A WINCHESTER Bachelor, lg Yearbook, lg German Club, Basketball, lg Football, l, 2, 3, 43 Men's Club. Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ1 VZ 19? ZZ 21 V 211121Z 12171111 ZZ MZ ZZZ ZZZ EZZ Z Z ZZ: fZ1Z1 ZZZ ZZ11 Z1Z1 3141 1Z Z111111 11 -111:11 Wil? ,., 16 M51 11 11, 111 Z111Z11 41111211 ..111 11: 11 7 ZZ Z: 91: Z Z I 1 If g Z 11 Z , Z Z Z 11 11Z1 '1 1111Z11g Z11Z11Z iZ11Z1 121211 :1Z1Z1: ZZ Z 4 Z Z 111iZ 11 131 Z W1 Z Z11111 Z Z11. Z Z 'Z11 111 41V 11 111112Z ,114 ZZ, ZZ ZZ ZZ' 1151121 iff 1, 11:4 ,, 5 112 111, 1 Z Z Z .. 11' Z .1111 Z 1111111 1 Z Z Z Z Z 1 . ,L 11 ' 112: ig 11 1? 1 1111 Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ , 1 , 1 , ,1 Z 1 ZZ ZZ z1Z ZZ .ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ 51212 'ZZ 'M Z '11 11 AZ ZZ1, Z1Z1z .ZZ QZ11? My Z1Z' :WZ ZGZ ZZ: QZZ' .1-1111-Z ZZZ ZZ! Z1ZZ :Z1:1: ZZ W1 ZZ 1 Zv .ZZ ZZ QZZ Z Z Z Z1 ,Z Z ,4 ZZ ZZZ Z ' ZSZ 11s 11 1 Z 1,1 M1111 I Z 914115 Z3Zs ZW ZZ N' ZZZ MZ? ZZZ ZZ? Z1Z f ZZ Z Z ff 1111? f 412 ZW ZZ14 ZZ Z1Z11s :ZZ 4115114 11Z11Z ZZ, 9111151113 !11,f fZ1Z111 ZZ ZZZ ZZ' 41114 ZZ 4511111 911 ZZ i1121Z ZZZ .1111 Z ,Z Z11Z1Z ZZ Z1Z1 Z1Z ZJZ1 ZZUZ W 1 sr 1 ZZ. .1110 ZZ Z111Z1 4714 g11'111111' ZZ1: 121111Z M12 11Z11Z 111211Z EZZ 9111113 ZZ 91911: 41151114 41411: :11,111eZ ZZ 11111915 Z 211Z2 Z, Z 11Z111 ZEZ11 l1ZZ Z111Zf 31ZZ Z11121 51152 W Z ?12Zz ZZ Z2 2Z:Z 111112 511123Z 216115 2111225 151, 21111112 11,11 47' .1911 M1114 111145 7115055 1111112 21'Z152 age Z111Za Zfng 5419 ZZJ1? 212111Z 1 11111, 1 11'Z11Z Z I I ..Z 2111f1, WZ? 1112111 ZZZ1 nw- Z4 ' -will ZZZ W. 211211 my 1 11111 I l l f 1 I l F X I 5 f 11'J I IOHN E. SPOHR TKE IAMESTOWN German Club, Z3 Alpha Pi, 2. I ROBERT L. SQUIRE EX MICHIGAN CITY Sphinx Clubg Senior Council, Pan-Hellenic Council, Swimming, lg Golf, 3, 4, "W" Men's Club. I MERRILL E. M. TARON me KANKAKEE, lu.. Pi Delta Epsilon, Vice-President, 45 Pan-Hellenic Council, Scarlet Masque, l, 2, 3, 43 German Club, l, 2, Caveman, l, 2, Yearbook, 3, Golf, 3. l IOHNIE N. THEOBALD fr-m Des PLAINES, ILL. Bachelor, l, 2, 3, Circulation Manager, 45 Vice- President, Press Clubg German Clubg Mills Contest, 35 International Relations Club. I WALDO W. WHEELER me SULLIVAN Sphinx Club, German Club, 2, 3. l CHARLES M. WRONA me si-ilNcLs1'oN, MICH. Sphinx Club, Blue Key, Senior Councilg Football, 2, 3, 45 Basketball, lg Baseball, l, 2, 3, 43 Men's Club. I E. RICHARD WYMOND AXA WARSAW Bachelor, lg Yearbook, lg French Club, 2. I IOHN A. YEAGER ATA INDIANAPOLIS German Club, l, 23 News Bureau, l, 23 President, lunior Class: junior Football Manager. ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ f Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ X ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Division 4 C sox H F A i I R M A N l Q i IAMES INSLEY osBoRNE, Ph.D. Yandes Professor of English Language and Literature: Wabash, A.B,, A.M.3 Oxford University, A.B.Q Columbia University, PhDs Rhodes Scholar, Beta Theta Pi, Phi Beta Kap- pa. ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ WILLIAM NORWOOD BRIGANCE Professor of Speech: University of South Dakota, A.B.g University of Nebraska, A.lVl.g University of Iowa, Ph.D.g University of Chi- cago. Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Kappa Alpha, National Association of Teachers of Speech, American Association of University Professors. NEIL CHARLES HUTSINPILLAR Associate Professor of English: Ohio State University, A.B.g University of Chicago, A.lVl. Pi Kappa Alpha. GEORGE VALENTINE KEN DALL Milligan Professor of English: Brown Uni- versity, A.B.3 University of Wisconsin, A.l'Vl. Delta Phi, Phi Beta Kappa. 1 'UN LEVI ROBERT LIND Instructor in Classics: University of Illinois, AB., A.lVl. Phi Beta Kappa. MYRON CUSTAVUS PHILLIPS Assistant Professor of Speech: Wabash. AB.: University of Iowa, A.lvl. Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Kappa Alpha. National Association of Teachers of Speech IOHN MAURICE PLUMMER Instructor in English, Alumni Secretary: Wabash, AB. Phi Gamma Delta, Tau Kappa Alpha. ,fi :vi f if I 'y ,i ji, :sei QQ -1 xSfKiXiQgtSlI'f ---4-xkwk vhs? as ix -1 Ax ,H v- : , .ff 5, I 4,2 ' I2 A af HZ , ,ei 4, I YL- ,li fs fy 15, ,A...,1 V9 3 if ,Z NA XXX XXSX X X xxxx xX XXXX f Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z XXX X Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z ZZ 6 Z1 Z1 Z Z :ZZ4 ZEZEZZ 111 IW Z1 ZZ Z1Z Z Z1Z1Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ i11ZZ1ZZ :WZ 21ZZZ WZ Z Z2 ZZ Z W ' Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 1 Z Z ww. ,Z Z Z Z 3 ZW? Z1 Z 1Z Z 11a ,ZZ 1511111ff 1 511411: 1 i16121Zs " 11144: Eli? 212115 21Z1Z illfli Z "ZZ :MZ 7'1!1ZZ 54132 ZZ ZEZZ . Z, ...Z Z ,1,. Z i111Z Z 11961 ZMZZ QZZZZ ' 411124 19214 ZZ, Z1 1,1 Any 1.3 MZ z1'Z1'Z a1i11Z Z'111iZ Z11aZ 212 Z 1 1171, ZZ Z Z Z :wwf ZZ 1 1 Z :WZ 111151Z ZZ 11,1 g1Z li 11Z ,1111Z l lv!! Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 1 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZllliZ Z ZZ Z Zf1,,Z ZIZZ ZEZZ ZZ Z ZZ MZ 4.11 ill? Z mi Z Z1 ZZ ,Z11 Z Z Z Z 2 Z l G. WALLACE B. ATKINSON CRAWFORDSVILLE Scarlet Masque, 2, 3, 45 Caveman, 2, 3, French Club, 2, 3. I W. LESLIE BURROUGHS TKE CRAWFORDSVILLE Pi Delta Epsilon, Caveman, l, 2, Advertising Man- ager, 3, Business Manager, 43 Bachelor, l, 2, Press Club, l, 2, French Club, l, 2, Speakers Bureau, Golf, lg Tennis, l. l CHARLES E. HUTCHINS AXA ROACHDALE German Club, 2, Basketball Manager, 2, 3. 'ff-"' 1 -JVQ 3 ,, YW., l KENNETH C. LOVGREN fm-A HUBBARD wooos, ILL. Sphinx Club, Blue Key, Pi Delta Epsilon, President, Bachelor, l, 2, Editor, 3, Advisory Board, 4, Chairman, Publications Board, Press Club, l, 2, President, 3, Scar- let Masque, l, Stage Manager, 2, Business Manager, 3, President, 4, Editor, Pi Delt Handbook, 4, Secretary, junior Class, Yearbook, l, 2, 3, Basketball Manager, 2, Hays Oratorical, 2, Spanish Club, l, 2, 3, News Bureau l, 2, Pan-Hellenic Council, Caveman, l, 2, 3, 4. v l KENNETH E. RUSH 'rim DANVILLE, lu.. Sphinx Club, Pi Delta Epsilon, Bachelor, l, 2, Year- book, 2, 3, Caveman, 3, 4, Baseball Manager, 2, News Bureau, l, 2, 3, Press Club, 2, 3, 4. l VACLAV l. SALLAK -in NEW Yokx, N. Y. Pi Delta Epsilon, President, Sophomore Class, Bache- lor, l, 2, 3, Yearbook, l, 23 College Choir, l, 2, Scar- let Masque, l, 2, 3, 4, Press Club, l, 2, French Club: Caveman, l, 2, 4. ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ V All College I-Ionorory SPHINX CLUB BLUE KEY BETA KAPPA PHI PHI BETA KAPPA The Wabash chapter of Phi Beta Kappa was established in l898 and since that time has been the goal of student aca- demic effort. Election to this national honorary scholastic fra- ternity is considered in college and university circles to be the highest mark of commendation for undergraduate endeavor. Occasionally members have been known to rest on their laurels and bask in the aura of the three significant starsg however, members of the Wabash group have not, as a rule, been con- tent with mere election to this body, but, even after personal recognition, have continued to advance the torch of Learning. It is the sincere hope of the Editors that the fundamental principles taught by Phi Beta Kappa may guide and restrain its members in this day of impetuous academic theorizing. The officers of the local chapter are: Prof. Robert W. Bruce ................ President Albert Diserens ....... --- Vice-President Prof. james H. Osborne ..... ....... S ecretary L. H. Adolfson, D. H. Wingert--jr. Members, l932 F 1 6 1 6 ' 132 6 , , 111114 1 1661 466361: 1 3, 3336366 1 1 11631311 16111111 iq 6133 6616 1166 121 111 jl3ll33336 633333 616113 11166 36666 36363 i X1 213636326 11661115 E66 116 f 11,1 6 1,111 21666 6 16 6 .1 1,1 3 11 76 6 6 313666 3311161 1363161 26611 216116 ff 66 11.61 .11 76 63363 V63 .13 11, 161 137 111 3133333 ll 333333333 231333316 9636 1,6 2 6112 1336116 11161 2111615 112161 41 1 1. 1 119 1111131111 11511 216' 23133 2 6 63636 163 3166 i 6 3661 663 633 l 533 33' 3161 I 1 61' 1 1366 fi 11661111 316111111 6 161. .11 11,1 1 11461116 1,611 116 631166 X1 I V6 6 6 16 1 16.166 113163126 2661366 1661166 .11111 4 3411111 . 11,11 1 111166 3 6 16111 1 :1 521161 6136? E111 1111611 g '15 3 1 1'11 6 1 66 f :ZZ 1 11616 2 1111 11111 '11 66 111. 6 f 1 66' '1 fl' 61 1, 6166a f33333i6 335336 33? 111 1.61 ,.,., '66 531116316 366 161136 16 X .6 6 2166 6 1 61116 1 611, -1112 .16 ' 116 6 fi 6631 61336 6111 61 616 66 66 166 Z3 35161 661513 lllxif 3636 71 616 1 1 ff! 1 166 1.116 1116 161111 1611 116633 1,156 21611 Q 36334 66 66 23166 163 6 17 116' f 53313136 6 23236 6 13611 166 1611: 1612 133121353 23311136 616 1 16 66661 33? :fig .,6 166 1 1,11 E363 1 1161116 1114 34 11153 13112 1333 3336 3333 1111161 13 113 if i1 1'j 1 1 1111 1111 1 16363113 261611 6363333 113361633 13 1 3363361 6333633 616111113 411611123 62626 .1131 1 6116113 1.36631 l6336336 16616 1 6 5131631 : Wy? 3666 56616 166666 E666 36533313 11601 if 32 r 161 .11,, 1111? 66, 1666 6 6 66 6 6 6 61 1, 11 616 6 6 , W6 53, fa . 16: 6 21 51 1? 1,3 6 116 66 6 6 6 6 6 66 6 6 , ,1 .6 6 6 fi 6 , Z1 6 6 6 533616 2333636 11366 66 X 16166 af 1666 13 3611 6 523353136 5 "32i 1 l. Wrona, Breading, Lovgren, Kitchen. l 2. Smith, Nelson, Peterson, Adolfson. Blue Key is a national honorary fraternity which recog- nizes outstanding men of the college. Eight men are chosen each year from the junior Class and are selected because of merit shown in leadership, character, student activities, and scholarship. The Wabash chapter enjoys the distinction of being the 3 second chapter of this fraternity to be established. There are now more than forty-five active chapters in the country, and the fraternity is rapidly commanding the esteem to which its standards and members entitle it. 11 3 The greatly needed yard markers on the football field were furnished by the club, and an enthusiastic project of re-foresta- tion of the campus has been the concern of its members. The officers for this year were: Edwin R. Nelson .................... President 3 john lVl. Kitchen ................ Vice-President Louis l'l. Breeding ........... Secretary-Treasurer George V. Kendall james I, Osborne - .-.-.-..... l:aCul'ry Members i George W. Horton 3 1 3 El 3 1 Sigrist, Rush, Hall, Carmack, Breading, Cassel, Ault. Smith, Kneisley, Coffman, Kelley, Rhodehamel, Peterson, Squire, Bald- win, Wrona. lvlemering, Lovgren, Mueller, Bales, Wheeler, Nelson, Swails, Anderson. The Sphinx Club was founded in i922 with the purpose of promoting closer fellowship among the organized and in- dependent upperclassmen. The club meets every two weeks at one of the fraternity houses, at which meetings the members discuss awards for various activities of the student body. This year the club again donated a cup for the best deco- rated fraternity house at Homecoming time. lt served as co- sponsor with the Scarlet Masque in making possible the "Foot- light Frolics", awarding a cup for the best vaudeville skit of the evening. Last year the club established a Hall of Fame with a large portrait of Pete Vaughan and a panel of the major sport cap- tains. This year the club will add the picture ot Harry Scholl- er, "The Skipper", and this year's captains. OFFICERS Stuart D, Smith .................... President Robert L, Squire -- .,... Vice-President Louis H. Breading .... --- Secretary-Treasurer 4 4 1: -ff 'ff , my 21 ff V' X f '4 I ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z 2ZZ .ZZ Z Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ 47 Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZZ ZZ ZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ Z Z 2 1. Bever, Smith, L. W., Nunn, Rhodeharnel. 2. Miller, Darter, Frank, Smith, M. A., Cole. 3. Larrabee, Snoddy, Horuff, White, Boots, Mangus. gui IG' OFFICERS RALPH W. WH EATON President A. CRESSLER BOIVIBERCER Vice-President HARRY C. BRYSON Secretary-Treasurer ,fi VHA, 'f 'J' 7, 5 f W. A K. .5 .V Y .2 , ,, Q, ,Le fa! W4 .A ad f4 ' if .- ,sri Y .. .. at if-X425 . v Q N xxx. fp: f 4,1 Mi. N N., wx 5 4, ' 13 1 Z 2 " :wi .y 1 I aff ' M ff gn Y V7 r , 94 4 dj 7 4 W f' Lf? Z 4 I X ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Q, l. Bradshaw, Horton, Davis, A. j., Vinroot, Varner, Barton, Danforth, Stepka. 2. Cornell, Easthope, Carscallen, Stafford, Thompson, Willis, Moseley, Sumner, Hassan. 3. McKinney, Snedicor, Beaman, Thomas, Meese, Fruits, Martin, Robbins. i l i ? l 2 3 l il i l. Warren, Lippincott, Fobes, Darnell, Crimes. 2. Linn, Wightman, Maloney, Fruits, Peck. 3. Wheaton, Auer, Ames, Prell. l. l la- if, fi? i El fl li l ,,. , 5,4 ,. T 'ru - Ag- 163,-us 'Kjffi 7? ilk 'i Hill 'fi' ,-4" Y'-'f " 'QALNEQP fa - K-ww naman ulitf-,JeiE,,,53f4,, ,-Ai! I. Stewart, Stierwalt, Rovenstine, Smith, R. K., Stephens, Ronk, DeLuca, Harris. 2. Blackmore, Null, McOaughey, Robertson, F. B., Fox, Schwartz, Loop. 3. Hunt, Heath, Mason, Visscher, Appel, Thorne, Harbison, Cheek. OFFICERS ,. NK!! '57 'vw D. MARCELLUS ION ES President ROSS O. NELSON, IR. Vice-President HAROLD A. ROMBERC- Sec retary-Treasu rer P z ,W Q., V 1 ,z ,V A ,, , ,K ,, v , ff. f 4 'M M M 4 1. Z H Q, Q4 J 2 ef W6 we .1 ,254 wg rg ,ff ff 1 fff as .,, F.. ' '5 Q ff 5 W4 L . lx 'g ' 4 W4 f 5, '3 V424 'ng vw :fo LW -zu 9, EZ :W ., ,,, K! Q14 W , 15' 1,3 rf if f 511 :ff , 45 52 f if in '9 I3 ,rip YY' I'2 222 QM V r 7 f 4 7 Z Z if fig: iff- ,ff W.. Z"z it V 1 . 7 .xg 55? 557' Zh 57s if! f',f ff Z '4 da F! if I I f Z 4, 31' Z 3 if Q r if gli is I X A , 1 X0 tt , . , K 6 lim Zij Z1 , Z EZ f 2 , f 4 4 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z YK WM 'w ei,igZ 1 ill i Z fill? :Z 253 3 Zi, Z ll ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ I. Blackburn, R. L., Ball, Cleaves, Hartfelter, Merchant, Kraning, Moore, McEwan 2, Berol, Gleason, Northcutt, Hays, Blackburn, W. C-., Hoaglin, Everson, Frasor Coon. 3. Kelso, Klevorn, Ewoldt, Curts, Neal, Nelson, Morris, Keefe, Oren, Milikan Kennedy. 4. Crisler, joyce, jordan, Ludwig, jones, Hird, Leyshon, Kernodle. SCDPHGMORES l. Pomeroy, Vogel, Myers, jenkins, Krause, Romberg, Robertson, C. R. Gerow. 2. Smith, H. W., Meahl, Fulton, Mclntire, Robison, Charles, Reinert, Saikley. 3. Clabaugh, Wachs, Underwood, Hoke, Berns, Pancoke, Murdock. 1 .,...v...,',- ,M ...... .... V K W , W Y , I. Loewi, Billingsley, Stults, Tompkins, Bowerman, MacBeth. 2. Long, Luzar, Lanigan, Thoeming, Lee, Mason. Q 1. 'S ri? OFFICERS GEORGE E. HOME, IR. President WILLIAM A. SUNDLOF Vice-President THAD S. MCCULLOCH Secretary-Treasurer W xii-Xe .MQ -Q ,su vi , Q X .N .six .R Q -w, XX NX XX .9 X h , . , .. Q,-Q. -QF, --.. 3-qw x- fv- - QA KAN ANN X s x X, xxm X Xxx X dfgw x ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ X Ragan, Rhoads, Merrell, M. D., Pedigo, Kirtley, Knight, Smith, R. B. Rush, Weaver, Smith, R. M., Nave, Mathews, Porzak, MacKay, Rubush, Mer- rell, M. S., Shearer, Lenhardt. Schetnitz, Smith, D. L., Murdock, Prestiri, Schrmur, Rayborri, Meritt, Parlon, FRESHMEN Storm, Sharp, Marmaduke, Rowe, C. F., Snyder, Riggs, Spiedel. Wezel, Elliott, l-lollett, McCulloch, Stilling, Terhurme, Terry, Sowle, Underwood Twitchell, Whitecottoh. Wood, TerBeek, Smith, B. B., Taylor, Sundlof, Vxfhite, H. W., Williams Trippet. Bingaman, Downey, Dwyer, Flshero, Forrest, Bigler, Davis, V. W., Coover. Clements, Flaningam, jones, F. D., Goff, Anderson, Creenebaum, Hall, L. D., Hanlin, Gewecke, Airhart. Baker, Howell, Beeson, Hanna, Home, Adler, Burkhart, Hall, F. T., Kent, jones, lewett. FRESHMEN I L4 2 af? 'yn MEL ? L if 5' af af 6 vii, 'Z M V4 Z, 2 4, 4 " ' . C" X 1 P01 QW' Q45 ,Z F 1 ii 'r , I I I :,: 5? 5 f we: Zum' ff w 4 'f , 1 if 4 4 f 1 4 5 4: jx gs: ,, Z Z f 5 3 N i Q, sz ,rs z. X 5 5, ,sw Q fi N 7 1 . , , fwg by f N ,Mm 1 wx .': , I , . 5 kQ31?i,' ,. q,, 92 f 1 . 1 .. i , ' ' ,ff W ITP., I ! 1 frffff 2519 ' ' , f,L. , 'Y ddr xl!! Mhz' I. 'MT' ' ' ' .13 f,Q1r. 5 4 A by A 1 A. cy". 1 ,rg f ', , ' ,mi :- f, .fi 4 ,mf ',,cff74g1-' , --W- :Y:'5f 9 . M , " .1.' 1 . A., flip-. r 5- URQQVA .'L,2v Li. 'QL , f , jfffj' 3 :ffl L , 1 1-gf . 1, ,IQ ' ' 'y' U ' ' ' ljfggwa ' A' Hvfunx' I V g ,' f', frfff 'NVQ ' f , ,V- on H . .. , ix .F ,- , 11 , , ' A. X .ps ug: 1595 ,iii 1 y , .',..f21' ',,f',-f?" 3' 67 1 1 new :ff f 3 f Y -3. ,A ,.:iv .3 , 3 14:J'4f542'k15 Q 9 -r ' . ' ,f Q ,j 75-1 ff ' 'f ' :fm ,. .45 ..,, . I , , ,uf-f 'Q Q' if I fwlgzggrglff- I, my A. 1 ,wi - 1,1 13 .ew-f' xii sf' ' 1 . ng, - 135L?!f' 5 I if 34241 9. ,ffm , . wx,rfWQMiT ,, Y ,,,,, , - .,,, , V , ' 4- 'L V 1,,'1' N ,A V- . fm 1. if va .F . 'W' ' ., . - . X fl, 11 ' .. ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ X D I R E C T O R O F A T H L E T I C ROBERT EDWARD VAUGHAN "Pete" Vaughan has been head coach of football and basketball since l9l9. Last year he became Director of Ath- letics upon the retirement of "The Skipper", Harry Scholler. He is very reticent in a crowd, but will tell stories by the hour to a small groupg he dislikes horses, but enjoys driving his car around the county on rainy nights. He has been seen rolling cigarettes and pulling grass at football games by every Wabash man. He is a tradition of the college, and will remain such after he has coached his last "Wonder Five". A. E. COLDSBERRY I. 1. PATERSON Head Coach of Baseball Freshman Coach Assistant Coach of Football Director of Recreational Activities ASSISTANT COACHES SENIOR MANAGERS Davis, Baseballg Bales, Basketballg Ault, Football E7 I, if' M de ' i V will 'l 2 fu IZ 12' .f I 1, l l I . 'l i l 2 f if 7. 'ir 3 ,, 125 Z ig i if l il 1, l ili l ig, ,N l ,V ,i ll I n l, 7' 'Q V, f J 'f 1 s P1 17' W , M5 if W ,i 'ff 1 f W fl ' ll ffl Zi Zl I. V4 fr 71. hz ff w 5 ? f M l l i . 