University of Tennessee Knoxville - Volunteer Yearbook (Knoxville, TN)

 - Class of 1938

Page 1 of 365

 

University of Tennessee Knoxville - Volunteer Yearbook (Knoxville, TN) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 365 of the 1938 volume:

Z, J.. X U I '-'.J?5T.3',,5, , ., .x.... .-1-' ' -2,113.2-L -.ifzLa-'1f"'..- 1-, .1 7 -' 7 .,5. -1 f .-.I 'I 'wg-f .- . . .i :Z ' ' . 4. 33 X ,- ,W . I '55i,g53,-f- "1s.,,Lf4'??' 5I:I Tg:',1"' If :I gig, ' f I 5 . . .W-,-,Q I .-.H '- V ff-f -- fy 23.5-,I . A ,v . gp . I. A .-e1'.w'+ -1-N-fe- ,- : - -.f .J ww, -V - l . - , . ,+.-w1.'-fy:-g'?fA.4t,-Q? '.-f-+,-f A," :--.-niiP:yg11- . , . , f f. V- , A 4 .Arr-: gf y "-. - ': -PG wt'-9.9 " 0 ' ' . -' -' -- ' .. f , .NIJ In. ... . , , 4. . f . .. .,.,33ANI.., -. I. ' " .'-IT Eff "I-" ,II II '!L7""" " Q -: 1 H H I K !i 1 2 H' 7 If 'K JL""' if.-' ",-V" .,,,., .., ' 'fvg ' -.-5' -. . - H 1,5--A . -1,1 .' 3-.I. .I , 1- 1 -3- If " ' .., . . if 'Mat " I L 1 Ig I' f 4' , .J I I f ' . I I I ' . - ' I.-,Z 1 .,.- I Q' . '- 1 I-. , - Jrrl -."' : " " - ' . . I. , 'ZPTQQ-f'.-' J 513.4 '. - I:--q 4 I4 I . ', -:. .' A . A A ,,.., ,I J ir F 4 ' V' .' W. . ' ' ' '1 . '- .S .T . I - , - -.1 .. I 5 : I 7 '. - .fi 1 'f' n- .53-, - . , -.A I ' fa . 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I, , , gr: H- ,1 X, .-.- . . 1 w W -35 ' 97- 5: -,, C: .i g n fy .f .. I V -. Ex.YlKaM4lwf'.a1 ' 1 ,KM ,, ...., fa' 1 , ,.,. ' , , .M ,- 1 J.. W S- -, Y Q . f .V ,., ,. ,- X, if .- .1 , .Gy ,, ., Y V . , . J ' f p Li, X - , .M- gr - - '- -- "" " figm- I .,.-51... 1--r-' fg--.-11-.5:..v 5,-,V ,It ,?iT:,:,.,.,,', -.kL-,-V... ,- .. . . , , - , ""' ' ' ' Q 'ZQ " 'Lt-. """' " ' " - " '-K ', , - -,--.'--N .- M - . , . - -- - --V ,.,. . .-4.1- wr ,.- G 0 P Y P1 I G H T l 9 5 8 WILLIAM S. IAGUB GRAY IUNES l EDITQR MANAGER ,,,.,m,,,......v.-. -. f.-,V-ff-ff-5-1--171151:--'-'f-?f'T-FT' - -- uf'-'N ' ' " ..,. .. Q rom the days of the ancient Greeks an their idolatrous awe of light, mankind has experienced pa grdual but profound ange in attitude toward this all-powerf ul fo . Paralleling his ' nificant evolution of outlook and integra with it in a cause effect relationship is the trend of man 'ntellec- tual progress. To the imaginative. d speculative Greek, the mysterie! surrounding nature str forcibly on the mind, and its phenomena on the senses. t feeling of alarm at the 1. r crashes of thunder, of gladness at lght of day, of terror in the darkness of night, and of the st of the dark- ness of death persists today. To Pheidias, Homer, and Aeschylus no works of science afforded such majestic occurrences. d ln such a primitive condition of life, perhaps nothing regarded of greater, importance or more mysterious in its nature than iire. lts beam dispelled the dread of darkness, and its warmth removed the chill of winter. The fire of the hearth was the center of domestic: life. 4 At the forge tools and weapons were fashioned. lt was an emblem of the life of man, with its flash and sudden extinction on one hand and the illumination of its prolonged blaze on the other. ln storms it was seen descending from the sky, and in volcanic eruptions it was seen issuing from the earth. The source of it all was readily believed to be in the close keeping of As man increased his control over ight in he began to regard it with less awe. Respect for its utility gradually replaced the dread of its power. Fear of this mysterious force waned as a natural effect of the growing familiarity with the cause of the i me p 1 osophers who looked b evements of ' ' c or truth recognized this correlation. Consequently, light today has become the symbol of achieve- ment in all fields of learning. ,f XX I Z ,ggi . t 5 J K . I K fff JV' ,ffl ff KV' ,M f V f I ff if lf' XI X a f f 1 If X f J kk X X f! X X 1 K X l x K X X x 1XXx X , R xx X N x X XX X! ,xv X K. N X xxx .X K x ,XXX s g? x X X Wf ,X -. X. X x X xx ---5-.L ff 4 Z L 1,2 4 ,Q ff X nf' I A K 1 1 XX If I XJ X ff!!! X, If If ff! f K K A , f if O l"" dia X0 Wag Vw K ,K X X .W R N , 9 0 1 Z. ' X 0 Q gf y. K, 'I . AV C100 ,E 1 J N 4 fy.. 1-,, OOC: D N, ,I 3.1 X fix"-..fQ3C5fR,5 fZA3,Gf1 f-Sf ELS f X an So, QAQQK-X? 'QQ I E39 'IXUS I5 ' QPR I I :fv443'331!'f-f,:i'i"'FI1'j5if'55:I'I .f - ', -. ,fp fl ' ' W4-x . ,I MXL wbif, I. -A .V , f-5 O Cb, ,. J -N,-Nni-WMA-HJ.,-'.A,, q.5,,,,,-Avi- "kg--K. C 000 wrffi fx! ff! X - ffifn, ff . n Q.. J md . , 1' - .EEL ,Q-.1,,,, givfxyrfffk'--f'4' FII Fra ., ,, 53' ,,:' , Ii. ',,g.f.-, ig, -E f t -. 1 xxx. .v iQ:,?L?5, My Egg .- Y . I, If, . A . L Xu , 1, Y ,,:g1.,:1v.' :, N fn , V A 3-,x , ff -I ,,es'?Lf2'T'-',y 1 ' ,,,,f" ' - ' I , if ' ' , " - M ' IQ 152 fwnifff Il3I.24-pff 3 ,Lg-:9'2f""'x,f I' ,fm ,f If .fi 'gf -ff' X, l, I E7 , 21, I 1 5 I. , -1,4-, . np - In r'7. .117 ' " 447' X 'ii ,pw . ff ,kr of fig:--' If 1 -' 7, .cf f 1" 7. If v J' X! !,. fy. Sum I, 1 X 1 4 4. ,f f IJ OFFICIAL YEAPIB OF Tl-IE Uni SIII of TSIIIIS BLISHED BY T I-IE U U I4 A I1 I I l Me 4534! - 51 Q Q 5 UNIVERSITY UF TENNESSEE PUBLIS ASSOCIATION, ING. . ,y . -1: ' .. ' 151352 5,-22.16 " .f uw 2' 2.- 5' f'.!f!.:g,l3f ING Ie' ' I Ali-f i'-' 94- , 5 S. 'Eff' I-I" Light and truth as co existent principles 1n the search for an lnterpreta tion of life are lnseparably lnculcated 1n the heritage and purpose of the University of Tennessee Throughout our college curricula there IS a and tradltlonal ceremonies based upon analogous associations with llght Durlng the week of orlentatlon, each freshman IS passed at the annual Torch Night service a lighted taper, the Torch of Preparation The pro gresslve ldeallsm lnstltuted there lS expressed ln the bronze symbol of The Volunteer which carries aloft The Torch of Learning, a slgnlficatlon of the ultlmate goal of a college career Upon graduation, the parting student pays homage to light and truth 1n the somber Aloha Oe ceremony in which there IS exchanged the burning .Light of Development for the Torch of Service, with which each individual takes his place in a world of application. W i Because of its associations in the history of the human race in its quest symbolization of the school's educational aims in the form, of colorful QT-1-,:-E.. 1- -Q x for knowledge and in the traditions of the University of Tennessee, the 1933 Volunteer presents as its theme the symbolical interpretation of light. . A.. 541' v, . . . m 5' rg' 0 ,b -it I :gn 'f CONTENTS JALEIA NlAT1EB M I LI T A R Y ATHLETICS P EAET HIRE S AlITI'VlT'IES ORGANIZATIONS ADVERTISEMENTS "fur I' 1 V Af,-.fm W. . 3 - - AJ, ,,..4... Y. . EDICATION To Mrs. Brown Ayres, wife of the late Dr. Brown Ayres, presi4 dent of the university, and beloved figure in collegiate activi- ties f or many years. During her residence on the campus she added dignity and refinement to the atmosphere of the Hill. The faculty and students alike sought her advice- and opinion concerning the problems of a developing university. Always alert to the immediateg and essential needs of the institution, Mrs. Ayres was one of the founders of the Faculty Women's Clubwhich served as a center of social activity at Tennessee. After the death of the president she remained on the campus as advisor to women. Even today Mrs. Ayres maintains a 7 K deep and understanding interest in collegiate affairs. Her radiant personality still lends that same charm to present day ,v' university activities. ' The Volunteer is indeed honored to be able to dedicate this f orty-first edition to a devoted mother, a sincere friend, and an unsurpassable supporter and en- thusiast of the University of Tennessee. gs:'2i-h-q,,nf jf 1 ,i Q Q 11,73 -N if ,4 R . l. M ,Tl 1 ' .4 5 T Y - . ., , A 'lj , --' ' I .3 .i . - . c" 'g, J A L' 1 Q. ,HH 'gf J' ig:-, rf ' X ' ,, TP: guy 'Ml-1 :.11' ..-- t r " .1 , XI , , - if-in Ji P' x ..,. ' "' "W .. - - . A .,-,-.:..w. i f - dy ' ' 1 ""' H - , ' 1-, ir ' n 'im x . . . i . -wid! n l ff Y' 7 Wy 1 if 1' .I ' Q ' I ' lr ll.. 5 I - '-' an , KN 4 if -- .BRO N YRE vioxx VJN ,fU.Vl7 S 5 , "w 0 A , I ,, "3 Q 4 O4 Cp 1"-Q' ogfe 71.57 " W 0 i 0 9 'J 1'-3 ' ' Q 33 - Y! LL 3 an U G w LN 0 f U 9 4 'J' 'N xvvf 'J ov,-U N 2 FS UNH y N J C ff A, v k SL-ff Q IO Of VO l LST. ,A P . Lf'7 , M- nxv-gliya - ' 5,111-if:-5"' "' 'T'?"N'A?'k--MN ,f-fM:"? 'Q "Tv-NN ' :slsfgmfiff-'if75A"'Zr, M Q .. U 5 5 Q4 ' f, M 'U Ajgisffif Q , . '- " , 1 -: ' - f .7 '3 M LWWX-7 VIL? J ' A ' aaa vSdfL'Lff 1' "lv L X G fx 0 Q An V f - A f few Y, ,..' . . ' .M divx' "' . "0 N Q Q VA I H X. 4 A 16,1 gf, 6A,Jx,YW'1 . a ' -A v fn, I A '. - A ' X - ' ,U,.A3g,,j+w' .5 A X' 4 Y ' .17 f- y ' PRU ETHEU Gifted with prophetic wisdom, and concerned with the cause' of humanity, Prometheus was commissioned to cre- ate man. Ingenious as he was, this champion of the race decided to bestow a special gift up ascended to heaven, illuminated his t with fire. With this on his creation. He orch at the chariot of the sun, and returned to the earth powerful element in his possession, win secrets and treasures from the e ner develop commerce, science, and the arts. man would be able to arth and in this man- 5f?s,, 1 f 5' Q. :sq '-r...,.-,M 'fedgfge -. N- . ?""'i'Qf'Ws?4'ei'.N -wif'--X igkiefffg 5515- MEN, L-'J -,a.'1:..Z4r'if.ig5, fag-gg,1T5,g2,-13.7-3g:p1f1,:,, , A, -rw .- 5,..x .1 .- 4---.' V- f--4-Nt'-A: 4, iv,-rhmv., .27 .- f-- 2-in 1 ' '. -If -pf! MWTP' - -arg.-:nf 3,-vGs,., -5Jiii'f9,5'.f31vY11.Qf--' rqg?Z'wk'. ' , RWM' im if 41" qi?-Q is i-iff.. iukigz.. y ,I ff.,-f ,.,,itW,':'.-,,gf1:-qyzfk. :x"JPt:. Hf'?9'3f"f."' .iJ,,.. 3?,,.5,.Lg ,QISQH 3, .Fax -:+'w'1-:ff-afizfigfsw.msdyiiw 5 ,gin ,si A .f4Q1f54n5f-,fx 5 .,.,, ,M .Q , JST Q L.--F's'FA---1. "r -J. '. ' -HS ' ' "'1""":i '-'fsfwngg'-12: . 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' . m -.--..':FN:-942. 1:15 ':'1-nam 542455251 ., ,, 1 ,M I, -2. -2 "Y-.NH -.-1. a -fi ' 4fSH'5ff"7"' 3 fan-?'1LPf'v3",51c1-' K wif? 2' 1 ia., 'S .v5aw-3f,,-szfgw.-,., V A. " '.r514f,'kT.a viii? 's,-65-1' 1123,-Q'!5c':f:m'-I x-Q. 5115453 M-ww -- fx , vfiiff HQ- an "-'HDS f,w.,ff'. W Qu. ':i',igqff2N'3fmf5e' "ff ' ' - ' .: 1.1-' st.. lvl, , .44 , .ww i?f7?5"fG1xwv3 gf-55 ,- -wave' qw? 5 , f.' ,dga.QS2.i 55.175 :sg .5252 P:H:iffi"YS , TJ Tklvgc'-iff-:g,,fwff, Ls Y, 14119415-,,, fig.. - ifv1E'5E'-'z'i: fs-S" r1""T'31"k , 'iikx'-at , 3. . , 217354 + 93, Q ,Qi- -qggg pg, R4 3,43 ,. 'ly 3 Qaifw 'Sify 471- h KA- SR Xi .! 'T fx ' T THE EUAPID UE TRU TEE Ex-OFF1c:lO HIS EXCELLENCY, THE GOVERNOR OF TENNESSEE THE COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRECULTURE THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS Fir-ff, CLYDE B. AUSTIN, Greeneville .July 1, 1945 Fifth, V HARRY S. BERRY, Hendersonville, July I, 1939 Second, CARY F. SPTENCE, Knoxville . .July 1, 1947 Sixth, W. P. RIDLEY, Columbia . . .July I, 1939 Third, PAUL J. KRUESI, Chattanooga .July I, 1949 Sefventh, I. B. TIGRETT, Jackson .... July I, 1949 Fourth, W. P. COOPER, Shelbyville . . . July I, 1941 Eighth, GEORGE C. ROWLETT, Martin . . July I, 1947 Ninth, JOHN D. MARTIN, Memphis . . July 1, 1945 FROM THE CITY OF KNOXVILLE FROM THE CITY OF MEMPHIS WILLISTON M. Cox ......... July 1, 1943 VVASSELL RANDOLPH .... . .July 1, 1939 JAMES A. FOWLER . . . .July I, 1943 THOMAS H. ALLEN . . .July I, 1939 ' OFFICERS OF THE BOARD JAMES D. HOSKINS ........... President JAMES J. WALKER . . . '. . . . The President i.v,a member ex-officio of all standing committees. Executifve: FOWLER, SPENCE, KRUESI, COX, AUSTIN. Finance: KRUESI, SPENCE, FOWLER. Building: SPENCE, ROWLETT, KRUESI, ALLEN, Cox. . . . Treasurer JAMES P. HESS COMMITTEES Liheral Arts: RANDOLPH, FOWLER, RIDLEY. Agriculture: ICOOPER, BERRY, TIGRETT, AUSTIN. Engineering: ALLEN, KRUESI, MARTIN. Lafw: FOWLER, COOPER, RANDOLPH. . . . . . . . Secretary Health: RANDOLPH, ALLEN, MARTIN. Agricultural Experiment Stations: AUSTIN, RIDLEY, COOPER, TIGRETT. Engineering Experiment Stations: KRUESI, ALLEN, BERRY. ,Junior College: ROWLETT, ALLEN, TIGRETT. Mm- A - --' A .-L-1-lv-"rw" " ' " ' of 5-67 . ,1 W , , f fgfm f ,fffif-Q f ,f 4 r if gas, 67,175 I V ,K 3 L, ' f 4,7 ,W si ,, W I xg 17, .A zfifvf XM' ' 'WMC " 3 944, ffftz' x K1 X .6 497 ff f X ' f f y , f0 . QSM, yr Aw f .V , ' ,Wy ,g 5 Z7 -. f fix? ff f A, JA, if , f ffsf,5w.,,.Qf ,Z , ,,',?S,,'YfQ, .I ,ll SX ,, ,C S , 1 ' f X 'Wsux f X w X f , 26, 7-Quai f -,-,., T.vv'1"""- -.1 K , Q i i f , X .. X4 f , wgw zz , ig , f f ,,,, f , 'I ,MQ f BZ W, f 02' I M' ---rf. D Hi' NNU L The University of Tennessee, as the head of the state educational I system, has a three- 1 fold mission, to-wit: resident teaching, by which we mean the teaching of students who come to the various campuses of the institu- tion for instruction, extension, by which is meant the channeling of university instruction and of the services of university specialists into the homes and activities of the people who cannot come to the institution, and research, by which is meant the investigation of problems in the various phases of activity of the state, as well as pioneer study for increasing the body of information concerning truths in all fields of life. To be sure, this is a large order and cannot be completely accommodated by the present facilities of the institution. The conception of a university down through the years is that of a body composed of institutional facilities, faculty, students, and alumni. ,This whole body, united and dedicated to The presiden+'s office, a source of advice and aid 'ro every sfudeni' SSAGE the ideals of the Uni- versity, can accomplish much. It will reach many objectives. But it will not stop its prog- ress upon attainment of any one objective, because new vistas will thereupon open unto it. The present Senior Class will, this year, join the alumni in support of University ideals. Their obli- gation will be the discovery of new University op- portunities and fundamental worlc in providing means for accomplishing them. An institution like a state university cannot stand still. It will either be aifected by dry rot or, as in a living organism, continue to grow and develop into wider services. Here is your Alma Mater's benediction, that you be favored with a real chance at work in her behalf and in behalf of her ideals. 1 0 s President fli- ig. :g. IL? 4:-513: '99 ,J ' ,A -ew. nf mf , X , " iv, M145 , "" ff f ff ,, , , ,, ,, Zif f V f f f 'V 1349 w J My gwn, , f ,, i , 7 .mx ' Ln' aw, ffl, ' f , ,, A M .X W4 WMM' 4 , f, 49 ,f ,, 'X x Q 1 if W, 4, 1 J 'WWHV 4 1 d 'f ' , f J ' ,, ff ' X STM ff ff' x AA Z if J? Wfv l L, A ff 1 1 ff ,, V 1 3. '-"ii,,,, Q f 5. ' ,f ff-f " 4,,,v.' f, f -wlfwx-wwz f wwf 4 X f M , , ,,, ' 'gn r U . 1 5, X ufnzf 1 Yu, A , J ,ff - AME, wi X V , .A , ., if ff, Ziff, I , 1 ' f ,wh ' 'M' f , X ,. f, ' naw... , g .S S, w nv, if ,f . 1 ir w - ' 1 ,Z J-WMM f 1 r A gf 1 X 3 : ' ,M 34 MAX 7 42M f, ' 5l""'f : ffl x ,WL f ' g xg," f A-I f C ' y f 'V-f. 212. ,, J V P 'M' 9 6 ' WMM! , 4 ,341 V M M. I, :f N, , ,3 , 5 y . ,, ,W f, , , ff M7 I V , xg 2 Z ,fff F ,lf Z f,.,,nm. 4 it Q I VM M ' H ... 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Z. f X! f f . e ,W - X 4 ff Q' 1 ,X . .. , X , 7 X x , X if ff 4 ' X X f Q X A+ U t XXX, X f fa 1 N 1 X W 4, Mg, , N i', 01.23 lf' ff.2X a Q f , "' , 5 XXXX' -Qjugjg K+ x Y . " 1:35, , - ,,j xg., - ,W M f Q. f A af- ? Nr ' " 7 nl E ,, 2 Z F ,, ,,,XX7'. ' ' ' ',f..aX -0 -X '-I 9 3' fl X, W J f S , ,, f N-Nz, X " , V X, , .jg , ' , f Q f ' 0 f A 5 ' , X Q 1 ' ' X 4. , X ' V X Q. X , f Z ' -fn ',' ' :yf'?'W ' QQ. f ' if , ' i ,Uv L If t X 7 -, , X X X X fr - 'ff f Q . W4 I ,J it , :X X, Rfb, X l 1 ,Q f Y? uf, ' UZ' Q ' ,xfwy FX ZX-XJWX-ffffff' N , 0 wvfic' J' , fbi' M7952 5 X X QW75 XX-IM, ,fxX5WfXX J W5 AX V,, ,, X I yi K , ff ' UTXYQXX saw' . X34 Xy .ss Lf -,WH A X 42, xvjtgi' -1 V "zQ'fd f Sv M 'ff Vg-y' iv, X-X nf ,y y HXDZ, X-Xa M Twffegx fv-fwff, . Xizfeifff XM, Ag V f1X,fW,? 3, ,AT XM .3 ,g?.L.Z 'yu W , XX MX , 1 MXWQL. .,,Z,,wX'fcaz1112fXf .aww- X XX 3 2 X 1, F 'xi Q ,, J f , V-' . 2 , X 2 1 ' 1 , 0, f ,g ' f f :X 5' ' f 7 ff Z X f Y, f H Z X Q-L I .- 7 ' 7X r ' M 7, E , 42 W V A f 'X in 0 ff 5 1 0 Q ,J 1' f, ' Qi, , azz, Slcilfully smoothing the rough edges for and in student scholastic and social relationships, Dean of Students F. M. Massey and Dean of Women Harriet Greve act as diplomatic ad- ministrators of university yes and no's. More essential is their advice and counsel extended always to those facing real difficulties. WITH TH Carrying the largest enrollment of all divisions of resi- dent teaching maintained by the university, the Col- lege of Liberal Arts embraces the Pre-Dental, Pre- Medical, Science, and regular courses. Dean L. R. Hesler commands the activities of the Liberal Arts scholars from his office in the Biology Building where the natural rights of the rabbit, chicken, fungi, and schizomycetes fall prey to the scalpel, microscope, and dissecting needle. For mas- tery of the mother tongue, foreign languages, and the geology, geography, and physics increase the density and factual substance of the student's path in the other build- ings circling the "I-Iill.'7 Designed basically to prepare a student for service to the state and future specialization in his chosen field, the Liberal Arts curricula enclose studies extending from the complex analyses in organic and physi- cal chemistry to the tonal qualities of spoken Greek to the intricate determiners of heredity and variation in advanced social sciences Ayres Hall is the scene of the exposures to knowledge. Studies in inorganic research in chemistry, X5 'axis UK. .gb genetics. I H xg '4 -an Mg .I .fb -'c I fx, . I N 'fn ga BV W W 55255 Xara 3, 531 M r.gi5a'a ?DW Qgfiga Jffif, ' :N,.,.x V :uf 'ff' Jae' 'Wai' 1 V' lg: , 2, . iii 5,-f '1 Q52 1 -33 .vu ,aw Q 2 'Q 2 . fc , V fi. L 'af- 1. mf ,I 'ZLL -MW ,WW w f vfzwp , ff ff wwf M1512 4 f 313' 1 , ,, 1 1 uggi L fp, f . . K I if- . I 'I 55.1 'J my D ,. . ' U "ji"- .'f.X.,' Qwhx 'SSN ax 4 Z Q- . 'qge K, , xXx x SX xo 1 W v 1 , x ' eg M, 1 xii X , S 1 x X ga S 22 .'. U o Yi CU TRUCTIU Since the institution of the engineering courses in 1880 the College of Engineering has expanded from scattered classrooms in the main buildings of the regular college to a four-building outlay housing a power plant, forge shops, and intricate technical equipment. Cooperative courses intro- duced into the curricula a decade ago under the administration of the competent Dean C. E. Ferris have solved the problem of inoculating the training with practical experience in industry to supplement academic work, and added to the proficiency which points out Tennessee as a leading technical school. In connection this college is the Engineering Ex- periment Station. Under the directorship of Dr. C. A. Perkins this medium of research makes con- tinuous contributions to the welfare of industry and commerce in the state. Giants of power react to the engineer's touch .... Charlie Burks poring over a tough one in physics lab .... Rating rocks absorbs the infrequent attention of Dunklin and Miss Guthrie .... Respected for his genius, admired for his counsel, Dean Ferris is seen in the right corner crossing the "Hill." l I 1 i v -1 w x , 1 Q X 9 x 3-'ffafirf we X HZ i x V X W . XFQ , Q 44 Hur . X , ,H , , N f, f 1 ' if jaw 7 fra np X? :S J 4. A , "' R Q K' 1 N577 2 . 1 1 5 f . :fs k gk .QQ . 2-W: kt gi. X ' , , 5 a , W Q ' E w 5'-if ,, ' f M . i 1 6 , :fm 2 ff 1 QW wie' 01 WN! f f Q , - J M1 T 5194 wri- X lf Z! Embryonic educational leaders practice the art of balancing the paddle and prat- rle of classroom conduction in the educa- tion classes beneath Ayres tower. 3 "f"W12g.jgj5?!f . '- 4 M-K ,ui W. 6 l ,,.. ' . ' .'r"'--rr-"'1'3 ' ' 'WW-,q,,,' wee, Q .1 ,Q - i..,,5,g-W vu-3 .,,. 1 AJ. h. . 4 ,,,,, . ,, wit' f ,'.yg,g -W, s- , .. .,l, V A Q. H tp... .- iil ffww ua, ,QQ M , Q, F2933 w,.9f1z, Z,c15?f..1 ff tn L www f ., yffgfw-"Q 5 N in 1 wg'?123f?Z' fig-4? 3 wg f -ff'-" X X K 'Wy ' aww. QA.A aisiw xi WX ,- , V 5' ' W W X , A m,xgbS,i,A. as Q QWVQA if 'ggvgi , 1' :QC - Vg?Q??p!m .fy -av., + 1 ' ' X x Xxx R 1 I 1 ig Q 13 X A x X E XX ix 1 , ,W XX z 'X ng, W - 4' -3 fi f Q ig' an if ,Q XN5 3. QQ N I , X he 7 N ,QE Q Q ' ,-4 Q I 5 K 1 s .mv me 5 in W Eg Z Q x 2 x 'X NE X V X s 5, 'ir 24 Q3 'Q A 2 4 22 X X X K if Q , 'Q Y ,ffifvr -1, Q zjyff 'Q V3 ' ' ' 'y Q- X 229' ' 2 Q ' - , T "fb Qfgi- ' - " - , .y 4. ' 1 Q V f .. M97 , S H- -1 in x Gai' ui ,, ', - 4 4 ' 'X A X 5 - was - w 5285" - A 1 45, M, . X Z, Y 4 , , A - ' , 'Q - l Q , V - , 1 1 7 X N., Q .p .' :lyk -wg -Y , .. Qi yi X ., Q W 4' is - , QF K f AZN Q P fn. M - 'Q .5 7 , 'e ' vw My A . 'V N 1 , " , Saw ng K-1,14 J .1- Z, . V - '1": .01 h ' - j " -1 Q , .X f .. W '?5"u"'lx7 ' M ' A Y 33" g U if ff 2 7, Q Wy Sid! Q .hw ff 5' wk' 1 QV ' 'H D. 'K V.: ,b ,YQ .2 rj, M . 555-3 fgmf-'TL f ' 1 V 7' V, 'WL if 1, Y Q 'v, 'lf Lf ww "fi . a+f'fvN,1xfJ.ff'1G,. 4. 5, . 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'L' , H 'Tv . ,Q , -.J 4 i T. f Zi' .K ! i i i 1 i il ll V i E ii I I Over the NBC network Tennessee speaks to America Wave len th Education Increasing its public service the university has established a weekly broadcast series designed to convey to the people of the South information concerning educational subjects ex- perimental data, and the latest developments in all fields of research. Under the supervision of the Radio Committee, this aerial feature for nearly two years has presented administra- tive officers, research workers, and faculty members offering material which is educational, cultural and practical in its ap- plication. A recent NBC hook-up gave to America in a one- hour program an insight into the vast amount of work carried on at Tennessee. This type of program has made education by radio a reality. Also representatives of the Agricultural Extension Service broadcast daily over local radio stations. Each week an increasingly large audience takes advantage of the various informative talks presented by the numerous de- partments in the university. President James D. Hoskins inaugurated this series on March 1, 1937, and since that time every department of the university has had a part in this latest h f ' 't xtension. Student announcer Jack Denman does his share P HSC O LIHIVCYSI Y C P -d H k- -f Ti-ie RADIO COMMITTEE resi ent os ins in orms thousands ot listeners ot the "Hiil's" activities. Lett to Right A J Sims Stanley Johnson and F C Lowry V., .,., - -.ea . . . t?W - - Dean M. Jacob ,I AGRICULTURE The College of Agriculture incorporates in its activities the three-fold program of research, resident teaching, and ex- tension. Under the leadership of Dean M. Jacob, the col- lege offers modern and comprehensive curricula in agricul- tural economics, agricultural education, agronomy, animal husbandry, dairying, horticulture, poultry husbandry, agri- cultural engineering, and forestry. Located on the Uni- versity farm the college is housed in spacious Morgan Hall, and which also serves as headquarters for the Experiment Station under the guidance of Director C. A. Mooers and the Agricultural Extension Service headed by Director C. E. Brehm. The facilities available for experimentation and demonstrating the practical aspects of farming include new agricultural equipment, 2,000 acres of picturesque farming lands, and some of America' s finest in animal aristocracy. Rapid expansion is a part of the program the college faces in serving a state in which thirty-nine per cent of the per- sons gainfully employed engage in agriculture. - i I l l 'l -1 'U 1? i i X 4 3 1 's 1 X xx f 3 ' .fm W gf f ww K-Mmff M Ly yff' K . f ww 1 '-:C -. wma Ww,2.Q,,f -ff Q1 nf 41" if' Z Z xv, N, M , X f f ww' . vx 17? Sw V2 f A 1 QE l we 53 K ' Simi? X vi ,aff 1 ,, Y xww aw' if ,J Wy ,df f QQ sf 1 Nsws 5 W 5 if K -nfffgwi ,wx:S,f,.:, xx :V wqf mc, g WW X 'XV X5 V 'fgfaa X 7 S 135 .K 'Lmz Wifi 4 S "Oy ,Z fa: ,vg Mt fksa 593' aw, , L - , .1 Y 7 x A fav x 5 fi? if I 5 ' 4 SSA Q, W ,, M2 43- . 1 1 GRICULTUP1 iL Research problems are worked out full scale at the University's principal experiment station at Knox- ville and at the four sub-stations and farms. Investi- gation and experimentation in cultivation of tobacco, legumes, grains, and other Tennessee products, in the production of stock, in the use of feeds and fertilizers, and in the innumerable phases of state agriculture are carried on at the stations at Greeneville, Jackson, Martin, Columbia and Clarksville. Glimpses of the work at the first four may be seen below in the order named. Information uncovered in the research proj- ects is relayed in every county of the state by home and agricultural demonstration agents who ably assist farmers and home makers. F37 ., .5 Nz I ., Y Somberly crowning the entire campus, Ayres Hall has looked down on more students engaged in the collegiate processes of 'qfinigelingf' leg-pulling, and real studying than any other of the buildings on the "I-Ii11.'7 Most imQ pressive and lasting picture in the mind of every student is che massive tower looming above the fast-shadowing hill, in the evening or catching the first light that penetrates the smoky city in the early hours, before dawn, around eight o'cloclc. A . X N .x,, n V x ,.V,, A ln iq, 1. X X X I x We nf ."' x , J 'Vx - V .. ,. -. ..- A. ,-1 , - VV A-V..,. 1' . .Ury , 1... Zi, f E' s ?5yzi JW, . f,,"'..I, ggi- . ij, '. S" -,fu afnzff: ' ' A3 e . X , ,',xt.,v. L . -I. 55 ' .E ' Nfl. KW' Z mx Q' I .b'. A1 "'5Q'r". I . M VVA A .- VV-jxf,w.f.Vw N- ..V-?g.uV X , .4f.JT .AV aff! -. Kg ,, , i, QQ'-. 'A-Q .2 V, , Q... .A - x.. W: A. '1 .r -. : ,fn gf. ,, Y .,, . . 1 VJ. , x .-uf 'in .aw r F' fgggww ww 1 ,pn awk .-b Q--aw 5""'v.' K '-1 fe ' V Q ew. ,M fx,-Q. K bs-A A Q X .Aff fc lj' x, ,. V' 9 41- ff'T' ex., ,W . MWF'-T. 'Nz ' 31 51 X 1 W" 41 , fx.. 3 -- : '93 ' 3, ' 2 YH ..,.1w1, . .5-v.-7 V , tee,-V.. : 4 N . w Qi ga' -E35 ff 'Hf':'..5' Y 3, f, T12 . J 1 V ,2 iw, . ' Q . 12 Vw .2f'af,,.x vi wX '7'-A fi-:ZW MW 1-i yy f ,ww .IW ' 2, WW .-W .. W ff v JW , V, V V W, VV , V g Vmwf, ,V my JAM f f ' lb., V' ,V Y Hawk . XWJW ,, .. fix?-X " A A ' -1.-,Q 11' M V ,, , , VV, ai W V wwf QW- f - - ' ' ag" ' H 4 .:?f + V' . ,, - . :ff 2:',,,.Q,j44vZ '-v, 4' .Ziyi 1, - , 1 , am: A ' ,...,:g,: 4, ' . f ' X ' qyyf1Q':' ' f, 'Q , Q, ' ' f " f " ,T ,. '-1 ' ?,1.,,,y 4 v f A - , j A R ff 1V,c,.1,jV ,: v , f , v , f 9 ui QS X-v 4X ii Q X YSWX . 1. . 3 , QS . .. XX..x V VSV: ,VA .xy N if' I T Q Q., .Q M i v L . . - k . , Hg, We MQ VV 'ST XX 5 . Q 5 V SY:-' Many a laborious hour is spenf in 'ihe seclusion of 'rhe medical library and amidst fhe aroma of +l1e laborafory DlCl The medical school located at Memphis is a vital part of the University of Tennessee. Housed in spacious quarters, the Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry, the Schools of Biological Sciences, Pharmacy, and Nursing, and the Division of Public Health offer op- portunities for scientific investigation and study. I-Ieralded as one of the nation's finest medical schools, the University gives to the state and to the entire country indi- viduals trained in scientific knowledge and practices. This college draws its enrollment of some 865 from all sections of America, and a faculty of prominent scientists directs the academic work. Surrounded by a group of the most superior hospitals in the South, the medical students receive practical experi- ence and may view scientific technique. From the dissecting table to the archives of medical literature, the selected students pur- sue their studies with the "one increasing purpose" of social service to humanity. The high requirements necessary for admission insure an enrollment of students who are qualified for a scientific career andwilling to pursue a curricula requiring intensive study and work. The University looks with pride upon the medical school which is out- standing in character and high in reputation. , A scienfisi' giffecl wifh execufive abilify is Dr. O. W. Hyman, Acl- minisfrafive Officer of the Colleges ai' Mem- phisl. X Q 1 f fig!! -I1 Hfjt. I ' IZI Ii II 5' I I I I .I I I , I I - ,I I , ,, , , ,WW I 4 I ,-I I . I I u .I I I Il . fII I,I I I I I I I I - I I IIE . ,I ,I f, QI I Q. - I II I t'II lI II - - II 'I QE I 'I II 1 I ',I , ' ' f I II I . I I . I- I, I ' A I ,I L' . ' Ig II . . ,I . 1 I 'II I I II I I II II I H ' 1 II I . . I I . . I I I I 7 I I: 'I I I ' f , ' I I ' ' I r I I I I I I I I I . I I I I l I ' I I I I I I I- . I I - I I -A I I . I fy I ' I 3 I . 'I I I, L75 Lp- I I, I, I I ,I I I I I m I I I f I I I I' ' I . I IA .II i I II I I . . I 2 ' I I :I I I I.. .., I I .V 1 , I ,I I l I-I ' 1, I I I I . I ' II - 1 QI , H II II 5 I I II I I' 2 2' 'I I II II? . . I I 7 I 2' ' 1 IA? ' ' II , H II, II Il' I I- I II ' . II ? I ji I , I I If IIQ ISI I I A ig I ' I 5 I 'I I' I I II I I ,I I I I II 2 I A I' 5 I I ' I , I II 5 7 ' I II E I I I I I I II I 1' I I If i ' I I ,I ,A III I , .I 1 I TI 3 I' I I T I II I II' 2 Q I I if-E' I 'I II 3 UTHEE UEEICEE DEPARTMENTAL HEAD C. E. ALLRED Professor of Agricultural Economics P. W. ALLEN Professor of Bacteriology MARY E. BAKER Head Librarian and Professor of Library Science - G. M. BENTLEY Professor of Entomology R. M. BOARTS Professor of Chemical Engineering AXEL BRETT Professor of Psychology C. B. BURKE Professor of English W. E. COLE Professor of Sociology N. W. DOUGHERTY Professor of Cifvil Engineering O. W. DYNES Professor of Agronomy C. E. F ERRIS . Professor of Mechanical Engineering 'N. E. FITZGERALD Professor of Agricultural Education T. W. GLOCKER Professor of Economics ' G. M. HALL Professor of Geology ancl Geography J. B. HAMILTON Professor of Mathematics J. W. HARRIS EDWIN POWERS Professor of Home Economics Education pfofo-Ho, of Zoolooy J. P. HESS Business Illanager of Unifversity K. L. HERTEL Professor of Physics C. O. HILL Professor of Chemistry A. W. HOBT Professor of Physical Education M. JACOB Professor of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Science STANLEY JOHNSON Director of Puhlic Relations J. L. KIND Professor' of German A. W. MCWHORTER Professor of Classical Languages and Literature R. C. MATTHEWS Professor of Drafwing and Machine Design N. D. PEAOOOK Professor of Horticulture C. A. PERKINS Director of Engineering Experiment Station and Professor of Electrical Engineering R. M. POWELL Acting Director of Health Department and Professor of Hygiene J. B. SANDERS Professor of History M. A. SHARP Professor of Agricultural Engineering F. C. SMITH Dean of the Graduate School and Aca demic Dean of the Unifversity J. D. SWAIN Professor of Romance Languages J. A, SWITZER Professor of Hydraulics and Sanitary Engineering R. F. THOMASON Registrar J. J. WALKER Treasurer of University F. L. WILKINSON Professor of Mechanical Engineering C. E. WYLIE Professor of Dairying C. H. WILSON Professor of Industrial Education Not pictured J. G. TAREOUX Professor of Electrical Engineering Not pictured -, .-Y.4f1..- .. ,,, .. 2 ,----------f '- fbi' - " , '- .f '- L ...r m ,7mx,,... ....., .,., ,.. I ,. , , , . , , . UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE I937-'38 DR. OLIVER Hirii:,g,'07, Knoxville . . . . President ' JOI-TN B. Cox, '93, Knoxville . . - - Vive-President ALGooD CARLEN, '30, Cookeville . . ' . . Secretary EDWARD NEWELL, '29, Knoxville . - - Tfedfufef REGIONAL VICE-PRESIDENTS West Tennessee Middle Tennessee P1-IILLIP D. HARRIS, '10, .... K Springfield E. H. QUALLS, '25 . . . Washington, D. C. MRs. IMELDA STANTON, '21 . . . Memphis MRS. JEANIE GARTH MOTLOW, '31, Crossville ffl ff H East Tennessee ' T. F. DOOLEY, '13 . A . T . . johnson City MRS. CLARENCE KLOWYCK, '25 . Chattanooga I EXECUTIVE SECRETARY VICTOR M. DAVIS, '20 . . . . Knoxville OBJECTIVES OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION I 1. To aid the university in securing adequate support for the full development of the institu- tion, ' 2. To bring to Tennessee the best men and women now enrolled in the secondary schools of the state, 3. To maintain accurate biographical records of University alumni and recognize them for their achievements, ' I 4. To assist in securing such publicity as will increase the prestige of the University, 5. To develop a personnel division for the placement of Seniors and ,unemployed alumni. -.a4"A":?..,,'--J--::. 'ix-: " ' "' r.. rf-L 'L-1.: :..f:E."-' ' ' ' ' , -.,.,. -. Q l .- ,. E ,Lf - , s " A-A Y 'f 'FLA . :-1-:..+-as -4+- 221.411-rsxa , E- .. . -f ... l eg,-.BT - , , , it .. ,, . .. 4, Ltiiisn. 4 - ,5 B 4' wr- ..... ,.,.,..' - g - 'M EL. , - -. 1 ir THECLASSES O F F I C E R S WYLIE HOLEMAN . . - - Pfefidffnf JOHN PARKER . . Vice-President KATHLEEN KING . . Secretary VIRGINIA WHITE . . . Treasurer COMMITTEES Finance-VIRGINIA WHITE, Chairman, ALLAN SAYFORD, SOPHIE LOWE, PAUL FREEMAN, VVILLIE LEFFLER, RALPH NEAL. Publicity-F. G. DENTON, Chairman, BETTY MCKEAN, ALFORD ORR, MAXINE VUNKANNON. Volunteer-JOHN FISHER, Chairman, NANCY POORE, WOODROW LUTTRELL, ALLAN RAMSEY, JIM ROBINSON. In-viiations-WALTER DILATUSH, Chairman, LOUISE BUSSART, FRANK WEBSTER, IELEANOR NOELL. Gift-MELVIN VVEAKLEY, Chairman, MIRIAM GUTHRIE, LEROY NEBLETT, GEORGE CRESWELL, JOHN ROBINSON. Senior-Junior Coordination-JOHN LASSITER, Chairman, MARGA- RET BEAMAN, BILLY TAYLOR, VVINSTON BRAUN. Surprise-LOIS WHITEHEAD, Chairman, BRODIE BAYNES, HELEN JENNINGS, HERNDON HAMER. Transportation-VVILLARD SLEDGE, Chairman, GEORGE KRISLE, JOE TIRULIOUS, BOB SHUEY. TH I Innovation-HENRY CARMXCHAEL, Chairman- TOM BAGLEY, LORA BOND, ANN BOLIN. Senior Class Day-JOHN FISHER, Chairman. Assistants-MARY HESTER GASKILL, RUSSELL MOXLEY, ALETHEA WHITNEY, WOODROW FLOWERS Senior Ball General Chairman-BILL SHY. Assistant Managers-L. C. STAIR, NAT BOWE. Grand March-BILL JACOB, Chairman, ELIZABETH KERR, JOHN PARKER, NANCY DOUGHTY. TiCkt?f5-BILL ELLISON, Chairman, FLORENCE ENNIS, LEO BUS- SART, GORDON PEARCE. Clzaperons-ELIZABETH BOWDEN, Chairman, CAYCE PENTECOST, LIB KNAUFP', BILL BUCHANAN. Programs-CHARLES GUTHRIE, Chairman, JOE SAMMONS, AILSIE YOUNG, KATHLEEN KING. Music-L. D. WORD, Chairman, GORDON WILSON, GORDON PEARCE, JULIAN HINTON. UPI CL SS I I I I I I I I I I 4.9-5 I LI I I I I I i ,. I I 5 I I -H I I I I I I I I if I I I I I I I I I I I I I JI 1 I I I I THE IUR CU ITTEEIVI N For the first time in the history of the institution the Senior Class celebrated a Senior Honor Day. Conceived at an in- formal meeting of the class officers, the idea was designed to increase class spirit and arouse interest in future alumni activity. A11 of the members of the graduating class en- joyed a full holiday from classes and participated in a pro- gram marked by a true holiday spirit. Together in a body for one of the last times, reflections of events of the college life of a departing group filled the air with many pleasant memories and possibly a few sighs. Resolved to be true sup- porters of Tennessee and loyal to the spirit of the Class of '38, a group of Seniors paid a farewell tribute to four years of collegiate life and activity. A class worthy of carrying aloft the Torch of Service had left behind four years filled with unforgettable memories. Fir!! Row: Bowden, Bowe, Carmichael, Denton, Dilatush, Ellison. Second Row: Fisher, Guthrie, House, Jacob, Poore, Richardson. Third Row: Shy, Stair, Weakley, White, Whitehead, Word. J , ww, I, Q ' f ., .. ..., ,Law A fa '- , f ,fa If .. , f Eff, gy, X ,, ,,,, , MES- ! f fit., , . .7 I 1 i I uf? IQQQXK if? f f SE IOR CLASS SAMUEL HOUSTON ACEE . . . . ..... . Lebanon Candidate for B. S. Degree in Agriculture Phi Delta Kappag University Ag. Club, '37-'38g Tech. Ag. Club, '34-'37, Treasurer, '36, Vice-President, '37. JAMES T. AILOR ......... . Straw Plains Candidate for B.A. Degree Sigma Phi Epxilon Transfer Hiwassee College. WILLIAM THERON AxINs ..... . . . . McKenzie Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education TOE RALPH ALEXANDER .......... Lenoir City Candidate for B-.S. Degree in Agriculture LOUISE HELEN ALLEN ........ . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree I Delta Delta Delta Delta Phi Alphag Biologia. SARA BELLE ALLEN ......... . Murfreesboro ' Candidate for B.A. Degree ROBERT VC. ANDERSON ........ . . Madisonville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Alpha Zetag Phi Epsilon Clubg Phi Kappa Phi: Ag. Clubg Circulation Man- ager Tennessee Farmer, '37-'38g Horticulture Dept. Editor Tennessee Farmerg Barnwarmin', '35g Barnwarmin' Ag. Alumni Directory Committee, '37. WILLIAM A. ANDERSON ........... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Sigma Alpha Epxilon Freshman Football, '34g Freshman Track, '35-'36g Captain of Company I, R. O. T. C. CHARLOTTE ANDREWS . . . , . . . . . Fountain City Candidate for B.A., Degree Delta Phi Alphag Athletic Club, '34-'35, '35-'36, '36-'37, '37-'38g Play- house, '37-'38g VOLUNTEER, '37-'38. ELEANOR ANDREWS . . ...... Little Rock, Arkansas Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Chi Omega MARGARET APPLING ......... . Memphis Candidate for B.A. Degree Delta Delta Delta CLAUDE JACKSON ARCHER .... , , , Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Phi Delta Kappag Band, '34-'35, '35-'36, '36-'37g Classical Club, '34-'35, '35-,36. Ai' E481 E fffffk asa 'Xxx 5, N, . I X f:..af x..r I4 Sa -is SE IO CLASS WANDA MARIE ARMSTRONG ......... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Zeta Tau Alpha Glefi Club. '35',37S Symphonic Choir, ,35-'37, Secretary Tennessee Valle Girls Club, '37, Hostess, '38, Home Ec. Club, Y. W. C. A., "Y" Cabinet? JANE ASI-IE . . ..... . , . . . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Chi Omega ED F. BABELAY .............. Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture U. T. Band, ,35-,36, '36-,373 Chorus, '35-'36-'38, University Student Branch of A. S. A. E. MARY NORTON BACON ........ . Morristown Candidate for B.A. Degree Kappa Delta THOMAS BAGLEY ............. Fayetteville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Civil Engineering Lambda Chi Alpha Tau Beta Pi, Phi Kappa Phi: Circle and Torch, '36-,37-'38, Secretary of Circle and Torch, '37-'38, Engineering Representative A. S. C. Council, '37- '38, American Collegiate Engineers Vice-President, '37-'38, American Society of Civil Engineers, '35-'36-'37-'38, Vice-President, '36, President, '37-'38, Lieutenant Colonel R. O. T. C., President Lambda Chi Alpha, '37, Secretary Tau Beta Pi, '37, President Tau Beta Pi, '37-'38, Interfraternity Council, Vice-President, '36-,37. MARTHA ESTELL BAILEY . . . . . . . . Huron Candidate for B.A. Degree French Club, B. S. U. Council, Transfer from U. T. Junior College. MARY ELLEN BAILEY ............. Sharon Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Home Ec. Club, '36-'37-'38, Transfer from U. T. Junior College. ERWIN BAIRD, JR .......... . Lebanon Candidate for B.A. Degree Sigma Nu MARY KATHRYN BARRETT .......... Shelbyville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Phi Mu Y. W. C. A., '34-'38, Home Economics Club, '34-'38, Dramatic Club, '34- '36, Mortar Board, Orientation Leader, '38, Home Economics Representative, All Students Club, '36-'37, Y. W C. A. Cabinet, '36-'38, Vice-President of Phi Mu, '36-'37. DOROTHY BARTON .... . ...... . . Greenfield Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Home Economics Club, Transfer from University of Tennessee Junior College. BRODIE BAYNES ............. . Ripley Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Phi Kappa Phi, Treasurer of the All Students Club. MARGARET LoIs BEAMAN .... . . . . . . Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Chi Omega Home Economics Club Vice-President, '37-'38, Treasurer Chi Omega Sorority, '57-'38, Tennessee Farmer, '36-'37, Tennessee Valley Girls, '35-'36, W. S. G. A Council, '37-'38, Phi Kappa Phi, Mortar Board, Alpha Lambda Delta, Omicron Nu President, '37-'38, Recipient of Danforth Fellowship, '37. lf49l N--. . fm .. 5 :Sig S pogo 5-'55 if his Kai Q. SE IOR CLASS 101-IN R. BEASLEY ............. Springfield Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Phi Sigma Kappa MARJORIE BEJACK ....... . . . . Memphis Candidate for B.A. Degree Biologia GORDON COLMAN BELL .... .... . . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree A1 h Ch' S' a, '37-'38, D lt Phi Alpha, '36-'38, Biologia, '37-'38, Presi- deriat aBap:istli'i1udent Union,e'316-'37: Vice-President Baptist Student Union, '37-'38. EDNA E. BENTLEY ............. Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Sigma Kappa Pan-Hellenic, '36, W. S. G. A. Council, '37-'38, VOLUNTEER Staff, '35-'36, Volettes, '37-'38, Barnwarmin' Staff, '37, Secretary Home Economics Club, '35-'36, Vice-President Home Economics Club, '36-'37, President Home Eco- nomics Club, '37-'38, Home Economics Club Open House Chairman, '36, Assistant Advertising Manager Tennessee Farmer, '35-'36, Advertising Manager Tennessee Farmer, '36, Assistant Home Economics Editor,.'36, Home Eco- nomics Editor of Tennessee Farmer, '37, Delegate to National Home Eco- nomics Convention, '37, Nominee for Barnwarmin' Queen, '37, Chairman W. S. G. A. Luncheon, '37, Decorations Committee. LEONARD BEVIS ...... . .... . Johnson City Candidate for B.A. Degree Transfer from State Teachers College, Johnson City. MABEL BLEv1Ns . . . . ....... . . . . Sardis Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Home Economics Club, '36-'37, Y. W. C. A., '36-'37, Junior Class Com- mittee, ' 36, Transfer from Lambeth College, Jackson, Tennessee, Intramural Council, '36. DOROTHY JEAN BOCK ............ Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Kappa Delta VOLUNTEER Staff, '35-'36, Orange and White, '36, Tennessee Valley Girls Club, Treasurer of Volettes, '37-'38. Doms BOLERJACK ...... . ....... Gibson Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics . Zeta Tau Alpha Omicron Nu, Home Economics Club, Y. W. C. A., Zebra Club, Transfer from University of Tennessee Junior College, Martin, Tennessee. ANN ELNORA BOLIN ........... . Mascot Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Chi Omega VOLUNTEER Editorial Staff, '36-'38, Carnicus, '35-'38. LORA BOND . .......... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Delta Delta Della Treasurer Delta Delta Delta, '36-'38, Alpha Lambda Delta, '34-'35, Vice- President Alpha Lambda Delta, '35-'38, Delta Phi Alpha, '36-'37, Secretary and Treasurer, '37-'38, Phi Kappa Phi, French Club, '34-'35, Vice-President of the French Club, '35-'36, President, '36-'38, Secretary Biology Club, '35-'36, VOLUNTEER Editorial Staff, '34-'36, Section Head, '36-'37, Associate Editor, '37-'38, Y. W. C.. A..Cabinet, '35-'37, Senior Cabinet, '37-'38, Biologia, '36-'37, Secretary Biologia, '37, Mortar Board President, '37-'38, Allen Prize Medal in Mathematics, '35, Faculty Scholarship tied, '35-'37, won, '37-'38, Cap and Gown Sophomore Award, '36, Tri Psi Scholarship Award, '36, Junior and Senior Class Committees, W. S. G. A. Treasurer, '37-'38, WILLIAM BOULTON ........... . Jackson Candidate for B.-S. Degree in Commerce ELIZABETH BOWDEN ........ . , Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Cbi Omega Camlcl-'S Staff, '34-'38s R- O- T. C. Sponsor, '35-'36, Senior Committee. su- 4 HU 5 fiffffzrf, 3 , l, X. ,..., ,. I l i 4 i I Z I 1 X l 5 l 1 i l l l l l l l l l i l ,, l l 2 l 4 iff ,gf-..a.,.r af! 2 f:' I ii ng ff I ew. L ill! ' ' . L,-e -..N f-.... ,..- ' -All ff K. """ f 1 f E501 SE IOR CL SS NAT W. BoWE ....... .,,, Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Alpha Tau Omega . -Capleville Carnicus Staff, '35-'37, Junior Assistant Manager, '37g Freshman Basketball Manager, '37g Varsity Basketball Manager, '38g Ag. Club, Barnwarmin' Staffg Chairman Parade, ' 37 Interfraternity Council. JEss BOWEN . . ..... . . . Candidate for B.A. Degree JAMES E. BRASFIELD .........., . Waverley . Friendship Candidate for B.S. Degree in Mechanical Engineering ASME, '36-'38, Vice-Chairman ASME, '37g First Lieutenant Company A. R. O. T. C. VVINSTON BRAUN . ...... . . Candidate for B.A. Degree Sigma Alpha Epsilon JOHN T. BRENNAN ......... Candidate for B.A. Degree Alpha Tau Omega , Memphis . Knoxville Carnicus Staff, '36-'38, Chairman Junior Class Committeeg President of New- man Clubg Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '33-'34g All Students Club, '35-,365 Intra- mural Manager, '35-'36, WILLIAM ToM BRIGHTWELL . . . . . . . Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Ag. Club. CHARLES W. BROWN . ....... Candidate for B.A. Degree JOHN P. BROWN ......... . Candidate for B.A. Degree Orange and White Editorial Staff, Cum Laudeg Member Squad, '34-'36. KATHARINE P. BRoWN . . . . . . . . Candidate for B.S. Degree Athletic Club. JOHN LEWIS BROWNE .......... Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Ag. Club. . Knoxville . Memphis Gallatin Varsity Football Chattanooga . Memphis MARY E. BRYAN ............. Arlington Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics WILLIAM F. BUCHANAN .... . . . Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce . Knoxville Phi Kappa Phi, Secretary Nahheeyayle Governing Board, '36g Assistant Manager Junior Prom. l 51 J SE IOR CL SS WINIFRED GENE BURGESS . . . Spruce Pine, North Carolina Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Della Zeta Home Economics Club, Tennessee Farmer. JANE BURGIN . ....... . . . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree French Club, Classical Club, Associate Editor Orange and White, Girls' In- dividual Rifle Tournament Champion, '37, Captain Girls' Rifle Team, '38, BILLIE BURKS ...... , ....... Dyersburg Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Chi Omega Editorial Staff VOLUNTEER, '36-'38, Editorial Staff Orange and White, '36-'37, Zebra Club, Y. W. C. A. WILTON W. BURNETI' ...,........ Nashville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agricultural Education Phi Delta Kappa LEO BUSSART ..... . . ...... . Etowah Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce VOLUNTEER, '34-'35, Junior Class Finance Committee, '35-,36, Commerce Exposition, '36-'38, Junior Prom Committee, '36, Orange and White, '33-'34. LOUISE BUSSART ..... , . . . . Etowah Candidate for B.S. Degree Kappa Delta Vice-President Volettes, '37-'38, Girls' Rifle Team, '37, VOLUNTEER, '37-'38, Sophomore Class Committee, Senior Class Committee, Freshman Orientation, '36-'37, President and Vice-President of Dormitory. LAURA RENA BURTON ....... . . . . . Lancing Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Home Economics Club, Transfer from Maryville College. MACON EUGENE CALLICOTT ...... . Memphis Candidate for B.A. Degree Sigma Alpba Epsilon JEAN HAYES CAMP ......... Ashland, Kentucky Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Delta Delta Delta Playhouse, Y. W. C. A., Transfer from University of Missouri. ELLZABETH CANADA ..... . . ..... Greenfield Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Home Economics Club, Transfer from University of Tennessee Junior College. CLIFFORD M. -CANTRELL ...... . .... , Jellico Candidate for B.S. Degree in Mechanical Engineering Triangle Fraternity QU. KJ , ASME. HENRY N. CARMICHAEL, JR .... . . . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Sigma Alpha Epsilon Phi Kappa Phi, Pershing Rifles, Sec d L' '36.'37- S Blade, French Club, '34-'36, "T" Ciiiii, Svwiieri1xii:xlilr:ilgAt,Team f3k:3iiibb1S1'i,a2',: Team, Scarabbean Senior Society, Major Second Battalioin, R. T, C, '37-'38. , U21 ij qv 54737, ,,ffI,3,'x f, if ff"'z,ZfZ "N iii'-.-1? if l?5.!3K3t7,f fAQi fig ,, x 2. . ,' f',j""7 ,A , Qoflt-.N f 'i S" 2 .ffl :vi Eff 1 ,,, ,. ffefda , f 5211.51-gp! f " ,,,.. 1. f., ,, . ,, ,fxm , .U . , ck 1 1 2,-fm at wi iffl 2 MI ma-,ff ff f 1-. N. A ,wx Sig ' "" 'J ,Z".L,4,cY"'-1- 5 2:6 nf 1,4711 jfffw i' gy Y l f' riff' ,M74 ' ,,f5,'f Q 4.4 155, 'W ,LV 5 2 ,f . N2fQ,:5LW" QV! iffff if f X! ,Z VX W5 5 gf'f-7,-7,113 2 , ,mx -...ti ..,. ..,-4, jX,ig-,fx ?..,,,f.- , 1 t A ll 1 X Z 5.-J? ?Q'fzf"v 155,75 472 l x 5 Z 2?7"f5""'-'J ,L.f.-d SE IOR CLASS J. EDWIN CARPENTER .......... . Newport Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Scabbard and Bladep Barnarmin' Committee, '37-'38' Tennessee Farmer S , Y I taff, 37- 385 Ag. Club. JAMES T. CARTER, JR ........ , Bristol Candidate for B.A. Degree JOHN W. CATE, JR. ..,....... . Cleveland Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Alpha Zeta Ag. Clubg Vice-President, '36-'379 President, '37-'38, University of Tennessee 4-H Club President, '36-'37g Barnwarmin' Staff, '36-'37g Assistant Manager, '37, Associate Editor Tennessee Farmer, '37-'38, University of Tennessee Round-Up, '37-'38. MARY HORTENSE -CATE ......... . Martin Candidate for B.S. Degree Athletic Club, '36-'37g Education Club, '36-'37, Volettes, '37-'38, Vice- President Athletic Club, '37-'38g Transfer from University of Tennessee Junior College, Martin, Tennessee. NELIA KAY CHAMBERS ....... , . . Tazewell Candidate for B.A. Degree Triad Club, French Club, Transfer from Ward-Belmont College. GRACE S. CHAPIN ............. Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Athletic Clubg Intramural Manager, '36-'373 Assistant, '37-'38, Intramural Council Secretary-Treasurer, '37-'38g Phi Eta Tau President, '37-'38, Modern Dance Club President, '36-'37g W. S. G. A. Council. MARY ALICE CLEVELAND ........ . Carthage Candidate for B.A. Degree Spanish Club, '37-'38. JULIUS GOULD COGSWELL . . ....... Chattanooga Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Delta Sigma Pi Pershing Rifles, Director of Finance, '38, Commerce Exposition and Ball. ALLIE GEORGE COLLIER ......... Powell Station Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Zeta Tau A lpba GAYNELLE COMES ............ . Bristol Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Delta Zeta Y. W. C. A.g University of Tennessee Chorus, Symphonic Choirg President Delta Zeta, '38. JEAN -CONVERSE . ..... ........ K noxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics MARIE COOK ............. . Erwin Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Kappa Delta Volertes, '37-'38, VOLUNTEER Staff, '37-'38, Transfer from Shorter College, '35. E531 I . I AIN IOR CL SS cr . ,- a f' A ' ,.. Z. NORMAN H. COOKE ..... . ..... . Milan 1 Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce M Alpha Tau Omega JOYCE REBECCA COPE ..... . . . . Newbern Candidate for B.A. Degree Zeta Tau Alpha Dramatic Club, '37-'38, Y. W. C. A., '36-'38, Classical Club, '36-'37, House President West Strong Hall, '36-'37, Second Secretary Zeta Tau Alpha, '38, Transfer from Milligan College, '36. CATHERINE COSTEN . .......... 1 . McKenzie Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Alpha Omicron Pi Pi Lambda Theta, French Club, Transfer from Bethel College, McKenzie, Tennessee. CYNTHIA COWAN ......... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Alpha Omicron Pi Transfer from Meredith College, Sponsor R.. O. T. C. Company B, '37, Junior Class Committee. GEORGE J. CRESWELL, JR. . ......... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Sigma Chi Education Club, '37, "T" Club, '37-'38, Freshman Track, '35, Varsity Track, '36-'38, A. S. C. Council Representative, '37-'38. FORREST WARREN CROWE .......... Adamsville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Phi Delta Kappa, Alpha Zeta Ag. Club, Y. M. C. A., Inter-Church Council, Barnwarmin' Staff, '37, Transfer from Cumberland University. VIRGINIA ECRUZE .........W ..... N eubert Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics MARY FRANCES CRYE ............ Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education MARY CURRIER .............. Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Alpha Delta Pi Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Lambda Delta, Delta Phi Alpha, Carnicus Staff, 36, '37, Chairman Junior Class Committee, '37, Y. W. C. A., '35-'36, Cabinet Member, '36, '37, '38, Orange and White, '35, '36, VOLUNTEER StaE, '36, '37, Education Club, '37. 3 BETTE KATE DAVIDSON ....... . Memphis Candidate for B.A. Degree Kappa Delta Orange and White, '36, '37, House Council, '36, '37, '38, Y. W. C. A., '36, '37, VOLUNTEER, '37, '38, Chairman Transfer Orientation, '37, '38, Spanish Club, '37, '37, Transfer from Southwestern College, '36. LOFTON DAVIDSON ............. Millington Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Zeta, Phi Delta Kappa, Ag. Club, '34, '35, '36, '37, '38, Freshman Alpha Zeta Cup, Sophomore Alpha Zeta Medal, Junior Dan- forth Foundation Fellowship, '36, '37, Barnwarmin Staff Chairman, Chairman of Ag. Club Charter Committee, Tennessee Farmer Departmental Editor, Student Homecoming Committee, ' 37. MARY FRANCES DAVIS ......... . . . Gibson Candidate for 13.5. Degree in Home Economics Home Economics Club, Y. W. C. A., Transfer from U. T. Junior College. i541 SE IO CL SS RUTH DAY . - ............. Greenfield Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Home EC- Club, '36, '37, '38, Transfer from U. T. Junior College. JAMES WILLIAM DEADER1cR ........ Oliver Springs Candidate for B.S. Degree in Chemical Engineering Tau Beta Pi, American Institute of Chemical Engineers. ROYAL H. DEERE ............. Lexington Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Transfer from State Teachers College, Ag. Club. JAMES N. DENT ......... . . , Martin Candidate for B.S. Degree Sigma Chi Cross Country, '36, '37, "T" Club, Carnicus Staff, '36, '37, Y. M. C. A., Senior Cabinet, '37, '38, Transfer from U. T. Junior College. F. G. DENTON, JR .............. Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Sigma Chi Delta Sigma Phi, Carnicus, "35, Committee Chairman, '36, Senior Assistant Manager, '37, Captain Company "A," R. O. T. C., Orange and White, '35, Assistant Manager, '36, Business Manager, '37, Freshman Advisor All Students Club, '37, '38, Circle and Torch, Senior Class Committee Chairman, Junior Prom Committee, Kappa Tau Chi, '37, '38, Carnicus Manager. MILDRED DERRYBERRY ........ . . . . Lexington Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Zela Tau Alpha Omicron Nu, '37, '38, Vice-President, '38, Y. W. C. A., '36, '37, '38, Home Ec. Club, '36, '37, '38, Guide Committee Chairman, '37, '38, Uni- versity Chorus, '36, '38, B. S. U. Council, '36, '37, Cap and Gown, '37, Mortar Board, '37, '38, Zebra Club, '36, '37, '38, Henson Hall House Council, '37, Lewisohn Scholarship, '37, '38, Transfer from U. T. Junior College. ERNESTINE Diccs ..... . . . . . . . . . . Paris Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Omicron Nu, Home Ec. Club, Athletic Club, Y. W. C. A., Transfer from U. T. Junior College. WALTER F. DILATUSH .......... . Memphis Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Sigma Alpha Epsilon Alpha Zeta, Scabbard and Blade, Pershing Rifles, Ag. Club, '35, '36, '37, '38, Y. M. C. A., Treasurer, '37, '38, Cabinet, '36, '37, '38, Rifle Team, Regimental Captain R. O. T. C., Scarabbean Senior Society, Barnwarmin' Staff, '36, Barnwarmin' Manager, '37, Aloha Oe Committee, '37, Chairman of Invitation Committee, Activity Calendar Committee, ' 37. MAURINE DILLON ..... ...... . . . Lancing Candidate for B. S. Degree in Home Economics Home Economics Club, Transfer from Milligan College. KEWEN DoDsoN ............. McMinnville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Phi Sigma Kappa Intramural Manager, Spring, '37, A. S. C., '37, Ag. Club, '34, '35, '36, '37, '38, Tennessee Farmer Staff, '37, Winner Madden Livestock Judging Contest, '35, Dairy Judging Team, '37. MAYNARD WALTER DONAHUE . . . ...... Corryton Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education International Relations Club, American Technical Society. ZELMA T. DoRR1s ......... .... K noxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education E551 SE IOR CLASS EVELYN LoUIsE DoTsoN . . . . ...... Nashville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Secretarial Science German Club, Athletic Club, Volettes. NANCY GAYE DOUGIITY ...... . . Greeneville Candidate for B.A. Degree Delta Delta Delta Y. W. C, A., '34, '35, '37, '385 Glee Club, '34, '35, French Club, '34, ,353 Camicus Staff, '365'Orange and White, '37, Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Kappa Phi. ROGER E. DUMAS ............. Memphis Candidate for B.S. Degree in Electrical Engineering Tau Beta Pig A. I. E. E., First Lieutenant Company C, Engineers R. O. T. C, EMMETT W. DUNN, JR ............ Rossville Candidate for B.S, Degree in Civil Engineering American Society of Civil Engineers. MARGARET R. DYCHE . ........ London, Kentucky Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Home Ec. Club, '36, '37, Y. W. C. A., '37, '38, Dramatic Club, '37, '38, Transfer from Western College. MILDRED ELLIS . . . ...... . . Dermott, Arkansas Candidate for B. S. Degree in Home Economics JANE ELLIOTT ........... . Alcoa Candidate for B.A. Degree Transfer from Maryville College. WILLIAM ARTHUR ELLISON, JR ......... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce ' Sigma A lpba Epsilon EUGENE J. ENGLISH, JR ........ . Memphis Candidate for B.A. Degree Kappa Alpha Orange and White, '37, '383 VOLUNTEER Staff, '35, '36, '37, '38, Boxing Manager, '36, '37, FLORENCE DE LOACH ENNIS ...... . Columbia Candidate for B.A. Degree Alpha Delta Pi Intramural Manager, Junior Committee, Transfer from Chattanooga. ANNA BERRY FANT ........ Gulfport, Mississippi Candidate for B.S. Degree Cbi Omega Y. W. C. A., VOLUNTEER Staff, '37. BITSY FERGUSON ............. Dyersburg Candidate for B.S, Degree in Education Chi Omega I 561 , 3 .3 I W. , X217 Eih.. -ff SE IOR CLASS RETTA FINLEY ............ , , , Finle , Y Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics JOHN WESLEY FISHER, II ........ . Maryville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Delta Tau Delta Delta Sigma Pi, All Students Club, All Students Club Dance Committee, Interfraternity Council, Commerce Exposition, Scarabbean, VOLUNTEER '37- Freshman Basketball, '35, Varsity Basketball, '36, '37, Freshman Track', '35, Varsity Track, '36, '37, '38, Scarabbean Sophomore Award, '36, WooDFoRD L. FLOWERS . . .I ..... . . Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Sigma Alpha Epxilon Delta Sigma Pi, Scribblers Club, Commerce Exposition, '37, Manager Com- merce Exposition, ' 38. JOHN WILLIAM FORD ......... Batavia, Illinois Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Delta Tau Delta Delta Sigma Pi, Treasurer of Delta Tau Delta, '37, '38. NAoMI JANE FOWLER ......... Woodland Mills Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Home Ec. Club, Y. W. C. A., Transfer from U. T. Junior College. KINCER Fox . . ............. Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Delta Kappa. BEN A. FRANKLIN . ..... ....... B ruceton Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture. Ag. Club, Transfer from U. T. Junior College. PAUL FREEMAN, JR. ..... . . . . . Nashville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Pi Kappa Alpha Intramural Manager, '38, Junior,Class Committee, All Students Club Council, Transfer from Vanderbilt University. WILLIAM LOWRY FULTON, JR ..... Owensboro, Kentucky Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Kappa Sigma Beaver Club, '34, '35, VOLUNTEER Staff, '34, '35, Carnicus Staff, '35, '36, '37, Junior Class Committee, '37, Rifle Team, '35, '37, '38, Individual Tennis Champion, Spring, '35. WILLIAM T. GALLAHER ....... . LaFollette Candidate for B.A. Degree JESSE GAMBILL ....... ..... . Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture MARY HEsTER GASKILL ..... Mays Landing, New Jersey Candidate for B.A. Degree Chi Omega VOLUNTEER Editorial Staff, '34, '35, '36, '37, Y. W. C. A., '34, '35, '36, '37, Zebra Club, '36, '37, '38, Classical Club, '37, '38, International Re- lations Club, '35, Actor's Workshop, '35, Women's Glee Club, '34, '35, University Chorus, '37, '38. E571 iv fain' fa as I 51'-' safe'- 5 523, -its E S-S' 3 1 55 A fx fe s fi. L ,Q 'f ' -'wg' ' SE IOR CL SS EDWARD M. GLAZEK ......... Detroit, Michigan Candidate for B.A. Degree BARBARA GODDARD ...... ...... D andridge Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Delta Delta Delta Omicron Nu, '36-'37, Treasurer, '37-'38, Orange and White, '34-'35, '35.'35, Associate Editor, '36-'37, VOLUNTEER Staff, '35-,36, '36-'37, Home Eco. nomics Club, '34-'38, Cap and Gown, '37, Mortar Board, '37-'38, Secretary, '37-'38, Y. W. C. A., '34-'35, '35-'36, Cabinet, '36-'37, Vice-President, '37-'38, Representative of University of Tennessee at the Merrill-Palmer School, Spring, '37. LYMAN H. GOFF, JR ............. Memphis Candidate for B.S. Degree in Electrical Engineering Sigma Chi Vice-President A. I. E. E., '37-'38, President A. C. E., '37-'38, Lieutenant in R. O. T. C., '36-'37, Chairman Engineer's Ball, '37, Freshman Track. NANCY KATHERINE GREGG . . ...... . Newport Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Sigma Kappa Phi Era Tau, Volettes, '37-'38, Orientation Leader, '36-'37, '37-'38, Man- ager Junior Relay Team, '36-'37, Publicity Manager Phi Eta Tau, Sponsor of Company E, University Guidon Society, Treasurer of Sigma Kappa, Vice- President of Sigma Kappa, President of Sigma Kappa, Pan-Hellenic Representa- tive, '36-'37, Secretary of Pan-Hellenic, '37, Modern Dance Club, Transfer from Asheville Teachers' College. CHARLES ROBERT GUTHRIE ........... Gallatin Candidate for B.S. 'Degree in Commerce Pi Kappa Alpha Orange and White Staff, '34-'38, Editor, '37-'38, Publications Council, '37- '38, All Students' Club, '37-'38, Chairman Dance Committee, '36-'37, Nahheeyayli Board, '35-'38, President Midwinter, '38, Treasurer, '37, Scarab- bean Senior Society, Carnicus Staff, ' 35-' 38, Senior Prom Committee, ' 38. MIRIAM GUTHRIE ......... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Delta Delta Delta VOLUNTEER Staff, '35-'36, '36-'37, '37-,38, Junior Class Committee, '37, Carnicus Staff, ,37, '38, Senior Class Committee, '38, Tennessee Players, '35. PAULINE HAMBY ....... ....... P elham Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Omicron Nu, Phi Kappa Phi, Home Economics Club. HOWARD HERNDON HAMER, JR. . ...... . Memphis Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Sigma Alpha Epsilon Delta Sigma Pi, VOLUNTEER Staff, Orange and White Staff, Commerce Ex- position Committee, All Student Sing, B. S. U., Freshman Football, Varsity Swimming Team, '37, '38, Captain of R. O. T. C. GEORGE DEWITT HAMPTON . .... . . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree ZELLA MAE HANSARD ......... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Athletic Club, Tennessee Valley Girls. MARTHA ELIZABETH HARRIS ......... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education ' ' Delta Zeta Y.. W.-C. A. Cabinet Member, U. T. Chorus, Tennessee Valley Girls, Orientation lreadprg University Playhouse, Orange and White, '34-'35, U. T. Glee Club, 34" 353 U- T- Chorus, '35-'38, Symphonic Choir, '35-'37, Y. FV. ,C. A. Cabinet Member, '35-'38, Tennessee Players, '34-'35, Drama Club, 35- 37, Orientation Leader, '36-'38, Secretary of U. T. Chorus, ,363 Presi- dent of Delta Zeta Pledges. RACHEL HARRIS ....... ,,,,,, - , Holladay Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Omicron Nui Phi KSPPH Phii Mortar Board, Home Economics Club, Transfer from U. T. Junior College. tsaj SE IOR CLASS JAMES KEITH HASSON ........ Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commgrgg . . . Knoxville Sigma Chi Interfraternity Council, '36-'37, Treasurer, '37-'38g Lieutenant in Band R. O. T. C., '37, U. T. Tennis Team. ROBERT E. HELLEN, JR ............. Ri le P y Candidate for B.S. Degree in Electrical Engineering AARON HELLER ............, Johnson City Candidate for B.S. Degree in Electrical Engineering JAY OUSLEY HENEGAR .......... . Carryton Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture JAMES O. HENSON, JR. . ........... Byington Candidate for B.S. Degree in Civil Engineering American Society of Civil Engineers. CLELAN HESTER ............ , Nashville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Lambda Clri Alpha Delta Sigma Pig Playhouse, '37, Treasurer of Lambda Chi Alpha, '38, Secre- tary of Delta Sigma Pi, '38, Transfer from Harding College. EDWIN M. HINSDALE, JR ..... . ..... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Electrical Engineering Phi Eta Sigma, Tau Beta Pi. JULIAN P. HINTON ...... . . Lumberton, Mississippi Candidate for B.S. Degree in Civil Engineering Sigma Nu Interfraternity Council, '36-'37, '37-'38, junior Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '36-'37, Senior Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '37-'38, Nahheeyayli Governing Board, '36-'37, '37-'38, President, '37-'38, Secretary, '37-'38, A. S. C. Council, '37-'38g A. S. C. E., '35-'38, Secretary, '36-'37, President, '37-'38g Chairman Engineers' Banquet, '37-'38, Scarabbean Senior Society, Transfer from Pearl River junior College. MOZELLE HOLBERG ....... . . Macon, Mississippi Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Kappa Delta Home Economics Club, '36-'38, Y. W. C. A., Transfer from Mississippi State College for Women, '35. EDWIN S. HOLDREDGE . ...... . . . Fountain -City Candidate for B.S. Degree in Mechanical Engineering A. S. M. E.g Secretary-Treasurer of Student Branch A. S. M. E. WYLIE HOLEMAN ....... . .... Oakville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce A lpba Tau Omega Circle and Torch, Scabbard and Blade, T Club, ,363 Swimming, Tfam, ,373 Manager of Wrestling, '36g Chairman on Commerce Exposition, 37-.383 Car- nicus Committee Chairman, '35s A- S- C-i 74335, ,37',383'CaPt3m R' T. C., '36-'37, President of Freshman Class, '34-'35, President of Senior Class, '37-'38, Treasurer A. S. C., '37. PAULINE MAE HoLMEs ........... Whiteville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home EC0I10miC5 Home Economics Club. T591 SE IOR CLASS DOROTHY MAE HOTCHKISS . . . ....... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Alpha Lambda Delta, '35-'38, Phi Kappa Phi, Upsilon Tau, President, '38, Classical Club, '35-'38, President, '38, Education Club, Athletic Club, '36-'38, Tennessee Valley Girls' Club, '35-'38, Mortar Board Historian, Freshman Faculty Scholarship, '36, Orientation Leader, '37. WILLIAM MCLEAN HOUSE, JR ....... . Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Sigma Alpha Epxilon Phi Kappa Phi, Secretary of A. S. C., Vice-President "T" Club, President Beaver Club, '37, Interfraternity Council, Scarabbean, Scabbard and Blade, Cadet Colonel, R. O. T. C., Varsity Wrestling. O.zELL HUEE ............... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics V. JEROME HULTQUIST ........... ' . . Alcoa Candidate for B.S. Degree in Civil Engineering Scabbard and Blade, A. S. C. E. MILTON GUTHRIE HUMBERD ......... Cleveland Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Agriculture Club, '35-'38, Transfer from Bob Jones College, '35. GRACE M. HURsT ..... ....... K noxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Phi Kappa Phi, Omicron Nu, Home Economics Club, Tennessee Valley Girls' Club. SARA HELEN HUTCHISON . . ......... Dyer Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Home Economics Club, Transfer from U. T. Junior College. MARGARET INMAN . ..... . ..... Morristown Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education A lpba Omicmn Pi WILLIAM S. JACOB ......... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Sigma Phi Epsilon ' Circle and Torch, '37-'38, President, '38, Scabbard and Blade, '36-'37, Per- shing Rilles, '34-'35, Kappa Tau Chi, '37, Biology Club, '35, President, '35, Delta Phi Alpha, '37-'38, President, '37, Biologia, '37-'38, Vice-President, '37, VOLUNTEER Reporter, '35, Section Editor, '36, Associate Editor, '37, Editor-in-Chief, '38, President of Sigma Phi Epsilon, '38, Interfraternity Council, '37-'38, Captain of Football Company R. O. T. C., '37, Deutcher Verein, Orange and White, '35, Chairman Grand March Senior Ball. BILL C. JACOBS ........... , Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree University Chorus, Symphonic Choir, Education Club, Arrow and Circle, Orange and White Staff, Delta Phi Alpha. HELEN JENNINGS ......... , Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree ' Alpha Omicron Pi Phi Kappa Phi, VOLUNTEER Staff, '35-'38, Orange and White Staff, '37, '38, Sophomore Class Committee, Chairman Junior Class Committee. ALVXS CLIFTON JONES Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Agriculture Club. ---........Henderson l601 i f2 Ng, Q W1 fe..-Si, 1 gag W SE IOR CL SS PHILLIP EUGENE JONES .........., Sale Creek Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Phi Sigma Kappa Phi KBPPP1 Phi: Phi Delta K3PP3S Alpha Zeta, Ag. Club, Tennessee Farmer, '37 '38' Barnwarmin' Staff '34 '35 '36 '37 '38 P,-eslde 2 ,I , i y y I i S i nt f Ph' D lt KHPPH-I 37, 333 SBCYCHYY Alpha Zeta, '37, '38, Treasurer Phi ggmalliapiaaj '36, '37, 38. JAMES B. JOHNSON ........... . . Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Chemical Engineering FRANCES ELIZABETH JOHNSON ..... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Kappa Della Delta Phi Alpha, Pan-Hellenic Council. CHARLES G. JOHNSTON ........... Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Pbi Sigma Kappa Delta Sigma Pi. Knoxville MARGARET K. JOHNSTON ........... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education GENE KEE ........... .... . Luray Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture JOHN L. KENNON ......... Candidate for LL.B. Degree Delta Sigma Phi . Paris Circle and Torch, Varsity Cross-Country, '32, Varsity Track, '33, Vice-Presi- dent Delta Sigma Phi, '36, President Delta Sigma Phi, '37, Junior Class Com- mittee, '37, Nahheeyayli Governing Board, '36, '37, '38, Committee on Enter- tainment, '37, '38, Inter-Fraternity Council, '36, '37, '38, President Inter- Fraternity Council, '37, '38, Transfer from U. T. Junior College. ELIZABETH KERR . ..... . . . . , Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Chi Omega Mortar Board, University Chorus, '36, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, '36, '37, '38, U. T. Playhouse, '38, Orange and White Staff, '37, Co-Editor Tennessee Tattler, '37, Vice-President Chi Omega, Carnicus Staff, '37, All University Sing, French Club, '36, Transfer from Judson College. KATHLEEN KING .......... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Alpha Omicron Pi R. O. T. C. Sponsor, Vice-President Guidon Society, Vice-President Freshman Class, Vice-President Junior Class, Secretary Senior Class, Assistant Business Manager of Orange and White, '37, Carnicus Staff, VOLUNTEER Section Head, '37, '38, W. S. G. A. Committee Chairman, Pan-Hellenic Council, President Alpha Omicron Pi, Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Kappa Phi, Mortar Board. JESSE B. KINSER ............ . Athens Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce "T" Club, Monday Night Club. GEORGE M. KRISLE, JR ....... ..... K noxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Phi Gamma Delta All-Students Club, '36, '37, '38, Basketball Freshman, '34, '35, Varsity Basket- ball, '36, '37, '38, Tennis Team, '36, '37, '38, Captain of Tennis Team, '38. MILDRED LAOD . ............. Kingston Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Alpha Delta Pi Home EC. Club, Transfer from Carson-Newman. Y?" C L.. - 19298 gi 0455 65' I S ITE? R X Aj I1 61 1 ,, V r ,fx 'isffgfygx SS:-3, gl 4 i lg S we s 1 f 1 ' ,err-, fy 1 t- ef . 5' Eats fig, f . if N it X Mix E Al 1'-1, ' . ijt 21, xfSg ,Cf as eff veg., i. an -' wwf 4 L. fs Haag, ig? , ls.. SQA lj ,gy pq, 1 . x C3 f'gi1w,g'e'H 2 a ' as ASR fl ia Kill g lf' ' IDE A ffxk 'X,f"'x s Eff' 1X Kiwi X2 Aki r :fill VE' l SW, ff X X gear ss-A35 Q 21. if L YQs'i:i 3, 3 2. 5 f ' r :E - 2 9 2 R Mg, :Ag is 5 -15' . 4 . X 5 E- ' i If 'l fa ,. 'XX ?..A .. of 3411, ,EQ ., A fl 1 ,aj . X- xg, 5 ETL?-x 'f.5ffR?2:'.s . L 1. I 1 I I l . i 1 l I l l 4 I I l I ll I , . I i 5 , 1 I ll l E JI I l 2 I I ll rl VV l SE IOR CLASS EUGENIA CHRISTINE LAMPLEY .......... Burns Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Home Ec. Club, '35, '36, '37, '38, Volettes, '37, Home Ec. Circulation Manager of Tennessee Farmer, '37, '38. MARJORIE LANE .......... Washington, D. C. Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Kappa Della Orientation Leader, '36, '37, Vice-President of Kappa Delta, VOLUNTEER Staff, '35, Home Ec. Club, Y. W. C. A. RUSSELL GARRETT LAWLER ......... . Martin Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Ag. Club, B. S. U. Representative, 4-H Club Member, Future Farmers of America. MARY EM LEE . . . A ........... Knoxville Athletic Club, Women's Horseshoe Pitching Champion, '37. WILLIE THOMAS LEFFLER .......... Nashville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Phi Delta Kappa, Vice-President Phi Delta Kappa, President Education Club, Arrow and Circle Club, Education Representative to A. S. C., '36, '37, Freshman Football, '34, Varsity Football, '35, '36, '37, Wrestling Team, '34, '35, '37, President "T" Club, '37, '38, Scarabbean, "T" Club Award, '37. EDITH ROBIDA LEMON ........... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Athletic Club, '34, '35, '36, '37, '38, University Chorus, '35, '36, '37, Tennessee Valley Girls, '35, '36, '37, '38, Vice-President Tennessee Valley Girls, '37, '38, Social Chairman, '36, '37, Symphonic Choir, '35, '36, '37, Y. W. C. A., '35, '36, '37, '38, Y' Cabinet, '36, '37, Secretary Y. W. C. A., '37, '38, Playhouse, '36, '37, '38, Secretary Playhouse, '37, '38, Church Worker's Council, University of Tennessee Christian Association Board, Com- merce Exposition Staff, '37, Chairman Commerce Exposition Committee, '38, ANNA K. LEOPOLD . . . .......... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics THOMAS STANLEY LEWIS, JR ......... Lenoir City Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Delta Sigma Pi. I. SPENCER LITTLE . .... Fort Washington, Pennsylvania Candidate for B.S. Degree in Civil Engineering . Sigma Nu President Sigma Nu, '37, '38, Secretary, '36, '37, A. S. M: E., '34, '35, A. S. C. E., President, '35, '36, Treasurer, '36, '37, Secretary, '37, '38, Glee Club, '34, '35. RUBY CATHERINE LITTRELL ...... , Martin Candidate for B.A. Degree Athletic Club, '36, '37, '38, Intramural Manager of Athletic Club, "37, '38, Intramural Council, Volettes, '37, '38, Member of Executive Committee of Classical Club, '37, '38, Rifle Team, '37. iw JAMES W. LONG ............ . Springfield Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Phi Sigma Kappa , Beaver Club, '35, '36, Nahheeyayli Board, '36, '37, '38, Secretary Nahheeyayli Board, '38, President Phi Sigma Kappa, '37, '38, MARTHA MAGIJELENE LORD ...., Little Rock Arkansas Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics ' Home Ec. Club, Transfer from Arkansas State Teachers College. l 62 I 'x X 1' , ..,.,. X-Y x , I, I .I .. 'I ,g X ,J N ...,. I C, U ,I- I M4 .fffffi KW N.. I l37f',lT1Qj ' X '11 -W5 I x. Qf fat? 'I fflfv K fra .A , ,Ca . f ff ,.,-,. ! XJ 'X SE IOR CLASS MILDRED KATHLEEN LOVE .......,. , Kngxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Tennessee Valley Girls Club. SOPHIE LOWE ......... ...... E agleville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Zeta Tau Alpha Phi Kappa Phi, Mortar Board, President W. S. G. A., '37, '38, Y. W. C. A. ,Cal-Finer, '36, '37, '38, Grace Moore Committee, '37, Senior Class Committee, 37, All-Student Club Council, '37, '38, VOLUNTEER Business Staff, '36, '37, Intramural Council, '36, '37, Scribblers Club, '34, '35. JOSEPH WOODROW LUTTRELL ...... .... C orryton Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Scarabbean, Alpha Zeta, Editor Tennessee Farmer, '37, '38, Dairy Editor, '36, '37, Ag. Representative to A. S. C., '37, '38, Member Student Faculty Welfare Committee, '37, '38, Dairy Products Judging Team, '37, Ag. Club, Assistant Manager Barnwarmin', '37, Barnwarmin' Staff, '36. JOHN T. MARLER, JR. .... . ..... Nashville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture HAROLD POWERS MAsoN . . ..... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Eta Sigma, B. S. U. Council, '34, '35, '36, University Chorus, '37, '38, Scabbard and Blade, Treasurer, '37, '38, Biologia President, '37, '38, Captain Company A, R. O. T. C., Sophomore Faculty Scholarship, '35, '36. ROBERT CLAYTON MATTHEWS, JR ........ Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Chemical Engineering Sigma Alpha Epsilon Tau Beta Pi, Scabbard and Blade, Carnicus, '35, Assistant Manager Carnicus, '37, R. O. T. C. Captain Engineering Company C, '37, '38, Freshman Foot- ball, '33, Freshman Track, '34, Varsity Wrestling, '34, Varsity Track. '36, '37, '38, Varsity Boxing, '38, MARY G. MAY ............... Powell Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Zeta Tau Alpha Alpha Lambda Delta, Omicron Nu, Mortar Board, Phi Kappa Phi, Home Economics Club, Pan-Hellenic, '37, Vice-President Alpha Lambda Delta, '36, Orientation Leader, '36, Merrill Palmer Scholarship, '37, President Zeta Tau Alpha, '37, '38, LOUIs WILLIAM MEHLHORN ......... Wartburg Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Ag. Club, '36, '37, '38, Cumberland Plateau Club, '36, '37, '38, Blount Hall Council, '36, '37, '38, Barnwarmin' Committee, '36, '37. DOROTHY E. MILLER ....... ..... K noxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Zeta Tau Alpha Home Ec. Club. JAMES BENTON MONG ............ Sunbright Candidate for B.A. Degree Ph' D1 K , V' -P 'd nt Education Club, '37, '38, Vice-President Stiidente 'EoruIr'i?P"38, Cliaiiiriiaine Cumberland Plateau Group, '37, Varsity De- bating, '38. MARGARET FRANCES MORTON .......... Cordova Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Omicron Nu, Phi Kappa Phi, Home Ec. Club, University 4-H Club. HAROLD MOSELEY . . ........... Greenfield Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Sigma Phi Epsilon Transfer from U. T. Junior College. E631 six i 11 SEP? 3- -Vw f ire., all 5 Ji 1 IJ K ,fix-iw femfv, xii,-Qi, 1' O fi 1 l 'ii S gl :pf !f"i21X 2 ' 5 I ,ffm , " 4 . s gl F s 1 5.555 XX, .act 2 13 742 SWT ff ii 3. S3 N343 'X'x'Nif ini ff" Mali-f' Q fi f isis.. P I 1, l 1. 1 l . l 1 l 1 l 1l l ,1 1l F xl, ff l l 1 l l 1 1 Q1 l 1 l l l 1 l l 1 l' l, l I l f 1 l 1 1 ll l i 1 Q 1 4 1 l l l l l l l I ' - 1 1 1, af' fa pf., ll 'FE ,'g'ij'Q'i Ms: 2 9 ll SJWW- 1. W "2 fa 1 53313 A 1 fi ' 'ul' "Q, ,fi l'ZA.i,f 11 W X ii ' I ' 1, 1, Y 11. X ,,,,,t 'My 2 1 fx fii x gx fx fi ,. 1 fi 'x ' 'ffl f. 1 l I ,tx A 1 1 2 ZZ 1 IOR CLASS RUSSELL S. MOXLEY ...... U .... . Nashville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Delta Sigma Pi, Treasurer Delta Sigma Pi, ,371 Headmaster, BF? Commerce Exposition, Division Manager, '37, Assistant Manager, 38- JOSEPH P. MURPHY ...... z . - . - KIIOXVIHC Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Delta Sigma Phi. LOUISE MURPHY . . ...... Little Rock, Arkansas Kappa Delta Orange and White, '34, '35, '36, VOLUNTEER, '34, '35, Y. W. C. A., '34, '35, '36. BETTY jo MCCLAIN . ........... Lebanon Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Zeta Tau Alpha Y. W. C. A., Home Ec. Club, Orientation Leader, '36, '37, '38, Pan- Hellenic Council, '36, '37, Vice-President Zeta Tau Alpha, '36, '37, Trans- fer' from Cumberland University. H. E. MCDANIEL, JR ........ ...... T roy Candidate for B.S. Degree in Factory Management Phi Sigma Kappa Second Lieutenant Company "H," R. O. T. C. JAMES BRUCE MCKAMEY ........ , Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Delta Sigma Pi, Senior Guide in ,Delta Sigma Pi, '37, Band, '35, '36, '37, '38, Senior Drum Major, '37, '38, Assistant Drum Major, '36, '37, First Lieutenant R. O. T. C., '37, '38, Scabbard and Blade, '37, '38, Freshman Basketball, '34, '35, Commerce Exposition, '37, '38. JACQUELINE MCKELVY ............ Newbern Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Chi Omega Orientation Leader, '37, Secretary Temple Court Dormitory, '35, Secretary Chi Omega, '37, '38, President Temple Court, '37, '38, Sponsor Company D, Secretary of Guidon, Carnicus Chairman, '38, VOLUN'rEER StaE, '34, '35, W. S. G. A. Council. RALPH E. MCKNIGHT ....... .... l . Trenton Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agricultural Engineering , Y Sigma Phi Epsilon President Sigma Phi Epsilon, '37, Blount Hall Council, l36, Manager Blount Hall, '36, '37, Transfer from Bethel College. ViRciNiA LYON MCTEER ......... Fountain City Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Delta Della Delta Mortar Board, Phi Kappa Phi, Omicron Nu, Omicron Nu Editor, '37, '38, Mortar Board Treasurer, '37, '38, Home Ec. Club, Y. W. C. A., Playhouse, '36, '37, '38, Secretary Playhouse, '37, Orange and White. RALPH EARL NEAL .......... . Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce MARSHAL NEAL .' ......... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree ANNA GRACE NEEDHAM ........... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Kappa Delia Orange and White, '34, '35, Home Ec. Club, '34, '35, '36, '37, VOLUNTEER' '34, '35, President of Kappa Delta, '37, '38, I 641 ,. . ,., . .,.x X 1 1 Ngxxz -'Q if 'RN Q . "uf 1'-'E ,QE :Fl 'rf ilflllxi' ff' 'JN NH Q' Fi: 'L fi A : , . an ' 'x,.f::7fi: -'SS IQQ7- f LE ' w 1 A W Z1 . WM f 1 f xi Wi Law! L2 gh-,,,,,,2 ref! IX' M e fl: A 4 .19 SE IOR CLASS ROBERTA NEWMAN ............ , Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Delta Zeta Playhouse. WILLIAM OSCAR NEY, JR ........... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Chemistry Kappa Sigma Alpha Chi Sigma, Delta Phi Alpha, University Chorus. ELEANOR NOELL . . . . . . . . . . . Candidate for B.A. Degree Alpha Omirron Pi . Norris VOLUNTEER Staff, '35, '36, '37, '38, Carnicus Staff, '36, '37, Senior Class Committee. WINNIE B. NORRIS '. .... .... . Memphis Candidate for B.A. Degree University Chorus, '36, '37. W. WAYNE OLIVER .... ...... . Knoxville Candidate for LL.B. Degree Phi Delta Phi, Varsity Debating Team, '30, '31, Rifle Team, '29, '30, '32, '33, Hearst Trophy Rifle Team, '33, Captain Company D, R. O. T. C., '33, Tennessee Law Review Board, '36, '37, '38, Case Note Editor, '33, Tennessee Law Review, '38, Exchequer of Phi Delta Phi, '36, '37, Magister of Phi Delta Phi, '37, '38, Pershing Rifles. FORREST CLIFTON ORR ........... Greeneville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Sigma Chi JOHN ALFRED PARKER ........ . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Phi Gamma Delta Scarabbean Senior Society, Phi Delta Phi, Vice-President Senior Class, Vice- President Y. M. C. A.. '37, '38, Treasurer Y. M. C. A., '36, '37, VOLUNTEER, '34, '35, '36, Senior Assistant Manager Carnicus, Student Chair- man Homecoming, ' 37, Chairman A. S. C. Campus Improvements Committee, '37, '38, Co-Editor of "Tennessee Tattler," '37, Band, '34, '35, Member Christian Associations Board and University Church Worker's Council, President Freshman "Y" Group, '34, '35, Chairman Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Class Committees, Aloha Oe Committee, '37, University Entertainment Committre, '37, '38. EVELYN JOSEPHINE PARKS ...... . . . . Somerville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Zeta Tau Alpha Home Ec. Club, Y. W. C. A., Transfer from U. T. Junior College. JENNY LIND PASCHALL .......... 1 . Puryear Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Home Ec. Club, '34, '35, '36, '37, '38, Glee Club, '34, '35, Dramatic Club, '34, WxLL1AM GORDON PEARCE . . ....... Cornersville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce. Varsity Wrestling, '36, '37, '38, "T" Club, '37, '38. RUBY REA PEARCE ......... . Milan Candidate for B.A. Degree Sigma Kappa Playhouse, '37, '38, VOLUNTEER Staff, '36, '37, Transfer from State Teachers College. D. MAYO PEARSON ........... . jackson Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Ag. Club. T651 ' X ei -TP 3 , jj? P ivbshqo -,,, 1 si E Opflfiqplkmlfl A iq 3 E2-wages K X fl ffvx W K si stlnlfilf R sv Vs X. r, ykgjzvxx Qfjvfx ll ,Nj X, ,.l, 5 L' f lil - 114 . ' X M N i - E0 2 f E ,X Eg ,X .- Ag .t A' Qi, jf -1 : "1 1 ,' i xi :sal 5 ' s 5 Er ' -N 11' 1 5' f l l"3"i's if ill -. ' N x 1. mf in rg 31. , 2 -Q, 3 5 a fffws X.. Fifi .Ei XRZXQQJ1 if ... .ew- I I 4 rw c-.Ili l ,, 4. E I I I i l l l fl ' im l',1 W VII l'l ll 'l l . ll, fi ill 11, All lil ll ll ll .,, ,, 1 HI 1, fl I l i s ll I ,I I ': 4 I , I i. ull 'illl My' Ill, ll, ,,, ral ,II llill ,, 'jill Mg, tal ,yell we iff? law? QW ,, , I ,Ev i If , ' 'if 2,1 Ii' l 1 f VI 1. 'f Q 5, 1 z s , l X l- , v ' 3V'Xl2 l' 'X ' 3. 1 QW, Z ,,. 5 ' EXE U, Xi fl l 'X J SE IOR CLASS ROGERS L. PEDIGO .......... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree MARY EMMA PERRY ........ . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree S, JAMES PERRY ......... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Kappa Alpha Business Manager University Tennessee Playhouse, '35, '36, President Play- house, '37, '38. CHARLES PFLANZE .......... . . Maryville Candidate for B.S. Degree In Commerce Delta Sigma Pi, University Chorus, Transfer from Maryville College. DANIEL MARTIN PICK ...... . West Bend, Wisconsin Candidate for B.A. Degree Glee Club, "T" Club, Biologia, President Delta Phi Alpha, '37, '38, Alpha Sigma Delta, Treasurer Alpha Sigma Delta, '37, '38, Track, '35, '36, '37, '38, Basketball, '34, Cross-Country, '35, '36. JOHN MORXER PICK ........ West Bend, Wisconsin Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Deltal Tau Delta Freshman Football, Freshman Basketball, Freshman Track, Varsity Football, '33, '34, '35, Varsity Basketball, '33, '34, '35, '36, '37, Varsity Track, '37, "T" Club, Carnicus Staff, '34. HOWARD PIERCE . ........... . Newbern Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Ag. Club, Transfer from Peabody College. VIRGINIA PLUNKETT . . ' ...... . Memphis Candidate for B.A. Degree Alpha Delta Pi Y. W. C. A., Scribblers Club, Junior Class Finance Committee, 'Senior Class Surprise Committee, Orange and White Editorial Staff, VOLUNTEER Business Staff, W. S. G. A. ' , JA. SARA H. POLLARD ......... ' , Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree - Kappa Delta Orange and White, '36, '37, Y.,3?V.,-ggi. A. Cabinet, '37, '38, Volettes, NANCY A. POORE ......... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Alpha Omicron Pi Orange and White, '34, '35, '36, '37, VOLUNTEER Staff, '34, '35, '36, '37, Debating Club, '36. '37, Y. W. C. A. Treasurer, '35, '36, '37, President Y. W. C. A., '37, '38, Christian Associations Board, '35, '36, '37, '38, Tennessee Playhouse, '36, '38, French Club, Secretary, '36, '37, Classical Club, Secretary, ' 37, '38, Junior Cap and Gown Award, ' 37, Honorary Lieu- tenant Colonel, '38, Guide Society, '38, Women's Student Government Council Elections Chairman, '38, All-Students Club, '38, Senior Volunteer Com- mittee, '38, University Entertainment Committee, '38, General Manager All University Sing, '38, JOHN CLIFFORD POWELL ......... . Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Della Sigma Pi ...........Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree VOLUNTEER Staff, '34, '35, '36, '37, Orange and White Staff, '34, Can-liqus Staff, '36, '37. ANN LEE PRATER . . i661 ,..e.. -,i ff, fy.: Z l I fiifl A E22 15' .J , -JQZZCN SE IOR KATHRYN PRITCH ETT . CLASS Candidate for B.A. Degree Transfer from U. T. Junior College. CHRISTINE PRoCroR . ..... . ..... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics GILES BLACKBURN PROPST . . .... Boydton, Virginia Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agricultural Economics Ag. Club. ALLEN C. RA1vIsEY ..... ...... . Gallatin Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Pi Kappa Alpha Varsity Football, '34, '35, '36, '37, Basketball, '34, '35, "T" Club. MARY MARGARET RICHARDSON ......... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Kappa Delta VOLUNTEER Staff, '35, '36, Orange and White, '35, '36, Tennessee Farmer Staff, '36, '37, '38, Home Economics Club, '35, '36, '37, '38, W. S. G. A. Council, '37, '38, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, '36, '37, '38, Barnwarmin' Staff, '37, Dramatic Club '36, '37, Orientation Leader, '36. ROY C. ROBERTSON ....... . . . . Dante, Virginia Candidate for B.S. Degree in Mechanical Engineering Tau Beta Pi, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, President, '38, Junior Engineering Award, '37. D. CLAYTON ROBINSON .......... . Etowah Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce JAMES KEITH ROBINSON ....... . Knoxville Candidate for B. A. Degree Delta Tau Della Phi Eta Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi, Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '35, '36, President, '38, Classical Club, '34, '35, '36, '37, '38, All Students Club Council, '38, Class Secretary, '35, Tennis, '35, Manager Grace Moore Concert, '38, Scarab- bean. MARY KATHERINE ROLLINS . ...... . Chattanooga Candidate for B.A. Degree STEVEN JAMES ROUTON, JR. ........ . Paris Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Sigma Alpha Epxilon Varsity Track, '37, '38, "T" Club, Senior Class Committee. MARY HELEN RUE ............. Franklin Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Della Delta Delta Home Ec. Club, '36, '37, '38, Y. W. C. A., Nutrition Editor Tennessee Farmer, '37, '38, President Tennessee Student Home Economics Association '36, '37, Student Representative to American Dietetic Association, '37, College Consultant for Woman's Home Companion, '37, '38, Transfer from George Peabody College. MARGARET LORETTA RULE Candidate f OI' B.S. Degree l 67 1 Sevlerville in Education 3353, V e 'Eu-Avi! I SE IOR CL SS JOSEPH Y. SAMMONS . .......... . Eads Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Sigma Phi Epsilon Barnwarmin' Staff, '37, '38, Ag. Club, '36, '37, '38, Transfer from U. T. Junior College. ALAN N. SAYFORD .......... Lookout Mountain Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Sigma Alpha Epxilon Orange and White, '36, '37, '38, Carnicus, '35, '36, '37, '38, Assistant Manager, '37, '38, Swimming Team, '36, '37, "T" Club, '37, '38, Delta Sigma Pi, First Lieutenant Company D, '36, '37. JAMES ALLEN SCHULTZ . ..... . . . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Eta Sigma, Winner Phi Sherman Bennett Contest, ' 36, Winner Rush Strong Medal, '37, U. T. and State Representative in Rhodes Scholarship Finals, '37. WILMA RossEA SHACKLEFORD .... St. Petersburg, Florida Candidate for B.A. Degree Y. W. C. A., '36, '37, Tennessee Valley Girls Club, '36, '37, '38, Monday Night Club, '37, '38, Transfer St. Petersburg Junior College. WILMA MARGARET SHARP . . ........ Huntsville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Athletic Club, '36, '37, '38, Home Ec. Club, '36, '38, Sigma Omega, Transfer from East Tennessee State Teachers College. ROBERT EDWARD SHERRILL ....... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree President Classical Club, '36, '37, Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '36, '37, '38. ROBERT H. SHERROD ......... . Martel Candidate for B.A. Degree J. R. SHIPLEY . ......... .... K noxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Civil Engineering I Band, '33, '34, '35, '36, Sergeant Band, '36, Second Lieutenant R. O. T. C., , '37, A. S. C. E. REBECCA B. SHROPSHIRE ....... ' . . .' . Ooltewah Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics B. S. U. Council, University Symphonic Choir, '36, '37, Home Ec. Club, '37, '38, Transfer from University of Chattanooga. BOB SHUEY ............... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Chemistry Pi Kappa Alpha Beaver Club, '35, '36, Inter-Fraternity Council, '36, '37, '38, WILLIAM M. SHY .......... Cumberland, Gap Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Pi Kappa Alpha Orange and White Reporter, '36, '37, '38, Commission in R. O. T. C.. Lieutenant in Band, '36, '37, Varsity Track, '37, '38, Bgxingy '36s Senioli Class Committee, President Pi Kappa Alpha, '38, WILLIAM H. SILVA ......... , Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree I 68 1 SE IOPR CLASS C. GERALDINE SIMMONS ....... Titusville, Florida Candidate for, B.S. Degree in Chemistry Pi Beta Phi Gamma Sigma Epsilon, Dramatic Club, '37, '385 Y, W, C, A., '37, 7385 President West Strong Hallg Transfer from Stetson University. VIRGINIA SIMPSON . ........... , Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Phi Mu President Phi Mu, '37, '38g President Pan-Hellenic, '37, '38, Member W. S. G. A. Council, '37, '38, Member University Entertainment Committeeg Tennessee Valley Girls Clubg Home Ec. Club. MARY E. SLEMP ......... Middlesboro, Kentucky Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Transfer from Eastern State Teachers' College. RUTH SMITH . .... .... . . . . . . Erwin Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Kappa Delta University Chorus, '35, '36, '37, '38g Symphonic Choir, '36, '37, VOLUNTEER Staff, '37, '38g Rifle Team, '36, '37g Transfer from Shorter College. BERNARD IVERSON SPARKS, JR ......... Harrogate Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Transfer from L. M. U. L. 'CAESAR STAIR, JR ........... . Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Sigma Alpha Epsilon Intramural Manager, '35, '36, "T" Clubg Band, Carnicus Staff, '35, '36, '37g VOLUNTEER Staff, Orange and White Staff. LILA MOORE STANTON ....... McColl, South Carolina Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Kappa Della Transfer from Southern Seminary and Winthrop College. ROBERTA A. STEVENS ..... 1. . . . Newark, Ohio Candidate for B.A. Degree Alpha Della Pi French Club, Classical Clubg Transfer from Muskingum College. JAMES H. STILZ ............ . Gallatin Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Pi Kappa Pm Ag. Club, Business Manager of Tennessee Farmer, '37, '38, Member of Dairy Products Judging Team, '37, Barnwarmin' Staff, '36, '37. HAROLD THOMAS STONE ........... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Rifle Teamg Captain Company G, R. O. T. C. ANNA RUTH STONECIPHER . ....... . . . Eagan Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Volettesg Transfer from L. M. U. LoUIS ALVIS STUART ............ Whiteville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Ag. Club. If69l SE IOR CLASS RICHARD C. STUDLEY .... . ...... . Alcoa Candidate for B.S. Degree in Engineering A. S. M. C., '36, '37, '38, Pershing Rifles, '33, '34, '35, Secretary A. S. M. C., First Lieutenant R. O. T. C. J. M. SUGARMAN, JR ............. Memphis Candidate for B.S. Degree in Chemical Engineering Secretary A. I. Ch. E., '37, '38. JUNE HARRIET SULLIVAN . . . . . . . Chattanooga Candidate for B.A. Degree Phi Mu Delta Phi Alpha, Alpha Lambda Delta, Biologia. FLOYD L. SWEENEY ............. Mulberry Candidate for B.S. Degree in Chemistry Alpha Chi Sigma, Transfer from L. M. U. EDWARD SYMES, JR, . ......... . . . Gallatin Candidate for B.S. Degree in Mechanical Engineering Pi Kappa Alpha Tau Beta Pi, A. S. M. E., Transfer from Texas Technological College and Baylor University. RUTH ELIZABETH TALLENT ......... Copperhill Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Transfer from Tennessee Wesleyan College. THEODORE M. TARWATER . ....... . Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce BEN W. TAYLOR . . .......... . Bruceton Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Alpha Tau Omega Phi Delta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi. BILLY TAYLOR ............ ,Q . Bruceton Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education A lpba Tau Omega JAMES DUARD TAYLOR ......... . Benton Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Ag. Club, Phi Epsilon Club, '35, '36, B. S. U., Barnwarmin' Staff, '37, '38, Tennessee Farmer Staff, '37, '38, Dairy Products Judging Team, '37, '38. KATHERYNE L. TAYLOR ...... . LaF0lleife Candidate for B.A. Degree Alpha Omicron Pi Glee Club, '34, '35, Y. W. C. A., '34, '35, Orientation Leader, '36. LUKE E. TERRY . ........... , Oneida Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Ag. Club, Sergeant-at-Arms, Secretary and Treasurer, '37, '38, Tennessee Farmer Staff, '37, '38, Glee Club, '34, '35, University Chorus, '37, '38, Monday Night Club, '36, '37, '38, Barnwarmin' Staff, '36, '37, U, T. Roundup Staff, '37, '38, , rvol SE IOR CLASS GEORGIA M. THOMPSON ....... Trenton, New Jersey Candidate for B.A. Degree Delta Phi AIPITBS Deutcher Verein, Town Girls Club, Classical Club. PAUL INMAN THOMPSON ......... , Kenton Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Alpha Tau Omega B. S. U., Third Vice-President, Blount Hall Council. JAMES ELVIS TICE .............. Sharon Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Zeta, Phi Delta Kappa, Ag. Club. JAMES W. TIDWELL ............ Adamsville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Phi Sigma Kappa Ag. Club, Track, Cross Country. JAMES H. T1ProN ............ Stony Point Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce JOE PAUL TRULIOUS . ........... Maryville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Phi Eta Sigma, Secretary Junior Class, Delta Sigma Pi, Headmaster Delta Sigma Pi, '38, J. MASON TUTTLE ............. Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Civil Engineering Sigma Chi A. S. C. E., Vice-President, '35, "T" Club, Freshman Track, '34, Fresh- man Swimming, '34, Varsity Swimming, '35, '36, '37. RUTH E. VANCE ...... ....... K noxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics - Zeta Tau Alpha Home EC. Club. MAXINE VUNKANNON ........ . Memphis Candidate for B.A. Degree Alpha Della Pi Y. W. C. A.,Cabinet, '35, '36, Secretary, '36, '37, Treasurer, '37, '38, Orange and White Staff, '36, '37, '38, Classical Club, '37, '38, Scribbler's, '34, '35, Spanish Club, '36, '37. LYSBETH WADDELL ............ Greeneville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Delta Delta Delta VOLUNTEER, Y. W. C. A., Transfer from Tusculum and Beaver College. LUCY ESTES WALKER ............ Dyersburg Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Phi Mu President Phi Mu, '35, '36, Vice-President Pan-I-Ielleinc, '35, '36, Treasurer Home Ec. Club, '35, '36, VOLUNTEER Business Staff, '34, '35, '36, Women's Intramural Council, '34, '35, '37, '38, Tennessee Farmer Staff, '34, '35s Scribblers Club, '35, '36, POLLY WALKER .............. Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Kappa Delta VOLUNTEER Business Staff, '34, '35, '36, '37, Orange and White, '34, '35, '36, '37, '38, Education Club, '36, '37, '38, Y. W. C. A., '34, '35, W. S. G. A., '34, '35, '36, '37, Junior Class Committee, '36, '37. i711 E IOR CLASS. RALPH M. WALLACE ...... , . . . . Knoxville Candidate for B. S. Degree lh Commerce Sigma Phi Epsilon ' S' g V' .P 'd ig, '35, '36, Circle and Torch, Phi Kappa Phi, I'3'ii1r.i"'s,igrifImi2ig iii ifiilgi A. cabinet, '34, '35, '361 BUS?"eSS,M"n?eef Torch '35, '36, Assistant Business Manager Orange and Whlte, 34, 35, Busingggs Manager Orange and White, '35, '36, President Sophomore Class, ,35 :36. All Students Club Council, '35, '36, Assistant Manager Commerce Expositioh '36 '37, '38, VOLUNTEER Staff, '35, '36, Chancellor of Delta Sigma Pi, '38, Secretary Tennessee College Press Association, '36, '37. MARGUERITE WAssENIcH ...... . . Beaumont, Texas Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Alpha Delta Pi Y. W. C. A., Home Ec. Club, Transfer from University of Texas. MELVIN THOMAS WEAKLEY ...... . Dyersburg Candidate for B.A. Degree Alpha Tau Omega JERALD C. WEATHEREORD ......... . Puryear Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Phi Delta Kappa, Ag. Club. ELLEN WEAVER ........... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Phi Mu WILLIAM BOLLING WEISIGER ......... Memphis Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce .Sigma Alpha Epsilon Carnicus, '36, '37, Chairman Junior Prom Publicity Committee, '37. GLADYS O. WHITE . ........... Rutherford Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Omicron Nu, Home Ec. Club. VIRGINIA WHITE . . . ....... . Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Alpha Delta Pi Vice-President W. S. G. A., '37, '38, Vice-President Pan-Hellenic Council, '37, '38, Y. C. A. Cabinet, '36, '37, '38, Carnicus Staff, '35, '36, '37, '38, Orange and White Editorial Staff, '34, '35, '36, '37, Subscription Man- ager VOLUNTEER, '36, '37, President Alpha Delta Pi, '37, '38, Barnwarmin' Queen, '37, Sponsor Third Battalion R. O. T. C., '37, '38, Treasurer Senior Class, Assistant General Manager Junior Prom, Chairman Senior Finance Com- mittee. LOIS WILLIS WHITEHEAD .......... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education . Delta Delta Delta University Chorus, "34, '35, Orange and White, '34, '35, Beauty Section, '34, '35, '36, '37, '38, Ace Day Queen, '34, '35, '36, '37, Vice-President Freshman Class, '34, '35, Sponsor Engineer's Battalion, L37, '38, President Delta Delta Delta, Chairman Junior Committee, Treasurer Pan-Hellenic, '37, '38, Pan-Hellenic Representative, '36, '37.' ALETHEA HELEN WHITNEY .......... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Alpha Lambda Delta, President, '36, '37, Senior Advisor, '37, '38, Mortar Board, Vice-President, '37, '38, Phi Kappa Phi, Athletic Club, Secretary and Treasurer, '35, '36, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, '35, '36, '37, '38, French Club, President, '35, '36, International Relations Club, Secretary and Treasurer, '35, '36, Women's Intramural Council, President, '37, '38, Phi Eta Tau, W. S. G. A. Council, '36, '37, '38, Orientation Leader, '36, '37, Cap and Gown Freshman Award, '34, '35, Tennessee Valley Girls' Club, '35, '36, '37, Women's Intramural Manager, '37, '38. MARJORIE WILBORN ............ Memphis Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Kappa Della Home Ec. Club, Y. W. C. A., W. S. G. A., Transfer from West Tennessee State Teachers College. MYRTLE VVILKERSON ........... Calderwood Candidate for B.S. Degree in Commerce Chi Omega Y. W. C. A. FLEDA STELLA WILLIAMS ...... Appalachia, Virginia Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Phi Mu Home Ec. Club, '35, '36, '37, '38, Y. W. C. A., Transfer from S. T. C., Henson Hall Council, '36, '37, Secretary and Registrar Phi Mu. HENRY E. WILLIAMS ........... . Savannah Candidate for B.S. Degree in Electrical Engineering Phi Pi Phi Beaver Club, '34, '35, Nahlieeyagli Board, '35, '36, '37, Secretary A. I. E. ., '37, '38. E721 SE IOR CLASS CONSTANCE LUCILLE WILLIAMS ..... Tavares, Florida Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Delta Delta Delta n u, ay ouse, Home Ec. Club, Transfer from Florida State Women's College. 'Dmicro N ' Pl h RUTH DOUGLAS WILLIAMS .... Franklin, North Carolina Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Editorial and Business Staff of Tennessee Farmer, '37, '38. SHERWOOD DAVID WILLIAMSON . . . Middlesboro, Kentucky Candidate for B.S. Degree Phi Sigma Kappa CHARLOTTE WILLsON ............ Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics Della Delta Delta Orange and White, '34, '35, Associate Editor VOLUNTEER, '36, '37, Home , Ec. Club, '34, '35. SARAH DOROTHY WILSON .......... Knoxville Candidate for B.A. Degree Spanish Club, Tennessee Valley Girls Club. THOMAS T. WILSON .......... , Chattanooga Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Iota Lambda Sigma, President, '37, '38, WILLIAM STEED WILSON . ..... . Cleveland Candidate for B.A. Degree Phi Gamma Della French Club, '37, '38, Boxing, '38, Cadet Officer R. O. T. C., '37, '38, Transfer from V. M. I. HELEN MARGARET WOOTEN . .... . Chattanooga Candidate for B.A. Degree Chi Omega Y. W. C. A., '37, '38, Business Staff Orange and White, '37, Guidon, Transfer from University of Chattanooga. L. D. WORD ..... ........ . Knoxville Candidate fox B.A. Degree in Commerce Alpha Tau Omega Circle and Torch, Pershing Rifles, Business Manager VOLUNTEER, '37, Car- nicus Staff, '35, '36, '37, Captain Company A, R. O. T. C., '38, Vice- President Circle and Torch, '38. POLLY ANN WORKMAN . .......... Clarksville Candidate for B.A. Degree Y, W, C, A., '36, '37, '38, Education Club, '37, Scribblers Club, '35. EUGENIA WYATT . ..... . . . . . . . Newbern Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Chi Omega ALSIE MILDRED YOUNG ........... Knoxville Candidate for B.S. Degree in Education Chi Omega JOHN LEROY YOUNG ........... johnson City Candidate for B.S. Degree in Agriculture Phi Delta Kappa, Ag. Club. LADY YOUNG ........... . . . . Ripley Candidate for B.S. Degree in Home Economics 731 1' I if -s If - .v , , A LJ' l ' "" I ' il , x 'Q 3 . ' - Xfxlgs ,NX f Q' Y, J , , I R ,N AM Qs px sf' xl li , I X . H-. . I .mortal . 1 - I if lil I l ee ll lt ln - I i THE JU TUE COMMITTEE N Strainin at the leash 'um in the un brealcin at the S 2 J P g S a S post, and crashing the gate were familiar antics of the rest- less uniors who a eared as anxious to exchan e the iclc a PP . S P for the avel as the Frosh were to linall swa the button 3 Y P for a pin. Occasional tastes of what itls like to step high at the Junior Prom and Party seemed to produce an even stronger desire for post and power in the BMOC's of next year rather than soothing any ego. However, on the basis of not too infrequent lapses into sober service and fulfill- ment of responsibilities by the class as a whole with length- ening flashes of outstanding merit in the leaders, one may safely presage a group worthy of carrying the torch for Tennessee. Fir!! Row: Black, Cecil, Christenberry, Draper, Fisher, Flenniken. Second Row: Hagan, Rodgers, Stanton, Stokely, Stubley, Talley. -J I I I III II II I I I E I I 12' I I 3 I I I II I II I I I , II 1 I I I I I3 :I,II III H I I III Ii IIII VI IIIIIII IU I II II-III :,I II4 I, NI III I :II I I I I I I1II II QQ III IIII II III YI IM 'I I I I 'VIII IIQIIII II! III III gIgI IIII III IIII MMI III. a'II KI mfg ,I ',I II , II 'II III, II III Il III II I'LII I I ,II ,I IIN II I II IIIIQI III Mi I 'IU ,.,, I fm lx-I 4 , .II II III IIII 'I ,III 5 , . X' Iiazii 1 I I I I II 4 I I I I R w I I I VV I , I7 i!V f, f ,I WV' Mmv1?iiQxNce5'jApAIQi3Ii?5I. .I fin f I Ig I o I Educalzon I ,BILLY I ,. . 1 , f ,, ,- If , I X x 'Aff z ,w'f4AfWZffl "3 .IAW?SI'I5IEfIIAsHLQQIFIf 'III . Ziwz Zlzificulwfi ,I I JI ' K glhdaamfnrelgiixyg FRANCESJCANNON .I . . ' I I ' Home Economic! 'I HELEN MARGARETICARR , . . Liberal Art: JOSEPHINR CARRINGTON . . . I Education R. BARRY Cscu. . . . . . Engineering MAUDE W. CHAMBERS . . . . . I Commerce DEXTER A. CHMSTRNBRRRY . . Liberal flrt: E761 , Home Economzcs ' , VRRW LdFol1Qfle Knoxville Gallatin Tazewell Knoxville r Q fa QW Q1 ,., 9 2 ,ANN-i?,i,OZIifii1 . f W1 JU1oR CLASS JOE LITTLE '. . . . . . . . Sparta fl gri culture BYRL C. LOGAN . . . .... Richmond, Ind. - Commerce JXMMY H. LovE .' . . . . . . Greeneville A Liberal Arts, Domus C. LOVELACE' . . .... . Henry U M Home Economics HELEN Louisa LAY . . , . .o , . Cor,-yton A o ' Home Etonomirs C FRANKIB LEE MACKEY . . . . . Parsons E Home Economics Ioittlei Rocko Ark. JOHN , . Martin SARA XMATUQISA fLAPsiJEYo EOCBEN Krwxvllle o f Home Eoonomzgsf E QE, ANATLAS PACE . . . ff. E -' N6ffiS , E j Educoiion WALTER REED PAGE . . . Yazoo City, fMiss. f , Home Economic: BLEACA DEE PAINTER ....E Cullowhee, N. C. Education ROBERT H. PEEPLES . . . . . . . Covington Liberal Ari: CHARLES ALBERT RAY . ..,. . Knoxville Engineering I791 Mom 'fo :EM ,,,,x " R Cb QE Q22 fn J U N 1 0 R MARTHA RECAN . A. . . . fMemphi 5 ' A + A -fLiberal Arts 1 ' 1 JAMES H. REYNOLDS . A . . . Athens A Agriculture J A A A A A A fEduL'alio1z ,T ' f A WILTQARD D. R1cHARDsoN . T. f ' Ca5T211 i3Il if5?PfiUgS 4 ,KATHfffINE' 'RIDDLEZ 4A ' . T. 5 ' SheI1fYi?i1Tlg ff ' " f' .f VLiberalTArt3'A f A w A A B Ropqmzs Lzlzeral A rt: NANCY SMITH A ANN 'SPRAT1' . A. A Liberal Arts SUE M. STAVNTON V. . . . . . A Liberal Artsp EDITH E. STOKELY . ..... . Newport Liberal Arts A MARTHA STUBLEY . . ...... Kngxville Home Economics A A SARASWANN . . . . . 4 . . . . , Palmer Home Economics , ANNE DUDLEY SWOOPE . . . . Columbus, Miss.A Liberal A rts LOUISE TALLEY . ...... . Knoxville Liberal Arts E801 62? 'ifl gsm... EIU IOR CLASS RENO L. TAUBERT ...... . Shirley Agriculture MARGARET THOMPSON . , . . . Knoxville Liberal Arts MARX' ELLA TIDWELL . . . . . . Adamsville Home Economics PATRICIA TUCKEK ...... Scottsville, Ky. Liberal Arts ANNA B. VANCE , . . . . . Knoxville Education CHRISTINE VAUGHAN . . . . . . Linden A Home Economics l GLENN E1 VVALKER Q .A . l . Lebanon l l f Liberal Arts "MARSHALL,WAl.KER'. .g .l . . . l ' Home Eronomics RUTH K. WAYLAND A A A .Liberal V l A AEDYTHE i Vinci NIA MABEL RAY VVELLS ,A . , . . . Powell l A , Ho1neEconomics yQHeARi,ES W.fWmEgQAMP .A .A Richmond, Ind, A , A A A l ECommerce l VRUTHAANN Wums A. l. . . . A A Liberal Arts A EMAR113 R. ,WILLIS . . . . . WestfPoinr, M159 Home Economzcs VVILDA VVUJNINGHAM . . . . Fountain City Home Economics A l CHARLES D. Woon ..... . Knoxville Engineering l WALTER A. Woon . . ..... McMinnville I 9 Educatzon Engmeerzng GEORGE L. YARBRO ..... . Dyersburg Agriculture 5 l' E811 GEORGE ROBERT VVOODRUFF . . . Knoxville A l X A x ., T OFFICERS JACK ,ARMITAGE . - President SEARLE GILLESPIE . . V ive-Pf0Sifl'fff1f EVELYN DARST . . . Secretary TOM SEARLE . . Tffdwffff COMMITTEES Open I'10lt56-DOROTHY HINTON, Chairmang MATTHEW TUCKER, TODDY BRANNUM, ELIZABETH JACOWAY, ROBERT FULTON. Dutch Dinner-FRED RAMSEY, Chairmang JANE HARRIS, JOHN LUTZ, C. P. IRYVIN, FAYE POORE. Transportation-FRANCES EDMUNDS, Chairmang NICAJ-'EE LEE, GERvAsE BARNHILL, EVELYN KIRBY. Innofvation-SARA RANRIN, Chairmang VINCENT VORDER-BRUEGGE, ANDREW MEYERS. Entertainment-ELIZABETH MCKELDER, Chairmang BILL SIMS, BETTY PEARMAN. Cooperative-YVONNE HOLLAND, Chairmang HERBERT DUGGAN, ROGER CATE, RUTH MORGAN. PI'0j6'C1'-JACK LONDON Chairman- MARGARET MCCORMICK Lois HENRY. Y Y ! Finance-SPEARS MCAI.LESTER, Chairmang MIKE CAMPBELL, JAMES MCKEE. S WI UPHUMUR CL 5 I it if THE UPHU URECUMMITTEEM N "Annus Mirabilis" may well he applied to the year of uni- versity which separates the Sophomore from the Freshman. How the Sophs grasp, not all, but more than the college has to offer in one year is indeed amazing. Who could pos- serge hiding beneath an unsightly mass of pea-green felt with a three-foot bill shading what slightly resembles a sheepish grin. Yes, education is astounding. Seriously, though, with more four-pointers than any other class this i sibly visualize that the white-shoed, herringboned acme of year, with leaders like Armitage, Gillespie, Darst, Ramsey, l Esquirean haherdashery lounging critically in front of the Poore, Kohler, Pickett, and many others, one can see a real I l sandwich shop was just one year ago a lowly rat in shiny future for the Class of '40, Fulton, Holland, Jacoway, Lutz, McAllestex l A McCormick, McKelder, Poore, Ramsey, Rankin l l 1 I 1 l l l A f?'F'L"'+ "' W ll ll l 1 1 . T 4 I 1. I 1 1 1 1 1 1 ,. 11 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 l i 1 1 l I E 1 L4 l I 1 5 51 ll 1N Wit. 1 1 1 I 1 l 1 1 141 1 l1 T l '1 I 5 11 l l l 1. I .P l E 1 gl Wil 14 li F1 1 1 7 1551 1 1 J lwl, fl E :XL 1 ld -N 1 -1 :fl L Ai IN1 l 1 1 1 Sl QQ? SOPHO ORE ROBRRRT S. l. City, 1VIAIiGARIZT7ALBERgi!' . -1 KDOX ViU6f 1 1f1 ARMITAGE . 1 ELLEN A CE '-, Q . LAWRENCRAR F. ACHANDL ER .A .1 M'V3YffmANCE5,1QHAPM'5N 1' 1 1 51949961593 Knoxville .,,.Q fE1S1W2h JUANITA CHYNOWETH . . jWiBg1ftIe Cregkg Mich. THELMA N. CLAPP . . Coryytoh MARIE LOUISE CLAYTON . . Bailey JACK M. Coma . . Knoxville KATHRYN Cioox . . AErwin S. T. COPENHAVER . . Bristol RICHARD O. DEAQRICK . . Klloxville ROBERT H. DICKERT . . Knoxville 1 JEANETTE DONALDSON- . , Lynbrook, N. Y. E841 Y EV' j fi, 2 2' fi 9 f-W, S ,, , ,1 . 1 . 1' 11 ' 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 11 1, 1 "1 5 1 li 1 1 .1 11 1 W 1 ,hw A . W 1 1 J", 1 1 , 1 H 1 1 1 1 1 . , 1 11 '1 J' ' 1 1 X INT 1 E1 1 11 131 1 13 11' E 11 1 1 '21 ' 1 1111 IQ 1 111 ,1,1 L ' 11' 11 1' " 1 2 11 1 '13 11 Ig 1 11 1 . .n g '1 1111 A 111119 15 11 ' , 1 7 1 1 1 1 11 11 ' 1 11 1 ' 111 '11 1 I 1 ' 111 I X111 1 111 1 11 '11 1 11 T1 1 1311 1 1 111 1 1 1 11 1 111 1 11 I1 1 '11 11 1I 2 115 1111 1 111 351 , 1 111 A4 , 1 W1 1235111 1 '11 1- 11 111 l 111 1 1 1, '1 1 111' 11 A 3-11 1 1 , 1-fx 1 1 1 11151- - 1 111233 ' l l 1lr"fn l 1 . 1 N1 f VST K 4' 4 'iHERBERT LSLATERY OPHOM ORE CLASS L ANTHONY RICHARDSON JAMES H Ruin A L ROBERSON R FosTER Ros EBROUGH Knoxvllle Somerville Hornbe'1k Memphls ALTA M. Ross . BELLA Ross . . PEGGY SANnERs . . VVALTER A. SATTERVVHITE MAR1oN SQHAAD . T. C. SEARLE . JAMES IL SISAY . . ROBERT E. SEWELL . . EDWARD ,SMITH f . Tom C. SMTTH, JR. . T. 1MlRXAM i!SN'iDER n A .A . Cleveland . Bristol . Knoxville . a . Athens ' .Z Knoxvillgz' Fountain City , ,,, Memphis . Franklin . wsriswn, val. MENDELL SNooGRAss A . . Tazewell 4 QS9?a9l?'l Aflf? A ii TAYLOR l.fijPikevillg XEVELYNV A!NN,i iIOMAtS . off, . BVILLIE TiMMoNs . ARosEMAR Y TUCKER 4. ,X I ,A Join: EDWIN WALKER A Josnrii L J. WALLACE MARTHA WALLACE . RACHEL WEAKLEY . MARGARLET V. WHITE JANE D. WHITTLE . MARGARET V. WILLIAMS . . LUCILLE YOUREE . 'Grand ,Junction- . 'Knoxvilk ., Gallatin A' Knoxvillo . . Smyrna College Grove . Knoxville . . Tazewell . Union City II 11 I 1 1 1 I I 1' II I I I 1 I 1 M I, iy 1. 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I. I II 111 I .3--. .pr I ,I -I gl 1 I '11 111 11 I1 I II 1 F232 11 I 31 11 I I I I , .II "1 I 1 Su .,1 I - OFFICERS JOHN LEA ..... : ..... . . . President BOE HUTCHISON . . V ice-President ARTHUR ALLEN . . Secfeidfy JOE JOHNSTON . . Treasurer COMMITTEES Program-LEN BROUGHTON, Chairmang JAMES HUMPHRIES. Attendance-ARTHUR ALLEN, Chairmang BOB RICHARDSON, JACK BOYD. Transportation-BOE HUTCHISON, Chairmang AL YIUTCHISON, JIMMIE ROBERTS. Finance-CARL STRICKLAND, Chairmang ARCH EATON. Publicity-GAINES STUART, Chairmang DICK BEAN, ROBERT PHILLIPS. Open House-CATHERINE BEHNKE, Chairmang MILDREIJ SIMPSON, SARA HINTON, BETTY FIPPIN. M CISS .ggsig 1-?'7Q '. lw"""'3f . 1 " 1 1 . --11. , ,L Y- M Y ,YW ELL A 1 A -' -A -' ---5 52- .L.,-,..-gg 'Wg ' " -' '--"f'-fY1-'-'ff-+-A--:--- . - A 1 A F - -A f A A E R' I "WSIS ' I' A ,, , , , 7, M 0 A --A-W. A, . ,, ,- I,L.,...4......,L.-I.,...E," ' H H ' , . I . 1 , ..f.,...,..,.,,C,-,,,k,, ,,-we , I I I . X ' ' Y ,-,,.. I...,. E I V-.Ivy ,, A ' ' ' -""'f' ":" f - - "r'--'- X-M Nf-+1:f:1f-vw-- , , -, ,, Y WA1 ,S I, :,- QI , wk! gin . . W "" :W S I 1-6, -, -J , 5' dw, I :KI I 1 ' L 44" ir THE F E HMA The grass on the college lawn is green, but not half so green as that group of would-be slickers who breeze in about the middle of each September like a winter blast oiic Clingman's Dome. This remarkable organization, dubbed Frosh, for the first week roll over the "Hill" like a tidal wave, denuding the campus of all of the pride and dignity found lurking in the cracks and crevices of Ayres Hall. it CUMMITTEEMEN A truly remarkable group are these representatives of pure American youth out to win fame and fortune carrying high the banner of the old home town. But that certain number blessed with the gift of initiative and possessing a developed cerebrum always break the fmish tape with plenty to spare. We are proud of them, for they bear the traditions of a true Volunteer. Fmt! Row: Bean, Behnke, Boyd, Eaton. Second Row: Fippen, Hinton, Hutchinson, Roberts. lf lf MQESAHMA CL SS MARS' EDEANDR ACUFF Knoxvlne .T 0H1s9THRRAEIeI3C ADCAMS7 AI5AMs'f'V74 CATHIQUNH CAMPBELL DANIEL C. CAMPBDL1., BERNARD H. CANTOR MARGARET DM. CARD ELIZABETH CARRINGTON LINDA W. CARSON . CLIFTON H. CARTER Trenton HORACE E. CATH . Knoxvxlle MARTHA CECIL . BIzTsY CHAMBERS . BETTY VV. CI-IAMBERSI JOHN CHILTON . MARY JANE CLACK BILLIE CLAIBORNE . DAVID W. CLAY . FRANCES CLAYTON . MABEL H. COBLE . ROBERT S. COCKROFT IOSEPHINE' CoFIfIN . VIRGINIA DARE COLLINS . JANE Vg Coox . CLAY CRoss . BETTY DAFFERNER . CATH 5 IJDAUGI-IIzRTY ANN DAUGHTRY R. BETTY DAVIS f .' HARRIS DXAVIS . MARY DIIANE DERRY . IDOBSOIAI5' JAMES ,ERVlN DOOLEY' l 'SARAH ,'QlA'.l',Ef DDUB' F RANKYSIQIELTON DOUGLAS f Q JIMMY C. DOYLEV . DOIROTHYVQVSDUGGANVI . KATHLEfEN DUKES . HILDA DUNCAN . lVvILLlAMl'DUNLAP Y. VIVIAN E. DYER . RICHARD K. EAGER . ARCH M. EATON . MARDITE EDVVARDS . INEZ ELLIOTT . LAVERNE EMERT . JACK G. ENOCHS . MAN CLASS Asheville, N. C. . Knoxville . Knoxville . Whitepine . Knoxville . Brownsville Hackleburg, Ala. i. Chattanooga . Shelbyville . Memphis . Knoxville ,Q , 'KDDJSVQQC , , f,,,' , ,Lf I., Memphis .f ?GrEen6vii1ie 'W . A Clmton . Memphio . Clarksville . Knoxville . Maryville . Winchester R FRESHMAN CLASS ,BESI E. EVERETTE - Q0fif1fh,'M15S4' LOUISE 'FEATHERSTONE . . - CHARLo1'rE yMAF-XE FXELLQWS gf R, ' Iinoivilld A ,VVM6mPh15 SARA FERGUSONQA J1Qno:gyiAl1 g I A Knoifviile Q93 0 ,ix NX A fMARY NORMAN AHLLL LEE E. HINES . CHARLES T. HINTON SARA KARR HINTON . . C. VV. HODGE . . . A GEORGE ALEXANDER Ho HAX'DEN H. HOYLE . AGNES HUFSTEDLER . HELEN HUNT . ' HELEN J. HUTCHISON . Q A RKnOXVilEle Q sqmhside Rcollimfiixe Calderwqod . Memphis . MeAnphis ' Knoxville A Tiptonville Knoxville FRESHMA ROBERT S. HUTCHISON MIRIAM BAKER HYDE VIRGINIA RUTH INGRAM OWEN DENTON JoNEs . MARY M. JARNACIN . Avis JOHNSON , BE'rrYE JANE JOHNSON SAM KASBRMAN . . NANCY ANNE KELLY . SELDEN B. KENNEDY . CHARLES E. KING . WOODSON KING . CLYDE KNISLEY, JR. . EDWARD J. KNowLxNO . JAMES L. KNOX . MARGARET KNOX . LUCY Enrm LAFORGE EDWARD J. LANIGAN C. ELEQNORJ LAPPACE A , , " , V' KATHLEEN LAY . J JOHN SLLERWOOD LEA i . ROBERT. P, LEONARD K MARGARET E. LEQPOLQ' .. HOWARD E. LOOKE A JRALPH E. LOVELACE MARILYN' A. LOWRY .J JOE' M. MARKs?v .A A ERNESTINE MARTIN . KATHERINE E. MASON ELEANOR ELAINE MAUNLEY . LUTHER W. M1LL1oAN MARTHA R. MOORE . A BxLL1E MOSLEY . BOE Moss . . CHARLES E. MURPHY . ANNA MAUDE MCBEE . i931 ' CLASS . . Brownsville Lexington, Mass. . Knoxville . Loudon . Jefferson City . Sweetwater . Atlanta, Ga. . Knoxville . Knoxville . Quantico, Va. . Springfield . Morrison . Greeneville . Knoaeville .f Memphis . . Colombia . I Fountain City . Murfreesboro . Ignoxyilxe . Knoxville . . Kgugxvismiise . JJN9a51iQi1.1e . Knoxville . Mcmigmfixle Jf . A Knoxville . A Knoxville, . J Kmsxvixie . . -Ngshvi11e . A .f ' 'Fountain City 'Q 'Knoxville . K Trenton Louisville, Ky. , Maryville . . Lewisburg Baltimore, Md. Powell Station 2 5 1 r A 1 Ii 'i 4 1 1 E 1 A K I I 1 A 1 V ll V m i 1 A l E K CZ:-' ff U' .43 ,f QQ-igw Sy falpz Ififtr I. if Q FRAESHMAN s CriARLAfisA MCCARTY fFQ!1 HfaiH'CifY JQHN MCCQNNQLL ig . . KHOXYIU? A f fKn6xx?iI IeM MARGARET SEARLE JACK G. SEATON . , My-yvglfye SARA T. SKELTON 4 Cumberland City M. :KATHERINE SLATTEN . , AMX SMITH . 4 .A Knoxville ALVIN E.SM1T1-I . . . . A, , Iingxville E941 FRESHMAN CLASS EDWARD H. SPENCER . Llawxs E. STRONG . W.'FRENCH SUTTON . BILL ,TANNER . HAROLD TAYLOR . WILLIAM BARRETT TAYLOR WOODROW W. THOMAS . FRANCES E. THOMPSON . PEGGY TRULL f 4 EUGENIA A. TUTTLE Q QIANB VANCLEAVEA . . DLCKEY WAGNERA A. jonl KzrmfWALKBR .4 JwiQ:LEw1S.WAxsf4eRjl JlI1?1iSi1S?IS'1f'1?FfiF.Qi 1WE1iBg' . R0Biif.l?fWEHB 2 ' Q 1? f Knoxville . Benton Knoxville Union City . Sparta Dandridge . Gallatin Shelbyvilld . Nashville Klqggvilie .WV nr, V ,, Cliapel Hill f, ,V A COBBQl'hlvlla wwnnf, .Gke+:nbac12 ' laMf2rfilS.1iisf Qin f, f' .fKH0Xvi11?f . . l an l A l1Q.NW,NN1,.....M . l B051 WlNlON .ll .l Ronam' B. WHT T . , Madisonville RUTH WORD . . Knflxville PENN WORDEN . . Fountain City l95l ,, M1 VVY - , , 4 Ye 4 lt 51 2 IL -41 4' PEW? 434,54 .4. 4 M ' 'v 4 4 4 4 4 42 9 'H 'T 35 if : 1 4 11 .qv X 4 44 , 1 V I I ll 1 4 4 4 1 NE 4 4" ,4, 4,4 !4 I 4 4 , 4:4 HE l vi: 4 .Ll i,: iij 1,4 QE? 3? 14 ' 4 vi U4 III -44 54? yi V45 Hg lf: in 1 . i'i I. A '4 Al r 4 f I i 4 I4 I , l N Z !4 4 fi 6 XZ 4 E 4 45 ' z ' 4 ,1fV"44 W- 15 H V' 4' ' 44 3' E3 J ' 1 f E Z 41 3 4 T' 45 4 'f is ln ' 4 4 42 1 44 f il E 4. I, 2 I Q 4 5 ' E 4 , , ' 6 ' 7 i W 4. , 4 - 'f E4 Si ' , Li ' F 5' W U 41 .4 53241 4' ' 53: I ,3 4 :is 4 334 4 fi 1 is f L4 E4 , :I 4 4 4 ,Ib ' 4 I 4. 5 5 3 jl' 4 -4. fp ii 1 KW I' K . XM, ,Y 44. VE, 'If l'- 4 444 1 ff: . M' , V 144 W! lpn' . ik! 44 U 4, 4 4? 4 1 is 1494533 ii 4 'fjcai wh K' 41 , Y' 4? X111 'Z 4 df 5 Q1 Q 4 llf Y? 4 J H E L I U S To Helios, god of the physical phenomena of light, fell the duty of conveying the sun's brilliance to man in the form of day. The gleaming sun god appeared each morn- ing from that mythical land of light whose boundaries em- braced both east and west. With the magnificence of a million flaming meteors, he paced his mighty steeds of blazing light across the sky. In an instant the flaming charioteer of the su11 would plunge the world in a per- vasive fluorescence. Recognizing him as the powerful con- queror of darkness, the Greeks placed faith in Helios for clarifying the path of truth and light, 1 li1l .N M1 . 11 +1 l N 11, N! Y H1 231 I4 1 li H X ' 11 1 I 5 1 51 I 11 1 I1 lt ' 5 1 .1 11 1 1111 f WEEE 1 YN 11 Nl ,. 1, V1- 11 -2 5 1 1 Ni 121 QV 1 HU ' 1 1' lilg VE! x, lj: 13 JE! . Mi Z1 ii 1 1' 1 W ? M51 1 11 1 111 ' 111 15 :il :QQ 1151 1 'Q 1.0-Q 1 +1 WJ 1112? 1 5 1 'M l? '11 N1 ,-1 If mg N ,111 '43 ig fi if 1? ff if 11 5 1 si 115 ' 1 1, i 1,21 ggi: if 'L "' rfi 5 1 iN X SQ! 5 1 11 mi 515-22 :14-. .. 1 1 , me-QQ?-Q-S',ig'Se'ra. .1?PLf'fs 5L'.,ggv" ' ..:-fy '- ., nE"5's?1 'rffawhl-Erie-'L+.-.LA1-3Q'L -.1. 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M , ,, , , W? , fx ww Commis LIEUTENANT COLONEL MAJOR FEREDRICK W. HYDE-- MAJOR BEVERLY A. SI-IIPP ...... MAJOR SCHENK H. GRIFFIN -- CAPTAIN MORRIS M. BAUER .... SERGEANT .IOI-IN H. Cox ........... SERGEANT MORRIS E. MILLER - SERGEANT JOHN R. MOORHEAD SERGEANT JOHN F. GRADY ........ frm sloned Ufflcer HUFF, STROMQUIST Firsf Baffalion, Engineers B TTALIU T A F F FIRST BATTALION STAFF Unfanfryj W. G. POLK ............................. Major J. L. BARNES ..... Second Lieut., Battalion Adjutant C. C. BURKS .........,.. Battalion Sergeant Major SECOND BATTALION STAFF Ilnfa n+ryI H. N. CARMICHAEL ...,.......,........... Ma 'or 1 J. H. CRENSHAW .... First Lieut., Battalion Adjutant E. M. BRADLEY .......... Battalion Sergeant Major THIRD BATTALION STAFF Ilnfanfryj C. A. HENRY .,........................... Major F. W. VANCE .... Second Lieut., Battalion Adjutant D. B. COOLEY ........... Battalion Sergeant Major FIRST BATTALION STAFF IEngineerI J. R. HUFF ....................,......... Major W. K. STROMQUIST. . .Second Lieut., Battalion Ad jt. SECOND BATTALION STAFF IEngineerI C- A. RAY .... ......................... M ajor R- S. HALL ......... First Lieut., Battalion Adjutant H051 RAY. HALL vu il. .A CARMICHAEL, CRENSHAW Second Baffalion, Infanfry I HENRY VANCE Th d BaHaI nf Second Baffalion, Engineers F fZOFfKl FRITTS I i I In :Il I I . I 3 I I I I 4 1 6 CU AY Rofhberger, Denfon, Barnes . F. G. DENTON ............... Captain J. E. CARPENTER . ..... Second Lieutenant J. T. AILOR . ..... . . Platoon Sergeant F. W. ROTHBERGER . . . Second Lieutenant A. C. VADEN . . . . Platoon Sergeant CORPORALS BITTLE, A. C. MCALLESTER, S. ROYSTER, W. L. WALKER, E. G. DRAPER, F. F. PATTON, E. S. TUCKER, M. WHITAKER, R. N. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ADAMS, F. E. FORD, J. A. LEDBETTER, R. PHILLIPS, R. M. BROWN, E. HURT, C. S. LovELAcE, R. E. PHLEGAR, R. L. CAIN, G. C. IRWIN, H. H. LUTZ, J. E. PROFFITT, H. H. COOPER, N. S. KIRBY, R. A. PERKINSON, W. P. PRIVATES ACREE, W. B. BURNETTE, C. A. HARVEY, A. S. MCMAHAN, M. B. ASHBY, S. CAMPBELL, M. R. HAWKINS, M. OWNBY, H. BEELER, J. T. DOYLE, J. C. HOBT, A. W. SHEA, J. F. BLACK, D. B. ENGLISH, J. C. HoWzE, B. K. STANSBURY, C, BROWN, W. R. FRAZIER, F. B. LUSK, E. TULLOUS, B. W. HARRIS, H. MCCARTEY, C. D. S Cadef officers presenf sabres in sabre drill before Major Frederick W. Hyde before receiving orders for company insfrucfion. 757557575 Knighi, Worcl, Clemenis CUM AN INFANTRY L. D- . . ..... Captain S, D, , , ' I Fifjt Sefgganl J. M. CLEMENTS . . . Second Lieutenant A. B. BELL . . . . . Platoon Sergeant J. H. KNIGHT . . . . Second Lieutenant J. G. THOMPSON . . . Platoon Sergeant G. T. FRITTS . . . - Second Lieutenant E. M. GODFREY. . . . . Sergeant CORPORALS ADAMS, J. T. BIRDWELL, W. B. BRUCE, R. P. PERKINSON, J. D. ARMITAGE, J. A. BRABHAM, M. H. GARRETT, S. Y. AUSTIN, R. C. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BEVINS, J. B. MCBROOM, R. B. PRIEST, M. F. THURSTON, J. B. CATE, R. J. MADDUX, J. M. TAYLOR, C. R. ZACHARY, F. PRIVATES ABERNATHY, K. O. CATE, J. B. MCCLAIN, R. K. SATTERWHITE, W. A. ADAMS, R. J. DEPRIEST, C. V. MCKINNEY, M. B. SLOAN, T. ARNOLD, J. M. ENOCHS, J. T. MANLEY, M. N. SPAULDING, J. B. BACON, F. H. HARRIS, K. E. MENESS, T. O. STRONG, L. E. BEATY, W. F. HUGHES, C. W. MONROE, J. W. SWAFFORD, C. P. LEONARD, R. P. PACE, N. l f f Freshmen apply class-learned principles in acfual loading and firing of l'l1e 3" +rencl1 morlar while +l'Ie cri+ical sergeanf looks on. fffiifffffi A. G. SEYMOUR W. IB. DAVIS . L. W. FRIERSON W. J. HAGAN ............. Captain , .... - First Lieutenant W. B. SHELBY Platoon Sergeant , . Second Lieutenant W. W. HOOSER Platoon Sergeant , . . . First Sergeant R. E. COBBLE CLAGETT, R. H. GIVANS, T. J. JENNINGS, ELMORE, H. A. HOUSEHOLDER, W. S. SHELL, J. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ANDERSON, P. A. FULTON, R. W. JACOBS, R. BURNS, S. L. GARY, T. A. KOON, A. C RODEMANN H DUGGAN, R. L. HALE, B. M. LINDER, WV E SMITH G FITZGERALD, P. J. HART, R. B. NICHOLSON, H A SPINKS WRIGHT, T. J. ALLEN, A. M. HODOE, C. W. MOORE, F. STOKES B C AUSBURN, J. W. JENNINGS, J. B. OLHAUSEN J W TAYLOR, B M CLAIBORNE, J. I JINKINS, M. B. PETREE, E. W THOMAS W W EVERETT, B. E. KELLOG, P. H. PEVAHOUSE B VANDERGRIFF P H FOWLER, M. D. LAY, I. V. RICHARDSON B WEAVER, C N GARRETT, T. W. LAWRENCE, R. W. ROBERTS, N WILLIGAN, V GILBRETH, W. O. LYON, J. S. SAMS, E, B Squads deployed In open warfare flre from The prone posnhon In dlreci' assaul+ on enemy poslhons FXTXSXSXBX Edwards, Hamer, Shirley CUM AN H' H' HAMER - ----- Calmlifl G. S. CHILDS . . . First Lieutenant J. P. EDWARDS . . . . Second Lieutenant E. J. BARNARD . . . Platoon Sergeant i D. A. SHIRLEY . . . . Second Lieutenant C. D. JOHNSTON . , . Platoon Sgrgegnf 3 CORPORALS ANDREWS, G. W. BULL, T. C. CORPENING, C. C. NEEDHAM, C. S. Q BOYD, J. K. BURKHART, J. H. IILIAN, H. SNODGRASS, M. E. 3 PRIVATES FIRST CLASS 1 1 S CHILES, C. S. GILLENTINE, J. H. ALLEN, G. W. A BROWN, R. H. 1 KLOss, E. F. PRIVATES ANDREWS, W. H. GILBERTSON, J. BARR, J. R. HACKER, D. J. HINTON, J. K. . HODGE, E. B. JARNIGAN, H. B. JOHNSTON, B. B. J KASERMANN, S. O. 7 i f N 1 3 1 BISPLINGHOFF, C. A. FINLEY, E. A. FRENCH, T. M. , GRAHAM, W. H. P1ERCE, J. E. SAFLEY, J. M. STEPHENSON, G. H. KINSEY, W. H. MASTERS, W. M. MURRAY, L. C. NELSON, G. A. N EVIUS, R. PATTERSON, M. RHODES, G. N. SFEWART, E. N. SULLENGER, C. H. R1CE, W. F. SPENCER, E. H. SWAFFORD, F. R. TANNER, W. W. W1LKERsoN, R. S. WORSHAM, J. G. . jf 1 , Non-commissioned officers gafher in an informal . group +o discuss "the wors+ bunch of firsr-year sol- : diers we've ever seen." I fffiiffilfiilfi Wilson, Dooley, Morfon CUM AN J. M. DOOLEY ...... ........ C aptain C. M. MORTON . ..... Second Lieutenant J. O. CUNNINGHAM . . , . W. S. WILSON . . . . Second Lieutenant R. L. SMITH . . . CORPORALS BECK, J. A. JONES, W. H. SHULTS, R. R. FORD, F. C. MONTGOMERY, T. B. VORDER-BRUEGGE, V. W. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS CLARK, C. W. HENDERSON, C. H. OGDEN, W. H. COCHRAN, F. LATIMER, R. G. PARROTT, W. F. CURRY, O. R. MCADAMS, J. H. PEARSON, J. S. HALL, T. MONTGOMERY, G. D. PORTRUM, P. PRIVATES BARKER, J. M. HICKLE, W. L. MAYFIELD, T. B. BIBLE, B. F. HUDSON, E. S. NELSON, L. BOETTGER, R. F. IRION, W. B. PHILLIPS, W. T. CHILTON, J. L. KNISLEY, C. V. PRIGMORE, W. A. DUNLAP, W. L. MCDONALD, W. L. RIGGAN, R. H. FINNEY, J. M. MCGOWEN, W. W. RODGERS, J. R. . . Platoon Sergeant . . Platoon Sergeant WATTENBERGER, H. D. WoODs, S. A. RUDD, R. R. RYMER, E. J. WALLER, J. L. SEATON, T. G. STEWART, T. R. TRIPLETT, B. WATTERSON, H. B. WILKINSON, R. E. Lieu'l'enan+ Colonel Ma++hew J. Gunner addresses 'bhe cade+ regimenfal sfaff in issuing orders pre- liminary +o dress parade. fffiilfffifi LoclIel'+, Slone, Ma lmaffey H. T. STONE ................ Captazvz C, LOCKE-rf , ..... Second Lieutenant G. T. CURRY . . . . . . Platoon Sergeant O. L. VVILSON . . . . Second Lieutenant J. L. DENMAN . . . . Platoon Sergeant CORPORALS CAMPBELL, D. A, JOHNSTON, J. D. MCREYNOLDS, J. A. TROTTER, D. R. HARIJISON, R. P. KEMP, C. E. ROBERTS, J. L. A WATERS, G. F. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BRYANT, T. C. HENDRLX, J. G. MONROE, M. L. STEWART, J. D. BYRD, E. S. HURST, F. M. SHARP, W. C. STONER, J. B. CAMPBELL, D. A. MITCHELL, G. R. STUART, G. R. WILKERSON, R. L. PRIVATES BLANKENSHIP, J. E. EUDAILEY, W. A. RICHARDSON, J. P. , THOMAS, F. G. BRINKERHOFF, R. E. FERNANDEZ, J. M. SMITH, A. D. ' WALLACE, M. A. CALHOUN, H. W. HARRISON, J. W. SMARTT, J. M. WEAVER, W. A., CRANE, J. J. HUTCHINSON, R. S. STUBBLEFIELD, S. W. WIOOINTON, C. COLE, J. M. HUEFMAN, G. TAYLOR, W. B. WOOLSEY, H, T ' COPENHAVER, S. T. JONES, J. W. TAYLOR, D. R. A Classroom inslruclion supplemenfs acl'ual field drill in llme Training course for officers seeking commis- sions. Mai. Hyde is conducfing a s'l'ucly of mapped 4 infanfry maneuvers here. JIXJIJJIXJJIJJIJJIRJIJJIJJIJJI 41' Ngl . lg Wilson, Richardson, McDaniel D I RICHARDSON . . W E MAHAFFEY . H E MCDANIEL . BEELER, W. W. CU PA - - - - Captain B. C. LOGAN . . . . First Sergeant - - S6'C011d Lifulffldflli C. G. EWING . . . . Platoon Sergeant . . Second Lieutenant A. KUPFER . . . Platoon Sergeant CORPORALS FISHER, B. A. HOWARD, H. E. PREVOIST, G. M. CLARK, W. K. HAMPTON, G. D. MARTIN, T. G. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ATKINS, R. L. BURKHART, R. S. LAWS, J. C. BISHOP, E. G. DAVIS, R. J. MILES, R. M. BROWNLIE, V. C. DUNAVANT, R. Moss, C. BOYD, R. W. GUINN, J. W. NICELY, G. F. BOUDREAU, R. A. HEWOLEY, J. C. NORTHCUTT, S. H. PRIVATES BAKER, H. J. GRIIvIEs, W. R. LEACH, W. D. BOWLES, H. M. HALL, W. S. LITTLE, J. M. CAMPBELL, D. C. HILL, S. MCNEIL, C. L. ERWIN, P. A. JACKSON, J. T. MCPHETTERS, F. T. FRAZIER, M. P. LANIGAN, E. J. MIELKE, A. J. Squad In exiended order advances wi+l1 rifles ai' frail on an imaginary enemy posifion al' one of 'I'l1e field drills. fffiifffffi T EDDER, R. L. SLATERY, H. H. STEELMAN, A. G SILVEY, W. E. WARR, C. B. WHITLOW, C. S. MILLIGAN, L. W RICKETTE, J. E. SPITZER, J. TAYLOR, G. E. TAYLOR, G. K. CUMPA W. A. ANDERSON . W. L. FULTON . C. G. JOHNSTON . . J. T. COWVAK - J. T. DUNCAN . BARTHOLOMEW, S. W. BOISE, J. M. ACKERMAN, N. J. CAFEGO, G. CLICK, R. D. COFFMAN, L. A. ANDRIDGE, R. B. ALLEY, R. W. ALPINE, M. H. BORAH, B. BROOM, L. W. Vance, Anderson, Johnston ELDRED . . . HENDRICKS . WYATT . . HUNTER . . .W.WEsTERcAMP . COLEMAN, JIMMY HUBEUCH, C. F. FIELDS, C. A. LITTLE, J. P. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS DISSPAYNE, F. W. MOLINSKI, E. M. HODGE, B. W. PRATER, T. W. MCFARLIN, B. H. RIKE, J. H. MELTON, D. W. n SANDERS, W. H. BRYSON, W. J. HVILL, S. H. CIEERS, E. C. KIMBROUGH, T. B. , CLAY D. W. KNOLL, F. D. CLAY, B. LUMPKIN, F. C. GAMBLE, G. B. LUTTRELL, B. W. . . Platoon OGILVIE, W. H. SMITH, T. C. SELLERS, E. M. THOMPSON, W. V. WEBER, N. OTT, W. W. PARKINSON, RENEROE, D. TANNER, L. F WARREN, B. Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant Cadet Colonel House discusses Hue orders of the clay wi+h members of the infanfry regimenfai sfaff prior fo furning 'rhem over +o Captain Adiufani' Kreis. XUTTXTFXDX Baum McKamey K. P. BAUM ...... ......... C ajntain J. B. MCKAMEY . . ..... Ftfit Lieutenant H, WILLIAMS , , , , , W- H- FISHER - - . . . First Sergeant C, P, MILLIRONS , D. A. WRIGHT . . . Technical Sergeant T. J. STEVENS . CORPORALS COLLINS, W- C- GOODWIN, G. R. JONES, S. C. GILBREATH, J. H. HAMMOND, A. T. STEWART, J. B. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS AMERINE, L. S. DICK, L, A, LEA, J. S, ARMSTRONG, C. O. DIFTLER, N. LOCKRIDGE, J, 3, BRYAN, J- T- HARTSOOK, J. M. LONG, P. P. CLARKE, S- F- HINES, L. E. ROSEBROUGH, R. F. KNOWLING, E. J. RUCH, J. W. PRIVATES BAILEY, L. W. COWARD, J. S. KING, J. R. BAKER, E. L. COX, F. O. KNOX, J. L. BARRASSO, A. DEMPSTER, G. KRIEGER, M. G. BARTON, J. A. FORKNER, R. G. LOVE, W. H. BRANSON, J. W. HARRIS, P. B. MEEK, T. H. BUTLER, H. HICKS, R. S. NICHOLS, W. W. CARTER, C. H. KING, C. E. OGLESBY, J. L. YOUNG, W. L. - Staff Sergeant . Staff Sergeant . Stay? Sergeant TORBETT, H. V. SMITH, A. E. TALLENT, R. E. WIEGAND, H. G. YORK, W. H. ORR, C. PINION, J. D. STANDIFER, L. R. STONE, T. S. TUCKER, R. A. WEBB, W. R. WOODSON, R. L. L I The band and Hwe VoleH'es march down H'Ie field ai' The game in The firsi' appearance of 'Phe +wo groups 'I'oge'l'her. if ffifffffi a F i P i- Fronf row: Huddlesfon, McGee. Back row: Newfon, PaH'y. R. R. NEWTON . V. J. HULTQUIST' W. F. MCGEE . OO PA E N G I N E E R S F. M. HUDDLESTON . ..... ........ C aptain Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant J. R. MCCREADY S. M. LERNER . J. B. RAGSDALE . . First Sergeant Platoon Sergeant Platoon Sergeant C. R. PATTY . . Second Lieutenant V. L. HUDDLESTON , , , , Sefggant CORPORALS ALLISON, R. L. FARNHAM, J. A. SPRANKLE, C. H. WINN, W, B, BROWN, J. W. PEEBLES, F. N. STRICKLAND, C. S. YAGODKIN, G. V. SEARLE, T. C. WILEANRS, J. L. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ANDERSON, R. S. DICKSON, C. A. HEALY, H. LONG, R, B, BAILEY, H. R. DOUGHERTY, N. S. HUTCHESON, E. J. MULLINIX, H. O. BEARD, R. J. EMORY, W. M. JONES, L. B. A REYNOLDS, J. L. PRIVATES BRANDON, H. HATEIELD, J. N. PARKER, B. D. WARD, W. D. CARRINGTON, F. B. HULTQUIST, C. H. RATLIFF, C. M. WATSON, C. D. COPPEDGE, N. JOHNSON, J. D. SMITH, R. C. WATTENEARGER, E. C, EPPERSON, R. F. LAMBDIN, W. J. STEPHENSON, E. A. WHITE, H. FLOWERS, H. F. MILLER, M. STIPE, R. G. WOOD, H. C. FOX, W, E, MILLIGAN, G. M. WALLACE, J. M. WRIGHT, B. M. Weary hoops plod into the home s'l're+ch refurning from +he five-mile iaun+ 'rhrough +own in 'Phe annual Armis+ice Day parade. Ziiffnfffitfi CUMPA ENi6'lNEERS R. E. DUMAS . . D. W. SCRUGGS . D. L. VVHITEHEAD . J. C. WILSON . . BARNHILL, G. GIBSON, O. L. EDWARDS, J. T. Fox, G. J. FRAZIER, L. BROOM, C. J. BUFFALO, W. D. CRYE, W. E. ELDRIDGE, R. C. ELLIS, C. L. Fronf row: Maffhews, Dumas. Back row: Whifeh ead, Wilson, Scruggs R. C. MATTHEWS .............. Captain . . . . . First Lieutenant R. T. DAVIS . . . . . . . . First Sergeant . . Second Lieutenant W. G. BROWNI.OW . . . . Platoon Sergeant . . Second Lieutenant J. M. FRASSRAND . . Platoon Sergeant . -Second Lieutenant R. F.. SMOTHERMAN . . . . Sergeant CORPORALS LOVE, J. W. MYERS, A. J. VINEYARD, L. L. MCCLURE, R. H. SWANN, H. R. WALLACE, C. F. - WAYLAND, H. R. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS KENNEDY, E. M. MORRIS, F. M. WHITEHEAD, W. S. LUALLEN, 0. L. ROBINSON, R. A. WISE, J. J. MANN, H. G. WALKER, O. L. WRIGHT, L. K. . PRIVATES FORT, J. L. MCCONNELL, J. R. REPASS, G. H. ' FREEMON, G. F. MABRY, W. R. ROGGLI, E. R. HILL, E. C. MURPHY, C. E. SMITH, E. W. HOWELL, J. QUINN, R. L. THOMAS, J. A. LEWIS, R. R. RAMSEY, O. L. WITT, R. B. LUCAS, W. D. ' REED, C. J. i Engineers pause wi+h sponsors ai' aHen+ion in baf- falion formafion a+ fhe drill ground in fhe "Rose ' Hole" fo receive insfrucfions from fhe commandanf. raiixiixiixiiixkxfiixiixii E N G I N E E R S J. W. SLATER . W. E. MCCRAVEY R. B. CECII. . . A. W. NICHOLS . CORPORALS BERRY B T BUSSART W KENT, R. C. BROOME D F GROSS R M LOVE, H. W. HUGHES L W MARSHALL, A. H. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS CHANDLER DULANEY F LYELL, C. R. CORY J B HAMILTON A D RAMSEY, M. E. DRAPER E LEE R SCHNEIDER, R. L. WRIGHT T. E. PRIVATES ARNOLD L DAUGHERTY H M HARRISON, W. M. BOWDEN C DOUGLAS F S HINTON, L. D. BROIA N, C EAGER R K KEELE, E. E. BROWN W EASLEY P W MCGILL, W. E. BRYANT C FERGUSON I V MALONE, T. F. WINN H. P. . . Second Lieutenant . . . First Sergeant . - Platoon Sergeant . . Platoon Sergeant RUCKMAN, R. A. W7HITE, R. P. STILL, J. M. WHITAKER, J. WILSON, J. MEGAR, G. H. POST, W. M. STEELE, G. A. TAYLOR, H. TUCKER, H. H. ,W . CU PA E N G I N E E R S Treni, Brewer, Wyrick, Sheffey J. E. BREWER ................ Captain J. R. SHEFFEY . . ..... First Lieutenant G. R. WOOORUEF . . . .. . . - First Sergeant O. W. MINTZER . . . . Second Lieutenant J. H. COOK . . . . . Platoon Sergeant T. L. TRENT . . . Second Lieutenant E. A. MYER . . . . Platoon Sergeant L. L. WYRICK . . . Second Lieutenant J. H. TOWE . . . . . Sergeant CORPORALS ABELE, H. M. HINES, V. A. MOURON, A. SCRUGGS, D. H. DEFORD, J. P. McKEE, J. P. PICKETT, E. SUTTON, W. F. TRENT, W. F. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ELLENBURG, R. B. JOHNSON, W. M. HOYLE, H. H. MCGIBONEY, K. P. PRIVATES ADAMS, C. W. DUOOAN, H. G. ATCHLEY, A. V. FIELDEN, J. H. BRADEN, E. M. FOWLER, H. N. BROOME, W. G. FONES, H. N. BURKETT, H. L. GANTT, W. A. Cox, R. H. GRISCOM, H. F. CUTCHTN, W. T. HARDIN, L. H. Z 1 1 i 5 T NASH, S. SEWELL, R. E. RUSSELL, R. M. HUDSON, J. A- ROSSON, J. MASTERS, C. M. SAYLOR, J. W.. MERIWETHER, R. T. STONECIPHER, J. O. MORGAN, S. TAYLOR, G. E. PEIRCE, R. J. THOMPSON, C. RANKIN, R. M. VVESTBROOK, T. W. REED, VV. A. S Sergeani Miller ins+ruc+s a squad in fhe mefhod of firing from The siH'ing posifion wifh proper sling and body alignmenf. ,W I gglffflflfl gg:ISlf' WA! Q if A.. 4 , 1 YJ . 5 " ' 1 . 1 f fr: y . H I A ' , K . Q - v , 1 Z . A gg r 8 Q iw K 1 ' . , sf ' , Q i ' ' s ' ' V J 2 li gf s , I v un f A ,ff L. X f, 7, ,,, 1 M X 5 5, E. nf-M. K Q S . J!-1, V lfvlffg :fri 4' uv" ,gf Qlflllff ' r66fr?",f'.' 1 5?f Q rm W2 ,M I Y- ' ' 1 iff flu E xmmff W! Jdgqff Z' "fU.fff3n - Q if f W fp 'wit iff' , ,V 90' 'Lf as 1' . ' "B "' , 7 '-M J if W , f Q, W f fm, 'Q A V ,y 0. 'M ,, gf fc. JSA G 94 ay ,Q 'P' , . ' Aim? 4, 'H ,I 7 1 gg I 4 ,. , y. , M' 'f , 1, 1' f 4 ,V ,. ,M ' u f 2 H . , " V2 , iv 233 , 5' Z " ff , f 4 ,Vf V I 9 ,, .mf '-'f7" ,ir ' ,yqw . 2. C 4 45 -I ' W Y 4 " 5 f W , ' f lg I Vg, 4 W an .fu 4 v f , V , 1 ' 'f s,,g,:4 , 'f I , . M f--f i f ffm 1 , v 1 f, , 1,59 3 , ,ff ' f ng, f 4 ,f i z: .7 I Z, i 1 jf ,.VV 4 Z ,, 5, 0 ff zz f V, M fi f , f fn ,, , ,M 4 U, . ,, ,,,, ,, f f sf J -6, ,f fy , 0 ff f 5 Za? v W H CABBAPID Scabbard and Blade, a military honor Organization, is composed of members Of the Junior and Senior Classes, and Was founded at the University of Wisconsin in 1904. Company I, Fourth Regiment, of this order Was estab- lished at the University of Tennessee in 1923. The Society attempts to hold before the college man his responsibility as the natural leader in times of national crisis and to promote preparedness for proper defense of the United States by disseminating accurate information among its members and others concerning the military needs of the nation. Scabbard and Blade aspires to unite in a closer relation- ship the Military Departments of American universities. One of its purposes is to encourage good fellowship among the cadet officers. The organization attempts to empha- size the characteristics of good citizenship and to develop the essential qualities of good and efficient Officers. One of its foremost activities is the spreading of intelligent information regarding the military requirements of our country. Finally, the club tries to impress upon the col- lege man his responsibility to his country in time of na- tional emergency. ' OFFICERS W. W. IQREIS .............. . . . Captain POWERS MASON, Second Lieutenant . . . Treasurer W. W. POTTER, Sergeant . . ...... Secretary TOM BAGLEY . . . . . . .First Lieutenant SCABBARD AND BLADE OLIN VV. MINTZER ROBERT RUSSELL NEWTON CHARLES ALBERT RAY JAMES C. WILSON LAPSLEY OGDEN CHARLES W. OGDEN CLARENCE R. PATTY DOUGLAS LOVEJOY WILLIAM HAGAN, III. DON RICHARDSON W. W. KREIS WILLIAM G. POLK VICTOR J. HULTQUIST HENRY CARMICHAEL WILLIAM M. HOUSE JOE R. MCCREADY JAMES B. MCKAMEY WILLARD RICHARDSON JACKSON G. THOMPSON FRED BREHM BOB MATTHEWS W. S. JACOB ARTHUR SEYMOUR W. W. POTTER JOHN POTTER TOM BAGLEY POWERS MASON R. BARRY CECIL ROBERT T. DAVIS J. EDWIN CARPENTER First Row: Angel, Bagley, Carmichael, Carpenter, Cecil, Davis, Hagan, House, Hultquist, I Second Row: Kreis, Lovejoy, Matthews, Mason, Mintzer, McKamey, McCready, Newton, Ogden, Tfmd ROW: PBYYY, Polk, Potter, J., Potter, W., Ray, Richardson, D., Richardson, W., Seymour, Thompson, Wilson, if iff i XJTXXX A Hl Pershing Rifles was founded at the University Of Ne- braska in the Fall of the year 1892 as a crack drill unit at the instance of the military commandant, John J. Per- shing. This Organization was not named Pershing Rifles until the year 1895, after the departure of Lieutenant Pershing from his tour Of duty at the University, and pre- ferring to remain as a local unit, it soon developed a national reputation. However, in 1925 a program Of na- tionalization was begun and the organization at the pres- ent time has I7 chapters. Among the more prominent RIFLEN members is former Secretary of XVar Robbins, who was a member before and during the Spanish-American War. The aim Of the organization of Pershing Rifles is to en- courage, preserve, and develop the hightst ideals Of the military profession, also, tO promote American Citizenship, to create a closer and more efllcient relation, and likewise to provide appropriate recognition Of a high degree of material ability among the cadets of the several senior R. O. T. C. units. . OFFICERS GERVASE BARNHILL . . . LEONARD RICHARDSON .. WILLARD RICHARDSON . JOHN Lurz .... J. G. THOMPSON . . . . Captain . First Lieutenant . . Second Lieutenant . - Second Lieutenant . First Sergeant MEMBERS GERVASE BARNHILL CHARLES BURKS JACK MCINTYRE JAMES C. PARKER WILLIAM SHELBY K. P. BAUM HENRY CARMICHAEI. R. E. NUTT H. C. PATRICK JACK THOMPSON R. E. CARTER JOHN LUTZ BILL BEELER JOE BOWMAN LAPSLEY OGDEN JOHN OWENBY LEONARD RICHARDSON WILLARD RICHARDSON JAMES WILSON Left to Rigbr: Barnhill, Lutz, Richardson, L., Richardson, W., Thompson. If123l A-A Herr YXYXTE ' V47 ll-2 l l- ' f I MARTHA IJAMS Colonel LOISLWHITEHEAD I' MARTHA STUBLEY Maior 2nd Battalion Eng. Captian Band MARY FRENCH FLENNIKEN A JACKIE MCKELVEY Captain Co. C, Inf. Captain Co. D, Inf. Q. N. Q59 NCSU? . A a a I I ' . E I I 50,63 MARINE BAILEY ' NANCY SMITH 9 A' Captain Co. G, Inf. ' Captain Co. H, Inf. P' Czefbxf :boxes Q-Y' E' VX I So '66 AILEAN EMERT I . I I E JANE MERRILL Cabtai' F- Y Captain Co. C, Eng, X y X -buh-Y VV MACC FRANCES BERNARD amy CLARiC CaPtain Co. A, Inf. Captain Co. B, Inf. 41,0 oo , . for 1-4, 60, 06 Gp "df 494' 100 , 41, 'V NANCY GREGG ANN GIBSON Captain Co. E, Inf. , Captain Co. F, Inf. 4796, -444,6 . 