Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL)

 - Class of 1931

Page 1 of 186

 

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 186 of the 1931 volume:

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' V :i'1'::5 V ' - ' 1--L., ?'I"'1"V"'7'1- fffliiigi fV'ar'2" - -- -34-. gr-V ,. ' 'V ,gf , '-QY, -,i'?5 " Wa, J. " - .M - . -,V V- D.-1' V, w in , V ':,V..V pf .5 ' -if gg , ,V :,- VV ' V TA. " , ' 'L " vi V' Lg 'fy 'J S1 Vqgsy .- , , , , V, V f.VV,,,.- ,E V P .54 rang: .A ".1'f'.5'!. 'V -QV 3, V ' ' -. ' pf- - 11.1. . .-, 'G'f'5.:' E 1, 'Q ' V- .'Q'g'?V'g ' V if '55 I Fifi 'Q V ' :ifif V . V, VL ' Jig f ' ZV- VE" ' wg- f 2 V- -V. , , . ,M-V-V 1 - r ' " V1 XY, . V V 4:4 ' 'T- Y'--Efv . L . ,xi ii '1 5' 1 : V. 17 ' ' .'1VA:,z ' ,IV V4 f V , ' s ,. . - g' - 1 V, K . 7 1 ' A. , 1 .J ' V' - 3 fu E?-iA Q." .- ' - -i.:V,- V -A 'gLfV V V3 . f : 4,1-4. ,. 5 - V, . V AV , L-mn-nu-:M THE ROSEMARY 1931 QJYHYZZILZI ofthe URBANA HIGH SCHOOL Urbana, Illinois Fopx gflzted by HELEN RUSSELL Edt BOB MARSHALL B Ma ge V122 JKABEL D. YQJCKETTS YDEDICATION During our four years of high school life, as a class and as individ- uals, we have been ever aware of the kindly interest of Miss Ricketts. This interest has been manifested by her faithfulness, by her unremitting ef- forts to keep before us the high ideals of our school, and by her willing and eager support in helping us to pro- mote all extra-curricular activities. Because of her helpful counsel to the students and because of her efforts to develop the spirit of Urbana High, we, the class of 1931, dedicate the Rosemary to Miss Ricketts, thereby expressing our sincere appreciation and affection. , lf' FOREWORD Ye who love a nation s legend Love the ballads of a people That lzke vozces from afar ojj' Call to us to pause and lzsten Speak tn tones so plazn and chzldlzke Sfarcely can the ear dzstznguzsh Whether they are sung or spoken, I zsten to thzs Indzan Legend, To thzs Song of Hzawathal Av the legend of thzs noble Indzan zs chromrled so do we too find our school lzje a chronzcle in word and zmage of events stzll fresh zn our memory There fore we the Annual Staj present the 1931 Rosemary hopzng that sometzme zt may serve the frzendly office of remembrance CONTENTS ADMINISTRATION CLASSES ATHLETICS ORGANIZATIONS FEATURES I Jia. Zin 51-Blemuriam l On December 14, 1931, Urbana High School sufTered an irreparable loss in the death of its beloved principal, Mr. C. VV. Rice. ln his passing, the school has lost a most efficient director, and the students a loyal and lovable friend. During the five years that he was principal at Urbana High, Mr. Rice came into close Contact with many lives which were benefited by his influence. His friends among the students are count- less. and he wasiheld in high regard by everyone. ' Wamng like rl hand ilmf lmfirfms, lfilrlw Maniin, U10 mfghfy, Vwlls flu' frzflms nf men tngffihcr. KVKINR flzf 1l'Ill'7"l-0'l'S 10 his rcfufnrl-il.' la s E 75 :gg vw-1-, an -4 W5 ,hy 0 f 1 mv.. 'V I. xag s ' if -3, ' f nf . Aff , ,Q :yr 'Q s L .V Y- 1' . V A MV -. , e,., , F 45: ...- 1 x-5 1 ig. , mis' ,Q N M, A5353 Qgfagaaif' H7112 f L15-Emu!--21:21:2- BOARD OF EDUCATION The Board of Education is a representative body elected by the legal Voters of the District. The Board of Education at present consists of a Presi- dent and six inenibers, naniely: 1'1'esidenf: F. E. Williamson. .ZMGIIIZJFFSZ Dr. Il. A. Hindnian, Sue C. Heater, Wallace V. Davis, R. W. NVebber. F. E. VVilliamson, Paul XV. Stephens, and Paul G. Busey. To expedite matters the President has appointed the following committees: Teachers Committee Fimmec and Supplies R. W. Webber. Chairman Paul Busey. Cllilllfllltlll Sue O. Heater Wallace V. Davis Il. A. Hindman Paul W. Stephens 1311.-'1'7dz'11g and Grozmds Health mul T7l'SfliUf1i07'l ll. A. Hindman, Chairinan Sue Heater, Chairman Paul XV. Stephens VVallace V. Davis R. W. Webber Paul G. Busey These members are elected for a term of three years and serve without pay and sacrifice a lot. of time, worry and labor for the good of the schools. The Board meets regularly at its ofiice in the High School, the first '1'liursday night of each month, for the purpose of transacting school business. and during' the year meets many times in special session, when business of great importance arises. TULA Woomizn Ross, Secretary I1I'lA'l'I'I1l, COBB, DAVIS. NVILLIAMSON. YYICBHIGII, S'l'El'I1ENS. BUSEY 'T'U"'i"T'T'i"2' fninfnnfnbnfni MR. T. H. COBB Superim'emZent of the Urbana Public Schools X es Mr. Cobb, our superintelldent, is a real leader l in education, and a man of vision under Whose excellent guidance the schools may be expected to increase in efHc1ency from year to year. 'i"i"'i'q"i"'i'? 151515555121 MR. S. B. HADDEN Principal of the Urbafna High School Mr. Hadden, our new principal, has by his firm kindliness and sincere personal in- terest influenced us to do what is right bet- ter than any harsh severity could have done. T '2'? T Tl? 'P 555151555 MISS MABEL RICKETTS Assistant Principal of Urbana High School Miss Ricketts, our assistant principal, has always been a loyal and conscientious Worker to uphold high standards of conduct and scholarship on the part of the students. 1 ' i s 2 'i'?'i'???? Lnfnnhbdubb FACULTY ADAM BENNETT, B. S., M. S. INSTRUCTOR IN MANUAL ARTS IINIYEIZSITY OF ILLINOIS GERTR-UDE BIEDERMANN, A. B. INS'l'BIfCTOR IN EINGLISH C,Xli'l'H,.XGE COLLICKEIC RALPH BOYD, B. ED. lNS'l'RIYU'I'0R IN BOORREEI-ING ILIIIXOIS S'l'A'I'E NOICBIAJI IVIARIAN BROIYNELL, A. B., B. S. INSTRI'c'TOR IN PHYSICAL EDIICATION UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS CLARA E. BULLOOK, B. E. INST1iI'C'I'0K IN ENOLISII ILLINOIS S'l'.X'l'IE NORMAL RIUTII CADE INSTRUCTOR IN TYI-ING ILLINOIS S'I'.Vl'l'I IXIOHIXIAL ETHYLE PORTER EYERLEY, A. B. INS'I'liUC'l'0R IN HIS'l'0liY UNII'ERSITI' OI' ILLINOIS SARAH FISHER, A. B. IXSTRVCTOII IN SIIOKTIIAND IINIYEIISITY OF ILLINOIS TIIITSENELDA GROSS, A. B. INS'l'RI'CI'l'OR IN PIIYSIOLOIII' .IND PIIYSIOORAI-III' IJNIVIERSITY OF ILLINOIS R. CLYDE IOIALLAM, B. S. INSTRVCTOR IN MATHEMATICS EUREKA COLLEGE ETHEL D. HAMILTON, B. S. INSTRVOTOR IN PURLIC SPEAKING ,IND DRAIWIATICS UN IYERSITY OF ILLINOIS ARE L. HORNOR, B. S. 1NsTRUc:'I'OR IN CIVICS AND HISTOIQX' UXI'v'ERSI'FY OF ILLINOIS IIARIIAN J.IIv11Es, B. S. INSTRUCTOR IN IVIATIIEIXl'.X'l'ICS UNlVERSl'l'Y OF ILLINOIS RUTH JOHNSON, A. B. INS'I'RI'4"I'OK IN FRENCH AND ENOLISII UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS FLORENCE KING, M. S. INHTRI'C'I'0K IN HOME ECONOMICS ETIIELYN KIRK, B. A. INSTRUCTOR IN LATIN NCJIi'l'II CENTRAL COLLEGE LORENE LAIR, B. S. INS'I'RUI'TOR IN ENOLISII IINIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS IIENRY LAWRENCE, B. S. IXS'1'RUC'l'OH IN AGIIIlTIIl.'l'ITllI4I UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS Top I.'o1r.' Iiuyml. '1'lIO1II:1S. IIIIIIIIIIOII, Sl'llI'llHl, Lair. Sh-pln-IIS, Iil'OXVlll'll, Haxllnm, .I:IlI1vs. First Nou-: Null-II, Hulluvk, MI-l'luI'g, Ylillllghllltlll, Ilauldvn, Ala-wI'I-y, GIOSS, FISIII-I', BRIIIIOH. TT'i'???'? Lain!-A LLL FACULTY BIILDRED LAWSON, B. S. INSTRUCTOR IN HISTORY UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LOLI. DE WITT IVICCLURG, A. B. INS'rRI'OTOR IX BIOLOGY AND M,xTIIEM.x'IIOS UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BIARGARET IVIOVVREY, B. S. INSTRITCTOR IN ART AND ENGLISII UNIVERSITY OI' ILLINOIS H. J. MURPHY, B. A. INS'l'KI'CTOR IN MATIIEMATICS IVIISSISSIPPI C'OI.I.ICGE .AGNES L. NEIISON, A. B. INSTRUCTOR IN AIIGIEISIIIX UNIYERSI'I'Y OF ILLINOIS BEN B. NOLAN, B. A., M. A. IXN'l'R1'C'I'OR IN ENGLISH .IND M.vI'HEM.vI'ICS UNIVEIISITY OI' TEXAS GRAIIAM T. OVERGARD, MIIS. B. DIRECTOR OI" MUSIO ITH.xC.x CONSERI'.ITOIIY OF MVSIC SIABEL D. RIICKETTS, A. B. IXS'I'Rl'C"l'UR IN GERMAN IJNIYICRSITY OF NEIIRIXSIQIX R-UTH RONIPEL, A. B. INS'I'RUc'I'OII IN ENGLISH UNIVERSITY OI' ILLINOIS EUGENE HOWARD SOIIROTH, B. S. INSTRUCTOR IN PIIYSICAL EDUCATION, ECONOMICS. AND COMIXIERCIAL GEOGRAPHY IINIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LEWIS STEPHENS, B. S. A1'III,E1'IC COACII UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS GENIEVE THOMAS, A. B. LIIIRARINN L,OIIRII.RD COILEGIC WIIIBITR GLEN TILRURY, B. ED. INSTRUCTOR IN CHEIXIISTRY AND PHYSICS ILLINOIS STIITE NOICBIIXII ELIZARETII TODD M. A. 7 INSTIIIICTOR IB HOME ECONONIICS UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO FREDERICK VIEROWV, B. A. DIRECTOR OF Ml7SII.! FRANCES WEBBER, B. S., M. A. INSTIIUCTOR IN FRENCH IINIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS SUSIE WOOD, B. S., M. S. INSTRIIOTOR IN HISTORY UNIVERSITY OI' ILLINOIS MILDRED YOUNGBLOOD OFFICE CLERK UIIIIANA HICJII SOIIOOL Top lfrmz' N4-ISIIII. 0V1'l'g'2ll'!I, .IIIIIIISI-II. AIlll'1DIlY. IIZIWSUII. IIOI'IIrII', IIIIIIIIJUI, Vim-I'OIv. First Row: Cadl, Wood, Eyerlvy, Rivlivtfs, Bin-IlI1I'III:IIIII, XVOIIbt'l', Kirk. ??T"i" 1'i":' 512:55-Ennfnni Zin Memoriam Margaret Louise Knotts, a member of the class of 1931, after having been intermit- tently ill since early childhood, and having fought off this illness with indomitable cour- age time after time, finally became too Weak to resist longer and passed away December 12, 1930. Her death has left a. vacancy in the hearts 31161 lives of her associates, who, during the many years of companionship With her in school formed associations which will forever remain in our memories. T'-1'TT??'i' 'Oni of childhood into manhood N our had grown my H l'!11Ul14U1ll.: Hkdlcd in all Ike craft of hunters Learned in all the lore of old mon ' F-HW' I fp - 295 35211 5:5 "K , ,N Q .i 4 , . .i Lv . 5- 21 1 1 .J 1-1 fi . 3 J 1 V. ti-5 HK- 4 T H+ 'L' wi- X 1n'.,:. if - E , :'-1-'K , ?1 .A Q'- . - ,nr 2 V: L syn- ,J-.Y l A 1 1 .Lx . , "V: A '::. , - . .T .-1, ,fflf ,Q f , , --.V 1, 'Ml -P . ,, , . .,., s as 5. 9,1 ,fr- . 5. ., 5. N - I. 3,- 3 J n r,, r M, df P. A fix? - 4:1-: s .lififf 'ga fix? Fil. 4.4 ' . H. ..X, lx. ,ra .93 Q. Ju 3 I .- 4 .-Q .- .. ,, ,.r ,, - LJ iii SENJIORS Laid!-fnifnfnnfn LEROY LQNDERS "Now for good luck, cast an old shoe after me." Baseball 2. CHARLES ANDERSON :'Almost to all things could he turn his hanrlf' Delta Sigma 3, 4: German Club 2, fl. 4: Band 3, 4: Junior Orph 3: "The Nephew as Uncle." MARY SUSAN ANDERSON f'She's a winsome wee thing," S. K. 1, 2, 3, 4, G. A. A. 1 2, 3, 4: Treasurer 4: Class Secretary 1: I"l'l'llI'll Club 2. 3: Stunt Show 12 Junior Orph 3: May Fete 1, 2, 3, 4: Stunt Show 4. LANVREN CE APPERSON "Every man is a volume if you know how to realfl him." Stunt Show 1: Band 1, 2, 3, 4: 3, 4: Stunt Show 4. RUTH APPLEMAN "Happy and friendly. one ever ready to do her part." Belleville Township High School 1, 2, 3: General Literary 1. 2: G. A. A. 2. 2: Glee Club 2: Junior Juni- boree 3: f'0lIllll0I'Cl2l1 Club 2: S. K, 4: Front-h Club 4. BIAXINE ARMSTRONG Hi-Y "Happy ancl winsome all the day. She's always reacly-come what may." Polytechnic High. Ft. XVorth 1, 2: S. K. 3, 4: G. A. A. 3, 4: French Club 3, 4. FRANCES BALDWIN "A charming girl we'pe often heard Shes one of the group eallerl prefc'rrefl." Class President 1: Latin Club 1. 2: Class Seu1'0t.:1x'y 3: Echo Stuff 3, Editor 4: Stunt Show 1: Junior llrph 3: May Fete 1, 2: S. K. 1. 2, Il. 4: G. A. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Honor SO- c-ivty 3. 4: Delta Sigma 4: Style Show 3. 4. BIALCOLM BANTZ "A man he seemed. of cheerful yesterdays, and confident io- 'morrowsf' Latin Club 1, 2: Art Club 1. MORELL BARBER "His words and ways are win- ning." Gorman Club 1, 2. 3, 4: Delta Sigma 1. 2. 3. 4-: Junior Orph 3: "Doro- thy A Vernon." JOHN BARR "There's not a wind but whis- pers of thy name." Band 1. 2, 3: Orchestra 1: Stunt Show 1, 4: Basketball 2, 3: Latin Club 1: German Club 3: Junior Orph 3: Style Show 41 Truck 3: Golf 3, 4, Captain 4: Hi-Y 3. Tzvmzty TTT? 'I-"i"2' 515-11-LLL PAUL BARRICK Latin Club 1. 2: Hi-Y 3. 4: French Ulub 3: Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4: Baseball 2. 3. BETTY BARRINGER :'Th.ere's no wisdom like frank- ness." Delta Sigma 3. 4: S. K. 1, 2, 3, 4: tr. A. A. 1: May Fete 1. 2: French Club 2. 3, 4: Style Show 4. JOHN BARTH Latin Club 1: French Plub 3: U Club 3. 4. President 4: Student Council 3: Flass Vice-President 3: Band 1: Stunt Show 1: Foot- hall 1. 2, 4: Basketball 1, 2. 3. 4: Track 1. 2. 3. 4: Delta Sigma 4: "Dorothy Vernon 3" Honor So- ciety 4. IIELEN BEAIRD S. K. 1. 2, 3. 4: G. A. A. 1. 2, 3: May Fate 1. 2: Flass Vicv-Presi- :lent 2: Freneh Club 1, ZZ: Stu- rlent Council 2. 3. C1uRL0TTE BEARD "Her ways are ways of pleflsfmt- ness." K. 1. 3. 4: G. A. A. 1. 2. 4: G. li. Il: French f'lub Zi. 4: Junior Urpln 3: May Fefe 1 2, 3. 4: Bas- ketlvall 1: Delta Sigma 4: 'Tiern- thy Vernon." -lUAN1r.x BELL "She has a. heart wiih room for every joy." French Club 1: S. K. 1. 2. Il, 4: G R. 2. 2. 4: G. A. A. 2. I-L 4: May Fc-te 1, 2. 3, 4: Baseball 1, 2. Il, 4: Basketball 1. 2, 3. 4 Captain 4' Stunt Show 4. ROGER BENEDICT "You are wisely silent in your own worth, Ahrl therefore 'Zwere a sin for others to be so." Hi-Y 4: French Club 2, 4. ELIZABETI-1 BILSBORROVV Band 1, 2, 3. 4: T11-'5lSlll'l?l' 4: Orches- tra 3, 4, President 4: S. K. 1, 2, 3, 4. Secretary 4: G. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4: Delta Sigma 2. 3. 4: Orpheus 3. 4, Sec-retary-Treasurer 4: Echo Hep- resentaiive 1: Iflxehangre Editor. l-Bello 3: ROS0lllfll'Y Staff 3, 4: Class Secretary 4: Stunt Show 1. 4: Junior Urph 3: XVomlwind Quintet 4: String Quintet 4: IIOIIOI' Society 4. ROY BIRDSELL "And what would life be if we took 'it too seriously." MARY BIRELY "But eyes and ears and e1J'ry thought Were with her sweet perfec- tions caught." S. K. 1, 2, 4: Glee f'lub 1. 2, 3, 4: May Fcte 1, 2: Style Show 4. T"?'i'?!'i"i'? Tw ty-one L n5n A A L :En A . JOHN Bounoois Basketball 1. 2: Debate Team 1. 2: German Club 2, 3, Treasurei' 2, Presilh.-nt Ii: Baseball 1 2, 4: Stu- dent l"ounf-il 2. 3: Glee Club 1. 2: Juniui' tlrph 3: Track 1. RQJBERT BOWDITCH l'lass Vic-e-Presillont 4: Student l'ounr'il 4: Basketball 2. Il. 4: "lm1'utby Vernon": Football 4: I' Vlub 4: Debate 3: Delta Sigma 3. 4: Stunt Show 1. 4: Honor So- oic-ty 3. 4: Band 1. 2. 3, 4: Or- pheus Ulub 3 4: fJ1'l'llPStl'2l 1. 21 I-Hg: Twelve Band 23. 4: Brass Sex- tet Ii. 4: Solo Fontests 2. 3. 42 Gs-rlnnn Club 3. 4: Frellvli Club 1. 2. CLIFFORD BRA ND l'hi1o High School 1. 2, 3: "Aaron Bogrgrs. Fl'0Slllllilll"I ".Tc1'1'y of Jeri:-lm lloa4l": "Patty Makes Things I'IlllllHQ Basketball Mau- agei' 33. SAM BRATTON "A serious minded youth who newfr ifllos away his Hmm" LIARIALICE BREEDLOVE "Silenor? sweeter is than speech." OLIN BROWDER Class 1'rl-sialcnt 3: Band 1. 2. 23. 4: Vice-President 4, Drum Major 4: Stunt Show 1. 4: Basketball 1. 2. 33: Junior Urph 3: Debate Il: Ilonur Society 3. 4: Big Twelve 0I'Zll0l'lC2ll Contest 3: Hatchet Ovation 3. 4: Echo Staff. Exchange Editor 3. Advertising Mgr., Edi- tor 4: Delta Sigma 3. 4. Vive- Presillent 4: Student Uounuil 5: Orplu,-us Club 11. 4: Style Show 4: Hllorotlly X'Ql'llUIlHQ Vest Pucker Band 4. l:I.xzEL BITRNES "Sho -is faithful. she' is true Anything for you she'll do." Clllll'l0Sf1lll Iligh Svhuul 1. 2: Philo High Svliuul 3: Class Play 3: S. K. 4. FERN BURR Philo High School 1. 2: Class Secre- tary 1: Vlass l'r'Qsident 2: "Aaron Boggs. Freshman" 2: "Jerry of Jleric-lm Road" 2: Cheer Leader 21 S. K, Il. 4: G. A. A. 3. 4: Home lic. Club 25: German Club 4. PATRICIA BUSEY S. K. 1. 2. Il 4: Latin Club 1, 2. 3: Freln-lx Ulub l. 2. 3. 4: G. A. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Delta Sigma 2, 3. 4: Lorelei 2. 3. 4: Orpheus 3. 4: Swimming Uaptain 3: Band 1. 2. 3, 4: 01'- clxostra 1. 2. 3: Glue Club 2: "Prince There lVas": Stunt Show 1, 4: Junior Orph 3: May Fete 1. 2. fl, 4: All-State Orvhestra 2. ii: National Orcliestra 2. 4: Bas- ketball 1, 2, 3, 4: Baseball 1. JOHN CARSON "Don't mourn for mo Don't mourn for me do nothing 2. 3. 'I'l0'l,U 61767' mary 4: Ag Club 3: Stunt Show 1 Twmztf - wo TTT'T""i"?'i' For I'm going to Formsev' and ever." Basketball 1. 2. 3: Echo 3: Koso- "A quiet smile played round her 55555115 BIADALINE GATES "She is of so free. so kind, so apt a disposition." Sidney High School 1: S. K. 2. 3. 4: G. R. 2. 3: G. A. A. 3: French Club 2, 3. -lg May Fete 4. OLGA CHRISTENSEN "She was enter fair and never proud. Had tongue at will and yet was nener loud." S. Ix. 1. 2, 3. 4: G. A. A. 1. 2, 4: Stunt Show 19 May Fc-te 1: Lorc- Iei 1: French-,Club 1. 2. GERflll,DINE CLEMENTS "She stands high in all our hearts." Latin Club 1. 2, 3: French Club -1: May Fetc 1. ROBERT COCHRUN "Men -of few! words are the best men." Fisher High School 1. 3: Ag Club 3: Music Club 3. J. IYATHAN COLE "He does his task from day to day. And meets whatever comes his way." Orchestra 1, 2. ELIZABETH COMSTOOK "A very worthwhile girl indeed, Her conscience seldom fails to heed." SBK. 45 May Fete 1. 3: Junior Orph U CATHERINE COOK "A winning miss with charming features." Gle-0 Club 1: S. K. 1, 2: French Club 2: Home Ee 2, 3. ' ROBERT CORD "Genial. jolly, full of fun." Philo High School 1. 2: Basketball 1. 2. 3: Style Show 4: Ag Club 3. 45 French Club 3. SBTTIE CORSON lips." G.3A. A. 3: French Club 3: S. K. 2, -. 4. BIARIAN CRANMEE "Sunbeams hide in her hair. And please themselves with silken wear." S. K. 1, 2. 3: "Mikado": HC1'02lklllg Chnir": May Fete 1. 2: Delta Sig- ma 3, 4: Glee Club 1, 2: Junior Orph 3. T'?'i"'i"i"i'? Twenty-three nba!-61512-515 DIARY CURRENT "A kind and gentle hvart she had. To Comfort friends and foe." G11-9 Ulub 1. 2, 3: "Mikzulo": Or- pheus Ulub 25, 4: Stunt Show 1: I4'rem'l1 Vluh 1. 2: G. A. A, 3. 4: S, K. 4: Baskntlmll 1, 2. 3. 4: Baseball 1. 2, 3: May Foto 1: Ilonm' Sm-ivty 4. RICHARD DERROUGH "Every inch a man but 'more man than lncl1.ffs." Iinml 1. 2. 3. 4: Ul't'll0Stl'3 4: French Club 35 Stylv Slum' 2: Junior Orph 3: Stunt Show 1. IJONAL-D IJIXON "l+'m'1ned on the grmfl olfi plan A trnf' and brave downright man." ltllillllllillllll High Sulxonl 1: Foutbzlll 1, 2. 3. 4: B2lSli41tlJ2ll1 1. 2. 3. 4: 'l'm4'k 1. 2, Zi. 4: Busolnslll 1. 2: From-l1 Club :iz Latin Club 1. ZZ.: IT Club 3. 4: Delta Slgflllil 4. KATIIERINE DYSON I-lunw El- 1. 2. il: May Fore 1: Echo Stuff 4. GLENN EVANS "gl 'manifr man." lli-Y Ululr ZZ. GRACE F.x1RcHu.D "The Tulle' .wa grmv civil at hm' song. And Certain stars shot nzalily from tlwir sph,e1'es. Tr: lzvav' the sm-maid's mush-." llvuniugr High Sc-hunl 1. 12: Glu' Fluh 1. 2. ii, 4: "Gypsy lim'e1"': "B:1Sl1ful Mr. Rulrlmrf: "Bells of lil-:111jnlis": S. K. 3. -l. DoR0'r11Y FARQUIRIAR "Happy am I! from varv l'm fref' Why ar0n't they all Pflfllfflllt likv mc?" Buskvtlnlll 4: Balsolmll Il. 4: S. K. 2. 3. 4: G. A. A. 2, 3. 4: G. R. 4: Home lic 22: Dc-llu Sliflllil 4: Mzly Fc-tv l.. 2. 3, 4. GORDON FAITLKNER "A tlllnlcrr. a fine fellow, an alll- Icftvfa rare' Combination." Lntin Ululr 1. 2: l1'1'0nc'h Club 3: Stullont fvllllllvll 2. 21, 4. Tl'OllSlll'l'P 4: I' Fluh 3. 4: Bnske-tlmll 1. 2. 3. 4: Trzlvk 1. Il. 35. 4: "Il01'0tl1y Vvx'nun." CONSTANCE FUABEY "Her C1If!l'I'7'l7, and grarfewller happy ways Ha-vf: b1'ightCn Gd The vcry gloomiest days." Orvlu-stra 1, 12. ii: S. K. 1. 12, 3. 4: G. A. A. 1: Latin Ululr 1: Fl'Clli'll Ulub Il: Em-hu Staff II. l NIARJORIIG FLETCHER "HW vyvs were flfvpvr than thf' flfflllfll of walm' stillefl at TWU -IW T T 'S' T Q ? ? even." F11-111:11 Uluh 1, 2: Glen Ulub 1. 2. 4: May F1-te 1: S. K. 1. 2, 4: Stunt. Show 1. 5515-5555 BIARJORIE FOOR "A rosy blonde with starry f'yf2s." Baud 1. 2. 3: S. K. 1. 2. 2. 4: G. A. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Junior Orph 2: Stunt Show 1: Lilfill Vluh 1. 2. BIARY FRANCES FRANCISCO "A sfzuevt attractivf' kind of gracv. A full c1S.v1u'a1Lc:1' givmz by looks." S. Ix. 1. 2. .1 4: C.. A. A. 1. 2. 3. -I: Mziy F1-tv 1. 2. . . 1 EUTHA FRANKLIN "Tl10s0 about lwr from hm' slzall read thc' pcrfvct ways of bon- 0r" 1.nrm'm'1uh 11 C. A. A. 2. :zq linmb Eff 3. EUGENIA FREEMON "As natural and pleasing 017' thu stagc' as she is on." Honor Nur-if-ly 3. 4: Dvltzl 51211111 1. 2. 3. 4. I'1'vsi1Ie11t. 4: S. K. 1. 2. 13. 4: Vluss I'1'4-sinh-lil 2: Junior Urph il: Lutiu Vluh 1 2, ii. 4: G. A. A. 1. 2. 25. 4: il:-hating 1. Z: "Jani:-v Mc11'vdit.l1": "Thu Syn-ll of tht- IlllilLl'P"I Hip: Tum-lvv Vout:-st 1. 3: National 0i':ltori4-al Vontest Il: Buildiugr :lull Luaiu Colitvst Ii: Stunt Slum' 1. 4: May Futv 1, 2. 225 "Im1'url1y Vernon." DICK FULMER limbs were ras! in manly mould. For manly sports or vmztvsfs bold." I"l't-'l1f'll Vlulm 1. 2: Ilvlrn Sigum 4: Trm-k 1: Fwnllnili 1. 3: Iizxskvtlnnll 1. Ii. 4: V Vluln 4: U1lfI1'fYfllj' Yur- lllfllnl Gulf 1. 2. 4. RUTH GERMAN "May om' like lzvr be mlmberaid among my frir'n.ds." Ili-lzlvnil Higrh Sf-html 1. 2: Houn- Er' 23: Uf'il'ClISnI "Ulu-1'utt:1" ZZ: In-ltzl Sigum 3. 4. FRED GuasoN "Honor libs in 7I07'IC'S'f toil." Fmnthall 1. 2. 21. 4: Haiskvtlrzill 1. Il: Fra-uf:h Vlulr 1. 2: Ii t'lulx 4. THOMAS GILLILAND "Wi.-rf: to rvsolrc. and patimit fo 1K?7'fOI'IlI.f' 15llI'll2llll. N. F. Hiprh Scllnml 1: Lutin Vluh 2: Bzxurl 3. FRANCES GCVRLEY "Things H0725 arf' l00?l,' joys soul lies in tim doing." Latin Ulub 1: May F4-tu 1. 2. fl. 4: G. A. A. 53. 4: Gt'l'illilll l'1ub Ii. 4: S. K. 3, 4. BURT GREAVES "HP 'is a little chimney and lwated hot in a moment." Stunt Show 1: Lzltiu Club 1. 2. 3: Freuvh Club 2. 3: Style Show 15. 3: Juuiur Orph 2. :L ?'i"??'? E E Tw .fy-five? 615555515 NQRA IIADFIELD "A nzaiflvn nvvcr bold: of spirit so still and quiet." 1'llillllfI2ll5.!l'l High School 1: German Club 2: Home Ee Club 3: S. K. 4. IIARRIETT HAMILTON Latin Club 1. 2: S. K. 1. 2, 3. 4: G. A. A. 2. 3. 4: Stunt Show 1: Echo 3. 4: Baseball 1: May Fete 1. 2: Honor Society 4. JOHN IIATCH ".-lnrl with a voice that was full of glcv. He answerefl. 'I don't know." lf Club 4: Fl'DllLfll Club 1, 2: Swim- ming 2. ll. 4: Captain 4: Football :L 4: Basketball 3: Golf 4. STANLEY IIENVVOOD "Aged Pars play trnant at his tales. .-lnfl younger ravishfvd S0 voluble is 1'1I'Q'lllfh Club 1. Show 1. 2, 3: 4: "Spell of ming Team 3. CATHERINE HESSELSCHWERDT Latin Club 1. 2: S. K. 2. 3, 4. Presi- dent 4: G. A. A. 2. 3, 4: German Club 3: Junior Orph 3: Echo 3. 4: Basketball 1. ZZ. 3, 4: Delta Sigma 3, 4: May Fete 2. 3, 4, May Queen 4: Honor Society 3. 4: Student Count-il 3: Stunt Show 4: Vale- mlivtorian 4. ROBERT HIERONYMUS Band 1, 2, 3, 4. Librarian 4: 01'- vhestra 2, 3, 4: Orpheus Club 3, 4: XVooclwind Quintet 3, 4: All State Orchestra 4: National Or- chestra 4: Big Twelve Contest 3, 4: Rosemary Photo Editor 3. 4: Junior Orph 3: Class Stunt Show 1: German Club 4: Latin Club 1, 2. 3. 4. President 3: Art Club 1, 2. 3. Treasurer 2: Class Debate Team 1: Honor Society 4. hearings are quite his discourse? 2. 3. 4: Buys' Stunt Delta Sigma 1. 2. 3, the Iu1age": Swim- LEWIS IIILDEBRAND "I be a tiller of the soil." F1'e1lc'l1 Club 3. 4: Hi-Y 3, 4, Vice- Presimlent, 4: Ag Club 3. 4. Presi- dent 4: Trac-k 3. 4: Football 4: Boys' Glee Club 1: Basketball 2. lu-AXINE HUNDLEY "Her smile was prodigal of sum- nzory shine,- Gaily persistent? S. K. 1. 2. 3, 4: Glee Club 1. 2. :-1. 4: Home EC 3: French Club 3: G. A. A. 3, 4. LIARY LOUISE HLTRSEY "Sha talks in a manner loqna- , eious. A maid who is gafy and viva- ClO1l8.H French Club 1. 2: May Fc-te 2. DOR0'l'IiY JOHNSON "This maid is quiet, cloinure, and sweet. And size is always very neat." Twenty-sia: TT'TTT?'2' :LLL Lu!-L5 M.xRG.xRE'1' JOHNSTON "f"lAil'llflSlll1l rfoulcl rlvmaml no moro- Loyaliy. Cliarm, and cl Clever zcil. iritlzolf' Honor Soi-in-ty 4: Hyile I'5lI'ii High School, f'ilil':lgu 22: Latin Club l. IS: tl, .L A. 1. 2.15: S. K. 1. Zi. 4: Styli- Show 4: RUSl'lllill'y Lit:-r:11'y lflllitol' 4. AIACK JONES "Hr zrlio is firm mul rrfsolutc in will molds ilu: world lo him- self." Cl11'istopln-1' High School 1, 2, Z3 R-Houiu Joxizs "If is I1 frivnrlly limrt that has plfufy of frimiflsf' K. l. 3. 4: Stunt Show 1: GL'l'lll!lll Club Zi. 4. 'i'l'l'ilSll1'l?l' 42 Ilvltai Sig:- ln:1 3. 4: Mzly l-'vtc 1. KARI.'roN KEMP "To tliosv zrlio lcuofu: Ihcc ozot, 'no uforrls can paint: .tlml flzosf' 1171.0 know Hive, know all 'irorfls arf' fai'nY." Hi-Y 1, 2. 25: l.:llin Club 1: G1-rinun Club 21. 4: Ilvltu Signm Il. 4: Bnnml 1. 12. Zi. 4,2 Vi-st Pocket Bzuul 4: Orr-lu-stru 4: lk-haute 3. 43 Foot- bnll 1: Stunt Show 1: Gloo Club 2: Honor Society 4. VAN i3USEN KENNEDY lli-Y 1, 2: Billlli 1, 2. 3. 4: Stunt Show 1: f,l'Uill'Sfl'll 1. 2, 3, 4: Foot- ball Ii, 4. Cnptnin 4: Glvc lflub 3: Student Count-il 4. I'rosirlont 4: I' Club Il. 4: Honor Sovicty Il. 4, llrplwus Club Zi. 4. Ilnlsirlont 4. FLOYD KERR "lf silrwzoo is glllfllfll, l'll always bc poor." Bloom Iligrh 1: Hi-Y 2: Class lie- bzitu 2: Varsity llvililtlf 2. 4: Gor- nmn Club 3: Doltai Slglllil 15, 4: Fri-m'li Club 4. EI,lZ.XlSE'l'H KULLER "Stillness of person and strolli- rwss of features Arr' signal marks of goofl breerli1ig." May FL-te 1. 4: Gernmn Club 2. 3: lloltn Siginu Il, 4: S. K. 4. PAIJI. LAVENHAGEN "Hourly and jovial." Philo High School 1. 13, 35: IgIlSk4Yt- bull 1. 2, Il, 4: Gerniun Club 4' Art Club 4. Omxx LEMEN "Though sveming quite clcmure and shy Thrre is misclzief lurking in lim' z'yf'." M1-Kinlcy High School. Hawaii 1: Girl Scouts 2. Il. 4: S. K. 2. 3, -l-Z Latin Club 2. Ci: GI'l'lIlIlll Club 4: G. A. A. 4: Delta Sigma 4: Girls' Glu- Club 2, Il. 4: State Chorus 43 Art Club 4: Honor Society 4. ELROY LEMING "Men of few words are the best men." T"i"i"? E ? ? Two -svvmi nhnhnfnnfnnfubb CORABEL LOVVMAN "With lovely features, she is Who always is quite full of fun." 1. 2, 5. 4. G. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, French Club 1 2, 3: May Fete 1, 2, 3. 4: Lorelei 1. 2, 3. 4, President 4: Delta Sigma 4: Stunt Show 1: Art Club 2. 3: Baseball 1, 2, 3: "Dorothy Vernon." LORENE LYTLE "Such ways, such arts, such looks, has thou." i1234'G4A123' S.I. .-. , , ... . ,-, , Latin Club 1. 2: French Club 3, 4: May Foto 1, 2, 3, 4: Stunt Show 1: Delta Sigma 3. 4: "Spell of the IlllHg'0"Q Art Club 2: Junior Orph 3: Popularity Contest Win- ner 3: Style Show 4. KARME MlXLl,0W 'Ll ladies' man." Bon HIARSHALL Band 1. 2, 3, 4: Orchestra 2, 3: Bas- ketball 2. 3: SWVlllll1lll'l,'l' 1. 2, 3, 4: Baseball 1: Junior Orph 3: Stunt Show 1, 4: Latin Club 1, 2, 3: French Club 3: Hi-Y 1, 2, 3: Roseluary. Ass't Ad Manager 3, Business Manager 4: Style Show 3. 4: U. H. S. Vest Pocket Band 4. ISABELLE IWATTINGLY "She has an pleasant way and sweet, A lovely character to meet." S. K. 1, 2. 4: G. A. A. 1: French Club 2: Baseball 1. ALICE lVIE'rz '24 smile for all-a welcome glad EY .4 jovial coaazing way she had. Danville High School 3: G. A. A. 1, 2. 3. 4: S. K. 1, 2: Girls' Basket- ball 4. BKIATTIE MILLER "A merry heart doeth good like a medicine." S. K. 1. 2. 3. 4: G. A. A. 2, 3, 4: G. Ii. 3, 4: May Fete 1. 2, 3, 4: Stunt Show 1: Fl'0Ilifll Club 1, 2. 3, 4: Baseball 1. 2, 3, 4: Basketball 1. 4. DAVID MITCHELL "He is an all 'round good fel- lowf' Ifoorlmll I. 2, 3. 4: Hi-Y 1, 2, 3, 4: Latin Club 1: U Club 4. ELIZABETH Mooma "Hearts that feel and eyes that Smile. Are the dearest gifts that Heaven supplies." May Fete 1: S. K. 3, 4. ELSIE MOORE "Her friends were many, her enemies few, And as time went on, her merits grew." Philo High School 1, 2, 3: "Petti- coat Politiesu: "Patty Makes Things Hlll11"1 Valedictorian 3: S. K. 4: Art Club 4. Twenty-eight T?'i'?'?'I-"SF fnininfnnfnbfn NEXVIAIN MORGAN "We cannot imagine him either becoming angry or receiving low grades." Stunt Show 1: Latin Club 1. 2: Boy Scout 2, 35 Gorman Club 4. ODELIA BTURRAY "Suit the action to the icordf' JOSEPHINE MCAULEY "A tender heart, a will inflexible." French Club 1. 2. 3: G. A. A. 1, 2, Ci. 4: S. K. 1. 2, 3, 4: Lorelei 1, 2, fl. 4: May Fate 1. 2: Stunt Show 1: Art Club 2. 3: Baseball 1. 2. 3: Basketball 1. 2. 3. 4. FAYE RICCOLLOM "Her only fault is that she has no fault." S. K. 1, 2 4: G. R. 4: Frenr-ll Flub 1: May Fore 1: I-Imne Ee Il: Girls' Basketball 1. 2, 3. 4: Girls' Bas- ketball 1. 2. 3, 4. GLESNA MCCORMICK "One wouldnt Quant a finer friend." G. A. A. 1. 2: Home E0 2, 3: G. ll. 4: K. 4: May Ferre 1: Latin f'luh 1: Girls' Baseball 1. 2. ' BIARTHA ROSE MCCOWN "All things are possible to dili- gence and skill." S. K. 1. 2. 4: G. A. A. 1. 2: May Fe-te 1: Delta Sigma 4: Latin Flulw 1. 2: Art Club 3, 4: Girl Scouts 2, 3. SEATON BICDANIEL "Granite in strength." "Dorothy Vernon," VVILLIAM MCFALL "The gentle mind by gentle deeds is knowng For a man by nothing is so 'well beiorayed As by his manners." ROBERT NENVMAN "The will to do. the soul to dare. A man worth knowing. I'lI swear." Hartford, Count-cticut 1: Student Council 4: Band 2. 3. 4. Secretary 4: Orchestra 2. 3: Hi-Y 3. JACK NOECKER "He's tough, mam- tough and deevilish sly." Glee Club 3: Delta Sigma 3. 4: "C1'uaking Cl1ai1"': Style Show 4. uEnn5nn5nLuEnbb BIIRIAM NOEL S. K. 1. 2. 3. 4: G. A. A. 1. 2, 3, 4: Latin Club 1, 2: Art Club 1, 2, 3: GGPIIIZIII Club 3: Glue Club 12 Stunt Show 1: May Fvto 1. 2, 3. Basketball 1: Junior Urph 2. 3, Style Show 2. 3. 4: Delta Sigma 4: "Dorothy Vernon." PHYLLIS NOLAN QBEAIRDD "Little and lively. and wholly Carefree. vs C0Ns'IxINcE OAKWOOD S. K. 2. 3. 4: G. A. A. 1: Latin Club 1. 2: Art Club 3. 4. X7lCG-l'l't'Sltl0lllI 4: Delta Sigma 4: Stunt Show 1, 4: Basketball 1 2: Baseball 1, 2. MEIIBA ODEBRECHT 'Ll blithfz and Donnie: lass." Philo High School 1. 2: Basketball 2: "Aaron Boggs. the Freshman? "JI-1'I'y of Jericlio R0ail": G. A. A. 3. 4: S. K. 3. 4: HBl'lll1l!1 Club 4. R.onEnT OGLES "His spirits are like a geysrfs. For they arc allways bubbling truer." Latin Club 1, 2: Gornxan Club 4: Delta Sigma 3. 4: Stunt Show 1: Uf'l'0flklllg' Chair." JOHN OLIVER "Pleasure and acftion make the 71,0111-S' seem short." lf'I'eInflI Club 1. 2: Stunt Show 2, 4: Iffmtluill 1: Band 1. 2: Intramural Basketball 3: Swinnning 1. 2: Track 1, 2: Style Show 4. EAN PEIIEOIJY K. 1, 2, 3. 4: G. A. A. 1. 2: Latin Club 1. 2: Ori-llestra 1. 2. 3: Na- tional Contvst. Flint. Miclligran 3: Ilonor Society 3. 4: Glue Club 2, 3. 4: linscinary ltepiwiseiitativu 3: Rnselnary Typist 4: Stunt Show 1. 4: "Mikado" 2: May Feta 1, 2: Jnnini' Orph 2. 32 Style Show 3, 4: Orpheus 3, 4: Hayes Sclinlar- ship 1. ORETHA PIERCE Paxton Higrh School 1: Style Show 2. 3. 4: Junior Orph 2. 3: Big Twvlvo Cnntost 2, 3: May Fate 2, Il. 4: S. K. 2. 3. 4: Tl'02lSlllf0I' 3, Pl'UL!'l'illll Chairinan 3: G. A. A. 2, 3: Student Count-il 2. 3, l'I'0sident :iz "Creaking: Chair": Dolta Sig- Ina 3. 4: Glve Club 2. 3. 4: Ot'- m-lwstra 3: Stunt Show 4: Class Tri-asurvr 4: liusmnary Feature Editor 4: "MikaIln": "S1wll of the luiagreu 3: All State Cliorus 3, 4: "Dorothy v01'Il4Ill'! 4. GRAIN POWIIMAN Mainu T4lXVllSlllIl High Sr-lmnl 1, 2. 3: Football 1. 12. 3. 4: Baskvtball 1. 2. 3, 4: Track -lg U Club 4: Band 1 I J S I.. M.xRYEI.LEN R.xDEIa.xUGH 'L-tliuays 1101911111-'l'Lt"l7f'7' sad Full of pep-cmd nfvvr bad." Stunt Show 1: Styli' Show 4: Latin Club 1. 2: GA-'l'lll2lll Club 2, 3: S. K. 1. 2. 3. 4: G. li. 3: G. A. A. 1, 2. 3, 4: Band 1, 2, 3: May Fetc 4. Tllirfj ??'i'?T?'i' Lin!-55515 WILMA RANKIN K. 1, ZZ. 3, 4: G. A. A. 1. 2. 3, 42 Bnxslwtlnxll 1. 2, 3, 4: Stunt Show 1. 4: Fl'QHCll Club 1, 2. 3, 4: Style Shuw Ii. 42 Lorelei 2. 3. 4. Sacre- tury 4: Junior Wrph 3: Dvlta Sig- nm 3. 4: May Ft-te 1. 2. 3. 4: Band 1. 2. 3. 4: Urt'ht-strzl 22: "Spell of tht- Il1lilg'1"'Z Basvlmll 2, 3. JOSEPHINE RTEHBERG "Lift: is sweet. -is it notJ"' Frvnch Club 1, ZZ: S. K. 1, 2. 3. 4: Home lic Club 3. KEl'l'l1 REYNOLDS '24 man of rare uvzflamztetl might-in wery way." Athlt-tics 1. 12. ii. 4: Ag Club 53. 4: Ulnss Vice--l'i'e-sitlvllt 1: Vluss Svc. 2: From-h l'lub 1. 2: U Club 4: Stunt Show 1. 4: Juninr Orph 3: Band 3. DIARY RITCIYIER Delta Sifxnnl 2. Il. 4: Stunt Show 1: Latin Club 1. 2: Frenrfll Club Cl. 4: Echo Staff Typist 4: G. A. A. 1. 2. Zi: S. K. 3, 4: Lorelei 1. 2: O1't'llt'Sf1'fl 1. 2. 3. 4: Debate ZZ: Varsity Debate 4: Hnnnr Su- :-iety 4. INEZ ROBERTS "Rval 'merit is evvntually Woog- wizfd and 1'ecei11es its flue re- 1f'a1'd." May Fvto 1: Latin Ulnb 1, 2: G. A. A. ZZ, 3: S. K. 2. 3: G. R. 3: Dt-ltn Slglllil 3. 4: "Spell of the ln1:1gc" BETTY ROWLAND "Great things thro' greatest ha- zards are llCh'i6'lJ'fl. And then they shine." llvltn Slgllltl 1, 2, 3: French Club 1, 2. 3: Girl Scouts 1. LE: Debate 1, 2: S. K. 22. Ii: Basketball 1, 2. 3: Bust,-lmll 1: May Fe-te 1, 3: High Svhonl in three years. STEVE ROMINE "What cz fmmdation of character to build on." Stm-kton Junior High 1: Basxkotbnll 1.: Sflllll High 2: Football 3: Wrestling 2: Swin1n1in,fz 4: Honor Sm-ivty 4. EDGAR ROOT Fnotbnll 1. 25. 3. 4: Baskr-tball 1, 2. 3. 4: Truck 1. 2. Ii, 4: Baseball 1: IT Vlub 3. 4: Stunt Show 1: Stu- dent Cnunvil 43 Swinnning 3. W1I1BLlR. R'0TlI "There with the goods, and game 10 the fni.s'1z." Gtfflllflll Club 2, 3. 4: Basketball 1: U1'cl115st1'z1 Il: Band 1. 2. 3, 4. DOROTHY ROYER "Not -very tall. 'nat very small. But fair and swvet and lovffd by all." Latin Club 1: S. K. 1. 2. 3: Dultzl Signm 35. 4: G. A. A. 1: Mzlv Fvtu 1. 2: Ilonlc Eu f'lnb CL I T'?????? Tha .y-one Adrian!--2-LL IIELEN' RUSSELL Class Treasurer 1. 2: Stunt Show 1: Girls' Basketball 1, 2. 3, 4, Cap- tain 2. 3: Girls' Baseball 1 2, 3: S, K. 1. 2. 3. 4: Treasurer 4: G. A. A. 1. 2, 3. 4: Band 1: Honor Society 3. 4: Latin Club 1, 2: Rosemary Ass't Literary Editor 3. Editor-in-chief 4: May Fete 1: Junior Orph 3: Hayes Scholar- ship 1: Style Show 3, 4: Saluta- torian 4. HILDALICE SADDORIS G. A. A. 1: Girl Scouts 1: S. K. 2, 4: Latin Club 1: Glee Club 1, 2: "Mikado" 2: Delta Sigma 4: Home Ee t'lub 3: May Fete 1: "Dorothy Vernon." GLENN SANDEN "Neat am! trimly dress, fresh as a britlegroomf' Orlando. Florida High School 1: Orchestra 1: Glee lflub 1: French Ulub 2. 3. EDN1 SANDERS S. K. 1, 2. 3, 4. Secretary 3, Vice- President -I-: G. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4: G. lt. 1: Latin Ulub 1. 2: Rose- mary Staff. Ass't Activity Editor 3. Circulation Manager 4: Stu- dent Council 2, 3. Secretary 3: Stunt Show 1: May Fete 1, 2. 4: Girls' Basketball 1: Girls' Base- ball 1. 2: Style Show 3. 4: "Spell of the IIIIHZIOHZ Delta Sigma 3, 4. LEONARD SANDERS "A goof!-mzftiuwfd chap and a friefnd to all." Ashton High School 1, 2: Orchestra 3. 4: Ag Club 1: Band 3, 4: String Quintet 4. DOR01'IlY SCHVVARTZLOSE t'The stream of kindltncss flows' quietly." NW-st Salem High School: Class Vice-l'resident 2: "Sailor Maids" 2: USunbonnet Sue" 3: Junior Carnival. VVILLIAM SCOVILL Band 1. Q. fi. 4: Orchestra 1. 2. 3, 4: Latin Club 1: Solo Uoutesls 1, 2, tl. 4: AllAState Orchestra 2. 3, 4: Nat'l High School Orchestra 2. 3, 4: Brass Ensemble Zi. 4: lVood- wind Quintet 3, 4: Popularity Contest XVinner fl: Band Mau- ager Ji: Orpheus Club ii. 4: Stunt Show 1: Honor Society 4. IRVING SEELY liosemary Representative 1: Foot- ball 2, 3: Basketball 1. 3. 4: Track 1. 2. 4: U Club 2, 3. 4: Rosemary Ad Manager 4: Stu- dent Vouncil Vice-President 4: Class President 4: Honor Society 4. WIARTAN SHAW "No matter what thcre's to do. You'll find this girl is faithful and true." Home Ee Club 2, 3: S. K. 1. 2: Echo Stalf Typist 4: May Fcte 1. HAROLD SIMON "He is worthy of trust." French Club 1, 2, 3. Thirtl -1100 TT?q"2"i"2' Libbibnfn JAMES SINNOTT "Forgetting self till a game is o'er ' And fighting for the team." Football 2: Track 2: Swinnning 1: I' Club 2: Ag Club 4. Secretary 4. BETTY SMITH HA vital spark of heavenly flame." LatiII Club 1. 2. 3. 4: French Club 32, 4: S. K. 1. 2, 3. -1: Art Club 1. ZZ. 3, 4: G. A. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Lorelei 2: Style Show -1: May Fefe 13 Glee Club 3, 4. CHARLES SMITH "Many things ts he. but most of all. sincere." East Lynn High School 1. 2: Class Vice'I'resiIleIIt 1: Hi-Y 4. Social 1,'lIaiI'IIIan 4. D0I,oREs SMITH "Dolores works with might anfl main. To reach the goal that is her aim." S, K. 1. 4: Frenr-h Club 1, 2. 3: Sfllllf Show 1: May Fete 1. IIOMER SMITH "None but lzinzself could be his parallel." FI'I-In-II Club 22: Ag Club 2: Travk 2, 32: Flltllllilll 3: Delta Sigma 4. KATHAEINE SMITII "A sweet Content. Passing all wiszloni, or its fair- est flowers." U'l'i0ll f'0lll1lllllllfy High School: "Mikado" 2: Glee Club 2, 2, 4: Home Plc Club Zi: May Fete Ii: G. A. A. 3. RIINNIE SMITH "She knows the thrill that comes from work well done." S. K. 1: May Fete 1. ROBERVT SMITH "On studies most his mind was bentg A book he had where 'er he went." FI'l'llCh Club 2: Stunt Slmw -l. SELYVYN SMITH "A przncelier-looking man never stept thro' a princes hall." Latin Club 1, 2. 3: French Club 1, 2, 3, -1: Hi-Y 1, 2. 3: Band 1. 2, 3, -15 Orpheus 3. 4: Stunt Show 1: Junior 011.11 3: Baseball 3: Rose- lllill'y lie-presentative 43 Style Show 4: Orcllestra 3: Brass Uc- tette 4: Stunt Show -1: Vest Poeket Band -lg Honor Society 4. THEO SMITH "The world is full of glaflness. There are joys for all mankind." T"?'i"'?"i' :ir 11-three 55511-2155 FRANCES SPEAR "A girl of style. praise. original- ity, and personality." rench Club 1, 2. 