Vanderbilt University - Commodore Yearbook (Nashville, TN)

 - Class of 1976

Page 1 of 442

 

Vanderbilt University - Commodore Yearbook (Nashville, TN) online yearbook collection, 1976 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1976 Edition, Vanderbilt University - Commodore Yearbook (Nashville, TN) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1976 Edition, Vanderbilt University - Commodore Yearbook (Nashville, TN) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1976 Edition, Vanderbilt University - Commodore Yearbook (Nashville, TN) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1976 Edition, Vanderbilt University - Commodore Yearbook (Nashville, TN) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1976 Edition, Vanderbilt University - Commodore Yearbook (Nashville, TN) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1976 Edition, Vanderbilt University - Commodore Yearbook (Nashville, TN) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 442 of the 1976 volume:

U . . W. - , N x',.' .Uli- 4 'vu . .x . W 1. '- .- I-,J-,,'-. .,p, -4- Aw-. .- s... . , '53 1 v.n.' , . '.'lr HL. .. .-,ji .:yI w fL"'. fx.. Ln A1 1- X. , :.:, g ,- L-- , ...X ,J+- idx X 1. L X 1 'ry' .X-" ' ff: fxyf f ., W .' V 71 . . C' ,Q ,- , ,lg 1 1 min , X . M.. . '1'. ww- .jf-jf ,K'4 '. K. -A.'Xl' V'-. .,,:' ,,, ..- ,rl ,--.,, X I W JY. ,.. ' , Q -. . .f ., .. ' .' -'. ' " x' f".."'- "" . ' ..1.a '- '- :'qyg,,.y- -V. ,-. E .. ,mf .' 'gn , . . ," -, -'f '-Xtx'--wiv--,':Y' -1 2 -- 'A ,Hz-.-: '-"4-" -if ' 5 L-V. -,,,j N.,-.g.,,v..., ,.'-"'.-' ... . uw... -,I'.- '-,. .... -' ' . wus-- IYNQF-X-NND, XTX C1-Don fx CXXX Tlw 1976 Commodore Vanderbilt University Nashville, Tn. - V' x O.-9 THE 1976 COMMODORE Copyright 1976 by V.S.C, inc. All Rights Reserved Editors Notes For a Better Yearbook A yearbook can be a treasured record of your life here, but not if it is only the editor's book-it must be your book. A yearbook is for recording the basic happenings, but it is primarily for rememlirclnces. Pictures are a powerful tool toward this end but can never be a complete record, for not everything is recordable in visual terms. NVhen you, as an organizational head, are asked to write about your organization, please take some time and think. What made the organization yours as opposed to someone else's? VVho and what were the defining aspects of this year? VVhy was this year and not some other? You will group teetotaler went out to burn quickly forget the party where the became totally smashed, when you the SAE lions, or that costume party where the groupls stud came in drag. You will forget words, happenings, and activities that define a particular club, group, or team. It is to record these types of events that you have your space in the yearbook. It is these things and not the publicity or advertising aspects which make a yearbook pertinent and interesting to the student body. For excellent examples of good organizational writing please see the choir fp. l20j, the theater fp. 1082, or the Rugby team tp. 1705. the in any catch- The Commodore will be on a fall delivery for some time to come. This was done to allow a complete year to be covered. To insure complete, excellent, and hassle-free representation, PLEASE SEND US A LETTER TELLINC- US YOUR NAME, ORGANIZATION, BOX AND TELEPHONE NUMBER AT THE START OF THE YEAR. This will allow easier, quicker, and better coverage of your organization. Also, if you feel that your organization has been or will be slighted, please contact the editor early, so that he can make the appropriate space allocation. 2 About This Yearbook The theme of this year's book is irony in college life The style is thus direct, unadorned, and personable. The Comedos and Tragedos masks of the cover stand' as symbols of the broadest and, I feel, the most appropriate type. College is, paradoxically, the most lamentable comedy and the most farcical tragedy ever contained under one tent. On the broadest level the masks symbolize the liberal arts. VVhen one is versed in the liberal arts one theoretically has a feeling for human experience and endeavor, is cultured, has class. A liberal arts graduate can supposedly continue learning without being taught, and can handle himself, he has many different masks which he can use appropriately in a wide range of situations. Vanderbilt, as well as other liberal arts schools, is not 'in my opinion preparing students in this classical liberal arts tradition. Students are taught very little of self-direction. This is why so many people will clutch at graduate professional programs. They don't have to figure out what to do with their lives ffor a while, anywayj, but are instead processed into lawyers, doctors, etc. On another level the mask symbolizes irony, the irony of college in the mid-seventies. We go to college to find a future-more often we lose one. We were all to be high-placed professionals back in high school, weren't We? It's funny that in a place where we are supposed to learn ideals we often learn to unlearn them. Itis funny how we find our parents to be so like us, or ourselves to be so like them. It's funny that we who were to conquer the world settle down as insurance salesmen. It's funny to see that we will never be ahead of the game. It's funny to understand that you can never fully understand. It's funny to leave. Thank you all, and best wishes, 9821 LV .gfcpvwuljl - vn - 0 lv, h it .4 , ' 9 , 5 0 .7 , . .sz ' r-A 1 I' 1 Yi? .S s I o 4 ' :' g- I v J' ' V' ' 'T 93- f, J . Q Q 1 "AC It l -1 1 " 6 a f . rs Q Wd O.: Q O 'Af .. . ,. ' 90' ' s m ' . , 3' 'K I. . 3' , A I - 1 . I -K 3T4,A.. "S 1 I 4,4 ' 4-'TTI 1 'I f. .L SQ :Ls Ji. . 15, 3,41 rg"'.,,, , R L , Y ,lf ' I ,efi 1 .1 .. Vanderbilt University exists for an 'Edueatibnl but many have forgotten that the classroom forms just a small stage for the pursuit of learning. , . 'P M., Ar 552' , A. W1 X - f N. usml- ,I A I L"F-FQQQ-..., W e-,?q-,:'f3,.gV .-:- V .. 'Q' lv: " , 'r i :L I ' 3 x , x 5, ,.A I ,aj 'X ' . e L x ' "3 4, , izzzf' w. -. K -. E Q? -2 Q:-,.' ' B 'Xu I -. Sn' I N 1 - QA X X J . 4 - -55. S' A fx E' '. I 4"'f'. 5 xx'-..., Xu . wx su. .X , V 4 'V I bf-J .A H .7, lx, - . x ,QV , x 51 xXL I I s tl, I J .1 ,f I, 1 Mft . fn dhrf rw ..,--C? ,X 11 5 I ,, 1.1, JM I, fa I-X-',, E ,. -'f -. A- .. ,I FW. F' x T v B i' VK sf ' lr , 'J x nm-5 yi W ,N Qyblfg ,M ,-X -- 1 u J , fx -1 1 1 . 'Z".k Q 1 . X n I W .1-zx -.w . ,-'ITN-1' ' " Y J ,fLL'l'l5 A'--"fry NEG" , ,fm . ,M IMP. 'K x 1 -ww. "'x.. -A Ly . .-'s -J -' -r IQ! x -fail Q E 1' gc I J ' zj .9 " W. W5 . 5 ff ' 1' I ,QA '.- pf' . J r --:-K. -.- .. iw 'fl -lg' Q aw-H Nl.--5, ',-. .., n ,. Q. , -ilu Q . N15 .1 It is the total environment of the student, his and his enemies, his recreatians and his endeavors, which form the students primary and We-long 'Enlightenrnenti S is-if f s Q ssts i . 4 xii wav Tilly.: U f--- -N ,, 'v ' I--, Qi, if 4 V .-'sw' I .3 .4 , WL I- 3 if 415' Abi' - 2 -I sg -- .4 P 8 . g yi. JP., fl- .5 I' i .,, -.5 3 .Q ' age: :."i,'f9"' "' .,,-1, "' T' ,jigamf ., or r . , . ' A, , --Q , V 5 Wiki? .1 T' I -Qi rf' "' . ' 1 F 'ff fi -WSFQ. Eau " ' 'f- , .qv ' .Lf ' gi f" "1 Y iz ' ' ,, :ff Wifi- tg-:agree . r -"ff-,Ft 1-1, .1-.?i a A , " 5 A' 972' 1 .4 intl , al 1 'S' 4 .1 .4 Z .J . , A- . 2 , 'J' 'S N' ' 7 ' , 1, , .V"" Y I f- Ag af? ' 3 5- im,,," ', ' 2 'ffl 29 f zu , 'Q . it ,gf . Not a Da .1 , 4 , For Q - 'f f l - . A dl Alexander - teastf' V 1+ "3 tie- x ,I 1 gl X lp z' X 1 I . t'f, , X. -H A., A day as thzck 4- r Holds us, heart plum rrfrjifiirkyj From leaving. Q. rg Our feet scrape at tree scrapsl P Tb? Feelzng nothmg but cold, our scuffgslroes Blending into wintefs You all Our,-spmts But hang And ' we a rape A time of trays Of somersaults 't we strow the lx. ' ' , A tix... press the Wasn 't the and N PSR' 2 ff' 'ff -, i., , ii P 34 Q.. .L ' , Vx:-LK, , v A .' , --. , ,Q-.iff , as, Y- , T' 45- v ' 'BA !'i QI A. P' "ni qv Vw V Lf' P. fd. w rl' W A 5 .4-1. ,r ,- ,:-, a I talked tz zrled leaves a I wondered aww some madness, lla i r 7 X saymg, n u f to ask the muszc, .And tell -' ' V just a prelude to rust 'ah2'l'tarnis . mettle pflb fown- '. J. A flourzsh far .. I make m l' urn be f le had a Chance? 'The w nfl a. j .. if15.1fl' arments to leave, 3K 1 . e'l' km-before, V ff AA' 'lf L47 Before. A But I move to a s, e e: . I .M . :vs 3, tif f..: lr' 'H fo: 1 ' J H f f I "f -53 1,1 yi .l V ' J- S I. A 4, . wif' , , 5 4 5" A yi-vi - HAR... h - v, ue? . .-f,-, N AB . .Q-3 'rfb 'Q V 1- ..1" ' ' ' 'Q' . A 14. .- fa - - '. W- r , fl. my gg -v iff. 7 '5-I F., . . ' I .r. il . . '-' ' -YS " -L ' M 2 ' - . 'T 'ff ' x .. az , 4- A' .5 :.,g,S3.v 5- V if-yn U t rl ' fp .Exe L' ' i 'V 4. W, .Z-N . :xl ,rv W " V ' ' A'- F- gl :lik A fi ,. t 1 . - 1 -. " -4 hQ"1r!'? 2 5 U J 4 , . . ...E fi., , ., ,. w, 4, x -. ' uf'-Q , -' V- .V 1 , V ' X- 5' . .X , S ,.-' " Ysf, .g,,, . ' F - 1 I ,, x ' 'X T23 i. v, Ab.. ii V Q ju I" , . . , I if 4' ' fi: 5 if 121' ,-air '- " Q. -. A". ll QPU A . . 4. . We f . 4 A I W1 -. 4 We V f i ' 6 ia: 'T4 'S '? ':f.,3f, ' ff. w 4 '- , -P. U , Y. ..,. I . ' ' B tv Z. -:V - 81.4 'V' HJC 1- ,iff - , . ' I V -Y: , I . lu.: k Q Yvh l i n n Y, '- 2 W- 2 k . . A '-n'f'f' ef-'F 5 , -? ' " , 44", ' 1 Na 1:3-ff, 512, 35? J, ' g gif , ' l l J' V w ., Q 3f:!'E-'ef' .N . - :-.V ' eff " .,,,. ' 5 5' --L T, 3' ,. N fx EW' L. I I ' ' Z' ,.-QQ.-f' : . " 8 M l - ' ,.' H A f- 1. . , 'i 'IF' ,N-'v ., ' ' ,' ' 5 . .-:ff ff ' 'rx X V ' 15, ' .. V QQ, I a '-G'-f M1 'H ' ' iff , -., 'X "7 JYd'."7- Sings' riff -fm -' .7 ' ' LL' .. ' A? if-' . ' ' "' 'AQ A ' 'gf 1-,um-7" 3,1 . - , 'QR -, - ' - i,1.f5:w -"'f- ,. W. 1 '14, ,Q ' ' ,V :-h 5' 1 ' " , ' K .V 5sf'g:g:f,f , , - 5 '-m. , ' 1 ' Wig. Q ' 5' ' . .+V ,-l v, .. 1. - ' l - 11,1 , 'lp' -". 2 'J - "Q ,h..iA. '- Q - ' 4' . 4131. ,dx .v W --5 I : .J - r .s.. 4. q 33 -3,-V it, .V .1 V. fa . .. J . . . Ly., ,. .HQ veg W M y w e JN r . 5 'kgsx 5 H 5 1: Love and Marriage, or ' 'I 'W , A W x.!. gl . . J, ' V' fff gs The Outlook 115' Good, Even If You Do Have to Screw Your Chapstzbk Stwk "A girl comes to Vanderbilt to marry herself a nice doctor. Today, this statement is about as welcome as a poke in the eye with a sharp stick, and a woman may well come to become a doctor rather than marry one. Rules of behavior between the sexes change from year to year, and each year things seem more complex and less Well-defined. There isnit a standard code of behavior accepted by a student majority any more, but men still Whistle and women still respond to it. For one group, college is a place for study, and Weekends in the library, for others, it is the great sexual proving ground. This isn't really much of a change from the days of tailfins and push-up Chap-Stick, but the willingness to practice sex and talk about it freely is a product of the 1970's. Love, especially formal expressions of it-pinning, engagement, marriage-has come under fire, but is still a viable force at Vanderbilt today. There are still those who feel that a man or woman can have feelings for a spouse that can be felt for no one else. To that end, dating is an important part of college life. It helps to develop friendships and love relationships, for the warmth and satisfaction such relationships bring. It is also a release from the academic competition and the daily academic grind. College is that first primitive, tenuous, and very frightening push into the world, and relations with the opposite sex are a wonderful, beckoning, mysterious force. It is a strong force, driving some to ecstasy, others to despair. f .,- ! Y 'i e-' 1 - 1 -- .4 :psy-,., , " ' '-..' f"4- 2.5 N 4-,N , . ,.,., P .,..4 . ' v . .ii-. f-'ii 3 .Z I . Fr CJ X. , Mr .gg 1.-.,!,4v. fag-Q, -,J-,' wa- . ,UM , Y . ,I W -A . ..- E f .,-, ,gg ,UQ . 1-1 .,',4 ,, 11 f -f 'Qi 1.. - 'F' ' ' . ' ' TM -4 :,' 5"-fl !'f'if3Hff?'.-"A -'f ' "' "" vs I ..,.' g.. 4., 1- A M43-H ' . ...hx -. x , U ' -Y - . .A-1-A - 'H M I 6 YL.-.1 L 'rl PI ""U .- "'f"':'f- -, 1 'FV 7 5"l dffilf. 'Q " ' f-'EAI' ' ' -' '. ' i'?'f 2 "lf--. .'?"' V' .1.-J' .N I , Q 4 . .4 , ,gg A 31 . , M ,ifgk-T'-4: I-'L'U.rQ- ll:-Y 11. W. 4 A 'A ' I5 " ' 1 T 2 ,' - - Q. e. g' 4 . -fi ff- 1 ef. " .-'SJ "." - - , " " 5 f 'T ' ' ..- ' - If ' 1 '. Q 9 I 'Q N 4 'ck 4.4. W " ' 4,1255 - - ' ' 4'-. 'f '- ' ' Wfq- .:t9h Q. 4 '-f -144-'f 1, -"" ,' " -' . P. . . f' f '---wp '9 .- ,. . 11-S-iw .41-.-4 -,, 'I 'N f, I? 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'. 5' ."Aff.f?-P' . 4, - 4,.,- ,- - . , V, ' '- 1'-- , X-.1 51. -. , fz. 4 , .,- ,fi 5. I . ' ' 1' 't,a.'1-'91-Q -34 -3 "l4i- :Q . Q-22 -' i-A-.a gf- "'f'l'fri' "' '-1 2' - - 1 's . 541' '43- ' 1- ' " " 'W' F 1'1" 2'--1 r'-1 Jr- .,, ', 515711 M- -- A -1. . '-E. ." ", l- 'E W- ,A 1, .,. -- -. .4 7 '1'2gj' ayff.: , xi, 3 5 . , , -.aw , .4 .-,.-1 E4 ., ,,., - .-,,,-1 -V :A .. 1 ' 1 . I-.-:'tl?A?31'17'f:-F'f' ,.-17,-g-,,, .WN M43 JI. 4.3. ' , , ,' 91.3-Bgggn-11,-,,! 1--,1-.fi Y'-'W L , 5' .- - 1' f,4f?'f': . g . ' S.-5 '- .- . - 1.L:fr'f-'I'-..,9-wi JHKZ -. A 4 .-U. '--r . ' . 'fsf?1!.gi 4- ---+' .. - " . 4 mf , ' RN' -- Y ' Wk - "4 5'-I-: ' ftffi .-' " . ' 1 - ,. - 7'..-7 . I .-. , F..-,.,,,4, . - - --' 1-.--gg, . A 1, . 4 L 'A -' 2 ffgfgg.-.j V Q- . 14, U - '. . ' 'L .-Ju -,-... f -.-4 :- - - - 4: -P' "-'Q' 'Q war- -vw-1-.4-.ff-4-, f , - 4 . -1 . -.-1-W. 'f-':q:wl'?fH'45+'vi'cs-'-.E-'.-gy ' ' v4 3:45 "11m:4-if-yi "-.alp ' :'p'.: .. -,Q --5.92.4-A . ' Q:,.6,. . .ml 5, - -f-:41-ew f-"J sk. .-' . -:f .." -girl ' 5-'-L -.Mit . 5-fggyv, .4 . JA.. .1 . ' N' , vw- -.. . . - -E'.5'fLi',1,s Q, 53, L. . .M ,1 4'-,175 . . ,4',1.g-.3-.5 -7: . A - -' f' 3c'.'Gf.,-..zf3'af4c . '- f-f--:,,-J, . t " 2. ,f.:f..wg4 ' -7 ' 4 jr-L:-1.51 4yf,g3IWl ,V Amxgfv ,, .gP44,L.. "f Wm4g:f.':2- ur! "' 'nf 4'- :ii-1" .El 1. 14:4'2..4"- -Lf-iii 1 . 1' M' .I ' '.. ,. ..: yn, L.. 1' .1- 4, I .- w 'n ,ik .. 4. Some believe in that time honored scientific principle of using the most direct, easy, and simple solution to the problems of love I6 - gr. p 5 53 , 4 , Ii?rg E ! .1 K. - .: A ,fee uilg l -44- ,. I A . , W' 'f'- ' , -M 1-,ia-vf:' 5 -:ali '-n QTifm- , f4.'1'..- af-Q -ful- .,x,, . ,.m.Z.wi!l,g A I ,:,,x:4.- V 1, , F523 f 1 f. , rYt'.'f"'1:-'r' . .al 1 'i ,L X, 'uh . .Q 1 mr . . ? h 'il' . . -, fi . +L- l' x -s..,, - , ,. ,Z"-" h. ' - xn ...Q ' im.-Gif ' 'Qu Ni - N :ff . , X - Rf f- p ' In u .W . P I Ss- Q Hg .,. 1- .f-"U-r be The Don McCormick Dating Method 1!XVonc1cring wlreflzer or not you .s-liould cull: Al L'She'll either make it obvious that sheis bored with me or shell not want to be around me any more because I'm being too forwardi'-go back to lc. Bl "Shes Ca theta, a tri-delt, too good looking, too rich lor mel and hence wonit be interested in me"-go on to 2, though you don't deserve it, coward. Cl i'She,s too ugly"-change girls and immediately go back to 1. 2!Mc1king the call: Al the "beginning with snappy patter and witty comments" ff' .A- ,,,-- ,.,4"' Bl Calling several times first-move on to 3 C. Qeontinued page 225 l n 1-'J' v la, , - f' :E ' 3. 1 ,gl My 11: 1 IEA? i ' 7 ga On occasions the female IS deacllier than the male ad-. ,. .-If 20 A, v ,,-.- if! "-rf' N. ,,.,, F -rr , f -'-if 'L Ir, .. :FSA QW- And more often she allows the male to think that hels' deadly is is Lair ',,' "4 . 3! Asking for a date: ,xp Bl Cl Point-blankfblnrt out: lj She says yes-move on to 4. 25 She says no-go back to 1. Eventually come to the point Qalso known as beating around the hushl: ll She says yes-move on to 4. 223 She says no: al Wfait one week, then start over at 1. bl Change girls and start over at l immediately Calling several times first doesn't work, dummy. She either gets tired of waiting or begins to see you as a ugood friend" which means no mustard in every case. Start over 'ufain with someone new. You lose. LEUC 4fVVlmt yozfre going 10 do: Al BJ CD D7 Someplace good with dressy clothes and a wine list for you to sweat over-go on to 5B. Movie, dance, frat party, or any other standard college thing,-go on to ESA. , ' Something uinteresting andfor newi'-Youire on shaky ground with this one. It had better be good, and a good idea is to underrate it a bit when you describe it to her, so that she can be somewhat surprised that it turned out to be any fun at all. It's a fair het with this sort of thing that sheis interested in you, though she may he interested in developing film or whatever, but remember that itis never too late for a girl to suddenly remember that her aunt has someone that she's supposed to meet or something like that-go on to 5C. Prom, formal, etc. ll Co through the extensive hassle and expense of tux, flowers, etc., in a vain attempt to impress her with the transformation. Remember to shave and go on to 5B. QQ Don't go through any hassles-just wear you suit tif you have onel and try to get by on your native charm and natural good looks. You look like a complete klutz and hence lose. Co on to QA out of politeness. 5!Hole you Curry if Al If she made it apparent that: Bl Cl lj She's not the girl for you, go to the pub for at least half an hour just out of politeness and to make sure, go to step 7, if you want to bother. 29 She's the girl for you, keep trying to convince her that youire wonderful. Several drinks andfor beers might help both of you believe this. Co on to step 7. Unless you did something like spill the soup, lead the conga line with your pants off, tell her what you really think of her friends, push her down the elevator shaft in a fit of pique, or something equally unseemly, your clever sophisticate ruse probably worked. Go on to 7 after checking through 6. Didn't work, did it? She tried to act interested, but you could tell. Ah, Well. Try 5A:2. If it works, go on to 6. If not, figure it out really fast so that maybe she'll give you another chance. So go on to QC. Qcontinued page 24j Soma will take love in all its .s'cri0u.s'n0.s'.s' mul flcptlz Qfjfbelirzgs' 17"-7 v .o-5 . .5 . Most certainly ought to Some just can? be botherecl Dfilflljlll' blzmclers and Ofl1Gl'jtlllI pus: Aj You passed out-skip to QB. BQ Your date passed out and you're sober-skip to QD. Cl Your date passed out and you're about to-skip to 912. Dj You told her, after one or six too many, why you're interested in her. Dumb move-skip to QF. EJ You did something dreadful-like l3ClL'l'1iI'1ff aloud Jiel'in1f your at il X w. nose when she could see, playfully dropping her into a punehbowl. or telling her an interesting story about her best friend and two marines. Skip to QF. FJ She disappeared with another guy tthese guvs are generally best friends, fraternity brothers, or suitemates. Life is roughj. Skip to CBC' . 1 . CJ , You picked up, during the course ot' this date, a better one. xrmeii your step very carefully as you skip to QH. 7f"I zconrler .......... H AQ If you are a coward, go on to QC. BQ If youlre not, proceed to 8. 8! Trying Al Setting the mood: 15 29 "W'ant a drink?" tlieally, in theory it should be the same to say 'iVVant a beer?" but somehow it's different. I suppose thatis because we were all exposed to james Bond movies as children. At any rate, make it a drink rather than a beer if you possibly canj. "VVhat music do you like'Pi' lt's a wise idea to ask this question, even though she'll probably Want to hear Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, or something else that you don't have. Even so, she will eventually choose something you have, and she'll feel more at home. BJ The "well, here goes nothing" phase ll 9-D ll 27 Following is for iinpetuous animals, is for everyone else. Attack. It it works, it Works. If not, you've blown it in the worst possible way. Vllalking or taking her houie sometime within the next 24 hours might be a nice gesture. lf you blew it, go on to QA. Let your arm fall idly about her shoulder, then immediately reappraise the situation according to her reaction. You need to be cautious. Here again, if it works, it works. Take all the hints she might give, like tearing your hands from her in a rage or kneeing you in the groin. Girls do these little things to indicate subtle disapproval. These signals are seldom intended to be taken as final, however, so if you get by with anything short of a flesh wound, dou't be too discouraged. Depending on what happened, go on to 9 and select the appropriate end. teontinued page 265 9! Taking her home or otherwise ending the date: AD Bl Cl DD ED F7 GD HP You are a general turkey in no-trump. Take her on home and be polite. Itis the least you could do. And don't try anything at the door, klutz. Next time, try to be more human. Start over at 1. Kick yourself repeatedly for being a complete ass, then go to 9A, UNLESS she passed out too. If she passed out before you did, try to act like you didnit. Be brotherly and understanding, then progress to 9C. Take her home fto her homej and hope she invites you up. Take her home Cto her homey and turn her over to the girls on her hall or her roommates or whatever. That is, unless you can find another date. If you can't, life is rough. If you can, look at 9H and proceed with caution. It is generally considered bad manners to abandon a girl who is passed out cold in a part of town that she is wholly unfamiliar with, sell her to turks or white slavers, or take advantage of inebriation in any other way. If it's at all convenient, try to see that the poor girl gets home. Itis probably not her fault. Now you don't believe that and neither do I, but imagine what sheill tell her friends if she wakes up tomorrow morning on the tables in Charlie's O.K. Corrale and Lounge. You might want to go out with one of those friends some day. Take her home fto your homej. Now this isnit as licentious as it may sound. If you've had that much to drink, you probably don't have enough walking moments left that you can make it all the way to her dorm, hassle With her friends, and then make it all the way home before you cash your food coupons for the evening. If you are feeling really polite Qand I don't know many people who are feeling really polite when they're just this side of making the beets listj you ought to find somewhere else to sleep. If you're normal, play it by ear. If you wake up together, chances for a deep and meaningful relationship have increased manifold. Brushing your teeth before you proceed to get deep and meaningful is a good logistic as well as hygenic move, though from a tactical! strategic perspective, it may be a bit much. f"Hey, We both seem to have awakened. Why don't we brush our teeth, then get back in bed and see what happens?,,j. You can see the error in this approach. On the other hand, if just play it by ear, she may reward you for being so understanding, as well as bribe you not to tell anybody what happened. It can be a very cozy arrangement, especially since you passed out, too. She might be interested andfor turned on by this sort of thing. If it looks like she is, try your luck at 8. If not, it's another case of 9A. Read it over just for future reference, then go on to QC. You lose, buckwheat. Find yourself another girl, which means going back to 1. Extremely sticky situation. You might, just for the sake of propriety, take date A home before beginning with date B, but if things look really promising and! or inviting fget it?l spend about five minutes thinking about it, then go immediately to 7, if possible. . if Hn, X , 'Q ip. sf-'Z .25 v x 1 ,Q ,Q ,Q Il is Ja gp we H, ,H 'F .. n, if fl .U K - H 2: 21 if A: f Drqams, and W. U ,V 6 A 11 M .A M 1 A. V, ff A H' X1 -uf . ,. A 4- .-1.3 I , . ,M 1 ll:t1".' ,.llh. 1 . iv , 1 1 ff" Q, , a Y 1 5 1 - -Q: ms P, F - 4 - fwrilf' I - I w .,f,., 1" ' - WJ -1 ' ."?z?,f Q.-.,l i'-:LL fl .-. B 1? " '.1"f.!. P K ,- V W4 ' 'J W M3534 W ' fr C OL. I For parting as-O, is all forgot? All schooldays friendship, childhood innocence? We, Susan, like two artificial gods, Have with our needles created both one flower, Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion, Both warbling of one song, both in one key, As if our hands, our sides, uoices, and minds Had been incorporate. So we grew together Ti!!! X 2 fr, X' .1 11 J, W Pb' What a piece of Work is a man, how noble in reason, how infinite in faculties, in form and moving how express and admirable, in action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god: the beau? of the World, the paragon of animals! nd yet to me what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me. To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow Creeps in this petty pace from day to day To thc last syllable of recorded time, And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle! Liles hut tr Walking shadow, a poor player That struts and frets his hour upon the stage And then is heard no more. It is a tale Told by an idiot, hill of sound and fury, Signifying nothing. Karen Lynn Creve Class of '78 It is impossible to say .something that can express how we felt about Karen. She meant to much in many different ways to all those whose lives she touched. Let us just say that in her short nineteen years she was loved deeply. Karen was full of life and her memory will always be cherished. In Memoriam The Arts conquest of the forces of pre med The transmutation of the Freshman Y 1:11 A , 'jj' M r. ' is isf X 5.3 f'g'f5:f'd":5 '-EMI., ' ' M , f Ws!xQg'WQQs,FrfX ' 'Kyiv X-,A ' u, , M ' Y , 'Y' b 'M "- I 'I' .Y ' - .. . --' W f x x ' 'E ' e f s J wi k i 1 - Nc,.3'1 ..- - Qi'-F ' 'V , 2 " . W M:ff.'vr9f' NS S.E-"ff" 'W ,W ,fe e XV- L H, . fs , e 'Gsm fibtvyii. fx Z K xx X H jj ff? I, ,:. -i jffsx H 4gi Ml.3'R3wr , .4 NR, LM-N. A ' F ' f Q- 'Fl--NX X ---XXX t AN. ' x, ,A 'X E, E l N V x -jg,-K x ,MHA- Ll ., a J ,. V ' ' gb., - , X ' s Ns f f' ' ' ' f4w'Ziif ' Y' , , f f? N F4 1'.,' "J'f'V - Q Y N, ,zgxT',:1.,3gZ---M .X . ,ff ' Kq'gQjf" . f 39' P W f' V' -, 4 5 Ny, Q-'W VW in -v' Lfgffy f45'4x:x .W gs- 'X R NWHR if K -ljf , ,-14:57, fy If V, 1, glut! 'Qu X X K 5. s , Q W N Y r A- Q ss A -' ' if , -Lf 19 H! 1 X Q 'Q'rfry',"' 1i 'r,, W 'Ag ' . f f ' A f 3 ww r fn , 5 ' Yv .N ' ,J f J' ,r r T ' . f' xg, 'yqiwv' 'Xxpsx wig J - r - 1 r r f Y ' ' W- r V I ' 'K , 1 X ' I , - . Nu. , Nxf , I , W . U 1 K s K, X .. Xxx X QX H k N sffiiigg xv X s i-5 -X , X xsx . . LQXRN ' I FQX5 sg, X s s s fgsw' X cl, - '.,.,f,, bf - X .XX ' xx xii -' 2 -xg-: e- Nr. ,V s eW,fr '4'Jm-ma, I v I 1 1. if 4 -. I I . 4 4 5 I 1 5 ,1 E 8 2,121,141- -B'f'+4JT1'4-L Drugs VVho could ever forget the intellectual fervor and the amazing acts of physical coordination of last night's party, where everyone was as high as 10 big Chancellors? Ah, yes, this was a night for the best loudly vocalized Faulknerian stream-of-consciousness, pure mental baby drivel. Who could ever forget the physical glow, the lucid tongues wagging at last night's rush party? Not to mention the physical excitement and tremors of bodily ecstasy as you dry-heaved through the night, your head hanging into the commode. Who indeed? Why do we do it? Why does well over half of the student body desire to alter their current state of mind? Not to say that they certainly donlt need to alter consciousness-it makes it easier for the rest of us-but why use drugs with such penalties. There are no conclusive answers to this question, from the majority of students. Reasons are as varied as sexual preferences. There are, though, what I feel to be three general motivational factors and one specific, immediate one, that mesh together to encourage drug usage. Stress relief is the most obvious reason for using drugs, including cigarettes. The pre-graduate college student is under a tremendous amount of pressure, as a matter of fact, this is the first time that such a large amount of pressure has converged on most students, and many have not yet found appropriate ways to handle this stress. Drugs provide an immediate quick relief from our obsessive concerns with grades, employment and relationships. Boredom is another motivating factor in drug usage. After the stress of exams is over or wanes with the passing of time, there is little to entertain many students. You certainly don't feel like reading. Many do not have easy access to TV, most do not have transportation, and the Sarratt game room can get old. Again, drugs provide a type of change which, if not used too often, is an interesting escape from boredom. Sociability is the most readily understandable motivation for drug usage. The passing of the joint, the clinking of glasses, the lighting of a cigarette-all are conventions for communal contact. When one is indulging in consciousness-altering activities etiquette demands that you share with all, even if you donlt get along with them. Finally, if you would ask a child why he whirls and whirls until he can no longer stand, he will answer "Because it's fun." Let's face it-to many people the fun of being drunk, high, or dragginl a cig is more important than the penalty. --is i w , , ,,,, 7, , ,N , , ,,,,, The Stump 'Tm gonna whip the daylights out of you." One of the regular features of their family outings was an outburst of some sort by little Maynard at the most inopportune moment possible, usually right after the picnic lunch when everyone had settled down for a Sunday afternoon nap. Uncle Holland was awakened by the shouting. He stretched, and, rising from beneath a tree, began to walk down the hill to see what was the matter. It had been an average Sunday morning, and as usual, he had been happy to get away from his parishoners for a little while, especially Mrs. Atwood, who had blue hair and a cane just long enough to trip him in the aisle every Sunday morning just like clockwork. Deep in thought by this time, his forward motion was arrested suddenly by the impact of one Maynard McTyeire in hot pursuit of Minerva, his sister. It seems Minerva had stolen Maynard's socks while he slept, and, drenching them with sorghum molasses from the picnic basket, had carefully lain them beneath a small bush, like two white cotton chevrons, across a rather large antbed. Maynard backed up a step, then continued his pursuit. As his gaze followed Maynard over a hill, the bishop was taken by surprise at the beauty of his surroundings. Though he had been to the same place dozens of times before, he had never seen the lay of the land from this exact spot. Suddenly, like a blinding flash, the thought came to him: this would be the perfect place for a university, a citadel of knowledge, a forum for new thoughts and ideas. Also, the Work would be easier, and maybe he wouldn't get tripped so often. "Give me a sign," he said. Whenever he made up his mind about something important, he always solicited a 42 second opinion. "O Lord, let me know if this is the right thing to dof, At that instant, the wind blew, lightning flashed, and a limb from the great tree above him fell, hitting him square on the head. He said, "Ooooh,,' which is, all propriety allow a bishop to say under such circumstances. The university would be here. That was not exactly the sort of sign he had in mind, but it would do. The university Bishop Holland McTyeire founded was Vanderbilt, and the tree that conked him as a sign from the Almighty assumed a role of importance in university affairs that lasted as long as the tree did. For nearly a hundred years, it survived as a swing, meeting place, an bulletin board. Uncle Sam poked his finger out from it a generation ago, and countless student government candidates have peered from it since, well-groomed and confident. It survived another century of Nashville winters, and the fire that destroyed Old Wesley, wher the library lawn is now. Finally though, the bugs began to take their toll. The swing was moved. Rand was built. At last there was no choice but to cut it down. Still its usefulness was not at an end. It became a natural portrait studio, the Official Vanderbilt Rump Rest. Th Stump has left this photographic legacy to be enjoyed b generations yet unborn: proof that these students left their own personal imprint at old V.U. Now, even The Stump is gone: pulled up and cut out an chopped into little pieces. Why in the world would anyone want to destroy such a historical link with the past? I know. The history department did it, looking for an even more important, more tangible link with the founding of the university: a fossilized pair of sorghumy white socks. .i.-f---w V X St -... x H k A mifwifi w WL X Av gk md W 5 K1 - ,,- V V -' , I mx iff If'-ff, l '4f" . ,V . x M 'I 'l l-by I Q' . If I'Wlz.,1. 5 ' HQ X VIA, :H f l, 'Nm 13,11 xff y ' . 1 q I- Qxgylg v, , YJ, 2 vm rl I vb , , , 1 X iw 'M 1 lx N N! 1 ' -V "w ,Q ' Y my x' ,,'. H, xx ff V . J - I. ' 'si 'V - N W, 'S' y ml If-'X ,W al 'fi :LQ il J 'Y YQ Nxifihf ' WV, 'IW ff v 'fk ii' IX' " 3' my .I my ,N Img! 'U 1: 1' It I, 2- Ml X wh'5My..Qgxgxgj NM ,, I IX. 'x q, ,'Y7l 11 4' ', LINK: tl fx," X1 X "v ca' gxeij, X, y f I san! MI! ' 1- -EX A. NX-5 N GR ' ' ' ll" 4 ' - WW l l ll' ' 'M X x' 'Af A "--5 J' LL LEU.,-, 'NQmg,4M, -+,ymMnn- yuf -7 .1-Ivum-uf 1, xi 'Mx XL' Alf NK 9 V. V xg, . 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Colley John Surface Elizabeth Kennedy jessalyn and joyce Nation Kathy Ranft Beth Callaway 47 W-sg-. Greg Thompson Ioann Longshore David Burnside Robert Hackcnberg Patsy King Lori Chisick Beth SWHILSOH Kathy Keys and Nutshell vf ffl N.. 1 - ln- u '?-- 1. N . . ,ni .-:Mk ffivfffifq 'M 5. H7473 'H .,,3:-.:.r:r -, cfm, .. 'Mg' , A E 'ff ' r V , 4 4 I Q 5 . l-tlfba "' -wil an '-.,"' ' ': 1 Q, - 3 A .nu 014 48 x l :L 1 W I K 'V fy nv' ll A 1 C r Rednigs F els Gus Halliburton jimmy justice LHCl0l1ll21 A-, XX -it Harry Murphy l0l1n Bumgarner Phil Walker Lew A. Wasserman Ginny Morton jencie Adams, Nancy Short Claudia Owen jannetta Fleming, Diane johnson CllriS Page lohn C' Bell Dillil N0ffl5 1 LW. 5. - 'Q ,gli 4 B 49 QW.: 4 Billy' M0lll1g61' Steve Hoffman Leila Rogers Steve Carson T0m Cambi5i0S John Daugherty Rob Bgumer Stell Simgntgn Debbie McFarland Anil' 51111111111 Bruce Hackett jeff Zisk jimmy justice Leisa and Sid Dr. Wesson 50 Dragon Month Michael and Maurice William O. Thwcatt :fy Mike Mcnlennins Professor Blumenthal NHDCY Neely Margie Pines Ginny Speed Martha MCClay Barbara Frackiewicz Beth Raebeck Qi-f 51 1 I 4' 'B 1, .,,f.' ' a 2,1 . ' 1 we . -X' . M W-fwf., v""fi.4?w - " .jfs 1 " " , 3, .fri yqkit A '. .-ns:u- ' x " . A41 .0 -4 "T-N1 -' 211 H' H .- ." fr',. 7. 1- -"N ff if -- 1 f13Q.,,.,,Qif -2"21:fg f - . .A , 1 , .f - 2.12 z, ..4 ..' - 4"' -:af ' - P 5 N "WI If-'Yi-aip7"m 5 ' M ' 3 . N . ix . Q- y 1 if rf qw , f R . , ' - -2 1' -'f ' ff- N51 sk ,,,, f xiii., ,Q gsbq ff!" Nxzf WA ' 'x ,"',ix ,1' '1 ' .s X. . Wx 'D 75: .-' ,ZX . V -. K Mx 'xi,irf.,. :.- .. ' " :QS-fi . '!5:1..: flh x 'CT' pf- ' K ' A ,V fi W ' Q 1 ' "' 1" 5' .f 'if 2 xf ' 1 "N LP' C. 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' rf- W .51 41 -. .57 ,Ls ' C ff ,,' Brian, Dave and lane Wheeler Miles Dean Frank Pallotta Danny I-Iackcnburg Iilda Unmh Leila Rogers Mark Kennan Claudia Owen Virginia Rone Marita Salazar Anju Sandhn Chris Page Shannon Barbee 53 Diane. Iklfle. SNC F-H011 Shawn Kelly Karammt Mi Marita Salazar. Adele Amink Sjzlhril Sklhilill Laura Iunseu r'4'U Russ Ad c1lllS X9 lu VCV L L! Cathy and Wendy David Hcitholt Soping Lai 54 .YY V45 'lf 93' ff , Y .px -in . 53.4 h : H Q-'S QS ' '.,... xx Dglvg Barnett Caldwell Crosswy Rodney Harrington Kim Kaster, jane Gully J. Boyd Salina Cross Randall Barnes Marnie Fitzsimmons Lynli Cates Wendy Regas Professor Brooks Nanci, Bess, Holly Organizations Vanderbilt has built its reputation as an excellent liberal arts university, in spite of the fact that the five arts are treated like an ugly stepchild around budget time every year. Cther things always seem to take precedence over the arts, so that instead of hiring a music teacher for the Department of Fine Arts and Music fa first that is yet to comej, the powers that be decide that the hospital needs still another hypersonic crevulator or electric tongue depressor. Clubs help to solve the problem by giving students a chance to widen the scope of their education practically, by sailing, or caving, or skydiving. Some, like the Theatre, are extensions of classroom subjects, while others, such as the Choir, make up for curriculum deficiencies. Each has its own personality, reputation, and goals. Each is intriguing, and a little bit weird. Maybe it's more fun without a music teacher. The rhythm of today's music is the heartbeat of our generation. Occupying a central portion of Americais contemporary music industry is the multi-billion dollar college concert market. This year's concert committee, bolstered by Vanderbiltis fine tradition in concert appreciation, set out to adapt itself to major challenges that faced its programs-lj the growing strength and dominance of professional promoters in this region, and 27 the realignment of programming to compensate for the loss of the use of Neely Auditorium Qapproximately 1200 seatsj. As artists' prices and other component costs soar, the non-profit collegiate concert program is faced with the necessity of arriving at a definite set of goals and intentions if it is to maintain itself aesthetically and financially. To this end the Concerts Committee determined that since we were to play "second fiddle" as a promoter in Hashville we would, nonetheless, try to make our operation as attractive to artists and agents as possible, by striving for a high degree of professionalism in our work. The first step-for general purposes the concert committee Concert Committee was renamed Vanderbilt Concerts. We designed a recognizable logo, that came to adorn our publicity and our concert halls. We worked hard at keeping the Vanderbilt students happy with preferred seating and our outside guests happy with reasonable guest ticket prices. We pioneered new forms of public service advertising and expanded our ticket outlet network. We built a nucleus of efficient, dedicated crew members. Most of all, We concentrated on artist and agent relations-person to person. This paid off for us. While the first semester saw us sharpening up our skills, the second semester saw us cashing in. Word of mouth worked to our advantage. Stephen Stills' touring crew passed on the word of how they enjoyed their show at Vandy, and this played a part in our securing a performance by Miss Carole King. By yearis end we had developed good working relationships with many agents and production companies-a harbinger of improved future access to name performers. 57 x-ff Rf, f N . Jfoff x 61' be' ff!! pffiyfiifff f'ff'.w"x"'f,'p. 'cy' xx! 'NSR- .+f.-Af ,Ii 'far 'Q ,A J 4+-'S "' WW JAZZ FESTIVAL flhhlfllkgz Thad Jones- Mel Lewis Orch. Jean-Luo Panty Sonny Btitt l1'7- 11230-4p.m. Neely Lawn FREE!! - -Y .- mug... VANDERBILT concerns PRESENTS: ms ' """ ALLISON SARRATT C :NEMA ' f vnu. Ullllllll ll mmonm. BTI JIMMY Ili: REE WITH . su'-mmnmn ldlhmmngshrl 5 huevfmmm'."'hu":"lr-num on AT Tue DOOR., .vm 'M'-'fs'-M-of 24: MOSE. TOEIC Sw' 950 A I F D K PRESENTS YI f -- I I gn TRACY lilnlll QQ I e mornin mln ' 'I - N ' --- I SI I 5' gala v I I' III if fra ,ue 1, 4. If '- ,J q. .,.C':1". . I . P .W 4 ,A f 1 T . , , . x :Uv 'i- , . f . . V' , - '.I I I , Nxt ,-,,,,,J, - A ...n . - E Jn.. H-- SARRBTT CINEMA OECEMBER4 8:00 8:9130 lree with valid UU l.r1. or S309 at door nm' WENT! unsung.. ,Ps fIc6"f"""! QT., VANDERBILT C0 PRESENTS AN EVENING I Ill 18 I V I I 5 I , ......,... 1 ..,.. .,., ., .. :rf "e: :1 ':r.1:.ll sn. ggi: VANIIEIIBILT IIEIIIIIIAI. III RESERVED SEAT TICKETS S6 Tlclseis Available A!-Grand Old Mexico, Hlllsboro Village - Cat's, Gxford House - Pori 1 Citizens Central Bank, Murfreesboro - Morris Sound Comer Thlrd National Bank. ibonelson, West End, Green I-Illl TS 1-een Hills ding Mall Rivergato adeb Steve o Goodman l Am W - X' 9 I W ,Q Thursday, Feh.12 o 1 Sarratt Cinema 8'-v9250pm ig. ,. Ho v-If -J""' f x Ih1rs,0ctB-8:Q08930 JN T h'eexg:'vurcl m, I I rm wamvmazrunlnu-5 e an.-.f .vume.gnrL1' 3,935 VANDERBILT cowcrams ' 1 8zWKDA-AM PRESENT Q , ,Km o g, 5, Q - 9 VASSARCQQTEITJTSBAND 4 A, JERRYJEFF .J Hwgfgilu-I., 1:4-H...--I 1 iff' OCT31 X99 5 ' MEMORIAL GYM 7:30 -' f .'.:? , f Smmcmm Shjgsig? ThurSdAy.Jan.22 8-00 9Z50pm procfor ESQ flreslgrw Theatre MLWHOSWQKAFZTQSM' . v,-.wus wsu I wuuun.u 4.v'.- A N ' S4 .W fm- .mn v U 1 in presents . . , ..A,.. , ' ww, .v swf.. gm.-v nu- ,v ,'-,-f, -im. -. my ,. ,. ,, U., ,. ,, T My t JOHN FAI-IEY featuring Willie Nelson Asleep at the Wheel GuyClark s 11 sept W 20 1 a pm "miihs.N0v1s aazssupm ree SUI!!! Cmema incU'VUlDm'55 A -T 3, , vanderbilt concerts 5 o x 4: 1 -ll v. I. XRHY RASBERNY 'N 1 Lo,.,,,. GREASE .1 1 Tl ' B l-ZS .L 1 'bf'. xx , F ,L ad? , "ffm, 'A X Q' Q Nl f' fi A qilx 'ax .Ny fx! 5 5 '41, U 5 w " A l'RlKI'l'l'IIi AND IEICIRKZNIAN ,fi A is f -QM , E Vqv 4 I a,l. - L, 1 f , I 'Q , V+' I ' V NI xt 1' A " 1 "-' 1 -ax 4, .Q gg-L . , F'-+ 4 ,- ' 5" -fi Hx 1 Wu un --ff 2' f D I.. 4 . , Wa, 5 an 25? A 55:3 Spa And what of our switch from smaller shows to large, festival type programs and big name acts? In the past, the Concert Committees' planning had reflected a mixture of shows-an outside show, using artists in Neely Auditorium, and larger shows in the gym. VVith Neely gone, we were left with two options: we set out to secure some of the nation's strongest club acts for Sarratt Cinema and arranged to broadcast these shows over WRVU for those who couldn't get in. Proctor and Bergman, Steve Goodman, Tracy Nelson, Leon Redbone, jimmy Buffett, and Albert King all "let it outn on those Thursday nights. For the gymnasium, we felt that we could at least try to get the big show, if we could find an artist who could sell tickets. We were thwarted until Stills and we sold that one out. Then came Carole King's return to the stage-the highlight of any year. In addition, our four other big shows each served a special purpose. Our two festivals- Progressive Country and jazz-showcased the country's two fastest growing musical geniuses. "Grease" was a stellar variety presentation- "Broadway comes to Vandyf' And who can forget the blossoming talent of the Tubes? From Willie Nelson to jerry Ieff VValker to Carole King to Albert King to Sonny Stitt to Fee Waybill-Vanderbilt Concerts presented a variety of music forms and artists in 1975-1976. The student body can expect Vanderbilt Concerts to grow and improve. Ours is a chain of precedent and adaptation, VVith an improved identity, with Sarratt Cinema accepted in the industry as a fine "club typei' hall, with the prospect of accoustical improvements in Memorial Gymnasium finstigated, inpart, we hope, by the Concert Committee's controversial petitionl, with increased student confidence as shown by activity card polls, and with but another year, past, to build on-itis lookin' good. ' ' 1' T 14 x -' - ' ,. XJ X' .- 2 ff 4 s4,'.', 31 "Jvf'i5- X , .A I . , I : .,, fp . , -X 'Q 6501 ' W win' Q , 1 1+ F . f 2 if 'M' ' R ' i fi K irq. -h . W. JV.. gi '51, . . 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V V ,V -Q T g x ,af - A . s ', V . 1jV,. 4 V V V ' D -, VV A . A 60,1 7-vm V V , -P, , ,ff A V Y -f V VV J ' x -M V if . m My haf, -5, , V:,V V VV .,f,?y . V ., P .V ifsykm QYQV V V, Q Y V , 2 ' ' "5-1-rf' 1? ff 3 . if " 42 ' V ,VV ,-A ,V VVV K, VVV V .. 11, J fjs,,.gV V 5 1 if V: V ,PT L' S KQV., 5, V, . V, ,V QJA, " Q V F. ., V I . r W .5 Q WV Vx .V , 4V , . V, 1, ff V ef - Q Y., , N . . V-S Ain V ff ,V VV M V fy V I Vi V V V-nfs' "1 Q - R- " 9V 5' gl. V Dv 'S 4' , VV V V VV ,QV X ' ff V x H' 5" ' ' Vbhvsxam ff - R V 1 ', V V, Q . 9, . 1 .' fn, f'i?'gsA- N , "ff A fi J' " 3 3 Q V - A g' ' " Qg QL' A ' '- Q 'RV fx, if -5 VV VV A V-Q , I' , X 'Q 'Q 1 J Q , 5 ig, 4, AJ 3' f f -. . - 'N ' f ' IJ' A' "' V ' - -' ' . A P Vfl V VV 1 '- jg 1 a L' ,V ,W N Vf EVZV VV-V1 ', .s nf , 2 V . . V 4? 1 . , 1. Q. - , ff , . vw f ',tV...SJ-9. V , - 'J , A - - 1 . ' NF f - X 3 N Nf- rig, Ev J L sy W' . " 71: ff" 57 5 5- U V . V , V - . 5. Q X 55" 5 Q12 VVS VTVVV L - V V . VVVVV' Pa ' PH 2' , V 4 in 2 V A as Q l X Q ,V lx'kV'74 Yf V x V N, ' N :VV - V 56 Q ' A gg ' 'fi .V V , V V Q V ,V V V :Q 2 N XV C. 2. if fx Q. T f , - , gs 1 , f VVVV ' - ,Q ,' Hg fs ' i ' gf' T' fi f if 5 y .KW -, 1- V V. V , V 3,25 V' V VV .VVXV I ' A . Y g. f .Q "" -. -A , Vucept Vucept Executive Board President! Hank Catlin Men's V.P.!Tony Lanzillo Women's V.P.! Diane Cannaway Sec-Treas.!Cenie Cato Dave Collins Dina Norris Riney Green Cile Mann A week before the freshmen arrived in August I informed Professor Ned Nabers that everything for Vucept was planned and running smoothly. As soon as he had laughingly reminded me of Murphyis law, which roughly translated means that no matter how thoroughly you plan, something will always go wrong, the table he was sitting on collapsed. Undaunted by this seemingly bad omen, the enthusiastic and conscientious Vuceptors were bound to succeed. Most of them remembered their freshmen years and joined Vucept to help other freshmen avoid the same mistakes. Of course, many admit that Vucept also gives them the "first shotsi' at freshman girls. Enough cannot be said about the great job that the majority of the Vuceptors performed. It is no wonder that Vanderbilt has one of the top orientation programs in the country. For the new students who arrived during the summer, Vucept sponsored a box supper in the Sarratt 64 c0tu'tyard and an ice cream social. Many upperclassmen began Vucept early, by helping new students adjust to the deceptively quiet summer school grind. These summer activities also helped generate social life for new students. In August, the annual Town Students picnic was held on campus for the first time and proved a popular outing. Incorporating the commuter students into the campus life was a necessity especially stressed this past year. In the past, Vanderbilt also sponsored a transfer student Weekend to help students locate housing facilities and to familiarize themselves with the campus. The housing office cancelled the program this year fa debatable move, since transfer students need Chancellor and Mrs. Alexander Heard cordially invite you to a picnic honoring the Class of I979 Monday afternoon, September 8, i975 from 5:30 to 7:30 a 21 l Deer Park Drive Please reply to your Vuceptor fPlcnic will he cancelled lf ralrr y. Your Vucvpmr will lu' nvrlflud h y carl y aflunmon.j special attentioni. Hopefully, this problem will be solved next year, so that transfers will be better informed when they arrive on campus. The final preparations for the freshmen started when the Vucept Board, accompanied by Dr. Ak, arrived on campus. The whole board plus several great volunteers putched in and handled everything from stuffing packets and fixing name tags to acting naturally in skits. The workshop, a refresher course on all sorts of information about Vanderbilt and Nashville, was shorter, much more effective, and more structured. Everyone was, as a result, prepared to welcome the class of 1979 with grace. Vucept has come a long way since its creation in 1971, however, improvements are still needed, especially in relation to the administration. Vucept definitely found out that bureaucracy at Vanderbilt is alive and well. YH Mark Little Ina Bigham Mzu'tin Zom Iulie Caldwell Anne Phillips Clark Fischer Tom Henson Chip Nielsen Don Begley For example, Arts and Science freshmen were not properly notified beforehand as to who their faculty advisors were for the year. The Vucept Board, which worked late into the night typing and compiling 250 copies of a sixteen page alphabetical list containing each student's name and his or her advisor, distributed these lists the moming after the Arts and Science meetings with freshmen, somewhat tardily remedying the situation. A closer working relationship between the Housing Office and Vucept would have prevented this mishap, the fact that it happened at all indicates that improvement can still be made in the Vucept program to make it more effective and more efficient. Irregardless of this small mishap, however, the faculty relations program has already improved over the past years. In fact, the continuing improvement in every facet of the Vucept program is part of what made Vucept 1975 a resounding success. 65 6' 0 YW JW? Ogybigwr P 6' ky 1116 'fr VSC 13 U0 VEC 5? f 'Q 915, spoils-N e 1101 'mei Being re 6 being be 991196 91 veit lo VVhat Happened to' Publications A Cause Versus an Effect Rhetoric, innuendo, accusation, witchhunting, and petard hosting at Vanderbilt in the Somnolent Seventies? VVhat would cause such a commotion? None other than those hard-working, hard-headed students in the publications. VVhat in the Hell happened? The campus had quietly received its publications service for years without a peep of complaints, then suddenly everything went wrong. In reality it was just that for several years nothing had gone right. VVhile there were many factors of the problem, there are two fundamental ones that underlined all others: money and staffing. For all the complaints, charges and recommendations, staff and money are the unheralded bases of all others. First, the graduate school drive has made students less interested in activities that are not entertainment or which do not provide the opportunity to receive credit or recommendation. This rules out most serious work on the publications. The major positions often go begging, and, with fewer people doing more of the work, the publications naturally are going to be ew VSC -lam hurl readme, 6,727 BY 85 5 7 Jtzzdenfv ie!! Hmm' Q, wwe ls gkudellls more personal and limited, even assuming the lmlikely event that there would be enough funding to cover all that should be covered. Secondly, the costs of producing a publication have been increasing by as much as 15 percent each year, while the Activity Card Committee has been holding the funds constant or even decreasing them. In 1975 the ACC forced a crisis by giving the publications an impossible set of budgetary and production demands. All publications vehemently appealed to the Chancellor and the rulings were mostly overturned, but, in the process, a giant can of worms regarding compensation, quantity, quality, and operations was opened. To guard against having to go through a lengthy and personally vindictive set of appeals, the publications demanded that Kirkland review the Publications Board charter. It became known that the entire structure of Vanderbilt Student Communications, Inc. was up for grabs, and everyone-each publication, the Student Govemment Association, the Democratic Action Coalition, Kirkland, et al,-wanted into the act. The paper hit the fan and private study committees arose from the mountain of shreds. Everybody had the solution to the publications problems, no matter whether there were or were not problems in the publications. Students have been given the unfortunate notion that back room politicking and blatant li - 'hired freed O '77 A chance for Z1 he Cha nceifor By-laws amendedg strike averted aw l OWH esigm VU Harrie, P compromising are dirty, undemocratic acts. On the contrary, in a working complex democracy, they are mandatory if any controversial issue is to be resolved. If, for example, the Styles Committee had sought a wide variety of opinions on the problems of the publications, asked for advice from and tried to sell their view to the editors, better and more unified solutions could have been produced. If the publications had quietly gone to the SGA, Kirkland, and others about their problems, complaints, and ideas, if they had not felt that right meant might, there probably would never have been any brick wall confrontations. If all parties had met one-to-one discussing the issues and problems, to in fact agree on just what the problems were, things might have been different. But this was not, in general, done. After all, each group spent many hours in deep thought, wrote volumes, and critically and impartially analyzed the problem before arriving at the right solution. Each group was right. The problem was that we were all working on almost unrelated problems. The publications were trying to avoid uninformed budgetary and fiscal meddling. The SGA was trying to increase accountability and control. Kirkland was trying to assure a noncontroversial student media. All these are valid problems. But their pure independent answers are obviously contradictory. Their synthesis into a working whole would have taken extensive bargaining, compromise and dispassionate discussion. It was too bad that this did not happen. we vsC Wm 522972 S WPQQ New By-Lows Board of Directors Seven voting members, composed of four students, three faculty. The faculty to be chosen by the Board and approved by the Chancellor, and the students to be nominated by a special committee and selected by the Chancellor. Also, the editors and station manager serve without a vote, as does the consultant journalist. The appointment of the consultant journalist is subject to the approval of the Chancellor. Faculty chairman. Funding Media funded through advertising,subscription, grants, and student activities fee money. Student money received from Student Activities Fee Committee, subject to the approval of the Chancellor and the executive Committee of the Board of Trust. No activities fee revenue used for compensation ofstaff and no transfer of revenues from one division to another. I Styles Committee Board of Directors Seven voting members, Three faculty, named bythe Chancellor, and four students, two submitted for approval to the Chancellor by the StudentGnvernment Association, and two submitted for approval to the Chancellor by the Corporations divisions. Professional journalist, non-voting. Faculty chairman. Funding Media funded through advertising, subscription, grants, and student activities fee money. Student money received from Student Activities Fee Committee, subject to the approval of the Chancellor and the Executive Committee of the Board of Trust. No activities fee revenue used for compensation of staff. Carr Committee Board of Directors Seven voting members. Three faculty, approved by the Chancellor, four students selected bythe Chancel- lor, two popularly elected and two from nominations by the media. Faculty chairman. Professional journalist, non-voting. Funding Media funded through advertising, subscriptions, grants, and student money. Student money assessed by the VSC Board of Directors without applying to the Activities Fee Committee for funds. This levy subject tothe approval of the Chancellor and the Executive Committee of the Board of Trust. I975 Publications Proposal Board of Directors Professional journalist, chairman of the Board and voting. Six votes from the publications. Faculty advisers, non-voting. Five ablarge students, voting. Treasurer from administration or faculty, voting. Self-perpetuating board of directors. Funding Media funded through advertising, subscriptions, grants, and student activities fee money. Student money received from the Student Activities Fee Committee, subject to the approval of the Chancellor and the Executive Committee of the Board of Trust. No restriction on the use of activities fee revenues. ln addition, the publications proposed separating WRVU from the corporation. Old By-Lows Board of Directors Voting membership includes all editors and station manager, faculty or administration chairman, professional journalist, activities fee committee representative, treasurer, five student at-large mem- bers, four faculty advisers. A representative of the Office of Student Life, non-voting. Membership self-perpetuating, except for chairman, who was appointed by Chancellor from recommendations of the board of directors, Fuadlug .Media funded through advertising, subscriptions, grants, and student money' Student money received from Student Activities Fee Committee, subject to the approval of the Chancellor and the Executive Committee of the Board of Trust. No restriction on the use of activities fee revenues. C' Z We 0 ff N H S A Concise Chronology of the VSC Conflict In 1971, after the Hustler had run an add for contraceptives, the Board of Trust passed a resolution to revise the composition of VSC along guidelines "which would permit freedom without licensef, The 1972 Carr Committee recommended that the voting business managers be removed and replaced by voting faculty. This proposal was passed by the board. In the fall of 1974, Hustler editor Irv Muchnick is named Chairman of a VSC Committee to examine possible by-law revisions. However, he refuses to convene the Committee even once, insisting that Chancellor Heard would veto any amendments favorable to the publications. On january 22, 1975 the Publications Board rejected a proposal presented by the 1974-1975 editors to remove the five voting faculty, install a professional journalist as its head and double the votes of the member publications. The proposals would also have removed WRVU as a member publication although they would have kept the six at large students and regulatory powers of the board the same. On january 23, 1975, the VSC fight erupts publicly. The editors of the Commodore, Versus, and Hustler sign a statement beginning a battle over amendments trying to stimulate campus debate. On january 31, 1975, the Publications Board votes down the student-opposed amendments, nine opposed, four in favor, one abstaining. Hustler editor Howard Crenstein called this vote "the clearest violation of the spirit of self-governance that I have ever seen on a campus." Dr. Robert V. Dilts, Chairman of the VSC, appoints a new by-law revision committee. Chancellor Heard appoints his own committee chaired by University Legal Officer jeff Carr. In March, 1975, the new editors, Howard Grenstein, Irwin Kuhn, David Burnside, and Dwayne Hastings, assume office. After seven months of Work, the Carr Committee submits its recommendations to Chancellor Heard, on October 28, 1975. The SGA, it is found, had made its own study of the VSC dilemma. Mark Styles heads the Committee and arrives at a proposal which is similar to Carr's except that the Styles Committee rejects Carr's wish to separate the VSC funding mechanism from the Activities Fee Committee. To keep them bound would, Styles feels, make the publications "more responsive to the students." The by-law changes are officially announced on February 9, 1976. The Chancellor patterns his decision mostly from the Carr and SGA reports. The proposed changes are much less favorable to the publications than those advocated in 1975. The editors and station manager are now placed under stricter control of Heard and the new Board. He revokes the voting powers of the editors and has the authority to name all four at-large students and the three voting faculty members to the Board. The newly constituted Board has the power to explicitly control and oversee the budgets, plans, and daily operations of the publications, and may reduce the editors, compensation on the grounds of "poor performance." On Tuesday, February 10, the Vanderbilt Hustler publicly threatens to strike if the by-laws are not changed within a week. On Wednesday, February 11, approximately 300 students, faculty members, and interested Nashvilleans fill Sarratt Cinema to speak up and learn about the issue. All sides of the dispute are represented, but the crowd is overwhelmingly pro- publications. All of the publications back this move, including WRVU, which has now moved over to the publications corner. Wednesday and Thursday of that week the local papers and radio stations cover the controversy, quoting Hustler Editor Howard Orenstein's view that Chancellor Heard's action endangers freedom of the press. On Thrusday, February 12, the Chancellor returns from a trip to Texas to find that the controversy has been well reported by the Nashville media. As he later tells students, "I feel as if I were invited to a party, and then when I walked into the room, somebody dumped a bucket of paint on my head." Chancellor Heard by-passes an offer to take part in a public forum. However, on Friday, February 13, he summons the division heads of VSC-the editors of Hustler, the Commodore, Versus, and the station manager of WRVU, as well as the SCA President Barb Tate and the Executive Vice President Iohn Dupree-to a private conference. The publications heads argue that a Chancellor-approved Publications Board with three faculty and four student at-large members would not have the knowledge, inclination, or goodwill to effectively oversee the many different problems of each individual publication, especially in view of the fact of the new Board's broadly defined control of the individual publications, and considering the fact that the SCA President would be a member of the three-person search committee for Board members. It was further argued that the publications were more student learning experiences than a University service, and as such needed the freedom to make mistakes without unjustified fear of reprisal. Barb Tate and John Dupree end up the middle-supporting most of the Chancellor's released by-laws, but balking at the "poor performance" clause. Chancellor feels that "as long as student communications media depend on the University for financial or other support, the University must inescapably have the power to reduce or eliminate that support, or to impose conditions on it." Heard refers dissatisfied students back to the Publications Board, saying that the Board can re-amend itself the still has ultimate veto power over any new amendments-to-amendmentsj The Publications Board meets that same afternoon. Facing an 18-0 strike vote by the Hustler staff, they agree to hold an emergency meeting that next Monday to consider new amendments to be written over the weekend. Sunday night, F ebruaiy 15, the Hustler staff meets again, voting 22-0-1 to strike if the Board does not approve new by-laws. On Monday night, Chancellor Heard addresses an overflow crowd attending Omicron Delta Kappa's "Evening with the Chancellor" in the Sarratt baseball glove lounge. At that same time, the by-law amendments workedup by the publications pass unanimously. The Hustler agrees to continue publishing, with the expectation that Heard will restore the votes of the editors and station manager, and give back to the Board the authority to appoint its at-large members. The new publication heads, Kurt Schmalz, Richard O'Neill, Mark McDonald, and jeff Rothschild assume office. V On April 19, 1976, Chancellor Heard vetoes the new amendents, saying that "to approve these changes in the context of the unwarranted, unsubstantiated allegations of intent, through the changes of February 15, 1976, to interfere with editorial freedom . . . might imply a substance to those allegations that does not exist." Kmt Schmalz immediately resigns his post as Hustler Editor-in-Chief. The Hustler does not publish its final issue of the year. Chancellor Heard awards Kurt Schmalz the Geyer Award, Vandewilt's prize for interpretative and investigative journalism. The award is presented behind closed doors in the Chancellor's office. About 30 students and a few reporters wait outside. The united front of the publications begins to break. WRVU's new station manager is quoted as saying that "the Vanderbilt Hustler has used the rhetoric of freedom to blow the issue out of proportion." At the next fand lastj meeting of the Publications Board, Chairman Dilts insistently tables all talk of the new amendments or of Kurt Schmalz's resignation. A group of students plans to start their own paper next fall, without student funds. Since the beginning of final exams the new publications heads have been in closed conferences with jeff Carr. The early reports are that most all major disagreements have been quietly worked out to the satisfactions of all parties. Sophia Wheeler Ann Mackey Paul Dickson Scott Greene Steve Kratson Dianne Crawford Yolanda Hardaway Billy Yoimg Russ Robinson Stan Perkins Bert Haas Mary Anne Wetterer john Titos Phil Walker Kathy Zickert David Saphier Gail Sisk Dr. Kassian Kovalcheck! Coach Dr. Randall F isherf Coach Debate Team Delta Sigma Rho! Tau Kappa Alpha is an honorary national debate fratemity. To be eligible, a student must participate in intercollegiate debate for three semesters, maintain a 2.0 grade point average, and be sponsored for membership. Vandervilt participates in national intercollegiate competition at over 20 debate tournaments annually. In addition, VU hosts its own tournament every year in early january. This year's debate topic reads: Be it resolved that the Federal Government should adopt a comprehensive program of land used in the United States. 1 I , Ll. 'n l i 'i , : rv.-.mv N li f L 1 1 . ' x . V 3 1 H I .A 45... -1. ' I 1, -2 fp, I .Ll-4 , , N, 'V . y ,St Z' ' A G 75 Democratic Action Coalition whining DEMONSTRHTE FOR HN OPEN UNIVERSITYIII Bang op 155+ """""s,PwI 'ku F"f'Y wt Sunni., Too PM. Raid A. 4 ifbaua In early November 1975 a group of concerned students met to discuss something that weighed heavily on their minds-the new Student Government Association. After years of inactivity and disinterest on the part of most students, the old structure had been done away, and a new, highly touted, student-run government was formed. At the beginning of the fall semester elections were held amid the cries of "effective leadership and progressive student governmentf' The new structure promised to be one of new direction and action unheard of at Vanderbilt. Now, in November, was happening. No it was obvious that nothing new new policies, no new action, and, more importantly, no new interest. In fact, less than 2596 of the student body had even bothered to vote in the elections. They seemed to have anticipated what was now obvious: students government was as worthless as ever. It was this atmosphere that spawned the Democratic Action Coalition. On November 5, 1975 the D.A.C. was chartered by the university and began to circulate a petition asking for a change in the form of student government, making it a structure in which students could be directly involved in the decisions affecting their lives. This petition too met with disinterest, but did direct some student attention to the glaring problems at hand. It also made it obvious that the D.A.C. was not just a radical curiosity, but a visible force of change at Vanderbilt. In February, 1976, the D.A.C. once again found an issue that it felt was being ignored by the Student Government. This time the ULC CUndergraduate Legislative Councill failed to respond to a move by the Chancellor that, in effect, gave him complete censor control of the student media on campus. The D.A.C. publicized this and cooperated with other campus organizations in organizing an unprecedented mass meeting in Sarratt Cinema to protest the Chancellor's move. Most dismayed was the staff of the Hustler, the campus newspaper. Its staff members felt that freedom of the press had been endangered, they threatened to strike rather than publish under these conditions. The Chancellor accepted alternate proposals for study and the Hustler was published as usual. All along, the Student Government Association kept a low profile while the D.A.C. came out in opposition to the Chancellor and in support of student interests. The Democratic Action Coalition is now involved in a recruiting drive. It is the goal of the organizers to provide a body large and vocal enough to make the Student Government Association and the administration sit up and listen. The D.A.C. is honestly concerned with the plight of students in a private institution such as Vanderbilt. The administration here takes a paternalistic attitude and student government goes along with it. This is an intolerable situation and the D.A.C. seeks to change it. Its purpose, as stated in its constitution, is to create a more fulfilling and less oppressive environment-an environment which students not only expect, but have a definite right to. The D.A.C. will continue to fight for this right amid such administration actions as Chancellor Heard's reaffirmation, in April, of his strict control over campus media. Government is everywhere, to a great extent controlled by a powerful minority, with an interest distant from that of the mass of the people. G.L. Dickinson 1862-1932 Student Covernment Acts In February of 1975, Brad Millsap, then president of the Student Association, appointed .1 committee of seven people, representing different aspects of student governance at Vanderbilt, to study all aspects of the old government. The committee interviewed people from the old USAB, SA Cabinet, class governments, and Interhall. The purpose was to find areas Where these governance structures overlapped and to find areas of the old government that were no longer serving any useful function. The goal was to consolidate the overlapping areas and to branch into new areas where action is needed. The elections for all but Interim President of the Student Association were suspended in April in order to concentrate all effort on restructure. After the initial study of the old system, the committee conducted open meetings to allow all students the opportunity to present specific proposals for restructure. the following system of governance which they did. The President of the new Student Government Association QSCAQ serves as the primary liason between the administration and students, and to help coordinate the legislative and executive branches. The legislative branch of the government, the Undergraduate Legislative Council CULCQ, is composed of a council of eight C8l students at large, two from each class. In addition, the Presidents of the Engineering and Nursing Councils serve as non-voting, ex-officio members. Large, supposedly "representative" bodies have led only to absenteeism and indifference. The new Legislative Council will be smaller, and therefore more responsible and efficient. Much of the dissatisfaction with the old legislative body was its Large, supposedly urepresentativea' bodies have led only to absenteeism and indifference. The committee's investigation concluded that the horizontal structure was inefficient in that it was comprised of many small organizations with common goals but no central coordination. It was decided that a streamlined, flexible system of government would be more efficient. The Restructure Committee recommended that the student body of Vanderbilt University adopt apparent lack of direction and accomplishment The new Legislative Council has a clearly defined role as the decision-making body on major policy and financial issues. It also serves as a screening committee for membership on University committees and in the Executive Cabinet. As experienced with the Sarratt Committee selections process, the most skilled, interested and motivated people can be found in this manner. The Executive Cabinet is composed of the President, Administrative Vice-President, and the chairmen of the six standing committees which represent the most crucial. and broad areas of concern for student government: Academic Affairs, Interhall, Speakers, Student Services, Rules and Finances. Interhall essentially retains its basic services with important modifications in structure and responsibility. The overlap existing in the past between Interhall and other student government organizations is virtually eliminated. In addition, Interhall provides the grass roots contact to faciliate the representation of student concerns. This new system is designed to seek to meet student needs as they arise. The centralization permits the flexibility to move manpower and resources into areas where they are most needed at any particular time. Ad hoc committees can also plug into the system to obtain financial and manpower assistance when the need is proven to exist, or to execute special projects not already covered in the six standing committees. Members of the Restructure Committee, the interim SCA President, Interhall President, and other volunteers helped to make public information regarding the new government with the aid of videotape. One September 9, 9206 of the students voting in a constitutional referendum approved this new system. The first order of business was then to elect officers to the eight positions on the Undergraduate Legislative Council and to appoint the standing committee chairmen. 