Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL)

 - Class of 1925

Page 1 of 250

 

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1925 Edition, Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1925 Edition, Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1925 Edition, Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1925 Edition, Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1925 Edition, Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1925 Edition, Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1925 Edition, Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1925 Edition, Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1925 Edition, Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1925 Edition, Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1925 Edition, Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1925 Edition, Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 250 of the 1925 volume:

5 E E 2 as E E s 1 Iv- 'E w I' I 5 5 is .in:l. :L:-IL "'- l--il-lI::.1Ll: H' - -4.1.1 . ...-Y. L . l' . ' . - W ' f .gjgi-kj-if' W'-L Qi. ' 1?- 9. 55-3 ' ' A ,. ,w -f , , tw +27 . ,.,. + .W LS' 4 . L ,, A , i . V . ,I , v M , . , 'V "W . my '32-3' '14 ff fL.f':'-fy . 5 :uk -5 ' 'A 5. I ' , ,Q . 4 -, . 't,,. 3. Cz , M 'A' NT W 4- ,. " - ff ' . .fziw . ,Q A ..f .v,1.,-,A.--- 1- m f- H25 412' -.41 554 f"'f"" 15' ff? 3 L1 .5 -f'f ,-avi 5 ',...5f4"w'4fQ5'W ,, ..5-ji., 475' 1: H," , 'iim M h. . "' YEA? sv -.E 1425? fia- 'Hgh 5" h 1 .I di. FC. Ffh f if' . Y. Uwe . if lu F12 e' 431 f ' ,HY ' ' 63,2 1 V ' Y- 'T' """1 -' ' H '- 'iithfk -fi ,,,.,' . Q ri... , 1' ' f A' :f n H3571-r... '-fps. . 'ff fig-zJff5"f' , -W-ag. ' 4' :rf-L ' ' "" -N ' -" I fm -""fH'25f : 5 ' s.-4 -ff -' .is -N I xv -. ggxxf.-QF' . . Qui.-. ., -x, A . .. g J " 26. 1 A, . . . , W '..,,Ww A 1 1 .. "" sf " QL." 'Qi2S.f,. ' 3 iff.. ,Ju ,Q , V . , X: ,,.,,.,,4,,. , .,.. ll P xr U-5 4 5: A.- J' -ul 1 . I 1115" K . Qc . 1 ' " ,. L F 'rf Q., Q Q-2 HI' Y, . ' T I V9 5 fhf-F: ,E .I , U. ,, .'A,,Efx,f', ,A 2 my JC - X552-44" fqlvfff' .,.M.af . .-Q, f 751' . :mtv- ,.- . www " -2 A ' 1 ""f', 'fL2'f 3,31 M: . -'HT thi ...J M- . A4 .11-' ' 52.4, ": 5 113,513.1 N, P- ic' 4 N 3 'PH lw 'Z pa - x ff? -A ,' -Z A-311,11 , . 3 - - g nf L, q -iff Q'-1:35-a'?F,"fEe,, , fr , , g.1 ffILg?1ffu af-yr ,HYQ-A1531-v jf. ' , Q , M. . 4. 3 3? ' , J kb 'gg 3'- 4e'ek'f:'4t.P J A .A jf4.2H ,1 . , Q QM41- nf :Z .. 3 . wq f " P i' - .. v ll .4 " .':.g'.f' -ff 1- Pwa , . . , . - ,,13" ,f-g,.gM5rfQ',. . 1 1q,j,:zia-'+ fr fb KF " - 'f'E'Y.-lif ' V5 '-. Lf -14 if A ' ' . ' " VF 'T' ",f"L'iw . 4 -1 .0 K 1 L . . . ., 1 K-,Mg :hh 1 .' , ,"h'g4 . " f-- i'-e2-171 1, Q E .1-,,,,.f1.,, lt, 3,-11.-1, .1H'j..l,--J.,-5.f.,.4 - Y.. : . rf1:1".. I , . kf..3.ffi+1ef1.. f 1-ff. .x .gn 21 Qdiff 'Thar Jr' A-.14 y A 4 that 5- f b . -w in .1.- .NSA M 7s.,,.p -sb. 1 avg., ,. in ' ,. ' Y " 1 . -.1 31 f' ,X-'fag : we 9 Ml V 71-JH I 3. A ffffff . ,v-.4 1- .eff iff- V' fl- -' wif'-K TA XM .., !l,.., B PL' "f. ..'... .. f' fv m, .. , in-,NT K T' V A ' 'fi Q. ey Y 'fifrljfl' ' 'f f -'3.54f z5.f 34, H 1.1 3 J' A le - ,. 1. A qgxir, X5 , ' 1 Q, -U. .. , ,.. qv. 2 2:2 22 if mn- '- Ay ...Bi Q:.7H2',.:fg,v,- -,hip K J 153' , "F Vmq. '-my .gl Q fy A 'S " f u? "f'1"d!f-.Vf.P ' 1 -5-5.3 - ,za , . mf A., .1 51 . - ' .- f. 'N w'2'f ' ff"5'-E , ' i'i?i y"Q?a5.Q',3?E'n, 2 Gi' g1 m' 1 " 1.4 Q.w.W,3-iii "fn ' 'N '-..'.1 . P . ., , q.,5,- ' :',f.4..'.1g , .ffv--.Jie VJ. f. . .4 -V ..A . - A 'NL 1 ' :'.'1",N 'L , QF." . " Q,,Q3iwu,fgjQ. 2f'ffW,"f4't w r" ' "5sfrH'.f, Q ' 'ii-. E 4. fLT4..,p,:- . -'ei 11 fgm' -f .pd F 743, " , -1 " - 31-'., ,: ' . ' ' lar? E ?-Wff' , ' -.ff . I' V-111393,-. -, ,.- ..4'i,7 . Q' ka. ,al ' f . .. .ga ' fi .Jw -'5i1H.' 55 . '-Li -' f ff is . 1 , ,Y 'il . gp a .Q .,1. '!fi7f.3f1j11-E2-'f il . . ,app 111, ' ' :M ,.:g, 'hi ' ' " ' "" ' ' . f-f,g1," f- 1, . If rx.-: f'..ffefav? - :T s - "i':f'. ?UYv1.., v.g.' 544' ,1 I Q ' 3 ' " ' ' X ' V.- ,.- 1 . ,ful Q: tri: 1 --filly' ff fgf5'eg.f. Vw ,gN':x1 55gf'--EY ' 1 13' ". .Y-1 . 487 . 'QM , '41 , . . .W ., - -.-w.-.r'tr,- V, . .. shi f. - V -- .' ...wh .. ,,f':. 4: Jw.. r. , ." Y.j 4,-Qbf yilf-V-V hffi "M" ' f . ,i 'J' .js - wi. ' ' " ' 'f 4 " . FL. f . , . ..,. "Off 3 -if?-' ' 'L ,gi : jk-,. :F K-if '-.9 " v :ill 55334 4 . f .,, A . Q.,-.l,,j.1Q,1 " , . 4 - V-,A A. 4. 'mf' .1 lam. f I ng. - 1: 5 . A gp: .V -,f - ' - QS' iivl .z ' 21' ' 3 , . ' . -' 1 'P' YH ., 1 ,E 528:53 .-.gmt U , . .,s,h.,. , , '.i Q J- if I Milf fi 52 -.1 zr I ., 'Q L -L' , .. . 'Jug W.. 2 " fb Q4 Vfr"'?-32' - 'l'.l'!Lra. .4 my , . , ff,.:gFw 4 'H-' . 1 . gg ' 1.1, N,. Ks'--1.4 , . ' 1 :17 5 . , Ef,,g".i7' ' ' K 'IFJ' ' ' .Q-v '- '95',?11," - ' :I 1' L., N '54-qv.: 51, 1551 ffl: 5,1550 E., .31 'U' 3-"9 A7 PY 'VH ' 'ill--1 :fam - f f1f44?f5E, W r :-sits. ' Eff-Il " --1: - -. , ...Ms .'J'f"-5443? '51 ' -' ' "' -4' f f +. , 1-fx ' W ...iw . ,, - - .g-.- . ..,f, -. X E - gag., mph .. i " '.,a:', if gig-75Q.4g.' 131 4, Nvxfi Nr ' ,vii auf: F' .. ,,--- 1-f.. ,,-.. ,,.- 1 - .A wa - .D -. ' H A A' ,, .N Q, , H , V 1 ,4 -93 1.1-,,: ' FHL ' " ig: 2- vw' - Jer! -ff -V . - li A-fur' ... 'P.,1 - L' ' , If A wt - ' ' ' 5 5 " I... f.,-fa, ,'-:HN Lf.:aRJ' if-my 4. j J ,. - 3, . ..g.A --57. ., T.. .,,,.WA . l, .1 . . .:,,fc....' , LK,-,. Q., Ark S EJ. N ' if--:Y W :ew.gffA- flu . -H , 52+ zz- . 1 ' . . 1 54 1-T TQ-7?fiZg'." t 'AT Mfr. ' pxffw..-',Lk',"' -. . . ,- .,.., . V 2: I f , V yr ' iqf ff' ., ' 'F . +n v - . . .1 Q, X.. fi, 6, . W . 4 ,,m ,Q ,Q-I 15,35 'viy-A -in t ' 1'w':6fkH, 2 ff "viii: . I V' .A ffgbi .a gif- 5 ' .fi 7-K! -.. ....-., . ,gf 1.11 1. -. , .'1Q..:5P"'..,,Aj L3?'-Eu ,Q Q.. J - a.-'. V-' "x f'-L , .-r,.f. 1 4 ' .:. -'P ,- ,Y .,., y H. ..,,,.., .31 f!N3,'f'Ngi" M -f QL , X' ' 'F' fz'1"f"555"' ""' ' ' ' If ff '-2-1' --1 "sl 1 ,L 1 - ,, 1 A V .- -. ,. fl - ,Q ..- f"a.,-'ffQ'g 1 D if 'F Jsfqis J' wifi, 1,25 4 ..-71 T ',,..I'g3 7 'wef.f.q:- ., -'- P - .-,Q :V . x "?? . 1' 1 ' J' Iv- 41 "EQ-.9L:.' cifii- f' . -. ' ' ,yd . , Wa. 1 , 4-15... - . - 5 ,3,, ,Q ",-effvgl'-Lf, ., 'E , .'f-j5"Ll,'j' Y. L 1533- rv: ' sf Ji xiiiee l 1 M., :,' ' , ,gr .il 154:- QF J 555, W 'if 3, . , 4' 4. +. ' ...L - " 1. .. Qt . V X-, al L . "1 '. f "QQ 'A 1 " , lgifj if" , I -MM I", 51 - Q,J'2?4gg9vZi?g,Z' i x f i--f "e-E15 'FP . 5ag.2...,,, ,L . fffw ' ' " ' ' ' ' ' ' - 1' ' - fxgffkg J EH" .. fkil"f.1 I::"F -1 'm fr A, 1 ' , vi-' ..Q,-.- --5, V-mf.. f - J ., fan , K3 -if ' - fu-. 974 .4 . . ,:.3,v33i:-'gin jig, .' fi' fn .ix 2: -'A . 4"f'Q7Q,:zf r' . . 5 ' ' ff .1-T 111- " - Q- ....-.' -- 1-4 - ' , .x -. Y' 4 A 1' ,. ' -H' nf: 5 we. f .. - "gl.322f'- 2, 91 w'a3vw?' ,. ,Q-1 41 . , X Y Ji 4- -. - A . . ,. .. . , , . . .. ,. .,--.4 ..f', .mail M .N l. ,.! . , , A if, Q, i , 4, :-I-M4 If , -,Vg-. . Q .ks -. , . ,. ' -xx fig -xx. - , gt.-'y .f -. . N ' ff , . ., ..-,5. -fjyg1311Q's2 ,, ,. 1,-f" ,. - , -- .-g.:: V- -' , Wig'-+f ml-J 1. wr- , . . .- -1 Qin. iw. P-'I ' ' . 4f,'Tb,lg, 1f .. , .E 'Z rw- wi -l'f'- ' ,, - ,f ig.. fa.-kgs, " Q' 'QQ' E- 5. - fm' ' -2 1 'Sf 42:4 , rfgvxlf-Q53 5245 . ' ' H fi! -'lpR..m,3 In 4 -.,r -xg-.,fj:l2. v"'1-sa 31 I '.1+.:5 ,.,, 3 . in ., . , 5 '1w1.-L',:- , '15 'Md' - wi' , 5 , E 4 V' 1 A H 5, ,,, w ily , .. .. fx" - 7 315 !f',"'f"A 'Af ' 7' ww- . 53" ' L 'mf .y-x...-if 51 '--1' J 4, ,- wi. x K-r-...ii 1 -if L.-1K gf. VA Q55 - ' -rg . ,D wwiqgzfg v . 5, fy 75- cg... sg . L ' W if 4 rf' 0 wg" 4 4 1 f. 5' ' 'ay L .fl 0 , , K - f 1? .- .Q ' f , . , . w... , ,pf .+., . , . -"' U' ' ' ' -- ., W- V flfi-rx' -EJ"-1,1 V1 ' 'L N 'A ' A wid +'S f:'9+A"'f5"5f ' f . -1 M. V ,v giv.,,- 3,'z,3.v5,,gK V, - 5 1,143 viii ,.w' 4. .-.f-p:,,-. f. .,- . , ..- . - - 'fl-f.a-,-.Jy, ' ' 1:21,- 27' '-If 735' '-4'3f'-xc :-' 'U-ff BA-1 if ' 1333, "31:3"4 4 'Cf X ' - , if U4 1Bff5?' Qi 'F W n "- .l"1'f7l4j"'if,:K gg' "3 ' '- 3145 --.-'-. '- ww"-' 2+ 4 1 'f -1 ' ' A -.- T:-Mr . ' 4 5' -7 f' .. 'xr' ' 3 - .. af- ..,.,,.,,. 4 , . . .5 .. P . . Yh . ,. Ui- i w - 5 451.73 'L , H ... g LQ: . .3 - ., QQ - ...N Q ,.3.:..?H, V ,. .M A ' ' " - , f ' -W V , T x '. - -. lf'-zz.. e : . .. ' 'zz 1'gv f.. .w-.fx -usp, fu --fy ' fa.. -I sm ' ff 1 ff' '- Z .. ,-"':',' '- 5 -..-,gwf--J. . iq wig 91- '- ' 1.15 -"1.1g.' ' ' .V f-g:.we'1w- 4' '22 1 4, f xt W . Y, ,?-xygw 'AE-v,f..i 4'-, L -V' , L. .3'af.f,.. . , -9.3 EH'-,4ff5A,uSE' if W 'M' Q, if ,vw-Y wg' f uw gi if . .gm -, .-- wgvhv .-,Q Wmufwwga SL 51 N xg, ' ' QI J. "AAI-v, "- -N 1 "7-. 'gli' -- '- 25, f 1 - . 'L , L " ., 1 '. ,0'g'3',f.'?41fu: ' nigfj ' Qg3?f4g1f,,5'.1f-.-.f1.Z. ,. 4 y' Q ' j.4 . q.g,,I-iff? . , 'ffixg 'ii m 'MT . tg, I -- , 1 - 1. , , -.4 --Q., ....w,,5-- ' 3 - iv-3. 1 V ...Q 1-, .. qw .Q .:..:.f-.1 mul' 03, Agf 5,-iw. .V gg, Dag- .ei -...'-uv! ' , ,. 1 gjagu5.Q:4m.3.s2J',-14,531.14 4:-' J-rf. XL, . I., .f.: V31 - Lg.. Q- ' uf? J. g,.,:5:.1g7.,'-. 14- . ' Sh , , it-,gi -F41 ,. N 4. U -,- , 3'5'L wi- ,Q ,. 1 " ' Nw: b 4 . 'g.-1 + 5.21 f -..:--5' 1- .11 ' 'L I l.,1"' H .5 f, Q 'i.-. Mm , wifi vfHf4,ff:afmg .f V1-H+ , ' M 6 f-25 Q ff M- V it ' , SQ Q w,3h?'58 4. A A ..t.,.u3., 17' -:Q , df. ' - Vg b H- . ,. x J ,-.,.1,.,.v j ",g.T.: 'egh-.1 ...rg 5 A . 2574 ujjf. 'I 1 M . 'a ' n"r'7 g,if" i'5 2 V !" ',.' ,mfg ff-'.x34.,,-.': 'J' - . ' - " Q' . ' ?i1.,",f'. "Lg:-' Q u mm:-'.f5:r 4' v-E' 135 ,Jw t MJ ., : T - , ,H .Q IJQWQ, A. YV - ...fy ,VJ L i. 1- I. 35-y ,V A K, , 1: ' .' N- -r .- , . .?.Zfrf,:ii., Q A 3' if 4251? - 's!if"" 'ii- 'We-Eff K V -4.58. jsfavn f 4'-,bf . , I, E: " L.,4w g,. . ,' '4'Zy4f4g4 F wk '. Pi -fl, " '1'+bv, 2 W" . 1 ik '- '- - , ' 1' ,x rf, ' us," 'f fs 1 ,g, , ag . . , .ff . f 1, , ww' 1 ffffrqxfm bwa ff 'f 'n',ibiJ1Y5?F'i:,'i: ' 5i'5f5?Y'37y 43i" f'42'1 f--:T fl-11 fa-1. Q, lf? 'fry 'ffufff 'ff G- -I f 1 7 .gs --r -, -1-L w - -rm . ..' ' :,. ., ',,:3'1v"i 'L'15g fl ly? F, -VE'.i' A 'gh-839' If ' "3i:' 13""ff"+Z" iff, 3' '7E'5 h. gf: , Y 1.11 , . J. ,., E., 5 , . , "1 ff? ' F -. -.few -- 'R .,-. ,- 9' iv - .. .H - .-wa. f X .H ., 3 . .. ,. ea, u w q , fi-'ip mf' f 4' ' " ' -wif'7xfif1"'- . ,- , 7"" 1xHf:e .H ,qt -, V f .- .vk,'.:it...f!??1k3':.3E51giaf5.L -2 ' ,GTM . :' ' '3?s.'+:1.f1'f rf?"-f.ff1i3'm 'V' "- ' 'FF' , ,yvlvtz-Q, ,, ,i ,:.i,,.I .'YemN'gi.4 1 , n- ,ga 4 S w I '-'za '- .-. -"y-Sxk -' ., ' --r. ' A 1-,L -a.".'g ai- ' P' ,, - tf A- -wie. ' g - we ,, M - .. ...J ' -,,. 1 , .- ,.: Y - - 1 -. .. ,... , -f A -.- "'- ,- . .4 . J .4 . ', - '-1 '1 wgff . A 1. . -, ,.x V 4' -+ I, , ,N f , - .4 MQ ', V V. P ,. l.fp3?ifFff,A, .L,fhfgf.':'V. :-5 .J - . A U . , . .J W U 'X V - ww V '- gg '- 1 -K ' f--, .f fu-2 1 V H . X- --E. , V. .-- A A F -. J ' '--5. ' ":' Q. .r.-ff' '-' ' f -1 - v .fx-'H-'g "4-H -'ig . '- 3 .' 'X .,' -4 7Q A X HAM, ! ' X . .- Ji m. -Ty r 1,-, ,.. wr . V-rv Y' 1' 'f,.-' k. ,, gl 'gnu- ,1 V . , X is if 1 all ,+A 3 1 ' 'I' ..,- -cf Ex L . . '-, .' .1-f '- :J jf' ,..4 "'.. ' dr . M 531 3 3ff' .pq,.J4:' f 1. fff Q. Q 1' N. v .. ,. gg, .ny Q it A4 Q. .gt ., Et' Q ' Fv- u A 1 . df , I fi!" . . s 'Qs W v gm mf ' 'S 'I k , -, .., . NI. 'r v, . v, '. .v Q... p . .'0f'n' 1, A . " -L. ,. .4-. 4 - ..'w-'Lb M' Q35-L.:Uf'f.ig1 f -'Aff gg-V '5' 2 1 ' 1' L fy Q 135 ,33 ' :QQ ., Ls' .u . K' g '- -.-31 , :-515-'g '1-" '. .x. A, ,N NDF 'fb ' 1 'gp Vr- w f 1G fW . eh -if .. x. , " ' - f-fff fhm. - . . . L f"54r'9, . 'i4f: f '-W'-5' ' fi' 1, 1 "'P'5L'Q"3" 1-.Lx-5" H' 7" .5-5421! fx ' 155333K " 5 , -25:5 -9 fmliif If QQEQ-L?A4,xf-, Lfirf, 'fw?1vHf: A f3t?Tli X- ,sq-'3,'fQ.'-1 V2' If T'-ff 5' ' ,.2-4 ' f . ii 'f'+-,f5Q',.,.f", -'T'Sii.f" fi'4,.Q,:,SA'-'-"QE-i..l" - k!"""UQ" 'fJf-' -5 '- L . 2ggQ17Z?r'.4-I.. 'JB . f :-1:9-is-A,.f.' ' 'fff+:?ff'.3.1rs-'fn -4 f 'a2f753'? ' Q- ' 5, f' 'mel 'f fifzffig Haw- -. 4' .F5F ' W-.:.vfz,g 1z5 w 1,44 , f Q 3 N: 1 " n f-."" 1.1: . -if 'Q fag '-ff ' :L-f--wtf' P-3 ..'-fibwa. 1 fi""'5 bU"5" 'inilf' ' 1"S3QFfi".f"Y-" gf ' -"9-'HL-' g--. " "'i"1"fEs'.'v,' - A-2931 'Jay' 'Q' 1.4,-x-'-. r A, " .-Q :ff-'Y V fi - .Y 'W -nf X ' -':,' 4 -- ',.,-11 ' 12 .. a. .' .-n..-,-"- Qi 's ... .1-. , ?'fff'f:g V ""' 'fi 'V ' kzmix 2 -'Q 'J . 'W-gM'i -P ' - ' ' f 'wA.,1N 'uf-.'f..,:-Mr. ' . 1' 2 - H 21'-v M'A'rLw- - we iw '2."r'.1f 1 ' .u. 4,-... K,-.. . .-ft-ff! A-.--J.1'.-1-.. -4 -.,L.L-1 , .., ,JZ-4 5... , ,. ,,. .f-'Pt . .. - 3.5 a?L1 -EIA ff',.., f' '-52'1 U 4 ,. - f35':5...'Eg x,Eff-w 5 ' f ALH:,.j:Z ' , . 3 za ' - . ,fb ' - ' 'mf,f..,.'. .' , J.. 511- " iw -,V - , - '- 3 '- ' ff ' ,qx3.x,4,,a3y 'fzljiif T 5 ' -545 ,fe wif.. my v .. ',zwfv. .ev 6.4 f A-mg.. .,+ . f- .iv-' 1 H-. ,' -wb-fSv'f...'z gif,-. -- ,L mf.: - I 5' A-ing' .1 'ffbffi' ff' fb - s "4 JG-JF. , gg., JI., fp?" f v' . ', r.,,1: B-'M 4,3',f - mf'--' , ka- . ' .ff ' 2- - 4, 1 vffw--g. K+- ' ' ' -N w 'f-'1s.ff "yxSf,,,-'N J. . 3 'Wh .'-My 'w,f,...517 4-1 -. . .fn 52- f .1 fha ,N , ,. ""..1- --b N- .f 5, , x- 5 V41-, ,Q-?., ,A . - . ,557 ,- y fy up, 2 ,I L-yy' 5 t ' . 1143-,-4?- 4,w.:-1?f'M '- - f' Rf.-P., 3. . -' , , 'vu 1.--Q -,wg al "1 . -A .-'-- 1.2" .L 911 ' "-'-tw 1- Q1-',1."q,,1f1fg'4' -v --2 fin ' w4'.a. -'M J "':-fla1"m'wg5aQ'f' 17' -' W, .- ".f '. .. V'-,531 'MEYER 135'--Ei' V' 'Y "-.1'.'I'5'44 ".4fH-. ' - H'-, 1' . Wh2fv'19? "42F',f'... . A sv L? Q 1: , ... Sr , ' ' ff' fa,-. L. .. 'ir ,gp-,1:5', f -' -,Q w.-' . F,-wg'-fr qi. 4 f,,, 'V 12 ff" ,Af a K-,L Y - .ij , N' ffm-- :- 'iG ,,1: 'fri' 14993 lvl -' 3 71 ' Aj iq '-" Hs! H 1 A 973111 Y 'n 'T I ' " .EW T ' FH -'fx' ""' 'ii " 5 l:1Ef"'l ski Z. . :F l ?V,25Yiat',g . ,-, . 1 1 3: -f,,i,N -.'iQf5lv,5:i3,1::,. ., Q ..m,l,,!F.?gu ,.m?3 . .ff ff" 'f" 'mi'11g' " f -'ZLf9L5'3jfL-74 F --"x 5 EVER A ""f5- 4A7"'T4'. VwJ:il. 32541, '-ff' 154. 'f 'f l- ft," -" ' f ' . 'H :1,7""' ', f6"'-.Air 1 A: ' 2 ? AC-QAFQ:-1 if Q4 2'- Q -2"'f-:.4- ' 'V ,f: .i"3'- x- , ' -1'-. .f l : 1- ' LJ. .fr ' - -1. 71+ F .y.- --7 . 4g ." 14. f r, ' 11 1 - ' - - :T .4 f ,.,.a .1 , .,: ' .. . . . V .L . v.:NQ +11 'L -we J, ., fu, - - 4. .4 .,, ' f -- -. 3, ,ef gg., .Jhg l .f-'wx 4 1, N. V - V Y I A.,-1 '- g W, 'z fl.-s ,L ,aa ,,- .r f 1,5 Q., U, . 3- V-, M- - . .1 ,kv . 4 - . M ,-1 , 1 sf .-.,, 53031 , , ' 4 . 11 Hg, , ,N -Q - , ,g-14 35.9 ., , -1 ,fx-, A.. nj., .12 2 ' - gf: 11'- 1 -wnzjk .4 .,1,.,,, Hajj , , 1 3.13 g g' -4 'V 'QQ -' 4 -in x-1 -.lx 4, 220.1 ':5lf"',f1?EE3f'2'ffZ?f Qfij Qia aff f '-'1i,if5"SQ " 'i"QS- 562, - -a ff 4,145 .1 - -454.-"UPI ' ' W Q- . fig . ' , gum -. ., . ., , - , .5 M -1- -,fm N.. ,I ..4.f- , . .V -v .,z. - . g - 5.4. -' 'r 5' 1 TVN 1... F GLW' vsfffag M-gf: 'za' ' ,-'ffwfkv f 'W' iff- - -fi-Km H: .' Q' 3 7 -. , -' 1 f U f--'1"3'v hw ,fi gf 1 - 1g,.'a13Qg-.ifs- '-5 5 -'ff U'?:b1-. L,-A: f 4.21: '-':.'1f,,-' ,g. - . 1L.ai?'-' ,- 1 v .Q A :ii 'G-, .t 25' , 45 -'A' L ,ZA "4"'5'. Qi-'Gu' 1 if" ':?v,,. .,f ,Ar I 'L,.. '-Puff t - " 'S-ii ' as K. 2 'J' '2"'f'- 205 "'Y.. d' -- 1-' 'VE Lum ,N .- vt, k v-ff . ffl- it "1 --,.:-2' +'1,a -5, -::. W 'w - ,1'- V1 '. ,....H,,4..1i-.,-fs,- ff - 455245: , g PM H ,..y'-.' . bw .. -- if J. .sg , A - gf -' ?,i',,-w..Lv,1..f V - ra 14' ,sf v 1-:gg - V-Q ' T'-691. 114 fi" L.aYfl1"f ' fr'- in i f .JV 1 Sw v.. Y'5'F 'z' "'a3j5,"'f6'?l ' fi' :A a-ku ff ' H75?1.7-Lf-f .mf '41 " 111. .2 .-'. ' 'ina' ,W mxea. K 5.5-.X ..3pT..'..,p:,1,' 54 . ,xjfflsvq 42.5 33450, H 5 ,rj .iw igijfT"5'+f1Ef'f . ' ' 'FF 4 ': 1, - " . 5 li-'fif ff ' .iw IW-"3 ' " '."1. kits: 4'f'33'fr"'1':'Af Q . "E '- av: " 1-fhw. 5. 1 " --ri ff Y 1' '-2'.f?'eaf. 'ff 2'wf..-,Q ' ,-3ML55 ,.f 1. f f' 31'- "'ZW?Uf Kipp- if-m -. f . .b ., nn., ' 1- .A M. JL' . bi: -W: ?vif4',,. H ,",' . -bf J -f""'Lf5- ' 'ir' -, ji' dh-M' ,fp "5 ff' l x " '- lk E' E. U.. u k , Y - A-3 - .JU . --,-., , .gf-jLw,,'f1'1,H4. rr W, ,wi V 'Msn' 3 ,--M49 -,V f?,f.J,?- -, ,H 4. 1 .. -:iv gi,-in? .. .4 - . 4- ' -4 - . " . Y. 'Sf 31. .fl-K'-' . .3 Ffh 1 5 - 1. !fi1:5'l5f5Q?r-', ,f ' ..y,4' F5 . 1 1. . M "'w,,,. : ..9-- .4 ,j 1-5 Q V1 -A ,, '1 xzs-2 q i,-f' A ' Yiiiaqgf 2 ' e- 2 ' lf'-fsQ.,:if,Gz?5" ,rfi Lfikff, 55. ,U ' '- ""- .- h ' fp' ' 1 . 3,54-1.,:.-,g..vf:'vv 'i l . -. WW- -' '+ Q 1 ., -v "-2-: f -- 1? -" 'f . '.?121sf" - 1- , it E. ' , Zin -- -5 1? . 7 if,-'F -, , ffljxf 3' .4 fw f ks - , iyigkfgi T 1 'fi-'fl fig.. viiffgw i 'Rig-fa'-,W gif. .wig-Q" . " - '1' . -I Q 1 wi- - 11+ 4-..G1'f1+ .. 541' W y w fgfgz' 1 .aifagg f-a.' . 4 ' A .'vf-gs. ' ye-.QE "7 'tv - hgl g lfii f f if f"' ' ."" ' U If-' ."' '44 2' ' - : 1-P V."-3. .'4'..'f'. " :"'f .' - .ff ' J n., ,' . WW- 1? ' ' ff--'L'-' 7 "1:'va' -1'- " -' ' '4,"L""' :Q,Egf1-4.55. ., fafifjif 52,2 1 I 395- ., ','Pb,wff'g, 21 1 ,153-V M- " . -,-my , 14. h 4 55 Haw 41:2- , -- 4 flu! EQ' 7. ,if-.g f. ,y rye.-..f' ,. 3 1, 1 1. 3, f .. .. ...wa 1. -R. .5.+.v. . k Q. sl-. -.- .-fax' 'fflxf'-1 w-jr, ,Il-' 12 -Ju .Jsg.,.,1Q4-.1555-' Y ,ff A ,V ,Q .. 3-5, i f ,z y wgv 5 - gf,-,f- 11 vj ,,..',g,5, - ' ' A 1 ...L-' , -ri , I L,-' qi V IF. -,. 'fn' " :-, -Y .Q 4 ' 'eff ' 1 ' 'f Q fif2'."l . :-. '-1 A -- HM ' . ff-L-Rl' 2 ' ' 5- .35".'7. -A '52 , Y- , :Q-,. '. 2. ., Ll -1 ,-,ww .1-1 G I -, ,1f-.'- V 1-- Ve'-',f 4- ' u' . i., . v.v"w .fl 'gh 1. '- -1. S x -x. L fr'gvY A U- A - ' . 'ww-P X -SJR -4. -X .- fs-.1 ff- V - , wr , L..-153 ' wr - :EF :if -' -1.5.-'afi f V - . L3 W - M. if -. '- v f Q - ,xlib . gg . ... , . ,. .. M ri? 55,51-. -.' '- -, -If-f , . ff? ,S Uv.-if-5 .-1 -- Q H , ,E l fi-"5vAx Q-SPN' 'ii' 'lugs .1'.k'l ' . Tlii 61 Y' :5 ' ?if'1""42-- -32" f -' 'TV' 1 E " S... 1 .ff - ' ' --2 ' J--"ii -f.-fi' 'ff-ffl -.W . I". WL- -, , .-. if? -if-71'-f'f!L'.. - .- S-.tr-T4 L-uf' 5-11. .f.-?f'1.--f1-- 911T5.1f: 315 - Hr' -z--Sw ia: ':.--1 Q--Q ilfz. ,f -1.1-1.-is--Sf .- -"iii-.1-1.1'-f..f.-3' sl .f.,-- ,",-'.f,w:a - .f'f.--'4'q',, ,.. ,1A'1Tv Quai- ia, - L w ff:-. - 15.-4.91-1 - 'x.-- fcgzxgk--, ,.-Te,-.h-3-..e 1,-:+4.k, fi T1f:.,,..i.-, 31-A 3,-'W --Way, :fa .1 '- .-i .' - -.4 -mg? '---is 1-H'-,ff . gg ' - - if 5' Hr., ' - ' -1-.ag-5: -2. -31.1-'13 -5-.-.-ag...--,-Q 6- Q. '.gff'xpg,-SJWE .,g-1Q.-':Af,g.1gmf--- -if f,- -4- 1 - -' ,- 9.-,Pi .1 --vc'f:.d7I 12'-w ' -,J --: sv -l" . .- .. '42 aif.-':fi"-.,'!-ip .L 2 eff'-."-1 -Y-r. -,-1: al!-1,1-'-'Viv Xin- -.-fi' ' "'.ggsL?,?'v,j- -,WN -f'55'g,-""1a-fe ' H 'GQfi1?4:?'-fhggski' i- Pi.. -.Z 3.5: ' -f - .. E5-xi : -- gui.:-.3--s.' -fi?-s'5 1' f-5'---.f-'-f----gs: J."?43'E--Sufi we-- . iiiz-'."g-if -We-" f -5-ff' L.,.:-'gi - .2--.1fQ?Q.f:3: rw .:f2gf-Exif.-'. . X 1 I-5 ti-j Amir - 2 5.3-1,f,'g l 'gl i JF., 1-. Q., Q.,-'ly -' ,ip-.. ..g.-5a,.L,i2:.i?i I. A 5F4:.rL.:3.34:Q..--g1'.- - rf5.p:n- ew -- ---1-.f .gi1y G-,,f-f.g.,..i5lr..2afg,gt, --L :,. ??S'1A,..,s,5-v- . ef is -X. P 1- .41 few' fm-" --1: -vii--i -- azfhiv ' - W 'E-'Q-.1'-:Sf-Lf,-:1 -. 'zffw 'P--is fe2-'ud"572fF --- .- ff?-'-.-fe .- v - ' - 1 A ' --f.. - - Q, -. - - . -' ' -w r ,,, 4-.1 ,.,. ,G1..S,-E5-,H+ , .. I .,f. -.- .v.,.1-.--.v.,...., , ., .. . ,. ...AQ ,. .Q Q-1 -.X -...- .' ' .?- ,-. , - Q ,., .1j-,.Q.-. ,..!l'p,g- A' -JJ--+ -.-.-H 'Yi , . -f -, .., --Ek5.-g-.--x.-2,,.:.-r':?'?'i'l?f'j1L-V MF' A i -9e.g,3...P2' -.J 1- - .-- 1 .- ,.:- .5 ..-...I -. 14. -. '- -'sip--,ik-H -'ASQ H, . -' 7g'?,,sfys Y,fA,,g.:: ,.1. '---Tw: 5-u,L,:i -'-- g- .QF ew. g, . ...g 74 1' ' .1-5 - 'f f.. -0 --1' - . .- .-ff' 1 .1. v-ff .a-fr - is-fr - .- - ' .wxw -w .2 -Ji .Q-" -Az. 1-vLff--1f'f5f--H 23-' we -5. - . - .- -amimfff rf.-.154 E.. Of--, M 1 .F Q . .+vz11- ?,sfi-55 -a.fs..w..--'-- -f .,.Jz,.:2-.2-'-:-f--i..-.Q-. - 4. ' . . - - ' " -'f' --J, ' - ,gi-f--- '-4? !5if',gg,,.1r:.-f---um l f 5 Q,-35.15 , ?r.-,gfqqggf-w. -12.5, -- '- 1-fgi 3.3 ---ai- .F : -, , A ' .f " 1-. Q- 'sm.1,:.:-.' " 33- , .?"'-"F'f ,fi 'SQL 'i ,:.,,,." ,.3.g-5' agslj - -Q -LPJF. 1,3 9-G + M 3245- Ni -E , 'Z -1 ia.. mi- v5.1-- 'S:'i' !i' 1 2 ii Z . Zi " ML -F " - 161 6.-V51-".A1.-"ff i'f32f'r1G1b'Zf-idirili :.- . . ... .. -J . ,Q - . -.-, ,- zz., - . .,, 4.-1-Jr. i ---- , . -, - 1 '-- '- gf ., -.v f - Sf-., 4 . nj.: rv ,.5,.:f.-. .ft -Q ' V-nw 4- 1 M , 'iffil ""5fM- ' 1""L"f4. -. f - -"-Z - --.51fM1iF" -Q '- - ' "Qi-H .ff A : ,R - -J,-,:., 1" . ..-ff- .-+:f..1..' P --'- ff-. ---H -J: ,-5. 'F .- -HQ. .-was z- Jfl .v!"'--- .if . - .ww -'3?4'...5'-! 2 3'--'--941 . mf -W .ang -1. ". -L - - -' ' .e"w. "JU -' ' - 3'-!'f"4:fx--. . --.-Sv - f- .?7i4'f1'i:-..-QZF.-'YE - -ir,-r-2-if We--'A . 'r :-fi-5?-mf an-1 ---5, -..-H 'STI' . 35-1-1 1-A--.-.-21-334-53... fe-. -.2-fp -J? iii .2-1.f7'1? - S-' ' .-V' : wif ' fIa' Q5f 16Q- 'W-f -f.-Wi ..--ilk "-gag--f-. . : f-E - ff QQ.. 73 'Sf-i'-wif-- . i 'g.,!-5. Mg:--4,-fi'."'I5'f',3,,g. I fir- Ugg,-E xg. nd.. ,s,w-35-FZ, 'q , f.',z'v"2!1 - .1 -we e' . 'v----7212-4 JEL -.5353 W - r 592: may , . , E-, , .:.s, f. 1. lf-F'?1EuM -1 41.. . 1,1 v,. ,ZSQK Q., -5 1543 Qjpfg, cg? ' V:ig :g-L:f,'- ' -: - f4.yi'jti.Q5E.s.i V '-'Ea:..7',f :ggi --vw x.. - . ya- 5 , 1-. kv,-' - " --- -K L. -. v - .-, ., -- 2-E.f-'ff-. ,f 'si ---5-... .. 5...- 12.3- . 2 Q. - -4,46-.'f-f,--...M '.',3a.--,-E75 -G. L -- gg Q"-2' f' - ,af '- 7633 '-'f-Arai .-"-"3-1 .-: 1, - . Q-'f 1- gk-.J 1- -' 1- ia- fu.. .'Q'.5Weg,--.fggfgtg -'nv . -, -. f - rc.. 4 ,Q jf. 2- 49- .r.j .-., -'L':1,,,51.w -,xp . .: 1. ,.- :Q - -j 35 , --A -3, ' -fn 5 - ,,a.- - . ey 8,1 :za ' .--cg, . :- Q--. -fig?-:'+E - . 4 Salim-wwf .QQH .93i. .g.,. F' fi m e ' "?r 45-ff-23 - if -ei 315:55 V 14,-.-At5,. ef, Sfix.-I 69, 'T .. 1 .J :L EM -1.1.13 J.: 5, gg-fi:Eg'4.z. ,jg V gf 2 vm ,T 1-,kaigfffg 1,-,,' Q' 3,3 Life,- 5 'on ' '-7 .4"l.L? "rw 'il--ff ' ,- 3.-fi. 5' ' .f-1-.5 J - "fn 'Ss ..z -T.-14 .!'f- '-f44f" 'fE'?5E"'42. 54:3--.1. ,- -:igfi-' 53552:-. :mf-22 . -yy -, iff: -. any 4133 .11 3-5.9. wig' -. a -M 23.1 .m p5g5g,...g- Zi?-Mfr? I suv- , .-17-4 ,j ,- 1 .. 7: ,f1. 'K f " r- , .g,'U.-.V -'-' lf.- .11 aw r..gQ,g.v: ,ff-Y. 1 4,-QW. ...ala Avg :ff , -, .' F. .- ai," f .gjfg-'j .L --:J 3 - :iff--1? -f iifgn -J ,bQw'5,g. l?23x-,.15f?"Ytf,, 1,52-if if 1 - -.: ' -' - T-slflibgriqx, "'-rf: 5' " ' ...35.1'f:sf.v5?5lWg Qi "QQ--'-'Q-is -ie? Jil' -A ' 'W jg-iid - af - Q P":"f"'i 35' f i3..,f?" "" " M- --g,,,a"-, -,gap .,-, '.,j,3, . . , .ft -.3 W-ELJL5-'..Lw.V ,-14:41--:.+'--t-.. 3? ' ,ii QQ- 3.3'kf-22, .:.j,:gW f i? , 'I'-q Ljn-A Y. 3 ,V-: ,ph . :kg-'-. .'n'.g,. Lil.. . 1 ,, -. . Q, . h. . ,Ld -,V ,,,..,':ij. .5,,. MS F., V :Jah Ili- ,mite 1:5 wha!! , gi' xii, 1 A l Q ., Mn. , ,r ,ya . 3. .. r- - ,. , . .- -- , -,." ---J 4--1 11. ,- '. .- .- ,gk --- .-its. i...x-sg, 1.1 na.. . H.. - - -if :Wg-Q-5.4 .-.f- .J -1 A -,ng mg- M5 at . J- 3-. . .JEFF I., 153- - set., rl iwggf. -54' -. if 7. I uf- -- 2254. nv: . .. - i ' -. 1 - - - -Q . .. ' '-:if-u A-1 -r' .-L. .f--f -- -17 . 1. -- 5....1,. - 1554- -- - .--2 ,' :ff-'iii'-. .'?:1.E-' Mg ' . 1-1-, E1-., l-,JE-it-I--S ' 2 . eq- - gr' +.?r'+,- 'j- fJ"F :'-Sei' -ff iff-'h A -wi? ,i,.3-5713?-3,-,Q-1 .:L. 7-2 f Mug- ' .2345 . 3' ,R ...S-I-viii,-if - V- 'H - . - f - za.-" .1 f'f 31' .P- "T-7 ---.-1. Wi. .- . -lf? - 'f' .- ' '3!!'-ah 'Lui -J. 11231 - -. f 'I-ff J 'S -u -Lf . ...-is Rv -1: ... - .y--4, . .-fi M. Jjgwf. .- .-. 4 -. gg.. f- K- - .. .513 gg 4. 4 2.-'59 - . .71 'B '-e' -- " fi -'. -" PF.. - 'r5..'. - -5,123 51--..'-5"4w - ,P":"'-ff?-, ',,'i.f.:-'-S5 15'-1 -.'?.,n'y..,- N.. 'Wi'-' -6-Q .t 1 'ff-Q 15 5,2-.. fn' f.iw1,,,I,?f5 gi . '.-1viff-2:-fgf1,.- '- ' , ,4.','rwE:,?j4.1f,fq,K,j5- gf,-. U- :Li-275:25 , ..,3 '-351, gf.-'.,'1 sg V . Yjgfggk, .1 - Q-'--4 , .gn '- :T -' Egfvfa- v- :QQ -5 5213-155 -1. .7-4--sf' if' 1 -:ef-Q Yi-L, ..'-?'-f1'a-"- ...l-1-u'-mi .z .--1 Jig :P-if--Fifi -.f --1221.-4. 4: FZ- - --.f vfi-Fi e...Sf"5-: '5--my -Wig E fa".-'f-E T51 - 12315,-. bf , 6. 3. -'V-ef" 'i'5.-.,---Lx.f..fb' if -.324 '- -DA' " 5,5 -MF. 1223? 'f-if-. -. - - .' -uhh?-1 . .R --: -f'r-- -1- - . far-. Q -' .' -'ww . -."'. f.:.-?: . WM- -df ' 1.-'EF'7Kfx -- 'f '5"liS1"' 1---.Q '15 ' r ff' '--' jc- ,A ., ., Q- -- --- - : uf -, -,+R ..q-,.a.--gr-. .. 4... ,A . , -- - 6 - 115 3 ,B--,qu-. -...bv , e 3 .f. . . A .- ug? 3, sim. , - ,. g. ,wi Q :. v3, ,,,M.?,i,,.,h 1. f, 4.55 3 . 5... ,kb lyxg, f,4.-Ly--u I VL .,3.'gg J . .- .. - - . . .. 5.1,-,5r- .1'--Q?5',HH.'P -my ... ,4 "z-. ..L Q 533155 -1124295 Q- -14-E-.25sQ5.v F bffbj? ,. -2-3, 2'f..1'.,.-',:5,g. ' iq?-5:,rfi'i,ggf25"P'wi .. - . 1- 1. fi- -ff. Z..-1' ef - wg- e2.f2r:".-:v'.--3.1.-M . -f'- -ff 'f sf. .1-fab - . 4.-.y -ew irc' 1-55'S"' -+ ' si' " a'his'Pl5- .2?k.'.n'E+ if5'j5?ff-.':?vl."'5-4935-I , '. 779: J- -'i.1'-'iP'.- ' ?'f'-'-' ':"1f 4- F- ?:. ' 5' 579 - in fag-f'-'f- jsewff- ' 'fri' 3' , , - - f - .' X - -.fe-"' -T . -1. ?iQ'r gf..-.g?4' H' 5' Z., .511- .-11 .. wa. an -:L ff -,f,,La'i7:- 1 ,-tf -A -- - . q-if :E-.-.l g xy.-. , .fa 1. - 'i."li1:-'A ...fi .,.. - ..-,gr-..-212- .Jr mfg.-. , 1: :uf .1 ' .- ' .- -. ' - - JF- f f ' ' +5-in "fi- ' l-" 5 -- -ff?-- .cf-TFHL. 447.1 -A L2-2 21 ' 'iii 1?Z,7'.iSA'M5'-5 ,Y L -Wig Q, ' ' l - 1. i - s1..-'-.- .Q-'--Q-.'-rf, 1' ff-r.f:,- ,ga-,ff ? -f .. '-.J -- .1- 1 as , 'rf : . .5 - ' g- -:..-,--- - . -,age 4 9- H. , . tm.-+e.v . UA.fff?i?fr1"1,5fi-e:,1v 1 :..1f--ug., , .- . 1- --L-.gw .1 'wa-if ,.-1-fm. if - .. - im. - -. '- -1-f..x.,,---9.-... -?-'1'4g'- - ."'T ' -.-.,-" gi , .:-- 1. ,..-H if .51 --- 155 . 1' 1"f': "l5Ca.'75-Ax-..1i' . -,' 'if GV." -Swv... -L .. -'Fa-Hr wr- - 'Si V--fy,4v '5"-pg,-Jw.---L J -. p ff 1- .- 1 Tai-fs. 57533 -4" Wi- - 5-'-.'15f'f?' "W-if 53'-"'f7Z5-5-if . si if'-ffl? Q3 2 ?3"'rf"7f'5l'g - gg. 41. 4 -- rx .. .vi-sg 5 A "1-ff-eg - -. - - f .- f- - - r -1---Q 5, .gj.Hr ...E -rl i:.f3j5,-4.-- fJ5-"7 - 1' .:.Hf'.:- -gg.,- ' 1---.,g,.g .T L1 1 . ,-'V ..-'lvl '-A. -- fx.-'wg -'F' . I gf- 5+ -f .1 .av-,.-' mf.. :-T'-x 121 'CW J.. . 'ii-121'-fL,,..igL ,ni C . 2.315 gg. -s. --: , -- ' .,.. -if- , 1- . - ,-ff 4 .i jg . M ' f - -ae? . 5. . mf- " Q-- .' ' ' iz, -f' E7 Q55 - . X55 955' .-255'-1-?'rI,'-:.'g --"Q-. .F ff' 9338 " 1 -, "S+ : S ?.i'f"?-1 ----2'-z - .t " - ' --.',T if.. 34 Fi .ga-Q-' . XM- ,, ...ag -gf , --1. . -3-521-gg,sY5'1?:'1f4-,Q-.' I..,:z9ffsm.-w e - . ,..,.. . . ew-- - - .M -:N--- --1.2.41 4 0- ' xv.-P .-.--2-fda..-, - -. -. -2. . -. '13, --5 - 1' -TQ --1 --- -fi?--4' 2 .11-. :aiu - r- -- --im F Mwvwf- .fy 1' - 'fm -M -W - Wi?" F' - 'S "-'iff-I.,f.,s . v-Q' -3522. "-7, . " 113:-5.3.1 if ' ' ' - , : . 'x ,, WI - .. . .- X , L. .L ' -..1, . n- '- 'L ' jf" -. .1-313-.' r" ' - , 'f ,- -1- -J. ' " - .5-5. -f .. '1--- - 111 - ' -' .5??'1.YgfEf'--'W'-5 - - " .. . . if Z im! I f .s - -1 . -5 - ' '- my- . 4' .i-g.:if1' . ffa 1l1-w 23-fr -f -v5'- 1. ' ,- .55 '...---2.-1. ,rig , :gd , 'rwljl 5,4 M I . .EM.i25f1,..ai!,,aia:i3Q7v4i555 Nigel, -5 .l, '- .-.. R - .QTEK . If. 3.5: .sk K-C Q' -Sn '- -IM' .23-14--P' -'if'i1Qji,g3'w-fn-.ji .-J-fffrvf-fis-if . 1. ax '-1. ' -mt, .. .F -. iff.: -L. 1.--' f.. .- ,Jr--wii'-5, '- .1 -4. --.-au. '- '- au. . wa. ' . Q14 -135 95: 51. f .. 'f'-g,.,-.Kgs .sg-1552.--1,41 iq'-H' -.7 - -.Q .. :Eg-,fr 13-aqwiw rv . -- MQ ...I--Z: .fi m u-3--f - " .. f ra ' - - f -- 5-ziwgfplq-..-2-.1w.g1ff?s5,9"'S-: .-1114-3 -1 fr -1 - -f .- -tnafiig.-'52-6 flip . -. 'ei .mi .. . .. -- . --x"- 4 - 81+ - -9'-f - ' wJ- Jin: 1. . ..Q- .-.':"-if .' .,,-.I g jf-..,.6' ":o.'1.a - . , F-ik?- ..Lf-w '- J.- " . " 9-'.i?f5i+2-' -"5flf3s?".5-Q-E' 1 ' 17.5 -9, . " ' 335 f in i'7'?'55' f'3L?i-T,-if-ff:-. QJQJQ'-5-'5--Ei H.: -1555? - ' ,,,.g3, 33455-gli:-4.g?c,., -:i'5:'m- ji- ,4 .-Hu -. - -1 f". cgfqzgffzg, 5: 1- -. .MFA 3-,...1,Qf.,1ik?,,g.f-.:5.j,11?ff'f .541 :Y , vu -if I L' ff . ..4 ' -EI-Elf '-s- Y '-be - M' '4-Q-I e 34' ".'..x-tl' '--IJ' '7 9 gFP"f'f'- -.- 41 ' ' - 1- Elia- QI-"fl 4" si. F1-1.11-5... " -s f-1 . -f - 1 4-2:-:1 --.5.-ff-a-.-?-mf 'r f '- -1 - ' KJ" "fir-if -f. . 2' ' --"ffm - " -em . ., -FFR?-? ' if' . -5- Jrffg' "' six". ,:f:f:..:'.5wff4?'-1eV'f- .ii-541.-. 'S' F143 -2.4 Q- , --MWLE.-' f"- , 1 -5 ' -.1.-.,5.,- ,.. , 51 -W3-.324-.g. -fig, -1- v, -3. ig:-'yy' f.-fQYegf,.v.-gg. 5-7544 :4-33, 1.-254 K iff, 1,555 .. gg-g 733.:iHg,..5fi :J 3- - ff- -iv f-f'.fi -.211--fix . -2 .- !'fhf-"Q -' '-.Q-LF. -1- f -1 Q..-1'--ai' .. .K --'Tiki-1'-Tr -' 1.- .grgig 7 5' -1- 5 ,- 7 H4-1:1 -.gba .1 1:45 , . J .-33,52-"i3F31.i"a rFX.,,.4.-.55,1s' if ,gag,-fi4.f-:v3,'a.J"!laf5-,jx-Fq3,f,f3,,q.s:4.,!,'gi,fs :3.'5fQl-451, -'U .- 3--.:. 1 , 3 3 --51, 1 y'.?LQ -u .ggi angie ggi1g,"Eif'g,ffy- ,...fY1:Q,g-'jf'ag.LF--.t4..:'-1.--iff? Q- . M 'A ,J-. ' - .ra V -E,-in 'ff.g,.-H?'f' -wr-' -.Qi " ., gQ5z.:gj ' 2.17. -EQ '-,. , "'--'i5'q'f- -E . 476 f?'..:-JY! .A f "'f'Y-L - - 155- ...- , 1 f'-'-Qfdf ' .ia-'Sr . -"""QV54f?fI' U. . -. ' 5-A if r - J 3-192-- ' 5-" f-9 ' 'V' - T . 'FF-' A' 's' .32 3-1 , " 7 4 ,Q ..J3'fQ..l +5219 . Q .' i-'4 .21"' " 4 ' -?Q1Sf...j.-' 'g ,' Q " , F QP.. f,- ::'x,f'Q"4...'f'f'--I,lixvlf " wi 5415 ,-,544 .-4.'7'1', ' ' .iYg"efw.-1-LL,f4.fi?.1f411, TN--"wig f - 9' 5? --- .M - 1- - . .J--f :wh--G.. - nu: -. -A' V-.rig ..- .1 .. fi.-1 -fm - 1 -'v-'ef 1 '--ug -, ---V:-M..-i.-,--,rim-.V----'X---f. ' 't .rf-".g'-.jf'fgg4, 1,qf-Y fu- f,,g5.,"-ami jg'-55223,-323' .1-:gm ,A v -. '.,.,4-'Q 1-fi-3 -.1 '-145'-il u.-:qfgg pfriv 7.g'3:.'.l..j- :.4..,Q.-Ni...4fl'-..11,.am5a1i7.Lg1Qynkiggpkj-H... -- .-fir gf:3j,.'F, ,i!- Q Q -2 ,5 425 .2 Q61-xiii-If ggyfgfjfg-05,5217 .-3 V:,1g43:j.g w.. Q .-5,-335--rg. f ,.: ' .- :1'..,f.'1 " - " 'ff,'-. -: Pi: 2-ffs. 4 3 Q .f?.!,2'- 1 .' ' f ' -1 "'.:l4- "Ki Jw?--1"31 .nib '- .-'Sis ,Lge '-1 'f k 3554171725 'rErf!5?',.. 1 .. 4' ..- '1 ., -3. '2f-Af-- - . .. -'v 7if'1" ' .'- fb 55.1-Ti?-APU.. lf' wifi" 1'lP?rE5.F'FiEfP-L 1. 253752. ':.i.-MFE 1, . Z Z 3 4 .5o o" 'z" " i" ?o " f JCB , A . g V v X V A O A 43' A 0 5 4 A Ogg Q . , -' 'wg .M rf' 1 1 ' Ew, 2 , A 9eE:e1.Mg 32,- XJ - S -.--91: --1 0 , 4 i H I KA an Akni IBEW nik U 7 I I I I f ' U ' g A "Jilin,lwsqlul-1--nup:'vI1 1-lli"'lli-f:'.':'-7 Q:Q"'1".'l7:: lli' A A X 5 my inglg.1:glEin'nw-sn'Ank'5n'4L31ni.In'nvg,ll:1:-fn'a:-tAnr1-:naman JA '91 '15-. A " , , ,.,.w.v: 7.5. , qb,f?.', ffSB2f ?. V . N7 N P .. "'4 ' Y 1 ' My 7: I -- - ' " 5f?i:E5'f2p?5i?e3fffL i 9 . f IQ F. . J' "'YV--SM-2-5-f-Sf:".f"Z' ku'-fr'-1 ' . L 1 'F ' j,.',:.'fff'!ff'?:E:,5 '--13533-'f. . -1 y , ' .Q , :Lf 114-1 ff W , .A M- -'safmggi'-Qf-f215' DTN H f. R ' 5 ,- .mf Af , 1- H' 171' 1 fx ?f',.Q 1 ., :af , x fn ff -'f:'e " Qi'. i'1 12-TQ ' 3 1 In 4' A 'lv T. "' Q 3 'W'-',' -, . P . . . AA- I :lg---V-ii'-jf ,- -'JN .jj5r?j. 'L E, N 17.5, " ' 1.1 I V 1 M L, ti. !E:A:1.1,xl.NFgyL2frt. xv ANN, :Ein lgvj- . :,. vi T T-1: kxj' 'V ' " Z" " f-121.-1 Q, ijfkil iulb '- - 'fill 1754-if - In -1: U 1.1, A .f D E- ,525 if L lla 9 3 ' ' ' 1.511 'qzgfyzl T ,',4j4f:-.-li 1:-Vlhgjgiii-if 5. . ' 'II' - Q , ' 'Tif 4Xf-,,gx1,g,gg,.:'wqgfxjjg5,35,-ffipqz-'S 'A A 1 ' - I 1' -PT-. 1 " 'ii f. , ' if " 3,wQ44f'hfV - LQ"3-91' 1' 1 . Y-Q' 251'-: fI5 : 'zP , :'?j'3.F1f-'iff Y ' ' ' gf' F -P?31'f't4 gd! ' 2 'f ' 'f E ' qu M Ti ' 55.25, Qi ,V M .5If1Q.i- . E ,Y . - 11"3,3""'r--1 . 1- bwgg. pi, 1 4 I KET .WJ - , , , :N !,.3,.'.ii"f1A,5',,i- :. - ,. lj, .5 1 ,,- In ,uf 23,4-,l,1.'v ,. QM- v',,v Aw., AM , if A I . , -H 3- I 1.1.12 mf. :V 43:1-ggi .F - u- z '11'Q:,-4455"-J "-f'?5.13'"f'T-4-3:1 1'.i,"' - v i g, -gg.. Ef,f.' " " 4 .-1Q5'ff'fT +" " f' "Z, ' fly- A , fl " lvlff-if fi' ' 1 ft - f!fEI.:4?' '51 ' " l - j 'lj 1 f.igliQf4'?f.-13 --ti-512-1Llv"i37'f5g5',5,p51:2-.-':-T'W J L- "'f'NQ1'f'.f-I , 4- iff,- l j 4 Frfllt'-.iLIf"-N 'vgfffff:5-'iiif',1f.:.' '?f',f,'?7'f":'EiE??'g3?"E'4f?IjfA,4L'livfifyf if S 5 , 4 Jizf 2".33:'Q'. 5343: j5'r,:, .VT I ,jfiff '5 y 'i' ,-,. -- yu '- f M 4, ', L ., .' - 15, f -31,2 . .,:.: -Y , nh ' --a 5 ,l.vf.,4.-nf..4.':mzfilz:lr-:.,'.vE',":'..,?,4:jE..L,!U.EQ,!Qk..14V AY J ' ,..,,'.,,..:jfJ':.f,., J , .Q-.1-1 Y. - 4 -af ' if Lg,1fli',,L-fbi. gi.H1-jwjVffLiQf1., y-V: 'pai ,T 51" hh V iii' if V '- , Q! ffiyn, ., 4' -Ziff ' , f , 7. A ' y 4 fff4Q'g1g z.fi.,3e.ff ms- . -A .. , ., , . . Q k,v55,'..::.' , 11'-Z: L '.,v1,,.1",.- IJ-:ia-I-':"r,v'g'-ti.1.. .au ',-:Ti-, fill- .':-fIfc:5.'1,L ' 5 .Q ' 'I' My Alix-. V "N - ' a. m, . um. "M lm1IlQhh 1 ' ' ' ' ' - N, LHEHHSHEHHEEHHHkk!!!EHHHEXXEHEHHXEEEEHXEXHXRH1X! ' 'Q xxsxxxxxxxxxnxxnxxxxxlxxnxxxxxxx1xlxxilxxxxxxxxxxxlxxxxxxxxxxxxxv i illilllIllllllllllllllllllllll111111llilllllllllllllllll :c: ! mill!!!llllIIilllllIllllllillllllllililllilllIXIIKIIIKXI 1111111111111lxnxxxxxxxxxxxxxlxxxl1 illliiillliiilllilililllliilll iliilllililillllllllllllllllllIllI1liilllllllllllllllliillili WllllllilliiliIllllllllillillillliliiillllllllll liliillli WIll!llllHillllIIllllllIIIIHHIHIHIHHIIIIIIIIIII HHIIHKV xiilllin-11111111lililllilmHQIIHHHIIIIIIHIHHHHIV HHIliI-Q11-IIHHIHHHQIIIHHQHHHQHQQHHHIIIIIIHIHHI Iiiihili IIIIIIIIHIIIIHSHHHHIHHI llilllli X 9 X ixxm-I-1-I-Xiu-Iii-QuI-HIIWIIHIIHIQP ' 1' Nlfx J XG Dx A, S, n H3111 E 2 IQ 91 IG 203 IG IG 32 KI 102 IC IG 101 102 Ii If KI IC If IC 102 C02 I f0f DI IC IQ IG IQ DI IG KI 102 DI 31 KI 1 DI 102 If IG If 102 KI I01 IC IG IG 202 IGI T01 1 r ' - w fm 2 1 ' ': '+- V 03216102101IOIKIIQKKKKKIIIG0513219292 Uhr RUHPIIIEIIQ 1 " PIBT5 - naaemarg Ulqath ' fur ememhrunlsi' ---Slpxlaespzare Tl'-an l3I?I202910210210211102202102DIDI!3I3IbI?I!3I3I3IbIIOI!10l ZEMNMNZQZZGZOIIOIDZ3292blylyyryyidieiiibibibil 3 IG IC DI 31 QI I DI DI 91 IQ IC If IG IG If IQ IC IQ Ii 1 9 .0. 202 I02 102 K2 32 103 102 IG If If IC 102 102 32 IC 101 102 32 If If 32 Ii 102 32 32 32 D2 I02 92 IQ Ii IG Ii IC If 202 102 IQ 202 92 32 32 32 32 If If IG 202 f0I 5 ui.:azz.:31:01:01zeiezexzexreze:e:.::+::.::o::e:e: Elly Igggpmm-g yyyy:o:y:o3101:03a:s::o::o:zx:exxszzSnQI9TB F ORE WORD The 1925 Rosemary Staff gratefully acknowledges the co-operation which made possible the publication of this book. Having completed the work as- signed to us by the Senior Class, we hope that this annual may bring to you many pleasant recollections of days in Urbana High. THE STAFF. 7 href' jggaays::oi:Q::o:5o:11.31103zozzsgzqziozyxazysi3192103311: 1525 Qozioiiexxyzorx5:Q5Qxsx:a::o:w5:q1q:q:qyywz3n 1 5 Zin Hilemnriam E119 Rngpmarg CDEDICA TION To the Memory of QJWPS. Caroline Killefer Who through our high school days was our true friend and counselor, ever inspiring us to the finest in life, we, the Senior Class, in loving memory and ap- preciation, dedicate f5he Clfineteen Cfwenty-five fRosemary Fine 'IICIIICICIIffiIIHICICICICICICKIMKIIIQICK 1 5 RICKIE!!!321116101261663IGIMIMZCZQZCZCZCI niet!!ieieiesieidzzziezxbihiZoibixieiozi E119 Kngpmarg CROSEMAR Y S TAFF 1 9 25 Editor-in-chief WILLARD MONOHON Associate Editor BEATRICE SLOAN Business Manager THEODORE OLIVER . Art Editor ELIZABETH MASON I Literary Editor MARGARET MOORE Circulation Manager HERTI-IA BOWMAN Joke Editor NELL MCDONOUGH General S taff VIRGINIA VEALE BETTY YANTIS DORIS SCI-IEIB DOROTHY SCHEIB REID EVANS PATTY BRENNAN ALBERTA CARPENTER I RUTH VILLARS MYRA TORRANOE JANET WOOLBERT EDNA BRASH HELEN VEACH Sim u:o:zozzozzmz:.::.::.::.::.:1.31.11.11.1zo::oz:o::o::o::o:s:x:s::o:yx: 15125 ::o::o::o::o::ozzo::e:e:o::e:o:yzxszmzzozsi:o::o:s:m::o:x:l RS 90vjgvjjvjif3.3j4j1.jf.i1.j1.jg.i1q1.jyjvjjvjivijojfvjjvjivjjvj lhp IK115p111g11'1I fvijviivilviZviZviiviiviZviZviiviiviiviZviiviiviiviiviiviZviZvZZvi,1l 2Z .W i K 'K L X I. ' Zvi 5. Z" iv Zvi 'v Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi 'vi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zv. Zvi Zvi Zvi Z i Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi jvj 'o' Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zv. Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi vi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zv. lvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi 'vi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi lv. Zv. Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi .Q Z.. Zvi Zvi .OZ .5 Z0 Z9 Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Zvi Qv' Zvi ivi .vi Zvi Zvi Zvi ivZ Zvi .OZ .OZ ivi Z . Zvi 'vi Qoj Zv Zvi .v Zvi Zvi Qvj Zv. Zvj .vi Zoi Zv' Zvi ivi Zo' ivf Zvi Zvj 'vi Z0. ,OZ ,Of Zvi ivj 'vi Zvi Iv' ,vj :Qi .5 6? SZ Vg - ,K'm'1n fZZlQL5'Ql.'v'fvfvfviivifvfvffvifviZviZviZvifvifviivfivifvifvifvifvfviIv'Ivilviivifvi 1 J iivffvfivifvifvifv''viivliviivilviivffviivliviZviZviZvilviZvfZvfivfZvifv'fvifvfU6w3E n:oiioiioiioiafizoizviioifoizoiioitoiio:tottotfoiioticioiioiioiiviq filly iKn5pmgu-q io:io::o::o:io:io:io::oi:o::o::vi:oi:oiioiiozaixiwifoixteioinu X - +2 9. 101 101 101 102 102 101 1G 101 102 C02 31 101 102 101 31 101 91 102 31 101 91 16 11 31 101 15 101 101 101 31 225 , at :Ii Q02 91 101 142 102 101 bi Lvl 1G 102 102 102 101 101 101 31 102 1d 1G 101 101 IQ 15 101 101 101 101 101 101 31 101 101 31 101 Ivi if i Zin Hllvmnriam - RALPH SCHOCH 1905 1924 lx' 111111 I I' f'EE101101101101101101101101101101101101911011011011011011013111?l1101101f0I101 1 g 2 I1011011Q1011011010101!10110110110110110110110110110110131311i101101101l nuwnn EDUC TIU nZvIf0I1oZZvZ1vZ102101102fviioiiviivilvlZviZfiiviifiiviivjiviiolivi Gjhp fKngp111m'q 193foj14334:jog141:oi:cjjoj:aj143jog1031031431.31533xjjo31oj1o1n E L x : : 191 z.: ff: 9. Q .,. ... If f0f :Ox 19: 20: 19: :.: 19: 102 JUDGE ROY C. FREEMAN 51 ... 2.2 If President of Urbana School Board gtg Q'I fef fi 9: 2.1 z.: if 3.1 2.4 if :': IC ff fi io: 102 :.: ff: O i.i MR. WILLIAM HARRIS if :oi . . H io: Superintendent of Urbana Public 2:1 fzf Schools :,: 'Q' Z.: 'c 2'2 Soi :oi io: io: zo: io: :vi .6 iii i.i C01 201 gg EDWARD J. FILBEY .0, 9, 1:1 Committees: Teachers Committee, Iti Building and Grounds Commit- 3.3 tee, and Finance and Supplies '.- if Committee. if if W. . ... C02 101 102 32 102 102 Zvi IQI 102 102 102 I 102 .3 MRS. HORTENSE BARR it . . Q. If Committees: Teachers Committee, if Library Committee, and Visita- 2, tion Committee, .zz :vi Lo: :oi fo: io: Loi io: iv: :oi if: io: io: :QQ wi .6 .5 A MR. F. E. WILLIAMSON gi ,Q . . ,, , ... "' Committees: Building and Grounds f,1 if , . . : 1 Committee, Physical Education :ji .6 3, it and Health Committee, Finance II w. ., , . P. f.- and Supplies Committee. I.- fi Q Q N 101 if S RS S R 2'l z.: X :Ox ,Q .Q 'C 'O AO, 9. f0f 101 I0f 101 bf IQ foi IQ 101 102 Z.. .5 5 'I en 5IIZQZ103101142143101102102103103102102LoiZvjiviibiioiivibjivjifj0210232101102 1 g LT Qf0f 101 I0f f0f 102 102 f0f 102 f0I 102 142 102 102102142 102 102 142 102 102 102 102 102 1oI1vi1oIU U202 102 102 102 202 S02 202 102 101 102 102 102 102 202 102 101161101102 102 102 102' GIIP ZKIJHP IIIEIYU 102242C02143503ZviZvi102102102102103Zvi321021vIZoZZv29ZCvZZoZZvZ14Q:f5 ' x MRS. SUE C. HEATER Committees: Teachers Committee, Finance and Supplies Committee, Visitation Committee. R. T. HICKERSON Committees: Physical Education ana' Health Committee, Library Com- mittee, Visitation Committee. DR. H. A. HINDMAN Committees: Building and Grounds Committee, Library Committee. Physical Education and Health Committee. Miss TULA G. L. WOOLARD Secretary to Superintendent zzuzu I fix Ziff 62237 -I 1 1 fauna wi10220210220210210210220210220210210220102102102102102202102202102102f02202202 1 g 2 5 102 102 102 102 102 142102101 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 2 142 101 102 102 102 102 K2 If 32 32 142 102 102 102 102 102 202 32 102 102 102 102 D2 202 102 202 Ii 102 102 32 102 .0. .,. 202 102 9. .0. ... 9. 102 102 .C 102 102 202 11 lvl 102 26 I 102 101 102 102 fel 202 202 32 101 K2 K2 .0 102 102 102 101 202 102 lei 102 102 102 101 DI 102 102 102 102 102 142 .'. 102 202 102 lvl K2 102 202 102 .5 6 1 If I 'rw tt K 101102 102102 IOZZv2Itl HCCKIIGIOIKIIOIIGICIO 9 0 Q Uh? mngpmafg 557142 5Board of Education The Board of Education of School District Number 116, Urbana, lllinois, consists of a president and six members. The President is elected annually, and two members are elected every year. The Board is selected by a majority vote of the people of the district, and receives no compensation. The personnel of the Board of Education is as follows: Judge Roy C. Freeman, President: elected 1925, term expires 1926. Mrs. Hortense Barr: elected 1923, term expires 1926. Rev. R. T. Hickerson: elected 1923: term expires 1926. Dean Edward J. Filbeyg elected 1924: term expires 1927. F. E. Williamson: elected 1924: term expires 1927. Sue C. Heater: elected 19253 term expires 1928. Dr, H. A. Hindman: elected 1925: term expires 1928. Regular meetings of the Board are held the first Thursday of each month in the Board room in the high school building at 7:30 P. M. Special meetings are called by the president.. The most important duties of the School Board, in conjunction with the Superintendent of Schools, are to employ the teachers, janitors, truant officers, and other officers, to fix their salaries and to prescribe their duties: to select text books, to adopt courses of study, to purchase supplies and fuel, to keep school buildings in repair, to submit bond issues to the vote of the people and to erect school buildings, Another important duty is to determine the amount of funds necessary to run the schools, not only the total amount, but also the amount needed for each item of the budget. At the end of each school year a budget is made for the following year. The accounts of the Board of Education are audited by a certified public accountant at the close of each school year. Miss TULA WOOLARD, Secretary to Superintendent. I l'l'Il'l' 1 H23 IDIDIIQDIIGHKKHIQIEIGICICKIMMIKKICIGIGICICI -M.. f -.--V-:fi -- -.tim r-'mm-f-V--V .-2-V, - 4.,.,..-,.,- V .. .- . V.--"9 Jn - I I-.. .,...,-,- -VVV-mmf ,ff-1'--f.'g,yp:V,,j?5!'V'!-T V. ' . - - . IV .I V I I .I.I.I.I, ,NI A.-qV,,, I ,Vw-f!9'.-1,g,g.nII.,I:4.V.g:,IgffiV,. gy,-I... ,VII5VJI.M-,Mig-ga.,.I,g,pV,ggzu5V,g,7V,V3,V5VI5x. ,fQi:x:IV3-335.1141-m5Ir..-,gI,I, 5I,.I V' f VV 1 - 2' V.-,'-1--4-2.-:--4 'ng -'1:eG-V451 1 ,..I.giL'f--V-, 9--'VW -"J V-V2E'2VV.-V 1' 'a,.1lFz'E'- i-' 7'f'.n1FV'-"V'I'fV-'wliti-".--' ' if 'I-J V- - . ' ?+?f,g'll1e? l,5p5ef'H.V'- VVV-f.:'f'-'V-V413 :v1g,V'.VV,V.-.Q jzilklff'Q'-'IQQQSEEQSLV1i':Vf1jIIj:12-H:f'5.'?jf5'11,t gf V- -- .. -a V ,V fm, . ,VV ., V -.V I, V1, V V V .I-V-.VI 7.-I -3--VH L 1 '-.'.::.y.,5.'.5', .' V,".VLV.yV.'- .2 ' - V -' ' ""-"Wwe-1 1.T51VVV - , 'V-'.a.a.ff .VI - . , : -A V' -- 1-5. 1' V-.Q-gigs?--'Q.fcx:f' , V V . I, I -VV -, - , -Vgg-, V V Iwi,--f.g. 54, , :.'Q,aI.!43yAgIg.,VV,5g :V-,911 V . Vg... V .- V.V,--'V , - . - . - . -V 4,-V-.-VV...V .-.Vp-4.,,,,,fVwVVV-V-,d-V.--,.-.V- HL! V....f.. ,V , " V X '- ', I V .. 'gf -.gglf-.3-' -1.:V.,VVz5 :V tix :wV'f4?Va,1iL1V--4151-13V '-V 1 , ,, I V , V V-V' '- V., V,. - . . --V.:-V-Vcevr,-5,,.VV I- V.z-:--1pVVV.'g3.V'af:- ixg:V.g-V 5 .- , V, .- .V ,I V. , 1- 4 , .V V I 4. V, ..,iV:.I.fV2fj -V-33,511 j.. V,a 53:f:'l,5V5'35:'Ir'I:LIyIV. I I ,,I.LIiQ-..IJ-'VI V V 'lf 1 V' - ' - 'V V I K. V, ,V V .. V 1.4.51 gII1aI-zV5g"'V- 1- p,CI.V1,VwIIt,-,2-51.3.I v ' ,V 5 --.jf---,.V Vf.I,--5 I. , - - ' . V-,...f.. .V , -- , ,V.V.,-M -V - V . . .-V. ,,,., V. V , VI- ,.II- I..q.,V,--.,I:V,.I.V- -VVI -, 3 ,I I A f ' f I1?.-f-'--fY'52,:-:V f If -I-If 5 .- I1-.A-V V'V.. .34 , 1- -V H:-.V 2:3115 --V.-.:VV.. ' - gg - V ,Vg -- SQ , , . ' ' , '-1-- V jg - " - , ' - " "1 1255-V' V' P - -Vw: , - .'-FL- f-,f I V , , 'V , . .EV-V I..- ,JIMI I -' I .-32-,II-,II , I,I.-f.gII,IV1 I ' V V V -V '- :V7'.-2,713 " V- --'V mV- V - - ' V' '- ' -A-' ' 'L -V--2-f'fI1.2V4-rg' ,ri V. --'Z-1' . , I 41. 5.Vl"-QVQ"Y.',V7f .293 V: ' V' V V V ' -- -' "" V1V.j1f,': - .-f ' .,3V5i2'V".V 'QV Hr . .V ...:f'ij-.'-'H-.55..5'i9' ' .L V.. .V V . ,V 7f ,Y-ff.. V, 9:15. , - '11,-:ff 1, ' ,'f-Vf-.73,'rlVT': .' Q1 ' . ' - " VFV- V ' 'V 3 :V V, bf. -1.r.V41f..,V V V 4. 3'-H I,I. IIIIV-XIX.-,I,1I .IV I,-,:VlgIVfV' Ig IV -V VM I., :VII II IV,I.IIV,1. V,I,.. .- Hz. ' ' '- - -V ,-'V .V-V- V.'5.,gL-vp.--11" V. -qV.-,- I. ,pm V, - 'V-' V VVV -.zz -VV....'z- V- A -V-fy-V-s 'Viz' V f"V'?f'2T'Vff-T:'- ' ."-V41 f.1-ffl-'5'LflV'-V V' ' . V V " ' X' Q .i'-"fZ:V'2-1fC.i'7V.-Civ 'V' 4- -'L f5VV:?4:V'-7 : '-' Q'-" L-'...vI,-".V5'f-""'. 4 '1f'f'J 'f.'V7'i'fV5?i55V'.f. 5f2Vf'-Z,'.-V731 fr' . 7 . 2Va.':T13+V.Ir'-'tV.M'3F:VZV., V-V' '-fflf fl ' '-V. V V V. V 1 -" -. J V, '. fifif. '-2:1 .'."-f".'1"'.i . ,"1Y?VQ'jf ,If f .", -' 1- ' - . - ' A - -'H V 'v- ' V.V..VJf - ' F -i. . ' ', - K - V I , J V ,-:.V- V .m'.,, MI- .- .A VVV: ,. ,A 3.V VVV, - V I'VV V ' -, -.V,z VV- - - I IV JV' ,-a.,i,1,,.-V - .1 V ' '-- ' .' ' V' . ' 31 fj .- '7' . ' ' V. ' ' ' -' V V V VL,.Vi',l-M-.". " L'-Q-LWVV --V ff'-Y . ' , L- .V '- 'T I: 'Vr:I,Q.' ' .VW "' ' 'Vf.5'5lV"-Y.?13.-- - "1 . 71343-' V .V ' I I-II "Q -1, .Q IQ 'I - "" V1 ',1Q,L'T-IIxVV'-Q13 P-MF.. I-I '-VVINI.-,I j.,- I 1 V I V II , V.-5.I,Ia?1-I gy- ' 7 1.11 II ,I I ' .I - Q ., ,V 'Hi-.QV -V: V- V-,-. .- rV ,V .V 4 V - 'V -1- f,,V V-V--. VV ' V-1 - -- A 4- .. -' '.. - ' 4 , 1. V 25 I IIHII V , HM - .- VV '- - I I ,V V , V J. ' , V - ' - V. - . g.-.-V -- 1 ' .D . V, V--'V'l", 5 H, 5' 1, 'V . ' II VI I 5 I V. I. -I-:.g.' -V , 5 4 .,.V, I VII. ,I , :V - V 4 ,V . ' .V ,V., V.. 1- - V A . V ' I --V , . 1. V V V - - . ... I V V 41: Vx I, IIV,,I . 4. . - V- - , 'V .2 V - V ', f V- V-Vg fn . . '1V 'L ' 'ff ..'11. V .- J 'VW .VVV1,-,V " V 2--V -V .1 - . , - :1IIV.I I I ,.--II VIE III V- . I I I -:VV ' k . ,1.,aVffff.V-'1 . ,- I. - Ny- V - V 'V-..Va. - if - , , -VI -I V I- g . .- . - l V ., - " - " f V' W F V , A--V-if -5g.'--- . - - 1 V. V 1 V VVV ff R Q 4. V, .--1 1 l KV K 311 :I V, I VV: V I , .II -V - D . . 3 I I .gi - II-VI., -I 5 ." . "VT, . " V V' 'NY 'J-. ,- V "GV ' 'H ' f ' ' " 'V , " 727 ,.V""' - ' '- A '. -'I .' 5 - 231- Q my '. , ' l r. '157 ' ff' ' ,, -",' ' ' nf. ' ,II-. V , V.,I VV II. .. I V, 5 . I M V .1If,.-, I' ' ,I . .Ii . ' . J ' ' ""- V:-""1- 7' 3 V ' Q- .V 2 V4 -J-V. V f V , VIR -I-f - -' A ' X QV ,- ' V -- ' V VM V, VV .- ,. V V , . ZIII I 3 - V .I,., V I I III . V. III V VI: V VVVV V . - V V. -V . QW' QV -,,Vf ' V ' -" .AI - V - -. , . V V V V 5- M " -' V II . Q 1 . ' 'IV B I - V X ' V - N I ' W I ' 1 1 V ' I.1V - ii l ' -.,. '- , I I I I . . , I ,Y I II -1 L I V .. - - - N -5 . if f - vw, , .-.4 Y- - "pq ,. - V- . V' ,,:- ' . - v -V - VJ ' 'f.f'ZV" " p ,ix ' '4 - Y 7 I . , , I Q- 7.7 I If mx I -4-'?i, ' I' L V.gV .I . A V -,..-,Q ,I I. V ' 0 " A ' -V V 7 ' H b -I I " ' Ali- V2 -V-V I , . , . . . V V . I . I , ' " I . I V ' ' - I V ' I I , V VV I. ' V' I' I . Q " - . ,III' V I . I I . I . . - I - . I - rg . V- q- V -. .. - V I ig -V ,, - -- I.- V ,I 3. - I V . - -. I ' I ' -V , - I . I ' V V I- . ,"V I,"'? , VV- VV ,V -VVV -V, V ,V,V ,-VV , Vw . ' V . - 'V . V ' ' - ' ' '- - .V 1 III ,I I 'I II 5V f II I V VV , I V V VV, V . V I, V. VIII V V , , . ,.VV :.VV V,.VV V .T - ff V? fi L I , T , ' C . , , : ' . ' "' . " ' , . VVV . V V " -" - -VH V --' NV.. . --" V i1 V . .V V - 1 , - .V .. . - ' " V V- . ' '- .V.:IV, ,aI-I.-. I ,I xv, V II II I ,IV I -I IIIIIII I ' - .. VV" 15- 1 ,'SS,5Qfx9ll1ug1Q3Qgo:.QQ1.33.31.31.3Lo::viLoiLo.jogiujiojjopwjwi. Ely- 'liKuHl'll12u'1I f01f0f101101Q01f0ff01f01101f0110f10fQ0jf0f10ff9ff01fQQfOQf01100W M M ' a x .01 .01 '01 '01 101 .01 19' 01 101 10' 101 ... .01 .01 Q01 .6 .Q 01 Q01 .01 '01 .Q Q01 .01 .02 5. 101 102 .01 10' Q .5 Q01 101 01 .01 01 101 .Q ... .01 102 Q01 'oi Qi .01 ... O. ... 0. .Q1 O. 0 O. .. Q. o ,. .. .1 .5 ..- O. vi .01 vi 0. 101 .. ... 191 0. 01 10' 10. 9 0. O o o 0 0. 10' L02 .5 .01 0 0 0 o o O. Q .. C3 Q I IVIABEL DUNCAN RICKETTS, A.B. ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL INSTRUCTOR IN GIEOMIETRY PREPARATORY SCHOOLS TO NOR'I'HWIES'I'I3RN UNIVER- SITY AND UNIVERSITY OI? NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY OI? NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY OI: ILLINOIS fwflf, 11 M. L. FLANINGAM, FS., MA PRINCIPAL POTOMAC HIGH SCHOOL NORTIIWIESTIERN UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVVRSITY f' K J Esf,500v'10'1v.L0. ogr o. o 0.10.01010..0..0..0ff01.0.I01'0I0f10.l0Il0,.0. 1 LI ,I J joj1ojjo..oj1oQ,+ 'ojgojjo,.ojgo,jojjojjojjoggojpjgop jejjqjQj,.gg,1j. 16'Nl 9 u102102102101021011021031201102102501Lvjivlivjjojloiiviivllvl101 Uhr i,Rl1H1'11lQ11'1I gojgojjojjvjjojgojjojjojjojjojjfjgojjvj1.31031931031vjjo1jojjvjgojn x ' ' sf Q 202 101 0 202 2G 20 0 If 202 202 102 202 202 202 202 202 02 92 202 202 202 202 102 202 202 202 202 C01 202 102 i0I 202 101 202 202 202 25 101 D2 202 202 202 202 202 202 202 202 103 103 102 202 26 102 202 K2 202 202 202 L02 102 202 202 202 26 fi K2 32 I 2G 202 IOI 101 202 202 202 202 202 C01 103 202 202 0 202 202 202 202 L07 101 202 Q02 202 5 LOIS CARMAN, INSTRUCTOR IN PHYSICAL TRAINING URBANA HIGH SCHOOL 2 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS JOSEPH BERNARD CASSERLY, INSTRUCTOR IN PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY A UNIVFRSIT Y OI? ILLINOIS ACADEMY UNIVERSITY OI- ILLINOIS IRENE MAY DOYLE, A.B., AM. INSTRUCTOR IN MATHEMATICS CLINTON HIGH SCHOOL UNIVERSITY OI: ILLINOIS RAYMOND FRANCIS DVORAK, B.S. INSTRUCTOR IN MUSIC DUNDFIE HIGH SCHOOL UNIVIZRSITY OI: ILLINOIS VELDA ELDER, AB. INSTRUCTOR IN FRENCH LIZXINGTON HIGH SCHOOL UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS y l f Y 9 5 f l Q, 20. 202 202 102 201 202 102 202 202 102 202 202 202 IQ 202 202 202 202 102 102 26 102 202 202 202 Ivi 202 102 202 202 IQ 202 102 Q02 102 202 202 102 202 102 202 202 IQ 102 202 203 202 202 202 202 202 202 0 02 202 202 102 If 202 K2 D2 102 202 202 101 102 202 202 202 102 202 102 102 102 202 202 103 202 202 202 202 103 202 202 202 0 102 32 20i 202 202 102 L02 Q02 Q I' lnfwrr Qy1f5n.02.0.,0..0..0. .0. .0. 202 .0,.0,20,.0..0..0..0..0.,0,.0..0..0..0. .0,.0. 20. .0..0. 1 5,11 ,o,,o,,0,,v,,o,,o,,o,,o,,Q3,,0,,0,,0,20,20,20,,0,,0,,0,,0,,02,0,,0A20,,o,,o,06:-EQ I u:+::o::o:zoiiozzozzozzo:QoziozzozioziezorzoziozzozgoizozzozzozQL Uhr ifnmpnmrq fo:zero:zozzozwzzozszzoznzxzzozfozzoz:oz:o::o::+::o::o::o::o:n X . 5 ff 3: 10: KI K1 191 102 10: ff: PI KI KI DI IQ :Of IO: IC 3: I 10: IQ PI 31 DI bf 3, IG Zo: IG fi Ii bf 101 102 102 19: 102 ff 3: 102 ff 19: fi Zi Zo: Ii ff IO: 19: C02 32 10: fi Q'Q 2 2 KI IC IG IG 202 C01 IG Ii If KI io: 102 ff: If fi 161 IOS 1 NELLE FIELD INSTRUCTOR IN ART EASTERN ILLINOIS STATE TEACHERS' COLLEGE THE APPLIED ARTS SCHOOL, CHICAGO UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS ETHEL DYER HAMILTON, B.S. INSTRUCTOR IN ENGLISH AND HISTORY WHITE HALL HIGH SCHOOL UNIVERSITY OI: ILLINOIS ALBERTA HUGHES, B.A. INSTRUCTOR IN ENGLISH SULLIVAN TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL ILLINOIS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS FLORENCE IDA JOHNSON, A.B. INSTRUCTOR IN DRANIATICS AND ENGLISH ROBERT WALLER HIGH SCHOOL CRANE JUNIOR COLLEGE, CHICAGO UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS HELEN M. LAHMAN, B.A. INSTRUCTOR IN LATIN FRANKLIN GROVE HIGII SCHOOL MOUNT MORRIS COLLEGE NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS NRM RSNSS Nxxxsxw s mmm xx xxsxxx xsXx xxsx s x x N N 'X N N VM-ffl: 0IQ If If Iwi Zvi IG 102 Zvi 102 IGI 102 IOI Zvi 101 10101102102 102 16101 16101101111 1 H 2 5 11101102Lojjojjoj1oj1ojQojjojQojjojjojjojjojjojyjjqjqyfqjqoj1011415211 R Q. 102 202 102 IG 22 D2 202 202 26 26 2C IQ IG 26 26 32 202 202 102 202 102 I 102 26 26 bf I I 25 26 26 201 102 32 IG V 2 9. .Q 26 TQ' A 'v 102 203 101 202 102 2G 202 25 .Q 202 202 i nie10:11:03:Qzo:1.3xx.::Q:x::Q:.::o:s:exyw:1 Efhp IKn5pnmrg iexyicxtszxixibis:3::o::o::e9::o:xb:xxxx1lQl'MID MADGE C. LESLIE, A.B INSTRUCTOR IN ENGLISH GORHAM, MAINE, HIGH SCHOOL BATES COLLEGE. MAINE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AB. ALGEBRA LOLA D. MCCLURG, INSTRUCTOR IN BIOLOGY AND URBANA HIGH SCHOOL UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AGNES L. NELSON, A.B. INSTRUCTOR IN ALGEBRA CHAMPAIGN HIGH SCHOOL ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS ESTELLE PECK, A.B. INSTRUCTOR IN HISTORY CHENOA HIGH SCHOOL ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LOUISE G. PRICHARD, A.B. INSTRUCTOR IN HISTORY CHAMPAIGN HIGH SCHOOL SMITH COLLEGE, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS Q .iff iffl? 2225! 111010 ff 1 I 1 unnuf 1 fun: ff annum N1'l'f'Vllf'1'n 2i 102 I 2G 102 32 101 102 ff IGI 102 143 102 102 242 202 202 32 2G K 202 202 102 32 102 1 g 2 5 323292202202202202 2022022022Q2G!!2i2G!IK22CUm IQK11011011011011011011011011011011011011011011011011011011011010Q41m U101 :oi :oi :oi 101 :oi 10: 101 101 io: :vi wi 1.1 xi 1.1 1.3 1,1 101 101 14: 101 :Qi Uhr IK 11 gg pmgyu Q r. .01 C01 101 101 101 101 101 101 .C E. CURTIS PULLIAM PHYSICAL TRAINING 101 IQ 101 'v MOUNT VERNON HIGH SCHOOL JAMES MILLIKIN UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BRADLEY COLLEGE 101 102 31 1G 101 D1 101 Q01 101 .0. OPAL T. RHODES, A.B. INSTRUCTOR IN HOME ECONOMICS .Q 101 101 I.: LOVINGTON TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL UNIVERSITY OE ILLINOIS .01 101 31 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 .5 RUTH EDITH ROMPEL, A.B. INSTRUCTOR IN ENGLISH, PHYSIOLOGY. AND PHYSIOGRAPHY 1G 101 101 101 101 W CHAMPAIGN HIGH SCHOOL UNIVERSITY OE ILLINOIS 101 Q01 101 101 101 D1 101 101 5 IQ 101 JULIA SCRANTON INSTRUCTOR IN SHORTHAND .0. 101 I01 101 'o' FLORENCE, WISCONSIN, HIGH SCHOOL WHITEWATER STATE COMMERCIAL NORMAL UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 101 101 101 101 101 101 31 101 10. L. L. SCRANTON, B.S. INSTRUCTOR IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE TRAINING 9. 101 101 101 CASEY HIGH SCHOOL CHARLESTON NORMAL SCHOOL UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS .01 101 NNN SSRN 55 9. 101 101 101 101 ... 92 .0. 101 101 101 10. 5 X I','f5lfIlwf'1I U1011i101101910101101101101101101101101101101101101101101101!!101101101 1101101101101101101101311011011011011011011Qf01101101101101101101101101101191U6'N 9 .01 101 101 101 101 101 31 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 Q01 101 IQ 101 31 101 101 K1 101 16 16 31 31 91 102 101 101 101 IQ 16 ld 101 101 102 101 1d 101 I Zi K1 31 101 31 101 101 It 1C fi bl Id id 101 101 101 101 Id IG 16 101 it 16 16 101 101 101 101 101 101 16 101 101 201 101 K1 101 101 If IG 101 101 101 101 Q. a uio11o1io110:10:011031031103102ioiioiiozioiiozioiioiioiwzioiioii Clip- Kngpmm-g 3.31.31033033031.11031110314310334333931.3103:.35.3y5.3p3nQ,"XQ,tE S 1 9 9. IQ If If 101 102 102 101 102 101 101 101 101 Zvi 102 102 102 Q01 101 IQ bl 102 I 102 102 102 101 101 101 102 Q01 1d 102 102 102 K1 101 ZOI 101 C01 101 101 101 1G IG IQ 102 IQ 102 102 101 101 101 IQ 101 T01 Q01 10 IQ 16 101 1C It 101 102 101 32 IG If 101 16 IQ IG 1G 16 101 101 102 102 IQ 31 101 102 101 101 If .01 101 If 101 5 JANICE TAYLOR, A.B. INSTRUCTOR IN MATHEMATICS WINCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL ILLINOIS COLLEGE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS ELIZABETH TODD INSTRUCTOR IN HOME ECONOMICS ATTICA, INDIANA, HIGH SCHOOL ILLINOIS WOMEN'S COLLEGE TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. NEW YORK CITY G. A. WALKER INSTRUCTOR IN PHYSICAL TRAINING PURDUE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS ELSIE ANN WERNER, A.B., A.M. INSTRUCTOR IN FRENCH SAYBROOK HIGH SCHOOL ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS WILLIAM DE WEES, B.S. INSTRUCTOR IN PHYSIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY AMALIA, ILLINOIS, HIGH SCHOOL FORT HAYNES NORMAL. KANSAS UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 3 101 31 101 11 101 101 101 31 0 15 101 K1 31 31 91 101 5 I 1C 101 1C P1 101 101 31 31 101 101 I 1C 101 31 31 15 102 101 31 Q: P1 11 101 101 1C 101 31 I fi 101 101 101 I 31 102 31 nz 15 ze 1C 101 101 101 1C f 1C f 4 A Q Z 7 7 ? :Q ' ' Q. 1C 1C K1 202 ann xg 1 mmf, f, 1 U , f 1, , f , , f 1 ff Wffffmm Q .. I .NIl1'lf'f'll K yalkjivjioiioj1031010110220321021011021021011011011010110110Z10IZ02i02I02I02I 1 H 2 5 101102Q01j0jjoj10j10j1Q1Q1Q1i1Q1021021011021Qb11Q10jjq3jjaj3j10110W uxi:o::o::o::o::v::o::o::o:zo:zo:zo:ro::otiozzoizozroizoizotiotfoi Ghz iKn5p11mrg :oi102:03:oz:oz:vizvizxzoiieioz9:zo:Lozioz:o::o::o::o::o::o::oJlQ7f5 2 102 bl 31 Ii 102 31 IG IC IC KI If Ii IG 32 102 202 IC Ii 31 IG KI IG C02 Ii IC IG If 102 joi I Trl Pnly RN -NRM RTNRRS xxx xxx ssxwxnumuxxxxxx J. A. ANDERSON, M. Acct. INSTRUCTOR IN BOOKKEEPING CARTERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL VALPARISO UNIVERSITY LA SALLE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS RUTH ALVERSON, B.A. INSTRUCTOR IN ENGLISH URBANA HIGH SCHOOL UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS ADAM Q. BENNETT, B.S. INSTRUCTOR IN MANUAL TRAINING WEST TERRE HAUTE HIGH SCHOOL INDIANA STATE NORMAL HERBERT G. BICKEL, A.B. INSTRUCTOR IN CIVICS AND HISTORY BLOOMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL ILLINOIS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS RUTH I-'IAZEL CADE INSTRUCTOR IN TYPEWRITING PAXTON HIGH SCHOOL ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL GEM CITY BUSINESS COLLEGE, QUINCY, ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 0IICI102102192IOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIIQIQIESIQICIGKIQIXICXIQIOI 1 g 2 5 IIYKIIQIIOIIOIKIIOIIQ10210210210210132KIKIIQIKIQOIICIQIOIIGIQN : Q ,Q Fw .Ti ,- .1 -- 1-1- L' Q29 P1 1- . 4. qj n 1,-Q . it ' . il .iz- . -T.. - - l... .. - 11 ..- ' -li. :'- 1' , Yi 1 ' l MW U W ,L9322'11w 1r ' Y ff . WH, Mum- .,, ll 5 f ,?M3m 4ki i C , Q M . aw - E QQ 5 E Wls . J. gf? 1 1 1 1 E 2 E 5,59 fx ' ' EQ i L K JL P5 gi' Q gf? E Q55 ' 622+ 2 SENIQQ E 5 "' 34-f , 5CJ1DHUMDQEf fei Z g W tn ii FDEEHNE 5 5 LS - Q 3 ' , L 'WWW' W 'FE g f WMIIW NWNInwmuwrmluvrffufmmmauuwmrunmnwn1nulunl1J JHIlUHHJ!IIHU!lMlHHlhll 124, ww' 'E wx: L rfgv . ,. . gg Vfgi, Q., .Wh X ,r I.. . A . i. "' ' 4 ,A '39 Q-.E M rx. A, HQ ii- , Y? ,J u :nav V. . A ig '.-. . .,-1 A .W ,.. A -1 fr f,. , 1 .x . ,l 1 2 greg , 1 -fr -.1 5 . J"'Ll'.'sf1. L -f ,552 . 1.