41, ai i 4 , Z1 iii in 5, ag 4 l Y M , 1 ll .2 P? 42 ,4 'E fa if 315 l P ,A F 6 lf: l gb y l W4 Al 5 F gf 52 A W 'LM M Z1 , X Q, Q4 ? f 7 tv ff' f A :Q 7 af' g 1 1 1 1 we Z rf 5 1 f fi Z Z 4 l Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z ZZ ZZ Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z f , Z Z A Football NELSON WRONA PETERSON SlVllTl-l, S. D. VINROOT October l WABASI-l Og FRANKLIN O With only two weeks of fall practice behind them, the Cavemen held the strong Franklin eleven to a scoreless tie on Ingalls Field. Two costly fumbles by the Little Giants in the shadow of the Baplists' goal proved fatal to their chances for victory. Franklin drove to within eight yards of a score during the third quarter, but at this point the Wabash line braced and held for dovvns. Several sophomores re- ceived their first dose of fire: Peterson, Powers, Stierwalt, and Rein- ert. October 8 WABASI-l l3: ROSE POLY 6 Don Kutz's forty-five yard dash around his right end for a touch- down late in the first quarter paved the way for the Vaughanmen's first triumph of the year. A pass, Cerow to Milam, was the means of the final Wabash score. The Engineers' points came as a result of a blocked kick recovered by a Rose Poly lineman on the Scarlefs eight yard line. This game marked the renewal of football relaticns bef'ween the two schools after a lapse of seven years. Zillf 115 511111122 3311 ig 1 Zin i Z9-lil if 1-if 11 ZW: IZZ11 llZ1Z .1Z'g11: 411 3112: ' Z1 111 ,Z1-1i 3111x111 57:11 1 , ,11 m1161115 :Zif E551 .Zi 53? 2 .ZZ 3 .Z ,, gllll QZ1 my W1 Z11Zl Z ZZ N, Z ,,,f 151.9 ,ZZ ' l iiiZZ' ZZ? Z f ZZ i Z3 ,, Z I. I li Z 5 Z 1 2 Z Z Z Rm W Z Z NZ ZZ' if l i , i i I Z Z 2 Z 1 , ff fZ QZ ls .Z . Z Z 1 Z 1 Z ll! l1' IE' E2 Ei? N li Z Z I Z Z ,Z Z l lZ iZ Z X 11? lfZ EZZ 2llfZ i 111 324 3 11Z 113111595 11111-11 Z 511111Z Z 91:2 5 Z ,, ZZ I ZZ Z? fs ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z1 All Al ZZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ Z1 1 7, ZZ 451125 ZZ Z' '11' I 3 7 1,1 ll Z1 141 ZW: 211 WZ? 41 ZZE 16 is ll vi ZW 1 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z I. VARNER KUTZ WICHTMAN WHITNEY IVIEESE October l5 WABASH l3: EVANSVILLE O Showing improved play in every part of the game, the Cavemen defeated the Purple Aces of Evansville by a two touchdown margin, l3 to O, in their first contest away from the home field. "Red" Var- ner, fleet Scarlet halfback, twisted and sidestepped his way fifteen yards through a broken field for the first Wabash score. A new aerial combination, Whitney to Berns, was responsible for the second score. Numerous penalties and fumbles cost both sides several excellent op- portunities to score. Two complete Cavemen elevens saw action against the Pocket City gridmen. October 22 WABASH 341 BUTLER O Facing a highly touted Butler team that outweighed them ten points to the man, the Little Giants rose to all the glory that was theirs of old in crushing the Bulldogs under an avalanche of touch- downs for a final score of 34 to O. The amazed Butler coach, Fritz Mackey, made frantic attempts to stem the rising surge of Wabash power, but to no avail. Not since the days of Milstead, Parr, Ebert, and other immortals of the gridiron has a Wabash eleven ever turned in a more masterful exhibition of football than did this year's team on October 22. The linesmen and backs worked together like a smoothly oiled machine relentlessly mowing down everything that crossed its path. There was no individual star: every man executed his duties with the precision of a master craftsman, and the impossible was real- ized. "i 16' "-'9lAl1.Il...iHMR -S!2W.3Xc Qui , Waiwrulll' REINERT STIERWALT CEROW BERNS MILAM October 29 WABASH Og MIAMI 33 Showing plainly the results of a Ietdown following their great triumph over Butler the previous week, the Cavemen proved to be no match for the heavier, more powerful, Miami eleven. The Redskins possessed one of the most mystifying attacks ever seen on Ingalls Field. Their single and double wingback formations, spinners, and su- perb passing offense kept the Vaughanmen on the defensive all after- noon, although on one occasion the Little Giants were within ten yards of a touchdown. In spite of a badly injured knee, "I-leme" Powers. veteran Wabash center, entered the contest and played his customary aggressive style of football throughout the game. November 5 WABASI-I O1 CINCINNATI I4 I-landicapped by the loss of Powers, Varner, and Nelson, who were out of the starting lineup on account of injuries, the Little Giants went down fighting valiantly against the superior strength of the strong University of Cincinnati Bobcats. Cilliand, All Buckeye Conference fullback, was the spearhead in the attack of the Queen City's men. The game was played in the new University stadium before an over- flow crowd. Elmer Peterson and "Cy" Cierow were outstanding for the Cavemen. l l l i l A i l i ll l 27 ii 1 l 1. Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 5 Z Z lZ Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z IZ Z Z Z i i 2 2 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z al 2 tZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z ZZ uNoERwooo BLAckivioRE I-nokia SMITH, 1, Q. smooov November l2 WABASH 50: CENTRAL NORMAL O After a three weeks absence from the victory column, the Scarlet gave a convincing exhibition of their return to form by swamping the inferior Purple Warriors from Danville, 50 to O, as a final tuneup be- fore the big game with DePauw the following weekend. Coaches Vaughan and Goldsberry made numerous substitutions as the score mounted higher, and all the Wabash reserves got into the fray. The Normalites were obviously not in the same class with the Little Giants and were able to offer no defense against the running plays of the Gavemens' offensive. November l9 WABASI-l O3 DEPAUW O Playing under the most unusual weather conditions ever exper- ienced in the long list of the Wabash-DePauw football games, the two old rivals battled sixty minutes to a O to O deadlock at Greencastle. Forty-eight hours before gametime, Blackstock Field was buried under twelve inches of snow. Workmen labored for two nights and days clearing the field. DePauw madelthree threats, but each time the Little Giants stopped Don Wheaton, one of the greatest halfbacks ever to don the moleskins for old Asbury. Both schools were within strik- ing distance of each others goal on several occasions, but the white line proved to be an uncrossable barrier to both teams. Five Wabash seniors played their final game against the Tigers. Owing to sickness "l-leme" Powers was not able to have his pic- ture included in this sectiong however, the Editors wish to take this opportunity of giving him due credit for his work as Gaptain of the team during the season. His backing-up of the line was superb, and his general ability has more than merited his membership in the l933 Hall of Fame. 'Q 'IWW' L4 "Wwe ,.5'3" f ,Sf 7 i 5 5 Erma' '2'fQ:?13f s 'ti-'2t?ai5lsf3.i+z2ll3il17f4'2'v+ if l., . - .. , .J . i . L-V V .-., : Lf,-, tl. PL ,-,.5g4ih i',,,, , . -1 jk , . 2, rf.. '-.e...-.s..g-.-vfemff' 2,-1.4. 3-1 L l. Hoke, Robbins, Whitney, Varner, Smith, S. D., Kutz, Blackmore, Horton. l 2. Stierwalt, Snoddy, Smith, l. Q., Vinroot, Riker, Beaman, Milam, Wrona, Nel- l son, Peterson, E. E., Cerow. ' 3. Coldsberry, Powers, H. R., Underwood, Powers, I. A., Visscher, Berns, Reinert, Wightman, Meese, Peterson, E. C., Mueller, Vaughan. ,l B 'i i i l l l. Coover, TerBeek, Luzar, Bingaman, Long, Burkhart, Davis, D. D., Baldauf. 2. Cain, Berol, Merrell, M. D., Pedigo, Dwyer, Riggs, Merrell, M. S., Nave. 3. Swails, Snyder, Clabaugh, Sundlof, Tompkins, Hanna, Rowe, White, Spiedel, jones, F. D., Fishero, Wood, Paterson. 4. Baker, Cewecke, Hunter, Terhune, Lockridge, Beeson, Kent, Schnur, Vifilliams, Adler. 1 l I-'Q' "-itz 1. - R' i W - W 7' ' ll "1 1 , ff .1 , 4: 51' 'W fn 4 is 4, .i 2 jx Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z, Basketball S VV RO TH FREE OULS F LS CCNA FIELD ,J IQ NELSON HARMAN COFFMAN HALL KNEISLEY A RESUME OF THE BASKETBALL SEASON Although the scores put Wabash in a poor light. the season was really more successful than one might imagine from the final results as such. When one considers the calibre of the Little Giants opponents, the resultant scores were not as important as was the spirit and determination with which the Vaughanmen met these superior teams. lt is interesting to note that the Wabash cagers played the best games against the strongest opponents. After the overwhelming defeat of Illinois, the Scarlet fell before "Piggy" Lambert's mighty cage machine, only to turn in a good game against Wittenburg the fol- lowing weekend. The Cavemen were at their best against the strong Northwestern University team, keeping in close touch with the Wild- cats until the last minutes when the superior play of Reiff and john- son gave the Purple a 3l to 24 victory. Outstanding performances were given by Nelson and Harman. loyce and Mason, sophomores, playing remarkably gocd games. At the close of the season, Eddie Nelson was chosen honorary captain of the squad. Nelson, Coffman, Harman, and Hall played their last games for Wabash, but with the necessary experience next year's team has promise of being exceptionally strong. 112 we ,,. Y: 'ft if 4 ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ SCORES OF THE 1933 December December December December january january january january january February February February February February February March 6-XNABASI-I 1 2-WABASH 1 7-WABASH 27-WABASH 2-WA BASI-I 9-WABASH 1 4-VVABASI-I 1 8-WABASH 31-WABASI-I 4-WABASH 8-WABASH 1 4-WABASH 20-WABASH 24-WA I3ASI-I 29-WABASH 4-WABASH joYcE OREN BERNS MASON CRISLER SEASON INDIANA 22 MANCHESTER 26 ILLINOIS 24 PURDUE 35 WITTENBURG 32 BUTLER 31 FRANKLIN 20 DEPAUW 29 WITTENBURC 30 NORTHWESTERN 31 FRANKLIN 23 BUTLER 34 EVANSVILLE 27 DEPAUW Z8 EVANSVILLE 37 NOTRE DAME 43 ,4- 47 I. Fobes, Rovenstune, Oren, Kneisley, Coffman, Harman. 2. Freeman, joyce, Mason, Prell, Berns, Vaughan, Riker, Heath, Nelson. I. Bungaman, Sauklcy, jones, Smvth, B. B., Snyder, Smnth, R. M., Fushcro. Z, Paterson, Mason, Hanna, Davis, Lockridgo, Hollctt, Sowlc, Adler. , -ll -L 1 , yu V1 5 W, .64 1 "2 ff ,A W 'Z K 1 Z3 Q 7 f x W ' ' A Q: Zn Z Z Z Z Z I, 1 i s E Z 2,1 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ,Z 14 Z 12? fZ , f l , if , , af , C , ff, I . 'ZZ ZZ Z .gi vi ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZff v Baseball ERRORS RUNS HHS 3, WRONA SlVllTl-l, S. D. PETERSON LAFDLLETTE BASEBALL, l932 GEROW April 9 WABASI-l 41 PURDUE 5 A fine piece of relief pitching by Griffin, sophomore portsider. halted a Caveman rally in the seventh inning and enabled the Boiler- makers to nose out the Little Giants in the season's opener. April ll WABASI-l l 1 PURDUE 3 After hurling two innings of shutout ball, "Red" LaFollette be- came erratic and allowed two precious Purdue tallies to cross the plate. Despite his issuing of four bases on balls, the sorrel thatched Wabash ace allowed only one safe hit during the game. April I2 WABASl-l l 1 PURDUE 3 Nine bases on balls combined with numerous costly errors by the remainder of the Scarlet permitted Purdue to annex their third vic- tory of the year over the Goldsberrymen. April l3 WABASH 41 PURDUE 3 "Chuck" Wrona's timely single in the eighth inning sent Good- man home with the winning run and the Cavemen took the final tilt of a four game series with the Boilermakers. "Red" LaFollette dispel- led the fallacy that pitchers are poor hitters by clouting a circuit smash with l-linshaw on in the initial frame, April i4 WABASH l43 BALL STATE I3 Wabash captured a long slugfest from Ball State in a game lasting three hours and ten minutes. Wrona annexed batting honors with a pair of Home runs and a single. April l9 WABASH 3: CENTRAL NORMAL 6 A Schoolmaster comeback in the opening half of the final stanza broke a three to three tie and enabled the Purple Warriors to emerge on the long end of a 6 to 3 count. April 23 WABASl-l O1 BALL STATE 6 A four hit pitching performance by Watson, Cardinal pitcher. turned back the invading Little Giants at ivluncie. April 28 WABASl-l l 1 INDIANA STATE 9 Continuing their mid-season slump the Scarlet received a 9 to l lacing for their trouble. Spence, Sycamore mound ace, gave the Cave- men a pair of scratch singles in nine innings of superb flipping. 91 xX Q' X Q 42 'Q fi 1oYcE RIKER THOMPSON SMITH, H. w. RoiviBERo April 30 WABASH lg CENTRAL NORMAL 4 Taking advantage of several Wabash errors at crucial moments of play, Central Normal pushed over three runs in the sixth inning to sweep a second victory over the Little Giants. May 4 WABASH 5: DEPAUW IO Wabash dropped its fifth consecutive game of the I932 season to an alert Tiger nine on May 4. Gehle's play stood out for the Gave- men, the little backstop lashing out a four base hit in the second period. May 8 WABASH 33 BUTLER I Brilliant hurling by LaFollette plus some effective support in the field and at bat enabled the Little Giants to regain their place in the winning column. May I3 WABASH 31 MIAMI 7 Miami avenged a l93l defeat by capitalizing on some slipshod fielding by the Gavemen to register a 7 to 3 victory. Both teams col- lected ten hits apiece, but Wabash was charged with five errors against the Redskins' three. May I4 WABASH O3 OHIO UNIVERSITY 7 The Little Giants: concluded a two day invasion of Buckeye bat- tlefields by dropping a 7 to O decision at Athens. Galabow, Ohio pit- cher, held the Gavemen to only one safe hit in the nine innings. May I7 WABASH 31 INDIANA STATE I3 A ruthless band of sluggers from Terre Haute gave the Scarlet their worst defeat of the year. LaFollette gave only eight hits but in- sufficient support caused the score to mount against the Little Giants. May ZI WABASH 51 OHIO WESLEYAN 8 A fighting finish by the Battling Bishops gave them a three run margin over the Scarlet in a loosely played game on the local diamond. Haase and Peterson had one of their worst days and play in general was sluggish. May 25 WABASH 9: DEPAUW 7 Rising to a new level, the Little Giants attoned for an erratic season by whipping the Methodists at Greencastle, 9 to 7. For the second time in two years LaFollette was the winning pitcher against DePauw. Y Lk.: Q a cs Qui. Seated: Robbins, Beaman, Berol, Thompson, Horton, Smith, C-erow, Oren. Standing: Darter, Peterson, Meese, l-loke, Heath, Riker, loyce, Byrd, Kernodle, Romberg, Coldsberry. BASEBALL 1933 As the book goes to press Coach Goldsberry has whipped his 1933 squad into good shape, but because of weather conditions the first sched- uled games had to be called off. Consequently only a tentative predic- tion can be made at this time about the first string positions. The lineup for the season will probably be: Wrona, first, Romberg, second, Oren, shortstop: "Stew" Smith, third: C-erow, left field, Byrd, center fieldg and l-loke, right field. Peterson, joyce, and Heath will do the pitching, and Berol, Thompson, and Riker will work behind the plate. "Red" Lalfollette, veteran pitcher, will not be in the line-up this year because of sickness, but may work out later in the season. The schedule promises good opposition, and the Cavemen will have to play superior ball in order to come out ahead. The squad shows merit, and will improve with the experience of one or two games. ., . fs- N 1 aku 65,11 W sax-. ,Ass 'f W .1 ,A x X . . . . 4 V. ' - , . - -.f ..r.:s..:e .111 s. M .xg :sq X X - f.. src N 'f 4 ff is Et- ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Minor Sports NIBLICK SPIKES RACKET T E N Maloney, Darnell, robes, i-iomff, Montgomery N I S At the time the book goes to press the Tennis team has not yet swung into action. The members remaining from last year are: Kitchen '33, Fobes '34, Maloney '34, Darnell '34, and l-loruff '34, These men with the addition of two others, to be selected, will most likely see action this year. The team is coached by Professor I-l. C. Montgomery. New tennis courts have been needed and promised for some time. The courts are now being built, and the team is waiting for themg however, they will not be ready in time to allow the team to practice on really good courts. With the new courts and the probability of several good players in the freshman class it appears that Tennis will assume an important place in Athletics on this campus. The entire college, realizing the condition of the equipment for minor sports, welcomes the new courts as an initial move in a project to raise the quality of the athletic equipment. 34 -4 5, fi ' 3. x ' + X a .- Qc YSSSK XS A X N X NE? XXX s .. .. -1 .fa gig-.1 -4 wg -4 .,,X,g.E-s5Q,4.,: qggqt, ,--54-9.1 ' . rffa- ' A 1 - w A - xx xx xx w, X so-mx M- 'Q ' ' " afifxvw - - , X ! YX5Q?SS2mfiel ., - N if ..51152535"'f5fQ E5il'sTxlF-QQ if xx N mf X ww M V3Xx vt Q Q A K Q0 NN K X Si N' X X X XXX X W X ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ C R O S S C O U 'l N l. Darnell, Bomberger, Hall, Kneisley. T R 2. Barden, Boots, Newell. This year's cross-country team has indeed proved itself worthy to be called a "Little Giants" team. Though winning only one meet out of five starts, each meet except one was a battle for supremacy right up to the finish line. The schedule was as follows: Oct. l5-Purdue l5g Wabash 40. Oct. 26-Butler 273 Wabash 28. Cct. 29-Ball State 24, Wabash 3l. Nov. 5-Ball State 253 Wabash 30. Nov.l2-DePauw 3l 3 Wabash 24. The Purdue meet was the only really poor showing of the season, for strong Boilermaker team preceded the entire Wabash team to the C-reat improvement was shown in the following meets, and of course the tape. won over the DePauw Tigers, while the Butler Bulldogs won over Wabash by a flimsy margin of one point. The squad was composed of Hall '33, Kneisley '34, Bomberger '34, Boots '34, Newell '34, Darnell '34, and Barden '35. These men received minor letter awards. Next year's prospects are exceedingly bright, for only one man is be- ing lost by graduation and there is promising material in this year's fresh- man squad, composed of Downey, Hall, Howell, Greenebaum, Weaver, and McCulloch. This squad ran in two meets, one at Purdue, and the other against Butler. To the uninitiated, Cross Country teams having low scores defeat op- ponents with high scores. This may explain the incongruity between the scores and write-up. The Editors also had a little difficulty in this con- nection. Z Z Z Z , Z Z Z Z Z Y Z f . Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z X Z X Z Z Z it is most gratifying to Wabash men that the lone Caveman victory was Z Z Z Z Z . Z Z . Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZZ G O L F T l Squire Rhodehamel, Taylor. 2 Ames Underwood. E A M The Wabash C-olf Team opened its l933 season on April 22 by drop- ping a match to the Purdue linksmen on the course of the Lafayette Coun- try Club. The match was closer than the score of l4-4 indicated, the dit- ference between the two teams resting primarily in the ability of the Pur- due men to conquer a strong and chilly breeze. Squire won his singles match while Rhodehamel and Taylor managed to garner a point apiece to score the Wabash counters. Rhodehamel, Taylor, and Squire are the lettermen of last year's squad. with Underwood, Ames, and Wachs competing for the remaining position. Competition for this position, scheduled for early April, was delayed by in- clement weather and was due to be held the week following the Purdue match. This competition was to be in the form of a thirty-six hole medal play match over the links of the Crawfordsville Country Club, where all home matches are played. The l933 schedule, although tentative as the book goes to press, was expected to include a return match with Purdue, home and home games with DePauw and Indiana State Normal College, and a possible match with Indiana. Entries also were sent to the state intercollegiate meet to be held at Terre Haute. ln past years Wabash golfers have lost this tournament by the slim margin of a missed putt. The l932 team squad had only fair success, placing sixth in the team standing. With three veterans around which to build the squad, and under the able coaching ot james l. Paterson, freshman coach and intramural direc- tor, this year's team has every prospect of a successful season. ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ fZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ NWI! M E N S C L U B l. 2. 3. 4. Snoddy, Ault, Bomberger, Hall, Stierwalt, Varner. Smith, l. Q., Whitney, Nelson, Vinroot, Smith, S. D., Wrona, Harman. Berns, Riker, Beaman, Milam, Mangus, Reinert, Blackmore. LaFollette, Kutz, Boots, Darnell, Coffman, Newell, Cerow, Kneisley, Fol The "W" Men's Club sponsors the annual Homecoming Luncheon in the gymnasium for the Student body, the alumni, and friends of the college. The fraternities cooperate with the club by never serving lunch on Home- coming Saturday, and consequently, the lunches are usually successes. With the money obtained from these lunches the club buys the gold awards pre- sented each year to the graduating lettermen. The members for the year were: Snoddy ............... Footba Riker --- --- Football Ault .... Senior Manager, Footba Beaman -- --- Football Bomberger ....... Cross Country Milam --- --- Football Hall ..... ..... B asketba Mangus -- --- Football Stierwalt -- -- Footba Reinert ..... --- Football Varner --- -- Footba Blackmore --- Football l. Q. Smith ........... Footba LaFollette .... Baseball Whitney ............. Footba Kutz .... ....... F ootball Nelson --- Basketball, Footba Boots --- Cross Country Vinroot ........-..-,. Footba Darnell --- --- Cross Country S. D. Smith Baseball, Basketbal Coffman --- ...... Basketball Football Newell -- Cross Country Wrona ....... Baseball, Footba Cierow --- ....... Football Harman ..... Basketball, Footba Kneisley - Cross Country Berns ....... Basketball, Footba Fobes ..... ...... B asketball Chuck Wrona was President, and Professor Carscallen was Faculty Sponsor. THE PLAN lContinued From Page 8l So it is with the other sacrifices involved in a limited enrollment. They do not seem to outweigh the benefits to be derived from such close per- sonal contact and the resulting united effort of teachers and students to perfect an opportunity for each undergraduate to educate himself accord- ing to his special abilities and interest. This program of emphasis on the individual student involves: lal the selection of a particular type of studentg lbl the securing of the intelli- gent, sympathetic, and whole-hearted support of the Faculty, lcl the adop- tion of a well-balanced and unified curriculumg ldl the harmonizing of all student activities, athletic as well as non-athletic, with the rest of the plan. These four divisions of the educational plan at Wabash l shall treat in the order named. The selection of a particular type of student involves more than dis- covering the degree of an applicant's scholastic ability, although scholastic ability is important. According to our entrance requirements, preference is given to boys who have stood in the first or upper third of their class in an accredited high school. For such boys we stipulate no other specific scholastic requirements. They will have the fifteen units of required work anyway, and even after allowing for the differences in high schools, the fact that they stood in the first third of their class indicates that they have both the capacity and the will to do creditable work in their studies. For boys who stand in the middle third of their class in high school, we require a high-school certificate and in addition stipulate that they shall have had two years of some one foreign language. Applicants in the lowest third of their class in high school are not ad- mitted on certificate, nor at all, except upon successfully passing entrance examinations. They must have had two years of foreign language and must demonstrate in their examinations that they are capable of doing creditable work in college. ln these scholastic requirements we are frankly endeavoring to secure a fairly homogeneous group of students as far as scholastic ability and in- terests are concerned. I have combined ability and interest because a four-year high school record reveals something of both. We desire other evidence of the appli- cant's readiness to profit by our rather restricted and fairly intensive pro- gram. We are particularly anxious to learn anything we can of his inter- ests, and our application blanks are designed with this thought in mind. In addition to the application blanks, either the Dean or the President or some representative of the administration endeavors to have a personal interview with each applicant whose scholastic record seems to indicate his readiness for college. Actually, this is not possible in all cases, but if'not, we attempt to accomplish something of the same sort by personal corres- pondence. The basis of admission is determined by the type of student who will profit most by what the College has to offer. The technique used is de- signed to help us discover this type of student. Where the number to be admitted is small, a more time-consuming and rather more personal tech- nique can be followed. This basis of selection is in harmony with the best interests of the individual. l grant that in certain institutions it seems inevitable that all students should be admitted who have completed their high-school require- ments. Nevertheless, l can conceive of no greater injustice than willingly to admit either a boy or a girl, or for that matter a man or a woman, into a situation where we know the student is doomed to be found deficient and subsequently to be discharged and forever after to be marked with the stigma of failure. lContinued on Page l23l , f? ,WZ xx Q-EXP gm? N f-x -., -sig.--1.--swiss.-f-:....:ss:rf.:- 1"sN?wrf1'.' 't SN NWN 12 fvxfklibkslxx -- .. .s v XX Activities T1 2' 4 1 U s I r X 1 1 4 P P' ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z Publications INK H RCON IA PUBLICATIONS BOARD The Publications Board is composed of the editor and business-manager of each campus publication, a senior member of Pi Delta Epsilon, and Pro- fessors Osborne, Ormes, Willis johnson, and Plummer. The Board re- ceives recommendations from its members and elects all men for positions on the various publications. The Board was founded with the purpose of improving the quality of publications by means of general criticism and suggestion. lt also serves as a restraining influence on too radical or expensive movements on the part of any sub-board. In its regular meetings this year, beside electing heads of publica- tions, the Board has established a precedent by requiring the editors and managers to be members of the junior class and to have at least a l.OO average. This has been a noteworthy measure, because of the enormous amount of work which the reading courses require in the Senior year. The Board has discussed calmly and unhurriedly the merits and faults of college comic magazines in general and those of the Caveman in particular. Although the Board does not dictate editorial policy, it is helpful with its suggestions, and any problems are brought before it. Through its ef- forts the editors and managers are not elected because of time served, but on the basis of work done. Kenneth C. Lovgren and j. jeffrey Auer were Chairman and Secretary of the Board respectively. Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z I ZZ Z 1 Z ,Z Z ZZ Z Z ZZZ ZZ 1 if gf Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ,Z Z Z ZZ .4 Z ZZZ ZZ Z ZZ ll? Z aissig 2111 Z 1 :Z .4 ZZZZ lr! ZZ Z l. Burroughs, Peck, Rhodehamel, Cole, Lovgren, Auer. 2. Sallak, Rush, Taron, White, Willis, Bales. Pl DELTA EPSILON Pi Delta Epsilon, the national honorary journalistic fraternity, has been on the Wabash campus for nine years and in that time has served as a goal for all men interested in publications. Recognition is given to men who have done outstanding work in journalism on the staffs of the campus publications. Meetings are held regularly throughout the year at which various questions of journalistic policy and the problems of the members are considered. The fraternity, in keeping with its ideals of Service, again published a Pi Delt Handbook and expects to revive the "Scarlet Rash" this spring. The Rash, with its rather sadistic caricature and caustic criticism, is the most popular of all the school publications, Each year the fraternity sends a representative to the national con- vention where the problems of college journalism are discussed. OFFICERS Kenneth C. Lovgren ..................-.... President Merrill E. Taron ...................... Vice-President j. j. Auer ....... , ................ Secretary-Treasurer james l. Osborne Willis H. johnson -- ................ Faculty Members john M. Plummer Miller Horuff Kneisley Cole T H E w A A B A S H None despite the modernistic with more scorn than do the editors of the i933 Wabashg however, few regard the modern manner of treat- ment with more sincere homage than do these four scribes. They inter- pret the modern manner as a direct and frank treatment of the subject at hand combined with a somewhat detached, though interested, running com- mentary on pertinent matters of today. They have attempted to apply this formula to the Wabash, with dubious results. Though locked up by the "Wabash College Plan", the book has no par- ticular theme. Each division, section, and page is treated separately with only an attempt at a common style. If the book seems to be unorganized. the editors ask that you test a theory of theirs: "The most cock-eyed ob- jects, when looked at with a cocked eye, will assume fairly symmetrical form". ln spite of the New Deal, advertising was at a distressingly low level this year, Bob Rhodehamel has done the best job possible in financing this book and his handling of the sordid details has shown much better results than might be expected in this era of Forgotten lvlen, a large number of whom are publishing college yearbooks. 11 1 1 1116 111 1 1111115 511111: 1111 9 111 111 511 111 1111 1111911 11 11 11 11 1 111 111 11 115 1 11 1511 1111 1 1 1 1 111 1111 1' 1111111111 11111 1 -11 1 111111111 1 1141 41111 V 11 41 1 51 11 :11,11 51111111 11311 4X1 111 21111 21111111 111111 111 1 1 11111 4,1 11 1 111 11111115 2511111 11112 "11?1 1? 1 1 1 1'1 11' 111111 111111 Q11 11 ' 11 11 1 111 111 111 21111 1 11211 Z 11152 11 11111 11 1 1111 11135 5111 11111 111 1 51153 11 W 1 iff? 1 1 231111 1? 11 111' 11 1, 5111 1 41111 11112 111111 ' 1 1111111 11 ,GV 111 111 1111111 11111, 1-215 1111151 411111 11111 1111 1111: 11 ff 1111: 11 E1 Q11 ,1 1119 I 1111 1 11 1 , 11' 11: 11 1 111 .9111 15111 N 1111: 11111 1111 11115 1 11 X 511 I 11 511111 1111111 211111111 11 1113115 21115 111111 511111 31111 2511 111111 111111 111111 1111 1211 1111 1111 1111 111 11111 2111112 11111 1 1g1 1111 Z? : 1f 1 1 I 1 1 11 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1' ' 11,1 1 1911 1 1111 1 111111 1 11111 1 111 7 X 1 X 1 1 11 X 111 I 1 1 1' 1 1 1, 1 11 1111 1 1 41511 211 11 1111 1111 11 1 111,11 11'1 gm: 111115 1111 2111111 1111111 gm, 511111 'f 11112111 2111111 111111' g,,111,11 5111115 5 2:11 111 11311 7 1X3 11 1114 111111 1111 2111111111 fn 111111 2111115 1 1111111111 1 1 i '11111 111,111 '111 11111114 11111111 11111 411111113 112 11111 ' 21111111 1 11 111111111 11111111 1121111 1111 1111 1'11r1f 1111 51111111 11111 5916114 111111 1111! 11114, 5191! W1 11 11 Q 211111 1' 11111 51111111 1111 1111111111 1112! 2111111 1111! 111111111 ff 2111151111 1111 11111112 2111111 111 21111111 111111111 9111112 11111 '11 11111111 111,15 1111? '1111111 51111117 11131 211911 111111 111111 211121 1191 gag "f11 21111 .11 111 111111 1111! 11111 1111! 111111 2112! 711 11111 111 11.11 1111 11111 21111: 111 11-111 411 1111 11 21 511 1 1 111 11 1111 1111 15111 1111111 RHODEHAM EL 1. Porneroy, Rhoads, Creenebaum. 2. Snyder, jones. STAFF MEMBERS G. Kendall Cole' jr. ------- ----,,. C hairman of the Board Robert H. Rhodehamel -------- ------- B Usiness Manager EDITORIAL BOARD BUSINESS STAFF I. C. Miller F. j. Horuff N. W. Kneisley G. F. C. E. M. E. A. F. K. P. E. N. Snyder Pomeroy Underwood Rhoads jones Greenebaum T H E C A v ACKELMIRE E l Stults Rush Forrest 2 Kline Stepka Venners. M A N The Caveman is Wabash College's contribution to collegiate humor. appearing six times in the course of a school year. The l933 period of existence has been enough to give any editor a nervous breakdown, and we are amazed that Ackelmire has remained stoically calm in spite of the row raging around him. The readers of college comics have radically diverse standards by which they judge the merit of humorous publications. Some think that a humor magazine should be cloaked in subtletyg others clamor for outspoken dirt. Some affect a liking for the ultra-sophisticated and unfathomable humor of the New Yorker type: others prefer Ballyhoo. A few demand a literary magazine. l-lowever, it is interesting to note that the Caveman is sent to appreciative readers in other schools by the very men who, while criticiz- ing it, capitalize on the opinions it gives of Wabash. The Caveman has grown accustomed to these difficulties. lt has been buffeted by the postal authorities, and been criticized for uninteresting sanctimoniousnessg however, it continues to exist as one of the best humor- ous college publications in the Middle West. ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ fZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ T H E C A V E M A N BURROUCI-IS I. Cain, Kraning, Robertson, Davis. 2. Leowi, Beaber, Harris, Sigrist, Prestin. john G. Ackelmire --- - ........... Editor W. Leslie Burroughs -- ...... Business Manager I. A. Stepka -- R. W. Frank -- B. E. Kline ..... K. E. Rush --- K. C. Lovgren --- EDITORIAL --- Assistant Editor --- Assistant Editor --- Assistant Editor - --- Exchange Editor BUSINESS I. W. Davis ...... .... A ssistant Advertising C. R. Robertson B. W. Beaber --- A. A. Sigrist -- --- --- Assistant Advertising -- Assistant Advertising - ........ Circulation PROVISIONARY BUSINESS STAFF --- Feature Editor Manager Manager Manager Manager A. B. Cain C. I. Kraning M. A. I-larris A. L. Loop C. B. Prestin T H E B A AUER WHITE C l Creenebaum, Stephens, Lovgren, Byrd, Bowman. 2 Schnur Sundlof, Hunter. H E L C R With Auer and Ludwig at the helm in the positions of editor and busi- most successful publications of that period. The second semester was ness manager, the Bachelor came through the first semester as one of the White and Ludwig directing the policies of the Bachelor in much the same efficient manner that chara cterized its handling during the first four months of the current year. An unusual feature of the paper was the weekly colyum, "Parade", conducted by Kenneth C. Lovgren for the first semster and by jeff Auer for the second. The column delt with satire and casual comment on hap- penings of interest aboutthecampus and nation. A sound editorial policy that gave the editor's views on timely knews of the day also did much to improve the content of the paper. Managing editors for the year were: ludd Davis. William Stephens, Daniel Wachs, and Bob jordan. Bob Frank fulfilled the position of literary and feature editor with the best judgment and interest shown in that de- partnemt for some time. lack Miller for the second straight year handled the sport writeups with customary vigor. will be competently guided for the next four years. were uncovered, and it seems reasonably safe to predict that the Bachelor Several freshman journalists who showed considerable writing ability N Z 5 .Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z. Z Z if ZZ Zli ff ZZ ,. ZZ Z IZ? Zvi , Z Z Z WZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ .Z 'Z 352221 its aw HZ 3 ai Elf Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ Z ZZ f ZEMZ Z iw :Zvi 25599 I f 7 ZZ if if 4 Z 191 if Z ZZ 22555 if Z, 23 gi I Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z k Z Z Z ,. gi mwssw si Z Z N Zi T I-I E . B A C H E L O R LUDWIC I. Ietfery Auer ....... I. Parlon, Stilling, Northcutt, Hollett. 2. Marmaduke, Clements. Luke White .............-.... Leo M. Ludwig Editor, First Semester Editor, Second Semester Business Manager EDITORIAL W. C. Stephens ..................... Managing R. D. jordan ........................ Managing D. P. Wachs ....................... Managing I. C. Miller .............. .