79 In addition, Interhall provides the grass roots contact to facilitate the representation of student concerns. The new ULC and SCA carried out numerous GFFKTRS or THE Q N WD ULC significant programs and actions over the year ' ' 's 'M A A 1 ' 1975-1976. Academic Affairs Committee of the SCA President .....,..,...... ...,. ...............................................,.. 1 i iirhrnc SCA moved early to set up two programs. The Ad1ninisti'ativc.Xfice President ,.............,..........,.. ,..,........ j ohn Dupree first, the and Support of Academic Affairs Chairman ...........,..............,,........., Paul Beach lialll j . . I Nick Gallucci rrp,-i,,g, undergraduate major organizations in nearly Attorney General ...,.............,...................,.,.................. Rick Sliireman every departlnent led to some interesting faculty- Finance Chairman ..........,...........................................,... Ed Spacapan , , , , , , , Interhall President ..........,.............,.,..,............................,.., Chuck Lee Student gathenngsa Speclal fllmsa and flGldUlpS- Speakers Chairman ..........................,...,............,.....,,..,.... Shawn Kelly Varying degrees of autonomy and the Student Services Co-Chairmen ............,..... , .,...,......... Mark Dominick t d . . th g DenI1iSL11Vette opportunl ICS 0 1 uence ecislons at e Bookmart Manager ....,....,..........,......,.........,.............,.... Rudy Moeller departmental level, thgge undergraduate majgr Secretary ..........,.. - ' .........,......,.....................,.........,......,.,..... Beth Rogers - - - Senior Representatives ............,...............,......,.,.............. 1 knne Phillips have been and Wlll cpntlnue to ' Tony iimziiio invaluable in the research for and implementation junior Representatives ....,....,.....,.,..,.,,...........,.......,....,..... Mike lizigot of academic Programs Bruce Berger ' Sophomore Representative ...... ,... ..,...,........ ................,.... C r e g Croyle , hllzabclh 0 New The second major project undertaken by the Freshman Representative ..,....,...............................,....... Marlene Hall , , , , Julia Goodall Academic Affairs Committee was the offering of Nursing Council President , .....,......,..........,................, Pat Strohmeier Ijndergraduate Research Grants for the first time, Engineering Council President ....................................... josh Thomas ced former Provost Hobbs: and Chancellor Heard's contingency funds for the establishment of this program. Twenty students were chosen from among 31 applicants to receive grants of up to S200 each to pursue research in areas of their own choosing. Some of the projects undertaken include research to try to develop an implantable muscle stimulator, three experimental films, and a study of Indian tribes Several students attended a conference at Harvard on the post graduate values of the Liberal Arts Education. living in the Southeastern United States. The Undergraduate Research Grant program was helped to stimulate creativity and innovation, and the SCA is Working to make grants available on a regular yearly basis. The Speakers program this year included experts not only in politics but in numerous other fields. Along with Julian Bond, William F. Buckley, and Edmund Muskie, the Speakers Committee brought Richard Schultes, who spoke on the history of man's association with marijuana, David Brower, who spoke on ecology and the enviroment, Germaine Greer, a well-known feminist, and David Belin and Harold Weisberg, who debated the Warren Commission Report. SGA money also helped send students to a number of different conferences around the country. In November, students attended the Tennessee Intercollegiate State Legilature CTISLQ at the State Capital. There they participated in mock Senate and House debate over issues primarily relating to higher education in Tennessee. Students also attended a conference on World Hunger in Austin, Texas in December. They came back with new methods designed to make people more sensitive to the problems of World Hunger, and have conducted several programs. Several students attended a conference at Harvard on the post graduate values of the Liberal Art Education. Another student Went to Washington, D.C., to a meeting of the National Student Lobby, bringing back some ideas for SGA next fall. Another SCA program, the Bookmart, moved into its new location in Sarratt. With a new manager in control, the Bookmart Was organized more efficiently and regular hours were maintained. The Bookmart provides students with the opportunity to sell and buy textbooks at reduced prices. With regard to its legislative functions, The ULC repeatedly responded to what it considered constructive criticism throughout the year. On the recommendation of an organized student lobby, the ULC took steps to help clear up misunderstandings about the government and to improve the flow of information. One such A adjustment, a major piece of legislation passed by ULC, was the Sunshine Bill, which opened all regular meetings of the ULC and all committee 81 meetings of the SGA. As part of an attempt to bring the SGA closer .to the students, SGA constitutions, membership lists, and other documents were placed in all of the dorms, and regular office hours were maintained, so that students could come by the SGA office and learn more about the workings of the SGA. More needs to be done to improve communications between the SGA and the students, hopefully, greater campus media coverage and the SGA link with Interhall will enhance the flow of communications. The Interhall merger with SGA was long awaited and much desired. During restructure the Interhall President and SGA President worked together to develop a way to link the two groups for their mutual benefit. Many of Interhall's programs and emphases had been discontinued and were supplanted by the emergence of new Sarratt committees. The merger of Spring, 1976, provided the SGA with a much-needed channel for the flow of information, and helped maintain l l an Interhall that was searching for a new identity. The issue most debated and most publicized this year was the issue of the restructure of Vanderbilt Student Communications QVSCQ. During the spring of 1975 several attempts were made to restructure the VSC, but by the' fall of 1975 no concensus had been reached in the formal committee so charged. Fearful of the tendency toward greater independence and separation of VSC's member publications from their community of mandatory subscribers, the SGA decided to attempt to create a plan for restructure which they felt would be equitable for all involved. An ad hoc committee was appointed by the SGA President to investigate and then propose revisions to Chancellor Heard. The VSC restructure committee of the SGA solicited student opinion on their proposal through a mailing of copies of the proposal to 100 different student leaders on campus. The response indicated a degree of support for the proposal and the committee moved ahead with the proposal. The basic principle behind the restructure suggested by the SGA committee is that the publications and media can, ideally, provide a service to large segments of the campus ' community, as well as in their provision of cultural and educational articles and programs of special interest to some segments of the campus community. Therefore a mandatory subscription fee is justified if that service can be assured. Without the "real Worldn aspect of having to appeal to a community in order to sell subscriptions, an artificial means must be devised in order to insure a degree of responsiveness without infringing on the editors' freedom of speech. It was felt that the Activities Fee Committee is the legitimate point for publications . . . some members of the SCA-VSC restructure committee began to consider complete financial independence for the publication. 83 Lo SGA USED OPEN EVERY FRIDLW 3-5' P camo on we LEFT' HALL off '17-is snfemm' 7UMNf1, l5iKMART SCA books bou5M+avsdgf,1Cl gn Qgngiay-gmg to be held responsible to their public for the kind of product they produce. The Activity Fee Committee makes recommendations to the Chancellor each spring, indicating what activities should be funded by students for the coming year. It was felt that because this was the legitimate means for the publications to be held responsible for their activity, it would be inconsistent to vest the power to redistribute funds allocated by the Activities Fee Committee in the VSC itself. Throughout the controversy concerning the VSC restructure proposed by Chancellor Heard, some members of the SCA-VSC restructure committee began to consider complete financial independence for the publications. A paper which must sell subscriptions must appeal to its community. This might, however, prove to seriously curtail the operation of some campus media. The major accomplishments of the year for the SCA include the successful implementation of its new system. The awakening of greater student awareness of the capabilities of student government was also a significant development. The resultant increased interest in SGA became apparent in the large number of students who applied to become chairmen of the six standing committees this spring. Student govermnent can only be as active as its manpower and resources allow. There are always issues left unresolved at yearis end, but students must be patient, as meaningful change sometimes comes after persistent evaluation and recommendation. SCA must set certain priorities each year and strive to accomplish what it can without becoming too discouraged that all issues cannot be handled. The successful completion and implementation of the new SGA constitution and by-laws sets the course now for action in the years to come. The framework for making the SGA broad enough to handle a wide variety of concerns is there. Students must become involved, to make this possibility a reality. The VSC controversy continues. Hopefully a rational compromise can be reached through a thoughtful give-and-take among all parties involved. 85 J niemlftcampussemny' A f 1 O i r ' -'if Am, f-jfs' 1 t ,KM Wm ,g,-,mu N,ggf,,,g,g,5Q,ifnL55,,ie ' A""""'eW"""f"'Sf5 l y 'S Bu " ' A ., mt fxotuilox or vvz EIQSUS A EIDSIJS .sw L. an QA fw'7f'K'n I""1 -LVL 75' -q no YEARS OF SOLITUDE ' 'A HB sg, , r Hypqvr REGENCY FromTheBfqgiff1i'1sSlolhevandefbiIrrmxie 1 K , V A' A - 'L A-,f gl 5A I . , A ig V - J - A A AA A A J A Qi A Q ' . 'i es-. . y . r r ! 5 ,, T-""i'N-3 Ar T I in ' A A , ,N I a 4 ' ,Af 8 Q Av , Q, '-glsg' -5 Q ling' 6. ' V X , ,f'2i'!4 Ai 4 1 xv. LA A s 4 UWM' M . . 'fi' A if-2 Irv . ' i w f I ' ' "' Qs, in , fr' f ' ' , 4-, E Nj- f' , 'f, V -4, f'A'. 'A'.'f' jisf A U 1 I - - ,f .' ,' 1 - I, f, ' 1 '-.- H' - ' X api' . A A 1A " i, " Q , ' F A W 4 ' I '4,, A ff' ' 'A "V F' K 2' ' ' -LOOKING INTO THE 'H . it 1 J 3 l ' I f FS'-f - fa! -A Y-e 4 iff Q 'A v, 'ix 'X-7 wx N 86 'o ll! ei '-rx What say you, underlings? Be advised, fair staff. To you your editor should be as god, One that composed your beauties, yea, and one To Whom you are but as a form in wax, By him imprinted, and Within his power To leave the figure, or disfigure it. The Versus is a worthy magazine. EEOIBYS Relwl VEIQSUS funn .v- - .rf A " . 1' 4"5sdI 'IJ'-Q" I 3+ Z'fl,l,f4-.9 5 N f kdlfliyt' fr! ff v ,QS N. Pk r's ' ' Q I , .",' I rv., ,alhiex Z If . "'X- 3-"ni" i., A NOR' 11. " jg, -Tiki. . A I ,n ,-- ,X il.. If . h ,X ' 34" , f Qky, if r 5 ' V 9, l In df-rar 'HQ' 0 o s, xk 3 . -. . i Q Cf ', M- 2' ' ,. v- A 'If ,C 114, ' I 5 rr , , , 1. J-', ,' 1. -vague X ,clnigsil-A - . - 'W , ,51v I V I fx,.A Q 'fix f"'::L'j' '3'-: 5-'H :- wr- r- ,-w.::"x - x ,fG'xQl!Fh th' 3 G r N f' :.' '1- Qvlrr , AAL! , Q iff- xb::"Q'JQx, YT, x xg N' ' DEATH1do-dA,do-dA , Prison Pfvifd Pfqblems 4 .z . fir -V 'ff' xxx X" X Versus had a lively and fruitful year, its format was changed from a literary magazine to a features reporting style. Through the diligent efforts of the staff and revenues were increased greatly and the magazine will be in the black for thefirst time in four years. A very large and talented staff was assembled and it .seems that they will be the basis of some much needed continuity. WWESUTSW '4 f , Qlf, gf! .. I -. ...qfux P,,f"'a'y 4'-A? fl TO BEER GI NDT T0 lilk Rich O'Neill Sharon Gang lim Onstott Eric Ethridge Craig Deriun Allen Boyer XVilI Akers Russell Adams john Dubois Scott Anderson john Ha.mln Kun Benz Nancy Brock Marian Bourcleaux Barbie Vogler Indy McCoy Henry Cranberry George Callis -. far ' u' The Hustler B? .1 f' fig ' V l Editor-in-chief: Howard Orenstein Business Manager: Margaret Lynch Managing Editor: Pat Boyce-Kevin Cuneo Executive Editor: Charles Bugbee News Editors: Kurt Schmalz, Clint Winstead Arts Editor: Allen Boyer Sports Editor: Tom Cambisios-David Brooks Photo Directors: Eric Bernstein, jim Onstott Assistant News Editors: Kevin Barton, Bill McCleery, Leigh Smitherman Assistant Sports Editor: Pat Nunnally Typesetter: Connie Rountree Consultant journalist: jim Leeson The year was an exciting one. The Hustler contributed its usual share of controversy to the campus, but also had the benefit of seeing its editorial stands adopted by certain segments of the commtmity. The year began with The Hustleris top three editors attempting to enter the traditionally closed meeting of the Board of Trust, and it ended with the trustees adopting a series of worthwhile-if not entirely complete-reforms that allowed for greater participation in the Board's affairs by students and faculty. Sports dominated the news this past year-and not only the accounts of the games on the field. For the first time in years, students seemed to be re-examining the University's commitment to a varsity sports program. A group of law students threatened a suit over the hours the athletic facilities were open to non-athletes. Stories in The Hustler told of the increasing militancy of the club sports in their demands for funds and access to the playing fields. We reported that substantial amounts of student money fin addidion to the activities fee assessmentj were being used to mbsidize the athletic department. For the first time in at least ten years, the department was forced to supply the Activities Fee Committee with a breakdown of its expenditures. The Hustler reported that the tax exemption on Memorial Gymnasimn had never been reviewed even though Vanderbilt coaches had for years been operating their own private schools on gym property. But the biggest story of the year concerned The Hustler itself. The controversy over the by-laws of Vanderbilt Student Communications-the University-owned corporation that governs The Hustler, Versus, the Commodore and WRVU-led to two strike votes by the staff and the resignation, for a few weeks, of the new editor. A Hustler- sponsored forum on the issue drew 300 people, in what was perhaps the greatest campus display of interest in anything non-athletic in many years. Thus the year ended as tumultuously as it had begun. The final issue of thetyear was never published, the staff refusing to work after the editor resigned. QF or a complete account of the VSC controversy, see page 780 89 3- The 1976 Commodore It was a difficult year, one of building, learning, and change. The Commodore, for the first time in four years had received a budget sufficient for the printing and production of a complete, high quality annual. Everything would have been perfect except for one problem. There was no staff, and no one with the needed skills showed up at the beginning. Much of my time, that would have been spent in organization and planning, was spent in finding and training a staff for this year and future years, hopefully giving the Commodore some much needed continuity. In addition to problems with staffing, much about The Commodore has been changed. It is and will be scheduled for fall delivery. This was done to allow for' a complete years events to be recorded and to give the staff more time to learn. There is an increased emphasis on contributed material, especially with copy, to give the book a broader and more valid appeal. This years book was done with the approach that Vanderbilts annual should, because of the length and breath of 90 .NS the student population and culture, be cyclic in nature. Some aspects of Vanderbilt life covered in one year, others the next. We have tried not to approve or disapprove in any of the features of sections. A yearbook should only hold up a mirror to the times, culture and events and say, "Look, look at this and remember". Due to the inexperience of myself and my staff, I made many wasteful and false starts in the organization and production of this book. But throughout we have all tried to apply the highest criterion for including any material. Only that which screamed "put me in the annualv was put in. My deepest thanks and appreciation go to the following people for their invaluable efforts in the creation of this difficult but 'worth it' annual. We all learned a great deal. Thank you for your patience and drive that kept you with us in spite of my sometimes incompetence and always nagging exactitude. Its been real. ,Jai Wesley Byrne-ace photog and freshmen! I AM RIGHT and an Olympus Lee Ann Thornton-female photog par excellence! 52 negative pickup and camera Rich McKinley-most dependable photog! Cibachroine and Hasselblads forever john Perry-worlds best writer! a sharp pen, you don't need a sharper wit Donna Stern-ever ready great gofer! typing-and an alphabet never more Don McCormick-wit and late photog! a date and an everpresent telephot Bob Schlussler-sometimes photog! a party and a flash Harry Murphy-excellent but unapplied photog! a new technique Marlene Hall-classes section and layoutfsorne time to work and play Denise Durbeck-classes section and layoutf a new alphabet Shara Ranp-classes section genius! thanks for the design and organization Barb Kennedy-classes section and typist! a new Selectric Afxl o lens , if Wir J C N, 4.1 X. V4 .4 Y ,ve H N ' N R ll in if ,. .. ,N -s gf 'I 1 ,, - .l J Il AQ", Q I Af ' A -:,h , :V A, '. 1 1975-76 was a year of transition for WRVU, with participation from over 40 freshmen, nearly half of the staff. In a city with a proliferation of youth orientated stations, the werve maintained a sizable share of the campus audience. Recognizing that no one type of music will suit everyone at Vanderbilt WRVU's programing ranged from the expected progressive, oldies, and classical music, to the unexpected bluegrass, jazz, blues, Shakespear, and the big bands of the thirties and the forties. Many familier voices left WRVU this year, mostly consequences of graduation. No longer will Vanderbilt afternoons be pierced by the highpitched shrill of Dashing Dave. Also leaving were Sky Yancy, Carol Ann Koster, Mel Bee, Steve Bond fjulianj, jay Boyd, Scott Burns QThird Degree Burnsj, Mike Witten fdestined someday to returnj Rick Eisman, Ann Marie Deer, Andy jacobs, and of course the man who made the trains run on time, station manager Dwayne Hastings fDwayne Who?j. Returning next year will be: Bill Gwinn fGwinchJ Dave Boniff Freddy Bile Caldwell Crosswy fasst. hnhblc gun: and stringsj Barney Kanter fhuhhlc gum and shoestringsj Keith Kendrick tbusiness managcrj Fred Love George Pallas john Perry jeff Rothschild Cstation inanagerl Ben Schaffer fsportsj Bob Schlnssler fllasj Rick Tubh fncwsj Lynn Frecr fpnhlic servicej Wes Green fprogrzun directory Miteh Bradley fsanity donbtfnlj Dan Crane Paul Friederich Peter Kruse Erich Merrill julie Fdrd Howard F reinian jeff Kaplan Bob Knapp jon Nau joel Powers Matt Ryan jim Stener Al Bingham Bob Eye Brad Goss Keith Griffin Emery Kohor Dawn Miller Grodon Piper Tim Riggins Ben Signer Steve Stuart Beth Swanson Robert Gray Stuart Adelman Ed Camey jay Cook ffather rsij Winston Gaines CMark Fullerj Bart Grooms Dave Higgs john Kelso Ron Miller Bill Nettles tWild Billl Bob Oswalt CDirty Bemiej l-lal Platt Clint Richmond Susan Taylor Kent Wonnell fjasonj Gary Zimmerman fLinsonj Catherine Patterson Phi Beta Kappa Class of 1975 Holly Robnett Caldwell julie Madsen Dennis Earl Oglesby Benjamin Thomas Tacker, jr. jerome Timothy Thiac Class of 1976 William Leonard Arendall Bettina Harman Ault Paul Richard Barkus Evelyn Evon Batey jon Robert Berquist Michael Stuart Biscoe john Edward Bowley, jr. john Ralph Bradley George Karstens Busse Sally Ann Cline Stewart Crile Crisler Michael Angelo DeRosa john Erin DuBois john Carroll Dupree Patricia Mclntire Early Robert Crutcher Eaton Carolyn Ann Ezzell Kent Galloway Farish Luanne Overton Farrell Charles Patrick Fitzgerald Thomas Boudol Fletcher Sara jane Fortune Norman Cooper Frost, jr. Deborah Linda Fry joseph Pannell Goddard Gary Alan Goforth David Allen Goldsmith Barbara Kay Goss Dinah Lou Grashot' Timothy Garland Green Mark Alan Greenberg Steven Richard Hanor Lee Walter Hendrick Mark Wendell Holladay Charles Edwin Hornaday, jr. Michael Nolan Howard Paul Andrew justice, jr. Mary Susan Keller David Linger Kyger john Edward Linn 94 Arts and Science Students With Outstanding Academic Records Robin Gayle Magee Mitzi Loraine Martinez Carolyn Ogden Meyer George Lyttleton Miller III Solomon Ira Miller jeffrey Scott Morgan Sara Helen Murphy Robert William Oliver james Fraser Patrick Mary Carolyn Peterson john Paul Ramsay Thomas Earl Rice, jr. Sophia joellyn Schneiter Susan Emily Senturia john Michael Shumate Robert Paul Siegel Daniel- Paul Smith Edward Spacapan, jr." james Dean Spratt, jr. Phillip Andrew Steidl Karen Ruth Strupp Linda joyce Tarbox Ronnie Haymond Tilford Sarah Inez Tillery Marion Lyon Tower Kenton Ittner Voorhees Dorothea Elisabeth Vorbusch Sharon Gwyn Walker Otis Bennett Walton, III Richard Winfield VVhite, jr. Stephen Harper VVhitmore" john Leland Wolford, jr. janet Susan Wray Nancy Clare Yarnell "Elected in junior Year Class of 1977 Richard Nils Dean Richard Andrew Hamblen james Edward johnson Elyn Ronna Saks Alumnus Member William T. Band Distinguished Professor of French Emeritus Honorary Member Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen Distinguished Professor of Economics Engineering Honor Society Tau Beta Pj Thomas Burwinkle Bowen Caldwell George Clark Matthew Clemens Ronny Deere Allen Elster! President David L. Foster Cary Costin Terry Hasis Robert James Craig Kuykendall David LeDoux! Vice President Debora Leek Sigma Theta Tau Marcia Ballard Rachel Brannon Patty Bryant Eugenia Cato Allison Dewalt Patricia Dodge Ruslyn Frederic Larry Lindquist Kathryn Marion Dennis Mette Rebecca Olive David Newton John Schindler Rick Shireman Robert J. Swayne Daniel Aucremanne Sandy Brown Michael Bryant Curtis Byers John Chappell Mike Clinton Elizabeth Hay Catherine Ives Ann Jarvis Marcey McCarrell Donna O'Bryan Kathy Ruark Mary Cross Farsheed Ferdowsi David Hollinberger Nancy Inman Chrisi Jones Danny Johnson Stephen Johnston James Lancaster Cynthia McCreless James Mitchell Pat Offner Joe Paul David Pendleton William Pease Jean Ann Popp Johnny Price Ted Pruitt Phillip Rich Ed Ries John Roarty Mark Rollins Joseph Rudolph John Spitler James Thomas David Turner Thomas Walters Mary Yarbrough Outstanding Nursing Students Sally Samoriga Joan Scheele Dabney Shelton Jimm Strathman Lori Szezukowski Mary Willms 95 Chi Epsilon Outstanding Civil Engineering Students Ed Clark Cindi McCreless Becky Olive Mike Zocolla Dan Aucremanne Kean Boyer Curt Byers john Chappell F arsheed F erdowsi Richard Garland Steve Hauenstein Richard Klein jim Littlejohn Pi Tau Sigma Outstanding Mechanical Engineering Students 96 Iam es Allison Robert Iames 'r if ' 'A President David Claude LeDoux Vice President Gary Belgrave Gostin Secretary Allen Devaney Elster Treasurer Kathryn Marie Marion Faculty Advisor Francis M. Wells Eta Kappa Nu Epsilon Lambda Chapter Eta Kappa Nu, the national Electrical Engineering honor society, recognizes leadership and scholastic accomplishment among students in that discipline. Our spring, 1976, initiation and banquet marked the tenth anniversary of the establishment of the Epsilon Lambda Chapter of Eta Kappa Nu at Vanderbilt. Sanford Samuel Brown James Aitkens Mitchell, Ir. Paul Herman Eichel William joseph Paul Michael Glynn Ellis Ted Ed Pruitt David Leslie Foster Philip Walton Rich Douglas Arnold Giese Sooda Sudhakara Shetty Ashfaq Mahmood james Louis Thomas Scabbard and Blade Scabbard and Blade is a military honorary society dedicated to the continuous growth and improvement of the Reserve Officer Training Corps. The society performed a number of functions this year, the most visible of which was the escorting of the Homecoming Court by a joint Army-Navy group for the first time in Vanderbilt history. Also, the society helped with local R.O.T.C. recruiting and held a formal dinner for its members. Next year, the society looks to increasing its participation in Vanderbilt activities. Richard L. Agee! Captain Ianet C. Arrowood Richard Alan Atkisson Mark R. Barron Gordon Wilson Beale George K. Busse Thomas I. Cavender jonathan W. Cooper Randall L. Courduff Lee B. Davis Lee A. Deneke Carl G. Gardner Ray H. Gray Charles S. Haffenden Richard A. Hamblen Caroline H. Hill Michael I. Lesley Dale A. Lewis H. Dwight Lyons Roger K. Mitchell Dale C. Newton Gilley G. Richardson William D. Roberts Steven L. Russell Brendan P. Ryan David I. Sneed David E. Turner Thomas E. York Skull and Bones Outstanding Pre-Medical Students Jeff Agee Robert Anderson Tom Arnau Paul Barkis john Berman Carl Blatt Tony Brannon Mary Brown Felix Caldwell Jim Cannon Mike Crowe Marcia Delk Rick Eiseman Dave Elliot Larry Floyd Chuck Fitzgerald Cary F onarow Bruce Frankenburg Rod Frazier Charles Friedman jay Cassman Iim Cerwin joseph Goddard Stuart Cold Bill Gregory Steve Hanor John Harris Dave Hollinberger David Holt Charles Hornaday Heyward Hosch Charles Houston Jim Hurlburt Bill- Hysell Elizabeth Kerner Richard Kubota Craig Kuykendall Jeff Levenson H. Dwight Lyon Mark McDonald Brian McGuire jim Mercer Roger Meyer Bradford Meyers Dave Minor Robert Mitchell Ken Moore Pete Moore Walt Morgan Sara Murphy William C. Murphy Patrick O,Brien Harrell Odom Ebi Okara Randal Owen Steve Parey Craig Phillips Cary Passons Heidi Pudliner Cynthia Rice Pat Rogers Ken Rosenzweig Cathryn Ruby Marshall Runge john Saclarides Bill Shell Paul Smith Lori Szczukowski Richard Turner Rawson Valentine Catherine van Eys Kent Voorhees John Weiner Bo Williamson William Wilson Steven Wolff Iohn Wolford Mary Yarbrough Iohn Zimmer Phi Sigma Iota Phi Sigma Iota is a national honorary Romance language fraternity. Its members are students of one or more of the Romance languages CFrench, Spanish, Italian, Portugese, and Rumanian, who have attained a certain degree of excellence in an advanced study of those languages and their literatures. Phi Lambda Beta Outstanding Portuguese Students Vilma Canali Kristina M. Crittenberger Reney P. Garay John William Garrison Michael A. Quental Iohn David Roney Margaret A. Stennes Cathy Czaky Danny Smith Jane Elizabeth Berry Cris Ann Craig Mims Maynard Tori Olin Mary Carolyn Peterson Michael Biscoe Val Gallin Thomas Gill Elizabeth Hagemann Ann Hale Karen House Lucy Hunter Sandy Iden Carol Iones Lucy Mancini Anne Myers Vicki Smith Leslie Pillsbury Susan Pyle Lisabeth Scales Andre Toffel John Michael Shumate jane Woodbridge Margaret Yount Dale C. Strasser B. Wesley Thomas Laurance C. Wood Sigma Delta Pi Outstanding Spanish Students Midge Allebach Wendy Baker Michael Biscoe Paul Borgeson Craig Derian jose Garcia-Reyes Tom Gill Caroline Hill Hortensia Hill Lucy Hunter Carol jones Jennifer jones Carol Logue Margaret McCullough Howard Marshall Anne Myers Peter Nammack Beatrice O'Connell Lorie Ricker Donn Sherrill Alice Springer jane Staub Lisa Vance Cathy V. Berkey Valery Warren Nancy Wells Margaret Stennes Lina Cofresi Cappy Porter Liz Scales Kris Crittenberger Rene Garay Ellen MacElvain Michael Ralston Connie Tabern Charlie Vance Ruth Wallace Margaret VVhittington 99 Eta Sigma Phi Outstanding Classics Students Leslie Anderson Randy Bibb Patty Booker Iohn Broocks Randy Bryant Suellen Craig Michael Crowe Miles Dean Patricia Dodge 'Richard Hamblen Elizabeth Holton Brian Klein Lissa LeGrand Dale Lewis Christopher Martin Mary Mulloy Diane Newman Harrell Odom Philip Powers Kirk Reeves Theodore Saclarides john Shaw Suzy Tichenor John Wallace janet Wray Nancy Yarnell Douglas Ammon F. Scott Anderson Keith Bergman Steven Chruchwell Colby Detrich Lynn Enterline jennifer Fletcher Lesa D. Fraker David Goldsmith John M. Mantle Stepehen Martin Marcia Ann McCauley Elyn Saks William Spears Shawne Swindler Cheryl L. Thomas Fowler VVhite Robin T. Wilson 100 Delta Phi Alpha Outstanding German Students Mia Margarita Benevides Robert Byron Betsy Callicott Suellen Craig Ianaruth Ford Charles Friedman Frank Gilliam Inka Goell Brad Goss james Harley Graham Mary Beth Hamann Debra Lippoldt Carolyn Meyer Samuel Nolen Debbie Paryzek Kathleen Sterritt Barry Tillman Herbert P. Walker, Ir. Sammie Di Walker Johnson William Watson Amelia Whitehead Martha Lee Wyatt Stacey Adelmank William Nordlund! President Jan Heller! Vice President Patricia Early! Secretary Lynn Bernard, Jr.! Treasurer Judith Lachman! Faculty Advisor Andrew Auerbach Janet Bates Jerry Batte Frank Benham Jon Berquist Richard Bond Joy Bradley Holly Caldwell John Dubois Denise Durbeck Melanie Millsaps Sharma Minchey Pat F edor John Gaffney Bill Gwinn Jan Hommel Glenn Hoskins Todd Kaestner Bill Lucas Elizabeth Noyes Cynthia Pyle Carolyn Meyer Sharon Musselman . 4 -wm- Aff ,- Omicron Delta Epsilon Economics Honorary Sarah Raup Tom Rice Ed Schklar Steve Selznick Mary Simpkins Joyce Stewart Genora Taylor Ben Walton Steve Whitmore Michael Wooten James P. Yalem Alpha Lamda Delta Shelley Ballard Margaret Bamett Martha Barnette Cynthia Bottrell Kim Brown Sarah Brown Siwan Brown Barbara Bullock Olivia Byrne Catherine Carey Alison Clarke Nancy Clegg Margaret Cottle Deborah Crawford Lynn Davis Claire Dewar Mary Dickson Elizabeth Ditmeyer Laura Draper Kelly Duggan Cynthia Eaves Cynthia Eittreim Katherine Finn Jana Fletcher Patricia Fraser Laura Gee Miriam Goldsmith Anita Guy Julie Haley Robin Hall Marci Hamilton Susan Harris Frances Harrison Leslie Haynes Sharon Hoffman Margot Hornsby Elizabeth Hovda Joyce Huber Catherine Jones Jill Jordan Elaine Kaime Valerie Keim Judith Kopec M. Laird Ruth Lennek Nancy LeSac Mary Liebler Stephanie Maginn Marilou Marcus Martha McClaugherty Emily Mitchell -f Adrienne Nedell Nancy Neimeier Penny Palmer Amy Price Mary Rice . Mary Robertshaw .. ri" Nancy Rossmeisl - Deborah Sanders Mary Schwahn Fran Schwaiger Kim Shafer C nthia Shemwell f a-- .. Chris Skinner Leslie Smith Catherine Tucker Nancy Vinson Janet Voorhees Laurie Walpole Frances Walton Bess Watson Josephine West Lancye Willmott Ann Woodruff Elizabeth Worrel President Joanne Gee Vice President Beth Hovda Secretary Penny Palmer Treasurer Frances Harrison ,Historian Ann Worrel Ellitor Olivia Byrne :H-gag X ,, -. . . 'lfec Tai -at in 51' :J-1' . Y ,, , Anne Shultz f lg, 6:3 Alpha Lambda Delta CVanderbiltis Women's Honor Societyj emphasizes outstanding scholarship and intelligent living. Leadership is one of the most important qualities needed to meet the challenges that the future holds for us. Alpha Lambda Delta had the honored Harry Howe Ransom as our guest speaker who lectured on the C.I.A. This was followed by a wine and cheese party. Members ushered at the annual Athenian Sing, and the Society is working toward a scholarship to be awarded to one of its members next year. lOl Phi Eta Sigma Freshmen with Outstanding Academic Records Antonio Alemida, jr. Carlton Ames Kevin Barton Scott Beard Edwin Bell, jr. William Berridge john Bibb, jr. Alfred Bingham, jr. David Blair Kalman Bltunberg Thomas Bockman Allen Boyer Cecil Branstetter, jr. Robert Briggs Erwin Burbach Bradley Burke Robert Butt Thomas Cambisios Ting Yee Chan Yuk Lun Chan Thomas Crabtree David Cross jeffrey Davis Paul Eichel Clenn Everton Stewart F link jefferson Friday john Froggatt III Robert Fulton IV Mark Garrett Mark Gillespie Ralph Greenwasser Gary Grottke Mark Guzzo Bruce Kackett john Hamm Timothy Harper Douglas Hart Gregory Hebrank Richard Hegger Raymond Hodges Craig Horn james Hurlburt Andrew Ichel Leslie joughin III Shawn Kelly 102 Mark Kennon james King Richard Kubota Timothy Laher Gerald Lankford, jr. Scott Loveless Patrick Lucas john Marable III Stephen Martin Bradford Miller Robert Mitchell john Mosby Eugene Newman Lewis Paceley Michel Phifer Clarence Phillips Daniel Ray Craig Rice Hilleary Rockwell III Anthony Rogers Charles Rule james Smith Michael Smith Richard Stiles Charles Talley William Tipton john Tomin Scott Tremelin Thomas Vaden jeffrey Walker james Wallace, jr. Karl Warden Blake Watson Thomas Watson William Watson Marc Weill William VVheeler George R. Williams, III Steven Wolff john Wooley james Zucker Mark Adams joseph Barnes james Bassett Robert Beck Charles Bell Michael Berryman john Bolling Daniel Hilliard Boone William Bradley William Bradshaw james Brooks, III Ralph Brown james Wesley Byrne james Chandler, jr. Gary Churchill Gregory Ciliberti Gordon Cohen E joel Coleman joel Cohen Ray Cowan Claibourne Crews john Davis William Davis Theodore Dearing jeffrey Deaton Robert Dolan Bruce Douglas james Durham Timothy English john Esbenshade Neil Ettinger Christopher Evans john W. Ey Scott Fayne Mitchell Fogel jonathan Frantz William Fullerton Edwin Furtaw, jr. Theodore Gast David L. George C. Scott Greene Kent Griffin Mark Hendrickson Stephen Hinton George Hopper Allen Hord Daniel Howard Carl Hughes jackson Donald Ray johns Robert johnson George Kaiser Louis Kinsey George Kemker, jr. David Koch Randall Kucera William Lamb Thomas Langeloh john Ludwig Stephen Lyle Richard Mayer Robert Montgomery William Mounger Wayne Murphy Philip Page William Paine Al Lytle Partee III Ronald Paul Gordon Piper Frederick Powell III Ronald Plybon Douglas Raborn Stephen Rose Rick Rosen Russell Lee Rua Ellsworth Scales Thomas Schaeffer Scott Schroer David George Shields Monty Smith Todd Snyder Cosby Stone john Story Donald Strench jamw Charles Taylor David Teare Britt Thediner Peter Wagner john Wambaugh Anthony Weaver Ronald Weitzerkorn Edwin VVheeler Peter VVhite Roger Dale Williams Gordon Wright james Wyatt III john Yocum Lotus Eaters, the Honorary Sophomore Women's Organization, takes its name from Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem "The Lotus- Eatersf' In ancient Greek mythology, the Lotos-Eaters of Northern Africa lived off the fruit of the lotos. The eater of this fruit was overwhelmed with a forgetful, indolent feeling. Though interpretations of Tennyson's poem may vary, the namers of our organization felt that the lotos was not a slybol of laziness, but rather represented the group's ability to forget differences caused by social organizations Cthose in sororites, as well as those who are independentsj. The purpose of Lotus Eaters it to recognize outstanding sophomore women and to work toward completion of certain service projects that are decided annually by current members. This year's group gave a monetary scholarship to a rising senior. The money was earned through bake sales and a Valentine's Day project. The members also held a banquet to which deans and professors of each member's choice were invited. They also ushered for Athenian Sing. President! Ann Woodliff Vice President! Anne Pandl Secretary! Tali Lieberman Treasurer! Jane Duncan Allyson Askew Barb Burke Mary Alicia Cain Kempie Craddock Kathy Ellis Gay Glasgow Christallia Ingram Sharon Kendall Barbara Massie Karan McLellan Beverly Miller Karin Murray Becca Norris Jan Overcash Laura Riedl Cynthia Smith Leigh Smitherman Kathy Van Eys Immor Hozrmmry Wendy Baker Patty Balch Arm Bmckmxa,ri SYlwva'w'm Brmtwm julie 'Caldwell Clarins Calida Smplmanfie awis Mary ominick Susarme Fisher julie Ford Ian Getty Bmibara Hall Nanny Ann Kamga Liz Kenner 'Cathy Madigan Mnmmdmy Cathy Nilmdeh Ellen Payne Charmaine Prime Susan :Smith Teresa Simrwn Kate Stillman Samrumie Walker I Ita e ot t or l 03It Lllvllleizwl jlo eww v '1'- -fQ'."Q3iHm1 Pilllfwlbc Early in me Elotml beet MW! Willllliemsf Mamie Easel 'Geomag More Fwllkmn- fimwlml Leitl A llmwetm, Femele alwrmmemtlno mmm Wmmtim, HBIWPITU Smsiivv lkllfviltmelltiaif Kalki' blllillafmfam :Wllmli5l!1l,'ll'llT!!l! Mortar Board will tapdance on class- Wlalke up and watch 'outg he glad you mee. Tapping-waylaying new mmmlaers way to and fmm . . . them with a rose. Mortar Board-a motiorml molar womms lxonorary since 1938 l. . . now e Immunol honorary for bode women and men . . . bmw on smvice, scholarship., and leadership to "the University and the community . . . started with a potluck 'dinner and ended by sponsoring an Honors Dimmer on April the 9th . . . annually sells calenders Q . .set up the 'boards'i1n Band to lend order to the of posters . . helped at Career Planning . . . spomotretl 'What Does it Mean to Suceed?',t two cm after graduation transitions , . conducted selection for Lady of the Bracelet, the senior who contributed most to the University . . sent a. delegate to a women's in Dallas . . . All members listed in the Gollege Register of outstanding students . . . MURTAR BOARD-composed' of diverse, involved people WHO NEVER SKIP CLASS. This year Omicron Delta Kappa, which provides a fonun for student leaders, tried to become more visible on the Vanderbilt campus. Three times during the year ODK sponsored a program held in the Sarratt baseball glove lounge entitled "A Conversation With . .," which featured important campus figures in an informal talk session with the university community. Chancellor Alexander Heard and Professor Ned N abers, recipient of the Chancellor's Cup in 1975, were the guests of ODK at its first conversation. In February, "A Conversation With . . featured Chancellor Heard at a time which coincided with the controversy over the VSC and the graduation site. It was valuable for the students to talk with the Chancellor about these matters. Finally, Chancellor Heard and Dean Iacque Voegeli sparked an extremely interesting conversation in ODK's final program, held in early April. 106 ODK also enlarged the scope of its own meetings by having Ierry R. Daniels, a prominent Nashvillian, Professor Harry Howe Ransom, and Professor Iames C. Thompson, both from the political science department, and ODK alumni who reside in the area attend meetings to discuss issues of concern. Paul Beach Tony Brannan George Busse Rob Connell john Dupree Allen Elster Chuck Fitzgerald Joe Ford Hank Catlin President Richard Cillerman Dwayne Hastings Bob Oliver Ed Spacapan Ben Walton Secretary-Treasurer Steve Winkler Raven Secret Senior Men,s Service Honorary LM Nlzirk Adenns Paul Bezlch licno Benson Tony Biminan George llussc Chip Golc Roll Connell Les Davis Allen lflster llulch Feher lfred Fisher Chuck Fitzgerald loc Ford cfi' llrosncs Bill Freed Russ Gallagher Hank Gatlin Torn Gill Bob Gillespie Glenn Hoskins Frank Iohnson Tate Rich Bob Schindler Dan Schmidt Kirk Smith Ed Spacapan Tim Sullivan Ben WValton Bill Zelenik 107 VUT The Vanderbilt University Theatre faced an interesting problem this year, in that it was forced to play in temporary quarters all season, the theatre building having been torn down last spring. Chapels, meeting rooms, and all other unlikely places became the "interim housing" of Vanderbilt's theatrically- minded students. Nevertheless, a full season was presented, with productions ranging from absurdist dramas viewed while sipping wine in an informal, coffeehouse atmosphere, to a production of "Twelfth Night," presented in the Divinity School Quadrangle and complete with juggling, orange wenches, and beautiful spring skies. Dramatic art is on the upswing at Vandy. In the past few years, Vanderbilt has produced a growing number of seriously theatrically-minded students, many of whom have made the decision to enter professional theatre. Vanderbilt drama majors are beginning to turn up in interesting place-in regional theatres and repertory companies such as Actors' Theatre of Louisville, in training schools such as Circle-in-the- Square in New York, in graduate schools such as Indiana University, and in television. This year's graduating class was one of the largest classes seen at Vanderbilt to become involved with the theatre. Its -lg members are going off in many different directions, ranging from law school and medical school, nursing goldsmithing and other so-called unormali' professions to those who will be taking the professional theatre plunge. The VUT is obviously a diverse group interest- wise-the only talent that we all share is the ability to work together in the often-harrassing and occasionally masochistic job of putting on a dramatic production composed almost entirely of full-time Vanderbilt students. The fact that most VUT-ers spend the majority of their four years at Vanderbilt working on shows indicates that these problems are not insurmountable and that we can even deal with it! Happily, the need to deal with improvised staging will disappear this summer. In the fall of 1976, Neely Auditorium, long under intensive renovation, will open With Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire." The careful designing and renovation of Neely has resulted in what is, even now at near- completion, one of the finest theatrical complexes in the South. A full theatrical season will be staged here in Neely, and new academic courses and dramatic training will be added to the curriculum-all part of a growing concem for the theatrical arts at Vanderbilt University. S 1 Y 2 'fa if .1L2 ' 5 X Q' 'ji -.Qf1,,, w. ' ,ng "Q:- , ' ', -L'x',.-Hi: iv Bk I , zgigaggtf' , A .,L..v-. QL , j 165 V' .xi Us f .J X , x aff 1.' ' "' "'Y 4 .- - v i 5 Y fi, F1 ,N li fi in ,, M IQ W t, B X ' f"'6 ' 419' :Tv- Af L,l,,, X-L f ' 111'- r A 7 if .' f 1 ' v ' f .114 'fl V ft 2 :qw ,Q Y r F .1 ,.'f 1 I v . ,.v. . ff Q! 1 . . . ff jf' .'NLf-. 4 yt .l VUT BOARD, 1975-1976: Prcsident!Frunk Pallottu Scausonal Production Managcrfjohr Business Munagerfflathy Blue Pulmlicityflvlonroe CI. Frank Sccrctary!Ellcn Bablritt Member-at-large! Don McCormick Member-at-large!Randy Owen Russell Adams Mott Anderson Mac Bennett Many S. Burger jay Boyd Terry Burko David Bumside Beth Callaway Craig Chambers Carol Christensen Dutclx Cluttou Karen Carr lay Cook Mary Dare Sharon Ford Kerry Graham Brenda Harris Sally Hubbard Laura Jansen Mark Katterson Victoria Lamb Lissa LeCrand Talia Liebemian john Lucey Adair Martin Ron Mayers Kirk Reeves Rusty Saunders jim Schaub jill Seltzer Pam Showalter jeff Shocklin Lindsey Smith Bethany Smith Lori Stein Ellen Taylor john Turnley jilda Unmh Lee Monroe Kristy Van Hoose Harry Murphy Stewart West Rupert Palmer Meuy Ann Wetterer Mary Pashley Kathy Wetherbee Sally Philbin Hzmk VVhetstone Teresa Pohlmau Terry VVhite Judy Porch Elizabeth Wideman Sarah Raup Harvey Wilson Karin Redding Mitchell Williams 25455 f i '11fZ.'r5L, 'pifffif ' A A r " f',:',T , : wx f,-.1 '9.Q.,:i' ' 5-'gg I t r-ggrl? , ll l T l v Philemon Twelfth Night Philemon The Show Off H2 Cecil jones! Director -5 IQ. '74 .-J Religion Many analysts have noted a change in the social and political value systems of college students from the turbulence of the sixties to the inner-directed calm of the seventies. Although this change has generally been expressed in a shift to political conservatism and more traditional career orientations, it has also been manifested by a change in the meaning of the term "religion" Because it is the description of the profound concerns of persons, "religion" is a word which must be continually redefined. We search ourselves for our utmost concern and rightly label that concern as religious. At the present time on the Vanderbilt campus there is a distinct change occurring in what can be called nreligiousf' For students in the latter part of the sixties, religious matters included a great emphasis upon concern for those who were "despised and rejected by men,', namely minorities of all sorts-ethnic, racial, economic, sexual and so on. This concern was fostered by a deep, pervading need to see God's justice brought to the coastlands and frontiers of the systems which engender American culture. The student in the mid-seventies, however, considers "religion,' to be descriptive of an internal condition. Religious values at this moment emphasize God's love for each person, rather than the acualization of God's justice in society. They focus now upon each person's need to feel that he exists both for a purpose and with a pLu'pose. This redefinition of religious values is manifested in individual belief in many ways. Some students tend to emphasize their having been part of Cod's saving activity. Others tend to respond to Godis personal freeing character, as with the pentecostal movement. Still others prefer to view Godis revelation within the context of loving situations themselves. The common denominator of these perspectives forms the redefinition of "religion" for the seventies: it is something that involves one personally with God. There are two important points to be made about this change. First, the fact of change itself must be recognized and understood, along with its implications. Secondly, the fact of change in religious 114 I .x th Q Q l - cw . - Q' ,ulx-.wifi .:,1253Ei,q, 1? .5 ' A f .1 .1 M -g: .-..-.3 gt, :gfggzzl . M , fx . - .Ear . . , 2. , v- 2 if- -. , . 9 . 3 et? ' .. .' sg-1.-is 1- 4322... tem .fs ff-.1-it Aura, -.M if 4-. .- .... 1+ ...m'f....--as... --fr ' . -. ' ' "' '2'1Q:, .1511 .. ., za.-,fs-' "gt" rr ' :amy '11'?'- . P-125315 V V ...fillwt 1. ,. 2 effili Vi-. ., V. e' .- . 1... gsm... -we - . 9 5 f 'fg1"'?y.'I.--L:'f:' v':f'1: Yi ., .. . ??Q.l1...'fi.!'F22-fa' ,ff .f....Qi 3? F95 'iii-Fla at i f . ig - .9-. . Q: 3 5 . . 3: 1 .- A QQ.-. N fs' if A I 4... . gi 3 bgi Ixvrfffg---, 4 if? ' r - 4' ,--'11 ps !v,,.,1-gm 1 jf' . , N' COUIB values over the past decade or so does not imply that the values of the sixties were a uwrongv interpretation, or even in any real conflict with the emphasis of the seventies upon the personal experience. Recognizing the fact of change in religious values across time involves separating the concept of a universal truth independent of experience, a universal concept itself when viewed in terms of mankind's continual search for its content, from the notion of content itself. Men have always searched for God in and beyond themselves. That search is the common experience, the universal. They have never reached a common result in that search. In noting and analyzing this change in student belief, then, we are dealing with a change in content, not an alteration in the fact of the search. One could speculate ad infinitum about the causes for this change in content. The failure of many attempts to bring God's justice to society through political means during the sixties, coupled with the increasing alienation of the individual in the face of modern technological life may be explanations of a sort. However, the important point in the distinction between the search and the result is that the result is transient, unlike the transcendent search, and responds to the pressures and currents of experience continually. The Vanderbilt environment as it affects the prior belief of students who enter can be for some a great challenge to religious values, and for some a great . I K'-. ' '14, . F . gt-fl: .4115- reinforcement. The isolation of the undergraduate campus community and the influence of the diversity of background and belief of one's campus peer group makes the Vanderbilt experience potentially very important in structuring one's decisions about the content of religious values. It is important in what it challenges to prior beliefs, and also in what it fails to challenge. In this brief discussion, we have thus far treated the search for God, the universal in our dichotomy, as an ideal, a search for God in a pure form as perfect truth beyond experience. God, however, can be and is used as a rationalizing force for human action and choices based on something other than the pure search. This is the inevitable consequence of the inability of hmnanity to place content beyond experience. It cannot be completely avoided, but it can be minimized through a continual recognition that as we unendingly redefine religion, we do it in a comfortable way, a way that meets our own most profound concerns, satisfies our desires and solves our problems. To be rather conclusionary, if not a little sermonistic, God is simply bigger than all that each of us experience-although we continually try to place Cod within such personal confines. Cod is end, not means, and distortion occurs when men and women use God and religion as rubrics to make absolutes out of experience. By this reasoning the second major point arises. Because we now emphasize the personal experience 115 with God, it does not mean that the search for Cod in social justice was a wrong direction, or that God is not to be found in social concern. Neither would it have been correct in the time of great religious emphasis upon social justice to have said that a search for a personal relationship with God would be a wrong search. The two are not incompatible. They are simply two versions of the universal search in response to differing perceptions of need, and God is surely present in both. The positive aspects of the redefinition of religious values of the seventies are obvious: the deep yearning for personal involvement and personal commitment to a God who is the source of purpose as well as the magnet drawing men to recognition of that purpose. The negative aspect appears when the personal Search becomes exclusionary of concern for the differing needs and processes of search being carried on by others. A personal understanding of "religion" is destructive to others, surely not a Godly thing, when it is founded in a "God-acted-for-mei' attitude rather than a 4'God acted for us so that we would love and understand that, and replicate it in our actions toward each otheri' view. The reconciliation of the religious search on the Vanderbilt campus as the personal search with the need and concern for Godis justice among all men may come from an understanding of God's being in all these concerns, and from considering that it may not be so important that we all find the same answer, and that if we did it would violate our own experiences and might not be right in any meaningful sense for any of us. VVhat is important, and terribly so, is that we recognize the distinction between the universal Search and the individual answer, use the awareness of the experiential basis of the individual answer to avoid putting God in our own little cubbyhole and using God for our desires, and finally, continue the search always. The answer for each of us disappears when We stop asking the question. Open House Welcome back get together Sunday Jan. 11 7:30 PM First time students to the center especially invited CALENDAR -SPRING SEMESTER 1976 REGULAR ACTIVITIES BEGIN THE 1ST WEEK OF CLASSES- JAN. 12 Mon Discussion group -"Spread the Word" lpersonol Ev , - anl Tues Dorm Devollonats Wed, Devotional Br Supper. Cost- 5100 Thurs Evrdences-"Inspirational lk Aurrronot Ina Buble" Fri Devotional 6 00 - Recreation nlgtrl SPECIAL ACTIVIIIES IWEEKENDSI JANUARY 11 Sun. Welcome Back Party al 7 30 - Open House to all interested 16-18 Fri,-Sun, Retreat planned with Auslrn Pt-cy 1512- I ci l mea s an o l tncludedl 24 Sal., Breaklasl ISweetroIIs and Cofleel Work Dov .31 Sat, Alter Game - Movie Night FEBRUARY 7 Sat, Ice Skating Partv tCosl to bo announced! 13 Fu . Valentina Party at 7:30- Dlnnar and Entertainment 21 Sal , Alter Game- Gel logelher 81 Devatronot FEB 29 THRU MARCH 7- ACYIVIIIES CANCELLED FOR SPRING BREAK MARCH 6 lk 7 Sat, Br Sun., Work days lor Seminar 13 Sol . Seminar rn Etrucs -"the Cruclal Issues" lPloce on Campus to be announcecil 27 Sal, Picnic 81. Klle Flying at Happy Hills Boys' Ranch APRIL 0-11 Fri.-Sun., Retreat - Themetlhe Blood or Cl-mst" tPlace d C l l b an os o e cnnouncedl 23 Frl.. Spring Banquet KMANN Awards presentedl 211 Bn 25 Sal. Bt Sun.. Leclureship at Tenn, tech Ivan leaves C,S.C. at 5,00 a.m.l MAY G Sat.. Htgn School Dcy 1 Sat. Cook Out al Edwin Warner Park Thing Winter Friday-Su Place: Brandon Sp Theme: "Whatever lMott. 25:31 Ethics S The Crucial Dale: Satul Time: 10 AM Place: Fu Vanderbilt m The Outdoor Education Program was established in May, 1975. The idea was conceived in the fall, 1974 when Kimball McKee interested Robert Warren in creating a Wildemess Skills Course on the example of the Outward Bound Schools, which McKee had attended several summers before. Half a year and miles of bureaucratic red tape later, McKee's projected budget of S3500 had been secured from then-University Provost Hobbs, and the program was underway. The Wildemess Skills Course is designed to integrate study in the academic disciplines of geology, biology, Zoology, chemistry, psychology, humanities, and social sciences with interpretation of and physical experience in the natural world. The course utilizes both the classroom and the natural environment by combining lectures, films, and discussions with field trips into the southem Appalachian -mountains. The lectures are presented by members of the Vanderbilt faculty and personnel from such agencies as the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Sieera Club, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. They cover topics such as: basic first aid, weather and climate, hydrology, caving, TVA, basic survival skill, geology of the southern Appalachians, and endangered species. The field trips are conducted under the supervision of faculty and student instructors, and are primarily designed to teach students the basic techniques of backpacking, white water canoing, caving, and rock climbing. Moreover, students are taught the proper methods of coexistence with the environment without harmfully altering it. Field trips this year included trips to Virgin Falls, Savage Gulf! Stone Door, Lost Creek Cave, and the Hiwassee and Nantahal Rivers. 3 B Fmt?" ., 2, G55 , up, . ' frm. 'bm W diy - -'M . .- ffbGi'? Rf".-' .L.. '-M 2 ,3' 'x ,y 942-1, . T- ' - mx I 1: v' , M. 5.2- 1 H- 5 Q' 'L 'LQ ' 12 'jL,,1,:1f..m!M 4- J 1 I Xl Y ' I --fsx.,,"A3,f.'g'g'xx',, L-, 5 ", ' . . ,. JIJWS-, .4 x "-Q 6y7qfqfv,...,-- 4 -cf' ,' X -3' . -fx! , , . . I- 5, u-.4..p-,5-5 -1. ,',,, 'f 1 N, ,,.g-,741 I A, ,, -L ,'., if I . ' ,fy . I , '-.1slwq.-,w5et- X' , . 'J " ,Nil - 4 A mem 1 ,sz+f,w e4-,,9:f-- ,QQ v--5 1 , . f. , 'Q Eg 'kqyff f2,.,jl5. "",. '55,-V' Q, Hg I Q. .. '- ulklu In-E - .1-hi. N-M :Kip 9 . Y 4 ' , QI' x-. " M L A-5, r 4,1 . Y UTQ' A QA' -1-"lvl, 9 I? "1 W .11 Tta V' 'Q' v --.,, ,v .f XZ, X. . f 1-'fqfL . 'ff-Qu:-wry' - A 3. - x"',. W X'-30' 'fig A f., , . la 'I --ivy H 'fi' 13629: . 1 "NL av! .f 'Q ' af 1Q?vk - us' '- I . 1. . PY '-ff-' 'ms Q.,- -.'-14.. ' ll A- '..-' X 53 ir if Centennial Service f"Ode to Vanderbilt", or "Oh, VVhat's the Matteriwj . . . New choir constitution QWe're no longer the Vanderbilt Menis Glee Clubj . . . Percy Warner picnic CWhere are your keys, Dale?j . . . Fall Concert C'iFreuet Euch", make a 'u' and say an 'e', "Let their Celestial Concerts All Unite", Oklahoma medleyl . . . Halloween Party fLaurel and Hardy, American Eagle, Morton's Salt girl, Artie Choke, the Worms, . . . Pancake Supper . . . Christmas Concert Q"R-R-R-Resonet in Laudibusn all together now, "For unto us a Child is Bornnj . . . Valentine's Day Party QSweethearts: Gilbert and Lisaj . . . Spring Tour for "My Kind of town 'Florida' is", . . . Unveiling of the Choir jackets . . . Try Kurt's punch for a good nightis sleep . . . Abigail and LeRiche keep on dancing . . . "Who is that speaking?", The Voice of Choir Tour, 1976 . . . Charleston Tour for "How to wedge a bus between your favorite historical buildingsnj . . . jacksonville fAndrew Sisters and Flatfoot F ourj . . . St. Augustine fDale,s party? . . . Cypress Gardens for, "It could have hailed all nightnj . . . "Save our Lakesv . . . Orlando QScoop: Gilbert and Minnie.MouseQ . . . More national acclaim: Mickey Mouse Certificate of Appreciation fanother victory for the Choir jocks? . . . Styles change, butterfly shorts to red feet-pajamas . . . Kirk Reeves, "Why are you in bed-Let's PARTY!" . . . Back to Nashpit and . . . Plasma Bowl . . . Gamma Globulin for everybody! . . . Welcome to VU, Columbia Choir, we've all been quarantined . . . Recording Session Q"Randy, take off your Shoesvj . . . Parents' Weekend QWhere's Bob'?j . . . Spring Concert QBach motet, "Send in the Clowns", reading your ' music off of someone's cowlickj . . . Dean Boutwell's party CCongrats to new officersl . . . Hartsville Party . . . Rand terrace Melrose House fWe'll miss you, F redj . . . "Happy Trails" to Seniors-. . . The Vanderbilt University Concert Choir dedicates these pages to Fred E. Ford who after six years as our director has resi ned to continue Work on his doctoral . dissertation. Diging the years under Mr. Ford's The Cheer direction, the Vanderbilt Concert Choir has grown to be a prominent part of the Nashville music Mi-he, Mi-hi, Mi-he Mi-hi Mi-710, community. Mr. Ford is responsible for the formation A f00m-SfiCk, A IJTOOTI1-SfiCk, of the Vanderbilt Chamber Singers, created in 19704 A-nick-nack-padclywack, this group of 18 singers performs at numerous events in A-Solfat merging, the Nashville area throughout the school year. Mr. Hobble-gobble rick-a-racka, Ford's excellent tast in musical literature has provided Hgbble-ggbblg firggragker, the Vanderbilt community with many hours of Hobble-gobble yazzoo enrichment as well as giving the choir members a FRED blow your cazzoo, broad musical background. We look forward to many SL9, Boom, Bah, successful years ahead thanks to Mr. F ord's Vanderbilt Concert Choir, contributions, and wish him the best in the future. Rah! Rah! Rah! Afro American Association Vanderbilt Afro-American Association Membership in the Afro-American Association is open to any Vanderbilt undergraduate interested in the projects and concems of the organization. A majority of black students are active in one or more of the many social, academic and cultural functions of the Association. Some of the Associationis major projects are: Black Academic Performance Program, a tutorial program Black Arts Festival, an annual campus-wide event that lasts several days and features Afro-American music, art, theatrical performances. RAP magazine, a literary magazine. Black Pre-Med Society Freshman Committee, a program that aids in helping freshmen make the transition from high school to college life. Officers for 1975-76 are: President! Teresa E. Snorton Vice President! Bonnie A. jackson Secretary! Yolanda Williams Treasurer! Sherman Wilson Advisor! Dean Paulette Thompson 1'-Q.-.5 ki-..DQQvgg0. -,ruief O Q Q if Ci - 6' N' 1' U9 T . - V. .V e. we. ew ' .. C .. C .- J 1 -1 , ,,4. J .5 Q . 6 ' SN x 'Wir of' s 0 01 fi our 'XX I , ' k fp ' Qi BLACK Anrs Fes1'lvALPnoenAM ?j.jl K U 1 1 . .sf - 99. ' Merch21-29,1976 e ' f . X -r L "A DREAM oereaneou ya LC' SUNDAY, Maven 21 ' . " 1 , X .- K x Worship service. 7:30 p.n1. Benton Chapel. , ' I Q " Q. ff Fnmsnadaws.1:3ua.a:o2p.m.sarrancane-m. L.. U Q O Y 1' f .1 Q 'lx 'I:lrrTl?9:1xaYrkanvt::nTI::g819:02 p.m. Sarrett Cinema. Wx , I lp U 49 . " TUESDAY,March 23 -Tek, KJ? 7 , Films. Cry, tha Beloved Country and Paul Laurence Dunbar: ' Q 1- 'I 'fro' n 1219, 0' W .fjaj xl ,JE I ref .jf lei' ' :CCW gc. ! f America? First Black Poet. 7:30 Bn 9:25 p.n1. Sarratt Cinema. J ' Lecture. Gannaine Greer, wrlter and educator. 7:30 p.m. . " -ic. Memorial Gymnasium. -' r , J? WEDNESDAY, March 24 - l T "Echoes oi a Dream." Boggs Academy Pantheramics. 8 p.m. .- I Carmichael West, iDif1aren! Drummerl. 9 K THURSDAY, March 25 ' LJ 5 Lecture. Oscar M. Henry, professor of music, Eastern Michigan Q " If sem unzv. 4-6 pm. 118 samm. l K 5 Concert. Alben King. 8 p.m. Sarratt Cinema. K V Q ' 1 .x, ' FRIDAY, March 26 V . Q ,V 3 Art exhibit. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Rand Terrace and Courtyard. , , Black Greek Exposition. 3:30 p.m. Band Terrace. ' DV Talent Show. "One More Step." 8 p.m. Underwood Auditorium. I SATURDAY, Merch 27 A Art exhibit. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Rand Tarraea and Courtyard. 1 tix Nightclub. "Evening in Black." 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Divinity Fleiectory. R N41 Q Q SUNDAY,March ze 4 Q. Cr- J ' 3 Pot luck dinner. 1-4 p.m. Afro House lResidenoe4l. N Q 1 f rx . A MONDAY,March 29 A ' Q' H PM X Lecture. Colston R. Westbrook, Iinguist.8p.m.114 Furman. T 1 . - XT Q30 A -.N be ii . .I if .A .Je ina ffifr' YT! f . 3 1 ' 'E 'ryj' 'th MRL ,J fill IO x F V .U as tl, ',, 'mx' . V ,X I Jdfzll. 1 ' .FIA ,, 'G' fr . W 'I23 l I .Fa PresidentfTony Brannan Vice President!Bcn Walton Recording See! Charles Miller Correspondj Susanne Fisher Ross Allen Bruce Berger Frances Black Betsy Cooper Lee David Paula Dean Bill DeLoachc james Early I-Iauvey Ford Ginger Freedman Mark Freeman lane Celzer Mike Gemhardt jan Getty Will Goodwyn Tom Crabeinan Laurie Littlejohn Bill Lucas Donnie Menendez Pat Moore Becca Norris Terry Northcutt Anne Pandl Bill Pease Pat Rogers Peny Welch Peter Groetzinger Andy Gustafson Barb Hall Greg Bebrank Ellen Hoge Ed Hurley Chip lngraham Walter jarrett Frank johnson Davis Kuykendall Honor Council The Vanderbilt Honor System was founded in 1875 on the idea that each student's personal integrity is sufficient assurance that in academic matters he does his own work without unauthorized aid from any source. The Honor Council is a representative body of 40 students elected from the three undergraduate schools of Vanderbilt, it serves as the judicial organ of the Honor System. The Honor Council aims to secure justice for any student under suspicion of academic dishonesty, to vindicate his name if innocent, and, if guilty, to protect the honor and standing of the remaining students by determining a penalty as set forth in the bylaws. In addition to conducting investigations and hearings, the Honor Council expends much time, energy, and care to increase and maintain respect for the Honor System by making the system more visible to the students and faculty. For example, every year the Honor Council publishes a section in the Student Handbook which contains a written code, a section on the preparation of papers, a complete explanation of plagiarism, a description of the policies and procedures of the Honor Council, and a copy of the Honor Council's Constitutions. Explanatory letters and pamphlets accompany the Student Handbook to provide additional information. Council members make an extra effort to reach new students by leading informative orientation sessions during the first week of school. The Honor Council has also recently instituted a program of Honor Council Advisors. The major function of an advisor is to provide information of students involved in an investigation and a hearing. Another recent improvement has been made, in this case in the hearing procedure. An accused student is now permitted to be present in the hearing room during the presentation of all testimony. This gives the accused student the opportunity and advantage of hearing the charges and evidence firsthand just as the Council hears it. It is interesting to note that this new policy has not resulted in a decline in the number of violations turned in for a hearing. The Honor System continues to stand steadfastly as the foundation of the atmosphere of trust which pervades Vanderbilt's academic environment. The support and cooperation of the entire student body is necessary for the Honor System to continue to work effectively. Students may feel that this is a difficult task, but without this degree of dedication and support, the Honor System will decay, taking with it the pride and respect that the Vanderbilt community deserves. Vobiscum Paul Bailey Iohn Bell Alice Bryan Karen Carrington Lynn Cates Woody Eddins Susie Hough Beth Kennebeck Linda Lewis Rekha Mohan jan Overcash Ieanna Peeler Stacy Reckewig David Stebbins Mark Styles Teresa Suzanne Vobiscum is a co-ed organization open, with no restrictions, to any and all members of the University community. The group has three major goals: having a good time, helping out in the Nashville community, and using the academic resources at Vanderbilt to learn something outside the classroom. Equal emphasis has been placed on these social, service, and scholastic activities this past yearg activities in all three areas proved satisfying and educationally fruitful to members. Highlights of this first year's activities included social events such as folk and jazz concerts, numerous sports events for male and female members alike, service projects such as Food Day and cartoon shows and picnics for Nashville children, and academic activities centering ,around informal discussions with important or intriguing faculty figures. For a first year, or, as a matter of fact, for any year, Vobiscum was a success. Skeet, Hunt, and Fish Young Democrats The Young Democrats changed their focus this year from the state and local political orientation of previous years to a more national scope. Several meetings early in the year tumed into in-depth discussions of the Democratic presidential candidates. Later meetings featured speakers such as Congressman Clifford Allen, "jimmy Carter for President" spokesman Iohn Summers, and State Representative Steve Cobb. President! Dave Blum Vice President! Mike Pfifer Treasurer! Bill Perry Pat Lucas Paula Codsey Tom Moore john Stukey Kevin Barton Iohn Dana Eric Schaeffer Lynne Walling Stewart Stallings Keith Bergman Kim Shafer Kevin Key Buddy Winter Debbie Bradstetter 1 A avi'-H The main purposes of the College Republicans are to spread the ideals and philosophy of the Republican Party, help elect Republicans at all levels of government, and generate enthusiasm among students concerning the political process in general. Information tables and speakers are our main concentration. Speakers this year have included Bob Olsen, Republican candidate for Congress, Dortch Oldham, Chairman of the State Republican Party, Dave jones, Executive Director of the State Republican Party, Gene Cantrell, Public Relations Director of the State Republican Party, and Rex Ienkins, Chairman of the Davidson County Republican Party. In the fall the College Republicans worked very hard in the Fifth District Congressional Campaign. Executive Board President!Scott Reed Vice President! Tom Aman Secretary! Dave Bnfkin Treasurer! James F usher Finance! Susan Swann Media Relations! Bob Beard Membership!Robert Proctor Newsletter Editor! jack Herrmann Program! Peter Oldham, Roger Ream Publicity! Maurice Marks Rules! Brad Taylor Our efforts in the spring primarily concerned the Presidential race and Senator Bill Brock's re-election campaign. Although We could not officially support either one of the Presidential candidates, members of the club Worked individually for both candidates. Several leadership workshops and conventions were held. A number of special receptions and luncheons were also attended, in which those present were able to hear such people as President Ford, Vice President Rockefeller, and Senator Brock. A mock convention, Where the platforms of both Ford and Reagan were presented and discussed, was held in the spring before the primaries began. It is sometimes hard to find a tangible Way of measuring the success of an organization, but we feel that we have been successful in our efforts, as the College Republicans are now the largest political organization on campus. Y I ollege Republicans The Sarratt Arts Committee seeks to educate the Vanderbilt and Nashville community in the visual arts through exhibits in the Sarratt main gallery, films, lectures, small exhibits and displays, and demonstrations. iiff-lhmwnl NASHVILLE Views rJ I9ll1 Ccnlmy flrclzirecmnf UQ 'JLQFIEA painting! lrawin exhilitilu I Warm: E-'Iif' Q pi-A sept I4 - nut llllllaiu jnhhyul sanatt student . centerfvalderhilt IIIIVEISIIIIIWIDIHQ sun.- sept I IZ-Epmllsnnsure hy sanan ms cmmittee Sdflklfl Main Lobby October 12- November l'l1ntugnapl1y by Jimmy Onsmn Slxmsmrd by: Sarmlt Arts Commitll Fine- Arts Dcpartme Cvnlvnninl fellows Xim.l.:lvl1 ximu: ,tm r'...-mill. .v lml-th-.lu Ily-im...-nr I-I---in Annr Wort! glass designer Wllll Anderssons mclsterglass blower fm l X I wr, M , x 1 . , .,, , ' - .. .Q 'f , I, . K 'F H sf fu 7. in J:-I.f.'-.:,,T , ' i lurilurnz r...ir.liw..'x,.n10 mm-nu sr I in nslmlinnsz glass blowing win...