4-1 ,,,, ,, - 006456 R oo! of 2-4 B2 A w , A A 4fe,o,jQ,, ELIZABETH COCHRAN ' V ' VERNICE' HOLLAND 'o'6f7 Captain Co. I, Inf. Captain Co. A, Eng. '90,,4,'5772c . 'ff f JUDY DONALDSON ' V HELEN wooTEN Captain Co. D, Eng. ' . Captain Co. E, Eng. - I 4? ""'f1"'a, -ff - 0-sf,ZZ'42cZo6 06, Q Q 'Q N 44 12 'J I ., ,.. 1. WHA PHUSPHUR Phosphor, the morning star, heralded the coming of the dawn by firmly advancing among the clouds of night in conspicuous brilliance. The height of manly perfection, he always appeared in tl1e sky before his mother, Aurora, the goddess of the dawn. Strength of build and force of character were two elements combined in him to establish a deiiied figure of courage with the duty of breaking the hold which the sisters of sin and darkness gain on the world. In him the Greeks placed implicit faith for assur- ing the advent of the light of day to man. 12.-"x NPJS' N' ,..f P.-.J 4 fiy, 'N 117 E i il 1 i 3 i W 1 r L S rl S54 If? . .Nv- , is ! , I i 1 I 4 ,Q X '9 .wp I I 1 1 1 1 i iff L 1 l 1 1 I ! l 1 1 if mg 4 l nl nj lr 1 I 1 1 1 1 ii 6, jl ,l swf ul '1 F 1. 22 li NP ii I ir 1 U 1 J 1 jg ts 1 3 1 'i 11 31 ii ,Q in 1. C ll 11 1 vie : lj ? ej " 12 ' WI T fi. I I I A 1 if ilu 4 1 is EF' jj, Major Neyland and Hi Assistant Few of the nation's better known college football coaches can boast of such excellent won and lost records over a period of years as can Major Robert Reese Neyland, head man of the University of Tennessee football destinies. During his eleven seasons at the helm, the- former West Pointer has piled up a record which includes eighty-seven victories, twelve losses and eight ties. Taking over the head coaching position 'in 1926, Major Neyland was at .Tennessee nine seasons, leaving after the close of the 1934 season to fill an army assignment in the Canal Zone. During the 1935 competition Major Brittonled the Volunteers. The following year, the football urge proved too stro-ng for Major Neyland, resulting in his retirement from the army ranks ,on February 29, 1936, and the signing of a five-year contract as Tennessee's head coach. A In 1936 Major Neyland was made Director of Athletics at the university with supervision over all inter-collegiate athletics. The splendid Tennessee football record, accord- ing to Major "Bob" has been in a great measure due to the splendid work of his assistants: Major W. H.,Britton, H. Barnhill, Blair B. Gullion, Murray Warmath, and Hugh Faust, Jr. A spirit of fine teamwork and cooperation among coaches and players has been an essential basis for these successes. , The Neyland system of football has gained a place among the established types of play, and at its greatest heights it produced All-Americans like Bobby Dodd, Gene McF,ver, Herman Hickman, Beattie Feathers and a host of All- , 1. , S V , ,,yw',- UZVZQ V W Y--. .........- t, . M ,,..u..,- i 1 I I ! 5 M gli Q5 5 Ji' 5 Ti lri' f ,Es t ' i af f . ,aa-32 . 33 V' 4- 55 in A ..A- ff ij. Qi ,yi 3 I937 VOLUNTEERS nd the 195 Sea on Southern performers. An outstanding tribute to Major Neyland's prowess as a football mentor is the demand for Tennessee men to fill coaching positions in both colleges and prep schools. The recent appointment of Quinn Decker at Centre College adds to the long list of Neyland-coached men who have gained outstanding successes as grid tutors. The present coaching staif at Tennessee includes four men who have been Volunteers. The Major makes it a point to take a personal interest in the future Welfare of his pupils, and a more popular coach among players could scarcely be found in the whole nation. With an eleven year record of such note Major Robert Reese Neyland has the complete confidence of the Ten- nessee student body and fans. Players look on the game anxiously from +he bench and discuss how They could have gained 'l'ha'I' exfra yardage, but i+'s a different our- look from in froni' of a charging line. GO Leaving behind a scoreless tie with the powerful Duke eleven, a victory march through Georgia, and a seven-point loss to the Rose Bowl Tide, the 1937 Vols surprised pre-season dope- sters with their strength. Brilliant Hashes of possible future standouts and steady excellence of the few senior lettermen brought the team through one of the toughest schedules in the nation with no bad defeats. Fighting Commodore At the final whistle closing the season for the Orange and White with a 20-0 win over Ole Miss, nine Volunteers walked from the field after fighting for Tennessee on the gridiron for their last time. The loss of these consistent stalwarts will cause serious gaps in the 1938 line-ups, but they leave with the MI-Iil1" a memory of a team of hard- fighting Volunteers who gave everything they had for the Orange and White again and again. Joe Black Hayes, a leader who inspired others by his own performance, made the Vols one of their finest captains. At his post in the line he turned in a repeatedly fine job. No one can ever forget diminutive "Red" I-Iarpis 75-yard dash to put the Blue Devils in the pot in 1936. "Perk" Perkins, the cotton-topped line breaker, 'iMoose" Fulton, THE ULU TEE W Frank Crawford, and Markey Luttrell, smashing tackles, Allen 'Ramsey at center, Willie Lefiier at guard, and Alvin Rice at end-all of whom figured in the stone wall defense of the Vols for the last three years are also giving Bowden Wya++ football the Aloha Oe. Captain-Eleci' Next year will find the Dukeis from Durham a conspicuous absence on the scheduled rostrum. Apparently having their Rose Bowl hopes wrecked frequently by the Volunteers has slowed up the desires of the Carolinians for one of the biggest drawing games in the South. The true collegians from Louisiana, the L. S. U. Tigers, are renewing their ventures into the Tennessee backwoods in search of pigskin prowess. Not hesitant in the least, the Bayou's hope to continue their conquering attacks in Shields-Watkins field. Men like Wyatt, Cafego, and Wallen with other veterans and sophomore reserves promise well for an improved U-T aggregation for-the 1938-1939 S. E. C. struggle. Games with ,Bama, Vandy, L. S. U., Auburn, and Mississippi presage some of the most colorful and thrilling contests ever held at U-T. One 'of the famous Vol "Twin Teams" Tennessee's other "Twin Team" The earer of the LONNIE ALEXANDER WILLIAM A. ANDERSON TOM ASHBY JOHN BAILEY BILLY BARNES SAM BARTHOLOMEW NAT BOWE EARL BRADLEY CONGER BROWNLEE JOE BUTLER GEORGE CAFEGO JOHN CAMPBELL HENRY CARMICHAEL R. E. CARTER WALTER CARTER BARRY CECIL DEXTER CHRISTENBERRY JACK CLEMENS LEONARD COEEMAN JAMES COWAN -FRANK CRAWFORD GEORGE CRESWELL HARRY DENWORTH WOODROW DERRYBERRY PHIL DICKENS CHEEK DUNCAN RALPH ELDRED MARVIN ELLISON JOHN FISHER JACK FLETCHER HOWARD FREEMAN ROBERT FULTON A. M. GLASGOW ERNEST GREER HERNDON HAMER THOMAS HARP JAMES HASSON JOHN HATEIELD .TOE BLACK HAYES JACK HAYNES GERALD HENDRICKS MELVIN HERRING ROBERT HICKS CHARLES HIGDON BONNIE HODGE WYLIE HOLEMAN WILLIAM HOUSE QHUENTIN HOUSEHOLDER CARL HUBBUCK GEORGE HUNTER C. P. IRWIN GLENN JEFFRIES ARTHUR JONES W. K. JONES VAN KELLEY JESS KINSER GEORGE KRISLE JOHN LASSITER VVILLIE LEFELER SAM LEVINE JOE LITTLE JAMES LOCKRIDGE BYRL LOGAN EUGENE MARTIN BILL MURRELL ROBERT MATTHEWS SPEARS MCALLESTER WILLIAM MCCARREN GORDON PEARCE MARION PERKINS DAN PICK - JAMES PLUNKETT OSCAR PLUNKETT J. HARRY PRICE WILTON PUTNAM ALLEN RAMSEY ALVIN RICE DON RICHARDSON SAM ROGERS JAMES ROUTON HUGH RUSSELL WILLIAM SANDERS ALLAN SAYFORD ROBERT SNEED KELLER SMITH WADE SMITH ALFRED THOMAS WILLIAM THOMPSON MASON TUTTLE JOE WALLEN BUIST WARREN FRANK WATERS DEWITT WEAVER CHARLES WESTERCAMP ROBERT WHITTAKER BILL WILSON O. B. WINSTON VVALTER WOOD ROBERT WOODRUEF HARRY WORTMAN W. G. VVUNDERLICH BOWDEN WYATT GERALD YAGODKIN Characteristic of the true Volunteer and indicative of g0Od 5P0f'CSmanShip, the Wearers of the "T" are Worthy of i admiration of the School which they represent. The letter IS awarded in all major and minor Sports, and iS gained only by Consistent efforts in playful Competition. Tennessee can be Justly Proud Of the wearers of the UT". the .tfut-,yr TRIBUTE He led his ieammafes Through The season wi+h The con- sranl' encouragemenl' and inspirarion which marks a frue leader. Capfain Joe Black Hayes' raising Team morale was accomplished noi' by yells or 'lallc buf by acrual self-Endeavor and acfion. 8 WE , M -ag, 'agp' F' lk X ,Z 2791? T X :fl V 5? f gyk For W . , ,W 5 3 f 9 is , Q sv MW - ,A ' fgi"i pf VV fb , 1 A -"- f sf U Q I 4 vs 5 Q f - 'f Q ' U, S 0 9 Q " , ' x ,ff f A MQ ' Z, WW, i 1 U li ,Q V A6 7 k , If. ' pi? 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I, " 'f L ww my - K "" 'L hx sms?-TQ" - 'QAfN',?.,f?42'x,.N ,. , ww 4 - J, I S f, ,533 4? if V ' QV if X11 ,' k-., A "uw A' V- A jx hh Z. 1-, " It ' M: 4,9-Qi ' S 5 ,' . kx .x If-M 11,3 Q ' M G ,X ,V Mfwj, Xtkgf, ' ' x 4 Y 1 X, Jah-w ,, ,. f X V Q,-1 ' F A W5 H' ' . J -ff 5 . ' - " L A w V Vw 'i -M 2:31.-Z M , if-Q:i1',ZEij.5 -'iff 9 ,. QA ' , . fix ,nw . X r 3. ' fl ', Q wav f , W g Q Q .,',,Q. 4 f ' k lf ,f k 5 G3 W- , a A1 1 'Q M ' ' 4 M, fdvf-4' 'xiii-'-Q, x Q e L. FW al. S., Z", L. ff , f f f, , A ,Q If A ffm 4 . 1. ' z xyv W, fl . .. , W 5 V. A ' T ,v , ,X , xx - f , sf ' I K Farm ' ki2,."-,W , 1, Ap: ! 41 VA ,N 5 , W It "' ,.,y'xwfwg,,,,,, W ui! ,- " iiutflf i 4, I, ,z x 1 x Nw. . , 7+ 7 ,, W' A-AL' 1 Q VAN KELLY Center Captain Boots Munford -- best center to face Vols in quite a spell- - caused Vols much grief - - savage tackler - - nice running by Wirtz--Deacons make as many first downs as Tennessee -- Cafego makes illustrious debut-- Tennessee's hopeful---shows great promise by his all-round work-- Babe Wood - -last year's reliable - - this year's promise. TENNESSEE TRAMPLES V. P. I., 27-O Toes of Tiny Tom Play Sweet Tune on Sfripes Against Gobblers Tennessee .......... 7 I4 O 6-27 V. P.I ............ O O 0 O-O Shields-Watkins Field, Knoxville, Tennessee, October 2: New- est Tennessee sensation sprints 74 yards for touchdown, then carries ball 64 yards to put team in scoring positiong Cafego looks like tops in Sophomore talent. Tiny Tom's twinkling toes tear up turf---inspired running attack-- touchdown sprint of 74 yards -- 64-yard punt re- turn to 11-yard line--pass to Wyatt for second score-- unstoppable - -- Then Cafego comes in - - really goes to town - - human dynamo - - streaking comet - - goes for touchdown - - master toter - - diminutive flash - - sure-fire All-American - - Wood passes to Duncan - - missed - - one of those too easy to catch - - not too easy for Eldred - - final tally - - Bacon gets loose - - most spectacular run of the game - - no blocking - - no score. Gobblers spunky - - simply outclassed - - Darnell - - cap- tain - - best kicker on the field - - Va. Tech stands ground - - Just as good as Tennessee in third quarter - - neither score - - Major Neyland disappointed - - Duke game n6Xf Saturday - - in Durham - - looks bad - - Vols had nO uyumphn today -- - HIGHLIGHTS: I-Iarp's evasive hips - - Cafego, an up-and-com- ing All-American - - Palm Beach temperature - - Darnell's kicking - - Eldred - - an outstanding forward - - Bacon's running - - Neyland disappointed -- - Duke in the offing. GEORGE CAFEGO I. GERALD HENDRICKS End AL THOMAS Guard f J Crimson Tide plows fhrough Tennessee line AN ACCUU T RALPH ELDRED End UF THE EA U FATE LOCKS TENNESSEE IN TIE WITH DUKE, O-O Vicrory Snafched From Waifing Hands of Volunfeers Tennessee ....... . O O O O- 0 Wx DUICG ....... .... O O O Oi O f ,R Duke Stadium, Durham, N. C., October 9: Fate lashed out to fr 4, S? fm . . Q, f of snare the olive branches of victory from the hands of a ga ant E Oran e and White team toda as one of the lar est crowds ever s A ' Y 1 g 5 ak to assemble at this stadium looked on in amazement. ff Opening whistle - - savage tackles - - tension great - - Wood drops back - - rushed - - .bullet pass to Duncan - -- 1 1 touchdown -- game only a few minutes old -- crowd as of 45 M . . , I r carved marble - - stillness punctured - - victory bubble pricked - - Vols ollsides - - no score. Gruelhng contest develops - - both teams fight with bared fangs - - all labor for naught, no score - - Duke down under punts -- hammer at line -- no Tennessee team ever fought gf,-g,wj wif ,L . , , , 'Q harder -- T1 ton, Hackne Smith bi uns in Blue--saw I . P Y' g g . age as an Indian attack at dawn -- Wood, Duncan, and Harp -- Cafego and Bartholemew--battle of charge and coun- tercharge--Duke line a sight to behold--close resem- blance to Man Mountain Dean's kin--work havoc against Tennessee's lighter stalwarts -- but Vol line raised to greatest heights. HIGHLIGHTS! Homecoming spirit at Durham - - Neyland- Wade feud - - 36,000 rabid fans - - autumn colors run ram- pant - - beautiful floats - - big balloon football- - bands, bands, bands - - plenty of Tennessee students - - Neyland flushed with pride. TIDE POWER CRUSI-IES VOLS, I4-7 'Bama on Campaign of Revenge Subclues Vol Eleven Tennessee .......... O 0 O 7- 7 Alabama .......... 0 7 7 O- I 4 Shields-Watkins Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee, October 16: Before Knoxville's largest pigskin gallery of 25,000, the Red Ele- phants tasted sweet victory over a butter-fingered Vol eleven. Kilgrow -- highly-touted Crimson Tide leather lugger -- for a 59-yard spree--intercepted Cafego hurl--tricky plays and devastating lunges -- Bradford--Memphis product - - sneaked over - - first tally - - Sanford - - extra point. ' Clean sweep catch Vols "with pants down" - - terrific punch - - t.d. by Hughes over center - - Zivish - - toed ball through timbers - - Tennessee still fighting - - short thrusts -- several aerial attempts. Fourth period - - minutes to go - - CAFEGO - - like a demon possessed with St. Vitus dance--spark-plug in spec- tacular comeback - - a little Napoleon - - no Waterloo - - lashed out at the enemy-- nice support from playmates-- Duncan appears on the scene-- touchdown by him via Cafe- go's catapult - - "Bad News" kicks extra - - Orange-shirt men give till it hurts - - make every effort to win - - no avail- - bad shot. HIGHLIGHTS: Wyatt carries mark of the Tide--his beauty marred by facial contour - - Crawford - - Hunter - - El- dred consistent--looks like roses for the Tide--here's hoping them luck--Vols did well--Kilgrow did better --biggest spread of humanity of the year. BOWDEN WYATT End "RED" HARP FRANK CRAWFORD Tackle ' "BABE" WOOD Back ACCUU T UF THE EA U CH EEK" DUNCAN Back TENNESSEE OVERWH ELMS SEWANEE, 32-O Orange and Whire Reserves Hammer Our One-Sided Vicl'ory Tennessee . . . . 6 7 I9 O-32 Sewanee . . .... . . O O O O-0 Shields-Watkins Field, Knoxville, Tennessee, October 23: A utoothless tiger" team pussyfootecl it baclc today after a 32-0 lashing from a second and third squad of Clyde Beaty's. Lew Coffman - - former Greenville "Green Devil" - - prom- ising Sophomore - -- cracked whip - - over the Kunning Kit- tens - - scores thrice- - blood drawn early - - Perkins over double stripes - - aided by Captain Hayes - - Duncan con- verted. Coffman and Snead combination pounces down field - - an- other score challcecl up - - now Harp - - brilliant run - - reminiscent of last year's feat against Dulce Blue Devils - - a new Harp - - a new score - - Sewanee butter-fingered - - fumbles - - too much rain and snow - - Barnes recovers - - in Tiger pay-dirt territory - - Coffman again - - hits touchdown trail - - poor boot - - no point. Again Coffman polishesroff his record--27-yard jaunt-- no stopping this Soph --.another tally -- reserves and more Bounding" Babe bounces over for fouchdown JOE LITTLE Cenfer reserves -- pity the water boy couldn't play - - even Dummy --e in goes Bacon -- dashes in at mile a minute -- scores - - called back - - oifsides - - tough luck - - bad break. VOLS PUT BULLDOGS IN DOGI-IOUSE WITI-I 32-O DEFEAT Georgia's Defense Falls Before Tennessee Line Tennessee . . . . 7 I9 O 6-32 Georgia .......... O O O O- O Shields-Watkms Field, Knoxville, Tennessee, October 30: A Swiss movement had nothing on the way the Vol team clicked this afternoon when they amassed fo-ur scores in the first half to "march thrgugh Georgia" to the tune of 32-0. An impressive victory - - Tennessee trips light fantastic - - 64-yard toting spree - - Wood - - spark of the squad - - Vols hawkecl- the ball- - slashing offense - - tackling of line and 'backfield destructive in its violence--Bulldogs' new de- fense shattered - - outmaneuvered - - outcharged - -e out- classesjt- - CUTSCORED. Cafegfk--in top form--passes to Eldred--a superb catch-f-- in like fashion same wingman tallies again with ease -- reminiscent with luxury. Harp takes over contracts--places Bulldogs in more of a spin-Jraerial fireworks begin to pop--Pineville Pony On trigger end - - out of the dark came Eldred again - - Eldred could do nothing wrong - - he' s hot - - great sport playing and toying with these Bulldogs. Last period and still more devastation by Tennessee - - Ten- nessee an unstoppable team - - everything worked - - 110 hocus-pocus - - no razzle-dazzle - - substitutions - - m0fC substitutions -- bloated pigskin through air from "Bad Newsn to McCarren - - another t.d. HIGHLIGHTS: Tennessee's backs - - Eldred - - nothing like him - - Quinton Lumpkin - - a great center - - Bulldogs in funeral march - - history almost repeated - - remember last year's drubbing - - bang-up good game by entire squad- ALVIN RICE GEORGE HUNTER End "MOOSE" FULTON Tackle Auburn kicks off--ball high--in the arms of Cafego - - he takes off - - behind nice interference - - runs - - --JEEP-. M CAR fast - - cuts back - - faster - - 15 yards - - 20 yards Bafk REN .. - 25 yards - - 30 yards - - 40 yards - nice blocking ... -- '50 yards - - 60 yards - - 75 yards - - interference cutting them down - - 80 yards - - 84 yards - - Scores ... .- it'5 time - - nice going - - Tennessee supporters go hog-wild. HIGHLIGHTS! Vols lack punch - - too much Fenton - - the conclusion - - Auburn - - Auburn - - Auburn - - Au- burn - - AUBURN. TENNESSEE BOWS TO VANDERBILT IN HOME- COMING GAME, I3-7 23,000 Homecoming Fans See Vols Crushed By Valiani' Commodores Tennessee . . .... 0 0 0 7- 7g Vanderbilt ..... .... O 7 O 6-I3 Shields-Watkins Field, Knoxville, 'Tennessee, November 13: Tennessee put up a magnificent display of pigskin technique only to come out of the fray holding the short end of a 13-7 score, this being the first time Vandy has ever beaten a Neyland-coached Tennessee team on home territory. Teams fight back and forth -- plenty of spirit -- neither can advance -- period ends with no score -- second quarter - - Vandy puts one over - - homecoming fans in dumps - - lose spirit -- need score to bring them out -- finally-- Bounding Babe runs up Hrst tally -- Cheek converts-- score tied -- fans start all over again -- Vandy not to be bluifed -- Captain Carl commands Commodores -- has matter well in hand -- better watch out. Tennessee gets bad breaks -- Bert Marshall -- Sophomore -- bombshelling about - - an outside attraction - - diverts fans' attention -- it's a drunk on derrick -- he's of Bar- num and Bailey caliber -- plenty good -- game continues- Commodores not content -- clouds grow dark for Volunteers -- King Carl in Vol backfleld -- leads to second Vandy touchdown -- Cafego drives ball to seven-yard line -- hurt -- carried off the field -- good break for Vandy -- tough on Tennessee -- Harp -- attempts to rejuvenate "IKEY" LEVINE Guard BOB WOODRU FF Tackle MARION PERKINS Back ACC BILL SANDERS Tackle UUTUF HE EAU squad -- nothing doing -- there's that drunk again -- the cops, too --- minutes to go -- then gun --- brings pluperfect grief and unadulterated horror to Tennessee-loss to Vandy. HIGHLIGHTS: Homecoming day --- election day -- three- ring circus - - game - - trapeze artist - - "Vote for Dempster" airplane soaring overhead - - homecoming decora- tions - - Tennessee band - - Vanderbilt band - - minor revolution after game - - attempt to bring down goal posts - - goal posts stand - - fans fall - - TI-IAT'S ALL. FIGHTING VOLUNTEERS BEAT KENTUCKY, I3-O Turkey Day Festival Brings Deserving Viclory Tennessee ..... p ..... O 7 6 O-I3 Kentucky .......... O 0 O O- 0 Stoll Field, Lexington, Kentucky, November 25: Tennessee had a Thanksgiving feast in the form of a Wildcat before a Ken- tucky throng here this afternoong not a new dish for the Vols, but always delectable when the cooked Kentucky Wildcats are offered for meat. Cafego -- dubbed "Bad News" by Louisville Courier-journal -- makes initial pointers -- 25-yard jaunt -- Kentucky papers acclaim him great -- so does Tennessee -- also 'Tucky -- Vols not pushed -- display ramming thrusts. An en'l'ire Tennessee squad rushes Vancly player ALLEN RAMSEY Center Woods makes stands think of "good ole days" -- Hackman -- McEver - - Dodd - - Vol line showed Rin ole feeling" --- backfield cocked for score -- ball to "Bounding Babe" -- the McMinnville Marauder -- charging fast -- Wildcats bite the dust -- the Babe scores -- Cats literally skinned -- Perkins superb -- finds the right place at the right time. Bob Davis - - The Kentucky Warhorse - - a pure thorough- bred -- Kentucky lacks that certain something --- Orange and White cally again -- called back -- then cross marker again -- called back again -- tough break -- Tennes- see's day -- as usual with Kentucky when theyire playing Tennessee -- Cats made to graze on blue grass -- Captain Hayes outstanding - - spirit high - - stands high. WILLIE LEFFLER Guard HIGHLIGHTS: Tennessee retains beer keg --- turkey for the squad -- last game on out-of-state soil -- no touchdown at 'end of game when whistle blew -- proverbial battle of bands -- tough going for Wildcats -- they prove to be tender meat. VOLUNTEERS PUT REBELS BACK ON I-IEELS, 32-O Cafego Carries Vols 'ro Pigskin Glory in Brilliani- Finale Tennessee .......... O 7 I3 I 2-32 Mississippi ......... O O O O- O Crump Stadium, Memphis, Tennessee, December 4: A squad of Orange and White Volunteers, worn by a long, hard season, ended their football schedule today with a brilliant victory over a Mississippi eleven. SAM BART:-loLoMEw Spartanburg Sardine sent opponents swimming - - inter- 1 I Back Cepts pass on Ole Miss 45-marker - - result, a touch- 1 down - - the Fish also converts - - third quarter and Cafego takes over reign - - '55-yard march through Rebel territory - - results in tally - - Fish again converts. peflfiHS - - Chattanooga burr-head - - makes third score - - series of power plays - - Sneed new general-- 1SSim0 - - heads new backfield combination - -- craClCS chalk line for another score - - Red Harp - -- ending football Career - - shows beautiful pigskin technique 5 - lugged ball - - for final score - - Rebels beaten down - - they lack scoring punch - - Vols out for re- venge E - victory sweet - f- season ends. . VAUZ, g FISH HERRING LEONARD COFFMAN Buack BA ET LL Basketball continues to hold its place as one of the major sports on the "Hill" after the conclusion of an- other successful season. Last fall Coach Blair Gullion started his third campaign with the problem of filling the places of stars like Marshall, Masterson, Johnson, and Fisher confronting him. The regular lineup did not shape out until the last half of the season, yet the Vol- unteers wound up with a record of fourteen victories out of twenty-one regular season starts. In these games the Orange and White scored 739 points to the 674 of the opponents, the record on the home floor was eight won and three lost, while the Volunteers broke even on road engagements, six and six. Ushering in the season with an easy win over the Lin- coln Memorial Railsplitters, 27 to 14, the Volunteers in their next game defeated Tennessee Wesleyan, 42 to 15, on the home floor. The next week the squad departed on a two thousand-mile pre-holiday road trip, during which games were played with Clemson, South Caro- lina, George Washington, and Duquesne. Clemson handed Tennessee its first setback of the season, 28 to 15, in the first game, but the following night Putman and Logan found the basket to give Tennessee a ten- Infeni' on a fast game IS fhe Orange and Wh fe hardwood squad l:i'?7-75 7 - J .4 -ft, "5 fi, ii. Q, , 411.7 el r yyl N . :1 jyaqgvy . X , QW M, M ,Wy . f f 4. 'Sy -is N , . , f , qv' , f f, f . Z I 7 f Z gf guy, f .M , V ,, 3? ,,, i ,,f 4, f 7 4 f Y , ,,,5 , 2 nf ,f 1 v ly, x uf' , ,ey- ff ??2 ,L M5 ,,w, f Va is 9: s 4, A - - f ,2 J H ,yy , , 'f Zee? - MMU :W f 5,6 f f f , f 4 , S , , M X I f ,f - fa, my - . - , 1, .. - nib ' M23 ff ,:' ' . i , Q sm, My, sum 6 A2 'M X ff 44. 4, wx f , k-n-- W fmw www ix ,pm ,....4i. warm I ,I 1 I 1 I I 3 r w 1 1 A 1 sd Ia. '. "a N ACCUU T UP THE EA U 1 ak .Viv ,, f . 5 f i 1 , 5 1, N fy, - 'ff' . ' I fa 5. , , fs, , j -l l N it , .X f ...Sf , C-62 , X ,.. ,M x.: I ,Q . f , I Y I H.,- '-XC , I ' , ff' 'I hx...-, V, , ., WILTON PUTNAM Forward point margin over the South Carolina Gamecocks. Con- tinuing on to Washington, 47 to 24, and from there went to Pittsburgh to terminate the trip with a 31 to 27 victory ,over Duquesne in the huge Duquesne Garden. Resuming competition after the holidays, the Volunteers dropped a hard-fought battle to the Maroons from Mis- sissippi State, 35 to 31, on the Alumni Memorial floor. Emory and Henry then came, saw, and went away con- quered before Tennessee departed on their second road trip of the season. At Tuscaloosa the Volunteers de- feated Alabama, 27 to 17, and the next night dropped another game to Mississippi State. Sewanee was the next 'victim on the home floor, and then at Lexington the Vols absorbed their' worst defeat of the season at the hands of the Kentucky Wildcats, 52 to 27. Succes- sive wins were hung up over Chattanooga and Vander- bilt, and then Marshall College, one of the outstanding teams in the nation, came to town determined to have revenge for previous losses to Tennessee. One of the season's largest crowds saw the West Virginians carry off a hard-earned 34-to-31 decision after a nip-and-tuclc contest all the way. Captain Rice played the greatest game of his career against the fast-moving visitors. The following five games were all Tennessee affairs: Chattanooga again fell, 37 to 315 Tennessee rang up its eighth straight triumph over the Alabama Crimson Tide on the home Hoor by a 36 to 22 count, the Florida l938 Baskeiball Squad . A Gators were sent home with the short end of a 41 to 28 game, Vanderbilt went down to defeat once more, and the valiant Sewanee cagers returned to the mountain after another failure, 27 to 33. The final home game of the season was witnessed by a Capacity house as Tennessee renewed relations with its most bitter hardwood rivals, Adolph Rupp's Kentucky Wildcats. After a rather off-and-on season, the Volun- teers were primed for this battle, and two of the most spectacular teams in the conference engaged in what proved to be one of the keenest and most spectacular battles of the year. Captain Alvin Rice and George Krisle, both veteran guards, started on the Alumni Me- morial floor for their last time as four thousand tense fans looked on. The visitors were off to an early lead, but as the game wore on the Volunteers forged up and for the greater part of the game the two teams battled neck and neck. The excitement grew as time became short, and paced by a brilliant forward named Curtiss the Bluegrass sank two goals in the waning moments to finish ahead, 29 to 26, after one of the best games of the long series between the two teams. During the majority of the games the Tennessee lineup had Wilton Putman and Bryl Logan at the forward positions, Westercamp and Higclon alternating at cen- ter, and Captain Rice and George Krisle at the guard slots. Among other members of the squad who saw con- siderable service were Warren, Whittaker, Jones, and Greer. Putnam performed brilliantly all season to take "CHUCK" WESTERCAMP Center III II I 'I I I I ' I I Il I Ig. If li I III I' II I I II ,I I ,I III II 'I I I I I . I I I' I.IQ I' I I l II I1 II I . I I I I I ' II I II I I III I III I I . I T I I I II I I I " ' I I' I I I I I I I I I :I I LI E In I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I ,N I I I I W. K. JONES Guard CHARLES HIGDON Forward GEORGE KRISLE Guard high scoring honors and being named on one of the All-SEC teams. When Putman was not doing much scoring, Byrl Logan showed his worth by sinking twist- ing shots from under the basket. Rice and Krisle played consistently at guard for their third successive seasons and replacing them is Coach Gullion's principal problem for next season. The Freshman team, which won 17 out of 19 contests, is expected to furnish an abundance of candidates for varsity positions, and the outlook for the next campaign is very encouraging. SOUTH EASTERN CONFERENCE TOU RNAM ENT Tennessee entered the Southeastern Conference Tour- nament at Baton Rouge as an unceded team for the first time in three years and as a result was at a great disadvantage when drawings were made, having two games to play the opening day. Against Mississippi State in the opening found the Volunteers gained re- venge for two previous defeats by ousting the Maroons, 41 to 34. The same ,night after only a few hours' rest Tennessee engaged Mississippi and after a hard battle were eliminated from the tournament, 45 to 40. Ole Miss's brilliant Country Graham, who hung his mates, sank enough shots to assure victory. Cle Miss continued to the Hnals and were beaten by Georgia Tech. The most surprising game of the meet saw Kentucky, leader in conference competition, bow to Tulane. Every effort will be made to return the tournament to Knoxville next year, where the meets of the previous years were such successes. , BUIST WARREN Guard AN ACCUU T UF THE Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee ..,. .... VARSITY SEASON RECORD L. M. U. ...... . Tenn. Wesleyan . . Clemson ........ South Carolina . . , George Washington Duquesne ....... Mississippi State . Emory and Henry. Alabama ......., Mississippi State . Sewanee ......... Kentucky . . . Chattanooga .. Vanderbilt . . . Marshall ..... Chattanooga .... Alabama .... Florida ...... Vanderbilt .... Sewanee . . . Kentucky .... i A close race In fhe hugh hurdles AN FIEL I937 posed of Plunkett, Duren, Russell, and Pick, made a clean sweep of their event, winning first place against Kentucky, Maryville, Cincinnati, Alabama, and in the state T. I. A. A. meet. Dougherty, Hayes, and Jeffries carried off honors in the weight events. Dashmen Pick, Plunkett Routon, and Duren did the "quick" work for the cinder-path squad, while Fisher, Herring, and Lindsay ran the high and low hurdles for frequent wins. Cresswell performed the off- ground maneuvers in high jumping and pole vaulting. Opening the season with 'a 79-41 trimming of Maryville track team, the Vols had a Held day, taking ten firsts, six seconds, and nine third places. The powerful Alabama squad, however, made the story different the following Sat- urday to give the Volunteers only four first places, seven seconds, and nine thirds. Boasting one of the best teams in the conference, the 'Bama squad won, 76-41. Fisher, Dougherty, Hansard, and the relay team won the only firsts for Tennessee. Tennessee struck pay dirt again in the next match with Cincinnati University to win by a close 70-60 margin. Nine CIRCLI G THE Glen Jeffries, iavelin fosser first places, with Routon's wins in both the 100 and 220- yard dashes, turned the tide in favor of the Vols. The Kentucky Wildcats avenged their loss of last year with a 70-47 win over Tennessee in the final of the U-T matches. Cl ERP TH The Wildcats yielded only five first places to the Orange and White. No standing school records were broken during the season, although both the distance and dash specialists approached the coveted marks on several occasions. Tennessee won the state T. I. A. A. meet here with a smashing victory to lay claims to rhe state championship. The Vols, with 56 points, easily led their nearest rival, Southwestern of Memphis with 24. Maryville, Sewanee, Chattanooga, Milligan, Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, and Lincoln Memorial University finished in the order named to trail Tennessee and Southwestern. The meet was a great success, showing marked increase in interest over last year's tournament. Vanderbilt was the only major school in the state not participating. At the close of the regular playing schedule, the Tennessee cinder-packers were invited to 'participate in the Southeast- ern Conference meet in recognition of their record during the season. Ar the conference meet held again in Birming- ham, Tennessee tied with Vanderbilt for sixth place through the point-winning performances of the team members who Dan Pick leads fhe pack info fhe 'Pape by fiffeen yards fo falceanofher firsf in his half-mile evenf. H Seen pulling up in fhe second lane is Tennessee's Oscar'PlunlceH' Fisher fakes a low hurdle JoJo Dougherty heaves the shot 1TH THE 1957 VULUG TEEP1 made the trip. Captain I-Iansard, with his third in the two- TR ACK SE ASQN' I937 mile, and Jeffries, with his second in the javelin throw, turned in especially brilliant work. With the loss of only three Of last year's fourteen letter- men by graduation, and the gain of several potential var- sity men from the Freshman squad, Coach Gullion hopes to turn out a winner for the 1938 season. The loss of Cap- tain Hansard will be a severe blow to team strength, as he could be counted On not only for consistent points but for bolstering team morale. Duren's absence will be felt by the undefeated mile relay team which showed its heels to every squad it faced last year. The weight division will be weak- ened by the loss of Joe Dougherty, the third letterman who did not return this year. With the 1938 squad not picked by the sports writers for a winner, team enthusiasts must admit that the places of these men will be difficult to fill. However, team spirit and determination coupled with good material and placed under the capable administration Of Coach Gullion make sup- porters confident that the 1938 team will continue to come through for the "Hill" with good showings, and a possible brilliance which may surprise pre-season dopesters. Tennessee Maryville Tennessee Alabama Tennessee Cincinnati Tennessee Kentucky VARSITY SCHEDULE, I937 SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE MEET Tennessee-Tied for sixth place with Vanderbilt CHEEK DUNCAN JAMES ROUTON DAN PICK OSCAR PLUNKETT RAY DUREN HUGH RUSSELL U SAM I-IANSARD TRACK, I937 LETTERMEN JOHN FISHER MELVIN HERRING GEORGE CRESSWELL ROBERT MATTHEWS JOE DOUGHERTY JOE BLACK HAYES GLENN JEFFRIES A. M. GLASGOW, Manager NUMERALMEN SHELBURNE WARREN ROBERT ELLENBURG HAROLD WARNKEY Fasi- action in the pugilisfic contests THE BUXI SQUAD Lack of experienced men in the early matches with rapid improvement of the team as a whole featured Coaches Warmath and Alexanderis 1938 boxers. Cpening a six- game season with Appalachia the mittmen captained by heavyweight Joe Little lost a 25 to 52 decision to the West Carolina teachers. In the second match the team fell to the strong Citadel eight and then dropped a second to Florida on the same road trip. In their last match away from the "I-Iilli' the boxers dropped their fourth and final loss to King. With several weeks of experience under their, belts and seasoned with some healthy punches from the South's best, the team turned on the prosperity upswing to tame the Kentucky Wildcats to the delight of local fans seeing the team battle at home for the first time. Proving even stronger the team walloped the 'Bama boxers 5-3 to bring the Vol conference, record to two wins against one loss. At the S. E. C. meet in New Orleans, Captain Joe Little and Jack Clemens represented the "Hill," Clemens lost in the early rounds to one of the finalists in his 126-pound class, and Little battled his way to the finals in the heavyweight bracket only to lose by a decision. Bayou fans expressed their approval of the Tennessee heavy by booing the decision lustily. Other lettermen were: William S. Wilson, 118-pound class, John Bailey, 135-class, R. A. Thompson, 135 5 Robert Hicks, 165, Eugene Martin, 155, James Plunkett, 145. l938 squad of Tennessee collegiate fighters 'Q'-ev Orange and Whlfe wrestling 'l'eam THE RE TLI G Hampered greatly by injuries and by the loss of several experienced lettermen, the University of Tennessee wrestling team completed a very' difficult schedule with one tie and six losses. The Vols were known for their fighting ability and their spirits despite the bad breaks and handicaps which they received throughout the season. The schedule was opened with a tie of 20 to 20 with the strong Y. M. C. A. team of Knoxville. From this match defeat was handed the Tennessee graplers in succession by Vanderbilt, Appalachian State, and again by Vanderbilt. Despite the losses suffered by Tennessee, these matches drew many interested and cheering spectators. VVith the loss of six of his outstanding wrestlers for next year, Coach lVIurray Warmath will attempt to build a strong and aggressive team around young and inexperi- enced men. Coach VVarniath has sounded a call for all men interested in the "bone crushing" sport of wrestling to report to him and they will get a try for the team. It is believed that with some new additions to the team, the Vols will avenge the defeats which they suffered this year by having a strong outfit for next year. Wrestling is becoming popular among the men, and next year's team is expected to be stronger and well fortified with reserves. The ofiicial squad of wrestling team as reported by the athletic office was composed of the follow- ing men: Captain House, McAllester, Pearce, Bradley, lllatthews, Silva, Leffler, Hayes, Butler, Erwin, Hatfield, Householder, Freeman, Baynes, Swafford, and Tom Smith. Tennessee's squad of rackei' wielders Action scenes showing iennis play ACTIU The 1938 racket outlook foretells of a brilliant Orange and White team despite the return of only two lettermen this year. Veterans George Krisle and Jimmy Hasson wear the only tennis 'QT's" in the squad now out and will form the team nucleus. Krisle will hold down the No. 1 position. One of the most interesting duals of the year will be Krisle's battle with his fraternity brother, Barney Smith, former U. T. student, who will lead off for the Tusculum squadg this battle is predicted to draw the greatest crowd. Supporting the lettermen are: Jack Armitage, Searle Gilles- pie, Herbert Slaters, Ed Pickett, and McAfee Lee, from the sophomore ranks, and Bud Randolph, a junior. None of the positions of the squad are certain except that of Krisle, and competition for the, other regular posts adds greatly to team strength as a whole. Road trips for 1938 include one-day jaunts to Tusculum and Maryville, and overnight trip to Kentucky U., and a two-day tour for matches with Vanderbilt and Cumberland University. The home schedule calls for matches with Maryville, Ken- tucky, Tusculum, Birmingham Southern, Vanderbilt, Emory and Henry, and East Tennessee State Teachers. The freshman squad will boast John McReynolds and Len Broughton as leading swing artists in the tentative first year program being worked up. . PRU ECT Somewhat handicapped by the loss of standout performers from last year's team, the University of Tennessee 1938 golf team nevertheless promises to give an excellent account of itself this spring. Two returning lettermen will serve as the nucleus of the squad, the number of candidates out and the unusual amount of interest shown in this sport indicates that stiff competition will be provided for places on the team. Coach Jimmy Walls has arranged one of the most complete and most representative schedules ever carded since golf became a part of the Tennessee minor sports program. The schedule will get under way on April 11, when the Volunteer golfers match strokes with the Uni- versity of Michigan swingers, greens champions of the Big Ten conference. In the following order the 1938 schedule lists engagements with Georgia Tech, Washington Univer- sity of St. Louis, Wayne University of Detroit, University of Cincinnati, University of Kentucky, all at Knoxville, and return matches with Georgia Tech and the University of Kentucky away. The climax of the season will come with the team's par- ticipation in the annual Southeastern Intercollegiate Tour- nament, to be held at Baton Rouge, La., with Louisiana State University as host, in May. Under the able leadership of Captain Harry Price, the Volunteer golfers present a well-rounded aggregation. Leading candidates who have been working out include Tommy Michael, Charles Westercamp, Marvin Ellison, Henry Carmichael, and the two returning lettermen, Cap- tain Price and Welch Sanders. The Tennessee golf team will again play its intercollegiate matches and practice over the Cherokee Country Club links. Club wielders display perfect form A winning i938 Tank aggregation E Tennessee swimmers fighi' 'I'heir way 'l'o another vicfory IMMI Vol tankmen swam through the 1938 season with seven wins and three losses, two of which were to Florida, S. E. C. champions again. Boasting fish like Jack Fletcher, Art Jones and Frank Waters, the team took easy victories over Maryville, Kentucky, Tusculum, Auburn, and Georgia Tech against losses to Florida and Clemson. - Jones, U. T. backstroke artist, lost only one start in the season, that to Clemson. He won the S. E. C. champion- ship in his specialty in the conference meet. Fletcher, high point man for the season, took two and three firsts in the dashes consistently. His swimming mate, Waters, showed his fins to some of the South's best in the distance events. The medley relay team of Carmichael, Yagodkin, and Christenberry placed at the top even against the Florida Gators. Wootman and Ashby in free-style events, Gagod- kin in the breaststroke and diving, and Brownlee in diving rounded out the strong aggregation. In the S. E. C. meet held at Tennessee this year the Florida 'Gators stepped out in the lead to win with 73 points. Georgia ranked second with 47 markers. Georgia Tech and L. S. U. were tied for third place with sixteen points each, and the University of Tennessee Volunteers ended up in fourth position with a total of ten points. Jones took our only first, that in the 150-yard backstroke with a time of 1:56. Coach Godfrey Novotny directed the sans terra competition of the 1938 tankmen and is due credit for producing some iinned athletes who were praised by sports writers over the South. l IF I I 1 L... -if 4 4 1 5 ff ,is 'L .ug M I TRAMUR To promote intracollegiate athletics, the University of Ten- nessee Intramural Department developed an annual sports program in which various co-ed organizations may partici- pate. A cup is awarded each year to the group having the highest total of points from the entire year's program. The individual tennis matches opened the feminine sports program for 1937-38. Miss Mimi Hyde, Zeta Tau Alpha, defeated Ann Fitts to gain the final bracket, while Dudley I-Iudson, Zeta Tau Alpha, reached the finals when her semi-final opponent defaulted. The final match, which promises to be one of the best of the season, was postponed until the spring quarter. The Individual Golf Tournament was the next event on the calendar. Miss Annie B. Donaldson, Chi Omega, topped the other divot-diggers by defeating Bernice Iddins by a one-stroke margin, 52-51. Excellent form in driving ability was displayed by the winner. In the swimming events the A. D. Pi's took the cup by collecting an aggregate of 29 points in the meet with two firsts and four seconds. The Chi Omegas ran a close sec- ond with 26Z points. The Kappa Deltas, 1936-37 cham- pions, placed third with 18 points. The A. D. Pi's proved strong from the first, their swimmers making a clean sweep in the 50-yard free style by taking first, second, third, and fourth places. In the sorority shuflleboard tourney the Zeta Tau Alphas captured the trophy. Their team, composed of Evelyn Mc- Leary and Evelyn Babelay, reached the finals by defeating the Chi Omegas, the Athletic Club, and the Kappa Deltas. They defeated the Sigma Kappas in the finals with the best two out of three matches. The A. O. Pi's won over the Zeta Tau Alphas in a fast three-game match to capture the intramural volleyball championship. After losing the first game, 14-20, the A. O. Pi's came back to take the last two by the scores of 20-7 and 20-11. The winners advanced to the final round by virtue of wins over the Tri Delts and the Athletic Club. Members of the winning team were: Mary Inman, Faye Poore, Edith Stokely, Catherine Dougherty, Margaret In- man, Nancy Poore, and Sally Rankin. The next intramural meet was the News-Sentinel Relays. The pledge relay, first event, was won again this year by the Zeta Tau Alphas, while the Athletic Club came in sec- ond. The Athletic Club also won the active relay over the Chi Omegas. The class relay was taken by the Sophomore AO E CC' Lefi +o right: Top-Phi Sigma Kappa I937 Baseball Champs: SAE I937 Softball Winners. Cenfer-Afhlefic Club's +op 'ream in I938 Baslcefballg ZTA first place Relay Team. BoHom-A. O. Pi I938 Volleyball Champions: A. D. Pi Swim- ming Team, Winner I937 Sororiiy Meet team, composed of Lib Childs, Jean Switzer, Faye Poore, and Mildred Dougherty, with the Seniors placing second. Eugenia Ray, Athletic Club, won the individual sprint Championship, outstepping her nearest opponent, Norma Merriweather, by a scant second. Margaret Post, Chi Omega Sophomore, still holds the individual sprint record with a time of 10.7 seconds. In the basketball race, the Athletic Club won the cup by nosing out the Tri-Delts, 1936-37 champions, by the score Of 25-23 in the finals. The Tri-Delts were the favored team, but the Athletic Club played inspired basketball to talce a surprise win. The Athletic Club gained the finals by defeating the Zeta Tau Alphas, while the Tri-Delts de- feated the A. D. Pi's. The Athletic Club moved to another first in the horseshoe pitching tournament by defeating the Tri-Delts in the finals. The players for the winning team were: Maud Snyder and Christine Land. In addition to the above mentioned sports, the ping-pong, playground ball, and double tennis tournaments are sched- uled for the Spring quarter. This will complete the '37-'38 session of intramural athletics for women. PHI GAM PLEDGE RELAY CHAMPS First row: Frazier, Knisley Second row: Doughty, Crumbliss I TB LIPIAL The intramural program for 1937-38 was one of the most complete programs ever arranged by the able intramural department. The managers for the year were Willard Rich- ardson and Paul Freeman. Both were competent and han- dled the tournaments in good style. Each man deserved a great deal of praise for his hard work and for the efficient manner in which the department was run. A slight change was made in the program to avoid such a crowded Spring program. As a result baseball was the first event. The Phi Sigma Kappas were winners and the Kappa Sigmas were runners-up. .Games were played on the various diamonds spread over the city. A Keen competition prevailed in the tennis tournament, which followed baseball. The Phi Gamma Delta team, composed of Jack Rodgers and Roy Crumbliss, was the winner. Run- ner-up was the S. A. E. team, composed of Searle Gillespie and Herbert Slatery. In the individual tennis tournament, Jack Rodgers and John McReynolds were matched in the finals. Weather conditions and an injury to one of the players prevented completion of the tournament. Since Jack Rodgers dropped out of school, John McReynolds was de- clared individual champion. p Golf proved very interesting this year. The K. A. tricli shot artists, English andiVorder-Bruegge, won out, 3 and 2, over the S. A. E.'s Ellison and Johnson. The swimming meet was again run off before a capacity crowd. The spectators showed much spirit and rivalry. Sigma Alpha Epsilon won the meet, with Rodgers, Beck, and Plunkett starring. Phi Gamma Delta ran a close sec- ond, trailing by only three points. SAE ACTIVE RELAY WINNERS H unfe r, BuehIer, PIunIteH'. W, .,..,, Biggs l THA UR The K. A.'s triumphed again in the shuflieboard tourna- ment. Joe McAdams and Walter Carter defeated Will Cobb and John Cobb in the finals. This year an exception- ally large number entered the individual shuflileboard. A gold medal was awarded Robert Miles, who attained the title of 'shuffleboard champion. Joe McAdams was the runner-up. The most colorful event of the year is the fox hunt. Oscar Plunkett was chosen for the fox, and the first to catch him was Lanas Royster. Richard Nevins was second and Charles King was third. The first group competition of the winter quarter was the Relay Carnival. A large, enthusiastic crowd gathered in the Alumni Memorial Gymnasium to watch the events, and to cheer for the various competitors. The Phi Gamma Delta team nosed out the Sigma Chi's in the pledge relay. In the active relay the S. A. E.'s won over the Phi Gams after a hard race. The trophy for winning the greatest number of points in the carnival went to the Phi Gamma Delta. New champions were crowned in almost every other division. The Engineers were 'the champs in the college relay, the Seniors showed the way in the class relay, and in the mili- tary relay Company "I" was the fastest. Edwin "Cheek" Duncan reaped the honors in the individual sprint. A sport that is becoming exceedingly popular among the men is handball. In this tournament, which had more par- ticipants than in previous years, Dan Pick proved himself to be a superior player to Herbert Duggan, who was run- ner-up. , Basketball, the most popular of all winter sports, was next on the calendar. Spectator attendance reached a new high due to the keen competition of the smooth-working teams which participated. The Sigma Chi's were crowned basket- ball champs by virtue of their win over the A. T. O.'s in the finals. In the independent basketball tournament, sev- eral strong teams were entered. The finals brought together the Varsity Inn Ramblers and the Ag Club. The Varsity Inn Ramblers were crowned champs in a close game. Closely connected with the basketball tournament was the individual foul pitching tournament. Sam Garrett was win- ner of this event, and Howard Flowers copped second place. In ping-pong, one of the most popular individual sports at the University, there was an unusually large number of participants who showed themselves greatly interested in the sport. Cecil Ward was declared the ping-pong cham- pion after defeating C. Archer in the finals of this event. The volleyball tournament saw some of the most closely Contested matches of any tournament on the calendar. The finals brought together Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Sigmi Chi. In the most interesting match of the tournament the Sigma Chi's defeated the S. A. Efs for the title of volley- ball champs. SAE Swimming Team, Winners I937 All-Fra+erni+y Meet Sigma Chi Baslceiball Champions Sigma Chi Volleyball Champs F 1 'I I A ,ff L L ,Q . cl .H I , " 4 I I ' jf I 1 I-f ff: I L Jar! 