-"7-S H. K+.:Jw.r . . - 5. P-.. ." .,. ,-W-If Y, 4 ,,,. . ' Qc- 'Yi 15 -:H -epm, Qu, .E 4. F ,- -.!1 -- p. . .. M, . -.127 wg 'I' f " if .wk v . a fe- .,-:,- V .,gff,,, 1,5 -. , 1 qyg. f .f 1- 4,-., , .. ,., r., Q.. fu f n 11.1.- ,. .. q H g 4. Z-L.: .. '-!-. .pl 'H Q1 ':. ' 11. " ' ,IK ,A . 1. N 'vi 1. A H 1 5: .,. s .,:. . Q -,. .r-. 4. f th, J.. 1 .1 . .. 1 " 34 5' w r , ..f.- 5 ...M-, -4 N. u. , 1' T K1.'., ,, A J, ,-.3 .. ,. ..gi,jl C .v ,. s ,. ... ... '3- '??'A""' 'v'.,,,, 1 . 1 m -r f' '1g."' ' fi.: 'jg .r 'LW ff' .wx ?,1.'?1 l,,,.'.., .. V I Z., an fun, ff. 32 , h'-"F AVA Jv,.,,-11 4. . rm .. '3 1 1 'JQQ S.. 1 -,Wi 1. 45' 'G ,fa-1'w 4 . WS ,,.. fist 1."'5'4f" ww fi. 2472 ff4:Qw ' ' iff. I . 'J E.-V, ,. . , .5-, M-, ' 1213- . . , , H.. wr 4 r .Eff 2- ,, f -' 'n - a.. H- A H :Q M xl .l' . -3 V,- lg 1 fi ' .,' 59' , ' . 1 H -4 1 f 'L- ,A 'x .- ,.' ' ,KWH .Y..,'. .- ,,, 411 . . ,r.g -Y ., f 1 " Q A , ,inf V.. sl - .. f ' -W 1. 'r -- 4, . ,.., V., -f -45: if ... ' IK .5 JF.. .im ,Hg X.- . Ji' .LL , .. I 5 iz" -w V. Lvgf- I .,, A ,ig n tu-L .4 U? .Sl ., + , r.:- .... . 1-.i.n::. .Img J " L . --1.1. ' 4 -..E . ,.,, - 41-sf-3. 215 1: . 4 'NI' . mx 5 - f .fi .e IF' .rf 1-V?" 1. .sg ff... - .-:J X54 U YI , .1 . -. ,,:A . , cf? 1 1 1 'Y "'IoW'I -WIW 'Wy7f MwW -If 1 -If dvr: Qgeawsiveawmyawmwwwmwn I 1 L11 Q 1 1 ,I gfiib qlgh EFI. 1 151. 5KiT1q?1l1E:,,':: z1 U ' ES .L,, 111Iw1111 11 I1-.:r1111I wx fl I II II11 " MMIII 11 11'LQ1 I wf 1 X11 If I :D 'I Y I1 -II -,.' I ' 4 1 wg My 1 la ' 12 1 ' I 'xx .Y S5 1 11 1 1 I 1 .N V, 1 1 ' 77' ' -.u 1 I -. I, I 1 I1 ' ,1 ' I IIIIWOI 1 ' 1 E I, I. ' I If I .,, I .1 ' "lf 11 I I 1 II 1 4 1 31 1111 1 ' I, 1AI 'X , I ' If I 1 If I III 'I J I .111111axl'Aqy11f Q .4U1'IQ,1.w4'f"mff I ' 1 1 lf' ,'NW!?'f.fU V,,' f 1 1 W" 'IIII2-. '-Z" I 513: 11 A' 1 1' 5 1 -"Flu, '-1 ' I I - x 1 - 1 W, ICJ 1 -1' an-U1 1 1 ' fx ' ., 11 " ' 1 T., " ,,Z31.lf:g5 I 1, 1 , , 1 1 , I 111 7 .1 1 II 1. f ,f ff 77 if N 111 1 I il Mgr11I,m11 1 I 1 J 1 1 I f f ff ' I I I II' 1 I f ,wf " 11 W1 If 1 I 1 I I I ' IWW If I II X ' 1 if XX XXX' I' QI' I 1' V YQX 1I I 1 I - A I I 1 Y Y f5x xx I1 ,ag 1X1 X f ff, II 1 I In W 1 H1 . N I: Tl 1 IVV III I I II' 1' 12 ,1ffy1f1III, 1 V 1.1 1 X V ff' Aix X III ' 1 1' I 1 11 I ff 1 gat: I TZ4 Tx g 1 V -xg II 1 L 1 A 1 fl ip if 2 ik H 1 I I 15- .I11I11I111 I -, 1111111 Fi .mj1,1f1" 1 I, QQAEVQ1 1, 1,1,,1 1,11 '1115X111,,,'ak?f ,X . 4'AI-V'-M. .1.1w A-H J M 4 W W X,X11,j13 'M' ' If I"I"""'lI'l"W" 1 11121 1 , 1: W V .. I , 7-ff' , "'1'1 If-7251. 'if' . 254' 54 L-Q-r 11 111111111III"L - 3 " I 20 - ,K lf':.l, 'f,1 , --fqiwlg u :2"'?,f1.4,:"' f WMgr-t W?niT:a55ELmm1V2i V mana 'VVV Gb no as Q ca 0 Q 0 Q Q ev ' O ' -v Q 0 , - -- " 1, 7f1,f,Xy1,,,,, , , iv- if ,.-1 1, ::IIIuJ?,qf ik, ,XE , - 1 " 0 5 ' ' - f f f if ,ff 'Q' ' f ' f A sw' 'wfvf-:-x-fw+----11- -7 if ,ff ,'l,f.-f5,.fkxI,f 1 .1 ' I r 1 11 1 1 - 1 --f Q' WI" " ' ' XNQW111 1111111-111111 111 111W1"7wTlTr11,,1, ,.. SEIIUIIS 11 ,1111 1 0102f02Z01Z0i1025102101I02I0210Z102Z0II0ZI0II03Z0ZI0Z102Z0ZZ0iZ0IZ IKu5p111m-q 1.31.3jo:jo:1.31.31.3ga:ie:jo:1.3go:QQ911.3103543103103yf.31o2ElQ:Q Q 10. 101 101 101 101 ld If 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 16 101 101 101 K1 101 101 101 I 101 101 101 101 id 101 101 101 Q01 101 101 101 31 L01 101 101 101 101 101 101 201 Q01 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 fi .,. 101 fbi 101 101 101 101 if 101 101 .5 191 I I 101 K1 .6 101 ... 101 101 101 101 101 101 10' Z Tuenlu 'S XSVSX saws usxxsms LESTER GLEN LEUTWILER Class President 4: Honor Society 4: Class Swimming Z, 3, 4: Varsity Swimming 3, 4: "Am I Intruding?": Varsity Debate 4: Magpie Society 4: Stunt Show 4: Stunt Show Committee l: Business Manager. Echo, 4: Journalistic Conference 4: K. S. K. 3, 4: French Club 4: Bobbette Club 3, 4: Literary Society 4: Junior-Senior Dance Committee 4: Carnival 2. "Sir Lancelot, as became a noble knight, was gracious to all ladies." VIRGINIA OLIVE VEALE Basketball l, 2, 3, 4: Captain 3, 4: Junior Baseball: French Club 3, 4: President 3: Honor Society 3, 43 S. K. 2, 3, 4: G. A. A. 3, 4: Commerce Club 4: Literary Society 4: Class Vice-President 4: Junior-Senior Dance Committee 4: Gym Demonstration 3, 4: Carnival 1, 2: Scholarship Banquet Z, 3, 4: Photo Editor, Rose- mary, 4: .lournalistic Conference 4. "lt is not genius so much as ability that carries one through the battles of life." FRANCES REBECCA WILLIAMSON Class Secretary 4: Exchange Editor, Echo, 3: Assistant Editor 4: Journalistic Conference 2, 3, 4: G. A. A. Z, 3, 4: Swimming Manager 4: Baseball 3, 4: Swimming Team 3. 4: Oratorical Contest, Champaign. 3: Stunt Show l. 2, 3: Carnival I. 2: Literary Society l, 2, 3, 4: S. K. l, 2. 3. 4: National Honor Society 3, 4. "Ay, here's a rare good sport." EDWARD LOHMAN MCGRATH Class Treasurer 4: Class Basketball l, 2, 3: Varsity Basketball 3, 4: Captain 4: Varsity Football 3. 4: Class Swimming 2, 3: Track 4: K. S. K. 2. 3, 4: Class Track 3. 4: Stunt Show Committee 3: Junior- Senior Dance Committee 4: "Bulbul": "Am I Intrud- ing?": "The Whole Town's Talkingn: "U" Club 4: Social Committee K. S. K. 4: Commerce Club 3. "Hail fellow-well met!" MARGARET BEATRICE SLOAN Class Historian 4: Literary Society 4: S. K. l, Z. 3, 4: Treasurer 2: President 4: Commerce Club 4: G. A. A, 2, 3, 4: French Club 3, 4: Bobbette Club 3. 4: 1'Agatba's Aunt": "Pair of Sixes": "Honor Bright": Gym Demonstration l, 2, 3, 4: May Queen 4: Class Basketball 1. 2, 3. 4: Class Baseball 3: Exchange Editor, Echo, 4: Assistant Editor, Rosemary, 4: Honor Society 4: Girl Reserves 4: Costume Committee, "Am I Intrud- ing?": Costume Committee, "Whole Town's Talking": Costume Committee, "Seven Keys to Baldpate": Carnival l, 2: Girls' Glee Club 4. "The fairest garden in her looks, And in her mind the fairest books." I 1 A Iwo EI01101101101If101101101101101101101101101C01101C0110110110110110110110110I101 1 H 2 5 11011011021021010110101N101IOIIQIOIIQIQNDIIO131101f0f101101101101101l6'N .0. 101 Q01 101 101 101 Q02 101 It 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 101 101 101 It 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 C01 101 101 101 101 101 D1 D1 31 31 101 102 K1 IQ 101 31 31 31 101 101 101 31 0 91 91 0 101 101 101 101 D1 101 101 Q01 101 101 101 101 101 101 201 16 101 Q01 101 101 101 101 102 101 101 101 102 102 101 16 101 101 101 101 101 D1 101 101 101 Q xgszaui'333''fi'5'5"93931'33'3i'31'3f'3ifiWWIi'I Flite Ifxnnelllarg io:10110:1.1rezszzyzot1.1101925111:.::o::exxyx!HlQIZ5 12 10I 101 102 32 102 102 102 102 102 32 101 16 102 203 102 102 102 102 1G 102 IG IQ 1G IQ bl KI I 102 102 102 103 102 102 102 102 I I 16 102 102 IG If 102 32 16 92 102 102 IG 32 16 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 Q02 IQ 101 102 101 102 102 102 16 I IQ 101 101 102 Q02 102 102 102 102 Q01 IQ 102 It 102 102 102 IQ 102 103 103 102 102 D2 5 WILL ARD EWART IVIONOI-ION Editor-in-Chief 1925 Rosemary 4: Hatchet Oration 4: Junior Response 3: National Honor Society 3, 4: Secre- tary-Treasurer 4: Iota Alpha Gamma 4: Vice-President 4: Literary Society l, 2. 3, 4: Magpie Club 2. 3, 4: Bobbette Club 3. 4: French Club 4: K. S. K. 1. 2, 3, 4: Treasurer 4: Art Club 3: Commerce Club 4: Class Historian l: Class Debating Team 2: Rosemary Subscrip- tion Team 2: Music Memory Contest 3: Carnival 1. 2: Boys' Glee Club 3: Illinois State High School Press Association Conference 4: Bobbette Dance Committee 3: Stunt Show Committee 1, 4: Stunt Show l. 3. 4: Cast of "Am I Intruding?": "Bulbul": UH. M. S. Pinafore": "A Pair of Sixes": "Seven Keys to Baldpate." "Tom Goodwin was an actor-man, Old Drury's pride and boast, In all the light and spritely parts, Especially the ghost." CLINTON THEODORE OLIVER Business Manager of Rosemary 4: K. S. K. 3. 4: Class Track 3, 4: Glee Club 3, 4: Business Manager 4: Alpha Sigma Rho 3: "U" Club 4: Bobbette Club 4: Stunt Show 3, 4: Literary Society l, 3, 4: Commercial Club 4: Latin Club 3. 4: Junior-Senior Dance Committee 4: Class Baseball ll: Class Basketball Captain 4: Class De- bating 3: Varsity 2, 3. 4: Magpie 3, 4: Echo Staff 3, 4: "Seven Keys to Baldpaten: "Honor Bright." "He was six fee! o'man, AHl" ELIZABETH MASON Carnival I. 2: S. K. l. 2, 3. 4: G. A. A. 3, 4: Stunt Show 4: Iota Alpha Gamma 4: Track 3: Art Editor of Rosemary 4: May Fete 4: Gym Demonstration l, 2: Literary Society 1, 2. 3, 4. "In framing artists, art hath thus decreed: To make some good, but others to exceed." MASON REID EVANS Vice-President l: K. S. K, 2, 3, 4: Stunt Show 1, 3. 4: Committee 1, 4: Echo Stall 4: Athletic Editor of Rose- mary 4: Class Basketball l, 2, 3: Varsity Squad 2, 3. 4: Class Swimming 2. 3. 4: Varsity 2. 3, 4: Captain 3: Glee Club 2, 3: Press Conference 4: "Honor l3right": Carnival l, 2. "A bold, had man." MARGARET MOORE S. K. 2, 3. 4: Latin Club 3. 4: Interrex 4: Literary Society I, 2. 3, 4: President 4: Bobbette 4: Echo Stafl' 4: Literary Editor of Rosemary 4: "H, M. S. Pinafore": 2'Fanny and the Servant Problem": Girls' Glee Club 3, 4: Secretary 4: Stunt Show 2. 3, 4: Scholarship Banquet 2. 3: Honor Society 4: Property Manager of "A Pair of Sixes": Property Manager of the May Fete 4: Gym Demonstration 1, 2. "The multitude is always in the wrong." Me eddie www 111111 1 1 1 1 u 1 1 In fuum. 'I wenfy Hn re sa 102 Z02 102 C02 If 32 IC IC 102 103 103 103 If Ii IQ 32 102 16 92 102 101 If 102 KI 101 IQ 92 IG 92 IQ fi DI IQ If 102 91 101 KI IC Ii IQ IQ IQ 101 If 32 32 102 92 202 102 102 32 102 102 102 202 102 102 102 102 102 102 T W u:qQ:Q,::,:,::,::..: 2, .. .. ., ., .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... 1- ., .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ., .. .. . Y n 9250 ' -'H'--MM--'--'--'-My.M-Mem 1 H 2 .1 :.o..o..o..o..o..o 4......Q.o..o..q:o::e:fieryzozzexzxiioibiieueqgg 651900 0 + v + Q 0 Q Q Q Q Q Q o o Q Q Q Q 4 o o Ellie Bngpmarq xriv:Q:zo:zo:zo:si:o::o::o:s::o::o::o::o::es::cyz:o:s:nQ,"9Q NELL CATHERINE IVICDONOUGH Girls' Glee Club 3, 4: Vice-President 3: President 4: S. K. l. 2. 3. 4: Literary Society l, 2: 3: Bobbette 4: Stunt Show Committee 1. 2. 4: Stunt Show l. 2. 3, 4: State Music Contests at Chicago and Charleston 3: "Bulbul": "H. M. S. Pinaforen: "Seven Keys to Bald- pate": Roast Editor of the Rosemary: Carnival l. 2. "Of her bright face one glance will trace A picture on the brain: And of her voice in echoing hearts The sound must long remain." HERTHA LILLIE BOWMAN Circulation Manager of the Rosemary: Class Statistician: Chairman of the Ring and Pin Committee: Charleston Contest 4: Press Conference 4: Stunt Show 2: Commit- tee 2: Class Basketball l, Z, 3. 4: Captain l, 2: Class Debating l, 4: Alternate 2, 3: Literary Society l, Z, 3, 4: S. K. l, 2. 3. 4: G. A. A. 2. 3. 4: Membership Committee 4: Basketball Manager 4: Varsity Debating 3, 4: Magpie Society 2, 3, 4: Vice-President 3: Presi- dent 4: Alpha Sigma Rho 3: Commercial Club 4: French Club 3. 4: National Honor Society 3. 4: Vice-President 4: Baseball Z, 3: Track Team 3. "A heart to resolve, a head to contriue, a hand to execute." DORIS GEORGIA SCHEIB Calendar Editor of the Rosemary: S. K. l ,2, 3. 4: Literary Society I, Z, 3, 4: French Club 3. 4: Vice- President 4: "Bulbul": Glee Club 3, 4: Stunt Show l. 3. 4: Carnival I, 2: Gym Demonstration l, Z: May Fete 4: G. A. A. 3, 4: Class Basketball Z, 3, 4: Com- mercial Club 4: Baseball 3, 4: Property Manager to "Seven Keys to Baldpatew: Chairman S. K. Swimming Party Committee 4: Press Association 4: Bobbette Club 4: National Honor Society 4: Junior-Senior Dance Com- mittee 4: Art Club 3: Music Memory Contest 3: Orchestra 4. "She has genius lo be loved." DOROTHY FRANCES SCHEIB Rosemary Staff 4: S. K. l, Z, 3, 4: Literary Society l, 2, 3, 4: Secretary 4: French Club 3, 4: Art Club 3: "Bulbul": Glee Club 3, 4: Sergeant-at-Arms 4: Stunt Show l. 3. 4: Committee 4: Carnival I. 2: Committee 2: Gym Demonstration l, 2: May Fete 4: Music Mem- ory Contest 3: G. A. A. 3, 4: Class Basketball 2, 3, 4: Swimming Team 3, 4: Track 4: Commercial Club 4: Baseball 3, 4: Property "Seven Keys to Baldpate": Mother and Daughter Banquet Committee 4: Press Asso- ciation 4: S. K. Sergeant-at-Arms 4: Bobbette 4: Class Historian 3: National Honor Society 4. "Happiness was born a twin." RUTH Lois VILLARS S. K. l, 2, 3, 4: Literary Society l. 2: Art Club 3: President 3: Iota Alpha Gamma 4: President 4: Com- mercial Club 4: "Honor Brightu: Rosemary Staff 4: Gym Demonstration 2. " 'Tis sornelhing to be willing to commend: But my best praise is that I am your friend." Qzlalqo o o o o o 0 o o o o o o Q o o Q o Q Q 4 Q 0 0 0 0 1 5 ICQIQC02C02101IOIIOIIOIQGLOIIOI101102102102C02IOSI0IIOII0IbIIQ!IQ10IIQl6'N H1011011021021010161011021021021021021021021o21C101b23210110I' U he TK U HP Ulflfg 1616 101 103 92 DI 103 103 103 16 102 DI P2 102 32 lil ROY ERNEST APPERSON K, S. K, 3, 4: Class Basketball 4: Commerce Club 2: Band 2, 3, 4: Ag Club 4: Carnival Z. "His cogitatiue faculties immersed In cogibility of cogitationf' BEULAH BERNICE BARRICK Class Basketball l: S. K. 4: Gym Demonstration 2: Literary Society 4. "Nothing is impossible lo a willing heart." GEORGE HENRY BATEMAN Stunt Show 3: Orchestra 2, 3, 4: Band 4: 1'H0nor Bright." "They have rights who dare maintain them." . HARRIET ANNETTE BECHTOLD "Bulbul": Gym Demonstration 1. 2: Stunt Show 1: S. K. l, 2. 3, 4: Literary Society 1. 2, 3. 4: Carnival l: Class Swimming Team 3, 4: G, A. A, 4: Commerce Club 3: Assistant Swimming Manager 4. "Ask me no questions and 1'Il tell you no libs." EDNA IRENE BECKER S. K. l. 2, 3. 4: Commerce Club 2. 3: French Club 41 Literary Society I, 2: National Honor Society 4: Car- nival l: Vice-President Class 3: Gym Demonstration 1: Class Basketball. "And your smile like sunshine darts Into many sunless hearts " gd dia ' l f f f eg xg? fnullm Vilflf I I I I 1 1flIIlllfllrllIVtrllI1A T14-enty-fire MOU!1021011101110102I102101102102I011011011Q1Q10I10I1021021G1011C101 1 Q 2 5 IQ!10110110110210210210211131101102102101I0210I1021021G!!!5.ll 9 S, 102 32 DI 16 32 31 KI 32 16 1G IG IQ X2 92 DI QI 32 102 K2 92 102 102 201 31 DI 32 16 1C 102 S K2 32 32 102 32 16 31 102 102 101 N 16 IQ 102 102 202 102 102 K2 31 102 102 1 n202102102102i02Z0110IZ0II0I10110i10210210210IC0IC0210II0II0II0II0I Igngpnmfg 143141141:aj1411.31.11.31.3:aj1031,3joj931431oj1oj1aj1oj1oj1o3x1nQ,"Q e 202 202 202 202 202 202 102 202 102 102 202 202 202 202 202 202 202 202 26 K2 102 202 IQ 202 202 202 202 102 92 202 202 102 202 if 202 202 If D2 202 202 32 102 202 2d 202 202 202 102 202 202 102 202 102 103 Q02 102 202 202 202 102 202 102 202 52 102 202 102 K2 102 202 202 202 202 202 102 202 102 202 20 202 If 202 201 IQ It 102 102 102 202 202 202 102 20' '3 REBECCA BETTY BECKER N S. K. l, Z, 3. 4: Carnival 2: G. A. A. 3: Literary Society 4: Commerce Club 4: Gym Demonstration 1: French Club 3: "Bulbul." "A Irue friend is forever a friend," NEVA ANDRA BEVIS Class Party Committee l: S2 K. 2, 3, 4: Commerce Club 2, 4: Carnival Committee 2: Chairman S. K. Hop Com- mittee 4: "Honor Bright": Gym Demonstration 2. 2' 'Trouble proof' they call her." DESSIE PEARL BICKERS Philo High School l, 2. 3: "The Isle of Chance" l: "Assisted by Sadie" 2: "The Kingdom of Hearts Con- tent" 3: Commerce Club 4. "Amiability shines by its own light," LAWRENCE FYFFE BINYON Stunt Show l, 3, 4: Band l. Z. 3, 4: Orchestra l. Z. 3, 4: Varsity Swimming 2, 3. 4: Captain 4: Class Swimming 2, 3, 4: K2 S. K. 1, 2. 3. 4: "Daddy Long- legs": "Seven Keys to Baldpaten: Echo Representative l: Literary Society l, Z: Glee Club 3, 4: Bobbette Club 2. 3. 4: Rosemary Staff 4: State Band Contest 4: State Glee Club Contest 3: Carnival l, Z: Sergeant-at-Arms. Bobberte Club, 4: Springfield Band Contest 4. "1 believe they talked of me, for they laughed consumedlyf' FRANCES BIRELEY S. K. 3, 4: Commercial Club 4: Carnival 2. "As we're merry, may we still be wise." f iw' I xzf 'QItZ02Z0ZI0I1021021031031021031021031021031011021021021021021021QZ0210Z10IZ02Z02 1 g 2 5 1Z0II0I102Z02I0I102103102103110110110310310210210210310120210310210I10Z103101U6g u1vIIo31o3ioizaioziozivzioiiviiviiviiviioizoiioiiiioizoiioiiotiazl Elhp Zllngpiimriy 1.15.1101331q:.31.1gf31.31.31.93gqgsyyiqisf1.31.1g.11.31.3iie,'XcD ' af LENORE PRICE BLAIR University High School l, 2, 3: Basketball l, 2, 3: Carnival l, Z. 3: Class Party 2, 3: Spring Dance 21 Halloween Dance '51 S. K. 4: Halloween Committee 4: Commercial Club 4: U. and l, Magazine 3: Stunt Show 4. "Youre uncommon in some things-um common small, for Instance." MARTHA ELLEN Boocas "Bulbul": lirench Club 3: Commercial Club 4: S. K. l. 2, 3, 4. "Friendship is the medicine for all mis- fortunes." WILLIAM RODNEY BRANNOCK Carnival l, 2: K. S, K. 3, 4. "He stood a spell on one foot first, Then stood a spell on t'other." EDNA MAY BRASH S. K. 2. 3, 4: Commercial Club 2. 4: Magpie 4: Literary Society 4: Vice-President 4: G. A. A. 2. 3, 4: Basketball l, 3. 4: Captain of the Second Team 3: Class Debating 4: Alternate of Varsity Debate 4: Class Base- ball 3: Gym Demonstration 1. 2: District Commercial Contest 3: French Club 3, 4: Rosemary Staff 4: National Honor Society 3, 4: Press Conference 4: Carnival l, 2. "I have done my task, let others do theirs." MARY ELIZABETH BRENNAN Ogden High School 1: Historian l: Carnival 2: Stunt Show 3, 4: Echo Representative 3: Vice-President of S. K. 4: S. K. 2. 3, 4: Literary Society 2, 3, 4: Girl Reserves 4: Secretary 4: Echo Staff 4: May Pete 4. "Be to her uirtues very kind Be to her faults a little blind." Mwasuunufufufnfuf 1 muunfuuuuuuumwufuu 7, Me efefe 'alfa "1-eiily.-1'-' Q 101 101 102 101 bl 101 32 31 101 101 103 101 101 101 101 IQ 31 102 102 101 102 102 If 32 ld Q01 101 101 102 101 1G 102 102 101 101 101 101 203 101 103 102 102 102 K1 101 32 102 102 101 102 101 101 101 ld 102 203 101 101 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 101 101 D2 102 101 101 102 101 101 101 102 if KI 101 103 102 102 102 101 102 101 101 101 102 101 92 5' f 1 L s 1 1 li K Qi,'Q02IQ101101101101102101102116110210110110110210210i1Q1Q10I1Q101h1101101 1 g 2 5 101101102101101101101101101101510110210210210210110210110110110110I!3f101I'lw 9 U if 103 f0f 101 101 101 101 101 IC 101 101 102 101 101 102 1011010 if 101 G1 hp Q115Pl1lEI1'g 101 101 101101 102331 3210212 ZOI K2 1C 32 C03 101 101 I 101 KI IU W X Q .0. 101 102 101 102 32 102 102 101 ki 101 101 102 102 102 102 32 32 32 if 32 101 102 bi 102 101 91 102 102 102 102 102 101 102 102 92 32 102 102 101 102 102 K2 102 102 DI 10 IC 102 IQ 102 101 if 102 102 102 IQ IQ IQ 16 101 101 102 102 102 102 1 DOROTHY PATRICIA BRENNAN News Editor of Echo 3: G. A. A. I. Z. 3: Bobbette l. 2. 3: S. K. l. 2, 3: Commercial Club 3: Alpha Sigma Rho 2. 3: Honor Society 3: Gym Demonstration l, 2: May Fete 3: Stunt Show 2, 3: Press Conference 2, 3: Rosemary Staff 3: Commercial Club Echo Representative 3: Literary Society l, 2. 3: Carnival l: "Daddy Long- legs": "Fannie and the Servant Problem": Boys' and Girls' Glee Club Pianist 2. 3: State Piano Contest at Chicago, Champaign, Bloomington and Springheld: Chair- man Committee for Mother and Daughter Banquet 3: Music Memory Contest 2: State Band Contest 3: High School in three years. "Grace, was in all her steps, heaven in her eyes. In every jesture dignity and love." IVA MARIE BUSEY S. K. I, Z. 3: Glee Club 4: Gym Demonstration I, 2: French Club 3: "BulbuI": "H: M. S. Pinaforen: Com- mercial Club: Literary Society l. 2: May Fete 4: Orches- tra 2. 3: Iota Alpha Gamma 4: G. A. A. 3, 43 Carnival 1, 2: Biloxi Mississippi High School. First Semester, 4: Dramatic Club 4: "Lost Pirates of Hawaii": Debating Team 4: Biloxi Athletic Association 4: Vice-President Biloxi Glee Cluh. "Better be happy than wise." ALBERTA PHYLLIS CARPENTER Stunt Show Z, 3. 4: S. K. 1, 2. 3, 4: Commercial Club 2, 3: Carnival l. 2: Committee 2: Rosemary Staff 4: "Bulbul": Gym Demonstration l. "Oh, give me whatever I do not possess, No matter whatever it be." GLEN EARNEST CHAPMAN K. S. K. 3, 4: Band 2, 3, 4: Varsity Football 4: Varsity Basketball 4: Class Track 3, 4: Bobbette 4: Stunt Show 4: "The Whole Town's Talking": "Honor Brightu: "H, Nl. S. Pinaforen: Class Basketball Z, 3. "Give the devil his due." MABEL SUSAN COLE Swimming 3, 4: Captain 4: Baseball 2, 3: Captain 3: Commercial Club Z: S. K. l, Z. 3. 4: G. A. A. 3. 4: Secretary 3: Gym Demonstration l, 2: lota Alpha Gamma 4: Literary Society. "Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul." f IW I . U!1Q101E01161Q1Q10110I1011Q10210I10I1011011021021011510I10I10II0If0I10I 2101101102101101101101101101101101610215110210210210210I10110I1Q10I10I10Il 5 af: QSQSL9nie:io:ioiioiio:Lo::oi:oz:ozio::+Izo:iozioziozzozzoiioiioziozsizoz Ehp IKngpmm,-q :oifo:Zo:io:zo:zo:io::ozzo::ozzo:wiio::oixi:o::o::+::o::o::o::o:rg ' x . JOHN BARBOUR BERESFORD Class Basketball l, Z, 3: Varsity Basketball 4: Bobhette Club 4: Boys' Glee Club 3, 4: President 4: K. S. K. 3. 4: President 4: "A Pair of Sixes": "Seven Keys to Baldpatenz "Treasure Huntcrs": "Bulbul": Stunt Show 4: Stunt Show Committee 4: Ring and Pin Committee: Literary Society 3. "The spirit of a youth that mean.s to be of note, begins betimesf' DOROTHY ALBERTA BLAISDELL Latin Club: Glce Club 3, 4: Stunt Show 4: S. K. '52 Literary Society 4: Commercial Club. "Her every tone was musicls own, Like those of morning brrdsfl FORREST EUGENE BOUCHER Literary Society l: Carnival l, Z: Band 2, 3, 4: Or- chestra 3, 4: K. S. K. 3, 4: State Band Contest 4: Art Club 3: lota Alpha Gamma 4, "Every man has his gift, and the tools go to him that can use them." RICHARD CHILDERS Class Basketball l, Z: Class Track 3: Carnival l, Z: Boys' Glee Club: "H, M. S. Pinaforcnz Class President 3: Secretary Z: K. S. K. 3. 4: "Bulbul": Stunt Show Z, 3, 4: "Honor Bright." "Lord3 I wonder what fool it was that first invented hissing." INEZ RUTH CONRAD Gym Demonstration l, 2: French Club 3, 4: G. A. A. 3. 4: Literary Society l. Z. 3, 4: Orchestra 4: Class Basketball 3. "Above our life we love a steadfast friend." J, fi? were f 7'a1-vnty nine K Qi 9. If KI KI IG IG C03 IQ If 101 IC IG Ii S02 IG 32 Koi 103 101 101 101 102 IQ If If If IQ IQ li 'v fi DI KI IC 102 203 If IG If IQ PI DI IC Ii IG IC 101 102 102 101 1 Q39gto::oi10310::og:vi:ozrcin:oz:ozzo:iv::oz:oi:oziozgopgozzoziezozzoiiozivr 1525 3.3gsp33.31.31.3gq1.33.3gsggsg5.35.33.31.33.31.31.3g.gg.gg.3p:1f:v::o::en U10210210202101010210210110210210210210210210210I102I02102f0I102l E119 iKnm-nmrq zo:gm:forim:zo::oz:oz:oz:ozzo::oiQ:zo:1o::o::oi:v::v::v::o:nQ2Q N 1 ... 102 '02 IG 102 IG 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 101 101 102 102 102 Z02 .Q 32 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 32 IQ 102 102 K2 102 102 102 32 102 202 102 If 16 K2 102 32 102 102 92 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 '3 ,.l -SX sw. eww txxxsm xxx sxxs ALICE HESTER CORDRAY "Bulbul": "H. M. S. Pinafore": S. K. 3, 4: Literary Society 4: Commercial Club 4. "Friendship is a youth to which old age exceeds not." HAROLD GRIFFITH CREAMER Tolono Community High School I, Z. 3: K. S. K 4: Band 4: Debating 3: Track Z. 3: Basketball 1, 2, 3g All-School Party Committee 4. "An affable and courteous gentleman." DORIS VIRGINIA CRITZER Stunt Show l: Gym Demonstration 2: Commercial Club 4. "Thoughts are blossoms of the mind." CYPRIAN CUNNINGHAM High School in two years. "For every why he had a wherefore." ADRIAN CHRISTOPHER DAVIS "Go on with laudable ambition in the path that leads to honor and renown." f I In I fl U10210210210110110210210210I10f10210210I1021021021021021021023210f10210l10210I 1 B 2 EI QIQOQQQQOQQOQQQ10210210119101102Q02f0jQ62f0f10f10f10ff0ff0ffoff0f10Q10210fQl uI02I0210I1011020102102101103102102C0210KI0I103102Z03Z02Z0j102I0j Elhp Igggpnmflt 103Q03103103103143103103303103103303510310j1033j10j1q10jj0j10j!lQK .5 IQ Id 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 10I 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 102 101 102 101 203 102 Zi 32 102 102 101 102 102 102 31 102 101 IQ 16 101 32 it 16 IQ If IG 102 102 ld 32 101 T02 101 ld Id 102 102 102 Id 16 IQ It 16 CG 16 IQ 16 IC 102 if 102 101 102 101 102 101 102 102 101 If Id 102 101 102 102 101 102 F Ili ' , - ne 0101f01101101f01f0f1011i 1021011011020210210210110110210.L0110210210210Z102102 1925 103103103103103103QQ10310110330191101103101101103110103f0jf0j1Q10Zb2K2ll6 J. ANSEL DEWEY Literary Society 2. 4: K. S. K. 4: Commercial Club 2: Band 3, 4: Carnival 1. "I have always thought the actions of men the best interpreters of their thoughts." BERNICE MAE DOUTHIT Commercial Club Z, 3: S. K. I, Z. 3, 45 Literary Society 2, 3: Gym Demonstration Z, 3: Carnival 1, 2: G. A, A. 3. Is 'A simple maiden in her flower worth a hundred coats-of-arms," OLIVE AVANELLE DUNN Literary Society 3, 4: Swimming Team 3, 4: S. K. l, 2, 3. 4: G. A. A. 3, 4: "Bulbul": Commercial Club 4: Chairman Leap Year Leap Committee 4: Class Basket- ball lz Girls' Glee Club 3, 4: Carnival l, 2: Type- writing Contest 3: Gym Demonstration I, Z: French Club 3: Stunt Show Z, 3, 4: Rosemary Typist: Track 3, 4. "Great let them call her for she conquered 7772. GRACE M. ENGLAND Carbondale High School l. Z. 3: Class Secretary l. 3: Literary Society 1, Z. 3: Class Play 3: French Club 3, 4: S. K. 4: Girls' Glec Club l, 4: Class Basketball 2, 3: French Play 3: Chairman Junior-Senior Reception 3. "All my ambition is, I own, To profit and to please unknown." VERGIL RUTH EVERMAN S: K. l, 2, 4: Carnival l. 2: G. A. A. 3: Literary Society 4: Commercial Club 4: Gym Demonstration l, 2: French Club 3. "There is no better relation than a true and better friend." y, .ff? fill? 14 " iflr! o Q 16 I 101 101 91 D1 31 If 16 31 1C IQ If 101 101 101 101 101 101 1C 102 101 91 D1 K1 91 101 101 31 D1 101 101 31 91 102 31 31 P1 102 K1 31 31 31 If I 101 IQ 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 11 1C 1C 16 I If 16 Ii K1 K1 31 202 91 31 C02 101 K1 91 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 E Makitanm:myzozw::exe:o:x::o::o::o::+::v::o::o::o::o::+::o:: Elhp Rggpmgrq :ozzo:zo:zo:nz:oz:ozzozzoz:ozzezcxzazxzsz:s::o::o::o::o::enQ7Q Q .02 102 102 102 16 If It 102 if 1d IC IG 92 IG 32 IG 102 K2 102 3: 10. 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 16 102 32 52 bl 102 102 102 IQ K2 102 32 102 IG 16 IC IG IG 102 102 102 102 Id 102 102 102 It 102 K2 32 32 102 102 16 IG 102 101 102 Z Wx Ness saws WRIGHT RANEAU FARNSWORTH Wawconda High School l, Z: "Come Out of the Kitchen": Varsity Basketball l, 2: Varsity Baseball l: Baseball Manager Z: Carnival Committee 2: Boys' Glee Club 4: K. S. K. 3, 4: Iota Alpha Gamma 4: Bobbette Club 4: Literary Society 4: Class Basketball 3. 4: Class Track 3: Echo Staff 4: "The Whole Town's Talking": Commercial Club 3. "Shot by a womans smile." MILDRED JOYCE FAULKNER Carnival Committee I: Freshman-Sophomore Party Com- mittee l: S. K. Z, 3, 4: Latin Club 3: G, A. A. 3: Basketball Team 3: Gym Demonstration Z: Art Club 3: May Pete 4. "Smiles and curls are her specialty." CLIFFORD EUGENE FEARS K. S. K. 3. 4: "Bulbul": Carnival 1: Glee Club l, 4: Honor Society 3, 4: Class Track 4. "Though modest, on his unembarass'd brow Nature had written-'Gentlemanf " ELVA GERTRUDE FEIST S. K. 3, 4: Girl Scouts 4: French Club 3: G. A. A. l. "A generous heart shows a noble mind." WILLIAM RUSH FISCUS Philo High School l, 2: Basketball Captain 2: Track l. 2: Basketball 3: Football 4: Commercial Club 4- "You can always discover a true gentleman by his address." I lizvflilflzrwr If01IiIQI0If0fI0IFifi102102If102I102131102151913119110110133 1 g 2 5 102191IfL0119132191191192102101102:Of102:Of102IOIIQIOIIIICQCIOIIOIIC3 ?lSx6?SL9a:o:ywixzzozzoz10210:10310:szzozyzm9:s:+:x::.::.::o:1 Elly Qngpmarg X Q .0 bl 32 102 IG IG 32 102 102 102 32 If IQ 202 IQ 102 102 102 CG 1C 16 32 Id 32 102 102 S02 102 102 102 16 If IG 101 32 102 i02 102 102 If 32 102 202 102 K2 IQ IQ 92 102 102 K2 202 102 IQ Zi If I02 102 L02 1 EARNEST HARRISON GREEN "He is a sure card." GARLAND BICKLEY FLETCHER Commercial 2, 3: K. S. K. l. 2. 3, 4: Sergeant-ab Arms 4: Literary Society 3, 4: French Club 2: Car- nival l. Z. "Lord, what fools these mortals be!" ESTHER FRANCES FOOTE Commercial Club 4: Philo High School l. 2, 3: "Isle of Chance": "Assisted bv Sadien: "Kingdom of Heafts Content": Class Order: Vice-President, "Taft is the oil that lubricates society." HARRY KING GHER Varsity Basketball 2. 4: Class Basketball 3: Football 2: Class Secretary 1: K. S. K. 3. "He would on either side dispute." INEZ CLEORA FOLTZ Commercial Club 3: Art Club 3: Iota Alpha Gamma 4: Literary Society Z, 3: S. K. 1. 2, 3. "A friend is worth all the hazards we can run." wr 1 ff ff f rn M? ffff? wuunflz funn Thulu three l:z:oz:Q:sicmesz:ozzo::oz:exe9:xp:ozzozzoizozzozzcgczwzbir 15 E5 xxzeiczeivz:c:o::s:ex:Q:Qb1s:xiqoiicxzcyzxxsln U101102102102102101102102102102102101102102102102102102102102102! wh? EKUHPHIEIIU fi102102102102102102102102102102102102!I02102Ii9210f32102102UQAf2a ADRIAN FRANCIS GILLESPIE Buckley High School 1. 2. 3: Basketball 2. 3: Literary Society 3: Boys' Stunt Show 3: Class Treasurer 2. "His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow." AGNES FLORENCE GLENN Gym Demonstration 2: Carnival l. 2: S. K. 2, 3, 4: Commercial Club 4. "Here's all that's ine to you." EDITH VIOLA GORDON S. K. l, 2, 3. 4: Gym Demonstration l. Z: Commercial 2. 4: Secretary 4: French Club 3: Track 3: Type- writing Contest 3. "A sunbeam on a winter's day." FRANCES EVELYN GORDON S. K. 4: Commercial Club 4: Musical Plays Z, 3: Glee Club l. 2: St. Joseph's Academy 1. 2. 3. HA beauty of a woman consists in her actions." DANTEL ELBERT GREEN Christopher High School 1: Literary Society l: Class Basketball 1: K. S. K. Z. 3. 4: Commercial Club 4: "Honor Brightnz Carnival 2. " 'Tis the voice of a sluggard, I hear him complain 5 'You haue waked me too soon, I must slum- ber againf " sgx SSRN X5 sxxxxuiu , xx xsxxw -N-Rwwmwwwtm 7'hir'l1f-fum' wl1021G101102102102102102102I021021021021021021610210I1Qk2I02102b2!1021C 1 Q 2. 5 1102102102102102102102321023220110211110210210210210210210292102!102102ll 9 .0. 16 1Q 32 32 32 103 16 16 1C 102 102 16 16 If IC 32 101 92 102 15 102 102 IC 142 102 L02 102 102 101 IQ 102 92 16 32 102 15 102 IC 102 102 102 102 142 If 102 IC IG 102 16 If IG 102 92 102 103 102 15 11 I lvl 102 32 142 11 IQ K2 102 102 92 P2 1 9 .9. 102 102 102 102 102 102 202 102 Ii 102 102 102 102 102 102 IC 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 Q02 92 If id 102 102 102 102 IQ KI 102 f02 102 202 . 102 102 102 S02 102 S02 102 102 It IQ 102 102 IOI Id it TQ IQ If 102 102 102 K2 32 IQ 16 1G 102 102 16 32 103 It 102 If 102 102 102 102 101 Q02 32 bi bl 102 102 1 102 102 102 5 nioiivi10:10:10:Zoiioiioiioiioziozieioi11021021021021021012031011 Uhr Kngpnmrq io:5.31.31.31.31.31.33.393p:yg.g1.3g.31Q31.1gQ3g.3g.3:.3:.3g.3n ' 1 3. if if if 202 :Of 101 ARLETTA LOU HAHN 1.1 :Of Easton High School ZZ years: High School 3M years: :Q Forum Society l. 2. 3: Home Economics Club l, 2: . Cilee Club 2: Junior Play 3. if "Mistress of herself though China fall." if if 102 102 102 ' ' 192 32 MARJORIE HAMILTON S. K. l, Z. 3. 4: Commercial Club 4: Gym Demonstra- ucn l. 2: Basketball l. 2: Iota Alpha Gamma 4: G. A. A. 3: Carnival l. 2. 9. 32 101 "A rare combination of red hair and good temper." .Q IG IC 102 DI KI 102 102 ... MARGARET KATHERINE HARAN xi 0 Bibb County High School. Centerville, Alabama. l. 2, 3: G. A. A. 4: S. K. 4: Program Committee 4: May Fete 4: Track 4: Swimming 4: Basketball l: Glee Club 2: Class Social Committee 3. I+: :Q 10: :og "All around her speech there hung Soft accents of a southern tongue." A If if 102 .C T02 ff HELEN A. HARDING g. Iota Alpha Gamma 4: Literary Society l. 2: S. K. 3. 4: Gym Demonstration l. 2. 3: Carnival l. Z. .Q T "A friend should bear a frr'end's 1'nHrmities." :oi .C D2 IC 102 PI bl x. GEORGE HENRY HARDYMAN Sidney High School l: Gideon High School, Missouri. 2: Literary Society 1. 2, 3: Basketball l: Varsity Track 2: Athletic Society 2: Football 3: Captain 3: K. S. K. 4: Commercial Club 4: Football Squad 4. bi :Q i01 102 If 'v X, fir New Mfr! MW' "Married, bigoshln 9. 102 102 102 102 16 32 K2 202 un TI ivfufile ::oi:oiiojzzioiisjisjzviic14:ie:ze:im:zo:io::o::o::o::o:1e:c:o::o:2 1525 103:oi:oz10393111110310:93:o::e1c:e:eyx3:e:c:o::o:1o3:o::e:o::o:a 10:10:10:10::0::0::0::0::0:10:10:10:10::0::0::0:x:10:1e:0:s:ie Ghz Rngpmgrg 1e:0::0:10:10310110110310:102102101010::0::0::e:0::0::0::0::0mQ7G 9 IG 32 I02 I02 D2 IG IG IG Ii Ii IC IG If 102 32 If IOI IQ Ii 92 I02 IC 32 D2 IG 32 Ii IG IQ 101 If V IQ If 202 IG IQ S .Q .Q .Q A If .Q IC IG IG ... 5 Thirfu .5-'ir 105392103101 .. ,egg .. saws ,, wage S x xx xxx-:N HARLEY H. HARMON Orchestra 3, 4: Class Basketball 3: Commercial Club 41 K. S. K. 3, 4: French Club 4. Barhis is willin'.' HELEN OPAL HARTLE S. K. Z. 3, 4: Commercial Club 3, 4: Baseball Z: Literary Society Z: Swimming 4: French Club 3: Car- nival 2. "The advice of a friend is good." DOROTHY OPAL HARTZ Philo High School 1, Z: "Follies" 2: Commercial Club 4. "And like a lily on the river floating She floats upon the river of her thoughts." VERLA AUDREE HILL Abingdon High School l, 2: Freshman Calendar Editor "Tattler": "The Wild Rosen: Basketball 1, 2: "Tattler Finance Shown: Girls' League l, 2: Literary Society l. 2. 3. 4: Glee Club l. 2. 3. 4: Track 3: Tennis 2.4: Swimming 4: Stunt Show l, 2, 3: Committee 2. 3: Chairman 3: Echo Stall' 3: G. A. A. 3. 4: Commercial 3. 4: S. K. 3, 4: Iota Alpha Gamma 4: Stage Proper- ties of "The Whole Town's Talking": May Pete 2: Mother-Daughter Banquet 4. "Friendship above all ties doth bind the heart. And faith in friendship is the noblest part." RUBY ODELL HISER Literary Society l. 2. 3, 4: S. K. l. Z. 3, 4: Echo Representative 4: Commercial Club 4: Vice-President 4: Gym Demonstration 1, Z: French Club 3: Carnival l, Z: Stunt Show 4. "Her eyes are stars of twilight fair. Like twilight, too, her dusky hair-" 102203102102102102102102102102biZQ10210i10210110I103101 1 H 2 5 II02I02I02Q02I0II0II0II02I02I02I0IIM160210232102102I02I02I02I02IQI0I92kQl6'X E .0. 10: 10: 10: ze 10: IG ze ze ze ze :Q :Q ze ze IQ ze ze ze 10: 0: IQ If 10: 102 102 U A H S V 16 re :e IQ IQ IQ Id ze :Q ze 102 I02 10: :Q 10: sz ii If 10: 1 E .Q 102 C02 IC DI 31 202 IG KI KI IG 2 IC bi KI IG bl IG CO2 102 as Uhr Rngpmurg BYRON KEITH HOLMES Class Basketball l, 2: Varsity 2: K. S. K. 2: Literary Society 1, "1 had a soul above buttons." JACK MARION HOLT St. .lohn's High School. Michigan, l, 2: Football l, 2, 3: Basketball l, 2, 3: Tennis 2: Student Manager 3: Orchestra l, 2, 3. 4: Glee Club l. 2: Literary Society 3: Band 4: K. S. K. 4: Bobbette 4: Stunt Show 4. "A little nonsense now and then Is relished by the wisest men." RAYMOND WALTER HOUSH Salem High School l: K. S. K. 2. 3, 4: Social Chair- man 4: Baseball 4: Literary Society 3, 4: Bobhette Club 3, 4: Social Committee 4: Stunt Show 4: Class Basketball 4: All-School Party Committee 2: "Am I Inrruding?": "A Pair of Sixes": Stage Manager to "Seven Keys to Baldpateu: "The Whole Town's Talk- ing": "Honor Brightn: Boys' Glee Club 3. 4: Treas- urer 4: Rosemary Subscription Team 4. "The man who frets at worldly strife Grows sallow, sour, and thin: Give me the lad whose happy life ls one perpetual grin." LINUS OTTO HUBBARD Band l, 2. 3, 4: Orchestra l. 2. 3. 4: K. S. K. 3, 4: Class Swimming 3: Carnival 1. 2: "H. M. S. Pinafore" Orchestra: State Band Contest 4: Football 4. "ln mathematics he was greater Than Tycho Brahe or Erra Pater." GLENN ANDREW HUDSON Commercial Club 2. 3: K. S. K. 1. 2. 3, 4: Glee Club 3: Carnival l, 2: Literary Society 1, 2. 3, 4: Class Basketball 3. "Calmness is the companion of fortitude." y f 4 7 e Z We 44244 4 I ""' I ""' f 1 1 1 nfnnnfunfunu Thirty-seven IIIQIIQIOIIQIOI102102IG!!!IfKIQIIOIIOIIOIIOIIGICICII 53132102126165ISM!!!1G1C1Q1GlG!MN!fQMZi!l 32193519uiviiozzozrftzozriozzozro:If:10::ot:otiozzozzoizozzezoizemzi Eh? ml1HPIt1arq ze49:10:10:zo::ot:oi101101101101zozzezvzzemzszfoz:+::o:2iQ,"9Q X . Q 101 10, 101 101 101 101 101 D1 31 101 101 D1 IQ 101 101 1d 101 10 If It 101 . 1 101 101 l 101 101 Q01 101 101 lt 91 101 If 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 IQ 101 101 101 101 101 1G 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 IQ K1 Q01 101 101 101 101 101 31 K1 101 If 102 D1 31 101 IQ 16 101 101 101 K1 101 101 101 K1 101 101 101 8. 101 101 201 If DI .91 5 1: lui sxmmnmmesxmssssse- e -.sxxasuxx QNX New NQSSS MORGAN FRANCIS HUNDLEY Carnival l, 2: Chairman 2: Bobbette Club 3. 4: Magpie Club 4: "Agatha's Aunt": "Seven Keys to Baldpate": Class Debate 4: Literary Society l. Z, 3. 4: K. S. K. 2, 3: Commercial 3. 4: Stunt Show l, 2, 3: Chair- man 2. "1 dare anything. Therefore beware."' KENNETH LEROY HUNT K. S. K. 3, 4: Ag Club 3. 4: Varsity Track 3, 43 Class Track 3, 4: Class Basketball 3, 45 Carnival l. "Action, not speech, proves the man." PRISCILLA MAE HUTCHINSON Sidney High School l. 2: Class President l. 2: Stunt Show 2: Class Basketball Z, 3. 45 Scholastic Contest Z: "His Latest Choice": Glee Club 3: S. K. 3. 4: G. A. A. 3, 4: Track Manager 4: Commercial Club 4: Literary Society 3, 4: Gym Demonstration '51 May Pete 4. "A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance." JOHN D. JOHNSON Carnival l: Band 2. "Quiet minds are generally the most happy." MARGARET LORRAINE KELLER Cowden High School l. 2, 33 S. K. 4. "What is your fortune, my pretty maid?" "My face is my fortune, sir," she said. Th ' 'lg E ' 'JM n101Z01IfC011011011011031011011101101101101101102101101I0ZI01i0110110110Z 1 5 21013110110110110110110110210110110110110110110191323232I0I10II0110110110Il6'N u:.:zezezyyzezoz1.11.3:ate:amz321.1141011031101 Elhp Kggpmgrq zo:10310:10110:1.310111151191102x::o::e:o::o:!y:o:l1Q29Y5 fff ffl 102 191 291 32 KI 3. MARVIN H. KEMP Bellflower Township High School l: Basketball l, 2, 3, 4: Class Basketball 2. 3: Track 2. 3: K. S. K. 2, 3. 4: Ag Club 1. 2: Football 4: Boys' Glee Club 19: 3, 4: "U" Club 4: Baseball l: Boys' Stunt Show. W "lt is really a very great plague to be too fa handsome a man." 5. DONALD R. KENDALL K. S. K. 3. 4: Literary Society 3, 4: Commercial Club 4. "Comb down his hair. Look! Look! " It stands upright." 9. if .Q :OI ... fef .6 ra ea if DOROTHY HELEN KERN Lamer High School, Macon, Georgia. 1: Literary Society Q: 2. 3. 4: Scholarship Banquet 2, 3, 4: French Club 3. 4: National Honor Society 3. 4: Class Debate 4: Magpie Society 4: Gym Demonstration 2: Salutatory Address. "Whose little body lodged a mighty mmd. 9. It fi KI IQ IGI 102 l'2 525 VARETA VELMA LAFENHAGEN ... Philo High School l, Z: "The Isle of Chance": S. K. 3: Commercial Club 4. x If 2:2 "ln earh cheek appeared a pretty dimplef' QQI DI 102 102 9. W if 102 5. 32 GLADYS RUTH LICHT KI Q02 Philo High School 1, 21 "The me of Chance": HAS. ,Q sistecl by Sadie": Athletic Association Z: Secretary 2: fl Glee Club 2: S. K. 3. 4: Commercial Club 4: Latin 7.5 Club 3: Gym Demonstration 3. 9. "A good friend is life's best inheritance." : : f X ff! iii MQW 'v KI W 9: 1 wunlfm 102 E ruff 1 1 Tlzirlyrnine R Qgfaebiif:1,31.31.3Q.::Q::c1.::.3:.:1.::o:io::oiio::ez:o::e:o:s3b:x::o::+::o: 1 H E 5 151023: io: Q' 'oi io: zo: :oi io: 115510: io: :Q :oi io: Zcieiewixxlsi P u202bis:si9-tb:1xisimy70:10:02ietefoifotioifoiioii Elly? ZKUHPFUHIW1 10:fs::QiIe10:io:1.3zo:9:933333351xw::c:o::.::o:n 9 .01 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 Id Id 31 91 31 101 32 31 D1 101 31 31 91 31 91 IQ 101 101 101 31 101 'G 2 31 IQ 101 QI 101 31 101 101 31 31 Id 101 101 101 101 K1 101 KI 101 101 91 16 P1 IG ... I Fnrly six QRRxQ XRSSS X ss xx x msxsxsw uxsxxxus BIRRELL ARTHUR LLOYD High School in 3 years: Scholarship Banquet l, Z. 3: French Club 2. 3: Honor Society 4: Valedictorian. "The rank is but the guinea's stamp, The man's the gowd for a' that." HOWARD ELLIOTT LOHMANN K. S. K. 3. 4: Literary Society 1. 2: Hi-Y l: Com- mercial Club Z, 3: Class Basketball 1, 2, 3: Class Foot- ball l. "That was as well said as if I 'd said it myself." VINNIE PEARL LOGAN Ogden High School I. 2: Gibson City High School 3: Girls' Glee Club 2. 4: Commercial Club 3: Basket- ball I. 2. "A good heart is better than all the heads in the world." CHARLOTTE FRANCES LOSH Beardstown High School l. 2, 3: Glee Club 2. 3, 4: Booster Club l. 2. 3: Russeloncian Society 3: Mitzie Organization 1. 2, 3: Class Basketball 3: Stunt Show 4: S. K. 4. "Teach me half the gladness that thy brain must know." CLARENCE EDWARD LUKER Carnival l, 2: K. S. K. 3. 4: Class Swimming 2, 3: Varsity Swimming 2, 3: Literary Society 2, 3: Band 2. 3. 4. "I took a hand at History, its altars, spires. and flames, And uniformly mispronounced the most im- portant names." ' wlfi X10110116191101161Q10I1011011C10110I101l0I10I10110I101 1 H 2 5 1101 I 101 102 102 IQ 103110101 102161611115 ZQ101 101 IC!!! NICKIIGEN uI+3roxy:ozio:io:io:io:io:io::ozio:io::oifoiioziiozzoziozzozioi Elie mHHPl1I211'U zozzozmfisz1.21.33033.35.33.3geggqgejpggsggqyyyyyn Q I I I K H I 5 1 ! 5 I W 5 I I I I K 5 I I IOI I I I 5 Q 5 Q42 A I A N K 1 K QQ 1 5 5 5 H 5 1 M I I I 5 E K K 3 3 I A E I 3 102 3 3 D 3 9 9 ! Q K K 3 3 3 3 b 3 D 9 3 fi 3 3 3 D 3 3 K 9 K 3 3 3 3 D .- EULA R. MAGILL Sidney High School l. 2, 3: Basketball l, 2, 4: Stunt Show 2: Cantata 3: S. K. 4: G. A. A. 4: Commercial Club 4: Literary Society 4: Laurean Society 2: Sikiol Society 3: Track 4: May lfere 4. "A merry heart goes all the day." ZACK LAFAYETTE MARTIN Stunt Show l, 2, 3, 4: "Am l lntruding?": "The Xlflhole Town's Tallringuz Class Treasurer I3 Vice-l3resi- dent 2: Bobbette Club 3, 4: Secretary 4: K. S. K. 2. 3, 4: Literary Society 2, 3: Varsity Basketball 2, 3. 4: Class Basketball l, Z: "Bulbul": liootball 3. 4: "U" Club 4: President 4: Class Prophet 4: HH. M. S. Pina- fore": "Honor Bright." "Never judge a man by his chest measure: he may be Hlled u.'z'th hot air." MARY ELIZABETH lVlAR'I'lNIE "Bulbul": Gym Demonstration l, Z: S, K. I, Z, 3, 4: Literary Society 4: Carnival 1: French Club 3. 4: Latin Club l. Z: Commercial Club 3: Girl Reserves 4. "As merry as the day is long." MINNIE LUMAN MEANS G. A. A. 3. 4: S. K. l, 2, 3. 4: Literary Society 2, 3. 4: "Bulbul": Stunt Show l, 3. 4: Gym Demonstration l, Z: Bobbette Club 3, 4: Treasurer 4: Echo Subscrip- tion Team 4: Glee Club 3. 4: Commercial Club 3. 4: Social Chairman S. K. 4: Carnival 1. 2: Class Basketball 2, 3, 4: Baseball l: "Fannie and the Servant Problemni "A Pair of Sixes": "Honor Btight": Costume Committee '4The Whole Town's Talkingu: May Fete 47 Rosemary Solicitor 3: Girl Reserves 4: President 4: Shorthand Contest 3: Girls' Quartet 4. "lf to her share some female errors full, Look on her face, and you'll forget them uU.H JESSE W. MILLER Band 3, 4: Orchestra 3: K. S. K. Z. 3. 4: Press Con- ference 4: Echo Staff 4: Class Swimming 3. 4: Literary Society Z. 3, 4: "Seven Keys to Baldpate": Bobbette Club 4: Stunt Show l, 4: Carnival l. 21 State Band Contest 4. "Hang sorrow! care would kill a cat. And therefore let's be merry." y, lf? flff? 44 ua Lf Forty one Qyfanlivj103103Zvjioiioiiei102102Zvi1021021021031025102Ioiiviivjioiivjisiivjioi 1 Q 2 5 50334:1031433.31.3iojioiieioijojjojgojjojjajgojgojgojgojiojyyyyiyyn !! 9. 3 3 3 P 9 hi 32 10 36 IQ 35 KE 35 35 KE 95 35 35 hi I0 35 bl 32 32 92 92 DI bl Z0 bi bl I0 35 I0 3i If 95 32 hi Q2 32 IQ IG CG Co DI KI 92 IC hi 32 Ii 32 bl It PI 32 Q. KI jo 32 hi If KE KE hi IQ IQ DI 32 DI K1 35 Z0 35 IQ 32 31 32 bl 32 92 DI bl 32 DI 32 I0 32 bi 32 bl 1 UKIf0fIOIIQICI162IOI102102IGI10110131IOIIOIKIIOIIOIKIKIIOIIOI wh? mUHPmEIr1I IOIIofIQIIQIIOIIOIIOIIOIKIIQKIIGI!KIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIYIKU is e fi If Q02 fff IGI f0f 102 192 ... io: WILSON E. MUMM 9. Sidney High School l, 2, 3: Basketball l, 2, 3, 4: 9. Track 1. 2, 3: Cilee Club 4: Secretary 4: Literary Society 3: Secretary 3. "And he himself was tall and thin, W1'th sharp blue eyes, each like a pin." If Q02 5 Q 5 iz: ELIZABETH ANN MACAULEY I "How could we know you were a genius? f,f You were so quiet about it." fig Q K 9. K 9. fi fi gg LLOYD ALLEN MCCORMICK 9. Class Football 1. 2:1 "I like people to be saints, but I want them Q01 to be first and superlatxuely honest men." .Of IO: 101 If If fi if 7.3 NOMA MCELWEE 9. If ff Sidney High School 1, 2, 3: Basketball 2: Captain 2: ff Literary Society l, Z, 3: President 3: Class Secretary 3, .O ,X "Maiden with the. meek brown eyes, fl In whose orbs a shadow lies. joj Like the dusk in evening skies." :Of IGI If If bf IG 101 I 101 ?1 AGNES DAISY MCINNES .2 If IQ Sidney High School l, 2: Literary Society Z. 4: S. K. bf 3, 4: G. A. A. 4: Class Basketball 4. 102 If "ln the maddening crowd she stands apart." ioj S X N V- sksss 9. ' ' 102 Ii fbf 102 IQ If If 'c 5 Forty Iwu Qyfallwlidid101110111110110116ieiloiioiioiioikiieiZdioiiolioiiojiojiojioj 1 5 IIC291192191321021IOIIICIOIIOIIOIIOIKI192192102102IGIOIIIKDIICU 1 f x59lIf0f10110110210210210If0IfiI0ff0If0ff0f10210I10I1i10IIII0IfQ' Eh? QKHHPIIIEIYU 102102102102102102102102101016?2!f0i9f3IIOIIOIf0f10IIOf102llQAfQ CECIL IRENE MCINTYRE S. K. 2, 3, 4: Commercial Club 4: G. A. A. 4. "An amiable disposition is in itself a good letter of introduction." ISABELL A. NICOLET Carnival 2: S. K. l, Z, 3. 4: G. A. A. 3. 4: Commer- cial Club 4: Gym Demonstration l. 2: Literary So- ciety 4. "Thy modesty's a candle to thy merit." ALICE MARGARET OATHOUT Charleston Contest 2, 3, 4: Class Debate l. Z, 3: Varsity Alternate 3: Magpie Club l, Z. 3, 4: Literary Society l, Z. 3: Secretary Z: Bobbette Club 3, 4: French Club 3: S. K. l. 2. 3. 4: Alpha Sigma Rho 2, 3, 4: National Honor Society 3. 4: "Fannie and the Servant Problemug Property Manager "Am I Intrud- ing?": "AgaKha's Aunt": Property Manager "A Pair of Sixes": Set Manager "Whole Town's Talkingw: Stunt Show Committee l. 2. 3: Stunt Show l. 2, 3, 4: Car- nival l, 2: Commercial Club 3: Echo Staff Z: News Editor 3: Editor 4: Press Conference Z,' 3, 4: Gym Demonstration 1. 2. "No one but she and Heaven knows of what she's thinking. lt may be either books or beaus, Fine scholarship, or stylish clothes, percents or prinhingf' MARY ALICE GGLE S. K. l, 2, 3. 4: French Club 3: Commercial Club 4: Gym Demonstration l. Z1 Literary Society 3, 4: Stunt Show 3. 4: Carnival Z: Carnival Committee 2: Base- ball 1: Press Conference. "A creature not too bright and good For human nature's daily food." MARTHA REINHARDT OLIVER S. K. l. 2. 3. 4: Secretary 4: Literary Society 4: French Club 3, 4: G. A: A. 3, 4: Commercial Club 4: Rose- mary Solicitor 2, 3: Track Z. 3: Shorthand Team 33 Gym Demonstration 1. 2: Stunt Show 3. 4: Committee 3: Swimming 2, 3. 4: Captain 4: Buffalo Normal Z: Carnival l, Z: Mother-Daughter Banquet Committee 2, 3: Baseball 3, 4. "Oui, oui, M'sieu, I'm mos' happeef' Me Qian fdff llll wmuufflfuluamu:wa:aurnuauwaap,,,,y,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,. Forty three 9 .02 102 IG K2 102 102 32 32 32 IC K2 D2 102 IQ 16 32 102 102 102 102 102 102 32 102 32 32 102 102 91 91 101 102 32 102 102 32 IQ 32 102 102 if 102 102 102 Zi 102 102 102 202 102 102 102 9. If 102 92 31 DI 102 If IC 102 101 102 102 C02 IQ li 10I 102 31 32 102 101 IG 102 102 102 102 103 102 1 M6010 102 102102 102 102 10210210216 10131102 102 102 102 102 161011021516 101 102 103 1 Q 2 5 102102101102102102Z1Q!9f3210110210210210210I102IQ!!32I023Il3Ill g9ll10210210210220210220202IQ102102102102102102102102I02102k21021N Uh? IKn5p111gfg 10131Q02jojjojjoj101102101f0jf0jj0j1021021021021022QI02j0jfojf010 Q .94 202 202 202 202 fi 202 202 202 202 32 202 202 202 202 202 202 202 fd 102 202 Q02 1:2 K2 202 202 202 32 102 202 202 202 102 202 202 202 202 202 32 32 32 32 32 26 26 202 bi 202 32 202 102 I 20f 202 202 202 20f 2C 202 202 20f IQ If 202 202 25 fi .Q .G .Q .0. 10. 0 .0' 'c 2.3 10. 102 .9. 10, 202 202 202 1 f' I X XX xgsgs xx uwsmxuwuwmwtuimmxxvmxwxxnsxnxsxxxmxxsxxxxxxxxxxxv CORA MARTHA PATTON Philo High School l, 2, 3: "Isle of Chancen: "King- dom cf Heart's Content": Lincoln Essay Medal: Class President 3: Valedictorian 3: School Treasurer 3: Latin Club 4: Commercial Club 4: Chairman Party Com- mittee 3. "Quietness and peace flower where reason and justice reign." NELLA BERNICE PETERS Commercial Club l, 2: Gym Demonstration l, Z: S. K. 1, 2, 3, 4: Carnival l: Literary Society l, 3. "Her hair was as bright as the waves of a rill. When the sun on the brink of a setting stands still." MARGARET SCHUMACHER "Bulbul": Gym Demonstration l. 2: Stunt Show l, 2: S. K. l, 2. 3, 4: Literary Society l, 2, 3. 4: Carnival I: Glee Club 4: G, A, A. 4: Commercial Club 4: Class Basketball 1, Z. 3, 4: Stunt Show Committee 2: Pro- gram Chairman Girl Reserves. "Friends I have made whom envy must com- mend, But not one foe whom I could wish a friend." EDITH JOSEPHINE ROCK Pesotum Community High School l, 2, 3: Debating Society l: Class Treasurer 3: Class Committee 3: French Club 4: S. K. 4: Literary Society 4: Commercial Club 4, "Charms are brightened by humility." EMILY JANE SCHOFIELD Champaign High School l. Z. 3: G. A. A. l, 2: French Club l, Z: S. K. 4: Commercial 4: Literary Society 4: Gym Demonstration l. 2: French Club Play Z. "Friends are all that matter." .0. 102 102 10 102 102 102 92 CQ 102 102 ld Ii 11 102 32 102 102 102 102 102 Z02 KI 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 K2 102 102 C02 102 32 102 IQ bl Id 32 102 102 32 102 D2 92 32 92 32 92 ld 102 102 32 92 32 102 102 102 102 32 102 16 102 102 It 102 102 102 102 102 32 92 D2 102 C02 102 102 IQ 20? I f 'n :fy jnur yall!IQI02102102102102102102102102102i03C0210210210210210210220210.1021Q202I0I 1 H E 5 1021031031021031031031031010110310:10310103Lo:1031021093102:0:103:0:1o3l6i u:o:ioiioiioiioziozzoiioz:opLo:zozioziozivziopiozzozzoiwizoiwzzoz Ehp EKHHPIIIHIL! :oi152:01xoxo:wi:oizo:zo:ioziozio:io:io::oiioiiozioziozzvziozwinom ' 1 AMELIA SCHREIBER Class Basketball l. Z, 3: S. K. l, 2, 3, 4: Commercial Club 4: Gym Demonstration l, Z, 3. "Pains of love are sweeter far Than all other pleasures are." WALTER REESE SCHWARTZ Villa Grove High School l. Z. 3: Class Basketball 2: Football 3: Baseball 3: Track 31 Basketball 4: Y. M. C, A. I, 2, 3. "And fricnds received him with thumps on the buck." HORTENSE BERNICE SCOTT French Club 2. 3: Commercial Club 2, 3: S. K, l, 3: Glee Club 2: High School in 3 years. "Only a sweet and virtuous soul, Like seasonal timber, never gives." MILTON RICHARD SCOTT Commercial Club 2. "Manners are not idle, but the fruit of loyal nature and a noble mind." VERNA LEE SCOTT S. K, 3: Commercial Club 3. "A face with gladness overspreadl Soft smiles, by human kindness bred." E 9. D2 D2 32 102 201 IG IQ IC 202 92 102 ivl 102 202 102 102 103 102 102 102 102 If If Ii 202 C02 If 101 IQ IQ IQ sis 0 1C 1C C02 IC 101 103 IC K2 102 IQ 32 16 IC L02 T02 I02 102 Q win any Q l'2m'Yy -lirr K M0102 101 IQ IOI 101 IQ 3210215I0210210226IGI02102102102102l02102l0I1QIdI02102 1 Q 2 5 ,10110210210142ffjftjfbj10232102102Ii!1Q10f10ff02K21C1021021C 32 102 1020 6 RgJ?SL9u:o::oz:ozzo::ozxoxo::ozzozzoziozioziezeiozzoziozwzzvzzozrozsgi Ellyn illngpnmrq :ozzo::oz:oz:ozzo::ozyzazezmzazzoz:o::o::o::o::o::exnQ,"'95aD X 1 i 102 102 102 101 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 101 IQ 101 10' 101 102 IQ Q01 202 102 102 101 102 102 102 101 101 103 102 102 101 102 101 101 It 202 It 101 92 101 IQ 101 102 101 102 Id IQ IG 31 102 101 101 102 D2 S02 102 102 102 101 Q02 201 101 101 102 201 102 202 101 KI 102 102 101 102 101 101 IQ 102 0 Q ROBERT EDWARD SEYBOLD Sidell High School I. 2. 3: K. S. K, 4: Junior Play 33 "Honor Bright": Basketball Z. 3: Football I. Z, 3: Stunt Show 4: President of Class 3. "When I am dead it will be hard to End another man like me." FRANCES LORENE SHROYER S, K. 3. 4: Commercial Club 4: French Club 31 Car- nival l. 2: Gym Demonstration l: Glee Club 4. "Good temper is like a sunny day: it sheds its brightness over everything." ALBERTA GLADYS SHUMATE Commercial Club 4, "A kind fare is ever beautiful." KENNETH WILLIAM SMITH Stunt Show I. 41 K. S. K. I. 4: Class Basketball 4: Literary Society I, 3. 4: Carnival l, 2: Boys' Glee Club 2. 3, 4. "He lrudged along unknowing what he sought, And whistled as he went for want of lhoughff' MARY GENEVIEVE SMITH S. K. 1. Z. 3. 4: Literary Society l. 2: Gym Demon- stration l. 2: Carnival 2: Commercial Club 4: Latin Club 3. "Black hair and snappy eyes-a dangerous combination." -N sssx sssss wmuwu I"nr'Irl Q-' I" 1 , . 1..r U1011011011010115101101101101101101101101011011019110110131101101101101102 1 H 2 J 102102102Q0jf0jQ0jj0jjQj0Q1011Q101M101!bj1i10j10110210j1ijojjojQ0jj0jjl 31 31 31 101 102 16 16 fi IC 15 IC I 16 16 101 101 101 12 101 1G 1 101 102 101 IC 101 101 101 101 15 101 1C 101 101 102 101 1C 101 101 101 Ii I K1 31 101 101 101 101 0 101 102 1G fi 101 101 102 101 101 101 15 If 91 101 101 16 16 101 lf 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 31 31 101 101 101 201 101 10 101 101 101 I IG 101 101 1 5 C02 101 101 101 16 101 IG 101 101 101 1G 31 202 101 101 101 1d 101 16 31 31 IC 101 101 101 101 101 101 31 102 101 102 101 101 15 IG 102 101 C01 101 203 101 C01 101 C01 101 IG 101 Id 101 101 101 102 102 102 31 16 15 101 202 101 C02 101 16 102 IG C02 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 101 31 Q1 102 101 IQ Ii 16 101 IC IQ 1d 202 101 '7 C9119110210310::oziozzozzozzoz:o::o::o::o::o::o::f::o::o::o::o::o: Ellie Qngpniarq 9:zvzzvzzozzozzvz:ozzo:zozzvzzvzzozzo::sz:ozw::o::o::+::o::o::o:1iQJ9Y1eUi2 ' 1 E. IVIEREE SPORLEDER S. K. l, Z: Carnival l: "H. M. S. Pinaforenz Commer- cial Club 4: Literary Society l: Charleston Contest 3. "All you willed or dreamed of shall exist." ANNA LOUISE STILL Class Treasurer 3: President of the National Honor Society 3, 4: Stunt Show 2. 3, 4: Chairman Committee 4: S. K. 1. Z, 3. 4: Vice-President 3: Magpie Club l. Z, 3. 4: Vice-President Z. 4: French Club 3, 4: Presi- dent 4: Literary Society l. 2. 3. 4: Commercial Club 4: Class Debating l. Z: Varsity Debating Alternate 2: G. A. A. 2. 3. 4: Class Basketball Z, 3, 4: Society Editor of Echo 3: Circulation Manager 4: Press Con- ference 2, 3. 4: May Fete 4: Carnival l, 2: Rosemary Solicitor 4, "She is so gay, so very gay. And not by fits and starts, But ever through the livelong day She's sunshine to all hearts." CORA LUCILLE SWAIN High School 35 years: Gym Demonstration l, 2: Commercial Club 4: French Club 2. 3. "A little too wise they say do never live long." EVELYN MAE TAYLOR Peoria High School l. 2. 3: S. K. 4: Iota Alpha Gamma 4: G. A. A. l: Girl Scouts I: Basketball 1: Spanish Play 3: French Club 2. 3. "Oh this learning, what a thing it is!" LILLIAN IRENE TAYLOR Commercial Club 4: S. K. l: Gym Demonstration 2. "Silver that spoke, and eloquence of eyes." aw ifff? Q? 9. 31 31 31 31 31 91 101 31 101 91 31 91 91 91 91 101 31 16 16 16 101 16 101 101 31 91 K1 101 C02 102 102 101 101 IC 101 16 Ioi 11 IQ K1 102 102 102 101 K1 If 101 C02 101 102 202 103 E ,Q 101 101 16 101 15 I K1 15 101 16 31 Ii K1 101 101 101 103 101 101 101 31 101 102 101 101 102 103 .91 If 102 102 5' Fnrtu mi 71 I . , .,, U141101101911011911011911931101 I10131319110110110f19f101191101191141 1 g 2 5 ,101101101101Q01Q01Q01QOIIQf0fQ0fQ0ff01f0f1011011011101101101f0fI0f1Q10ffQU xrQ'i9n:x:v:a::e::o::ezozioizczoziozsiteZozo::ozzozzoiioiivifozsis Uhr Illngpmnrg :oizviaziozwzraxis:rio::o::o::o::o::o:1yx1r:o:w:n N Q 102 32 32 102 101 K1 16 32 1C 16 101 I Pi 3. If 16 102 102 I02 101 C02 32 1C 101 102 C02 K2 1G 32 IG IG S02 102 102 102 102 16 1G 102 102 If IQ 16 18 12 103 102 201 102 202 32 If K2 102 102 i MARY DAVIS THOMSON National Honor Society 4: S. K. l, Z. 3. 4: G. A, A, 3. 4: Literary Society 3, 4: Carnival I. Z: Commercial Club 3. 4: Social Chairman 4: "Bulbul": Bobbette Club 4: Stunt Show 3. 4: Cilec Club 3, 4: "Seven Keys to Balclpatcf' "Oh, I am a music-maker. And I am a dreamer of dreams." MILDRED ELIZABETH TIPTON S. K. 2. 4: Commercial Club 4: Carnival l: Cilcc Club 3, 4: Literary Society 1, 4. "Beware of her fair hair, for she excells All women in the magic of her locks." MARGUERITE PAULINI5 TOBIAS Paxton High School l: Girls' Stunt l: Gym Demonstra- tion Z: French Club 3: S. K, 4: Commercial Club 4. "The sweetest thing that ever grew Beside a human door." MYRA MITCHELL TORRANCE Bcotone High School l: Secretary-Treasurer l: S. K, 3. 4: Gym Demonstration 2. 3: May Fete 4: G. A. A, 3. 4: Literary Society 3. 4: Rosemary Staff 4: Swimming 3, 4: Baseball 3: French Club 4: Commercial Club 4: Honor Society 4: Basketball 3, 4: Captain Second Team 4: Carnival Z, "Can angels haue a sense of humor?" CLYDE J. TREES Longview High School l: Sidney Z. 3: Class Treasurer 2. 3: Literary Society 2. 3: Class Play 3: Basketball l, 2. 3: Captain 3: Baseball Z, 3: Track 3: Football 4: "U" Club 4. "His limbs were cast in manly mould For hardy sports or contest bold." N NSSX sssss uxxxssuwv rwsswmxxxxx x x xxw-mssgssmsw sssxxs sxxwxxsxw Puffy eiyln Qg5g:o::+::v:1o::e:o:Lo::vi:o::o:101:03:exif101101:yzozioixieioziogzeie 1 H 2 5 Q02102Q02L02Q02ji101102Q92QQ192QQQQ102102I1510Q1QfQI021C101Q0jf02fQfIl 102 202 li 102 92 If Ii If 102 IQ IOS DI C01 102 IC 102 IOI 101 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 102 102 32 102 102 102 102 K2 10I 101 102 102 142 102 102 ZQI 102 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 202 102 102 102 IC IQ IC IG 101 IQ If 102 101 102 L01 103 102 102 103 loi 102 It IQ KI 102 102 102 102 202 L02 3 ui+::o:iorzozxzwiwe10110:zo::oz:oiiazozzozszzxyiotzozzozl Ellie IKLIHPIIIEIIL1 :oz1.31.11031.3102rciozicyxwzxois::o:9:zyzs:zl Q 10Z C02 101 102 102 Q02 102 101 D2 102 102 102 32 32 16 202 102 92 102 32 32 102 102 Id 202 102 102 K2 IQ 102 202 102 202 IQ 102 102 92 102 IQ 102 I LQ IQ 102 102 16 IC T 16 0 1d 16 102 102 If 102 202 102 Q02 102 li 102 102 102 E HELEN ARABELLA VEACH S. K. l. Z. 3. 