- ............. Sports R. W. Frank ......................... Literary I. I. Auer ............................. Parade C-. R. Byrd ........................ Intramurals E. N. Cireenebaum ..................... Column Reporters: Bowman, Shearer, Underwood, Schnur, Porzak, Sundlof, I-lunter, McCulloch, Lanigan. Editor Editor Editor Editor Editor Editor Editor Editor BUSINESS K. W. Stilling ...............-. Ass't Business Manager D. H. Northcutt ............... AsS't Business Manager B. P. Hollett ..........-....--. Ass't Business Manager I. C. Parlon ..............-.... Ass't Business Manager R. L. Clements ......-......... AsS't Business Manager R. A. Marmaduke .............. AsS't Business Manager j, N. Theobald ................... Circulation Manager ADVISORY BOARD K. C. Lovgren I. I. Auer B. I. Peck WILLIS I Schetnitz, Hays, Davis, Klevorn, Frankenfield, Dwyer. 2 Kraning Parlon, Smith, Hunter, Menaugh, Elliott, Forrest, Stults. Because of the Centennial Celebration the News Bureau has had a very busy year. The Bureau is Wabash's publicity department, for its job is to see that newspapers are supplied with articles about Wabash whenever happenings on the cam- pus are noteworthy. Before the Centennial the Bureau was constantly busy supplying the newspapers of Indianapolis, Chi- cago, and other cities in Wabash "territory" with the news of the celebration. The success of the Centennial was due in a great part to the efforts of the managers and their assistants. This year the Bureau, to help finance itself, sold programs at the Butler and Miami football games. In normal times the Bureau busies itself with sending out personal news, news of the schooI's forensic activities, and pre- game information of the practice of the athletic squads. In charge of the Bureau this year were Henry Willis, Sen- ior Manager, and john W. Davis, junior Manager. Their as- sistants were: Douglas Klevorn, Fredrick Frankenfield, john T. Hays, and C. j. Kraning. The Bureau is under the supervision of the Alumni Sec- retary, john M, Plummer, himself one-time director. 'Q 3' I A fl f , M :fm ., 1, , 4, Z 1,1 , f x Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 1 Z Z, fl Z Xxstmmtm ,1 Z1 ,. 41 Z Zi ,, Z, Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z X A Z ubs RELATIONS ONAL : : INTERNATI GERMAN SPANISH ENCH FR l Mangus Reynolds, Davis, Lamb, Breading, Cassel. 2 Bever Livengood, Boots, Van Cleave, Baldwin, Carscallen, Beaver. ALPHA Pl Alpha Pi Science Club, since it was organized in i927 by Ralph How- ard, has been perhaps the most active of any of the divisional clubs. The members, not bothered by the need of expressing themselves in a tongue other than their native one, can devote the majority of their time to such scientific dissertations that one might expect to occupy the minds of sci- entifically inclined men. Members of the club are offered a wide comprehension of the entire field of Science, rather than highly technical discussions always in one par- ticular branch. ln order to prevent the members from becoming too technical and academic in their viewpoints, the meetings are usually devoted to topics of applied science as manifested in the World of today. Many of the men concentrating in Division l are preparing for work in Medicine, and the sub- jects for discussion are usually considerations of the part which basic sci- ence plays in the different branches of Medicine. The officers for the year were: Louis H. Breading, President: Stewart D, Smith, Vice-President, William W. Davis, Secretaryg and Robert L. Hop- kins, Treasurer. l l' 4" 'aa 15 7 A Z2 ef Z 'fs X X X wggmc 7? l' 1 Q Q: l 1 I f 1 7 54 f 5 f' l 1 Eff' E 4 2 f f 5 V f Zi .W 4 l 5 Z Q Z , Q 7 , i V l 1' , i 6 , 3 , ,., ZZ SZZ2 We in ZZZ ZZ? VZ iZi Z Z i Z ZA? ZZ? ZZ: ZZ, . W 2 Zi? , Z Z Z VZ Z 5 ,Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ X X X X NXX Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z. Z 'ZZ ZZ WZ, ZZ ZZZE QWZ: 1 Z ZZ? ye ZZ ZZ ZZ yn Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z 12Zi vit aiZsZi ZZZE ZZ Z 4 ZZZ .ZZ 5 fl Z 2 l Z Z Z A. l. larvis, Leavenworth, Robison, Beamer. 2. Willis, Rhoads, Merchant, Stafford. LE CERCLE FRANCAIS The French Club entered this year upon its thirteenth season of con- its original purpose, it well as amusing and to knowledge, not only of and life. tinual and active existence. Not deviating from has attempted to have its meetings educational as give advanced students a chance to increase their the French language, but also of the French culture To this end the club was particularly fortunate this year in obtaining as speaker at one of its meetings M. Francis Biraud, a native Frenchman but recently come to this country. At other meetings members of the club spoke on news of the day in France, French literature, or some phase of French social life. At an early meeting the annual game of bridge was played using only the French language to convey power and kibitzing com- ments. The club octette was well received this year. It was composed of Sallak, Beamer, Bomberger, Kutz, Willis, Stepka, Sundlof, and Rhoads, who performed at the meetings and also for the Christmas Chapel program. The officers elected at the first meeting of the year were Robison, President, Stafford, Vice-President, and Beamer, Director of Programs. Mem- bers who are not in the above picture include Blackburn, jordan, Bomberg- er, Bradshaw, Meyers, Sinnet, Underwood, Wachs, Sundlof, Ragan, Vissch- er, Sallak, Bales, and l-lome. l. McEwan, larvis, Eldridge, Robison, Rubush. 2. Todd, Blackburn, Cleaves, Hunter, Vogel. 3. Dwyer, Shearer, Beamer, Elliott. EL CIRCULO ESPANOL The Spanish Club has been reorganized and meetings this year have been more frequent and interesting than in the past. EI Circulo provides adequate opportunity for its members to become accustomed to using Span- ish in conversation. Through the club members can become acquainted with important Spanish authors and musicians. In the meetings, which were held once a month at the various fraternity houses, time is devoted to conversation in Spanish, singing Spanish songs, and playing Mexican games. This year's entertainment committee, consisting of Shearer and larvis, provided the club with interesting talks by Dr. Ball, Mrs. Lind, and other speakers who are acquainted with the life and habits of the Spanish and South American races. Because of the difficulty of understanding just what is happening in Spain and Mexico today, these talks have been invaluable. Professor Eldridge was Faculty Sponsor with Robison as President, Ru- bush, Secretary, and Romberg, Treasurer. s W f 153: zz zu YA, ,W 4, N ,4 if Z '39 QV ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z f l. Carscallen, Adolfson, Domroese, Maloney, Wezel. 2. Schetnitz, Lamb, Reynolds, Schwartz, Vinroot, Schnur 3. Davis, Greenebaum, Hoaglin, Vojvoditch, Stephens, Beamer DER DEUTSCHE VEREIN The purpose of the German Club, which was organized in l925, is to foster conversational German, the singing of German songs, and the study and appreciation of German culture. Membership in the club is limited to twenty-five. Of the ten meetings held during the season, the Christmas program, at Professor Domroese's, always has its peculiar charm, with German Christmas music and Frau Domroese's excellent German food. One evening ot the year was devoted to the poetic-musical genius ot Wagner, another to the personal histories of tive outstanding German scientists, and still another to the memory of Sir Walter Scott, because ot his connections with German Literature. In line with the exchange idea among college German clubs which are close enough to visit one another, the German Club of DePauw sent its players to Wabash on April l9th to present Mark Twain's "Meis- terschatt", a three act comedy. The members of the club earned the undying respect of one of the Editors when he attempted to work a German cross-word puzzle at a meet- ing he attended uninvited. OFFICERS Lorentz H. Adolfson ............ ....... P resident john Maloney ....... -- Vice-President Professor Domroese .... .... S ecretary Earnest Carscallen ...... --- Treasurer I Adolfson Tomlinson, Kitchen, Davis. 2 Stephens Auer, Olson. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB The International Relations Club is the newest and most novel of the Wabash College organizations. This group was formed by Professor Tom- linson last year at the request of the students in the International Rela- tions course, and membership was limited to these. This year, although the course is not being offered, the club has remained active and consists of all those interested in problems of world relations. Meetings are held monthly and are in the form of a round-table dis- cussion, a subject being decided upon at the previous meeting. As there are no regularly elected officers, Professor Tomlinson acts as chairman. Connections are maintained with the Carnegie Foundation for Inter- national Peace. The Foundation has donated a small library to the local club and has provided it with "Fortnightly Review Sheets" of current in- ternational questions. Also, through the aid of this organization, a speaker is procured each spring to address the members. This year lvlr. l. Oyama, former member of the japanese Diet, spoke to the club on "japanese Pub- lic Opinion on the Manchurian Policy". Wabash sent four men to the state convention at Indianapolis which was presided over by john Kitchen, president of the Indiana Association of International Relations Clubs. Mr. Kitchen is a member of the local club and was very active in the formation of the body. The organization of like clubs is a movement that has spread rapidly through the colleges of Indiana and neighboring states. As a result of this an Interstate convention is Planned for the Spring. 0 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 2 2 Z Z ZZ Z Z QZZQ QEEZZ' my :Zz amy :il if 15: M3 ps 25221122 We ,W Zz, Z MZ WZ 1 WZ asm QZZZ :WZ WZ W fi Zz Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z , Z Z QW! ZZ 411151 QW :ZZ ,ZZ ZZ ZZ 45 W? Z :Z53 M2 W, 1- WZ 2553? ZW, ZW, MZ ZZZ ZZ' Z 55 if Z ZZ Z Zlb Z., ,,, Zim? EZ can :Z :sm 14' :mu Z M 35:1 11:2 "W was sf 1 EV X ,, , HZ ZZ ,xc EZZU ZZZZ ZZ M221 12212222 was MZ: ,W Zin? EEZ MZ dwg! 55111 Vw: QW Z Z ZZ QZZ sd 2321432 MEZZ: .Mr QM? Drama cmd Music Zwfm. Q f "Sami LE MARZIA ODERATO M MA RA MELOD in K f li, 'i If . ,. S 1' 4 N I V ' X :M E its 1 I 1 ff 1 ,nj , , 7 fd, 1 Z X 1,5 Q36 2,5 Z7 gy pf 574 gffj Vf'Q5 Z Q Z 2, 1 K C 14 A 1 f"4' 2 , 93, " Z 1 , 42 6 11' 32: ia VI' ' Zi? 1, .rg VU ?7, 'X IM 9' 41 Qu .XZ U6 'fc f W2 f, 2: , A, 1,122 3 42 M ' W' fl! KW 577 ' M4 Z 1 1 z ,Q '47,-2 1 if 4, Z ' 1 1,, jf 1 1 W 1 1 4 1 fi 367 32:15 1 9 1 0 O Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Ziff M, Z llllg ZIZ MZ: ,iiZiZ,Mz Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z N DRAMA lOn the opposite page the Editors present a pictorial impression of "The Fallen Saved". Stilling, Coffel, and Schwartz, the unseen guardians of the properties, watch anxiously over the destinies of their mimes. Mem- ering and Gleason tread the boards, while in the wings, Miss Caplinger awaits her cue and the grips make the most of a welcome lull. Rubush mutters lines from the prompt corner, and Sowle works the lights. Five masquers enact the ribald and dissolute Barroom scene.l The Wabash dramatic organization came from behind its Scarlet Masque to face a new year with all the zest and zeal of the immortal Thes- pians. When the curtain rang down upon the last vehicle of the season, the treasury of the club found itself literally "out of the scarlet" for the first time in years, a condition which stands as a tribute to the successful handling of affairs by coach, cast, and officers. Upon the completion of her first hundred years Wabash men gathered for the Centennial celebration, and in conjunction with the program, the Scarlet Masque, tossing aside all regard for such famous temperance ex- periments as the now popularly infamous Volstead Act, inaugurated a new era in the college's theatrical activities with the presentation of "The Drunkardg or, The Fallen Saved", a nineteenth-century melodrama, depict- ing in a humorously serious vein the evils of Bacchanalian revelry. Received by a capacity crowd, this tasty morsel of highly flavored social life revealed that the pioneering spirit of the club was not in vain, for campus critics were unanimous in their agreement that another century will probably roll around before a more popular melodrama is presented. Ably coached by Professor Phillips, the cast went through the antiquated antics and amateur anticlimaxes of the play with a precision and earnest- ness which brought hisses and cat-calls to the dastardly villain and applause to the weak-willed hero who finally realized the evil of his transgression and riobly restored equanimity to family and friends. Included in the cast were Harry Memering, Hollis Gleason, Richard Olson, Max Keenan, Ford Larrabee, and the Misses Caplinger and Cox. just before Spring Vacation the "Footlight Frolics" were presented to an enthusiastic audience. Vaudeville skits were staged by five fraternities and were so well received that a similar performance will undoubtedly be given next year. At the conclusion of the program the Sphinx Club pre- sented a silver cup to the Phi Cams for their "For Better or Verse", an un- usually clever playlet satirizing prominent people of today. Heading the list of the faithful followers of the immortal Roscius were Kenneth C. Lovgren, presidentg Russell A. Ames, vice-president: Ford R. Larrabee, business manager, and Victor L. Schwartz, stage manager. Try- outs for membership in this college clan of amateur adherents to the foot- lights were held late in the second semester, when approximately twenty new names were added to the roll of the Scarlet Masque. o R C H E S T R A ORCH ESTRA VIOLINS: Adolfson, Hollett, jones, Vojvodich, Bruce, Ronk, Venners, Snoddy. CLARI N ETS: Merchant, Sumner, Willis. TRUMPETS: Neal, Hanlin. TROMBONES: Frank, McEwan. TUBA: Livengood. HORNS: Montgomery, Horuft. SAXOPHONES: Kraning, Rowe. STRING BASS: Stephens. PIANO: Doren. BAND TRUMPETS: Neal, Hanlin, Moseley, Menaugh, Nelson, Hatfner, Trip- pet. CLARINETSZ Willis, Bever, Canine Parker, Hudson, Merchant, Tay lor, Weaver, Sumner, Milligan. TENOR SAXOPHONESZ Kraning, Si- grist, Rowe. ALTO SAXOPHONES: Venners, Har- man. BARITON ES: Montgomery, lewell. TROMBONES: Frank, McEwan, Thorne. BASSES: Livengood, Hird. ALTOS: Lamb, Whitecotton. DRUMS: Horutt, Loop, Hassan. CYMBALS: Stephens. DRUM MAIOR: jones. l B A N T D I A- - I -1 I 1 -I 0 ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZ! Gro Tory ARC-UMENTATION EXPOSITION T A U K A P l Mr. Zilch, Adollson, Kitchen, Davis A A L P H A Tau Kappa Alpha was established for the advancement of oratory in undergraduate circles. The fraternity also recognizes ability and service in intercollegiate debates and oratorical contests. The members must have represented Wabash in either two debates or one oratorical contest. The men pledged this year were: F. R. Larrabee, W. j. Hassan, Luke White, R. M. Vogel, I. T. Hays, N. lvl. Elmore. Mr. Zilch lwhom we know to be l. I. Auer, in spite of his temporary disguise behind the official photographers pince nezl, showing his ver- satility, gives us at one time both an attempt at the Ballyhooesque and a characteristically charming portrayal of the naivete which pervades the department. fn ,W .f we 4 x Wx? W Z! M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M zz M M M M M M M M M ff M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M f Z M M if M M Z 7 M M 77 ZZ M W M ff l. Burroughs, Larrabee, Brigance, Adolfson, Kitchen. 2. Robbins, Auer, White, Crimes. SPEAKERS BUREAU With six featured programs in addition to discussion on the Debate question and fire prevention, the Wabash College Speakers Bureau had its most successful year, filling sixty-two engagements. ln presenting pro- grams the speakers gave talks in towns of all sizes in Indiana and Illinois, from talks to farmers to speeches before the Indianapolis Kiwanis Club. Ap- proximately ten speakers have presented these speeches on subjects includ- ing taxes, the depression, Soviet Russia, and Fire Prevention. The bureau was founded six years ago for the purpose of supplying speakers to all kinds of meetings. Due to the depression there was, this year, an unusually large number of requests for speakers, and several en- gagements had to be refused because of lack of men. The feature of the year was the two-man debate given over the radio between Ford R. Larra- bee and j. jeffrey Auer on the recognition of Russia. Members of the bureau and their subjects were: Lorentz H. Adolfson, "Tomorrow", john M. Kitchen, "This Modern Maze". Leslie Burroughs, "Fire Prevention". Ford R. Larrabee, "Real Heroes of the Depression" and "Recog- nition of Russia". john W. Davis, Book Reviews. j. jeffrey Auer, "Recognition of Russia". Luke White, "Education and the Tax Problem in Indiana". Cale D. Crimes, "Fire Prevention". Wiley Robbins, "Fire Prevention". Announcements of the programs are sent out by Dr. Brigance, and all requests for speakers are made to him. Students desiring to become mem- bers of the bureau must present manuscripts of their speeches for accept- ance, and if accepted, they are added to the list of speakers. Z. t,i,.W - P' 'TT i. Shearer, Phillips, Stafford, Kitchen. 2. Bigler, Vogel, Larrabee, Hassan. T E The question selected for debate this year was "Resolved: That at least one-half of all State and local revenues should be derived from sources other than a tax on tangible property". The regular affirmative team was composed of Adolfson, Kitchen, and White. The negative side was supported by Larrabee, Hassan, and Vogel. Both teams were coached by Professor Phillips. The affirmative team won a decision against Rose Poly, lost to DePauw. and participated in two non-decision meets against Purdue and St. Louis University. The negative lost to Earlham, and met Lake Forest, Evansville. North Manchester, Indiana Central, and Indiana State Teachers College in non-decision debates. The question was unusually pertinent, and extra- ordinary interest was shown by speakers and audiences. wsqffm Mb H h A fi lf5zQf1z??faaW2 5" 4 Q21 . x A 1 w,- I --H .. ..., 2 .. mf .