University of Wisconsin Stout - Tower Yearbook (Menomonie, WI)

 - Class of 1963

Page 1 of 235

 

University of Wisconsin Stout - Tower Yearbook (Menomonie, WI) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1963 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stout - Tower Yearbook (Menomonie, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1963 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stout - Tower Yearbook (Menomonie, WI) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 235 of the 1963 volume:

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And, indeed, the very heart of the collegels purposes derives from the traditional skills of our civilization. deuekapiugauewuiowmmueewuchmmpwwpectiue ,rw-....- Y.-. .-.Yi - Qfizfii ,, H Y . YN. X5 xgxy YV wwnbalmtemmkumukedgeaud ahiwoweuenexpaudiugbfwuliefw ' ., 4 And if the college is firmly founded on all that is finest in the past achievements of man in his use of nature's resources for the better- ment of human life, it is also acutely aware of marvelous vistas to a future good life. New materials, new techniques, new and so- phisticated machines, and entirely new modes of thought have come within our compass. And we are destined to move swiftly down path- ways undreamed of two decades ago. Stout State College is focused on the new frontiers of Twentieth Century living. 4-4 M4535 ff 'W . ,fx VW.: by . vw- 3, 72 5, Q 4 4, ., 5 this a ' U 'I'-ig 5+ new -i 4, V " :,.qvm bfwm owutb pakhuuxyo I R Q 1. -'WN V U M N "K J' .. ' . '.l it I wg ' ' M' -A . 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'I :IL 31G':L"?, da-rl " Ig?-'-a' A flu lm-1-Ln 1 I r. wrlnlmun O E EO Though Stout State College is one of the nationls most highly rated schools spe- cializing in home economics and industrial education and technology, much emphasis is placed on broader fields of study. Stout also provides her students with a back- ground of general education, a vital part of learning in every field. Departments are maintained in education, psychology, English and speech, science and mathe- matics, social sciences, physical education, and music. Other departments are also developed under each specialized field of home economics, industrial education and industrial technology. Students interested in fields other than home economics or industrial arts, are also able to build a curriculum around their field of interest. Those desiring to take pre-law, nursing, dentistry, medicine, engineering or social work, are enrolled as special students at Stout. These young people are given every possible aid in planning their curriculum to fulfill the requirements of their chosen profession. With the skills and knowledge gained at Stout, graduates are placed in school systems and technical and executive posi- tions in industry throughout the United States and much of the World. T Time or chronological order are two of the many principles that are used in preparing a speech of explanation. George McGuire and Ray Han- sen intently and hopefully await the results of their physics ex- pernnent. 1 I l Everyone listens intently as Dr, Agnew points out an important battle field or 21 change in a country which took place during the stages of history. Knowledge, concentration, and a slide rule equal good math grades for Ray Hansen. ., Z2 " ,gl tvf , 1 ,V I 5' .- , . V, V v, ' ta - ,245 0 ,.,,, it -' A .' ,,,.f I I Kb. One, two, threeg one, two, three, resouncls the Stout hand as they practice for one of their all school periorinances. 29 Richard Tiede assists fellow students as they weigh and measure the exact amount of each ingredient that is used in their organic chemistry experiment. It's check out time - hundreds of magazines and books dealing with various s u bj e c t s are checked out and returned daily by the students. 30 A "Practice makes perfect," well - almost perfect as students acquire skill in the new audio-visual laboratory. Physiology and anatomy courses give the girls a chance to examine the muscles and organs of a cat. . My . ew For individuals seeking an Eng- lish minor, the Shakespeare class lends itself well to an understanding of plays. With a compass in his hand Chester Jensen puts many hours of pain- staking care into his project for drawing class. Pat Bingham lets the photographer take a peek at his work as he begins the formation of plastic. IU m ITIORIAHI PETER F. CHRIS TIANSON Peter F. Christianson, 49, teacher, friend and colleague, died March 4, after a one- day illness. A longtime member of the Stout family - a student who returned later to teach - Dr. Christianson will be remembered as a practical scholar who knew and was able to communicate the importance of knowledge and experience. His warmth and friendliness were inspiring to student and fellow teacher! His loss will be felt by all who knew him. '- Q 3 or With 21 compass in his hand Chester Jensen puts many hours of pain- staking care into his project for drawing class. 4 Pat Bingham lets the photographer take a peek at his work as he begins the formation of plastic. butww' Udall o The student of today needs a thorough train- ing in his field, and his teacher must be well informed and highly trained. To provide such masterful teachers, Stout's Industrial Education program includes a curriculum with concentra- tion in six different areas: drafting, electricity, general shop, graphic arts, metals, power me- chanics, and Woodworking. This same curricu- lum leads to a bachelor of science degree with majors in either Industrial Education or Vo- cational Education. Nearly one-third of the Industrial Education program consists of practical application cours- es. These courses, commonly referred to as shops, provide the student opportunities to de- velop his skills. Students enrolled in Industrial Education are from almost every state as Well as from many foreign nations. And because the Industrial Education program at Stout is the largest in the nation, students who major in Industrial Education are prepared to teach in public schools, technical schools, vocational schools, colleges, and universities. The Industrial Education program is de- signed to produce an instructor having a broad and complete background of the principles of industry and education. VVith the use of special machines, Bob Sugden and Bruce Hirte test the hardness of certain metals. A group of Stout men display great interest in a demonstration shown them on one of the electronics field trips. Smile - you may be on candid camera. Lea Ann Meyers sits patiently as Chuck Thomsen and Tom Lowe adjust the lighting. With a gentle touch Larry Schoenberger skillfully puts the finishing touches on his woodwork project. Gene Hallogren watches closely as Bob janeczko explains how to make the engine run smoothly after putting in new points. Haven Mfilliznns adjusts the lighting on the Printing Departments copy camera. .. .bmw One of the many phases of learning encountered in our educational process is obtaining experience as a student teacher in the Menomonie High School. Tim Mero, teaching a metals class, gives a helping hand to his students. Vg? ' " " 7 Girls attending Stout State College are intro- duced to many interesting phases of the School of Home Economics. They are offered majors in home economics education, clothing and tex- tiles, institutional management, home economics business with emphasis on foods and nutrition, dietetics, and general home economics. A twenty-two credit or two fifteen credit minors are offered in many areas, including English, journalism, chemistry, related arts, speech, mathematics, physics, biology, and social science. One hundred and twenty-eight semester hours are required for graduation, at which time a Bachelor of Science degree is awarded. The girls gain knowledge not only through lectures and books, but also through laboratory work, including meal management, home man- agement, and other areas. The graduate with her general academic and specialized studies is qualified to contribute much to the education of junior high and high school students. And after she has completed graduate courses, the girl may be qualified to teach students at the college level. Two Stout Coeds test the tensil strength of a material. Such a test is one way of checking the quality, strength, and Wear-ability of a fabric. Loretta Lewis, Judy Dorow, and JoAnn Strasser display their creative talent in millinery class, as they put the finishing touches on the hats they designed and made. , -- 36 Mr. Charles Sanna of Sanna Dairies watches the progress of Barbara Knauss as she works on an evaporated milk experiment. Here each ingredient must be weighed and only one factor can vary each time. W Ftiulmig 'Q jxracf ,W W Informal demonstration holds the attention of an advanced foods class as Mrs. Cotter explains "why" it happened. Carolyn W'estphal and Sharon Brovold earn extra credit in clothing selection with their bulletin board display. ,vw jan Diehl, as she begins work on her gingham, discovers that many hours of hard work go into the making of a basic pattern. Kay Duebner admires a beautiful piece of pottery, even though she wonders just what the shape resembles. Although it takes many hours to complete. Sue Mortenson patiently works on a hand loomed rug. . . . , .....,, ,... . .. ..---- f . arm-mfwwN,Mvmmgpmmsm wmw:fm.wmmmwwwwsv -V--- V--V-H www vb f f f 2 ,, .va ,. fw- , T ff QA Idelle Fauske finds out that after every good meal comes the enjoyable task of clean-up. A good dietitian learns that careful measurements assure good results. Biting her lip, Virginia Rose- now carefully weighs cake flour. A familiar scene, Mrs. Vasey captivates her nursery school youngsters with a story. . ,- wwf 1znsm s slm1, 1 ml jim Rather relinquishes a few moments of advanced "uni0nology" in exchange for the able assistance of jim Borgen on several analytical geometry problems. During those quiet hours Idelle Fauske and Charlotte Syring take time out from the busy duties for their studies. 40 Miha: wa z ' - ,,. , , . A: ' V A Bill Schneider finds a bed conducive for studying - at least for a few minutes. More serious studying can be done at a desk provided for each student in the resident halls. tiwwaudplacebwmo As yet, there is no magic formula for acquir- ing knowledge. And if college means a new life of fun and friendship, it also means honest hard work. The college student must study. There is no substitute for regular sessions with the book, the straight back chair, and quiet concen- tration. But this does not mean that one need become a drudgeg it does mean that the student should consider his time and choose intelli- gently between the library and the pool table. Though there is a pride in learning to do something well at Stout State College, there is pride in the ability to deal with ideas. The student in electronics or dietetics may also be dealing with the poetry of john Milton or the economic theory of Adam Smith. Regardless of one's major interest, it is possible for students to broaden and deepen their minds by selection of courses in a well planned curriculum. But again, to learn to think, one must study. Taking advantage of the various magazines and periodicals available, Pat Larsen broadens her scope of Home Economics. ,. f nelaxatiuu io imp With the heavy demands of classes, the tedi- ous hours of concentrated study, and the whirl of extracurricular activities, college students manage to pack many events into four years. lt is a wonder they find time to relax, but find the time they do. All students need a certain measure of leisure, for it gives them time to reflect on their progress and to think over new problems which confront them. Or it may provide an opportunity for quiet talk with a close friend or a long walk. These valuable moments of relaxation enrich and deepen the party sponsored by the men's dorm. experience of education- Taking life easy, two "cool cats" sit out a dance at a beatnik Sandy Carlson puts every inch of her height to work as she and Jerry Holubets struggle to gain posses- sion while john Leu awaits the tip of the ball. The contest between the DK's and the Alpha Sigs proved victorious for the Sigs. 42 2 ' ,"h7'3"'i' A xxx Nj .A . Hu g Many students take part in the Sunday night church suppers, movies, and inspirutionzil prograins presented by the various church groups at Stout. The Texas Boys' Choir, one of the many varieties of entertain- ment for students, presented western harmony. -13 Y fi. 2 H , Roasting hotclogs by an evening fire, students gather for a break from their study routine. Students are offered a wide variety of activi- ties to participate in throughout the school year. An all-school picnic starts the year off right with the renewal of old acquaintances and the forming of new friendships. Orientation programs for new students are presented with emphasis on the development of study habits. The student body may become familiar with queen candidates, organization leaders, and cheerleaders at the convocations. Local and pro- fessional entertainment are also featured. Dormitory parties and organization sponsored dances are held regularly throughout the year, plus Homecoming, VVinter Carnival, and the Prom where all students have an opportunity to socialize. Stout Days are held annually to introduce high school seniors to the campus, curriculum, and facilities. The student body contributes to the event by cooperating with the administra- tion to present display booths, demonstrations, and tours. Athletic organizations and many other forms of recreation are available, which give the stu- dent body a further opportunity to take part in a wide range of activities on campus. Dick Baker must be confused! It's Sadie Hawkins lVeek time for the girls to catch the guys. i A3 . If f 5 . .4 . .1 1 wx E: . ,X Q XX' 5 . .. 529: ax 4 Ex wwf, 20 A . ,..,, . ..,.. 4.. X Xxx im 3, 3 E. X , X. , if f X If XX ax ff X .. xv xx :X X. wh 4 M "-sftgu.-9, '- V94 'fx' '4 ' -"Lil" f 23. -ZVTJEZK 'E ' - if - - . Q-. 'Im-1'-:::r.2f'..2i' -wk 3 1 v+ H Sf V- 1 f- NXMX X- 'xi X 'N X X x ' I irzg . ' V. ' -Ifglyi-"J .ysf-f" - .. V - 'Q x I I 'f'i?'i351. . .f 4 . . :W YL ? ,G f f ,,,. . wg., J ms ' 69 V ' ! wi V mi ... .- . m f . - ffl'-F3 - . -f ' QQ, , , 6 4 ,- ..v. , . .4g..:'aw1-' ' mu yawn, f, ., v 322 f,-'ei , Q .dn 4, -. .1 ' .2 V ' ,"'w'fz, wg ff -' . W , " w 1 . 1 w ,M . ,. . 214 4, . WQJW-e?w.:aMyfw4'vf me W 4' '-f- f 'f f vV.fws.,,4f1f24-. -fx. f- Mffdfdf a if-mmm JM . V-fy . ,Z?f.J6f4, jg, 211g?f4fa.1-19 1-K Q . 1.4-vwgfw 4,-ZF-f 'fm may ,fggcywifh vmfxgff . . Wig 2 " 2" mwz, 41 X x -fm, x X E S 2 , , .. ,. , ' ,MEC ' Q' .fi- X .Q ,J ,v2Zf',,-ff, , A ' E., 5 3 ff, .. fi- " " ......f. wwf W' Q . ...gf 'ogy . .Hg X - vw.. . 1 -42 21 me f f. fi-'MW .13 Q ,Af W W, 1 , 'i wif NZ The fall all-school picnic at Wakanda Park is a familiar gathering spot for all upperclass- men and a new experience for the freshmen. A highlight of Mfinter Carnival weekend is the stock car races held on the ice at Wakanda Park. The races provide many Lhrilling moments. Bill Way goes in for a perfect layup shot to help his teammates pile up the points for Lhe Stout Blueclevils. luwg alll! the ' Throughout the year, students at Stout can have their share of fun and excitement. A full schedule of football games, homecoming and mixers provide a full calendar of fall social events for freshmen as well as upperclassmen. Since few students are lucky enough to spend many winter weekends at home, we are fortun- ate to have so many activities. Lyceums, con- certs, basketball games, dances and a Winter Carnival are just a few of the many school and club sponsored activities of the winter season. Many look forward to the big ski holiday dur- ing semester break, as well as weekend skating on Lake Menomin. Swimming in Stout's pool is also popular on Saturday afternoons. Spring brings renewed interest in the out-of- doors. Swimming and sun bathing, canoeing, and water skiing are eagerly anticipated. Ten- nis, track and baseball are perennially popular with many of the men. Thus every season at Stout brings with it a variety of activities, ranging from zestful sport to quiet talks over coffee at the center or an evening at the movies. Backstage before the presentation of "The Larkf' Kay Lund makes last minute adjustments on a knight's costume. ly 1 rv' ' f ya. im, V, v The pressure is on girlsg let's give it all you have. The Alpha Phi sorority is working hard to get in the rhythm for the big pull. 2 '- , - ,v-4-, q Sadie Hawkins lfVeek is Z1 favorite of all Stoutpatch gals. It is the time to chase their favorite beaus. K 1 , WKYWF QA: K 'Qi .pvjw wi 'QQ c I Q2Z+A" ,X N A O if The Chi Lambda fraternity serenade their queen candidate, Miss Ann Hanke, at the Queens Convocation several days before the YVinter Carnival activities began. During Sadie Hawkins XfVeek anything goes with Jan Klapste and Donna Leonhard around. !SvWPJS'N1RYs3Ml8'?-1?2ff4AUlPS Sue Mortenson tries her best to make pledge Roger Prickett smile A Sigma Tau Gamma active is ready with a penalty if Roger does "Help" screams Donna Leonhard when tackled by jerry Holubets at the Delta Kappa-Alpha Sigma Alpha football game. We HP, P92402 Bernie Schmidt gels an admiring glance from Casey as he diligently studies his pledge manual during Hell Uleek. A quick sandwich and a cup of coffee or a full course meal are served daily at the snackbar. Laden! center: wie The student center is often called "the col- lege student's living room." Here on campus this is true. The center at Stout State College, the Memorial Student Union, means something different to each student. Here is a place to eat and to meet new friends. During the year in- creasing numbers of people relaxed and en- joyed the television and stereo facilities. Stu- dents drop in between classes or during a free period to enjoy pool, bridge, conversation and coffee, or many of the convenient services of- fered. A place for the student, the Memorial Student Union, centers around the student. There is always a fast moving game of bridge in the Union. Right now Fred Linberg's hand doesn't look too forboding for the opposing players. ,g .3 1 W W.,--.--5 f? , 4. S Qui? Roger Sabota was the winner of Lover, a dog given by the Tri Sigma sorority at the Sweetheart Dance. Mail boxes for each student located in the Student Union make it possible to transfer college and personal correspondence. 53 During intermission at the Panhellenic Ball, Susie Brubaker lines up the cue and the ball in a quick game of pool. A'Stout masters of apartment cook- ery,', Tom Heller and Bob Hain hassle over their next creation. IEW That "special occasion" dress is unpacked and shown Lo Sharon Pechn's admiring friends. m duo ab cmwege Biting WN: . Beverly Lee enjoys the co-educational food service at Tainter. The cafeteria now serves Hovlid and Fleming Halls in addition to the girls dorm. 55 The paneled living room at the Sig Tau house provides a place to entertain guests or to have a community chess game. Adrian Mueller finds the kitchen table handy for studying and it still gives him a chance to visit with his family. Bertha Tainter Hall, college home for three-hundred women, overlooks beautiful Lake Menomin. www.. Vine-covered Eichelberger Hall, one of the wo1nen's residences on campus, resembles a medieval castle. 56 Newly remodeled Bowman Hall and the Stout tower stand as the symbol of our tradition and shining future. u-Lxgrslcmwswc 'il ' -Q 'A - www. bw, ,V x, 'X 'N'--V N . 3. ! 1 Bowman and Harvey Halls stand firm as the hub of our specialized learning. Students can be seen hurrying between build- ings any hour of the day. YVarm weather finds students taking full advantage of the ten minute break to chat with friends. A familiar path for Stout men leads to the main entrance of Hovlid Hall nvm zmazcwmxmviw. , . . Harvey Hall serves as the center of all the Home Economics and science classrooms and labora- tories. It also houses the administrative, business, and alumni offices. 1'1o 58 The Memorial Student Center serves as a meeting place for stu- dents and professors. The ball- room is the scene of many teas, banquets, and dances. Focus of the campus academics is the walk to the Robert L. Pierce Library which houses a wealth of material. The Home Management House, familiar Lo senior girls, is 21 living lz1lJorato1'y. campuo pathway ,..,,.,.,gw : 'J -' iwlwsi . -if: ,-an The biggest thrill 21 freshman has on coming to college is moving imo a new home. Fleming Hall is the new home of two-hundred men. A natural frame sets off the ultra modern Fryklund Hall classroom building. wut expamlo Outward signs of growing pains can be seen at Stout in the expan- sion of the campus. In September, a new men's dormitory was com- pleted, and another upper class- menis dormitory now under con- struction is scheduled for occupan- cy in September, 1963. To make room for the increas- ing number of students, a new printing department, photography laboratory, and an audio-visual cen- ter were recently completed. lt is apparent that many changes will be seen on Stout's campus, re- flecting the expanding needs of our college. President Micheels and Athletic Dnectoi Ray Johnson talk over construction plans for the new physical education building Tainter Hall now boasts a new addition to then cafereua bClX1CC I'he expanded dining room serves Hovlid Fleming, and Tainter Hall residents, "lN7e'll Octopie Victory," the Delta Zeta sorority's 1962 Homecoming Parade entry, won the first place trophy in the humorous division. lumwcumiug Homecoming, the favorite of fall col- lege events, was ushered in with a whirl of excitement and color. Parties, decor- ations, as Well as the traditional mums and pennants greeted the returning Alumni, and bustling students rushed to stuff the last napkins into their floats. Attended by Princess Kathleen Car- dinal, Donna Herrick, and Ruth Hop- fensperger, Queen Sharon Wyss was pre- sented at the coronation ceremony Fri- day evening. The Homecoming royalty officially led the torchlight parade to Nelson Field for the burning of the letters. And so the weekend went, till the football game played in brilliant fall Weather, there was fun for all even though our Bluedevils lost 6 to O. Closing a week of activity, students and Alumni gathered in the Union ballroom for the Homecoming Dance. Dave Beardslee and his escort are rolling along to victory in their entertaining addition to the Homecoming Parade. M1 .wr mx-rr.xfxwzmffwsrerbzwxazsmwxvzxwfswvavvmnweax Following the Coronation cere- mony and torch light parade, the burning of the letters at Nelson Field climaxecl the prehoinecom- ing activities. Miss Sharon Wyss, 1962 Stout Homecoming Queen, leads the pa- rade to Nelson Fielcl for the ex- citing football game. Stuffing thousands of napkins, Sig Taus work diligently on their very beautiful and colorful Homecoming float. A.-my-n-.11 "The Happy Hobo," portrayed by Nancy Gigowski, won first place in the most humorous category. Nancy also received the outstanding individual award. l:aQent nite On December l, the fourth annual Phi Sigma Epsilon Talent Nite, presented before a capacity crowd, gathered fifty-five Stout State College students to display their talents. All fifteen acts showed the poise, originality and showman- ship of the contestants which left a difficult decision for the judges. Nancy Gigowski, "The Happy Hobo," was selected the most outstand- ing individual actor, and this dance routine also won her the first place trophy. Second place was a duet by Barney McCall and Gerri Bock, accompanied by Dorothy Jernander. Third place was awarded to "The Clan," a group of midgets residing at the dorms, Jerry Coomer, Carl Lang, and Dick Henry kept the show lively as masters of ceremonies, and entertained the audience between the acts. From the proceeds, the Phi Sigma Epsilon fraternity bestowed a one-thousand dollar scholarship to the school to be used as part of the Federal Aid Grants given to students on this campus. This is Carl Lang, master of ceremonies at Talent Nite, as he portrays a bashful lady in a between act skit. Beverly Lee entertained the audience with several native Hawaiian dances. It is the hands you watch, gentlemen. f-..,,.v.. Q. aa One of the most humorous skits at Talent Nite was presented by "The Clan" of Tainter Hall. This rendi tion showed precision form to the highest extreme - right girls? One ol the top new groups on campus. the "Tradewinds," pro- viclecl enjoyable entertainment at the Phi Sig Talent Nite. 65 X I Y. 9, f , ..-.,,v,xF.., , g f a-f ". , f..,, x wp x 5-y wmlzem cwmniuaf Freezing temperatures and falling snow ushered in the 1963 Winter Carnival on our campus. The gay weekend began with the coronation of Miss Sharon Pecka who reigned as queen for three days of festivities. After the coronation, the Alpha Phi sorority won the tug of war among the sorority com- petition. The Phi Omega Beta fraternity beat the members of Phi Sigma Epsilon in the ice hockey game While the chilled students cheered them on to victory. The beautiful and elaborate ice carvings made the decisions difficult, but the judges gave first honors to Hovlid Hall and the Phi Omega Beta fraternity. In the evening, the Snowball dance was held in the union Where the traditional Delta Zeta quilt was given away. On Sunday the ice races were held on Lake Menomin Where the Delta Zeta car won first place, and Tainter Hall copped the "Powder Puffu race, a new feature for the coeds. These events brought a close to the exciting and fun- filled Wiiiter Carnival. After the shaping is finished, the Sig Taus paint just the right amount on their caiving The crowning of the 1963 WVinter Carnival Queen, Sharon soiorities is a highlight of T11cl'1y nights actixities on Lake Pecha, by Diane Xfvenzler, began the weekend activities. Menomin T., 1 -:gy Fourteen Tainter Hall girls did a take-off of the Academy Award Winning musical "VVest Side Storyf' This vivacious lady, Charlie Thomsen, prepares his speciality-spaghetti. Jf s-1:arnsef1'f"'f'f ' - m mnwavnmn The F.O.B.'s cosmopolitan advisor, Mr. Melrose, recites his version of "First Line Trench." i o night Stout's auditorium was packed to cap- acity during the two performances of Stout's annual Stunt Night, sponsored by Phi Omega Beta fraternity. Committees and organizations work hard on their skits to provide enjoyment for the entire stu- dent body. The fraternities, sororities, and residence halls enter skits in two cate- gories - humorous and most beautiful. Proceeds from Stunt Night provide a grant-in-aid to an incoming freshman ath- lete. This year's winners were Tainter Hall, first place most humorous and Alpha Phi, first place most beautiful. Diane Wenzlei' received the individual perform- ance award. The Chi Lznnbda fraternity harmonizes in songs from "South Pacific." The long-haired DZ musicians present "Sympathy Under the Stars." The Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority give their version of "Showboat." Through song and dance, the Alpha Sig's tell the legend of the maypole. "X'Vhen You Wish Upon a Star" won first place for the Alpha Phi's. 69 In the production "Anastasia" everyone turns his attention to the grandma, who was played by Barb Shotola. anbiuwllfege Three excellent plays were presented at different intervals throughout the year. The Lark, a lyric play based on the story of Joan of Arc, was the fall production. Anastasia, a melodrama concerning the mystery of a supposedly surviving Russian princess, and The Boyfriend, a delightful musical comedy of the 'iroaring twenties," completed the year's program. Interested students may help as cast members, assist- ing directors, ushers, or stage crew mem- bers. A student may also work on make- up, costume, lighting, properties, or pub- licity. For months the actors and stage crew work to perfect the play: practices are held at increasing frequency as open- ing night nears, and directly preceding the actual performances, rehearsals are sched- uled every evening. Students may obtain more experience and knowledge of dra- matics through the Stout curriculum which includes such courses as Theater Worksliop, Stage Craft and Scene Design, and Play Production. Joan of Arc, portrayed by Myrna Castleberg, pleads with the Completing final touches on a costume for "The Lark," play Court to understand her mission to save France. director Mr. Falkofske creates an authentic headpiece. 2 ff f S 2 -' i f 5 . I t 4 . In the Alpha Psi Ol1lCg21'S production of ".-Xnastasiaj' Pete Riebau and Richard Loughrey listen while Richard Sajnog talks to Jack Hoiby. Myrna Castleberg as joan of Arc gave an excellent portrayal of a young girl dedicated to the service of her God, king, and country. Anastasia, D. Ann Wilson pleads with her grand nmma, Barb Shotolu, to accept her as thc real .-Xnastasia. Homecoming is a happy time. Queen Sharon Wyss seems to be floating as she leads the dance after receiving her bouquet of roses. Diane Wenzler and her date enter through the swinging doors to join the fun at DuEfy's Tavern. , -. :, ww One, two, Lhree, kick! Everyone ilwuelhia dance? Dancing at Stout reflects the various foreign countries and sections of the United States represented on campus. This year strained backs, aching sides, and sore muscles often ac- companied the new dance crazes - the popu- lar twist and the limbo. And the search for something original resulted in the Homecom- ing committee engaging an orchestra and a jazz band to make the Homecoming dance a very special event. The Rose Dance, Mardi Gra, and the Prom head the list of very special events on the social calendar. These formal dances are al- ways centered around a reigning queen and elaborate decor. At Duffy's Tavern and the Herr Schmit- thaus Ball students caught the spirit of the German band and polkaed with gusto. And in spite of their youth and energy, the dancers needed the breaks to catch their breath. Hours of organizing, planning, and decorat- ing make each dance a night to remember. These are moments to remember for Ted Giencke and his date, Kathy Rumocki, as they dream along. Limbo some more - how low can you go? Roger Meier takes this business serious even down to removing his shoes and socks. Chosen to reign as Chi Lambda's Mardi Gras Queen is Barb Cook. Gerri Freese and Sally Burmeister, members of the court, offer their congratulations. Balloons, streamers, and floor lights were the decorations at the Mardi Gras Dance, "Basin Street Blues." Members of the Alpha Phi sorority decorate for their Sno Ball Dance during Winter Carnival Week. '74 Two girls step in style as they join in the fun at an informal dorm dance. -N-rw.-4... The twist craze has hit Stout. Twisting at a record dance is Tom Rogers and Margie Groszczyk. ...dauce... joan Rotzel and Bill Eickelberg make a wish at the wishing well at the Rose Dance held in the Center ballroom. 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'- .V Z rs M: - I A2 +A - . .FfVf.'Q.53 Zips- ' --..5w.k'.1EIu1.:1"' . ,.... Y.q:'1Ai11 IJ.. .,,, 1 1 HL gl A V gin W . . v . 1 , . A - IA, .94 Q -- 5 if .J-5 fi f FX ith ,E ll! ,N ,ja 19. w if.3:',f.H . ?W . 1 .1 . 5 - .wx ts, a manage hmm the pfwoideut An old Scottish proverb says that wherever you may be going, you must start from your own back door. This maxim - appropriate to the theme of this yearbook, "Pathways," indi- cates to us that it would be naive and inaccurate to say that forward is the only direction that counts and that the future is all that matters. The past can and does teach us many things, in the words of Tennyson, "I am a part of all that I have met." However, there is no substitute for a forward- looking, forward-thinking person. It is he who is able to profit from the lessons of the past, to foresee and thus avoid unnecessary pitfalls and dangers. The same applies to colleges. We at Stout have a long tradition of taking the lessons and techniques of the past and pres- ent and applying them to the future to make our college the best it can possibly be at any given time. We expect each graduating class to be better than the last. The years immediately ahead hold challenges perhaps unmatched in the history of this or any other college. The great explosion of knowledge and the rapid changes in technology and living pose problems which should be of primary con- cern to every faculty member, every student, and every graduate. Much of the specific sub- ject matter which you have learned these past four years will soon become obsolete. This is a fact which many find difficult to comprehend. Our constant challenge is to gear the learning experiences at the college in such a way that our graduate not only leaves with a sound grasp of the necessary subject matter, but that he has learned how to learn. This should prepare him to meet the unknown problems of the future. The level of planning necessary to meet this challenge is high. But the value to be gained by us all exceeds the price. Fortunately, this is the way of the world, great challenges breed great opportunities and still greater benefits. Looking ahead, you, as graduates, can and must play a vital role in Stout's future success. We expect to keep in touch with you and we want our mutual accomplishments to be such that your pride in your Alma Mater will con- tinue to grow. Looking back, I regret that I have not had the privilege of being with you during your four years at Stout. However, it is my hope that many doors have been opened to you and that in the future you will be able to build on the foundation laid here. If this is true, we will have been mutually successful. You will be started along the pathway of a lifetime of learn- ing and achievement. You will continue to learn how to do things well, you will not be afraid to grapple with new ideas, and you will face the future with a creative attitude. These are the marks of an educated person. May this be the pathway you choose to travel with vigor, foresight, and insight. President Micheels and Sileshi Mulatu of Ethiopia casually converse over coffee in the Student Center. Informal meetings of the president and students promote close relations within the college. President William Micheels 79 RALPH G. IVERSON, Dean of Student Affairs, Director of Counselor Education Program, teach- es Guidance and Counselor Education coursesg B.A. Augustana Collegeg M.A. University of Minnesotag Ed.D. University of California. JOHN A. JARVIS, Dean of School of Industrial Educationg B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Uni- versity of Wisconsing B.S. in Industrial Educa- tion Stout State Collegeg M.Ed. l'Vayne State Universityg Ph.D. University of Minnesota. MERLE M. PRICE, Dean of Meng teaches Government, Philosophy of Modern Educationg B.S.. MA. University of Minnesotag Graduate study University of Minnesota. ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF maintemwwe atandwwlls Stout State College takes pride in her cap- able and efficient administrative staff, the base of whose efforts is the continual maintenance and further development of Stout's high stand- ards and its world-wide reputation. The basis of all efforts is to forever impress those high ideals on which Stout was founded - industry, skill, and honor. The administration is con- stantly alert to the needs of the students and is aware of the demands of the profession for which they are preparing. Each year, due con- sideration is given to possible revisions and modifications in curriculum and policies for the betterment of the school and student body. Evidence of an excellent administration is seen in the continued growth in enrollment and the constant progress toward a better col- lege. Joint efforts of administration and faculty provide the high quality of education and ex- cellent direction toward making Stout State College a truly unique college. RAY A. WIC-EN is Dean of Graduate Studiesg teaches Principles of Supervision, Problems of Supervision, Applied Research, and is Advisor for Plan A and Plan B Investigationsg B.S., M.A., Ph.D. University of Minnesota. STELLA PEDERSEN is Dean of Women: teach- es Introduction to Guidance and Personal Serv- icesg B.E. River Falls State Collegeg M.A. Uni- versity of Minnesota, Additional studies at Northwestern University and Columbia Teachers College. ALICE J. KIRK, Dean of the School of Home Economicsg B.S. University of Wisconsing M.A., Ed.D. Columbia University. K- Dean Jarvis talks with one of the local Boy Scouts, showing his interest in various activities in addition to his job as Dean of Industrial Education. dweempmgp ... Throughout the year, the industrious faculty of Stout State College Work together toward a common goal: the advancement of learning and the development of the potentialities of all students. They move toward their goal by guiding and inspiring the students in many Ways. The many activities on campus find one or more members of the enthusiastic faculty serving as consultant, coordi- nator, or patron. The faculty also devote much of their free time to advancing their own scholastic attainments. And many hold prominent positions in civic and state organizations, some use their talents in writing books, While others travel to all corners of the globe. IRENE ERDLITZ teaches Phys- MAX SPARGER, Director of ical Educationg B.A. State Col- KETURAH ANTRIM teaches ROBERT BOSTYVICK teaches the Student Center, teaches lege La Crosseg M.A. North- Physical Education classesg B.A. Physical Education classes, Physical Education classes and Western University, Evanston, Lake Forest College: Ph.M. coaching, gymnasticsg B.S.C., coaches: B.S. Dubuque Univer- Illinois. University of Wisconsin. MA. University of Iowa. sityg MA. Macalaster College. RANZUSCH teaches zation, Driver Educa- ral Shopg B.S. Stout geg M.S. Iowa State. DWIGHT L. AGNEW, Head of the Department of Social Science, teaches History: A.B. Park College, Missourig A.M., Ph.D. University of Iowa. IVAYNE COURTNEY teaches Princi- ples of Secondary Education, General Psychology, Psychology of the Excep- tional Child, and Applied Researchg Ph.D. Purdue University. HERMAN C. ARNESON teaches Gen- eral Biology, Physiology Xa Anatomy, Advanced Physiology, and Heredity Xa Eugenicsg B.A. Northland Collegeg M.A. University of Minnesota. HERBERT A. ANDERSON, Head of the Department of Drafting, teaches Draftingg B.S. Stout State College: M.A. University of Minnesotag Ed.D. University of Missouri. WILLIAM D. AMTHOR teaches Ar- chitectual Drafting, General Drawing, Descriptive Geometry, B.S., M.S. Stout State College. PAUL A. AXELSEN teaches Printingg B.S., M.S. Stout State College. DONALD A. DICKMANN teaches General Biology, Physi- ology 8: Anatomy, General Zo- ology, B.S. Lakeland College, M.S. South Dakota State College. JACK B. SAMPSON teaches General Shopg B.S. University of North Dakotag M.S. Stout State College: Graduate work at University of North Dakota. 83 52 ' 1 OTTO YV. NITZ teaches General ELEANOR H. COX teaches Inorganic and Inorganic Chemistry, Chemistry and Organic Chemistry, Biochemistryg of Engineering Materialsg B.S. Elin- B.S., M.A. University of Vtfisconsin. hurst Collegeg M.S., Ph.D. State Uni- versity of Iowa. CHARLOTTE ROSE, Home Manage ment Resident, teaches Consumer In formation: B.S. Olivet Nazarene Col lege, M.S. University of Illinoisg Grad uate Study at University of Illinois. FACULTY IMO C. BROWN teaches English Com- position, American Literature, B.S Northwest State College, Maryville, Missourig M.A. University of Colorado in uudwwtauding HENRY GERBER teaches Metal lfVork- ing, Machine Shopg B.S. Northwestern State Teachers College, Aberdeen, South Dakotag M.S. Oklahoma State University. FREDERICK D. BLAKE teach es Inorganic Chemistry, Quali- tative Analysisg BA. Ripon Col legeg M.S, University of Min nesota. YVILLIAM H. OWEN teaches General Inorganic Cheinistry and Organic Chemistryg B.S. Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, Colorado, MA. Univer- sity of Denverg Ed.D. Colorado State College. it ,... M MARGUERITE C. BARRA, Head of the Clothing and Textiles Department, teaches Clothing, Flat Pattern, Textiles: B.S. Univer- sity of Southern Illi- nois: MA. George Pea- body College: Ph.D. Texas XVoman's Uni- versity. Joining Dean Price at a familiar game of cribbage is Mr. Belisle as Mr. Kranzusch looks on. DAVID P. BARN.-XRD, Head of the PHYLLIS D. BIZNT- LOIS BLAUG teaches Department of Audio-Visual Educa- LEY, Librarian: BA. General Sociolo y tion, teaches Audio-Visual Education, University of Wiscon- BA Phe City College Photography, Motion Picture Produc- sin: M.S. Columbia Of New Xoik M A tion. Audio-Visual .-Xdniinistration, University. University of Minne Graduate Audio-Visual Instruction Ad- sota visor: B.S.. MS. Stout State College: 1id.D. Indiana University. AGNES B. BRATLEE, Head of the De- partment of Related Art, teaches Home Furnishings: B.S. University of North Dakota: M.Ecl. University of Minnesota: Graduate work at University of Minne- sota. KENNETH J. ERICKSON teaches Indus- trial Graphics: B.S. Vfisconsin State Col- lege, Platteville: MA. University of Min- nesota. 7. lb , ,., 1,-5 lr' 7. LOIS BYRNS teaches Ameiican Litera ture, Poetry, Shakespeare, Expository VVriting, Fiction: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Uni- versity of IfVisconsin. FACULTY excellfeut DOROTHY I. CLURE teaches Consumer Information, Home Equipment, Demon- stration Techniquesg A.A. Stephen's Col- legeg B.S. Iowa State Collegeg M.A. Uni- versity of Chicago. DYVIGHT D. CHINNOCK, Supervisor of Student Teaching for the School of In- dustrial Educationg teaches Business Man- agement in Industrial Education and Methods of Teaching Industrial Educa- tiong Diploma, Wisconsin State College, River Fallsg B.S. Stout State Collegeg M.A. University of Minnesota. BETTY S. COTTER teaches Food Preparation, Institution Administration, Institution Food Pre- paration, Institution Food Purchasing, Food Serv- ice Accounting, Institutional Management Prob- lems, B.S. Stout State College, M.S. Kansas State University. MARIAN DEININGER teaches Sociology, Cultural Anthropologyg BA., M.A., Ph.D. University of Minnesota. At the APO's March of Dimes benefit game, Mr. Jax scored often. As he shoots for Stout, two Menomonie High faculty watch. nes FRANK J. BELISLE, Registrar and Placement Chair- inang B.E. Wisconsin State College, River Fallsg M..-X. University ol Minnesota. DONALD 5' DONALD E. OSEGARD is Stu- dent Admissions Examiner: B.S. Wisconsin State College, Eau Claire. 3-tttit as ,Z CLARA C. CARRISON teaches Food I ' .- Preparation, Experimental Study of S Foodsg B.Ed. IfVestern Illinois State Uni- versityg M.S. University of Iowa: Grad- uate studies at University of Minnesota, 1' Ohio State University, University of Ten- nessee, University of Pennsylvania. Wilt DENNIS P. BOLSTAD teaches General Psychology, Introduction to Guidance, and Counseling Procedures: BA. St. Olaf Collegeg M.Ed. Macalester College. EDWIN VV. DYAS teaches Machine VVood- working, Cabinet Making, and Tool gf EUGENE R. F. FLUG is supervisor of Machine Conditioningg B.S. University of On-Campus Student Teachingg B.B.A., Nebraskag M.A. University of Minnesota. B.S., MA. University of Minnesota. WESLEY L. FACE, Head of the De- partment of Metalworking, teaches Foun- dry, Machine Shopg B.S. Northern State Teachers College, South Dakota, M.S. Stout State Collegeg Graduate work at University of Illinois. NOEL J. FALKOFSKI teaches Funda mentals of Speech, Stagecraft 24 Scene De sign, Theatre XfVorkshop, and Play Pro duction, B.S. IiVisconsiu State College, River Falls, MA. Kent State University. ' 1 ffrasmmvh-:,:5 .'-' A1 "" 1- l it Allan, ..... . . gi? 5 'J ri , 5 FACULTY EARL XV. GIERKE teaches Mathe- maticsg B.S., M.A. University of Min- nesota. PETER CHRISTIANSON teaches Ac- tivity Analysis, Educational Evalua- tion, Methods of Teaching Industrial Educationg B.S., M.S. Stout State Col- legeg Ed.D. University of VVyorning. THOMAS E. GRAY teaches General Printingg B.S., M.S. Northwestern State College, Louisiana. pwbeoaimuall eufluwiaom It is a bruised ankle for Mr. Wilson, but Mr. Melrose and his assistant will have him back on the floor in no time. MARY FRANCIS CUTNAWV teaches Fundamentals of Speech, Essentials of Public Speaking, and Techniques of Group Leadershipg B.A., M.A. Uni- versity of Wisconsin. MARY R. DONLEY, Assistant Librar- ian: B.A., M.A. University of Mliscon- sin. ms1smmsXssmmm......s: r""vlN-vmLr.:ll ff RICHARD P. FRIEDRICH teaches English Composition, Fl'CSlllll2Il1 Eng- lish Honors: A.l5. St. Proeopiusg lNI.S. University of Wisconsin. O. CLIFFORD KUBLY teaches Phys- ics and Mathematics: B.Ed. Platteville State Collegeg INLS. University of Wis- consin: Cratluate work at the Univer- sity of South Carolina. WARREN Z. YVATSON teaches Math- einaticsg B.S., M.S. University of XA'is- consin. MYRON HARBOUR teaches Phys- icsg B.Ecl. Superior State Collegeg Ph.M. University of I'Visconsin. if ,z MARY K. IVIIIIAMS teaches Funcla- inentals of Design, Art History, Hous- ing: B.S., lNI..X. University ol' XViscon- sin, Gratltiate work in Vienna, Austria. RAY C. JOHNSON, Head of the Phys ical Education and Athletics Depart rnentg B.E. Moorhead State College Minnesotag M.A. Columbia Univer sity, New York. HAROLD H. HALFIN teaches Oxy- acetylene Welding, Metal Working. and Electric Arc lveltlingg A.B. Fair- mont State. West Virginiag M.S. Stout State College. MICHAEL J. JERRY teaches Design: BA., M.A. Rochester Institute of Technology. S9 4i'Q3 :Q 4' MARGARET E, HARPER teaches Food Selection and Preparation, Methods of Teaching Home Eco- nomics, Methods of Teaching for Dietitiansg B.S. Kansas TxVesleyan Universityg M.S. Kansas State University. MILDRED HALVORSON teaches Clothing Selec- tion, Fundamentals of Clothing Constructiong B.S., M.S. Stout State College. A one-time basketball star for Stout, President Micheels still exhibits skill as he shoots freethrows at the APO game FACULTY seeking wnotaut pfuuywoo NORMAN C. ZIEMANN, Head of the Department of Speech, teaches Fundamentals of Speech, Essentials of Public Speaking, Radio and Television WVork- shopg B.S. La Crosse State Col- legeg M.A., Ph.D. Northwestern University. 90 FERN HORN teaches Introduc- tion to Teaching Home Eco- nomics, Education Evaluation, Supervisor of Student Teachersg B.S. Wisconsin State College, Stevens Pointg M.S. Stout State College: Ed.D. Michigan State University. 1.i-vt wsxwsw x:vssN:wz.aassm MARGARET A. JAMES teaches Meal Management, Nutrition 8: Dietetics, Nu- trition in Disease: B.S., M.S. University of Wisconsin, Dietetic Internship John Hopkins Hospital. BEULAH HOWISON, Assistant Librar- iang B.A. Northland College. LORNA S. LENGFELD teaches Essen- tials of Public Speaking, Fundamentals of Speech: BA., M..-X., Ph.D. University of Ifllisconsin. DICK G. KLATT teaches Arc Vlelding, General Metals, Advanced Technical Problems, Problems in Industrial Educa- tion: B.S., M.S. Stout State College. DAVID M. KELLY teaches Freshman Eng- lish: B.A., M.A. Michigan State Univer- sity. JOHN J. JAX is Assistant Librarian and Resident Head at Fleming Hall, B.A. Wisconsin State College, La Crosse: M.S. University of Wisconsin. RONALD PETERSON teaches Fresh- man Composition, Expository Writing, B.A. University of Wisconsin, Milwaukeeg M.A. University of VVisconsin. 91 LOUIS L. KLITZKE teaches Gen- eral Psychology, Adolescent Psy- chology, Appraising the Individual, B.A. Southwestern College, Win- field, Kansas, M.A. Colorado State College, Ed.D. Colorado State Col- GUY SALYER teaches Principles of Secondary Education, Industrial Psychology, Educational Psycholo- gy, A.B., A.M. University of Mis- souri, Ph.D. University of Nebraska. lege, Greeley, Colorado. MARVIN M. KUFAHL teaches Sheet Metal classes, B.S., M.S. Stout State College. ANNE C. MARSHALL, Head of the Department of Science and Mathe- matics, teaches Biology, Physiology and Anatomy. Bacteriology, B.S. Deni- son University, M.A., Ph.D. Ohio State University. SARAH W. LITTLEFIELD teaches Fundamentals of Clothing, Clothing Selection, B.S. University of Maine: M.S. Iowa State University, Graduate study at Pennsylvania State Univer- sity, Colorado Agricultural and Me- chanical College. New jersey College for Women, Cornell University. EDIVARD M. LOYVRY teaches General Biology, Physiology and Anatomy, Community Hygiene, Botany, A.B. Ripon College, Ph.D. University of Missouri. E. R. OETTING. Head of Depart- ment of Education and Psychology, teaches Educational Psychology, Personality and Mental Health, Psychology of Learning, B.S. Mfayne State Teachers College, Wayne, Ne- braska, M.A., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. ROBERT E. McMURTRIE teaches Audio-Visual Education, Elementary Photography, Ad- vanced Photography, Communi- cations Media Design, B.S. Southern Illinois University' M.S. Indiana University. 1 We -.4 gi if ui 1 ya 3? fs ., , 14 , Father Bennett is introduced by Dr. Klitzke at one of the Weekly Undergraduate Fellows Seminar. The topic for the exening was Origins of Christian Religious Thought. bumlalziauub DVVAIN P. MINTZ teaches Physical Education classes and Coachesg B.S., M.S. Mankato State College. B ELLA nl.-XNE MEILLER, Head of the Department of Food and Nutrition, teaches Nutrition: B.S. Kansas State Universityg Dietetic Internship, John Hopkins Hospitalg M.S. University of Wisconsin. RALPH J. PETERSON teach- es General Economics, Manag- erial Economics, and Labor Problemsg B.A. Gustavus Adol- phus Collegeg MA. University of Minnesota. EDVVARD O. MORICAL teach- es Automotive Mechanicsg B.S Bemidji State Teachers Collegeg M.Ed. Wayne State University EDFIELD A. ODEGARD, Head of the Department of Music, teaches Concert Band, March- ing Band, Symphonic Singers, Rudiments of Music, Solo and Ensemble Coaching, B,A. Con- cordia Collegeg M.A. University of Washingtong Ph.D. University of Iowag Graduate work at Northwestern University, Uni- versity of Michigan, University of Minnesota. ROBERT J. MELROSE teach- es General Economics, American Politics, United States Govern- ment, Recent History of United States, Economic History of the United Statesg B.S. Eau Claire State Collegeg M.A. University of Minnesota. FAC ULTY ARNOLD C. PIERSALL teach- es Hand Woodworking and Gen- eral 'Woodworkingg B.A. Iowa State Teachers Collegeg M.A. Colorado State College. PHILIP W. RUEI-IL, Head of the Department of Electricity and Mechanics, teaches Electric- ity, Radio, and Industrial Elec- tronicsg B.S., M.S. Stout State Collegeg Ph.D. University of Minnesota. EVELYN G. RIMEL, Head of the Department of Family Re- lations and Child Development, teaches Marriage and the Fam- ily, Introduction to Guidance, Group Guidance Procedures, and Supervised Counsel Practicesg BA., M.A. Montana State Uni- versityg Ph.D. Syracuse Univer- sityg Post-doctoral study Merrill- Palmer Institute. Drifting away from the zlttlill- tion of a basketball game, Mr. Owen's eyes meet the camera. Mrs. Owen and other spectators are unaware. NEAL IV. PRICHARD teaches 9 ' , Nmlcfsnon Hloodworkingg B.S., M.A. Uni- HARRY C. ROSENBLRG teach versity of Minnesota: Ed.D. es AlgCb1'2l2.X.B M X Colorado Pennsylvania State University. State College. DONALD R. ORTLEY teaches General Electricity and Elec- tronics: B.S. Mankato State C01- legeg M.S. Stout State College. MARY J. RATHKE teaches English Composition, Exposi- tory Writing, American Litera- ture: A.B. College of Saint Te- resag MA. University of Wiscon- sin. ANN M. NOBLE, Head of the Department of Home Econom- ics Education, teaches Methods of Teaching Home Economics, Supervisor of Student Teachersg B.,-X. Simpson College: M.S. Uni- versity of Wisconsing Graduate work at Colorado University and Ohio State University. E. ROBERT RUDIGLR teach- es Methods of Teaching Indus- trial Education, Problems in In- dustrial Education, Course De- velopment, Activity Analysis, Principles of Vocational and Adult Education: B.S., M.S. Stout State Collegeg Ed.D. Uni- versity of Missouri. ROBERT L. PHELPS teaches English Composition, journal- ism, Technical Writing, Copy Editingg B..-X. Morningside Col- legeg M.A. Syracuse University. WESLEY S. SOMMERS, Head of the Industrial Technology Department, teaches Industrial Management, Production Con- trol, Quality Control: B.S.E., A.M. University of Michigang Ph.D. University of Minnesota. BENITA G. SMITH teaches Child Development and Child Guidanceg B.S., M.S. Iowa State University. 95 ROBERT P. SCHESVOLD JERRY SCHEMANSKY teaches ROBERT T. SATHER teaches teaches General Sociology, Prob- Lithography, Advanced Litho- Freshman English, English Lit- lems of American Society, BA. graphy, Press Xftlork, Cooperative eratureg B.S. St. John's Univer- Buena Vista College, Iowa, M.A. Printingg B.S., M.S. Stout State sityg M.A. Marquette Universityg University of South Dakota. College. Graduate work at University of YVisconsin. ROBERT S. SWANSON, Head of the Department of Woodmforking and Plastics, teaches Design in Mlootlwork- ing, Educational Statistics, Advanced Technical Problems in VVoodworking, General Shopg B.S., M.S. Stout State College: Ph.D. University of Minne- sota. Colonel Melrose entertains the Stout troops at F.O.B. Stunt Night with a bit of light humor. GLADYS TRULLINGER, Head of Department of Home Man- agement and Family Economics, teaches Home Management, Home Management tk Family Economics, and Family Health EQ Home Nursing: B.S., M.S. University of Nebraska. JANE ROSENTHAL teaches Introduction to Teaching Home Economics and Student Teach- ing in Home Economicsg B.S., M.S. Stout State College. EDWIN W. SIEFERT teaches Mechanical Drafting, Machine Drafting, General Draftingg B.S. Stout State Collegeg M.Ed. Penn- sylvania State Collegeg Univer- sity of Illinois, Bradley Univer- sity, Stout State College, and New York University, Graduate study. GEORGE .-X. SODERBERG teaches Finishing, Painting and Decoration, K. T. OLSEN teaches Building Con- and IfVoodworkingg Stout State structiong B.S., M.S. Iowa State Uni- Collegeg M.,-X. University of Minne- versity. sota. l' r:zw wf rw'-'wwmwfwwwemulvl - ' BARBARA YVALLEY G. S. WALL teaches Graduate ROBERT F. YVILSON teaches LLOYD WHYDOTSKI, Head of es Freshman Composition: Stucliesg Diploma, Winona State Ifuntlamentals of Design, Atl- the Department of Printing. Northern Illinois Univer- College, B.S., M..-X., Ph.D. Uni- vancecl Design, Crafts. Pottery, teaches Printing and Graphic M..-X. University of Illinois. versity of Minnesota. jewelry, Creative Art, Mfeavingg Artsg B.S. Stout State College: B.F.A., M.A. Ohio State Uni- M.A. Colorado State College. EL VAN NESS teaches Textiles, .ecl Dress Designg B.S. Syracuse zrsityg M.A. Columbiag Graduate at Columbia University, Michi- tate, Syracuse, University of Ten- 1 versity. THEODORE WIEI-IE teach- es Machine Shopg B.S., M.S. Oklahoma State Universityg Ecl.D. University of Missouri. K.L. RUE teaches Physics, Col- lege Algebra, Calculus, BA. University of North Dakotag MA. University of Minnesota: Graduate work at University of Ohio. University of Kansas. MATTHEW W. R E N E S O N teaches Mathematics and Phys- ics: B.S. Fitchburg State Col- legeg M..-X. University of Min- nesota, Graduate work at Wayne University, University of Mis- souri, Clark University, Univer- sity of VVisconsin. University of Minnesota, University of Illinois, MARY B. VAN ALLSBURG teaches Clothing Construction, Clothing Eco- nomics for the Familyg B.S., M..-X. Michigan State Universityg Graduate study at Cornell University. ALYCE D. VANEK teaches Clothing Construction, Costume Millineryg B.S., M.S. Stout State College. Minnie Becker's smiling face greets all who come to the president's office. As resident head of Fleming Hall, Mr. Jax maintains a semblance of order in the newest men's dormitory by having frequent meetings for all of the boys. Distributing mail to the boxes of approximately two hundred men who reside in Hovlid Hall is one of the varied duties performed by Mr. Blake, resident head. .. .. . - . .. ..l,, - .. .. . M fm tv- 4..i ' .aa SERVICES genefwuo and o Reli Indispensable to the practical operation of the college community is a consider- able number of courteous and responsible people Whose special skills and experience are called upon every day. This is to extend our Warm appreciation of their services Which, though they may not al- ways be visible, are nevertheless needed. Among those who efficiently carry out the financial affairs are the business man- ager, the accountant, and their staff. And in addition there are the secretaries and office Workers who handle thousands of details in the administration offices. Contributing greatly to the health, safe- ty, and comfort of all on campus are the college nurse, the supervisor of buildings and staff, as well as the resident heads of the dormitories. ef from physical ailments is available through the medical services of Mrs. Chase, nurse, and Dr. Palmer. Q 4 v 5 Q 1 ws 'X ,Q X T W..-1 ' f As housexnothers of Tainter and Eichelberger Halls, Mrs. Stone, Mrs. Lunn, Mrs. Ungeseth, and Mrs. Goodall, are friendly, understanding substitute mothers for many Coeds. LOUIS RODEY is Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds. MARY E. KILLIAN, Director of Dorinitories and Director of Food Service, teaches Institutional Man- agement: BA. Omaha Universityg M.A. Creighton University. JAMES THOMPSON is Accountant. E. J. SCHOEPP serves Stout as the Business Managerg B.S. University of Mlisconsin. 99 Mrs. Vlfagner, Mrs. Hotchkiss, and Mrs. Thompson work in many ways to make information available lwlffw vis liek qualify A well-run Business Office takes time and skill. Mr, Carl Nuenke, Miss Ann Stansbury, Miss Donna Shock, and Miss Marlys Olson are working hard at records, accounts, and reports to maintain a smooth running college. iw-M , .,'. , -5.3 sgagam. 100 Dr. Rudiger, secretary of StouL's Alumni Association, prepares a bulletin board with alumni information. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION expanoimt mb alma mawt Alumni play an important role in the con- tinued development of Stout State College. Realizing their personal achievement is built on the solid foundation acquired at Stout, many alumni contribute annually to the growth and expansion of their Alma Mater. The Stout Alumni Association is headed by Dr. Robert Rudiger, who directs and coordi- nates the alumni groups located throughout the country. The association keeps a complete file of all Stout graduates and records and in- formation such as occupation, position, extra activities, and family news. By publishing a biennual newsletter, the association seeks to interpret the college pol- icy - its heritage, its dynamic present and its promising future. The college newspaper, THE STOUTONIA, keeps all former stu- dents regularly informed of the achievements of fellow graduates, current campus events, and other Stout Alumni chapter activities. The Alumni Association also maintains an alumni bulletin board in Harvey Hall. Here the accomplishments of outstanding Stout Alumni are posted for the students and faculty To keep an accurate alumni file and send out data are important duties for Dr. Rudiger. Alums, friends, and students crowd the streets to watch the Homecoming parade. to read. I . A N -.N ' E N , ., A ,,, .. .. Q f A. 1. - -1, 1 nga-a+v""4""""f W V ' ' QT, i 'L V' MW"--... , .1r5"iW6 ' . 'li .-. .1 -il I N , . , n ,,,,,,,,,,,-him --'Q AW N" ww V n f' ww' - M""'w..,!!, ' ' H f Xu. I ll.. 1 , ,, f-vw - ' - -H., ,Ln 1-- - E ,- " 4' N' wrv""i' I If ' ' X - I ,ff 'N M - 'xxkb ' :. .W r, I . N ' 9 A ' i 1 N. EDATTHWAYS T0 EEARNUNG .-. . -'3."'i"' l. .Q .--1 4. L ,1:'3"'-'-.hfz 1,51 '57-51? ,5'-'IW .4 .' .. 'v M., . . , .-'fn 4 . 1,44 -'1-rg .-.11 8 '."T'T'T31.- ""'-1 T 'IES' jp' -"""'T. A ff. iR?J.f'm1.1.um-J ' . 1 v Q.. ..f- . -mmfqwwmm' 1 TW. ,, 1 Mu 1:- . ,. 1, ,.. x,j 1- 1--f...7,'l1 F7 .1- : - 4- 5 Q 1, 1 . Q-.rA1j.1': +1.,Qg+fjyib!?f'E" ' K ' ' i.L'..i L '. 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'rv X 'nal - I . -.' 3?-Z,-l', 'Lf uv xgly ' U1 'ILCLQQA . i 1" 9' ' A : ' 1 :ff ji. - in 1315.-.i'i'4,5,!i ' 7 ?'f'1fv Afv': r 'xxffgf ' rf: t,:.1l8' 1 L-i'1'34i'J"1"11 ' 4 ff 1s:ff'!.f4-'-" Thr" 114'-I'-1'-.r - 'fi 'if 1 .21-f23:' f-2 ' 11-'-2112 311 11 www.-.w4w, v--nAaw- an fww- ,1.J -v,puq1w1qwM,. 4wy.w , .lv '35, Sl' - 13 fx-71 -Q-.F1-1 sf'-.. rel ',- n gg, 1.5 tofu Hify- fg- fi" . '1 fi -fr 2-Hg?-" -555'-Q'ilk ' A -L 7 .u,' .l if :V I . . ff "midi - I 1- 1 -1. -X fm' 1 I gf N ' I ' 1.3 Q' ' 1 . l .nga qi. , 1: nxt, A ggi ,.5y35x'f5lgJ - La. ' - L51 "J Q-a!Y"1'J ir' 1- .'4 1,'.'- I ' 5' 7 .A ' ."li1 '-4.5 ' ".1' .-l1...... ..y'I1'S3f1g. - - 1 'lg' ' 'ra -'31 STU,-If-1 11" '1' 9 1' L! .' P- if 0. -1 -fs ' ' ':. ' ' 'Q1 ' -H 4.1 5 ""'1.r':.- .WJ '2'1lf'f5 '- - - Ol! 1. . ---Q.. --' 1 Z-. T sf i -- "- '11 . - - up 5.15 '1 . .. -.1. - .v--.-"1.:- ....s.-fri , ,.,.- ..,-'. -.-3.:, "--' 1 .1-' -2-7l'1 ' 1. - 15:1-1'-4.1 - 35-1-: 31247: 13. .. ir.: - 2 ' . .' - a QW. . .' 3.1 '-1s1..15.'f11- 1- . .-111,-M 1 - x IQ - -.-, '- ' ' - 1 . - 11- ,- -. : , -.G -'1-. .f 1 - iv- -1 . -1-P31-'e'f- P 3 -Z.. t.k'.ea'h- 131312.-1'-Wifi .I APN.-.'n'VN'i'n-1341 - 52.41" uh. ffisralv -'f:4- L' ' il-f'-1---11 ' -." 'if' H' Q. tikkfigk 1 FRESHMEN obanting new pathways The first week in September five hundred freshmen arrived with great expectations of their first year in college. They were eager to enter this new way of life, but at the same time were a little anxious about the future. Coming to college was a big step-a step from a small island of their own into a wide new world with many new people, interests, and opportunities. The freshmen soon learned that college in- cluded a great deal more than picnics, parties, and mixers. The introduction of the study program "Grappling with Ideas" in the orien- tation week program was a reminder that they had come to college to get an education and made them realize how important it was to be able to combine social and academic life. Homecoming was the first opportunity for the freshmen to show real spirit by getting together and working as a class. The spirit was evidenced by the two very impressive floats entered in the Homecoming parade, and by the burning of letters representing Stout's rival. As the months passed, students learned what studying really meant. When semester tests suddenly arrived many wondered how the time had passed so quickly and how much they had really learned during the first semester. During Winter Carnival it was the class's opportunity to introduce six pretty coeds to the rest of the student body. After a week of campaigning and serenading the students voted Sharon Pecha to reign over the festivities. As their first year at Stout draws to a close, the freshmen realize that this new world they entered in September provided many oppor- tunities for greater independence and broad- ened interests. They can look back on the good times, the new friends, and the knowl- edge gainedg and they can also look forward to three more wonderful years of college life. Setting the stage for the freshmen class are Beverly Lee, secretaryg Gerald Miller, presidentg Thomas Schmidt, vice president: and jack Wyss, ETCHSLIYCII 104 FRONT ROW: Jane Braateng Barbie Buchanang Sue Andereggg Sandra Barrong Evelyn Blahnikg jean Bodag Bonnie Blowersg Geraldine Bock: Linda Anderson. SECOND ROW: Barb Boehmkeg Ginny Bolkcomg Bonnie Busse: Jill Beekerg Jeanne Bordinig Judy Baewerg Lynette Brayg Gail Brummg Carol Busseg Patricia Biekelg Georgia Ahrens. THIRD ROW: Robert Bethkeg Stanley Arnetveitg Mark Bach- huberg Kurt Bents: Donald Andersong Robert Barolskyg Vincent Barnesg Ted Bispalag Lee Blaskovich. FOURTH ROYV: Paul Akeng Curtiss Brihng Paul Baxterg Jim Bucherg james Bauerg I'Villiam Albrechtg William Brandtg Sheldon Busseg Marvin Delzerg Joseph Arntz. FIFTH ROYV: Dennis Belecg Jim Blissg Lee Bellg I'Villiam Adermang Charles Busaterig Bruce Barnesg Terry Armagostg David Beveridgeg Jerome Anderson. FRONT ROYV: Barbara Abelg Sharon Brovoldg Eleanor Barthelg Susan Daehng Anna Rose Brinkmang Linda Blomquistg Diane Carrg Kathy De Vriesg Mary Baker. SECOND ROXV: Karen Carlson: Lucy Craigg Karen Ekerng Susanne Danielsong Sally Coreyg Kathy Connery Kathy Draegerg Sharon Collettg Kathy Bergg Kay Bauman. THIRD ROW: Rick Daughenbaughg Jerald Daubnerp john Devoeg Pat Dolang Elizabeth Conlong Rosemary Ehleng Marsha Demskeg Linda Court: Eileen Dahlstromg Daniel Eniumg jeff Ewert. FOURTH ROW: Tom Edwardsg Douglas De YfVittg james Doornikg Russell Christenseng Rex Blumg Maxon Day: Thomas Driesseng Edward Dombrockg Robert Dionneg Bert Chapman. FIFTH ROW: Richard Dawsong Clayton Carlsong Fredrick Derrg Dwight Davisg Paul Dixong Roger Dahlg Frederick Casperg Norm Derickg Bill Eickelbergg Tom Dunng Jack Eger. 105 FRONT ROW: Billie Greeng Rita Hoffmang June Harling Joanne Fenwickg Linda French: Barbara Deiningerg Marsha Hamiltong Jeanie Jacobsong Kathleen Hartmann. SECOND ROYV: Jean Gilbertsong Monica Fedieg Carolyn Hauckeg Margaret Handrahang Marguerite Hauaerg Mary Lou Harringtong Paula Jacobsg Jane Kemperg Maurine Heftg Bonnie Hendrickson. THIRD RONV: Jim Gargulakg Bruce Grug Alice Grundahlg Judith Fuller: Karen Karaschg Janet Hahng Mary Hartungg Ray Gielowg Robert Koppes. FOURTH ROW: Eddy Gabrielseg Steve Fetzerg Jim Koepkeg Dick Haugeng John Gerrishg Billy Krullg Gary Kiefferg Gary Keeleyg James Fishery Robert Kelly. FIFTH ROYV: Ted Gienckeg Norbert Keoppleg Gary Goetz: Jim Herbst: I'Villiam Krauseg Michael Kelleyg Richard Jobstg Tom Johnson: Gary Kloth. bfwahmeu FRONT ROXV: Jacqueline Coxg Kay Kruegerg Shirley Feuersteing Maureen Culleng Lila Christianseng Renee Blumerg Carol Clarkg Jill Godfrey: Jean Erickson. SECOND ROW: Mary Ann Grahamg Phyllis Heitlelg Nancy Gordong Mary Geilg Dorothy I-Iageng Patricia Giegeg Mary Lu Hutchinsong Cheryl Holmang Diann Holtsappleg Mary Grube. THIRD ROW: Robert Fruthg Charles Geurinkg Richard Grasseg Tom Hursthouseg Karn Fortneyg Carol Folzg Janice Foemmelg Jim Greeng John Hardyg John Hartertg Joseph Hock. FOURTH ROW: Lynn Hochwitzg Leonard Herrmanng Don Hawkins: David Fredricksong Dennis Herlingg Robert Gelinag Thomas Gergg Robert Hoclkiewiczg Ronald Halling Jeff Fullerg Richard Herm. FIFTH ROW: Roger I-Iammondg Jim Hansong Tim Fairchildg Bill Gospodarekg John Ferlaakg Robert Howardg Reuben Hoffmang Mike Geiger: Theodore Fleskesg Joe Gubastag David Ferdon, Fleming Hall men work diligently on the huge carving of Mr. Magoo. FRONT ROW: Nancy Kretschmerg Gail Klattg Ann Hankeg Sharon Hanson: Marian Hammond: Kathleen Helgesong Doris Kramasg Ruthanne Haldemang Sharon Hutjens. SECOND ROW: Jeanne Meyer: Marian Kussrnenng Nancy Knabeg Lee Ann johnsong Elaine Kuetherg Kathryn Johnston: Kay Koss: Kathy Kuehlg Dianne johnseng Barbara Kusmirek. THIRD ROYV: Bernard Lienaug Harvey Millerg Jerry Mangertg Betty jo Keppeng Pat Kenyon: Glenda joynesg Carol Koepselg Mary jo Kovacevichg David johnsong Keith Minto. FOURTH ROW: Paul MeCormiekg Matthew McNallg Paul Madaryg Robert Liebelg Lesley Mathwigg john Kotziang Dennis Jacobsong M. Earl Knott: Gerald Jacopsg Robert Kapsy. FIFTH ROVV: Gerald Larsong Russell Koxlieng jerry Knutsong Kevin johnsong Thomas johng Jim Klingbeilg Roger Johnsong Larry Kreylingg Michael jilekg Richard johnsong Byron Kessey. 