University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA)

 - Class of 1940

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University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 280 of the 1940 volume:

ft ; : ■ I (MfM ! ill ■!]■! ill i M i( I Ui ' { ) i ' MM HP iff ) 1 1 } 1 1 ( » ' ; i:l i ! ((Mr lit ; : It I M i I I f r ' y r -I J t ' H ( f 1 1 1 I.! ill 1 MM •If! • f: 111 I? 51] ! Ill { fi ! 1 ■h: Ml it il ill m i . i i L 1 Urn I ' % y ' ' s % r l ' fnr, nm- mf ?i;ik ak " m- Ai ii ' A, r ov g ' ■ ' C- ' " ,c voe° INDEX • 1940 kAAQQA r Ul iCCTTC PREFACE .. . " ANDID shots of campus life seen - through a student ' s eyes will give the 1940 Index a true-to-life resume of the past year at State. With pictures, a lively style, and a really typical keynote, the Index depicts students and faculty as they are seen daily — without extreme realism and without the idealistic aura of the college movie. This escape from dessi- cated formality will give its readers the flavor of life at State unadorned by con- vention or by rose-colored glasses. Though simple, the student ' s existence possesses pleasant aspects common only to the State campus. Making a novel approach chiefly by use of photography, the Index has captured the essence of State College activity both in and out of the class room. : fi CONTENTS... COLLEGE AND CLASS Trustees, the President, Officers of the Administration, Recognition to Mr. Ken- ney and Professor Chamberlain, In Memoriam, Faculty, The Class of 1940, Class History, Senior Activities, Junior Class, Sophomore Class, Freshman Class. SOCIAL AND SOCIETY Dads ' Day, The Horticultural Show, Military Life, Amherst Weekend, Winter Carnival, Interfraternity and Intersorori- ty Balls, Social Union Programs, Soph- Senior Hop, Fraternities, Sororities. ACTIVITIES AND ACTION Undergraduate Honorary Societies, Governing Councils, Academic Activities, Clubs, Scholastic Honorary Societies, Alumni, The Radio Station, Civil Aero- nautics Authority, Varsity Athletics, Interclass Athletics, Women ' s Athletic Association. T O CHARLES PAUL ALEXANDER ty- pifies all that is best in the American tradition of Science and Education, com- bining, as he does, the admirable traits of a stimulating and inspiring teacher, and those of a brilliant scholar and leader in scientific investigation. In his chosen field of research, the study of the Tipulidae, Dr. Alexander is known throughout the scientific world as the leading authority; his zest and inde- fatigable industry in this field are worthy of the emulation of all who seek to add to the sum of human knowledge. As a teacher, his varied interests and encyclopaedic knowledge arouse our deep- est admiration and respect, while his magnetic personality and his infectious enthusiasm, together with his intensely human qualities of mind and heart, en- dear him to all who have been so for- tunate as to be associated with him. In dedicating this Index to Dr. Alex- ander, the students of the Massachusetts State College not only express their ad- miration for a loved friend and mentor, but also reflect the universal esteem of the students and faculty alike, for an out- standing scholar and investigator — one whose international repute gives added prestige to the renown of our College throughout the realm of scientific re- search. G. C. Crampton o ' Outstanding Investigator " ' Inspiring Teacher ' ' CHARLES PAUL ALEXANDER " Study of the Tipulidae " f Ki miii ' International Repute " ' Brilliant Scholar " THESE ARE Grads THE PEOPLE Beauties ' BISH " Typists Thumbers Theorists Grinds Greasers Graders THIS IS THE PLACE Stockbridge " Abbey " Fernald Wilder Fountain Gyr Gift of 1939 AND THIS Praying- Playing Pasting WE DO Cashing Cuddling OLLEGE AND LASS TRUSTEES His Excellency Leverett Saltonstall, Pres- ident Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Framingham, Vice- ' president Robert D. Hawley of Amherst, Secretary Fred C Kenney of Amherst, Treasurer Term expires 1940 John F. Gannon of Pittsfield Davis R. Dewey of Cambridge Term expires 1941 Joseph W. Bartlett of Boston Philip F. Whitmore of Sunderland Term expires 1942 John Chandler of Sterling Junction Frederick D. Griggs of Springfield Term expires 194S Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Framingham William C. Monahan of Framingham Term expires 1944 Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara of Cam- bridge James T. Cassidy of Dorchester Term expires 1945 Mrs. Katharine G. Canavan of Amherst Joseph B. Ely of Westfield MEMBERS EX-OFFICIO His Excellency Leverett Saltonstall Governor of the Commonwealth Hugh P. Baker, President of the College Walter F. Downey, Commissioner of Edu- cation William Casey, Commissioner of Agricul- ture Hubbard, Monahan, Malcolm, Bartlett, Baker, Bowditch, Hawley Griggs, Burke, Whitmore, Brown 1 NINETEEN [18] HUNDRED FORTY Ht President Baker President s Message The Index reminds me of a popular song of a few years ago entitled " Just a Memory. " But the Index is more than " Just a Memory " for through its illustra- tions and narrative it gives enduring life to the cherished friendships and the ex- citing experiences of the Campus. The old alumnus finds in the Index what Ponce de Leon sought in the fountain of youth. With it we are able, as the years roll by, to live again those happy college years and renew our youth in the record of their pleasant experiences. Hugh Potter Baker President HUGH P. BAKER, D.Oec, LL.D. Born 1878. B.S. Michigan State Col- lege, 1901. M.F. Yale University, 1904. D.Oec. University of Munich, 1910. LL.D. Syracuse University, 1933. Fellow, A.A.A.S., F.R.G.S. (London). Major, O.R.C. Accepted to faculty 1933. ■ . 19 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I OFFICERS OF THE WILLIAM L. MACHMER, Ed.D., Dean Professor and Acting Head of Mathematics Department Born 1883. A.B. Franklin and Marshall College, 1907. A.M. Frank- lin and Marshall College, 1911. Ed.D. American International Col- lege, 1936. President of Eastern Association of Deans and Advisors of Men. Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Gamma Mu, Alpha Sigma Phi, Adelphia. Accepted to faculty 1911. FRED J. SILVERS, M.S. Director of the Experiment Station and Director of the Graduate School Born 1880. B.S. University of Wisconsin, 1910. M.S. University of Wisconsin, 19U. Fellow A.A.A.S. Theta Chi, Sigma Xi, Alpha Zeta, Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1928. MARSHALL O Assistant Dean aiid Pro, LANPHEAR, M.S. ' ,ssor of Freshman Orientation Born 1894. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1918. M.S. Massa- chusetts State College 19 ' 26. Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Sigma Kappa. Accepted to faculty 1921. ROLAND H. VERBECK, B.S. Director of Short Courses Born 1886. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1908. Phi Sigma Kap- pa. Accepted to faculty 1924. WILLARD A. MUNSON, B.S. Director of Extension Service Born 1881. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1905. Phi Kappa Phi. Phi Sigma Kappa. Accepted to faculty 1926. ROBERT D. HAWLEY, B.S. Secretary of the College Born 1895. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1920— as of 1918. Adelphia, Phi Sigma Kappa. Accepted to faculty 1920. Machmer, Lanphear . . . Sievers, Munson, Verbeck . . . Hawley, Broadfoot, Erickson, Burke 20 it THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ADMINISTRATION JOHN K. UROADFOOT Assi itant Treasurer Born 18S4. Accepted to facultj ' 1915. GUNNAR S. ERICKSON, B.S. Businens Officer Bom 1897. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1919. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Accepted to faculty 1935. BASIL B. WOOD, A.B. Librarian Born 1881. A.B. Brown University, 1905. Delta Upsilon, Phi Beta Kappa. Accepted to faculty 19 ' 2-1. GEORGE E. EMERY, B.S. Field Secretary and Assis tant Alumni Secretary Born 1904. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1924. Sigma Phi Ep- silon, Adelphia. Accepted to faculty 1929. EMERY E. GRAYSON, B.S. Director of Placement Service Born 1894. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1917. Adelphia, Alpha Sigma Phi. Accepted to faculty 1927. GUY V. GLATFELTER, M.S. Placement Officer Born 1893. B.S. Pennsylvania State College, 1919. M.S. Iowa State College, 1920. Kappa Sigma. Accepted to faculty 1921. FRANCIS C. PRAY Assistant College Editor Born 1909. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1931. M.S. Massa- chusetts State College, 1932. Phi Sigma Kappa. Accepted to faculty 1934. MARGARET HAMLIN, B.A. Placement Officer for Women B.A. Smith College, 1904. Accepted to faculty 1913. Pray, Emery. . .Miss Hamlin, Glatt ' elter. . .Wood 4. il I IN RECOGNITION This year marks the retirement of two of the outstanding men on campus; one from the faculty, Dr. Joseph S. Chamberlain, Goessman Professor of Chemistry; the other from the administration, Treasurer Fred C. Kenney. Born in 1870 on a middle western farm. Professor Chamberlain graduated in 1890 from Iowa Agricultural College. After being graduate assistant at his alma mater for five years, he took advantage of winter vacations to study chemistry at Johns Hopkins University where he received a scholarship and fellowship. In 1889 he received the degree of Ph.D. for an investigation in organic chemistry. Years spent as a chemistry instructor and a research assistant and years in the Bureau of Chemistry in Washington and a year in Germany with the noted Emil Abderholden, led to his appointment to the M.A.C. chemistry staff in 1909. His achievements are many. He has written two texts on chemistry. He is a councillor of the A.C.S. and a fellow in the American Association for the Advance- ment of Science. From 1928 to 1934 he was he ad of the Chemistry department, be- sides being professor of organic chemistry. From 1934 to the present he has been Goessman Professor of Chemistry. But he was not the cold scientist in his thirty-one years at " Aggie " and State. He has always shown a deep interest in the success of all students with whom he has come in contact, offering advice and encouragement. With a record as lengthy and serviceable. Treasurer Kenney has also retired this year. Born of pioneer stock in Michigan in 1869, he has lived a full life. In the course of time he has been affiliated with the U.S. Army, the M. N. Railroad, Michigan Agricultural College and finally State College. The College owes Treasurer Kenney a tribute for his good judgment of char- acter, his accurate and methodical work, and his shrewd business sense. Mr. Kenney ' s farewell banquet. . .Let " Shorty " do it. THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTr St IN MEMORIAM A true " Son of Old Massachusetts, " a member of the class of ' 83 who has seen the college grow to many times its original size, Dr. Joseph B. Lindsay has been fondly called " Joe Lindsey " by students and colleagues for the forty years of his life at Massachusetts State College. While an undergraduate, he was vice-president of the Washington Irving Society which grew into the present Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity. A favorite student of Professor Goessmann back in ' 83, he completed his studies at Gottingen, Germany, and in 1911 was designated Goessmann Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. Since then, he has continued teaching on campus. No one connected with the College in 1892 or for forty years thereafter has failed to know Joe Lindsey, if only by reputation. His personality will stand out among his fellow professors. In the words of Cicero, " he was an eloquent man who treated humble subjects with delicacy, lofty things impressively, and moderate things temperately. " In terms of the advance of State College his name will never be totally forgotten. As a scientist and research worker, his fame likewise has long been established and his unceasing industry will in years serve as an inspiration to bud- ding chemists. His death last year marked a long and useful life. 23 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX PROFESSORS EMERITI JOHN C. GRAHAM, B.S. Professor of Poultry Husbandry, Emeritus B.S. Wisconsin University. 1911. Fellow, Poultry Science Associa- tion, 193o. Professor Emeritus 1938. Accepted to faculty 1911. HENRY T. FERNALD, Ph.D. Professor of Entomology, Emeritus Born 1866. B.S. University of Maine, 1885. Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, 1890. Accepted to faculty 1890. Professor Emeritus 1930. Beta Theta Pi, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa. FRED W. MORSE, M.S. Research Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus Born 1865. B.S. Worcester Polytechnical Institute, 1887. M.S. Wor- cester Polytechnical Institute, 1900. Accepted to faculty 1910. Research Professor of Chemistrj ' , Emeritus, 1935. Phi Beta Kappa. FRED C. SEARS, M.S. Professor of Pomology, Emeritus Born 1866. B.S. Kansas Agricultural College, 189 ' -2. M.S. Kansas Agricultural College, 1896. Honorary Doctor ' s Degree, Kansas State College, 1937. Accepted to faculty 1907. Professor of Pomolo- gy Emeritus, 1936. Phi Kappa Phi. FRANK A. WAUGH, M.S. Professor of Landscape Architecture, Emeritus Born 1869. B.S. Kansas State College, 1891. M.S. Kansas State College, D.S. Kansas State College, 1934. L.H.D. University of Vermont, 1934. Accepted to faculty 1902. Professor of Lansdcape Architecture, Emeritus 1939. Kappa Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi. Sears sees Labrador . . . The Grahams relax 1 NINETEEN HUNDRED FORTY j AGRICULTURE VICTOR A. RICE, M.Ao. Profcsnor and Head of the Division of Agriculture Born 1890. B.S. North Carolina State College, 1916. M.Ag. Massa- chusetts State College, WiS. Kappa Alpha, Alpha Zeta, Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 191(i. ROLLIN H. BARRETT, M.S. Professor of Farm Management Born 1891. B.S. Connecticut State College, 1918. M.S. Cornell Uni- versity, 19 ' -26. Accepted to faculty 19 ' 26. WALTER S. EISENMENGER, Ph.D. Research Professor of Agronomy and Head of the Department Born 1887. B.S. Bucknell University, igi . M.S. Bucknell Univer- sity, 1916. A.M., Ph.D. Columbia University, 19 26. American So- ciety of Agronomy, American Association of Plant Physiologists. Lambda Chi Alpha, Sigma Xi, Accepted to faculty 1931. JULIUS H. FRANDSEN, M.S. Professor of Dairy Industry and Head of the Department Born 1877. B.S. Iowa State College, 190-2. M.S. Iowa State College, 1904. Phi Kappa Phi, Gamma Sigma Delta. Accepted to faculty 19 ' -26. ADRIAN H. LINDSEY, Ph.D. Professor of Agricultural Economics and Farm Management and Head of the Department Born 1897. B.S. University of Illinois, 19 ' 2-2. M.S. Iowa State College. 9i5. Ph.D. Iowa State College, 19 ' 29. Pi Gamma Mu, Alpha Gam- ma Rho. Accepted to faculty 19 " 29. RAYMOND T. PARKHURST, Ph.D. Professor of Poultry Husbandry and Head of the Department Born 1898. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1919. M.S. Univer- sity of Idaho, 1936. Ph.D. University of Edinburgh, 1932. Sigma Xi, Kappa Sigma. Accepted to faculty 1938. Victor A. Rice Barrett, Lindsey, Planting. . .Frandsen, Mack, Lindquist. . .Thayer, Eiseumenger r ■ft 25 L L E G E I AGRICULTURE WILLIAM C. SANCTUARY, M.S. Professor of Poultry Ihishandry Born 1888. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 191». M.S. Massa- chusetts State College, 1932. Phi Delta Kappa, Theta Chi. Ac- cepted to faculty 1922. LUTHER BANTA. B.S. Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry Born 1893. B.S. Cornell University, 1915. Sigma Pi, Lambda Gam- ma Delta. Accepted to faculty 1918. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON, M.S. Assistant Professor of Agronomy Born 1888. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1910. M.S. Massa- chusetts State College, 1936. Phi Sigma Kappa, A.A.A.S., American Society of Agronomy. MARION E. ENSMINGER, M.A. Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry Born 1908. B.S. University of Missouri, 1931. M.A. University of Missouri, 1932. Alpha Zeta, Lambda Gamma Delta, Block and Bridle Club. Accepted to facultj ' 1937. RICHARD C. FOLEY, M.S. Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry Born 1906. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1927. M.S. Massa- chusetts State College. 1931. Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Phi Epsilon. Accepted to faculty 1932. HARRY G. LINDQUIST, M.S. AssiMant Professor of Dairy Industry Born 1895. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1922. M.S. University of Maryland. 1924. Accepted to faculty 1927. Banta, Sanctuary . . . Dickinson . . . Ensminger, Foley 1 AGRICULTURE MERRILL J. MACK, M.S. Axxi.itaiit I ' rofc.t.sor of Dairi ludustrij Born li)() ' 2. B.S. Pennsylvania State College, 19 2,3. M.S. Lhiivensity of Wisconsin, 19 2.5. .Mpha Zeta, Pgi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi. Accepted to faculty 1925. CLARENCE H. PARSONS, M.S. Assistant Professor of Animal Iliishandn and Superintendent of Farm Born 190-1. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1927. M.S. Massa- chusetts State College, 1933. Phi Kappa Phi, Adelphia, Q.T.V. Ac- cepted to faculty 1931. CHARLES H. THAYER Assistant Professor of Agronomy Born 188-1. Accepted to faculty 1919. JOHN N. EVERSON, M.S. Instructor of Agronomy Born 1887. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1910. M.S. Massa- chusetts State College, 193o. American Chemical Society. Accepted to faculty 1936. JOSEPH F. HAUCK, M.S. Instructor of Agricultural Engineering and Farm Management Born 1911. B.S. Rutgers University, 1936. M.S. Rutgers University, 1937. Alpha Zeta. Accepted to faculty 1937. JOHN H. VONDELL Instrucior of Poultry Husbandry and Plant Superintendent Born 1898. Poultry Science Association. Accepted to facultj ' 1929. JOHN M. ZAK, M.S. Instructor of Agronomy Born 191-t. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1936. M.S. Massa- chusetts State College, 1937. Associate Sigma Xi. Accepted to faculty 1938. Everson, Zak . . . Parkhurst, Vondell . . . Parsons 27 ' ? MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX ENGINEERING CHRISTIAN I. GUNNESS, B.S. Professor of Engineering and Head of Department Born 1882. B.S. North Dakota Agricultural College, 1907. Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1914. MINER J. MARKUSON, B.S. Assistant Professor of Engineering Born 1896. B.S. in Architecture, University of Minnesota, 1923. Accepted to faculty 1925. WILLIAM H. TAGUE, B.S. Assistant Professor of Argicultural Engineering Born 1892. B.S. in AgriciJtural Engineering, Iowa State College, 1924. Accepted to faculty 1929. GEORGE A. MARSTON, M.S. Assistant Professor of Mathematics Born 1908. B.S. in Civil Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Insti- tute, 1930. M.S. State University of Iowa, 1933. Sigma Xi, Lambda Chi Alpha. Accepted to faculty 1933. JOHN B. NEWLON Instructor of Agricultural Engineering Born 1884. Accepted to faculty 1919. GEORGE F. PUSHEE Instructor of Agricultural Engineering Born 1887. Accepted to faculty 1916. Marston, Tague, Markuson . . . Newlon, Pushee Ht HOME ECONOMICS EDNA L. SKINNER, M.A. Professor, Head of Division of Home Economics and Advisor of Women B.S. Teacher ' s College, Columbia ITniversity, 1908. M.A. Teacher ' s College. Columbia University, lO ' iS. M.Ed., Honorary, Michigan State Normal College, 19 ' 2 ' -2. Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1919. HELEN S. MITCHELL, Ph.D. Research Professor of Home Economics B.A. Mount Holyoke College, 1917. Ph.D. Yale University, 1931. Sigma Xi, Phi Beta Kappa, Iota Sigma Pi. Accepted to faculty 1935. HELEN KNOWLTON, M.A. Associate Professor of Home Economics A.B. Mount Holyoke College, 1903. M.A. Teachers College, 19 ' 2-1. Accepted to faculty 193-t. SARA M. COOLIDGE, M.S. Assistant Professor of Home Economics B.S. Michigan State College, 1924. M.S. Michigan State College, 19 ' -27. Sigma Xi. Accepted to faculty 1935. MILDRED BRIGGS, M.S. Assistant Professor of Home Economics B.A. DePauw University, 1920. M.S. Iowa State College, 1925. Kappa Alpha Theta. Accepted to faculty 1931. GLADYS M. COOK, M.S. Instructor of Home Economics B.S. Battle Creek College, 1934. M.S. Massachusetts State College, 193C. Accepted to faculty 1936. ANNE W. WERTZ, A.B. Research Assistant of Home Economics B.A. Connecticut College for Women, 1935. Accepted to faculty 1939. Edna L. Skinner Dr. Mitchell, Mrs. Cook. . .Mrs. Coolidge. . .Miss Briggs HORTICULTURE Ralph A. YanMeter RALPH A. VAN METER, Ph.D. Professor of Pomology. Head of Department of Pomology, Head of Division of Horticulture Born 1893. B.S. Ohio State University, 1917. M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1930. Ph.D. Cornell University, 1930. Delta Theta Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1917. LYLE L. BLUNDELL. B.S. Professor of Horticulture Born 1897. B.S. Iowa State College, 19 24. Gamma Sigma Delta. Accepted to faculty 1931. WALTER W. CHENOWETH, B.S. Agr. Professor and Head of Department of Horticultural Manufactures Born 1871. A.B. Valparaiso University, 1902. B.S. Agr. Missouri LTniversity, 1912. Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, Alpha Zeta. Accepted to facultv 1912. CARL R. FELLERS, Ph.D. Research Professor of Horticultural Manufactures Born 1893. A.B. Cornell University, 1915. M.S. Rutgers University, 1917. Ph.D. Rutgers University, 1917. Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Lambda Upsilon, Theta Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1925. ARTHUR P. FRENCH, M.S. Professor of Pomology and Plant Breeding Born 1895. B.S. Ohio State University, 1921. M.S. Massachusetts State College. 1923. Alpha Tau Omega, Alpha Zeta, Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi. Accepted to faculty 1921. Born 187 ARTHUR K. HARRISON Professor of Landscape Architecture Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Accepted to faculty 1911. ROBERT P. HOLDSWORTH, M.F. Professor and Head of Department of Forestry Born 1890. B.S. Michigan State College, 1911. M.F. Yale Univer- sity, 1928. Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Gamma Rho, Society of Am. For- esters. Accepted to faculty 1930. Maclinn, Tucker, Fellers, Chenoweth . . . Trippensee, Holdsworth . . . Robertson, Harrison y [30] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY St HORTICULTURE GRANT B. SNYDER. M.S. Profcsnur of Olericulture and Head of Department Born 1899. ij.S.A. Ontario Agricultural Coliege, Wii. M.S. Michi- gan State College, 19 ' 28. American Society for Horticultural Science, American Society of Plant Physiologists. Accepted to faculty 1923. CLARK L. THAYER, B.S. Professor and Head of Department of Floriculture Born 1890. B.S. Mas.sachusetts State College, 1913. Alpha Gamma Rho, Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Alpha Xi, Adelphia. Accepted to faculty 1919. REUBEN E. TRIPPENSEE, Ph.D. Professor of Wildlife Management Born 1894. B.S. Michigan State College. 1920. M.S. University of Michigan, 1933. Ph.D. University of Michigan, 193-1. Alpha Zeta, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Sigma, Sigma Xi. Accepted to faculty 1936. RAYMOND H. OTTO, M.L.A. Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Temporary Head of Department of Landscape Architecture Born 190,5. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1926. M.L.A. Har- vard Graduate School of Landscape Architecture, 1929. American Society of Landscape Architecture. Accepted to faculty 1938. JOHN A. CLAGUE. Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Horticulture Manufactures Born 1905. B.S. LTniversity of Washington, 1929. M.S. Massachu- setts State College, 1931. Ph.D. Massachusetts State College, 1935. Pi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1936. SAMUEL C. HUBBARD Assistant Professor of Floriculture Born 1890. Accepted to faculty 1921. J. HARRY RICH, M.F. Assistant Professor of Forestry Born 1888. B.S. New York State College of Forestry, 1913. M.F. New York State College of Forestry, 1936. Sigma Xi, Pi Kappa Alpha. Accepted to facidty 1933. Thayer, Ross, Hubbard . . . Tuttle, Snyder, Lachman . . . Rhodes, Rich, Morehead 31 z HORTICULTURE OLIVER C. ROBERTS, B.S. Assistant Professor of Pomology Born 1895. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1919. Theta Chi. Accepted to faculty 1926. JAMES ROBERTSON, JR., B.A. Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture Born 1906. B.A. Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1930. Accepted to faculty 1930. ALDEN P. TUTTLE, M.S. Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening Born 1906. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1928. M.S. Pennsyl- vania State College, 1930. Gamma Sigma Delta. Accepted to fac- ulty 1930. JAMES D. CURTIS, M.F. Instructor of Forestry Born 190.5. B.A. University of British Columbia, 1929. B.A.Sc. University of British Columbia, 1930. M.F. Harvard University, 1934. Alpha Delta Phi. Accepted to faculty 1935. WILLIAM H. LACHMAN, M.S. Instructor of Olericulture Born 1912. B.S. Pennsylvania State College, 1934. M.S. Pennsyl- vania State College, 1936. Gamma Sigma Delta, Pi Alpha Xi. Ac- cepted to faculty 1936. WALTER A. MACLINN, Ph.D. Instructor of Horticultural Manufactures Born 1911. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1933. M.S. Massa- chusetts State College, 1935. Ph.D. Massachusetts State College, 1938. Theta Chi, Sigma Xi. Accepted to faculty 1936. DONALD E. ROSS, B.S. Greenhouse Foreman and Instructor of Floriculture Born 1896. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1925. Alpha Gamma Rho. Accepted to faculty 1928. Martini . . . Otto . . . Roberts, French . . . Traraposch . . . Blundell n » Horticulture continued LIBERAL ARTS EMIL J. TRAMl ' OSCII, 15.S. Iiiniruclor of Uitrticultiirc Born 1913. U.S. Massachusetts State Collt-ge, 193.5. Adelphia. Ac- cepted to faculty 1937. EFGENE R. MARTINI, B.F.A. Iiislnicti r of Landscape Architecture Born 191,5. B.F.. .. Uiiiversitv of Illinois, 1939. Phi Eta Sigma. Ac- cepted to faculty 1939. ARNOLD D. RHODES. M.F. Instructor of Forestnj Born 191 2. B.S. University of New Hampshire. 1931.. M.F. Yale University School of Forestry, 1937. Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, Phi Sigma, Alpha Tau Omega. Accepted to facility 1939. Liberal Arts ALEXANDER A. MACKIMMIE, M.A. Professor of History, Head of Department of History and Sociology, and Head of Division of Liberal Arts Born 1878. A.B. Princeton University, 1906. M.A. Columbia Uni- versity, 1914. Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to facultv 1908. ALEXANDER E. CANCE, Ph.D. Professor of Economics and Head of Department Born 1874. A.B. Macalester, 1896. M.A. University of Wisconsin, 1906. Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, 1908. Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Sigma Phi. Accepted to faculty 1908. HARRY N. CLICK. Ph.D. Professor of Psychology Born 1885. A.B. Bridgewater College. 1913. A.M. Northwestern University, 1914. Ph.D. University of Illinois, 19 ' 23. Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Delta Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi. Accepted to faculty 1923. ARTHUR N. JULIAN, A.B. Professor of German Born 1885. A.B. Northwestern University, 1907. Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Gamma Delta. Accepted to faculty 1911. Alexander A. Mackimmie Lyie, Ellert, .Julian. . Glick, Neet . . .Prince, Goldberg, Troy, Rand 4. 33 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE IND I LIBERAL ARTS WALTER E. PRINCE, A.M. Professor of English Born 1881. Ph.B. Brown University, 1904. A.M. Brown University. 1905. Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1912. FRANK P. RAND, M.A. Professor of English. Head of Department of Languages and Literature Born 1889. A.B. Williams, 1912. M.A. Amherst, 1915. Phi Sigma Kappa, Delta Sigma Rho, Phi Kappa Phi, Adelphia. Accepted to faculty 1911.. WINTHROP S. WELLES, M.Ed. Professor of Education, Head of Department of Education and Psy- chology Born 1875. B.S. University of Illinois, 1901. M.Ed. Harvard Univer- sity, 1929. Phi Delta Kappa, Sigma Phi Epsilon. Accepted to faculty 1919. WILLIAM G. VINAL. Ph.D. Professor of Nature Education Born 1881. B.S. Harvard College, 1906. A.M. Harvard, 1907. Ph.D. Brown University, 1924. Sigma Xi. Accepted to faculty 1937. CHARLES F. FRAKER, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Modern Languages Born 1888. A.B. Colorado College, 1919. M.A. Harvard University, 1920. Ph.D. Harvard University, 1930. Accepted to faculty 1931. STOWELL C. CODING, A.M. Associate Professor of French and Music Born 1904. A.B. Dartmouth College, 1925. A.M. Harvard Univer- sity, 1927. Phi Beta Kappa, Kappa Phi Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Sigma Phi, Gamma Delta Epsilon. Accepted to faculty 1927. THEODORE C. CALDWELL, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of History and Sociology Born 1904. B.A. College of Wooster, 1925. M.A. Harvard Univer- sity, 1926. Ph.D. Yale University, 1934. Accepted to faculty 1935. Coding, Fraker . . . Caldwell, Cary . . . Cutler 34 ■J THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY LIBERAL ARTS HAROLD W. GARY, Ph.D. A.sni.stant Profeasor hi Ili.flori Born 1903. A.B. Williams College, 19-25. A.M. Harvard University, 19 ' -2(). Ph.D. Yale University, 1938. Accepted to faculty 1933. FREDERICK M. CUTLER. Ph.D. A.ssistaiit Professor of History and Sociology Born 187,5. A.B. Columbia. 189.5. B.D. Columbia, ' 1898. Ph.D. Clark University, 192 ' i. Pi Gamma Mu, Sigma Phi Epsilon. Ac- cepted to faculty 19 ' 26. FREDERICK C. ELLERT, B.S. Assistant Professor of German Born 1905. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1930. Adelphia. Ac- cepted to faculty 1930. PHILIP L. GAMBLE, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Economics B.S. Wesleyan, 1928. M.A. Wesleyan. 1929. Ph.D. Cornell, 1933. Sigma Chi, Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1935. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG. Ph.D. AssistayU Professor of English Born 1907. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1928. M.A. Yale LTniversity, 1932. Ph.D. Yale University, 1933. Adelphia, Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Epsilon Pi. Accepted to faculty 1928. VERNON P. HELMING, Ph.D. AssiMant Professor of English Born 190-i. A.B. Carleton College, 1925. Ph.D. Yale University, 1937. Phi Beta Kappa. Accepted to faculty 1933. CLAUDE C. NEET, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology Born 1905. A.B. University of California, 1930. M.A. Clark Uni- versity, 1932. Ph.D. Clark LTniversitv. 1935. Accepted to faculty 1935. ALBERT W. PURVIS, Ed.D. Assistant Professor of Education Born 1903. A.B. University of New Brunswick. 1931. Ed.M. Har- vard University, 1935. Ed.D. Harvard LTniversity, 1938. Accepted to faculty 1936. Gamble, Colwell, Cance. . .Sharp, Alviani. . .Dubois, Miss Horrigan, Helming Goo: rffiNB S p J ,X FOrIectJ sake FoksBARE, 4L 35 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX J LIBERAL ARTS CHARLES J. ROHR Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Political Economy Born 190.5. Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, 1931. Kappa Alpha. Accepted to faculty 1937. HAROLD W. SMART, A.B. Assisfa7it Professor of Lair and Economics Born 1895. LL.B. Boston University, 1918. A.B. Amherst College, 19 ' -2 t. Phi Delta Phi, Delta Sigma Rho, Kappa Epsilon, Adelphia. Accepted to faculty 19 23. FREDERICK S. TROY, M.A. Assista7it Professor of English Born 1909. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1931. M.A. Amherst College, 1935. Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1931. DORIC J. ALVIANI, Mus.B. Instructor of Music Born 1913. Mus.B. Boston University, 1937. Accepted to faculty 1938. RICHARD M. COLWELL, M.S. Instructor of Economics Born 1913. B.S. Rhode Island State College, 1935. M.S. Rhode Island State College, 1937. Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Tau Gamma. Ac- cepted to faculty 1937. CLYDE W. DOW, M.S. lusfructor of Languages and Literature Born 1907. B.L.I. Enurson College, 1931. M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1937. Phi Alpha Tau. Accepted to faculty 1937. CHARLES N. DUBOIS, M.A. Instructor in English Born 1910. A.B. Middlebury College, 193i. M.A. Middlebury Col- lege 1935. Phi Beta Kappa, Kappa Delta Rho, Kappa Phi Kappa, Pi Delta Epsilon. Accepted to facultj ' 1937. LEONTA G. HORRIGAN, B.S. Imtructor of English Born 1914. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1936. Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1936. Rohr, Smart . . Welles. . . Varlev, Hannum, Dow 36 St PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Liberal Arts continued C. COLLIS LYLE. Jr., M.A. Instrucfor of German and Latin Born 1912. A.B. Cornell University, VJ ' .iS. M.A. Cornell T ' liiversity, 1934. Accepted to faculty 193.5. H. LELAND V.VRI.EY, A.M. In sir Ill-tor of Lani iKu i:-.- and Literature Born 1910. A.B. Wesloyan University-. 1934. A.M. Wesleyan Uni- versity, 193j. . .ccei)ted to faculty 1938. DAVID A. SHARP, Jr., B.D. Director of Religion Born 1913. B.A. AVilliam Jewell College, 1933. B.D. Andover New- ton Theological School, 1938. Accepted to faculty 1939. Physical and Biological Sciences CLARENCE E. GORDON, Ph.D. Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. Head of Department of Geology Head of Dirision of Plii siral and Biological Sciences Born 1870. B ' .S. IMassaciinsctts State College, 1901. B.Sc. Bo.ston University, 1903. X. ' Sl. Columbia University, 1906. Ph.D. Columbia University, 1911. Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, Fellow A,A.A.S. Ac- cepted to faculty 1906. CHARLES P. ALEXANDER, Ph.D. Professor of Entomology and Acting Head of Department Born 1889. B.S. Cornell University, 1913. Ph.D. Cornell University, 1918. Alpha Gamma Rho, Gamma Alpha, Adelphia, Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1922. LEON A. BRADLEY, Ph.D. Professor of Bacteriology Born 1896. B.S. Wesleyan University, 1922. Ph.D. Yale University, 1925. Beta Theta Pi, Sigma Xi. Accepted to faculty 1925. G. CHESTER CRAMPTON, Ph.D. Professor of Insect Morphology Born 1881. A.B. Princeton L ' niversity, 1904. M.S. Harvard Univer- sity 1901. M.A. Cornell University, 1905. Ph.D. Berlin University, 1908. Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Ac- cepted to faculty 191 1. Clarence E. Gordon Serex, Peters, Ritchie. . .Bradley, Miss Garvey. . .Sweetman, Alexander, Crampton - . 37 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 1 6jcAPITULAT£r I GEOKGE E. GAGE, Ph.D. Professor of Bacteriology and Physiology, Head of Department Born 1884. B.A. Clark University, 1906. A.M. Yale University, 1907- Ph.D. Yale University, 1909. Kappa Phi, Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1913. JOHN B. LENTZ. V.M.D. Professor of Veterinary Science and Head of Departme7it Born 1887. A.B. Franklin and Marshall College, 1908. V.M.D. Uni- versity of Pennsylvania. Wl-l. Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Sigma Kappa. Accepted to faculty 1916. A. VINCENT OSMUN, M.S. Professor of Botany and Head of Department Born 1880. B.Agr. Connecticut State College, 1900. B.S. Massa- chusetts State College, 1903. B.S. Boston University, 1903. M.S. Massachusetts State College, 190o. Q.T.V., Phi Kappa Phi. Ac- cepted to faculty 1905. CHARLES A. PETERS, Ph.D. Professor of Inorganic and Soil Chemistry Born 1875. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1897. B.S. Boston University. 1897. Ph.D. Yale University, 1901. Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Sigma Phi. Accepted to faculty 1911. WALLACE F. POWERS, Ph.D. Professor of Physics and Head of Department Born 1889. A.B. Clark University, 1910. A.M. Clark University, 1911. Ph.D. Clark University, 1914. Alpha Sigma Alpha, Sigma Xi. Accepted to faculty 1925. WALTER S. RITCHIE, Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry and Head of Department Born 1892. B.S.Agr. Ohio State University, 1916. A.M. University of Missouri, 1918. Ph.D. University of Missouri, 1922. Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Chi Sigma. Delta Tau Delta. Accepted to faculty 1934. Gage, Blair, Packard. . .Osmun, Clark, Davis. . .Lentz 1 38 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY St PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES RAY E. TORREY, Pii.I). Professor of Botaiiij Born 1887. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1912. M.A. Harvard Fniversitv. 1918. Ph.D. Harvard University. 1918. Accepted to facultv 191!). ORTON L. CLARK, B.S. Associate Professor of Botany Born 1887. B.S. Massachusetts State College. 1908. Phi Sigrna Kappa. Accepted to faculty 1913. FRANK C. MOORE, A.B. Associate Professor of Mathematics Born 1879. A.B. Dartmouth College, 190-2. Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Chi Phi. Accepted to faculty 1918. PAUL SEREX, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Chemistry Born 1890. B.Sc. Massachusetts State College, 1913. M.Sc.Massa- chusetts State College, 1916. Ph.D. Massachusetts State College, 19 ' 23. Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1913. GEORGE Y. ALDERMAN, B.A. Assistant Professor of Physics Born 1898. A.B. Williams College, 19-21. Accepted to faculty 19 ' 26. ALLEN E. ANDERSEN. Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics Born 1899. A.B. University oif Nebraska, 1923. M.A. University of Nebraska. 1924. Ph.D. Harvard University, 1934. Sigma Xi. Ac- cepted to faculty 1937. HAROLD D. BOUTELLE. Ch.E. Assistant Professor of Mathematics Born 1898. B.S. Worcester Polytechnical Institute, 1920. Ch.E. Worcester Polytechnical Institute, 1922. Accepted to faculty 1926. RICHARD W. FESSENDEN, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry Born 1902. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1926. M.S. Massa- chusetts State College, 1928. Ph.D. Columbia L niversity, 1931. Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Lambda L ' psilon, Sigma Xi. Accepted to faculty 1931. Torrey, Ewer. . .Moore, Miller, Boutelle. . Parrott, Fessenden 4L 39 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MARY E. GARVEY, B.S. Assistant Professor of Bacteriology B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1919. Accepted to faculty 1935. CLINTON V. MacCOY, Ph.D. Assist ant Professor of Zoology and Entomology Born 1905. A.B. Harvard University, 1928. A.M. Harvard Univer- sity. 1934. Ph.D. Harvard University, 1934. Gamma Alpha. Ac- cepted to faculty 1939. WALTER McK. MILLER, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics Born 1896. Ph.B. Lafavette College, 1918. M.A. Pennsvlvania State College, 1923. Ph.D. University of Illinois, 1927. Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi. Accepted to facultj 1935. RANSOM C. PACKARD, M.S. Assistant Professor of Bacteriology Born 1886. B.S.A. University of Toronto, 1911. M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1933. Accepted to faculty 1927. HARVEY L. SWEETMAN, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Entomology Born 1896. B.S. Colorado State College, 1923. M.S. Iowa State College, 1925. Ph.D. Massachusetts State College, 1930. Alpha Zeta, Alpha Gamma Rho, Gamma Sigma Delta, Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1930. GILBERT L. WOODSIDE, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology Born 1909. B.A. DePauw University, 1932. M.A. Harvard Univer- sity, 1933. Ph.D. Harvard University, 1936. Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi. Accepted to faculty 1936. JOHN H. BLAIR, M.A. Instructor of Physiology and Hygiene Born 1915. B.A. Wesleyan University, 1937. M.A. Weslej ' an Uni- versitv, 1939. Sigma Xi, Delta Kappa Epsilon. Accepted to faculty 1939. ' Vinal. . .McCoy. . .Woodside I THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES SETII J. EWER. I ' ll. I). Iiistnictnr of Boiainj Burn 1 !)().■). U.S. Massachusetts State College. 1938. M.S. University iif Illinois, 1930. Ph.D. Rutgers University, 1934. Accepted to faculty 1938. C.VLVIN S. H.ANNUM, M,S. Inntnictor of Mathcmaiics Born 1914. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1936. M.S. Massa- chusetts State College, 1938. Adelphia, Kappa Sigma. Accepted to faculty 1938. ERNEST M. PARROT, Ph.D. Instructor of Chemistry Born 1903. B.S. Union University, 19 ' -27. M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1933. Ph.D. University of Missouri, 1938. Phi Kappa Phi, Gamma Sigma Epsilon, Sigma Xi. Accepted to facultj- 1931. YILLIAM H. ROSS, Ph.D. Instructor of Phi sics Born 1909. B.A. Amherst College, 1929. M.. . Amherst College, 1930. Ph.D. Yale University, 1934. Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, Phi Delta Theta. Accepted to faculty 1933. FRANK R. SHAW, Ph.D. Instructor of Entomology and Beekeeping Born 1908. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1931. Ph.D. Cornell University, 1936. Sigma Xi. Phi Kappa Phi. Accepted to faculty 1935. MARION E. SMITH, Ph.D. Technical AssistaJit in Entomology Born 1913. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1935. M.S. Massa- chusetts State College, 1936. Ph.D. University of Illinois, 1938. Phi Kappa Phi. Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, Alpha Lambda Mu. Accepted to faculty 1938. Ross, Powers, Alderman, Minzner . . . Dr. Traver, Dr. Smith . . . Swenson, Andersen 41. 41 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical and Biolosical Sciences — continued JOHN D. SWENSON, M.A. Instructor of Mathematics Born 1909. B.S. New York University, 1932. M.A. Columbia Uni- versity, 1936. Accepted to faculty 1936, JAY R. TRAVER, Ph.D. Instructor of Zoology Born 1894. B.A. Cornell University. 1918. M.A. Cornell University, 1919. Ph.D. Cornell University, 1931. Sigma Xi, Sigma Delta Ep- silon. Accepted to faculty 1938. Physical Education CURRY S. HICKS, M.Ed. Professor of Physical Education and Head of the Division of Physical Education Born 1885. B.Ed. Michigan State Normal College, 1909. M.Ed. Michigan State Normal College. 1924. Accepted to faculty 1911. ,cTv HAROLD M. GORE, B.S. Professor of Physical Education and Head of the Physical Education Departmeni for Men Born 1891. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1913. Q.T.V., Adel- phia. Accepted to facultj ' 1913. ELBERT F. CARAWAY, B.S. of A. Professor of Physical Education Born 1905. B.S. of A. Purdue University, 1930. Lambda Chi Alpha. Accepted to faculty 1936. Shaw. . .Miss Philbin, Dr. Thoroman. . .Gore, Ball 42 ' THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Ht PHYSICAL EDUCATION ERNEST J. RAUCLIFFE, M.D. Professor of Uijgienc and Head of the Department of Student Health Born 1898. M.D. ITniversity of Toronto, 19-23. Phi Rho Sigma. Ac- cepted to faculty 19!27. LAWRENCE E. BRIGGS, B.S. Assistant Professor of Physical Education Born 1903. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 19-27. Theta Chi. Accepted to faculty 19-27. Curry S. Hicks LLEWELLYN L. DERBY Assistant Professor of Physical Education Bom 1893. Accepted to faculty 1916. MARGARET R. THOROMAN, M.D. Assistant Professor of Hygiene Born 1901. R.N. Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, 19-25. A.B. Indiana University, 1932. M.D. Indiana University, 1935. Nu Sigma Phi. Accepted to faculty 1934. ETHEL B. PURNELL, B.S. Physical Director for Women Born 1910. B.S.Massachusetts State College, 1934. Delta Phi Kappa, Phi Zeta. Accepted to faculty 1934. Radcliffe. . .Briggs. . .Mrs. Puruell, Miss Callahan ■ft [43] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I PHYSICAL EDUCATION LORIN BALL, B.S. Instructor of Physical Education Born 1898. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1931. Q.T.V. Ac- cepted to faculty 1921. KATHLEEN CALLAHAN. A.B. Instructor of Physical Education for Women Born 1910. A.B. West Virginia University, 1929. Certificate of Hygiene and Physical Education, Wellesley College, 1931. Orchesis, Chi Omega. Accepted to faculty 1937. WILHO FRIGARD, M.S. Instructor of Physical Education Born 1912. B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1934. M.S. Massa- chusetts State College, 1938. Phi Kappa Phi, Adelphia, Lambda Chi Alpha. Accepted to faculty 1936. SIDNEY W. KAUFFMAN, M.Ed. Instructor of Physical Education Born 190-1. B.S. Springfield College, 1931. M.Ed. Springfield Col- lege, 1934. Accepted to faculty 193,5. JOSEPH R. ROGERS, Jr. Instructor of Physical Education Born 1900. Worcester Poli,i;echnic Institute, 1930. Accepted to faculty 1931. Caraway, Frigard. . .Derby, Rogers. . .Kauffman 1 44 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Dt MILITARY SCIENCE DONALD A. YOUNG Major. Camlrij, U.S.A.. Professor of MilUanj Science and Taclic. ' s, and Head of Department Both 1888. B.S. University of Maine. 191-1. M.S. Norwich Univer- sity. 19 ' 29. U.S. Cavalry ' Troop Officers Course. 19 ' -24. U.S. Ad- vanced Course, 1930. Accepted to faculty 1939. HAROLD P. STEWART Major. Cavalry. U.S.A., Asswtant Professor of Military Science and Tactics Born 1893. Lnited States Ordnance School. 19 25. L ' nited States Cavalry School, 19 ' 27. United States Command and General Staff School, " 1936. Accepted to faculty 1936. H. JORDAN THEIS Captain, Cavalry, U.S.A., Instructor of Military Science and Tactics Born 190 2. B.S. United States Military Academy, 1924. United States Cavalry School, Fort Riley, Kansas, 1929-1930. Accepted to faculty 1939. FRANK CRONK Staf Sergeant, U.S.A., Instructor of Military Science and Tactics Born 1894. Accepted to faculty 1921. ROY TANNER Staff Sergeant, U.S.A., Instructor of Military Science and Tactics. Born 1885. Accepted to faculty 1923. Young. . .Stuart, Theis. . .Cronk, Tanner 41. 45 z MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX SENIOR CLASS In September 1939, 230 men and women registered as seniors at State ; perhaps 220 of them will graduate in June 1940. They are all that are left of the more than 300 who first entered the college in September 1936. When they came in 1936 they represented col- lectively, though they were completely unconscious of that fact, a good cross-section of the youth of Massachusetts. Somewhat more ambitious than the average high school graduate, and gifted with a slightly higher intelligence, they came to take advantage of the low- cost education which the Commonwealth was offering in Amherst. From the cities and from the country they came; from Lawrence, and Brockton and Lynn and Holyoke; from Boston and its sub- urban fringes, from Connecticut Valley and Berkshire Hill farms they came. Most of them came from middle-class homes, of non- college-educated parents. Most of them expected to earn part of their own college expenses. The more determined and more clever of them have stayed and will get their diplomas in 1940. Some of them have managed to avoid getting the education for which they came; at the other extreme, some students have seized every modi- cum of the education made available (yet, as they approach gradu- ation, realize how little educated they actually are in the face of the vast and confused field of modern knowledge). Whatever college has or has not done for them, here they are on the following pages, representing the youth of Massachusetts — the Seniors of Massa- chusetts State College. " You can ' t live without ' em " . . .Esoteric serology students. . . " Boots, boots, boots! " . [46] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Norwood, Miss Leete, Reagan, Hager, Miss Malm President Secretary Myron Hager Irma Malm Vice-president Captain Kay Leete Lawrence Reagan Treasurer Sergeant-at-Arms Louis Norwood Leo Santucci OFFICERS Seminar Studies. . .Fatal Opeiaticii, .At last, we made it! SYDNEY SCHEIE ABRAHAMS BETTY VIGNES ABRAMS MARIO PAUL ALFIERI ERMA STUART ALVORD JEAN MARIE ARCHIBALD GEORGE LEONARD ATWATER MILDRED MARION BAK ANNA MATILDA BANUS 1 [48] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY GEOFFREY HAMILTON BEAMES BERNARD JAMES BEAGARIE MARY ELIZABETH BATES BERYL HAZEL BARTON RICHARD FRANKLIN BLAKE DEANE ALLEN BEYTES ROBERT HAROLD BERNSTEIN ROBERT LORENZO BENEMELIS JOHN EDWARD BLASKO HARRIS BLAUER EARL KENNETH BOWEN RICHARD NORMAN BOWLER LOUISE BOWMAN GLENN DAVID BOYD MARIE TULL.MER BRADSHAW ROGER WHITTEMORE BROWN, JR. 1 [50] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY » MILLICENT CARPENTER HERBERT VANE BURNS MORRIS H. BURAKOFF JAMES BERNARD BUCKLEY, JR. ROBERT MORGAN CHAPMAN HAZEL RUTH CHAPIN MELVIN HAROLD CHALFEN LEO GARY CARROLL 4L 51 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX EDITH MARJORIE CLARK ISADORE COHEN FREDRICK JOHN COLE KATHLEEN FREDA COOPER D. ARTHUR COPSON ANNE CATHERINE CORCORAN DOUGLAS HADFIELD COWLING ROBERT MILLER CRESWELL J THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY St FRANK HERBERT DALTON FRANK ROBERT LEE DALEY, JR. GERALD MICHAEL DAILEY GEORGE MORTON CURRAN ANTONIA SOPHIE DEC IDA BESSIE DAVIS FRANKLIN MILTON DAVIS, JR. GEORGE GODFREY DAVENPORT, JR. 4. [53] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX KATHERINE HAZEL DORAN MARY RITA DOYLE AGNES DUNHAM ROBERT FRANCIS DUNN ROBERT BOWKER EATON RICHARD BOURNE ELBERFELD LAURA VERLIN EVERSON REAETTA BARBARA FARNSWORTH THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY j MARGARET ASQUITH FIRTH JOHN EDWARD FILIOS VERNON LEROY FERWERDA PAUL THOMAS FERRITER WILLIAM GREGORY FOLEY ROBERT THOMAS FOLEY URBAN CYRIL FLEMING GEORGE FRANCIS FLANAGAN 4. 55 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX ? WILLARD OLCOTT FOSTER, JR. BERNARD HYMAN FOX HARVEY FRAM LAWRENCE JOHN FREEMAN VIRGINIA GALE PHILIP CARL GEOFFRION THELMA NELLIE GLAZIER CHARLES LESLIE GLEASON, JR. [56] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY » EVELYN ATHERTON GOULD MARK HAROLD GORDON WILLIAiNI FRANCIS GOODWIN RICHARD RUSSELL GLENDON HAROLD EMORY GRIFFIN, JR. BURTON WILLIAM GREGG SIDNEY GREENBERG -MYRA CAMPBELL GRAVES 4L " SSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I ARTHUR ALEXANDER HAGELSTEIN MYRON DEXTER HAGER FRIEDA LILLIAN HALL JOHN WALTON HALL THOMAS EDWARD HANDFORTH ROBERT HAYES HANLEY MALCOLM BENNETT HARDING, JR. THOMAS WALDO HERRICK, JR. 1 [58] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY It --i ;- ELIZABETH MARGARET HOWE ARTHUR FENNER HO T FRANKLIN HOPKINS RALPH BREWTR HILL ALBIN FELIX IRZYK MARJORIE BUCK IRWIN FREDERICK KENNETH HUGHES HOWARD MASON HOXIE 4l 59 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE I I OLIVE GEORGINA JACKSON PRISCILLA JACOBS JOHN CHESTER JAKOBEK RICHARD HERBERT JAQUITH ELEANOR FRANCES JEWELL ALBERTA MARGARET JOHNSON LOUIS FINGAL JOHNSON MARGERY DEANE JOHNSON [60] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY » FRANCIS BARTHOLOMEW KEVILLE LORETTA CHRISTINE KENNY ROBERT CHARLES KENNEDY ROBERT ARTHUR JOYCE VASILIS LAVRAKAS EVERETT WALTER LANGWORTHY ROSA FRIEDA EMIVIA KOHLS JOHN FORREST KIRSCH 4. 61] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I CATHERINE MARTIN LEETE ROMA DINA LEVY ROGER HURLIN LINDSEY BARBARA LITTLE VIRGINIA CHADWICK LITTLE NANCY ELIZABETH LUCE DONALD JOHN MAHONEY JAMES WALTER MALCOLM THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ft ROBERT ANSEL MARTIN HELEN ALISON MARSHALL CHARLES FRANCIS MANSFIELD IRMA ISABEL MALM CHARLES LEGRO McLAUGHLIN WILLIAM BLAKE McCOWAN GERALD EDWARD McANDREW VICTORIA KATHERINE MATUSZKO 4. [63] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I JOHN EDWARD MERRILL, JR. JOHN CALVIN MILLER CAROLYN EMMA MONK PAUL MORIECE DOROTHY RUTH MORLEY ROY EARL MORSE MAYNARD FOWLE MOSELEY, JR. ROBERT HENRY MOSHER 64] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY » DOMINIC EDWARD NIETUPSKI MICHAEL NEZNAYKO CARL FELIX NELSON RICHARD KENNETH MULLER WILLIAM BROWN NUTTING ARTHUR ALFRED NOYES G. DAVID NOVELLI LEWIS FRANK NORWOOD, JR. DANIEL JOHN O ' CONNELL PRISCILLA MAY OERTEL JOHN RAYMOND O ' NEILL EDWARD ELLIOT OPPENHEIM JOHN VINCENT OSMUN TRACY OMAR PAGE RALPH FRANCIS PALUMBO JAMES WARREN PAYSON, JR. 1 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY :ii KENNETH VERNON PIKE LESTER LEROY PHILLIPS, JR. HELENE ELIZABETH PELISSIER VIRGINIA HELEN PEASE JOHN JOSEPH POWERS CHARLES ARTHUR POWERS, JR. RICHARD JOHN PLICHTA GEORGE THO MAS PITTS, JR. MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX J ESTHER PRATT LAWRENCE HUNNEMAN REAGAN MIA REINAP MELVIN REISMAN KATHERINE LOUISE RICE WILLIAM HENRY RICHARDS, JR. PATRICIA JANE ROBBINS ROGER GILBERT ROBITAILLE 1 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ALFRED HOWARD RUDGE DOROTHY JEAN ROURKE EDWIN MALCOLM ROSSMAN ROBERT RODMAN LEO JOSEPH SANTUCCI JAMES JOSEPH SANDERSON THEODORE SALTZMAN WINSLOW EDWIN RYAN ■ . 69 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX FRANCIS RICHARD SAUNDERS DAVID ALAN SAWYER EVI C. SCHOLZ N. JAMES SCHOONMAKER HENRY MARCUS SCHREIBER JOHN PAUL SEREX EVERETT SHAPIRO DONALD HOUGHTON SHAW [70] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY 3 WILFRED BRIXTON SHEPARDSON DANIEL EDGAR SHEPARDSON ROBERT IRVING SHELDON MARJORIE CLARINDA SHAW DOROTHEA FLORENTINA SIMALLEY EDGAR BURTON SLATER ALFRED JAY SILFEN SIDNEY CARL SIEGAL 4L [71] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX J FRANK BROWNE SMITH IMARJORIE MARION SMITH EVERETT ROYAL SPENCER, JR. ELIZABETH HARRIET SPOFFORD SIDNEY SPUNGIN ERIC STAHLBERG ROBERT STAPLES JACQUELINE LOUISE STEWART [72] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ALBERT WILLIAM SULLIVAN HAROLD LOUIS STRAUBE HOMER LINCOLN STRANGER MARY ALLERTON STEWART JOHN WILLIAMS SWENSON MARTTI ILMARI SUOINII EUGENE FRANCIS SULLIVAN ARTHUR ELLIS SULLIVAN 4. [73] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I GERALD LLOYD TALBOT DAVID SCOTT TAPPAN WARREN RAWFORD TAPPIN, JR. ROY CLIFTON TAYLOR DEAN THOMAS TERRY GORDON FRANKLIN THOMAS CHESTER HOWARD TIBERII GEORGE BURTON TOBEY, JR. 74] y THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY It MARGARET VIOLA VANNAH CARLTON WILLIAM TWYBLE MATTHEW NATHAN TUTTLE RODNEY CHARLES TURNER HOWARD DEXTER WETHERELL ROBERT THOMAS WETHERBEE HELENA JOAN WEBBER RICHARD STEARNS WARNER ■ft 75 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I MARCIENE RAINISDELL WHITCOMB NATHAN LEONARD WILANSKY FRANCIS WING WILFRID MURRAY WINTER JOHN FERRIS WOLFE BEATRICE WOOD JULIAN HENRY ZABIEREK MYER SAMUEL ZELBOVITZ 170] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY CLASS HISTORY I BRAD WILLIAMS came to State Col- lege from Melrose. But that doesn ' t matter: it could have been Medford or Worcester; or he might have come from Turners Falls where Lou Bush had made Mass. State a household word. He might have come to State because his father, like Don Shaw ' s, had graduated with the class of ' 07; or he might have come, like Bert Gregg or Chet Tiberii, to study agriculture; or because his mother, when they had driven through had liked the campus spread out over green New Eng- land countryside. But he didn ' t. Brad came to State College mostly because his family couldn ' t afford Dartmouth, and because he wasn ' t attracted to Boston University or Tufts. He had never been in Amherst before September 21, 1936. He swears that he will never forget that date. He liked Thatcher Hall even before he had un- loaded his trunk. And even before he shook hands with his father, and his mother had kissed him wistfully goodbye, he knew that he would like the bright- eyed, sports-coated, maroon-capped fresh- men he saw in the corridors. Later the thought of the view from his window — of the dense hemlocks on the bank opposite, and of the long white walk down to campus — was to seize him with nostalgia. Brad lived through freshman week in a state of perpetual excitement. He entered the rope pull with enthusiasm and shared in the triumph of his class. He got up at six o ' clock every morning for a week to sing college songs in front of the Abbey, where he stood half-frozen in the damp air. In spite of certain secret convictions to the contrary, he learned to regard all coeds as utterly unattractive. He lost his shirt and got a bloody nose razoo night. He explored the pine-scented trails of Toby on Mountain Day; took candid camera shots of Freida Hall and Betty Abrams resting at the summit; paused to admire the Indian Summer beauty of the Connecticut Valley below; and sang his heart out around the giant campfire at Roaring Brook. He visited eleven fra- ternities, shook hands with 400 members, partook liberally of the refreshments, and enjoyed himself immensely; but when it was over, he couldn ' t remember even the names of the houses. He learned that all Amherst boys were " Willies, " and prized as his finest trophy the green cap which he brought home from one of the desultory raids to the Amherst campus. He was a ringleader in several wonderful water fights at Thatcher Hall. He sat in on in- numerable bull sessions, late at night, and almost came to blows with Herb Burns over the question of reorganizing the Su- preme Court. He stayed up past one o ' clock every Sunday night preparing a theme for Dr. Helming; and then hurried off to class sleepy and breakfastless the next morning. Suddenly, he was seized with fear that he was going to flunk out of college. Rumors circulated that more than thirty freshmen had flunked out at ■ft 11 ' I MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX the end of the first semester last year. He went to see his advisor and found that he was flunking chemistry and was low in German and English. Professor Fessen- den reprimanded him mildly and sug- gested that he study more regularly. Hour exams crowded faster into his life, and he did study more regularly. Winter came and passed; and Spring came, beautifying the campus and the view off toward Mount Toby. He got up at 5 00 o ' clock one morning to go for a bird walk with Bill Nutting through the fields and damp meadows east of campus. Afternoons, he sometimes went off to Cla rke Hill to take a sun bath, and while notes from the chapel clock floated up from the beauty of the campus below — two o ' clock. . . three o ' clock . . four o ' clock he sat arguing over sports with Ma] Trees, or talking about girls with Hal Straube, or discussing the universe with Doug Cowling. He was never to forget those exciting days of his freshman year — of rollicking songs and comradeship, of light-hearted scuffings and water fights in the dormi- tory, of interminable bull sessions, and then the pathos of sitting up afterward until three o ' clock to study for an exam. II Brad might have come back early in September 1937, for he looked forward to his sophomore year. But his job kept him at home until the last minute. He arrived on campus as the chapel bell was ringing for Opening Convocation, and he strofled up the walk to Stockbridge Hal l with the pleasant sensation of belonging. Over a " coke " in the college store he 9p9 9irc told Charlie Powers about the wonderful summer he had spent, and listened to Charlie ' s equally glowing account of the girls he had met at Lake Sunapee. He eyed the freshmen critically, and went to the Freshman Reception to meet the new coeds. Then sophomore life began to take form, its outline fixed by required courses in Pats, science, and military. He had never ridden before, and was frankly nervous when he stood beside his horse for the first time. Before long he had learned to trot and was enjoying that brisk ride in the cool autumn morning. Major Connor ' s sung cavalry commands, " Slow Trot Ho-00 " and " By Threes by the Right Flank, Ho-00 " impressed him deeply. He decided that he ought to start going to dances. He asked Jean Raymond to the first informal and then to a vie party at the house. He found himself meeting her in the library evenings and walking back to the Abbey with her. Then they began [78; going to all the dances, and to the social unions and plays, and to the football games together. He appreciated now what a wonderful institution Amherst week end — the rally and the round-robin of house parties — was. By then he thought that Jean had the most wonderful dark eyes that he had ever looked into; and his rommate was warning him that if he didn ' t stop talking about how beautiful she was, he would ask Mrs. Broughton to keep him down in the Abbey. Sunday afternoons they walked hand-in-hand over the countryside exploring roads be- yond campus. It was always thus with young love. After the Winter Carnival, Jean was THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY 1 not the same friendly vivacious girl, hut was cool and elusive. He came back from his dates alternately miserable and hope- ful. Then they broke up. Jean went care- lessly on her way, but he was heart-broken with longing just for the sight of her. He found himself singing Stardust with melan- choly earnestness; then to forget, he turned to recreation. He went bowling with Rog Brown and Jim Buckley; he went to the movies or bummed down to Mountain Park with Chuck Mansfield. When Spring came, he started going to " Studes " at Mount Holyoke; and then his roommate got him a blind date at Sm.ith, where he met the girl whom he later brought to hear Artie Shaw at the Soph-Senior Hop. When he left college in June, something of the old naivete and boyishness was gone from inside him, and he was older and wiser. Ill Brad came back to college early to be- gin his junior year. He was living at the fraternity house now, and he wanted to help get it ready for the arrival of the freshmen. He swept rugs, washed win- dows, sandpapered furniture, and painted floors until the big old house was as shin- ing and neat as a child groomed for an annual visit to his aunt. He saw fraternity rushing from the inside and discovered that it was not so much fun for upper- classmen as for freshmen. During the rushing season the hurricane swept through Amherst leaving the town like a war village — the main street choked with fallen trees and debris and houses half battered in. It made calling off classes a necessity and deprived Fraternity Row of electricity and shut off telephone com- munication with Northampton for two weeks. AVhen life settled down again, Brad was surprised to find himself enjoying his studies. The required sophomore courses had been difficult for him (how he had envied Bill Shepardson and Bob Chap- man for the ease with which they got nineties in physics while he wrestled long hours with it merely to pass). He had given up his plan to major in chemistry. He planned his day so as to use his time to greater advantage; and he studied harder than he ever had before. But he just had to go to dances and basketball games. He heard Glenn Miller at the Winter Carnival Ball. He watched State take one frantic victory from Amherst and lose another in the cage. Sometimes he couldn ' t resist the temptation to bull session, and then he stayed up late to study and went to classes bleary-eyed and half asleep just as he had done fresh- man and sophomore years. He was hardly conscious of the weeks speeding by, until suddenly it was June. IV State College was more a part of Brad Williams when he came back to campus in September 1939. He was a senior now and Massachusetts State was his Alma Mater. When he was an underclassman he had watched such things as the birth of the Collegicm Quarterly, the meeting of 300 Model League of Nations delegates on campus, and even the granting of the A.B. degree with indifference. But now he was enthusiastic for the growth of the college. He cheered President Baker for 4. MASSACHUSETTS 79 STATE COLLEGE INDEX the announcement that two new dormi- tories were to be built, and waited eagerly for the ground to be broken. Even in his envy he liked the new Kappa Sigma Fra- ternity House. He looked forward confi- dently to the day when his Massachusetts State would be a great State Univer- sity. Brad was older now, too, and he enjoyed things which would have bored him three years before. He sat enraptured at the lecture which Carl Sandburg de- livered at Social Union. For the first time, he bought a ticket to the Community Concert series. He attended occasional meetings of the Fine Arts Council, and paused once in a while to look at the ex- hibits of modern paintings in the Me- morial Building. He discovered that he preferred the New York Times; and he read Hcifpers and The Nation almost as often as Colliers and Life. Some of Brad ' s closest friends were the " Big Men on Campus " now. Walking arovmd under the same senatorial hats which had been so awesome to Brad Wil- liams — the freshman, were fellows with whom he had worked and played, and studied for three years — Larry Reagan was President of the Senate, and Al Irzyk, Tap, and big Carl Nelson were pro- minent members. Myron Hager, in addi- tion to being President of the Class, was equivalent to about half the famous men ' s quartet. Brad was a minor power in his own right. He was a leader at his fraterni- ty house, and the underclassmen listened when he spoke at meetings. He flattered himself that freshman men regarded him with some deference, and he took the freshman co-eds in his stride. More and more as his senior year fled from him. Brad began to wonder about the future, black, unknown, and forbid- ding beyond graduation. The stark reality of what he had vaguely realized for two years — that a background of history and English wasn ' t a readily cashable asset for a job-hunting graduate — suddenly im- pressed him. He often talked the situa- tion over with his roommate, and wrote more about it to his family. He went to see Mr. Glatfelter; and discussed it with Professor Goldberg. He decided to seek entrance at a graduate school. With that aim in mind he studied even harder; though at the same time he wanted to take advantage of the social opportunities of college days. When June came, and he walked slowly across the green campus lawns in his cap and gown with his father and mother, his thoughts went back to that mellow Sep- tember day when they had first left him at Thatcher Hall. How short a time it seemed since he first put on his freshman cap; or even since he went to the first informal with Jean. At the Soph-Senior Hop that night he felt how much State College was a part of his life. He would be sorry, tomorrow, to leave it forever. NINE »- SENIOR ACTIVITIES Sydney S. Abrahams 7 Rii ' cnncw Are., Bcrcrly Born 1918 at Salem. Beverly High School. Major in Bacteriology. Student Religious Council, 3: Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, i; Spring Track, 3 (Manager); Joint Com- mittee on Intercollegiate Ath- letics, 3. Betty V. Abrams Z 136 Harvard St., Springfield Born 1918 at Springfield. Classical High School. Major in Economics. Women ' s Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4. Mario P. Alfieri 21 Railroad St., Amherst Born 1916 at Northampton. Am- herst High School. Major in Eco- nomics. Erma S. Alvord Z 8 Stevens St., Turners Falls Born 1918 at Greenfield. Turners Falls High School. Major in Eng- lish. Band, 2, 3, 4 (Drum Major); Roister Bolsters, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Vice- president, 4); Christian Federa- tion, 1; Dad ' s Day Committee, 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Handbook- Board, 2. Jean M. Archibald 16Jf Montague Rd., North Amherst Born 1918 at Truro, Nova Scotia. lAmherst High School. Major in English. Women ' s Glee Club, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2. 4. 81 STATE George L. Atwater 12 Hedges Ave., Weslfield Born 1918 at Westfield. Westfield High School. Major in Economics. Class Sergeant-at-Arms, 2; Dad ' s Day Committee, 3, 4; Sophomore- Senior Hop Committee, 2; Fra- ternity Secretary, 4; Swimming 3. Mildred M. Bak AAM Middle St., Hadley Born 1919 at Hadley. Hopkins Academy. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Newman Club, 1; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Anna M. Banus AAM Ifj Longfellow Ave., Pittsfi.eld Born 1918 at Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. Major in Home Economics. Wom en ' s Glee Club, 1; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Beryl H. Barton AAM 1077 Massachusetts Ave, North Adams Born 1919 at North Adams. Drury High School. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Christian Federation, 1; Bay State Revue, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority Vice-president, 3. Mary E. Bates SBX 2J,7 First St., Pittsfield Born 1919 at Pittsfield. St. Jo- seph ' s High School. Major in Home Economics. Student Re- ligious Council, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary-Trea- surer, 2, Vice-president, 3, 4); Choir, 4; Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. COLLEGE INDEX I Bernard J. Beagarie 97 Maple St., Greenfield. Born 1918 at Granville, North Dakota. Greenfield High School. Major in History. Richard F. Blake Q.T.V. Southmlle Rd., Southville Born 1918 at Arcadia, Florida. Southboro High School. Major in Chemistry. Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer, 2); Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2. Geoffrey H. Beames Woods Hole Rd., Fabnoiilli Born 1919 at Pontiac, Michigan. Woodstock Academy. Major in Floriculture. Horticultural Show Committee, 4; Fernald Entomolo- gy Club, 3; Zoology Club, 3. Robert L. Beiienielis SAE SS6 Sargeaiil St., Hohjoke Born 1918 at Pittsfield. Williston Academy. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Robert H. Bernstein TE ISS Fountain St., Springfield Born 1918 at Springfield. Classical High School. Major in Chemistry. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club, 1. Deane A. Beytes i30 Court St., Plymouth Born 1919 at Providence, Rhode Island. Plymouth High School. Major in Physics. 1 Tr — f John E. Blasko AXA 238 S mset Ave., Amherst Born 1919 at Amherst. Amherst High School. Major in History. Adelphia, 4; Senate, 3, 4; Informal Committee, 4 (Chairman); Mili- tary Ball Committee, 4; Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M) (Captain); Basketball, 1, 2, 3. Harris Blauer 67 Hillside Ai ' e., Arlington Born 1917 at Revere. Brookline High School. Major in Chemistry. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Nominating Committee, 4; Football, 4. Earl K. Bowen AXA SJf Elmdale St., West Springfield Born 1918 at Colonic, New York. West Springfield High School. Major in Mathematics. Men ' s Glee Club, 1: Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 2, 3, 4; Soccer, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); Spring Track, 1,2. Richard N. Bowler AXA 113 Franklin St., Westfield Born 1916 at Westfield. Westfield High School. Major in English. Maroon Key, 2; Class President, 1: Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer, 1; Basketball, 1. 1 HUNDRED it Louise Bowman Z 39 Early Ave., Medford Born 1918 at Everett. Medforfl High School. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Women ' s Glee Club, 3; Home Economics Chilj, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 2,3). Glenn D. Boyd 53 Fearing Si., Amherst Born 1919 at Mexico, New York. Mexico Academy and High School. Major in Horticultural Manu- factures. Horticultural Show Com- mittee, i; Winter Track, 1, 2(M). Marie T. Bradshaw 33 Lincoln St., Chicopee Falls Born 1919 at Chicopee Falls. Chicopee High School. Major in Economics. Roger W. Brown, Jr. AXA 36 Outlook Dr., Lexington Born 1918 at Concord. Lexington High School. Major in Econom- ics. Carnival Committee, i: Soph- omore-Senior Hop Committee, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Club, 3, 4; Current Affairs Club, 3, 4; Soccer, 2, 3 (M), 4(M) (Cap- tain) . James B. Buckley, Jr. SAE 31 Carver St., Springfield Born 1917 at Springfield. Classical High School. Major in Economics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer, 2, 4(M); Winter Track, 2, 3; Hockey, 2, 3(M). i Morris IL BurakolT TE 16 Poplar St., Boston Born 1918 at Maiden. Chelsea High School. Major in Chemistry. Menorah Club, 3, 4; Music Record Club, 3; Radio Club, 3, 4; Chem- istry Club, 3, 4. Herbert V. Burns 3 Colonial St., Gloucester Born 1918 at Gloucester. Glouces- ter High School. Major in Bacteri- ology. Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3. Millicent Carpenter I Z IT Medfield St., Worcester Born 1918 at Putnam, Connecti- cut. North High School. Major in Economics. W.S.G.A., 3 (Vice- president) ; Sorority Vice-presi- dent, 3, Treasurer, 4; Women ' s Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Hockey Manager, 3, Secretary, 4) ; Phi Kappa Phi. Leo G. Carroll •567 Pleasant St., Bridgewater Born 1917 at Bridgewater. Bridge- water High School. Major in Historv. Current Affairs Club, 2, 3,4. Melvin H. Chalfen TE 9i Naples Rd., Brookline Born 1918 at Boston. Brookline High School. Major in Forestry. Orchestra, 1; Bay State Revue, 1; Freshman Handbook Board, 1; Menorah Club, 3, 4 ; Music Record Club, 3; Outing Club, 1, 4; Fra- ternity Secretary, 3, Vice-presi- dent, 4. ■« MASSACHUSETTS 83 STATE COLLEGE INDEX Hazel K. Chapin A AM East. Rd., Sheffield Born 1918 at Sheffield. Sheffield High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1,2, 3,4; 4-H Club, 1,2. Robert M. Chapman KS 1S50 North Sedgmcic St., Chicago, Illinois Born 1918 at Scranton, Pennsyl- vania. Belmont High School. Major in Physics. Radio Club, 4; Mathematics Club, 2; Fraternity Treasurer, 3; Swimming, 4; Soc- cer, 3; Spring Track, 1, 2: Winter Track, 1; Phi Kappa Phi. Edith M. Clark Main St., Sunderland Born 1918 at Sunderland. Deer- field High School. Major in His- tory. Index, 2, 3, 4 (Editor-in- Chief, 4): Christian Federation, 1; Outing Club, 3. Isadore Cohen TE SS Floyd St., Dorchester Born 1916 at Boston. Boston Pub- lic Latin School. Major in Lan- guages and Literature. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Bay State Re- vue, 1: Roister Bolsters, 3; Men- orah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. - %. Kathleen F. Cooper i Z Bulwark, Alberta, Canada Born 1919 at Coronation, Alberta, Canada. Amherst High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Sec- retary, 3). D. Arthur Copson 4 SK 117J Adams St., Boston Born 1918 at Boston. Boston Eng- lish High School. Transfer from Boston College. Major in Horti- cultural Manufactures. Index, 4; CoUeqian, 2, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3. Psychology Club, 3; Inter- trateriiily Council, 3, 4; Fraternity ' ice-president, 4; Cross-Country, 4(M); Spring Track, 3, 4; Winter Track, 4. Anne C. Corcoran SBX J Myrtle St., Stoneham Born 1919 at Providence, Rhode Island. Stoneham High School. Major Home Economics. Class Nominating Committee, 1; New- man Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary- Treasurer, 3J; Dad ' s Day Com- mittee, 3; Ring Committee, 2, 3, 4: Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority Vice-president, 3, 4. Douglas H. Cowling 126 Commonwealth Ave., West Concord Born 1917 at Fairhaven. Fair- haven High School. Major in English. Orchestra, 2; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Manager, 4); Bay State Revue, 1, 2. Frederick J. Cole 160S Carew St., Springfield Born 1918 at Springfield. Classical High School. Major in Physics. Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Radio Club, 3; Chemistry Club, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 2, 3; Swim- ming, 1; Baseball, 1. Robert M. Creswell KS 8 Creswell Rd., Worcester Born 1918 at Worcester. Worces- ter Academy. Major in Agri- cultural Economics. Bay State Revue, 1; Christian Federation, 1; Landscape Architecture Club, 2; Football, 1; Spring Track, 1. 84 NINETEEN HUNDRED George i I. Curran 17 Madison Arc, Xorlhamptoii Born 1918 at Xorlhanipton. Northampton High School. Major in History. Music Record Chib, 2, 3,4 (Secretary, 2, President, 3, 4); American Student Union, 2, S (President). Gerald 31. Dailey 10 Alhcrstone St., Dorchester Born 1918 at Boston. Cathedral School. Major in Economics. Bay State Revue, 1, 2, 4; Roister Doisters, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club, 1, 2; Psj-chology Club, 2: Current Affairs Club, 2; Football, 1; Basketball, 1; Spring Track, 1, 2; Winter Track, 2. Frank H. L. Daley, Jr. Q.T.V. 13 Wright PL, South lladleij Born 1919 at Waltham. Holyoke High School. Major in Chemistry and Physics. Men ' s Glee Club, 3; Student Religious Council, 1, 2; Christian Federation, 1, 2; Pre- Med. Club, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 1, 2; Interl raternity Council, 3; Fraternity Vice-president, 3, 4; Winter Track, 2, 3. Frank H. Dalton Sil High St., Greenfield Born 1917 at Lynn. Deerfield Academy. Major in Chemistry. Men ' s Glee Club, 1; Bay State Revue, 1, 2, 4; Chemistrv Club, 3, 4; Hockey, 2, 3(M). George G. Davenport, Jr. North Are., Mendon Born 1917 at Mendon. Dean Academy. Major in . nimal Hus- bandry. Music Record Club, 3, 4; Dairy Club, 3, 4; Animal Hus- bandry Club, 2, 3, 4; Fraternity Treasurer, 4. Franklin M. Davis, Jr. 0X l ,0 Trupelo lid., Waltham Born 1918 at Maiden. Waltham High School. Major in Economics. Collegian, 1, 2; Cla.ss Nominating Committee, 2, 3; Carnival Com- mittee, 3; Military Ball Commit- tee, 4; Fraternity President, 4; A.B. Degree Committee, 2; Foot- ball, 1,2,3. Ida B. Davis 21 SJt Stevens St., Taunton Born 1915 at Taunton. Taunton High School. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Religious Council, 3, 4; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3, Vice-president, 4) Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President, 4) Intersorority Council, 3, 4i Sorori ty Secretary, 3, President, 4. Antonia S. Dec S W est St., Hadley Born 1918 at Hadley. Hopkins Academy. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Home Economics Club, 1,2,3,4. Katherine H. Doran J)Z llfS Lincoln Are., Amherst Born 1918 at Amherst. Amherst High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 4. Mary R. Doyle Mansion Honse, Hudson Born 1917 at Holyoke. Holyoke High School. Major in English. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. ■ft 85 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX Z Agnes Dunham AAM Ogden Rd., Kinderliook, New York Born 1918 at San Juan, Porto Rico. Martin Van Buren High School. Major in Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Robert F. Dunn AXA 23 Adam St., Pittsfield Born 1918 at Pittsfield. St. Jo- seph ' s High School. Major in Economics. Men ' s Glee Club, 2, S, 4; Class Nominating Co mmittee, 1; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir, 3, 4; Football, 1; Basketball, 1, 2; Swimming, 1. Robert B. Eaton SAE 17S Main St., Waltham Born 1918 at Waltham. Waltham High School. Major in Chemistry. Index, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 3. Richard B. Elberfeld 7 ' 2 Trenton St., East Boston Born 1918 at Framingham. Trans- fer from St. Lawrence University. Major in Entomology. Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4. Laura V. Everson AAM 1063 NoHh Pleasant St., North Amherst Born 1913 at St. Louis, Missouri. Savannah High School, Savannah, Georgia. Transfer from L niversity of Illinois. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Phillips Brooks Club, 2, 3, 4; Sorority President, 4. Reaetta B. Farnsworth I Z 31 Chesterfield Rd., Worcester Born 1918 at Worcester. Classical High School. Major in Home Economics. Bay State Revue, 2, 4; Roister Doisters, 3, 4; Home Eco- nomics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women ' s Athletic Association, 3, 4. Paul T. Ferriter AXA 31 West School St., Westfield Born 1917 at Westfield. Westfield High School. Major in Chemistry. Men ' s Glee Club, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 2; Chemistry Club, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 1. Vernon L. Ferwerda 823 Main St., Amherst Born 1918 at Rockford, Illinois. William Horlick High School, Racine, Wisconsin. Transfer from Kansas Wesleyan University. Ma- jor in Psychology. Psychology Club, 3, 4; Current Affairs Club, John E. Filios Bates Rd., Westfield Born 1916 at Westfield. Westfield High School. Major in Pre-Med, Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Associate Edi- tor, 4) ; Freshman Handbook Board, 1; Zoology Club 4; Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 1; A.B. Degree Committee, 2; Cross Country, 2; Swimming, 4. Margaret A. Firth AAM ■3tS Swan St., Lawrence Born 1919 at Lawrence. Lawrence High School. Major in English. Bay State Revue, 4; Roister Dois- ters, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 4; 4-H Club, 2. [86; St HUNDRED AND FORTY George F. Flanagan J, West Green Si., Easthamplon Born 1919 at Easthampton. St. Michael ' s High School. Major in Entomology. Academic Activities Board, 4; Men ' s Debating Team, 1, 2, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4; Interfraternity Council, 3, 4; Fraternity Treasurer, 3, President, 4; Soccer, 1. Urban C. Fleming 53 Howard St., Holyoke Born 1918 at Holyoke. Holyoke High School. Major in Chemistry. Newman Club, 1 2, 3, 4; Chemis- try Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 3; Football, 1; Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1. ' Robert T. Foley S i E 6 Burnett St., Turner.i Falls Born 1918 at Turners Falls. Turn- ers Falls High School. Major in Chemistry. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club, 1; Radio Club, 3; Psychology Club, 3; Chemistry Club, 4; Mathematics Club, 2, 3, 4. William G. Foley AXA W Hanson St., Salem Born 1917 at Salem. Salem High School. Major in Pre-Med. Class Nominating Committee, 1, 4; Student Religious Council, 3 (President, 3) ; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President, 3); Zoology Club, 3, 4 (Vice-president, 4); Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Council, 3, 4; Hockey, 1; Cross Country, 1; Winter Track, 1; Baseball, 1; Interfraternity Ball Committee, 3. Willard O. Foster, Jr. 0X 66 Main St., Marion Born 1916 at Medford. Tabor Academy. Major in Agricultural Economics. Baj ' State Revue, 1, 2, 4; Roister Bolsters, 1, 2, 3, 4; Fra- ternity Treasurer, 4. K» ■ . [87: Bernard II. Fox ■j. ' i Grape St., Maiden Born 1917 at New York, New York. Maiden High School. Trans- fer from Harvard University. Major in Mathematics. Collegian, 3, 4; Men ' s Glee Club, 3; Men ' s Debating Team, 3, 4; Menorah Club, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 3,4. Harvey Fram AEH S Shannon St., Worcester Born 1918 at Worcester. Classical High School. Major in Bacteri- ology. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer, 1, 2, 3. Lawrence J. Freeman H9 Everett St., Sovthbridge Born 1918 at Springfield. Mary E. Wells High School. Major in En- gineering. Class Nominating Com- mittee, 4; Mathematics Club, 3, 4; Current Affairs Club, 4. Virginia Gale SBX 25 Rockaicay Ave., Marblehead Born 1918 at Gloucester. Marble- head High School. Major in Physi- ology and Bacteriology. Class Sec- retary, 1, 2; Class Nominating Committee, 4; Carnival Commit- tee, 2, 4; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; Fernald Entomology Club, 3; Sor- ority Secretary, 4. Philip C. Geoffrion S i E .56 Hampden St., West Springfield Born 1917 at Springfield. Williston Academy. Major in Economics and Political Science. Class Nominat- ing Committee, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 3; Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); Basketball, 1; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3(M), 4; Winter Track, 1, 2, 3(M), 4. C H U S E T T S J Thelma N. Glazier AAM Levereti Born 1918 at Leverett. Amherst High School. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Outing Club, 2; Home Economics Club, 4; 4-H Club, 2; Intersorority Council, 3, 4; Wom- en ' s Athletic Association, 3, 4. Charles L. Gleason, Jr. 11,S Broadway, Hanover Born 1918 at Hanover. Hanover High School. Major in Economics. Academics Activities Board, 4; Orchestra, 2, 3, 4 (Manager, 4); Band, 1,2, 3; Bay State Revue, 1, 2, 4; Men ' s Glee Club, 3: Ring Com- mittee, 2, 3, 4; Fraternity Trea- surer, 4; Burnham Declamation, 2; Cross-Count ry, 1. Richard R. Glendon 2AE 4 Ware Rd., Winchester Born 1918 at Winchester. Win- chester High School. Major in History and Political Science. Index, 2, 3, 4 (Literary Editor, 4) ; Newman Club, 1; Outing Club, 1: 4-H Club, 1, 2: Current Affairs Club, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3, Presi- dent, 4) ; Fraternity Secretary, 3. William F. Goodwin KS 15 Wheelock St., Winthrop Born 1918 at Winthrop. Winthrop High School. Major in Economics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 1, 2, 4; Winter Track, 1, 2, 4; Cheer Leader, 1, 2, 3. I«)il Evelyn A. Gould I Z G Hartshorn Rd., Walpole Born 1918 at Cambridge. Walpole High School. Major in Economics. Women ' s Glee Club, 1; Bay State Revue, 4; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority President, 4, Secretary, 3; Women ' s Athletic Association, 3. Myra C. Graves AAM Main St., Sunderland Born 1918 at Sunderland. North- field Seminary. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 1. Sidney Greenberg ,5i JejTerson Ave., Springfield Born 1917 at Springfield. Classical High School. Transfer from Spring- field College. Major in Chemistry. Men ' s Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Menorah Club, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Burton W. Gregg Westminster We. ' it, Vermont Born 1918 at Marlboro, New Hampshire. Brattleboro High School. Major in Animal Husband- ry. Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President, 4) ; 4-H Club, 2, 3, 4; Inter-Collegiate Livestock Judg- ing Team, 4; Inter-Collegiate Dairy Judging Team, 3. Mark H. Gordon BK Stony Hill Rd., Springfield Born 1909 at New Lexington, Ohio. Classical High School. Trans- fer from American International College. Major in Landscape Architecture. J . Harold E. Griffin, Jr. 0X 7 Adanac Ave., Dorchester Born 1917 at Boston. Boston Latin School. Major in Chemistry. Christian Federation, 1; Chemistry Club, 3, 4; Swimming, 4(M) (Manager); Joint Committee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 4. Jt Arthur A. Ilafjelsleiii AFP nil, School SI., SloiKjhton Born 1918 at Dorchester. Stougli- ton High School. Major in Bacteri- ology and Physiology. Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 4; Mathematics Club, 1, 2. Myron D. Hager 127 Main St., South Decrfiekl Born 1917 at South Deerfield. Deerfield High School and Deer- field Academy. Major in English. Adelphia, 4; Senate, 4; Maroon Key, 2; Honor Council, 1, 2, 3, 4, ( ecretary, 3); Class President, 2, 3, 4: Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Carnival Committee, 3; Carni- val Ball Committee, 2, 3: States- men, 3, 4: Pre-Med. Club, 1: Foot- ball; Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1. Frieda L. Hall 1)Z 152 Huuihorn Rd.. Braintree Born 1918 at Braintree. Braintree High School. Major in Economics. Class Nominating Committee, 1, 2, 3, 4: Mathematics Club, 2; Sorority Secretary, 3. John W. Hall Marshfield Born 1918 at Burlington, Vermont. Marshfield High School. Major in Pomology. Horticultural Show Committee, 4. Thomas E. Handforth APP i06 Main Si., West Medway Born 1915 at Quincy. Medway High School. Major in Economics. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4: Bay State Revue, 1, 2; Xewman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. A — Robert H. Hanley 17 Bancroft Pic, Ilopedalc Born 1918 at Hopedale. Wilbra- ham . cademy. Major in Entomol- ogy. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Out- ing Club, 1, 2; Fernald Entomolo- gy Club, 2, 3, 4; Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 1; Winter Track, 1,2. Malcolm B. Harding, Jr. 4 SK S!t Court St., Westfield Born 1918 at Westfield. Westfield High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemi.strv Club, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2, 3,(M), ' 4(M};Hockey, 1, 2, 3(M). Thomas W. Herrick, Jr. KS Tremont St., South Duxbiiry Born 1917 at Du. bury. Mount Hermon School. Major in Econom- ics. Baseball, 2, 3, 4; Fraternity Vice-president, 4. Ralph B. Hill I SK 26 Summer St., Ip.suich Born 1918 at Newton. Manning High School. Major in Economics. Class Nominating Committee, 1; Current Affairs Club, 4; Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Franklin Hopkins AD Leverett Born 1917 at Hartford, Connecti- cut. Amherst High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Horti- cultural Show Committee, 4; Out- ing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Landscape Architecture Club, 2, 3, 4: 4-H Club, 1, 2; Swimming, 1, 2; Winter Track, 3; Hockey, 3. -ft 89 STATE COLLEGE INDEX z Arthur F. Howe 1 Rockland St., Brockton Born 1918 at Brockton. Brockton High School and Tilton School. Major in Bacteriology. Pre-Med. Club, 4; Soccer, 2, 3(M), 4(M); Winter Track, 2, 3. Elizabeth M. Howe S Z 19 Dexter St., Pittsfidd Born 1918 at Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. Major in Floriculture. Women ' s Glee Club, 3, 4; Class Nominating Committee, 2; Chris- tian Federation, 1; Horticultural Show Committee, 2, 4; Women ' s Athletic Association, 4 (Rifle Manager) . .c ' Albin F. Irzyk Q.T.V. .;7 Mason St., Scdem Born 1917 at Salem. Salem High and Classical School. Major in English. Adelphia, 4 (President); Senate, 3, 4 (Treasurer, 4); Class Nominating Committee, 1 ; Roister Bolsters, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Informal Committee, 4; Dad ' s Day Committee, 4; Military Ball Committee, 4; Interfraternity Council, 3, 4 (Vice-president, 4); Fraternity President, 4; Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); Baseball, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M). Olive G. Jackson AAM 5i High St., Monson Born 1917 at Three Rivers. Mon- son High School. Major in English. Bav State Revue, 2; Christian Federation, 2; 4-H Club, 1, 2; Women ' s Athletic Association, 3. Howard M. Hoxie Ji North Elm St., Northampton Born 1919 at Northampton. North- ampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Psychology Club, 4. Frederick K. Hughes AXA l-3Jf Dartmouth St., Holyoke Born 1917 at Holyoke. Williston Academy. Major in Chemistry. Bay State Revue, 4; Carnival Committee, 3; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Marjorie B. Irwin J Z 33 Longview Rd., Palmer Born 1918 at Ardmore, Pennsi,!- vania. Palmer High School. Major in Psychology. Bay State Revue, 4; Freshman Handbook Board, 1; Psychology Club, 2, 3, 4; Women ' s Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Swimming, Archery); Head Usher, 4. Priscilla Jacobs Ashland St., Holliston Born 1917 at Hopkinton. Hollis- ton High School. Major in Animal Husbandry, Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 2, 3, 4; Literary Club, 4. John C. Jakobek 332 Middle St., Hadley Born 1919 at Hadley. Hopkins Academy. Major in History. Soc- cer, 2, 3 4(M); Basketball, 1. Richard H. Jaquith J(S Massasoit St., Northampton Born 1919 at Newton. Northamp- ton High School. Major in Chem- istry. Outing Club, 4; Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 2, 3, 4; Soccer, 2,3, 4 (M). [90] NINETEEN HUNDRED Eleanor F. Jewell Z J S Barnard Rd., JVorccxIer Born 1918 at Worcester. North High Scliool. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women ' s Glee Chib, 4; Bay State Revue, 1, 2, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Chib, 1, 2, 3, 4; I ' .sychology Chib, 1; Mathe- malics Clul), 1, 2, 3; Women ' s Ath- letic .Vs.sociation, 2, 3, 4. Alberta M. Johnson 2BX College Buy., Soidkirick Born 1918 at Southwick. Westfield High School. Transfer from Brenau College. Major in Home Econom- ics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3,4. Louis F. Johnson 7 Hillside Court, Gloucester Born 1919 at Gloucester. Glouces- ter High School. Major in Pre- Med. Adelphia, 4 (Secretary- Treasurer) ; Informal Committee, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 4 (Presi- dent, 4); Chemistry, 2, 3; Cross- country, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 2, 3, 4; Winter Track, 2, 3, 4. Margery D. Johnson AAM Oregon Rd., Southboro Born 1919 at Boston. Peters High School. Major in Modern Lan- guages. Bay State Revue, 1; Dad ' s Day Committee, 4; Outing Club, 1, 2; Music Record Club, 3, 4. Robert A. Joyce S91 Locust St., Florence Born 1918 at Northampton. North- ampton High School. Major in Recreational Planning. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 1, 2 (M), 3(M), 4(M), (Captain, 3, 4); Winter Track, 1, 2, 3(M), 4(M), (Captain, 3, 4). Robert C. Kennedy Id Macomhcr Aoe., No. Dartmouth Born 1915 at Milford. Bristol County Agricultural School. Major in Floriculture. Horticultural Show Committee, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3; Cross-Couutry, 1,3(M). Loretta C. Kenny 17 Rochvieii St., Palmer Born 1918 at Swampscott. Palmer High School. Major in Chemistry. Collegian, 3; Women ' s Glee Club, 1; Newman Club, 1; Chemistry Club, 3. Francis B. Keville AXA 7 Porter St., Lynn Born 1918 at Lj-nn. Lynn English High. Major in Agricultural Eco- nomics. Class Nominating Com- mittee, 3. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club, 1, 2; Fraternity Secretary, 3, Treasurer, 4. John F. Kirseh 0X 393 St. James Ave., Springfield Born 1917 at Springfield. Spring- field Technical High School. Trans- fer from Springfield Junior College. Major in Economics. Band, 2, 3; Music Record Club, 4; Outing Club, 3, 4; Current Affairs Club, 3,4. Rosa F. E. Kohls AAM 31 Buttonuood St., Dorchester Born 1918 at Kiel, Germany. Girl ' s High School, Boston. Major in Chemistry. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 3, 4; Class Nominating Com- mittee, 3; Chemistry Club, 4; Sorority Treasurer, 3, 4; Phi Kap- V Phi. " 4i 91 C H U S E T STATE COLLEGE INDEX z Everett W. Langworthy 22 Murray PL, West Springfield Born 1918 at West Springfield. Chester High School. Major in History. Current Affairs Club, 3, 4; Football, 1; Soccer, 4(M); Bas- ketball, 1, 3: Baseball, 1, 3, 4. Vasilis Lavrakas AXA 59 Elioii Are., Waterlovii Born 1917 at Watertown. Water- town High School. Major in Chem- istry. Football, 1, 2, 3(M), 4(M); Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1. -t Barbara Little Z 50 Marlboro St., Netcburyport Born 1918 at Newburyport. Nevv- buryport High School. Major in Bacteriology. Bay State Revue, 2, 4: Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 3, 4; Women ' s Athletic Association, 3, 4; Bac- teriology Club, 3, 4. Virginia C. Little SBX 10 Parker St., Saugus Born 1917 at Saugus. Saugus High School. Transfer from Boston University. Major in Education. Women ' s Glee Club, 3, 4; Choir, 3,4. Catherine M. Leete Z Maple Rd., Briarcliff Manor, New York Born 1918 at Mt. Kisco, New York. Briarcliff High School. Major in English. W.S.G.A., 2, 4 (President); Class Vice-President, 4; Bay State Revue, 2; Roister Doisters, 3; Intersorority Council, 3, 4; Women ' s Athletic Association 1. Roma D. Levy SI 37 Springside Are., Pittsfield Born 1918 at Turners Falls. Pitts- field High School. Major in Bac- teriology. Collegian, 2 (Secretary); Class Nominating Committee, 4; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club, 1; American Student Union, 3; Sorority Secretary, 3, Vice- president, 4. Nancy E. Luce SBX S9 Goodrich St., Fitchburg Born 1917 at Boston. Fitchburg High School. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Women ' s Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4. Donald J. Mahoney IJ, Miller Ave., Holyoke Born 1917 at Providence, Rhode Island. Vermont Academy. Major in Chemistry. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Newman Club, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 3, 4; Football, 1; Baseball, 2. 1 Roger H. Lindsey in Church St., Ware Born 1919 at Ware. Ware High School. Major in Chemistry. Ac- ademic Activities Board, 4; Col- legian, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Business Man- ager, 4); Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Collegian Quarterly, 4 (Busi- ness Manager). 0T [92] HUNDRED James W. Malcolm SK 169 Beech St., Holyoke Born 1916 at South Hadley Falls. Transfer from Springfield College. Major in Physical Education. Football, 3(M), 4(M); Basketball, 2, 3, 4. ;Jt Irnia I. Alain) Z flo Forest Si., H ' orce.tlcr Born 1919 at Worcester. North High School. Major in History. W.S.G.A., 3 (Secretary); Class Secretary, 3; Bay State Revue, 2; Carnival Ball Committee, 3; Soph- omore-Senior Hop Committee, 2; Women ' s Athletic Association, 1, 2,3, -i (President). Charles F. Mansfield 8 Jenny Lind St., Taunton Born 1918 at Taunton. Taunton High School. Major in Chemistry. Maroon Key, 2; Newman Club, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Helen A. Marshall Amherst Born 1918 at Amherst. Amherst High School. Major in Geology and Minerology. Women ' s Glee Club, 2; Christian Federation, 3,4. Robert A. Martin 37 Pleasure Ave., Piitsfield Born 1918 at Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. Major in Forestry. Horticultural Show Committee, 4; Outing Club, 1, 4; Cross- country, 1. Victoria K. Matuszko R.F.D. -i, Amherst Born 1918 at Hadley. Hopkins Academy. Major in Liberal Arts. Newman Club, 1, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. ■%. Gerald E. McAndrew ■idij James St., Barre Born 1916 at Barre. Barre High School. Major in Chemistry. Ma- roon Ke.y, 2; Roister Doisters, 2; Newman Clul), 2; Carnival Com- mittee, 2; Chemistry Club, 3, 4; Swimming, 3. William B. McCowan AS 70 Bermck St., Worcester Born 1916 at Springfield. North High School. Major in Economics. Fraternity Treasurer, 3, President, 4; Soccer, 3(M); Joint Committee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3. Charles L. McLaughlin KS H Nutting Ave., Amherst Born 1918 at Palmer. AVilbraham Academy. Major in Wildlife Ad- ministration. Football, 1; Hockejs 1. John E. Merrill, Jr. K2 171 South St., Southbridge Born 1918 at Beverly. Mount Hermon School. Major in General Engineering. Class Nominating Committee, 2; Spring Track, 1, 2; Winter Track, 1, 2; Engineering Club, 3, 4 (Secretary and Trea- surer, 4). John C. Miller A2$ Charlton Born 1918 at Worcester. Charlton High School. Major in Horticult- ure. 4-H Club, 1, 2; Spring Track, 1: Winter Track, 1, 2. 4. 93 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I Carolyn E. Monk AAM Champney St., Groton Born 1919 at Gardner. Groton High School. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Collegian, 1, 2; Home Ec- onomics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Paul Moriece French Hall, Amherst Born 1912 at New Haven, Con- necticut. New Haven High School. Transfer from Univ. of Hawaii. Major in Landscape Architecture. Student Religious Council, 4; Christian Federation, 2, 3, 4 (President, 4); Landscape Archi- tecture Club, 2, 3, 4; Phillips Brooks Club, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi. Dorothy R. Morley 12 Pleasant Court, Amherst Born 1918 at Muskegon, Michigan. Amherst High School. Major in Home Economics. Class Nominat- ing Committee, 3; Home Econom- ics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-president, 3, President, 4), 4-H Club, 1; Women ' s Athletic Association, 3, 4. Roy E. Morse KS 683 Washington St., Boston Born 1916 at Boston. Transfer from Boston University. Major in Bacteriology. Adelphia, 4; Inter- fraternity Council, 3, 4 (President, 4); Fraternity President, 4; Swim- ming, 2(M). 3(M), 4(M) (Co-Cap- tain) . Maynard F. Moseley, Jr. 10 Imrie Rd., Allston Born 1918 at Allston. Jamaica Plain High School. Major in Bot- any. Orchestra, 1, 2; Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Outing Club, 2; Zoolo- gy Club, 4. , b 94] Robert H. Mosher AS 3 Westfield Rd., Holyoke Born 1919 at Holyoke. Holyoke High School. Major in Chemistry and Physics. Outing Club, 1, 2; Engineering Club, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 2, 3, 4; Fraternity Secretary, 1, 2, Treasurer, 2; Soccer, 2; Bas- ketball, 1. Richard K. Muller KS Jfl Fearing St., Amherst Born 1919 at Orono, Maine. Darien High School. Major in General Engineering. Orchestra, 3; Mathe- matics Club, 2; Engineering Club, 3, 4 (President, 4). Carl F. Nelson 586 West Broadway, Gardner Born 1914 at Gardner. Transfer from Holy Cross College. Major in Wildlife Administration. Senate, 4; Football, 3(M), 4(M). Michael Neznayko R.F.D. SOS, Hadley Born 1919 at Easthampton. Hop- kins Academy. Major in Chemistry. Newman Club, 4: Chemistry Club, 3, 4; Basketball, 1. Dominic E. Nietupski Miller St., Ludlow Born 1917 at Ludlow. Ludlow High School. Major in Dairy In- dustry. Men ' s Glee Club, 1; New- man Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Club, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 1; Winter Track, 1. 1 HUNDRED » Lewis F. Norwood, Jr. 1S5 Main St., Rockport Born 1919 at Rockport. Essex Agricultural School. Major in Floriculture. Senate, 4; Class Treasurer, 4; Fraternity President, 4: Football, 3(M), 4(M); Basket- ball, 1. G. David Novelli 116 High St., orlh .igawam Born 1918 at North Agawam. . gawam High School. Major in Bacteriology. Football, 2, 3, 4 (M); Joint Committee on Inter-Col- legiate Athletics, 3, 4. Arthur A. Noyes 0X Lafayette, Indiana Born 1917 at Lafayette, Indiana. Lawrence Academy. Major in Political Science. Index, 2, 3, 4; Collegian, I, 2, 3, 4 (Sports Editor, 2, Managing Editor, 3, Editor, 4) ; Class Nominating Committee, 1, 2, 3; Freshman Handbook Board, 2; Carnival Committee, 2, 3, 4: Carn- ival Ball Committee, 2, 3: Outing Club, 4; American Student Union, 3; Cross-Country, 1, 2, 3; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Track, 1, 2, 3; A.B. Degree Committee, 1, 2. William B. Nutting Temple St., West Boylston Born 1918 at Worcester. West Boylston High School. Major in Entomology. Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3, 4 (President). Daniel J. O ' Connell ZKE 1,7 Bardu-ell St., South Hadley Born 1919 at South Hadley. South Hadley High School. Major in Economics and History. Class Nominating Committee, 3; New- man Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2, 3(M), 4(M). Priscilla M. Oertel AAM Washington St., Hamon Born 1919 at Hanson. Whitman High School. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay State Revue, 2; Christian Federation, I; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority Vice- president, 4. John R. O ' Neill Q.T.V. ' 2-20 Sargeant St., Holyoke Born 1918 at Holyoke. Holyoke High School. Major in English. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Current Affairs Club, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1. Edward E. Oppenheim 388 Spring St., Brockton Born 1917 at Brockton. Brockton High School. Major in Political Science. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee, 4; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Current Affairs Cluo, 4 (Vice-president); Basket- ball, 1; Swimming, 3. John V. Osmun KZ 78 Northampton Rd., Amherst Born 1918 at Amherst. Deerfield Academy. Major in Entomology. Honor Council, 3, 4; Maroon Key, 2; Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay State Revue, 4; Carnival Commit- tee, 2, 4; Carnival Ball Committee, 3, 4; Sophomore-Senior Hop Com- mittee, 2; Statesmen, 3, 4; Choir, 3, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4 (Vice-president, 3); Fraterni- ty Secretary, 4; Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M). Tracy O. Page K2 51 Knox St., Springfield Born 1915 at Putney, Vermont. Classical High School. Major in Economics. Swimming, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M). ■ft 95 ? MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX Ralph F. Palumbo AXA SIS Lancaster St., Leominster Born 1916 at Leominster. Leomin- ster High School. Major in Botany. Class Nominating Committee, 2; Newman Club, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club, 4; Swimming, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Track, 1,2,3,4. James W. Payson, Jr. 0X 1019 Main St., Millis Born 1918 at Millis. Millis High School. Major in Pre-Med. Class Sergeant-at-Arms, 3; Class Nom- inating Committee, 1, 2; Carnival Committee, ' 1; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; Interfraternity Council, 2, 3, i: Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); Inter-Class Athletic Board, 1, 2, Virginia H. Pease AAM i7 East Pleasant St., Amherst Born 1919 at Amherst. Amherst High School. Major in English. Index, 2; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4; Burnham Declamation, 1 Helene E. Pelissier AAM Russell St., Hadley Born 1918 at Hadley. Hopkins Academy. Major in Liberal Arts. Newman Club, 1, 2; Music Record Club, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1. Lester L. Phillips, Jr. U Holmes Rd., Pitisfield Born 1917 at Indianapolis, Indi- ana. Pittsfield High School. Major in Zoology. Class Nominating Committee, 1; Student Religious Council, 1, 2; Christian Federa- tion, 1; Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2; Current Affairs Club, 4. ■ l Kenneth V. Pike ASO 2.3 Westminster St., Pittsfield Born 1917 at Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. Major in Entomol- ogy. Honor Council, 3, 4 (Presi- dent, 4); Outing Club, 1; Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3, 4; Inter- fraternity Council, 3, 4; Fraternity Secretary, 2, 3, Vice-president, 4; Cross Country, 1. George T. Pitts, Jr. 0X 5 Herrick St., Beverly Born 1917 at Beverly. Huntington Preparatory School. Major in En- tomology. Maroon Key, 2 (Secre- tary-Treasurer); Class Treasurer, 3; Class Nominating Committee, 1; Freshmati Handbook Board, 1; Carnival Ball Committee, 2; In- formal Committee, 3, 4; Military Ball Committee, 3, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4; Swimming 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M) (Co-Cap- tain). Richard J. Pliehta Strong St., Amherst Born 1919 at Holyoke. Amherst High School. Major in Engineer- ing. Orchestra, 1, 2, 3: Band, 1, 2, 3; Bay State Revue, 1, 3; Engin- eering Club, 3, 4; Football, 1; Swimming, 1. Charles A. Powers, Jr. K2 6S Robinson Are., Braintree Born 1918 at Wollaston. Braintree High School. Major in Horticultu- ral Manufactures. Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Men ' s Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Class Nominating Committee, 2, 3, 4; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3, 4 (President, 4); Bay State Revue, 4; Military Ball Committee, 4; Spring Track, 3, 4; Winter Track, 4. John J. Powers SAE i7 Onota St., Pittsfield Born 1918 at Pittsfield. Pittsfield High School. Major in Chemistry. Index, 2, 3, 4 (Associate Business Manager, 4); Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 4; Mathe- matics Club, 3, 4; Fraternity Sec- retary, 2, 3, 4. 96 Esther I ' ralt AAM S Kiiigmont Si., Greenwood Born 1917 at Melrose. Wakefield High School. Major in English. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Bay State Revue, 2; Student Religious Council, 4; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3, i (Secretary, 2, 3, ' ice- president, 4); Music Record Club, 3: Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Psy- chology Club, 2; 4-H Club, 2, 3, 4; Sorority Secretary, 3, 4. Lawrence H. Reagan AS ■SI Colonial Ave., Boston Born 1917 at Boston. Jamaica Plain High School. Major in Bot- any. Adelphia, 4; Senate, 3, 4 (President, 4); Maroon Key, 2; Class Captain, I, 2, 3, 4; Men ' s Glee Club, 3; Carnival Ball Com- mittee, 2, 3; Dad ' s Day Commit- tee, 2, 3, 4; Sophomore-Senior Hop Committee, 2. Mia Reinap Nobscoti Rd., Framingham Born 1917 at Tallinn, Estonia. Waltham Senior High School. Major in Zoology. Women ' s Glee Club, 1; Zoology Club, 3, 4. iVIelvin Reisman TE$ 11 Cummings Rd., Brighton Born 1918 at Roxbury. Boston Latin School. Major in Economics. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club, 1; Pre-Med. Club, 1; Chem- istry Club, 1; Spring Track, 1; Winter Track, 1. Katherine L. Rice AAM 103 Weslford Cir., Springfield Born 1918 at Spring-field. Classical High School. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Wesley Foundation, 4; Music Record Club, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Wom- en ' s Athletic Association, 4; Sor- ority President, 4, Vice-president, 3. William n. Richards, .Jr. AXA H.3 Federal St., Northampton Born 1918 at Hartford, Connecti- cut. Northampton High School. Major in Economics. Patricia J. Robbins Z 29 Laeonia Rd., Worce.ster Born 1918 at Boston. North High School. Major in Psychology. Psychology Club, 3, 4. Roger G. Robitaille 16 Sargeant St., Holyoke Born 1917 at Holyoke. Transfer from Assumption College. Major in Pre-Med. Newman Club, 3, 4; Zoology Club, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 3, 4; American Student Union, 3. Robert Rodman AEH 9!t9 Blue Hill Ave., Dorchester Born 1919 at Boston. Boston Latin School. Major in Pre-Med. Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2, 3(M); Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Ath- letics, 3; Fraternity Secretary, 2; Treasurer, 3, 4. Edwin M. Rossman AEH ' 23 Claflin Rd., Brookline Born 1918 at Winthrop. Boston Latin School. Major in Economics. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Inter- fraternitv Council, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track, 1, 2 (M); Winter Track, 1, 2(M); Fraternity Secretary, 3, President 4. -ft C H U S E T T S 97 STATE COLLEGE INDEX 1 Dorothy J. Rourke SBX Sit Marion St., Springfield Born 1919 at Palmer. Classical High School. Major in Bacteri- ology. American Student Union, 2, 3 (Treasurer, 2); Women ' s Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3, 4. Leo J. Santucci i SK S,S3 South Main St., Palmer Born 1917 at Palmer. Palmer High School. Major in Mathematics. Class Sergeant-at-Arms, 4; Mathe- matics Club, 3, 4; Football, 1,J2 (M), 3(M), 4(M); Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1. Alfred H. Rudge 33 Adelle Circuit, Worcester Born 1918 at Worcester. South High School. Major in Historj ' . Football, 1, 2(M), 3(M), 4(M); BasketbaU, 1, 2, 3(M), 4(M) (Captain); Baseball, 1, 2, 3(M), 4(M). Winslow E. Ryan AXA 6S Park St., Hudson Born 1918 at Manchester, New Hampshire. Hudson High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 4: Football, 1, 2, 3. Theodore Saltznian TE 167 Howard Are., Roxbury Born 1917 at Boston. Jamaica Plain High School. Major in Ag- ronomy. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. James J. Sanderson Becket Born 1918 at Springfield. Dalton High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Francis R. Saunders 33 Trask St., Gloucester Born 1918 at Gloucester. Glouces- ter High School. Ma jor in Chem- istry. Band, 1; Chemistry Club 3,4. David A. Sawyer AEH 60 Lucerne St., Dorchester Born 1919 at Dorchester. Dor- chester High School. Major in Sociology. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 3, 4; Hockey, 2,3. Evi C. Scholz AS State Line Born 1918 at West Stockbridge. Williams High School, Stock- bridge. Major in Animal Husband- ry. Animal Husbandry Club, 2, 3, 4; Cross-Country, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Baseball, 1, 2. N. James Schooumaker South East St., Amherst Born 1918 at Germantown, Penn- sylvania. Westtown Preparatory School. Major in Mathematics. Maroon Key, 2; Mathematics Club, 3, 4; Soccer, 3(M), 4(M). Phi Kappa Phi. 1 Henry M. Schreiber AEn 185 Gravers Ave., Wmthrop Born 1918 at Winthrop. Winthrop High School. Major in History. Index, 2, 3, 4 (Business Manager, 4); Bay State Revue, 4; Men ' s Debating Team, 4; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Current Affairs Club, 1,2, 3, 4; American Student Union, 2, 3; Fraternity Vice-president, 4; Soccer, 2; Basketball, 2, 3(M), 4(M); Joint Committee on Inter- Collegiate Athletics, 3, 4. John P. Serex 0X 3S7 Lincoln Ave., Amherst ' Born 1918 at Northampton. AVil- liston Academy. Major in Econom- ics. Football, 2. ' ■ V Hobert I. Sheldon AXA 90 Ilam iilin Si., We.it- Sprinyfield Born 1918 at Springfield. West Springfield High School. Major in English. Maroon Key, 2 (Presi- dent); Class Treasurer, 2; Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee, 2; Dad ' s Day Com- mittee, 2, 3, 4; Fraternity Vice- president, 3. Daniel E. Shepardson SAE 63 Simonds St., Athol Born 1918 at Athol. Athol High School. Major in Chemistry. Rois- ter Doisters, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club, 2, 3, 4; Radio Club, 3; Chem- istry Club, 3, 4 (President, 4); Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3; Fra- ternity Treasurer, 4; Cross-Coun- try, 1, 2, 3, 4(M) ; Joint Committee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3, 4. Everett Shapiro TE 106 Deering Rd., Dorchester Born 1917 at Boston. Boston Latin School. Major in Physics. Bay State Revue, 1 ; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Committee, 2, 3, 4; Radio Club, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 3, 4; Interfraternitj ' Coun- cil, 3, 4; Fraternity Treasurer, 3, President, 4. Donald H. Shaw Q.T.V. 215 Washington St., Belmont Born 1916 at Belmont. Browne and Nichols School. Major in History. Index, 2, 3, 4 (Statistics Editor, 4); Freshman Handbook Board, 1 (Editor); Current Affairs Club, 4; Fraternity Secretary, 4. Marjorie C. Shaw AAM North Main St., Belchertown Born 1918 at Holyoke. Northfield Seminary. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Honor Council, 4; W.S. G.A., 4 (Treasurer); Home Eco- nomics Club, 2, 3, 4; Intersorority Council, 3, 4 (Secretary-Trea- surer, 3, President, 4) ; Intersorori- ty Ball Committee, 3; Phi Kappa Phi. Wilfred B. Shepardson 2AE 63 Simonds St., Athol Born 1916 at Athol. Athol High School. Major in Chemistry. Aca- demic Activities Board, 3, 4; Roister Doisters, 2, 3, 4 (Business Manager, 4); Class Nominating Committee, 3; Christian Federa- tion, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-president, 3, President, 4); Radio Club, 3; Chemistry Club, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Council, 3, 4; Fraternity President, 4; Cross- country, 1. Hockey, 1, 3. Sidney C. Siegal 38 Forrest St., Winthrop Born 1918 at Mattapan. Winthrop High School. Major in Pre-Med. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club, 1, 2. Alfred J. Silfen 130 Belmont Ave., Springfield Born 1917 at Springfield. Classical High School. Transfer from Amer- ican International College. Major in Zoology. Zoology Club, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med. ' Club, 2, 3, 4. 4. 99] STATE COLLEGE INDEX 1 Edgar B. Slater :SAE Tyringhani Born 1918 at Pittsfield. Lee High School. Major in Economics. Out- ing Chib, 1, 2, 3, 4; Radio Club, 3; Cross-Country, 1, 2, 3, i. Elizabeth H. Spofford SBX Ji6 Hoiisatonic St., Lee Born 1919 at Lenox. Lee High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority Treasurer, 3, 4. Dorothea F. Snialley 2BX 7S Dauming St., Worcester Born 1918 at Worcester. South High School. Major in Home Eco- nomics. W.S.G.A., 2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Intersorority Council, 3, 4 (Vice-president, 4); Sororitj ' President, 4. Frank B. Smith 10 Parker St., liolyoke Born 1919 at Holjoke. Holyoke High School. Major in Chemistry. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Bay State Revue, 1, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Marjorie M. Smith AAM 19i Middlesex St., Springfield Born 1917 at Springfield. Classical High School. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Class Vice-president, 1, 2, 3; Bay State Revue, 1; Wesley Foundation, 4; Music Record Club, 3, 4; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority Secretary, 4. Everett R. Spencer, Jr. KS 61 Saratoga St., Springfield Born 1917 at Springfield. Mount Hermon School. Major in English. Collegian, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Com- mittee, 4. Sidney Spungin TE$ 50 Grove St., Greenfield Born 1918 at Orange. Greenfield High School. Major in Chemistry. Menorah Club, 1, 2; Radio Club, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Fraternity Secretary, 4. Eric Stahlberg K2 H State St., Northampton Born 1917 at Northampton.North- ampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2. Robert Staples ■33 Olive St., Northampton Born 1917 at Philadelphia, Penn- sj ' lvania. Northampton High School. Major in Entomology. Outing Club, 4; Fernald Entomol- ogy Club, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Phi. JaqueUne L. Stewart SBX 31-5 Lincoln Ace., Amherst Born 1919 at San Antonio, Texas. Leavenworth High School, Kan- sas. Major in Home Economics. Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival Com- mittee, 1; Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4. 100 1 HUNDRED AND FORTY Mary A. Stewart Bay Rcl, South Diixburi Born 1917 at Duxbury. Duxbury High School. Major in Enghsh. W.S.G.A., 4 (House Chairman); Class Nominating Committee, 4; Women ' s Athletic Association, 3,4. Homer L. Stranger A2: Slimmer St., Kingston Born 1916 at Plymouth. Kingston High School. Major in Dairy. Dairy Club, 3, 4; Animal Husband- ry Club, 3, 4; Cross-Couutry, 3. Harold L. Straube 0X 60 Haines Dr., Bloomfiekl, New Jersey Born 1918 at St. Louis, Missouri. Bloomfield High School. Major in Entomology. Carnival Committee, 4; Outing Club, 2, 3; Fernald Entomology Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Fra- ternity Vice-president, 4; Swim- ming, 1, 2; Cheer Leader, 1, 2. Albert W. Sullivan 27 So. Main St., So. Hadley Falls Born 1918 at Holyoke. South Had- ley High School. Major in Psychol- ogy and Zoolog} ' . Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Bay State Revue, 2, 4; Roister Doisters, 2, 3, 4 (President, 4); Men ' s Debating Team, 2; Pre- Med. Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-president, 3, President, 4). 1- u ■ Eugene F. Sullivan .V Maplewood Are., lViUi.man.ieU Born 1916 at Springfield. Transfer from Springfield College. Major in Economics. Newman Club, 2, 3, 4; Soccer, 1, 2; Spring Track, 2; Baseball, 1, 2. Martti I. Suomi SAE Xeck Rcl., Wellfleet Born 1917 at Wellfleet. Wellfleet High School. Major in Agricul- tural Economics. Wesley Founda- tion, 2, 3, 4 (President, 3); Dairy Club, 2; Animal Husbandry Club, 2, 3, 4. John W. Swenson AXA 9 Montvale Rd., Worcester Born 1917 at Worcester. North High School. Major in Economics. Student Religious Council, 1, 2; Christian Federation, 1, 2; Fra- ternity President, 3, 4. Gerald L. Talbot 3iS Pearl St., Springfield Born 1917 at West Springfield. Classical High School. Transfer from University of Wyoming. Major in Agricultural Economics. Men ' s Glee Club, 2, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Dad ' s Day Commit- tee, 4; Animal Husbandry Club, 2; Fraternity Vice-president, 4. Arthur E. Sullivan 0X 63 Park St., Palmer Born 1917 at Palmer. Palmer High School. Major in Mathematics. Football, 1, 2. David S. Tappan GX 39 Byfield Rd., Waban Born 1916 at Spruce Pine, North Carolina. Cambridge High School. Major in Entomology. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Carnival Commit- tee, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 1, 3, 4. 4L 101 MASSACHUSETTS STATE C L L E G Warren R. Tappin, Jr. AXA 133 Grove St., Winchendon Born 1918 at Winchendon. Mur- dock High School. Major in His- tory. Adelphia, 4 (Vice-President); Senate, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3, Vice- president, 4); Class Nominating Committee, 2; Carnival Commit- tee, 3; Football, 1, 2(M); Winter Track, 2(M); Baseball, 2(M), 3 (M), 4 (M) (Captain). Roy C. Taylor Bernardston Rd., Greenfield Born 1919 at Greenfield. Green- field High School. Major in Eco- nomies. Chemistry Club, 1. Dean T. Terry S E IT Church St., Palmer Born 1918 at Waterbm-y, Con- necticut. Palmer High School. Major in Zoology. Academic Ac- tivities Board, 3, 4; Men ' s Debat- ing Team, 2, 3, 4 (Manager, 3, Captain, 4); Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club, 1; Zoology Club, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 4; Chem- istry Club, 1, 2, 3; Mathematics Club, 1, 3; American Student Union, 3; Football, 1; Cross- country, 1, 2; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3; Winter Track, 1, 2, 3, 4(M). Gordon F. Thomas Q.T.V. 596 Sumtner St., Brockton Born 1918 at Brockton. East Bridgewater High School. Major in Agronomj-. Student Religious Council, 3; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3; Dairy Club, 2; Interfra- ternity Council, 2, 3; Fraternity Vice-president, 3. Chester H. Tiberii S E North Main St., Charlton Born 1918 at Charlton. Charlton High School. Major in Dairy In- dustry. Band, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Fraternitj ' Treasurer, 4. George B. Tobey, Jr. AS 250 Cochituate Rd., Framingham Born 1917 at Kingston. Framing- ham High School. Major in Fores- try. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President, 4). Rodney C. Turner AS Falmouth Heights Born 1917 at Stoneham. Lawrence High School. Major in Chemistry. Outing Club, 3, 4; Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 3, 4. Matthew N. Tuttle IS Beckert Ave., Revere Born 1917 at Boston. Lynn Classi- cal High School. Major in Land- scape Architecture. Index, 3, 4 (Art Editor) ; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Landscape Architecture Club, 3, 4; Collegian Quarterly, 4. Carlton W. Twyble 111 Main St., Gilbertttille Born 1917 at Gilbertville. Hard- wick High School. Spring Track, 1; Winter Track, 1; Baseball, 2, 3 (M). Margaret V. Vannah AAM 7 Hamden Ct., Monson Born 1919 at Westbrook, Maine. Monson High School. Major in English. 102 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTr Richard S. Warner Q.T.V. So Moiilrosc Sl.y Springjield Born 1917 at Noithfield. Technical High Scliool. Transfer from Amer- ican International College and University of Dayton. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Helena J. Webber 159 West St., Winchendoii Born 1918 at Amherst. Murdock High School. Major in English. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Robert T. Wetherbee Bolton Born 1917 at Marlboro, New Hampshire. Clark High School. Transfer from Clark University. Major in Chemistry. Howard D. Wetherell 13 Arnold St., Westfield Born 1917 at Westfield. Westfield High School. Major in English. Marciene R. Whitcomb 6 Central Ave., South Hadley Falls Born 1916 at Holyoke. Wilbraham Academy. Major in Dairy Indus- try. Band, 1, 2, 4; Dairy Club, 3, 4. Nathan L. Wilansky TE 51t Ridgeu ' ood Are., Holyoke Born 1919 at Holyoke. Holyoke High School. Major in Engineering. Band, 1, 2, 3; Bay State Revue, 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Soc- cer, 2, 3. Francis Wing 0X Sandwich Born 1918 at Sandwich. H.T. Wing High School. Major in Zo- ology. Class Nominating Commit- tee, 4; Zoology Club, 3, 4 (Presi- dent, 4) ; Cross-Country, 1 ; Spring Track, 1; Basketball, 1. Wilfrid M. Winter AFP South St., Wrentham Born 1917 at Milford. Chauncy Hall School. Major in Geology. Roister Doisters, 4; Military Ball Committee, 4; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Fernald Entomology Club, 1, 2; Interfraternity Council, 4; Fraternity Treasurer, 4. John F. Wolfe APP 19 Jefferson Rd., Winchester Born 1918 at Winchester. Win- chester High School. Major in Pomology. Cross-Country, 4; Win- ter Track, 3; Wrestling, 1. Beatrice Wood i Z Williams St., West Upton Born 1919 at West Upton. Upton High School. Major in Home Eco- nomics. Outing Club, 1; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorori- ty Vice-president, 4; Women ' s Athletic Association, 2, 3, 4. Julian H. Zabierek Q.T.V. Hildreth St., Chelmsford Born 1918 at Holyoke. Chelms- ford High School. Major in Eco- nomics. Fraternitv Treasurer, 3, 4; Football, 1; BasketbaU, 1. Myer S. Zelbovitz ■33 Vale St., Chelsea Born 1917 at Chelsea. Chelsea High School. Major in Bacteri- ology. 103] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX J JUNIOR CLASS The Junior has passed the half-way mark of his college career. But it is more than a designation of time that he has passed; it is a world. The Junior is a man of memories. Faces that he once con- sidered as land-marks on campus have gone forever and they leave a gap which the Junior finds hard to fill. The new world which the Junior faces has lost some of the glamour and romance of the " movie college. " The demands of the outside world have begun to make themselves known. The cat- alogue and the offered courses have become more than matters of idle curiosity and butts of jokes. Juniors think in terms of careers after graduation and bread-and-butter matters. For more than two years, now, the Junior has been subjected to varied bombardments of courses. Science and the liberal arts have been handed to him in well-proportioned doses. The ambitions he started out with may have been modified or discarded a thousand different times, but at last he is sensing a crystalhzation. For not only is he obtaining an education; he is actually studying and con- centrating on his major. The goal of his college career is almost within his grasp now, and the Junior reaches firmly toward it. His stumbling around in the dark has ended finally, and his two-year meandering among " guts " and sciences and liberal arts has reached a smooth stretch with an objective in view. Juniors close-up. . .From the Freshman Balcony. . .Photogenics 1 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Miss Critcliett, Streeter, Miss Phillips, Burr, Skogsberg, Smith President Clement Burr Vice-President Jean Phillips Treasurer Ronald Streeter Secretary Barbara Critchett Captain Paul Skogsberg Sergeant-at-Arms C. Vernon Smith OFFICERS Coeds crave Chopin. . .Frank foams Jack and Alden just jive. . 4. [105] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I JUNIORS RoseElaine Agambar, 29 Hitchock St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Phi Zela. Helene Dorothy Abearn, 268 River Bd., Winthrop; Winthrop High; Pre- Medical; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3. Jobn Casty Ajauskas, 54 Lincoln St., Brighton; Boston Latin; Pre-Medical; Men ' s Glee Club, 3; Class Nominating Committee, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Pre-Medical Club, 1, 2, 3; Mathematics Club, 1, 2; Football, 1, 2; Q.T.V. Donald Pearson Allen, 20 Winch St., Fitchburg; Fitchburg High; Economics; Senate, 3; Class Nominating Commit- tee, 2; Dad ' s Day Committee, 2, 3; Football, 2CM), 3(M); Basketball, 1, 2; Baseball, 1, 2(M); Lambda Chi Alpha. Helen Faitb Alperln, 159 AUyn St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; American International College; Bacteriology; Orchestra, 2, 3; Women ' s Glee Club, 3; Bay State Revue, 3; Menorah Club, 2, 3; Sigma Iota, (Secretary 3). Edward Everett Anderson. 3 William St., Andover; Punchard High; Bacteri- ology; Student Religious Council, 2, 3; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 3; Radio Club, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 3; Cross Country, 1, 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Tbomas Josepb Andrews, 94 Beech St., Revere; Hunting School; Massa- chusetts Institute of Technology; His- tory. Gladys Glencross Archibald, 164 Montague Rd., North Amherst; Am- herst High; English; Women ' s Glee Club, 2, 3; Bay State Revue, 3; Stat- ettes, 2, 3; Phi Zeta. Priscilla Bales Archibald. 84 Beech- wood Ave., Watertown; Norwood High; Home Economics; Choir. 1, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 1; Women ' s Rifle Team, 1, 2; Phi Zeta. Lillian Arcine Arslanian, 541 State St., Springfield; Classical High; Eco- Edward Wilmarth Ashley, East Freetown; New Bedford High; Chem- istry; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Gabriel Irving Auerbach, 26 Com- monwealth Ave,, Springfield; Classical High; Horticultural Manufacturer; Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Class Nomin- ating Committee, 3; Roister Doisters, 2, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; Double Quartet, 2, 3; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. George Sterling August, 34 Colum- bus Ave., Northampton; Northampton High; Pre-Dental; Zoology Club, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Ps.vchology Club, 3. A. Wesley Aykroyd, 2 Warden St., Worcester; Fitchburg Academy; Ento- mology; Bay State Revue, 3; Roister Doisters, 2, 3; Fernald Entomology Club, 3; Soccer, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Theta Chi. Robert Todd Babbitt, 92 Woodlawn Ave., Welleslev Hills; Wellesley High; Forestry; Orchestra, 3; Band, 1, 2; Christian Federation, 1, 3; Outing Clula, 3; Kappa Sigma. Ellen Priscilla Badger, Clapboard- tree St., Norwood; Norwood High; Economics: Phi Zeta. Frank Gerald Baege, 1487 River St., Boston; Hvde Park High; Landscape Architecture; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Landscape Architecture Club, 2, 3; Current Affairs Club, 3; Hockey, 2; Q.T.V. Cynthia Haven Bailey, Brewster Rd., Kingston; Kingston High; Home Eco- nomics; W.S.G.A., (Vice-president 3); Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Women ' s Athletic Association, 3; Phi Zeta. Annetta H. Ball, 440 North St., Dal- ton; Dalton High; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, 2, 3; Mathe- matics Club, 1; Women ' s Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3; Phi Zeta. AUan Ralph BardweU, 122 Pine St., Florence; Northampton High; Chem- istry; Kappa Sigma. Charles Henry Barney, 13 Hadley St., South Hadley; South Hadley High; History; Basketball, 1; Swimming, 1; Spring Track, 1; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Peter J. Barreoa, 89 Dalton Ave., Pittsfleld; Pittsfield High; English; Collegian, 2, 3; Band, 1, 2; Roister Doisters, 3; Soph.-Senior Hop Com- mittee, 2; Kappa Sigma. Edward Richard Barrett, 268 Denver St., Springfield; Cathedral High; St. Michael ' s College; Chemistry; Delta Omega. Ruth Emeline Barrus, Lithia; Wil- liamsburg High; Home Economics; Women ' s Glee Club, 2, 3; Christian Federation, 2; Outing Club, 1; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. Joseph Bartosiewicz, 51 Maple St., Northampton; Northampton High; Agronomy; Collegian, 1, 2, 3; Kappa Sigma. [106; Jt Betty Blanche Bascom, Leverett; Amherst High; English; 4-H Club, 1; Alpha Lambda Mu. Cortland Amidon Baasett, 1365 Main St., Athol; Athol High; Harvard College; Chemistry; Outing Club, 2, 3; Chemiatrv Club, 2, 3; Mathematics Club, 3; Interfraternity Council, 3; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Rosalie Agnes Beaubien, 85 West Main St., Millers Falls; Turners Falls High; Home Economics; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Home Economics, 1, 2, 3; Phi Zeta. Norman James Beckett, 100 Jaques St., SomerviUe; Somerville High; Chem- istry; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3; Animal Husbandry Club, 1; Pre- Med. Club, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 3; Alpha Sigma Phi. Evelyn Sofia Bergstrom, ISS Mel- bourne Rd., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; Recreational Planning; Women ' s Gle( Club, 3; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3: Carnival Ball Committee, 3; Music Record Club, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3: Lambda Delta Mu. Richard JoUes Bernson, 111 York Ter., Brookline; Brookline High; His- tory; Debating, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Isaac Bialer, 42 Union St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Soccer, 1, 2; Baseball, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Jerome Biederman, 952 Morton St., Mattapan; Boston English High; Phy- sics; Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Mathematics Club, 1, 2. 3; Swimming, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. Eleanor Birchard, 79 Cedar St., Springfield; Classical High; American International College; English; Alpha Lambda Mu. R. Alden Blodgett. SS Lakeside St., Springfield; Technical High; Economics; Honor Council, 2, 3; Index, 2, 3; Soc- cer, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. Ernest Albert Bolt, Jr., Windsor; Dalton High; Zoology; Roister Doisters, 2, 3; Radio Club, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 3; Alpha Sigma Phi. Merton Philip Bornstein, 39 Pearl Ave., Winthrop; Winthrop High; Horti- cultural Manufactures; Men ' s Glee Club, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Mathe- matics Club, 3; Spring Track, 1; Hort- icultural Manufactures Club, 3. John Bodfish Bourne, Red Brook Rd., Buzzards Bay; Bourne High; Ag- ronomy; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; Spring John Joseph Brack, 26 Westcott St., Dorchester; Dorchester High; English; Student Religious Council, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3 (President 3); Pre- Med. Club, 1, 2, 3; Interfraternity Council, 3; Q.T.V. Roberta Helen Bradley, Southfield; New Marlboro High; Home Economies; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. George William Bragdon, 641 Lowell St., Methuen; E. F. Searles High; Ani- mal Husbandry; Q.T.V. Robert Anthony Breglio, 136 Rim- mon Ave., Chicopee; Suifield Academy Pre-Medical; Informal Committee, 3 Pre-Med. Club, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2. Marguerite Brielman, 21 Britton St. Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; Bacteriology, Edward Broderick, 169 Irene St., Willimansett; Chicopee High; Chem- istry; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 2, 3; Interfraternity Council, 3; Alpha Gamma Rho (Vice-president 3). Elizabeth WiUard Brown. 40 Nor- wood Ter., Holvoke; Holyoke High; English. Shirley Marie Burgess, 123 Prospect St., Brockton; Brockton High; Home Economics; Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 3; Outing Club, 1; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Phi Zeta. Clement Franklin Burr, 289 Main St., Easthampton; Williston Academy; Physics; Senate, 3; Maroon Key, 2; Class President, 2, 3; Carnival Ball Committee, 2; Soccer, 2(M), 3(M); Inter-Class Athletic Board, 1, 2, 3 (President 3); Theta Chi. Katherine Tappan Callanan, 64 Elmlawn Rd., Braintree; Braintree High; Alpha Lambda Mu. Sylvia Campbell, 39 Knox St., Palmer; Palmer High; English; Christian Feder- ation, 1; Music Record Club, 2, 3; Lamb- da Delta Mu. Robert Norman Cashman, 22 Searle Ave., Easthampton; Williston Acade- my; History; Interfraternity Council, 2, 3; Soccer, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1; Sig- ma Phi Epsilon (Secretary 2, 3). Mary Elizabeth Chaffln, 293 Sea St., Hyannis; Barnstable High; New Jersey College for Women; History. Kathleen Clare. 185 Main St., East- hampton; Plymouth High, Plymouth, N. H.; Pre-Medical; Outing Club, 1; Phillips Brooks Club, 1. 4. MASS C H U S E T T S 107] STATE COLLEGE INDEX Z JUNIORS Virginia Mae Coates. 1S4 CottaRc St., New Bedford; New Bedford High; Home Economics; Outiug Club, 1; Alpha Lambda Mu. William Sebastian Coffey. 9 Sander- son Ave, Northampton; Saint Mich- ael ' s High; Economics; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Swimming, 1, 2, 3(M); Q.T.V. Arthur Irving Cohen, 251 Marvin St., Springfield; Classical High; Pre- Medical Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Foot- ball, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Dad ' s Day Com- mittee, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Herbert Morton Cohn, .53 Texel Dr., Springfield; Classical High; History. Alton Brigham Cole, Main St., West Medway; Medway High; Forestry; Men ' s 6lee Club, 2, 3; Band, 1, 2; Wes- ley Foundation, 1, 2; Music Record Ciub, 3; Alpha Gamma Rho. Ann Wilhelmina Cooney, 212 Bridge St., Northampton; Northampton High; Home Economics; Horticulture Man- ufactures Club, 3; Phi Zeta. Elizabeth Mary Crafts, Whately; Northampton High; Home Economics; Home Economics Club. 1, 2, 3. Richard Graham Crerie, oS Hadwen Rd., Worcester; Classical High; Eco- nomics; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2; Swim- ming, 1; Theta Chi. Ruth Lillian Crimmin, 55 Westover St., West Rosbury; Girl ' s Latin; Home Economics; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3; Phi Zeta. JUNIORS CHOOSE THEIR MAJORS John Paul Crimmins, 10 Gilford Dr.. Worcester; North High; Horticultural Manufactures; Senate, 3; Maroon Key, 2 (President); Student Religious Coun- cil, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Carnival Ball Committee, 2; Soph.