-- F? N .. :-, i, .1-:,,.,,f,,f1wfXany A QW, ' wg-S..-Q.-o'qg',, 'Sc . . s ,V , W., ww- . ,' - - M " Q -W ' , ...w-0',A A A W "" L . .fy H'-v"'f.4x Y " - A!l"""- W', 'f , ,. .M ,Lf ,, ,v M' ' 'A' avvv- "' . 1 li l - 0 I T- F I ll I I r 5. E . F s I U t G ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ fZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ I. Sigrist, Anderson, Cassel, Squire. 2. Beaver, Lamb, Taron, Lovgren, Robison. THE PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL OFFICERS William F. Cassel -- .......... ..... P resident Calvin T. Beaver -- ..... Vice-President Francis O. Lamb ........ .- ......... Secretary-Treasurer The Pan-l-lellenic Council is the governing body that rules over the nine national social fraternities on the campus. The Councilmen are elected by their respective fraternities and meet whenever some problem of fraternal welfare arises. They award a cup to the fraternity having the highest scholarship during a semester. A fra- ternity is entitled to permanent possession of the cup if it is won for three consecutive semesters. The Council specifies requirements for initiation and sponsors the Pan- Hell week-end in the spring. 1 4 'J 4 ,.... 1: -....LQa" .QA . 7 -4-- L 10 A . F' F 11 -'l"tf'f3Rr'wsi 5 3 1 '- new if 'fu . fps ,wi l. 2. 3. Ragan, Smith, R. B., TerBeek, Shearer, Smith, R. M., Elliott, Rhoads, Rubu Sowle, Trippet. sh, Hoke, Price, Morris, Smith, F. L., Taylor, Hudson, Home, Neal, 1. W., Snyder, Merchant, Blackmore, Fulton. Breunig, White, Larrabee, Fobes, Neal, R. R., Kitchen, Kostanzer, Robison, Wheaton, Millikan, Frank, l-loruft. j. M. Kitchen H. L. Breunig D. B. Fobes G. V. Blackmore R. W. Fulton 1. I. Hoke R. C. Elliott C. E. Home R. B. Hudson M. S. Ragan ,ff p AP - SENIORS R. E. Kostanzer R. R. Neal IUNIORS R. W. Frank F. l. Horutf F. R. Larrabee SOPHOMORES P. W. Merchant W. l. Millikan Morris Morris l. W. Neal FRESHMEN A. F. Rhoads B. W. Rubush W. W. Shearer R. L. Sowle R. B. Smith W. l. Robison R. W. Wheaton Luke White H. L. Price F. L. Smith C. F. Snyder R. M. Smith R. S. Taylor R. B. TerBeek C. K. Trippet Tau Chapter established ,I ' it 15.5 if M xi? 'Wi i if 2 .wi if 2 if 122 E114 41' il Mi 312 ,449 A14 if X27 f ZZ f fa f 1 Z Z K! f fi 4 f 1 44 W 1. W if W1 1, Z X f Z W W3 .,. 2 V4 I4 1 . Wi 4 M Z6 , 1 ,7 I ,4 M f Q 5 I 2 .4 Z i i i 3 i l 24, W2 Z ,I 1. X 94 fff Z If 4 2 4 fi ! I Z ZZ aff Z . lf 1 life 1 T ZZ 1 E: Z ' ZZ MZ ill ill? ' W2 Z Z Z ZZ i ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z i Z L Z 327 Z Z Z L Z l Z Z Z Z 1 Z Z Y Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 13 mmf 2 ll 5 :li V 5 X Z N Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z vv ZZ XZ Z Z . ZZ Z Z 4: 15 5 Z Z ll ZZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ Z Z Z Z :TZ 'Z ., :Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z . Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z A Ted Carmack S. D. Smith j. C. Ackelmire H. C. Bryson T. Z. Ball R. L. Blackburn W. C. Blackburn A. B. Cain 1. N. Freeman jack Forrest T. S. McCulloch Ball, Mueller, Kelso, Schetnitz, McCulloch, Rowe F rrest Smith B B Cain, Robertson, C-leaves, Meahl, Hays, Freeman Harttelter Whitney Todd Blackburn, W. C. Taylor, Lippincott, Ackelmire, Davis, Smith, S. D Wrona Wheeler Carmack Linn, Willis, Bryson. SENIORS M. E. Taron IUNIORS 1. W. Davis C. C-. Linn T. M. Lippincott SOPHOMORES D. E. Cerow A. F. Cleaves S. W. Harttelter 1. T. Hays C. D. Kelso FRESHMEN M. D. Merrell M. S. Merrell C. F. Rowe lndiana Beta Chapter established l B50 W. W. Wheeler C. M. Wrona B. S. Taylor H. E. Willis Ceo. Meahl Bob Mueller C. R. Robertson C. C. Todd P. H. Whitney E. A. Rush B. B. Smith Y N . Q is l. 2. 3. l Schnur, Pedigo, Ciewecke, Hunter, Underwood, M. E., Stilling, Menaugh, Sund- Iof, Easthope. Frankenfield, Klevorn, Cileason, Meese, Newell, Berns, Ames, Maloney, Ken- nedy, Bomberger, Jenks, Berol. Ludwig, Northcutt, Underwood, C-. V., Smith, Lovgren, Theobald, Creigh, Moseley, Freeman, Rhodehamel, Memering. Tom Creigh R. B. Freeman R. A. Ames A. C. Bomberger j. L. Easthope H. E. Berns E. C. Berol F. R. Frankenfield H. C. Cleason R. W. Cewecke l. T. Hanna W. R. Hunter pq- If., SENIORS K. C. Lovgren H. R. Powers V. Sallak IUNIORS l. T. Maloney E. W. Meese H. R. Memering SOPHOMORES Oakley lenks l. O. Kennedy D. M. Klevorn FRESHMEN l. l. Menaugh j. K. Pedigo H. W. Schnur io. 1. N. R. L. P. D. R.H Smith Theobald Moseley Newell Rhodehamel L. M. Ludwig D. H Northcutt C. V. Underwood D. P. Wachs K. W. Stilling W. A. Sundlot M. E. Underwood Psi Chapter established l866 ff, zine ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ X ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ X ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ j. Y. Bales R. C. Harman Cr. K. Cole F. A. Appel C. M. Frasor R. L. Hird R. 1. Krause R. A. Dwyer l. Smith, McEwan, Dwyer, Yeager, Wood, Thoeming Krause 2. Meyers, Romberg, Reinert, Vogel, Lamb, Reynolds Cole Bales Harman 3. Hird, Frasor, Snedicor, Cray, SEN IORS F. O. Lamb IUNIORS M. R. Cray SOPHOMORES j. B. McEwan R. C. Meyers D. F. Reinert FRESHMEN A. l. Thoeming Beta Psi Chapter established l872 Rovenstine, Appel. R. P. Reynolds l. A. Yeager l. A. Snedicor H. A. Romberg C. E. Rovenstine R. K. Smith R. M. Vogel l. A. Wood F. mf A ' I 4 v- - Q ilk V' ff ai ' x l Pa Ion Hanlin, Whitaker, Mason, Kent, Hollett, Stults. Z Null Curts Moore, Kraning, Crisler, Mason, C. F. 3 M Iler Darter, Kelley, Danforth, Squire, Shafer, Riker. M. E. Darter R. E. Crisler W. H. Curts R. F. Evvoldt P. R. Hanlin B. P. Hollett H. 1. Kent AA 04' 'hr SENIORS R. L. Squire lUNIORS l. D. Danforth 1. C. Miller SOPHDMORES j. C. Kraning C. E. Mason FRESHMEN l. L. Lenhardt l. E. Mason l. C. Parlon R. H. Riker C. E. A. Moore E. Ci. Null C-. B. Shafer F. M. Stults 1. E. White M. Whitaker Delta Chi Chapter established l88O xii NSN Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ Z Z Z XV Z ly ZZZ 9sZiii 3 lg? Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z N ff ,ZZ ZW ZZ My im! Zi ZZ Z' W EEfm 'fiSYV Q Z 'Z' , . L. H. Adolfson C. M. Baldwin j. j. Auer C. R. Bradshaw j. M. Darnell A. j. Davis A. P. Charles j. W. Fox E. R. jenkins P. M. Adler R. C. Baker M. R. Bowman C. R. Beeson E. N. Creenebaum L. D. Hall jones, K. P., Saikley, Kline, C-reenebaum, Bowman Spiedel Riggs Weaver MacBeth, Kirtley, Howell. Adler, Beeson, jones, F. D., Snyder, Pomeroy, Fox Vinroot Varner ones D. M., Darnell, jenkins, Ronk, Nunn. Vojvodich, Stephens, Cammack, Bradshaw, Charles Horton Auer Schwartz Wightman, Davis. Warren, Hall, Y. B., Cassel, Hopkins, Baldwin, Nelson Adolfson Gingerich Hall, L. D. SENIORS W. F. Cassel C. N. C-ingerich Y. B. Hall jUNlORS R. j. C-ammack D. E. Horton B. E. Kline SOPHOMORES D. M. jones C. E. Pomeroy T. M. Ronk A. F. Saikley FRESHMEN C. T. Howell F. D. jones K. P. jones W. R. Kirtley M. A. MacBeth C. D. Riggs Alpha Pi Chapter established i895 R. L. Hopkins E. R. Nelson B. T. Nunn H. L. Varner E. C. Vinroot D. D. Wightman V. L. Schwartz W. C. Stephens R. C-. Vojvodich W. M. Snyder R. C. Spiedel F. M. Weaver -1 l Bingaman Clements, Marmaduke, Tompkins, VVilliams, Davis, Baldaut. Z Nelson Thompson, Smith, Kutz, Heath, Caplinger, Kneisley, Stierwalt. 3 Breadung Hutchins, Ault, Keenan, Wymond, Beaver. L. M. Ault C. T. Beaver V. j. Caplinger W. S. Heath C. N. Baldaut R. M. Bingaman .,X SENIORS L. H. Breading F. B. Coffman C. E. Hutchins IUNIORS N. W. Kneisley D. H. Kutz SOPHOMORES R. O. Nelson H. W. Smith FRESHMEN R. L. Clements D. D. Davis R. A. lvlarmaduke "1 S I 4 M. L. Keenan E. R. Wymond R. K. Thompson C. W. Stierwalt E. A. Tomkins l. P. Williams Alpha Alpha Chapter established l9l8 4? , 1 . 0 f f f My ,, ,,. 90, 1 ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ fZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ 1. P. Ang l. Beaber, Loewi, Prestin, Whitecotton, DeLuca 2. Harris, Hassan, Beaman, Milam, Spohr. 3. Peck, Alig, Sigrist, Rush, Burroughs. SENIORS K. E. Rush W. L. Burroughs E. E. Beaman B. W. Beaber A. E. Loewi iuixiioias W. 1. Hassan M. M. Milam SOPHOMORES M. F. DeLuca M. A. l-larris FRESI-IMEN C. B. Prestin Alpha Alpha Chapter established l9Z7 A. A. Sigrist 1. E. Spohr B. j. Peck Lyle jenkins F. S. Whitecofton R. . f I. Byrd, Oren, Brownlee, joyce. 2. Venners, Peterson, Anderson, Thomas, Wright. P. A. Anderson A. D. Thomas C. R. Byrd I. W. Brownlee SENIORS E. C. Peterson SOPHOMORES R. C. Venners IUNIORS L. W. joyce E. W. Pankoke C. R. Oren R. j. Wright Alpha Beta Chapter established 1928 ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ,fZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ fZZ ZZZ ZZZ l. jarvis, Billingsley, Goff, Nave, Bowerman, Twichell, Murdock, R. L. Flaningam, Terry, Luzar, Lanigan, Angell, Carscallen, Merrell, M. S., Rowe. 3. Canine, Murdock, 1. L., Coon, Merreil, M. D., Hunt, Olson, McCaughey, Mer- riff. Pankoke, Boggs, Davis, Wezel, Harbison, Prell, Burkhart. INDEPENDENT MEN Hudson, Robbins, Livengood, Fruits, Bever, Grimes, Dodson, Smith, L. W. O'DelI, Long, Hoaglin, Beamer, Mangus, Hall, F. T., Elmore, Robison, McKinney, Thorne, Cornell, Downey. Barden, Lee, Sumner, McCollum, Stafford. 'iff 4' 'L l-laffner, Canine, Stattord, O'Dell, Robbins. Livengood, McKinney, Davis, lvlangus. Omega was organized with the purpose ot stimulating participation in college activities among the independent men. The membership ot Omega is elected trom among the most active unorganized men, and only men ot outstanding character and leadership are chosen. The club has always been small and kept its standards on a par with its motivating purpose. Several smokers are held each year for the independent men, and the club meets once a month to discuss the problems and proper representa- tion ot these men in college events. The club also chooses the intramural teams for the independents, and submitted a skit tor the "FootIight Frolics". OFFICERS W, W. Davis ............................ President L, R, McKinney ...................... Vice-President W, F, Livengood .................. Secretary-Treasurer , 4 f fi ZZ x X , , ,f ' ,.: .aff V gf ,. Zh fic' , ff' ff, f-if ,VJ '24 Zig ,,,, FN ., 3- S. , XSISNXXN m X ss xv-. NN k . bit XX X E515 ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZ ZZ ff ZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ fZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ X THE PLAN lContinued from Page 86I We, like all institutions, have certain standards that must be met, once the student is admitted. We shall do what we can to help all who enter college to meet, and more than meet, these minimum requirements. I am speaking not only of scholastic requirements but also of requirements of conduct, of good taste, and of attitudes. These are minimum require- ments below which a student may not go without disaster to his college career. We attempt to discover any marked tendencies in an applicant be- fore he is admitted to college rather than afterward. Now, if I may, I should like to leave the applicant just as he is noti- fied that he is, or is not, admitted, and consider the second of my four di- visions-the securing of the intelligent, sympathetic, and whole-hearted support of the Faculty. Possibly I should use the word informed, instead of intelligent, for I have in mind an adequate understanding of the im- portance of the individual and the significance of individual differences. I would emphasize the need for the FacuIty's understanding why the educa- tional program is built around the individual student as of prime importance. I would urge in such a situation as ours that each Faculty member be sympathetic with the point of view that has led us to adopt this particular program, and, of course, if he is to work with the rest of us, we desire. and have the right to expect, his whole-hearted support for the plan adopted by the Faculty, and now in operation. There are certain obvious facts, frequently overlooked, as regards this theory of the importance of individual differences. One is that college pro- fessors differ from one another in about the same ratio that college students differ from each other. Any educational program for a college that ignores this difference in teachers is doomed to mediocrity. Such a program as I am discussing depends on such individual differ- ences in the Faculty. For instance, our incoming Freshman class, of ap- proximately l5O, is divided into twenty groups and assigned to twenty Fac- ulty advisers. This is not a hit-or-miss assignment, but from what we know of the incoming Freshmen we can judge with some accuracy as to which one of these Faculty advisers is best suited to the interests and probable needs of each new student. Even then, the assignment is not made final until the advisers meet, and each new student's name and record is pre- sented. Not infrequently one of the Faculty advisers will say, "I will take that boy," and give his reasons for doing so. If there appears any reason for the boy's having another adviser, the matter is discussed and a decision reached. It is true that in the past I have frequently said that it was not likely that one could find many excellent advisers in an average faculty. I am glad to say that I have changed my mind. At least, given certain condi- tions, I think that teachers as a group are likely to make most excellent ad- visers. Provision must be made, however, for personal differences. Some teachers do not make contacts readily, but if the student will seek them out it is frequently true that such teachers give very good advice, and com- mand the student's respect and personal regard. It is the wise thing in such cases to make the contact for the teacher and thus utilize a good ad- viser. Some teachers make contacts easily enough, but are not skillful in re- peated follow-up work. In special instances where several conferences are justified by the nature of the case, it is better to provide that such fol- low-up work be done by someone else rather than to sacrifice a good first- contact adviser. Such conclusions have led me to believe that by careful cooperative planning many college teachers can be used most effectively as student advisers. In so far as this is true, there are numerous indirect benefits I lContinued on page l24l THE PLAN lContinued from page l23l to be derived from the use of many faculty advisers, in addition to the direct benefit of having enough advisers to go around. One such benefit that I have observed at Wabash is the carrying over of the personal contact technique and point of view into classroom work. Our Faculty give a great deal of time to personal contact instruction, where they sit down with one student at a time and discuss the course work. This is in addition to the regular classroom work, and is quite apart from their work as advisers. l am sure that their advising adds both to their interest and effectiveness in this individual instruction. Our Faculty also Cooperate most heartily in making contacts outside of the classroom where the status of teacher and pupil is more nearly that of associates. l-lere again the principles and practices growing out of interest in the individual student add materially to the profitableness of such contacts. The President and Dean of the College work with the Faculty in all of these activities. Both of them do a great deal of personal interviewing, and together they follow the work of the Faculty advisers and assist them whenever possible. The student's cumulative record card is kept in the Dean's office, since he is constantly using these records in daily personal interviews with students. At no point does our plan of personal contact with students op- erate more effectively than in the Dean's personal relationships with indi- viduals and groups, both in the Faculty and in the student body. As l have indicated, a considerable amount of information concerning each student is obtained from the application blanks. Additional informa- tion is received from the Registrar's office. The Registrar is much inter- ested in this whole plan and is of great assistance in the entire advising program and especially in checking the technical requirements. He watches over the program for all students, checking all technical matters, and also checks the work of the advisers, to make sure that they do not go wrong. l think that if our scheme for handling students on an individual basis has any especial merit it is, in part, in the extent to which the members of the Faculty cooperate with the administration, and in the degree to which the work of these two groups is coordinated. That we should have achieved this cooperation and coordination with so little formalized organization is a source of great satisfaction to me. When the Freshmen arrive they are, first of all, given a series of tests. The next day they are divided into five groups for registration. Five or six members of the Faculty are appointed, for the day, to assist in the registra- tion process. Thus, each Faculty member has about twenty-four men to register-twelve in the morning, and the same number in the afternoon. This allows sufficient time for the Faculty member and the new student to sit down together and discuss the requirements of the College and the desires and interests of the student. Certain technical information is essential at this point. The Faculty member receives it directly from the Registrar, who during these days must work rapidly and accurately to supply the adviser with the answers to the following important questions: l. l-low well did the entrant do in the English Placement Test? If he belongs to the top twenty, the adviser gives him the choice of a top section of Freshman English, or an advanced course of English, or of taking Speech. 