-u 1 I I I I glzussntczlliiig umm: I 1 I lv EXHIBIT SCHEDULE 75-76 September 14-October 10 September 1 9 October 11-November 5 November V9-30 january 29-February 28 March 8-April 2 April 5-May 2 April 5-10 April 29 Brett Depalma, paintings and drawings, "Off-the-Wall Personificationn Hallmark Cards Exhibit "Nashville Skyline," exhibit of photographs by jimmy Onstott "Chickenscratch Showf' Acorn Exhibits, co-sponsored by Tennessee Artists and Craftsmen Association Photographs by Walter Chappell, Visual Studies Workshop, N.Y. "Celebration of Intemational Women's Year" V.U. Women's Art Exhibit Photographs by Clark Thomas Lecture! demonstration by Ann Warf, Swedish glass designer Lecture! demonstration by Toshiko Takaezu Intemational potter, Brandeis Univ. Sarratt Arts Committee l PiioTbGRAPHs It 'Vxlll Kiill '- APRIL 5-30 131 Disrnas Original Cast The Original Cast is a new and very different singing group at Vanderbilt. It is made up of sixteen students who select, direct, and choreograph the songs themselves. They meet twice a week to put together a revue of Broadway show tunes which they perform in the spring semester. This year has been quite challenging for the Original Cast. They have learned how to work together, how to produce a theatrical sound, and how to overcome the obstacles that any beginning group faces. The rewards of this effort have been impressive. Besides producing a successful show, they have had several offers to perform around Nashville. Their plans for next year include a three-week tour of Europe and several other performances in the Southeast. They plan to enlarge the group size and increase the number of performances next year. The most exciting thing about the Original Cast is its future. As one cast member put it, "When you start from the bottom, there's only one way to go-upli' Qlfi illlgi Vanderbilt Poetry Review Student Health Coalition Periperty Vanderbilt Poetry Review VOLUME ll. FALLIWINTER. 1975 NUMBER I Edirol? JIM CLARK ' Hlitolial Assixlan ls: KURT BENZ ALLEN BOYER DAVID CH EATHAM ELEANOR COBB MILES DEAN BRUCE HACKETT STELL SIMONTON The Vamlerbilf Partly Review . Published Twice Yearly: Box 5405, Station Il, Vandcrbill University, Nzuhvillc, Tennessee 57235 Subxcdplion Rates: S250 per year. Manuscripts cannol be retumcd unless xcuompunied by z lumped self-adducsed envelope. Qlfopyrighl l975 by Inme.sA.Clnrk . - Ngeff C- N 'm-,,ij1'S.a'fj 42, ,, 4 . , 1 1 --at Km. 4, 1 17 'fix I 5,-' Q3 fr l33 Goof-off Sports There are plenty of people with a dribble or two of sporting blood who are just a little too busy, or too lazy, to join a sports team, so, they , make up sports of their own. It's a shortcut through endless hours of practice to that tingling rush of victory in competition. Frisbee, moonball, and the rest are mental and physical relaxation from the World of Milton and molecules. No Actcard hassles, no expenses- just a pair of cut-offs and the simple tools of the trade. he f, I A I l l 'QUQYI Y 134 J n if fue A 4 U -sz L., H r 'cv K Jr' Q ,- 'a ' . -' 'e 1 1 s x. .,-K ' 351-55 12? I . N V ,. ,, N. . , ...nblf xv' v V fy : -s",.x.V. -1 - 1:f5.1', ky , C 32.3 73, 'kj 'Q F'7K"'f?F?'L ' . 'wyyf li! . .i , ,.-, -v N . '-1 N ,- Q. rl , .,. 31 7' f I T - - ...- - 4 f 7-1 59' , ,.,4 2.4 Vanderbilt Sports 1 , .-.Tim 1- 43' 5 Sr '--N. of --lv .- '-'S , .,.r f e ' . 4 than Kiclfem in the stomach! Knock,em in the head! 136 Kill,em, Kilfeml Dead! Dead! Dead! Band Football Cheer ' 4- 'w -6161! There is something for everyone at Vanderbilt, and for some people, that something is the gnashing of teeth and bashing of heads known as college football. Though it came late to old V.U., football is finally becoming big business, with talk of SEC gate percentages, a new stadium, and Vanderbilt's responsibility to entertain the Nashville community. There are other dramatic and entertaining team sports, but it is the gridiron group that gets the steaks, and the fancy wallpaper in Tower II. There is baseball too, tennis, golf, and basketball, along with sports less familiar to Nashville: lacrosse, rugby, and soccer. Their common ground is that they're fun both to watch and to play-a productive escape from the boredom and academic pressure we all must deal with. IVM A S as! ai l I3 7 -ki Football This year's football team had something to live up to, the charisma of the '74 squad. With the personable Steve Sloan at the helm, the '74 Commodores captured the imagination of the city of Nashville by sweeping to a 7-3-2 record and the first post-season bowl bid in 19 years. There was something to prove for the twenty-two seniors in this group-Burton, Fisher, Chesley, Galbierz, et al. Nashville was expecting a good season, even with the departure of Sloan. Everyone thought that the football program had turned around, that this might be "The Year of the Commodore." It would be up to these seniors to complete the last span in the bridge between pessimism in a marginal program to revitalization in the forward-moving program Vandy football has become. Every bridge needs support, and the support for this one would be the broad backs of the offensive linemen. Not big by any standards, averaging just 225 potmds per man, this group of blockers matured as the season went along and became an instrumental part of Vandy's strong finish. By their steady improvement at what coach Fred Pancoast calls "one of the most difficult areas to playf, offensive line players such as Matt Cossage, David Harber, Tom Ballman, Frank Smith, and Bill Holby provided a point of stability around which the rest of the team could improve. Although the offensive linemen lacked in size, the blockers for the Commodores made up for it by having outstanding patience, intelligence, and concentration. These mental attributes enabled them to overcome their physical handicaps and lack of experience to become one of the strong points of one of the most rapidly improving teams in the I38 South. As Pancoast commented, "They were the foundation of all the good things that happened to us in the latter part of the year." A bridge is useless without a continuous system of links or spans to hold the various parts together. The men that provided links for the Commodores this year were on the specialty teams. These units served as a means of unifying the entire squad by enabling players of all levels of experience to play together and learn from each other. Many exciting moments were provided for Commodore fans by Martin Cox, the fleet sophomore reserve split end who found a home returning kick-offs. Consistently listed among the top five returners in the SEC, Cox finished with a 24-yard average per runback. His 65-yard dash in the Alabama game helped set up what proved to be Vanderbilt's sole score that forlorn afternoon. A review of the 1975 specialty teams would not be complete without mentioning senior Mark Adams. The burly Adams, who also doubled as a linebacker, converted 11 out of 11 points after and connected on 12 of 19 field goal attempts. Although not attaining the all-SEC honors that he garnered as a junior, Adams was more valuable to the team this year. Four times field goals provided the margin of victory for the Commodores and twice, against Rice and Tulane, Adams' kicks were the'only score in Commodore wins. Barry Burton, all-American tight end and punter, was another who dominated the specialty games. His punts were at times as valuable to the offense as the hands of jesse Mathers, or the legs of Lonnie Sadler. Against Kentucky, Burton's 78-yard punt, longest in the entire conference during the year, turned the tide for the 'Dores and enabled them to beat the Wildcats for the first time since 1970. "The specialty teams serve as a link-up between all areas. By allowing both offensive and defensive players to play together, the specialty squads solidify the teamf' was Pancoast's evaluation of the contribution of this area to the entire Commodore picture in 1975. If the offensive line was the foundation upon which the Vanderbilt team was built, then the defense was certainly the pillar that held the entire structure up. Led by stalwarts such as jay Chesley, Kimmie under ten points four times and to just 14 on three other occasions. The sense of unity and the confidence of the players in each other was a big factor in the overall strength of this year,s defensive unit. Although neither very big, nor exceptionally strong, the Commodore defenders played so well together that they often overpowered bigger, faster opponents. Some names must be mentioned, however, and senior noseguard Tom Calbierz is as good a one to start with as any. The small f5'11',, 225 lb.j captain utilized his exceptional quickness to overpower Weaver, and Tom Galbierz, the defense made things blockers and often to seemingly arrive in the a lot easier for the offense by holding the opponents backfield at the same time as the ball. By forcing many opponents to double-team him, Calbierz allowed lineman teammates as Dennis Harrison and Mickey jacobs greater room to wreak havoc on the opponent's offense. Calbierz's consistent play resulted in all-SEC plaudits for the second consecutive year and anchored the defensive line, indeed the entire unit. The defensive backfield was perhaps the strongest individual group on the entire squad. jay Chesley, Ed Oaks, Steve Gurnette, and Reggie Calvin combined to lead the SEC in pass defense by giving up fewer yards per game than any other combination in the league. Chesley, a ferocious tackler and reckless ballhawk, was named to the first team all-SEC squad for the second consecutive year. Oaks led the conference in interceptions with seven and broke up several more pass attempts. Quarterbacks who tried to keep the ball away from Oaks and Chesley ran into Steve Curnutte. They 139 kept thinking that they could beat Curnutte with a long pass, but it wasn't done all year. Vanderbilt's "Black jack" defense could just as aptly be named the "No Name" defense. Aside from Calbierz and Chesley, the rest of the unit was not well-known. Few people realize that senior defensive end joe Reynolds made two crucial sacks of Tennessee quarterback Conridge Holliday, stopping a touchdown drive. Sophomore linebacker Kimmie Weaver made some truly outstanding plays throughout the year. Tim Riley, David Hale, Damon Regen, and Brenard Wilson were a few others among the many that made significant contributions. Pancoast was quick to remark about his defenders, "The unity, togetherness, and confidence in each other was their strength. No area stood out more than any other and that is what made them a good defense." No defense, however strong, can be an entire team. Every squad must have a sound offensive unit and that unit must include receivers. The 1975 Commodores were blessed with a variety of ends of various styles, speeds and sizes. Each was adapted to a specific role and each fit the role well. jesse Mathers probably had the best moves, Cox was probably a step faster, and Hal Kemp was the best blocker of the three. The stand-out receiver, though, was tight end Barry Burton. The all-American "tripel-threater" was a dangerous runner on his famed "end around reverse" play as well as a more than adequate receiver. Time after time, Burton's booming punts kept opponents trapped deep in their own territory. In many respects, the situation at running back mirrored that at the receiver spots. Including one real standout, the VU runners had several men who made key contributions to the season and always came through when they had to. Adolph Groves and Lonnie Sadler sparked the backfield from their tailbackspots and provided quick bursts of speed. David johnson and Paul Izlar powered the ball up the middle for tough yards and provided strong blocking support. Sadler, though, was the indispensable man. Without the senior captain, the Commodore offensive machinery ground to a sputtering halt. Hampered by an ankle injury that sidelined him for about half 1 l 140 of the Tennessee game, Sadler fell just short of the Vanderbilt record for yards rushed in one career. Pancoast summarized his offensive firepower this way: "We had a real good balance. When one wasn't playing well, the others took up the slack." Not enough can really be said about the coaching staff, led by Pancoast. When he realized in the middle of the year that the Veer offense Wasn't working, Pancoast had the guts to junk it and go with the Power I. He risked a lot, the chance that the players would not adjust to it and completely fall apart. The gamble paid off, however, and the Commodores closed the season with a rush, winning four straight. The rest of the staff deserves some mention, also. They were the mortar, the glue that held the Vanderbilt team together in this year of change. They kept the players together and in the right frame of mind. Indeed, the unknown factor in the turnaround might well have been the patience and the confidence that the coaches-Richard Trail, Frank Emanuel, Lynn Hughes, Gene Windham, Hubbard Alexander, Charley Whittemore, Bill Maskill, P.W. Underwood, and Ray Barnes-fostered z I l I behind the scenes. Reams of copy have been written about Fred Fisher. Reaction on the part of Dudley Field partisans to his play has ranged from boos to wild cheers. Without a doubt, the slim senior quarterback was the catalyst that put all the other factors in focus. Under his expert guidance, the Commodores came from behind to beat Virginia in the Homecoming game and streak to three more consecutive wins. It was the intangible known as leadership, even more than his statistics, that made Fisher so valuable. Not to belittle Fisher's replacements. David Culley and Mike Wright just had the misfortune to be thrust into the limelight against the strongest teams in the conference. It remains doubtful if even a healthy Fisher could have done much about the disasters that the games with Georgia and Florida became. The skill that Wright and Culley showed, coupled with experience, should give Vanderbilt two remarkable quarterbacks next year. Pancoast summed up his quarterback, the keystone to the year, by saying that "his clutch play and consistency during the latter part of the year gave our offense and defense a feeling that it could be done." The proof that, yes, it could be done, and the climax to the entire year, came November 29, 1975, in Knoxville, Tennessee. On that date, Barry Burton erased his personal stigma about never playing well against Tennessee, the ghost of Steve Sloan slipped mtfs ron 4-PE'-1. forever into the background, and Vanderbilt defeated the Vols, 17-14, to complete one of the most sudden turnarounds in SEC history. You've already read about Lonnie Sadler's gutty running that led to the first touchdown, about Ed Oaks' two interceptions, the second of which was the turning point of the game, about Dennis Harrisonis blocked field goal, about the inspired performance of the defense, and other plays that stopped Tennessee when they were deep in Vanderbilt territory late in the game. You've heard, no doubt, about Fisher's masterful direction of the team on a pressure touchdown drive and about Mark Adams' clutch field goal. Burton's punt from his own end zone with all the imaginable pressure from 72,000 hysterical fans, plus the images of the past, were upon his strong shoulders, will be a 142 R 'fi Vanderbilt legend. What then remains to be said? That win was probably the most significant Vanderbilt victory since before most of the players were born. For it is now, after these four straight victories, and especially that comeback triumph at Knoxville, that Vanderbilt football has more momentum than it has had in the last 25 years or more. The city of Nashville believes, the student body believes, the coaching staff believes, and, most important, the players themselves believe, that a football team from Vanderbilt can be competitive every time it goes out on the field. It is the 1975 squad that put the momentum into VU football. These players, led by the 22 seniors indeed formed a bridge between the pessimism of 1971, when Vanderbilt was the laughingstock of the league, to the optimism of today. Fisher was the keystone of that bridge but it took a complete team effort to complete the structure. The U.T. game was the last span in the bridge. As Pancoast put it at the time, "We might have things turned around." It remains to be seen whether the bridge will be used, whether Messrs. Culley, Weaver, Groves, and Co. can pick up the torch lit by these seniors and carry it into the upper level of college football competition. But undoubtedly they were started off in the right direction by this yearis squad, the unit that played in "The Year of Transition." in Sag - Sixx 'im-Q.. 14 Fred Fisher Speaks Out Commodore: Basically, trace the growth of the football program as you 'oe seen it, from your freshman year to your senior year. Fisher: Well, I guess you could say our freshman class, this year's seniors, we kinda got together there at the beginning. The program was just getting going, but it wasn't real strong at the time and our freshman year was sorta hard for everybody because as freshmen you don,t usually participate that much with the varsity. As you know, that was the first year they brought the rule about freshmen being eligible for varsity competition ack and a few of us did play. But I think our sophomore year was the turning point, as far as going out with the idea of thinking that you can win. Our sophomore year we thought we could beat certain teams and really compete with rest. We went 5-6 that year and in my junior year, we went out with the attitude to win. That went to a 7-3-2 record and of course this year it has built on. In other words, the program has changed from one of doubt to one of where we can compete, to one of where we can win. Commodore: You mentioned the change in attitude before your sophomore year, the time you thought you could win. How much of the change was due to Steve Sloan? Fisher: Well, Coach Sloan when he first came in was just trying to give everyone an equal chance. His main goal, I think, was to get the attitude that we could compete with such teams as Alabama and things like that. You could sorta sense that our purpose that year was to have a winning record, and to compete with other teams. This was something the Whole team kinda voted on, it wasn't just Coach Sloan saying this. The whole team voted on setting our goals and we did the same thing last year. Commodore: Can you think of a single game or personality that you could point to as a major turning point in itself? Fisher: Yes, I think one of the big turning points during my sophomore year was when we beat Georgia for Homecoming. We started off that year 1-2 and then we went up to Virginia. They were supposed to be really good that year, but we beat them real bad, something like 39-22. And then we came back the following week and upset Georgia and that gave us the confidence I think that we really needed as a team, and then we beat William and Mary. We were 4-2 at that point and finished 5- 6. I think that was a big turning point as far as our I44 mental attitude then. And then in my junior year, the turning point was when we almost beat Alabama and did beat Florida. Commodore: Who do you think has been the prime force behind the athletic program in its turnaround that has seen it being emphasized more than it has been? Fisher: I think it's a combination of a lot of things. I think one of the team players on our team, and a great team leader, who hasn't gotten a lot of credit, but deserves it, is Tom Galbierz. Everybody really huddles around Tom really well. I personally believe that it was little bit of everything, everybody just getting together and pulling for one another. You can trace it back all the way to the secretaries and the type of people they are. The head coaches, Sloan and Pancoast, and the Ways they have related to the team what it takes to win, were very important. I think our assistant coaches are doing an excellent job, too. I think it's the attitude of all the players. VVhen you start winning, the attitudes become better. Commodore: What effect do you think re- emphasizing the athletic program has on the University as a whole? Fisher: I think the people who really don't know the football team and program, who don't understand, are the ones who will think that if you do bring out the athletics more, it will bring down scholastic life and standards, which is not necessarily true. We have guys like Rich Dean and Greg Martin, who are 3.0 students, really bright guys. This is something else I'm proud about, the guys on the team do have to uphold the grades. Commodore: There was a feeling at school this fall, and especially in the paper, that spoke of the perspectives of the school being warped. Not so much of the school itsem I guess, but the athletic department. The feeling was that too much emphasis was put on the spectator sports and not enough on the sports where the participants are the real benefactors involved sports such as IMs and club sports. How do you feel about this? 4 JL 1 fxgrrf' lll Fisher: Well, the thing you have to look at in a thing like that is that college football is becoming a big business. The people who are paying for the tickets are the ones who are going to come out and see it. You could almost say that it is a profession. It is a miniature professional sport, because you're recruited. Guys aren't paid, of course, but I think that . . . you know what I'm saying? Youire going out to monopolize the best quality players for your school. I'm saying that there are some guys on IMs that could come out and play football with us, they're just overlooked because of their size or whatever. I think the people are paying for what they want. Do you see what I'm talking about? Commodore: Yes, but you said that the people in Nashville pay for the football team, in effect that the football team is for them. Do you think that is the way it should be as opposed to a football team that the students can identify with? Like now the students look at a football player and think, "Aw, jeez, all that guy ever does is lie around in the lobby. He never goes to class. " In a way, the football players are on a separate level from the rest of the students. Fisher: I think that is one of the stereotypes about the football team. There are a lot of really big guys on the football team and whenever anyone sees one they immediately think that he's a football player and that he's dumb. Which is not always the case. We have some really academic guys on the team. And I know what you're talking about, the sitting around. I enjoy that myself-looking at some pretty girls walking by. I think that the students, however, are almost pre-decided that football players feels that we're above everybody else on campus, that we're completely separate. Commodore: I quote from Versus that appeared in March, 1975: "The Vanderbilt Athletic Department is not playing games, it is a big time business operation. Be it football, basketball, or baseball, the Athletic Director is selling them just as Ford is selling Pintos, Lincolns, or Granadas. " VVhat do you have as a reaction to this? Fisher: You mean about the tickets? Commodore: No, about the fact that, as they say, the University, is providing entertainment for the University community. Fisher: Well, that's what you're out there for. I mean, you're out there to better yourself. I mean, I think you can learn a lot from football, learning how to take adversity. I know of very few college football players who have gone through college to have everything come up roses. As far as the athletic department entertaining the community goes, Well, H5 that's the job of the Athletic Director, to try to keep things running smoothly and on schedule. Itis a sort of public-relations job, and it's hard to do when you're losing. I believe that you do have to sell your program, that's your job. It's just like going out and selling insurance, you have to believe in your product. Commodore: Well, I think this was written in the context of after-game parking. I don 't know if you 've noticed it, but it is almost impossible for students to park on campus during games. That little street next to Scales dorm, for example, is closed off at 5:00 on the days of basketball games. The people of Nashville, through the strength of their money alone, and this is the situation that I ,ve run across, on the strength of the money that they contribute through the National Commodore Club or whatever, they can park right there next to the gym. Fisher: Well, the thing you have to realize is that these people do contribute a lot of money. I've run into the same problem, I have an F parking sticker and I tried to park there about an hour and a half before the game and a guy stopped me and told me that I could not park there. I don,t think it's from the Athletic Department, I think it's from Kirkland. I think that is where Vanderbilt University as a whole, not just the Athletic Department, gets most of their money, from the donations: They call it the Vanderbilt University Athletic Fund, I believe. It goes to Kirkland first, and, I'm not real sure about this, but I think that from there it can be designated for various departments. All sports get some of it, not just football. Commodore: I don 't know how familiar you are with this, but several weeks ago, the club sport coaches received a directive stating that they were no longer to play any games on the club sport field on the days of home football games. Here is a case of people outside the University being given preference over those inside it because the only reason those receiving the letter could figure for its purpose was the parking situation. Fisher: I didn't know anything about that. Last year, I thought it was pretty neat, having rugby or soccer play before we did. Commodore: Well, okay, I might say, "Fred Fisher, you're a good football player. I 'll give you Vanderbiltls tuition, room, board, books, the whole thing, all 85200 of it if you 'll come and play football 146 for us. M Fisher: In essence, that is what's being done. You can sit down and look at it like a job. I don't like to, but you can look at it as virtually an all year-round job. I'm out there working hard in the summer, trying to get in shape, in the spring, during the season, even pre-spring. We have about two weeks off, I guess. I've talked to quite a few people who've had the attitude that the football players are on a free ride, and Iive seen some go through what I thought were free rides. In a situation where you say "bought," I say "choice," You have a choice to go to 'Sr-31 - v 3' 'J ,gy ,,l - lfg I c.1.gg'g..r another school to play football or not. I know a lot of the players here, myself probably included, who would not be here if it weren't for the scholarship offered. In a way, it's almost financial need. I think the NCAA is working now on a sort of scholarship by need arrangement, where the athlete will pay as much of his load as he can. It's becoming more a true grant-in-aid than a true scholarship. I think that now everything will shape up as far as that goes. Commodore: Looking at it from the general aspect of the student, how much do you think he or she is confronted with athletics as opposed to the other aspects of school such as social life, academics, and so on? For example, the attitudes of students regarding attendance at baseball games as opposed to football or basketball games. Students generally feel that they have to attend football or basketball games. As far as football goes, I have found the attitude to be, "W'hat's the matter with you, you didn't go to the football gameP,' Have you gotten that impression? Fisher: Sometimes, when you have so many different types of people, some might not be drawn towards athletics, they might be more academically oriented. But I think that with such an emphasis upon X11 athletics, that more people will have the"'I Want to" rather than the "I have to" attitude. And also, winning is contagious. People will want to come out and support a team if it is winning more than if it is losing. Commodore: What do you feel to be the ideal balance, as far as money, emphasis, and general support goes, between the spectator sports and the participant-oriented sports such as rugby and lacrosse. In general, though I hate to stereotype, none of the sports in which the athletes themselves are the ones who get the biggest thrill out of the games are the club sports. Fisher: Right now, in the developing stages, you can't really support a team as much as you'd like to. I think that more of a balance will be brought about eventually. I know that it's going to be tough, especially from the point of view of the budget and the economy. You have to look at it from that standpoint. Football is starting to feel the crunch and the basketball program is starting to be cut back on as well. But from what I know right now, a whole lot of money hasn't been put into what you call "club sports." As it becomes more appealing to the people, theyill put more money into it besides what they have to. Like, you take state schools. A lot of them have state funds to help pay for things, and that's a big difference. If Vanderbilt had state funds, I think the club sports would get a lot more money. I think that's a big issue that should be brought out, that makes Vanderbilt different from all the other schools in the SEC when you start comparing them to everyone else. And that is another thing that I'm proud about, the fact that Vanderbilt is a private, high-level educational school and is still able to compete with these other schools. Like I said, I think the club sports will eventually have more attention brought to them. Commodore: There was a story in one issue of the Hustler last fall that raised the rhetorical question if it would not be better to have a football team where the "guy down the hall" played, the general student played, rather than a bunch of "segregated demi- idols?,' This probably stems from the fact that not many students seem to be able to identify with the athletes. No one really knows them, everybody knows you as "Fisher 5112" but no one would recognize you if they saw you walking down the street. It's gotten to the point where most students feel that you guys aren't really students. Fisher: I think some of that comes from the newspaper talk. They build you up, make you sound good. I think it may be a natural tendency of the student, after reading this, to think "he's too cool for me." I think that may have a lot to do with the feeling of separation, that broken-apart feeling.' There's another problem-we are scrutinized carefully. We eat in Branscomb, as opposed to other schools that have their own line in the athletic dorm. Commodore: Yet you guys do have your own line, behind the screen, and people see you guys back there just loading your plates up. Students tend to get a feeling that "those guys are different from us. I47 Theyire not real students." Fisher: Yeah, well, during the season it's done that way because we have to have a different type of diet, to keep our weight under control. Ilve seen people who are coming up and looking around and wondering, "It's our line too, why can't We have some?" For one thing, I think it may be more economical, cheaper for the football program to do it that way than for us to go through the line. It might be cheaper overall because we don't have that much of a selection compared to everyone else. I think that it all evens out in the long run as far as that goes. Like I said, the football team is being scrutinized, with a different line and all, but I think it works that way with anybody. Commodore: Do you feel that athletes as a whole are treated any differently from the other students? Fisher: VVhat do you mean, by the teachers, or just generally? Commodore: Well, any way. just generally. Fisher: Well, not really. Sometimes the teachers will watch you pretty close because they say that he is an athlete, but there are always two or three that are going to have it out for you and two or three who are going to help you. I think it evens out. Sure, we get benefits such as different tuitions and all that, but as far as being just helped through school, I think that welre not that much different from other people. The teacher might make a little allowance for the fact that youive been in the hospital knocked out or something. Commodore: Athletics at Vanderbilt is expanding, and there is more heard about football as well as the rest of the sports. Do you think athletics is expanding at a rate comparable to that of the whole university? Like, do you think that the Athletic Department as an integral part of the University is expanding faster, slower, or just how? Fisher: I think the whole University is expanding, like with the new Sarratt Center and other things that they are just adding on. The Athletic Department is progressing and it's progressing rapidly. But the rest of the University is, too, so I think it's pretty comparable. Commodore: So really could you say that in the last four years the Athletic Department has grown faster 148 than the University, but that the school has grown to catch up? Do you think that this trend will continue to the point where the athletic program is bigger than the University? Fisher: No, I don't think this will ever happen. Commodore: Well, like the example of the University of Alabama. Nobody ever thinks of the school, just the teams. Sports have become the University down there. Fisher: I don't think that Vanderbilt, being the school that it is, will ever let that happen because of the emphasis that is continually being placed on academics. Athletics will never overtake academics. It may come up to the same level, but I think Vanderbilt, being a private school, will control that. VVhat I want to say is that at that point the football program and scholastic program will go hand in hand. Commodore: What do you think about this thing that Tennessean sports editor john Bibb put in the paper the other day about the stadium? John Bib published in last Wednesdays paper that a new 55,000 seat football stadium for Vanderbilt is "a definite possibilityf, Senior Vice-Chancellor Rob Roy Purdy said that the report was premature but that the possibility ofa new stadiun was one of four at which a feasibility committee was looking. It has to do with the splitting of gate receipts at football games and has come down to the point where Vanderbilt cannot keep its 34,000 seat stadium. Tennessee just will not play down here every other year and split the money from 34,000 tickets. They,ll make us play in Knoxville every year and split the revenue from 78,000 tickets. Don't you think that the idea of building a 55,000 seat stadium at an estimated cost of 812 million is coming awfully close to what we were talking about earlier-the idea of expanding and doing things for the athletic department at the cost of the rest of the University? Fisher: I think a lot of times people misunderstand that the athletic department does not draw from the University. Commodore: 8117,000 from the Student Life Pool, and thus from the student tuition, goes to athletic scholarships. Fisher: Yeah, but when you consider how many students go to the University and how much it costs them, and you take that entire sum, the total you mentioned is a minute fraction indeed. That and you consider other benefits of the athletic program. For instance, the SEC basketball champions from a few years ago might have a bearing on how much money some of the alumni give. Commodore: Don 't most of them donate it to the athletic department though? Fisher: Well, I clon't know about that. Youid have to talk to Mr. Stewart, the executive director of the National Commodore Club. Commodore: I really believe they do. Fisher: Well, I'm afraid to say because they might get fired up and say that if athletics is doing it that well, then I want to see academics do that well, too. They could say, 'Tm going to send this to Chancellor Heard and Kirkland and let them handle it." So I think that really the burden of building a new stadium will fall on the athletic department and not on the University as a whole. Commodore: 55,000 seats is a lot of people, though, when you talk about filling the place. Do you honestly think that they could fill it? Fisher: I think that we're going in that direction. I like that stadium that we've got but I think that if you built a nice new one it might be more appealing to people who want to buy the tickets. The people themselves will think that they helped bring about this pretty stadium. Plus you could tie it in with the club sports if they got bigger. In the new type of University the stadium could be used at different times for different sports. So it could benefit the entire University if you look at it in that light. Commodore: Yes, but the parking situation is another problem. Currently, parking is so scarce that students cannot park on campus without paying a dollar. If you hike the number of seats in your stadium from 34,000 to 55,000, then it is going to be just a little bit worse. It is a small step, I believe, to add a stadium again once you've originally added to it, and the problems will just compound themselves each time you do so. Fisher: Well, I've heard mentioned in the future plans of the University a sort of high-rise parking lot that may be built on the other side of Natchez Trace on that land that the University has just bought. This would be near the stadium. I just don't think they're going to stick the students out in the cold. Commodore: So what do you see as the direction of Vanderbilt sports? Fisher: I see them as looking up. You canit have a championship team every year, you will have your up and down years. I see the pressure that the public puts upon the coaches to win as the most unfortunate thing. It is almost so much that the coaches have to worry about producing instead of teaching. I think that was one of the most important things about Pancoast and Sloan, the kind of teachers they were. It,s the coaches like this that are really important in college, for theyjre dealing with lives, not just football players. I think eventually this may keep getting stronger and stronger, and it's up to the community to support the coaches. Somebody is going to win and somebody is going to lose and we're gonna have to face that. What I'm saying is that I think things are looking up. We want to come back and watch things grow. I49 The 1976 Cheerleaders It is very difficult to describe what it has been like to be a Vanderbilt cheerleader. I don't think I can remember when I've worked so hard and enjoyed it so much. How do you explain it? I guess it is the people and the things we do together, as well as the opportunity to actually do something for the teams. Of course I won't say there weren't bad times-who could forget the cold, rainy Georgia game, the 95 degree weather at the Florida game, the long, long practices, and the times when "my body says no but my partner says yes"? But looking back on the year, the good times outweigh the bad, and by a long margin. It started with camp-how proud we were that we won blue Superior ribbons every day but the first and placed third overall in the camp. And then came the excitement of the first football game, the fun of the road games Qespecially Bourbon Street after the Tulane gamelj, and the big victories over Tennessee. Who would have ever thought that one day we would be building the high pyramids, doing advanced double stunts, and learning to work with or around an injured foot or arm? I feel like we worked hard this year and accomplished a lot. One of the reason s that we did is because everyone cared enough to work. Iim not saying that we did it alone though-the support of the fans, faculty, and alumni helped us get through the rough spots. And I guess that's a big part of cheerleading-pulling everything together for one reason: the promotion of Vanderbilt and the athletic program here. It's something that Iive enjoyed every minute of, and I know will remain a part of me. 150 X Rob Goldsmith Paul Moore Pat Moore Greg Googer Mike Goldberg Bob Welsh Cynthia Smith Bethany Smith Priscilla Smith Cindy Love Mimi Nimmo Susan Pressly "'5f'E""'1ff Q'-SA W :Lf W ES sm 14- ' D 3' , ,J I -- F, 3 .ll 'fi ', ' , i Iig. .. 1, H.. Eb.: 11. . .9 A' L 'il' ' p p t 'IL' .jf ' nl X' ' fq' w 9-Jywgiav ' ' In .19 'N Riu Q ,A X , -ll "' ' tzffxz f Q " ' , V I , ':. X 2 K - QE 'elf ' -. H ' , ' J 1, QA 'fri ,, , I 531. ' 'A ' fi . ,-' . Q -f" .gf 1,1151 ' '- ,. Q W- f J iff , , I I f ' I ' - . . A:. -pg' .4 ' X l :fa-'x,l::N:. 'N' is ' Q ' I K I . 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' .5 1 b .- r V N " - -wmv.---'few Q? ' ,:' 7-',-1: Q x, 1 N-x N.-'U pq.. F ,.,,., U.: fi 4 ..- ff' J I K, my .X .1 zu "dv" V' ' L . '-'f' Qt!-G' ' Q- 4 .-.f X. 35,45 fx 1. A. S '1-"K-' v " k 10-' J ' my h ' ."' K 1 , ui I ' "1 A N U 7 S 5 ' 'C x . V6 ,. n w L , in Nl , A O x O N. V K 'b L, """"'l V' I" - . , ."H 1 . v an '- Q -I Nw P1155 . ' , I 1- -' ' . Mu. K 3 -Ml' -- ' 1 'f Www. ' ' Ma. .. 3,.w 9"! ' . ' 'ir' ' V. '. .t, . K J-us, M Q' V. - -f ,, ..-. , I v -Q" . :iz ' QxL.'7Q'f' u "' gk D 'x ,' . ,Jw . 'fl 'A x N QE .4, 'A s , . t i K ' 7 4' '- xgs r Q! A H rw .A H . . . .. l , Y V I V .., .X y 44 . V ' Q., 1. 3 N . - . 5 K V If '.Q,, 'Q . 'X sx 61 Basketball s ,,, I Q,-.A , , 1 f 'Q iv , if 'Q N1 . S 3.1 2 , ' 3 5' ' . ,U - vw. . f' A, ,,f"' A . kxsjiifr Yi - ' 4 ' ... 1 ' - ' . . I xy Wm : I , W L " 'I QQ, N 'zi- ih 5 my -v ' P - . -, Q A . 1- y., X ,V . ,, 2 xx . R.. W .Q,:f,,x..4 4 in v R R x ' 5 ' ' ' f X P ,,,!'!:h 1 .' V! ' gg44,' g," 3-X, Q Q f .wismXQ Q 1 -e i, .V fp a An. ff. I . , z , 'na '- l r . P '3"'f"" 4, .V J' qusffb X '5 f V5 X 1 1' S Q lj-K-,. Qi i. B2-X o Vanderbilt's basketball Commodores, 1976 was a radoxical year. Pre-season picks to do nothing xciting in the conference race, the ,Dores set the ague on fire with a five game winning streak in anuary. After much talk about the possibility of a ree-way tie for first place in the conference, the ubble burst for Vanderbilt as they lost both games f their last road trip. Vanderbilt closed the season on a strange note, as head coach Roy Skinner ounced his resignation after sixteen years at the lllelllm, immediately after the final game of the eason. nconsistency was the Commodore trademark hroughout the first part of the season. Vanderbilt ould look excellent against a team such as Holy gross Cwhom it beat, 106-91j, and then turn around o look terrible the Way they did against UNC- Charlotte. Ianderbilt seemed to find the key to success when it npened its Southeastern Conference schedule. After etting trounced by Alabama, 83-66, the 'Dores won o overtime decisions and took an 11-point ecision from Tennessee. A one-point loss to entucky on national television was the last ommodore loss before embarking on a five-game ' ning streak. After taking both ends of a tough ad trip to Auburn and Florida, the Commodores ad a breathing space against Louisiana State niversity. This game was followed by the game 'th the Rebels of Ole Miss, that saw Dicky Keffer ve a game from the winless Rebs with a last- cond 35-foot heave. I: double-overtime win over Georgia and a loss to ennessee later, the 'Dores took a three-game home and, beating Kentucky, Auburn and Florida in a n-day stretch. 'he excitement ended for Vanderbilt, however, on e last road trip of the season. LSU stopped the ores 89-75 before Ole Miss broke into the win lplumn with an 81-72 trouncing of the hapless anderbiltians. 'he men in black and gold did not give up, owever, and won a close contest with Mississippi tate. The last game of the year, against Alabama, gas possibly the most courageous Commodore effort the season. The outmanned ,Dores fought their mkufi . It ? nf -- ft-1 --' f --1 - . 4-. -- J' .f""f D. , V, . 1 .4- 5-:A PN-. way into an overtime period before bowing to the toumament-bound Alabama. The announcement after the Alabama game of Skinneris resignation capped what can only be described as an unpredictable year for the basketball Commodores. Some things were no surprise, however, jeff Fosnes led the squad in scoring by ringing points up at a 17.9 points per game clip. F osnes was closely followed by his "F-Troop" runningmates, Butch Feher and joe Ford, both averaging over 15 points per contest. Feher paced the team in rebounds, corraling just over seven each time out. Citing pressure and personal health as reasons for his decision, Vanderbilt head basketball coach Roy Skinner announced his resignation on Monday, March 8. The news, which immediately followed Vanderbilt's last regular season game, an overtime loss to Alabama, came as a shock to the University community. "As fulfilling as this experience at Vanderbilt has been, it has not been without some serious detrimental side effects," Skinner remarked at the time. "The daily pressure of coaching on this level has had an adverse effect on my general health to the extent that I must now cautiously consider my future health welfare." Skinner had been head coach at Vanderbilt for 16 years. With an overall mark of 278-135 and a record in the Southeastem Conference of 172-97, Skinner ranks as the winningest coach in Vanderbilt history. During his tenure as Vanderbilt head coach, Skinner coached one All-American, nine first-team All-SEC, and three players who are currently playing professional basketball. Skinner joined the Vanderbilt staff of Bob Polk in 1957 as an assistant coach and freshman coach. In 1959, when Polk suffered a heart attack, Skinner took over the reins for a year. Three years later, when health forced Polk to resign, Skinner took over the head coaching duties full-time. Skinner, a firm believer in the importance of a good free throw and strong defense club, made the Commodores one of the perennial powers in the SEC. His teams always played smart basketball with an emphasis usually on a strong running game. Under the guidance of the Kentucky native, Vanderbilt won the SEC in 1965 and was a co- champion in 1974. Senior Vice-Chancellor Bob Boy Purdy said at the time of Skinner's resignation, "He has been a great ambassador for Vanderbilt basketball, and his teams have brought immense credit to the University throughout his tenure. We wish him well." Vanderbilt assistant coach Wayne Dobbs was named to replace Skinner. Vanderbilt's F-Troop, jeff Fosnes, Butch Feher, joe Ford, and Mike Moore captured the imagination of their fans for four years. Here are the thoughts of some of the people who knew them: Kevin Smith was manager of the basketball team for the junior and senior years of the F-Troop: "The F-Troop wasnlt really special inthe sense of preferential treatment, but they were different. Mike Moore was the most open-minded of the four. He said what he thought and meant it. Everything he did came of sheer determination and whatever he wanted to do, he did. joe Ford was your basic, easygoing country boy, but the classiest youill ever find. He was cool, a leader. VVhen we beat Auburn twice this year, he really shut off Eddie johnson. Down there, he blocked his shot early and set the pace of the game. jeff Fosnes was one of the best jumpers I ever saw. He got his motivation from Dobbs and his other teammates, and played emotional basketball his last year. He was aware that he had to lead, and he didnlt talk a lot, so he led by hustling on the court. Butch Feher was emotional from 6:00 when he entered the gym to the hours after the game when he signed autographs. He was an ideal player, the kind that makes other people hustle and work harder. The F-Troop was always on the court as one and Nashville was used to that type of team with good passing and teamwork. None of these guys was ever selfish. You can talk about them forever, but it can all be smnmed up in the reaction of those 16,000 fans when they were introduced for the last time fagainst Alabamaj. jimmy Davy, reporter for the Nashville Tennessean, has covered Vanderbilt Sports fog nearly a decade: Their talents turned out to be as good as predicted, and remember those guys were all high school All- . Z, I Americans. So many times these highly touted players don't live up to their billing, but the F- Troop did. Butch Feher, for example, never reached his true scoring potential, but he became a super rebounder and improved in other ways. He and Ioe fFordQ always sort of played in Ieff's lFosnesj shadow, but each was a great all-around player. Their talents complemented each other. I don't believe that there has ever been as good a "team" of players on the same club. Surely the greatest tribute one can pay them is to remember this past season, their last. Everyone was saying how the league had passed them by, but they didn't pay attention to that and they very nearly won the championship. And they did it on determination and brains. This reflects not only their talent, but their character as well. It'll be along time before anybody wins the hearts of the fans like they did. Fans know about being an underdog and rooting for underdogs and most of the time these kids were. Their talent and character overcame 'whatever deficiencies there were. I57 Teamwork Pays off Coach Wayne Dobbs was an assistant under Roy Skinner for six years. VVhen Skinner stunned Vanderbilt followers with his resignation, Dobbs was there, ready to take over. I think they represent what collegiate athletics is all about. They represented the character and the integrity that is Vanderbilt. As a freshman joe Ford was cautious to shoot, but he developed his leadership and his consistency and topped it all in his last season. joe was limited in his ability, but he squeezed everything he could out of it. Early in his senior year, jeff Fosnes was worried about Med School, perhaps unconsciously, but he was worried nevertheless. After he was accepted he was able to concentrate on basketball and develop, for the first time, into an emotional leader. This whole class had the intangibles going for them-character, determination, a willingness to work hard and keep working, and they had the ability to draw the crowd to them, because they were underdogs. They were so very, very special. During the Alabama game, the last timeout in overtime when it was pretty well hopeless, when they went out on the floor for the last time, tears welled up in my eyes, Ilm not ashamed to admit. We'd been together for four years and now it was finished. Coach Ronnie Bargatze has been an assistant at Vanderbilt since the early 70's and it was he who helped convince the F-Troop to come to Vanderbilt as much as anyone: The F-Troop came when we had good talent, but lacked that little bit of extra something to put us over the top. The year before they came, Ligon, Compton, Fowler, and Van Breda Kolff were sophomores and won 6 out of their last 7 games. The fans were excited. The F -Troup complemented that group and gave us three strong classes. They were both a solidifying force and hope for the future. I read about Fosnes in a magazine, got in contact with him, and then we took it from there. We all 158 worked on Fos and the other three and were lucky enough to get them. Mike Moore was a member of the same class, but it's not really fair to say that he was a member of the F - Troop, if, for no other reason, than his last name. But he had as much character as anybody. When he was a freshman we gave him a choice: either stay with the varsity and play a little, or join J.V. and play regularly. He wanted to play, and volunteered for the I.V. team. He was an inspirational player, especially offensively. He didn't have great natural ability, but he was proud and competitive and rose to his ability. He is an important type to have on a team . . . he has to lean and shove and do the dirty work. jeff Fosnes knows his talents, but he was always soft- spoken and not emotional. He realized that this year's team needed emotional leadership and he showed it. Fos had all the talents but he sometimes needed to be spurred on, to be stung. He sometimes had a habit of getting complacent, of falling into the flow of things and when that happened he needed to be charged up. Butch Feher will go down as one of Vanderbilt's most popular players. He not only was a great player on both ends of the court, but a great person off the court. joe Ford was a stabilizing guard with Van Breda Kolff when he was a freshman. He didn't shoot much, but he controlled the tempo and kept things going. joe was always the first person out ohto the practice floor every day for four years, and I believe that this past year, his last, he played closer to his potential than just about anyone, he got the most out of his ability of anyone on the team. Yes, the F-Troop will hold a warm spot in peopleis hearts for a long time. They epitomized Vanderbilt basketball . . . jack Hollaclay is the first of two fans outside the immediate Vanderbilt family, consulted on this article. He is a fan, period. He didn't know the F- Troop, but he watched them faithfully for four years: If there is a word to describe them, as we the fans saw them, that word is class. They all had it. They couldn't jump as high as those Auburn forwards, they didn't have the speed of Monte Towe or the strength of Leon Douglas, but they did the most with what they did have. They were unselfish and they were smart. They made the game look poetically beautiful instead of helter-skelter freelance, and I can't think of a single game where that class was epitomized as well as in that last game. They were out of the race, but still came within one shot of being a true national power. I remember going up to Mike Moore after the Alabama game and getting his autograph. I said, "In ten years I might need you to defend me in court" fMoore is in Law Schoolj and he smiled and said, "I'll be glad to do it." It was just small talk, but who else would have bothered? I will always remember those 16-footers from the top of the key when we had to have a basket. He may remember the Mideast Regional against Notre Dame, but I remember the night he scored 27 points against Kentucky and the two games he had as a senior against Auburn. He is the man who beat them both times. joe Ford was as cool as is possible for a freshman to be. He wasnit flashy, but he quietly went about getting things done. Butch F eher played until he was exhausted and then played some more. He was vibrant and more emotional than the other three. He would come down the floor after scoring or helping someone else to, throw that fist in the air, and you knew the game was over. jeff Fosnes had that flat trajectory shot from the side. No arch at alll After the first few games, and after he had been accepted in Med School, he played his most emotional basketball. You could tell it from the stands. The way the F -Troop played the game reminded one of a Beethoven symphony, with all the intensity and yet with each component knowing his part and performing it accordingly. 159 Dudley CWaxoj Green has been with the Nashville Banner since before the F-Troop was born. It was he who pinned the sobriquet upon them: Ioe Ford was the only one who played a great deal his freshman year. He played early in the Louisville game that year and was a starter thereafter. Fosnes and F eher didn't start until the Kentucky road game that year. when he was a freshman, but just as big, if not bigger, was the game he played against Tennessee at home last year. He had 25 points, most in his career, and he was hitting all of those shots he wouldn't take as a freshman. Mike Moore deserves a lot of credit. He came in in tough situations and did a great job. He knew he could play this game and he got himself ready to play. He was a very key performer, particularly in 60 Fosnes could have played on any team in the nation. Early in his career he didn't have emotion. He didn't look for his shot until his junior year and he didn't really play with fire until his last year. Feher was a slashing type of player who always Wanted the ball, never was afraid to take it and drive. He was a clutch player. joe Ford was always consistent, and his senior year without a doubt was his best year. Everybody remembers those free throws against Kentucky WWBEIIIQA A dwarfs gf as L his last two years when he was just as valuable as anyone on the team. None of the F -Troop said much fparticularly Fosnesj, but actions spoke loud. Thatis the way they were their whole career. They showed rather than talked a lot. Fosnes ended up the second best scorer in Vanderbilt history and only made one All-SEC team. There simply were not five better basketball players in this conference than Fosnes. Snuffy Miller, with MCA Records, is the second Tan" consulted about this article. Snuffy makes every road trip, never misses a game, and is more than a fan to the players-he is a personal friend: Their personality and character came across from the floor into the stands and people loved them. They always, always gave 100,000Wb and they won big games. No class since Clyde Lee, for example, beat Tennessee as many times as these guys did. Maybe they didn't shine individually all the time, but that wasn't their purpose. It's one thing to know players as you watch them on the court, but another to know them personally. We were close friends and still are. joe Ford and jeff Fosnes were both pretty unemotional off the court as well as on. joe was the kind of guy who was proud of what the team accomplished, but he was also the kind of guy who would never say it. They all had a quiet, inner confidence, especially joe and F os. Butch was the one who got fired upg he showed more outward emotion than the others, getting swept up in emotion and, by the end of the season, almost trying too hard. I think without a doubt they were the most talented class ever, but individual talent doesn't always get it. Character and attitude and teamwork are what is important. I can't picture them not playing out there next year, and I don't like to think of them not being there. But Iguess it's time to realize it and point to the future. Baseball 'L The 1976 edition of the Vanderbilt Commodore baseball squad was an enigma, to coach Larry Schmittou, to the fans and possibly to themselves. It was amazing to see how the diamondmen would play mediocre baseball against teams that did not mean that much and then turn around to play outstanding baseball against Southeastern Conference opponents and crosstown rivals like David Lipscomb and Belmont. VU split the two game series with Belmont and beat Lipscomb for the first time in four years. The season started slowly enough with a long spring break road trip to Florida and Georgia. The 'Dores did not play Well in the early going, but turned around to take two out of three games from the Florida Gators, supposedly one of the stronger 162 2 teams in the conference. Vanderbilt continued its chameleon-like play, losing to teams such as Western Kentucky, Miami of Ohio, and Murray State. However, when the chips were down, against SEC foes, the young Commodores rose to the occasion. They took two of three from Georgia and Tennessee while dropping two out of three to Kentucky, gthe eventual division winner. VU was in the thick of the SEC race down to the wire. Kentucky opened second half play with a near-disastrous series at Lexington. The Commodore bats went dead for the first two games, as the 'Dores were shut out in both. Vanderbilt rallied to take the last game of the series before coming home to win two out of three games from both Georgia and Florida. The last series of the year, against Tennessee at Knoxville was a must for both teams. Each squad had to win all three games to force a tie with Kentucky for the divisional crown. The home field advantage proved to be too much for the Commodores, as they dropped all three gamesq For the season, Vanderbilt finished with a 27-23 record and a 12-12 mark in SEC play. There were many individual standouts for the Commodores. Steve Chandler was possibly the best hitter. He led the team in batting average f.357j and in walks, and was among the leaders in runs, hits, doubles, triples, home runs, and runs batted in. 'I'he junior leftfielder cracked five homeruns and twelve doubles among his 55 hits and drove in 22 runs. Seniors Bill Anderson and Bill Hardin were other consistent hitters for Schmittou's club throughout the year. Each hit for more than a .300 average, Anderson collecting 60 hits and 15 doubles. Hardin had the most power on the club, smashing seven home runs and knocking in 23 rimners. Freshman catcher Mike Wright, in limited action due to spring football practice, nevertheless was a standout hitter whenever he was in the lineup. -Pitching, the Commodore strong point according to preseason predictions, was unpredictable. The pitchers might hold Georgia to no runs for two and a half games, or they might give up 18 runs in two games against Kentucky. I6 f . Al... N I ' ' 4 ' Y D 4- like , G V ga wiv ln M In L-i A ' V- N'-gp J-A Z U A I 1551 Q U. , l A ' 1 5 V fi . Q 1 5 Q fnuefgwussi if 5 muessff ' ' f 9 i.,,mag-Ulf. .. nm . 2 QA- , X1-I, ' '1' Q ks ' A ' ' -D1 1 'ff' 'I Q, . 5 I' v fc . sw 1 ,f Q Q - - , lv - .. .9 1 1 , R---- ......--.. f wvh.,i 6 k ' v Wi.,-,ix V -- f-1 V - -' 'B-a 1 " I. 1 ' ' - , ' all " Q 1 A f A ' T' ' -' .7 -L 1:3 iq ' V, - 1.5. 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Led by what coach joe Franklin called "probably the strongest group of forwards in the Southeastern Conference," the Commodores streaked to a 7-3 record in the fall and a 6-4 slate in the spring. Vanderbilt opened the fall season with a bang, taking the first three games it played before losing to Fort Campbell. Tough games with Kentucky and the Atlanta Old Whites paved the way for the most important game of the year to the participants of both teams: Nashville. Most of the players on the Nashville squad had played with the Commodores two years earlier when the two teams were both under one organization. With the split, which put players not actually attending Vanderbilt on the Nashville squad, a rivalry as intense as any in the country was formed. Last fall, Vanderbilt won a freezing, emotion-packed contest from Nashville, 18-6. The fall season was started off on the right 170 note with the arrival for three weeks of Tom Cleary. Cleary, from Dublin, Ireland, is known as one of the best rugby coaches in the world. He stayed in Nashville and worked with the Vanderbilt club, especially the backfield, until the fourth game of the season. Franklin remarked, "Undoubtedly I learned as much as anyone from him, especially since I am the coach. He also got everyone on the team in tremendous shape by running us hard every day. His value to our program can only be measured, I guess, by saying that he put us a year ahead of where our team would normally have progressed at this point." Spring arrived with high hopes for the Commodores. Although losing a few outstanding players to graduation definitely hurt, the nucleus of the fall squad remained. Opening the season with a weekend trip to Atlanta was a rough way to start. But Vanderbilt took three out of the four games played. The middle of the season saw the - ' ' - . ' 1 'T-ff' 'if 7 ' ' 'f VET A Hin?" H -' . 'if wwf LJ' A' f.. 1r'wtvf5Q3"?T-F 'H - 4. 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'NJA .J -1, IM ., f II ' -I I . .N + wr ' .aff " '-"JH ..:x.f- w C , . . . A Q- '-ffw ,ww -.Z - .I ,,'4 'L -Y ,4x'I1t1'lf" 4 -. . . M .f . . .. . - . - 4 . . . .-.. - .-f- ,.. . . - ..4. M ,. .. .. 1-A L4.-.-- .- ..,.. "Www N Rugby Football Club Scores Ist XV Schedule-Fall, 1975 US Them Univ. of Alabama fHuntsvilleQ 10 0 Univ. of Alabama lTuscaloosaj 41 4 Univ. of Kentucky 13 10 Ft. Campbell RFC 10 21 Atlanta Renegades RFC 12 8 Memphis Wanderers RFC 25 4 Univ. of Mississippi 11 11 Old i'F7 RFC QHOMECOMINCJ 4 6 Atlanta Old VVhites RFC 4 10 Univ. of Tennessee 28 3 Nashville RFC 18 4 2nd XV Schedule-F all, 1975 U.T. Chattanooga 15 3 Univ. of Kentucky 6 18 Ft. Campbell RFC 19 19 Altanta Renegades RFC 8 16 Memphis Wanderers RFC 21 6 Univ. of Mississippi Cancelled Old if 7 RFC 8 3 Atlanta Old VVhites RFC 6 21 Univ. of Tennessee 18 4 Nashville RFC 8 24 SPRING SCHEDULE, 1976 Second Games Ca. Tech. 7 10 20 4 Emory University 18 Ft. Campbell 21 Nashville Rugby Club 9 Ft. Campbell 11 Mardi Gras-Southeast La. State U. - Ft. Campbell - St. Bernard 46 U.T. Chattanooga 8 Millington Navy and Old ii 7 28 Univ. of Kentucky - Univ. of Tenn. 18 Southeastem Conf. QGainesvillej - Southeastem Conf. QLSUJ 4 Southeastem Conf. fRenegadesj 36 Southeastern Conf. lU.T.j 11 172 7-- 5-- 20 14 0 20 20 0 4 - - 5 - - 8 6 12 4 - - 23 - - 3 - - 4 - - f-'Wx 173 I A-.'-r Soccer Bob Alvis Scott Amling Tom Cambisios Ron Coates Tom Cummings Troy Deal David Giessel Iohn Garrett Iirn Hellman Roger Hyman Dick Klausner Ieff Knight Ron Lacey Neil Lampe Brock Langley Bob Laub Skip Mersereau Kim Moore Ken Norcross Lex Phillips Forrest Ralpho Craig Robinson 174 Heiner Rohremeier Rusty Ross Ioe Rudolph Devinder Sandhu Ross Scrofani Mike Shea Pete Silberling Elton Smith Larry Tilley Ben Tyler Peter Van Eys Howard Young Doug Youngblood Soccer Team Scores Covenant College Murray State Morehead State Cincinnati Alabama U.T. Martin U.T. Knoxville Sewanee Tenn. Temple Bryan Southwestern Tournament Toumament Tournament Kentucky 3 5 0 5 4 4 4 1 6 2 4 -7th place 4 0 Sailing The Vanderbilt Sailing Club is organized through the Athletic Department as one of several "club sports" with membership open to Vanderbilt students, faculty, and staff. The Club was formed in 1962 by a small group of Vandy students who were interested in sailing. History Professor Alexander Marchant took an active role in sponsoring and advising the first club members, and a small but excellent and well- organized club soon developed. The chief activities of the Club are sailing instruction, racing, and cruising or casual sailing. Each semester, we also schedule one or more lake-side picnics, and an overnight camp-out complete with moonlight sail and cruising the next day. Cold weather almost terminates sailing from Thanksgiving to mid-March, but winter activities include a few seminars, business meetings when necessary, and a lot of work to maintain and improve the boats and trailers. 176 1 Intensive sailing instruction is offered in September and October to new members who do not know how to sail or do not sail well. They are expected to study an orientation booklet, and the inexpensive 75 cent paperback book "Basic Sailing" available from the American Red Cross, and receive on-the-water instruction for two hours each Satmday morning. An experienced club member serves as sailing instructor in each boat. Infonnal races between the club boats, and the regular Sunday afternoon races run by the Percy Priest Yacht Club are instructive, challenging, and frm. From time to time, our members are invited to sail as crew with PPYC skippers in local races, both on Priest Lake and Old Hickory Lake. Also, our members regularly assist ir1 the operation of the PPYC race committee power boat, which is used to lay out and time the race events. Margaret Anne Barnett Betsy Bramm Thomas Calhoun john Caron Cathy Caron Martha Dalstrom Barbie Dellinger Richard Dietzen jeff Dwight Paul Eichel David Ferguson George Garcia Baxter Cordon Dennis Hartley Marie I-Iuffmaster Thom Hunimel Ruth Hummel Craig jacobson J 1 Ar If I .r -nl-5, , I V Kathleen Kennedy David McClary Andrew Moulton Forest Ralph Mark Redelsheimer Tates Reilly Rosemary Richmond Tony Revenis Elise Shaw Terry Slattery Conrad Stauffer Barry Tillman Steve Weintz Chip Woltz I.K. Wong Walt Robinson Robert Swayne Lacrosse 9 '. . , an .-fl.: 1 f ., 533 Leighton Aiken CCaptainQ jim Mercer Tex Arnstein Brain Nurname Richie Blue Bill Paine Hill Branscomb Paul Parks Bruce Bryant CCaptainQ Amy Praskac KManager2 Dave Burn Bill Roberts Howard Freiman Mark Shafer Mitch Grayson Doug Stockham David Hoon Frank Tuttle Bobby Iohnson fCaptainj Dave Vollmer Mark Kennon Bill Watson Bob Knapp Steve VVhite Susan Kraft CManagerj Tim VVhite 178 For the bicentennial edition of the Vanderbilt University Lacrosse Club 1976 was the best of times and it was the worst of times. A host of problems stemming from a shortage of facilities and an athletic director who does not know the difference between the sport of Lacrosse and the city in Wisconsin leads to a high attrition rate among disillusioned new members. Only a hard core of mainline Lacrosse jocks remain behind to compete against opposing teams and a closeminded athletic department. However, the membership's steadfast determination to have a good time while sharing a common interest gradually overshadows the woes. To insure happy days throughout the season and in keeping with the spirit of '76, Mark Kennon, Steve VVhite, and Richie Blue formed the Red, White, and Blue social committee. Unfortunately, as the group's success peaked at season's end it had an inverse effect on game time performance The future of the committee is in doubt even though all three of the founding fathers are returning next year. As the second two-hundred years begins, Mitch Grayson, Hill Branscomb, and Leighton Aiken will be structuring the future of Vanderbilt Lacrosse. The large number of New England Preppies and Baltimore Aborigines on the roster gives the team a strong nucleus of experienced personnel, and the newly created Southeastern Lacrosse Association gives them an arena to display their talents. Cross Country Team The 1975 Vanderbilt Cross Country Team earned the unofficial title of the "Kingpins of Middle Tennessee" by routing all their dual meet opponents, defeating David Lipscomb College, MTSU, Sewanee, and Fisk in convincing fashion. The team's performance in invitational meets was in general below that awesome level, though they managed to make very good showings in the David Lipscomb and Georgia State Invitationals. With only seniors Tom Walters, Rob "Paul Seig" Eaton, and jeff Morgan departing, and starting freshmen Skeeter Askey, Iohn Schultz, Tom Guzikowski, Steve Iones, and David Peeler returning, the future looks bright for the Commodore harriers. The Track of 1976 was the best in recent Vanderbilt history. After an abysmal start against Carson-Newman, the Vanderbilt thinlies destroyed Emory University and won a triangular meet over Sewanee and Samford. The team's strong performances in losing efforts against the University of Louisville and David Lipscomb College, and in the Tennessee Tech Relays, Southwestern Invitational, and the Rome Relays were very satisfying. Leadership for the team was provided by a strong cadre of seniors, middle- distance runners Iim Fuqua, George Busse, and Tom Walters, shot putter Russ Miller, pole vaulter Al Atkinson, and discus thrower George Hilgendorf. .