107 A busy freshman learns to knit, read, and beautify herself. Everyone had fun, including Diane Fencil and Tim Teufel, at Tainter Hall's dance. uwpirwd ak!! FRONT ROW: Pamela Meyer: Barbara Lowe: Lola Looker: Kathy Peterson: Rachel Roberts: joan Rotzel: Shirley Olson: Kathie L1ndblom: Annette. O'Rourke. SECOND ROW: janet Olsson: Deanna Nell: Nancy Perkins: janet Nelson: Karen Riha: jo Ann Ross: Carol Rada: Patricia Nungesser: Judy Miller. THIRD ROW: Leon Romatowski: Kathleen Rumocki: Marlene Richter: Eldean Propst: Pat Olson: Dorothy Nielsen: Camille Osmanski: Victor Rosebrock: Dean Noth. FOURTH ROW: James Polarski: Donald Rantala: John Nicoll: Bryan Peth: VVarren Race: Gary Reynolds: Thomas Rohde: Raymond Osinski: Miles Ptacek: Kenneth Noesen. FIFTH ROYV: john Olson: Orris Ruth: Douglas Ripley: Charles Reeves: David Oas: Glyn Roberts: Frank Rimkus: Bill Ozga: Kenneth Nelson: Dean Olson: Robert Raap. FRONT ROYV: Chris Martin: Mary Mavis: Dianne Lindberg: Nancy Meyer: Gladys Millard: Leslie Moberg: Margo Melchert: Nancy Leeman: Ruby Mantik. SECOND ROVV: Kathie Lindow: Sandra Lugar: Bonnie McCall: Janet Lundy: Verna Lange: Paula Lesch: Linda Loppnow: Stephani Milio: Ann Marshall: Carolyn Maki. THIRD ROW: Clarence Lehman: Barry Mumper: Jim Lewens: Donna Lempke: Carole Mason: Bonnie Metzger: Thomas Montag: Russ Larson: Robert Kott: James Mitchell. FOURTH ROW: Gerald Lesch: James Lizott: jon Lavasseur: Don Martin: Gerald Miller: Lessel Young: Allen Ladwit: Dale Reindl: Duane Nelson: james Rebne. FIFTH ROWV: Jim Luther: Dick Loughrey: George Manthei: Gary Larson: Bob Maxwell: Paul Meister: john Marsch: Don Larsen. FRONT ROVV: Jean Roggow: Sharon Pecha: Marilyn Phillips: Corene Ridel: janet Perret: Patricia Quall: Janet Nelson: Carol Satter- Eield: jane Steinmetz. SECOND ROYV: Muriel Smith: Karen Steubing: Yvonne Schwengels: Marcia Spath: Roberta Rodgers: Lana Pedersen: Elaine Steele: Vivian Schendel: Anne Rossmeier: Marianne Naylor. THIRD ROIN: Masayukri Sumida: Judy Roth: Kathryn Smith: Sandra Stolp: Diana Schuster: Elizabeth Schneider: Christine Predeaux: Patricia Payne: Patricia Schuette: Terry Sorenson. FOURTH ROW: Allen Otto: Stuart Rubner: Tom Stroup: Myron SCl1lllCl'j Robert Schnell: Bruce Suncl: Edward Rogers: Tony Schwaller: Tom Selig, FIFTH ROYV: Robert Staebell: Don Raether: Tom Stern: Edgar Ryun: Delbert Schneider: Phillip Schwistcr: Bob Rasmussen: Dale Sandvig: David Staehling: Davis Seis. 109 Tears of joy "reign" as Sharon Pecha becomes Little people came from miles around the the 1963 Wfinter Carnival Queen. night of "Leprechaun's Penthouse." mlbwwwilwfl " FRONT ROW: Jean Sprecherg Jill XfVeissg Carolynn Schlottman: Sharon Seversong Carol 5111101150112 Cindy Snyclerg Janice Weicleniang Virginia Suhrkeg Kay Schwartz. SECOND ROW: Robin Rolfsg Maxine Smasalg Florence Tegt: Judy Sylteg Pat Sobczynskig Carole Trewarthag Carolyn Mlestphalg Judy Weissg Betty Lou Trahmsg lylasahiro Shirome. THIRD ROW: Mark Strohbuschg Jill 1'Vhyteg Janet Van Amber: Florence Tedmang Sue Tippleg Marcia Vrabelg Shirley Wahlg Sandra Zibellg Jerry Robers. FOURTH ROXV: David V. Smithg Jeremy X'Vojtkiewiczg Dave Xilfhitmoreg Dick Stelterg Dennis Saelensg Paul Sawyerg Patrick Sharkusg Edward Trautnerg Bill Schneider. FIFTH ROW: Norman Tyndallg Harold Tracyg Harold Scheselg Bob XValasinskig Le Roy Wojcikg Gerald Tietzg John Sacharskig Francis Valetchkag Jack YVeiss3 Stuart Hlittwerg Xvilliam Zawistowski. 110 FRONT ROW: Marian Zichg Judy Zendag Jane Wetzelg Enola Tackeg Naomi Yaginumag Shirley M. Wegnerg Nancy Mfittstockg Chris Mfall- greng Lois Scolze. SECOND ROW: Dan Smith: Catherine Tietel: Judy Seversong Janice Vanlnatreg Miriam Tubbsg Anita Wormg Margaret Vllardg Cheryl Zirbelg June X'Veaverg Elvina Tichyg Pat NVyrwas. THIRD ROW: Steve Surguyg Randy Vander Schaafg John Turnerg George Whittier: David Tanckg Tom Stanglg Barry Tinnng Tara Rabhaelg Morris Waite. FOURTH ROYV: James Zuelzkeg Tom Sautebing Richard Stoddardg Bob Wernerg James Witeckg Craig Vogt: Dave Wamboldg George l'Varreng Ken Voddeng Bruce VVurzg Mahdi Shirazi. The creative ability of the freshmen class has been exemplified in all they have done throughout the year . . . snow carvings, dances, and student opinion. jill, ' - The sophomore officers, Jack Shanahan, president: Gene Hallon- gren, vice president: Bonnie Nelson, secretary, Gary Enlow, treasurerg and Karen Mager, prepare for the show. The sophomore returned to the campus wel- comed by the familiar faces of many friends he made in this freshman year, and was anxious to take part in the coming year's activities. Pre-registration in his freshman year enabled him to carry out the first day of school with comparative ease. Having decided on which course of study to pursue, the sophomore re- viewed his schedule, wondering if he would ever complete the long road of required courses and hard study involved before graduation. He finds himself not alone in this situation and is relieved with the thought that his fellow class- mates are engaged in the same struggle. During the first class -fmeeting, new class officers were elected and plans were made for the approaching Homecoming events. The 112 g bam the bufww sophomore went on to plunge eagerly into the responsibilities assigned to his class and all the traditional activities associated with the event. Following Thanksgiving vacation, he once again found himself busy in the midst of pine boughs, the Christmas spirit, and the gay holi- day atmosphere as the class decorated the ball- room for the all school dance. The following months were devoted to studies and the student thought seriously of his career and the two years ahead of him. Easter vacation came and the ten days of rest and relaxation were welcome. The sophomore returned to the campus to complete the semes- ter, and at this time he began to look more toward the future - to his status as a junior, and to the second half of his college career. FRONT ROYV: Carol Andersong Suzanne Brubakerg Kathy Buieg Rosemary Andersong Sandy Carlson: Nancy Brunstadg Rita Benjaming Marla 'Bauerg Mary Collenburgv SECOND ROXV: Jack Bryan: Barry Climieg Bette Beinbinsterg Kay Lynn Boehrneg Phyliss Bergg Sally Burmeisterg Judy Canniffg Howard Bentsg Cliff Abbate. THIRD ROYV: Charles Brennerg Gene Butterfieldg Larry Burtong Stephen Blattnerg Robert Bredeg Allen Batemang John Andersong Don Boyle: Robert Askinsg Lewie Benitzg James Blaskovichg Carl Bohniang Rudolph Browng Roy Carlsong Mark Bartelg James Albersg Dale Anderseng Tom Bublitz. FOURTH ROW: David Beardsleeg Jerry Bartong James Alfg Thomas Andersong Charles Carpenter: Dennis Bergerg Bill Barthg Kendrick Cloughg Francis Becwarg Keith Bird. FRONT ROYV: Zita C-ilbertsong Patricia Gottschalkg Joann Foennnelg Corrine I-Iungerg Joan Hohlweckg Jean Kronerg Diane Kozikoskig Sarah Frantig Rosemary Fesenmaier. SECOND ROXV: Darleen Jaschob: Phyllis Harrisg Barbara Harmon: Lavonnc I-loltg Janet Hapl: Judith Ingersollg Karen Karlson:-. Bonnie Hamerg Cassandra Helbigg Elaine Kraemer. THIRD RDW: LaDonna Jackson: Janice Jonesgi Julie Hardyg Corinne Kreibichg Joanne Kolanderg Gwen Hogkg Mary Ann Knightg Janice Yvolfg Sandy I-lallmerg. FOURTH ROW: Roger Hullg James Klapsreg Bill Johng Dzwirl-'Husseyg Terrence Hernesniang Allan I-Ioveyg Dennis I-Iawkinsong Richard Hartungg Ronald Hull, FIFTH ROYV: Dennis Haslowg Jerry Haughg Dennis Harinsg John Hansong Eddie Kerleyg Jon Krauseg Donald Hinksg Larry Keller. 113 FRONT ROIN7: Faith Ellison: Margaret Groszczyk: Arlene Dahnert: Carole Ellis: Sue Disbrow: Mary Groth: Janice Geiser: Donna Foley: Marguerite Flanagan. SECOND ROW: Mary Jo Gartman: Jerrilynn Decker: Judy Etscheid: Marian Dunn: Jeanne Duel: Sharon Dollase: Nancy Gigowski: Crystal Drengberg: Mary Ann Carlson: Marilyn Erdmann. THIRD ROW: Arnold Geiger: Robert Engelke: Janet Crotteau: Pat Graham: Janet Diehl: Donna Deane: Anne Gaderlund: Elaine Dahl: Ronald Gaudes. FOURTH ROW: Dale Dix: Jerry Enloe: Chuck Fuller: David Fausch: Gary Goldbeck: Bill Dubats: Gary Geszvain: Howard Gygax: Darrel Dregne. FIFTH ROW: Patil Derby: Toni Douglas: Russell Degernian: Norman Frakes: Harold Ehrenreich: Tony Gullickson: David Fedler: Edward Gullickson: Tom Gregurich: Brian Clark: Jeff Dickson. UP FRONT ROW: Kathy Kilb: Alice Knox: Jeanette Kephart: Connie Hanson: Faye Kalland: Bonnie Jennings: Vicki Hicks: Judy Kennner: Betty Lou Halama. SECOND ROW: Dorothy Jernander: Christine Johnson: Dianne Kernwein: Ida Hoffmann: Beverly Hansen: Mary Ann Jaeger: Helen Haralsrud: Anne Hornick: Diana Kadinger: Donna Hirsbrunner. THIRD ROW: Dave Lindow: Gene Hansen: Kathy Kohoutek: Joan Herwig: Maryann Drezdon: Sharon Janssen: Gary Linders: Peter Lowe: Edward Kofal. FOURTH ROYV: David Kennedy: Dave Hotchkiss: Otto Hoepner: Jerry Hillman: James Kiesow: Paul Holm: Lance Keisler: Dan Hanson: Rollin Larson: I'Villiam Marotz. FIFTH ROW: Theryl LePean: I'Villiam Johnson: Bruce Hirte: Robert Henning: Peter Johnson: Jerald Hargraves: James Keeler: Clark Leeson: VVarren Leisemann: Dennis Leonard: Robert Marcella. 114 An accomplished twister dis- plays his skill at one of the informal dances sponsored by the sophomore class. J FRONT ROXN: Gloria Michalg Georgia Miller: Gloria Minchg Gail Mc Curclyg Jeanette Nordg Pauline Leschg Margaret Lauderdale Pam Novotnyg Judith Lewis. SECOND ROW: Karen Larsong Jane Leary: Sharron Leichtg Janice Nelson: Karen Nielseng Kay Lund Jean Massieg Susan Lange: Marilyn Millerg Joyce Maeno. THIRD ROVV: Robert Matzekg Carol Nording Bonnie Nelson: Joanie Nicklas Karen Magerg Lonnie Keinpfg Cora Milliking Beverly Needhamg Carol Miller. FOURTH ROM7: Russell Maki: Robert Marxg Pat Mako vec: Diane Marohlg Charllotte Nehring: Joan Nevin: Chester Nygreng Donald Noller: Lawrence Meicher: William Meyer. I"Il"Tl-l ROW Jack Baehmang Thoinas Norman: Bob Hayhurstg Gerald Norrisg Yvayne Mathisong James Naylorg Allen Newberryg Larry Mousel. 115 The sawdust gets deep as two Stout men vie for the title of champion log-sawer. FRONT ROW: Patricia Rustg Judy Rodgerg Dorothy Wormetg Kathy Wlalclschmidtg Gayle Swansong Marilyn Yvittg Diane X'Venzler3 Roberta Tillotsong Barbara Walker. SECOND ROXV: john Streifg Joyce Zeiglerg Carol Zibellg Donna Simpson: Carol Thorpg jean Vranag Ruth Ann VVaidelich3 Sandra Mfagnerg james Seitz. THIRD ROW: William Trainorg john Zuerleing Richard Rocklewitzg Bob Rupnowg jeff Olson: joe Rossmeierg john Papatriantafylloug Wayne Soppeland. FOURTH ROW: Gerald Rademacherg Henry XVinter- feldtg Dick Schmidg Roger Pricketteg Spencer Ritzeng Robert Slatteryg Karl Stilhnang Dennis Offerdahl. 116 FRONT ROW: Ruth Sobottag Gale Pederseng Karen Raderg Mary Slnrcinag Judy Scharfg Linda Poulosg Mary Meudtg Sue Schlunipfg Jane Preston. SECOND ROYV: Shelley Stenzg Mary Ollroggeg Ann Rudeg Karen Pedersong Myra Schlegelg Marcella Noiseng Maryann Pavlasg Jane Orsingerg Janice Packard. THIRD ROW: Paula Planskyg Karen Rhoclesg Karen Schultzg Judy Ritharnelg Renee Seilerg Kathy Rainakerq Ruth Pabstg Barbara Steinkeg Diane Stevensg Beverly Pitts. FOURTH ROW: Robert Schultzg Kenneth Schulzg Gene Ruetherg Bernard Schmidtg William Shukleg Robert Stoffelg Richard Sundstromg LeRoy Schneiderg Robert Slane. FIFTH ROYV: Don Pearsong l'Vayne Sangerg Clair Sawyer: Canute-Alvin Sylvesterg Randy Smedstadg Darrell Passog Karl Schreckg Bill Smetg Bud Phillippg Gary Riesenberg. ideaohiwo Hank X'VinterfeltlL is caught as he snaps one of those rare shots. And she's over for the touch- down! .ir . 11.521111 FRONT ROW: Gloria Xflfirsingg jo Ann Strasserg Mary Tyriverg Kae Schulz: janet Suckowg Marilyn Sill: Joan Zawislowskig Phylis Trippg Marlene Zibell. SECOND ROW: Robert Stark: Larry Ten Haken: Jim Willoughby: Karen Taylorg Judy Robleg Gale Tappeg Thomas Zarden: Richard Daniels. THIRD ROW: David C. Smilhg Eugene Vavrag Gary X'VCI1ClOl'l'fj Myron lvagnerg Donald Stolzelg Paul Werleyg James Vierg Jerry Weyenberg. FOURTH ROW: James XfVarreng Gary X'Veber3 X'Villiam Weiclmang Robert Wortockg Michael Tibbettsg Thomas Twesmeg Marvin Williams: Dan Manlhei. Pat Graham, a loyal basketball fan, cheers her Bluedevils Lo victory. L. The junior class officers, Judy Norton, secretary: Roger Sabota, presitlentg Tom Friewaltl, vice presidentg Dennis Duginski, social cbaii mang and Barb Campbell, treasurer, manipulate the lighting. The end of the journey is in sight for the juniors as they complete their third year at Stout. The road has been rough at times, but they feel a sense of achievement in winning a number of honors in academics and in their extra-curricular activities. The class worked with enthusiasm on its many projects, starting with Homecoming early in the fall. The juniors introduced an innovation in providing the Don George or- chestra for dancing in the ballroom, and the john Logan orchestra for listening in the Union snack bar. Decorations centered around the theme "Rustic Rhythm," and Sharon Wyss was crowned Queen. "Snowbound," the theme of Winter Carni- val, gave the juniors a chance to display their skill with snow and ice, and participate ac- tively in a memorable weekend. The lively spirit of the class continued as JUNIORS wwf dw lwfbwwi plans were made for the annual junior Prom. King Roger Sabota and Queen Judy Norton reigned over the festivities on April 27, and the dance theme was carried out with appro- priate decorations. Academically the class has become very seri- ous about their education as they realize the value of it. They are not the same carefree freshmen that entered the campus three years ago, but serious students who work hard and plan to get the type of education they desire. Various members of the class have brought honors to the class in the form of awards, scholarships, and leadership, as they accepted responsibilities in campus organizations. As the juniors watch their president receive the torch on Honors Day, they look forward to their journeys end next year, but they realize the responsibilities they must face one day soon. Chester Jensen grins as helpful Mary Merwin pins a flower on his lapel. FRONT ROW: Kathleen Cardinalg Judy Dorowg Barbara Dramburgg Joanne Boweg Shirley Coatsg Dorothy Brandt: Kay Duebnerg Evelyn Borkg Phyllis Bahr. SECOND ROYV: James Suksig Sue Brommerg Jill Curran: Kaye Christiansong Pat Arganbrightg Sue Banovichg Mary Sievertg Joyce Albreehtg Ellen Chase. THIRD RONV: Sue Chase: Barbara Campbell: Gail Diehlg Kay Boettcherg Kathleen Berensg Cynthia Borneg Mary Anne Caldwellg Joyce Delphg Sharlene Dresler. FOURTH ROXV: Ned Biwerg Lee Block: Den Duginskeg Alan Peckham: Joseph Brenner: Alan Burchell: Edward Blahnikg Lynn Bird: X'Valkcr Cushman: Dennis Christensen. FIFTH ROXY: Jim Borgeng Larry Melbyg Jim Buswellg David Andersong James Dillnerg Tom Dingesg Andrew Cochraneg Dewey Coerper. 120 FRONT ROVV: Audrey Gniffkeg Cheryl Fadumg Margaret Ann Glennong Linda Hodne: Millie Hurbang Virginia Fellingerg Karen johnson: Sally Ann jeffriesg Gerri Freese. SECOND ROW: Janice Halamag Anne Fetzer: Becky Gralowg Linda Gasperinig Irene Christmang Grace Doughtyg Christine Faberg Joan Harrison: Rita Hanseng Carol Abbuehlg Paula Heiclel. THIRD ROW: Chester jenseng Peter Gerstelg Jim Flerningg Martin Hougg Jim Rathertg Richard Brungraberg David Bohog Beyene Bekeleg Grant Beer. FOURTH ROIV: Jack Hoibyg John Fidlerg Eugene Bergg jim Appletong jim DeLestryg Bob Birchlerg Jim Berndt: Lawrence Bishopg Bill Haase. FIFTH ROIN: Mitch Millerg Bryan Engstromg Jerry Coomerg Bill Heuserg Tom Freiwaldg Bob Cooleyg Kenneth Faberg Don Henriksong Harry Hemelg Lynn Inman. g . . Hey! Who's supposed to catch who during Sadie Hawkins Week! Louise Reselcl, Judy Bergen, and Marilee Olsen take the pause that refreshes at the Senior VVomen's Tea. 121 , A FRONT ROW: Karen Kardin: jean Lahti: Carolyn Spargo: joan Klingbeil: Lois Kostman: Mary Merwin: Judy Norton: Donna Leonhard: Beverly Kent. SECOND ROVV: Patricia Kuritz: jean Low: Sharon Munson: Katherine Madson: Pat Larsen: Joan Meyer: Lois Laubenstein: Linda Luck: Carol Krueger: Tim Mero. THIRD ROVV: Y'Villiam Peters: Karl Rosenow: John Simpson: Richard Tiedeg Sharon Krueger: Sue Swanson: Dave Schneck: Claude Pepper: Art Schwibinger. FOURTH ROYV: jack Klein: Otto Krueger: WVilburn Myers: Donald McNaughton: Sileshi Mulatu: Emmert Ludeman: James Seiler: Paul Rosenow: David Vfolslegel: Paul Lien. FIFTH ROYV: Jerome Larson: Neal Ragatz: Robley Mangold: Fred McGilv1-ey: Carl Lang: Fred Lindberg: John Graham: Richard Paske: Stan Payne: Ronald Lemke: Glenn Mott. Gene Smit ponders over a referees decision. 122 FRONT ROIV: Sue Kleing Susan Johnsong Pat Jungersg Pat Johnsong Sue Hoevermang Georgia Hoytg Kathy Jessick: Mary Gorman: Mary Whelen. SECOND ROWV: Barbara Lewis: Barbara Olsong Afton McMahong Kathy Koffarnusg Karen Horkyg Karen Kapelluschg Carol Karding Judy Kunsg Barb Kneeversg Curtis McCulley. THIRD ROVV: Janet Mitchellg Mary Lynn Kochg Loretta Lewisg Marie Mankeg Sue Mortensong Ruth Kollg Lois Bladeg Marie Keipeg Sharon Mickeyg James Enium. FOURTH ROW: Tom Hellerg Art Greavesg Vance Nurmig Mike Morang Jerome Landsverkg Gary Godfreyg James Litvinoffg Stan Lueckg Dale Lervikg Tom Krysiak. FIFTH ROW: Carlton Frohleichg Lewis Larseng Roman Osmanskig Richard J. Johnson: Thomas Olleg Charles Lorenceg Richard Evertsg Gerald Johnsong Clark High. FRONT ROIV: Kathy Rudisellg Donna Reiter: Janice Petersong Sandra Spathp Sue Petersong Lois Tlustyg Pat Skoogg Pat Radosevichg Beverly Prahl. SECOND ROIV: Bob Waldockg Barbara Renmang Sandy Whyteg Kathleen Towsleeg Sandra Rusch, Annamarie Sihsmanng Dee Ann Wengerg Nancy Reynoldsg Dorothy Rathsackg Holly Schrank. THIRD ROW: Ben Roderg Dianne Willson: Sandra Laudong Clairice Stephens: Jan Schnablg Ruth Steenslandg Bonnie Parochkag Carol Parrishg Geraldine Udovich. FOURTH ROYV: Roger Sabotag Gene Smitg Bill Vaseyg Erlyn Youngg Don Van De Heig Paul Teppeng Roger Williamsg Peter Riebau. 123 FRONT ROYV: Dorothy vVC1'IUlllllQ Barbara lfVagner3 Delores lfVallg Ellyn Thorsanclerg Sara Pitznerg Carolyn Zacheg Janice Smithg Irene Schultzg Virginia Trautmann. SECOND ROYV: Tom Trostg Alan Vaterg Larry Schoenbergerg Sandra Ziarnikg Karen Volbrechtg Brian Walkerg Charles Whitey Robert Zickert. THIRD ROW: Arthur Uherg Wayne Waltersg Charles Thomseng Haven Williamsg Ken Wolskeg William Schreiber. Perky Donna Leonard acts as clerk for Sadie Hawkins Marryin' Sam. SENIORS As the senior lives through his last days of campus life, he can not help but review the four active years that have passed be- fore him. In addition to his memories of classes, term papers, and professors, he recalls the activities he so enthusiastically supported, "Bali Hai"-his Freshman For- mal, "Penthouse Serenadeu-his junior Prom, picnics and parties, mixers, athletic events, concerts and dramatic productions, and Homecomings. The senior looks back to the days he spent as a freshman and remembers the awe and respect he held for seniors. He hopes that he, too, is looked upon by fresh- men in this same manner. The senior re- members various episodes of his sopho- more and junior years, but these years pass so quickly that his memories become mere snatches of an overall picture. He stands now with college life, a pleasant memory and enriching experience behind him, and ready to approach a new under- taking-graduation and the life which lies beyond. He remembers with an odd mixture of sadness and joy the people he met and the friends he made. It is with growing nostalgia that he realizes he will be leav- ing acquaintances whom he may never see again. He knows, too, that he can never return to being the carefree, fun- loving student. In a few short minutes, four years of the senior's life becomes past tense- he is a beginner again. just a few steps, perhaps a few tears, a diploma, congratulations, and goodbyes, and then the big step to a new way of life-a career, graduate school, the armed services, or marriage. The senior possesses many qualities among which courage stands forth. It takes courage for the senior to gather his college memoirs into a chapter of life's past history and set out on a new pathway into an uncertain yet challenging future. In their last performance are the senior officers Judy IfVeiss, treasurerg Dick Minch, social chairmang Sharon XfVyss, secretary: and joe Borgen, president. 125 SENIORS Beoomu plum Mohammed Abdel-Rahman Sudan, Africa Sandra Ainsworth Arlington, Wis. Donald Anderson Racine, Wis. Lila Ahola Poplar, Wis. Stanley Amyx Poynette, Wis. Howard Anderson Menomonie, Wis. Vernal Anderson John Angell Galesville, Wis. Mauston, Wis. Fred Antonneau Richard Arfsten Algoma, Wis. Chicago, Ill. Daniel Arola Rosemary Badzinski Owen, Wis. Thorp, Wis. William Barnard Carolyn Barney Menomonie, WVis. Chippewa Falls, YVis Ronald Beckman Milwaukee, Wis. Judith Bergen Plymouth, Wis. Alan Bensemann Thiensville, Wis. Richard Berglund Stillwater, Minn. Peter Betts Sparta, Wis. Patrick Bingham Portage, Wis. Gerald Biese Kaukauna, Wis. Duane Bien Eau Claire, Wis. Joyce Bisbee Portage, Wis. Ronald Bitters Menomonie, Wis. Joseph Borgen Barbara Cliver Brightsman Viroqua, Wis. Menomonie, Wis. Robert Buelke Larry Briski Juneau, Wis. Menomonie, Wis. David Burt Gary Buss Independence, Wis. Menomonie, Wis. Lyle Buss Harry Cain Menomonie, Wis. Dallas, Wis. Thomas Bu arski y Myrna Castleberg Green Bay, Wis. Nelson, Wis. David Chambers Richard Chier Wenatchee, Wash. Menomonie, Wis. Paula Christenson Joyce Christensen Cambridge, Wis. Amery, Wis. 128 SENIORS app0icali1m Retief: Judith Clark Waterford, Wis. Wayne Clark Eau Claire, Wis. Barbara Cook Milwaukee, Wis. Nancy Clark Menomonie, Wis Paul Connors Antigo, Wis. Loretta Cruger Sun Prairie, Wis David Doner Chicago, Ill. Joyce Erickson Nou listen KHICI1 I uint you to be ieicly when I come to pick Edina, Minn' you up tonight' Ideue Fauske Patricia Dable Medford, Wis. Gloria Dallmann Shawano, Wis. Donald Dannhoff LaCrosse, WVis. Norman Dearth Eau Claire, Wis. Karen DeWald Red Wing, Minn. joseph Dientenberger Hartford, Wis. 129 Genoa, Wis. Patricia Fesenmaier Elmwood, Wis. Dwayne Dzubay Clayton, Wis. Sanford Erickson Menomonie, Wis. Kolleen Ferstl Reedsburg, Wis. Grace Fischer Manitowoc, Wis. Richard Fredrickson Gabrielle Fuerst Durand, Wis. Cumberland, Wis. Jacqueline Freeman joseph Gerber Oak Park, Ill, Menomonie, Wis. jack Garrett Menomonie, Wis. Richard Gerstner Fort Atkinson, Wis. Fred Seggelink and Ron Kahl act as masters of ceremony at the 1963 F.O.B. Stunt Night. Janice Geraets Elmwood, Wis. Mary Gifford Durand, Wis. Sandra Gill Cumberland, Wis. Peter Grace Beaver Dam, WVis. Linda Gilles Ashland, Wis. June Grambo Menoruonie, Wis Cynthia Gregg Delavan, Wis. Kenneth Grcsk Menomonie, Wis. Sandra Grudt Menomonie, Wis. Nancy Guenzel Red Wing, Minn. Sharon Lentz Gunderson Menomonie, Wis. Lois Hansen Howard Lake, Minn. Maryls Hamilton Beloit, Wis. Ray Hansen Menomonie, Wis. Loretta Nourse Hanson Menomonie, Wis. Richard Hanson Menomonie, Wis. SENIORS uifwd lmmukulge Steve Hanson Strum, Wis. janet Hedler Thorp, Wis. Brian Hepperly Pontiac, Ill. Patrick Harrison Madison, Wis. Susan Hefty johnson Orangeville, Ill. Shirley Higbie Colfax, Wis. dipiema eb achievement Sharon Hutchins Elmwood, Wis. Angeline Hurban Phillips, Wis. Donna Herrick Menomonie, Wis. Marvin Hillman Menomonie, Wis. Robert Janeczko Chicago, Ill. Geor e Iessick 3 Xveyerhauser, WV is. erome Hilt I Janesville, WV is. Charles Hofmann Wheaton, Il l. Wvilliam Iodar Milwaukee, Wis. Diane Sucharski Sparta, YVis. Gerald Holubets Marshfield, Roger Hoov Rock Falls, 'Wis. er YV is. Charles johnson Lake Ehno, Minn. David S. Johnson Augusta, Wis. Ruth Hopfensperger Appleton, Wis. Thomas Ho wden Appleton, Wis. 132 Jill Johnson Madison, Wis. Joyce johnson Virgini a, Minn. Ruth Kunz Antigo, Wis. Byron Kessanen Britt, Minn. Linda Johnson Barron, Wis. Judy johnson Viroqua, Wis. Janet Klapste Coleman, Wis. Genevieve Klawiter Weyerhauser, Wis. Robert Johnson Eau Claire, Wis. William jusela Britt, Minn. Judith Klawiter Eau Claire, Wis. Kenneth Klosterman Suring, Wis. Thomas johnson Eau Claire, Wis. Peter Iushka Port Washington, Wis. George Kahl Menomonie, Wis. Ronald Kahl Amigo, WV is. Demeter Kalinoff Stillwater, Minn. Donald Kegel Suring, Wis. 133 X l and jim Schlumpf and his date dance to 21 foot stompin polka at the Herrschnlidthaus Ball. SENIORS wduvuu mlb Barbara Knauss Hastings, Minn. Edward Knigge Libertyville, Ill. Melvin Koeller Shawano, Wis. Ethel Knutson Amery, Wis. Wesley Koball Kohler, Wis. Gene Koshak Park Falls, Ill Lillian Kowieski Thorp, Wis. Pat Krall Mountain Iron, Minn. Ray Krall Eveleth, Minn. Robert Krueger Menomonie, Wis. William Kuehn Fairwater, Minn. Larry Kufahl Wausau, Wis. Don Kuester Menomonie, Wis. Nancy Lang Racine, Wis. Donald Larkin Bethesda, Md. Laurann Larson Madison, Wis. Gary Leonard Niagara, Wis. Kenneth Lenz Wausau, Wis. Wayne Lemar Menomonie, Wis. Barbara Lindeman Glenville, Minn. Daniel Linneman Kenyon, Minn. Charles Lohr Aurora, Ill. Fred Loomis St. Paul, Minn. james Lorenz Sheboygan, Wis. Thomas Lowe Menomonie, Wis. eneene johnson Lowe I Madison, Wis. SENIORS wwdallimw and "wlw' " i i I i 1 1 , 1 Michael McDonough Eau Claire, Wis. William McGinnis Appleton, Wis. Harriet Maas Maribel, Wis. Carol Machovec Hillsboro, Wis. Laurence Mehelich Ely, Minn. Thomas Mehring West Bend, Wis. Elizabeth Machovec Yuba, Wis. Sharon Mallin Osceola, Wis. Nancy Marcks Black Creek, Wis. Allan May Prentice, Wis. David Miland Chetek, Wis. Roger Meier Milwaukee, Wis. Barney McCall Clearwater, Fla. Harriet McClure Coleman, Wis. John Meyer Appleton, Wis. Marilee Kmett Meyer Chisholm, Minn. l 36 Nancy Mossholder Appleton, Wis. Elizabeth Neumeyer Wausau, Wis. joan Mudgett Hibbing, Minn. Sandra Neuser Manitowoc, Wis. Adrian Mueller Chris Nelson Beaver Dam, Wis. Milwaukee, Wis Larry Newman William Niederberger Elkhorn, Wis. Monroe, Wis Lea Ann Meyers Monticello, Wis. Dick Minch Kewaskum, Wis. Helen Morioka Lihue, Kauai, Hawaii James Moen Clearbrook, Minn. William Monsen Wauwatosa, Wis. Gerald Mikunda Conrath, Wis. Senior cheerleader, Sharon Wyss, has a big smile. Robert Ott Chippewa Falls, Wis. Harold Orth Franksville, Wis. john Pagels Two Rivers, Wis. Rosemary Peichel Almena, Wis. James Paulos Paulding, Ohio David Passo St. Paul, Minn. Karen Oberpriller Menomonie Wis. Marilee Olson Reedsburg, Wis. Alice Peterson Olsen Menomonie, Wis. Charlene Pochanayon Menomonie, Wis. Shirley Opsahl West Salem, YVis. Clyde Owens Menomonie, Wis. David Peterson Menomonie, Wis. Karen Potocnik Owen, Wis. 138 Sarah Rhiel Elmwood, Wis. james Richardson Cresaptown, Md. Carol Preston Richland Center, Wis. Joan Quackenbush West Salem, Wis. Sharon Richmond Neillsville, Wis. Roger Roble Sturgeon Bay, Wis. Karen Raht Mukwonago, Wis. Geraldine Rassbach Menomonie, Wis. Richard Rassbach Menomonie, Wis. Carole Ratner Sand Shawano, Wis. ' kipaudbafwwellko Richard Roessler Rochester, Minn. Virginia Rosenow Cashton, Wis. Nancy Reindl Milwaukee, Wis. Mary Anne Reinmuth Howard Lake, Minn. Geraldine Rowe Menomonie, Wls. Jerry Rowe Delavan, Wis. Louise Reseld Eau Claire, Wis. Gerry Retzloff Menomonie, Wis. 139 Isn't that Harpo Marx? No, it is just Ferenc Toth show- ing off his new tie. jane Ruege Milwaukee, Wis. Robert Sagstetter Menomonie, Wis. Karen Santarius Milwaukee, Wis. Ada Bignell Scha Galesville, Wis. ller Gary Saatkamp Villa Park, Ill. jo Ann Sampson Camp Douglas, Wis Roger Schaefer Wausau, Wis. G:-:orgine Schaller Ettrick, WVis. James Schlumpf Durand, Wis. Arthur Schnell Sheboygan, Wis. Emily Shiu Hong Kong, B.C.C. Thomas Schoemer Sheboygan, Wis. Barbara Shotola Milwaukee, Wis. Barbara Schoendorf Milwaukee, Wis. Lois Siegel Schultz Milwaukee, Wis. Gary Simonson Tower, Minn. lwvvu 141 james Schorer Sheboygan, Wis. Ronald Schroeder Pulaski, Wis. Ronald Schubert Menomonie, Wis. Lynette Schultz Black Earth, Wis. Sylvia Schultz Mercer, Wis. Fred Seggelink Neenah, Wis. Donald Schutt Harvard, Ill. Charles Sharkus Menominee, Mich David N. Smith Gerald Smith Jerome Socha LaCrosse, Wis. Eau Claire, Wis. West Allis, Wis audthm4,abwmbmmgeafw,itwaovwm 1 Anna Mae Stanley Chetek, Wis. David Stein Spring Valley, Wis. Robert Sugden Neenah, Wis. Judy Svejcar Wis. Dells, Wis. Marilyn Steinbach Clintonville, Wis. Donald Stephenson Washburn, Wis. Charlotte Syring Milwaukee, Wis. Michael Taylor Menomonie, Wis. Martha Stoelb Sheboygan, Wis. Gretchen Strohbusch Cambridge, Wis. Gary D. Thompson Evergreen Park, Ill. Gary G. Thompson Wausau, Wis. 142 MQ migfj' as Now is the time for all good Stoutpatch women to make the big move and catch their mates John Washburn Eau Galle, Wis. 3 Judith Weiss Mondovi, Wis. Harland Thoreson Kenyon, Minn. Ference Toth Nagykanizsa, Hungary Bruce Whelchel Fort Dodge, Iowa Shirley Wiese Fall Creek, Wis. Len Vanden Boom Nlilwaukee, Wis. LaMont Veenendaal Sheboygan Falls, Wis. Judith Wikkerink Baldwin, Wis. Janice Witt Manitowoc, Wis. Carol Sobieski Vanek Menomonie, Wis. Gary Walker Plainfield, WV is. 143 Ronald Wolf Rochester, Minn. Mary Wyatt Luck, Wis. Sharon Wyss Boyceville, Wis. Stanley Yamato Kahului, Maui, Hawaii Betsy Zavada Verona, Wis. Jerry Zavada Eau Claire, Wis. Jean Zillisch Menomonie, Wis. Richard Zurawski Stevens Point, Wis. ABDEL, RAHMAN, MOHAMMED3 Industrial Education,' Chi Lambda 3-4. AHOLA, LILA3 Home Economics Education3 Home Ec. Club 1-4, council 43 SSA 43 IRC lg 4-H Club 1-23 Stoutonia 1, 2, 43 Delta Zeta 2-4, vice pres., editor-historian3 NEA 3-4, co-publicity di- rectorg LSA li Alpha Psi Omega Understudy 1-4. AINSWORTH, SANDRAQ Home Economics Educatiom Gamma Delta 1-23 Young Dems 2, secretary 23 Home Ec. Club 1. AMYX, STANLEYQ Industrial Educationg AIAA 2-4. ANDERSON, DONALDQ Industrial Educationj STS 2-4, vice pres. 43 "S" Club. ANDERSON, HOWARD3 Industrial Education. ANDERSON, MARGARET3 Home Economics Education. ANGELL, JOHNQ Industrial Educationj Phi Omega Beta 1-4, historian 33 IFC 2-4, representative to SSA 4. ANTONNEAU, FRED3 Industrial Educationg HSS Club 2-4. ARFSTEN, RICHARD3 General Industrial Arts,' STS 33 Tower and Stoutonia photographer 2-33 Stout Film Society 4, vice pres. 4. AROLA, DANIEL3 Industrial Education,' Chi Lambda 2-43 Young Dems 2-4, pres. 2-43 Symphonic Singers 1-3, pres. 2-33 Stoutonia 2-4, ass't sports editor 3. BADZINSKI, ROSEMARY3 Home Economics Eclucationg SNEA 43 Newman Club 1-43 Home Ec. Club 43 Young Dems 3-43 Band 1-2. BARNARD, WILLIAMQ Industrial Education. BARNEY, CAROLYN3 Foods ck Nutritiong Young Dems 2-4, publicity chairman3 Newman Club 1-4, board member3 Alpha Psi Omega 1-43 WRA 43 Home Ec. Club 43 Archery Club 1. BECKMAN, RONALD3 Industrial Education3 Alpha Phi Omega 2-4, vice pres. 43 EPT 3-43 SNEA 2-4, vice pres. 43 IRC 3-43 LSA 2-43 Stout Undergraduate Fellows 4. 144 BENSEMANN, ALAN3 Industrial Teclznologjg' Ind. Tech. Steering Comm. 2-3, pres. 33 Arts 8: Crafts Club 3. BERGEN, JUDITHQ General Home Economicsg Delta Zeta 2-4, sec- retary 43 Home Ec. Club 1-43 Tower 33 LSA 1-23 Rifle Club 33 treasurer Eichelberger Hall 3. BERGLUND, RICHARD3 Industrial EClllClllI0l1j LSA 3-4, treasurer 43 Alpha Phi Omega 3-4. BETTS, PETER1 Industrial Educationg Sigma Tau Gamma 1-4, Chaplin 43 Canterbury Club 1-4, pres. 1, vice pres. 23 Stoutonia 2-43 Tower 2-43 vice pres. senior classg counselor Hovlid Hall 3-4. BIESE, GERALD3 Industrial Educationg Newman Club 1-4, pres. 43 Delta Kappa 2-4, reporter 33 Radio Electronic Club 2-43 SNEA 3-43 AIAA 3-43 Track 1-4. BINGHAM, PATRICK3 Industrial ECl7.lL'llli07'lj Arts 8: Crafts Club 2-53 EPT 4. BISBEE, JOYCE: Home Economics Educationg Home Ec. Club 1-43 SNEA 3-43 INRA 3-43 Gamma Delta l-4, vice pres. and pub1icity3 Band 1. BORGEN, JOSEl3Hj Industrial Educationg IFC 2-43 LSA 2-43 Chi Lambda 2-43 SSA 43 pres. senior class3 counselor Fleming Hall 4, I-lovlid Hall 3. BRIGHTSMAN, BARBARA CLIVER3 General Home Economicsj Home Ec. Club 1-23 Young Dems 2-3. BRISKI, LARRY3 Industrial Educationg Delta Kappa 2-43 "SH Club l-43 Football 1-23 Track 1-2. BUELKE, ROBERT3 Industrial Educationj Band 1-4, pres. 1-23 Gamma Delta 2-43 EPT 3-43 Radio Electronics Club 2-4. BURT, DAVIDQ Industrial Education3 Arts Sc Crafts Club 2-4, vice pres. 43 Stout State Skydiver 3-4, treasurer 43 LSA 1-33 Synchro- nized Swimmers 1-2. BUSS, LYLE5 Industrial Technology5 Metals Guild 2-4, treas5 "S" Club 1-4, treas5 Phi Omega Beta 1-4, sec5 pres. freshman class 1959. BUYARSKI, THOMAS5 Industrial Teclznology5 Phi Sigma Epsilon 2-4, vice pres5 Newman Club 1-4. CASTLEBERG, MYRNA5 Home Economics Educationg Alpha Psi Omega 3-45 Sigma Sigma Sigma 3-45 Home Ec. Club 3-45 SNEA 3-4. CHIER, RICHARD5 Industrial Educationg Football 1-25 Wrestling 1. CHRISTENSEN, PAULA5 Home Economics Education,' SNEA 2-45 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Wesley 1-4. CLARK, JUDITH5 General Home Economicsg Home Ec. Club 1-45 Newman Club 1. CLARK, NANCY5 Home Economics Education5 Sigma Sigma Sigma 3-45 Home Ec. Club 1-4. CLARK, WAYNE5 Industrial Technologyg EPT 2-4, pres. 45 Radio Electronics Club 3-45 Stout Undergraduate Fellow 3-45 Industrial Tech. Steering Comm. 3-4. CONNERS, PAUL5 Industrial Technology Phi Sigma Epsilon 1-4, treas., pledge master5 Ski Club 1-4. COOK, BARBARA5 Clothing of Textilesg Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-45 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Alpha Psi Omega understudy 2-4. CRUGER, LORETTA5 Home Economics Educationg Home Ec. Club 1, 2, 45 SNEA 3-45 Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-4, song leader 3, mem- bership chairman 4, council member 4. DABLE, PATRICIA5 Home Economics Education,' SNEA 2-4, treas. 35 Sigma Sigma Sigma 2-4, corresponding sec. 45 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Newman Club 1-4. DALLMANN, GLORIA5 Home Economics Educationg Home Ec. Club 1-4, pres. 4, council 1-45 SNEA 2-4, treas. 25 Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-45 Phi Upsilon Omicron 2-45 Gamma Delta 1-4, program chair- man 25 XVRA 15 Who's Who 3. DEARTH, NORMAN5 Industrial Education,' Metals Guild 2-45 EPT 4. DeWALD, KAREN5 Home Economics Education,' Sigma Sigma Sigma 2-45 Home Ec. Club 2-45 Canterbury Club 2-4. DIETENBERGER, JOSEPH5 Industrial Education,' Newman Club 1-4, Sgt-at-arms and vice pres.5 Rifle Club 15 Metals Guild 2-4, reporterg SNEA 3-45 AIAA 3-45 Phi Sigma Epsilon 2-4, house treas. 