-Senior Hop Committee, 2; Spring Track, 1, 2; Win- ter Track, 1, 2(M). Barbara Jane Crltchett, 36 Hillcrest PL, Amherst; Amherst High; Psych- ology; Class Secretary, 1, 2; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Women ' s Glee Club, 2, 3; New- man Club, 1, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 1; Psychology Club, 3; Phi Zeta. Richard Browne Curtis, 233 Church St., Marlborough; Governor Dummer Academy; Pomology; Class Nominat- ing Committee, 1; Horticultural Show Committee, 1, 2, 3; Carnival Commit- tee, 2; Ring Committee, 2, 3; Spring Track, 2; Hockey, 1; Theta Chi. Jean Anwyl Davis, 35 Worcester Lane, Waltham; Waltham High; English; Academic Activities Board, 3; Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3 (Manager 3); Class Nominating Committee, 1; Dad ' s Day Committee, 2, 3 (Co-chairman 3); Soph-Senior Hop Committee, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Xntersorority Council, 3; Phi Zeta. Marion Elaine Delorey, 60 Wilson St., Pittsfield; St. Joseph ' s High; Psy- chology; Student Religious Council, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Home Econom- ics Club, 1, 2; Psychology Club, 3; Sig- ma Beta Chi. Esther DcPalma, 12 Garden St., Feeding Hills; Agawam High; Psy- chology; Women ' s Glee Club, 3; Bay State Revue, 3; Home Economics Club, 1; Psychology Club, 3; 4-H Club, 1. Betty Desmond, Riverside Rd., Sims- bury, Conn.; Simsbury High; Land- scape Architecture; Women ' s Glee Club, 2; Bay State Revue. 3; Music Record Club, 2, 3; Landscape Architecture Club, 2, 3; Intersorority Council, 3; Women ' s Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. Charlotte Lee Donahue, 2352 Wash- ington St., Newton Lower Falls; New- ton High; Landscape Architecture; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1; Landscape Architecture Club, 1. Norman C. Dondero, 81 Playstead Rd., Medtord; Medford High; Bac- teriology and Physiology. Currie Hayes Downs, 38 Tucker St., Lynn; Lynn English High; Chemistry; Men ' s Glee Club, 1; Bay State Revue,3. Franklin Harmon Drew, 167 Walker Rd., Swampscott; Waltham High; Chemistry; Chemistry Club, 2, 3; Bas- ketball, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. Robert Elsworth Dukeshire, 242 Monument St., Concord; Hopkinton High; Chemistry; Phi Sigma Kappa. George Emil Erikson, 125 Shearer St., Palmer; Palmer Hi|h; Entomology; Fernald Entomology Club, 3. Margaret Lucille Everson, 1063 N. Pleasant St., North Amherst; Hanover High; Floriculture; Alpha Lambda Mu. Robert Stanley Ewing. 121 Main St., Easthampton; Monson Academy; His- tory; Roister Doisters, 3; Burnham Declamation, 2; Soccer, 1, 2, 3; Theta Chi. William Favorite, 183 Clinton Rd. Brookline; Brookline High; Yale-Co- lumbia; Botany; Mathematics Club, 2, 3. George Campbell Feiker, 2137 Ban- croft PI. N.W., Washington, D. C; Western High; Michigan State College; Landscape Architecture; Horticultural Show Committee, 3; Outing Club, 2; Landscape Architecture Club, 2, 3; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Frances Rosalie Field, 51 Lawler St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; English. Eugene J. Finnegan, 72 Westland Ave., Boston; Jamaica Plain High; Dairy Industry; Dairy Club, 3; New- man Club, 1, 2, 3. Robert David Firestone, 453 Pleasant St., Hol,voke; HoLvoke High; Chem- istry and Pre-Dental; Men ' s Glee Club, 2, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 3; Chemistry Club, 3; Mathe- matics Club, 2, 3. Gladys Elizabeth Fish, 53 Edward Ave., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; Psy- chology; Phi Zeta. Pot-wrestler . . . Poultry petter . [ 108 ] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY 1 JUNIORS Winifri-d Leslie Giles. Cumminglon; Norlhonipton High; Botany; Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; OuUng Club, 1, 2. tcr Doisl.Ts, 2; Clin-I I -1,,. 1, 2, :i; Music Kccoril Hiib. .i; ! ' - chology Club, :i; Lambda Delia iMu. Edward John Flynn. 71 Otis Ave., Dalton; Dalton High; Blue Ridge Col- lege; English; Roister Doisters, 2, 3; Debating, 3; Soccer, 3; Alpha Sigma Phi. Margaret Flynn, 124 Ingham St., Willimansett; Chicopee High; Bactcri- ologv; Freshman Handbook Board,l; New- man ' Club, 1, 2. 3; Music Record Club, 2, 3; Lambda Delta Mu (Treasurer 3). Arthur James Gleason Foley, III. 9 Fairfax St., Ashmont; Dorchester High; Political Science; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Pre- Med. Club. 1; Swimming, 1; Kappa Sigma. Harold Everett Forrest. 1S6 Brattle St.. Athol; Athol High; English; Index, 2, 3; Collegian, 1, 2, 3 (Campus Editor 2, 3); Sigma Alpha Epsilon, George Fotos, 351 Main St., Amherst; Amherst High; Ps.ychology. David Allen Frank. 69 Crawford St., Roxburv; Boston Latin; Chemistry; Menor.i ' h Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 3; Chemistry Club, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. William Emil Franz. R.F.D. No. 3, Waterbury, Conn.; Crosby High; Land- scape Architecture; Landscape Archi- tecture Club, 2, 3; Alpha Sigma Phi. Marion Gertrude Freedman. 91 Verndale St., Brookline; Chelsea Senior High; Floriculture; Bay State Revue, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Intersorority Council, 2, 3 (Secretary-Treasurer 3) ; Sigma Iota. William Hall Fuller. Main St., Lan- caster; Clinton High; Geology; Orches- tra, 1; Class Nominating Committee, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3. Doris Madeline Glehler, 61 Elm- wood Ave., Holyoke; Holyoke High; Mathematics. Glee ! Club, _■). Ginsberg, 36 WiUow- .d St., Dorchester; Boston Latin; Northeastern University; Pre-Medical; Menorah Club, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi! 1 Francis Gooch, 72 Egmont _... -.jokline; Williamstown High; History; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Current Affairs Club, 3; Baseball, 2; Choir, 3. C. Foster Goodwin. Jr.. 20 Common- wealth Ave., Haverhill; Haverhill High; Landscape Architecture; Index, 2. 3; Band, 1, 2; Men ' s Glee Club, 3; Land- scape Architecture Club, 2, 3; Soccer, 1, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha. WlUlam Thomas Goodwin. 24 Silver St., South Hadlev; South Hadley High; English; Collegian, 1, 2, 3; Carnival Committee, 3; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Fred Morris Gordon. Stony Hill Rd.. Wilbraham; American International College; Botany. John Davison Gould. 340 Woodlawn Ter., Collingswood, N. J.; Williston Academy; Entomolog.y; Class Captain, 2; Men ' s Glee Club, 1; Fernald Ento- mology Club, 3; Soccer, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Theta Chi. Marcelle Joan Grlse, North Brook- field; North Brookfield High; Eco- nomics; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Cheer Leader, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. Pauline Viola Grise. Church St., Ware; Ware High; History; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Robert Edward Cleaveland Hall, Mendon Rd., Upton; Upton High; Entomology; Collegian, 1, 2, 3 (Sub- scription Manager 3); Orchestra, 2; Men ' s Glee Club, 2; Fernald Entomol- ogy Club, 3; Swimming, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Kappa Sigma. Rohir St., N. Mathr 1; Nc Club, ;. Ii.ran. 14(1 K. deral iiihampton High; ' . ; iii f)o;i Board, , 2. 3; Pre-Med. . Alpha. 3 Assumption ercc High; Hor- s; Index, 2. 3; mittec, 3; Hor- Club, 3; Lamb- Gcorgc F. Hamcl. Ave., Worcester; Comn ticultural Manufacture Class Nominating Con ticultural Manufacture; da Chi Alpha. Anna Elizabeth Harrington. US High St., Amherst; Amherst High; Home Economics; Newman Club. 1, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Phi Zeta. Louise May Hartlev. Wybcn Or- chards, Westfield; West6eld High; Home Economics; Christian Federa- tion, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1. 3; Home 3. John WiUlam HaskeU. 160 Waverly St., Arlington; Kents Hill School; Wor- cester Academy; Cornell University; History; Lambda Chi Alpha. Wilfred Bostock Hathaway. 121 Dav- enport St., Taunton; Taunton High; Entomology; Band, 1, 2; Men ' s Glee Club. 2, 3; Christian Federation, 2, 3; Outing Club, 2; Fernald Entomology Club, 3; Theta Chi. John Michael Hayes, Jr., 217 Cam- bridge St., Worcester; Commerce High; Economics; Collegian, 1, 2; Men ' s Glee Club, 3; Freshman Handbook Board 2 (Editor, 2); Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Lambda Chi Alpha. Richard Bascom Hayward, 31 Clin- ton St., Taunton; Taunton High; Land- scape .Architecture; Band, 1, 2, 3; Chris- tian Federation, 2, 3; Landscape . rchi- tecture Club, 3; Interfraternity Council, 3; Cross Country, 2(M), 3(M); Alpha Sigma Phi (Secretary, 2). William Arlington Hendrlckson, Jr., First Parish Rd., Scituate; Scituate High; Chemistry; Radio Club, 3; Pre- Med. Club. 3; Chemistry Club, 3; Alpha Sigma Phi. Math shark . . . Chemical equation fisher . . . ■ . 109 z MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX JUNIORS Vivian Victoria Henschel, 107 Mount- fort St., Boston; Brighton High; Flori- culture; Intersororitv Council, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. John Taylor Heyman, 129 Sumner Ave., Springfield; Cathedral High; Economics; Men ' s Glee Club, 2, 3; Class Nominating Committee. 2; Stu- dent Religious Council (Vice-president. 3); Newman Club, 1, 2, 3 (President, 3); Dad ' s Day Committee, 3; Lambda Chi Alpha (Vice-president, 2, President, 3). Calvin Henry Hood, Jr., Rockland Heights, Northampton; Northampton High; Chemistry; Chemistry Club, 3. Kenneth Arthur Howland, South Duxbury; Duxbury High; Recrea- tional Planning; Collcpian, 1. 2, 3 (Managing Editor, 3); Outing Club, 1, 2,3. George Perkins Hoxie, Jr., 31 Bridge St., Northampton; Northamp- ton High; History; Roister Doisters, 2, 3; Q.T.V. Marion Barbara Hoye, 39 Granite St., Taunton; Taunton High; Psychol- ogy; Class Nominating Committee, 1; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Home Econom- ics Club, 1, 2; Psychology Club, 3; Women ' s Athletic Association, 2, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. E. Stuart Hubbard, R.F.D. No. 2 Poughkeepsie, N. Y.; Oakwood School; Pomology; Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Class Nominating Committee, 1; Statesman, 2, 3; 4-H Club, 1; Football, 2; Theta Chi. Phyllis Dean Hutchinson, Rochdale; Leicester High; English. ■Walter Graves Irvine, Jr., 25 Rollin- son Rd., Worcester; North High; Dairy Industry; Dairy Club, 2, 3; Animal Husbandry Club, 2; Theta Chi. Stanley Arthur Jackimczyk, 13 Oak St., Florence; Northampton High; Edu- cation; Senate, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1 .2(M); Baseball, 1, 2(M); Q.T.V. Woodrow Richard Jacobson, Win- throp Ave., Ivoryton, Conn.; Pratt High; Phvsics; Mathematics Club, 2; Soccer, 1, 2, 3(M); Spring Track, 1; Theta Chi. Doris Marie Johnson, 64 Grand St., Springfield; Classical High; Home Economics; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1. Thomas Welles Johnson, Main St., Deerfield; Deerfield Academy; Ento- mology; Inpex, 2, 3; Fernald Entomol- ogy Club, 3; Soccer, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 2, 3 (Manager, 3); Joint Committee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. Irene Johnston, 18 Main St., East- hampton; Easthampton High; Ohio State University; History; Phi Zeta. C. Parker Jones, Jr., 22 Nutting Ave., .Amherst; Kimball Union Acade- my; Pre-Medical; Outing Club, 1; Mathematics Club, 2, 3; Swimming, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Kappa Sigma. Mary Jane Jones, 2S Tahanto Rd., Worcester; Classical High; Chemistry; Chemistry Club, 3; Women ' s Athletic Association, 2, 3. Robert Lincoln Jones, Princeton; Worcester Classical High; Wildlife Management; Class Treasurer, 1, 2; Band, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1; Kappa Sigma. Elliot Harold Josephson, 58 Town- send St., Rnxbury; Roxbury Mem- orial High; Bacteriology and Physiolo- gy; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 2, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3; Foot- ball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1; Tan Epsilon Phi. William Alan Joyce, 291 Locust St., Florence; Northampton High; General Engineering; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3; Winter Track, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Phi Epsilon. David Michael Kagan, 134 East 51 St., Brooklyn, N. Y. Erasmus Hall High; Pre-Dental; Index, 2, 3; Menor- ah Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 3; Pre- Med. Club, 1, 2, 3; Hocke.v, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. !r Zalman Kaplan, 47 Win- chester St., Brookline; Boston Latin; History; Index, 2, 3; Roister Doisters, 2, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Current ASairs Club, 3; Soccer, 1, 2, 3; Winter Track, 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Dana Alton Keil, 70 Lindsey St., Attleboro;_ Attleboro High; Economics; Maroon Key, 2; Index, 3; Interfrater- nity Council, 3; Football, 1; Phi Sigma Kappa. Kathleen Margaret Kell, 31 Clapp St., Stoughton; Stoughton High; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. Paul Zelman KeUer. 257 Dickinson St., Springfield; Classical High; Politi- cal Science; Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Roister Doisters, 2; Student Religious Council, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Music Record Club, 2; Basketball, 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Edwin Wallace King Jr., 9 Franklin Ter., Melrose; Melrose High; Ento- mology; (Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1; Fernald Entomology Club, 3. Howard Francis King, Summitt St., Millville; Dean Academy; Forestry; Freskman Handbook Board, 1; Radio Club, 2; Alpha Sigma Phi. James H. King, Jr., 65 Charlotte St., Worcester; South High; Economics; Football, 1, 2(M); Baseball, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Inter-Class Athletic Board, 1, 2, 3; Theta Chi. Mary Doris King, 44 01m St., Gard- ner; Gardner High; Economics; New- man Club, 1, 2, 3; Lambda Delta Mu (Treasurer, 2; Vice-president, 3). Solomon Klaman, 33 Bicknell St., Boston; Boston English High; Agri- cultural Economics; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Soccer, 2(M), 3(M); Spring Track, ), 2, 3; Winter Track, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Baseball, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Milton Klevens, 22 Oldfields St., Bos- ton; Roxbury Memorial High; Forestry Men ' s Glee Club, 2, 3; Menorah Club, 2,3. Economics book borer . . . Blossom girl . . . Bug man . THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY It JUNIORS Ja.-.)1) Kill Do il Ma M.- Ilnrlf St., ■.A Iliuli; ■A: Hor- llllfiiclil Hivu,-, :i; MiMioiali Clill), I. ticullurni Show Committee, :i; Foot- ball. 1; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3; Winter Track, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. llaig Koobatian. 2S Hermitage Lane, Worcester; Worcester North High; lologj ; Men ' s Glee Club, 1; Alpha Ga ,S ' ho. Regina Genevieve Krawiec, Libert.v St., Belchertown; Belchertown High; American International College; Pre- Medical; Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 3; Mathematics Club, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. Marion E. Kuhn., Southampton; Easthampton High; Springfield .Junior College; Physical and Biological Sci- Chester Leon Kuralowicz, 19 Cath- erine St.. Willimansett;Chicopee High; English; Index, 2, 3; Colicgian. 1, 2, 3; Collegian Quartcrbj, 2, 3 (Associate Edi- tor); Music Record Club, 3; Alpha Gam- ma Rho. Edward Amedee LaFreniere, S4 Mon- roe St., Chicopee Falls; Cathedral High; Pre-Dental; Collegian, 3; Class Nominating Committee, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 3; Pre- Med. Club, 3; Chemistry Club, 3; Hockey, 2CM); Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Walter Russell Lalor, 432 Hollis St., Framingham; Framingham High; Dairy Industry; Collegian, 1, 2, 3; Band, 2, 3; Freshman Handbook Board, 1; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Dairy Club, 2, 3; Q.T.V. Helen Elizabeth Lane. 1147 Saratoga St., East Boston; East Boston High; Pre-Medical; Newman Club, 1. 2, 3; Fernald Entomology Club, 3; Pre- Med. Club, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. Priscilla Elizabeth Lane. 590 Pleas- ant St., Brockton; Brockton High; Home Economics; Class Nominating Committee, 1; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. Ralno Kiilli ' HXi LanHon. f.Sl Burn- conl Si., Woit. ' sI.t; Norlli High; I ' ouiliv HlKhiLIKiiv; Ouling Clul,, I; Animal Ilushaii.iiv Cbih, 1. 2, 3; Puul- trv Science Club, 3; 4-H Club, 2; Alpha Gamma Rho. Joseph Phelps Larkin. 21.5 . rsenal St., Watertown, Watertown High; U.S. Naval Academy; Chemistry; F(J0tball, 1, 2(M), 3(M1; Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. Hamilton Laudani, 123 High St., Lawrence; Lincoln Preparatory; Ento- mology; FernaldEntomology Club, 3; Track, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Sigma Phi. Edwin Mitchell Lavitt. 41 North Park St., Rockville; Svkes Memorial High; Animal Husbandry; Band, 1; Debating, 1; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3(M); Winter Track, 1; Joint Committee on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3; Tau Epsilon Phi. Thomas Richard Leonard. Jr., Church St.. Raynham; Taunton High; Landscape .Architecture; Christian Fed- eration, 2, 3; Outing Club, 2, 3; Land- scape Architecture Club, 2, 3; Alpha Gamma Rho (Secretary, 3). Richard Henry Lester, 9 Highland St., Ware; Ware High; Economics Football, 1, 2, 3; Lambda Chi Alpha. Daniel Levine. 78 Wellington Hill St., Boston; Boston Latin; Argicultural Economics; Menorah Club, 1. 2, 3; Interfraternitv Council, 2, 3; Tau Ep- silon Phi (Treasurer, 3). Bertha Elizabeth Lobacz. 36 Thomp- son St., Amesbury; Amesbury High; Zoology; Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 1, 2, 3; Phi Zeta. Dorothy Jean Long. 33 Maple St., Maiden; Arlington High; Chemistry; Women ' s Glee Club, 3; Christian Feder- ation, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2; Chem- istry Club, 3. Jason Ronald Lotow, 1S20 Common- wealth Ave., Brighton; Williston Ac- ademy; Economics; Bay State Revue, 3; Menorah Club, 1. 2, 3; Psychology Club, 3; Soccer, 1; Cross Country, 1; Baseball, 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Rebecca West Lovell, 643 Lincoln St., Worcester; North High; Horti- cultural Manufactures. Flora Dora Lucchesi, 108 Nonotuck St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; Home Economics; Women ' s Glee Club, 1; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Home Econom- ics Club, 1, 2, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. Stella Ruth Maisner, Amherst Rd.. Leverett; Amherst High; Home Eco- nomics; 4-H Club, 1; Home Econom- ics Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. Dana Harold Malins, 8 Nottinghill Rd., Brighton; Boston Latin; English; Bay State Revue, 3; Menorah Club, 1. 2, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3; Psychology Club, 3; Soccer, 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. John Charles Manix. 62 Graves St., South Deerficld; Deerfield Academy; Engineering; Collegian, 2, 3; Class Nominating Committee, 3; Alpha Gamma Rho. Howard James McCaUum, 6 Center Ct., Northampton; Northampton High; Landscape Architecture; Swimming, 1, 2(M), 3; Kappa Sigma. Harold Timothy McCarthy, 59 Broad St., Salem; Salem High; English; Collegian, 3; Roister Doisters, 3; New- man Club, 1, 2, 3; Swimming, 1, 2, 3; Kappa Sigma. Robert Joseph McCartney, 233 La- fayette St., Salem; Salem High; English; Collegian Quarterly, 2, 3 (Editor, 3); Men ' s Glee Club, 1. 2, 3; Bay State Re- vue, 2; Q.T.V. (Secretary, 2). Frederick -Wilson McGurl, 211 Ham- ilton St., Worcester; Classical High; Pre-Medical; Men ' s Glee Club, 2, 3; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2, 3; Double Quartet. Joseph Francis Meder. 244 North St., Northampton; Northampton High; Chemistry; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Mathematics Club, 2, 3: Chemistry Bertha Louise Merritt, Cataumet; Bourne High; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. Botanic Sherlock Holmes. . .Lactic Dr. Pasteur. 4l 111] I MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX JUNIORS Irving Meyer, oS Linden St., Spring- field; Classical High; Zoolofiv; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 3; Prc- Med, Club, 1, 2, 3; Soccer, 1, 2, 3(M); Basketball, 1, 2; Winter Tr.-ick, 2, 3; Baseball. 1; Tau Epsilon Phi. Walter Theodore Miles, 19 Pleasant St., Dalton; Williston Academy; Eco- nomics; Football, 1; Basketball, 1, 3; Baseball, 1, 2; Theta Chi. Joseph Thomas Miller, Oakham Rd., Barre Plains; Barre High; Horticultural Manufactures; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 2; Q.T.V, Miriam Miller, 20 Maple St., Brook- field; Brookfield High; History; Men- orah Club, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Iota. Marion Burnham Millett, 23 Mel- rose St., Adams; Adams High; Chc " - istory; Orchestra, 1, 2; Women ' s G Club, 1, 2, 3; - " ' ■ ■ ' ' " ' - Lambda Mu. Lincoln David Moody, 57 Blue Hills Rd., Amherst; Amherst High; Physics; Men ' s Glee Club, 3; Roister Doistcrs, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; Radio Club, 2, 3; Mathematics Club, 2; Soccer, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Sumner Martin Morrison, 2S0 Hum- boldt Ave., Roxbury; Boston Latin; Bacteriology; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Radio Club, 3; Prc-Med. Club, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 2, 3; Football, 2. John Charles Morytko, 9 Sibley Ave., Westfield; Westfield High; Economics; Current Affairs Club, 2. Umberto Pasquale Motroni, 62 Em- erald St., Boston; Boston College High; Landscape Architecture; Music Record Club, 1, 2; Landscape Architecture Club, 2, 3; Soccer, 3; Alpha Sigma Phi. Glenn Mulvey, 114 Appleton St., Springfield; Classical High; Springfield Junior College: Liberal Arts. Carl Albert Nastri, 5.5 Maltby PL, New Haven, Conn.; Miltord Prepara- tory; History; Maroon Key, 2; Class Nominating Committee, 3; Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2. .John -William Nye, U Otis St., Need- ham; Needham High; Chemistry; Men ' s Glee Club, 2, 3; Bay State Revue, 2; Chemistry Club, 3; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3; Winter Track, 1, 3; Kappa Sigma. Edward Joseph O ' Brien, 36 Nutting Ave., Amherst; Collegian, 1, 2, 3; Class Nominating Committee, 2; Bay State Revue, 3; Freshman Handbook Board, 2; Newman Club. 1, 2. 3; Carnival Com- mittee. 1; Outing Club. 1. 2. 3; Math- ematics Club. 1, 2. 3; Interfraternity Council. 3; Kappa Sigma. J. Edward Emmett O ' Connor, S7 Pine St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; En- gineering; Spring Track, 1. 2(M); Winter Track, 1, 2(M); Lambda Chi Alpha. Florence Marie O ' Neil, 14 Howard St., Ludlow; Ludlow High; Home Eco- nomics; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. Merton Howard Ouderkirk, 34 Mari- on Ave.. Brockton; Northeastern Uni- versitv; Floriculture; Horticultural Show Committee, 3. Robert Everett Pardee, 509 White St., Springfield; Technical High; Chem- istry; Wesley Foundation, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. De i St., Henry M. .T. Parzych, Greenfield; Wilbraham Academy; Eco- nomics; Basketball, 1, 2; Baseball, 1, 2. iChristopher Paul, 332 Talbot Ave., Dorchester; Jamaica Plain High; Horti- cultural Manufactures; Band, 1, 2, 3; Horticultural Manufactures Club, 3; Dairy Club, 3. Arthur A. Pava, 28 Somerset St., Springfield; Classical High; Entomolo- gy; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Fernald Entomology Club, 1, 2, 3. Richard Lewis Perry, 16 Orchard St., Springfield. Vt.; Springfield High; Tufts University; Mathematics; Or- chestra, 1, 2, 3; Band, 1, 2, 3; Men ' s Glee Club. 3; Chemistry Club, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 2, 3; Current Af- fairs Club, 3; Theta Delta Chi. Robert Rice Peters, 2250 Dixwell Ave., Hamden, Conn.; Tatt High; Eco- nomics; Class Nominating Committee, 3; Interfraternity Council, 3; Soccer, 1; Hockey, 2 (M); Theta Chi. Rose Helena Plichta, Strong St., Am- herst; Amherst High; English; Alpha Lambda Mu, Phyllis Jeanne Phillips, 40 Holmes Rd., Pittsfield; Edgewood Park; Psy- chology; Class Vice-president, 1, 2, 3; Psychology Club, 3; Women ' s Rifle Team, 1, 2, 3; Phi Zeta. William Phillips, Jr., Rome, Italy; Avon Old Farms School, Conn.; Uni- versity of Virginia; Pomology. Wallace Frank Powers, Jr., 30 Fear- ing St., Amherst; Lebanon School; Physical and Biological Sciences. Paul Nicholas Procopio, 264 Boyl- ston St., Brockton; Brockton High; Landscape Architecture; Landscape Architecture Club, 3; Alpha Sigma Phi. Alfred Adams Prusick, 10 Devens St., Greenfield, Greenfield High; Eco- nomics; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Foot- ball, 1,2(M),3(M). .lohn Joseph Prymak, 61 Kingston St., Lawrence; Huntington School; Entomology; Fernald Entomology Club, 3; Swimming, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Phi Sigma Kappa. .lean Puffer. II Rockhill St., Foxboro; Foxboro High; Bacteriology; Orchestra, 2; Music Record Club, 2, 3; Zoology Club, 2; Outing Club. 3; Women ' s Athletic Association, 2, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. Bruno Francis Pulnik, 76 Main St., Hopkinton; Hopkinton High; Flori- culture. Chester Carlos Putney, Orleans, Vt.; O rleans High; Animal Husbandry; Animal Husbandry Club, 2, 3; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3; Cross Country, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Spring Track, 1, 2, 3; Winter Track, 2. Lionel Georpe Reder, 142 Strong Ave., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; Agri- culture; Animal Husbandry, 1, 2, 3. Wild Life critique . . Psychology technique . 1 112 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY it JUNIORS Andrew John Reed, 753S Paxton Ave.. Chicago, 111,; GeorRe Willinma College; Zoology; Men ' s Glee Club, 1; Zoology Club, 1; Kappa Sigma. Stanley Copcland Reed, 78 Win- throp St. . Broekton; Brockton High; Animal Husbandry; Outing Club, 1; Animal Husbandry Club. 1. 2. 3; Foot- ball. 2; Baseball. 1; Alpha Sigma Phi (Treasurer. 3). John David Retallick. (i Wallace PI., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; Maroon Key, 2 (Vice-president); Class Nomin- ating Committee. 2; Carnival Commit- tee. 1. 2. 3; Theta Chi. H. Elisabeth Reynolds, 134 Wood- land St.. Worcester; South High; French; Sigma Beta Chi. lona Mae Reynolds, 41 Church St., Thorndike; Palmer High; Bacteriology and Physiology; W.S.G.A., 2, 3 (Secre- tary, 3); Roister Doisters. 2, 3; Music Record Club, 2, 3; Women ' s Athletic Association, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. Stephen Henry Richards, 246 Bronx- ville Rd., Bronxville, N. Y.; Roosevelt High; Columbia University; Wild Life Management; Outing Club, 3. Edward .4daTns Richardson, 47 High- land Ave., As ' er; Aver High; Botany; Men ' s Glee Club, 2, 3. Virginia Alice Richardson. 3S Maple Ave., Medford; Medford High; Lasell Junior College; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, 2, 3; Cheer Leader, 2, 3(M); Sigma Beta Chi. Robert Bertram Riseberg, 90 How- ard St., Waltham; Waltham High; Eco- nomics; Band, 1, 2, 3; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Spring Track, 2, 3; Winter Track, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Ada Margaret Robinson, 24 Hubbard St., Concord; Concord High; Home Eco- nomics; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. Robert Ames Rodriguez, 207 Cresent St., Northampton; Northampton High; Economies; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; Soccer, 1. Rino Joseph Roffinoli, 97 South St., Williarastown: Williamstown High; Agronomy; Bay State Revue, 3; New- man Club, 3; Soccer, 2, 3(M), (Man- ager); Joint Committee on Intercol- legiate Athletics, 2, 3; Alpha Sigma Phi (Secretary, 3). Anthony Stanley Rojko, East St., Hadley; Hopkins Academy; Agricultur- al Economics. Albert Stanley Rouffa. 5 Park Vale, Brookline; Brookline High; Agriculture; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Tau Epsilon Phi. Lee Lawrence Sanborn, 72 High St., Holyoke; Charles E. Gorton High, Yonkers, N. Y.; English. Patience Mantcith Sanderson, 16 Hastings St., West Roxbury; Girls ' Latin; English; Women ' s Glee Club, 1 Class Nominating Committee, 1, 2 Bay State Revue. 3; Christian Federa tion, 1; Home Economics Club, 1, 2 Current Affairs Club, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. Hanssen Schenker, 44 Brookline Ave., Holvoke; Holyoke High; Ento- mology; Band, 1, 2, 3; Fernald Ento- mology Club, 3. Harold Vincent Scollin, Jr., 51 Bar- ham Ave.. North Quincy; North Quincy High; Economics; Maroon Key, 2 (Secretary-Treasurer); Band, 1, 2, 3; Roister Doisters, 2, 3; Debating, 2, 3; Freshman Handbook Board, 2 (Business Manager); Ring Committee, 2, 3; Soph- Senior Hop Committee. 2, (Co-Chair- man); Military Ball Committee, 3; Burnham Declamation, 2, Kappa Sigma. Marion Elizabeth Scully. 24 Adams St.. Pittsfield; St. Joseph ' s High; Home Economics; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Sigma Beta Chi. Irving WiUard Seaver, 160 Gulf St., Shrewsbury; Shrewsbury High; Dairy Industry; Outing Club. 2; Dairy Club. 2. 3; Animal Husbandry Club, 2; Theta Benjamin Harold Shanker, 14 Ded- ham St., Wrentham; Wrcntham High; Agricultural Economics; Orchestra, 1; Soccer, I; Basketball, 1, 2; Tau Ep- silon Phi. Berniee Mac Shaw, Belchertown; Belchertown High; Zoology; Christian Federation, 2, 3; Fernald Entomology Club, 2; Zoology Club, 2, 3; Pre-Med. Club. 2. Samuel Pettee Shaw, 88 Pearl St., Middlcboro; Memorial High; Wild Life Management; Orchestra. 1. 2. 3; Band, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 2; Kappa Sigma. Muriel Edith Sherman, 26 Pine St., Palmer; Palmer High; Home Econom- ies; Home Economics Club, 1. 2. 3; Phi Zeta. Robert Quentin Siegel, 15 Roxton St.. Dorchester; Roxbury Memorial High; Pomology; Horticultural Show Committee. 3; Winter Track, 2; Base- ball, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Alan Silverman, 54 Elm Hill Ave.. Roxbury; Boston Latin; History; Ma- roon Key, 2; Class Nominating Com- mittee, 1; Roister Doisters, 3; Freshman Handbook Board, 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2. 3; Interfraternity Council, 2, 3; Burn- ham Declamation, 1; Soccer, 2, 3(M); Basketball, 1. 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Pi (Secretary, 3). Ralph Eugene Simmons, Jr., 21 Silver St., Pittsfield; Staunton Military Academy; Clemson College; Political Science; Football, 3(M); Theta Chi. Frank Melville Sii erett St., Stonehan my; Agricultural Economics; Class Nominating Committee, 2; Carnival Ball Committee, 3; Interfraternity Council, 3 (Secretary); Soccer, 1, 2(M), 3(M); Lambda Chi Alpha (Secretary, 2,3). Paul Lester Skogsberg, 9 Beckman St., Worcester; South High; Entomolo- gy; Class Sergeant-at-Arms, 1, Cap- tain, 3; Fernald Entomology Club, 3; Football, 1, 2, 3(M); Theta Chi. Landscape construction . . . Biology destruction . 4l 113 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I JUNIORS David Skolnick, 4S6 Blue Hill Ave., Roxbury; Winthrop High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Men ' s Glee Club, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3; Cross Country, 2. 3; Spring Track, 1, 2, 3; Winter Track, 1, 2, 3; Tau Epsilon Phi. Tracy Bernard Slack, Jr., 177 Mon- tague Rd., North Amherst; Amherst High; Landscape Architecture; Men ' s Glee Club, 3. Francis Leo Slattery, Dorchester; Boston Latin; Forestry; Band, 1; Class Nominating Committee, 2. 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 2, 3; Base- ball, 1, 2, 3; Kappa Sigma. Carlton Vernon Smith. Hillsville Rd., North Brookfield; North Brook- 6eld High; Argicultural Economics; Class Sergeant-at-Arras, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball. 1; Soccer, 3(M); Al- pha Gamma Rho. Elmer WiUia m Smith, IS West Cen- ter St., Flore ace; Northampton High Fernald Entomology Entomology; Club, 3. Fredcriek Edward Smith, 35 Stan- ford PI., Glen Ridge, N. J.; BloomBeld High. N. J.; Entomology; Ferniild En- tomology Club, 3. Helen Marg:aret Smith, .53 Beacon St., Athol; Athol High; History; 4-H Club, 2; Outing Club, 1; Alpha Lambda Mu. Richard Neilson Smith, 384 East St.. Chicopee Falls; Chicopee High; Chemistry; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Beverley Snyder, 109 Rochelle St., Springfield; Classical High; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Christian Federation, 1; Alpha Lambda Mu. Matilda Martha Sobon, 29 Kendrick St., Lawrence; Lawrence High. George Hodges Soule, 36 Keith St., Springfield; Classical High; Agricul- tural Economics; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3; Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3; 4-H Club, 2, 3. Frank Henry Spencer, 439 Elm St., Northampton; Northampton High; History; Football, 1, 2; Baseball, 2. Hyman Julius Steinhurst, 90 Green- wood St., Boston; Boston Latin; Bac- teriology; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; Mathematics Club, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. James Alexander Stewart, Jr., 14 Fruit PI., Amesbury; Amesbury High; History; Wesley Foundation, 1; Outing Club, 1; Soccer, 2, 3; Lambda Chi Alpha. John Bushnell Stewart, 7 Roseland Rd.. Worcester; Worcester Academy; Horticultural Manufactures; Kappa Sigma. Harold Frederick Storey, Union St. Minis; Millis High School; Agronomy; Class Nominating Committee, 1; Theta Ronald Mather Streeter, S3 Welles- lev Rd., Holyoke;, Holyoke High; Eco- nomics; Class Treasurer, 1, 2, 3; Theta Chi. Charles William Styler, 44 Quina- poxet St., Jefferson; Hardwick High; Poultry Husbandry; Roister Bolsters, 3; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Music Record Club, 3; Poultrv Science Club, 3; Chem- istry Club, 2; Baseball, 1, 2; Alpha Gam- ma Rho. Mary Margaret Sullivan, Brimfield Inn, Brimfield; Hitchcock Academy; Physical and Biological Sciences; New- man Club, 1, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 1; Chemistry Club, 2, 3; Current Affairs Club, 2. Jean Frances Taylor, 92 Mt. .Auburn St., Watertown; Watertown High; Eng- lish; Class Nominating Committee, 1, 2, 3; Christian Federation, 1, 2; Ring Committee, 2, 3 (Chairman, 3); Sigma Beta Chi. Raymond Winehell Thayer, 5817 London Rd., Duluth, Minn.; Central High; Landscape Architecture; Class Nominating Committee, 1; Outing Club, 1; Landscape Architecture Club, 3; Theta Chi. Mildred Arlene Thomas, 157 Maple St., Amherst; Hopkins Academy; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3. Henry Smith Thornton, 77 E. Pleas- ant St., Amherst; Amherst High; His- tory; Alpha Sigma Phi. Robert Connor Tillson, Common- wealth Rd., Cochituate; Wayland High; Poultrv Husbandry; Poultry Science Club, 3; Cross Country, 1; Swimming, 2; Spring Track, 2; Alpha Gamma Rho. Barbara Tolman, 530 Burncoat St.. Worcester; Classical High; Smith Col- lege; English; Orchestra, 2, 3. Marian Esther Tolman, 22 Main St., GilbertviUe; Holyoke High; Home Economics; Women ' s Glee Club, 3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Inter- sorority Council, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. Phyllis Tolman, 530 Burncoat St., Worcester; Classical High; Home Econ- omics; Women ' s Glee Club, 2, 3; Home Economics Club, 2, 3; 4-H Club, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. Mary Margaret Tormey, 353 East Center St., Lee; Lenox High; Liberal Arts; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Current affairs Club, 1, 2. Malcolm Parker Trees, 14 Randell Rd., Maynard; Maynard High; Botany; Carnival Committee, 2; Landscape Architecture Club, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. Kathleen Mildred Tully, 35 South St., Southbridge; Mary E. Wells High; English; Collegian, 1, 2, 3; Bay State Revue, 3; Freshman Handbook Board, 1, 2 (Editor); Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Ellsworth Arnold Twyble, HI Main St., GilbertviUe; Hardwick High; Pre- Dental. Jean Gates Tyler, Stockbridge House, Amherst; Mclndoes Academy; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Phi Zeta. Soil analyzer. . .Sentence juggler. . .Saw forester. 