3. 4: Delta Sigma 2, 3. 4: Eelio Stuff 2, 3. 4: Ger- uiun Club ZS, 4: G. R. 1, 2, 3: S. K. 1. 2. Zi. 4: May Fete 1. 2: Stunt Show 1: Girl Scouts 1 2, 3: Honor Society 4. ESTHER SPECK "She is a dear and gentle maid. Of any work she's not afraid." Girls' Gloc Club 1: S. K. 1. 2. 3, 4: May Fefe 1, 2: French Club 1. 2: Latin Club 2. 3: Delta SHIIIIH 4: "Dorothy Vernon." FRANK STAPP "Now 'in the name of all ye gods at once. What meat docs this man feed upon That he has grown so great." lutruniurall Basketball 4: Hi-Y 3. 4. GEORGE STEVENS "To-morrow comes, and we are where? Then let as live to-day." W.XLTER STILL "A he-man to the core." Band 1. 2. 3. 4: Orchestra 4: Vest Pocket Bunfl 4: Lutin Club 1. 2, 3: Delta Si,-:inn 3. 4, Treasurer 4: Echo Business Mallagor 4. Stntf 2. Il. 4: "f're:iking Ch:lir": Stunt Show 1. 4: Junior Orph 3: Hi-Y 1. 2, 3: Honor Society 4. JEAN STIVEN "She moves a goddess and looks a queen? University High Sf'll001 1. 2: "Mur- thu" 2: "Miss Cherryblossoilf' 1: "Flying: Down the Sky" 2: Or- chestra 1. 2: G. R. 1. 2: Social Scieiive Uluh 1: Latin Plub 1, 2: K. Cl. 4: G. A. A, 3: Style Show 4:4l,'horus 1, 2. 4: I+'re-uch Club BILL SUMMERS "A willing heart adds feather to the heel. And makes the clown at winged Mercury." Band 1. 2. 4: Gtfflllilll Club 4: Sun .Inc-into High School, Houston 3. ATABERTTX TAYLOR "Quiet, true. and kind, One whom the world ca.-n't leave behind." May Feta 1: S. K. 4. LIAROLD TENHAEFF "Never the run of the seas of life shall hide thee." Uilllil 1. 2. Il. 4: lloltu Sigma 2. 3. 4: French l'lub 1. 2. 3: IIi-Y 1 2: Brass Sextot 3: Orpheus Ulub 3. 4: "Mik:ulo": Stunt Show 1. 4: Orc-lu-strn 2. 3: Vest Pocket Band 4. BIAXINE TUDOR "True as the needle to the pole Or as the dial to the sun." Proto:-tion High Sc-hool 1: G. R. 1, 2: Home Eu Club 2: Mny Foto 1. 12:11 A A A A A CLARA TURNER "Joy, s'ucce.s'.s'. and happiness to you.. Rosie. May Fe-tc 1. 2: French Club 1, 2. 3: S. K. 1. 2. 3. 4: G. R. 1. 2: Girl Scouts 1, 2: Stunt Show 1. FRANCES UTTERB.KCK "For if she will, you may depend 0n't, And if she 10on't, she won't, So thc9'e's an end onftf' S. K. 1. 2. 3, 4: Dclta Sigma 1, 2. 3. 4: G. A. A. 1. 2, 3. 4: Echo Stuff 2. Il. 4: French Club 1. 2, 3, 4: Class Debate 1: May Fc-te 1, 2: Orcliestra 1. LOWELL VIIJLARS "O. it is carecllent To have a giant strength." Football 1. 2, 3, 4: Basketball 1, 2, ZS. 4: Echo Stalf 4: U Club ZS, 4, Yicu-I'1'4-siilcllt 4: G4-rnnin Club 1, 23: Elvctricinn 2. 3: Stunt Show 1. LQRIAN WAllDO "Cll,Cl7'llCtC7' is success and there is no other." xvlllillllllfl High School. Illlllilllli 1, 9' Ch-c Club 1 "' ,Orem-Qtr ' -. .1 ,.., ... :1 l, 3: Latin Club 1, L, Scum-t:1rv L: S. K. 3. 4: G. R. 3. LLOYD WALDRON "Rather go down to the lowest defeat Than save himself if he had to Cflfllltf' Arnistronp High School 1: Football Ci: Rose-innry Stuff. Auditor Il, 4: Hi-Y 4: French Club 3. GENE WEISIGER Latin Club 1. 2, Ii: Band 1. 2. 3, 4: Hi-Y 1. 2, 3: Stunt Show 1, 4: Student Council Zi. 4: Delta Sig- ma 3, 4: Junior Orpli 3: Athletic- Bfilllillllfl' 3, 4: Iiosonlury Sport Editor 4: Suxalpliolie Scxtuttc ll, 4. LIELEN WEST "Shes honest. kindly. true and glad to work from day to day." Sidney High School 1, Il: Bnskot- ball 1. 2. 3: Glf-0 Club 1, 2, Ulu-11-ttal Club 1, 2, 3. KATHERINE WH1'1'E "The cautious seldom err." S. K. 1: Home Ee 1. 2, 23. BIARY ELIZABETH W11.L1.x11s S. K. 1. 2. 3. 4: G. A. A. 1. Il. 4: Latin Club 1: French Club 2: Stunt Show l: May Fvtc 1. 2: Gloe Club 1. 3. 4: Girls' Chorus 1, 2, 4. President 4: Home Ec 3. RIILDRED WIIJSON "A small little girl with a great big snzilc. Puts pep into iizork-makes life worth while." Honor Society 23. 4: Hayes Scholar- ship 1: Roscnnlry Typist 4: May Fete 1. 2: S. K. 2. Il. 4: Latin Club 2. fl: G. A. A. 4: Girls' Bus- kctball 4. l Qi? ? ? ? ? ? Thirty-five Lifniufmbnfn VICTOR WIMMER "Power arlanits no equal." German Club -1-: Hi-Y 2. CARL WINGFIEIAD 'RA mischievous twinkle of the eye is often cz symbol of enf ergyf' French Club 1, 2. PAUL WOOD "Fare thee wellg The elements be kind to thee, and make Thy spirits all of comfort." Ag Club 2. 3, 4. Vice-President 43 Hi-Y 4. ELMER WRIGIIT t'Sort of a 'man yon like to meet, In the home or on the streetf' Mzihonlet High School 1. 2: Basket- ball lg Dralnatics Club 2. MELVILLE YOUHILL "And still the wonder grew How one small head could carry all he knew." NVaukegau High School 1, 2: Mili- tary 2g Junior Orph 3. XTIRGINLX CHURCH "Music hath charrnfsg so hath shef' S. K, 1, 2. 3. 4: Latin Club 2. 3. Secretary 3: Orchestra 1, 2. 3, 4: Delta Sigma Il. -1: Orpheus Club 3. 4: All State Orchestra 2, 3, 4. On the following page will be found the names of some of the more active seniors, together with the quotation selected for each. On account of the long list ot activities in which these seniors engaged, it was impossible to include both the quotations and activity lists on the page with their pictures. In previous issues ot The Rosemary it has been customary to omit the quotations for the more prominent seniors and to group their pictures and activity lists. on the Hrst two pages. But this year all the seniors' pictures are arranged alphabetically, and so we have adopted this method to include all the senior quotations. :Shini- -2-:Emi John Barth ". . . a strong man, For where he fixed his heart he set his hand To do the thing he willed, and bore it through." Helen Beaird "She looks the world straight in the eyes, And it smiles back at her." Elizabeth Bilsborrow "As lovely notes on her fiddle she D13-YS, Loveliness of person she also por- trays." John Bourgois "There is no genius in life like the genius of energy and industry." Robert Bowditch "Genius, industry, and energy com- bined with a magnetic personality make this man." Clifford Brand "Of all our parts, the eyes express The sweetest kind of bashfulnessf' Olin Browder "Born for success he seemed, With grace to win, the heart to hold, With shining gifts that took all eyes." Fern Burr "Her friends are many, Her foes-are there any?" Patricia Busey "Easy going, fair, vivacious, possess- ing A charm that is most gracious." Katherine Dyson "She has a pleasant smile, a gentle way." Harriett Hamilton "We know her by her jolly air- Laughing eyes and jet black hair." Catherine Hesselschwerdt "How can she be so clever and so lovable both at once?" Robert Hieronymus "He was a scholar, and a ripe and good one, Exceeding wise, fair-spoken, and per- suadingf' Van Dusen Kennedy "In full possession of all that is best in himself and the world about him." Bob Marshall "A pleasing chap, perhaps a trifle con- ceitedf' Miriam Noel "Frank, Winsome and merry is she- As clever a mixer as ever could be." Constance Oakwood "A companion who is cheerful is worth gold." Jean Peabody "Her heart and mind are as lovely as her person." Oretha Pierce " 'tis the song ye sing, and the smile ye wear That's a-makin' the sunshine every- where." Crain Portman ' "O, he sits high i11 all the people's heartsg A great hero." Wilma Rankin "She is pretty to talk with, Witty to walk with, Pleasant, too, to think on." Mary Ritcher "A roguish maiden with deep blue eyes and a heart of gold." Edgar Root "No better attribute to fame Than these few words, He played the game." Helen Russell "Her merry way hath won our hearts, And her ability hath won her laurelsf' Hildalice Saddoris "Her eyes are blue-deep, beautiful blue-and her smile never wears off." Edna Sanders "We have bright dreams of her past and future which none can de- stroy." William Scovill "His face is much to seep And back of it there lies A heap of joy and tenderness And judgment sound and wise." Irving Seely "Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have great- ness thrust upon 'em." Gene Weisiger "Why worry about tomorrow? It's still today." Mary Elizabeth Williams "It's sweetness makes her eyes so brown And also lights her smiley She's the very best of girls- And sl1e's a friend worth while." ?E'T'? 'E' ? T' Thirty-xcvvn Lbnfnbnibb COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM Processional --- Invocation ...- Salutatory --- Statistics ..... Class History .... Duet ....... Class Will--- Prophecy .... Vocal Solo .,... Hatchet Oration--- -Tnnior Response .... Music ........... Valedietory .................... .... Alliance Chapter D. A. R. Prize ..... - Presentation of Diplomas .... Recessional .... ..... .... ----High School Orchestra -----Rev. Sidney A. Guthrie - -- --Helen Russell -- ---Charlotte Beard lMildred Wilson 2Margaret Johnston SRobert Hieronymus ""lWilliam Scovill SFrank Stapp "--'2LoWell Villars SFrances Spear lFrances Utterback -- ------ -Mary Bireley - - - -Olin Browder --- -Audrey Frank ------------Mixed Chorus -Catherine Hesselschwerdt SF. E. Williamson "HIS, B. Haddcn ----High School Orchestra TT'????'2' Thirty-eight VALEDICTORY "Rosemary, that 's for remembrance." Since that is the title so appropriately given to our year book, it seems fit- ting for the theme of our farewell message. The old familiar halls, the building, the teachers, the students, the activities-all these things are now only a chap- ter in our life. In later years when we leaf through the connotations of the past, these pictures will flash across our minds like some exhilarating stimulant, bring- ing back pleasant memories. This is the last time we will rightly be able to call ourselves students of Ur- bana High. Every year since starting to school we have left behind us one more stepping stone in the path of education. Each succeeding rank left us stronger and better fitted to bridge the gap to the next one. Now we End ourselves ready to make a great advance. For some of us it is a plunge into the sea of life, for others only a step into the complicated machinery of some university. These last four years have printed one of the most important chapters of our life. In the course of routine and study here we have formed friendships that are true and dear to us. We have acquired habits that will never desert us. Some of these habits will determine in part our destinies during the remaining years of our lives. Through various activities, we have experienced lessons that will help us solve the many diilicult problems of coming crises. We feel competent and ready to push out into deeper water, but not with- out a tinge of regret at parting from these friendly halls. We all have high ideals and ambitions to attain. We aspire to develope strong and noble charac- ters 5 to become worthy citizens of our country 5 and to serve as models for other classes and another generation. We wish to extend to the members of the faculty and the school board our deepest appreciation for their help and sincere efforts during our stay in Urbana High. These things and better have bee11 said before and will be echoed by others following down the trail that we pursue. Words are hollow tribute to our pas- sage. Actions only speak. We look behind at the things accomplished and ahead at tasks still waiting to be done. In order that we might fulfill our share of these duties to the best of our ability Let us do our work as well, Both the unseen and the seen 5 Make the house where gods may dwell Beautiful, entire, and clean. Else our lives are incomplete, Standing in these walls of Time, Broken stairways, where the feet Stumble as they seek to climb. Build today, then, strong and sure, With a firm and ample base, And ascending and secure Shall tomorrow find its place. CATHERINE HESSETJSCHXVERDT 'Z' T' 'PET' ? T 'S' Thirty-nine .:u.:..m..m..:..m..:n. SALUTATO RY We, the members of the class of 1931, extend to you a sincere welcome to share with us the thrills of this evening. We realize that you are fully as in- terested in this occasion as we are, and we deeply appreciate that interest. As we sit for the last time on this platform many thoughts are racing through our minds. Memories and visions of twelve school years crowd into our consciousness, while we are also permitting our imaginations to take short flights into the future. Shall we attempt a brief analysis of these hurrying thoughts and visions? Most of us doubtless feel some sense of relief that these twelve years of schooling are completed. We know that for a large number of us school has been dismissed permanently, while, for us all, tonight marks the end of compulsory education covering two-thirds of our lives. Even though we realize that there is work ahead, we can pause to draw a long breath now. But this feeling of relief is quickly submerged by the sense of satisfaction which comes with the successful completion of a difhcult task. To have graduated is no mean achievement, but many of us have accomplished things in other lines than merely our lessons. Some have gone out for athletics and have won the coveted UU" while helping to bring glory to our school. Others have engaged in various activities, such as work on the school publications, the Echo and Rose- mary, some have devoted their efforts to the musical organizations, While a num- ber of courageous souls have indulged in dramatics, oratory or debate. Whatever our field of endeavor, we feel a justifiable pride in whatever success has been ours. Our analysis of our minds this evening reveals still another feeling-that of sharp sorrow to think that the associations and activities of these years are ended. VVe know that nothing can ever take their place. We have played and worked together, We have met and learned to know the members of the faculty as friends as well as teachers. Tonight we are one, a class, a unit, we have many common interests as students of Urbana High. Tomorrow we shall be parted, scattered never to unite again, our interests will lead us afar, each to his own destiny. lt is this realization that brings a tear to our eye and a lump in our throat. We know, for you, our parents and friends, have told us so, that these years just past will prove for many of us the happiest of our lives. As we think of these things we are conscious of yet another feeling-that of gratitude to those who have made these opportunities available. The tax payers, our parents, and those citizens who have helped in so many ways are remembered with appreciation tonight. We have received liberally at your hands, and tonight we feel, more strongly than ever before, a sense of responsibility-a responsibility to go out and dis- charge life duties as worthy representatives of our splendid school and com- munity. To Urbana we owe much, and we are determined to pay our debt. Finally, the analysis of our minds discovers a trace of ambition and hope for the future. We do not feel that we have reached the pinnacle of achievement tonight. Rather do we realize that these years of formal education have been merely a preparation for what is ahead. We shall never be content to cease striving upward in whatever paths our feet may be planted. We are, then, relieved, we are proud, we are sad, we are grateful, we are hopeful. With these mingled emotions we again say from our hearts, "Welcome to our graduation exercises." HELEN RUSSELL T T T 12' T T T T Forty bibbibb CLASS STATISTICS tWith Apology to H. W. Longfellowj In the Village of Urbana, In the la11d of maize and oatiields, Stood a Wigwam built for learning, Stood a Wigwam strong and mighty. And within this mighty wigwam, Dwelt four tribes of learned people, And their chieftain was a stranger, From the distant land of Penlield, Strong of build and full of sinew, He, a ruler wise and trusty. But the Senior tribe was strongest, Wisest in all lore and learning, Bravest in all skill and cunning. From the lips of Irving Seely, Called he all his tribe together, Counted every man and woman, One and seventy people had he, Eighty fair and ninety swarthy. Twenty tons of limb and body. Thus again cried Irving Seely In the warm and pleasant summer: "We are crowded, O my people! In this lodge of brick and mortar, Let us seek for greater glory In the kingdom of the West Wind, In the land of the Illini." Then they gathered all around him First the tallest-Richard Fulmer, And the small ones-Burt and Susan, Then the oldest-Cook and Oliver. Came the fairest-Betsy Bilsborrow, Lovely as a water lily. And the modest 'Lizabeth Koller, Shyer than a silver heron, Then the popular Frances Baldwin, Loved the faces of the athletes, Knew their names and also secrets- Called them "Dutchy" and his rivals. Then the orator, Olin Browder, And the very strong man, Villars, And John Barth, the fleetest runner, And the warriors, Root and Dixon, Spake with native tongues together, Talking much, and much designing, How this Senior tribe might prosper. All the wise squaws of the Seniors, Glad were they to travel westward, Brilliant as the sun was Catherine, Just as glimmering Helen Russell, Deep and quiet as the waters Are the maidens Jean and Mildred, Just as deep and just as kindly, Johnston, Spear, and Betty Rowland. Then spoke up Eugenia Freemon, Winner of a silver trophy: "Go not forth, O clan of Seniors, To the kingdom of the West Wind, Till we have a feast together, Till we sing and dance together." From the lips of Robert Bowditch, Came a clarion, shrill and treble, "Calling all the sweet musicians, To the pow wow of the people." Came the flutist-Bob Hieronymus, With the French horn, William Scovill, With the saxophone, Gene Weisiger, With the trombone, Robert Marshall, And the trumpeters, Smith and Karlton. Then at last from out the shadows Came the lovely dancing maidens, Lytle, Gourley, Pierce, and German, And the restless Patsy Busey, With her moods of sun and shadow, And the laughing Corky Lowman, With her smiles and sighs of longing, And the slender Maryellen With her tresses, fair and silken. Then he called upon the singers, "Sing to us, O Newlin Morgan, That the feast may be more joyous." And the gentle Orian Lemen, Sang us songs of love and mercy. Then the maidens, Fairchild, Fletcher, Gave us music soft and pleading, And the tall and stately Katharine Sang a song of our departure. And the Seniors sadly listened, For they knew that on tomorrow They must journey to the West Wind, To the home of the Illini. Then the little Carolyn Riley With her paints of many colors, And the artist, Connie Oakwood, With her brushes and her pencils, And the sketcher, Rose McCoWn, With her scroll and roll of parchment, Sat they down before the camp fire, Drew the lovely dancing maidens, Sketched the faces of the warriors, Painted figures, painted symbols, Representing the statistics Of the class of one-nine-three-one. In the doorway of the wigwam, Stood Miss Ricketts, kind and faithful, She the leader, oldest, wisest, She the friend of all the classes. And her voice shook with its sorrow, "Farewell, O my laughing Seniors, My best wish I give unto you, May God-speed be ever with you." Then the councilor, Van Kennedy, Spake aloud and spake in this wise: "We are going, O our leader, On a long and great adventure, But three tribes we leave behind us- Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior. In your charge and care we leave them, See that never harm comes near them, Teach them ways of truth and goodness, Show them paths of love and beauty, So they, too, may journey onward, To the land of true success." CuAiu.or'rn BEARD T??? ? ? ? Forty-om: Lninnhnfnnhbnfl SENIOR CLASS HISTORY CAs You Like Itj All the school 's a stage and all the boys and girls are merely players, They have their exits and their entrances, And each class in its time plays many parts. The acts being in four ages: ACT I "Those salad days when we were green in judgment." Time: Fall of 1927. Scene: Urbana High School. Characters: President ........ .... F rances Baldwin Vice-President --- .... Keith Reynolds Secretary .............. ---Susan Anderson Treasurer ----------------- --- -- .--- Helen Russell Rosemary Representative --------------------- Irving Seely Two Hundred Forty-six Other Green Young Things The curtain rises on the first act to show a jolly, rollicking crowd in pur- suit of knowledge. Gradually they become acquainted with each other and get accustomed to their new surroundings. With inspired and loyal feeling they burst forth in their "lusty little voices" with the strains of their newly learned school song "Orange and Black." Eagerly they join the various organizations, S. K. 's, G. A. A.'s, Girl Reserves, French, Latin, German, and Comrade Clubs: and with great anticipation they await the ordeal of initiation CMuch Ado About Nothingj. The climax of this act is the Class Stunt Show entitled "Four Min- utes to Go," which wins first place. Then the curtain is drawn on thetirst act of their career. ACT II "Too too vain, too too vain." Time: One year later. Scene: Same. Characters: President ------- ---Eugenia Freemon Vice-President ---. ----- H elen Beaird Secretary -------- . ------- ---- I ieith Reynolds Treasurer -----------------------------..--- Helen Russell Rosemary Representative ------------------.- Jean Peabody Two Hundred and One Other Sophisticated Sophomores. As the curtain rises on the second act, these same students feel themselves a very distinct part of Urbana High School ready to play another important part in their educational careers. The gay scenes of this act consist of hops, parties, sports, and other good times. In the midst of these activities, exams approach and many are exclaiming: " 'Tis true, 'tis pity, and pity 'tis, 'tis true," while others look longingly at the teacher, saying: "Heaven that I had thy head." This act closes with the presentation of t'The Mikado" in which they are well represented. . ACT III "I feel within me, A peace above all earthly dignities . . . ,, A still and quiet conscience. COYlfflI1If'd on Page 172 Igormwo T 'I' T T Fi' T 'SP nfnnfnnfnninhib SENIOR CLASS WILL Amo11g the documents brought to light after the departure of the class of 1931 was this last will and testament. What a document it turned out to bel Who would have suspected that such treasures were so carefully hoarded away by the various members of the class? The document was in the rough-await- ing, I suppose,the hand of a master lawyer. Hark ye! to the hoarded treasure. We, the Seniors of Urbana High School, being of sound and disposing mind, and with peace and charity for all the world, do hereby declare this our last will a11d testament on this day, June 12, in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and thirty-one. To the Juniors we leave our best wishes for a successful last year with the hope that they will still retain their humble attitude and remember that they are "just children" in Senior English. To the Sophomores we will our excess knowledge with the request that they will forever leave our initials which we have so laboriously carved on the desks as a source of inspiration in their hours of need, which no doubt will be many. To the Freshmen we pass on the encouraging thought that three short years ago we were but freshmen, that there is still hope, that they too, if they strive diligently, may attain the heights of wisdom and maturity we have gained. To Mr. Hadden and Miss Ricketts we leave our thanks and hopes that they may in the future boast of another class as wise as ours. To Mr. Hallam, one geometry quiz book with all the solutions and answers. To Buck Schroth, two detective stories to read to his sixth hour Economics class. To Miss Eyerley, two ways to look cross without cracking a smile. To Lew Stephens, a spool of thread and a needle with which to sew the pocket on his football pants. To Miss Biedermann, a book entitled, "Poetry to Be Memorized at the Age of Seventeen and Enjoyed at the Age of Seventy-Five." To Mr. Tilbury, a pair of roller skates to save him many a tiresome walk to the office. The following personal bequests are made to various students: I, Susan Anderson, do hereby will my ability to wear young II18l1iS wrist watches every other week to Lillian Moss, with the devout hope that by the time she graduates, she will have developed it to as high a degree of art as I have. I, John Hatch, do, under my seal, will my ability to acquire detentions to Kenneth Thomas. I feel sure that he will remove the blot from the Hatch escut- cheon. Robert Smith leaves his reputation as a thinker to Ruth Mosher who is to use it only when needed. Lowell Villars gladly gives a book on "The Etiquette of Love Making" to Naomi Stetfy. Lloyd Waldron donates his job as a typewriter hauler to Marcus Cord with the suggestion that an elevator be installed in the high school. Being sound of body and mind, I, Harold Tenhaeff, do leave to Stewart Edgar my oom-pah talent and inclinations. David Mitchell regretfully bestows those "pleasant second hour study periods" in the library to Buddy Shroyer. Gene Weisiger gives to Marjorie Zink a life size photograph of himself. I. Walter Still, recognizing my qualities as a man with an unusual voice, leave it to Gayle Hollingsworth, for the good of the church. I Continued on Page 162 ? ? ? ? ? ? ? F t U 0711- W'66 Limb 511-12115 SENIOR CLASS PROPI-IECY The presses were clanging noisily. An exasperated editor was storming at a tardy reporter. Said reporter looked fa- miliar. Why, I did know him. He was one of my old school mates, John Hatch. tAt least, he wasn't asking Miss Ricketts for an excuse, this time.J I was going to speak to him, but the editor' looked formidable, so I passed into the city edi- tor's office. As I opened the door marked "Lowell Villars, Private," the sound of clicking typewriters assailed me, but I braved the din and made my way to his desk. He was storming. "Look at this!" he yelled, as he waved the morning edition of a newspaper dated June 10, 1941, in my face. I looked. The headlines told me the whole sordid story. GANGLAND'S KING MAKES CONFESSION. I read on. "One-Lamp Louie Catoni, Chicago's second Capone, has confessed to charges entered against him and has been sen- tenced to life imprisonment in the Bald- win penitentiary. "One day as Mr. Catoni was chatting with the Police Commissioner, Robert Hieronymus, Miss Frances Baldwin, chief executive of the Baldwin penitentiary, entered the room. Upon seeing her, Ca- toni completely lost his acquired poise, and, forgetting time and place, threw himself at her knees, saying he was Gor- don Faulkner, former resident of Ur- bana, Illinois, and if she would listen to his pleas he would reform and become a new man. He sobbed out the entire story of his career of crime on her shoulder. "He told of the giant network of henchmen he had scattered throughout the city, foremost among whom were Wilbur Roth, William McFall, Elroy Leming, William Scovill, and Melville Youhill. These associates posted them- selves in different sections, and, at the break of dawn, concentrated their efforts on securing all the dandelions within their area, later taking them to a west- side brewery where wine was made. Some of the flowers were sold at greatly re- duced prices, and the florists of the city were forced into bankruptcy because of their inability to compete with such cut- rates. "Too, in the dead of night, these prowling accomplices stooped to the base act of taking the light globes from the city streets and using them as vats for the fermentation of their wine. This practice left the streets in darkness, which condition is undoubtedly demoral- izing to the youth of today. District At- torney Sam Bratton considers this a major felony and says there must be re- tributionf' I could read no farther. The details stunned me. I could think of nothing else for days. Finally, feeling that a change of surroundings would relieve me of my oppressed feeling, I asked to be transferred to the Paris office of our newspaper. I went immediately to New York, but before I had embarked for Paris, I learned of a hold-up at the Palais d'Ar- gent, a notorious nightclub, and I went thither to investigate. During the course of the investigation, I learned that Mar- garet Johnston, the famous woman racketeer, was in charge of the liquor traffic of aforesaid night-club, and that Malcolm Bantz was the manager of the establishment. Maxine Armstrong, a well known settlement worker, has been try- ing vainly to convert them both. Also, before I left to take my boat, I had the pleasure of meeting the charm- ing hostess of the club, Miss Helen Rus- sell. She was very kind to me and gave me a personal introduction to their dancer of world fame, Frances Mary Gourley. Soon after I left for Paris. Upon my arrival there I received a no- tice asking me to appear at the foreign correspondence office at once. I did so, a.nd was informed that I was to have complete charge of this department. My work was to begin that day. As I was looking over the dispatches recently re- ceived, I noticed foremost amongst them that the Delphi Oracle, hitherto one of the mysteries of the modern world, had been discovered fradulent and that a Miss Wilma Rankin had admitted being the instigator of the plot to deceive trust- ing seekers of truth who have consulted the Oracle in their hour of need. Many other interesting news items met my eyes. Robert Ogles, a prominent Washington politician, was laboring night and day to secure the repeal of the eighteenth amendment. His arguments in the House with Constance Filbey, woman Representative from Illinois who opposed his views, are the talk of the nation. Mary Susan Anderson has been made president of the "Royal Order of Ameri- can Spinstersf' with Catherine Hessel- schwerdt as vice-president, Mariam Noel, secretary, and Betty Smith, treasurer. Dorothy Schwartzlose has opened the Taj-Mahal as a summer resort. Among her prominent guests this season are Mr. Cmztinurrl on Page 170 'Q' 'S' 'E' Forty-four ??'iF? :Bibb LLL HATCHET ORATION Senior: Full many a legend hath been told About this hatchet, wondrous old, Full many a song has found its way From olden times to the present day, Telling whence this emblem cameg And every tale has added fame And interest to its mystic name. But careful research bared the truth Of ancient years to the present youth And truth is stranger far, you know, Than all the hectic tales which grow In fertile minds, or man-made plot- Imagined tales, with mystery fraught, But we shall tell you whence 'twas got, And how it came to Urbana High, In those olden days, so long gone by, Before the white man came to dwell In Champaign County, histories tell, The wandering tribes of Kickapoo And Miami Indians lived her-e toog The Pottawatomies set their tent, Returned to hunt the moose and deer Abounding on the prairies here, Before Urbana was a town. They brought their people, settled down, And built their tents near Main and Race Where Davis' grocery grows space. A little further down the hill There bubbled forth, their thirst to still, A spring of water, clear and cold, A comfort to these warriors bold. 'Tis near this old historic spot That C. N. Clark had a business lot. When first the whit-e man hither came With thought this Indian land to tame, The red men of the Kickapoo, And all the other Indians, too, Bore keen resentment, then they swore That they of sleep would have no more 'Till they had driven every man Of white blood out of this, their land. The Indian Chief, Chicagou, strove In vaing the white man throve. He throve in spite of trials severe While ever dangers hovered near From every hostile Indian band Who treachery against him planned. Then, when Chicagou saw at last There was no doubt, the die was castg The white man must be made a friend, The struggles, fighting, all must end If the tribes of Illinois Were to live and not to die. He gathered his chiefs together then And bade them bring both women and men, To meet the white man near this spring. With Indian chant and tom-tom's beat The ceremony was complete. They buried a hatchet as a sign of peace, And they promised all their Wars to cease. They kept their word, and as time passed on Urbana grew to be a town. The schools were formedg the high school too, Was added as the system grew, One day-We do not know the year- So cannot tell it to you here- Some senior lads from Urbana High Stopped at the spring as they passed by To quench their thirst. One kicked the ground And heard a hard and ringing sound. Then they one and all would see VVhat this amazing thing might be That, buried beneath the hard earth's crust, Responded thus to his gentle thrust. They dug it forth and brought to light The very hatchet you see tonight- Chicagou's hatchet, ancient, old, Whose legend hath just now been told. They made it a mascot for their class, And decided it should onward pass To each senior class as it came in line, And so it has, to this very time. But each class must prove its right to it By showing forth its power of wit, In mental contest, strong and bold, But not with weapons as of old. The classes meet by proxy: I From the Senior class do cry Upon this stage to produce- their man To answer in person for his class, Before, to them this hatchet may pass. Senior: You come sailing right up here, As if you l1ad no care nor fear,- But sailing high I hear's your fad, Tho' an airplane ride you've never had! You thought you had it fixed one day While at your aunt's, to slip away And take a ride in an airplane, With a friend who had one down the lane. But auntie, somehow, "smell't a mouse" And wouldn't let you leave the house, Unless your grandma went with you, So she could "see the airplane too!"- So the airplane engine made no sound You did your sightseeing on the ground While grandma stood right there near by, To see you did not sail the sky. And you've grown no wings since then, I see -- But had to walk up here to me. . .lust an ordinary lass, Sent up here by the junior class. Junior: You're not so much, as I can see, Uontinuvll on Pngr' 160 ??T"? ? ? ? , L arty-five 5:51-5:12--1-2-12- I Trexzdefzzf GAYLE HOLLINGSWORTH JUNIICUDRS Fly ubunfnudnbnfnnfnb THE JUNIOR CLASS VVe did our best to make this year an outstanding one in our career. VVe accom- plished several Worthwhile projects under the leadership of our four class officers: Gayle Hollingsworth, President, Ihleen Tranip, Vice-President, Dorothy Edwards, Secretary, Bernice Quinton, Treasurer, and Naomi Steify, Rosemary Representa- tive. The home room teachers and advisers were Miss Fisher, chairman, Lair, IHIJ-mx 'l'R.u1r. , , , , DOROTHY Enwuzns, vi,.,..p,-,-,f,1,i,,f Miss Mowrey. Miss Kirk, and Miss Gross. sf,U,.,.,,,,.,, These five advisers gave their support to every undertaking. As the annual Junior Orph we gave the play "The Mummy and the Mumpsf' This production was very successful due to the efforts of the committee which was composed of Charles Anderson, Lowell Villars, Max Meadows. John Willizillis, Naomi Ste-ify, Betty Bauer, Ruth Wyninger, Maurice Sehroyer, Rosemary Coldwell, Vivian Bell, Marie Hogans, Mary Hilbnrn, Fern Dey, Betty Rowland, Avis Gaffney, Elizabeth Gundlock, Ihleen Tramp, and Ruth Brennen. ln the Class Stunt Show we presented Hflutl Shoot! Cutll' a dress rehearsal for a movie in a New York night club. Top lfnzo: 1lf'G2ll1l'j'. West, C'rnwi'ord. Mc-Innes, Wln-rry, Harris. Kirk, Mowrey, Simpson, Ball, Johnston. Fourth Rum: Ilillnnrn, Hnndlom-k, Svlllllllillth tirem-nwn-ll. Williams. Lina-ienine, Rnh4-rls, A. Smith, Winters. Dyson, Coldwell. Bain-r. Iirnwn, App:-rsnn. 'I'l:ird I-'ann' Vhilds. Bells-field, Statler, Lee, Jalnes. Stir-r, M. Smith. Honey, Goble, Seovill. Gourley, liratton, Brown. Nvvunrl lfuzr: Ransoin. Mm-D4-vill. Morris. Butts, 'l'lmn1pson, E. Slllllll, kV!'1ltl1l'1'. Huhh:u'll. Porter, Grivsln-inier, Britt, GRllTll1'X. Ifirxf li'uu'.' Russell. Ford. Silver. Miller. Young, Warrick. Enipson. Str-Wy. llollingrsworth, CHl'lil'I'y, Tll4llllZlS. l':ldy. XVyni11ger, Kirby. 