4. DONER, DAVID5 Industrial Education,' Metals Guild. DZUBAY, DWAYNE5 Industrial Technologyj EPT 2-45 Stoutonia 1-4, circulation manager 45 LSA 1-45 4-H Club 2-35 Stout Under- graduate Fellows 4, representative of Ind. Tech.5 Ind. Tech. Steering Committee 2-4. ERICKSON, JOYCE5 Home Economics Educationj Home Ec. Club 4. ERICKSON, SANFORD5 Industrial Education and Technology Phi Omega Beta 2-4, treas. 35 "S" Club 3-4. FERSTL, KOLLEEN5 General Home Eco1zomics,' Tower 15 Newman Club 1-2, librarian 1-25 Sigma Sigma Sigma 2-45 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Alpha Psi Omega 2-4, vice pres. 3, sec. 4. FESENMAIER, PATRICIA5 Home Economics Educationg Newman Club 1-45 Phi Upsilon Omricon 3-4, corresponding sec. 45 Home Ec. Club 1-45 SNEA 2-45 Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-4, pres. 45 Panhellenic Council 4. . FISCHER, GRACE5 Clothing cb' Textiles,' Newman Club 1-45 4-H Club 1-25 Home Ec. Club 1, 2, 45 IRC 1, 35 WVS representative 2. FREEMAN, JACQUELINE5 Dietetics5 Wesley 1, 2, 45 WRA 1-25 Ski Club 1-25 Dietetics Club 2, 45 Synchronized Swimmers 1-25 Alpha Phi 2-45 Phi Upsilon Omicron 2-45 Home Ec. Club 1, 2, 4, council 25 SSA 2. FUERST, GABRIELLE5 Home Economics Educationj Young Dems 3-4, social chairman5 Home Ec. Club 1. GARRETT, JACK5 Industrial Technology IRC 1-4. GERAETS, JANICE5 Horne Economics Education,' Home Ec. Club 1-45 SNEA 45 Newman Club 1-3. GERSTNER, RICHARD5 Industrial Educatiom Metals Guild 2-45 Sigma Tau Gamma 1-4, treas.5 IFG representative. GIFFORD, MARY5 Home Economics Education,' Home Ec. Club 1-45 Newman Club 1-45 SNEA 3-45 Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-4, treas. 4. GILL, SANDRA5 Home Economics Educationg Home Ec. Club 1-45 SNEA 2-45 Ski Club 45 LSA 2-4. GILLES, LINDA5 Home Economics Education5 Phi Upsilon Omicron 3-4, pres. 45 Home Ec. Club 1-45 LSA 1-35 SNEA 3-45 4-H Club, historian 45 Who's Who 4. GRACE, PETER5 Industrial Education5 Newman Club 1-45 Phi Omega Beta 1-4. GRAMBO, JUNE SHELLIAM5 Foods sb' Nutrition,' Home Ec. Club 15 Dietetics Club 25 Band 1. GRESK, KENNETH5 Industrial Education,' Radio-Electronics 2-4, vice pres. 45 EPT 3-4. GRUDT, SANDRA5 General Home Econornicsg Home Ec. Club 1-35 Choir 1-3. GUENZEL, NANCY5 Dietetics5 Home Ec. Club 1-25 Dietetics Club 2-4, vice pres. 45 LSA 1-4. GUNDERSON, SHARON LENTZ5 Home Economics Education,' Home Ec. Club 1-35 LSA 1-25 Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-4: Stoutonia 1-2. HAMILTON, MARLYS5 Home Economics Education,' Alpha Phi 2-4, historian5 Home Ec. Club 1-45 SNEA 2-4. HANSEN, LOIS5 Home Economics Education,' Delta Zeta 2-45 Alpha Psi Omega 2-4, outstanding senior in dramaticsg Home Ec. Club 1-4: Rifle Club 3. HANSEN, RAY5 Industrial Teclznologyg EPT 45 Delta Kappa 2-45 Rifle Club 3-45 Radio-Electronics Club 3-45 Stout Undergraduate Fellows 3-4. HANSON, LORETTA5 Home Economics Education5 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Wesley 1-45 Phi Upsilon Omicron 2-4, treas. 4. HANSON, RICHARD5 Industrial Educationg Chi Lambda 1-4, his- torian 25 Wesley 1-4, vice pres. 2, treas. 4. HANSON, STEVEN5 Industrial Educationj Rifle Club5 Phi Omega Beta 1-4, sec. 2-45 Faculty Sc Students Welfare Comm. HARRISON, PATRICK5 Industrial Education and Technology Delta Kappa 3-4, historian 45 Rifle Club 2-4. HEDLER, JAN5 General Home Eeonomics5 Newman Club 1-45 Home Ec. Club 1-4. HEFTY, SUSAN5 Home Economics Educationg Wesley l-25 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Phi Upsilon Omicron 2-45 Alpha Phi 2-45 Stoutonia 1-4, co-editor 35 SNEA 2-4. HEPPERLY, BRIAN5 Industrial Educationg Metals Guild 2-45 Sigma Tau Gamma 1-4, sentinal 4. HERRICK, DONNA5 Home Economics Educationg Home Ec. Club 2-45 SNEA 3-45 Phi Upsilon Omicron 3-45 Sigma Sigma Sigma 2-4, pres. 45 WRA 25 Wesley 2-45 4-H Club5 Homecoming attendant 45 Who's Who 4. HIGBIE, SHIRLEY5 Home Economics Education,' Home Ec. Club 1-45 LSA 1-25 SNEA 3. HILLMAN, MARVIN5 Industrial Educationj "S" Club 1-4. HILT, JEROME5 Industrial Educationg Sigma Tau Gamma 1-4, sec- retary 45 Metals Guild 2-4, program chairman5 Who's Who 35 EPT 2-45 Stout Undergraduate Fellows. HOFMANN, CHARLES5 Industrial Educationj Alpha Phi Omega 15 Wesley 15 Stoutonia 15 IRC 2-3, sec-treas. 35 Phi Sigma Epsilon 2-45 social chairman, junior class. HOLUBETS, GERALD5 Industrial Education5 Delta Kappa 1-45 "S" Club 1-4. HOOVER, ROGER5 Industrial Education5 Phi Sigma Epsilon 1-4, sec. 4. HOPFENSPERGER, RUTH5 Home Economics Education,' Who's Who 35 Home Ec. Club 1-4, council5 Phi Upsilon Omicron 2-45 Alpha Phi 2-4, pres. 45 Newman Club 1-4, treas. 25 Student Senate 35 Alpha Psi Omega 2-45 SSA treas. HOWDEN, THOMAS5 Industrial Education5 Newman Club 1-4, vice pres. 35 Delta Kappa 2-45 SNEA 2-4. HURBAN, ANGELINE5 General Home Econornicsj WRA 1-35 New- man Club 1-35 Stoutonia 2-35 Tower 2-45 Young Republicans 2-35 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Alpha Sigma Alpha 3-45 National Literary Association5 WEA. HUTCHINS, SHARON5 Home Economics Educationj Home Ec. Club 1-4, publicity director5 SNEA 3-45 Sigma Sigma Sigma 2-4, sec. 45 Tower 1-25 Stoutonia5 4-H Club. JANECZKO, ROBERT5 Industrial Educationg Sigma Tau Gamma 1-4, vice pres. 3, pres. 45 Alpha Psi Omega 2-4. JESSICK, GEORGE5 Industrial Education5 Baseball 3-4. JODAR, WILLIAM5 Industrial Education5 Alpha Phi Omega 3-4, sec. 45 Newman Club 1-45 Young Dems 2-3, vice chairman 35 IRC 25 SNEA 3-4. JOHNSON, CHARLES5 Industrial Education5 Chi Lambda 1-4, vice pres. 35 EPT 2-45 SSA pres. 45 Wesley 1-25 Metals Guild 2-4. sec. 35 Junior class pres.5 wrestling 2-3. JOHNSON, DAVID S.5 Industrial Education5 Radio Club 2-4. JOHNSON, JILL5 Dieteticsg Dietetics Club 2-45 Canterbury Club 1-4, sec. 3-4. JOHNSON, JOYCE5 Home Economics Education5 WRA 1-25 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-4, sec.5 SNEA 4. JOHNSON, JUDY5 Clothing if Textiles,' Home Ec. Club 1-35 LSA 1-35 Young Dems 3-4. JOHNSON, LINDA5 Home Economics Education5 Home Ec. Club 1-45 SNEA 3-45 LSA 2-45 Band 1-4, sec. 2-3, pres. 4. JUSELA, WILLIAM5 Industrial Educationg Delta Kappa 3-45 EPT 3-45 Metals Guild 3-45 Undergraduate Fellowship 3-4. JUSHKA, PETER5 Industrial Educationg Phi Omega Beta 2-45 New- man Club 1-45 Counselor Fleming Hall 3-4. KAHL, GEORGE5 Vocational Education5 AVA 2-45 AIAA 2-45 EPT 2-4. KAHL, RONALD5 Industrial Education,' Phi Omega Beta 3-4, treas. 4. KALINOFF, JOHN5 Industrial Educationg Alpha Phi Omega 2-45 Arts 2: Crafts Club 3-4. KEGEL, DONALD5 Industrial Technologyj Metals Guild 2-4, pres. 45 Rifle Club 1-4. KESANEN, BYRON5 Industrial Education,' Metals Guild 2-4, treas. 3-4. KLAPSTE, JANET5 Foods cb' Nutrition and Home Economics Educa- tion5 Alpha Psi Omega 1-4, sec-treas. 2, vice pres. 3, pres 42 Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-45 Tower 1-4, section editor5 Panhellenic 3-4, vice pres. 45 Home Ec. Club 1-4. KLAWITER, GENEVIEVE5 Clothing ch Textiles5 Newman Club 1-45 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Band. KLAWITER, JUDITH5 Home Economics Education,' Home Ec. Club 1-45 SNEA 3-45 LSA 1-45 band 1-4. KNAUSS, BARBARA5 Foods cb Nutrition,' Wesley l-4, pres. 35 Symphonic Singers 1-4, publicity director 2-45 Synchronized Swim- mers 15 Stoutonia 2-45 IRC 3-45 Home Ec. Club 1-4, state officer 4. 145 KNIGGE, EDVVARD5 Industrial Teclinologvg Ski Club l-45 Arts 8: Crafts Club 2-45 Radio Club 4. KNUTSON, ETHEL5 Home Economics Educaliong Home Ec. Club 1-45 IRC 2-35 LSA 1-4, sec. 3, co-social chairman 45 Phi Upsilon Omi- cron 2-4, marshal 35 SNEA 2-45 Stout Undergraduate Fellows 3-45 Who's Who 3. KOBALL, VVESLEY5 Industrial Educationg Rifle Club 45 Intramural Sports 2-4. KOELLER, MELVIN5 Industrial Teclzn0logy,' Phi Sigma Epsilon 2-45 Rifle Club 1-4, treas. 45 Metals Guild 3-4. KOYVIESKI, LILLIAN5 Home Economics Education5 Home Ec. Club l-45 Newman Club l-45 SNEA 3-45 Film Society 3-4, publicity director 45 Stoutonia 3-4. KRALL, RAY5 Industrial Educati0n5 AVA 2-45 AIAA 2-4. KUEHN, XNILLIAM5 Industrial Education' "S" Club 3-45 Rifle Club 3-45 Choir 25 LSA l-45 Basketball manager 2-4. KUFAHL, LARRY5 Industrial Teclznologyg Rifle Club 3-4. KUNZ, RUTH5 Home Economics Eclucation5 United Christian Fel- lowship 15 WRA 35 Home Ec. Club l-45 SNEA 3-4 publicity5 Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-4, vice pres. 4. LANG, NANCY5 Clothing tb' Textilesg Home Ec. Club 2-45 Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-4. LARKIN, DONALD5 Industrial Educationj Stoutonia, 1-4, editor 45 Sigma Tau Gamma 1-4. LARSON, LAURANN5 General Home Econom.ics,' Stoutonia 15 LSA 1-45 Tower 2-35 Home Ec. Club 1-4. LEMAR, WAYNE5 Industrial Eclucation5 Arts gc Crafts Club 2-4, vice pres. 3, pres. 4. LENZ, KENNETH5 Industrial Teclzn0logy,' Ind. Tech. Steering Comm. 3. LEONARD, GARY5 Industrial Education,' Newman Club 1-45 Sigma Tau Gamma 2-4, house manager 3-45 Alpha Psi Omega 3-45 Arts 8: Crafts Club 1-45 Student Senate 45 freshman class social chair- man. LINDEMAN, BARBARA5 Home Economics Education,' Home Ec. Club 1-45 Symphonic Singers 35 SNEA 45 Young Dems 35 LSA 4-H Club. LINNEMAN, DANIEL5 Industrial Education,' Arts 84 Crafts Club l-4, treas. 4. LOOMIS, FRED5 Industrial Education5 "S" Club 2-4, vice pres. 45 Delta Kappa l-45 IFC 3-4, pres. 3, sec-treas. 4. LORENZ, JIM5 Industrial Technology and Educationg Phi Sigma Epsilon 3-4. LOUSHIN, TERRANCE5 Industrial Educationg Phi Omega Beta 3-4. LOIVE, THOMAS5 Industrial Educationg STS 1-4, pres. 3-45 Stoutonia 1, 2, 4, circulation mgr. 25 Tower 1-25 Young Dems 3-4. LUEPKE, JERRY5 Industrial Technology. LUNDE, VIRGINIA HOLTAN5 Dietetics,' Dietetics Club 2-45 Home Ec. Club 2, 4. MAAS, HARRIET5 Home Economics Eclucationg SNEA 3-4, treas 45 Home Ec. Club l-4, social chairman 45 Stoutonia 2-45 Phi Upsilon Omicron 3-45 Sigma Sigma Sigma 3-4, sorority public relations editor 4. MACHOVEC, CAROL5 Home Economics Educationg Alpha Phi 2-45 Home Ec. Club 1-4, program chairman5 WVR.-X 1-3, sportshead 2-35 4-H Club 2-3, sec. 25 SNEA 45 Newman Club 3-4. MACHOVEC, ELIZABETH5 Home Economics Education5 Home Ec. Club 1-45 SNEA 45 Newman Club 1-4, reporter 45 IRC l-4, sec. 4. MALLIN, SHARRON5 Home Economics Education,' Young Dems 2-4, publicity chairman 2, sec. 45 IRC 2-45 SNEA 3-45 Home Ec. Club l-45 Wesley 15 Tower l-45 Stoutonia 1-3. MARCKS, NANCY5 Home Economics Educati0n,' Home Ec. Club l-45 SNEA 2-45 Choir 23 LSA 1-4. MCCALL, BARNEY5 Industrial Education,' "S" Club 2-45 SCF 2-45 Basketball co-captain 3. MCCLURE, HARRIET5 Home Economics Educalion,' Stoutonia l-45 Home Ec. Club l-4, sec. 45 Phi Upsilon Omicron 3-45 SNEA 3-45 band l5 LSA 2-4. MCDONOUGH, MICHAEL5 Industrial Tecllnologyg EPT 2-4. McGINNIS, BILL5 Industrial Educaliong Delta Kappa 2-45 SNEA 2-45 Newman Club 1-45 "S" Club 2-4. MEHELICH, LAVVRENCE5 Industrial Teelznologyg Intramural bas- ketball. MEHRING, THOMAS5 Industrial Educali0n5 Stoutonia l-4, produc- tion manager 3, business manager 45 Newman Club l. MEIER, ROGER5 Industrial Educationg Sigma Tau Gamma 3-4, historian 45 Schubert's Serenaders 2-4. MEYER, MARILEE KMETT5 Home Economies Educationg Home Ec. 'Club 1-45 Ski Club 2-35 Sigma Sigma Sigma 2-45 Newman Club 15 Wesley 2-35 Tower I-2. ' MEYERS, LEA ANN5 Home Economics Education,' Mlesley l-4, coun- cil 3-45 Home Ec. Club l-45 YVVCA 3-4, district representative 3, pres. 4, Big-Little Sister chairman 45 SNEA. MIKUNDA, GERALD5 Industrial Education.: Phi Sigma Epsilon 3-4, Stoutonia, business manager. MINCH, DICK5 Industrial Education,' Phi Sigma Epsilon 2-45 Metals Guild 2-3, vice pres. 45 Ski Club l, 2, 45 senior class social chairman. MON-SEN, VVILLIAM5 Industrial Tecl'1n0logy5 Wesley 3-45 Track 1-2. 146 MORIOKA, HELEN5 Dietelics5 Home Ec. Club l-4, senior repre- sentative council 45 Dietetics Club 2-4, treas. 3. pres. 45 Phi Upsilon Omicron 2-4, librarian 3, vice pres. 45 IRC 1-2. MOSSHOLDER, NANCY5 Home Economics Educationg Home Ec. Club l-45 LSA l-45 SNEA 3-4. MUDGET, JOAN5 Home Economics Educationg Home Ec. Club 1-45 Mlesley 1-4. MUELLER, ADRIAN5 Industrial Educationg Chi Lambda l-45 IFC 3-4, sec.-treas. 3, pres. 4, representative to SSA5 SNEA 4. MUSSELL, ROGER5 Vocational Eclucation,' Phi Sigma Epsilon 1-45 Radio Club 1-4, vice pres. 25 Newman Club l-45 SNEA 2-4, pres. 3. NEHRING, NANCY5 Home Economics Education,' 4-H Club 2-4, sec. 45 Home Ec. Club 2-45 LSA 2-45 YWCA 2-4, vice pres. 3, treas. 45 Band 2. NEUMEYER, ELISABETH5 Home Economics Educationg Home Ec. Club 1-45 SCF l-4, vice pres.5 IRC 2-4, pres. 8: sec-treas5 Phi Upsilon Omicron 2-4, rec. sec., chapter Candle eclitor5 SNEA 45 Baptist College Fellowship l-45 Tower l-4, section editor 35 Symphonic Singers l-45 Stout Undergraduate Fellows. NEUSER, SANDRA5 Home Economics Educatiom Newman Club l-45 Home Ec. Club l-45 SNEA 2-45 Delta Zeta 2-4, social chairman 3, standards chairman 45 SSA 2-35 Rifle Club 3-4. NEWMAN, LARRY5 Industrial Education,' Phi Sigma Epsilon 2-4, sec 45 Wesley 1-4. OBERPRILLER, KAREN5 Dietetics5 Delta Zeta 2-45 Dietetics Club 2-45 Home Ec. Club l-4, council 45 Tower 15 Newman Club 1-4, board 45 Symphonic Singers l-4. OLSON, MARILEE5 Home Economics Educationg Delta Zeta 2-4, Panhellenic representative 3-45 Home Ec. Club l-4, sec, 35 Choir 2, sec-treas. 25 WRA 1-2. OPSAHL, SHIRLEE5 Dietetics5 LSA 2-45 Choir 2-45 Dietetics Club 2-4. ORTH, HAROLD5 Industrial Eduealiong SCF l-4, treas.5 Arts 8: Crafts Club 2-4. OVVENS, CLYDE5 Industrial Education5 Metals Guild 35 EPT 2-45 Sigma Tau Gamma 1-45 freshman class vice pres5 sophomore class pres5 vice pres. SSA 3. PAGELS, JOHN5 Industrial Educationg Stoutonia 1-4, ass't sports editor 2-45 Young Dems 2-4, treas. 3, historian 45 Newman Club 1-2. PASSO, DAVID5 Industrial Technology and Educati0n,' Phi Sigma Epsilon 2-4. PAULUS, JAMES5 Industrial Educationg "S" Club 2-45 Delta Kappa 2-4, chaplain 35 co-capt. football 4. PEICHEL, ROSE MARY5 Home Economics Educationj Home Ec. Club l-45 Newman Club 1-4, public relations chairman, historian5 Sigma Sigma Sigma 2-45 Choir 1. PENDERGAST, FRED5 Industrial Educationj Phi Omega Beta 1-45 Metals Guild 2-45 Ski Club 1-4. PETERSON, ALICE5 Home Economics Education,' SCF 2-4. pres. 45 Phi Upsilon Omicron 3-4, chaplain 45 IRC 3-4, sec-treas. 45 Home Ec. Club l-4, council 35 Symphonic Singers 1-3. PETERSON, DAVID5 Industrial Teclzn0log'y5 EPT 3-4. POCHANAYON, CHARLENE PFAFF5 Home Economics Educationg IRC 1-4, vice pres. 345 4-H Club 1-25 LSA 1-45 Home Ec. Club l-45 Stoutonia 1-45 Alpha Psi Omega 1-45 Phi Upsilon Omicron 3-45 SNEA 2-4, sec. 4. POTOCNIK, KAREN5 Home Economics Education,' Home Ec. Club 1-45 Delta Zeta 3-4, sec. 45 LSA l-45 4-H club l-45 SNEA 2-4 sec. Eichelberger Hall 4. PRESTON, CAROL5 Home Economics Educationg Home Ec. Club 2-45 SNEA 3-4. QUACKENBUSH, JOAN5 General Home ECOIIOIII-ICS,' Home Ec. Club I-4, vice pres. 4, council 35 NVRA 25 LSA l-45 pres. of Independence House 45 candidate for National College Queen Contest 3. RAHT, KAREN5 Dieleticsg Dietetics Club 3-45 LSA 2-4, corr-sec. 45 IRC 3-4. RASSBAC1-I, GERALDINE5 Home Economics Education5 SNEA 2-45 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Tower 15 Canterbury Club 3. RATNER, CAROLE5 Dieleticsg Home Ec. Club 1-25 Delta Zeta 2-45 Dietetics Club 2-35 Tower 15 WRA l. REINDL, NANCY5 Dietetics5 Delta Zeta 2-45 Tower l-4, literary editor 3, editor 45 Home Ec. Club 2-45 Dietetics Club 2-45 Alpha Psi Omega 1-4, sec-treas5 LSA l-2. REINMUTH, MARY ANN5 DieIetics,' Dietetics Club 3-45 Home Ec. Club 3-4. RESELD, LOUISE5 General Home Econoniicsg YVRA l-3, sports- head 35 Tower I-4, senior and class editor 45 LSA 15 Home Ec. Club 15 Alpha Psi Omega 1-45 Stoutonia 45 freshman formal chair1nan5 senior gift co-chairman5 pres. Eichelberger Hall 4. RICHARDSON, JAMES5 Industrial Educationg Delta Kappa 1-4, historian, corresponding sec., pres. 4, national corr. sec. 45 EPT 3-4. RICHMOND, SHARON5 Home Economics Educationg Home Ec. Club I-45 Newman Club 3-45 YVRA 1-25 SNEA 4. ROESSLER, RICH.-XRD5 Industrial Teclinologyj "S" Club 1-4. ROSENOW, VIRGINIA5 Dietelicsg Dietetics Club 2-45 LSA 1-4. ROWE, GERALDINE5 Home Economics Educationg Alpha Sigma Alpha 3-4, scholarship chairman 45 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Young Dems 2-4, treas. 4. ROVVE, JEROME S. Industrial Education,' Tower l-4, associate editor 45 Mlesley 1-4, pres. 4. RUEGE, QIANE5 Dietetics, Home Ec. Club 15 Dietetics Club 2-45 Gamma Delta 1. SAATKAMP, GARY5 Industrial Education,' Chi Lambda 2-45 Arts Sc Crafts 3-45 Rifle 2-3. SAGESTETTER, ROBERT5 In.dustrial Education. SAMPSON, JO ANN5 Dieleticsg Alpha Psi Omega 3-45 Home Ec. Club 1-35 Dietetics Club 2-45 Band 2. SANTARIUS, KAREN5 Home Economics Education,' Home Ec. Club 1-4, council5 Alpha Phi 2-4, sec5 Tower 1-35 WRA 1-25 SNEA 2-4. SCHAFFER, ROGER5 Industrial Education,' Phi Sigma Epsilon 2-45 "S" Club 3-45 Student Senate 1-35 Who's lfVho 3. SCHALLER, ADA5 General Home Econoinies5 VVRA 25 Home Ec. Club 1-4. SCHALLER, GEORGINE5 Home Economies Educationg Newman Club 2-45 Home Ec. Club 1-45 SNEA 4. SCHLUMPF, JAMES5 Industrial TCCl17I0l0gjl,' Newman Club 1-45 IRC 2-45 Young Dems 3. SCHOEMER, THOMAS5 Industrial Teclinologjg' Newman Club 3-4, alumni chairman 4. SCHOENDORF, BARBARA5 Dietetics: Dietetics Club 3-45 Home Ec. Club 2-45 Newman Club 2-45 Delta Zeta 4. SCHORER, JIM5 Industrial Edueationg Ski Club 1-45 Sigma Tau Gamma. SCHROEDER, RONALD5 Industrial Teehnologyg Newman Club 3-4, Sigma Tau Gamma 2-4, house manager 45 Tower 15 Stoutonia 2-45 IFC 3-4. vice pres. 45 EPT 3-4. . SCHUBERT, RONALD5 Industrial Educatiom Sigma Tau Gamma 1-4, corr-sec. 25 EPT 2-45 Senior class vice pres. 2-35 Student Senate 2. SCHULTZ, LYNETTE5 Home Economics Educationg YVVCA 2-4, sec. 3, pres. 45 LSA l-4, council5 IRC 3-45 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Stoutonia 1-25 Tower 1-25 SNEA 3-45 Film Society 3-4. SCHULTZ, SYLVIA5 Home Economics Educaliong Home Ec. Club 1-45 IVRA 1-25 LSA 1-25 SNEA 45 Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-4. SCHUTT, DONALD5 Industrial Educati0n,' Chi Lambda 2-45 EPT 2-4, vice pres. 4. SEGGELINK, FRED5 Industrial Educatiom Phi Omega Beta 2-45 "S" Club 1-4. SHARKUS, CHARLES5 Industrial Educationg Phi Sigma Epsilon 2-45 Stoutonia 1-4. SHOTOLA, BARBARA5 General Home Ee0noniics5 Home Ec. Club 1, 45 Ski Club 25 Newman Club 1-35 Alpha Psi Omega 3-45 Stout Film Society 3-4, treas. 3-4. SIEGEL, LOIS5 General Home Econoinicsg Ski Club 3. SIMONSON, GARY5 Industrial Eclueatiom Phi Omega Beta 2-45 "S" Club, pres. 45 EPT 3-4. SMITH, DAVID5 Industrial Educationg Young Dems 2-4, social chair- man 8c historian: Band 35 Arts Sc Crafts 3-45 Synchronized Swim- mers 2-3, vice pres. 3. SOCHA, JEROME5 Industrial EcIucation,' STS 2-4, sec.5 Stoutonia 1. STANLEY, ANNA MAE5 Home Economics Educationg Home Ec. Club 1-45 SNEA 3-45 Synchronized Swimmers 1-25 Archery Club 2. STEIN, DAVID5 Industrial Technology. STEINBACH, MARILYN5 Home Economics Educationg Delta Zeta 3-45 Choir 1-35 SNEA 3-45 Home Ec. Club 3-4. STEPHENSON, DONALD5 Industrial Technology and Education5 Chi Lambda 1-45 Newman Club 1-45 SNEA 2-4. STOELB, MARTHA5 Home Economies Education,' Home Ec. Club 1-45 Newman Club 1-25 Delta Zeta 2-4, vice pres. 2, rec. sec. 35 Stoutonia 35 Symphonic Singers 1. 1 STRATTON, JOHN5 Industrial Education5 Phi Sigma Epsilon 2-43 Ski Club 1-4. STROHBUSCH, GRETCHEN5 Home Eeonovnics Educationg Home Ec. Club 1-45 WRA 1-25 LSA 15 Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-4, treas. 35 SNEA 45 pres. Tainter Hall 2. SUGDEN, ROBERT5 Industrial Educalion5 Chi Lambda 1-4, pres. 4, treas. 35 EPT 2-45 Rifle Club 25 Ski Club 3. SVEJCAR, JUDITH5 Home Economies Educationg Home Ec. Club 1-45 Sigma Sigma Sgima 2-45 Triangle correspondent, vice pres.5 LSA 1-3, publicity chairman5 Phi Upsilon Omicron 3-4, historian5 SNEA 45 Panhellenic council 4. SYRING, CHARLOTTE5 Home Econoniics Educationg SNEA 3-45 Home Ec. Club 1-45 Tower 25 Symphonic Singers 15 UCCF 1-2. TAYLOR, MICHAEL5 Industrial Education5 Rifle Club 3-4, his- torian 3-4. THOMPSON, GARY D.5 Industrial Education,' Wesley 1-4, vice pres. 2, MSM rep. 45 Metals Guild 3-4. THOMPSON, GARY G.5 Industrial Educationg Ski Club 1-4, vice pres.5 "S" Club 3-45 SNEA 3-45 Chi Lambda 3-45 junior prom general chairman. THORESON, HARLAND5 Industrial Edueatio-n,' Chi Lambda 2-45 Choir 1-2. TOTH, FERENC5 Industrial Technologyg Sigma Tau Gamma 2-45 IRC 2-3, pres. 35 Electronic Club 45 junior class treas. VANDEN BOOM, LEN5 Industrial Educationg Phi Sigma Epsilon 1-45 Ski Club 2-4. VANEK, CAROL5 Home Economics Educationg Phi Upsilon Omi- cron 2-45 Sigma Sigma Sigma 2-4, acting pres. rec. sec. and scholastic chairman 35 Home Ec. Club l-4, publicity chairman 35 Newman Club 1-4, editor of paper 25 Whols Who 3. VEENDAAL, LAMONT5 Industrial Eclueationg Chi Lambda 2-45 Arts 8: Crafts Club 2-45 Tower l-25 Band 1. WALKER, GARY5 Industrial Teclznologyg Radio Club 3-4. VVASHBURN, JOHN5 Industrial Technology. XNEISS, JUDY5 Home Economics Educationg SNEA 3-45 Newman Club 1-4, membership chairman 45 Band 1-35 Tower 2-35 Alpha Phi 2-4, chaplain 4, Quarterly corr. 35 Panhellenic council 45 Treas. senior class5 Mardi Gras Queen 2. WIESE, SHIRLEY5 Home Economies Education5 LSA 1-45 Young Dems 3-45 WRA 4. WIKKERINK, JUDITH5 Home Economics Educationg Home Ec. Club 1-4, SNEA 3-45 Wesley 1-45 4-H Club 1-4, sec. 15 band 1-3. VVITT, -IANICE5 Home Economics Edueationg Alpha Psi Omega 1-45 Newman Club 1-4, vice pres.5 Home Ec. Club 1-45 4-H Club 1-3, historiang Tower 2. YVOLF, RONALD5 Industrial Educatio-n,' Newman Club 3-45 Metals Guild 3-4, vice pres. 4. YVYATT, MARY5 Home Economics Educationg YVRA 1-35 Synchro- nized Swimmers 1-2, vice pres. 25 Phi Upsilon Omicron 2-45 Alpha Phi 2-4, song leader, vice pres.5 Home Ec. Club 1-4, state officer 33 VVUS 2-33 SNEA 3-4: Choir 1-3. XVYSS, SHARON5 Home Economics Educationy Home Ec. Club 1-4, council5 Stoutonia 2-35 SNEA 2-45 Alpha Sigma Alpha 2-4, editor 3, chaplain 45 Who's YVho 35 Cheerleader 1-4, captain 45 Senior class sec. 2-45 Senior class rep. to SSA5 Homecoming Queen 4. ZAVADA, BETSY5 Home Economics Educati0n,' Home Ec. Club 1-45 Newman Club 1-4. ZILISCH, JEAN5 Home Economics Ed-u.cation,' Stoutonia 25 Alpha Psi Omega 2-45 Home Ec. Club 2-45 Phi Upsilon Omicron 3-4. ZURAWSKI, RICHARD5 Industrial Educationg Phi Sigma Epsilon 2-4. Bill Heuser prepares to capture the exciting moments of the game on film. . ' nys-'l!'1.s. Q 4, Xb 43,1 - e-tr' 1 , ,-,m, . X . 1 f - ff 2 I 4 " , gf., Lip ? rv ., A .-.Qs a life at .vi iff R - MEDALLION AWARDS Puufwwiw' As a student wends his way through the many pathways of education at Stout, the highest honor he can receive is the Medallion award. The Medallion is a bronze replica of the official Stout Medallion and is given to one percent of the student body. This award sym- bolizes a great deal of hard work and outstand- ing achievement in specific organizations or in general service for the betterment of Stout. JOE BORC-EN has received a general Medallion award. Joe has been active in the Chi Lambda fraternity: Inter-fraternity council: Luthern Student Association: and Stout Student Asso- ciation. He also served as dormitory counselor and senior class president and has received recognition in "X'Vho's Mlhof' JOYCE CHRISTIANSEN has received a general Medallion award for active participation in Home Economics club: Phi Upsilon Omicron: Alpha Phi sorority: Panhellenic Council: Student National Education Association: Symphonic Singers: and Luthern Student Association. GLORIA DALLMANN has received a general Medallion award for her outstanding support of the Home Economics club where she served as president during her senior year. Gloria has been active in Phi Upsilon Omicron: Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority: Gamma Delta: Student National Education Association: Women's Recreation Association: and she has been recognized in 'WVho's IN7ho." PATRICIA FESENMAIER has received a general Medallion award. She has been active in Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority serving as president: Phi Upsilon Omicron: Student National Education Association: Home Economics club: Women's Recrea- tion Association: Newman club: and Panhellenic council. Pat has been recognized in "IfVho's VVho." l 148 Joseph Borgen Viroqua, Wis. Joyce Christensen Amery, Wis. Susan Hefty Johnson RUTH HOPFENSPERGER has received a general Medallion award. Ruth has been active as president of Alpha Phi sorority: Stout Student Association treasurer: and Newman club treas- urer. She has also been a member of Phi Upsilon Omicron: Alpha Psi Omega: Young Republicans: Home Economics club: and has been recognized in "Who's Who." ROBERT JANECZKO has received the Alpha Psi Omega special Medallion for his outstanding contributions to dramatics. Bob has also held the offices of president and vice-president of the Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity. CHARLES JOHNSON has received the Stout Student Associa- tion special Medallion award. Charles has served as president of the Stout Student Association in his senior year. He has also been a member of Epsilon Pi Tau: Wesley: Metals Guild, serving as secretary his junior year: wrestling team: Chi Lambda fraternity serving as vice-president his junior year: and served as president of his junior class. SUSAN HEFTY JOHNSON has received a general Medallion award for her participation in campus organizations. She was active in Alpha Phi sorority: Home Economics club: Student National Education Association: Alpha Psi Omega: and STOUTONIA, serving as co-editor her junior year. She at- tended Merrill-Palmer Institute for one semester, reigned as Junior Prom Queen, and has been recognized in "Who's Who." JANET KLAPSTE has received the general Medallion award. Janet was active in Alpha Psi Omega, serving as president her senior year: Panhellenic council serving as vice-president: Stout Student Association serving as publicity director: TOVVER and STOUTONIA staffs: Home Economics club: Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority: and YVomen's Recreation Association. DONALD LARKIN has received the special STOUTONIA Medallion for outstanding service. He has worked on the STOUTONIA staff for four years, serving as co-editor his junior year and editor his senior year. He has also been a member of Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity. Gloria Dallman Shawano, I'Vis. Robert Janeczko Chicago, Ill. Patricia Fesenmaier Elmwood, VVis. Ruth Hopensperger Appleton, Wis. Charles Johnson Lake Elmo, Minn. Orangeville, Ill. CLYDE OVVENS has received a general Medallion award. Clyde has served as freshman class vice-president, sophomore class president, and Stout Student Association vice-president. Clyde has also been active in Epsilon Pi Taug Sigma Tau Gamma fraternityg and Metals Guild. CHARLENE POCHANAYON has received a general Medal- lion award. She has served as secretary, vice-president, and president of International Relations club and as secretary of Student National Education Association. Charlene also was a member of Alpha Psi Omegag Home Economics club, Luthern Student Association, Phi Upsilon Omicrong 4-H clubg and STOUTONIA. She has been recognized by "Who's YVho." NANCY REINDL has received the TOVVER special Medallion award. Nancy has worked four years on the TOWER staff serving as reporter, section editor, literary editor, and editor. She has also been active in Delta Zeta sorority, Home Economics club: Dietetics club, serving as reporter her senior year, Luthern Student Association, and Alpha Psi Omega, serving as treasurer and secretary. RONALD SCHUBERT has received a general Medallion award. He has been active in Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity, Epsilon Pi Taug Stout Student Association: Graduate Fellows clubg and served as vice-president of his sophomore and junior classes. JUDY VVEISS has received a general Medallion award. She has been active in Newman club: Home Economics club: Band: Student National Education Associationg Alpha Phi sororityg and TOWER staff. She has served as treasurer of the senior class and on Panhellenic council. Judy has been recognized in "YVho's Who." SHARON WYSS has received a general Medallion award. She has served as secretary of her sophomore, junior, and senior classes, Homecoming Queen: and as a cheerleader, serving as captain her senior year. Sharon has also been active in Student National Education Association, Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority, Home Economics club, STOUTONIAg TOWER, and Stout Student Association. She has been recognized in "Who's XVho." Janet Klapste Coleman, Wis. Clyde Owens Menomonie, Wis. Nancy Reindl Milwaukee, Wis. Judy Weiss Mondovi, Wis. Donald Larkin Bethesda, Md. Charlene Pochanayon Menomonie, Wis. Ronald Schubert Menomonie, Wis. Sharon Wyss Boyceville, Wis. Paul Hallingstad Bagley, l'Vis. Zita De la Cruz Philippines John Mihalko Milwaukee, Wis, Angel Aguilar Panama City, Panama Tien-ren Cheng Taiwan, Rep. of China Anselmo Bernal Chacon, New Mexico 150 Larry Iillefson Ridgeland, Wis. Ronald Schubert Menomonie, Wis Roger Kane Appleton, lfllis. John E. Anderson Spring Valley, N.Y Leigh Steinman Aurora. Ill. John Hammill Neenah, Wis. Robert Lee Onalaska, Wis. Robert Hansen Chetek, Wis. john Graf Amboy, Minn. Stanley Badzinski Milwaukee, Wis. Barbara Harms Platteville, Wis. Nygen Trinh Cholon, Vietnam Larry Graham Oak Ridge, Tenn. Dean Christianson Valders, Wis. 151 GRADUATE STUDIES wevfllu Maki Since 1935, the ever-increasing number of men and women enrolling for graduate work at Stout indicates the growth of the trend toward advanced education. Stout offers a Master of Science degree in home economics, various industrial ed- ucation and technology areas, audio visu- al, and guidance. There are two plans for research which the graduate students may choose, either the plan A, a thesis involving original research in the area of the major, or a plan B, which requires an investigation report in addition to the regular course Work in graduate studies. People with advanced education are eagerly sought and compensated accord- ingly both by industry and the schools. The graduate program offers students the opportunity to acquire the competencies leading to professional achievements. F I . 1 .. , gi? V j, '.l I- I ' . r' I z , ' ' 45. h . I vnfff? '- I , X V PATHWAYS T0 SPQEBTSMANSHUP .ug i ' i ,Y ,. V ,HF Qc., Q ' ...fr .IW -" WH' 'I-. V ""-. ,iwh - -W1 - . 'ffm 221 , "',- -f""' 4 , fr? 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'. 351- fe- . ,li-4 , grae, . ig:c.ij.!' gg: .Mg A: ' ' 'rpg .9 ,nj Fi . ..s I , H- " . Y-f .. A' . yd M r . M 4 .N 5,1 ,rf .,1i'r' ' ' 1,441 -.LW . 5.3.1 5 .3321 FJ f' .31.gy"z-, ' -7. .M-fs. " ir-,.g,3,,-5 Q 1 ...lien , , . , .Vg 1. l it-. , I .,,. .pg ---. 'i -Q. -V ... . :ji . . . '.'qu'e.-- + 1-Ki f Wif' . x. WF. Wi: .M wr ' il- .1335 . L. 'ff 'A Af: -3. - 7' f! '5' 'a'F.ifg45 ' WQig'?g5i?,f5?f3 . .bf " .- ' ' -1: ' '41 5 f 'I A . H Ur! ' . - f f 'SQ-'F.Vv 522' X - , ', I I .2 TC' ' . . .5 idk' A fl ' ' Q B Jaifiltr 1,3-,-vm' .l , f:f+ 1-,QL 'ligfh , A W.. Alt!! sl-l , 3, Jx Nl ' r ' I A? F A f Q ' . I ef. ,' ' f,. My :5 ,. gil. ,1 . -1 lu 4153. , .mf .Yu:...1'.QgM ,-tif. ."'..gf rf? '. f,. fs , 'fp 1, f.f2if,zQ3f 3:5 . 4P',.1 1:4 gf' 331 W... , , ' . K: , ,' 'iq .1 ' ' n 'I . .- .1 'Q . . 'N r gf ,, :Q IN . if -533,4 i'a"".' 'I' "wa -!' -. f,,"'f jf..-y 2f.+4mi..mWvfw1H W' H4 w mm-?WwMN-Mwwvwf ' ...S ' .5 .. W- "V Q - 'f'..., 4'-:T I' 5' -'. ' . V " ff ,' - 137' '37 A'f.73'vi ' 'V .L 194 - 37!! : fir. El ' 57-"'-"."'Q '1fe1'5.'3ii1' if .. -, Q sf Fifi iffill + ',.,', '--- 'Q , '.!-any '75',"- ' .fl " ' 'y 4" .g'V' M. ' . , "I 1- -'X xg' , " .1 V: A :J fue. 'f FA '51, ' ,, if .jf g. ' -if : . :Ja 1 ."'. T .fl .:'.lt."'V 'Yip fi", 'V if ff: 4 '-iZvi""53 -' ':3i.5.1e1z.f'EA'L.5x".. 35.5. "3 ru rfifffi. ff. V.-7.i' 1-If 3.1 f'lT if zf,L.L,.. '-Jggigfif K ' Enthusiastically directing Stout cheers, the Bluedevil cheerleaders give their loyal support to the team. Clockwise Kathy vV3lC,lSCl11T1lClt, Kay Krueger, Sandy Carlson, Sharon YVyss, Judy Etscheid, Donna Leonhard, and Tim Mero. A moment of tense excitement is marked by the expression on Donna Leonhard's face. l54 CHEERLEADERS pepmmpwwde Plenty of pep and enthusiasm marked the l962-63 cheerleading squad. Dressed in their smart blue and white outfits, the yell leaders sparked the spirit of the Bluedevil fans who loyally cheered St0ut's athletes. The Stout student body elected eight ener- getic students, seven girls and one boy, to lead cheers. Senior Sharon Wyss, a four year veteran, was captain of the squad. Returning for their second season on the squad were Donna Leon- hard, Sandy Carlson, and Linda Poulos. New faces this year included Judy Etscheid, Kathy Waldschmidt, Kay Krueger, and Tim Mero who displayed their jubilant spirit at the Blue- devil games. Besides leading Stout Division yells, these eight lively cheerleaders presented pre-game and half-time shows, held pep rallies, taught the students new cheers, and performed acro- batic feats. 4 ' 55-in' .13 tu 'I ,A Q24 5' v-1 R 'lF,, bmmbakf pwwmnafitieo A spirited Stout football team managed to outlast an inspired Mankato State team 7 to 6 in the season's opening game, Bob Reid drove four yards to score Stout's only touchdown. The Devils held a 7 point lead until early in the fourth quarter when Mankato scored but failed to make the extra point. In perfect football weather, fans saw LaCrosse hand Stout its first conference loss. It was an exciting see-saw battle as the Bluedevils staged a tremendous 224 yard rushing attack. ln a game full of drama and breaks, Stout almost tied the score only to have, in the last 50 seconds of the game, a strong LaCrosse team block Stout's extra point attempt. Both Bluedevil touchdowns came in the fourth quarter on short runs by fullback Al Babl. The final score stood at 14-13. A highly spirited Stout student body cheered their Bluedevils to a fourth quarter comeback as Stout and Superior battled to a l4 to lfl tie. With six minutes remaining, Stout climaxed an 86 yard drive when end Bob Ott brilliantly caught a Peckham pass in the end zone. Taking advantage of a Superior fourth down, the Blue- devils tied the game when Al Babl plunged over the goal line. Hugging the pigskin, Bob Reid fights off a tackler in grinding out extra yardage against a strong defense. i MMM . 