-"' ,ff - Z ,ff -1 ' . .A4.l" . ll. . L TAE KWQN DO Tae Kwon Do, the Korean Art of Self Defense, has been practiced for nearly three millenia. It was introduced to Vanderbilt University six years ago by Tae Whae Haw, six degree Dan black-belt, a Vanderbilt alumnus from Korea, and has, since then, won more than 100 trophies in National tournaments both in forms and free sparring for Vanderbilt, establishing itself as one of the most powerful and respected schools of marital arts in the Southeast. N o other sport in the history of the University has equaled this record. The key to our success has been long, intensive training involving both mental and physical self-discipline. We are taught to concentrate our energies into precise and powerful movements involving both kicks and punches. Along with these fundamental techniques, we do basic movements and forms ftheoretical attack and defense movementsl, but free sparring is emphasized with controlled contact being the measure of proficiency. The idea behind kicking is that the legs are longer and stronger than the arms and Tae Kwon Do stresses these leg movements, not so much for speed or multiplicity of movements as for power and efficiency. The ethics of Tae Kwon Do is respect for the human being entailing protection of the weak. The Vanderbilt Tae Kwon Do team is more than an athletic team-it is an individual experience of intense mental and physical concentration that enable one to relate to himself and his surrounding environment in a better way. S1 182 f K ' XM Fencing This year the men's fencing team faced eight opposing teams and the women's team fenced seven teams in official competition. We held additional competitions off the record for the purpose of teaching new local teams fM.T.S.U., Sewanee, Westem Kentuckyj. The reduced size of the schedule was due to financial concerns and the demise of the University of Tennessee and University of Kentucky teams. We anticipate an expanded schedule for 1976-1977. THE VARSITY SQUADS, 1975-1976 Men's Foil: Harry Stone john Turnley Ed Kennedy Dale Sweeney jeff Aldrich Al Boyer Bill fHackj jenkins Andrew Auerbach Arthur Robinson Dawn Miller Kathy Smotherman Carol Schmitt Carol Scholla Several other fencers also competed on the varsity team. MEN'S TIMM SCORES FOR 1975-1976 Men's Epee: Men's Sabre: Women's Foil: Opponent Score: VU! Opp. Cumberland College 141 4 Clemson University 12115 N.C. State University 10f 17 Rice University 121 15 Texas A. and M. University 18! 9 U.T. Austin A. 16711 U.T. Austin B 247 3 Southwest Texas State Univ. 207 7 WOMEN'S TEAM SCORES FOR 1975-1976 Opponent Score: VU! Opp. Cumberland College 4f 5 Clemson University 9f 7 N .C. State University A 3! 13 N .C. State University B 107 6 Texas A. and M. University 9! 7 U.T. Austin 6f 10 Southwest Texas State Univ. 107 6 This year's women's team was comprised of three novices and one one-year veteran. Victorious this year, the prognosis for next year is excellent. Coach 's comments: I have been affiliated with the Vanderbilt fencing club for six years, and have seen many significant changes. The first serious change came in 1972 with the loss of Mike Moore as coach. With him went all assurance of stability and continuity within the team. Each year since then has seen a new novice coach. VVhile each coach has done a fine job, just as he had gotten the "feel" of the job, he has had to leave. 1 am now in the position to coach the team for two more years. Hopefully this will restore stability to the team and allow the coach to learn from his first year's mistakes. I therefore expect improved scheduling, training, and management over the next two years. A second serious change in the club took place over 1972. That was a change from a club "just for funn to a very seriously competitive club. Fencers began attending many of the A.F.L.A. tournaments right up to the national championships. We began to acquire national ratings. However, we had fewer social gatherings of a "happiest sport club" nature. This year, while maintaining a high level of competitive spirit fwe are sending several people to nationalsj, the club spirit has been reintroduced. Many outings were planned involving beginners as well as varsity club members. It is my hope that a balance of these two spirits will attract a wider range of people to the club and hold their interest. A third and last major change noted is one of experience. As late as 1973-1974 the mean fencing experience of a varsity team member was almost three and one half years. The current mean fencing experience is only about two years. The average age of varsity members has similarly declined. Turnover rates are higher. At the end of 1974 we lost only one varsity team member. Now we are turning over one fomth of the team per yer. Without the core of graduate students with years of experience many more individuals are fencing on the team, earlier in their fencing careers. Changes of this sort, in team pmpose and personnel, are, I believe, leading to a new and better day for the club. 185 Tennis Team With all due respect to being stranded in Knoxville in the dark A.M., to serenading a couple of sweet things from LSU, to partying formally until it.was time for an early morning match, to searching for the Birmingham babes, to realizing it was indeed Miller time in Sewanee, and, of course, to the remembrance for the lack thereof? of never a sober moment between Nashville and New Orleans, the 1976 tennis season was a shocking success CI mean on the courtsj. Without both the impressive string of 9-0 victories and the group of disheartening losses, a Vanderbilt tennis season would be somehow devoid of meaning. Despite an impressive winning percentage and the most Successful season in recent experience, again it was proven that we cannot eompete on an equal basis with the numerous powerhouses of the SEC Calthough the top six were always smoking, we were not always so hotl. Randolph proved himself to be a singles player with victories over the best pros in the area, but he never did find out "what it is,' at Ole Missg Ellard and Ellison, the juniors from Georgia, provided their crackerland humorg co-captains Runge and Lummis gave everyone a taste of Lone Star leadershipg Flink and Thompson will always live in etemal team harmonyg while Henshaw and Harris made it, Schoettle and Green did not. In singles or doubles, on the court or off, there was never a dull bicentennial moment. i Golf 1976 Schedule Mar. 19 Middle Tenn. State Mar. 26 Middle Tenn. State Apr. 2 Sewanee! Lipscomb Apr. 9-10 Bing Crosby Classic Apr. 16-17 Tenn. Intercollegiate Champ. May 13-15 37th SEC Tournament j0l1I1 Canney Will Matthews Kent C0l6l'r1aD David McAlister john Fritz Dan Schmidt Rob Lent Coach jess Neely, a veteran of over 50 years on the golf links and the gridiron, returned to his alma mater where he captained the 1922 football team in 1967 as Athletic Director. Currently Neely, former head coach at Southwestern, Clemson, and Rice, serves as the Commodores' Athletic Director emeritus and golf coach. Neely's top three golfers are his three returning lettermen from the last year's squad. john Fritz, a 188 senior from Northbrook, Illinois, Will Matthews, a sophomore from Ozark, Alabama, and Dan Schmidt, a senior from Columbus, Ohio, will provide proven leadership. The Commodores, who hope to improve on last spring's rather mediocre record, willbe bolstered by transfer Kent Coleman and David McAlister, walk- on senior john Canney and freshman Rob Lent. In diving, the Commodores finished third, outscored Scott Shepard Swimming The Vanderbilt swim team concluded its 1975-1976 season with a bang at the recently completed Southeastern Championships in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The Commodores, improving on last year's last place finish, placed sixth in the eight-team competition and in the process tied or broke eight school records in the March 4th to 6th meet. "Our guys did very, very well," said Vandy swim coach john Smith. "It was a real team effort. We had six swimmers shave their heads bald for the meet, and believe me that takes full commitment." In the 500-yard freestyle junior Scott Shepard broke his own record by almost five seconds, swimming a 4:44.94 while in the 200-yard backstroke, freshman Mike Stickney swam a 1:59.5, breaking Frank Lorge's mark fI:59.9j which had stood for almost four years. Senior Steve johnston left his mark on Vanderbilt swimming history by equalling junior Tom Evans' 21.7 in the 50-yard freestyle and shaving one-tenth of a second off the 100-yard freestyle record with a 47.3. In addition to his heroics in the 500-yard freestyle, Scott Shepard also cut seven-tenths of a second off jeff Perout's 1972 mark in the 200-yard freestyle by swimming a 1:44.1. junior Brad Vear improved his own record by six-tenths of a second in the 100-yard butterfly, with a 52.2. The 400-yard medley relay team, composed of Mike Stickney, john Linn, Brad Vear, and Steve johnston, pared almost a second and a half off the existing record with a 3:34.7, while the 800-yard medley relay squad, made up of Tom Buck, Lindsay Bohannon, Steve johnston, and Sbott Shepard, also established a Commodore record with a 7:06.0. only by national powers Tennessee and Alabama. On the one-meter board freshman Mike Leibson placed seventh, with sophomore Bob Balaka finishing ninth just four points back. On the three-meter board all three Commodore divers placed in the top ten. junior Dirk Ewing finished sixth, while Balaka was seventh and Leibson was tenth. "I was very pleased at our conference showingf, said Vandy diving coach joe Suriano. "It was by far our best finish ever in the conference championships." The Commodores, strong conference showing followed an outstanding 7-1 dual meet season, the only loss being a 58-54 loss to Tennessee. "We swam well all season," said Coach Smith, who now holds an overall 91-38 dual meet record in his ten years at Vandy. "At the beginning of the season, we counted on only one 'sure' win. We'll lose just two swimmers through graduation this year fSteve johnston and john Linnj, but we already have a very small team. VVhen you have a nucleus of only seven or eight swimmers, a loss of even two swimmers is very important." Bob Balaka Lindsay Bohannon Tom Buck jeff Davis Dirk Ewing Brad Goss jerry Martin john Matush Greg Nelson john Protzman Tom Sharpe, jr Steve johnston Mike Leibson john Linn Mike Stickeny Brad Vear Richard Vinton VANDERBILT SWIM TEAM RECORDS 50-Free-Steve johnston Tom Evans 200-Back-Mike Stickney 100-Free-Steve johnston 100-Fly-Brad Vear 200-Free-Scott Shepard 400--Medley, Relay 500-Free-Scott Shepard 800-Medley, Relay IB9 Female Athletes This year has been an important year for women's athletics. Three new teams have been sanctioned where only two had existed beforeg there are now five interscholastic sports available for women. The newly established sports are field hockey, basketball, and track. As far back as 1896, Vanderbilt women participated in interscholastic basketball. However, several years ago, only the swimming and tennis teams for women competed with other schools, though there were intramural teams including basketball and volleyball. This year, in addition to the five sanctioned sports, there were many intramural teams. These included basketball, volleyball, softball, gymnastics, ping-pong, and flag football. Wesley Gym several years ago was the only available place for women to practice. The gym IS small-volleyballs frequently hit the ceilings. Also, it is not air-conditioned and is in a somewhat inconvenient location. This year, the need to apply early for time allotments in Memorial Gym has been realized. More women have been and will be able to use Memorial's facilities. The newly constructed women's locker room and gymnastics floor has allowed more women to use Memorial Gym. The gymnastics floor area includes full length mirrors and bars for ballet. With regard to funding, the officially sanctioned teams can apply to be considered on the Club Sports budget. This budget is drawn up each year in March. However, as things are now, the same amount of money is divided up into smaller portions as more and more club sports are formed. VVhy has this year seen such a large growth in opportunities in sports for women, and such expansion of facilities? The right combination of sincere interest and a couple of people with the real initiative needed to get things' started apparently were instrumental in this yearis sudden growth. Another factor which may have been important in creating this new momentum is the fact that there are more women on campus. More voices were being heard in favor of enlarging the sports program for women on campus. There is also the feeling that Title IX is in a great part responsible for the sudden blossoming of womenis athletics here. Women feel fand rightly sol that they should legally have more of a share of athletic facilities and 190 funding. Title IX specifies that if there is sufficient "interest," a school must provide funds. Knowing that the legislation existed and that they had the interest, the women asked for and received help in starting the teams. No doubt there are other factors besides these which were important in initiating these new teams. These beginning teams signal a greater opportunity for womenis participation in athletic activities at Vanderbilt. 1 Tkack The Vanderbilt Womenis Track Team was sanctioned as a club sport this spring. The team consisted of a dozen dedicated members who worked out daily at Dudley Field or Centennial Park. The highlight of the season was the team's participation in the Memphis State Women's Invitational Track Meet. QKRLS 9- N. figx Women Reach Goals In their initial season, the Vanderbilt Womenis at times during the season, but the future looks Basketball team finished with a highly successful 7-5 bright for V.U. in women's competition. The leading win-loss record. For the most part the Vandy team scorer and Most Valuable Player was guard Kathy held its own against Women's powers such as Austin Cunningham 115.6 points per gamel. Great support Peay, Belmont, and Tennessee, even though they was also given by co-captains Iennie Patton and fielded an entirely underclassman team. Youth and Lynn Andrews 110.4 points per gamej. lack of consistency plagued the Lady Commodores Lynn Andrews Liz Huber Betty Caldwell Rubynell jordan Kathy Cunningham Ieannie Kohrs Dee Dooley Martha McC1augherty Sybil Hill Iennie Patton 192 Tennis Swimming Self Defense 194 ef e A' sf, llflnla QUE' the i r -. , p . -P . A ,. r ff m'f""l-Q-:P X ' ' V' 'Q'-'I - ,gfftfgus gg 'vga ,Lb-.. r . -K, f" - . f -' -,hw gif, r, gn 'R-N' -s ' . L ' SX- " A .f-sgqb .. ff, if x'Q?ESg7ij1-f?.,I.-Qi-A ,L ,FH E5-AQ ,F . " 'r A V - ' 1 i. 1 J Ag 'fi' f-53- ' 'w"i:+S-Nifffisl' 1 ' ig.-ra. Q ir4-' fo r-sawn Field Hockey This fall brought the arrival of a new sport to our campus-women's field hockey. Unknown to most and questioned by many, it was somewhat difficult to gain recognition and become established at Vanderbilt. As opposed to being regarded as a prestigious, competitive women's sport, womenis hockey was looked upon by the majority of students with a good bit of skepticism and uncertainty. But despite our novelty and the limited amount of veteran hockey players to be found on campus, we managed to recruit a sufficient number of interested participants and receive a charter from the University. Unable to produce one solid team which could practice together on a regular basis, we nevertheless were able to combine our efforts and take on some outside competition. After opposing The University School, Judson College, and twice playing Sewanee, we ended the year with a 1 and 3 record. Not at all discouraged, we regarded our season as a valiant beginning for a brand new game. WAKE X' , S 1?-Q ' gh N A Y . ,. s,fQ'Z'5'et'3'f '- A ' '-f"'3'Lla-i5!v""'l 'a'135 .- w rv-.,.. :YJ 'pffuf 1474.-1 It . . ,W V U I A,!.- , M. N ',,Y,b.., I . 94. U 1 . :A fl 'Yn- V ' . 1 -. ' 'Y , X Fin ".r"'., z". X "'f-,.4.'F .f ., . W, G VAL rf Jr 'EK ,3!'n..iQ 5" , a if :ik Q 4 ,ug ,b .4 ff' X EQ 1 PM -as ., b . :"' . L , A. -- 5 V, , 5 P 3 .V le? 5. -if" F 'K -1' 'Q f'-fcfff '. . ,, . AEN'-'Lv' '- . .ffuxafb-me L 'MW ' '-2 MJ: , VW?" ,. '- .. ng 'x,Q. A V 1 ,H 1, Q, x.,h Q A w .Pr n. ,. . Sa, ,- f ,K ia., ,- 4 alia kt . :E af' 'Y . ri!-b4" v Q? 'fa p L 9 5 ' V 1 1,4 A s 5 an P' E-it J 2 Q6 11 4 59315531 ,Mx , . ,..f4f3:, -T. - " f.-ii -all - 4 : I. -.,,Q..,,g,g, 9" "f xftffiaz l ,' iii.. -X 5. ..r.ru.--Y.j55V.,' Q, ,.l- iv. if Q A- f ,f K . gi.,-. 5' x "L Y fi,-,. , , ,124 . 4 -v.:.,f:1, v ' 1 flat,-ig-..w:4l, 2, C.. ' "' f Q ' u:..- ,V N 4,fff4f,fE4fl"' ',j-Qisf.j1f1?5 Q t'1'f"fTY+ Y Y Hg? ' v Saw, .gswgy V'- Jf' , F: . fy S74 Song of they Greeks A young man, freshmanesque and cleanly shaved, Had heard that college was a lot of fun, But after one semester here at Vandy, The poor chap figured he was having none. He puzzled, thought, and pondered o'er his problem. He really couldnlt figure what to do. Until one day another freshman, Snerdley, Said, 'Toe found just the thing for me and you. There are these groups of young men here at Vandy Who form fraternit-ies-theylre really neat. They have these comfy rooms for doing homework. They sit together every night to eat." To these words our young man attuned his ears. ' The news was almost too good to believe. He turned to his companion and said, "Snerdley, I think its time for you and me to leave This fetid place, I think they call it Rand, To see if with some searching, we can find Someone to tell us all about these groups. I think they are just what we had in mind. " The two of them walked down Alumni Lawn, The wind was cool, the morning quite pristeen. The sun shone on a ,67 Chevy. From whence a black effluvium was seen Enveloping our heroes for a second. They walked along, and stopped, and took a peek Around the corner. There, in regal splendor, Against a portal leaned a mighty Deke. His jeans were torn, his Allman Brothers t-shirt Had recently been soiled with beer. He raised his eyes and saw our two young heroes, Discreetly belched, and said, "Come over here. " The two exchanged a glance and then walked to him "We want to know about fraternities. We,ve heard a bit, and it all sounds exciting, And we would like to know more, if you- please." "I thought you looked the type, you silly freshmen. All right, I 'll show you what you want to see. U He snorted, spat, and hitched up his Levis, And, opening a beer, said, "Follow mef, The pair walked down the street wide-eyed with wonder "The frats are different' than it might appear. Each frat identity is quite unique. Each has its specialties, as you will hearf' They came upon an ancient house, appearing As though a king had built it for his bride. Two lions made of stone stood guard without, Protecting SAE 's passed out inside. "This place gives me the williesf Snerdley whined. The Deke said, "But all frats are not like that. " He took them thence to Kappa Sigma Corner. Behind a chair the young collegiates sat. They winked at girls, they whistled, jeered, and threw things They bit girls' hineys, thinking it was clever, The Deke asked, "Do you think that you could do this?" The two replied, in unison, "No, never! H They went to see the Knights of Alcohol, But in the dining hall not one Knight sat. Instead, they saw each member in the ceiling, A-hanging from the rafters like a bat. "This trip is getting weirder by the minute, " Said Snerdley, "Aw, just cool it, " said the Deke. "Here, have a beer and youlll start feeling better. I drink 'em by the dozen every week. 'i The two sipped beers, and then Deke filled them in On other frats and each one's specialties. "It's lots of fun, and really not expensive. There's drinking parties-anything you please. The Phi Psi's have a waterfall inside. The Sigma Chi's are famous for their mud. Therels Zeebs and Nubs and Baked Potato Pies, And APO ,s, who specialize in blood. I can't imagine life without the Brothers, " Said Deke, who rose while finishing his drink. He sloshecl more beer upon ,Gregg's golden forelock, And lurched away. The frosh began to think: . "A frat will cost us several hundred dollars, And we could do stuff on our own for free. We can bite hineys, drink, and hang from rafters, While still preserving our identity. " "Lets do it! " shouted Snerdley, all excited. "Who needs official sanction to go wild?" , "We'll party on our own and never study! H "Compared to what we'll do, the frats are mild! D And so, they beat the system. Gamma Del- Ta Iota gained members on that day. Toward the Southerner they boldly marched, And made up dirty stories on the way. 'Y g . , 1 ' ff- f v W Q5.-V A AS - a fa., 1 s X j 1: 1 J o ai I Kb ' - ug w nl .J-'I 1, ,fl -3 ms, , , Q -.3 L 1 ,T- ' fl-W, a I K PTR xv .X xv, X I ,XXAQXTX , 1' XVK EMT, 'v Q'-in 1 - w "X -'fr -. :hx 151 ..-, XA X xv H .,-fa fig ,,. . r ,V . V' l'1iL, ,,,-....-.:,,....- 4 'J' X ,-4.,,,,,q.LJf"'a' 1'. ,. vm' ' , J Y Y -VV - I 4' -' 'Fi 1 ,,,. 5- Alpha Kappa Alpha Page 1 V . ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA fx 4 1 ir Ifllenita Whike K 'K l 320 zmosiland senior 1 A y C, 3!Chrislallia Ingram J lllr J . V13 4lPa.mela H R fp! f 'L ,Q 5!Vemelle may K f gl f ' f XX 6!Shevawn Brown, Pres. ,' ' sj Q, ir ' 'N 71 Teresa Snorton ,' l ' T4 fx afvolanda Williams f A--Ljf H, 9!Patricia R ers r I K I l rin 10lDelphine liguffrnan ,l J lv lex '3 ll lv NmPi1:1ure1l ' 'T ff ' f , ly X mnysg Cotton lll X 1 l x K f ,own fr H ., mmlraa angie l r ff N l '--ff Dabra Ka man 'X , J Sheryl Perry X RX, x lennifebloncs 'ff , N' X alum. remand ill CJ DS? YSL Ur 'f R e or ' K - ' Galgmwluldey V , W W Roseha Davis V In Alpha Ph1 Alpha 1lEdward Ire Whaley. Ir. 2lIerome Keamey 3!Walter L. Fields III 4lCera.ld Thomag Washington 5 T I eny Jerome erman 7!Sircedrick L. Li ens III 8!Sherinan E. Wilggn 9lEHleston Craig Rucker "Ord Dancing" Iany Douglas Brandon lee LI. Ingham Douglass Renard Nomian Delta Slglfla Theta DELTA SIGMA THETA lflda Garrett 21 Barham Hannon 3lTolci Slublefield 4!Pamela May 5! Sharon Vaughn 61 Lynette M. Stone Tlgpyoe A. Young 8! hyllis Prather 9lDarlene L, Puckett 10lPamela M-:Daniel Alpha Epsilon Il Neil "Dr. Stoneg' Feinglass 2!Danny "Public relations" Picciollo SIN 'l 'Mr. X" Ettin er ei g 4l"Peerpin " Tom Kolditz Sllpff Tesdy Bear" Schlang 61 hil "Dallas Cowboy" Page 7lSteve "5 ce Kadet ' Karr Slleff "L'ilPlllascal" Markel 9!Stuart "T-shirt" Adelman IO! Wayne "the Hom" Childers 11lSteve ulightenin " Struck I2!Chris "How ya goin' " Gibson l3!Andy "How are yoooo?" Fradkin MIB-ob "Private" Eye l5lH.C. "the Rock' Rockwell l8!Cil "Gre hound" Bubis 17lTeny "Bless your heart" Bonner 18!Frank "Don'! worry about it, I lmow what I'm doing" Rubin l9lErich "Numbers" Merrill ZVPamled: Zl!Brian "IGiyeen" Klein 221501 "I'm not cranlca' Miller 23lPerry "the Hulk" eisberg qgfhpo Q I ll? V 1 Page214 QQQQ p 2 gn l QW 43 N' .A ln El All . A al Page 215 :Jr ' L Elf. qlrffrxggyf Mm zfM?ip if l b p M? 3l'iQI L 'L lrrl I flee, J A fi or fl 5919 xl Us fl 5 Pages 216 217 P X l Sw 9 W QA X A U li EKU ie LW Q Q X MXN ly XJ fppl A fFQl '!, Zxqflf A215151 QQ! AEM CQ Wi 'xl ,.. lj Luv 'W N - QMS 1 ag fftblllllfdl XZX llillxlfsxt CHU u ' ' X 5 ,Y ef fbi J l rf, we-gr L fxllfl I QA V . xl ff llrifl A it Pages 218-219 Pages 220-221 fqlqm 0 G -06 gmei ,gran . i?'l tQ90ai319Fs.Q2 'N fs Wm . 'Mira S 19514 -0' M- -if ggqgmgagaf 111.1111 N I .kk l 09511 'QE Q 11 2. is A e,aKiQ Q, wgg 6' N x ,f if ,- u i wi.QQ ' - 11-Q time 1, in MW rf- A 1 7 val .1 41 iff , l 5 i f '!'U,1MgjMi-'J Pages 222 223 W? - ,. 318 'E' -.gait ...A fi 1 11' f 1Wtia11i1i1'15i f It 11, 'rn'r"M veg'- s gt, ,x j E Ay- ml E, path B J I. X HM. gina Q 1111 111111111 5 6' A: 'Q MW' f ' i '1 .' . 5 a 1 3 "' W Wi' ii - ngiifiegt fi F , lf! 1 vm ' ' . Q ,r ' 3 "W w if 'YM 1 A 1' w ' . u ' W U r 6' 4 r Q 3 I nl' ' . W 1 Alpha micron P' 11 Mary Han-is 21Nancy Niemeier 31lane Mann 41Fmnces Sommers 51Br'idgett Luther Gljennifer Sonnichsen 71Cindy Travis 81Barb Bill 91Becky Boston 101Iane Duncan ll1Anne Pandl 121 Nancy Ru l31Beth Hovd? l41Ann Olikhant l51Elizabe St. Coar l81Becky Todd l7lConnie Treece l81Polly Moore 191Cind Neff 2111Heid1lTummel 2l1Sally B ant 221l.aurenr1:'acher 231Mary Ann Hite 241 Laurie Krull 251 Diane Newman 261Linda Nabb 271Lisa Newman 281Anne Moore 291Charlie Munn 301Laura Riddick -Sllkuiia Cleveland 321 thryn Hodges 331Cynthia Cramer 341 Sue McCown 351 Linda Von Lackum 361Palrice Pritchard 371Barbara Browning 381 Lillian Harpole 391Lisa Camacho 401 Kate Stockham 4l1Susan Amold 421Marion Marshall 431Holly Fakin 441 Barb Dunn 451L4slie Ha es 461Diane 471 Sally Hubbard 481Debbie Harper 491Alioe Dicke 501 Margaret Myatthews 511 Kristi Kjeldsen 5211an Laird 5'31Cini.ly Rice 541Cheryl Thomas 551Lcslie Neely 561 o ce Haile 571lJZbl1ie Fotki 581Susan Adzick 591julie Smith 601Sue Albert 6l1Rena Dreskin 621Karen Scott G31Leslie Mc ie 641A1ice Wri t 651Cheryl Blat! 661 Kim Smith 671Iaclcie Scott 681Susan Roberts 691 Kathy 0'Conor 701Barbara Craighead 7l1Sue Sue Derryberry 721Melinda Clinard 731 o Bradle 741Sn11dra Ledlnard 751Martha Day Dickinson 761Angie Berry Alpha Tau 11Flash Flood Floose 21 Maurice Grease Floose 31Gary P. Floose 41Hill T. Floose 51R. Stoner Floose 61Twit C. Floose 71Edward S. Floose, III Sllze H. Floose, M.D. 91Theodore A, fTedJ Floose l01Arthur L. Floose l11Donald Savage Floose 121Dub H. Floose, IV 131D.R. Floose 141Wllliam C. Floose 151 Richard V. Floose ltilbmhn H. Floose 171 innie S. Floose, Esq. 1B1Stephen C. Floose 191john B. Floose 201George S. Floose 211Ceo e W. Floose Floose 231 ph M. Flow 241Schmmt W. Floose ?51Matthew Ryan Floose 261Kurt W. Floose 271Da1e P. Floose Beta 11 Tom Cummings 21Tom Hardy 31Daniel Wankel 21 Bill Stricker lllandi Harwood 61 Neil ohan 71Bi1l Goran 81Lim Cui 91 ill Hysell 101 im Baker Il! eff Otnun 121 Om Gill 131 Rod lone: I41Bi1l Watson 151Ed Kennedy 161 Chip Gill l'11CinniS 181Deb McCarthy 191 Richard Polatty H11Steve Allen 211LLni Lacefield 221 tl1 Carter 231 David Towles 241Tim Lester 251Bi1l Pease 261Raoul Duke 271 Bob Montgomery 281 Buzzzzz 291 Bob Miller 281 anim H Flnose, II 291Lavid Dlmlglloose 301Charles Spri Floose 311 Randall M. Igloose 321Space H. Floose, Lost 331 an S. Floose 341B.P. Floose 351M. Link Floose 361Commodore C.V. Floose 3'llRichand B. Floose, jr. 38lFimky E. Floose 3911ones O. Floose 401Cono P. Floose 4I1Marlon M. Floose 421David M. Floose 431Iohn C. Floose 441Capt. C.W. Floose 451Short C. Floose 461Ta.nk S. Floose 471Sean W. Floose 481Patrick H. Floose "Dirinhe1-Hell" NickCa.rter Floose Sugarbear Floose Chris P. Floose Y'all Qualls Floose Keith D. Floose Roger Odd Floose Theta 301Loel Cohen 311 ewt Wheeler 321Andrew Nall 331Ben Matthews 841Addie Beale 351RuSfy Rushton 361Greg Nelson 371Zero 381GR 391 Carl jackson 401B-obby Perry 411Bruce Mcflrea 421 ohn Warnbaggh 431 ohn Eshensh e 441 Steve Rhoda 451 Randy Fmnk 461Tom McPheeters 471 Rees Mitchell 481Chris Simcox 491Will Dudley 501 Will Holman 511C Swint 521 R:1yF razier S31 Peter Oldham 541Charlie Vogl 551Wil1 Rice 5614842 Hammond 571 'ch Evans 771M 'e L on 7sfN:rl3y Brllt 791Susan Davidson 801 Chris Benz Bl 1 Sister Loflin B21TriSh Potts "Those in Session" 'Ruth Ellen Smith one ampson Karen Rauch Marc-eylal:,cCarrell Anne ison Rose Paula Dean Vicki Lancaster Ann Riebel Libby Owen Susan Findley Tobey Stilz iloyce DeBmsse ynsley Stewart Stephanie Samples Sandy lden Cile Mann Terri Conant Lan Cates attie Booker Dana Economou Sally Richardson Linda Kaiser Marsha Manahan Lymi McKay Mary Spitz Anne Brouhard Casandra Monk Maryrdo Dickson lriyn lgood oel Basi Iudith jay Omega 1.13. moose, 111 Oliver G. Floose Mark H. Floose jerry N. Floose W N. Floose atthew Y. F1oose Thomas B. Floose lewis A. Floose geff R. Floose ' A. Floose Thomas T. Floose Mark A. Floose Lane A. Floose Keith G. Floose David C. Floose Arthur D. Floose Stephen I. Floose Roger C, Floose Ehn P. Floose ike S. Floose ohn S. Floose arnes C. Floose C. Floose john M. Floose Alan C. Floose P . 581g.oel Powers 591 om Neylan H11 Steve Eson "CouIdn 'I come out to play Edwin Schklar Greg Anderson les Anderson Rich Komneyer Greg Gubelin Nate Ridley eff Begle Eisenberg ohn am ler ob Conne1 Stan Smith Kent Wonnel Bill Alderson Tim Cummings Elm Stevens 'chard Statuto Datriodhilason W Schloser Leonard Hyde Tommy Caldwell Andrew Byrd hm Gray ark Garrett Iody Hutton Alan Lequire Bob Layman 203 lljanie Coe 21 Melody Fitc 31Kathy Fleming -illeanne Fink 51Mar faret McLennan 61Leig?i Damon 71Susan Greenlee 81Patti Maloof 91 Allyson Askew l01Beverly Cumming ll1Rita Racket l21Linda Grafton l31 Lisa Tucker l41Mau'tha Lee Slater l51Tori Ellington l61Carey Beard 171!t:lie Caldwell 181 'nda lliuit l91Cnurtney Sprague Zllljeana Peeler 2l1Kari Severson 221Denise Durheck 2'31Emiley Cleveland 241Sne Snn Json i'.5lNan1.ee haysinger ' mega 261Alice Howze 271 Linda Kivett 281 Rita Bryce 291Sur Birdwell 301 Marti Hunter 3l1Liz Kennedy 321Beth Wilson 331Debhie Hendricks IHlSue Wagner Z351Betty Gardner 361 Angela Pardee 371Paula Gosdey 381 Melanie Rolader 391Parn Bashore 401Anne Russell 4l1Mau'y Ball Ellett 421Audrey Hoskins 431 Nancy Lenkins 41-l1Marty aither 451Bnnnie Sukloff 461Maggic 0'Shaughnesy 471 Laurel Sutherland 481 Anne Echols 491Laurie Dollhofcr 501 Betsy Watkins Sllltobin Brigham 521Laln Heller 531 olly Huntington "ln ilu' Slnllu-l's" Ellen Brittain Barh Burke Carol Cox Carol Culp Nancy Evans Patty Greener Donna Lilly Margaret McNichols "On the Cvurll' Sharon Musselman lan Hummel Elaine Green Connie Pierce "On flu' I-'i1flrl" Patty Pitts Ann Polk Amandah Strange Nell Stringfellow Stephanie Strohm Lori Szczukowski Camille Tarbctt Louise Timberlake Nancy Wehher Delta Delta Delta 2 l1Kelley Walton 21Zan Small 31Betsy Kulman 41Susie lnviniood 51Melanie Mo ey li1Patty Chaffin 71 Cathy Tucker 81Laurie Jo Clinic 91Laura Cumming 101 Mary Ellen Pointlexter ll1Susan Longshore l21Sally Pnictt l3ljan Tate 1-l1Katu Oates 151 Ann Lindsey lfillfan Hill 171 'athy Dowling l81Sara Hamric 191Pam Cooper 2tl1Terry Northcutt 2l1Glaire Dewar 2.21 Meg Phalcn 2'3lDenise Dodson 241Molly Phalcn 251laura Dodd 261 Adrienne Rivers 271 Amy Markarian 2S1Nancy Sanford 291 Karen Pancoast 301Betsy Kenyon 3l1Regina Roane 321jane Williamson 331Stephanie Beavers 3-lllanc Montgomery 351 Beth Callaway 361llane Berry 371 inda Peacock 381loann Longshore fB1Susan Long 4011.00 lee Bright 4l1Tricia Fraser 421Roscy Finucane 4-31Kim McMann -l-41Knthy Graham 451 Cathy Johnson 461 Mary Schwahn 471 Susie Davis 481Tcrry Kahlmns 491Nancy Smith 501 Merry Schumacher 5l1Kim McAneIly 521Cathy Langdon 531 Nora Wellman 541 Kim Ezell 551lgiurie Littlejohn 561Elizabeth Kennedy 571 Adair Wakefield 581Mary Collins 591 Betsy Cooper 601Sara Graham 611Pat Ewin 621Beth Knight 6'31Sue Gore 641 Paula Ewing 651Ellen Ewing 661Nonna Poindexter 671 Ann Tipton 681Robin Andrews 691Susanne Fisher vofjulie Mmm 7l1Lane Rutledge 721julie Cain 731Cindy Kulman 741Pam Howell 751Ma 'e Williamson 761BZllg?l1.l'3 Blair 771joanie Appleyard l K De ta appa l1Studs 21Biff 31Y.A. Tuttle 41Flint 51 Ricklin 61 Reid 71 Lonesome Lewis 81llamld BJ. 91 St uealos 101 Charles Manson l11Ca.ine9 121 McAllister 131Shockcr ireallyj l41Al'xlun ben Tool 151Willie Stark l61Pntato Man 171 Rocky 181 The Ham l91Bntch 201 Rusty 21 1 Flex Pages 224-225 J ' Y. vu ' , Q 7 jw li i -71 ' ' I A N iw- g H555 f 3. 4, V ,N I 1 N. or A +2 R 4 JZB 1 5 -X w f , , Y N S N 4 2 ,Q IJ K' i ' 1 Qt at 2 -iw HA , Y, 1 X 'ioJ Q ' uv 5 M 1 aft 'gf L P ' V A N D A Q' ill !! X L 1 I, 1 .X XC S MAN X ii Pa es 226-227 g DELTA AU LU 'M ES a- as 801Barbara Wyt-he U 7 ,3 Z ff- 'N V f 6 - 9 ' 3' Bllfsizne Borg f fi ,HY fix Q F "' ,, Elkay gaaiimtt 8 In iw WA Q K an v ' ico , 6 I , L7 'QS Aw my M ia, is w e ft mj A 59 New 1. Q '1 ary 'ne' I ,f ' KW- - C to , 4 M 3 Q 891Mary Catherine 7 fl ,wi t-Eli ijt D6 , , B7 Bradshaw it N 1 y 1 , ' X 7? , , gi1ClN:lalALigagiel31iicli ff "3 ,' 37 ,"'-ikill ,I "V -'U 7 i jp L, ,sz X at 921Kim Smith I ' f A 1 f J ff, i th rf. 9-'31MaC caan K x X f 35, H L 5 ft' gt r f SM1Eli7abeth Brewer P t 37 Ox! H 5-q Q ,' 951Allyn Mmm f , - g- X A i 'gjft 5,7 f "ln ilu' Yoke-5 l.4rung1"' I lx ' v' M ' -L f f -1 I Pen Bell 1 1 '55 ,f ,li t fig yi 1 Genie Cato X 'Ni Dj " hh , Aix, i ,fix ' llelcn Clark x . L' ' 9 f ' 1 ' X ,' Cherrie Clay X' Q LJ ' L i f' , Xlxl l' l 1 TV-, Y ,lf Sempielrcradtlock P I I ix fx J fi!! CRT' ' ,K KL:airry5.93Ia:1e:naii M sk I ,, C .xxxuix I tg-J wk! x J 2 V ' , '- A f it 1 g1ml.lti!c?3?KKLl"l1 H f,,t Ui 1-LH-1 Marcia MLCauley ,N fog, it N3 I e " Melanie McEwen --' ' ' " 'T Linda Penney W Kylie Rogas 'uf' Debbie Smith Susan Snyder Becca Stiles Cile Temple joan Thomas Nancy Wells Page 228-229 . 1 221Dashin Dave P ' a - wir 4' ' W -- M f in - , - 1 2 6 fame -ea 271The IDeEd-lnterrerl 31 41 Q J L ? Y C 6 M fegwwfft M y if .t . Fi-ry ox G I 4 . :A Q -4 . I ' i v Q- wi-at HL ia: Q .f ' sifcnpiam B A A ' ff' ,W Q, 3" N 1 " 321Emily Q 4 mi 'B -yi f 3'31Warren the Wizard X' I ' ks Chllrake v J Q ex ., ., mann V ggjggie Dea flnterre 31 ' - W 5,4 W . P C - 5 371Lincoln Lamont I QL 381Ml:lain 391The Parrot 401The Mole 4l1Burgcr Page 230-231 hi il" it Pages 232-233 X r. 4 l ,, U ip :Oi L' - ' s llifjam f' no QQXQM 4- 4 .fb i 1' " f w F Le Lui LTIQJ? W lr, QQ' Xb ' NL A fr-' M if i i i' F 5' ,M , rj" K .ny s r. me S536 FN, -1 di !!!! mQ'f1v5'igiii' mi fi , 4 27 lx J. if fp QA 1 'wifi 154' il 6 40 i .5 'ati- ii' W1 2 rr all l lf if if Pages 234-235 'fs-fr' J-XJJ., B S sins, . n is wr ,A on em T " 1 ' Q n H 'lA qu 6 E r F17 11 79 11 in 1 J . Q 1 ' tsl ..Wkeel.ch5'f".',l E' lgilliyll sl 51 ,NX S1 W 53 ,Y vu I4 W 4 'N gg 1 x IJ LX, J-HQN gx su 33 J? CLF U 541 ,Q fill: H .fx ' X 'vii 'xx had ' . af V' W i 'mf 7 3 rf Q.-I 13. in , roX,,:.l'l7r is ard Jil 1 1 F tr s if fi at Rl! Xl L 7 xc ' 4 l Qu 1 S ' .tty Q I , ff' Kfufl r 'YE ry- A V if S-L5 X-T,AJf1, .X r N 1'Qfj,1 '-Nfiitxg-galwp '71'r rw -f rx ,le .5 ex tp l -.vfjx--. 5 V0 guiinj 'g 5'-J, X K, pp X., kk kk AK! F, ,ku K dl I- 1. ii Zi- 4915 1 If viii? We KJ N i 12 , x Wm, r J A 2 r ,J 570 1ry.jo,jfr , J I WX Gamma l1Shirley Stanley 21Cat Doster 531 Lynne Ayers 41"WilIard ' 51 Sandy Green filjanet McCarraher 71 'Nurdu S1jean Rainer 91 Susan Ball l01"Ru" 1l1Darlyne McDonald 121 Donna Howe l31Meg Franklin l-ifjane Starns 151 Ann Hotter 161 Patt Penuel 171 Debbie Martin 181Sheree Peglow 191Susa.n Riggs 201Sne Keller 2l1joan Scheele LH! Cathy Arvidson 231 Pam Auble 241 Barb Tate 251Lisa Davidson ?1i1Deblzie Brice 271Susan Lucas M1 Anne Marie Cleary 1191jane Krabill 301 'The Dnkeu 3l1"Chuckles" 32li'Mu Se" 331Dinah Grashot 3-41Margie Benavides 351Harrry 36l"Mac." 371"Sugar Bear" 381"Chat" 391Debhie Lippert 401 Debbie jue 4l1Tori Olin -121SiLsan Kent 431Nadine Kalstell 441Goorjan Damell 451 Mary Evans 461Susic Liuid 471Catl1y Cohill 481jennie Ford 4!J1Suc Bruton hi Beta 691Mary Willrns 701Anne Phillips 'illjac Stmud 721 olly Grover T11 Sue Deluke 741"T00!" 'Ztt llrc' Vrnulerbillsu Nancy Amato Cathy Ives Nan Nunes ..BJ.. Amye Reeu: Rosalie Torres Dawn Dudgeon ..Ku.en,v 501Marilyn Gardner 511Susan Hinkle 521 5'31"Tlul1l" 541Susan joseph 551Lec Notowitz Sfiljgne Sasser 571 ebbie Domino 581Mildrccl McKenzie 591 Linda Dacus 601Cindy Mosby 61 1"Mnsl1er" 621 Nancly Vinson fi'31Caro Schmitt 641Maureen Miller 651Elizabeth Foote 661 Mary Stone 671Peggy Callen 681Peggy justus "Romeo" Karen Rrres Mairi Cae Howard Barb Goss Susan Douthit Barbie Chadwick Nettie Harding Ann Taylor Pam Rutherford Gen' Mullo Cincfv Fisher? Dawn Smith Patti Goddard Heidi Pudliner Katherine Power Paige Highfield Karin Keyes "Dodo" ..0Z.. Kappa lpha 11Kirven Gilbert 21Eminet Griggs 31jim Spratt 41Fred Andersen Sfjim Vandenneer 61Ben Walton 71Bruce Frankenherg 81 Les Davis 91 Rich Moore 101Glenn Hoskins 111 And Gustafson l21HarLy Thomas 131 Don Heidbrier l41Charlie Gaines l51Ca.l Martin l61Ted Baker 171 Dan Hooper l8lSteve Lee l91john Wharton Hl1Chuck Lee 2l1Bruce Berger 921Panl Van Landingham 231 Phil Moore 2A1 Frank johnson 251Kenny Menendez 261 Paul Olin 271 Buck Montague 281Zuint jardine 291Cle Dade 301Devan Ard 3l1Donnie Mencndeze 321Konnie Flower 331 Bo Bri : 341john 'llhgrhlin 351Carl Brannan 361Tony Brannan 371Terry Hasis 381 Bob Slater 391Harvey Ford 401Bill Kahlmus 41lMikc Flanagan 421j!ohn Boyle 431 om Co ven 441 Will Chase 451Bill Thompson 461Tom Crabeman 471Cleave Ham 481Tony Behr 491Frank Bcrkey 501Will Borden Kappa Alpha Theta 11 Dorsey Clark 21Trioia Spoerl 31A.nn Marsden 41 Martha McDonnell 51 Liz Campbell 61Cheryl Cape 71Kathy Depenbrock 81 Anne Henry 91Peg Sewell 101 Peay Shook l11Ca erine Rea l21Mzu'y Hills Baker l31Sa.lly Youn 141Susan Mcfgarlev l51julia Newton ' l61Knt.hy Morgan l71Shannon Smith 181j-Aencie Adams 191 ynne Smith 201 Libby Love Andrews 2l1janetta Fleming 221Minette jones 23lBarhara Hall 2-41 Libby Hughes 251Sall.ie Spence 261 Martha Currie 271 Kandy Hayes 281Gray Oliver 291jane Gelzer Sflljsfki Tomlinson 311 ims Maynard 321l.4ee Buford 33lDime johnson 341 Frances Roy 351 Libby Oldfield Sli!!-lean Ann Stewart 371 ynn Denton 381Sa.ra Shaw 391Sandy Kessinger 401 Lynn Shallberg 4l1Fnmcie Von Stadc 421 Martha jones 431 Rosie Price 441I.avoe Griffin 451 Dale Smith 461An.n Sewell 471 Katie Bourland 481 Nancy Short 4SJ1Nina Morse 501Ann Lehr 5I1je1nny Fritz 521 im May 531Connie Tahern 541Margarct Mr.-Cullough 551Nancy Hunter 561A.my Price 571jan Ferguson 581Quinton Smith 591 Robin Comwell 601Gwen Motter 6l1Kathy Bell 621 Cathy Taylor 6'31Mary Susan Berry fi41Claire Sllackelford 651Virginia Payne 661Frn.n Alexander 511 Cal jum r 521jxeH Goulida S31 eil Lampe 541Mike Zimmerman 551j7ohn Tumer 561 eter Wolff 571Tom Moore 581 Randy Owen 591 Ed Hurley 601Sambo 611BilI Griffin 621 Don Ford "ln The Mansion" Tom Crews Neil Demursey Peter Felsenlhal Dale Huddleston Walter janet Tommy Kimbrough Ed LJF. jack ercer lich Thoman Steve tvmtby Bnmett Williams 671 Nancy Beach 681Katherine Bone 691jennifer Corog 701Gayle Dunn 7l1Beck johnson 721 Caroline Bickel 731Gina Crehore 74ljanie Cannon 751j3an Douglas 761 ary Miles 771Belle Schroder 781Nancy Annstrong 791 lxslee johnson 801 Frances Black 811Floy Oliver 821 Milner Stanton 831jean Popp 841Ginny Dallas 851Mi.llie Farmer 861Becky Dickenson B71Regina Whitley 881Laura Hobson 891Betsy Nesbitt m1Ma.ry Claibome 911 Nancy Dinwiddie 921 Ellen O'Connell 9'11Crea Pilkinton 941jane Trotter "Below Deck" Betsy Ford 205 Margaret Milnor jennifer Wertz Ellen Mears Kappa 11 Floy Mikell 21Ellen MacElvain 31 Patti Balch 41Nancy Ellis 51 Debra Tilem 61 Lynn Aselin 71Lori Emerson 81 Nancy Morse 91 Melanie Clemmons 101 Sandy Griffin l11Sall Coodson 121 Mogy White 131 Kari Hopkins 141 Cris Crai l51Beverly lailler 16!Beth Mos l71Tornilyn Norris 181Aimee Mandeville 191Sa.rah Deneke m1Susan Beasley 211Sumr Courtwright D1 Sally Stevenson 231Babs Lewis 2415 dney Evans 251C,inny Speed 261 Lisa Mandeville 271HiIary Hoover 281 Sally Nordlund ZJ1Ieanie Harley 301 Cathy Carter 3111-lolly Holliman 321Lody Severinghaus 331 ancy Stein 341 Anne Atkinson 351Sue Bereswill 361gn Walker 371 wn Winkler 381 Lisa Burrus 11Denise Dilion 2lLiz Dunn 31Ba.rb Kennedy 2751231 EEST' Delta Pages 236-237 891 Scarlett Stewart 40lTmce Cooke glassy Wischmeyer 1 argie Pines 431 Nancy Harris 441 Becky Fricke 451 Melissa Kane 461k1rne Kokiko 471 argie Ratteree 481 Aimee Lubas 491 C3111 Lett 501 Carol, Caine 511 Becca Norris 521 Kathy Ellis 531 Nina Page 541 Celia Kin 551Sara.h johison 561 Karen Heiligenstein 571 Ellen Haydon 581 Marian Brown 591 Mari York HJ1Debra Hash 611jennifer Fletcher 621Lorianne Crook 631 Sally Samoriga 641Iennifer lawrence 651 Lisa e 661 Kalhgiidsler 6'IlLori Rioux 681Beth Raebeck Q1 Sherrie Wier 701Wendy Baker 7l1BarlJara Frackiewicz 72lCathy Magigan 731 Ke Yar 'n 741Ianre?lHurnphreys 751Charey Southmayd 761 Nancy Hutches 771 Hillary Breslauer 781 Marcia Ludwig 791 Carol Munger 801l.ee David 811 Margaret Ann Reynolds 821 Cory johnson 831 Martha Bracket! 841 Amy Hudgins 851Lisa Logalnh 861 Melissa ite "In llre Canine" lo Lynn Baker Penny Coo r Lynn Enteriliine janet Forsythe Laurie Gardner slC:Z.ris Hamblin ie Hcgarty Barb Hogenson Maureen Iakocko 53131 we Koster ann Lyncl Mersereau Anne Myers Betty No es Sherrill Pztrkins Holly Potts Nancy Rittenhouse Debbie Schulte Sally White Diane Stalcup Anita Guy Kim Thomas Mary Webster Barb McCall Ruth Miller rib if 'ff 71, V lk? giifi v A 5' it 1 3 j i 4 , 9 '. emma fm -.I . Q, 01 1+ I n A F.. 0 '44 Q' l F1 I, A' il 1 I3 H Y, .ki L' H Q ,e H - o L u 1 ff, , I 4 K4 G ff: ll ff V fl If . ' V 'fr I, P f 0' C I in E LU by l X ix X I 1 11 1 is of 4 K Jliiiiiriwi Kappa Kappa Gamma B1 Doreen Davis ZJ1Gay Glas 'ow 301Sharon I-lsoffman 31lSu9n Bonnick 321Cathy van Eys 541Sue Rogacz 551Suzie Amold 561 Cind Towle 571 Katlrleen Tumer 581 LuLu Knowlton 61Mary Kate Coleman 331 M Tinsley 591Rutl1 Wallace 71 Nicky Robertshaw 341 Ann Kanaga lIJ1Eli2fabeth Small 81 Mari gCMcCarley 351Bootsie Huff 6111Aren Rich 91Ann armo 361Sara Skochdopole 621 Leslie Doriglas 101 Nancy Neely 37lEn1il Minus 631 Margaret icholson 111Cail Graves 381Shelli:fy Regan 641Shel ey Ballard mlliigordan 391 Ann Eastham S1 Debbie Schaffstall 131 r Evola 401joni Spacelield w1Patty Bevill 141Annette Smith 411Cathy Conlon 671Liesel Schaaf 151 Diane Peterson 421 Diane Applegate 681 Maggie MacDonald 161Sally Engemoen 431Patti Rogacz CB! Mary Stamp l71julie Comian 4-41 Patti Eh: 701 Liz Thompson 181 Amy Feinman 451 Ann Trimble 711 LeiglrVSmitherman 191Sandy Rowe 461The Evalinas Cheadle 721Val arren ZJ1 Susan Regan 471 Lucy Harrell 731 Monica Reznik 211Laura Draper 481Cheri Graham 741-Ann Thegle 221Shen'i White 491Ca5erole Gundlach 7511-Rllly MBCBGUI 2'J1Ann Marie Deer 501Stacey Emerson "B11CkSfflg2" 24lRonni Adams 5l1Sarah Raup Claire Zivel 251Robin Famsley 521 Nancy Hartenstein Abby 5ll2iDll,8rt ?BlBarbi laChine 53lMarry Badger Dana Moreton 27lKaLher'ine Powell Ka S' g 11Coat Hamilton 28!Goat Hah 561 ie 21 Mike Wehrle 291 Dave Ellicliipah 57ll'lill Smil-ll 31TrickE Spence Young 301Teen Angel 531 H6110 41Rick et! 311The Mule 591Chip lngiraharn 51Goat Talley 321EarnglCollins H11 Rbnny ango 61Gro 331 ' 'ng Cajun 511 ll-900 CFIBVUS 1fMr. joseph Hurst 3412 62105 I 81Kneel Anderson 351Dale Pacetti 6'31Steve Harrison sfjorm E. Roar aefrizd Snodgass 64fToorall 101 Alice Chalmers 371Er-nie D. McVicar 6'11Efiii9 Belgpul 111Dave "the Fonz" 381Kookie "Hf1Ck2d OU! McComb 391 Gio Lin Ames 121Coat Frost 401 Mick Edwards by Anderson 131E.D. R an 411SamrrB::Duker Frizz l41Ricky Kyle 4215? Grliuist Mark Houck 151Pat Alexander 431 vid . Buntin Lynn Fielder 161 Beau Williamson 441 Daniel P.W, Schmidt Richard Strang l71OD. Wiesman 451Ioe Al habet lime Borg 181Bill Lamb 461Glen rown Left' Hoffman 191T-Bone Pritchett 471 Billy Mc ot ill Hamilton, Sr. Zllkoe Roller 481Creg Phifer Beth Raebeck 211 lvis Smith 491Goat Gish Slick Webber 221Air-Ball Stow, El Prez HJ1Rev. Bill Derryberry Mark Singer 23lPhilth Graham 511 Ame Amesen Greg Thompson 241Bob Carson 521The Portuguese Penguin Ceo e Morrison 251 Scooter Collins 261FemAndo Maroyo 271CaHisl1 206 S31Vemon Hutton 541 Kevin Grevey 551 Bonus Caldwell Mel rEiclCinnon Pages 238-239 5 gs . I BX' iq H' Q 41 6 , 4, 534711 11552, N37 1, w w? rf A o 2 'Ji ' C WU A A if aiinew Pages 240 241 YQ? 00 ew.'Eiil'.giizEa?5? gila?afii7'l6 ' ii ev Vufil'ii1-?,.'5' l w L-jf 'K .emo-f -A ffpfi r ...re Q?4l 2 l W L ' A L-gl 1 Ffh W 'va " ,, L, 14' 27 K iv ff,-, rf- my 1 2 f img? in as Q Q10 1' 7 l ' 1 f e F 5, if 1 l I ' X it 1 J V A U3 qi M L1 X 'N 5 P lf' fir Deli I 1 aka if itll tml r L1 K i il 41 X , if I ,. " ""' o"" I 4 -1 ' P o Pr! V5 'd 7 ' -1 ' 1 2 7 I M 1 . ., g P7619 , S Q 5 f as ' sr y fr I g J 2' " ' .W Pages 242-243 rlf W. A f. ,. 4 . gre . gil e9Pnm,Qm'5'a6"Cf- ofa fa P' xii' fri-agen' ' 'we are xmas -H m . .v essltgm 1 Bt QA My awegfqsgi. 4 vb- tc- 1' I 2 X K'-on smog-.Q fi its -6 , :QQ 61.01 '5' WW Wi' 'mfifpwi 2' " ii' . ,gems vwaagawifgagegafra avfsibmn Q , V 1 U: I. 1 ia 'vo it .L 1 I , L - Q at 3 .Q Y I ' 4 5 h 6 U C 0- 4, x ,- Pages 244-245 , M, e il I I fl :ll lrxl ft. igg Angel Q b it WQQ Q gang? A' Q xr .A f,, V lp xgilirli siigiiii , U i 'l- 'ill ill ai " fi Q. iii i ,.4 4 -'K Q I. Iii tg i , .. 52:21 4 afidilflelir -lfal it f' im lla f H i I ll fi fr U Q, " 1 L - G. I6 - il P 4 4 W rf lift ' 'I Pg ' Qi ' f tis C J? 1 15 1 U J fo i e' W 7 A Pages 246 247 Aix . X W' 'B 'N no 0 Q 7- I .e N ' 't 'N '1 'in 1?T'wi"t"'5 til .6.0esae4ei41.aw,.agaf"ea . gf R' irltnvwa W Iii A V V l '11 xx? l1Preston Smith 21 Price Morrison 31Hayne Hamilton 41Tom 14-xwson 51 Mike Condrey 61Tom King 71Can Andrews 81Dennis Prin le 91 Chi 3' Nichog 101 Kei Page 111 gzllli Bart ett 121 Oliver l31Paul Paris 141 Bucky Wellford 151 Mark Riley 161 Billy Edwards 171 Doss Fowler 181 Win Bell 191Bob Rea ZJ1Soott Stem 2l1Bi.ll Lell ett 221Ceorge Heberton 231 Danny Knight 241Bill DeLoache 251Frank Garrison 261 Burke Hardin 271 David Selverstein 281g7hn Hunt 291 eadle Bell 301 Steve Hatter 311 Scott Atkinson hi 11 Robert Cregor if Steve Garrett 1 oe Hi am allay Hglhd 51-lohn Shaw 61Sa.m Marable 71 amie Wallace S1 i.m Allison 91 Tree ioflcelly wt-ight 111 Earle Martin l21Dick Hensler 131 Hunter Bogitsh l41Soott Danson 151Howard Parks 161 Paul Home 171Frank Benham 1811311 Stone 191 ouse Nllohn Thomas 211 Art Olender H1 David Malone 231Bob Rumble 241 Baxter Gorden 251Rick Tubb 261 Bill Webb 271 Ed Riley 281 Brad Burke 291Bob McLaughlin 301Bob Homm 11Creg Hebrank 21 Steve Holst 31 Mick Wallace 41 Pete Thompson 51 Ed Clark 61R1ss Gallagher 71Rms Miller 81 Kent Voorhees 91 Phil Cary 101Lm Gewin 111 eny Belleufant l21Mike wright 131 Olin Shivers 141gJl'l.n S itler 151 rian Blurphy lfillple Foley 171 'ck Breen 181 Dave Buchman 191 Blake Watson 201 Bill Fay 211 Charles Tabb 221Nom1 Mclnnis 231 Chuck Hawldns Delta Theta 3211.12 llahourcade 331 Davis Kurkendall 341Waymon Tipton 351 Doug King 361 Dewey Branstetter 371Caines Matthews 381C McCo 391l.,x?us Mcdehee 401 Dave Holland 4 1 1 M ike Gernhardt 421 Baxter Brown 481 Clark Akers 441 Clay Sublett 451Rlssell Carpenter 461 Wade Cowan 471 Perry Given 481 Scott Loveless 491 Mike Englebert 501 Mark McCou 51 1 Mike Beard 521 Stewart Bronaugh 531 Woodard Peay 541 Bill Carpenter 551 Reed Tnckett 561 Lynn Bemard 571 Bob Kjellman 581 Hoyt Elliott 591Igahn Stem H11 vid Banker 611Dou Quartner 621 lohngAnderson Kappa 311 Michael Crowe 321Iim Bonnet 331Ctxl?f Stone 341Cor on Wright 351Randy Harris 361Grei Hoveland 371 Ma Morgan 381 Marc Slufer IB! im Kro 401h.le WEP e 411 Robbie Plalirison 421Warren Hunt 431 Mark Strickler 441Bob Schumacher 451Creg Duncan 4-61 Dave I-llrlglies 471 David iche 481 Rudy Moeller 491Malcolm Smith 501French Hill 511 Paul Hashim 5211215 Smith 531 ade Detamore 541Greg Cooger 551Ten'y Palmberg 561 Dave Doering 571Creg Coben 581 Mac Mendelsohn 591 Bob Beard Klffirn Sullivan 64151.-ott Lundeen Billrirn Burt 661 om Curtis 671Bill Fuqua 681Iphn Stone Q1 oger Meyer 701Axson West 711 Bob Schiff 721 Ceolggl Hover 731 im andruccio 741 ohn Peterson 751 Calvin lewis 761 Bill Freeman 771Frank Floyd 781Ton McQuistnn 791 Mark Stengal 801 Chris Davis "ln lhe House" Al Blanton Ice Fleming ilandy Wiersma len Lon Will Coozivyn Pete Moore Bryan Baker Be Coertz Bill-rhudolf Clay Seckman Cale Miller Ed Reilly 601 Alec Wyeth 611 Syd Wnght 621 Don Davis S31jerry Moore "Out Hunting" Tom Ba le Steve Biol, Mark Brenzel jim Cannon Chip Cole Stewart Crisler Tom Derr Mike Ellison Rus Fannon Nonnan Frost Iohn Henshaw oe Hrasna Gus Himt Greg Isley Bob ames Bill landon Mark Major David Mdllary Eric Nelson Charles Parkinson Rgflk Shubert B' Stuart Taming' Smith Doug tockham P . Kappa Sigma 241Iim M hy 251Steve lla:-subs 261Erv Burbach 271 Ted Saclarides ?81Milte Upfield 291Phil Walker 301Ron Ma ers 311 Mike Viyatson 321Rick Burbank 331 Mike Goldston 341BolJb H ard 351 Rick hhfellifriwgioff 361Bil.l Lee 371Soott Frantz 881Mike Hertzog 391Iohn S. Taylor 40113019 Sghindler 411 e ushman 421lii1nyCraves 431 Bob Tallent 441 Bob Oliver 451Al Atkinson 461 Keith Johnson 471Rich Ehbert 481 Charles Runge 491 im Harper 501lJave Hull 511Lm Valentine 521 ob Rosen 5'31'1'om Rice 541 Mike Cmyle 551Le2g Schmitter 561 tt Amling 571John H. Tay or 581Clen Smith 591loe Orman fi11Keith Holder TAI the Polaris" Mike Bagot Mike Conway Dale lgeber Dave er Steve Tom Rissler Pat Wright 207 P. l1Ellen Payne 21 Katie Thorpe 31 Phoebe Welsh 41Susan Weyrauch 51 Marian Bourdeanx Gljill Strathman 71Marianne Nieastro 81 Karin Collins 91 Francie Seibels l01 Meg Hartmann ll1 Lynn Yocum 121 Laurie lawrence l31Mary Carson 141 Linda Rodgers 151 Bethany Smith l61Alison Hopkins l71Cynthia Smith 181Terry Petrone l91Karan Mcbellan 201 Elizabeth Owen 2l1Susan Pressley .?21Priscilla Smith 2.31Cindy Lake 2A1Sall Hudson 251Ardi,Jn Brown 261 Ellen Hendrix 271 Lynn Vega 2B1Cindy Love 291 Beth La Viers 301 Ann Dillard Beta 3l1LeeAnn Thomton 321 Mimi Nimmo 331jilda Unmh 8-41Debbie Patton 351Christy Frerking 361Ilibin Magee 371 Sally Hale 381jane Hanes 391Randie Sears 401 Nancy Montgomery 4l1 Dina Norris 4215? Powell 481 ' da Crockett 441 an Get 4515ally Clihe 461 Marianne Dnnstan 471 Margaret Robinson 481Lupy Hunter 491 Ho y Dennison 501Beth Belasco 5l1Thayer Wilson 521joan Stumpf 531 ud Fox Sflllleclcy VVilson 551D.O.B. 561 Carol Reitz 571 Lisa Schilling "Un the Wu In the Frmnn " Becky Bradlgury Glenn Bush Pi Kappa l1Tori Adams 21Ca.ldwell Crosswy 31 Mr. jason Poulos 41St'retchy "Toolhead" Aming 51Kevin Heffner Walsh Slkzhn Fritz 71 obert "Pokechops" Robertson 81 Linda janecek 91 Alan "Confused" Pierce l01Mike Walsh ll1Bo Gus Green 121Ga.il Graves l31Steve Wise 141 Michelle Meyer l51Tom "Dull" Sharpe 161Ted "Moreconfused" Alford 171Tony Lanzillo I81Susan Taylor 191Mike Cnttman ?D1Karen Keyes 211 M.P. Voor 221Ti.m Hnnlin 2'31Wi1l Tipton Zltfkrck Finley 251 ob "Fingers" Wood 261Mikc MeCadden 271Sue Ellen Harris 281Sinbad 231 Dave Cros 301 Dennis Cross 311LuAnn Hensinkveld 321Norris Little 83lDiane Purcell 341Iack I-lerrmann S1Paul Tyler l1 Dr. Ste hen A. Benson 21 Wiutrdp 31 Fem Patton, PHD 41 Leisure Ramsey 51Tiger Wigor 613. Patterson 71 Chipmrmlc B1Daven rt Mosby, III 91Rick H-hye, B.A. 101T. Chesley Parker, Ir, 111 Missin Link IZINORNTL McDonald 131Screamer l41Tater ' 151 Cynic Yearger Yandell 161 Max Man 171 Bionic Fisher 181 Big Swede Borchers l9lCrv.vMxEron N1 Pretty y Sutton 211Wally Van Spmdley 221 Chicago White 231GSM,Orand Mlspace 251Big George 9!ilArtzt, The Creek 361 Andy Norowski 371 Richard Garland 381Nanc Dinwiddie 391Em Spinolenski 401 ill McFool 4l1Scott McMurtry 421 Dave Mud 4-31Pr-iscilla T.M, Hester 44lIim Iemigan 451Bird-man Baxter 4611-Ierr B.D. 471Tom Faust 481 Doug Kerins 491Nally Wrectum Ozbom 501Bill McClee 51 1 Ginger Freedinan 521 Matt Stickitnoth 5'31Ann Kanaga 5-i1Dave "Spe. Ent." Collins 551Omar "Leisure" Euhanks, Ill 56151.-ott Vive Gregory 571 Russell Pedley 581 Adm. Dave Bird 591 Kathy Lott 601Bill Bradshaw 6l1Humhle Ed Hely 621St.an Littlefield 6'31Craig Graham "Crackers" 641Steve Lyle 651Skip Montgomery 661 Keith Parsons 671Biek Clark 681Paul Bi Ier 691Steve 'izinkles 701leff P.D.B. Shaheen hi jan Coblzledick Alison DeWalt Clay Dixon Ann Hale Hilda Hamlrocker Evelyn Harrkcy Kathy Hrmt Shannon Kay Marthy Keay Andrea Lykim Pam McLrcary Muffy McKay Claudia Owen wie Parham ar Pe KayyPetcrrrs,on Kristi Peterson Laura Riedl Ashley Rowe Betsy Rubel Carol Scheer Kathy Sdirock Vicki Smith Miriam Staples Cheryl Stevens Val Vogelstein Stephanie Winning Iolyn West Kathy Wilkinson Lynn Yncum lpha 711 Cath S Ier 721Le-ighl Srfifhennan 73105. Martin Zom 741 Dead Pillersdork 751Iim Bob Satterwhite 761Karry E. Grant 771 Alex Seerfankus 781 Beau's HTH 791 Marty Duncan 801 Bruce lee Stearns 8l 1 Mary Currie 821 Doug King 831Susan Roberts "living Booked" Dave Cutler Mark Greenburg Cary Brown Hank Hewetson Ricky Star Powell Big O. Larsen Harold Hick Bob McNulty Eff Newbcm 'ck Foos Schiffman EH Dwight inda Day Kiss Sandy Warren eff Agee ack Sneed Clark Fischer Mary Masters Perry Williamson Mike Brewer Lip Davis Sigma Epsilon 271Willie Edwards Z81Commander Bowen 291Bear Wooley 301i-leyward "Where's Hosch ' 3l1Rajun Cajun 321 Moshe 331Pinhead 341 Ed Cooper, B.S. I.51ggr0n Townsend, BAD BS 361 371Nubl1er 381 Huey Sellers 391 Eugene O'Neill 401Gimmick Barrett 411Yoe 421H Harris 431 Wiiilllyer "On Ilic 13th Stack" M 'te Bames Milcse KXITBFA Eagle Eye Bories Su s Up Brans-comb Sigh Campbell Ted Cooper Downer lpha Mushroom Exum Pooter Slimbo Floyd Iangley Cranhe Sam Dennedy ny Louclm Dunk McChesncy Melon Head The Duke of Paducah Timmy Mickel Ollie Reid Pierce Pittyman Ragan Tombstone Reynolds Cigar Rhett Shart 0.0. Andre stlieii' f o e er Steve White 6 Year Plan Whitson Hokie Vaughn Pages 248-249 . ,En . .. I' ,ly 0 '5 -. ro xl ' i I. K fix :,r'?!'tj , .'f 5? by gs- ivvo g e lgwl ewir 1' r i J ' . Q3 X 0 rwm "2'i.,n yl we T T l X A APB? ti ff ii i X gtg S Pages 250-251 N in Va A V N lei: i h " B Q5 539 Qi? shkiisbmlh- it 1,4 g -65 Q - ID Gs iiiiil P R-kg Q 33223323 iiiwat Pages 252-253 F 1 , '7 Q 'FE' 40 A 9 i ' f"'7bf'1?3Ag5?in F " to x Z' I 4 We Q 'f ' ye.. J t Kg y 'vxdi rk H f 1 A agy D N gi., L I, . ' I Pages 254-255 . Q , il-vt., y I ' A ga 'lg 7 E olalifllhse my A iii? lxvmtl GJ Q I . 6 R59 whit 'Jw v M l iii if? Qswkvx gv My 4 A 6 1 Jwj K., Q B 9 iiyfff f ill' SG- sa ea its Pages 256 257 All-N sq X NNW Xxi iw A Q :xiii 93 Till' W2-9 WM, ' gg' Gian J tim Jiri' iif im l l .lr A. l1"Trout" Rathe 21 David Stone 31Chip Rimrner -I1Ennque Casas 51C Be 61Cl.gEn Bondlrgeois 71Scott Tremelin 81l-limter Moore 91 Al Corro l01l.e0 Schmid ll1Hap Holliday 121 Ronnie Pearson l31Ronuie Nichols 141 Paul jacobson 151Tim Miller 161Er: Littlejohn l71 ve Eckert 181 Don Schwartz l91Lee Zimmennan 201jim Fuqua 211-les Selby Z21Greg Stmud 2'31Craig Clayton 241Churchill Morgan 2S1Bn.ree Tromberg 261 Bob Weldon 271Britt Thedinger 281Axel Anderson 291Iol'u1 Harris 301 Keith Summar 3I1Tim Hunter 321 Matt Matthews 331-Iohn McSwain 341Will Akers 351 Don Conrad 361Rian Grisemer 371Eric Bemstein 381 Steve Carson IB1grL1uOnstott 401 g Hitchcock 41 1Rob jones 421 Chip Cogswell 431 Edward Steele 4-i1Ski Evans 4511eel? Sloan 461jon Fales Ulgm Helman 481 errv Lawrence 49113,-.id Vear 501Larkin Caningion 5l1Steve Sclznic 521 Logan Shillinglaw, 531 David Dcehl 541Em Harrison 551 fic Taube 561 Bobby joluison 571George Garrett 581Cavin Nowlan 591james Wombwell Ill "CIeunirr the Stables" Mike Airilinder Dave Badesch kick Beatty indsay Bohannon Paul Brock ohn Brooks lohn Broocks Les Carson Eff Colton ' ott Corlew Peter Cowen Matt Darden lolhn Daugherty illiam avis Robert Diehl Rick Engle Chris Evans Peter Freeman Iohn Graham Chris Griesedieck Sigma l1 Allen Elster 21 Don Begley 31Mnrk Freeman 41 Rob Goldsmith 51 Cal Wells 61 Steve Parey 71 Bill Freed Sljon Cooper 91 Kin Clinton l01 Mike McGraw ll1Steve Philli . 121 Bill Chenaugt 131 Bob Courtney 141Dave Bell 151 Bob Mason 161 Flynn Walker l71 Paul Smith 181 Craig Kuykendall 191Doug MacKenzie 201Ceorge McGinn 2 11 Tony Rommans 221 Stu Spronl 231Bill Adams 241 Charlie Barnard 251 Charley Hanke 261Tom Mclaughlin 271 Steve Klein 281 Carl Blatt 291 Ken Kostenbader 301 Scott Tygard 31 1 Hank Batlin 321 Bryan Dixon 3t'31KirRf Bowers 341M Stein 3511oel Coleman 361 Chuck Fitzgerald 371 Cleavage Wortham 381 F Caprio 391Mi.lte Lucas 401Bert Walker 411 Bob Mitchel 421Tony Almeida 431Bill Perry 4-41Dnn Boone 451Russ Rua 4-61Todd Mitchell 471Loe MCCorkle 481 endall Card 491 Bob johnson 501gphn Gaffney 511 ichard Watston 521BilI Lucas 531john Mitchell 541Tom Bellows 55lTom Henson 561Tim Sanders 571Chip Nielsen 581Hal Daughdrill 591 Steve Crawford 601Bill F e 6111125 Rblzerts 621 ohn Wells m1Mark Dyer 6-4fNOl'mHI1 Olsen 651 Green 661joe aul 6715 ee Monroe 681CiIi'lie Herd 9353? 'Elllh aer om n 7l1MarkgMulloy PM 72lBill Branyon mlglsh Lukins 741 'ckey Manley 751 Kevin Harris 7611ohnny fNOB at hear fl Pages 258 259 U gpigaog f-Q WQSSQQ e, N we Wit to ailing Q9 9 'USU Wi lh IW Q-p O l 1 A X vKHAs w -lrgfhla .QR iq'i?"Y1xi' 4 inc? Qs - . .a I 4 Q' N arg W lm .4 :Mfg Q 1 QI 4 ll X - ,f , ff"l 553 - ,, Avg ll in fp' Q ., ailitil' All fi 9 592132 A' P lei it V ji F f' ,f0l3'?,, 6' B" ex ll ' 35 A 4,1 ' ip 9 I n 41 F n sNa Zeta 11 Dave Steckler 21john R. Wiener 31 err "E read" Slilka 41lJen,i'iis l5gllaVette 51"Beet.hoven" 61Crai5!Fr-iedman 71 Lon ossen 81 Dave Blrun 9 "Herm" l01lke Feathergill, lll l11"Cinci Sl er 121Big AFB "Skipper" Bingram 131 aul Deutsch l41David Kupher l51"Mixed Up Max" 16151 Greene 171 by Scha iro l81Steve Wolff? 19lRobbyaKi.sber Zlljoel plan Beta 211 Marc Weill 221Bemie Z'l1Michael "Spike" Solomon 241Stevrart Flink Z51Mike P. Hifer 261 "Bomba" 271Felix L. Caldwell 281"Bumer" 29lBobo" 301Phil Engel 31!Kevin Ke 321Cary Perlinan 31Toco Fllelmaindez L-irry' 0 351 Rick 361Paul Woods 371 Bill Gwinn 381"Odie" 391 Ben Schaffer Mitch Grissim Qatar groetzinger l air Matt Henderson Jim Hillsman glyde Jones oss ones Chuclc Kaiser Rusty Kelley Mar Kennon Lawton langford gm Mercer ean Meyer Ha es Miller Rogbie Murray Eric Neva Dave Norrrran Ioe Parkes Craig Phillips Lex hillips jim Pittman Damon Regen Rusty Ross Haven Samson Steve Schoettle Tom Schoonover joan Sclgzlunaelier Bi S Ted Slineellings Mark Stone Alvin Thoma Dick Vines Iohn Williams Tom Wilson lack Wood '771Ora Mathias Underwear "On Sovinl Probairkmn Ross Allen Trip Allen Ric ie Blue George Bose Matt Callihan Clyde Carroll Ice Crabb Doug Crall Kart Csaky Steve Dohrne ghn Dubois an Ellard Bob Engel gil-in Evans ill Heberton George Hilgendorf Lab Kelley gnhn Kelsoe ob Laub Kim Moore Pat Moore Paul Moore Rick Newell Corden Nichols Chris Perry Tomrn Ri s RandyyRoEguez joe Settles Tom Thom n Bill Zelnik PS0 Ted Clemens john Scholtz Tau 401Paul Kelly 411 'COOKE' 421Jim " hopper" Yalem "l.oruIinf,g Luggage" "Pickie' Greenberg ..Rat,. Steve U.S. Bond Keith Gelman Greg Chadwell Dave Blum Swag Emst Melchior Gary Lift-oE "North-side" Sparrow 'L I1,-1 X I nr rr- 15.2 ,J-1 Tx- 7-uc 212 I Once I've been an AKA, Life owes me naught . . . I have lived my day. ,QVJ .,...'- 1 . ' ,, ' 'az A ,,4...,-, ,.., " av ggi. 75' " ,.1a.C . ,. '-M51 qi' Af.: .ff JL:-,EX 1.-' WL , 1 ,QL 'sf 'nk .lvuw-5 inf' "'f-!4r'S-'-H-C'+-- --'Ku-f P - - "First of all, servants of all, We shall transcend all." nv- ,iqg.-f,ag.-ffo- un: lv.. "' 1 .. VX af' ,R-ax A I , V ,I . , ...md-EFI' .5 , - fry Z Ami' ,v,,,A:-.L..... M ...f,,J -1 , , F Vw 41 wt R1 Plym? 'rj I "'A ' -47 , k,... -, "' - Q, 'ln V Y - M , 1, if WA 6 ' 3?Tf,.i..,,,,,. Q , J-.':1?.--A+ -- L- f H 1? , .- gui f f -V g-,az,LQ,,,Y. ,-.-fJf.-Q-i-'e- 1 , gg i4 N g1ggm4 Mf.4gE5 . f , 1-..' 71. ,R-2' .'Q.54?a .1 31 350,94 TMJ' " - ' ' 'v"v"' , . J 1 Vw V f 7 f- .' ' 11 'v Y ' N. "-'- fa ' ""f""":z- , f- -' H- '1f'f?kw--"T-" ' V M ' 1 "f4.oi,-I. le 1'5" I D V ' 1 3, Z X ' "YJ "ir W V TQ1 1 1 0 X - - '11 ,. ' 1 J ' . -K QI L - fl' ,, ' 1 6. - '15r:f.E N A 1 i eg- x --, 5115, -gn ' .f f ,,,,, l A W Y .' : ,hwy 'tl , 7.1-f' 'oy . +P -J ., VV' .1 Qlf?-'I . 'gg-1 "'-' -H-k 'ag V A I , , f ' .Z fx lr in 1 .g Y Ts 1 '?: 'S' .ir h X 1-2g .f+a-131 M ' I ,J 5 . ' b It MI.. 1' Q uf Q11-r. A .'rUA:!iMN .. 'f , 6' -i-M .13 My '75 'zggswixg 5 r 4i'gQ.f'9a4Q3!? .L J'5'-'2f.,flf:iTFn,'7.w1,M . ,.55LfAf,r'L.ra'h!!,I, 1 any .fit kwa- 3'5ffff34N?"1'FNf4' 11 Eiffxii ?1f.xr, w 5' " any 1-. f' Q X Ns, 7 4 gh E 3 i gf gd . m ..f-- 'H - 1. . X In i . 5 l ' i . Ma3 '- . 3 5 1 rg fv 4 w r 41,1 W1 ,1 xx t: E -4 ,- . .,.,. A 1 P A h H E P V s 73 i , AL, 1 0 1 Q 1 V "" -V - e H 'F' f X i -J 'WAX rx , - P Qi' A ' 5 ' ' i ' wi 'Ns A I 1, 4' f'-V' - 5 X . A U' , 3 J ,ln . ' ' x 1 I ' , X N 3 'nfs gl 'Nr-fu m .f. F. 1 Q' .1 bf L VA V o '52 F elonious Libachery? The Pi's are set up. For the Record Neil "Dr, Stoney" F einglass, sentenced for "moon-light" malpractice. Danny "Public Relations" Picciotto, he uprofiglianoedv once to often. Neil "Mr, Z" Ettinger, for dealing counterfeit doughnuts. "Peeping" Tom Kolditz, convicted for assult with a deadly grandstaff. jeff "Teddy Bear" Schlang, one of the notorious Wimpy Gang, sentenced to Sing-Sing at midnight. Phil "Dallas Cowboy" Page, condemmed for ludicrous linksmanship. Steve "Space Kadet" Karr, sent up the river for impersonating an officer. jeff "lil Rascal" Markel, convicted for . . . "Oh Man" Stuart "T-shirt" Adelman, the Shirley Temple of radio land, sentenced for arson of the airways. Wayne "the Horn" Childers, doing time for passing body notes. Steve "lighining" Struck, a "P'cola" man who with a flick of the hair, went "Caroling" out of season. Chris "How ya doin" Gibson, sentenced for too much 'cano action. Andy "How are yoooo?" F radkin, convicted for impersonating a man with a beard, he can taste it. Bob "Private,' Eye, canned for pernicious imitations, he Went "stud',-ying in the basement and found "no line, no wait, no movie eitherv. H.C. "the Rock" Rockwell, head of the infamous Crabland gang, sent up for larcenous lancemanship. He was quick with a stab. Gil "Greyhound" Bubis, convicted for scandalous scooping during carnival. He was the "king-pinfsjn. Terry "Bless your heart" Bonner' sentenced for conducting cave tours without a license, Uncle Shortie posted bail. Frank "Don't Worry about it, I know what I'm doing" Rubin, the master mind behind "Rose-a-felt" politics, arrested for tongue exceeding the speed limit. Erich "Numbers" Merrill, he forced mathematical integration. It was a "calculated', risk. Paroled: Brian "Kliyeeen', Klein Sol 'Tm not cranky" Miller Perry "the Hulk" Weisberg And those "walking the last milei' see the year pass before them. Who could forget: "What, no salad?" . . . the landing of the Martians . . . Get a grip . . . a little Shoni's Action . . . reading the minutes for hours . . . "nik, nik, wanna play backgammon? . . . cave woman on the scene . . . travel time!! . . . the date look . . . the pimping spot . . . the pledge trainer takes a swim . . . Zoom, Schwartz, Barf. . . Action on couch 1 . . . "Rahlly!', . . . Here comes bunny, there goes your money . . . the return of Happy . . . 34 to 2, but the runs "don't count" . . . And to those who left in September for bigger and better things . . . in your eye! LP? You decide Men of Tau 217 FT-I Y . f 'Qu - JG- Hfa 5 F, - - S.: 5 ' U " :Z J i..Q-,, 4- if-- !f. A. A ...kj- ------W V-.....,.-.., K-1 1. 1 ......NN- ' "' ' - --- ,J.-,. ., ,. pfm, .w " it H 'rl 5 ,f,-Q 1 1' ' FQ 1.41, 1 4 -' ,. f L 4:11, laws. -,.f ..,,, lm' " Order in variety we see Though all things differ All agree. -Pope Ilm not an eccentric. It's just more alive than most people. -anonymous 1 ii - s V' ' 5 X 5 I K 'isf , .m -'r.', I . nl 7 swf! , s , ht.. "' , E 1' X I x- L X ms 'P' W ' I' ul lr7"'.mt"54lE . ' "'w"f Q' ' .-35-' XXI ' -nf f X . - ks " . fs, . X ' x . Q - , ' is , I ' ' 'J "' 4 R Agp 0 C - ' x Q I -'XIX ."S' 3, ' "N Q . 1 A . 8 . x 4+ I 5 P . 1 I au if X J ' X . ' 'n I - LU. sip. L- If 4- , m " J' ' X-Q A I ' l x . I s . I - A .- K ' 'I 5 xxx 1 0 . A ' x 1-',. .f "' xg - ' N .T S ' ' -FJCQ i I! F4 J 0 . -1 QA .' 5 ,ir I I s V1 X Q ' K' Y ' In 6. ' k u ' i3vt""""' HRH LA mi ' 1 A AZ. . , 1 1 v 'Q " , xl ""l in 4' 'Q .- . .' I 5 'K It ,ql'N. X .iss . . .?,- , 4. ss' W. IAN, J . s. ,- , 5 t 'QQ . 'L 1 I . ..4 I - I Q ' -. xp f- ' A x. Al, y"f ,,. .. V Q. Q: f , fl ,I 1 . A , . -fr' W - .1'.,1 'I' u.' Z1 'bu' " rg ' 'j -4rf'Q,' ' as ff. , 'C 1 6" :Q I ...K ' If 4 'Pri X n' .Q 1' . - " 4 Q "AL 'g w 1 t't'di'K"h 4 ..' 4' . . ' df: ' -9, ,h-.y'?'g V."'l-5 9-x , I A 0 Q-, ' 1 r fs ' A' I - K, ,lb x ', , 4 1 -.Q f- '- -- . 121' l 1 .. ,xl W' "1 Y - Q t fn' fl. 1 J X ' '- ' ' -' - .- , , 1 . V W - ' ' -'Y ' I. "vi , . Qi j , V l J, , k. x A- I .Lex .- Q W V 2 ' 's"l"h," , ' . V ' ' "5 W . I -1-' ' ' Q . , gm 'tk 'h 1 ' 4 ' v, ga . ' 'I ' -I . 4 ,v , 'W N3 'iw 5 . - ' F 5- 0 .,5'f'i'- . ' ' 'Q Q" , gt .fat . "z, Aga- ' Q N . f 5, 3 1, -' .R- '.""'. ,- ' V' ,. .',f,,.db 1 AN f - . - A ---fl - x QQ Y ,z .' .'f '. .',s',..,g.j x ' - . - . w 'hi . 5 x - xl R 5 Q' xl - X ' G Q. , .vb '-1 ' Lf' -lv". 'AP . 1 . My X 'H -' A 1 .x . -A yr X, ' .Z Q. X.: ',,vZ:5, 1 1 - 1- - uf ', pf 5" Hr '.:2 y ' 4 fr' x '-A A s L. .. D, B x., 2+ xv 1 -fx ' 1' - w ' .-X" ' . "- . X' xx ix ' 'R 35 X' . 1 -VA, .buh 14. I Q. .- I ' , 0-V N. . . uf' . R- V xx 5 . s. . ,V '-RQ' Q . ff 3 Nb ' -. ' -- - " ' ' K v A " x n rt .3 ' ATN! .L 'lo q . v 10 ' U ' y 4 1 . . H' Y- ' N' , ,Q ' ' '. ' if H1 -' ' ' QA? , ! u fi' H 1 K I K I r 'ix - . e ' u r' WM V , x -L X A 5' . X ' fn' I A I '-4 X. , A I . 1 5 fy V 45 . L, 3, H. E ff' 5 I 'V V . f f 3 -INK I . ' Y J' , I , ,Q4 -xi 1 X ,h ,iq t Ln i JV. l x mf .-4, fa' 1 , 1 V Q I K4', vw f ' X9 'A' "5'ile'W ' ' , M ws. "" lhim' ,ani "At nine o'clock on the evening of the eighth day of the eighth month of the year 1839, eight earnest young men, all students of Miami University, held the first regular meeting of Beta Theta Pi in the Hall of the Union Literary Society, an upper room in the old college building . . From Son of the Stars All eight made the deans list later that year 223 QQ? 1 gr ai M '59 Q., 'f xiiy S' F 'ff 115. 1. " . X -11' ' 1 f -4 . w v'f,.- W W 224 y g L ' 5 ff 9 V ff '33,-' fa' 1 , . N LM . 5, . 5 w- , L x 2 ,s Q V ' YS, - 1' ' , V, 5 at ..f NAU .,,f 6+ 'Ta' "wr ,W T"! ,-qv? H - 'iii 1 '14 - x, 5, 51, N ,1 ,, 1 1-vi Av-..,, far Chi O . . . X and a horseshoe . . . the owl and Carnation . . . Chi Omega . . . The cardinal and straw . . . Mrs. Green and Mary . . . VVho's car is double parked n0wPP Tow it! . . . It's like a "heat Wave" . . . Oh Barb, thatis just T.M .... Don't ask Iackie Onassis, Bev, she's all through with Creek life . . . Pickwick Dam . . . The elusive Eleusinian . . . Who's Boobikins? . . . The Big Owl's in Nashville! . . . All right, girls, who took ,Lil Abner? . . . Riverwood Riding Academy . . . Mail it to: Cookbook, 2416 Vanderbilt Place . . . itis just pick a little, talk alittle . . . "Here's to Chi Omega" . . . Lots of fun, lots of friendships, lots of love . . . in Chi O. 225 l 5. ,gm K , f QQ . f 3, HELTA All , 'U in I 'S f-f, 'L' sr . Y Q, A u , -V ' .4 4 , , , A ,, , 1 , ' . ' . 3 ' . I, K I b 1: 'I . 'E X , ,IV . -W . .g .w W ' -1 ': k " t iafl 4. I ' Q51-.J-I y , F1 Q 5 Q , ' 1 7 f K I if .f 4 . E' I y,,l Q W 1 ' N. . 11. fl' ' I v I Q 1 . ' ' ni K ' 'A .,. I , a K I' wr 1 -3311 rj' g . ' ' if M49 A ' Q 5 M 1 , E ,X -K 'Cx K " Wi' - QW W if ' 4 its 5 T J 1 2 U J-is xy n. I N It Aj: i WN ' 1 1 1' ff H36 f' ,..Bf,. ,L Q 6 Q . 1 A N IV ., - ' 9' si . gf A s Yi Si' E T 1-D t . , T N A A .-,Q 57 :ff "" A r ', . ', ,, Q I A , 5:-v A 'lj ,V 'Q' 1 mi fy! fn! ' Q 1 A fx ' if VL Q ' , .. Q G- f I, ' a f R . 0. 'A fx v " .gi?LF2. ,':f'1IQ..-2 ' E+ . 4,-14 3' , 1 .Elf -Q 5- I 15- ,A E 1 'Y' as .' lf . x- Fx -px 'Y 'w .,. ..x,L, in -G X . L, . 1 " R 3113,-Aa,5..: + " W in 1 I rg, ,P ,eg rl matt, ', 1 'L f 1. r , 1 JP" 'fri ..,-ya .nw rf ' Ar,7,7l at .Q U: .Q .Wa 1. 3:4 1 xl :r"5- L, mu ' , ..' ., .ff- Qv x ' ,-Q pn ' Jfvgflb, Pasta? if -.i'.'r 'fgsfiwi , - . . aff . .-.fir . ,HH my ,-W '..."v MM .L ,- Mg N . ' .gd f .--, . .- za' .rf- 1 .1 .--. wg. ,J , - ,. A . ..,, imc' 1 X .H . 4 .J- N-. , . - i""TN' f' 1 ,1 -k' - '5"x:!eQ' -wr ,K Q - 74' . .' QHF7- A A 'rf Qi? 9? ' 3'1"" 41 5' 4 Y if dw .4 'I' un 4 -1 V . '1- rs eb- I .9 dp. ... r --"""-I---. 'wi if .4 QQ 1 ,. ,. r ,, gm 'l Y :Nikki V 1 if they can nap together. Dr. Flex plays p0Cket pool Acutes. Idream of jake while Ham's lumpy bed makes While the ward sleeps. Five p.m.-bath time. FDR and him dream of the Rodent. the Mole refuse and not even by force will they take one. Supper is over and there are no casualties. New patients are admitted tonight. They eat our goldfish. The Wizard appears with a new deck. Lights out at nine, the Big Nurse leaves, and Turkle straps in the 229 It's tough to be humble when you're the finest . . . Big Brothers . . . Pledge Auction . . . Country Fair . . . "Vanderbilt is THE University of Tennessee" . . . Keys on the Bread Box . . . Skinny-Dipping . . . Fall Retreat . . . '4That's the way I like it!" . . . Tequila Sunrise . . . Two at the front, One at the back ..., C offeehouses . . . Pledge Quiz Bowl . . . CB . . . Baked Potatoes . . . Brownie . . . Troop . . . Candlelights . . . "It's raining, the formal must be tonightli' . . . FAD . . . Basketball Champs . . . Amit Carol . . . Popcorn . . . The First Woman SCA President . . . Turtas . . . Pandas . . . Mom'srWeekend . . . Dadis Weekend . . . 65 more days . . . Supressed Desires . . . Pink Carnation Pie, Again? . . . The Singing Group . . . Simores . . . Scholarship Trophy . . . Phone Duty . . . Housegirl's Skit? . . . Champagne Party . . . Composites . . . Talent Show . . . "Sing it, Pam!" . . . Vera . . . Mardi Cras . . . The Gamma Phi Beach . . . Christmas Party . . . '4Are the formal pictures in yet?', . . . Space Cadet . . . "Clicks" . . . TUSH . . . The Bar Light . . . Kidnapping . . . Willard . . . Sugar Bear . . . Blind Dates . . . Tick . . . Hayride . . . Pablo Fanque's . . . Happy Hour . . . Snowball Fights . . . BISIR . . . Serenaders . . . Athenian Scream . . . Plumbing . . . TOOT . . . Chapter Dinner . . . Later . . . Much Later . . . 230 vi ' P ' ."'T .nf ., , '53 if-af:-.t-,s , -F,. w ww ' ' ' ' '42'i":?'-N, f"5'lT!.2' A " 1 . 1 fa. -rt - Usaimfkm -S 4 -. si u ' "tv .r ,Q --1 Q 1.-. ..4cd .. ' -- 5" - .--.H W . 'Q. , 'I-J Z .T' ,. 0 "--. . .. ' 'Av,.':s!' f' .. . .on n u 'Dr ' W. ' ' l 'AO' 94" F v ' - 1 .. 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This This This This royal threne of kings, this scept'red isle, earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, other Eden, demi-paradise, happy breed of men, this little world, 5 'Q l 1 .T f ,. 2. I U., 3 ll Q G .R . ' 1 47 'L 5 Ss. . .,. -:I 11, -i. g 9" 3' if r' IU ki ,l W -. s,,I Q ffm , ' i- "'-'iz 'Q T 3?-FTE.. ' H -ir W 'T if T5 ' A'-' 1'-4n.,, Q' , "if ,V V , '52, 1151 ' .-v'-f+2aEgfl'lfil'1'1-5.51' :- . il M V --,1i.l',,,-.vs gf,--, . sgff-:ff -- ' - -l 'F " -'--- 1 -' " T -- 'i A . ,xi ti-52. 5, 2 , . , -,s 'E 3 A . ' '1av,i1i:i?i':1...i6?Ts?'it:-P Q is V ,gi If '-I. :jg -. , i :J ,,.,, H 240 gi This precious slum: set in the silvcr sua, Agaiusl the envy of lcss happier lzunlsg This hlcssocl plot, this earth, this rcuhn, This llornur . . . liichsvrci ll 3'- E 'F' its A 27:5 N , , xx, , . .1,, 24l K I ur is- e- -. Q. E . -'aw-4.1. .gf 1, Nik'-v..- in. 41" f. Uiw K i ii l K S . Q Q- K l X gh' H h5""1! 74- 41.7 uv. if Q 'fn nu elta KJ' lm., , F . W- ff?-H r U if 'i'l' - - -d z u. ,. 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'f F 7 53 , i ,4 I 1 S t s Q' -,' of ,I Ord ,'a IQ 'Q Q , . 9 I Q' 'P Ng Q, as -., Q 1,-fQa,3,f Z ' Q, .' N ' 11 ' Q - ,Tri NY,'V"-if 1 - - N ,Q -A vi' '. T, H- Q A 'x , N o- V - w gy, -R -, Y , ua - W J , , I .Q . .ha is , ,, M in . ' 'Xl f 11' Li ,. 1 . 