5.5 dn A -2- L A Avlis, ' " ' ' .5 4 v YQ if . Z - THE JUNIOR CLASS We made a splendid showing' in ath- letics. Kenneth Thomas, Paul Simpson, Robert Schumacher, John Amerman, Merle Waldron, and Thurman Sears won their letters in football. Our Junior basketball team was made up of Paul Simpson, ' 3. Maurice Schroyer, Merle Waldron, Charles i VVertz, Clem Gerhardt. Thurman Scars, i'il and Kenneth Thomas. The two boys on the varsity squad were John Fuzak and John Amerman. The girls interested in basket- ball were Elizabeth Gundlock, Myrna Kus- ter, Mary Elizabeth Blaisdell, Wilma Brown, Betty Bauer, Frances Portman, Pauline Floro, and Elinor Nixon. Several of our Juniors tried out for debating: Ruth Mosher, Lawrence Greenwell, and John Peacock made the varsity team. The Student Council members elected from each home room were Ruth Rrennen, Audrey Frank, Rex Roberts, Ralph Waldron, and Marie Hogans who was elected secretary. Our last activity was sponsoring' the Junior-Senior Re- ception as a farewell to the Seniors. K ,, Naomi S'rr:Fm', Rl1RPlll1II'.ll Iff'prvs1'1:1f1fire B1-mxirii QI'IN'l'oN. TI'I'lIKlll'l'l' Top Razr: Warrel, Alberts. Gross, Ifishe-r, Lair. A. Smith. Wilton, Hill. Gl'l'll2ll'4ll'. l"llll7'fll IA'll1I'.' Elvis. Walker. H. Smith. Phillips. Sr-hanialiorn, Gerharllt. M4-dsks-r, l'ear'om-k. Fnzak. Sanders. Mosher. Third li'0ll'.' I'1-nm-ll. Faqaly, Ilmlgos, Fruit. S1'lllllIl5!l'llt'l'. J. Smith, Nelson, Iloffs-1-, Il'lTrsu, Meadows, Moore. Davis. l'ill'lil'l'. Nvemlzl lf01l'.' German. M. Smith. l'l1illi11s. Waldrrun, l'll'1lllli. Long. Thomas, Gault, Savage, Brunt- lingvr. llackolinan, llavis, Booker. Si-liroyor. First I1'u1r.' Ferris. l'ri4-kson, Bourgois, Kirby. Hogans. Nixon. Tranip. Quinton. Edwards. Portnlan. Allll'l'llHIlI. 'llill'lll'IllllIl,2'. liowlanal. q"2'?"i'T'T"Q' For y-nine nbnniuhbfnnfnnfn JUNIOR TRIBAL TITTERINGS Frank and his parents had been living out West because the Winters in Illi- nois were too severe for his mother. Spring, when Florists gathered flowers for Fiore wreathes, was here now and they were ready to start back to the home state. Frank was much pleased for on the way they were to take an auto trip through the mountains and would doubtless encounter many Savage Rebnwn. The next day the weather was fine. The Dodge car was covered on all sides with baggage and camping equipment. The family was packed in tightly and loaded down with boxes and bags. The car swung out of the driveway and down W ooleridge drive. They had gone about five miles when Frank's mother sud- denly remembered that- the folding cots had been left in the back yard, so the Dodge was turned around and the Smith family started back to get the cots and then prepared to start over again. They were finally on their way. A beautiful trip lay ahead of them. They rounded many dangerous mountain curves and each time they had to honk the Horn. That night they stayed in a tourist camp in a Sehaede pine grove. The next. morning Frank rose early to inspect the surrounding forests and mountain streams. While on this Tramp he saw in the distance a Griesel bear. He was much excited but was afraid to go closer for he had heard that they were very fierce. He walked on and soon he met an old friend of his by the name of James Scott. They had a great talk, since they had been parted for so long. The two families were together the greater part of the morning. At noon they started in their respective directions. That afternoon as they wound around the mountain roads and had just gone up a Long Hill and around a sharp turn they encountered a band of fierce Indians. Mrs. Smith was very frightened fearing they would be held up so she put her diamond ring quickly into her mouth. When she found out the Indians didn 't mean to rob them, she was so surprised she choked on her ring. Frank said, "Wykojt', mother?" Then she explained her reason for coughing. Sur- rounding the car, the Indians took the Smiths prisoners and led them before Chief Hollingsworth in the camp nearby. He sentenced them to remain in the camp for two weeks and during that time they were to help him LaSell his furs to the white men. They also had orders to obey all the commands of Scribe Ed- wards. Wrather than have to stay longer they did this. Frank was very glad of the chance to be in the Indian camp. As he was thirsty, he went immediately to the Greenwell nearby to get a drink. It was dry so he ran to the Coldwell where he was greatly refreshed with cool sparkling water. While he was doing this, Mr. Smith asked the Scribe where he could keep the car. "Just Parker under that treef' she said. Soon night came and they were forced to sleep in Stefffy little wigwams. The members of the tribe had better dwellings than these, with Wilton rugs and Morris chairs in them. They ate Fruit from Silver dishes while the Smiths had to eat from Corlfery ones. In the morning Frank went exploring around the camp. He liked it very much. He enjoyed listening to the call of the Robbins. While wandering around, he heard a Russell behind him and turning around he saw a very beautiful Pea- cock with a. handsome spreading tail. On the left he saw five Banta, chickens eating Kerns of corn and a turkey which said, "Goble, Gentile." He decided that this must be like a real farm. Frank played with the little Indian boys. They showed him how to play a new game with a Ball and Cord. Then he showed them how to make a miniature bb A :En :En A A Ferris wheel. After tl1ey had Dunne this, they ran races over the Lee, through the Blaisdell and across the Green and Brown fields. The Indian boys won for they were good runners as well as W walkers. Frank went wading along with the Indian boys and when' he had finished he couldn't find his other Sh.1H7Ll1wf6 so l1e had to go to the Schumacher and have another made. They were trying to decide what to do next, when the Porter blew the Srafmahorn which was a signal to all Young Indians to come running. The Porter sent them to the Miller to get Moore Hour for the cook who Sears the meat. The Miller was an old German named Greisheimer. After the Smiths had been there for sometime and the novelty of the camp had worn off, Frank was wishing they could leave. One reason for this was that there were no Heaters in the wigzwams, the nights were chilly, and they were al- lowed very few blankets. Another reason was that they didn 't get much to eat and had to work a great deal. As Frank expressed it, his stomach was as empty as Mother H11bbar1I's cupboard. He thought heid Dey if he couldn't leave soon. His father said, 'tNever Dyson." The only time he ever got enough to eat was when the Hatter gave water Mullens to all the boys. When the two weeks were up they were released and after finishing thc journey with little excitement, they arrived home safely. JUNIORS We've lingered here for three long' years, VVith lots of work and lots of pleasure, Witl1 much of worry mixed with fears, And just a little bit of leisure. We 've learned to love each little nook, Know each mark upon the wall, And yet we know it 's in the book That sometime we must leave it all. We 've had much fun along the way, For work well done is naught but fun, And we've had ever time for play As the months and years have run. Ah! this old school has earned a place, Within each junior 's happy heart,- A nook no other can replacc,-- But in a year we must depart. As seniors we shall work and strive To make our school life better yet, To make the best in us survive,- A year we never can forget. T' 'S' 'i' 'P Hi" ? 'E' Fifty-one uChn!nn!-Lbnnfnb '?'i"'i"?'2'T'? J - V' O SUPHOMURES nfnnininbnfnnfinfn THE SOPHOMORE CLASS VW started our second year at Urbana ,MW High School with the purpose of inereas- 'iiim X 3 ing our knowledge of everything, especially A' i lV., geometry and English. We elected the following officers to guide the activities of y lf - our class during the year: John Sehriber, presidentg -lane Hadden, vice-president, 1 in-e f ' George Gladding. secretary, Maurice i Sehandt, treasurer: John Gaines, Rose- M T S3 f Y .l.xNKH.xnIn1-IN. Diary Relnlimentativei Course we Vieux liE0ll4l1'1 GLAUDINH. bubbling over with ideas, so we selected sf-,.,,,,,,,,.,, Harold Craig, George Zink. Donald i Oelnnke, Betty Ann Knight, Elaine Hood and Eileen Bennett to voice our opinions in the Student Council. Our class advisers were Miss MeClnrg, Miss Wootl, Miss Brownell, Miss Lawson, Mr, Tilbury, and Mr. Hallam. We felt that we were very fortunate in having these particular advisers assigned to us, for they have backed us in every class activity. We were well represented in athletics this year. Two of our boys, George Zink and Bill Hamilton won their football letters, and George Zink was also lYif'1"Ill'1'NfIl1'llf Top li'n'H',' Ihiker. Ilyson. M4-I.:1nghlin, 'l'ipps, XYood. Lawson. M1-Vlnrg. l'onm-rty. Bloom. Reeve. Paul, Sf'lllilffI'l', Robbins. Waldron. I-'iftll li'll1l'.' Wilkinson, Johnson. Robbins. l'o1'le1'. hIIl1'lblll'1', Elliot. I-in-lleiield. Taylor, Tralnp. XVin5:- iielil. Keller. NYM-ks. Raulellzlllgll. Zink. I-'ourlh li'nu'.' II. Smith. Hayes. Ilendriek. Glendy. Bern-diet. Morgan. Prevette. Kelly, Dixon. Brunn- ri ll e 1 . Third li'm1'.' Smith. Webber. l'fllIQIlllRlI'lll'l'. F. Kehberg. llyson, Mnriloek, Sperling. Busey. fli'l.ll1llil', Ryder. Miteln-11. Meenaeh. Nrwmlzl li'nu'.' Brush. hvilfll. Mills. Slaelc. NVilson. li. Smith. Koller, Tudor. Hollingsworth, 1Iill. 1ltll'l'llj'. Ileater. Lyster. Keller, First lfozax' lVl'l51lll. l'arker. Knight. l'offnian, I'rir'e. I-Iznlden. Sr-lwiher. Slnnult, Rankin. Vain-e. H. Anderson. Bennett. Davis. G-if -:P 'Q' Q- -il' 'Q' 1:- Ififty-join' dnufnnhb-E-LL THE SOPHOMORE CLASS on the varsity basketball squad. The Sophomore boys' basketball teain was made up of Bill Guinn, John Sehriber. Gus Radehaugh, George Gladding, and Maurice Sehaudt. Our girls' haskethall team took second place in the tournament. The squad con- sisted of Ruth Cogdal, Jo Bennett, Jean- nette Weelis, Marian Wiiigfield, Mae f MAU,,1CE S.-mmm Prevette, Alberta Trap, Gertrude Wheeler, JOHN MINES, v',-t-fmum- Ruth Sinnott, Betty Ann Knight, Helen PR0Sf'7ll2l7'il' Bogan, Barbara Miller, and Lois Edwards. "wmv" " "" The greatest honor that came to us was the winning of the Class Stunt Show, and as a reward our numerals were engraved on the Stunt Show Shield. The name of our stunt was "Beauty Ala Carte." One of the main events of the year was the Sophomore party. Everybody had such a grood time that we thought we should have two parties a year. All in all, we have had such a good time as Sophomores that we almost hate to think of hecoming Juniors, hut, what is to he, is to he. Tup lfozaa' H. Smith. Frame. Byers. Butzow, Tillmry. llilllillll. Brownell. Rees. Sehnede, Payne, Shepherd. Fifth Irma: lireenwell, Mel"oy. Wap.:ner. 4'oeln-un, Craig. Smyser. Alf-Dade. Gndgel. Roney. llindnian, Mehnert, R. Smith. Conerty. L. Smith. Bloom. Fourth Ifnio: Hutton, Ilarvey. Horn. Phillips. Horton. Appleman. l4'l:inig:an, Edgar. Davis. V. Good, D. Good. Kirnple, Slack. DeTnrk. Third Row: Miles. Buekles. Shoaf. Harris. Phillips. Pearson. Murray. Jordan, Li-May. Uhilds. Bird- sell, Fairchild. Fletvher, NVheeler. Gougler, IXIc'Lain. Second Row: Fahey. Loreh. Moore, Sinuotr, Dailey, Rohe1'ts. Bland. Cole, Hayes. Bennett. Mullins, But-hholz, Towner, Gallivnn. I-'irst Row: Carpenter, Stewart. Serviee, Edwards. Mc-Vain. Kelley. Gaines. Gladding, Miller. Rogan, Cogdal. Smith, Hood. I-iarker, KUTII. ':' 'J' Hi- -P Q -P ':- My-M 1512155555 SOPHOMORE TRIBAL TITTE RINGS On the Braurnfielrls of Kimpel resided a tribe known as the Sophomore. They were Good Indians, Harmon no one unless unrighteously molested. They carried on trade with Byers of nearby towns. The 'l'owners always gave them a good Price for their articles. The price was not paid in money as it is today but they exchanged certain articles for clothing from the village Taylorg for apples from the Applemang and for tl1e Miller-'s Hour which was made at the old Mill. In return the Indians offered Hays, asparagus Tipps, Cole, and frequently tl1e boys would a B1'rd.seIl. The chief of this tribe was Srhriber. He liked nothing better than to in- spect the Newman brought in from no Mansfield after a war. Some would be seriously injured but the one who could stand the 1l10St Payne would be given certain privileges. The main event. was the evening meal. The Shepherd would watch the chief's flock and each Knight would bring in a. lamb to the cook who Sears and roasts it. Every two Weeks everyone in camp would have a feast. On this event. tl1e chief's Singer would sing Z-lllfl pound on a drum which hung on the Wall of the chief's wigwam. His singing sounded more like a SC'hfI'Ilfdl from a coyote. After the feast they would hold a contest to see who was the best Ryder. Most gener- ally a Young warrior would win. Ball was played and races were run where they would run with their faces covered with a H ood. Wlieii there were no wars the men would Slack and the women did all of the work about the Place. The men would rest on Sehaede banks of Brooks midst Bowers of flowers just in Bloom. Dailey a small group would Tramp for Miles to hunt Bruno the bear. A Waggoner would go with them to Wheeler back to camp where Moore would offer their Servifs in skinning the animal. Although they had little responsibility it was necessary for someone each day to go to the Hutton tl1e Ilill where they could see Bufefield and surrounding territory. In this way they could protect themselves from other invading tribes. Though they feared 110 other tribes someone might Frame up on them so their motto was Safety first. A Barker would announce all events just as we would do today. The chief had a Iflairchild, Goutgler, who was madly in love with the Young warrior, Raclebaugh. Now this young Radebangh didn 't. care two '4Indian whoops" for her. In vai11 she tried to win his manly affections but she made no Gaines for he was a woman hater. He was a very accomplished man. He could live on raw meat for a monthg he could shoot an arrow at the rate of ten rods a minuteg he could run faster than the Cochran of the wind blowing down a can- yon, he could whoop so loud that the very beasts would growl with envy. He was the sovereign of maidens' hearts and the object of the jealous rage of all other Indian warriors such Oehmlfe, twin warriors Keller, Loreht, Hinrlinan, llarfzrey, a11d Hamilton. One day Gongler was tripping in the meadow picking daisies. A daisy she took in her hand and plucked each petal while murmuring softly to herself, " He loves me, he loves me not." Suddenly the earth reverberated with a mighty tremor, and as she turned, she -saw a herd of buffaloes. stampeding down the Glenfly toward her. She shook in l1er very moccasins with fear. There was no hope of escape. The oncoming herd was too close for her to run to the sheltering woods nearby. Now strolling through the woods was handsome Raclebaugh, returning from l1is morning dip. He noticed little Goufgler in the meadow and the stampeding animals. His keen intellect took in the situation at a glance. He snatched his W Hi y T T ? ? ? ? Q 5555555 bow and arrow, and taking a quick but accurate aim, he let fly the arrow, which struck the very heart of the leader of the herd who fell at little Gougler's feet. The natural instinct of the animals made the herd divide and go around the body of their leader. Thus little Gougler was saved. After the herd had passed he ran to her to see if she had been injured. Not a. hair of her head had been touched. Poor child-how frightened she was. Then Radebarugh realized what a dear little thing she was and that it was she and she alone that he loved. When he looked into her beautiful blue eyes he knew that she was his. Together they crossed the meadow to the camp where they immediately sought her father 's wigwam. They told him of their engagement and he rejoiced when he learned the news. To make certain their decision he asked Radebaugh, '4For her would you Dyson?" He answered without hesitation. "Yes, Durst you ask me such a questiontlll It was decided that Gougler would give as her dower, East Brumfield, a section of Wifngfielrl and the Greenwell Wigwam, that they were to have the Hatter as a servant and Captive DeTurlf as Porierg that the groom would wear the family Buckles on his shoes at the wedding. For their wedding gift the chief said he would give them a Tudor Ford sedan. Though glad for such a union the chief shed tears at the loss of l1is Ward. He gave them his blessing. We trust that they lived happily ever after. SOPHOMORES We 've been in school now just two years, We 've had a lot of pleasures, Perhaps for teachers we've made tears But tears are always treasures. With two more years to tinish in And much more fun before us, Perhaps more stunt shows we can win And enter Zeigfield's Chorus. Our boys have made good records On gridiron, track or field, They hold our victory banner high, Our laurels they will shield. Our girls have been good backers, They have followed all our teams, In fact we have no slackers We 're a dandy class it seems. With half our school days over And as many more to go, We ,ll keep our f'33" in clover With the motto "Always grow." ? T ? T ? ? ? T Fifty-sever: L bb f--5 12-45 ?TT'i"'??'S' N E CARSON Prefidenz' FRESHMEN fnbbfnulnnhnfn THE FRESI-IMAN CLASS ln the fall of 1930 about two hundred l twenty-tive ambitious students entered Ur- bana High School. Joe Carson was elected president, Lillian Moss, vice-president, Billy Browder, treasurer, Betty Mooinau, secretary, and Maxine Gladding, Rosc- inary Representative. Miss Eyerley led us through a most successful year with the help of Miss Biedermann, Mr. Boyd, Mr. .. I.iI,LiAx Moss. JHTUGN, MP. lll11l'plIy, BIT- Nfllmla MISS Bnrrrr Momnw. Iliff'-l'I'1'Mf1fl'Ilf Tlioinas, and Miss Webber. ,w-mary Our class was well represented in the different activities of the school. Our outstanding athletes were Arthur Apper- son, Joe Carson. Eugene llanes, Beverly Tate, and Guy Villars, who Mr. Schroth stated, are good prospects for the future. Our girls' basketball team, which tied for second place in the tournament, was composed of Ceeelie Sandwell, Marjory Stephens, Charlotte VVeeks, Marjory Portman, Dolores Roycr, Leonora James, fvllllfl' llfllf-Top Il'o14': Eye-rley, Boyd. Bishop. l'hapman. Bunting. Burn-her, Boskin. Grof. Fifth Iffnv: HIIX lilllllltlf Butt' Bvard I,1't'l't'l' Bl-In Food fXlb1'i"ht 1"mo'fh lrmr hart, V 'I'hir1l ll'U1l'.' Bailey. Anderson. Heels. l'lillllllf'Dll, M. Hutchins. H. Hagenhart, Crawford, flVL'I'lIl2l1l, "z- , s. .- . x . 1 tl.: ., . .' Heater. lburst. IP. Faust. Cooper, Galbraith, Dunlap. Em:-les. G. Faust. Barker, IIag:en- Keist. Neennrl ll'ul1'.' IL Johnson. Hayes. Forkery. Barrick. Day, Craipr. l'arroll. B4-vis. Gaylord, Buckles. l"irsf 1l'o'14'.' l'arson. Browder, Allen. Morris. Ilearth, li. Johnston. Burgess. Hagan, IIesselsehwerdt. Field. Inrleu' llfllf--Top I.'ou'.' Elvis, E. Hanes, Ilulbary. R. Johnston. W. llanes. Burnett. W'ebber. James. Fifth lfnzc: Beaird. Iludson. Volbert, ID, Collins, R, Douglas. Redelxaugh. Apperson. Boley. l'ourH1 Il'o'1L'.' Zinli. Weeks. I". Fuppernell, Burr, Uonard, Gundloek. Hrsey, li. Hutchins. Third Ifoze: V. Uuppernell, M. Johnston. Green. James, Fulton. Uraigs. Burnier, Copeland, Bowers. Balispy. Gordon. Neefnlfl ll'u'u'.' Hlaisdell. M. Johnson. Iflinpson, Ii. Uollins. Uorson. Clark, Guard, Haines, Hendrix. Ilowser. S. Johnson. Ilogans. First ll'o1lf: Ilersey, I.. Anderson, Boaker. S. Green. Gauble, Els-1'l'. I. Green, Hoy. Gladding. '2'!i'T?"i'?'-I' Sixty I1 L L :En ni nf: L THE FRESHMAN CLASS June Mershimer, and Marjory Zink. The substitutes worked hard to help their teams eonipete. Many Freshman girls took part in the April Pageant. the last event of the year. VVe placed second in the class Stunt Show with a very clever act, entitled "Shades of Barnum and Bailey." We felt l proud because it was the first time we had Bm! Bmwlmx. everwput on a pei-torniance. MAMNE GLM,,,,N,,, y',-maart-r lhe Student Louneil members chosen 1-"W"""1'.'f . . l'I'1H'1'8K'Ilfflfil'!' last year were Mary Louise Hayes, Billy ' Carroll. Billy Browder, Philip Hagan, Elnore Kinser, Mary Reynolds, Robert Straueh, and Frances Williamson. These stude11ts who have had the opportunity of being members of the Student Council will find it valuable experience in later life. For the lirst time in several years a class picnic was held at Crystal Lake Park. I41l1Il'I'IflllfiTUll lruuz' Ilailden. Mi-nges. Wright. h1I'll4IWll, M. Miller. Williamson. Fifth Ii'uu'.' R. Lineieoine. li. XYilson. Roberts. Kinser, Kilnberland. Brumlield. Villars. Fuurtli Ii'o14'.' Minor. Wissells. llawley, J. Lloyd. Warriek. Lakey. Rose. Robinson, Alathais. Third lruzr: Wells. MeLaughlin, Yeaeh. Taylor. K. Minor. Simpson. Sr-haeiie, W. Weeks. Nfrunfl lrmzz' Stephens. Shadoan. I.en1ing:, Selade. ll. Smith. Sanden. 0'IYonnell. Stovall. I"irsf li'u1r.' Seth, Merehant. Vestal. Kiley. Sears. Stites, Sfl'illll'll. Sinionton, Slusser. Sehoeli. ' Iinwri' l141Iff7'o11 Ifoiv: .I. Miller. 'l'itl'in, liaseoni, Vrestin. Iiiederinann. Wood. Tholnas. I-'iffh lfnux' Thompson. Long. l'err-ival. R. Miller. Phillips. Walker. Van lleventer. Mr-Fall, Wilson. Fourth Ii'n1r.' l'l'lup,:n1ac-lier. Meyers. Waxler. Rodinon. I'aul. W. Miller, A. Smith, Martin. Royer. 7'l1ir1I Ii'nu'.' Miller. 3l4'I't'lllllIl'l'. l'l!l'fllltlll. Saltsgaver, Uliverson. Lee. Lineieolne. Young. F. WW-hlier. New-mir! crore: G. Webber. Waldron. Kemp. D. White, Reynolds. Sell, LaValle. Sandwell, Scott, .'pit er. Firxf Ii'n14'.' H. Nelson. Mr-1'loud, G. Nelson. Menges, Kirby. Moonlan, Moss, RI. Smith. Snider, Williams. l 'D' 'D' 'Q' -P 'ii' -:P -:P M my-one 555555-2- FRESHMAN TRIBAL TITTERINGS It was in Lelllay, 1787. James and his papa and mama had reached the end of their long journey. Their old Ford, with no Heater, wheezed its way around the corner of Kimberlin mountain into La,Valle which had been recommended to them. "A Hoy,', Seth James' papa, "here is an ideal place to make our resi- dence. He then put up a shelter for the night intending to complete camp the next day. With J ames' papa had come a larger party, the rest having stopped farther up the road for the night. All of them were Easterners. and had come out here to set up claims in this laValle which was supposed to be rich in Ztnlf. It was indeed a queer group that had come all this way together. Among them was a Good Bishop named Tate, a Merchant named Mengis, a Taylor, several Millers, a Cooper, a Burgess named Van Deventer, and Germans named Hesselsohwerdt, Gerhardt, Swearingen, Stranch and Heganbart. There was also a Gaylord named Galbraith, a bolshevist Balispy who had a long Beaird, a Booker called Beals, a Port-man named Percival who always wore a big Buckle on his coat. Then there was a Smith, a Miner, an unusual chap named Thompson, a descendant of the owner of the famous chain-restaurant founder and several Scotchmen, McCloud, MeFall, McCown and McLaughlin. However, there was a. Dearth. of Irishmen, there being only one Hogans, one Corhery and an 0'Donnell. Several weeks later our friends having found their Havens and being set- tled in the valley decide to go exploring up the old mountain. Mr. Scott, James, might go along, for during this time his son had learned to use the bow and arrow quite well and had captured quite a few wild animals. So James thought that if he could Sell their furs he would make money. At last the Day came when they were to go. They arose with the sun and got an early start. Their path led them through a Schaede Wood. A Martin overhead sang a Carroll, and here and there was an open space, prairie-like in appearance but thick with Bnrr and Mar-berry. After crossing a Longmlre they reached an elevation where they could look down into laValle below. Here they saw Green Fields and a little brook with its Moss-covered banks on which grew many a Rose. In the distance was a Lalcey, which they named Kinzer. Now and then they stopped to rest and eat Dunlap apples and Hnrsey bars with nuts Prestin. The candy made them thirsty but as there were no Wells they could get no drink. In the meantime James was very much attracted by some frisky Gray squirrels which were .Baslfen Neer and chased them in and out among the trees. To he frank he was so interested in them that he failed to notice how far away he was from his companions. The older men, being tired, overlooked the dis- appearance of the Y onng boy. Suddenly James missed the party. He called and called but received no answer. He was glad that he had his gun with him but received a Schools when he discovered that his Gufndloek was broken. Though it seemed hopeless he started out to find shelter for it was getting late. Soon he heard some Cox crow- ing and down an incline in front of him on the farthest edge of an open space, he saw a group of buildings. Coming closer he saw that they were Barrlcks, but did not know until later that it was an Indian Camp. He was greeted by a group of Small Indian boys, playing Ball, who eyed him curiously. Although a brave lad, the little white boy 's heart beat fast at the sight of the Redman. One little boy, whose dog was a great Barker, came running towards him with a war- whoop. This brought the rest of the Indians, while here and there James saw a head thrust from the door of a Barrick. ?'i'?T?'i"i' Siwfy-two 1112-12-5-5115 Though frightened, he attempted to tell one of the warriors what had hap- pened to him. The Indian failed to understand, but to his surprise he took James by the hand and led him to the door of the Chief's Barrick. One of the Indians called and Chief Carson came forth in such Riggs as you never did see. He was followed by l1is scribe IVI00l'lHl'Il and pccunia Browder. James was very much worried for fear the Indians would scalp him or hold l1im for Ransom. It was some time before he could make them understand what was wrong and that he wanted to go back to his people. At last the Chief got it Wright and they decided that Scout Pflnglnaelzer was to take him back to his own camp which was 'on the other side of the moun- tain. But first Chief Carson, being sociably inclined, and proud of his long Swedish ancestry, introduced James to all of his sons. They were Anderson, Apperson, Carson, Empsoen, Hudson, Johnsons, Nelson, Olliverson, Robinson, Simpson, Williamson, and three Wilsons. It. was a mighty happy little boy that was delivered to his mother late that evening though the Redman had been good to him. FRESHMAN Mayhap we did look mighty green Last fall to many a Senior,- But you should have gained a grain of sense In all the years you 've been here! We saw a many a. slanting glance Cast on us by some Junior, But we don 't pretend to know it all, Since we have come so soon here. And too, there often passed us by With stuck up nose the Sophomore. Just wait another year, me lads, VVe'll be big enough to stop yer. Old Algebra with all his signs Who tried so hard to flunk us,- We 've conquered with a mighty hand Tho' he may have all but sunk us. Old Man English, too, has tried, With History, to slay us, But all he ever yet has done, Is a little bit to flay us. As we are hanging on, we warn, All ye who dared to scorn us! So, don 't begin, for you 'll have no chance To pity or to mourn us! 'S' T 'S' T ? 'EF T Siwtyathree abbbnfnbbni 1:'-1:1--:--1:--Q--w":' -U um Q 5 Svriff' of foot zras Iflifl-Jl,'UH1f1j lic could shoot an arrow from him, A nd run forward with .wuoh j'Icc1'mf.c.c, Tilflf Ulf arrow fell behind him."' xi- s. -N H V:-M -4' A s r " . 1. , . 4 5 -sh gf fg. 9, 2, M -1: -ggi-It -.ff N i Q: fv-1.531 X I' J.. U, ,,s .,,, .,. 5' 1,- ' Y fm. - ,Ii ,gt 'L I ,.?5. f -1 - ' " ' 5L?'FS?z'X E ig -f f i i rfgli f 2. - v 1 1 Q 1 J, Q nibninfnuf-A A COACHES What events of our high school days will we remem- ber longest--the HA" we made in Latin, the HE" we received in history, or the team's touchdown against Duane Purvis and his Mattoon warriors? It is only through the media of high school athletics that school spirit manifests itself to the greatest degree. And behind the scene of the big games and athletic events lies the everyday work of training the individual athlete. In this way. and to a great degree, the coaches are responsible for the spirit of the school, as well as that of the teams and individual players. Urbana has bee11 for- tunate in its selection of leaders in athletics, and through them it has become a respected opponent among the schools of central Illinois, especially the Big Twelve Con- ference. Coach Stephens, in his six years at Urbana High School, has won a reputation as a leader capable of de- veloping the flPiQ1'1lllllkll'l01'l and fighting spirit of his teams. Of equal importance to our school has been Mr. Stephens' interest in and encouragement of underclass- men in athletics. Steve 's football teams have always been thoroughly trained as is exemplified by their frequent Sri-1 1' Hass, 0011011 .i victories over Big Twelve teams, and even more so by their successful competition with the best that other con- ' terenees have to offer. Even though not such a popular sport, track de- SUHROTH, Assistant Corleh mands more time and effort on the part of the coach than is usually appreciated. The variety of events requires the training of competitors in each of the many phases of a meet. Surely tl1e life of a coach is a busy o11e. and Coach Stephens well deserves the credit given him as a very suc- cessful leader in athletics of all branches. Buck Schroth has been Stevc's assistant for live years. He scouted teams that were to compete with Ur- bana later in the season, and reported their plays and ability. He coached reserve football and basketball teams and assisted in track. Besides this, he always willingly responded with his t'sales talks" when called upon to support the different activities. He will always be re- membered for his peppy, loyal speeches delivered in our assemblies before our big games. Our athletics have been greatly aided by the as- sistance of Wyman Eccles, the Junior football and basketball coach, by Clark Root who coached swimming, and by Clyde Hallam, the baseball coach. ?'S"C'???'2' Sixty-sect n Y l Dixon. W:-isiggi-i'. Fl'lll'llN'l', Rilvy NIANAGERS 'l'l1v1'v was a l'l'l'l?llll hwy in scliuol who always wont around with a wry husi- miss-like aii' and Sk'l'I1lPll iniportant. Ilv was uftvn called out of class to go on smnnv athh-tic mission. Well, it was Gone Wvisigrer. Ilv was an assistant athlvtiv nianagvi' last yvar, hut this yn-ar ho was made the hcad lll2lll2lgL'l'1'. N0 one walizeal how Illlli'll woirk Gvnv rvally did and how vtlicivntly it was dmw. His assistants were' John HCllI'llJ0l', llwayno Dixon, and Junior Rih-y. Tlwse lmys did a lot of hard work hut the-y tlumisvlws reinained in the hackgrrcnind. Howl-yQ1'. their servicvs played an iinpfurtant part in tho sucvess of our te-anis. CHIQLIR LEADERS 'l'lu-ro is no douht about tlu- fact that ganu-s and imp nnlvtingrs would hc dead without clws-1'iiig'. This yvai' l'i'hana was wry lucky in having' a QIFOIID of foul' peppy clivvi' lc-ada-rs. Tlnfsv wc-1'+1: M1-lyin VVYIIIOF, flllHl'lt'S Kellvr, lllivstm' Kvllvr. and Hlvanrn' Nixon, 'l'hi-y wv1'v ve-ry dvpviulalmlv and indirectly assisted in the Yl0lf01'lftS of thv tt-anls. lt is a wry dilliuult task to kc-vp up the enthusiasm of a vrowd. Iluwvym-i'. Q-avli mu- of thesv elim-vi' lvadi-rs ct-rtainly did his or her part in gvtting rfnisiiigg' vlieers froin thi' attvndants at the grainvs. Fair or rainy WOEllllPI', the-y worn always right tlnirv lmvliiiigr tht- lt'2lll1. t'ln-sl'-r li4'l1l'l', Wynn-r. l'hai'l4-s lil'lll'l' Si.1'l'Jl-vigil! Nm ! !. VX la . ff- in 71 ,, SEN KENNEDY Capfnin I FUOTBALJL, Lbnfnqfnubn. Top Ifolr: Sf:-plu-lls. Mifehell. Wilton, Dixon. 'l':11'1renl1ing. Phillips, Reynolds. S4-hruth. Ne:-mul I-'our' Gibson, Sears, Bowditeh, Sinxpsnn, Ilillllllflill, Sl,'l.llllllllClll'l', Zink. Hartll, S4-l1rnyel'. 1-'irsf lfoze: Hatch, Rout, l"i1lIllilll'l'. Il. XVill1ll'Ull, I'. xv1llfll'UlI, Yillars. Vlllllllllili Kennelly. A1ne1'n1:1n, Port nmn. PERSONNEL OF FOOTBALL TEAM Yan Kennedy. Capt. Gordon Faulkner Ralph W?llCll'011 Emlga 1' Roof U1'hana---. L.,...,. ,, ..,... --- Urbana .,................,,,. Urbana ............L... .. ...L - Urbana ................. llrhana ............A. .....L.... - Urbana ........,........ llrhana .....,A...L,.,.,. Urbana .........,....... llrhana ...L........,.... ----Quill iff 0 Pete Waldron John Amernxan Kenneth Thomas Paul SHIIPSOII Lowell Villars 'llllll1'lllElll Sears Crain Portnlan SCHEDULE 1-P ' 7 U- - 'll?lj'l0I'Y1llt' ..H... - ....,...... ---- --- 6 llecatm' ....L...E............. -- 6 --- 6 Benton ,........A.,..L....... --- ---I20 Bloom High ...,. .,...... ..... - - 6 T Pekin ....E....., A ............ ---13 Peoria U6lll'1'2ll-,,. ..,.......... -- 6 --- 0 ' Danville ........H - .....A....... -. 6 , 10 l 2 L - Mattoon ......,..-........... --- Cham Dillgll, .................... "2'?'5"i"'U'?? S'Pl7l'lIf1l 0 ' 0 Giulia!-:Emil Gordon Faulkner was one of the best ends in the state, winning a place on an All-State Team. He was a crack pass receiver and very few plays got around him. Ralph Waldron played the diflicult position of running guard and he played it well. He was named "most valuable player on the team" by vote of the squad. Van Dusen Kennedy played tackle, was the most dependable lineman, and he was also captain. He was aggressive and often stopped plays be- hind the line. URBANA 12, TAYLORVILLE 7 Playing on one of the hottest days of the season, the Urbana High football team opened the 1930 season with a 12 to 7 victory over Taylorville. To start the game Urbana kicked off to Taylorville, and Taylorville on the very first play fumbled the ball. Urbana recovered on the S-yard line. Portman carried the ball through right tackle and scored the first touchdown. Urbana tried a place kick but it went wide. The first touchdown and Taylorville's lone counter came as results of breaks. The second score for Urbana made by Portman, how- ever, was earned. This touchdown was made in the second quarter. The ,QT-ll1'16 resulted in a duel between Portman and Hall of Taylorville, All-State halfback. 'S' T' 'i' 'E' 'P' E' 'D' Seventy-one nhbbbbbnfu Crain Portma u was new to Urbana this year, but he soon made a name for himself at halfback. He was extremely speedy, long end runs being his specialty. Edgar Root, on account of his long experience on the squad, was assigned the duty of directing the plays from the quarter- back position. He did a dandy job. Kenneth Thomas was only a. junior, yet this was his second year as a regular. He played full- back instead of end this year and was a powerful line plunger. URBANA 6, DECATUR 6 Urbana opened its conference season against Decatur. Early in the first quarter Rex of Decatur took the ball on a lateral pass and ran 60 yards down the sidelines for a touchdown. .ln the second quarter Urbana retaliated. Root out through right tackle for a gain of 30 yards. Then alternating' between Port- man and Amerman, the trio advanced the ball to Decatur 's 4-yard line. At this point Decatur called time out to gather its defense together. On the first play Urbana was stopped by a determined li11e. But on the second play Root scored through center. Each team had another opportunity to score but the opposing lines held. The second half became a punting duel, neither team scoring. T!i"i"'S"?'i"i' Scrcafy-two 55-51-5555 1 ei Robert Schumacher played at various posi- tions in the center of the line. He was the best at center because of his accurate passing and strength on defense. Paul Simpson was the other powerful tackle. He was one of the big rea- sons why our line held like a stone wall. Next year he ought to be even more valuable. Lowell Villars was the only veteran on the team. H-e was the regular cen- ter and whenever Urbana wanted to be certain of a good pass Lowell was the passer. URBANA 6, BENTON 0 Urbana defeated Benton, 6 to U, and avenged a 7 to 6 defeat, received at the hands of the Benton team last year in a night game. During' the first three quarters neither team scored and fortune changed throughout the game pretty much as the wind shifted. lu the last of the fourth quarter, Benton punted and an Urbana man crashed through the line and blocked it. The ball was re- eovered hy Schumacher for Urbana on Benton ls 12-yard line. Portman tried to gain around end but was stoppedg Root threw a pass to Waldron which was inconipleteg Portman carried the ball again but gained no ground. On the fourth down Root passed to Ralph VValdron over the goal line for the winning score, ? Q ? ? ? Y ? Seven y-three Ldnufnbuhbb Pete Xvaldron was one of the running guards. He was fast and a good blocker. As Pete is only a junior, he is one of Ur- bana's best prospects for next year. John Amerman played either quarterback or halfback on offense and safety on defense. He was a good ball carrier and one of the best tacklers on the team. Donald Dixon won a position on the varsity near th-e last of the sea- son as end. He was very fast and was always the first down the field on punts. URBANA 20, BLOOM HIGH 6 Urbana's speedy offense was too bewildering for Bloom's ponderous line. Bloom made the Hrst touchdown early in the first quarter, but failed to make the extra point. To start the second period the Bloom punter made a poor kick which went out of bounds on his 30-yard line. In the next play Portman gained 15 yards. Bloom was penalized 15 yards which placed the ball on the 1- yard line. The Bloom line held for the first three downs but Hatch hurled across center for the score on the fourth down. Later in the second quarter Ur- bana began a steady march down the field which resulted in another touchdown. T 'S' 'J' T T 'ii' 'IF Seventy-four nfnfnibbfnb George Zink was one of the two sophomores to earn his letter. He played halfback on defense and end on offense. He has promise of being a real player. John Hatch was full- back during the first of the season but later he played guard. He had plenty of power and force behind his plunges which always gained. Robert Bowditch was a substitute -end. It was Bob's Hrst year at foot- ball and he made re- markable progress. He was eager to learn and he always tried hard. URBANA 7, PEKIN 13 Urbana suffered the first defeat of the season from the strong Pekin team. Pekin made the first score early in the game, on its passing' attack. Urbana scored as a result of a punt in which Amerman ran back to the Pekin team 's 30- yard linc. On the next play Portman circled around end for 25 yards. Then Amerman drove through the line for the scoring touchdown. In the try for the extra point, Edgar Root 's place kick hit the bar and bounded over. It looked as if Urbana might win the game by this one point, but later Pekin scored again. Urbana fumbled on Pekin 's 30-yard line. In the next six plays the Pekin eleven forced the ball over the goal line for the winning touchdown. 