Virginia Commonwealth University - Cobblestone Wigwam Yearbook (Richmond, VA)

 - Class of 1968

Page 1 of 256

 

Virginia Commonwealth University - Cobblestone Wigwam Yearbook (Richmond, VA) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 256 of the 1968 volume:

FROM LIBRAE? Tfinnnrtm i p rrrp ' ' n i » » nm i f f mnnnnMt wopi i i i» n » i n n im » „| iiiw inim • . • ♦ ♦ For Reference Not to be taken from this room ♦ ♦•♦ ♦ , ♦ ..♦••■• ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ •♦ t I % • % ♦♦%♦♦♦ ■ TABLE OF CONTENTS TITLE PAGE 1 INTRODUCTION 2 DEDICATION 18 ADMINISTRATION 26 SENIORS AND SCHOOLS 36 FEATURES 142 ORGANIZATIONS 168 SPORTS 230 INDEX 244 I • • •« ♦ m m ♦ ♦«♦ ♦ THE COBBLESTONE RICHMOND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTE 901 WEST FRANKLIN STREET RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 1968 ' fllffflf i ilium mum • Virginia Commonwealth University Archives INTRODUCTION Richmond Professional Institute ... a world in itself . . . with standards, perspectives, capacity ... to mold, to develop . . . for each, for all . . . Characteristic entities . . . the people, the structures . . . their facades and interi- ors . . . each a segment of a complex unity . . . rushing, seldom still ... to meet destinies . . . desired, unknown . . . Straining to understand . . . continuous movement, demands of functioning . . . amidst the whimsical and the concrete . . . " good " and " bad " . . . " right " and " wrong " . . . Progressive patterns . . . bring rebukes and scorn . . . from shortsighted minds . . . which ultimately reap . . . with the innovators . . . the fruits of progress . . . Transition envelops them . . . day to month to year . . . ideas like structures expand and grow ... to fill chang- ing needs . . . Building . . . more than a tradition ... a leg- acy . . . tangible and intangible ... of pride, knowledge, and distinction . . . with talent, service, patience . . . with bricks and mortar . . . They are reflected in concrete and steel and glass ... in tearing down and building up ... in living, learning, loving . . . Involvement . . . with themselves, with others . . . enduring, transient . . . op- posing apathy ... a stealthy interloper ... a silent de- stroyer ... of ideals, of rewards . . . Creating images . . . physically, spiritually, socially . . . offbeat and conserva- tive . . . working side by side . . . towards self-expres- sion . . . happiness . . . the summit . . . Endeavoring to justify . . . individual existence, purposeful rebellion, youth . . . they are praised, admonished, ridiculed . . . wavering and shaken . . . frequently . . . not permanently . . . Islands unto themselves . . . groping, discovering . . . seeking to relate ... to the whole, to one . . . straining to understand . . . non-existent boundaries, transition . . . Advancing in number, in character . . . from obscurity to recognition . . . encompassed in an aura of uniqueness . . . stemming from within . . . Dynamic scion of the urban society . . . unique and contributing . . . enjoying its col- orful character . . . thriving on its motley environment . . . endeavoring to keep barriers down ... to entry, to de- parture, to detachment ... A child . . . innocence in the dirt ... an old man . . . lost to society . . . socially dis- joined but physically integrated . . . with the academic sphere . . . They come . . . and they are gone ... so swiftly . . . these four years ... of intensive living ... of laughter and of tears ... of frustration and of fulfillment ... of preparation for more complete existence . . . • «-•-••••%••-•• •%•• • ; Vif Sit !- • « v • • ♦ •••■%•••• fe A A A A ♦ ♦•♦ !•♦ ♦ TvVaT- i 1 ■ ' P. • ■ wjpii Hgp f Nfe 1 - .• •♦• - % ♦ % « i ♦ ♦••••%• •••♦• •• . % « » • ♦ •♦•• • ♦ ♦• •♦ 4 £?a? L .• • ••• c • • . • ♦ - -v J J ♦ ■♦•♦•♦ • ' ♦• ♦ ♦ I ■ fc M d r r n ♦ ••♦ ♦ m rm . [ ' • ♦ s% " i " 3i mmm %• • %• » k A % 4 t 00 • ; • •♦ I • •• . . . , . HO WltASHfl! 0O6S AUOWO r m W " r k »:..„ r ■fi • ' ;A. ' KOC ' afr - -1- I " --I ' ' ■ ! ' ■ " ' ■■ " ' - % » • ♦•♦••••• ♦ •• " • . • ♦ B £ « J i » A % ■ 4 i % • • ♦ ♦•♦••■•• DEDICATION As the darkness silently slips across the sidewalks and streets, the activity of the day changes to the hushed bustle of the night. And another day at Rich- mond Professional Institute draws to a close. The day students return to their homes and urban apartments via busy city streets-and as they go they are assimi- lated into the life of the city. Many work afternoons and evenings, giving the city businesses and bureaus a vi- tal source of part-time help in department stores, of- fices, firms, and warehouses. And the evening college students come to RPI from all facets of city life-busi- nessmen, laborers, housewives, teachers, secretaries all come to further their education and to satisfy their thirst for knowledge. But we are all of, from, or in the city. As an urban college, Richmond Professional Institute is now celebrating fifty years of diligent, faithful, and vital aid to the city. In many respects RPI is the only college of its kind in this region of the United States -it offers many unique courses of study and it prepares stu- dents for a profession, that is, life in an increasingly urban society, education for an urban age. There have been many changes and improvements this year: we have a new president, an extension to Hibbs, a new dormitory under construction, a dynamic student government, the closing of Shafer Street, and an in- creased entertainment program. Besides being a changing school, RPI is also an urban school. We have no real boundaries; we are mingled with the city. The possibility of RPI becoming a university has been discussed and presented. Immediately, several areas began vying for the right to have a campus of univer- sity status located with them. This in itself shows that the community recognizes and supports our work. It also shows that although we have reached one mile- stone, we are being offered unlimited opportunity for continuation and expansion. With that implicit challenge I dedicate this 1968 COB- BLESTONE to the students who are symbols of fifty years of progress and change. I would like to give spe- cial recognition to all who made the following pages possible. Sincerely, Patti Jones Editor-in-chief 1968 Cobblestone w; » • r fcw T- M Z 1M | w 1 J YEARS OF ACTION AND CHANGE ♦ % % » • ♦•♦•••••% ••••• The following is description, history, definition, criticism, and opinion. It is provided to entertain, amuse, inform, and hopefully to inspire some serious thought. The tastes and attitudes of Richmond Professional Institute are many, from the strictest conservative to the most liberal; both live together on campus. This work is in- tended to be captured attitudes, of interest to all who take time to read, think, comprehend, and most of all act. Brick, mortar, pavement, and the ever present cobble- stones -these are the campus of RPI. A campus created out of the city. At first glance RPI does not look like a college. To those who have no direct contact with the institution, RPI seems to be swallowed by the city. To those who go there it is an experience, a memory, a vital part of their lives. The buildings with their cold exteriors hide the true life of the school. They are a barrier to the world outside; this barrier has been a help and a hindrance. The stone faces of the structures hide the flesh faces of the stu- dents; the faces that have many different attitudes, shapes, and appearances. Much like a coconut, the meat and heart of the college is hidden from first inspection by an extremely hard shell. Like the coconut, once this shell is broken, the meat and the heart are revealed. There are over 10,000 students now attending RPI, each with a different background, ambition, and appear- ance. The growth of RPI has been rapid and steady; each year brings more people who are willing to break the shell. At this point a look at the past may be informative. From the inception of the college by Dr. Henry H. Hibbs, to the present day and hopefully the future, RPI has been moving rapidly forward. The first classes of the school that was to become RPI were held on the third floor of No. 1112 Capitol Street in 1917. At that time there was only one school, the School of Social Work and Public Health. This school was the first of its kind in the entire South. Within the first three years from the Octo- ber 1 1 starting day, a program in recreational leader- ship and extension courses from the College of William and Mary were available. It was in this period too that the Dramatic Art Department was started. The school moved to 827 West Franklin (Founder ' s Hall) in 1925 and the School of Social Work and Public Health became the Richmond Division of the College of William and Mary (the first branch college in Virginia). In 1937, a depart- ment to train teachers in distributive education was formed. This was the first such program offered by any college in the United States. Richmond Professional Institute of the College of William and Mary was the name adopted by this school in 1939. The name was aptly chosen to point out the emphasis on training for professional fields. In 1962, " of the Col- lege of William and Mary " was dropped when the college was accredited on its own merits by the Southern Asso- ciation of Colleges and Schools. The year 1959 marked the retirement of Dr. Hibbs after 42 years of service. Dr. Hibbs will never leave the school entirely, for a debt is owed him by all. In this year. Dr. George Oliver ably took up the responsibility of running what had become a rapidly growing urban college. Although RPI received its