'A I cfjf E .5 !,.' ,L + I by ' jf' .M 1 f M f 1 1 ' . . 3 nj!!! I f , 5 I , If ' f J , I, " ,ff , 1 ,V ,, ,' fl I, lj , ' 1 I "' I . I ,V " 1 .1 J , I . .h ,I I I' 1' fl -V," I ' fl! 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'dvd-'fly f f . - f f . 1 I , fr ,f f"if'7f"'-1 I 5 ,A,,,L., ' D I A N A With her place in the circle of greater deities as the divine per- sonification of the moon, Diana became the mistress of a di- versified scope of real and fancied influences which the cor- relating Greek connected with the mysteries of power in the moonlight. Graceful in form, lithe in movement, the versatile goddess radiated the chaste brilliance of the moon in a variety of phases of Greek life. Her arrows brought swift, painless death to all wild and un- checked creatures and actions. Her light of favor could turn to the huntsmen their luck and prey, or to the plebian mass an added fruition of their land. The integral concept of this queen of night finds her mistress of the chase, guardian of the animal world, guiding saint of the huntsman, protectress of youth, and maidenly symbol of modest beauty. X95 Q 1 4 , A 1' . X . X. N N N Q' . 1, x xixd Q5 9-4 4 . Q I Q s 3+ ,LQ " Y G 4 . 4. . .. .f ,fl -5. 1- x ' 7 V V .g. if Q "W: iff. ' i A .-I 4:5 .' RC' V.,- 'Y ' .gif x, 3:12 'T Miz Q, ' 1151. -fi, .HTA -iz, N n U, i. 3 n it .4 ' 4 - - wi. it . - ' ' 7 + + + 7 4 If ' 4: 'Y 1 7 . ' . ' + 7 " 1 ' 1 . 5 , t wk . 5 'ff 4. 4: 'Q Q Veg. 7 ' , i' L , n 1 I --V f i - It it 'f . ' " E ' 1. 4 ' 'R 4: '+P ' A . , . . + . : , X .. . n ve I I- I 'lg In x 1 -4-Q, 1 EQ -' +1 "fx: I ' X , . In 1. L LJ X Q fall f . w , .A 4 , 1 'A .N .A,.. ," I -Q :uf 4 U 1 ' 'fefby ff? 2'5" n '51 .F nv' 5 . Y ' 1 1 7 1 u I r 5 I , . ,. . I Lf ' .Zi 1 A'.i Y. I A.-,.w.s,p-,z rv. , "L, -f,L?,?,i1-,,f. ,-, ':.-.- - si .. 5 , .wr 1-9, .skjskgp-:', 1' ,,3,t- y .-'!,Q:. av' 4'-ap-'fm ur' -L ,. :"'Q,?f'f:k4' 's'fg,-4'- 5' 'IV I "-'lbf LM f,'y':',ff'1 fill: ' 'bfffffi E1-ms ffl F Lain , 'Sq,'f'Y . 'ii' J If " I . In ,Vfwff n 1-4",,. HJ : 3 A 'gg.,42igM. a5?TvN,5Qf:.g 1. gnu .. ' -Ag-13 Af v.. 9F tb' , ,'?Q, -:,-24.- wi,- -' fl,-.V . -ilq, 1 A v yf u 1 4 4 ! 9 1 1 1 w 1 v v x , i 1 4 W f .1 l i I MISS HNNESSH SS KATHLEEN HI Dr. Robert Russell Wiclts, Dean of Princeton Chapel, seen in formal and informal shots. TOPICS Dean Ififks' topics for the General Convocation Hours fwere: TUESDAY, JANUARY 18 "The Religious Contribution of a Good Home" WEDNESDAY, JANUARY I9 "Making a Home" THURSDAY, JANUARY zo "The Effective Power of Family Sentiment" President Hoskins and Dean Wicks lead platform sing- ers at Convocation. Each year during the month of January three days are set' aside for the Annual Mid-Winter Convocation sponsored by the University Christian Associations and the Univer- sity Church Workers' Council. Classes are suspended for one hour each morning during these days while students and faculty are invited' to assemble in the Alumni Memo- rial Auditorium to hear the General Convocation addresses. The speaker this year for the Tenth Annual Mid-Winter Convocation services was Dr. Robert Russell Wicks, Dean of the Chapel at Princeton University. A native of the state of New York, Dean Wicks has degrees from Ham- ilton College, Union Theological Seminary, Williams Col- lege, and Yale University. He has served as pastor to churches in many sections of the East and was for some time chaplain' at Mt. Holyoke College. Since 1921 he has served as Dean of Princeton Chapel. An outstanding' plat- form speaker, Dean Wicks was of special interest to us because of his very rich experience in dealing with the most intimate of student problems. His book, "The Reason for Living," reveals much as to his insight into student thinking. In addition to the .three general convocations, Dean Wicks spoke to several other smaller groups while a guest on our campus. His other contacts included addresses to a student leadership group of members from the campus Christian Associations and the churches in the University area, at a faculty luncheon, at an interchurch supper, and at an open forum meeting for all students. His three main lectures were broadcast to people all over the state. Student attendance, always voluntary, has increased each year in recognition and appreciation of the benefits offered them in the meetings. ID- NTEP1 CUNVUCATIU I S I l I I I I I I I l I I I I ! I I I 1 I I I I . 1 t I I I I I I I I I I I I I i II I I I I I I I I I I I I THE 1958 TURCHBE RER Seniors leaving the University of Tennessee have re- ceived four years of the best training the state has to offer. Taking up the Torch of Preparation as Fresh- men four or more years ago, the students who now are making the exchange for the Torch of Service have be- hind them four of the most vital molding years they will ever experience. In a period in which they have not only applied themselves for future returns, but have tried an actual "way of living," the most outstanding characteristics of every student are brought out through the uncompromising exposer-action. In their studies, in their athletic competitions, in their social recreation-in all their activities, there is necessi- tated a dedication either to service or to self. The col- lege curricula which neglects this basic principle which in after years will dominate the life of the student misses its reason for existence. The "Volunteer" figure is a symbolization of those ideals which touch the height of character, scholarship, and service. From the Seniors who leave the "Hill" each year are chosen those eight students who seem to have infused their college career most fully with the ideals of the "Volunteer," These eight are honored as the Torchbearers, the students who appear best fitted to carry the Torch of Service for the class into life. The eight selections are not made on the basis of accu- mulated honors, of flashy appearances, or any other Sur- face signs of success. "Amiable, unselfish service" to their fellow students was the one unit of measure, and is, in fact, the only true unit of measuring greatness. Something more important, more essential than mere getting there, lies behind the grounds of selection. Get- ting there in the right way, an extra something, is the almost indefmable quality which separates greatness from mere success. This extra something over and above energy, ability and effort was the characteristic exempli- fied in the "Torchbearers" of the Class of 1938. LORA BOND JOHN FISHER CHARLES GUTHRIE WILLIAM HOUSE WILLIAM JACOB KATHLEEN KING NANCY POORE JAMES ROBINSON - -+..--i ii iz I -h 'S A . X., i i" LF ? 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N an in Q..x..g . , 5 X . ,,,, ,, , X 2 .Q ,H G S . , ,f ., , ,M v 0 Q 5 vngyw ' . 13 g 4 x ,L M N ww , ,Vx Y YI. xg f"K 'Z . SSM ,. . NS , tx Y . 'hm 'Vi?x LST - , 4, x 3' N-,va 411' 'P' :pp ' 4' if 1 uf N Q . , 1 .,., , .M 4 .. ..w,Q .W . 1 "1 , A .Rh ,- . .' A-.., H , v- .. " ."' 'M' .yu . UA. ,- 4..,M-U , .f,..,....,. F 4' v ff, 1. x f Q . w .1 Q,-Q l 5'-X ,QQ Q. . ..,.,.V.. A N- - 'hw CN: X X 4 . f r f f 1 4 , , 5 A A - 4- 'v'nIryp,, ,NUR CHARLES GUTHRIE For sheer amount of unselfish service Charlie stands out as a contributor to the fullness of col- lege life at Tennessee. Under the moniker Q'Scoop" he made the University one of the most excellent Orange and White editors since the inception of the student paper here. Conscientious, hard-worlo ing, patient, and steadying, he added greatly to the prestige of Tennessee publications through his work on the paper and his service on the Publica- tions Council. Serving in another field with a sec- ond moniker, "Sport," Charlie as president of the Nahheeyayli Governing Board infused the Mid- winters with one of their greatest successes. Not in these recognized honors does the most deserving part of Charlie' s work lie. In publicizing and for- warding the Grace Moore and Rubinoff concerts, student social and literary functions, and every movement or activity designed to benefit the Uni- versity and University students, the services he rendered unselfishly are immeasurable. The Uni- versity loses in his graduation a true Torchbear- ing Volunteer. wa , ,kg 'fsyfr kf .5 . 1' 9 'J'-. fb , ..-, , X- ' 'L .f,,.,.,wf A -.- ,-u'.,, au, ' Y:f'i,,,nrsTr' - -'wwf .:.. of 'imxfeffv ' 5f'ifs:2' iii ,, ' 1 H,,,g,,.' ' '-nf" cl. ---'ng ,HQ :xg g--fa.. 5 L ,,3 ,x'?Ql':f,A3 , T ,j 1 -:AZ-sf My. u'A'..E',..wL-0 ' rm .-:111'A7?. 4 ' - '. . . .f --'-awx..'--fs V f ' ' X :Lily -'-wi'-are 'Q ' r ., 4 -,,,,,,,, ,,"'s 4 Last . 'gf-z", .K f '-if ' ' ' Q. a.fbrFFfag'3' X -ai' , ff-v,-. xfla. E-' if Kass we 'I hw mf Z., 43 V f ,A iv! if cr, 1 ... U ' ' amz. af 0' 's 1 J 0 'Q' .'Bx, X mm 5 1 ' X ' Q., f A wx, f I E if ff J ,' X 4152 A f fag, .159 5 .. ff f 'ff .Z fn, :'f:'- X f sf-Q, ' fff f ' .1 f Mx 1 xx X fm , W wlwwlg , YW eww . , iN ,gn 'Wx Sf. 1, ,gg 11 ww ,B .Eh JSF Wggx fa w Wg Vg X A EG "1 , ,nf X 4 , Q . J, ',,g ' , x s V W ,, lf i Um KATHLEEN KING "Kolcy," despite all Natureis rules to the contrary, exemplified a feminine combination of beauty, in- tellect, and sociableness. Chosen a class officer three times, she was selected by her classmates to posts of honor again and again for her sincere friendliness. In her scholastic work she ranked high throughout her college career and during her Senior year was elected to Phi Kappa Phi. For her leadership and integrity her sorority sisters named her their president. An attitude of cheerful friend- liness was a part of her associations with everyone she knew and added to the winning qualities which brought her the highest popular honor a co-ed at the "Hill" can receive, the election to "Mis Ten- nessee." Personal popularity was not one of her aims. It came as an inevitable result of her un- feigned wholesomeness. Recognition of her schol- arship, leadership, and service, including member- ship in Mortar Board, national honor society for women, in no way changed her modest, unassum- ing amiability. I 'QR Fw QP EQ M? 1. -P R 1 K in fa-ff A ' I ' x , 4 Qs ff 5 A2 .7 N 'x A I 7 E , If 1 iff I 3 I 'H , .gf i , Q w Jr... "' A X Y 5 .wt g ff 4 iw 4 , GA Q tr I is V J Q Q' x ' if A Tk x zhfz. .g. ,A -2' R, 4-EGL 1. :- ' 3 xx.f 3 Sa, ? Q XEIS ,, vim? Q, . ,Thy Q STLDENT W , ACTUTHE5 -411 , , -4 EFLU ER Each year the yearbook in cooperation with the student weekly, the Orange and White, sponsors the Annual Vol- unteer Beauty Contest as a means of selecting from a representative group of comely co-eds the most outstanding beauties on the campus and as a way of feting townspeople and friends of the university with a beauty review of Tennessee co-eds. Since its inception the contest has grown into one of the most colorful of campus events. In former years the contest was held privately with only the contestants and judges attending. In order to give all the opportunity of attending the color spectacle, the competition has been held in the gym with all persons invited. A limited number of entrants from the various girls' organizations at the university are presented to- the judges and audience in the Alumni Memorial Gymnasium each November. From the seventy to a hundred co-eds entered there, twenty-four are selected to appear in the VOLUNTEER as campus "Favorites" Pictures of these twenty-four are sent to a nationally-known artist or other connoisseur of beauty, this year to the artist McClelland Barclay, who makes the final selection of the six girls who are featured in the VOLUNTEER as the campus "Beauties" The contest this year presented ninety con- testants in the gym in a setting of modernistic blue salon. White inlaid tables and damask overstuffed suite contrasted with a background of star-covered blue to form a perfect frame for the flowers of Tennessee beauty in the annual review. A Seventy-five of Tennessee's most alluring campus beauties stand competition en masse at the close of the annual beauty contest while the selection of the heights of femi- nine pulchritude are made. The co-eds pass in review from the modernistic salon down the silvered aisle as Announcer Jack Den- man presents them to the audience of friends and judges seated in the rear of the Alumni Memorial Auditorium. Participants who have run 'fthe gauntlet of beauty" rest in the seats under the balcony and look with critical approval upon the other contestants. UF OLE 'PENN SEE AS SELECTED BY QPOISE i QBEAUTY QPERSONALITY McCLELLAND BARCLAY .-7601157 qv-vv7ff!g Z-Cfdffftfra ywv., ' Nt ' lfvi-ll . WCW 40 QA,.,,,.... pdmta,-'rw .fl 1,0 941' K ,...- Qfff fem The essence of Tennessee beauty was so adjudged this year by McClelland Bar- clay, famous artist and feminine portrait- ist. Honored internationally for his color paintings of -American beauties, artist Barclay is most commonly known by stu- dents for his Cosmopolitan covers and his recent part in the show, "Artists and Models." au, V I I 1 , A 1 , V 1 . . - , 1 MISS VEHNIIIE HIIHHNH Ai 5 I 1 Y i i ' z i BEAUTY iifixrr, , , ,, V w I 1 Ju I F I P n 1 n .w.g. K. a+ Z ,, N :iii -df, E1 5, ' V, "L i ,V Fix' wr' 1 I L ,, ! I E s 1 I r 1 s 0 I MISS HIHISI HHSSHHY 1' , ,gy E W. 'iw Wi 1 .w U' I ' 4 E H5 QW In ru lu I F I TX- SW 11 L 'll J 'J 1 I 3 4 1 1 4 ?' . a 1 w' 1 1 1 i I i i 1 h 3 'Q 5 3 I 5 fi J V 5 I 5 lf. 1: :EJ .4 'V'?'f'1i' ' -v v 1 N 1 Ei., A in' I Q q+ ,mas F ' WN i 5 i Jr 5. 'E w, 4 w- igi! 5 i Ni! iq 245' 1 f,af lg: 1,1 s f ? U i1 Q' fi la z ? 4 'E V. 11 if 1 Y Lf -' 5 I 1 ,3 M iz' "li uf I 1 i 31? ' , r L: ll Q V I : II 2 - ' x it X x 3 Lf n if fl vi ? F - 1 ' Q f i fg ' f W 1 an 1 1 ' , f 'x l N ! 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VL1, , ,.-ww 0 l 1, if? . hm ,-gk Q A P, 1 'R Aw f at f ' Y f W ATI' 1 .11 , , 11 Q 1 1' , Q A 1' 1 11 1 15 ,g I 5: 1 li 1 , 11 .111 ' , 11 1:11 1 '11 ,111 1 1 14 1 1 1112111 Q11 K I S11 1 11 11 ' 1 111 1 1 1 1 11 1,1 1 1' 1 ,1 -1 11 1 x 1 :Li 1f 11 111 111 111' 225. 51 11 Ei? 4-xg 1:11 1, 1 111 nj 1 ' 1 11 111 11 li, 5. 1 F' 1 1 in 1 1 1 1 11111H111N11H1SHH11 1'., ty 1 1 1 1 11 1 I 1 1 arf' I ig, J., " . UF THE TENN SSEE C MPH 3532, if -' new-r.. , LOIS WHITEHEAD JEAN ETTE WEBB 5' MILDRED MOSS CYNTHIA COWAN KATHERINE RIDDLE MARTHA STU BLEY r I QW 7 A , st A I I 1 s .l 1 f I I ii F 'i E I 11 ? 3 11 if . 1, -,N i E, s 5' 3 5 , V, E41 1 2 f in g 31 1 if il W . W, Q1 1 .L A U R U P1 A In Aurora, saffron-robed goddess of the Dawn, the Greeks con- ceived a relation of the freshness and glow of the morning with the early death of promising and beautiful youth. Heralded by Phosphor, the morning star, the bright-haired mistress rose from the depths of the ocean in the east to pass like the spectra across the sky, shedding a purple glow of light to gods and men. Fresh winds were felt at her approach, and ruddy beams ushot the orient through with gold" when the dawn of morning called forth the light of day. The moon and the stars vanished gradually as the rosy-fingered maiden advanced, lifting the veil of night from o'er the earth with softening rays of violet. The spirited goddess purposed to bring to man new strength for the toils of the day. i W x I Q V 1 w . 'uw , l 1'i x .1 1,5 ,Q Ile? 171' 1', NY ' N llmf Wi Quif ,-- , Ill ,i 'Bsf Q 1 ,Tj 'E Y. 131' W W ix 1 'ls ,Q .V l'a ?'F ,W 1 , 55, 1'i vim 1 W , 4 H W N I s 4 3 H 4. B Ei 'L L 3 1 3 Q4 4 V I , ll .1 :F 'I - 1 I 2? 23- 1 V TZ'-1 55 , U r :l '.. rd Zi' 1 3' 'I,i1.'3v-9 3 Sit 'C.fWf,E ifsvifi 1. 353-"Q 'I z' -yi. F' if , 5142.2 1--.1 -1 .3 9-1" 1-Zo, 1 ff'.1f'fc 3,38 L , -:aj . 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The latest in new hats may be seen on the fourth row second from the far end Unsolicited smiles add a cheerful note as the throng awaits the opening gun THE BIG PAR DE Long "rahs" and loud whistle booms add an atmosphere to collegiate life which gives college color and pep. "Pack- ing 'em in" to add that extra bit of enthusiasm reflects a sharp note of lingering cheers to any crisp fall afternoon and never fails to give the fans an extra close of collegiate fevered spirit. Along with the crowd prevails that feeling which calls forth true sportsmanship and keen competition: One senses an underlying current of excitement and watch- ful hope, when in a tense moment of extreme expectancy an entire throng rises in unison to cheer a fighting team on to victory. Its a great sight to witness the glamour of crowds- crowds-CROWDSl ,, ,V - At Tennessee the crowds which witness pigsltin contests are by far the most colorful and enthusiastic. From the very first game to the closing encounter the throngs gather to witness the best Dixie has to offer on the gridiron menu. Some stand, some iust sit and stare, but when the feeling of tense excitement fills the at- mosphere every spectator experiences the tingling thrill which en- gulfs the stadium like a mighty wave. The scene 'pictured below is packed with that same tense excitement. I WW The Vole'Hes form a colorful "T" in fhe easl sfands of Shields-Wafkins Field CROWD CONVERSATION: . . "Betcha Hve to one Oshkosh scores before the half" . . Cold Dreeenks!! . . . 'lAnd Mable, I waited for over an hour, all d resse d up and my hair combed you know, and he still didn't come, so I figgured I was stood up so I saysl' . . . Pop-corn, Peanutzl . . . "There's the whistle for the half, 7-0 favor Tenn" . . . "All right then, I betcha, five to one Oshkosh scores" . . . Brown Cows! . . . "Look Mabel that new sponsor can't walk worth a darn" . . . You'll have to talk LOUDER, BEN, I CAN'T HEAR YOU FOR TI-IE BAND" . . . "Oh, the poor thing's hurt! . . . Game,s over . . . Quit pushinv . . . "No, I can't go tonight, Ben . . . Lost all my money on Oshkosh, punkest refree I ever saw." Thousands of hearrs srand s'l'lll as fhe yardage is measured Hus+ling +o buy fhe lasl' few seals is a common occurrence among foofball fans I-i1 URK AND PL Two phases of student life give the "I-Iillv a true collegiate aspect. The classroom lecture, the intricate laboratory, and the long, labori- ous hours of attempted concentration in the form of study offer an intellectual and cultural atmosphere. This view alone of life at Tennessee casts a shadow indicative of a secluded and cloistered existence. Fortunately, however, there is quite in evidence another influence which is exemplified hy drug store gatherings, congenial sandwich shop congregations, and numerous social activities. It might even be said that this type of student activity is the most popular educational pursuit and attracts students from every col- lege. Another group, however, stands out as true representatives of what a strong will power and a fine determination may accomplish. This is the group who do not have time for idle loaling, but invest their time in putting themselves through college. They are to be commended-more power to them-they've got the stuff it takes. l+'s no play fo absorb physics. 1 .-- .75 , ff if 1 .wwf L ai ry-if x v I-fi A , , '15-fimsvf . My ., f-.x,yT2fz, 938 . -" if J 4 f Y in.. N 1 2 5 K 4 1 Y I 1 , ,- lHl HHNH PHHHMS "I-lere's to Old Tennesseev sings across the "Hill" as bandsmen march for the Volunteers on Shields-Watkins Field. Silvered hatons Hash in the crisp air of an au- tumn afternoon while thousands stand and cheer for the fighting Vols, roused to a fever pitch by the martial swing of drums and trumpets sounding forth from the M.: K. ,.,. wr mighty ninety-piece Tennessee band. Captained by P. Baum, the hand paraded through its most colorful season in support of the Neylandmen to the delight of the fans in Knoxville. Executing formations with ma- chine-lilce precision, the unit also thrilled crowds at the Kentucky game in Lexington and at the Mississippi bat- tle in Memphis. Pretty sponsor, Martha Stubley, played her share in the musicians, success marching at her post of honor in front of the band. BANDMASTER ERNEST W. HALL ably insfrucfs H16 crack music unit in fhe arf of the no+e and formation. Making their initial appearance with the band at Band and VoleHes siand al' aH'en+ion in a mass U-T forma- +ion while Vol fans pay rribure fo "a hallowed Hill in'Ten- nessee " "Best of +he year" commenfed visi+ing specfarors the Sewanee game this year were the Volettes, col- ' on me Held drills of me we WHS orful girls' drill team. They injected a new vivid- ness in field formations at the football games. Organized under Bandmaster Hall's supervision, the seventy-live co-eds, dressed in flashy capes of orange and White, participated in the half-time maneuvers and tricky techniques which make a game a classic of music and color as Well as of conflict. Baton-twirling Drill Major Mildred Alexander played the lead in the drill team pa- rades in step with hand expert McKamey. Varsiry cheerleaders go into a "Tennessee Train" in an effort 'lo exhori' 'em louder and longer from 'lhe Vol Voicers. Sev- eral shofs of the old ''Whislle-boom-on-H1e-kickoff" were bil'- 'rerly censored by +l1e alleged ediforialisl, J. A. O. .2577 FU A D FRULIC Contrary to popular belief, a great portion, if not all, of a college student's career is devoted just having a udarn good time." Every fiscal year a nine months' fun curriculum offering the degrees T.D. fTea Dancersj, S.L. fSocialitej, S.D.T. fSaw Dust Trailj, and simi- larly lettered suflixes is taken almost without exception by every student. Barnwarmin', the Ag School spree, and Carnicus, the Spring festival, highlight social rec- reation at the University. The Sigma Chi Derby, the SAE-Sigma Nu Bowery Ball, the Chi Omega Mardi Gras, and other organization frolics add variety to the one-year course in "After Ofiice Hours." One is re- minded of the famous IFSO motto: "There comes a time in the life of every man between the ages of ten and forty when he must lay down his books for Bruclcsf' In fact, Tennessee seems to have the knack of injecting more out-and-out recreation into a nine-months school year than most profs consider possible. Queen of the Barnwarmin' ' Virginia Whife X ' fl . 3-Q 'P f , - x . ,Q .l ,I 5 ii 2, LM? , X L V? , ' 4' -A 1 X ' fi i , :fg'j'y- , A ' W ' f--V41-w - 1 .1:A' f A- , , gwf' . ,, H HQ. y . X z""- W - .wmff 'W' in x..X Yi -IT g I -, Y-5 if xiff ,,1. -, 'N iff: vmLP lf ag Pi. 'Q I 1 L if PL M .f a5A Q, Z -CN 1 mi? ' 4: Q 'Nw f in " m , f, ,Vw Tennessee's own Grace Moore sfeps from +he rrain for her +wo-day s+ay a+ +he Uni- verslry of Tennessee. Visifs fo fhe fraiernify where her brofhers, Jim and Rich, spenf four years a+ U-T, and +o a WSGA lunch- eon were among fhe fearures of her slay. A capaciry crowd of s+uden'rs affended her conceri' in 'rhe Alumni Memorial Gymnasium in one of fhe mosr oursranding even+s of 'rhe campus year. Seen escaping her crowd of admirers Harough 'ihe rear door of 'lhe gym in fhe +wo lower piciures ro The leff is Miss Moore immediafely following rhe con- cerr. The success of 'lhe conceri' has pei'- manenHy esfablished rhe program of in+er- narional celebriry appearances ai' U-T, spon- sored by +he Universify CommiH'ee on En- ferfainmenf. ITUR University organizations took a forward step this year in bringing personalities of international note to the "Hill" in a movement to enlarge the scope of the Uni- versity experience for Tennessee students. A new Uni- versity Committee on Entertainment was instituted for the single purpose of developing and extending this field of educational contact here. Members of this commit- tee, which was chairmaned by Dr. Ralph E. Dunford, for 1937-38, were: Dean Fred C. Smith, Dean F. M. Massey, Dean Harriet Greve, Dr. John B. Emperor, Ralph Frost, Charles Guthrie, Leroy Neblett, Bill Kreis, Nancy Poore, and Sophie Lowe. World-famous artists to appear here through the efforts of this committee were singing star Grace Mooreg Dave Rubinoff, the great violinistg and the novelty piano team, Fray and Braggiotti. U. S. Senator Kenneth D. McKellar of Tennessee contributed to the list of outstanding person- alities visiting here when he addressed the Interfraternity Council Banquet in November. .Z Gazing longfully af the sandwiches he didn"r 'rake is SPE's New Jersey shysfer. Frank Barnes. Dafe Doro+hy's inieresl' is also gusfafory, while Millie Moore's seems fo be in 'Phe cameraman. Ann Gibson and Doi' Griffin give aHen+ion fo ihe lecture being delivered, no doubly from fhe rear. Billy Fulton and Miss Tennessee of I937 dance in formal aH'ire ai' the Bowery Ball. li. ,i 1 l I l 1 lf 1 'i 1 1 I If 1 1 1 I .1 1 l Q1 i g.. ill Q, il ' 1 F 1 1 l l I I 1 1 E .LL ...Y , L 11 ,A 1 1 A novelfyg in +he way of dances is fhe annual frafernify Jail Dance THE ANCE PARADE University dances contribute a social aspect to the student life at Tennessee which has become a tradition noted for fine conduct and the advancement of friendship and hospitality. Under the direc- tion of the All Students' Club Dance Committee, the dance calen- dar is composed the first of the year, and the various organizations lcnow months in advance as to the exact date of each dance. Under this type of supervision conflicts have been reduced to a minimum and today Tennessee may be set forth as having a model social activities plan. Leading the social calendar are the two sets of Nahheeyayli formals. Will Osborne thrilled a large Mid-Winters crowd this year, and Paul Whiteman gave to the students at the Finals a real dancing treat. But in order to fully appreciate the dance activities at Ten- nessee, it is necessary to attend one or more of these sessions. Grand March leaders at the Mid-Winters were Jackie McKelvey and Charles Guthrie. To the pulsating rhythm of Will Osborne this popular couple headed a procession of lads and ladies, winding in and out in an intricate Hoor pattern. Viewed by one of the largest crowds ever to witness a Nahheeyayli dance this pan- orama' of soft lights and sweet music, beautiful girls and fancy decorations, was by far one of the most brilliant and successful events of 1938 festivities. Numerous dances at the University afford not only a recreation for the students but a colorful affair to outsiders. It's a fashion parade for the girls who put on their best bib and tucker as they parade smiling beside their attentive escorts. Work and books are tossed away while the dancers swing in the "Little Apple" and in the newest steps to the rhythm of the Collegians, the Commanders, or to the syncopated melody of nationally known orchestras. Under multi-colored decora- tions, which contribute a dazzling effect, the. dancers forget the class- room struggles and enter into a spirit of celebration. From the opening week of school to the final closing days the dance calendar alfords a combination of formals, costume affairs, tea dances, and informal swing sessions. The Nahheeyayli dances, however, with all of their glamour and sparkling color, are highlights of the social season. At this time visitors from over the entire South come to Tennessee to participate in this series of gala dances. Then there are the never-to-be-forgotten "frat" and sorority formals when each organization tries to outdo the other struggling to receive the title of ubest dance of the year." Proudly Tennessee can boast rightfully of having gained the reputation of I , lil" lfilllf being an excellent host to students and visitors alike who attend the many dances given each year by various organizations on the "I-Iill.', of ,933 1 fff!,'g,y-'f4'f4ffl f ,ww W1 mm. l A i - ---Ll V 1 i Left to right: Charles Guthrie, Norbert Lester, F. C. Lowry, Chr., J. C. Hodges, C. E. Wylie, Alford Orr THE PUBLICATIU CDU CIL Controlling the activities of student publications is the University Pub- lications Council, a corporate entity known as The University of Tennessee Publishing Association. This board directs the production of The Orange and White, the student weekly newspaper, and the VOLUNTEER, the stu- dent annual. Of the council of six, the President of the University appoints two from members of the faculty and one from the University alumni. Students who subscribe to the publications elect the remaining three members-two students and one alumnus-in the general spring elections. The Board of Directors purposes to insure the development and expansion of the two student productions through the careful infusion of the few regulations which work toward the extension and construction of greater publication prestige and influence on the campus. The board under the chairmanship of Faculty Representative F. C. Lowry prepared new oilices equipped with the latest in modern improvements for both publications this year in an effort to facilitate production. To Richard RICHARD WRIGHT W1'ight, former member of the council, the publications and Publications Council owe an immeasurable debt for his eihcient administration of the installation of the new oiiices. He gave his time, energy, and ability unselfishly to the performance of this job for the undergraduates of the publications offices. Present and Years to Come- if Former member of the council, who directed the installation of the new WOODROW LUTTRELL CHARLES EDWARDS . . JOHN CATE . . . . PHILLIP JONES . BILLY I-IALE . . J. E. CARPENTER . J. D. TAYLOR . . RUTH WILLIAMS . JOHN R. BEASLEY . LOFTON DAVIDSON . EDWIN BAEELAY . KEWEN DODSON . . HOLLIS WOODWARD . GENE BURGESS . . . J. H. REYNOLDS I TENN SSEE FARMER EDITORIAL STAFF . . . Editor-in-Chief . . Managing Editor . . Associate Editor . .Associate Editor D EPARTM ENTAL EDITORS . . .Associate Editor . . Animal Husbandry Dairying . Horticulture . . . . . . . Extension . . Agrirultural Education . Agricultural Engineering - . Agricultural Business Assistants J. W. PEACH MILTON HUMBERD MARCUS SAELEY 'THOMAS BRIGHTWELL JAMES TICE NELSON MADDUX JAMES STILZ . . BUSINESS STAFF Agricultural Economics Home Economics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . Business Manager EDWIN TAYLOR - - . . Assistant Manager ROBERT ANDERSON . . ..... Circulation Manager SPENCER TURRENTINE ...... Assistant Circulation Manager CHRISTINE LAMPLEY . . . Home Economics Circulation Manager A. B. ROGERS .... ........ A dvertising Manager THOMAS BRIGHTWELL . .Assistant Advertising Manager RUTH WILLIAMS . . ..... Assistant Advertising Manager SARAH SWANN . . . Home Economics Advertising Manager MARGARET EDINGTON ..... Assistant Advertising Manager WOODROW LUTTRELL Edifor First Row: Anderson, Babelay, Beasley, Bentley, Bible, Brightwell, Burgess, Carpenter, Cate. Second Row: Davidson, Dotson, Edington, Edwards, Hale, Humberd, Jones, Lampley, Reynolds. JAMES STILZ Third Row: Rogers, Rue, Swann, Taylor, E. W., Taylor, D., Terry, Tice, Williams. Business Manager 5 EW I Il J IL fl 1 -l r" J, PA- I S I!- H Flf I i ! ha A M LX 4 , I I V fi' A . I !"v f ,. , ku ,xl F3 If ...-, I-1 I , A A I f ,I in Ii .I I I W :L BILL JACOB Edifor WILLIAM S. JACOB LORA BOND . . . ROBERT C. AUSTIN LOUISE TALLEY . EDITORIAL STAFF WILLIAM ARMSTRONG . TATE CARTY . . LAWRENCE CHANDLER . . . . BARRY CECIL . . KATHLEEN KING . HELEN JENNINGS EVELYN DARST . EUGENE ENGLISH CAYCE PENTECOST FEATURES BART BARTON MARGARET A. BROWN ELINOR BARKER ANN DOUGHTRY DOROTHY BARHAM JUANITA CHYNOWETH ANN BOLIN VIRGINIA NAFF MARTHA JEAN OSBORNE ATHLETICS J. M. SMITH, JR. JOHN LEA FRANK BARNES L. C. STAIR SORORITIES ELEANOR NOELL, Head ANN PRATER MARY FRANCES ADAMS JANE COOK HELEN I-IUTCHINSON MARY WYNATT GALBRATH . Editor-in-Chief . Associate Editor . Associate Editor . Associate Editor . Associate Editor Associate Editor Staff Photographer Assistant Staff Photographer . . Administration Editor SECTION STAFF CLASSES EVELYN CARTY LOUISE FEATHERSTON KATHRYN COOK KATHERINE BRISCOE ANNA MAE ALLEN ADMINISTRATION MARGARET ALBERS SUE DEBUSK BETSY CHAMBERS MARY LOUISE KUPFER ELEANOR LAPPAGE PAT CURRIER FRATERNITIES VINCENT VORDER-BRUEGGE' Head JEAN POWELL EDWINE POWERS ORGANIZATIONS WYLINE BAIRD LILLIAN READ BURTON CAYE BEHNKE JOSEPHINE COFFIN T PRUDUCTIU UF . . Class Editor . Features Editor . Military Editor . Athletic Editor HELEN MARSHALL MARDITE EDWARDS MARY ALLISON FRIERSON FRANCES EDMUNDS BEVERLY BAER VIRGINIA I-IORSELEY TYPISTS BILLIE BURKS JEAN ALLEN MARJORIE MILAM MARIE COOK MARGARET FRENCH ART CHARLOTTE ANDREWS BOYS' INTRAMURALS L. C. STAIR, JR., Head GIRLS, INTRAMURALS LOUISE BUSSART JUNE ADAMS EDWINE POWERS LAVERNE EMERT VIRGINIA EISENSMITH RUTH WORD TH ,-...44AA GRAx'joNEs . . DEXTER CHRISTENBERRY . HERBERT SLATERY GENE BUTLER . JFVVETT EDWARDS MARIE CLAYTON , FEI.Ix HooTs . . BUSINESS STAFF - . . Businvss .flssislant Businrss f155i5lllIlf Iglljillfj-f glssislant Bitsinrss flssistallt liztsinrss . . Subsrription Blanagar Blanagar Blanager jlanagfr Alanagfr Blanagvr . . . 0,fl.CL'MHIldg6f MIRIAM - - GUTHRIE - . Organzzatzon Managwr LAPSLEY OGDEN . , , , f1d.w,,,,,i,,g M,,,,,,g,,. VVOODROVV THOMAS . . Assistant fldwrtising Manager HERMAN SARVER . . flssistant 1-Idfvertising Manager JAMES PARKER . . Assistant ddfvertising Manager Typists: MARTHA CECIL, REBECCA DRANE, MABEL HOLT COBLE 1 ELLEN VVEAVER, BILLY HINES, FRANCE HUDGENS, MILDRED M055, Clerical Stajf: MARY FRANCES ADAMs, ANN RICE, VIRGINIA ER- wIN, JANE VAN CLEAVE, ALTA Ross, VIRGINIA PLUNKETT. Sub-'ffiI9fi011 Sidyff: RUTH ANN XAVHITIS, KATE Ross, MARX' ELEANOR ACUFF, LILLIAN VVRIGHT, LYSBETH VVADDELL, RosEMARY TUCKER, MARX' ANN FRISTOE, KATHERINE RINEARSON, JOSEPHINE LEA, MARY DALE KING, MARGARET HDRNER, SARA HINTON, ofiice to the student distributing boxes gives the detailed HELEN TIPTON. VULU TEE Planning for the next VOLUNTEER starts soon after the close of school in June. Color schemes are drawn up, rough sketches are made, and new theme material is traced in every conceivable manner. Actual production, however, starts with the opening of the college doors the last of Sep- tember. The photographers blow the dust from the cam- eras and usher in a busy season marked by the familiar expression, "Smile, please." First call for staff members is then made and within a couple of weeks some fifty or sixty students apply for positions on the annual. The section heads arrange their individual staff and by the last of Oc- tober the VOLUNTEER is in production. The publication Offices are in a continual "hubbub," with the staff collecting photographs, arranging material, rewriting copy and read- ing proof. Toward the last few months the lights burn long and the typewriters become overheated due to the long hours of rushed work. From September to May the staff members realize the gruelling monotony of answering one simple question asked by hundreds of students, "When will the VOLUNTEER be out?" The one important goal of send- ing the last bit of copy is constantly before the staff, and during the last days of work there is a renewed vigor in an effort to finish the copy. f GRAY JONES, Business Manager Reviewing ad. possibilities The business division of the VOLUNTEER is faced with the problem of financing the annual. Selling books, organiza- tion space, class space, and advertising occupies the staff for several months. A continuous stream of notices from the work to a staff of ofiice help. The science of bookkeeping is submitted to a rigid test as payments are checked and re- checked. Working from the start up to the last dollar which must be collected means long hours of laborious work, but assures a financially successful book. Checking subscription lists Editors Orr and Guthrie s Reporters: MILLER TUCKER, ELIZABETH MILLS, ANNIS 'oN,lC. H. VANCE, BRUCE DAVIS, J. E. WILLIAMS, LAURA TER, ELIZABETH CHANDLER, ANITA BOWMAN, FELIX DOWDY, Y C. JACOBS, MARY DALE KING, J. W. PEACH, MARGARET 1, ANN THOMAS, SUE DEBUSK, PENN WORDEN, BEN OGLE, . COLE. ts Reporters: NELSON LINDSAY, TED KELLY, J. M. SMITH, L. C. STAIR, T. V. ASHBY. 'ty Reporters: SARA GRACE RICHMOND, MARGARET ALBERS, Y CATHERINE PHIPPS, BARBARA RULE, HELEN JENNINGS, Y KUPFER. THE UPIAN E EDITORIAL STAFF CHARLES R. GUTHRIE . . Editor-in-Chief, First Term ALFORD ORR ..... Editor-in-Chief, Second Term IQLEBER DUNKLIN ........ Associate Editor ROBERT C. AUSTIN . . Associate Editor CHARLES EWING . ALAN SAYFORD . MARTHA REGAN . JANE HELM . . JACK DENMAN . GENE ENGLIsH,. . . M.AXINE VUN KANNON J. W. ORR ..... GEORGE KEELER . JIM TATE .... ROBERT CLAGGETT . GARRETT PARKER . BARRY CECIL . . . Associate Editor . . Sports Editor . Society .Editor . . Feature Editor Editorial Assistant Editorial Assistant Editorial Assistant Make-up Assistant Make-up Assistant Rewrite Assistant Rewrite Assistant . . . Cartoonist . . Photographer S T U D E N T The Orange and White is U-T'S weekly newspaper, ed- ited and published by students under the direction Ot the Publications Council. The paper, which appears each Friday, is a seven-Column edition with standard-size news- iake-up and rewrite artists Ewing, rr, and Clagget review the copy unklin, Regan, Saytord, English, Tate, and .ustin bear down to get out that "eight page" this week paper type, averaging six pages an issue. Two editors Command the publication each year, one from September to February and the other from February until June. The business manager, who handles the ad- vertising and circulation, serves the whole' school year. The O-W has approximately twelve hundred fI,2OOJ subscribers. From a four-page, four-Column tabloid in 1906 to the 1937-1938 sheet of Standard size, seven Columns and six- to-eight pages, the paper, like wine, has grown stronger with age. The first edition appeared Friday, October 5, 1906, under the editorship of J. H. Richmond. Paul A'- AN HITE BUSINESS STAFF F' G- DENTON, .lR- - . . Business .fllanager .l-ACK ARMITAGE . . Assistant Sales tllanager .lOHN E. LUTZ . . Assistant Sales .fllanager JOE BLACK . . Assistant Sales flifanager JOE WISE . . Circulation Maizagez' FRENCH FRAZIER . . Bulletin Board .Manager ANN THOMAS . . Make-up Manager' ANN HOLLOIWAN . . Ojice Manager Ojice Assistants: SAMMY BEALL, DICK BEAN, JOSEPHINE COFFIN, LINDA CARSON, HELEN HUTCHINSON, LAVERNE EMERT, PAT CUR- RIER, MARDITE EDVVARDS, MARY ALLISON FRIERSON, MARGARET HDRNER, BARBARA FoUsT, JOSEPHINE LEA, KARR HINTON, JR. W E E K L Y Work, who was business manager, explained its purposes: "lt will be the aim of the editors to issue every Friday a paper that will, as far as possible, answer the questions that arise in your mind and be a true reflector of all phases of student life and activity. Departments will be devoted to athletics, personals, organizations and ex- changesf' ln 1914 the O-W became a six-column, four-page, stand- ard size newspaper. In 1922, it became a tabloid again, but with five columns and smaller type. Through the presses on March 26, 1931, roaring with new size and strength, the O-W became a standard-size paper, seven columns with regular news type. It has increased in size, campus coverage, and column variety since that time. Six-page papers this year succeeded the former four-pages, and some eight-page issues appear. N... fit- 'W i F. G. DENTON, Business Manager Drawing up ads with ideas that sell occupies the atten tion ot Beall, Wise, Thomas, and Armitage. On the business staff Lutz, Holloman, and Frazier check on the ads ot the past edition. THE HILL NUMBER ONE-Campus BMOC's Carmichael, Neblett, Guthrie, and Kreis confer with President Hoskins on the next step of the Volunteer Symbol. NUMBER TWO- Henson Hall Zebra's add another stripe to a diminu- tive and embarrassed neophyte. NUMBER TH REE-Pret- ty but packing disasters, the "Bama Susannasv eased the ache of a stinging 14-7 defeat via Tennessee to the Rose Bowl. NUMBER FOUR- A. O. Pi braintrusters pause on their trek to the Golden Gate carrying the laurels of Southern Pulchritude to the men of the West. NUMBER FIVE- Football magnate Joe Black fSultanj Hayes poses a miniature harem for a day- light picture on the U. T. parking lot. NUMBER SIX- Two of them got away. "Grand March" McKelvey and "Songbird" Kerr discuss campus politics in an appropriate nook-the cellar. NUMBER SEVEN- Keep off the grass signs are swept away as feminine sit- down strikers demand shorter classes and better food. NUMBER EIGHT-Freshman stags tell why they left home in the annual Fireside chat at Lee Lakes. NUMBER NINE-Three of the greater great lovers, Knight, Lanigan, and "Chocolate" Etheridge straighten out dating difficulties. NUMBER TEN-Town- send's token to Tennessee, Tippy Tipton, carries on with apparent fervor despite indication of physical torture infliction. NUMBER ELEVEN- Prositl say the carefree femmes feasting on the hard-earned candy of that plodding, simple lover back home who sweats out gift after gift for his imagined faithful. NUMBER TWELVE-Josephine Lea, the Sigma Chi Venus turns on a masculine admirer with stock expression No. 317b, "quizzical but inviring."NUMBeR THIRTEEN- Fleetfoot of the freshman class, Al Barasso, quote: "It's was a hard fight, Ma, but I won." Incidentally he has just escaped being cow-tromped by 700 frosh. NUMBER FOURTEEN-"Early to bed and early to rise makes a man-" There's nothing like that three- minute nap between twelve and that eight o'clock. NUMBER FIFTEEN-Chi Omega sledders take a down- hill glide under the direction of "Nu-Grape" Hughes. " b ' 'ii ., M A f '-'5 ? 