1 [114 J THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ft- JUNIORS High; riiv irN; Collnii.ui. 1, L ' . :i-, Kii- gincciing Vh.b, 2, .i; ' Hadi.. (;iiil., 2. 3; MathcmiiUcs Club, 1, 2, a; Kiippa Sigma. Eleanore Mildred Vassos, 2055 Allen St., Springfield; Classical High; Zoology: Outing Club, 8; Zoology Club, 2, 3; Lambda Delta Mu. Richard W. Vincent, Little River St., Westfield; Westficld High; Entomologv: Fernald Entomologv Club, 3; Spring Track, 1; Winter Track, 1; Phi Sigma James Dexter Walker, Pelham; Belch- crtown High; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Physics; Theta Chi. William Thomas Walsh, 249 Spring- field St., Agawam; Agawam High; Economics; Maroon Key, 2; Newman Club, 1. 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3(M); Biiseball, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Sigma Phi. Kenneth Frank Waltermire, 341 St. James . ve., Springfield; Technical High; Landscape . rchitecture; Land- scape .Architecture Club, 2, 3. Arthur Leonard Wannlund. Jr., 144 M_t. Vernon St., Arlington; Arlington High; Chemistry; Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; Radio Club, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 3; Mathe- matics Club, 2, 3; Sigma Alpha Ep- Everetl Lee Warner, 163 Northamp- ton Rd., Amherst; Technical Higli; Chemistry; Outing Club, 3; Chemistry Willia Roxbu bandrN Arthur Wendell Washburn. Jr., George St., Plainville; Kimball Union .Academy; Geology; Maroon Key, 2; Band, 1; Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Stu- dent Religious Council, 1; Christian Federation. 1; Wesley Foundiition, 1, 2; Choir. 3; Statesmen, 3; Music Record Club, 3; Outing Club, 1, 2, 3; Swimming, 1; Spring Track, 1; Alpha Gamma Rho (Vice-president, 2, President, 3). Gordon Henry Washburn. Goshen; Bangor Theological Seminary; Liberal Eleanor Elizabeth Wentworth, Sta ley St., .Amherst; .Amherst High; Ec Harriet Elizabeth Wheatlev. Chester Depot, Vt.; Chester High; Home Eco- nomics; Bay State Revue, 3; Christian Federation, 1; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. Esther Hammond Wheeler, Dun- barton, N. H.; Concord, N. H. High; Chemistry; Home Economics Club, 1,2; Chemistry Club, 1,2, 3; 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, Horace B. Wildes, Jordan Rd., Dart- mouth; Dartmouth High; Agricultural Economics; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Walter Anthony Wileikis. fll Sum- mer St., North Amherst; Amherst High; Mathematics; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Music Record Club, 1, 2, 3; Outing Club, 3; Radio Club, 3; Ps.vchology Club, 3; Chemistry Club, 3; Mathe- matics Club, 1, 2, 3. Nellie Marie Wozniak, 30 X St., Turners Falls; Turners Falls High; English; Newman Club, 1, 2, 3; Dad ' s Day Committee, 2, 3. Dorothy Eleanor Wright. Stock- bridge Rd., Lee; Lee High; Liberal Arts; Horticultural Manufiicturcs Club, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. Albert Yanow, 43 Millet St., Dor- chester; Boston Latin; Sociology; Col- kgian, 1, 2; Student Religious Council, 3 (President); Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3 (President, 3); Tau Epsilon Phi. Dorothy Marion Youland, 35 Win- slow Ave., W. Somerville; Somerville High; Home Economics; Women ' s Glee Club, 1; Bay State Revue, 3; Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Lambda Mu. " Hort " manufacturer. . .Coed reciter. . .Historical unraveler. " mi 4L [ 115 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I SOPHOMORE CLASS As glorious as it may have been, the freshman year is but a mem- ory to the Sophomore. He has climbed a mountain and is master of all he surveys and, somehow or other, freshmen are always under his surveillance. With characteristic vengeance, the Sophomore takes the freshman under his wing and introduces him to part of the college which isn ' t found in books. True, his enthusiasm for instruction is a bit dampened at the rope-pull and rather subdued on razoo night. These trivialities, however, are more than offset by Hell-night. Once the preliminary fun is over, the Sophomore settled back and notices change. To be sure, some familiar faces have not re- turned and this makes an uneasy shiver run up his back. College, during Sophomore year, begins to assume a matter-of-fact air: jobs to earn room or board, responsible positions in fraternities, a few vie parties as an intermezzo in studies, week-end trips home to search for summer jobs, worries over Pat ' s, conferences with the dean. . .Back home and on campus he is now more than a " lowly neophyte. " School is not as simple as before. If the Sophomore does not know what he has wanted to study, he at any rate, has begun to think about it seriously. The fun and laughter which have char- acterized his freshman year are now tinged with the solemnity of increasing manhood. With June, he has abandoned his careless frivolity — he is becoming mature. Instructors make life complex for the Sophomores. . .Psychology. . .Military . . . Physics 110 » 1 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Yerme, Freitas, Miss Chase, Dwyer, Miss Mclnerny, Sullivan President Secretary William Dwyer Phyllis Mclnerny Vice-president Captain Ann Chase Carl Werme Treasurer Sergeant-at-A rms John Sullivan Edmond Freitas OFFICERS Sophomores heave-to . . . make life harder for the freshmen . . . while coeds assume Thespian guise 4L 117 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX SOPHOMORES Melvin Abrahatnson, Chapman St., Greenfield; Greenfield High; Liberal Arts. Louis Abrams. 113 Thornton St., Revere; Revere High; Ph.vsical and Biological Sciences. Paul Joseph Adams, Jr., 23 Harding St., Feeding Hills; Agawam High; Chemistry; Bay State Revue, 2; Spring Track, 1, 2; Winter Track, 1, 2; Alpha Sigma Phi. Dorothy Eleanor Adelson, 309 Sar- geant St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; History; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Current Affairs ' Club, 2; Sigma Iota. Nancy Strowbridge Alger, 5 Court End Ave., Middleboro; Middleboro Memorial High; Home Economics; Roister Doisters, 1, 2; Phi Zeta. Richard Colwill Andrew, IS Ply- mouth St., Florence; Northampton High; General Engineering; Band, 1, 2; Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Bay Staters, 2; Engineering Club, 1; Alpha Gamma Rho. Doris Elva Angell, Ridgeview Ter., Westfield; Westfield High; Home Eco- nomics; Weslev Foundation, 1, 2; " ■ i Club, 1,2. Gilbert Stetson Arnold, Southwick; Westfield High; Economics; Soccer, 1, 2(M); Alpha Gamma Rho. Dorothea Eve At vood, 110 South- wick St., Feeding Hills; Agawam High; English. Milford Walter Atwood, 44 Florence Ave., Holvoke; Mt. Hcrmon School; Mathematics; Maroon Key, 2; Col- legian, 1, 2; Carnival Committee, 2; Mathematics Club, 2; Soccer, 1; Base- ball, 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. Frances Pauline Avella, 26 Fl.vnt Ave., Monson; Springfield .Tunior Col- lege; English; Orchestra, 2. Marion Rachel Avery. Pocasset; Bourne High; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, 2; Women ' s Ath- letic Association, 1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. Winthrop Boynton Avery, 11 Loring St., Shrewsbury; Worcester Academy; Economics; Theta Chi. Mary Ely Baker, 126 Northampton Rd., Amherst; Northampton School for Girls; Liberal Arts; Women ' s Glee Club, 1; Phillips Brooks Club, 1, 2; Music Record Club, 2; Outing Club, 2; Psychology Club, 2. Daniel Balaban, S7 Abbottford Rd., Brookline; Boston Latin; Horticultural Manufactures; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. Matilda Ida Banus, 4.5 Longfellow Ave., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; Home Economics; Newman Club, 1, 2. Elizabeth Ann Barney, 14 Spring Vale Ave., West Roxbury; .Jamaica Plain High; Bacteriology; Christian Federation, 1, 2; Music Record Club, 2; Psychology Club, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. Marjorie Lucille Barrows, 35 Whit- man Rd., Worcester; Auburn High; Languages and Literature; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1. Everett Wilbur Barton, 1077 Massa- chusetts Avenue, North Adams; Drury High; General Engineering; Outing Club, 1; 4-H Club, 1; Q.T.V. Thyrza Stevens Barton, Amherst; Amherst High; Smith College; Physical and Biological Sciences; Phi Zeta. Constance Jean Beauregard. 3 Sonoma Place, Holyoke; Holyoke High; Liberal Arts; Class Nominating Com- mittee, 1, 2; Bay State Revue, 2; New- man Club, 1, 2; Music Record Club, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1; Psychology Club, 2; Choir, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. Morris Leo Beck. 48 Ellington St„ Boston; Roxbury Memorial High; Languages and Literature; Menorah Club, 1; Mathematics Club, 1. Kate A. Belk, 210 Fifth St., Leon ster; Dedham High; History; Wom( Glee Club, 2; Bav State Revue, 2; pha Lambda Mu. Leslie Ross Benemelis, 236 Sargent St., Holyoke; Williston Academy; Phy- sical and Biological Sciences; Band, 2; Bay State Revue, 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. George Neil Bennett, 39 Bridge St., South Hadley Falls; South Hadley High; English; Football, 1; Q.T. " V. 118 Barbara Tucker Bentley. 54 Belmont Ave., Northampton; Northampton School for Girls; French; Christian Federation, 1, 2. Mary Elizabeth Berry, 253 Front St., Weymouth; Weymouth High; Zoolog.v; Orchestra, 1, 2; Women ' s Glee Club, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2; Zoology Club, 2; Women ' s Athletic Association, 1, 2; Phi Zeta. Marguerite D. Berthiaume, 17 Rut- land St., Springfield; Classical High; English; Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Bay State Revue, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2; Music Record Club, 2; Statettes, 1, 2; Choir, 1, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. Charles Frederick Bishop. 172 Pleas- ant St., East Walpole; Walpole High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Col- legia7i. 1, 2; Class Nominating Commit- tee, 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. Lester John Bishop, 1 jNIargaret Lane, Huntington, Long Lsland. N. Y.; Hun- tington High; Economics; Football, 1, 2; Kappa Sigma. Justine Bette Blackburn, Meadow St., Lanesboro; Pittsfield High; Home Economics; Christian Federation, 1; Home Economics Club, 1; 4-H Club, Richard Alfred Booth, 50 Raymond Ave., Holyoke; Georgia School of Tech- nology; Engineering; Mathematics Club, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. John Edward Brady, Jr., 2-37 Federal St., Greenfield; Deerfield Academv; Physical and Biological Sciences; Ma- roon Key, 2; Football, 1, 2(M); Theta David Truman Brewster, 98 Preston St., Danvers; Proctor Academy; Gen- eral Engineering; Outing Club, 1, 2; Alpha Sigma Phi. John Harper Brotz, First St., Chelms- ford; Chelmsford High; Animal Hus- bandry; Music Record Club, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; Animal Husbandry Club, 1; Alpha Gamma Rho. Esther Mather Brown, 5 North West- field St., Feeding Hills; Agawam High; Bridgewater Teachers College; Psy- chology; Sigma Beta Chi. Harvey James Brunell, 7 Jones St., Worcester; Classical High; Horticultur- al Manufacturers; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Chester Herman Budz. ileadow St., Housatonic; Searles High; Stanton Military Academy; Engineering; Basket- ball, 1; Spring Track, 1; Kappa Sigma. Ralph Francis Bunk, 43 Sohier Rd., Beverly; Beverly High; Animal Hus- bandry; Cross Countr.v, 1, 2; Winter Track, 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. David Farwell Burhank. 119 Webster St., Worcester; South High; Liberal -Arts; Band, 1; Christian Federation, 1, 2; Theta Chi. Preston James Burnham, 10 .Jackson St., Lvnn; Classical High; Pre-Medical; Band, 1, 2; Dad ' s Day Committee, 2; Zoology Club, 1, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2; Psychology Club, 2; Chemistry Club, 1; Theta Chi. Barbara Myrle Butement. 39 Madi- son Circle. Greenfield; Greenfield High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Wom- en ' s Glee Club, 1; Christian Federation, I, 2; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1; Mathematics Club, 1, 2; Choir, 2; . lpha Lambda Mu. Alan Buxbaum, 87-11 loOth St., -Jamaica, N. Y.; Woodmere Academy; Animal Husbandry; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Pi. Ruth Elizabeth Cambridge. 45 Hill- crest PI., . mherst; . mherst High; Ph.vsical and Biological Sciences; Chris- tian Federation, 1, 2; .Upha Lambda Mu. Harold Jakob Bloom, 111 Maxwell St., Dorchester; Dorchester High; Geology; Men ' s Glee Club, 2; Menorah Club. 1, 2; Football, 1; Wrestling, 1. James Gerard Bullock, 35 Everett St., .Arlington; Arlington High; Chem- istry; Maroon Kev, 2 (President); Newman Club, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 2; Football, 1, 2(M); Baseball, 1. Jean Burleigh Carlisle, 164 Essex St., Saugus; Saugus High; Chemistry; Psvchologv Club, 2; Chemistry Club, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. -ft 119 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLE ? SOPHOMORES Daniel Robert Carter, Jr., 244 Glen Rd., Wiimington; Wilmington High; Horticultural Manufactures; Football, 2; Kappa Sigma. WilHam Waldo Case, 26 Manitoba St., Springfield; Technical High; Uni- versity of Maine; Geology; Theta Chi. Mary Louise Chapman, 28 Western Ave., Westfield; Westfield High; West- field State Teachers College; Home Economics; Lambda Delta Mu. Anne Muriel Chase. 21 Rockhill St., Foxboro; Foxboro High; Home Eco- nomics; Class Vice-president, 1, 2; Orchestra, 1; Roister Doisters, 1; Ring Committee, 2; Phi Zeta. Frances Emma Clark, 235 Ashley St., West Springfield; West Springfield High; Home Economics; Home Eco- nomics Club. 1, 2; 4-H Club, 1, 2. Russell Tynan Clarke, 12 Tirrel St., Worcester; Worcester Academy; Eco- nomics; Football. 1, 2{M); Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1; Kappa Sigma. Elizabeth Boyd Cobb, 332 Grove St., Chicopee Falls; Springfield Junior Col- lege; Liberal Arts. Mary Louise Cobb, 332 Grove Chicopee Falls; Springfield Junior lege; Home Economics. A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A SOPHOMORE Philip Arthur Cochran, 269 Summer St., Somervillc; Mt. Hermon School; Dairy Industry, Band, 1, 2; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Elizabeth Marie Coffin, 4 Jefferson St., Newburyport; Newburyport High; Physics; Collcgion, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 1. Cohen, .59 Auburn :; Boston Latin; Liberal h Club, 1, 2; Alpha Ep- Alan Collier, 110 Rosseter St., Dor- chester; Lincoln Preparatory; Horti- cultural Manufactures; Menorah Club, Chemistry Club, 1, 2; Tan Epsilon Phi. John Francis Conlcy, Jr., 12(1 Bel- mont St., Brockton; Brockton High: Bacteriology; Bay State Revue, 2 Newman Club, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1 Sigma Phi Epsilon. Roscoe Wells Conklin, Hancock; New Lebanon High, N. Y.; Agriculture; Alpha Gamma Rho. Marion Helen Cook. 1 Underwood St., Worcester; Classical High; Chem- istry; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2; Outing Club. 1; Mathematics Club, 1; Alpha Lambda Mu. Francis Timothy Coughlin, 26 Ad- ams St., Taunton; Coyle High; Chem- istry; Newman Club, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 2. , Beeket; Pittsfield High; Zoology; Freshman ; Newma n Club, 1; Pre- Med. Club, 2. William Allen Cowan, 29 McKinley Ter., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; Animal Husbandry; Outing Club, 1, 2; Chem- istry Club, 1, 2; 4-H Club, 1, 2; Spring Track, 1, 2; Winter Track, 1. Richard Philip Cox, 192 Summer St., Bridgewater; Bridgewater High; Physi- cal and Biological Sciences; Collegiany 1, 2; Christian Federation, 1, 2; Zoology Club, 2; Psychology Club, 2; Theta Chi. Barbara Ann Cramer, 15.5 North- ampton Rd., Amherst; Amherst High; Mount Holvoke; Newman Club, 1; Out- ing Club, 1; Current Affairs Club, 1. Richard William Cressy, 40 Stone St., Beverly; Beverly High; Political Science; Newman Club, 1, 2; Soccer, 1; Phi Sigma Kappa. Mildred Culver, 18 Park St., East- hampton; Easthampton High; North- field Seminary; Liberal Arts. Ralph Kenyon Dakin, 169 Park Ave., Dalton; Dalton High; Physics; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 1, 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. William Hinds Darrow, Jr., Putney, Vt.; Putney High; Pomology; Carnival Committee, 2; Outing Club, I, 2; Kappa Sigma. Sherman Gilbert Davis, 62 Commo- dore Rd., Worcester; Worcester Poly- technic Institute; Horticulture Manu- factures; Band, 2; Bay State Revue, 2. Rosalie Blaise DiChiara, 105 Walnut St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Newman Club, 1, 2. John William DivoU, 866 Main St., Worcester; Bellows Falls High, Ver- mont; Animal Husbandry; Bay State Revue, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Mary Joan Donahue, 7 Coffin ' s Ct., Newburyport; Newburyport High; Eng- lish; Collegian, 1, 2; Freshman Handbook Board, 1; Index, 2; Newman Club, 1; Outing Club, 1; Chemistry Club, 1. Our typical soph is up with the sun . . . with five minutes to dress . 120 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY » SOPHOMORES Elwyn John Doubleday, Pelham; Belcnertown High; Chemistry; Soccer, 1. John Andrew Doyle. 12 Willow St., Pittsfield; St. Joseph ' s High; Historv; Class Nominating Committee, 1; New- man Club, 1, 2; Football, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. Phyllis Louise Drinkwater, 443 West Britannia St., Taunton; Taunton High; Zoology; Christian Federation, 1, 2; Music Record Club, 1, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 2; Choir, 1, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. Kathryn Rita Duffv. 619 Broadway, Chicopee Falls; Cathedral High; Home Economics; Women ' s Glee Club, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Ernest Albert Dunbar, Jr., Kendall St., Barre; Sanborn Seminary, Kingston, N. H.; Zoology; Swimming, 1; Phi Sigma Kappa. ' William .lohn Dwyer. 17 Pearl SI.. Holyokc; Holyoke High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Class President, 2; CoUcgim. 1, 2; Newman Club, 1. 2; Carnival Committee, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. Melville Bates Eaton. 144 Winsor Ave., Watertown; Mount Hermon School; Economics; Maroon Key, 2 (Secretary- Treasurer); Carnival Ball Committee, 2; Football, 1; Hockey, 1; Theta Chi. Althea Louise Ebeling. S Mvrtle St., Pitts6eld, Lenox High; Psychology. Taleott White Edminster, Howland Rd., East Freetown; New Bedford High; Agricultural Engineering; Band, 1, 2; Outing Club, I, 2; Animal Hus- bandry Club, I, 2; Alpha Gamma Rho. Albert Coolidge Eldridge, 47 High- land Rd., Somerville; Somerville High; History; Band, 1, 2; Class Nominating Committee, 1; Football, 2; Spring Track, 1, 2; Theta Chi. Nye Emery, Chestnut St., ; Westboro High; Agricultural ;s; Cheer Leader, 1, 2; Theta liam Theodore Evans. Jr., 24 riner St., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; ral Arts; Maroon Key, 2; Football, Winter Track, 1. Mildred Mary Eyre, 111 Riverside Drive, Northampton; Northampton High; Home Economics; Sigma Beta Joseph ' William Farrcll, Jr., 81 Pol- lock Avenue, Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; Ph.vsical and Biological Sciences; New- man Club, 1, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha. Harvey Eugene Ferlig, Sheridan, Pa.; Schaefferstown High; Physical and Bio- logical Sciences; Soccer, 1. Frederick Arthur Filios, Bates Rd., Westfield; Westfield High; Agriculture; Bay State Revue, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2; 4-H Club, 1, 2; Soccer, 2; Spring Triick, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Wilma Fiske, Upton; Upton High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Wes- le.v Foundation, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1; Lambda Delta Mu. Priscilla Florence Durland. IS Thom- as Rd., Swampscott; Swampscott High; Home Economics; Christian Federa- tion, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. John Lawrence Dwver, 25 Edwa Ave., Pittsfield; Pittsfi ' eld High; Che Paul Joseph Dwyer, 96 Loring Rd., Winthrop; Winthrop High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Newman Club, 1, 2; Ring Committee, 2; Football, 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. Carl Lambert Erickson. 6S Steere St., Attleboro; Bristol Countv -Agri- cultural School; Dairy Industry; Soccer. 1, 2(M); Phi Sigma Kappa. Axel ' Vincent Erikson. 94 Massa St., Northampton; Williston Acade Horticulture; Theta Chi. David Hoffman Eskin, 310 Tappan St., Brookline; Huntington School; Liberal Arts; Band, 1. 2(Drum Major); Class Nominating Committee, 2; Men- Club, 1, 2; Basketball, 2; .Alpha Epsilo Fred Courtney Fosgate, 152 Central St.. Hudson; Hudson High; Economics; Current Affairs Club, 2; " Theta Chi. Edith Fox, 556 Cottage St., New Bed- ford; New Bedford High; Bacteriology and Physiology; Orchestra, 1, 2; Sigma Iota, (Secretary 2). George Fredd, 274 Norwell St., Dorchester; Boston Latin; Phvsical and Biological Sciences; Menorah Club, 1 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. .to sing as he shaves that fuzz. . .and then to serve and eat breakfast. 4. 121 I MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX SOPHOMORES Bernard Freedman. 376 Main St., Hudson; Brigham Young Univ., Chem- Edmu nH Fr ' en lan Freitaa, 12 Laure St , Fairhaven; Ha rtford High Animi 1 Hu shar Hr r. C ass Sergeant-at Arms, 2; Newr Ch h, , 2; Anima ndrv CI lb. V. l ' ' o thall, 1, 2 Spring Track, 1 , Winte ■I ' r ack, 1; Base Michael Mitchell Frodyma, SS High St., Holyokc: Holyoke High; Physical and Biological Sciences. Alan I. Gewirti, 16 Cross St., Win- throp; DeWitt Clinton High, New- York, N. Y,; Band, 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; Psycholo- gy Club, 1, 2. Charlotte Gilchrest. Arbor St., Lun- enburg; Lunenburg High; Home Eco- nomics; Women ' s Glee Club, 1; Wesley Foundation. 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Alpha Lambda Mu. Eleanor Irene Gillette. Towanda, Pa ■ Towanda High; Liberal Arts; Class Secretary, 1; Phi Zcta. Harold Philip Golan. 45 Templeton St., Dorchester; Boston Latin; Physical and Biological Sciences; Collegian, 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Zoology Club, 1; Chemistry Club, 1; Mathematics Club, 2; Baseball, 1, 2; Hockey, 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Joseph Robert Gordon, Jr., 8 Con- gress St., Greenfield; Greenfield High; Botany; Collegian, 1, 2; Index, 2. Sarah Shirley Gordon, 80 Hamilton St., Holyoke; Holvokc High; Liberal Arts; Women ' s Glee Club, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Sigma Iota, (Treasurer 2). Margaret Roberts Gale, 3 Summer St., Northboro; Northboro High; His- tory; Bay State Revue, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. James Wilbur Gilman, 15 Hollis St., East Pepperell; Pe perell High; Physi- cal and Biological Scii Alpha Sig- Thomas Parke Gordon, Jr., 5.5 Nei South St., Northampton; Wilbrahat Academy; Economics; Football, 1; Bas kctball, ' l; Baseball, 1; Theta Chi. Marion Luella GaUagher, 165 Walnut Ave., Norwood; Norwood High; Home Economics; Bay State Revue, 2; Home Economics Club, 1; Alpha Lambda Mu. Theodore Alsdorf Girard, U Main St., Housatonic; Sears High; Pre-Med- ical; Newman Club, 1, 2; Pre-Mcd. Club, 1,2; Alpha Sigma Phi. James Clifford Graham, Warehan St.. Middleboro; Middleboro Memoria High; Liberal Arts; 4-H Club, 1, 2 Kappa Sigma. George Albert Garbowit, 39 Prospect St., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; Agri- cultural Economics; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. John Joseph Gardner, 460 Hallock St., Pittsburgh, Pa.; Saint Mary of the Mount High; Agricultural Economics; Newman Club, 1, 2; Kappa Sigma. - Saul Max Gliek, 77 Walnut Pk., Rox- burv; Boston Latin; Dairy Industry; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Dairy Club, 2; Football, 1; Tau Epsilon Phi. Florence Goldberg, 29 West Selden St., Boston; Girl ' s Latin; Economics; Bay State Revue, 2; Menorah Club, 2; Dorothy Ann Grayson, 91 Cottage St , . mherst; Amherst High; Liberal Arts; Lambda Delta Mu. Bradford Marson Greene, 108 Dart- mouth St., Springfield; Springfield Jun- ior College; Landscape Architecture; Index, 2; Landscape Architecture Club, 2; Spring Track, 2; Winter Track, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha. Ethel Kenfield Gassett, 56 Ellis Ave Whitman; Whitman High; Hon Economics; Outing Club, 1; Hon Economics Club, 1; Phi Zeta. George Woodrow Gaumond, 70 West Bovlston St., Worcester, North High; Horticulture; Newman Club, 2; Spring Track, 2; Winter Track, 2; Cheer Leader, 2; Hockey, 1, 2. Gertrude Helen Goldman, 129 Franklin Ave., Chelsea; Chelsea High; French; Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Men- orah Club, 1, 2; Music Record Club, 2; Sigma Iota. Joseph Goldman, 40 Bovlston St., Maiden; Maiden High; Bacteriology; Orchestra. 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. Eric Leroy Greenfield, 30 Church St., Ware; Ware High; Agricultural En- gineering; Roister Doisters, 1, 2; Cross Country, 1, 2; Winter Track, 1, 2; Kap- pa Sigma. Benjamin Levi Hadley, Jr., 62 Ledg- lawn Ave., Bar Harbor, Me.; Bar Har- bor High; Entomology; Class Captain, 1; Football, 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. . Out of the frat doors he dashes . . . later is glad to leave " Pat ' s " 1 122 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY SOPHOMORES Pauline Jan« Hale. South A.shficld: Sanderson Acadeinv; Home Economics; Oueing Club, 1; Home Economics Club, Rulli Mill ' John MutehingB. South East St., . mherst; Amherst High; Ph.vsical and Biological Sciences; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Martha Baird Hall, 22;i .Tunc Si., Worcester; Classical High; Recrcalioiiiil Planning; W.S.G.A., 2; Women ' s Ath- letic Association, 1, 2, (Vice-president, 2); Phi Zeta. " Norma Louise Handforth, 40(i Main St., West Medway; Medway High; Liberal Arts; Women ' s Glee Club, 2; Class Nominating Committee, 2; New- man Club, 1, 2; Carnival Ball Com- mittee, 2; Women ' s Athletic Associa- tion, 1, 2; Choir, 1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. Una Louise Harding. 33 River St., Hudson; Hudson High; Home Eco- nomics; Newman Club, 1; Outing Club, Helen Marie Harley, Mas Ave., Lunenburg; Lunenbi Home Economics. Kalph Augustus Hatch, Jr., ol Cen tre St., Brookline; Gould Academy Animal Husbandry; Phi Sigma Kappa Rene Victor Hebert, 57 Franklin St., Holyoke; W ilbraham Academy; Pre- Medical; Pre-Med. Club, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon. na Linnea Hedlund, 2 Hedlur , Braintree; Braintree High; Sic I College; Home Economics; Hon omics Club, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. Louise Heer St., New Haven, Conn.; New Haven High; Landscape .Architecture; Wom- en ' s Glee Club, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; Landscape .Architecture Club, 2; 4-H Club, 2. HuHscll Elmer Hibbard, North Had- Icy; Hopkins Academy; Animal Hus- bandry; Soccer, 1, 2. Robert Noble Honson, 9 Main St., Florence; Northampton High; Engineer- Raymond James Hock, Indian Or- chard; Ludlow High; Springfield Col- lege; Zoology; Outing Club; Q.T.V. Robert Wilkinson Holbrook, 7S Congress St., Milford; Kent ' s Hill School, Me.; Chemistry; Alpha Sigma Phi. Roy H. Holmberg. 27S Union St., Ashland; Kent ' s Hill School, Me.; Carnival Committee, 2; Maroon Key, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha. John Daniel Horgan, 2S Harrte Ave., Belmont; Belmont High; Cam- bridge School of Liberal Arts; Pre- Medical; Bay State Revue, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2; Footb. 11, 2; Soccer, 1; Alpha Sigma Phi, Harold Horwitz. 19 Nightingale St., Dorchester; Boston Latin; Zoology; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. ' Howard Knapp Hunter, 41 Noble- hurst Ave., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; Stockbridge School of .Agriculture; Class Nominating Committee, 1; Chris- tian Federation, 2; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2; Index, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; 4-H Club, 2; Sigma .Alpha Epsilon. es Michael Hurley, 19 Aldrich Northampton; St. Michael ' s High; oistry; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Melvin Hutncr, 23 Chapin Tcr., Springfield; Classical High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Menorah Club, 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Bertram Roy flyman. 112 Talbot Ave., Doreheslcr; Dorchester High for Boys; Zoology; Collci,ian. 1, 2 (Sports Editor); Freshman Handbook Boiird, 1; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Fcrnald Entomology Club, 2; Zoology Club, 2; Psychology Club, 2; Cross Country, 2. Helen Ruth Janis, 18 Main St., Mil- lers Falls; Hempstead High School, N. Y.; English; Roister Doisters, 1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. Joseph Thomas Jodka, 104 Park St., Lawrence; St. Mar.y ' s Preparatory and Lawrence High; Entomology; Swim- ming, 1, 2(M); Kappa Sigma. Irwin JofTe, 104 Patton St., Springfield; Classical High; Physical and Biological s; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Hockanum 3 Academy; Eleanor Bliss Johnson, Rd., South Hadlev; Hopkil Home Economics. Mary Elizabeth Judge, 47 Paine St., W ' orcester; North High; Liberal Arts; Newman Club, 1, 2; Dad ' s Day Com- mittee, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. cal and Biological .at eleven attends " convo " . . .and gets a lift back to the House. 4. 123 I MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX SOPHOMORES Foster Clarke Kay, 525 New Britain Ave., Hartford, Conn.; Bulkeley High and Suffield Academy; Colgate Uni- versity; History; Alpha Tau Omega. Marie Barbara Kelleher, Sandwich; Henry T. Wing High; Ph.vsical and Biological Sciences; Orchestra. 1, 2; Woman ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Newman Club. 1, 2; Woman ' s RiBe Team, 1. Andrew Einmett Kennedy, 1475 Northampton St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; General Engineering; Football, 1; Q.T.V. Hyman Charles Kessler, 110 Orange St., Chelsea; Chelsea High; Zoology; Menorah Club, 1. 2; Chemistry Club, 1. Gould Ketchen, Javish St.. Belcher- town; Belchcrtown High; Liberal Arts; Index, 2. George Edward Kimball, 99 East Pleasant St., Amherst; Wakefield High Liberal Arts; Football, 1, 2; Hockey, 2 Track, 1; Baseball, 1; Lambda Ch Alpha. William Warren Kimball, 99 East Pleasant St., Amherst; Wakefield High; Forestrv; Cross- Country, 1. 2(M) Spring Track, 1, 2; Winter Track, 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. Elenor King, 19 Great Ed., Maynard; Mavnard High; Home Economics; Orchestra, 2; Home Economics Club, 1,2. Howard Robert Kirshen, 49 Almont St., Mattapan; Dorchester High; Chem- istry; Debating, 1, 2; Menorah Club; 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Robert Joseph Kirvln, 159 Bradford St., Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; Pre- Medical; Bay State Revue, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Charles Henry Knox, Jr., East Long- meadow; Classical High; Springfield Junior College; Engineering; Class President, 1; Engineering Club, 1, 2; Kappa Sigma. Mary Anne Kozak, 1 Oakdale PI.. Easthampton; Easthampton High; Home Economics; Alpha Lambda Mu. Marrigan Samuel Krasnecki, Adams St., North Chelmsford; Chelmsford High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Newman Club, 1, 2; Football, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. Eva Moe Krasnoaelsky, . shfield; San- derson Academy; Liberal Arts; Outing Club, 1. Howard Raymond Lacey, S3 Milk St., Fitchburg; Fitchburg High; Get- tysburg College, Pa.; Chemistry. Vincent Arthur Lafleur, 26 Williams St., Marlboro; Marlboro High; Forest Entomology; Newman Club, 1; Hockey, 1; Q.T.V. John Paul Laliberle, 27 Lexington Ave., Holyoke; Williston Academy; Chemistry; Chemistry Club, 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. George Paul Langton, 77 Highland Arlington; Arlington High; Eng- lish; Soccer, 1. Frances Helen Lappen, 137 Geneva Ave., Dorchester; J. E. Burke High; Bacteriology; Index, 2; Bay State Re- vue, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Sigma Iota. Elizabeth Frances Leeper, 273 Mar- rett Rd., Lexington; Watertown High; Home Eco nomics; Roister Doisters, 1; Newman Club, l;PhiZeta Maurice Wright Leland, 12 Fiske St. , Natick; Natick High; Forestry; Spring Track, 1; Hockey, 1; Phi Sigma Kappa, Louis Ovila Lescault, 6 Morse Ave., Ware; Dean Academy; Pre-Medical; Newman Club, 1, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 1,2; Kappa Sigma. Waldo Chandler Lincoln, Church St., Ware; Wilbraha my; Horticulture. Sylvan Mortan Lind, 21 East 21st St., Brooklyn, N. Y.; James Madison High; Chemistry; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 1; Chemistry Club, I, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. Joyce Hamilton Lindsey, 114 Chu St., Ware; Ware High; Home Econc ics; Home Economics Club, 1 . 