accreditation in 1953, the name was officially changed by an act of the General Assembly in 1962, at which time RPI became an inde- pendent state-supported college. Upon Dr. Oliver ' s retirement in 1967, Dr. Roland H. Nelson, Jr., became president of the greatly expanded college. Although Dr. Nelson has not held his post long, he has shown that he is a man who not only wants results, but also one who expects results. RPI ' s history is a history of growth. Much like any ex- panding thing, the college has felt growing pains. The growth and size of the school are the fountainheads of the many problems that face RPI. By 1970, the total enrollment prediction reaches nearly 19,000 students. This terrific increase is due to the geographic location of the school, the atmosphere of the campus, and the courses of study offered, among other things. Richmond ' s location in the population cres- cent of Virginia, which extends from Washington, D. O. to Richmond, and south to Norfolk, makes it a leading city in the state for industry and retail business. RPI, situated in the center of this large area, was fated from the beginning to be large. The urban campus en- courages attendance by those who would not other- wise have the opportunity for higher education. RPI per- mits many students to live at home and work part-time in the various businesses of the city. The urban campus has many problems, one of which is the lack of space. The school has been growing steadily, but the avail- ability of land has decreased. RPI has been forced to go in the only direction left-up. The extension to the Hibbs building was constructed to facilitate the addition of four more floors. The buildings and faculty of RPI are both overtaxed. Another of the problems of the college is the lack of strong support of the school by the State Legislature in years past. Now the attitude is beginning to change; the city ' s, and pos- sibly the state ' s, largest college cannot be ignored. RPI is a rapidly changing school; and with each change, the reputation of the school is boosted. RPI is not a school afraid to change. The strange, the new, and the different are not rejected, but are embraced with the hope that something can be learned by each unique experience. This attitude of open-mindedness has not always been looked upon with favor. At times, RPI has seemed to be a life independent of the city of Richmond, yet dependent on the city for its life. The problems of an urban college (soon to be a part of a university system) are complex. The school h as not been a parasite on the city. RPI has added a greatly needed number of trained workers to the labor market of Rich- mond and other cities. While attending school, many students work, again adding to the work force and bol- stering the economy of the city. The art department of RPI has added culture and color to Richmond. The art sales of the schools of art have permitted many people to add a touch of fineness to their lives. The relationship between the city and the school is one of mutual need. One needs the other to function at its best. The first fifty years of existence have shown that the college will survive. The second fifty years will prove the worthiness of this life. All predictions of the future do have the nature of speculation, but not all are uncer- tain. The connection of RPI and MCV to form a new state-supported university is a certainty. A centrally located university is desired and greatly needed. The final form of the merger is still to be decided, but the combination can only aid the city and state as a whole. The college of RPI in the near future will continue to grow, build, improve, and expand. The faculty will con- tinue to increase and improve. The student will have more personal attention; the school will gain its much needed ardent support and the whole will benefit from the improvement of one of its parts. The administration, faculty, and students are all dedicated to this purpose, and it shall be achieved. ♦ ♦ • ♦ • • t • i£ J as aifsal i JfsES dF " ?2} " A. »J 4 { 4 pet I ! feiifefJl ■ ■ IkL ( t9 j . -LfJ Y : t T v « a V " . ♦•♦■ , ♦ ♦♦♦%♦♦♦♦♦ • m ♦ % % ♦•♦•♦••••♦ ♦•••• ••• S ».. -». A ' fl -v » ' ' • • ♦ -wp- ADMINISTRATION DOCTOR ROLAND H. NELSON, JR., rpi ' s second president, approaches the problems of the ur- ban university with stress on the individual and the col- lege ' s total integration into the community. " The urban college, to deserve the name, must be part of the city which surrounds it. It must use the city as a learning laboratory . . . but more, it must know the city ' s concerns, but most important, it must educate its students to solve the city ' s problems; to share the city ' s concerns. " Dr. Nelson received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Duke University, his Masters degree from the Univer- sity of Virginia, and his Doctorate from Harvard. Coming to RPI from Duke University where he was chairman of the department of education, Dr. Nelson brought with him definite ideas about the role of the administration in an urban college. In his address at the first convocation of the year on October 4, 1967, Dr. Nelson said on the subject of administration, " The job of the place is edu- cation. The name of the game is learning. Administration is not the end but the means. " His beliefs, his aims, and his goals reflect the ever- growing and ever-changing atmosphere of the college. " We must hold to the vitality and the courage to experi- ment that have characterized RPI. We must respect each man for what he is, for what he can do. " By combining and incorporating the best of the old with the best of the new -the cobblestones with the steel, the new data with the traditional but nevertheless valid and useful laws-Dr. Nelson approaches his new college with skill, with intelligence, and, most important of all, with understanding. " We have before us a challenge to develop a college that truly educates for our age. We have the will for it. We shall find the way. Let us join together now and pledge our efforts to meet that challenge. " ► -♦•♦•♦• ♦«•♦■• • V. w w w T (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) J. KENNETH ROACH, DEAN OF COLLEGE; RAYMOND T. HOLMES. JR , COMPTROLLER; CHARLES M RENNEISEN, DEAN OF STUDENTS. (OPPOSITE PAGE CLOCK- WISE FROM TOP LEFT) WILLIAM O. EDWARDS. DIRECTOR OF DEVE- LOPMENT; ERNEST V. WOODALL. BURSAR; RICHARD S. VACCA. ASSISTANT TO PRESIDENT; JANE BELL GLADDING. DEAN OF WOMEN; RICHARD E. MACDOUGALL, DEAN OF MEN. ♦ . ♦ ♦♦%♦•• ••■ ♦ ♦♦♦%♦♦♦%♦ • i • ' 0 ■ 9 ■ 4 4 t (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) JAMES W. BAILEY, ASSOCIATE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE; ROSAMOND MC CANLESS, LIBRARIAN; JOHN A. MAPP. DEAN OF CONTINUING EDUCATION AND DIRECTOR OF EVE- NING COLLEGE; WALTER F. STIERS, REGISTRAR; JACKIE F. TAPLIN. « • • ♦ ♦ . COUNSELOR. (OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) MERLE V, SLATER. DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS; JAMES DUNN, DI- RECTOR OF PLACEMENT; DR. JOHN D. CALL, SCHOOL PHYSICIAN; DR. MANFRED CALL. SCHOOL PHYSICIAN. r T ♦ t 9 • •» - • • . • ♦ ♦ -• • (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) JOHN VELIER, SECURITY; MAR- GARET J. PERRITT, ASSISTANT DEAN OF WOMEN- MILTON F. WOODY. DIRECTOR OF FINANCIAL AID; PAULINE MORONI, COUN- SELOR; EDWARD SANTUCCI, AUDITOR; WILLIAM J. WEBBER, DIREC- TOR OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ASSISTANT TO DEAN OF STUDENTS. (OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) MIL- TON WALLACE, DIRECTOR OF PHYSICAL PLANT; E. A. BECK. SU- PERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS ANDGROUNDS; ROBERTM. TIPTON, DIRECTOR OF TESTING; MRS. A. R. HARDING, HOUSEKEEPER. ■BI I ••♦♦■ • • ♦ .♦.♦ ♦•• • ' •;;;•;;.; BOARD OF VISITORS: MR. THOMAS P BRYAN. JR ; MRS. JAMES B. BULLARD; MR. JOSEPH C. CARTER. JR.; MR. H. HITER HARRIS. JR.: MR. RICHARD MAXWELL: MR. HERBERT C. MOSELEY: DR. JAMES W. MULLEN. II; DR. THOMAS W. MURRELL. JR.; MR. WEBSTER S. RHOADS. JR.: MRS. CHARLES G. THALHIMER; MR. C. PORTER VAUGHAN. JR.; DR. H. I WILLETT; MR. ROBERT A. WILSON. I t ' $ • H V t • • • • • •■ •♦ ♦ 4 SCHOOL OF ART The School of Art began with a sculpture course in 1926. Two years later Miss Ter- esa Pollak directed the formation of a one- faculty Art Department. Since that time, the department has expanded to a school con- sisting of six departments and has achieved national recognition through its programs in the visual arts. Students are offered the advantages of comprehensive facilities and professionally competent faculty within an urban complex of higher education. The professional art curriculum at RPI is one of few in the nation which exists in a combined academic and professional environment. It is also the only state supported professional school of art in the South. Individual competencies in the visual arts are emphasized through the six depart- ments in which students devote the greater part of each day to studio courses in the arts. Herbert J. Burgart, Dean ».». . Clockwise from top left: JACK L. AMOS, 8.F.A.. Communications Arts Design: EDITH M. BARBER. B.F.A., Art Education; ANDREW D. ATTILIIS. B.F.A., Communications Arts Design. ♦ t 9 9 9 Clockwise from top left: JOHN C. BARBER, B.F.A.. Communications Arts Design; BARBARA J. BLOOM. B.F.A., Interior Design; WILLIAM K. BLYTHE, BRA.. Communications Arts Design; SANDRA C. BRISTOL. B.F.A.. Communications Arts Design; LESLIE BOWLES. B.F.A.. Fashion Art- Clockwise from top left: KAREN J. BLYTHE, B.F.A.. Communications Art Design: RICHARD BARLOW, B.F.A.. Communications Art Design; LAURA M. BLEVINS. B.F.A.. Fashion Art; JOE BOWERS. B.F.A.. Interior Design. £r . • 1 Br ««©- ♦ ♦ » 0 t ♦ ♦ Clockwise from top left: SANDRA T. CONRAD. B.F.A.. Fashion Design; J. R. BURBULIS, B.F.A., Communication Arts Design; BRADFORD C. CLEVER. B. FA., Communication Arts Design; SUSAN BROWN. B.F.A.. Art Education. ,-... Clockwise from top left: RICHARD BLOUNT. B.F.A.. Communication Arts Design; ANTONIA J. COULEMAN, B.F.A.. Art Education; DONALD CIRILLO. B.F.A.. Communication Arts Design. - U ii m • • • }. ■• 4 ♦ f ♦ Clockwise from top left: DAVID G. DOYLE, B.F.A.. Communications Arts Design; BEVERLY P. CURRY, B.F.A.. Art Education; MARGARET L. THOMAS R. FIELDS, B.F.A., Fine Arts. !