4: gi" J, V , M.-, .. WHT ,a f '.f?'5MQ M2Y g1rf'f f K- iw- ff'- ,irl ,- V . -1 1 'k -' wi' -f 'fi " Vw , I ,,r " W,-J H. .f K 'I l x 52? 'rw rv- 0 ' n sggyds 4 " A f' 4 vnu ,f f. E5 . f 1,'f..-.E-1-sn... P 553' ,,f,..,,4 ,, 5- 1 an 'QV4 'Eff ,nu-...4 Y 5 U S ,,.. 3? fiigf N .7 ,. ,la ofa THE HILL NUMBER ONE-Cheerleaders Stuart, McKinney, Love- joy, Hooser, and Armitage invoke the subdued muse of noise from a crowd probably watching a light in the north bleachers. NUMBER TWO- Tyson Home, student social center, looms majestically, through one of the few coats of white the smoky "Hill" received this year., NUMBER THREE- Phi Mu dehutantes hold open house in the wide open spaces. NUMBER FOUR- Not another open house, but one of those usual Sunday afternoon gatherings in the spring sun. NUMBER FIVE-Clayton tries some real pushing while sorority sisters practice the advanced technique in "leg-pulling." NUMBER SIX- Co-eds Holland, Webb. and Holland break the Dean's hitch-hike rule to the delight of Knoxville brake reliners. NUMBER SEVEN- Grace Moore, pride of Tennessee Fijis, smiles for the U. T. admirers. NUMBER EIGHT-Books are not all that are studied in the Sigma Nu house, but where is the third roommate, if any? NUMBER NINE- The Delt's surprise everyone including Poppa Fisher who escorts his winsome debutante, Miss America, through Gay Street. NUMBER TEN- A Sigma Chick quartet fwe're not counting the rockl pauses in dignified pomp athwart the fraternity stronghold in Circle Park. NUMBER ELEVEN- Even a 1798 Fire Engine failed to quench the Sigma Chi-sorority frosh ro- mances springing out of the annual girls' derby in the park. NUMBER TWELVE-Reflecting the glory that came only to a frosh, first year retreaters pause in unison. NUMBER THIRTEEN-A. O. Pi's rifle through Barber Shop Bard Books in search of yodeling win- ners for the All-Sing. NUMBER FOURTEEN-Despite the 500 per cent profit on fraternity jewelry, fish from the female hook bite again. NUMBER FIFTEEN- All up in the air is another 'Bama Beauty. U Q Q 5 2 3 4 ff? .,, 0 K ,- X X . K ' . . ,V ' 1 at I 1 ,' . -S' g . X a' x , -. ff ff A 3 . , S .6 . 'h 13? ,C . , 6 :F X X X Z ,- R K K. , M Lv -nobr Shar' 2? A -QQ Q ,pf f ,was if ' fl! THE HILL NUMBER ONE-Lambda Chi lads display baseball form while they call time out from cutting the grass. NUMBER TWO-University students well represent their place and party at the ASC Retreat. NUMBER THREE-A quiet nook in the Zo lab inspires the students to strive for an accurate "ily count."- Some fun ? f? NUMBER FOUR- Freshmen deposit many a Torch of Preparation on the campus fence after the annual Torch Service. NUMBER FIVE-The Tennessee Playhouse puts on the last touches for their forthcoming production. NUMBER SIX-A battle to the finish looms as the cam- pus braves dodge flying snow rockets. NUMBER SEVEN-A scholar and a gentleman concen- trates on problems of economic concern. NUMBER EIGHT-"Beechnut" Orr greets his public with a pack of Rummies. NUMBER NINE- Tennessee delegates to the Student Christian Conference expose themselves to the Caro- lina sun at Blue Ridge near the famous Mt. Mitchell. NUMBER TEN-Phi Gams and Fiji femmes are all smiles for Tennessee's gift to song, Grace Moore. NUMBER ELEVEN-She's not eating that straw-simply displaying perfect form in balancing. It rings of the last stages of a fraternity hay ride. NUMBER TWELVE-A big hand for a deserving player as Cheerleader I-looser leads the applause. NUMBER THIRTEEN- "Yeah, he stepped on my feet a dozen times" is a common remark in dormitory after a dance in the gym. NUMBER FOURTEEN-Lambda Chi7s pause-"I'11 bet it's Busse-" 'QBusse heck, it's Tommy Dorsey." "Dor- sey the deuce, it's Paul Whiteman." NUMBER FIFTEEN-A sleeping beauty that's too hard to classify-you name it. Q. Wim 1. if 2 , 1 .1 - 'S 'tfm f 4 mf a J- , -, 0' I" 2' 1 M" , ff 'KF' y, iff, , 4 ' J?-i' , "" ' k I V+ 'Y M . ,, 4' X A if 'NK mi? - . 'Q Y. X,. 0 'xsifx ,,'A-W lu" 5 o 'ff-sm ,Q 1 ,rf 2 I I 1 5 1 r 1 I I I 2 1 I 1 1 I I I 1 if I I I 1 1 I Ae u ,I ' 1 I , , I I I I 1 I ' 0 1 I I I ,l I I I El1,I If i I1 JM I A Ii I I I 1 1 I LI' f H E C A T E Nocturnal goddess of the moon, the mysterious Hecate was regarded by the Greeks as the mistress of all magical and trans- d h nliht cendental incantations. As Diana represente t e moo g splendor of the night, so the conjuring Hecate represented its darkness and terrors. All the secret powers of Nature were at her command as the spectral sorcerer traveled stealthily through the three regions of nature-heaven, earth, and the underworld. When the radiant light of the clear full moon was blotted from the face of the earth at night, the Greeks at- tributed the disappearance to Hecate, whose chief functions they held to be that of goddess of the nether world, of night and darkness, mistress of all the witchcraft and black arts. 'D X Qi if 'L Eff? 5 I ' 4 . c 3' " 'U 1 0. Q 'Q I Y 'A +0 'lr ." ' 5 K Q Q n ., 'K ,, Q , 5 ar s -v 'a . 'I- o 'J . 1. ar ' . v- + KX 1 r A QW ,g 5 X a , 1, v v .-1 -.. -1 l L . N-- 5, ' .v I 5 t L " , 'I' 4 g. i. eg 5, " 'N-.- 1 4-F5 1, ,.P . I , 'S f I i A l J FRATERNITIES AND SUHUBITIES l N1 l , 4 1 1 I l l l lag. N l I , P ri, :lf l E KS 5 H ,l ie J 5 QI, J! 2 ,l 1 1 l First Row: Allen, Bowe , Brumfiel , Christenberry Second Row: Dcnman, Draper, Duncan, Fisher. Third Row: Hasson, Hinton, I-looser, House Fourth Row: Jacob, Jamieson, Kennon, Kreis. Fifrh Row: Long, McKee, Patty, Richardson. Sixth Row: Ruclcman, Seymour, Shuey, Sullins. Seventh Row: Walker, Williams, XVingo. INTER OFFICERS 1 - - .A Preszdent - Vice-President 5 - - - Secretary Treasurer ICHARDSON Chl JAMES HASSON FRED DRAPER Sigma Phz Epszlon BILL JACOB VVILLIAMS MAYNARD WINGO fZ39l 5. 1. A I l l 52 V 1 .V . N .Il ll, Il .ill l I 'M In lx X ,. 31 .V I I l , l ily! I, I I 'V l. 'll J ,gn ' "1 l W' l wg My I llt 2 Ill l 'lrlll l vw 'llllg,l llwlll l lil r 1Wl,! L l ll l l l l f l 'J l J, l r' l ,Q Il lf , 3511, 1' will ,M lll V llllr l lil?- lily NJN, llllll ,fr ll ply ukxll l , Ill ',l, -,ilal nhl l IJ, :iv all Gl I ill l l ' l llgf l ,, l1 I2 4 iii 'Fl 1, 11 ' llli l fa x -.4 l l I lal li ix, H -I ul l l l 55 , 4 Y U P X lr I Rf ' ' First Row' Abele Adams Anthon Bowe Brennan Burks Cart er Car . , , Y, , , , , rv, Care- Second Row: Cooke, Currie, Cutchins, Deck, Dempster, Dooley, Elmore, Felden, Ford. Third Row: Glasgow, Herring, Holeman, Huffman, Hutcheson, Hutchison, Jennings, Jones. Fourth Row: Logan, Monday, Moore, Nichols Noel Parson Petree Ratliff Fifth Row: Rogers, Shepard, Sledge, Smith, Stansberry, ,Sullins,,Tanner, Taylor., B. Sixth Row: Taylor, B. W., Thompson, Wade, Weakley, Weaver, Westercamp, Woodruff, Word. ,, -J f J ' is-:Qii t .N as 5 .1-W, X15 f , MN Sa ,, 'Riff Q Q Nizntifilf 755' X ,.x ' ws Q5 Ky xv 'bl M 5'3 ifgij-ezie,f'Q1Eg ' ' of 9- f A' 5.5" A' V' 'V Zi'?'f.f' "' v . 3 .'13yC'fJ: .f VQJQQQZ L-il. ALPHA Firxt Row: Adams, Alder, Armstrong, C., Armstrong, R., Barnes, Bevins. Second Row: Cate, Clark, Cobble, Deaderick, R. I., Deaderick, R. O., Dunlap, J. Third Row: Dunlap, W., Fox, A., Fox, E., Kennon, Murphy, Oldham. Fourth Row: Patty, Rosson, Russell, Searle, Sloan, Worden. .X A It ' 531 ,C . s- 5. 1 QQ A 5 352. .2 fl "5 I X X V, -'jg is igzxfs- iff' xii 5 X111 .nw sf: 3 a.- X 5 3 f f 231. A EQQTXX fx ff I Q r Q ' 1 ' a f - fry: ls .cffsz f H- X fl 1 .5 P-'QT-'fjxkf 3 iwiffsil ,X -Q g FV X A SSX, J f 5-IK EFA Exif-I 5 A x. x -ji 11x ,,a3k..xk4q j j f 3 .fwx 1 1 nf' X! 3.' .j' Q1 C, IIN ' X" , 1 X I f' 'C fxx 5 'N'E. . X Skill A375 NQS1'-I ,ffrrf 9 xx xx I X: - 3 I 1 21 ' A E 5.1 . i Mk :if W f swf' -:ig X: Q - :X Xisvmw g.. XE. I' F X N X lx 5 1 . , 4 xx . x f N - fs Q :Q X .1 , . - 1 .. . . f QLZLS .Qi 13 lf? ,I ,ff . is Q Rx! ---- ' fs-sie 5 f I ras ai C ' 'X Y X ,ibn N FJ .Bai X , YV, Q, ,Q H H 1, ,L , '-":'i'?f7L'L.,, A lt, ' mffif .f -A ff,'ef'++2 - f, f -- A x ' 5 1' -r - 1- .. r .:-- - ..-fy R , A Q . ,, V5 -g.-H' ,yvfg I 71 K ' ' 'Y .- 1-Eg"?-Tsi fl-J' . 'f. 15-4.-,f"Z , , ' ' 2 1 ' .. - ,-:g.,4:-L, f.. , V. ,M x...+i..,s..L1i..lp?,n I I I DELTA SIGMA PHI FRATERNITY 'N MEMBERS IN FACULTY VV' E' COLE MAJOR B. A. SHIPP JOHN C. HODGES JAMES B. DUNLAP . JOHN L. KENNON . J. FRED BREHM . JOSEPH MURPHY . , . R. H. ARMSTRONG . J. L. BARNES . . R. L. CLARK . . R. E. COEBLE . . . ROBERT RUSSELL, JR. RUSSELL SMITH . BARNEY ALDER . . CLIFFORD ARMSTRONG RICHARD DEADERICK J. J. EMPEROR . . Roscoe FINNELL . AUS1'IN Fox . C. R. PATTY . . . THOMAS SEARLE . DAVID WITH ERSPOON JOHN T. ADAMS . . JAMES BEv1Ns . . F. M. CATE, JR. . H. E. CATE, JR. . R. I. DEADERICK , . VV. L. DUNLAP . EDDY Fox . . . JIMMY GUY . ROY OLDIIAM . JOE ROssoN . TED SLOAN . PENN VVORDEN . House Illqther . GRADUATE LA W 1938 1939 1940 1941 l243l . Memphis . . Paris . Knoxville . .Knoxville . . Knoxville . Sweetwater . . Concord . . Midway . Memphis . Whitehaven . Nashville . . Lexington . . . Knoxville . Auburn, N. Y. . . Cleveland . . Concord . . Memphis . Knoxville . Knoxville . . Knoxville . . Knoxville . . Daisy . . Knoxville . . Knoxville . . Memphis . Lewisburg . . Memphis . . Sardis Memphis Humboldt Knoxville MRS. S. P. BROWN Founded College of the City of New York, December IO, 1899 Omicron Chapter granted a charter in IQI2 Colors Nile Green and VVhite Flovwer iVl1ite Carnation First Row: Barton, Beall, Berry, Boudreau, Claiborne, Coppeclge, Costello, Denman. Second Row: Dickey, Fisher, J., Fisher, W., Ford, Freeman, Hall, Harris, Holtsinger. Third Row: Hutchison, Jarnigan, Jordan, Kemp, Kupfer, Lumpkins, Mann, Parrott. Fourth Row: Patton, Pick, Pickett, Richardson, Robinson, J. K., Robinson, B., Rogers, Sills Fifth Row: Stevens, Taylor, Webster, Xwilliams, Wilson, Wood, Woodson, Wright. .Ars I S1 . rffios ,ELA RQ 1 is'-E33 xii J ...W-:SW r X ,NX I xx f FAQ : X'i-0755 l ,N-'X 4- X 1 'X '!., I X f N: li wk XXX' C,RfNP ss -Liv a - fffxsi. f A N 1 X :K :sw X1 Lrg: 1' X, x la r x xXx . t .R X , .,- 5..,,,, tx fp. P21 ,. ,ixttlxx D DELTA TAU DELTA FRATERNITY MERIBERS IN FAcU1,Ty R. S. BRASHEAR B. J. MCSPADDEN I- L- KIND J. P. PORTER DAVID W. DICREY . . A. EUGENE HOLTSINGER JOHN M. PICK . . . DAVID B. ROGERS . JOHN WEBLEY FISHER JOHN FORD .... ' ROBERT S. HALL . . JAMES K. ROBINSON . JOHN B. ROBINSON . Ross B. YOUNG . . JOHN DENMAN . . . WM. HAROLD FISHER . CARL KUPFER . . . W. H. PARROTT . L. CHAMP STEVENS . EDWIN L. VVILLIAMS . BEDFORD BERRY . . ROBERT BOUDREAU . JOHN CLAIBORNE . P. B. HARRIS . SYDNEY JORDON . HOWARD MANN . . VV. FLOYD PARROTT . BAXTER PATTON . . EDVVARD PICKETT, JR. WILLIAM PUTNAM . CHARLES R. TAYLOR . HAROLD VVARNKEY . HARRY LEA WEBSTER HERBERT VVILSON . STEPHEN WOOD . . LEONARD WRIGHT . JOSEPH BARTON . SAM BEALL .... NEEDHAM COBPEDGE WALTER COSTELLO . G. F. FREEMAN . DONALD GUINN . NOEL HATEIELD . . ALFRED HUTCHISON H. B. IARNAGIN . . CHARLES KEMP . . FRANK LUMPKINS . JOSEPH RICHARDSON . MORRIS SILLS . . . R. L. XVOODSON . . House Mother . LAW 1938 1939 I Q40 1941 H2451 . . Sweetwater . . . . Dandridge . West Bend, VVis, . . . LaFollette . . . Maryville . . Batavia, Ill. . . Memphis . Knoxville . Knoxville . . .Memphis . . Copperhill . Hickman, Ky. . . Knoxville . LaFOllette . Memphis . . Maryville . . . . . Paris . . Washington, La. . . . .I.aFollette . Greenfield . . Memphis . Knoxville . LaFOllette . Kingston . . Memphis LaFollette . . Brownsville . Clarksville . Memphis . Memphis . . Knoxville . . Knoxville Greenfield Knoxville Brownsville . Memphis . . Lawrenceburg . . . . Nashville Hackettstown, N. J. . . . . Obion . . . Dandridge Fort Moultrie, S. C. . . Lawrenceburg . . Glasgow, Ky. . . Lawrenceburg . LaFollette MRS. CONNIE NEIGHRORS Founded Bethany College, 1359 Delta Delta Chapter granted a charter in 1924 Colors Purple, Gold, and VVhite Flofwer Pansy Xwyb : AS' f I First Row: Adams, Aden, Alden, Arnold, Bates, Boyd, Bozeman, H., Bozeman, S., Campbell, D. Second Row: Campbell, lVl,, Carter, R., Carter, W., Dickerson, Doyle, English, Fisher, Foxworthy. Third Row: Givan, Graham, Hawkins, Hayes, Hooser, Jamieson, Jennings, Lamb, Fourlb Row: Link, McAdams, Miles, Miller, Milligan, Palmer, Perry, S., Perry, T. Fifth Row: Rainwater, Repass, Richardson, B., Richardson, P., Rosebrough, Smithson, Smorherman, Vorder Bruegge. . X 1 , ,X xx , , . - ws. . '- s?f fs XCR Q., 'S K Yifi L., X .QXY ,. ,we ,..... 1 is-s 5. FM., 1 .N X.- ...,,.... -:psyd X.. -- i :ga .zQ.1?Er3-E .. .fygxliafs x 1 5 L .gf as 1 1, x... y X,--A ...w . X ., ,Mrk ss Q-X. X ,s AQ is gli? as .- -sis Q vPiY sf xx X 'X an ,f ,al N TFKLI, N 3 -'A C X Xa-M3 tg' X xx Q v ALPHA FRATERN fr V5 1 iff 1. MEB'IBERS IN FACULTY HUGH PRICE CROXVE 1938 R. E. CARTER ...... EUGENE ENGLISH, JR. . JAMES S. PERRY . 1939 JOHN DALE ALDEN . . . . JOHN FRED BOYD . SAMUEL BOZEMAN . W. S. CARTER . . J. VV. DICKERSON . CHARLES FISHER . . CLII-'TON FOXVVORTHY . JOE BLACK HAYES . WILLIAM HOOSER . LOGAN HUGHES . DAVID JAMIESON . KAHLE JENNINGS . ROBERT LAMB . . LAVERN LINK . . ROBERT MILES . . . CHESTER RAINWATER '. RICHARD ROSEBROUGH . EDWIN Ross .... GUY SMITHSON .... ROBERT E. SMOTIIERMAN . ISAAC WILSON WRIGHT . 19.1.0 EDWARD ADAMS . . . JOHN ADEN . . MIKE CAMPBELL . R. VV. FUGATE . THOMAS GIVAN . JOE MCADAMS . BROWN PALMER . TEIADDEUS PERRY . JOHN RICHARDSON . MILTON SMARTT . . . V. W, VORDER-BRUEGGE . 1941 LAYVRENCE ARNOLD .... CHARLES HOXK'ARD BOZEMAN . DANIEL CAMPBELL . . . JENNING DOYLE . VVESLEY GRAPIAM . MALCOLM HAWKINS . MUMFORD MILLER . LUTHER NIILLIGAN . GEORGE REPASS . . ROBERT RICHARDSON . House .Mother . . . I247J B. F. FARRAR . . Mascot . . Memphis . Knoxville . Goodlettsville . . Cleveland . . Knoxville . . Mascot . Shelbyville . Covington . . .Knoxville . Murfreesboro . . VVartrace . . Arlington . Covington . Knoxville . Fayetteville . . Portland . Murfreesboro . Dandridge . Memphis . Shelbyville . . . Knoxville . Murfreesboro . Gallatin . . Arlington . . Memphis . . Tullahoma . . El Paso, Tex. . Murfreesboro . . Petersburg . . Erwin . . Camden . Fayetteville . Mt. Juliet . Memphis . Shelbyville . . Knoxville VVashingtOn, D. C. . . . .Memphis . . South Pittsburg . Bartlett Memphis Trenton . , .Knoxville Tullahoma MRS. RALPPI RUBENS ITY Founded VVashingtOn College, December 21, T865 Pi Chapter granted a charter in 1883 Colors Crimson and Old Gold Flofwers Magnolia and Red Rose LAX 'Q x 3 Pint Row: Allen, Anderson, Arthur, Barrett, Brownlow, Cory, Crye. Second Row: Day, Ellis, Ewart, Ewing, Fernandez, Fones, Fulton, H., Fulton, W. Third Row: Galloway, Hancock, Harbison, Lee, Lovejoy, Matthews, McAuley, McCormack. Fourth Row: Miller, Murphy, Myers, Neblett, Ney, Phillips, Poore, Potter, Fifth Row: Potter, W., Prichard, Ramsey, Richardson, Rochelle, Seymour, Smith, Spranlcle Sixth Row: Stuart, Summers, Lowe, Webb, W'ilson, G., Wilson, O., Wood, Wx'ight. X" ' 11 . X, , N X N Yr, ' FW' is Q55 xii -- XY. X :fs KAPP SIGMA FRAT MEMBERS IN FACULTY C. B. BURKE L R HESLE WBNDELL GRAY J. D. REID R :Sails H. B. WITIRAM i ' LAW FRANK CRAWFORD . . WILLIAM FONES . . . BENJAMIN MCAULBY JAMES LEROY NEBLBTT GORDON BARRETT . . WILLIAM FULTON . JOHN HARBISON' . THOMAS HARP . . . lRAYMOND MATTHEWS WILLIAM NEY ,, , , JOHN PooRE I. . J. ,JQHN C.. POTTER . . . . .ffALVIN RICE ,. , , ARTHUR SEYMOUR .. . -CHARLES SMITH . JAMES WEBSTER m. WCFLIARLBS WILSON . . KVQLIN WILSON .V QGJLBERTV ALLEN' . ., . I - I MALEXAILIDBR ARTHUR . JACK CARTER gf. . JIMMY EWART ., . ,JAMES FERNANDEZ . 'BERNARD FULLER . . HUGH FULTON . . ,W. E. HANCOCK . . , DOUGLAS Lovejoy . WILLIAM MCCORMACK W. W. POTTER . . Rox ROCHELLE . . . ROBERT SNEED . CAREY SUMMERS . . JOHN D. WEBB . . . CHARLES D. WOOD . NEWT ANDERSON . . WILLIAM BROWNLOW JOHN B. CORY .... PETE DAY ...... JACK T. EDWARDS . . FRANK TERRY ELLIS . CHARLES EWING . CHARLES FIELDS . ,. J Kjos GALLOWAY . MCAFBB LEE . K. ,JQHN MILLICE . ' ANDREW I MYERS . . 'FRED RAMSEY .... QLBQNARD RICHARDSON JACK TALLENT .... JACK TOWE .... DAVID WRIGHT . . WILLIAM CRYE . . WILLIAM MILLER . . CHARLES MURPHY . . ROBERT PHILLIPS . . ROBERT PRITCHARD . . CHARLESXSPRANIILE . GAINEs STUART . . VAN THOMPSON . . House Mother. . . 1938 1939 1940 I94I l249l West Liberty, Ohio . . . . . Memphis . . Jackson . . Clarksville . . . . . Lexington . .Owensboro, Ky. . . . . .Knoxville . . Pineville, Ky. . . . . Jackson . . . Knoxville . . . Knoxville . . . . .Concord . . Ashland, Ky. . . . Knoxville . . Clarksville . . Knoxville . . .Jackson . . .Jackson . . . . Knoxville . . South Pittsburg . . . .' Knoxville . . . . Memphis . . Tampa, Fla. . . . . .Knoxville . . Owensboro, Ky. . 1 .... Memphis . . . .Knoxville . . .Knoxville . . Concord H. . Knoxville . . Manchester . . Lexington . . Lexington .' . . Knoxville . . South Pittsburg . . . . . Knoxville, Robinsville, N. C. . . . . . Clarksville . . . Memphis . . . Knoxville . . . . Knoxville . . Ashland, Ky. . . . .Knoxville . . .Knoxville . . Mascot . Memphis . . . . .Knoxville . . . . . .Knoxville M Spartanburg, S. C. . . . . .Nashville . . . . . Knoxville . . . Knoxville . . . . . . Ripley . . Baltimore, Md. . . . . Memphis . . . . Jackson . . .Knoxville . . . . .Knoxville . . . . . . Jackson Rs. CHARLES SMITH RNITY Founded University of Virginia, December IO, 1869 Lambda Chapter granted a charter in T880 Colors Scarlet, White, and Emerald Green Flo-wer Lily-of-the-Valley .,.. X XXX, X W if ,J QR q - :' ,Q r Xxqw Cx N M X ,,,..,.Q. - Q X , Xfiq -SX X' Xi N-XX Sk 3X T R X, S Q5 X 5: .TIC x 23:5 -Q 'f Q .M X :pg 5 ix . E X VX-Q X iymx ., X, .... : X, :Frei 1 - LAMBDA I ALPHA FRA 'MERIBERS IVLAW, . Chattanooga . Chattanooga Fayetteville Ooltewah 1 l TERNITY l l 1 i l 2 I a 1 l 1 4 l Fozmdfd Boston University, November 2, 1909 Epsilon Omicron Chapter granted a charter in 1932 Colors Purple, Green, and Gold Flofwer Violet l l l Q l E. MCQUEEN PENDLETON PERK1NsoN CAMERA! REED . . VVooDRow T HOMAS . POWELL VVINN . House Mother . . . Meridian, Miss. . . . . Memphis Bryson City, N. C. , . . . Etowah . . . Memphis l 2 l l l l 1 1 1 l L251fl . . Damascus, Va. , . . Etowah . Newport . . . , Gallatin . . . Nashville . MRS. I. C. LADD IN .. First Row: Armitage, J., Armitage, O., Austin, Bass, Bean, Bowden, Brakebill. Serond Row: Brown, Crumbliss, Dempster, Dick, Dobson, Dooley, Earnest, Dooley, Ervin. Third Row: Doughty, Elmore, Frazier, Garrett, Gary, Hagan, Humphries. Fourth Row: Knisley, Kreis, Krisle, Lea, Love, Luttrell, Mayes, Mayfield. Fifth Row: McAllester, McKinney, McLaughlin, Moss, Parker, Polk, Pryor, Quinn. Sixth Row: Rogers, Smith, Tucker, Webster, Williams, Wilson, Winton, Yates. N ,ff X t St 1 Q X X QQ DELTA FRATERNITY . Greeneville Morristown Knoxville johnson City . Louisville Chattanooga Mem his . . p' Greeneville . Knoxville . Knoxville . Knoxville . . Athens . Lewisburg . Knoxville . Knoxville Miami, Fla. Mas MARGARET BRoo1c1NG Knoxville, K Founded Jefferson College, May I, 1848 Kappa Tau Chap ter granted a charter in 1890 Color Royal Purple Flofwer Purple Clematis .X N' ,wx c,..,,,X.b 1 f If il . xx. -'1 1 X " wswii If fix. xl fig-lg Ki: 115 .-, X X if ga: flf ' f f"""'Nw' gg 2 :'fN.',, Ai. 1, f 1 1 X Xerfw .fr f .Ss X, ,P If f...fsw-'S si ,fi I asf .Q fy ,ff 1 :wa 3 awe f' i 'X X X ' Kf: ff x:'.....f' :-rf X W - f ,s . Now 51152 f me S A x i Q . ., 1 131, 1 . LQ,-xii xx ,-sfyi of iff if . - XX.. X. R1 X . . First Row: Barthick, Bates, Beasley, Burnett, Clemens, Corpening, Dodson. Second Row: Drane, Dyer, Felts, Fleming, French, Gaby, Human. Third Row: Jackson, Jacobs, Jellicorse, Jenkins, Jones, P., Jones, W. Fourth Row: Jones, W. K., Johnson, Johnstone, Keller, King, Long. Fiflh Row: Mabry, McDaniel, Pace, Randolph, Ruckman, Tidwell. , V,-5 .K cxk, RIN: : Q - XXX XX 1 X 2,1-x-.J , r x . , X In Q. lx. . X , I fXf1ff'V"y'X ,'if'5.1' lx 1' Q Y 2 - 131 X l ,llg-ASQWLF. , .,..Y- YVLIR f .432 1, j- 1 x , Q X 5 ani ::gm.la...aL!v:XLx- Q. ... -.1..i I-g Ps, N X X. fx 1., Rik . XC' ,.,.1s-N,..k,c?, X fu X .JN .. , xx 'N ,, , . 31 P8 fl 'TE e ffiizgg- H ,GCSE i:J:ifS ig b fxlrggfe-53 QNZX iv ,QQLQQF X - . .X-sf xx, X 'xvge ERNITY Founded Massachusetts Agriculture College, March 15, 1873 Xi Deuterbn Chapter granted a charter in I925 A Colors ' Magenta and Silver '-,J Flower Red Carnation 1 X f ' ,X ,- X l ..f"' X 'u 4 , I 'fi ! fi I 134 1 . EA ,Q i sf .ff K , .V . . Sevlervxlle , . Middlebdro, Mass. , r ..., Knoxville ,i . Cumberland Gap , . . V. Nashville , , ,.... Pikeville NTON . . . . Corinth, Miss. HQWARD Rose . HERMAN SARVER FRANK VSWAFFORD CLEBURNE WIGGI House Mother . . . . MRS. WILLIAM LAXTON lf2571l ERNITY Founded University of Virginia, March 1, 1868 Zeta Chapter granted a charter in 1874 Colors Garnet and Old Gold Flofwer Lily-of-the-Valley L.. ,mx X x xl .5 Q1 X :xl :Ss x NX x X X N x .G.T R A R N I T Y Founded College of Charleston December Io, 1904. Alpha Sigma Chapter granted a charter in I93I Colors Gold, White and Blue F lofwer Red Rose . Chattanooga . Woodbury Lexington Darden KEhlllJETH PARKINSON . . Knoxville Rona1u'PEvAHoUsE . . . Linden GEORGE STEELE A . . . Bulls Gap WALTER SUTTON . ...... Knoxville Mozher ,U A . Mus. CHARLES GO0DI.0VE House n lf259fl First Row: Allen, Anderson, Ashby, Beelet, Billings, Braun, Broughton, Callicott. Second Row: Carmichael, Cheely, Christenberry, Cole, De Ford, de Franceschi, Dilatush, Doyle. Third Row: Ellison, M., Ellison, W., Fisher, Flowers, Fulton, Gillespie, Goodson, Hamer. Fourlh Row: Hannan, Hays, House, Keeler, Lutz, Matthews, Maclntire, Mccready. Fifth Row: McCrory, McReynolds, Mitchell, Murphy, Plunkett, J., Plunkett, O., Prater, Ransom Sixrb Row: Roberts, Rodgers, Routon, Sayford, Schulenberg, Seay, Shoaf, Slater. Seventh Row: Slatery, Stair, Smith, Taylor, Walker, Webb, Weisiget, Wortman. 'X ,V x. 'x ., QHA, T l l ,.,f.. ,,, SIGMA MEMBERS m FACULTY EPSILON A H Moses' vp. TERNITY Founded University of Alabama, March 9, 1856 Kappa Chapter granted a charter in 1879 Colors Royal Purple and Old Gold F lofwer Violet l . f Memphis f 1 K IQ4I fLEN BROUGHTON . . ..... . .Knoxville EDWARD CHEEL1 , . . . ..... Knoxville FLOYD Goovsbrz' . ., ..... Knoxville BEN HAYLEY . . . Birmingham, Ala. ROGERS I-IAYS , ..... p. Pulaski JAMES JACKSON . . . South Pizcsburg Jo!-xN MCREYNOLDS . . -... Knoxville JAMES ROBERTS . . . . . .Knoxville BARRETT TAYLOR . . ..... Dandriclge ROBERT WEBB . ..,..... Knoxville . . Mas. J. C. W1r.soN Home Mother . l26ll First Row: Allen, Bittle, Bonner, Bowen, Broome, Clark, Cobb, Conner. Second Row: Creswell, Daugherty, Dent, Denton, Dickert, Draper, Eudailey, Everett. Third Row: Fletcher, Frazier, Goff, Harris, Harrison, I-lasson, Henry, Hinton, Holman. Fourth Row: Jones, E., Jones, J., Lassiter, Lockridge, Lovingood, Lucas, Martin, McGee, Mclfleynolds. Fifth Row: Montgomery, Morris, Orr, Osborne, Patterson, Pitner, Priest, Pugh, Rothberger. Sixth Row: Stromquist, Tuttle, Veazey, White, Whitlow, Wilder, Wilson, Wise, Wunderlick. ,N X X it Xe yiyxsg otx,..5-' ff NN Xifsstx vgihgfw-Nix ffxtrgxxk X rl X If s. X fvkt 2 1 5 .offs 2 fav A XE . , ,,,,.,' ,isi"Z Z lx QQSXE z 5 1, ..... , vsvxi i 1 'E EFS S? ?::::L:11'-'f A its Xxw 1 fr f.: g - . 1- wi vm .:. 1 x ,e wh Nw aff -- 1 N :px-12:1-Q H? f+1?RS"Ns f f E F 1--N?Wft'r1'5 11-3 --was ,st-ff'X,.,fiT.s Xxx f F-T1 if-N 1 1 Nwfxx x Ji- N"'Y3'X- fix 1" ' : 5 W ' H gif' 5' NIE ,fsiisb -ig., 55557 S - X1 -t -X if XX 'if 2 1 X vi as coo Y fr X ,Navy .1 ' sf 9 . sl x X K .it x 1 Apsxqleigqx is I .. ,bi Q f ,S is E X ,x -H 2 F ,- X X 5 gg-TN M Q21-ern N - - . . ,f :X 5 :gf -xg..-.gym x X fi f X ff xx E wwe six X 5 ,qs QC. fit, X X YR, f,.-- Mg,-fggrxx gl? F X xg I Xi, 1 X .j. X73 on as gt: s- Hr be Nxt SIGM Mmxvxs Fmzxza . . . KAHRIHINTON , '. . V. . CONVNELL MCREYNOLDS Tnox Moxvrsomany . . FRED Momus l . . Blu, PATTERSON . JACK,VEAZBY .X . ROBERT WHITE . . Jos Wise . . . House Mother . l263l . Sr. - . - . Mus. fr, ..- A1 'S . bans, W .V .' ,Chatgdriooga . ... College Grove Corinphl, Miss. . . Nashville . Collierville I Knoxville Johnson City . . . . .Paris . . , . . Paris . '. . Paris Gatlinbuxg X Memphis 1 . W. C. CLEMENS Founded Miami University, June 28, 1855 Beta Sigma Chapter granted a charter in 1917 Colors Blue and Old Gold F104-wer White Rose ,1-1 First Row: Acuff, Anderson, Baird, Bassham, Boettger, Brawley, Copenhaver Second Row: Dean, Ellis, Emory, Eubanks, Ford, Grimes, Grissim. Hicks, H., Hicks, R., Hicks, T., Hinton, Householder, Q., Householder Fourth Row: Johnston, Laws, Little, London, Needham, Ogle, Patton. Fifth Row: Sellers, Slate, Strickland, Taylor, Warren, Williams, Young. f , ,efffst IGM Founded Virginia Military Institute, 1868 E silon Eta P Chapter granted a charter in 1921 A Colors Gold, Black, and White Flofwer White Rose t Izssl Knoxville Nashville Memphis iw.. 1 ,IT II g , I I I ,I ,I I ,Q ,.a I1 I I I, iv, I I I. I IE 'I L I I II I+ Ii I I ,I ,W I I ,I, I I I I -:a I I ' n .'.I Ig ' Ig V .,, III .II I5 I3 Ig I III 5 if I: HI .I ,gg I my I9 II, I I Hg ' 'L IW bf, 'Iv , wi , gk :LII lar I f I ,141 ,Al I -.:.r , 'swf 2 ur I , , 5-I II Q44 I Ii "3-5 If 4,1 . Q fl . -I' 'I 1 I ILI , ,J ' KL 1 . 1'2"1':L..1:.E SIGMA F' E R N I T Y .V Criattanooga Nashville . . Erwin Chattarioogaf . Memphis . Knoxville Lexington Middleton . Nashville '. . Memphis . . .V . .Memphis . Chattanooga . . . Nashville WHITE . . . . . . Memphis R. L. Wlnxnnsow . . ........ Knoxville ' . . MRS. H. T. HAYNES House Mother . l2671 Founded Richmond College, November, 1901 Tennessee Alpha Chapter granted a charter in IQIS Colors Purple and Red Flofwer American Beauty Rose and Violet A i J 1 i 1 . I 4 -1.2.-.gf x Qi 4 4 4 3 ff, l u I A f 1 'rfi.-'-E:',2g:.:s.?w:52' , L f ,V ff jg , ' ly , yr ,f W1 W, M fm bum W X , ggjf ' f , 0 f W 159' fri! ,if if We 1 f W X f ,WX W 2 G Gregg, Hughes, Johnson. eedham, Poore, Scarbrough. XX"l1ite, Wfhitehead, Willis. W W JN xm- PAN-H 'Sigma Kappa NANCY Gases i CARRIE MAE SLEDGE 1 .Q i , S , I , , , , , , . , l2691 First Row: Acuif, Alexander, Atkins, Bomar, Bowman, Bryan, Butler, Cecil, M. Second Row: Cecil, S., Clack, Clayton, Coble, Corpening, Crenshaw, Currier, Denison. Third Row: England, Ennis, Erwin, Ford, Hatcher, Holland, V., Holland, Y., Hunt, Jerman. Fourth Row: Kelley, Kupfer, Ladd, Lipscomb, McAfee, Phipps, Plunkett, Priest, Regan. , Fifth Row: Richards, Richmond, Riddle, Rinearson, Scheerer, M., Scheerer, R., Shephard, Smith, A., Smith N Sixth Row: Stevens, Swafford, Tipton, Vun Kannon, Webb, E., Webb, J., Web5, M., White, Whitis. ALPHA Doxus ALMENA P JUDITI-I RICHARDS . KATHERINEKRINEARSON BOBBIE SHEPARD . . Aux SMITH . . JEANETTE WEBB , NIARTHA' WEBB . ,V I271J . Knoxville, 'Knojtville Tiplonville' Knoxville, Mernphls . Knoxville . Knoxville . Knoxville . Knoxville . Knoxville . Knoxville . Memphis Knoxville CRIT Founded VVesleyan Female College, May IS, 1851 Colors Pale Blue and White Flofwer Purple Violet 4 4' ., K . ,W ' fm. .ff A- 4 , rf - y ' A i -' J . . ff A 1 , M y . f 6 Q .6 g ,.,. . 1 2 My .,. f W, ,V ' W W . A N , W "Vi" f ' 4 7 ' , fl? A . fi ff v'......-Mi M' "wg 4 I ,ff . , M , 7 ' ',, , f , ,I 1. V , ff i y W s e. me ' , . .1 - "". ?"' f ' f Q 1 Z' Q Qi? ff Q I ,, , . ,,,.,. , , , . . . I, f, , 5. , ,W guy, 3 Q fiwf f ,, , 'YU " ff . f ,X f s A , , . , W A f f ' . em A , J M . wwf, f. - V --,Q ,Z .7 qv ,fy ff, WV I , V 7 7 14 .f fm K Z wk: ff, 'AJ' ' Q , f f , - V, . A I 1, IQV, f fi I 1 Y ff fm X ?,, fy rl I-i 'ff 4,1 . gj' X U W lf ,?ff4'x9- ff V 5 ' ff " ' ' " ' . Va, --YV I . Q, I f, v 1 'K fy , as my f ., f W ffm .me Q me an QF , ff , ' V P ...,, A , A . leli f f 1 v- f W. W . .W - . W l l 1 1215 f 1 f- 1 .y M ne w , ' 1 - X -' .2 - P fi' C 'A . A . f as ' ' 53ll'1g,,-ig ' if X 'A 6 fjf, ' I ,jan x ,Q .441 if if ' . f. JV. VV 6 . A WV ,y . Vi f A V A H . , - , . , f ,,L, - R ' f , A f 27' ' 'mi mg l as . f .,...:::K for 1 X if ff if . f ' .izzfi ii '... 'fQ..Ji"' - ,.,, -.. 2, .. .... . . X . 437.4 ...fx"rN-w.f- " l Firxt Row: Albers, Andrews, Baer, Baird, Barham, Bates, Behnke, Blackburn Second Row: Burton, Carty, Chambers, Betsy, Chambers, Betty, Childs, Combe, Cook, Costen. Third Row: Cowan, Cox, A., Cox, I., Cullen, Daughtry, A., Daugherty, C., Duke, Early Fourth Row: Edmonds, Fearherston, Galbraith, Gibson, Hart, Ijams Inman, Jarnagin FiftbARoW: Jennings, Jones, B., Jones, G., Keener, King, Lappage, Nlannin lVlcCormaek. gn Sixth Row: Morgan, Nelson, Noell, Parclue, Poore, F., Poore, N., Powel, Powers. Seventh ROW: Prater, Rankin, Spratt, Stokely, Talley, Taylor, White, Willson, Wood. . l I 5 1 I ALPHA CMICRGN PI SORCDRITY I ' 'NIEMBERS 1938 4 P CATHERINE COSTEN Q . . . McKenzie CYNTH1A COWAN . Knoxville i MARGARET INMAN Morristown f HELEN JENNINGS . Knoxville KATHLEEN KING . Knoxville ' KATHRYN MILLS .E . Knoxville 'ELEANOR NoEr.L . . K. Norris . Knoxville . Knoxville . LaFollette Nashville L2731 Founded Barnard College, january 2, 1897 Color Cardinal F lofwer jacqueminot Rose I L: 'l do I 4? ,A yi ' 4 fl ,fm 'pg 3251 M ! X ff lx fp' 1 J 'of fy f 1 Mx! one f ,ty l Hui .xx s S2 ! s X t Af ' 2 f f vi, J ww, f W 45 'EFS gem in is f '02 Aw Ab f Y el ! ,f If M vm W X 1 fits Rx Fxrxt Row Adams A N 2 Second Row Brown B ,- X 'JZ Tbxrd Row Donaldson f 'Q P 1 1 o U I x 1 I' ' ' 5x ', W2 'I K A e I x g N Q f K 1 N ,K 5 1 In 1 X f N x ' I '47 I f- A. , g, Q 4 5 ' V X. .X 5 A 3655 y I ' ff .jfs 7 4 4- -. ?,,Q5?bx! ff X f V I' gli 'ls ' x a fjgwv I' Wg x K , X ff ZX f W S? f MQQE ff :QW Aw H-.,,,,fff Qf WM jf f ff' X , Zi M f M ff wax ff Off aw Z M' W 'fjwff' JW T fw af W Q if , iwfm WR of if ff, W NX-rw ,- 'S .gin W, W W X gW4 Q X f ff gf' ..a' Wk la f 'Q an wav QQ' I 7 ff, 47' , vs fwf M f llen Andrews E Andrews, M Barley Beaman Bolm, Bowden, Brlscoe urks Card Carson, Collin Cromer Crutcher, Currier, Darst Donaldson Drane, Duggan Edwards Elsensmxth Ellxs, Emert Fant, Ferguson Flenmken 2 Fourth Row Foust Frxerson Frxstoe Gaskxll Grlfhn Harrll P Harrll S Harris Hughes, HUfCh1SOH K A 54, Fffzlv Row Kerr acey Lea Mallory Marshall McCulloch McKelvy McNe1l Mrlam, Mxller 5s ,R Sxxtb Row Moss Naff Osborne Patterson Pearman Post, Rice Rule Sxmpson Skaggs V V Seventh Row Thompson Timmons Tucker, Whittaker Wilkerson, Wooten Wright, Wyatt, Young -L A X , s as Y 1'-V wwf X 1 Ml .am f x 'W' N K X X fx X f Q ,- as fe ,f i , fs sw I P3 fy, 1:19 f f WW f X fQ f W! W WW WF' 185' A Q I i 5 N z L 4 4 3 MEG SORORITY MEMBERS f ELBANOR ANDREWS . JANE As:-is N .... N MARGARETLKBEAMAN . ANN ELNORA BoL1N . Euzmanrn Bowmm BILLIB Bmixcs . ANNA BBRYXFAN17' .1 . BITSY FERGUSON '. . . N MARY I-IESTER GASKILL . N ELXZABBTH' KER11 . . . i JAlCQUELlNE MCKBLVY . Manjoizug MILAM' 4 . I MAN HELEN Fanny . .N 'MYRTLE WILKERSONX N L Ai.usoNNN'DAnsrf WOODALL ' HELEN rM4mGAnsf WOOTEN EUcsENx57NWYA'rr N . .N 'N N A NArLsrg Yoxmc if -A J A '1938 naw.. 0 . . Little Rock, Ark. . . . . .Knoxville . .Knoxville . . .Nlascot . . . . Knoxville 5 . . . . Dyersbiirg . . . Gulfport, Miss. ..... . . Dyersburg . May' s Landing, N. 1. ...x... .- . . v 1 'f Knoxville 'Nbwbernl upelo, Missl Trenton, . Calderwooml ' . . . Knoxville . .Chattanooga N . . 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' 4. .N A N - 1 NN 5 N N N -3 NN by N NNNN , N N N 3 5 M F-mlfmiii P " .: - - Ng 4' fvqvff' 1415 20 fffwavaxyl N'2- iff N, ' -ifgn VM? .QQ-rf W' 5 N"-"QQ'1 Qi " x .I ,MV ' K 'Nlefv N, H' X Ng . Q A- if' ,' lklnleakgclc, A, . JZ 'T -,I . -Ng.f,ENf:Nl-A f 1 N- N Nl I n f gowuzw . N- - Qifwffn NW- N W--,ww 5 f fflfnoxvluewy .Nw,w'Nif- " J fl ' . zN f . 2 1 -'Nw 71 5 ff 'ff My . -Nfmf , x 1. 5 p.f N. N ' I 'N . X . Q- lG101v11iw ' " ' ' ' f ."-1-'jfllarksvillef ' N 3 W lN,,tlN.3 f' ' ' ' QLNNN, Nyyvg N ' . f: N N 4,NMAno1r1a3 DWAMS N 1 NNMB,-yvllie 5 N E??5?337 N ' ' N511 . N. .oifN Kn0vsv1l1eN f . N :Nl ' ,Z Kndxville, f E -XMAS!-2:M1S0NFBFHRSON1 ' New York, N- ' Q " ' 'jf 3 , , . fIf.Knoxvi1le Q, N 1:Il,I'I1CI-fl'lIjZSON . . . l . li Knoxville N V f . . . Q v L Knoxville N - N Nfrg,BH1'rX:Nvl?-NH MQRIFFON i' ,Knoxville Nfipvrnclrm 'NAPP - - . v.'Kmvn1e f NNlVlAR'1jl-IA'NJEAN-NQSBQRPINE1' ' . . Knoxville NRACHAHLN PATFBRSON ' ' . . Knoxville N N -BAIV-BARAf'RUL3 ' ' . '. . Knoxville NNi'!MILDRED ?soB ' , .N .' 'Chattanooga "LILLIAl4l2 A N BSTERC: . N N '," ' ' " 2 E f . 1 I2751 Founded University of Arkansas 5: Colors Cardinal and Straw F lofwer White Carnation 9' 1 ,ygffar 4 4 4 fo 4 1 f f , ir ,Z ,X elf A I r ' m, C94 ,222 0 xg ,Z 1 0 Y X f 1 I X r' l , 4 7,4 ,I-I, . gr ,vas A, g,4:.:sg 4' 'Q I 1 r 4 X 1 f.,4 - 1.44, N ,Q ff , 1 4 - Sf! .- " . . .X - 1 IW K 1' ' , 1' .e n " Y ri., 4 1' s' 415 4 'fr e xif 1 , as 1, ,a ff L 1 Wy' 1 A 1 'ffm 'rv 17 . 'x 4 1 1 Q 6 . 4 ' ' KW' ,f 1 K X K 4 , af X Q1 w, 1, If 1 far l 6: 'aim If 1 4 71 'E 'WF , 41 V, , ,11 , W - 1 41" ' ii is V Z i 'V 1112551-' 4' , f 'Z ' ' 1 ?'- ' if -2 ffz 41 . fi 4 , K ,f A 1 VV ,fi X 5 ,1 1 1 -2' X , 57554, ,4 4 'fl' , 1' , , x 4' 1 1 ,154 4 ag duff 4 .42 ' 1 P11 ,, 4, 4 -V4 4 4 ff- , 1 4 f 17 1 ff 1 , ,f f f J 1 , I fw iist ,H eh, - 4 , --4, Q - ' 17,5 , '7 14 ' ,f 44 W ,1 4 I 14" mf? 5 'Ji K ,,,, 1 "'4 V , fl W 'W f ., V4 ,W : ' 4115 35 4 1"1 ' f 1 lg 1 cf 44 , Q fi 671 1 f " K I . I4 r 4 I L A, X .QU ,X A 24, fm 5 I je , , f M, -Z A1 w g ff f ' 1-.L-I,,,f ii A li - - 1 i W ' iw, K, K" ' V A 2' W1 N , ' 531' 1 4 V L k i w ,4 c v 4 Z K ,QM if 1 ' f i XM ,4 y N4 Q X V 4 ,Al 4 71 ,I .'L.Q ' .41 X 4 ' , ,.. r 4 " 1 idff ..A 4 - V 4 no 21 f 4 f 'if 1 -GM? W as-1 4,55 41 ' o L s- if 'fy 44 4 1' Q 5 4 , 3 r. 1? r. ' "se , 1 My 4 ,, 14 , ff, 1- ,.-. , 144 'fffff 4 f 4 4 W A ' 1 , lj! Ng K , K ,, 4 ..: ' , V w , 'f v H Z 'Q 44 -e " , ' f ' A1 5 X17 4' . 'X i if gf ' ,., 5 4 Z VV 5 .. ,VM 14.4. Ti- is ,4 1. :ff ff' r 1 AY "uf I y' I -I . , 1 W . I, s .1 ' ay , , , ' N 1 ,4 4, .- 22, in 35 ry' 4' 4 4 - 4' 4 Q ll K Ae. 4 4 V 4 wi 41, f NSI! Ill'-rar., X .rr fr ,Elf ' I , Q in , , ,. Q' M, ' I ' 4 f f 4 . me Q. 4 , I ,i , V ,Is Tig , ' A 4, A 4 4 .,... ,.... -M ik, f f' - ' First Raw: Allan, A., Allan, M., .. -r,..-......D. .. ,.,. . Appling, Bernard, Berry, Bond, Briscoe, Browning, Burnett, ton, Claiborne, Clark, Connell, DeBusk, Dougherty, Doughty. Third Row: Dyer, Emert, Fitts, Freeman, Goddard, Guthrie, Hinton, D., Hinton, S., Horner. Fourth Roni: Jones, Kennedy, King, Lyons, Long, Mahan, McKelder, McLaughlin, Meriweather. Fifth Row: Moore, Mildred, Moore, Marion, Norris, Olcey, Parker, Pope, Rue, Russell, Stubley. Sixth Row: Stultz, Tatum, Taylor, Thompson, Tigrett, Trenholm, Phoebe, Trenholm, Phyllis Tuttle, E., Tut , Seventh Row: Waddell, Weldon, Wheeler, Whitehead. Williams, Willis, B., Willis, M., Willson, Winton, Word. Second Row: Caldwell, Camp, Carring .Z 4 5 1 ,l - 1 1 J 1 an 4 , 1 O 5 , 1 , MA 2, 1 1 jf X 4 '4 f 4 14 11' MW- '- -"" Z ' 4 I 'Q 1f Q6 1 ' M ,1 1 We VL 4 14 f 1 f QW 5 1!, 42' 4 7 , 1 ,f'x,. 1X ,f v , J, , . 27 44 411 4 ff t fi ' 4 , .17 , 4 A '. ' . I A 4 4 ,44 . , . 4 f f ii, - . 1 ' 4. 014 . " - . fr ., ,.,,::: .-?,,. Q 3 I W" ,wg : ff X1 ff' , r ,m.:.. ,. , . Y ' H LSI' i DELTA DELTA DELTA SORDRTTY z L s Aff -f l jf, A-QQ T u A ff? Emzvfx' Z T My .QQ 1, 11.212 V 6 2 'A "A"SH7?g 3 4' f p .5 HELEN MARIE MAY . KA11-TERTNE TAYLOR . VTRGINTA HUG:-:Es . MARGARET APPLING LORA .BOND .... ' .JEAN CAMP .... NANCY Doucx-I-rY . BARBARA GDDDARD . MTRTAM Gun-TRIE . BEl'I'I'Y MCKEAN . V. ,MARY -HELEN RUE . Lo1s'WH1TEHEAn . LUCILLB WILLIAMS CHARLOTTE WxLLsoN 'QIMARTHA -LEE - ALlQE,l'1' ,QNANQY BRQNDON 'V ,. A-, l1QHgLENE,:7'BURNETT'f Dom 'T-'fAl'fQEEN EMERT y., , ,, N: A ,r6Tli5neD12EfiEm4ii3i 4 1 if , fra. f,.rwf zum, . 'f -I R. - Q. ,, of, v,.,.,.,,5.W.H ' GRADUATE STUDENTS SPECTAL STUDENT 1938 on .vu Q . A '939 55MA3vr1-TA f1KEN1r'HpxQ A - Y. 9, .-nt.. L, A ,T ,W A M , , .074 . , .M iw.:-L, .X - - - A ,, .4..E,. T M. A f A L"' YAYAD TLT, . l 1 i '- f LATD A T ,i Ag ,T A ., YfAD , , wfplr -' f1'NIILDRED'p,IDOUG!-IERTqA, . ' ' g",VTRGxNTA,f GAUSBV' A I wk-vw W ywffif A R 1 1 AW ' ii-Wiijf Q7 , . ff ,. afillvr filzvf -, as Lf: If :iXQ"54'ff'fVW?N0KWIfN g'NORRAlSQf V, ' fQf?.E,t: ., jd iM?3F5GAR5? HQENFR S Qoizorrerxfglflr rgxfro :T ,al fAUC5Tl553T0N'4J0"V5s" ffMARY'fDQLE,:' Krzscg 5 5 'QglA?jE1,izAEEfri41, ,MCKFQLDER .V ,,,f f ,. -,ff - , ' ,, 'www ff. vor. 7 , Own . ,,,E , , J ,Ross f f. V 2mQgY,,g,,g'mA.. E.. ,A . , . W, 1 fi..-554 ,, 1 f finfegj Tift. , ' ,Eros .ff , ,f -if E., vw . 74545 , ,f X I ' '-Y. X. ,ey 9 ,. .4 , Mg 1, f cv 1fZ,g5,.Q AW ., f WNNAYYMAE, AnpANi-Z5 A 7 'Q' 'i NW' '54 -E.,.4,f Jg 5,941 iii - A ff W 'T ,z - A-go, ' . I W' 5,41 IA wi. E. . ,f QA, T f of . ', ' L-xg f iw, f A A "YBfPf5133f?QY?A'59W5!5 . . Uri, Ay MERIYFA A iffy IlUcxifx.E,fV PAIGQEK q,v'fGENl?i xROPE ,. , ,.'f',,D0'iil5,RUSSBL5 . 'LVVV LUCQLLE STUL-ri L. N1V1oi?fifDYEW7 ii A Q JT- of A 'afsiaiiuuff MCL?5VGH':fNL - ' THER . ' TATUM . i'MARGAR5T RUTH 'Gmini TUTTLE T. 1:2771 A 'f ,.k.7,,k,5 ', 142 erm.. , . Waldron, Ark. . . . Greeneville . Memphis . Bartlett . . . . Knoxville . .Ashland, Ky. . . .Greenevillc . . Dandridge . . Knoxville . .Knoxville . . . Franklin . L .Knoxville . Tavares, Fla. . . ,Memphis . . .H:,.KnoxvillE,, Ionesboto, Ark. . . ilfnoxvillg-I. ' Mille, We ,Q '4Y.1xwax1e A .. wa,fgmwixxgyff ,Bgsersvilgei 4, W ' Wffgj' 3"fFf'A,,E ,vQ,.-. QE . ,, Knoxvxllef. 1 5 A A rLLGlgebnyfi95-lg ,, Q ,. iqffi E mf. ff P 12, 'Fi' ezfiif-, W Ch, To T- X -:i"p4' - X 3, , 5 -i'KI19XV!ll?f , ','kf.5., X 'Lf .wwf G' . , QM :E ,X , ., 'A . , , a -Zg2f'KhdiYi11Qf" W SEZ' T My W 7 3 I f f R-Aim 2 og' M, ., ,Z f':f.x' . X. QI. ,Q 2 ' . f,Clwelq53g5Q1g ' 4'.A - -rw, ,Y LT X , X .. My , ,f , ,,,Memp!35g.,: ,. 5111542 f 1 A Q ":1fK'19?9!!llei FQ'?'Y5i'1+ Y'?F4?R, , A Zl'..lg::1cn.s,wT1T3, ., .,,, Bliiabethtdn ' "" . T fcaimfvzire' lg5VBgg,..maqg1ig . f'GreenEville ,icnllieggfiiiev ,.a.rYTcmvsT1e goxgmiig A .j , Clarksvillo 1 ,. . Inskip . . Knonrville ' Brownsvillg T L . E6-iinl r Q Knoxville . Knoxville 1 Cs, ELAT 1240.1 I S. QA... ,J Founded Boston University, November, 1 888 Colors Silver, Gold, and Blue Flofwer Pansy ' I n fQ,L.J..a .Ll!.,4.- i1 ,www u DELTA ZETA SGRCDRITY GENE BURGESS . MEMBERS 1938 . 4 Spruce Pine, N. C. GAYNELLE CoMBs . . Bristol MARTHA HARRIS I. , Knoxville iiAN'NAeLE0P0LD . . 'Knoxville ROBERTA NEAWMANQ, . .i Knoxville, - 'iE1l'IlLYl!lVIASO1gl . 'Madieoni?i11e . A .A gl ?Moiintain i A , ,Q A A, 1 R . .i f,:i X , li ,,V iV, Q ' 5, !,ARRRiR VR1 1 Q Ae 5 in , ,, ' X . I 2 izfmyf' M " , X f Founded Miami 'University October 24, 1 902 Flofwer Killarney Rose Colors Old Rose and Vieux Green I2791 ff f 4 5 3 W ' 3 .. , l"- E' hifi- V QW r V f 'W , f' f x 4 : f sa: ' . f Wx vu if Nw Af ha.. 1 f f W4 ,. 9 , fs 17-' 2 7 s 1 X W 1 is i 1 , 5 S .i x , , y, ,q Ks. X2 x 5 -"' 'Nur bf ' "A-A . , I ff X Z, y s if 'ab "Jr X ,. ,y,::5,.v.3,,. Y f:,-. N ., f , mf ff lb f 'vi if 7 ff .. .I J , ff f' 4 2 i' f if l. K 557 W, ,Q Z A.-J ..g , 5 ff' - fa, , V,-.fig na . f if 1 as . , 9 ,W 7 f I s 67 72 ! .wif x gms if , , , 1-M f , X la 1 , , of , ,, Z , , m.,,,y-wx ffff f 'Q i 7 f ggi? WK , .,A..sw:.f. of-N., f . ,, , , , 75 ff' I ., , ,V,,f,f, ,V W ' ' ,f ,, , r A ' b y I l 1 ' 4 new aw. s A s . y ' ,. y, 3 , W' l Q 2 .gf .1 X Qf , ,uf ,,, ff , f , , lf , gf - , ,ff .'.. I A ' f 2' 42-4 Y , X f . ' 'M .,If5::l' ' 2 ,.,. ,Wifi It ,,-, 1 : f 1, . , x - ff' 6 First Row: Adams, Anderson, Bacon, '4 A A f ,m x , , f Z , , f-,W J I?! X i ff HA f7 Z1-Q ,ff N1-.4 25 ' f f 4 Af, r y 9 V., 1 .Z x y, , l 5 lj X W 9 , M ' Z W ff, f 1? I .W ,,,., A ,V ,ff . f A , f fig V' N 'f fi . , 371 of af.. ' f Af 'Z ' ,V 'If 7 A ' 7'ffj X w f X , . ,, 'Q 3 f if H , MA .QQ ., . .. , f W. , fy . Q' W ,wy ,yy f , m pw ff ' ,J ,, . lg f .. w , -.f f V 'f , ,, ,f f wg' f N Z 3 f 1 fs ff . . f ,, , , r , , X U fm 1 ,M vv ' 6 V A J x , I .1 QW 2, I, Vw I , f , ,WE,,, ,, k l X 5 JZ, ,, lf, f f,, ,ry . ,LW ,, 1 1 J r , ,Q 174 7? M' " . f' ? ""',v.:v f' I X fl by ' Q X! f 5 12204, X 7 f if ,iii Q f f l X , 7 1 Z ff W fy lf X .L W 3 I P1292 :. f f W I W 1 , wwf . ,L f f -swf 1 7 f ' as ,, , sniff, Wa. ,f vw- ff I 2 f gf W X ff 1 ff f V ,Q M f Z x f X ff , W if f 1 .. X ' 7 Qs W f , Q , , X i X 1 1 f f 1 7 X 1 K 1 , Q f, ic' he y af 6 A! Z f swf A. iw af Elf'-ff: 1.5: J f ' ,ff 2 ff, V M' , l 'AZ Q ,N V, . , f., , .4 .f f Q 1 -M W is .gf Q , W . f 315 f TQ f " W iff, 4 w, f . W Q . , . 1 ' " -. 4.J?,.,i, 1 ' L , f M .Q , ff". f Barker, Bishop, Blevins, Bock, Bonham, Bussart. Second Row: Caldwell, Chapman, Cook, K., Cook, M., Davidson, Derry, Duke, Easley, Fischer. Third Row: French, Galloway, Glenn, Goddard, Gooch, Gray, Guinn, L., Guinn, T., Holberg, Helm. U Fourth Row: Hill, Huff, Hufstedler, Johnson, Johnston, Kirby, Lane, Lay, Maden, Medearis. Pxfrh Row: Mosley, Murphe, Murphy, Neas, Needham, A., Needham, L., Pollard, Richardson, Rumbley, Sellers. Sixth Row: Shelby, B., Shelby, M., Smith, Stanton, Stewart, Switzer, J., Switzer, K., Switzer, M., Tansil. Seventh Row: Thomas, C., Thomas, J., Tidwell, Tucker, Walker, Wilborn, Wilkinson, Williams, Wright. f,..,f:Xy K Y f f PPA DELTA SORQCDRITY MARY NoR'roN BAcoN MABEL Busvms . . . DOROTHY JEAN Bock Louise BUSSART . . . MARIE Cool: . . RosA GRAY .... Mozsu, HOLBERG . Ozau. I-IUFF .... FRANCES Jo:-iNsoN . MARGARET JOHNSTON MARJORIE LANE . . Louise MURPHY . . lVlEMBERS I938 . . Morristown . . . Sardis . . Knoxville . Etowah . . . . .Erwin . . . .Knoxville . . Macon, Miss. . . . .Knoxville . . . . .Knoxville . . . . . . Etc-wah Washington,L C. . Little Rock, Ark. lililli A ..... Knoxville . . . .Knoxville Efowiah Knoxville, rgmsgvsxxe . . Knoxville . .ff ' Knoxville Knoxville ' . . 'fzf Erwin .1- .A . . Knoxville f., . . Reaclyville Knogcville' f ,Knoxville , ,A f Founded Virginia State Normal School, October 23, 1897 Colors Green and White F lofwer White Rose I1 S H I f J l w J i .N r 1 l i 1 5 x 5 4 1 w 1 w I l A Q l I v A I 4 '1 1 'Bl 1 il, wi ,u 'E w ,rl 'l ,l ml, ,,, ry mi iff :fl jx :W ,H MU 3131 ui ,W .sr :TV ,Um wi if ,ul w ill 1 ll all SI, M ilu' Sl Ml lie' Iwi ill U ,l 1 i . w ,l I li 'E J 'I fl X! w ill lv ii, ,, V" rl 5. N i lm ll li l 'w l'1 'fl U' ll iii ll F. V N I, ! F .Aw4Mfm.,f,, ' First Row: Barrett, Bingham, Blair, Calhoun, Carden, Cruze, Farmer. Second Row: Freels, Gibson, Gleason, Hardin, Hendrix, Hill, I-lines. Third Row: Hufhne, Inman, Johnson, Jones, Legg, Lowry, Mason. Fourth Row: McGuire, C., McGuire, M., Nickerson, Page, Parrott, Pryor, Roberts, Ross. Fifth Row: Schaad, Scott, Simpson, Thompson, Tiller, Vance. Walker, Weaver, E. Sixth Row: Weaver, L., Wells, Whittle, Williams, F., Williams, M., Wilson, A., Wilson, M., Wright. KATHRYN BARRETT MARGARET FARMER JUNE HUEEINE . JUNE SULLIVAN . VIRGXNIA S1MPsoN LUCY WALKER . f ELLEN WEAVER , FLEDA VVILLIAMSC S MEMBERS -1938 1939 RGLRITY . . Shelbyville . . Knoxville . . Kingston . . Chattanooga . . Knoxville . . Dyersburg . . . Knoxville . . Appalachia, Va. . IS,-,RAH TILLER ,L OLLIE MAE THoMPsoN b . Lois WEAVER s RUTH WRIGHT . l283fl . .Knoxville , . Knoxville' , .V , Knoxville C . Knojiville li A , i. 'Washingt n Collegeif o A ' .Knoxville A it L Knoxville Knoxville Knoxville . 1 I Founded Wesleyan College, March 4, 1852 , F lofwer Enchantress Carnation Colors Rose and White f 1 ZZ! WW X f ,l X N W, , fyf ,yr ,f ,, ff V, aff ff ' , fQ5 1 ,- rw-, - ff V 5.1 V4 X ' f , ,ff-s ,fr f First Row: Bentley, Brenneis, Carson, Fippin. Second Row: Gregg, Haddox, Harrison, Johnson, Landress. Third Row: Leopold, Patrick, Pearce, Sanders, Sledge. Fourth Row: Smith, Stanton, Sterchi, Stickley, Tickle. -vfm-.fry-f-nffvv-v.,.1.,,,. ' :,gL, SIGM I I I I I K I III , ,,1 IVI II' II ,, I II: KII 'IQ 1, 4' I I' , 'I ,lx 'A I ,.II Q 4 I C ,HI ITI II Ill . 5, ,II M II I I I II I I ' , . 4' f IIII ,III ,gif , V ,E I',iII 5,'I.!I m 2 2 EI I I Q ii I I I3 we Q91 I lj I II I4 II 4 11' III I, Ilggll I I III Eg I I I I IQ, I I I I I I I I I. k , , . r', gi n V 41 If II ,Q ff I I 1! I I III A i Q Ii gl iq I Il I I I1 I 2' ,III- II 41' I 5 II Iv' I III II "II If We . Ig I, III It M 13 lf, rv VII fl NI, AI, Q III ' IMI, X gllil ", jr, I ,yr IA IIII ,W I I , I , I ! I I iQ I 'I FII I First Row: Abel, Allen, Armstrong, Babelay, Baker, Barber, Black, Bolerjack, Brogan. Second Row: Brook, Burchfield, Carr, Carringer, Carson, Christenberry, Coleman, Collier, Cope. Third Row: Dees, Derryberry, Donnell, Drewry, Elliott, Fielden, Haase, Hay, Henry. Fourth Row: Hudson, C., Hudson, D., Hyde, Ingram, Jones, Kavanagh, Kelly, La Forge, Ledgerwood Fifth Row: Lowe, Mackey, Marr, Martin, Mathews, Mauney, May, McCain, McLeary. Sixth Row: Mcspaddin, Meyer, Miller, Mitchell, Moss, Parks, Powers, Seymore. Seventh Row: Skelton, Slatten, Smith, Spinks, Stooksbury, Thomas, Vance, Van Cleave, Walker. .f"'LgQ'-V h '- .-'f'--'ff-"Y r ' ZET, 1' V E i 5 4 F p Ns 'Q L In r K 1 3 ? J 1 S Ni .4 ? avuwxivfi' ORG!-RN Z TID y 15s. l i i I E W5 Ii i 1 .. 