'Iv ' -1 . -X " ' 7 7 .41. LY. ' ' my. V - Q 1 ff 2 A X NN : E u f' Q . t it 3 g 1,315 F 1: f .,u lgr' Q , fi , mfr! I -5 sf 3, ' ? llsl E 1, ..,- 34. Q. 1 gil fy4gf .L54,. J 1 - V- + Af' 3 5 -i-115222, , 'gut' 1 X x f b Vi ,:-L"',j.,:sQyq--1 'Q l ' sa!!! , F3222 l H ' I II ' - F ' .fi - gg. pg f - ' -- L 'Q' 1 ' Qin .I 1' ' y a ffl? - +51-L .. 1' is 1 :A .' ' 'l . 1 - Q . ' t v , M Y V A- 1 I 5 -nu ' x"""! A 'Q 1 ' X 90" rf ,R Na 'i J Haig!" "3 zqh X 'Q gf., ' with df :A Q :Ni . ,- T 145'-3. Kf'?'4,2-5 V- F : -572, gf , ' ' Ai H R -1 A I, , K M ,I - AXTT'-Sf' wsu xx ,r J, . ffhkjx . UL, 1 J' V 5 ,il i W A ,,.-ni 2 i :rn 2. . 1 f ' ' 'V H V, 1 in 6 ,ff '? 4, JSE -11 I, . xxrbvrd 9.73 Ag , .r e-M l V O, V i. I, i. 1 W, W V if Q , F x F V 1 6: f . 1 P, K X ' -' ' ' ' ' , 'bfi .A , Ar' A ,- . as 4, .- 0 ,ms yn g :xv 4 "Q, E 1 .! nz: 1- ? , '.- EU :jf si I 1 V ' V 'DE sr wx i l 1 N54 t -4 3- - if X 4 Y, 4- 'Mu ' L 5 l! f' - 3-' I 'yvv "W ' is w ,Qu rf , 3' 1 df' Lu " W J r ' is J 'ws ' xxx "' 'l ' is .5 V' .. fi ' " . H 1 ' 4 5-"'-11,13 'f 'PM W, A' - lb A lif ' V' 'Cf 'ESQ 'gf' B . 1- x , rn' ' J -5 AJ M6-. I' .- -'SN g ax I 'ii ,Q . vqs H .J Q. - if "F Al.. LH. Q. I N , K A 1 , - . , ' 1 ' X v , , 3 H X -lv. C A 'l:'ffa,l . rl ,l 3 .B .hi 'A r :- - .",'vl,f L 'z zvnmfg ivan A t L if .A ff: Y,Qv.,3.,fg, r Q , ' , . X: . u -Y e - ' , X! Fix t-'W5f"g'Y3:' 7 V Q' ,A -,Q , wh, . j In T1-in X I 3"""T '. Q6 -"."K-1' .' E -'.Zf'.:4f..g'Tf-' 3 "4 ff ,Q ,' rn-. ', .I u.. -. Vw..-,., '-, "-, -'L I., -,,'.-'-4,..' . ,Q, 'f -.4 -if in Q ' 01--'M "1 N 4 5 II, 1 JK J.'. . X J-2-J--"' . ' W pang TJ. ff... .4 Q 5 f?7E'f'f'ij ,. A' i , anu- lui Z!! "3 5'Q'3m4--' J V .EEQEZ-31: Q "f .I V W Q ,:-'Y'-'L by Ng M X I I nj ui' -E. fi' PH f -3- fe -my ' 3. 1 5-lo-J. hs.. ,Y s V aiu- N. PE: E N' In , . H wi' 'nib' -M5 x xiii, 'pul 3 -.517 nfl! ,-.3-x, L45 XXX, Y., H , 1 vii ,V gl: 1 X ,Lf Iii, .-aff, 1 1 ', S9111 J L ',Y'. in X 41 H an I 2 JN . , Lf, .Eg Q 'f 'QI 'Lf L' ,fl .. N WE 1- ull. , Xggsknn 3 5 'f Ae A I -. 5 FI " ' 6? d -11.4 .lg F . ' '- H . 1 . 34 . T , in H ' I , QTTCEA5 'R , - 1 I . 43, ng 4Q.:M,,s.:.Vl9fNQ,?' , " M T'-" " E-Ulf-: T- 4- :W W N f i Q - . 1 ARS j X - fm 9 ,PK A ' - J-gg LM ' . v- ve'v'-5255512 35 ,jggi iv-vb . .Q JXMFE ,.g 1?-tj, . . -.N T-ij I U " - L ' ' uf fl-QLJKT-5-jf gk' 'Yi ' u +11-iswf-" -feb. , ' 7-- -L '- ir V -- V V' - Salim W N-6' Jfffl X 'Y 1. . A if - - an ima-ti 1 In I , :Tu i Q --fxfut V :Jw 1 Q, ,, . A 'f- - j -- Q 'fz-, I I ',Q 1 4, t' " A " . --I-1,1 1 if , W V if f I ' 1 f V I ' 1 if Q, -Vw , .-V ,2- - ' . - .- N- Q 33- r ' dn: ' I 1 f ., . W Ar- ' 1 , f ,L I W. .i Q P 'E 3 5 2 -' A X. - 1' ' ' 1 . x ' J 1 I1 3 2 I , , P 11.43. r - 1 - Pi .'V '- , 'X 14511 35-A 5 '- 43" 3 F, ,, V, ' " I N, 'N X . 260 Beauty is a quality everyone can appreciate, but it's a difficult thing to define, both in current terms, because everyones perception of it is different, and in historical terms, because the commonly held concept of it changes from age to age. King Tut was fond of braided beards, even though he never got old enough to grow one, but such a growth would look pretty funny on Santa Claus at Sears. Renoir was notoriously enraptured by some of his models, but no one today could paint nude portraits of those pink, chubby ladies and keep a strait face. These pages present the concept of personal beauty at Vanderbilt in 1976. Each organization has nominated two people who they felt represented their idea of a beauty in what they say, what they do, and the appearance they present. The editors have imposed no other restrictions, since concepts thus restricted would be inaccurate. Keep these pages for future reference. In 1996 your children can take them out of the attic and giggle. BETH CALLAWAY Huntsville, Al English lll 1'MLs 4 G. Ji 62 'T' lk I "r.P':!" BOB OLIVER Mexico City, Mx Geology SUSAN PYLE Mamaroneck, NY French Isa 'Q 'AL , f - .- ,. - . 14 - '. 'v :S N FRANK JOHNSON Dallas, Tx Interdisciplinary SARAH JOHNSON Rochester, Mn Nurse 64 MIKE BACOT New Orleans, La History WENDY BAKER Ann Arbor, Mi Nurse DENNIS HARRISON Murfreesboro, Tn PE DELPHINE HUFF MAN Birmingham, Al Nurse 265 BILL CARPENTER N ashville, Tn History CLAUDIA OWEN Houston, Tx ' Sociology 266 -J' '1 ,fg- ,il H 1ii-' iw , Q- wi. -- W W lv , U, -QPR 135 'ft' N1 FRANK PALLOTTA Atlanta, Ga Drama LISSA LEGRAND Birmingham, Al History 267 68 gm' V5 LYNN BERNARD Houston, Tx Economics NANCY ARMSTRONG Maitland, Fl Nurse KENT YANDELL Lake Bluff, Il Philosophy IOAN MEYER Alexandria, Va Psychology ,agua , .W C '13, QQ -Q6 Au Q 0 l"2"3'1'!vv 'Wk ' a s 5. -:Qu I A A f , Q 1la'hl'x 1 N J' -'fl 4- pr ,., .A-. , -'lA,..A if "du 'xf'!.' r 51'-rd'-v ' 95 ggffre. Y! , v ul' Q D tx 269 Q .7 it Ln an -may ,. v ,4, 'K 'Q rr 1 Il wt ' 4 t J v n rl, Y . f v ' Xu nv- ' A 'O 'T' 'gl' Q 'Y x .XXX 1 ' I --2 . , 'X X 'x fy x' ,, N. ,x x 7 2 , Fm W ,aw 4 1 -. MARK MCDONALD Atlanta, Ga Economics MELINDA CLINARD Metairie, La Economics LEEANN THORNTON Nashville, Tn Philosophy 270 K 271 Army Rotc it r T? ' if Army ROTC provides military course of instruction designed to supplement normal educational experiences at Vanderbilt with training which will qualify students for appointments as officers in the regular Army or in the Reserve. Both men and women may enroll in ROTC and both are eligible for the scholarships and other activities provided in the program. Under the progressive leadership of Colonel Russell E. Baugh, Vanderbiltis Army ROTC enjoyed a successful and eventful year, offering a variety of social and progressional activities to its supporters. The Cadet Battalion, commanded by Cadet Lieutenant Colonel Charles Haffenden took part in several diverse community and social activities such as Muscular Dystrophy Associationis mothers march, the annual Army-Navy football and basketball games, Nashville Metropolitan District College nights, the 272 Tennessee ROTC day, a welcoming picnic, a military ball, and the Spring Review. The Army ROTC color guard provided color and pageantry to Vandy home basketball and football games. Cadets participating in the color guard were Richard Hamblen, jack Sneed, Ion Cooper, and Mike Hiemstra. The Vanderbilt University Army ROTC Rifle Team, in its maiden season, demonstrated that a young viable program is in the offing. Competing against some of the best collegiate rifle teams in the nation, Vanderbilt showed impressive results in both postal and shoulder- to-shoulder matches. With numerous such accomplishments to its credit, Vanderbilt Army ROTC counts 1975-1976 a vital and successful year. ARMY ROTC CADET BATTALION 1975-1976 Battalion Commander Charles S. I-Iaffenden XO! S1 Cilley C. Richardson S3 Richard L. Agee S4 Randall L. Courduff A Company Thomas E. York B Company james M. Althouse C Company Thomas I. Cavender H7 hd 'nu 273 5 ANL .-1 rx J I aw . A r'1 v -'T' '4- n H N. 274 sn., r-L, 4, 4'-. 1" if r '4' NX ri K, 3 I sm Q' jf -44 X -,,, 1? L" s A ',. A. I !, I '!'7f ,,. A ,fr Y .oi . ',-3. X .jxh -,f 11011. ' -diy,-gi , 9 . 'iw ,, . 153,145 ., , .l- 5,40 ii-Q Y ,ff :E F? Li Q! 275 NROTC Shortly after the drill sessions were underway for the 1975- 76 year, the U.S. Navy nationwide celebrated its 200th birthday. The battalion of 150 assembled to celebrate with the ritual cake caking, where the oldest and youngest sailor present get the first piece of cake. It marked the beginning of an exciting year for the NROTC at Vanderbilt. Successes along the way were punctuated with trophies. There was the crushing defeat of the Army ROTC in the annual Army-Navy football game, another addition to the old bucket. The NROTC Band trekked to Mardi Gras in New Orleans to receive a first in stationary music performance along with many beads and baubles. Vanderbilt's NROTC basketball team swept the Ninth Naval District Championship in Great Lakes for the second year in a row as well as defeating the Army ROTC on the court. And the fast pitch softball team took a third in the Ole Miss Invitational. Rest, relaxation and revelry were part of the year's activities. The annual Navy Ball was held at the University Club where senior Blue Angel F loy Oliver reignedg midshipmen and guests dined and danced until the early morning. The seniors reveled at their best at Senior Mess Night with flaming beef, flaming dessert and fiery tosts to one and all. There was a fall picnic, a spring picnic and "after-drill" parties to relieve the mind from its endless hours of study. Solemnity and celebration were also part of the midshipmeifs lives. Commissioning in December and May embarked new Ensigns and second Lieutenants on careers backed by 200 years of pride and tradition. Spring Review was a time to give recognition to those midshipmen who have consistently given of themselves and for their families to join in the celebration of their academic and military dedication. It was a year marked by highs and lows but one held together by the thread of enthusiasm and perserverance. 276 fl' -.ra ,... ..- 'nv K A 'Q 141' 4. g 1 - 'x - ' ' 1 , 1 P, 4 .-7' --fl-, '- , '..::N'.. " , L' ,. N "JI-,AQ-.V . V -p... : Y A 4 1131 ,- .., .- 4 1 p ' P' Q. '- n3.L'.. 1 277 -Q NJ A 4 1 ,-., 278 fm! 4 f' r v 13 1, ,r -1 S N.. 4'- vn. , . -v- Ns., -'Z'-'S "s ,' 5wggEi,offs,f'I' -., . sf: Z ylln 3.14 -will iii SN. 1 7- 7. 4 Officer Staff, 1975-1976: Commzmding Officer: Captain Kenneth C. Smith, USN, a 1952 graduate of the Naval Academy, earned his wings in 1954. He assumed command of the unit in August, 1974. Executive Officer: Lieutenant Colonel Henry L. Searle, USMC, was commissioned in 1956 from the NROTC unit at the University of Washington. He served in Vietnam in 1970-71 with the Military Assistance Command and reported to Vanderbilt in the summer of 1975. Marine Officer Instructor: Major Donald II. Cardner, USMC, enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1955 and was commissioned in 1960. He has a.n M.A. in Military History from Memphis State. 1!C Instructor: Lieutenant VVilliam M. Marshall, USN, enlisted in the Navy in 1959 and received his commission in 1967. He is a nuclear power trained officer and will be reporting to the USS Nimit: QCVAN-68D in july 1976. 2!C Instructor: Lieutenant Mann A. Shoffner, USN, graduated from the Naval Academy in 1971, He came to Vanderbilt in August 1975. 3!C Instructor: Lieutenant Katherine Brown, USNR, was commissioned in june 1972. Prior to joining the Navy, she earned a master of arts in teaching and taught in public schools for three years. 4!C Instructor: Lieutenant Kurt O.E. Tschaepe, USN, was commissioned through the Vanderbilt NESEP program in 1969. He has recently received a j.D. degree from Vanderbilt and will be joining a law firm in Orlando, Fla. 41C Instructor: Lieutenant Qjunior gradej john L. Fisher, USN, was commissioned in 1972 through the Vanderbilt NESEI' program. Before reporting to Vanderbilt in 1975, he had several Mediterranean deployments. if fr-if ilE,.:1:1ffIi-Qt f . 'W if "'5.45:.ff iii: g27':i'Llff+-f:fTs'i bg, -g., 'i' f- , 15.3-Cgi4PA,if zn.,iLff-- A -- .5 1,3 '...gT-if.,:- fi' lf'i7,1.7"' X454 V' A I if I - V- M-,,.... , . X :,,,i:t,l, 1,3135 niet: li 5 7:75 '- i - ' 177.5 5' 1475 -P j-' -f1- .N ..f?', W i't't5 fi3g:Lr41w5'. A if a...-.:..,..Q,,, 8 N I I' ' 7 '7'aL-.Lays-Q..-'W' " :fe.1Li,+L.me::salYe-Essen:-' '- Aug L A lhsi 279 Sunda orm Life March 14, 1976 I 5' ga .. 'f' 4'4" , 'R 280 The Vanderbilt Hilton will open in a few years, across the street from the freshman quad, but what Conrad doesn't know is that the Commodore has been running his own hotel business for a hundred years, and running it proudly QOld Kissam Hall, once on the site of what is now Alumni Lawn, was designed by the same architect who designed the palatial Vanderbilt home, which stood in New York City on the present site of Bergdorf Coodman'sj. Besides being an educational institution, Vanderbilt offers food, shelter, parking, and entertainment nightly-for a price. Rooms are expensive fa one room double in Tower II, public bath, is we all 4- J i w 9 li-Whig, 5 about 85229 per month, total costg a Chaffin Place apartment is about SSOOQ but popular, and the dorms foster a lifestyle that is a rmique and integral part of college life. The spirit of the pennied portal, and that of the everpresent Everclear, keep the situation from being boring. Survivors of four years can stand pile drivers, jackhammers, demented practical jokes, and almost anything else, without a llinch, smiling veterans of one more rite of passage. Conrad might not approve, but chances are the Commodore would still trade an ice machine for an ice fight any day. You have to have a sense of humor to give away a million dollars. ' Q+i-L M fy' W S'?'F1E .fi W Dzjferent Strokes for Different Folks ,. ,, 'vp .QQ- ,,f., ,:..f'.:--V . e-X Z' 'T 835- e - m'::: K 1 282 49? vv f ax , -if Fw wenevennuavou Tl-EWRONGWAV i-f V X A Dwi' 'SQ 5" -. A F' 41' . ' 1 1 1 3 I '. 0 .1-1 JH- L. 0 f xi Day Dreams and Highlighting 3-if 284 Vi Fifi .Vt ,M . , lv fn- FXR ln IA Qxyx x ,pw w K' ,f ff if 1 1 f --r' "':T I ggmi rf. -' A . X f . L VK iv ,Z '-:ef ' -if ' X nw? -X 0' JM 285 542 - Itfs F City V 286 in X. WW 24 I' , .-um., If 1 Q- ,'-A, wk Ixissblf .QPU . ., - " " aff: f 'ff- ' -P:,.'-.ml 'lf' ' 291422-1'-M" of '- .' A 5j,, ,af : -T,3aih . ar.. , , 3' , K I . , N. 8. I , f ...F Q, I., lg 1- , 444551 '- i' 7 Hutch to Hutch L ,Qian-.- 311. 'TH 99 2 .1 Fl? mf! , ,Jr , f 1 fi , T518 K 3 . - s 1 :qg - -x ,, ffm' - 14.64 . -:rx 'Yr ts- RAPX N I Q .Qs - 289 Scopeing and Other Things r 290 X X . ' fffl 33 X Mcmming After 292 'T Q ' ""5' Nb l:..,., , A 293 Taking Care of Business W" " 4 uf-L 1....... M-1 u 1 r in 4 294 qwhw-gm 14 1 a birrz H i li-'iuprl RP .. Q Black Holes It has been anounced that next year numerous singles in Barnard, Vanderbilt, and Carmichael will be converted into "temporary" doubles. We have our doubts as to the temporariness of these doubles. Surely they will be temporary for at least one yearg almost assuredly for twog no proposed donn could be built within that length of time, and no dorm has even been proposed. VVhy this sudden conversion of ivy-covered academe into the Black Hole of Calcutta? Such questions are moot. It has been decided that two students can survive in the area that formerly supported one, and so it shall be. But will it? Is there no alternative? The first answer that presents itself is the suspension of the entire class of rising sophomores. Consider what is to be gained by thisg surely little is to be lost. Sophomores are irritatingg at least this class gives promises of being as irritating then as they are now. Of course, this is a drastic remedy, but these are drastic times. You may have nothing against sophomores, but would you want to room with one? J .5 3 H LET, I V- f 1 y .A . rw, 4 -We .va fl . .5 ' I Another possibility is even more felicitous. Why not forceeach and every student to justify his continued studies at Vanderbilt? Ah, the results! At one fell swoop the academic climate of the university would increase twofold. The G.P.A. would rise astronomically as a result of eliminating the mentally unfit, and professors would be assured of having only the best and most dedicated students in their classes-anyone else would either have failed to gain readmission or not have bothered to apply. The third answer focuses on the plans for the expansion of Dudley Stadium. Although some feel that this will be unnecessary, we feel that it does not go far enough. Not only must our stadium be expandedg it ought to be roofed as well-the Commodome, perhaps, or the Vanderbowl. Instead of crowding into a cramped ex-double, students could enjoy the freedom of the great open spaces. Encumbered by only a sleeping bag and a backpack full of spare clothes and textbooks, they could happily range the bleachers and concrete staiiways, finding in their possessionless society a new happiness. And is this not the essential purpose of a liberal education? S LM 295 Moving On ,. 'L I 3 k.5 .4 , J r W J. , -J 4 , ,.. , xv., . , 1 Getting Around There are about as many ways to get around as there are people doing the getting. The old reliable shoeleather taxi is still the most popular, because it,s cheap and convenient, and hasn't got any crumpleable fenders. Dune boots, earth shoes, and topsiders are favorites. Once in a while, you'll catch somebody mowing the lawn in his 1959 model penny loafers, but he wonit admit it later CIt,s kind of like having an Edselj. In the summer, even the leather is j ettisoned in favor of cool bare tootsies. Tastes vary, though, and some students trade in their callouses and corns for bicycles, anything from a Western Flyer to a ten-pound Peugeot. There is even a unicycle loose somewhere. A few people, either cripples or nonconformists, have golf carts that can't decide whether they belong on the street or the sidewalk, and are a hazard on both. There are also skate boards, resurrected from that never-never land of the recent past filled with silly putty, hula hoops, and stickum caps. They have to fight pedestrians, golf carts, cars and speed breakers-only a dedicated handful bother to try. Despite the alternatives, there are a lot of cars on campus. Vanderbilt isn't as choked with cars as a lot of schools its size, having no through roads and no large inner campus parking lots. Still, affluent college students and their cars are inseparable, and the Vandy student may be spied behind the wheel of a battered Beetle or a Cadillac Fleetwood. He gets his exercise hiking to the gym parking lots. Footfans rejoice: feet won't be obsolete for a while yet. I ,A Q x. '49-xi G X 'A Q A ,gui- ,H ,- f-wr ,.n R --...-.2-..-.f 9--2 -" ,,-1s-- 'fa 7 snffifqi - tv 'Tiff 2Fr9JU "Tu .1 .nctvarlx-'n-u.pmwv.p N 1 9 4 'QQ 300 ,,..-4" f 1 'fl 4,,,,lf- if Odd Shot Gallely A collection of loose knit, but worth it shots. I T11 'U O 04 O5 r wav 9,4 Q f u 1 H 1 306 -wx' .- BAT Nv- ,.,-.1 5,- ,.,..- ....,- w,'- f.. L. . V.. ,. 307 -ni. K-7 ' S., -fv3,+-iks.a-4l-.-.-l.........-- Y .lx-1 '-'- ' --"V-. ,. . "PW ' wil. v.d5,.,'. vs V ' '-'N 'ef ll-6 alw- Q H' 'H W' 4 222 5:- 49 9. - s ' X' ' Qi? V 'im F . ' V v . 2 ' if-, 5 1 .X --r -,, .1 - , , . -L, . N. , ,... X i E , V .' I' V, ' 1. A A V ,RN N". 1 ' ' If ' 25 V J x ' Ji -A 5,5 1 !f" .-,Win " - QQ L. , if-f , N L Vg' ' .ig-0' if. . ' , Q ' .1 , J xc . .- pg, nj , . - 1.5: - .4 ,fp Vu, 5 , r 1. 4 JH . . , H ,llqw f V -' f '. ' ' , , . J ' :fits :4 , A V Ig' M:-7:33 Lf: , . . ' 1 I' 5 ' , A , " "xx wg The Centennial Program ' gtSI'IT1l'I'I,g'X Q X 44, I. Concert of organ, chorus, and brasses. 5 as so II. .3 S III. Procession I., Trustees, Past Presidents of the Alumni Association, Members of the Board of Directors, Representatives of the Classes. Procession II, ranking professors of the University. X ,R X rt, IV. Procession III, speakers, deans, and ranking administrators of the Q ,V I ,q I l ml , A i . , ..j ,,. ,A W. xg- fill - ., Af - wr xr Xi .f'Ccci.x'1vP.t X J, University. A Litany for the Centennial Vanderbilt Concert Choir CELEBRATION VII. Remarks by the presiding officer, Sam M. Fleming VIII. Remarks by the Chancellor OF THE IX. Inauguration Ode from 1875 . . . K' ' B 't , . Centennial of the University XI, Ogfgdsanfeiziir lf XII. jean Leblon 1:30 p.m. Friday, October 3, 1975 iiedlaiimijnko . ma a er Memorial Gymnasium The following text, prepared and delivered by Chancellor Kingman Brewster of Yale, Concerns the future prospects for the liberal art education I know you realize that this is a pleasure and a privilege for me. It is also somewhat awe-inspiring, and not only because of your milestones, but because two of my distinguished predecessors were also privileged to share this platform, one on your twenty- fifth anniversary, another later, on your fiftieth. In predicting the future, my real liberation derives not from the years just past but from the vista which a centenary offers. I am quite safe in wildest predictions. Neither I nor anyone within reach of my voice will be around to disprove or confirm my predictions for the next century. In looking into my crystal ball, I would expect to see quite different visions as I look at four quite distinguishable aspects of higher learning. One aspect is information, the accumulation of knowledge. The second aspect is skills, the "how-to-do-it" or "how-to- think-it" aspect of learning. Now if you listened to some commentators, journalists and politicians, you might think that information and know-how are all there is to education, whether it be higher, lower or in-between. There is, however, a third area which I would call critical judgment. This is the area of plausible assessment, discriminating taste, aesthetic sensibility, and moral conviction. The vast realm of ideas, of course, straddles aio 3 information and judgment. When a concept or a theory passes into certainty, beyond argument, it is learned as though it were hard information. It is important to know it, it is no longer necessary to argue with it. Darwin's Theory of Evolution, Newtonis "laws" are, for most of us, primary data, as hard and fast as primary facts, even though biologists and physicists may elaborate, refine, modify, certainly supplement the original theorems. But some concepts, say Keynes' general theory in economics, Rawls' theory of justice, are still arguable, especially in application to public policy. They are still in the realm of what I would call critical judgment. Certainly the developments of competence in philosophy, in literary criticism, in historical interpretation, in both experimental and theoretical science and social science all require the development of judgment. This is more than skill. It sets to sea beyond the shores of hard indisputable information. The fourth category of higher learning, perhaps the highest, is what I would call discovery. Here again there is an overlap with judgment. Maybe all I mean by discovery is that rare capacity for new insights which deserve critical attention. At best discovery finds a clue to some new indispensable piece of the jigsaw puzzle which fits random experience into a coherent noncontradictory whole. From the new elementary particle to new light on Edith Wharton, discovery is the aim of all scholars and scientists. So my crystal ball gazing would direct you first at information, second, skill, third, judgment, fourth , discovery. What then does the next century hold for each of these distinguishable aspects of higher learning? I foresee fantastic breakthroughs in the way information is communicated and in the way skills are acquired. The audio-visual revolution cannot be delayed much longer. When its technology is unlocked, when a market comes into being which is large enough to support economical mass production, then it will be possible for any citizen to take a "course" of lectures and reading at his own convenience, over his own television set, simply by attaching to it a little black box which can transmit to his screen a whole semester's worth of lectures. Given the craving for credentials typical of our society, undoubtedly some form of examination and certification will be attached to this "demand feeding" form of electronic education for the acquisition of information and the development of skills. Some of this audio-visual self-education will be at the purely vocational-technical level. It will bring the language laboratory into the parlor. It can do the same for teaching the uses of computers and the hundred of simple mechanical instructions which have long since made the film an important element in military and industrial training. Long before the century is up, it is probably true that "Socratic computersv will also become popularly available. VVhen that happens, home learning can include trial and error, correction of mistakes, pacing of advancement through different levels of sophistication. These will be upackagedv in a single system which can respond to the student's answers to problems and exercises. All this will be able to be done at the user's own convenience, in his own home, whether by cable television or by tape cassette. We also would be quite wrong to dismiss this potential for electronic self-education as adaptable only to the vocational skills, only to quantitative information. The fantastic accomplishments of a Kenneth Clark, an Alistair Cooke, are ample evidence of ways in which lectures, carefully designed for film and tape, can convey the awe, wonder and mystery of cultural experience and historic achievement. The nub of this prognostication, if it is valid, is that our an S0 what happens to Vanderbilt? What happens to Yale? children, or childrenis children, or their grandchildren, are not going to have to go to a classroom on a tight schedule, taught by a live teacher, in order to learn information and skills. The command of information will be gained not only from reading, but from reading supplemented by visual images on tape in cassette or other electronic devices for transmitting visual lessons at one's own convenience. What then will happen to our university colleges, with their present schedule of live classes in large masses to convey knowledge and train skills? They will diminish in importance as far as the learning of skills and information is concerned. Why should anyone pay the overhead, why take the time, if almost as much by way of skill and information can be obtained on your own time, so to speak, at home? If the job you want, the career which interests you, can be prepared for by self-education, if you gain the certificates of your accomplishment by some respectable, nationally recognized examining board, why invest in the time and money which live education costs? Even if the tuition is free, either by tax support or by public and private scholarships, there is still the cost of living While not working. If skills and knowledge are all you seek, a few decades from now college may seem to be an unwarranted luxury, both for those who pay the bills and for those who spend the time. So what happens to Vanderbilt? What happens to Yale? You will recall that I mentioned two other levels of learning, beyond the acquisition of skill and the acquisition of knowledge. The first of these I call the acquisition of critical judgment, the second the capacity for discovery. What are the prospects for these two missions? It is my conviction that critical judgment cannot be packaged or programmed, that it cannot be learned passively. Even the most sophisticated "Socratic computer" cannot provoke the free ranging argument which holds unorthodox, genuinely original insights up to the light of scrutiny by discussion. "Thinking out loud? is indispensable to this process. The spur of rigorous discourse is itself the provocation to more adequate critical thought. The role of "creative learning" seems to me equally valid for the humanist testing a new way of thinking 312 about a literary or artistic form, the scientist testing a new hypothesis, or the student of society groping for more adequate explanations of human and institutional relationships. For all of these there is no mechanical substitute for the live "sparring partners," be they fellow students or mentors or elder sages. I am one of those who believe that judgment is transferable. The capacity to grapple with a new idea, to distinguish inquisitive skepticism from captious debunking, to be unafraid when assumptions are questioned, all of these capacities, in short, the capacity to enjoy intellectual challenge, require a resilience which only intellectual confidence can provide. Intellectual confidence, in turn can be gained best by experience of live intellectual challenge. This process itself, it seems to me, matters more than the particular specialized field of intellectual combat. The widespread availability of access to skill and information will not devalue the special quality of critical judgment. Indeed, as specialization becomes typical of a hyperorganized society, as "future shock" becomes normal under the pressures of population, pollution, and resource exhaustion, in these circumstances critical judgment will be more highly prized than ever. A nation or a region which does not have a few centers devoted to its cultivation will be barren indeed. Those colleges and universities which by privilege and tradition have been taught to care about this mission owe it to their past, and their potential, to be sure that they not lose or squander this precious heritage in face of popular concern with vocationalism. VVhat then of the fourth level of higher learning, discovery? Skill and information is its foundation, for no idea is wholly new. Critical judgment is indispensable also, for the new insight springs most often from an awareness of the inadequacies of the intellectual inheritance. Also the mystery of discovery cannot be gainsaid. Nevertheless, we do well to recall Pasteur's saying that "In the field of observation, chance favors only the prepared mindf' As knowledge has proliferated, as methods of knowing have become more complicated, the isolated garret inventor, the image of Watt seeing the steam engine in the vapor of his kitchen kettle, becomes less realistic. The variables which the economist, especially the political economist, must bear in mind defy the The flags displayed against the back curtain are those ot' the 25 nations. in addition to the United States. that are represented in the list ol' Univer- sities beginning on page 9. Front left to right in alphalvetieal order, they are the flags ol' Australia. Belgium. Brazil. Canada, Colonthia. Czecho- slovakia. France. Cierntany. India. Ireland. lsrael, Italy. Japan. Latvia. Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines. Poland. South Korea. South Vict- lllllll. Sweden. SWillL'flilllkl. Tltxtilattd. Union ol' South Alriczt. and the United Kingdom. knowledge of any simple intelligence. And even the humanist, if he is to take into account the variety of cultural experience and expressions, has to test his critical insights against a far vaster panorama of historical experience than any single person can hope to master. In short, whatever the field, valid innovation can no longer be achieved as easily in isolation. The university, of course, cannot claim to be the only community of intellectual explorers. But I submit that it does have the great advantage of both a horizontal and a vertical stimulus to discovery. By horizontal I mean that it does provide a community in which one can hope to find a neighbor who really knows what youire talking about, when a field suddenly becomes relevant to your own speculations. By vertical I mean The banners back ofthe chairs on stage are those ofthe eight schools ol' the University. Each is decorated with the Vanderbilt shield lcnthattled. charged with oak leaf and acorn! against the appropriate academic color: purple For Law. green for Medicine. orange for Engineering. white for Arts. apricot for Nursing. light brown for fvlanagcntent. scarlet for Divinity. and dark blue for the Graduate Schools degree of Doctor ol' Philosophy. that a university is a community which provides the sometimes impertinent freshness of younger minds, undergraduates, graduate students and junior colleagues, and that freshness is a marvelous counterweight to the inevitable tendencies to that intellectual obsolescence, which is the enemy of discovery. It is my conviction that as specialization and complexity race forward, as they must, the scholarly research-intensive university will become increasingly important to any society which puts any whatsoever on the role of discovery. And by discovery, I mean not only the invention of things, but the invention of ideas which give meaning and purpose to life and coherence to society. You may have noticed that I have shifted from the ata vernacular of prediciton to the language of conviction. At the level of skill and information prediction seems to me largely a technological and economic matter. The technology is there for a massive revolution in self-education. When the market makes its mass distribution economically feasible, it will happen. The faculty-student ratio required for teaching by mutual provocation is very expensive. If the stretching of critical judgment is the goal, then there is no mass production substitute. Indeed, the library collections and laboratory instrumentation, let alone the support of advanced students and apprentices, which true research and scholarship demand, are enormously expensive. But if discovery is the goal and the value, there is no substitute for access to the collected Wisdom of the past or the instrumentation for testing new ways of looking at man and matter. Even if there were no spectre of inflation, it would be expensive, very expensive, to maintain even a few centers devoted to the development of critical judgment and discovery. There are at least three obvious obstacles to adequate support. First, the functions I am talking about do not lend themselves to hard and precise measurement. The "payout,,, as the investor would put it, does not translate easily into quantitative assessment. Yet the quality of a nation's leadership may stand or fall depending upon the quality of its critical judgment. The survival, as well as the welfare and culture of a nation may depend upon its capacity for discovery. And yet these consequences cannot be quantified. Their achievement cannot easily be traced to a single program or educational activity or single isolated scholarly event. It is very hard for the "investor," 314 K whether he be a legislator voting for an appropriation or a foundation president voting for a grant, to prove the results of his investment in either liberal education or in creative scholarship. The second obstacle which faces adequate support for critical judgment and discovery is that both of them are very high risk enterprises. Many efforts at discovery will fail and even those which succeed will do so only in terms of a lifetime of work and generations of refinement and application. The "time horizon" as the economists would say, is far more distant than most politicians or investors are used to. The third obstacle to popular support of liberal education and creative research is the disparagement . . . I cannot help but fear that the "something-for-eveifyhodyv instinct of legislative politics . . . of elitism. The basic ethic of most politicians and even of many foundation officers and trustees seems to be "if you canlt do something for everybody it,s better not do anything for anybody." This I submit is a counsel of disaster for the cause of both liberal education beyond the level of skill and creative scholarship and for research beyond the level of information. Of course, we are a big country. But we need many colleges devoted to the development of critical judgment. And we need many universities devoted to discovery. America never has had, and never will have, a single "national university' like the University of Paris or those universities in the capital cities of so many countries. But as the market for higher education beyond the learning of skills and information shrinks, the country probably will not need, probably will not be able to afford, as many truly liberal arts colleges, as many truly research intensive universities as we thought it might or were confident that it could afford in the spendthrift decades just after the second world war. It will need even fewer, when technology makes information and skill available to all outside the classroom. The question remains-how do you ration the nation's resources without giving the government the power to decide who survives or not la severe problem in countries such as Englandj? This imposes a terrific moral and judgmatical overload on the political system. Happily, in our country we have not yet come to rely on government, the central government at any rate, to support universities with bloc institutional grants. We are big enough, competitive enough, and perhaps affluent enough to be able still to rely on the mechanism of a free market. My crystal ball tells me, then, that we stand right now at a big fork in the road. We may follow the British model of making the political process the arbiter of the fate of institutions of higher leaming. Or, we may seek ways in which students will be given the wherewithal to vote with their feet and bring with them the support which institutions need. They would then from generation to generation choose which institutions best fit their needs and talents. Competition in the American tradition would then decide which should survive and which should not. If the future of higher education in the United States is left to the political process, I cannot help but fear that the ''something-for-everybodyv instinct of legislative politics, inevitably tempted to spread support in an even-handed way among states and congressional districts. The feeble will be sustained and the excellent will be brought low. Even-handed, fairshares mediocrity will be the outcome. It is very hard for "investor, D whether he he a legislator voting for an appropriation or a foundation president voting for a grant, to prove the results of his investment in either liberal education or in creative scholarship. The high costs of a truly "Socratic', development will be scorned as "elitist," The very high costs of collections, laboratories, graduate apprenticeship and discovery will be shimned as politically unjustified because its payoff is too long postponed and conjectural at best. If this were to happen, the nation will eventually fail to offer the superb opportunity which superb talent so deserves. I would fear the common denominator will be very common indeed. If, on the other hand, national investment in the relatively few who are excited by ideas, and the relatively few who are dedicated to discovery can be allocated by competition, then I see American higher education going onward and upward. If students can be adequately subsidized in a way that makes them 315 free to choose and pay the high costs of the college and university of their choice, then institutions can compete for them in terms of the quality of teaching and the quality of scholarship. I am, as your Chancellor knows, forced by dint of my office to be an optimist. How else would one have survived these recent years as a college president? But I am an optimist, in a deeper sense, about our country. I think we still have the dedication to freedom of choice for the individual. We still keep the faith in competition as the best way to ration resources and achieve progress. I believe we still have the ingenuity to devise free market mechanisms to allocate the taxpayers, "investment', and their most talented children. I have to believe that we Will, over the decades ahead, find ways in which the society can invest in its most talented young so that they, in turn, can find institutions somewhere in the country which are worthy of their talents. Vanderbilt certainly is one such and, given the freedom to compete, it Will, a century from now, be greater for its state, for its region and for the nation than any federal bureaucratic program or master plan could make it. In that spirit of optimism, Happy Birthday! Morning was golden when from one high tower The cool bell stirred its bronze and rang the hour. Trees were all April to our youthful mood, And sun lit golden Morning in the blood: For what is Morning but to tread old ways Where other steps have trod, and measure days With eager touch as for an ancient door That willingly swings as it has swung before? Where youthful feet have passed and yet will pass Morning abides on trees and tower and grassg And Morning rules where voices murmuring From April windows summon up the Spring. Old paths may change. new faces light old walls, Morning will still be golden in these halls. Donald Davidson, '17 316 317 Freshmen Once Freshmen once, they are freshmen once again, a new beginning with new goals. The lifestyle is so different, and that first Thanksgiving seems a hundred years away. They shake the Chancellor's hand and eat his catered chicken. The first exams weed out a few, the first summer a few more. There is homecoming, and rush, and parties-part of a year-long orientation. I if 'Ku I n. .Ii iv" W M Y " N551 1, in r, 'l V. , ' has g' . ' -A . J' Q r 'T 5 Q v :L if Hr' -5,3 lg I , , 453' ' fi 2 . . .V ,gr . -,ii N , "W H sh. ' 4 5 . 'ff mei! : -Q Q -h.. 1 nl 1",. .'. ' H" . , . i ., L 1 qu x A . .1 v '. . -. 1 . uv., N X n 5 "' R '1-" 1 , . 1 L T '- ".q. X N. ..o. ,' .A x . A V 9 1 1-.." . ' A. P iii". Y 5 "Q g. ' gg.. -if . isa. -5' . . '.."..- '..,3vs'. .atv .zzlg l 'Syst 1 To Sophomores To the sophomores, a little knowledge proves to be a dangerous thing, as they overextend the body and the mind, late night drinking and late night studying. Self-reliance grows with experience, and, as all the initiations are completed, they approach an easy, assured rhythm of daily activity. Friendships are tested, broken, strengthened. 318 1 Q . 8 ru Q . i',. lsilflfj ' '- 5 ,J we Q . 'g , y , -5 Q S . 1 -Alu f. . .l as ' , , ix Q! ' - - ' ,fs- . at 1 si' " I-.vi 4 vo.,-' Y is Q 5-n r Rx I I 1 H r ' . a"7', er ,l,,',:. v'- 1 , I '5' 4' - ' 4 . y . 'cas' . juniors Approach Uridgvrclassmen no more, juniors approach I-peaks of academic achievement. Optimistic and self-confident, they have Q passed the half-way point, gaining . J-7' ' Q .notoriety or assuming a comforting -glanonymity., Qaireer choices flicked like distant 'cami fiifes on a moonlessnight. . i ' . . L "q 'I ' 5 ' ' 'Ti 1 A as ... lax mv ,I is .. "lpP1,. ' , h' 4 3 0 qv ,uf I' .0 , -' .4.,f"'.. A 1' . 't ' ' -- . J' 0 nf 5' , . 4 - t 3 ' 5-J ',a- fl' . 'iq' -I 7' - ' 7 ' H1 0 "fa I4 if if-fo " " ,fi ' s it 'ml' '. ' . ' -4 ' 'S' .. T it . T T l ' ' an Ac.. 'bf' " 'S .W IA 1' ,,- i- 1 L, A I, sv , 1 - o 5 ,g , pg. 54654: iv -' . , Ll -1,5 W . , jf .. 1 . wi" Q . V - ,A ' ' A 5'.- ' - 4. Jw- .- so - 3 I-. if 'I .. " f..' 'I ,H . , , t " aol, ff . ' . 'T ' 1 W 9 7-'sffff-' "1 " ,' . . , w , n 1 . .'1,' 23: n .1 'f V .fbi -4 .n 1- , f 1 " 5' ' . ' " ., fLxv4p!'f4 ' , H X W, , 6, . ,,- .- H.. ' - f 5 ,,, .' . ' "' ' 4 Q 1' ' n:',,f- 'Rig-3. , -I . , . .J in x cy . ia 'I' ' 4 " 'fs r' ' ' Q V I I J" ' ' . ' .g9f!t, ' L -M E' ..'7-135, F , lu n ,lriwvy pl, I .. 54" 5, , ,V -n.,' v wat. -0- . 4. - - ff" -i " "' at 'f ' Y' 6 ' , 'V+ ' Q - -, ' , p 'f.f.-.',- 'gig'-1-,I ' , . I ,ai W-Vt , ,Gy fa ,lg Je fp . 4, Q nu. ' tl I.. .H 4 - 5-', , , , Q aff- 'I .' 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Lp beyond the academic environment to 1 3,1 1 - - A may A35-.f.'?fe'1i , N f f si" Q., which they have become accustomed. 5+ Q Xu ' x . 1 ., 75 9? 3,5 ,4 , Q5 'gk "f i ' Campus sights, organizations, and ' 'N ' liflff- l 'n .336 'W' 71'-, A1 . 'Q activities are assumed, regular, and ' ', ' , . :gt .bv I1 . , , - ' ' 5 N comforting. Graduation draws nears, and , iff' - 'tif '42 ' they look forward to yet another . - ' TF 'beginning The Great Boot cocks itself. " fail? , "lf ,P A I I ' r 1 The nest quakes. -,A v .'. . v P vs ul l ' ' we 319 0 ,iffy u , 1 1 ' x' ,fx , " 4 m f , f I If l' ,FX x X f ,N ., ' r g N f ' " X ' ,f Q " 47 3 , 51 .- ' 1 ' ,f . ' A K K 1 C -- nf A - ,J 1 V, f'jf', --,-u-J, f , 4 I ' , V Ni may 'X -'wx gl 4. J PK' 'K' a. 4--'jxz , 1 ., wg 1 , "Qi f . f V' 'N'-A -'J ,if 'pfs' ' . A ,.s..sNN , 1 I V XJ, ' I fa-.T 'x , ,Q 4 Q' . W '-'-weslfff' ' " A ffa?---. x V -Il l - , K -r'u,:4H '- 3 3 y ,Q A w k ' , I x l . 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A .5 Q fr ,- 1,1 f 1 K L . r 47 4 L !, ff' - .QQ""'jPg, a :Au 'X I X.. .Ax ef' 1 LQ: ! 5 X Applications rofile of Freshmen Total applications ................ ........... 4 284 Total offers of admission ......... ........... 3 042 Total freshmen registered ..................... 1300 Registrants from public schools .............. 862 Registrants from private schools ............ 438 Registrants with alumni family ....,.......... 294 Editor of papers of yearbooks ........,........ 144 Senior of Student Body Presidents ......... 135 Valedictorians ................................,. ........ 8 3 Arts and Science Total applications ................. ........ 3 300 Total offers of admission .................. 2167 Total freshmen registered .................. 891 SAT AVERAGES Verbal ........... 560 Math .............. 600 GRADE AVERAGE IN SECONDARY SCHOOL A ......................,................................... 3796 B ......... .......... C ........ ........ 57'Hn 6'Zi D ........ ......... 1 1 F ................................................. ......... I 1 COMBINED SAT SCORES 1500-1600 .......................................... 0.9'Zw 1400-1490 ........ ......... 3 .7'Ki 1300-1390 ........ .......... 1 5.0fKm 1200-1290 ......,. .......... 1100-1190 ........ .......... 1000-1090 ........ .......... 28.5'Zi 27.5fXi 18.2'Hm Below 1000 ........................................ 6 .2'Xm DECILE RANK IN SECONDARY SCHOOL 1!10 .................................................. M5006 2! 10 ........... .......... 2 6.9'Zn 3! 10 ...................... .......... 4! 10 ......................... ....... 11.2'ZJ 05.9121 5! 10 and Below .......... ......... 6 .0'Km Geographic Distribution Tennessee ...,................ 295 Cnon-local 179 Nashville 166 Florida ......................... 136 Texas ......,.. .......... 9 9 Alabama ....... .......... 9 3 Georgia ......... ......... 9 10 Kentucky .......... .......... 8 1 Ohio .............. ......... 6 1 Illinois ........... .......... 5 3 New York ..... .... ......... I 3 8 Missouri ........ ......... 3 7 Arkansas ....... ......... 3 0 New jersey ....... ......... 2 9 Maryland .......... ......... 2 7 Pennsylvania ................. 24 Mississippi ........ ......... 2 4 Indiana .......... ........ .2 3 Virginia ........ Louisiana ......... Connecticut ..... Oklahoma ........ South Carolina West Virginia.. Massachusetts.. Michigan .....,....... ....... Wisconsin ........ North Carolina ................ Delaware ......... Kansas .......... Colorado ......... Dist. of Col ...... Iowa ................ Minnesota. ....... New Mexico ....... ......... Engineering Total applications ............................... 753 Total offers of admission .................... 677 Total freshmen registered .................. 284 SAT AVERAGES Verbal ........... 537 Math ..... GRADE AVERAGE IN SECONDARY SCHOOL A .................... B .......... C ......... D ......... F ..................... .......................... COMBINED SAT SCORES 1500-1600 .......................................... 0.7Wi 1400-1490 ............................... 1300-1390 ......... 1200-1290 ......... 1100-1190 ......... 1000-1090 ......... .........54fMi Alaska ......... Arizona ....... California ...... Hawaii ........ Nebraska ......... Washington ........ Wyoming ....... Iran ............... Korea ............. . Germany ............. Columbia, S.A. Virgin Islands ..... Netherlands ........ Puerto Rico ........ Hong Kong ......... Bangladesh ......... England .......... Peru .............. Nursing APPLICATIONS Total applications ............... .. Total offers of admission .......... .....198 Total freshmen registered .................. 125 SAT AVERAGES Verbal ........... 4 98 Math ......... .........33'Kv A ........0 B C D ........3.4'Mi .....521 3 GRADE AVERAGE IN SECONDARY F ................................................ .........12.7'Xi .........23.1'Zi .........21.5'Zi .........22.2'Km Below 1000 ...................................... 10.4'Zi DECILE RANK IN SECONDARY SCHOOL 1!10 ................ 2!10 ........ 3!10 ................... 4!10 ........................... .....43.2fZ1 ......,..17.2'Zi .......8.7'Zi 5110 and Below ........ ......... 1 5.4'?b COMBINED SAT SCORES 1500-1600 ................................... ....22'Zi ....58"Zi ........20'Zi 1400-1490 .......................................... 1.070 1300-1390 .......... .......... 2 .0'Zi 1200-1290 .......... ........ 1 0.0'Zm 1100-1190 .......... ........ 1 9.0'Zi 1000-1090 .......... ........ 2 2.5'Zi Below 1000 ..................................... .45 .5'Zm DECILE RANK IN SECONDARY SCHOOL 2! 10 ......... ...... 3X 10 .................... ...... 4! 10 ........................ ........ 5! 10 and Below ........ ........ 0.2896 1! 10 ............................,..................... ..23.0'Zi ..20.5'Ki 10.5W: 18.096 , ' -'5 1 Q- ,S N tl -il- y . x '-1 .... A-M ,V 5 ll V :cj 4' A , Q , ui. 'H sf, gs X ly y . efdllx- ,V ,-5 V, L N:1-:F C- Vasa" VVhat can I say? ' XX iifg i l Q. ,Q J ' 'I Q I 7 it it f , f , , f, lg ,I X mn! I X A l K 1 f wx I X-Xxx bf K X ff f 1 X X 1 A lj Q , X 1 ,, f ll L X N- 1 T O54 0 K 'Z fl ,X I VXI? 4 ,-'- i A xi ll ' 5' ur i l ll!lXx 7 l " N1 ' x x rl illx, ff s X l 'll F li xlxxx KX l X lfg q 1 'HI 'llll AL I x fl X X ,I ff tx N ai l W 1 wiv M 1321 if R l , "' ' I Alla 3 lf L ,,f " lg-7' " '11 'SLI' Q 1 ' : l iii '. ,. -l . V F 1 in - , ' ' v -t, v l , V X ' - ' .' V . 2'- , ,- IQ4'-'Q' I 1 N ex 5 l Il .i L ima no J M I, I ., , , A ea faq' . ' V I,-3 I I F I V ' l X .4 -x I ' i i A T If-.t i L -L L ,LZL ,lt :ILE It dz-5 ' , ,. .lf . . H ii I' , il- gl - l 5' ,. f "1 gli J U W V 1 t l V . .. A i if -I -.-2 W" U ? Q X ,, ,N i V - Q , VN Y . Y w , , A 'F' A . Q' T T f , t ' . A 1 , li r , -' , . P ll ' f3'?5':' .L , 3 V i 'ill ,. ' I ff ' ll X , , f i ,g xg w- '- , ' 'i wi ""-'ff rf" 'f "" PT" ' A . , ' '47 3 Q rd .53 ' IF X '-LQ: ,-Q, cs' ff 1145 -in ' , , ' J ik X ' -' v'. J 1 J ,J 1 -A-N xii., gl' ' 5' 'Q' -A . .Lgwi 3: . '35 , ' "f" , . -rf . A V V, , , 1 sa X-- K , ,J 1 V4 -. DIR- xx . Q x A E ' 7' ' ,V '- Rebecca Hunter Abram, a Susan Leigh Acuff, a Cherly Ann Adams, n Gladys Aileen Adams, a Iencie Manning Adams, a Mark Charles Adams, a Rhonda Beth Adams, n Samuel Russell Adams, a Victoria Ann Adams, n Debra Lynn Addie, e Michael C. Ainbinder, a Thomas Clark Akers, a Sawnie R. Aldredge, a Lewis Shapard Allen, a Bruce james Allison, e Douglas john Ammon, a Beverly 1. Anderson, e Kathleen Anderson, n Mary Kate Anderson, e Donna Lee Andrews, n Libby Love Andrews, n Marc David Appleman, a Joan Appleyard, a Anne Sumpter Amey, a Sheryl Lee Ash, n Allison Benson Ashby, a Robert Norman Askey, e Scott Edmond Atkinson, a William Calvin Austin, a Lane Charles Avery, a Michael jay Bacco, e Hen Weslev Baggett YY . - 3 Herbert Eugene Baggett, e Karen Rosalie Bagley, n Thomas Owen Bagley, a Nashville, Tn Atlanta, Ga Louisville, Ky Hopkinsville, Ky Nashville, Tn Columbus, Ga Nashville, Tn Mobile, Al Coral Cables, Fl Dallas, Tx La Crangepark, Il. Hixson, Tn Nashville, Tn Dallas, Tx Cherryville, NC Memphis, Tn Tulsa, Ok Geneva, Switzerland Nashville, Tn Chicago, Il DeFuniak Springs, Fl Bloomfield Hills, Mi St. Petersburg, Fl Washington D.C. Bellevue, Wa Riverside, Il Miami, Fl Decatur. Al Hartselle, Al Colmnbus, Ca Waterbury, Cn St. Bethlehem, Tn Cunningham, Tn Woodbury, NY Fayetteville, Tn 325 Maryellen Bailey, a Elizabeth Taylor Blair, a Bryan W. Baker, a Laura Leigh Baker, a Pamela Sue Baker, a William Sidney Baker, a Mark F. Baldwin, a Shelley B. Ballard, e Robert Lewis Banner, a Betty lean Barber, a Joseph Clay Barnes, a Margaret Anne Barnett, a Panama City, Fl Atlanta, Ga Houston, Tx St. Louis, Mo Bad Kissigen, Ger. Miami, Fl Glenview, Il Louisville, Nashville, Nashville, Tn Pall Mall, Tn Memphis, Tn Ky Tn Martha Ann Barnette, a Louisville, Ky C. Hunter Barrier, e Dallas, Tx Robin joy Bartelstein, a Vtfilmette, I1 Barbara I. Bartelt, a Longwgod' F1 james Lowery Bassett, a Evansville, In Marc Alan Bates, e Shepherdston, WV Theodore B. Bates, a Elizabeth B. Battey, a Barbara E. Baumann, a Walter Hope Baxter IV, a julia Crawford Beach, n james Michael Beard, e Robert Elliott Beard, a john Ioseph Beatty, e Robert David Beck, a Susan Kay Beesley, a Lexington, Ky Augusta, Ga Aiken, SC Lubbock, Tx' Frankfort, Ky Waco, Tx jackson, Ms Washington, D.C. Selmer, Tn Wilmington, Dl 3 YY 'E ,,,: "I ' 6 N same time That s the fun of it- "You otta stud our butt off but there's a lot of good partying that goes on at the Larry Roger Behm, e Charles William Bell, a David Chambers Bell, a Deborah E. Bell, e Alice Ann Bellows, a Andy Dwane Bennett, a John Thomas Bennett, e Mark Allen Bennett, a Keith Alan Bergman, Karen Frances Berry, a Michael james Berryman, a Gary M. Best, e Leslie Ann Bishop, n Michael Robert Bishop, e john Mark Blackburn, e Roger Alan Blasberg, e Cheryl Diane Blatt, a Barbara Linda Blonsick, n Lonnie Roy Boaz III, a Steven Charles Bodner, a Philip Lindsay Bohannon, a Robert I. Boland, III, e Susan jane Bolanovich, n john Benjamin Bond, e Terry Lynn Bonner, a Susan Lauretta Bonnick, n Diane Hilliard Boone, e E. Karen Boone, e Virginia Kay Bosomworth, a Betsy Brown Bostick, a Susan Charlotte Bostick, a Mary jane Boswell, a Amanda Kathelln Bourland, a Bonnie C. Bourland, n Lucy Glenn Bowron, a 326 Kalamazoo, Mi Cincinnati, Oh Cincinnati, Oh Greenville, D1 Houston Tx Dickson, Tn Mt. Pleasant, SC Mt. Dora, Fl Danvers, Ma Savannah, Ga Del City, Ok N. Little Rock, Ar Atlanta, Ga Nashville, Tn Bowling Green, Ky Miami, Fl St. Louis, Mo Miami, Fl Chattanooga, Tn Indianapolis, In Bowling Green, Ky Hartford, Ct Pittsburgh, Pa Nashville, Tn Pelham, Tn Ft. Thomas, Ky Memphis, Tn Gary, In Lexington, Ky Hopkinsville, Ky Franklin, Tn Harrisburg, Il Tupelo, Ms Goodlettsville, Tn Birmingham, Al L ,. -' J. 1 T7 'A . Ja Y . 'l .l Nu . -w . 1 fi r? T ' A . ,L ' ,N 1 l l LI? sg A - Y- kt? li lr lk, r 3 .A , r .. V Y , V , g F, , , v Y. , I Q v , , E- - N It , 'J a ,, , l , , 'if' V -N ' F' -- I I ' + l' ,." '- I if F A dx- I ll D JA M , f ' l I, ' Al- W l"" I at N 1 in-'U WIT 'Q l ' CTBT I 'Plz' i' l. ,' 1, , , 'T' 'I ayh 54251 r l IJ, 1. rx' if "' A.. 1 "". A . 3 - rstl f I - I -S+ ll A ,Mgr . L , 1, K " X X V A1,I ,,, flea!! 2, l A ,Vi V1 ' ' 4 -.av La- f: - 1 ff ik' Sd J, J! W A I of Q' -- sf f' ' fa .1 as ' gal ' 14' v learmng when 'to study and when to. party Walter Baxter ,-,lem -- - ll' -' h -1--V 1 , A fa I-1 A 3. , F in , '.i-If., ' is as I .fi I4 aa I .AZQ M l .. vi -is i or , n , . in M , V ,A ji' ni in ni- fini fr 'I f xi X " M' l 5, ,A A x If l ,Q 5,1 1-C xy Y ,I - 3 .. ' ,jp fx ' - ' fi ' at .-A t r lt- .. 'l llll if ' . ll! ' l- WA-I 1 QL, Tl , if l- lv C' l ' ' gg -. V I It - ,li -T L, are ti "'-i',g, f I 'EB' -l J x -v 1 , rx I AN. , ll kli x I , I f '5:f.,z . ,nv g J n. if I gg g r a t ' I I ,,. .. I , . Ll A I V L ' x-'ff , ' A-S -sv' fi ill, .vw l A i " 4 p Q A -,Q 2 ,,h 55 . wyklg W 'Eg T K I- LJ, I Y Z Qi ' A R. hx I . ,fx Q . - .Z vw - xr, -I - J, .l , , Je 4 w' r T ' .. r- - .Q if -. ,lg , . pg ,lp A, ,ay H my at pa 5, if ' P 1 .7' 'I , X Xl X QU X if-1 FY'7 S Il "'1 ffl' l xg' 21 llctsx' lean Bl'2lL'l1. ll xvlll-lil-Ill Nlilcliell Bradley. 1 William Moody' Bl'klKlSllilXV, 1- lJCll0l'1lll NI. B1'a11dstte1'. il C2lfllCl'lllC .-X111111 Brescia, 11 Allan F11rq11h11r Brooke ll, David N. Brooks, 11 Nlonlclaii' . NI Nlagnolia. .-Xk Battl1'Creck. Nli SL rlillfllllllh, Virls l11ckxo11x'ille, Fl Xl1lckso11villL'. Fl Teaneck .Nj ,,.' V '1 L3 ' Q" l 1 . 1 X 1 ' . james David Brooks III, 3 Old Hi1'ko1'y'.'I'11 1:1 f Sig ll' Marian B1'ow11,11 l11di1111apolis. I11 1' 3 X X 9 A ' 1? , ll. B11.xtc1' Brown. 21 jackson. Ms ,X , , XX gf, X 'X ' -JL,-" Siil'1lllJ2il1C B1'ow11. Z1 Cl1iU'lCSt0ll. Mo X fail lf JJ' XR 1'-F X Susan Elaine Brown. Il Ch3ltill100gil, T11 ' ,M XX 1 ' p-X 'f k .X .XXX 4 FX X fr .XX jeffrey ,lilllll Brown. e Bullcr. Pa ,-.1,.l. .1-'4 lf".-o 1-' .4 ' 1. 1 .1 1' . - 1 'f I-1 -- -- '. ' 1 11 . . . ,- .1 1. ,Wm . . 1 , Q. X A X HX X.. ., . ,X X X ,X , X, X FX I lj! M.11k lu.v111 Broxlu, 11 B111115xx1Lk, Ca -- seeblfnf 1,-. 'M - - " ' ' lk' 1 .110 1 EQ M ' l "7" Y F X l Z 31 'ts J X I Sarah Elizabeth l51'y1111t. a .-Xtlanla. Ca 1 l 1 I1 111 ' 2 " F Frederick Howard B111-. il X11sl1villc. T11 H ! 1 A ' .X V, 'W' , Lilllfil Xl. B111.-kl1olts, 11 Ypsilanti, Mi ' 1 . '-6 . Q- 3 fe' '11 W'll'1 F. B 1-ll-'.1 T 1 V -f' XXL X . "E 6:1 ' XXX T 1, '- my B11ll1l11ll:iE.B1llllodkll11 I A ' Y Q. ' . ' f' 's Xt Harry S. Bllllfill. 11 ClllltfllI1lJC7Q'2l. Tll - I 1 1 ' 1' " 19-1-1151--11-1 -11-- 1 - 1 XX A 1 11.1 1Lf1 Lt 1 B111 5.11 Inst1lIbp1111gr,.'I11 . nl, . . A FF Y I Y V ll? .lm I F- . Fall-by '1 F L - I Xlol111 'xlltllflllk B11111s e N11 l1w'll T , ' A - X' ' .15 '1 C. ll X1 l ' f '. N Ricl111rd R. Burslem. a Sl. Louis. Nlo "" 1' XX 0. S Diana Elaine Button, 21 Centerville, Oh X5 F i - ., 12111165 Wesley Byrne. e Vickslmurg. Ms " 7, XX 2 Olivia S. Byrne. 11 Sylvaxiia. Oli AXXX, ' .1 ' 1- X X ,X ' . ' X 1 XVillia111 O.C11llaway, e Il1111tsvillc..-Xl "5 XX X -'44 Q: I' W - -A ' Lisa Marie C1111111cho. a Memplyig, Tn lil' wth .1 ' ' cc 9 - 3 ' ' Im kmd of busy W11t1ng a paper nght now, so maybe you should call 93 . - ,, somebody else. B11rl1a1.1 Bullozk l' 'W ' 'tl I X,-.,, X. X 1' XV X - X X X X 1 , my X 2X l XJ if 11' llolmcrta Dee C111111. a .-Xtlanta. Ca - " ' ' 5 X C11tl1eri11e E. Carey, A NOl'tlllJl'00li. ll 1 1 fd' ' l 49 l ' ' '3 Tll0lll2L9 Nl. Ca1'1'ell, a Dallas. Tx X XX . X . :S jeffrey CJ. Czuier. e S1-oltsvillu. Ky ' lx -J!" X ' 1 1 X if ' " X Lisa Camille Caruso. ll Hiintsvillc. :Xl l 4 l I 1 -. . lug-1 ,E 1 ' A Enrique E. Casas, il Bar1'a11q11illa. Col. 1 X pl ,1 i l X - X, 'A' , X 6 f' C111'111c11 .-X1111ette Castro. e xlOlllQ'0lllk'I'f'. .-Xl . ,.- A fr '1 . "1 .. .' .' 5 1 1 11 3-Z 1. F Y FTF F MFT- 'A V X X Craig F.Cl111111l1c1's.11 gkllkllllil. Ca Xl XX 1 ll '-1 James L. Cl1a11dle1', a Bl'ClllU'00Ll, T11 XX X.,Xg'7X 1 1' X ' X X l 1 - ' .: Abc Pasha Clwij, 21 N11,sl1vill1f, T11 ' 1' ' - ' A X - 1 . 1X Richard M. C:llCIlUXVClll, e PI'lllCl.'lOll, Nl - N-3-1 X ":'- XX X X K Wayne L. Cl'1ilde1's. a Pine Bluff. Ak A 2 Y X .. joe TllOlllilS Cl1ild1'ess.a Cl111'ksville. T11 XXX 'N X: +11 l1 Y1111gl1i Cl1oe. 11 Xlt'llll7lllS. Tll ,. .X X X -.-. .LLXXL j . I "T" 1 1 X . ' "L I-. 1 1 David C. Cl1ristoffe1'se11, a l,ilXVl'ClICCX'lllL'. T11 X V f' Steven c:.Cl1llI'CllVV0ll. ll Nl6lIllJlllS. T11 - P- ""' XX 1 2. f-- ' -1 C1'ego1'ylol111 Cililwrti. il Louisville. Ky' . 1 X 1 ' I X .X X Mary T. Clailmorne. 11 llll'l'llIl0lKl, Va I I ' ' .- ' " 1' , in XR 215 Gig Clzillhbll, ll Nugllvillgg Tn . Q11 XX ' 13.5" Q1 l - ' 7' . ' Russell Clc11Cl1111to11. e Nashville. Tn ' X J Q' 'il I XX, 'X 1 4? Cy11tl1iaCa1'Clark. a cJI'lilllLl0. Fl . '1 , + 2 11 I -11 P 1 , . I . X X XX., ,LL Uri T., . , .,,.XX X X X ' X " X X Dorsey Lynn Clark. e Fl'2ll1lil'0l'l. Ky X1 1 ,lllllll Dawson Clark, ll Ricl1111011d. Ky - A - 1,3 'I X ' ' Katlierine A. Clark, ll Nashville. T11 ' 1 ng, X ,XX Maiy Kenley' Clark, ll Rivn-1'sidc. C11 " "'-T' ' ', 1 'I-'X X' A Steven Lee Clark, e NIe111pl1is. T11 3 X 3 1- 5 'ol V 1 Craig Karl Clayton. a St. Louis. Mo f Q XX " J XA x " S A X Nam-yl1111c Clegg, I1 New Orleans. La ef ' 1 ,1 1 if . -' -1TXY-- - , 1" ' f' fi 'fr .. - vw- ' f . -X ll I1 1-gf l- ' 1. X 4 . L XQX X Ted Cle111e11s III. il L,lilllllO!llH. City. Ok - A l l X ' F Melanie .'kl1llClCll'llll0llS. a H11111ilto11. Oh lei Qi 1 - f ' 3' " , Rankin A. Clinton Ill. a lI1111tsville. AI ' , XX X ' 4-A . 1 , sf 1 Virginia Nl.fll0Ollill1 Clklllililll. C11 'S' -'f ' XX -T, "I ' " , X .-Xnnc Frances Coakley. ll Naslivillc. T11 k XX E l X 1 - ,f Q ' X X X Eliz11l1etl1 Allll Col1l1. e Metairie. L11 n L ' ' 1 1g A 1 L L.il.llI'Clll.'C VVillia111 Col1l1, c jacksonville. Fl ' ' X ffffff 1 1 , 1- ix - .f 'Ef'1ft 1 1' 1 ' .1 ll L james R. Cochran. a Beth Cockerham. e Charles F. Cogswell. e Cordon Eliot Cohen, a joel Douglas Cohen. e Mark Harris Cohen. a joel C. Coleman. c Creeneville. Red Rank Creve Coeur. Atlanta, Mary Kathleen Coleman. a Pittsburgh Hopkinsville. Ky Tn .xi Mo Ca Creenville. SC Florence. Al . Pa Diane Louis Collins. n Atlanta. Ca Richard M. Condrey. a Ririningliain. Al Mary Calvert Congerwa Bethesda. Md joseph Henry Connor. e Bethesda. Md Donald W. Conrad, jr., a Atlanta. Ca Debra Leigh Cook. e Nashville. Tn Tracy Ann Cooke, a Prospect. Ky XVilliain Alan Coon, a Rebecca Copeland. a Nancy Ann Corley. a juliette Ann Corman. a Margaret Nanne. Cottle. a lleather Ellen Couch. a Atniore Tallahassee jessie johnson Couch. a Tommy j. Couch. a Fayetteville. Kenneth Reese Courington. a Mobile Allan Lee Courtney, a Lexington, Susan Baldwin Conrtwright. a Marion. NVilliani Reid Covell. a Ray Fianklin Cowan, a Chattanooga. Relic Mead. Nj Tuscaloosa. Al Dallas, 'lx . Al . Al lndianola. Io Hot Springs. Ak Tn , Al Ky Oh Pensacola, Fl Tn W 'fi' V 1' Q i l A at 1,5 1. K." A' F 'E . ,-'V' :El .I jf 2. j .fig '-S., P .Tsawi ' ,1. ' fe f- Y . .rsiw .ffff lg, 1 , A ' , ,T "-. V' I 'P at i. I .H Y ' ' ' " -i g 'C A l i ' ri I ii TS N ' ' . J if ' ' A . . . ff 'T A, -T il A- , es. 'Zyl T A it A 9 si , i . f' K' qi 11 A iff- f - .1741 ' 11.1 , K '. ' . Y I ' f f, lm V - .. 'l r. IIT: fe" on ' rf i' . - s. i fr ' l EF l . 41 '.il" -'IV' l Q A ' in za q fr' - if jn- . f ' 1. i jilrl fl E q 4 xl. Jag? YA wi .. N J., In 1 1 -. lil. Q . ' N. V jail. i . 1 'iv I. .- ., " 1, ' i ' '- I N xy-1 4 , N . rj ' 'i i-. haf jfenak- - m sajgasfgui ffb.f l fajj5rrrr o'j 3 . .re czrk 1 ,ij ,x V rl" ! -Y My ' 'zu ' 94, i A ff.fi. c'God I donit know, I'm not very originalf, Peter Douglas Cowen. a Tenafly, Nj Charles Roggess Cox, a Athens, Tn Mary Beth Cox. a Dunwoody. Ca Susan Elaine Cox. a Callatin. Tn Carol jane Cragon. a Birniingham. Al Phyllis Temple Craighead. a Columbia. Tn Lynn B. Crall. a jonesboro, Ak Cynthia Louise Cramer. a Pittsburgh. Pa Daniel Thomas Crane. e lluntsville, Al Deborah Martin Crawford. a Lafayette. La Diann Yvonne Crawford. n Parker Fl Caliborne Curran Crews, a Steven Snowden Crider. e Little Rock. Winchester. A k Tn Lorianne Lynne Crook. a Madison, Tn Nelson Keith Crouch. e Winchester. Tn Mary Ann Crowell. a jackson, Ms Sarah Linday Culbertson. a Raleigh. NC Martha Claire Cunibie. a Andalusia. Al Laura Bailey Cumming. a Atlanta, Ca Cindy jean Cunningham, N Nashville. Tn llenry Smith Cunningham. a Cadiz. Ky john Talley Cunningham. c McLean. Va Roger Dale Cunningham, a Paducah. Ky llenry Sevison Dade. a Hopkinsville, Ky Scott Brady Dansou. a jacksonville. Fl Duncan Richard Darby. a Akron, Oh Lisa Ercel Darden, a Tuscaloosa. Al john Dillard Daugherty. a XVi1.-hita Falls. Tx Reid Holmes Davidson. a Duluth. Ca Doreen Barr Davis, n Houston. Tx Gregory Franklin Davis, e Williamsburg, Ky john Timothy Davis. e W. Columbia. SC William Eugene Davis. a Alexandria. La vvllllillll Lipscomb Davis. a Nashville. Tn Andrew Carlisle Day, e Nashville. Tn 328 V-J-A - -1' ji Y,.jj.,, V i. , -.-He - . , I1 A N . , jj i if: .Q kj V 7, N j f W1 i 4 xiii ,I i Wai, 1' 'J I X jj ff ht -vi .iw ' - 23 . 'F W A - ' ' cg it , A .. M t 'i" T :si i 'Z ' i ' Sgr , . ' 1 - t f Yi i A, f , iv' V' ' ""' S.-, A J 4 ' M 'W ' P ii: w if L i 5 j ' .I 1 ll C, A . 'T l ' l- x ' J 2 i a ' V ,-,.., ' .JI Q' i , QF H j W -' A ' " ' Q . ' s T 9 5- TQ, i T . V W' . 'fr it A . l' ' T M . .,, , T " . f' is 1 rp +1 wr, M. My fs,' r'yaj5 f+ Ml '-M tvrdueg 'E 1. Mgji p ix X A j v-Nw j V X j' i , K N an l' ' ' ll r - tj it , i V A J I ,.-s. x N 'N 1' P A ri e 1 T ,' L , Q If 'ij in , l I fi , "Lf-,L I in T All N ' V y'-Y- V, 'V' ,. Th" il" V Y , " f' .li Q.-ss.-irL5ae-adh 1? r.-y 9' If F RESHMEN JN 1 1: I I X " 9 v I. II . fi. i Z 'jj Y A-A A'-lj 4 'W 'Y lj l , ,-7' j I james Allen Deal, e Nashville, Tn l in I A' .i i A"' " 1 ll A Theodore D. Dearing, a St. Louis, Mo ' P . A 7 II A - , ' jeffrey Lynn Deaton. e jackson. Tu aa ,PA Q 'Ai 77' 'A 73 Lyle Deffehack, a II El Paso. Tx S, IJ I " lip, Y-il, I Q vi I, Ann M. Degarmo, n c-lllClllllL1ll. Oh I I, 4 Iy. ' P I: - I ' ., james Barnard Degeorge, a Houston. Tx XI II if f I i 4, P' Q R - Q I ' II Q Dorothy Lynne Dehls, a Pilf fotv, Ar i . gf 'V i tp' H A A ii ll ' i ' . . nb . j A . IH, 1 U- , . K? 'J mp' P?"-1 'PI'-im? K X A 'P ' , P so . T'T 'i"5i F sf". ' Mary Martha Dejoin, a Delray Beach, Fl A ' l S ' ,. Ai. E, ' - " ' ' 'J Thomas M. Delker, e Owcuslaoro, Kv , . , ' 3' x i 7 Teresa M. DeMaio, a Cincinnati. Oh AQ' I A 3 -A ' F- K i "' P Linda Anne DeMarco, a Birniingham, Al , i 'QS Y gp 'A ,yi ' A " 'A ,Q1 joseph M. Demeut. a Laseassas. Tn II A- I , lil if ,A N f 1 Marcia Dempski, n Tulsa. Ok A ,GI - " ' , , I Ii, , N' Y i 1 Sarah L. Deneke, a Alexandria. Va " IPX!! ', I',', l X- .. - ' I l i ' A ly Avi' A W ,I V - ' i 3"'i 1 .i-1' I: . ll I" ' .J lf' T 'l A F' i' "T . ' Sara Lee Denman, c Dallas. Tx ' I I ,ff IL sl lc ' L A' I john P. Denninghofl. e Nashville. Tu ,I - T I Theresa A. Dennison, a Atlanta. Ca I I .A I ' 6' . ' I ' I ,, A Kathryn A. Depenhrock, a Houston, Tx - A 'III -SI,-I Q2 ,I - '- gh - za - NVade Allen Detamore, a Cartersville. Ca . ' . ' , I , I i . Claire Cravens DeWar, a Dallas, Tx j I I ' ' I .5 I I L I A in ,QI fi 5 QI! Chvla Camille Dilxlxle. a Chicago. Il Aj ' Q. ' V 'A Aj A 1122? ,I i ' ' ' 'hx ' My H I Iitljil .li YI A 1 ple -wb. - P I ji: I-il Charles R. Dickerson, E McDonough. Ca -I , T , IU - A Charles F. Dickson, a Coral Cables, Fl E AA V P :II I I I , Mary jo Dickson. a jackson. Ms 2' . A ' 'AX "' , ' IRI T A Scott Brinkley Dill, a Florence, Ky Q: ' I P ffl. ' Carol Denise Dillon. n Nashville, Tn . A If A - A If I I, I I. ,Af I jan Diner, e Little Rock, Ak - hifi? jr II ' .PQQIJI ' ' ' 'f' I P M ' 'I 1 Nancy Dinwiddie. a Dallas, Tx ' '3 Fi' A ' . I If I f . 5 l t1'lJZ5ffl.Q'f. in ' I ' 'i ' "H cl h k I I ' b m Am ' m " or os ec , ove it ut so eh es you just gofto screo . Nancy Dinwidclle Elizabeth Ann Ditlneyer. n St. Louis, Mo l f"'7. In 1 ' IA i ,I i ' A A A: i fl Deloris Hean Dooley, a Waynesboro. Tn i ' ' ji :A 19" '--" ' A' Cathy Lynn Doster. n Cincinnati, Oh si ' ' "'- I I A L, I I " Many Louise Dougherty. a Miami, Fl IICJQ: 1 I I 154 ji, " 21 II Bruce Robert Douglas, a Little Rock, Ak A "' 1 . III ,I ' 'T' ' , Elizabeth Dowling, A Ft. VVorth, Tx I 52 .5 ' I Q' ' V. -I ri ' i Y , ' ' Kathy L. DowlingI n St. Louis, Mo . , I ff I I . PI I I I .II III I Khin . iii,-1 M nj. T.. ' I A . V ff 2 :C """' l t- 5: "TU P " P WT 'V' 1 ' Steve Randolph Dozier, a Nashville, Tn 'Ffh' A I I- gd, 1 . I 'P ' '- Laura Lee Draper, a Houston, Tx - ji P 4 l If 50" A 7 V A ,' t Wayne F. Drash, a Tampa, Fl Aa' , " 'Q ll 'j - 5A '42 john Kneller Drury, a Bethesda, Md A ev .I ' ' ' ' I Katherine Sue Dudas, a Hopkinsville. Kv ,. ' A if A . I 2 Stephen Mark Dukes, a Opelika, Al A - -I I I ' ' I' ny' Ellen Gayle Duncan, n Atlanta, Ca Q, ' A I I 'A X ' X . - ' . - L Emmett M. Duncan III, a Toledo. Oh "I A A: -'71 i A A A H W i Elizabeth T. Dunn, a Birniingham. Mi ,I ' A ' james L. Durham. a Tulsa, Ok 'F' - -. gf' ' 'IQ 3 Q F5 '- Mark B. Durham, e McMinnville, Tn 'Il r , 4' P ,I J., .1 , Geoffrey Dwight. a San Antonio. Tx I I , . A 1:5 ' A 4 , Holly Lea Eakin, a Ft. Lauderdale, Fl A if .' A l j V ,L I ' james Lind Easton, a XVest Newton, Ma . , XL ' j l ' " ' at .' I W . ' f V ' PW . ' 7- P , 'ja' II I II-'F " Tm Cindy Diane Eaves, a Panama Citv. Fl 0 AA A' T- .P V. To ' A '3 I. I . l 6 1 I , . I : j David james Eckert, a Pepper Pike, Oh p J 2 Q Q I AI w RI , LII X jim Lambert Ehret, e Wilmington. Dl "' 1 v- A . jj , I , '-A Ie P ' Cynthia Ann Eittreiin, a jacksonville, Fl Ig. . A - ' II i' I A I -9- Cheryl Ann Ellis, a Colnmlmis. SC Q A i ' I, jf - Nancy Marie Ellis, n Grand Rapids, Mi ,III r I I P L 7 A- . PI " i .I Robert C. Ellis, a Vicksburg, Ms ' A ' L Rf! I V ' ll' x I II l II . L, II . ,I " iw" 'f' 'T' ' -1?"' x i jv-1 .. I I Lori Dawn Emerson, a Bells, Tn ji-T I. ig, , ' I , -' 1 A 1 ' Ifss: P - Timothy joseph English, e Alpharetta, Ca i P . - , . i 5- I ' " ' john Eslmenshacle. e Vienna, WV I , , A' I ' ' I E,-ic james Etheridge, a jackson, Ms ' ,IQ .I -Q QQQQI P A I II I , Neil Allan Ettinger. a Miami, Fl A, T A I , I ' I A Q ,If April Camille Evans, a Centerville, Oh A it ..,- 14 II I . , , K ' W -' .f , 2'f"j I ' It Christopher K. Evans, a College Park, Ca QII , II I I F FIIIIDI I I IIIIIII I tv J , I II II 330 AA ' . X j AA vii' bi if . .i 9615 1 -Vi ,-' 1:2 "W ifi 4- fl 1 .I i ul U , - ,.,A f SI X , , -4 i'f4 -A "3 ' if n- i We-'e , ff -in 1 + . ,W ,, Sydney Lee Evans, a Sara Wilson Eveiitt e :Ilan -'F ' R" W I II -L. Il john Withers Ey,e, 7 ' 4 ' ' ' T.. N I' i i. L .Qi r, i l I l , K i II I 19 r is al li ' f Laruen Ilene Facher, a jame Alig Failey, a . , , , ' - I, ,I ff-- I , I i 1 Virginia El Faison, a ' Mi, '-,', ' " j' ' -af, . . fair., . 1 e - , la N- 1 . .1 Q-52. Louise Pettit Faulkner, a x 3. , f,,.,, N I I A T Q I l Scott Fayne, a 'i ' ., , ' julie Ann F eibel, e 'lj A Q vv- ,. -X . . . K-J , " Richard S. Femsilver, a "Q, Q - ' ' - ' Thomas Anthony Ferris, a i ' ' Il I . I j , f f Kathy Ann Fieber, n , .f ,Il " ' ' ' A j f ' Suzanne L. Fiederlein, a ., I I .I , 1 'A -'I jack Loys Finley, jr., a ' pm ' T I II - I U i . ' , ,I D. Webb Fitton III, a ,I 2 . ...Af l janetta N. Fleming, n 5 I jana Lee Fletcher, a V 'A' I '-' , -'gi ' Mary Ellen Fletcher, n l ,M ' ff Susan Kelly Flint, a P ' ,., i '. 'I Roy Alva Flynt, a I, ' I r , Fun Hung Fong, a -' F ' ' f . ,I ,l , L 'l 1 "TY 1 W ' li- 'l Elizabeth Marie Foote, a ,-5 , ' , - f, ,f W ' jennifer Kay Ford, a I1 W " ' 4' A FSJIII Sidney Suzanne Forester, a ' ' Lf, I. If,"i-,Ia I. Q' ', Toni Annette Francis, a ' , j ' ,'-' ., , ii, gi -l ' 'f Andrew Philip Frankin, a A ,, , R ' N ,F "' . 5 Il -I jeffrey Wayne Franklin, a " 'Y ' . ,H l , 57 I ' fi.. ' 4' rf. F Mark Demrie Frankum, a Tom Ferris Memphis, Tn Memphis, Tn Huntington, WV Short Hills, Nj Indianapolis, In Clearwater, Fl Dallas, Tx Smithtown, NY Columbus, Oh Brooklyn, NY East Palestine, Oh Stamford, Co Muncie, In Tallahassee, Fl Hamilton, Oh Nashville, Tn Memphis, Tn Indianapolis, In Tulsa, Ok White Plains, NY Hughes, Ak jacksonville, Fl Lake Forest, Il Old Hickory, Tn Dayton, Oh Livingston, Nj Russellville, Tn Indianapolis, Id "If anyone Wants to really make out later in life, this is the place to gof' G , , c 9 If . . I f I 7, If ."' A .2 I I 'Ds I , I 46 'i I' :lg gi A , 'Y , :AL ? ' ig I Q vt ll ' I JI I" ,I 3 l fx- ffl Il, zl' W ,A I l F .c . f ' 'I il-"--F-FT dl ' 'V l N at In I I -:J QI 'l,I ,I l, ' I I I . f' II I I ly' I I ' ,, . lt , a A ,. .1-,:11.1b'l into , 2 .fs .JW . N f - - ' -'f ' - ' ' gf' Q T' o t . - rt, .E - fr 1 7 1, 3. .i -ff .'-ga, ,I t !' 'J up ,Q vw 1 A ,s l X' I I in abt.-fri l ,A . .Mb I, QW ljlf-r v i "' ia? I f 4" ' ' A ' 42 '3 , . '. . . Ji r .3-fs, ' r a' Tfzeti' - y . . - 1- AV- . at "til Wg I feta I-1 'V Ni "f "fn . . r 'P ' " " PM f - f.-55325 I I A ' i n ' 'KA P ' :I Z I -H mlm rallsqf' 'l' , . y a t .es 1' ', il ' Q g et ,I f I i -- V :gf J X . I I- L 1 - K, , 'll' 1 I YI . i 5 5 -. " . -. 