• • ■♦• 1 ♦•♦%••••••• ••%•• Clockwise from top left; JANET W. GROVE. B.F.A., F ne Arts; JANE G DUCK, B.F.A.. Fashion Art: MARILYN GARLICK. B.F.A Fine Arts. l L . : ' ¥m 2 9 - B 2 1 A V £r W — - a ii JJ f W.:.: : : NORBERT HAMM, B.F.A., Communications Art Design; NANCY A. MIGHT, B.F.A., Art Education. V ■•■♦ ♦ •••♦•♦ ♦ • %• ♦ • % •••• •%•♦ ■mm Clockwise from top left: WILLIAM M. HEADY, B.F.A., Communications Art Design; JANE A. HATCHER. B.F.A., Art Education; ROBERT HARDY. B.F.A., Communications Art Design. 1 1 Wf4 ' 4 ♦ ♦ Clockwise from top left: E. A. JONES. B.F.A.. Interior Design; MARY P. JONES. B.F.A., Interior Design; LINDA M. HONSAKER. B.F.A.. Art Edu- cation. I ♦ • ♦ ••♦♦•♦ • ♦ V ♦ ♦ • ■••• • ■• ••%• ••♦ Clockwise from top left: JOE H. IVEY, B.F.A., Communication Arts De- sign; FRANK J. JOHNSON, B.F.A.. Interior Design; JANIE M. KELLER. B.F.A.. Interior Design; JOANN H. KEITH. B.F.A.. Interior Design. I t :v v. W I f-9 ♦ •■ Clockwise from top left: JAMES H. LYON. B.F.A.. Fine Arts; JANE K. POTTER. B.F.A.. Interior Design; JERRY L. MORRIS, B.F.A., Communica- tion Arts- Design; DOUGLAS W. PRICE, B.F.A., Communication Arts Design. RICHARD G. ORANDER. B.F.A.. Fashion Design; S. N. MARLOW. B.F.A. %■♦♦ ' ♦• t t % » Clockwise from top left: LINDA D. LACKEY. B.F.A.. Interior Design- JOAN L. LIVESAY, B.F.A., Interior Design; CHRISTINE L. ORCULT, B.F.A.. Art Education; CHERYL DIANNE MERDINGER. B.F.A.. Art Educa- tion; CAROL S. LANSINGER. B.F.A.. Interior Design; EDWARD C. KEN- NEDY. B.F.A.. Interior Design. m » » • t [. •♦ • • ' Clockwise from top left: KARL M. SAUNDERS, B.F.A., Communications Arts Design; FRANCES L. REX, B.F .A., Arts Crafts; WILLIAM T. SACHAK. B.F.A., Communications Arts Design; DELICE E. RICHARDS, B.F.A., Fashion Design; REBECCA L. SCHOCK, B.F.A., Interior Design; BRENDA A. REYNOLDS, B.F.A., Fashion Art, . , ♦ ♦ % • • t ♦ •♦ ••.; Clockwise from top left: BONNIE A. PRINTZ, B.F.A., Art Education; HERBERT C. PULLIAM. B.F.A., Interior Design; WILLIAM R. ROBEY. B.F.A.. Interior Design; JERRY L SEAMSTER. B.F.A., Communications Arts Design; LAURIE A. SIMPSON. B.F.A.. Art Education. - L V ♦— I ■■■ ■■■■l ■MIR t 1 ST J ' m Clockwise from top left: SANDRA S. TAYLOR, B.F.A., Art Education; JOYCE A. SMITH, B.F.A., Fashion Design; ZETA KAYE SMITH, B.F.A., Fashion Design; C MELVIN THOMAS, B.F.A., Interior Design; KYLE SPANGLER, B.F.A., Communication Arts Design; HOLMES M. WAGON- ER, B.F.A., Communication Arts Design. •••♦• ♦ ♦ •• •■ :a : ••♦ t ! • Clockwise from top left: W. B. STEVENS. B.F.A.. Fine Arts: LOUISA W. STANSFIELD. B.F.A., Fashion Art: SHARYN G. STRONG. B.F.A.. Fash- ion Art; SANDRA SYDER, B.F.A.. Communication Arts Design. v ::;;;;; ; Clockwise from top left: CHRISTY WARD. B.F.A., Interior Design; RE- BECCA A. WHITLOCK. B.F.A.. Fashion Art; MARILYN S. WRIGHT, B.F.A.. Interior Design; RONALD E. WHITE. B.F.A.. Communications Arts De- III _ tj ip K p7 % L •• •♦• " , % • ♦ • ♦%♦••-• » t ♦ • ♦ •■•• •••• •-• • % ♦ ♦ ♦ • •••• ••♦ ♦•%•♦ ••♦ Clockwise from top left: GEORGE WAKEFIELD, B.F.A., Interior Design; PORTER WHITESIDE, B.F.A.. Communication Arts Design; CYNTHIA L. WINSTEAD, B.F.A.. Art Education; ELWOOD M. WHITE. B.F.A., Interior Design; NANCY L. WOODHOUSE, B.F.A.. Communication Arts Design. A V 1 — SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Throughout history most of man ' s energies have been devoted to business or economic pursuits. He has been inescapably involved in a constant struggle to provide the basic necessities of life. Only in nations that have adopted the industrial ideas and techniques of the western democracies has he even today achieved much more than a meager subsistence level of living. The American business system, especially, has made pos- sible a better, richer life for millions of peo- ple. Fortunately, we have used some of our resources and talents to study the system and to learn how to make it work more effectively year by year. The goal of the School of Business is to aid in the further enrichment of man ' s life by contributing to the development of knowledge in such fields as accounting, business management, data processing and computer science, economics, finance, marketing, public ad- ministration, and secretarial administration. It also prepares both undergraduate and graduate students for careers in these fields. J. Curtis Hall, Dean Clockwise from top left: EDWIN A. ALLAN. B.S.. Accounting; JOYCE AYERS. B.S.. Accounting; WILLIAM BABCOCK. B.S., Economics; GARY N. APPEL, B.S.. General Business. v. v. ♦•:♦•:• • • ♦ ♦ ♦ ••• k Clockwise from top left: HARRISON S. BALDWIN, B.S., Accounting; D. P. BRUEGGEMAN. B.S.. Accounting. MARVIN BRADSHAW, JR.. B.S.. Man- agement; MICHAEL H. BARNES. B.S.. General Business. • ' ♦•♦• i !!!!! • ♦•♦ HBHHBH Clockwise from top left: PHILIP C. CLARK, B.S.. General Business; EDWARD B. CHEWNING. B.S.. Accounting; CHARLES V. BUCKER, B.S.. Accounting; MORRISON BUTLER. B.S.. Economics. Clockwise from top left: G. CLEVELAND COOK III. B.S.. Management; RONALD J. COTE. B.S.. Management; JUDITH L. CURRY, B.S., Business and Law; JAMES M. COOLEY, B.S.. Economics. 5 • • » Clockwise from top left: KENNETH C. DAVIS. B.S., General Business: JOSEPH D. DAVIS. B.S., General Business; GEORGE A. DAVIS. B.S., Business Education; LESLIE M. DAVIS. B.S.. Management; CAROLE D. CHILDRESS. B.S.. Business Education. 4 •• ' • ■ • ' ••• | 9 ■ 9 • W ■ 9 ■ ♦ » Left to right top: JEROLD W. DICKERSON, B.S., Accounting; FRANK C. DEAL, B.S ., General Business. Left to right bottom: LINDA D. ENOCHS. B.S.. Accounting; FRANK J. DOHERTY, B.S., General Business. Clockwise from top left CELIA GERSHOWITZ, B.S.. Secretarial Adminis- tration; RONALD P. GIBSON. B.S.. Management; PHILLIP J. GOSHER. B.S.. Management; ARNOLD S. FARBER. B.S., Management; WILLIAM W. EVERETT, B.S.. Accounting. . •♦■ • ■ Clockwise from top left. JOAN A. GRAHAM. A.S., General Secretarial; JUNE E. GRAHAM. A.S.. General Secretarial; ROBERT H. GRIFFIN. B.S.. General Business; JAMES E. HALARD III, B.S. General Business; CHARLES E. HALL. B.S., Accounting. • ••••% Clockwise from top left: DARLENE HARRUP, B.S.. Business Education; JOHN HOWARD, B.S., General Business; JAMES N. HALL. B.S.. Econom- :::::::::;;; :« j , ._■ ••« t • • ' 9 « •♦♦ •♦ Clockwise from top left: BETTY A. HUDGINS, B.S., Business Education; ELIZABETH G. JETER. B.S.. Business Education; PATRICIA A. JONES. A.S. Medical Secretarial; JOHN H. JENKINS, B.S.. Business Education. W%- gfll j Mfe 1 Clockwise from top left WILLIAM M. JORDAN. B.S.. General Business; EDWARD R JUSTIS, B.S., General Business; CHARLES F. KAIN. B.S., Secretarial Administration; MICHELLE J. KELLER, A.S.. Legal Secretar- 4 ft I • t t f .« • ' • : ♦ . • Clockwise from left to right ANDERSON K, LAMBERT, B.S.. General Business; MICHAEL H. KLINE, B.S., Management; DONALD B. LEAMAN. B.S., Management. • ' ■jcwkwiiswv Clockwise from left to right: EUGENE M. LEWIS, B.S.. Management; LIN- WOOD F. LOGAN. JR.. B.S.. Accounting; KATHRYN R. MARTIN, B.S.. Business Education. HENRY MARTIN, B.S.. General Business. t « ♦ ♦ Clockwise from left to right. FREDERICK H. MC KAY. B.S., General Busi- ness- LARRY MEADORS, B.S., General Business; RICHARD L. MAXLEY, B.S., Management; RAYMOND C. MORRISON. B.S., Economics; DAVID L. MORRISON. B.S., Management. Clockwise from left to right: FRANKLIN B. MOSS. B.S., Accounting; JOHN E. NEAGLE. B.S.. General Business, MRS. J. A. NUNNALLY. B.S., Business Education; JOHN W. NELMS, B.S., Management. N X i ■(■ ■ -«■ ■ i 9 4 •♦♦ ♦ Clockwise from left to right GLENWOOD E. PADGETT, B.S., Manage- merit; JAMES D. PATTERSON, B.S., Economics; JAMES R. O ' BRIEN. B.S., Accounting. Clockwise from left to right R. F. PLEASANTS. B.S.. General Business; EDMOND S. PITTMAN. B.S.. Accounting; CHARLES I. PATTON. B.S.. Economics. w itm 9-t ♦ Clockwise from left to right RONALD J. PEARLMAN. B.S.. Business Education; MICHEAL D. PRITCHARD. B.S.. General Business; STAN RABINEAU, B.S., Management; CHARLES REESE. B.S.. Accounting. «•• ♦•♦••»• Clockwise from left to right: PAUL L. ROLLISON. B.S.. General Business PAMILA D RAMEY. AS.. General Secretarial; ROBERT A. ROBEY, B.S. Management. 4 v - • « Clockwise from left to right: J. A. SATTERWHITE, B.S., Accounting; STEWART E. SHANER, B.S., General Business; JAMES M. SYCKS, B.S., Management; BRUCE E. SHORT, B.S.. General Business; SANDRA S. SHELBURNE, B.S., Business Education. • • • f ■• » Clockwise from left to right: STEVE K. SILVER. B.S., Management; WIL- LIAM H. SHURN, JR., B.S.. Management; J. DAVIS SMITH, B.S.. Account- ing; WAYNE E. SPROUSE. B.S.. Management; EUGENE M. STEPONS, B.S.. Management. 