31 W EX fi 'fi M I 1 N 1 ORG IONS First ROW: Alexander, Bagley, Brand, Brehm, Denton, Drane, Holeman, Hooser. Sffond RUWI Jacob, Jones, Kennon, Lovingood, Orr, Stair, Wallace, Word, CIRCLE AND TORCH Circle and Torch endeavors- "to recognize men who have attained a high standard of leadership in Collegiate activities, to encourage them to con- tinue along this line, and to inspire others to strive for similar conspicuous attainmentsf' Par- amount among its interests since its founding in 1932 has been an endeavor to develop leadership Of highest character, and to further the progress and development of the University of Tennessee. A group containing some twenty-five of the most representative Juniors and Seniors of the institu- tion founded the Organization, Which, in 1934, selected as its name Circle and Torch. This so- ciety has established for itself a prominent place on the Tennessee campus and engages in construc- tive collegiate Work. The organization is open to those Juniors and Seniors who are outstanding in character and take a definite part in extra-curricular activities. High scholastic attainment is encouraged and rewarded by Circle and Torch. Realizing the opportunity to be of service to underclassmen, the society en- deavors to aid the Freshmen in the selection of extra-curricular activities. OFFICERS VVILLIAM S. JACOB . .... . . . . . . President L. D. WORD . . . . Vice-President TOM BAGLEY . . . . . Secretary J. FRED BREHIVI . ..... . Treasurer MEMBERS WILLIAM S. JACOB LONNIE ALEXANDER JOHN KENNON WLLLIAM W. HOOSER L. D. WORD J. W. BAKER FRANK LOVINGOOD R. GRAY JONES TOM BAGLEY F. G. DENTON ALFORD ORR H- C. BRAND J. F. BREHM WYLIE G. HOLEMAN RALPH WALLACE JOHN DRANE L. C. STAIR FACULTY MEMBERS PROFESSOR R. MATTHEWS PROFESSOR G. A. CANNING JUDGE R. M. JONES MRT. A. H. GROSSMAN PROFESSOR W. E. COLE PROFESSOR F. B- WARD PROFESSOR R. E. DU NFORD ORG ION First Row Anderson, Bagler, Baynes, Beaman, Bond, Buchanan. Second Row: Carmichael, Currier, Davidson, Doughty, Fowler, Fox. Third Row: Hamby, Harris, Hellen, Hotchkiss, House, Hurst. Fourth Row: Jennings, Jones, King, Littrell, Lowe, Mason. Fifzh Row: May, Morton, lVlcTeer, Robinson, J, B., Robinson, J. K. Sixth Row: Schultz, Taylor, Tice, Wallace, Whitney. E29OJ ORG IONS OKCDE A A A ' PHI KAPPA PHI Phi Kappa Phi is an honorary society founded in 1898 at the University of Miaxni. Only one year later a chapter was established here at the Univer- sity Of Tennessee. Since that time the organization has grown to enormous proportions, and there are chapters of Phi Kappa Phi in nearly every state of the union. The association is composed of graduate students from all departments of American colleges and universities. The main interest of Phi Kappa Phi is the encouragement of scholars and the stimulation of the student to greater mental achievements. These wor- thy men and women are rewarded with membership to the society. To be elected member of the society is to receive a high degree of recognition for meritorious worlci The club also seeks to bind more closely the alumni of the university to their alma mater. Phi Kappa Phi endeavors to interest its members in the promotion of a larger, more thorough education. Phi Kappa Phi is one of the oldest organizations On the "hill," and one of the most successful in carrying out its proposed work. Because of this it has the respect of every student in the school. OFFICERS DEAN J. A. THACKSTON .............. President DR. FRANK B. WARD ...... Vice-President MISS TVIAXINE JOHNSTON .Journal Correspondent DR. R. F. THOBIASON . . . Recording Secretary H. B. AIKIN ...... ...... T reasurer FACULTY MEMBERS . NI, VV. DOUGHERTY MAMIE C. JOHNSTON A R. F. THOMASON H' B' AIKEN L H. L. LEE F. B. u7AKD I. E. AX'ENT AXEL BRETT MARY P. CARLTON ELLA J. DAY ROBEKI' ANDERSON THOMAS BAGLEY MARTHA BAILEY BRODIE BAYNES MARGARET BBAMAN IDRA BOND ' WILLIAM F. BUCHANAN ADRIAN BUCK HENRY CARMICHAEL MARY CURRIER LOETON ALLEN DAVIDSON C. E. FERRIS T. W. GLOCRER HARRIETI GREVE L. R. HESLER A. VV. MCWHORTER N. D. PEACOCR J. A. THACKSTON STUDENT MEMBERS NANCY 'DOUGHTY ERA MARGARET EASLEY JOSEPH FOWLER KINCER FOX JAMES E. GANT1' PAULINE HAMBY RACHEL HARRIS JOHN HATFIELD ROBERT HELLEN DOROTHY HOTCHKISS w7II.LIAM HOUSE, JR. GRACE MARIE HURsT HELEN JENNINGS PI-IILLIP EUGENE JONES KATHLEEN KING RUBY CATHERINE LITTRELL SOPHIE LOWE POWERS MASON MARY MAY DEVVITI' MORGAN I291l CLYDE H. WILSON H. B. YVITHAM C. E. VVYLIE MARGARET MORGAN VIRGINIA MCTEER JOHN B. ROBINSON, JR. JAMES KEITH ROBINSON JAMES ALLEN SCHULTZ GEORGE SHENDELMAN BEN VV. TAYLOR JAMES TICE RALPH 'WALLACE ALETHEA VVHITNEY ROEERTA WHITT' GRE-5 ICDNS Pint Row: Bagley, Dumas, Fowler, Hellen. Second Row: Hinsdale, Matthews, Potter, Robertso Third Row: Stromquist, Sutherland, Symes. f292l H. ORG IONS 7 TAU BETA PI Tau Beta Pi was founded at Lehigh University in 1885 to mark, in a fitting manner, those who conferred honor upon their Alma Mater by distinguished scholarship and exemplary charac- ter as undergraduates, or by their attainments as alumni, and also to foster a spirit of liberal culture in engineering colleges of America. At the present time there are seventy chapters in the leading technical schools of the country with a total membership of over twenty-nine thousand. To be eligible for membership one must rank scholastically in the upper eighth of the Junior Class or in the upper fourth of the OFFICE C. T. BAGLEY .... . T. R. C. MATTHEXVS, JR. . . W. K. STROMQUIST . . E. M. HINSDALE, JR. . Senior Class. In addition to this requirement, one must also be of good character and partici- pate in activities on the campus. The Fall initiation was held at the S. SL W. Cafeteria, December 11, 1937. Two Seniors and five Juniors were made members. At the initia- tion banquet which followed, the chief after- dinner speakers were R. C. Matthews, Jr., on "The Texas Convention", Dana M. Wood on 'iAn Engineer's Impression of Japan", and R. C. Matthews, National Secretary and Treasurer of Tau Beta Pi, on "Business of the Associa- tionf, RS , . . . President . . . . .Vice-President .I . Corresponding Secretary . . . Recording Secretary PROF. A. B. Wooo . - - - Tffffl-fufef R. A. SUTHERLAND . . . . Catalowlff . ACTIVE MEMBERS R K CoLL1Ns JR. J- E- GANTT J' C' POTTER J 'W' DEADRISK R. E. HBLLEN R. C. ROBERTSON If E.DUMAs R. B. LINDSEY ED SYMES, JR- J. L. F OWLER L293l A. F. Wooos - ilfi lm i , , lil A L I i K 1 ,ll ,, i if lf ml ORG IONS ii I it I 5, I it E+ , li I I lil j il I I, IW I 11. 1 'Fi I ,I il E+ I 'I V I I I, y, Qi it 'El ll ju P ill l lj '1 l lil 'Mi lie! Mil in , fl l l 1 ,Qi iw im ,il m H ,p, N' gl , . ll Wir Ml E tl' Jill Ml ,M ,, , Ml 'tix hi I. ill hm il, if V yu :fl l l BTV, ,iw 1 wmv! lf liw 5 Wav 1 Hfjf I, gs, 3' 1 'ligi 'Q 'llllw ll, 5. ,Nil l' i r Vfi' l in l - I , fy IM I f' lx' in , 1 l. il 1 , 4 l 'I l. I, : , . I ll I , I 1 I ,I 1 dvi 2 3,1- QEIW ' .,,, , ,l l First ROW: Barrett Beaman B , , ond, Second Row: Kerr, King, MORTA Before 1918 there were local Senior women's honorary societies on many campuses with similar ideals of scholarship and leadership, but until that year there was no national organization by whom these groups could be recognized. Through the efforts of four such clubs, Mortar Board, a na- tional organization, was formed. These four groups belonged to Swarthmore College, Ohio State University, the University of Michigan, and Cornell University. Only this year, 1938, The Cap and Gown, University of Tennessee's Senior organization for women, became affiliated with Mortar Board. Mortar Board's purpose is to provide for the cooperation between societies of R Derryberry, Goddard, Hotchkiss, Harris. Lowe, May, McTeer , Whitney. BOARD different schools, to promote loyalty to the col- lege, and to advance the spirit of fellowship and service amo-ng college women. Its goal is to main- tain a high standard of scholarship, to recognize and to encourage leadership, and to stimulate and develop a finer type of college woman. To qual- ify as a member to Mortar Board, one must be recognized on the campus as a scholar, as a leader, and as a giver of services. Although the club is only a new member of the national group, it fully intends to become, by diligent work and steady application, the most important of the sixty-five college groups which today comprise the Mortar Board. OFFICERS LORA BOND .... ALETHEA WHITNEY . . . . . . President . . . . . Vice-President BARBARA GODDARD . . , , Segreigry VIRGINIA MCTEER . . , , Treasurer DOROTHY HOTCHKISS . , Historian ELIZABETH KERR . . , , Editor MEMBERS CATHERINE BARRETT MILDRED DERRYBERRY ELIZABETH KERR SOPHIE LOWE MARGARET BEAMAN RACHAEL HARRIS BARBARA GODDARD MARY MAY LORA BOND DOROTHY HOTCHKISS KATHLEEN KING lf294l VIRGINIA MCTEER ALETHEA WHITNEY GRS Fl'-ff ROW: COSSWBUI Edwards, F10W0rs, Ford, E. C., Ford, W., Hamer, Hester. Second Row: Hooser, Johnston, Jones, Lewis, Long, Mahaffey, Montgomery, Nloxley. Third Row: NICK:-imey, Pflange, Powell, Sayford, Schleich, Trulious, Wallace, Williams. DELTA SIGMA PI Delta Sigma Pi, .honorary fraternity for commer- cial students, was founded in November, 1907, at New York University's School of Commerce, Ac- counts, and Finance. Since that time the frater- nity has developed into one of the largest and most influential organizations in the entire col- legiate Held. In twenty-four states there are fifty chapters of Delta Sigma Pi with a total member- ship of twelve thousand. The purpose of the organization is to foster the study of all business in the University, and also to encourage a high scholastic average for the en- tire student body's mutual advancement. Other than this, Delta Sigma Pi endeavors to sponsor a closer relationship between the commercial world of today and the students of commerce, who Will be the commercial world of tomorrow. In the past year Tennessee's chapter of this fra- ternity has taken a very active part in the forma- tion and promotion of the Commerce Exposition, which is becoming an annual event in the sclIOOl's long list of important customs. Alpha Zeta Chapter was begun in 1924, and has increased steadily, in spite of the serious setback it received during the first years of the depression. OFFICERS Advisor PROFESSOR H. G. MEYER . ...... . . . Headmaster RUSSELL S. MOXLEY . . WOODFORD FLOWERS . . J. GOULD COGSVVELL . HERNDON HAMER . . . THOMAS LEWIS . . . . . Scribe . . . Chancellor . Senior Warden . . Treasurer MEMBERS JAMES MCKAMEY JACK FORD E JOHN POWELL RALPH WALLAC T P H PAUL P LONG CHARLES OHNSTON HOMAS . ARRINOTON . J - CHARLES B. PFLANZE ROBERT W SCHLEICH JOE T RULIOUS - BILL HOOSER WILLIAM MAHAFFEY ALLAN SAYFORD EARL O. WILLIAMS JEWETT P. EDWARDS PLEDGES PROFESSOR W. H. REED FACULTY MEMBERS DR. T. W. GLOCKER DR. C. P. WHITE DR. F. B. WARD EARL C. FORD JOE B. MONTGOAIERY CLELAN l'lESTER GRAY JONES WILLIANI H. REYNOLDS l295J GRS IGNS First Row: Beaman, Derryberry, Diggs, Goddard, Hamby. Second Row: Harris, May, Morton, McTeer, White, Williams. TOMICRON NU In 1912, Michigan State College felt the need for a national organization to embrace all of the clubs which were being formed in the Home Eco- nomics Schools of the various universities. In that year Omicron Nu was founded, and it became the only national honorary society in the Held of Home Economics. The Society grew until it now has twenty-nine chapters in as many different colleges and univer- sities over the country. In 1936, Alpha Epsilon chapter of Omicron Nu was established at the University of Tennessee. To become a member of this society a girl must have a high scholastic average, the ability to lead, and a keen interest in Home Economics. The purpose of the club is to recognize and promote Scholarship, leadership, and research in this school. Among its activities is the publication of the Omicron Nu Illagazine, which is distributed over a wide area and is read by a great number of people. The Hower of the society is the sweet pea, and its colors are pink and lavender. Omicron Nu is new on the "Hill," but through the club's interest in its work this association is taking its place among the important chapters of the Organization. OFFICERS MARGARET BEAMAN . . . . . President BARBARA GODDARD . . . . . Treasurer MILDRED DERRYBERRY . . Vice-President VIRGINIA MCTEER . ........ Editor RACHEL HARRIS . . . . . . Secretary MRS. MARY P. CHARLTON . . Faculty Ad-visor STUDENT MEMBERS MILDRED DERRYBERRY VIRGINIA MCTEER ERNESTINE DIGGS MARGARET MORTON RACHEL HARRIS MARY MAY HELEN TULLOCH LUCILLE WILLIAMS BARBARA GODDARD 'GLADYS WHITE PAULINE HAMBY ' I FACULTY MEMBERS MISS JESSIE HARRIS DR. ELLA J. DAY MISS ALBERTA YOUNG MISS RUTH BUCKLEY MRS. ELIZABETH SPEER MRS. ORISSA SIMPSON MISS ELEANOR HAILE MISS MARY E, SPENCER MISS ANNIE MCCORVEY DR. FLORENCE MCLEOD l296J -4 Us CRS IONS memes-aasuwyMw........- Fir!! Row: Anderson, Bible, Cate, Crowe, Davidson. Second Row: Dilatush, Edwards, Jones, E. L., Jones, P. E., Lutrrell, Tice. ALPHA ZETA Alpha Zeta is a national honorary agricultural fraternity which was founded at Chio State Uni- versity in 1897. The local chapter at the Uni- versity Of Tennessee was established in 1912. Dr. H. A. Morgan was very instrumental in the es- tablishment Of this chapter, and no more fitting name could be given it than Morgan Chapter. Alpha Zeta upholds high standards as require- ments for membership. It recognizes the fact that scholastic achievement is one of the chief aims of a college training, and establishes it as a basic requirement. The fraternity emphasizes those qualities of perso-nality and leadership which are of vital importance to the student in the univer- sity, as Well as after graduation. Last, and by no means least, the proper character Of students is greatly accentuated. The purpose of Alpha Zeta is to promote the profession of agriculture, to establish, foster and develop high scholastic standards, firm characters, responsible leaders, and a spirit of fellowship among its members as well as among those stu- dents whom fortune does not bring into its midst. It also tries to encourage a balanced development of the agricultural student. OFFICERS WALTER DILATUSH . . . . . . . -. - President ROBERT MOSLEY . . - Vlwpfefldeflf RAYMOND SOHNELL . - - ' Seffffdfy ROBERT ANDERSON . . . Treasurer - VVOODROW LUTTRELL . - - Rfflwffff . ALPHA ZETA MEMBERS ROBERT ANDERSON WALTER DILATUSH WOODROW LUTTRELL GEORGE BIBLE STANLEY EZELL ROBERT MOSLEY JOHN CATE CHARLES EDWARDS RAYMOND SCHNELL FORREST CROWE PHILLIP JONES JAMES TICE LOFTON DAVIDSON EDWARD JONES l297l I - I' 'I - PHI ET AU IONS ,nf . ' ' 1 ' K ' f I , - ,. e - . 0 . I I K . I I A f E, fm I an rw -- . - I ' -2 wg, I , f' - , Q A f" V. ' f, A , f 9145-T if I- .E Egg I . . I Q' ' A 7. M .gavk ,jj 'jr i W5 , . wi, - , V , e ' , 'Qty ' af, 7' tt if , Af Qiliee? 7 ' . " I , ' ' 1 A il fix ' A .ef " ix' at - Jw ,gf . 1 r ' ,pr L' , ,f yr. ,Q f ' A ,f , ,A .sf we . A aj. if A3-...ff I 'ati' . X 4 S4 W , I 5 Y ' ' J V f MEX ' U f ff , .V -, V1.5 K rf Q' ,,,, , f ' ,zu ,,.,g,,.f Q -5:53 jg- f x X ' y"4iS'f' AKA- - ff ,A ' ' ' , r If L. A r .24 f 'WMS I 5 I . fra' ffl-L' x R ..'-.Af id ' 9 fm v " f I .. ,SW yy . ,, R ,,, y , , ,. N. ' . e A M .. A A 5' A K .. "f'-2 - ga X WFS! a R W M . , , we -: .,g':' :2,15:g.,,.1 gr, if -:wie .1 f , M O 1 A , 'Q 1, f A 46" X ,- Q-,.f ' 1' x 90 I A 9 ,ff . 'f X f N' r f f X X-r A We ,V , ' Rfkgwt' , , ,, f 4,if,,f fav, " f A rs: ' '7 .' ' ' ,,,,, , , ,,,, X f , -eff ' ' 'f K ' , ,f QW ,mfff ffffufffe -4:1:a::E-:Ea z,gJaa,,,. ' First ROW: Brook, Chapin, Combe, Farmer, Garrison, Gibson, Glenn, Gregg. Second Row: Huddleston, Iddins, Irwin, Johnston, jones, Mitchell, Whitney, Bullinger, Phi Eta Tau is a professional physical education club for women. It was established at the Uni- versity Of Tennessee in the fall of 1933, and be- came an organization for those college Women who are majoring in the field of gymnastic ac- complishments. The purpose of this society is tO further professional interest in healthful exercise on the campus of the University. The club strives for the highest ideals in sportsmanship, and it endeavors to bring its members into a closer realization of the intricate details of their chosen profession. Phi Eta Tau takes an active part in the work of the Physical Education Department. They Spon- sor the annual High School Day pro-gram and act as referees for intramural sporting events. Senior membership in the club is open to those Juniors and Seniors who wish to major in Phys- ical Education, but junior membership is open to the Sophomore Women who have expressed a de- sire to become majors in that field. Although Phi Eta Tau is a relatively new organ- ization On the campus, its many activities have aided it in becoming one Of the most important. The colors of Phi Eta Tau are black and White. OFFICERS GENEVIEVE BULLINGER . ..... . . Sponsor GRACE CHAPIN . . . MARGARET FARMER . SARA BROOK . . . FRANCES COMBE . . . . . President . Vice-President . . Secretary . . Treasurer MEMBERS SARA BROOK MARGARET FARMER NANCY GREGG BONNY KATE JONES GRACE CHAPIN RUTH 'GARRISON DELMA HUODLESTON JANE MITCHELL FRANCES COMBE MARIAN GIBSON LILLIAN JOHNSTON ALETHEA WHITNEY JUNIOR MEMBERS ELIZABETH GLENN ELEANOR IRVIN BERNICE IDDINS l298l I ORG V aaa, IONS I First Row: Baker, Fones, Kreis, Millard, McLaughlin, Oliver.' Second Row: Parker, Savage, Smith, Vfeakley, Word. PHI DELTA PHI The international legal fraternity of Phi Delta Phi, an honorary fraternity, was founded at the University of Michigan in 1869. At present there are sixty-six student chapters in leading law schools and fortv-one barrister or graduate study of the law, and ideals and attributes of character marking ability for leadership in the profession, are made prerequisites of admission to the fraternity. The University of Tennessee chapter, Roosevelt 3 1 chapters scattered throughout the United States and Canada. The present membership is approx- imately 28,000, and includes the Honorable Franklin Delano Roosevelt and seven justices Of the United States Supreme Court. The primary purpose and aim of this fraternity is the advance- ment of high scholarship and culture in the legal profession, steadfast Opposition to corrupt prac- tices, and rigid adherence to a code Of professional ethics. Accordingly, scholarship aptitude for Inn, was chartered in 1919. The Inn engages in a number of activities which include an annual banquet honoring the members of the Tennessee Supreme Court, a yearly award of a loving cup to the member of the Freshman Law Class at- taining the highest scholastic average, and period- ical luncheons, at which prominent lawyers ad- dress the Inn. The Inn also sponsors series of educational lectures for the benefit of all students Of the College Of Law. OFFICERS W. WAYNE OLIVER . . SAMUEL T. MILLARD . 'THOMAS H. ROGAN . . JOHN W. BAKER . . . .President . Secretary . Treasurer . Historian MEMBERS JOHN W. BAKER WooDsON T. SAVAGE L. D. WORD ROMULUS L. NIEARES WILLIAM W. KREIS KELLAR SMITH JOHN .I- DEUU5 EARL BRADLEY SAMUEL T MILLARD JAMES VV. WATSON WILLIAM H. MCLAUOHLIN JESS E. PEARMAN W WAYNE OLIVER MELYfIN T. WEAKLEY LINCOLN LEWIS VVU-I-IAM H- FONES TI-IOvIAs H ROOAN ' JOHN A' PARKER I2991 ORG IONS l Armitage, Austin, McCravey, McCrory, Searle. PHI ETA SIGMA Phi Eta Sigma, national Freshman honorary SO- ciety for men, was first founded at the University of Illinois On March 22, 1923. With chapters in thirty-nine of America'S most outstanding univer- sities, Phi Eta Sigma was elected last year to membership in the Association Of College Honor Societies in recognition of its standing, along with Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, and five other major national honorary groups. The Tennessee chapter was founded in 1930 by Dean F. M. Massey to be an incentive for higher scholarship. The society has been instrumental in bringing about greater ambition for scholastic achievement among Freshmen, because to receive an invitation tO this fraternity is to be highly com- mended for intellectual ability and is a step to- ward other rewards for meritorious work. Mem- bership rests entirely upon scholastic attainment. A 3.4 average for two consecutive quarters is required Of a student before he is elected to the Organization. The society then directs its fund Of intellect to other channels in the universities' extra-curricular activities. Many Of the promi- nent men of the "Hill" have worn the Phi Eta Sigma pin. The national fraternity publication is the Forum of Phi Eta Sigma. OFFICERS ROBERT C. AUSTIN . . . . . . . . President VVILLIABT E. MCCRAVEY . , , Vice-President THOMAS C. SEARLE . , , Secretary ROBERT ALLISON . , Treasurer JOHN A. ARMITAGE . . . , . Historian MEMBERS JESS IRA MAROOVITOH JAMES WOOIJS WILLIAM E. MOCRAVEY ROBERT ALLISON CHARLES E. MOCRORY, JR. ROBERT C. AUSTIN THOMAS C. SEARLE JOHN A. ARIVIITAGE R. E. DUNFORD, Faculty Advisor lsool ORG IONS First Row: Ault, Beaman, Black, Bond, Currier, Doughty, Hotchkiss. 'Second Ra1v:.Ijams, Jones, King, Lintz, May, McTeer, Pace, Paxton. Third Row: Rankin, Sisk, Skaggs, Stanton, Stokely, Sullivan, Wade, Whitney. ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA Alpha Lambda Delta was organized on the "Hill" in 1932 under the guidance of Cap and Gown, Senior honorary society for Women. The order was founded at Illinois University in 1924 as a national honorary society for Freshmen women. Membership is based upon a scholastic average of 3.4 for the first two quarters of a student's Freshman year. The purpose of Alpha Lambda Delta is to en- courage and promote scholarship, leadership and service among Women, both while they are IH college and when they have entered the Outside World. The club also aids in' bringing together groups of women who are interested in scholastic achievement. Each year the club gives a tea dur- ing tlIe Winter quarter for those Freshmen Wom- en Who have made their average for the first part of the school year and might become members of the Organization. - Alpha Lambda Delta points with pride to the many campus leaders who have been members of the society and the numerous club women of the United States who Once Wore the badge of Alpha Lambda Delta. OFFICERS ANATLAS PACE . . . ...... . .U . President lMLART1-LA JEAN WADE . - - V160-Pffsldenf MARTHA IJANIS .... - -I SeCff?ff1"J1 ALETHEA WHITNEY . . . . Senzor Adfuzsor DEAN HARRIET C. GREVE .... . .... Sponsor PATRONESSES MISS GENEVIEVE BULLINGER MRS. A. H. MOSER MISS RUTH STEVENS MEMBERS J - FRANCES EDMONDS LORELLE FILLERS PATSY HARRILL DOROTHY HOTCHKISS MARTHA I JAMS ' DOROTHY JONES IQATI-ILEEN IQING REGINA LEDBETTER JAMIE AULT MARGARET BEAMAN MARY N ELL BLACK LORA BOND LUCILLE BRAKEBILL MARY BUTIGESS MARY CURRIER NANCY DOUGHTY f301l AILEEN LINTZ MARY MAY VIRGINIA MCTEER ISABEL MORRIS ANATLAS PACE MILDRED PAXTON SALLY RANKIN EVELYN SHIPE MARGARET SISK HELEN SKAGGS SUE STANTON VISA STEWART EDITH STOKELY JUNE SULLIVAN MARTHA JEAN WADE ALETHEA WHITNEY 4 +L ORG IONS TENNESSEE VALLEY GIRLS' CLUB The Tennessee Valley Girls' Club is one of the largest and most active organizations on the University campus. Any girl who is not living in one of the dormitories is eligible for member- ship. The club meets twice each month at noon for a luncheon party. These meetings are held in the lounge of the Young Women's Christian Association building. Members of the club participate in various types of programs for their own or for guests' entertainment. Occasionally some member of the faculty is invited to speak before the group. The purpose of the society is to develop in its girls a finer personality, a completer individual- ity, a stronger leadership, a better ingenuity, and a friendliness to envelop all associates. By giv- ing the students these qualities, the club builds a higher type of university woman. Through this organization the students may aid the school to meet some of its needs. To promote better relations among parents, fac- ulty, and students, the Tennessee Valley Girls' Club sponsors an annual Parents' Reception. This occurs on the Sunday before Thanksgiv- ing. In this fall's reception the club was assisted by the Beaver Club. The slogan of the group is "Bring your lunch and join the bunch." OFFICERS DOROTHY JONES ...................... President EDITH LEMON ----.... . . Vice-Presidenf ANNA B. VANCE ....... . . Program Chairman HELEN MOODY .... . . . Treasurer W1LDA VVINNINGHAM . . . . . Social Chazrman MARY FRANCES DOOLEY .... ...... S ecretary VVANDA ARMSTRONG ..... . . Hostess Chazrman L302fI If I E if ORG I I Y Y l l . IONS Q 4 l First Row: Stokely, Bates, Albers, Dougherty. Second Row: Talley, Helm, Davidson. ROMAN AN UAGES SPANISH CLUB J I I The Spanish Club is a newly organized group which meets at the University Cafeteria every Wednesday noon. Membership is limited to- students of second, third, and fourth year Spanish, but exceptional students in the first year classes are occasionally in- vited to join. The club has a dual purpose-to promote good fellowship among Spanish students and to increase the oral vo- cabulary of each member. In the future the club plans to have a Noche Espanola, at which talks about Spain and a Spanish play will .be given. As the organization grows in members and in infiuence, a more far-reaching program will be planned and executed for the enjoyment of Spanish for years to come. OFFICERS LOUISE TALLY . . . . President BETTY KATE DAVIDSON . . Secremry JANE HELM . . Vice-President ALLEN S. MOOREFIELD . . . Treasurer MENIBERS MARY ELLEN ATKINS EVELYN CARTY BETTY KATE DAVIDSON JANE HELM LOUISE TALLEY ANNIs BARTON MARY CLEVELAND MARGARET FRENCH ALLEN S. MOOREFIELD BILLIE TIMMONS LUTHER BROWNING PATRICIA TUCKER THE FRENCH CLUB The French Club at the University was organized about four years ago. It was formed for the purpose of giving those Astu- dents who are interested in French an opportunity to learn .to speak and to understand the language. This is accomplished through conversation during the weekly noon meetings and par- ticipation in the programs. The club has grown in size and im- portance on the campus until now it is recognized as one of the outstanding organizations. Members are chosen from the second, third, and fourth year students. Their selection is based upon interest in the language and scholastic' attainments. EDITH STOKELY . MARGARET -BATES MARGARET ALBERS JULIA ANDREWS ESTELLE BAILEY MARGARET BATES LORA BOND LUCILLE BRAKEBILI. JANE BURGIN JANE CAMERON MARGARET CARD NELIA CHAMBERS MARY JEAN CLACK CATHERINE COSTEN EVELYN DARsT MILDRED DOUGHERTY J. N. DENT OFFICERS . . President MARGARET AI.EERs . . Vice-President MILDRED DOUGHERTY . MERIBERS LORELLE FILLERS CHARLES EWING MARY JARNIGAN MAE KIMBROUGH ROBERTA N EWMAN ANATLAS PACE SARA POLLARD I3031 UNA MAE PRIEST JUDY RICHARDS CARRIE MAE SLEDGE ALICE SMITH ANN SPRATT ROBERTA STEVENS EDITH STOKELY . S erretary . Treasurer ELIZABETH STEWART ANN THOMAS CORNELIA TYLER MARTHA WEBB SHIRLEY WHITNEY JUDITH WILKINSON WILLIAM WILSON ANNE WRAY 41 1 l DRG ICNS it ,. sy First Row: Allen, Bell, Buffat, Burchfield, Chastain. itil econd Row: Fielden Grubb Rollins, Tidwell, Thompson, Vfoodruff. p s , , lp! T r 1 Mil ,tm , CFU i ljllt BAPTIST STUDENT UNION "lil ill' .' , . . . - - - W 1k The Baptist Student Union is an organization of of the Southwide Baptist Student Union is tio T all Baptist students on the campus. Membership unify the Work of each individual campus. This 11 l is gained by becoming a member of some unit Work is under the control of the student depart- l organization of a local Baptist church. The ob- ment of the Baptist Sunday School Board, lo- rlti 'ect ofthe B S U is to connect the student with cated at Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. Frank Lea- J . . . the local church and its activities. It encourages attendance to church servicesg a definite devo- T tional life, personal evangelism, and a Wholesome 3 social and recreational life. The local B. S. U. i is governed by students selected from that group. T These students meet Weekly to plan the Work of l the organization on the campus. The local chapters are under the direction of the State and Southwide headquartersj The purpose It T i Bos VVOODRUFF . . ........ President Sm CHASTAIN . . . . Enlistment Vice-President ly MARY ELLA TIDWELL . . Enlistment Vice-Pre.ident "T GORDON BILL .... . . Social Vice-President PAUL THOMPSON .... Devotional Vice-President MARY KATHERINE ROLLINS .... . . . Secretary vell has been Southvvide Student Secretary since the organization of B. S. U. Work in 1922, a year after the founding. The local organization Was formed in 1935. The offices are on the second floor of the campus Y. M. C. A. building, and Mr. Frank Grubb is the Student Secretary. This group of Baptist students have made fine contributions to the Uni- versity. MARGARET KNOX . . Chamberlain Representative JOE BLACK HAYES ..... Humes Representative MARY LOUISE BLACK . . . Broadfway Representative RUTH FIELDEN .... Fifth Avenue Representative HELEN BUFFAT . . Deadrick Avenue Representative RUSSELL LAVVLER . . . Sunday School Representative I W F. PEARSON ALLEN . . . - . Treasurer KATHRYN HILL . . . Training Union Representative T TOM SMITH - - . . . . Reporter MARGARET OGLE .... Bell Avenue Representative T SARA MCSPADDEN . . . Musical Director PROP. R. T. BROWN . .... Faculty Advisor i SARAH WILKES . . ...... Pianist REV. O. E. TUIQNER . . Pastor Advisor T JAMA BURCHFIELD . . Henson Representative FRANK GRUBB . . . Student Secretary I 3041 .J .--, ,T ll l E l IONS F ,477 Y VVAV ,M . 1 I Q N First Row: Andrews, Bell, Black, Blankenship, Bond, Chastain. Second Row: Donaldson, Fowler, Guy, Jacob, Jacobs, Kesterson. Third Row: Ney, Paxton, Pick, Sanders, Sullivan, Thompson. DELTA PHI ALPHA Delta Phi Alpha, the national honorary German fraternity, has two main objectives: First, to honor excellence in German, and, second, to en- hance interest in German literature and arts. It also aims to promote the study Of German civ- ilization, and to further an interest in, and a better understanding Of, the German-speaking people. Qualifications for membership are: At least I 8 quarter hours of college German with an aver- age of B5 good standing in all other courses of study, and an indication of continued interest in the study of the German language and literature. The Tennessee chapter, Beta Mu, Was established in 1936. There are now thirty-nine chapters throughout the leading universities of the United States. Although it had only ten members in the beginning, the chapter has at present a member- ship Of approximately 35. Meetings are heldin South College the first Thursday of every month. Programs which include the presentation of plays by members, lectures on Germany by Dr. Kind, and the showing of cards. and slides dealing with history and culture of Germany are held through- out the school year. This year the organization was fortunate enough to have Miss Helen North- rup present an illustrated lecture on her recent German tour. DANIEL M. PICK . , JOHN KESTERSON . LORA BOND . . . OFFICERS . . . . . . . . President . . . . . Vice-President . Secretary and Treasurer MEMBERS ANDREWS CHARLOTTE JACOB, BILL S. SANDERS, WELCH LAMB: KATHERINE BELL GOQQDON C, JACOBS, BILLY C. SCOTT, MARGARET FOWVLER, J. L. BLACTC MARY NELL MORRISON, ALFRED SHIRLEY, DAVID MILES, ROBERT BLANIJENSHTP MARTHA H. NEY, VVILLIAM SMITH, CHARLES G- GUY, DAVID CHASTAIN SIISNEY PAXTON, MILDRED SULLIVAN, JUNE WRINKLE, A. S. Q 1 DONALDSON, JEANNETTE RODEMAN, HANS THOMPSON, GEORGIA F3051 oRe IGN First row fboltoml: Sharp, Chambers, Chapin, Cates, Dougherty, Brimer, Littrell, McNutt Second row: Snyder, lVlcGehee, Simpson, King, Whitney, S., Andrews, Hansard, Aulr Third row: Taylor, Brown, McBee, Amerine, Irwin, Rodeman, Hotchkiss Fourth row ftopjz Land, Ray, Black, Whitney, A., Peak, .10hn5f0n GIRLS' ATHLETIC CLUB In 1935 the Women's Athletic Department of the University of Tennes- see saw an increasing need for a means by which girls could enter the Intra- mural Sports Events of the year. Therefore, at this time the Girls' Ath- letic Club was formed to allow those girls who had no other way of com- peting in the gymnastic activities of the campus to participate in the games. This organization was brought about with the cooperation of the Athletic Department. In the club the first year were only twenty-one members. Rosslyn Braden was the first president. During the short time the society has been on the hill, it has increased its active membership to forty-five- twice the number of charter members. The association has been very suc- cessful in its activities. To date the group has won the basketball cham- pionship trophy for the present year, and the horseshoe pitching trophies for the tournaments of 1937 and 1938. The club also won the group relay races in the 1938 Relay Carnival. Miss Genevieve Bullinger, the faculty advisor, has contributed much to the ability of the athletes. l3061 ORS IONS 3 Fifi! ROW? BCSC, GUY, Harrison, C. M., Harrison, J., Hicks, H. K., Hicks, R. S., Hoffman. Second Row: Kesterson, Latimer, Mccrory, Pick, Sanders, Taylor, Woods. ALPHA SHS Alpha Sigma Delta, an honorary fraternity for pre-medical and pre-dental students, was founded at the University Of Tennessee in 1929. The local chapter was founded because of a need for the arousal of interest in pre-meds and their workg another reason for the formation of this club was to reward students for proficiency in their studies. Its purpose is to promote good fellowship among all pre-meds, whether members of the fraternity or not, and to bring about a greater understand- ing Of the problems which they must face in med- ical school and later in life. Any male pre-medical Or pre-dental student of MA DELTA sound character who has successfully completed his work during two successive quarters with the necessary average needed for acceptance to medi- cal school may become a member. Meetings are held on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, and the programs are diversified and in- teresting. Emphasis is put on outside programs, in which some speaker from the city, who is a specialist, explains his Held. These meetings are not confined to fraternity members alone, but are open to anyone who might be interested. The Official symbol of Alpha Sigma Delta is a key Of yellow gold 5 the colors are blue and gold. OFFICERS CHARLES F. HOFFMAN. . . . . JOHN ZKESTERSON . . . JAMES W. WOODS . DAN PICK . . . . . . . . . President . Vice-President . . Secretary . h Treasurer MEMBERS JAMES W. HARRISON CHARLES M. HARRISON CHARLES F. MCCRORY ROBERT G. LATIMER EARL M. BEST VICTOR WILLIGER DAVID M. GUY W. S. SWAN WELCH SANDERS RUDOLPH TAYLOR BOBBY HICKS KENNETH HICKS lf307l 4 - ORG T Bond, Lowe, Stokely, White. WOMENS STUDENT GOVERNMENT AS S O C IATION Soon after the first woman was admitted to the campus, in 1893, the first Women's governing body Was organized. The function of this organ- ization, called the Women's League, was princi- pally judiciary. As the number of Women stu- dents increased with the years, the need was felt for an organization which would embrace all ac- tivities in which Women are permitted to par- ticipate. The purpose of the WOmen's Student Govern- ment Association is to regulate all matters per- taining to the life of the University Woman, to provide a medium by Which all Women's activities are co-Ordinated, and to help form and keep high the standards and ideals of the University. Its motto: "Serve. Serve A11 the Womeii of the University. Serve all the time." All Women of the campus are members of the Association. The officers, making up the Execu- tive Board, are immediately responsible for its services. This Board is backed by an advisory council composed of representatives from the fol- lowing organizations: Y. W. C. A., Pan-Hel- lenic, Alpha Lambda Delta, Intramural Council, Phi Eta Tau, Omicron Nu, Tennessee Valley Girls Club, Mortar Board, Home Economics Club, and Dormitories Councils. Besides being directly responsible for Freshmen orientation and the annual Freshmen Retreat to Gatlinburg each year, it is the aim of the associa- tion to present to the women of the University some person outstanding in the field of Women's achievements. This year Grace Moore was our honor guest. OFFICERS SOPHIE LOWE . . . . . President EDITH STOKELY . . . Secretary VIRGINIA WHITE . . Vzee-President LORA BOND . . . . Treasurer REPRESENTATIVES NANCY POORE . . . . . . Y. W. C. A. MARGARET BEAMAN ...... Omicron Nu VIRGINIA SIIVIPSON ...... Pan-I-Iellenig ANATLAS PACE .... Alpha Lambda Delta ALETHEA WHITNEY . . . Intramural Council GRACE CHAPIN . . . - . Phi Eta Tau DOROTHY JONES . Tennessee Valley Girls Club LORA BOND ......... Mortar Board EDNA BOND ..... Home Economics Club BARBARA WILLIS ..... Dormitory Council lf308l ORG IGN -I First Row: Birrle, Bussart, Byrd, Cecil, Curry, Draper, ' Sffonal Row: Edwards, Hardison, Lewis, Love, Patrick, Ruckman. Third Kow: Scruggs, Searle, Taylor, Vorder Bruegge, Young. THE BEAVER CLUB The Beaver Club of the University of Tennessee was formed in the school year 1924-25, With George Turner elected as its first president. The primary purpose of the Beaver Club is to act in the capacity of the official Welcoming com- mittee Of the University. It extends hospitality to all visitors and Visiting groups who may from time to time come to the campus. The club also sponsors a special cheering section at the football games, which adds a great deal of color and fun to University sporting events. In the Spring the members of this club, in cooperation with various' other groups, Welcome the high school students on the annual High School Day. Another phase of the club's work is the Beavers' cooperation with the Tennessee Valley Girls' Club in the reception held on Parents' Day. Membership in this organization is limited to Sophomores, and is composed of one member from each fraternity and two non-fraternity mem- bers. ln addition to these there are two Junior members-the president and the co-president. The Beaver members are an excellent representa- tive group and perform invaluable service to the University. OFFICERS BARRY CECIL . . . . FRED DRAPER . JACK EDWARDS . . . . . . .President . Co-President . .Vice-President . . Secretary JERRY YAGODKIN HUGH LEYVIS . .BEN YOUNG . JACK CURRIE . TOM SEARLE . CHARLES TAYLOR VINCENT VORDER JACK EDVVARDS BRUEGGE . . PRESTON HARDISON . . MEMBERS Alpha Tau Omega . Delta Sigma Phi Delta Tau Delta . . Kappa Alpha . . Kappa Sigma Lambda Chi Alpha . . . Phi Pi Phi ED BYRD . . DON SCRUGGS . . AUDREY BITTLE . BEN YOUNG . . H. C. PATRICK . WM. MCCRAVEY XVALTER BUSSART BARRY CECIL . . . Treasurer . . . Pi Kappa Phi '. Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . . Sigma Chi . . . . Sigma Nu . Sigma Phi Epsilon . . . . . . Non-Fra! . . Non-Frat . . Junior Member President . Phi Gamma Dell!! . Phi Sigma Kappa . Pi Kappa Alpha JIMMY LOVE . . BOE RUCKMAN . . HUGH LEWIS . Junior Member Co-President FRED DRAPER .,.. . Faculty Adfvisor MR. RALPH FROST , . . . . . lf309l l II, ,I II i I LI :II In II! VI JN I 1 I 5 I , , ., U , I was II 'III I II'I'III I IEIIIM IMI f I DRG ' I I QI I III. '! ? . I, M I :I I 1 I J! I II I I , LI' II II I. I I 3, I 1 I II I ,II H I t I .V I I ," , 'I , MMI, M, WI ,. ww I I 'Ill , 1. I I, 31' , 1' II I-I III I I1 IW 1, ,,, v IVI I IQ I I 35 I I II TIIII I It II Ii I1 A 1 ' K' I I 'I qw' 1 'I I 3 1, I , I II Q: 'Ig' I1 I W1 W5 I Il, lx!! I' , I 1 I II : I I we I I .V I , 'I II 1, I I It I . II ,II I I 'I IH , I' I, I I II I II , X IIII I I I ' I , II I I III First Row: Armitage, Bagley, Baker, Baynes. Q , I Second Row: Burkhalter, Creswell, Denton, Dunklin. 3 Third Row: Fults, Hayes, Hinton, Holeman. Q Fourth Row: House, Krisle, Lowe, Luttrell. I I 3 I I 5 ,I II I , E31oJ ONS , Fifth Row: Neblett, Poore, Richardson, Robinson, W'alker. QRS IONS 7' W 4+ KE ALL-STUDENTS CLUB COUNCIL As set out in the preamble to the constitution, the All-Students Club Council was organized in order to promote, expand and guide extra-curricula activities at the Uni- versity of Tennessee. Because of the rapid growth of the University of Tennessee and the increasing com- plexity of student extra-curricular activities, it was deemed necessary in 1920 to establish an organization to handle students' problems. This organization, which became known as the All Students Club, is composed of every student of good standing in the university, and is governed by the All-Students Club Council, which is elected by the students in an annual election. The All-Students Club Council of twenty members is made up of four officers, a representative from each college in the Uni- versity, two representatives at large, one representative each from the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A., the president of each class in the University, the president of the Woman's Student Government Association, a Freshman Class advisor elected by the Council, and the intramural manager. As implied in the preamble to the con- stitution, the All Students Club Council supervises student affairs with the end in view of promoting the best relationships between the twenty-eight hundred students attending the University and the large group of faculty members. MEMBERS JOE BLACK HAYES . WiLL1AM HOUSE . BRoDxE BAYNES . VVYLIE HOLEMAN . KLEBER DUNKLIN . JACK ARMVITAGE . GLENN WALKER . J. W. BAKER . . Woomzow LUTTRELL GEORGE CRESVVELL . . . S I 1 A i A ASC President LEROY NEBLETT . . . . . . . . . ASC Vice-President . . ASC Secretary . . . . ASC Treasurer . President, Senior Class . . President, Junior Class President, Sophomore C1051 . . L. A. Representative . . Lafw Representative , , . Ag, Representative . Education Representative f3111 GEORGE KRISLE . . . ALMA FULTS , . TOM BAGLEY . JULIAN H1NroN . BILL BURKHALTER . F. G. DENTON, JR. . WILLARD R1cHARDsoN . SOPHIA LOVVE . . Jim RoB1NsoN . . NANCY PooRE . Commerce Representative . Home Ee. Representative Engineering Representative . Representative-at-Large . Representative-at-Large . . Freshman Advisor . . . Intramurals . WSGA Representative . YMCA Representative . YWCA Representative i iq C I ORG ON Firxt Row: Brakebill, Buchanan, Burkhalter, Fisher. Second Row: Guthrie, Hinton, Jenmngs, Kennon. Third Row: Long, McClure, Neblett, Nutt. Fourth Row: Pentecost, Rodgers, Wade. I312I I I I I I I I I I I I , I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I ORG IONS 7' 'T Q , R31 NAHHEEYAYLI GOVERNING BOARD The Nahheeyayli Governing Board, formed at the University of Tennessee in 1925, is a student organization which sponsors and tenders two sets of formal dances each year, the Mid-Winters and the Final formals. Nationally known orchestras are en- gaged, and unique decorations are planned for each set of dances. townsmen, and visitors who comply with the regulatoins of the Governing Board shall become members of the Nahheeyayli Club, and in so doing these persons shall then become entitled to attend the dances sponsored by the Board. All students, The purpose of the Board is to control the two sets of formal dances, to insure the members of the N ahheeyayli Club the best type of social activity at these dancesg and to have constantly in mind the furtherance of the University of Tennessee. In fol- lowing these aims throughout its existence, the Board has developed dances which gather about them the limelight of the social season of the school activities calendar and has set up a prestige that is recognized far beyond collegiate circles. The Board includes seventeen membe1's representative of fraternity men, non-fraternity men, and faculty. A different panel of oflicers is selected for each set of dances. OFFICERS First Term CHARLES GUTHRIE BILL BURKHALTER JULIAN HINTON CAYCE PENTECOST KAHLE JENNINGS BILLY BUCHANAN LEROY NEBLE1rr . JOHN KENNON . CHARLES GUTHRIE . . . . . . . . . . . President BILL BURKHALTER . Vice-Preszdent JULIAN HINTON . . . . Seeretary CAYCE PENTECOST ---- Tffa-'Ure' KAHLE JENNINGS ..... . . Asszslant Treasurer Second Term JULIAN HVINTON . . ...... . D- Pffffidfflf BILLY BUCHANAN - V1Ce'Pff-'ldmf JAMES LONG . . . . Secretary CAYCE PENTECOST - - - - Tffmfff KAHLE JENNINGS . Q MEMBERS . Pi Kappa Alpha . . . Non-Frat . . . Sigma Nu Sigma Phi Epsilon Kappa Alpha . . . Non-Frat . . Kappa Sigma Delta Sigma Phi JAMES LONG . C. K. MCCLURE EDDIE NUTT . BILL FISHER . BILL BRAKEBILL ERNEST ROGERS EARL BRADLEY Ross WADE . A ssisiant Treasurer . Phi Sigma Kappa . . . Pi Kappa Phi . Lambda Chi Alpha . Delta Tau Delta . Phi Gamma Delta , , Sigma Alpha. Epsilon . . . Sigma Chi , . . Alpha Tau Omega PROE. JAMES G. WALLS, Faculty Advisor l313l I IONS . .51 Leffler, House, WoodruE, Barnhill. T CLUB The T Club is composed of those men who have won the right to wear a University of Tennessee letter by participating successfully in any of the recognized sports. The club at- tempts to lead those men to an understanding and appreciation of the obligations a MT" wearer has to those who support clean athletics. A member of the club has a three-fold obliga- tion: to his Alma Mater, to the other wearers of the NT," and to the general public. The club has an increasing responsibility to its school. It promotes harmony and cooperation between the coaches and playersg it maintains an average scholastic standingg and it encour- ages preparatory and high school athletes to enroll in the University. The MT" wearers realize it is not only an honor to wear a letter but a responsibility. Those who have fought for Tennessee realize and ap- preciate the ideal of the University more thory oughly than those who have never struggled on the field of action. The club encourages its members to conduct themselves as gentlemen and sportsmen whether on Or off the athletic field. The MT" men set an example of courage and unselfishness for their fellow students, by keeping constantly in mind that they are repre- sentatives of the traditions of Tennessee. OFFICERS WILLIE THOMAS LEFFLER ........ , . , President BILL HOUSE -.