4 , ,,,..... LL!-12:51:15 T h u 1' m a n Sears had grit, determination, and the fighting spirit-all qualities that every coach wishes for in a player. He played a scrappy game at guard. Bill Hamilton substi- tuted as tackle and was the other sophomore to earn his letter. He was the biggest man on the team and plugged big holes in the line. Keith Reynolds had more energy and pluck than any player 011 the team, although he was smallest. When the team needed pep, "Ike" filled in as halfback. URBANA 0, PEORIA CENTRAL 6 Urbana High received a heart breaking defeat from Peoria Central. For three entire quarters both teams were held scoreless, and it looked as it the game would end with a 0 to 0 tie. But in the last quarter one of the Urbana boys fumbled on his own 18-yard line. An alert Peoria end recovered the ball. On the next play Peoria completed a pass for a gain of 14 yards. The Urbana line stiffened and for three downs held Peoria for no gain. But on an intricate triple pass Peoria Central scored the needed touchdown. Van Dusen Kennedy, Pete Walclrriii, and John Hatch did some outstanding blocking and tackling in the Urbana li11e. Ralph W3ltlFOll7S punting stopped several Peoria attacks. -:I 'Q' -Q' 'Q' 'Q' Ii- Ii' bb hb Fred Gibson was a substitute back- Held man and lineman. He made a. splendid showing in both the Dan- ville and Taylorville games by his tackling and blocking. A hard worker, he showed a fine spirit for four years on the squad. David Mitchell earned a place on the squad for himself this season by four years ofrconsistent hard labor. He played end and other positions in the line. His determination was always a real inspiration to his team mates. UR-BANA 20, DANVILLE 6 The Urbana eleven received a decided surprise at the little resistance the Dan ville team had to offer. Urbana had very little trouble in opening holes in Dan- villels defense. It took only six minutes to score the first touchdown. Root attempted a drop kick after the first touchdown for the extra point but it was no good. Kenneth Thomas crossed the line for the second score after another long march down the field. Root's pass to Faulkner was completed for the extra point. The game was so one-sided that it lacked excitement. The only thrill furnished by Danville was when Archie, the star halfback, cut. through the Urbana line, reversed his field, and galloped 61 yards for the lone Maroon score. 'S' ? 'T Q 'Q' 'E' T' Seizenty-seven Lnhnlnbinfnnfu Top Row: Coach Langhorst, Kimbcrling, Villars, Payne, Apperson, Wrathers. Second How: Smith, Maring, Boley, Thomas, Pennell, Wertz. First Row: Carson, Heater, Meenach, Fagley, Robbins, Douglas. RESERVE FOOTBALL SQUAD The Reserve football team playing against regular reserve squads from other teams came through the season with fair results. The team played St. Joe, Decatur Reserves, Roosevelt, John Hill of Decatur, and Rantoul and Won a majority of the games. The team was composed mainly of under-elassmen. It was difficult to keep a consistent line-up, because as soon as a player im- proved he was moved up to the varsity squad. Next year many of these boys will be on the varsity team. The reserves were coached by Oliver Langhorst from the University. URBANA 12, MATTOON 12 A iigrliting and inspired Urbana eleven gained a tie with the undefeated lllattoon team, 12 to 12. No scoring was done until the second half when Mattoon passed over the goal line. ln the fourth quarter, Purvis while at- tempting' to punt on the fourth down was tackled on l1is own 20-yard line. Rey- nolds and Thomas took the ball to the one-foot line and then Thomas plunged over for the touchdown, tying the score. Urbana scored agrain on Purvis' fumble. But in the last few minutes Mattoon passed its way down the Held for another touchdown. URBANA 0, CHAMPAIGN 0 Three time-s Urbana threatened to seore and three times Cha1npaign's line held them back. Urhanals first opportunity came early in the game when Champaign fumbled on her own 5-yard line. Urbana recovered but couldn't advance the ball past the six-inch line. Then again Urbana. blocked a kick which put her in position to score, but both the line plays and end runs failed. The third opportunity came when after a hard march Urbana reached the 10-yard line. But an incomplete pass on the fourth down ended all the scoring hopes for either team. T 'SF Fi' T' 'T 'SF 'T Sevenvfy-eight H A HI A DON DIXON Capfain BASKETBALL 1512155-2:12:15 Urbana Urbana Urbana Urbana Urbana Urbana Urbana Urbana Urban a .... 13 fin Top Row: Stephens, Fulnier. Sealy, Faulkner, Schroth. Second Row: Weisige-r, Bowditvh, Fnzak, Dixon, Simpson, Haunilton. First Row: Root, Villars, Zink. Amernmn. Barth. PERSONNEL OF BASKETBALL TEAM .. .--H Capt. Don Dixon Gordon Faulkner Leslie Hamilton Dick Fulmer Edgar Root SCHEDULE '77 Rossville ......... 12 Urbana-- --28 Champaign - -.. -19 Longview -------- 14 Urbana ---- 17 Clinton---- ----12 Rantoul- -----23 Urbana----11 Decatur--- 16 Spaulding' -.----- .25 Urbana- -- -29 Champaign 21 Clinton .----.---- 11 Urbana .--- 26 Danville--- 25 Peoria Central---18 Urbana -..- 28 Mattoon--- 20 Pekin ----------- .16 Urbana .-.- 19 Decatur-- - Danville .------.- 12 Urbana .--- 28 Mattoon- -- Vandalia -------- .27 Urbana ---- 20 Covington- Urbana---17 Taylorville- -- -21 Pontiac Tournament District Tournainent Sectional Tournament Eighty T'2"'i'T"2"? Lid-f--LLL ,- Don Dixon was one of the leading scorers in the Conference and averaged about four baskets to a game. He played center and was elected honorary captain. Dick Fulmer was the other forward. His health was poor during the sea- son so he was kept out of some games in order to sa.ve him for the import- ant games. UR-BANA, 12, RANTOUL 23 Leslie "Curly" Harnil- ton was on-e of the best defensive guards Urbana, has ever had. He could be depended upon to get the ball off either of the team's backboard. Rantoul made the first score in the game with a. field goal and two free throws. Curly Hamilton and Don Dixon both scored soon after with two baskets. But Rantoul made about two field goals to Urbana's one throughout the game. Urbana seemed unable to make its many tries for baskets good. JUNIOR SQUAD The Junior squad completed a successful season by winning seventeen out of twenty-three games. The Juniors defeated such strong teams as the Decatur Reserves, Champaign Reserves, Sidney, Onarga, Tolono Reserves, Rantoul Re- serves, and many others. They lost by small margins to Fisher, Mattoon, and Armstrong. Top Imw: Thomas. Sears, Heater, Hodges, P. Waldron. First Raitt' C. Gerhardt, xV1'IlfllC1'S, G. Tarpenning, Wertz, Wikotf. ??C'?"??? Eighty-one Lnjnbbfnnfn Gordon Faulkner played a fast game at forward. "Dutch" had nat ural ability at handling the ball and he always did his share of scoring by his sensational one-handed shots. He was the one varsity player back this year. Edgar Root was a dandy guard, and many tim-es he dribbled and pivoted his way through for a short shot. Edgar was very fast and al- ways stuck with his opponent on de- fense but entirely outplayed him on offense. URBANA 22, CLINTON 11 :En The Clinton team could not get its offense organized. Their boys rarely got in for a short shot and they could not hit their long ones. During' the first half which ended 7 to 6 this was a. real ball game. But in the third quarter Urbana changed tactics and flashed down the floor for one basket after another. SOPHOMORE SQUAD The Sophomore squad had a rather poor season. The team was greatly handicapped because it lacked tall players. Games were played with Longview, Onarga, Tolono, Johns-Hill, Champaign Ponies, and Centennial. This team was coached by Sehroth, and when the boys are taller they will be good material for the Varsity. 'Pop Row: Sr-lirotli. Scliavdm-, Guynn, Selinudt. First Row: Gladding. Schriber, Radobziugli, Or-lunke, II. Smith. T' T' T' 'EF 'E' 'Z' 'S' Eighty-two 51:15:21 LLL Irving Seely was very close to be- ing a regular. He substituted as guard in almost every game. Be- cause he was an excellent dribbler and had an uncanny eye for long baskets, he was sent in either to stall or to shoot. John Fuzak was only a Junior, but he was a valuable substitute. He was on the Junior squad at first, but be- cause of his ability he was moved to the Varsity. He played any position and was good on pushing in re- bounds. URBANA 25, PEORIA CENTRAL 18 At the start of the fourth quarter Faulkner made two free throws giving Urbana the lead 15-13. Peoria scored on Root 's fourth foul. Seely went in for Root and sunk two long ones. Dixon dribbled in to make the score 21-14. Peoria made two more shots but Hamilton, Fulmer, and Faulkner scored before the game ended. FRESHMAN SQUAD The Freshmen had a strong team this year. They lost only two games, one to Centennial and the other to "The River Rats." The first team consisted of Tates, E. Hanes, Simpson, Bland, and Apperson. This was the best Fresh- man squad Urbana has had for some time, and future hopes for the Varsity are very bright. Top Row: Weber, Carson, Simpson, Schroth, Kinzer, Beaird. First Row: Bland, Apperson, Tate, E. Hanes, Browder. ? 'E' 'i' T' E' T' 'I' Eighty-three 5555121515 URBANA 18, DANVILLE 12 The first quarter was slow, ending 1-1. In the second Root scored, then Danville made two shots. But Dixon tied the score with a push-in. Two free throws by Danville and five points for Urbana made the score 10-8. In the last quarter with Danville ahead 12-11, Root tossed a free throw as the gun went off. In the second overtime, Root again made a free throw to win the game 13-12. URBANA 28, CHAMPAIGN 17 Champaign started with a rush and scored four points before a minute was up. After a short time out Urbana came back strong. Faulkner and Root made field goals to tie the score. In the second quarter Hamilton batted in a short one and followed it with another soon after. In the second half Urbana played a waiting game and then changed to a flashy attack which piled up points to win the game. URBANA 11, DECATUR 20 The play in the first quarter was evenly matched and it ended 3-2, Decatur. To start. the second quarter Decatur made an easy one. Faulkner and Hamilton both scored on fouls, and Fulmer put Urbana into the lead 6-5 for the one and only time during the game, when he pushed in a rebound of Hamilton 's. During the rest of the game Decatur piled up points and then played keep-away. INTRAMURAL WINNERS More than one hundred boys turned out for the intramural basketball tour- nament. Every boy had a chance to play on one of the sixteen teams at some time or other. '4Barrick's Bricks" won the championship by defeating "Mitchell's Monkeys" in the final game, 25-24. The players on the winning side were Marvin Schaede, Paul Barricks, Nathan Cole, Charles Anderson, Frank Stapp, and Jessie Field. CONSOLATION WINNERS 'iReynold's Rats" were the winners of the consolation tournament this year. The team included George Phillips, Bud Schroyer, Milton Johnson, Keith Reynolds, and Harold Cates. A Home-Room tournament was held this year for the first time. This gave every boy in school a chance to play. Miss Rompel's room won. The team was made up of Irving Seely, Keith Reynolds, Charles Smith, Edgar Root, and Steve Romine. Top Row: Schaedc, Barrick. Cole, Phillips, Shroyer. First Row: Anderson, Stapp, Field, Johnson, Reynolds, Cates. E. hw T ? 'S' 'ii' 'I' ? ? 'zg t' - our ufnbnbiibb URBANA 29, CHAMPAIGN S Fulmer sent Urbana off to a flying start when he dribbled in for a short shot. Faulkner added a one-handed shot and Dixon pushed in a rebounder be- fore the quarter ended, 6-0. Champaign made two free throws but baskets by Fulmer, Root, and Faulkner, and two free throws by Dixon gave Urbana 14 at the half. In the second half Urbana substitutes had little difficulty in scoring. URBANA 28, MATTOON 15 Urbana scored the first basket soon after the opening tipoff and was lead- ing 8 to 2 at the end of the first quarter. From then on Urbana had an easy time of it and wasn't threatened once. Dixon sunk seven field goals and three free throws besides playing a marvelous floor game at center. Urbana played like an inspired team, making its own breaks and taking advantage of every one. PONTIAC TOURNAMENT The Urbana High School basketball team participated in the Pontiac In- vitational Tournament during the holiday season. We played our Erst game with Sauneman. Our second team played the entire last half and we gained an easy victory over the opponents. Urbana took an early lead in the Spring- field game and held it the first half but Springfield finally defeated us by the score of 21-19. THE DISTRICT TOURNAMENT The District Tournament held this year at St. Joe was won for the second successive time by Urbana. We opened the tournament with St. Joe defeating them in a hard fought battle by the score of 29 to 15. The second game was played against Homer. Urbana won with a rather close score of 19 to 13. The greater part of the first and second games was played by our second team, the varsity team played only a few minutes in order to give them practice for the semi-finals. In the semi-finals Urbana defeated Sidney by a score of 27 to 6. The first team gained a good lead during the first half of the game and that lead was held to the end of the game by the second team which was put in during the third quarter. The final game was won from Fisher by a score of thirty-six to fourteen. Urbana took the lead in the first quarter and held it easily until the final whistle. The Urbana boys showed good form throughout the whole tournament, and proved by their easy but effective handling of the ball that they deserved to win. At the time it was held we had one of the most severe snowstorms of the winter, but even this did not keep a large Urbana delegation from attending the games. SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT The Sectional Tournament was held this year at Danville. Due to the fact that the floor in the Danville Armory was very slick, there were lots of bad passes and many shots were missed. Urbana met Monticello in the first game of the tournament. Monticello was reputed to be very strong after their victory over Champaign at the Dis- trict Tournament, the week before. We had a hard time getting a lead over our opponents, but late in the second quarter we took a slight lead and steadily increased it in the second half so that the score waws 28-15 at the final whistle. The second game of the tournament was played with Rantoul. Rantoul scored continuously in the last few minutes of play and defeated us by the score 18-12. '2'???T?? Ei ty-,me Lifnnfnnfunf-:En Van Kennedy Edgar Root Irving Seely Jim Sinnott Gordon Faulkner Ralph Waldron Lowell Villars John Hatch Don Dixon Crain Portman Keith Reynolds Don Dixon Leslie Hamilton Edgar Root John Barth Crain Portman John Hatch Jim Sinnott Elton Hill "U" WINNERS FOOTBALL BASKE TBALL Irving Seely TRACK Edgar Root SVVIMMING GOLF David Mitchell Fred Gibson Kenneth Thomas Pete Waldron Paul Simpson John Amerman Bob Bowditch Thurman Sears George Zink Bill Hamilton Bob Schumacher Dick Fulmer Gordon Faulkner John Fuzak Irving Seely Gordon Faulkner George Phillips Marcus Cord John Barr Eight T'-7?q'??? NME 5, , 4 v n !. 1 n 4 f' x 7 5' 1 ,, ARTH TRACK Lnfnnhfnbbb Top Row: 12eaird,tLeming, Shroyer, Browder, McCown, Carson, C. Smith, P. Waldron, Frame, Elam, Baker, Slade, irey Second Row: Apperson, Oehnike, Radebangh, W. Hanes, Thomas, P. Simpson, Mahnert, H. Simpson, E. Hanes, Schriher. Wertz, Tarpenning. First Row: H. Smith, Zink, Alnernian, Portman, Root, Set-ly, Faulkner, Barth, Schumacher. SCHEDULE Champaign Big Twelve Quadrangular District Ottawa State SUMMARY OF TRACK SEASON Urbana enjoyed a most successful season on the track, winning the dual meet with Champaign, the Conference, the District, and placing third in the State. Although missing the services of Terwilliger, Knight, Ralph Seely and Russell, heavy point winners of last year, Steve was able to develop new talent to take their places, although not in the same events. It is the system of always having a bunch of nnderclassmen coming on that contributes as much as any other factor to Urbana's success in all branches of athletics. This year every winner of a track letter is a Senior, but it is safe to predict that next year will find a group of athletes ready to carry on the win- ning tradition. Already signs of budding talent may be discerned in such men as Simpson, Amerman, Zink, Smith, Thomas, Waldron, Wertz, Schriber, the Hanes brothers, Shroyer, Browder, Elam, Schumacher, Mehnert, Penell and others. If these boys will stick at the job and practice diligently they will be able to step into the shoes of Portman, Barth, Seely, Faulkner, and Root next year and bring accustomed honors to Urbana High. If-5:55555 .....nuiEEef Y U CHAMPAIGN MEET Urbana High School 's track team opened the 1931 season on April 11 with a decisive victory over her ancient rival, Champaign. The score was 81 1X3 to 35 2f3, Urbana. winning nine of the thirteen events, and picking up enough second and third places to pile up the impressive total. Crain Portman showed promise of the splendid record he made later in the season by winning both dashes and the broad jump, making him high point winner for the day. Dutch Faulkner was a double winner, taking first in both hurdle races. Irving Seely added eleven points with a victory in the pole vault and a second place in the broad jump and the high jump. Don Dixon and John Barth also contributed eight points each, Don Winning the high jump and placing second in the mile, while John won the quarter and picked up a second place in the hundred yard dash. Other point winners were Schumacher who won the javelin throw, Amer- man with a third in the javelin and half mile, Thomas with his second in the quarter, Sinnott with a second in the shot, Simpson with a second in the discus and a third in the shot, and Smith with second in the pole vault. The best marks of the day were hung up by Portman in the dashes and Seely in the pole vault, Crain stepping the hundred in 10 3f10 seconds, while Seely vaulted 11 feet six inches. This meet concluded the dual competition between Champaign and Ur- bana for the year. The Thanksgiving Day football game resulted in a 0 to 0 deadlock, Urbana won the two basketball games, while Champaign triumphed in the two swimming meets. The winning of this meet clearly gave Urbana the edge in the year's athletic competition. T ? 'I' 'E' ? ? 'G' Eighty-nine 1515555155 Crain Portman was Urbana's outstanding per- former. He climaxed a season in which he won firsts in every meet by Winning a first and sec- Irving Seoly was good for a first place in almost every meet, outvaulting his competitors handily. In the State he tied for first honors with three others. John Barth was a con- sistent quarter miler, winning many firsts dur- ing the season. He qual- ified for the State finals but finished barely out- side the money. ond in the State. QUADRANGULAR MEET Mattoon, Danville, and Champaign were met in a meet consisting of six relay races and six field events. Urbana won four of the six relays: the hurdle relay, the half mile, quarter mile, and mile relays. Champaign took the distance medley and the sprint medley relays. In the field events Seely Won the pole vault and Schumacher the javelin throw. Mattoon proved the strongest in the field events. OTTAWA MEET In the Ottawa meet Urbana won second in two relays, the quarter and the half mile, being defeated in both races by the team from Maine Township High School of DesPlaines. Both races were run by the same team, composed of Barth, Root, Faulkner, and Portman. Portman won the hundred yard dash and placed second in the broad jump while Irving tied for third in the pole vault. N. T T T T 'I' ? 'S' mcty shin!-51555 Gordon Faulkner was a hurdler- and a good one. He usually won first in the lows and frequently took the highs as well. Besides contri- buting many points in the hurdle races, "Dutchy" was a member of the fast relay team. Edgar Root improved steadily throughout the season, seeming to gain in speed with each meet. He was first used as a m-ember of the relay team, but later was entered in several low hurdle events, where he helped out, BIG TWELVE MEET Urbana won its fifth Big Twelve track meet in seven years and set four new records at Springfield, May 2, compiling- a total of 29 points to nose out Peoria Central by two points. Although he was probably aided by the wind, Crain Portman stepped a truly sensational hundred in 9.7 seconds and the 220 in 21.2 seconds. Irving Seely established the only field record of the meet, when he vaulted 11 feet 10521 inches to win that event. The fourth record was set by the half mile relay team-Barth, Root, Faulkner, Portman-when it lowered the old record of 1 :34.2, set by Urbana in 1926, to 1 :30.6. This was the final event of the meet and enabled Urbana to overcome the two point lead which Peoria Central enjoyed. Faulkner and Root with a second and third in the low hurdles, Barth with a fourth in the quarter, and Portman with a second in the broad jump were the other Urbana point winners. It was a great day for Urbana. ? 'E' 'T' 'F 'S' 'E' Q Ninety-one The Scoring Lnfnubnfnbnfnnfn win DISTRICT MEET On a water soaked track, which made record breaking performance difii- cult, Urbana completely outclassed the teams from twenty-one other towns to their fifth district championship in the past six years. The following table shows the number of points garnered by each team: Urbana ........ - ........ 36 Tolono .................. 6 Westville ....... --- ..... 21V2 St. Joseph ...... - ....... - 6 Georgetown .... .. ........ 18 Kankakee ...... .. ........ 6 Monticello ...... --- ..... 15 Onarga ..... - ....... - 5 Watseka ..... - ........ 15 Momence .... .... 4 16 Hoopeston--- ..... 13 Gilman ..... ---- 4 Ogden ..... ..... 1 2 Allerton .... .... 3 Rantoul ...... ..... 1 0 Danville ...... .... 2 Gibson City .... ..... 1 0 Cissna Park .... .... 2 Hammond ...... .- ........ 9V2 St. Anne ................ 115 Champaign .............. 9 Roberts ........ .- ........ V2 for Urbana was done entirely by six boys, and here is the way they did it. Portman contributed ten points to the total when he led the 'field to the tape in the 100-yard dash, being timed in 10.1 seconds, and when he again stepped away from his competitors in the 220. John Barth captured the quarter mile in the good time of 50 seconds, add- ing tive more to Urbana 's total score. Gordon Faulkner was forced to give all he had to win the 220-yard low hurdles, while his team-mate, Edgar Root, placed third. John Amerman also contributed three points with a third place in the javelin throw. As was expected Irving Seely won the pole vault easily. The height of his winning vault was 10 feet, 10 inches, the slippery condition of the runway handicapping the performers. To complete the day the relay team won iirst place. The quartet was composed of Barth, Faulkner, Root, and Portman. The winning of the district meet made the Urbana team eligible to com- pete in the State Interscholastic the following Saturday. STATE INTERASCHOLASTIC MEET Urbana's five-man track team entered the state meet virtually unheralded, but emerged a close third, having made the best showing of any down-state team in recent years. First honors went to Oak Park with 17 points, Maine Town- ship High took second place with 1415 points, and Urbana was a strong third with an even 14 hard won markers. As in previous meets, Crain Portman accumulated the bulk of the score, winning the 100-yard dash and placing a close second in the 220. A strong wind slowed the runners, but did not make the competition any less keen. Portman had to beat Herman of Oak Park, winner of both dashes at Stagg 's national meet last year, but he proved equal to the task. Irving Seely earned 392 points by tieing for first in the pole vault with three other boys, the bar being at 11 feet 11 inches when they finished. The relay team, composed as usual of Barth, Root, Faulkner, and Portman, earned the other two points for Urbana, placing fourth. Barth did not draw a good position in the quarter and was forced to run around a number of other runners on the turn, finishing just too far back to count on the score. Urbana fans are congratulating themselves that Crain Portman left Maine Township High School to enroll at Urbana this year. Last year he made a real reputation for himself and upheld it this season. c T' ? 'E' T 'S' ? T Ninety-two JOHN HATCH Captain SWIMMING 51155-5515 Top Row: Glendy, Romine, Sinnott, Hamilton, Hatch, Marshall. First Row: Morre, DeTurk, Cord, James, Davis. PERSONNEL OF SWIMMING TEAM Captain John Hatch James Sinnott George Phillips Marcus Cord Robert Marshall William DeTurk Steve Romine Gerald James SCHEDULE Danville Champaign Champaign Streator Peoria Central Danville Conference Meet WW Q Q Q Q Q Q 'S' ufniiinf-ful X James Sinnott tried out for the swimming team as a Senior and earned his letter. He swam the 100- yard free style and was also a mem- ber of the medley relay team which won second place in the Big Twelve Conference meet. Captain John Hatch was high point man for Urbana and was most val- uable to the team. He won lirst in the 40-yard free style at the Big Twelve Conference meet a11d he also placed first in this event in every dual meet. George Phillips was one of the two Juniors to win his letter this year. He tied for second place in the breast stroke at the Conference meet, and he also swam on the medley relay team which took second at the same meet. Marcus Cord made the team and won his letter this year as a Junior. He was Urbana's one and only fancy diver. This event requires somewhat more practice than the strokes and Marcus worked hard and improved rapidly. SVVIMMING Last year all but one of the varsity swimmers were graduated. This left a rather weak and inexperienced team. This year 's team had a heavier schedule than usual, competing in six dual meets and the Conference meet, while in previous years Urbana has only swum in four dual mets and the Conference. The team consisted mainly of underclassmen. This fact makes future possi- bilities for Urbana swimming teams quite hopeful. Urbana met Danville for the first meet and received a decisive defeat. Dan- ville invariably has a strong team and always ranks first or second in the Con- ference. Swimming is considered a major sport at Danville and the high school includes a beautiful pool. Urbana competed against Danville later in the season and lost again. In the two dual meets with Cliainpaigrn, Urbana was outswum both times. Urbana also met Peoria Central and was likewise defeated. During the second semester Urbana improved rapidly. We won over Streator and placed third in the Big Twelve Conference meet which was a real victory. Clark Root coached the team, and the fact that Urbana developed so well throughout the season and ended up so splendidly speaks for his coaching. ?????'S'? Ninety-,me 551215155121 Gcrhardt. Hill, Barr, Fagcly, Hodges, C. GCX'lHIl'4'It. GOLF This was the third season for the Urbana Golf team, and it proved just as successful as last year's. Witli two of last year's varsity players back again Urbana completed an undefeated season. Golf is coming into prominence more and more at Urbana, and it is hoped that in the near future it will rank up among the other sports. The Urbana team was fortunate in having the Urbana Country Club course for practice. Several of the meets were held here and the Urbana golfers easily underscored their opponents. The two veteran players on the team were Elton Hill and John Barr. The new team elected John Barr as captain, and he has proved a good leader. The four regular players who participated in every meet were John Barr, Elton Hill, Edwin Hodges, and Clem Gerhardt. They had no regular coach this year. but seemed to get along pretty well without one. Urbana inet Champaign in its first inateh on April 15, winning by a score of 9 to 3. A few days later they again defeated the Maroon quartet, SW to ISM. Danville was outplayed by the same score on April 18th. The Lincoln team proved no inatch at all for our sharp shooters, the score being Urbana 10, Lin- coln 1. On April 29th our boys once more trounced Danville by the same score as before, 81fg to 31fg. ln the District Meet Gerhardt qualified and went on to place ninth in the State, a very creditable showing, considering that he was playing against boys from Chicago who have played inany courses. Each of the four boys composing the teain played good golf all season. VVhile nobody broke par. they were all playing in the 80's about every match, which is good enough golf to make most of the regular golf bugs of the country envious. No matter how good the opposition was, it seemed that the Urbana lads could muster enough skill to win when it was necessary. 1 T ? T T Wi' ? ? Ninety-sizr 1 Ju f r X mag 5, , I l x x A . C if SQ --Q x Q2 I w X rr MARIAN BROWNELL Girly' Atfzlefic Director GIRLS? ATHLETICS Lbdnbbnfhnfn BASKETBALL The annual girls' basketball tournament was begun on November 18 this year. The tournament was of the Round Robin type, each class team playing two games with each of the other teams. The first game played was between the Juniors and Sophomores. Wilma Brown, Frances Portman, Eleanor Nixon, Myrna Kuster, Pauline Floro, and Mary Elizabeth Blaisdell made up the Junior team. The Sophomore lineup consisted of Mae Prevette, Jeanette Weelzs, Ruth Sinnott, Ruth Cogdal, Josephine Bennett, and Betty Knight. The game was close and the final score was 24 to 20 in favor of the Juniors. The Senior-Freshman game was a close contest and the final score was Seniors 17, Freshmen 15. The personnel of the Senior team consisted of Vtlilma Rankin, Helen Russell, 0,,,,taf,, Catherine Hesselschwerdt, Juanita Bell, Josephine McAuley, and Corabel Lowman. Those on the Freshman team were Mar- jorie Stephens, Charlotte VVeeks, Cecelia Sandwell, Rhoda Collins, Dolores Royer, Marjorie Portman, June Mershimer, and Marjory Zink. In the Seniors' second game they received an upset from the Sophomores and the resulting score was Sophomores 17, Seniors 11. 'ln the Junior-Freshman game the Freshmen beat the Juniors 20 to 12. The Seniors won over the Juniors by one point with a score 22 to 21, and also beat the Freshmen by one point, the score being 17 to 16. In the Seniors, other two games, they were victorious over the Sophomores, 28 to 10 and over the Juniors, 26 to The Seniors lost only one game while the other teams lost two or more. This gave the championship to the Seniors. Juanita Bell was captain of the Senior team and she played side center. Helen Russell, a forward on the championship team, was high scorer of the tournament. JUANITA BELL, Top Raw: Brownell. Mmtuley. Russell, Hesselselnverdt, Bust-y. First Row: Lowman, Rankin, Farquhar, Bell, Miller, CllI'I'k'llf. ,,,,,,,y-,,g,,, -Q' -Q' 'P Ii' Ii' Ii' Ii' nfnbnbufnulnib VOLLEYBALL This year the girls were very active in sports. During the latter part of the winter volleyball was introduced. The games were interrupted by other ac- tivities but the girls enjoyed a successful season. Miss Brow- nell. physical education instructor, helped the girls a great ' l deal, showing them ways of playing that were very useful and clever. This year a very unusual thing happened-the freshmen won the tournament. They had an exceptionally good team. Their team work was, perhaps, one of the main factors in their successful playing. They kept the ball in the air, passing it over the net several times before a point was made. The captains of the teams Were: Freshmen, Charlotte Weeks, Sophomores, Josephine Bennett, Juniors, Eleanor Nixon, Seniors, Mattie Miller. 0,,,,taif,, The winning team was composed of Charlotte Weeks, Marjorie Zink, June Mershimer, Lillian Moss, Marjorie Portman, Cecelia Sand- well, Delores Royer, Marjorie Stephens, and Rhoda Collins. Volleyball proved to be a thrilling and interesting game to the many girls who participated in it even though they were new at it. The freshmen had al- ready had some experience in volleyball at Thornburn. The seniors had perhaps the best team next to the freshmen. They might have won the tournament with a little more experience at playing volleyball. The same senior girls that dis- tinguished themselves in basketball played on the volleyball team. The spirit to win dominated every team and each girl knew that for her team to be a success she must be alert at all times. The games were played at night so that more girls could take part. CHAnLo'r'rn WEEKS, Top Row: Webber. Guard. Royer, Barrick. . First Row: Zink, Wm-ks. Moss, Sandwell. 'ff -wi'FEit'g,, p aftfgrafst e .m..:u.:..:..m..:.,.:. THE APRIL PAGEANT The annual pageant, sponsored by the Girls' Athletic Association, was held on April 17, in the Urbana High School auditorium. The pageant was entitled "The Golden Agew based on Marmion's poem, 4'Legend of Cupid and Psyche" and was divided into six epic episodes: The Wratli of Venus, Meeting of Cupid and Psyche, The Seed of Mistrust Sown, The Ordeals of Psyche, The Underworld Adventure, and Cupid's Petition Before Jove. Psyche, daughter of the king and queen of Lusinia, excelled all other earth maidens and even the goddess of Love and Beauty, Venus, in beauty and grace. This aroused the anger of Venus, who commanded her son, Cupid, to strike Psyche. Cupid, instead, also fell under Psyche's power. His love for the earth maiden, however, resulted in dire consequences, and he finally humbled himself before the throne of -love and sought to have Psyche immortalized. The queen of the pageant, Catherine Hesselschwerdt, was elected by pop- ular vote. Psyche was played by Patricia Busey, and Cupid by Oretha Pierce. Other leads were played by Roberta Elvis, Josephine Bennett, Maryellen Rade- baugh, Bernice Coffman, Elinore Nixon, Edna Sanders, and Corabel Lowman. Many girls participated in the group dances. The production was under the direction of Miss Marian Brownell and Miss Lorene Lair. Due to their unremitting efforts and the cooperation of those taking part the pageant was a success. Charles Anderson, Max Meadows, Katherine Smith, Martha Roney, Eliza- beth Comstock, Ivan Crawford, and Charles Moore served on the scenery and property committee. The pianists were Jean Gougler, Marjorie Stephens, Doris Vance, Wilina Brown, and Miss Lair. Costume committee: Mary Current and Rachel Smith. Advertising: Eliza- beth Koller. Program: Madelene Cates. The ushers were Marjorie Prucha, Lola Fairchild, Madelene Cates, Myrna Kuster, lrene Rebman, Mary Current, Thelma Empson, Maxine Davis, Edna Koller, Ruth Appleman, Fern Burr, Isabel Mattingly, Naomi Steffy, Mildred Towncr, and Rosemary Caldwell. Our annual pageant has always been held in May and called the May Fete, but this year it was decided to have it in April so other athletic events could be held in May. Ono Hundred Q ? ? ? ? Q ? Down fha rivers. rfcr fhf prflirirux, Came the ufarriors of Ihr natfiong All fhe 'l,l.Y1-7'7'I.07'S rirrmwn fogeflmr By the signal of the prarc pipe." Q W f V 'T 'T' , , 7.,,k ., -- ., ' .1 54 sl' : .,,. -afi- -- ig. L. .4q. K.,-L--'fn -- '!.gif'- , --I :K -. : .