1 J » ■» « Clockwise from left to right: DAVID SUSSMAN. B.S., General Business; ROY THOMAS TATE, B.S., Management; JAMES R. THOMPSON, B.S., Management; THOMAS THACHER. B.S.. Management; HENRY M. THACHER. B.S.. General Business. mm Wm Clockwise from left to right: JOHN S. TURNER, B.S., Accounting- RAY- MOND VERBIT, B.S.. Management; AMY WAINWRIGHT, B.S., General Business; NORMAN P. WASH. B.S., Management. t 9 « • ' Clockwise from left to right: PATRICIA L. WEBB, B.S.. Business Educa- tion; CLAUDETTE E. WEATHERHOLT, B.S., Business Education; LAY- TON A. WHEELER, B.S.. Management; CARL W. WELLS. B.S.. Account- .. ' " T »» - ■■ " Clockwise from left to right STUART B WRIGHT. B.S.. General Busi- ness; R. B. WILTSHIRE, B.S., General Business; MARY WILBOURNE, B.S.. Business Education; JOHN M. YEARMAN B.S.. General Business. ♦ 9 4 4 §• ' •• ' § « SCHOOL OF EDUCATION The School of Education has grown steadily with the increased enrollment of the college. Along with this growth new members have been added to the education faculty. At present the school has the greatest number of student teachers as compared with past years, and an increased number of teacher scholarships have been granted. Professional preparation is offered by the School of Education for future teachers in elementary and secondary schools, which is intended to contribute to both personal and professional development of prospective teachers. The elementary education curricu- lum provides for complete pre-service prep- aration for teachers of children in the pri- mary and upper elementary school. Also provided in the curriculum are optional courses of study with special emphasis in early childhood education, special educa- tion, and elementary school library work. Other areas of the school of education deal- ing with secondary education include the following fields: art education, business education, drama and speech education, distributive education, English education, history and social science education, mathe- matics education, music education, physical education, and science education. Educa- tion shall never cease to exist. Arnold P. Fleshood, Dean Clockwise from left to right. BONNIE BAKER, B.S.. Elementary Educa- tion- MRS. BETTY BARNES. B.S.. Elementary Education; ROCHELLE P. BLUM. B.S.. Elementary Education; JOSEPH B. BUCKER. B.S.. Elemen- tary Education; CAROLYN B. BRITT, B.S.. Elementary Education; IN- GRIDG. BREWER. B.S.. Elementary Education. • 4 t 1 WC V w 4 « t • • i ••- - •• ♦ Clockwise from left to right: NANCY P. BUNCH. B.S.. Elementary Educa- tion; JANE I. CARMACK. B.S.. Elementary Education; RUTH P. COFF- MAN. B.S., Elementary Education; FARRELL D. CARTER. B.S.. Elemen- tary Education; JAMES E. COBB. B.S.. Health and Physical Education. ♦ ' • " ♦ ' ••% ' Clockwise from left to right: MARY W. DABNEY. B.S.. Elementary Educa- tion; BARBARA A. DAVIDSON. B.S.. Elementary Education; B. J. DON- ALDSON, B.S., Elementary Education; RUBY DILLARD. B.S.. Elementary Education; BARBARA M. ELVERS. B.S., Elementary Education; ELIZA- BETH DEMASTERS. B.S.. Elementary Education. I V £rA , t-4 ' 4 , ♦ -i Clockwise from left to right: GRACE GULICK. B.S., Elementary Educa- tion; ANNE M. FELTON, B.S.. Elementary Education; CAROLYN A. HAMMOND. B.S., Elementary Education; CARL R. JENNINGS. B.S.. Ele- mentary Education; JENNIFER L. HUFFMAN. B.S., Elementary Educa- tion. ' ••• Clockwise from left to right: PATRICIA L. JONES, B.S.. Elementary Edu- cation; ELIZABETH E. LAND. B.S.. Elementary Education; MARY W. LAWSON, B.S.. Elementary Education; SARAH W. LIGGAN, B.S.. Elemen- tary Education; DORIS M KORMAN, B.S.. Elementary Education. t • i - • • » Clockwise from left to right- LINDA C. MALLORY. B.S., Special Educa- tion; CHERYL A. MC CLUNG. B.S.. Elementary Education; DORA L. MC COY. B.S., Elementary Education; MARY A. MC COUCH. B.S.. Elemen- tary Education; PENNY B. NAVIS, B.S., Elementary Education; M. J. MCCULLOCK. B.S., Elementary Education. " •■ IWKI «K » £ r ♦ • % ■♦ r r r Clockwise from left to right: ILSE M. NIEDERMAYER. B.S., Elementary Education; L. WAYNE OLIVER. B.S.. Elementary Education; CAROLYN R. OWENS. B.S.. Elementary Education; ANDREA L. POLLARD. B.S.. Ele- mentary Education; JAMES T. POLK. B.S.. Health and Physical Educa- tion; KAREN PEZZUTI, B.S.. Elementary Education. :K I , mm. Wki a M - - • t - Clockwise from left to right: REBECCA STEIN. B.S., Elementary Educa- tion; JAMES L. SANDERS, B.S., Elementary Education; GLORIA F. STERN, B.S., Elementary Education; SUSAN K. SMITH. B.S., Elementary Education; JOHNIE STENCIL. B.S., Elementary Education. •• ' ••• ♦ • ♦ • Clockwise from left to right MARY J. WORRELL, B.S., Elementary Educa- tion; BETTY C. SATTERWHITE. B.S.. Elementary Education; NANCY S. THOMAS, B.S., Elementary Education; BONNIE J. WHITE. B.S.. Elemen- tary Education; MARGARET R. POWELL, B.S.. Elementary Education; MARY M. WALL, B.S., Elementary Education. » « 1 PW 4» :-i •♦••• ■ SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY The general objective of the Department of Psychology is to give the student a scientific attitude toward and a better understanding of human behavior; to prepare students for personnel work and jobs in business and in in- dustry. Those receiving the Masters degree work under the supervision of senior psy- chologists, psychiatrists and physicians in hospitals, mental institutions, social agen- cies, child welfare services, as personnel officers, and guidance counselors. Dr. Edwin R. Thomas, Head of the Department of Psychology Clockwise from left to right: FRANCIS BATTE, B.S., Psychology; MAU- REEN BECKER. B.S.. Psychology; DENZIL D. GOODWILL. B.S.. Psychol- ogy; G. JEANETTE CARDEN. B.S.. Psychology. ♦ •♦■ •« t • t t Clockwise from left to right SUSAN H. SHAFFER. B.S.. Psychology; BARBARA STEPHENSON, B.S., Psychology; LARRY L. MASON, B.S., Psychology. JL »•« • " Clockwise from left to right: W. M. WALDER, B.S., Psychology; BETTY A. PORTER. B.S.. Psychology; GLENDA RAE SILVERMAN. B.S.. Psychol- ogy; MARION G. SPONG. B.S.. Psychology » ♦♦♦♦%••♦♦ ' ♦ «• 1 4 " 4 « t ' 4 4 ♦ SCHOOL OF MUSIC The School of Music is a conservatory in which the students devote approximately eight tenths of their time to musical studies. This is in direct contrast to most schools which only require about one fourth of the student ' s total time to be devoted to the study of music. The Richmond Professional Institute School of Music is the only college in the Richmond area which offers this program. The School of Music is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Music. In the School one may study Applied Music which requires a high degree of talent, Music Education for teaching at all levels, Music History and Literature, for teaching college or private lessons, Theory and Com- position for a p rofession in composing, and Sacred Music which prepares a student for the Ministry of Music in the church. Wayne L. Batty, Chairman, School of Music ROBIN BLANKENSHIP, B.M.. Theory and Composition REBECCA D. HUTCHINS, B.M.. Music Educatii • »• •« • Clockwise from left to right RIVES MAXEY JONES. B.M.. Brass, Wood- winds or Strings: JANET WORSHAM, B.M.. Music Education, MARCIA RAMSY, B.M.. Music History and Literature; REBECCA C. GROVES. B.M.. Sacred Music; SAMUEL WALKER, B.M.. Music History and Literature. ( • 4 - t « SCHOOL OF ARTS SCIENCES The School of Arts and Sciences encom- passes eight departments. Within its exten- sive range are courses required in all four- year programs and in many two-year curric- ulums. Although the school has been in existence for little more than a year and is RPI ' s new- est school, it has nearly 300 full-time stu- dents and 80 full-time faculty members. The school has recently added degree programs in math and French and hopes to soon in- clude in this category German, Spanish and Russian. J. Edwin Whitesell, Dean GORDON ALLISON, B.S.. Mathematics JEANNE B. BROWN. B S . English Education Clockwise: SUSANNE W. FORBERG. B.S.. English Education; JOSEPH B. FAWLEY, B.S.. English; PEGGY A. CONE. B.S.. Mathematics; OTHO W. COON, B.S., History; RONALD B. DONATI. B.S.. General Exploratory; ANTHONY G. FAINA. B.S.. History, • « V «-«- - • ♦•♦ ♦ Clockwise: ROBERT C. JAMISON, B.S., History and Social Science Edu- cation; GORDON V. GAY, B.S., History; NANCY E. GORMOURS, B.S., Mathematics Education; PAUL B. KIRBY, B.S., History; M. O, HUBBARD. B.S.. English Education; MARTHA A. HUMMEL, B.S., History; CAROLE E. HURSEY, B.S., History and Social Science Education. Clockwise: WALTER P. LOWERY. B.S .. History; DIANE L. PIORO. B.S.. History; MICHAEL A. KIRBY. B.S.. English; STEVEN LIBERMAN, B.S.. History; WILLIAM G. LIPPY. B.S.. Chemistry; ANNE C. LODGE. B.S., Eng- lish Education. .4 • ♦• •♦• I • f • ••■ •♦ Clockwise CAROLYN A. MARTIN. B.S.. History and Social Science Edu- cation; WILLIAM H. PFAUMER. B.S., Pre-dentistry; EDWARD J. MC GARRY, B.S.. History- RAYMOND L. NICAR, B.S., Mathematics; KENNETH F. ORBAN. B.S., Biology; JOYCE M. MC KINNEY. B.S., English Education; GRAY F. MORRIS. B.S., History. • ••%• • Clockwise: JANET S. SCHER. B.S.. Pre-dentistry. MARY C. WEBER. B.S., Biology; BARBARA L. ROBERTSON. B.S.. Language Education; JAMES W. ROWE. B.S.. Chemistry; WANDA J. ROOKE, B.S.. English Education; DIANNE L. STEPHENS. B.S., History and Social Science Education: INA C. WOODROOF, B.S.. English Education. t -i 4 ♦ ■ SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE Guiding students in a better understanding of the social life of man, the School of Social Science offers three four-year degree pro- grams in sociology and social welfare, jour- nalism and recreational leadership. A two- year program is offered in law enforcement. The school strives to prepare its students for positions in these and other allied fields and for admission to graduate schools in an environment combining academic and pro- fessional elements. Lois Washer, Chairman ANNA BENNETT, B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare • ♦ • % Clockwise: ANNE E. ELLIS, B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; ANN G. COOKE. B.S., Sociology and Social Welfare; OLGA M. COX. B.S.. Sociol- ogy and Social Welfare; CAROL R. CROWDER, B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; THOMAS M. DIGGS. B.S.. Journalism; BETTY L. DAVIS. B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare. ♦ ♦ « _ M V t t • ♦• t t t 9 i Clockwise: JOHN B. EDWARDS, B.S.. Journalism; LARRY R. EVANS, B.S.. Journalism; JODY FARMAN, B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; JUDITH l_. GILL. B.S., Sociology and Social Welfare; STUART A. HALL, B.S., Sociology and Social Welfare; BARBARA A. HAMEL, B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare. ♦ » •%•♦•» Clockwise: DONNA L. HANNAN. B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; DONALD L. HARRIS. B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; MARY L. HARVEY. B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; DONNA P. HERRON, B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; ROBERT W JOHNSON, B.S., Sociology and Social Welfare. • • ■■ ' « ♦•♦ ' t t » • I Clockwise: JOHN C. KING, B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; ANNE D. LAGOW. B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; MICHAEL J. LAZZURI. B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; SUSAN J. LEVIN, B.S., Sociology and So- cial Welfare; MILFORE K. LILES, B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare. ;• ■a!.