156 Coach Bostwick revises strategy for the next play as jim Fleming 1'C-Cl'1E61'S the game with instructions. The roof fell in as a highly rated Vlfhitewater team handed Stout a 27 to lil defeat. White- water held the Devils scoreless until midway in the third quarter when junior halfback Jack Neubauer scored. Whitewater scored their fourth touchdown in the last quarter. Three minutes before the end of the game, Bill Way scored Stout's second TD on a 31 yard pass from Mike Schipper. Early in the second quarter of the game with Stout's closest rival, Eau Claire, Mitch Miller booted a l2 yard field goal for the game's first score. The Bluedevils threatened again when Wayne Elinger intercepted a Blugold pass and returned it to the Eau Claire l3. Unable to penetrate the Eau Claire defense, Stout ended the first half leading 3 to 0. ln the third quarter Eau Claire was threaten- ing on the Bluedevil one yard line when Stout's Nick Florentino recovered an Eau Claire fum- ble. Six plays later, the Stout eleven scored another touchdown on a pass from Mike Schipper to halfback Bill Way. The Bluedevils held a 9 to 0 lead. FRONT ROVV: Mitch Millerg Tom Dingesg WValt Croppg Chuck Lohrg Duane Rambergg Dave Bohog Dick Freclricksong Dick Bakery Bill WVayg jim Paulusg Al Peckham: Fred Loomis. SECOND ROVV: Tom Norman: Bob Haing Mlayne Elingerg Dennis Bockertg Bruce Schott- mullerg Cy Pontillog Gene Hallongreng Bob Ottg Bob Reid: Pat O'Reillyg Ned Biwer. THIRD ROVV: Dick Chiappettag Gene Vavrag Pat Geregg Mike Schipperg Al Bablg Gene Duginskig Al Schultzg jim Flemingg Terry Petersong Dick Romanekg Paul Derbyg jack Neu- bauer. FOURTH ROVV: Dick Sajnogg Vic Rosebrockg jim Herbstg Tom Johnsong Gay Herbstg Chuck Geurinkg Gene johnsong Dave Seisg jim Lutherg Gene Symuchg Nick Fiorentino. FIFTH ROW: joe Culliney, managerg Mike Stellag Peter Johnson, ass't. managerg Don Marting Robert Bostwick, head coach: Mike Blaeser, ass't. coachg Pat Krall, ass't. coachg Max Sparger, ass't. coach. Eau Claire scored early in the last quarter and then with two minutes remaining, its aerial attack sparked for a second TD and a 13 to 9 leadg a heartbreaker for Stout. Despite a fired up Stout team, the River Falls Falcons managed to blacken Stout's homecom- ing with a 6 to 0 victory. The Bluedevils moved the ball to the Falcon 12 yard line but a strong River Falls' defensive unit held and Stout failed to push the pigskin over. Bluedevil mistakes enabled River Falls to score. Things began happening early in the Stout Oshkosh game when Jack Neubauer intercept- ed a Titan pass and returned it to the Oshkosh 45 yard line. Dick Romanek then scored the first touchdown. Minutes later halfback Bob Reid scored on a 45 yard jaunt to give Stout a 13 to 0 lead. Stout picked up their final three touchdowns on a 40 yard punt return by Tom Norman and on a 1 and 4 yard plunges by quarterback Mike Schipper. Stout outgained the Titans 251 yards to 98. Stout closed the 1962 gridiron season with a 21 to 12 loss to the St. Cloud Huskies. Al Babl plunged 3 yards for an early Bluedevil lead. The powerful Devil defense held until two minutes before the end of the first half when the Huskies broke for a 7 to 6 lead. An outstanding end, Bill W'Vay leaps high for a pass with an oncoming tackler close at his heels. 157 A Bluedevil ball carrier is upended as an opponent shoves a teammate into him. The bulwark of Stout's defensive line as- sumes position against their opponent. 2 1 Everyone is tense during Z1 crucial moment as seen in the expressions of Trainer joe Brenner and team. Miuedeuill lmtfkebielld In the third quarter the Bluedevils forc- ed St. Cloud to punt. Stoutis speedy half- back, Tom Norman, took the ball and covered the 41 yards to the end zone only to have the officials call the touchdown run back. Sophomore back Dennis Bockert scored 6 points for the Bluedevils in the fourth quarter. The game was almost over when St. Cloud capitalized on several Stout fumbles for the winning touchdown. Although Stout defeated their opponents only twice this year, they played a fine series. Stout rolled up 101 points - more than any previous season. However, the final scores did not always depict the hard fighting Stout football team. FOOTBALL RECORD Stout '7 ...................... Mankato 6 Stout 13 ...... .... L aCrosse 144: Stout 14 ...... .... S uperior 143i Stout 14 .... Whitewvatei' 27? Stout 9 .... Eau Claire 1331: Stout 0 River Falls Gii Stout 33 Oshkosh 1396 Stout 12 ...................... St. Cloud 21 fDenotes conference games Guard Mitch Miller lands a bone-crushing tackle on an advancing ball carrier as Wayne Elinger witnesses the exciting play. Halfback Bob Reid Q33j sweeps wide to avoid being tackled by two opponets who are obstructing his path to the goal posts Approaching from behind is Cyril Pontillo Q69j and moving in from the side is David Boho 1755. BASKETBALL at ' ---otrwug Stout State College's fighting Bluedevils fin- ished the l962-63 basketball season with a 3 win, 9 loss conference record. The Devils displayed fine sportsmanship and great incentive as they performed under the capable and inspiring leader- ship of Head Coach Dwain Mintz. Stout's bucketinen rang up conference victories over Eau Claire, Superior, and U. W. Milwaukee. In spite of losing several close contests, the Blue- devils' kept their spirits high, giving even the best of teams a fiery battle for their triumphs. When the season opened, the Bluedevils found themselves a bit cold as they bowed in their first three non-conference attempts. Stirred by their bad start, the Devils, more determined than ever, took their first victory against Northland '71 to 63. Forward Glenn Bates set the pace for Stout with 32 points. St. Mary's was next to fall to the Bluedevils 60 to 57. In the first conference game of the season, Stout downed Eau Claire 68 to 64. Three players, Fred Seggelink, Glenn Bates, and Bob Fruth shot in the double figures for Stout. Scrambling for a loose ball is Stout's Tom Farbotko and St1perior's John Bonk. Stout trounced Superior 88-61. 160 With the ball under control, big Fred Seggelink, Stout's leading scorer, drives in for a layup. Superior suffered a bad defeat as Stout pulled out its second conference win 88 to 63. At this time, the Bluedevils were tied for first place in the conference with Stevens Point. The team then suffered three defeats in a little over a week at the hands of Platteville, Stevens Point, and River Falls. The River Falls game was a real heartbreaker as the Devils lost by only two points. Stout balanced its early season win over Eau Claire by losing its second game in a close '72 to 6l battle. Finally, the Devils came up with a vic- tory over U.W. Milwaukee to break their prolonged losing streak. Aided by Bill Heidemann, who was ineligible the first semester as a transfer, the Bluedevils got off to an early lead, and kept it throughout the game. In a frantic last-minute attempt to tip in a basket against the Northland Iuinberjacks, Frank Rimkus leaps to assist Glenn Bates' effort to atlcl a field goal to Stout's score. lGl if-'ff 40 FRONT ROW: joe Culliney, trainer: Bob Kellyg jack Iigerg Tom Farbotkog Bob Fruthg jim Rebneg Pete johnson, manager. SEC OND ROW: Emmert Ludeman, ass't. coachg Bill Way: Richard Paskeg David Oasg Frank Rimkusg Del Schneiderg Dwain Mintz, coach THIRD ROYV: Glenn Batesg Bill Ozgag Fred Seggelinkg Bob Hayhurstg Bob Galina. bucket bmmd Oshkosh defeated the Devils the following night 82 to 68. In the last two games of the sea- son, Stout again met defeat. ln a close game with La Crosse, the Devils put up a good fight all the way, but ended up two points behind with a final score of 7l to 69. The final game with River Falls again saw Stout putting up a fierce battle only to lose 83 to '77 in a five minute overtime. Looking back on the season, several boys put in some outstanding performances. Among them are Fred Seggelink, Tom Farbotko, Glenn Bates, Bill Heidemann, Bob Fruth, and Bill Way. Be- cause the team was very young, comprised mainly of freshmen, they did not win as many games as they would have liked to. However, their season was quite successful in other respects. The boys kept their spirit high and put up a good fight in the games. The team will be losing one of its best players next year as Frek Seggelink will graduate this june. Regardless of this, our team shows great potential in some of the returning players. It should prove to be a very exciting and successful season next year. 162 Closely guarded by Eau Claire's Bob Loewe, Bob Fruth looks for an opening to pass to a teammate. In an exciting moment coach Mintz, ass't. coach Ludeman, and manager Pete johnson intently watcli thc court action BAS KET BALL RECORD Stout 63 ....... Wiilona 823 Stout 66 Northland 73 Stout 5l Hamline 66 Stout 7l Northland 63 Stout 60 ..... St. Mary 57 Stout 68 .. Eau Claire 643 Stout 64 .. St. Thomas 78 Stout 88 ..... Superior 635 Stout 53 .... La Crosse 653 Stout 89 .... Platteville 1223: Stout 66 Stevens Point 925 Stout 76 .. River Falls 784: 9"m"""W Stout 60 St. Cloud 73 Stout 61 .. Eau Claire 725 Stout 58 Mankato 74 Stout 59 .,... Superior 6735 Stout 82 .. Milwaukee 675 , Stout 68 ..... Oshkosh 8235 -u,4 Stout 69 La Crosse 713 Stout 77 ...............,.... River Falls 833 QQDGDOKGS Conference gmnes tree thrciu exeitisef is one of the nur? some Raine Wallll UPS l'lCllClHg Ol Z1C,LlIlclCY 15 glldll 1 'ly A familial' figure on the scene, the referee watches the action. A bit of advice seems to be the topic of conversation between Coach Dwain Mintz and Bluedevil center Fred Seggelink. Daily afternoon practices are a large part of the teams preparation for its games. Bob Hayhurst drives in for a layup. 164 During a time out, Coach Mintz gives helpful instructions to the Bluedevil players. INTRAMURALS wud mind, For men interested in basketball, foot- ball, and softball, Stout offers team com- petition in the intramural program. In- dividuals interested in table tennis, intra- mural swimming, and tennis are urged to participate and compete for honors, and anyone is eligible who has not won a major letter in a sport. The intramural program is supervised by Coach Ray John- son and Assistant Director, Glenn Hardy. Teams are composed of fraternities, or- ganizations, and dorm groups of fellows interested in these sports. Besides giving vigorous physical exercise, the intramural organization gives the individual a chance to participate in the sport he is interested in, and it helps him to develop qualities of good sportsmanship. The men have a chance to develop their sports skills and recreate themselves in athletic competition. Basketball is by far the most popular in- tramural sport and the fraternities and other teams practice long and hard to gain victory in the championship playoff. Women participate in many sports through the XfV.R.A. intra- mural program. Volleyball is one of the favorite games. 5 Dressed in 21 variety of costumes, men of the intramural basketball teams leap high to snare the ball. Students take a refreshing dip in the pool during open swimming periods on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. if-ma ' -wif. If ntfqfi,-S? fr Zrfre... 1. .. VV' W ' -' E-ifi-A-Q-ff-mf. 3' -va-.-CM' 1 N--M . :gt pw, wigz1s'1s6is'1ut,xs:,2s Jt,a.1 , . fi .rw-wg M . MXL.-f til-M--a,,ww,.fL-,-, '- 5' -' A:-' - . . .. -a . 6,:'4'fq,Eiv.,5vv,-:X "" ' '47'W32"' " 1.9, 3 'f V- . M 4: vs' .rv KNEIELING: Darrel Dregneg Lewis Benilzg Bob KY2llSSj Jerry Rollers, STANDING: Denny Laruing Larry Seversonq jim Blissg Glenn Hardy: Charles Geurinkg Dale Dixg Coach Lyle Buss. Driving his opponent into the mul, Glenn Hardy quickly works for ll pinning combination. Smuggling Lo fight his opponent off, Walt Cropp jams Z1 forearm into the neck of Z1 La Crosse grappler in a last minute effort Lo keep from being pinned. The referee keeps 21 close watch to see if Walls shoulders touch the mar. ' ' "iii-151 - - - WRESTLING curmpetitiim an the mat The Bluedevil grapplers posted a 2-7-1 cam- paign during the 1962-63 season. The year was climaxed with the Wisconsin State College Con- ference Meet at La Crosse where Stout placed sixth. Glenn Hardy, Wrestling in the 177 lbs. class, won the state title. ln his first year as wrestling coach, Lyle Buss directed his team with enthusiasm as Stout gained a victory and a tie with Eau Claire and a Win over Macalester in some of the more exciting matches. Outstanding Wrestler and captain of the squad was Glenn Hardy who had an impressive 10 Win and 2 loss season. Two members of the team, Larry Severson and Lewie Benitz also turned in some excellent performances. Other promising grapplers doing outstanding work on the team were Jerry Robers, Bob Kraiss, Darrel Dregne, and Chuck Geurink as they put out all their effort in their various matches. WRESTLING RECORD Stout 3 ................................ Superior 27 13 Stout 15 .... .,,.............. M acalester Stout 3 .... Gustavus Adolphus 23 Stout 8 .... ............... R iver Falls 17 Stout 7 .... Augsburg 27 Stout 14 .... Eau Claire 14 Stout 10 .... La Crosse 24 Stout 7 .... .......... S uperior 28 Stout 9 .... .... S tevens Point 19 Stout 18 .... ..... E au Claire 12 In planning his strategy for the next move, a Bluedevil grappler advances his position on his opponentls shoulders. 7 With a determined look on his face Walt Cropp, Stout's heavyweight wrestler, faces an even larger opponent from La Crosse State College. Gritting his teeth, lfValt works on his opponent's leg in an attempt to bring him to the mat. He uses speed to make up for his weight disadvantage. Walt expresses no sympathy for his opponent as his determination to win this match is unsurpassed. His agility on the mat proves to be an asset. ix-Q FRONT ROYV: Bob Cooleyg Harold Ehrenreichg Fred Seggelinkg Dick Fredricksong Duane Ramberg. SECOND ROM7: Jerry Bartong Gerald Bieseg jim Fleming: Roger Cook: Don MeNaughLon: Bob Henning. THIRD ROW: Robert Melrose, coachg Joe Culliney, trainerg Mike Blaeserg Glenn Harke, ass't. coach. Shot-put artist, Mfayne Elinger, listens to instructions given by Coach Melrose on throwing for distance. E 168 9? X X ln Official timers and judge at the "Little Olyinpicsu are Trainer joe Culliney, Coach Bostwick and Coach Melrose. TRACK ' wt il mine The fourth season of track at Stout brought great improvement by the cinder- men, along with stronger competition from other participating schools. Under the di- rection of head coach, Bob Melrose, eight of the previous fifteen track records were broken by the l962 team. The outstand- ing trackman was Fred Seggelink, who soared to first place in the pole vault at the Quadrangular and Triangular meets. Other outstanding performers were Mike Blaeser, who hurled to a first in the shotput at the Stout Triangular and a second place at the Quaclrangular. In the Winona meet Roger Cook won the high and low hurdles, Harold Ehrenreich took first in the half mile, and Bob Cooley leaped to first place in the high jump. Throughout the season, the Stout track- men showed great potential in their vari- ous events. Witli new prospects in the broad jump and hurdles next year, the boys are building for a promising season. TRACK RECORD Stout Quadrangular ...... Stout third place Winona ...................... Stout second place Stout Triangular ............ Stout third place Stevens Point Triangular Stout third place Leaping high to clear the hurdle, a track star puts forth great effort in one of the features of the "Little Olympic meet held at Stout. "Little Olympic" stars partici- pate in 21 relay race. GYM NASTICS calwuc , hilllml Gymnastics made its debut at Stout State College in l962. Student Coach John Zuerlein and his assistant, Tom Zarden Were organizers of the team. Agility, strength, alertness, and a sense of balance are very important in gymnastics, and the sport makes a unique and vital contribu- tion to the physical fitness program. Areas offered are tumbling, free exercise, horizontal bar, parallel bars, and side horse. Bob Koppes and Dan Smith are two of the outstanding tumblers on the team. Dick Roder excels in free exercise, While Dick Stoddard displays agility on parallel and horizontal bars. FRONT ROXV Dan Smith Bob Koppes Richaid Stoddard Petex Cerstelg Richard Roderg Dave lfVeaver. SECOND ROYV: Rudy Zaiden asst coach lVayne Illhnger Bob Ham jim Keeler Roge1 llfilliamsg Byron Kesseyg Steve Snyeclerg Tom Hursthouseg Lee Block l K FRONT ROW: Jack Neubauer: Bill McGinnisg Duke Severson, coachg Wayne Sabatkeg Barney McCall. SECOND ROW: Orv Hansong Dave Smithg Fred Antonneaug Dale Anderson, George jessickg Ed Kofalg Frank Koppg John Steeleg Denman Chaseg Gary Goldbeck, managerg Lee Blockg Don Boyle. Coming on the scene with new strategy for a team member, is Coach "Duke" Severson. devikoabtlw' Stout's 1962 baseball team, coached by Don "Duke" Severson, opened with the Bluedevils playing host to Hamline University. This was the only single game scheduled, the rest being double headers. In the remainder of the season, Stout's dia- mond men played only nine gamesg nine others were cancelled because of poor weather. In conference action, Stout posted a 2 Win, 4 loss record. Bill McGinnis led the team with a batting average of .346 followed by Barney McCall with a .276. Frank Kopp and Dean Abbott also were leading hitters in the Bluedevil's attack on the diamond, and Denman Chase proved to be the tearn's best pitcher. Barney McCall patiently awaits his turn at bat as he warms up in the on-deck circle. Sandy Erickson positions himself for a long drive. Don Andersen is an early bird on the golf course. Can he find the hole? l72 GOLF ' uulwitt Stout's 1962 golf team, under the leader- ship of student coach, Claire Simdon, faced stiff competition on the links. With a seven man squad, Stout opened their golf season in a match against Eau Claire and River Falls. Stout placed third in this event. Claire Simdon shot an 83, the best individual score for Stout. Though the following four matches also resulted in defeat, the linksmen were able to gain experience and develop their skill while in competition with collegiate golfers. The best individual performance of the season was a '72, shot by Claire Simdon in a dual match with Winona. Sandy Erick- son was close behind with a 79. Although Stout suffered many setbacks, their individual determination proved to be an asset to the squad. -, ,,7,,, LM . . ,t .Mm-w:+xs1Q:tkwgs 1-sq TENNIS cfuwadeo Old man weather played his mischiev- ous tricks during the 1962 tennis season, bringing rain during 3 of the 7 matches. During the regular season, the netmen had their hopes dampened by rain in sched- uled dual matches with Mankato, St. Cloud, and Superior. In two dual matches with River Falls and Eau Claire, the netters found rough going as they fought hard only to be defeated. Two singles players and one doubles team represented Stout at the State College Conference tennis tournament at Oshkosh. But the boys could not cope with the scoring of their oppo- nents and lost out in some exciting match- es. With highly regarded newcomers on next year's team and the gain of experi- ence, the netmen are looking forward to an improved showing next season. Tennis is becoming a more popular sport every year at Stout. Hoping to score, Instructor Tom Krysiak awaits the ball and prepares to smash it over the net to his opponent. Student coach Tom Krysiak demonstrates the correct form for a backhand stroke to the racket squad! From left to right: Ed Kerleyg Jerry Hargravesg Cal Aroldg Jerry Norris: Gary Christianson. Lf, 5 1 :I .. , ' 1 If ' Q '44 '7 ' Q SX i , h . IQ! ...em ""' PM ik?" ut 1 . K """"--M- w"'- an - i 1 - .....4 " -' -' A t. -hm-4'LLQ-W., vw E- x L M - J", " ,.4. 'H ,-4. K , I' . ,' A ,H fi I RNN5 K fx 4 f ' A - 4 . f -sr" ' - ' L EQATEHIWJQWS TCD CCCDQEDEEQATUCCDN ' '1I,. ' I ig.. ,-1 V' , qi . r i 5' .- I' . , , ' , ' N . FI. K ' E Q RI .I,- I I i 'I ' . I :ln 'A . Q '- A "I-lgxi' 1 11 A . ' .' I 11'-Q 'J 5' Q 1' .II -V lf.: -,I TQ: 1 'X I III..: . ' . 'i II II,.. 'if 5 , ' xi" 'E 'gi IEISIIIIII .Qi- I.?I in . Iii I .ik . ' . 1 -- aI'g-61.415 . N1 ' 1, 51, .. .qg iI11'1ifIIII III ? I, I'11.-,,. , .3353 'Qi III .Iv f J I. 131. . 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All fraternitites and sororities on campus are guided by the Stout Student Association, and each group has a campus activity which they sponsor. Many of these activities require Weeks of careful planning and preparation, and the in- dividual groups strive for a greater measure of success each year. During this time, the fra- ternity man and sorority girl are limited in the time they can devote to bridge or dormitory discussions - they may even lose some sleep. In addition parties are held throughout the year Within the various groups. The life of the Greeks may be hectic at times, but in the end very joyous and rewarding for those Who participate fully. Sororities and fraternities help the student to mature in leadership, re- sponsibility, and in social poise. The good fairy, Carl Lang, waves his wand to change jerry Coomer's long nose. XVhat sir, another pledge duty! FRONT ROW? Kathleen Cardinalg Virginia Trautmanng Sharon Munson, presidentg janet Klapste, vice presidentg Marilee Olson, sec- retary: Judy Weiss, treasurerg Barb Kneevers. SECOND ROXN7: Stella Pedersen, advisorg Cynthia Borneg Shirley Coatsg Donna Herrickg Ruth Hopfenspergerg Pat Fesenniaier. Mike Moran and Cynthia Borne dim the lights to produce an enchanting at- mosphere. PANHELLENIC COUNCIL flvuwgk tlwin elbows One of the most exciting events of the year for sorority girls is the rush season. Before the fun of actual rush begins, a freshmen orientation party is given by Pan- hellenic Council. This rather informal function gives the freshmen a chance to ask questions and find out about sorority life in general. Round Robin marks the be- ginning of formal rush. During this busy afternoon the rushees meet each sorority as an individual group. By enforcing a well- organized rush program the Panhellenic Council allows the sorority circles to widen in a Way that is fair to both the sororities and the rushees. Cocktail dresses, gay decorations, and smiling faces appear at the Panhellenic Ball held each fall. This important event gives the Greek women a special opportunity to entertain their favorite dates. Another event to promote intersorority relationship is the Panhellenic picnic held in spring. As sorority members get together over hot dogs and potato salad, the circles of friendship are enlarged, all through the efforts of the Council. , l I 177 ALPHA PHI me . Many lasting and close friendships are formed in the Alpha Phi social fraternity. The girls of Alpha Phi seek to develop the highest ideals of womanhood, as exempli- fied by character, poise, and conduct. And sorority life is an excellent opportunity for developing leadership and considera- tion for others. During the Christmas season the girls were busy preparing gifts for two needy Menomonie families, the Phi's helped the Menomonie chapter collect money for the heart fund. This year, as soon as first semester finals were over, Winter Carni- val was ushered in and with it the Phi's sponsored the "Sno Balln which high- lighted the weekend. Depicting th e dreams of a young bride, the Alpha Phi's won the most beautiful category at Stunt Night with their presentation of "Out of Your Dreamsf' In addition to many other activities the local chapter of Alpha Phi was given the honor of acting as hosts at the initiation of a new chapter in La Crosse in March. This was an inspiring experience which will linger in the memories of the girls as Alpha Phi continues to grow nationally through the coming years. Ruth Koll, Virginia Fellinger, Rosemary Anderson, and Joan Nevin roll a big snowball to advertise their Yilinter Carnival Sno Ball Dance. Beaming brightly is Ruth Hopfensperger, Alpha Phi candidate for Homecoming Queen. as she is serenaded by her sorority. FRONT ROXV: Joyce Delphg Mary Wyatt, vice presidentg Sue Heftyg Kay Boettcherg Ruth Hopfensperger, presidentg Gail Diehl, secretaryg Judy Norton, treasurerg Judy NVeissg Marge Groszczyk. SECOND ROYV: Carol Machovec: Marilys Hamiltong Janice Nelsong Audrey Gniffkeg Carolyn Spargog Virginia Fellingerg Karen Karding Mary Xvheleng Diane Wenzlerg Karen Santariusg Carol Miller. THIRD ROVV: Keturah Antrim, advisor, Kathy Rudisellg Judy Kemmerg Barbara X'Valkerg Karen Horkyg Mary Grothg Jane Prestong Dianne Kernweing Joan Zawistowskig Mary Tyriverg Anne Marshall, advisor. FOURTH ROVV: Ruth Kollg Cynthia Borneg Joan Neving Georgia Millerg Mary Merwing Sue Banovichg Rosemary Anclersong Pat Johnsong Jackie Freemang Sue Hoevermang Karen Mager. FRONT ROYV: Sara Rhielg Loretta Crugerg Janet Klapsteg Ruth Kunz, vice presidentg Pat Fesenniaier, presidentg Mary Gifford, treas- urerg Mary Lynn Kochg Millie Hurban, secretaryg Angi Hurban. SECOND ROYV: Donna Leonhardg Lois Bladeg Joanne Boweg Geraldine Rowe: Jill Currang Judy Etscheidg Mary Meudtg Sharon Gunderson: Shelley Stenzg Sue Sclilumpf. THIRD ROYV: Barbara Campbellg Nancy Lang: Linda Hodneg Joanie Nicklasg Kathy Ramakerg Sandy Whyte: Charllotte Nehringg Virginia Trautmanng Gretchen Stroh- buschg Barbara Cook. FOURTH ROYV: Bonnie Parochkag Mary SlH1'ClIlZ1j Sylvia Schultzg Sandy Spathg Jean Lahtig Jan Schnablg Joyce Johnsong Gloria Dallnianng Sandy Carlsong Sharon Wyssg Sandy Laudon. ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA pink lea in pkedge tea Sadie Hawkins' week was ushered in with an official decree by women of the Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority. The Sadie Hawkins' dance climaxed the week of February 17-24 when the women of Stout State College reigned supreme and had a chance to chase a man. In the spring pledges of all sororities were guests of the Alpha Sigma pledges at a Pink Tea. This gave the girls a chance to become better acquainted. To remind everyone that St. Valentine had come round, the girls gave a tea on that day for all the students. Through sisterhood Alpha Sigma Alpha works for the individual development of members - physically, intellectually, so- cially, and spiritually - as well as for group development. As a sisterhood they are active in every phase of campus life and are known as women of action. Alpha Sigma Alpha was founded at LO1flgVVOOCl College, F21lfI'lVlll6, Vlfglnla, The "Stoutpatch" gals begin their legal chase as Jill Curran, November 15, l90l, and has the distinc- tion of being the first national sorority fOllI1ClCCl lI1 l1l1C KW61'1KlCEl1 CCHKUTY. against Jill Curran, Bonnie Parochka, and the other Alpha Sigs. Sharon Mfyss, and Barb Cook officially open Sadie Hawkins Week. Darrel Dregne and the DK's found it hard to pit their strength 179 FRONT ROYV: Sue Peterson, Carole Ratnerg Judy Bergen, secretary: Ruth Steenslandg Kathleen Cardinal, presidentg Sue Chase, vice presidentg Kathy jessickg Lila Aholag Karen Oberpriller. SECOND ROVV: Marguerite Barra, advisorg Bev Prahlg Martha Stoelb Marilyn Steinbachg Sandra Neuserg Evelyn Robotkag Carol Karding Jean Kroner, Barb Kneeversg jan Smithg Sue Klein. THIRD ROW Anne Fetzerg Sally Burmeisterg Lois Hanseng Pat Larseng Grace Doughty: Nancy Reindlg Maryann Drezdong Marilee Olson: Karen Potocnikg Marlene Zibellg Donna Hersbrunner. FOURTH ROW: Joyce Zieglerg Bonnie Nelsong Suzanne Brubaker, Barbara Schoendorf Christine Faber, Mary Sievertg Janet Haplg Kaye Christiansong Paula Heidelg Carol Anderson. DELTA ZETA we'UB mcwpie ' The Delta Zeta sorority, the largest of all national sororities, started its very busy year with a Halloween mixer, "Spooky Hollow." In keeping with the theme the girls gave a live cat as the door prize. The DZ's used a card theme in their campaign, 'KKaty Cardinal for Homecoming Queen," and their homecoming float, "We'1l Octo- pie Victory" won the most original award. Later in the fall "Little Peanut Week" and a song-fest at Eichelberger Hall climaxed pledging. During the busy Christmas holi- day season, the DZ's took time out from their active schedules to stuff toys for the children at the Northern Colony. Soon after, as part of their philanthropic project, the Delta Zeta's helped with semester regis- tration. Then they were busy with the many activities of Winter Carnival, ice carving, tug of war, and dancing at the Snowball, Where the traditional Delta Zeta quilt was given away. With the warmth of spring, the DZ,s sponsored a Heidelberg Tea with its German atmosphere and "ale and beer." "Step right up and buy your chances on our quilt,' was the cry of joan Hapel, Anne Fetzer, and jean Kroner It may be cold, but the coffee will keep you warm. FRONT ROW: Anne Fetzerg Loretta Hanson, treasurerg Alice jane Petersong Karen Dewalclg Helen Morioka, vice president: Linda Gilles, presidentg Elizabeth Neuineyer, recording secretzlryg Pat Fesenmaier, corresponding secretary: Judy Norton: Judy Svejcar. SECOND ROVV: Charlene Pochanayong Sue Heftyg Kathy Jessickg Mary Wheleng jackie Freemang Ethel Knutsong Jean Zilischg Carolyn Spargo Idelle Fauske. THIRD ROWV: Kathleen Carclinalg Mary X'Vyatt3 Carol Vanekg Gloria Dallmanng Donna Herrick: Mary Merwing Harriet Maasg Ruth Hopfenspergerg Hariet Mc Clureg Mary Gorman. PHI UPSILON OMICRON ' akdeuehipmeuf By means of their bulletin board in Harvey Hall, Phi Upsilon Omicron presented a thought for every Week to students on their way to classes. Sometimes serious, sometimes humorous, the quotations were readily applicable to daily situ- ations. The girls once again brought cheer to many people by caroling at Christmas time. Following the caroling the local alumnae chap- ter acted as hostess at a chili party. To bring birthday cheer to all students, Phi U made it possible for parents to order birthday cakes. Two of Phi U's fundamental purposes are to encourage interest in home economics and the promotion of intellectual development, carried out through a professional meeting with Epsilon Pi Tau and a joint meeting with the Home Economics Club. To emphasize the importance of intellectual development a recognition tea was held in the fall honoring all women who had made the Dean's List the previous semester, and a freshman girl was presented with a scholar- ship for her outstanding scholastic record. Comparing notes the girls plan an- other Phi U project. Rosemary Peichel watches as Sharon Munson serves Mrs. Rosenthal and Mrs. Vasey at a tea honoring new faculty members. The Old South comes alive as the Tri Sigs present "Showboat." SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA inawhink " As the members of the Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority came back for the 1962-63 year they immediately embarked on plans and prepartions for the Homecoming fes- tivities, the Halloween Tea, and a tea hon- oring new faculty members. These activi- ties, however, were just a sample of the busy times ahead. just as things began to settle down to the routine of classwork and study, the Tri Sigs were again caught up in a whirl of activity, with preparations for the Sweetheart Dance, which they sponsor jointly with the Phi Sigs. Throughout the year, the girls were busy with their ham sales and with social services for the school and community. At the start of the second semester the Tri Sigs joined the other organizations on campus to prepare for Stoutls traditional Winter Carnival, and in the spring they held their annual dinner dance. Yes, the year was a busy one for the Tri Sigma sorority, but the contributions they were able to make to life in the college and community made it a satisfactory, as well as an enjoyable one. FRONT ROW: Mary Williams, advisorg Pat Dable, corresponding secretaryg Sharon Hutchins, recording secretary, Donna Herrick, presi- dentg Judy Svejcar, vice president: Sharon Munson, Shirley Coats, Mary Gorman, treasurerg Carol Vaneli: Alice Vanek, advisor. SEC- OND ROW: Gale Pederseng Idelle Fauskeg Karen DeX'Valdg Mary Anne Caldwellg Myrna Castleberg: Betty Lou Halamag Loretta Lewisg Nancy Clarkg Gerri Freeseg Susan johnson. THIRD ROW: Elaine Dahlg Carol Kruegerg Sharon Kruegerg Dorothy Worinetg Nancy Brunstadg Kay Duebnerg Kae Schulz, Donna Reiterg Judy Dorow. FOURTH ROW: Kolleen Iferstlg Kathleen Towsleeg Harriet Maasg Rita Hansen, Ruth Ann X'Vaidelichg Judy Rithamelg Rosemary Peichel. FRONT ROWV: Fred Loomis, secretary-treasurerg john Angellg joe Borgeng Aclrian Mueller, presiclentg Grant Beer. SECOND ROV! Merle Price, advisorg Allan Mayg Jerry Coomei. INTER-FRATERNITY CCUNCIL The chief purpose of the Inter-Frater- nity Council is to promote the welfare of friendship among the members of Creek letter fraternities. Their main goals are to strengthen the bonds between fraterni- ties and to raise the standards for all fra- ternity members. The Council sets the dates for Hell Week and establishes the rules and regulations for pledging. During Hell Week, IFC pro- vides a speaker who acquaints the pledges With the ideals of fraternity life. To promote scholarship and physical fitness the Council awards a trophy to the fraternity with the highest scholastic aver- age and a trophy to the fraternity with the best athletic record. The