2. How did he get along in the Mathematics Placement Test? Does he present college algebra or trigonometry or both, for admission? lf he makes the top twenty he may go into a superior section of Freshman mathe- matics. 3. Does he offer enough mathematics for entrance to register for Sophomore mathematics, or may he waive mathematics altogether and be- gin his science? lContinued on Page l37l -4 fz I, 1 Z f fa I , , 0 lf! " if -,ff if W2 M Z X x Z 4 1 Z Z Z , A 4 Z 1 . ,, X C A X 3 . wg? if Zh Wf , fy , VN Q31 I 1 " 1 Ea I 7 ,R f AN Q SQ Cx x X w SN ,gb if N X IV N Q ,J -34 , .- Q-' .1 hwy 1 " J ,A J . r IS' , WWW Q. f 'lf x X X, 4 K ,. ,, ,f , 'W , ,x 1. . ,V , 1 wwf if , MW if A I gg, .1 . Yf "1 ,.X:?,.z1 H It Lf. . Mi lf: w iii ...,. , . . V, Xj"d'ffvf 'Mb x m f Q ' f Q X WW f , W f ,X sx ' 'S X 1 f 1 J y ff 'nf 4 I ' 1 y , X , "V x .iff y 4 f c if--'if My 17 1 ,W ,1 If , .X m y , W 5 0 M W va x"iK W'-:Tx 1 ---- -?l1- 'S N I f .E v N .L r +,, 9 I If H: .P 'U v ' I -,H 'ey' 1 l l yi il ll li ll l l il l l Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z in Z ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z ZLZ T Z Zif Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Ziff Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z X k CENTENNIAL PROGRAM Saturday, October 29 l0:00 Meeting of the Board of Trustees l2:00 Luncheon in the Gymnasium 2:00 Football Came, with Miami University 7:30 Reception to Alumni by Administration 8:00 Scarlet Masque Play, "The Fallen Saved" Sunday, October 30 l0:30 The Centennial Religious Service 8:00 Concert: The Cincinnati Little Symphony, assisted by the Wa- bash College Orchestra. A Monday, October 31 l0:00 Centennial Academic Assembly lOn the following pages the Editors offer a pictorial conception of the Centennial week-end. No chronological sequence is attempted, other than a presentation of the principal speakers in the order of speaking. The pictures were taken by either the omnispective camera of the official pho- tographer or the irreverent but candid kodak of john Horuffl gn fE'VE"' an . 'rf' ' fl. V ' Yu , I ' I we ,g-1-P-" 1- ivf' Ziff. H WNFR 29.7-Eb lf 7 . A ,,- - .1 -b ,C I ". . , . - I2 , .ii ,Y 261.05 at .. l ml x"i..L.ias9!" Q-.J 11 1? Q f 'l 127 1551, 11: 3611 1, 111 111111116 13 1 11111615 1 11,116 11 .191 6 1 161121 16,1 .,111 11611, .11 111 61 6 ,1611:w 1111611 if ' 6112 16121 1 12111 1 611111 13111513 s i 1. 62 ig 31111 2115111112 ,114,,1i11 ,116-111 ,.,, 11 61161111 ug 11, ,f1, i '661111 16 ii 5111 14-0 16 5 , 1 1, ill! 1 'fi 1 1116 11116 616111 , 4 61161-1 ,. 1. 1, 51 i611 191 ,711 16 1661116 M' 1,, i666 1y6 A9 if 11611 161, 66 11,1, 16,116 1, ,1., , 1 1 , 11 V151 . 11461, 2 111,-31 , A ,6 14111 614111 1,1611 E16 111 -6116111 61 1116 511 111616 112 li 166 ff! 31 16 16 1 19162 gif? .f 111 '6 gs l 6165 6? , M15 U33 116531 5311165 65? 616 1114 16 1' f6111' 1 16? fr' 1111: 1x61-116 -1116V '67 116161 ,,,, , 111111, 112116 11,916 ,Q 41111661 if 7 a111,16'1 :V '1f' ,, 4 1, 1,6116 211116 ,6 1,6611 1 .fgfw Z6 6 13316 .mm 131116, 21161 1111315 66, 1,6 , 1113 1116 ,61,1 66,161 6 61126 616 3,615 111-1 1112112 1ll1116l 11111661 1.1461 11:6,,1 N66 1 XG! 'M 561112 . 14, , 1 111191 .3221 1111! 5117 61? ,1,, i1,1111w 1,111 162 E61-111 l 6 i i 5 9 11111: , ' '76 14 131-1:12 1 i111 1119 111 , 1111? 11,1 W 41 116 211666 , 611116 61111116 2111115 Q16 49 W 6116 6616 1716 3 166 11111, 63116 11 1, ,W 11116 1,., .1-, ! 61166 461 4 11116 1, Q12 4 Z 111-1 6 3 11, 6111111161 A111111 41616: ., ,J 111165 6 I 1, 111116 611116 I . 4 1,112 Q 1 .7 33313 1711111 6 15 14. 1 1, 1f 11 111' 11 1111? 1 1116 1111165 1111126 411-1 561-1 1, 2561 1: 313, f111s 6 6. Z, if 5 4 61 if 6 26116 36116 112 16111611 561 43 3 151 1 6 1 11 1111111 11111 1 Q1 11 2 'Q 1151 ,1,f11,f! 61116 161 11 :11111 71 111111161 116 96 if 61611 1 1 161 29,1 2 4 f11w l1'1?1V 116113 1161114 :1 611114 ZF 1614 :1 11114 3lf1l 6116 11 61 16 2215115 NW Y111 6 1 16 f 1 1, f ,, '66 J I 2111! 66616 iff! WV W4 My 4111117 61 614 261 66 2111 'I .1,1.,,, 216166 61111: 1? .11116 11 512512 ,1 ,1 , 626116 y1166 ,111,6 6656 3166 666 66 6 y1, A6 46957 W6 I 6166 313611 ,gli 12 76111156 y'1111f' 31l11 616 1 19 1, 21616 ,11616 11161 112 2636? 6141? 45166 ,616 4 , 411-4 Wt WV? M? X116 611 411 1 96 161,661 1111? 6166 6667 566621 265761 QW 211616 411113 EV? 1251? 6616 24516 ,1,1,, 411' ,1, 6 116615 WA, 6666 5111 41' f6 f 6 16 :6 7 6 5666 1166116 3116136 111 1 11' 11 6116 , 4116-1 1 26, 1111: 116 '11116 1111121 611,11 5162 sf!-1 66171 11124111 6113111 6116 6131 4 1,1-1, 1 52111,1 :14 56 11 W", 16666 4665 QW 11611116 66 25111191 3111161 31111119 3111? W 7116 Q6 ff 1 M 1 ,411 Zifl 1 6171 66 W 2 1 661 21171 11 M111 . ff 1 , 1 1151115 ? , 666 6616 51614 46614 355,22 ?1616 , 6 11 11 561313 1,16 6 216616 116116 111111112 ,1 111, 6116111 561165 11116116 llilfllf 261913 516216 1161112 11, 2611116 591136, 611631111 611161651 313,15 ,wg 6111! 16111614 i'111'1z1! Z6 ffif 41616 M615 111, U 1 516,151 16611611 64,-111, 21111616 Ellllgffg 1299: 611167 Wy 61666 A ,31 011,611 19112611 561161 766 116616 1611166 llallall 2113531 111144 212116 yawi 6111 66666 51, We was 6651? may ,Q 5, 5 56 , 16676 EWS? 1661116 lllllfllllz 111 611x111 'z A1161 2111646 1111! 67 ,111 111 61151611 fylf f1f11l11 6111151111 6l'1161f7' 2115154 46666 '66116 1 11516 Nils? 511:55 I I 6 ?111l16 13? 1 Z CENTENNIAL l Dr. Henry Sloane Coffin, Presi- I The Kappa Sigs used as deco- dent of the Union Theological ration, a pictorial record of the Seminary, who delivered the Presidents of Wabash and lists Centennial Sermon. of their achievements. l Caps, gowns, and hoods of students, faculty, and visitors in academic procession. l The Betas do homage to Pete l Visitors leave the inspiring Vaughan and in addition pre- Centennial Religious service. sent Nature in the raw being seldom mild. l An unusual study of the l Saturday night at the Admin- Chapel by Horuff. istration's reception. A group of students, faculty, and friends only subconsciously aware of the camera, discuss among other topics the events of Homecoming Saturday. x 5" uv 41 4' 7 f Q . r J' 4 1 Q, ny o Y. 'L4 Sl. I ,Ar P ,or 3- p. WB ,1 4 -v m ' 5 Y 0' i11191.,1: 1 i11111,E11 i 1: 1311141 1 wi 4353 :11 4, 24? 19, ,:11':' , 1 111111161115 11111111ff, 1 W 4 f 1911133 41.5 I f I a lllllz i214'1l5 Q, N, 211121 Ellllllili 31 a11a111 f 4 .-:W 41:1 212112 2166 "W 1a1f1 1111 1 1' M119 111514 M1114 51512 2117 Ziiilllf 31N 71? 5141" 1 16? M' ff 'W 5 195 l 1 .WEE Z 1 '1 E95 i1i51,'1 111,121 Q11 we :1z1i?1111 11' "1'1 1421129 1, 1111 VZ 7117 2111? Zllll 11111 11414 -111 Eiilil 5211? 11,1 69 sl" z f if 1:5 An informal study of Trustees G. B. Luckett and 1. 1. Daniels listening to an amusing com- ment on the festivities. Ward "Piggy" Lambert signs the register of Wabash men at the Alumni Luncheon. An ec- centric Miami supporter toots his horn in defiance. l The Delts welcome their alum- ni, warn the Redskins, and de- pict the evolution of a Cave- man. I President james Rowland An- gell of Yale, principal speaker at the Academic Assembly on Monday morning. Two more views of the academic procession. W I The freshmen's burning invoca- tion to the gods of Football. H S N , mt lv --,.. . rs. .1. IAM 5 I x V-1 .,t i-1 xy 1 NIH I xi R Ns, Q--'Q 5 xx x, Z xx , Xxx. 51 yTW I -H 1 A 1 llll 'Ill llll llll al., Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 2, Z: Z ZZ Z QZ ZZ a33eZz 13,3 fs ZZ: Z Z ,3fz3f3Z iZ'.3Z Z3 533343Z f3l33l'Z 233332 521934 MZ 2332 Z liz Z 3343.34 ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Q. Z Z ZZZ 7 Z W ZZ Zi! Af 2 33 VZ, Q, -Z, rv ZZ 3 Z QM I 5 Zif Z7 'lf ill "ZZ ,Z-Z 33953: y "Z A3Z3Z i'32Z'g WZ2 :33Z,3z ,Z 333Z33s 135 .iw 1. 33,0 xi i33ZZ 13 The Beta Kappas compare the student of l832 to a student of l932. President Ernest Martin Hop- kins of Dartmouth College, commenting on the early condi- l Doctor l-laines, backed by Presi- dent l-lopkins, warns his col- leagues that an unrobed intrud- er is at hand. tion of his college, communi- cated the greetings of Dart- mouth. An external view l of the Chapel por- tals. A Phi C-am horse and buggy having o v e r c o m e ob- stacles, looks ahead with determination to future conflicts. l The Sig Chis, undecided, both hang and electrocute effigies of the Homecoming opponents. Dr. joseph L. Car- nahan pays homage at the shrine of his father, james A. Carnahan, Founder and Trustee of the college for forty- six years. I Mr. Ragan' and Mr. Lawson flanked by the Cincinnati Little Symphony and Wabash College orchestras. Mr. Lawson conducted the Little Symphony in the first half of the concert, and Mr. Ragan conductedf both orchestras in his own compositions, "Old Wabash" and "Alma Mater". T' ' ' C 'VW' Y XA' at ,QSM t X s Nix A an Pm 4 Sui 7fhil,11 LHl RH :pg , 1 ,W '11 , 7 1 , Z1 Q15 W7 z V4 M, W gn 1 , bl ,1 .7 Vfii ykf 1 15 Q7 ? , 1 1 2 f 25:6 W 11 1 1 Q W yxX?ifW'TWQf' 54 f 2 1 3 Z Z 4 21 ga Z1 , Z' Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z M ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ! 1-ZZ ZZZ Z ZZ Z ZZ ZW ZZ ZZZ 'WZ Z if ,AZ Z ZZ Z 4i122151Z ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ff ZW ZZ 412132 11,55 Z, Z Z14 Q1 1 :ZZ EH 21:1 Z wil 2 ,W 'Z Z Z 1 X 11131 1 1 : Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z, Z ZZ f gl Z Z P, 2 N119 ZZ2 ZZ Z 3 Z Z ZZ Z Z Z 6 ,s Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Zyl? ZZ gm Z f 111152: Zlll Z1 Z Z 5 Z aff 11 ZZ 1 1,14 . M111 1361312 Z Z Z film 1 11 1, ,1,1 13 Z? sg 114 M1 1 ni 51.11 111: Kllll 11.1 1, 1135? W, ,1,,, 11 11,45 1 iw MZ 1 -Z -1, l Tau Kappa Epsilon waves its I banner of challenge. l A materialistic view of the Chap- l el, again by Horuff. I Dr. Alfred Horatio Upham, I President of Miami University, expresses the greeting of his school to its friendly opponent. Betas return to the old stamping ground. Lambda Chis are again wel- comed and the motto of the college prominently displayed. A closeup of the freshman bon- fire. l Wabash parades and vigorously responds to Breading's entreaty of i'Yell like Hell". ,.', If 2' O 9 rf- Er . 4 ,eo -P+ 4,1 U W 'll 22 5, . ,5 Z . ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ? ZZ Z Z ZQZZ ZZ Z ZZZ ai':Z ii WZ mf I zZssZ :fn mx 116: 53:5 ZZ - ' ,Z 4 ZZ? Zi: Z ZZ ,W Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z X x Z Z KN l 4 5 11315 1 E 2 fl? ,Zz 3264 if fi Z2 5135 29154 Z if 'Z Z lnclex to Advertisers Page Adlers, Inc. ...... . . 149 Bank Cigar Store ...., . . . . . 138 Benton Review Shop, The . . . . . 151 Blake's Cafe ............ . . 141 Burroughs Brothers . .. . . 141 Davis Grocery ...... . . 142 L. H. Davis, M.D. ........... . . 139 Em-Roe Sporting Goods Co. . . . . . 149 Evans Cleaning Co. ......... . . 145 Goodman's Department Store . . . . 139 Grove and Hungate ............. . . 145 Hackleman and Shields Agency . . . . . 148 Hirshburg Studio ............. . . 143 Indianapolis Engraving Co. . . . . . 144 Kostanzer's Pharmacy . .. . . 137 Frank C. Mueller .... , . . . 140 Producer's Dairy . . . . 142 Schultz 85 Schultz ................... .. 139 Service Laundry and Dry Cleaning Co. . . . . . . 141 ShaW,s Market ..................... .. 150 Thos. D. Sheerin Investment Co. . . . . . . 146 Spray and Servies ............. . . . 147 Wabash College . .. ,, 136 To the patronage of Wabash men, We Wish to recommend the above professional men and merchants, Who have aided greatly in the financial support of this yearbook. Wabash College fFounded 18325 A COLLEGE FOR MEN BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE ONLY LIMITED ENROLLMENT The Purpose of Wabash The term education is of very extensive import. It relates equally to the moral and physical nature of man, and com- prises the development and training of all his powers . . . But I have chiefly in view, in my remarks on liberal educa- tion, the improvement of mankind .... Education in its appli- cation to the mind, comprises the development, right direc- tion and permanent discipline of all its powers. To be thorough it must provide this harmonious and efficient action. -fFrom an address by the first president of the college, Dr. Elihu Whittlesey Baldwin, July 13, 1836.5 400 Students Faculty of 33 Catalog and information concerning admission may be secured from the Director of Admissions, Crawfordsville, Indiana. ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ fZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ THE PLAN lContinued on page l24I 4. I-low many units of foreign language does he present? For in- stance, if he offers two units in Latin he may continue his Latin for a year, thus opening a place on his schedule for a science, or he may begin an ele- mentary foreign language which will exclude science at this time on account of the hours involved. All this information the Registrar supplies. I I have already indicated how the Faculty advisers are appointed. In point of time these appointments are made as soon as classes begin and college is under way. At once thereafter I begin interviewing all new men. It is in this interview that the Freshmen are notified concerning their Faculty adviser. I explain to each one individually that we have no in- tention of annoying him with a lot of supervision or a lot of advice, but that in both his Freshman and Sophomore years there will be matters that he may wish to discuss with someone in a position to furnish him with re- liable information, that his Faculty adviser has been appointed to serve in this capacity, and that it is the student's right to look to him for such counsel and advice as the student may desire. I endeavor to emphasize the point that the Faculty adviser is not going to run around after the student, and that it is the student's responsibility to make the first contact and to make it early in the first semester. I explain to the student that he will be allowed approximately ten days to make this contact, and that I shall then have a report from the advisers as to who has complied with this stipulation and who has not, so that if in ten days' time he has failed to make the contact, I shall get in touch with him again and find out why. This interview offers me opportunity also to check our records. I in- quire where the student is living, what course he is taking. and concerning any other matters which should appear on the student's cumulative record card that for some reason or another have been missed. If carefully done such an interview will reveal the cases of students that are in any diffi- culties, and if there is something actually done to correct the difficulty, word will be passed around among the students that such interviews are worth while. After the interview I write a short letter to the parents, saying that I have talked with the boy and find that he is well established, or this or that difficulty has come up, but that we are endeavoring to correct it and that we shall appreciate any help they can give us. In the spring before pre-registration for the next year, I interview all Sophomores to discuss with them which field of concentration they are going to elect, and why. During this interview I endeavor to check very carefully the basis for the student's decision to do his work in the last two years in one field rather than another. The significance of this de- iulunluIlllllllulllllnllilnllnlnullinIluIInIulluinnuiiuIluulnllunuulliinninlulullnnIunlllinIluIlununlulnuuuuuunulnlnulnllnlllllIlllg KOSTANZEHS WASHINGTON PHARMACY R. E. KOSTANZER Phone 198 109 S. Washington St. Our Fountain Drinks are Always Good Our Drugs Pure THE PLAN cision for the student will be made clearer when I have had opportunity to explain the nature of our curriculum. The point I wish to make here is that, having settled on the student's field of concentration, I then give him his choice of adviser for the last two years of his college work from among the teachers in the division in which he has elected to do his work. During this interview I have before me a form prepared by the Regis- trar, giving a summary of the student's scholastic work to date. I am thus able to discuss with him any requirements that have not been met and what must be done to meet them. At the same time I fill in the information on this form, showing what division he has elected, whom he has chosen for adviser, and the courses that the student and I have agreed upon tenta- tively for him to take in his junior and Senior years. This form then goes to that member of the Faculty chosen by the student as his adviser, and at an appointed time the student sits down with his new adviser to discuss his proposed schedule for the next two years. This is no perfunctory interview, and it is not uncommon at all for the Faculty adviser to suggest another combination of courses than that which the student and I tentatively agreed upon. It also frequently happens that the student, having given the matter further consideration, has some dif- ferent notions of his own from those that he had when he talked with me. If either the student or the Faculty adviser is uncertain about the changes made, one or both of them will take it up with me. After this interview these forms are carefully checked again in the Registrar's office to make doubly sure that all requirements have been taken care of. During the winter I interview all Seniors to find out how their plans for the future are developing and what, if anything, I can do to assist them. In point of time these Senior interviews come between the Freshman and Sophomore interviews. Here again any one of innumerable circumstances may arise that make it seem important that Seniors should talk with one or more members of the Faculty. Plans for graduate school work or pro- You will find a COLLEGE ATMUSPHERE -- at the - BA K CIGAR STORE Wabash Headquarters Billiards - Magazines - Candy Smoking Accessories "Bud" "Lonnie" Massing Mitchell ' 3.4 ,,f.,2 it' .N f, is r V+, W ,,.. W- ! if , , t, f' ,I 4. 4 , . 