«ttj. •• • ♦ ' ♦ Clockwise: MARY L. MESSLER, B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; BARBARA L. MAY. B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; DAVID MORRIS. B.S.. Recreational Leadership; BARBARA W. MOUNTCASTLE, B.S.. So- ciology and Social Welfare; KATHY W. MOUNTCASTLE, B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare. " «K rra I t • I • ' • ' « 0-9 9 -I « .• -»•»- Clockwise: GLADYS PIERSON, B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare. THERESA NACKLEY. B.S., Sociology and Social Welfare; M. H. STEW- ART, B.S., Sociology and Social Welfare; ANNE B. RIPLEY, B.S., Sociol- ogy and Social Welfare; NANCY A. RYDER. B.S., Sociology and Social Welfare. Clockwise: SHIRLEY M. SHURN, B.D., Sociology and Social Welfare; GARNETTE E WARNER. AS.. Law Enforcement; NORMA VAN DEPOELE. B.S.. Recreational Leadership; DIANE C. WATERS, B.S., Soci- ology and Social Welfare; JEAN M. WILLIAMSON. B.S.. Sociology and So- cial Welfare; MARY C. WHARTON. B.S.. Sociology and Social Welfare; ANTOINETTE TURMAN. B.S.. Recreational Leadership. DISTRIBUTION " Distribution " is defined by the Chamber of Commerce of the United States as the " term used in American business to embrace all the activities employed in finding customers for goods and services and in moving goods, geographically and through the channels of trade. " The School of Distribution prepares men and women for careers in distributive occupa- tions—advertising, retailing, wholesaling, and teaching distributive education -which employ more than a third of the employed persons in the United States. Students must supplement academic pursuits with profes- sional experience to qualify for a degree from the school, which is the oldest of its kind " in the South. Mary L. Wellman, Chairman of Faculty Committee DONALD BLAKE. B.S., Distributive Education GIGI BELSER, B.S.. Retailing %• ♦ ♦ • • ♦• Clockwise: REBECCA C. BRICKEY. A. S.. Cooperative Distribution; R.F. BLE1CHER, B.S.. Advertising; DAVID G. CHALKLEY, B.S., Retailing; RICHARD BOLTZ, A.S.. Cooperative Distribution; JOHN L. BOCK, B.S.. Advertising. : J ONEWAY W m " ■ » 4 ♦ Clockwise ANITA L. DOWELL, A.S., Cooperative Distribution; FAYE M. FRETWELL. B.S.. Distributive Education- KAY DAVIS. A.S.. Cooperative Distribution; MARTHA COLLETTE. B.S.. Retailing; GEORGE R. DEMILLE. B.S., Advertising; THOMAS R. DEW. B.S., Advertising. i ■-♦-♦••• • • • • • •••• Clockwise- DOUGLAS C. FARLEY. A.S., Cooperative Distribution; WIL- LIAM R. GETCH. B.S.. Distributive Education; EDMUND L. HARDBAR- GER. B.S.. Retailing; RICHARD E. HEMBY. B.S., Advertising; JOHN A. GRANGER. B.S.. Retailing; HUDSON C. HARLIN. B.S.. Retailing. . ' •♦-♦ t • ■ ( • ♦♦•♦ ♦ . Clockwise: KAREN L. JAMES. B.S.. Retailing: IRENE A. JENKINS. B.S.. Distributive Education; DANIEL T. KIRK. A.S.. Cooperative Distribution: MARVIN O. LINDSEY, B.S., Advertising; SUSAN D. MANLEY, B.S.. Re- tailing. • • " . Clockwise: SANDRA L. NASH. B.S.. Distributive Education; CONST- ANCE L. PEPPER. B.S.. Retailing. GEORGE W MAVES. B.S.. Advertising; RICHARD E. MACMILLAN, B.S., Advertising; ROBERT E. MCMILLAN, B.S.. Advertising; ROBERT C. MORRIS. B.S.. Retailing. : : « « I I I Clockwise: JOHN D. REVENUE. B.S.. Retailing; BERT E. SHADOWEN. B.S.. Distributive Education; ELAINE W. ROBERTSON, B.S., Distributive Education; CHARLES M. ROSE, B.S., Advertising; JANE STANLEY, B.S., Retailing. I 1 1 % ♦♦♦%♦♦♦♦♦ Clockwise: WAYNE D. WOLFE. B.S.. Advertising: CLIFTON R. WARD. B.S.. Advertising: DAVIS R. WHITE. B.S.. Advertising; CAROL J. WITH- ROW. B.S.. Distributive Education. Cfi 9 ' • ' 4 • . .»•»• ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY The School of Engineering Technology was founded in the summer of 1957 to offer interested students a two year program of an associate degree or a baccalau- reate degree. The program has increased from three students and one faculty member to five hundred full and part time students in the day and evening college with fifteen full time faculty members. The program now consists of mechanical engineering technology (air conditioning and refrigeration option); civil and highway engineering technology; drafting and design technology (architecture and building construc- tion option); electronics engineering technology; and electronics drafting technology. The students divide their school day into one third lab- oratory work, and two thirds theory. In the second year, a student may work in a co-op program. After completing their degree program, the students in Engineering Technology have tremendous opportuni- ties open to them with salaries equal to that of a bach- elor degree. John Ankeney, Director t T. Clockwise: NORMAN BRAND. Associate. Engineering Technology; RONALD W. BROOKS. Associate. Engineering Technology; STEWART P. CONRAD, Associate, Engineering Technology; RICHARD H. COSBY. As- sociate. Engineering Technology; LUCIUS T. CHAPIN. Associate. En- gineering Technology. 1 ! 1 X . ♦ ♦ • ■ ' « ♦ ♦ Clockwise: GARY F. COWARDIN, As; nology; LAWRENCE M. EDWARDS ciate, Electrical-Electronics Tech- Associate, Electrical-Electronics Technology: CALVIN R. EVANS. Associate. Electrical-Electronics Tech- nology: MAGIN F. ESTEVE. Associate, Electrical-Electronics Technology: STEPHEN GELLETTY. Associate, Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Technology. Clockwise GARY J. HALL. Associate, Drafting and Design Technology ROBERT C. HOLLAND, Associate, Drafting and Design Technology ERNEST S. LEE, Associate. Electrical-Electronics Drafting Technology RADY S. MITTON. Associate. Drafting and Design Technology; W. F MC CONNELL. Associate. Drafting and Design Technology. r M • • ' •• ••• • ' ' Clockwise: JEFFREY M. PARKER, Associate, Electrical-Electronics Technology; EDWARD S, MURRAY, Associate. Drafting and Design Technology; ROBERT W. RANSON, Associate. Air Conditioning and Re- frigerating Technology; CARL E. SCHULZ, Associate. Drafting and De- sign Technology; KENNETH H. SATTERWHITE. Associate. Electrical- Electronics Drafting Technology; DAVID C. PETERSON. Associate. Elec- trical-Electronics Technology. Mm 8» -_- L fl _ Clockwise: DAVID STALKER, Associate. Civil and Highway Technology RONALD K. TRAYLOR. Associate. Drafting and Design Technology ROBERT STEWARD. Associate, Electrical-Electronics Technology RAYMOND E VIA, Associate. Electrical-Electronics Drafting Technology JOSEPH L. SCOTT. Associate. Drafting and Design Technology. ■ f SCHOOL OF NURSING The ever-widening opportunities and responsibilities in nursing require that breadth and depth of knowledge and skill be increased in order to meet the nursing needs of individuals, families and communities. The faculty believes its function is the building of an educational environment that will provide the student with the opportunity to develop those understandings, skills, attitudes, and knowledge that are necessary to provide nursing care for people in our present and fu- ture society. The School of Nursing believes that re- spect for the integrity of the individual and his needs is fundamental to our democratic society. As a member of this society, the professional nurse fulfills her respon- sibility through participation in the health care of peo- ple. Health care includes care and rehabilitation of the sick and injured, maintenance and promotion of individ- ual and family health, and participation in community planning for the provision of health care. Evelyn C. Bacon. Chairman DIANA LOU DUDLEY. B.S.. Nursing = % « -or f. J. P. STROHOFFER, B.S.. Nursir • •••■■ DEPARTMENT OF DRAMATIC ART SPEECH The Department of Dramatic Art and Speech offers intensive training in the per- forming arts of the theatre. The four pro- grams offered leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree are: Dramatic Art and Speech: Acting Major; Dramatic Art and Speech; Di- recting Major; Dramatic Art and Speech: De- sign Major; B.F.A. degree in Drama Education. Students in the department presented in 1967-68 four productions - " Light Up the Sky, " " Summer and Smoke, " " Threepenny Opera, " and " Elizabeth the Queen. " Raymond Hodges, Head RONALD G. MORTON. B.A., Dramatic Art and Speech ROBERT T. WHARTON. B.A., Dramatic Art and Speech ♦ • ♦ f SCHOOL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY The School of Occupational Therapy trains men and women for service to the mentally and physically handicapped through the application of activities prescribed by a physician for the purpose of hastening re- covery from disease or injury. Students in the rapidly expanding school must complete both academic and practical experience endeavors and may participate in the Occupational Therapy Club which promotes interest in the profession and var- ied social activities. Corneliun A. Kooiman, Director Clockwise: BETTY S. BARR, B.S., Occupational Therapy; VERONICA BIRKHEAD. B.S., Occupational Therapy; MARY H. BRIDGES, B.S., Occu- pational Therapy; JAMES C. BUMPASS, B.S.. Occupational Therapy. • • I - • f 9 4 ( 4 ♦ ' m M Clockwise: JUDY CHRISTIAN, B.S.. Occupational Therapy; SALLY J. COMB, B.S.. Occupational Therapy; MARY F. ENGLISH, B.S.. Occupa- tional Therapy; KAROLE R. FLETCHER, B.S., Occupational Therapy. V 1 1 r !