IFC also spon- sors an all Greek dance which is attended by fraternity and sorority members. Dean Price explains expansion plans to IFC members jim Borgen, joe Borgen, and Dick Cersmer. Andy Cochrane and a Menoinonie High student collide at the APO's benefit basketball game for the March of Dimes. ALPHA PHI OMEGA mbowwicewmtlwfw Blue and tan jackets were a familiar sight on campus as the members of Alpha Phi Omega, a service fraternity affiliated with the National Council of Boy Scouts, plung- ed into another active year. Marking the high point of activities, APO again sponsor- ed the Ugliest Man On Campus contest and dance. All proceeds from this activity were donated to charity. Continuing the tradition of scouting, APOis lend a "helping handy' in many phases of school and city life. During the fall, members held a car wash and wax, and sold comfortable Stout cushions for those attending the football games. Ful- filling one of the main purposes of the organization-service to youth and com- munity-the APO's spent time leading and advising Boy Scout troops in the city of Menomonie. T h e fraternity members ushered for many school and local civic events and solicited campaigns for the March of Dimes Fund. Inter-collegiate fraternity activities and the attendance at the National Council of Alpha Phi Omega in Kansas City in December completed another year of college scouting. FRONT ROYN7: John Kalinoffg Peter Gerstelg Roman Osmanski, historiang Thomas Douglas, vice presidentg Andrew Cochrane, presidentg Ronald Beckman, vice presidentg Haven Williams, treasurerg XNilliam jodar, recording secretaryg jack Klein, alumni secretary. SEC- OND ROVV: Robert YValdock3 Cliff Abbateg Art Schwibingerg Eddie Kerleyg Lawrence Meicherg Robert Engelkeg David Yllolslegelg Arnold Geiger: Jim Rathert. THIRD ROYV: Myron Harbour, advisorg Philip Johnson, advisorg Calvert Aroldg Richard johnsong Richard Berglundg George Horang Robert Marxg Guy Salyer, advisory K. T. Olson, advisor. FRONT ROXV: Paul Derby, .Xbdcl-Rahman Osman Mohzunedg Richard Tiede, historian, Larry Schoenbcrger, vice president: Robert Sugden, presidentg Mike Moran. treasurer: Chester jensen, secretary, La Mont Veenendaalg Adrian Mueller. SECOND ROW: Charles Johnsong Daniel Arolag Roger Sabotag David Mc Naughtong Dennis Haslowg Don Henriksong Cary G. Thompson: Cary Saatkampg Dave Nourse. THIRD ROXV: James Naylor: Bryan lingstroxng Roman Osmanskig Henry Winterfeldtg Charles Brennerg Don Schutt: Harland Thoreson. FOURTH ROW: Riclmrd J. johnson: Randy Smeclstzulg Boh Cooley: Don Stephenson: joe Borgeng Bill Heuserg Tom Engel. CHI LAMBDA luwiuobwetluwnd In their continual effort to support the whole- some growth of extracurricular activities on campus, the members of Chi Lambda fraternity start the year with their lively street dance. Later in the year, just before the Lenten season, this group sponsors their annual Mardi Gras Ball. In preparing for this dance, one of the high spots of the second semesterls social events, the members put in many months of planning and hard work to make the Ball a success. Susie Brubaker and jim Klapste get into the "twist" of things at the Chi Lambda street dance. Homecoming finds the members of this fra- ternity working on their float and honoring their alumni brothers at a Homecoming break- fast. The Chi Lambdas participate in such on- campus events as Winter Carnival, Stunt Night, and intramural sports. Throughout the year members of Chi Lamb- da are easily recognized by their gray and white jackets and gray blazers. During Pledge Week, the traditional red tie and battle ax distinguish the Chi Lambda pledge. Barb Shotola and Gary Saatkamp dance to the smooth music at the Mardi Gras. The popular College Chords lead a sing-along at the DK Grant Anderson and Jim Comparin are in deep con- sponsored Tacky Drag. versation at the DK fall convention. DELTA KAPPA 0 0 0 0 0 lt A bit of New York night life entered Stout's campus as the Delta Kappa fraternity again pre- sented their annual Tacky Drag-a one-time crazy clothes party which has recently taken on a nightclub atmosphere. The DK's strived hard and succeeded in presenting an activity which provided many with an inexpensive, yet enter- taining experience. Later in the fall, the frat challenged the Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority to a game of football, which ended in a l3-13 tie. Then, in November, the group served as host to the Delta Kappa national convention. Christmas, a time for peace and goodwill to- ward all mankind, found the DK's spreading joy to many Menomonie families with baskets filled with food and candy. After vacation, thoughts were turned to preparations for the Winter Carnival, and later to the Delta Kappa Dinner Dance. The entire year was a busy one for the DK's but through it all the members tried to maintain high standards on campus, and to foster the development of leadership, fellowship, and scholarship through the socializ- ing influence of fraternal life. FRONT ROW: Fred Loomis: Pat Harrison: Allan May, corresponding secretary: Ned Biwer. treasurer: james Richardson. president. jack Neubauer, secretary: Dick Baker, sergeant-at-arms: Bill McGinnis, alumni secretary: Darrel Dregne. SECOND ROW: Art Greaves, Don VVitt: Wayne Y'Valtersg james Paulas: Ray Hansen: Bill jusela: Otto Krueger: jerry Holubets. THIRD ROXV: Alan Peckham. jim Comparin: Tom Howden: Larry Briski: Gary Godfrey: Lee Block: joe Brenner: Alan Vater. FRONT ROW: Robert Sugdeng Michael Mc Donoughg Richard Tiede Stanley Badzmski secretary treasurer Wayne Clark president Don Schutt, vice president: Gerry Retzloffg X'Villiam Vasey James Richardson SECOND ROW John Jarvis advisor Charles Johnson Chester Jensen: Bill Jusela: Claude Pepper: Ronald Schubert Dwayne D7lll7lS Den Dugmslxe Klan Peckham Philip Ruehl advisor THIRD ROW: Mike Moran: Roger Sabotag Ronald Beckman Bob Cooley Cary Slmonson Thomas Ileivsald John Graf Ronald Schroeder: Jerome I-Iiltg Robert Buelke. EPSILON PI TAU O I vfwwe, , bun Service, learning, and fun comprise the yearls activities of Epsilon Pi Tau, Stoutls honorary fraternity for men. A continued service of EPT is their visitation and re- cruitment program in collaboration with Dean Pedersen, the purpose of this pro- gram is to inform high school students about the Industrial Education and the Industrial Technology curriculums of- fered at Stout. Throughout the year sev- eral meetings are held, at which profes- sional men, in the field of industry, speak to the Epsilon Pi Tau on various subjects of interest to the members. Each year, one of these meetings, held in conjunction with the girls' honorary professional fraternity, Phi Upsilon Omicron, is open to the en- tire student body. For pleasure, Epsilon Pi Tau annually holds a Christmas party, to which the memberls families are in- vited. In addition to the annual picnic in the spring, a field trip is planned. Dr. Philip Ruehl is the trustee, and this year Mr. Wesley Face became a co-trustee of the organization. TRONT ROW: Sam Cave-g Grant Beerg Steve Hanson, secretaryg jerry Schneider, presidentg Richard Paske, vice president: David Boho, Ron Kahl, Dtreasurerg Milte Blaeserg Patrick O'Reilly. SECOND ROW: Thomas Hellerg Terry Loushing John Angellg Peter Grace: Sandy Eriksong Mitch Miller, B111 Vasey. THIRD ROXV: Peter Jushkag Butch Schultzg William lfVayg Tom Dingesg Fred Mc Gilvreyg Gary Sunonson: Gary Buss. FOURTH ROXV: Charles Thomsen, Fred Seggelink: Fred Pendergastg Stan Payne. Bartender, jerry Schneider, offers "Tavern" goers cider. Stout students danced to some lively "old-time" polka music at the F.O.B.'s Herrschmidhaus Ball. - -.gal .. . -ff: . , PHI OMEGA BETA bwmdeanmlleowut Scholarships were again presented this year by members of the Phi Omega Beta fraternity. According to the policy of the F.O.B. F und, three scholarships are award- ed through the college to deserving fresh- man athletes. Duffy's Tavern, an annual fall event for the F.O.B.'s, led a busy season of activity, and their authentic HI-Iillbilly Band" captured first place for the humor- ous division in the Homecoming parade. After the Christmas recess, the Phi Ome- ga Beta fraternity offered the Stout students "old-time" polka music as they sponsored the Herrschmidhaus Ball. Capturing first place for the most humorous, the F.O.B.'s spent many hours designing and molding their life-size snow sculpture for the Winter Carnival. By sponsoring the ever popular Stunt Night, the F.O.B.'s again gave their members an opportunity to reveal their talents. A first prize cash award and trophy and a second place plaque were awarded to the Winners. The organization activities of two pledge terms and the spring dinner dance concluded another successful year. PHI SIGMA EPSILON auewb 'luiuoe On December l the fourth annual Phi Sig Talent Night was presented before a capacity crowd of students and faculty, and the three most talented acts were given prizes. From the proceeds a one-thousand dollar scholarship was presented to the school to be used for the student-loan fund. At the Phi Sigma Epsilon national con- clave, Stout's Omega chapter received the National Efficiency trophy. Competition among all national fraternities is keen, and the trophy is presented to the chapter most active fraternally and socially. The fraternity's version of "Born to Lose" won second place in the most humor- ous division in the Homecoming parade and everyone enjoyed the Phi Sig snow carving at the Winter Carnival. During the year the Phi Sigs kept busy with work on the new fraternity house purchased by the Alumni chapter, community work, car washes, the Sweetheart Dance, co-sponsored with the Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority, and school activities, including football, basket- ball, and intramurals. A great year ended with the annual spring picnic for graduating members who now look forward to being part of the Alumni chapter. Carl Lang, with the help of a hidden friend, shakily prepares some breakfast at the annual Talent Night. Pete Roble, driver of the Phi Sig car, joins in on the excitement and fun of the Wlinter Carnival Ice Races. FRONT ROVV: Roger Robleg Kenneth Grosskopfg Tom Freiwaldg Larry Newman, secretary, Jim Seibert, president, Tom Buyarski, vice presidentg Paul Connors, treasurerg jerry Commerg Dick Minch. SECOND ROWV: George Soderherg, advisor, Melvin Koellerg Bob Sawyer, Roger Hooverg Carl Lang: jack Shanahan, Joe Dietenbergerg Roger Schaeferg james Suksi. THIRD ROW: Charles Sharkusg Richard Henry: Gerald Mikundag Roger Mussellg VVayne Elingerg Donald Schleig Chuck Bartel. FOURTH ROW: jim Lorenz: Len Vandenboomg Dave Passog Charles Hofmanng Darrell Passog Fred Lindberg: Richard Zurawskig Kenneth Klostermang Richard Rose. SIGMA TAU GAMMA may flPP900f PGPNW4 Winning the competition for the most beautiful Homecoming float is practically a tradition for the Sigma Tau Gamma fra- ternity. This year the prize winning Sig Tau float was a gorgeous orange and black Monarch butterfly which towered almost a story and a half above the crowd. How- ever, Homecoming is not the only activity in which this group plays an important part. Some of the events sponsored by the Sig Taus include the all school mixer in September, a jazz concert in January, the Hootannie in May, and one of the most beautiful and important dances of the year, the Rose Dance. Since finances are a necessary part of any organizations activities, the Sig Taus, easily recognized by their blue and White jackets, can be seen selling candy apples and popcorn at the football games. A car wash in April also contributes to the money- making projects. The gentlemen of Sigma Tau Gamma are noted on Stout's campus for their sera- nades. Accompanied by several of their talented members playing guitars, a uke, Bob janeczko proudly waves the first place flag he won at the and 31 bass, this g1'0up C011tiI1L1CS to ice races. At the Winter Carnival Queen Convocation, the Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity serenade their candidate Kathy Lindow. the student body with their music. FRONT ROW: Martin Houg: Brian Walker: Roger Meier: Richard Gerstner, treasurer: Robert janeczko, president: Dennis Duginske, vice president: Brian Hepperly: Paul Lien: David Wheeler, secretary. SECOND ROW: Tim Mero: Clyde Owens: Peter Betts: Richard Rocklewitz: Jerry Enloe: Jerry Hilt: Lance Keisler: Edward Kofal: Jim Rathert. THIRD ROXV: Ferenc Toth: Neal Ragatz: Gary Leonard: Robert Wortock: Richard Sundstrom: Robert Dealey: Dick Rosenquist: Carl Bohman: jim Borgen, FOURTH ROW: Edward iompzy, advisor: Stanley Lueck: John Altmann: Cary X'Vendorfl: Al Rosenthal: Gene Hallongren: Ken Faber: Ronald Schubert: Don ar in. FRONT ROW: Sue Chaseg Stanley Yamato, treasurerg Kay Boettcher, historian: Jan Klapste, president: Alan Vater, vice president Kolleen Ferstl, secretaryg Janice IfVitt. SECOND ROIA7: Noel Falkofske, advisorg jo Ann Sampson: julie Hardyg Lois Hansen: Kay Lundy Ruth Hopfenspergerg Barb Shotolag Lorna Lengfeld, advisor. THIRD ROVV: Myrna Castlebergg Chris Nelson: Gary Leonard Robert janeczko. ALPHA PSI OMEGA achieved it pwdici afitm This was indeed a productive and exciting year for the Stout theater group who presented a Wide range of plays. The productions ranged from the 15th Century to contemporary drama. Members and pledges of Alpha Psi Omega were active participants in the areas of acting, design- ing, building, painting, lighting, and make-up which were necessary to produce three full- length plays. Zeta Beta is the Stout chapter of Alpha Psi In the "Lark" high priest John Papatriantafyllou crowns Jack Hoiby king of France. Omega, the national dramatic fraternity, and membership is achieved through participation in the different areas of dramatics. Alpha Psi Omega members enjoy Watching plays as Well as producing them, and the group traveled to St. Paul to attend a performance of THE OB- LONG CIRCLE at the Edith Bush Theater. In the spring, three awards were presented for the most valuable contributions to Stout theater in the past year. D. Ann Wilson, star of "Anastasia," wearily undergoes the trying experience of interrogation. Jim Buswell slowly performs the vital process of shaping the distinctive features in his plastic form. ARTS AND CRAFTS adept Amid the hustle and bustle of the school year, the members of Arts and Crafts Club find time to produce many worthwhile and useful products. Adept in such media as Wood, metal, leather, plastics, and ceramics, their skilled hands produce such useful aids as models for demonstration in the classroom. Twice a year the Arts and Crafts Club initiates new members. A high scholastic standing is a prerequisite for membership in the pre-professional organization. Founded in 1931 by their advisor, Mr. Kranzusch, the guild holds Weekly meet- ings. On the basis of merit points, club members are awarded gold keys at their annual club banquet. The week of Homecoming found the Arts and Craft Club selling booster but- tons to the Stout student body. During the chill of winter, members sponsored their annual card party, and in the spring they held their last meeting at their fare- well picnic. FRONT ROW: Lamont Veenendaalg David Burt: Curtis McCulley3 lVayne Lamar: Ed Knigge: Ray Kranzusch, advisor. SECOND ROW: Bob Waldockg Harold Orthg Gary Saatkampg Don Van De Heig Stanley Lueck. THIRD ROXV: jim Buswellg Gary Leonardg David Smithg Dennis Christiansen. ml f mu -:'wila- xt ve u'aa DIETETICS CLUB Busy is the Word which best describes Stoutis Dietetics Club. This organization, open to all dietetic and institutional man- agement majors, maintains an active sched- ule throughout the year. The first big activity of this school term was a field trip, taken in October, to Ro- chester, Minnesota. This excursion proved to be educational as well as entertaining, for the group was able to visit the kitchens in the Kahler Hotel, tour the Mayo Clinic, and meet the nutritionist at the Rochester Public Health Center. As Christmas drew near, the girls again entered into their traditional money-mak- ing project of baking and selling their scrumptious fruitcakes. This year the girls baked and sold 3ll pounds of fruit- cake. Another traditional club activity was the continuance of their community projects, this year the students made nap- kin holders for the Dunn County Hospital. Each March the group sponsors a tea for the purpose of observing and publicizing punch cups from Miss XfVilliams and Mr. Jax. National Nutrition Week. The Dietetics Club concludes their school year by award- ing a medical dictionary at the Honor's Day program to the outstanding senior. At the Nutrition Tea Barb Dramburg takes the empty FRONT ROXV: Janice Peterson, Jeneene Lowe, jill johnson, Becky Gralow, treasurer, Helen Morioka, president, Nancy Guenzel, vice president, Pat Arganbright, secretary, Barbara Dramburg, Virginia Rosenow. SECOND ROYV: Margaret james, advisor, Barb Kneevers, Gail Diehl, Virginia Trautmann, Mary VVhelen, Nancy Reynolds, Sharon Krueger, Virginia Lunde, Barbara Schoendorf, Karen Raht, Karen Oberpriller. THIRD ROVV: Carole Krueger, Kathy Jessick, Sue Klein, Jackie Freeman, Jo Ann -Sampson, MaryAnne Reinmuth, Phyllis Bahr, Gerri Freese, Jan Mitchell, Betty Cotter, advisor. FOURTH ROW? Pat jungers, Nancy Reindl, reporter, Kathleen Towslee, Sharon Munson, Dorothy Wfermuthg Shirlee Opsahl, Ruth Steensland, jane Ruege, Annamarie Sihsmanng Mary Anne Caldwell, Karen Johnson. FRONT ROYV: Mildred Halvorson, advisor: Karen Oberprillerg Carol Machovecg Bonnie Nelson, treasurerg Gloria Dallmann, president: Harriet McClure, secretary: Carolyn Spargo, president-elect: Helen Moriokag Sharon Hutchins. SECOND ROXV: Lila Aholag Carol Millerg Virginia Trautmanng Judy Nortong Karen Horkyg Sharon VVyssg Sandra Spathg Dorothy Clure, advisor. THIRD RONV: Hazel Van Ness, advisory Barbara Knaussg Harriet Maasg Sarah Littlefield, advisor. Mrs. John Jarvis serves Kay Krueger and Kathy Buie at one of the many Home Economics Club sponsored teas. HOME ECONOMICS CLUB tangent mngamgalum Having the distinction of being the larg- est professional organization on the Stout State College campus, the Home Econom- ics Club, which is associated with the American Home Economics Association, was again very active during the past year. Founded with the purpose of widening and stimulating cultural interest and social experience of its members, the club partici- pated in such activities as the sponsoring of the first all school "get acquainted" mix- er during registration week, the fall style show given to present an appropriate col- lege wardrobe - and as in previous years, the traditional freshman Green Tea and the sale of Stout's cherished recipes. This year the president-elect, Carolyn Spargo, traveled to Miami, Florida to at- tend the National Convention of the Home Economics Association held to further in- terest in home economics. At the close of another year the senior girls were honored at a breakfast, a fitting farewell to Stout's graduating girls. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS utlun uwhmw "Our Country Is The World" was the theme of the International show presented by the International Relations Club dur- ing Parents' Weekend. With this show IRC was able to acquaint not only Stout students, but also their parents with the customs characteristic of the native coun- tries of the foreign students. IRC also carried out this theme in their ice carv- ing for Winter Carnival. This year IRC adopted a song to be sung at meetings and other functions entitled 'AMy Country Is The World." The words, which were written by Robert Whitaker, are sung to the tune of America. During United Nations VVeek, IRC co- sponsored the UN Tea with the Home Economics Club. Also in connection with the United Nations, representatives of IRC attended a model UN at the University of Minnesota. Under the sponsorship of the International Relations Club, a Peace Corps director came to Stout and spoke on the importance of his organization and the need for Peace Corps volunteers. e ,...., i,,,,.,,., I fm,vn.,'f'4h. v if .r" few I "Our Country is The World," I.R.C.'s ice carving won second place in the most beautiful category at the Winter Carnival. Sileshi Mulalu, who has a "way" with children, entertains a young friend, with the help of some other IRC friends. 4 FRONT ROW: Advers Zita Dela Cruzg Irene Christinang Beyene Bekele, treasurerg Mohamed Abdel-Rahman, presidenti Charlene Pochanayon, vice presidentg Sam Pochanayong Tarira Raphaelg Karen Raht. SECOND ROW: Lorna Lengfeld, advisor: Vicki Hicksg Rudolph Browng Sileshi Mulatug Mustafa Ali: Annarnarie Sihsmanng Dee Ann Wengerg joan Klingbeil. THIRD RONV: Dwight Agnew, advisorg Dorothy Rathsackg Sharron Malling john Papatriantafylloug Betty Macliovecg Patricia Rusty Robert Tauringg james Schlumpf. INTER-RELIGIOUS COUNCIL In keeping with our times, the Inter- Religious Council developed the theme "Theology in a Scientific Age" to be car- ried throughout the year. The adjustment and coordination of science and theology is a major issue which was well worth em- phasizing at the four dinner meetings. At each dinner an eminent speaker was featur- ed, the first of whom was Dr. Paschkis of Columbia University who spoke on the "Need for Wo1'lcl Peace and the Scientists Responsibilities." Another speaker was a Biblical archeologist who spoke under the theme i'Archeology Views Theology." The Inter-Religious Council correlates all religious organizations on campus, and consists of several representatives from each denomination. The main objectives of the organization are to stimulate student religious development, to administer re- ligious activities, and to promote an under- standing of the relationship that should exist between higher education and re- ligion in a democratic society. gmSr...,....c-,., ...,...... , .. . . .L Two members of the Inter-Religious Council consult with Dean Iverson. FRONT ROW: M. M. Price: R. L, Sanasac, vice president: Alice jane Peterson, secretary: Elizabeth Neumeyer. president: Linda Luck Kathleen Buie: Rev. Redmond. SECOND ROW: Ralph Iverson, advisorg Ellen Chase: Karen De Wald: jane Prestong Sandra Wagner Robley Mangold. THIRD ROXN: Rev. Hollequeg jerry Roweg Richard LI. johnson: Barbara Knaussg Marian Dunng Joe Dietenbergei FRONT ROYV: Faith Ellison: Idelle Fauske, recording secretaryg Richard Berglundg Richard J. Johnson, presidentg Margaret Ann Glennon vice president: Karen Raht, corresponding secretaryg Ethel Knutson. SECOND ROW: Nancy Nehringg Audrey Gniffkeg Helen Haralsrud Dwayne Dzubayg Barbara Lindeniang Faye Kallandg Nancy Reynolds. THIRD ROW: Mrs. K. L. Rue, advisorg Barbara Dramburg Sarah Franti: Karen DeYVald: Joyce Albrecht: Jeannette Kephartg Reverend Richard Holleque, advisor. LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION ' alwwbace Last fall the Lutheran Student Center once again received a face lifting. The improve- ments included modernization of the meeting room, chapel, and study area. Added to the study room, which provides a quiet place for students to study, were built-in cupboards and book shelves for the expanding library. Christ Lutheran Church loaned the center a beauti- ful hand painted oil painting of Christ for the altar, which greatly enhanced the beauty of the chapel. In this chapel the members took part in communion services in the fellowship of friends and fellow students. All the work on the center was done by students, making the improvements more appreciated by everyone. Another highlight of the first semester was a trip to Minneapolis. At that time the LSA'ers visited many churches and received new in- sights into other religious denominations. Two non-credit Bible classes, offered each semester to all interested students, resulted in broader knowledge of the Christian religion. These classes were conducted by an intern and a pas- tor of a local church. Hard working Nancy Reynolds is just one of the A picnic, with lots of food, fun, and fellowship be- many LSA'ers who pitched in to remodel the center. gan the school term for L.S.A. Dr. YViehe, Metals Guild advisor, supervises A member of the Stout Metals Guild puts some the work of Don Kegel. of his knowledge to practical use. METALS GUILD Pfwlewiwwl ebbiviww As a professional organization composed of students majoring in the metals field, the Metals Guild is intended to enhance the members' knowledge of new techniques, products, and advances in the metalworking field and to further develop skills in the use of tools, ma- chines, and products. Membership is open to men who have the required number of metal courses and the proper grade point average in these courses. The main objective of the organ- ization is to increase the professional efficiency and social competence of all its members. Under the direction of the club's advisors, Dr. Wiehe, Mr. Face, Mr. Halfin, and Mr. Gerber, the members conduct regular meet- ings on the first and third Monday nights of the month and schedule work nights on alter- nating weeks. At these meetings films on the metalworking industry, prominent speakers, and individual reports by members give val- uable information to the members on their fu- ture life's work. Social functions are held: and as a highlight of the year, a field trip was planned and enjoyed by the entire group. FRONT ROW: Theodore Wiehe, advisor: joe Dietenberger: Byron Kesanan, treasurer: Don Kegel, president: Peter Betts, secretary: Ron.YfVolf,.vice president: Pat Harrison. SECOND ROW: John Papatriantafyllou: Jerome Hilt: Melvin Koeller: jack Baclunang Dick Maki: l'V1ll1am Peters: Jack Klein: james Litvinoff, THIRD ROYV: Paul Lien: Andrew Cochrane: Gary D. Thompson: Fred Pender- gast: Brian Hepperly: Dave Doner: Bill jusela. Carl Lang and Sharon Vvyss, mem- bers of the Stout SNEA, discuss a current article in the professional NEA magazine. S.N.E.A. P'wPw1iwJ BM To prepare today for the work of tomorrow might well be the motto of the Student National Education Association on Stout's campus. The SNEA is a professional organization for college students who are preparing to become teachers. The members of this group are also student members of the Wisconsin Education Associa- tion and the National Education Association, during the year, these students attend some of the meetings and conventions held by the state and national organizations. The purpose of the Stout NEA is to provide opportunities for professional growth, cultiva- tion of leadership and for participation in the programs sponsored at the various levels. The Stout NEA achieves these purposes by subscrib- ing to professional magazines, broadening their knowledge of education, and by fellowship ac- tivities. At their meetings they explore the field of education by listening to teachers, hold- ing panel discussions, and acting out skits on the life of a teacher. FRONT ROW: Sylvia Schultz: Rosemary Badzinskig Marlys Hamiltong Lila Aholag Roger Mussell, presidentg Harriet Maas, treasurer Charlene Pochanayon, secretaryg Sharron Mallin, publicity-historiang Dorothy Rathsack. SECOND ROW: Judy Kemmerg Sandra Gill Sharon Richmondg Karen Potocnikg Mary l'Vyattg Betty Lou Halamag Marian Dunng Marilyn Steinbachg Pat Kuritzg Carol Machovec Janice Witt. THIRD ROW: Lynette Schultzg Harriet McClure3 Pat Dableg Linda Gilles: Jeanne Duelg Dee Ann Wenger: Joan Klingbeil Crystal Drengbergg Charlotte Syringg Janice Geraets. FOURTH ROW: Elaine Kraemerg Ethel Knutsong Virginia Fellingerg Joan Harri song Sue Banovichg Mary Merwing Barbara Lindemang Loretta Crugerg Gloria Dallmanng Donna Foley. FIFTH ROVV: Ellen Chase Idelle Fauskeg Sharon Wyssg Betty Machovecg Elisabeth Neumeyerg Jerry Biese: Joe Dietenbergerg Cynthia Borneg Carolyn Spargo Judy Mleissg Alice Jane Peterson. FRONT ROYV: John Jax, advisorg Kendrick Cloughg Irene Christman, treasurer: Ronald Schroeder, vice presidentg Jerry Biese, presi- dentg Sandra Ziarnik, secretary: Janice lfVitt, vice president: Marge Groszczykg Reverend Arthur Redmond, advisor. SECOND ROW: Mary Jane Gorman, David Kennedyg Carol Millerg Jane Preston: Rose Mary Peichelg Judy YVeissg Carol Machovecg Karen Oberprillerg Grace Fischer. THIRD ROYV: Betty Machovecg Joe Brennerg Gary Godfrey: Tom Howdeng Jerold Hargravesg Joe Dietenbergerg Ruth Hopfensperger. N EWMAN CLU B fwiuiwi ' Uwwahf Spiritual, educational, and social growth is the goal of Newmanism. With this in mind Newmanites revised their educational program by alternating lecture meetings with discussion sessions. Subject matter was selected and pre- pared by individual groups of students in ac- cordance with their needs. A number of stu- dents elected to study and discuss Catholic thought as found in the writings of Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Jerome, and Thomas More. This group was under the guidance of Mr. Richard Friedrich and Mr. Robert Sather. Once again the Newman library was further enlarged by the students to three reading- study-discussion rooms. Social events through- out the year included community Christmas caroling, communion breakfasts, Sunday sup- pers, and the annual St. Patrick's Day dance. This year realizing the importance of con- stant spiritual self-renewal, Newmanites were glad to have the privilege of attending daily afternoon Mass at the new chapel conducted by Father Arthur Redmond. Members of Newman Club lis- ten attentively as President Joe Rossmeier speaks to them. FRONT ROYV: Don Ortleyg Jim Zuelzkeg Richard Stoddard: Thomas M. Johnson, treasurerg Roger Wlilliams, presidentg Ken Gresk vice presidentg Jack Klein, secretaryg jack Hoibyg Phil Ruehl, advisor. SECOND ROVV: Richard Evertsg Clark Highg Ray Hanseng Bud Phillippg Joe Rossineierg Bill Marotzg Kendrick Cloughg David S. johnson. THIRD ROW: Stanley Badzinskig Roger Mussellg David Beveridgeg David Fedlerg james Seilerg Bob Leeg Paul Hallingstad. FOURTH ROVV: Donald Hinksg Ed Kniggeg Byron D. Kessey VVarren Leisemanng Mfayne Clark. Members learn the intricacies in the use and operation of ham radio equipment. RADIO-ELECTRONICS CLUB Any member of the Radio-Electronics Club with a novice or general license may operate the radio transmitter in Room 210 of Fryklund Hall. With this transmitter contact is made all over the World. Future plans include the installation of satellite tracking equipment and a standard Navy radar system. " For further training in the use of radio transmitters the club participates in trans- mitter hunts. A transmitter is hidden in or near Menomonie and members of the group try to locate it by following the sig- nals received on directional receivers. Ad- ditional practical training is obtained with the operation and maintainance of the college public address systems. This service is free for the school and its organizations. The Radio-Electronics Club also studies the International Morse Code, which gives special help to members who Wish to take the qualifying exam for a Federal Commu- nications Commission Amateur Licenses. To stimulate interest in radio and elec- tronics the club provides information on amateur radio, stereophonic sound, high fidelity, and radio control. tram, .22 ' me Firing again commenced on campus as the Stout Rifle Club continued to participate in highly skilled competition. Beginning its first year as a member of the National Collegiate Rifle League, the Stout Rifle Club had fifty-two conference matches against the University of California, Brigham Young, and other well known universities and military schools across the country. Member- FRONT ROVV: Pat Harrisong Patricia Fiegeg Lois Hansong Bob Koeller, treasurerg Sandra Neuserg john Streif. SECOND ROW: 'Nilliam Johnson: Ray Hanseng Bill Dubatsg jim Bliss. THIRD Don Kegel. Rupnowg marksmanship at one of the shoot ing matches. ship in such a league presents widely separated teams with the opportunity of competition. The matches, known as postal matches, are fired on the campuses of the individual col- leges and the totals are sent to the National Rifle Association and to the competing school for comparison. Team members use .22 cali- ber, three pound trigger pull, rimfire rifles. From a distance of fifty feet the shooter must fire from three positions. Haven lfVilliams, president: Tom Ekelmann, secretaryg Melvin Dick Klatt, advisory Dennis Harms: Steve Hansong Andrew Cochraneg ROW: Bill Kuehng Tom Driesseng Larry Kufahlg Duwayne Lamuskag .n-awuaff H .