2. George William Litchfield, Whatelv; Wayland High; English; Colkgim, 1, 2; Index, 2; Band, 1, 2; Christian Federation, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; Cross-Country, 1, 2; Sigma Alpha Ep- Agnes Elizabeth Lockhart, 151 Mon- tague City Ed., Greenfield; Greenfield High; Home Economics; Newman Club, 1, 2. Lewis Rice Long, Jr., 2G Beechmont St., Worcester; Worcester Academy; Cheer Leader, 1, 2; Theta Chi. Henry Joseph Lott, 374 Hyde Park Ave., Boston; Jamaica Plain High; Botany. John P. Lucey, 19 Underbill PI.. Pittsfield; Pittsfiled High; Zoology; Alpha Sigma Phi. . Dinner with the boys ... is followed by a chat . 124 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY it SOPHOMORES Charles D. MacCormack, Jr.. 10 Gorham Rd., West Medtord; Mcdtord High; Bacteriology: Kappa Sigma. A. Francis MaoDougalK Wcstford; Mt. Hcrmon School; Fre-Medical; Cross-Country, 1; Phi Sigma Kappa. MacNeil, US South •lainville High; Home William Edward Mahan, Elm Court, Lenox; Lenox High; History; Class Nominating Committee, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2; Lambda Chi . lpha. Helen Kate Maisner, Amherst Rd., Leverett; Amherst High; Economics; Alpha Lambda Mu. Margery Constance Mann. 19 .Ab- bott St., Pittsfield; Framingham State Teachers ' College; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, 2; Cheer Lead- er, 2(M); Phi Zeta. John Peabody Marsh, 155 Center St., Danvers; Phillips Academy; History; Class Nominating Committee, 1; Soc- cer, 1; Phi Sign- ' ■ " -- Margaret Wheeler Marsh, North Hatfield; Doylestown High, Pa.; Poul- try Husbandry; Index, 2; Poultry Sci- nce Club, 2. Lillian Gertrude Martin, 100 Lake- wood St., Worcester; South High; Home Economics; Newman Club, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. Richard Randall Mason, 27 Lowell St., Maldcn_; Maiden High; Chemistry; Soccer, 1; Kappa Sigma. Willard Mayo. 10 Deer St., Rutland, VI.; Rutlancl High, Middlcbury Col- lege; Chemistry; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Robert Clinton McCulcheon, 9 Park St., South Deerfield; Deerfield Academy: Physical and Biological Sciences; Honor Council, 1, 2; Collegian, I, 2; Class Nominating Committee, 2; Ring Committee, 2; Tlieta Chi. Phyllis Anna Mclnerny, 103 Lake- wood St., Worcester: South High; Home Economics; W.S.G.A., 2; Class Secre- tary, 2; Class Nominating Committee, 1; Bay State Revue, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Lamb- da Delta Mu. WiUiam Francis Mcintosh, 19 Sum- mer St.. Amherst; Dean . cademy; Landscape Architecture. George Edward McLaughlin, 14 Nut- ting . ve., Amherst; Amherst High; Forestry; Swimming, 1; Kappa Sigma. Harold Hubert McLean, 155 Cowper St., East Boston; East Boston High Forest Entomology; Newman Club, 1 Music Record Club, 1; Spring Track, 1 Winter Track, 1; Sigma Alpha Epsilon Joseph Wright MeLeod, 4 Maple St., Pepperell; Pepperell High; Dairy In- dustry; Bay State Revue, 2; Newman Club, 1,2; Outing Club, 1, 2; -l-H Club, 1, 2; Soccer, 1, 2; Alpha Sigma Phi. Mary Jean McNamara, 10 Central St., Brookfield; Brookfield High; Eng- lish; Freshman Handbook Board, 1; Newman Club, 1, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. Walter Melnick, South Deerfield; Deerfield High; . griculture. Ralph Bertrand Mendall, Jr., IS Forest St., Middleboro; Memorial High; Entomology; Band, 1, 2; Men ' s Glee Club, 2; Class Nominating Committee, 2; Bay State Revue, 1, 2; Kappa Sigma. Marjoric Edna Merrill. 114 President St., Lynn; Lynn English High; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, I, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. Albert Richard McaiolT, 167B North Common St., Lvnn; Lynn English High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Men- orah Club, 4, 2; Zoology Club, 1, 2; Pre-Med Club. 1, 2; Psychology Club, 1,2; Chemistry Club, 1,2. Susan Micka, Park Hill Rd., E hampton; Easthampton High; An can International College; Home ] nomics; 4-H Club, 2; Home Econoi Club, 2. Robert Park MiUs, 61 College St., South Hadley; Choate School; Willston Academy; Rutgers College; English. Donald William Moffitt. 1 Franklin Court, Northampton; forthampton High; Engineering; Engineering Club, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 2; Alpha Gam- ma Rho. Norwood Charles Moore, 7 Parker Ave., Westfield: Westfield High; Amer- ican International College; Mathe- matics; Mathematics Club, 2. David R. Morrill, 2 Prospect St., Row- lev; Dairy Industry; Cross Country, 1, 2(M); Spring Track, 1; Winter Track. 1; Alpha Sigma Phi. Freeman Edward Morse, 9 Rhodes Ave., Lvnn; Lvnn Classical High; En- tomology; Outing Club, 1; Psychology Club, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. Rita Mae Moseley, 5; Agawam; Springfield Ji Chemistry; Women ' s Gle Cooper St., nior College; : Club, 1. .and funny amoebas in lab. . .are left with relief. 4. [125 1 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I SOPHOMORES Harold Elwood Moshcr, Worcester Rd., Sterling; Leominster High; Land- scape Architecture; Christian Federa- tion, 1; Weslcv Foundation, 1, 2; Outing Club, 2; Cross Country, 2; Spring Track. 1; Sigma Alpha Epsiloii. William John Mosher, Pleasant Ridge Rd., Marrison, N. Y.; Harrison High; Entomology; Class Nominating Committee, 1. Arlene Marie Mothes. 65 Cottage St., Hudson; Hudson High; Zoology; Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Mathematics Club, 1, 2; 4-H Club, 1, 2. Jolin Robert Mott. 15 Ash St., North Attleboro; North Attleboro High; Wor- cester Polytech; Agronomy; Band, 1, 2; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Betty Jane Moulton. G3 Highland St., Worcester; North High; Liberal Arts; Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Sla- tettes, 1, 2; Bav State Revue, 2; Home Economics Club, 1; Sigma Beta Chi. Robert Allaire MuUany, 24 Elm St., H.itfield; Smith Academy; Cushing Academ.v; Agronomy; Soccer, 1, 2tM). Patricia Am 1 Newell, 101 Maple St., West Roxbu v; Girls ' Latin School; Home Econo niics; Roister Doisters, 1, 2; Home Eco nomics Club, 1, 2 Sigma Beta Chi. Elsie Rose Musi St., GreenBeld; Gn istry. vie, 356 Deerficld nfield High; Chem- 54 Marion Louise Nagelschmidt Garden St., Pitts6eld; Pitts6eld High; Home Economics; Zoology Club, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. Kenneth Malcolm Nagler, 577 Long- meadow St., Longmeadow; Springheld Junior College; Physical and Biological Sciences; Outing Club, 2; Mathematics Club, 2; Soccer, 2. Otto S. Nau. Jr., Country Club Rd., Greenfiled; Greenfield High; Zoology; Band, 1, 2; Bay State Revue, 2; Pre- Med. Club, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon. ' William Newell, 236 Shelburne Rd„ Burlington, Vt.; Holyoke High; Eco- Sally Neilson, 60 Oak Crest Rd., Need- ham; Nccdham High; Floriculture; Outing Club, 1, 2. Richard Edward Noon, 2!) Church St., Hudson; Hudson High; Chemistry; Chemistrv Club, 1; Mathematics Club, Howard Lysander Norwood, 14S Pearl St., Hol.yoke; Hol.vokc High; En- gineering; Alpha Sigma Phi. Robert Arthur Nottenburg, 132 Sum- mer St., Waltham; Waltham High; Mathematics and Physics; Collegian, 1, 2; Freskman Handbook Board, 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. Baxter BardwcU Noycs, 620 High St., Greenfield; Deerficld Academy; Prc-Medical; Men ' s Glee Club, 2; Zool- ogy Club, 2; Swimming, 2; Spring Track, 1, 2; Phi Sigma Kappa. Norman Ogan, 416 Appleton St., Holyoke; Hol,voke High; Horticultural Manufactures; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Tau Epsilon Phi. Peter Paeocha, 56 Glendale St., East- hampton; Easthampton High; Ph.vsical and Biological Sciences. Stephen Papp, North Falmouth; Fal- mouth High; Mathematics; Soccer, 2; Hockey, 1. Stanley Pearlman, 6 Ruthven St., Roxbury; Roxbury Memorial High; Dairy Industry; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Dairy Club, 1; Hockey, 1; Alpha Epsil- Robert Douglas Pearson, Pleasant- ville Rd., Briarcliff Manor, N.Y.; Mount Hermon School; Pre- Medical; Biind, 1; Class Nominating Committee, 1; Soccer, 1, 2; Theta Chi. Alice Pederzani, 3 Pinev PL, Spring- field; Wareham High; French; Women ' s Glee Club, 1; Newman Club, 1; Wom- an ' s Athletic Association, 2; Phi Zeta. Gertrude Ann Pelissier, Hadle.y; Hopkins Academy; Liberal Arts; Lamb- da Delta Mu. Robert WiUard Perry, Eastacres, Pontoosuc Lake, Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; English; Roister Doisters, 2; Carnival Committee, 2; Phi Sigma Kap- Richard Hurst Pierce, 37 Birchwood Ave., Longmeadow; Williston Acade- my; Physical and Biological Sciences; Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Kappa Sigma. Dorothy Florence Plumb, Box 16A, Springfield, Vt.; Springfield High; Home Economies; Women ' s Glee Club, 1; Choir, 1; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; 4-H Club, 1, 2. Violet Lillian Politella, 400 Hamp- shire St., Lawrence; Lawrence High; Modern Languages; Christian Federa- tion, 2; Choir, 1, 2. Louise Frances Potter, 4 Mechanics St., Ware; Ware High; Chemistry; Collegian. 1, 2; Pre-Med. Club, 2, Spencer Romeyn Potter, Norfolk, Conn.; Gilbert High; Horticulture; Band, 1, 2; Maroon Key, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; Soccer, 2; Winter Track, 1. 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Dorothy Boyd Prest, 19 Brook St., Manchester; Story High; Bacteriology; Orchestra, 1. .Now for some " sheeing " !. . .returning later with the girls. 1 [ 126 ] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY St SOPHOMORES Harris Pruss, 36 Sngamore St., Lymi; Lynn EnRlish High; Physical and Bio- logical Sciences; Mcnorah CInb, 1, 2; Tun EpsiloM Phi. Wurroii Morrill Pushcc, Prospocl St., Honsatonic; Lcarles High; Bacteri- ology; Band, 1, 2; Bay State Revue, 2; Soccer, 1, 2; .Mpha Sigma Phi (Secrc- Jamcs Nathaniel Putnam, -i Larch- mont St., Danvers; Danvers High; Poultry Husbandry; Roister Doisters. 2; Poultry Science Club, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; Alpha Gamma Rho. Irving Rabinovitz, 415 Warren St., Boston; Roxbury Memorial High; Lib- eral Arts; CoUegian, 1, 2; A.S.U., 1. Morton Bernard Rabinow, 31 Hazel- ton St., Mattapan; Dorchester High; English; Mcnorah Club, 1, 2; Hocliey, 1; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Robert Solin Radding, 1 1 Sunapee St., SpringBeld; Classical High; Zoolo- gy; Freshman Handbook Board, 1; Pre-Med. Club, 1; Cross Country, 2; Baseball, 1. 2. Eileen Richardson, Hospital Cottages Winehendon; Templeton High; Home Economics; Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2. noris Mary Robitaille. 144 Sargent St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; Ph.vsical and Biological Sciences. Remigio S. Roda. IB Alden St., Proi incctown; Boston University; Ph.vsici and Biological Sciences; Mathematic Mitchell Sidney Rodman, 21 Strat- ton St., Dorchester; Boston Latin; Ph.vsical and Biological Sciences; Mcn- orah Club, 1, 2; Soccer, 2; Tan Epsilon Israel ,Iay Rogosa, 55 Cherry St., Lynn; Lynn English High; Economics; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 1; Mathematics Club, 1; Current Af- fairs Club, 1, 2. Edward Morton Rosemark, 57 Sup- ple Rd., Dorchester; Boston Latin; Economics; Freshman Handbook Board, 1; .Mcnorah Club, 2; Soccer, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Arthur Henry Rosenblooni, 1S47 Northampton St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; Zoology; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Outing Club, 2; Zoology Club, 1, 2; Psychology Club, 1, 2. Arthur Ernest Rowe, 225 Norfolk St., Springfield; Technical High; Politi- cal Science; Bay State Revue, 2; Mathe- matics Club, 1; Swimming, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Jacob Rubenstein. 164 Omond St., Boston; Boston Latin; Bacteriology; Bav State Revue, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; . lpha Epsilon Pi. Harriet Newhall Sargent. 121 Hil berg . ve., Brockton; Thayer -Academy South Braintree; Home Economic; Women ' s Glee Club, 2; Home Econon ics Club, 1, 2. Elliot Vernon Schubert, 18S Pleasant Valley SI., Mcthuen; E. F. Scarles High; Poultry Husbandry; Poultry Science Club, 1, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. John Joseph Seerv, West Main St., Brookfield; Brookfield High; Zoology; Newman Club, 1, 2; Kootball, 1, 2(M), Basketball, 2; Kappa Sigma. Frederick Shaekley, II, 121 Cottage Park Rd., Winthrop; Winthrop High; Chemistry; Phi Sigma Kappa. Howard Webster Shaw. 41 Indepen- dence St., Canton; Canton High; Pre- Medical; Orchestra. 2; Freshman Hand- book Bo.ard, 1; Spring Track, 1; Winter Track, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. Alfred Francis Shea, 102 Oak St., Florence; Northampton High; Debat- ing, 2. John Shepardson, 15 Starrett Ave., .Athol; Athol High; Chemistry; Outing Club, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 1; Hockey, 1; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Theodore Shephardson, 63 Simonds St., Athol; Athol High; Chemistry; Outing Club, 1, 2; Cross Country, 1; Sigma .Alpha Epsilon. Martha Irvine Shirley, 12S Hampden St., Indian Orchar d; Springfield Classi- cal High; Liberal Arts; Sigma Beta Chi. Donald G. Simpson, 298 Franklin St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; Psychol- og.v; Christian Federation, 1. George Stephen Sinnicks, 24 Bennett St., Manchester; Tufts College; For- estry; Outing Club, 2; Zeta Psi. Corneliw . mherst Physics. i Slack. North Amherst; High; Mathematics and in time to dish out supper. . .and then to catch up with news. ■ft 127 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX Z SOPHOMORES Eileen Smith. Doggett Ave., Vi yard Haven; Tisbury High; Histo Newman Club, 1. Richard R. Smith, 49 Vinini Rd., Southwick; Westfield High; i istry; Outing Club. 1, 2; Cross-Co 1; Alpha Gamma Rho. Myron Solin, 2039 Northampton St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; Economics; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Edward Francis Sparkes, 20 First St., Pittsfield; St. Joseph ' s High; Liber- al Arts; Newman Club, 1, 2; Football. 1; Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. i Elizabeth Staples, 353 Lin- coln St., Stoughton; Stoughton High; Home Economics; Christian Federa- tion, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Psychology Club, 2; 4-H Club, 1, 2. Benjamin Stonoga. 1.5 Hardy Ave., Watcrtown; Watertown High; Horti- cultural Manufactures; Horticultural Show Committee, 1; Pre-Med. Club, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Donald James Sullivan, 1,SS Lafay- ette St., Salem; Salem High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Newman Club, 1, 2; Cross Country, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha. John Joseph Sullivan, 5S Bellinghan St., Chelsea; Chelsea High; Argicultura Economics; Miiroon Key, 2; Clas! Treasurer, 2; Mathematics Club, 2 Football, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Pi. Howard Henry Sudden, 36 Upsala St., Worcester; South High; Economics; Carnival Committee, 2; Theta Chi. Peter Joseph Swaluk, Pine Nook, South Deerfield; Deerfield High; Horti- cultural Manufactures; Soccer, 1. Marlon Frances Thomson, Monte- rey; Searles High; American Interna- tional College; Poultry Husbandry; Poultry Science Club, 2; 4-H Club, 2. Phyllis Louise Tower, 239 Centre Ave., Abington; Abington High; Ani- mal Husbandry; Outing Club, 1, 2: Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Alpha Lambda Mu. Robert Xavier TrigRs. 22 Atwood PI., Springfield; Cathedral High; Seton Hall College; Liberal Arts; Basketball. 2. Edward Donald Tripp, 490 Chicopee St., Willimansett; Holyoke High; Eco- nomics; Alpha Sigma Phi. Philip Arthur Trufant, 78 Washing- ton St., Abington; Abington High; Pomology; Orchestra, 1, 2; Roister Doisters, 2; Outing Club, 1, 2; Hockey 1; Alpha Gamma Rbo. Maynard Albert Steinberg, 70 Bou- telle St., Fitchburg; Fitchburg High; Horticultural Manufactures; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Zoology Club, 1; Chemistry Club, 1; Spring Track, 1; Winter Track, 1; Tau Epsilon Phi. Abigail Marie Sto ne, 14 Clark St., Holyoke; Holyoke High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Newman Club, 1,2. Chester Gushing Stone, 340 Paka choag St., Auburn; Auburn High; Gen eral Engineering; Phi Sigma Kappa. Lucicn Szmyd, 129 Walnut St., Holy- oke; Holyoke High; Physical and Bi- ological Sciences. Harriet Elizabeth Tarbell, Brook- field Rd., Brimfield; Brimficld High; Modern Languages; Orchestra, t, 2; Women ' s Glee Club, 2. John Joseph Tewhill, 16 Center St. Northampton; Northampton High Chemistry; Music Record Club, 2 Outing Club, 2; Soccer, 2; Alpha Gam ma Rho. Meriel VanBuren, S3 Whittier Ave. Pittsfield; Pittsfield High; Home Eco- nomics; Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Barbara Cerile Wainshel, 92 South Common St., Lynn; Classical High; Sociology and Psychology; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Current Affairs Club, 2; Sigma Iota. JoAnn Waite, 98 Newton St., Athol; Athol High; French; Women ' s Glee Club, 2; Newman Club, 1, 2; Home Economics Club, 1. Phoebe I. Stone, 17 Boulevard Ter- race, Brighton; Girl ' s Latin; Modern Languages; Bay State Revue, 2; Men- orah Club, 1, 2; Current Affairs Club, 2; Sigma Iota. Donald Turner Thayer, 618 Mill St. Worcester; North High; Forestry Class Nominating Committee, 1, 2 Hockey, 1, 2; Baseball, 1, 2. Ann Gertrude " Waldron, 15 Fifth Ave., Northampton; St. Michael ' s High; English; Newman Club, 1, 2; Sigma Beta Chi. .A cozy after-supper nap. . .is interruptr.l for ;i liaiui of bridge. 128] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY SOPHOMORES Evelvn Elizabeth Walker, 11 Maple St., Georgetowiv, Pcrlev HiRh; Biictrri- ology; Dad ' s Day CommiUce, 2; Phi Zetn. Robert Norman Walker, 20 Center St., Winthrop; Winthrop High; Animal Husbandry: Theta Chi. Edward Walkey, 1S2 High St , Ha son; WyominE Seminary, Pa.; Econoi ics; Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2; Newm; Club, 1, 2; Music Record Club. 1, Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2; Swimming, Kappa Sigma. William James Wall, IS Adare PI.. Northampton; Northampton High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Spring Track, 1; Winter Track, 1; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Evra Althea Ward, 162 Bowdoin St.. Springfield; Classical High; Home Eco- nomics; Home Economics Club, 1, 2; Lambda Delta Mu. Franeis Everett Ward, 77 B Worcester; South High: Engli- ter Doisters, 1, 2; Soccer, 1. Helen Agnes Watt. 1S3 Suffolk St., Holyoke; Holvoke High; Chemistry; Newman Club, 1, 2; Alpha Lambda Herbert Wciner, 69 Riyer St., Matta- pan; Boston Latin ; Zoology; Debating 1, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Index, 2: Pre-Mcd. Club, 1; Cross Country, 2 Tau Epsilon Phi. Carl Pershing Wermc, 36 Steele St., Worcester; Dairy Industry; Maroon Key, 2; Class Captain, 2; Football, 2; Alpha Gamma Rho. Anne Carolyn White, 279 Le St., Springfield; Springfield Junii lege; Chemistry; Sigma Beta Chi. Harold Bancroft White, Jr., Pelham Rd., Amherst; Monson Academy; Lib- eral Arts; Swimming, 1; Kappa Sigma. Paul Arthur White, 23 Pearson Rd., Somerville; Somerville High; Forestry: Theta Chi. Phoebe Whittemore, Sturbridge: Dean Academy; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Harold Edwin Williams. Church St., Stockbridge; Williams High; Agronomy; Men ' s Glee Club, 2; Music Record Club, 2; . lpha Gamma Rho. Paul Wolf Winston. 7 Watson St., Marblehcad; Marblchead High; Zool- ogy: Swimming, 2; Lambda Chi Alpha. Kenneth D. Witt, Belchertown; Belchertown High; Economics: Spring Track, 1. Henry Robert Wolf, 64 Ormond St., Mattapan; Boston Latin; Psychology; Menorah Club, 1; Zoology Club, 1: Psychology Club, 1, 2: Alpha Epsilon Louis Wolk, 91 Nightingale St., Dor- chester: Dorchester High; Horticulture; Menorah Club; Football, 1, 2. Charles Morton Woodcock, Siiyer St., South Hadley: South Hadley High; Physical and Biological Sciences; Sigma Phi Epsilon. John Rodger Workman, 11 Park St,. South Hadley; South Hadley High Engineering: Soccer, 1; Football, 1. Henry Wyzan, 19 Glines Ave., Mil- ford; Milford High; Pre-Medical. Sydney Zeitler, 29 Magnolia St., Mai- den; Maiden High; Physical and Bio- logical Sciences; Maroon Key, 2; Class Nominating Committee, 2; Menorah Club, 1, 2; Football, 1; Winter Track. 1; Inter-Class Athletic Board, 1, 2: Tau Epsilon Pi. Ruth Nancy Webber. JIaple St.. Bedford; Lexington High; Liberal Arts; Lambda Delta Mu. Jeannette Williams, 123 Oklahoma St., Springfield: Technical High; Bac- teriology: Outing Club, 1, 2. Casimir Anthony Zielinski, 473 Hill- side Avenue, Holyoke; Holyoke High; Botany; Phi Sigma Kappa. .but grinding must be finished. . .zzzzzz. . sleep conquers books. 129. MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I FRESHMAN The Class of 1943 needed no hurricane to mark their arrival at Massachusetts State College. With true Freshman enthusiasm, they fell to the task of accommodating themselves to the campus and their spirit persevered successfully through all the trials and tribu- lations imposed upon them by the lordly Sophs. On the other hand, it was all " take " with the Freshmen. Just ask any ' 43-er how the tables were not only overturned but also dumped upon their traditional masters at the rope pull and razoo night. Good fortune seemed to follow in the train of this freshman class. Even the mean old New England climate assumed its best be- havior when they appeared on campus. Mountain Day, which had been postponed as a result of the hurricane the year before, was sunny and diverting. The heavens obligingly released a snow-storm for the Winter Carnival, an exciting and eventful week-end which awed and pleased these future Statesmen. Then, too, work was actually started on the long-promised dormitories. The Freshman ' s life is a life of vivid change. Change from curi- osity and surprise to laughing resignation and fun; change from troublesome quizzes and hour-exams to fear-inspiring finals; change from the naivete of the neophyte to the super-elegance of the budding sophomore. The Class of 1943 came through these changes with flying colors. They toUed and played; studied and worried — and enjoyed their first year of college life. Convocation knitting. . .Winter jesting. . .Dorm gathering. 130 1 » THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Place, Miss Carpenter, Burr, Hicks, Miss Gutfinski, Clark President Frederick Burr Vice-president Mary Jane Carpenter Secretary Blanche Gutfinski Treasurer John Hicks Captain Robert Place Sergeant-at-A runs William Clark OFFICERS Bread line . . . Rope pull . . . Future Veterans . 4l [131] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX T FRESHMEN Marjorie F. Aldrich 706 Allen St., Spring6eld Alan W. Bell 4126 73rd St., Jackson Heights, X.Y. William E. Arnold Main St., Lunenburg Ruth K. Baker Spring St., Har Beverlv A. Bigwood .59 Highland Ave., Athol Charles E. Blanchard Granite St., No. Uxbridge Pearl N. Brown 94 Grenada Ter., Springfield Brighto Mary F. Callahan 273 Aquidneck St., New Bedford 132] It Kenneth L. CoUard Maple St., Belchertown John B. Dcllea R.F.D. 3, Great Barringto Walter Chroniak 39 Maynan St., New Bedford Roscoe W. Conkli] Charles H. Courchene .50 Dexter St., Springfield Stanley Cykowski 35 Maple St., Easthampton Winifred E. Day Boston Worcester Tpke., Northbo Jean H. Dunham 2S9 High St., Nutley, N. J. Ruth Ellis 19 Almont St., Mattapan 4L 133 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I FRESHMEN FOUR LONG YEARS BEGIN WITH THIS Peter A. Gervin 110 Cottage St., Athol George G. Gyrisko Ferry St., So. Hadley Richard A. Hewart Briggsville, North Ada First we pay. then we pay again. . and keep on paying. NINETEEN 134 HUNDRED FORTY » FRESHMEN :laire D. Horlon Maple Ave.. Hiidley 41S Pillmcr St., Plymouth, P.i mherst Elinor M. Koonz 86 MontiiKUc Cily Rd., (Incnfielil William i: Mu ;onn.ll 14 Grove St., Westhoro Arthur N. Kouliaa 38 Bntterfield St., Lowell Roger S. Maddocks Main St., Brimfield Hcnriclta M. Krcczko S. West St., Feeding Hills Mcrwin P. Magnin .-,47 South St., Dalton Florcnt-c M. Lane 11 Knowlton Sq., Gloucester Richard F. Maloy 6G0 West Housatonic St., Pittsfield Frances Langan 121 W.ayne St., Springfield Norman P. Mamber 43 Rice Ave., Revere Anita L. Lapointc 18 Cherry St., Easthampton Edward C. Manix 02 Graves St., So. Deerfield Marguerite G, Laprade 69 Pleasant St., Ea.sthampton Lester P. Mann Washington St., Mendon Edward F. Larkin 21.5 Arsenal St.. Watertown William C. Mann 19 Abbott St., Pittsfield Robert F. Laurenitis Sunderland Mary .1. Mann 237 High St., Dalton Dorothy B. Kinsley 1 Winthrop St., Ston James L. McCarthy Brimmer St., Watertown 37 Lavender St., Millis Frederick A. McLaughlin 14 Nutting Ave., Amherst They send us fishing. . .but the Sophs don ' t bite. . .do they? 4L 135 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I FRESHMEN Helen £. McMahon 16 Holyoke St., Easthampto Henry O. Miller S75 Washington St., Haverhill lice F. Monk Champney St., Groto Edward F. Pierce 6 Fitz Rd., Peabody Robert W. Place 15 Appleton Rd., West . ubu William J. Robinson 2 Ferguson PI., Holyoke Robert A. Rocheleau 37 Munroe St., Northampto Robert A. Mungall 243 Bridge Rd., Northampton 140 Cabot St., Chicopee Matthew J. Ryan 677 Carew St., Springfield Bourcard Nesin 750 Southampton Rd., Westfield Lawrence E. Newcomb Norwell Ave., Cohasset Richard P. Newell IS Dutcher St., Hopedale Ruth M. Nichols 121 Franklin St., Greenfield Urbano C. Pozzani 1S3 New Bridge St., W. Spring Ephraim M. Radner 65 Firglade Ave., Springfield Theodore A. Saulnier, Jr. 476 Waverly St., Framingha Robert J. Schiller 130 Longwood Ave., Brooklii Food gives us energy ... but we have to expend it . . . with vehemence ! 136 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY FRESHMEN Prlscilla Scoll y4 Spruci- St.. WalcTlown Marguerite J. Shi Box 2S, Huntington : y. Dorchester Joseph A. Tosi, Jr. Justice Hill Rd., Sterling Brc-wsKT I ' . VI 1 Jonah S. While 120 Francis St., Everett Lorcn C. Wilder 20S Orange St., Springfield Bernard M. WiUemain 29 Francis Ave., Holyoke Jean M. Sprague 49 Holman St., Shrewsbury e, N. J. Helen L. VanMeter 1B7 Montague Rd., Xo. Amherst Rinka M. Stein 45 Bay State Rd., Holyoke Kenneth A. Stewart lis Quincy Ave.. Winthrop Bernard W. Vitltauskas 99 Williams St., Northampton They seem all right . . .but we wonder. . .what now, little man? 137 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I OCIAL AND OCIETY %, SPECIAL EVENTS The social season at State College begins two days after Opening Convocation with an informal dance in the " Old Grey Barn, " and ends only with the Soph-Senior Hop after Commencement in June. From the date of that first informal until June, there is no lessening of organized campus recreation. The programs of the Social Union, Mountain Day, and Dad ' s Day are a part of that college social life; but at State, as inevitably at any co-educational college, dances are the major part of social life. During the early weeks when fraternities are rushing freshmen, vie parties are held with much greater frequency. Rushing is hardly over when Amherst week-end brings the round-robin of formal and semi-formal fra- ternity house parties with their six-piece bands. After time out for Dad ' s Day and sorority rushing, campus caperings begin again at Informals. Ranging from barn dances and old clothes " brawls " to " victory " dances, they fill the week-ends between formals and house parties. For fifty cents a couple, the informals attract a large hallful of students, who thus have a means to dance the old-fashioned fox trot or contort themselves in ultra- so-so jive. In December comes the first formal dance, the Military Ball. Outstanding feature of the social life of the campus is the Winter Carnival Ball during Winter Carnival in February. Inter- fraternity and Inter-sorority Balls in the spring, and the Soph- Senior Hop in June climax the series of formal dances. Something about a soldier. . .How do I look?. . . " One more couple! " . 1 140 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY 1 Blasko, Johnson, Breglio, Irzyk, Pitts INFORMAL COMMITTEE Apples on parade. . .The everlasting no. . .Time out for a quick one 4. 141 z MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX Miss Wozniak, Irzyk, Miss Alvord, Miss Judge Burnham, Miss Walker, Miss Davis, Sheldon Dads Day " My Heart Belongs to Daddy " burst across the football field from the band at the twelfth annual Dads ' Day this fall. Under the direction of co- chairmen Jean Davis and George At- water the Dads ' Day Committee of 1939 arranged a program that showed visiting parents varied phases of col- lege life. In the morning the dads were lead from class to class by members of the Maroon Key. Later that morn- ing the R.O.T.C. put on an exhibition of riding. In the afternoon under a sky ideal for football games, Massachusetts State played Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute to a 7-7 tie. After the game the dads were taken to fraternities, sororities, or Draper Hall for supper. In Bowker that evening five fraternities presented skits previously chosen in competition for their entertainment and artistic value. The W.S.G.A., the orchestra, the quartet, and the trio also contributed to the show. Dads inspect college at close range and later are entertained . 1 [ 142 ] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FOPTY St 4L Beames, Miss Howe, Feiker, Gordon, Hopkins, Ha Horticultural Show Formal Garden Rustic scene . General view . Pre-show preparation . 143 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I Ryan, Merrill, Swenson, Talbot, Dailey, Sullivan, Blasko, Daley Dunn, Wetherell, Hughes, Tappin, Serex, Powers, Scholz, Richards, Tobey Slater, Davis, Thomas, Griffin, Winter, Pitts, Irzyk, Buckley Military Every able male student at State College is required to join the Reserve OfBcers ' Training Corps and take mili- tary training during his freshman and sophomore years. As freshmen the students, as soon as the novelty of wearing a uniform wears off, complain loudly about being required to get up early three times a week and get into high boots and a wool-khaki uniform. They complain about having to march and learn gun drill, but secretly, more than one young soldier gets a thrill out of weekly regimental parade when the band plays and banners wave. As sophomores, they are all glad of the opportunity to learn horse-back riding and, if they talk scornfully about stupid army horses, it is merely to let their classmates know what excellent horsemen they are. When the spring of their sophomore year comes, nearly all the men, attracted by the thoughts of an officer ' s uniform or the thrill of hard riding, want to take advanced military. The best part of a Military Major ' s life is the summer at Fort Ethan Allen. The pictures at the left were taken by Cadet Frank Daley on the long pleasant ride through central Vermont. 