■ £2BiHflHHlHH . ♦ » ♦ ♦ ♦ % • • Clockwise: SHERRY A. GIBSON, B.S.. Occupational Therapy; ELIZA- BETH M. HAMER, B.S., Occupational Therapy; CHERYL R. HOEL, B.S., Occupational Therapy; SUSAN J. JACKSON, B.S.. Occupational Ther- apy. T «, 2 .♦ $• ■• :v .{. iJi. Clockwise: SHELIA KANESHIRO. B.S.. Occupational Therapy; ANN G. PHILLIPS, B.S.. Occupational Therapy; LOIS E. JENKINS, B.S.. Occupa- tional Therapy. Clockwise: MARIE A. PINNA. B.S.. Occupational Therapy; LINDA 1_. ROLLHOUSER, B.S., Occupational Therapy; B. J. STRICKLER, B.S., Occupational Therapy; SALLY M. WOOLDRIDGE, B.S.. Occupational Therapy. 9 • • EVENING COLLEGE ; ;;;.;;;;.;.; JV uJjXIL. +G 1 0T i --- - t ♦ ■ sL HBMHB Mn Ml FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS . ♦ • SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS i ♦ t t ■ 4 i ■B HBBH HBM JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS -♦• • ♦•♦••% 1 SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS -- ' . " 7T " " K- - 4 m, Hl f P ' : JK 7f " " v a scp , t tfjt v " ' 7; 1 " fc fc V ' i slMMi pr 4n « ' " ■m.« n ■ ' i 1 -t« j — -•jpwd . • « " " ft « » » i n ■ »« n i l III ' " ' I " ' I " ' ? N ■• — S. I J ? 3SS M ♦ r • ' -— . pBiHHH B H MHMi HHMB. v B FEATURES REGISTRATION . » • • % ♦•♦•♦ ••• ••%•• CAMPUS SCENES • • • • ' mw September, 1967, marked the beginning of a new world for the more than two thousand freshmen who converged on the RPI campus. These apprehensive new students were led through an eventful week highlighted by a concert, picnic, talent show and two dances. During this week they were oriented to their surroundings in preparation for the beginning of classes. Rat Week, a long time tradition at RPI, encouraged the freshmen to get to know not only one another, but upper classmen as well. The week consisted of four days of enlightenment by the juniors and climaxed on Friday by a Turn About Day on which the fresh- FRESHMAN SCENES men tasted revenge. A dance was held in the Gym that night where Queen Ashby Watson and King Harper Powell of Rat Week were crowned. In December class officers were elected to govern their class for the remainder of the year, and in the spring the class will sponsor the annual May Dance which will climax their year. All in all this year ' s freshmen have proved to be a dynamic, enthusiastic, interested group of students, just what RPI needs in the year of its fiftieth anni- versary. » ♦ • f • ♦ I I ♦ ♦•♦•♦•••••v CONVOCATION ALUMNI i •♦♦%♦•♦♦♦ • «l V 7 . • • ♦ t, ♦ - HJ HHIHI H K BANG ■BuB H HOBBB DRAMA V J fc I ♦ ♦♦ •♦•% ♦ HHI HBBHHi 4 m HHK With memories and tears, alumni and present student body relived traditions at RPI ' s fiftieth anniversary Homecoming Weekend. The weekend began with de- partmental booths on Shafer Street Court showing the alumni what is happening now to RPI. A parade to Byrd Park highlighted a day filled with a football game be- tween the victorious German Club and Circle K. The HOMECOMING alumni viewed a demonstration by RPI ' s crew team and a mock crew race between the victorious C-Quo and Cotillion Club. The culmination of the weekend came when Susan Eyler was crowned Homecoming Queen at the dance with Anthony and the Imperials on Saturday night. Mt • 1 1 » = = ! ■ .» : ; " •- ' % t ♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦ i 7Z l a ' A 9 ■ ■ ■ n • ■• wfr. 1 • " ' n ■»► • • ES i fctsfPFfl - V » .ss 2 S k hZWJ 9 J 4 9 4 • ♦ ■ • . t-4 • ♦ ♦ ♦ Bl » HHH K 3 t« OPENINGS - ddddddt . ♦ « • ♦ •••♦ •• ••••• •• tetViij jk ♦ t ♦ « • ♦ ♦ ' MHHM HMII H ■M %♦♦•♦••♦♦♦ HwV ' ? 1 ' ' ' In MIDWINTERS :- 4 1 » I ♦ ♦ » ' -.- - ' •:-: ♦ ♦•••♦ V 7 X •-J ■ ■■M • -• • 9 J • " 9 9 • 9 r ART SALE t » ■-• JL GRADUATION i •■♦♦•• ■ I mm. B| • ♦ ♦ 1 J ' -f 9 • ■w » ■■ 9 ' V , K r o i. -. —v £ V ♦ ♦ ' ♦ vl ! t :| . ' h Jl - J ! 1 i! n r r « iw r -sl L. fc , W! ' . ' M Ml S,l ' .|,.il«i •1 : ! 5 i yL A ' ' s:?m ' i 1 1 ' ' A » ► I: i ;xm it . ft ■ % •■%••)•%• ' • ORGANIZATIONS . 4 ».%. Between the buildings . . . invisible threads . . . weavin g the campus into a pattern ... of learning and service . . . the Student Government Association . . . dynamic, pro- gressive, vibrant . . . initiating cooperation . . . among faculty and students . . . expanding services . . . sharing common problems . . . with other institutions of higher learning . . . and now a member of the Virginia Associa- tion of Student Governments . . . upon the student ' s mandate . . . the Honor Court exists ... to promote in- tegrity ... a spirit of honesty ... to further a cherished tradition . . . but not for tradition ' s sake . . . the Ring Committee . . . support and reflection ... of the school ... in the " visible diploma " . . . guidance through interest ... by the Freshman Advisory Board . . . leading proces- sions ... at each convocation . . . the Junior Marshals . . . the Alexandrian Society . . . perpetuator of interest ... in the past . . . the Psychology Club . . . thinking . . . delving . . . into what makes us think . . . and delve . . . Psi Chi . . . reasoning on lofty plains . . . the Young Re- publicans . . . the Young Democrats . . . two parties . . . two groups . . . co-existing democratically . . . the Fine Arts Club . . . arts . . . crafts . . . striving to create . . . learning to appreciate . . . music as a performing art . . . Alpha Xi . . . Rho Omega . . . reconstruction . . . rehabilita- tion . . . the ways and means ... to this end . . . the Occu- pational Therapy Club . . . education . . . the diamond . . . among the stones of ignorance . . . the Student Educa- tion Association . . . social clubs . . . service clubs . . . organizations of merit ... of value ... of dignity ... of caliber . . . C-Quo . . . Cotillion Club . . . German Club . . . Circle K . . . fun . . . achievement . . . meritorious leagues . . . contradistinctive purposes . . . for a group . . . mer- cantile . . . commerce . . . industry . . . dealings . . . awareness of the practical world . . . maintaining stand- ards of design . . . the American Institute of Interior Designers . . . the retail establishment . . . the Distribu- tive Education Clubs of America . . . bridging theoretical with actual . . . the Society for Advancement of Man- agement . . . the Accounting Club . . . the Economics Club . . . investments in tomorrow ... Pi Sigma Epsilon . . . marketing and selling . . . Phi Beta Lambda . . . com- peting and growing . . . towards awareness . . . Alpha Sigma Sigma . . . application of the social sciences . . . the Order of Technicians . . . encouraging fellowship and professionalism . . . SAGA Food Service . . . striving . . . Campus Security ... an omniscient warm blanket . . . WJRB ... so fine . . . the Theatre Associates . . . peep show . . . religious groups . . . stress unity . . . service . . . fellowship . . . the Canterbury Club . . . the Newman Club . . . the Wesley Foundation . . . the Baptist Student Un- ion . . . Hillel . . . Christian Science Organization . . . keep- students informed and entertained . . . campus publi- cations . . . the Postscript . . . weekly news media . . . training and service . . . Image . . . literary and visual arts . . . Spectrum . . . creative composition . . . Cobblestone staff . . . exhausted . . . Look more closely . . . the buildings become significant, individual . . . the skyscraper, the antiquated mansion, the hotel . . . not cold units of the city . . . but centers of life . . . seen upon inspection as homes . . . search for meaning ... in the modern 18-story structure . . . be- ware low flyers . . . the " 700 " . . . brilliance in execution . . . housing 700 women ... an amalgamation of tradition ... a synthesis and consolidation of many monolithic states . . . new, different, beautiful . . . more than an at- tribute . . . glance across the street . . . Monroe Terrace . . . the second largest dormitory ... 1 1 separate units ... 1 1 significant composites ... of women ... of feel- ings ... of hopes ... of talents ... of contributions to the whole ... a Victorian mansion . . . Ritter Hickock . . . a blend of modern attitudes . . . traditional ties with the past ... a historical site of Richmond ... a small edifice playing a large role . . . the house next door . . . not yet condemned ... of yet undertermined repute . . . the old- est dorm on campus . . . Founders Hall stands at the crossroads ... of the campus . . . the Bocock house . . . 909 W. Franklin . . . stately, aristocratic ... an " upstairs " dorm . . . O T majors predominate . . . Andy ' s girls . . . seeking always the ghost . . . Colonel A. A. Anderson . . . a cherished part of Anderson House . . . pink elephants . . . year round parties . . . vivacious females . . . on the corner . . . Scherer Hall . . . formerly feminine . . . creativ- ity rewarded . . . top honor in Homecoming decorations . . . now masculine . . . new ideas in creativity . . . Mere- dith House . . . 