4: Iota Alpha Gamma 4: French Club 3, 4: Literary Society 2, 3, 4: Commercial Club 4: President 4: Baseball 2, 3, 4: Basketball 3. 43 Swimming 3: Press Conference 4: Latin Club 3: Gym Demonstration l, 2: May Fete 4: Rosemary Staff 4: "Bulbul": Girl Scouts 4: Carnival l, 2: Glee Club I, 4: G. A. A. 3, 4: "Pied Piper of Hamlin." "l'll tell the wall-eyed world she's peppyf' DOROTHY' LOLA WEBBER G. A. A. 3. 4: Swimming Manager 3: Stunt Show 3: Commercial Club 3, 4: S, K. 2, 3. 4: Track 3: Liter- ary Sociery 2: Baseball 2, 3. 4: Gym Demonstration I. 2, 3, Carnival I, 2. "My heart is true as steel." , MILDRED FRANCELIA WATERBURY Polo High School l: Basketball Team l: S. K. 2. 3. 4: Literary Society 2. 3. 4: French Club 2. 3. 4: Sec- retary-Treasurer 3. 4: Junior Debating Team: Magpie Society 3, 4: Gy-'n Demonstration I, 2: National Honor Society 3, 4: Bobbette Club 3, 4: Alpha Sigma Rho 3. 4: Commercial Club 4: Girl Reserves 4: "Agatha's Aunt": "A Pair of Sixes": "Honor Brightug Senior Ring-Pin Committee: Stunt Show 2: Charleston Orator- ical Contest 3, 4: Springfield Oratorical Contest 4: Carnival 2: Class Will 4: Glee Club l. "She's an angel in a frock Wz'th a fascinating tilt To her nose." WILl,lAM MICHAEL WEBER Track l. 2. 3: Football l. Z. 3, 4: Basketball l, 2. 3. 4: S. K, 3. 4: Commercial Club 2, 3. 4: Class Track 3: Class Basketball I. Z, 3: Class Secreiary 1. 2: Stunt Show l. 3. "Life, not only its frelness. but its enjoy- ment consists in action--action! MAE INNES WELCH San Antonio High School, Texas l, 2: Baseball l, Z: Vollcy Ball 2: Spanish Club 2: "Trip Around the World" 2: S. K. 3, 4: Literary Society 4: Com- mercial Club 4. "1 never knew so young a body with so old a head." Z, .die were ,Mum M , N W, mm f f 0 M, 1 0, mmffmm Fur!!! - n Im wl10210210i10210210210210210210110210102102202if3210211021022021021025101 1 g 2 5 102121610216 920102I021Q1G1C!1Ql!1021021G 321021021021 32913 awujoi102IojioiioiiviiojioiioiioiioiiojioiI0L101I0210110iZ02Z02Zoi1o2 Ghp TKUHPUIEIYQ loiiqgojgogjogQQjogjog1.3jogjogLogjogQ43jo:1v3go3jajjo11oj1oj1ojnQ,"7fQ ig 101 102 102 102 102 102 102 KI 32 32 It 10 102 Ii Q02 102 102 102 102 32 32 102 102 102 102 102 IQ 1d 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 32 102 Q01 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 T02 102 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 101 102 102 32 102 102 16 IC Q02 102 101 102 10 102 102 102 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 .OZ 5 as NNN saws GRACE WILSON G. A. A, 3, 4: French Club 3. 4: Literary Society 2. 3. 4: Gym Demonstration 2, 3: May Pete 4: Class Track 3. 4. "A serious minded miss you'd say Not given much to school-girl follies." MINNIE EVELYN WELLS "Bulhul": Gym Demonstration 2: Chorus Concert Z: French Club 1: S. K. 4: Commercial Club 4. 'iSometimes from her eyes I did receive fair speechless messages." MARTHA NELL WERTZ Armstrong High School HQ years: Basketball l, Z: S. K. 3, 4: G, A. A. 3, 4: Commercial Club 3. 4: Gym Demonstration 3: Track 3: Baseball Manager 4. "l would be friends with you and have your love." ANITA BLANCHE WOOD Basketball I: S. K. 1, 2, 3, 4: Literary Society l, Z, 3, 4: French Club 3, 4: May Pete Assistant Business Manager 4: Gym Demonstration l. 2: Girl Reserves 4: Stunt Show 4: Spring Carnival l. 2: G. A. A. 4: Properties "Honor Bright." "Her hair was of waving bronze. and her eyes Deep wells that might cover a brooding soul." IRENE YVILSON Danville High School l. 2: Girls Club, Danville l, Z: S. K. 3, 4: Commercial Club 4. "Lightly was her slender nose Tip-tilted, like the petal of a flower." f I 1111.11 u102I0Z10110j1Q1d10210102102IQ!Z02101102101101102021d10Zi02102I02102102 1 EI E. 5 110110210110I1021023210210210210210210j1021o232102101101Qqloljojjojjojiojpjggix 9 9. 10: 10: :oi if :oi :oi 102 io: 10: 10: io: io: ie 10: 101 if io: 9: Zo: Lo: :oi IQ 103 io: :Q :ol 102 :oi Zo: io: ic Zi 10I Zo: :oi 102 bi bi IC io: 10: io: io: :oi if it :Q io: :oz :Q if if 10: to: :Q 101 ie IC :Q :Q :Q Iv: if 10: 10: 101 :vi 101 10: io: si :oi :vi 10: 103 Lo: Lo: zo: io: io: 32 3 U 102 101 102 102 102 101 101 9216 102 102 I 102 101 102 102 102 D2 101 If 1021 E h P TK U H D 111 1' 11 102 102102 102 10111 101 15 91 1G 102 K2 102 102 102 102 92 102 102 102 0 0 ll ' if 9 .0. 102 102 102 102 101 id 10 101 102 101 102 101 IQ 102 S02 102 101 102 102 102 102 If 102 16 102 32 32 16 102 102 102 502 102 102 10Z 101 201 If 101 102 102 102 102 102 102 Id 102 101 101 102 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 102 IG Id 16 16 102 102 D2 If 102 102 101 KI I 102 102 102 102 101 101 102 102 102 0 102 Q JAMES BERNARD REYNOLDS The manly part is lo do what you can do with might and main." ERWIN JOHN SCHREIBER "Honest men are the gentlemen of nature." JANET WOOLBERT Literary Society l, 2, 3. 4: G. A. A. 3, 4: Business Manager G. A: A. Beneht 4: Chairman Membership Drive 4: S. K. 2, 3, 4: Program Committee 4: French Club 3, 4: Commercial Club 4: Bobbette Club 3. 4: Vice-President 4: Gym Demonstration l. 2: May Fete 4: Business Manager 4: Girl Reserves 4: Chairman Social Committee 4: Class Basketball l, 2, 3. 4: Class Track 4: Captain 4: Carnival I, Z: Stunt Show 3: "Fannie and the Servant Problemn: Rosemary Staff: Junior-Senior Reception Committee 4: Property Man- ager "Honor Bright" 4: Springfield Oratorical Contest 4: Chairman Spring Dance 4: Illinois State High School Press Conference 4: "A bit mischievous But never meaning wrong As still as any cyclone Going all day long." MARJORIE ELOISE WILSON Literary Society l. 2. 3. 4: Stunt Show l, 2, 3. 4: Committee l. Z, 3, 4: S. K. l, 2, 3, 4: Bobbette Club 3, 4: President 4: Girl Reserves 4: Carnival l. Z: "Fannie and the Servant Problemu: "Agatha's Aunt"3 "Honor Brightu: Springfield and Charleston Oratorical Contest 4: Class Track 4: French Club 3, 4: Chairman Senior Banquet Committee 4: Class Historian 3: Honor Society 4: S: K.. Literary Society. K. S. K. Dance Committee 4: Chairman May Fete 4: "Bulbul" l: Rosemary Drive. "Oh she is fairer than the evening air. Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars." MILDRED ELEANOR WILSON Sidell Township High School IW years: Class Sec- retary l: Gym Demonstration 2: S. K. 2, 3, 4: Commercial 4. "I have a heart with room for every joy." wr fun una 1 nuff, 1 j, we Qffie 1 nfffrn, 1 fuuffnflnffllfnnm 1 ll . . . , . .. .. ., ., .. .. W .. 0. N .. -. .. .. .. .. .. -, -1 P . .. .. .V H .. .. -. U .. .. ., . ., .. . . . ., I 11 on K wl10210210.10.10.1Q I010..0..0..0..0..0..0.10..0.0..0.0..0..0..0..0..0..0..0. 1.523 .0..0..0.10.0.0..0..0..0,0.0..0.h.0.0.10.10.I0..02101102102161020 0.06139 Q 16 16 16 1G 16 K1 31 K1 101 31 16 31 101 102 101 102 15 102 C03 31 101 16 31 D1 Ii K1 101 31 1G 16 IQ Ii 16 16 101 1G 101 IG 101 203 101 16 101 16 1Q 101 102 101 1 u:ot:Qiozzoiifztotiottoziozzoz:oz:otie:ozioifoiiozzozzozzoiroiroi Ellyp Kngpnigrg :oiiozioizoiioiioiioziczoiszrefo::oizero::o::o::o::o::o::o:s:IlQ7Y5 Q S l"iffyl11n NQNQY MARS .sxxx News 59 KATHERINE ADAMS "A delightful, retiring miss." DELORES BURNETT "The sweetest flower in nature's gardenf MARY FERN RECTOR Afton. Oklahoma High School 3 Yeats: Q. Q. C, Club 2: Literary Society 3: Home Economics Club: Glce Club: Negro Minstrel. "A mark for cupid's bow." DOROTHY DEAN GIBSON S. K. l, Z, 3, 4: Commercial Z, 4: Stunt Show 35 Literary Society 4: Girls' Glee Club 4: Gym Demon- stration l. 2: Carnival l. 2: "Bulbul". "Her hair was blond and wavy." OPAL WINKLEPLECK S. K. Club Z. 4: Commercial Club Z. 4: Class Base- ball Team 2. 3. 4: Gym Demonstration 1, Z: May Fete 4: G. A. A. 3: Carnival l, 2: Class Track 3. 4: "Pied Piper" 4. "But let me silent be For silence is the speech of love. The music of the spheres above." . i l10110110110,101101101101101101101101101101101101101101101101101101101101101101 110110110110110110110110110110110116101160101101D110110110110110110110131l6'N 9 9. 16 31 31 D1 K1 101 91 31 101 P1 101 15 16 if 102 101 101 101 1C 16 101 16 31 91 101 If s A Q A A 1C 1C 1C 15 1C K1 101 101 1C 101 lei 102 101 101 I 11 101 0 11 K1 101 1 IEICIQIGKIGI102102IQIOIIGIOKIKIOIKIIOIIOIIQIOI Eh? mugknlafg 313132DI102IGIQIZIIKIKINIIOIIOIICHIHKZU CLARENCE DELE WITT Sidney High School l, 2, 3: "U" Club 4: Secretary of Class Z, 3: President of Literary Society 3: "Little Miss Jack": Basketball l. 2, 3: Captain 3: Track 1. Z, 3: Football 4. His Egure is not noted for grace, You may not care much for his face. But a sixty yard dash A record to smash He can take at a wonderful pace." ELDRED MAY PRICE S. K. Club l, Z, 3, 4: Art Club 4: Carnival l, 2: Committee 2: Gym Demonstration l. "An unpremeditalea' verse." GILBERT GEORGE WRIGHT Class Basketball 2. 3, 4: Commercial Club Z: K. S. K. 3: Glce Club 4: Carnival l: Literary Society 4. "You beat your pate, and fancy will come, Knock as you please, there's nobody at home." HAZEL MARIE FARQUHAR Commercial Club 3. 4: Gym Demonstration 3: Car- nival 2. "Modesty is almost inseparable from true merit." RosE ELLEN WOOTERS S. K. 3. 4: Commercial Club 4. "ll seems to me that talk should be Like water, sprinkled sparingly." Vg I I ,nnfn,u1tM ' Flfl.lj'illl'PP uIoiioiiojzoiivioiKew:ioiioifoiZviioiioifoifoifotfoitotioisiioii E119 i'Kg5pmm-15 g.31.3g.3g.3gqyy31.3103103303g.1g.gg.3g.3:.3g.31Q:v:1e::o:5lQ,"XQ Nu ' ' Q e .5 I U if r.: 202 3, if t.1 :Of Zvi :Oi 2.1 19: 2.1 If :': IGI :.: 19: :.: 5. INEZ M. V. SCHOCH 325 z.: I I.: Carnlval lg S. K. l, 2, 3, 4. IQ: :ot ,A S'2 fcj In her eyes a thought ,ti ,tl Grew sweeter and sweeter, deepening like 7,1 j,f the dawn," gg if if 102 10: 10: 1.2 31 :.: ' ' 9. gi EUNICE LORENE YOUNG g.g fvf Q'Q Ig: Champaign High School 3 Years: G. A. A. l, 2, 3, 4: 79: jg: Latin Club 1. Z, 3, 4: Commercial Club 4: S. K. 4. :zz 19: t 1 QQ "And young is beautiful! and soft as young! 5:3 And gay us soft! and innocent as gay." if iff if gig if 523 bi MARY ELIZABETH YANTIS .3 I 1 S. K. l, 2, 3, 4: Girl's Glee Club 3, 4: Sergeant-av Arms 3: Vice-President 4: Gym Demonstration l, 2: ,Q Carnival, 1, 2: Stunt Show 4: M. S. Pinaforen: :Qi Q: Literary Society 3. 4: Commercial Club Z. 4: So- :gi 59: ciety Editor of Rosemary 4: Typewriting Team 3: :QQ 3:5 French Club 3. Q: : : I 7:1 "A rose bud set with little willful thorns." PQ 1:1 io: Qi 2:2 bi z.: if 332 5.3 VIVIAN ESTELLE YEAGER .3 j,j : 1 Philo High School 2 years: "Isle of Chance" l 5 .OL "Assisted by Sadie" 2: S. K. 3. 4: Latin Club 3, 43 ig' 29. Gym Demonstration 3. 'gi ig, r.: :zz "For nature made but one like her QOQ f,f And never made another." :zz 'Q' : : fof "' IG 7 f :QI 7:2 Z C Z.: zz: L.: :.f 535 si pg EUNICE WILKINSON 22: .gl z.: S. K. 2, 3, 4: "Bulbul:" "H. M. S, Pinaforef' : : :Oi if Q "Her very frowns are fairer far Q2 :Q Than smiles of other maidens are." f,f fof 2:2 1,1 : 1 :gi ::: 1,1 z.: io: fg Z.: :Oz 1,2 c.: 'Q' : : : 1 ..w....... ,ol 2. Zvi 69 5 lfiflyffimr' Q3i1'EllIoiIo2ZoiI0II0Cdivjiviivi101ZoiIviiviiviieiT02Zvi10214110292foiiojivjiviioi 1 g 2 FI IIOIIGI102IOI102C02101102IOIIGIIGIIGISOIIOI10102516531IQf0IIOIf0IIOI3Il 9 A W K 3 I E I I N I I 1 I H M ! E 1 I E H I 5 I 3 9 9 3 3 D 3 9 9 K 3 3 K 3 3 3 3 3 9 3 K D D D R 3 9 Q D 3 I0 32 9 D 3 9 9 9 9 32 b D K bl 35 35 bi DI 31 3 K 3 92 D 9 3 3 32 9 3E bi 9 IQ 35 bi 32 5 91 35 3 as lwtixxbiioiioikite:ioizxyioiioiioi931.33292:ez Uhr iKnHPI1I2lI'11 :oi1.11.31031025515921591y:o::Q:oIZo::eMx!hlQ7'Q K J ROGER PERRY CONERTY Captain 4: Varsity Track Basketball 1. Varsiry Football Z, 3, 4: Z. 4: Class Track 45 Class "His eyes-how they twinkled, his dimples --how merry! His cheeks were like cherry l ' ' roses, his nose like a FRANK HOLTEN VOORHEES Urbana High School Orchestra 2. 4: A. H. S. 3: K. S. K. 45 "Hurry! Hurry! Hurry!" "A sweet lad of fifteen summers." I 7l?, ???!? HAROLD WEISE "Perseruerance catcheth the Hsh." unlfnfm fum: f mmmuuumuffl ffl 1 1 , Fifi!!-fi ro' wfiffffiff If 3: 102 19: 102 if If 110: fC: 102 :Of 1OIf6:fCf9IfQf 1 g 2 5 IO: IO: 10210210210 'QICKQIIQIIQISOI101102IOIIGIQIGIGIKIKIKINICU llioziewzsxzicxmzytazozfszszieszstxixtxzzozzei E119 liggpmgrq :ez1.1size:zo:zo:go::e:o:::s::cxxxxwxxmx:o:n Valedictoryb "Liberalism in American Education" "Like as the waves made towards the pebbled shore So do our minutes hasten to their end: Each changing place with that which goes before, In sequent toil all forwards do contend." SHAKESPEARE. Emerging from the darkness of the Middle Ages, reformers advanced the idea of individual religious responsibility as against the collective idea of the Church. The consequence of this was the demand for elementary schools in the vulgar tongue for the education of the masses. This was the beginning of liberalism in education. The creation of these schools in Europe led to a double educational system which was transferred to America only to disappear before the rise of a distinctly American and democratic spirit which in time demanded one common school for all. This was the beginning of liberalism in American education. Although education was not mentioned in the Constitution the states- men of the time were not actively opposed to the liberal idea in education. Jefferson, writing to James Madison from Paris, says: "Above all things, I hope the education of the common people will be attended to." John Jay. the first Chief Justice of the United States, remarked: "I consider knowledge to be the soul of a republic." In spite of these opinions, however, the battle for free state schools was long and stubborn. In the nineteenth century the struggle was won bequeathing us the legacy of a free education. In the new system there were the primary school, the English grammar school, the high school, and in some parts of the country the beginnings of the state university. But the various units of the system did not yet fit into each other. When the Colleges made their work a continuation of that of the high schools, the American educational ladder was complete: and with the abolition of all charges this ladder was thrown open finally as a birthright to all Americans. Another educational institution, the normal school, was of later develop- ment and originated in Europe. Its beginning in America was, however, in- dependent and was just another manifestation of a democratic ideal-that the instruction of the young be not left to incompetence. The liberal educational advantages of America were therefore increased by the addition of the free state Normal school. Statistics show that but two percent of the American people pass through the high schools and only one-fourth of that number continuein the university: but the leavening influence of these upon the mass is immeasurable in terms of percent and constitutes the informal education. On a journey along the paths of education we come to several stopping- places. At such a point has the Class of '25 arrived. For four years its mem- bers have tread the educational ladder together, each one reaching, but not sel- fishly, for the rung above, and the class moving forward as a unit. In our stay here we have each, to a greater or lesser degree, imbibed that knowledge and been subjected to that discipline necessary for good citizenship. We go from these halls pledged to the highest ideals of conduct and citizenship, leav- ing behind us, we hope, a name, that will live in the annals of Urbana High. Our place on the ladder of education is needed: we make room for our succes- sors as the curtain falls on the Class of '25. BIRRELL ARTHUR LLOYD. l"iffy-Mir 1 5 N59UIQ202102IGI102IIN!!CO1IQIOIIOIIQIIOIFIICHNDIIG' Eh? BUHPIIIHIQ IHIIQIOIIOIIGIIOIIOIIOIDIIIISMIYNIHNI Salutatory Gpflq F you have knowledge, let others light their candles at it." The op- portunity of the teacher is the greatest opportunity in the World, today or ever. In the United States today it might be called the op-- r',Q 9,7 portunity to save the country. We have not yet learned the right xlff-9, view of our own part in the progress of the World-the attitude of inheritors of riches verily, who are thereby constrained to put them to better and better uses for succeeding generations. Our nation was not begun as other nations. Our country did not, like Topsy, 'Ajust grow." Its foundation was an assertion of human rights, a re- volt against human wrongs. It's beginning was a fully conscious and highly de- termined effort to attain for a people the principle of liberty. It was a demand for privilege-the privelege of principle-and that privilege for all under its constitution. We stand among all nations as the great experiment of a wholly repre- sentative government. The nations of the earth turn to us with eyes of long- ing and expectancy and question. Do not foreigners who come to our land for education and to observe our national life go away disappointed finding that we are not living up to the ideals upon which our government was founded? Can we really say that this generation is fulfilling its obligations to the nation? We cannot, The answer must be. "Not yet." Here is an opportunity for the thoughtful and well-informed teacher to influence the uninformed but inquiring mind of the youth of today. Where in any step in the progress of mankind has the teacher been absent? In the olden days he wore a cowl. He could only live within the church, With her protection only could he give the light that was in him. Today he needs no protection. He may teach there. too, but he need not. He has the arena of every school room in this country. He speaks to the youth of today, our best citizens, our citizens who are waiting only to be taught, to be led, to be inspired, to know their part as citizens of this country, in order to go forward to bear that part nobly. Each generation that is built should be built higher than the last. There is no hope that this great country of ours may take the great ideals of its foundation and carry them to their greatest destiny except that the youth of the land be awakened and catch the vision of principle, of purpose, and of endurance of hardship, privation and loss for principle because of purpose-there is no hope but that the youth of the land be aroused to live that principle and that purpose. How sublime is the teacher's opportunity-on our great American public school system to build out of the past, the school of the future: to bring from its portals, citizens, not to it society, but from their great qualities, to make society: to re-create and uplift a nation. You have done your part. The responsibility now falls upon our shoul- ders. The class of '25 must make good, and will make good, for we truly appreciate what you have done for us, and appreciation must be proved. So parents, teachers, and friends of Urbana High School, we Welcome you to these our graduation exercises. Ififlllruezfen wulflffIllffffffllffififiiiffffifffffffif Ziff!!!3:3:fCfOi:QfK:!I!f0iiOifOifQKifffflw.ill mgujojiqlifojoooooooooooooooooijoj Ehp mngpmgfg 3131404000ooooocoooeillliwm History of the Class of 1925 Landing of the Pilgrims-1922. , 4, , RINCIPAL Geneva's long and glorious reign came to an end in 1920, when he was succeeded on the throne of Thornburn by Principal Garrett. ln the year 1921, Mr. Garrett gave permission to "certain loving subjects to deduce and conduct one colony or plantation of SIMT' settlers to the Urbana High School." After sailing through the weary and turbulent Thornburn days, these Pilgrims landed on the shores of a new world, the Urbana High School, on September 8, 1922. Fear was in their hearts for they did not know what dangers and hardships awaited them from the surrounding tribes of Indians-namely, Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. But they poured out their troubles to God and trusted that he would protect them from all evils for their cause was just. In order that the colony might thrive, Father Flanigam bade them assemble to elect their leaders. ln the month of November, a representative assembly convened for this purpose. Jacob Judy was chosen by his fellow Pilgrims as Governor. His wise council was made up of Reid Evans as Lieutenant Gov- ernor of the colony: Zack Martin as Secretary of the colony: William Weber as Keeper of the Common Treasury in the colony: Willard Monohon as Writer of the History: and Lawrence Binyon as Public Scribe. Had it not been for the great efforts of one so-called Vira Bryan, whose masterful spirit at once assumed the direction of the colony, it would not have been successful in its Hrst great attack-"When Peter Blows His Horn." For days she lent her un- tiring body to this service, but was justly compensated in the end, for a new day dawned, and they! They had won! Development-One of the Four Colonies This first great epoch in the history of this colony was one full of bitter memories and hardships. A great Puritan aristocracy had been built up. This seemed so harsh to many colonists that it was only natural for them to leave of their own accord or be exiled by the civil authorities of the colonies. Those who were exiled were the ones who had not learned the doctrines acceptable to the Puritan leaders of the colony. At the same time, the magistrates of the colony gave permission to "divers loving friends, neighbors, and freemen of the colony of Freshmen to transport themselves and their estates unto the colony of Sophomores, there to reside and inhabit as such." Led by their pastor, Emmett Kirby, they tramped through the summer days and again formed a new colony in the Urbana High School. They drew up and adopted their "Orders," and proceeded to elect their new leaders, Emmet Kirby, their kind and loving pastor, was elected Governor of the colony: Zack Martin, Lieutenant Governor: Richard Childers, Secretary: William Pierce, Keeper of the Treasury: Marjorie Wilson, Writer of the His- tory: and Frances Williamson, Public Scribe. With Miss Alverson as spiritual and mental director of the colony, they prospered and gathered themselves to- gether to protect themselves from the enemies bands. It was as they expected. They greatly feared an oncoming of their foes for they were small in stature and could not meet them evenly matched. But the grace of God was again with them and they won the the battle with "A Modern Cinderella." Junior Territory Each year they lost some of their band. Some of the people had greatly displeased the leaders by not accepting the doctrines taught them. These must '1-eil I Jil! gl I waKjoj3jpjjQ'o'b"o"o"o o' o o"o"o"o"o"0' o"o 0' o"o' 6191102102 1 H 2 L1 15510110 9 9 Co 0 Q Gio 9' o' one 0 'Yo Q Q 'qjqojjil Xg9Uf0I102ICIOIIQIQIIGI19219210210232IOIKIOWIQIOIIOIIOIIOI' Eh? ?K1lHPI11211'g IGI!3232IQIIQI101192116323232DIIQIIOIIOIIOIIOIDIIIIW pay and they did greatly, being banished from this colony and required to re- turn to the colony of Freshmen. But at the same time, strangers migrated into the settlements to take the place of those who were lost forever. While this was going on in the colony, the land of Urbana High School had been formed into the United Classes. Great wonders had been accom- plished. A Constitutional Convention had met and framed a Constitution, the framers being the Board of Education. It was a difficult task to establish a government which would be acceptable to all the states and which would last. The feat was accomplished, however, and the United Classes lived on, as one, rather than many. The people of this little colony were not within the boun- daries of any one of these states, so they did not enjoy the protection of the supreme government. But this was not for long. The government, anxious to extend its power, negotiated a treaty with this colony and other surrounding colonies, forming them into a territory. Being thus formed they enjoyed all the rights and privileges of the other citizens. They were also granted per- mission by the president to elect leaders and representatives. Richard Childers was elected Governor of the Territory: Irene Becker, Lieutenant Governor: William Weber, Clerk: Louise Still, Secretary of Treasury: Dorothy Scheib, Chief Historian: and Betty Brennan, Public Scribe. Miss Rompel was ap- pointed Overseer of the Territory by the president and with her good advice, the Junior Territory was well on its way to prosperity. Before another year, it was to become one of the leading states in the Land of Urbana High School. Senior State Many thriving cities had grown up in the Territory such as S. K's., Bobbette's, K. S. K's., Magpie's, etc., on account of the upward migration of new people and the exchange of ideas. The resources of the Territory had been put to great advantage. Education had been fostered and many colleges and Universities built. People had grown away from their old-fashioned ideas and instead were reaching out for the study of science and invention. An era of prosperity followed and the people were filled with the thought of be- coming a state. In the fall of 1924, they petitioned to Congress to be admitted to the United Classes as the Senior State. Their petition was accepted and they im- mediately called for an election to elect state officers. There being no partisan spirit in the class, a very Democratic election ensued. Lester Leutwiler was elected Governor: Virginia Veale, Lieutenant Governor: Frances Williamson, Secretary of State: Edward McGrath, Secretary of Treasury: Beatrice Sloan, Attorney-General: and Ruby Hiser, Auditor. Miss Madge Leslie was elected the Governor's Attorney and "right-hand man." In organizing the government the State Legislature met to pass laws which it deemed necessary and for the good of the people. One or two im- portant bills were introduced in Congress. One, in the fall of 1924 which read as follows: 'AThe Urbana High School shall defeat Champaign High School in Football this year-to take effect on November 25, 1924-." However, Coach Les Moyer was not in favor of the bill and owing to his excessive filibustering, the bill was rejected. At last the greatest moment in the history of this state arrived. It was on the night of June 12, 1925. It was also one of the most sorrowful moments, as well. We, one and all, kissed the hand of our loving state in farewell to roam forth into the world where needs must take us. BEATRICE SLOAN. Fiji!! Hill lliffliifl102102192fiICICI!!!YIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIXIKNKI 1 5 iffi32102IOIIOIYIIDIKKIKiIOIIOIIOIIIOIICKKXYINNHW UKIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIGIOIIGIOIIOIIOIDIICIICDIIGIQIKIKI wh? KUHPIUZIIII KI!!!H101IC102192IOIIOIIOIHIINQINIGICIW , + LL! L. Statistics AST your eyes on the class of '25l Because of the variety and com- plexity of good looks, intellectual ability, and beauty, we found it necessary to take a careful census of the class of '25 in order that you may know the absolute truth in regard to facts concerning our class In numbers we are very large There are l64 members 67 boys and 97 girls which is 30 more girls than boys making it seem that idx... . . fi' 27 - Tilt' , ,U I . : the boys in this class have no chance against such odds. However, we found in all arguments we were pretty evenly matched. In height, this class is truly a mountain, the total height being 900 feet M inches. The tallest of us is Clarence Witt with 6 feet 4 inches to his credit. The honor of being the shortest goes to Lenore Blair, her height being 4 feet 9 inches, We had no trouble in discovering that Olive Dunn takes the prize for being the thin lady of the class. She is 5 feet 6M inches and weighs 99 pounds. However, there was great difficulty in determining the fat lady of the class, as there were four or five who were very close, these being Audree Hill,Doris Scheib, Frances Shroyer, Edna Brash and Fern Rector. ln ages, we have a huge range. Adrian Davis is the father of our class, being 30 years, 7 months, 19 days old. We have a very young baby in this class--Dorothy Kern, who is 14 years, 9 months, 19 days old, and who is also Salutatorian, which shows that babies often grasp things quicker and retain them longer than some of their elders. We made several tests on the class in order to determine who could talk the most and the fastest. Alice Oathout far out-stripped any of her competitors, with Louise Still second, which establishes the fact that if you want to accom- plish things you must learn to talk a lot and learn to talk fast. We have some very queer tastes in this class. Zack Martin and Marvin Kemp have for their favorite vegetable onions and garlic. The rest of the class is perfectly normal, the majority preferring tomatoes as the favorite vegetable, peaches as the favorite fruit, and ice cream for their favorite dessert. We have 60 snub noses in our class: 20 pug noses: 24 with knobs on the end: 18 Grecian noses: 14 Roman noses: 26 long noses: and 2 noses which it is impossible to describe. Miss Ricketts, our mathematecianfsays if all the noses were put side by side they would make two pairs of aeroplane wings, and if extended forward would make a mountain as high as Mt. Etna. Our class has very pretty eyes. We have 98 blue eyes, 20 yellow eyes, 54 green eyes, 58 hazel eyes, 90 brown eyes, and eight black eyes. It has been found by blending all these colors that one gets the color of Morgan Hundley's eyes. We also have 13 boys who wear shoes larger than l0's: the one girl in the class who does not use powder is Grace Wilson, who still keeps her school-girl complexion: we have five girls in our class who do not have bobbed hair: and one of these, Marjorie Wilson, is unanimously considered the prettiest girl of our class. Truly, are we not a wonderful class? HERTHA BOWMAN '25 Sixly Qgfalmitlidyxwjxpooooooessoooooojgojgoj 1923 13150040vv00000vvo0oovom.z.o..xl 6199 Q o o Q o o v o o o o vzzozzozzozzoz:o::o::o::o::o: Elly illngpmgrq sz:o::o:zozzozzozzeszzozwzzoz:ozzozzozzezozzeyfexxzqgm Hatchet Ovation Senior Orator: Willard Monohon. Junior Response: Betty Mitchell. CWe the hatchet orators, desire to givc to Miss Rickets the credit of putting into rhyme the material furnished by us.j WILLARD lVlONOI-ION, BETTY MITCHELL. Senior: Full many a legend hath been told About this hatchet. wondrous old: Full many a song has found its way From olden times to the present day, Telling whence this emblem came: And every tale has added fame And interest to its mystic name. But careful research bared the truth Of ancient years to the present youth: And truth is stranger far, you know, Than all the hectic tales which grow In fertile minds, or man-made plot- Imagined tales, with mystery fraught: But we shall tell you when 'twas got, And how it came to Urbana High, In those olden days, so long gone by. Before the White man came to dwell In Champaign County, histories tell, The wandering tribes of Kickapoo And Miama Indians lived here. too: The Pottawatomies set their tent, And, as the seasons came and went, Returned to hunt the moose and deer Abounding on the prairies here. Before Urbana was a town, They brought their people. settled down, And built their tents near Main and Race Where Palmer's grocery grows apace. A little further down the hill There bubbled forth, their thirst to still, A spring of water clear and cold, A comfort to these warriors bold. 'Tis near this old historic spot That C. N. Clark has a business lot. When first the white man hither came With thought this Indian land to tame The red men of the Kickapoo, And all the other Indians, too, Bore keen resentment: then they swore That they of sleep would have no more 'Till they had driven every man Sitfly-nl! I' O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Qzzz.:zo:zozzoizegozivimizvibiii 1925 :Zeb vbzazzoizozzo:zo:zezozzcxxxwzzopziezezexxwmu H102101C01101102101102102C02IOIQ02102C023If0ff0I9IIOIIil0If6!l Eh? iKUHPmEIf1I 102102102IfIOIIQ!IIOI!IOI3I3If0If0IIOIICIOIIQKIIWUQW Of white blood out of this, their land. The Indian Chief, Chicagou, strove In vain: the white man throve, He throve in spite of trials severe While ever dangers hovered near From every hostile Indian band Who treachery against him planned. Then, when Chicagou saw at last There was no doubt, the die was cast: The white man must be made a friend, The struggles, fighting, all must end If the tribes of Illinois Were to live and not to die. He gathered his chiefs together then And bade them bring both women and men, To meet the white man near this spring. With Indian chant and tom-tom's beat The ceremony was complete. They buried a hatchet as a sign of peace, And they promised all their wars to cease. And kept their word, and as time passed on Urbana grew to be a town, The schools were formed: the high school, too, Was added as the system grew. One day-we do not know the year- So cannot tell it to you here- Some senior lads from Urbana High Stopped at the spring as they passed by To quench their thirst. One kicked the ground And heard a hard and ringing sound. Then they one and all would see What this amazing thing might be That, buried beneath the hard earth's crust, Resounded thus to his gentle thrust. They dug it forth and brought to light The very hatchet you see tonight- Chicagou's hatchet, ancient, old. Whose legend hath just now been told. They made it a mascot for their class, And decided it should onward pass To each senior class as it came in line: And so it has, to this very time. But each class must prove its right to it By showing forth its power of wit: In mental contest, strong and bold, But not with weapons as of old. The classes meet by proxy: I, From the senior class, do cry A challenge to the junior clan Upon this stage to produce their man To answer in person for his class, N ,FIJI l11'0 R 0101102102101 0 0 02102101101313231IOIIQIQIifCIOIIi3f!!IOI3IN 1 H 2 5 321021029210 Q ol10214232202102116IG202101101h1N!IC1iI0IZiIQI96w ns:az:Q:ozQeiozzezezozzozza:zozzvzzoziezfzazzszzoisizo: Uhr Engpmarq :e:o::of:o::o::e:e:ex::o::.::.::.::o::o::o::o::c:e:o::o:s!lQ7Q Before, to them, this hatchet may pass. Senior: Well, who is this so long and thin That's sent up here by junior kin? It is a girl, as I'm alive! She must be, surely, six-feet-live! For athletic honors she does sigh- In every sport she makes a try To break a record, But, they say. She breaks all else when she's at play. If a hurdle she would leap- She knocks it down with both her feet. If at high jump she would star She never fails to break the bar. In playing golf she's an awful dub, She really seems to think a club Is only made to dig up sod- For at every stroke she takes a wad! What tickets are you selling now? To the Colonial Theater, I allow! And if not there, then I assert It must be "Liquid Air Concert." For you'd surely not feel well If no tickets you could sell. Junior: Oh, you! with your supercilious air! You, with your waving marcelled hair! You, who have our fashions led With suit of gray and "hanky" red- You, with pure intellectual knack, What know you of golf or track? How would you know if what I broke Were the track record or the rope? You, whose sports are all in-door Who of games know nothing more, Than, in some way or other, teams do score! It seems to me I've heard before, You actually thought the Danville team Really used a "sewing machine" To penetrate the line! You'd never heard That "scoring machine" should be the word! Senior: You've done quite Well, As all can tell, In giving your roast to me. But the senior class Sits there enmasse For your roving eye to see. Pick out your man, Do the best you can, f Si.rfy-Uzrw wifi!!!32KI102IfICI!!!ICIOIIOIIGNICQQIIKIKIIOIIC I!IC!IQ!3285315325102IiICIG!!!!l0I3IICIGIOI3IU6'N UIC!ICOIIOKIKIIOIIQIGIOIIGI192IOIIOIIOIIOIIOIKINIQM why KUKPIIIHIQ biC01202102102ZGKZDIIHIQINIIHIZoZZoZIdZd!!lQ17fQ And roast as hard as you will! I'll promise you Without ado, To give you a better one still. Junior: LESTER GLEN LEUTWILER When Lester was a little lad Said his mother to his dad, A'What's all this stuff about?" By this she meant a pile of strings. Of books and knives and many things. Said dad, "Why, Les would be a scout." Since then, l seem to recollect He's earned his honors by the peck, He has badges. buttons. by the score. And still he keeps on earning more. He's grown to be a big young man- Though he's still a scout in suit of tan! He's earned all the merits that there are, But he's hitched his wagon to a star: And when he's old and worn, we're sure, I-le'll have for his hobby this sinecure: He'll invent new merits, one a day: Then. just to pass the time away, He'll earn them himself, and thus, no doubt, To his dying day he'll be a scout. Senior: LEOTA MAEBRAE MILLER With her cunning little tricks She bursted into 206- She waved at Edrie, sitting there, She nodded and winked at Leland Lair, She glanced. so flustered, round at Tom. Then remembered 'twas an errand she came on- She turned to Bickle "Eh-Oh-What-- I came for-l-l've forgot!" A friendly little miss is she, Always glad her friends to see! She entered the bank one day down town, But without ever glancing round, She heard a man say hello to her, "Hello," said she, without a stir: Again, "Hello," he did repeat, "Hello," said she, with little heat! But when again 'iHello" he said, She turned her dainty little head, And there she saw and gave a moan- The man was talking on the phone! Junior: EDWARD LOHMAN MCGRATH Ed's always in doubt rlu 'nur lie: :oi:oi10:10:20:ioiiojZoitoiioi:QZo::oiioiioiioiZoiioiieidyioiioil 1 H 2 5 blyiolwiieioibi biioiiell R910 0 0 Q 0 v Q o o Ghz Engpmurg When you ask him about His preference in ladies' hair! If blond and straight He can scarcely wait Till he sees the lady fair. If wavy black It has a knack Of making the love flame flare. Be she fair or dark, It's such a lark, To see her-he'll be there! If he'd sit at home With two alone, To the blond he doth repair, But if for the social whirl He'd hunt a girl, The brunette he would ensnare! J unior: l"lOVVARD ADAMS Howard's blossomed out this year Into a full-fledged cavalier- But not for ladies, "Nay," says he- "One alone is enough for me!" Between each class, right in the hall, He greets her there before them all. With flame of lovelight in his eye He looks at her as she goes by. She smiles so sweetly back at him, As if he were a cherubim. The thing that really gets us all Is how he practiced basketball Or how he found the time for 1 track, Without at Janet looking back. Junior: ALICE MARGARET OATHOUT Alice sat at the desk in state, While Mrs. H. worked on debate, She listened while the Freshman clas S Displayed its history knowledge vast. And when our maiden did recite A drawn-out story-a dreamy light Dawned in Alice's pretty eyesg So that she scarce heard the maid's repliesg And when the maiden took her seat- "Oh!" said Alice, "will you please repeat?" Then little Bob Crathorne spoke with glee: "We're on to you! Now who is he?" Senior: EDRIE SELPHIRA SEWARD Edrie's such a little girl- About as big as a minute- Sultly-live lo . . . . Q Q Q 0 19 25 UIOIIOIIOIf0I if102CO2101Q0131101101IOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOI QT hp Knnpniurg KI!! C02 C02 Zvi Zvi C0101 Z0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 Q . . 'Twas strange to see her auto whirl With little Edrie in it. She was none too sure just how to drive, In fact, she was just learnig, And at Green and Fifth, as I'm alive, She couldn't make the turning. Her engine stopped right in the street, And in spite of all her trying, Of all her work with hands and feet, That engine kept on dying: The autos piled up back of her, At right and left were stranded: Not one of them could even stir, Though one and all demanded A right-of-way: she should move her car, But Edrie sat there saying. "I'm sorry still the way to bar," But in her heart was praying! For fifteen minutes no one could pass, Then something she touched or pressed on Seemed to release a gallon of gas, And quite in a hurry she passed onl Junior: MINNIE LUMAN MEANs I asked her one day when we met in the ha If she wouldn't keep open her eyes, And if she could find any jokes at all, Please to put me wise! For hatchet orations are make of jokes, And the gist is hard to find. "I don't know stuff on other folks," Said she, "but I really Wouldn't mind, In fact, I think I'd like it much If you could find a way To give Minnie Means a little touch To put her on display!" We've hunted far, we've hunted wide, Nor efforts did We stint, But We've accomplished naught beside To get her name in print. Senior: WESLEY RICHARD Huss This junior lad's a man of parts, Really a breaker of Women's hearts. If on Wanda he makes a call, Or if he takes her to a ball, Then Dorothy to the rest room hies And there she cries out both her eyes.. Of if he takes a look at Anne, Wanda fears she's lost her man! X l :.z'Ifl-NIJ' afezffazg'o"QQojjoj1oj19j1o o Q Q 0 o Q 0jojjoj10116101jojjojjojjojjojjojjoj 19 ZNNIEPIIOIIOIDIIOIIOI1021621610 O 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 O 0 6 O uioizfzio o + o e:o::o::o::o:9::o: o ozyrozyyzezozzoil Uhr Kngpmgrq zazzozzxzmzzebzo o:x::o::o::o::o::o o Q o::o:s:nQIfcD He must have been thinking with all his might Of these lovelorn maidens one moonlit night, He must have been dreaming with all his soul, For he Walked right into a round sewer hole! If only these maids could have seen his plight, Perchance their love would have taken flight. Junior: JOHN BARBOUR BERESPORD If ever fairies lived at all In the days of Cinderella. They must have returned to be at the call Of this wonderfully lucky fellow! For his godfather touched a golden wand, As he ended his regime- He left him money by the pound And a wonderful machine. No tiny chariot, drawn by mice, But run by gasoline, - And clothes and jewels just as nice As fairy hands e'er gleaned. Now he spends his time in shopping, I've heard his friends assert, And there's no such thing as stopping Him, if he sees a new kind of shirt. He took his sweetheart, for a lark, Cut walking in the Third Street park. The sky was dark, the air was cool, As they stopped at the edge of the wading pool. "Pat," said he, "is it your wish To take a swim with the little fish?" With that he pushed her, just for fun, But was soon chagrined at what he'd done, For, before he could catch her, now-don't grin! But Patty really had fallen in! Senior: ANNE CRATHORNE Anne stood at the board and bit her chalk, The teacher waited for her to talk. "You cannot say it? Well, then," said he, "Please write it onthe board for me." Still Anne stood there, and did not write, Till the teacher's patience was exhausted quite. When he finally asked, "What's the matter with you?" She stammered, "I can't think how to make a 'Q'." Anne sat bewildered in civics class- The words were falling around so fast! "Coolidge or chaos," the teacher explained, Was the slogan the Republican party attained. While "Coolidge and Chaos," the Democrats roared, But Anne sat there as if decidedly bored. Snrfy-wa'1'1a ljqojjo o o Q 0 0 0 o 0 Q o Q o Q o o Q 4 o o Q ojjqfoji 1 ybjjqjqyjd'o"o"o"o'b"o 0 0 A Q Q 0 Q 0 0 01612325 QQ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q:ys:s::Q:x::Q::Q::Q::Q: E119 mggpmgrg xx1qx1qgq1Q3:Q:Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q3 Then she raised her hand: "Please don't betray us But tell us, please, who's this fellow chaos? Jumor: CLARENCE DELF WITT Cin other words, liH21H1C J This young man by the name of Witt Really made an awful hit When he Went to Bloomington last fall To play the game we call football. He caught the ball on a forward pass, But stood there looking quite aghast! Till Walker cried, "Why don't you run? Why are you standing there, you bum?" Then in slow motion picture style A He ran down the field for half a mile, And thus he won for himself some fame, While for Urbana he won the game! Semor: KATHRYNE ALICE BURROWS Kathryne, Katie, Kittie, Kat! Now tell me what do you think of that? She spells it with K and not With a C, She puts in a Y, and ends it with E. At any rate, she must spell it so Nobody else could possibly know How to do it. And then her name Is never really ever the same- Some call her Kitten, some call her Kit, But she never seems to mind a bit. For she gave herself a name, you see, The queerest of all-'tis "Kickashi." Junzor: RICHARD Cl-IILDERS Dick indulged in exploitation Of gymnastical gyrations To gain the ladies' admiration We could give no appelation To the kind of demonstration Dick produced for our approbation. He circled the bar in fast rotation, For which he wanted commendation. And then he fell into contemplation How to gain further adolation Without so much perspiration Or a loss of respiration. Then with no abbreviation Of his careful preparation, With his gum in mastication, To assist his cogitation. Dick cried out in ostentation: "Please now, watch my presentation?- Qgap Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 1525 :xxwxm:Q::ex:Q:z:e:cQ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q5 Efhp mggpmurg There he stopped in his quotation, Then, with no time for remonstration, With his heart in palpitation And without his expectation, And to his abject consternation, Followed by his larnentation, He yielded to the force of gravitation, And with no bit of deviation-- Amid his great expostulations He almost made an indentation In Mother Earth! Oh, darnation! Senior: RAY EMNIERSON MARTINIE That he may keep himself in health, That he may learn whence comes his wealth, That he may not come to harm, Ray spends his summers on the farm. He feeds the pigs and mows the hay, 'Tis how he spends each summer day! One day, when he was hard at work Pitching hay with his old pitch fork, An insurance man approached the lad And asked him where he'd find his dad. Said Ray, "If you will just go by Where the pigs are rooting in the old pig sty, You'll find him there and have your chat- You'1l know him by his old straw hat." Junior: IVIARJORIE ELOISE WILSON With hair as black as raven's wing, Of which the poets often sing, Above an alabaster brow, Methinks I see it curling now! With cheeks of roses naturelle, A beautiful girl is this high school belle. Her eyes are deep and steady gray, Which to the whole world seem to say, "Put your faith in meg I'll ne'er betray Your trust in me to my dying day." Her ways are gentle, true and kind, High are her qualities of mind: Nor narrow is she in her art, For in many plays she's had a part. Her fingers, nimble on the keys, Make music that is sure to please. A toast to her, an ideal girl, For she's as pure as a gleaming pearl. Senior: , You've done your best, I will admit, The foibles of my class to hit. v Sixty-nine u1c:cw::eyyxxzozxziozie:o::+::o::c:o::e:o:z:ex1 Elhp Rngpmarg zz:o::o::e:o::o: Q o o 4 o + Q Q Q Q v v 4 0 0 l Sf' rw We've each of us filled our boast, And we have given roast for roast. I hope that you'll not take amiss, Nor misinterpret the real gist Of what I've said. I pray you now Accept my friendship's kindly vow, Permit me now to toast your class Ere from your circles we do pass. Here's to you, Juniors, one and all, May. all good things to you befall: Success to you, a World of fame, Bring honor to each junior's name! Junior: We thank you for this kindly thought, Forgive the havoc you have wrought, Forget the unkind things you have said And call down blessings on your head, We give this greeting to you all As you go out to duty's call: May every joy which you can know Attend your feet where'er you go. An olden toast We offer you, 'Tis given with good Wishes true: "Here's to you early, here'e to you late, Here's to the favorites of fate, Here's to the best class in the State- Our Seniors!" Senior: With all our hearts we thank you For your toast so kindly given, For it makes a pleasant parting Of all bitter feelings riven. That you may pass your senior year With naught of Worry nor of fear, We leave our mascot here with youg It will prove a blessing trueg Guard it, handle it with care, And to it render service rare. Junior: We thank you for your wishes, And for this mascot, too: We will try our best to be To its traditions true. We'll guard it well, and use it well: And when from these halls we pass, We'll give it with its legend old To the next year's senior class. Thus will it e'er, as years go by, Bring blessings on Urbana High. lICIOIIOIIOI192IGIblIOI16101CO1IGIC01IfIOIDIIQICICKIOIIQIIQXQII 1 5 IKIIOIIOIIOIIQIOIIOIICICICQI9 0 0 0 9 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 vl Emma::oz:o::o::o::f::eys:zx:x::o::.::.::.::.:s::Q:x:x Ellie IKUHPHIHYM 1.11.3gszzzmzzezozszzoz:o:a:xzxxyxyw:11Ql'ZiD Class Will . To E, members of the class of nineteen hundred and twenty-five, having attained our desire to sit on these football bleachers dressed in white 'Tk dresses and new suits, though somewhat weary from incessant cram- 556 ming of useless knowledge into our gray matter, but still of sound W ft QQ-ffl? mind, memory, and understanding, make and publish this, our last will and testament, hereby revoking and making Void all former wills made by us at any time heretofore. As to our worldly estate, and all property, real and personal, which we shall have acquired or owned, or to which we shall be entitled at the time of our decease, we devise, bequeath, and dispose thereof in the manner following, to-wir: First, we hereby appoint Miss Madge Leslie as executrix of this, our last will and testament in consideration of her treating us so nicely and being such a good sport by letting so many of us pass out into the wide world to taste life as it really is. 1 To Miss Elsie Werner, with Miss Lola McClurg's consent, we wish to be- queath the solid gold alarm clock which was given to Miss Lola McClurg by the class of '24 in order that the aforestated Miss Elsie Werner may dismiss her classes in time for them to get to their next classes. We will to Mr. Miletus Flaningam one victrola record to be played each day the third hour in assembly. This said record is to be in four parts: the first part is his famous speech on the half-wits of the school: the second part is his oration on pin-featherish, back-woods people: the third part is his address based on the famous story of the grasshopper and the fourth part is his little talk on nauseating, spring, puppy-love affairs. Certain individuals have requested that we bequeath their personalities and traits thusly: Clarence Witt bequeaths his stature to Glen Morris. Minnie Means bequeaths her "line" to Leota Miller, Willard Monohon wishes to leave his beautiful, natural marcel to Blanche Huffer. Bob Seybold bequeaths his ability to sleep in classes to anybody who thinks they can get by with it. Ruby Hiser bequeaths her authority to pass out excuses to anyone who does not possess saintly pity. Jack Holt bequeaths his art of writing ardent love letters to Thomas Lyman. Marjory Wilson bequeaths her dignity to Katherine Burrows. Dorothy Kern bequeaths her brains to Margaret Phillips. Nelle McDonough bequeaths her ability to step out with a teacher to Ann Crathorne. - y Scribbled, pasted, printed, and declared by the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-live, testatrix above named, as and for our last will in the presence of all of us this twelfth night of June, 1925. The Class of Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-five. PGY. lVlILDRED FRANCELIA WATERBURY. St'l'6'2Lijj'0IlP 0I102192Q01102IQ!1011102C02101192li!IGIOIIOIICIOIIQIIQIIQIIOIIOIIOI 1 H 2 5 X92IQIGIOIICK''OI102102IOIIGIC021025551021602IOIIOIDIIGIOIICNIW lliilvooooooooooooooodyy Elly Rggpmgfg bjyoooooovooqyyxykikjyyyyl Class fprophecy recall some of my old high school days and see if I could find what each one of my classmates was doing today After these forty long years it was quite a task, but after five months and six days of corres- ltfliel ponding I was able to gather the following information about my long forgotten friends of the class of 1925. Lester Leutwiler was the first to answer and to my surprise Lester, who is now close to sixty, is still trying for honors as a boy scout. Mildred Waterbury is on the vaudeville stage but is retiring the first of the year so as to be home with her husband who was Clifford Fears in my high school days. CAnd the kidsj Glen Chapman is farming in Texas. He is called "The King of Texas." Jesse Miller is sweeping the streets of Urbana for a lively-hood. Jesse seems not to be taking advantage of his education. Mary Thomson is a hosiery model in Chicago. Helen Veach is writing books. She has just released one entitled "The Ways of Men." Kenneth Smith has taken a position at the Pastime Billiard Parlor. He is janitor and house man. Kenneth says his rheumatism is bad. Jack Holt is playing his violin on the corner of Main and Market for his living. I Q 1- 3 Evelyn Taylor is in Hollywood playing in the movies. She has taken Poli Negri's place as a cinema star. Ruth Villars is now an old-maid and says she is still trying to find a mate. Beulah Barrick is an artist's model in Pesotum. Margaret Schumacher and Clarence says there is nothing like married life when you get a good wife. Beatrice Sloan is Dean of Women at the University of Illinois. Olive Dunn is now Mrs. Willis Atkinson. They live in Hollywood. Wilson Mumm is still the sheik of Sidney. Roger Conerty says he weighs 300 pounds and never felt better in his life. Wright Farnsworth and Audree Hill are married. Wright is running a beanery in Wyoming-and Paris. Morgan Hundley is at the asylum in Kankakee. He went dippy thinking himself a sheik. Dan Green has been named "Dangerous Dan." He is wanted in Chicago for murder. Harriet Bechtold is an artist's model in New York. Arletta Hahn has taken Mrs. Jigg's place in the funny paper. Dorothy Kern is an old-maid living at the Home in Champaign. Anita Wood is now the leading star in Hollywood. She plays in comedies. Vinnie Logan is now interested in the bootlegging business. Eldred Price is running a boarding house in Thomasboro. Frances Shroyer takes a heavy part in vaudeville now. Janet Woolbert is now teaching the old ladies how to keep young. Virginia Veale is now Mayor of Glover. Martha Wertz is training monkeys. She is also trying to train Walter Schwartz. NE evening as I sat in my study I had a feeling that I would like to lin, fl! . . ' . M .N'l'I'1'Hlf I 9555333.90eoooooooooooexxlliyioi 1225 gyyyooooooooooooqxgqyyyyyyyyg wnwiezqp Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q ozyzezextzxxxizl E119 Rngpmarg v o o o o o o o o o o o Q Q o Dorothy Gibson has at last learned to drive a Ford and she can at least keep it in the street. Betty Yantis has been married the past 37 years and is now Mrs. Carl Freeman of Chicago and Europe. Linus Hubbard is playing his horn in the Pumpkin Center Town Band. Ansel Dewey is now a horse doctor. Trying to make both ends meet. Harley Harmon is now messenger boy for Western Union. Irene Becker is head nurse at Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago. Betty McAuley is now Mrs. Roy Miller- Roy was a famous football player at the University of Illinois. It was a high school romance. Jimmy Sullivan is putting hub caps on Fords in Detroit. Ray Housh is head .attendant at the Urbana dump grounds. Byron Holmes is still single. He is unable to find one who loves his curley hair. Eugene Boucher is now chief draft clerk at the Busey's State Bank. He regulates the doors and windows. Harold Creamer is in Tolono taking advantages of opportunities offered there. Dorothy Blaisdell is one of the telephone operators in Champaign. Willard Monohon is janitor at the court housej Agnes Glenn is helping her husband run his oil station. Ruby Hiser has taken over the duties of Miss Ricketts in Urbana High now and they say it is harder to get an excuse from her than it was from Miss Ricketts. Martha Oliver is now acting as life-saver at Crystal Lake Park. Mildred Tipton is table hop at the Apollo. Irene Taylor is matron at the County Poor Farm. Irwin Schreiber is President of Dodge Brothers business firm. Bernard Reynolds holds the state three cushion billiard title. Arthur Lloyd is now washing dishes in the Hotel Urbana Lincoln. Ed Luker is working for the city. Sweeping streets. Mary Martinie, Eula Magill, and Elizabeth Mason are chorus girls in Chicago. Verna Scott is working in one of Chicago's leading Cabarets. Eunice Young is a member of the United States Olympic Team. She is a fancy diver. I . Neva Bevis is check girl at Lewis' store. Patty and Betty Brennan are billed for a three day run at the Varsity Theater in Champaign. Bernice Douthit is girls' athletic director at Urbana High School. Mildred Faulkner is being sued for breech-of-promise. Marvin Kemp is taking care of the horses for Troop E. John Johnson is now Champion horse shoe pitcher of the state. Donald Kendall has taken J. B. Casserly's place as Chemistry and Physics teacher. In school it took Donald two years to pass Chemistry. Frances Williamson is Chamber Maid at the Urbana Lincoln. Clyde Trees now lives at the County Poor Farm. Lenore Blair is now a widow and is working in a beanery for a lively-hood. This is last of the answers and to my belief I suppose the rest of the 165 must be dead or too old and feeble to Write. ZACK MARTIN '25. Serpnfyftlu wmyyyoooooooooooocoooooooqyy 10210110ooooooooooooooooooooyybjl NQQQUivifviZvi102kviivjioifoiiviiviioiIoiivi10110viviioiioiioiioifvi Elly IKugp111g1fg jojqojjvjjojgfjgojpjjsjjojis1011,13.1jvggojgvjjejjejjojjsjjojjQ3u 9, ... .Q O ... ... 