-. ,7 ,-V-fy 4. ,-,-.mv -1-'fa f . , . '-.. ,-4, YZ' Qi' -. lf f-Q f . . K . , N 1 5 715 .. ,,,,,. ... 1... ' F' '-'?Zf:1 4 . . J H I-" 1' . 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N is .5 . - X Q El . , 4-492. .3..f.f..aEal.isa1x.z5m.- Lbbnfnbbb NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY One of the most respected organizations of Urbana High is the National Honor Society. Officers for this year, elected after the new members were chosen, had charge of formal initiation in the assembly. They include: President-. ............... ..-Helen Russell Vice-President ............... Irving Seely Secretary-Treasurer ...... Robert Bowditch Since the establishment. of the Urbana chapter of the society, students have been inspired to live up to the require- ments for membership: scholarship, leadership, character, and service. It is quite a distinction to be chosen by the faculty to be a member of the club and students in all four classes strive toward this goal. The adviser, Miss Ricketts, has held these ideals before the student body and raised the p,,,,,Me,,t standards of the school on these particular points. Senior members of the National Honor Society are: Catherine Hessel- schwerdt, Helen Russell, Jean Peabody, Olin Browder, Mildred Wilson, Van- Dusen' Kennedy, Robert Bowditch, Frances Baldwin, Eugenia Frcemon, Frances Spear, Robert Ilieronymus, Mary Ritcher, Selwyn Smith, Elizabeth Bilsbor- row, William Scovill, Karlton Kemp, Mary Current, John Barth, Orian Lemen, Harriet Hamilton, Margaret Johnston, Steve Romine, Wzilter Still, and Irving Seely. Juniors who were elected this year are: Ruth Mosher, Betty Thomas, Marie Hogans, Roberta Elvis, Marcus Cord, Fern Dey, Miriam Savage, Audrey Frank, and Ruth Wyniger. H11:m+:N RUSSELL, Top Row: Barth, Bowditch, Seovill. Hieronymus. Seely. Kennedy. Still. Romine. S. Smith, Browder. Second Row: Baldwin, Hesss-lschwertlt, Peabody. Bilshorrow. Dey, Russell, Elvis. Savage, Thomas, Spear, Cord. First Row: Wyninger, Hogans, Mosher, Frank, Freemon, Ricketts. Le-men, Hamilton, Wilson, Cur- rent, Ritcher. 'i'?'i'?'?"i'? One Hundred Three Lnfniinfn. ROSEMARY STAFF g A To Helen Russell, editor of our annual, A , , ' mueh of the credit is due for the success ' V of our Rosemary this year. She has given L S generously of time and effort in order that ' L ii our year-book might be one of the best that Urbana High has ever known. Miss Rom- pel, the statt adviser, with her advice and lj ,ft, gg a ready assistance has helped 1no1'e than i E i 'itl words can express. Every staff member HELEN RUSSELL, put in a great deal of time doing his own Bm, MARSHALL, EWU' assignments and helping others do theirs. BW- Mflmlgff' Bob Hieronymus, the photo editor, took many of the pictures himself. The solicitors are to be thanked and others out- side of the staff who have helped in making possible this, our 1931 Rosemary. The staff consists of: Editor-in-Chief ........ .... H elen Russell Athletics --- ..... Gene Weisiger Business Manager ........... Bob Marshall Assistant --- ...... John Schriber Auditor ................... Lloyd Waldron Photo ........ ..... B ob Hieronymus Ad Manager .... ........ I rving Seely Assistant ...... ........ - --Bruce Ryder Circulation ....... ........ E dna Sanders Organizations ........ Elizabeth Bilsborrow Literary ............... Margaret Johnston Assistant ...... ........... M abel Dyson Assistant ................... Ruth Mosher Feature ...... ............. O retha Pierce Typists ..... Jean Peabody, Mildred Wilson Assistant. ................ Mary Jo Scovill Snap ................... Dorothy Edwards Calendar Cartoonist ..... Earl Meenech, Jr. Art ................................ Carolyn Riley, Roberta Elvis, Elaine Hood Class Representatives: Senior, Selwyn Smith, Junior, Naomi Steffyg Sophomore, John Gaines, Freshman, Maxine Gladding. Adviser: Miss Rompel. T011 Row: Marshall, Rompel, Elvis, Seely. Waldron, Hieronymus. 7'l1'iwl How: Mosher, Gladding. Edwards. Dyson, Gaines, Schribr-r, Ryder. Second Row: Wilson, Steiiy, Hood, Carly, Scovill, Smith, Weisiger. 1-'irst How: Riley, Pierce, Peabody, Russell, Bilsborrow, Johnston, Sanders. 'D' 'S' 'E' 'E' 'E' 'E' 'SPE One Ilzmdrcd Four 51155-555 ECHO STAFF The Echo this year was in danger of being discontinued clue to financial diffi- culties. But after two vigorous campaigns sponsored by the staff, the students re- sponded by loyally supporting the paper. lt was necessary to secure more student subscriptions than usual this year because of the scarcity of advertising. Frances Baldwin was editor the first semester but because of poor health she ,, , , , , , , , WALTER STILL, F""MZili?0ff'I""N' was forced to resign the editorship. Tlns BHS. M,,,,,,gL,,. responsible position was given to Olin Browder. He showed his capability by editing 2111 exceptionally good paper. Wal- ter Still deserved a great deal of credit as business manager in making the Echo financially well-off. The advisers. Miss Webber and Mr. Nolen, were both new to the Echo this year but they made many improvements. All the solicitors de- serve the thanks that the Echo extends to them for their selling efforts. The staff includes: . -. - . lFrances Baldwin Society ................. -Doris Vance Edltor In Chlef ""' 2 Olin Browder Joke ..............,... Lowell Villars Business Manager ......... Walter Still Sports ................. Gordon Evans News ........ Catherine Hesselschwerdt Girls' ...... Joe Bennett, Ruth Wyninger Feature ................ Frances Spear Circulation .............. Marcus Cord Exchange ............ ---Marie Hogans Advisers ------- Miss Webber, Mr. Nolen Ad Manager .--..-.---.--. Don Wikoff Club-Frances Utterback, Harriet Hamilton Reporters: Miriam Savage, David Lincicome, Mildred Wilson, Betty Thomas Typists: Catherine Dyson, Marian Shaw, Mary Ritcher Tap Rate: Browder. Evans. Still, Nolen, We-liher. Lineieome, Villars, Ford. Nec-mid Rfmv: Vance, Savage, Thomas, Ilesselsehwerdt. Shaw, Dyson. Bennett. First Raitt' Xvyninger, XVilson, Iloguns, Baldwin, Ul'te1'haek, Riteher. l l '? S? 'E' 'E' ? 'E' ?HddF.i :bb-555512: STUDENT COUNCIL On September 23. 1930 each home room selected a representative for the Urbana High School Student Council. The President and Vice-President of the , -lunior and Senior classes are members of the Council. Offi- cers elected for the year were: President ............ Van Dusen Kennedy Vice-President .............. Irving Seely Secretary ........... N ..... Marie Hogans Treasurer .............. Gordon Faulkner During the week of November 10-14, the Council spon- sored Book VVeek. Committees were appointed to take charge y of the books donated. The purpose of this drive was to get better books for the High School new library. The six VAN D"SPfffKENNE1'Y1 special assemblies which everyone enjoyed were also the rc- PN3"lU"t sponsihilities of the Student Council. The duties of Council members are to do at all times whatever is possible to improve and aid the school. They also explain to their home rooms for the benefit of new students the meaning, purpose, and work of the organization. The second semester, Magazine Week was sponsored by the Council, under the splendid guidance of our advisers. Every member thoroughly enjoyed taking part in this activity. They only hope that the future Council representatives get as much pleasure and interest from their work as the 1930-31 members. Miss Ricketts, the faculty adviser, was very helpful. Top Ifilltif Weisipser. Waldron. Zink. See-ly, Faulkner, Kennedy. Root. Kinser, Williamson. ser-and lrozu: I-'ranks. I. Tramp. Bowtlitch. Nllvlillltlll, Browder. llolu-1'ts, Uehmke. Ryder. First It'ou'.' Reynolds, Brennan. 1-lay:-s. HPIIIIUH, Hogans. Hood, Sfl'illll'l!, Carroll, Hagan. i 'T' 'S' 'E' 'T 'E' 'S' 'E' On 1' Ilunrlrcd Six fun!-55512-5 DELTA SIGMA The Delta Sigma Club was composed of students who had taken part in de- bates, plays, or oratorical contests. It also sponsored all these activities. The ofhcers who were elected last spring Were: , , President .............. Eugenia Frceinon Vice-President ............. Olin Browder Secretary ........... Elizabeth Bilsborrow Treasurer ................... Waltel' Still Sergeant-at-arms ............. John Barth Under the auspices of the club, debate teams traveled to take part in Conference debates. Urbana was Well represented in both the National Oratorical and Big' Twelve Contests. Olin Browder, a club ineinber, Won the Building' and Loan 'B ICUGENIA FREERION, . 11 .fa t Regular meetings were held every mouth Hlld speakers Tm' W' from the University, our faculty, and club members talked on subjects of public speaking nature. The first initiatio11 was held after the Junior play, and then again in the spring' debaters, orators, and members of play casts were taken in. Social events included the Hallowe'en dance, entertainment for the Seniors f ' ' 7 a tea, and a picnic. Top Row: Gres-nwell, Meadows. Evans, l4llllIl1PI'. Dixon. Mvllanivl Nor-1-In-1' Smith B'l1'lP0l' Nloore. Fifth Raw: Smith, Barth, Bilshorrow, Uoldwell, Dey, Royer, Henwood, T4-nliaei. Ke-nip, Ogles, Pea cock, I4illCli'0Ill0, Kerr. Fourth Row: Koller. German, B2ll'l'lllgt'l', Enlpson, Nelson, Saddoris, Thomas. Ell,1!Il1'. Davis, Ander- son, Phillips, Still. Third Row: Baldwin, Corkery, Hesselsr-hwerrlt, Pierce, Edwards, Scovill, Oakwood, McCown, Low- inan, Busey, Wyiner, Bowditch, Calder, Browder. Smith. Ncroml Row: Roberts, litterhack, Spf-nr, Hilhurn, Bc-vis. Beard. Quinton. Trump, Cady, Lemon. Mosher. Noel. Lytle, Dodge. J"ir.st Row: Blaisrlell, Anderson, f'l'llllllll'l', Rowland. Jones, Gourlcy. Hamilton, Free-xnon, Eyerley, Sanders, Rankin, Speck. llogans, llitw-111-r, Sperling. i 'S' B? ? ? 'E' 5' ?HddSc 155512-555 U CLUB The U Club is an organization composed of all boys who have earned a major letter for participation in either football, basketball, or track. At the beginning of the year the old members elected the following officers: President ................... John Barth Vice-President ............. Lowell Villars Secretary ................... Irving Seely Treasurer ............... Leslie Hamilton During the course of the year the U Club sponsored sev- eral events. The first one was a banquet for the football team. The boys who earned their letters in football and were therefore eligible for the club were: George Zink, Bill Hamil- ton, Paul Simpson, Bob Bowditch, Pete Waldron, Fred Gib- son, John Hatch, John Amerman, David Mitchell, Ralph VValdron, Crane Portman, Bob Schumacher, Thurman Sears, and Keith Reynolds. The two boys who won their letters in basketball were John Fuzak, and Dick Fulmer. The initiation of these new football and basketball lettermen took place in a lonely spot several miles from town. It was an occasion that the boys will long remember. After the initiation a large bonfire was made and a supper of marshmallows and wicners was served. The annual dance which is always a very popular event easily lived up to its reputation. Music was furnished by Jack Kreanier's orchestra. All of the decorations and work was done by members of the club. JOHN BARTH, l'rrsi1I1'ut Top lion? Si-hx-oth, Zink, Root. Barth, B. Iianiilton, Faulkner, Simpson, Bowditch, P. Waldron, . ep it-ns. Second Ii'mr: Gibson, Villars, Sei-ly. Kennedy, Sinnott. Hatch. Alnerlnan. Fuzak. Fulnier. Ifzrst Ifnut' Mitvllell, li. Waldron, 1'o1'tn1an, Dixon, L. I-Iainilton, SK'lll1lll2lK'll4'l', Sears, Reynolds. I il.. 'T 12' 'E' 'ii' 'i' 'E' 'S' One Ilrmdrcd Eight L L L L L 5 5 GIRLS' ATHLETIC ASSOCIATIGN The Girls' Athletic Association is a national organization which sponsors class tournaments in all sports, Play Days, and soclal events. Urbana also Joined the state G. A. A. Officers for the year were: President .................... Mary Cady Vice-President ......... Mary E. Blaisdell Secretary .............. Frances Portman Treasurer ......... Mary Susan Anderson Play Day was held at Danville, and Urbana was well represented. Girls from all Big Twelve schools attended and took part in swimming, baseball, volley ball, relays, soccer, and horse shoe pitching. , This year the basketball tournament- was very close al- A though the Seniors Hnally won. At the banquet after the Mlj"Y,t'M:Y' tournament, the Seniors were awarded numerals, and seven "8""' 3 girls received U s. Volley ball was introduced and proved popular. The swim- ming, baseball, and track meets were held in the spring. In April a dramatic pageant, '4The Golden Age" was given. Catherine Hesselschwerdt was Queen of the pageant. Miss Brownell was the adviser and she entered into all the club 's activities with a great deal of pep and spirit. Ni.rth Row: H. Russell, Cole. Guard. Hendrix, B. Smith. Hesselsehwx-l'dt, Sanders. Elvis, F. Corkery, Sandwell, Farquhar, Bell, Lenien. N. Gonrley. Ganlt, Cogrrlal. Bogan. Fifth Row: Bilsborrow, E. Russell, K. Smith, Wheeler, Ptlugmaeher. Reynolds. Wingfield. J. Weeks, A. Tramp, S. Johnson. Phillips, W. Brown. Bauer. Edwards, Freeman. Baldwin. Armstrong. Fozlrfh Row: Gallivan, Saltsgaver, Martin, Bnrnier. Towner. Collins. Minor, Moss, Zink, Stevens, Portman. Mershilner, Hayes, Rednlon, Kemp. Gougler, Sinnott, Miller. Third Roto: Place, McCollum, Speek. Dearth. U. Weeks, Allen, Roy:-r, Moore. Wyninger. Steffy, Wil- son, Beard, Utterback, Buckles. F. Gonrley. Knster. Odehref-ht. Burr. Nrcoml Row: Smith, Vance. H. Anderson. Bennett. Riley. MeAnley. C. Corkery, XV. Rankin. Four, A. Empson, Williams, Roth. Current, Wright, I.aValle. Waxler, Hadden. Hurd. First Row: Mr-l'ain, E. Rankin. Nixon, Miller. Blaisdell. F. Portman, Vady, Bus:-y, Noel, S. Ander- son, Lowman, Knight, Scott, Edwards, Brownell, Gladdiug. ? T? ? ? ? ? Hundred Vine nbdndnbfnbni SOCIAL KLUB . The officers for this year 's S. K. Club were elected at a meeting late last spring. The following girls were chosen: i President ....... Catherine Hesselschwerdt Vice-President ..d.......... Edna Sanders Secretary ........... Elizabeth Bilsborrow Treasurer ................. Helen Russell For the past two years we have been fortunate enough to have the same adviser. Miss Fisher has the interests of the club at heart and the success of the club 's doings has been due in great part to her efficient management. The girls have en- joyed working with her and everyone has cooperated nicely. Primarily a social club, the main events of the year were HESSHI'S+'HWEKDT: planned to give students a good time, help new students get P"'i""'1nt acquainted, and establish a friendly spirit among diierent classes. The membership drive early in the fall resulted in a big membership of over half the girls in school. One of the first events of the year was the Big and Little Sister Party. Each CATHERINE Upper Half-Top Row: Scovill, Smith, Service, Cole, Bowers, Honser, Bateman, Leblay, Hendrix, D'l,'l'sn. Fifth Ifovr: Winn, Prevett, Parker. E. Russell, German, F. Portman. Lytle, Johnston, Williams. Foulrfli Rn'w.' Shoaf, Sales, J. Weeks, A. Tramp, Oakwood, McCown, S. Corson, Moomau, Kemp, D. Johnson. Thirll How: Shadoan, Guard. XVells, Wingfield, Miller, Day, W. Miller. Shepherd, Hlllldl0y', Fletcher. Necoml lime: Edwards. Wyninger, Udebreeht. Breedlove, Martin, Burr, Reynolds, Clark, Roth. First Row: Rowland. Hogans, Kelley, Birely, Current, Utterback. Hesselsehwerdt. Sanders. Lower Half-Top Row: Thomas, Barringer, Miner, Fisher. West, M. Smith. J. Rehberg, MeCo1lom, Gaffney, Hill, Ward, Buchholz. Fifth Role: Lemen, Nelson, Iloffey, Waldo, Koller, R. Smith, Mosher, Hollingsworth, Green. Fourgl fl'01U.' D. Hogans, S. Johnson, B. Smith, Moss, Redmon, Taylor, Appleman, Comstock, Lee, - lll 0I'S0ll. Third How: Four. E. Shoaf, Farquhar, Leonard. Honey, Fruit, Long. Franks. Nvcmzd Now: Spitler, Fairchild, Lowman, McAuley. F. Gourley, Knight, Williams. M. Smith, Nixon. First Row: Pierce, Beard, A. Empson, G. Johnson, Burgess, M. Johnson, Scott, Waldron, Speck. i T T 'C' ? ? 'Z' ? One Hzmrlrrd Tm 1551551556: SOCIAL KLUB Senior girl had a little sister in the Freslnnan class. ln this way everyone got more widely acquainted and the freshman girls felt they had someone to help them get into the spirit of the high school. Initiation of the freshmen took place at this party and all the girls played games and took part in relays. Tl1e night of the Thanksgiving game a dance was given for the football team. The second annual "Ditch Diggers' Dancefl a post exam jubilee, was held in February to celebrate the end of the first semester. All the dancers came dressed in old clothes and en- joyed games, dancing, and picnic lunches. Several matinee hops were given and well attended. Pep assemblies were planned before important football T and basketball games. The presentation of comic games and SALLY FWHER, dialogue skits amused the student body and also served to -4fl1'iM'1' arouse the school spirit. The girls, cheering section was con- tinued. Our cheer leaders were Elinor Nixon and Jo Bennett. Most of the block "U" at the Champaign game was made up of S. K. girls. Club members sold candy at games and backed all athletic events. llllpfl' Hfllf-T011 Rmv: Kuster, RPXVl'l'fS, Lakey, lICllUI'llllf'li, Harmon, Hacltielil, Began. Cogdal, Iladrlen, Singer, Wilson, Vnrson. Fif1I2Ro'N:.' Green, Price, Birsell. Cates, Miller, Wherry, Brentlinger. Winters. W. Rankin, C. 'orkery. I-'ourtlz gow: Beaird. E. Moore, Burns, M. Young. Warwick. E. Bennett, F. R1-lilnerg, James, Turner, D. tinith. Third Row: Baldwin, H. Anderson, Untfnian, ll. German. Riley. Arnistrnng, Balispy. Slack. Second Row: Blaisdell. Vance. E. Rankin, Glaalding, F. Webber. M1-Fall, Olliverson. Haines, I. Tramp. First Row: Anderson. Gougler. M1-I.:-an. Memlsker, Mattingly. Br-ll. Smlmloris. Bennett. Bilshnri-ow. Lower Half-Top Ifmc: Uhilds, Myers. Spear. Britt. Bauer. Brown, Russell. Barrick. Mershinier. 1-'fifth Row: Goble. Savage. Jones. l'a1'ker. Gault. Eflwalxwls. Gourlvy. Gundlovk. Coldwell. Steffy. Fourth Row: M. Smith, Snyder. LaValle, Menges. Clark, Waxler, S. llayes, Filbey, Francisco, Kul- ler, M. Hayes. Th-ird Row: Paul, Mullins, C. Young. F. t'orke1'y. Burnier. Plat-e, l'ealn-dy, Rita-her. Nrcoml Ifmv: Quinton. M. Webber, Mills. Miller. Ward. Hood, Wright. Church, Mc-Cloud. First Row: Busey, Freenion, Noel, Zink, M. Portman, Stevens, Dearth, Nelson. ? 'S' 'C' 'E' 'S' Hi" 'E' One Hundred Eleven A Linlunlnnfni LATIN CLUB The Latin Club has carried out a very successful and worthwhile year under the supervision of the following officers: . ,ff l K fy .. I. :rf "LTf?W - ' i' 'SJR- iil 54.115 'L ' , ,vi 1. ,, , BIARY Jo Seovim., Pr1'xi111'1lf Consul .................. Mary Jo Scovill Pro Consul ..... ........... J oe Hindnian Quaestor ................... Frederic Lee Scribes ....... Betty Knight, Jean Gougler The Latin Club started the year with a Hop on October 10. This began a series of activities. The next big social event was the Christmas Party which was held December 13 at the TNQ-sley Foundation. At this party all of the first year Latin students and new members were initiated. The oath was given by the Pro Consul. After the business part was over, the social period began. The club nieinbers were entertained with bunco or bridge. Surprise gifts were given out by the Pro Consul of the club. During the second semester, the club put on a very interesting and instruc- tive projcct. Slides were shown which gave the Latin students the opportunity to see the ainuseinents, home, dress, and social life of the Romans. Also, studies about the life of Virgil were given. An assembly was held celebrating Virgil's two thousandth birthday. This D . b assembly proved to be quite unusual and was really enjoyed y everyone. The club with the aid of Miss Kirk, the adviser, put on a Roman banquet. Top 16010: Phillips, Weisigzer. S. Smith, N. Gourley, D. Edwards, G. Parker, Fruit, N. Morgan, Roney, Lineieome, U. Faust, Williams. Fourth. Noir: llieronyxnus, Marshall, B. Smith, Bland, Sperling, Glendy, Gregg, Bevis, Cochran, H. Smith Faliev Tlziwl Roni: 1'arlcer. Bogans. Miller, Denrth. Kemp. Mills, Ward, Keller. XV. Loreh, Keller, G. Zink. Nfveoafl Ifolr: Minor. Alf-Lean, Roth. Spitler. Mullen. LaValle, Rafleballgll, Barrick, M. Zink, Weeks. First 1i'ou'.' Allen, Gnugler, Knight. Seovill, Kirk, Hinlllnan, Lee. TT?'iF"i'?'2' One Hzmdred Twelve If-.L L L nf- in A FRENCH CLUB One of the linguistic clubs of Urbana High is Le Cercle Francaise or the French Club. Wheii the club was organized the following officers Were chosen to take charge for the year: gg I President ............... George Gladding Vice-President ............ Eleanor Nixon Secretary ............. Christine Buchholz Treasurer ................. Chester Keller The two French teachers, Miss Webber and Miss John- son, acted as club sponsors. An entertainment committee com- posed of Josephine Bennett, David Lincicome, and Margaret Gault was appointed by the president. They planned pro- grams for the regular meetings and social entertainments. i Programs have been quite varied this year. French plays GEORGE GLADDING' were studied and translated. "Rosalie," a French play, was Pm"dC"t translated and presented by some of the members. At another meeting Christine Buchholz, who spent last year in Paris told of some of her experiences. She told something about French customs, dress, and manner of living as compared to ours. Group singing proved to be entertaining in French as well as in English. Club members feel that the aims of the organization have been fulfilled. They understand and appreciate the French language more than they would just in class. T010 R010: Hadden. C0gdnl, Wuxler, Webber, Lincieonle, Lee. Flaningam. Hollingsworth, Kerr, Frame, Miles, Kirby, Gaines. Fourth Row: Wingfield. A. Trump, Spear. Shadoun, M. Smith, Snyder, Wells, Hayes, Mershimer, Moomau, Barker, Schriber, Wertz, Faust. Third Row: Riteher, B. Smith, Erickson, Ferris, Bourgois, Gladding, Webber, Johnson, Cady, Ryder, Keller, Oehmke, Beaird. Hamilton. Second Row: Elvis, Gault, Coifnmn. Beals, Appleman, Clements, Dunn. Howser, Burnier, Hognns, Scott, G. Buckles, Harvey, Vestal. First Row: Rowland, Flora, Beard, Johnson, Bennett, Bnohholz, Nixon, Webber, Miller, Busey, Glad- ding, Keller, G. Hay, R. Buckles. ? T ? 'P ? Wi' ? C One Hundred Thirteen They were : .m..m..:..m..m..n..m.g GERMAN CLUB The officers of the German Club were elected at thc beginning of the year. ' John Bourgois President ................. l Vice-President ........... Harold Bourgois Mary Cady Treasurer .......... ....... R hoena Jones Secretary .................... The German Club was made up of members of the Ger- man classes. Its purpose was to promote interest in the lan- guage and broaden the students, knowledge of the people of Germany and their customs. 'Programs were planned with this aim of the club in ' mind. Professor Willianis of the University Department of 'lf"'FFfll'f"i"'S- German gave an interesting talk on his trip through Ger- "s"I"'f many. He illustrated it with slides of the Black Forest re- showing the dress and homes of the peasants. Plays were studied and presented in German to increase familiarity with the use of com- mon idioms. Club members were also active in a more social way. In November the club gave a wiener roast on the Country Club grounds. A Christmas bunco party was enjoyed by club members and their guests. Christmas carols were sung in German at one of the meetings. Many of them are well known in English, but gion and pictures were iirst written in German. Miss Ricketts was club sponsor. She has been adviser since the club was or- ganized and has contributed largely to the success of the club. To Huw' l'luee NI-nrtin Collins Weeks llieronynlus Empson. D - - A - . -. 4 , . , Idourth linux' hvllllilllls, Anderson, A. Smith, Rewerts. Lnvenhagen, Cuppernell, Kinlpel, liuSulle. Thi1'd Razr: Stier Young. Veach, Heater, Schaudt. Hubbard, Blelmert, Sehoeh. Sveonrl Rohr: blflljgilll, Odebrecht, Burr, Spears, Shepherd, Lemon, Green. Gourley. First Rrnv: Lyster, Riley, J. Bourgois, H. Bourgois, Ricketts, Jones. Williams, Bennett, Hays. 'CF 12" ? 'ii' 'SF ? ? 0110 Humlrvd F011 rtern, . Lninhbfnib IOTA ALPHA GAMMA Early in the fall, members of the Art Club met to select officers for the com- ing year. The following people were appointed to the offices: President ................. Roberta Elvis e Vice-President ........ Constance Oakwood Secretary-Treasurer ..... Gertrude Parker Adviser ........... Miss Margaret Mowrey The purpose of the club is to sponsor exhibitions of good pictures and to cultivate an understanding and enjoyment of fine art. An exhibit of 150 famous masterpieces was held in the Library, November 10-14. These line reproductions had the color and atmosphere of their famous originals. With the 1 proceeds from this exhibit, two beautiful pictures were pur- ROBERTA MVIS' chased for the school. From time to time, the members of the club attended some interesting art exhibits at the University. One of the most enjoyable things the club worked on this year was the miniature oriental garden project. Diminutive streams and lakes, mountains that rise and fall in the fancied distance, an entire oriental village-all created in a small dish or bowl. The miniature ornaments gave us a wide Held to try our skill. Figures of men, bridges, boats, and pagodas were all hand-fashioned and colored true to oriental life. The Art Club is eagerly looking forward to carry- ing on this Work next year. President Top Row: Crawford, Lavenhugen, 0'Donm-11, Meenech, B. Smith. Young, German, Miles. Second Row: Miner, Hayes, B1'IlWll, Mcllown. Paul, Lelllell, Hood, Moore. First Row: N. Parker, Oakwood, Price, Elvis, G. Parker, Mowrey, K. Moore, Miller. 5 T 'S' 'D' ? 'E' E' 'Z' Onc Hundred Fifteen, 55555155 Hl-Y CLUB The activities of the High School Young Men 's Christian Association began near the first of the school term when the following officers were elected: , President ............ Lawrence Apperson Vice-President .......... Louis. Hildebrand Secretary .................... Don Silver Treasurer ................... John Gaines The purpose of this club was to create, maintain, and eX- tend througliout the club and school higher standards of christian character. The meetings were every Tuesday evening and consisted , of an interesting program for the club's enjoyment. After T each meeting' they would either swim or play basketball. Then once in every three weeks the boys would have a banquet. The program contained a speaker or entertainer of some kind. Some of the well known speakers were Mr. Hudson, Joe Friend, and Dr. Hinds. Oliver Sun of China gave a very interesting comic sketch of "How a Bachelor Sews on a Button." The boys secured several speakers for the assemblies. One was Reverend Kennedy who spoke on tWVorld Citizenshipf' The assembly was enjoyable as well as instructive, and it gave everyone a problem to think about. ln the fall, representatives of the Hi-Y Club attended the Older Boys' Con- ference at Aurora. A combined meeting of the Girl Reserves and Hi-Y Clubs of the Twin Cities was held at the Wesley' Foundation in January. I..xu'm:x4'i-1 Arr!-:RSON l'rfwi1Ienf Tap 1fU1I'.' .lame-s, l'. XVood, Brunilield. xVIlltil'0ll, Melina-rt, Smith. Bnrrieks, Dodge, Reece. 'I'hirzI lt'nu'.' Fuzak, Fl'2llllP, i'0f'kl'llll. Hull, lfonerly. Brush. Hutton. Dixon. Nrefnzrl I.'nu'.' Zink, Miles, Glendy, Keller. Wikoff, Kirby, Bouri:uis. Ilarvey, Keller. I-'irsf lime: J. Smith, Glaulding, Gaines, l'. Smith. Apps-rson, Ilildebrnild. Silver, Oehnike, Radebaugh. One Hundred Simtecn, ? ? ? ? ? q 11:2-155555 COM RADE CLUB The Comrade Club of Urbana High School is an organization of freshmen boys patterned after the Senior Hi-Y. This is the second year for the club. The main purpose of the organization is to prepare the boys for the Hi-Y work which they will take up next year. The following officers were elected during the first se- mester: President ................... Junior Riley Vice-President ............. Art Apperson Secretary ................. Charles Beaird Treasurer ............ --Howard Simpson Adviser .................... Lute Mosher Faculty Adviser ............. Mr. Hallam ., JUNIOR RILEY, The club was composed ot about twenty freshmen boys. p,.,.,.,i,1,.,,, The meetings were held every Wednesday night at seven o'clock and entertaining programs were always given. The first part of the meet- ings was usually taken up with business. Then later the boys participated in an athletic hour, when they would swim and play basketball. Twice during the year the club held a social hour. The boys brought popcorn and candy and they all had a good time. One evening they staged a boxing match which proved very amusing. Several interesting speakers furnished entertainment at some of the meet- ings. Mr. Van Trees gave a very interesting account of his trip through Europe and showed many souvenirs which he had brought back with him. Mr. Hudson of the Y. M. C. A. at the University of illinois played a big part in organizing the club at the start of the year. Top Rout: Linf-ir-oine, Mel'own, Hull-ary. Faust. H:-,fri-11lm1't. Eccles, f,llIlllll'I', Smith. Net-om! 1x'01l'.' Elvis, Booker. Wr-her, Tmiiiing, Selnrle. Butts. Hamilton. Gray. First 1:'uu': Merchant, Groth, Hudson. Beaird, Simpson, Blaisdell, Byard. Field. T' ? 'E' 'U' T' 'D' 'ZF C Ono Hundred Seventeen 1551215121115 GIRL RESERVES "To find and give the best in life" is the purpose of true Girl Reserves, an organization which is sponsored by University Y. W. C. A. girls, who act as M advisers to the club. Officers elected for the year were: President ............... Margaret Edgar Vice-Pres1dent--------Elizabeth Gundlock Ulf riy . 1'- Secretary-Treasurer ........ Marie Hogans l" Q - Adviser ............ Miss Mildred Lawson I d 'Vdk G - - - g ,QHA W e Entertainment for the year included a wiener roast, a V, Hallowe'en party, several bean suppers, a swimming party, -:' - and a skating party. Mrs. Bracken 'ave an interesting talk on Ce lon and ex- R 2 .1 . . . e f hibited native costumes and accessories. NIARZAREE EIQGARI On November 12, Champaign, University, and Urbana TVN! UH high schools gave a banquet at Wesley Foundation. The speaker, Miss Pierce, told of Girl Reserves in Japan. A Christmas basket was filled for the needy and some of the girls helped with the Y. W. C. A. Doll Show. The second semester the Hi-Y, Comrade, and the Girl Reserves all joined for the annual banquet. Recognition services were held January 25. The Girl Reserves are a member of the Inter-Club Council of the Twin Cities, and the officers attended the Council meetings several times during the year and made reports. Miss Lawson, a new teacher at Urbana High, was the club's adviser. Be- cause of her interest in the organization and her untiring efforts a successful year was completed. Tap Row: Foltz, Hnrsey. Hood, Gougler, K. Smith, Miss Lawson. M. Hilhurn, M. Smith, Craig, Wingfield. Third How: Hadden. Cogdal. Gudgel, Good, Davis, M. Webber, Winters, Breutlinger, J. Weeks, Win11. Nvcoml Row: Bilgilll. M. Smith. 11CC01'IlllI1k, Wells. Appleman, Paul. Mullen, Roberts, Cole, Bell. FirstCRow: 10lliversun, Hendrix, Edwards, Guard, Bennett, Gnndloek, M. Hogan, Kelley, McCain, 00D0l', lay. 'Z' 'Z' 'J' 'E' 'i' 'P 'P One Iiundrcd Eighteen l dnlfnnfnnfnbbb GIRL SCOUTS The Girl Scouts though few in number form one of the most worth while organizations at Urbana High School. The officers for this year were: Captain ..................... Miss Wood y Lieutenant ............... Dorothy Miller Robin Hood ................ Orian Lemen Scribe ................. Gertrude VVheeler Vilhat higher goal could be set by any group of girls than the development of character and pursuit of happiness? The Girl Scouts have this for their goal and are always striving toward it. At their meetings, instruction has been given to help them to live up to their motto, 4'Be Prepared," and to be of help in the home and to the community. The Girl Scouts, through wholesome recreation in the OMAN LEMEN' outdoors have learned many of the secrets of nature and the principles of good sportsmanship. Miss Miller, the lieutenant, instructed the girls in archery and a contest was held in the spring. Most of the girls have worked this year and expect to receive Merit badges at the Court of Awards in May. Mary Cady was presented with the Letter of Connnendation and both she and Orian Lemen expect to be Eagle Scouts soon. Miss Vilood, a member of the high school faculty, was the Captain, so called in Scout language, otherwise known as adviser. Miss VVood, although a new member of the facility and new to the students, has adapted herself very Well to the group of girls. She has worked diligently with the scouts and they found her a very good adviser. 1'I'1'.NfilIF1lf Top li'nu'.' Carter. Al1'l'Sllill10l'. Vady, Zink. l"irsf lfo'1l'.' Hayes, Miner, In-lnon, Wood. Roth. E' 'S' 'D' 'I' 'E' 'D' W' G One Ilvmdrcrl i inetecn Lnibf--5-55 AG CLUB Among the progressive organizations of Urbana High School was the Future Farmers of America better known as the Ag Club. The club began its program this year with a fair en- rollment, the ofhcers were elected the previous year. They are: l President ....... .... I lewis Hildebrand Vice-President .... ....... P aul Wood Secretary ....... ---George Pennell Treasurer ..... ---Donald Kirby Reporter ------------------- Jake Sinnott The organization was composed entirely of boys who were either farm boys or persons who had taken the agricul- LEWIT, FI'.I'IfF"R'wD' tural course. rrsulznt , , , At the meetings, speeches of interest to the agriculture students were delivered by Mr. Rice, Mr. Nolan, Mr. Rucker, and by men from the department of agriculture at the University of Illinois. Many of the meet- ings wcre followed by athletic hours. During the year, the club sponsored an oyster supper, Father, Mother, and Son Banquet, and a Wiener roast. A great part of the success of the organization was due to the efforts of thc advisers, Mr. Lawrence, Mr. Reddy, and several University students who served as practice teachers. lt is hoped that next year's classes will carry on the movement that has been developed by these students and that the Ag Club will prosper and grow stronger each year just as other student organizations have done. Top Row: Burr. Mm'l'l1-llell, Brooks. Robbins. XVuod. Smith. First lfnw: Pennell. Kirby, Sinnott, Ilildehrund, P. Wood, Silver. F 'D' 'Q' 'Q' 'C' W' 'SF T On u Ilzmllrvcl Twmz ty If-fnfnnfnbbb LORELEI The Girls' Honorary Swimming Club was organized a few years ago and has been one of the active organizations of Urbana High. The officers of the club were elected at the beginning of the term. They were: President ............... Corabel Lowman Secretary ................. Wilma Rankin The Lorelei derived its name from a myth concerning a German mermaid by that name who enchanted all of the sea- men by her beauty and singing. While sitting on the steep banks of the Rhine River, she would comb her golden hair and sing to the seamen. The seamen, overcome, would try to climb the steep banks and failing in this would fall back into . the river. The emblem of the club is a mermaid in the shape of a "U" and is given to each member upon her admittance to the club. A member must be able to meet the following requirements: swim five lengths of the poolg one surface diveq bob ten timesg three divesg three strokes for formg and four practices. They must make a passing grade of 85. The new members of the club this year were: Frances Portman, Marjory Portman, Jeanette Weeks, Charlotte Weeks, and Ruth Sinnott. Life saving was taken up during the last semester. The girls learned some very useful holds and carries. The Lorelei had quite a few swimming parties and entertainments. Practices were held on Tuesday and Thursday of every week. The Lorelei is a branch of G. A. A. and counts for credit towards a HU. " It is under the direction of Miss Brownell. CORABEL LOWMAN, President Top Row: Quinton, Blaisdoll, Brownell, F. P01'l,lll!lll, Busey. Bennett, Cady. .1'l'l7'8f Row: M. Portman, Sinnott, McAulvy, I40YV!Tlllll, Rankin, C. Weeks, J. Weeks, Knight. T' 'P 'D' 'I' 'D' 'S' 'S' One Hundred Twenty-one 5555555 MUSIC Music is one of the most beautiful ways of bringing pleasure both to those who take part in rendering it and to those who listen. The curriculum at Urbana offers classes in band, orchestra, glee clubs, and music ap- l preciation. All these organizations have varied libraries and popular repertoires. Urbana has always been fortunate in obtaining excellent music directors. This year Captain G. T. Overgard was superintendent of music in Urbana schools. Captain Over- gard directed the band, orchestra, and girls' glee club. Mr. F. M. Vierow taught music appreciation and directed the boys' glee club and mixed chorus. Captain Overgard and Mr. l Vierow have devoted a great deal of time and effort to mak- m,,TA,N 0,.ER,,Am,. ing our music at Urbana better as well as more enjoyable. nz.,-an This year was a busy one for all connected with the music department. The band gave a series of concerts before the contest and gave an out of town concert. The orchestra played for Parent- Teachers meetings and plays. Glee club members sang for school and town pro- grams. Instrumental and vocal ensembles furnished music on various occasions. Although Urbana's musical organizations have been organized more re- cently than those in most Illinois high schools, they are up to the standard set by the others. In competition of all kinds we have won honors and established a name for our school musically. The programs and special music furnished by students in music activities deserve commendation and Urbana is proud of her work along this line. DRAMA One of the earliest means of expression was through drama. Primitive races enjoyed acting out events of their everyday life and adding ceremony to festivi- ties by dramatic presentations. Today. drama has become one of the foremost develop- l ments of the high school extra curricular activities. The old appeal has grown stronger and our modern audiences thoroughly enjoy the comedies, tragedies, and satires realis- tically presented by our high school dramatics classes. Students who have taken part in plays have had good training which was received in an enjoyable way. Stage and property workers have also had valuable experience. The plays presented this year offered a wide variety. The Junior play, "The Mummy and the Mumpsgj' was a comedy, MKS. HAMILTON' directed by Miss Lair. 