26 young women ... in step with . . . the pulse of RPI . . . 922 W. Franklin ... in need of . . . fre- quent fire drills . . . two structural ingredients perform- ing as one . . . Chalkley House . . . roof parties . . . the award-winning " Father Time " . . . 806 W. Franklin . . . fra- ternal unity ... as a beginning ... of campus union ... of participation . . . for total benefit . . . next door . . . 808 . . . still trying harder . . . Lafayette Hall . . . most venerable of men ' s dormitories . . . continues to set precedents . . . first with a coat-of-arms . . . 928 Park ... a baroque mansion ... of perpetual activity . . . generated by 27 male inhabitants . . . the number also residing at ... 913 Floyd . . . considered by some to be a construction site . . . Harvie House ... or the " Harvie Hurd " . . . geographi- cally off campus . . . but on campus in spirit . . . Sevilla Hotel . . . temporary luxury . . . for 100 men . . . knowledge- able in guerilla tactics . . . » t t 9 • ' ' • t ■ ♦ • ♦ ♦ IMM HIB STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION HOUSE ♦ ♦•♦ ♦•••••» »•» 9 I 4 » ■ ♦ ♦ • ♦ ♦ ' HONOR COURT 1 - » ♦ % ♦ • • ♦ ••%•• •• 1 or . s ' c f •i . - " ■ • •♦•♦ ■ • ■ ■ w • ♦ ' • -♦.♦♦ .•■•■•••• ' tw • I w w w • • CONCERT AND DANCE COMMITTEE 4 ••••• ♦♦ ♦• ■I HHB " ■ SPECTRUM IMAGE - _ A CIRCLE K t ♦ GERMAN CLUB ••♦ ♦ ' ♦•♦ • ♦ •••• RHO OMEGA HBM H v . • ' . 9 •• • ■ ••■ • • ♦ • • •••• COTILLION 0-9-4 ♦ • •♦■ • 9 ■•■ ♦ ■ !•» - 3 PI SIGMA EPSILON ■ R W ' W »•«•♦••♦•• PHI BETA LAMBDA V, 9 t • • • ♦ f ♦ ■MH H ALEXANDRIAN SOCIETY FRESHMAN ADVISORY BOARD •♦•• •• i • % • • ♦ ♦♦•••♦♦ ♦ AID JUNIOR MARSHALLS ■ H r ■m - I X s r »% I , .4- DECA THEATRE ASSOCIATES ♦♦•♦•♦ FINE ARTS CLUB WWW • • 9 a w OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY CLUB • ♦ ♦ %•♦•• • ♦• •• PSI CHI PSYCHOLOGY CLUB ' ' ■ £ fm. . • ;«JT, JEjPvS frite M m u ■ • •♦■ v ••• • •♦• • ■♦■♦• i ■ ♦ ' SEA « ♦ t .♦ ♦ ■ • ••••♦ • • ' • ALPHA XI • ■ ♦ ) 9 ' SAM 1 ••• •■♦•••♦ ••♦ r Aiiii ALPHA SIGMA SIGMA ■HHBBp I • • ■ w ' it ORDER OF TECHNICIANS ' ■ , ' ACCOUNTING CLUB 9 ' ♦• - ' ♦« • I r YOUNG REPUBLICANS i, y , V »V • ■ ■ ' . ' ■ ' . ' ■ ' ■ •:■ ' ' •■!•;• ■ ••-.V.IIIIIIII f» fcc „if T3j • ■••• ' • • i 4 4 0-0 4-0-9 4 44-4-0 -» ' W° • •• ' ■• •■•• ♦ t • 9 f « 4 I ' ' ■• • CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION Wy» — • CANTERBURY CLUB m ■ ■ 1 ' It 1 1 1 ' .w •••♦••■♦♦•♦•• I ♦•♦ •••••♦ • " ♦ BAPTIST STUDENT UNION HILLEL — - . ■Hi . • t • •♦ •• • ••»« FOUNDERS ' HALL i : » - • •♦• • l t " 4 0 ,4 4 ♦ % it .A jpuiauLT 1 - ANDERSON HOUSE ♦•••••••••♦•♦ ♦ ♦ •••♦ CHALKLEY HOUSE SENIOR CENTER 8: ' -a 9 ' •■••• i }-0 4 ' MONROE TERRACE • •••■••% • ' ♦■♦••• • ♦ ♦ % t • ►. . ■ ■• MEREDITH HOUSE % % ♦• • • ■ 1 .%•••. V i tl- it li " " " - w ' jfi ■■- - ' .,-r. r. 4 ♦• • t ' . •♦• ♦ ♦ 91 1 TO 917 PARK WILLIAM BYRD i SEVILLA HARVEY STREET DORM -n ' " ssr L V i • ♦ ♦•• • • •♦•♦ • ••• 928 PARK 12 I WISI ■if ' t • M ! • r h • - j ■ ■ 1 r4 vg ■ 3T JmBB p s. I AW " mi | 7 xSr 926 PARI I l ' S K ' " 1 J IB. ft - 4 m y ■» 1 V ILl K Jk 3 0 ' 1 ♦•••••• ••♦•♦»♦ 913 FLOYD [- ' « • S " ■W nr •»• ' • I I I i i §l lillli j 806 1 808 - - W - ■ » ' ■0 ♦ 3 LAYFAYETTE md • • ■♦••• ♦••••■ INTER-DORMITORY COUNCIL S , M fl ILjflfli l - j g ik ♦ • • « ♦;♦••■ ♦ i Onf S ' - r ■ ♦ • ■ i ♦ 9 9 4 « « « • ♦ ♦ 4 • jto 3g| " ■H II SPORTS Sportmanship . . . not so much wins and losses . . . as the evolving spirit and unity . . . pride and accomplish- ment . . . personal and mutual ... in the effort ... by team members and coaches ... by those who kindle spirit . . . Jan Clay . . . Pat Crimes . . . Lynn Dowell . . . Pam Kilpatrick . . . Rosalind Phelps . . . Virginia Whitten . . . Sue Temme . . . Ellen Revelle . . . the cheering behind Basketball . . . with Coach Benny Dees . . . the players . . . Chuck Sparks . . . Ron Woody . . . Allen Blackburn . . . Bennet Nelson . . . Bobby Bostain . . . Steve Harvey . . . Charles McLeod . . . Bob Alford . . . Don Ross . . . Assis- tant Coach . . . Buck Jones . . . and Manager . . . Allen Creasy . . . faced rough competition . . . with victories few and far between . . . but Randolph-Macon bowed . . . 79 to 77 ... in the last match . . . with two leagues . . . Day and Night . . . twenty teams involved in Intramural play . . . James Polk . . . Coordinator of program . . . Chess . . . Volleyball . . . Basketball . . . Ping-pong . . . Softball . . . the Has-beens . . . remain Volleyball champi- ons . . . top contenders of Intramural Basketball ... by Day . . . the Gentlemen . . . the Sevilla Number One ... by Night . . . the Rejects . . . the Drafts . . . the Has-beens . . . the DD ' s . . . Co-ed basketball . . . with coach Biren- delli . . . met first with defeat . . . but . . . Ann Carneal . . . Linda Sheepe . . . Ann Murphy . . . Debbie Eades . . . Wanda Quesenberry . . . Duckie Rivers . . . Carolyn Mills . . . Nancy Dyke . . . achieved a six to four record by March . . . Co-ed Hockey . . . RPI ' s fall sport . . . under Coach Royster ... a winless, disappointing season . . . though victory came close . . . Captain Patricia Stanley . . . Honor Fitz . . . Ann Murphy . . . Nancy Boutchard . . . Roberta Wilson . . . Linda Sheepe . . . Gloria Crittenden . . . Ann Carneal . . . Debbie Eades . . . Betty Tepper . . . Marion Bellak . . . Honors and enjoyment . . . the RPI Karate and Self-Defense club . . . forty-five members . . . promote self-defense and fun ... as Pat O ' Hara ... at YMCA prepares for future inter-collegiate judo matches . . . ' American Judo " . . . Wrestling ... in the form of . . . Gar Wood . . . Rick Ostlund . . . Bill Loth . . . Al Kemp . . . Mike Hirshman . . . Bob Scrum . . . Neal Wolfe . . . Hank Fitz . . . Terry Lehew . . . Danny Redfearn . . . coached by Dave Magill . . . ended with one win and seven losses . . . but youth rebounds . . . celebrating its first birthday in March . . . Crew . . . Coached by Donald faced floods and damaged equipment . . . . with fifteen new candidates and Captain Richard Sawyer . . with Coach Magill . . . Bukie . . Cleveland Terry Fore- Bowles long hours of practice . . . . and returning men . . . . . RPI ' s newest sport Brockwell . . . Gary Burton . . . Billy Cook Cook . . . Joe Campbell . . . Harry Duke . . hand . . . Steve Fox . . . David Kalman . . . Jim Liles . . . Jerry Semones . . . strong on the court . . . with high hopes . . . offering good competition to opponents . . . Golf . . . with three returning lettermen . . . Danny Rose . . . Paul Rollison . . . Fred Antone . . . and new members . . . Gerald Coury . . . Johnny Lee . . . the All-American sport . . . Baseball . . . played by Coach Allen ' s boys . . . Bernie Franke . . . Dick Fisher . . . Butch Anderson . . . Dale Chenault . . . Don Clattenbough . . . Allen Creasy . . . Bo Bowers . . . George Gay . . . Rick Blackburn . . . Barry Winslow . . . Ron Woody . . . Mike Wolfrey . . . Robert Flat- ford . . . Ray Markey . . . Butch Houser . . . S.V. Johnson . . . Ray Synder . . . Danny Smith . . . John Redue . . . Bob Blaiswell . . . Bob Blackburn . . . Richard Bozard . . . Jack Anderson . . . Jim Anderson . . . ended athletic for 1968 at RPI . . . I ♦••• •••♦•♦•♦ •■•••■ ■Sl- JalL I Hk CHEERLEADERS . 0 0-4 $ » • ♦♦♦••♦•♦•♦ I GIRLS ' HOCKEY : :::::::: : : : i -jaii GIRLS ' BASKETBALL » • ■• BASKETBALL I - ••%•« HI m WeMwt K i| i ■ 4J W J (C- 4Pf % v 44 ■■■■I IH •♦•♦ « ! KARATE ■••••♦•♦ TENNIS i •♦ • INTRAMURALS ■• • • •■• ••• WRESTLING V ft lO GOLF £ Pi|fl ♦• •♦• •« • • •« JUDO BASEBALL ♦ • ♦ • • • • i t 9 t INDEX FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION Ankeney, John F. 120 Bacon, Evelyn C. 126 Bailey, J.W. 30 Batty, L. Wayne 96 Beck, E.A. 33 Burgart, Herbert J. 36 Call, J. C. 31 Call, Manfred 31 Dunn, James 31 Edwards, William O. 29 Fleshood, Arnold 82 Gladding, Jane Bell 29 Hall, J. Curtis 56 Harding, A.R. 33 Hodges, Raymond 127 Holmes, Raymond l_. 28 Kooiman, Cornelius A. 128 MacDougall, Richard E. 29 McCanless, Rosmond 30 Mapp, John 30 Moroni, Pauline 32 Perritt, Margaret 32 Renneisen, Charles M. 28 Roach, J. Kenneth 28 Santucci, Edward 32 Slater, Merle 31 Stiers, Walter 30 Taplin, Jackie 30 Thomas, Edwin R. 92 Tipton, Robert M. 33 Wallace, Milton 33 Washer, Lois 104 Weber, Joseph 32 Wellman, Mary E. 112 Whitesall, J. Edwin 98 Woodall, Ernest V. 29 Woody, Milton 32 Vacca, Richard 29 Volier, Maynard J. 32 Batte, Frances H. Becker, Maureen Bellak, Marion Bennett, Anna Blackburn, Allen Blackburn, Bob Blackburn, Rick Blaiswell, Bob Blankenship, Robin Bleicher, R.F. Blevins, Laura M. Bloom, Barbara J. Blum, Rochelle P. Blythe, K.J. Blythe, W.K. Bock, John I Boltz, Richard Bostain, Bobby Boutchard, Nancy Bower, M.G. Bowers, Bo Bowles, Leslie J. Bozard, Richard Bradley, David Bradshaw, James Brand, Norman Brewer, Eingrid G. Bricker, Rebecca C. Bridges, Mary H. Brikhead, Veronica Bristol, Sandra C. Britt, Carolyn B. Brooks, Ronald W. Brown, Jeanne B. Brown, Marilyn S. Brueggeman, D.P. Bucker, Charles V. Bucker, Joseph B. Bumpass, James C. Bunch, Nancy P. Burbulis, J.R. Butler, Morrison K. 93 93 234 104 236 243 243 243 96 113 39 38 83 39 38 113 113 236 234 39 243 38 243 138 58 121 83 113 129 129 38 83 121 98 40 58 59 83 129 84 40 59 STUDENTS Alford, Bob Allan, Edwin A. Allison, Gordon Amos, Jack L. Anderson, Butch Anderson, Jack Anderson, Jim Appel, James Attiliis, Andrew D. Ayres, Joyce A. Babcock, William R. Baber, Edith M. Baker, Bonnie L. Baldwin, Harrison S. Barber, John C. Barlow, Richard L. Barnes, Betty E. Barnes, Michael H. Barr, Betty S. Carden, C.J. Carneal, Ann 236 Carter, Farrell 57 Carmack, Jane 1. 