1, .1 7 za F? 13' af 524' " Wig we iw ffl ,, ew 11. Z ,Z W K aa Z Zz 7 Z 1 s . fit? ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ X ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ Z ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ THE PLAN fessional school work, information concerning state requirements for teach- ers' licenses and opportunities for positions, business opportunities, and all that is involved in making a choice and making contacts may thus be dis- cussed by each Senior, not only with me and with the Dean, but with sev- eral members of the Faculty, all in the light of the information we have collected concerning his capacity and interests both when he entered and during his four years of residence in college. The two points which l am especially anxious to emphasize under this division of my paper are that, in spite of its imperfections and short- comings, I believe that we are able to demonstrate bv means of our whole educational plan at Wabash that, first, if reasonable effort is made to do so, it is entirely possible to secure for the plan the intelligent, sympathetic, and whole-hearted support of the Faculty, and, second, if some care is taken that the reasons for such personal contacts between Faculty and students be thoroughly understood by the student body, the plan will be accepted as a natural and desirable service and so utilized by them. It may seem to many of you by this time that we have endeavored to emulate the historic fable of Mark Hopkins at one end of the log and the student on the other, and that we may be a little shy of classes and courses. Such is not the case, however, for we do have both, as l shall attempt to show under my third heading, which is, the adoption of a well-balanced and unified curriculum. ln the winter of l927 a committee was appointed of five members of the Faculty of Wabash College to consider the desirability of revising the curriculum and. if they deemed it advisable to do so, to draw up a plan of the new curriculum and present it to the Faculty for the Faculty's consid- eration. Two members of the Faculty went to study what was being done in various other institutions. A great deal of material was collected and studied. coMPL1MENTs OF 2 Schultz 81 Schultz GOOdH1HH,S Student Headquarters for Department Store Dollar Books Loose-Leaf Note Books Fountain Pens and Pencils Stationery Pennants s Athletic Goods 5 Royal Portable Typewriters Gifts Kodak Films L. H. Davis, M.D. 103 N. Washington Phone 1400 THE PLAN As l have said before, this Faculty committee borrowed freely from the plans in operation at other institutions. Special acknowledgment should be made of assistance received from Columbia University for the plan of the first two years, including the course in Contemporary Civilization, and from I-larvard, Princeton, and Dartmouth in their schemes of concentration in the last two years. In june of i927 the committee presented a tentative plan to the Fac- ulty. When college opened in the fall, this report became the principle business of the regular and special meetings of the Faculty. A revised plan was finally worked out and in january of i928 it was adopted by unanimous vote by the Faculty, to be put into effect with the class entering college in September of that year. Thus it will be seen that the first class to graduate from Wabash College under the curriculum which I shall discuss will be the class of l93Z. ln forming its plan, the committee stated that it had constantly in mind two main purposes: l. To assure that every student should acquire, mainly in his junior and Senior years, some degree of mastery of one field of study, as a whole, and not merely of particular courses in that field. 2. To assure that in his Freshman and Sophomore years every student should so distribute his time among all, or nearly all, the fields of study as: lal to enable himself to make a wise choice of his field of concentration, and lbl to obtain for himself., particularly in these years, though also in the elective courses provided for his last two years, the values of a general and not merely of a specialized education. Of almost equal importance in the eyes of the committee has been another purpose: 3. To provide a new course, to be taken by every student in his Freshman year, which should enable him to see all the fields of study not ulllulnllnnnllnlllllnlllnllllllullllulnunnInnuunninlunlululinliulenlnlnunlnllulllluullululnnlllnullIInInuullululuuulnunnullnlvl- K A Lj gajii For Real gl 1 fllfi -'SWIG X U ' fix u l . . Snap I V' -11 0 Xi I ..F1t ,X 1 ! i 'iii' . . Value ' 'X P V . . See FRANK C. MUELLER Tailor 105 N. GREEN ST. And Have Your Clothes A MADE TO MEASURE BY KAHN 'TAlL0l2lNQ'C0 or' in DIANAPOLIS IllluIlunulllunInIllIn:nllullIlulnlnlululoulllu 1, 2 ,aff 4 f Z -71 we il ! v 64' Z2 L22 f,,4 . Z m fr .. 154 ,fr I , , 41 V .2 IZ 7 22 my af vs? QA fl W R X .h , -.Z . ., ..-v,..,-2-5, -, ,,s.g, u.:,5.- 14. was qs 'ssx XYN B-X - . .. - 4 - 1- .fs A - 2.1:-.-Q' N s,..,.. M gpqesm -w, X 5 j - ' , h . f-152. ja-.1s.,..f, ' 1 Aviv: ,X X3 fgssfks Q X . . . - . .... 4 . 4. ,. . . c L . +1-,,.., ,s,,. .Y Thy., X-.si-.,5.5. .5 X xy X 4 jf. -:Ei -': .- 4 1 .4 " ., j:?.4:2g1 tf'1w.- XX X X Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z X Z ,Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZZ , ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z iisi Z ZW Zi 1:11, Zi SEZ ,Z fi fi ZZZ Z Zil 4isi1l:iZ Z I f Z ZZ Z Z Z : VZ 232555 Z W Z Z ZZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZZ ZZ Z Z Z, Z ZZ ZZ? Z Elf? Z Z Z Z ZZZ ZZEZ if ZZ Z ZZZ ,Z Ay Z' ZZZ6 ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ i, i1lZZZ iii ZZ E lilly!! l ,MZ , M Mil siSZ2ii MZ: ZZZ Z Z 2iZ5'i 2 2iZi i ZZZ SEZ ,Zi :ZZ ZHQSZ5 ZZ? 2 ii MZ 2153 Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z x Z ,Z 'aff QMZZ WZ ZZ :Zi l if ZW if ,i ii s' :xiii :Z 13:11:32 -giigiy :Z ZQZEZ ZZZZ ,Z may Q14 Ziff? ZZ .i my ai if Z: :ii 1 Zi? ai ig :Zi :gg i Z5 ' W Z :iii Z M yi: iZ Ziyi gas 32:2 ZZ VZ? 1 Za!! THE PLAN as distinct but as closely related, and which should stimulate him to re- gard his college work as something more than merely a continuation of studies already pursued in high school. The report continues: For the fulfillment of its first purpose, that of securing concentration of effort in the last two years of college, the committee has placed its re- liance chiefly on the device of the comprehensive examination. These ex- aminations are to be given at the end of the Senior year. It is essential that it be clearly understood that to pass these examinations is an absolute requirement of a candidate for a degree. Concentration, and the comprehensive examinations, are to be not in the department, but in a new unit, the Division. There are four Divisions as follows: Division l. Science. Division 2. Foreign Language. Division 3. Social Science. Division 4. English, including Speech. This new divisional organization takes the place of the old depart- mental organization. For the Faculty the tendency is to study teaching problems in divisional rather than departmental meetings, thereby broadening their outlook and increasing cooperation. For the student, in the Senior year, there are two courses in the Di- vision, two outsideg and an amount of reading equivalent to a fifth course, to be done in preparation for the comprehensive examination under the direction of the Faculty of the Division of concentration. ln the junior year the student takes three courses in his Division of concentration and two outside his Division. illlllllInIllIIllIllllIIllllllllIllIIlllllllllllllllllllllll llIIIIlllllllIllIllIIllIllIIllIIllllllIllIlllllIIllllIllIlllllllllllllllllllllllll I 5 The Last Word in Smart Style COMPLIMENTS OF Wa1k'OVeI'Sl f Friendly Fives I Blake,S The Booth Shoe! 353.00 - 35.00 - 37.00 Cafe and Sweet Shop Burroughs Bros 105 S. Washington St. llIllIIIIIllIllIllIIIIIIIIIllIllIIIlllllllllllllllillllllll IIlillllIllllllllllillllllllllllll I SERVICE Laundry and Dry Cleaning Co. We Want to Serve Wabash Men Weil 823 S. Washington St. Phone 1855 THE PLAN The Freshman and Sophomore years are distinctive in that each stu- dent takes at least one course each year in each of the four Divisions. This distribution of studies is Provided partly for its own sake, to secure a mea- sure of the "something about everything" part of the old definition of the liberal education, and partly to help the student to make a wise choice of his field of concentration, in the second semester of his Sophomore year. ln all of its proposals the committee sought to get away from hours and credits as the basis on which the degree is awarded, and to substitute as units of measurement of fitness for the degree, first, year-courses, to be taken in orderly arrangement through four years of residence, and, sec- ond, the passing of the comprehensive examinations. It is impossible for me to separate in my own mind the importance of the arrangement of courses which we call the curriculum from the import- ance of the quality of instruction and the attitude of the instructor. lt is for this reason that I have placed so much emphasis on the point of view which actuates us in the carrying out of this plan and which has so great an influence on the teacher in his contact with students inside and outside the classroom. My own interest, and I believe the interest of the entire Faculty, in this point of view is not because we consider it something over and above, or apart from, good teaching methods, but rather because we believe it to be inherently bound up with good teaching. The chief criterion with us in securing a new Faculty member is his ability as a teacher. Whatever his other qualities may be, we do not assume that a man can be a good teach- er without a scholarly mastery of his subject, but being assured of this, we are then very critical of those other qualities which are also necessary for good teaching. The curriculum which l have described is designed with the purpose in mind of rendering the greatest possible service to each student. There are certain definite requirements in it that all must meet, and this is one reason why we feel we must be careful to secure as nearly as possible a homogeneous group as regards scholastic ability. Even so, we recognize that there will be marked individual differences in the students who are admitted, and it is for this reason that the requirements are made as flex- ible as they are for individual cases. Our educational plan as evidenced by the curriculum calls for serious effort. There is a remarkable absence of the so-called "cinch" courses. The exceedingly brilliant student finds ample opportunity for the exercise of his ability, and his somewhat less talented companion meets an equal challenge, but the educational plan is designed, as far as possible, to bene- fit all alike. We desire neither to waste our time on a group whose only interest is "getting by" nor to devote an undue proportion of our efforts to a selected group of superior scholars. lContinued on page l45l COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF u Produtrefs BERT DAVIS Dairy Products Co. GRQCER ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ur Part Again, and for the 11th time, We have been proud of producing the photography for "The Wabash". Each year We have at- tempted to set our cameras at a new angle, to focus from a different direction, and to depict with our lenses a new set of pictures that is better than those of pre- vious years. 1-i-.ll Gur sincere hope is that you Will enjoy our part. .il-,l The Official Photographer - - for - - THE 1933 WA BASH HIRSHBURG STUDIO INDIANAPOLIS ' ENGRAVING COMPANY SCHOOL PUBLICATION DEPARTMENT 22 EAST OHIO STREET 'INDIANAPOLIS INDIANA 2 , , Y- , ,,,.' ' ,-.- , ,...g.. Nj A 4 We ,,4 ,,? iv 7, W4 .WF fl M . 24 2 Q XS N 3 Z ZZ Z ., A ?ZZi iZ Z AZ :I QZ , 1 1 l i 5 Z ? Z Z , Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z js zZi Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z THE PLAN lContinued from page l42l So far as possible, our aim is to create an environment in which we may all work together for the highest possible development of each per- son, within the group. lt is for this reason that l have chosen as the last of my four topics, the harmonizing of all student activities, athletic as well as non-athletic, with the rest of the educational plan. Wabash College has no professional courses, nor do we attempt to prepare men specifically for any vocation. The courses given are offered because they seem to us to have a place in a liberal arts curriculum. lt does happen that certain combinations of courses meet the requirements for professional schools, and we refer to such combinations as pre-medical or pre-law courses. We have courses in religion, for instance, that seem to me most ex- cellent courses for any man to take. A man going on to divinity school certainly would profit by taking these courses, but so would a man who was not going to divinity school. In so far as our curriculum is to help a man who is going into the ministry, I think the help should come from the things he studies that will not be covered in divinity school rather than from any specific course that will save his time or give him advanced stand- ing there. The same thing is true as regards graduate schools. We have no in- tention of attempting to give graduate-school courses. While a student is in Wabash we would like to give him as much education outside of the field in which he will specialize as we can, leaving it to the professional or vocational or graduate schools, which should be vastly better equipped for the task, to give their own specialized instruction in their own way. We believe in specialization, but think that for some the gaining of a broad foundation should come first. The discovery of new knowledge is essential to life and is dependent on specialization. But the capacity to evaluate the knowledge that we acquire, to see and appreciate the rela- tionships of one branch of knowledge to another, and to understand the significance of the facts that research will discover, comes not from spe- cialization but from a well-rounded, nicely balanced, and more compre- hensive application of the mind. A liberal arts education is not so concerned with the discovery of knowledge as with the gaining of understanding. The forces that we now have, the knowledge to create, we do not yet know how to control. Wa- bash College will continue, therefore, to offer a liberal arts education de- signed to lead to an understanding of contemporary life, and we shall en- courage each student enrolled in our courses to strive to the limit of his capacity to perfect himself according to the abilities that C-od has given him. This purpose has a bearing on our various activities outside of the classroom as well as on our courses and instruction in the classroom. Spe- cialization is to come later. We would assist the student as an undergrad- .nllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllIllllllllllllllllilllllllIllllllllllll-llllllulllll ullIllllllllllllllllllIllIIllIIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllullllllllu COMPLIMENTS OF Phone 150 127-29 S. Green St. Grove St Hungate Men's Clothing Evans Cleaning Co. and Furnishings Cleaning and Dyeing THE PLAN uate to secure an understanding, an appreciation, a comprehensive view of the whole of life, and a grasp of the magnitude of man's possibilities with- in himself. Thus, in all activities in college the trend is away from a high degree of specialization. Wabash has for years had a very strong Department of Speech. Under the divisional plan it becomes a part of the English Di- vision. Among our campus activities are oratorical contests and debates. Dur students have a truly enviable record of contests won. But while these teachers urge each man to his best effort, they constantly point out that the purpose of the courses is not to make contest winners or orators but to give to as many men as possible a knowledge of the best that is known in the art of speech, and to each one such facility as he may acquire in public address. Athletics at Wabash include vastly more than intercollegiate sports, but in intercollegiate sports the question of the harmonizing of activities with the whole educational plan became more sharply defined than else- where. First of all, we had a Department of Athletics with a Director of Ath- letics who was put into the position, a number of years before, because of his business ability, and because of the need for money to get, and to keep, the department out of debt. Naturally, the Athletic Director was con- cerned if any educational plans were introduced which seemed to inter- fere with gate receipts. The difficulty was not with the Director of Ath- letics but with the type of organization which made it one official's busi- ness to harmonize all athletics with the educational plan, and another of- ficial's business to make one branch of athletics pay financially. We, there- fore, did away with the Department of Athletics and took over the finances THOMAS D.SHEERIN AND COMPANY INVESTMENT SECURITIES FLETCHER Tnusv Buu.oiNG INDIANAPOLIS f ,Hz 3. 