5,5 551 A I ' ' 1 Wig S f , ,- , i .SFI 'fog ' ' ' 1:b"'g'i ,Ou-19 1 I .fi 1 xx .S 1 i 4 I Patricia Anne Fraser, a jackson joseph Frazer, e William Douglas French, e joellen joesten F rick, a Paula Gerard Friederich, Paul Gerard F riederich, e Steve Gerrard Fridrich, a jennifer Anne Fritz, a jack Meyer Frost, a Philip Lcott Frost, e William Richard Frye, a ennifer Ellen F ryman a j , Edwin james Furtaw, jr., e Winston W. Gaines, a judith Y. Garratt, a Deborah E. Gaskill, n Leigh Anne Gaskins, e Theodore'Carl Gast, a Sharon Anne Gay, a john Hart Geary, jr., a Lama joanna Gee, n David Lewis George, a Robert Houston Gilman, e Robert Houston Gilman, e Walter Merrill Glasgow, e Diane joy Glassman, n Karen Rae Gloede, n Robert Greg Goben, e julia French Goddard, a Gerald Francis Goertz, a Margaret jamie Goldberg, a Andrew Mark Goldenberg, a Miriam Claire Goldsmith, a julie Green Goodall, a Sarah Ann Goodson, a Robert Baxter Gordon, a Houston, Tx jadisen, Tn Savage, Md Nashville, Tn Clearwater, Fl Clearwater, Fl Nashville, Tn Cincinnati, Oh Dallas, Tx Atlanta, Ga Tampa, Fl Oxford, Oh Nashville, Tn Hendersonville, Tn Winston-Salem, NC Birmingham, Al Mobile, Al St. Louis, Mo Scottsboro, Al jackson, Ms Knoxville, Tn Memphis, Tn Matthes, NC Matthes, NC Houston, Tx Princeton Danbury, Rogers, Ak Maryville, Tn , N Cl Brentwood, Tn Augusta, Ga West Hartford, Cn Northbrook, Il N orthport, Al Dallas, Tx Lynchberg, Va 33 I f-4.4 K- A xi E mpgs .. 1 -441: unix P' in I x' hid' ' wig N .1 nxt. F .Fin X .. M it S M33 :mm " 1 A Q1-.+f""3'S ' X' v- ' I . .D I N 573 3 5 :V A :gn 'a - K K x - ,- ' Af'..1 ' A , ' , 1 . 'A J 'A I ' JV -' Vx f , Q- A ,--" , ' 4 ' . -, I f X Y, ff Yan. 5 Q " 573 ' 1 1- . lr I ,. H ,' Ruff? 1 1 z A J .Z M " -' , 5.p Ni! . f Ti., 'V ' W ' J by ff? f 1 J J I f . x ' X G , j. g,"'Q, 5 - fl L V Z lla. ' xx, N QQ J... Q, if gf, ' V :I 5,15 J, -I V 1 x Y r X. X1 -:L .Hx A " 1- , N-. .fi if N . 1, j' , Jux X , ml" .sfx ,, :AW , 'Lg V-X: - , ' mg. -Q -v 1 , , , I K, ,- .xr J 5 In NL , . 'A if , ,- , K -7 . w I If I - I 1 V' rw.: tl, A x -- f- Y - , 3-1'- rf,f -- -151 ii. fir X ' ' wfw- ' ' Fir' '-' Ei ' f i ',,' my-5 X. I V x ' , ' , I I . rg X ' -, "' ' ' ' A ' is " ' , Q X V f S, , , , . fl, H h 22, AA J " ,K . . . -'x V ' 1 I X , Y 'tj J, ' f, I M V N 1 H A -f ... :::i 'A . ' FRESH MEN V . 1 V , V VVVVV g r' ' ii, ' in J g , . l . 1 ' 'N url if I ' jennifer A. Gorog. a Dayton, Oh . . , - - -,' , I -S Dennis Michael Gothard, a Ashland Kv . 7' , " ' . 1, i t Q' l I Q i ,Fla i J. , .al Cheri Lynn Graham, a Prairie Village, Kn l , -,V -7' ' ' VV, I -in ,J 2 Craig Lee Graham, a Convent Station, Nj ,, . Af v- 5 fw fi ' -V Vf,j 1 ' '4 Kerry Bennett Graham, a Atlanta, Ga 'ph D V ' ' W gag: ,Q ,I ij It I -VVV V . l 7 john Miller Crammer, a Dallas, Tx ,t V V . ,V T V ,- -,:V ' ft :Ms ,V VV VyV.1ViV ' I l 'r -f f V V -V . . V Y, VV F n,V.VVVV :Z gg V , V V flflkyix V, V,V V -gg-V VLA, I -:V KathyE Granger, .1 Big Timber, Mt 7" ' 5 ' , 1 Elizabeth VV. Graves, a Athens, Tn 5? K Robert Bourdeaux Gray, a ,Hattiesburg, Ms 'VT i V ' V C. Scott Green, a Glenview, Il ' ' ' -7 Catherine Lynn Greer. a Lexington, Ky f , V Nancy Rose Greer, n Lexington, Ky , V V, ' Kevin John Gregg, e Barrington, Il V, 'Z ' 1 Robert Downs Gregory, a Evansville, In i I n- 7 I "" W 5' . r 1 D Alexandra Griffin, n Pittsburgh Pa .rm 5, , A' ' f .JJ S' ,, A V -. ,F David Kenhly Griffin, a M01ia1e,A1 l, ' LU H , V J h Kent Martiug Griffin, a San Antonio, Tx l 'E .lla V- 'i l ll ii 5 L21-V06 Griffin, 21 Nashville, Tn , 1' if : l ' john Riedlinger Grise, a Bowling Green, K . .gs 4, , -. , in , . . Y V V ,V V ,B ' L "4 . ll , V Susan Dianne Grooms, e Decatur, Al s. V Wig W V ' i j f, A V ' K A Richard Grosse, a Rockville, Md ,r .i'. , no " 1 1 ' ' MT- M- VY if it F Tf'G'T' " I 1- X ' I V ' ' 1. Mary jemison Grover, a Birmingham, Al 4 , Linda Sue Grubb a A leton Wi - - ir - i PP - :T VV ' Allyson Katherine Guehl, a Pittsburgh, Pa '-3 'fl' ' 'var ' V " Jane Wright Gulley, a Augusta, Ga . . 5,6 'w fi. th ' , Andrew Willson Gustafson, a West Lafayette, In ., . V V ., V J w t Q ' V ' g Q i Anita Louise Guy, a Roswell, Ga l 11 . ,. - - X' V 'f ' l X I Thomas john Guzikowski, e Devon, Pa A W xt '-, . - 1 . ' just can t take the Rand Runs :F-'Y--'?1F WVV :Vg U' V, I V " , Y "V iVi,5- , if s . ,. V V V, V ' I A , Q , V I . ' 7 K Edward Nash Hair, a Alexandria, La i 7 ' 1, qu V , V f , , - ' . . Mellie Claire Hale, a Albany, Ga , W' 'az , , , ,ig 1 , r . Y.. " "' Thomas Summers Hale, a Rogersville, Tn -A ,A ' ' ' ffl' 3 . . ,,, 2 1 Q -rf! 4 V - N, julie Wayne Haley, n Old Hickory, Tn , 'I 7' , 4:9 - ' ,V " - ' Marlene Elaine Hall, a Dickson, Tn If V V VV V l Q ' V ' ' V ' .V , ' f' V ' Patrick joseph Hall, a Tulsa, Ok , 1 Vl V - ks, ' V V , .V 1 V " Robin Lee Hall, a Potomac, Md I lr ,l 'il 1 H1 ' -43:7 A F' I -xt M. Havne Hamilton, a Nashville. Tn I' ' ' X ll" J ' V " - Marci AnuHamilton,a Wheaton. Il ' ,V ' 1' V ' . A ,. ,. William B. Hamilton, a Winston-Salem, NC .- .1 ' Q' F -I V . .4 " ah' Timothy Carey Hanlin, a Chattanooga, Tn - V ' z jf' --J' V"'7,' T '17 , 'T Yollander E. Hardaway, a Memphis, Tn D V VV V .- K , ' ' V ,s w ' " Thomas Griffin Hardy, a Winstou4Salem, NC ' ff, l V , 1 in ' ,F ' 2, - Laura Virginia Harlan, e Mt. Pleasant, Tn A' -at its .1 , 4, it ,4 ,g,- . 1 . L Y rsh Ag Ag,-wiki --V i in ' ' V,g'f'f""' - ' H . 'l VVV 'i" 1 J V.. l V 1- 1 X Lillian Ann Harpole, a Roanoke, Va l V i ' ' L in ' ' P ' Bruce Reed Harris, a Annandale, Va 3 U ,V l bi to l ' 1 'ta , "A Francis Carter Harris, a Lynchburg, Va ' V V V 1 ' ' .1 " V , -1 1 Kevin Jess Harris, a Memphis, Tn , , V Y- ,VV T, ,.. V fn, V Milton Lanier Harris, a Baton Rouge, La g ,- 6 l ll' Robert L. Harris, a Nashville, Tn ' V ,V ' rif f? ' V Sue Ellen Harris, n Atlanta, Ga v-W li" ren: ' - f ' 'rf' - v'-+ V I I A H V ,E A I l 4 va- ,gba Frances Mann Harrison, a Forrest City, Ak in S , , l I james Robert Hart, a Kingsport, Tn E " L' ,,,, . Linda Irene Harvey, e Clearwater, Fl I , 1- eg M - Debra Lynn Hash, a Nashville, Tn g. V V V Y Ni? V3' , Paul Christopher Hashim, a Rockville, In .V ' V A5 - J' james Edward Hathaway, a Little Rock, Ak I '1 4' f 'L ,- V -- fi: ,,5:l' Q ,NV V 4 Steven Drew Hatter, a Maitland, Fl. , . L' . 3' -iff T as I H ' ' " QV . v -V ' f n ff- ' , 'welll l ll F "Q l -,, Anne Dunlap Hauser, n Winnetka, Il Vf , f'-1 I ' A V , Leslie Elizabeth Haynes, e Mary Ester, Fl , 0- '. 3" 'Li "i Denise Rae Healy, a Cincinnati, Oh 1 ' I , Mary Louise Heiman, a Dumas, Ak 11- V ' -5 rf' i Edward joseph Heller, e Miami, Fl V N' ' I VV X ' I Y I james Diller Helman, a Hendersonville, Tn A jj AT . Q ,L nl fi , i Carrie C. Hendrix, a Austin, Tx w V - I - ' l ' ' 333 1, r ' 'Tr i , . l -fr ,. lf' . ' ll - r il Anne Roberts Henry, e Dallas, Tx ' 'I' , ' l ' V - , ' l Thomas joseph Herald, a Miami, Fl V A ' if V I A ' l' , u Brett William Herr, a Barrington, RI , " 'V , Q ' V " ' ,. joseph William Herzog, a Meridian, Ms ' ' V'-Q. V -1V . ' Priscilla Lee Hester, a Naples, Fl i :V 'q i ' " V , 11 I ' VI, V Lu Ann Heusinkveld, a Deerfield, Il X ' V l Vt, VV ' g V Vij"QQ j V' ,' f ,V Bmce Alan Heyman, a Dayton, Oh V V f : l ,Vi 'f ' 4 'i j ' ' 1' 1 5 . HI 1 i. .. ' -' joseph Paul Highham, a St. Petersburg, Fl 1' , O 'EV ' I ' Douglas Allyn Hill, a Atlanta, Ga : ... V ' N' , l l james French Hill, a Little Rock, Ak "" '-"" V ' "" " ' l f ' H james Richard Hillsman, a Skokie, Il Q.. gig, ,J i V, ' Susan L. Hinkle, n Prairie Village, Kn . " XV I ,' V , ,,,' V I - Stephen Shaver Hinton, a Louisville, Ky nE'i5ii3f it V W W VV , Mary Ann Hite, a Nashville, Tn j VV Q? E . 1 VVVJ ,.. "F" ' ' "Fi ' , "' ":- Sherry Elaine Hoard, a Madisonville, Ky - U 1 ' , ' ' G ' ., Kathryn Elaine Hodges, e Atlanta, Ga f ' Qi 2 .iV Sharon Lynn Hoffman, a Islip, NY ', " tugs af A M r - if , 'E "' Steve William Hoffman, e Dallas, Tx ' , ' ' ' '- Q- 1 Henri Etta Holbert, e Montgomery, Al ,, V ' , J " f Hap Holiday, e Middletown, Oh ,111 it V f ' -'G ff . X i . . Lisa Anne Holland, n Glen Ell n Il 7 ' , ' 5 ' 5-. ' ,. H' I A ' if ' W ' i .. Y QMQVP, 1, Lp ,F V TWV x g Vi V . f ' "' ' ., 'j , Howard Rhea Holly, a Lewisburg, Tn - V- ' I , -V 4' ' l 4 l W William Baynard Holman, a Fallschurch, Va V ,P MV -' ' I V' - :V J 1 V- Pamela Ann Hoover, a Atlanta, Ga I 1 . l 0' V Q QW V V ' Karen Lynn Hopkins, a Morgantown, WV 115- , -'12 ' J ' . i 'A 1 4 .A George Wade Hopper, a ' Albertson, NY , , V, V V V ' V V., .V I VV Allen Henry Hord, a Anchorage, Ky V7 . V4 RV w ' - V - ' NV Margot Lynn Hornsby, a jacksonville, Fl gl: . f X 'img ' ,jx i if N f ,E I a' A I ff ., - 'fs if X .4 ss. " ll l'k ' d ' k " 1 e O 0 O t 0 Nannette Hutchens ,ww Q V 7 , --VV V, . Rebecca Ann Houston, e Waverly, Tn , , ff W W 4 R -,W Elizabeth Cecile Hovda, a Evansville, In V' ,V . ' 1 Daniel Alan Howard, a Frankfort, Ky 6- 1' is-:Iv . .W ' Larry Allen Howse, e Nashville, Tn , Qi. K :far . V X J ' V Sally Elizabeth Hubbard, a Bremen, Ga J ' 5, ,- H ' l", V A 'Y . . 'ug Elizabeth Ann Huber, a Basking Ridge, Nj V V ' 4 . , J ' A V 1 Mg' V., ,w-4 Vi f' George Barlow Huber, a Ft. Wayne, In 5' l f- 1 V ' lx V' R- V1 N ' 'K ' V ,N 'XV , WV 2 gf? VV gn 3. ' Fi .114 , lk .M-4' 21 -. ' 'Q f - at 7' rrrrmm ,fe A or joyce Helen Huber, a Hartland, Wi 'N ' 4' .' ' i ,V ii, V, " " 1- " Mary Elizabeth Huff, a Northfield, Il f 4 ' , -' ' V 'N ' ' 'l V joni West Hughes, a Indianapolis, In f P 1' Q-Q V V V 'H V . Q - 7 Gordon Stuart Hunt, e Bethesda, Md V . , ' 1 V' V. ' i , Nancy Roe Htmter, a Dallas, Tx " , 1:-'Q :Sy V I " .ii ,:g I Timothy Hunter, a Amherfst, Ma , V V QVVV 1 AM V, Vi fs V j . .L ,fffr V XVVDV n Gary Stephen Hurwitz, a Ty er, Tx . li , V 55 3 , 5553 ,f I 'V -f ,VVV I I JV V ' - . - 7:32 . i - uf 1.25.1341 . " I . I ' I. 1-J 3 ,V .P .A M ,V V Nannette F. Hutchens, a Huntsville, Al l , ' . 1 Q Leonard Barnes Hyde, e Birmingham, Al 1 at 'q "lf . V , Cecil Sims Irvin, a Franklin, Tn rm 13" . 9 V. 'T - - W V -' Catherine Ann Irwin, n Nashville, Tn W4 5 if V V , V V L+. ,L ' ' -V V- Richard D. Israel a Wedowee, Al ' " V '37 W 'M V A I ' ,iff V Carl Hughes jackson, a Danville, Ky .V V Y VV ,. X ,A QV ' V f V.!.7,V ' - Z I Stephen W. jackson, a Pompton Lakes, Nj ,A ' i jg 'Qi 'V . 3- ' -.U i u -75 '-it it - . at A 1 i N . . ' 452' 31 ' 'moi fi is . i ' ' V i i T Leonard H. james, e Clarksville, Tn l " ' " P W f' " john Nichols janoch, a Chagrin Falls, Oh l ' Vw ' - : ,,, Y ' Q Debra Gail jenkins, n Russell, Oh ' ' 'Q ,L -' ' ' ' Debbie R. jennings, a Brunswick, Ga Q ' V X V V , , Q, " ' - William E. jennings, a Cornwall-on-Hudson, NY ' Q V fl' V.V, U ' 1 , V Elna johanna jensen, a Houston, Tx X I X7 V ' ,,1 VV , ,, A ' " P- f I 7 ,V Donald Ray johns, a Oak Ridge, Tn as ' r 1 , 'ax V ' 1. - Frank P. johnson, jr., a Martha D. johnson, e Pamela G. johnson, a Robert Wayne johnson, e Steven johnson, a Albert'M. jones, jr., a Catherine j. jones, n Kingsport, Tn Nashville, Tn Dallas, Tx Browder, Ky Rockledge, Fl Memphis, Tn Catonsville, Md Vf iz . ,-- . f . .',i,1. " fvrf' -' 'wrt V VS ,j f f ,VV . VA' VV. , T ., , .,,. A. -V -a V ' V' :rV- -V-V' V V. , , x . . -.-lv' 2 V 'i ' xg V Y , .- 5 J " 1 , ' 41 V .VV VV , Vl I lj r f A Lvl 'X X f' 'I -xg T .. x.V .- . . .- Q ' ' ' 'si V--H' Y ' ' W , fi re? FF' ll ' 'T l ff Christine R. jones, a Fulton. Ky - Q - - -N l Y I ' ' A ' David Kerrell jones, a Meddletown, Ky - 7 'W' 7' . 1 .f F "7 5' ' janet Renee jones, a Savannah. Ca .ff-Q, ' 'N . 1 . , ,H-Q i-IQ Laura Lynn jones, n Lexington, Tn N' I ' ' ' 4 Q A n Q4 'K Minette R. jones, n Birminghain, Al , ' Q ., . ' - i. . 9' Q Vlfhitney .-X. jones, a Memphis, Tu Q ' l Q V Q - N' ,Q ,ll 1 QV Q - . N- I i X A . .I in jill Alison jordan, e Dallas. Tx . ' . ' ' -J 3 x k ,1- f'-'? "T" fi-Y' '-ff fe--- if ' - --fi--L 'wi-ff' - j ' QVQQQSQ- ' ' Till - ' I f, 5-,X Q ll Elizabeth D. joslin, a Newport, RI ' -' ' 'i f .' 4' . F, Y ' ' ' f james justice. e Nashville. Tn 3 ap. Q Q ' 0 Richard YVilliam Kaden, a Babylon, XY Q , , - A 1 Elaine Melissa Kaime, e Farmington, NM 'W - jf: ' ' Q.. Kathleen E. Kain, e Lighthouse Point. Fl r '- -,nb - lk Q - g Q Q N C. Charles Kaiser, a XVebster Groves. Mo ' 'x i ' 2-. 4' - Lawrence R. Kanter, a ar -hmon , ' ' 1 ' ti l' "ii f- , , ' 'W '3 j li, L L t H l I 'S 1' Ti Y th 1 I F ' ' f' ' W if l 'qi W . judy Rogers Kasey, a Louisville, Ky 1, I W 2 A .1 ' K -, Kimberly Louise Kaster. n Prospect. Ky N I' f W -- Y " A Stuart O. Kaye, a Miami Beach, Fl sg, ,f Lfj, , mg Y :, C... , Love Pizza Overbite, n Leaning Pitza. NY Q 1 V' f Q ,T " Valerie Ann Keim. e DeKalb, ll .I -A 1' 'mix , f V" F 1 X I ' George Harry Kfifrker, e xQjlQainpa. QQ X Q Q 'fhxei in Q N i Patricia jo Kent a , a i mette. l' Q ' V - Keith Swor Kendrick, a Dallas. Tx I Q ' ' f- .- X Beth Kennebeck, n Oxon Hill, Md ' . . , ' Q ' 'A In " Douglas Paul Kerins, e Pound Ridge. NY Lf, 35- Y Karen Lynette Keyes, n Signal Mtn., Tn -- ' ' -F" -' ' ' Ellen Ai-rhan Kim Nashville, Tn 'I , ' tg-il 'V - rw? AQ I . Q Macon M. Kimbrough, e Hendersonville, Tn Ea Q , , ., QA Q S 12 -is , 'N I X Alden Farr King, a Nashville, Tn .' ' :wg . 1' I 'I I ' A 'V 1 ' cr . .... ap I A The people outside have the Wrong idea, 1tS a big bruldup. Valerie Keim TT -r . ' ert' xii? , - H Q ' f ,f Q: l ' S '-.if Q '33 L ' Michael Harold King. e New Orleans, La ' S , S -21103-ti ,C ' ' Raymond Eldridge King, a Atlanta, Ga ' 9' I S' ' ' ' 3 ' 'ef . Bruce XVilliam Klingman, a Dallas, Tx x 4 U . ' i -- it 1 -in :eb Deborah Ann Knaver, n jacksonville, Fl . 'xx ' , l Q Qf, N' David Bruce Koch, a St. Louis, Mo I ' , ' Y' 'l .Z lf' I I 1 jeanne Marilyn Kohrs, a Tampa, Fl ' 'NN' Q ' I ' , Q Q ' 'T - ' l , 4 If ' Y' judith Anne Kopec. a Eucled. Oh . , 5 f 'M l-, ' I I l ' S I I l K ' iN"'V F-Fw . ' ' ' ll ' 31' Kenneth Frank Kostenbader, e Montgomery. Al 'I V ' 1 , 1 ' ' , X Beverly Ester Kraft. a Skokie. Il , ' - ' ,Q A z 8- Paul Steven Kratsch, a Decatur, Ca QQ Qt , Q Q Q ' QI " ' ' Betsy Kulmau, a Atlanta. Ca , T? ' " - " ' l A , ' ' ' ' "ff I Katherine T. Kuroczko, a King of Prussian, Pa ,- ,Q fl 4 Q i 1 Margaret Kathryn Kuse. n Decherd, Tn ' 7' W - H I -X I 5 " iql N' f ' ' 54 n ' K BarbaraL L'tChine a Knoxville Tn K1 g ' at ' ' . ,ls"1e! i L " ' ' ' ' ' 1 Hi. gli' .,' . l X... T-"' FT-T -T'-" "'V'Tx' 'TWD-"T ' - X Stephen D. Lackey, a Coral Cables, Fl . .2 9. Q ' ' Dixie Adeline LaCrone, a Atlanta, Ga ' Q 3' , ag N 5' Lee Alan Lahourcade, a San Antonio, Tx ' "M ' l 1 ' ,Q . jane Laird, a Tequesta, Fl ' 'A 5' if -W. VVilliam Douglas Lamb. e Louisville, Ky - Q . 1 Richard Edward Lamping, a Cincinnati, Oh Qtx , s james Cary Lane, e Lebanon, Tn I v x li Tl l A . l l Tl Cicil Scott Langdon, e jadkson, Tn qw? 1 ' Q M11 Q A -M V E Q 11 if-I Q. QQ Q Qv x 'Q ,K Q QQ ,L T. lg- ' ,,,, , QT ,, QQ A i . T , j f . .F '17 F Q. .3 - IQ, . 'Q X 1 1 f f- ' , f ' X I Q gs - X -, - f Qc .457 , r v .. fy, W' - If . v 'Q W , -A W 3 27 " ' xg if, Q Q Q. K , . QQ.:::E2 Q A ,glxfyy-x. Q ,, A .. ' - d I Q, "" " . 3 j . ' i .Q l Q -l -e ' A .SQ H ' 'Q , . --4 il I if 2 , '-7 , A 5 ,T . . ii ' Q F AM .Q I Q ,f.QQQ 1 U, .N , , , K E, E wa, , I A -- . ri i f. v Q rv X1 'r e john T. Langevin, e A. Lawton Langford, a jean A. Lankford, n julie M. Larrick, a joseph A. Laspada, a Karen Lauritzen, a Howard C. Layne. e Kim E. Lazarus, a Damien M. Lee, e james T. Lee, jr., a Michael jay Liebson, a Ruth Ann Lennek, a David E. LeRiche, a Sanford, NC Tallahassee, Fl Mohile, .-Xl Columbus, Oh jacksonville, Fl Canton, Oh Nashville, Tn Huntington. NY Honolulu, Hw Charleston, SC Louisville, Ky Babylon, NY Tulsa, Ok l i f Nancy C. LeSac. n Oconomowoc, Wi l l K Paul R. Lessard, a Marblehead, Ma 1 Claresa S. Levetan, e Atlanta, Ga Arthur joel Levin, e Atlanta, Ga .-V 1' Kenneth B. Levitan, a Smithtown. NY ' V '4' Barry E. Lewine, a Wheeling, WV Q' V ' V Barbara Ann Lewis, a Birmingham, Al I1 V ff' ' ' 'fi "' ' T - 1nTf'3ggV- . V , lam iii Maurice Wendell Lewis, e Nashville, Tn . 'I 'll I V - C l Steve D. Libowsky, a Atlanta, Ga ' V , Mary Grace Liebler, a Coral Gables, Fl T '5 V. ,J l ' ' H Ann S. Lindsey, a New Orleans, La ' ' r ,, - - VV Steven Adam Lippman, a Watchung, NJ V, 'Iii Y Stanley W. Littlefield, e Huntsville, Al A 'V A V SV l ,V kathy Lynn London, a Louisville, Ixy VVVVV V V 5 V VV VV VV V V . V Q VE , VV sV V - . - Ii, - 'T rf jane Miller Love, a Gallatin, Tn J l l, ,gs ' " Keith Loveless, a Tanner, Al 1 ll ' 1 I ' GP V V Edward M. Lovell. jr., a Birmingham, Al T ' ' 1 tiff Diane Sue Lovinger, a Huntsville, Al ' ' f ' 4, .G ' Q jay Neil Lowenthal, a Pontiac, Il , , 1 . , l I Michael Lee Lucas, a Huntsville. Al "ff" V ' l V 1 , V, john Martini Ludwig, e Louisiana, Mo. V " , V X N ,-' ar' A il 5 ,il ., i 'gi , -w 1 . , . S . ,, . V -, 5 , ..-l Beatrice Lynn Luellen, a Flmt, Mi V Q ,IW 1 V i f " V Q , V ,V V Stephen Michael Lyle. e McMinnville, Tn ' 57, it V ' , ' .1 HV, ,Q " ,Sap ,H V Ann Rita Mackey, a Bullwin, Mo ' ' 'I' ' V .' , V, 1. Q X . "' Martha C. Maclay, a Dallas, Tx 19, V . V, I., ' ' -:Qu QV .,,' Carol Marie Maddox, a Kingsport, Tn ' fV V-, , V , 7 ' V ,,1fQV V -a V' Franklin W. Maddux, a Charlotte, NC f 5 fl ,9 4 1 Melissa King Madigan, a Little Rock, Ar f I if " , ll '- F 'N Q CC ' I 77 Being at College means never having to say your sorry. , Tl' 'f 'hm V T ',"": W Kevin james Mahoney, a St. Louis, Mo 1 . Q l. l L ' l ll l A ' Ian Lynn Maier, e Massillon, Oh ' ' J- . V W I john A. Maloof, a Birmingham, Al ti' Q5 "' ' ' T Allen Michael Mandelbaum. a Lexington, Ky K4 1 A ' " fm' ' gg ' . 1 Aimee Lucille Mandeville, a New Rochelle, NY 1 VA' 7 1 V MaVrthaVIanc Mann, a Forrest City, Ak of V " A ' A De oral Dianne Ma les, a Meridian, Ms V , ' - S ' V V 43 1' Q4- T P ,T 1f Lalffne '1 x .. la s. :iff Samuel Addison Marable, a Dallas, Tx 'FW , ' 'F " . Y' V1 H f ,V .V Lisa McDowell Marchand, a Houston. Tx ' ' ' C 1 . af '1' Marilou Louis Marcus, a Lousbrecht, Neth. 1 i 9 . , , Q- , - .av Stephen john Maroda, a Germantown, Tn " V '. V V l V , VV ., ., . Guy Yarbro Marsh, a Nashville Tn , '- 'V V V 7"" T7 Marion McKenzie Marshall, a Cordova, ll .. S V. , ,'.' 2 , ,-til , l y julia Clarke Martin, a Atlanta, Ga , ' - ,J f ' ' " V f A lv" ' . V31 l f V ' 1 'I ' ,Q L 7 ' uk iw 'I 1 S " X - 1, Randall Keane Martin, a St. Louis, Mo ' l ll' Q- l -'T' - l ' 5- ,fxflf A. Melissa Massar, a Columbus, Oh - - V i ' 1 Vf - Margaret Diane Mathews, a Forrest City, Ar ... 12 v '1 Q Q, V J' "X -.r Stephen E. Matter, a Edmond, Ok ffl - , ,,1-A VV ' 1 . '15, , -.i. , I , Laura Lee Maxwell, e Dallas, Tx ' 1 I 'T' ,VK 'V ' ,Qin ' Richard Carlisle Mayer, a Birmingham, Al -Q ggi., K ' ' ,Q f fjl f ' ' V, yd: LT' ff, jeanne Marie Mazurek, a Lakeland, Fl V -. -5 ' A ,,.,, V V Vp l V l' Y af I .S . A ' I 1 'g 'ii V,'-. 'VVVV - r " I ' T-f"... ' - " Q17 'f.4 Ronald Lee McAlpine, e San Antonio, Tx Vfs " 1 1 Cl ' , l XX 5' Susan Elizabeth McCall, n Old Hickory, Tn "gl M , Ianet Lee McCarraher, a Ft. Lauderdale, Fl ,jfj '1 sz -'r David Stanley McClary, a Etowah, Tn H " , V t ' i V:-Vi .1 Martha M. McClaugherty, a Charleston, WV 1 .V 1' " ve Thurman D. McClenton. a Greensboro, NC V V , .V 1 " 'ff X Stephen V. MeCrary, a Murfreesboro, Tn f ' , . if-: .. A '. vi r rr 1 - ---'fa ' r- l Neal McCulloh, a Key Biscayne, Fl , ,fr l , 'W john Cato McDermott, a Carbondale, ll T ' David C. McDonald, e Nashville, Tn -" ,ff '- ' . 7 ' joan P. McDonald, a Atlanta, Ga ' V J E Martha M. McDonald, n Houston, Tx ., -- . Susan O. McDonald, a Tylertown, Ms V' , , TI, V 1 V NV Martha K. McDonnell, a Memphis, Tn V '7 336 I .TL :V..,,,V V Au A YV ,L f' A 9 he xx 4 ui!! rf .5 vf l . rg'-.D '-x .- .I . .P A ,I . xr' .1 ' .., b' 11.7, e 4'- '. 3.1.3. x " -A-.,.::'.t', I .L Tj'-r'Q-M,-., '- Msn . iff, '.f"vx. Q '-2 I -1'-,ff.'1L'g"5: ' "'2"'f'?f5j , . -x"' g". ,fy ' X . if 5. 4 I A ', 1 W' X A 1 X. v .KAN N Z, . '1 Samuel Marshall McGaw, e Mt. Pleasant, Tn , V . V Stephen A. McGill, a Cartersville, Ga. ' V 'f " -, Maria D. McGlamery, e Cottondale, Fl ' 4. 'F , -I V ' lr , 1, '- Chester McKay, a Robinsville, Ms A -4, V V. 1 .V il V i Laura Kathryn McKay, n Ft. Sheridan, ll '-T "A '-7 T fir Susan M. McKell, a Tampa, Fl l - if 3V ,- 45V Q ' V543 ' f J Mildred P. McKensie, a Atlanta, Ga - l- fi X ij I ' ' ii 'T is Vwg V V VVVV V VVVV I V VV BWV V V t if V Mark Lee McKinney, e College Park. Ga l - ' " - H ' ' il ' ' 'V A' V. i f it l V 'wi james M. McKinnon, e Franklin, Tn ' 1 'S' , L V ,Tj , Mark N. McLaughlin, a Chattanooga, Tn ' - V, ' qu, -G, VV ,Vg Q, " ga ,-. ,,, ' V V'V Michael G. McLoughlin, e Charlotte, NC , VV 'Z V . V H5 f ' at - - L , 1 ,' , Kimber Lee McMann, a Ft. Lauderdale, Fl V. V"'?'Z ' '5' Vf1.V Ti T35 ' ' ' ' I " E- Martha Pitts McMillin, a Inman, SC Vw ,IL . ,V Vf is V . VV V3 ij Amy Elizabeth McNicol, n Huntington, NY 555V VU! 'k,,,., V- , 'l - , ' i , V T - -bw' 1 if ' 'T . ii Y. ' .2 9 ' Mary D. McFarland, a Atlanta, Ga 'i, -' ii A - - V ' li ' i ' .-..- l' 1 , ' Thomas A. McRae, a Memphis, Tn -' ' V ' lf" ' i f V W' V john Tyler McShan, a McShan, Al - "5 'ES' ' ' 'j -' , , ' V ' 4 ' -A Daryl E. Merlin, a Minneapolis, Mn .S V 'Q' " V ,L V -N . . V ' Erich W. Merrill, e Memphis, Tn V Va 'V ' V -J ' 5 tg' Hugh N. Merritt, a Meridian, Ms , 'j f' " 1' .V V V X1 X - ij 1 . james W. Mersereau, a Chevy Chase, Md .3 - V V . V .QVL VVV A A KV Michael R. Meulemans, e Nashville, Tn ' - ,,,, 'LV P , i if I, Y , ' Michelle L. Meyer, a Ft. Lauderdale, Fl 2-H" ' ' ' K 7 , ' ' Thomas j. Michie, e Charlottesville, Va jig, V -3. as VV -za V tv... Pg V AV n Melanie Floy Mikell, a Tallahassee, Fl ff. M, VV, ,V .X .gi V V-, V, -.Q V ft 'A Christopher H. Miller, a Louisville, Ky ' V ' f VV, "2 ll 7 Vi "' David Gregory Miller, a Hodgenville, Ky V-VV: ' r J' 1 ' " 3' 'z ,V ' , r V Scott Edward Miller, e St. Petersburg, Fl 1' J "H, ' i K Vy 'V fV " V- - N V 2 AV " xx I' X A , , , ,A -. ., 1,1-er' If J .M 1. N C C 0 I I I I I 3 3 , 0 Rehka Mohan i V, ' if 1' V ififi -- H Isaha Bugal Meanmouth, a Music City, Tn V V, ' ' V V 'rf V E V V423 1 I V' judy Pratt Mills, a Tuscaloosa, Al i ,Q ' 2 ' .x 3 V- X 'V V5 -9 V ' l 4 V Melanie K. Millsap, a Monroe, La V V ,A ' -A V V! :lf V VV, , x Sharma.Ruth Minchey. a Lafayette, Tn - , l' 'H-' . '- V V "? ' , ' - ' " ' 5, Rebekah Christine Minnix, a Miami, Fl ' , . V ff V .VVg,f, V V.,.V- . " Emily Gail Mitchell, e jackson, Tn 2 . V V, - . l,, . ,U V' - 1 'f' 7 I jolm Mark Mitchell, e Louisville, Ky ' iii 2 " ' ' ' r my' . f XV ,' - f Q aj Q fi g,L..' .Q VVVV:iVV,fe-- oak V ,. :V -Tl V-A fd ' , rf- . . V Q A VV W" Melanie Sue Mobley, n Hermitage, Tn ' ' 'Q f - , Rudy F. Moeller, a Louisville, Ky i V "Q 'V - V ,L , " , ' . . V L.. Rakha Mohan, a Chattanooga, Tn 'F at V Q V - Jw -'X A V V . Harry Edward Moore, a Newbern, Tn I t -'1 il V-5. VV- "' A g 'f Ii il, ' V V Hugh Thomas Moore, jr., a Kingston, Ga f- -5 g , - J 1 - ft" Heather Ann Morcroft, a Hollywood, Fl ,. - '- L V - V .. . V Felicia Gloria Morgan, a Cedartown, Ga . ' i X Agf 'f ,V if .5 V ,viii W "'Y iL'r' ' V V ,V A G' . A 'i'f..I ' . D' 'F V nl K -- f- 1 ,al w if ' Mn , , -- Y.: Hilary Stevens Morgan, n jacksonville, Fl Vlf-if -51" ' " :1 '- - A 'jk - " Calvin Franklin Morris, a Winchester, Tn 3. V. V 'V' , , V, , V 5 Q , john Steven Morris, a Birmingham, Al ' ' l P V, ' V A ' , Q ' , VV VV " Martha Dickey Morris, a Charlottesville, Va ' 3 ., i .3 ' fl 'rg , ' V' V -- V , ---ff VV ' 'V' V. ' Peter Craig Morris, a Fort Worth, Tx V VV -- i , ' VM 'V ' K. :V ' V,f D V ,- V V V - V jason Drew Morrow, a St. Louis, Mo f 'N VV. J' i Q.-,ay V N Li' . i X f V '1 3, in 'V 1. Nancy Nerille Morse, a jackson, Ms J V '- L- - 6 V fl W ' V5.1 ' CV ' ,Q ' " LV, ', Ffrffif " " " "f ,-. -- 1 lV " . U' i ' f ,, " qi ' 4-1-"Tj-H ,ar , r, ' 5 Nina Morse, e Dallas, Tx 1 ' 1 ' ' ' ' - 1 , , ' Elizabeth Harding Moss, e Atlanta, Ga ,la I, ' V . ,,, . U V ,G f ' i f' V . William Malcolm Mounger, a jackson, Ms i i I . . Q V .Ag - 1 D K ' Arnold R. Mozisek, jr., a Dallas, Tx Y? 'V V' -', - ' ' f ' .- V V ' Michael jeffrey Mueller, a St. Louis, Mo ' g R 11? HL' ' V' 4 gr' A William Hughes Murray, a Huntsville, Al V - V - 'i ", ' l . V 7 ', . Wayne Murphy, e Nashville, Tn VV ' w A V V V It St., N :VV l V Alan Doyle Myatt, e Madison, Tn ' V- i 1 'V V' " " V r Vi V Richard E. Nabatoff, a NSW Y0Yk, NY - -V - ll" "- L- 1 -v, 3 ' .5 V. F- Ima Cary Nailling, n Asheville, NC V V ' V 'V, - V V V T 'T Marc W. Namie, a Orlando, Fl if if 'V - if ' 'li V V E255 Pamela Ann Neal, a Marietta, Ga V - ' N 1VVVV g V , c.. 1 ' V ' li ' William Thomas Neamy, a Dallas, Tx S ' - ' 5 ' f ' V. Ma Parish Neel,n Aubrey White, Ga ' I ' ' ' , if "V . V..'V V ry X 4 ,- V ' l . " ' V EN! . it I ' l e E XE xx V, ll' ' -.aff ' 4' " . ' 1 , . ' . r A K2 Q.: AV 57, h Y ,QL .W l . j I- i 1-2 W M .et 'V 5 ,i 4- 27 '-in :x 1 .5 ,U A 4- p pp ...am T 2- A 7: Q-'N ,Fi-1, "L, 5. P-4 t.f f, 2 2 f-1-v . il I . Q' gg Vg 1-lg., X A .J , W. ' ' '-.-. -. 'f 4 '-"N 'V' gf h P 'ii I ci: - '- Jig' , D , 4 x 1 4 1 4. i.. I' Q ly 9,4 - L l A -I!! Q 6 ?'i ' N' 'I x pp 1- 'U . aiu., ,. f ii. 'V ' . 'li' "gk ' le il 4 5 ' . qi - . . if We IS . fi x CTO. 'f l ii ' t V ., 9: -14. 4' - 4: q' unix' A 1 'ti n D X ' 1 ' 2 'Q li iff' i 3 -" Ji ll Q' 2 .lr -'B' U3 Tuul' "' "Cl -5,-'i-, is . '-'ln r '1. E 5 'xg . X ' ., 4' Q ,sa-Z X. '. I Q' . ' 't J I A I - 1' 'V gs QY p.Y,,Qr 5 - j 4 , ,A ix? . js X 5 -- .fi ,-X QQ .L .SM - .l - X 5-I. 'iff 'AQDXF' ',, ' i J - .. x Q- l h,. pf , . if . QL! 5 . ffa: 44 V- L' ' U iff' Q3 K 1:4 in ., Q.: O arrears resume megan weave 9-' Hasan: aeaewgtf sewage 5-are-rea 2-:aware as aw A-: awe 7: wen-- Ud msgig-F03 g"QU,:2.Z QEEQYYG QTEZEOYQ S9 Eswmswv- --IFE 418 :S 52" w'ss+E'3'Q 5-1- D' O...-f'X2Q2:5 U'-' F12-'U - fl- -1C1-N "" E"'.5Pa2U,go 5:-agggneo? "niggas-w 233925291 as '-up'-9:1 ?i"P' 5 O0 KOS STR' 325' OUQSZMQE. D aa,-:a,.U:Ug9': O::....Qo -m 32' gf?-'Q 39" 3,223 EGBQQ 5 2625-?5s5'.-' Em"b'-92 EDN'-'L9912' 0 again. S arg:-.1535 Za' .3 ig se 5-veg SD 'PES' E Fmlnlvags, 55, '5 39. 91 fplsl mmm ' 'D E22 E' w L13 5 H it l" "' Pkg, Rst' P L N '5' 9' 3' 'B CD io f"l'v V E g Zvi Q 7153 5 F' EE rp-15 9 Qi?-25555 Egg: 523155 -353155.12 afimirmz- F:-SFSC5 EUEFFUK gezggo-E :555525 552.5355 gisiii.. gif-FPPS-QQ 555-ep.-fii WSFFF5? - ' -1 - i-On:-sci' w ' - D-wierd wrrswwilfv 5151555551 ?:i9?!l3Il2? --n -1 A . v ,..q - 4- :ii t . '1n. . 4 ,... .v . ".- s I.. , , '- A , 'x x. i ' r Y 1 If -a ' ,a U- - V -'f "" as U x X ' 5 Aa' U Lisa Marie Pantea, e 'X Q i IQ Y I ,. . . f' - A . le Z M p , W ,pi -.4 K - x , I--JA M ,, , f a r -. ,aa - v .ni , . y A e A A. L, i J A. -55? I 4 I 1 A I lx X l ', 'C " i . : " A ' ' ' 2 - ' 1 'Q +3 .. d p 'fs' i of L K w if e y ' -. X i i i " 'N 1 9' ..-. x .-g 'x - 'l-.'- -A i Q 'Uv 1 . - L1 'ifflfif' ,' N if gl. NA. . --ni sz C. Alleta Parker, a Ann Elise Parson, a Keith Hampton Parson, a Miriam E. Parsons, n John Rhinehold Pastryk, a Marc Howard Paul, a Ronald Irvin Paul, a john Reed Payne, a Virginia F. Payne, a Richard B. Pazomick, a john F. Pearson, Ir., a Timothy Alan Pearson, a Richard C. Peck, jr., e David Lee Pedigo, a David C. Peeples, a jo Anne Pelligrin, a Beth C. Pennington, a jacquiline Peny, a Margaret T. Phalen, n Sally Ruth Philbin, a Rubel L. Phillips, jr., a I. Daniel Picciotto, e Barbara jean Pierce, a Gordon H. Piper, a Walton D. Plummer, e Candace Allen Poe, a Holly Ann Poe, a Teresa Robin Pohlman, a Mary E. Poindexter, a Mary Beth Ponce, a Patricia Lynn Pope, n Frederick E. Powell III, a Katherine'C. Powell, a Mark Primogentor Portage, In Montgomery, Al Potomac, Md Potomac, Md Houston, Tx Lake Forest, Il Silver Spring, Md Louisville, Ky Columbia, Mo Hopkinsville, Ky Silver Spring, Md Frederick, Md Hendersonville, Tn Iacksonville, Fl Chattanooga, Tn W. Memphis, Ak Gallatin, Tn Newark, Oh Birmingham, Al Girardeau, Mo Bethesda, Md jackson, Ms Bogota, Columbia johnson City, Tn Wyckoff, Nj White House. Tn Dexter, Mo Western Springs, Il jacksonville, Fl Memphis, Tn Miami Springs, Fl Tampa, FI Birmingham, Al Houston, Tx Rabbit, Al 339 Stephen M. Pratt, a Amy Todd Price, a Richard Brian Price, e Sandra Ann Price, a Denis C. Pringle, a Scott M. Pritchett, a Emileyann Purcheart, n Robert jesse Proctor. a Francine Protogere. a John YVills Protzman, e Elizabeth Diane Purcell, n Cabot Pollard Pyle. a Leyser Yvette Quinn, a Douglas Kent Raborn, a Forest Ralph, a George Michael Ramirez, a john Earl Ramsey, a Ieanne Marie Randall, a Celie LuRae Rawlings, a Hamilton, Oh Nashville, Tn Dayton, Oh Birmingham, Al Tulsa, Ok Sheffield, Al Virgin, Al Atlanta, Ca Indianapolis, In Baltimore, Md Houston, Tx Haddonfield. Nj Greenville, Ms Boynton Beachl Fl Houston, Tx Hialeah, Fl Atlanta, Ca XVinchester, Tn Hurricane Mills, Tn William Elbert Rayburn, e Tliompsons Station, Tn Catherine jeanne Rea, a jeh'erson Lee Reeder, a Robert Bruce Reiner, a Cynthia Dawn Rice, a Mary Melissa Rice, a I.P. Ricker, a Ianet Lynn Ridgway, e Dorothy E. Riis, e Sylacauga, Al Smithville, Mo Hong Kong Madison, Tn Nashville, Tn Nashville, Tn Maitland, Fl Mobile. Al 1 ' va ,- T. 5 at K., X , f? w 49 .. 'Q 'T lm :I P? . ' Q T ' . -2 i . . .t li- It-1 Ci .N k :A fr' 'N , , 3 , 2- ,Z .ggi . T t T TT 2- 1 ' TT i T l'x" 'li V -4' T J .4 f' 'jk . T . ' . T T -T -T .4. T, ,aft I T T .N l 71 3 T y l I -A ,g Riffs T' l H " 1 V 'V C NC' - . Q t .JL , .A are ' 'ff . Qx f 4 wa- 7' . 5 " .V I-ali Ti 442, 1,3 ' ,sq 'X ' T 4. ,T Q E if ', .a Q.. . R I r ls S15 rm. T , i k-f " 'TR V If 'Q 4 b 'VT . J HT 3, 'J' ,s 1' l- T.' vw 1 , ' 'Pr B X i ,, I d . 'T as . , ,, ,. . i 4:1 si, --A T 1'. V I ' fl, ' 9 Lg-V - I q ,' sl . f' V I TR: 1 1' X ,is F, it R I, . T W 5' y fy' .J it W be 5 q css. T , T . , 1.41 W T ,y- Q., i "5 ...-a' "- ,T 1 ""'T J: 4 if A--. T , , , ,, . Q ., ? r lk 1 f ig, T' T, T jg,,,,xlf f T X 5, At . . T . like much at all about It Nu, ,,,,,,,,, "Lots of things to do Weekends . . . places to date . . . Shoot man, I donit Ted Allen Riskin, a Robert Thornton Ritter, a Ierry Lee Roberts, a Mary N. Robertshaw, a Holly Ann Robinett, a Charles Arthur Robinson, a M. Russ Robinson, a Rebecca Dian Robinson, n William Scott Roder, e Beth Ellen Rogers, a Rachel joy Roginsky, a Don David Rollins, a Stephen Lawrence Rose, a Rick Callen Rosen, e Ioan Susan Rosenberg, a William Anthony Ross, a Nancy Ioan Rossmeisl, e james Hunter Roth, a Vida Zah ra Rousta, a Ann Rowland, a Russell Lee Rua, a Richard Alan Rubin, a William Louis Rudolf, a Nancy lean Rupp, a Cary Anne Ruscick, a Debbie Ioan Rutledge, a Susan Lee Rutherford, a Iames A. Ryan, jr., a Matthew K. Ryan, e Linda jane Rylee, a Richard Neal Sabinsky, a Steven Bennett Sadowsky, a Elizabeth St. Coar, n Robert Paul Salimbene, e Nancy Anne Saltsman, n 340 Trenton, Basking Ridge, Owcnsbo1'o, Ky Crecnville, Ms Springfield, Mo Norfolk, Va Houston, Tx NI Nl Paris, Tn Centerville, Tn Muncie, In Eastchester, NY Nashville, Tn llouston, Tx N. Miami, Fl Eastchester, NY Ft. Lauderdale, Fl St. Petersburg, Fl Deerfield, Il Teheran, Iran Richmond, Va Pittsburg, Pa Charleston, NVV Charlottesville, Va Atlanta, Ca Alpine, NI Lewisburg, Tn xAtlanta, Ca Prattville, Al Brookfield, Wi Memphis, Tn Commack, NY WVorchester, Ma Chattanooga, Tn Mt. Juliet, Tn Byram, Cn t fry ' !i gtflfl Fe:-gf , , L B if-N it ' a ll -lv l ,N ...li X? .T -'S O . 'gfff A ' li fl 1 5 ' rl' -N .IM 1 I , J ' C, 'll L if fl' . R - I 4 A QR , - .,. e-2 H " wi ki . rf QE, 1 ,N--:L R i ' T 'WWI K . -:ln-. -' TL- , T , , ,.,j:.-125111:-, 'I I-1 Q -Q , lb ls I V5 ,Rav-I, ...ui 'Tj T M T f"' rf . l V Y,g2iT ' T ' T J M T re ,it T- -T T' T- Q A 315355 2' N T J .T 4.1 fx.-JV 1 H .1 xt", at 'W 5 lv, SI' , ,rT -1 A .X V4 'Tru T' I . T' . 41 4 T. .a a t . iw . l Y Y , Y T . fl 1, L7 7 jg 5 'x V Q .524.5?1' ,f,,,,..1A 1. .ff,::, , ,-. -L - . ,-,,,.J4 , .-...- , - if i g . nl i 1 L..L.4, Q ' 76 ,- 1- - f'-Q7 vqtlg . V' at . .T1 A1 , . S...- .' lf, gl' T 1 . , T, , i ' 1- T .. v 1 4. ' 7' 4. x ,. -- . -- . i'.la',rTT . 4'- Q Ji s'l" A E, Ulf ! II' ,, x X3 S 7 lyk Q .l . Pvmo il 5 I , s Q ur ,J N-in 7 N1 Pr kg-!'.,l. AN' Q.-1 -lin. f 11- W FRESHMEN Debby Ann Sanders, a Timothy R. Sanders, e Deborah I. Sanderson, n Rita Nim Sandner, n E. Steve Scales, e John N. Schaffner, Ir., a jeffrey Aaron Schlang, e William Woody Schlosser, a Carol Emily Schmitt, a Susan jean Schmidttx, n Frances Louise Schneider, n Susan Patrice Schoettle, a Scott Raymond Schroer, e john Francis Schultz, a Jackson, Ms Hardy, Ak Winnetka, Il Birmingham, Al Franklin, Tn Nashville, Tn Hollywood, F I Ballwin, Mo Oak Ridge, Tn Milwaukee, Wi Austin, Tx W. Memphis, Ak Cincinnati, Oh Orland Park, Il T2 r'2"' ' ' 5 'B F225 X4 " 1 :I 1 I . I . , .r A 7 A ut- ,c A a- i N ffr-7?-y ig S- - :I . 'I . 'Ti' B' l lynn.. Vs " I -i t 'Ch v J I 1 'S fm., "Toll-iw 'T' 'N y,y, , , , - , NW ll' ' , - .- V, A ,, , i , If - Y - - , I, , , Q , ! fs , I yy 4 ' I if . 5 : at w - - l A " 'M fr' U ' 4 'lx L, 1 I . . ,fi V I, , , , , L. I, -fxns 1, , gl 14 Y-3, L 'al : di ' " 2 . 'tiit -wi . 1 .. I Mary Getchen Schwahn, a jackson, Ms , f ' 3- X - 4 I, 65 'L' '-,- l ' A ' Q Z5 5 Fran Kay Schwaiger, e Cullman, Al A-'3'-I ,, .. I 1 1 "' W ,Q " 1 J :"'l ' as 44 I Karen Leslie Scussel, A Creve Coeur, Mo A "' ' , A p 3 3 A - is ' Q' , A A-J 'F I, L R. Clay Seckman, e Nashville, Tn ,ll N , , I 4 ,L ' .. -54 ' ' V -1 ' Lis, ,33 ' Adam Douglas Senter, a Mamaroneck, NY "' A . I K if -F-N' A- X L I, 4 - A 'A IX ,- Debra Lynn Server, u Chicago, Il " ' "Qi 'ff " , A , ' 4 1 I I , l Margaret Leigh Sewell, a Houston, Tx 'A ' A i ' jill - A "5 ' W , 4' A 1' Kim Leslie Shafer, a Bryn Mawr, Pu ' ll ,.,,, ' f i " 5 ' Marc Thompson Shafer, e Hartford, Cu " , In A an , v -' ' V h I David Duffield Shardelow, e Cincinnati, Oh ' is 1 . 1 A ' I .,, W2 , William Allen sharp, a Ft. Lauderdale, Fl -V,M, . if 5, I . T, I at-ff -ff . james Luton Shaub, e Brentwood, Tn I '-I J I T, V pf f la , fm: B. A Kevin Iames Shaughnessy, e Greenbelt, Md ' ' 1 l .,.. Hsgfl' f ' l 'V xi. Cynthia Ann Shenwell, e Paducah, Ky 4 ,,'. xqyv ' if ' 'T V: , X H A KK ,,,,', 'I 'pI?- ' , ' 4. ,g-, A 4 , 4. . ..i -I ... . . , - CC I 7 u a a Vanderbilt s blg enough so I can meet a Wide variety of people but as small enou so I can be someone. MW, ,,,,,,,, David George Shields, a Sarah Anne Sheilds, n Robert Davis Shingler, e Michael Allen Shoffner, a Margaret Swift Shook, a Nancy Baird Short, n Samuel jackson Short, a Iunne Christa Shreftler, a Anne Louise Shultz, a George Steve Siderys, a Douglas Paul Sifford, a Christopher M. Simcox, a Vick Lynn Simons, a Alicia Pamela Sinclair, a Scott Alan Singennan, e Donna Io Singeton, a Susan Theresa Skelton, a Chris Skinner, n Robert W. Skinner, jr., a Sara Skochdopole, e George Awfull Shock, a Jeffery Wilton Smith, a john Sloan Smith, a julie Ann Smith, a Ocala, Fl Nashville, Tn Atlanta, Ga Wartrace, Tn Birmingham, Al Nashville, Tn Shelbyville, Tn Nashville, Tn Maryville, Tn Indianapolis, In Annandale, Va Frankfort, Ky Ashland, Ky Miami, Fl Kettering, Oh Franklin, Tn Tallahassee, Fl Nashville, Tn Memphis, Tn Omaha, Nb Nashville, Tn St. Louis, Mo Indianapolis, In Kenilworth, Il Leslie Hollister Smith, n St. Cloud, Mn Martha Dale Smith, n Atlanta, Ga Monty D. Smith, a Owensboro, Ky Nancy Reynolds, Smith, e El Paso, Tx Renita june Smith, a Nashville, Tn Teresa Ann Smith, Dayton, Oh Catherine Gayle Smothemian, a College Grove, Tn Matthew Raphael Snyder, a Bristol, Tn Vicki Lynn Sobel, a Coral Gables, F I Frances Caroline Sommers, a Selma, Al Catherine D. Speeler, n VVinter Park, Fl ,,- , ,., w.,-if? , .--V, --ev V ci ,. -.i. J.- ,-' --,--gl -'-, 3 - - . 'lf ,,,, I- I A I .2 A yi s lf - I 'it fi '- p ,' , ' -fffffr. 'F ' ' 'I ., lf , I . .JU 4 't , 4 1 'Q ' V " ,N V x nf' . v' 'I 'gl A f- , Hx ' Q ' ' , I -f' - , , y r 8,411 sssrflakw f auyaziigw I . i3f2i?.F" j ,, . e,e' jj is ' I ,- .I -A I Y' vt, ,V ' . , - , I ' 1 Q -I 'ff ' ' I ,X "" I E 3 I 'N 1 x ,. in I y 1 , I,-3 1 N -. ,W U up 1 .I Al l X ff "H" GRN 1 sg? " . 3 ' - ' N J U ,xjjffl ' L e L, pa.. 1,1 ,' In 5, , ' t r ' ' "4 f Tlf fi ' I F-' 5 v ff, ,V -.if ,- l il 4 u ,gll I ui JA sc es. Xsfx A i 4 i t l, s' its - Q - I ' , I 4 ', - I' " : li' Q, W . ' ,va v , Q lol A is ,, I . it , , - , . up , ,J J . ,I1 !: Y JJ JY., J J . .-,,..,,-'J:J . I ,fa J , J' . is . I JJHF-3 'J -. J tml , ' . V. -' l ", 1 A , 1, . 1. , i ' , ,,, ,-4 J ' ,, J ' lf ' I ,rj . . cg.. J: 'gg J I V -N ri . . 'I it . ' ray: g l T rf' Y. k ill ill' '42 , ' . 'lt ' Q. .,, .f . ,i?fg?.-'- 'L-its". r I ' I, ' ' i 1 ' '- J S " l R ., 1 ,V -gJJ ' -up qfxfix 1 ' ' .J J -. , .Q ' J -i . -2 f-5' . J J J - ,--J fr W X ,lp , I T! ,J H Z, .h -, , v P ' J v ' JJ !Jh,' lx . f TW, J, I AMW, J' - if f J f J Q I Ja . ' . l " E f ,. H" J J I .,J J , J -'P J ..f J.J I -. ,i , ,. , . Q. ,...,,, - ' A7 T --: V" "F 'T' . gi ' . F f fat ll if' i I I 1' X . . l if . -A fl .,4 , , 7 , , J v v' , ' 'L , ' , ' T' . ev f' me - , Thomas Speisman, a Tricia Conroy Spoerl, a Mark Edward Stalcup, e Julia Ann Stallard, a Philip Evans Stanley, a Richard Joseph Statuto, a Dorothy Christine Steck, n Sally Anne Stevenson, a Timothy James Stichmoth, a Michael Patrick Stickney, e Clark Tillman Stirling, a Faith Marie Stone, a James Alvord Stone, e David Clayton Stotler, a Donald Davis Strench, a Mark Jay Strickler, a Stephen Radcliffe Struck, e Marshall S. Stuart, Jr., a John Gregory Stucker, e Susan McClure Sturrup, n Susan Elizabeth Sullivan, a Michael Scott Sumner, a Bill Suudermann, a Kathleen Jeanette Swan, a Kristine Louise Switek, a Cathy Denise Swords n Martha Elizabeth Symmes a Margaret Knox Taliaferro a I lke the football team and the coach football the professors are O K too xx. ' fl-'PX Yx f Q59 A' AW fins 'Q AE S-11 ...., I 4 'I 'i l M ' Scott Stephen Talpers e Eric Jay Taube a Dorothy Ellen Taylor a James Charles Taylor e Karen Rennee Taylor n Lisa Anne Taylor a Mary Evangeline Taylor Britt Ashely Thedinger a Kyle Gene Terry e Irene Thomas n Joseph Charles Thomas a Kim Lanette Thomas a can Thompson n Terrible Thompson Rise Carol Thompson e Robert Knox Thompson a Tim L. Thompson a Debra Lee Tilem n Kristen Key Tippin a Tony Albert Trujillo a Sally Truss a James Richard Tubb a Catherine Anne Tucker a Hugh Tucker a Jann Alison Turner a Thomas A. Turner III a Bradley C. Turney a Margert L. Turrentine a Amanda Marye Tuttle n Frank Douglas Tuttle e Lora Barrow Tuttle a Ben Lawrence Tyler Gregory Lee Utley a Tipicalia V. Vanderbilt Laura C. Vandervoort a Kingston, NY Hamilton, Oh Sandersville, Ga St. Joseph, Mo Canfield, Oh Floral Park, NY Nashville, Tn Birmingham, Al Bettendorf, Io Boxley, Oh Chevy Chase, Md Houston, Tx Ocala, Fl Houston, Tx Louisville, Ky New Orleans, La Pensacola, F l Burns, Tn Louisville, Ky Ft. Lauderdale, Fl Jacksonville, Fl Hopkinsville, Ky Little Rock, Ak Miami, Fl St. Simons Is., Ga Canton G1 Houston Tx Memphis Tn I pla . . Stone Kansas City Mo Baldwin NY Paris Tn Seaford NY Huntsville Al Lisle Il Dayton Oh St. Joseph Mo Tulsa Ok Gainesville Ca W. Palm Beach Fl J- Atlanta Ca Indianapolis In Transylvania D.C. Cadiz Ky Memphis Kansas City Beverly Hills ' Wichita Millington Birmingham Dallas St. Louis Lexington Austin Murfreesboro Nashville Atlanta Milwaukee 7 W' New Ipswich N Birmingham Louisville Madisonville Nashville Houston N .J J, J er , , H -. A ' JL l QQ A I , ,J J T I' ' ' . I -ig my , 1 . ' , I wr , . T' , X - J ' x ' T l - Arn 1 r 'RN r' 4 CC 1 I O I 37 O O O O O O E...-' 'J ix I . '-lg ' , J - J if Tf ' f ' J-' x J e , I ew. ' 2 I , ,... , , A --4 ref, I ,.: ' 'ff-. ' , . ' 1 J -. ' Ie- 's " ' , , ,a , I JN, i , puff ,1,- ,iq , L if -'ii-sf'f7f' i'i f'-1 '- - VT ' ,S - JJ J Jgf.. A.. , Q 9 JJ ' ' 'fy A TJ - ' 4 'V' 3 J , , Q :J i , 57' I LJ' Q' -J " ' ' " V J ' ' ba, , J ,J ff., . ' at A ' 'V , - ' if are I I , L '31-E'f f "', ' f - I " ,f.f , t I ' I , I -. " ' P 122121.44 tg. Q! , . J,, J -J ,A J T A I l 1, J - J J , Tn at l I I ni Tx I I ' 1, 1 ' 2 5 , .MO H - .. ,..,'h. - G' :L Y 'sf A i ' ' , ,Ca -' "v-7,7 'ga ' ,- dr' mrs J . N' 13 .. I " f, 1' . . - I f -K5 s , X ' ' -.-f--.1 - 'ik ,. ' ,gt ,gi , ,Tn f f-aj , r 'J Af, ' , ' ,J J ,Al -4 . . l f SIAYI -W1 ' 5 4' I A ff-,fu ' 1 , ,,,,,J, - J J wi. ., . yi?-J-'3s1Jft,Jff3 JJ J-J , NIJ ' - A .',f,cf", ' ' N ' f . .TX , Je l ' i 'MO J " : -' .' Q ' T' . ,Igy Y-if-'JJ , JJ if A J Q3 . ' , e J JJ , J JT: ,A 5 lJ NI' , .vi " ' " fit 'Q if ' ' Tn A I ull .. 1 I N J- J ' J - Y J .J i - gli. s. Ak 5' ,: 1 , , 1 J ,l ', 3 I 1' 'ig ' , s H , . at I - ve., yt ', a- . ,Al . ., J fe, - I, sa ,Ky J -,. I ' JJ . ' -r , , I "' , ,Ky f' I uf 'f Va. -'vt' e . F M. A ,Tn l Q l- X VJ fx! 1 J rx ' ' Tx john H. Van de Vate, a Kristina Van Hoose, a R. Victor Varney, e Teresa Dee Vaught, a Cheryl Lynn Vetter, Kingsport, Tn Sarasota, Fl Hendersonville, Tn Waynesboro. Tn Houston, Tx ,- is " ,.-A - - ta 3 G it . fer are i -. jules Vietorisz. a Nashville, Tn i , " ' . - ' -it Richard V. Vines, a Mom'oe, La s, ' , ,, 'Q -' 1 el , W Nancy Ruth Vinson, a Hillsboro. Al V - ' " . Carl Eric Von Buelow, e Knoxville, Tn ' . s ' ' I Mary Pat Voor, a Nashville, Tn Q XIV , .I I 4 .: Ig, "- I '-Te A - anet lttner Voorhees, n St. Louis, Mo '- 'O ' , , -,,. ' ,vi ', 5 , gf I liurt Mcllwan Wagner, e Gallatin, Tn I ii 1-IV" I Y 'T ' sf II - V Wi' Sallie Staten Wakefield, n El Paso, Tx In i j x f ' i 3 "2 -. ' A I . I Wade Walk, e New Orleans, La , " ' X INN I In f II it -- - 1 ' i W. Flynn Walker, e Huntsville, Al .. ,I ' ' I QI, . ' f ' ' W TW' ' W1 , Y Brigit Louise Wall. a Nashville, Tn I -' ' 'I ' " "' ' .TI ,I I II . Mary Elizabeth VVallace, n Nashville, Tn 5,-' A - 4, If -I W " ' I ,-, II 3 Susan Virginia VVallace, a Little Rock, Ak -it I ' R , ' l, 5I , Y I -i I V, ' if If D - Lynne Elizabeth VValling, a Atlanta, Ga i '-- I --fi If I , Y I,' LL if Sw , Nanette Van Walls, n Houston, Tx ' N . f r I. If it Y ' ,N I - Richard H . Walston, a Birmingham, Al l il, I ' F I I Xa. , .II H Q' 4 ' A AA , ., Frances Kelley Walton, a jackson, Ms I Iw ,AI ' . ll ---1. I 1, G. john Olson Wambaugh, e Midland, Tx ' I' II II A , .I ,fa 'L james Kenneth Ward, e Limestone, Tn A 'M I , 4 1' II J' ref: , Q 4 - Q- F7 , Thomas W. Ward, a Cairo, Ca , , f -JP.. . I' 1' I - I I , Leiga Warren, a W. Palm Beach, Fl -59,5 , 1 ' 227' .f '35 ' 1 , Mary-jane WVarren, a State College, Pa R Ne- I I v .1 'Q -r II - 1-rv., 1. .. ' -'., 1 - s ,, ,P , J - f Leslie Lliaabeth Vi aters, a Slltilltltlll, XX y II , AI IIIIIIIII I IIAI I A ,IIIII , Ix ix l .4 'x 'lily-'J in F . . "i . cc U C C VVhat I reall like are the grounds, stud mg outs1de o U Q 7 With the squirrels and all. we . . , ,. I T .gi , Bess Bailey Watson, a Batavia, N1 II Beverly Darlene Watson, a Nashville, Tn , A J l I Elly Watson, a Boston, Ma ' 4 I f "" Robert C.'Watson, a Lake Forest, Il 'Ti , fr: .-5 qi ' ,:.Q,,, Marion C. Weatherly, n Chattanooga, Tn X t- A X ' 'I Anthony Dean Weaver, a Scottsville, Ky A . .I ' " 'L V l - I Linda jane Webber, a Oklahoma City, Ok A ' 'kt' ,, I ' E I tt l , N wa 04 eu 4 J ' I L 1 I I I I ,W . . , I Ti -16 Y A1 Craig E. Weber, a St. Charles, Mo f - - -if 'Q' T , ' L Margaret Ella Weeks, e Orlando, Fl I jf 'Ii i I A Lisa Margaret Weidt, e Orlean, Ny . I It T i " I O Risa Weinberger, e Dallas, Tx A , ' I I , - 'J ,Q . Perry Samuel Weisberg, a W. Palm Beach, Fl 'lg , V I F7 l 4 . I Iay Allan Weisman, a Beachwood, Oh l A ' ' . s i Y' if i 1 Ronald jay Weitzenkorn, a Dade City, Fl I 'y If , I Robert Brown Weldon, a Ft. Mitchell, Ky " l f ' ' ose hine West, n En flewood, Co gg. I . ,- v 'V -3 4 gs. 7? llhaldes R. Wharton, a Ciicinnati. Oh Ng. 'T IMA: I at 8 I N, - -A l Edwin Hill Wheeler, e Knoxville, Tn ' F' w fl ' 'J' ' x Sophia Eloese Wheeler, a Paris, Tx I ,I , ' - gI ' ' ' Henry Muller Whetstone, a St. Augustine, Fl ' 'I ty In I l '1 'I -T . '-f'1 Peter Francis White, e Atlanta, Ga - I 4 I ,A , ' , ," , 5 . , , . Robert Burton White, e Kingsport, Tn , - II I Sharon Lynn White, a jerseyville, Il .A Q Q - l y Martha Ann Whiteside, n Northville, Mi I Ng , I , I ' ,j -II. Wayne Bruce Whitham, a Dallas, Tx f"7 It . I K U Joni Beth Vifhiting, n Hollywood, Fl I , X-vi IN ' :hh I , il Thomas john Wild, a Huntsville, Al - I , , ' X T' , ' ' ' - ' ' I i i :ini 'i,- :I-.-Ll :flair V Paul Thomas Wilkinson, a Anchorage, As 8,9-N N ,wg-:I ' I ,N IAIZTIQII rA.- if, ,, ,,,,, I-,.,. I .. Betty Susan Williams, a Maryville, Tn II 4 ' l Candace Ann Williams, n Miami, Fl 5 A Q . A ' x Gertrude Molton Williams, e Birmingham, Al , 5 f ' I Q " I 9 ' W I I " Therese Lynn Williams, e Memphis, Tn qi '17 1975 M' 4-, ' , .. ' - I - ' " ' H. Perry Williamson, a Kingsport, Tn HI, ' II -If Nr Iii, I- I II' Margaret Lee Williamson, n Birmingham, Al g3I,II I ' iilrrg " I , I I I: I,,,:.:II II , , I I 3 I , 1, 'q Nanci Lynn Williamson, n Ashland, Ky I IE III 55551 ,T I A N -Nw A I C 7 '-0-F7 qv 1 my X u-sau gg: lz fQrV W5 F RESHMEN 345 Lancye Carol Willmott, e Holly Lyn Wilson, a Robert C. Wilson, a William Whiteford Wilson, a Sarah jane Wing, a Nora Chappell Wingfield, a Irving Morris Winter, a Steven A. Wise, e Robin Renee Withington, a Michael Lee Vlfhitten, e Kathryn Eileen Wolff, n Steven Bradford Wolff, a Sandy Elenor Wood-Prince, a Anne Catherine VVoodruff, n Elizabeth Ann VVorrel, a George F. Wortham, III, a Lexington, Ky Springfield, Oh Culflnrecze, Fl Orlando, Fl Orlando, Fl Memphis, Tn Montgomery, Al East Ridge, Tn Glenwood, Md Birmingham, Al Atlanta, Ca Rockville, Md Mundelein, Il W. Hartford, Cn San Antonio, Tx Ft. Washington, Pa ,. i ,S Qi - .4 I r ' , i K P . ,-1 '- i v W V V if 2 ,E Al, Y X ie-e1.-gL,3,-ii. " ' A Ami' ll , gg -Ll In . .qt 4, 9 A l V- I ak 1 Q K 4: , F A 4 J "l p Til l if, f Alice Fontaine Wright, n Denver, Co 4 ' 13' A -' L35 , 'F Cordon Braxton WVright, a St. Louis, M0 A 1 J ,, A-' I .1 dl, - ,. Sidney Pehlau Wright, a Rome, Ca ' " 5' T V, ' - at 'T' I. T' james Frank Wyatt III, a Barrington, Il A 'F' , NH P! john Hill Yocum, a El Dorado, Ak ,. X It ,J tl 4 4 Herb Spencer Young, a Brookville, Fl - CT Tm I Z' ' 1 if g V f'T'l 'T Z i f Kelly Ann Young, a Ft. Worth, Tx , , A '-. g , , Douglas L. Youngblood, e Key Bixcayne, Fl -9' .1-ey 5: N T,:. fl i V 7: I 1" Stephanie C. Zaricznyt, n Springfield, Il , - ...H ' ld' ., jeffrey Brian Zisk, e Dallas, Tx T 'V X f n T", , ' V - 'f"' ' ' William E. Zweifel, e Northbrook, Il 1 ug 'I ' N h , ,I V V i 'A f 3 ,AQ V L 4 ' '- X A I N Sheila lane Zwingle,a Charl0tte,T, 5'5"'5f"A E! . ' -3 . , " it t, i t T, ' ' ' '-vi, ' ' lllllf fr- 5 we ' flea f' if t K r .er gg . . . F I hate large classes. Some people take Crip courses mstead of using ' . . . . . 79 their full ab1ht1es . . . people take too much computer time. H Sl Y ung- run ee 346 N M -J 'B-T' A - W ie! FZ, l' FRESHMEN 34 UPHOMOR1'-EE! i ff ,f " 11.3 .1 JSM f-'56 ,p..w-,ve uf' I I 4 s, Niffjl-M" X ,,..,.L..v-- W- -177 ' ,- , 'IF I' , F QD T. L. J ff.-"' I V 1 J' . 'i ,427 ' gif" X, 4- xf v" ' f' - -f ' , ff ' X X H .rf 4' f N V , f' if' . rf ,f - ,fm A! . ,N W , J.,- ' Y f.I. -' " f' W ,H- , ' -f'1"" thy -xl I Y , X, ff ' V X , ' 1 I J! -3 NN f" " ' ' ,,,.,v'I,. ,. gs' f M 4 " 'ilk .,.,,,, A M T r If g u i H 0 . . im . 7 JA vi XQYIA ' "'v -I ,f ' L - x "fr " ,ff U .IRQ WFP XX" ,R -.f Y.,-"Ffh ' -MV' w K f .,.f-f v 1 'f 5 X 1- i 4 Q N ,RE-,I A2 .W . f .A ' ' mm., ff Sf, 'V f' -,ij X N K . w T . 7 ' A XX ' I my y M . .x f Q ,'.1'-5sli17?5i' v A K- A. k" J ,A -:.a,-Wlfil gzbq, 'x f -iv P jf" HT R H Y . J ,, .Nw "1-lx XNQ xv? A 5 ' NX xx 5 ,-,.-... + Q X -I-1 1 XR J "1 . J,-,Mg - " XA' F, ". ' Y ' f 3 +C' 1 . " " ' ' '1- -KIT' .tif , ,fijqp z , ,X ' 5,-1 ' I 2 " 1 s A. 'W .5 'Ark rf Q rx X- ' M 34. N Q11 K. 2 1. -w - , E X in A N 1 X - W , .X . Q sv NEA X, s. w in xxx Xb X wk' AQ xx- ' X ' K Hx MQ? ' . . Y., X P 1' 5, -" 5 A 'X I Q' XA . 2 E ' Vx , lfxf i , ,R if --9 g ,af I 5 , V 'wg'-.1 M 1 . N, I' 'V We-N. 1 Y' ' , V f s 1: .Nm 4 v j ' 3-rw-ef-0-2 ' "al "W " X . "' -f:'T""' 5' , It I xi rf I 'x 1 ! ,I ' A 1 N E r , 'I - , "'ru'rf'f" ' 5. W -V-'QM '53 JRR t 5. . l 1 ,1 wi. . . df T144 if ,fb a JN? ' ' 1 , ,. X . , r if . 'WL , , , ' f H.. ,,.W. 1 . 1 , . - " A 1' ' Lf Q , fx g + ,- . xfw L.+f 1: 'J mx 571 -Q ' aff' ' "1 ' -Arr., '- -ui.-.f25w'.. f'.?- p.:g,.,-5 ,gay -" ' ' "if, Y ' - ,Iris - ,,. 4 . -.,, . J , Jin: if im, I, , - , .. . ' "a, '4'-L1 -I " . J -ff, .. . WM . b - 1- f -' , V '- A3725 5- H Q wa--:-mf." . H - . ,f.,f..g A .Mm --my-. 1 ,- :, ,,. ,Ag wg-' " -.- ,,.--: "W , jf Af - . , ., 4 P.. -- - . .- ' x M 'W' ,,f.-L:.f- - .ff-' -K . v 'ww ix ." ' ' 2- 'fx . ' , 0 :- 'nn lf' ,riff OU! 'un ...J Fm' SOPHOMORES il - -ug Robert Balakl William Cofield Adams a Louisville William Matthevs Alters a Nashville n "" Charles james Allen e Hermitage '-I Lawrence Ross Allen e Memphis 1 Lynn Allgood a Atlanta Antonio joseph Almeida Atlanta I JohnE Ames e Heles Corners 1 1 X V,- Flederlclt S Anderson e Ashland 4- Greg Anderson a Washington DC ohnC Anderson a Madison Al Leshe McEven Anderson a Ch irlotte NC Lynn Richarde Andrews n Decatur Ca Fiedericlt Scott Amlmg a Potomac Rohm Elizabeth Andrews a Chattanooga Tn A K f IosephIohnAneslt1ev1eh a NOI'llStOXVI1 Pa D Diane Lynn Applegate n Shalnnar Fl Susan Elizabeth Arnold a Memphis Tn Wlllldln Matthew Artzt a Cllltlllllrltl Oh Cathy Ruth Arvdson n Winter Park Fl Allyson Ann Askew a New Orleans La Martha Elizabeth Badgel Carmel In 1 - s -N ' ' ' Vf F lf' V V MaryHillsBaker a Memphis Tn V V , . VV V V L V." f V ' Sarah Anne Baker e Clearwater Fl V A . A V4 'V V t - V I Wendy Lyn Baker n .inn Arbor Mi , H ,- V. ' V ' - i . V: " V ' . ' V' Robert William Balaka. e Dearborn Mi V. ' ' V A - l' V, -V V ' - V 'F' V Catherine Ann Balikes a Miami Fl . . V- V f V, H ' .V :IVV VV David C, Banker a Tampa Fl ' - A A ' ' in ' VV it 'f ' ' ' .V V' VV VV V ' V ' Shannon E. Barbee. a Lighthouse Point Fl - VV V AV .V V ' V " ' .4 J ,V . Daniel B. Barge e Nashville V . V V ' ' ' l ' David Alan Barnett a Wilmington D ' .. V A ' , ' V ' Elizabeth C. Barnett e Memphis T - W -V ' V V - ' Arnold Broyles Barrett a Xugusta VV - ' , V' V., 'f Kevin M. Barton a Greenwood In . . :VV 'V V ,V " N V li - Elba julia Batista a Nashville Tn 'V L ff J ' E Aj . 4 1' if -' ,R ' Nancee Ann Baysinger, n Catonsville, Md -...Q V, . . , . ,.r V- .1 V. . . :Z-bk-:-rc.. - f 5 l e . -,.-, i . - 35l "The restaurants around campus are good . . . I havenlt eaten the campus food at allf' TD L' ' i 1 if ' 'B fr , 7' Diff ' 'DT .. . K , 'IF 1- '31 VV ta. l- - V ' A ' A ' I , ' ' ' ,TH " .-it -fa. - P3 ' -. R' fee, 2 ' ' ' - '- WTI 2 -' ' , - .-1+ Vf I g V 5 4. ,' - ,cf it l 'RV N' if V ,- I Q NV, ii ' V i ' XSL' ' 5 - 2 ' ' ,a ,Cd V A l .ju-V'1.x1f1,'VV .5 ' . ,VAV .' ,,Ti Q-me g ' Q Vfr Vlilliljtef Q' 'C .fin V ' V! .gg M' I V ' ' V V ' ge- V V ' . .' , ' ' ,Ky Q w " f V 23 V 4 ., 1 - ,1 ' , - I V ' V' . -4 V -5 V . ,, I . : , ' I , -'J A ve, i l W .a fi-L 1 . , Q , - , A i fi ' 'aff , A, 7 A. ' R ' ' A ' ' 1 " MVVVVXWVQ ' V V V ' V xV VV l ' 5 A31 l '- VV ,mit if-L4 Q ' ,-' Ve V V. . V , V. V 'J ' A A '-. I R 1 l V ' - A 7 ' ' s ,aff V , V V x ' V . I VV A" I' I -. " V 'VA , V. V 1: ll , g V ' " A J' 1 'ar ' .' , ' 'V L PV L flip ,V ' mf Vg A Q A 1 ' ' ' ze ' , Vin VV V 1 E" -V-lLVVV,-VV V Y VQVVV A QL? - ' 'ft , ' , ' M -F ' A F Tv l, f ,l V L l v J 1 V 3- 3' V x V' -as V , - 1' It -f , J I I 1 ' 1. I 1, r 1 r v , 1 W f , A i , 4' 1 ' 1 W? Q it X + i ' If M M I-Y -' F 4 Tl spit' , 11 1 ' f V V E V , ' x 13 , ,Tn X' ' i ' , , 1 'zu 1 an 3: f V V n ' lt 4 at , I , Ga -- r -- .-. x . V , A X. - XV ,V I 1 lx ,V X V I L cf 5 X r wi N 1 ll fo K 1 .ix I qs Juaneta Jeanne Bean, n Steinhatchee, Fl , ' ff E V L V Scott McKenzie Beard, a Dallas, Tx V ' 5' ' A - V ' S - Edwin Sharpe Bell, Ir., e Dallas, Tx 11-.V ,V fn . 'T , "' P ,--11 Kathy Anne Bell, a Memphis, Tn X 5 -A . VY-V V ' ,V Thomas Neil Bemenderfer, a Plymouth, In 1 5 V ' ' , KH ue Allison Leigh Bennett, a Mt. Pleasant, SC f ... FAQ' V 2 ,,, N Herbert Leswing Bennett, a St. Petersburg, Fl Vai' 4 , gg if 4 V , AV, V , " U W, -iff l 7 , f 3:5121 f: ' .1-, 1: ii fi . 7 ' -Tx 1 Richard Keith Bennett, e Prairie Village, Kn Tl' .V 5 V ' . .V ' F V l ' V ' Kurt Christian Benz, a Indiana, Pa 5' 'ILP ' ' mf. "1 i l. ' Suzanne Lee Berewill, a Houston, Tx ' ' Q , is ' - h H VV, V' 'fx ,v V A 5 Michael Bernstein, e Highland Park, Il ' , if --1 A V ' N, -A V V NA V, William Paul Berridge, a Hamilton, Oh ? V ' V' " " V 1, 'tif' ' Mary Susan Berry, a Franklin, Tn '-xv. V. , , E' l ' -' 1 , V Q john Randolph Bibb, a Nashville, Tn V T , uVi,.VV:2 ' ,.' N V in , " V V, , , , V,.VV .V,VVVV L .VV . VV A l , .K 1 Ii-A if Ni ! 'ef Y 15 ' F57 ,777 ' "T ' " A' - ,:- 'FF' ' Paul Gray Bigler, a New York, NY V l ' 51 ' 'f " , Alfred A. Bingham, jr., a Decatur, Al V ' 1 1 4 f. David Andrew Bird, a Upper St. Clair, Pa ' Q 1 V T , Philip William Bittel, a lrlarwinton, Cn V lf, , ,-, . i Frances Bell Black, a Atlanta, Ca ' P ' ' -. T 1 1 Barbara B. Blair, a Charleston, WV AV, X S Vgfg, V ,V ' . . T " L L I , Alfred Hamilton Blanton, a jacksonville, Fl V g V VV! - VV' x 'V- if al F Wi V . ' -' ff" .. ' 1 ...,. Donald McLain Blanton, a Madison, Tn A ffjax 7 I 1 l wwf. Valerie Aurellia Boaz, a Chattanooga, Tn 1 ' - 7 1 4 V W , Linda Catherine Boggs, n Brentwood, Tn M . Vu V i ' f ' T 4 V id V Paul R. Boggs, a Fort Mitchell, Ky 4-2 t ' V: S 7 1 ' 57" f 1 4 -3- Eric Charles Borchers, a Cincinnati, Oh X, K' , f ' xv: 1 ' gf David Thomas Boruff, a Maryville, Tn 4 lf V 5.1: f' VV 'S Walter H. Bosserman, III, e lfVinchester, Va , ' 1 1 ' V fi.. "IFS sort of hard to think of something about Nashville when you,ve been reading Bleak House. U Anonymous Marian Ward Bourdeaux, a Meridian, Ms ' l ' Glenn Edward Bourgeois, a Atlanta, Ga "1 Kerry Wayne Bowers, e Decatur, Al w 2 ' 9- 'ifff , Allen Dillard Boyer, a Oxford, Ms ' V 1 ' ' Martha lane Brackett, n Chattanooga, Tn . ' ! """ ' 1 Rebecca Ann Bradberry, a Englewood, Co 1- 1 - K' iV Mary Catherine Bradshawga Brentwood, Tn "1 0 5 ' B 4 " -- 1 li V Elizabeth Alleron Bramm, a Huntsville, Al ii ,' , 1 Carl Dyess Brannan, a Tampa, Fl .5 V V' 1 :gi . C. Dewey Branstetter, Ir., a Nashville, Tn V , V 7, Tj A .8 Marla Kaye Brazzell, a Dickson, Tn ' . " Elizabeth Vaughn Bres, a Houston, Tx VVV V, V V N? Hillary Sue Breslaueig a W oodcliff Lake, Nj ' ' , V Robin Sarah Brigham, a Mobile, Al . 9 Q V5 SFF? 1 i ' A H' Robert C. Briggs, e Nancy Elizabeth Brock, a Paul Fischer Brock, a Mary Margaret Broclnax, a john Henry Brooks, a Lee Anne Brouhard, a Amy Elizabeth Brown, a Ardon Berkely Brown, n David Stewart Brown, a Michael David Brown, a Barbara Ioan Browning, a Geraldine Stuart Brune, e Susan Marie Bruton, e Alice Lee Bryan, a Rita Marie Bryce, e David Andrew Buchman, a Ianis B. Buckner, a Craig Buettner, e Lillian Lee Buford, a Susan Ann Buhrow, a Erwin Robert Burbach, e 352 Memphis, Tn Buffalo, NY Rossville, Ca Birmingham, Al Covington, La Rogers, Ak Brentwood, Tn Houston, Tx Bethlehem, Pa Huntsville, Al Nashville, Tn Fair Haven, Racine, Loganville, Ca Nl Wi Pittsburgh, Pa McMurray, Pa Beaumont, Tx Hot Springs, Ak Clendora, Ms Louisville, Ky Whitefish Bay, Wi ?' 1 w Vow, , sd Val' ' IW rl 1 1 1 5 I ' :V -' K lf x I Q' - ' Q- s . - -, -5. , 1 , 'IJ' 5 6 6 f VFVV , V, , L i .. - l x .L ,,,, LW VV 4 A , ' 4. Q r -'. . --v -Vf s , ,...A . , r 1: 4, , V g, .- 5 ' ,, J sf' -13 X I, x 1 Aff , v D. L Y rf F TMI .r A , 'H . - ,.,-., 7 . i 3' H .- ,F .2 . , as l E -tp ,P tp f L, M xt s- 1- . :I-'. I xii V! lil 1 '. - X . . X it ,Q V ' -- ff' 1 . f . ., ,- Vlllli' ' " 'R l " - by . Y ' l V .I U-It i :A ', -LQ - il p -X-'51 ' ' -if I' . 5 ' I gimp 1 r f' AWN. A ' r f- X ,,-- ' fifil, ,Q I 'N A' ' C vflh pu 'I f .Ire f -4' W p ji lp r V i' fe 1 .- "Making it at Vanderbilt is a challenge Stuart Cohen T 'li "F ' i ' " TW 0- 'lf K' T tx li 'Z' .td ' C ' ,M gy", V is ll ,dp 'sl N -Lx N JI l YT ' I '4 ig' , ,U I' It X Q Agtiam if fsfrf ' 77 I1 .55 fri TT FFT' Y "?l 0 1 up - :E 1 - .fin ',. ,. ' 'l N , ' il. it . - ij . 'r ' 'i"". - . 542.1 f' ' T: Q ,J -, ' J , A -.. ' ,fi X Q ' A ' 1 Tl Fi .' ' TT C it 5"fC'h T T , - ll ag fl C n . l I i ' R 6 if lr 1 "'-3 1 N , p fi. . B X Q2 . .li - f fi .,.- 4- I . . , V A, . .N . . -up T faq p . 1- i T l A A lr' Q ,f K :L s I ,I VUL tp R I I Qtzsw. W ? ki E r' 1 i .J r , ' l ,filmtv Mary Stewart Hurglier. a Barb Burke, a Bradley H. Burke, a Xliade Alan Burkhart, a XVilliam Alfred Burkhart. a Lisa Burrns, n john Victor Busch. e Maeie Clenn Bush. a james Taylor Burt. a Christina Lynn Byers. a Louis Lipscomb Cage III, julie .-Xnne Cain, a Mary Alieia Cain. n Betty june Caldwell, a Thomas Gene Calhoun, e Margaret Mary' Callen. n Thomas Cambisios. a Edward George Camera. a john F. Cameron, lr. a Elizabeth S. Campbell. a Todd jerome Campbell. a Mary Katherine Campo, a Margaret Ann Canright. n john Thomas Cantwell. a Cheryl Ann Cape, a Frank Mark Caprio, e lo Zenaida Careeclo, a Clyde johnson Carroll, e in itselff' Frank Leslie Carson, e Melissa Tillman Carter. a Robert Philip Cary, a Leila Anne Case, a ll Miilliaiu Douglas Castagna. e loseph Mir.-hael Cesarini, e Barbara Lee Chadwick. a XVilliam Joiner Chase. a Evalina Casey Cheadle. a David Cheatham, a Steve F. Chefan. a Stephen M. Chesney. a Carol Al. Christensen, a joeseph H. Christovao. a Helen Walker Clark. n Cherrie Denise Clay, it julia C. Cleveland. e Eleanor Molette Cobb, a jeryl Susan Cohen. a Stuart Martin Cohen. a Abigail Marie Collins, a Catherine Muriel Collins. n james Ernest Collins. a Karin .-X. Collins, a :Xliee Faye Cook. n Martha Ellen Coombs. n Cynthia Ruth Cooper. a Edgar B. Cooper. a Ted Cooper, a Carolyn W'est Corbin, n john Stewart Cossnm. a Timothy jay Cowles, e Carol Ann Cox. a Thomas Hayes Crabtree. a llebekah Kemp Cracldoek. il llouston. Tx Sl. PClCl'Slllll'f1l. Fl Memphis, Tn Hixson, Tn Hixson. Tn Nashville. Tu Lafayette. .ll Atlanta. Ca Tampa. Fl Memphis. Tn Nashville. Tn Houston. Tx jackson. Ms Monteagle. Tn -laeksonville. Fl N lilwankee. Massa vet ua Park. l Wi XY Madison, .-Xl Montgomery, :Xl J Nashville. l ittsburgh. Pa Tu l't-lhain Manor, Xl' Mobile. Al Morristown, Memphis. Tn Tn Union. Nl Nashville. Clifton. Tir Tn Lebanon. Tn Ilyattsville. Md Bristol. Tu Deellielcl, Il Clearwater. Fl llanson. WV Ft. Lanclertlale. Memphis. Nashville. lil Dorado. F. Tu Tu .-X r Ft. Lauderdale. Fl Dalton. Cineimiati. Douglas Manor. Macon. Elba. Versailles. Selma. Petersburg. Columbia. Louisville. Dallas. Ca Oh Nl' Ca .-Xl Ky :Xl Vat SC Ky Tx Panmna City. Fl Nashville. Nashville. Nashville. Short Hills. Tn Tn Tn Nl Tusealoesa, .ill llouston. Pittslnirgh. Ilouston. Clarksville. lloirstou. Louisville. Memphis. 353 Tx Pa Tx lu Tx Ky Tn Virginia Crehore. n VVavcl'ly D. c:l'CllSllLl.M'. Katherine Grace Crisler. a Lillda Susan Crockett. a David Lynn Cross. a Gregory' Ellsworth Croyle. Ennnagene llailer Crunk. Karl G. Csaky. a Maly McLeod Currie. a :lllll M. Cushing. a Linda Ruth Dacus. a Leigh Harris. Damon. n Aftlllll' Steven Dans. a D. Lee David. a Chris Davis. a jeff H. Davis. e Phyllis Maria Davis. n j2!SlIlilf Marie Dawkins. a il. it ll Margaret Theresa Deckhar. a David Lee Deehl. a Barbara G. Dellinger. a p-e l 4 T ..f?ff' . f. Lexington. Ky V , v , ' ,L 4' 'X V Nashville. Tn V 1 ' Q I 15' 'T 1 " V Memphis. Tn V V . ' Q Sheffield. Al V A if l n L, Bristol. Tn L l Q l 1 ...Z - l .V ' 42.5 Martinez. Ga ,I 'W "A 1 ' wail.. I 4 -:gp 'fl V, . 4 COltllllllllS. Ms 4, t t A V .. Q , ji ' 5 I ,,- , E V' - ' V ffi. V -. ' M uljQl Ez. A Lexington. Ky W l V Bellaire. Tx Blfllllllgllillll. Al li M, llerndoll. Va V M I ' - F Allml. Il Q' "H j Louisville. Ky .E , 4 ,A jf Roswell. Ga 1 7 , 'V f-.4 Temple Terrace, Fl Q A J n I I Childel'slnll'y. .-Xl - Blfllllllgllillll. .-Xl .5 - 5- - Phenix City. :Xl l 4 1 V J xi Nashville. Tn 11 y xi' Q - " 1""L Miami. Fl 1 W V , s V, Newhern. Tn Ah f ' l -'fl i , . V J Pauline Ethel Delzell. a Nashville. Tn F fi V l jane Ann Dempster. n McMinnville. Tn V , Carol Lynn Denton. a Sllelhy. Ms 4- K ea. - Paul Anclrew Deutsch. a White Plains. NW' P+ .,,, q ., Becky Lee Dickinson. a Dallas. Tx ""'7 7 i 1 'F' Lynn Michelle Diehl. a Huntsville. .-Xl hd A X 1 George Bryan Dixon. a Nashville. Tn Xu I Q. , ' lv' V a- V, ff I 7 h o o h , , 0, can t t mk ng t now. L j.. E es IB Douglas Mary Clayton Dixon. a Eufaula. Al V ' Brendan Fair Dodd. a Macon. Ga wk A l - j Laura Bowman Dodd. a Atlanta. Ga " ' I 1 i-" ' f 'JV V' l Rita Denise Dodson. a Lexington. Ky .Q 5' 8 f I 5. - x V-A , ' te Debl'a Ann Domino. e Ann .-Xrbor. Mi A f iv? : Dianna Denise Donnell. n Nashville. Tn R 'if j 1 D X A . ll Leslie Louise Douglass. a Atlanta. Ga J l ' f 'J V 4 1 Y--N4 1 li, l , W1 TF-'. -. '--- -1 Susan Elnily Douthit. n Indianapolis. In . l " l - V-'ll' 'l Randall W .K. Dover. e Chattanooga. Tn l U . , Sheryl Bonita Dowdy. n Nashville. Tn A l V . , 2- V jolln Osborne Downing. a Reisterstown. Md 1 . ' I-J fs-lik, David xVl'lQ,'l'll Dl'oss. a jacksonville. Fl fd' ' 17' X J" William Case Dudley. e Morristown. Nj , V .:.,v 'V Gregory Bryan Duncan. a Great Falls. Mt .. W E' l ' A, ti' ' 'T' 'T' f T 'Q li.. f. A - . j I jane Cotlley DllllL'21I1. a Luilcin. Tx l V . ali . : ll L Dorothy Gail Dungan. a Little Rock. Ak A A, V x ,, 0 1? I- .,, Donn Gayle Dunn. a Nashville. Tx ' H V ' ., .A - - V L , ' i f E 5 ' 1 james Allen Early. a .'hll12ll'lll0. Tx J! ' - fi V THE? ' Richard Howard Ebhert. a Northbrook. Il ' ' V V j ' Y I T ' I l Anne Estelle Eellols. a Charlottesville. Va if T 'I 'V ' . 4 - A A " fy Tril ' 5, V joseph Louis Eckert. a Cincinnati. Oh , . i ' 1 ' A my X 7 A ,T lg, li?" ffrf r " f vie.. fflf' f sgflelf- 1'--Wivll V .. l 1 jolln Cunnnins Endinger. e Louisville. Ky ' ' K l V . ,. ' 'Hg l l ' ll R .A l ' '-' l William Thomas Edwards. e jacksonville. Fl j . " , M Q V V , Paul Herman Eiehel. e Wilmington. Dl V. ,'- ".'V "P, U ' ' 75 , ' A ' ' ' jeff David Eisenberg. a Charleston. SC 7" T'Q .pi :L - - I F, Hoyt M. Elliot. jr.. a jasper. Al ' " fy 47' " , j N V V"3i 4. Katherine Anne Ellis. n Grand Rapids. Mi ,V il.. ' 7 T' l.- S1 'F . ' pl' 'T -I 'i-3 Richard Lee Eliston. a Cleveland. Tn fri! '- ' , "F" ,' ff' Q .f ,L 'Q F 4 '. ' ' ,F T373 , ff" ' 'T 'l , .s"":H2F,1. T F' Barbara Ruth Eltinge. e Northville. Mi K .. lg" N Y. 'wg . V - Z li?" ' "5 Stacey Emerson. a Atlanta. Ga ' ' T 'JL K 'V V W l . 'Vg. Phillip Engel. ti Efllslm. N1 We ' - 1. . ' . I Ve V Silllj'El1g6lllO6'li.2l Houston. Tx X .fr 4 X1 - 5-1 , . , V V'-in ' 1" K' Victor Michael Englehert. a Wassenaar. Neth. A l, fiji - ' ' V I ' ' V- J N ' -' -2 'V Phyllis Ann Enoehs. e Dyershnrg. Tn . 'ff 5 ' ' s , D ,Er - ' Parrish N. Erwin. a Albany. Ga U jly . A ' . . lj-Q7 '. i:::.2- N - 'V fix J . ' 7 we V ' l 'i l f kiz , V. V V l:i:', J 3.12" ' ' a. f .l+ K a2:.VVl -.g 354 'Q' WEL E AA 1 "?'hz-H SOPHOMORES 355 Helen Eileen Iislilv.-man. a Omer L. Eulmnks. III. a john Peter Evans, a Mary Bashie Evans. a Ric-hard Alan Evans. a Timothy Malcolm Evans. a Clcnn Dale Everton, a Lesa Marie Evolu. a Ellen Patton Ewing. a Susan Kim Ezell, a Nlary Edna Falkmann. u Russell Edmund Fannon. e Michael jeffrey Farrar. a Thomas Wilson Faust, a Aniy ZlLlll'lFLllll1l'1ll. '1 Victoria Ann Feldman. a Karen .'XllCll'C'l l'c1'g,ilson. 'L fuitt lrcne Ferguson. ' Rohcrto Isaac Fernandtz, '1 William A. Fielding, . ' NX -iltu' L. Fields Ill. L Charles Cregory Fifa r. '1 Diane Elizabeth Finney. e 'nuns T, Fisher, '1 ohn S. Fisher L VI-u'k Luvis Fisher, a Susan Helen l letchcr. L Stuvirt Ross Flink. '1 New Orleans, La .-Xlpliaretta. Ca Signal Mountain. Tn Lookout Mountain. Tn Hoffman Estates, Il Rockford, Il Memphis. Tn Louisville. Ky' Macon, Ca Nashville, Tn Memphis, Tn Brooklyn, NY Smyrna, Ca Schenectady, NY Lynchburg XX Lstl-Ike Dallas, Wliitevillc. Fort VVorth Macon Nislix ille. ll C 'i Tn Dcffcrsonvillt Fl Decatur. .Xl Nl'insfic.ld, Oll Nlunphis, 1 Medficld. M1 Clolumhia. Nld Northbrook. Il Being a sophomore, some people think there s cl slump . there isn t really You Lan have fun if you just go out and look 'uncs oseph Flood. 1 Cl1t,Xf'C:ll'lS6, Md Dax id Randolph Flower, '1 Charles McDonald Foster. 41 Bradlty Dean Fouraker '1 ndy L. Fox, -1 Charlotte LaVcrnc Francis. n Paul Marlon Francis, -1 M'u'g'n'et Vanct Fr-inklin. Rohert Scott rl"llllZ, 'L john Paul Frazier. a Cinf er Freedman. e IIow'n'd .-Xrtlinr Fre.iin'1n. ' Christine Anne Frerking, ' Lffcrson David Friday. '1 Cfkllf' Douglas Friedman. ' ho in Vt . Fttiwlilljl. III, a Robert B. Fulton IV, Charlie Pafford Gaines ' 'ine Poucll C'lllI1'lNX'ly, M-iry Lisa Cnin-ru ay-',' A ' -iie F. C'u'dner, a ' Allmci't'iC"1i'i'ett. olin Cerlrisi C"n'rett, 'l Mar ' Cl'1yCarrctt, '1 Ei i 5' :X1i11C"ecr, ' 'n1'C'elzer. '1 Terry crome German. a Miclrlel Landon Cernharht, L olin Andrew Fill -1 M'u'k Eels-.'n'd Cillespic. 'i kim Cisele Cilmore '1 lYl'll'g'il'lpl Elizabeth Cinn, 'i Sam Perry Civcn, a Y. Gaylord Glasgow. ' Andree Yvonne Glenn, - 356 Oinolrl Xl lllllllljwtilll Nh acksonvillc. Fl Tulsa. ,-Xirfiistli. Forest Mills, ,-Xnn-md-ile. Frcenvillt. Atl-:nl-1, Nlonti ointry Balto, St. Louis Coluinliia, N'l'iss'1pequ'1. Li A0 tl N-1'1itl'ind. Kennett Square. T'ill'1desa. Topeka, L'inc'1stLr. Memphis. Alisecon. C rosse Pointe Shores 'ishville ll 'l T'unp'l. 1' Atlanta. C. Nlontyoinu'y. . ixlmsfield. New 'll'l'i, Oh Dl Lilscrtvville Il Xflenipliis, Munphis. Tn Tn Birminghani. Al Houston, Tx Memphis, Tn 51 , t C -1-' ,ff Ps uv ':1.' vs.: I I . 'S r 5 , I A ' ., 551' i l 5, X f lx Linn' v l ,v . i ly -.,, 7 C7 , ,.. . l . i .4 . S ' --qv 1 1 . Rf: . ft L uis 7+ . 'EU i- Cinqci Freedman ,K ,i VI-J, . Tl'Z7"'f'i' V" -env , ' F? F9 I .. A u , 'fi ,,.,, sv .sg J I . , lr i Patricia Lynn Goddard. e Suzanne Elaine Goodrich. a ' E 'V , V I V. Bi"1dCoss.-1 AHCIV COX 'llSUS. 'l . I w' l K fs il . ' .' ' if A ' 'I' 'm I I I - .I "" I '3 Gregory Alson Googer. a f rd, V F - , XL., .. . 1 . , 54 N, 'A -0 s .29 , fc t . f V , , i ff y . it 9 iii. -I . . VAX.. - ' X 5 X II 4 . Qt ,i Y I 1 . . , . x ll I I I Memphis. Tn Fairfield. Cn Atlanta. Ga Carbondale. Il Canton. Ma I I 1 '-I I I 4 V I .v , L. V- l V. - 'I . Theodore Bato C'ovedarica. a Northbrook. Il YV V' ' V f I V , V ' I If ' ' ' VVVVVW MV oseph Nl'lLtDCPll'llCl Cracldy. c Versailles. Ky " I V 1'-"Tr'i?'f1i Fgffei'-1-,V,q,gg f 4 - WV ' ,V . 'V V 'V V .Q . ' V P, Linda jane Grafton. a Dallas. Tx ' ' U V MV ' 9, " V' ' " " I Katluyn A. Graham. a Spartanburg. SC 3 V ' IV . . J ' 9' f V ' Daniel Michael Gray. a Louisville. Ky :jd V -. I .V f 1 V 5' 'T .5 V. Ewing Coleman Green. e Nashville. Tn ' I V V' ', Af V A ri A-7 I V jeffrey Allen Greene. a New Rochelle. NY . H ,, 3 1 I ' -"' I' , , I . V Y Ralph H. Greenwasser. a Plantation. Fl ,0 X 'I N ,I ",' i ' ' 'X 52 ' -. ' I . . A Karen Lynn Greve. a ' Dallas. Tx 'II Iv l 'I ' ' It I' , ' I V ' i A W , L V ' I I - I M l:f"I'9f"'Ii'1,,., -'-'Z I Y Y I I I . . . , I ,. V -- V . V. I Jose Asa Griffin. a Florence. SC, I Q V , V VV Einmitte Hamilton Griggs. a fxlacon. Ga " el' ,: fr., V - 'Z V Nr If V james A. Grissett III. a Atlanta. Ga L4 V AV ' ,IL . I V Harlan Hobart Grooms. III. a Birmingham. Al I V " ' I .- N- ' ' V' Gary Robert Grottke. a Northbrook. ll I WJ' I , V ' mi' 1V Greg W. Gnbelin. e Chappoqua. NY B ' VX V. VV KV Richard john Gndaitis. a Huntsville. Al -A -- 1 V , 1 v V- V,,f-f-., V,"- II I V 'lf 4 I V I l',:" F5' ' I' I A james Ernest Guess. a Alexandria. La -3, , . V , 'f 'V M PV ' , 1, I - f- FV ' It VV VV Catherine A. Gnndlach South Bend. In ,YEA V I . - ' 0 VVLV , 5, VV ' U. Ivan Sonovavich. e Donnboi. U.S.S.Pi. ff? ' tl z, ,IV V ' V "7 'V ' ,-.. V. f Michael Louis Gnttmann. a Pensacola. Fl 'XV A "'V ,Vi . V I - V I I' V lf ,V - . I Is. VV V, - Mark Anthony Guzzo. a Huntsville. Al bfi - V' F' . l - V Q Q UV 'V Bill P. Haganbuch. a Scottsvillc. Ky "4" -A Ia I' . DeAnn Haffler. a Dallag Tx . X lV-S V V V V A V . .. V n . " th h h W d h D lust at ou can e oose 0 ou Want to 0 ere. Karen Greve A . Ii A A TFT rr' I i 'V . ' I--" f Y 1 . I I I Virginia Frances Haile. n VVayne. Nj f V' VV V ,V 1, I VV Ianice Elaine Hailey. a Bethesda. Kid ff 5 Q- ' ' .' " V I U' Q' V I' ' V V Joyce Yvonne Hailey. n Springdale. Ak " ,V I VV JV? I"-' - I"-f-, ,V V '- Susan Sydney Haire. n Satellite Beach. Fl 5 -' I I f -' '3VV. 'V I V ,V ,V V- ', ' Mary Beth Hamann, a Praire Village. Ks . , K. . . ' V V V.V 'IV 'Vi'-V-1' ' ' I V ' I 'fi' 'Vs Lindsey Allen Hamilton. e Potomac. Il ' - 'd ,- ' A I ,. sn., I I Y V ' rl -I X , X y NVilliam G. Hamilton. e Ft. lVavne. In Lia- .t ai V1 ' 1 -f' -I ' ' I ' ' ' 'Y .Q if -Lifg'- I' 'f I I P- ' I' 'F I I .. If,-FI "4" ef. ,. Q, .gf-"LC '-" 1 - john Turner Hannn. a Louisville. Kv I I "I I . , 'll I If I I 'I , 1 Gwendolyn P. Ilammer. n Canajoharie. V - . V9 4 1 V ' ' .V ' joseph james Hammond. e Atlanta. Ga I V ' ' K f-an . ,V Charles lVinship Hankey. a Atlanta. Ga VV V ,N P V V A 'V' I V V I john Burke Hardin, jr.. e Nashville. Tn V -,VV..l I V V V I V,V,tg3.V A V V '- J Timothy Wayne Harper. a Birmingham. Al 5' ' X, ,f fv 'I II f 3 :AY David E. Harrington. e Memphis, Tn ' -' - 2 Y' 1 fiiiilia I V VVVVVVA gm V jg V V , V I I ' I 'I I f 'I I' I ,I VVV' john Borgeson Harris. a Lincoln. Il lr, V V i V V .5 V, f ' V ' l Robert E. Harris0n.Va Crossville. Tn ll, ,V VVN I ' ' I N V FA- ,J Margaret Mary Irlartmami. a Tampa. Fl t . ' VA I V V V . Nancy Sanford Hartenstein. a Akron. Oh ' A iff '- cy J I f Randell Lee Harwood. a Bronxville. NY . VV . . V X V . +I Shelley Read Heard, a Savannah. Ga ' 1 1 if V, I Gregory Thomas Hebrank. e Greensbur 1 Pu :1-.JVSH I I' I' ' F' ' ISI: .7 . - - I5 - 1 A I , , A.-. ..,...- Vrrf. , I 2 I ' V . ' " l V f ' I ' V' l ,V " ' I ' i V 5 'V Suzanne A. I-Iegarty. n Bloomfield Hills. Mi "N I R I ' ' V Karen E. Heiligenstein. n Milwaukee, Wi , V --V V . .- Mark Alan Heller. a Mattoon. ll I t V V if ' V ' . , . 'I Barbara jane Henderson. n Tampa. Fl '- lug. 'V 'F ,y VV A 21.1, ' Matthew Morgan Henderson. a St. Louis. Mo ' . ,I V fb . V . V, , '-,VN ' IH, vV - V, . f Deborah Kay Hendricks. a Cedar Rapids. Io -V A' . l K' -1 . -Q ' A I ' "1 I ' Ellen Cordon Hendrix. a Austin. Tx ' 71 'II' Q . ,.f.- -3 '-'r- 4 ' - ' . - xr I ' I' x V i VV 1. i V7 . 41 iV Vw . ' I 'A 9I'i'i'Fl"" f I It 1 ' V II III .V T V - H7 I Stephen Richards Hennessy. a Atlanta. Ga Q 5 ' 1 T' . V, VI ' ' I Richard Bennett Hensler. a Toledo. Oh V .9 . -4. I I if V V .V Charles F. Herd. a Louisville. Ky ?f . J' , ' -I , . H ' . V ' II " g- 'I Carol Scott Herron. a Memphis. Tn ,V 39? ' . --31 , . V Ivtvff . Q Lee M. Hester. e Lakeland. Fl .V . VV VV ' I V I V , 13' Gibson Nowell Heuett. a Avondale Estates. Ga ,f f-J. VLV . V V, gy, y x . V I , JQGYV' V ' 1.-if E-Ex Rick Heye. a Clearwater. Fl IA I N ' . "-- J' 2 I - . N- ,EA 357 358 E:""" Wf"' "xt-v is SOPHOMORES fe.. , Y i 21 ,,q-- 3' " 'f-, 'Wil . F WT'W7'1'7 .' F' if gf - .g fl : f'l..i.e 5 - l ' V . f T fs - -Q ' ' ' l - My , ' tQ 3 ' ' Q P9 Q av ' - N -Q 9, '3- Q QQ f- Q l Q .-1 9' - . N EQ-'Q 'ff R 'F' l 5? A . 'Q' 'fri 'C 'ti QQQ QQ Y , L ' ' HQ x 5, l l l ff V A ' . . I TTC- 7.-Tw rirqlrq F ' F M' w1"'F-F57 A f A ' all . it . Y f un ' ' 1 . l 461 " ' f ' -R ' A ' 'T-' 1 Q Q . - Q, Q 'fm , . 1 Q QQ , Qu . i K , e. Q Q .QT . . i f ffl f .. ,.. A ,ee 5:21, - . f e .f QQ H it All li A y Fifi A ' , 'A ll., vi. og, - ' ' ' Q' A' "fri ' ,Q 115:-1 571' V Q 1,f,kfffQw.v,,. af':-- - 111 QQJQ f5, Q my Q ,, .n Q-e. , ' t QQ uf AQ-:Qin QQQQ,l Q i :Q Q Q Q Q fe I ' - , J 1" ' f 15-i A -5 'ii ' 1- r ' l .. . L .' 