98 Chalkley, David G. 37 Chapin, Lucius T. 243 Chenault, Dale 243 Chewing, Edward B 243 Christian, Judy 57 Cirillo, Donald 37 Clatterbough, Don 57 Clay, Jan Clever, Bradford 57 Cobb, James E. 37 Coffman, Ruth P. 83 Comb, Sally J. 58 Cone, Peggy A. 38 Conrad, Sandra T. 39 Conrad, Stewart P. 83 Cooke, Ann G. 58 Cook, Grover C. 129 Cooley, James M. 94 234 84 84 113 121 243 59 130 41 243 231 40 84 84 130 99 40 121 105 60 60 ♦♦%♦♦♦ Coon, Otho. W. Cosby, Richard H. Cote, Ronald J. Couleman, Antonia J. Cox, Olga M. Creasy, Allen Crimes, Pat Crittenden, Gloria Crowder, Carol K. Curry. Beverly P. Curry, Judith L. Dabney, Mary W. Damiari, Mary Davidson, Barbara A. Davis, Betty L. Davis, G.H. Davis. J.D. Davis, K.C. Davis, Less Deal, Frank C. Demasters, Elizabeth Dickerson, Jerold W. Diggs, Thomas M. Dillard, Ruby Doherty, Frank J. Donaldson, B.J. Donati, Ronald B. Doyle, David G. Dowell, Lynn Duck, Jane G. Dudley, Diana Dyke, Nancy Eades, Debbie Edwards, John B. Edwards, Lawrence M. Ellis, Anne E. Elvers, Barbara M. English, Mary F. Enochs, Linda Estever, Margin F. Evans. Calvin R. Evans, Larry R. Faina, Anthony G. Farberg, SusanneW. Farley, Douglas C. Farman, Jody Fields, Margaret L. Fields, Thomas R. Fisher, Dick Fitz, Hank Fitz, Honor Flatford, Robert Fletcher, Karole R. Franke, Bernie Gay, George Gay, Gordon V. Gelletty, Steven Getch, William R. Gibson, Sherry A. Gill, Judith L. Goodwill, Denzil D. Graham, Joan A. Graham, June E. 99 121 60 41 105 243 231 234 105 60 42 85 61 85 105 61 61 61 61 62 85 62 105 85 62 85 99 42 231 43 126 235 234, 235 106 122 105 85 130 62 122 122 106 99 99 115 106 42 42 243 234 243 130 243 100 122 115 134 106 93 64 64 Granger, John A. Griffin, James Groves, Rebecca Gulick, Grace Hall, Charles E. Hall. Gary J. Hall, James N. Hall, Stuart A. Hallard, James Hallard, Robert C. Hamel, Barbara A. Hamer, Elizabeth M. Hammel, Martha A. Hammond, Carolyn A. Haman, Donna Hardbarger, Edmund L. Hardy, Robert G. Harlen, Hudson C. Harris, Donald L. Harrup, Darlene Harvey, Steve Harvey, Mary L. Hatcher, Jane E. Hemby, Richard E. Herron, Donna P. Hirshman, Mike Hoel, Cherl R. Honsaker, Linda M. Houser, Butch Howard, John F. Hubbard, M.O. Hudgins, James Huffman, Jennifer I Hussey, Carole E. Ivey, Joe H. Jackson, Susan J. James, Karen L. Jenkins, Irene A. Jenkins, Lois E. Jenkins, John Jeter, Elizabeth Johnson, F.T. Johnson, Robert W. Johnson, S.V. Johnston, Lancy Jones, E.A. Jones, E.A. Jones, Patricia A. Jones, Patricia L. Jones, Peggy L. Jorden, William M. Justis, Edward R. Kain, Charles F. Keith, Joann H. Keller, Janie M. Keller, Michelle Kemp, Al Kennedy, Edward C. Kilpatrick, Pam King, John C. Kirby, Michael A. 115 64 97 86 64 123 65 106 64 123 106 131 100 80 107 115 45 115 107 65 243 107 45 115 107 243 131 46 243 65 100 66 86 lOO 131 116 116 132 66 66 47 107 243 243 46 97 66 87 107 67 67 67 47 47 67 243 49 231 108 lOl ♦ • t $40 Kirby, Paul B. Kirk. Daniel T. Kline. Michael H. Kineshiro, Shelia Korman, Doris M. Lackey, Linda D. Lagow, Ann D. Lanbert, Anderson T. Land, Norman E. Lansinger, Carol S. Lath, Bill Lawson, Penelope L. Lazzuir, Michael Learman, Donald B. Lee, Ernest S. Lehew, Terry Levin. Susan H. Lewis. Eugene, M. Liberman, Steven Liggan, Sarah W. Liles, Milford K. Lindsey, Marvin O. Lippy, William G. Livesay. Joan D. Lodge, Anne C. Logan, Linwood Lowery, Walter P. Lyon, James H. MacMillan, Richard E. McClung, Cheryl A. McCouch, Nancy A. McCoy, Dora L. McCullock, M.J. McGarry, Edward D. McKinney, Joyce M. McMillan, Robert E. McKay, David W. Macleod, Charles Mallory, Linda C. Markey, Ray Marlow, S.N. Martin, Carolyn A. Martin, Henry Martin, Kathryn K. Mason, Larry L. Maves, George W. Maxey, Richard L. May, Barbara L. Meadors, Larry Meidinger, CherylD. Messier, Mary L. Mills, Carolyn Mitchel, Pete Morris, David Morris, Gary P. Morris, Jerry L. Morris, Robert C. Morrison, David Morrison, Richard L. Moss, Frank B. Mountcastle, Barbara W. Mountcastle, Kathy W. Murphy, Ann 100 116 68 132 87 49 108 68 87 49 243 87 108 68 123 243 108 69 101 87 108 116 101 49 101 69 101 48 117 88 88 88 88 102 102 117 70 236 88 243 48 102 69 69 94 117 70 109 70 49 109 235 243 109 102 48 117 70 70 71 109 109 235 Murray, Edward S. Nackley, Theresa Navis, Penny B. Neagle, John Nelms, John W. Nelson, Bennett Nicar, Raymond L. Niedermayer, Use M. Nunnally, R.E. O ' Brien, James R. Oliver, Larry W. Orander, Richard G. Orban, Kenneth L. Orcutt, Christine L. Ostlund, Rick Owens, Carolyn R. Padgett, Glenwood E. Parker, Jeffrey M. Patton, Charles I. Patterson, James D. Pearlman, Ronald J. Peterson, David C. Pezzuti, Karen Pflaumer, William H. Phelps, Roaslind Phillips, Ann G. Pierson, Gladys Pinna, Marie A. Poliunka, Hank Polk, James T. Pollard, Leon M. Porter, Betty A. Pritchard. M.D. Printz, Bonnie A. Pulliam, Herbert C. Quesenberry, Wanda Rabineau, Stan Ramey, Pamila D. Ramsy, Marcia Ranson, Robert W. Redfearn, Danny Redue, John Reese, Charles Reville, Ellen Revenue, John D. Reynolds, Brenda A. Rex, Frances L. Richards, Delice E. Ripley, Anne B. Robertson, Barbara A. Robey, Robert A. Robey, William R. Rollhouse, Linda L. Rollison, Paul I Rooky, Wanda J. Rose, Charles M. Ross, Don Rowe, James W. Ryder, Nancy A. 124 110 89 71 71 236 102 89 71 72 89, 139 48 102 49 243 89 72 124 73 72 74 124 81 102 231 132 110 133 136 89 89 95 74 51 51 235 74 75 97 124 243 243 74 231 118 50 50 50 110 103 75 51 133 75 103 118 243 103 HO «•«•«• «« •••••■•••■••••• Sachak, William T. Sanders, James L. Satterwhite, B.S. Satterwhite, J. A. Satterwhite. Kenneth H. Saunders, Karl M. Scher, Janet S. Schultz. Carl E. Schurn, Shirley M. Scott, Joseph L. Scrum, Bob Seamster, Jerry L. Silver, Steven K. Shadower, Bert E. Shaffer, Susan J. Shaner, Stewart E. Shelburne, Sandra S. Sheppe, Linda Shock, Rebecca C. Short, Bruce S. Shurn, William Silverman, Glenda R. Simpson, Laurie E. Smith, Danny Smith, John D. Smith, Susan K. Smith, V.A. Smith, Z.K. Snyder, Ray Spangler, Kyle Spong, Marion G. Sprouse, Eugene M. Stalker, David Staneil, Johnnie Stanley, Jane Stansfield, L.W. Stein, Rebecca Stephenson, B.D. Stepons, Eugene M. Stevens, W.B. Steward, Rubert Stewart, B.H. Strickler, B.J. Strokoffer, J. P. Strong, Sandra Sussman, David E. Sycks, James M. Syder, James T. 50 Wagoner, Holmes M. 90 Wamwright, Amy 91 Wakefield, George 76 Walder. W.M. 124 Walker, Samuel 50 Wall, Mary M. 103 Wash, Norman P. 124 Ward, Clifton 110 Ward, Clifton R. 125 Warner, Garnette E. 243 Waters, Diane C. 51 Weatherholt, C.E. 77 Webb, John W. 118 Wells, Carl W. 94 Wharton, Mary C. 76 Wharton, Robert T. 76 Wheeler, Layton A. 235 Whitbrow, Carol J. 50 Whitlock, R.A. 76 White, Bonnie J. White, David R. 95 White, E.M. 51 White, Ronald E. 243 Whiteside, Porter Whitten, Virginia 90 Wilber, Mary C. 52 Wilborne, Mary 52 Williams, Tommy 243 Williamson, Jean M. 52 Wilson, Roberta 95 Wiltshire, R.B. Winslow, Barry 125 Winstead, Cynthia L. 90 Wolfe, Neal 118 Wolfe, Wayne D. 53 Wolfrey, Mike 90 Wood, Gar 94 Woodhouse, Nancy L. Woodroof, Ira C. 53 Woody. Ron 125 Wooldridge, Sally M. 1 10 Worrell, Mary J. 133 Worsham, Janet 126 Wright, Marilyn S. 54 Wright, Stuart B. 78 76 Yeatman, John M. 53 52 79 55 95 97 91 79 119 54 111 111 80 80 80 111 127 80 119 54 91 119 55 54 55 231 103 80 137 111 234 80 243 55 243 119 243 243 55 103 236 133 91 97 54 80 80 Tate, T.M. Taylor, Sandra S. Temme, Sue Tepper, Bert Thacher, Thomas Thatcher, Henry M. Thomas, CM. Thomas, Nancy S. Thompson, James S. Traylor, Ronald, K. Turner, Antoinette Turner, John S. Van de Poele, Norma Verbit, Raymond Via, Raymond 78 52 231 234 78 78 52 91 79 125 1 1 1 243 1 11 79 125 PHOTOGRAPHIC ESSAY CONTRIBU- TIONS Denny Attiliis Jerry Seamster Gail Weineger Tim Sachack Steve Grabinsky Gail Weineger Sandy Sachalk Jack Amos Steve Grabinsky Steve Grabinsky i 4 • • -4 i ' -♦-♦♦ } 4 • • • • Denny Attiliis Pam Ramey Tim Sachack Jerry Seamster Ron White Denny Attiliis Denny Attiliis Larry Ketron Janice Foster Ron White Robb Jenkins Tim Sachack Jim Sanders Jim Sanders Robb Jenkins Steve Grabinsky Tim Sachack Tim Sachack Jack Amos Jack Amos Patti Jones Robb Jenkins Jack Amos Jack Amos STAFF MEMBERS Patti Jones Denny Attiliis Pam Ramey Janice Foster Elsa Perry Ron White Robb Jenkins Jack Amos Gail Weineger Jim Sanders Larry Elliott Larry Ketron Michele Hathcock Vera Nicholas Interested Students 10 11 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 15 16 16 17 19 22 23 24 25 26 27 140-145 166-167 168-169 228- 229 Editor-in-chief Art Director Assistant Editor Copy Editor Business Manager Photographer Photographer Photographer Photographer Photographer Organizations Sports Features Faculty • ♦ • • • ♦ « t » ♦ ♦ • • ♦•♦•♦ ♦ % ♦ 4 ' • • ■•■ ) t ■• ' • ♦•♦ « ' ■♦•♦■♦ HHU Wiiw m H) ii i i mi w xi ii ii i in—m i nim ,y MwuM W W waaww wi ' ■ ■ " ■ NkVMMMNMMtHlMMMMMM IMMfllMi


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Virginia Commonwealth University - Cobblestone Wigwam Yearbook (Richmond, VA) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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Virginia Commonwealth University - Cobblestone Wigwam Yearbook (Richmond, VA) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Page 1

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Virginia Commonwealth University - Cobblestone Wigwam Yearbook (Richmond, VA) online yearbook collection, 1967 Edition, Page 1

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Virginia Commonwealth University - Cobblestone Wigwam Yearbook (Richmond, VA) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

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Virginia Commonwealth University - Cobblestone Wigwam Yearbook (Richmond, VA) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Page 1

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