-W -:M ' Haven Mfilliams, president of the Stout Rifle Club, demonstrates his init mb opwmmmamhip Composed of all men who have won a major letter, the S Club has as its primary function the promotion and furthering of the athletic interests of the college. In order to promote athletic interest, a spirit of sportsmanship, and high morale, the S Club sponsors an intramural program. Here interested participants vie for hon- ors in football, basketball, and baseball. Besides active participation in sports, the main activity of the club is the S Club Carnival. The fraternities, sororities, and other campus organizations pay a nominal fee to erect a booth or concession stand. Excitement and a festive mood fill the air as the decorative booths open and the fun begins. Proceeds from this event bring the club one step closer to its goal - the purchase of jackets and letters. At the Honor Day program blue jackets and letters are awarded to outstanding athletes. These men must have partici- pated in varsity sports for two years while maintaining a MC" average in academic studies. On this occasion the award for no basketball gon-S. the exceptional freshman active in varsity sports is also presented. Dick Baker, David Boho, and Jim Paulus serve refreshments At the S Club Carnival Jim Paulus tries his skill. FRONT ROW: Charles Johnsong Jack Neubauer, secretary: Richard Roesslerg Xvilliain VVay3 jim Paulus: Tom Dingesg Cary Simonson, presidentg Fred Loomis, vice president, jerry Holubets. SECOND ROVV: Cliff Abbateg Wayne Elingerg Bob I-Iaing Don McNaughtong Bob Ottg Fred Seggelink: Roger Schaeferg Gary G. Thompson: David Boho: Robert Bostwick, advisor. THIRD ROW: Dwain Mintz, advisorg Walt Croppg VVillian1 Kuehng Bill McGinnis3 Larry Briskig Sanford Eriksong Pat O'Reillyg Mitch Miller. FOURTH ROXV: Joe Cullineyg Arthur Uherg Richard Paskeg Mike Blaeserg Dick Bakerg Don Anderson. FRONT ROW: Sandy Barrong joan Hohlweckg Kathy De Vriesg john Zilischg Pat johnson: Gary G. Thompsong Ruth Kollg Kay Lynn Boelimeg Elaine Kuether. SECOND ROVV: Fred Blake, aclvisorg Lila Christiansen, D. Ann Wilsong Lee Ann johnsong Renee Seilerg Kae Schulzg janet Suckowg Marguerite Flanagang Marsha Hamiltong Mary Jo Gartman. THIRD ROW: Chuck Fuller: Barbara Campbellg Dianne Linclbergg Pat Sobcynskig Karen Horkyg Sue Mortensong Maryann Drezdong jack Bachmang Paul Teppen. FOURTH ROW: Jim Blissg Jack Kleing Grant Beerg Paul Connorsg Ken Grosskopfg David Beveridgeg Phillip Schwisterg Delbert Schneider. FIFTH ROW: David johnsong David Schneckg Ed Kniggeg Clark Leesong jack Shanahang Fred Pendergastg Jim Seiler. " luwehalk game Each year the Ski Club leads the Win- ter Carnival activities held here on cam- pus in February. As a major attraction, they sponsor the hjalopy Racel' in which cars entered by the different organizations compete for three trophies. Also a part of the Winter Carnival events is the baseball game between the Eau Claire Ski Club and the Stout Ski Club. This is an actual F t game played on the ice with both teams wearing skis instead of shoes. The members of Ski Club are interested not only in snow skiing, but also in water skiing, ice-skating, and tobogganing. These various activities allow the club to be busy almost the entire school year and also provide opportunities for many more students to take part in and enjoy. Each january it is customary during semester break for the club members to take it easy and enjoy themselves on a ski trip, but this year because of the lack of snow, it was not possible to make such a trip. However, on weekends members skied at nearby Telemark, I-lardscrabble, and Deepwood. To end a good year of fun and fellowship, the club held a picnic in the spring for all its members. Ski Club enthusiasts find playing baseball on skiis challenging but a lot of fun. 204 STOUT CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP The Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship, an international organization which seeks to deepen the spiritual life of the student and his understanding of the Bible, is rep- resented on the campus by the Stout Christian Fellowship. As an inter-denomi- national organization seeking to cooperate with the local churches, S.C.F. purposes to strengthen the spiritual life of college stu- dents and help them develop into well- balanced men and women. The members of S.C.F. hold informal weekly meetings on Wednesdays for Bible study, prayer, and fellowship. Special so- cial meetings and exchange meetings with the Eau Claire and River Falls chapters are held periodically in order to become better acquainted with similar groups on other campuses. Stout Christian Fellowship does not eliminate the social side of college life from its calendar. This year a fall picnic offered freshmen a chance to get acquainted, a Christmas card sale, which began before Thanksgiving, all school films, and Bible studies constituted the other activities. Students laugh and chat with their neighbors as they await the showing of one of the S,C.F. all-school movies. FRONT ROVV: Phylis Tripp, Jane Orsinger, secretary, Elisabeth Neumeyer, vice president, Alice Jane Peterson, president, Harold Orth treasurer, Karen Johnson, Linda Luck, Geraldine Bock. SECOND ROW: Jack Sampson, advisor, Nancy Meyer, Rita Benjamin, Miriam Tubbs, Clairice Stephens, Sandra Wagner, Ellen Chase, Maurine Heft, Dan Smith. THIRD ROW: Don Boyle, John Nelson, Dick Loughrey, Harvey Miller, Ken Vodden, Barney Mc Call. hmHlu1l E mn.-':w"h2'Js'al.Z fnall- STOUT STUDENT ASSOCIATION The Stout Student Association is the only organization on campus that Works with and for all students. Meeting every Tuesday, the S.S.A. consists of the student officers, who are elected each spring, the various class and organization representa- tives, who are elected by their respective groups, and all other Stout students who are interested in this governing group. The functions of the S.S.A. are to plan some of the year's big social events, such as Homecoming, Winter' Carnival, and the Commencement Dance, and to help other organizations arrange their social activities. This year the group was faced with some new duties, too. In February it served as host to the United Council Convention of the nine Wisconsin state colleges, and later, it sponsored the sales of the Stout State College rings. In addition to working for the betterment of Stout's social life, the S.S.A. also concerns itself with certain types of student problems. As a student organi- zation on campus its purpose is always to serve the students and faculty. fn ,E Important decisions concerning the students welfare According to the S.S.A.'s statistics, only forty-five per cent are made by the S.S.A. officers. of the student body votes. The S.S.A. plans the Homecom- ing festivities. FRONT ROYV: M. M. Price, advisorg Joanne Boweg Bill Vasey, vice presidentg Charles Johnson, presidentg Mary lfVhelen, secretaryg Alan Peckham, treasurerg Janet Klapsteg Lila Aholag Ralph Iverson, advisor. SECOND ROVV: Virginia Trautmanng Gary Leonardg Tom Freiwaldg joe Borgeng Eugene Hallongreng Sandy Carlsong Sharon Wyss. STOUT TYPOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY lwot bu wwbtomen Open house for Stout's campus printing facilities was again sponsored this year by the members of the Stout Typographical Society as part of its Printing Education Week. In January educators and crafts- men, active and interested in the printing field from Minnesota and Wisconsin, at- tended the various discussion groups and tours. The open house was concluded with an evening banquet. The Stout Typographical Society, affil- iated With the Stout Printing Teacher's Association and the National Printing Edu- cation Guild, participated in three separate field trips during the year, enabling mem- bers to get a closer View of many other printing programs and organizations in larger scale operations. The annual Stout stationery sale and initiating of new mem- bers contributed to another busy year for Stout's professional printing organization. Tom Lowe laughs at one of R. Hunter Middletons anecdotes at the Printing Y'Veek Banquet. Tom Heller and Don Anderson put the old Wfashington Hand Press back into order for Printing Week FRONT ROW: Lloyd Whydotski, advisorg Tom Krysiakg Earl Knott Tom Hellex Dax1dSm1th Donald Boyle Dewey COCIPCI SECOND ROM7: Gerald Schemansky, advisorg john Ferlbakg Charles Thomsen Haxen XV1ll1dlTlS Tony Gullickson Dennis Haukinson Pete Noreen STOUTONIA an ' pfuweoo The Stoutonia is something more than a college newspaper - it is an educational pro- cess. Made up entirely of students, the staff does every step of production - writing, print- ing, and circulating. Conforming to good jour- nalistic principles and practices, The Stoutonia not only offers its staff members an opportun- ity to gain valuable knowledge and experience in Writing and reporting, but also helps them build character. The Weekly Friday edition is published throughout the year except on exami- nation days. Putting their best efforts into each publication, the staff members can justly ex- perience a sense of accomplishment and pride when their finished product is released to the student body. But for staff members, not all is laboring amid ink and copy against deadlines. Through- out the school year parties and social get-to- gethers were often held for all the members. During the first semester, Don Larkin served capably as editor, with Nancy Gigowski han- dling the duties of assistant editor. Second semester Nancy took over the position of editor. During the school year the helpful and skilled advice of Mr. Whydotski, advisor to The Stou- tonia, clarified many problems and questions which arose. The Stoutonia is one of the most important student projects on campus because it involves every student, and enlightens and informs us of past, present, and future events. Editor Don Larkin works on an editorial for the next issue Mr. Mfhydotski, Kay Duebner, Chuck Sharkus, and Janice Packard are earnestly proof-reading before the paper goes KO PTCSS. Richard Grasse and Dennis Hawkinson prepare the press for the production run of another weekly Stoutonia issue. Setting type is an art that comes only with much practice and patience as David lklolslegel demonstrates. WP P ' To speed the completion of the paper, Sharon Micke and Chuck W Sharkus occupy their time read- ing galley proofs. Tom Lowe and Chuck Sharkus run the linotype machines. FRONT ROW: Kathy XfValdsch1nidt: Kathy Ramakerg Richard Henry, production managerg Don Larkin, eclitorg Nancy Gigowski, assist- ant editorg Gerald Mikunda, business managerg Dwayne Dzubayg Joanne Boweg joan Hohlweck. SECOND ROW: Sue Heftyg Carol S1- monsong Harriet McClureg Linda Poulosg Sharon Wyssg Sandra Laudong Kay Lynn Boehmeq Ann Rudeg Judy Beerg Jan Klapsteg Lila Ahola. THIRD ROYV: Lonnie Kempfg Ellen Chase: Pauline Leschg Lois Hansen: Donna Foleyg Pat Kuritzg Martha Stoelbg Kathleen Runiockig Karen DeYNaldg Kay Duebner. FOURTH ROW: Bill Dubatsg Charles Sharkusg Barbara Knaussg Haven Ulilliamsg Harriet Maasg Karen Rihag Louise Reseldg Lloyd Whydotski, advisor. FIFTH ROW: David Wolslegelg Tom Harrisg john Pagelsg Richard Zu- rawskig Don Andersong Pete Bettsg Richard Tiecleg jack Klein. Even the small job of cutting paper takes careful plan- ning and measuring shown by Tony Gullickson. Nancy Gigowski, assistant editor, reads articles for publication. 211 i S I Nancy Reindl began her duties as 1963 editor last spring and worked continuously throughout the year. TOWER captwuzd new As the hands of the tower clock move and mark every second of life on the cam- pus throughout the year, so it is the task of the staff members of THE TOWER to assess and record a year's measure of college life within the covers of this col- lege yearbook. Each successive year an idea for a new TOWER is born and dur- ing the summer vacation the production editor develops and expands the idea into a basic design for an entirely new book. ln the fall, photographers are eager to capture the highlights of an exciting year as the literary staff prepares copy and creates captions. The staff followed the traditional pathways of basic production, but tried to reach new levels in photogra- phy and in writing copy to give the book a definite character of its own. Under the shadow of the tower clock, the school year moves and the TOWER grows - till at last after a thousand de- tails, patient labors, revisions and deci- sions, after proofreading sessions and trips to the engravers and printers and final Literary editor Becky Gralow production editor Tom Heller editor Nancy Reindlg literary ad visor Robert Satherg and associ ate editor jerry Rowe check prog- ress. 'T'- Cassie Helbig, Karen Nielsen, and Paula Plansky write copy while , Rosemary Anderson types. Tower section editors are Ellen Chase, faculty: Chuck Lorence, athletics: joan Nevin, organiza- tions: Becky Gralow, editor: Sandy Laudon, social: Margaret Glen- non, organizations: and Louise Reseld, classes. FRONT ROW: Dr. Barnard, advisor: joan Nevin: Becky Gralow, literary editor: Tom Heller, production manager: Nancy Reindl, editor: Jerry Rowe, associate editor: janet Klapste: Margaret Glennon: Mr. Sather, advisor. SECOND ROW: Donna Simpson: Kay Boehlnep Mary Graham: Barbara Campbell: Elisabeth Neumeyer: Pauline Lesch: Paula Plansky: D. Ann Wilson. THIRD ROW: Louise Reseld: Lois Hansen: Donna Foley: Bob Askins: Tom Krysiak: Cassandra Helbig: Ann Rude: Ellen Chase. FOURTH ROW: Vicki Hicks: Gwen Hock: Dorothy Nielsen: Karen Nielsen: Charles Thomsen: Charles Lorence: Harriet Maas: Sandra Laudon: Sharon Mallin: Becky Roberts. solutions to problems - as the face of the old tower clock gazes placidly over a new spring, the new edition of the TOWER has come forth. With time passing, the approach of graduation and the students looking to- ward summer vacation, the books arrived and were given staff approval at the TOWER banquet. And now the l963 TOWER has reached you, the student, may it serve in the future as a link be- tween the past and the present. For some staff members graduation will bring an end to a valuable experience in working with this publication, but we know that time will bring forth new faces and new ideas. And we trust that the established tradition of striving for excellence will always motivate future staff members of this our yearbook, THE TOWER. . V The Tower advisors Mr. lVIcMurtrie, Dr. Barnard, and Mr. Sather glance over yearbook copy, The 1963 associate editor, Jerry Rowe, checks the Tower budget. K: 5. . 5 i 2 E E I e Production editor, Tom Heller, supervises the work of Charles Thomsen, Anne Gaderlund, Bob Lee, and Tom Krysiak. ! 2 Uwditiauwk pathway Tom Heller, responsible for the production ol' the book, ponders over a page layout. , . -1 .1 el is vu Q 9 r , Q. i f'1 Heavily ladencd literary cdilor, Becky Gralow, comes prepared for 21 day's work. These are, perhaps the Loo hard working, Tower photographers. FRONT ROVV: john Roeckergp Myra Schlegelg Ferenc Toth. SECOND ROW: Bill Heuserg Warren Race. THIRD ROW: Dick Tiedeg Hank Yvinterfeldt. xswff-:z.::...i1 .'-1. -' ' " - "W "W""P-if-ii""" - . ,.,., L lx V- -.VI-aw Mfxgwggg .I P.. 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Kg 1 fPJ'2f" '- - '- ,-. -W. ff-"-51" 1-iff' "-:Rf '-1. V 'R :'fl'f ."2.P2'-"P-5-f2'iIf3.' X' ' ' 'V' 75.24-Q 'E5.r'f' 'fif- V' 1 - ' """5"?1,l, 5 ,- "' VC ' ff '5'.fS3f'i.1i'- TI'- ' ' 79 ' T42 . 'ik " " V I , ' ' . - . . VV . V V V -- -V 12' V .:t,rw.:V - Vt V, 1' ' ,, -' ',:':fg1i:S'V.w:. 2, 'r 'V ' ' 1. 1-' .-VgV1 if ' . 'L -fi. ' N " 'f-j. J .- :. if I ' ii-af., t1:'f','f. 'iff fi" 'ii - ' ' . -a . Members of Synchronized Swimmers demonstrate their abilities to a crowd of students and faculty at their annual swimming show. Many hours of hard work are put into this yearly showing by all of the members. SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMERS My puecwe w.- "Splash along on Broadway" was chosen as the theme for the water show given by the Syn- chronized Swimmers earlier this year. Hit songs from popular Broadway plays were used as back- ground music and as guides in developing the various acts. New costumes added color and variety, and modern dance and Hlandworkw were also introduced into the performances, Under the leadership of Mr. Robert Wilsoii, swimmers met once a week to plan, prepare, and practice routines for their water show. Synchronized swimming combines swimming with creative ability and co-ordination. Precise co-ordination is important to achieve the correct timing and rhythm. Members modify basic techniques such as the back and breast strokes and use different rhythmic motions in their interpretations. They engage in both simple and difficult underwater and above water rou- tines. The result of this hard work is an effective and aesthetic water 'Kballetf' FRONT ROW: Judy Kemmerg Linda Luckg Dale Andersen, vice president: Marilyn Sill, treasurerg Mary Ann Knight, presidentg Judith Lewis, secretaryg janet Suckowg Richard Tiedeg Kay Bauman. SECOND ROXV: joan Rotzelg Kay Lundy Karen Nielseng john Zilischg Jerald Hargravesg Robley Mangoldg Ted Browng Florence Tedmang Mary Tyriver. FRONT ROW: Sharon Mickey Ann Marshallg Jean Roggowg Shirley Feuerstein, Gladys Millard: Janice Halamag Elvina Tichyg Lynn Brosie. SECOND ROXN7: Nancy Nehringg Arlene Dahnert: Kay Schulzg Yvonne Scliwengelsg Judy 'Wikkerinkg Jean Sprecker: Margaret Lauderdaleg Jean Massieg Naomi Yayinamag Gary Riesenberg. THIRD ROVV: Gayle Swansong Margaret VVarclg Carol Par- rishg Myra Schlegelg Tom Twesmeg Carol Radag Margaret Handrahan: Mary Sievertg Joann Rossg John Streif, exchanging exp ' "To make the best better," the motto of the 4-H organization, is the goal of all Stout 4-H members. Through varied activ- ities such as health and safety, recreation, citizenship, conservation, leadership, and various other projects, members have an opportunity to continue in 4-H work While they are attending college. While at Stout, club members also have a chance to ex- change ideas from experiences in their re- spective counties and work closely with the Dunn County 4-H groups. Donna Simpson, Mary Ann Jaeger, and Roger Palmer excitedly plan their trip to National 4-H Club Congress. J I --Ji At a work meeting, members of the campus 4-H Club study correct parliamentary procedure, 217 FRONT ROW: Paula Christensen: Gary D. Thompson: Caroline Zache: Bill Smet, vice president: Jerry Rowe, president: Marian Dunn: Joan Harrison: Virginia Fellinger: Dianne Wlenzler. SECOND ROW: Beverly Needham: Suzanne Burbaker: Mary Lu Hutchinson: Dianne Kernwein: Cynthia Borne: Joan E. Meyer: Carolyn Spargo: Nancy Meyer: Mary Geil: Anne Gaderlund. THIRD ROWV: Patricia Rust: Janice Nelson: Mirian Tubbs: Jeanne Duel: Renee Seiler: Judy YVikl4erink: Nancy Brunstad: Donna Foley: Elaine Kraemer. FOURTH ROW: James Klapste: John Streif: Lea Ann Meyers: Myra Schlegel: Barbara Knauss: Mary Kay Merwin: Carol Parrish, secretary: Donna Simpson: Ronald Lemke: Vincent Barnes. FIFTH ROYV: Lynn Inman: Jack VVeiss: Alan Burchell: Bob Cooley: Roger Dahl: John Ander- son: Paul Teppeng Dale Andersen. WESLEY - UCCF Jan Diehl, Phyllis Berg, and Barb Lindeman prepare a . scrumptious meal for Vvesley-UCCF, LSA meeting. Student thinking has been greatly chal- lenged in the united program of lNesley- UCCF, not only in the breath of the cen- tral theme, "The Word, The lfVorld, and The Sacraments," but also through an ef- fective series of "Fireside Chats." Meet- ing monthly in the nearly completed stu- dent lounge, students have been faced with ideas and opinions introduced by faculty members in areas of personal val- ues, marriage and family living, and poli- tics. Participants were able to discuss their own opinions and beliefs in an informal atmosphere outside the classroom. Ex- tended use of the lounge carried into study groups and a Forum which met to discuss the many aspects of religious living. Activities went beyond the four walls of the Center - they involved workcamps, state conferences, Wisconsin Calendar sales, and an active part in Stout Days. The entire round of activities experi- enced by the active members of this cam- pus organization has enriched the individ- ual person in faith and has also established a greater fellowship among his campus friends who joined in his sharing. 218 9 of lfVesley-UCCF listen attentively to Mr. Wfatson as he ormal lecture at one of the monthly fireside chats. ROW: .Carolyn Hauckeg june Harling Gayle Swansong Mary Ann Knightg Carole Ellisg Kathy Rudisellg Carole Mason: Jean V11g1H12l Suhrke. SECOND ROW. Judy Kemmerg Mary Ann Grahamg Gwen Hockg Janet Diehlg Dorothy Nielseng Elizabeth rgLes1iMb"Bk " ' ' ' " e 0 Clg, ec y Roberts, Clystal Dlengber, Kathleen Blue. THIRD ROW: Robert Kottg VV1ll1aIn Monseng Charles ld Kniggeg Larry Newmang James Seilerg Jerry Bartong Ronald Hullg Robert Hull. WOMEN,S RECREATION ASSOC. athletic ' The lively clowns in the Homecoming parade this year represented the Women's Recreation Association as they held their fall balloon sale. WRA members were also active selling hot dogs as a concession at all home football games, and they offered a day of athletic entertainment in sponsoring their annual Gym Jam. At this time the gym is open for all to participate in one of several games. Affording WRA mem- bers more enjoyment were the Christmas party and several Sport Days - inter-colle- giate activities sponsored for specific sports. Competition in a wide area of sports was carried on throughout the year, rang- ing from the volleyball to the archery tour- naments in the spring. Intramural competi- tion was continuous through the year, of- fering an organized program consisting of a variety of seven sports. The State Con- vention was also attended by delegates of WRA at Eau Claire in October, and, fol- lowing the Spring Tea, final achievements for a good year's work were honored at Awards Day. FRONT ROW Donna Simpson Rita Hansen secietaiy Kathleen Buie piesidentg Crystal Drengberg, vicenpresidentg Ka-ren Schultz, treasuiei Dianne Kernwein Marguerite Flanagan SECOND ROW Irene Erdlitz, advisorg Ruth Ann Waidelichg Janice Geiserg Marian FRONT ROM7: Phyllis Trippg Lea Ann Meyers, presidentg Nancy Nehring, treasurer: Kathleen Buie, vice-president: Lynette Schultz secretaryg Marian Dunn: jan Mitchell: Crystal Drenberg. SECOND ROM7: Margaret Harper, advisorg Ruth Ann Waidelichg Donna Simpson: Jeanne Duelg Jean Vrana: Judy XfVikkerinkg Patricia Rusty Dee Ann Wenger. YWCA omakkhut ' Each spring is greeted with a sudden out- burst of bright colors and pretty new hats as the women on Stoutis campus entertain their mothers at the Mother-Daughter banquet. The YWCA sponsors this all-campus dinner. Another highly successful function undertaken by this organization is the Big-Little-Sister pro- gram. Before freshmen come to college in the fall, they are assigned an upper classman who acts as a Big Sister. The two girls correspond during the summer and the prospective fresh- man can ask questions that will help her adjust to college life. A Big-Little-Sister tea is held during the first weekend of school and there is the opportunity for the freshmen to meet many of the people on campus and to be in- troduced to the college social scene. Though the YWCA is a small but active group on Stout's campus, it is a part of a vast nationwide organization and the experiences gained by the members will be very beneficial to them in their future careers, especially in education. Members of Y.W'.C.A. share ideas at an informal gathering as they prepare the year's activities. Here they discuss preparations for the Big-Little-Sister Tea. 1 a1f""""'1 rr , ,,,,, L . I ll FOREGROUND: Judy Rodger, accompanist. FRONT ROYV: Geri Bockg Karen Larsong Joan Klingbeilg Dan Nourseg Ray Gielowg Russell Christenseng LeRoy Schneiderg Terry Sorensong Irene Christmang Karen Oberpriller. SECOND ROYV: Barbara Loweg Sue Langg Karen Karding Katherine Madsong Robert Kapsyg David Boling Marvin YVilliamsg Jerome Steffeng Bruce Sundg Barbara Knaussg Jeanne Duelg Jean Boda. THIRD ROYV: Karen Karaschg D. Ann Wilsong Elaine Steeleg Jim Schlumpfg Vincent Barnesg Jerry Barton: Thomas Montagg Tom Johng Larry Kreylingg Robert Schnellg Ted Bispalag Sandra Grudtg Mary Lu Hutchinsong Gloria Michal. FOURTH ROXN7: Diana Schusterg Elaine Kuetherg Gene Hansen: David Beveridgeg Clayton Carlsong Hal Ehrenreichg Gerald Norrisg Joe Rossmeierg Tom Andersong Myra Schlegelg Joan Meyerg Maurine Heft. The brass section repeats a difficult passage. On Monday bandsmen look at the charts and learn how the operation will work. On Saturday football fans see precisioned formations. MUSIC DEPARTMENT phmevls One pathway to the heart of man is through music, and Stout State College is proud of its fine traditions in music. Our four sections - marching band, concert band, college chorus, and Symphonic Singers - under the capable direction of Dr. Odegard, work hard to create an at- mosphere of harmony on campus. The marching band performs at all the home football games and participates in several local parades. At Homecoming their half time show does much to add to the spirit of the occasion. The more serious side of music is studied by the concert band and the col- lege chorusg they concentrate on the fine techniques of music. The concert band, composed of fifty members, and the sixty voice college chorus participate in con- certs, recording Work, and broadcasting. The Symphonic Singers are composed of the outstanding musicians in both con- cert band and college chorus. During the year they present several concerts and do much recording Work. During a rehearsal, director Edfield Odegard, totally in- volved in the music, leads the chorus. FRONT ROVV: Jeanne Duelg Ellen Chaseg Carolyn Hauckeg Maxine Sniasalg Corene Riedel: Mary Hartungg Mary Ann Knight. SECOND ROW: Judy Klawiterg Sharon Leichtg Janice Foemmelg Rita Hoffmang Roger VVillia1nsg Kay Kossg Ruthanne Halde- mang Marilyn Silly Shirley Feuersteing Margaret Lauderdale: Judy Beckerg Joan Foemmel. THIRD ROVV: Tom Twesmeg Corrine Hungerg Dee Ann Mfengerg David Fauschg Byron Kesseyg VVarren Leisemanng Roger Johnsong Myron Schulerg Robert Buelkeg Julie Hardyg Larry Meicherg Ruth Sobottag Dan Smithg Nancy Wittstockg Mary Ann Jaegerg Linda Johnsong Paul McCormick: Kay Lundg Helen Haralsrudg Charles Thomsen. FOURTH ROWV: Art Schnellg Robin Rolfsg Robert Howard: Don Hinksg Dorothy Nielseng Reuben Hoffmang Sharon Janssen: Dr. Odegarclg Richard Butkiewiczg Eve Borkg Richard Daughenbaugh. u'We-'wMM'W f' -'dmv' fm- .ww -if -,mai-i-i.-.-mn zlmL...:a...,- :num-in mvsvn' :lmmsnr 1 '- ie- -. -1 a vi in xl.. KN- , g, ,T f . . installation of the new closed circuit te1ev1s1on . . . the D.K.'s prize winning YVinLe1' Carnival snow carving. , . . the Sig Tau Homecoming float. bacukty and index A Abbate, Clifford-II 113, 184, 203 Abbuehl, Carol-III 121 Abdel, Rahman, lvlohammed-IV 126, 185, 19 Abel, Barbara-I 105 Aderman, 1fVi11iam-I 105 AGNEW, DWIGHT 83, 195 Aguilar, Angel-Grad 150 Ahola, Lila-IV 126, 180, 194, 199, 207, 21 Ahrens, Georgia-I 105 Ainsworth, Sandra-IV 126 Aken, Paul-I 105 Albers, james-II 113 Albrecht, Joyce-III 120, 197 Albrecht, William-I 105 Alf, James-II 113 Ali, Mustafa Mohamed-I 195 Altmann, John-III 190 AMTHOR, WILLIAM 83 Amyx, Stanley-IV 126 Anderegg, Sue-I 105 1 Andersen, Dale-I1 113, 171. 216, 218 Anderson, Carol-II 113, 180 Anderson David-III 120 Anderson, Donald E.-IV 126, 172, 203, 208 Anderson, Donald O.-I 105 ANDERSON, HERBERT 83 Anderson Howard-IV 126 Anderson Jerome-I 105 Anderson Anderson john E.-Grad 150 john H.-11 113, 218 Anderson, Linda-1 105 Anderson, Rosemary-II 113, 178, 213 Anderson, Thomas-I1 113, 222 Anderson Vernal-IV 126 Angell, John-IV 126, 183, 188 Antonneau, Fred-IV 1, 126, 171 ANTRIM, KETURAH 82, 178 Appleton, james-III 121 Arfsten, Richard-IV 126 Arganbright, Patsy-III 120, 193 Armagost, Terrill-I 105 ARNESON, HERMAN 83 Arnetveit, Stanley-I 105 Arntz, joseph-I 105 Arola, Daniel-IV 126, 185 Arold, Calvert-II 113, 173, 184 Askins, Robert-II 212 AXELSEN, PAUL 83 B Babl, Allen-I 155, 157 Bachhuber, Mark-I 105 Bachman, jack-11 115, 198, 204 Badzinski, Rosemary-IV 126, 199 Badzinski, Stanley-Grad 151 Baewer, Judith-I 105 Bahr, Phyllis-III 120, 193 Baker, Mary-I 105 Baker, Richard-II 44, 75, 157, 186, 203 Banovich, Susan-III 120, 178, 199 BARNARD, DAVID 85, 212, 214 Barnard, VVi11iam-IV 126 Barnes, Bruce-I 105 Barnes, Vincent-I 105, 218, 222 Barney, Carolyn-IV 126 Barofsky, Robert-I 105 BARRA, MARGUERITE 85, 180 Barron, Sandy-I 105, 204 Bartel, Mark-II 113 Barth, Bill-II 113 Barthel, Eleanor-I 105 Barton, jerry-II 133, 168, 219, 222 Bateman, Allen-II 113 Bates, Glenn-I 161, 162 Bauer, James-I 105 Bauer, Marla-II 113 Bauman, Kay-I 105, 216 Baxter, Paul-I 105 Beardslee, David-II 113 Becker, Jill-I 105 5 ,211 Becker, Judith-11 223 Beckman, Ronald-IV 127, 184, 187 Becwar, Francis-11 113 Beer, Alois-11 121, 183, 188, 204 Bekele, Beyene-III 121, 195 Belec, Dennis-I 105 BELISLE, FRANK 87 Bell, Leland-I 105 Bembinster, Bette-11 113 Benitz, Lewie-11 113, 166 Benjamin, Rita-II 113, 205 BENTLEY, P1-IYLLIS 85 Benselnann, Alan-IV 127 Bents, Howard-11 113 Bents, Kurt-I 105 Berens, Kathleen-111 120 Berg, Eugene-111 121 Berg, Kathleen-1 105 Berg, Phyllis-11 113, 218, 220 Bergen, Judith-IV 127, 176, 180 Berger, Dennis-I1 113 Berglund, Richard-1V 127, 184, 197 Bernal, Anselmo-Grad 150 Berndt, James-111 121 Bethke, Robert-I 105 Betts, Peter-IV 127, 190, 198, 211 Beveridge, David-I 105, 201, 204, 222 Bickel, Patricia-1 105 Bien, Duane-111 127 Biese, Gerald-IV 127, 168, 199, 200 Bingham, Patrick-IV 52, 127 Birchler, Bob-111 121 Bird, Keith-II 113 Bird, Lynn-III 120 Bisbee, Joyce-1V 127 Bishop, Lawrence-111 121 Bispala, Theodore-I 105, 222 Bitters, Ronald-IV 127 Biwer, Ned-III 120, 157, 186 Blade, Lois-III 122, 179 Blaeser, Mike-111 157, 168, 188, 203 Blahnik, Edward-III 105, 120 BLAKE, FREDERICK 84, 204 Blaskovich, james-11 113 Blaskovich, Lee-I 105 Blattner, Stephen-11 113 BLAUG, LOIS 85 Bliss, james-I 105, 166, 202. 204 Block, Ernest-III 120, 170, 171, 186 Blomquist, Linda-I 105 Blowers, Bonnie-I 105 Blum, Rex-I 105 Blumer, Renee-I 106 Bock, Geraldine-I 105, 205, 222 Bockert, Dennis-II 157 Boda, jean-1 105, 222 Boehme, Kay-II 113, 204, 211, 212 Boehmke, Barbara-I 105 Boettcher, Kathryn-III 120, 178, 191 Bohman, Carl-II 113, 190 Boho, David-III 121, 157, 188, 203 Bolin, David-I1 222 Bolkcom, Virginia-I 105 BOLSTAD, DENNIS 87 Bordini, Jeanne-I 105 Borgen, james-III 183 190 Borgen, Joseph-IV 120, 125, 127, 148, 183, 185, 207 Bork, Evelyn-111 120, 223 Borne, Cynthia-III 120, 177, 178, 199, 218 BOSTVVICK, ROBERT 82, 156, 157, 168, 203 Bowe, Joanne-111 120, 179, 207, 211 Boyle, Donald-II 113, 171, 205, 208 Braaten, Jane-I 105 Brandt, Dorothy-III 120 Brandt, William-I 105 BRATLEE, AGNES 85 Bray, Lynette-I 105 Brede, Robert-11 13 Brenner, Charles-11 113, 185 Brenner, Joseph-III 120, 158, 186, 200 Brightsman, Barbara-IV 127 Brihn, Curtiss-1 105 Brinkman, Anna-I 105 225 Briski, Larry-IV 127, 186, 203 Brommer, Susan-III 120 Brovold, L. Sharon-I 37, 105 BROWN, IMO 84 Brown, Rudolph-II 118, 195 Brown, Ted-111 216 Brubaker, Suzanne-II 113, 180, 185, 210 Burmm, Mary-I 105 Brungraber, Richard-111 121 Brunstad, Nancy-II 113, 182, 218 Bryan, john-11 113 Bublitz, Thomas-I1 113 Buchanan, Barbara-I 105 Bucher, james-I 105 Buelke, Robert-IV 127, 187, 223 Buie, Kathleen-11 113, 194, 196, 219, 220, 221 Burchell, Alan-III 120, 218 Burmeister, Sally-11 74, 113, 180 Burt, David-IV 127, 192 Burton, Larry-11 113 Busateri, Charles-I 105 Buss, Gary-IV 127, 188 Buss, Lyle-IV 128, 166 Busse, Bonnie-I 105 Busse, Carol-I 105 Busse, Sheldon-1 105 Buswell, James-111 120, 192 Bulkiewicz, Richard-I 223 Butterfield, Cene-11 113 Buyarski, Thomas-IV 128, 189 BYRNS, LOIS 86 C Cain, 1-larry-IV 128 Campbell, Barbara Caldwell, Mary-111 120, 182, 193 -111 75, 119, 120, 179, 212 Canniff, Judith-II 113 Cardinal, Kathleen-III 120, 177, 180, 181 Carlson Clayton-I 105, 222 Carlson, Karen-I 105 Carlson Mary,-Xnn-II 114 Carlson, Roy-11 113 Carlson, Sandra-11 113, 154, 179, 207 Carpenter, Charles-II 113 Carr, Diane-I 105 CARRISON, CLARA 87 Casper, Frederick-I 105 Castleberg, Myrna-IV 128, Cave, Samuel-II 188 Chambers, David-IV 128 Chapman, Bert-1 105 Chase, Ellen-III 120, 196, 199, 205, 211, 212 213, 223 135, 182, 191 Chase, Sue-III 120, 180, 191 Cheng, Tien-ren Richard-Grad 150 Chiappetta, Richard-I 157 Chier, Richard-IV 128 CHINNOCK, DWIGHT 86 Christensen, Dennis-III 120, 196 Christensen, Joyce-IV 128, 148 Christiansen, Lila-1 106, 204 Christensen, Paula-IV 128, 218 Christensen, Russell-I 105, 222 Christianson, Dean-Grad 151 Christianson, Gary 173 Christianson, Kaye-III 120, 180 CHRISTIANSON, PETER 88 Christman, Irene-111 121, 195, 200, 222 Clark, Carol-I 106 Clark, Judith-IV 128 Clark, Nancy-1V 128, 182 Clark, 1'Vayne-IV 128, 187, 201 Climie, Barry-II 49, 113 Clough, Kendirch-11 113, 200, 201 CLURE, DOROTHY 86, 194 Coats, Shirley-III 120, 177, 182 Cochrane, Andrew-IV 120. 