5 " - F- . . ,113 "i It ti. ' ' . ' U ' 'Q Jil ' l ' ' ' i,.f'.,,"-31 Il. .g , A .rf - j A . ff Robert M. Heyward, e Paige Lynn Highfield. a Catherine QI. Hill. il Sybil Anne Hill. a Raymond Francis Hodges. a Loreli HoHo Keith Perry Holder, a Stephen W. I-lolst. ll David l'l2ll'l'lS0ll Holt. a Agnes Dale Hooper. n Daniel Paul Hopper. e Hilary joan Hoover. a Craig Anderson Horn, il Terrell Thomas Horne, a Audrey Hoskins. a Susan Lkllllkll' Hough, a Pamela jane Howell, el Alice Adair Howze, n Kathryn Ann Hoyt, a Sarah Frances Hudson, a john Hardy Hunt. a Marti johnette Hunter. a IillllCS W. Hurlburt. ll Nancy Ann Hutchcs. n Steven jones Hyman, a Gary Monroe Iler, a Christallia Denise Ingram. n Mugg O'Beahr veg... miie "Vanderbilt is a true experience for the Northerner " Louisville, Ky Inclianupolis. ln Bil'llllIlgl1i1lll.:Al Athens. Ca Little Rock, Ak Laughing. Tn Dallas, Tx Colorado Springs. Co Ft. Lauderdale. Fl Madison. Tn Cleveland, Oh Chevy Chase. Md Bound Brook, NY Orange Park. Fl Lexington, Ky St. Petersburg. Fl Winston-Salem. NC Clcdge. Ms Tampa, Fl Clarksville. Tn Little Rock, Ak Shreveport. La Winter Park. Fl Tallevast. Fl Mianli Springs. Fl Louisville. Kv Colnlnbns. Cya Overcup, Ok " 4 l l w e . fi. , I 4' ,ii 3,5 ' QQ ' 'FQIQ ill Ann acohson, a Huron. W ' 1' Q , W :fy xQ ohn Madison alneson.zl Norman. 2 3 ' ' , ',:,QQ 4 "5 ' . ' - Laura Jansen, a Cincinnati. O t ln Q . as ' Q 3- ,fa ,, 1 ' -- 1 ' Nancy Lee Iankins. n TlllS11, Ok ' ' I . ' ' . fi, ' h 4: james Dennis Jernigan. a Laceys Spring, Al 0 1 1 1. V dj .,,V 5 V Q Corinne Marie johnson. a CGrII1i1l1f0Wl1. T11 ' R . ,p L j Wi P, QQQ Jeanne K,'l0l1ILQOl1, e Nashville, Tn f M ' K L R:-fee-A - - f l Fm -D 'A :I r - -. 3, ' "1 - ft " Keith Robert Iohnson. a Huntsville. Al Q . lf ei' Q ' " i ,W , Rebecca johnson, a Milwaukee, Wi Q ,Q 1 . y . , L-S4 f 'f ' Robert C. johnson. a Louisville, Ky ' 'Q l Q ' ' v ,wid , VY?" 1 Q Q ' Sarah Weeth johnson. n Rochester. Mn , -A , A 4 1 '-i ' ' Martha Elizabeth jones. a Callas. Tx I it , Q Q ., Q ' ' -. ' ' 1 jan Elizabeth jordan. a Franklin, Tn I. il 'J 'i g f-ef . , 'lm K ,,' ' ' '-V: Susan Gail joseph, e Rockwood. Tn Q Qs . ,i '- '-I A ll X Q A ' Q . lr . 1. , f l ei-11"-' , - .- 1. A el . - . 1173 wfff ff- at '- . " ' ., . ' 1 . ' " ' ., .e ' L ' Leslie E. joughin. a Tampa. Fl ' , 3 ' ,A .Q 1 ll Q .. Debbie wen Ine, ei Hollandale, Ms ll. f f" V ' . 'bm Q ' Q ' 2.4 Q iff: ' . james C. jumper, a Chattanooga, Tn 4, if .r Q . . , QQ - , ii- '4 Margaret Loujnstus. n Beloit, Wi . , e ' Q' 'T i 1 .- Q' ' ' ' " Teresa Elizabeth KZ1l'lllllllS, a Meridian, Ms . .t . . , f :-5' ' - -- . . -. ' , 1' QQVQQ,,3QeQ Q f l J Q1 ' ' W , Lindy Lou Kaiser, a Rossford. Oh f ' . :. -121: . , Q+ if ' ' .' " 1 X 74 Melissa Ann Kane, n Nashville, Tn we M. A is ti , i T 4 . . QQVQT., f 1 ..Q. Q ,iQ , JQ Q 1--. , f. :Q g Q Q Q .ll I 'iff Q Q 'Az ' ' QQ ' N ,Jr . Q Q Qi- .- M 'A-,Ag , , rl A. fi E' ' :-My 'Qfier l ee , ' 1 l . A it :ae A -c f hh QQ 5 Q QQ- ,. , Y . X fl-A!! Q NY Q 3, Q ,. '- mf' ' ' ' Q'Q I A TQ QQ Q C .Q 3 l, T - . I " if ' V 7'3" J' ' Y 'Y '-Q ,g,-. 1 s .,Q,zf'-' .S 'QQ - ' i i ,ii e . ., ,, - l ' v. - . . , , 1- l.'i Q., i fl.: N ILL, S, ' l QQIQ QQQ 0 ', Q iQ.Q Q QQ Q QQ-g Q l Q ,LQQQQ .. . :1 . '. . , r nn - ' ' , J' " "Qu ' U t.- ' - A - V, ,. f , ,Q Q, l .. Q. ,i Q, Q . Q Q - QQ QQ Q ,AQ ' ' ' L l 'I ,Hi " ..-, rf: C fa 434' . , " wwf Q V " ,-els. ., .2 ' '- ' ' . , " ' : fililggl , ,. 4 - J ' ' . f- ,, - - I ' f'iiiL-:Q -.fiixp-1 1 -.1 Q Q, , . ,n Q - X l+?Q4.i,L Q 1' Q 1 tQ, l Qi. - -'. -.- - : -: 4 I l A f W'-.L jeffrey A. Kaplan. a joel Kenneth Kaplan, a Lily Shannon Kay, a Wendy Eileen Kaye. a Karen Elizabeth Kea. n Jerome Kearney, a Michael N. Keathley. a Mary Ella Kehlusek. a Willialn Clifford Keel, a Kinsole Louise Kelley. a Lad Lawrence Kelley. a Paul Keith Kelly. a Shawn Patrick Kelly, a Karen Lee Kendall. e Madison, Nj Lincolnwood, Il Macon. Ga New Castel. Pa Akron. Oh Could, Ak Bernie. Mo Naples, Fl Nashville. Tn Houston, Tx Nashville, Tn Memphis, Tu Anniston, Al Chattanooga, Tn Barbara Anne Kennedv, il Edward Patrick Kennedy, e Mary Raymond Kennon Susan Cray Kent, n . 8. Martha Sanford Kessinger. a Mark Robert Kettner, a Kevin Steele Kev, a Kathleen Keyes, a Laura Celeste Kilgore, a Paul S. Killion. a Celia Lou King, n Douglas Ray King, e' Doug Wilson King, a james NVillianis King, e Laree King, a Susan Lynn King. a Richard T. Kirk. e Linda lean Kivett. n Dale Elliott Kleber. a Kenneth David Knight. Frank li. Knoop, a june Kathryn Kokiko, n Thomas Alan Kolditz, a Laurie Jayne Krull, a Richard Nelson Kyle. e Ioan Duval Laeefield. a Cindy Frances Lake. a Neil Erie Launpe, a C Kingsport. Tn Oak Ridge, Tn Cantonsville, Nld Columbus, Oh Lexington. Ky Atlanta, Ca Miufreesboro, Tn Iluntsville, Al Nashville, Tn Branford. Cn Augusta. Ca Corinth. Ms Tampa, Fl Paducah. Ky Nashville. Tn llnntsville. :Xl Troy, Al Somerset. Ky St. Charles. ll ,Cine-inuali. Oh Louisville, Ky Upper St. Clair. Pa New Athens, Il St. joseph. Mo Chattanooga. Tn Atlanta, Ca Austin. Cincinnati. Tx Oh "One hundred E'f?5fj"'fT?'liKL1 'ml .2 -A, u It ff '5' .8 ts., ., . f SN. 1. r , r, . i' li x I4 .1 .' WT" f' "'fTTl' ' . XF, . If 4 . l - ..l . ,ily V n -5' wr- V -, V 1 '-. , f- - , gl' . , .1 .A .ms , .,- ' n' Nl-,g . -- ,iw - ,ily ,. H55 ,e ,f J f A, -1-. -fe' I ' P I, ' -f .L Y ' 1 Y: f, All K 1. .. tsl, f f lei i'l' fit:7i i "H , ' F"""'+'2'I: T! 1.1, 'Ii' .fx W " ' K "- 1- . P 'X i I f - ii, F' Jf. I .1 ,L Q. - s ll 1 --.1 x z' 1 -9 QA" -13 vi Q f s .fir . H .-..1- 4 V W Q , U Lfv,,.:.:Eg W A .T ga. , l 'au an, , V' -5 f ' iff" - J 1 'J AJ - Y it "ii f x""' e t '2""s . e' i V- , , '7 I, "Xi 4, ' fig xg? A - 1' ' 'H ' 3' U AIVV. - Y . Q, '- ' wx ,Q fix- ,hx ' 'ii "l ' hai f I i ...T-N ---- ff -1 " , , , .Nl f I . - f d A l 1 . f W "5 :ff A l ' ,. Y Y ' ff' 'Q' - ,' 2 . f ,i ' it -' 1 5 ' d J' P? , .i 5 , 1 l 1 " . . ""7 "iq-1 . s , .iii 4 .. . .3 f , . V l N N il xy, 'A .A l, l ' X11-I'i,'l W -. . li l 1 ' ' f gi .' - , . 5 , i Y' 'A x' if ' - ...J 'l,QfrHs.:i .fini 12' X .' V - f ' It wir. 73 years of tradition unmarred by progress. Slrm n Kellv 1 l Theresa Clhristle Lamp: Robert john Laub. e Leslie Michele Lava, a jennifer Ann Lawrence. Mary Lucian Lawson. a Robert Stephen Laymai Daniel Craig Lee. e Iaines Stephen Legg, a William M. Lellyett, a Alan R. LeQuire, a Steven Louis Levy, a Nancy Rae Lieberlnann Talia Lieberinann, a Lynn Ann Lindeinan, e Deborah M. Lippcrt, a Leslie Ann Lipton, a Cary Steven Litoff, e Ieffrey VV. Lobelson, a Susan L. Longshore, a Katherine Ann Lott, n Susan W. Loveland, a Cheryl Ann Lovell. e Gilbert VV. Lovell. III, a Aiinee Celeste Lubas, e Patrick H. Lucas. a Susan M. Lund, a Margaret K. Luther. a Laury Ann MacBeth, a L. Ellen MacElvain. a Ernest L. MacVicar III, Charles E. Maginnis, e Nadine Makstell, a Patti Lynn Maloof, a Lisa K. Mandeville, n Allyn Hewitt Mann, a 360 llllll, ll tl 1. il il ii ,vs Louisville. Ky ""' , 5' ,gtg 'f XVinter Park, Fl ' if U 1 I ' " 1 Oak Brook, ll ,A 1 rg: I gp J ptnuandale, Va , .N - " J 3 fi , 41 V ,QI Meniphis. Tn 'Hy ' ' ' Yr: 1 ii P ' 1 ' tx' A 'Jw Brentwood. Tu 1. wi l s .V ,a dl W ' 1 A Houston, Tx , ' U 3 ' - ,V H ' VVinnetka. ll l Nashville, Tn A., Franklin, Tn X 1 Q Memphis, Tn , ., St. Louis, Mo " ' J-if V '-'f Louisville. Ky ' ' . Ft. Lauderdale, Fl Apr ' 4' ' V . ' W , K Cincinnati. Oh 3 - ' -"5 ' ' 'jf V ' Lexington, Ky W ' ll ,A . ' K ' 4' Nashville, Tn , 9' , - .:, Northfield. Il ,,,, -4 ' if V -4-41" Birniinghain, Al 'W 1- 1 .V - .T'1""' Convent Station, N 4 ' 1 X A , r' Peru. ll d U F LM St I X V 5 'Qi I . St. Louis, Mo i ' l -H 1' Hermitage, Tn - Venetia, Pa H , U l , ,.1 "' Chattanooga, Tn ' ,fi lf 'IT X ' X J St. Louis, Mo ' I W, . , Nashville, Tn J, 1 1 V " l ""' ' ' F D Groton, Cn 5. I X A - ' ' - Z1 ',.r':'a-W' r. wg '-1 - - ' 'Wi ei' S Eufaufa. Al I ul rd ' N' Franksville, YW 7 s D Q l l ' , Q New Orleans, La L " l li '- 'A Cincinnati. Oh - I f ' ' I Dawson, Ga 1 , ' k 1 ' Q w, New Rochelle, NY 3 jx 4 A Q-, ' . Jackson, Ms 1 1' ' . fl o - i . i , , f ?t?7'i tr L' .+':fff"., Nik ' 11-' r' r' r r' 'i ' P-QI I W'- 1,-3' I-'Isl "ff I I .. N I A"I I," ' I Timothy Marlow, a Greenville, Al I 'A 2 Il f ' II I Christopher D. Martin, a Hendersonville, Tn I I i ur f - ,I GP ii - Stephen D. Martin, a Louisville, Ky i I I A , A 5 ' A ,. Stephen M. Martin, a Union, Ky YJ A '27 4- - 'D' ' .gy E A' Thomas R. Martin, e Huntsville. Al L A . . I wr" , - I A Barbara Ann Massie, e Nashville, Tn I I ' I '-5, Q, 1 I f ' -I1 -, I s T.V. Cee, a Eu XVhanna, Ha 5 X . sq sl r- I I:-T : I 4- ,- I 5 X . If . 1 fx Lil. .4-' 'K '--'-A-'91 ' i A- ii -'lf ' 1 f' . I Q ' " ' ' I ,,- 'II f I Mary Alice Masters, a Atlanta. Ca i - , ' ' I ' - ,WA A 'N A I I I , Charles D. Matthews, a Sikeston. Mo ' ' I v l 0 - 'fa A ' A I XVilliam B. Matthews, a Ozark, Al ,g ', ' ' ji- A - I5I1j'.. 555.5-:Im gl Steven A. Mayans, a Cincinnati, Oh I X 'ir A -' I, cd: "I .I if " Rick XVaLle Maycumher. a Dallas, Tx N I 1 , A ' . lil l. ' -'V ,. joan Carol Mayer, a Alexandria, Va A' I - ' - 5 :jf II I - -1 -. 1 7. ' rt 1 D 5 I - , I II III5, I Hose Nose, 2, Xl as nng ox , . IIITI O II 1 r- -A I . I Im, :,-- f v ' I I 'Z ' V" ' -' " 1 ,i ' ' ' ' Todd K. Maziar. a Atlanta, Ca I . I I Kimra Mc.-Xnelly, a Liberty. Ky Q, I f W' I . A S ,M 7' ' 'W' I Kevin Shane Mc.-Xteer, a XVashington, DC .,g I X '-5 -I I-5? ,Q A ' . sri " Michael Edwin McCadden, a St. Louis, Mo II'T' f-la A? -I T ' A i A, Marilyn Pauline ML-Carlcv, a Atlanta, Ca I A 1 .-ph ., I ' I' L: ' ' ik 4. . I I Susan NVillard McCarley, a Nashville, Tn , : I I I ., A " VA I , i -' ' 7" - I 91 Michael Courts MeChcsncv, a Atlanta, Ca g4I A' 1' -. "5- 1 as I- ., L ' - 'A ' A 'n a ae ' - . -' -f-.us .1 , T' 'W FYI ' ' ' ' 'Th' IIIf' :I ' ' ' ' ' John XVesley McClellan, e Nashville, Tn f' ' II . - ' 5' ' A A I David Forbes McComb, a Pittsburgh, Pa 1' II 'I ' 6' J ' 6 Elizabeth Janes McCord, a Memphis, Tn Ilia . " I AI - II II. I I,Q ' 5 I Judith Ellen McCoy, a Tampa, Fl A7 I I G7 5 - if A II II II' Angela Maury McDaniel, a Atlanta, Ca . I I . ..,II - j . ' J ' -' I " ' I Darlync E. McDonald, a Murfreesboro, Tn I -H fi A A fvg' II, . "Ii , I I 5- Cathy A. McDowell. n Brentwood, Tn l.WI.'A ny, II II I I . . '. E iizb ' 1 , 4 4..- - , , . . an I II "Vanderbilt lS1'1At as bad as a lot of people say it IS. oan . ayer "H i f fir- TW? i . . ilii- FHA 'V -"il - A ' 4- ' lr A A? A U A " r A ' - 5594 - A- ' - V Melanie june McEwen a Chattanooga Tn " AA' I' A ' "A-I 7.1 ' ' AII Yvonne Marie Mclntyre. n Cleveland, Oh ' W - ' ,IQ "' r i -M 'il' g I I Lynn Ann McKay, a Ccneva, Switzerland 5 I 1 I I ,' I -, Nancy Ann McKay, n Ft. Lauderdale, Fl. , II ' . II" . xfptl T ?.- I Mary Eleanor McKinley, n Catonsville. Mil . . A ' F III H Iwpgi John Stuart Meliissick, a Alvin, Tx s.I 1' I . . I - I I . " I "lj I A ,144 '-41413 Robert Ylfayne McLaughlin. a North Caldwell. Nj - 4 .- A '. - . -. ' J 'JFFSF Ti" i CT ' . iii-A TT? "W ' ., AA Ai i' i '. ' 'A U V I ,- -- , , IA' Thomas Hugh McLaughlin, e St. Louis Mo ' I F. ' ' - I A Karen Raith McLellan, a jacksonville, Fl 1' 0 L' i 5 I -A lk . ' 2 .,, 1 3 Margaret N. McLennan, a Atlanta, Ga il ,Jw I I .I A Barbara Louise MeMillian, a Huntsville, Al X " A3 A V - Q Scott Robert McMurtry, a Columbia, Tn -' I I I ' . ' Thomas Carl McPheeters, a Atlanta, Ca A Ll - . -1- 7 A ' - M' 'l ' l R4 Ni -VVl -rter ' Dresden Tn , II Q, . I , X it mae ayi L me . a , C F " U we . - I f lx ' 'T A V -l A i I A - AAN A A F-rl Gregory William Medlin, a Columbia, SC 'I I ,, '- A . Donald York Menendez, a Barrington, Il ' ' 7? I ,: QI- -Q ' -6 Leigh Celeste Meriwether, e Clearwater, Fl R Ia II , I f I I - Dean N. Meyer, a Mamaroneck, NY fi? lf, 411- , - . Tiln Michel, a Monroe, La I 'N I ' , f I ,ffl-I I A II -'A f ., I A I 1 ig Lois Irene Miklas, a St. Louis, Mo 1 " 'I if ,, 'I ' . Beverly Ann Miller, a Huntsville, Al r i l 4' 4. r -H I, . I . . II' I 'I+-. 4' i A I - 4 4 I ? .I . fa av, ' , ii. , I -, L, . y -4' iII,I 11.- Maureen 1. Miller, n Robert M. Miller, a Sarah Ann Milliken, a Sharon Louise Mills, a Emily Ioan Minor, n Robert D. Mitchell, a Rees Mitchell, e Sybil C. Mitchell. a Todd Mitchell, a Susan E. Molaris, n Paul A. Moniot, a Cassandra L. Monk, a Spence S. Monroe, e Robert M. Montgomery, e Deerfield, Il Decatur, Al Louisville. Atlanta, Columbus, Birmingham, Kennett Square, Memphis, Pittsburgh, Clifton, Middlebury, Murfreesboro, Cincinnatti, Kr Ca Oh Mi Pa Tn Pa NJ C n Tn Oh Birmingham, Al 361 Kimberly G. Moore, e Patrick C. Moore. q Paul M. Moore, a Philip L. Moore, e Cathy L. Morgan, a jean A. Morgan, n Walter A. Morgan, a Kathryn B. Morton, n Cynthia L. Mosby, n Dave Mosby, a Gordon D. Muir, a Geraldine Ann Mulloy, Carol jean Munger, n II Anniston, Nashville. Al Tn Nashville, Tn Nashville, Tn Lexington, Ky Annapolis. Md Sanford, Fl Nashville. Tn Memphis, Tn jackson, Ms W'inston-Salem, NC Nashville, Tn Little Rock, Ak W ., -gs V rpg -3 -9 1? ' I 4 - Ji 1 19, ' f-1 'i fa I af.. -"'-49 ,-:fa 'f 1 ' ' , K ig Pig QAM I 1 I ri "M L , 1 lfllgif My ' ' . 1 Z: T ' I 1 I 5 7 a l X X T T i - 4? 2. lx I W" 1 P: J im ,.,a Annj. Murray, a Houston. Tx -, , . , f ,. 1 7 ' A aww- - -- H '-- P T' pw . W tffj' A N I. A 5 ' - 4,2 Karin L. Murray. n San Antonio, Tx l I E - " P ,N un Bonnie j. Myers. n Chattanooga. Tn r A I Q 5, ' p, ' - ' Carolyn M. Naifeh, a Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. ' ' ' , V 'Jn 1' Y , Thomas Neely. a Franklin, Ky' 'A' 'I , ' 'TTT 1' K'-7 , ' I A , , 1 Mary .-I. Neil, n Forth VVortl1, Tx Q 1 , 'I iigffl L Gregory L. Nelson, a Nashville. Tn Wi X -' 5 K '51 Y I ,3 Marcia Leigh Nelson, a Andover. Ma qw V ,-', , J .' ,XT T "', 7'5"-?f ' Q - Eg., '-ff .1,, is - iiiiifff f' D 5 ' .V I Eugene Edward Newman, e Dandridge, Tn V X lf" Fl Y ' J .nl F W ' julia Margaret Newton, a Greenville, Ms . '7' it L Q fi Q "' H . I I ' ' EGM - Margaret Ann Nicolson, a Mobile Al .'I"'5, 1 , 2' IRQ 7 if -9 ' P'-if V V f jolm Fred Nixon, a Mt. juliet, Tn swdt- li L -1 r 1 4 H1 ' " Susan Gail Nordin, e XVinston-Salem, NC 1 5 N j C twirl I4 ,fr iff W H up 2, " - ' liehecca Muriel Norris. a Chattanooga, Tn j ' ' ' 5' E' ' I V' I fi r if Robert Henry Norris, IV a Dallas, Tx ' ugh' I Q I ' .0 P' A 'ef c 4 . . . . . 7 7 National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, can I help you, please? Pat's Rooinate Terry Lynn Oaks, a Nashville, Tn ' W' W ' 4 f W H '- 5 , ' . Y, W 5 p , ' Pllillil-7 Michael O'Brien, e Knoxville, Tn , I H - ' ' A: P- Patricia Ann O'Donnell, a Long Beach, Ms gy MA if L. "' , ," , tv, Lisa Evelyn Ogle, a Memphis, Tn -13 -1-5 ,' , G ,ai 'f-.Sta I Peter Mitchell Oldham, a Nashville, Tn " I P 9 Pt ' I ' 'T' TM ' Arthur joseph Olender. a Opa-Locka, Fl "' r' li H ' - , Q J' f ,' j. Ann Oliphant, a Lookout Mountain, Tn X , . ml' ' 'Y , -' gs I F fp ti ll 1'-fi f! 4. fx ' T' T 'I v' 'P V ' -Y ' 'T Y i:?'71 C'f""'t5' 7T'f'.' ', ' , 'fffgx 1 T' l ff'-, 2,3 4 . 4 Q-' i.'v fr':'V'L?""'j'. Yjifiivf g " Elizabeth Barry O'Neill, a Winnetka, Il I . P A I P Af' 'i ' ' l 3' Qi: H Greg Onstott, e XVichita Falls, Tx ' ' ' P I ' I ' , X '1' ' Edward S. Oppenheimer, a Mobile Al ' f-sv ' 'N X f" ' ' , , Y ' f 1 .35 , William Nally Osbum, e ANolensville, Tn K ' .r l V V ,- 55. ' Margaret O'Shauglinessey, a Macon, Ga 'P I ' ' 7 V' v' '5' Emma jan Overcash, a Atlanta, Ga 'P T e' , qv' , , ,, ' - sg. 1 ', Elizabeth Cheny Owens, a Baton Rouge, La , ' , s j F Wx gf, -1 E P .,s I f ' 'S' '- ,W ,,f A I A , 4, 1' - dl J- j EL 3-.ix . - -1 . -Y I L-4 bl 'W Y I M o 1 A. ,D I ,. --, V. ., A , ,.. Q-. - 1 f- 1, Randall Allan Owen, a Atlanta, Ga ' A 35 l ii, - ' , , - ,-vi ' - ,N ' joseph Craig Oxman, a Atlanta, Ga ' A I '-7 - ' ' " , ' f -A Kim Marie Padula, a Ormond Beach, Fl -- . I' .- 1-. , U' '-:. - " Nina XVray Page, n Darien, Cn Y L X D 1 ,:- - - ,gg ' 'J 4 1' L , ,lf an Terrv Galen Palmberj. a Arlington Hts.. ll ' ' ,.x 1 ' -f'-Tfjg ,I ..1 ' ' ' A A 3 I ' 1 Ann'Marie Pandl, n L, Milwaukee, Wi N , I, Q. '- ,, -, -QW T7 -f -' if ,M Martha jane Parker, n jasper, In ' ' ' f' . . j N 'T Q' of . .. sais. . i r lsr J l I ' if ssl jacqueline O'Neal Parr, a Savannah, Ga 5 , , ' Prichard C. Partridge, a jacksonville, Fl I In ' Debbie Ann Paryzek, a Westport. C11 i ' Em" Emily Catherine Pate, e Birmingham, Al ' A ,7 james Woodard Peay, e Birininghanl, Al : , . Linda Mae Penney, a Niwllville- T11 .. lj ' Gary David Perlman, a Greensboro. NC lj X Q Robert Gayle Perry, a Atlanta, Ga , z 4-fflgw I wr john E. Peters. a Manchester. Tn , l 4 V " K jolm Louis Peterson, a Nashville, Tn 7' ' Kristi Gen Peterson, a Pal Boca Raton, Fl - , . I 'f'-W lr 4' Teresa Marie Petrone, a McLean, Va ' ' Q fr: F Molly Padden Phalen, n Cape Girardeau, Mo j 1- 4 K. ff Michel Lynn Phifer, a Camden, Tn ,Aix I i -' , 362 , ,Ls ' LQ! ' -li""' lg xx i f X. S 'Rx ,f SOPHOMGRES 36 Stephen K. Phillips, a Reid Cuyton Pierce, a Valerie Pierce, n Margie Pines, a Hal NVarren Platt. a R. Donald Plosser, a Richard james Polatty. a james Randall Post, a Deborah Stuart Potts, n Steven Michael Powell. a Katherine Narr Power, n joel jefferson Powers, a hvillilllll Harold Powers, e Susan Briley Pratt. n Timothy james Pratt, a Susan Elizabeth Pressly. a Victor Charles Ptak. a Wonder Evans Pnd, n james Cregory Qualls, a Mark Hubert Ralston, a Betsy Ellen Rand, a jonathan Elliot Rattner, a Karin Ruth Redding, n jessalyn Elois Redmon, a Scott Edsel Reed. a Marian Frances Reiff. a john Palmer Reynolds, e john Patrick Reynolds, a "Save Monica joan Reznik, a Craig M. Rice, e Cynthia jean Rice, a William Vaughn Rice. III. a Sarah Linglc Richardson, n Frank Adams Riddick. a Laura Ann Riedl, a Timothy Lee Riggins, a Thomas Richard Riggs, a Edward George Riley II, a Thomas Allen Rissler, e Adrienne Stevens Rivers, a Sandra Lee Roark, a joseph Kenneth Robbins, a Faith Marie Roberts, a jeffrey Graham Roberts, a Susan Elizabeth Roberts, n Margaret E. Robinson, a Walter Thomas Robinson, a Hilleary C. Rockwell III, e Anthony Scott Rogers, e Lelia Hussey Rodgers, a Katherine Leigh Rone, a Lon jeffery Rosen, a Frank Alan Rubin, a Elleston Craig Rucker, n Albert E. Ruinmans, jr, a Charles VVheeler Runge, a Pamela Ann Rutherford, a Theodore john Saclarides, a Akron. Oh Pine Bluff, Ak Bessemer, Al Lakeland, Fl Decatur, Ca Birinigliain. Al Roswell. Ca Birmingham. Al Louisville, Ky Shelbyville, Tn Nashville. Tn Toms River, Nj Louisville, Ky Antioch. Tn Mt, Kisco. NY Lynchburg, Va Shaker Ills., Oh Nashville, Tn Sheffield, Al Chicago, Il Little Rock. Ak Woodxncre, NY Louisville, Ky Greenville, Ms Atlanta, Ca NVatertown, Cn Tuscaloosa, Al Signal Mtn., Tn av ., . s , ,ani . " 'nr ,7 9:4 l , .Q X X l V f , w I 1. V-as v lf, ' fe T 'ef 3 . , , 1 l l X Q i I F l ' i V , .K .- - --:v :?-H' iv ..-L A f . at .. ,...' . ii, , ' i ,e 4 ' V t, at , v I i A ' xx! li-A hi V ' fx' it Q. -' 'L ' 1 5 5 is 'l " ,'fih . - ' fi ' '7 5' r i ' i i Cf rr i , i ""fi ,- A-Q 1 . .., 4 -" - A: A f l" "' L' 'Ji if .41 44 A, R -2 . 31'-i .- P 4 e. ' A 5 Q A i' - , - ,. V 1 fl " Q fee- lfllll' A if J 'MW new R . I Aflv f S vm Q Q' Q , , ', 4 .r 1 your Dixie cups, the South shall rise again 3, lirecksville, Oh XVauwatosa. VV i Columbus, Ca s Seabrook, Tx Ypsilant, Mi Metairie, La Mt. Prospect, Il Memphis, Tn Little Rock, Ak Quincy, Ma Louisville, Kv Austin, Tx Nashville, Tn Tupelo, Ms Signal Mtn, Tn Louisville, Ky jackson, Tn Atlanta, Ga Atlanta, Ca Silver Spring. living, Memphis, jackson, Tenafly, Kansas Ci ty. Murfreesboro, Fd Tx Tn Ms NI Mo Tn Fayetteville. NC Marietta. Ga Nashville, Tn Clearwater, Fl Scott Douglas Sanderson, a Northbrook, Il Chatranjan Kaur Sandhu, e Ft. XVayne. Ill Nancy Ferris Sanford, a Dkllliltl. Tx Del-laven Bright Sanson, a Alexandria, Va jane Scott Sasser, e Huntington, VVV 364 T,,,, .. 7 Margaret Robinson V ' ..l 6 Q , :fy 4 i!1y,l'l i . I." A wlwfil 4 , ' i .!' - , , 5. , sv , , i FTE? I1 A A V li I J ' ni - i- . inf, , L., , . i . "-PP,-' A j. 2' ' Q 1, .Q r A P V f i ' I '09 '59 "5 2" ..-g 'ZZ-'71s , ei ? V M, -fri -.4 . YQ? Q 1 ,H-1, ,, Aff j. I :sg , 1, , if La' . , nn break 1 too fa, ., f T35 ll l ,I t QT 1 ,Q , Y. E A' AMA . X ' ff - ig.. , "H A 1 ' Cynthia Hillen Sauter, a Lisa Roth Schilling, n Kurt L. Schmalz. a Iohn Anthony Schmidt. a john R. Schneider, a John F. Schumacher, a Robyn Ann Schwinghamer. n Barbara Carol Scian, a Jacqueline Rose Scott, a Kirk Alan Scott. a Lisa Nanett Scott, a james Timothy Searcy. a Ranclie jane Sears, a Randal Hugh Sellers. a Antinette L. Serena. e Lynn Elizabeth Shallberg. a Robert Martin Shapiro, e Thomas Lugrand Sharpe, a Thomas Martin Sharry, a Olin George Shivers, a Richard E. Shubert. a Alexander Siatacas. a Benjamin Signer, a Peter Silberling, e David L. Silverstein, a Mary Duncan Simmons. n Edna Estelle Simonton, a Susan Graham Simpson. n shortf, Bruce Edward Sinclair, a Dina Marie Sine. n Strachan Thomas Small, a 'Zan XV. Small. a Annie Lee Smith, a Cynthia Anne Smith, 11 Dawn Ellen Smith. n Deborah Ann Smith. a Douglas T. Smith. jr., a joseph Collines Smith, a Kiniberlee Smith, a Michael Ray Smith, e Preston Lawrance Smith. e Priscilla P. Smith, a Quinton Smith. a Sheryl Lynne Smith, n Leigh B. Smithermon, a Susan Holley Snyder, a Gwen Elise Soho, a Ronni Sonnenberg, a Iennifer VV. Sonnichsen, n Charlotte M. Southmaud, a Vincent Robert Sparrow, a Rob Spihnan, a Mary Margaret Spitz, a Cynthia Darcy Sporborg, a james Watson Spradley, e .lane Crews Stearns, a Kenneth VVilliam Steffen, e Steven Mark Stein, a Susan E. Steinmuller, n Iobn William Stern, a jim William Steuer, a Cheryl Anne Stevens, n Lynsley Beth Stewart, a Terrace Park. Oh Boca Raton, Fl Alexandria. Va Louisville. Ky Convent Station. Nj Canton, Oh Himtsville. Al St, Petershurg. Fl Colchester. Cn Amarillo. Tx Ottumwa. Ia Nashville. Tn Montevallo, Al Cordover, Tn Franklin, Tn East Calais, Vt liaysitle, NY N. Palm Beach, Fl Charleston, SC Tallahassee, Fl Memphis, Tn Athens. Creccc Cincinnati. Oh Huntington, NY Birmingham, Al Delaware. Oh jarion jet.. As Pittsburgh. Pa Huntsville, :Xl Largo, Fl Charleston. Sc Mt. Pleasant, SC San Antonio. Tx Fort XVorth, Tx Plantation, Fl Clarksdale, Ms Nashville, Tn Boone, Ia Little Rock, Ak Crossville, Tn Chattanooga. Tn Memphis, Tn .-Xtlanta. Ga Dickson, Tn Houston, Tx Brunswick, Ca St. Louis, Mo Roslyn Heights, NY Mt. Lalq:s, Nj Bethesda, Md Lake Forest. Il Bassett, Va Tallahassee, Fl Decatur, Ga Eastman, Ga Nashville, Tn Oak Grove Ky Columbus, Ca McLean Va Atlanta. Ga Oh Decatur 365 Shaker Hts.. Macon, , Tn Ga Matthew M. Stichnoth, a Richard Glcn Stiles, e Clayton Andrew Stockctt. a . Douglas Arant Stockham, a Mary E. Stone, n Richard O. Stoner, a C. XVilliam Stricker, a Laura Lynne Stroud, e hvlllltllll G. Stroud. a VVilliam D. Stuart, e john T. Stukey, a Mark Scott Styles, a Clay Marshall Sublett. a Bonnie jean Sukloff, n Marlyn Gail Snklott, n Kathy Ann Summers, a Laurel jane Sutherland. n Steve Kelley Sutton, a Susan Emily Swann, a - jo.-Xnn Swearingen, a Charles Rowand Talley, a Philip Stewart Tatum, a Ann Elizabeth Taylor, a Cathryn Anne Taylor, a john Hendricks Taylor, a john Sessoms Taylor, a Laura Leigh Taylor, a Susan Lee Taylor, a Lincolndale, NY Bowling Green, Ky Chattanooga, Tn Birmingham. ,-Xl Ocala, Fl Bethesda, Md Xvyoming, Oh Knoxville, Tn Nashville, Tn Memphis, Tn Pompano Beach, Fl St. Louis, Mo Tulsa, Ok Atlanta. Ga Dickson, Tn jacksonville, Fl Pittsburgh, Pa Ft. Mitchell, Ky 'A rMorristown. Tn Columbus, Ga Tampa, Fl Lebanon. Tn Des Moine, Io Richmond, In Birmingham, Mi johnson City, Tn Lcwisburn, Tn Paris, Tn I .- 1 .Q 2 ogg v . . lt T .., , ,rj M, f 1 I l ra-:Al V7 . l ' I' 4 ia r . K -2 la X K IIA ' e . -. F' W 'T' "T x - -. ea. as l ll S L-.X '- " , e -' , 3' 7' N U-la g fr. A M 4. . 'I ' U, Al xl I ' .Jia v it N -Y-2 -' i Q .2 W n 1 ll' K I ' x + yi -,', '.ff. . ,Q ' X ol K 't ' In at lit , l ll ,Y i 3 ll 1 l , j 1 i id? ll ills-'iv .Q 'Er' . ' W '- X, -V 1. Q -, 9, , , ' - ' '- 1 - L " JS 2 I H. 'K 'Tm from the North, and Vanderbilt has made me appreuate ie South julea G. Thigpen, a jolm Forbes Thomas, Lee Ann Thornton, a Suzanne P. Tichenor, a Irene Donna Tidwell, Martha C. Tinsley, a William W. Tipton, a jolm F. Tomlin, a Cynthia Welborn Towle, a William Lee Towler, Cindy Kay Travis, a Scott S. Tremelin, a Reed Edward Trickett, a Ann Clay Trimble, n Bruce jason Tromberg, a jane Barrett Trotter, a Mary Lisanne Tucker. a john Thompson Turner, a Mark Anthony Tusken, a Walter Scott Tygard, a Paul Wesley Tyler, a jilda Lee Unruh, a Thomas Lewis Vaden, e james Walter Vanderineer. a Dickey C. van Eys, a Lynn Ellen Vega, a Gary Francis Verego, a Linda jo vonLackum, a Francis S. von Stade, a Gary Wayne Waddey, a Sara E. Waggener, a Susan jean Wagner, a Rosemary Cecelia Waldron, a Blake Milan Walker, e judy Lynn Walker, e 366 Logos, Nigeria Chapel Hill, NC Brentwood, Tn Westport, Cn Dickson, Tn Indianapolis, In Tiptonville, Tn Greenville, SC Franklin, Tn Galveston, Tx Newtown Sq., Pa Akron, Oh Nashville, Tn Ormand Beach, Fl XVashington, D.C. Augusta, Ga Chattanooga, Tn Columbus, Ga Kansas City, M0 Nashville, Tn Bakersfield, Ca Tulsa, Ok Lebanon, Tn Deerfield, Il Houston, Tx Naples, Fl Knoxville, Tn Cedar Rapids, Ia Columbus, Oh Nashville, Tn Charleston, Mo Pittsburgh, Pa Philadelphia, Pa Dallas, Tx Atlanta, Ga I v , T .V 'H' -1 i ', X 1 1 '- l 1 :"'- ' ' f-e 4 if-" 57 H' .941 de I , Q -1, wr'-J 4 . -A rf a I' I 755 Q. I X t 'VA 'X. F 2 XL pu . -WL , X il ' r , ' , ' 1" ' I - x j 'i A12-A , 1-R .3 I If r P- J. f . 3- 1? '-ff' ' . . . ,fi ' 't I 'I '- l ...,: gl f 'V-1.4 457'-l In E - iw 31,3 V 'X i i . ,fu - -I 'lit-T3 Q Q gi., V . ' Ur ix V -4. Y' K ., ' V I A lfljfwn, I l :fi I ' . A "QI 'I , tif ...A at S ' " ' 'Y ' Y nwltf' 'Y' ', if ' lr ll ' I ' I -,Y X . .W -if XJ ' "' if Q 1175? ll l 4 V, Z i w N i fn A VA tirV l '.. .' i ,V rl KN I i T' F3 F? 6 5 T 4 Ill 33: A ,- l . - 7 ,Q A- .fr - A .V IV , My ' D J, I ,f QNX L J ltr" Q 1- . , X - If fn r. -F. A - '53, A A+ I N, N ' 5153 " ui 4 'I s .' I -,v . Q 'I ,W-sf V Fri V ' . V jr A V -V . .E I T' g, 5 .f V V, in V' T 'T ,V--al " k' .Q Y' H ' ' f " K-7x:ll'.l A ' T F -- f' ' V, we qt., , - V Q P-if ' A ,, . - K I ., W -- 1: ',. f. A 4.1 l V J V NV A, 'Vx V I- ' 1' l""x l .V, ', "P" ' l ' N ll Vi .L A if V if ' 7 Vx ' Q Q '. . , V N. jean Walker. n james M. Wallace, a Ruth Elizabeth Wallace. a Sean Enwright XValsh, a Frank Vllalter III, a Daniel A. Wankel. e Sandra Sue NVarren, a Elizabeth Ann XVatkins. a Blake Andrew NVatson. a Thomas M. XVatson Ill. e Kenneth Dale NVayne, a Christie joan Weber. a Virpnia Susan NVeeks. n Marc Philip VVeill, a Alvin Howard Weinberg. e john Theron Xvellington, a Buckner Potts W ellford. a Nora Lou Mlellman, e john Pope NVclls. a Phoebe Le Moine VVelsh. a john William Wepfer. a Frank N. NVheeler. a Jayne Suzanne NVheeler. a Decatur. Al Gideon, Mo Dallas, Little Compton. Falls Church, Kingsport. Louisville, Tx RI Va Tn Ky Lexington. Ky liobinso 1 Dallas, Tx 1, Il Flowery Branch, Ga Marion. Oh Plant City. Fl N ew York, NY Pompano Beach, Fl Savannah, Memphis. Nashville. jackson. Houston, Memphis, Marks. Ga Tn Tn Ms Tx Tn Ms Plymouth Meeting, Pa , A Sara Mary VVhite. e Nashville. Tn if A I V A Timothy Alan VVhite. e Nashville, Tn ' V, J, Regina Marie NVhitley. a Memphis, Tn A ' , T' Alden Allen Mlillard. n Roswell. Ga R George R. Nllilliams III. e Nashville. Tn "On th Wh l Fd tb b ' v e o e, ra er e III PHILADELPHIA. john Wclls if - v 'V ' l f ' T M I ' A i John B. VVilliams. a Alwlill, Tx ' I ,,. Mae Francis Williams, n Tuskegee, Al A A T' ' ", V' as , ' V Bo Williamson, a jackson, T11 'if' l l " U ' l - ' Christopher F. Wilson, a Mobile. Al - " , V V .A, I' V p Elizabeth Linden VVi1son, a Greenville. SC ' , 'V ' V l ' ' ' I ' 1 A f,- Mary Thayer Wilson, n Chattanooga, Tn Vx V' V X up -, hy! I Sherman E. Wilson, a Huntington, WV ' 'Tl Q V " F A ll 1 ' Constance VVinning, n Huntsville, Al V' ' , Q l - , I Ap, V Steven Mark VVolff, a St. Louis, Mo V.. i . . ' , A H " Sarah Louise Wollenburg, a Nashville, Tn 5 4- I - V ..- " Q 1 ' A james Austin VVombwell, e Nashville, Tn 5- I . " ' , V A ' , N ,V l 4 V Margaret Berry Womer, n Shaker Hts., Oh 1 ' 1 K l ' "L, ' 'fl , ' AQ, 1 ' 5:23, lllx Kent H. Wonnell, e Batesville, Tn J . it l 'A ' Q K l , If Fi :Kun Sullivan Woodliff. a Iackson, Ms ,:A. , 1 VI. . L. . J ' 1 - fr' 'G TT -Tim ' L i F , l l M Henry Harper Woods, a jasper, Al ' M l F ,W ' Q 5 A Paul Bradford Woods, a Newton, Ma E , V -'A ' H' ' Terry Lynn Woodward, e Daisy, Tn A -Vf , ' 5 l --4 john Russell Wooley, a Iackson. Ms ,A ' . v - ' , NE.. john Kelly NVright, a Nashville, Tn V ,Q -U 7 " F' 'M Michael Greg Wright, a Dallas, Tx Sax' ffl. x,U,,AjJ1 I Q A ' L A X Patrick Eugene Wright, a Owensboro, Ky b ' lr W Robert Charles Wright, a Mary Ville. Ins ,al ' Evangeline Iola NVynn. e Columbus, Ca 'M Yerger Clifton Yandell, a Vance, Ms o : WL? Z. 1-.,rg'Q sz., 5 . -I -,. il -3 1 l W V I xii .I l , fx' H 21:5 'M L 'j, .i 11:2-1 B T' . :I -H1 - .1 W my .gn .an fr - :J 34- . . . V 4 . . ' ' s Kerry Lynn Yarkin, a Hungshun Yee, e Stephen M. Yelenich, a Marilyn York a Lou Ann Yme Sarah Lee Young, a William Neil Zwiren, a Ford Sniff Zaire Coldilia Zonk Bruce Zits Alpha Zqwiskagorsh Miami Beach, Fl Kowloon, Hong Kong N. Little Rock, Ak Tallahassee, Fl Newcastle, Nj Durham, NC Atlanta, Ga Olfactory, NY Mud Springs. Ak Macon, Ga New York. NY 301 uniors V I I ,4e-6'1" ,?6"'i' 5 K h. ' ZLL 37 0 gi Ti 49 4' -'un an wA'2N IUNIORS 233 1 97154 a RQ? .pu ,gi Oh Lord' My mind was on di ag I'dC1llg You can dig a niche as deep or as shallow as jack Anon Susan Eve Adzick, e ' jeffrey Hamilton Agee, a --'WWW Maureen Elaine Ahern, u 'J if L - 1 'it -2 eng iton Ai en, a '2- X. -A X... .', N7 haw Hifi 2 ',w ef Susan L. Albert, n XVilliam T. Alderson III, a jeffrey Brooks Aldrich, a Frances Huger Alexander, a Patrick Lynch Alexander. a Theodore Crandall Alford, e Midge Elaine Allebach, a Donald Lee Allen, a Steven Michael Allen, a Trip Allen, a Franklin Scott Anderson, a , " - udv Ann Andrews, a QD ,ang jack Bryant Anon, a Yasser Arafat, a Ev., T.j. Arant, a ' DeVan Dumas Ard, a H Thomas Brantley Arnau, a I' 't Grossout T. Arbuckle, e 5 fi-5 Edward Stevens Arning, a A41 Pamela Mary Auble, a , ,.. Anne Atkinson, n 1 Daniel Aucremann, e P ' Andrew james Auerback, a ' ' 1. U Ellen Babbitt, a I -L Susan Lynn Baer, a HQ ' Michael H. Bagot, jr., a 5 ' Martha E. Baither, a t Patty joyce Balch, a 1 ' Susan jane Ball, a ' dl - james Edward Baker, a .f f . Mir ' Charles Tinsley Barnard, e Prairie Village, Ka Atlanta, Ga Washington, D.C. Pikcsville, Md Califon, Nj Nashville. Tn Boca Raton, Fl Tuscaloosa, Al Franklin, Tn VVashington, D.C. Pensacola, Fl Huntsville, Al Nashville, Tn Memphis, Tn. Nashville, Tn Nashville, Tn Daytonl Oh Houston, Tx Paducah, Ky Birmingham, Al Charleston, SC Hicksville, NY Timonium, Md Sandusky, Oh Decatur, Al Clarksville, Tn Oak Fridge, Tn Bethesda, Md Memphis, Tn New Orleans, La Toledo, Oh Tupelo, Ms Northbrook, ll Madison, Nj Huntsville, Al 371 David Waddell Barnes. a Mark Randall Barron. a Pamela Ieanne Bashore Noel Marie Bassi, n Roger David Bear. a Carey Burnice Beard. a Peri Margaret Bell. a Terry Lynn Bellenfant. a Tom F. Bellows, e Richard George Belshoff. a Tom Charles Bennett. a Sarah Ann Bennett. a Bruce XV. Berger. a Mimi Berkeley. n A. Franklin Barkey. a Carol Lynn Berry. a Gregory VValton Berry. a Ellen Beth, a Patricia L. Bevill. e Bruce Bohert Beyer, a Ina Ruth Bighani. a Kay Ellen Binkley, a Sue Carol Birdwcll, a Barbara Ann Bischoff. a David E. Blum. a Stephen Todd Boho, a Pattie Pittman Booker, a XVilliam Scott Bowen. a Rohert A. Bories Laura Lucille Boyd. a Kean Daniel Boyer. e john C. Boyle. u john Miller Bradley. a Susan .lean Bragg. a james E. Brakelield. a William I.. Branyon. a Daphne Brashear. a -Ianies B. Brevard, a Iflizalmetll l. Brewer. a XVorth Lee Bright. a Anne A. Broekman. a Ann L. Broekmann. a Arthur S. Brooks. a Beverly Brown, a Cary M. Brown. a Mary B. Brown. n Sanford S. Brown, c Shevawn D. Broxton. a Cilliert H. Buliis. a Bichard D. Burbank, a Louise C. Burehett. a Nancie Burrows. a james L. Burton. e Gerald A. Bushman. a Susan D. Calerwood. n julie A. Caldwell. n Thomas C. Caldwell. a Betsy M. Callieott. a Matt M. Callihan. a Mark B. Cannhisios. a Larkin L. Caninston. a Gaines P. Campbell, a Christine A. Canda, n 372 Macon. Ca Paris, Tn Camp Hill. Pa Bay Village, Oh Key Biscayne. Fl Waco. Tx jackson. Ms Shelbyville. Tn Houston, Tx Louisville. Ky Arlington Hts.. Il Shelhyville, Tn Indianapolis. In Houston, Tx jacksonville. Fl Milwaukee, Wi Arlington Hts.. Il Murray. Ky jasper. Al Passaic. NI Nashville, Tn Avytlllltllg, Oh Carthage, Tn Wilmette. Il XVilmette, Il Miami. Fl Ft. Lauderdale. Fl Little Bock, Ak 1. 'T dr! tr' ,e,.. j Wei JYF-l-T il i.f 3 I 7 Q ., lt I l , ' ' f 1 , ' f -i '11 I A ,.. ia ty If 47 ll ay -. In W ' .I I W . " A X H.v.,.... X f . E .XX V A I rttrgi e NL li B re Q ri ,ir Q, 1 , V 'W X , 5 i ... V W I Ns f f ' J . .l v - '. A . V lg yu, F 51.4 , 1, i i I. V . I l li A U tes N -5-lil" iii? A I. .t'.-.e f f . I "You grow a lot I, New Orleans. La Athens. Tn Ilavre de Crave. Md St. Louis. Mo Birminghain. Al Old Greenwich. Cn Nashville. Tn Anniston. Al tlainsville. Fl Houston. Tx Lake Park. Fl Nashville. Tn Birniingliani. Al Frontenac, Mo Kingston Springs. Tn Asheville. XC. Colnmhiu. In Conrad, Mt Athens. Ca Tannpa, Fl Nashville. Tn Long Meadow. Ma Lelianon. Tn Ilouston. Tx cllL'Ill'Vt'tt.l.Cl', Fl Little Bock. Ak Dunwoody. Ca llouston. Tx Biriningham. Al Memphis. Trl Pensacola. F 3 Massapequa Park. Nl XVayeross. Ca Lookout Mt.. Ti Chesterfield, Mi lava. an ,- -ij'-sf. .i .3 if X rf . s.. ,llr B T-rr ' . fl . B' .4 7 5 ...... 1 ' 13. f . .faq 'T' ' 17, .L . I . I ll Susan C tlderwood Q ik FFF. FFI' V 7 tl A all I t st.. "V - - lf L. l . L ff V 4 n 1 R lr- ' y . X1 Y rl .1 , -A V fn i, t I X - ."" , - A . J' Y .l F324 . X ' -- :li fl . Tfi 1 K ' 1 ' ' l 1351- ad I 1 i .Y ly su-L ...I of -ft i I T' ' ' Q 'V B i . . - uf' ' , Q 't" i Zh' . Q , P ' . 3 I3 l V lk - .YL V - -:J ...,x- I . v'.- 1 v xiii ? filth gif nw.. -it eeee it B f at i B 'vrv 5' 'l M all V, M Y' I V' vm - 'S' V xt ' -t . ' 'Nei Qt- it tv V.f if-'rf "rl rw F -' , . .f --'f"'j , , l V I ' ,- V ' ' . " V41 ' ,V ,VF ,RV V Kendall L. Card. e Ft. Stockton, Tx Q V ' l V . VV Q ,. VV 41 T l Edward WJ. Carpenter. e Ft. Lauderdale, Fl ' Q' ' , 'V li . 'Q 1 X 'T ' V ' ' Karen S. Carr. e Columbus. Ca .,.. V - 'V ". - V VV 1 ' Stephen P. Carson. a Bowling Green. Ky V V , ' x , ' V .' V .v'.- Beth .-Kun Carter, a Birminglmm, ,Xl . V, i ' '- V Vx f A -"N 1 Q ,. Catherine .-X. Carter. a Moline, ll 1 - - VV ' V IVVPV VV ' Robert H. Cassels. a .-Xtlanta, Ca Ji' I . . 1 1' ' ,, F gi L . V 3, H- A A - N' " R Hifi, ' D Patty L. Chafhn. u Franklin. Tn VV 5 1 Q V V: on - V x - ' XVade C. Chzumell, a Hermitage. Tu ', ' 'V ' , , "' ' ' Q 5 john F. Chappell. e Nashville. Tn U i -. 2 -35, 'ww . - , . . . ,Q VV,V .V - 5? .V ---A V -3 ..:.. Robert L. Charion. a Clue-ago, Il V V ! V ' . - V .4, ' Ernest P. Chin, a Hong Kong ,VV ,V. -.VV V A ,VV V ,l , Richard E. Choate, a Coodlettsville. Tu A V gr V ' ' ' 'AV V Athena Pallas. n Olympus. Ca If - 4 l , . i . K 7 fi nisher 'F 'fr - r" si ri ' ,V . V V' 'll V ,i l . V 'V l Al e Sliiik:l.0T::st.Z ' , l TV, n ' ' V V Anne Nl. Cleary. n Nasliville, Tn VI V ' ., . 3 V i "' Emiley L. Cleveland, a llouston. Tx V ' V A ' . , gif. , V, . '15 Melinda .-X. Clinard. a Metairie. Lu N' fl. ' V M- ,' 'fl - P A ' ' Catherine E. Cohill, n San Diego. Ca l AV , f V V V V, ,Vp XVilliam K. Coleman. a Sniyrun. In ,V VV V . , ISK.-- EEVV . f . W V ---.- - -Yi . '-C . K . V V Vs . T " rv l f," ' Michele D. Collins, a Xlurrvsville. Pa , ' T . Terri L Conant u lloustou Tx .. Dv ' . f ' ' ' - - VL V v qt ff' ,V 9' . V jay Parker Cook. a Memphis, Tn , VV V, , "tv V - QW 1- jonathan XV. Cooper. a Newport News. Va 'Vg 1- L, ,. ' . N VV V Penelope Cooper. ai Winter Park, Fl I2 , VNV ' 5, 'V ' ' .MVT R575 VV X Yvilliam H. Cooper, a Vlaekgonvillg, Fl , :HF , Wg M . l l ' ' I 1 Daniel S. Corlew. il Nlurlreeslmoro. Tu '-I ,iff 11 X U -f ' f ' " ashvilleis an cinterestin ' city i' g ' Susan Deluke A.. VA 'fy-r-..-v-:fav is K 'si ' ri if . 5 I ' I Robert XV. Courtney. a Tauupa. Fl . A V? A V H. Douglass Crall, a Vlouesboro, Ak , 9' V V 0 ' " 'T 1 Stephen M. Crawford, a Tampa, Fl V '59 L- " 1 -Ta Q '-'.I?'2g- ' fl V Robert B. Cregor. a Louisville. Ky ' A V V W V VV Sarah C. Croft. a Atlanta. Ca V .V l ' ' V: ,'A l ,Q Kimberly Pi. Crook. a Madison. Tu ' A 'Q 'Fs ' "S ' ' ' ' .' Marv E. Cross, e Nliami, Fl N. A V' lg 'I i .- ' ' ' i ' " Ti . """'jV" VV - . 5' -P ' 5, i I ' ' . - T . ' ' 'C 1 - , ' XVillizuu C. Crosswy, e Paris, Tu wa . V A ' l - V Michael C. Croyle, a Streetsboro. Oh J V V V V V V V Carol C. Culp, a Birmingham. Al N. L' ' ' ' 'E' N4 - xX"1"' 'Beverly M. Cumming. a Atlanta. Ca , , V, VV ' ' .- ' V Thomas L. Cummings. e Nashville, Tu VV ' fi iVV' 5' ll ' e ' . fa Stephen D. Cummings, a Houston. Tx VVS LV V , f Timothy J. Cummings, e Nashville, Tu . fr . I - . i ll V, 'T i 3 ll! l Kevin Eugene Cuneo. a Erie. Pa V V? V, 1 Martha Lavona Currie, a .-Xtlauta. Ca I ' ' . V -3' V' Q XVilliam Cleland Dade. a Hopkinsville. Ky it L-:AL Forest Keith Daniels. a Louisville. Ky ' IV ' 'A " 'f' - iV , Vlumes Harold Daughdrill. a Nlemphis. Tn V- ' . I - l' ,V Elizabeth Ann David. a Creve Coeur, Mo . . V B P . X Edwin Robert Davis, a Hopkinsville, Ky ' 1 1 Q A if l 'Q , '-51 1' , P u ll 'l l, T-lift. Y, Il qw ll! S ll it .... .is 1-H l F f-72. l Susan Carter Davis, n joy-'ee Marie De Brosse. n Diane Leigh Dekich. a Murcia Lee Delk, a XVilliam R. DeLoache. a Susan Virginia Deluke, a Thomas Craig Derian. a S. Alice Din-ky. n joan Peyton Diehl, a Ann Garland Dillard, a Grant Ferrell Dillard, e Stephen Ashton Disney. a Steven A. Dohme, e Laurie .-Kun Dollhofer, a jaeksonvi lle, Fl Cincinnati, Oh Birmingham, :Xl Suvzunmili, Ca Creenville. SC Selieueetacly. NY jackson. Ms Wrigley. Tn Huntsville. :Xl Lynchburg, Va Columbia, Tu Louisville. Ky Cincinnati. Oh Newport. :Xl 373 Mary Francis Dominick, a Robert Blair Downing, a Rena Lynn Dreskin, a Dawn Louise Dudgeon, n Marianne Ruth Dunstan, a Denise Mary Durbeck, a Jill McRoy Dutton, a Ann Tinsley Eastham, e Ellcna Economou, n NVilliam H. Edwards, Jr., a Lisa Ann Ehrichs, a 7 Grant Walter Eisner, e Mary Ball S. Ellett, a Winfield David Elliot, a Charles Michael Ellison, a Gregory T. Ellison. a Donald Mark Engleman, a Richard Alan Engle, a Susan Hall Englund, a Stephen Forrest Eson, a Neal Dow Evans, III, e VVilliam A. Evans, a Patricia Ann Ewing, a Elizabeth Hane Faig, e Jonathan L. Fales, a Audrey Sharon Farkas, a Mary Jill Farringer, e Patricia Ann Fedor, a F arsheed Ferdowski, e Lynn Felder, a Jeannie Farrar Fields, a Jeannie Elizabeth Fink, a Roseann Finucane, n J. Clark Fischer, a Jeffrey Reynolds Fisher, a Susanne Brook Fisher, n Marion Agnes Fitzsimmons, n Mary Melody F ite, a Jennifer Lee Fletcher, a Ezekiel Allen F loose, a Walter Lawrence Floyd, a Janaruth H. Ford, a Mazo La-De Ford, e Janet Claire Forsythe, n Robert Marshall Foster, a G. Doss Fowler, a Barbara C. Frackiewicz, n Diane Lynn Fraiman, e Lesa De Anne F raker, a Bruce Liwd Frackenberg, a Janiece Yvonne Frazer, a Rod N. Frazier, a Margaret E. Freeman, n Lynne Doranne F reer, a Rebecca N. F ricke, e Joanne Bette Fried, n Laurel Fuson, a Jolm Michael Gaffney, a Betty Ann Gardner, a Laiu'ie Anne Gardner, a Marilyn Ruth Gardner, a George Montague Garrett, a Steven Ray Garrett, a Birmingham, Al Nashville, Tn Greenville, Rockford, lVebster Groves, Lexi ngton, SC Oh Mo Ky Dunedin, Fl Luray, Va. XVillmette, Il Nashville, Tn Cincinnati, Oh Oklahoma City, Ok Slidell, La Indianapolis, In Cincinnati, Oh Augusta, Ga Middlebury, Cn Providence, RI Birmingham, Al Glendale, Mo Jacksonville, Fl Nashville, Tn Miami. Fl Houston, Tx New Canaan, Cn La Porte, Tx Nashville, Ti LaCrangc, Park Il W -Q X -L, xt . I L ," S 1 ' .2 f 5 t V 4 ,, I -.. . - ft. -nf :. , T -..Z - -X, ,., ,gqjfflgzisig V I,-,L r ' ' f N. . , if. , - f' . J , I , ff., uf. ff rif- , ,. L, B i " , . 1: v ' cl, ru ary . I 'LA' , ' 915' J., A I 1 - K.-gvt fa AN . lf, J . I 'X J 'A I ...Ula 1 --- 'fu '15 A -1 at l Jr JM, A 'rr C is ' if -C I 'J' 'fr- i I ' , fl . , A tx f 1 A , "What,s the difference between Vanderbilt and a cactus? . A cactus has pricksf, Tehran, I Arlington, ran Tx Nashville, Tn VVhitehouse Sta., NJ Ballwin, Mo Memphis, Tn Columbia, Tn Charleston, WV Staten Island, NY Nashville, Tn Lexi ngton, Gregory Town, Ky Vt Durham, NC Birmingham, Al Garfeild Hts., Johnson City, Tulsa, Hattiesburg, Huntington, Scarsdale, Clinton, Oh Tn Ok Ms NY NY Tn Barrington, Il New Orleans, La Smyrna, Tn Altos, Ok Atlanta, Ga Jacksonville, Fl New Orleans, La VVilliamsburg, Ky Birmingham, Al Lonvingston, Va Ft. Lauderdale, Fl Decatur, Ga Bardston, Ky Decatur, Al 9: . R, ji l if are 'fi E P 1 V, :N 6 'i'fe,, T ,A r, ff Q 5 i AK l 'i 1 2. .. 5-... I 3- 1 . q, . 1' S J ,v.. 6. Q1'l-- J, as 1 I .. WALTER FLOYD 71' .1 J 4' lf' 5 il fs ii J -,Q J ' ,L ,HV ' U f - . an .UA E A 5 J, . mg V . 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N r H121 if X X 4 xshzxng txfkxx U M: 'Y V4-1 P Xu-M-vs -xx -I , fx K r Y X WN., 5 vg nhxx ,x X X W' w'fMx W Mew' ' - -"X YQUV s "' N XXQJQAY X 5 X X W '4u'x,M,qXy K N Q 1 0 'N A: . ,A A. x Qfxfv X N nm ' N 'X "'+ W X KSN, WN 'K 1 1.-1 1 v 5.1 f ,, Jfw M "7'p'7LG -,- war, FUNNX wr Uof fur NXUNN-HlE'- mu" W EL.:-I Rem-5 Y D,'T'1'em-IOM 'WSH Xmvxx 'fi 7 Z f wx Q .xv LG EWR? X X.. STOP 1' J as 41 ,N vs. f 1 'Y 4 l 11 I L I l 1 I L , .1 . - ,'.-. x - . M5 FW . , E - I 31,5 If-lx V :E,mea,5gxQr.r,:xxsqgQ5Q mxmmwqmgaalg 'LANXIXKK-'IN f 4' W wi U A fl " I X 'xii Hi W 5 'V Y f'Iff'fQ ,-1- -8 fi N - Q, ri' f 1 . f W., . ,, , MW, ,A v'--J hQ1l?i7m4 W 4 '01-f.z:fe if gf? - ,. L kj' N- 'Qi .Q ,Q 1 1 ,f A . . . W .if J- .Sl .-I' . , 'WE "Q" a Q f1"X71fij3.fY 'Q nw, , ' N 9 . .2 3 .15, e,.,:117,.,'..'-vigrx -:T.i,g2f. V' . A by Si .px . -ii qw is'w:PM'.f92i1'2 SX f Q1 if 5 M ' P..rw-ser.'k1.Qsv:fe-lwzz. --'mx , vw A " 515 45.2" - "P ' Q--1 ' f g:,5:'gP+ gINQ" ""'-iif,.i':."g1.:-g A-f-fx,,. A M K :HN :fy Qi,--r . Xvaxyw-112' fm. :J an J. f ' G -Q Qr'w ' i In 5: .-rs. NM, f.xf'3-' ZX' ' '..:13Q"-,JLG n'l.'Mf' -1- ' ,ki f-'N w " - Q4 - MJ'-.'."',' Z4 '42i'f'-w,g1,Y1 H - " .av -Q -54fA.4+ffmf1a'a. w H af ww , X gm" YVQW ' f? , ', .f 'fgffi-"" .1.N'4f, Aux Y T--XXL .-my 'f ' JTLQ J 11'4'1ii.S" '.'.1'f'5iEf??Yi?5iiiV:. in I, 5 9 X. J , . '--NLM. , ., ,r - 4 3. V ' ..,ijv. N N I.-Tx - -h ,.:.:,.-::w:q., .-,,ff,,f.,.-bn layup Q- H L, .qlwga :ALJ kkyj 15- X l M.. 1, Qfixf my .lzyllili-'t!fEi.v,Zfm ,. ' - - N- KY W 4,f.fQ5.L'2'?f4.P'f"7y, 'asf " . N ' 154x117 P in ' SX A X vi 31' IV -it-A J"' 'l.7l!'iR9,'??fil5J,x A ' , fi A-'1"3 ff 1e.l..':':-N Q , A27 iw: XX X , a,iH'pw-1"-, "Q.'iiiv?'e'- - NX ',.1.f,:5f... 1' rv A TQ, X. ,HJ ' mg x 9 fQ,i3'g,'.ff' ,Liv , , "P+'.1'-- 1 ' wA:g,f,'f'l,,x,j,N,g-"x.15Ig1g,. 9, 4 , ..vm' , " .-xfpf VH X L, ag x ,-- I K X--.qy'avQ5.,bg:.-at VN' 5 1 N K .,.-A . Z X 1, . - ,MN X Y X lf MWNV4' : NWS' ' , . 'X ' . .W 'f 1. ' M " KX' Mk X- X H X, .:,,,,,- N N W, ,X W , v W .N , X X X !'9-ff ' X W . ' .ws ,VA X ,' ,--igzafiiv ' X nggiffl H. , U " ' ' ' ' X , 1' 4, X Q. zrfiga, -:Q , -- xl 1 ' ' Q ' . '-.rw.sw.::' fi, xx f N-. - R ,, may k. If -L- ' A K , -, x , .Lam i- , . . . ' wma ., ' My '1 Wa X X K - --.Q , ..21.5,5M -.1-l - ... , - - . . - if- QV" .ff 'Es' - . G-'fa' " ' ' J - -- - "' " ?":If" k.4a45fZ" '-5f"- fr 5"" ' P ' 41 1 1 - - an ja, V f - A N 1- , -. , A u b , . N D . ., Y I R K lm. A D .,- X .5 'h V ,vx ' 1 Q . Q .N I -V . . x, I - ri-. IW .NM ,, ""1 -I XL. ,J X ' 1 -,. V 1' V' mx K H. jk . 2 5:-luis. A If, wa , , X ,' ' 4 ' vu-,I - l.,-ug, I f ,- -Xsvfb N N A xx Pm, f n,-H f ,JN E I - X 1 Six .' ,L-Al A 1 LJ.: ' ,., jk- M xx - N i j 'las S ' R ., .-.,- ,, A' xi, xg -X W W ..... . ml: IUNIGRS 1 LQ., ,.,- T.,.,.4-. 'k I 375 Frank McMurry Garrison, a Linda Sue Garver, n Carlton S. Cass, a jay David Gassinan, a jan Clayton Gates, n Georganne Claire Cayou, n janet Sue Getty, a David Paul Giessel, e Edward C. Giles, jr., a Charles McClelland Gill, a Nancy Elaine Gill, n john joseph Giordanb, a Laurie-jo Glime, a Paula Diane Godsey, a Michael Neil Goldberg, a Robert Davidson Goldsmith, a Michael Eugene Goldston, a jamie Lynn Gooch, n M. WVilliams Goodwyn, a William B. Gordon, III, e jeffrey Richard Gould, a Thomas Arthur Grabeman, a Oliver Russell Grace, jr., a john Hatcher Graham, e Phillip Rush Graham, e Langley Cranberry, a james Crawford Cray, e Ray Howard Gray III, e Nashville, Tn Akron, Oh Miami, Fl Woodbury, NY Wilmington, De St. Louis, Mo Little Rock, Ak Houston, Tx Charlotte, NC Nashville, Tn Nashville, Tn Morrisville, Pa Bloomfield Hills, Mi Nashville, Tn Houston, Tx Albany, Ga Dunwoody, Ga Indianapolis, In Selma, Al Columbia, Tn Murfreesboro, Tn Kettering, Oh Oyster Bay, NY Franklin, Tn Evansville, In Nashville, Tn Cleveland, Oh Chattanooga, Tn . -,yr .'f'fA'fF'1 " ' , , 1.--s - . 'I-I i ,ff f l if Ili F W W 2 j . '-4 ' l '. I, f f' - X1 ' x. .-4. ' ca , , J-' ' Pa 'l 'J' 1 I X - F4 '-H '. . . ! ' 43, 'ua- wf-'ei-Q -X . xg, l 'LF , si I l,,..... x. - .1 ,hi H . i ,..... xg it ' 1 ,,,, , . , . we fill I1 I 'W I T l 1.-.it fa n' .f E, .'- .5 , , ...uf - " 2 4 . s.v l 4, G7 r WL, lp' ir l ni, ,' ' 1 J S , Ji 'f .1- K e , .Ay . .-. 4 "si- 1 ' -. Q ' fa. f pf X ,A A av . .-..., yr -I- ll ll ll gk, x' 1' f L31 ' if if i 'Y' - -g 1'-:O 1- I Q . as I K . ' at Mx l g .1+1,'ll I ,if X, 1 .WFT . ii y K , il ff es. 5 iv V xv X E 'L , . -L I 4 v f v r ,-1, . ., or 4 'et -., . , Q Q 351' +3 x 4 -A A ,F X,-7' ' , 5, Q VNQX X , Q 'Tm not plugged into social scenes, which has been disappointingf' Anon Bernard Riney Green, a j. Wesley Green, a Susan Randall Greenlee, a Karen Rose Grimaldi, n George Rian Grisemer, e john Mitchell Grissim, a Peter Vanatta Groetzinger, e james Moore Guill, a William W. Gwinn, jr., a Christine M. Haeussner, n Barbara Lukens Hall, a Forrest Cleave Ham, a jeffrey Richard Hamilton, e Douglas Eugene Hanlin, a Nettie Clare Harding, a Katherine P. Hardy, a Waller Cecil Hardy, a Carol jean Harley, n Lucy Dale Harrel, a Nancy Ann Harris, n William Camp Harris, a Steven Ramsey Harrison, e Teri L. Hasenour, a Stephen F. Hauenstein, e Charles Everett Hawkins, a William B. Heberton, a Mark Weslie Hektner, a Bruce Balfoiu' Henderson, a Donald Edward Henerson, a Thomas Barnes Henson, a Mark Phillip Herman, a john R. Herrmann, a Melissa Ann Gerrmann, a Mike Scott Hertzog, a john H. Hewetson, e 376 Nashville, Tn Nashville, Tn Columbia, SC Tampa, Fl Cincinnati, Oh Nashville, Tn Birmingham, Al Union City, Tn Memphis, Tu jacksonville, Fl Birmingham, Al Lexington, Ky Bratenahl, Oh Kettering, Oh Newport News, Va jackson, Ms Vienna, WV Western Springs, II Pensacola, F I Homewood, Al Macon, Ga Coral Gables, Fl Louisville, Ky Kettering, Oh Stamford, Cn Atlanta, Ca Coral Gables, FI Wellesley, Ma Memphis, Tn Ethridge, Tn jefferson City, Mo Cleveland, Oh Pittsburgh, Pa Huntsville, Al Pahala, Hw 1 f A 0 'W r 1 .i .,.. . .4 V .. E , 1 'T' J 1 'N CT -i .f 5 4 A l , ,f , K f W" 'A " 'T elif l I QF C i v , . .fx-' 5 1 .K , . Ll ' , y r, - L I9 .,,.,- . .i..-- 1.1 ' .Y ,X V ga . .sv . . 3 I 4 ii X 5 V 5, ,iq I x 'Q' L l X' A ' -l'r fzfimgff T 1l"?zTQ W XY il g fail 1 H-Friar? emi, 'Z f-1, '-" ff -' "- i 15 " j a- li' , ,,- i. 5 A ,-M I .V x.- 3,5 . I 59' , .is ml -1- ,E x--I 1' ,. x. J. r , . , fm. P , 'A at .xr .1 aa i 1 -.,. j V l ' j, N . ? E A 1 c.. J F7 ' 7 i f v ' ' i ,ns I dagger U10 07 L E 'I . sp- ,---1 ' x ,W iii? Magi I 'ff' 7.59:-ga, ' Wk . H 'I A 'I ' E" I I w ' 'Z 1 A V57 gf VR I: K XT: rl ,fl it , ,X X F 'P 1- Y-.1 -. ., ' as A - , Qh X rl i ' ' . Ill X il 1 5 119553 lt- Il A r., . .'Af v 12 - I . 1 me ' T A ' ' 'J' " A .I rf ,,, nq 3 'Ji xii' , 'A -r, L - ...Aww 4 I - .. A 1 "4 H' i,'fl . - ' '-21 A IV V IXAV J I 9 A V :K ,st X bk . -,E L, f ,,,.'fE,,f's if I X ffrgxcjli X ig-mir' vw E l yr ., f . . N . . . ' 'CT 'fx 4- . 'HQ ' 18- 3 I. J . A: . l A . i A 'P ' Q..-.airs . ' ze i I . dy .,,, :Q 'er -na I ea A Na... r - a 'gl Ma h e Steve Houston 5- Q' TWV 'iff H' aa, Its been great for rn Vanderbllt beats the ,-A -s-. ii sf f 16 it e f, 55,1 .ggl .JV t--5 A ..,-I Michael Alan Hiemstra, a Barbara Lynn Hill, a Caroline Hazel Hill, a Hortensia Christina Hill, a Patrick Samuel Hillegass, a Michael E. Hilts, a Douglas R. Hitchcock, e Mark Andrew Hix, a Laura C. Hobson, a Richard H. Hoetle, e Barbara lean Hogenson, a W. David Holland, a Frances Hunt Holliman, n David Edward Hollinberger, e Iames Milburn Hopper, a Paul Nicholson Horne, a Ann Noreen Hotter, n Gregory Howard Hoveland, a George Mona an Hover e Main Cae Howard a Donna Marie Howe n DelphmeV Huffman n Kather1neM Huffmaster n TeresaG Huggins a David Whitaker Hughes a Elizabeth L Hughes n David William Hull a ane Lynn Humphreys n hell out of U T Ira A Hunt e Linda Fontaine Hunt a Warren Harold Hunt r e Thomas Andrew Hunter a Molly Huntingdon a Edwin Gray Hurley a oseph B Hmst Jody Hutton e Vernon Hutton III e William R Hysell a Sandra Kay Iden a CharlesW Ingraham e Nancy Elaine Imnan e Bonme Ann acltson n Maureen T jakocko n Linda Susan Ianecek n james umtus ardme a Walter Allen Iarett a EmlynC Ieffrey e HaroldB johnson II a ames Edward ohnson a Morris Vester Johnston Robert Knapp jones a Robert R Iones Ir a Sarah Ann Kankga a Barbara Sue Kane a Iohn D Kaufman a Martha Evelyn Keay a john Rice Kelsoe a Michael Garth Kemp e Elizabeth Eric Kennedy a Liz A Kennedy n Betsy Camille Kanyon a Elizabeth Kerner a Thomas Shelley Kimbrough a Ia Atlanta, Ga Atlanta, Ca Scottsdale, Ar Scottsdale, Ar cksonville Beach, Fl Hinsdale, Il Cleveland, Oh Nashville, Tn Memphis, Tn Peotone, Il Denver, Co Dallas, Tx Atlanta, Ga Belleville, Tn Baton Rouge, La Martin, Tn Elm Grove, Wi Madison, Wi Houston Tx McLean Nashville Birmingham Atlanta Nashville Indianapolis Memphis Shreveport Chevy Chase Md McLean Charlottesville N Canton O Hendersonville Collunbus O El Dorado Little Rock Ak St joseph s Is Can Nashville Allendale Nashville Atlanta Columbia Palmyra La Grange Il Morris Plains N Mobile A Tifton Rtunson Watertown Enterprise Al Nashville Tn Memphis Tn Tampa Fl Greenwich Cn St Louis M0 Pittsburgh P Dallas Tx Birmingham Murfreesboro Lookout Mtn T Clearwater Fl Gainesville G Dallas T Birmingham 377 ,. . '---f - - -' f x 1. ., . I 3 Q 1 ,, gh , , I p ' - v NN A I , ir' f' ' , ,Va I . I. f 1 i i -'L' Al: ' V W 'i f ---r-' ' fs ., - i s A- Y u . ' . , ' ' - ,Al V . - , K L , . 1 . ' . , .,Ga 7 3 2 ' -1 W 1: . A A . ' , ' ,Tn X ,f -4.1! f -4 Af . lr , , ' . . , '.' Tn . -'H Eli, ., , f-ff, LJ' H f ,J A . 'V ' ' ' " i -La 4 .' Z'-'H " ' 1 -- :IIE Q- ' 'Q A r .u 'E ' ' W 1 A - . 1 ' ' . , ,Va 3" 3' ' 1, - 'll ' . I Q- A l ' ' 1 'Va -. '.--v .-.L 4-.,, , " ,, , J ', n sf ' I gala' C I l Yue 1 - ' ' Q F J , .Jia - -'Ak Q ' I I A an I ' ' ' is 'V I-V I ' R 'lr 0 , l ' 1 :TH 'X ij? . X L 7 4 ' I as . , , Ga I' tv A., ' V f . l as ,1. 1 I ' ' ' , , - -. SC y 1 , V, 1 .V y , , t a 1 2-- f f ' I 1--. . ,NI ' ., f , - . ' ,gi p J 'fz??i- .i:i"5, . u ' N -vw L . f . 0 ' ' , rfrvi , g ap -.ii -Q H' ... E- b. p , ,Q , ,J .V -f 0' " Y: V af I?-H " , 4:-, ., -'Jil' :D I ll , , . 92: I ' ' Y Ga ,X I " mr N I tiki J t :V " - i ,NI L f FF . L. ' 1 L, .. if ' xl , s'Ws rg . ' - , v WY lv " A A ' - A .-'LLL , J' ' I A i I' L4 rr if ,X H ,rlvl I l 'e gill f -' A 1 I . H 'W ' ' I ' ' V. Q ' K I' in .In luv .Maris L.. :X IJ! I , N y, .. , N .r , . I , J, I i, , , ,, I . fb , RI A as 411 A npr, V' yy-. ,T It 1 , l .11 is an a it i s a U Q y -3 f- A . p . A " rf? .ei k i,-, it , s l ' .I 5 , .- ' I '- , ' ' , Al as we leg Q, fr I 3" p Y YTD . ,-,Qi jg K - , , , f 1 ., n NHC, L., - ' ' ' . ' . . ' a z . :arg . -- I A A A . ' 1 X fl .4 fu-' I '-4 "-'Y ' , ' ' ,Al 'ITT 'Q' rv' M55 . V if ' pf 11- JUNIORS Margie Lyon, a t A A g 6 14' ' ll ,YWL F- -4. Q fy- ll- I A I Q, . Ll' x?-fe., f e' ' . ' Vg X' Q 6 Q C Q it -at ' f Wg ' .' , . 5 1 ,a . '43 ' , lv- it V ' ,T-' 'Qi ,, J V , ,, - 'yn ' 'H' 32 3 , 4 :tl l ,l ,a i , W 'X Q, '. x A , QA . ef .' rf. , 'al 1 -M, L ., J J .W 1 , l nl S f' X ' , , , . Tom Watts King, a lon Kinnard, a Paul Lee Kirby, e Robert Kahn Kisber. a Kristi Sue Kjeldsen, a Richard B. Klein, e jeff Perry Knight, a Nathaniel S. Koenig, a Richard VV. Korsmeyer, a Susan Kaye Kraft, a Charles T. Kreisher, a Cynthia Kulman, a Barbara C. Kunikoff, n Davis W. Kuykendall, e Glenn Minga LaCrone, a William Reed Lamb, a Frank H. Lamons, a Louis Lanos, a Douglas M. Lanpher, a Robert Charles Larsen, e Mary K. Laughlin. e Elizabeth A. Laviers, n Laurie Lawrence, n Thomas C, Lawson, a Charles Harwich Lee, a Robert Erich Lee. e VVilliam E. Lee, a Sandra M. Leonard, a Columbus, Ca Franklin, Tn Carthage. Tn Memphis, Tn Atlanta, Ca Barrington, Il Plantation, Fl Nashville, Tn Oak Ridge, Tn Tulsa, Ok Dalton, Ca Atlanta, Ga Milwaukee, WVi Little Rock, Ak Atlanta, Ca Ridgewood, NI Creeneville, Tn Crawfordsville, Ak Chagrin Falls, Oh Leesburg. Fl Nashville, Tn Irvine, Ky Alexandria. Va Oklahoma City, Ok Tyler, Tx Nashville, Tn Lexington, Ky Decatur, Ca "I don't do all that much studying, when I'm not studying, lim having fun." Douglas Lan pher K?-A Qi, -N fi P04 ', Lia? Zi , fu-ly' .U 1-fer 4-:a:1J.lil QA ,X-I In JA ' 1 ' . ' ' , - tv --na -A-Terri T - e we , Y iilgikrilki! lim x ,191 2 -,,-, 3, 'T' "" i J it ' , Q x ,' :Nil -Q., . ' 4 L,r , ill'-T, v 9 ---jr, 5 I - - "- . 4' K lf- A Q L X Q N4 "' 3 1' or 3- E uf,-, QQ! 'T ,. lx M I f' X 1' ,X A X s, I 1 f A Og, , Q is A V 1, JJ A , 1 ' ,I ,. - ur!-gp-.vi---ix I J Kevin Lee Lerner, a Tim R. Lester, e Catherine Marie Lett, a Geoffrey R. Lewellen, a Dale Alan Lewis, a Linda Louise Lewis, a Helen Wen-Feng Li, a Donna Sue Lilly, n Mark Hunter Lincoln, a Maurice Reeves Little, a William Norris Little, a Laurie D. Littlejohn, a David M. Lockman, e Susan E. Long, a Cynthia Love, e ames Michael Low, e ames Edwin Lubbers, a William R. Lucas, a XVilliam oshua Lukins, a Bridgett L. Luther, a Douglas A. MacKenzie, a Catherine'Madigan, n Ioan C. Mahery, a Lucy Anna Mancini, a Barbara j. Mangum, a Richard S. Manley, a Eleanor Lucile Mann, a Dianne M. Mannarelli, e Amy C. Markarian, a jeffrey B. Markel, a Anne Elizabeth Marsden. a Elizabeth R. Marshall, n Timonium, Md Atlantic Beach, Fl jackson, Tn Atlanta, Ca Oklahoma City, Ok Panama City, Fl Hattiesburg, Ms Oklahoma City, Ok Little Rock Ak Charleston. SC Dalton, Ca Dallas, Tx Hixson, Tn Chattanooga, Tn Atlanta, Ca Dallas, Tx Leeland. Mi Huntsville, Al Louisville, Ky Newport Beach, Ca Margaret F. Lynch, a Nashville, Tn Orlando, Fl ennifer L. Manson-Hing, a Anchorage, Ky Ft. Lauderdale, Fl Athens, Tn Mexico City, Mex Huntsville, Al Demopolis, Al Forrest City, Ak Memphis, Tn Birmingham, Al Englewood, NI Huntingdon, NY Jackson, Tn Haverford, Pa 379 1 .- Katheryn Dix Marshall, n jeflersonville. In ? "' Y 1 . ,L ' V Dehra Sue Martin, n Indianapolis, In P 4 I l . - .l ' 5 ' Earle P. Martin, a Ilouston, Tx Q V r' 39,4 .5, 1 'F " Y '-7 If-. 'R if "' lainie Sue Martin, a Smyrna, Tn A yf " A t 4 .Q - ,-L? ' ,337 Robert C. Martin, a Columbus, Ga ,Io , ' il, Y XZF' , , john Alle Matush, a Greenwich. Cn 'l l ' X-.aim . f I "' ' "" .. A I' 4 Aliee jane Maxwell. n Chattanooga, Tn X U.. . v , Q .. Y it -N if I 1' - ',I, ,A .f '. ' I A V-fyhktj A v i ill Tr. I M I -. I Y iv? Ronald Lewis Mayers, a Manliasset, NY I N- 1 -. 1. V ' ' . 3 s I N Mark Davis Mayo. a Memphis. Tn V ' "I" K if ' '-'X - '- . Spears L. Mc.-Xllester. e Lookout. Mt.. Tn :H A Q' ' ' l ' E 67 , - . . ' C john D. Mc.-Xlrster. a Nashville. Tn x .32 I E' f - lj 1 jg . A ' Catherine McCann, a San jose, Ca Nh 4 1 H ' i William MeCleery, a Quincy. Il 1,7 ' . '- N.. ' gk lu. ChristophcrC. McClure. e Nashville. Tn ' 4' HZ . gf - ,K egg' s H5 -'I ' , .. A ' 14 1 x q - , Sue Ellen MeCown. a Memphis, Tn Q I N ' 17 gy! Gregory B. McCoy. a Clarendon Hills. Il l 42 1 I I , - ' Q, L. A , ' Bruce MeCrea. a Richmond, In TB . ' ,tv-2 ' , 5 7 I ' 4 Pamela Ann MeCreary. a St. Petersluirg, Fl fi ' 'Q A l ,h Lili , Ann Logan McDaniel, a Ft. Lauderdale, Fl wxmr . A- , ' ' ,A , 'g '1. If Mark McDonald. a Atlanta, Ga . , '1 ' 'lf . E - H' gp ..- Williain Thomas MeFatter. a Ft. Lauderdale, Fl .' 'tg ,K V " "1'A K ,wx I R' 'A' A A -if u A George Petess MeGinn. a Nashville. Tn 1 in . - '- . h I l V Miehail Stanley McGraw. a Cincinnati. Oh pg, - Q, F M f- A james Avillliltll Melnturff. a Nashville. Tn h , A 5 " lil., Wd I, Meredith Lynn Mckay, a Davenport, Iw 17. - ' fj 'I"'. , -:Q , Y, fl, V L Mel Benson McKinnon. e Franklin, Tn A "' "1' aj I I ' ma Leslie jo MeQuarrie. a Angelfire, NM 6 ' ' ,. . " , Q- IA - HW V 1, john Sinnnons MeSwain, a San Antonio, Tx 'X , E ' " I UTY. . ... alt' t tak h'l t t d t ' V d b'l ius esaw 16 oge use 0. an CI'1tg1'OWS 77 Cn Ou. Gerald Newhurg . mf r . F rr" ffm' Richard W. Meacham, a Nashville. Tn . ' I Kenneth Gary Menendex, a Barrington, Il , ,, ,. A Fernando Enrique Meuoyo, e Barranquilla, Colin. I ' Q, '2 1 7' 9 james Edwin Mercer, a Akron, Oh f ' ' .wg David L. Metzig, e Neenah, NVi ' - F ' ' ' "4 Q Roger john Meyer, a Quincy. Il I ' I 1 W X ,X , I Franklin Bradford Meyers, a Alton, Il f ' .ff A 41 , V V! I I-. J A.. IQ? I -.iz - , Z" W ' ' , ' lf' I I I S.P. Midkiff, e Nashville, Tn V ' ' l , i 'N .' Roger Keith Mitchell. e Cuyahoga Falls. Oh ' Pamela A. Mornenthy, n Oak Park, Il , V ,- R wk X fa " , 9' , Nancy Lee Montgomery, a Carlmondale, Pa 2,6-if 1 -'Q ' pf , Y. Charles Kirkman Moore, e Metairie. La 'T' "il ' A , 'E Kenneth Gerald Moore. a Altomonte. Fl if J f lf ' ibn 3 ' ,,1' Kenneth Seogeins Moore. a AVCSIPUIT. Cn N 'f 9. Q ' I 'A M I-ilfigb if jx V it '-it 1 " Y -- sf.. js,-Sfil ' ga. V71 ' 5 T ' ' F H ' ' I H... L.P. Moore, a Owensboro. Ky .N 'Q' ,, .f if , ' Yi Mary E. Moore. il Richmond, Va A - ', . Steven Morris Moore, a Little Rock. Ak 'V 75 j, ' 77' Clive Newlands Morgan, a jacksonville, Fl A-' 14" 1 fi, I A Mack jay Morgan III, a Lexington, Ky Q. 'F' ' A ' K A' Sarah Ianet Morgan, a NX-'est Point. Ga Q 1 David Marvin Morrow, a Evansville, In 1 Wei 1 : -- A Wil iii if A sf A Gwen I. Mottck. a David Lee Mueller. e Charlotte Kittrell Munn Donna jean Murphy, n james Houston Murphy. C Robert Sands Murray, jr., a julie jean Mushro, n Mary Lynn Mustoe. a Richard Andrew Nall, a Kathryn Bryson Nash, a NValter Nellns. a Erie Marious Nelson, a Gerald F.. Newhurg, a jefferson Lamar Newhe Atlanta, Ga Elin Grove, XVI , a Fort Worth, Tx Atlanta, Ga Nashville. Tn Mohile, Al Grosse Pointe Fins., Mi VViunctla. Il Savannah, Ga Charlotte. NC VV. Memphis. Ak Louisville, Ky Lorton. Va rn, a Valdosta. Ga -.,,, f fx 1. l ., L X l I . . 117 .2 l Qt I -er 1'IV"l ' 1' V Y 1 W M '-.x X- r . I . . M F' ., I5 fi . Z. ., Las- lf. iff . 'IN ff . T 11 'fi-, , 'f' 1 1'-ix Tl 5 l 1 , 41:1 , . - , , '1 A T- W- ' g iane . ewnian, a .-Xt anta, ya ' X W A D' Y l C -., ' A f 3, ,: nn ' is V Dale Christopher Newton, a Clarksville. Tn .- -, V ' h , ' I! - Q , Marianne C. Nicastro, a ll1111tsville, Al ' 1- .141 ," 5' 3, 1 -4 Cordon Earle Nichols, a Nladisonvillc. Ky TK if H I inf, 4 ' - I Henry R. Nichols, e Palos Verdes, Ca , , " ?f- '- 1 ' ,, P Q4 - .. lillifilliFfiliiiif, - 1 A iii'-ilfllc-' ill . 3,1 .amy I Q A Q- if X f Y 5 . .. .1n. a . ux 1 mans, tl l ' l' i W I " '- . V jane E. Nickerson, a iXlo11tpelier, Vt ' 3 I ' I- F W I in 1 e C1121-i1i11atli,3h , ak V. J., VV ll ip . o11es, a .'1, an , ,1 ll ' f Karen L. NOl'lllClllllilCllCl'. e Jacksonville, Fl 1- , V1 ' Sally Nordlnnd, ll Decatur, Il A .1 VB David E. N0l'llllll'I. Ll Hinsdale, Il , 1 . A , l 1 Peter Andrew Norowski. a Nlennphis, T11 , . 'F 'N ,k flT:'Tff:" 1 . .5 11 11.7 T 2' 1' Dina Marie Norris, a Atlanta, Ca 1- ' s V - Gavin Peter Nowlan a Breiitwood T11 .rf-1 f 1' , 1 mr., 4-. ' , , ' qv, 1 6 'L , 7- "". V Betty Noyes, a XX yoining. Ol1 'ff-,A ' fy' I 'lx l ' 1 ,Ni ,.:.,. is ' I Ihcanazho H. Nwokogha. e Port liarconrt, Nig. 5 .i ' . 1 1 Y - gd H E.H. Nyhart. e Iiidianapolis. ln 1 .1 -it 'I ' 1, lb- f r' Harrell Odom ll. a Forrest City. Ak . if LL gy W1 ,' ' 'li V W ax y-A Ebi Daniel Okura. a Ft. Harcourt, Nig. 1 '1 -3 .1 21' 1, . 1 L' ' 1 1 rfrfi 1" T7 lr ' V 1 I - , 1 ll ' Elizabeth Lynn Oldfield. ll Nashville. T11 7 ' W, A - N . 1, 1. Panl Ellglltlllll Oli11, a joliet, Il , la' E ,' as , ' K , - Norman George Olsen, c Jhllkllllit, Ca V ' 1 ' ,ii , 'iff QQH, ' ix -Q- ' NVillia111 Dardern Orancl, il Nashville. T11 '- K ,V ' " I -X Y in 1 A 1 ' 'hx P I Susan Ann Oshnrg, a Kirkwood, Mo ' 2 N if ' ' lm' ff 'V 1 Steven Frank O'Sl1eal, a Cifllllllllllil. SC A' " f l - - ' 5' IoseahH'1r1'isOswaltII e Xlohile 'Xl ,, it ,, , Qsq swab 1 11 '- 1 - -- , 1: 1 j .5 Ajxbei 16 , N - 1 nr - ,1 in 4 Q C CI 0 o 1 o o I o 7 7 john Pike 1 N e 1 e P Itt 2. '- l L , , Randal XVilson Owen, a TCXt1l'ki1Il2l, Ak 'f at R 5 , - Q xvlllltllll Dale Pacetti, a St. Allgllbillllli, Fl ,Q 'A -' 1 ' i f " A 1 3 PJ2- f Benjamin Gerardo Padilla, a Toledo, Oh ,RFQ 'G' . 'I' -12 :SS -vi, James Owen Palmer. a Portland. T11 ' X "J -if I 7 h' .fir tx ' fl xv T 'T' Nancy Leslie Parhanl. a Talhotton. C11 - M A V 1 "' ,X A ,J ,B , , Theodore C. Parker, a Forrest City, Ak it li . I 3 ' I l' t, '., ll' V A Q Howard Iver Parks, e Highland Park, Il .1 , t W .fs - ,fr 'Ai 'Z 1 D A F will W ' , i K , Y " 1 james Tll0lll2L'i Patterson, a Nashville, Tn ,,. l 73 ' V ' 1 Ann Rosainond Patton, a Dalton. Ca '35 " fa 4 N T . . T' 5 ' xvllliillll Joseph Panl, e Geneva, Al q-gggr -' ' , ' 12.5 ' A 1 Ellen VVhite Payne, a Hopkinsville, Ky A 'I R I ' ' , .Q U Nenette Ly1111 Peacock, a ' Chicago. Il ' 1 1, "2 -. 1151 ,V : Nanette Pearce. a Shelbyville. Kv l -'xl AN." W , 'V V 'V ' Lewis Edward Pearson, Little Rock, 1 ' xi ff. ., 1 -' iN, .- If 1' ,V ' in l ' V ' '7 ' wif" ' '-' ,WH 7 lvlllllllll Pease. e NVyon1i11g, Ol1 ' ' 5 1 ' ' A2114 ' 1' 1 A 1 'pf , 1 V , " Q Fred Vi11so11 Peay, e Nashville, T11 P9 1 x ill ' 3' ':"" , - ' fl " f' Ieana Cradley Peeler, a hV1lVCl'lj', T11 . fa ' 'V J I A ,ji -1 1 P 1 if - lohn S. Perry, a Houston, Tx ' M A W ' , . ' 4 ii l J -'21 L 35 n A xvllllillll Merritt Perry, Ll Ridgewood, NI 9' 'i - A Q 'ill 4 J U 1 CllCl'yl All Peters, a Manclwster, T11 5, X, ' ' ' " ' ' Ciane Marie Peterson, a Nashville, T11 g ' 1 1' 1 il. Yklwliktt - ' 7 V fi ' ' -, 71 - 5-r-:X , V -. l, ' I Q ' A' -1 1 ,cg 1 Kay Ellen Peterson, 11 ASlltill3lll2l. Oh U , 'xr . . 'ff ' Alan Charles Pie1'ce, a Key West. Fl T ,M f""4 3! 1 f Connie MacLean Pierce, ll Clarendon Hills, Il ' l ' "'i ng A ' Ned Barry Pillersdorf, a Nannet. NY W I ' L I ' "" 1- , ' V ' Leslie Ann Pillsbury, a Nortl1l1rook, ll ' H A 1 , , " J VV john Miller Pogue III, a Riselle, Il nk " Nl 1 ,.1 , j ' ff ' ', ' ' ' Norma Piachele Poindexter, a Meinphis, T11 N .. l1'-11 .lf E lt Q L, , ' 1 l I' - A -3 -Vim' " ' ll! 1 M 14? 111 ,g,?,,,b,.-.A-1, ,V - , ' iijjvl l 3 ' 5 H. "' 3 V .--, . i , lr I ' - l David L. Pontis, a . Willianistown, Ma 1 ' ' 1 l A Andv Rohelt Porter, a Kansas Citv, Mo ' Q' gg Nl, 1 'F ' -- A ' 9 ' ' Holly Ann Potts. ll Creencastel, Pa mi' , Y' Y ' ' V V 11 ' is f ' jane .'kll1illldll Powell, a Dallas, Tx N T' y ,, A I 1 ' 1 , f! , Amy Margaret Praskac, a Rlnnson, NJ ' , 1 ililill 3 1 - , X ' 1 Q A- - Phyllis Novella Prather, ll Selmer, Tn ,' ,f , ' . - ' '4 I ' K . Mary A. Price, ll New Orleans, La 1 ' ' 1 ' .. 1 ' ' . i . . .M 'J ' -' . - Rosie Price. a Nashville, Tn ' -' ' ' 'F Q William Wheaton Price Lakc Placid, Fl U ,Q , , U . Gary Thomas Privavera, a Germantown, Md f U U ' 'A - -7 -- 'f ' Thomas L. Pritchett, a Sheffield, .-Xl - 4 , V -,QT-f J Valerie Kay Procter, a Trentwood, Tn YQ.. Us " . . , Heidi lane Pudliner, a Okcnios, Mi 1 A jim Sacca Pugh, a New York, NY 'C l " 5' l U , ip' ,ef s' ' 'f , F ' i i4:.-.'-1- -- 1" .f A A -1? Douglas Michael Quatner, a Baltimore, Md 'T' l V V, if ll Elizabeth P. Raebeck, n Bronxville, NY . 'i ' :M 1 - l Il. Bearney Ragan, a Rockville. Md U, U i ' . ' 'Q S i jean Marian Rainey. a St. Louis, Mo i Q4 '."' 'V U Ug - U U7 Thomas Doe Ramee, a Savannah Ga X 'Nl 'V t R7 'N 3' "' ' x . Gamiel Avram Ramson, a New York, NY 'U U . IU, 'H 'N 'i ' ' I. . - Y Katherine Ann Rantt, a Ardmore, Pa '- . ,J " 45, I-.. fA"".' -" 4 --.-1- judy Lynn Rary. a Atlanta, Ca 'U , l Margaret Alice Rattercc, a Irving, Tx l , joshua Griffith Rattray, e Owensboro, Ky ' , ,. VU A Sarah Keen Raup, a Springfield, Oh ' ,ii '. 'UU .-A q -Q Robert Creswell Rea, lr., a Syacauga, Al f , ii ,- U, . -. Roger Russell Ream, a Brooklield, lVi ' ' " L 'ff " UU U Sijmund Mark Redelsheimcr. e St. Louis, Mo be iiv, my 'I ff 1 ,ffl U,. ll ' Shelley j. Regan, a Tyler, Tx Ugj " ' V' ' V ' 1' Susan L. Regan, a Tyler, Tx A7 3 ' ' , '. Q. l at 1 ' U U Phillip Allan Regan, e Nashville, Tn '9 , - G' 5 QU" '-'. l ' l l , 7. , Anthony M. Revenis, a Mt Carmel, Pa f ' ' ' .Bs 1 I l fp "E Steven Michael Rhodes, e Naperville, Il 1 fx, ,U N ' Z 'l U KU Philip XValton Rich, c Miami, Fl ., U .yiv 15 I - 7 i' ' "v. 5' Clinton Q. Richmond, a Pleasantville, NY ., ,. .-. UU U, X. r U 6'It,s the things outside the classroom that give it its Worth." P.Y. Richmond Richmond, Ky I' l Lorie Ann Ricker, a Cincinnati, Oh ' ' Ann Ellen Riebel, n Haddonfield, NI ' Q U f 5 13 U .f Gail NVoodward Riley, a Meridian, Ms ' f . ff U , ., E. . Mark Barry Riley, a Oklahoma City, Ok , U U Lori Ann Rioux, n Punta Gorda, F I ' U f " ' ' . . ' 4 1 - ' r 4 J 1 Nancy E. Ritterhouse, n Ft. Washington, Pa UL A fx QU E UE.. U X lb Regina Ulourdan Roane, a Memphis, Tn ,ff:U'.- 1' iUU-il li V ' - ' - ' john Charles Roaity, e Pittsburgh, Pa P UU , . , l i QL . john Louis Roberts, a Lexington, Ky if Q U - .U ' l J! " it Stephen Crawford Roberts, a Nashville, Tn .. U UA' . I-'jj 'r :L ,i William Duke Roberts, a Mt. Iuliet, Tn 'U . 'Z 7' AU " i , U ,, U P ' if 1 Robert N. Robirtsou, e Iztcksonvillie, Fl ,ii J ' 1 V ' 1 U ' U 1 UU U jessica Dee Ro ins, a Oak an , Ca -, N A ill - ' in 1 A ll '- , 1 an 'r rfrtfffiigr.-. - fe' 1 '-I lf" ' mal' , T' fi -"" " "'l" ' W Margaret Anne Rockwood, a Columbus, Oh i cl if l Lf 4' S' . 1 ' '25 l "K, l , 1 ' Henry Dewitt Rodeffer, a Fernandina, Fl , U ,, l ll 4-- 'Qi - ,,i ' , l , Patricia Ann Rogacz, e Andrews, NC I , l U l F . ' l l l Kylie Marie Rogas, a Lafayette, La ' ' V ' : H, .. - Melanie Anne Rolander, a Atlanta, Ga ' 1 U. , U ' fx l 'iiytmlzf l ' ,. ,A f 4 Alberto E. Ron, a Miami, Fl ' li :U f U UU U U im R Laura Gibbs Roosevelt, a Birmingham, Al Ui-U'Uf"ig4U V U lf A Uf U ' LU ' C K Kenneth M. Rosenzweig, a Hot Springs, Ak I 1 I joseph R. Ross, a Savannah, Ga l , , ' ' Ashley Kennedy Rowe, a Richmond, Va , , ,- U ,, 4. joseph Willcox Rudolph, e Radnor. Pa ' f Robert Frank Rumble, a Decatur, Ga 15 i '13 Anne Everett Russell, a Ashland, Ky 1 U3 . Q, t ' , 1 Lane Rutledge, a Birmingham, Al 15 Q U Q R A X it L '. ii I A X FTM ' f 1 S i ' ll Sharon Elaine Sanders, n East Point, Ga I ii 1, 7-U U Charles S. Sands, a Gambrills, Md l -'U, U l - 1 U U I Mark Stewart Sassman, e Nashville, Tn ' A ' I . U I Van Chapman Sayler, a St. Petersburg, Fl . ,. 1 M. ', U65 V . ' . 1 -. f, Elizabeth L. Schaaf, n Richmond, Va U Vg" A ' S ' U , ' Ben Michael Schaffer, e Hartdale, NY U , N fl ' H X ZZ' . ' , 4 Debra S. Schaffstall, n' Chamblee, Ga c, U. U - i 1 f ,' ' ' 'Q ,' - fi l' ' ,. ' i i A t le Rwiif 7 I Y- ii 'im- IUNIORS Carol Anne Scherr, a Robert Cleveland Schiff, a jeffrey Lewis Schmitter, a Steve Palmer Schoettle, a M. Kathryn Schrock, n Deborah A. Schulte, a Mary Marth Schtunacher, n Charleston, WV Cincinnati, Oh Hamilton, Oh W. Memphis, Ak Iowa City, Ia Corona, Ca Canton, Oh d F -A ,I U ii iv we 1' A ' , f: 1 .3 , , ' fl . I I. 1- QQ- '-1, t I Y 'H yi I. .553 in .QV 4 . V 5.:V 'V v ,V V VV V. V V 1. V f V1, V . rg ' '- V, L r . ."- " fl' r Karen Nancy Scott, n Cincinnati, Oh ' 'Z L jill Ann Seltzer, a Huntsville, Al ' Steven Howard Selznick, a Lantana, Fl '7' , . 7' QV V 'F V V' Zh 3 joseph Hays Settles, a Louisville, Ky -9 jj. ,V L-53, V . ' l 4 K -5, jody Severinghous, a Rosewell, Ca K 2' ' ' ' " X " V A V- Kari Ellen Severson, a St. Louis, Mo V, ' 5" . 24 if ,V V -1' V Anne Mebane Sewell, a Houston, Tx 5 ' A 'Y . --' ' ' V l . A 1' J ., X ., . fp, - ' lm' Y MT R. Claire Shackelford, a Atlanta, Ga ' "' , f' Q. " jeff Raymond Shaheen, a Northbrook, Il A Vx ' - VSV V ' Q . V V john Sherman Shaw III, a Birmingham, Al "' M S' ' ' 7, Sara jane Shaw, a Birmingham, Al 1,3 QV, j' V , if-,W '-'S f 'V' , Sheila Diane Shay, e Pulaski, Tn 4 - ' ' . 52 V, T , ' L Scott Darrell Shepard, a Riverside, Ct VV V V., Q' fix. 1' .1 'V ' fi 4 V V, A 7 . V Lo fan Shillin flaw, a Lake Bluff, Il li ' Y I" T5 T "7 . ' ' A ' A , ' 'FEV V A B --K L u-1 V J. -' If L T' "' " A 1 M ' ' - ' -'- ' , .- - if'f?"' 'TV Melanie Ann Shoffner, a Wartrace, Tn 1 1 V f' l -'H' -, 'A ,VV it '- - Randy Short, a Nashville, Tn VV 1 y ' j' - . Mark David Siegel, a Sarasota, Fl W' " ,, ,",3-7,?-V V, 'Vu - ,V .- V . . , V. Alvaro jesus Siman, a Barranquilla, Col. -S if' W f- V -f , ' . '-1.-3, , - , VV5' Mary Nell Simpkins, a Alexandri, Va -N "' 4 X Kyle QQ-' ' I V 'T' " f Carl Albert Sims, jr., e Madison, Fl ff 1 t V. ' ,'V' ' 1, . " ' V ,.', .1-rw V VV ' ' ai Leigh A. Sisk, a Memphis, Tn ' Q UV V xv ' 'K lx " S' ,N ' gl Qi! S 1- Ji. 'fl 1 . :YL c'The students are the most im ortant art to me U P P ' jeff Schmitter jerry H. Slifka, a Woodmere, NY . A-fi ' ' 'l -'T l George Prescott Slover, a Dallas, Tx V I V 1 ' T . 3 Elizabeth Leigh Small, n Hinsdale, Il Cr' Q- -3 ... . V , J- ' 'V F' V C. Annette Smith, n Birdeve, Ak ., ' ..-Q i V , Q43 Kathryn Shanon Smith, a Nashville, Tn X ' L ' . 'T' VV 1' 1 VV ,V 2 ' V7 Kimberly G. Smith, a St. Petersburg, Fl B211 KV N V' f V - ,V " , V - ,V , ' , VV' Kristopher W. Smith, a St. Petersburg, Fl " ' V , . V VV - ' Vg ' if. ,. ll X . ' i' w'-4"-NW' --539' i 'ri . -- V ' " Y Y Y' "P ' ' H l "7 ' 'l Neida Kaye Smith, n Frankfort, In A E Paul Heermans Smith, jr., a San Antonio, Tx V V A A' Sally Lee Smith, n Whitesburg, Ky I "" D 1 " f ,Q Sarah Lynn Smith, n Akron, Oh ' ' SQ ' sift' 4 . -TF ' A sl Stanford B. Smith II, a Kenilworth, Il V 1 V' , - V William May Smith, a Monroe, La ' ' V IM? ' V VV VA K V - ' james Horto Smolenski, a Shreveport, La JV ' Q l 'B ,X V W A ' ir!-V E-T' V A . ' - A David jackson Sneed, e Columbia, Tn V A V . V 3-'S ' V X ' V ' Cathenne julia Snider, a Charleston, WV ., V V' - . - i , V Va VV V V Teresa Elaine Snorton, a Richmond, Va W -- 1 , V Vx-V V V. . VV . ,. jr Virginia Lyona Speed, a Louisville, Ky X -'Q ,V . ' V V 1 .' V ' " 1 Sandra Kay Spellings, n Nashville, Tn VV V M up '75, V V . ' - ' Sallie Barton Spence, a Charlottesville, Va S ' ' VV I . 'B a V .H if 5 john Eugene Spitler, e Cincinnati, Oh idx , 4 ,.,V .' . ' V Ri.. ,a VCV i, 1, '- . Courtney Spraque, a Savannah, Ga l V A Q' Milner Marion Stanton, a Memphis, Tn :V J. Elizabeth Anne Stark, a Bethesda, Md ' ' ,. V 4' ' i V Vi K ' ' . Danna Lynn Stearns, a Cincinnati, Oh - ,Yi -jmdf, tg V ' David Stebbins, a Mobile, Al A V f A VA , V ' Edward Moore Steele, a Signal Mt., Tn Q, .V X ri " V, ' . . 1 - . x 1. X . s Edward C. Stephany, a jean-Ann Stewart, a Kate Susan Stillman, a Kate Clark Stockham, e Lynnette M. Stone, a William David Stone, a Fredick Marldey Stow, a Ft. Lauderdale, Fl F rankfort, Ky Charleston, SC Birmingham, Al Waynesboro, Ca Nashville, Tn Haddonfield, Nj 5 . 