3. O ,Q , , .Q z' 9 If ,.. O 9. ,- 9. O 9. 9. 6 9. ... . . ,OA Q, . . if j j fi ZZ? Lo: if 2: if iii :Oz :Ol kf '- if 1,2 bf ?'5 lf :J kg, : 1 if ' gig 9,2 I 1 lf Q 2 1, 5, Iof ' ' : 1 .92 Firs! Row: VVright. Hunt, Oliver. Appcrson. Harmon. Second Row: Smith, Housh, Farnsworth. if SENIOR BOYS' ATHLETICS ' EI? If Ioj is The Class of '25 passes out of Urbana High with one of the most re- 'Q' lot E4 O gg markable athletic records in the history of the school. This is more noticeable '- O ,.. if in the Varsity sports, where the Seniors ruled supreme. Indeed, it may almost QQ I be said that the history of Varsity ahtletics of 1924-5 is the history of the 5:5 O 'Q' athletics of the Senior class. 1,1 O .. . ,. , In football, of the thirteen men who earned their Varsity letters, Captain 1:1 , 7 1 , Roger Conerty, Bill Weber, Ed McGrath, Ted Oliver, Clarence Witt, Clyde 51, O 'Q' O . . . were but four underclassmen on the Varsity football team. P, Trees, Glenn Kirby, Culen Chapman, and Zack Martin were Seniors. There 3.2 9. ,.. f, The Senior monopoly continued in basketball when Captain Ed Mc- if fi if ,Q Cirath, Wilson Mumm, Glen Chapman, Zack Martin, Marvin Kemp, and 91 ,.. .Q ,ti Bill Weber received Varsity letters. Only three underclassmen could keep pace Loi . . Q01 pg with this group of great athletes, and they were not regulars. 1.3 0 . . . . . . ' ' 24, In swimming, Captain Lawrence Binyon, Lester Leutwiler, and Reid fzf .5 , , 3' Evans of the Class of '25 won the coveted letter. If 31 Z.: if In interclass basketball the Seniors who were Varsity candidates were not :,f allowed to compete, which accounts for the unsuccessful record of the class in 1:1 the tournament. Q12 Q In interclass swimming the Seniors copped with ease, no other class 2:2 2.1 2. having a look-in at first honors. -. 5. 3. ,IQ In interclass track the Seniors were runners-up to the really remarkable .. O .,. ,Q Junior team, which set some new records while winning the meet. :oi Truly, in the face of these achievements, it may be said that the Seniors fzf ,O QQ: 'Q' are one of the greatest classes, from an athletic standpoint, that Urbana High ',- if has ever produced, and the absence of the sturdy athletes mentioned above will If 43 be keenly felt in the seasons to come. TED OLIVER, '25. Ez H .Y1'zW'I:l1f'm1l' K m u:9ii9ii9:i9i 1OIIOQIOf19fI0lIOI 1010101 if iff 101 19: IOI 19: 19: IGI if: 101 101 :Vi if 1 g 5 32:02 iO:fOffO:10:1OI1Q,10119::O:fOff0::Oll0fiOfi9I f0:fOi iOffOf10:n 051901ioizvfzeiez1.1101iozzvi:siftzozzezciorivzicivi:o::v::o::o7 Elle Ilingpniarg io:zero::ozzozzczoiioiiciozzoizoz141:02xoxo::o::o::o::o:a::o:1lQ,"W5 First Row: Veach, Scheib, Webber, Bowman, Veale, Sloan, Woolbert, Means, Scheib, Second Row: Mclnnes, Brash, Torrence, Still, Magill, Carman. Hutchinson, Schumacher. SENIOR GIRLS ' ATHLETICS Here you see the Senior girls basketball teams, both first and second. The Hrst team is as follows: Virginia Veale CCapt.D, forward: Helen Veach, for- ward: Hertha Bowman, forward: Dorothy Weber, center, Doris Scheib, center, Beatrice Sloan, guardg Minnie Means, guard: and Janet Woolbert, guard. The second team is as follows: Myra Torrance QCapt.j, forward, Agnes McGinnis, forward, Mae Hutchinson, forward, Margaret Schumacher, center, Edna Brash, center, Dorothy Scheib, guardg Eula Magill, guard: and Louise Still, guard. The first team beat all oncomers except the Juniors. The score of the game with the Juniors was 20-22. The second team, however, was victorious in every game they played, thus receiving second team championship. Track was on the whole rather unlucky for the Seniors, but nevertheless our girls' team consisting of Janet Woolbert fCapt.j, Helen Veach, Grace Wil- son, Beatrice Sloan, Dorothy Scheib, Eula Magill, Opal Winklepleck, and Margaret Haran made a very good showing in spite of the fact that they had had very little practice. Seniors had the champion swimming team composed of Martha Oliver CCapt.j, Harriett Bechtold, Olive Dunn, Frances Williamson, Audree Hill, Dorothy Webber, Mabel Cole, and Margaret Haran. These girls walked off with the swimming meet on April 24 in the Urbana High School pool. VIRGINIA VEALE '25. Sw l'l'IIl!!'ff re M5032IOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOI101102102101IOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIGIOIIOIIOI1102102102102 1 H 2 El 103102102102ZQXQIZQQQ102102102102102102102102102143IGZv11QIi1QZOI9I!Il6',iQ 9 U 32102 202 202 I-92 202 C6102 202 202 202 202 202 102 202 202 202 202 D2 202 IG K2 E hp IK UHPUIEIYL1 202 10216 D2 32 I K2 102 32 102 202 202 32 Ioll Nu Brash Hundley Bowman SENIOR DEBATE The debating team which upheld the honor of the Senior class for the year 1924-25 was composed of Hertha Bowman, Edna Brash, Morgan Hund- ley, and Dorothy Kern Qalternatej. The debate was held November 26 with the Junior Team no the question, "Resolved, That congress should authorize a sales tax." The Seniors upheld the negative side with a systematic and well planned argument, while the Juniors responded with a well-prepared attack and exposition. The delivery of both sides was acceptable. Although the Seniors did some fine debating, the Juniors were awarded the victory by a two to one vote of the judges. The Senior team, however, avenged their defeat by placing two of their members on the varsity team. MORGAN HUNDLEY, JR. Ni' v'Hllf.v12.r Qgfauxzezeai :Q xmzzezozzezoziozsz :oz zo: :oi :oi 14: :oz :oz iw: :ez zo: zo: 202 1 H 2 5 2313210121102102102102L021021021631201hlidliojlolliIQICQIZQIZOIIOIKIII J., . -E., 4: V W krV,: 1 , , f A .' ' 1:-' . 2 mg 3, .r .U ,. Y, Q.. - - X,-.LK , "th .A v X vi. , 5 , . , . .. ,n , Q, -1 . A 1 I X Ns. "'f'Y"""W " " 'fffvvi ww J: fTPVF71"'W, mf 1 15 25 - uv- -i7'Tff"Z" , , , - - - 'vw - , 'tev!..::::'g'f-Y! - ..q. , , v NM"-1'T X N, A ,Wm 1g,,WffN ... -..zLb 1 :M 'X N 'uw 'FM f" '1Lz..a. 'W L4 5339010i0i10i'0:10310i:01L03:og30:10210:302101101i02:0::03101102203Ze'1J Ulu' 1tKl1HL'lll2lI'1I 103101L0i:0110:10310:10310:10Zi02i03i01102iotZ0:10210:10:1o1l0i:0ZllQj'f1eDI'M, a ' 2 if "-T ' F13 Q, 1 .5 ,'. I 202 z.: S.: 1 102 31 3 joj 31 1 10' 1.1 'Ol z.: :Ol 1,1 fo: 1.1 iff 31 goj L.: 'Q' ,L 192 ,: 192 fx 'Q' "L L.: :OI :Oc 102 r.: '0' gl :L , . 9. :Oi 19, Q.: 152 :': 192 1.1 19: :': 59: :': 14: :'1 Q02 z.: 192 1.1 '92 K.. :C .1 191 3: 19: 102 102 102 ff 202 19: 102 102 if :Of . 1 . .1 ff SS CLA THE. JUNIOR 101 102 102 Q0f 102 102 102 'O' .0, L02 T02 102 202 102 202 102 102 202 202 l02 102 102 102 .02 .Q ,.. ,.. f02 ... ... 202 202 '02 101 Q' , ,.. 9, ,O2 102 102 102 102 102 L02 102 102 102 102 102 Q02 102 102 102 102 L02 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 C02 ,0Q Q02 102 102 102 102 L02 i02 L02 102 102 102 102 j0j 102 T02 101 202 101 10' 202 20' 202 0' .02 O' 9' 0, .01 0' 1 01 9' 92 10 E 0. ,.. 2 0. CSX!!! .6 X ,M ,wjfffjllfl I wU102I',1'214f 'A-'V-'Vfl.P.-'..'f.'.-if-'f9.9,.'.-'I-'.-9--'H'--9.9. 1 H C.. .T 10.10.102,0210210210210,10110,L02101102I0210210I102I02I0210I10Q10f10l10I102102.lmN u 0 Q 0 Q o 0102IOIIOIIGIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIYOIIOIIOIIOIIOI Ely- iK11HPI11Zl1'g 102102C02IvlIOIQOI102101IOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIO Q o Q v 4 QUBWQZF sf JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS President THOMAS LYMAN Vice-Presid ent KATHRYNE B URROWS Secretary RAY MARTINIE Treasurer VONNA MARR Historian BETTY MITCHELL Echo Representative BLANCHE HUPPER Class Ad uiser HERBERT BICKEL fi? Zffie ff!! egzgl IN' N 11 1 1 Il K Qyfm ' ' ' ' ' 'H'--Q-'A-'A9.-'A-'If-'A-'A-'I-'ff-'A-'A-'A-'f-'A-Y 152.1 as 0, A. 1, A, A, .Q .Q .Q 9. .v. 9. Q. 9. A. .Q .v, 9. .o 4 Q 4 Q o 0065? 010210220210GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQDII wh? mngpmarq 3130009ooooooooobovdkikfmna Junior Class History 'Gym-9 F the Class of '25 there is much to be said. Often Mr. Pulliam in his talks has admonished the other classmen and especially Freshmen to model themselves on the Juniors. Mr. Flaningam likewise, has im- pressed this on the Freshmen, so we can expect much of them. But i i deeds-not words. Hear ye! After the Thornburn Graduation the class began an enviable high school career. The officers elected were later to become important people in the school life at U. H. S. President, Charles Johnson: Vice-President, Verna Dailey: Secretary, Helen Tobias: Treasurer, Edwin Martin: Historian, Leota Miller: Echo Representative, Vlalter Gibson: and Adviser, Miss Bryan. The stunt that year was "The Historical Revue," which while not taking the prize, was highly commended. Also '26 sponsored a picnic or rather a swimming party CFD that is remembered with a great deal of pleasure even now. On becoming Sophomores we found the President, Verna Dailey: Vice- President, Charles Johnson: Secretary, Wesley Huss: Treasurer, Wayne Mann: Historian, Leota Miller: Echo Representative, Blanche Huffer: and Adviser, Miss Doyle. This time the class did take the first prize in the Stunt Show, presenting "And The Villain Still Pursues Him," which was extraordinary clever and well coached by Miss Ricketts. Both girls and boys were Basketball champions. The boys on the team were: Evans CCapt.D, Adams, Thornton, and Mann. The Sophomore Dance Committee included Leota Miller, Everett Hundley, Katherine Veach, Ray Martinie, Edwin Martin, and Frances Blue. This year saw added honors for the class of 1926. Thomas Lyman was the able and versatile president: Vice-President, Kathryne Burrows: Secretary, Ray Martinie: treasurer, Vonna Marr: Historian. Betty Mitchell: Echo Repre- sentative, Blanche Huffer: Adviser, Mr. Bickel. The Echo Campaign, con- ducted by Tom Lyman and Betty Mitchell for the highest number of sub- scriptions, was won by Juniors and they were awarded the Echo Shield. Then the class basketball season ended with the Junior girls as champions, the personell of the team being Harriet Hadlock, Carrie Jane Barton, Madge Quinn, Nina Patterson, Blanche Hulfer, Helen Gordon, and Betty Mitchell CCapt.J. The boys, however, did not come through with first owing to the fact that Wayne Mann, Howard Adams, and Frank Walker were lost to the varsity squad. On the varsity football squad Frank Walker fCapt.D, Glenn Kirby, Harold Best, Howard Adams, and Tom Lyman received letters for their good work. .In Track eight of the Hfteen members of the varsity squad were Juniors. Joy Cullison QCapt.j, Howard Adams, James Coble, Albert Davidson, Wesley Huss, Everett Hundley, and Frank Walker won the inter-class track meet for I ilflflff 5g1qygo1joooeooooooooooooooooyyx 1525303143100QoQQuoouooconooyjgsggqgqn 0210253 o Q 4 Q Q 0 o 9 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 Uh? mngpmafg 0 o o Q o Q Q Q Q the Juniors and, with the girls' twenty-two points, collected a total of 71 points. The girls on the track team were Blanche Wilson Cmanagerj, Dorothy Doug- lass, Maxine Taborn, Carrie Jane Barton, Hazel Baugh, Blanche Huffer, Mabel Palmer, and Betty Mitchell fCapt.j. The girls did their part nobly in the Annual Swimming Meet with Anne Crathorne CCapt.j , the snappy little backstroker, and Katherine Burrows, Verna Dailey, Maxine Taborn, Cleo Horn, Harriet Hadlock, and Emma Jane Shepherd on the team. n Charles Johnson received an old English "U" for his literary activities. Again this class walked off with the first prize in the Stunt Show, largely due to the efforts and superior coaching of Mr. Bickel. The Stunt was a musi- cal comedy, "Alias Jerry," and was greeted with greater enthusiasm than any stunt of this kind has ever been greeted. The leads, Wayne Mann, Fred Shroyer, Mildred Jones, and Katherine Veach, along with the feature dancers, Charles Johnson, Helen Tobias, and Verna Dailey, made a great hit. Those one the committee were, Charles Johnson CChairmanj, Kendall Kelly, Edwin Martin, Edrie Seward, Helen Tobias, Leota Miller, Vonna Marr, and Betty Mitchell. The class, in order to express their gratitude for the splendid work Mr. Bickel did as coach of the production, presented him with a pen and pencil set. In "The Whole Town's Talking," this year's very successful Boys' Stunt Show, Charles Johnson and Fred Picknell had stellar roles. Thus, '26 has been well represented in the many and varied activities at U. H. S. May all other succeeding Junior Classes share our fortune, sports- manship and all-round good feeling as we enter our last and fullest year as SENIORS. Deeds-not words! BETTY MITCHELL 1 ai" Eighty-nz I DlIGIG!2CZG!!3oooooooooooooooo!H 51655553oooooooooooooqyyyypjg .ws wenietgoto:io:L+:iv:ze::mi:oiiv:zo:io:zftiozzozfoiroziotioiiozfvi Elie IKUHPUIEIIU zo::v::v:zo:zo:I+:io:io::ozzo::oziozioziozzoi:o::o::o::o::o::+::o:flQ,"F:D X , Q: :': ti M O t 1 5,5 . . 'v 0 5. : : 2.1 'c if Q. O 3. .Q , ,.. , .Q ,.. ,,. . . 'C ,.. -.1 .Q 9 -1 9. ' o 9, : 1 32 9, 3: if :': :J -,I . . io: i 3 z 1 : : 'Q' :.: fo: :': jg Q. if: M :': "' fof :Oc :Of z.: 52 : .1 Z.: : .1 :Q Zo: 32 '6 202 :J ' If 2.2 1 fgf W 102 First Row: Trimble, Brumfield. Holmes, Kelley. White. Zz: Second Row: Richards. McCloskey, Bantz. :.: fvf Qi 'O' .Q iff fzf JUNIOR BOYS" ATHLETICS z .1 pl . . ,Q The Junior Class is a class that can boast of its class spirit toward ath- 2: .,. -0. ,Q letics because it has been represented in every branch of sports this year. f: Q ,.. 3,3 First, the class basketball. The Juniors responded in a large num- pq T01 f- ber, but only eight were chosen because there was only to be a first team tourna- O ,J ment. The team could not hit their stride until the last game with the Seniors. Z6 They lost one game, to the Sophomores, and ended in second place. Those I 5 W V iavho earned their 26's are Vvlesley Holmes CCapt.j, Vance Brumfield, Charles gg Q 1 'C 9. '- Harris, Kendall Kelley, Lloyd Trimble, Floyd Richards, Mark McCloskey IQ 3. . . .. , and John white. Q Zi 5 The class track meet ended the inter-class activities. The Juniors won the 2.3 r.: U meet by a large majority. We were represented in the class track meet by iq .. ... 'c Frank Walker, Howard Adams, Wesley Huss, Junior Hurd, Everett Hundley, Toi .Q -'- James Coble, John White, Joy Cullison, Mark McCloskey, Thomas Lyman, gt! : : Q. John Coombe, and Albert Davidson. :: Q A 9. 525 The Juniors who won major "U" 's are: Adams, Walker, Mann, Lyman. Q22 :Ii Cullison, Best, Coble, Hundley, and Coombe. Those winning minor"U"'s 2:2 are: Martinie, Butzow, Weber, Villars, Holmes, Stuckey, Davidson, Bantz, .Q : 1 P, Shroyer, Gibson, and Smith. .2 .Q 1: O 2.2 WESLEY Houvnas '26. gf G2 , QD I flyflll-ffl1f'if 1 KO:i9ff0fi4Viiff9ff9fi9if9i19:10110101Kii9ii9f19ff0f:0ii9ff0ff9ii9if0i:9ii9i 1 g 2 5 1101102C01102Q02Q02101IOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOI101101102Q02IGIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIDIIOI Gw njejgoj1o:gQjfj 4 Q Q Q ojlojjojZvjioiioiiojioiioiiojlo ojioj. Elly -IK11gp11mru joj fof jog 1.3 3.3 gag fof jog goi QQ ff :aj 1.31.3103 joj joj jo: joj joj foj jojnQ,D7aJ'2Z 55 K af First Row: XVilson. Barton, Huffer. Mitchell, Patterson, Quinn, Campbell. Second Row: Roberts, Taborn, Hadlock, Lester, Carman, Veach, Way, Greaves. JUNIOR GIRLS' ATHLETICS The Junior Class made a specialty of athletics, and the girls, not to be outdone by the boys, showed up excellently in all the athletic activities. Twice champions in Basketball, Harriet Handlock, Nina Patterson, Blanche Huffer, Blanche Wilson, Madge Quinn, Helen Gordon, and Betty Mitchell played on the first team, with Kathryn Veach, Nelle Lester, Maxine Taborn, Rosaline Roberts and Rosalind Greaves on the second team. . In the Inter-Class Track Meet the girls took twenty-two points of the seventy-one taken in all by Juniors. Hazel Baugh was one of the high point girls taking first in the high jump and first in discus throw. The other mem- bers of the team were Blanche Wilson, Blanche Huffer, Carrie Jane Barton, Opal Palmer, Maxine Taborn, and Betty Mitchell. The swimming team, composed of Anne Crathorne CCapt.l, Leota Miller, Verna Dailey, Harriet Hadlock, and Kathryne Burrows, placed third in the Inter-Class Swimming Meet. The Baseball and Tennis season was just opening as The Rosemary went to press, but if Junior girls fare as well in these sports as in the others there is no doubt as to a successful outcome. More than just being victorious, Juniors have ever been "good sports." BETTY MITCHELL '26. l,44f1lf!lff!fHf f yqfgnjajjvjjojgojjqjiwo Q Q 4 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 4 Q Q Q 433.33 1512 5 gqgoj Q Q Q Q oggaggoggoggoggqjsjgogo o Q Q ogjojjojgQj1ojjoj1ojj43u6:w uw:io1i+1io::o'totroifoizozzoiioiioife:exeiozzoizoiioirviiozzoi Uhr IKHHPIIIEIIQ :ozLozioiiozioiioiioizoiioiiozioiio:io::eat:o::f::o:to::o::o::o:uQl'9?cD f . . , WISE!IGI102ibfDI101I101101101I.Ol10110110111I011iIQ101l0I1Ql0II0lQOI .101IGIICI102102Q01I101101102102102101IIOQIOI192Q02102IOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOII Mosier Bennett Shepherd JUNIOR DEBATE Vfhen the call for class debators was made about twenty Juniors responded. Those selected were Hazel Mosier, Emma Jane Shepherd, and Edgar Bennett. Leota Miller acted as alternate the first semester and Arthur Lloyd during the second semester. The Hrst inter-class debate of the year was held early in November be- tween the Seniors and Juniors. The question for debate was "Resolved, That a sales tax should be levied in the United States." The Juniors made up the affirmative team. While the Seniors, Hertha Bowman. Edna Brash. and Morgan l-Iundley, upheld the negative. The debate was closely contested but the final decision was a two to one vote in favor of the Juniors. As a result of the Junior-Senior debate the Juniors met the Freshmen in the final debate of the year. The question was "Resolved, That the United States should grant immediate independence to the Philippine Islands. The Juniors took the affirmative and the Freshmen the negative. The Freshmen negative team was composed of Merle Sanders. Robert Hanchion, and Merle Hopson. The Freshmen. victorious by a two to one vote, earned the coveted class championship. A great deal of credit in Junior debate should be given to Miss Ruth E. Rompel. debating coach, and to Arthur Lloyd, alternate. EMMA JANE SHEPHERD '26. lz':'+1Mu in ir 6'S Wy? evg w - M N X!'i15 , 9!Q.Q h1E5S4oA6 hy , . .91 X ?'wq yang, y 9X.v., , 95141589 'V sv gigs! 5 'Q ff'-'a vibgiafe QE ' H 41 i gif , K' .mn WMM miiifm Wm S-0 QMQYMA gi W mnmlrtwl W 51" 5 1 Q 2 1 i 1- Sz: '1' 5 5 l x-LMcQQy S GL Hill SUUHU UUE K .iw 5 ALHIIIH I 5 M HUWIIIIII 1 'Q ,Q 'o 'o 'o i ' .. .V .. ., .1 ., ., .. .Y U 1. U H -V -. .. .. .. .v 31901jQj1o"ojio'ioi'o'1oi'o' QiiviIQiiQi'oZioi'o'1vi!vjIv''0""I" LL Ill' 1Kl1!il'llIil1'QI 9-V'--'A '--'-'A-'A-'1-'f-'.-'U'--M',.'..'. '..'..'..'.9..'.:DQJfi QM Si RQ 0 1 0, 4 I 0' o 3 , 0 o .0 0 If' o .0 , Qc. 0 2.1 'Q .9 -Q, QQ' 1 3 .5 ,V 9 pi 0 V, o . 4 I .. Ao 0. 'Q 9. 494 Lvl 0 9' ,Q V.: 0 5 ,. ,- .O V. Lo -'. , 9 4 Vg Q. , . . ox 5 .O 4.- .Z 6: ow ' .1 i, .., fi VJ Q' :.' cn :of '. 'C ,- 1'. f-3 4' Q' ul z.: X 9, so 2 .1 Q O .V .1 E . 1 1 4 " O Q, ,' V5 9 If Lu .1 . III 9- ... H 9, 1 o Q . I .1 if tO: '1 Io' vQ 5.1 o 20' ,o, :Oz 31 :of Z.: :Oc zz: Lf "' :': Io: 3: to! :': Io: 30: :OZ :': :oi 31 Zo: :OS :OZ 16: :6: :OL :Ol :Qi :Oi 70. IQ: z.: :Ol 1.1 70: z.: :Of 7.1 , :Qi L.: IO: Z.: 70: 3: to: 1.5 76: :': :of 2.2 :OZ Z.: 1 :Ol I .1 N I 9, j L13 Q , Y .,,,,,,,v ,,,,,,, , Q f I ww 1,,v,f,,U. 4 va' 'I T' 'J gjZl31:5u3,3, 1.3.3'.-3,335.3g,g.gg.j1.gjag.1g.gj,jg.1j,jj.jjQ1g.31Q jQ3j+jio11o2 1 LI, ,1 ioi103ZojiwjioiiviZviiviiviioiidlvlLojlvjlvi102iviioiioiZofiwiioiioilvjlvjI+Il6j5Q"5'E UIQ!IOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIKIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIDIIOIKIIQ wh? QUEPHIEII11 102102102101IOIIOIIOIKIKIIOIIOIIQIKIIOIIQIIOIHICIIIYMW ' af SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS President HOWARD WHITE Vice-Presid ent FRANCES WILSON Secretary MARGUERITE STEPHENS Treasurer EDNA POLK Historian MARY ANN CARSON Echo Representative RUTH BRESEE Adviser IRENE DOYLE Q f 1 Q???g df!! WW' Iiiylzly-x:'1'P11 WEIOIIOI16102101102101IGIIOI102102IGI101161101102102IOIIOIIOIIOIICIOIIOIIG 1 H 2 5 IKIIOIIOIIOIIOIIO''GIG1010231101101142102102IOIIOIICIOIIOIKKI10292110 Q19nismzyzvsimayyxxzexwzsreiszmzozz Efhp Kngpmgrg History of the Class of '27 ,QSQDI IS a long story," said the Sophomore. Having attained the second if jf milestone, he was narrating his successes to the special providence which f protects all sophomores, who stood regarding him with a slight smile. iw ,Q "It is a long story," he repeated, "and I really don't know where to KQQYQ, begin. You see, before we were Sophomores we were Freshmen, just as all Sophomores were once Freshmen, and before that we went to school at Thornburn. After two years of the Boneyard we escaped and became High School Freshmen. Thus faded the Prehistoric Age, and the Age of History widened into view. "Our first year in High School was fairly creditable. Pending a fuller acquaintance with higher education CMDR'S tardy slipj and cafeteria lines Qendless kindj, we elected the following class officers: President . . .... LAUREN JUDY Vice-President . . HENRY SCHUMACHER I Secretary . . GLADYS FREEMAN Treasurer . . J OE WILLIAMSON Historian . . . . MARY CARSON Echo Representative . FRED OATHOUT Class Adviser ...... MRS. SMOTHERS Our class party was successful and our stunt was quite clever. We showed promising athletic and debating ability also. Aside from this there is little to say' about our Freshmen year. In 1924 we entered as full-fledged Sophomores, as all virtuous Freshmen eventually do. We elected the following officers for our Sophomore year: President . . . . . HOWARD WHITE Vice-President . . . . FRANCES WILSON Secretary . . . MARGUERITE STEPHENS Treasurers . . EDNA POLK and RALPH PORTER Historian . . . .... MARY CARSON Echo Representative . RUTH BRESEE Class Adviser ....... MISS DOYLE Basketball was our first athletic interest. The boys' team was made up of Henry Schumacher CCapt.j , forward: Joe Walker, forward: Dick Mitchell. center: Leland Lair, forward: Easton Schwartz, guard: Charles Brannock, for- ward: Arthur Mosher, forward, and Justa Kebler, forward. They won the inter- class tournament. The girls' basketball team included Dorothy Green, forward: Edna Polk, forward: Catherine Colvin, forward: Byne Lohman, center: Lillian Wilson, center: Grace Bechtold, guard: Mary Carson CCapt.D, guard, and Marguerite Stephens, guard. The debating team, made up of Milton Dewey, Florence Reece, Will Rich- ards and Charles Brannock Calternatej , was defeated by the Freshmen. However, two Sophomores, Milton Dewey and Arthur Mosher, made the varsity team. Our stunt show, entitled "The Lion and the Lamb," was quite clever and original. It was coached by Miss Rickets, Miss Werner, and Miss Carman. Helen Smith was chairman of the committee, Fiylitif-viyhl wlioffolfifblfbf:OI262192192102IOIIOIIOKIKIIQIKKIKKKZHI 1 IIQIIQICIKKIIOIIOIIGIOIKIEINICMIKIKIIC' wh? EUHPIIIEIIQ Morris Sutherland and Joe Williamson played the parts of Happers in the boys' stunt show, l'The Whole Town's Talking." We placed second in the girls' inter-class swimming meet. Those on the team were: Grace Bechtold fCapt.j, Josephine McCoy, Hazel Gordon, Ruth Cranmer, and Ruth Habermeyer. In the girls' inter-class track meet we placed third with 22 points. In the boys' track meet we took third place. Glen Dunkle, Jonathan Peters, and Henry Schumacher made the varsity track team. "Thus," concluded the Sophomore, "we have accomplished these things, and in addition brought up the Freshmen in the way that they should go, so that really they are quite a well-behaved little class." "This was well done, my little protege," said the special providence, "and yet many things have been neglected." "Oh," replied the Sophomore, "but we have still two years in which we hope to do much." ' "Hope is a poor crutch to go through life on." The Sophomore frowned. "That isn't kind," he said, "nor is it even original with you." ' 'My protegef said the Special Providence, "you are mistaken. You do not know me-and you never will. But I repeat this-that Hope is precious, but not so effective as Courage and Experience. You have Courage, for you are young and conceited. Experience lics in waiting for you on the high road. Con- quer it, or it will conquer you, and if it does, it may rob you of Courage. But if you conquer it, it will serve you faithfully. Do you see the path ahead? lt leads to the future. Now begone: I am a busy person." The Sophomore arose from the second milestone. The path lay before, winding through the morning mist, a thin streak of silver on the hill. He strode bravely forward, humming: "And courage never to submit or yield, And what is else, not to be overcome." "Surely," he cried, "having this, no Experience can take it from me." And he set out on the path of his Junior Year. MARY CARSON '27, 'fr' .. gL Qrfyg-2 !!! Eighty-nine x 1lQQjjQfjQ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q1iQ1 Qi Qhp Kggpylmfg 1QjjQjjQ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q1jQjjQjjQ1jQjjQjjQQ1QjiQj1Qi0 f Q Q 1' if 0 :QI v Q 9 .0. 9 10I " Lvl 10, Qoj Z'Q lei .0, foj 'QI 'Q' 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 ' 9. ' 141 ' Lvl ' 102 ' 202 ' 102 ' If ' 102 ' IQ ' I6 ' 102 ' 101 Q 'Q' 0 Q 0 0 0 0 ' ,0. ' Lvl 0 ioj Q ... ,.. Q i0f Q QOI Q 102 Q lvl ' 5 : O 9. 5. : First Row: Lair, Walker, Fallon. Eccles, Brannock. 'Q' Second Row: Kebler. Mitchell, Schwartz, Schumacher, " 101 Q .QA L01 ioi Q03 if 1 ,Q . , Q 3,Q SOPHOMORE BOY'S ATHLETICS .5 , I The athletic record of the class of '27 is one to be envied. The Sophomore I I basketball team won the class tournament easily. Henry Schumacher CCapt.j gig E and Eston Schwartz were guards, Joe Walker and George Fallon were forwards, Z and Dick Mitchell played center. The substitutes were: Wyman Eccles, Charles I Brannock, Leland Lair, Justa Kebler, and Arthur Mosher. I The first game played by the champions was with the Seniors. Dick "- Mitchell and Joe Walker kept the scoreboard going and displayed some brilliant ' ' ,Ol 9. ... Q . . . . L03 Qzj passing for the iirst game. The second game was with the Juniors. This game gzg 9 : : 5:1 was a very close one, but the Sophomores managed to come out on top by Eve it points. ln the game with the Freshmen the Sophomores won an easy victory, ' this giving them the championship. if ' : : I The Sophomore team challenged the faculty to a game. Mr. Dvorak, .Q. Q Coach Walker, Coach Pulliam, Mr. Bickel, and Mr. Scranton represented the gtg 9 . : : 2 faculty. In a spirited contest, featured by the brilliant playing of Coach Walker Q. ' for the faculty, the Sophomores triumphed. 2'Z 9 :.: I The Sophomores took third in the inter-class track meet. The Seniors won I over the Sophomores by one point for second place, the Juniors taking first. The 2:3 ' 3. 1 class of '27 was well represented on the varsity track team by Henry Schumacher, I EQ Johnathan Peters, Wellington Towner, Glen Dunkle, and Wayne Miller, Lf HENRY SCHUMACHER '27. gg, im, pf, WQZQIHQQQIQIIO vQQQQoQoQooooooooeooojjojoj ,jojjojoooooQQQQQQQQQQoQoQQojjoj1Qj1QjB nioi1oi1QZo Q o o Q o o wits 4::o1:o:1i:o::o::o::v::Q:: Elle TKUHPIIIZIYQ zo:Zozo:niforio::+I10::ozio::otzo::oizo::oiiofio::o::o:to2:o:nlQ,f"'7n2EB First Row: Green, Bechtold, Colvin, Carson, Polk, Stephens, Horn, Royer, Habermeyer. Setond Row: Fulmer, Coffman, Gordon, Carman, Collins. Lohman, Shuman. SOPHOMORE GIRLS' ATHLETICS The girls' athletic record of the Class of '27 in the Freshman year was not very good. This year, however, we have shown some improvements. Quite a number of Sophomore girls came out for basketball. Those who made the team were: Dorothy Green, forward: Edna Polk, forward: Catherine Colvin, forward: Lillian Wilson, center: Byne Lohman, center: Grace Bechtold, guard: Mary Carson CCapt.j, guard, and Marguerite Stephens, guard. The second team consisted of Ethel Royer fCapt.j, forward: Ellen Horn, forward: Mildred Schuman, forward: Marianna Collins, center: Audley Fulmer, guard: Hazel Gordon, guard, and Louise Coffman, guard. They took second place in the second team tournament. The first team fared poorly: it tied with the Freshmen for third place. In the inter-class track meet we won 22 points, taking third place. The track team was made up of Dorothy Green CCapt.J, Ethel Royer, Ellen Horn, Bernice Davidson, Marie Anderson, and Margaret Besore. While not many Sophomores came out for swimming, the team won second place in the inter-class swimming meet. It consisted of Grace Bechtold CCapt.j , Josephine McCoy, Hazel Gordon, Ruth Cranmer, and Ruth Habermeyer. At the time that this is being written the Sophomore baseball team is still a thing of the future. Much is expected of it, considering the fact that we won the baseball championship last year. We hope to do much more as Juniors, for there is some very promising athletic material in the Class of '27. MARY CARSON '27, .Yinvijl ur wlLf0fi0ff0f.9 O 0 0 9 0 0 0 O Of IO: 102102 if iff' 9 0 0 9 02102 iff 1 g E 5 Zfiviidlvl102102102Zvi10210216102102lvl102Zvi102103102I0IZvII0I10I1oI1Q21QZil6'X n1oLioi'oiivio11oZio1'oj,v21o2io3'o'101Zviioiiviiowllviivlloiiv Gln: lgugfllluflx iojgoj1.35.11.101543iagjcjjojjojjoiifjfoipi1Q1ieijojifj1Q1jojjo1I Ns ' K af 42 if 2.1 O ig' 2 1 , . Q, L.: 'QI :.: T01 1.1 'O' 2.1 3.1 'O' -gl 3 : . 3. T: 'O' 5 : : ,.. i 1 .Q 2,1 102 :': IQ '.' 3: 2,1 :Q .9. 19: : 1 :'1 'O' Ag. : : . 1 Q. Q. 1 W 9. Q'l 'J ,I . . :Q Q. Q' ,.: 19: ,'- IQ -.1 3: ig- . . t.: .o, 5 Q? if 31 32 3: '.l 1.1 if 9: 31 5 if if Q92 O O 0 3' O foi 9. :OI if 3: .9. ..f..,,,,, . . . 9. YOI 3: fl Psrannock Reece Dewey ,Q io. Q. if Pl Q, 9. If 91 IO' f0f Q02 fC. Q92 fvf Q01 QQ' B' ge si , . T '21 SOPHOMORE DEBATE if ,, O .. .S 9. , . IQ 102 2:2 The question for the debating tryouts for the Class of '27 was: "Resolved, Z.: V. That the students of Urbana, High School should be arranged according to their 1.1 9. . . 6 . . , ability." Only a few Sophomores tried out. and the following survived the cuts: ffl .5 . , O Milton Dewey, William Richards, Florence Reece, and Charles Brannock as if .9 9. if alternate. V ,Q O O if The debate with the Freshmen was on the question: "Resolved, That capi- tal punishment should be abolished in the State of Illinois by statute." The if Freshmen chose to take the affirmative and the Sophomores the negative. After ffj Q: several postponements they finally met in debate, each side doing its best to win a gtg 0. .Q if victory for its class. As luck would have it, the Freshmen won, three to nothing. 9. ... 9. . . I: Nevertheless, the Sophomores were good losers and hoped the team next year I would make a better record for the class. 1. FLoRENCE REECE '27, .11 YO. 102 10 10. If 102 101 101 141 102 10. 10, ,Q .5 f X in . ru f U10ii9Qi9 o Q 101IQ3214.,Oll0I.Oll4QI01Q0QI0II0.l0QI0lIOI Q Q3 I0lI01l0I :oi 1 Ll 2 5 110.0 Q 4 Q Q Q Q o Q o w.:o1io:1og:w:1o1Qo:to1go3Lo11o::o':v1u f'-Zip' I 1 1 1 f ,--4--.-f , -+ J' ftgfcr' L T 4 J + +' 5.1! Q-it Jia! ,..,l..ff ,ff L-N", -A-'K fjl --4. ' N -'22 F...-Zi I .J-...V I fi ,xx if f- xg .-,,.2..4 1 J -,.,.A...., amid 'ff' I-4 if gl ' Y Qi , f 3 455g i f 5f 5 i Qagq 7 - 5,37 4 17fiwi fx' f 23 iw gg :f f . af u 1, . Q5 f-xg'v 4 swf' X. 'af-V :fi-f -?: f g flf sgfgi 2212 .fa N N-G i "1-3q fx: fif '. f 43X L: J "eg-lgifg , ' S- X7 'V I ' ' ff ' "" 7' ,ff 'A lw f E15 .1 'BSQJQDIIQ 0 do of o' o o Q 'o Q 0 o o 0' o Q 'o fo, 0, LL111' 1-Kl1gil'1lIL1I'!I .Q 0.0.0, 0..0..0..0 0..0,,9,.0,0,,0 0.9.,0,0 0 0 9-'UQI' k 4 1 'Q 1 9- T Q 4 Q 0, Q o V, Q Q' Q. , ': ov ' Q oh .. Q ,' ', Q Q .' 'z RQ o ,V ' o ' o ' o '. Q ' o '. 0 ': o ' Q 'Q 4 ' o Q, 0 ' o ' Q ': Q 'f o ' o ' o ' 0 ' 0 ' o Q- ,' 4 o' Q Q o Q' Q V5 o o cn 0 Q 4C 0 0 ,.l Q Q U o Q o C Z O I Fu Q Q 2 o o Q: 0 Q QA Q Q ul Q 0 M o Q F-14 0 Q o O ml O Q m Q Q F" Q O O Q Q Q o 0 4 Q Q Q o o Q Q o Q o 0 no Q o Q Q Q Q o 4 o Q' 4 o o o Q Q O Q O O Q Q Q o o 9' 9 9 Q 4' o o O Q Q o Q Q Q' Q 'Q Q o o Q Q 9 9 O O O O Q Q Q Q , .Q - Q9 K3 - Q 'gs L gf, l ,w , qw Q Q Q Q 0 Q Q Q Q Q Q QQ Q Q Q Q Q 9.16 bi'0,0,.0,0, 151, J 5QI0QQ0.0I..0'.0..0 1.11.0 Q10 0,10 'v Zvi' viiv.,v'0.0 rv Mfggko mba Q' 31914 Q Q Q Q Q Q 0ff0If0II9fI0II9I 202102Zv21v2I0ZIv210Z1v1Z+110Z U11 p IK 11 gpnm 1-11 gQg gQg gQg QQQ gQg gQ3 gQ3 gQ3 gQ3 QQ3 1011010210: xi :Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 1166 FRESHMEN CLASS OFFICERS President LOUISE HOLMES Vice-President FRANCES ALLEN A Secretary LEONARD PICKETT Treasurer WINI FRED HAVEN Historian MARGARET HARRIS Echo Representative GLEN MORRIS Class Adviser AGNES NELSON ? 144 MM? f X l f K K Qhfauv 0 0 0 Q 011103103102Zvi103101iojiojicjoliejlomiioiioiio OIIOIIOI 1525 f0ffO::0:fOfi0 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q gQg1Qg1QjgQ3gQgpjgQ Q Q Q Q Q Qngjsg MQW!!!1162232121102IGIIOIIOIIOIKIIOIIDIQIIH Eh? mngpmafg IOIIOIIOIIGIEHKIIGDIIOIKIIOIDIINIIDIIDIHI History of the Class of '28 In September of 1924 two hundred seventy green and gawky Freshmen, lately from the banks of the "Boneyard," Wended their weary way toward the tall and stately building, the Urbana High School. With many misgivings and faltering footsteps they entered the halls of the school toward which they had been looking for so long. Everything seemed so strange and new, but with the assistance of the upper-classmen, who in like circumstances always so lovingly and tenderly look after the interests of such needy creatures, the babes in knowl- edge soon struggled to their feet and elected the following officers for their Fresh- man year: President . . . LOUISE HOLMES Vice-President . . FRANCES ALLEN Secretary . . . LEONARD PICKETT Treasurer . . . WINIERED HAVEN H is'torz'an . . . . MARGARET HARRIS Echo Representative . . . . GLEN MORRIS Class Adviser ...... AGNES NELSON Great interest was shown in basketball. The girls' team, organized by Miss Carman, consisted of Louise Holmes CCapt.U, center: Blanch Veach, forwardg Elizabeth Hudson, forward: Anastasia Hudson, guard, and Marue Stockwell, guard. Margaret Harris and Marjorie Pierce served as substitutes. The boys' team was composed of Robert Taylor CCapt.j, center: Jack Sowers, forward: Thomas Fallon, forward: Roy Brown, guard, and Russell Wilson, guard. Wayne Orr and Orville Vandervort served as substitutes. The debating team was made up of Merle Sanders, Merle Hopson, Thomas Adams, and Lessly Carmichael Calternatej . They defeated the Sophomores, and Merle Hopson won a place on the varsity debating team, a feat that a Freshman seldom accomplishes. Thomas Adams, one of the best debaters, moved away, very much to the sorrow of the class. The Junior debaters, by virtue of their defeat over the Seniors, debated the Freshman team for the class championship. The Freshman team, in a two-to- one victory, won the coveted championship. The class stunt was a sensational little pantomine, entitled "Wild Nell." It evidently pleased the audience, but did not meet the approval of the judges. The class party was very successful. It was planned by Miss Nelson, Miss McClurg, and Miss Carman. In the inter-class swimming meet Marjorie Pierce was chosen captain, and the girls captured eleven points. ln the inter-class track meet, which was for both girls and boys, the Freshmen captured fifty-two points, the girls winning twenty-two of these. After a year spent under the influence of the upper-classmen, their childish ways have gone. Next year they will enter as Sophomores. Without regret, they leave behind their Freshman year, full of fun and hard work. MARGARET HARRIS '28, N iHl'f!l'Nl'.l' 1 102162010210232102IQIGIIGIIGIOIIGNIXIIIQHIIQIC921021611 UEIOIIGIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIKIIQDIIDIIQKIIOIIKIIOI1021021 wh? Kngpmarq IOIIOIKIDI102SOIIi!WHNNKIHEKIKIDIKIKIKIKIIW First Row: Brown. Taylor, Sewers, Vlilson. Second Row: Fallon. Orr. Vandervort. FRESHMAN BOYS' ATHLETICS The Class of '28 showed up well this year. In the class basketball tourna- ment we placed third, handing the Seniors a 25-to-12 defeat. We were beaten by the Juniors and the champion Sophomores. The members of the team were Robert Taylor CCapt.j, Roy Brown, Russel Wilson, Thomas Fallon, Jack Sowers, Wayne Orr, and Orville Vandervort. On the swimming team we were represented by Clark Root and Lessley Carmichael. In the class track meet we didn't do well, as was expected. The girls made most of the points. Marion Foltz is the Freshman representative on the varsity track team. On the whole, the Class of '28 will bear Watching, and in another year we hope to "show our stuff" to the other classes. BOB TAYLOR '28. Nirrvfy A-www: wal!!!IIOIIOIDIIOIIOII102IQIOIIOIDIKIIGIGl3If0IIOffOIIOIIOfICf 13291101IQIojiojidbiiiyyblDJMZGZOZMIIQIMEIDIHU uZ0IZ0Zi0Ii0210I10210 0 0110220210120110210210Z10I10Z10Z10Z10Z10I Q hp IK 11 5 pmaflg 101 KI 103 103 jog 103 go 0 Q aj 143 103 :ag jog fvf 1.1 pg pg 103 103 jog jojnQ,7YS IG , """ "' Q01 Z1 i if 14 i sp :J IQ I C iii 'Q' I0i 'C :OI :oz 102 ? 1 .6 121 10: :ol 91 V :Q :ai IG :oi KI 5.1 .Z 5.1 I.: 10: . . ,,. gf 5.2 20: A -.A : : Y 'Q' 9. g 1 ... 2.1 vo. . . .Q .0, If 102 32 2.1 2.2 E+? 20: 10: 10: - - .Q 9, 9. 0 : : -.1 ,,. .Q 'Q' bl :.: ,Q 4 0 .0. g :Oi - - r.: if ' ' 10: j .. 1 bl :Q E 101, .f ,,,,,,,,Y,,, , l 3- . , z.: First Row: Harris, Stockwell. Allen, Hudson, Veach. Hudson, Riley, Swartz, -0- Second Row: McPherson, Bevis, Dodge, Carman, Pierce, Pierce, Beard. :.: 1 'V 102 FRESHMAN GIRLS' ATHLETICS .0, U l ,Q ... :Q The Freshman girls made a good record the lirst year for themselves in all gc -.f . , -'A branches of athletics, especially basketball. The team and a few substitutes were 5, -.1 . , picked from about forty girls who came out for practice. Louise Holmes, who T played center, was elected captain, with Blanche Veach and Elizabeth Hudson as A if forwards and Marjorie Pierce as substitute. Anastasia Hudson, Marue Stock- -g well, and Frances Allen held positions as guards. The first team won a game w from the Sophomores, and the second team a game from the Seniors. Although they did well they are expecting to do still better next season. Among the Freshman girls interested in basketball there were also many Q :Q who were interested in swimming and track. There were several girls who came ri : 1 9. .Z out for swimming. The team was made up of Blanche Veach, Dorothy Beard. ,0. -Q 0. - . Louise Holmes, Marjorie Pierce, Ruth Taborn, and Vera Loudon. They elected 2 I '5 ... Marjorie Pierce as their captain. Although they did not receive first place, they 2:5 10: It tied with the Juniors for third. 1,3 9. 101 Q. ic The saying is, "It is better to have loved and lost than never to have loved 3.3 at all." So it is with the Freshman-it is better to have tried and failed than ff: fi never to have tried. Those on the track team were Elizabeth Hudson, Anastasia rf: ,f . . .IA Hudson, Sina Bevis, Blanche Veach, Dorothy Watson, Marue Stockwell, Gene- .Q vieve Hays, Ruth Davis, Mable Jones, and Elda McPherson. In the girls' part Q. O 2:2 of the track meet we took first place, beating the Juniors by one point. 1:1 5 FRANCES ALLEN '28. it ' 1 f 1Xrfn'Iyw'lfI K u10ZI0I101Z0iZ0ZI0Z10Z10Zi0 0 9 0Z101102102102102C0210 0 0 0 20210119101 1 g 2 5 IOIIOIIOIIOIIO 0 9 0 9 0 0 9 0 0 0 I0Z10Z10210IZ0I10Z10Z10 0Z10i10iU QSL9u1oijvjjvjjo Q 0 Q Q Q 4 Q Q Q Q Q o 031.2102321421021 Glu iK115P111in'1I jojiojgo Q 43jojgojjojjojjojjojjojiqjojiojjojjoiioijojjojjojjojnQ,"Q'22 Hcpson Carmichael Sanders RRESHMEN DEBATE About Hfty Freshmen answered the call for tryouts in class debating. The lucky ones who made the team were Merle Sanders, Merl Hopson, and Thomas Adams, with Leslie Carmichael as alternate. The Hrst debate was against the Sophomores. The question was, "Should capital punishment be abolished in the United States?" The Freshmen took the aflirmative and the Sophomores the negative. The Freshmen were victorious by a score of three to nothing. As a result of the Freshman-Sophomore debate, the Freshmen met the Junior team for the class championship. Both teams had very short notice of the debate, so had little time for preparation. Thomas Adams moved from Urbana and Robert Hanchion took his place on the team. The Junior team was composed of Hazel Mosier, Edgar Bennett, and Emma Jane Shepherd. The question was, "Resolved, That the United States should grant immediate independence to the Philippine Islands." The Juniors defended the aflirmative and the Freshmen the negative. The debate was closely contested, but the final decision was two to one in favor of the negative. Thus the Freshmen were class champions for the year 1925. The class was also represented on the varsity debating team. MERL HOPSON ,28. rnw'f nm X ,f K gfauioiioiiv Q o 0 Q o Q v 4 Q 4 0 0 0 v 0 Q 0 Q 4 0 0 njivj' 192 5 1010710 4 0 0 v viIf10110111102IojjvjiojivljvjlejifidZOIZQZQIIQZIQJJGYPQ niozzozzozzvzzoz:vzzoizozzozzoziozzozzozzoxzoz:o::o::.::.::.::.::.: E119 iknnemtlrg 1.19::e:x:Q::o:x:s::o:m:zo:zo:zozzozzoziozzozzexzzeyl fprogram For Commencement Piano Duet-Lingalshohle - F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy DORIS AND DOROTHY SCHEIB Invocation REV.. CHARLES S. PIER Salutatory DOROTHY KERN Statistics HERTHA BOWMAN Class History BEATRICE SLOAN Vocal Solo-The Two Grenadiers - Schuman JOHN BERESEORD Class Will MILDRED WATERBURY Flute Solo-The Whirlwind LAWRENCE BINYON Prophecy ZACK MARTIN Vocal Solo--Lo! Hear the Gentle Lark - Sir Henry R. Bishop NELL MCDONOUGH Hatchet Oration WILL ARD MONOHON Junior Response BETTY MITCHELL Piano Solo ---- Beethoven PATTY BRENNAN Valedictory ARTHUR LLOYD Alliance Chapter D. A. R. Prize CAROLINE J. GLOVER Presentation of Diplomas JUDGE R. C. FREEMAN Benediction REV. CHARLES S. PIER One Hu ml red Qga IDI 31 203 101 101 101 1C 101 102 143 101 101 202 31 101 101 101 102 101 102 101 1 g E 5 32 32 31 K1 lol C01 101 31 C01 101 P1 101 K1 11 102 202 101 101 ZOZI 3' Nui' 41 Q 'lx q , A A M. run IN! ll IY 1 vi IW , f fax 1 -xtsyj x Q xgxfqzfjxly Lxulnmf n64.Aafe1lQ.!lM all? ,... - J 'lf-'ff' .,1.1f':,'f.,. 5 , 'szglfut 'VJ .ff , . -.,,. , ,,. f -'.'a' '27.'. -f- . 1:2 b. ffnka f",1!vz-I 'y' 1 ::: 4 P O-2'-L.: fa '-' '-"K, ' ,.-"Q.. -Z.:-fl.-'fi :: -.x-Elffifl3'l"x,'24ff-X'V.1a"' :.-23''.'r'-:fF?f- as X, .-,, , ... rf. CNS' - L " ':':"3' 3-' :EE X v!:" rgifffv "5 "WF, 2:55 v' -- J . 1 '-t:f'f -'i'-:Alfa-P-1,.-1 7222 N. : 5 .- Q : ., . 51, - ---In " '-j-.-,-21'-ij? - -QQ, f ff C PQ ifvg r6 'I--L-t-1:-fs-:A na: .4-'J .xg UL w 'I - ' - " '.-ff."-f'.'.".: 1:11 E " ' '.: ' ' f 4 -J - 15Q2':a:.-. EEE? ' ' 'irlzff T 7 1 ' . 'V :ff.2'5fi"5'i'i' I-'fl ' EE? - A-PJ-ffl,-I'-I-fnj-f-1'QI -:E-'-' iff? J -' " Kwan LI? :av " :EEE 5 1 .Q-9 .5-.1 1- 11:1 . -A ' fi L ' ' 'f IEEE 5.,A :'i,f,:':z1:' villa .1 -zfff' Qmiii v-3:5 1.21: 217 Hua .x"f'. . -' . K A f 2 "iff-. ".'41'.1u,"-J:J:.',': 1. - V X 'ag-fp'l".' ' 1' - -, 2 I. lr V .. . .- Q -nw: -. 4.71. 1 Q ':L:1.u', A - f-f D 'X - 1.1 X ..-.?4--:-l Jr' 'X NNN. J Y"v- 1 -Q 'Zi' V -- .np -az 3 , Q 1 'Ju-IN vw xw Wy 1 ww W 1, ' 1 1"'X"""X ' " " UTE TUHE ps: Q2 IGI Q01 fi Q o Q 0 Q 0 0 0 0 0 O o 0 Q Q 0 0 0 0 Q 9 9 0 .0. 102 CO1 142 31 bi 9. -Q ,.. O O O O 0 O O 0 O 0 6 9 O O 6 O O 0 0 O 0 O O O 0 0 0 O 6 0 O 0 9. IGI 101 Q02 31 IOI 3. o Q o o o Q Q o 0 o 4 0 o 9 o Q o 102 IOT I01 1 m9i9Uf'ff'ff'if' 0 r ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 0 Oiiozazioztei Uhr EKLIEPIIIUYQ 101:41ieioizoiMaisto:ww:103:03:.::o:ro::o:x::o::o:zHlQ,'MD fG71e Spmng ONG TOM woke with a start at a heavy jolt of the wagon. He lay Wal, weakly on his blankets, hearing, as in a dream, the voices of the drivers ' '4' A as they urged on the oxen. Strong-shouldered beasts those oxen, yet they were floundering, knee-deep, in the drifting white sands of the .ffl desert. The sun, a pitiless, brazen sun, beat down upon men and animals. Its heat was so intolerable that Long Tom raised his hand as if to curse it: then, feeling a surge of pain, he sank back into a world of black- ening shadows. A sense of utter hopelessness swept over him. Three months of weary traveling had brought the little caravan to the rim of Salt Lake Desert: three more plodding months of such progress were neces- sary before they might see the Sierra Nevadas, and these must be reached before the first heavy snow fall. The last several miles had been strewn with the bleach- ing bones of men and animals that had died from disease, from lack of food and water. Sand and burning sun, misery and death-they plodded on despite them, with the vision of an Eldorado before their eyes. These were the men of '49, doomed by their avarice, but grand in their courage. However, to Long Tom, scarred and weakened by scurvy, the doom seemed impending, while the grandeur was hidden. Not, he reflected, that he feared for himself, for he was a man, even in his weakness: but this desert was no place for a pale, pretty slip of a girl like Ellen. He cursed himself heartily that he must ever be thinking of Ellen: yet she would mingle most strangely in his dreams: and before his mind was always a picture, the picture of a little White house, with a little stone walk, and red geraniums, and Ellen at the window. The wagon stopped with a sudden lurch. Long Tom, listening intently, heard the buzz of men's voices. They gradually became fainter, and for a While there was silence. Raising the flap of the door, he perceived that, without apparent reason, the caravan had halted and that most of the men had gathered together some distance away, as though in solemn conference. The captain of the caravan, large, powerful and dark-browed, was talking rapidly, and gesticu- lating with great earnestness. Tom raised the flap a little higher, and thoroughly alert, listened with every muscle in his body. And yet he heard nothing. Sud- denly felt the touch of a hand on his shoulder, and turning around with a start beheld Ellen. He could feel the dim radiance of her hair, and his pale features flushed, for he saw that she was weeping. He pushed the dark locks from his thin, handsome face, and cried, astonished, "Miss Ellen!" "Be quiet," she said. "I have come to tell you, to warn you. If you knew, I thought perhaps you could save yourself." "Save myself! But from what? I don't understand." "They've reached a spring. Captain says the provisions are getting low, and the oxen are worn out. Two of them have scurvy now. We have to cross this desert in several days and make El Reno soon, for you know that we can get food and fresh animals there. But a sick man slows the journey and the men are desperate-and now a spring!" Long Tom looked up, still not comprehending. "fDon't you-can't you understand what can happen to a man with the scurvy when the captain hates him-and the men, the cowards, are crazy with fear? Why, they'd cast off their own fathers to make El Reno sooner! What happened to Timber-what did they do to Big Joe?" "You mean that they are going to leave me here in this desert, and go on- and let me die?" H Um' Illrmlf' 'il I uw: mwguiojIoj102102IQIQIIQIIOIIOIIOIIOIIO 0 0 O 9 0 0 0 O 9 0210241101101 1 H 2 5 2102IOIIOI10210219210219210119110210210132102191102102102HDIKIIOIIOIIOIKIIGW 032311021020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0,9IIOIIi Clip mggpmgfg 1011021020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 QIQMIQIJQQQ Ellen nodded. She bowed her head and sobbed. "What will you do? What can we do?" "I do not know-they are insane with fear. I do not know." He sat up and thoughtfully rocked to and fro. Then his face lit up. "And you came to tell me! and you are crying! Why do you cry?" She said riothnig, but looked at him: and an expressive look it must have been, for he drew her to him ever so gently. "I will not die out here. No, not all the captains in the world can make mel" he cried. "For so long as I love you?-" "Tom," she cried, "they have come." The tent flap toward the rear of the wagon was raised. The captain and several of the men entered, bowed to the "Young Leddy," and silently ap- proached Tom, before whom they stood for a moment, embarrassed. Then a tall, pale Englishman, his voice of a pecularily cold and gentle firmness, said: "I wouldn't be surprised if the young lady has already informed you of our-of our-" I "She has," said Tom. "I know. And I have to believe. But I didn't think you could be so heartless to a comrade!" No one replied, and Tom sank back after a despairing look at their sullen, determined faces. A dizzy faintness seized him, a half-dreaming state, in which he could feel that they were carrying him out, out, for the first time in weeks, into the open air. Now they were laying him by the spring, the spring that meant death to him, as a place where he might be conscientiously cast off. His brain cleared a little as he remembered how, for miles, he had prayed for a spring: then, it was a symbol of hope, perhaps healing: now, death. To die-at the longed-for spring, the only spring in miles. Then-his mind caught the phrase "the only spring in miles." A subtle hope flashed in his head-hope that was born of an idea. Opening his eyes, he wearily looked up. Men, women and children had assembled together, waiting to bid him goodbye. For they loved Long Tom-loved him for his handsome face, his ready wit, his careless courage. With not a few tears, they left him--all but the men-they were not to leave yet, for the time had come to make use of his idea. "Boys," he said plaintively, "you wouldn't allow an old comrade to die out here, undefended and starving. At least give me some food and a gun, and build a blockade to protect me from wild animals." He saw that they were touched, and continued: "Do this, for the friendship you bear me, and some other caravan may come along and pick me up." They consulted a little. Then they brought him some provisions, and because they really loved him, they gave him his gun, and built him a little fort around the spring. With a rough tenderness they bade him farewell and slowly left. He waited until the nearest was ten paces from the fort, and summoning all his strength, lifted his gun and cried, "Hands up!" They wheeled around in astonishment. One of them, the tall Englishman, cried out, "Drop that gun, you fool!" and advanced toward the fort. Tom pulled the trigger-a puff of smoke went up from it. The Englishman tottered and stifily dropped. A small rivulet of blood flowing from his head clotted the fine white sand. His companions were struck motionless with consternation, for though they were ten, yet not one among them was carrying a gun. They stood silent, their faces blanched, and Tom, his tortured body drawn to its full height, knew him- self master. "Now, men," he cried, "the next one that moves-I shoot. You Olll' Uumlfwl Thru w5lIOIIOZIOIIO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CIC! 1 1102110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 602510110jQ0j1oj10jQ0jf0j10jU6w IIQIIZIQNQ 0 Q 0 Q Q Q Q o Q o o 0 0 N102 E112 mnnymafg will stay here, you will just camp here until you promise to take me all the rest of the journey. And if you wait till I give in, till I consent to be meat for the buzzards, you'll waste a long time waiting. And you know that I can hold out the longer, for remember-this fort surrounds the only spring in miles!" Long Tom was leaning over the wagon seat, plying a stick to the oxen. He ran his hand idly through the locks of the little young girl by his side, and pointing to the distant and gleaming summits of the Sierra Nevadas, he quoted in dreamy fashion, "A little white house, and a little stone walk, and red geraniums-and you." MARY CARSON '27, Flower Souls I wonder-what is a soul? Perhaps a flower, A white moonflower, Maybe the soul of one NVho loved the night In all its silent beauty. Might not the blood red poppy Be the soul of one Who lived and loved, And in loving died, Leaving its flaming emblem, That all the world might know? The waxen lily, white and fair Is mayhap the spirit Of a maiden lovely, Pure and holy, This way leaving to the world A symbol of her faith. Flower souls, I call them- But the heart within that soul Is always Love: Then they surely must be love souls, And being so, - A soul is Love! MARIE BUSEY '25, Um' H IIVIH mul Four Qgfalioiididfiiieiioiiollo Oi:OffbifOliQfO:fQ!!!3fUf!1!!! 