'lhe faculty play, Skinner s Dress Drama Suit," gave students an opportunity to see their instructors oif their dignity in a riotous comedy. "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall," was a costume play of Elizabethan times. It was presented in March by the dra- matics classes. The Senior play, "Jonesy," closed the year successfully. In ad- dition to the big plays, one act plays were given in assemblies and also at club meetings in both Urbana and Champaign. For many years llrbana has had a very fine dramatic sponsor and coach. Mrs. Hamilton may feel that her efforts were not in vain after the successful production of the plays we have had this year. Miss Lair and Miss Fisher proved to be able coaches by their presentation of the Junior play. C 'D' 'Z' Q' 'E' W' 'SF 'P Ont' Hzmdred Twenty-two , , , 5512-12-12-L5 ORPHEUS CLUB The oflicers of the Orpheus Club like all other organizations were elected last spring. They were: President ........... Van Dusen Kennedy Vice-President ............... Bill Scovill Secretary-Treasurer--Elizabeth Bilsborrow Sergeant-at-Arms ........ Bob Hieronymus Members of Orpheus are chosen on the basis of a point system established two years ago. They are rewarded for their service in band, orchestra, and the glee clubs. At the first of the year all members were Seniors who were elected last year. They were: Robert Bowditch, Olin Browder, Van Dusen Kennedy, Harold Tenhaeff, Elizabeth Bilsborrow, Patricia Busey, Robert Hieronymous, William VAN DUSEAI KENNEDY- Seovill, Selwyn Smith, and Mary Current. Seniors elected Pm"d"m this year were: Karlton Kemp, Robert Newman, Robert Marshall, Wilbur Roth, Bill Summers, Lawrence Apperson, Walter Still, Gene Weisiger, Charles Ander- son, Mary Ritcher, Grace Fairchild, Mary Elizabeth Williams, Catharine Smith, Mary Bireley, and Orian Lemen. Newly elected Junior members were Miriam Savage, Dave Hubbard, Al Smith, Harold Smith, Max Meadows, John Peacock, Gayle Hollingsworth, Ruth Mosher, Betty Bauer, Mary Elizabeth Blaisdell, Ruth Wyninger, and Marie Hogans. Captain Overgard, the faculty adviser worked willingly with the club and backed it in every way. At a special program the new members were entertained and initiated. Top Row: Fletcher. Marshall. A. Smith, Kemp, Newman, Peacock. Tc-nhaef. K. Smith. Third Row: Kennedy. Birely, Still, Bauer, Apperson, Anderson. Fairchild. Summers, Williams. Secogld Row: Peabody, H. Smith. Mosher, S. Smith, Savage, Scovill, Bilshorrow, Meadows, Lemon, oth. First Row: Hieronymus, Hogans, Browder, Ritcher, Hubbard, Overgard, Current, Bowditch, Wynin- ger, Weisiger, Blaismlell. ? 'S' 'ii' 'EF 'S' T' One Hun red Twcnt -three bbbb BAND Band officers for the year 1930-31 who were elected last spring are: President ............... Robert Bowditch Vice-President ............. Olin Browder Secretary ............... Robert Newman Treasurer ........... Elizabeth Bilsborrow This year the band has been very active along many dif- ferent lines. Band members. have taken a mutual interest in raising the standards of this organization and under Cap- tain Overgards direction much fine work has been accom- plished. Some of the activities of the band this year have been Bon B"Wl'IT""' providing music for athletic events and parading for the Chamber of Commerce in Urbana and at Homer. Several concerts were given in Urbana and Champaign, and one at Monticello. The band also played for Parent-Teachers meetings during the year. Our band oiieered competition in the annual contest in this state. Band soloists and ensembles also represented Urbana in the contest. Urbana High School was well represented in the Big Twelve Massed Band which assembled in Springiield in May. The hand nielnbers have enjoyed two theater parties, a hayrack ride, and a Wiener roast during the year. Prr'xi1I1'n! 'I'up Ix'o'1l'.' Tenhneff, Miller, A. Smith, H. Smith. Seovill. IInhli:lr1l. Apperson. Fourth Irrmz' Ilaekleinail, Kennedy, Hodges. Still, Kirkpatrick, Williams. Reece. Griesel, Moore. liilltllllilll. Smith, Kemp. Eliot. Albert. Third ffIlll".' Koller. Decker. Smith. Paul, Kirby, McCoy. Oelunke, Di-'1'urk, Evans. Bowditch. Suni- lllt-'l'S. Davis. 0V4'I'l1li1l1, Smith. lVeisige1'. Nvrnnzl lfmr: Young. Sperlinpz. Weber. f'rawtor4l. Smith. Apperson, Hilsl1o1'row, Phillips, Browder. Ilolehe, Newman. Mzlrsllall, XVZILUIPF. Savng.:e, Glllllilvii, Me-emu-li. Firxf lfuu-.' Davis. Mosher. Harris. Ilerrongh. Elvis. Hagan, 514-t'own, Roth. Dol:-he, Guult, Butts. B. Browder. I'llf'I'4lllj'I!lllS. Savage, Slusser, OVt'I'L!2lI'1i, Anderson, llarvey. l -A 1 , , 'Q' 'E' 'D' 'E' 'I' 'E' T One midwel Twenty-fozn' , 5555555 ORCHESTRA This year tl1e orchestra was a smaller and more select group. Last spring the following' officers were elected: President ........... Elizabeth Bilsborrow Vice-President ........... Vi rginia Church Secretary ................. Miriam Savage Treasurer .................. Ruth Mosher The librarians were Arthur Connard and H. C. Davis. This year the orchestra did not enter any contest it has in previous years, but many of the members were used in the band. During' the year the orchestra became quite popular and i was much in demand to play for banquets. meetings, and plays. Under the able direction of Captain Overgard, the or- chestra furnished music for "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall." the Style Show, Parent-Teacher meetings. and Chamber of Commerce, Kiwanis, and Farm Bureau banquets. During the second semester the orchestra played a concert in Monticello. During April a series of weekly programs was broadcasted over the radio station WILL. Urbana High School was well represented in the All-State Orchestra. Those who played were: Elizabeth Bilsborrow, string bass, Williaiii Seovill, french horn, Patricia Busey, flute, Harold Tenhaetf, bass, Bob Hieronymus, flute, Ruth Mosher, 'cellog Virginia Church, violin. E. BILSIEORROYV. P l'l'8idl'1l i Tap fx'0Il7.' Ilin-ronymus. Kennn-dy, Slusser, Seovill, Butts. Y Nrrwml lrouz' Koller, Young. Brown. Still. Moore. Davis, 4'unarfl. S2lll4lI'l'S, I"u'xf lfnzo: Mosher, Savage. Smith. fJV"l'f1ill'1l, Ilitclu-1', Copeland, Ililshurrow. Hi' 'D' 'Q' 'I' 'E' E' 'D' i One Hundred Twenty-five 555:2--21:21:21 GIRLS' GLEE CLUB The Girls' Glee Club was not fully organized until the second semester when the following officers were elected: President ....... Mary Elizabeth Williams Vice-President ...... T .... Grace Fairchild Secretary-Treasurer ......... Orian Lemen The Librarians appointed for the iirst semester were Doris Vance and Ellen Ranking for second semester were Bernice Coffman and Martha Webber. The accompanist for first semester was Jean Peabody and for the second semester was Doris Vance. Urbana High was represented in the Illinois High School Chorus by Mary Elizabeth Vlfilliams, Betty Smith, Betty MARY E' W'm"'mS' Bauer, and Grace Fairchild, Sopranos, and Oretha Pierce, Martha Webber and Orian Lemen, Contraltos. The Club planned to give a concert with the Orchestra and Boys' Glee Club but it had to be cancelled. In the second semester the election of ofiicers increased the club activities. A successful St. Patrick 's Day Hop was held on March 20. All the musical or- ganizations cooperated in giving a big evening dance which was held in the Spring. A selected group from the Glee Club entered the Big Twelve at the end of the year and several girls entered as soloists. Selected groups sang at various places and a concert was presented in the Spring. Prcaizlwit Top Row: Hundley. Webber, Fletcher. Harris, Tramp, K. Smith, B. Smith, Stiven, Britt, Leonard. Fourth Row: l'offnn1n, Neer, Price, Vance. Kemp, Miller, Brown, Bauer, Steffy, Sells, Moomau. Third Row: Mills. Thompson, Cole, Warrick, E. Rankin, Sinnott, Pflugmacher, Hollingsworth, Hill, Y Bratton, Tgowner, Wooleridge. V Sccfrnfl Row: Guard. German, Byers, Lee, Haines, Shaidoun, Scott, Craig, Olliverson, Stevens, Glad- ding. First Row: Whcrry, Blaisdell. Ilognns, Wyningcr, L0lll0ll, Ovcrgnrd, Fairchild, McCain, Hendricks, Young, Cooper. ? Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Une Hmzdrcd fl'wcnty-sim 5555555 BOYS' GLEE CLUB Last fall the Boys' Glee Club organized and elected the following officers: President .................. John Peacock Vice-President ............. Max Meadows Secretary-Treasurer ....... Marion Glendy Bill Browder worked as librarian and Virginia Church played the accompaniments the first semester. The accom- panist for the second semester was Mary Mills. The club is made up of about twenty-five boys who re- hearse every afternoon. A double quartet, made up of boys picked from the glee club, made a number of appearances throughout the year. They furnished a special music for club meetings and sang at different churches. Virginia JOHN I,EM0"K' fllll1I'Cl1 accompanied the boys the first semester and Van Dusen Kennedy played for them the second semester. The boys' glee club was entered in the Conference meet of the Big Twelve. Vocal soloists also entered the contest this spring. On various occasions the entire club furnished music for events at school and holiday programs in town. Plans were made to give programs at the grade schools and Thornburn. There were possibilities that the club would broadcast. Aside from the enjoyment derived from singing, the boys feel that time spent in the Glee Club has proved of value. They have received excellent train- ing and an appreciation for good music under the able leadership of Mr. Vierow. l'rf'Nfrlr'llt Top Irnzlz' Greenwell, l'hapinan, Kennedy. I'e:1eoek. Vie-row. Meadows. A. Smith, Wilson. Third l1'n14'.' XVorreIl. Linc-ieome-, li, Faust. llenwood. Anderson, Bourgois, Browder. Nc-cowl km:-.' Smith. N. Morgan, Glendy. Cooper, Rose, Newman. Miller, Hendricks. First Ifozr: Booker, Gray, IJ. Faust, Tiffin, Butts, Byard, GrofT, Buckles. 'I' '2' Q' 'U' 'D' 'D' 'E' One Hundred Twen y-seven 515-12111-5512: NATIONAL ORCHESTRA Urbana High was very Well represented in various lines of musical activity this year. In November the All-State Orchestra and Chorus assembled at the University and we had representatives in both groups. The North Central Division of the National High School orchestra met in Des Moines the third week in April. The orchestra was conducted by Dr. J. E. Maddy and Henri Verbrugghen. Elizabeth Bilsborrow, William Scovill, Van Dusen Kennedy, and Bob Hieronymous played in the orchestra. Summer sessions of the National Orchestra are held at the camp at Inter- lochen, and Urbana was represented here also. DOUBLE QUARTET Perhaps the most popular ensemble this year was the boys' double quartet. It was organized this fall under the direction of Mr. Vierow and appeared on programs throughout the year. The double quartet is made up of eight boys and two sing each part. They are Merill Leister and Newlin Morgan, first tenorsg Joe Carson and Gayle Hol- lingsworth, second tenorsg Bill Browder and Donald Faust, baritones, Max Meadows and Al Smith, basses. Virginia Church accompanied the singers the first semester and Van Dusen Kennedy played the accompaniment the second semester. SAXOPHONE SEXTET Last year the Saxophone Sextet proved so popular an ensemble that it was continued this year. Practically the same personnel was used this year and the sextet was composed of the following boys: Gene Weisige1', first altog Donald Alberts, second alto, VValter Still, third alto, Robert Gundlock, tenor, Chuck Anderson, baritoneg and Dale Harvey, bass. The sextet used t'Humoresque', by Dvorak, HSextet from Lucia," and L'Twilight in the Mountains" on their pro- grams. This music ensemble fitted in as entertainment tor various occasions. Gene Weisiger directed the group in rehearsal with Captain Overgard's and Mr. Vierow's help. Harvey, Anderson, Gundlock. Alberts, Still, Weisigcr i T 'J' 'Z' ? ? ? 'I' One Humlrvd Twriziy-eiglzt b bbb STRING QUINTET Early in the fall several orchestra members organized the string quintet. The ensemble consisted of one instrument from each section of the orchestra Hlld the personnel was as follows: Rachel Smith, first violing Miriam Savage, second violin, Leonard Sanders, violag Ruth Mosher, cellog and Elizabeth Bilsborrow, bass. Captain Overgard and Mr. Vierow trained the quintet. This small en- semble proved very popular for furnishing music for banquets, playing in small rooms and between acts of plays. Those in the quintet received much valuable playing experience, and at the same time got a great deal of enjoyment from it. HORN QUARTET Ensembles composed of players from one section of the band or orchestra were a new development this year. One of the prominent organizations of this type was the horn quartet. The four horns playing in parts proved very etfec- tive and the ensemble was well received. The boys in the horn quartet were: Williani DeTurk. Robert Yapp, Donald Oehmke, and George McCoy. They entered their ensemble in the state contest in April. Captain 'Overgard and Bill Scovill coached the boys in their interpref tation of their contest number. WOODWIND QUINTET The woodwind ensemble was one of last year ls groups which continued work this year. Two of tl1e players in last year's quintet, which won the na- tional contest, played this year. They were Van Dusen Kennedy, bassoon, and Bill Scovill, French horn. The new members of the group were Miriam Savage, oboe: Elizabeth Bilsborrow, clarinet, and Bob Hieronymus, flute. The number used in the state contest was 'tScherzo" from HViertes Quin- tet" by Soluck. The quintet played on the program at Monticello. Under the direction of Mr. Vierow and Captain Overgard tl1e players de- rived a great deal ot pleasure from their music. Him-ronymus, Savage, Scovill, Kennedy. Bilsborrow T' Q 'E' ? 'E' 'E' ? One Ilundred Twenty-nine 555555-2- DOROTHY VERNON OF HADDON HALL From year to year the dramatic classes have advanced from the simple three act plays to the more complicated four act dramas. "Dorothy Vernon of Had- don Hallu was the most difficult play ever attempted by the high school, but it turned out to be the greatest success. Both the matinee and evening perform- ances were staged without a flaw. A great deal of time and care was spent on the scenery, and the result was a beautiful and very picturesque stage setting. The school electricians were re- sponsible for the splendid lighting effects. "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall" was a historical play, taking place dur- ing the reign of Queen Elizabeth. The first and fourth acts were staged on the terrace of an old English castle. The second and fourth acts were set in the interior of Haddon Hall and Rutland Castle. The costumes, together with the supreme acting made the play far above the average high school theatrical. From Queen Elizabeth in all her majestic splendor down to the greasy aproned kitchen boy, all were arrayed in complete costumes befitting an ancient English court. The part of Dorothy Vernon as played by Eugenia Freemon was exceptionally well done. Eugenia put her own vivaciousness and wit into the part that so well fitted her in a way that thoroughly charmed her audience. Oretha Pierce with her poise and splendid carriage made Queen Elizabeth much more than a mere figure in history. The hero, taken by Gordon Faulkner, seemed very much alive and able to cope with the dangerous situations. Gordon, with his athletic and well built physique. made a good appearance in his doublet and hose. The entire cast included: Eugenia Freemon, Gordon Faulkner, Morre'l Bar- ber, Corabel Lowman, Oretha Pierce, Esther Speck, Newton Walke1', John Pea- cock, Bob Bowditch, Olin Browder, Miriam Noel, John Barth, Hildalice Saddoris, Mary Jo Scovill, and Charlotte Beard. But no matter how good a cast, the play would never be a success without the excellent coaching of Mrs. Hamilton. i i l r 'P' 'Q' 'D' 'S' Hi' Hi' 'S' Ono Hunflrcrl Th irty dniifnnhnf-L5 STUNT SHOW The Hrst Stunt Show in three years was held at Urbana High School, Thurs- day evening, February 12. Competition was very keen and many feel that it should be made an annual affair. The Sophomores, who presented the winning stunt, "Beauty A La Carte," had an exceedingly clever and original idea. The setting was in a beauty shop at midnight which was carried out in detail. One of the most outstanding features of the act was the dialogue, it was exceptionally good. There were lots of takeotfs on people around school. The advisers for the Sophomore act were Miss Brownell, McClurg, Woocl, Miss Lawson, Mr. Hallam, and Mr. Tilbury. The Sophomores will have their name engraved on a silver shield. The Freshman stunt was called 'tShades of Barnum and Bailey." The clowns were especially cute and the features were excellent. The Faculty ad- visers were Miss VVebber, Miss Biedermann. Mr. Murphy, Thomas, Mr. Nolen, Mr. Boyd, and Mr. James. Many felt after the first stunt that the Seniors would win. The theme was so different and the skeletons and ghosts made shivers run up and down your spine. The name of it was 'LCurriculitis." The advisers were Nelson, Miss Rompel, Johnson, Miss Bullock, and Mr. Horner. The Junior stunt, "Cutl Shoot! Cut!" was the dress rehearsal. for a movie in Hollywood. The scene was in a cabaret. The setting of this stunt was quite effective. The huge black cat with blinking red eyes, tl1e paper hats, balloons, confetti and serpentine added greatly to the presentation. A great deal of credit was due not only to the people who actually appeared on the stage, but to the committees who set the stage, helped with costumes, and to the teachers who spent so much time supervising practices, training choruses and finding new ideas. Eyerley served as general chairman of all the stunts. She had a difficult task but was quite successful iu her management of the pro- duction. T 'S' 'I' Fi' 'E' E' T' One Hundred Thirty-one 5615515515 JUNIOR PLAY In place of the annual Junior Orph, the Junior class staged a play entitled, "Mummy and the Mumpsf' This production was given for the purpose of rais- ing money to finance the Junior-Senior Reception. Out of the entire cast of ten characters, eight made their Hrst appearance as actors. The play was a first class comedy and all the characters certainly did their part to make it a success. The cast of characters included: David Lincicome, George Phillips, John Peacock, Newton Walker, Lawrence Greenwell, Fern Nelson, Catherine Corkery, Elinor Nixon, Betty Thomas, and Bernice Quinton. The setting is laid in a girls' school. Miss Agatha. Laidlow, the principal, is expecting Sir Hector Fish, a noted scien- tist. He arrives in a mummy case to avoid being quarantined for the mumps. He remains in hiding because someone is impersonating him who is in love with one of the students. Things become complicated, mainly through the stupidity of Racker, man of all work. But in the end everything is straightened out and the right couples are united. SENIOR PLAY A three-act comedy, "Jonesy," by Anne Morrison and Peter Hookey was chosen as this year's Senior play. It was a success in 1929 when produced at the Bijou Theater in New York. The title role, Wilbur Jones, was taken by Olin Browder. Eugenia Freemon as Diana Devereaux, the leading feminine role, was charming. Mrs. Jones was played by Oretha Pierce, Anna Jones by Susan Anderson, and Henry Jones by Robert Bowditch. Pat Busey as Mildred Ellis, Walter Still as Billy Morgan, and Morell Barber in the role of Stanley Jackson were capable interpreters of their parts. The entire cast was excellent and presented a finished performance. Wilbur Jones has just come home from college and he falls in love with the ingenue of the local stock company. The efforts of his family to prevent an elope- ment result in many amusing and embarrassing situations. The modern costumes contributed to the success of the play. Good staging and lighting completed a fine presentation of an entertaining comedy. FACULTY PLAY - "Skinner's Dress Suit" was presented by the faculty on December 10, in the High School Auditorium. The cast included "Honey Rutherford" played by Miss Lair who was successful in winning her man after she had helped him achieve success. The hero, Skinner, was played by Mr. Hallam. His employers were McLaughlin and Perkins, Mr. Hornor taking the part of Mr. Mcliaughlin, and Mr. Nolen the part of Perkins. Mr. Briggs, salesman for the firm, was Mr. Eugene Schroth. The last member of the office force was the office boy, Tommy, played by Mr. James. Mrs. McLaughlin was played by Miss McClurg. Mrs. Colby, a wealthy social leader, played by Miss Ricketts, and Miss Colby played by Miss VVebber gave a charity fete, Where Skinner made his first appearance in society. Miss Brownell, Miss Bullock, and Miss Mowrey were guests at the fete. Mr. Jackson, portrayed by Mr. Tilbury was the dissatisfied business man. His wife, Coral, played by Miss Fisher was a "rough diamond" who wanted to get into society. Mrs. Hamilton coached the play and she deserved much credit for the performance. P-Q'-:--:--Q--u:--Q-'cr One Hzmdrrd Thirty-two 1 5511-2-LLL DEBATE Soon after the Christmas holidays, try-outs were held for the varsity de- bating teams, witl1 the English instructors of our faculty acting as judges. Those chosen for the affirmative team were, in order of their . speeches: Lawrence Greenwell, Mary Ritcher, and Ruth Mosher. The negative team included Karlton Kemp, Martha Rose McCown, and John Peacock with Rhoena Jones as alter- nate. The question for debate, as chosen by Big Twelve coaches was: Resolved: That Chain Stores Are Detrimental to the Community. This question is one of great importance and is widely discussed at the present time. The negative team lost its first encounter to Danville by LORENE MIR, the decisive score of 4-1, in our auditorium on March 18. Ur- Debuts bana was at a disadvantage, having an entirely inexperienced team, while the Danville team was composed of veterans. Our team, having the burden of the proof, was unable to successfully refute the strong arguments presented against the chain store by the Danville team. On March 19 our affirmative team met Champaign 's negative team at Cham- paign High School. The decision was close with a. score of 3-2 in favor of Cham- paign. The affirmative side of this question is extremely hard to defend because it is very difficult to find statements of sufficient authority against the chain store system. Both teams were inexperienced in debating, and although defeated they made a fine showing. Miss Lorene Lair has been our competent coach for the past three years. VVe owe much to her for the help that she has given ns. 77,11 Ii'nu': Grew-11w+-ll. Kemp. Lair. Pr-new-lc. First Irrnc: Ritz-her, MeCown, Mosher, Jones. Hi' T 'D' 'E' 'P Q' 'J' T Ono Hundred Thirty-three Ln!nLbL.Ln!u ORATORICAL CONTEST Every year an oratorical contest is held at the state convention of the Build- ing and Loan Association. Each participant must write and deliver his own five minute oration on some phase of the Building and Loan work. During past years Urbana. High has always placed high in this contest. This year Olin Browder upheld this record and won another victory for the school at Freeport on October 14. He was presented with a beautiful loving cup by Eu- genia Freemon who won the contest in Springfield last year. The national meet this year is to be held in Philadelphia sometime during the summer. Olin is a talented speaker and we expect to hear more of him in the future. The contestants are under the direction of Mrs. H. H. Hamilton. BIG TWELVE CONTEST The Big Twelve Contest for 1931 was held in Mattoon on April 17. This year, as always, Urbana High School contestants received high honors. Olin Browder received first in oration. Eugenia Freemon was given first place in extemporaneous speaking and second in interpretative reading. First place in dramatic reading was won by Budgie Spearling. Urbana High has reason to be proud of these people and we only hope to maintain this high standard in the future. Students of Urbana. High School have reason to be proud of their public speaking department. Real talent is discovered in these classes. Pupils receive valuable training in thinking and learn to express themselves clearly. It is usually from this department that the people are chosen to represent the school in various contests. Mrs. Hamilton is the able instructor of these classes. She is a great deal more than " just a teacher" to those who know her. Public speaking is a thing of vast importance and benefit to every indi- vidual, and the boy or girl who goes through school without enrolling in some type of public speaking course is neglecting an important phase of his educa- tion which will be of real value throughout life. STYLE SHOW For the past three years the Rosemary staff has sponsored the presentation of the fall style show. Urbana merchants have cooperated willingly and fur- nished the latest clothes to be modeled by high school students. This year tl1e setting for the models was a garden. The fall colors used in the decorations set oif the models and were also appropriate for the entertainment. Urbana stores which participated in the style show were Kline's, Mont- gomery Ward and Company, Sholem's Shoe Store, Harry Little and Company, and Lowenstern's. Brash Flower Shop, Prehn's, and Montgomery Ward loaned furniture and palms to complete the stage. Special features were presented by Frances Portman, Betty Rowland, Mary Belle Carpenter, Lawrence Smith and Stanley Chapman, Wilma. Brown, and Mary Birely. Wilma Brown, Jean Peabody, and Betty Moomau were the ac- companists. Those who have attended the style shows have enjoyed them fully and declared each better than the one before. S 'C' ? 'Z' W 'D' ? T Ono Hfinzrlrml Thirty-four ' Wiih Zhmr uvvz mm ann' lhfir war ear , , . , , ' 4 ' 'g Wfilflly glllvriwg ul I'll!'Il othnrg In 1lIc"l:7'fIII1l'N .wtvrw llf'filIf'lN'PN, ln Ihmfr hcaffls the fouds nfl1g6S. N F , MS, 'I 1-'1 , .- Y ,Ty f 5- 1 lu '5 ev 5 n '1- f 12 M ,,., ,, J-I V.. .ga x Q. i E . f, -. . 41.1 3, .Q w ' f ,4- iii M 1 JM' QQ! 4 A 5, ,, ?"tf1' X if: 4. 2 a' L, 'x 1 'I r + 1-, 7' , 3 F ' -A 47' V, 1- . S T931 .. , iivi H V. :iii- X " . ' km A . , ,b v J Y 3 EY? f L. 'fb , --1139. -rr , E ., f H., G-s , 9-Q-E' an fin 5 L fr ! , - I. .x ,LE X FT -1 Ash, . 1 1, Aka S . ,, 1 Q r ,...,-' rw . ii W . iq., .1, I- '- r -F :" Km! QQ ffl 3,1 , - Q 1 4. 12 'V 574 '- 'w FA 2 . 1 iz? 1. 551115555 SEPTEMBER Monday, 8 Happy days are here again! A new school year begins. NVednesday, 10 Mass meeting held. Echo campaign. 1 930-3 I CALENDAR 4 eg "'v fa M JD l l A 7? 1 f IN KQJ, nl , l I I Q, -3 gf Sis? P' f ,Xi M EC y " 'Sly f Z! ' 5 fm C f 41 ff i XJ 59 , 4 12 0 , N f f f ? OCTOBER Friday, 10 Strut Miss Lizzie! Annual Fall Style Show. Friday, 17 What a break! No school. f, f " fiuiiix ff, ff 'f-2 fax fx? me ,HL Q - 8 cl " M0l1d3y,. 15 ,lag 1 " 'gg Wednesday, 22 Oh, girls! ' i ' KSSIX W Misery tickets! The neyv music in- I 0 QQ 2 'port cards. s rue or. Q - -311 ...IBF 213-Xxx Q 7 mf ,k Saturday, 20 9557332 Saturday, 25 Nice start, gang! if wg A Tfmgh! f00 bad! I Urbana 12, Taylor- fx 5 Urlagna 6, P ekin ville 7. l M' 5 Si ' - PQ il 3 cial fx k 25. fy! , Tuesday, 23 i- VV .F I 18 A Tllf3Sll3y7 Big Politicians be- 4. ' lg, ' lf! " ' 1,1-3' Check and D011- gin Work. li ,MMG ff: A 7. ble Check." Elect Class Ofagfgrg. 1 BOOTH ' 'I M Balld ll?lS 3 tllealfe . CEI 1 1 W' party. in 2! C, .L . . A ., , y .i 1 qw " i w Friday, 31 53!l!1'd33'f 27 ' ff!! What a fish story! 11033 PSP! J!-15 , R. M. Zimmerman Lrbana 6, Decatur -QE, - relates experi, 6' , ,, G 'G ences on "Bot- cn Sip tom of Sea." , Q -J Cb SN- 15 ?'i"?'i'!i'?? One Hundred Thirty-seven nhbiiflbnfn NOVEMBER Saturday, 1 Just a tough break! Urbana 0, Peoria 6. Thursday, 6 Help the library! Book campaign un- der the auspices of the Stude11t Council. Yvednesday, 12 S p lend id Work, Juniors ! "Mummy and the Mumps. " Thursday, 20 Delta Sigma initi- ates display talent. YVednesday, 26 Real entertain- ment! Bennie Oosterbaan speaks for spe- cial assembly. 73" Ex- We ,rr I. 'V .fc 5' P? Q5 ' x l ff ' I A ...i lll XV! ' , I -1 1 llnl In I Fr . I ,' L.. S.. ' --El 1 ml f - , I l 'l"I G92 4.1 y fi ,ral , ,- if f' f 'X jr- .K I fa l , 3. V .ri ,f 42 Q f ' : 'f ,. K ' L V f f K. ,jakmvzzynlll 0 . in W 1 "? , :wi i . SSE ' llll 'lla 3 :fig I!! , I 3 f 7 , yi ,4- 2 rl! - ll! on lx I llirp K KT 1 fi - ff j f 6-N 'V . ar X :ey 1, ,, : K X i rf! ij U aff? y ff? .I ff 1151, ? e a Z!!! as E9 5 'K W If S-:Z ag 3 . Tliursday, 27 Gems sw Almost! VH-'ll get ' S 'em next year! ,,-- I I -1 Urbana 0, Cliam- , "'0 l paign 0. l i , lm- 5454, E, Q SWB il"' g5 5,4 DECEMBER Monday, 1 Boom! Rosemary c am- paign begins. Friday, 5 Campaign ends. Rosemary hop. Friday, 12 VVham! Wham! Delta Sigma initia- tion. Hop and dinner. Saturday, 13 Every Roman cele- b r a t e s at the Latin Club par- v ty. Sunday, 14 Music in the air! U. H. S. band gives concert at the University. Friday, 19 Vacation begins Whoopee ! T?? Our' Ilundrrd Thirty-night ?"IF?'2' TANU ARK Ooh! new neekties and searfs. New Principal, S. B. Hadden, arrives. L D A? :S 47145: .f i ' fl xv " X x. . 'x N 'I V 'i'lN FEBRUARY Oh Boy! Another special assembly. Major J. J. Hill. L L L L L L 5 I A A Y Q YZ Z 1 Monday, 5 X12 5, Y' Tuesday, 3 I + I Fi x X T 'I 4 S viral 1 7f ' if Friday, 9 G. 11. HO17. Music everywhere! Orchestra camp lee- ture i11 assembly. Saturday, 10 Yea Urbana! Urbana 25, Peoria Central 18. Tuesday, 13 Z ar f C .54 If s 'f Z H .44 -2 JL. W le D "ii 9. Q -L, S 5.1 'f 4--' 9 . zu' Friday, 6 VVho's afraid of Champaign 'Z Urbana 28, Cham- paign 17. Thursday, 12 Three cheers, Sophomores I Stunt Show. Saturday, 14 Perm' Sillaille' HS- U Never mindg it's Sembly- . 1 4' c-X-gf ' only the first. A , 1, x . nother vietory.. is if X 'QD V Urbana 117 Deca- Uihiana 20, Pekin -I ' ' tukr 20, . 7 - A Zhw '4 av-nv 1 I ' f I 3 X355 tUUi'PE7L SHO Friday, 16 :ck ,A "M lim' I VVednesday, 18 A good lead, fel- i My W Sueh original an- lows! rf ., ties! Urbana 13. Dan- gg ,. I Lil X Puppet Show by ville 12. -Q Art Class. 1 , N J .Lv A I . iii- , fff '? ' V f. Saturday, 31 GU Q Q Tuesday, 24 S ff! WWA Y l 1 Hurrah I Exams M vff ag pig! BUD - BUY- ' Over, A WSI? Magazine Drive S. K. Dance. Q f'A SP011S01'ed by , i ! 4 f Student Council. I Ono Ilumlrcd Thirty-nine Lbbnfnnfnbb .5 V MARCH 1 APRIL 1' Extra! Extra! f 13' im 1 S . Urbana wins Dis- Q- l X' Eprmg Sonmits' trict Tourney. 'ling aster acatlon' .Q ' s .. X Ni I l 4 N L -.1.. .-I e , ' 'tx Ill' IIWHI I H - I J Wednesday' 8 Monday, 9 Q' Q XX . Q , - . - 7 Good for Urbana! M fm f gf ffjff1QHf2'1,- Rosemary Dummy W' . ' li iiworld Citizen- f0llDd. -T, gf 1. '15 f Shiphrr H- T T: S I i l A ' S Weclliesclay, 11 If 1 ' no J N lt's all ri0'ht, fel- ,, f ' Friday, 10 lows. U 'H' . Tra la la! Lost Sectional ' w Delta Sig Spring Tournament. ff J - Hop. f - " x f 0 X l 5 Q Monday. 20 Q4 , Q E , Some jazz orches- I 'fre 'g l Frlclay' 17. N 'P . 4 1 Y tra! C Q 211 Q g1PlS.'G1TlS. H Glee Club Hop. ' -4 X AP1'1l Pagefmt- ,I I, C LJ Y' I- 'X K ' ,mf . - . Thursday, 23 . LAWN? "lf .. Q " Nice going! ,. ,JZ fill' Saturday, 18 Basketball boys re- W 'll' L I 5 1-2-3-4 ceive 'tU7s" in 1 314 ', '.-ES' 2' Quadrangula r assembly. if , Track Meet- 'fv KL -f-1-" 1' .V,z,,fq ' " F1iHE"'ilI1i7' .,. .- ,, gn-- xx ' Friday, 24 ' WB Thursday, 23 LAD. ' , V 1 Q65 , ' li A , State Band Contest orf thy ernol N Q X , , ofHaddenHa.ll." ff hw LQ' Wolodwllld Qumtet Keen P1-oduetion. . J 35566 for second '5 -Q ' -7 ' . ' fly if TTT'???'i' One Ilundrcll Forly fnin!-f-LLL MAY Record broken ! Urbana takes Big 12 Track Meet Monday, 4 Vllith pleasure! Trophy presented to school. NVednesday, 13 Great ceremony! Honor Society ln- itiation. Tuesday, 26 Vllould you believe it? Rosemary goes to press. Thursday, 28 Kids again ! Senior brea kfast by S. K. Friday, 29 '4Jonesy" - Sen- ior Play! Some show. - J .rv-Sm B sign Q F,fF-R LG by al' .5 Q iw' JUNE Really! Only seven more days! Sunday, 7 VVe stroll sedately down the aisle. Baccalaureate ! Monday. 8 Such misery ! Exams- 'nuf said ! Wednesday, 10 It 's over! Last day of school! Friday, 12 How exciting! Connneneeinent ! ! ! Saturday, 13 Can it really be true? Y'lT ? 'S' ? ? ? One Ilzmdred Forty-one A L A 5 :Eu L 5 U. H. S. SONGS AND YELLS ORANGE AND BLACK With loyal hearts we pledge you, Our heroes of the field, We will cheer you on to victory, With a faith that ne'er will yield. Tho' our foes may seem o'erwhelming Tho' hostile voices ring, With that old Urbana pep we'll triumph as we sing CHORUS To you we're always faithful, Urbana High With all our hearts we cheer For you and that good old football line we 'll back, so Fling out your colors of the Orange and Black, You're the fairest, bravest in the land, Urbana High. HAIL TO URBANA There is a flame right in my heart, It grows brighter each day, It leans to you, Urbana High, It points no other way. "Oh ye who gladly learn and teach May there ever be Moral virtue in your speechi' And truest loyalty! CHORUS Hail to Urbana-here's our heart and hand, With the Orange and the Black For you we'll always stand. U! Rah! Rah! Though our foes be sturdy, May there never be- Shameful cowardly defeat But righteous victory! ON URBANA On Urbana! On Urbana! Plunge right through that line, Run the ball clear 'round Champaign, A touchdown sure this time! On Urbana! On Urbana! Fight on for her fame, Fight, fellows, iight, tight, fight, We 'll win this game. i T Hi" 'E' T Q T T One Hundred Forty-two Giambi-Babb I'M STRONG FOR URBANA I'm strong for Urbana, U-1'-b-a-n-a High, The girls are the fairest, the boys are the squarest, Of any old place that I know. I'1n strong for Urbana, the place where the breezes blow, No matter the weather, Weill all stick together, For U-r-b-a.-n-a High. HERE 'S T0 URBANA Here 's to Urbana-the high school with go, No other team can stop our marching on to goal, We fight and our spirits are always on high, We win for our Alma Mater, Urbana High. Urbana! Urbana! Rah! Rah! Urbana! Urbana! Rah! Rah! Who rah! Who rah! Urbana High School-rah! rah! rah! Oskee-wow-wow Skinny-wow-wow Urbana ! Urbana ! Yea ! Clap! Clap! Who-wah-wah! Who-wah-wah! Clap! Clap! Who-wah-wah! Who-wah-wah! Clap! Clap! VVho-wah-wah! Who-wah-wah! Urbana! Urbana! Yea! Rah, rah, rah, rah, Urbana High, Urbana High Rah, rah, rah, rah, Urbana High, Urbana High Rah, rah, rah, rah, Urbana High, Urbana High Yea! Rah! Rah !-Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah !-Rah! Rah! Rah! , Rah! Rah !-Rah! Rah! Rah! Urbana ! Urbana ! Yea ! Fight 'em, Urbana, fight 'em! Fight 'em, Urbana., fight 'eml Oskee-wow-wow ! skinny-wow-wow ! Fight 'em, Urbana, fight 'em! Yea team! Yea team! Fight! Fight! Fight! T T W' 'D' 'i' E' 'D' One Humlred Forty-three Lnfnfnb-2:1215 P T T T TV ? ? 'P O II d dForfy-four Leslie Hamilton .... L L dui Lied John Amerman .... Virginia Apperson-- Vincent Ball .................. -.- Vivian Ball .................. Betty Bauer ....... Verna Bielefeld .... Cleo Booker ..... --- .............. ----.--- ----- JUNIORS An all around athlete. ------------Where's Maxine? A dignified young man. -----------------------------A faithful friend. A future Prima Donna. A shy, meek, little maiden. Shy too,--Ambition: none. Ruth Brennan ........................................ A petite little maid. Harold Bourgois .................................... A good match for Verna. Christine Buchholz ............................... Timid, but likes a good time. Wilma Brown ........................ .... I f music be the food of love, play on. Eugene Butts ................... - ........................... An Evangelist. Harold Cates .................................. Would sooner ride than study. Richard Childs ....................... ,. ................. An aspiring chemist. Virgil Clements ............................... ..- .............. Non-studious. Rosemary Coldwell ............................... Never seen without Roberta. Marcus Cord ....................................... Tinkle, tinkle, little coins. Catherine Corkery .................. - .................. l like chemistry-yes? Olive Crawford .......................... .- .................... A good sport. Fern Dey ............................................. Still water runs deep. Ruth- Dunn ................................... -. ............... Mifschievous. Mabel Dyson ................................................ A good worker. Dorothy Edwards ........................... She makes snap pages-and how! Roberta Elvis ........................................ As great as her height. Thelma Empson ...................... .- .................. Life is full of fun. Edith Erickson ............................ Don't hide your light under a bush. Gordon Evans ............................ -. .............. A second Ichabod. James Fagaly ............................... ,- .......... Golf bug number 3. Helen Ferris ................................................ Shy and quiet. Pauline Floro ................................. .- .................... Quiet? Audrey Frank ............................ Eleanor Fruit-.- .............................. Avis Gaffney ...... ----A Hatchet Orator of distinction. - A brilliant mind, a Hash ot wit. -------------------Charming. John Fuzak .............................................. A basketball star. Carol Gauble ..................... - ........ ................. H appy. Margaret Gault ......................... .. .................... Yeah, Juniors! Florence Gerhardt .................... .. ........................ Oh, so quiet! Fern German ......................................... An aspiring musician. Elizabeth Goble .................. ............................ O h, Bernie. Norma Gourley ......................................... -Tell us some more. Ruth Green ........ .. ..................... - ................ Watch that curb! Lawrence Greenwell ................... ......,............-.. A book worm, Floyd Greisel ........ ......................................... O h, girruls. Elizabeth Gundlock ............ ................................. T rue blue. Russell Hackleman .......................... A large quantity of good material. Marie Mary Hatler .......... - .................. Hilburn .............................. Another basketball star. ------Oh, that car! -------------An aspiring actress. Elton H111 .............. ................. . .- - ........ Golf bug number 1. Pearl Hoffee ............................-.................. ,-Golden locks. Marie Hogans .................................... ............. A lways busy, Gayle Hollingsworth ................ -. .................. ,...,.. O ur President, David Hubbard -.-..-........................... ...... A good mathematician. Bernard Johnson ............... ..........-..................... T he Sheik, J0hI1 LaSell -.......--...........-............... ............. A happy pest. Irene L60l1aI'd ..--.....-.-...................... ........ Q uite an undertaker. David Lincicome ........................ .- .... - ....,, ..., - ,-Quite 3 mummy! Frederic L66 ---------.--.-..-......... These Americans are so bloomin' speedy. Irma LOI1g -......-..-................ ........................ H alf of twins. Arline Medsker .............. .,.,....,-...,.,,,.,-,,,,-,--,-,- A wful nige, 'S' W ? ? ? W ? S Onr Hundred Forty-five 115155151515 ninhnhnhnfnninfn Mary Miller ....... Charles Moore ............................ Max Morris ....... Ruth Mosher ...... Marjorie Mullen .... Mildred McDevitt ........................ - ......... Ione McGahey ..... Adah Mclnnes ..... Fern Nelson ............................ --- Gertrude Parker .................... John Peacock ..... George Phillips .......... Elinore Nixon ...... Lawrence Phillips-- --Small, sweet and smart. -A's -ZiiiiiiziziiiiziiiQuiet: Worth her weight in gold. Always ready to help. -----------A true friend. -----Always wears a smile. A very quiet little maiden. ---------A good speaker. -An intelligent girl. -------------Ideal. -------------------------------------Sophisticated. ---------------------No make up. A good man when awake. Frances Portman .................................. Yea, Deedee-some dancer. Charles Porter ....................................... A chip off the old block. Marjorie Prucha. .......................... Oh, for a boy friend with a Buick car. Bernice Quinton ............. . ................... The girl from Monkey Ward's. Irene Rebman ................ -. .......................-............. Dainty. Carolyn Riley .............................................. One swell artist. Davie Roberts ............ -. .......... ......... .............. W h o is he now? Rex Roberts ............................................. Least out, not last. Martha Roney ............................................. Any mail today? Elizabeth Russell ........................................... Oh, those dates! Byron Sanders ......................... -...... ......... T 0 o smart for words. Miriam Savage .......................................... A swell oboe player. Harvey Schamahorn ............... Edward Schaede--- It's all in the name. ---A future banker. Robert Schumacher -.----- .-.--.---.-.---...-.---.-....----....- C ave man. Mary Jo Scovill --.-...-.--.-------...----- -. -..-----....-.. A willing worker. Therman Sears ---------------------------------.-.--.-------- Football man. Maurice Shroyer .----.----.--.--.-. - ---.--.--.------.-..---. Horses! Horses! Claude Shumate -------.---------.---------.---.--- Future farmer of America. Don Silver ---------.---.-.--.--------.------- A good man-when he grows up. Paul Simpson ----.-.-----.---.--.---------.----- Do you know Miniature Golf? Al Smith ---------------..----- --.--...-.-..--- N obody knows how dry I am. Harold Smith ---------.--.----.--- - -.----- Pretty big horn for such a little boy. Junior Smith ------.--.-..---..--.--.-.----.---.-----.-.------- Why worry? Mabel Smith ------...------.------...-.--.--.-------------- Shy little maid. Marjorie Smith -----------------.-----.---.-----.--- One of the Smith Family. Rob-ert Statelar -...-.-.....-..--.-..-..-..-..-.-..-.-..- ---Turtle in a shelf. Naomi Steffy ---------.--..-.--.--.-.----.-..-.-- - .--. Oh, Lowell! here I ami Paul Stier .---..-----.-..--..--.....-...--.--.-.---.--.--- The typing shark. Betty Thomas ---.----------.-.-..-.-..---.---.---------- Buy "Phillip's 66.i' Kenneth Thomas ----..----..-.---. Blushes-not always convenient but beautiful. Marjorie Thompson ...............................------- A maid from Philo. Ihleen Tramp -----..----.--..--- Oh me, how weak a thing the heart of woman is. Ralph Waldron ----.-.-.----.--.--------.--.-------.----- "Vagabond Lover." Newton Walker ------------------.--.--.-.------.-----.-------- "The Fool." Charles Wertz ...........-.................-.-.-...-..-. A cracked little nut. Betty West ..-.---.........-...-....-.....--.-...- A little dash of powder-. Helen Wherry .... -. ..-.......-.--.......-......----. Temperamental musician. Lois West -.--...-.....-... ...-. - -.-...-...--. ---.-.-. L a ugh, Clown, Laugh! Don Wikoff -.-.....-..-..--.--.-.--.--.--.-...----.-- Tomorrow's undertaker. VVi1da Warrick --..-....--.-..-.--..-..------..--.--- How does my hair look? John Williams ...........-...--.........-....----.-.-..-- -A second Einstein. Velvia Winn ...........................-..-..--...-.- Who's who in America. Eva Winters -.-----------.--.-----------..------------ ----------- T oo cold, Jay Worrel ..-..-........-....-....-... .-............- A modest young man. Claude Wrather -.--.--.--....-.................---- .-..---- Y es, he'd rather. Ruth Wyninger- -- Marilee Young ---. ---------------------..--------------------------Chatter. ------------------------------A pleasing, timid little miss. WWWPWWTW One Hundred Forty-seven 5:5112-515512: -Q--QIH:--PI:--:--:P 0 d rl Forty-eight bin!-Lnhbi SOPHOMORES Donald Alberts ........... .. ................................. I should worry. Bernard Baker .................. - ............... A little slow but gets there. Herbert Appleman ..................................... One of our new boys. Eugene Antrium ........................................ The early bird C?J. John Banta .... -, ......................... Keep your hands out of your pocket. Mabel Barker .... Adelaide Bateman Bruce Benedict ........................ Eileen Bennett--- Josephine Bennett Russell Bielefield- ------------------------------------------Dear Lawrence. -------- ----------------------------------Sweet Adeline. ----------------------Tootsie-Boy! ----------------------.---------------------Shy but sweet. --------------------------------------------What a girl! -------------The faithful farmer boy. Marian Birdsell -..---.-..--- .-.----..-.... S till popular-as ever! Mary E. Blaisdell ---.---- -- .--.-.--.-.---.---.--.---.-.--- Bill H's date. James Bloom -.-..--.-------.--.-..--..-.-...-.-.....-. Jimmie-the scholar. Helen Bogan ------.-------..-.---.-.-----.--- Oh, that Sectional Tournament. Richard Bowers -..---.-..--..-.-.----- - --....-.-...-- Likes fun and friends. Frederick Brash .----.....-.-..---.--.---..-..-.----.- Now Freddie, behave! Leonard Brooks .----..-.----......--.-- If it's a weighty problem, give it to me. Harold Brownfield -------- -. ------ -, --.--.-.--.---.. Puts thumb tacks on seats. Millard 'Brumfield -..--..--.. --------------------------------------"La.rd." Raymond Bruno ---.-..-.-----.-.------...-.--- Gee, but I love to go to school. George Buckles .--.-..---.-.....-..-.--.....-.-. . -..-.-.--..-.-- Good caddy. Lottie Byers -.-.----.--.-.-.-...--.----.--..-..-....- Very quiet little blond. Gilbert Calder ------..----..------...-..-.---.--.-..-.---.--.---. Oh, hush. Leon Cardiff .-..--.--.-.-..-...------.---..-...-...-----.-.. A. little mouse. Leonard Cochrun .---.---------------...-. Teacher, what's my grade gonna be? Bernice Coffman .--.---.-.-...-..-.-.---......--.-. I'd rather dance than eat. Ruth Cogdal .--...-.--.--..-...-----..----.- A face most pleasant to look on. James Conerty -.--..--.-... ...- A big smile and a good disposition. Harold Craig .---..-.----.----.--- --..-..-..-.-------.-.- F ull of mischief. Hazel Dailey -----.....-..-...--.-.-.-..-..-.-.-.-.-.. Who's sweater, Hazel? Della Mae Davis ..--..-..-..--.-...--..---.--...--.--.---- And she may not. James Davis ---.--.--..-.--.---..--.--..--.------.-.--.---. A wiggle-worm. William De Turk .--.-..------..----...-....-.-.-.-..- Don't step on that bug. Dwayne Dixon -..---.---..--..-. ----- - - - ----- - --World's Champion tree-sitter. Austin Dyson .--.-........--.................---..---.-...----..- Bashfull Mary Dyson -.-......- ---.- ..-..-.-- Boys are never faithful. Margaret Edgar -..-...--.-..--..--..-.-.--..-... -. .---.----- Stewart's sister. Stewart Edgar -.--.... ..--.........-.......-...-.- P lays the piano and how! Lois Edwards ...-......-...-.--..-.-..-...-.-...-.--.--. Oh Gee, I like P. T. Thornton Elliott --.....--.-----...--.------..--..---.- I like a good joke too. William Fahey ................--............... -......-..-. I 'd hate to say. Lola Fairchild --.--.....-...........--...-. How sweetly sings the nightingale. Junior Flaningam .......-.-..-.....-.-.--.-...-....-.- I like a certain maid! Mary Fletcher .-.-.--.---.-----.-...------------ ---Eyes like velvet pansies. Elzalia Foltz ............................-......-. I like to have a good time. Hazel Foltz .-.-........-...-........-.--..- Studious? Yes but I like fun, too. Robert Frame --..........-..-...-..--.---......-.---.-- Basketball aspirant. Selywn Funk ......-.-.........-...............-. Life's a serious proposition. John Gaines ...........-...-..........-.... Makings of a good football player. Thais Gallivan .----------.-.-.-.--.---. George Gladding -.-.----.. Marion Glendy ----.-. -----------Now boys, quit teasing me. ------------------------A1l the world loves a lover. - ...... -...-. H e warbles sweet music. Dorothy Good --..--.--.--------.------.-.-.-.-.--..-----.---.- A good girl. Virginia Good ....-...-.---.---.---.--..----.--.. -------. A nother good girl, Jean Gollgler -......-...................... Charming, studious, and loves fun. Dorothy Greenwell---.---- .-.--.--.-.-.----.---.------ --Parlez-vous Francais? Walter Greishimer ......-.--.--....-.--..---- .-.-- G ood-natured, likes a joke, Lucille Gudgel .........................-...... Studies never worry me-much. 'i'??'i'??? One Hundred Forty-nine A 555555 Billy Guynn ................................................. A good scout. Robert Hacker ........... -.- .......... His voice was soft and low-a gentleman. Jane Hadden ........................................... Brown-eyed beauty. Bill Hamilton ................................ A good match for Mary Susan. Elberta Harmon ............................................ Very, very shy. Marjorie Harris ......................... May I have an excuse please, Mildred? Dale Harvey ........ -. ............................. Little boy with a big horn. Nellie Hays ............................... Next to chewing gum I like to talk. Clyde Hatter .............,.................................... Ding, dong. Ralph Hays ....................... ,. ........... . ..... Overshadowed by Nellie. Dick Heater ...................... If study interferes with play than hang study! Rolland Hendricks ................. Oh to be an aviator, a soaring in the clouds. Betty Hill ........................................ Nice eyes and a nice girl. Joe Hindman ............ .. ................ .- ........... ---Latin is my forte. Louise Hollingsworth .......... ,. ......... .. .................... Modesty itself. Elaine Hood ............................ To paint a picture's a delightful thing. Leon Horn ..................................................... Alibi Bill. Elizabeth Horton ....................... . ........................ Sings well. John Hudson ......................... If I didn't stutter maybe I'd recite more. Lyle Hutton .......................................... A-hunting I would go. Vanetta Jackson ..... -----------------------------------A deep dark secret. Gerald James ........... - ............... A little brilliantine on that stray lock. Milton Johnson ......................................... Oh, for a nice nap! Mary Grace Jordan ....................................... A sweet little girl. Charles Keller ............................................ Urbana! Urbana! Chester Keller ............................ ..................... R ah! Rah! Paul Kell-ey ................................................. A lot of noise. Leroy Kelley .................................. -. .......... A great big tease. Martin Kimpel ............................................. A great blusher. Emmett Kirby .......................... Give me a good farm and I'll be happy. Mabel Kirby ................................ I want to be a farmer's wife HJ. Betty Ann Knight ...................................... Any errands to run? Edna Koller ....................,....... True, honest, pleasant and dependable. Myrna Kuster ............................... Do we get out ninth hour today? Marie Lakey ............................................... I like Home Ec. Glenn Mansfield .................................... Be careful with that car. Clara Marriott ....................................... A sweet country maid. Max Meadows ........ .- ....... -. .......................... A good stage hand. Earl Meenach ................................... Not only women like to talk. Wallace Miles ....................................... Jack and the Beanstalk. Barbara Miller ........................................ A curly headed blond. Mary Mills ............... - ...................................... Cheerful. Robert Mitchell ...................... A younger brother with fame yet to come. Earnest Milinert ................................ Gardening 'makes him strong. Bertha Moore ...........................................-...... Big Bertha. Kathleen Moore ............................................ A slip of a girl. Quentin Morgan ........................................... Newlin's brother. Elizabeth Mullin .......................................... O, you geometry. Jessie Murdock ................................................... A blond. Eleanor McCain ....................................... Eleanors are brilliant. George McCoy ................................................ What a gun. Anna McDade .......................... Most Annas are quiet and shy, are you? Opal McGath ............................................ Quit your teasing. Melvin McLaughlin ............... .. ............................... Speak up. Harriett McLean ................-................. - ............. Oh, mama! Donald Oehmke ..................................... An aspiring horn player. Nellie Parker .............................. ............ A nother nurse maid. William Paul ......................................-. William the Conqueror? Cassell Payne ......................... .-- ............. Promising football star. Elizabeth Piiugmacher ....... -. .................. -. .... ---Th-e name's too short. Pauline Phillips .......................... - ........ Spearmint or Juicy Fruit? Ono l Fi y TTT??'2' Linibbbnfn THE WORLD!S LARGEST BLEACHER INSTALLATION 0 QKQJWIII ILIEAQIHI IE IRS This photograph shows KNOCKDOWN Bleachers of more than 52,000 seating capacity at Soldier Field, Chicago. These bleachers were used for the first time for the Army-Navy game in 1926 and have been used each season since that time. You will find KNOCKDOVVN Bleachers in very many of the High Schools and Colleges throughout the United States and Canada. Urbana High School uses these bleachers both outdoors for football and indoors for basketball. LEAVITT MFG. COMPANY URBANA, ILL. We Also Manufacture the FAMOUS LINE ATHLETIC OF IMPLEMENTS 5' 'P 'T' 'E' 'D' 'E' 'I' One Ilunrircd Fifty-fme A bibinfnb Virginia Phillips ............................. Lyle Porter ....................................... Ethel Prevette--- James Prevette-- Peggy Price ---.. Are they sisters cousins or what? Studious paperwad shooter. A shy and quiet maiden. ---A bookkeeper. She wants lipstick to match her hair. Gus Radebaugh ------------------.-..-----.------- The Kellers' light shadow. Ellen Rankin ------------- .- -----.----------------------.-----.-- Any news? Ruby Ransom ---.--------...---..-------..-------.------- Chew, chew, chew. Keith Rees ----------..---------------- -. ------.--..-----.-.-- Studious-yes. Frances Rehburg -...-....-..----.-.-..-..--- .. -----.......--.-- Those large blue eyes! Winfield Reece ---.----.----..----.---.--------- Have you learned to cook yet? Edward Robbins --...--------.----..--.--.--.--.. Red curly locks and freckles. Lyle Robbins --..-----...----.--.------------.--.. Sincere, honest and likable. Dorothy Roberts .----------.------.---.--.-----.---.-----.--- A country girl. Charles Roney--- Ruth Roth ------ A country boy, full of pep. She's little but she's smart. Bruce Ryder ---.------.---------.-..--- A dandy fellow?-curly hair-oh, girls! Marvin Shaede ---------------------.-.-.-------.- I like a certain porch swing. Maurice Shaudt ------..----------..---.------.-.--------..----- A trackman. John Schriber --.-.------.-----..--------..--..--.-------.-.- I hate to work. Rosella. Servis ------.-------...----..--------...-..--.-..--- I like spit curls. Edith Shepherd ---..---------.-.----..-------.---.---.--.-..---- Straight A. Ruth Sinnott ---- Claralouise Slack- Growing fast. A librarian. Stanley Slack -----------.--.-.-------.--..--.----------.-.- What's the use? Edward Smith -------.----------.------.-.-------...-- Quit teasing the girls. Catherine Smith -.---.-----------.--.--..---.-.---.-.--- Catherine the Great. Henry Smith ---.--..----.-..----------.---.----------------------- "Hank." Herbert Smith -----.--.----.--.-.----.-..-----.-..--.------- Courtesy, itself. Lawrence Smith ---..------.-------- Short, curly headed blonde-a good worker. Marjory Smith -----.------------.----..----...------.---. Just a little Smith. Rachel Smith -------.----..----....--.--- - --.----- Violinist in the orchestra. Rex Smith ---------..-------------.---..--------.------ Look me over, folks! Jane Smizer -..---...-.-.---...-.-.-..-.--..--.. . .------. A modest little girl. Budgie Sperling -------------.-------..-------.-----.- "Little Bobbie Shaftof' Bernice Stewart -------.----..-----.--------.----.----.. A friend of Mildred's. Ruby Stewart ---..----..--.---..---------------------.--- A good little sport. John Tarpenning --.---.---------.--------------- - ----------- A ladies' man. Edwin Taylor -----------------------.------------- Acquaintance of the twins. Hyre Tipps ----.---.-------.-----------.-. - -..------.--.---- A ticket seller. Carl Towner ----.----..---..-----.-----..-----..---.-.-----.-...--- Artist? Mildred Towner -----.-------.--------.-.----.----.-----.------. Long curls. Alberta Tramp ---..----.-----..--..-.------.--... - .----...--- Popular Soph. Almeta Tudor -----.------.-.--.--.------.-------.--.-.--. Not like her sister. Doris Vance -.--.-----.-------...---...--------.---------.---.------ Echo? Robert Waggoner --------------------------------- ---------Let's take a ride. Merle Waldron .-.--...---.-----..---.---.--.----.-- - ..-.----.--..-- "Pete. Avis Wall .-----------...----------------.-- She is not the only Avis in school. Elizabeth Ward ---.-. ...-- ------.-----.....---. - .--...------ S t udious Soph. Martha Webber ----...----.-...---...-- ..----...-. Jeanette Weeks- - - --- -- ---Pleasingly plump. The girl friend. Gertrude Wheeler -.---...----...-----.....-----.--.-- - ..---.--- A girl scout. Raymond Wilkinson ----------.-..-----------.------------.------- Energetic? Eugene Wingler .------..---.---.----------..-.-.-.. - .--.---.- Another poet? Mary Wilson ...---.--------------.--...-.--.----. Louis Wiltsey--- Melvin Wimer--- ---Did you say something? Still growing? What a cheer leader. Marion Wingfield --.---------.---- - ------.-.------ Popular in the younger set. Margaret Wright ----.---------.--.--.-------.------- She's generally Wright. Herle Young --------..------..--.------..--.-----.----.- A future salesman. George Zink ---..---.--.----....--..-.--.---..-.---... -Al, lick your hands. T One Hundrcd Fifty-two ?????'? 12-5155-Sabi COSTUMES SPORTING GOODS PHONE 5358 39 MAIN 5FlHT IF Seely Johns'l'on '24 SCHOOL SUPPLIES When school supplies are needed, you iusi' na+uraIIy +hinIc of KNOWLTON 8: BENNETT. This s1'ore has supplied Ur- bana and Champaign for years. Your mofher and fa'l'her boughf +heir school needs here. Your children wiII proba- bly 'Follow in 1'heir foo+s1'eps. KNOWLTON 81 BENNETT A. R. CONWAY ILLINOIS FANCY GROCERIES AND MEAT WATER SERVICE MARKET PI one 7-3414 703 So. Race St. We Deliver 'S' 'Q' Ii' 'G' 'ii' 'Q' 0,,gg5MF, Jth 515555155 FRESHMEN Eileen Allen ....................................... "He doesn't look at me." Lloyd Anderson ......................................... .- ..... Strong man! Louise Anderson ....................... - ..................... Bashful blond. Arthur Apperson ......................................... Handsome athlete. Dorothy Bailey ..... Virginia Balispy .... Make yourself known. Silence seems golden. Wayne Barker ............................................... What a man! Clarabel Barrick ................................. Studious and awfully sweet. Warren Baskin ......................... - ............... Marathon Swimmer. Charles Beaird ............................................ Promising lover. Alice Beals ............................................. Her brother's sister. Ralph Beals ........................................... His sister's brother. Robert Bercher ............................................ An opera singer. Joe Bevls- ..... ---- Charles Bishop ..... Dick Blaisdell ...... Going to follow in your brother's footsteps. Product from Chicago. He thinks that people go to hospitals for "apparitions." Miles Bland .......................................... Cross country runner. Tommy Booker ........................................ Our Little Red Hen. Mary Bowers .............................................. A pretty blonde. Billy Browder ....................... - ........ The other famous Browder boy. Glenn Buckles ...................................... The last of the Buckles. Galen Bunting ....................................... Bye Low Baby-bunting. Helen Burgess ................................................ A shy Helen. Kenneth Redenbaugh ............................. He visits us once in a while. Virginia Burnier ........................................... Oh, what looks! Junior Burnett ..................... .- ................ F'at's good looking too. John Burr .................................................... A little boy. John Busey ............................................... Romantic blond. Herbert Butts ................ ................................... D oes he? Earl Byard ....................... -. ............................... Shrimp. William Carroll ......................................... Every teacher's pet. Joe Carson .................................................. Big shot Joie. Edith Carter ............... - ..................................... Brilliant. Stanley Chapman .......................................... Ignorance is bliss. Edith Clark ................................................ I'm from Philo. Erita Clark ............................................. I'm from Philo, too. Harold Colbert ............................................... An electrician. Mary Lois Cole ......................................... As quiet as a mouse. Don Collins .................................. Ho hum, is this the tenth hour? Rhoda Collins .............................................. The girl athlete Arthur Conard ................................... He knows about the Tropics. Eugene Cooper ............................-................... I like Latin? Ruth Cooper ..................... , .... Just what is the attraction in the library? Irene Copeland ............................................. She likes music. Frances Corkery .......................................... Katherine's sister, Leon Corray ...................................................... Freckles. Margaret Corson ....................................-.... Pretty brown eyes. Ivan Crawford ............ .. ............................... Brother Crawford. Louise Crays ....................... -................. ............ S e w, sew. Clarence Cuppernell ..................................... Tardy again today? Kenneth Davis .......................... Without you there would be no school. Josephine Day .................................................... Not bad. Mary Dearth ................. -.............................. .... M a ry Kay. Robert Decker .................................. . ..... ......... W hat a man. Robert Douglas ..................................... -..... ...... D a irymaid. Donald Dunlap ..... .......................................... S leepy. Charles Durst .............................................. Always whining. Lillie Ebert ....................... -. ...................... Is the water cold? Byron Eccles .............................................. The third Eccles. Elmer Elam- .................................. ......... A big track man. One Hlndrcd Fifiyefour ???'iF?'? :Sushi-bbfnb HEADQUARTERS for Urbana High ScI'1ooI Men SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES-SMITH SMART SHOES HARRY A. LITTLE 81 COMPANY , ILLINOIS X, CONGRATULATIONS, Q Q SE-RVICEV SENIORS EVERYTHING- You have done a good job and de- Worthwhile serve praise. Now keep up the good work and get in some college years. in Electric We sell complete University and Supplies Gas Appliances -1 PROMPT SERVICE Next Summer or Fall you will need many new things for your college classes. Come to us for saving and satisfaction. 8' Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods, Gifts, Art and Engineer's Supplies, Electrical Goods, University Souvenirs "Flat Iron Building" PHONE 5141 BUSEY'S STATE BANK EstabIisI1eoI I868-63 years of service URBANA " ILLINOIS T' 'S' 1' 'E' 'S' 'S' GEMM Fm-F A nfnbibbnh John Elvis ................................................ Red-headed Jack. Alice Empson ..................................................... Too bad. Donald Faust ..................................... The earmarks of cave man. Russell Faust ................................................ D0n's brother. Jesse Field .............................. You wouldn't bet 4. if you took Latin. Gerald Frank ........................................................ Red. Harvey Franklin ................................................. Reformer. Dorothy Fulton ...................................... Gayle, if you only knew. Millard Garvin .................... -. ............. . ..... Find x fthe unknownb. Junior Gauble ................................ Champion tobacco chewer, Bah! Norbert Gerhardt ........................................ Golf and more golf. Maxine Gladding ..................,..................... A Rosemary worker. Russell Good ................................................... Good boy? Frances Gordon ........................................,...... Independent. Dorothy Gouble ............................................. Where's Selma? Carl Groff ........................................................ Courier! Robert Gray ........................................ Ain't he the ladies' man? Irene Green ................................................ Another Greeny. Selma. Green ........................................ Where's Dorothy Gouble? Frances Guard .................................. Where's my note from Lloyd? Robert Gundlock .......................................... Bear tone player. Phillip Hagan ...................................... On the Student Council. James Hamilton ............................................. Little baggage. Eugene Hanes ........................................... Gee, isn't he cute! Walter Hanes .................................................. Hi, Schroth. John Harman .................................................. Next mayor. Gordon Hatch .................................................. Let's skip. Bill Havens ................................................... It's no use. Mary Hayes ............................................. ..The spice of life. Elmer Heater .............................................. Algebra's 0. K. Billy Hegenbart ................................................ . Raymond Hegenbart ...................................... ...... a Not saints' Arline Hendrix .......................................... A petite little miss. Robert Hesselschwerdt ................................... He's little but cute. Dorotha Hogans .................................................... Precise. Garnette Hoy ............................................ A sweet little girl. Frederick Hudson ....................................... Here's a quiet boy. Chas. Edgar Hursey ........................................ Note the Edgar. Dorothy Johnson ................................. .- ......... Another blonde. Gertrude Johnson .................................................... Small. Marjorie Johnson .... ' .............................................. M usical. Sara Johnson ............................................... Big City Blues. Mignon Johnson ........................................... Gertrude's sister. Eleanor Kelley ......................................... Anybody seen Kelly? Aster Keist ............................... - .............. What's in a name? Mary Kemp ............................................ Still loyal to Urbana. Walter Kimberlin .................. ,- ................... Freshman basketball? Elmore Kinzer ...................................... I do not choose to work. Wannetta Kirby ............................................. Serious minded. Marjorie LaValle .............................................. Pretty curls. Geraldine Lee ............................... - ......... - ...... Johnny's girl. Kenneth Leming ....... .- .... .- ........................... In again-out again. Richard Lincicome ........................ .. ..................... Richard II. Louise Lincicome .............................................,... Red-head. Bill Lorch .................... .. ................................. Ofllce boy. James Long ................................................ Long but short. Wilbur McCown ................................................. Angel face. Mildred McFal1 .............................................. A gentle miss. Donald Merchant .................... .- ...... -- ............. An algebra artist. ' Has an increasing list of boy friends. June Mershim er ........................... Milan Miller ............................ - ....... Just about as big as his horn. One undrcd Fifty-siw ?????? Lninfnnhnfnbiq P-N' 5 . e 'VQGN 5' o u. I oo so 41pAN'l' FLANIGAN-PEARSGN CG. PRINTERS AND BINDERS CHAMPAIGN T' 'P 'E' ? T' 'T ? 4 Ono Hundred Fifty L nibbbbb Raymond Miller ........................... Speeding down Green Street with-. Virginia Miner ................ ..... - --. ........................... An artist. Betty Moomau ................................................... A pianist. Fred Moore ................... .- ................., My alibi is my car--Greece? Lillian Moss ........................................... A future May Queen. Wanda Myers ........................................... Silent Gum Chewer. Hance Nelson ..................................-....... Not his sister's equal. Aston Newman .................................................. A cut-up. Robert 0'Donnell ................................................... "Red." Marguerite Olliverson .................................... Where are my eyes? Ralph Overman ............ -. .............................. The clarinet man. Dolores Paul .............................................. A budding artist. Marjorie Portman ....................................... A friend of the boys. Sophia Pliugmacher ........................................ Elizabeth's sister. Norma Phillips ............................................... Keep smiling. George Picard ........-.......-............................... Hit and miss. Catherine Place .................... .. .............. She doesn't know her Place. Frances Prestin ..................... .- ............ .. ....., Oh those blue eyes! Ruth Redmon ............................................ A sweet little girl. George Rewerts ..................................... Post Graduate Freshman. Mary Reynolds ....................... ,- ................ Ike's. sister-cute too! Cecil Riggs ............................ .. ......... ,.---The eternal Freshman. Junior Riley ................................................ Willing helper. Augustus Roberts .................................................. Retired. Alfred Roberts ............................................. Peppy trackman. Glenn Rose ............................................. Miss Thomas's pet. Mary Reiman ............ - ................................. Another Trudie? Jack Sanden ............................................ A sweet little chap. Cecelia Sandwell ................. -. .................... She makes the baskets. Keith Schoch ............................................. Work shocks him. Mildred Scott ...................... - ........... ............,.. U p in the air. George Sears ............................................... Quite a jumper. Izetta Sell ........................ - ................... c .......... "Giggles" Walter Seth ................................. .--. ....... V--One of "Our Gang." Dora Shadoan ........................................ A typical southern girl. Howard Simpson .............................................. Little Zoom. Leslie Slade .................................................... Pug nose. Glenn Slusser ...................................... The gum and candy man. Agnes Smith .................. .. ..................................... Sadie. Horace Smith ................................................ All mixed up. Mildred Spitler ............................................. A Latin shark. Marjory Stephens .... .. ................................. The dashing Brunette. Frances Stites ............................ - .................. Illini Bat Boy. Ronald Stockwill ..................................... He likes his motorcycle. Robert Strauch ............................... - ................. A real boy. Beverley Tate ........................... . .............. A polished Freshman. Carol VanDeventer .................................. , ............. .--All A's. John Vestal .......................................... There's no one smaller. Lucille Waldron ...................................... "Tell me the answers." Glenmore Warrick .................................... "Bud"-but not a rose. Mary Jane Waxler ........................................ Tell us about Billy. Florence Webber ............................................ Almost all A's. George Weber ........................ Gentlemen prefer blondes: but ladies-? Juanita Wells ...................................... .- ........... Nita's neat. Charlotte Weeks .... Lottie. Louisa Williams ....................................... Smart with long curls. Francis Williamson .......................... -- ................. Pretty boy. Everett Wilson ......................................... Another Bafnjd boy. Forrest Wright ............................................. Spanish cavalier. Charlotte Young ............................................... Cello player. Marjory Zink .......... - ..... .................. I . S. doesn't even notice me. 'E'-'???W?':' One Hundred Fifty-eight :bhfuil- :Bibb JAS. S. MASON, M. D. OFFICE-129 W. ELM ST. Oiitice 7-2604 Residence '72-3112 CHARLES T. MOSS, M. D. PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON DR. G. F. SCHEIB EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT Glasses Properly Fitted Co-op Bldg., University District, Cor. Wright Sz Green Sts., Champaign, Ill. Phone 3568 DR. J. A. OVERTON DR. SYLVIA R. OVERTON OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIANS 422 Robeson Bldg. Oiiice Phone, 56695 Res. Phone, 2554 DR. C. E. POLLARD OSTEOPATHIC' PHYSICIAN I- 205 Co-op Bldg. Champaign Illinois T. G. KNAPPENBERGER, M. D. 433-34 Robeson Bldg., Champaign Phones: Office, 95955 Residence, 7-3091 Oftice Hours: 1-5 P. M. DR. A. J. DALTON 408-9-10-11 Robeson, Bldg., Champaign Office Hours: 1 P. M. to 5 P. M. Telephone Office 95843 Residence 2859 Champion Knitwear Mills MAKERS OF Sweaters, jerseys, sweat suits, and all athletic knit goods ROCHESTER, NEW YORK BURTON 8. TRELEASE DRS- REAL ESTATE HINDMAN 8. WAXLER INSURANCE DENTISTS Phone 5101 URBANA, ILLINOIS 617 E. Green Champaign 2995 West Elm Street IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN URBANA YOU'LL BE INTERESTED IN READING THE URBANA DAILY COURIER "For Urbana First, Last and All the Time" T'??'i"i"i' One undrcd Fi gy mnc LLL Lili HATCHET ORATION Iflontinucd from Page -552 To take such a lordly air with me, You may orate, or make a speech, But no one ever yet could teach A boy like you to watch well out And always know what he's aboutg In Physics lab you often work, And while you don't appear to shirk They say one day you had the gall To take a jar of alcohol And seeming ne'er e'en once to think, You poured it boldly down the sink! No one saw youg nor could prove You had ever made a move- You left them one and all to think Donald Dixon'd had a. drink! No reason yet could you ever find To account for such an absent mind! Senior: You've done quite well, As all can tell In giving your roast to me. But the senior class Sits there enmasse For your roving eye to see. Pick out your man Do the best you can. And roast as hard as you will! I'll promise you Without ado, To give you a better one still. Junior: VValter Gordon Still Robert Dudley Marshall NValt and Bob made quite a hit In the class stunt show with their little bit,- A clever dance, so many said, That it made them grow quite big of head. Said Bob one day, "I think we might Put on our show for 'amateur night'g" "O let's" said Walter, "sure we can"- And then right there they made their plan, But the Orph was so full of friends that night That both the boys had bad stage fright: Their legs just trembled, wouldn't go. Such a razzing! You may know, The hearts of these two boys just sank, But with their pennies they'll start a bank! Senior: Donald Troy Wikoff With half a dozen auto cars A-sitting round the place,- Anyone of which we know Could hit a monstrous pace,- What could Donald ever want What did he think he'd do With that ancient motorcycle Model nineteen ltwo? He tinkered round with it a bit Then hitched it up one day, It balked and kicked around so much Like a young colt at play We heard it threw him off its back, He landed on the street, He hit upon his head they say, Instead of on his feet. We heard it cost him just two bucks But it wasn't just so funny To have it buck and kick that way So he sold it for two bunnies. Junior: Clara Frances Baldwin Raven locks with eyes of brown Capture every lad in town, But most of all the lads, I Ween, The fellows on our basket team. There is a spot in the lower hall Where Frances' locker's by the wall, A spot right there in that open space That is a famous trysting place. If Bob's not standing idly there Gazing at this lady fair With love-light twinkling in his eye While in his heart he heaves a sigh.- Then sure it's Edgar, 'scaped from gym, Who fits this lady's changeful whim, Edgar with his heart awhirl For favors shown him by this girl. But if 'tis neither, then I'll swear, Gordon will be standing there,- All a-tremble with the fear Steve would find him lingering here! For Steve was sure that all this iight To gain the lady's favor might Disrupt his team: for jealousy Is ever bad for unity. But the good old team survived, we hear And this sweet lady shed a tear,- Then with a gesture of disdain Transferred her favors to Champaign! Senior: Kenneth Keith Thomas When the boys Went down to Benton On a football trip, they tell, They spent the night at Flora In a middle class hotelg , The partitions were a little short Left quite an open space- Thought Kenneth, "I will have some fun Through that open space." He filled the water pitcher full, And climbed upon a chair,- And threw the water over Thought "Buck" was sleeping there,- Alack, alas, a stranger man Had that adjacent room: One heard him in the morning To the landlord making moang "It must have rained right hard," he said Continued on Page 164 'E' 'D' 'J' One Hundred Sirvty T"'i'?? 555512155 GOOD OLD SUMMER YOU can enthuse all YOU want to about WIN'l'ER- sports, but WE 'LL vote for the GOOD olcl summer ti111e, WHEN we can enjoy AUTO rides, picnics, FISHING, bathing and ALL that sort of thing, BUT even summer has ITS drawbacks, like MOISQUITOES, sunburn and FRECKLES, not to mention THE pesky flies, and WHEINEVER you are ANNOYED by these little SUMMER pests and other AILMENTS we wish youll REMEMBER that this STORE is a regular RELIEF station, just FULL of soothing LOTIONS that will MAKE your summer much MORE enjoyable. Moral: We can always make life happier for you in any season, if you'll try our drug store first. OLDHAM BROS. SAVE wil: sawn, 'The Ifare STRAUCH PHOTO ART HOUSE AT CAMPUS 709 So. Wright Photography Diploma and Picture Framing Photo Finishing Fountain Pens Pen Repair Stationery Notebooks and Supplies Gifts, Costume Jewelry, and Greeting Cards for all Occasions at STRAUCH'S 1 T- ' r"'1'ili!!:i1 YOU CAN BUY WITH CONFIDENCE at WILLIS' 'i'?'??'i'? 0:15 glundrcd My one 55551211215 SENIOR CLASS VVILL fffontimced from Page 1,31 To Donald Silvers John Bourgois wills his talent as a basketball player. "Hoot" Gibson leaves two much-used Colt revolvers to Charles Porter with the hope that he will use them with discretion. Clara Turner bestows her giggles upon Betty Thomas with the suggestion that they be released in Mr. Hallam 's study period. Being fully cognizant of the fact that I have unusual artistic instincts, I, Miriam Noel, leave to Vivian Ball said instincts to use in decorating our high school walls. To Ruth Wyninger, Esther Speck wishes to leave her ability to capture the affections of early-rising milk-men. I, Gene Freemon, do hereby leave to any girl who thinks she can do it, the ability to hold at least five young men in check all at once. Paul Barrick regretfully gives his seventy dollar Elgin watch to Catherine Corkery with a picture of his pet pig pasted in the back. Jean Stiven bequeaths her gift of gab to Rosemary Coldwell. In all faith of humanity, I, Frank Stapp, leave my athletic shoes and over- alls to Joe Hindman, who, at the present moment, seems to be the only likely candidate. Selwyn Smith leaves his ability to model the latest in men 's styles to Pete Waldron, with a prayer that he has not chosen wrong. In the event that I am not here next year, I, Stanley Henwood, bequeath my gate-crashing ability to Chuck Wertz, hoping for part of a permanent wave in return. Oretha Pierce wishes to leave her dancing talents to Mildred McDevitt. No one else can qualify. ' Dick Fulmer leaves his last year 's stock of wise-cracks to the school in gen- eral to be filed away in the corner stone of the new building. Van Dusen Kennedy, with the help of the English Department, has decided to leave his scholastic acquisitions to Gordy Hatch and George Rewerts, who seem to be in dire need. Melville Youhill gives himself to any Junior girl who is willing to take him. We, Gordon Faulkner and Edgar Root, believing that John Oliver will be back again next year, do hereby leave to him all of our possessions, namely ath- letic, scholastic, and romantic affiliations with whole-hearted faith that he will round out the missing links. Maxine Armstrong a.nd Jean Peabody, having already given away their possessions, wish to leave their names on a bronze tablet to be put under the clock in the assembly. Irving Seely, Crain Portman, and John Barth leave all of their talent to Bill 'Hamilton in an effort to reform him. Curly Hamilton leaves his marcel to all of the underclassmen who are lacking in that commodity, provided each share is used according to speci- fications. Bob Marshall, being, he hopes, of sound mind and body, wills to Burt Greaves his trombone playing ability, as well as a. good leaning shoulder for the lockers in the lower hall. Donald Dixon donates his high Physics grades to Don Albert with the hope that he will do his utmost to uphold his fine record. Frances Baldwin bestows her vampish ways on lhleen Tramp. Continued on Page 175 One Hundred Sixty-two 55515555 "THE ROSEMARY FOR REMEMBRANCE HART SCHAFFNER 85 MARX CLOTHES FOR STYLE "VVe Sell Style" M. LOWENSTERN 81 SON URBANA PURE MILK COMPANY BEFORE YOU DRINK A GLASS OF MILK BE SURE IT IS HPASTEURIZED " 115 N. RACE-111 N. BROADVVAY-117 W. WATER J. F. LORCH GARAGE COMPLETE AUTO SERVICE "ASK ANYONE" Chicago Motor Club and A. A. A. Service APPROVED APPAREL SERVING THE CLASS OF 1931 COLLEGIATE CAP AND GOWN COMPANY 610 East Green St. Champaign, Illinois T 'P' 'C' 'W' 'E' 'D' 'E' One Hundred Sixty-three 51555555 HATCHET ORATION IContinued from Page 1601 "And your roof has sprung a leak, For my pants were hanging on a chair Of this I hate to speak,- But you can feel it for yourself, I'm mad enough to choke- .Iust feel them, sir, and you will see That they are wet as soak!" Junior: Harry Gordon Faulkner. Gordon thought he had a date, For every Sunday night,- With her he thought he'd surely rate As no other fellow might. One night he waited there for her As he usually did, at church, But soon he saw, with heart astir, She'd left him in the lurch, That there was standing at her hand A rather handsome Champaign man! Not knowing where to go or turn, And ne'er a thought of time or place Full of anger and concern He slapped her in the face! 'Twas not the end of this sorry tale Or so the story goes: For we have heard this saddened male, Went round with a broken nose! If you ask this lad how't came about He'll give some -excuse or other,- But the hint has somehow just leaked Out, She had an older brother! But many things this lad has done 'That have brought him much of fame, In plays he's many a laurel won Has gained an artist's name. In basketball and football too He ever played the game, While all the time he always knew His lessons just the same. Senior: William Robert Hamilton Harley Leonidas Tarpenning Vandalia's quite a stretch from here, It's a full five hours by car, But if one hitch-hikes, he may fear He never will get thar! Bill can tell you how it goes To 'wiggle' for a ride- 'Twas seldom "yes," but many "noes"- That his requests denied, A ride with this, or t'other man, Then walk a mile or three Brought them just to Eilingham, When 'twas quite too dark to see- With half the distance yet to do And time the game should start, And Bill was hungry, weary too- Entirely without heart To venture on-no friends in town And ne'er a bit of kale, And ne'er a place to lay them down So they spent the night in jail! Junior: John Harmon Carson Johnnie stayed at home one day A thing we hate to mention For staying home the way he did Is sure to bring "Detention," "But that," said John, "is what I like And this is no pretention, 'Tis easier far than Latin verbs Or Latin noun declensions. In all the courses that I've had I've met with much dissensiong- But I'd never flunk at all, I'm sure Nor have the least contention If all the studies that I took Were as easy as 'Detention'." Senior: Naomi Helen Steffy. A rather useful maid is she Good at oflice work, She often is on duty And is never known to shirk. With all her lessons to prepare And a mile and a half to walk However, does she find the time VVith Lowell so much to talk? One sees them on the side-walk One sees them in the hall, To see one without the other Is never done at all! ' Hoot" Gibson would have stolen her Without a 'by your leave' Would have carried her clear off, Ii' it hadn't been for Steve, For he was always close at hand, And called Villars quick to come- But before he ever got there "Hoot" was on the run! At last it seems quite settled And we're betting a sure thing That Naomi will appear some day With a diamond ring! Junior: Donald William Dixon. The senior boys crept out one night And raised their old white flag With no one els-e around in sight, Their efforts did not lag, Until their '31 was flung To the early morning breeze. But when the Juniors saw it hung They worked as hard as bees, Brought a vaulting pole and push pole too And tried to burn it down- Tho' that was something very new, The seniors rushed around, They broke the pole, that senior band But the juniors pulled and tore Continued on Page 166 T?T???? Ono Hundrcd Sixty-four' dnnfnfnninhbb CHARTER A BUS LEONARD fm -Kuta, FOR ,FUNERAL Home SPECIAL TRIPS fifth 31 if GOLDEN 3' H. M. LEONARD S f.. Director ILLINI COACH CO., INC. W" Parkhius, Tours URBANA 302 W. GREEN 32 Chester St. Phone 4848 PHONE 7-1121 MAGUIRE STUDIG Urbana, Illinois A I A R. W. WEBBER MER C N INSURANCE DRY CLEANING First National Bank Building EFFICIENT AND RELIABLE Urbana Phone 7-3507 c'?????T One Hurzrlrmi S11 A A A fn L 5.5 HATCHET ORATION KOont'inued from Page 16151 Until the pole pulled through Don's hand And left it mighty sore. But that is only half the tale For the real fight came at night The seniors thought they,couldn't fail To keep their honor bright. Rut e'er they climbed e'en half the pole There came, how, no one knows, A stream of water, icy-cold From out the fireman's hoseg Seems Donald got the most of it, And the Juniors got the flag. Now Donald simply has a fit If one mentions that old rag. Senior: Bernard Jefferson Johnson, Elizabeth Fisher Goble, Bernard has two eyes for her, And she has two for him, And they have eyes for no one else, Or else their eyes are dim. Each one can see the other one But neither can see both, If they only could, I'm sure they would- Admit, and nothing loath It would be well, as Burns has said If some good power could give us The "giftie" which we seldom have To see ourselves as others see us! Junior: Melville Andrew Youhill. He wants to know the where and why 'I'he what and who and when, He'll question you until you sigh And never stop it then, Especially in History Eight No point gets by his pen. Perhaps he doesn't know every date But he knows just why it's been. And when he learned the Nobel Prize Was giv'n for deeds for peace- When he learned its monstrous size His wonder never ceased. For why, said he, should any man, VVho created dynamite- Give a prize of forty grand To one who doesn't fight? Senior: Ruth Loren Wyninger. A little hunch, a little punch Spilled upon the iloor, A little prance, a little dance, Just that and nothing more! But there were none who had no fun When they danced with Ruth that day- Said she and laughed, "that's where quaffed But some of it got away! Just step right in, you can but swim-" And made them dance right through it-A And with her chaff, she made them laugh As none but Ruth could do it! Junior: Eugenia Lois Freemon. Eugenia's in the halls so much We've always wondered why And always we have noticed She has a roaming eye. She must be hunting something Or somebody it may be, A magazine for her public speech Or perhaps a she or he. Olin met her there one day She asked him if he'd save her, If he'd get a book for her Do her this little favor,- A paper she would like to have, 'Twould be in 204- But why not get it for herself? She went with him to the door. "Oh say," said she, "please will you note. VVhere Irving Seely's seated, If he's next to Frances, I'll admit, I surely will feel cheated." Senior: Maurice Johnson Shroyer. Are they pimples? No, they're dimples, Said his friends one day- Little red spots, are those said spots What's the matter, hey? Farmer shot me, almost got me With his blamed old gun- Had a darn pull, with my arm full So I couldn't run! I'm a-tellin' that that melon Almost cost my life While the fellows just as well as Left me in the strife- They forsook me,-later took me With a right good will, Without splurgin', to a surgeon- Now they pay the bill! Junior: Helen Louise Russell. I-lere's to Helen, we've a toast, Every virtue she doth boast- Loyalty to every friend, Energy that hath no end Ne'er a task that's left undone, Labors often without fun 0'er a troublous yearbook page, Undaunted, tho' she hath no wage! In every test we find her true Sincere and ever constant too. Efficiency in every deed, Resolving that she must succeed. Unseeking honor for her own Seeking just to serve alone. Strong is she in virtues rare, Continued on Page 168 I 'T Q' 'Q' One Hundred Siwty-aim T?'2'? 115-515 COLVIN'S MARKET Dealers in CHOICE BEEF, MUTTON, VEAL, PORK, FRESH FISH AND POULTRY 204 W. Main St. Urbana, Ill Ph 7 1186 STYLE QUALITY VALUE KUI-IN'S APPAREL Will Rank High ID Any Examination JOS. KUHN 81 CO 33-35-37 MAIN STREET CHAMPAIGN FIRST NATIONAL BANK URBANA A Member Of the Fede al R S e Syst The WOrld'S Greatest Ba k g System RENNER FUNERAL HOME J. T. Wilcox P. T. Wikoi DEPENDABLE AMBULANCE SERVICE 7 1716 208 S R Hi' T' 'D' 'S' LLL fnnlmnfnnh HATCHET ORATION fUontinu1'd from Page 16411 Ever faithful, honest, square- Living right is its own need, Lofty ideal e'er her creed. Senior: You've done your best, I will admit, The foibles of my class to hit. We've each of us tilled our boast, And we have given roast for roast. I hope that you'll not take amiss, Nor misint-erpret the real gist Of what I've said. I pray you now Accept my friendship's kindly Vow, Permit me now to toast your class Ere from your circles we do pass, Here's to you, Juniors, one and all, May all good things to you befall, Success to you, a World of fame, Bring honor to each Junior's name. J1mio1': We thank you for this kindly thought, Forgive the havoc you have wrought, Forget the unkind things you have said, And call down blessings on your head, We give this greeting to you all As you go out to duty's callg May every joy which you can know Attend your feet where'er you go. An olden toast we offer you, 'Tis given with good wishes true: "Here's to you early, here's to you late, I-Iere's to the favorites of fate, I-lere's to the best class in the State- Our seniors!" Senior: VVith all our hearts we thank you For the toast so kindly given, For it makes a pleasant parting Of all bitter feelings riven. That you may pass your senior year With naught of worry nor of fear, We leave our mascot here with youg It will prove a blessing true, Guard it, handle it with care, And to it render service rare. Junior: We thank you for your wishes, And for this mascot toog VVe will try our best to be To its traditions true. We'll guard it well, and use it wellg And when from these halls we pass, VVe'll give it with its legend old To the next year's senior class: Thus will it e'er, as years go by, Bring blessings on Urbana High. Senior Orator: Olin Browder Junior Response: Audrey Frank For the last several years Miss Ricketts has written the Hatchet Oration. The raw materials have been furnished by the Hatchet Orators but the finished pro- duct is the result of her handicraft. This is but another example of the real in- terest Miss Ricketts has always shown in Urbana High School. IHEIQFIZ-JONES COMPANY DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS OE SCHOOL AND COLLEGE JEWELRY AND GRADUATION INVITATIONS INDIANAPOLIS JEWELERS TO URBANA HIGH SCHOOL Q' 'S' 'Q' One Hundred Sixty-eight ?'i'?'iF bb bb CORRAY BROS. COAL-GRAIN-FEED 510 East Main St. Urbana Congratulations from George Bill Fred Frank SEARS ROEBUCK 81 CO. MARRIOTT 81 MILES REAL PRINTERS 43 Main Street Phone 4223 108 North Walnut Street Champaign, Illinois Champaivn D Phone 8698 4LRCH16H1bG1'?,, O. R. MILLER TEXACO NOOK GAS AND o1L Race and Vtlashington Sts. Cor. Race and Washington McClellan-McDonough ' ' Electric Store We Sell or Repair 212-16 W. Main St., Urbana STYLE Everything Electric Urbana, Phone 7-2 015 WITHOUT EXTRAVAGANCE An Institution of the Community ????T'T-'? On c I1 nmdrvcl Sirty-aim' LLL Lipid SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY fC'onttnucfl from Page M1 and Mrs. Seaton McDaniel of New York. Mrs. McDaniel, the former Maryellen Radebaugh, was the outstanding society matron of the four-hundred until she was forced to go to India to improve her health. Robert Smith has published a collec- tion of poems entitled "Tender Recollec- tions of Youth Gone By," which has ob- tained for him the Nobel prize. Some of his best known compositions are dedi- cated to old acquaintances, among them Marjorie Foor, Mattie Miller, Marjorie Fletcher, and Dolores Smith. Elizabeth Bilsborrow has charge of a health camp in the Switzerland Alps and is famous for her work in teaching the children an appreciation of music. She has obtained excellent results. Irving Seely has lost his slim and sylph-like form and is a big, burly butcher, with Gene Freemon as his cashier. A mysterious and apparently penniless customer has left him a fortune amounting to several millions of dol- la.rs because the beneficent Mr. Seely once allowed him to take a pound of pig's feet on credit. In telling the press of his new experiences in the realm of capitalism, Mr. Seely says that he in- tends to offer his fortune to his -cashier as an inducement into matrimony . Josephine McAuley is spending a very noble life as matron of an orphanage, devoting all her time and interests to those poor unfortunates. Charles Anderson has commercialized his talent for picking up tallen fireplaces in stage scenes. He received his train- ing during Dorothy Vernon. Katherine Smith, Dot Farquhar, Har- riett Hamilton, and Orian Lemen have been selected as the Baby Wampus stars of 1941. Olin Browder has recently fallen hope- lessly in love with London's stage cele- brity, Rosie Turner, and is now the hen- pecked husband of a temperamental actress. Morrel Barber has been proclaimed the champion hog-caller of the United States. The same day Mr. Barber won this distinction, Elizabeth Koller won first in a rolling-pin throwing contest. Lorene Lytle placed second. Corabel Lowman third, and Jean Peabody re- ceived honorable mention. High up in the hills of Abyssinia there is an ancient monastery which has never been entered by any except the monks. In a dispatch recently received, I no- ticed that John Oliver, who had entered the monastery in order to escape from a calloused world, had been commended for his translations of Chinese manu- scripts. Oretha Pierce owns an alligator farm in Brazil. A picture with the press no- tice shows Miss Pierce holding an alli- gator's jaws open, while her head is thrust inside. "They are as gentle as kittens," she states. Crain Portman and Ike Reynolds have each received a gold watch awarded them for superior salesmanship displayed in selling the anti-blush tonic invented by Robert Bowditch. Mrs. Homer Smith, the former Settie Carson, has just been granted her fifth divorce. It is rumored that her next husband will be Edgar Root. Stanley Henwood has just received the diploma signifying that he is a gradu- ate of Urbana High School. Dick Fulmer, a noted archeologist, has unearthed the skull of an ancient Egyptian king. His wife, the former Edna Sanders, states that she will do- nate the money gained thereby to be used for a pension for disabled sailors. She says she hopes it will prevent Don Dixon and his wife, Mirian Cranmer, from ever being in want. Don is at pres- ent an admiral in the service. Miss Patricia Busey, the famous model of the Scott stores, will soon appear in a style show displaying the very latest things in house dresses. I had finished reading all the dis- patches. I sighed. My reading had brought back memories of my old school days, and I remembered the care-free joyous existence We all once led. Ah! Such sweet memories! I gazed dream- ily out of my window. Across the street a flower vendor displayed his violet, golden, and flaming red flowers. A bril- liant sign announced that the American sensations, Mary Frances Francisco and Helen Beaird, were appearing in the lat- est hit, "Ooh, LaLal" A strolling gen- darme, whom I recognized as Van Dusen Kennedy passed my window. I was go- ing to call to him, but at that moment I was interrupted by a stenographer bring- ing in some late dispatches, and when I turned to the window, he was gone. What varied careers my classmates had chosen! Perhaps they had realized their highest ambitions and were happy in their fulfillment. May they ever re- main so. FR.ANCES Louisa SPEAR FRANCES UTTERBACK T T 'EF One Hundred Seventy ???? 12:12-Lnfnnfnnfni BEST WISHES W. LEWIS 8: CO. TQ THE Champaign! CLASS OF I93I Leading --T P. S. CAMPBELL 8: SONS Deparifmeni -'YOUR PRINTERS" Sfgre 109 North Broadway I 1 EOR THAT Dance, Dinner or Party WE CARRY A VERY econ ASSORTMENT ev SPECIALTIES CALL US EOR SUGGESTIONS CHAMPAIGN ICE CREAM CO. I I5 E. UNIVERSITY AVE. CHAMPAIGN, ILL. McCARTHY DRUG STORE 121 XV. Main, Urbana Drugs-Soda PI'ioIo Finishing MUSICAL SUPPLIES We Frame Pictures and Diploma. It's VVise to Choose A CHEVROLET SIX THE GREAT AMERICAN VALUE also 0. K. 'ed Used Cars BRUBAKER CHEVROLET INC. l'lmmpaig.1gn Urbana Cerfified Cleaners SOUDER'S Phones 4900-3725 TE BM? ' 0 9 Q BILI-IARD PADI-OR "'S' 'P 'D' 'P 'E' Q' 'J' Ont' Hurulrrfl Nw tj 51555-555 SENIOR CLASS HISTORY fCuntinm'd from Page Nj Time: Fall of 1930. Scene: Urbana High School. Characters: President ........ ..... O lin Browder Vice-President .... ............. Q Tohn- Barth Secretary ............... .......... F rances Baldwin Treasurer ......................... Catherine Hesselswerdt Rosemary Representative .................. Susan Anderson Other Characters: One Hundred Sixty-four Dignified Juniors Wlieil the curtain rises this same group, now characterized by seriousness, is shown entering into every phase of high school life, confronting weighty tasks and sharing responsibilities. Many of their members are elected as club ofiicersg several of the boys receive their letters in athletics, the class is well represented in music and oratoryg and nine of the members are elected to the National Honor Society. The climax of the third act is the Ju11ior Orph, the theme of which is based on the circus with the usual balloons, freaks, wild animals, and clowns. The May Breakfast, at which the girls play the role of hostesses to the Senior girls, and the Junior-Senior Reception held at the Urbana-Lincoln Hotel, close the third act with a great display of color and gayety. I ACT IV "Being so 1'eputed in dignity." Time: 1931. Scene: Urbana High School. Characters: President ....... ......... I rving Seely Vice-President ..... ......... B ob Bowditch Secretary ............... .... E lizabeth Bilsborrow Treasurer .................................. Oretha Pierce Rosemary Representative .................... Selwyn Smith One Hundred Sixty-seven Other Solemn Seniors And now the curtain rises on the fourth and last act. The most thrilling scene is the scoreless Champaign-Urbana Football Game which is followed by the Thanksgiving Dance. Next comes the Style Show with all its promenading and display of attractive dresses and suits. After exams they renew their efforts on the Annual, but oftentimes they are exclaiming with Shakespeare, "Oh ye gods, ye gods! Must I endure all this!" Then the class play, "Jonesy', is pre- sented-"Well spoken with good accent and discretion." An additional feature, coming later in the act, is the Junior-Senior Reception. It is a brilliant affair with the Juniors entertaining royally. Next comes Class Day with its usual good time. The final scene in the last act consists of the Commencement Exercises. Clad in caps and gowns of grey, the class tiles in, each trying his best to look solemn and dignified. Speeches and music constitute the program and there is much laugh- ter and even a few tears. Finally, each is awarded his diploma and he leaves the stage as the curtain descends for the last time on the Class of 1931. "The past is dead and gone." The future, who can say? O, Urbana, "More is tl1y due than more than all can payf' IVIILDRED WII.SON '31 BTARGARET JoHNsToN '31, u 'E' 'D' 'E' Hi' 'S' E' 'S' Une Hundred Seventy-two 5515155554 l'IlJl3I3AIQID DAIIQY FRESI-I PASTEURIZED MILK AND CREAM Phone 7-36I5 "II has The IIavor" PLAYMOR BILLIARD MONTGOMERY WARD PARLOR 81 COMPANY CANDY, SODAS, URBANA, ILLINOIS BASEBALL SCORES, RADIO, AND W. V. TICKER Think First of Ward,S 11 S R Qt Urbana When You Think of Buy' g Drink-NEHI-AII Flavors in Sterilized 9 z. bottles A. J. EMLY 1 B ttl cl tl St ilized Water 406 F ISI gf Phone- 7-2688 U b WE ARE FEATURING A SPECIAL IO WEEKS SUMMER TERM FOR I-IGI-I SCI-IOOL GRADUATES BEGINNING JUNE I5 AND 22 Champaign Commercial College I20 N. Neil Sfreel' Phone 8045 T' 'Z' 'S' 'Z' ? 'S' ? 4 - ' One Hundred Sfwmzty-th 15551-5515 SENIOR CLASS WILL ffhnitimued from Page 11:21 Margaret Johnston bestows her straight A average on Harold Cates. Helen Russell leaves her great ability as an editor to H. C. Davis. Mildred Wilsoii donates her elevated eyebrows to Ed Smith as a souvenir. Newlin Morgan bequeaths his melodious tenor voice to Donald Kirby. Carl Wingfield has finally decided to give his Utwo-bit cameral' and all the undeveloped films to Ed Hodges. Nathan Cole releases his firm bond of friendship with his three girl friends to Jackie Fuzak. Charles Anderson contributes his track ability to Max Meadows for decided improvement. Frances Spear wishes to grant her literary ability to anyone who is mentally capable of using it, Karlton Kemp wishes to turn his argumentative ability over to some promis- ing orator in the Junior class. To Lillian Moss and Mary Louise Hayes the boys of this class leave a fond but sad farewell. Patricia Busey beqneaths her beautiful braided wig to Norma Gourley. Roger Benedict donates his quiet manner to Alice Empson. Elmer Wright will present his mustache to any underclassman whose lip is strong enough to hold it. J im Sinnott leaves his number eighteen shoes to Elton Hill for use in cham- pionship golf matches. Catherine Hesselschwerdt wishes to give or donate her cute remarks to Floyd Griesel postpaid. Harriett Hamilton would like to leave all the dirt she has collected for next year's 'tDid you knowl' column to Marie Hogan. Elizabeth Bilsborrow bestows her queenly beauty to Mary Miller. I, Olin Browder, give free of charge my piece of chalk to Don Wikoff. so he too may make a big mark for himself in the world. To Marcus Cord, Robert Bowditch leaves his tenacity to hang on and the motto "Faint heart ne'er won fair lady." In witness whereof, we to this, our last will and testament, have set our hand and seal, this twelfth day of June, one thousand nine hundred and thirty-one. The IllustriousySeniors, '31 FRANK STAPP LOWELL V ILLARS SENIURS For four full years we've labored here To gain our store of learning. For knowledge and true wisdo1n's sphere Our hearts were ever yearning. We now have finished our last year, Our thoughts are forward turning. AlIllJlflIJl1,S banished every fear, VVith hope our souls are burning. e 'P ? 'Z' ? '? Q 'S' One Hum!-red Seventy-jour , fnnfnuhniinfhnfng F. K. ROBESON CHAMPAGN CHAMPAIGN'S SANITARY IARK ECT DP PARTMILNT QTOI F MILK CO. APOLLO CONFECTIONERY KAMERER BROS. Qpevial Drinks, Homemade Czmdie, and Lunches T1 ' t t QHXNIIAICN IRBANA I AI I ANf FL Om' Ilundrrd Sw1'm:ty-j hahahah EDITING A YEAR BOOK Getting' out a yearbook is no picnic. lf you print jokes, people say you are silly, If you don't, they Say you are serious, If you copy things from other annuals, You are too lazy to write them yourself, If you don 't you are stuck on your own stuff. If you stick close to the job all day, You ought to be out hunting up material, If you go out and try to hustle, You ought to be on the job in the office. If you don 't print all contributions, You don't appreciate true genius, And if you print them, The Annual is filled with junk. If you make a change in the other fellow 's make-up, You are too critical 5 If you don 't, you are asleep. Now, like as not, some fellow will say We swiped this from some other yearbook- YVell, criticising, critical critics-we did! T T ? ? Q ? ? one Hundred Seven ty-sirr :Emi-5512-55 Q1 utogmplzf 'S' 'Z' ? ? ? 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Suggestions in the Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) collection:

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

1927

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

1929

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Page 1

1930

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Page 1

1932

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1934 Edition, Page 1

1934

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

1935

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.