2 "7 4, T 1 - f- ' S T1 in 'L VV -..ur A V J i ' ,LV K if .n - ,V V ,f ' Q ti ?VVVVZLV?,4 ,f . V VV me W if - for EB ' Q., E . f . U K ' , , ' rf ' Q 4 4 I f l 'U ' l i 1 A r . - F-4 ' 'l: X l ff, 3 i xt at F I .. V - ,fig-,if ,j ao, V, I ,Nur I! f i I? N N . ,N I 3- C yo- H Q- ' Wi X... if .L . " f ,rf-7.1 V- Ji 3 :L 1 fi? tg Y' ,Ngfj , x 1 . V' lx ll of X1 A 3 .i ' D A 'I V L . 1. '7 -- Y ' . J up V ,Xu-gp 7-5, -1, V it F 1- J A ,f K F Y Personally, I prefer the weekendsf' Phil XValker Barbara Ann Stratton. e Stephen C. Stratton, e Nell Miles Stringfellow, n Patricia Strohmeier, n Cynthia Marie Stueker, a Thomas Sullivan, a Michael jolm Suty, e john NValter Sweat, a Shawne Swindler, a George Cary Swint, a Charles jordan Tahb. a janet Reid Tate. a Cenora Taylor, a NVilliam L. Taylor, a Richard ll. Tazelaar, e Lueile Carter Temple, a Richard B. Thoman. a james Louis Thomas, e janet Thomas, a joan Darby Thomas, n Elizabeth H. Thompson, n Frank Coraee Thompson, a VVilliam Newton Thompson, a Mary Kate Thorpe, a Thomas Mason Tillett, e William L. Tilley Ill, e Barry Forrest Tillman, a Ann Blanche Tipton, a Paducah, Ky Atlanta. Ca Nashville. Tn Great Falls. Va New Albany. Oh Hempstead, NY E. Chicago, ll jackson, Ms Little ltoek, .-tk Mm'freesboro. Tn Dallas. Tx Memphis. Tn Nashville, Tn Lewisbnrg, Tn Clinton. Md San Rafael, Ca Cincinnati. Oh Memphis. Tn Birmingham, Al Memphis, Tn Essex Falls. Nj Pittsburgh. Pa Nokomis, Fl llopkinsville, Kv Charlotte. Nf' Durham. NC Natchez, Ms Nashville, Tn "VVhen people come to visit Vandy, they don't know what to expect. If they come during the week, they think we study our butts off, if they come during the weekend, they think we study all the time. u xii ps 4 A A - -, . N J, F , I i 'Tl J ' F' 1 . 4, p 2-5 - sllis st F s.. s f rw F ' ' t , x. , ri I A 5 W, -.y f l , 1' ,Amr - V 'F i f 'Z Y Il e i F F 1, 12 f ff? i-1.3 VI-3, - up " 1 I ..,.. K is ,. ml K r . in ' 'it jf' T , . . W ' 'P .sei ' Y :fig ff. ,. fag., ef.. me ' IQ , 'l Y :Ng 'Nff . . ' 'fa' L. il l "sl I' L - icy lv . if, , .ii ! .Ng xl' .3 -,M - 1 ,I M ' i 144, 'xl . W i :sm 'A' wi? V-331 f a? pi. V AAI I: !, in-It 5? p A ' f .1 I .- - ,f , 'IV f - , M,-JZ., mga' .b .v,: , IAJL 4,4 J pike fx i if . fi a MMM if ' ,Qi Q' ' i . it h l ,gg ,A ,W U -GM iv , ' ' .I ML.. 3 , ' ' ri! " K' 5 ' 5' .11 J ., ' , ' '- J 1 ' , , . L , -ai 35:12. A JH. J? L rf' Q . t lleheeea Lynn Tittle. n Becky Newman Todd, a David L. Toxvles. e john XVallaee Townsend, a Constnnee Sue Treeee. a Deidre Lee Trnitt. n Heidi :tnn Tmmnel. a David Eugene Tnrner. e ltiehard .-Klan Turner. a lliehard llill Turner. a Bass Tyring. a ltohert Earl Ustrnek. e Larry Glann Utley. a Scott ltussell Valby. a Lee S. Van Deest. a Frank Van Middlesxvorth. a Tim Vanglm, a Bradley T. Vear. e ltiehard j, Vietor. a Valerie Lynn Vogelstein. a Barbara jane Vogler. a Mary Susan Vogt. n Richard Pagels Voss. a llerbert P, NValker, jr.. a Phil Neal NValker. a Oak ltidge. Tn liielnnond, Ky .-Xtlanla. Ca Little ltoek. .Xk White Sands. NM Snow llill. Nisseqnoqne. Md NY Littleton. t.o joppa. :Xl Pensaeola. Fl liivansville. Tn Ulean. Milan. NY Tn Sarasota. Fl Nashville. Tn Memphis. Nashville. Tn Tn La cvl'J.llU't', ll IW Miami Beach. Fl Crea! Neek. NY C.arhondale, Il Larrollton. ll XVyoming. Oh llmitsville. .-Xl Miami. Fl Samie Doris Walker, a Madison. T. Hugh Michael Walsh. e Memphis. Tn john Kevin XValsh. a Memphis. Tn john M. Wampler. a Nashville. Tn Michael C, M'arner, a xil5llVilll'. Tn Cerald Thomas NVashington. a Rolling Fork. Ms William F. NVatson. a Worthing, Uh Nancy Ann XVehber. a Oklahoma City. Ok Steven Weinstein. a Great Neck. NY Deborah jolyn M'est. n Tripoli. Libya Stewart Ntiest, a Christopher Jude YVhite, a Molly XVhite, n Steve White. e Whit lVhitson, e Tide L. XVave Benjamin tl. VVhitten, a john Robert lViener, a Sherrie L. XVier, a Bradley David Wigor, a Eddie Wiles, u Rohert B. lVilkins, a Mitchell H. Williams. a Nancy Ann VVilliamson, il Anita Diane Willis, a Mary Judith NVillms, n C. Douglas Wilson, a Mary jo Wilson, a Robin Terrell VVilson, at William E. Wilson IV, a Clure Layeaster VVinfree, Stephanie Winning, a Peter M. Wolff, a Steven Lynn Woodruff. George Dewey W iight, 8 3 john Kelly Wright, jr.. a Alexander S, VVyeth, a lames Paul Yalem, a Disco Yikes Mary Idyle Yarbrough, C i Craig Maurice Yeager, e Len Inslee Yokley, a Ioyee Ann Young, n Margaret Fawn Yount, Innocent Youth Nilvoid Zero Iohn Wesley Zimmer, a Lisa Maureen Zinninge Rick F. Ziska, a Cornelia Zoomorphic Martin M. Zorn, a Chrystal Zerofrost 21 l', Ei Columbus, Ms Nashville. Tn Bethesda. Md Charlottesville. Va Nashville. Tn Tuscaloosa, Ala. Memphis, Tn XVootlmere, NY Bronxville, NY Cincinnati. Oh Lewishurg, Tn Mobile, Al Birniingliani, Al Breenwieh, Cn Muscle Shoals, Al Milwaukee, XVi Fern Creek, Bloomfield Hills, Brentwood, Louisville, Nashville. Ky Mi Tn Ky Tn Huntsville, .-Xl Highland Park. Il Decatur, Al Dalton, Ca Nashville. Bryn Mawr, Tn Pa St. Louis, Mo J . i . 1 Q ,FF Fl . -4 if ' is i 4... as 4 A i .. : "'N gs ' '- ilil -P' va ws, . ' 9 N ' Y "S -. V-.. 'X 1? ' - 4 V. Q .5 ' ,X ., vi Y ii f ' A N: I 1 - - 1 g i I I4 'I :Jig Q K . .. M "l , ..4. '33 6.1, fa., asa. ,,, F rldd Y--gf" ' xl' A iwg . x, '-'- '. V, 'N fm' . , A Y v x 1 azigigagiul ' A ' ' f V' if -Llvi ififiiliilib. - Q viii f Y ' ir.: s Q 1 I ., ' lx W ',V,- 1 :'m?f" , . ' " F" W' ,, 'F - 2- 'J 'Ji '4 ff H ' .L . Y ,Q f ,'i? 'i ,Q 1-, t as i . , f ti .J 1. 1 .135 E ' 5 4A -loft' -. ,Af 5l ,X , io. , VT F' or ' . it . ig' , , 1' 31 - .sz I ' in 3 ' QAYWV F at M- it , -2 Q.. . .3 4 , ' , , ,ffjfezw Fl I I-1' 1 -:LI :- ful .-I .i- 'i I canit Wait for summer vaeationf' MMM XVKD.-X, Tn Toone, Tn xvllltfll' Park, Fl Nashville, Tn Atlanta, Ga Oak Ridge, Tn Smalltown, Fla. Yazoo, Tx Hamilton, Oh Deerfield, Il Columbus, Oh Hogshead, Neb Hillsdale, NI Nashville, Tn? 1-db gl -1 if F of 4255 9 ii X 'i 'QS N25 F1 I' IUNIORS 387 . I mmm .- .U M Ml 'H ' ',:-15-TIL. .-ra .3 , .1 4. - I 'A .:n .: . , -.4 , 1: .u . .. -- ng A, H, OR . . , I 'givx J' Aff- S A. Iv. rf' "-' . 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V v , ag I an . 1--V41:r5?ff?5'i"' ' - E ,FE -'H"f. 1 .-3 'sf' ' A' QE gm L '11 f sf' 1. 'in "K.L ,V X 5 ff? -40.-fy . ""ffTe, ' ., X11-f mrj- , 5 . , uf ' -' . A, . , W 4 . V - i ,, m- A' 911+--' . pf-2.1.45 Q- ' - 2 'V , - '1'i4:i.:3'1L L 5155?-.Q3.gZ 1855 lf' 'W' . -ffbwffin-,1 .v N ---2-Psa.. 1--N4-N , f -?w.?':f?i'1E ' 5-.'."T':'5f'?,: '5 :A '.l?45n n ' -, , Y 390 QVJHPS rx SENIORS 7 'X wa if it 1-11 fr., l' 1 1l1f' 11:1 "' wg 1, 1 ,1 l 3 A V1 ' 1' I ml 11 11-1 ml 1. 11,1 A ff Ui r l 4 l lx g J . ,Y wp. 1 WP I' ,B ','. in 1 LN 'I .M 'JE 1.111 N, 4- i 1 T' I I f .4 M1 1 .1 . V... 1 1 , .1 it 1 'L i ,r Fwy? r' ' '1 r r' 53 . ll ,V , M2 lf' .7 ,. I I. " 6 , rl . g , -ii , ""'I.' 1- K X .-.- V .' X L?' ,, . '- X X 4 1 '. F . X, I si.--' . l r A ' ! P 4 A ' W ' 1' 7 1 . 7., 'I s a" ,- V A 3 ' Rf- . . H, ,,- -- J . - -- ,L- ,.,,,v:51 I '11, ,ul ' 1 , I", . 1 ,Q-, M 'gf j ' 1, -A Oliver Abel, IV, Phys joseph F, Alessi, Ch! FA james D. Allison, MEIBE james M. Althouse, III, M!Ph Robert Y. Alvis, ME jennifer L, Anderson, Eng Robert E. Anderson, Ceo N. Carter Andrews, jr., Eng Louise Amy Arkin, Nurs Steve Armstead, A Nancy G. Armstrong, Nurs Linda C. Arnold, Hist Suzanne S. Amold, Nurs Richard Lee Arnstein, Eng Alfred V. Atkinson, Math Bettina Harmon Ault, Bio Lynne Marie Ayers, Psy jo Lynn Baker, Psy! ST Ted King Baker, Ec! His Wilmoth H. Baker, Bio Marcia S. Ballard, Nurs William C, Barker, EE Gerald D. Barksdale, Ec! BA j. Michael Barraza, Phys Elizabeth Ann Bashaw, Nurs Xml Clayton, Mo. 6449 Wydown Blvd. Boston, Ma 130 Hyde Park Ave. Little Rock, Ak No. 7 Pine Mt. Rd. Dayton, Oh 1801 Shady Lane Dr. Wheaton, Il 105 W. Elm Hayesville, NC Lance Cove Rd.. Lakeland, Fl 1637 Sylvester Nashville, Tn 4421 Warner Pl. River Forest, Il 1020 jackson Ave. Nashville, Tn 708 Lynwood Blv. Maitland, Fl 711 Sequoia, Tr. Texarkana, Ak 20 Arnold Dr. Austin, Tx 2622 Wooldridge Dr. Dallas, Tx 5628 Meadow Crest Hyattsville, Md 4410 Oglethorpe St. Knoxville, Tn 1121 Montview Dr. Clarksville, Tn 489 Georgetown Rd. Owensboro, Ky 1840 Antler Dr. Wilmington, D1 1621 Windy Bush Rd. Tallahassee, Fl 1324 Victoria Dr. Thousand Oaks, Ca 1632 La jolla Dr. Bridgewater, Nj 96 Prospect Ave. Memphis, Tn 2116 Fox Run Cove Monroe, La 2717 Bayou Lane Pittsfield, Ma 35 Charles St. Nlelincln XY. Baiskins. Bio Evelyn li. Butey. Psy Num-y ll. Beach. llis Conlon W. Beatle. Klaith Stcpliunie D. Bczivers. Nurs Doiinltl E. Begley ll! ENB.-X Beth Belaiseo. llis Frank I.. BClll1llll1 III. ICQIB.-X Steven .-X. Benson. .11 Cliristine E. ienzf . 'urs Lynn .-X. BC1'l1'll'Q1. Ee!B.-X l'i ' Nl. BL1'YtL'L sy' on B. Berqnist ECXBA A 1Vfel'1 Vo Berry. . '1 's Vwne ll. Berry. llis I'1' Gl'L'Cl1X'1llL'. his Nlnyon Bond hlCIllPl1lN.TIl --i3:2T Bhotlcs Ave. Frankfort. Ky l253 XlL'LlLlOXX' Lan. Webster Brovus, Mo filfi Nlilfhllllll ,-Xve. 'llKlL'liCl'. C21 53602 Nliclvule litl. Toleclo. Oh 3504 Woodley Bd. hllillltil. C121 500 Scliooner Cr. XXV clUlllIl1l3llS. Oli IT25 Seottsclnle Ave. Nnslwille. Tn 5307 Vueksoii Blv. lllIIliAlClll. C 2-1 leur liiclffe '. 11lJ1lSfUl1. Tx 22-lb Si'lIllllO1'L West fJl"lltV e. L V 26 L-lkevieu '. Nts lX1llL. Tn 6104 B'lI'llCIlll'llL '. A ' i11 10111 eif1ts 6011 P u St 4300 Esteswootl D1 -:L .71,Yr ,iv Yi -i..- , 111 -'ff' .1 ff- 1' W- -1. 1' 1 af. J V1 gh 1 xfb i 4, V-sr N' s IX illc, 3111 VV J' 1 College is a four year paid vacation Where you leai friends, and have a kick in the ass Brent E. Bertke. at Cztrloine C. Bickel. Nlzith x1'lf'llL lJo11'1lcl BlC!A1l'tlllll. Psy SllS'lIl Lte B1V"ll'll11, F.-111211 01111 Howe Billin s. Cl1 t'11 1 Erich Mishel Birch, Nlefi C,'eo1'g,ial1'1 Luke Bitzer. Nurs C'n'l Frecleriek Blutt, B' C lt-11 C. Bo itsll. EXVBE ncly Lynell Bond. Pol Sei Bit-l1'11'c1 Craig Bond, Eu! BA Steven R. Bond. u 'UIICS Vincent Bonnet, Chun une f,liz'1betl1 Borg, E11 Behecem SllS'll1 Boston, Bio ol1n Alan Boyd, His John R'1lpl1 Bradley, M!PolSci joy T. Bradley Ma!Ecol1 D'1vic,l H. B1't1ll1'1ll a Toledo, Oh 3"440 c:l1'l.I'Cl'1KlV 1. I '1tt'1 IOOV ' . ' 15 6 1..exinV ton tl. S. ete1'sl1111'ff, Q '21 '1'l1i1-d.1Xve,. 'X ,uvis Dlll'1.,. Tn 9463 Oltl Yell Bd. Nwslivillc. Tn . 906 X1 m1tll'n1'11 Dr. Nlohile. .- 1179 Texas St. Pinehill Bd. Old Hickory T11 4809 Fverest '. St. Louis. 1' o 120257 Topping Ilst N. Nashville, T11 6615 Ornioncl Br, N'1s1villc. Tn 1302 Nl. 5111 St. 0l1ll5OllC1ty, Tn 911 Millercrest Dr. LCXX1Sl7lll'f5 Tn 1035 Creen Vulley Temple, Tx 3201 NV. AVL. T Atlantu C1 -170 BI'0'l.Cll'llld Bd. NW 1..'1vs 1'e11cLln1rgV, Tn 1201 Tohen Terr. Cincinnati, Oh 3270 Menlo Ax c. Portland. T11 NI. Russel Evansville Ill T69 Loiiihurtl Nve.. Silver Sprinjs. Md 19600 Spring Loch Ct. "Sf 1 ' 1 ' 73'-S, f Ig. WE'-. V ,.-.f V511 mfs 1 af '. , ' .fs I 11 .. X -F VV N. V tyixxixf'-7 73 4 1. --.is v- 47 . 1 . ' R 1 111any thmffs make many Xnon 'ix 7 1:-"I '4?'1 i A A ar E . V wwf 47 nd "lv-9 '1lt, '1ill - -lt, 'if-Ll 'f .4 - . 'xi' V. l X x 7 ., 1 Mx 1 1 - x 1111 Il , y ' 1 fm ANN 1, t 1 A . 5 . ,V D1 1 11 , 1 1 V l X fb, f 13 l ' , " 705: 1 ' lf " 1., V . .H p V V: YI ' VV f A VHF. V V 5 x V. P ' V . . ' DI sg V l" . ,V " . I . V 1V I 1 . D 1 -M-5 I-VVS V V '1 ,433 V Vg 1 . - I 1 'V A-, V ' V11 iq. I 'N ll ll QV I gl ll 1 l Vf .1 1',pV.f"f-u"' VER -V V ... V V lx V I I X 1 .J , IVV :VV N ,IQLVI VV V 11. ij. V . ft V1 1 -Vx . .f,, V- f V V V l ,f ,f 1 2 J- fax? U , 1 " 1 cc I I Il ' I . ' A 1 C a 7, ' U I . ' .ZX -1 V QV Ai. Q i: . V -4 V 1 2' 'N Q J r A ' . 1' V Ch. .1 ga 'ln , v, ru i 1V lp 'W V V 1 Q H . 1 1 . 54 .1 ' -1. W '. - . 1 1 P N lil ' f, , V 1' . - '7fV 1 --S- . x1 .1 ,V ,QQ 1 .V .. .11 1 -1- 'Q '-'f ' I 1 , s fra. ' ' 1, '-4 , .1 ff ff 11 , 1 V 1 1 V 3 1. V-V V 1 1 L I ' 3 1 , l ' Z " f Ea .1r':":1 1 qi ' 's '. -' xl 'J . . . 1 ' 1 1 ' f 'za Q Mic-lulel Biscoe, Spun X1'ooclh1'1dge. Ln AE- V. . V . V - V 5 . -fx rl. 1 , 1 1 D1 l R V S" ...ff 1: 1 ' 1 . I1 I0 Nl ' ' 3 Y 4 1 Z Lf 1 ' . X S V V , V11 V44 1401 A l V VNV J 1 . V 1 -'f.'f' -. V V 1 V VVV ,run V, V ' f ' 1 6' F' -li 7 1 ' If l A 1' -1., V ' 1 1 1 J A ...Q VV! ' 'A 'fi 1 .r , 5 H, V .11 V 1 " 1 .. ' 1 V1 1- ' A - ij -. A . V V 43 . VV I . V 1 ,V 1 Q VV ,V A . 4' V V K L ' rl' A V f V 1 1 1 VVS ' K ' ' 1 4.35. "" ',uxpfV -1 S V V1V , V. I ' 'SR VV . V ' in ff V, K V . -L Q2 1 V 1 f n 1 1 .if 12151: 4V ' ' L V 1 1 V . 1 A' 1.11 1 ' 1' K 3 ?1"71:.fZf'-J 11 1. , . ll' tl . X11 K - lfi fflfgli ,. C I ' A " I ' BX' ' ,N 1 X . x I ' 'f"f'Lf'fA2a1' 7:1111 1' r-5:E.5 '.i A ' 1 1 11 4 411: li .Tf1.1i1Ki'1 +110 .-Xnthony N. Brannan. Ma Rachel Ann Brannon, Nurs Richard M. Breen, His Mark Thoinas Brenzel, Ma! BA Dehorah M. Brice, Bio john Douglas Brinsko, Bio Nancy Lee Britt, Eng Ellen Gertrude Brittain, Nurs J. Stewart Broliaiigh, B.-X john Greer Brownlow, SIS Randy NVayne Bryant. PolSci David Louis Bulkin, His janet L riix ise Bnllaird. B.-K .-Xlhcrt E. Bush. PhD. Caineron Bug. His ou ve got to go you know, else youll stay Tampa. Fl 1118 Culhreath Isle Dr. Nashville, T11 539 Northcrest Dr. Louisville, Ky -1091 Elmwood Ave. Louisville, Ky 305 Chadwick Ilonic. Ca 809 Horseleg Cr. Rd. Cranford, NJ 436 Manor Ave. Evansville, In 62317 Newhurg Rd. Nasliville. Tn 1119 Crater Hill Nashville. Tn 216 Olive Branch Hd. Knowville, Tn 6915 Stove Mill Rd. Jackson. Ms 531 Franwood Clove Stone Mtn.. Ca -1-156 Cedar Iiidgc Tr. Chatta111oogu, Tn 202-I Avalon Ave. T1'HIlSy'1V2lll1tl. NY 113 Fulhnoon Dr. Ahaco. Bahamas Montego Ave. CC 7 7 97 I ,'k1CXlll1ClCl' Brouhaha, PS Buddy F. B1 ii'u ion David Wingate Buntin, Ec!BA Phillip Edward Burke, CheE Bt. 1 N1CCl'0l'V Ck. Rd. Christopher Scott Burns, BiE! EE David Wayne Burnside, Drama George Karstens Bnsse, His! Cer Curtis David Byers. CivE! Ma Aiidrew XV. Byrd. A Carol Evelyn Caine. N Felix Leh111a11 Caldwell. Bi!Psy L. Bowen Caldwell, SIS Margaret Suzanne Calle, :Xnthr Beth V. Calla xxfz 1 y. Eng john R. Canney III, PS!Soc james Boss Cannon, Phys XVillia1n F. Carpenter, Hist Charles H. Cathay. Psy Eugenia Cato, Nurs Thomas Ira Cavandar, Bio Fireside. NC 212 Theatre Ave. Bigtoe, Il 56 Bursa St. Nashville, Tn 5916 Hillsboro Bd, Nashville. T11 Danhiiry, Cn 55 Garfield Ave. Kirkwood. Mo -164 N. Taylor Mt. Prospect. Il 117 School St. Louisville. Ky 202 S. Lyndon 1411. Nz1.shvi1le, T11 400 Ellendale Dr. jackson, Ms 616 Rohinhood Bd. Memphis, Tn 5867 Brierdale Lexington, Ky 345 Andovei' Dr. Denver. Tn Rt. I Box 322 Huntsville, Al 2200 Coveinont Dr. Mendon. Vt Eastridge Acres Nashville. T11 -I-101 Honeywood Nashville. T11 3605 Knollwood Bd. Nashville. Tn 5101 Linbar Dr. Macon, Ca 2825 Hilandale Ct Nashville, T11 906 Noelton Ln. L Mark Garland Chandler, Phys Ralph C. Chandler, Anth Nashville, Tn 4960 Hopedale Dr. Oak Ridge, Tn 119 Cumberland View Dr. William E. Chenault, Psy Decatur, Al 2406 Quince Dr. William 1. Chenault, Ir., M!Ed Atlanta, Ca 6225 Mountain Brook Ln. Lori Louise Chisick, Nurs Goshen, In 320 South 3rd Atlanta, Ca. Ben Franklin Christian, Ec.l BA Atlanta, Ca George Edmond Clark, CE james Alfred Clark, Eng Sally A liii Cline, Math William F. Clubbon. Dr! Ba janice Lynn Cobbledick, Nurs Nancy jane Coe. Nurs Ward Coe, Hist David E. Cole, Hist David F. Collins, Biol 780 Starlight Dr. Brentwood, Tn Box 172 Cookeville, Tn Route 1, Box 29 Dallas, Tx 11431 St. Michaels Birmingham, Al 3536 Oakdale 'Dr. Ashtabula, Oh 1700 WVinterhaven Dr. Tulsa, Ok 2818 East 38th Okalahoma City, Ok 1503 Buttram Rd. CampHill, Pa 515 Devon Rd. Maraga, Ca 297 Birchwood Dr. "Vanderbilt is into Dukef, Frank R. Collins, His!Engl Mary E. Collins, Nurs Robert W. Connell, Eng Michael W. Conway, Biol Betsy Cooper, EnSc Judith Ann Cooper, Nurs Mary Ann Cooper, F.A. Pamela D. Cooper, Pol! Sc David H. Corry, B.Ad Donnyss T. Cotton, F.A. Helen S. Coupe, Hist Lou Ann Cox, EvEn Cris Ann Craig, Fren Suellen Craig, F.A. Barbara E. Craighead, Hist Thomas M. Crews, Biol Stewart C. Crisler, Bus Ad Dennis Wayne Cross, a Nancy Bell Crouch, Hist Michael E. Crowe, Chem Manhasset, NY 293 Trumbull Rd. Andover, Ma 33 Katheleen Dr. Orchard Park, NY 7 Fir Tip Dr. Ft. Wayne, In 4618 Barrington Dr. Birmingham, Al 4009 Winston Way Decatur, Ca 578 Wendan Dr. Lexington, Ky 11 Landsdown Est. Tucker, Ca 3563 Castleridge Glencoe, Il 521 Longwood Ave. Nashville, Tn 2307 Hammond Dr. Utica, NY 8 Talcott Rd. Louisville, Ky 3249 Cross Bill Rd. Brentwood, Tn 815 Stuart Ln. Franklin, Tn Holly Tree Cap Rd. Hilton Head, SC 5 Beach Lagoon Dr. Laurel, Ms 3304 Franklin Ave. Memphis, Tn 505 Cherry Rd. S Bristol, Tn 216 Bluff City Hwy. Shaker Hts., Oh 22780 Fairmont Blvd. Bristol, Va 2514 Osborne St. 1' IDKU I' S. -X -, H Mm ' 5 H xvl- .-.V .P X ! N 1 xl 1 ' f ' 5 , X' .X ' 4 . '. X5 L- G J I ,. WH ' ' .N7 Wi 1 I it . Q , . 'A' ! N I , 4,57 if mx SENIORS Arthur Crownover, BA George T. Curtis, Hist Barry S. Dallas Virginia P. Dallas, Nurs john Richard Dana, Hist Roger B. Docile Mark V. Danielson, Ec john jacob Dauer, SIS Donald F. Daugherty, Hist Theresa E. D'Augustino, Psy jolm A. Davidson, Hist Susan L. Davidson, Nurs Donald j. Davis, jr., M! EE Les Boone Davis, BA Miles Patrick Dean, Eng Nashville, Tn 614 Bowling Ave Nashville, Tn 5300 Hillsboro Rd. Danville, Va 603 Lansbury Dr. Chadds Ford, Pa 405 Painters Crossing Richmond Hill, NY 119-17 Hillside Ave. Childhood, RI 6101 Concord Rd. Chicago, Il 175 E. Delaware Pl Beaver, Pa BOX 160 Springfield, Mo 1444 Siegen Dr. Tampa, Fl 8502 Lynn Ave. Memphis, Tn 546 S. Cherry Ro. Evansville, In 800 Blue Ridge Rd. Orlando, Fl 1113 Country Ln. Newton, Kn No. 6 Circle Dr. Atlanta Beach, Fl 210 14th "Life is like a game Paula Dianne Dean, Ed Neil E. DeCourcy, BioE Huntingdon, WV 104 N, Blvd. Cincinnati, Oh 2851 Crandin Hollow W. Ann Marie Deer, Eng Ronny Glenn Deere, ChemE Laura Holly Dennison, Math Thomas McKean Derr, Econ Susan Elizabeth Derryberry, His Martha Day Dickinson, BA!Acc jilda Leigh Diehl, Bio Delray Beach, Fl 221 NW 17th St. Nashville, Tn 3507 Woodmont Ln. Atlanta, Ga 4745 jott Rd. NW Birmingham, Al 2003 Inverness Apts. Shelbyville, Tn Rt. 3 Mineral, Va Rt. 2 Box 2B Huntsville, Al 2216 Briarcliff Rd. Richard Edward Dietzen, Bio! Che Chattanooga, Tn 309 Lynncrest Dr. Patricia Ann Dodge, N New Orleans, La 3640 Rue Delphine David Lloyd Doering, Math! Cer Huntsville, Al Warren R. Donaldson, Phil joan Parsons Douglas, FA David Eugene Driver, BA jolm E. Dubois, Econ! PolSci Leigh Elaine Duke, ArtHis Sammy Christopher Duke, BA Deborah Ann Dukes, CivE Teresa Dunkel, N 6020 Trent Dr. Nashville, Tu 1906 smith si. Apt 104 Memphis, Tn 192 St. Albans Fwy Gardendale, Al 420 johnson St. Albuquerque, NM 747 Georgia SE Amarillo, Tx 4407 jennie Nashville, Tn 2116 Harding Pl. Houston, Tx 3234 Norfolk Huntsville, Al 1605 Grennwyche Rd. V-. ," , j ' ftli I s a ' if ' A A ' . 1 ,F re' .. fr-1' .X , ' l.. 'Q' ,e 8,9 ' ' ' '13 5 az, X. A 1 . . . 4 -. i 1. 'X H ' N2 ' ': . K' - I 1 -. 1 X-' ' . X Q1 . K ,X XX -'B 1 . ,. 1 X leer iw "" fr' , N N-ff ,fit All F Fil lxtlx' 0 1? D :A jf f 4 Ex ' kr in , es a N dl., "-7? i ,H . ef of pinball here, You've got to get it up to get it 1n i' ,.,- -..Y . W, -7 lr X f 'Y I f W R V23 . X 1' Riu , A I 1 1 . , 'E - -Q . rf f,-is ii X, r -7 ,X' A ,J N" - ., X X' '. I 5 1-,-an ! ,ev ,f . , X ' ' XX ,S A Q - J I A - , . , X XX- 5.-f ' - i-1,12 .XM X X-A X 'X .T X - ,X ' NX A 1. i. 1 f . i X' S 'Q i N V X ' 'ls i A f , Q " 9 ' X . 1 3 X X If X X V 1 ,Qi . . - 4 i -- 'cf' f X .. 1,557 ' if 'S X i s I . X, j 3,-- -5' , W' . . ESQ 1 .-1. 4112 -2 -:: ,J , f,- ' I 1, L .- ,. ,. , , L I--, 1' ' ',:5,,l1'-Wil 1' 4 , 1 1-' ' " . ' .1521--.."x,i-"W , A i g,J1w2q',,-.QX . wr Milo'-fi - , A we ref .- 1" ' Jil ' f v l-as 1:44 rl - 'ir ' , . A iv . l 10114 --.., -ex xi-we , w 1 R U ' -x 1 rlj E' I 'sf- ' TL-.-. X. X in , . I , , , . - -J! all 'X We - yt , , 4 it -A W EW' Es . 1 xx- . ' r i ...I K d .4 I r: U . -fp Q L 1 f ..- 2 , . n vi ' . Q' jf cap. ' 1 is S11 ,2 -kin ,,s -'. ',:. ,..a, 1 , 4 2 , . NX. tnnixrxt KA N. ie -.., VV.. --, J- 'Z ff 5' 'ai ,f .fi -, ,.'-am J- ., , .P Ar Patricia Anne Dunn, FA Irma lean Durham, BA William A. Durham, Phys jeffrey E. Dwight, CSXECBA Patricia M. Early, Econ Steven W. Edwards, Psy A Susan jo EHand, Nurs Richard Eiseman, Math Tori S. Ellington, Nurs Tampa, Fl 4704 Estrella Memphis, Tn 4616 Birdsong Fwy. Donelson, Tn 4044 Fort Victoria Tampa, Fl 2614 Parklund Blvd. Amarillo, Tx 2409 Parker St. Linden, Tn P.O. Box 150 Clemson, SC 304 Tamassee Dr. Memphis, Tn 5643 Glade View Dr. Atlanta, Ca 2296 St. DeVille Allen D. Elster, BioE!EE! Math Houston, Tx Thomas C. Eubank, Biol Arthur R. Evans, Math Nancy Ann Evans, Nurs john R. Exum, PolSc Carolyn Ann Ezzell. Psy! Math !"I love Vanderbilt? Anon. L., I "digg A v-3. A N . " A nv ,, y l N I , ,Nj ll N ', I" 7 i ., ' .al x 5 . -1 ' ' - 1,-ff i ' . .1-v 1 , 1 N ' 1 1 xi . ,LL ae ' H: l I, . . . . 11 fi-1 , as 445. K ,1 . l' '. X W ? ,I 'U , :gk '-a N 2- ry" ' .ri V V r' -1' , 1 l ' A 1 3 . .fs i- . , qw A - ii Vg: 1 JR - ,f Q - -L E " 'WT' 3 A ' x. L Y, il 1 ' 1-I, 1 'U v 1 ' '-'G A HM . Filip V e ggi 1 1315.1 , f?i,:1ig Fri' - " Y' ...L lib, ."' l No.1 I md' x-uf J' 5 fa? hi l 11 1 4 ,,T,..,, ,z ll fix ft fx. ' ', , , ff ll' fi' 1 - I ' 1' - 1 'W " 'fi' lv, F' .. -. .' v ' , in i5'., .I 'L -5- .1 . t .. . - . I Kent C. Farish, Psy Millie E. Farmer, F.A. Robin L. Farnsley, Drama Luanne O. Farrell, Psy 5555 Cranbrook Louisville, Ky 2141 Edgehill Rd. College Park, Ca 2289 W. Lyle Rd. joplin, Mo 1366 Valley Dr. Nashville, Tn 4020 Marydale Dr. Jacksonville, Fl 8622 St. Patrick Ln. Tulsa, Ok 2740 E. 41st Atlanta, Ca 620 River Chase Rdg. Louisville, Ky 2806 Newburg Rd. Nashville, Tn 3310 Orleans Dr. William Thomas Fay, Math!SIS Wilmington, Pa Peter S. F elsenthal, Bus Ad Barbara T. Ficlnnan, Phil john Miller Findley, Rel Susan Blaine F indley, Psy Bret Kortney Fisher, Ee! BA Frederick M. Fisher, A Glenn M. Fisher, Math Charles P. Fitzgerald, Phys jane R, F lachmann, Ceo Michael D. Flanagan, Hist joseph R. Fleming, Ec!BA Richard A. Fletcher, Ee! BA Thomas B. Fletcher, Idp Waldo E. Floyd III, Hist Betsy Vajen Ford, Nurs 317 Walden Rd. Memphis, Tn 5428 Collingswood Rd. Bethesda, Md 9408 Kingsley Ave. Overland, Mo 2475 Hartland Clyde, Oh 210 S. Mulberry Nashville, Tn 1123 Draughton Ave. Nashville, Tn 4311 Dale Ave. Kingsport, Tn 1157 Watauga St. Frankfort, Ky 108 Hay Ave. St. Louis, Mo 1317 Topping Rd. Lake Charles, La No. 12 Fairway Dr. West Hartford, Cn 9 Trotwood Dr. Atlantic, Va Box 159 Houston, Tx 2215 Dorrington Macon, Ca 2900 Ingleside Ave. Cincinnati, Oh 2150 Convert Ln. ru I!! Vx. LZ .1- xx ,Q SENIORS l,- V-"W" ' Y I l T' V .E ui fi . X X ll 1 wwf : --any 'iss-ig, I F Harvey Albert Ford, Ec Sara lane Fortune, Hist jeffrey Carl Fosnes David Leslie Foster, EE Monroe C. Frank III, Eng! Dr Ruslyn M. Frederic, Nurs William AL Freed, BA Mark P. Freeman, Math Peter R. Freeman, Eng NVilliam C, Freeman, Bus Ad Walter E.. Freitag, jr., BA! Ac john P. Frick, Phil Charles M. Friedman, Cer Norman C. Frost, jr., Ec!BA Deborah L. Fry, F.A. "The stagnant air of sleepless nights, of broken pencils, mingles with tears and joyful faces as a dazed crowd walks away form a lecture hall, which many of them will never see againfi .75 . . - -'I .I-.win , ' y L Q Q K, V ff wx 1 Flf ' ia A- 1 ' A X I 1 i X S I If ..- R f 1--7:1 :"' - f ' i 3 , Y ' . B 1 B f"l'44GE -fi 9 L ' V S ,Q ' S l' i - r ' - "f E - 'rf ,M , PM , M , if 'ag "' rf- Q '-'1 v fe - 'e '11 Ng , :I .. 'elf Fi? ""' 1 .-9 ' , S i .,. , I 35 .1 1,425 , J . . V: , lg.-2 -.f:,.N,. - - :- ' -X - : H N Wi james F . Fuqua, Ir., Biol William M. Fuqua, Phys Roberta E. Gallagher, Psy Russell C. Gallagher, Bus Ad Nicholas T. Callucci, Psy Dianne Cannaway, F ren! FA Kurt D. Garbow, SocEv Bio Richard D. Garland, CiEng Douglas G. Garrett, Hist Henry G. Catlin, PoSci Dawn M. Gavigan, Psy Pamela I. Gaylor, Nurs Keith Lawrence Celman, Psy Elizabeth S. Cersten, F rn james Richard Gewin, Psy Tony Blair Giles, Ec Thomas james Gill. Span Richard G. Gillerman, Bio Frank Stuart Gilliam, Bio Gary Gittelsohn, Phys St. Petersburg, Fl 515 34th Ave. NE W. Lafayette, ln 805 N. Chauncey Denver, C0 3096 Owens Ct. Nashville, Tn. 2609 Tiffany Dr. Little Rock, Ar 4713 Crestwood St. Louis, Mo 14512 Tramore Dr. Scarsdale, NY 10 Fort Hill Ln. Memphis, Tn 1265 Hester Rd. Southwest Harbor, Me Femald Pt. Rd. Nashville, Tn 5966 Post Rd. Louisville, Ky 402 Kaeline Dr. Nashville, Tn 1151 Gateway Ln. Knoxville, Tn 8128 Chesterfield Birmingham, Al 3504 Belle Mead Way Coral Gables, Fl 700 Minorca Kurt Garbow Tullahoma, Tn Lakewood Dr. Columbia, Tn Route 7 Huntington, WV 1409 Spring Valley Nashville, Tn 2148 Timberwood Dr. Louisville, Ky 3129 Agwitt Ave. Lancaster, SC 123 Canterbury Dr. McLean, Va 6457 Dryden Dr. Paintsville, Ky 359 Fourth St. Nashville, Tn 432 Springview Dr. Bethesda, Ma 5902 waiion Rd. Nashville, Tn 3627 Willow Branch Dr. Oak Ridge, Tn 120 Northwestern Wichita, Kn 1302 Kevin W. Hartford, Cn 30 Fulton Pl Mobile, Al 4702 Old Shell Rd. Nashville, Tn 6610 Sussex Circle Wyoming, Oh 349 Compton Hills Dr. St. Louis, Mo 8631 Old Bonhomme Lexington, Ky 1244 Summitt Dr. N. Woodmere, NY 818 Plainfield Ln. Theresa D. Codehaux. FA joseph P. Goddard. Bio Cary Alan Coforth, Phys David A. Goldsmith. lIn!Math Beth Goldstein. Nurs XVatIaee Camp Coodloe, BE! MS Susan Louise Core, Fren Matthew E. KIOSMIILC. Eng Caxy Belgrave Ciostin. ISEXSIS Sara tl. Graham. FA Louis W. Grant Ill. NIE Mimi Dean Grant. FA Dinah Lon Crashot. Nlath Daniel Lee Graves, EE Diane Elaine Green. Ch! Math "Th Sandra Ann Green, Math Timothy Garland Green. EMBA lliehard L. Greenberg, Eng Patrice E. Creener. Eng Scott T. Gregory, Psy XVilliam David Grief. Ceo VVilson Crievns. Bio Abdul Oblong Haag, EvSo Ann Baehman Hale. a Sally Io Hale. Nurs joseph Lee Haley. PSe! BA Lee Hartley Hall, Psy Almlmeville. La llomeplaee Maryville, Tn l0S Duncan Dr. Ft. Wadsworth. NY 44715 Ayers Sl. Coral Cables. Fl 5l0 Tilmidaho Louisville. Ky S3012 XVellhrooke Hd. Ormond Beach, Fl 24053 Oakland Ave. New Urleans. La 450 Andolion Blvd. Atlanta. Ga 3847 Fos Clen Ct. Chattanooga. Tn 306 Central Dr. Spartanburg. SC 33 Montgomery Dr. Tulsa. Ok 2405 lj. 26th Pl. Nashville. Tn 9 Lynwood Ln. Memphis. Tn 31305 Ilomewood Dr. Nashville. Tn 2302 Elminglon Ave. Dyerslmurg. Tn 912 Cooper Dr. I l 1 "- 2 T-5' X X I6 11-1 Y T, 1 F .b f -f I. Q - T vv' A I I" I lily i ,,.,-- ' 'N-Ting' ' ,X . 'D A ,-1, ,sa fy J f 1 ,ig ' 1- " fi! 2 I e happiest da at Vanderbilt is Ma 12thf' Vlfineliester. Ky 382 Boone Ave. Memphis. Tn 5440 Shady Grove Nashville. Tn 2419 Kensington Pl. Memphis. Tn 5492 Gwynne Pensacola, Fl 6445 Seenie Ilwy Memphis. Tn 5518 Shady Grove Ter. Nashville. Tn 3522 Murphy ltd. Finhaek Ilarhor. Nflnd 307 Cedar Ave. Rogersville, Tn 400 AV. Main Iticlgway. Il P.O. Box 427 Enterprise. Al 309 Averetl Ave. Bradenton, Fl 7704 Desoto Memorial Bd. Karis jan Hamhlin. Bio Cary Nestor Hamburg. ESC Charles F. I-Iammer. Hist jane Hampson, Psy David ll. Hampton, Ph!M Sara Louise Hamrie. Ev!Se jane T. Hanes. Hist Steven II. Haut ii', Math Tupelo, Ms 210 Ilaneoek Dr. Maple Glen, Pa I6-I0 Fort Washington Nashville, Tn 1404 Ilildreth Dr. Franklin, Mi 26550 XVoodlore Deerfield, Il 935 Heather Dallas. Tx 6922 Pemberton Winston Salem. NC 2910 Bartram Rd. Cincinnati, Oh 5616 liayherrv Dr. .if it i, - . v' Q I' ,' I--. Anon l A" ,f -5 ' fl e .. . 7 Q '-al ,jg , X I, 1. , 4' +.1.gFt," M . 75? -A L 46- , -.ff -.lb , an Q--Y--1 li, I I 'I "Sf 'V - fl A Q' 'Q ! l A EF" . , f-'AI' I ' I - , ' , . 1 ". . ' .. , ' Ig. is " .w 1-5-J .xl ? 5' V ' -. ' ' yi .,-ff" if 5 - Q' "I Y: 's" I i- IM Bi ll . 43' 9?-' ei., , iflfv' fi sv at 4, . -If f ,r X Q I0 nf, I 37 1 ,X HQ I 4. A 1 1 . 1116- -,, ir: -Y--V aw. ,- P if . J-1 'T 1 fait' . 1, 1 . N5 x-'Z' 1,8 5 uv dy I 1 .5 It VT T' U . vi as V ' W IE-1, .gg ' A 'Z' ' '-L -Cf' I - -1 x - x' lr 1 -.1 -, v 1 .F fs- , W gg -4 , X" .51 1, ,- -k '-' ,... C. David Hardison. MalhfSIS 51. Claire Harmon. Nnrs Iaines 11. Harper 111. CIS! Susan Mae Ha x'1' ell. Nurs Dane Carl Harris, Psy jim Harrison, E Margaret Ann Hart. Nurs Alexander Harvey IV. Hist Terry L. llasis, Chl? Kenneth Swayne Hastings. Psy Patrick C. Hanenstein, Psy Ellen E. Haydon. Nurs Don .-Xlan Heidlmrier, ME Martin 1l.Heilstedt. EE Donald M. Hein. Hist "It's been a great four years, but four years is enoughf, George Ililgendorl' fl' Q I 1 Nl vw' ffl 4 .cs 'E f., - Q HPS rCN '11 . - 1"-1 , .s-. ,.,, 7 K, 7? , .. 'W 1- 'efri f . Q my ! f'-'Z f or TS' 7 'lie v 1- A Y ,Q ' fe' . '-FE A ww. q 1' . as ' l J Q: Jn, . . . Q . .W id 4. -1 Q '- F "1 'RJ' - Tx.. In , , -y , , V 'I xv., . i i lgkfafili- f Sw' .fasts x i . 1 f ,. as ,:.5?!Q.nt, .V ' . lv. f 1 "s. ,Jw- igu .LLH7 1 ll - . . 2 M. , H .tl -- . -- D .. V 1 , 1 Q it I ' -eu., 1 -,.- 1 . , W -. . V Q L., . fe- - . . '-if - I ,:- if A' I . ' f-51 'wil , ' 1 A ,.. - .. ,- . ji , 'xn VL!-. , -' ' ,' 1 l X L, 'A xr 1 it ll 1 Q . ,N X, .xi 4.. ,13.X E . . fl Dorothy jan Heller. EMBA Stephen K. Henderson. F.-X Cordon E. Hendrieh. Ph!M Lee Walter Hendrick. BA It alll es ll. Henry, I1, BA VVilliain 11. Herod. Hist Valanea Lee Hicks. Psy David W. 1-Iiggs. Histflilng jean Marie Higham. Psy!BA George M. 1-lilgendorf, Psy David Wayne Hilsdon. CIE William H. Hoff, Psy john R. Hogan. Bio William A. Holby. Psy Nancy Anne Holziner. Nurs Robert Hoinm, Ch Ianet E. Honimel. Ee!BA Charles E. Hornaday. MBi Herwarcl C. Hoseh, Phys Glenn A. Hoskins, ECIBA Lewislznrg. Tn 927 Oak Sl. Knoxville. Tn T204 NVellowood Ln. .-Xtlantzl. Ca 45355 Brooliview Dr. Ocala. F1 11-12 S151-111151. Decatur. .-Xl 1911 Woodniead SW Nashville. Tn 5305 Lynwood Blvd. Aslutalmnla. Oh 617 Winterhaven Dr. Baltimore. Nld Briglitside Rd. Rockford. Uh 1111 1 Orlando. Fl 2207 Beatrice Dr. South Hill. Va Box 127 Cincinnati. Oh 2-163 W. liookwood Ct. Ft. Worth. Tx 5817 Wheaton Dr. Peru. I1 2218 First St. Severne Park. Nld 12 Evergreen Tr. N1attoon.l1 13 Country Chili Rd. Cincinnati. Oh 6517 N1 eaclowvista Bend. Or 60801 Parrell Hd. jackson. Ms 33011 Hawthorn Dr. Tnllohoina, Tn Lake Circle Dr. Longwood. Fl 600 Sweetwater Clnlm ltd. St. Lonis. Mo T333 Sherwood Dr. Nashville. Tn 6117 Cordendale Dr. St. l'eterslmnrg. F1 700 16th St. S X1'innetka. II 1129 Cherry St. Meniphis, Tn 4560 Craiginont jacksonville. Fl 5503 Coppedge Ave. Lineolnton. Ca P.O. Box 2537 Vestal. NY 3121 Cortland Dr. Nashville. Tn 649 Brook Hollow Rd. Louisville, Ky 4902 Miles Ln. Toledo, Oh 5604 Plantation Owensboro, Ky 1717 Bittle Rd. Gainesville. Ga 1190 Laurel Lane Lexington, Ky 2029 Lakeside Dr. Charles S. Houston, Ch Michael Nolan Howard, Math Margaret Walker Huber, Soc Dale Warren Huddleston, Geo Amy Louise Hudgins, Art His Kathleen Elaine Hunt, N Susan Merrill Hunt, CeolMath Lucy Selligson Hunter, Hist Catherine Ives, N Andrew Alan Jacobs, Psych Steve Ecott Jacobs, Econ Paul Frederick Jacobsen, Eng Knoxville, Tn 5304 Maywood Rd. Lexington, Ky 750 Shaker Dr. 21907 Nashville, Tn 21 Vauglnfs Cap 3142 Tarrow Springs, Fl Innis Brook Falls Church, Va 6418 Overhill Rd. Scotch Plains. 2620 Deer Path Houston, Tx -107 Coachman Dallas, Tx 3801 Gillon Birmingham, Mi 619 Overhill Rd. Mission, Ks 6656 Millhaven Dr. Cincinnati, Oh 6518 NVerk Rd. Santa Barbara, Ca 4642 Via Roblada Robert Douglas James, ME!EnSci Indianapolis, In 7304 Layman Ave. Ann Margaret Jarvis, N Tunica, Ms Box 1095 George William Jenkins III, Psy Memphis, Tn 5563 Quince Rd. A ll f s X l la 0? 1 W I l A 0 4, .- Q 'Y Qt xx ll 'J 'I :ff YI .IA 67 - :gf ., 1 is. Q, ' lm "The university is a university for the administration and not for the studentsf, J L... Ks.. K-.-y X Paul Gerrard Jensen, Math! SIS Louisville, Ky 7414 Creenlawn David Neal Jewell, SIS! Math Lexington, Ky 3337 High Hope Rd. Catherine Lorraine Johnson, BA WV. Palm Beach, Fl 7301 Flagler Dr. Frank Doyle Johnson, UrbStu Dallas, Tx 3912 Colgate Leslee Kay Johnson, BA Indianapolis, Ms 8 Seymour Dr. Mark Warren Johnson, Phil Ann Arbor,'Mi 2671 Park Ridge Dr. Robert L. Johnson, Econ Langdale, Al 6105 26th Ave. Stephen Jay Johnson, ME Atlanta, Ga 6390 Brigewood Va. Rd. Rodney E. Jones, A Naples, Fl 1274 Pine Ct. Lee Workman Jordan, Chem Franklin, T1 Rt. 5 Wilson Pk. Alexis Jones Joyce, BA Nashville, T 422 Sunnyside Dr. Paul Andrew Justice, Jr., Chem Nashville, Tn 5442 Wakefield Dr. Robert C. Kain, E Lighthouse Pt., F 1 3235 NE 28 Ave. Lou Franklin Kalil, Math! Phys College Park, Md 4108 Bridgewater St. Gregg Robert Kantak, Econ! BA Worthington, Oh 5742 Linworth Rd. Stephen David Karr, Soc Nashville, Tn 6129 Jocelyn Hollow Rd. George Thomas Keith, Jr., Phys N ashville, Tn 6129 Tousdale Dr. Mary Sue Keller, BA! Acc Peoria, Il 218 Embert Pl. Susan Elaine Kelso, N Paducah, Ky Rt. 10, 148 Ridgemont Walter W. Kennedy, A Bikou, Al 3400 N. Woodridge Dr. -. K P' SEN IORS 40 Mark Thomas Ketterson, Drama Evelyn Sue Kimbrough. EVVRE Robert Harold Kjellman, BA Brian Stuart Klein. Cals!Hist Stephen Robert Klein, Chem!Cer Beth Ann Knight. Eng Harry Weatherly Knight, Engl His Lucinda Knowlton. Chem Richard Koch, Ecl BA Richard Alan Koch, Rio Laura Susan Kossoy. Soc Carol Ann Koster. Cer jane Elizabeth Krabill. Michael Lee Kraeger. PolSci N Nashville, Tn 1902 Lombardy Ave. Prospect. Tn Rt. 1. 1-16 Needham. Ma 109 NVashington Ave. Huntsville, Al 826 Eldorado Ave. Gainesville, Fl 185-1 NW 12th Rd, Delray Beach. Fl 2101 NNN' 3rd Ave. Anniston, Al 12313 Fairway St. Petersburg, F1 -111 Cordona Blvd. Des Moines, Ia 515 55th St. Louis, Mo 3031 Regis Dr. E. Pateliogue, NY 150 Durkee Lane Paducah. Ky 3734 Beyer Lane XVadsworth, Oh 269 VVoodland Ave. Dallas, Tx 12-15 Nottingham Lane lrwin jacohs Kuhn, PolSci Nashville. Tn 121-1 Chiekering Rd. .f, in-L 1 , W 1 get 4 N ,L 'f fQ?fffl1Z.- . Q-,. :rr " ' 3. -2 ' ' P' - 1 1? P L . ., J'-' .1 , l.:r. - 'f F w ' il x , , , 1 wx J -- ,f .1 J Y- A , . - - . Z. 54599619 41'-. , CU , .- . , . . 27. 45, gr . 9 I I U. nnyofcgf. tx c.M,,.'0g: ,af '-"'.,. " s 17 if-f'--Q.OoL'Cr'0M0 4971 Y-'I -.Lu ' ,.-.. Jax H 1. .- '.x""' 1 - 1 --.r. - -AL L. .Ja "Vanderbilt's a good place to meet people from all over U Robert Craig, Knykendall, BiomedE Huntingdon, XVV David Linger Kyger, Eng VVil1ialn Blanchard Lacy. His!PS Iames Royden Lancaster, SIS Vicki Renue Lancaster. Bio Arthur VVilliams Landry. His Catherine Marie Langdon. His Dennis Richard Lavette. Bio!I'1is David Claude LeDoux. EE Iere Robert Lee, PolSei Stephen Paul Lee, Chem Debora Elaine Leek. RiomedE Lissa LeCrand, His Ann Lehr. RA Ernest C. Leonard. Hist Pamela L. Lesemann, 1-list jeffrey R. Levenson. Bio Calvin P. Lewis. Ee!RA john Edward Linn, Phys james H. Litllejohn, CiE 31-1 11th Ave. Huntingdon, NVV 31-1 11th Ave. Cookeville. Tn T56 Brown Ave. Tnllahoma, Tn 1033 Strarford Ct. Franklin. Tn Rt. 112 Gilbert Dr. New Orleans, La 7730 Burthe St. XV. Hartford. Cn 27 Norwood Rd. New Britain. Cn 150 Oakwood Dr. Paducah, Ky -126 Illinois St. Nashville, Tn 1-107 Lebanon Rd, Norman. Ok 701 Sundown Tillar, Ak Rt. 1. 110x353 Birmingham, Al 53325 1-lermitage Rd. San Antonio. Tx 10 Ehncourt Nashville, Tn 3818 Hilldale Dr. St. Mountain, Ca 1107 Alpco Court Fremont, Oh 918 S. County Rd. Shelbyville. Tn 1200 Behnont Ave. Chicago, Il 10021 Hamilton La Grange, Il 425 S. Spring x'Y'.'Si3' .5 .-- .. far. in . -937,11 ' . I J . A .., . tilt X 1 gtg hr Fran. x . . -,pi .1 ' Tl.. . . ,, A " ' - t 1' I - ix -1 1 i A 4 3 ,P 1 'P A l -1' 1.1 -if N JL' 54-.fi . t , p:, J,'.'Q:,i f- 'Ani a -,, 5 M s-A iss- .3-.. , - H-11,5 . .. .iff -.5 1: 1 1 ,. 'i Iii 'T 7111 'V 5' g'T.r"5' I E git! Y-W Eduin Manning "Pray eveiy night' the name is A , r 4 ,1 ,ft ,.. 'i., r l .xl xqt 1' Qf ' f5' as ' is N" t , . 1x ,,- . . .,, ,NWI .9,. i. ,.' .hx 'Ik hit U Fig' fl - 'N' 197 Magi lu ,., ' J ".. at-1 'fy A . C 1 1 f . 1 .f1 31v , i "Q' -C5 'W '-f,. gg.. 1'-' -'TJ Danny E. Lodter, Math Elizabeth Ann Loflin. Nurs Melissa Y. Logan, Eng johnson City. Tn 810 NV. Maple St. Spokane, La Lake St. john Atlanta, Ca 770 W. Paces Ferrv Rd. NVilliam A. Long, Bio Joann Ford Longshore, Eng Adrian D. Lorentson. Math Chattanooga, Tn 1055 Carter Dr. Birmingham. Al 3805 Spring Valley Northbrook, Il 12153 Bar Harbor Terrace Denise I. Louthiau, Math Susan E. Lovinggood, PSC Susan V. Lucas, BA john F. Lucey III, Cer Marcia Sue Ludwig, Chem A. Scott Lundcen, Psy Lucretia L. Lynn, His!Psy Bonnie L. MacPherson, Ceo! An Marg Madden, Nurs Worth itf' Robin C. Magee, Math David D. Malone, jr.. Math Edwin B. Manning, Ec!B,-1 Roy Redford Manning. l-list Harry B. Maring, Hist Kathryn M. Marion, EE Maurice joel Marks, Chem joseph B. Marshall, Hist Elizabeth VV. Marston, H ist Douglas V. Martin, Hist XVesley Adair Martin, BA Marius Matioc, SIS Ben R. Matthews, Ec! Ba Miriam M. May, Math Isabel M. Maynard, Fr! AH Donna jean Mayo, Anth Barbara Lee McCall, BA Marcey A, McCarrelI, Nurs Debra jane McCarthy, Bio Thomas P. McCarthy, Psc Vienna, Va 2508 E. Meredith Dr. Cape Cirardeay. Mo 2505 Allendale Dr. Tulsa, Ok 2722 S. Uticca Loudonvillc. NY 8 Willo Lane Louisiana. Mo 19 Ordonia Miami. Fl 1880-1 XV. Lake Dr. Dallas, Tx 10001 Preston Miami. Fl 9955 SW 33 St. W . Palm Beach, Fl 277 Cordova Bd, Atlanta, Ca River Park Dr., NNV Nashville, Tn 906 Evans Rd. Franklin, Tn Bt. 4 Nashville, Tn 211 N. Bellevue Dr, Selina, Al Nashville, Tn 4107 Utah Ave. Lake Wales, F I 322 Steedly Ave. Knoxville, Tn 118 Carrick St. History, Tn 5877 Brierfield St. Louis. Mo 17 Ridgetop Atlanta, Ca 2854 Arden Rd. NXV Arad, Romania QA Pottier St. Kenilworth, Il 3:28 Leicester Houston. Tx 527 Westminister Birmingham, Al 21 Woodhill Rd. Alton, Al Box 286 Brentwood, Tn 1237 jefferson Davis Decatur, Ca 1842 E. Ramble Ct. Ft. Lauderdale, Fl 1701 NE 7 Ave. Phillipsburg, NJ 614 Barrymore St. 06 '- naw A , J if 1 fr ' ' ,os S' puma .X L-ur' N :W W--1 'L--JJ SENIORS ,ly F .WT-1:7 A . 4 . ai AX o I , if xx Marcia Ann McCauley, Ec! CS Robert T. McClelland, Phys Margaret McCullough, Math Donald W. McCormick, Psy Cynthia S. McCreless, CiE Beth jean McElvy, Nurs john L. McGehee Charles M. McGibony. His!Ec Daniel B. McGregor, EE Brian VV. McGuire, Bio Oklahoma City, OK 6618 N. Hillcrest Ave. Nashville, Tn 223 Ensworth Pl. San Antonio, Tx 331 Terrell Rd. Chattanooga, Tn 631 Spring Valley Ln. Bethesda, Md 7121 Longwood Dr. Seabrook, Md 9610 Woodherry St. Memphis, Tn 191 S. Perkins jacksonville, Fl 4648 Baden Ln. Clarksville, Tn 2171 N. Meadow Dr. Prairie Village. Ku 7412 El Monte . 1 " 'iz in t, , , l Y. A-DCC H j ' ' W F " Norman K. Mclnnis, jr., H! Psy Santa Ana, Ca 1 . U 11621 Heathcliff Dr. as , ' -,ps 4 joel B. McLemore, ECXBA Nashville, Tn I A I V . is If W V A ' 4829 Hopeclale. Dr. A f I A Thomas j. McQuiston, Psy Memphis, Tn X ""'if' -,Q ' ' 4561 Sequoia " ' Ii ' ,l 431' 1 K Ellen F. Mears, FA Birmingham, Al 1 -,Q ' . , Q. 3648 Rockhill Rd. , ,. 1 X 1 wi' 1 V. QQ. r Darlene Mendenhall, Nurs Lake Park, Fl 1 if 111 1. ' 1 ... 1 3802 Bermuda Rd. C C I 1 0 1 0 0 0 ' 7 7 Ike 1V1Hg 11'1 H. PGHUIOUSG. Anon. ' " V .' X 1 lf- 1 -. N judith S. Meriwether, Nurs Nashville, Tn f ' ' - 2"5 T .' D -. fp, 1 53 - fl' 1 '1 Daniel Merrick A Ghrdohriiiie, Vja A - T ' A h V ", 6' if I - 1 The Meadows ' lv .Q ' -as ' , 4-dw L A s Lynda Ann Mersereau, Hist Chevy Chase, Md " j . . 'sf -7 A ' 'l 1' 6420 Brookside Dr. V' . - . ,. -' A L V' ' L 5, J A., Carolyn O. Meyer, Ger!Ed Cincinnati, Oh r 'J " 1 j . 1 '-" 7360 Thumbelinda Ln. 1 '1' N . 'F N- ' 1-.1 ' -'Q ' T Mary Capell Miles, Eng Memphis, Tn I p" ik '1 - f ' 1 2941 Robin Rd. 'K 4 V i Charles Davis Miller, His jackson, Ms 'J fi ,D . 4 .,l V1 A 836 Brookwood Rd. , I it -H " j 3 Dale Anthony Miller, His Tampa, Fl .,-4, ".,.. . --. f Y' N ' 4 hff "auf 2624 N. Dundee . -j , ,I ' ' .f R George L. Miller III, Chem Germantown, Tn 'S-'V l ' Vg, f jf" V f 7 1655 E. Churchill Dns. .f 1 L, A T? f 1" fl. g Russell Edwin Miner, Matsui Rocky River, Oh K, N 0 ' 1 A 20723 Beachwood Dr. , ii i 2 1 1 Ruth Anne Miller, His Port Washington, NY .2 :P-5 ' ' Soloman I. Miller, Eng Huntsville, Al 1 i , I 1101 Fraser Ave. 1 can 3 - Timothy D. Miller. Econ Cincinnati, Oh '. ' Q ,B f , 5, 7936 Keller Rd. "--- 'A' .9 . '- , ' . Margaret Mary Milnor, Eng!Mus Memphis Tn 1 gl, .I ,,., 'E 'I I' -gi " ' 2923 Midland Ave. ' 5-. . 'ij' i f- .f Anthony Guy Miranda, MecE Vienna, Oh ' A ' " -J ' " I 'V ' 1' ,j 3- E- " 676 Youngt'n Kingsv'1e - 1 ,' fl ' Y William Edward Mohler, E01 BA Charleston, wv ' ' , ' I 'X , 971 Ridgemont Rd. , -'wflf-rf, ' 'i A ' . ' ' George E.N. Montague, ECXBA Charlotte, NC -S , , 8900 Abington Rd. in Y .5 V ' .K x Richard AB Montague, jr., Ec!His Hattiesburg, Ms "' 'T L , fx f ."' 404 s. 34th Ave. 'arf-5 1 ' ' 5: jane Ann Montgomery. Math Tampa, Fl " , 4 -ir. x .AJ ,f 4' .I ! V in I W 1 fp f A 1 j. Hunter Moore, His Royanne A. Moore, Nurs 4203 Sainpedrado Nashville, Tn 385 Chesterfield Richmond, Va 7100 jahnkc Rd. Thomas Wilbur Moore, jr., Matl1!SIS Nashville, Tn 21 Vaughn's Cap 317 Virginia Rice Morton. His Brian john Murphy, Ee! BA Sara Helen Murphy. Bio XVilliam Carroll Mur mhv jr. B' Alexandria, Va 202 Creen St. Huntsville. Al 709 XVatts Dr. Indianapolis. In 2321 E. 69th St. ohnson City Tn 1 , , , io j . . 1, 208 W. Chilhowie Ave. Sharon joy Musselmhn. Econ Anne Keel Myers. Span Michael jerome Naber, Bio jonathon Douglas Nan, A Cynthia Lee Nefl','Nurs Susan C. Neff. PbyslAstro Bruce Allan Newman, Phil Gail Grace Nichols, Math janie Blakemore Nichols, FA john Henry Nichols, Econ Pittsburgh. Pa 1859 Taper Dr. Dallas, Tx 6026 Teakwood Dr. Franklin Lakes, Nj 822 Scioto Dr. Batavia, Oh 295 Old Boston Rd. Fort Thomas. Ky 39 Mayfield Nashville, Tn 2116 Westwood Ave. Cookeville. Tn 7535 Nowelancl Rd. Pine Bluff, Ak 2 Longmeadow Dr. jackson, Ms 2421 Hideaway Short Hills, Nj 121 Forest Dr. ,, ,- , ,Wfni , -3 . A ia ' FQ. .' I' I A 11, rg I i si f . N ...J 1. l W A -if s e 'Ee j . ' 1 ll cc: 5 gg. I if . Z3 'fl-1 - 1" will 1 1 , , .. . .J , fi' '5 lf. 1' 111. " 11 . . 1- if 'V ' ' 111 IT: 463 1" f' is 9 31212 .1 ' gigs, J" Q ' . K .3341 ' 4 "-- zz. j: 1 ,,.Q.', ,,', . -111 s.1 'N 81-.L.a'3fT?2!-'JS-rf. ffi "'i'. ,11 . . 11.7. ' 1.'-N... 'Tve never known William Ronald Nichols, EWRE David Lee Nicholson, CivilE Mark Edward Nicol, Ec! BA Mimi Renee Nimmo, Math Samuel A. Nolen. Cer! PolSci Oak Ridge, Tn 774 VV. Outer Dr. Memphis, Tn 6484 Heather Klamath Falls, Or 17T5 Calhoun Springfield, Il 40 Virginia Ln. f-fifx, NVilmington, Dl. 1002 Overbrook Rd. Ellen Lisa Noinberg, Psy Dothan, Al 113 Camelia Dr. Kenneth L. Norcross III, EnvE Louisville, Ky 605 Indian Ridge Rd. William Chalmers Nordlund, Ee! BA Decatur, Il 260 N . Oakcrest Luci Kirtland Norman. PolSci Nashville, Tn 2809 VVhite Oak Dr. L. Terry Northcutt, Nurs Louisville, Ky 3517 St. Germaine Ct. Nashville, Tn 2713 Clenoaks Dr. Nan Alice Nunes, Psy M. Madonna O'Bryan, Nurs Ellen jane O'Connell. Soc Kathleen Mary O'Conor, Eng Becky C. Olive, CivE Floy Anne Oliver. Ee! BA Gray Adelaide Oliver, EcBA Robert William Oliver. Ceo! Math Louisville, Ky 1627 Eastern Pkwy. Cincinnati, Oh 3591 Mooney Ave. Ottawa, Il Bos 605 . Houston, Tx 12511 Kingsride Nashville, Tn 229 Deer Park Dr. ' Nashville,'1'n 229 Deer Park Dr. Mexico D.F., Mex 203 Pal de Versailles William Langdon Oliver, Psy!BA Savannah, Ca Rte. 3 Box 306C james 1. O'Neill, BA Rome, -Ga 448 Mount Alto Rd. it to rain so much an heref, 1? Q -ng , Safe 1 1 I 53 - F .2 ,Q MQ CK is .L I I 1 'Q 1 11 - jf.. ' X 1 EZ" 5' 1 . a 1 ' f L . -. --A. ,lf . A . . . A , 'cu' , -7 '-- V' Qu' I X if E I I, 1' 1 .1 111-5. 1 A 1 ' .. 1 e , 1 , .gig . ,. . , 1 ", 1 ' ' A 1 V , an-' N, 1: 1 51 lun- WP il . 111 ig' K ati.. - y , X1-Cl 1, .Q Xl' - 1 4 ,. I. Cynthia Neff cz il" 'A' ,vi-F , 1. . 1 ., -. Q y,Vk 1 ' l f I -, ..l Ronald C. Piacenti, Math!Ec Park Forest, Il 423 Monitor -' " ' ,-'-'x - '77 1 ff: f'f 1 7 7'--S11 - . - ' -ill I ' ' 5. Pilvx- ' ' ll V 1 Lloyd james Onstott, jr., Ec!ESci Wichita Falls, Tx - l 3304 Robin Ln. L rg lar ' Richard Kenneth Orr, Chem!Psyc Ft. Lauderdale, Fl ' . 1 .Q Q .1 I ' ' 4218 NE 5 Ave. Mtg' 'i ,gf 1 l Robert Edward Oswalt. CivE 4 gleE1pl:is,IlI'l1 ' N 1' 77 inc a n. , jeffrey M. Ottum, A Green Bay, Wi -9.5 A 1 'il 33200 Vllaubenoor Dr. is M 1 . X Arlene Gisele Owen, Psych Nashville, Tn A X T 1. Ag , 1 L1 707 N. 51h sl. F-311 . ' 'i . :P .. -. . " NYX. A "' ' r 9 N' I Claudia Owen, Soc Houston, Tx f- 'law - .I i -. 1 ll' ' 1909 Olympia . - ' U V Q W 3 as Elizabeth Owen, Nurs Houston, Tx If 1 1' ' . 11709 M '- I its. 1 if . ' ' . -5- 'l f Chris VV, Page, Ee! BA Eilfallllillkkil s' - ix, 1 "V . 539 N. Randolph St. ' I , 1' ' . ' l . f I' ' X Frank Bernard Pallotta, Dra!Eng Atlanta, Ga my . 1 A ,X H, A Y. it Q., ., 1999 w. Paces Fy. Rd. M' l . Q ,Wil I 'X - ' ,fs ,N - X "l Christopher Allen Palumbo, CivE Memphis, Tn L U' t 1 -"x -1 RG. L X ' fy 5 3021 Birchlield " -9. an " 1 " Angela Cannon Pardee, BiomedE Gaitherburg, Md -,A I " ' -N 19340 Keymer Way sv' -1 - T. Iohn David Pardue, Psych Clarksville, Tn K ' . 330 Davis Dr. , ,.' 1 "S Stephen Edwin Pardv, Chem Pittsburgh, Pa E' ' ' l.":E'i"' ll. QT T i 2666 CCLliil'VlllC Dr. V ' Y WA. ...J ' ' Ivll Richard Craig Parker, A Fort Smith, Ak 5 K '. , " 7621 Horan Dr. s A M 1 g 1 Gary Allen Passons, Bio Chattanooga. Tn rl 1 ' 1 A 'X , 1 ' ...N ?2??5E?l?2?i23:13:25ifit? .Zf4:E7:E17ZI:E 1805 Verona Dr. "Ov ll ' ' b d D era It s een a goo ear. Richard Parker 1 4... 1 ' 1 , 1' , " ' I I ' James Fraser Patrick. Phys Lexington, ky . ' 751 Sherwood Dr. "' ' T Catherine Patterson, Phil!Eng London, SW' 1, Eng. ' 2' . - 10 Lowndes Ct. Lowndes 'fl ' " l, Deborah Grace Patton, Psych Nashville, Tn h . , 5 5815 Still Hollow Rd. a f 9 '4 v Q Richard Morris Patton, BA Atlanta, Ga ,. lQ...4,,A' q i fy 1 ' 669 Stal-light Dr. . f " , ,f 5 , Linda lane Peacock, Nurs Atlanta, Ga , yy L 1' f 1'-' 7 3120 verdtm Dr. NW 1 1 ' H ' f ' 1 --. - I 1, A, " Ronald G. Pearson, His! PSc Tucker, C21 , Q 'ffl' ' QQ 4164 Waterloo Dir. 1,5 .f ' gg H . ' I Benjamin H. Pedigo, II1 Atlanta, Ga , 1 . gl. if K ,qv V. 3750 Summitridge Dr. 1 f . - will -Q .l 'T 11' Russell S. Pedle Lebanon. Oh A " JJ 'li' ' ' l ' Y 113C dD , . A' ' . . - oncor r. ' . N' , l , I ' ' ' ' f . vw Sheree L. Peglow, MolBio Munster, In tary'-'l. lf . ,Xl xx A A Q 8668 White Oak ,Q .1-I ' ' 'Q l , " .X '- - 7.41 '. ,L David E. Pendelton, ESC Memphis, Tn ima' ai?-. . f l 2435 Bartlett Rd. E-ZH ' " ' ' T- ,. W ' li ' 0 7 "' ' f ' ' Patricia R. Penuel, Hist Lascasses. Tn V 4 ' T ,I V Maplewood Farm 0 ' 8. li 5, ,N K. Sherrill Perkins, Psy Huntsville. Al R 'nib f -' 5' W" 7 1 ' 1402 Monterrey 1. ' f h 1 bg 1 I . A I X. ' . Mary Cox Perry, a Houston, Tx 5" A 4 A ' I ' "K ' " 1' 602 Shadywood E. ,SJ A I ' ' , N..f"Q . - n ' Will Harrison Perry, Psy! Math Poway, Ca '- ' 'V .'l'I7' 1 ' ' ' ' Box 845 . -1 - V if ff ' ' in Conrad W. Petersen, EVE Greenwich, Cn lx -, fg,51,j,fl5f Y: , '- 1' Dingletown Rd. ll . . in 7 t ' ' - A ' ' Debra M. Petty, Nurs Nashville, Tn ' " K 1604 Glen Ecllo Rd. 'l ' V . '- 5 lu, K R Edward E. Peyronnin, Geo Evansville, In E 4 I . 'X 600 Cullen Ave. l ,- f,,..,,'4 , L' ,."9, ' Anne S. Philli s, BA!Soc Birinin ham, Al ' '. ' ,L Lf M . arise t. 1 ' ' P 2930 C gi 1 Rl ig., .7 ' '- gl 'I 'A , . 41 Kathleen Ann Phillips, Nurs Harrison, NY ' ' I i I ' Y , 91 Harrison Ave. 7. . I.. ' Emily C. Pilkinton, Nurs john Steele Pitts, His! Ph Patricia D. Pitts. Bio Margaret Ann Polk, Nurs jean Ann Popp, ESC William Rip Potter, EC Michael H. Potts, a Patricia E. Potts, UrbSt jason C. Poulos. Hist Jennie Lynn Powell, PSC Philip S. Powers, jr., Geo Clair Patrice Prichard. Psy Sally Fuqua Pruett, BA Bruce R. Punch, Geo Siwan Ann Pyle, Fren john Paul Ramsay, Chem 'Robert Ramsey, A Charles Tyson Randolph, Eng Richard C. Rathe, CivE Karen A. Rauch, Nurs Stephen Allen Ray, Ee! BA Kirk S. Reeves, Eng!Cl Wendy O. Regas, FA joel Damon Regen, CivE Vern E. Reinhardt, EE Margaret C. Reitz, Nurs Margaret Ann Reynolds, Eng Thomas E. Rice, Jr David Tate Rich, A Karen P. Rich, Math!SIS Daniel B. Richardson, jr. Cilley C. Richardson, Chem Laura E. Riddick, Psy Nathan H. Ridley, PoSc! His Edward L. Ries, Ir., ChE! Ch Columbia, Tn 2807 Mere Dr. Shelbyville, Tn Box 147 McLean, Va 7901 Foxhound Rd. Vidalia, La 809 Alabama St. West Hartford, Cn One Peaslee Hill Birmingham, Mi 3595 Hzllla Lane Tampa, Fl 3101 West End Ave. Dallas, Tx 3608 Drexel Miami, Fl 5000 SW 83 St. Birmingham, Al 2109 Vestridge'Dr. Houston, Tx 615 Pifer Nashville, Tn 3003 Medial Ave. San Diego, Ca 3033 Browning St. Nashville, Tn 6503 Brown Lee Dr. Mamaroneck, NY 917 Cove Rd. East Q , .th- S . '54 . .i 'ilu bmp" Q' v s 1 A has x 5' ' ti .13.gj2.f on n,:.,::k: . F y -'iv g af,:,o'.:'1,x I lxsxhw .. .- ly V I . l l UI?-1 If , .1 ls, .1 S "It's so Sarasota, Fl 1340 Tangier Way Nashville, Tn 5932 Post Rd. Richmond, Va 5100 Stratford Cres. Covington, La Belle Terre Rd. Sterlacoom, Wa Box 250 Hendersonville, Tn 105 Bluegrass Pt. Thomson, Ga 530 Central Rd. Naples, Fl 2021 7th St. S. Nashville, Tn 865 Glendale Ln. Lima, Oh 227 N. Woodlawn St. Louis, Mo 6 Ridgeline Dr. Cadiz, Ky Route 4 Columbus, Ga 3240 College Dr. Nashville, Tn 4410 Honeywood Dr. Dallas, Tx 7331 Paldao Dr. Worchester, Ma 5 Algonquin Rd. Lake Charles, La 919 Henrietta Ln. Metairie, La 4820 Cleveland Pl. Gallatin, Tn Liberty Lane Louisville, Ky 7211 Woolrich Rd. '-7 1 , N . 5 ,MAX I X X --,f , 1 'R T 5 was J 1 conservative, but 1 like itf' 'T . - 1-'Lili F., ' i -gf, . . z f iiae' . 1, - , ' ,ffm-1 '59 ! 3 , I Li A 'f"1p .f V I -5 4 , 1 i . Elf Y- Z ' A - we-V, XR l"?' 'nf " mt ' "ff: rg 1 rg.:-i i H.-.-rj-. 3 A 1.1Q'z'F .f' ,C ' 1. . ' 'I r ,-,L L v ' t . My . 14,5510 k - ,. . 1 7 A . .1 1.-PT .. l 1 .FF 59 llill 40 9'1" SENIOBS Susan Riggs, Bio Carol L. Ritter, Math Henry H. Roberts, Psy Cland Robison, 1-list Suzanne Rogacz, Psy Linda Scott Rogers, Econ Patricia Ann Rogers, Math joseph Allen Roller, BA Susan Lucia Romero, Nurs Anne Harrison Rose, Psy! Ed Robert Terrell Rosen, Ec!BA Kathy Ruark, Nurs Betsy Lee Rubel. Bio Merri Rudd, Eng Teri Rummans. Psy Little Rock, Ak 1300 N. Hughes Southhaven. Ms 5976 Darlington Clove Memphis, Tn 3879 Minden Rd. Springville. Al Box 281 Andrews, NC Fairview Rd. Nashville, Tn Box 181 Sta. B. Memphis, Tn 178-l Kingsview Rd. Ashtabula, Oh 6307 Oldwood Rd. Fieldalc, Va Rt. 1 BOX 1021 Richmond, Va 4506 VV. Franklin St. Las Vegas, Nv 2809 Mason Ave. Greencastle, In RR 3 Sherwood Hls. Clarksville, Tn 175 W. Glenwood Memphis, Tn 5369 Pecan Gr. La. Fayetteville, NC 2738 Bennington Rd. "After four enjoyable years at Vanderbilt, I observe: The more things change, the more things stay the samef, Marschall S. Runge, Blllfclllllll Ree Russell. Ee! BA Richard Morrow Russell, ChemE hvilhillll Latham St. Charles, His Austin, Tx 2501 Calewood Pl. Memphis, Tn 1417 Court Ave. Madison, Tn 729 NVeSl Ave. Nashville, Tn 1-109 Grandview Dr. Sally Lynne Samoriga, Nurs Hamilton. Oh 15315 S. Hills Blvd. Dcvinder Singh Sandhu, Rio Punja, India Sanehwal, Dis.Ludhiana jim Bob Satterwhite, Psy Lexington. Ky 758 Sherwood Dr. Russell Harper Saunders, BA! Psy Lexington, Ky 229 Shady Ln. Wanda M. Scarborough, Nurs Sandusky, Oh 911 Thorpe Dr. Mary joan Scheele, Nurs St. Louis, Mo 8025 Venetian Dr. Robert William Schindler, ChemE Louisville, Ky Edwin Schklar, A Leo Bachle Schmid, Ed! BA! His I. Daniel Schmidt, BA Jody Schneiter, Chem Robert james Scholes. ESci Carol Ann Scholla, AICO 8507 Cheltenham Cr. McMinnville, Tn 205 james Rd. St. Louis, Mo 3 Ladue Acres Columbus, Oh 800 Fairway Blvd. jackson, Ms 945 Royal Oak Dr. Nashville, Tn 2141 Fairfax Ave. Louisville, Ky 9005 Seaton Spring Pkwy. Belle Spalding Schroder, Soc Atlalltkl, C11 2628 Habershain Rd. Robert james Schumacher, Psy Louisville, Ky 501 Seaton Spring Ct. Alvin Robert Schwab, jr., Ee! BA Chattanooga, Tn 6 Rose C Iirele .ffifwr Y 'ff.,,.mf+'f 'Y 171 'Y fr' Y" f pd 'fy' .ws 'Q . .. 4-5? N! Merri Rudd Pam 'Z env- ,. 7? if T' A 1 Q ' 2 ' .. S5 ,' v fi? ,I x ,vi L ' Mi X it X I 1 ,, .. .V L ip-i 1'-rrwf 'r t"'f'. PES. hifi 'E' V 3 4' L11 I 'A sag ,-. iw ,..7,..,... f L.. L. i ., .- 've' ff, ivy' G 6?-1' I - Q if I 'ii v fl 7. FH ,,v' D49 uq,, , . X f- .6 I. . :ip AA? . fi f' 1 ff- "A lot of unfullfilled potential is in this university. If students would just learn to uti- lize the resources here . . ela Showalter Donald David Schwartz, Ee! Acc Evzm Bennett Schwulst, Psy john E. Selby, His! Psy Susan Emily Senturia, FA Robert F. Sharpe, Ir., His Ann M. Sharry, Psy Elise Levereault Shaw, Math Mark Andrew Shetley, Ba! Ec Roger Steven Shields, Eng Philip David Shipley, E john Frederich Shireman, BioE NVilliam Merritt Shohe, PolSci Pamela Sands Showalter, Eng Robert Paul Siegel, PolSci Scott Foster Siman, Econ 9 yljnrg. .lip 1 WL 11 .1 W i . .A -. ,Q .I .5 Y. 'ITT .' ri ll 1 .y in N f W . . v ,fr , ' at it T . , 1 l:j"i' ,,.- if . , A-Q4 '1 ' " J. ' 5 Aa, , A -.- 1 lynx! L V' V rr, , 1 i if Y' l 1 1 Q 1 1 isiiaslflrbg 1, . s r T' .1 R .TQ "if" .1 A .iv-1 Artlmr joseph Simon, Ec! BA Mark Lee Singer. Psy!Ec Robert K. Sirgiovanni, Ec! BA Gail S. Sisk. His Martha Lee Slater, Nurs Evanston, Il 324 Wesley Ave. Alexandria, Va 101 Cameron Mews Columbus, Oh 1800 Lynnhaven Dr. Lake Iaekson, Tx 123 Clover Memphis, Tn 2289 Kirby Rd. Charleston, SC Dallas, Tx 4-140 NVindsor Pkwy. Kennett, Mo 924 E. Baker Dr. Old Greenwich, Ct. 2 Tods Driftway Nashville, Tn 201 Chamberlain Girard, Ks 401 S. Ozark Kingsport, Tn 1214 Linville St. VVinter Park, Fl 1461 Via Tuscany Freeport, NY 8iLAnn Dr. So. Sprinfield, M0 Rt. 12 Box 329 Lagrange, ll 721 Ashland Huntsville, Al 1909 Cedar Ridge Rd. Pennington. Nj 5 Queens Ln. Lafayette. La 70518 jacksonville. Fl 1351 Holmesdale Rd. Bethany Louise Smith, Drama! His Memphis. Tn Brier R. Smith 111, BAEng Daniel Paul Smith, Fren! Eng Glen Owen Smith, Ee!BA Hallie Smith, A james Kirk Smith, Ec!BA Philip Copeland Smith, His Ruth Ellen Smith, Nurs 77 N. 1.Vhite Sta. Rd. Kirkwood. Mo 7976 N. Signal Hills Iackson, Ms 322 Arlington Ave. Novelty, Oh 1-1822 Hillbrooke E. Orlando, F l -L4-1 Jennie jewel Dr. Sellersburg, In 815 Dreyer VV. Atlanta. Ca 3181 Lanier Dr. Chattanooga, Tn 1419 X-Vinding X'Vay Thomas Garthwaite Smith, Ec!BA Birmingham, Al 33710 Montrose Rd. Vicki Ann Smith, Fren Douglas Lee Smythe, Chem Dallas. Tx 3500 Bryn Mawr Hixson. Tn 1422 O'Neal ltd. William Edward Snodgrass, Rel!Sp Chattanooga, Tn Richard Alan Snow. Eng Michael Lee Solomon, His Edward Spacapan, Math! Soc 1 Rivervista Dr. V Abilene. Tx 2410 Shoreline Dr. Harrisburg, Pa 3970 Green St. Arlington I-Its., ll 103 S. Brighton 414 SENIORS 'vvva . A." 1 5 J- is-' X, J! - i- 'D' 1521 3 .4 ml li' ,Uk " -. iq, i 5. va of 1 , . if' M - . 1 M' , .1 , .., . 1' I 1 .- . rg ' 'IDN ' , "Milf, , an, wi 1 xv! K. Y" e tif if S x -wi Charles Ted Spcllings, Econ james Dean Spratt, jr., Ec!BA Stuart L. Sproull, Econ Mary Esther Stamp, Math Shirley Lucille Stanley, Nurs Miriam Elizabeth Staples, FA Conrad Andrew Stauffer, CivE Tom Rye Steele, His Phillip Andrew Steidl, CeofEcl Nancy Susan Stein, Nurs Scott Allen Stern, BA 4, pq. Mary Faye Stetson, Nurs ' james R. Stevens, A X , 1 Joyce Ann Stewart, Econ MW 1 Scarlett Inga Stewart, Econ 'X " rv, .3 C C l n e Nashville, Tn 709 VV. Meade Dr. Atlanta, Ga 4534 Tall Pines Dr. St. Louis, Mo 9 Modoc Tr. Nashville, Tn 3324 Acklen Ave. Highland Park, Il 1474 Sunnyside Orlando, Fl 1570 Waterwitch Dr. Princeton, NI 192 Brookstone Dr. Nashville, Tn 2703 Valley Brook Pl. Wyckoff, Nj 375 Van Beekum Place Miami, Fl 1616 S. Bayshore Dr. Atlanta, Ca 368 Lakemoore Dr. Springfield, Ky 403 Locust Hillsdale. Nj 6 Overbrook Pl. Tulsa, Ok 4132 E. -13rd Lithonia, Ca 3077 Evans Mill Rd. I enjo the school and the Wlde vanety of people Miriam Stalmlcsthat here-v ff 2 - ee' at 4, - V -4 Y Q 1' -""fsw'r wi N A X N' X. "r- X gg. if '52 ,-gi if L2 - , ll' T17 i i l l . ,x l 5. 1 A 1 15' 1 f 'Rf .AV O I . 1, .. , 3, r 1' : LSL' ' QF fl.. .1595 i' ' ,f,. Q, -y , fgf l- 1, . .L,. ,,,,,., 5 . 4, -ei fda is -R.. P , I rj . -1' g l - 1 i J 'lp' ' ,'-Lai' A f - ,r " -'A R ., ,fr A , . . 4 ' r " r ' X, ' 'L 1 i .1 - I ! ' , - 1 x -- 1 Tobey Gayle Stilz, EnSci john William Stone, III, ECXBA Dale Christian Strasser, Psych Jill Roberts Strathman, Nurs I.D. Strickland, His Stephanie A. Strohm, BA Versailles, Ky Rt. 4 Shelbyville, Tn Rt. 3 Harriman, Tn Rt. 2 Box 330 St. Louis, M0 1452 Fawnvalley Ct. Chillman, Al 1017 Larkwoocl Barrington, Il 135 Monument Maragaret Love Strome, Psy! Soc Gambier, Oh Jan Strother, SIS! Math jaclynn Stroud, Nurs joan Strumpf, A jane Gordon Sullivan, His Timon V. Sullivan, His john Morgan Sundermann, Chem Lorna C. Szczukowski, Nurs Constance Marie Tabern, LatAm Robert Glenn Tallent, ChemE I. Camille Tarbett, Nurs Barbara Lynn Tate, Math jim Tate, BA!Ec Carolyn Hall Taylor, Acc! BA P.O. Box 225 Birmingham, Al 3753 N. Woodridge Rd. Birmingham, Al 1624 Belvedere Dr. Rye, NY 31 Stuyvesant Ave. St. Simons Is., Ga 4326 11th St. E. Beach Tampa, Fl 4714 Clear Ave. Little Rock, Ak 10 Brookfield, Cove Chattanooga, Tn 200 Hillclale Dr. Lake Bluff, Il 506 Sunrise Ft. Lauderdale, Fl 4630 NE Is. Ter. Pomapano Beach, Fl 612 NE 4th St. Cincinnati, Oh 6522 Ambar Ave. Louisville, Ky 531 Poppy Way Nashville, Tn 2804 Blakemore Ave. Gregory Alan Thomas, Bio Harley Walter Thomas, BA josh Bradford Thomas, EnSci Gregory Brian Thompson, His Peter Russell Thompson, jr., His Rollin Louis Thrift, Bio1ncdE Ron Haymond Tilford, Bio Sarah Inez Tillery, Psych Prineville, Or Rt. 2 Box 636 Stillwater, Il 1818 Sunset Dr. Tulsa, Ok 2677 E. 36th St. Plano, Tx 2924 Creekbend Dr, Pit ua Oh 1 H 2 Hopewood Dr. Oak Ridge, Tn 232 S. Benedict Ave. Fulton, Ky 406 East Dr. Lafayette, La 113 Demanade Blvd. D. Louise Tirnerlake, N urs! Soc Brenda Corine Tompkins, Nurs Rosalie Tourne Torres, Psych Brownsville, Tx 24 McFadden Hut Hialeah, Fl 431 E. 62nd St. New Orleans, La 235 Dodge Ave. Michael Edward Torrey, SIS! Math Mexico City, Mex Homero 507 401CPolanco Belinda Traughber, Psych joel Wyatt Upcluoch, Math Michael Alan Upfield, BA!EnSci Donelson, Tn 22.3 Eldon Ct. Nashville, Tn River Road 222 Anchorage, Ky 11900 Arbor Drive E. " ,rn gonna hate leaving 1t,S been too damn eas 'l Rawson james Valentine, Eng Paul Douglas VanLandingham, Deborah Ann Van Meter, Nurs jeffrey Jennings Vaughn, CivE M, Virginia Vogel, Nurs Cherie Sadler Vogelfanger, Nurs Washington, DC 3101 3-ith St. NW His jackson, Ms 1040 Beasley Rd. Elizabethtown, Ky Box 46 Rt. 7 Nashville, Tn 451 Oakley Dr. Phoenix, Ar 1513 W. Flower Circle Memphis, Tn 3653 S2 I-Iaughton Ln. Kenton Ittner Voorhees, Psch M. Adair Wakefield, FA john Stuart Wallace, Glas Michael Edward Wallace, His Kenneth Edward Walker. PolSci Sharon Gwyn Walker, Psy! FA Thomas Robert Walters, MecE Otis Bennett Walton, III, Ec!BA Stephen Becker Warren, BA Valery Ann VVarren, Int'l Rel Karen Weaver, Math Sarah lane VVebb, Nurs David Lee Weber, BAIEC VVilliam Bryan NVebster, His St. Louis, Mo 4 Litzsinger Ln. El Paso, Tx 516 E. Hague Athens, Al 202 Ridgelawn Dr. Nashville, Tn 2951 River Dr. Ct. Cascais, Portugal Rua joaquiin Ereiria Memphis, Tn 1394 Ridgewood Pk. Birmingham, Al 480 Paige Dr. jackson, Ms Dr. 1600 Eastover Winter Haven, Fl 1150 N. Lake Otis Di'. St. Petersburg, Fl 858 Placido XVay NE Dixson, Tu Box 545 Tallam, Fl 2117 Tresscott Dr. jasper, In Box 387 Wyoming, Oh 93 West Hill Ln. .vi 1' 'Q .pi l . J f itll: 1 1' . 4? l . 8 J-" fr Z is L . is ' a I th, 1. '14, 44 l Nm I 1 pw' ,g-Q William P, Welch, jr.. Chemli Richard B. lVellingh0ff. Ee! BA john Neel NVells, Bicilliioliit-clE Nancy Lynn NVells, B.-X Thomas Calvin Wells. EL-XBA llulmert Allen Welsh. Clheinlf Steven Allen XXX-stlmy. llis Katln'i'n Anne Nl'L'tllel'l1ee. Nurs Susan P. Weyraneh. Nurs William .-X. Whalen. Math john V. XVharton. BpVHist Cale D. XVlnitley. l'sy!Soc- joseph NI. XVhelan. lie!B:X Melissa ll. XVhite. BA Hanclall F. Nlfliite. llel St Smytha. Tn Till Belaire Dr. CinL'innali.Ol1 IZQ3 Crestwoixl .-Xve. Ft. Lanclerclale. Fl 10:25 Ponce cle Leon Dr. Erwin. Tn 626 Sprnee St. xllll'liS0ll. Ms 20334 lf.. Xorlllsicle Dr. Ft. l'iert'e. Fl 2718 Plaeicl Ave. Janesville. Wi 22l jefferson Ave. Galena. Oh 4110 Snnlnnw' Htl. Sewiekluy. Pa li4l clilIllL'IillllI'f' l.n. Winqllnun Ctr.. Cl, Suntli Sl. Lexington, Ky 20lT Fontaine llcl. Blfllllllgllkllll. .-Xl 508 llllll .-Xve., XY, CIinnaminson. Ni 25313 Laurel Dr. Lake Clmrles. La 4029 liaymnwmcl Ln. NklSllYlllC. Tn -KST Wanfortl Dr. "On the Whole, it's a little more difficult than I expectedfi Anon. v I' ,'!"l'f":' 1 . ' - 'I 4 . 443 E. il 4 in 'ly Wu . Ng! I . . .J li "-9 . X f 4 J' " . - 'V ' " ,N ,.-1 ' mil ill f 1' 7"'5iT' lvl . v ,. 'jQ:.i ' ' :'::..'iifl- i N ' .fi H XXl.rxNl'S V Q rg' . iw F I X it I 1 J U 'l l ' ' I, . ' f I 'J Ii N ' t f' . ' xi, ' ,-. U ii I ell ' iii f Ci S 19- .4- l""D . 'W .V ll -lib i - 3 ' l F f 14 4? llieharcl XV. NVhite. Math Amelia .-X. XVhitehcacl. Fren Stephen ll. VVliitnnn'e. Ec!Nlath Margaret lvllllllllfllllll, Psy Randall F. lViersina. lky Tllolnas D. Wiesinan. EL-!B.fX Cary C. XVilkins. Eng Kathy Lyn Xllilkinsun, Math Mary 1, Williams. a jane Ii. XVilliamson. F.-VElEcl hvllllfl' D. Willis. Biol Barbara R. XVilson. Fren Catherine M. XVils0n. En Sci llarvey S. Xllilson. Drama llohin B. Wilson, Phil. Dawn M. Winkler, lie! BA Steven Pt. NVinltlc '1'. Bus .Ml Marg K. XViselnneyer. Mathfljsy Sallv VVulff. Engl jane O. YVooclln'iclge, Fren Macon. lla 45ll Old Clnh llml. llocllcsler. Nln IGSLZ Tb Ave. XE Nll. Plcaszanl. Nli ll05 N. Fairlieltl Alacksinlville. Fl 1663 Parrish Place Western Springs. Il :ulllli Fair l'llIllS Evansville, ln 33208 Oak llill Iltl. Greenville. SCI 53053 Sweetlwiar llll. Ncwluwn. Pa XYuotll1ill lltl ll.D. l Nleacluwlwouk, Pa Tl-l Moreclon llcl. Dallaa. Tx 4205 .-Xreacly Oneco. Fl 1907 5lSl ,-Xvv. Dalton, Ca ll3 Ilarvarcl Dr. Dallas. Tx 4549 Alta Vista Ln. llolclvn. Nia 5333 Frekleriekson Ave. Chapel Hill. NC 603 Laurel Hill Rd. llallwin. Mo 605 Claymont Estates Dalton. Ga 706 Sevnmnr rllCl'l'ilL'C Fair llaven. Nj 25 Lanrel Dr. DIIIIIQIS. :Xli 105 E. lVolfi' St. Topsfield, Nla 27 Tiinlwer Ln. Miclmcl 15. Woolen, Econ 1:lllC1S. l1'1'an'. fX1nl11f1.nl 11111105 D. N1'1'1Lf11l. Qlr.. 1'1nsf.Ml llnllcrl U. Wriqlml. llial h1lll'l11il 1.4-0 Wyull. lil-run. Bill'1lRll'2l 11. Wyclw. Engl. Surah K. Yzlllrey. Soc. Nanu-5' C. Yurnell. ling llucllcl L. Ynhx. Kflmn ll. 1.f'l11Ih4K'lllI1. Nun llmvaml X1.Ynngc. X112 Thomas lf. York. P0154- kvlllllllll L.ZL'1L'll11i. 1Cc!Snc Kcilh.-X.Zi1n1ncrmun. PHISQ All Znrcl. Econ li. Zickil-1 1.40011ll.Z11l1111L'1'lllill1.Ill. PS Mil-11111.-1 11. Z1lll111L'1'I1l2l1l. Binfil X114-111101 17. Znccolu. Civvli Easy Lan' Znrn. N112 Xnslnillv. '1'n Box 91131, 1'czl1mL1y Cf, 150111-x'i11L', I1 2205 1.11111 Lunc- 1111'1ll1lIQ1Iillll..X1 511-1 Tnpl-In Nlllx' .-Xllunlu. Clan STH 1,l'llL'1lll't'L' linllll' llnrringlon. 11 625 CIum'm'c1 131. 121111-rlnn. 1-Q1 2551 f111lII'L'1'l Sl. Nalslnvillv. Tn. 18118 Slnkus 1.11. k1111lllll11Ul1Qll. Tn 1814 11ixsl1n1'ikl' xkllillllll. Cn 2687 Overlook Dr. Elclurauln. .Xk 13033 Ifurcallnwn Dr. 1'cmzu'lm1:l. 171 1014 l12ll'1lOlAX'1l?XY Dr, lJ1c111icknry.'1'n 511 liigllurn DV. XYa1nkl'gu11. 11 S3332 Lynn Terr. 11lQh1nnc11'k.. 11 H52 Nlnxclcy 1111. New Ynrk. NY 18132 1'an'k Sl. Sprimgfil-141. liff 43 1710111 Sl. Nus1n'i11c.'1'n 25103 xY1l1llCI11l,'1'l' Kcnnull. N111 1105 hvllllt' Onks l'1. Nashville. Tn 221-1 Crniglllcclc Cr. llrnkun 1'1x'is. N11 65169 Funny 11111 1111. 'Tve enjoyed it very much I donat thlnk I could have been any happlel anyplace else. I'm sad and happy at the same tnne to be lbdV1l10' Y 4 Lf Q Y-:Nik '5"""" SEN IORS I XX NY , ,omg -' 419 Q i 3. W 4 U .pw-'W' ' 3 wg n'W -. an - o O 1 X if J' YP' .nu lx: 44 Q I I . - 15 sl Ill p 1 sm' Dune? l uni . "'. 2' H I 0 '. . t I 5 I ?.- if .Q 5.2 l' l. L 8 "- 9-5,0 'I -, is 0 I Q ' - if K , -0 E, . QQ 'K , Li4' I .-If Q... 5 0' him Chl 'A me f-16'-' -L IW' QARA Yfilgligl ifii I IRM. I ll ll ' ' ,, 2 N 5 t I- , I ,' !?' we 'lv ni : .- i . ll -nv ' 2 6 ., . Q if H M YO TIRES MUN A. Ss... Q- Qr, A-. 'L, " -. H .n ., . 34W-P+21.?m ' -V--vm.-kr. .af- 'Qi-I. f"" X.. 1 mth, V . owned by Vanderbilt students and alumni Radlal Tue Experts -4 f' V VLFQQ -i f A I, V My "2 ' Eff! W t -'X , ,lll , V' - www , 5 ff" n x',, ' ?'fvg. mag f"E-'lislr' :fa 'Y sm, " - ' n 1 n n Lf' 51 n , QW' iw! 1' ' , .fu X N 5 G! -I iinigd n , , 4W 4 if Q S ee!" 1-'An CGMPLEME FROM A 'FT- .,,,,i sf E 1 , f N ' Thanks For a Success ul Year Sf ox 'J X f CATS 1313 21st Ave. S C 1' get Rgwdbq Congratulations Seniors -11.f- L r V my at Je-""" A TRIXY'S HEALTH STUDIO A 'A All cm Stqff From A ff ,V Wate1'Berls V d ij' House Calls SJ Yr ! Qi, Private Rooms 12, ' JL' l v ' ,Y . ,., - xi. Lx Be pampered and pleased F E D K 1 ' Not tickled and teased L55 42 'Nb 'Q 424 4,000 Krystal S Servmg Vanderbllt Students 24 Horus a Day ll N NXAX The Influential Medium XE-QXX gxX ICE BEER ffl' 2011 8th Avenu South ,Q Q- ef., Edward Vantine Studios, Inc. NATIONALLY KNOVVN COLLEGE PHOTOGRAPHERS Hamilton, New York, 13346 Compliments of Bert Smith Oldsmobile in St. Petersburg, Florida VOLUN STRUC TURES Petroleum 407 40th A e North n Nashvllle 1 SER VICE S STEEL 426 f' f L '- , -. ' , , 1, -U ML. -gr -, - L. A- N xanikg . Um VK L 7 4 - .. ww ' . - ,su .Q V ,w.,..k walk-W X., Qs.. 41 . .. H. ru L . ,,., ,Q B1 "Rfk 7- ,-nf wif . Temp is Liquors EVERETT TEMPLETON 19th Ave and Chmch 327 3055 Come Vzszt Our Brand New Buzlclmg and Shop Wzth Conoemence and Luxury Through Our COMPLETE WINE ROOM IMPORT AUTO PARTS AND MAINTENANCE Everything For Your Imports Needs . 100 17th Avenue South I X' - ...,..m . NX 'fffaszfsszsesf I L fix I I vqlvdit R IJMPDRTPIIRTSIHPI ff . A fk'j'I ' 1 --- EI 7 Ill Ili 1 '?,fQ A Amrm1AurouorlvEMA'INT N I ROTIER S Restaurant 24 13 Elllston Place Anothe f1 ue longstand ng Vande b lt t adlt1O 'MUN Wax' J-.frm 504- !": qipanva-nn. -.,, 's siW.lMi'lQ MAIN STORE AND OFFICES WEST END AT 24TH PHONE 1615! 327 4061 LJ16f!ZA!rI1f if fff EM? ""'k sun .- gm 1.0-as 429 4 Adds ...................... Afro-Americans Baseball ................. Basketball ......... Beaut y ............ Centennial ........ Cheerleaders ......... Choir ..... . ..... . .... . Commodore .......... Concerts ............ DAC ........... Debate ..,........ Democrats .. ...... Dismas ................................... .......... 1 38 Student Healtlj Coalitigu ,, Dreams, Belonging, Death ...... Drom Life ................ Drugs ....................... Fencing .......... Football ......... Freshmen....... Gallery .............. Golf .......................... Goof Off Sports Greeks ................... Honorarys ............. Honor Conmcil ......... Hustler ........... ..... . . Juniors ............... Lacross ........ ..........38-41 Credits Art Contributions David johnston . . . 322-323, 348-349, 368-369, 388-389 Russ Adams . . . .... 36, 86, 419, and all cartoons William Li ....... 37 Sybil Hill ....... 156 Writing Contributions All organizational writings were done by their officers. Iohn Perry ...... 14, 42, 58, 134, 198, 260, 280, 318 Pat Nunnally .... 138, 154, 162, 170 Allan Boyer ..... 294 Paul Beach ...... 114 Donna Stern ..... 190 Don McCormick . . . 20 Robert Chambers. 32 David Biunside . . 38 Howard Ornstein for his research and help on VSC Ellen Babbitt for her editing and correction of all copy William Shakespeare for his many assorted tidbits Directory ..........420-429 Love and Marriage.......... .......122-123 Military..................... Poetry Review .......... .......162-169 -------154-151 Religion................. Republicans ....... ..........260-271 ..........s12-317 Rugby............. ......150-153 Sailing............ Sarratt Arts ........ ......120-121 ----------85-87 Seniors.......................... SCA ..................................... Skeet, Hunt and Fish ......... ..........56-63 ..........76-77 Soccer............................. -----.----128 Sophomores................. . ..........28-37 Swim .................. . ..... Tae Kuan Doe ......... ..........184-185 --.----.--138-149 Tennis................... --.-------322-347 Theater............. ..........298-311 T1-aCk,,,,,,,,,,, Versus .......... Vobisciun ....... ..........188 ..........134-137 ..........196-259 Vucept ......................... Wilderness Skills ......... Womens Sports ....... ..........94-107 ..........124-125 ..........88-89 ..........368-387 ..........17s-179 AFWW, ........- ........- Specifications ........................ ......... 12-23 .2 72-279 133 114-117 129 170-173 176-177 130-131 388-419 78-85 127 174-175 348-367 431 132 42-55 189 ..........182-183 ..........186-187 ..........108-113 ..........180-181 ..........90-91 ..........126 ..........68-73 ..........64-65 ..........118-119 ..........190-195 ..........92-93 . .75 Specifications The 1976 Commodore, a division of Vanderbilt Student Communications Inc., was produced and paid for by the undergraduate .students of Vanderbilt University at Nashville Tennessee with an activity fee of 81165. The paper is an 80lb. dull enamel, 'Calais', by Warren. The endsheets are an 80lb. slate grey from Paragon. The cover wa.s designed by the editor and uses a grey Holliston Sturdit material, quality 18, with a pregrained and ooertoned 'Spanish' finish. It is top- stamped with gold foil over a 160 pt. binders board. Headlines and text are in 'Caladonia type. The book is Smyth .sewn in 16 page signatures, trimed to 9 by 12 inches, and rounded and backed by headbands. The cover, plates, presswork, and binding were done by Herffjones Yearbooks in Montgomery, Alabama. The negatives were shot with a 150 line elliptical dot screen. The 304 pages of duotone reproduction were printed with Pantone 403 fgreyj and process black inks. There were 4,500 copies made. Class portraits are by Vantine in New York. Approximately 35,000 pictures were exposed by the editor and staff Most were made on 35mm Tri-X film, exposed atASA 320, and developed in D-76, 1-1, for 8 minutes at 68 degrees. All prints were made on Kodak Polycontrast Surface 1. 4 Now my charms are all o'erthrown, And what strength I haoefs mine own, VVhich is most faint. Let me not dwell In this bare island by your spellg But release me fromqmy bands With the help of your good hands. Gentle breath of yours my sails Must fill, or else my project fails, Which was to please. Now I want Spirits to enforce, art to enchantg And .my ending is despair Unless I be relieved by prayer, VVhich pierces so that it assaults Mercy itself and frees all faults. As you from crimes would pardoned be Let your indulgence set me free. 32 O vc' ", 2 Nah' .,, - ,- -..,.. .. .su , , .--N V V N v- ., 1- M ,.-, , . ,,1 ,- A ,..., .. ,,,.. .,,,,.,....x,1, . , X N W N f s H , , --.... ., ,.,, -1. '-.K , - ..., -, , .. -x-,---4-- V-.-sg -W,-,- ., -LL-v,--ff 'Apu--.:,w '1Q ,.' g,3,. ly .5L.Z'-9 .. . . X . .. -, - ., . . .. .. .,.v.- ff... ..f1'..- 1-,, ,,.,.w-,,z,.,4.'.1---M-.-.91 -- -"1-a.:':-Q,-:1,,V:. L-'i' ' -"S '-'F " " " " " x s "" "' " 'W 1 ' ., ., - f - - ' - v vf-.V-N ' f-Y-gg. .: -- -..':r . .. . 1' ' . W .E 5 A- J


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Vanderbilt University - Commodore Yearbook (Nashville, TN) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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