1 i!!IfC!i0ffC!f9ilQf9fiQ!MKIYHHIIIQDICIOIHI NOIZQIQIQ o Q Q Q o o o Q Q QIQIQKIKTKIIHHDZ' ah? mU5PmEI1'g 0 0 O 0 0 0 Le Loup Ga 4.9 T was a dull, humid afternoon and as I rode on my dangerous errand If fl. through the wastes of northeastern Canada, I had foreboding thoughts as to the outcome of my excursion and was wondering what false will- ",g 'Q' o-wisp had drawn me from my luxurious life in Boston to this un- ,lfi-W, requited labor. My companion spoke but little and that in abrupt sentences. He had a thick-set figure, slightly over the average height, and his clothes and actions had the general aspect of a clergyman save for his burning black eyes under thick black eyebrows. I had met him at the last town, Le Singe, thirty miles back where I had halted for the night for thelast time before reaching my destination. He was traveling, he said, all day and all night in order to reach the next town in which he was a minister of the gospel. "What may a handsome lad like you be doing in this turbulous country?" he asked suddenly. "I am in search," I replied glibly, "of a relative who has inherited some money." "I thought you might be one of those foolish detectives." "Why foolish?" I asked, my pride in my growing fame as a detective somewhat piqued. "Because of their practice of sending one man to cope with Le Loup's desperate colony." ' I B "By the way," I asked, "is not their stronghold in this vicinity?" "We will pass near there at night fall," he replied, "and I advise you to ride on with me instead of camping." "No," I replied, "my horse is weariedf' He shrugged his broad shoulders and fell silent again and thus we rode for the remainder of the afternoon. It was twilight when we entered one end of a narrow valley, and the few decayed trees cast sullen shadows from the ghostly, half-clouded moon. Here I reined my horse and the clergyman, bidding me a short good-night, turned and moved up a steep path, the only exit to the valley. Instead of camping I rode slowly down the valley, sketching as complete a map as I could by moonlight, and finally came upon an immense ancient manor house, dark and dilapidated. This and its surroundings I also sketched. Working up my courage I dismounted and leading my horse, approached, passing by an old stable. Without warning I was seized from behind by three powerful assail- ants. While struggling I managed to slip the map in a saddle strap and to give the horse a dig in the leg with my spur. As he galloped off something crashed on my head and I sank into oblivion. I awoke sick and weak. Turning my head I gazed on the loveliest creature I had ever seen. A lithe, slender girl of about twenty years, clad in a short, bright plaid dress with a broad black belt about her hips. Her golden red hair fell loosely to her waist and her features were beautiful, almost Grecian, while large, violet eyes sparkled with life. Instantly forgetting my pain I spoke to her. She said her name was Marie Dupont and commanded me to remain quiet. One Humlrffl Fi yfauxzimnnnuusnunnoebihi1925:sysonnunuooiexsxzxxyxbll G59nw:io:fo::+I:otze:1.31.3L.:io::Qt1.3:Qiioiimiiozaziozfoziozzc Gig Kugplirarq 10:Lo::epicio::oz:Qzo::o::o::oizoizot1:e:Qm::o::o::e:enQ7Q She nursed me for two days until I was able to walk and then two dark bearded men came to conduct me to their leader. They were dressed in tight trousers, brightly colored shirts exposing the neck and chest, and plaid sashes. I was ushered through a number of apartments along the walls of which were stacks of all varieties of weapons. Sullen looking men and women were sitting about long tables eating, and as I passed, they cast smoldering glances at me. Finally I entered a small room and found myself facing the bandit, Le Loup, celebrated for his daring and cruelty. He was my clergyman companion. On seeing my surprise he smiled and said, "Please do not be conventional and ask what this outrage means or demand to be set free immediately." As I did not reply he continued, "You will remember the duty of a guest to respect his host's property. That is all." I was then led to an apartment of two rooms with heavily barred windows, stone walls, and two thick oaken doors. One was a room exactly like my own, although furnished more comfortably. Here, also a prisoner, was Marie Dupont. A month passed and our jailer took no notice of us. We had fallen passionately in love. Marie told me that her father had belonged to this gang and when he had died or had been murdered they had kept her a prisoner, although they hated her, for fear of her knowledge of them. Then one dreary evening as Marie and I were conversing, the door was thrown open and Le Loup and a knot of followers, both men and women. stood in the doorway. He smiled grimly and, without giving us time to speak. ordered four men to bind us. We were then picked up roughly and carried to an open court yard where I could see low hung clouds and hear sullen mutters of distant thunder. I shuddered as I saw at one end of the court a tall stake surrounded by piles of fagots. To this Marie was bound in spite of my struggles and cries of protest, and the test of the colony surged out of the various doors and gathered around with hoarse laughs and jeers. The fagots were lit and my raving and cursing and my loved one's piteous cries were drowned in their wild cheers. Hardly had the flames consumed their victim when there was a loud report of a cannon and a crash as a shell demolished a turret of the manor. I knew that the end of the bandit gang had come. This interruption turned the attention of the devils to me. Le Loup, knowingthat his reign was ended, and suspecting that I was the cause of his misfortune, sprang towards me with a cry of rage. His huge hands encircled my throat. I choked, gasped. tugged at my boards. The world turned black and flashes of flame pierced the darkness. Then suddenly, above the ringing in my ears, I heard an angry commotion, the grip on my throatvrelaxed, my bonds were cut, and I sank unconscious to the ground. A I opened my eyes to ind my chief bending over me. "We got your map, boy." he explained, "but thought you were dead, or we would have come sooner." Other figures crowded around congratulating me on my de- liverance, but I turned from them. Life held little sweetness for me, for they were too late to save Marie. JAMES COBLE U 11' llurull ml .N :,r' M1191IGii!ffl1911101101102lil192:Oliffl101102i0If0fi0fi0ff0If0ff0if0f 1 g 2 L1 lf0IfQIQf91f91f0If0I10f101101021911101101101fQf9ili0If0ff9ffOff0ff0fKIBQHN x,9u:c1o::o:s o o Q Q o o oziewzxzezozio o o o cite? E119 mU5Pmii1'Q iozxxzzozo o o v o o o::o:s:xm::cyxwyJlQl7f5 CBea twice 1 She was a paean of most perfect grace And I, beholding her,-more fair to me Than some white temple gleaming by the sea- Marvelled upon the beauty of her face. Soft starlight lay entangled in her hair, And in her dreaming eyes and mystic smiles The holiness of dim cathedral aisles,- Not Dante's Beatrice was half so fair. Surely, I mused, she is some old-world saint That, having wearied of her niche of stone Hath, sighing, yearned toward life: hath left her throne The chastity thereof, the cold restraint, And, radiant of visions, waked to bless This world with her surpassing loveliness. MARY CARSON '2 7. Stealing Watermelons - It was September. The moonbeams danced in silvery lines along the rippling surface of the water. We were floating slowly down the stream, softly singing old love songs to the strumming guitar. The croak of the frogs and the chirp of the crickets helped with the accompaniment. What romance was in the air: how our hearts tingled with the thrill of youth! But we were young, and could not go on singing forever. Four girls as ambitious as we desired some excitement, some daring adventure. Finally we thought of a plan. Old Father Jones had forbidden all campers to trespass on his land, especially his watermelon patch. How brave we were to attempt stealing a choice fruit from the dear old man! We floated quietly down the stream keeping close to the bank until we came to the patch. We tied the boat to the rushes, and after stealthily weaving our way through the tall weeds and grasses quickly climbed over the fence. So far luck had been with us, no one had made a noise and no one had been caught on the fence. The greater task, however, still remained before us. The tangled vines hindered our progress. As we proceeded on our hands and knees toward the center of the patch we examined all the melons in the vicinity and chose the largest and ripest one. Two of us, after some exertion, started off with our trophy. I-low sneaking we felt, how daring we were! The stars mocked us and the breezes shamed us, but we had gone too far to turn back now. Then out of the stillness some one shouted, "HaltI" The poor melon crashed to the ground in pieces. My knees shook violently as I turned to see a dark Hgure rising from the ground. Something long and narrow glistened in the moonlight. I knew it was old Father Jones with his gun. Helen and Um' Hum1f'+'1l Nl'i'l'?1 QQEDIKIIIOIIQIOQ :Oi :Oi fOii9ifiifif!i9iiOi :Oi f0ii9ii9i 10216592591 1 H 2 5 ifififiifii9ii0if9i!ffi3i!Dii9ii9:i9iif why mngkmafg Gertrude stood there as if stuck to the ground. June fell sobbing and crying. As for me, I must have been white with fear, and I wondered how long my weakened legs would support me. But the kind old farmer must have known we were girls, for he ordered us to leave at once, threatening to shoot us if we didn't hurry. Somehow we got June on her feet and over the fence. Somehow we got into our boat and started for home in hot haste. XVe failed to see the beauty and romance of the Indian summer evening on our return trip. Frightened and ashamed, we resolved silently to steal no more watermelons. That night I dreamed of our poor broken treasure, lying there in a heap among the vines. Lois NICHOLS '28. Cparting Thoughts The sun from the west is sending Its last long gleams of red, The trees of the school ground are blending Their purple branches o'er head. The lake lies dusty in shadow: The lilacs lavish perfume: From afar in the distant meadow, All sounds seem to blend in life's loom. A thought softly comes at day's endingg With a feeling of sadness, we find That we'll leave, when our Way we are wending, A bit of our hearts behind. FRANCES SHROYER '25, Um' H11 ll1il'1'lI Eight' I!!H32IKIIHIICIGIKIIGIGIOIEIG2025IOIIOIIOIIOIIOI 1 5 G32IOIDIIOIICICIQPIHIOIIOIIO!CO2IOIIOIIQDIDIIOIIOIIOIIOI Uhf mUHPmafg IOIIQIIOI10210210210210232IfIIIDIIOIIOIIOIIOIKIIOIIGIQ O4unt Tabitha Whatever I do, and whatever I say Aunt Tabitha tells me that isn't the way: When she was a girl forty summers ago Aunt Tabitha tells me they never did so. Dear Aunt! If I only could take her advice! But I like my own way and ind it so nice! And besides, I forget the things I am told: . But they will come back to me-when I am old. If a youth passes by, it may happen no doubt I-Ie may chance to look in, as I chance to look out, She would never endure an inpertinent stare It is horrid, she says, and I mustn't sit there. A walk in the moonlight has pleasures, I own, But it isn't quite safe to be walking alone So I take a lad's arm-just for safety, you know: But Aunt Tabitha tells me they didn't do so. How wicked we are, and how good they were then, They kept at arm's length those detestable men What an era of virtue she lived in! But Stay- Were the men all such rogues in Aunt Tabitha's day? If the men were so wicked, I'll ask my papa How he dared to propose to my darling mama, Was he like the rest of them? Goodness who knows! And what shall I say if a wretch should propose. I am thinking if Aunt knew so little of sin What a wonder Aunt Tabitha's aunt must have been! And her grand aunt-it scares me-how shockingly sad That we girls of today are so frightfully bad. I A martyr will save us, and nothing else can Let me perish to rescue some wretched young man Though when to the altar a victim I go ,Aunt Tabitha will tell me she never did so. MARTHA Bocos. '25. Om' I1 ll mlrml X1 IfDIIOQKIIOIIQKKIIIif1021111159102IOIICICIOIII IIOIICIPIIOIIQIff!ICIOIICIXNIDIIKIHHKHHKI u:Q::Q::Q::Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q::Q::e: Ehp Kngpnmrq :Q::Q Q Q Q:s::Q::Q::Q::Q::Q::Q::Q::Q:xQ Q Q:s::Q::Q::Q:nQ7EQD X . U Justice decapitated skeleton was found in a shallow grave near here. The bones were slightly charred and only the heel of a boot or shoe and some buttons remained of its clothing. Evidently the body had been , burned in a forest ire which occured here last fall. The skeleton was uncovered by Clarence Henderson while cleaning some new ground. The man had been, according to the coroner, well over six feet tall." A slight, dark, rather nervous man about thirty years old read this paragraph in the "Scranton News" and a slow, forced, smile that would have made an observer feel that intangible fear which the bravest will not confess. showed on his face and then it faded away. Slowly an expression of thought- fulness came over his countenance. All things come to him who waits: he had waited and it had come to him, the one chance that comes to all men. No more would he have to take the jibes of larger, stronger men. No longer need he do hard work and feel the pounding of his weak heart in his frail body. Never again would the big timber boss bawl him out if the beans were not cooked right. P He had stumbled into the lumber camp half starved. To pay for lzis meals he had to work. The cook had left camp, and since he wasn't strong enough to work with the timber gang, he, although inexperienced, was made cook. For two weeks he drove himself to work, hard grilling work. Cooking for a timber gang is not easy and the hours are long: one meal at daybreak, one at high noon, and one at dusk. He was not used to hard work and at times his heart beat queerly. The curses of the timber gang and of the over- bearing boss fell dully on his ears. They seemed not to know he was not a professional cook. One Sunday morning the boss squeezed his bulky body into the cook shack and yelled, "Grub, Cookie!" "Grub at 7:00 on sunday. Nuthin' ready before then," answered Cookie. "I want grub!" "There's nuthin' ready!" "Why in-lhaint there?" the boss bellowed. At that he grabbed the small Cookie in his great, scoop-like hands and pitched him into a corner as one would an old rag. And like a rag he lay where he fell, his heart flutter- ing, almost ceasing to beat. Through his mind, keeping time with the flutter- ing of his heart, ran the words, "Get even, get even." For the next month the same words came over and over to his mind and gleams of hate like electric sparks leaped up in his eyes. Many times he could have used his long knife in the broad back of his boss, and always he kept it sharp as a razor. But how could he escape the gang of lumber jacks? Some of the gang was always around. How would he gain his living after the deed was done? He had no means of sustenance, and he seemed always to be grow- ing weaker. Saturday would be pay day. On Friday the boss always went for the pay roll because he trusted no one else. Every one was Hup timber" this Friday except, of course, the cook. Just after the noon "grub pile," after the lumber jacks had gone back to work, Cookie, glancing up, saw the boss walking up the trail toward the camp. Lfn-.N Q.. M., -2114 rtvllhtl an ij. u -at-f gs vs f ur' Ilumlfwl len fwfagjqjqjQggQjgQjgQ11Q11Q31Q3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Qggqy 1925 QQQQQQQ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q QjQjjq3ggil 010210110110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0101101101 any mngpnlarq 1510110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0j10jI0j102!IQ:Ka Around his waist, under his unbuttoned coat, was the "bank," a S6000 pay roll. The very sight of the boss filled him with hatred. The little inward voice whispered, "Get even, get even," and to his mind leaped the fact that the boss was alone, that he would come to the cook shack for a bite to eat and a chance to torment the helpless Cookie. If only he had a means of livelihood! Suddenly he started. Wasn't the pay roll on the boss? He reached for his long, razor-edged knife and crept behind the door, waiting, tense, in the shadow. :af if ik nk In the edge of the forest the figure of a man dragging a heavy burden could have been seen. He dug a shallow hole and dumped in his burden, cov- ering it with dry leaves and small branches. Then he took a can, poured part of its contents on the heap and scattered the rest around among the trees. He lighted a match, threw it on the heap and became one of the shadows of the forest. In a few minutes a forest fire was well under way. xr :of sf sf His dreams ended and with the smile of a conquerer, he walked to a small table, pulled out a drawer and lifted some loose papers. Beneath them lay a can- vas money belt. He let his fingers linger fondly over the belt, threw back his shoulders. and took a deep breath. Suddenly his hand flew to his chest, he swayed, gasping for breath and sank slowly to the floor. an -ff ak af "The body of a strange man was found in a room of the hotel here late yesterday morning. Some old papers and a canvas money belt containing a large sum were found in the room. No means of identification were found." -Bellflower Record . MINNIE WELLS '25. fGfze Knight gf fRomance 4 Enid Stratton sat with her sewing in her lap. Her eyes were straying from her work to the forest which she could see from her window. From here her knight would come riding at any time and her hours of dreaming be over at last. On the morrow she would ride away as the wife of her Knight of Romance. Now she was finishing the last touches of the lovely gown she had made all by herself for the most important day of her life. Into the dress she had sown many, many dreams of her knight. Into these finishing stitches were the thoughts of his journey to her castle this very day and of the many encounters he might have to meet. From time to time Enid glanced out of the window to see if she might detect in the forest before her castle. the red plume of her Knight of Romance and his guards. No sign of her lover could be seen so she sewed faithfully on her dress and dreamed of the time she would really be his. Suddenly she was awakened from her dreams by three sudden blasts of a trumpet. Immediately her heart answered with loud throbs for she well knew the significance of these three blasts. She intently watched for the coming of her Knight through the forest, but instead of seeing him ride through on his worthy steed and with a red plume waving in the breeze, she noticed that the line of knights wavered. Evidently some one else had heard the three blasts too-surely there wouldn't be a battle between the Knights of Tragedy f - Onr llumlnfl 131414 M9101 101 102 10' '0' '0' '0 0 '6000'0'0'0''0"0''0''0"0"0"0"0"OIfOI10f 1 H 2 5 1210110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0"0''0"0'1011QQQQQjQj0jf0jy10jf0jylJ6w 0101321010ooooooooooooooodiibli Eh? mggpmgfq jojjojooooooooooQoaoooiI3I!llQ and Romance before her very eyes! What if he were killed the day before her wedding and she helplessly watching from above in her tower. The only way Enid could distinguish her Knight of Romance was by his red plume and his blue black horse. I-le was being driven back now for she couldn't see his plume any longer. The combat would be more of a struggle than she had thought. She was no longer interested in the other knights, but only in the two leaders. The Knight of Tragedy was much larger and rode on a steed of gray. while her Knight rode on a steed of black, and also he was known far and wide for his fame as a marksman, They rode up face to face with the gray against the black. A clash of swords: the combat was on! The first blow was hidden in a cloud of dust. The horses were whirled about and the swords sounded again- the black horse with the red plume faltered-oh! Enid was in perfect agony-would it fall? No! The Knight of Romance had been able to whirl his steed around suddenly and when the gray steed turned-with one swift blow the saddle girth of the gray horse fell to the ground. But soon the Knight of Tragedy was on his feet, not yet willing to surrender. True to the ideals of Knighthood the Knight of Romance jumped from his horse. It was such a confusing combat that Enid could scarcely detect one from the other, but she could see that it was a real struggle-they faltered. Now the Knight of Romance was in a dangerous position. He must turn his head for if he didn't--she dared not think of that or even watch to see if he did turn. A second passed but to Enid it seemed as if it were hours. She looked-fate had spared her knight! If only there was some way she could send out knights to help him. This was responded to as if by magic power. A line of knights rode forth from the castle and immediately took the followers of the Knight of Tragedy prisoners. But the Knight of Romance faltered and fell. He had been injured! She must rush down to meet her lover who had fought so bravely for her love. But oh! how sad it was to see him being carried wounded to her castle instead of riding triumphantly to declare his love. The question whether or not she should rush down to greet him lingered on her mind. Oh! how much she wanted to-but should she? Oh! should she? Enid decided that nothing mattered only that she and her Knight of Ro- mance were united. But suddenly- she was aroused by the sound of a bell and a humdrum of voices. Back to earth her dreams and aircastles fell and her Knight of Romance, who faithfully fought for her love, had faded in Carle Park. Enid had failed to finish her dress as she had wanted to. Glancing around her, the lonely tower of her castle was now the sewing room, on the third floor, with all the girls busily putting away their sewing too. Conse- quently Enid went down from her tower to greet her Knight of Romance in other dreams. LOUISE STILL '25. Um' llunrlrrfll T1I'4'l1'1' wal102IOS92IOIIQIOZZOZIOZIQZOZVO 0 4 O 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 O!! 1 102101110 Q o o o o 9 o o o Q Q Q 0 o o Q o o QQQIQQQQJJ Q!'L9n1o::o:1o::o o v Q 0 0 0 v 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 + 0:11031 E119 ?Kfl5P11IHfg yay. Q Q Q Q Q 4 4 Q Q Q Q qyyp3p3pgpg1lQjQ The CDrama Egg, AWN came. But. it brought no cheer, or no brightening in the dull, leaden sky. A faint glow in the east barely lightened the murky gloom of the Northern woods. To the hunting animals it meant only an- other short period of food-search: to the hunted it marked only an- other chapter in their daily struggle for existence. And yet to Wahtik, the porcupine, it meant little, for he was the neutral power of the timberlands, not being a meat-eater, nor was his kind often eaten, for their spiny quills protected them from natural enemies. Squeaking and muttering like a fussy old man he crawled down from his night's perch in a tall fir. From its base he proceeded across the snow to his breakfast of a few clusters of half-buried pine cones. He was gnawing complacently at a cone when a light footfall behind him caused him to curl instantly into an impenetrable mass of bristling points. Out of the corner of his eye he saw a tufted lynx poised for a blow, and he squawked and grumbled with invitation and he lashed out with his armed tail but the great cat stood at a safe distance. Whatik kept this pose until he thought that the hungry lynx had gone. Then he slowly began to straighten himself out. A lightening slash from the expectantly waiting cat was his only reward, and he peevishly drew himself into his de- fensive attitude. Long hours he kept at his waiting game of life and death, until at last he heard the disappointed cat stalk silently away. With many squeaks and side glances he uncurled and finished his breakfast. This finished, he ambled off on a tour of his favorite rounds, up among the rocks and scrub- growth of an irregular hillside. Wahtik was just topping a rocky ridge when he heard a menacing snarl. He instantaneously drew himself up: but after a moment discovered that he was not to be a principal but a spectator in the next tragedy of the gloomy forest. The selfsame lynx who had earlier menaced the porcupine had evidently been passing this way and had gotten wind of a rare find indeed. In crossing the rocky gully he had smelled a wolf's den, and his accurate and sensitive nose told him that the pups had been left undefended. After a little cautious reconnoitering he had, it seemed, eaten the entire litter and was on the point of leaving when he was discovered by the mother, who was returning with a white rock-ptarmigan in her mouth, She wasted no time. Her instinct and intellect told her that here was the despoiler of her family, and giving vent to a vicious. crying snarl, she leaped for her foe. It was this cry of mother-love and vengeance which the porcupine had heard, and he now settled down to watch this everyday tragedy of the timberland. The wild barbaric beauty of the scene, the lightning flashes of greed, hunger, love, and vengeance were alike wasted on Wahtik. He merely watched because there was nothing left to do, possibly it might be interesting. The old she-wolf spent no time in fruitless maneuvering, but came instantly to grip with her dreaded enemy. The lynx's short powerful hind feet, armed with curved, heavy talons did terrible work as he, true to heritage, sought to disembowel his adversary. But the fangs of the old wolf scored deeply and often about his throat, always seeking the jugular, ever missing. The lynx was fast winning the combat when, by chance, or fate, his foot slipped, momentarily throwing him off balance. A leap, a slash, Om' Ufmflrwrl Ilfiwlf-1 Efalkibjlojido 4 0 o o o o o o o o Q o o Q Q o Q 0 Q Q12 19 Zdjojjojo o o o Q Q o o o o''vjqyyyypjypjgjgqjpj'gg ayy:Q::e:c:Q::e:Q:Q Q Q Q:Q:m::Q::Q::e:Q 0102102 Uhr, ilngpmgrg :Q::Q3x Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 63255132920 and the tide had turned. Here on the bloody snow and spattered rocks lay the great cat, long a tyrant of the valley, and on the other, lay the she-wolf, near death from grievous wounds. The mother arose, staggered into the cave, and fell to licking the last of the litter, a tiny little fellow who was lodged in a crevice of the wall and had been overlooked. Entirely unaffected, Wahtik turned and waddled away, mumbling and muttering, for such is the code of the North-"Eat or be eaten, kill or be killed"-the byword and the mainplot of his everyday life, as well as the tragic drama he had so listelessly witnessed. RAY WEBBER '26, Adventures Little Adventure It seemed hopeless for a while but as in a popular song-"Life and Love Seem Even Sweeter After the Storm," I can't criticize Lil because the same thing might have happened to anyone. Lil's my wife and a mighty fine one at that. She manages to pay the apartment rent and for the "three squares" out of my two hundred a month, and that's saying a lot. It is Lil's usual custom to put the bi-monthly one hundred dollars in a magazine and to take it out as it is needed. Last month I brought her two twenty-lives and five tens and so she put it in an Adventure magazine and put the magazine in the buffet drawer. The next day I was startled out of a spring fever doze by the ringing of the telephone. I never heard so much suspense, horror, and sorrow, all at once in a voice than was in the voice that was at the other end of the wire. It was Lil and between sobs, which she was trying mightily to suppress, I could make out that, "The Adventure with the money in it was gone." I couldn't grasp what she meant so I told her I'd get off early and come home as soon as possible. When I got home she managed to tell me through her tears that she had gone to the grocery and had taken a ten out, leaving the magazine with the money in it on the table, intending to put the change in it when she got home, and then put it back in the drawer. When she returned she forgot about the change and went about "straightening up" the rooms. She gathered up the old magazines and papers and put them in the garbage can. Somehow that Adventure magazine got among them! You know how things like that will happen. When she thought of the money she got the change and was going to put it with the rest of the money, when she saw that the magazine wasn't where she left it. Her first thoughts were that somebody had entered the apartment and had stolen the money, magazine and all. That was when she called me. In between time she thought of how she had disposed of the old magazines and saw the possibilities of the Adventure being among them. To her dismay she found the janitor had come and emptied the garbage can. Then I came home. The iirst thing I did was to rush to the basement to ask the janitor what he had done with the garbage. I-Ie said he separated the garbage, sold the len Una' Hullrlrlvl Fulfr f Qgarv:4:Q::e:Q:ze:Q::e:Q::em::Q::Q::Q:s::en:ewiezezmmz 1925 1xxxzm::Q:a::Q::QQsz:ewmxmzm:s::Q::Q::e:Qzl IIOI102102ICEIQIKKIIQIOIHIOIIOI2021633325131 Eh? BIIHPIIIBIIII magazines and papers, and burned the rest. It seemed as thought the junk man was in the alley right then, loading the papers in his wagon. I hurried out into the alley and the junkman had just started on. I called him back and explained the situation to him. At first he was rather reluctant to have me undo all the magazines and papers but when I showed him a five-spot it was all right with him. And say, if you ever had to go through about a thousand magazines, picking a few of the wanted variety, you will know what a task it was. There were thirty-seven Adventure magazines 'in that bunch. And as luck would have it on page thirty of the third magazine I had looked through was the ninety dollars. I tell you when I had that money in my hands I could have hugged that junkman, but I didn't. The look Lil gave me and that kiss was worth twice as much as what I had spent on retrieving the money. "You great, big masterful man, I be- lieve you could do anything." Then she sat down and had her cry out. Here- after I notice Lil doesn't put money in a magazine but makes a "bee line" for the bank and we use a checking account. PAUL COURTNEY '25. . The Wild Rose Bowl Many years ago in far away Austria, near the city of Vienna, lived little Marie. She lived in an old store house surrounded by meadows, through which a little stream flowed. In summertime the meadows were covered with beautiful white linen, for her father was a linen bleacher. Marie's parents were frugal German people, and Marie's principal food was bread and milk which she ate from a pretty blue and white bowl. Times changed, Marie's people, as they had lost a great part of their wealth, decided to emigrate to the wonderful, golden America. So at Ham- burg they embarked in a big sailing vessel to the land of their dreams. They took a few of their possessions with them, among them the pretty blue and white bowl from which Marie still ate her frugal meal. Many days were they tossed about on the big ocean by winds and storms, but arrived at last at Quebec, from whence they came to the United States. Years have passed. Marie's mother has gone to her eternal rest. Marie is an old, old woman. A few days ago she gave to her granddaughter the bowl from which she had eaten when a child. The granddaughter exclaimed at the beauty of the coloring and the perfect pictures of the wild roses adorning the bowl. In turning it over, she read this inscription, "Royal Bonn, Wild Rose l755." It is one of the rarest bowls in existence and of which only a few exist. The bowl is now exhibited with great pride. ELIZABETH LINDSEY '26. Um' Hzlrlrirwl Fiflrrn IIHIQIGIOIIQIGIQENIZIOIH3102IQIIQIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOI Eh? BUHPMMQ DZIMEIMZQIIZOZZGielieiivliolididyxllbm Mathew.' Mathew.' Y, ATI-IEW! What is the matter? You'll shake that newspaper to pieces 0 'f if you jerk it 'round much more." V At the sound of his wife's voice, Mathew Dobbins shot a quick QAVQ glance at his spouse from the corner of his eye, cleared his throat Y N and settled himself for the sixth time in his chair. "Nothing, nothing. th matter with me. Did John put the cat out? Thought I heard ,. 9 . it in the kitchen." "There you go again! Every time someone says something you give them the most idiotic answer, and whenever anyone comes near you, you fidget around and move away from 'em quicker 'n you've moved for a good many years. The cat's over to Aunt Mary's since last week, and you know it." "Well, what if I did know it? A man can't remember everything a fool cat does-he's got other things to think about." "Yes, and goodness knows you're thinkin' about 'em, too." Matthew settled himself again with a grunt, shook his paper, and began sympathizing with himself. "Hang women, anyway! You can't keep a thing from 'em. If Sarah knew what he had." Here his hand stole down to his side, and, coming in contact with his buldged pocket, he uttered a sigh of momentary relief. "Well, why shouldn't he buy hair restorer if he wanted to? There wasn't any reason why he should get bald-headed yet-bad enough to be gray. If Sarah'd only leave him to himself a minute he'd have time to hide the stuff someplace." 'iMatthew." This time Mrs. Dobbins' voice was a little gentler. " 'Tain't rheumatism, is it?" Rheumatism! A man at his age having rheumatism-you'd think to hear her talk, that fifty-five years was seventy-five. Well, he'd have her to know he was still young. "No, 'tain't rheumatismf' he snapped, "nor I ain't got a cold comin' on nor a fever or anything else. I feel like I was twenty-five 'stead of fifty-live, and I'm feeling younger every minute." At this moment the telephone rang and as soon as Matthew saw his wife leave the room to answer it, he hopped up out of his chair, and up the stairs as quickly as he could. He rushed to his room and yanked out one of his dresser drawers, pulled the bulky package out of his pocket. shoved it in among his socks, slammed the drawer shut, hurried down the steps and was back in his chair again fully two minutes before his wife got back from the telephone. When she came in, however, Matthew was still puffing a little, so he raised his paper in front of him so Mrs. Dobbins wouldn't notice his rapid breathing. But Mrs. Dobbins didn't need to see her husband to know he was panting: she could hear him. Neither did she need to see him go upstairs to know that he had done so-Matthew Dobbins was no fairy, and when he moved around it certainly didn't take a mind reader to be aware of the fact. So, from these facts and from her husband's earlier actions, Mrs. Dobbins gleaned that Matthew "had something up his sleeve" she wasn't supposed to know anything about. And when Mrs. Dobbins began to let up with her questioning, Matthew grew more at ease and the evening passed with Mr. Dobbins having a satisfied feeling of having "put something over." Uni' Humlrrfl Sfrfeen Qffalibliilivl32102202ZQIGZOZZGIOIZGQIQIIOIIOIZOZZQDIZOIIOI102112611 210132IHIOIICKIKIKIYKIIPIIOIPIPIMKIKIFIIOIESIOII uxzszw:o:x:emm:s:m::o:z:eww Uhr Rngpmm-g The next week when Mrs, Dobbins was putting Mr. Dobbins' clean socks away she noticed a loud pink jar in the drawer. She took it out, read the label, unscrewed the top and sniffed at the contents, screwed the top back and, putting the jar back in the drawer, smiled and shook her head. Then she went to her own dresser, opened a drawer, took out a puprle box labeled "Beauty Clay," and as she stood there looking at it, she began to laugh, for she knew that even as the "Beauty Clay" had disappeared and her wrinkles had remained, so would the "Hair Restorer" disappear and Matthew Dobbins' hair continue to fall out. VERNA DAILEY '26, I .1 i A Windy Street Corner She was pacing to and fro, tearing her hair, biting her nails, weeping bitter tears, Why, oh, why, didn't he come? He was now thirty minutes late-yet he had sent no word, neither had he come to her. He had run off, left her, eloped with another girl, gotten killed, broken his leg, been knocked senseless, been put in jail or what not?' She wept and bawled and boo-hooed, but to no avail. While she con- tinued to carry on in this manner, he-her lover, her husband-to-be-was hurrying from the court house with an envelope in his hand containing the marriage license. He turned the corner. Just then a gust of Wind swept down the street, blowing dust in his eyes and likewise the letter from his hand. There it went, flippity, floppity, down the street and right into an open manhole. What would he do-only thirty minutes to be married and catch the train! Otherwise he would be caught-yes, because her folks and his, too, would be on the wise and his chances gone forever! His first thought was to return for another license, but no, the oflice would be closed: so without further meditation he jumped down into the manhole to try to get his letter which was floating around on the muddy waters in the bottom. After much diving here and there, he proceeded to get it, but what good is a letter containing a marriage license to a man trying to climb out of a manhole? A cop passing by saw the uncovered hole, and, thinking some rascal had left it open on purpose, put the lid on and walked on without having noticed our hero trying to get out. What could be worse? Here he was, shut in a dirty, muddy manhole which had water in it. He yelled and shouted until he was exhausted. Sud- denly, to his delight, he saw daylight. A colored street cleaner, having heard peculiar noises, lifted up the lid and peered in. "Lord a massey-do youh stuff, feet," screamed the colored street cleaner as he dropped everything and tore down the street. Such a strange coincidence attracted a large crowd, who at last proceeded to pull out our hero with his license from the nocturnal depths. Once again on dry land, our husband-to-be dashed' off to the minister's to be married to his darling, his sweet dove, his dearest, his honey-bunch, whom we have seen waiting for her dearly beloved. He rushed in, handed the license to the parson-but she, his dove, was dovish no more. Fire blazed in her eyes as she saw him, muddy, dirty and dripping. With an indignant, haughty stare she left. This was the end of their elopement, VIRGINIA VEALE '25, One Hundred Serenlve IIDIIOIIOIIGIQIQICD QXKHIGIGICIGIICICHD 0 oi!! 1 5 GIGHICIXNIKIGCQIGIQIGKIHHI u1Q::e:Q:Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Ellie Enuemarg Q Q Q Q Girl Shy KU HE fellows laughed at Speed's shyness of girls. They called him Speed because he departed from a restaurant in all manner of haste one eve- ning, leaving his strawberry shortcake to the astonished young lady who had sat down opposite him, This incident suggested an idea to . 15 his friend Bill, who immediately put it into effect. "Say, old woman hater," said Bill upon meeting Bill one evennig. "I'm going to get you a date." "Go ahead: see if I care," said Speed, not taking his friend seriously, as usual. The next day Bill informed Speed that the date was made for that evening, and that he had also made a date, in order to save Speed the embarrassment of trying to talk to the young lady in case they happened to be alone. Speed at first thought his friend was joking: when he realized that Bill was in earnest, he acted as though the very thought of it scared him to death. He offered five dollars and expenses to any fellow in the house who would substitute for him: he made promises of treats, shows, everything. Nobody would take his date off his hands-they were having too good a time laughing at his anxiety. When he was finally convinced that escape was impossible, he prepared for the worst. He had his suit pressed, bought three new collars, and two new ties, and spent all afternoon getting ready. When the fatal moment of departure came, he shook hands with everybody, including the landlady, and said good-bye to all as though he intended never to return. Speed and Bill went for the girls together. When the young ladies came in answer to their call Speed's terror increased, His only acknowledgment of the introduction was a stiff bow--he couldn't talk. At the theater conversa- tion wasn't necessary, and Speed was thankful. He replied to the young lady's remarks. Soon Speed began to feel more at ease, she did talk interestingly and had evidently realized his plight, and tried to make it as easy for him as she could. Realizing this. he made up his mind to talk. After the show they went to a crowded confectionery, and Speed started talking. He made a supreme effort to control himself, and would have succeeded had he not accidentally tipped over a chair upon getting up from the table. This started a rapid flow of words which he could not stop, because he thought he would faint with embarrassment if he did. However, again the young lady tried to help him, and soon he was quite at ease again. When the two boys were alone Bill laughed long and hearty. 'Poor old fellow," he said sympathetically. "Well, it was awful at times, but I'm glad I went. I didn't have any idea a girl would pass over anything as dumb as my tipping over that chair, and still be nice to a fellow. She was a good sport." ILA MCPHERSON '26, Une Humlreil Eiyhlfzfn 'Q!QfQfffKfIKQQ0Q6OOOOOOO!!!1g25i!yx3'999.99999999999999:9iI:fl ...--ALM HEHME 1' y1.v.4.4 7 v -., . Jw- . r, -fy' 1 --f' :gui-gq-: r- ga-55,-gf nr' ' " ' ' ' 1234122 i 'mf ,.v 1 1 Tia1hf,g'13:1I fu-jl.rYi'7I: ,.1-541' 53 ,iff ' ' I-' I':',?. 5 ts 31- ' 1 -,. .- -X, ..- -hg,-X 4 9 1"i:f .1 -wx .. I A ,:1a:,Q,. f Wifi ' f, aw . Y. K. t ' NT c':4'5 ,QL 6 I .. x iff! T Es. 1241" 552 Aw- .IA'Z I, 'Egg rj '- .' 1- . 'N r gig? .wg F' 2 ig.-w ew: 72,141 iff: ,515 f I ,I , .All . 1 x .eq Wh , 254' .3-'-1 lf! 01ojIojjojjojjojQ01jojfojjojjqjojfojfojjojIojjojjojjojiojfojfojftj Eh? 5-Ku gp 11131111 101102102Q02IOIIGIICIIOIIOIKI5242102C01202fOII0IfOI3II0If0If0IB 1 I IOI 9. 5 101 ... .,. fof , . 3. Z: I f O 2.1 fbl li if If If V 102 .Q V 'OA 3: : : . . .Q 9. SOI .,. 2.2 w . . , ai v I 1 9. .6 .6 Zi fo: if 52 7.1 ,0- 2.1 i I b. 3. 0 7,2 Q1 V fvf IGI 102 .6 ,.. fof I I 192 102 :Of I.: .6 K: C01 bl if 102 C02 - - 3- Hamilton Hopson Mosher Leutwiler ,.. W 2.2 fo? :oi 'C 'OI Toi I . fo: 52 if 9: 9. .'. v Affirmative Debating Team The affirmative team has been very successful this year. They have won ,Q two debates and both teams placed second in the A'Little Twelve." The ques- tion for both debates was: 'AResolved, That Congress should authorize the im- 3. mediate construction of the Great Lakes-Mississippi Deep Waterway." Through QQ Q, O QQ the double victory with Champaign High School, both the affirmative and nega- if O Q . . 'O' 'Q' tive teams qualified for the finals in the 'Little Twelve." The affirmative man- :J ii '.- aged to defeat Springield by a score of two to one, but the negative team lost at Peoria. The results of the triangular debate placed Peoria first. Urbana second, ,.. .. 2,1 and Springfield third. Mrs. Hamilton, the debating coach, deserves highest :'1 ,. .2 ,. ,G :': praise for her work in training the teams. -- .o. .. gtg The affirmative team was composed of Merle Hopson, Arthur Mosher, and 221 Lester Leutwiler, with Emma Jane Shepherd as alternate. 1:1 'v 3.5 I I 1.3 LESTER LEUTWILER '25, 52 .,. .. . . .o. if 19: .Q ... fd Zi Ii to: I 7 .1 ',q Z.: 2'1 7.1 2.1 ' ' . . joj Za A Il 0 1' I1 rflltlfwl .X iru'Iw'n i1o1103101LvlLvlLvllv:Zvi12102lollvllvl101102142ldZviZOZIQIOZIQJLOJZQLQJZQ 1 ,g 2 5 l102IOIIOIIOQQ0110''OI102102DI1921911210102101101101IOIQOIQOIICIIOIIOIICIW ULv1ioiiv2v 4 ozioitmzzozfozio Q o Q Q Q + Q vin: Elie IKI1 gpnmrq ioiioiiotzoiioifo Q192102IOIIOiIOIIOIf0QIOff016 Q .1:o::oi:o:al E i if ....... ....... Q2 : : Qoj z.: 101 1.1 'O' .x :of ' foi 0 t Q 1.3 . . 101 ' 102 O '- ' fi O O .Q , O O z.: Q 9. , i.: :Oi fs fo: 1.1 ifi 20: fi z.: 101 2.1 if 9: :of 2.1 iQ' 9: 'oi 0 : : 0 3.1 O z.: 9. :Or 'Ol 7.1 if :': 10: :Oz 'O' Q . . : : Lol Zvi Qoj lol 1oj 192 91 Q02 joj 91 101 Q Q01 io: T 102 101 ............,,, . .. . 1 0 Zvi ii Q02 Dewey Hamilton oliver Bowman 3:2 ... . . it Koi fof 'QI ' ' 5.1 ::: O si if :Of if .Q . . gg Negative Debating Team 1: In the tryouts held for the varsity debating team, the following people if Q: were selected to uphold the negative side of the question: Hertha Bowman, Q Milton Dewey, Theodore Oliver, and Edna Brash Calternateb. Q fi In the first round of the triangular debates the team met the affirmative ' 2.1 team of Champaign on the question: "Resolved That Congress should authorize 515 the immediate construction of a Great Lakes-Mississippi Deep Waterway." 1:1 Champaign asked that the d.ate set for the debate be changed in order to give 1' l 1 I 1 1 a them more time. Although the Urbana teams were ready at the original time. I they generously agreed to the delay. The West Side profited little by the delay, ' 9, 0 ri however, for the well coached Urbana team won an easy 3-to-O victory, thus ' qualifying for the finals for the championship. z The negative went to Peoria for the iinal debate, and was defeated by a E 9, unanimous decision, which surprised no one more than the Peoria debators, who o O ... 3' had not seemed to meet the arguments of the Urbana team. I 1 Urbana, therefore, retired with second place honors in the "Little Twelve" I I Conference. I O p,. TED OLIVER '25, I 9, ,.. I . . 101 fi 102 V ,Of 5 G fl nw llffnilm-,I I mimi K 1 .- Efgbliivl 101 IGI! If 102 IQ Q02 102 0 0 O O 0 0 0 9 0 41101-viivi KIIOIIOI IGI 1 B 2 J 10110110110110101IOIIOI10I10QIOIlOIl9Il0f10210 OI IQ IQ 101 101 Ifl Io OQ10I31l w. MONQHCN 'mg' rff - Xt Y 7 5 UUA TA n w dwg E'?5!.Qi2'1?kg' I 'B A '-1 4 fu M "Lg T .1 ,, ,,. if .- - 2,15 ,VY ,-G? , .ld A .Milf ."' YJ: 3- ivfilxfif , . , fn Pg: ,. .q,'lf'E,1" 4' 'Rfk 'fi 1-if . 4.35 ?-fm! Hx!" 1' -F YF , 1 1..:. 4 y ,-1 miifpf' F?" sffgjl. ,A3.!:L,, as .5181 1 aw , 1.3 ,1- . 35- 4 'zu 1 ' 33.3 i:Y,jc 'Y Af, iff' ' S 1, .fi- I- K X fm" 4 4 55 .1 ,f' .' 1? T :Q 1 ' if 3' Ll? 1 'EELS ' rl. ,YI V Q4 I. v - .F 5 ' .,g -'z Ei" I. Q9 X ,- Q r a...., w N ' au, , 4 1 mnfojjojlojjo Q o Q o o o Q o o o o o o o o ojfoifoj' iKL15pg11g1fU jojjojo o o o 4 o o o o o o Q o o o o o1o1joiI01!lQ:7Q Lefl ro nghl: Martin. Mann, Waterbury, Kelley, Roney, Beresford. Burrows, Monohon, Douglas, Means. lloush, Sloan, Johnson. "A Pair of Sixesu "A Pair of Sixes" was the play chosen to be produced for the benefit of the Echo. On the fifteenth of November, after three weeks of rigid rehearsal, the following cast presented a brilliant performance. George B. Nettleton .....,.,,..i.....,......,..... Willard Monohon T. Boggs Johns ........,...,.....,..,......r.......,,,,..,... Ray Housh Business Partners Krome, their bookkeeper ...r.........i,.....i.r...r John Beresford Sally Parker, their stenographer ........,... Kathryne Burrows Thos. J. Vanderhold, their lawyer ...r.r.......... Otto Martin Tony Toler, their salesman .....r.,.,..... ,.,... K endall Kelly Mr. Applegate ....,.,.............. ......... P orest Roney Ofiice Boy ........... ....... J ames Douglas Shipping Clerk ....... .4.... W ayne Mann Mrs. Nettleton ...r.,.,......i.,..........i... ...,..., M innie Means Florence Cole ......,,.,..4.,..,.........,.,,,...........,.. Beatrice Sloan Coodles, English maid-of-all-work ..4.,. Mildred Waterbury The most outstanding work of the play was the acting of Willard Mono- hon, as one of the cantankerous partners, but everyone was well drilled and excellently fitted for the part he took. Beatrice Sloan spoke her lines in the very manner of the jolly girl she represented, and handled the few dramatic parts of the play with telling force. Mrs. Nettleton, the jealous, nervous wife, was admirably played by Minnie Means. Mildred Waterbury, in the role of a Cockney maid, had the audience laughing from her entrance to her exit. In the first act, the office force played their parts with spirit and vigor, and Krome, Sally Parker, Tony Toler, Jimmie the Office Boy, and Mr. Applegate were all good, The part of the lawyer, the longest of the minor parts, was well handled by Otto Martin. In fact, there is nothing but praise to be said of any of the characters and of the coaching, which made this play one of the best of Miss Johnson's line productions. f Uni' Ilflmlwil 'l'uw'nf,1lfnn K Q2 WU-QOff0f16ffO O 6 '5 'OHOUC 'C 5"O"O"O"O"O''OMCT 'O O 6 QIOIIQI 1 g 2 5 10219: O O O 0 O Q 6 6 0 O o''oj1o1jo11oj9j1ojjoj1oj1ojjojjoj3jjoj3w Ubjiejiojbooooooooooooooooybj alhp Kngpmgfg yyboooooooooooooooebiiojbjl "Seven Keys to Baldpaten ' EVEN KEYS TO BALDP1-XTE," by George M. Cohan, was presented on February 13 in the high school auditorium. This was the fifth annual mid-year play presented under the auspices of the Literary Society. Miss Johnson, the coach, deserves highest praise for the clever , and realistic acting of the production. The whole performance carried out the Urbana High School standard of acting. The story of the play is founded on a bet made by a writer of hair-raising novels that he can produce a novel in twenty-four hours. The two acts are the story he writes. The leading parts, Mary Norton, played by Carrie Jane Barton, and Magee, played by Morgan Hundley, were ably handled and admirably presented. Willard Monohon, as Peters, the half-wit hermit, did the most clever by-play that has been seen in an Urbana High School production. Myra Thornhill, acted by Nell McDonough, presented a most striking and original performance. The two cops were a delightful "Mutt and Jeff" combination. Mr. and Mrs. Quimby were an excellent old couple. The characters of Mrs. Rhodes, Thomas Hayden. John Bland, Chief Kennedy and Lou Max were well presented. Jim Cargan was exceptionally good. 9 'C' U Ol f"I'1'l Y 'nf ? CAST Elijah Quimby ....... ,...,.., . .. ....,..... John Beresford Mrs. Quimby ...,.. ....,. W anda Hamilton John Bland ........ .........,...... O tto Martin Mary Norton ...... Mrs. Rhodes ....,.. Peters, the hermit Lou Max .,.,,,...... Myra Thornhill.. Jim Cargan ...,..... Thomas Hayden.. Chief Kennedy .... , ,,,.. Carrie Jane Barton ,..,.., Mary Thompson Willard Monohon ....,.......... Jesse Miller ......Nell McDonough .,..... Lawrence Binyon ........Charles Johnson ... ....,. ........ T heodore Oliver Owner of the Inn ...... ,.,,,.,.......,,....,....,.. W esley Huss Cops .,......,.......,..... ......I-larold Hurd, Glen Morris Une Humllml Tuvnfll - lEQfQfffflIQ00OOOQOOOOOOOOMMY 251600beeoooooeoooovooooeoool NSU!1021021021111169102102IOIIOIIOIKIICGIZKH' Eh? mUHP1l1E1I'g IIGIKIKI10210216102ICIIIIIKINDIIQRHHI "Peter Pan" . T HAS been a custom in the Urbana High School for the gym classes each year to have a demonstration, but this year, under the auspices of the G. A. A., a Ivlay Fete was given. It Was given on McKinley Field. Thursday, May 7, at 5 o'clock. The story was that of "Peter Pan." Miss Carman and Miss Ricketts worked the story and spirit of "Peter Pan" into the May Fete to make a charming series of dances. Beatrice Sloan, who was chosen by the popular vote of the entire school, made a very charming May Queen. The other characters were: Peter Pan, Helen Tobias, Wendy, Kitty Burrows: John, Verna Dailey: Michael, Ruth Cranmerg the Crocodile, Mildred Ruple: Tinkerbelle, Patty Brennan: Lost Boys, Elizabeth Mason, Janet Woolbert, Elizabeth Hudson, Anastasia Hudson, Doris Scheib and Dorothy Scheib: and Fairies, Barbara Stansfield, Edrie Seward, Anne Cra- thorne, Helen Mumrna, Agnes Griilith, Marjorie St. John, Helen Besore and Elda McPherson. All the girls in the gym classes had parts-some were Indians, some were Pirates, and some were in the May Poles. The committees appointed by Betty Mitchell, president of the G. A. A., Were: General chairman, Marjorie Wilson: business manager, Janet Woolbert: publicity managers, Elizabeth Mason and Patty Brennan: costume managers, Marguerite Stephens and Margaret Haran: property managers, Margaret Moore, Dorothy and Doris Schieb. GL QW rc A L G ' 7? 1? 'F' I ABI! Sf' 61' .U l . -I One Humlrml TIl'P7lf1l'Hll'4' 032102102IQICKIICKIIOIKIDIIOIIOIIOI0 O 0 0 9 Q Eh? Rngpmarg "The Whole Town's Talking" J N April twenty-fourth a group of boys presented as the second annual tQ'g Boys' Stunt Show the play, "The Whole Town's Talking." The performance was very well attended. Although the primary purpose of the stunt show was to entertain, yet the excellent coaching kept the lljffi action from being wholly farcical and the audience was interested in the plot as well as the antics of the six boys who took the parts of women. The cast was: Henry Simmons, a manufacturer ,.i........,.. Charles Johnson Harriet Simmons, his wife ,......,,..,.,..,. Wright Farnsworth Ethel Simmons, their daughter .....,............ Glen Chapman Chester Binney, Simmon's partner ,.,.,.. ,..,.. E d McGrath Letty Lythe, motion picture star .i.,.,,..,.,..,..... Zack Martin Donald Swift, a motion picture director ,..,.... Fred Picknell Roger Shields, a young Chicago blood ....,......... Ray Housh Lila Wilson i...,........,......,..,.............. Maurice Southerland Sally Olis ..,... ,....A,...,....,..............,..,... J oe Williamson Friends of Ethel Annie, a maid ..... .,.....,.,,.i.....i..,....,............. G len Morris Sadie Bloom ,....,. ..,.., J ames Douglass Taxi Driver ....................,..,.,...,....i............... Wesley Huss The "girls" were surprisingly good. Annie was a pert little maid, Mrs. Simmons was a very suspicious wife, Lila and Sally were two pretty young ladies, and Sadie Bloom a very hard-boiled dancing teacher. Ethel was a blush- ing person and quite electrified the audience when she rushed, sobbing, into her mother's arms, or when she had a love scene with Chester. Letty Lythe was every inch a movie-queen, and the high spot in the play was reached when she made love to Chester. The two main men's parts, those of Simmons and Binney were excep- tionally well done, and the dialogues between the two were extremely amusing. Donald Swift and Roger Shields were also well portrayed. Om' HlHllil'1'l'1 Twenty fuur Richard Barrington is engaged to Tot Marvel, IIINIZOIIGIIQMNECOIQIIOIIOIZOIIOIXNKRIDIIOI ml-lp mngpmafg jqiqjojjqyyyypjjqyyyypjyjqjqyjqyyl ll ' .Vi Honor Brfzght The Senior play, "Honor Bright," was presented on May 30 by the fol- lowing cast: Richard Barrington... .. Honor Bright .,.,....... .. Rev. Carton .,..., ..... Rev. Schooley ..,... ,.,. Mrs. Barrington ,.i.. .,.... Mrs. Watts ,..,,...... ..,. Maggie ...,... Carton ........ .... ....Zack Martin Beatrice Sloan .Glen Chapman .George Bateman Marjorie Wilson ....Minnie Means .Robert Seybold .......Neva Bevis Michael ..,.,.,, ...,......... D an Green Bill Drum ,4.....i ...,...,.....,,.. R ay Housh Tot Marvel i.,.., ..,.4 M ildred Waterbury Annie .....4..,.... .,....,, R uth Villars Foster ......., .......,,. R eid Evans Simpson ....... .,..,... D ick Childers Jones ..,......,...,...,.,..,.....,....,...,.....,.,,....... Theodore Oliver a chorus star, and is show- ing her to the family for the first time, It is rather important that his uncle and aunt, Rev. and Mrs. Carton, approve of his future wife. for they are going to make him their heir. But Tot doesn't show up at train time, and sends a mysterious telegram. Honor Bright, a book agent. iust starting out on her career, comes in at this point and in return for a subscription to her set of books agrees to act as substitute for Tot Marvel. The whole familv approve of Honor, and Richard himself admires her very much. Then Tot arrives, an entirely different type of person than Honor. She causes Honor and Richard some very bad moments, but Iinallv Bill Drum. who "knows how to- handle" women and loves Tot. arrives and takes her back with him. The family is told of the deception, but somehow they don't seem to care, since it is pretty certain that Honor Bright will take Tot's place permanently. Much credit must be given to Zack Martin, who played the leading part after only two weeks of preparation. Um' Hzmzlrud T wenly-ji rv ITNIKPIKHIGIGIGNIIHIOIPIIG1'I1'I!l'3!WIIf?IP? 1925 31923192102202102102102NIQDIDIPIIDIDIIIOIIQEKKNKIHU l UIC!!!3165113215102HIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIHI Eh? mngpmafq 32102KIIOIKIIICKIHIKIIDI1631102551153 The Stunt Show HI: Eleventh Annual Stunt Show was held on December fifth this year. CTTQ It consisted of the usual four class stunts. The judges, Chancy Fin- frock Mr. Willis Bloom, Mrs. Scott, Mr. Rovelstad and Mrs. Mikesell, 9 chose the Junior stunt as the best one by a large majority of four 4 4 iii l,i,, ,Qs g. V 4. mam CH RI to one. The Senior stunt consisted of several acts. A feature by Willard Monohon and the Parade of the Wooden Soldiers were the outstanding successes in their performance. The Junior stunt, "Alias Jerry," was a musical comedy and won the prize. This stunt was the best performed of any of the stunts and had a clever plot which centered around Jerry, a young barber, and a fake count. If the Juniors win the prize next year, they will receive the cup awarded for winning .the stunt show for three consecutive years. Th Sophomore stunt was unusual, portraying the story of an animal kingdom. The costumes were especially clever. The entire stunt was given in verse composed by Miss Ricketts. The Freshmen gave a stunt entitled "Wild Nell." The plot was centered about a movie actress. The Freshmen showed promise of winning a prize before their four-year career has ended. The Senior stunt received the one vote and might well be placed second on the list. However, it was generally conceded that the Juniors were the deserving winners. Una' Ilunrlrr'-I Zlzvfnly-s-i.r 5161032021021021632iii!!1103102202ZOZZGZQCOZZGIOIIG1021021025 1 H 2 5 IGIMLOIDIIOEKIIKHIQICIQ101102ICIOIHHIICNICIOISFI 12 E XWIliviiojiviivji-viiiZviIv?ivjiviivjifiiviiviiojldhjiviiviiviivjiolf illngpmafg 1.3jeg3.3jojjo:joj343iojjojfejjejjejgojiojiojiQbZIojfoj:ojjojjojn I lfirsl Row: Brennan XVilkinson, linrnsworth. Denrth, Turner, Hildebrand, Blue, Beresford. Smith. Fears, Johnson, Hardy- man. Hurd. Dvorak. Second Row: Douglas. Judy, Douglas. XVilson, XVhirc, Villart. Mackey. Childers, Holmes, Bantz, McCleur. Chapman, Moore, Third Row. XVard. Cole, Schumacher. XXX-bbci. Oliver, Martin. Houxh. Hurd, XV.1lker. Ryder. The Boys' Glee Club The Boys' Glee Club is composed of about thirty voices. These are chosen by a system of tryouts from the Boys' Chorus. The Glee Club rehearses with the chorus at the regular class period and very seldom rehearses alone. However, the Glee Club made most of the public appearances. Last fall the Boys' Glee Club elected the following officers: President. ..... .r.....,,,....r..,................. J OHN BERESFORD Vice-President ,. . ...... FRED PICKNELL Secretary ...,..r,.,.. ...,. C I-IARLES JOHNSON Treasurer ,.....,...,. ...., R AYMOND HoUsH Sergeant-at-Arms ,..,..., .......,., ..........., L O UIS DOUGLASS The Glee Club made about twenty-five public appearances during the year. The more important of these were the State Teachers' Conference. State Auto- mobile Association. Methodist Church, Rotary Club, Parent-Teachers meeting, the Association of Commerce. They also sang for the radio station of the Uni- versitv of Illinois and at the portable station at the Urbana-Lincoln hotel. The Boys' Glee Club and the Girls' Culee Club gave two concerts in the High School auditorium. The Boys' Chorus entered the musical contest at Charleston and tied for second place. The most notable achievement of the year was the winning of first place in the Boys' Glee Club division at the Springfield musical meet. The Boys' Cilee Club has just finished a very successful season, Aside from the enjoyment the fellows get out of singing. they have received excellent training under the able leadership of Mr. Dvorak. CHARLES JOHNSON '26. lin' llffmliffl Ifff'nl,fii1l1f wUf0II0iI4II0iI0iIIf4f101IQQ92IfIOIIOI102102Iifif0II0iI0II0fI0II0jfOIfQ 1 H 2 5 Qoj 103 :aj .og jx goj jog jf go: jog jog pop pg jog gag jog Q91 jog jeg 3.3 103 jo: gy goj goj 311.16259 I Q!i9nto:102:02ioziozzoisi103:02Zo:zo::szzmzyxzxtzezoz:Q::.::o:: E119 iKn5pnmrg zo:sz:QiZo:zo:rozzozsxxixzxixzx:x1:o:x:a:x:o::o::o:nQi'KQ First Row: Green, Lincicome. Blaisdell. Habermeyer, Busey. Tipton, Langhoff, McDonough, Brennan, Means, England, Critzer. Brescc, Hill, Marr, Yantis. Serond Row: Thomson, Douglas, Jones, Harris, Colvin, Slater, Scheib, Moore, Schumacher, Sloan. Scheib, Losh, Shroyer, Holmes. HufTcr. Third Row: Dvomk. The Girls' Glee Club The Urbana High School Girls' Glee Club is a group of about thirty girls. The members are chosen by a system of "try-outs" from the students in the chorus class. The Glee Club has no regular practice, for their songs are learned in the regular chorus class. In this way a member of the chorus is always ready to fill a vacancy that occurs in the Cilee Club. Early in the fall the entire chorus chose officers from the members of last year's Glee Club. The officers chosen were: President ....... NELL MCDONOUGH Vice-President . BETTY YANTIS Secretary . . . MARGARET MOORE Treasurer ...... DELORES BURNETT Sergeant-at-arms ..... DOROTHY SCHEIB Delores Burnett moved away in October and Lorene Langhoff was elected to fill the vacancy. The Glee Club and chorus have made about a dozen appearances this year. Among the most important were the appearance at the Illinois State Teachers' Association, the presentation of "Saint Mary Magdeline," a cantata by Vincent D'Indy at the University Auditorium, the presentation of a concert in conjunction with the Boys'Chorus, and participation in the contest at Spring- Held. Besides the enjoyment derived from their various appearances in public, the girls feel that they have received a knowledge and appreciation of good music that will prove invaluable later on, for Mr. Dvorak has chosen the selections that were learned by the Chorus with great care. Also the girls have learned to read at sight pieces of medium difficulty, another invaluable accomplishment. Altogether the work of the Chorus this year has been of an entirely satisfactory character. MARGARET MOORE '25. Ulf un 'wr "Hr: f-nif lllfllllllflf 1 w'3f:0ffOIfOjQOIfQ FI:Offof:OIICIOIICIQIQ102:OfIOIIOIQOQQOIQOIIIOIIQ 1 H 2 5 16102192102IOIIOIICIQIQNIOIIQ101IOIIOIICIKIQIKIKKIIQKIIOIUW will Ilnmlwfl Iliff-lu WUQQQQQQQQjojQojjojjojjo"c'0ooooooonoooooojjojjoj Qqjojooooooooooooooooooooojjojjojjoj QSi9u:Q::Q::Qt:Qt:Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q1fQ':Q: Uhr iKn5p11m1-11 :Qi:Q::Q::o::Q::Q::Q::Q::Q:QQ:io::Qi:Qi:Qi:Qi:Q::Q::Q::+::Q:wt:Q:IlQIfc3 U. H. S. Band One of the most successful music organizations this year was the band. Their first triumph occured when they appeared in new uniforms of black and orange capes and black hats at the Thanksgiving game. These uniforms were obtained with the help of the parent-teachers association. The band played at many of the football and basketball games and also at the track meet held on McKinley Held. This is the second year the band has been organized, and it is a remarkable fact that this small band of forty pieces should place ninth out of seventeen other bands competing in the State Band Contest held at Champaign. The band tied with Tilden Technical High School of Chicago for ninth place. Tilden High band was champion of Cook County last year. "U's" were awarded to bandmen who have done a certain required amount of work in the band. 06'N x9 n.0210210210210210I102 102 102102102102102102102102102102101101102 1021 E P EK 115211121111 1021021021092 10210210210110f10210210210210110f10210j10210j10ff0fD M N ' I 'Q' : .1 :.: :Oc : .1 :Oc Z1 c.: 19: 1 z.: :Oz . . , 101 : 1 .6 6 1 .6 : 1 .6 :Oi 7 1 ,Q :xc :Oz : .1 10: 3: 10: :Y :.: :Oi : .1 Q1 3: . . Q '0' : 1 :': :Oi :J :': Q :Q kj :Z :.. : 1 9, .4. 