184, 198, 20 Coerper, Dewey-111 120, 208 Collenburg, Mary-I1 113 Collett, Sharon-I 105 Comparin, james-111 186 Conlon, Elizabeth-1 105 2 Conner, Kathryn-1 105 Connors, Paul-IV 189, 204 Cook, Barbara-1V 74, 128, 179 Cook, Roger-111 168 Duel, Jeanne-I1 114, 199, 218, 221, 222, 223 Duginske, Dennis-III 119, 120, 187, 190 Duginske, Eugene-I 157 Dunn, Marian-I1 114, 196, 199, 218, 220, 221 Dunn, Thomas-I 105 DYAS, EDWIN 87 Dzubay, Dwayne-IV 129, 187, 197, 211 E Edwards, Tom-I 105 Eger, John-I 105, 162 Ehlen, Rosemary-I 105 Ehrenreich, Harold-II 114, 168, 222 Eickelberg, William-I 75, 105 Einurn, Danny-I 105 Einum, jim-III 122 Ekelrnann, Russell-IV 202 Ekern, Karen-I 105 Elinger, Wayne-II 157, 159, 170, Ellefson, Larry-Grad 150 Ellis, Carole-II 114, 219 Ellison, Faith-II 114, 197 Engel, Tom-IV 185 Engelke, Robert-II 114, 184 Engstrom, Bryan-III 121, 185 Enloe, Jerry-II 112, 114, 190 ERDLITZ, IRENE 82, 220 Erdmann, Marilyn-II 114 Erickson, jean-I 106 Erickson, Joyce-IV 29 ERICKSON, KENNETH 85 Erickson, Sanford-IV 129, 172, 188, 203 Etscheid, Judith-II 114, 154, 179, 211 189, 203 Everts, Richard-111 20, 122 Ewert, Jeffry-I 105 F Faber, Christine-III 126, 180 Faber, Kenneth-III 121, 190 FACE, WESLEY 87 Fadurn, Cheryl-111 121 Fairchild, Timothy-I 106 FALKOFSKE, NOEL 87, 191 Farbotka, Tho mas-I 160, 162 Fausch, David-11 114, 223 Fauske, Idelle-IV 129, 181, 182, 197, 199 Fedie, Monica-1 106 Fedler, David-I 201 Fellinger, Virginia-III 121, 178, 199, 218 Fuller, Jeffrey-I 106 Fuller, Judith-I 106 G Gabrilse, Edward-I 106 Gaderlund, Anne-II 114, 214, 218 Galina, Bob-I 162 Gargwlak, james-I 106 Garrett, Jack-IV 130 Gartman, Mary Jo-II 114, 204 Gasperini, Linda-III 121 Gaudes, Ronald-I1 114 Geiger, Arnold-II 114, 184 Geiger, Michail-I 106 Geil, Mary-I 106, 218 Geiser, Janice-II 114, 220 Gelina, Robert-I 106 Geraets, Janice-IV 130, 199 GERBER, HENRY 85 Gerber, joseph-IV 130 Gereg, Patrick-I 157 Gerg, Thomas-I 106 Gerrish, john-I 106 Gerstel, Peter-III 121, 170, 184 Gerstner, Richard-IV 130, 183, 190 Geszvain, Gary-II 114 Geurink, Charles-I 106, 157, 166 Giege, Patricia-I 106 Gielow, Raymond-I 106, 222 Giencke, Theodore-I 106, 73 GIERKE, EARL 88 Gifford, Mary-IV 130, 179 Gigowski, Nancy-II 114, 211 Gilbertson, jean-I 106 Gilbertson, Zita-II 113 Gill, Sandra-IV 130, 199 Gilles, Linda-IV 130, 181, 199 Glennon, Margaret Ann-III 121, 195, Gniffke, Audrey-III 121, 178, 197 Godfrey, Gary-III 122, 186, 200 Godfrey, Jill-I 106 Goetz, Gary-I 106 Goldbeck, Gary-II 114, 171 Gordon, Nancy-I 106 Gorman, Mary-111 122, 181, 182, 200 Gospodarek, William-I 106 Gottschalk, Patricia-II 113 Grace, Peter-1V 130, 188 Graf, John-Grad 151, 187 212 Cooley, Robert-III 121, 168, 185, 187, 218 Coomer, jerry-II 121, 176, 183, 189 Corey, Sally-1 105 COTTER, BETTY 86, 193 Court, Linda-I 105 COURTNEY, WAYNE 83 COX, ELEANOR 84 Cox, Jacqueline-I 106 Craig, Lucy-1 105 Cropp, Walt-IV 157, 166, 167, 203 Crotteau, janet-II 114 Cruger, Loretta-IV 128, 179, 199 Cullen, Maureen-I 106, 220 Culliney, Joseph-II 157, 162, 168, 203 Curran, V. jill-111 120, 179 CUTNAW, MARY FRANCES 88 Cushman, Walker-III 120 D Dable, Patricia-IV 129, 182, 199 Daehn, Susan-I 105 Dahl, Elaine-II 114, 182 Dahl, Roger-I 105, 218 Dahlstrom, Eileen-I 105 Dahnert, Arlene-II 114, 217 Dallmann, Gloria-IV 129, 148, 179, 181, 194, 199 Daniels, Richard-11 118 Danielson, Susanne-I 105 Dannhoff, Donald-IV 129 Daubner, Gerald-I 105 Daughenbeugh, Richard-I 105, 223 Davis, Dwight-I 105 Dawson, Richard-I 105 Day, Maxon-I 105 Dealey, Robert-III 190 Deane, Donna-II 114 Dearth, Norman-IV 129 Decker, Jerrilynn-II 114 Degerman, Russell-II 114 Deininger, Barbara-I 106 DEININGER, MARIAN 86 De la Cruz, Zita- Grad 150 Delestry, James-III 121 Delph, Joyce-III 120, 178 Delzer, Marvin-I 105 Demske, Marsha-I 105 Derby, Paul-II 114, 157, 185 Derick, Norman-I 105 Derr, Frederick-I 105 DeVoe, john-I 105 DeVries, Catherine-I 105, 204 DeWa1d, Karen-IV 129, 181, 182, 196, 197, 211 DeWitt, Douglas-I 105 Dickson, jeff-II 114 DICKMANN, DONALD 83 Diehl, Gail-III 120, 178, 193 Diehl, Janet-II 38, 114, 218, 219 Dietenberger, joseph-IV 129, 189, 196, 198, 199, 200 Dillner, james-III 120 Dinges, Thomas-III 120, 157, 188, 203 Dionne, Robert-1 105 Disbrow, Sue Ann-II 114 Dix, Dale-II 114, 166 Dixon, Paul-I 105 Dolan, Patricia-1 105 Dollase, Sharon-II 114 Dombrock, Edward-1 105 Doner, David-IV 129, 198 DONLEY, MARY 88 Doornink, James-I 105 Dorow, Judith-111 36, 120, 182 Doughty, Grace-III 121, 180 Douglas, Thomas-I1 114, 184 Draeger, Kathryn-1 105 Dramburg, Barbara-III 120, 193, 197 Dregne, Darrel-II 114, 166, 186 Drengberg, Crystal-II 114, 199, 219, 220, 221 Dresler, Sharlene-111 120 Drezdon, Maryann-II 114, 180, 204 Driessen, Thomas-I 105, 202 Dubats, William-I1 114, 202, 211 Duebner, Kathleen-III 120, 182, 209, 211 Fencil, Diane-IV 108 Fenwick, Joanne-I 106 Ferdon, David-I 106 Ferlbak, John-I 208 Ferstl, Kolleen-IV 129, 182, 191 Fesenmaier, Patricia-IV 129, 148, 178, 181 Fesenmaier, Rosemary-11 113, 117 Fetzer, Anne-III 121, 180, 181 Fetzer, Steven-I 106 Feuerstein, Shirley-I 106, 217, 223 Fidler, John-III 121 Fiege, Patricia-1 202 Fiorentino, Nick-I 157 Fischer, Grace-IV 129, 200 Fisher, James-I 106 Flanagan, Marguerite-11 114, 204, 220 Fleming, James-111 121, 156, 157, 168 Fleskes, Theodore-I 106 FLUG, EUGENE 87 Foemmel, Janice-I 106, 223 Foemmel, joan-II 113, 223 Foley, Donna-11 114, 199, 211, 212, 218 Folz, Carol-I 106 Fortney, Karn-I 106 Frakes, Norman-11 114 Franti, Sarah-I1 113, 197 Frearichson, Dawn-111 Fredrickson, David-I 106 Freclrickson, Richard-1V 130, 157, 168 Freeman, Jacqueline-IV 130, 178, 181, 193 Freese, Geraldine-III 74, 121, 182, 193 Freiwald, Thomas-111 119, 121, 187, 189, 207 French, Linda-1 106 FREIDRICH, RICHARD 89 Frohleich, Carlton-III 122 Fruth, Robert-1 106, 162 Fuerst, Gabrielle-IV 130 Fuller, Charles-II 114, 204 226 Graham Graham Graham Gralow, Grambo , John-111 122 , Lawrence-Grad 151 Graham, , Patricia-II 114 Mary-1 106, 212, 219 Rebecca-III 121, 193, 212, , june-IV 130 213, 215 Grasse, Richard-I 106, 210 GRAY, THOMAS 88 Greaves, Arthur-111 122, 186 Green, Billie-I 106 Green, James-I 106 Gregg, Cynthia-IV 131 Gresk, Kenneth-IV 20, 131 Grosskopf, Kenneth-II 189, 204 Groszczyk, Margaret-I1 75, 114, 178, Groth, Maryfll 114, 178 Gru, Richard-I 106 Grube, Mary-I 106 Grudt, Sandra-IV 131, 222 Grundahl, Alice-I 106 Gubasta, joseph-I 106 Guenzel, Nancy-IV 131, 193 Gullickson, Edward-11 114 Gullickson, N. Anthony-II 114, 208, Gunderson, Sharon-IV 131, 179 Gygax, Howard-II 114 H Haase, 1fVi11ia1n-111 121 Hagen, Dorothy-I 106 Hugh, Clark-1 201 Hahn, janet-1 106 Hain, Robert--II 157, 170, 203 Halama, Elizabeth-11 114, 182, 199 Halama, Janice-III 121, 217 Halberg, Sandra-I1 113 Haldeman, Ruthanne-I 107, 223 206 2 11 Johnson Thomas W.-I 106, 157 HALFIN, HAROLD 89 Hallin, Ronald-I 106 Hallingstad, Paul-Grad 150, 201 Hallongren, Eugene-II 112, 157, 190, 207 HALVORSON, MILLARD 90, 194 Hamer, Bonnie-II 113 Hamilton, Marlys-IV 131, 178, 199 Hamilton, Marsha-I 106, 204 Hammill, John-Grad 150 Hammond, Marian-I 107 Hammond, Roger-I 106 Handrahan, Margaret-I 106, 217 Hanke, Ann-I 107 Hansen, Beverly-II 114 Hansen Gene-II 114, 222 Hansen Lois-IV 131, 180, 191, 202, 211 Hansen Ray-IV 20, 28. 131, 186, 202 Hansen Rita-III 121, 182, 220 Hansen Robert-Grad 151 Hanson, Dan-II 114 Hanson James-I 106 Hanson John-II 113 Hanson Loretta-IV 131, 181 Hanson Hanson Hanson Hanson, Orvis-II 171 Richard-IV 131 Sharon-I 107 Steve-IV 131, 188, 202 Hapl, Janet-II 113, 180 Haralsrud, Helen-II 114, 197 HARBOUR, MYRON 89, 184 Hardy, Glenn-III 166 Hardy, John-I 106 Hardy, Julie-II 113, 191, 223 Hargraves, Jerold-II 114, 173, 200, 216 Harlin, June-I 106, 219 Harmon, Barbara-I1 113 Harms, Barbara-Grad 151 Harms, H. Dennis-II 113, 202 HARPER, MARGARET 90, 221 Harrington, Mary-I 106 Harris, Phyllis-II 113 Harris, Tom-IV 211 Harrison, Joan-III 121, 199, 218 Harrison, Patrick-IV 131, 186, 198, 202 Hartert, John-I 106 Hartmann, Kathleen-I 106 Hartung, Mary-I 106, 223 Hartung, Richard-II 113 Haslow, Dennis-II 113, 185 Hassig, Janice-I1 113 Hanger, Marguerite-I 106 Haucke, Carolyn-I 106, 219, 223 Haugen, Richard-II 106 Haugh, Jerry-II 113 Hawkins, Donald-1 106 Hawlcinson, Dennis-II 113, 208, 210 Hayhurst, Robert-II 115, 162, 164 Hedler, Janet-IV 131 Heft, Maurine-I 106, 205, 222 Heidel, Paula-II 121, 180 Heidel, Phyllis-I 106 Helbig, Cassandra-II 113, 212, 213 Helgeson, Kathleen-I 107 Heller, H. Thomas-III 122, 188, 208, 212 215 Hemel, Harold-III 121 Hendrickson, Bonnie-I 106 Henning, Robert-II 114, 168 Henrikson, Donald-III 121, 185 Henry, Richard-III 189, 211 Hepperly, Brian-IV 131, 190, 198 Herbst, Gay-I 157 Herbst, James-I 106, 157 Herling, Dennis-I 106 Herm, Richard-I 106 Hernesman, Terrence-II 113 Herrick, Donna-IV 132, 177, 181, 182 Herrmann, Leonard-I 106 Hersbrunner, Donna-II 114, 180 Herwig, Joan-II 114 Heuser, Ivilliam-III 121, 146, 185, 215 Hicks, Vicki-II 114, 195, 211 Higbie, Shirley-IV 131 High, Clark-III 122 Hillman, Jerry-II 114 Hillman, Marvin-IV 132 Hilt, Jerome-IV 132, 187, 190, 198 Hinks, Donald-II 113, 201, 223 Hirte, Bruce-II 33, 114 Q 212 2 Hochwitz, Lynn-I 106 Hock, Gwendolyn-II 113, 212, 219 Hock, Joseph-I 106 Hodkiewicz, Robert-I 106 Hodne, Linda-III 121, 179 Hoepner, Otto-II 114 Hoverman, Sue-III 122, 178 Hoffman, Reuben-I 106, 223 Hoffman, Rita-I 106, 223 Hoffmann, Ida-II 114 Hofmann, Charles-IV 132, 189 Hofmann, Mary Jane-III Hohlweck, Joan-II 113, 204, 211 Hoiby, John-III 71, 121, 191, 201 Holm, Paul-II 114 Holman, Cheryl-I 106 Holt, LaVonne-II 113 1-Ioltsapple, Diann-I 106 Holubets, Gerald-IV 132, 186, 203 Hoover, Roger-IV 132, 189 Hopfensperger, Ruth-IV 132, 148, 177, 181, 191, 200 Horan, George-II 184 Horky, Karen-III 122, 178, 194, 204 HORN, FERN 90 Hornick, Anne-II 114 Hotchkiss, David-11 114 Hong, Martin-III 121, 190 Hovey, H. Allan-I1 113 Howard, Robert-I 106, 223 Howden, Thomas-IV 132, 186, 200 HOWISON, BEULAH 91 Hoyt, Georgia-III 122 Hull, Roger-II 113, 219 Hull, Ronald-II 113, 219 Hunger, Corrine-II 113, 220, 223 Hurban, Angeline-IV 132, 179 Hurban, Mildred-III 121, 179 Hursthouse, Tom-I 106, 170 Hussey, David-II 113 Hutchins, Sharon-IV 132, 182, 194 Hutchinson, Mary-I 106, 218, 222 Hutjens, Sharon-I 107 I Ingersoll, Judith-II 113 Inman, Lynn-III 121, 218 IVERSON, RALPH 80, 196, 207 J Jackson, LaDonna-II 113 Jacobs, Gerald-1 107 Jacobs, Paula-I 106 Jacobson, Dennis-I 107 Jacobson, Jeannie-I 106 Jaeger, Mary Ann-II 114, 217, 223 JAMES, MARGARET 91, 193 Janeczko, Robert-IV 132, 148, 190, 191 Janseen, Sharon-II 114, 223 JARVIS, JOHN 80, 187 Jaschob, Darleen-II 113 JAX, JOHN 91, 193, 202 Jeffries, Sally Ann-III 121 Jennings, Bonnie-I 114 Jensen, Chester-III 32, 120, 121, 185, 187 Jernander, Dorothy-II 114 JERRY, MICHAEL 89 Jessick, George-III 132, 171 Jessick, Kathleen-III 122, 180, 181, 193 Jilek, Michael-IV 107 Jobst, Richard-I 106 Jodar, William-IV 132, 184 John, Bill-II 113 John, Thomas-I 107, 222 l Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Kevin-I 107 Lee Ann-I 107, 204 Linda-IV 133, 223 Peter-11 114, 157, 162, 163 JOHNSON, RAY 61, 89 Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Richard J.-III 122, 184, 185 196 197 Richard O.-1 107 Robert-1V 133 Roger-I 107, 223 Johnson, Susan-III 122, 182 Johnson, Susan Hefty-IV 131, 148, 178 181 211 Johnson, Thomas M.-IV 131, 201 , Johnson, Johnston, Wi11iam-II 114, 202 Kathryn-I 107 Johnsen, Dianne-I 107 Johnson Charles-IV 132, 148, 185, 187, 203, 207 Johnson, Christine-II 114 Johnson, David P.-I 107, 204 Johnson, David S.-IV 132, 201 Johnson, Eugene-II 157 Johnson, F. Patricia-III 122, 178, 204 Johnson, Gerald-III 122 Johnson Jill-IV 132, 193 Johnson Joyce-IV 132, 179 Johnson Judy-IV 133 Johnson Karen-III 121, 193, 205 227 Jones, Janice-I1 113 Joynes, Glenda-I 107 Jungers, Patricia-1II 122, 193 Jusela, William-IV 133, 186, 187, 198 Jushka, Peter-IV 133, 188 K Kadinger, Diana-11 114 Kahl, George-IV 133 Kahl, Ronald-IV 130, 133, 188 Kalinoff, Demeter-IV 133, 184 Kalland, Faye-II 114, 197 Kane Roger-Grad 150 Kapellusch, Karen-HI 122 Kapsy, Robert-I 107, 222 Karasch, Karen-I 106, 222 Kardin, Caroll-III 122, 180 Kardin, Karen-III 122, 178, 222 Karlson, Karen-II 113 Keeler, James-II 114, 170 Keeler, Gary-I 106 Kegel, Donald-IV 133, 198, 202 Keipe, Marie-III 122 Keisler, Lance-II 114, 190 Keller, Larry-II 113 Kelley, Michael-I 106 KELLEY, DAVID 91 Kelly, Robert-I 106, 162 Kemmer, Judith-II 114, 178, 199, 216, 219 Kemper, Jane-I 106 Kempf, Lonnie-II 115, 211 Kennedy, David-II 114, 200 Kent, Beverly-III 122 Kenyon, Patricia-I 107 Keopple, Norbert-I 106 Kephart, Jeannette-II 114, 166 Keppen, Betty-I 107 Kerley, Eddie-II 113, 173, 184 Kernwein, Dianne-II 114, 178, 218, 220 Kesanen, Bryon-IV 133, 198 Kessey, Bryon-I 107, 170, 201, 223 Kieffer, Gary-I 106 Kiesow, James-II 114 Kilb, Kathryn-II 114 KILLIAN, MARY 99 Killinger, Gerald-III KIRK, ALICE 81 Klapste, James-II 113, 185 Klapste, Janet-IV 50, 133, 149, 177, 179, 191, 207, 211, 212, 218 KLATT, DICK 91, 202 Klatt, Gail-I 107 Klawiter, Genevieve-IV 133 Klawiter, Judith-IV 133, 223 Klein, Jack-III 122, 184, 198, 201, 204, 211 Klein, Sue-III 122, 180, 193 Klingbeil, James-I 107 Klingbeil, Joan-III 122, 195, 199, 222 KLITZKE, LOUIS 92 Klosterman, Ken-IV 133, 189 Kloth, Gary-I 106 Knabe, Nancy-I 107 Knauss, Barbara-IV 134, 194, 196, 211, 218, 222 Kneevers, Barbara-III 122, 177, 180, 193 Knigge, Edward-IV 134, 192, 201, 204, 219 Knight, Mary-II 113, 216, 219, 223 Knott, M. Earl-I 107, 208 Knox, Alice-II 114 Knutson, Ethel-IV 134, 181, 197, 199 Knutson, Jerrold-I 107 Koball, Wesley-IV 134 Koch, Mary-III 122, 179 Koeller, Melvin-III 134, 189, 198, 202 Koepke, james-I 106 Koepsel, Carole-I 107 Kofal, Edward-II 114, 171, 190 Koffarnus, Kathy-III 122 Kohoutek, Kathy-II 114 Kolander, Joanne-II 113 Koll, Ruth-III 122, 178, 204 Kopp, Frank-IV 171 Kopp, Paul-III 106, 170 Koshak, Gene-IV 134 Koss, Kay-I 107, 223 Kostman, Lois-III 122 Kott, Robert-I 109, 219 Kotzian, Jani-I 107 Kovaceuich, Mary-I 107 Kowieski, Lillian-IV 134 Koxlien, Russell-I 107 Kozikoski, Diane-II 113 Kraemer, Elaine-II 113, 199, 2 Kraiss, Robert-II 166 Krall, Pat-IV Krall, Ray-IV Kramas, Doris- KRANZUSCH, 134, 157 134 I 107 RAY 83, 192 Krause, William-I 106 Kreibich, Corinne-II 113 Kretschmer, Nancy-I 107 Kreyling, Larry-I 107, 222 Kroner, Jean-II 113, 180 Krueger, Carol-III 122, 182, 193 Krueger , Kay-I 106, 154, 194 Krueger, Otto-III 122, 186 Krueger, Sharon-III 122, 182, 193 Kruger, Robert-IV 134 Krull, Billy-I 106 Krysiak, Thomas-III 122, 173, 208, 212, KUBLY, O. CLIFFORD 89 Kuehl, Kathleen-I 107 Kuehn, William-IV 134, 202, 203 Kuester, Don-IV 134 Kuether, Elaine-I 107, 204, 222 Kufahl, Larry-IV 134, 202 KUFAHL, MARVIN 92 Kuns, Judy-II 122 Kunz, Ruth-IV 139, 179 Kuritz, Patricia-III 122, 199, 211 Kusmirek, Barbara-I 107 Kussmann, Marian-I 107 L Ladwig, Allen-I 109 Lahti, Jean-III 122, 179 Lamuska, DuWayne-I 202 Landsve Lang, C rk, Jerome-III 122 arl-III 122, 176, 189 Lang, Nancy-IV 134, 179 Lange, Susan--II 115, 222 Lange, Verna-I 109 LaPean, Theryl-II 114 Larkin, Donald-IV 134, 149, 190, 209, 211 Larsen, Lewis-II 122 Larsen, Patricia-III 122, 180 Larson, Gary-I 109 Larson, Gerald-I 107 Larson, Jerome-III 122 Larson, Karen-II 115, 222 Larson, Laurann-IV 134 Larson Rollin-II 114 Larsoni Russ-I 109 Laubenstein, Lois-III 122 Lauderdale, Margaret-II 115, 217, 223 Laudon, Sandra-III 123, 179, 211, 212, 2 LaVasseue, jon-I 109 Leary, jane-II 115 Lee, Beverly-I 104 Lee, Robert-Grad 151, 201, 214 Leeman, Nancy-I 109 Leeson, Clark-II 114, 204 Lehman, Clarence-I 109 Leicht, Sharron-II 115, 223 Leise1nann, Warren-II 114, 201, 223 Lemar, XfVayne-IV 135, 192 Lemke, Ronald-III 122, 218 Lempke, Donna-I 109 LENGFELD, LORNA 91, 191, 195 Lenz, Kenneth-IV 135 Leonard, Dennis-II 114 Leonard, Gary-IV 135, 190, 191, 192, 207 2 13 Leonhard, Donna-III 50, 122, 124, 179 Leruln, Dennis-II 166 Lervik, Dale-III 122 Lesch, Gerald-I 109 Leseh, Paulette-I 109 Lesch, Pauline-II 115, 211, 212 Lewens, James-I 109 Lewis, Barbara-III 122 Lewis, Judith-II 115, 216 Lewis, Loretta-III 36, 122, 182 Liebel, Robert-I 107 Lien, Paul-III 122, 190, 198 Lienau, Bernard-I 107 Lindberg, Dianne-I 109, 204 Lindberg, Wilfred-II 122, 189 Lindblom, Kathleen-I 108 Lindeman, Barbara-IV 135, 197, 199, 218 Linders, Gary-II 114 Linclow, David-II 114 McCulley, Curtis-III 122 McCurdy, Gail-II 115 McDonough, Michael-IV 136, 187 McGilvrey, Frederick-III 122, 188 McGinnis, William-IV 136, 171, 186, 203 McGuire, George-Grad 28 McMahon, Afton-III 122 MCMRUTRIE, ROBERT 92, 214 McNa11, Matthew-I 107 McNaughton, Donald-III 122, 168, 185, 203 Mehelich, Laurence-IV 136 Mehring, Thomas-IV 136 Meicher, Lawrence-II 115, 184, 223 Meier, Roger-IV 136, 190 MEILLER, ELLA JANE 93 Melby, Larry-III 120 Melchert, Margo-I 109 MELROSE, ROBERT 68, 88, 94, 96, 168 Mero, J. Timothy-111 122, 154, 190 Lindow, Kathie-I 109,190 Merwin, Mary-III 120, 122, 178, 181, 199, 2 Linneman, Daniel-IV 135 Metzger, Bonnie-I 109 LITTLEFIELD, SARAH 92, 194 Meudt, Mary-II 117, 179 Litvinoff, James-III 122, 198 Meyer, Jeanne-I 107 Lizotte, james-I 109 Meyer, joan-III 122, 218, 222 Lohr, Charles-IV 135, 157 Meyer, john-IV 136 Looker, Lola-I 108 Meyer, Marilee-IV 136 Loomis, Fred-IV 135, 157, 183, 186, 203 Meyer, Nancy-I 109, 205, 218 Loppnow, Linda-I 109 Meyer, Pamela-I 108 Lorence, Charles-III 122, 213, 212 Meyer, William-II 115 Lorenz, james-IV 135, 189 Meyers, LeaAnn-IV 137, 218, 221 Loughrey, Richard-I 71, 109, 205 Michal, Gloria-II 115, 222 Loushin, Terrance-IV 188 MICHEELS, WILLIAM 61, 79 Low, Jean-III 122 Micke, Sharon-III 122, 216, 217 Lowe, Barbara-I 108, 222 Mihalko, john-Grad 150 Lowe, jeneene-IV 135, 193 Mikunda, Gerald-IV 137, 189, 211 Lowe, Peter-I 114 Miland, David-IV 136 Lowe, Thomas-IV 135, 208, 210 Milio, Stephani-I 109 LOWRY, EDWARD 92, 190 Millard, Gladys-I 109, 217 Luck, Linda-III 122, 196, 205, 216 Miller, Carol-II 115, 178, 194, 200 Ludeman, Emmert-III 122, 162, 163 Miller, Georgia-II 115, 178 Lueck, Stanley-III 122, 190, 192 Miller, Gerald-I 101, 109 Luepke, jerry-IV 135 Miller, Harvey-I 107, 205 Lugar, Sandra-I 109 Miller, Judith-I 108 Lund, Kay-II 47, 115, 191, 216, 223 Miller, Marilyn-II 115 Lunde, Virginia-IV 135, 193 Miller, Mitchell-III 121, 157, 159, 188, 203 Lundy, janet-I 109 Millikin, Cora-II 115 Luther, james-I 109, 157 Minch, Dick-IV 125, 137, 189 Minch, Gloria-II 115 M Minto, Keith-I 107 MINTZ, DWAIN 93, 162, 163, 164, 203 Maas, Harriet-IV 136, 181, 182, 194, 199, 211, Mitchell, james-I 109 212 Mitchell, L. janet-III 122, 193, 221 Machovec, Carol-IV 136, 178, 194, 199, 200 Moberg, Leslie-II 109, 219 Machovec, Elizabeth-IV 136, 195, 199, 200 Moen, james-IV 137 Madary, jr., Paul-I 107 Monsen, 'William-IV 137, 219 Madson, Katherine-III 122, 222 Montag, Thomas-I 109, 222 Maeno, Joyce-II 115 Moran, Michael-III 122, 177, 185, 187 Mager, Karen-II 112, 115, 178 MORICAL, EDWARD 93 Maki, Carolyn-I 109 Morioka, Helen-IV 137, 181, 193, 194 Maki, Richard-III 198 Mortenson, Suzanne-III 122, 204 Maki, Russell-II 115 Mossholder, Nancy-IV 133 Makovec, Patrick-II 115 Mott, Glenn-I 122 Mallin, Sharron-IV 136, 195, 199, 212 Mousel, Larry-II 115 Mangert, Gerald-I 107 Mudgett, joan-IV 137 Mangold, Robley-III 122, 196, 216 Mueller, Adrian-IV 137, 183, 185 Manke, Marie-III 122 Muir, Edwin-I Manthei, Daniel-II 118 Mulatu, Sileshi-III 122, 195 Manthei, George-I 109 Munson, Sharon-III 122, 177, 182, 193 Mantik, Ruby-I 109 Mussell, Roger-IV 189, 199, 201 Marcella, Robert-II 114 Myers, I'Vi1burn-III 122, 187 Marcks, Nancy-IV 136 Marohl, Diane-II 115 N Marotz, XfVi11iam-II 114, 201 Marshall, Ann-I 109, 217 Naylor, james-II 115, 185 MARSHALL, ANNE 92, 178 Naylor, Marianne-I 109 Martin, Christine-I 109 Needham, Beverly-II 115, 218 Martin, Donald-I 109, 157 Nehring, Charllotte-II 115, 179 Marx, Robert-II 115, 184 Nehring, Nancy-IV 197, 217, 221 Mason, Carole-1 109, 219 Nell, Deanna-I 108 Massie, jean-II 115, 217 Nelson, Bonnie-II 112, 115, 180, 194 Mathison, VVayne-II 115 Nelson, Chris-IV 137, 191 Mathwig, Lesley-I 107 Nelson, Duane-I 109 Matzek, Robert-I1 115 Nelson, Janice-II 115, 178, 218 Mavis, lVIz1ryEllen-I 109 Nelson, John-III 205 May, Allan-III 136, 183, 186 Nelson, Kenneth-I 108 McCall, Barney-IV 136, 171, 205 Neubauer, John-III 157, 171, 186, 203 McCall, Bonita-I 109 Neumeyer, Elizabeth-IV 137, 181, 196, 199, 205 McClure, Harriet-IV 136, 181, 194, 199, 211 212 MCCOfmiCk, Pillll-I 107, 192, 223 Neuser, Sandra-IV 137, 180, 202 228 Nevin, Joan-II 115, 178, 212, 213 Newberry, Allen-II 115 Newman, Larry-1V 137, 189, 219 Nicklas, Joan-11 115, 179 Peterson, Alice-IV 138, 181, 196, 199, 205 Peterson David-IV 138 Peterson, Janice-111 123, 193 Peterson, Kathleen-I 108 PETERSON, RA LP H 93 Nicoll, John-I 108 Niederberger, William-Grad 137 Nielsen, Dorothy-1 108, 212, 219, 223 Nielsen, Karen-II 115, 212, 213, 216 NITZ, OTTO 84 NOBLE, ANN 95 Noesen, Kenneth-I 108 Noisen, Marcella-II 117 Noiler, Donald-II 115 Nord, Jeanette-11 115 Nordin, Carol-II 115 Noreen, john-II 208 Norman, Tom-II 115, 157 Norris, Gerald-I1 115, 173, 222 Norton, Judith-111 119, 122, 178, Noth, Dean-I 108 Nourse, David-IV 185, 222 Novotny, Pam-II 115 Nungusser, Patricia-I 108 Nurmi, Vance-III 122 Nygren, Chester-I1 115 Oas, David Oberpriller, ODEGARD, O -I 108, 162 Karen-IV 138, 180, EDFIELD 94, 223 193 OETTING, E. Offerdahl, Dennis-II 116 Olle, Thomas-III 122 Ollrogge, Mary-II 117 OLSEN, K. T. 96, 184 R. 92 Olson, Barbara-111 122 Olson Dean-I 108 Olson, jeff-II 116 Olson John-I 108 Olson, Marilee-IV 138, 177, 180 Patricia-I 108 , Shirley-1 108 Olsson, janet-I 108 Opsahl, Shirlee-IV 138, 193 O'Rei11y, Patrick-III 157, 188, Olson Olson 203 181, 194 194, 200 O'Rourke, Annette-I 108 Orsinger, Jane-11 117, 205 Orth, Harold-IV 138, 192, 205 ORTLEY, DONALD 95, 201 OSEGARD, DONALD 87 Osinski, Raymond-I 108 Osmanski, Camille-I 108 Osmanski, Roman-III 122, 184, 185 Ott, Robert-IV 138, 157, 203 Otto, Allen-I 109 OWEN, WILLIAM 84 Owens, Clyde-IV 138, 149, 190 Ozga, William-I 108, 162 P Pabst, Ruth-II 117 Packard, Janice-II 117, 209 Pagels, john-IV 138, 211 Palmer, Roger-I1 217 Papatriantafyllou, john-I 116, 191, 195, 198 Parochka, Bonita-III 123, 179 Parrish, Carol-III 123, 217, 218 Paske, Richard-111 122, 162, 188, 203 Passo, Darrell-II 117, 189 Passo, David-IV 138, 189 Paulus, James-IV 138, 157, 186, 203, 206 Pavlas, Mary-II 117 Payne, Patricia-I 109 Payne, Stanley-III 122, 188 Pearson, Donald-II 117 Pecha, Sharon-I 54, 109, 110 Peckham, Alan-III 120, 157, 186, 187, 207 Pedersen, Gale-II 117, 182 Pedersen, Lana-I 109 PEDERSEN, STELLA 81, 177 Pederson, Karen-II 117 Peichel, RoseMary-IV 138, 182, 200 Pendergast, Fred-IV 188, 198, 204 Pepper, Claude-III 122, 187 Perkins, Nancy-I 108 Perret, Janet-I 109 Peters, William-III 122, 198 PETERSON, RONALD 91 Peterson, Sue-111 123, 180 Peterson, Terry-I 157 Peth, Bryan-I 108 PHELPS, ROBERT 95 Phillipp, Buddy-11 117, 201 Phillips, Marilyn-I 109 PIERSALL, ARNOLD 94 Pitts, Beverly-11 117 Pitzner, Sara-111 124 Plansky, Paula-11 117 Pochanayon, Charlene-IV 138, 149, 199 Polarski, james-I 108 Pontillo, Cyril-11 157, 159 Potocnik, Karen-IV 138, 180, 199 Poulos, Linda-I1 123, 180 Prahl, Beverly-111 139 Preston, Carol-IV 139 Preston, jane-11 117, 178, 196, 200 PRICE, MERLE 80, 183, 196, 207 PRICHARD, NEAL 94 Prickette, Roger-II 116 Prideaux, Christine-I 109 Propst, Eldean-1 108 Ptacek, Miles-I 108 Q Quackenbush, joan-IV 139 Quall, Patricia-I 109 Quiegler, joyce--11 116 R Raap, Robert-I 108 Race, Warren-I 108, 215 Rada, Carol-I 108, 157 Rademacher, Gerald-I 116 Rader, Karen-11 117 Radosevich, Patricia-III 123 Raether, Don-I 109 Ragatz, Neal-III 122, 190 Raht, Karen-IV 139, 193, 195, 197 Ramaker, Kathryn-11 117, 179, 211 Ramberg, Duane-IV 157, 168, Rantala, Donald-1 108 Rasmussen, Robert-1 109 Rassbach, Geraldine-IV 139 Rassbach, Richard-IV 139 Rathert, james-111 121, 184, 190 RAT1-IKE, MARY 95 Rathsack, Dorothy-111 123, 195, 199 Rebne, james-I 109, 162 Reeves, Charles-I 108 Reid, Robert-II 156, 157, 159 Reindl, Dale-I 109 206 Reindl, Nancy-IV 139, 149, 180, 193, Reinmuth, MaryAnne-IV 139, 193 Reiter, Donna-111 123, 182 RENESON, MATTHEW 97 Renman, Barbara-111 123 Reseld, Louise-IV 139, 211, 212, 213 Retzloff, Gerry-IV 139, 187 Reynolds, Gary-I 108 Reynolds, Nancy-III 123, 193, 197 Rhiel, Sara-IV 139, 179 Rhodes, Karen-II 117 Richardson, james-IV 139, 186, 187 Richmond, Sharon-IV 139, 199 Richter, Marlene-I 108 Riebau, Peter-III 71, 123 Riedel, Corene-I 109, 223 Riesenberg, Gary-II 117, 217 Riha, Karen-I 108, 211 RIMEL, EVELYN 94 Rimkus, Frank-I 108, 161, 162 Ripley, Douglas-I 108 Rithamel, Judy-II 117, 182 Ritzen, Spencer-II 116 Robers, Jerome-I 110, 166 Roberts, Glyn-I 108 Roberts, Rachel-I 108, 212, 219 Roble, Judith-11 118 229 181, 195, 212 Roble, Roger-IV 139, 189 Robotka, Evelyn-111 180 Rocklewitz, Richard-II 116, 190 Roder, Ben-III 123 Roder, Richard-1 170 Rodger, Judy-I1 116 Rodgers, Roberta-I 109 Roecker, John-II 215 Roessler, Richard-IV 139, 203 Rogers, Edward-I 75, 109 Roggow, jean-I 109, 217 Rohde, Thomas-I 108 Roles, Robin-I 110, 223 Romanek, Richard-I 157 Romatowski, Leon-I 108 ROSE, CHARLOTTE 84 Rose, Richard-IV 189 Rosebrock, Victor-I 108, 157 ROSENBERG, HARRY 94 Rosenow, Karl-III 122 Rosenow, Paul-I1 122 Rosenow, Virginia-IV 139, 193 Rosenquist, Richard-1V 190 Rosenthal, Alan-111 190 ROSENTHAL, MRS. JANE 96, 182 Ross, jo-1 108, 217 Rossmeier, Anne-I 109 - Rossmeier, joseph-II 116, 201, 222 Roth, Judith-I 109 Rotzel, joan-I 75, 108, 216 Rowe, Geraldine-IV 179 Rowe, Jerry-IV 139, 196, 212, 214, 218 Roy, james-I 109 Rubner, Stuart-I 109 Rude, Ann-I1 117, 212 RUDIGER, E. ROBERT 95 Rudisell, Kathlyn-III 123, 178, 219 RUE, K. L. 97 Ruege, jane-IV 140, 193 RUEHL, PHILIP 94, 187, 201 Rueter, Gene-II 117 Rumocki, Kathleen-1 73, 108, 211 Rupnow, Robert-II 116, 202 Rusch, Sandra-111 123 Rust, Patricia-11 116, 195, 218, 221 Ruth, Orris-1 108 Ryun, Edgar-1 109 S Saatkamp, Gary-IV 140, 185, 192 Sabatke, 1Nayne-III 117 Sabota, Roger-III 53, 119, 123, 185, 187 Sacharski, john-1 110 Saelens, Dennis-I 110 Sagstetter, Robert-IV 140 Sajnog, Richard-I 71, 157 SALYER, GUY 92, 184 SAMPSON, JACK 83, 205 Sampson, jo Ann-IV 140, 191, 193 Sands, Carole-1V 139, 180 Sandvig, Dale-I 109 Sanger, 1'Vayne-II 117 Santarius, Karen-IV 140, 178 SATHER, ROBERT 96, 212, 214 Satterfield, Caro1-I 109 Sautebin, Thomas-I 111 Sawyer, Clair-II 117 Sawyer, Paul-I 110 Sawyer, Robert-I1 189 Schaefer, Roger-IV 140, 189, 203 Schaller, Ada-IV 140 Schaller, Georgine-IV 140 Scharf, Judith-II 117 SCHEMANSKY, GERALD 96, 208 Schendel, Vivian-I 109 Schesel, Harold-I 110 SCHESVOLD, ROBERT 95 Schipper, Michael-I 157 Schlegel, Myra Ann-II 117, 215, 217, 2 Schlei, Donald-IV 189 Schlottman, Carolynn-I 110 Schlumpf, James-1V 133, 141, 195, 222 Schlumpf, Sue-II 117, 179 Schmid, Richard-I1 116 Schmid, Thomas-1 104 Schmidt, Bernard-II 117 Schnabl, Janice-111 123, 179 18, 222 Schneck, David-111 122, 204 Schnedier, Schneider, Schneider, Schneider Schneider Bill-1 110 Delbert-1 109, 162, 204 Elizabeth-1 109, 219 Gerald-111 188 LeRoy-II 117, 222 Schnell, Arthur-1V 141, 223 Schnell, Robert-I 109, 223 Schoemer, Thomas-IV 141 Schoenberger, Larry-III 34, 121, 185 Schoendorf, Barbara-IV 141, 180, 193 SCHOEPP, E. J. 99 Scholze, Lois-1 111 Schorer, Jim-IV 141 Schottmuller, Bruce-111 157 Schrank, Holly-111 123 Schreck, Karl-1 117 Schreiber, William-III 124 Schroeder, Ronald-IV 141, 187, 200 Schubert, Ronald-IV 141, 149, 150, 187, 190 Schuette, Patricia-I 109 Schuler, Myron-I 109, 223 Schultz, Alfred-II 157, 187 Schultz, Irene-111 124 Schultz, Karen-II 117, 220 Schultz, Lynette-1V 141, 199, 221 Schultz, Robert-I1 117 Schultz, Slyvia-IV 141, 179, 199 Schulz, Kathryn-II 118, 182, 204, 217 Schulz, Kenneth-IE 117 Schuster, Diana-I 109, 222 Schutt, Donald-IV 141, 185, 187 Schwaller, Tony-I 109 Schwartz, Kay-I 110 Schwengels, Yvonne-I 109, 217 Schwibinger, Arthur-111 122, 184 Schwister, Phillip-I 109, 204 Seggelink, Frederick-IV 130, 141, 160, 162, 164, 168, 188, 203 Seibert, James-IV 189 Seiler, james-III 122, 201, 204, 219 Seiler, Renee-I1 117, 204, 218 Seis, Davis-I 109, 157 Seitz, James-II 116 Selig, Thomas-I 109 Severson, Judy-I 111 Severson, Larry-I 166 Severson, Sharon-I 110 Shanahan, John-II 112, 189, 204 Sharkus, Charles-IV 141, 189, 209, 210, 211 Sharkus, Patrick-I 110 Shirazi, Mehdi-I 111 Shiroma, Masahiro-I 110 shiu, Emily-1V 141 Shotola, Barbara-IV 71, 141, 185, 191 Shukle, William-II 117 SIEFERT, EDWIN 96 Siegel, Lois-1V 141 Sievert, Mary-III 120, 180, 217 Sihsmann, Annamarie-III 123, 193, 195 Sill, Marilyn-I1 118, 216, 223 Simonson, Carol-I 110, 211 Simonson, Gary-IV 141, 187, 188, 203 Simpson, Donna-II 116, 212, 217, 218, 220, 221 Simpson, john-III 122 Skoog, Patricia-II 123 Slane, Robert-II 117 Slattery, Robert-I1 116 Smasal, Maxine-I 110, 223 Smedstad, Randall-I1 117, 185 Srnet, William-11 117, 218 Smit, Gene-III 123 SMITH, MRS. BENITA 95 Smith, Dan-1 111, 205, 223 Smith, Daniel-IV 170 Smith, David C.-II 118, 171, 192, 222 Smith, David N.-IV 142 Smith, David V.-I 110 Smith, Gerald-IV 142 Smith, Janice-111 124, 180 Smith, Kathryn-I 109 Smith, Muriel-I 109 Smrcina, Mary-II 117, 179 Snyder, Cynthia-I 110 Snyder, Steven-I 170 Sobczynski, Patricia-I 110, 204 Sobotta, Ruth-II 117, 223 Socha, Jerome-1V 142 SODERBERG, GEORGE 96, 189 SOMMERS, WESLEY 95 Soppeland, Wayne-II 116 Sorenson, Terry-I 109, 222 SPARGER, MAX 82, 157 Spargo, Carolyn-111 122, 178, 181, 194, 199, 218 Spath, Marcia-I 109 Spath, Sandra-III 123, 179, 194 Sprecher, jean-1 110, 217, 219 Staebell, Robert-I 109 Staehling, Davidfl 37, 109 Stangi, Thomas-I 111 Stanley, AnnaMae-IV 142 Stark, Robert-II 118 Steele, Elaine-I 109, 222 Steensland, Ruth-111 123, 180, 193 Steffen, Jerome-I 222 Stein, David-1V 142 Steinbach, Marilyn-1V 142, 180, 199 Steinke, Barbara-11 117 Steinman, Leigh-Grad 150 Steinmetz, Jane-I 109 Stella, Michael-I 157 Stelter, Richard-1 110 Stenz, Sheila-II 117, 179 Stephens, Clairice-III 123, 205 Stephenson, Donald-IV 142, 185 Stern, Thomas-I 109 Steubing, Karen-I 109 Stevens, Diane-I 117 Stillman, Karl-I1 116 Stoddard, Richard-I 111, 170, 201 Stoelb, Martha-IV 142, 180, 211 Stoffel, Robert-II 117 Stolp, Sandra-I 109 Stolzel, Donald-I1 118 Strasser, JoAnn-11 36, 118 Streif, John-I 116, 202, 217, 218 Strohbusch, Gretchen-IV 142, 179 Strohbusch, Mark-I 110 Stroup, Thomas-I 109 Sucharski, Diane-IV 132 Suckow, Janet-II 118, 204, 216 Sugden, Robert-IV 33, 142, 185, 187 Suhrke, Virginia-I 110, 219 Suksi, james-III 120, 189 Sumida, Masayoki-I 109 Sund, Bruce-1 109, 222 Sundstrom, Richard-II 117, 190 Surguy, Steven-I 111 Svejcar, Judith-IV 142, 181, 182 Swanson, Gayle-II 116, 217, 219 SWANSON, ROBERT 96 Swanson, Sue-111 122 Sylte, Judith-I 110 Sylvester, Canute-Alvin-II 117 Symuk, Eugene-I 157 Syring, Charlotte-IV 142, 199 T Tacke, Enola-I lll Tanck, David-1 111 Tappe, Gale-II 118, 170 Tarira, Raphael-I 111, 195 Tauring, Robert-11 195 Taylor, Karen-I1 118 Taylor, Michael-IV 142 Tedman, Florence-I 110, 216 Tegt, Florence-I 110 Ten Haken, Larry-II 118 Teppen, Paul-III 123, 204, 218 Teufel, Timothy-1 108 Thompson, Gary D.-IV 142, 198, 218 Thompson, Gary G.-1V 142, 185, 203, 204 Thomsen, Charles-111 68, 124, 188, 208, 212, 214, 223 Thoreson, Harland-IV 143, 185 Thorpe, Carol-II 116 Thorsander, Ellyn-111 124 Tibbetts, Michael-I1 118 Tichy, Elvina-I 111, 217 Tiede, Richard-111 122, 185, 187, 211, 215, 216 Tietel, Catherine-I 111 Tietz, Gerald-I 110 Tillotson, H. Roberta-II 116 Timm, Barry-II 111 Tipple, Susanne-I 110 Tlusty, Lois-III 123 Toth, Ferenc-IV 140, 143, 190, 215 230 Towslee, Marcia-111 123, 182, 193 Tracy, Harold-I 110 Trahms, Betty-I 110 Trainor, William-11 116 Trautmann, Virginia-111 124, 177, 179, 194, 207 Trautner, Edward-I 110 Trewartha, Carole-I 110 Trinh, Nguyen Hoang-Grad 151 Tripp, Phylis-II 118, 205 Trost, Tom-III 125 TRULLINGER, GLADYS 96 Tubbs, Miriam-1 111, 205, 218 Turner, John-I 111 Twesme, Thomas-II 118, 217, 223 Tyndall, Norman-I 110 Tyriver, Mary-11 118, 178, 216 U Udovich, Geraldine-111 123 Uher, Arthur-111 124, 203 V Valitchka, Francis-I 110 VAN ALLSBURG, MARY 97 Van Amber, janet-I 110 Vandeberg, Scott-I1 Van DeHei, Donald-111 123, 192 Vanden Boom, Len-IV 143, 189 Vander Schaaf, Randy-I 111 VANEK, MRS. ALYCE 97, 182 Vanek, Carol-1V 143, 181, 182 Van Matre, Janice-I 111 VAN NESS, HAZEL 97, 194 Vasey, William-III 123, 187, 188, 207 VASEY, MRS, WYLA 182 Vater, Alan-III 124, 186, 191 Vavra, Eugene-II 118, 157 Veenendaal, LaMont-IV 143, 185, 192 Vier, James-II 118 Vodden, Kenneth-I 111, 205 Vogt, Craig-1 111 Volbrecht, Karen-111 124 Vrabel, Marcia-1 110 Vrana, jean-11 116 YV Wagner, Barbara-111 124 1'Vagner, Myron-I1 118 Mfagner, Sandra-11 116, 196, 205 Wahl, Shirley-I 110 Waidelich, RuthAnn-II 116, 182, 220, 221 'Waite, Morris-I 111 Walasinski, Bob-I 110 1'Valdock, Robert-IV 123, 184, 192 YVa1dschmidt, Kathy-II 116, 154, 211 Walker, Barbara-11 116, 178 Xvalker, Brian-111 124, 190 1'Va1ker, C-ary-IV 143 WVa11, Dolores-I11 124 WALL, G. S. 97 WALLEY, MRS, BARBARA 97 1'Va11gren, P. Christine-I 111 Mfalters, Wayne-111 124, 186 1'Vambold, David-1 111 VVard, Margaret-I 111, 217 Warren, George-I 111 1Varren, James-11 118 Washburn, john-1V 143 WATSON, WARREN 89, 219 WVay, William-11 157, 162, 163, 188, 203 Weaver, June-I 111 Weber, Gary-I1 118 1Vegner, Shirley-I 111 Weidman, Janice-1 110 Weidman, VVillia1n-11 118 Weiss, Jack-I 110, 218 Weiss, jill-I 110 Weiss, Judith C.-1 110, 125, 143, 178 Weiss, Judy A.-IV 149, 177, 199, 200 Wendorff, Gary-11 118, 190 VVenger, Dee Ann-111 123, 195, 199, 221, 2 11Venz1er, Diane-II 116, 178, 218 Werley, Paul-11 118 Wermuth, Dorothy-III 124, 193 Werner, Robert-I 111 Westphal, Carolyn-I 37, 110 Wetzel, jane-I 111 Mfeyenberg, Jerome-11 118 Whelchel, Bruce-IV 143 Whelen, Mary-111 122, 178, 181, 193, 207 White, Charles-III 124, 219 Whitmore, David-I 110 Whittier, George-I 111 WHYDOTSKI, LLOYD 97, 208, 209, 211 Whyte, jill-1 110 Whyte, Sandra-111 123, 179 WIEHE, THEODORE 97, 198 VViese, Shirley-IV 143 WIGEN, RAY 81 Wikkerink, Judith-IV 143, 217, 218, 221 1rVi11ia1ns, Haven-I11 35, 124, 184, 202, 208, Williams, Marvin-11 118, 222 WVILLIAMS, MARY 89, 182, 193 Williams, Roger-111 123, 170, 201, 223 1fVi11oughby, james-11 118 Wilson, D. Ann-111 71, 123, 204, 212, 222 WILSON, ROBERT 88, 97 Winterfeldt, Henry-I1 116, 117, 185, 215 VVirsing, Gloria-I1 118 211 Witeck, james-I 111 Witt, Donald-111 186 Witt, Janice-IV 143, 191, 199, Witt, Marilyn-II 116 Mfittstock, Nancy-1 111, 223 Wittwer, Stuart-I 110 Wojcik, Leroy-1 110 Wojtkiewicz, jeremy-I 110 Wolf, Ronald-IV 114 Wolske, Ken-111 124 Mfolslegel, David-III 122, 184 VV01111, Anita-I 111 Wormet, Dorothy-II 116, 182 Wortock, Robert-11 118, 190 1fVurz, Russell-I 111 Wyatt, Mary-Iv 144, 178, 181, Wyrwas, Patricia-I 111 Wyss, jack-I 104 200 210, 211 199 Wyss, Sharon-IV 125, 138, 144, 149, 154, 179, 194, 199, 206, 207, 211 Y Yziginuma, Naomi-1 111, 217 Yamato, Stanley-IV 144, 191 231 Young, Erlyn-111 123 Young, Lesslie-I 109 L Zache, Carolyn-111 124, 218 Zarden, Thomas-11 118, 170 Zavada, Betsy-IV 144 Zavada, jerry-1V 144 Zawistowski, joan-11 118, 178 Zawistowski, William-I 110 Zenda, Judith-1 111 Ziarnik, Sandra-III 124, 200 Zibell, Carol-II 116 Zibell, Marlene-11 180 Zibell, Sandra-I 110, 118 Zich, Marian-1 111 Zickert, Robert-111 124 Ziegler, Joyce-11 180 ZIEMANN, NORMAN 90 Zilisch, jean-IV 144, 181 Zilisch, John-111 204, 216 Zirbel, Cheryl-I 111 Zuelzke, james-I 111, 201 Zuerlein, john-11 116, 178 Zurawski, Richard-IV 144, 189 211


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University of Wisconsin Stout - Tower Yearbook (Menomonie, WI) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

1960

University of Wisconsin Stout - Tower Yearbook (Menomonie, WI) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

1961

University of Wisconsin Stout - Tower Yearbook (Menomonie, WI) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Stout - Tower Yearbook (Menomonie, WI) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Stout - Tower Yearbook (Menomonie, WI) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Stout - Tower Yearbook (Menomonie, WI) online yearbook collection, 1967 Edition, Page 1

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