4 I ,fi in fu, 9' 'C . fy W' Wi ZZQ f , 232 VX 3 L 74 1 5 vf 2 ui A W2 1 f 4 4. f ,. in il I X X ff f ff W. ,W 7' Z Z' g. 70 7 Z, af V QQ 4 . af' J.. if? W I K aff ' lf ,if - A if f, . II fry, IZ' 4 iff 7173 ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ,ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ X!! THE PLAN as a part of the operating expenses of the College under the direct super- vision of the President. There were other conflicting points of view connected with this whole question of intercollegiate sports. ln l929, in addressing the Faculty and students on this subject, I said in part: There are those who believe that the abuses which have grown up around intercollegiate games are so injurious as to warrant their discon- tinuance in colleges. These individuals shut their eyes to any possible bene- fit that may be derived from intercollegiate contests and, I believe, to the whole spirit of youth. They see only the bad in a situation and instantly desire to wipe out the whole thing. As opposed to these, there are some who argue that winning teams are essential to the life of the college, and that since this is so, it is simply a business proposition of how much it will cost to get winning teams. The desirability of some means for physical development for college men is evident to all who have given the matter any consideration .... The particular plan which we have adopted is an athletic program, intercolleg- iate, intramural, and on down to contests between any two men who will find sport in friendly competition. Individual differences in athletic abilities are as common as in the classroom, and therefore the effort is made to place men in groups where they will be neither too greatly depressed by the superior skill of their fel- lows nor too easily satisfied with anything short of their best effort. To meet an occasional opponent who can outplay you, in every department of the game, may not be bad for you, and to meet an occasional opponent who is much less skilled than you, may do you good, but the zest of com- petition comes in closely matched rivals. lf this be true, there will always be a group of men on any campus who, because of their superior athletic ability, will find real competition only with another superior group from somewhere else. Another group of fellows from another college seems a logical source. Meanwhile, it should be noted that in emphasizing games in our re- creational activities, we believe that in addition to other educational bene- fits to be derived therefrom, there is something of definite value in mak- ing the more intimate acquaintance of the men you play with and the men you play against. ln intercollegiate sports there should be something of educational value in meeting and knowing men from other institutions. There is nothing new or original in these comments on the relation- ship of athletics and more especially intercollegiate sports to the educa- tional program of a college. lt seems to me, however, that there is not the need at this time for original thinking in this regard so much as there is need for straight and honest thinking. Any talk of doing away with in- lContinued on page l49l 1llllllIllIllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllIIllIllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIL Quality Service Meat - U - Can Eat all SPRAY AND SERVIES Free Delivery 117 S. Washington st. Phone so MASSACHUSETTS MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Clncorporated 18515 Hackleman 81 Shields Agency 302 Continental Building Wabash Men with This Agency Frank J. Cleland Richard Habbe Ralph W. Hackleman Ward Hackleman Thaddeus R. Baker Jean Black We want other Wabash representatives A fine opportunity after graduation At least worth an interview with us. Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZZ ZZ 1 ZQZZ ZZ 2 5 il EZ 5 Z iii? 1.'Z ui Z ?lf1ZlZ ev' ZZZ ZW WZ :Z Z ZZ 74:5 Z Z i Z Z ZIZIZ ZZ Z ZZ MZ ,Z Z 21ZZwZ :WZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ Z Z Z ZZ Z Z Z Z N ZZ , Zi, ZZ Z MZ 9 Z Z :MZ g:5jZ ZZ Elliig Z ZZ Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z ZZZ IW VZ ZZSZ ZZQZ ZZZ ZZHZ ., Z'-Z 513.-issfsi we 515133555313 2 3 ljj ZW WZI. ,I t f. Z .j ,Z .ii Zi. .Z ,. Z .Z fizl Z Z WZ THE PLAN lContinued from page l47l tercollegiate sports, because of abuses that have developed, appears to me to be nonsense, just as l consider it stupid and unprincipled to argue that we should hire men for our teams and thus force the legitimate undergrad- uate representatives out of their rightful positions. Either intercollegiate sports have a place in the educational program of the college or they have not. lf they have not, we should do away with them even at the risk of leaving alumni with nothing to do on a dozen Sat- urday afternoons each fall. I believe, however, that they have a place in the education of the undergraduate. We shall endeavor to avoid overem- phasis and strive to make intercollegiate sports count to the benefit of the undergraduate as a part of his education. I am happy to say that this program has had the hearty support of the student body and of a majority of the alumni. lt has presented some difficult problems. We have definitely given up any attempt to play out of our class. We have had to reduce expenses materially. Other adjustments have had to be made. Not all of our prob- lems in this regard are solved as yet, but even so, something tangible and vital to our plan of education has been accomplished. Meanwhile, the rest of our athletic program has grown in favor and effectiveness so that our recreational activities command the interest and involve the participation of more than four-fifths of the student body. ln the intramural contests, teams from among the fraternities and independent men compete throughout the year. The Faculty also are represented with a team in several of the sports, and finished well up in the ranking by points won at the end of the second semester this june. One other activity, or an outgrowth of an activity, should be men- tioned, since it bids fair to harmonize so perfectly with our curriculum as to become a part of it. We started a very informal discussion group of stu- dents and Faculty some years ago as a sort of continuation of some of the departmental clubs. One is never certain of either the origin or the de- velopment of these things, but even prior to the discussion group there had been an attempt at the formation of an outing club. Perhaps from these sources in part and from new inspirations in part, the formation of a study camp for Seniors has materialized. Thirty miles southwest of Crawfords- ville on the edge of what can be called the rough country of Indiana is located a state reservation of land and park, known as Turkey Run. Here in the spring before the tourist trade is heavy, the large inn and adjoining camps, all property of the state, are made available to us at a very reason- able cost for groups of Seniors and one or more members of the Faculty to hold study camps. Groups chosen from various cross sections of college affiliations pack their books and leave college to spend a week living and working and play- WOMENZS APP-AREL Wabash College Uses 2 Em-Roe ACCESSORIES Athletic Equipment QUALITY WILL sHoW Em-Roe Sporting ADLERS, Inc. G00dS CO. 209 W. Washington INDIANAPOLIS lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llIllluIllIllIllIHIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllll Ben Hur Bldg. illIlllIllIllIllllilllIllIllllllllIllIllIllIltllllllllIllIlIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllll QIIIllIIlllllllIllllllIIIllIllIIllIIllIllIllIllllllIllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllz THE PLAN ing together in surroundings isolated from interruptions in any form from outside. Breakfast is at seven o'clock. Reading for comprehensive exami- nations is the program for the morning and for two hours in the afternoon. A long tramp along one of many trails down into the canyons and up steep and rugged slopes is scheduled for the last half of the daylight. Dinner is at six thirty, and an hour of leisure comes before the assembly at eight o'clock in the evening for a general discussion of some topic previously chosen. At night several members of the Faculty will join the group if they have not already done so for the afternoon hike. From Monday to Saturday the same group of students are together. The experience has been found to contribute to an individual's capacity for self-directed con- tinuous work and to helpful and intimate companionship. ln our catalogue statement of requirements for graduation for stu- dents entering in September, l928, or later, there is this stipulation: "Four full years of residence are required." Why do we believe in four years of general training? The answer is, first of all. that we believe in the developing process of the liberal arts college. There is no question concerning the process that all young men must pass through in growing up: of passing out from the immaturity of boyhood into the maturity of manhood. It is for boys who are willing to take the time and do the work, that Wabash College holds out the opportunity of devoting four years, not alone to the training of the mind, but also to the improvement and refinement of mind, morals, and taste, to the end that they may become familiar not only with the mechanics of learning but also with the spirit of learning. lm- provement and refinement can never be put on a piecework basis. lt may be that knowledge can be pumped out or pounded in by the clock, and measured in quarts or pounds, but understanding comes as a process of growth in appreciation and experience, and is dependent both on the indi- vidual's capacity and on his environment. It is in this belief that Wabash concerns itself with the selection of its students on the one hand, and the environment in which they live and work in college on the other. The chief factor in the environment in the liberal arts college seems to me to be in the daily lives and associations of both teachers and stu- dents. Such an association of youth and maturity will, of necessity, create an atmosphere in which permanent impressions will be made, permanent disciplines accomplished, and permanent values established. To pass into and out of such an atmosphere like a mail plane in the night will neither contribute anything to, nor take away anything from, such an environment. To live and to work in such an atmosphere and participate in such associan tions offers an opportunity both to give and to receive those things which have ever gained a permanent hold on the minds of men. IIMIllllvlinlIlllulllulullllvlllllllltllulllllllullvlIllIllliIlunlnuInInInulIliInlInlllnlIllIllllllllllnllllllllllull Our Compliments to Wabash Men SHAW'S WEST MAIN MARKET 130 W. Main Street 7-Phones-8 4333 7833? 11,114 :ma :J1:' I1 3371 1: :M 5' 131: 6 6323335 :3 1 1 1 Z 1 Q ,, , if 2:1 32132: ,111 11 53 13:31 53313 13:11:31 521121: 2412 26 23 225 '5: 91 311212 211114 43132 111, 431 1 am 4:1415 11,111 M 'E 2? 5 416 4 9369 5533116 1:31:14 23313232 E'33'x3? I :: :1 1:31 Z 211312 33 23336 I3 'Z 5 13 7 2 2:4 13,113 113111 2646 me I3 I 13 :3:: 211: 3333 23? 333 339132 2:3632 33, :nf 2: 23 3 3' ,11 , 1337 333 13133332 3333? :IZ I2?E 11,111 IEQIIZ 211 225 Rv? 1 1, ,Z ,' 33 332323332 615312 111: :if I 336 : 33: 4 ' :3: :g 1 11 1 3,2 411 111 11131: 4 V333 II, 5 1:'2 I I: 3 3 I3 331:12 ,3 13131111 31:4 I , I I I :J 592 , 1 II Z E33 1 1 fe 1111, ,Z 2, ,1 14 1:1113 'F ,MZ f ff? 5 2 , ,1,, 1 M311 1:2366 f 1 f 1112 , 1 11 .:3::g1 Ir. Mmm ,1 5 3 6: 312 :gg 4 322 ? 1 ?3'f 1 Zig Z: 115' 1312 3 1 I 1 K 331191: 13 1 1 fd 1212 111 1 ' 1 5 I 5 35: it 11,11 4151355 1:1 1,,1y 111 Z? I 41,1 .MI 432312 X131 511: 111:41 4 533232 4 I 232355 333622 111111 2:32 ' if , 1:7111 s:f::: gf! 1: Z: 32 ' 2333 '5 53633135 21323333 , "133' 1 !31,5 1 2332 4 Z:I3I3I E:9:3:,3 1341334 2232: ,1:f: H: 1 23' 5 1 4 11 , I 1 511516 Q 1: 1: 93535 Z 1:43-7 f 11f':1 f 11:1 43 :I 'S 9 :1, 1 1 3:9 :3: 5321333 W 1152: I 13336: 1:,g1f1 M132 f::,:':1 ' 333331 11:23:15 11111313 1 ? 5, Z 5 5336 .111 1 2411: Wh? 2 4 Z, 9 1, 4: , , 4 7 12, , 11 , 3:11111 1 533' Z1 Q3 if 131 2 1,1 2? 1 19 1 6 6 , 11 1:11 Ei 134 31 Z 33K 23? g 1:33 3: 31 V3 6, 1335 13:9 'V 6 I 1 6 Z 15 :11 ,:g ,G 1 91 I 355 Z ? 4, 9 ,1, 35 fffes :aww ::3 I 111 15:5 f 7 Z Ze 1335 M 152 W' 3333 325 ,115 33 ,I VI 11:32 1, 1 111, 1, .11 1, :121 I 3? Z3 333 633 32 :f::i3: 133333 1334154 2:3 , 23333 13133131 '13:3: 233352 W1 333332 53325 232:21 233336333 119335 43I33'r 597' 111:11 'Mi s131:1' 23163325 23592 Z32:::'1 13723: "Z1336 233313 11" 1:31:11 H333 133 aww 11 wwf 5310 ::o:1:: 1371: 53:23:32 We 23'33:'? 41:2 13:33:32 53333334 133313334 2:5359 33312 11:11 3331 2333332 23533335 23331332 233 21h 53,235 131333: :::1,3 131313: 1:91 f62:i 3:31 6 2:3123 ,11111 'Z E 532:33 :1::3:,U we 1 ,, 1 1 3,34 1:11 ::::34 1,1115 11,114 ,31:13I3:1 113:11 11333:3:3Z II3 3 1333335 ' 1, 13 131 23133 :I ':!3:: ,, 331,11 1 11133, 13 313: X35 sg: :23 1 4 33I 'I I :I I I Z: I 2 i I Prln fin er FI -I O I REVIEW SHOP Fowler Ind -, - .- -f .- 'XSDJQ II I I I I I II II III I I I II IIIU I A I ' . . bw' . ' UQ . If U NHHIHIH HIHIHIHIHIIIHIIHIIIIIHIHIIHIHIIIII HIIUIHH AUTOGRAPHS .. fp' -AJ 1 '1' ' T ff A ,W-' -2 J!" vl S 5 594 'F X t lu- xil 1 , 11r,. 4 I WH, 1!','n I 4 . n W- ' 'r.. II. 'D . -vi Q. fw- J . ,A fn , . . is wig 41" ,-8 was V7 1.7 5 I ,, . .1 uf 'hi I fl 4' n -ff if' ii info it '- . Y 4 . Srl .. ,.,,' 1 im- -,.-55155 , h ' 'Lg A ,Z hi A J Ip I, 3 I I U I 0 o .2 ,. .wx 11 Y . f-39" 1 vu i 5 ,mm ' ' ' k . I ' 1-gf tk- 1. , ' ' 5 H- ' UVHLQ .pf , , L F ' 1' I Sf 1 I 1 "1- 1 , ' x.R11S:Y1,V.:f,1'6L ' 1, I 1 1 ' .Jg ' 1 1 1, 11. 11: 115.1 .1 , ,411'1f,,:111- 21. 5 , :,1"1,-- ' 1 H11 1 .1 ' S -- 1, 1 11 1 'g,A1'31"': '1' 1' 11311 'Q-1 1., 1. 1 11. ,1 ', '1 1 A11 .X T" 1 I11' : 1 .,.,,.'1Qi1 ' " ' 11.1 1148-P1 .-11: 1' -1 . Ui' TT- , 1 .--51' .111 11. rf 1 M- f, A f '15 ' '1J'1f+ 1" if 1,1 'W , x 1 i 'gm' -1 fs" H fQ.i'11x I 11 1 1 .. 1-,011 1' - --,111 ' ' f':1. 1 - 1-1 '11 ,-'.c,x,-1'--1" '- -1"' '1' '1 2"'.1e'1' 1' :1 ww X -1-. 11,1 1. ,,.11.1 4 1, 1 1x . .1 1,111 . ,. .J 1 H ,JI ,I 1k f,1"f,1111.1 ,, l ,. 1-.1 - ff., 1 1 I .mf 1 .-411. 1! ' f 'A 1? 1.11 I! i , ..X'f-311151-,' JW' 1 1 . 1, I ,I 1111. 11' X 11- 3 11- ' 'Q11 , ,,.,,.,.- - 1- 1 ,- '1 1,1-111,-:, . ,- 1 11-'21 11 1-1: " . . 111 1 -1 1 ' -- -.-1 I "1, 111 1. ,1 11 1,114 " W. .1,,1.-,.-,'1 1 1 11,1 1 V 1.-1.111 - 1, , 1 .1 1-' . "1 -' " ' 1 A J - ,1- 'W 1. 11.11. A' 1'11 P-' 1' .1 5 1 1 1 -1,1 .1 1 '9'f'1'1i'x?F? 31- if .DVM 7,1 V 1'1..-1 1,-' 1.5. g'w:F1LP1rJ4 W, -Qfnzv' 1 , . ' ' 1,-',-gl..-H111 III 3-I '11 Y if ' 1' "1 . 1 1 V .1 1:1- Y11' , , . ,, 1 1 ' 1 M9-11,-15 '1 1 -1111112 -'-"L '- 11 f -' 1'..1-11' 'eww' .11 1' ' 1 ,wg 51, 11 P - 1 "Q-M 'T11' -- '-11? ,". H, I' 1 1 1 Q1 , , 1 41.1,-'11' ,141 511, I wi A V Uv., av Y-112' wt , ,V K 1,1 X :by , 1.1 I .1 1 , 1 1 R' 1' 1' , 15 ' ' y 1..,1 ,:' - -. U I r 1' A '1 1,1 1' I 1 I 1.1- . , 1 I X I-.ou 4 A ' 11 , . 111 51' ' M1 , 15 . 1 1 1 , ' 1 1 ' , 1 M1 .'P 1 1 Q .1 11 4 ,1 , 5. 1 1 1 " 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 . 'FK' ' 'I I J I I f .',1-' 1 11 N 1 : 1 51 . J. ,X . V: .ff 3 1 ' ,1, M' . . ' 1 . f , 1 , . ur - 1 1 1 ' 1 Y . , 1 1 I I ' A I41 -, -1. 1 l. ' ' 1 ' 1 1:1 1' I 1 1 I ' li' 1 1 ' 1 v 1"1 1 "es ,111 A ' 1,11 EA .A ma .11 1 1 U +1 1 1 ' 1 ,11- f.1rb I .1 1- 1 1 'A 6 If 'Ill' , .. - 'Y ' -T 5e.!'W'.. ' "1 1 '. , . S f , , ' 4 Pu . if . ' U y ' ,xr , , Qtr- N Y U Y I . u v' 4 ' . ' 4: . ,lx .J , ,An V l I , K 'I .a, p 5' ' , ex, 'I L 1 , . 5" Q -' .-:Fw f. V Q 'fxxrx v .,' . ' " 'Vp 'X 1, KV ,qv 1, z- Q ,-. -f, .'.L - V fi.. -y.4-I4 ,. -,. ' I .', . .l .O V' , w Ig mf . , ' Lim' .4 -, ',. .n ' uf an . U, I, .N I . 1 v, -, 4 1 '- .1 F -H. 'S - - ., - ,-r . A" " . sbp ,Q Y , 4 W' ul . 'LT ' " 45 ,IX - . H5-1f.+v:b'a Ng ' " -rw n A , fi' 4. ' 'f ' -- J ' 1 ' -.4. ' - " f .r-H ,. . . ,V h p , 'f. V -I I. M .H ',. 5 u 1 ' S A' 7 1 v V :- L . 1 . fs- 'M' I T."4 ',-5 ' 1 - -:f .Jax I, 5. r , 115M.,l.!i'-1 I I 1' ",xv'f3n..r A . , . I u .1 . 'I r . v 4 I' o .. , J' ' 5 ..' bp" o 11 ' '1'f .- "' I , 1 ulffi 1 I , 'L' ' u-J' ' F ' l",' A- 4 A ,' ' 4' A - .f x u, V , .f'::i- :4..r -"-" " ., ' a""'u K- 'ir - ' ' ' - x -.gut Y. ha ,ng .-, ' ' X 'W ' -w.' ,IN is u ' xv, I ,' . Jix 0 Llj K f I' ' I 3 ' .x v 1,4 .5 .Y ,- 4 NI' . ' '-"' ' ' 'ffm-'11 I' ' .'.' 'M J - x 1 5 Alf J., ',.', . -his: '- 1" ' , - ,A I ' I .P I ,.- H Z .J.1,lr Z' -'fi '- iii. -ag .- I M9 A, L, L. v. 41 J. u' 4. . x v 1 1 v . 4 t .4 N x X a c 1-.,, 4. 3 H 1 1 - I 1 ,. 1 . , s sb' 'df' A1 . Ar A A' I X AN , V , ' '..4.m- - I . I .- 1- . , 4 . - a' .' .7 'P ,. TP . , .z . rn' , . 'Any V -.gn f Q IJQA' , I 0 ln 'I .- , 6 ' 1 ' H . .L - 4 u ' h A 1 3, . ,f- ,ir 3 X . . . ffl av ' an- . , . . V- X F 'lf' '. ..f.4.4 , .1 in 4 , ' w,,..g,fi ,I .4 . M535 rl: ,"Q'. t l,. , ,N"' ' . "' ' P .4 .. 44 -.11 ,, 'K'-.,-Q. ', ' " .V ll . ,. . ., . ,Wei ,434 L. .'v,f ,lv r- Av r. .. 1. .. 4 - ix. '.r,' .1 g. . . . I .4 3. . .iq f' I 1 ,V ' A .-'Q I 4 I I: TH . -ff' Zn N441 v val 5 .14 . ,ft 4. 1 .43 1. .f, A s 9 PE 4 '. - 1 f an 1 "L, F A I 3 I .- :zz Q ' 1 qw? gf' ' ' F , , his .5 u . Q t" ' ' a 4 xi 4 151 li ?xgA.:A,. . ei 1 I V I I 5 ' , .5 ,3 A .5. , JJ I I ji.: '. V . , fy' I . .4 fa." 13 if f . 5. 1:-if 1 - 3' X' 1-ff . I v , lp 1. rf. fr-w-5: . . 1, 1' A . .- ' ' .J ' ' '.- re ' . 1A-,".,- : v' ,I 1 , , . , ' ' 5' .- A W 1 A ,,,1.-.,.k.-3. . , . . W '- - . T.,,. . My ' , , ,I ,f , Q . " .-".-'lf , ' ,' 441 - -.', v 1 - A "-. ' ' . .I . . ' -f. 1 ' Q r .' n , ,Q f' U' V' ,f-v. 54, I . I 1 ' '34 4 - vf . ' f -13 - as , 1 , ' . 'f ,FE ln ' uk- '.' ' ' . .!' I . 'J . 'Q - -01,2 iff: ,J , . '-1 r.-A Y . K . V4 . :Qt ' .1 xv. NF" is 1 5 Iv r' ,- 5 Q ' X . Y ,." xuu M, I. "?,4'f n ' fl f' ,I 1. I h Qu . 1 ,1443 - , '11 1 .' ' .' ,4 'P -w. I 'V' "- '. .1 T. I . ,A . ,' --f V' '-'A af' . ""?.'4 4 ' P ' . ". ff" . Mi 4' ':"4 fm . V: 1 ,F I .. . .41 I ,f. , I I I I I 1 -20 all 4. I 'VI' WM 'IIII wg- L..:n,'- Q,- lf-A A-P Y U' ilu X . I 1 y J I ki ":':"A,!u 4 A , l.su4M9f:'g'1-fm ' Q yn 'I 1 I a ' r E-Pm. - 'IF 11 I a ' r E-Pm. - 'IF 11


Suggestions in the Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) collection:

Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

1922

Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

1923

Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

1929

Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Page 1

1936

Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

1937

Wabash College - Wabash Yearbook (Crawfordsville, IN) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

1938

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.