9. 10, , f0f ,Q First Row: Jutron, Porter, Voorhees, Heimbaugh, Wilkinson, Stevens, Holt, Dvorak, Rankin, Douglas, Sadcrus, Pierce, fi Gougler, Craig. 3: gf Second Row: Lane, Conrad, Leming, Scheib, Hutchinson, Tepper, Phillips. Apperson, Harmon. 101 1.1 Third Row: Hubbard, Bateman, Martinie, Williamson, Hubbard, Oathout, Boucher, Bestow, McBride, Fluke, Taborn, :Of if Prestin. ff Fourth Row: Ward, Huss, Dewey, Creikmur, Johnson, Picknell, VanDyne, Bantz, Swartz, Wilkinson. if If fbi ' ' If j0j I.: . . 1' U H S O li 1' :QI o n o 2:1 K2 10: The High School Orchestra this year was unusually well balanced. It was if M 12 a symphony orchestra of forty-four pieces, and it was instrumental in making it 2.1 9, it many of the music assemblies interesting by playing selections which were sung Q ,Q 1 A by the school. The orchestra gave one complete program this year during National Music Week on May 4th, -.- ,.. :,: Following is the instrumentation: 14 I .1 First Violins Janet Beston Flute ' ' Jack Holt Evelyn McBride Ray Martinie '0' Holton Voorhees Bernice Rankin Charles Stephens John Heimbaugh Lela Jutton James Douglas Joseph Phillips Ralph Porter Franklin Wilkinson Second Violins Harley Harmon Marion Sadorus Madelyn Pierce Marcelline Gougler Pauline Craig Pearl Tepper Harry Preston Raymond Apperson Mae Hutchinson Vera Fluke Ruth Taborn Viola Charles Lane Inez Ruth Conard Cello Marion Leming Bass Viol Linus Hubbard George Bateman Clarinet Eugene Boucher Joe Williamson Fred Oathout Ralph Hubbard Lawrence Binyon Horns Roger VanDyne Omer Bantz John Swartz Robert Wilkinson Trumpets Frederick Picknell Robert Creekman Trombone Milton Dewey Drums Bryce Ward Wesley Huss Piano Doris Schieb time Ilumlru " iw ffl I Ili My if K ,- WIC102102102102102102102102102102102102101102102102102101102101102102102102102f 10110f102IQIQ!10210Q10I10I102I021Q1011Q1021021021021021021021021Q1021011l6sQ4Qj u:v::o::o::o::o io:1o::v::ot:o:io:to7:o::ozzoifozroiioiioiioiiogzft Elly Kngpggiaru Qviioiioiioziviioiwizozioiiozsz:oiZo:io:fo::o::o::v:io:1o2:o1x:llQ7fQ C01 1 IQ if if 3: :Of iff if :ff 10: if if ffl if if DI 3: 3: ,......,,,,,,,, ::: Holt Lcming Lane: Voorhees 19: 3: :Oi Pi Ki if if :Vi 3: 91 19: IO: 3: :Of 102 if :Of fC'57ze String Quartet .Q 91 A new feature in the High School this year was the String Quartet. This 9: . . . quartet was composed of the following students: Jack Holt, Hrst violin: Holton Vorhees, second violing Charles Lane, viola: Marion Leming, cello. This string quartet appeared before assemblies and on concert programs. Q At their initial appearance before the High School they played the following selections: "Air," by Aubert: "Petite Etude," by Albert Pochon. The success of this quartet was remarkable, this being their first year. and it is hoped another will be organized next year, as some of these students were O - . . in the graduating class this year. 2.1 .o, bi O IDI IG Koi Ki 101 If 191 IG If 'Q Iv: :vt 1 Une II ' ' unflr'r'1l lhrrly In-vu 0101101102102QIIGIQ02102li102101191102li101101102IGII0I10IIQlOI1QIOII0lI0l if191192Q02202192101iffI0If9fKff0i19if9Iii1CKIif110110li9ff0if9If9ifO:l6'N A , . . . . . -- Q.-' 1 A..wAws1f'r 'G W'-Aw . -.r A A. -- - -. f . A - A ff FYE1- -If ffl-F- 3' Wi? -51f'?L"gh5J5 M A ' N -A A NM . Am i- - 1 1 '-. .y-.sw..:,.SQfQx:,wgg4aftb A.---,Q vafs2." 'f..,gw:.,aa.f .nw fav. .32 we .A 5 , ,' , '- A- 1 " ,. r . --- 7i25?nf'4 rw. .J-A--xvWqiwgwxls.555251-Eff-'5'rEF3 ' -91s1f:f".v5'7 . 1.11 -'f'gf7iw?'f'?-5W.,E?f473g+-'.t ,lgff If . - f " " . M 21- - "52. E"fT3?ff , 'zvmufm .,.-.-...Q.Q-f-yggf,--rg.-..'X+fA,A1wQQ.:-n'meaQ+iA-swgqgzkisaf.1 -3Qwgg--696ef-.f5Ef5w4E?- gm.. :A ,-... AQ,-.Q1m ...Q'-P- ,geggugfgck-.,,.ug 'QQSAQ-Z."-wf,fv,1'-ff? Q4A-4:HT.iw1:5341-A-AfA'L5'3Q-:z+f'i:'?:eWe1'ugW"-ai-w. H' -W' f"f5g..f, A -is. 'P 'f-fig!-K+'- . .1 'wmvn--m - -.,p,:ns'-aw .I.'.AAvYg4Z,-5Af"--A-,-Ad 1-i'.i:-p-Y' .e'f.-HE: -Mu -' -iw-41: r'p-'wb'-H 14, -...AH .Au-A 574 qSf'l.:4W,.-5-. i . 1 A.. 1' . .A . .,+Z13Pif5.x-v-Av.ff ? ,Q ...pq -.A ,.1j-.Q.1,-,1s....-,4:- L--i:'e"-gg.A..,P--5. K'---f ,ig 3,13 M 751.555, 34. ' ,U 13 ls, -' 4 E, ,JH .1 M-P 1 'R , A A: 3.5: jc, .5 ,154-1' - I , 1.-'vgsfQ-ZAf.q3'..-1 Q. -,Qv---:'---:,Y1E?75LAu5 .iz?a1a-I:-'fdrfgfqyksipv Jig? ?5TT53I.i?iw,,.i'M Sm- q,':q"5 A ,-1,4-: A -5 -s - gg-"rw,esj.13', ---w - x wx, - -H -gg'!:'- .41 .-.- egfgigf.-M--+,g,.i K,5jQAf--.gig-ggcgfag-Qq11,kwqF..,f232:5-.-P',c?A-..Qm3s's' ,.J?vlef,'Qhf. nlywrf . om.sq5,,g.-12? I f2'1',y?J5f' '4 . 'H-ff "- 7 'ilu :M-i'i w4'h2g,2?.1 1 E521-1"" -551' 'i.?T"?'.f"' -E"i' L L . ' 11 "Fm P- l l A. ff" 'f ' 1-'Fw ".fi.v?'-Yale fi .gf ri 1,5 -iff, r 1 .' ' 5 ,a f A- 45 .' -'Y-Qin?-5 'A m pf' , - ' -fr?ffg -vfxeggq--:.,g, A A A-2.51.-1:55-12,313'gfgay-JJ.3332-Qsgx-fgi3-1,-vg.,3Lglgif9 z- Wi- v..f- M' QF., V- . 5-4 ' .CA .4 -f Q -Vugfmiffvi-Egg-gg:f3'1e3g-Sw -A1,f..:,e-1-1.-.5.AA-f.-gm f. g .A . - J- 'Q-L. 1 . ,q3-l'.z5,-ggf-y.--2,25---.-gf::gi.iQ15,f,hj,, 1.433543 ,, ,lf A -- Y sw -'kwa,yK:,g1M1i5457Qg-Qiyaft-9 ix-:Nd - rr- - -..:'?.-.. -L--in - ' sf' 1 - ,f f',f-Qffgqal J" , - . J,,e:,"Ax3-:,1,'E.'.- is-' 4,?f:'5i': ' m f '3fsfw"?2Ca. P-.Sf ii-A-f'f1ifsff-ff?-E"f5??v-'Q '5' S' 5? 71- 'HAZ A in gs-. .y-ff - zqyyff?-.,Af.,,5.g-5-.?,z1,3f'g.,,-, yy- Ay?-Lv --.K P A. -4 :-'1?1'5'L'-.Af-'igfhzy.pfZ".'.-A-- Af--f .- -- -- -A 1' -ff ---2 -1-1.2.1 " 2 'Jr -. "A A .' . .. ' ' -fm-1 :elf -, -NF:-? . ,gif Qg.f'.Alj':3u -"'.1i'vf-2"-'.31f1.rY.Z25Jf?fg,T'i5,,:.-I A Q, '. W4 K2 ' f . -1,-v baifhgf 751-11 5.--1-'f--f..v Zfizx-ef2'-1222-ffW'ff:5'1.u.-'assi SFS :Z -zamkxifi 1 ::g,VA.r ..A.-WA?-sjii. N liga s e. W. ' ':i"' N-'3 .- . g g g5. . 1 " 2 X., - .L "TM '5- -Sm.-P-. f'1.Ai?:w:r'-'Ai.1,L5f2fFa.:'1kw,,.'1 , -3 '- A - ,. ff 'f 5.3.,5-g-'1...- ':,,AZs'1,:fj. f:f'-p 1-Q'3.-.wgqfji-' ft 111224 - ' jf- '.j.4.w'. . f' e w an- AAA' . A 1 A f.-A'--4:--:wi 5:Aff.:-1f132.:.fPssw5fg.-4'f.-Wg? A . , ip? - 594-:gf . ,- 7.3.---. ,.,-91'--,g'..-'-7,.:E5.-QH'1p2zxgf A -, '- .-g 5:11, enfgm , 355 ,Q - -L 5 -H .A-: .. , A ' el- .-.Q ' A-.. --1--1 A --1 -42 A f- A A 1 4 N. Qt.-!'A-A37 . , Hn.-,A,1-,.aAgr,.,+-.g,,f5.4 A...,.,, - N.. gp K, , mn- .35 ...BAA-w,..,,. ,, ' -1221 H- M- -fe f Q'4'Z-452432 FS?-rg lif, J ,E-f-515' -'Ii i2i73:-ff5SQi5fM A: "2 f frafgiifffx .r-e2a-.:-g- . . aa Mgr ' -f.,- gn-..ge5g.5f,, :v-4 1a-'WA:-'-:.-z'-viii'-Q?"-Q ' -, 5i 15:' 3 av ' i?2Q+1f1-fi.-.2:' . 1 'ffl-if :MA - A , . ' .J fi.. -' .- J- 'Q -. +L-+,'1-' fa' . ' , 'G .-A -L H111-5 AA.: -.ww-.'-ine:-9.2....sw-'w:..nf.1,.:. -5 , .. 1' JWHE- 5A - A-'A A .,4v.gA A.-. ,.zS.,.f,,fA,j.,.,g,. .As,,,.ig..,,-,,3,f,',f-E V .,,AA .5 .-5, ., 3,,5,,Agh ,J faf:-.-2-4-'4:.'fg2arf:sf..-AH1.fAfffif-,..::xf:..-?f.f:sLw . ., - 4:51 -- M A .Affgigimfvw f5.w:-9.211115:5,+1,q2.fe""A'W '-hfffr?-Q v A ' - 0' ,gg-2563-'5-yiffr 3.35153 .QQJ ' -. "-.-Af: f1'A,f-Aw "--"J?"'?wfaf'?1ii:7-:gkai4"7s-'- f A, -.siffzfs ' W' 9 ' W-ff15L'ff lf' - W f . . ...rf-Q-455-if wz 'I 5 - - - 1 . I , v I f . 'X . I a .u 'H .. IL. c 41,4 K ' - n ' , . W . .L ' 1 .. . Q , 1--Q -v-u:m...,-f1-f"5-'- -.--Q .. ... 1..fx,:iv--e' 4-'!'.Qf4i4:"-r"2'-.'-' u 339113 gi: - f '3i-?Q,53n9'i332353E74'n?Wii'1.:: " . 5af1rf:':gfA.Az-A-1.A-3 A. .. 0 "1E2r. 21- A5 '.-I" -' - B '-.UZ ""' E- "f" -1 ' 'I7 -'1' .'.',1',,',1 -'-. .-.-1 nl-,,, , Uv, . ',..-- '-L ,1,,v- ' , 1 -'E 'f' ' 'JIU '. I 1: E11.114-fri--9-'Z-ilria '2aesf:. f'I Z -2522522553 .A.f535z? aims- 4 ' A' A- -'iii ' A - , ' ' ' 1- 2 A A '3"'+1-1 '-54' 0 - 121355353 '-fer' img 1 'f'5f3,'f-2 21-ff.,.Afe,3'gfwgg15,-gfv4,y3Aef1gqa,.qg 1316 -xg.-e-S11-H52-:f1f.':f'1f1v'?'f2-.-.'L'-1' ' 'FZ ' . 1 ? 'yi v , 2 2 IV - ffm?-iiQv?1f-'WQ23-EQA: . ' A ' 'Sift-1-frqwgy 5.1-g-Q5-1-'Afe3?ffqi""' .fa 1-'fi-Bw -3,pfI.i ' ' -.qv QA- -- g a - ..Z. 5.5.1 ' ,..,L ,v-ii 4.3fr5g,1gE-i,,f,q.q ..-u'4--wr' .:- w - ' o -' WA' xv? ---"-9,3 - -nA'4H- . -f' Nah- .. .iw 1. if ' - ' ---'---wg-.-1-4-.MN 1 rv-1'f:""'9.--1"'--"' : ru- Aiwa- '--1-A -:-2 " nM-.553 4' A. ,. -J-wh" -A ' 'l 145mm -..:::: ' 119 iv ' -.. 'u?',61'Q."!-3f'.-W5--iffy-14 Q-Whig5.f:?5:Y-iewtifv' ..-.e??.sfL:H sfggqfvgf . . bafgrfzq 1'-fav' rim-:fix .i"f?'-Tffezw.sf-'2-"-'AgI-.2l'f?lf'i:f:1rfiQ'.Esz S 253-5 - " - - ' Will ' ies.. A r ' '. 4. rsfff G3?vf-i1eHw'?gUT1'-ifffi 2 WJ' w f- 45 .1 .21 pf -M -1 V f y, -9:52-QI 4:3-Za-431.53252-.-Ki- --.A.s---.,-p.-Af-.-g.gs1z5-62.-1Z-ff:Arf:-gm. 2 - 3'e?-4213, 0 . . A ,--.-:sm-'-.mal "-G' -hifi nl"!r:-l1"-1'-.1'i1.- 1.-f. 3 . tw , m- u . nfl -- --- Q 5' ' -' - ' -242251 '-'.A --'--'Rf M 'S-:Aw....mc.:11 -4.-qv .21-A' 2 - .fimigxi--:za - :,., . .Haig .1 , 5 . 55, 5'f5g53'-P'Q3'1Y'Sh ' A 0 - '1- 5,3 " 5i'--l-.fi'.?:-i- A ' -' -5'.w1si"a.'H jiffinf --Ar..-Qi' A, as -H . A. W ' uw 'J -em ' AB1l1f'1f-Asfnmiwn.. 1 el-wh-f -"1f:A-.H wg'aff.-.f:3.1-A,-v-LAa. 11 -sgq3-.,.1'xe' A A - x 'N V, in ' 1-ygw,-r ' "V Try-L'fAf.'-':-"1I'-fi-.:.,-,-u'E'-ff. .P -f , 4 we A, -' - wf' fr ? ,., -A1'fq3Y.'-"? rv Ymqgfj iq? Q if-..1,4S,,,:gg Q35-E534-.gg-, fAH 4. 5 Q- : ,. ?g'.EE2, -.1 uw '-I-L,2"f'.'v'-f, ,.,-115 -AZN :J--52, 2 Aa X' . " -- ' Q ' -1 ' - .' '.. ' .re -f '2"f'--yAe- :',+1y-5i'- - :sl- .f.:A-ga'ri- 1 -L-La.-L, -.,+,,--.,FM.:,,f : 1.-f QL, gg- gf 2 .37 w '-, 'W' ', 3 K A . .--.- ,mfg-Q 5' - ,Af- 5- -1 - .g. -.agtvzgiz-3w,, 2, . -1552? sg fii- -W. 23-5 -, . frE.Q,2f'A'f?hfQ -g:'?5q-gli' --gif-,." psf..-.-'fu r,'2..,x?uf45.?54fe.5,., ,g iii., Q1 ' 'lmful A ff' Vgayag. A-.XX f- 5' No- ,:.r,S."3Ll."?g,A-iq5gfflE.'x2J 3'.e?f,."?w-1 j '2,"ij-U,-'KF-f.'fQ-Ei. Qi-7 "fi'.z-,,- ' 5,-'12 ff' '.g.,, 5, I 'zsfwfng ' 1 1. . 5-QQ, ffl'-fr' ' -Qi gg, 3511 Aw-E'5'JLex.g ',.:. 5. ' f:f'3rf33P.fff.fw1'.I- ffmfi. 'WG' 1 59' " f -. HP i: '- f f H5 'w:fEfW'f- wa--'-:'f"-'A A -mf,-1-1Ff.2--ei-r.A AsMfrs..--wr..'A-'-4-Vs ..-mm-w - wr--1 Q--rv .11 'ga ai?-pf'-a'3+'g-FQLP' wff--'f-1v'rfaf-.Af S-ff-e-ii?,3aiYgAH5i.M--f' f--'im 2 ' A W--".'f Ni ei . .. .asf 1-22. A1.-:iL,.4's.A-6-3?w',.,f..-.4' :2fM.i1i?:-1122:1543-'-Qs-.QS ,: ififg?-9191EPE: , 'U' -aff. .fgfjfel-igwgqf -y-4-Qf5r3f5-'imgziff-,ig A '- is-1:xr:--'-wAf.f.v4'.::' e:.1-:W -.2'A'5:1.-A-'rf .wwf-a,A--A Agew-3FyA-pa-.w. '-Wiggwa A A- 'H - ..4A 35Yf' - gffrgg-2"l3.vQP-wg: ww?--i,e?,:-,-:.'4f:: 1 -:-.:. ... -".,,-.-- '-,-.,...:,,'7.,1'.f, -Af .,,,-,.- .- I '- -.., X n . - .-, -V ty.-,,.,.,,.,,,,.:,,.., f'-.2,,Tw-J' c-,-JAA:gs135.fg:f1qi-fy. 5 '-35, .gh 3 15" , '..'fff.:.-ailf.-fi'-' 'T-'--fs,-5112-: Ju- 4 -' " '11 Q .,. r . -:.,1-,z 7 ' . '7 ,Nj ' 5 . N EFF: -Gv."-?-2':If-i- .af'5'.,115g4ii-3,: . ig,if+14'v -A- V' 1' f ' A wrf ' 244 fix. .lk-f..-f, 1. ff:-'L:fXkf.,6,H2ir..ie,ff,:f..'1f5z-Mt: -.tfixlifli--Aff. -f:Aw-Affs.-K: --4 A . 1- . Ls-X -F , f wifff--fe-1-P.:-7-F-1-L'-4+-.--11."f14.'1'::,A::- '- . f .A 4 . fl 32:75 U' ' Ti'fTl' :-Lf 'M 3-'aft F .' 'w- fl?" .' -.- ' 'cf ' U .K ' .,,5 W' ' . f' 5' , 3 1 3 - 15 ,W ' SF- ."--1.--'Faq yi". .-Pj-'1iQ"F iii fa 'f ff-52?-'TATL1f'P.?f5Zf35'f-P?"giT"Ef5S'.G"-TEKFSZY-121525555 ' V?f5Pf73?f1? ' 'Q f" .-I A ,5fi!I53tf5f 1 xlfvl-' 'li -ff i'f.flz5F1?34P2f'i?iw?-?f?5P1'Tf:Ff"'4 fQfHnaf5f"?f! Q.-11,-g.g.ff5f:,1-ra:-y.12kLfZif1.7f5 ' ,g.ig!- H .-- .- 3 . Q5fw,egf--.gyvgfii TI-Ue:'.1'Q1,RT-9314-A-7.1f.Aj,if1-Hg gm-err'-.-I-:gg3sf-:isA-v119-'-WM''5'5'if'.'-3.:'W1 'kf':'-afMfi'eL-- WM. nm J ' 'P'-. -A .Fw-'+'i'Mv45-:51b1i"4'l' , uf''5-ii-A'-'faiiszr'-.12zathf . ffffz-2.1-. ""---PH-,Q-"1-'.:f'1 2122:f:1f+J'.'-A-'-'7'-F. ' A11 'W -.. , - -' wN.w-wr. Q4-'RGS-711 -1z'f-vis" '.-A,. ww-.--A:.4'.,u q.fA.:,f+-.-swfv ?5'?N'fi'lg,, f-iii. , , . -.1-+5 f.9?gqgff.e1. -ia-4rg,+--25a?!eY,-gfAW5-1 :ff:.a-.A-.J-g:---- J,.-Ag-:S--a -.Y-5: V, Ill f I cg-A T 5 f A L 1 . ANON 1. f.,-.1 EL , E 5:2 -1 El E2 ET. ' E E E E 5- l E Q ' E E -' E El - E 4:-1. ' -. . - - -- ' f EE!'II'WNUIIIIUIlllllllllllIllIlllflllllllllllllllllllllllIllIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIHIIIllllllllllllllii W9 'ff 1 - 111 -mt'111ai9.'13 :A11+7i+i7f-3or-ifffiwiiifitfftif-:fm14::':r1i1'f11s7'fi::feffsi1-i . f 1 ll l 'Y i'?li0ii4::9 Fi' H5132'f7li-fifF7115'5'f'M0"?"-"N can ..1 U M ui M ru ' EPI Fi L k. s ardyman, Blan rnton, H ho Chapman. T emp, K Seybold, Gibson. airc W orris M ackey M son, Oathout ner. Vk'ilkin ur 'I' ance Root Dearrh. Coble, V LU! First Ro Iii S . Qi Second Row: Bareman. Miller, Hudson, Binyon. Pickncll. Lohman, Johnson. lfluss, Monohon, Farnsworth. Shobe, Fears, Apperson, Apperson, Sparks, Anderson, Oliver, Roughron, Keating. if Third Row: Judy. Voorhees, Waltoxi, Leming. Leurwiler, Dewey, Housh. Brumheld. Kelley, Mitchell, Beresford, Brannock, Foster, Villars, Webber, Hunt, Burnier, Vandevort, Wertz, if Hildebrand, Mosher, Bloke. Fourth Row: Douglas, Boucher, Green. Moore. Blue, Smith, Flctchcr. Hubbard. Holt. Roney, McGrath. Adams. Childers, Conerty. Nleadows, Kempf, Creamer. Stockwell. Fifth Row: Hurd, Shroyer, Mansfield. Parker, Vx'illinmson. Steele,-Sperling, Michael, Vfard, Foltz, Cole. Nlarrinie, Holmes, Hundley, Hundley, Bantz, Coombe, McCleur. -Sixlh Row: Adams, XVhitney, XX':ilker, Martin. Martin, Dewey Kendall, Mann, Evans. Ecclc, Walker Hopson, Pickett. 'ei gl? riffg' X 'fLf"If'+l"'b'fI' -fi-"ff 'c"C"4"'f'u"vF'c"'4''f"o'ifP,"P ff?"-'f i5i4'i'4' f'f"7' "1 V937 0, 4 0,33 inf 'f,"l', 429' '7.'-ff Of? fin -'Q.9f4f -'ff ri 773.4 'Y'ff'f.?,f'P.i4'l'fi'v.44.9.1'eff' '-'ff 55,5 591 K' 'ff' 'f'i.'V' '-Yf,qg'f:fG X'-'EFA1 ego: D FXS-F. rf -iii u:o::oztvtiozzoiiozfozif Q o o Q Q v 921Cf02fQ102f0292f02 Ellie ZKngpn1urq io::o::o:Lo:xzewzioiioiioizozs::v::+::o::Q:e:v:zzml1Q,"9YE 9. 102 101 102 102 102 102 102 IG 16 IQ 'v iff 16 16 102 102 16 fi IQ - , 1, ,, :ze Beresford Mann ' Monohon Evans 102 102 ... 102 Q02 bi bi 102 102 32 Key Stone Club In the beginning of the school year a few of the boys interested in a boys' 1.1 club met and elected the following officers: io: . Q12 Preszdent ..... . JOHN BERESFORD gtg Vice-President . WAYNE MANN 35 Secretary . . . LOUIS DOUGLAS Q I 1 Treasurer . . WILLARD MONOHON .Q :Z Sergeant-at-Arms ....., REID EVANS I 1 clean sportsmanship, clean scholarship, and clean social affairs. : In the first part of the second semester the S. K., Literary Society, and 9. K. S. K. showed their co-operative spirit in uniting to give a Valentine Dance. The club was organized with the same ideals as last year: clean speech, There were about fifty couples present, making it a very successful dance. .9. ,:: Later in the semester two bean suppers were given. There were about seventy-five boys at each. The speakers were Rev. Baltis and Dean Clark of the University of Illinois. Both gave very interesting and instructive talks. I believe that all the members will agree with me in saying that this has 22: been a very successful year for the Key Stone Klub. gtg LoU1s DOUGLAS '27, 2,1 O 9. 102 102 102 16 92 102 102 102 202 .92 5 I' wl10f102102!!1021021021021021021021Q10210 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 02102 1 Q 2 J 210210210210210210"021Q10I102I02I0f32I02102102102102f02102102102 Une Ilumlrvrl Tl:i1'Iyfirv R 32 Q9 101 Q01 Q01 101 101 101 101 Q01 Q01 101 101 101 Q01 0 101 Q01 .01 Q01 .01 101 101 L02 GI JS' "5 E5 'S 5 '1 Z I4 23 'Z H-O 101 101 101 Q01 Q01 101 Q01 Q01 Q01 101 101 101 101 Q01 QQ if Q01 101 101 If 101 G 115 B CLU K. 10, 5 Q01 ' ... .0. 101 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 101 Q01 101 101 , .1 10i 101 102 101 101 101 Q01 101 Q01 101 9. ,.. 10, 31 91 31 .01 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 Q01 101 1G 101 101 . .1 101 101 S. THE sl .0. Q01 0 101 .01 101 Q01 101 Q01 Q01 101 Q01 101 101 0 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 0 31 101 n- 15 IQ 1-I Q01 101 101 101 0 101 If 101 101 101 101 101 1 I 101 101 Q01 101 Q01 101 K1 101 Q01 1C IQ 101 5 ga' .0. 101 .03 52 32 101 101 101 101 101 101 10' 101 101 101 102 101 102 Q01 102 101 10 101 101 101 10T 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 101 101 9, Q W0 ffm- llffml 1-,I lf,f,f,,,W- A .1 ,- .01 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 102 L01 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 L01 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 DI 101 01 101 102 102 Q01 101 102 101 101 31 31 31 KI D1 K1 01 1i 91 91 31 102 KI 101 101 101 101 101 Q02 101 101 101 103 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 10Z 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 Q xg9Ii0fl9:PIfff9i:Of:Ol:Oif9if9:f9ff9li9fl0ff0ffffOffOff0ff6f3ii wh? IRUHPUIEIYQ 31IOIIC9232KQIDIIQIOIIGIQKIIOIIGIOIICKIIOINHED Sloan Brennan Marr Oliver The S. K. Year J 1924-1925 Every girl in school was present at the first S. K. meeting of the year, held during the twenty-minute period September 5, 1924. Our first activity, the membership drive, was a great success, and brought into our club two hundred and ten enthusiastic and interested girls. This alone proved a big incentive, making every one of us strive to have this organization the outstanding one in school. Several new features were introduced, and we hope they will be as popular in coming years as they were this: The Big Sister Drive, the well-attended swimming parties, and the Senior S. K.'s sun-bonnets and aprons which were worn October 23, 1924. Nevertheless, our old customs were not forgotten, School didn't seem like school minus the traditional matinee hops, dances, pic- nics and banquets. Each one of us served our turn on a committee for these entertainments, thus increasing the interest to a large extent. The oflicers this year were: President . . BEATRICE SLOAN Vice-President . BETTY BRENNAN Secretary . MARTHA OLIVER Treasurer . . . . VONNA MARR Sergeant-at-Arms .... DOROTHY SCHEIB The success of the club can be attributed to the excellent backing of the girls as a unit, and we know if this spirit prevails this club will be as great a success in future years as it has been in the past. lVlAR'I'HA OLIVER '25. One Humlrwl 7'l1i:'Iy-sm-4' C!ifif202192ICfffiffff:Of32KiifIffCfCfC!fC3I3ff0iI0If9I f9if9ifCf0f!f0i:OIIO:ICIOIICICICICKIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIKIIOIIOIICICICD x !I1o'2o'102I0210'2011022032101io2142102j0jj0i'0jj0jf0jf0jj02'022of mln' iKl15P11lu1'1I 10jjojjojQ01joijoj102101joj107102j0jj0jjoj10ij0if021o21o120f102j010 M ' ' gf X .5 O jo 5. 202 Q0 10' 10 10. O. 202 10 102 f0 10. 202 10' 10 .02 10. .5 102 20. 102 102 202 10' 102 202 102 102 102 10' 102 102 .02 .6 102 10. 10' 102 102 102 Q02 101 102 10' 102 10. 10. .0. 10. .01 0. .Q '0 10. 101 .02 'Q 1, '0 .QA 10. .01 102 .02 10' 102 101 f02 202 102 102 202 Y0' 102 L02 202 102 102 102 102 102 .02 102 102 102 101 101 202 102 102 10' C5 e l a 2 'E V21 5 E 3 :s .A E an I E 2 E 'O , 'EO c :E o O V. :1: F 5 .E no Z1 CP 2 7:5 I . C , C fr 2 2 5' ..- '5 'U L- . .. we 'pl' 5 iw - fu F9 mx N RAS is 5 .M ,,., O 55 3 5' .QE EQ ' CID... Ji :K ' ,ef if G v--4- 3 is ... , .cw o f .520 Q E: 5 If wa .. E .. EE. .E 2 E. E E 55 U , .g , : 50' '5 C- :O .o , b-4Q S : -J Q 'Ea P' Q: 3 E L-U32 .J A r-4+ E .5 Uwe Q 5 C.. '1 J: O--2 E 5 5 WSG -2 in M4 5 V '-. X D-pgs. - - 04.55 YE ff HO 0-1 :Q '65 'E 3 Ei Q' '6 E an D: Em ' oo H4 f .C .2 -2' E" gi : s 4m ,Tuff 5 D E e af U-130 o E uk 41 0 .LQ Q .. ,M IA, E 5 Q- 'V P -U.- E FHS g g , , in Q ng u. V EE I : N '35 .E E C.: : 3 Em 0 cg U Q e .0 .: ,SE E 55 :: .. N Q, .. FU 5 U ' - o :-- - O23 E 5. UD I- H: :ES w V90 f 5 .rf . ,, .. 15. 3 gh- cwn r: Q4 :ng 5 ,S 1 Z.- 1 I-U Clog og . m 0 U: EE 3 : :' O EQ Emi D4 :cn :PAN . fa 1 2 E : F: Q,-C w '.-. ,-o g .- "J-C-I .-c L25 My U Qu fa: .... ,D :Oc L :N SQ9, O-5 .QE 2 'OO O as gl' :Z cs qw -C M31 -C N no '5 'Sf 4:3 s EX u.vJ Lu mv, p rm, llffmlf fl llmmffffn K W:g:Ell.0..0..0.10..0,.0..0.10..0..0..0.10..0..0. .0..0..0..0..0..02.0.10 .0.,0..0.,0. 1 LI ,. .1 ..0.10.,0.10..0.0..0..02.0,.0.10.10..0..0..0210.10..02.02.0..0..0..0,.0..0..0.Il6'I3Q x,90f0f 102 192 IGI 102 Zo 0 0 9 9 0 OI DI IGI IOI If Ii N101 DI IOI fi' El he IKHHPIIIEIYU iff 102 IGI IGI fi Ii If 10103142 iff 191 102 102 IG If 102 C02 KI IC IOI IOIDQASZQ Moore Brash Seward Scheib Literary Societya The purpose of the Literary and Debating Society is to stimulate an interest in literary work, debating and oratory. The season just completed was un- doubtedly a great success, judging from the many annual school events for which it was responsible. The following oflicers were elected at the beginning of the year: President ..,... MARGARET MOORE Vice-President . . EDNA BRASH Treasurer . . EDRIE SEWARD Secretary ...... DOROTHY SCHEIB One hundred and seventy-five enthusiastic students responded to the call for members. At the Hrst meeting plans for the following year were discussed and there was a delightful program. The first interclass debate was held November 9th between the Juniors and Seniors, the Juniors being victorious. The Freshman-Sophomore debate, which was next in line, was won by the Freshmen by a decision of three to nothing. The Tenth Annual Stunt Show was presented on Tuesday, December 5. Everyone took an interest in the stunt show this year, and all the stunts were very entertaining. The proceeds were used to send the oratorical contestants to Charleston and the debaters to Peoria. A dramatic production, 'Seven Keys to Baldpatef' was given under the auspices of the Literary Society through the help of Miss Florence Johnson, the dramatic coach. Receipts of this play were used for necessary scenery for the Urbana High School stage. A regular system has been worked out by the Literary Society for awarding Old English "U's" for the literary and dramatic contestants. Five points are necessary to get a The Literary Society presented about fifteen people with "U's". The programs for the remaining meetings were taken over by each of the different organizations. The French Club had an old-fashioned spelling match which was well attended. The Bobbette Club presented a short play and the S. K. Club gave an entertainment. This ends the chronicles of the Literary Society for the year of 1925. DOROTHY SCI-IEIB '25. f Une l1llllAIl't',1' 7'hf1'l'f1v11ine Qyfauioiiozioiio o Q Q o v v o o o o o Q Q o o v o o o oiaiioi 1 Q 2 5 1411019 v o o o ozioiioiiesizoiiozzoiivi:o::o::o:ioiioiiozioiivzicxn R 0102if10214-2I01Z01I0I102i0IZ0ZI0ZT0Z102i0T10Zi0Ii0If0If0Ifo2i0f1o2 E119 IKugp111m-11 Q03j0jjojj0jf011ojjojj01jojiq103103ioiioiiojiojfojiojfojjoiiojZQQIIQIZQ M ' I Q .0. 101 101 101 101 101 Q02 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 101 C01 101 101 101 101 IQ 91 101 gf 0 101 101 101 101 Q01 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 Q01 101 102 101 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 IQ 31 101 91 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 101 '01 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 10. 101 101 101 Q01 10' 101 101 Q01 102 101 102 10 101 10 101 101 -: E E fc 0 -c :x: fl- ,-I -Q: -Q: IH O -1 l Um llulllnl I'm Habermeyrr. 2 Ly: Monohon, ill. Qld, Farnwworth. H aborn, Fi T er McCoy, Mill Row. F1r.sI Villars. Mason, Boucher, Johnson Cole. Foltz der umcr, Sny Gordon. T Svcond Row: Slansfield, gk SS 10. 101 101 101 ' 101 3 101 1 102 1 101 101 5 101 1 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 102 101 101 101 101 b-4 L5 P.: LSI 101 101 101 101 101 31 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 5 .L 2 P. N P- .fi ... .1 0 2 :L Q, w 5 m .-E -J O E as ni: E -a .. .1 I el Q II Q II o P-' 51 Q fl an J 1, E C Q . U .af if Q D 3 G 2 1 : -C S- .0. 101 101 10: 101 10: 101 101 :oz 102 101 101 101 zo: :oz to: ze ze .Q 5: Lo: :Q zo: 101 101 101 101 101 101 az 10: 101 101 101 101 102 101 101 31 nz ze: 10: az 91 101 31 31 9: 9: sz zo: 10: ze ze ic :oz zo: 92 101 101 101 101 101 101 10: 101 sz IQ 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 101 101 101 10 31 101 102 1 M Uni' Ilrlllflrvvl l"nrf11un1' n:0: 10: 10: i0: 10: 10 0 0 0 0: 10: 30: 10: 10: 10: i0 0 0310110133103 Elm- 11111 gp mg rq 10:10:10 0 0 0:10:10:10:131:01:0210:10310::0::0::0::0::S::0:3pQj'3?Q 9 9. 32 PI DI IC DI 102 IC V , . 102 Villars Monohon Miller Foltz 3: DI 'C IC IG 32 KI DI Iota Alp ha Gamma fzf If 102 Iota Alpha Gamma is an organization composed of members who are '.' taking or have taken art. Its purpose is to arouse an active interest in art among ... the students of the Urbana High School. gf .0. The ollicers are: 143 SOI President . . RUTH VILLARS :If Vice-President . WlI,LARD MONOHON 91 9. Secretary . . GERTRUDE MILLER Q Treasurer . . INEZ FOLTZ Adviser ........ NELLE FIELD The society meets every other Thursday during the school year. Many interesting meetings were held at which craft work was taught and delightful talks given by the adviser, Miss Field. Several parties were held during the year. A costume dance was given by Iota Alpha Gamma, April 8. Ruth Habermeyer and Mr. Bickel sang, and Barbara Stansfield gave a feature dance. Although we have had a very successful year, we look forward to even :E more successful years in the future. GERTRUDE MILLER 'Z6. If If 102 DI IOI IQ 31 Ii li IG ... f0f iff Q91 EJ 96951016110 0210210220261 32102Z01Z02Z0210 0 0ZI03Q01102!Z03102103Z0i 1 H 2 5 303 1.3 go 43 Q03 jog 16132 101503103103 jog Q02 jo: 162 101 iq pg 593103 aijojgojjojugix -XS !! o' oi Io, fi 'oi Q, oi oi oi 32 4 1 vi joj 'oi ol o 'o,'oi'o"o1joj E 11 p ill l'lHrn1'II'1I 'oigoijojjQj1Qijoj'4jj4j1o1jo1'o'1o'jeg'ej1vgi4ijoj14jja,'owjQa VQIQQQ W 1 . Q . L a X Q 5 9. Q ,Ov ... ,fi E 9. 5 92 33 I , If 5 'Of C 0' E , G ,' J: ,- L- .Q id Q, , ,J 'oi ., 16 S.: Ku: .4- 9. . - : ... 9, 59 9' 'Z Qi E2 'of -: Qi I-2 9 Lx 'Q Ei Qi 53 ,O M3 Q m Ol ge QQ 3- 0 EE o EE QQ :nf 9: vid 'V E9 QQ :lg . '12 o if 'U , , .a '. 0356 f li Il W5 'Q' .xi vi E55 o' L, E: Qi nib.-CI 'o E -, ol S 55 oi Q E2 . '-4-,gf .. V :. 11433: o I ,M 0 5. :C 0 ,. o' E? 4, 1. QE -E 4 W5 'f xi ol E5 .0 -I o' f 1. ag If 55 A' EI. "Q ob wg? :L E59 -Lu Q 2 .3 Q 1:3 ol QF! o L.: '-1 .. .423 -- ,xm 9, yr' 'Q' iid " fl I SIE -, Id? .0 ,gui Q Zg OL 'Sanz 9 Pus- o 523 ,' .C o 3-.im o Qs: o MQ L E3 N Lua V! ohon, Hnrrns. un M 4' ll I If o 'xy X, f,,,, MJ f,, , 3, ., fi. - .. 4 wfgsfgub 'Ivi+.01wv,v.0i'viv'+iiv 4 if I01'v',41Iv1.v''vjlbllvgvl0, 1 LI ,I J 101010. 4 10Z10'i+120,1v 1vi.0Iiv.LvZ,v.10..0.,v ,0'IOQJviIv Iv l01.0,f0 Iv l6 E G5!",9nioZIoZZvIZvZIoZZ02io v v 0 v v 0 0 Q 4 4 v 0 viioiioi Ehp Kngplllqrlg 302102lolZviZviivjfviiviivjioiblivlbiiojivZ'o' Q o 0 OIIOIIOIHW Veach Hiscr Gordon Bireley Commercial Club The Commercial Club was re-organized in the spring and the following oflicers were elected: President . HELEN VEACH Vice-President . . RUBY HISER Secretary . EDITH GORDON Treasurer . . FRANCES BIRELY Social Chairman . MARY THOMSON Echo Representative . PATTY BRENNAN I MRS. SCRANTON Advisers . i MR. ANDERSON lM1ss CADE The purpose of the club is to promote interest in commercial work and to place the members of the club before the business men of the twin cities so that the members may be able to procure positions. This is done by writing letters to many business Hrms to learn of vacancies. The programs of the meeting consist of talks from prominent business men of different kinds of business. Mr. Harris spoke at the first meeting on the subject of "Making an Application." A matinee hop was given in the gym April 28 and was quite a success. The members of the club have lost a staunch adviser by the death of Mrs. Killefer and each one of us should strive to uphold those high ideals which she so nobly lived and taught. The following quotation portrays her view so well: "Do something worth living for, worth dying for: do something to show that you have a mind, and a heart, and a soul within you." HAZEL GORDON '25. Um' IIN iulrfwl I nrlff Ili r K 3.1501021020 0 0 Q 0 0 0 0 0 Q vjioiioiiojlviioiif 0 0 4 Q v OLIOI 151,25 gojgo Q Q Q Q 4 Q Q 4 oi103jogjegjogjoggojjoggogjoggogjojjojjfjjojjejngfe-EQ BQQQ,9n1vi:oi1o:1o1 ottoiiojfoiioi:oiioiioiioiioiioiiottoiioifoiioiioiivi. Uhr ZKIIHPIIIZIYII Zvizozioiioiioiioiifiio:Ioiloiiotioiiotiotiftivtioifoiiot1oi:ot:o:JlQIfQl'ZZ BZ ' 1 .0, 101 101 102 .Q 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 IC 102 102 I 102 102 D2 102 102 101 Q02 102 102 101 5:2 102 102 bi 102 102 101 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 T02 102 102 102 102 102 102 202 102 .01 101 Q02 10I 102 32 IQ S02 1G 102 102 102 If IQ 102 92 If 102 102 202 101 102 102 101 102 101 102 102 102 102 102 It 101 102 101 .02 .02 201 .01 .01 5 Z Q E- E u o cn VJ Q: H i- LU l-J : E- 'nfl in .1 E U lf' llffflffwfl I-fffffffmfl' 5 FZ L: .C u :a I 'al I r: : J O' N 'J E :1 1: U an .n 'a .C V. ill vi C d E 'C 1. .D O hc 5 e Q O E Z L, Li L2 .d 's .-C U LIT a m E 3 c CZ . Q -D .D ,M 5 7 vi : x: TJ -u 2 5 u c U C 0 F 2 N Q, 9 3 fi I 1: u. Polk, Gm n, S. phen IE Taborn. Cole, lVlcElwee. S eAt cy. D l, O lxvcr. Hil Huffar, Miller, ward, Sccond Roux: Haran, Hudson, Blank, Stanslield. Bmsh. Gordon. Se erce. Hnbermeycr. Dodge. Pi Taborn. us Dax' Smith, Sanders udson. Shuman, Veach, H Horn. Patterson, oycr n.R Vfilliamso on, homs T Wilson wr Wilson, Roberts, Third Ro 4: 'L -J :E 0 'C -1 LD rf fl E S .J : fx E S 6 S : '-a F 5 'C -- a Ll :E 'c L. w .C r.. J.: :A v7 Q -J CO : 2 1.. Q,- -- 4 -:5 2 5 fn ID vi l. x. E fi I fa 3 .:: Q an Q : E .-D 0 D5 'J .. -: : O U U E U i 6 o .A fn 2 .2 v 2 "J fa .M E 3. O U 3 v fu .. U 5 Q 5: -.Q I :s o PM Bechtold ell, Baird, Stockw Campbell, gym Q 0 Q02 102 '02 102 101 102 101 102 102 , .1 102 101 101 101 102 101 102 101 101 202 202 102 Q02 Q02 102 u-o LS FU Lil 102 102 102 101 101 102 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 102 102 Q02 102 101 102 101 1120210102102202102IGIC02IOIICIG!!!hliojiojiolioiioifojivjl Eh? igngpmgfq Qoj1021421021013131155331pj3jpjpjpj3jyyjq3Qm Mitchell Miller Polk Hadlogk GIRLS' ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION The Girls' Athletic Association is only in its second year, but under the leadership of Betty Mitchell a strenuous program has been very successfully carried out. At no time during the year has the Work of the G. A. A. been allowed to lag behind. The aims of the club are to create a keen interest in girls' athletics and to stimulate good sportsmanship. These have been successfully carried out during the year, for great progress has been made in getting a larger number of girls interested in sports, and there is undoubtedly a feeling of better sportsmanship among the girls. The lirst activity of the G. A. A. was the basketball tournament, which was held the week of November lO. This year the girls came through with some real games. The Juniors won the championship, and the Seniors won the second team championship. The girls' track meet was under the management of the G. A. A. Mae Hutchinson was the manager. The track meet was held Thursday, April 9, and in spite of the rain went off smoothly. Swimming practice was carried on right along with track practice, and the meet was held Friday afternoon, April 24. The affair went off nicely, under the management of Frances Williamson. The Seniors won, carrying off prac- tically all the honors. A beneiit movie was given at the Colonial theater on January 20 and 21. The G. A. A. earned altogether on the two performances about 380, which was used for hockey equipment for next year. Janet Woolbert was the business manager. Instead of a Gym Demonstration this year, a May Fete was given under the auspices of the G. A. A. It was given Thursday, May 7, on McKinley Field. It was a decided success. Marjorie Wilson was general manager and pianist, and Janet Woolbert was the business manager. JANET WOOLBERT '25. Ilnw Ifumlferl Fnrlyjir yalxzzozzozzozszzmzazz. . Q OIIOIIOIKIIOIQOIf0Ii9If0f3ff0ff0INl0ff 1 H 2 5 zozxzzezeyzczozxizoiiezxxxxyxioiiesziexxiwwa ,.,.. - VU H' h M571 mg!QGE53fQg1u:-"NY: Q: .v 'ff fy 'f' ' " ' ki", 'x """'f'i-H"1i i5,ff'1yY' 'fQH'5i'WM?fl YU f'?1F'f '.l'A'::f':"f'L4I1j:'7'::'7,i'7',f7'TI5,."..f',.f'..'f'.5'..f'.47f,74H:J":n'ZiQl-ig? 1,13 D x ., . ,. ,, ,, ,, , . , . , . .- , , . ,. K. in qgglhx golfii 291 Sax, Calf I - ws , , fn LAY E 0. fr' 2 .Q- vi 3 Tqrl ' 'Af X Rx. ,xi 23' 335 I-T5 'fi P-' Zn: ki Xi Q5 Pff 'ff iff 5:5 'fff - - vs E 5 :KL s 2 33 :YL e V7 V: 13 3 , :I 5 IJ : 5 5 U I C E E E 4 .. Q. O G : . 1 3 an . U A .2 2 Z If L E .J bf U - , '-5 5 vw Q' J. if O 2 '5 'v nf 2 - e.: L6 '1 c E V - ew 3 :- X 3 , 'C W5 .J .Af :L o .. : 1 , 3 .S ,1 O A- . -.. , ., 2 - V, sg I I . -D 9 . , fi G w '5 fc. A- f' 0 C ,gm : 1 -. ..: gg U A, 2 H- 'A fi Ac-' I I O , c I ' C " ff. ff. D 2 Y 9 V: Lv 'ni P-I - N ' E , 1 1 sa E N -2 fi C J .4 N :I .y .. E :S : 5 :Nz - .. , 0 Q. :nz I-IJ -a -J 3 hz: 4. .fi A ,, ..- fi I-4 5, I '5 O , 'ff i" : 3 o 5 : ul o '5 -E 'Q if IE Q, -1 3 gg -7- Q -"' O E 'cf Q Q , U : 1 - - N : 1: . .v. .v, O 3 3 G 5 'V- IIJ 5 E E E if li pa O 5 O -, -,Q .2 -C .rg ff iv , 1 ul .DP L, , 5,5 Q 0 gg N I 5 ':. IEE if . I O E : 1 . f-l C ... J: .QQ -5, H2 on F : 1 :: F fn . E 1? r: '1 'J ' - 2.1 N .Q -1 : J. -, E E ,Y 2 2 -C 'Qs -5 : gd : : .V I-. E 5 Z 2 bi 1. .. , - , . . , N -5 as -EE s Q if 5 CD 3 5 ' ': zo: va A A 4 5:1 zv: ,,g.E -NP: : : 3 I -A .wx 5 2 2 5 F vi :A: L5 'L E E :"f fa, GQ .. 5- ,, :Qt .v. , 3 E 5 3 W oi Q O pil -Vi Q 'Z gg CE W1 :Ar Z -u -c zv: , . C -3 .. .A V- Z3 o -: '5 'X -E: ki 'C o ff: H- va F- LL. "J, li Si A , . L1 :i: Ff Q ,M 15' , . V5 'J 'f I. ,y-3, P W ff ,, ,, , x 4:jg,Q fkgxf5iV',,?,W ,AN AHA A .AHA .A. ,U .,, ,A A- . ,-3. . A-4,.--.4 L L1 5 ',.".---,. fx Af.-,,.V.f.H,I.K.l,, A .4-I-nf.. 5v55,l,gfD -Tw,6qh,l1 ,,,f-g,, V' .,,, ,.. , ,. .. . - r p-V41-.3 fx. VV UL, Q , . . u'0ZIoi10231101102101ZQIIQZIOZZQZIeiiviieiidioifvihiioifojfojivil Gllp' fK11gpmm-H Qvjjoifojfojiojjojiojioj10151415.314310310103143jojxiiojfojjoj5 Q , ,.. 9, , . - - 9. 'Q' if o 0 : : O .Q O , . -,- .o. ' ' .Q z' ' 9. o . . 9. ' .Q O 9. 9 A : : ' ' .Q ' - 102 io: ' ' . . :Q :Q II SOI : 4 Y - .Q V if .Q O .. 5. j,' .o, ' o ' ' .Q xi gif Wilson Woolbert Means Martin Q' . . it a.: 'O' : : .., 9 : c I 'Q' 9. V: D. O T ' ' Zvi ' Zvi 3:3 THE BOBBETTE CLUB 9. .Q :W The Bobbette Club has the distinction of being the outstanding club of 2.1 9, 3' : : 1: Urbana High for the year of 1925. The Bobbette Club has taken up new lines it Q. .5 515 in dramatic work this year. Any students who take part in a play or have charge of costuming or stage lighting are eligible for membership. The club 9: has sponsored four of the leading plays for the year-HA Pair of SiXes," "Seven if Keys to Baldpatef' "The Whole Town's Talking," and "Honor Bright." " E'2 Q The club has also quite a few members who now wear the Old English .:. "U" which was given to them by the Literary Society of the school for their 5 .Q work in school productions. The Bobbettes also hold an annual party which gg is looked forward to by everyone in the club. The officers this year are: -1 9. A AQ ' . , President ...... MARJORIE WILSON Q ,.. VIICC-PfQSid9Uf . JANET WOOLBERT Secretary . . . ZACK MARTIN H M 0 1 :a ' ' Treasurer . . . MINNIE MEANS 91 : a .Q V if Sergeant-at-Arms . LAWRENCE BINYON A 9 32 Adviser ....... FLORENCE J OHNSON 5: M O Q. S A The club was started in the year l923 with twenty members. The club ff has been steadily growing, and at present there is a membership of forty-five, if which shows the fast growth of the club. The Bobbettes are to be the leaders 2:2 jf? in all dramatic enterprises in the years to come. fl ZACK MARTIN '25. I 2 ' .Q Q , . 9 ::: ' Q . . Zo' :2 Q , 1 :Oz to: O f Unr' llnmlf nl l"m'1f,'.w'1'r'7l K g,,'5l!.z,o,p,.o,.o,,a,yy,area o,.o,.o,.Q,Q,oy.m.o..o,p,.o,.o..Q,o,.x,o, 1523 9,,o,,o,1o,1oj1o,1oj1oj1oj1ojiojiojjogojfojy51035103103jejisgiqpjgsgngvxaSBE - xmgjqjjgjjgjjqjjgjpjjqjjgjjajjaj1015101101j0ji0jj0j10jj0jj0j10jj0 why iK115p111E11'u 101101101101I01101101f011011011011011011011011011011011011011011010 S2 Q 101 101 Q01 16 101 101 K2 101 101 101 101 101 If 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 1d 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 Q01 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 01 101 IQ 101 101 01 101 101 101 101 101 IQ 31 101 101 If 16 101 16 31 101 101 IQ 101 IQ 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 C01 14 101 Id 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 5 I fn an 'D .1 U 'ii od U 'fC 2 LU CE E-1 D. Q Still, Oathout, osher, M Bennett, Hopson. Brush, VUebber Reece, Mos er. Kern, Carson Roux : Scrum! g Q1 101 101 2 101 1 '01 L 101 2 101 1 101 w 101 E 101 3 101 1 101 -3 101 2 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 D-4 U3 DU L1 101 101 101 101 101 id 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 11 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 f01 '3 . E? Q? .0, 101 101 101 101 101 If 101 EE .01 Q01 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 31 31 Ii 101 101 101 101 101 101 K1 16 102 101 101 L01 31 101 li 101 101 10 101 101 101 11 101 101 16 101 101 101 101 101 101 L01 QC Zi IC 16 IC 101 16 101 101 101 101 L01 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 1 ua::o::o::ca:w::o::v::o::ozzoziozazzczcxzexxzozzq:oz E119 IKUEPUIHIH xwzzxzoznzzoz3239210310191x:exsxxzxx!1lQ7f5 Bowman Still Dewey Oliver THE MAGPIE SOCIETY The purpose of the Magpie Society is to encourage and foster all debating and oratory of any kind, color and description. Those eligible are those who represent their class in debates, in varsity debating, or any oratorical contest. The officers are: President . HERTHA BOWMAN Vice-President , . . LOUISE STILL Secretary-Treasurer . . MILTON DEWEY Sergeant-at-Arms . . THEODORE OLIVER Faculty Adviser ..... MRS, HAMILTON Class debates were held. The Freshmen vs. Sophomores and Juniors vs, Seniors. The Freshmenwere triumphant over the Sophomores. The Juniors were victorious over the Seniors. The iinal clash made the Freshmen Winners of the class debates of the year 1925. M. DEWEY '27, Um- Iiunrlrwl l-'urfy-nim' IIC!!3IIQlCIG10IlQIQlQICN9231IOIIGIOIICIQQQIOIIQIIGI! Sided!!!lblitididloiyxxlMIZQLGZGZGMMHMI A , .5 4. ,C A x. -x v S. Gx ,. r 2 C 5 f Y 'W Qu fl? ' .- ,. I--fl ,,? -f .. ,Aw ,P , A Q,'if.Y!,!QjHNugfh.i M' P, H L' ' HfHfWvvwW,v 4' ' K ' -'AX,4X"'f"' ' 1 A --'54-'.y.gN-v.55f0Vg37f.l,yy1 - K ?jf0l ,J 1 Rf: PN Q. C O cz 6 1 E E .. ,N u SE : w ,in 2 .. Q azg E ' U 5 M: e555 af:- :UEE ' E - 2 A uigi i , C A' NESQ 1 E Deb , som b .. , ni .1 3. 1 5 E32 " 3.1: SU ff. .. U ,X- Opqi-' vi . 5 AE ,0- 62 'SF 'QE :nu-5 ". via.: . ' iS? S ESD 5 wu.,EuCj QQ , bd ' 'S "' 6 ' w E .: o EEE E 4' NE U32 fl L Q3 Er: Q ..: 53 'Z hinge, L .D ww! I. Q.-U ... - U E :,63' : N x-4,15 , Uma A ,.. .: ,, r-4 :hm -'U 1 .N :Mez f 5g .5 v' :Q 632 gm ,H ,, A -.,. - E335 igz: YI - 'J S o' .5 :E E 5 'f. : '25 U ' gi-3 5 3 rim? 4 7: , J ' ci Sf' Q5 w-- : gram oO 2.2 ' .A .-'c 5 -E Z E 2 sang aid, Q E525 4 ,C :M u V, .. .5 fm :iii Scif gf rf: fe 0 e4mO D ' . 2 rv 5.4: ECL :nfl m.gE f 3. E335 if Bk- 2 8 D AEE eE,g 1 2 2 :E if EQOB 7 N3 '-1- 2:2 23 ---.-.H O . ,,,HM, W- Q mr ,,.v f ,EE-2 0 ,l 'f'.v" '. ., ' V' C-... k V ,,,l:,5::4.., .bg :rg E M .. V 4 x Lgwhuf . "-4'--5..f'f5:i I L74 7 ' - wan uwww, , ' "- A- ., -L, .. ,,4A!o.k.m,,ll.,::43.,Q-.F-A-V M .U ,Sh .. .. ,,vH,sHf,vIA,l, I N 59.55 'wommms ' elfi fx., .W U32IfIOIIQIOIIQIQ92Q62102102IOIIGIKIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIOI EV 112 1-RuHPlllZ11'1I ZQIIQIIOIZQZQIIQIZQ 0KI3131023210232f0I3IIOI3IIOfIOIIOIm 3 sv fi 1.3 :Of if 102 'o' 101 0 102 o 9, W . , .Q 'c . . .Z " IG .. li .. 'C V .. T .. 202 'v .. i bf .. IQ ,C .. . . A IG :Of QQ ze ze . . O ,.. M :Q g .2 9. , , Moore Shepherd Way Bresee is LATIN CLUB izj The Latin Club was reorganized under Miss Lahman at the beginning of :fi this school year of 1924-1925. The organization is the same as that of the Z1 old Roman government, with a Senate body and an Assembly. The following ofiicers were elected: I nterrex . . 0 9. :I Chief Consul . . MARGARET MOORE . EMMA JANE SHEPHERD Assistant Consul . . . MILTON DEWEY 2:2 Quaestor . . . JOSELYN WAY Chief Scribe . Assistant Scribe .Q ,.. V Q. ,.. ,.. ,.. O 9. ,.. .v. 'c .Q 'c 101 . RUTH BRESEE . . JAMES COBLE f PAULINE CAMPBELL . . .Q 221 . SHERMAN SPARKS Aeddes ' MAROUERITE STEPHENS fi MARK MOORE if f RUTH CLINE Z.: Pmetors GENEVIEVE SHADE wi ROBERT SHURTS ff OMAR BANTZ 3 JAMES COBLE I Tribunes . , JACK DEATLEY GLADYS FREEMAN Q25 JosEPH ALBERTS flsr hourj Z, HELEN BESORE C2nd hourj 95 Censors . PAULINE CAMPBELL C 5th hourj fi GUY MEADOWS 17th hourj -A MAURICE SUTHERLAND f8rh hourj Q12 Licror . .... EVERETTE HUNDLEY 3 EDGAR BENNETT I Augers . . . . . THEODORE OLIVER 2:2 MARY ROBBINS z.: if .. Under the Latin Club's direction, both the active and honorary members if of the club have made donations and have purchased a picture of a "Street Scene Q in Rome," which was framed and hung in the Latin Room. IG .Q f- The Latin Club has functioned with business meetings, picnics, and parties, and because of the origin of this form of government, it has been a very interest- 25 ing club. RUTH BRESEE '27, Um' ll1Inrlr1'41' If IJIII nr M1102IQIQIQIOIIOIQOIIOIIOIIOI1021021021616IOQIQIIQIIQIIQIIQIIQI1119210216 1 Q 2 5 jfoj10110110110216'QIIOILQIQIQIIOIIOI102102102102IOIIOIIOIIGIGICIOIIGEUGW -,SQSQSQQnzo:10:10:10:asio:10:ioiioiioiioiiviioiioiioitotioiioiioiiviieifvii 'dllgp 1tKL'IHPl1IE!1'11 10110:10:10:ic:Q10:io:10::oz10:zo:at1010::o:w:s::cfc:0::0:k1Q,"?Ql22 M ' af B 101 101 102 101 102 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 101 101 101 Q1 91 Q01 101 101 101 Q02 102 101 101 101 102 102 101 Q02 101 101 101 102 C01 101 102 101 102 Ii Q02 101 102 102 102 102 102 101 10l Ii 101 101 D2 31 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 101 101 101 C01 102 102 101 31 101 101 101 101 101 K1 102 101 5 In 111111 ll KD D .J U E U Z Lu at u. LU CE E- -ci 9. 2 H w c : W EQ 5 o .C o : 5 .J 3 3 :: Q. '6 .. .1 :: vo J E '1 L. GQ Q Q. qv 2 Lf Li o E "1 L, ri o vi 5 .J Q m Q I E Z ws 1. C N Q. 102 102 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 1d 101 101 101 102 102 101 102 101 101 101 16 101 102 101 51 101 101 101 102 101 101 101 L01 101 102 31 10 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 101 101 101 IQ 102 1d 101 K1 101 C02 101 101 16 101 101 102 101 101 101 101 102 IQ 101 101 101 101 102 101 Q1 101 102 102 101 102 15 101 102 101 101 101 102 101 101 Q un, r 1 ' 1 -MI l"fjly Iwu K W E10210110110210f10Q10j10110210j10210110fQ0jQ0ff01f0ff02f0f10ff0Q10110210f101101 1512 5 110310210210210310310310:10:10:10310:Zoisiicieis:Q:e:0::0::0:Z0::0:103l659 GSL9n:+::o::o::o o o Q o o f Q o o wzzoiioiiozzozfvozioz' Uljp ZKUHPIIIEIIQ :mis o o o o o f Q ozicxizozioizoizvz:+::o:s::v::o:nQ7Q Still Scheib Waterbury XVerner THE FRENCH CLUB 4 The French Club is one of the baby organizations of Urbana High School. But in spite of its youth, we feel that it is a prominent society. This club was organized last year, but it hardly got started before school closed, so it meant some hard work on the part of our this year's president to make the society a success. This club was organized to promote an interest in the French language, France and the French people, and is for all students taking French who have an average in that subject above 80. This year's officers were: President . . . . LOUISE STILL Vice-President . .... DORIS SCHEIB Secretary-Treasurer . . . MILDRED WATERBURY This club holds its meetings the first and third Thursday of each month. The two French teachers, Miss Werner and Miss Elder, are the sponsors, and the club is indeed fortunate to have two such interested and helpful advisers. The programs of this club have consisted of little French plays, acted by different members of this club, the reading of French stories, little talks in French, talks by our advisers on the French people, French costumes, French artists and paintings, or some other subject of like nature. One of its best meetings of the year was its Christmas party. The French Club also had a very enjoyable meeting When they entertained the Literary Society with a program. The French Club has given several candy sales to help pay the expenses of the club. Here's wishing the best of success to next year's French Club. MILDRED WATERBURY '25. Um llrrnflf 1 fl I ,ji-if flu' WWIGIQIOIIGIIGI102Q021021022026102101IGI102102IOIIGIOIQQIQIQIOIIQIIQI102 1 g 2 5 IOIIOIIOIIOIQQIOIIOI1011015f9ff0fiOiQi31Xf9if9IIOff0if0fi9I19iI9I3ifCll6w .-..-H ey, f' W -N -I MVN, Wy, M, A 1. xy , .- M, , V, A . ww lvsr f' K x - ,,. N w-fn . , f , HCA. ,rw ,5,',, ,- A ff, f,,,,r , , , . . , , A , . U FQ , . A . law .fm , .x.- Q. .. fx Af ,f,.- . .. ff. f ..s4,f... f , cj: ' ' j 1 ' 8,231 . .- .. .. ,. .. . ,., ,-.- .- . .. .. ,. .. Conerty, Chapman, McGrath, S dam A umm an, M m LY anim, M Binyon Mann. Trees, on. llis Coble. Cu Furs! Row: w u s 'A 1-, 4 LQ. ,M A. ri .. E H an ri O W 32 .7 N 9 . Q. ... Q , .nc 'z .,. SF C22 L, . PX v. . SE v- I: '1 2 B: ,- .: ,. .. .. 3 v. :P QF. U .J Q. '55 Era 9 E LLI :J .5 :nn 53 "1 Y 1-.1 P. si ' E2 U N 5 E 2: 5 yi Ex: : of I va ,Q N! E2 -C: Us is .: .0 OE ,gf V. 3:5 -.4 3 :, Q- W A J ,, 3 V2 v, 'E 5 vi :: O 5 Qt: D .J z 'U-.. 55 EF SOI' 'NJ yf . V' -w f'-'Y ff :ff N : . .. ,. ,. x y,,y3,5'3vLE 6!'L9u:cxxzy:ozis:ez1.3iezezzrzze:41:.::.::.:s:w:' Ellie Knnemarg wtbzyxxoz1.31.1:o::ezzxxzm:m:x::o:mxn THE "U" CLUB HE HU" Club is an organization of all boys winning major "U's" in football, basketball, and track. All minor "U" men are to be regarded as associate members and may come to all of the meetings. The "U" 7 l Club was formed in May and is to last for many years. This is to R promote better athletics in Urbana High and also to encourage athletes to Win major "U's." This club consists of eighteen members: Presi- dent, Zack Martin: Treasurer, Tom Lyman: Secretary, Wilson Mummg James Coble, Everett Hundley, Joy Cullison, Edward McGrath, Howard Adams, Frank Walker, Glen Dunkle, Roger Conerty, Clyde Trees, Glen Chapman, Marvin Kemp, Ted Oliver, Wayne Mann, Clarence Witt, and Johnnie Coombe. Nine of the members leave this year, but the remaining members will assume the work again next year. All alumni who have won a major "U"'are to be regarded as associate members. Mr. Walker and Mr. Pulliam are charter mem- bers of the club. Q me L :gg ,rss I M J 15 WILSON lVlUMM Om' Hunrlrvzl Fifi!!-li: ufQffff!!iOifOlfQfCi9I!!f!K:fifffiffffflyff :OICfOlf0ffC!iQ!fiOf9ffOliffQi9II!!i1!If!!NiU RSQWLQIHQZLois:ie-7:oi:viiv::oiioiioiiftortu:toizozifgiogioziozgoi E119 iKn5r111z1r1g Lv::oizoziozioiiojioziozfoiiozio:zo:si1o::v:1vt:v3:o::o::v::oi1o:uQI9fQ122 ' ' if Q 1 ' Q 9 N N 1 I 5 i W If .fl :fi 1 1 ! I y W I 1 I y ff QQ I I 1 K fi QQ 1 3 ffl Q02 W W H IH Schcib QN3 ,C ,.. gg Q02 Sf go rbury, ji I6 , . -.4 f :og Ywa 9: 191 'Q 'Q' if Y s, Sloan. CJTS. Offiff if :oz ,.. L ci 3.1 Wfflfifi l, Mean Lloyd. Monoho iff ',- : 'O' I!!! man. S Johnson Hubbard, If If I :Of o w Q .Q r: , -4 fu If ib, B enn vcr if ff?Y on, Schc osier wilcr, Gil! , , 2 V,- .0. cg B - I y E H .6 '-' A.- K 5 r cu nm 4- : Q4 Q fOf T: if Q 7.5 .. an Q E . 19 XX' fliff homson. . Moore. ash. firm 5515! C T cc Br C A' C .. Zvi 5 s: - 92 f W EE m lo, Q E- 42. ,Q 101 E vi E r.: y 2 an A .Q I ai if K e :S Q 5 3 Q3 M 1 e, f V, C ,. K - .- 1. 9. 3: if if if If ow: Vcale Oathout. Row: Qu uuq: Dail fl!!! .. x y O 2 Sq . , 1 , EE M fi E E 5 101 'Q' LL V1 N :oi K 1 Loi I'3 li I fgj 9. y N 2 5 :oi 2'2 'Q' .9. iff Q'2 :gf 9, :oi C'l If 32 Q f 5 1 io: 32 , . , G 'EE Um HwnMwJIUHMMm K HRQZENQQKIKIIlliiilififlylflllyl 1523.yylllMyIMMKIMIIMKNIMMIIMKMMQQQ azxzzizozszzozzczezzczozzoz:ozzvzzozszzeazxszzozzoz Uhp Bngpmgrg xiezoztextzozzoizozzom:o::c:cs:zxxxxxzx3e7G THE HONOR SOCIETY ., A O HONOR conferred by the school excels that represented by this society ec g es o la J es as ' a I Stkj ' . It r o niz f ur cardin l ob'ectiv fundament 1 in all educational processes: Scholarship, character, leadership, 'and service. The emblem of this society is the keystone and flaming torch, sym- .l bolizing the high ideals and purpose of the organization. The nucleus of the society this year consisted of the ten charter members chosen their Junior year. The president was Louise Still: vicefpresi- dent, Hertha Bowmang and secretary-treasurer, Willard Monohon. On May 20 twenty-three new members were initiated into the society at an Honor Society banquet given by the Board of Education in the High School cafeteria. Fifteen of the new members were Seniors and eight of them Juniors. LOUISE STILL 'Z5. . One Humlrrrl I"i4f1y-.wwri I"3I'II'IIC!N!I'3IGPINWWIINH331039355155 1525 1329111011021.19::ozaixbzynziozxzxzicbiiezxyyywu 59010110311:oz:o::o::o::o::o:ioiroixzcxx:o::e:o::o::e:o3: Ehp lingpmarg xb:xy1ya:w::o:s:s:zo::o:9::e:yx:ex:s:b::o:nQ7Q GIRL RESERVES ARLY in October in 1924 a new club, the Girl Reserves, sponsored by the Y. W. C. A., was organized. Miss Elder and Miss Leslie were chosen by members of the club as our faculty advisers, and the follow- iglglfg officers were elected. ff,v'2g President . . . MINNIE MEANS Vice-President . LEOTA MILLER Secretary . . BETTY BRENNAN Treasurer ...... VERNA DAILEY The purpose of the club was to develop the mental, moral, social, and physical side of a girl's life. The code of the club is to End and give the best in everything. Margaret Schumacher, program chairman, immediately started arranging a program for the entire year, the idea of trails being worked out in naming the meetings. Many parties were planned by the social chairman. In April an Easter party was planned and a trip was made to the orphanage at Rantoul. In March a rummage sale was given to help linance the club. This club is a national organization, and in nearly all high schools there are Girl Reserve Clubs. Their national convention is held in Michigan in July, and a member of the club will represent Urbana High School there this summer. We hope that next year the girls will continue to carry on the Work begun by this year's club, and we know we are going to hear from the Girl Reserve Club of Urbana High School. MINNIE MEANS '25. nr Ilrnirlrfvl I" fljl'I'!'1ll1f wi!101202102IOIIOI3216102IGQIICIOIIOIIOIQOIIOIKRIIOIKIIGICIOIIOI! 1 5 I!!!!!!!!I0IQC!!l0IICIC3IIOIIOIIGKIKICKICICIUGQ 1 A X x 4 x K , . ,X X I f W! . J, X , Q pq aubjf Hull! 1 x 'x i' M, N , ,w N 1' ,N , yV,uywf,',1f fx, y 'vnu,gfl"ff!4ifNll,1v'M'Q7l7Z' ,,4,,.',ff,1 V , ,.f,ff'1Mf ,W7LylVT'rTrfT 55?n 5'm::'7'K ' I 5, f x 7 K, X I :N 4, ' 7 w . 1 , ' G - W, p--J 'B'5"w..ma'1f-f wfwdlufNMf,cz'Ld4f!.',,,14fwW: Hd:f,ffI1wP4 4 .V 14 wr, fm W .MMM , JK!! f f H 1' u:ezxx::o::o::o:zx::o:a::o::o::o::o::o::o::o::o::o::o::+:: Clip Rggpmgfg yxxxx::Gaz:Q:.:s::o::o:xmxxxw:x:c!n f--C' 3 V U E.. nl lffl - S. K. HALLOWE'EN DANCE I URROUNDED by pumpkins, cornstalks, and other things suggestive of a Hallowe'en party, the S. K. Club gave their annual dance October 3lst in the High School gym. Besides the cornstalks and pumpkins there were streamers of orange and black, which also made the gym more attractive. The programs were of dominse masks and were also of orange and black. The music was excellent, being furnished by Fred Silkey's orchestra from the University. The groups of multi-colored cos- tumes representing all nations of the earth lent an air of pageantry to the scene. Two feature dances given by Barbara Stanfield and Bernice Coffman were much admired and applauded. Alice Oathout '25 and Boyd Stephens '23 received the prize for the most clever and original costumes. Alice being dressed as an angel and Boyd as a devil. In answer to the applause, they gave a feature dance. The grand march was another feature of the evening, being led by Herbert Bickel and Dorothy Gray. The chaperones for the evening included Miss Ricketts, Miss Johnson, and Mr. Dvorak. Many parents were present also to enjoy the good time and see the costumes. The committee in charge was composed of Audree Hill, Lenore Blair, Martha Oliver, and Thelma Markley. Um' 1IllllI"'PIl XVIII! lfCfOII0I10ffC3f31101DI102101110101IOIIGIOIIIDIIIWNWN 101101202102102PIIOIIOI1021021023231HIOIIOIIIIWKHICDIIOIIQ3 uxzzozieymzxixzofazzozzsxzazyyxxxzzetezozl E119 Kggpmgrg :ear:ozzen:9:zzxxxym:s:m:xzm:h:lQ7Q MOTHER AND DAUGHTER BANQUET HE 4th annual Mother and Daughter Banquet was given by the S. K. , Club on Thursday evening, April 2nd, in the high school cafeteria. There were about eighty girls with their mothers present. Margaret Schumacher acted as toastmistress. Among those called on for short 4 talks were Mrs. Tobias, Beatrice Sloan, and representatives from each class in school. Ruth Villars spoke for the Seniors, Betty Mitchell for the Juniors, Florence Reece for the Sophomores, and Frances Allen for the Freshmen. Miss Leslie and Miss Cade each gave a vocal solo, and Miss John- son read a poem entitled, "Mother" The committee in charge of the banquet was made up of Patty Brennan, chairman, Lorene Langhoff, lla McPherson, Dorothy Scheib and Helen Smith. The club colors, blue and gray, were carried out in the decorations. Candles were used which gave a soft, charming atmosphere. This is one of the very few times that the girls and mothers are brought together during the school year. It is a wonderful chance for the mothers to get in closer touch with us, with our friends, with our friends' mothers, and with our teachers. Each year it brings to us the realization of how wonderful Mother really is and that she is a very vital part of our school life, and that we must always give her the chance to help us in it and to share it with us. I i ,fe 2 fi? ,IN J l I A Ulu' Hlzlulrwll Ni,L'ffl rm MIICIOI102ICOS!!!102C02202LOIICIQICIICIOIIQIIOIIOIIOIIOIIGIKI 510210116132IGI202IQIGHHHKKIKHIHIKICHIEKII WUIOIDIIOIIO Q 0 Q s Q c Q ozzozzozzozzozzeiv o Q 4232 E119 Engpmgrg iczozzo o o v Q ozzozxxzoztozx o o o o v::ezm0QI9f5 1 C' Jrk Pj Q 1 L . up Mg- -yi? L C410 I.. i ai , VALENTINE DANCE ' HAT could be more suggestive than a Valentine party, and more appropriate than a gym decorated in large hearts and twisted stream- ers of red and white? Lawrence Binyon's orchestra furnished the music for the dance. The three clubs of Urbana 'High School went together and sponsored the dance given in the high school gym Saturday, Febru- ary l4th, from 8:30 to ll o'clock. Everyone present agreed that it reigned supreme of all the dances of the year. The general committee in charge included two members from each of the organizations. They were Literary Society, Janet Woolbert and Harold Creamer: S. K. Club, Marjorie Wilson and Vonna Marr: K. S. K., Raymond Housh and Jack Holt. The chaperones for the evening were Mr. and Mrs. W. Harris, Mr. and Mrs. Miller, Mrs. Shelby Himes, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Miller and Miss Ricketts. It is only natural to assume that a dance given under the auspices of any of these clubs should be brim full of fun and pep. It was a very decided success. .i . IOTA ALPHA GAMMA DANCE The members of the Art Club, with their guests, gave a dance in the art room on Wednesday, April 8. The room was attractively decorated, and everyone came costumed, making a very pretty effect. A prize was awarded to Ruth Cranmer for the cleverest costume. As special entertainment Barbara Stanslield gave a feature dance and Ruth Habermeyer and Mr. Bickel sang. The president of the club. Ruth Villars was in charge of the dance and Helen Harding and Myra Torrance were in charge of the several committees. Um' llumlrrfzl iql.l'fj1'f1I'0 Mgqpjyiojyyyjojiolbjifjiojio o Q o o o o o o o o o 0 QI! 1 23113 o o o o o Q Q 4 Q o o o Q o o o o o o QQIQQQQIQQBQX lljojjojjojjoooooooooooooooooqiql Eh? mngpingfq102590QQQQQQQQQQQQQQQCDIIIIQRM CAPTAIN CONNERTY BANQUETS FOOTBALL TEAM APTAIN Roger Connerty gave a banquet in honor of the U. H. S. football team at his home on December lOth. Coach Walker, after an hour of strenuous effort to deplete the many good things to eat, said, 'iBelieve me, this sure is some feed." 