--.. . . Vice-President BOB WOODRUFF . . . Secretary JOHN BARNHILL . , Treasure, l314J ORG CNS iMEMBERS OF THE T ALEXANDER, L. J. ACUEE, JOHN N. BARNHILL, JOHN BAILEY, JOHN BROWN, CHARLES COWAN, JIIVI CECIL, BARRY CARTER, R. E. ETTER, CHARLES DENT, J. N. DERRYRERRY, W. FULTON, ROBERT GULLION, BLAIR HIGDON, CHARLES ,HAYES, JOE BLACKL LOVINGOOD, FRANK LASSITER, JOHN LOGAN, BYRL KINSER, J. B. PICK, DAN PLUNKETT, OSCAR PUTNAM, WILTON PIERCE, G. PERKINS, MARION SNEED, ROBERT SMITH, KELLER SMITH, WADE TUNNELL, BILL WEAVER, DEWITT WARMATH, M. LEVINE, SAM HOLEMAN, WYLIE CRESWELL, GEORGE RICHARDSON, DON WYATT, BOWDEN WALLEN, JOE DUNCAN, CHEEK HENDRICKS, GERALD LITTLE, JOE P. BRADLEY, EARL ELDRED, RALPH HOUSE, BILL CLEMENTS, JACK LEFFLER, WILLIE I315l CLUB WORK, DAN SAYFORD, ALLAN HL'NTER, GEORGE CARMICHAEL, HENRY PRICE, HARRY RAMSEY, ALLEN MCCARREN, BILL WOOD, WALTER WOODRUEF, BOB WORTMAN, HARRY WESTERCAMP, CHARLES HUBBUCK, CARL P. HERRING, MELVIN COFFMAN, LEONARD - CLAY, BOYD BARNES, BILLIE ROUTON, JIM HODGE, BONNIE BARTHOLOMEW, SAM SANDERS, BILL RICE, ALVIN CDRG el 'I n.. D 1 1 IONS l i E 4 l Ni r, 1 1 l t q 53, r . l l , T, ll llj . ' i fls Q ' ,l . ,V ' .. ll 1 ll ' , , ll ' M , ' ll l , 1 I l r N l l l 4 w 1 r t 1 l , , l First Row: Armitage, Bentley, Bolin, Bomar. Second Row: Brennan, Carty, Christenberry, Clayton. Third Row: Denton, Dunklin, Garrett, Guthrie. Fourth Row: King, McKelvy, Noell, Parker, Richardson, D. Fifllu Row: Richardson, W., Rue, Sayford, Talley, Xvhlte. l3161 5 . f I '-xl:-L FH,- L ORG IONS , r N l +G KE CAR ICUS Before the Carnicus Came into existence, there was h'eld on the campus each year a circus and- a carnival. These were combined to form the Carnicus, which is held in the spring quarter. It is a gala event which brings forth competition from all the fraternities and sororities on the campus, as well as a great many non- fraternal Organizations. The day is begun with a parade down the main Street, featuring colorful Hoats sponsored by th'e clubs. In the early part of the evening a series of stunts or plays is put on by the various groups in the Alumni Memorial Auditorium. Loving cups are awarded to the groups winning in both the parade and stunt contests. Another cup is given to the sorority selling the greatest number of tickets. The carnicus attracts not only the students in the university, but many downtown people as well. The climax of the evening is the announcing of th'e new Carnicus Queen, who is chosen the most beautiful and popular girl by those attending the stunts and the dance, which takes place immediately after the plays are Over. ' ' STAFF F. G. DENTON, JR. . . . . . General Manager SENIOR ASSISTANT MANAGERS WILLIAM KREIS ALAN SAYFORD JOHN PARKER DANCE WILLARD RICHARDSON, Ch. ROBERT ALLISON BILLY FULTON L. D. WORD ROSEMARY JERMAN PARADE TATE CARTY, Ch. NORWIN NORRIS KATHERINE BRISCOE BEN OGLE TED KELLY PUBLICITY JACK DENMAN, Ch., VIRGINIA IRWIN BEN YOUNG DECORATIONS MARY HELEN RUE, Ch. CATHERINE DOUGHERTY LUKE E. TERRY ANNIE 15. DONALDSON DON RICHARDSON JOHN BRENNAN, PRIZES KATHLEEN KING, Ch. BILL BONNER L. A. DICK JULIA EARLY PROGRAM VIRGINIA WHITE, Ch. JOE WISE CAYE BEHNKE J. E. WILLIAMS TICKETS CHARLES GUTHRIE, Ch C. K. MCCLURE ANIMAL LOUISE T ALLEY, Ch. JEAN POPE JOHN LEA ATTENDANCE MARY ELIZABETH BOMAR, Ch. SARA HINTON SHELBY CRENSHAW JUNIIOR ASSISTANT MANAGERS KLEBER DUNKLIN BILL BRAKEEILL JACK ARMITAGE BOYS' CLUB STUNTS MARIE CLAYTON, Ch. BOE HUTCHINSON MARY ELLEN ATKINS ADVERTISING DEXTER CHRISTENBERRY, Ch. BOB BOETTIGER HARRY DOUGHERTY MISCELLANEOUS JACKIE MCKELVIE, Ch. MARGARET LYONS FRATERNITY STUNTS JAMES DENT, Ch. FRENCH FRAZIER CLAY CROSS SORORITY STUNTS SAM GARRETT, Ch. GENE BUTLER MILDRED DOUGHERTY lf3l7J A. M. GLASGOW ANN BOLIN NAT BOWE GIRLS, CLUB STUNTS EDNA BENTLEY, Ch. MARY MARGARET RICHARDSON MARJORIE SCHEERER ELECTRICAL JOHN MONDAY, Ch. C. A. DANNER BILL PATTERSON STAGE J. R. JONES, Ch. CARL STRICKLAND LYNWOOD MURRAY M. B. MCMAHAN INDIVIDUAL STUNTS ELEANOR NOELL, Ch. BETTY CHAMBERS ANN PRATER JUDGES GEORGE BASS, Ch. JANE COOK MILDRED FREEMAN 1 DRG ION I O Q U ' I I I I I I I RALPH W. FROST, HELEN I-I. HENDERSON Secretaries of the Young Men's and the Young W0men'5 . Christian Associations 'UNIVERSITY CHIRI The University Christian Associations seek to embody the following philosophy in their program: "Religion and life are one and the same Or neither is anythingf, They feel that their place on the campus is one of leadership in the STIAN ASSOCIATIONS U . upbuilding of the spiritual life at the University. The Associations have a Wide and varied program, cooperating - in many phases of student activities. i BOARD OF DIRECTORS DEAN L. R. HESLER .............. . . Chairman MRS. FORD WILKINSON . . Vibe-Chairman f MR. CHARLES I. BARBER .... ......... . . . Treasurer J JUDGE D. C. WEBB JAMES ROBINSON BARBARA GODDARD MAXINE VUNKANNON MRS. FRED RAMSEY NANCY POORE BILL KREIS WALTER DILATUSH MRS. L. R. HESLER JOHN A. PARKER EDITH LEMON J I ADVISORY BOARD JAMES D. HOSKINS, President F. M. MASSEY, Dean HARRIET C. GREVE, Dean FRED C. SMITH, Dean HELEN H. HENDERSON RALPH W. FROST HOLLY HORNBECK EMPLOYED STAFF I RALPH W. FROST . . .......... . . General Secretary HELEN H. HENDERSON . Y. W. C. A. Secretary l I HOLLY HORNBECK - ' . Associate Secretary l MIMMIE M. WADE . . . 017566 Secretary FRANK WELSHAN - - . Building Secretary A l 2 i. I I318l il I I ORG I I, 4' Q, 3 ll ' J u :, 5. II "P "I I O N S ll ill 'I 'I li LIE I. ii I1- ,, ,, I Il Ei ll in Ji ,I 1121 .Ii UNIVERSITY I I Top Row: Poore, Robinson, Goddard, Parker , Bottom Row: Lemon, Dilatush, Vun Kannon. , I CHRI The Associations, together with the community churches of Knoxville, work to furnish a center for friendships, training for leadership, and an intelligent knowledge Of a positive religion. A full program including conferences, retreats, inter-collegiate visitations, deputations, and socials is provided each year. Numerous Speakers and leaders are brought to the campus SO that students may be pro- vided with the best in the field Of religion. This year I STIAN .ASSOCIATIONS I Dean Robert Russell Wicks, Dean Of the Chapel at Princeton University, was the speaker at the Mid-Winter . I, Convocation. Among Others who came to the campus i this year were Dean Umphrey Lee, Dr. Howard Morgan, Dr. Harvey C. Brown, and Dr. Taliaferro Thompson. if The Christian Associations have been admirably sustained g in their whole program by an interested administration, !5 faculty, student body, and the church community. li, OFFICERS OF THE CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS . Young, Men's Christian Association Young Wo1nen's Christian Association JAMES K. ROBINSON ........ D. President NANCY POORE .......... '. President i JOHN A. PARKER . . . Vice-President BARBARA GODDARD . . Vice-President i WILLIAM W. KREIS . . , Secretary EDITH R. LEMON . . . . Secretary 1 WALTER DILATUSH . . Treasurer MAXINE VUNKANNON . . T760-FU7'37' ' I CABINETS OF T1-IE CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS I YOUNG MEN Senior WALTER DILATUSH ROBERT SHERRILL JAMES K. ROBINSON JOHN A. PARKER JAMES DENT JOHN ROBINSON EDGAR NEAS I YOUNG WOMEN i. Senior I MARY CURRIER ALATHEA WHITN EY p MILDRED ALEXANDER MARY M. RICHARDSON I EDITH LEMON LORA BOND ELIZABETH KERR ,i I NANCY POORE BARBARA GODDARD I J WIL HAM W' KREIS ,QUQIQN HfNT0N MAXINE VUNKANNON VIRGINIA WHITE LOUISE TALLEY Il ' ADE FOSTER WANDA ARMSTRONG gi I ' Junior '5 Junior S L L W I E LLIAN I JACK MURPHY BILL POLK SPENCER TURRENTINE SARA POLLARD BZKESEIA IQIVXRRIS IILICE COXRIGHT 11 BOB AUSTIN CHARLES GUTHRIE JOHN POORE FAYE POORE 'I C p IRWIN FRANK ELROD BILL M AYS KATHERINE CAMERON JUDY DONALDSON ?ARA IECHMOND 5, ' ' - HELM ANIE ARRINGTON BH, N KATHRYN BARRETT JANE 1, L BRAKEBILL OLIN MINTZER LEONARD RICHARDSO EUNOR BARKER I I i, l319J NM. I T v I ORG IONS l E ......., W.......t ,,,, , ,W .VWWW1 E Top Ron' Bolerjack, Burks, Carson, Coble, Derryberry, Donaldson, Edwards, Erwin. Bottom Row: Gaskill, Gernt, Horsley, Jacoway, Jarnigan, Mallory, Merrill, Timmons. ZEBRA CLUB Sixteen years ago an organization known as the Zebra Club was founded in Barbara Blount Hall. When Blount Hall was changed to a boys' dormitory, the organization was trans- ferred to Henson Hall. Membership is confined to the "horsiest" girls in the dormitory. Little is known concerningiother qualifications, but it is generally recognized that to be a Zebra is a high honor. Initiation occurs each year at the beginning of the fall and winter quarters. Dur- ing a set period the new members are compelled to wear cotton stockings-One black and one white. These girls also wear a black "Z" ,on their foreheads. President James D. Hoskins is the only male member who can boast of mem- bership in this unique society. The Zebras exist for no specific purpose but the honorable one of Since the initiation is secret, having a silly time. we are not allowed to give details of the cere- mony, but it would no doubt be of great inter- est. The members create quite a disturbance each year when the initiates go about the cam- pus Upraising Allah" at the command of the Senior members. MEMBERS DORIS BOLERJACK ANNIE B. DONALDSON CARMEN GERNT, President JANE MERRILL MILDRED FROST BROWN MARDITE EDWARDS VIRGINIYX HORSLEY EMILY SUE SHELTON BILLIE BURKS MARY ELLEN ELLIS ELIZABETH JACOXVAY BILLIE TIMMONS HELEN GATES CARSON VIRGINIA ERVVIN MARY JARNAGIN HELEN TIPTON HOLTY COBLE MARY HESTER GASKILT. JESSIE M.ALLORY JANE VAN CLEAVE MILDRED DERRYBERRY JAMES D. HOSKINS rszon QRS IONS 1 k TT? Top Row: Archer, Burnett, Crowe, Davidson, Fox, Jones, Lefiler Bottom Row: Meredith, Meng, Moon, lVlcBee, Pearson, Weatherford, Young. PHI DELTA KAPPA Phi Delta Kappa was organized in both Colum- bia University and the University Of Indiana in I9IO. It has grown steadily until there are forty- seven institutional chapters and thirty-One field chapters in the United States today. Membership in the Organization is honorary and professional, and is confined to those students who are taking education. The ideals of the fraternity are research in the fields Of education, service to the University, and leadership among its associ- rites. It is quickly seen that Phi Delta Kappa occupies an important place in American education when we realize that most of the textbooks On educa- tion have been Written by Phi Delta Kappa men. The Alpha Kappa Chapter was established at the University of Tennessee in 1925. Dr. Avent and Professor Fitzgerald took the initiative in the founding of this chapter. Meetings are held twice a month and since the programs presented are professional in content they are of exceptional benefit to education stu- dents. At present the membership of Alpha Kappa in- cludes twenty-six faculty members and twenty- two student members. OFFICERS PHILLIP JONES ..... . . WILLIE THOMAS LEFELER . FORREST W. CROWE . . . DR. J. E. AVENT . . . . . . . . President . . . Vice-President . Recording Secretary . . . . . Treasurer MEMBERS WILTON W. BURNETT W. B. SHOULDERS D. M. PEARSON JOE D. MCCLURE WILLIE T. LEFFLER KINCER Fox JOHN L. 'GWIN PHILLIP JONES B M NG WILLARD MEREDITH LOFTON A. DAVIDSON ROY YOUNG JAMES - 0 ROY BELL CLAUDE J. ARCHER FOREST W. CROWE HORACE B. SMITH GUY R. IQIRK JERABLD WEATHERFORD HOMER E. SMITH JOHN A. MCBEE ROBERT S. MOON ROBERT A. PHILLIPS, IQ321fl J ' ri GRG ONS First Row: Bentley, Blankenship, Bowe, Cate, Cecil, Crowe. Second Row: Davidson, Dilatush, Jones, E. L., Jones, P. E., Jones, W., Kee. Third Row: Luttrell, Rollins, Sammons, Stilz, Taylor, Terry, Watson. BARNWARMIN' Barnwarmin' is the one event of the year when the Ags, with their many friends and former classmates, meet and renew the bonds of friend- ship and enjoy an evening Of Wholesome enter- tainment reminiscent Of the Old days when people in the country used to entertain to celebrate the erection of a new barn. Each year Barnwarmin' is held On the first day Of the University Homecoming season. This past year the Barnwarmin' Parade, consisting Of eight- een sorority and fraternity floats, followed the theme, "An Agricultural Homecomingf' The climax Of the Barnwarmin' program was the dance at the University Memorial Gymnasium. In the upper gymnasium was featured a special Agricultural Alumni and Faculty Square Dance and the traditional hog-calling contest. In the. auditorium the main dance was planned around the theme, "An Evening in the Old South." The highlights of the program were the crowning Of the 1937 Barnwarmin' Queen, the grand march followed by the Virginia Reel, with the partici- pants in Southern dressy the milking contest, and the serving of apple cider and ginger cookies. i T he success Of Barnwarmin' for the past seven- teen years has made it one of Tennessee's cher- ished traditions and has earned it a prominent place in the social and fellowship circles of the University. BARNWARVMIN, STAFF VV ALTER F. DILATUSH .............. ...... .ll lanager WOODROW LUTTRELL, JOHN CATE, EDWARD L. JONES .... Assistant Managers COMMITTEE C1-IAIRMEN FRANK B. WATSON . .... Decorations FORREST W. CROWE . . Special Decorations EUGENE KEE ........ Square Dance CHARLES W. BLANKENSHIP .... Publicity JAMES H. STILZ ........ Invitations RAYMOND SCHNELL . . . Special Amusements NAT W. BOWE . . ...... Parade LOFTON DAVIDSON .... Favors and Awards PHILLIP JONES . .... Program JOE SAMMONS . . . Grand March WILSON JONES . . . Refreshments J. D. TAYLOR . . . . Protection LUKE E. TERRY ......... Finance BARRY R. CECIL ........ Electrician EDNA BENTLEY . Ifome Economics Cooperative WINSTON ROLLINS ........ Clean Up l322l ORG IONS Beaman, Bentley, Wells HOME ECONOMICS CLUB The Home Economics Club is almost as old as the University itself, for soon after the start of the institution, the club was organized. At first the chief purpose of the group was to bring the students of the school into a closer and more friendly contact with each other, but now the main purpose of the club is to further profes- sional interest in the field of Home Economics. The club, too, sponsors each year an open house for the public in general and high school girls in particular. This event takes place at the time of the annual High School Day. Every fall the Home Ec Club receives at a tea to welcome all Freshmen women to the campus of the Univer- sity, soon after the tea the group gives them helpful advice concerning clothes for the school year. Each spring the newly-elected president of the club is sent to represent the University of Ten- nessee's School of Home Economics at the State Club meeting in Nashville. Last year the presi- dent was sent as the delegate from the Univer- sity to the American Home Economics Associa- tion, and the club hopes it can send a member annually to this convention. H OFFICERS EDNA BENTLEY . . MARGARET BEAMAN . . RENA DONNELL . . MABLE RAY VVELLS . . , . . . . . . President . Vice-President . . . Secretary . Treasurer If-323 fl ORG IONS i First Row' Ashe, Bailey, Bernard, Clark, Cochran, Donaldson, Emert, Flennilcen. M K ld lVlcKelve Second Row.: Gibson, Gregg, Griffin, Holland, Ijams, Merrill, c e er, y. Tbld Row: Patterson, Poore, Smith, Stubley, White, Whitehead, Wooten. GUIDES'SOCIETY The Guides, Society, composed of the sponsors Of the scho0l's R. 0. T. C. unit, Was founded on this campus in 1934. Although the society is one of the youngest Organizations on the "Hi11,', it has already become prominent among the Univer- sity student associations. The purpose of the society is to put before the student body and general public a clearer picture and a better idea of the significance of remaining a peaceful nation. University of Tennessee'S guides have not been granted a charter from the United States govern- ment, but they are rapidly approaching success in their endeavor to gain recognition. Since there are but few organizations of this type which have received charters from the national government and so many more applying for them, it is easy to see that the guides are important nationally. Without the cooperation of the entire student body, this organization will be unable to attain its goal. The guides hope to establish a national guides' society in every military department of the United States during the next few years. This takes time, Work, and cooperation on the part of the student body, but the guides will accomplish this Work. OFFICERS ANN GIBSON . . ..... . . President VERNICE HOLLAND .... , ViCe-P,-3,-i,ienf JACKQUELINE MCKELVEY . . . . Secretary BSIARY FRENCH FLENNIKEN . . . , Treasurer MEMBERS ANN GIBSON VERNICE HOLLAND NANCY GREGG JANE ASHE DOROTHY 'GRIFFIN MARTHA I JAMS NANCY SMITH BETTY JEAN CLARK ELIZABETH MCKELDER AILEEN EMERT MARTHA STUBLEY VIRGINIA VVHITE LOIS WHITEHEAD JEANNETTE DONALDSON FRANCES BERNARD JACKQUELINE MCKELVEY NANCY POORE JANE MERRILL ELIZABETH COCHRAN RACHEL PATTERSON HELEN WOOTEN MARY FRENCH FLENNIKEN MAXINE BAILEY l324il DRG IONS 1 i I Q . Q Q 1 D Left to right: Goff, Bagley, Harris, Lassiter. - AMERICAN COLLEGIATE ENGINEERS A The first engineers' day in America was held on the University of Missouri campus in the same year of its foundation, 1903. The mother organi- zation was known as the Order of the Knights of Saint Patrick, because the "Blarney Stonen bearing the inscription, "Erin Go B1'agh," which means "St, Patrick was an engineer," was found under a building at Missouri. Since then St. Pat- rick has been patron saint of all engineers, and his birthday has been set aside for honor to him. By this it is easily seen that the history of A. C. E. is most unusual and unique. In 191.7 a national organization was formed to include all the schools to which the movement had spread. Largely through the efforts of Pro- fessor R. C. Matthews, the University of Ten- nessee became a charter member. The year the association became a national society the name was changed to American Collegiate Engineers. The name ACE was first used instead of A. C. E. at the University of Tennessee, and the idea worked in with the aces in a deck of cards. Each year the engineers elect at their banquet four queens, the Queens of Hearts, Diamonds, Clubs, and Spades, to preside over Ace Day and the Engineers' Ball. These two festivals are high- lights in the engineers' year at the "Hill," OFFICERS - L. H. GOFF . - Toivi BAGLEY . S. T. HARRIS . . JOHN LASSITER . . FACULTY Aovisons N. W. DOUGHERTY E. S. FABIAN , , .... President . Vice-President . . . Secretary . . . . . . . . Treasurer R. C. MATTHEWS J. G. TARBOUX lQ325l 1 , 1 ORG IONS I Left to right: Bagley, Little, Tuttle, Armstrong, Dougherty, Faculty Advisor. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS AMERICAN SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS FOUNOEO 1852 The Tennessee Student Chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers was founded by the Senior Society in order to bring the students into closer contact with the current problems in the civil engineering world of today. The club meets Once every two weks to hear the latest practical developments in this field. Qften prominent TVA engineers and other authorities give illus- trated lectures, each speaking on the phase of civil engineering in which he specializes. The chapter has long desired tO be instrumental In the realization of high scholastic attainment, as well as to take an active interest in civil engin- eering. To keep this interest at a high point, the chapter makes two annual awards. One is a year's membership in the student chapter and the ASCE membership key, which is given to the Sophomore having the best scholastic average. The other award is given to stimulate the Juniors and Seniors to greater mastery of the funda- mentals Of engineering. This is a year's member- ship to the Senior Society and is given to the Senior outstanding in scholarship and interest in his field. OFFICERS MASON TUTTLE . . . . ROBERT B. LINOSEY .... J. C. POTTER ...... A . . WILLIAAI H. ARMSTRONG, III . . . . President . Vice-President . . Secretary . Treasurer MEMBERS WILLIAM H. ARMSTRONG, III TOM BAGLEY FRANK BLOODVVORTH JOE J. BOWMAN JAMES B. CLARK FRANK ELKINS JULIAN P. HIN1'ON SPENCER LITTLE HARLAN D. DEVVEY EMMETT W. DUNN, JR. VICTOR J. HULTOUIST, JR. SAM T. LOGAN G. H. MAXWELL J. W. MILES OLIN W. MINTZER ROY OWENBY JAMES C. POST JOHN C. POTTER GEORGE L. SITTON, JR. MASON TUTTLE J. E. VVOMACK ROBERT B. LINDSEY I326l GRS IGNS Left to right: Cate, Jones, P. E., Jones, W., Kee, Terry. AG CLUB The Ag Club started as the Dairy Club in 1889, it became the Farmers Club in 1899, the Rural Science Club in 1900, and the U-T Ag Club in 1908. A requirement of the Farmers Club was "one must have handled the hoe, sowed his wild oats, and raised, cane." Today the purpose of the club is set forth in the constitution: "To estab- lish a closer relationship for the purpose of study- ing rural life problems." The first club had half a dozen members, today there are two hundred. The members have de- veloped that feeling of fellowship that endures long after other school activities have become only pleasant memories. The Ag Club gives students a chance to- express themselves and to develop those qualities of leadership that are so essential, throughout life. Members have a firm, purpose- ful objective in their school life, and they always strive to build constructively, as well as to enjoy the activities of the University. The Ag Club leads every other student organiza- tion in its activities. Its Barnwarmin' has be- come a tradition throughout the University and the State, and its publication, The Tennessee Farmer, reaches the entire nation. The newly- created U-T roundup promises to become an- other high point in the school year. Judging teams which represent the University are made possible through the support of the Ag Club. There are other mino-r activities of the club which also contribute to a well-balanced, fuller college life. O'FE1cERs Fall Quarter JOHN CATE , , , , . . President LUKE E. TERRY . . Secretary and Treasurer PH1L1.1P JONES . . . . Vice-President LocAN ATRINS , . . . Sergeant-at-Arms Winter Quarter ROBERT MOSLEY . ..... President LUKE E. TERRY . . . . Secretary and Treagurer EUGENE KEE . ..... Vice-President STANLEY E.zELL .1 . . . . .... . . rzttc t-at-Arms WILSON JONES ..... . . . Sergeafl DEAN M. JACOB, Adfvisor . - -il . ORC-5 IGNS Lefz to right: Blankenship, Chappell, Dodson, Jones. DAIRY CATTLE Every year since 1921 the University of Tennes- see has been represented by a dairy cattle judg- ing team, which competes with teams from all the major universities in the United States and one from Canada. The team is composed of students in the College of Agriculture who are taking dairying as their major subject. The pur- pose of this team is to train students to be a good judge of cattle as well as to be able to teach others the proper methods of judging. The team is financed partly by the Dairy De- partment and partly by the Ag Club. The members of the team look forward to this con- J UDGING TEAM test, which is held in conjunction with the Na- tional Dairy Show. The 1936 contest was held in Cleveland, Ohio, during the month of Sep- tember. Clyde Chappell, a member of this team, placed third in a list of seventy-five contestants on the judging of Jerseys. The team was fourth out of twenty-five teams on judging Jerseys, tenth on Guernseys, tenth on Brown Swiss, and sev- enth on the judging of all breeds. Wilson Jones, another team member, stood third among indi- viduals in judging Brown Swiss. It is indeed an honor to be chosen a member of this team. - TEAM COMPOSED OF WILSON JONES KEWEN DODSON CLYDE CHAPPELL CHARLES BLANKENSHIP COACH S. A. HINTON 13281 GRS IONS l r ' 0 Q Q ' Left to right Humberd, Luttrell, Stilz, Harrison, Coach. DAIRY PRODUCTS JUDGING TEAM The dairy products judging team is usually composed of students who are taking their ma- jor in dairying and principally those who are most interested in the field of dairy manufac- turing. For many years the University of Ten- nessee has been represented at the national con- test by a well-trained products team. All through the summer a group of boys work for the contest, which is usually held in October. Until this past year the contest has been held in an Eastern city, with the exception of a meet- ing in Memphis and one in St. Louis. This year historic New Orleans was the host city to the team. It has been the custom in the past to hold the contest in conjunction with the Dairy In- dustries Exposition. This exposition sponsors the contest and many prizes are offered by large manufacturing companies. In recent years the team has won the cheese cup twice, the milk cup once, the butter cup once, and in '35 and '36 a scholarship of S600 for each year. The 1937 team placed sixth in the judging of ice cream. Wwdrow Luttrell, a team member, placed eighth among Hfty-four contestants in judging cheese. It has always been considered a very exceptional honor to be selected as a member of this team, and the train- ing derived therefrom is quite valuable. THIS TEAM Is COMPOSED OF JAMES STILZ Woomzow LUTTRELL MILTON HUMBERD DUARD TAYLOR COACHES R. D. KILPATRICK PROF. T. B. HARRISON H3291 PEGGY SANDERS DRG ION , OLETTES In the Spring of 1937 the Volette Drill Team Was Organized On the University of Tennessee campus, un- der the direction of Bandmaster Ernest Hall. Mem- bership must be arranged through application lists and rating on a drill test to be given each Spring by Mr. Hall. The purpose of the Volettes is: To aid the University Band on certain occasions, to develop poise, leadership and group cooperationg and to give an opportunity to a larger number of students to participate in activities and increase school spirit. The committee appointed by Dean Fred Smith to serve as faculty advisors consists of Dean Harriet Greve, Miss Helen Henderson, Coach Watt Hobt, and Band- master Hall. The Volettes first appeared With the University Band at the I37 Sewanee-Tennessee football game, and Were enthusiastically received by the spectators. Clad in White skirts and sWeaters, orange capes, White Oxfords and gloves, and overseas caps, the girls contributed greatly to the color and spirit of the football season. Ofhcers for the year I937-38 Were as follows: MILDRED ALEXANDER .... . . Drill Major FAYE POORE . . . . . . President LOUISE BUSSART . . . . Vice-President RUTH WATSON . . . . . Secretary DOROTHY JEAN BOCK . . Treasurer T MER-IBERS MILDRED ALEXANDER JANICE ALLEN JAMIE AULT MARY BACON EDNA BENTLEY DOROTHY JEAN BOCK ANITA BOWMAN IANELLE BRIMER LOUISE BUSSART ANNE L. CARDEN HORTENSE CATE BETSY CHAMBERS JANIS CHAMBERS MAUDE CHAMBERS ELIZABETH CHILDS THELMA CLAPP KATHRYN COOK MARIE COOK SUE DEBUSK JEANNVETTE DONALDSON EVELYN DOOLEY MARY FRANCES DOOLEY LOUISE DOTSON BESS DOUGHERTY INEZ ELLIOT MARY ELLEN ELLIS ALMA FULTS RUTH GARRISON NANCY GREGG KING HART MARTHA HENDRIX AGNES HUEESTEDLER JUANITA HOLT MARTHA TJAMS CARRIE LEE INGRAM ELEANOR IRVVIN DORO1'HY JONES LOUISE LANDESS RUBY LITTRELL HELEN LAY ELIZABETH MCBEE MIRIAM MCGUIRE BETTY MILLS ELIZABETH MILLS MARGARET NELSON CAROLYN OKEY HARRIET' PARDUE SARA POLLARD FAYE POORE NANCY POORE EDVVINE POWERS ALTA ROSS MARTHA ROSS DORIS RUSSELL VVILDA VR INNINGHAM JUNE SCARBROUGH MARISON SCHAAD SAMMIE SUE SCOTT MIRIAM SNIDER SUE STANTON EDITH STOKELY RUTH STONECIPHER LUCILLE STULTZ SARA SWANN ANNE D. SWOOPE CHRISTINE THOMAS JOSEPHINE THOMAS MARY ELLA TIDWELL ELAINE TOWLE PATRICIA TUCKER JULIA TUTTLE RUTH VVATSON QRS IGNS THE COMMERCE EXPOSITLION The Commerce Exposition and the Commerce Ball are the only functions given exclusively for the University by the School of Commerce. They serve to promote the School of Commerce in the University and the University in the Commonwealth. Contacts provided between business firms in Tennessee and the students of Business Administration in the University are invaluable. The first Commerce Exposition was held in the Spring of 1937 as an outward sign of the growth of the School of Commerce. It was first begun by members of the commerce fraternity, Delta Sigma Pi, but the response to the project immediately led to the cooperation of the entire school. This year the theme of the Exposition was "Commerce Binds the World." Following this theme, the Commerce Ball, which was held March 19, offered a world cruise on the good ship Commerce Queen, with stops at various ports of call for romantic dances and good times. The Exposition itself was April 1 and 2, High School Days, when several thousand vis- itors viewed the interesting exhibits representing all fields of business. Thus the Commerce Exposition has become an annual affair sponsored each Spring by Delta Sigma Pi and the School of Commerce to fur- ther the ambitions of those students interested in commercial pursuits. BOARD OF DIRECTORS WOODFORD FLOWERS, Chairman J. GOULD COGSWELL VVILLIAM P0 LK EARL O. VVILLIAMS RUSSELL S. MOXLEY ALAN SAYFORD H3311 1 4 'I.I5 ,WI l. f I I ,. N I Ili 1 I I .y, .Q . I I Ik. 1 . I is I 2 J 5 .JV4 W Ms: J W 2 .Ili W . IJ J V 31 1 Igln, I PI H J NUI ' I 'I I Fw ' 'IM ,I I jlai. V UI ' 54' . 0 1 if ,rev INFNR . I J-If! ' I All 'fl .,!: I wig I - I I K'sIlii'flI' ' J I ' I I L 1 I I ! ' - T Q.,-X -7-an fv- A Afyf,-54-.fxf-: Z-:gf-5-17 1 .. 1 I 5' .iffy I ff f f ,.,',1K I ff! I X 'J-r4l I ff 1 tj I f"" 1 Z x.1s.X .rg !k.fx.4, ,fx,. ZX-fl-g .xi N- 'fm fiyx- -j-'L Jkvfji, SCARABBEANZSENIOR SOCIETY MARKS ALEXANDER O. C. 'ARMITAGE W JOHN BARNHILL . HENRY CARMICHAEL. VICTOR M. DAVIS HOWARD DARROW U - WOODROW DERRYBERRY WALTER DILATUSH JOHN FISHER W CHARLES R. GUTHRIE JOE BLACK HAYES L. R. HESLER JULIAN HINTON HOLLY HORNBECK WILLIAM HOUSE WILLIAM JACOBS WILLIAM KREIS WILLIE LEFFLER JOE LITTLE 4 WOODROW LUTTRELL LEROY NEBLETT JOHN PARKER J. P. PORTER JAMES ROBINSON ARTHUR SEYMOUR KELLAR SMITH R. F. THOMASON DEWITT WEAVER I C. A P1 , . all S When but a youth, Icarus was cast in an endless labyrinth with his father, Daedalus, because of the disfavor which the latter had incurred with Minos of Crete. Seeing-no other way of escape, Daedalus, a skilled artiiicer, constructed wings out of feathers for Icarus and himself, which he fastened upon them with wax. Poising momentarily in the air,'the two soared away. Forewarned of the danger of flying too close to the sun, Icarus, as things went on favorably, became incensed-with an exultant COI1fidence in his own power. Defiantly, he soared upward into the face of the sun. The flaming heat of the massive orb Of fire melted the waxened fastenings on his wings. They dropped from his shoulders, and he plunged to death in the - sea below. I fp T'2 -1-su. ...L-R 5 1 Hx? N ,,, 1 r lf, 5, rn ily, ,.,,, 'E '1 L, Mi, ,,I, 1, W 1 , , , , l ,I '4 wi 1 4 1 'l 4, 1 U l w W. 1 ,f fi, Qf ii? W, A 15,- " ll. :N ,auf ,,-, ,. ug, ,V ,, :,, , ','N .,,x,,,, mi W-,fwiiiw ,r ,ig ,311 ,a 2.1 :1, A H, '1 2, 1, ,N f wt' 1, l" N '1!', 'Q xiif 'H ,,,:,, xl ' w, V!! HW ix' HW 3 ml W1 H Y: U M ,HN N, W, ,,K' , 'N ,cv M, ,JN rw WL' -HM 'MUN :,, w-ww 11,1 WM, Mm ,,, 1, '11 w ,, . ,1 W4 ,H vw' lim' 'L ,qi LQ: 72311. 151, 1' S ,,, I., ,- C sq ..u flwgsr L S 53 X- 51-. 7. 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I L 4.44 and two lovely Oran e Blossom Rings, to make a perfect motc These rmgs are beautifully matched, and correct for the occasron Ever brrde wants her rmgs to be aclmrrecl Give her the best I 9 iCll7ZIQ4.ClK7OZll 4ZCll !C24.7ClZ7OZIf IC.KIl7Z2 AND THE GIFTS CHOSEN FRDM GUR DISPLAY OF NATIONALLY ADVERTISED SELECTIONS WHETHER WATCHES, VANITIES. BRACELETS, CLOCKS, DIN- NER SETS, STERLING SIL- VER, NOVELTIES IN AN ALMCPST INFINITE VARIETY. WILL BE CHERISHED THRGUGH LIFE 520 MARKET ST Sf The Graduation Present CHQOSE Is Easy to Sele ct from FALL BR , .'-.'. Our Modern Shop at i "t" J 520 MARKET ST. LING ' ER SEE OUR PATTERNS IN 51 H Woes 0 . .swf I t XS I K5 Sterling Silver, Courtship, Trous- bddesjtoebeior Cqogfifaqs. seau, Orchid, Pinetree, and Simplicity INLAID PATTERNS If S , M0002 Steyn? A Chest. X b'xE- Sm AOMX v6 an e6 xt' 9 eeffxa 10 XO 00 S 'mg X9 . 1 Y X55 Caxjttetft bling X a. SAS grating up new RY Chafwzlour bftda 16 S6 fc Choo fr! ff' f f wf K, ' 1 'L 0 4 W ,W First Lady, Masterpiece, Guest of D0 - 7 ' hw - .- 502,711 Honor, Century Napoleon I WE ! YQS a a ,W fff WN-Wujfz S1 Charm Wffffwwmf In 'r'.3eY:APsill4gY if 529 Www L ,qw 3 f 'iff f,,' g-. "" MVZ7ZffK1Wzrc24'czKVQUWZKWZWQZGQUWMMWZWGK X ' I ' X 'il I W' -AA-Q The HAM delicious A I .,.:,V.V..:V,,A-::,5:,,:v.::E ,..,. ,VLV---vi,-:V-5.51,-V-VVE'-1-Q52,5-::AHf::.:ug:-V.V'V VA-is V35 , ' , 3 - . . VV V "fiiff-.-'::!I2.',fI.53fVf'ff'.:sf '," Q"fVff1:ffffZ.' I.5f':I:.:f-ffl:-.If-'A,VV f -,:QVQL:..,.!V 1,... . 1 IQ ..., f..1.'.f,-1.1-:2f:., ..,, f E V' VV f-'-,- , Y - ' V nl kf z: :.,,, o vi:-IMS.. :a v r AV . .: .... t -A -z :W+ VV 'V , I . 4, E., ,,V,. U I, 5-4: u ll B C d la 0 ll -7:5n:Z4t3:f'f'2:I'7: . -I , ' N """" ""' . ,, ., I ' k U ' 5-"'N .. 3- H 5.-.L :jg 1 522- .ci--4 , ZIV 1 , " "2 T e A e lclous .'4.:::fV-wx: 5:hx-:M1,:14,Vz:-N.-sz: V .. - - "--' V , NR ,--, 4 , - H :-: - . 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V A GN is The S0uth's Largest Independent Packers COMPLIMEN TS B. CARROLL REECE Member of United States House of Representatives First Congressional District of Tennessee It ls a pleasure to Serve . the U nfversfty PARK NATIONAL BANK Calif?-1 S1,000,000.00 Surplus and Unclivicled Profats S4-00,000.00 48+ swf' 1551 ,gf szmrui liiginzzxng izszzllgnn xnklgigt 2 vin ,4- 1' 4.5 ,Nw H A M I LTO N NATIONAL BANK OF KNOXVILLE TENNESSEE Member Federal Reserve System Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation EYou... lack the convenience of a check mg account, have no safe deposit box for your valuables, would like to start a savings account, have been thinking of an estate P 311, or lf you want modern bankmg facllltles comblned with close per sonal attentlon to your banking needs Hamilton N atlonal Invltes YOU to Become a Customer Capital and Surplus, 52,157,000 Deposits, 525,000,000 KIIOXVI 6 V13 r It S SANI SEAL 41659 I "ICE CREAM AT ITS BEST" 4 1 ' ,K-152' .i 14 '2i:i.3? ::Zi:3:-1' ll ' ' f, Q7 F.-,.g.-.1:2:'::f ' fff1fE:. 'gl . .1"-'I . 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Weaveris Restaurant 619 S. Gay St. "We N ever Close" Real Estate Title Compliments of MODEL LAUNDRY Compliments of II'1Sl11'3.I'1CC CO. A Knoxville, Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee v Phone 3-8171 A Compliments of 'ED SCHMID You-r Drug Store NTCLELLANES REAL ESTATE 711 Henley phone 3-4139 Sc to 51.00 STORES 709 Market St. Knoxville, Tenn. 407-409 Gay Street T. E. BURNS CO. 321-323 Wall Avenue Dial 2-2161 The Picture Framery 203 W. CLINCH AVE. "We do the Framing and Never Disappointn Compliments of James B. Wright EG? Go. General Insurance Bankers Trust Building 1 The Hope Brotliersi Co. Exclusive Representative for KIRK AND WATSON STERLING 613 Market St. Claaniciler Printing C om p a n y 413 Chamberlain Ave. Everythzng zn Typewrzfers I Preston Typewriter 5 701 SOUTH GAY STREET i i 1 V,-l..-a,----- is--1.-....l. Y -Y , ,, Il Y,V- K Wm, - - V H Y if F D 'FM 1 l I JNO. D. STAIR, Pres. A. C. PANNELL, Mgr. AIKIN l-ICTEL l 5 16163 afwfpd T5 200 Rooms CW ,NZ 4356 J- K. CRAIG, President QUALITY AND SERVICE ALWAYS PAUL B. BROOKS, lllanager Satisfaction Guaranteed Phone 3-6191 1823-25 W. Cumberland SONNER'S Kingston Pike Pharmacy 3703 Kingston Pk. "At the Forks of the Road" CURB SERVICE WORMSER HAT STORES "Hatters to Men" Since 1894 525 So. Gay St. Phone 2-3139 MIMS DRUG STORE Fast Delivery Service KNOXVILLE, TENN. 1001 W. Clinch Knoxville, Tm, Compliments of - - AMERICAN OPTICAL Co. Whlte my Flour LEM ANDERSON CU. General Building "The Finest F l01ft1: Money Fancy Grocers KNOXVILLE, TENN. Can Buy KNOXVILLE, TENN. CLARK 56 JONES 510 So. Gay St. KNOXVILLE, TENN. COMPLIMENTS OF Beeler Bootery 520 So. Gay St. Knoxville, Tenn. J F G SPECIAL COFFEE "The BestiPart of the Meal" Best Wishes Seniors UNIVERSITY TOGGERY SPENCE SHOE CO. n 430 So. Gay St. KNOXVILLE, TENN. Briscoe Electric Co. - 722 Market St. KNOXVILLE, TENN. Henry W. White', Jr. General Agent MASSACHUSETTS MUTUAL INSURANCE CO. Compliments of CHANDLER E6 CO. KHOIIPISYZYKTIIZITISBSSGB Barber McMurray ARCHITECTS 517K W. Church St. KNOXVILLE, TENN. PAIRCNIZE OUR ADVERTISERS A 111111 1 1 ew! ' ' 1:11, 1 .1111 .11 8? 11g 21,111 . 1 1 11.11 1 1 fgl 1 1 . ' 11I4' 1, I .1 1 1- .1 1 .1- ,, 1411 11 111 11111 1 1 1 1 1 1. 1 111 11 11 11 i111 '1'11' 11.11 1 ' 11 1' 'ESV I1 -5,11 , 1.55. 1 1 1, gf'7f' 1 ,1 122155 ' ful il' 511' I 11 11 11 1 1.1 , 1 1 1 1 ' 1 X. ,I 1 E 1 1 1 '1 1 11 1 1 1 1 11 11, 1 .5 1111113 11111111111 1 .1. 111 11 -1 1111 1 111 11 5,1 5 1111111 1 Jog 11,11 1 1 1111111 '1111I 1 gf 7I 11 112 11 'Tf A11 1111 11 QM ,111 M E111 ' 1 11 , 11111.11 11 11 1 1 1' 111' 1 11 1 ,1 1111 jj 1911! - 1 1 111 1 1 A1 111m1e"1 2f1111fgfff!31 111 1 1 E111 E 311111 1 11 1 1 11u1Ll'. 'T' FI' 1 1 1 1 U 1' 1 1 11 It 1 1 11.1 1 E 1 '11 1111 1 1 1 11 F911 1. 11.1 11 A M111 :I 1 11' 1 ' 1 J 1 1 111 111 W. 1, 1, 1111 1'1 1 1l 111 11 1 'N 13 1 , 1 1 1' 1 1 ,111 111111 'W111 11 1 ""111111 .111111 '11 1 '11 1 51,11 ' -1 '111'1 11 1 1141:1 1 1lN 1 11' 1 11-11111 1 1:11111 15111112 Q 11 11 1111111 .1 '11 1 . up 1 . I 1 .' 1 1.1 11 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 11:1 ' 111 1 11 '1 1 4' 11 1 -1 11 11 . 1 1 11' 1 1 111111 .1 11 11 '11 1 111 1 1 , 1 'bl 1 1? 55.1, .,f. 1 YOUR CAREER Gainful-Healthful-Helpful-Opportunity for Advancement RALPH E. TALLEY PENN MUTUAL LIFE PHONE 2-3539 906-7 General Bldg. KNOXVILLE, TENN. Compliments of Tennessee Optical Co. PRINTING AND LITHOGRAPHING For Best Values Try STUBLEY PRINTING co. Esfablished l905 415 State Street Phone 3-4567 Knoxville, Tenn Best Wishes Seniors Southeastern Optical Co. D Compliments of Knoxville Paper Box CO. KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE THE FASHION STORE ! OF TENNESSEE THE NEW PALM BEACH SUITS Marie in Knoxville- Worn the Worid Over 'rAll.on:n av soooALl, GOODALL COMPANY Delicious .Sandwiches and Drinks ELLIS 81 ERNEST DRUG STORE 1 AT THE CORNER OF THE CAMPUS ' 1 Phone 2-6103 A- - f' - ---. Q'-'T-ra p .4 'f -- . . - ----T71-1nf---.-----vH-- r-+-T-kv-,.- ,-, ,F K ,- dr, x -Wg' N - ATTENTION CLASS OF 1938 All Students in Engineering and Other Technical Courses are Reminded That Wlmen They Become: METALLURGISTS, CHEMISTSL OR PURCHASING AGENTS In the Steel Industry Their Requirements in the Line of Ferro-Silicon May Be Supplied from Chattanooga, "The Dynamo of Dixie" BY SOUTHERN FERRO ALLOYS COMPANY PAUL J. KRUESI, President x X 1 , N X x as .X T' .I 1 I 5 Il ll X s N xx S x -, x m 1 n I 1 , I, , X TNNN X ",,. The Co Wh th d the xl 7 ' N f 6 f ,f ,f ,ff f 1 x X NAM X X f 1' 1' I T 5 '- - X X X ',-' ',' , 1 , I - , i y X , A F, ...f' OUR FAMOUS GOALS "DIXIE GEM"-HREGAL4'-'LSOUTHERN STAR" PHONES 3-5103 614 OAK AVENUE NEW ST. JAMES HOTEL CENTRALLY LOCATED - REFURNISHED AND REMODELED THROUGHOUT A11 Rooms with Private Bath 52.00 AND UP GEORGE W. TRAYLOR, Manager ., T .. - E " A" ""'i'MA T "Insurance in All of Its Branclnesn J. E. LUTZ AND COMPANY Established 1896, Incorporated 1929 Underwriting Managers TENNESSEE INSURANCE COMPANY czlm:-o Our Organization Includes the Following Alumni: "NED" LUTZ, '12 "GENE" MCCLAMROCH, '22 A "JOHN" JACOBS '24 J. WALKER LEACH, '08 , "GABY" HOOPER, '20 "SAM" FRANKLIN, '25 "DON" SEVERAN CE ENTIRE SECOND FLOOR, BURWELL BLDG. KN OXVILLE, TENNESSEE VESTAL LUMBER fs? MANUFACTURING COMPANY Incorporated KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE J. PARK VESTAL, President and Treasurer B d EDWARD M. VESTAL, Vice-President and Secretary an 1 S EMMET P. VAUGHN, Sgleg Manager KNOXVILLE, TENN.-DUFF, TENN.-SARDIS, GA H' V' H01-'STONa Traffic Manager CLAYTON, LA.-ARKANSAS CITY, ARK. JOE D. PENLAND, Auditor JEWELERS DIAMOND MERCHANTS -Gift Shop Dealers in New and Usecl Books VOL BOOK EXCHANGE ENGRAVED INVITATIONS, ANNOUNCEMENTS . k f STATIONERY AND CARDS Complete Llne of Boo s or KIMBALL'S JEWELERS "The South's Most Beautiful Jewelry Store" . , A T 428 GAY STREET KNOXVILLE 805 Flfteenth St. KNOXVILLE, FEINN Extension Courses "IF WE DON'T HAVE IT, WE CAN GET IT" REAL ESTATE, LOANS 502 GAY STREET EVERY FIDUCIARY INVESTMENTS SERVICE IQSISIQNISINIWNI' MANN ., ,, -v'- .,,.....-----A---A---"4-""4' 'M ""' A47---'Y I 'ww-Y I II ' ' ,TF MII' wg: ,UNI AIU "fwfr TI lr ,I ll! If ' VI, ffm In 4 1 ,r Ny ,gy if 'LI Iwi , IMI XIII I ,I If wt I I 1 I , 'if III QI E0 C"I' 'mill III gy. 1 In 1 I f If 1 I ep I .. ,. I I I I I IL ,ii Ii I In ui- fn I If I E I 'II II Il I, II, lf: II QU II I Il, II' I-, :II I 353 :Iwi I .0 :1 'Q 5 2.14 ,4 I I4 I at I I-I1 If , Q! I , I , 4 'J III I I I I I .lx I . RING BOOKS AND SHEETS ENGINEERING SUPPLIES, EDISON-DICK MIMEOGRAPHS FOUNTAIN PENS .AND PENCILS SCHOOL 81 OFFICE SUPPLY CO. 407 West Clinch Avenue "The store of service" A Dial 3-7145 THE SHERWIN WILLIAMS Lumber, Millwork 4 Johns-Manville Roofmg G. J. DOMINICK, Local Manager ' . CHAVANNES Paints, Varnishes. Lacquers, Leads, Oils, Enamels, Brushes, ancl Painters' Specialties Handling the best in: Telephone 3-6136 314 South Gay Street Knoxville, Tennesse . N00 CORPORATIONS-but to INDIVIDUALS Banking Services Needed II'ldIVId113.I.S SAVINGS AT zwk PERSONAL AND "POPULAR" CHECKING ACCOUNTS SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES-TRAVELERS CHEQUES PERSONAL LOANS OF MANY TYPES-5100 to 510,000 Are Ufferecl on a Basis Gearecl to Their Requirements.,at THE BANK FOR THEINDIVIDUAL Morris plan Bank of Knoxvflle Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ""'1'1YT-Yr' - ' 1 g" .-,1-mr,--.--Y.,-.....,..,. ,,,,.,- v ' 'NY' ' " , Crushed Stone ' Mascot Clmatts, o R001-'mg Gravel 0 Asphalt Roaclway Gravel Asphalt Filler Dust MAS COT AMERICAN LlMEsToNE ooMPANY Knoxville Sangravl EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL Material CO' Quality Products Phone 3-2147 KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE ' C CO S ravel'-CernentiL1rne Broadway and Union Ave. Ready-Mix-Concrete CALL Us Wholesale O ly I-loTEl. FARRAGUT Eooo, SERVICE, ENVIRONMENT E , Y. ,, . . . , - . 4 z z, -..- I I- I: - . . - .... .. ,......i . ..,....,.R.E-...,,..- .,.-.,.., Compliments ofthe Following Florists of Knoxville CGFIOZLJETS for OCCaSi0nS,, BAUMS JENNIES FLOWER Home of Flowers 621 S. Gay St. 3-3195 405 Union Ave. r 3-2412 BROCKWAY CROUCH CROUCH ART Flowercraft Florist, Inc. ' D 415 W. Church sf. 3-3236 521 Market sr. 3'-3151 ELSIE STAIR FLOWER SHOP 701 Market St. 2-6414 SHIP BY TRUCK 'MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT "Express Service at Freight Rates" . . 1701 W. Cumberland Ave. Free Pick-Up and Delivery - HOOVER TRUCK CO.. Serve Wholesome Food Eat at REGAS BROS. CAFE A 318 N. Gay St. HOME OF SIZZLING STEAKS "Air Conditionedi' Good Food Is Good Health 524 N. Gay Knoxville, Tenn. Phone 3-7151 G. E. SMITH, Knoxville, Manager Points Covered and All Intermediate Stops ' KNOXVILLE, NASHVILLE, MEMPHIS, ATLANTA, Compllmentf ST. LOUIS, BIRMINGHAM, CINCINNATI, LOUIS- I If VILLE, JACKSON , TENN., FAYETTEVILLE, TENN., O PULASKI, TENN., GALLATIN, TENN., LEBANON, ' TENN. The Above Points are Covered With From S- H' 8 , 1 to 2 Days' Service . I Knoxville's Leading Popular-Price Inquiries cheerfully Answered Dept. Store 3 i 1 l 1 I 4 Y J Q . x . 1 :-n uviv grq- . ... : . ' , .-3-wvrmwv-1-1.f.........v.... ,, ' - ' . " -..-Q.,,q- Tlve Following .Knox County Ufficials Ex tend to the Graduating Class of 1938 Every Wislr for Success and Happiness in Life Sir A. E. Mitchell Chancellor as S. O. Houston County Judge Pk Jessie Marie Miller Circuit Court Clerk Ofice Pk W. Harvey County Court Clerk Pk J. A.Shacke1f0rd Criminal Court Clerk J. Frecl Biblia Attorney General P24 I. B. Parker Register of Deeds Pk L. H. Briclcey Superintendent of County Schools Dk . Tl1CfOH D. Wi1SOI1 Trustee :xc W. L. Cox Commissioner of Welfare ,u,,,,..,..------4'-' FOR SMART TAILORING - SEE TQNY BOWERS 8. Ta-:AD SCGTT JosTEN's TREASURE-CRAFT JEWELERS AND TRUST AND STATIONERS COMMERCIAL BANK Y Class Rings, Commencement Invitations, Medals, Trophies CORNER GAY AND CLINCH I Factory: OWATONNA, MINNESOTA ' Division Manager: C. W. WINEGAR VOLUNTEER GCOD CEMENT USE IT I VQLUNTEER PORTLAND CEMENT CQMPANY I I L I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 'A I 2 I I I l I I I , Q -,- , ,re -r v+?- V wa-f-....-.,...,, ... , rn .I - wr--f+v..-.,-1, Buttermaking C mM MkcMlk DyMh UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE CREAMERY The Most Up to Date Dany Manufacturlng Laboratory 1n the South MORGAN Eff HURLEY Inc INSURANCE BONDS FIRST FLOOR GENERAL BLDG Ph 3 8193 U T Headquarters or mart Clot es WOODS TAYLOR COX THE HOUSE OF STYLE AND QUALITY 422 SOUTH GAY STREET TENNESSEE OFFICE SUPPLY CO OIH S ppl F COMPLIMENTS Brzscoe Coffee Shoppe 1508 WEST CUMBERLAND AVE Ice rea aking ar e i Cheesemaking Advanced Testing air ec anics . . f " ' S 11 Complete Facilities for Handling Every Line of Insurance one - - ' OF ce u ies-Office urniture D ce s ems-Carbon Specialist A , Offl Sy t V Phone 2-1223 203 W. Clinch Ave. KNOXVILLE, TENN. "A ir C onditionedv Fraternity Jewelry OFFICIAL BADGES, KEYS AND CHARMS, CLUB INSIGNIA, PARTY FAVORS, DANCE PROGRAMS CRESTED GIFTS, TROPHIES, STATIONERY, INVITATIONS, FINE RINGS Write for Free Catalog L. G. BALFOUR CO. 1502 W. Cumberland Ave. KNOXVILLE, TENN. JACK JOYNER, Representative T ere Is D1st1nct1on 1n Bemg Henley at Cumberland Avenue TIRES. TUBES, GAS, OIL AND BATTERIES Brake Debt. ' Road Service Dial 27121 COMPLIMENTS OFFICE FURNITURE AND W W 504 U on Av n e - TODD 81 ARMISTEAD COMPANY KNOXVILLE'S LEADING PRESCRIPTION STORE MARKET AND CLINCH STREETS Dial 2-2131 E. D. ARMISTEAD, President R B. CREECH, Vice-Pre d W' JQHNSTON, Secret y d T FARRAGUT LUMBER CONGRATULATIONS COMPANY SENIORSI 4 KN OXVILLE, TENNESSEE RAGLAND BROS. CO. STUDENTS B Tbe advertisers in tbis book make it pos- sible for you to get a better book at the "That Friendly Banff, same minimum cost. Show your appre- ciation by supporting tbem. I III I I I HV 1 IIIII IIII7 II I -I II. I III E1 II Z' lid I I I I I III t I I I I'I E IIIIIAI I I I I II I Ii VI I III II I M I I I I I II Im., IIIIIIII Iwi ' nh .fl 455. 2225? 25131 - I-11 'SHI I.., llfq: I If-In Ifkra' I 65: i I 5 ,S-Q I QIII I, I I I fir I lnggll ' I I I I I III' II Iii II I., III IIIIII III . IIIIQ I I, IIII In I III III III I II II III -II I I II .WI 5 I I I I I .II I I -I. I EI I IV I! I 15 I I I H I I' I III I ,II il I IIL It YI ,I ,I I I II I-ill: W' gill! E'Iw, Q' .III . V14 I. II, I' I I I II.?I:'I 'fit I III? I I 112.3 I IHII. I IIIIII ,VIE II I I IIII I., EI II II!! I 'III2 II,, II', III III, pi ,I II COMPLIMENTS OF E. cl.EAN VOLUNTEER I PHOTCIGRAPHER If you desire Photographs taken from any picture in this Volunteer, phone W 2-0470 or write MISS E. MCLEAN, 131 East Oklahoma Ave., Knoxville, Tenn. THE I938 VOLUNTEER IS BOUND IN A I KINGSKRAFT COVER Designed and Pfedueed by Kingsport, Tennessee , ..- .nv --, , - . 1 --nfq-T,n.mf-7-'V--....,-. ,.... , - - - . 5 : A ' CD CD CD CD CD 5 -U: CD-CD-Cb-CD-CID-CD-CD-CID-CD-1 g E- A, Dittqqvvq ,-X 'fb' I W, A-L-at-asmii, vvifvvtu-Q .. - - 5 -1. H g - iemwwa: rv ' UAALITY .- ' me 5 INE Annuals are brought about by IVE Um-WWA o ' 1 299-2 skillful and trained effort, onlyi . . Capperx supremacy is the result of rnanf years of successful experience in Annual cle- signing and engraving. Clhis experience, to- gether with the Soutlfs best artists, designers and engravers, is a guarantee for the finest Annuals. --------A------- CAPPER ' ' COMPANY . KNOXVILLE, TENNE S SEE ARTISTS v - DESIGNERS - + ENGQAVERS. - n ,, .4 . - -- , , .. -. .. .---- --- --V---v-----H " '--- "MA"-""?A T '-SQ .- ,. -.x :,,1.,,.- . I .. --' x ,Q i X ,,. -Ln.,-,. X ,J . X.. - Y- Qs -' - Y.: .Q f.Lf---g,135V- x,- -x..q..g-V r -N v .. .4 - ..,f.,..-z , 1. 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Suggestions in the University of Tennessee Knoxville - Volunteer Yearbook (Knoxville, TN) collection:

University of Tennessee Knoxville - Volunteer Yearbook (Knoxville, TN) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 1

1931

University of Tennessee Knoxville - Volunteer Yearbook (Knoxville, TN) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Page 1

1933

University of Tennessee Knoxville - Volunteer Yearbook (Knoxville, TN) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

1935

University of Tennessee Knoxville - Volunteer Yearbook (Knoxville, TN) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

1940

University of Tennessee Knoxville - Volunteer Yearbook (Knoxville, TN) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

1941

University of Tennessee Knoxville - Volunteer Yearbook (Knoxville, TN) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 1

1942

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