'ii'Q+"f2i' Everyone present immediately agreed with him. After the banquet speeches were given by Mrs. Walker, Coach Walker, and Captain Conerty. As it was the last banquet for the year Coach Walker called upon every player for a talk, and it would have surprised anyone who attended the Elks' banquet to have heard them. The boys made real speeches, and the main theme was the brotherly spirit of the team this year, and what it meant to every man on the squad. "Bill" Weber, who has starred for Urbana for several years, said, "I have played for four years on Urbana football teams and this is the first team I was ever on where there was no jealousy or selfishness, but each man doing his best all the time for the good of the team, and helping the other fellow in his difficulties." The seniors, eight in all, each expressed their regret that their football days were over and they could do no more for the old Orange and Black. The men who attended were those who played in the Mattoon, Springfield and Champaign games, including Captain Conerty, Frank Walker, Captain- elect Glen Kirby, Bill Weber, Ted Oliver, Glen Chapman, Zack Martin, Clyde Trees, Clarence Witt, Harold Best, Ray Martinie, Ed McGrath, Glenn Dunkle, Henry Schumacher, Tom Lyman, Lowell Davis, and Howard Adams, The occasion was also Roger's birth anniversary and marked the end of the season of 1924. Our' Humlrerl Simlyefhr 1 Wf5qgQ3gQggQggQ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q mn: 1925 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q'Q':m:ex:e:e:e!xwyxm:u6T,gQ lbiiojio QZo:x::o::o::o::o::.::.::o:o Q oxozxxzcxy E139 Rngpniarg 10:io:io::Qio::o::o:Zeyxxxmxzyxzoz:o::o::o::om K. S. K. BEAN SUPPER HOUGH a bean supper is hardly original there is nothing that a boy enjoys more. With this in mind the K. S. K. club gave a bean supper on Monday evening, March 9, in the High School cafeteria. V Reverend Baldus of the Baptist Church was the main speaker. The H purpose of a bean supper is not only to have a good time but to learn some valuable lesson. In his talk. Reverend Baldus stated that there are three bones necessary to success in life-back-bone, jaw-bone, and funny-bone. The back-bone stands for stability, the jaw-bone for grit, and the funny bone for humor-for every one must have a sense of humor to get along in this world. The boys were entertained by a quartet made up of Wright Farnsworth, Lloyd Villars, Charles Johnson, and Clifford Fears. -Mr. Dvorak and Lawrence Binyon gave a musical stunt on the clarinet and flute. John Beresford. presi- dent of the club, acted as toastmaster. 3 J Q 17 MATINEE HOPS The first matinee hop of the year was given by the S. K. club, Monday, January 12th, after school in the gym. The dance was opened to everyone in school and was attended by a good crowd. Hank Shively from the Uni- versity furnished some very good music on the piano. The newly re-organized Commercial Club sponsored a matinee hop Tuesday, April 27 after school in the gym. There, have been so few hops this year that this one was a great success. A feature was given by Helen Tobias with Patty Brennan accompanying her at the piano. The dance music was furnished by Hank Shively. One Hundred Si.:-fy fnur wal!!!Q92IGIOEIGEHEEIOIHIOIIQHDIHIQIOIICICIQDIKZ 1151112632QIQ!3210292102ZQIDIIEEMIZQICGIGKZQII Glyn ilhmgpmarg BASKETBALL BANQUET Q53 OR the first time in the history of the Twin Cities, the Urbana and Champaign basketball teams were brought together at a banquet. llj The banquet was given by the American Business Club. Talks were made by the principals and the coaches of both high he -Q-if high schools. The captains of the teams, both this year's and next year's, were called on to speak. During the banquet the captains for next year were elected. Raymond Fisher was elected captain of the Champaign team and Howard Adams was elected captain of the Urbana team. The sub- stance of the talks was the creating of a better relationship between Cham- paign and Urbana. Everyone has fallen into the spirit of the American Business Club in bringing the two schools together, and everyone hopes that it will become an annual affair, an dthat future years will be marked by the best of sportsmanship between the Urbana and Champaign High Schools. ECHO DANCE The members of the Echo staff, their assistants, Echo solicitors. class Echo representatives, and Echo advisers, with their guests held the annual Echo dance on Friday, March 13th. The dance was held at the home of Kathryne Burrows, 506 Green Street. The committee in charge consisted of Louise Still, chairman, Bill Holmes, and Charles Johnson. Music was furnished by Jack Martin's orchestra. The programs were very clever, being miniature Echos. One Humlrerl Si.rly-fire Ng9llIG9IIOIooooooooooobooooqqfqj why mggpniafg 1313ooooooooooooooodllblll S. K. FOOTBALL BANQUET 2 Rx of the U H S football boys It was impossible for the entire squad to attend so the iirst eighteen Were invited Mr Harris was the nfl toastmaster. Speeches made by Mr. Flaningam, Mr. Walker, and Q Q Mr. Pulliam were the features of the banquet. A poem entitled HE S. K. girls gave a banquet on Monday, December 1, 1924, in honor Kfisfb ' Football Boys" was given, This is the first time the S. K. club has undertaken anything of this kind and it was a decided success. The decorations were very attractive, the tables being placed in the shape of a "U", covered with orange and black streamers. The menu served was: cocktails, baked ham, sweet potatoes, green beans hot rolls. pickles, pumpkin pie a la mode, and coffee. K. S. K. BEAN SUPPER The K. S. K. Club gave a bean supper, Tuesday evening, May 12. Coach Pulliam was the toastmaster. Wayne Mann, next year's president, made a short talk. Reid Evans was called on for an extemporaneous speech. A quartet consisting of Ted Oliver, Allen Dearth, Charles Johnson. and Clifford Fears sang "Hail to the Orange," "The Storm," "San Domongof' and "Illini." Plans were made for a dance to be given before the close of school. All the boys joined in singing some of the school songs. G. A, A. UMIDDY MIXER" The Girls' Athletic Association gave their annual "Middy Mixer" on St. Patrick's night, Tuesday, March 17. Some of the girls went swimming, and some went to the gym where there were games and stunts. The girls who did either one of these earned several points toward "U's". About eight o'clock sandwiches, potato salad and punch were served. Margaret Moore and Margaret Schumacher danced an Irish jig, and Irish songs were sung by a quartet made up of Mildred Jones, Margaret Schumacher, Mae Hutchinson, Margaret Moore. The committee in charge was Mae Hutchinson, chairman, Patty Brennan, Doris Scheib and Margaret Haran. our Hrfnrlrml A :ly 1 Qlty1Q2oj1Q!2ooooooooooooooooo0102102102 131010400QQQQQQQQQQQOQQQQOZMZGHI 9 Uyyykoooooooooooooboebll Eh? mggpnigfg 10110130oooooooooooooG!!!!ll THE SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET OLLOWING the custom instituted by the late James Wellen Hays, r ' i , , R5 for thirty-two years the superintendent of Urbana schools, and per- petuated in his honor by his widow and the co-operation of the Urbana Rotary Club, thirty-six honor roll students from the three g... ...a twin city high schools were banqueted on May 13, at the Urbana- Lincoln Hotel. In addition to the students each invited the teacher that had imparted the most aid to the student. Homer Shepard, president of the Urbana Rotary Club, presided, intro- ducing W. W. Earnest, William Harris, and L. W. Williams, superintendents of schools in Champaign, Urbana, and University High Schools respectively. These men, in turn, introduced their principals, C. S. Dale of Champaign and M. L. Planingam of Urbana. A representative from each high school, Virginia Veale of Urbana, Robert Kelley of Champaign, and Margaret Carnahan of University High gave ex- pressions of appreciation for the honor bestowed upon them. Miss Maria Leonard, dean of women at the University of Illinois, gave a short talk on "What is Education?" "It is not a goal, not an end," said Miss Leonard, "it is a means, a shining tool to work with." Judge F. H. Boggs, the next speaker, stated that schools have contributed more to this country's greatness than any other one factor. Dean K. C. Babcock of the University of Illinois complimented the honor pupils present with the following: "You are competent men and women, to take over the reins which we will drop to you in a short time, not because you are smarter than most or have more brains, but because you have learned how to use them." Dr. C. B. Taylor, who in youth was a student under Mr. Hays, and a life- long friend, read a memoriam in his honor. The honor pupils of the Urbana High School who attended were: Arthur Lloyd, Dorothy Kern, Virginia Veale, Emma Jane Shephard, Hazel Moser, Madge Quinn, Mary Ann Carson, Donald Mackey, Helen Smith, Marceilleine Gougler, Mary Robbins, and Leonard Pickett. Those attending the banquet from Champaign High School were: Robert Kelley, Winona Morgan, Vera Hutchinson, Edith Neideffer, Mary Rea Peterson, McNeill Smith, Katherine Osterbor, Ruth Walters, Virginia Squires, Margaret Phillipi, Florence Robinson, and Virginia Souder. Those attending from University High were: Dorothy Filby, Morgan Watson, Dorothy Vose, William Lloyd, Margaret Carnahan, Elizabeth Stiven, Margaret Guild, Elizabeth Windsor, Mary L. Cameron, Bertha Enger, Eliza- beth Gore, and Helen Johnson. One Humlrvd SI.v4'y-sera wli9fKIi9If9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9f9If9If9f 1 5 21319 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9'92113:IQDIIIICICICIHNI FOOTBALL BANQUET HE Urbana Elks entertained the U. H. S, Football Squad Friday evening, December 5, with a banquet in the B. P. O. E. Hall. All the varsity squad and all the second team players who earned minor ' l "U's" attended. Mr. Thomas Carson acted as toastmaster and speeches were given by Ray Gallivan and Roy Miller, former Urbana High players, "Red" Grange, Coaches Walker and Pulliam, Ernest Bearg of the University, Sheriff John Ciray, A. T. Burrows, and Principal Flaningam. The Urbana business men seem to be taking more interest this year and are making plans for a business men's and alumnus club with the purpose of backing the high school team. There was a great deal of optimism as to the future of the Urbana athletics, and much faith was shown in our present coaches, Walker and Pulliam. Coach Walker, in his characteristic manner, told of the ups and downs of the season, his trials as a coach, and the magnificent spirit which was de- veloped by the Urbana team. He explained the usual loss on Thanksgiving by contrasting the athletic systems of the two schools and pointed out the fact that Urbana freshmen and sophomores do not come out and serve their ap- prenticeship on the scrub teams, learning the fundamentals of the game, but wait until they are big enough and old enough to have a good chance to make the varsity before donning a uniform. This fact, he pointed outfmakes it necessary to build a new team from the ground up each year, for almost in- variably the majority of the team graduates. His argument was strikingly illustrated by the team of 1924, for only 13 men of this years squad earned their varsity letters and of these Captain Conerty, Weber, McGrath, Chapman, Oliver, Martin, Witt, and Trees, eight in all, graduate and leave vacant po- sitions to be filled next fall, and of the remaining Hve, Captain-elect Kirby, Walker, Adams, Lyman and Best, all are juniors and have but one more year to serve under the Orange and Black. Coach Walker has promised a new order of things for next year and we expect to come out on top. u p ,4., ,E frail' One Hunflrml S'i.rl11f'irJ1If .1- v f.!' i . J. uw. ,fv- . . mf' H. .. ,A A R ' H' 4: . Q' -wp- Q.1 . .,5 ' V .A I, Q 4 I fn Y X 1 . . . -' - . . 1. .Tl .1 ,., , . , , 1 oi, 7 . Q'-ljzl K Y 'fix .,' . A 1 ..'l, ,L .DYYTI7 U . V., . I .,... A, 'w '.4 1' " -.yn-,A ' iii - V r .4- f W ,I ,', J , I ,s.,. , ,,. i fl .. 1 Ju- -a.-..4...1zmeL-. ,. V 1511551 , M -5: UP .- Xx9n Q' Q' Q, Oivb 'Q 0,10 Q Qi Q 'QQQ"Q 'Q 'Q 'G Q Q' Q' Q QQ LLI11' IKu5p111jj1'U 'Qj'Q"Qj,Q,jQj'Q'jQ1'Q'Q'Q'Qj'Qf'QfQ'fQjQ'Q'QfQj'QjjQ'1Q1D x, ' ' af - Q. Q Q Q Q 0, Q Q QQ Q fQ' 'Q ,Q QQ if W 0, ,., Q. 0. 9, 'Q Q 'Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q O Q Q Q Q O Q 'Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 'Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 6 Q Q Q Q 0 O Q Q O O Q 0. Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q O Q Q O O Q 0. Q 0. Q Q Q Q Q 5 if Kf no 10. ,Q ,QL Q01 ,Of ,Qi 9. IQi 9' IQ Q' if QQ' ,.. 102 OI 9, 'Q ,Ol Qi ,Qi 10' Q Q. Q 3, 9, ,QQ 9. Q .OZ Q Q Q Q Q. Z .I 'E IW X gQg I 4,4 3,1 MMU' 'K' :Ot 9. ,., QL 40 .Qi .01 x 'QV ,.I 9. .Of 9, Q2 9. Z 9 O O O O E. . m H S o N '15 'Q 0 31 14' I+' ,Qi 2'17'2Q'i ,.... gn A 5 'QQ i ,Y,, ,.. S AQ: Q 'ff : L- 4 9, 2- if 'Q 3 fl' f ' i, - Q , ' ,Q , I F I ,O Q, . . f 9, Q. Q01 QQ 9, Q 'Q 5 i I av 1 ff llyfmlffrl x,v"'rrff1. K m u,,,..,:...l:.,l5,..,., QI".QTQTQLQlvgvjIQ.1Qj.Q1JQI,QQlQ.1Q1IQ.101.0 1 H2 fl iQ.,Q11Q.iQ,LQ,1Q.Q.iQ,QQ,LQ.LQ1LQLLQ.LQ,.Q11Q.1Q,.Q,iQ'LQ..Q 1QIlQZLQZ,Q,1QlD6f3L9 1 fv +1 . Q. X A ' M. , I A 1 -- , 'P 14.4,-.-. ,,.1.,,z A N . N 1 I qw f,,, Hy N N!! c,,y. M.- - Q , 'Lau an Im, A 3 ".,Qf-'F-If finffjg-fjQf41fy:AlQ5-.Q-,2:,.f::,l5,I:4,i,LH , GQAQ,gfQ,!:px. ' ,',,4 'X . .QT W ,oz ,Af fi: Q02 ,Elf I: f, U , ,C U E 5 f ,JI , vl 5 I E , 146 -u I: gg 3 U .'-'. Q vi fi , 5 EE if-i 5-J' '4' 0 5 1. VI ' ,- Fw . ,.: 5 'C Q E E 1, :QUE :Vi i- - v. 0.5 , 1'- E E E N1 I-EPD -Q2 vm -5-Z5 Iv. EEE Z 1, 145D gtg e 5 1" N I: ."', E " 5 , I-Q ' ,K ,, A .Ch 5' O .42 31' iw CKE 'J E Q 9. -'iz X XV Ls VJ L' .Q. .Au S. 5 V' ,K 1:1 557 if 'W V' -'- 'Y -1 2 ... .. ,11- A 4 A ,- A' -A Y M .,,.A... ,,, ,.,.,,,, ., .. ., .,. ,, ., , ., . ,, ,gqgj 'Y g fif0'Fi' 1'lJ..r,fQ X ww J, , 1 1 LA, ix A V. , ,. ,. 4, 45 K A A J 1 V ,,. , 4,,.A,,,, A 4 nv , ,,. ,. .. U A. H , ,AH H ,IIAI-fl-A, 5 QL , A T 4- A A l ... ,, ,. , .Q UP-Q N9gjQ1q101joj0 Q 0 0 0 o 0 0 0292j0jj0jj4110j1oj1ojjojjoj' Uh? mngpnlafg Kilo 0 0 0 0 0 0 Q o o 0 0 0 0 0 0 Review of the Football Season of 1924 M HE football season of 1924 was, as a whole, fairly successful, the team playing a total of nine games, winning five, losing three, and if 'IQ tieing one. Urbana met and defeated some of the best teams in the A f ghffb state, including Bloomington, Tuscola, Decatur, and others of equal . Qi calibre. gil The entire squad consisted of about forty-five men, four of whom were veteran material, around which a new team had to be built. Urbana's football hopes took a stimulus in the form of George Walker, new football coach. With two weeks' practice, Walker picked a team to represent Urbana against the veteran Mahomet aggregation. ln a game featured by good play- ing the elevens representing Mahomet and Urbana struggled to a scoreless tie, most of the playing being in the middle of the field. Mahomet excelled throughout the game in all branches of the sport except punting, Walker getting off some neat kicks, keeping his team out of danger. This game showed the weak spots in the Urbana line-up. The next game was won from Tuscola by a last minute touchdown. De- veloping into a well oiled offensive machine in the last quarter, our Orange and Black warriors swept down the Held to a touchdown and victory. Line plunges, forward passes, and end runs were all mixed in the triumphant march, which began on Urbana's twenty-yard line. Kirby, second string fullback. accounted for the lone touchdown. Walker kicked goal for the extra point. On the following Saturday morning Urbana defeated the fast eleven from Macon County to the tune of seven to nothing. With a spectacular aerial attack, the eleven representing U. H. S. downed Decatur. Both teams fought on even terms the first half. Urbana's only score came in the final period when Walker advanced the ball to Decatur's forty-yard line and a series of three passes resulted in a touchdown. Adams crossed their goal line and Walker got the point after the touchdown, The Urbana High football squad extended their victories to three straight by defeating the fast Normal eleven thirteen to six on the enemy's field on the following Friday. It was a hard fought game, Normal taking the lead early in the first frame, when a pass resulted in a touchdown. The Urbana huskies came back strong in the second quarter and by flashy playing and driving line plunges, the score was tied. Urbana scored again in the third quarter on a pass, Chapman catching the ball behind the goal line. Walker kicked goal. The teams battled back and forth the rest of the game without avail. Urbana's line was far superior to Normal's, the Normalites having to depend on passes. The Urbana High School made it four straight by taking the strong Mattoon outfit into camp on October twenty-fifth, seven to nothing. The Orange and Black warriors were keen in following the ball and taking ad- vantage of all Mattoon's mistakes and fumbles, and won a well earned victory. The U. H. S. eleven played a superior brand of football, although playing without the services of Captain Conerty who was ill with the mumps. Walker scored on a wide end run, and then kicked goal. Although out-weighed by Mattoon, Urbana played them off their feet. f Une Hmulvenl A'e1'1'IIl.V'U' Qzffgzmfojiqjojhlo 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4 0 o 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 031101102 122 5 10210210210 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 , .J Y f-.,, .. . 1 ,gf 1,Lf5f'f.fI,f!1E'i. f ' Lil -'fgejxgp'-fUg'q':i if-jp. f N f X , " '-fb'j.y'K, 1'-ji!51,,f'xQg',f3' , ,E KW n 2. N, . , ,. ., 'N,x.,, '1' 'qu f SECOND FOOTBALL SQUAD First Row: Gibson. Bantz, Co erly, Fostex. Davidson, Newman, Kcblcr. Second Row: Hardy:-nan, Davis, Coombe. Hundley. Zech. Peters. Sc Q1 ' f. H x -,'l,.v.-'. ' lf.,-?..i.f'..-f T3.'?.,f'. 313111335 11-'. . ,.. .- ,-zu, ,Lipfgf5m1f3:'- fgfiifgififig-' :i1Q,lJ.g+:2-1 f 'ffl-7i'f:" e ei.:-eip:-.1 7x5kl'fWgf- 'CCA WIN'ifif1'?1'if'ifififif1'1ifHi'f'1W?1'?1'11'21'I1' ' ' f'3if 1525 .:o::o::v:w:3o::Q:1.31.31031.39:iewzszicsziozzeiorieiciezxioixn 91901021011bis::Q:Q:oz:emizo:zo:iv::o:1o::o:1o:1o::o::o::o: Ehp Kggpnggyq Qozioizftviioiioi:oiio:zozioi:oi:o::o::cw::o::o:m:xxya,QpQ Urbana suffered her first defeat when Springlield, who used a driving line attack and an occasional forward pass, took advantage of every break and defeated Urbana, 12 to 7. Urbana scored Hrst. Then a fumble by Urbana resulted in a score for Springfield. Springfield again crossed Urbana's goal line on a fifty-yard dash in the third quarter. Urbana opened with passes, but failed to score. Approximately five hundred loyal students journeyed to Danville, only to see Urbana walked on by John Thomas' speedy crew, thirty-nine to six. Urbana's lone touchdown came as the result of a pre-arranged trick play early in the second quarter. Walker, instead of touching the ball to the ground, touched it to his shoe and with perfect interference, raced one hundred and fifteen yards for a touchdown. Danville's powerful scoring machine found it hard going through the line, so most of their gains came on passes and end runs. Showing a complete reversal of form after the disastrous defeat at the hands of Danville, Urbana triumphed over Bloomington by the score of four- teen to nothing. It was a hard-fought battle, with the Orange and Black warriors out-shining Bloomington in all departments of the game. Witt, Urbana's giant tackle. snagged a pass and, behind perfest interference, galloped sixty-tive yards for a touchdown. The other score came in the first few minutes of play. ln the annual Turkey Day Grid Classic, Champaign, displaying a smash- ing line attack, defeated the Orange and Black in the Memorial Stadium nine- teen to nothing. Urbana held the Champaign lads to a three point lead at half time, but Les Moyer's proteges opened up with a vicious line attack which re- sulted in two touchdowns. This makes the ninth consecutive time that Cham- paign has won the twin-city title. Um' Hrlnllrml Svrwfflly ll: 1' GPX 101 IG IGI DI 102 wi Id 32 32 32 It Zi Id 92 102 101 102 32 IG Id Ii SOI iol Id Id IG 92 IC IQ It 102 It IG IQ IG IQ IG IG 202 KI E e 1 QM l UIC!!102191102102102102KIKIICIIIQIOIICIOIIOIIOI32312 wh? mUHP1'IIH1'11 Roger Conerty Harold Best Glen Chapman Howard Adams William Weber Edward McGrath Clarence Witt Clyde Trees Glen Kirby Frank Walker Thomas Lyman Zack Martin Theodore Oliver Our' Humlrpll Serentlrl-four The line-up: G B E E B B L.T G B B E C T . Q WQINKIISVIIOIKI10210210216913192IOIIGINKIIIQIEHICDI! 1 5 3220210231IOIICIOIIQIOIINIIHEZIMICNYSE!!!-I Q!".9uZv1ZviZvi1023210191142ZviLvlZvifojLvj102103101Ivjiojlvlivilvlfd Efhp Qngp11mf1I 1.31411033035.31.3pg1.1joggagjog543:ajjogjog1oj34j:Q31Qj1o11oj1o1!lQ,"Q gif. .vig .9. X 3: f9: 19: f9: 19: :9: :9: f9: 19: 19: :9: :Q f9: f9: :9: 19: :9: :9: f9: 19: f9: f9: :9: f9: bf if :Of f9: :9: :9: :Q fO: I9: :9: Ii lol f0: P: If :9: :9: .9, fC: 3: :9: :9: :9: f9: 19: 19: :C :9: ioj g Q 'ff XA , , M joj :9: f :9: f9: 19: if -if 2:2 f9: :9: 19: :9: f9: :9: if f 4 9 X. ' f Q XX zz: IG Q' K 19: Q9: 6 X :9: ,9: :9: 'O' :Of fof """l"f 102 IQ :9: 19: :9: :9: :9: f9: :9: :9: f9: If 19: joj IOI :9: :9: :9: :9: fvf ioj :9: .9, 502 L02 '9: Q9: :9: :9: :Y IO: fo: :.: :9: :': 19: z.: 3: :': :9: c.: :9: :': 19: z.: rt If :Q 19: I9: E. l"I as 0 n 1 5 :': :oi z.: A :.: :9: :.: Q , :9: :9: 101 ' 29: 1:1 , :Oi 2 : j .9, Q ' goj zz: :Oz 1.1 :Ol 1.1 : : Q. z.: V QQ: :zz 5.1 :OZ :,: 0: C-5 is f Um' Il r1n.1f'1-fi .Nw-ww-ff 'lm' K wa M9: :9: :9: :9: :9: :9: :9: :f 19: :9: 19: 3: I9: :9: :9: :9: :9: :9: :9: .9: :9: :9: :9: :9: :9: 1 5 IO: :OI :OI :Of Qoj :OI IO, foj :OZ :Of 10: :Of :Of :QI If :Of K: :Of IO: :Of IO: 10: :QU 6 IgSgmi9Il'01'01102f0 01i01'0f010.01'0101'0i2010Z10110Zi0'10I10Z'0.L01 Gln' iKL11il,'11I2l1'1I 103i0i01i01'0::o31o3get003101'viLoigoiioiio:ioiioivoiioi'oioislQjfg2k, SE ' ' K . .Q 0. .Q 101 101 102 10' 02 ... .Q ... 101 101 Q01 1.1 102 102 102 102 102 101 .0' 10' 101 101 if 101 ... 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 10' .,. 101 10. '0 101 101 101 .01 ,01 .01 .01 101 102 101 101 .02 .02 101 0. 101 101 101 102 101 101 102 E 101 102 Q01 102 Q01 101 31 102 101 101 101 10' 101 101 101 Q01 102 101 101 101 101 101 101 .Q 10' 5 ... O. Q. 0 0 .: 5? l - Tk A M FSASKFTBAI I. TH Ii Jn. . Chnpm Mumm emp. Vfeber. Martin, McGrath. Mann K Furs! Row: S2 E u E7 01 .01 101 .01 ... .5 .1 01 O '0 0. .Q 101 10. 'Q .01 01 .01 'Q 01 .Q .01 01 10. .01 101 .Q 10. 10. 101 10. 101 Q. .5 .5 .01 .Q .01 10 10. 101 10' 10. 101 .01 101 10' 101 101 .01 01 .01 01 01 101 10. 101 101 10 101 102 102 32 10 102 101 101 101 101 102 101 102 0 101 10' 101 .02 101 Q01 101 101 102 101 101 10. 10. .5 Q. 0 9 5 0 o 0 77fQk:5g'.1 'Q if .3 1. Q 1. . Q. 01101101010 0.0.10'050101'-oi.o2'0..0.10L10L 1 .12 J 10.10.010110.10..0.10.10..0.1010..0.10..0.10.1010.f0I.0110.10'0.0.010.wl6TTQ5R, 01021612600oooooooooooo0GIGZC1 Uhr! mngpmgfq IojiojjojooooeoooQQQQQQQQZKZHHIQW Review gf' the Basketball Season 1924-1925 HE basketball season at the Urbana High School this year was one of the best ever enjoyed by an Urbana team. Under the leadership of Coach Pulliam, the Orange and Black warriors won eleven victories and were defeated three times. Champaign, Longview, and Athens ' defeated Urbana, but Champaign was later defeated in a fast game by the score of 16 to 13. With only a week of practice the powerful basketball quintet representing the Athens High School invaded Urbana, and after a hard battle carried home the bacon. Until the last four minutes, when the score was tied at 16 all, the southern state lads were held well in check, but the local defense cracked and the final score was 32 to 19. The lineups: Urbana f19j-Kemp, forward: Weber, forward: Chapman, forward: Mumm, center: Schwartz, guard: McGrath CCapt.j, guard: Mann, guard: Adams, guard. 3 1 Athens C325-Zalenas, forward: Spounce, forward: Perkins, forward: Hibbs, center: Winterbauer, center: McLovish, guard: Bokocki, guard. The next game resulted more favorably for the local team. Rantoul came up to furnish the competition and went back home on the short end of a 50- to-13 score. Urbana led all the way and was never in danger of losing her advantage. The lineups: Urbana C501-Kemp, forward: Chapman, forward: Weber, forward: Mumm. center: Adams, center: Mann, guard: CMcGrath CCaptj, guard: Schwartz, guard: Stucky, guard: Walker, guard. Rantoul f13l-Morgan, forward: Smith, forward: Hall, forward: Mulli- ken, forward: Siddens, forward: Funkhouser, center: Burkhart, guard: Starkey, guard: Stout, guard: Keal, guard: Blue, guard: Stayton, guard. . The third game of the season provided the first upset of the season when the scrappy little Longview five defeated Urbana 24 to 11. Neither team played any basketball, but Longview, with Smith and Paine as their stars, had a little more luck with their shots than did the Urbana players. The lineups: Urbana C115-Kemp, forward: Chapman, forward: Weber, forward: Mumm. center: Witt, center: Mann, guard: Schwartz, guard: Walker, guard: McGrath CCapt.j, guard. Longview C24j-Paine CCapt.j, forward: Smith, forward: Budheimer, forward: Fitzgerald, center: Brooks, guard: Warner, guard. In the next game Urbana journeyed to Villa Cirove and after a hard fought contest defeated them 18 to 17. Weber, Urbana's flashy forward, was the star of the evening and nearly unaided won the game for Urbana, and at the end of the game had 10 points to his credit. The lineups: Urbana C185-Kemp, forward: Chapman, forward: Weber, forward: Mumm, center: Mann, guard: McGrath CCapt.j, guard: Adams, guard. Villa Grove C175-Smith, forward: Landis, forward: Bennet, forward: Ciaffney, center: Benge, guard: Norman, guard: Stoudt, guard. The following night Urbana overwhelmingly defeated the Danville tossers 32-14, and although the score does not indicate it, the game was a battle throughout. Weber was again the outstanding man on both teams and gar- nered ten points for Urbana. The lineups: llnr' Hlllulrwl Sf'l'l'IllIll xr. v wlyjdjojjojooooocQQQQQQQQQQQQQQIM 159000ooooooooyfqyfqyyyyyyyyjg 0 H I I S r ,H wujijojjqjqfib Q 0 9 ojojjojjojjojk o 0 0 Q Q o o 0 ojojjoj 1 1531326 0 0 0 o Q o'0"o"o'Q Q Q Q Q o 0 0 0 Qjojjqjojl ljiojjojjqooooooooooooooooojfojfoj any igggpmafg Iojjojooooooooooooooooqyiojm Urbana C32j-Kemp, forward: Chapman, forward: Weber, forward: Mumm,. center: Adams, center: Mann, guard: McGrath CCapt.j, guard. Danville C145-R. Marshal, forward: Hoffman, forward: Davis, center: W. Marshal, guard: Gibbons, guard: Firebaugh, guard: Mason, guard: Whit- lock, center. The next game with Champaign resulted disastrously for the East Siders. After the smoke of the battle had cleared away from the diminutive Champaign gym, the opponents had the big end of a 24-to-l4 score. Urbana found it hard going on the little floor, and what shots they did get hit the ceiling. Mann and Weber starred for Urbana and kept Urbana from falling too far behind by their superior playing. The lineups: Urbana C145-Kemp, forward: Chapman ,forward: Weber, forward: Mumm, center: Adams, center: Mann, guard: McGrath CCapt.j, guard. Champaign C245-McCallister, forward: Derment, forward: Hyland CCapt.j, center: Fisher, guard: Gamble, guard: Johnson, forward. On the following night, after their disastrous defeat by Champaign, the Urbana lads took Decatur into camp in an overtime period game by the score of 24 to 20. Kemp, Urbana's diminutive forward, sank the winning basket for Urbana, and Chapman a few minutes after put the game on ice. Mann and Weber played nice games for Urbana, Mann sinking the basket that tied the score in the last part of the fourth quarter and which saved the day for Urbana. The lineups: Urbana C24j-Kemp, forward: Chapman, forward: Weber, forward: Mumm, center: Adams, center: Martin, center: Mann, guard: McGrath fCapt.j, guard: Gher, guard. Decatur C205-Robbins, forward: Thompson, forward: Pope, forward: Lowery, center: Sattley, center: Harrold, guard: Mitchell, guard: Frisch, guard. Coach Pulliam and his warriors traveled to Danville for their return game. Danville was out for revenge, but when the iinal whistle blew they were on the short end of a 23-to-9 score. Mann and McGrath played good games for Urbana and held the opponents to a low score. The lineups: Urbana Q23j-Kemp, forward: Chapman, forward: Weber, forward: Mumm, center: Adams, center: Mann, guard: McGrath CCapt.j , guard. Danville C93-Marshal, forward: Hoffman, forward: Davis, center: Gib- bons, guard: Firebaugh, guard: Mason, guard: Whitlock, center. Urbana won her third straight game of the season by defeating the power- ful Centralia quintet 22-20 in a double overtime period game. Captain Mc,- Grath played the best game of his career and sank the basket that won the game for Urbana. Centralia started a last minute rally, but it was nipped in the bud by the whistle. The lineups: y Urbana C22j-Kemp, forward: Chapman, forward: Weber, forward: Mumm, center: Mann, guard: McGrath fCapt.j, guard. Centralia C205-Dodson, forward: Randle, forward: Cameron, center: Litchenfelt, guard: Lacy, guard. Before one of the largest crowds ever witnessing a high school game in this vicinity, Urbana downed the fast Maroon five by the score of 16 to 13. It was a fast game from start to finish, with Urbana going just a little faster nv un: rw iff' n ,rl-rig 1 C-PX g1Q3gQ3gQ31qQ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Qiyiei E119 fKn5pmm'q 1Q:5Q3gQ3Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Qjojbjlsjlm than Champaign. Mann and Mumm performed best for Urbana and were the high scorers of the evening. Mumm sank the basket that put the game away for Urbana. The lineups: Urbana C165-Kemp, forward: Weber, forward: Chapman, forward: Mumm, center: Mann, guard: McGrath CCapt.j, guard. Champaign C131-McCallister, forward: Derment, forward: Hyland fCapt.D, center: Fisher, guard: Gamble, guard. In a poorly played contest, Urbana defeated Mattoon 20 to l4 on the latter's floor. Urbana found it hard going on the small and slippery floor, but managed to keep ahead at all times. The victory over Mattoon made it five straight for Urbana. The lineups: Urbana KZOJ-Kemp, forward: Chapman, forward: Weber, forward: Mumm, center: Mann, guard: McGrath CCapt.j, guard. Mattoon C141-Knight, forward: Lefller, forward: Gratham, forward: James, center: White, guard: Beason, guard. Displaying an air tight defense that allowed the visitors nary a field goal, Urbana walloped Kankakee 29-4 in a slow, uninteresting game. Urbana took the lead at the start of the contest and was never headed. Martin, starting his first game this season, played a nice game and sank two baskets and a free throw for his share of the Urbana points. The lineups: Urbana C295-Kemp, forward: Chapman, forward: Martin, forward: Weber. forward: Mumm, center: Adams, center: Walker, guard: Mann, guard: McGrath CCapt.j, guard: Gher, guard. Kankakee C43-Devine, forward: Barber, forward: Dean, forward: Deselm, forward: Cooly CCapt.j, center: Cook, guard: Kuntz, guard: Butler, guard: Scott, guard. The following night Chrisman came up to furnish the opposition and was walloped 49 to 8 in a slow contest. Weber, Mumm and Chapman played the best they ever played for Urbana. The lineups: Urbana C495-Kemp, forward: Weber, forward: Martin, forward: Chap- man, forward: Adams. center: Mumm, center: Mann, guard: Walker, guard: Cuehr, guard: McGrath CCapt.j, guard. Chrisman C85-Richards, forward: Weston, forward: Ballard, forward: Collins, forward: Oliver, center: Lolops, center: Creed, guard: Daley, guard: Wilson, guard. Urbana won her eighth straight victory by running rough shod over Bloomington to the tune of 26 to 7 in the last game of the season. Urbana led from the start and was never headed, as Bloomington was weak on both defensive and offensive. The lineups: .Urbana C261-Kemp, forward: Chapman, forward: Weber, forward: Mumm, center: Mann, guard: McGrath fCapt.j, guard. Bloomington C75-Jones, forward: White, forward: Morrison, center: Lewis, guard: Burke, guard: Kinley, guard: Palmer fCapt.j, guard. Ill' IIIII l'K'I i'I'I'I'PI ll'll1ill n H 1 I s fu K gfauxx:Q::e:Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 1925 :mm Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Qymzzciezezcxxsxmzasjgg Uidiojiojfoooooooooooooooabilid Eh? mngpmgifg 1119oooooooooooooooyiojjoijolfl THE DISTRICT TOURNAMENT Urbana was defeated in the first round of the tournament by Mahomet by the score of 18-9. Mahomet, with a veteran team, ran rough shod over the crippled Urbana team. Lack of judgment in substitution and slow starting spelled defeat for Coach Pulliam's Warriors. Champaign and Mahomet met in the final round, and after a hard battle Champaign vanquished the tired Ma- homet team, 24-17. Champaign later came through and took second place in the state tournament. MISSISSIPPI VALLEY TOURNAMENT Out of forty-two teams from four different states the Urbana team copped third place by defeating Principia, Western Military Academy, and Carbondale. They were defeated by Centralia in the semi-finals, l7 to 10. after a hard battle. In the first game, Principia, rated as the best team in the city of St. Louis, fell before Urbana by the score of 34 to 16. This was one of the first upsets of the tournament, as Principia was picked to cop the title. Next in line came Western Military Academy of Alton, and they were defeated by the lopsided score of 41 to 12. The next game did not come out so good for Urbana, Cen- tralia defeating them l7 to l0 after a hard battle. By this victory Centralia avenged their defeat at the hands of Urbana earlier in the season. In the game for third place Urbana trounced Carbondale 39 to 19, with nearly every man on the Urbana team connecting with the basket. Centralia defeated McBride in the finals for the championship, putting the Illinois teams on top. Out of the five teams competing in the finals, three were Illinois teams and one a Missouri team. Urbana placed three men on the all-star teams, Mumm making center on the first and Chapman and McGrath obtained places on the second. Following are the scores of the tournament: Urbana .....,,,....,....,. I ..,,, 34 Principia .,.,,......... ...,. l 6 Urbana ........ ..... 4 l Western M. A ...... ..... l 2 Urbana ..,.... ..... l O Centralia ..,.,,,... ..... l 7 Urbana ...,,.. ..... 3 9 Carbondale ...,. ,.... l 9 Total ....... .,,.. l 24 Total. ,..,. .. ..... Tl L . Om' Humlrerl 'lglnfy Qgggyypjypjpjjojiojjojjo o 0 Q o o o 0 o o o Q Q o 1102101 1 2311610 0 Q 9 o o Q o o 0 Q Q Q Q o Q Q Q Q oyyykjl uw:io:10210::oiio:io:io:iv:iv::viiozioiLv:iozioiiozivizozioziozie Uhr 311521113111 :vi101:02Io::Qiif:isz10:1.31.31.3x::.:fc:o::.::o:s:zzllQl'Wc9 . i 53, w ' ,f J I 3 1 ,4 xW ,T K ' ,ww Q1 x 'gaff' W ' f I I xx , Lnunn is Unw Ilffmlrml Ia'fyfl1f41f 'Inv wll0fl9I19QQ92QCQ9Ql0IQQQ0l19Il0fQ9I19f10191011911if0IQ0I1Q19If9If9IfCff I1fl9fQ9lI9II9II9''ifilflfflif9If0If9If9fIOIIQIQIQQQICIIOIQIZUW 'f'-"W f1O'o'0f'o'o"o 4 141 o"o"o"o"q-,W Q" - -1 'v V I I.. abr Qxu grnuuhu 'Zy'ii'iififf'1'0"01'ffl'0"o"o"o"v"o"o"0''9'!lQ,,'Q'?Zr .f c c .. Q QS. A - Q ,. 6 F 0 o , sr' o 9 ol .. Q o ,Q ,Q Z.. Q: 0' '. 'Q :'. 'Q' -'. 'O' ',: o " o :'g ,, , . 0 o ". 0 1' O ,Q . .Q . 4 0 4 . o .A 1 2 Q ' I 1 f .. Q . o 0 Q o , I O .TZ o 9 F A o 5 9 o , Q 2 I 0 H- o 0 E E 4 "V KC Z 1 o o 5 - , Q' LEE 'E ' 5 if m ff 0 ' : 7 Q. U E 5 o .. . 0 ' E 3 2 Q o E ..: E- , O D Q o 2 9 L. , . v-1 9 5 D ac " o .Q Z gg -1 O ' cn 5, 6 0. o nc , ' N 4 0 0 E 6 Z Q .01 5 'E o o 1- gg Q 5 5. i 3 O. ' Q' 2 Q' ' z wc ,Q '- N E o hi E 5 gy 'Q -A .A 0 o iff 0 ,I fl 0' ,.. .1 Q ,' Q ,' 0 0 .5 Q' ,Q Q vi o 0 o 9 O 9 0 .V 'or A42 o IO. Zo' f4Q go ff Vo ioi 5' 'Oi ,.: ff Zo' 10, bo' I -.1 Q 1 1 Q, 19, PQ' ' 'f li f ' W 1 ' L Q1, ' M , .1 ' W '- S '22-gfQlLo1o,,oj',-,o olojo 01044 o Q ,..vj,'j4,jo,v,1vQ0f01010102 1 ll ,I V,.,..V..,,H. ,,U,U.,.H,w f A-Q '-- M .. ., , . ., ., . A'.0.,4If0QfvQjoX'o"4"o'o"o"o"o one X 4 uwzezyszzo:zezeiexxxxxzozmzzexxxx Elie illngpmarg Review of the Swimming Season My HE swimming team experienced a fairly successful season, winning two and dropping two. Urbana twice fell the victim of Danville's speedy splashers and the same number of times Urbana beat Champaign. With but three veterans to work with, Binyon, Evans, and Leutwiler, i", Q1 Coach Walker faced the problem of building up a winning team. The work of Binyon CCaptainj was the outstanding feature of the season, as he went through the season without a defeat, winning first at both the National and Mississippi Valley meets. The plunge has been eliminated from athletic competition, and surely Binyon's last year was a grand climax to his years of success. ' Reid Evans, last year's captain and breast stroke swimmer superb, and one of the fastest tank stars in this section of the country, brought in many points for Urbana and will be a great loss to next year's swimming team. Lester Leutwiler, for two years Urbana's best sprint man, garnered many points for Urbana in his chosen event. Joe Williamson, a sophomore with no experience, came out and by virtue of his consistent work became one of the best back stroke artists Urbana has known. Much is expected of him next year. Eston Schwartz solved Coach Walker's greatest problemg in the dives. Eston came through in great style and will be a valuable man next year. ' One Humlrefl Eighiy-llnrea 01119 Kngpmgrg i Mississippi Valley Meet Q-539 N APRIL 4th, three members of the Urbana swimming team, Captain 'W 3 Binyon, Reid Evans, and Lester Leutwiler, accompanied by Coach Walker, competed in the Mississippi Valley Swimming Meet. Law- rence Binyon, plunger of great ability, won his event and broke the Will Missouri Valley record with a plunge of 74 feet. Lester Leutwiler, finding it too fast for him, did not qualify in the preliminaries. Reid Evans qualified for the finals and won fifth. I-Ie com- peted in a record-breaking race, the time being 1:11 2X5 seconds.. These three boys graduate this year and will be a great loss to next year's team. The boys reported a wonderful time, attending several shows and staying at the Beta Theta Pi house. This trip is something for future swimming teams to work for. M Um' fIlllldl'i"ll lffjfllfjfflllll' -r U321011021021020102921021021021021011021091102102102102101102' EUHPIIIEIYQ 102102102102102102102102Q01f02K1101911011021021021021021021G102DQpm N x X xv 75 ,.- '- X ' X X E.n.m. 'Ls TU EK Um' l11rmIf'f'rl la'f1llr!fl'fif'1' F! Q, 101 102 102 102 32 K2 92 92 32 32 32 202 102 I If 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 32 102 101 101 91 101 102 102 102 103 16 102 31 102 L02 C02 102 102 102 19. 102 91 102 102 102 102 16 102 102 D2 K2 32 102 102 11 101 102 102 101 102 32 32 1C 102 Col 101 31 32 103 102 101 1 01'! 3210210210110216111021021021011011021021021C1Q101b21011011011011611 1 H 2 5 1021021021021021Q1Q1011Q1021021021021011021021011Q10110231102102921021QD SQKQQQIIvi'ojioii-rio'fviffoiioiioiiuiioiiviioiioiioiioifoiioiv'iot Glhp '?K1I51'l1l2I1'1I ioiioiiviioiioi'oiiv?iv:iviio:ioiiviwiiojfoifftiotioi1o11oi1oiiv1flQ4f'7.Q52Z Ya b K f Q5 6, Qo' : 'Q it bf :': . . xo, ,K Zo: , 0 'Q : : lg' :Qi , . 0 ff T A 2 1 , , Q, Q ... Q'Q fof 11 iv: : .1 :OI 1 : 'O' :', if :Q ... Q : 2 I 9. 'A fo. SQ: K' Ivi O: ,.. I: f0f 2 4 102 o . . ',- fof z.. 9, i V ,.. 'o E " 24 fu L01 : : E 3. , 5 jog .'. N 'o' 9. -5 Y A A O . . 3 '60 0, fo. Q, 'of 'Q oumbc. F ny, Dunk 0. L01 101 10. f0II ne 'QQ 'Q Q 0' 'Q' fo TEAM Coblc Hunt . Adams, Co 9:19.19 I 19. .Q ' 1 U - 0 . 10. Q. ,O . . . .X '- 7: , - 9 ,OA .f M if 0 U 4: E ,Q .0, ' 3 .01 "2 E 9 c . ,Y iv. P' 5: Lo: 9' :A F ,Q ,J , . THE r son. I' und :O Q. 0 3 ' ,0. f0f :J Ioj 0' I Qoj I. F ff' .94 'fi' u.'. XYalkc Rim: Da id if .Of fi :Of .Ol '0 Loi D . , K .Y - E 101 31 Q F 3: .0 L.. J, To: 9, .0. f0I Q02 L0' L02 10. 101 L0i Q01 IO' 102 Loi Lvi 10' i0I V5 ff 10' ,0I .9. W' Q0 fbf Ioi Q01 Q0 'O' .O Il . . ,0. 0' 102 l0. 102 101 L02 101 IOL id Loi If Ivl 102 101 10. , 102 Ii 10. i0' ' L01 '0l 102 'of 'Q' Pi Nw Ilfilrwfwl l,'HllJf1.xf:' X y2fQgjfau1+:Lo:Zo:Lo:,oiLoiLv:Logic.:uiiv:Lv:1v:1oi1o11+:Lo:Zo:1v11viviiviimiioi 1 H 2 5 1Q21o:Io31+11o2LogL+:10310:gf:iv:io::viio:ZfiioiioiiviioiiviioiiogLviioi1oL:o:u csgugojgojgojio Q Q Q 4 Q 4 Q Q Q qs31v3:G1o31o"o"o:1q' fjhp mngpmgfg Q 4 4 4 Q Q Q Q 4 Q Q Q Q o o :o13:yyIlQ,'9Q URBANA SECOND ANNUAL INVITATIONAL TRACK AND FIELD MEET AL HE second annual meet was a decided success in spite of the poor show- ing made by Urbana. Having only one week of practice, and that of gli an indifferent calibre, Urbana failed to do as well as had been expected. 3, lyfgribx Danville easily won the meet with stars such as Whitlock, Howery, ll x c and Mason. Whitlock, with wins in the javelin and high jump and places in the discus and standing high jump, won the gold Elgin watch given for the individual with the highest number of points. Howery of Danville sprung the surprise of the meet when he defeated Stickrod, Champaign, in the mile run. Mason, dusky Danville hurdler, also showed up well. Urbana's few places came in the decision which Adams won, standing high jump, in which Walker tied for first, and Huss nabbed a third in the hurdles. Captain Cullison failed to display his usual form and failed to get a place. The Urbana relay team got second place, which counted some points. The relay team was composed of Cullison CCapt.j, Coombe, Dunkle, and Adams. Much credit should fall to Coombe, as he was the only Urbana man who gained any ground on his opponents. The success of their meet was due to the good management of the coaches, Pulliam and Walker, and student man- agers, Wayne Mann and Reid Evans. It is hoped that this may continue to be an annual event. MILLIKIN TRACK MEET The Saturday following the Urbana meet Coach Pulliam took his track- sters to the Millikin track and field meet held at Decatur. This year a new idea was introduced at Millikin. The meet was in the form of a relay meet, although several special events were also included in the program. Urbana did not do well in most of the events entered, but the grand con- solation was the winning of the 440-yard relay. It was Urbana's first attempt in a sprint relay, and it surely was a successful trial. Urbana was running second until Hundley, star dash man, took the baton, and he easily stepped past and away from his adversary. A fine silver trophy was the prize for the winner of this particular event. The team was: Walker, Coble, Cullison, I-Iundley. Those making the trip were: Captain Cullison, Coombe, McGrath, Adams, Walker, Lyman, Conerty, Dunkle, and Huss. This first relay meet was certainly a success and Urbana is expected to enter and win many of the Millikin meets in the future. 0 ru' H II mlrml Eigh ly-xr' re Qgamiciczcs Q Q Q Q o o o o o o o o o o o o o o owne 1925 iozzozgo Q Q 0 Q s s Q Q k9u1ojxjxj33poooooovooooooooiqioj E119 Qggpmgyg yyyoooooooooooooooqyxyl CHARLESTON TRACK AND FIELD MEET y On May 2nd, the Urbana track team competed at the annual Charleston track meet and took fourth place. Urbana placed more men in this meet than in any previous one. Captain Cullison started the ball rolling by copping a second in the 440. He lead the field clear to the tape, but fell beneath, thereby giving the second man first place and taking second himself. Conerty and Walker each entered in the order named. Huss carried his horse shoe with him and took a third in the 220 low hurdles. Adams ran in a fast half-mile race and managed to get a third. I-lundley, running in nine heats, came through in fine style and captured second in the 50 and third in the 220-yard. The mile relay team easily won first place over a field of 12 schools. The Urbana runners were Cullison CCapt.J, Coombe, Dunkle, Adams. The trip was made in the Illini parlor coach and a good time both before and after the meet was reported. CENTRAL ILLINOIS HIGH SCHOOL TRACK AND FIELD MEET Urbana took a fourth place at the lirst annual interscholastic track and field meet, scoring 17 points, Urbana was a leading contender for the championship of the newly founded high school league. The scorers for Urbana were: Culli- son, Hundley, Adams, and Walker. Hundley was high scorer for Urbana, winning both the 220 and the 50. Cullison won the 440 and Adams took fourth in the broad jump. Walker jumped to a fourth place in the high jump. Whitlock and Howrey of Danville put up records that should stand for some time. Whitlock threw the javelin 186 feet and Howrey ran the mile in the fast time of 4 minutes and 29 seconds, time that any college man would be proud of. These two wins enabled Danville to win the meet. Om' 111111 ll' 1H1 ll wallyyybjoooooooooooovooooooyyy 1113000009940ooooooooooqjqijojl INDI!IOIIOIIGKIICIIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIICNIIOIIOIE Eh? RUHPIIRXIII SICIOIIKIKIQIIOIIOIIOIICIGIGIGIKIKIXIIIWI ILLINOIS INTERSCHOLASTIC On Friday and Saturday, May 15 and 16, the Illinois State Interscholastic Was held in the University of Illinois Memorial Stadium. The preliminaries and trial events were held on Friday afternoon and those lucky, fast, or good enough ran in the finals on Saturday morning. After the smoke of the trial heats had cleared Urbana had qualified only one runner and the relay team. Hundley was the lone entry to survive the fast paces of the trial heats. The relay team, not having to run in trial heats, ran Saturday morning. Competing against the fastest dash men in the state, Hundley came in fifth, which gave him a bronze medal to add to his already plentiful collection. The half-mile relay team, Cullison, Adams, Walker, and Hundley, took a fifth in their event, running in one of the fastest races of the day. One Iflumlrerl Eiglriy-:rim ITC!!2011110555915?ICiZ'3!l!!91l'IP3i'3C'3i'iiif 1525 iyxyszzomz:exif5zo:szxzxxzozxrxzeiezexxxxxsu I, Weavers of the "U Football ' Roger Conertyl Captain Harold Best Glen Chapman Howard Adams William Weber Edward McGrath Clarence Witt Clyde Trees Glen Kirby Frank Walker Thomas Lyman Zack Martin Theodore Oliver Basketball Edward McGrath, Captain Howard Adams Wilson Mumm Wayne Mann Frank Walker Marvin Kemp Glen Chapman Swimming Lawrence Binyon, Captain Reid Evans Joe Williamson Eston Schwartz Lester Leutwiler Track Joy Cullison, Captain Everette Hundle-y Glen Dunkle Frank Walker John Coombe Roger Conerty Howard Adams James Coble Um' Hrmrlrrwl Ninety lf- in ,i '-.7 gm R.: Q m ". . 4 ., , C x"'L ..- r vi - 1 U -.. 5. 7,4 ,,.., L ,. A,-, -. X an-. , -..u. .. -., ln ,.. .rig-1:5 in Q., M., . 5:5 O., .., g -'-.g,-w-'-- ,3 , 4- , H .'v . , , 1 . fx.,-Q f, -V-1-x ,s.-.--'pf A .- beam. - -. - , .,---nf-4. , Y, 1, .,--.., . ,pq-11. ,,r1-rrvrvw ,-Q V erm, 1--1, v,,,,-x, -- -- ' - '--5 .4-J 5-.,-37' 5. ,'31zi?1.-,.,- ,1-ff,-,x-' figzf-13? Q- -iw? -a' g'y.'v... A-. -H Xi fwfr---' ,gn-'..---N'-5311---,f-.-75419 I I Q ':.r": 3- w "f',Cg' :fc .J-x,3f -gf, ,gig jfgfg -RQ.. -3. .- " .. I El: " '-.g-'.x'1 -"'f'--ff1,.?-4,15-.:'. ' " . -- if-T--3 f-221,-.1,f. - - ffiw :ivf.d1':fE:v-.f31-'-af''1:.1-gsaf '- .,'.-.-'f-1.--411' ' , .' ,..-5" er V '---.-'ff.,' -.' -' --v ,31,.-:L-, -:.1.f1i'r.,aa,wN. .- " , f ' a'Ir.Y'2Q1' ff -Q 1- .- ,. -7-.V--f--:lj --N. ww- -7' 1... .--.g.!f,., ' 1.5.5 - .I - .- - . a., 1 x 4 4 .. , 9,5 -' - ' - -- .QQ -. ,.- I-1' 1 f' . 'f'F1""" ' I, -N ,N 1 - , -1- ---.- f .- 5. -' -- - A., 1-, ff' - f 'v.l.'5r- '. ' 1' "N" f Z., ?...,W ,,, Y 4-'high ,lp , , , m.v.Z-cf. .f' ,., ,, ., .3 . it Q, V' -" ' ' 'Q w-.- -- -,'.,...aff!.2fH'f . . 1 , mr ,ur-J' - L.!.u,-Ax' "" - ,. 'IL: -rf-. -,A-.-. ...nz W-.1-lgu ,.,':w-.'y1.x.-.- - - " Tr, .- .- ,,. ,,:..i1.,.'.,j: -V: f C -. : U-.:k--Q91-' ,5,.f-,'-- 1 .1 Aw., ,I'4.?,u,-.,,. .Lap- ,. . .,,,., ., 1: J 4 1 v - mt r xx ' 7 . f W. a c .. .-.,-3 g, :- 'gfw 4-.." 'LK L .,-.'l - P41 5, 5.1 ' .1wmummWMw r 1 4 K E. ,,,..-. -rv --1 uv- ' , . ,f- .34 I-1- fffxx f' 4, 5. .5 -17.- WX! .'l - Rf J JM .- - 1'-...g i f -aw IQ '55 .ff-1 .IJ S, X A-u'Q?,AS'QlS.XN-SNR--5. . S . ,gy-.X X X .0g.Rf.::-xgi 7 r M' Q X N ., ,QM .QA f ' .X 4 TB' ' g ,mari A 159 -"aa - lg K , , ,. . . A xv :S ...r-51,5 X ., 1- -Q-.xx- - yu-Q. wx -- - ,V , V. - - 13.9 ar ,f "GQ-.-:-,, "' 1 -- f ,J-R 1 ' --'-er' .A 1' l'f1Q1 1. -aug- .X . ,. , N f1z"i"j5Z", . 1 ' -4x v .J . Q.. a:,..,.,A,,l1 71.- ,j,,..S7. , ,. ...iv-V-.4 Q' X' ' ' A- . '11 f 1' ., , . V. . i. . - 'Y , " .1-. v-1, ,f.,. wx I.. ,,-.., ..,g .' :il ' I' ' ,Il v 1.1 ,5..-'- ., - 4 5.- HH, ZZ". " JLW1: - . '-'.- ,L- mmm ' wma ki.. .- -A ..,., . ., I, C -Q,f -:Lfe,xfg -. -, J ,.- " , f 4, . ' " -.Jn -g.' .-.1 f DUHLIEATIU U Xl IU L51-Q, 4 -'T .Q ' 4 f L. 1.59. ,-" ,ff - ,L .R , . f "'- . ' w . ---A .. -'rv f Q A ' 3. f .5452-4 ln .,f:j1." . j --.--.---1 --.',:, --' - . , ' A , f -1- 51-3 EQ' x-.- -:z - ff X 6 ' -- :fi AL' 9 fifff, 3 K f w ' N 7 f - .,f1"-rf'-,g5L"t , . F 4 ' . . -, rv' , Q Q mafia.. -.-,i V- .' 41 j H '.', Q K fXN'39p-Q55 - ,f--gr ' .' f ' , , 'Qlfff ,'QQ.-gL"f?-Q X w , X L.'ffe-4.4"Q-iv-VLGS. I , "g.' - . ,, ff. - ,f x -...Q--J ..5. - f. V . f . 3 ', ' .. -'--,W ,f 1 I5 .1 F K . ,jg .I ' ' ., -nu:.f1f',,,'- ,I 1 X ,y-::,j-fb:-Q -'L f' .,'J - -'-2 . , I, X, , ..,,, , f ,X " - - 4,'41125,1A ilzgfv V I -11 w ff.-'flip " 3-. gy f. r. - 'md ' g J'-ws.-Ly. A A-JH ,Y X I I 1, Qj. Y t 33.--Q9,,L'g , J 2 V 4, , ,, ' " W .--.f'fZf'ii'1-' - ' f -'-'-51-.."Y,Q .-j',1'3' ,ig 3,31-' 1'-. f .i' I 1. L 1 -I'-vi ,: I X -3' 'I ' 'H-L, 7- 3- . '- - Q- - . ----4,',i.-,',5..-g- X J 4 X v ,-L122'-' , ,,Af:,.:' I- ---- - -J ---.f w , Q , - """,- -' ' ' f 'I " ' . -' 1. . . ' M5 ' "2'?T:: -1- 1 'fy' 7315 257.13 '.,i""- lf" "1 ' .J-71 3.7,----Ln Y -5 -,f--f , - f . if -. ui.. --, 5155. -.Lf W jg f-X, Y '- .Z , , x Z --1 -'A j.T,3.-. v"- fa Z, .-4. - 1--T H -. 1' f .7-. A V '-1-5 1 'I -- 2".,31ii?f--. -- -' aff.-1 w, -N 4 , , - " ?:4Y,.- K .4 - ..g, - pr -'!. r . W- X ,g i , :-, 1 5, J: .- '-A 1 -. ' I . ' 1 W , .Qg,- ': ,-.,.-,I 1. 1 I - -XX -22 UU -N .-4 Mg C6718 qlosemary M 1 HE Rosemary is published by the graduating class of the Urbana High School. The Senior class elects the editors and the editors pick their assistants. The George D. Louden Printing Company printed the Rosemary fs . this year and Geo. R. -Grubb and Company made the engravings. Each A Rosemary costs four dollars and fifty cents, but by having every or- ganization pay for its cuts and, also, by advertising, the Rosemary is sold for two dollars. The Rosemary has a subscription list of four hundred and fifty. THE ROSEMARY STAFF Editor-in-Chief WILLARD MONOHON Associate Editor BEATRICE SLOAN Business Manager THEODORE OLIVER Literary Editor MARGARET IVIOORE Art Editor ELIZABETH MASON Circulation Manager I-IERT1-IA BOWMAN Photo Editor VIRGINIA VEALE Athletic Editor REID EVANS Calendar Editor DORIS SCHEIB Society Editor ELIZABETH YANTIS Joke Editor NELLE IVICDONOUGH General Staff HELEN VEACH PATTY BRENNAN RUTH VILLARS EDNA BRASH MYRA TORRANCE LAWRENCE BINYON DOROTHY SCHEIB JANET WooLEERT ALBERTA CARPENTER ne Hunflrefl .Yinely-In-0 Gif:Of101:02fOff0fIO:IOIIOI11029::OfIOI1022021921IOIIQXCQQIIOIICIIQ 1 5 KI!Yif!lf!lifliilllllfifiiffifIIOIIHJI U '01 101 101 fi ff f0f If f0f 101 101 101 101 i0T 31 101 f0f ff If 101 '01 fi 101. El P L1 51' 11121 1' 11 101 Q01 Q01 102 f0I 102 101 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 101 102 201 f0f Q01 102 102 Il N. ' 37,1 Q .0. K1 101 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 102 31 102 102 91 102 202 32 16 102 101 102 102 102 102 101 102 102 31 101 101 102 101 101 102 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 91 101 102 101 102 C01 101 202 102 It 101 C03 102 5 32 M .Z 16 16 1Q IQ IQ IQ 101 101 102 102 101 101 If 101 101 101 102 102 102 101 20 .OI 3 THI1 RrusLMARY STAFF lnsl limb' Mmmhon. Sloan. Ullvrr. 'l'hrrd Rau! Vcnic. Ifvans Sclmclb. Sauna' Row: No-"ru Mason, Bowman. Iourlh Row: Ynnlis, Mcllonough. Lcsllc. 1 H111 llflwlrffl Xmwlw' 1 101 102 102 101 101 102 103 101 102 101 101 101 10. 32 102 102 102 102 102 102 101 101 102 102 32 101 102 101 101 102 101 102 101 101 102 102 ZOI 101 101 102 102 102 101 101 101 02 101 102 101 102 102 101 101 102 52 102 101 101 16 IC IC 16 102 102 102 11 102 li 16 IG 102 IQ IQ 102 102 101 101 101 102 102 101 101 Q02 101 101 101 101 L01 ,O1 .Q ,61 0 J' P gg wUI0ff01f0If0If0110f3ff0If01f0f1i1i101201102101f02f0110I10f10I1Q101102102101 1 H 2 LT I0210210I10jI0I10I10110110210110110110110110110110110110110210210f10210110I10IU6'i5gig 0192IGI31IGIIOIIOIIOIIOIDIICIOIKIIOIDIIOIIOIKIIOIDIIIOII wh? IKIJHPIUEIYQ EIDE132202KIIOIHKIKIIOIIQIGWNKNIEDIU- Che Echo lxffibl rather inexperienced staff took up the Work of publishing the Echo at i the beginning of the school year. In spite of this fact, a paper was printed on time each week of the school year. Six pages was the I wi usual size of the Echo, although several eight page papers were pub- lished. At the first of the second semester the paper was increased from a three column, ten-inch sheet, to a four column, thirteen-inch sheet. Every department of the staff has done good work during the year. Many of those who helped with the Echo this year are members of next year's staff and hope to put out an excellent paper. THE ECHO STAFF Editor-in-Chief ALICE OATHOUT Associate Editor FRANCES WILLIAMSON Business Manager LESTER LEUTWILER Circulation Editor LOUISE STILL News Editor PATTY BRENNAN Society Editor EDRIE SEWARD Joke Editor WILLIAM HOLMES Athletic Editor WAYNE MANN Exchange Editor BEATRICE SLOAN Advertising S oil icitors WRIGHT FARNSWORTH CHARLES JOHNSON M Uni' Hunrlrvrl Xzawlpf-fum' yall!!!5bl!20210120291102IG20210210210210132202102ZQIZQZZQCOIZQIOL 1 H 2 5 2102102102102KIPIGKIIOIIGKICIIMMICIQZIQZ1021021032519 A U4 4 4 4.4 4,4 4,4,,4.,0.0 0. 4. 0 0.0.0.0 0..0.0 L, IL A1151 111d1 44.4 4 4,4 ,GMO 4,4,,4,,4 4,4,4,,4,.4,4,4,4A4,,4IlQ,. gif Sh il 4 6. .3 "' 202 Q . . , III . 1.1 4. 4 29 242 0 24 0' gi 0 .V 2.1 .02 242 2.5 2.2 l4i 24: 2.2 ',' 2.1 I.I '51 :Qt 2.1 'QV 7.1 'O' 2.2 202 241 202 24: '02 24: '42 4 101 74: 41 24: ',f :Oz i4Q ii V.: :Oz 202 24: 2,1 .0. 24: 1.1 c.: 5.1 242 42 l4i 4' 202 4' 202 4' Z4i 42 142 '42 202 62 IQ '42 42 242 202 1.1 4: 24f 4' L42 242 Q02 1,1 242 202 4' 202 4 42 4 0' 4 0. 4 .02 0 .5 4 .02 4 .42 4' 202 242 0 '4' 102 242 IQ '42 202 '4' 202 '42 142 4 202 14: Q02 24: 202 242 Q02 24' Q02 541 202 242 102 24: 202 24: 202 '42 '02 4' 4' 4' 4i 4 241 ,. .5 '4' 4 202 '4 L42 4 20' 4 202 0 .5 .0 2. 2' .. 42 14 4 14' 4' 20' 4 4 O . ..,,......., .I L THF ECHO STAFF K CD I-irsz Ruin: Olithout. Williamson, Leutwiler. Third Rnw: Hqlmes. Mann. Sloan. ' GD 7 Srcund Row: Still, Brennan, Seward. Fourlh Row: I-arnsworlh, Johnson, Leslic. .L GE vw Ilffnfffiii x,,.,f, J., Q' Uv . .. . . . ...,, .. . .. .. . . ., . .. .. q fl ..,....... QV... .......,....,Q ................,,,,.,.,,,H.,,ul6wXr 4 RQ,fQn.4.4.4.4 44.4.4.4 4.4.4.4 4.4..4..4..4.4..4.4.4..4.4..4..4. 1- ,., . .. ... .. .2 .. .. .. .. .. .. ,. .. ,. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. ... uzero:Servwif.::miic10:1.3xzzozzeizoixiteiextzbtz Elie Rnnemdrg zo:1.11.2:ozzo:zo:zo:ze:o::o:xxxm:yxwz:o::0IlQ7E Illinois High School State Press Association N November 20, 21, and 22, the annual meeting of the Illinois High 'xl '4 School State Press Association was held at the University of Illinois. t Those eligible to attend this meeting were all members and assistants on staffs publishing a high school paper or annual. lmidl Over five hundred delegates attended this year's convention. Some of the social functions given for the entire body of delegates were: a reception and entertainment given by the Quill Club of Champaign High School, a Journalism Jamboree which was a dance given at the Woman's Building, and a luncheon at Wesley Foundation. At this luncheon Winners of prizes for the best publications were announced. Urbana had entered both the Rosemary and the Echo. The Rosemary took fourth place. As the main purpose of this convention was to instruct the delegates in improving their publications, several lectures were given by faculty members in the Journalistic Department at the University of Illinois. One of the most interesting was given by Charles B. Davis from the University of Illinois on "Making Your News Interesting." A very interesting lecture was given by an "Illini" reporter who told "What I Could Have Done With My High School Newspaper." Miss Alice Tessendorf from Crystal Lake High School, Chicago, was the president of the association for this year and presided at all the meetings. This was the third annual meeting of the Association. The attendance has steadily increased and the publications entered in the contest have improved. It is a general wish that these conventions be continued and enlarged, not alone for the enjoyment, but also for the instruction and experience derived from them. Hum! el Nm Um' 1' .1 r" My-.w1'.l' f!3iifQiMiff9ff9ii9fi9i?iii!!3iiQ3ifCf0iffiC!if!i91 iiflifliffffffffffiifIfi9if9i!3fff!yll3iKiifl6'X EJ1 2 mm r rv N CALENDAR Ar Amnooooooooovoooooooooooo Qllu igngmuzu-N jgjjgjjqoooooovoooooooooo1fojjoj?lQ,,s'Q'22 SEPTEMBER Registration-Senior girls help. Registration-The "babies" get along line. The angry mob enters. We have an opening assembly. Several green things seen floating around. Everybody is glad to be back to school-especially the Seniors. We all love our teachers. There are several new ones. Ruby Hiser has accepted the position of writing excuses in the office. The gym and swimming classes are overflowinghsuch healthy people this year. We have a big representation from Sid- ney this year. l-lienie, Wilson, and Clyde. The "Purity Gang" have made a foot- ball team. There are certain quali- fications to have which some find hard to get. Nelle lVlcDonough's mother said she couldn't have any week-night dates this year. All the girls are trying to get Roger for their football hero. Be careful "Rog." Sophomores elect officers. Football game between Urbana and Mahomet. OCTOBER G. A. A. holds their second meeting of the year third hour. Everybody is getting along fineifoutside of schoolj. The Juniors win the Echo shield. Rosemary election-Hall seniors excited. First grade cards out. "Much grief." Kitty Burrows suHocated with gas in Chemistry. The cast is chosen for "A Pair of Sixesf' Urbana 7-Decatur O. Pat us on the back please. MQMQUQQQQooooooovooooooeooooooo jojiojooooooooQoooooooeosooojjojfojlwg ll BSm9ll'o1'oj'o' 0 0 o o 0 9 9 0 0 0 0 o 4 o 0 Q rofo' Gln' Qh1gp111u1'1I fvjjofo' 0 0 o Q o Q Q 0 0 02201Ii'ojfqf1ojfiIo1fo1fojJlQ:Q2Z Q-2592 E51 .5 2 7' 13. Neva Bevis is absent with a sore toe. 7' . . 101 4' 14. S. K. meeting after school. Seniors re- Loi O 1 . . I ceive a little sister to look after. I O ' 15. Pep is steadily increasing-assembly ' E: for Bloomington Game. G. A. A. E : meeting after school. : 16. The Junior and Senior debating teams I 1 are chosen. : 17. We just had school in the morning so I I Ed McGrath could go to the Hobo Z I parade in the afternoon. 2 I 18. Homecoming Game in the Stadium. 2 I Illinois 39-Michigan 7. : 1' 20. Eirst Erench Club meeting of the year. I if 23. S. K. Senior girls try to be sweet. 1 Q simple and girlish once more and I I dress like little girls. I if 24. Mr. Casserly takes Miss Leslie on an I Q errand of mercy. G. A. A. hike I . O Q after school. , 25. -'sEN1oRs PAY YoUR crass I DUESY' I 0 Q 0 Several people went over to Mat- Y Q 0 - Q 0 toon for the game. Urbana won Q 9 V 0 Q 7-O. , Q :Z 27. Ray Dvorak is in Chicago getting 1 1 music for chorus. Q . . 0 1' 29, Girls Basketball Teams picked. 2 I 30, Pep assembly for Springfield-Girls 1 ' are going to form a block 0 0 Ii 31, We get out 7th and 8th hours for the E I game. Springneld 12-Urbana 7. 1 0 o . O ' NOVEMBER Q 0 o Q 1. S. K. club gives a keen Halloween I 2 dance in the Gym. I I 3. The Seniors start having their pictures I ' taken. Several cameras are broken. ' E 4. AssemblyflVlr. Bickel and some of his E ' pupils tell us how to vote. 0 . . . C I 6. Red Cade '24, was a visitor this noon Q 1 and used his car to take all the girls I Q for a ride. I z 7. NVillard and Kendall Kelley are leaders I I in points for 'APique." I I' 8. About half the school went to Dan- Q IIA ville in cars for the game. You all 'f C3 know how it came out. k E, gf Huwllifmlliil 1111-111111111 Qgfrlagtojono, Q o o o o o o o o o o o Q Q o o o o o 4 oijoijo, 1 it 01015 o 4 0 o o o o 0 Q Q Q ojQojQoQQojQojQojo 0 ojQoQjojj0jD6w S S 9 if .0 ... O 0 Q ll O O 9 6 , l2 0 O O Q O Q 13 O 9 O O 0 3 14 O 0 O I 15. I 17 O 6 O O O O 0 0 O Q 18. 0 0 O 6 O 0 O :1 O 0 O J O O Q 20. 9 0 O O O O 0 0 0 O O O O 0 I 23. 0 9 I 24. Q O 0 4 25. Q O O O O 21. Q .Q gg 2 6 . io: :oi ro' d M Yu-U llffmlrml ff 10. 19. GYQ-'xguvajkjjoj s o 4 o o o o o 4 o o o o Q o o vikiiojj Eh? Qngmual-U joiioifv o o o o o o Q o o o Q 0 Q 4 Q ojfojfoj1ojn Na ' ' af All Stunt Show committees are ap- pointed. Mr. Casserly and Miss Leslie were seen talkingseventh hour. The chorus sings down at the Ma- sonic temple. Betty Brennan stumbled over her i'BlG" feet and fell down the steps at the Virginia. The chorus makes themselves famous again by broadcasting at the Ur- bana-Lincoln. All classes working hard on the Stunt Show. Janet has captured Howard's heart. QA Pair of Sixes" is a big success. Everybody is peppy after the Bloom- ington game. Speeches were made by all the members of the team. CHI suppose you know we won etc."j The Juniors fas usualj Won the girls' basketball tournament. Minnie Means was absent because of a black eye received in the game. Roger Conerty starts the mumps around the school and quite a lot of "boys and girls" have fallen for them. Illinois State High School Press Asso- ciation Conference this week-end. Echo and Rosemary staffs get out of school. Komedy Koncert tonight. fBand Uni- form Benelitj. The football team is working hard. We are going to beat Champaign. The chorus sings 'iMary Magdelinen at the Auditorium. The Juniors are planning to Win thc' Stunt Show. Our dear teacher Mr. Casserly is ill to- day. The football team is staying out at the Country Club-Bill and Zack got up at six and played golf. Stunt Show practices everywhere. The band played in their new uniforms today. WQy:5qjoj1ojZiIQ1o"ooooooooooooooooooojjojjoj ggojiojlovoooooooooaooooooooojjojgojjojl 551909000oooQoo4o0216Kiioiiibjfojjojfojloj Efhp iKn5p111i1fU oooooooooooooooooooooolmfffa Wasn't that Turkey good? Champaign 19, Urbana O. We played in the new Stadium. Basketball starts. DECEMBER S. K. gives the Football team a banquet in the cafeteria. It rained rather hard-all girls wore their hair straight. Seniors receive their pins, Senior pic- tures have to be in by the 15th. The Elks give the Football team a banquet also. Glen Kirby is elected captain for next year. Tenth Annual Stunt Show given in the Auditorium. All of the stunts were good, You know who won. The Seniors received one vote any- way. Everybody is tired and worn out after the Stunt Show. Mr. Bickel has to get a new hat-he feels pretty good today. Roger entertained the Football team. I guess they all had enough to eat. The Echo is forming a "mumps club." New members are joining every week. Received the sad news of Mrs. Killefer's death. She was loved by every one that knew her. French club has a Christmas party. Christmas vacation begins-'iMerry Xmas." Everybody is recuperating from the Stunt show. Santa Claus visited the good boys and girls. Some people failed to see him--I wonder why. Our Baskeball boys go into training again. QTry to.j JANUARY Everybody is glad to get back to school again. "Mike" broke his arm during vacation. Assembly-The Basketball team do some ballet dancing and act cute in general. QzffgzU00ovvooooocooooooooooooqojq Zqjooooooooooooooooooyoooooojlghg X5-if Q 7 O 0 - 8 O O O O , 1 0 O O 0 O O O g I2 3 I3 1 14 I 15 I I7 O 0 O , 19 O O O 0 I 20 O 6 6 Q I 23 6 I 26 I 27 Q ' 30 o 9 0 O , 31 O 9 O O O O O O O O O 2 Q 4. O O O O 0 Q O . 9. O 9 O 0 ll. O 0 O 0 I 12. do .Of D, 1 3. 5 , l1111Il11111l111! 11111 n'QZft'QlLQojjojQoj,o' o"o"o 'o 'o o' vo 'vo' o 'o"o"o"o"o"o"o o 410102 3. 6. m9ll1of'ojjoj'o o o 4 o o o o Q o o o o o o Q ojjo',oj Ehp Qh1gp11gaf1I jojjojjo o o o o o o o Q o o o o o o o QQQQQQQUQIZQM Hienie Witt attended the Colonial Theater. C1. A. A. meeting third hour. Tryouts for i'Seven Keys to Baldpatef' We beat Danville 32-l4. Ed made a basket from the middle of the floor. l wonder what he was thinking about. Alice presents the Echo shield to the Senior class. Ah? Hum1 Matinee hop after school. Nothing happened4all is well. Bobbette Club meets. Jesse and Willard had a fist fight. Would like to have seen it. Decatur game here. Urbana 24. De- catur O. New sized Echo this week. Miss Ricketts, Mrs. Elaningam, and Marguerite Stevens celebrate their birthdays together. S. K. meeting after school. G. A. A. benefit at the Colonial. "Barbarie Eretchief' Senior book reports due. Danville game there. Urbana won again. Semester exams begin. Everybody is concentrating. We Staggcr home under the weight of our report cards. Centralia game. We won after two overtime periods, FEBRUARY Registration for second semester. Echo campaign begins. Campaign continues. Very exciting game between Cham- paign and Urbana. 16-13, in favor of Urbana. The first Robin seen today. Miss Johnson tells about the play. The sidewalk hit Reid's eye. CThat is what he says.1 We all sang in the assembly today. Lincoln's Birthday. i'Seven Keys to Baldpatef' Ray I-loush is the curtain puller. 1 H 2 ,fo'Qojjo"o"o o"o"o"o"o 'o"o"ot'ot'o' Q Q Q Q Q 0 Q 0 oj1ojjojU67-Q ggV 0,ojoj'ojoooooooooouooooooofd EIU' mlllilllllilflj OOOOO99009660009000O60ll S2 ' af Q O O O O O , 16 O O 9 O O 0 O Q I8 0 ' 19 O 17 20 I 21 23 0 24 Q 0 75 O 9 Q O O 0 ' 26 o Q o ' Z9 o o o Q Q o o Q Q Q 2 O O 0 3 O O 9 O ' 4 0 9 O O O 6 O 4 5 O 0 O ' 6 o o 0 I 7 I O 110 0 ll Q o Q ' 12 0 O O O O gg 13 G? S. K., Literary Society. and K. S. K. give a Valentines dance-all dances close at 11:15. Everybody is sleepy after this week- end. The chorus sings at the Urbana Lincoln. S. K. meeting. Spelling match by the Literary Soci- ety. Kankakee 4. Urbana 29. Crisman 8, Urbana 49. G. Pi. A: have a bean supper. S. K. swimming party. Mr. Bickel warbled for us in the as- sembly. Roof is moved over six inches. A'Bobby" told us about the Boys' Stunt Show. Seniors-"My Love Is Like a Red. Red Rose." MARCH Mildred Vwlaterbury had her hair cut just a little bit. We have a new seating arrangement so it took a long time to get seated this morning. The Seniors march out of the assembly one by one. You didn't know what good looking seniors you had did you? Basketball tournament starts. Alice Oathout has to wear glasses. No school4Basketball tournament starts. Tournament finals. Champaign won. Good Posture week. The Thornburn band plays for us. Kendall Kelley has a new Red Hot jacket. XVillard had his hair marcelled today. Miss Johnson told us about the oratorical contest. First annual Echo dance given at Kathryne Burrows. ESQ 1 I1 1 111 ?2iWQl1,jo,'o'oooooooooooooooofooovojojjof 1141241fooooooooooooooooooooooooowmfig 0I0II0II0I140II0IQ 0 o 0 Q 4 Q o o o 4 o o o QIZOIIOI Eh? m115p111U1'q jojjojo 4 o''o'jojfojfojjoj1ojjoj'o o o o o Q ofojfojjo1D SQ Nm t J .Q Io' 102 .6 o o o o o o , 17 0 0 0 Q o Q o , l 8 6 0 O 0 O , 19 6 0 0 0 I 21 O 6 o ' 23 o o o 0 Q o 4 0 O 0 , 25 O O O O 24 3 26, O 9 O 0 0 Q ' 28. Q 0 6 O O 9 O O Q 0 Q l . O 6 O 0 6 0 O 9 Q 0 O 0 O 0 3 . , . 2. 0 9 O 9 0 4. 9. IQ jof H 'P 16. Virginia Sale and Margaret Campbell entertained us third hour. Vir- ginia went to U. H. S. and quite a few people know her. She is at the "Orph" this week-end. The Bobbette Club is initiating all of its new members. They all look kind of funny, as if they didn't know what they were doing. Miss Leslie and Miss Johnson are se- cluded-they eat their lunch in Miss Leslie's room. Our Basketball team goes to St. Louis to be in a tournament. Janet looks lost without Howard. First day of spring. Wright Farns- worth and Audrey Hill are one of the first victims. Rosemary campaign-"Watch that Clock." Tryouts for Charleston, Cast is practicing for the boys stunt show. Lawrence Binyon gets medal for breaking a record at St. Louis. Pep assembly. Pulliam tells about the tournament, Adams is next year's basketball captain. Audrey Hill's clock was an hour fast so she got to school on time for once. G. A. A, meeting after school. Champaign and Urbana have a benefit Basketball game for the relief work in the southern part of the state. APRIL April fool's day-'nuff said. A call is made for girls with big feet to offer their shoes to the boys in the stunt show. Several people killed in the rush. Mothers' and Daughters' Banquet. Miss Cade shows her musical ability. Signs of spring. Several new cases. Catherine Colvin thinks she has captured Zack. Willard played while we ate this noon, the piano being down in the cafe- teria. f 1 if-ff llffml-'ml I- nur wujo1jojjojQo'o'jajjo"o Q o o o o 0 o Q Q Q Q 0 o o Q ojjojjoj 1 3 ,Qojjoj Q o o Q 0 0 0 4 Q 0 0 Q Q 4 0 0 Q 9 ojyjojjejjojjojlgw v 0 0 0110120110107iviiviieiioiio 0 Qiivlibiiviioiiojiojioj Em- IKggp111m'u Q Q Q Q Q 4 Q Q Q 4 Q 4 Q Q Q Q Q o Q oqQ,7Q f Lawrence breaks another record in the swimming meet. Swimming party at seven-thirty. Rose- mary campaign extended. Champaign and Urbana debate. Ur- bana won both places. French club candy sale. Miss Werner ate too much I am afraid. The American History class was as peaceful as ever. Caps and gowns or no caps and gowns: that is the question. C. A. A. meeting after school. .lack Holt washed his hair and it "stands up straight." Champaign offers us their debate points. lsn't that nice. Invitation track meet. Danville came out first. Senior play tryouts. Petitions for next year Echo officers started. All Seniors are getting rather uneasy as the year is coming to an end. Beatrice Sloan was elected by the whole school to be May Queen in the May Pete under the manage- ment of the G. A. A. The Rotary Club was here for dinner. Urbana beats Springfield in the debate but was beaten at Peoria. A Commercial Club was organized for the remainder of the year. Miss Ricketts has a new Ford. The girls have a swimming meet after school. Seniors get first. Martha Oliver and Harriet Bechtold are go- ing to be in the Olympics in about Eve years. Second Annual Boys' Stunt Show giv- en. Did you see Zack make love to Ed? Chuck Johnson is editor of next year's Echo. Assembly-Mr. Pulliam and Miss Johnson tell us about the Charles- ton meet. Track and Oratory. f l ll If I I S 3:50 0 0 0 viivjioiioiivilfiiojiojZv110j1o1ZoIio1Zv110L101.02Iojlvjivjivlioiivi 1525 joggo Q o Q Q Q Q o Q Q Q 4 Q o o o Q 4 Q Q Q 4 Q Q 0065935 7 5-H ' ' 'Ii gS:,QCi9llfojjo'jv, owe, ,o,eo,,o,,o, ko, one 9 9,,QA.9,9,,6,,0,.O,,Ol:O1, why IKI1 gplunfu jojjoi Q o,,o,,o,ko,.o,Vo Q o 4 o Q o 0 o o oj'ojjo1f01JlQ:Q'242 'F 0. if ,9, ... 0 O 6 O O O O O O O O O 9 O O 6 O O O O O O O 3. O O 6 O 9 O 6 O O O O 9 O O Q Q 6 O 6 O O O 9 9 0 O O Q O O 0 O O 0 O O 9 O O O 9 6 6 O O O 9 O O O O O O O O O O 6 9 l ' l O O. .5 O 5 1 MAY Music Week. We all sing in the as- sembly. S. K. meeting after school. AssemblyAMay Fete people do a dance. First May Fete ever given. Bee Sloan is May Queen. The Glee Clubs that are going to Springfield sang. Urbana Won eleven iirsts at Spring- field. Something to be proud of. Miss Prichard rides to school every morning in a Ford roadster. Marjorie Wilson and Mildred Water- bury gave their readings in the as- sembly. Reid Evans is eighteen years old today. Happy birthday Reid. Mr. Bickel left today for a position in Bloomington. The French Club gave a short play. Margaret Schumacher and Wilson Mumm take a stroll together this noon. The K. S. K. Club have elected their officers for next year. The Inter- scholastic track meet is being held this week-end. The Junior-Senior "mistake". Louise Still and Lester Leutwiler are still going together. Haven't had a fight yet. The Tennis tournament begins this week with Dorothy Scheib in charge. Mr. Casserly entertained his Physics classes by taking them boat riding at Crystal Lake. Ray Housh and Bill Holmes have been going over to Champaign quite often. The Senior play "Honor Bright" was very successful. JUNE Baccalaureate services. Graduation. gf, 1, ., Il1ffH1,,fl.v,' 'J u1olfoii0I00000QOOOOOQOQOOQQOQQLLQZQL 151251035.uuuuusun.Mn3g.1g.gg.g.1f.5'sl N U!!102102102IGI!322102IGIIGI1021011021011021022923210292 fjhp IRUHPl11E11'q' ICIIGIICIIGI102IQKIDIIOIQDIIOIDIIOIIGIOIIOIIOIKIKIIIBW Q v :J 4 Oratory RBANA High School has always been proud of its oratorical ability, and never has it had more reason to be proud than this year. 'Four contestants were entered at Charleston, one in each division of the contest, oratory. humor, dramatic reading, and modern poetry. Each contestant placed in her division, something that no other school 'has been able to do. Hertha Bowman '25, received second place in oratory: Alice Oathout '25, second place in poetry: Marjorie Wilson '25, second place in dramatic reading: Mildred Waterbury '25, first place in humor. Marjorie Wilson and Mildred Waterbury entered the meet at Springfield. May 8, and both received first place in their divisions. Theodore Oliver '25, entered in extemporaneous speaking, and Janet Woolbert '25, in interpretive reading, at Springfield, but neither ranked high. enough to receive a medal. The people that placed at Charleston brought back four of the eight medals offered as prizes, and the winners at Springfield each received a gold medal. Two H11 zulrwl Srfrmz lfOIfCIC 9101 102 IGI IOIIGSIIQIOIIIOI 102 If 102 102 Q02 IGI Q02 192311012 1 5 2102 101102 Ii 201 102 DI 32101 I9 0 0 Q 0 IO' 'OIC 5131313232 IGI IOIWUGZQ awuZoiioiToii1-IioiioijeiibifviifiiojiviioiivjiojioiioiivjIOZZQZIQQQQQ, Elm, igngpmarq fo:jo:5,3543343go:ioiKIici!Io:io::cjiojQojiojiajjojiojjvjioi93B N A af Miss LEE The Cafeteria Every noon hour the students rush to the north side of the first floor, where the high school cafeteria is located. Over a hundred students and members of the faculty are fed here every day. The menus are planned in order to provide the best balanced and most nourishing meals for the lowest prices. Two varieties of meat, four of vegetables, appropriate salads, and several kinds of dessert are served. Besides the patrons of the cafeteria, between two hundred and two hundred-fifty students are provided with hot sandwiches, candy and ice cream in the halls. The cafeteria is not conducted to make a profit, and the income just covers the expenses. For the past two years Miss Lee has been the manager of the cafeteria. The employees who work in the cafeteria are three cooks. Mrs. Pritchard. Mrs. Kaufman, and Mrs. Hampton. and fourteen students. The students earn their own dinners by serving in the halls or in the cafeteria. All the school banquets and suppers are held in the cafeteria, and many delightful evenings have been spent there. Occasionally the Board of Education or some business men's club visits the cafeteria. I 1,1-If llu ml,-ffl lffyllfl Uf9f 102 19: 102 f0f 142 IQ IQ If if if 201 if 201 :Oi if 19: IOI 101 101 if i9if9If9.i9: if 1 5 102202102LOIIOIIOI10102202102101102.023210210120.102202IOIIOIIOIIOIIOILOLIQIUW i 3: jjgv.. 5 -1 in-A." T2 JSUQE , ifwgqmg ff' 'W 5 , ui. ix Q. W. f. 4 .H 1-9 'V Wfivggwg 31-72 t My JS -L54 ,X .14 , K A 1. ':, - ., 'N' ' . ,n Z :ffl xv- . - I ', I . ,-,f, Us A 'jg .-'a H ' -. 1 ."" LM 5- JZ, -1 'L 11' '- r '.:, . , . ., ,. " i L . :4:f::l?' ,, Yiijf, , "y,?,n,,2f -.-- - '- . J, 1J'en'F", 4 ., ,wsu ,- 'S ,L - V 1, , F- qi, 4-. ., wff my ,Nga um -...R -- ,.-1.,'5'A .ra '- 4 .f H , X uw. , 1- .. , f',-Af , V X A 4-,ff M 1, .. , - x . U , 'H A 'Z "" 'l'.' fl! A ,Z -, 5- 1 , . ' -' - zz.-1 . .'-yn' hz: - .. , , 1 ' 'I' f-4 1 1' Jw .. ,Z - It . 1 - , X , , 1 K 's . ,-11,1 . ,, M Lzfrur . 4, ., ' f f.-wi.. Jw., , 4f "' -,.,. S. xx, .. .' f xy., , ' 'TT . W: J.- my . . :Mgt ., ,H ,,gJ A Wir' ' I ff 1 . fu.. g-ju W," .N J , u ,,,. , 15, . af. H ' -L" f. , fum 1 ' Um 2-1T'. G24 .1 '- .- ,.,, .AH-4. .,-4.3 u X .- ew' l . 1 -f. Q. .i,,.TL' f' 'fl -,fu T 'W' 3, 1, , : ' 2 uh, Mi. 4 . 1 Q . 1' -fr. QV, 5, 'A .1 tiff? ' J Qr9'.' 'It-. 1 4 , X , r xii: " -w if im: ZTQ3 . hy-1,-5 ' 5' ':- XJ,-L' ' Af? ,: W 5 .1 1 ,jg . .Elf ai 4, A wlvi, ,X-'w,,,, 1 A ' ' 4' 4 sl' V-' a . ' ' -+51 V J- ' A V1-I "' 1' .,, , .. f, .. 445 Q A Here at Last, You Olcl Scandal-Mongers 01 , 1 01 QI 0. 1 Y. Q Q .. 01 C U Q 6 .. 01 0. .C 1.- G? me U 101 161 101 101 Ioj 101 141 101 101 131 101 101 101 141 101 191 101 191 191 191 191 1011 El ig P 1' 101 191 101 101 101 101 101 foj 101 101 101 101 101 101 foj 101 101 foj foj foj 101 1013 ?g!g . N5 1 1 t Q? ' .01 O 1 The usual apologies cannot be made because we are doing no one .1 1 .01 ' wrong, it is all self-inflicted. 9. 102 ,,. . It again proves the simple and homely adage :QI 1 that the truth will out. w- 101 7.2 1 WHEREUIJON WE OFFERS iz: 101 K1 ,C 101 101 101 102 101 101 I 101 01 . . 10. .01 ffl 101 101 3. 101 , .1 E 10. 101 101 143 101 101 101 101 101 102 101 101 L02 101 101 0 01 102 102 202 102 bi 102 91 101 101 3. 1 101 .91 101 101 3. ,.. g .. .Q 4 Q ... 9 'Q . 3.1 102 101 101 143 101 101 101 101 101 142 101 102 .0. W 10. And the Hgh! is on. wg mfg 'I if-1, ll,,,t,l,,N,f xm, wU-'f-'1-'--09-ifif-0-91-'Q-0-'--'..'.,'.-0.0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 fm. 1 J 4. .1 an + Q v Q Q 0.10A10.151011011011011011011011011f1011011f101101U K xggnjojjojjojo o Q o o o o o o o o o Q o Q o oijojfoj mhp mngpnggrg pjiojfojvo o o o o o o o Q o QZZQQMQQQQMQJBQW How THE AVERAGE STUDENT READS HIS ROSEMARY First Five Minutes - Looks for himself in his class group and society group and 'finds his name wherever he is on a committee. This is the most enjoyable period of inspection. Second Five Minutes-Does the same for his girl's name and picture. Third Five Minutes-Hunts up every joke on his girl or himself. Last Five Minutes-Makes sure of all these things, then shuts the book forever. After this he takes pains to say that the Rosemary isn't as good as it generally is. NOTES PICKED UP ON ASSEMBLY RooM PLooR A Senior? Say Bill, I heard you seen the names of them whose to graduate, ain't I on it? J. M. An English Student? I seen in the paper you was to be in the play. How about my coming for you, or has somebody beat me to ir? UNSIGNED. What Is It? I'm glad you like it. You know, I have to get up so early to get it done, that some days I go without combing it, and Inwas afraid it looked kinda messy. Sure, I'll show you l'lOW to do lt. FRANCES A Worker? Say, kid, if you will cut today, I'll get my mother to write a note to have me help her clean house. Will you? BLIC A Bride? How about the English note book? Will you let me copy it if I take you to the Senior play? WAYNE M. Skeet W.: "Do you like popcorn balls?" Janet W.: "I don't know that I ever attended any." I 11-n llnnflrvrl 7 en MISSING WORD CONTEST Alice Oathout sat down on a tack. She at once sprang up and said only two Words. The last was "it." Any- one guessing the first word and send- ing 82.00 to Willard Monohon, Editor, will be entitled to a free copy of this year's Rosemary. Miss Leslie. in Senior English Class: "How did Johnson die?" Dick Childers: "Johnson died of a chronic disease: there was something the matter with his chrome," Zack M.: "Your eyes are like the deep blue sea." B. Johnson: "Oh, do you really think so?" Zack: "Yes, they're watery!" Said A to B "I C U R Inclined 2 B A JH: Said B to A "U R mind I C Shows signs of slight D K." Martha O. fat class meetingj: "Olive. say, nominate me for some- thing." After she had been nominated: "I move the nominations be closed." Pat and Mike went to heaven. St. Peter said: "Here a penny is a million dollars, and a minute is a million years." Pat said: "Loan me a penny." Mike replied: "Wait a minute." It is said that at the Juinor-Senior banquet Ted Oliver put two lumps of sugar in his bouillon and asked for the cream. Qlalukjlijjejyjiojjojyjqp 4 Q o o Q o o Q 9 o Q o o o 01531 1 2IGIt'5V'd'dWo Q o o o Q o Q o o 4 o Q Q o QIQIQZQII my J ' Q . ' ' O ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' will 4KlIl1l'llI'll'!I ,o1jo,lo"o,.010210QoIIvI,vj'o"oj0foj'vfoijy'ajjQj'.jj,jj,Q1,Q:fQ'?g4 5 ff ff GJ 5. CE Ivf if fff Q01 If 31 fi KI L01 If 101 it f0I :ff fi ff If If 101 :Of fi if if If 101 201 Zvi 102 ff ff if 191 If Q92 fi if Q02 :Of Q01 KI 101 32 ff ff f0f fff If ff kj 102 iff if Q02 Lvl 102 ivl f9f if f0f iff If 191 fd 19: fvf ff 'Q' 3' si 32 'O' 2.1 z.: if :Oc :Oz If :.: 'QA t.: 0: :.: fvf z.: 'Q' z.: Y :,: 5 -'V o' -'g if 1,1 .52 3,1 'O' 2,1 -5 t.: QQ -'L 9' I.: 9, 3.1 'vi "1 ,.. it ff t.: 02 ,'. if :': W: z.: if L.: if :': if t.: if 2,1 :Oi 101 2,1 If r.: if :Ox if 20: 19: :.: 10: :Oc I :': r" is P2 fl :,' ki fl 19. z.: 9' r.: 'Y z.: 9, r.: io X 0, 3. 0' 32 ,O :,, 9, z.: 0. ff .6 "L Q 'V Q' .fi ol 'i O .., 0 O 5 O O Q E Y fWl1.,,,,,,, f,, ,, ,B 5ff2.G2gfEIl0. 0 'Ion lo iofo, o,o,.o,jo'o 'o 0,109koj,o,jojjQj'qj.j, , ,' 11,11 7' 0 0 ... ,.,o...., . . ,QV H , , - - - f - M.- . .. . ,. .- ,. , .. .. .. ,, ,. WO,9,92foQQofQo'jo'j4jjgj'.",'',",'',fu6xX Zv qiojiojfojfo o o o o Q 0 Q o o o 0 o o o o ojojid any mngpntgfg 1650 o Q 0 o o o o o o QQZQIZQIZOIKIIICIQKIQQII APPROPRIATE GIFTS An adding machine for the hopeless man, that he may have something to count on in the future. Herbert Bickel. A cornet for the spendthrift, that he may blow in everything he has. Pat Binyon. Some flowers for those who are dead. Guess who! A radio for those who like to broadcast announcements. Beatrice Sloan. A vacuum cleaner for those who like to get all the "dirt," Olive Dunne and Dorothy Gibson. A dictionary for the bashful lover, that he may find words to express his feelings. Glen Chapman. A phonograph for the haughty maid, that she may put on all the airs she wants. Ruby Hiser. Clerk: Yes, miss, you'll find that most women like this lipstick." Eva B.: 'iYou couldn't-ah-tell me the kind the men like, could you?" Chuck Johnson: "Is anyone tak- ing you out to dinner tonight?" B. Huffer: "No," "Chuck: "You'll be awful hungry tomorrow." John B.: "Fifty miles an hour. Are you brave?" Patty B.: "Yes, I'm just full of grit," and she swallowed another pint of dust. R. I-Iabermeyer Cpracticing for obligatob: "I know my voice is all right, but what do you think of my execution?" Voice from the rear: "We favor it." Miss McClurg: "Where can I get specimens of bed bugs?" Leota Miller: A'Search me." if-fi Illlllzlrml lu'1'lr'v IN THE REAR OF THE AUDITORIUM Ray Dvorak Cstraining to hearj: "The acoustics is bad." Fat Binyon: "Shut up, Ray, I don't smell nuthin'." Waiter: "I have frog's legs, deviled kidneys, pig's feet, and calf's brains." Hungry Man: "You look it, but I don't want to hear about your ail- ments: I came here to eat." Willard: "I saw a wooden wed- ding last night." Alberta: "For heaven's sake, where?" Willard: "Two Poles got mar- ried!" I'm looking for the kind of man I read about in books- One whose eyes are all for me, One who adores my looks. The men I go around with now Are dear, but condescending, I want one who lives just for me. Whose love is never-ending. He must be tall and worldly, A hero brave and bold, He has to dance divinely, Be possessed of countless gold. He must be understanding And be ready to forgive- Ah me! An old maid"s doom is mine, 'Cause such a man don't live. Any girl can be gay In a classy coupe: In a cab, any girl can be jolly, But the girl whose worth while Is the girl who can smile When you're taking her home on the trolley. Louise S.: "Are mine the only lips you have ever kissed?" Lester L.: "Yes, dear, and the very nicest!" Qizagwvc'v'43'fj1Q3g.j1oj1.g'vw Q Q Q Q Q Q o o Q o o o:o11o1 1925 13210210 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 4 ojivjlojivil uio:i.:i.31.3:.iZ.::.:1Q1103f02io1io3i0iio3iojsifoifojioifoifefiq Elm llugplmlyly f02f02f02f02f0jf01j0ff02f0ff02f02f0jj0j102f02f0jf02f0ffo2j0jf0jf0jD 2g w. ' 2 1 Q1 102 1029 If Q02 102 102 i02 101 101 102 102 102 102 102 Q02 102 101 101 C01 102 202 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 L02 102 102 102 102 102 102 L01 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 18 32 I 102 102 102 102 102 102 If 102 102 32 IQ 102 102 102 101 102 102 101 102 102 102 202 102 102 102 103 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 102 K2 10I 102 102 102 10 5 102 Q02 ' 16 ,,, 102 102 102 102 Q02 102 102 102 103 102 101 102 102 .6 7.1 2.1 102 102 102 102 102 102 102 202 101 102 102 3. 102 ,.. 102 102 102 202 102 32 102 if 102 102 101 102 102 102 102 x. D2 02 92 92 92 32 LOI 102 102 103 102 .,. 201 102 101 If K2 103 102 102 102 102 9. 101 I 101 102 102 102 102 102 202 102 102 102 102 101 10' 102 102 5? f -I ,- l1wIIun1lmwI llu If fn K l10210210220I10QI02102Q02Q021021021021021021021021020202102102102102102202101 1 51 Q. L1 21021021021022021011021022021021022012021021021021021011021Q1Q102102202f02I02I6"w m9ajojQoj1oj1o o o Q 0 Q o Q o 0 o o 0 0 Q o Qiqjojf Ehp Qngpmgyg Qojjojjo o o o Q o o Q o o o o Q 4 0 0 OKIKINFIQXQQ BEAUTY HINTS To keep a good complexion, petrify it. To have a Roman nose you must be born with one. To become a blonde use peroxide. To keep your feet small, cut them off while you are young. For a pale complexion, try cooking beefsteak. If you have a long neck, shorten it. To keep your locks curly, buy a good curling iron. For a nice, sweet voice, never refuse sugar candy. To make your pompadour lay down, cut it off and lay it down. To be able to hold your head up high, use a derrick. To get rid of a double chin, take anti-fat. If your ears extend out too far, 10 cents will buy a bottle of glue. Hic, Heac, Hoc, Holy smoke, Champaign High School- What a joke! Dot Gibson :'AMiss McClurg, I can't find the eyes on this insect." Miss McClurg: "No wonder, the head is gone." "Did anyone in Bill Weber's family die?" "I don't know. Why?" "Oh, he's wearing his trousers at half mast." Miss Ricketts: "Can't you remem- ber anything? What is your head for? Ed. M.: "To keep my tie from slipping off." I :fin lllfllllwvl InH1'lr'v' RULES EoR FUTURE JUNIOR-SEN1oR BANQUETS Don't Cat like a vacuum cleaner. Don't tuck your napkin under your chin or tie it around your neck, for it might do some good that way. Lay it across your knees and continue to spill the catsup on your necktie. Always call the waiter by his first name so everybody will know you have been there before. Freshman: "Say, what frat do you belong to? Are you a Delta Chi?" Senior: "Yes, I am a Delta Chi." Freshman: "Say, do you know I tho't you were a sophomore?" Morgan H.: "I am frightfully sorry that I forgot to come to your little party last night." 4Margaret M.: "Oh, weren't you there?" Fred P.: "Do you really think you'll be a big violinist some day?" Jack H.: "I certainly do." Fred P.: "Then you'd better start taking on weight now!" Miss Alverson CEng.V IIIJ : "What are clauses?" Sophomore: "Clauses are things that grow on dogses and catsesf' Joke Editor: "Why don't you laugh at these jokes?" Tom Lyman: 'AI was brought up to respect old age." Bill Gibson: "Say, fellers, let's go to the store and get a popple of bot." Qyqfgqyjqyhiidiojiojiojioooovooooooooooiyioj 11421210sooooooooooooooooooohjjojkjlw uioiioiioiioiiviiviioiioiifioifoiiojfoiieiviioiioiioiieioifvzioz Ely? 5KHHPlI1Zt1'g :oi10:10:10:1o:io::+:1+::o1:o11o11viZ011v1Z'if'IC'IC'If'ii'31'3i'33Q1sf22g XX .N nnnwwukn E ff 10. I 1 E 101 .9. I '5 'Q' E :Oc 5 20, li :Z 20: 3 :Oz 1 : Q 9 z.: 2 :Z 5 Q62 :Oz Qoj 3: 1.1 .9. 'Q 191 c.: Q'2 xi 1.1 :A 3: :J 3: :J 2.1 3: 9. vg if To: z.: 70: 9. li ki :': :oi ,I . . Q03 221 ff :oz :': 70: Q :Oi 3: ti 2.1 :.: 4 : : zz: :Of : : Ibf :Oz 'O' z.: :Qc -QA 2.1 f'l :J z.: :Oi Q :ba ,gl : .1 Lo: rg l'Z U .Q :QQ : .1 zo: at :g :oz 9. ' ' ,.. 3. : : Q62 :Oz 'C :Oz Z' 9, . . Y . Q, 9. ' - , . Q, 9, , . 9, ' - , . Q ,o, , . , , Q, 9, , . - 1 Q A - - . . Q, -9. . . . . Q, s.: 'O' 1.1 :C z.: 'O' 0, , . 1 , 9, ,o, , . . . 9, o, , . 2 . ,o, 9. f - . . ,Q y, , , - - 9. ,Q , . . . Q, Q. - - , - Q 9. - - , . y 9, , . v - 9. o, . . 1 . 3 9, , , . , p, 9, , . , . ,O, Q, , . , . ,o, 9, , . , . 9, ,o, , . . . 3, 9, , . . . Q, 9, . . , . ,o, ,o, . . V 1 9. Q, , . . . ,Q ,o, , . . . 9, Q, , . - - 9, ,o, . , , . iq 9, , . . . Q, 9. 1 ... A , , . 9, 2 :': 1 - : 9. x.: E 'Q' Q 14 i 1 1 ,o, I ' . . ' 'O' ' 'x .ff -, - .. ,. ., ,, ..'.."ff'.f'.i'ff'ff 'ff'.,' .f'f 55' Qgffazwgoziozgvi:oi105Lo:Lv:Qognpiogiozioziogiviioiio:io:1oi1o:1o:1o3:o1:o31v1:Q1 1 H h. J .,o,.o..f,,.,,,,. Q,Q..Q.1.o.p,,..,.,,..,f..e..o4.oA.o..m.w..MA.'.U6',sQ'R U323210232IQHDI!IGNIOIICIQIIOIKWNIHNIII Elhp mUHPI11211'11 3231323232KI!DIDIEIDIKIKIDIKIIKTWHHNU What is so rare as Dick Childers with his History lesson? Patty Brennan's mistakes on the piano? Dorothy Kern with a 70? Janet without Howard? Olive without a date? Some girls without their paint shop? Dorothy B.: "My cheeks are all on fire." M. D. R.: "I thought I smelled burning paint." Mike: "What is the function of the stomach?" Scheib: "The function of the stomach is to hold up the trousers," Jess M.: "Have you ever smoked before?" ' Dot S,: "Before everyone but mother." - Miss Pritchard: "Have any of you relics of the Civil War?" Reid Evans: "Ay, I think we have an old union suit." Dark Street, I Banana Peel: Fat Man, Virginia Reel. Like a.circle never ending, Doth my tongue forever go. HARRIETT BECHTOLD. Mildred Waterbury, at football game: "That must be bad Water they're giving those players: they all spit it out." Mule in the barnyard, lazy but quick, Freshie with pin on end of a stick, Sneaks up behind him, still as a mouse. Crepe on the door of the Freshie's house. l'11'o Humlrefl Siflwn U. H. S. OLYMPIA COUNCIL Juniper-Mr. Flaningam, father of the Gods. M ars-Mr. Harris, God of War. Pluto - Mr. Bickle, ruler of the lower world. Vulcan-Mr. Casserly, God of fire, who lives under the earth. Mercury-Mr. Anderson, messen- ger of the Gods, God of commerce. Apollo - Mr. Dvorak, God of poetry and music, most glorious among all the Gods. Juno - Miss Ricketts, Queen of heaven. Venus-Miss Leslie, Goddess of beauty and laughter. Minerva - Miss Werner, Goddess of wisdom. Vesta-Miss Todd, Goddess of the hearth. Ceres-Miss Pritchard, Goddess of civilization. Ray Dvorak: "My hair is falling out. Can you give me something to keep it in?" Barber: "Yes, here is a cigar box," This space is reserved for Betty Yantis, who has paid for it at the regular adver- tising rates. Last year's roasts about her being ob- jectionable, she purchased this space to put in some about herself, but through our neglect they were lost, They say miracles are past, but various well-known Seniors still ex- pect to graduate. Lives of football men remind us, That they'Il write their names in blood, And departing leave behind them. Half their faces in the mud. 1 5 11118161616If3202!IGIGICIQHIINHIINHKHHII 112021020 o 0 Q Q o o o 0 GEKIIOIIOTIOIIOIZOIKIIOI wh? RUHPIIIZIIQ IOIIQK 0 0 0 o Q o o o o o o Q o Q Q 0 DIDIIGI THE HIGH SCHOOL ALPHABET A ffection-Link between Janet W. and Howard A. B oy-Half feathered roosters. C rams-A very amusing thing. D eceivery-Mostly girls. E ats-Common verb: take any sub- ject. F eet-Harold Hurd's beside Edrie Seward's. I G um-Ruination of a recitation. H ymns-Liked by all girls. I t--Morgan Hundley. J okes-Courtesy in cafeteria line. K iss-Demonstration of affection of a sick kitten against a warm brick. L anguage-Best heard in football dressing room. M oney-A scarcity. N ores-Best way to learn all the "dirt." ' O nion-The forbidden fruit. P ony-Synonym for "Dumbbell." uiz-That which we all love. un-At 2:45 every afternoon. Q R S uspense-Until 5:30 Thanksgiv- ing. T eachers-Of U. H. S. U My dear reader. V aledictorian-Arthur Lloyd. W aist-That which makes the arms go round. - XYZ-Continued next year. Katherine B.: "How the trees moan and sigh this morning." Verna D.: "You would, too, if you were so full of green apples as they are." - Teacher: "Now I will illustrate the moon by my hat." Neva B.: "Is the moon inhabited?" "A wise man is the one who tries to shine before himself: a fool tries to shine before others." WHAT HATH BEEN PUT TOGETHER LET No IVIAN TEAR ASUNDER Eva Becker and her lipstick. Ed Martin and his gum. Ray Dvorak and his ford. Catherine Colvin and her head- aches. Marge Wilson and her dignity. Miss Ricketts and her patience. Mr. Flaningam and his book from Marshall Field's. John Beresford and his voice. Rog Conerty and his bashfulness. ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Do ships haue eyes when they go to sea? Are there springs in the ocean's bed? Does the jolly tar flow from a tree? Does a river lose its head? Are fishes crazy when they go in seine? Can an old hen sing her lay? Can you bring relief to a window pane? Or mend the break of day? What sort of vegetable is the copper's beat? Is a newspaper white when it's read? Is a baker broke when he makes the dough? Is an undertaker's business dead? Miss Prichard CAmerican His- toryj : i'Wake up, Mary." Mary Thomson: "I can't." Miss Prichard: "Why can't you?" Mary: "I'm not asleep." Bee Sloan: "He tried to put his arm around me three timeslast night." Minnie Means: "Some arm." Miss Leslie: "Do you like Kip- ling?" J. B. C.: "Why, I don't know. How do you kipp1e?" Tivo H11ml1'eilSv:'enlw: yalivlifii' 0 ' ' ' 0 0 ' 0 ' 0 0 ' ' 0 e ' ' ' 0 GIG! 1925 :v2:v::o Q o o Q Q Q Q v o o exy:ex:o::o::c:eb:z:exn UZQXNQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOIQX why mngpmafg yioooooooooooooooovlilinjl Qur Advertisers In the following pages are to be found the announcements of many re- liable firms which have contributed materially to the success of this volume. We bespealc your patronage in re- turn. K Two Ilumlrwl lfiqI1lw'n MQIEICMLQIDIIOIIIMQIDQoooeooooooooklii 216100ooovoooooooooooooyiiplyl n:Q::Q::Q::Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q::Q:a::Q:i1ex::Q::Q::Q:I E119 iKn5PI11iII'g :Q:x::Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q:Q::m::enQIfc9 O ,.. Q 0 1 . 102 9. Q 9. O QQI ,.. 9. 3. 102 .5 Q O Q 102 9. O O l. Q ta 102 O 102 .6 E ,lm1,,.....,1..1.,1..1...----nu1u-nn-:sin--un-.gg Quinn-an-n 1uu-n1nu-uu1uu1nu1nl1lr1un-nu-Q? I 1 , - ' 5 Q Amerman Harriman Co. I 1 Elm Street Bakery E O Sales and Serwce We are back of Urbana High 1 ,QQ 2 4- 1 School and wish her success jf N A S H - p A C K A R D in all her C1Cfl'Ul.fl.9S :, I M A R M Q N 5 i Opposite Fire Department 'I I - .. i 1 B. D. POLLITT, Prop. if I URBANA i URBANA l-..-.. .... ..-..-..-.. .... .-.I L.-. .... ..-..-..-..- - -.-..-.l. 'lull' 1111-1-111 I1II1un1ul-an-un-ln1lu--luis: 11111111 u-In-l in .. L I Q G R A D U A T E S 1 9 :I I' I of the 2 : - ll Q .I l ' " , I Urbana H1 lt School ., 7 F- 0 : tl ! MAKE GOOD . .5 L I ' I in our 'F ' : ll E 6 MONTHS' SECRETARIAL COURSE E 2 Several graduates of last year are now making . e good in desirable positions, after taking our 2 Q 6 months' Secretarial Course-Shorthand 1 CCregg or Byrnej, Typing and Bookkeeping. I CALL OR WRITE POR CATALOG T . I i . I I I H : l Champaign Corumermal College E 120 North Neil Street ' COpposite Lewis Storej il 2:1 l il 'Q' +u1uu-nu1nn1uu- 1-uninn1uu1uu--un1un--ruin:-uu1un1uu-nu1uu--In-an-1:1 1 1ll-ll-Il-'ll1"1"'f' .ian-.,,.1..1..-. 1 --I.-nu---.-an-n1l.-an 1111-1 un-uu1uu-ui - 1:-uu1nl-uu1uu1ul?0 , . Q ' 0 . I ' - C. N. CLARK E6 CO. 1 ' 1 ' l 1 A R T M E M O R I A L S I R URBANA ILLINOIS ll 1 I 5 of u-1u- :nu-llxlu-uu1uu 1111111 uu1ll1ll-ll11l-II:ll1lu 111111 unills-Malo 5 f I IT l 'Ml ,X Iinwlw Qy:5m1qjQjQQjjQ O'0"Q"O"O"0i'O"0 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Qj1Q31Qj 12125 1Qy313"Q'Q Q'Q"Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q UbIIOfIOIf0I0 0 o o Q o Q Q Q Q Q o Q o QZOIZOIZOT Uhr 'iaugpnlgifg bjjojfo o Q Q o o o o o o Q o Q 4 4 0 f!,:iO: fl I O TITITl'luiIli'll1lllllllllllllllllTll'-ill!! TlilllIITIITH107IIHTII-1llTlIl'1'llillillTll1S? fvf I - - I P2 I ' ' ' I Society Brand Clothes 1 Illznz Cafe I T and 3 I Furnishings in keeping with ' The Place to Eat their style is our hobby. EQ I STEAKS CHOPS Men who care about their .3 : appearance are our steady : 22 I SHORT ORDERS I Customers. E 104 E. MAIN PHONE: 7-1022 Harry A- Little Q 1 URBANA ILLINOIS 2 I I 14 South Race Street YI I I ' i URBANA. ILLINOIS I Q ' E O II!-II1111111111111:111u1uu1au1uu1uu--nn1au1uu1uuL ofa--:uinu1uu-In-un1un1un1nn1uu1nn1uu1uu-uu1ucln : TUPWWYll1llT'llTlU1lIill1ll- TW'TI'll ll'-"lllI'lill7ll""lll llllTllillillT Ui TilTlllllTll? ' - I ' 1: I I I H' I1 S I1 I G d I I I ig Q oo ra uates I 9 H u o I I : I E Know by this time of the efhcient service of I Knowlton '65 Bennett in the book line. All 9 I I II other lines carried by them are handled in I I H the same careful and progressive way, by ' 2 I II the people that know how. . I 1 Q I : 9 : KNOWLTON ef CBENNETT 1 I We lead in every line , z LU? Caff ! O g I ' f z I 7 o I : : anillilllllillillllllll'-"llillT T llli-'UTIllllillilllllllhllllll Tiii llTllTlli'lll"ilg E 101pp1nl1p.1pn1ln1un1nn1nn1nn1nu-nn1un1:u-gi. ofnulun-anI1II1ni?I:tulinlillilu--uliluinxuxnu-mg, Q ' - ' , ' I I I THE MCALLIS TER I ' F 6? S - I I reeman on I STORES GOI . HARDWARE I I URBANA. ILLINOIS :I .- . I T- I . 1 I Q I Always the best I I I IO WEST' MA1N STREET a little less Ig I IIRIIIINAI ILLINOIS 1 I DRY GOODS, NOTIONS and I I I READY-To-WEAR I ' -I------I ----------- ----4' -9----I--------------------------- ------5. 1' ff-ff I1 ffrnf I: I I I yfauivlioiiviioile v o 0 Q Q 0 0 0 0 Q v v 0 0 Q Q 0 0 viioiioj 1225 1gQp31o3gQ"Q"Q'Q Q Q'Q'Q'Q'Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q qyfqpjl llbjj0jj0jj0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0102102 Ghp mngpmafu I0jj0j0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 02j0jj0jI0jQQm' oIon1nIn-un:ln-1ln1un1nu- nn1IuI 11111 ul- , ofcn-nn1uu1ln-1:11a-1nu1uu1II:-nn-nn1un1n:1nu-Q. E l I I Z: rule I Urbana Furnishing Store I I I I I E 'I' I 126 West Main Street : I ' URBANA. ILLINOIS ' 0 I Court House Cafe For your vacation and daily I I wear in dress shoes, tennis I 1 "'- shoes. and oxfords, hosiery, I I A : I shirts, neckwear, trousers. : 2 I OPPOSIW Court HOUSE etc., and last, but not least, z I URBANA, ILLINOIS Esfglgggliflg I I I I ' I I ole,-.I-...-..-..-...H-..-...-..-...-...-...-. -..-mg. oi--I..-I..-II.I-.-.II-..----------.-------u--ny : Tv-11un1nn--nn1:u1nn1 - 11II-:l1-nn-nl1lII1ul-un1nn1ln-- 1-Mullin-1 lil-lnlnl-ln1uu--lliuu--ll1mit : E 0 I I : I I I I oLDHAM I3Ros. I 5 : . I I fRexall mPLlgglSIS I I 5 O 5 II O I "Fair, Square and Always There" I : I I I : I PERFUMES, COIVIPACTS AND TOILET ARTICLES 5 I 5 0 We carry a wonderful line of the creations of the most H I I celebrated perfumeries of France and America, such as I Q I HAUBIGAND KERKOPII DJER Kiss ' CoTY I I I RICHARD HUDNUT's WOODWORTH'S E : - H 0 I Beautiful Gifts for Friend. Relative, Mother or Sweetheart ll 2 I Sizes and prices to meet every requirement 1 Q I 0 i Corner Race and Elm Sts. URBANA. ILLINOIS ll I . I I I If ' illillillillilll lllillll ZIIlTlllllTl!TlllllillTlllllTlliMUTllllIliIlilliIlllllllS1llTllCill+ : 0!0l1ln1un--IIII1nu1-nn1IIn-nn1uu--nuinn-1uII1uII1nuI--:go fiw-ll- I1Ilr-nu1nl1nn--Ilin:-:In1nn-runnin:-:nn-U? : I ., . ,, I I I 1 : The Pastlrne 1 - I 0 l I - I I The ECHO I 1 Billiard Parlor I 1 II 3 ' , ' I n 0 i HOWARD A3L1jZ:jFSON' 20 The Iolrili ,Eager Elllifh all the E I Billiards, Packer Billiards, I l 'f 335 'SWS' I 2 I Tobacco - Candy. Sodas Ssue ee y 0 i 103 W. Mani sneer Phone: 7-3222 I 31.50 A YEAR 1 I URBANAJLLINOIS I i H iilllllillllillillilllllilllllillllll-llilll Q!llilllllillilllllillillillilllllliMl1ll1n4 7ilI'Ul1lIlllIl4I'11 Y'Ir'wlIlIf nm' 5 9222022022020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 020202102 1225 ,QOQQQ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0jg0jpj10j3j10jg0jjq10j:03:0210210ZZQU W 032IOIIOI10231102IOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOI102102IOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOII Eh? mnlkmilfq IOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOIIOI101IOIIOIKIIOIIQKIIOIHDIDI102IOIIOIIGH Im' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' - """'I I""""' ' ' ' ' """"'-""'-'MI' I Ympla 1 RQSEMARY COHIIGCIIOHGTY for Remembrance" I E "Your Clothes for Style" I II II II 2 H H The finest Of New ideas in young men's I ,I I HOME-MADE CANDIES clothes are always found II Hrst at l II ICE CREAM LIGHT LUNCHES 5 H :I II 2 I Q M. Lowenstern I I I cc? Son I " URBANA, ILLINOIS 1: u I I I I ,. I . I gH...,,,,,,,, i111.11- 1 1 Quinny ofa-nu1u 111- un-nu 1111 - -Iniulfu ,lain 1i11 11-1 1111 u 1 nu-un--nu iiii uu:uw1ul-ll 11111 ll-lu! II I II ,I I II In II jg Urbana High School Cafeteria , I 1. I. 'I I :I 553:35 I Y Ii? H Q l fd - FLORENCE LEE, Manager II I' itnn-un1n1n1un1nu1uu1un-un-uu1 - 1 - - 1 1 11'-ll1lm--Ili 1 1 1 --II1ll"-'I-""'1"l' x Yu-rn lllfnflwfl If'l"1'IIv'I,'-I n uZo1Zv2iv151103102102101102Wvbiioiivjidibiivibibi921110110211 1925 1011021029211143102202102102102103161022110114325IQIZQIQZZQIZQZZQJJI uIo1IoIZoZ1v 0 0 Q Q 0 4 Q o Q 0 o v o Q Q 01101101 Uhr IKmip111g1fq 1o31o31o,.o,.v,,o,Q Q .4 Q Q op Q Q Q 4 ogQj1oj:ojfo:9QK 3 lon-nn--nn--un1n-nn--nn1nn1nn-nu1uu1nu1n 1 Q'2 ,L I After the show, visit the WHITE ,Q , v I Q I 0 I Q II 9 I Q if ' I Q .I 9 g -I LUNCI-IES O O Q 5 I I and GOLD SODAS I CIGARS ' URBANA, ILLINOIS Q H 3 I Q 4- Q G e!u1uu-un1un-n-u-n1u-n-nnxu-nn-.11 C O O . 2 Q u a I z t y O O I , ,,1.,.1q.1,,,..., 1 1 in..-I.-.QIn1u..1n,-.ng.-..1..-.,m1m1...-.11 .- 1 1.1.l1ul1q.-qg1g.iu.-q 1 II I. Service :I z Champaign I 0 0 0 O 9 .: O . I O 0 . Ice Cream Co. Manufacturers of . I' ESKIMO PIES, ILLINI SUNDAES, BRICK ICE I I CREAM, SHEREETS, ICES ' I Q o 0 0 I Any Flavor Desired 9 I ' I o 0 o 0 Q Bc sure your ice cream ' is pastcurized O O 0 ' : g ' MAIN 175 Q I f I 6 Q 6 I I f E DR. H. A. HINDMAN I DENTIST I I . 1 i DR. HOMER PEER 1 I DENTIST ' I 4 , .... Q 204 W. Elm St.. 2nd Floor if Urbana, Illinois 202 tj -if-..-I.- -..-...-..-........-.......- .. .....-. g1Q1dQQjooooooooooooooooooosqoiloj J ul1-nmin-niun1ln.-lu-un1-n-u1mu1-nu- 11:-ll1-un1.lu1um-unrvn--ln-.nn1al1ul1un1:u--nn-nn1nn:nsin 1 q..-..-..-..-...........,.....-....-...-.....-..-..-... MAIN 176 I 4, can1uu1nn-uninn-ll-n-nu-1nn-ll:-ul1-nu--ll-n- ' I I WILLIAMSON 26 WINKLEMANN I I I at Law E i F f COHEN BUILDING ' l I I : I I . I I ala +-,.-.....-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-,.-......l Iwo UllVllll'1'1l lI1'vnly1-fl: 1 H25 ww: Q 0 Q Q o 0'O''OIIOI201102Q021101102992101IOIPFIPIYU I -1- 4- 'Q' Q E. E. Wnliamson R. E. winmemann I 1 Attorneys and Counsellors 1 i . I URBANA, ILLINOIS ' nZoZSoi10259.9.Q..o,9..Q.v..v..o..v.9..v..4..v..v..vZI021v2I Uhr mngipmzlrq ZojZo2ZoI.o..o..o..o,.o,.v.9..o..o..o..o..o..o..qandhtxrl nfs:--un1nn1nn1un11nn1 --nu1nu1nn1 -h-11:11uu1uu1nu1uu1u11un1un1u1nn1nnv1uu1nn1uu1un-qq1un1nu1uu I MEMBER UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED I i WIRE SERVICE 1 I I The 1 . I 1 I U l 1 Urbana CDazly Coupler I Champaign Countyls Best Newspaper v 111-113 N. Ra-Ce sf. Urbana, Illinois Published every evening except Sunday I 1 by 1 THE URBANA COURIER COMPANY L li , CTWO DEPARTMENTS, g Newspaper-Job Printing f if - -11---- ------ --- ----------------.-----M ---- -------1 ----- --.-'fl -r-1--1------- - --- ----- ---------Q -v-----1 --------- - --------9 5 I 1 1 1 , I 5 1 I C1355 P1115 and XVhen You Buzld Sec I I 0 IT 1 Inv1tat1Ons S' E. HUFF ,. 11 1 r 3 I 1 1 1 Ea COMPANY I 1 4 1 1 A FLEX-A-TILE , ff ROOFING 1 1 Herff' Jones CO. 1 : QQ 7 1 CREO-DIPT I if Q i SHINOLES 5 SHEETROCK Q I I v 2 Indlanapolis, Indiana WALLBOARD ' 1 1 f T I i .1-..-..-.....-..- -..-.....-..-..-.....-.i -I-----.-..--.---.M - - - - - -----i Ywnllu I"l7 I af0ffQ10I:Qf06 OOOOOOOOOOQOOOQOOIOXQ 15125 gqgojgoooooo oooovoooo oooqyygqgu 'S' I 6519010210::o..o..o..o..o..o,,o,.o,.oi.o,.o..o..o,.o,.o..o,ioiioizoii Uhr KHHDIIIUIQ :oiioiioiioi.o,.o,.o,.o..o..ohm.o.n,.o,.Q,o:ststbIh:JlQm,72 llilllilllilllilliulllllillltlvl-1lllimtvmlrulliinllxslllllnnilnylninnvln-1nll7lllllIl1-llllvxllvllllvull-nllilulv Q ' Col I MILTON MBIS E4 COMPANY I I2 X I : ' V I A Store for Everybody z 9 I URBANA I 1 I I . . Q " o I The High School Girl's Store " 2 I , , H ' i Newest Ready-to-Wear Mzllznery and Footwear I T at Lower Prices 2 O i -ini I ammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm---------mm, .... . -x--------------------------------- ---------------- ------z- 1 I I 2 U , 4 I - FE O T Q : 'III I ,I mr. l4l"lI.7i!iTI:EIi? FI O - I I'-If 1- ' T 1' II1i42Qrf ' . II ' Iwi " " ' iiixx II . Q H , o I I . :I Quality First 53 If I I P I fi -' I Service Next Price Last I I 'O I I' w 2 z I G. C. WILLIS I I I " i Q , CHAIVIPAIGN. ILLINOIS I I -I-..-...-..-..-..-..-..-..-...-..-..-..-...-...-...-..-..-..-.......-..-..-.. ---- ..- -...-ng. 5 I I Lillard-Getman-Hughes 3: I I I I I Furniture Co. E: 2 . I I I W' Lewls 64 CO' Champaign's Leading Furniture, I one of fhe GREATER Rug and Drapery Store I Stores of Illinois 1 ' I I i In I 2 hmmmmmmHHM---m4.mm ..-.---- --MMI 5 G? I mf' j I ll I II -,f,,f,. fm- MBl.Q.Q,o,,oooooooooooooo oo 0.03, J ,QypooooooooooooooooooQ.q.t.t.o,IlGwK u:o::o::o::+ o o Q o o o o o Q o Q 0 Q o o ozietzoi C1119 Rnnpninrg :exe o Q 0110::Qzo:zozzezoixzzozioziozzoiry:o::o::o::o:nQl?Y6J 11:---I---I-M ---- ----I--'H ----------I +-'-w---H-------In-----------W-I--H-------1' : Q L Hunter, Wood I I P. S. Campbell 81 Sons l 23 CO. PRINSSSLEIQEICE : I l 2 BUILDING MATERIALS 1 1 T ' ' ' 5 "We Serve to Serve Again" 1 - RUBBER STAMPS 1 2 I 1 5 Phone: 7-2706 li g 109 N. Broadway-1 URBANA i 4------I--------------------- - - ------2 4.-------------------- - --------------i lm" """' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' """"""" """""""""' - ' ' """'l' E ' W' cl 118171985 A IS 0771 "Be sure you are right, then go ahead," is an old axiom applicable ll I to any business or personal venture. H When you have a firm conviction that you are right, and go ahead I ,, in whatever you are doing in a very convincing Way, you are sure to T T come out on top. 2 ll I : ' 'i' ll l ' 1: l :I U In CB lc ' C ll The P ana an mg o. U ll JOHN H. THORNEURN, President J. W. I-IUSS, Cashier ll i .. .i...-..-..-..-..- -..-.,...-.. .... ..........................-.....-..........-..-..........-..I. Tn-----.--n--.-.--.n-n--I----un-nn-an-uv.-Q. Qu-nu-mi-un-m---u-nu--I-.--an-M-.nn-un-u--4, - I l l ' I J ' x A I Bengston Garage I I - H- Fmch 6 CO- l T 1 2 104 Main street 1 T 120 West Elm sneer i URBANA I . A 1 Q 1 L --- For good merchandise l I always at the right i TIRES, TUBES, ACCESSORIES, L T price L 1 TOP TRIMMING, STORAGE, DRY 66538 AND ' GAS, OIL 2 : e l 1 SHOES 1 Ui'-HI-I' - - -' inn-'nv11un11vn 1111 luI1vwIl ein-mi1nn ---1 1411-ln1nq-pl - 1 -. 1,,,1,,.i, Two IIunllrr'1l Twrnlyf a!gjqjjojjojjojjojbjjojjojlo o o Q Q 4 Q o 0 o o o o o o 01101101 1 Elk 0 0 Q Q Q o o ojjojkjiojjojiojylb 4 o Q 0 ojojjojiojl lylojjqoovoooooooooooooqyy E119 mggpmufg 1119000000ooooooooooliklwm I------P---''-"-"-"-"-"-""-"-'HM-""P"-"-"-"-"-"-"- - - -----1' 1 I 3 T l i 1 i 3 T Q Candies Socias T I 1 'T I 1 I l i i I j Q When you get Apollo Confections of any 5 kind you 'get the best. E I fl ' The i . I l Cvqpoilo Confectionery I 1 - Mouyious Bros. ! I I URBANA, ILLINOIS QI 1 V I I I i I l I 5 H Q Lunches Cigars IL ! L S Q ff i i I I -i-.----------------------- ---- ------- ------------ ----------------------+ TwaHun1IrPrl Twenty-.-:even Iliff'0"0"0"f'6'V'C'0"0''O"C'0"0 O O 9 9 0 0 OI!! 1 9 0 0 0 0 O 9 'QV Q1 Q .Q 3 9. Q ,. 9. 9. 9. 9. 9 5 O 0 9. Q 9. 9. , 9. 9, Q .- 'T F5 5 I '1 - 3 2 "7 .- - 9 9. 9. 9. 19. 9. .9. 5. .Of .9. .9. .Q QO. 9. .f .Q 9. .9f 9. if K 5 Aim 1 1 QQ 4...-..-....-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-....-..-..-..--..-..-..-.........-..-..-..-,.....-..-,,-.,..,..,, o T ' . jo' o i Q, : f .3 ' . Q 4, 'I 1,1 ' . '4 . , ... Q. I zf .4 , I. .,- 1 .5 .01 I 0, O. g 9. ' l lo. ' - o. -'. I Q' .4 -, Q. ' ',1 ' I 'Q' .. , .. ' I o O I . ' . o O i , ' . 0 : ' f 0 o ' , ' Q .9 I 0 '. : 0 o I 4 o 5 o .., I 0 o : o 0 I Q o 5 o 0 I Q 0, - Q o o 9. 0. o Q o 0 Q o o I Q o 5 4 Q o .A 1 . o o ol , o cj ' o .A l . 0' I 0, o , o o I ov 0 , o' u ' lo o o o I o Q , 4 Q ' 0 Q Q 'Q i 0 4 , o o I o ol , o 0 F 0 o : o o o Q l o Q i Q o : o o o ' ENGRAVERC' FOR THE ROSEMARY ' ' o J 4 o , o 0 I 0 4 , o o i 0 Q , ,Q 0, 'i 'Q 9 . .9. 0' I Q0, If . lvl 0 i 'QQ iv , .0 ,.. i .0 ,o , o ,.. i 5 'o , o 4 i 'o Q Q uvuniuuvnuiunvuuvluvnuvm1--slain:--nvvvnlninu1ul--ggiggTggiigig-in--.lliglilligg1lgi.g.1g. gg ...P f Q0 Us N ll I Ki X x - - f 0 .0 0. 0 4 0 Q 0. 0. 0 0 Q 0.4 0 0 4 0. .Q 010 0161610.20 1 LI ,I .1 'v'Lv..v.1o.1o 03.101 4.0. 0 ,Q on .vi 1011031411141iQi.02101I4..oZ.ojl6fw ji' I xg9UfCK9f9I101102192Q02YIQIOI101fiIGIIOIIOIICIOIQIIOIIOIDI' Eh? RUHPIIIZIYQ Ii!If5910232102IOIIOIZOIZOIZOICOIKIDZZOIIQIIIZII ein-an 1:-11--11111111111111 --1:1111 1111 ul-nfs 4 I I "O4uthority on Printing that is Correct and Different" I I fl I II 1 II I I I ll I I I I I Geo. D. Loucien Printing I C m I O pany I I I II I I I I I . . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I High School 8 Fraternity E College Annuals Publications I I I I I +--------- ------- ----------- --------- -------- ------------l- 1'll'1lHIlIIfI l'1'4 1 TLUf'llfjl'I1lIlf' Zawya III! :Of :OI :OI 1816101151102 If if 155113: 19: IG Ziff!!! 1 g 2 5 :Of :OI IO: :Of 102102161 DI IO: IQ 111021651616 IQ :Of IC 3: :C 3: IC IQ f nb::o::o: Q o o o o o o 4 0 o Q Q v Q Q erm: Gig Rugpmgrg 3::ora.q.q.m.m.mn.m..v.p..o..m::o::o:mvQ7KD 9 aiu 1111 uu1un1nu1nu-nII-un-m1uilu-un1un-an--uu-uuiun--ln-an-un-un-nn 111: nl1ll!I 9 'I' 2.1 I i The Men's and Boys' Outiitters of Central Illinois I L since 1865 I : L I : L I : 0 In 0 l 1 I Kuh E6 CO L , . Q 2 l 0 I I 2 1 DOWNTOWN CHAMPAIGN Ll ' E itll-ill-blllllllll-ill! llll NITIUCI-Il-"'bIIillTll1l'lll1ll1-ll lli?TTTTT llT'lli'WllulTWi E emu-uuvnuiuuiuuiuni --nu--nu-u-ul--lu-un-an-gi, Twill 11111111 ll'-IITIITIITII-051 g VICTOR KODAK I I' 2 RECORDS FINISHING 3 I L " : I I I : HOLTON BAND INSTRUMENTS T 2 I I I . L I L I Thotographs ' LL L 2 LL I Strau I1 I 1 C L by TT : L L Q. 'c MUSIC AND ART I ' L E I I QMQQUIPQ I ' l H .. I URBANA, ILLINOIS 2 L : L L o I II I , 121 WliS'l' MAIN H 1 URBANA U 1 L I LL 625 SOUTII WRIOII1- I I I CHAIVIPAION 7 I 13 L. L .L .L E inn-niuinznn-un1u1:sill-ll-ll1ll1ll1ll-or in-ll1ll-ll-II1 1 10-11 111111 1 1ll'-l"1l0? 0 L L 1 o ' ' i : I A. Sherman Hoyt 7 7 I , PORTRAIT E PHOTOGRAPHER T L INS U R A NC E 1 : I I I L . I L- I I E- I 22 l T T L CHAMIDAIGN T T I 10 XV. Main URBANA L ,IL .. , al I' . q.. -1- l an-ul-1uu1u:nn1uu1ll1ul1uu-nan-auxuuinnzuniu +u1uII-nII-uII1nu1uu1uu- 1 1 u1uu-uII-um1uu- Two ITIIVHIVPII l'lIirIy LMNNZQZQZQIZOZQIQOIQoovoovvvvvvoodiviie 1925 gp3g.3.u.uuunn.NHn::.:g.gg.3n 00:32:031.31.3gqgqgqpgq1.31.31.33.3g.::cm::o::Q:fgg.: Efhp Eggpmurg :exe:Qi:Q911019::oz1.3ze::oz:exeiozioiioiieieioziezeg +.-......-.---------------------------------------------------------------------------1' 4 t . ! i L I L .. l 2 Z ' 1 1 ! U li lm", L t 1 l ! ? First State Bank H URBANA W 5 i V H T l I 4 Q I L i I 1 L 4 it ii ' 1 I L I Q I :: M I I L L Q , . M ' Safety Fzrst-Servlce Always I T I .L...............-.....-..-.................,.......-..-..-.........................-..-..-......L Two Hlrmlrrwl 7'l:4'1'I11-um I1692391102IOIIOIIOIICIDIIOIKIIOI162IGI1011011021011KIIOIIQIIOIIOI 1 H 2 5 Qftf Q61 162 :Of 161 IGI ftffbfbf joj :Of IO: 19212 KKQQIOIKIQQ Q01 161 IQ: IO: jojfqu 9 M az :oz sz 9: sz sz sz IOI zo: fi :oz sz ze :oz :oz ze ze :oz ze si M zo: KI ze 191 DI 101 :Of zo: :oz f0f If I - 102 C02 101 102 IC 16 202 31 31 102 31 si .Z 101 101 31 102 202 31 16 102 101 101 202 1G 31 IC 16 16 16 31 16 D1 16 31 101 101 2 U3131!b1311G!l!911C311011G!101101101101311Q1Qf Eh? mnifmafu 5 532 in TIF!!HIlHlll'P!11l1lIfl'f1l-T700 UNMIK!!!101315163131161011Gb131K131H!31101b11C 10111101101161C1161011116!k!101!!911Q!!Il!INfU lil eildli'-Vi'G'!'EKFE22'J6'.Eaii1'-5 -Jil' 7 ,, .. . an 1, .A, wg. I ., V? 3E12i2Tf4'T 2- , L. gli- , , C.. uv- -...:. .x..- , 1,91 " V,- 4'5-mfs,-S-1, FW A. 7 rik- 'I


Suggestions in the Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) collection:

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

1922

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

1923

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

1924

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

1927

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

1929

Urbana High School - Tower Yearbook (Urbana, IL) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Page 1

1930

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.