144 1 ActiKilly, Iidwcxer, the ihiiiiIxt of adxaiifc ' d military .students must l»c limited to aliout twenty-five in each class. Military majors, as the advance students arc called, ride and practice mounted drill an hour a day in the fall and again in the spring. In the winter they give one class hour a day to the study of military tactics, military organization, military history, and allied subjects. The high spot of military life at State College is the six weeks mounted trip to Fort Ethan Allen each summer for cadets between their Junior and Senior years. The troop of twenty-five students soldiers, commanded by a United States x rmy officer, leaves campus the day after commencement for the Fort. Filled with six full hours of hard riding, ten days travel brings the outfit, tanned, bearded, and dusty to Fort Ethan Allen on the Canadian Border. Camp life begins at five-thirty in the morning and does not end until early evening. The tired cadets roll out of their bunks at five-thirty for camp duty. At seven they head for the Camp life at the Fort is filled with a constant succession of vigorous activities. Shown here at the right are shots of a camp horse-show, (top), a machine gun firing demonstration (center), and Bob Dunn taking his turn at K.P. with enlisted men (lower left). X Bolt, Tillson, Jones, Hall, Goodwin, Broderick King, Simons, Morytko, Hendrickson, Bassett, Scollin, Aykroyd Haskell, Hamel, Bragdon, Coffey, Foley, Schenker, Crerie [ 14o " SSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I Powers, Blasko, Scollin Davis, Winter, Pitts, Irzyk Social functions are also a part of the military major ' s life. Top left shows decorations, right is honorary colonel and escort. Bottom pictures show band and state " smoothie. " rifle range in army dungarees. Not until eleven are they able to return to quarters for showers and change of uniform. At noon they answer to mess call, have fifteen minutes free time, and are off again for two hours of dusty riding over Vermont hills. After grooming and watering their horses, and attending inspections, the men are free at five o ' clock — unless of course it is their turn to go on weekly kitchen ]X)lice or guard duty. Military majors exert their influence ( )n campus social life too. Their autumn horse-show and review is a major par t (if the Dads ' Day performance. In the spring at commencement, they sponsor tiie annual horse show, featuring jumping contests. Their major con- tribution to campus social life, aside from their mere presence in parade uniform, is the annual Military Ball. This year ' s committee of military majors, chairmanshipped by George Pitts, brought Gene Dennis ' band to campus. In a colorful ceremony at intermission, Erma Alvord was chosen honorary colonel. [146] viiim j . mm Mt! " 3i Amherst takes the annual game . . . but not the goal posts State ' s traditional tussle with Am- herst College resulted last fall in an- other football defeat but boasted of a gay weekend. It began on Friday night with a huge bonfire and cheers and enthusiasm fortunately not ac- companied by brawls with Amherst students. The game on Saturday afternoon was played on the State Campus, but even that supposed advantage was to little avail — Amherst won by a wide margin. The other activities of the weekend Amherst Weekend were quite unaffected, however, by this partial failure. On Saturday night a Round Robin of fraternity dances was held. Each of the fraternities was decorated for the affair — most often in fall fashion with cornstalks. For the remainder of the evening, each House held a closed dance. It was estimated that 312 guests — alumni and imports — came to State for Amherst Weekend. Student and alumni dance. . .at house parties 4l [147] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I Oppenheim, Levine, Brown, Osmun Miss Handforth, Shapiro, Retallick, Miss Gale WINTER CARNIVAL Jitterbugs and stolid penguins made out of snow — Sunday-b est imports trying to feel at home — new evening gowns for one glorious evening — in fact, the Winter Carnival at Massa- chusetts State College. The carnival has been the heyday of the campus social season since weekending came into vogue, and this year ' s was perhaps the most unusual and successful in a long time. In the first place, snow came — not from force of habit, but undoubtedly from the gods after days of despairing- ly warm weather. So many things de- pended on its coming, that with it the campus was in a hasty hubbub. Snow sculpture for the traditional fraternity JitterljuKgins ' . Antarctica. 1 148 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY It Potter, Eaton, Holmberg Simons, Miss Bergstrom, Osmun, Barreca competition went up in a day, and the skiing program at Bull Hill became somewhat surer of itself. The Carnival ofEcially began on Friday afternoon with cross-country skiing competing for attention with the imports arriving on campus. The guests were asked to register upon ar- rival and received booklets giving the complete program of carnival events. It is significant, however, that the co- eds were by no means neglected this year. In fact, they were in the ma- jority on the ball list. The Carnival Ball was held on Fri- day night, and with it came a full- fledged miracle — it was held in the cage! After years of fuming over campus glamour wasted in the ancient Drill Hall, the Cage was finally gotten — and with only the minor disad- vantage of its being rather chilly. An- other " first " for the Ball w-as a radio broadcast for a short time during the Twice-Queen . nn and her Court of Comeliness . 4. 149 J MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX dance. The orchestra was Benny Car- ter ' s — of Savoy fame — and for the first time in campus history a past carnival queen was rechosen — Ann Cooney, queen of both the 1939 and 1940 balls. On Saturday morning those who could bestir themselves sufficiently to walk about a half-mile through snow, went up to Bull Hill for the ski-meet. Dotty Graves, a women ' s amateur ski jump champion gave an exhibition, but campus skiers also did well in the downhill, slalom, and jumping compe- titions. In the afternoon, there was fun tobogganing on Clark Hill, as well as basketball, boxing, and wrestling in the Cage for those who cared to watch. Saturday evening ' s activities were less grandiose but more varied than those of Friday evening. As a begin- ning, the ice pageant was held on the college pond to crown the queen of the Carnival, and to announce the de- cision of the judges on the fraternity Sport scenes (to the left) show the outdoor fun in ■ ' a half-mile through snow, " " slalom, " " ama- teur ski jump champion, " and " student compe- titions, " while (below) the College Pond was the scene of " skating at the Ice Pageant. ' I THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY j snow sculpture. Tliota Clii took first place with its jitterbugs. Then, as a Social Union program, Carl Sandburg came to speak and to read his poetry. He read chiefly from Yes, the People, and also sang a few ballads from his American Song Bag, accompanying himself — homespun fashion — with a guitar. Later in the evening fraternity row was flocked with people comparing the various snow sculptures, and matching their opinions with those of the ofiicial judges. The fraternities meanwhile went their own merry way, and held open house and round robin dancing until midnight — the official close of the Winter Carnival. During the anti-climactic days that followed, the only evidences of this most important social affair was the few last import departures, an excess of the longed-for snow, and the gradual deterioration of the snow sculpture. And thus, another Winter Carnival weekend was past. Evening scenes (to the right) show the climax of the weekend with (first) Carl Sandburg ' s pro- gram, next — the coed beauty line-up, and then two Ball scenes at the Cage; below is politics professor Rohr crowning the Carnival Queen. 4. 151 A C H U S E T T STATE COLLEGE Z Flanagan, Simons, Irzyk, Rossman, Bassett Interfraternity Ball Intersorority Ball Early in May the Greeks throw aside all rivalry and get together for the Interfraternity Ball. White flan- nels and white coats come out in force, for the Greek Ball is the first ofiicial affair of spring. Each house chooses the prettiest coed date as the fraternity sweetheart and at the Ball the most beautiful is chosen as Interfraternity Sweetheart. The following night is devoted to a round robin and private house dances. The Intersorority Ball, held in April, is the big affair of the year for the coeds. Since it is the custom for the coeds to invite the man of their choice, the Ball was peculiarly ap- propriate, this year being Leap Year. Smooth music, colored lights, femin- ine decorations, young hearts, and spring in the air — trite, perhaps but the s orors ' Ball was hailed as one of the most festive occasions of State ' s socialites. Misses Smalley, Davis, Leete, Shaw, Freedman 1 [ 152 ] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY It social inion Initiating the series of Social Union Programs, Ted Shawn and his ensemble of dancers presented on October 20 their choreography of Dance of the Ages. Main- taining the high artistic standard of the first of the series, the Social Union Com- mittee next booked the Boston Sinfon- ietta. In December Edgar Lee Masters read various selections from his poetical works. Two months later. Masters ' com- temporary, Carl Sandburg, bard of Amer- ica, read some of his poetry and sang almost-forgotten folk songs to please a joyous audience of Winter Carnival guests and students. Next in the Social Union series, the combined musical clubs of the College under the direction of Doric Alviani, College Musical Director, presented a musical program that even surpassed last year ' s performance. Top: Blanche Yurka Boltom: Carl Sandburg Ted Shawn and male perfection 4. 153 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX Crimmins, Miss Davis, Scollin, Barreca Soph -s omore-oenior Hop The Soph-Senior Hop, as the last dance for the senior class, is usually at- tended with an undercurrent of weepy farewells. And yet it is usually made one of the most spontaneous formal dances of the year. The 1939 Hop was held in the Drill Hall on an especially hot night. Between the hall and Good- ell Library, however, there were chairs set out on the lawn, where the couples could relax between dances. As usual, an exceptionally lively swing band was chosen — perhaps to offset the tinge of sad finality that ac- companies these dances. lii 1938, it was Artie Shaw, and last year Don Redman. The decorations for the dance were Milling Mobs Make Merry 1 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY It in tunc witli the usual cam])u.s decora- tions for commencement week. There were Japanese hmterns both in the hall and out on the lawn. In a brave attempt to hide the archaic beams of the Drill Hall, the entire ceiling was festooned with streamers, while the orchestra sat in front of painted Jap- anese screens — strangely reminiscent of the Mikado. At about three o ' clock — just as the dancers were beginning to walk across the campus — the traditional chimes concert began. All the college songs, familiar from the first days of freshman hazing, were played, and the concert ended with " Farewell to Bay State. " Thus, the collegiate life of another Senior class and undergraduate social functions at State came to a glorious end. Members of the smoother set Even the chaperons had fun And where ' s Mr. Wood (The crowd cheered) and the band plaj-ed Everybody ' s happy V J 1 til ■ft 155 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX J FRATERNITIES Many a highlight of the college year results from fraternity activities. Bull-sessions that leave a mellow after-glow when col- lege years have passed, take place within fraternity walls. The fraternity is the natural culmination of friendship, and to every student his " house " lends a warmth to college life which might otherwise be lacking. It is no wonder, then, that more than sixty percent of the men belong to State College ' s eleven fraternities. For fostering a spirit of natural competition and at the same time making a healthy bond among all fraternities, the Interfraternity Council must take a bow. During the entire school-year it plans and considers interfraternity activities of all kinds. The inter- fraternity ball, the interfraternity sing and the interfraternity declamation, all sponsored by the council, represent the crowning- point of campus extra-curricular life to fraternity members. More tangible evidence of fraternity competition and cooperation are the interfiaternity skits, the snow sculpture competition, and the house inspection scores. Healthy and clean-cut competitive spirit characterize interfraternity sports which include seasonal ath- letics such as soccer, basketball, and baseball. To the Interfra- ternity Council belongs the task of initiating and coordinating the extensive and varied fraternity activities. Broad-mindedness and good fellowship are qualities which the Interfraternity Council has fostered. Both the school and the students receive benefit from the council ' s work. Earning the heart- felt appreciation of the student body, the Interfraternity Council has in the past year been an active factor in the molding of student character. Frosh vs. Soph Touch Football Bull Session (156] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ft Hayward, Keil, Silverman, Foley, O ' Brien, Levine, Broderick, Flanagan, Bassett Pike, Copson, Brack, Morse, Irzyk, Simons, Shepardson, Rossman INTERFRATER.MTY COUNCIL Dumb-bells " Got a butt r " Vic " party sing ' s -ft 157 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I OFFICERS President David Novelli Vice-president Homer Stranger Secretary Warren Pushee Treasurer Stanley Reed Interfratcrnity Richard Hayward Kenneth Pike FACULTATE Alexander Canoe Earle S. Carpenter Edwin F. Gaskill Stowell C. Coding Emory E. Grayson Wilham L. Machmer Sumner Parker Charles A. Peters James Burke George W. Westcott IN URBE Edward B. Eastman Walter B. Hatch Alexander A. Lucey Stephen P. Puffer Carl J. Bokina ALPHA SIGMA PHI Mullany, Johnston, Pushee, Laudani, Bubriski, Franz, Brewster, Weeks, Girard Sullivan, Adams, Procopio, Beckett, Morrill, Hendrickson, Norwood, Thornton, Lucey, J. Dellea Hayward, McLeod, RofEnoli, Flynn, Miller, King, Triggs, Podmayer, J. Dellea Bokina, Mosher, Pike, Scholz, Novelli, McGowan, Reed, Tobey, Mayo, Stranger 1 158 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ft- Soup ' s on, Novelli!. . .Hell Week Alpha Sig has a cup. . .Close Harmony CLASS OF 1940 Frank Hopkins John Miller Robert Mosher David Novelli Kenneth Pike Evi Scholz Homer Stranger George Tobey, Jr. CLASS OF 1941 Norman Beckett Ernest Bolt David Brewster Curr ie Downes Edward Flynn William Franz Richard Hayward William Hendrickson Howard King Hamilton Laudani LImberto Motroni Paul Procopio Stanley Reed Rino RoiSnoli WiUiam Walsh Henry Thornton CLASS OF 1942 Paul Adams Theodore Girard James Gilman Robert Holbrook John Horgan John Lucey Joseph McLeod Robert Mullany Howard Norwood Warren Pushee John Sullivan Robert Triggs CLASS OF 1943 Thaddeus Bokina Stanley Bubriski James Dellea Robert Johnston Francis W ' eeks Thomas Kelley Matthew Rj-an John Podmayer Gamma Chapter 4. 159 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX Z OFFICERS Presidt ' iil Daniel O ' Connell Vice-president John Powers Secretary Cortland Bassett Treasurer Daniel Shepardson Intcrfraternily Wilfred Shepardson Cortland Bassett FACULTATE Guy Chester Crampton Gunnar E. Erickson IN URBE B. C. Bottomly Vernon Coutu Richard Elliot Steward L. Garrison Franklin Hunt Lloyd P. Jordan H. C. Sproul SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON Blanchard, Moody, Xewconib, O ' Connell, Goodwin, Dakin, Pardee, Wildes, Steeves Potter, Feiker, LaFreniere, Barney, Laliberte, Schubert, McLean, L. Benemelis, Litchfield Anderson, Wannlund, Bassett. Mosher, T. Shepardson, Gervin, Salwak, Burnet, J. Shepardson Eaton, Buckley, Slater, D, Shepardson, W. Shepardson, Powers, Glendon, R. Benemelis, Suomi 160] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ft S.A.E. ' syncopate after Anderson waxes Shepardson studies (?) while Forrest frowns CLASS OF 1940 Robert Benemelis James Buckley Robert Eaton Richard Glendon Daniel O ' Connell John Powers Daniel Shepardson Wilfred Shepardson Edgar Slater Martti Suomi CLASS OF 19-tl Edward Anderson Edward Ashley Henry Barney Cortland Bassett George Feiker Harold Forrest Edward LaFreniere William Goodwin Lincoln Moody Robert Pardee Richard Smith Arthur Wannlund Horace Wildes CLASS OF 1942 Leslie Benemelis Ralph Dakin Howard Hunter John Laliberte George Litchfield Hubert McLean Harold Mosher Spencer Potter Elliot Schubert John Shepardson Theodore Shepardson CLASS OF 1943 Barton Allen Charles Blanchard Winthrop Brielman Wayne Burnet Peter Gervin Richard Hewat Lawrence Newcomb Edward Podolak Stanley Salwak Raymond Steeves Lorin Wilder Kappa Chapter 4. [161] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX Z OFFICERS President Franklin Davis, Jr. Vice-president Harold Straube Secretary Harold GrifBn, Jr. Treasurer Willard Foster Interfrateriiify Robert Peters James Payson, Jr. FACtlLTATE Lawrence Briggs Walter Maclinn Oliver Roberts William Sanctuary Fred Sievers Stuart Edmond Hubert Elder Enos Montague THETA CHI Eldridge, Seaver, White, Burnham, Case, Walker, Manix, Ludeman, Ferguson, Thaj-er, Hathaway, McCutcheon, Collard, Sprague Ewing, Gould, Miles, Fosgate, Burr, Erickson, Brady, Eaton, Hubbard, Skogsberg, Sunden Irvine, Aykroyd, Emery, Avery, Fj-fe, Long, King, Simmons, Pearson, Williams, Burbank, Cox Retallick, Serex, Tappan, Payson, Wing, Straube, Davis, GrifBn, Foster, Pitts, Kirsch, Storey, Phillips Field, Ward, Burr, Magnin, Clive, Clark, Powell, Nims, Dunham [162] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY It Clive and Cards. . .Hurry up! Sound comfort . . . For men only CLASS OF 1940 Franklin Davis, Jr. Willard Foster Harold Griffin, Jr. John Kirsch James Payson, Jr. George Pitts Harold Straube Francis Wing David Tappan CLASS OF 1941 A. Wesley Aykroyd Clement Burr Richard Crerie Richard Curtis Robert Ewing Allen Fuller William Fuller John Gould Wilfred Hathawaj- Stuart Hubbard Walter Irvine, Jr. Woodrow Jacobson James King Walter Miles Robert Peters William Phillips John Retallick Irving Seaver Ralph Simmons Paul Skogsberg Harold Storey Ronald Streeter Raymond Thayer James Walker CLASS OF 1942 Winthrop Avery John Brady David Burbauk Preston Burnham William Case Richard Cox Melville Eaton Alfred Eldridge Clarence Emery Vincent Erickson Courtney Fosgate Charles Fyfe Thomas Gordon Lewis Long Robert McCutcheon Robert Pearson James Selkregg Howard Sunden Robert Walker Paul White William Williams CLASS OF 1943 Fredrick Burr, Jr. William Clark Kenneth Collard George Ferguson Gordon Field Harold Lewis John Ludeman Merwin Magnin Edward Manix Stuart Nims John Powell Edward Sprague Lewis Ward, Jr. 4. 163 STATE OFFICERS President Albin F. Irzyk Vice-president Frank R. L. Daley, Jr. Secretary Donald H. Shaw Treasurer Julian H. Zabierek Interfrafcrnity John J. Brack Albin F. Irzvk FACULTATE Lorin E. Ball William R. Cole Harold M. Gore A. Vincent Osmun Clarence H. Parsons Emil J. Tramposch IN URBE Wellington E. Cassidy Francis C. Crowley Leo ' . Crowley Frederick Dickens Leonard C. Wirtanen Elliot K. Greenwood Ralph Haskins Gerald D. Jones Albert Parsons I. Douglas Reade Frederick Whittemore Q. T. V. Polchlopek, Coffey, Bragdon, H. Miller, Hauck, J. Bennett, Smith, Ajauskas, Barton, Lalor, E. AYarner Jackimczyk, Warner, J. Miller, Shaw, Irzyk, Zabierek, Brack, O ' Neill, Blake, Bagge 164 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ! .Boys do Carnival sculpture. . .to neglect studying for a spell. .Q.T.V. cops cups. . .and slicks house for inspections. CLASS OF 1940 Richard F. Blake Frank R. L. Daley, Jr. Albin F. Irzyk John R. O ' Neill Donald H. Shaw Gordon F. Thomas Richard S. Warner Julian H. Zabierek CLASS OF 1941 John C. Ajauskas Francis G. Bagge John J. Brack George W. Bragdon William S. Coffey George P. Hoxie Stanley A. Jackimczyk Joseph T. Miller CLASS OF 1942 Everett W. Barton G. Neil Bennett Ray Hauck Vincent A. LaFleur CLASS OF 1943 John E. Bennett Richard H. Best Henry F. Martin John P. McDonough Henry O. Miller Stanley E. Polehlopek William F. Smith Edward C. Warner Alpfia Chapter 4. [165] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I OFFICERS President Roy Morse Vice-president Thomas Herrick, Jr. Secretary John Osmun Treasurer Charles Gleason Interfmternity Roy Morse Edward O ' Brien FACULTATE Oran C. Boyd Kenneth L. Bulhs Guy V. Glatfelter Calvin S. Hannum Edward B. Holland Marshall O. Lanphear Frederick A. McLaughlin Raymond T. Parkhurst Frank A. Waugh IN URBE George Cutler James A. Foord Edward W. Harvey Edward Hazen Ezra L. Shaw George P. Smith Robert F. Stevens E. Joseph Thompson Warren Tufts KAPPA SIGMA Mendall, Goodwin, Bardwell, Babbitt, Pierce, White, Mann, Bart, MacCormack, Nye, VanMeter, C. Jones, Hall, O ' Brien, Knox, Seery Jodka, E. Horgan, Janes, Warner, Fitzpatrick, Place, VanAlten, Darrow, Tosi, Slattery, Walkey, Gardner, Courchene, D. Allen, Mason, Spencer Richards, Holmes, Sloper, Thompson, Saulnier, Graham, A. Foley, Bishop, Serex, MacCallum, Stewart, Shaw, E. McLaughlin, W. Brown, Bejiies Schoonmaker, Creswell, Dailey, Merrill, Powers, R. Jones, Gleason, Morse, Herrick, Hager, Osmun, Stahlberg, C. Mc- Laughlin, Page, Mahoney Rhodes, Koulias, Reid, Scollin, Newell, Lescault, G. McLaughlin, Barreca, Greenfield, Geer 166 NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ■■■ ;:.. ' I V 1 ' " H H 1 1 MaB , ; JHW " jj jl 1, Kjs| i H M ' iiJ - ys H BIS iKHi .v B i HHI H " Women are a snare to men " " Hearts trumps. . I pass " . l H rMS : 111 V " Back-to-Xature is where Juniors so " . . . " This is what we build " CLASS OF 1940 Deane Beytes Robert Chapman Robert Creswell Gerald Dailey Charles Gleason William Goodwin Myron Hager Thomas Herrick Daniel Mahone.y Charles McLaughlin John Merrill Roy Morse Richard Muller John Osmun Tracy Page Charles Powers James Schooumaker Everett Spencer Eric Stahlberg CLASS OF 1941 Robert Babbitt Al an Bardwell Peter Barreca Joseph Bartosiewicz Arthur Foley Robert Hall Carlton Jones Robert Jones Harold McCarthy Howard McCallum John Nye Edward O ' Brien Andrew Reed Harold Scollin Samuel Shaw Frank Slattery John Stewart David Van Meter CLASS OF 1942 Lester Bishop Chester Budz Daniel Carter Russell Clark William Darrow John Gardner James Graham Eric Greenfield Joseph Jodka Charles Knox Donald Lee Louis Lescault Charles MacCormack Richard Mason George McLaughlin Ralph Mendall Richard Pierce John Seery Raymond Taylor Thomas Walkey CLASS OF 1943 Douglas Allen Howard Bangs Wendall Brown Charles Courchene Robert Fitzpatrick Charles Gare David Holmes Everett Horgan William Janes Arthur Koulias William MacConnell William Mann Fred McLaughlin Edward Nebesky Robert Newell John O ' Keefe Edward Pierce Robert Place Robert Rhodes Bradford Richards Theodore Saulnier Alfred Scalingi WiUiam Serex David Sibson Harry Sloper Berle Thompson Joseph Tossi William Van Alten Charles Warner Gamma Delta Chapter ■ft 167 STATE COLLEGE INDEX I OFFICERS President Lewis Norwood Vice-pr ' esidenI D. Arthur Copsoii George At water Treasurer G. Godfrey Davenport Inlerfrateniitij D. Arthur Copson Dana Keil FACULTATE William H. Armstrong Alfred H. Brown Orton L. Clark Charles R. Creek Lawrence S. Dickinson Robert D.Hawley John D. Lentz James F. Moorehead Willard A. Munson Francis C. Pray, Jr. Frank P. Rand Roland H. Verbeck PHI SIGMA KAPPA IN URBE Frederick Adams Warner H. Carter ' incent Cooper George C. Hubbard Raymond H. Jackson Parker Lichenstein F. Civille Pray Philip H. Smith George E. Stone Vernon K. Watson Howard H. Wood LeLand, Dunbar, Dukeshire, Erickson, Santin, Terry, Booth, Krasnecki, P. Dwyer, Morse, W. Dwyer, Drinkwat er, Mac- Dougall Knight, Cleary, Ring, Hood, Stewart, Hatch, Bishop, L. Atwood, Stone, Moriarty, Cressy, Hadley, Johnson Noyes, Keil, Vincent, Kimball, Freitas, Zielinski, Marsh, Arnold, M. Atwood, McKiernan, Gaumond, Shaekley, Bunk Hill, Cowling, Lindsey, Langworthy, Harding, Copson, Norwood, Davenport, Dalton, Mansfield, Hanley, Phillips, Saunders o rs n ' ' ;f f. :, 1 1 f f f r f f S n ,%% % % % ■% %0- f I ! 1 168 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY » I ' rc-cliuw relaxation. . .Mass mastication. " Hi, you smooth apples! ' . . .When do the Phi Sigs grind?. . CLASS OF 1940 George Atwater D. Arthur Copson Douglas H. Cowling Frank Dalton G. Godfrey Davenport Robert Hanley Malcolm B. Harding Ralph Hill Everett Langworthy Roger Lindsey James Malcolm Charles Mansfield Lewis Norwood Lester Phillips, Jr. Leo Santucci Francis Saunders Albert Sullivan H. Dexter Wetherell CLASS OF 1941 Robert Dukeshire Thomas Johnson Dana Keil Richard Knight Baxter Xoyes Richard Vincent CLASS OF 1942 Milford At wood Charles Bishop Ralph Bunk Richard Booth Richard Cressy Ernest Dunbar, Jr. Paul Dwyer William Dwyer Carl Erick.son Edmund Freitas George Gaumond Joseph Gordon Benjamin Hadley Ralph Hatch William Kimball Marrigan Krasnecki Maurice LeLand Allister MacDougall John Marsh Freeman Morse Robert Perry Donald Thayer Frederic Shackley, Jr. Chester Stone Casimir Zielinski CLASS OF 1943 Joseph Arnold Lewis Atwood Charles Bordeaux Robert Cleary Lewis Drinkwater Stanle.v Hood Brian McKiernan James Moriarty James Ring Gilbert Santin Kenneth Stewart John Terry Bernard WUlamaine Alpha Chapter 4. H U S E T 169 STATE COLLEGE INDEX ? OFFICERS John W. Swenson Vice-president John T. Heyman Secretary Frank M. Simons, Jr. Treasurer B. Francis Keville Interfraternity Frank M. Simons, Jr. William G. Foley FACULTATE Elbert F. Caraway Walter S. Eisenmenger Wilho Frigard George A. Marston IN URBE William F. Buck Norman Myrick Donald K. Tucker Franklin Burr Charles M. Rodda LAMBDA CHI ALPHA Goodwin, Shaw. Langton, Maddocks, J. Larkin, Horton, Lester, Kimball, Farrell, Davis, Holmberg Heyman, O ' Brien, Winston, Maloy, Grain, Hayes, Sparks, E. Larkin, McClure, Hicks, Gavin Stewart, Bower, Greene, O ' Connor, Blodgett, Brown, Mahan, Kelly, Hamel, Arnold, Hoermann, Simons Bowler, Ferriter, Sheldon, Keville, Foley, Swenson, Hughes, Dunn, Richards, Tappin, Blasko 170 I THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Wolves before tlie Ball. . .John and the boys, a la Statesmen. Lambda Chi ' s B. M. O. C. . , .Larkin vs. Foley. CLASS OF 1940 John E. Blasko Richard N. Bowler Roger W. Brown Robert F. Dunn Paul T. Ferriter William G. Foley Frederick K. Hughes Francis B. Keville Carl F. Nelson William H. Richards, Jr. Robert L Sheldon John W. Swenson Warren R. Tappin CLASS OF 1941 Donald P. Allan R. Alden Blodgett C. Foster Goodwin, Jr. Franklin H. Drew Robert E. Halloran John W. Haskell George F. Hamel John M. Hayes John T. Heyman Joseph Larkin Richard H. Lester J. Edward E. O ' Connor Frank M. Simons, Jr. James A. M. Stewart, Jr. CLASS OF 1942 Joseph Farrell Bradford Greene George E. Kimball Howard Lacey George P. Langton William E. Mahan H. W ' estcott Shaw- Edward F. Sparks Donald J. Sullivan Francis E. W ' ard Paul W. Winston CLASS OF 1943 William E. Arnold George H. Bower John H. Grain, Jr. William J. Gavin Richard Haughton John W. Hicks Francis J. Hoerman Daniel J. Horton Thomas J. Kelly Edward O. Larkin Roger S. Maddocks Richard E. A. Maloy Albert H. McClure Robert F. O ' Brien John F. Powers Alfred Rummenger Wallace W. Turner Gamma Zeta Chapter 4. MASS [171] CHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I r=i} OFFICERS President Arthur W.Washburn,. Jr. Vice-president Edward Broderick Secretary T. Richard Leonard, Jr. Treasurer Wilfred M. Winter Interfraternity Wilfred M. Winter Edward Broderick FACULTATE Charles P. Alexander Ellsworth W. Bell Arnold M. Davis •James W. Dayton William L. Doran Richard W. Fessenden Robert P. Holdsworth Aihiiin II. Lindsey Campbell Miller Dcinald K. Ross Harvey I . Sweetman Clark L. Thayer Frederick S. Trov IN URBE J. Lee Brown Kenneth T. Farrell Stanley A. Flower Donald Lacroix Kenneth R. Newman Earl H. Nodine George G. Smith ALPHA GAMMA RHO Gentry, Tillson, Rhines, Werme, Gare, I- ' ozzani, Smith, Glista, Libby, Trufant Lincoln, Styler, Putnam, Conklin, Brahlit, Williams, Marsden, McCarthy, Tewhill, Drinkwater, Clorite Brotz, Andrew. Edminster. Smith, Arnold, Koobatian, LeMaire, Lecznar, Hardy, Colman, Hallen Kuralowicz, Oik " , Lansoii, Leonard. Rrc.derick, Wasbb irTi, Winter, Handforth, Wolfe, Manix [ 172 ] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY We love " Lovey " ' - . .We listen to Charlie. ' Camp, " " Talc, " ' " Ed, " " Dick, " " Swish " . . .Butch bathes — not at Holyoke! CLASS OF 1940 Arthur A. Hagelstein Thomas E. Handforth Wilfred M. Winter John F. Wolfe CLASS OF 1941 Edward Broderick Alton B. Cole Haig Koobatian Chester L. Kuralowicz Raino K. Lanson T. Richard Leonard, Jr. John C. Manix C. Vernon Smith Charles W. Styler Robert C. Tillson Arthur W. Washburn, Jr. CLASS OF 1942 Richard C. Andrew Gilbert S. Arnold John H. Brotz Talcott W. Edminster Donald W. Moffitt James N. Putnam Lorimer P. Rhines Richard R. Smith John J. Tewhill Philip A. Trufant Carl P. Werme H. Edwin Williams CLASS OF 1943 Henry L. Bralit Clinton T. Cheever Robert H. Clorite David M. Colman William O. Drinkwater Mason M. Gentry Walter A. Glista Xorman L. Hallen Frank I. Hardy William B. Lecznar Richard L. Libby Harry C. Lincoln David H. Marsden James L. McCarthy Urbano C. Pozzani George R. Yale 4L 173 z MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX OFFICERS President George F. ' Flanagan Vice-president Gerald L. Talbot Secretary Robert N. Cashman Treasurer Chester H. Tiberii Interfraternity George Flanagan Robert N. Cashman FACULTATE Malcolm S. Butler Frederick M. Cutler George M. Emery Richard Foley Ralph L. France Winthrop S. Welles IN URBE Harold Elder Herbert Hatchings John Schoonmaker SIGMA PHI EPSILON Joyce, Conley, Wall, Poretti, Foley, Carigamis, Gianarakos, Hutchins Hebert, Kirvin, Hurley, Whitcomb, McKenzie, Mott, DivoU, Peccioli, Filios Geoffrion, Cochran, Stonoga, Tiberii, Talbot, Flanagan, Cashman, Rowe, Nan, Terry I 174] NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY » Uolling up before wolfing . . . The Sig Eps concentrate . . Definitely a posed picture . . . certainly a wonderful wiffle . CLASS OF 1940 George F. Flanagan Robert T. Foley Phillip C. Geoffrion Gerald L. Talbot Chester H. Tiberii Dean Terry CLASS OF 1941 Robert N. Cashman J. Robert Mott CLASS OF 1942 Phillip H. Cochran John F. Conley John Divoll Fred Filios Rene V. Hebert James Hurley John Hutchins Robert J. Kirvin Otto S. Nau Arthur F. Rowe Lucian Szymd Benjamin Stonoga William Wall Charles J I. Woodcock CLASS OF 1943 Clinton Allen Kenneth Beckman John L. Brown Nicholas Carigamis John Davenport George Durgin Christos Gianarakos Richard McKenzie Thomas Moriarty Leo Porretti Renzo Peccioli Stanley Poccocha Quentin Xelson Benjamin Ristuccia Robert Rocheleau Donald Wood Massachusetts Alpha Chapter 4. 175 J MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX 1 1 u -■ I ' — 1 OFFICERS FACULTATE President Edwin Rossman Maxwell H. Goldber Arthur S. Levine Vice-president Henry Schreiber Secretary Dana Malins Treasurer Alan Silverman Intcrfratcrnily Edwin Rossman Alan Silverman ALPHA EPSILON PI Fredd, Horlick, Blake, Klubock, Feldman, Pearlman, Riseberg, Kirshen, Joffe, Eskin, Rosemark. Kaplinsky Tallen, Rich, Brunei!, Golan, Frank, Ginsberg, Klaman, Harris, Casper, Gordon, Yules, Brown Lebeaux, Kipnes, Mamber, Cohen, Mendelson, Siegel, Rabinow, Rubenstein, Golick, Hutner, Wolf, Goldman Kline, Lotow, Silverman, Malins, Schreiber, Rossman, Fram, Rodman, Sawyer, Kaplan, Bernson Jimniie sees Ihe " birdie " . . . " ' Nvah, nvah! — Hob, Sol, Al " The book-worm chuckler. . .The B.M.O.C. (Hank) shaves. CLASS OF 1940 Harvey Fram Dana Malins Robert Rodman Edwin Rossman David A. Sawyer Henry M. Schreiber CLASS OF 1941 Gabriel Auerbach Richard Bernson Arthur Cohen David Frank Sumner Ginsberg Sumner Kaplan Paul Keller Sol Klamau James Kline Jason Lotow Robert Riseberg Robert Siegal Alan Silverman CLASS OF 1942 Harvey Brunell Jason Cohen David H. Eskin Sumner Fredd Harold Golan Melvin Hutner Irwin Joft ' e Howard Kirshen Stanley Pearlman Morton Rabinow Edward Rosemark Jack Rubenstein Myron Solin Justin Winthrop Henry Wolf Louis Wolk CLASS OF 1943 Arnold Blake Arthur Brown Murray Casper Alan Feldman Robert Goldman Nathan Golick Irving Gordon Samuel Harris Lloyd Horlick Arnold Kaplinsky Herbert Kipnes Alfred Klubock Maxim Lebeaux Norman Mamber Irving Mendelson Lester Rich Elles Tallen Jack Yules 4. CHUSETTS 177 STATE C L L E G INDEX ? OFFICERS President Everett Shapiro Vice-president Melvin Chalfen Secretary Sidney Spungin Treasurer Daniel Levine Interfraternity Everett Shapiro Daniel Levine IN URBE William Bergman Samuel Golub Irving Lipovsky TAU EPSILON PHI Buxbaum, Weiner, A. Kagan, Horwitz, Keder, Lind, Lavitt, Oilman, White, Cohen, Abrahamson, Pruss Zeitler, Collier, Rodman, Goldman, Skolnick, Steinhurst, Goldman, D. Kagan, Firestone, Yavner, Nottenburg, Wein, Glick Meyer, Bernstein, Cohen, Burakoflf, Levine, Shapiro, Chalfen, Spungin, Reisman, Saltzman, Rouffa Waiting for the funnies! CLASS OF 1940 Robert Bernstein Morris Burakoff Melvin Chalfen Isadore Cohen Melvin Reisman Theodore Saltzman Everett Shapiro Sidney Spungin CLASS OF 1941 Gerry Biederman Robert Firestone George Garbowit Harry Oilman Eliot Josephson David Kagan Edwin Lavitt Daniel Levine Irving Meyer George Reder Albert Rouffa Benjamin Shanker David Skolnick CLASS OF 1942 Melvin Abrahamson Daniel Balaban Alan Buxbaum Alan Collier Saul Glick Joseph Goldman Harold Horwitz Abraham Kagan Sylvan Lind Robert Nottenburg Norman Ogan Harris Pruss Robert Radding William Rabinovitz Mitchell Rodman Maynard Steinberg Herbert Weiner Sydney Zeitler CLASS OF 1943 Hyman Bloom Norman Cohen Manuel Dobrusin Melvin Goldman Daniel Horvitz Abraham Klaiman Eugene Wein Jonah White Murray Yavuer Tau Pi Chapter 4. MASSACHUSE 179 STATE COLLEGE INDEX I SORORITIES From the five sororities at Massachusetts State College emanates feminine influence which pervades campus life. To nearly all upper- class coeds, the sorority is a second home — a social center and a place for study. Their influence over college life belies the youth of State College sororities. Three of the present sororities — Lambda Delta Mu, Phi Zeta, and Alpha Lambda Mu — were formed in 1931. Sigma Beta Chi was established in 1932, and Sigma Iota in 1934. The position which sororities have attained on campus is largely due to the work of the Intersorority Council. The Council does a commendable job in regulating all intersorority competition, and in planning for such events as the annual round-robin Patroness ' Tea and the Intersorority Ball. It establishes the rules by which sororities must abide while rushing freshmen women. Each year it oft ' ers two plaques: one to the winner of the annual Intersorority Sing and Declamation Contest, the other to the sorority which maintains the highest scholastic average. The council likewise directs a combined sorority skit presented annually on Dads ' Day. Finally, all Social L ' nion events have as hostesses tlie members of one of the sororities for each of the presentation throughout the school year. The sororities at State, under the direction and supervision of their own intersorority council, have brought to the coeds all the advantages of lively, helpful " houses. " Rushing. . .did you hear aliout?. . .knitting 1 [ 180 ] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY l s v V Misses Henschel, Tolman, Glazier, Desmond, J. Davis Misses Leete, Smalley, Shaw, Freedman, I. Davis INTERSORORITY COUNCIL Waiting for dates. . .house formal . , snow 4 [181] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I OFFICERS IN URBE President Mrs. Wilho Frigard Katherine Rice Mrs. Leshe Kimball Vice-president Doris King Secretary Marjorie Smith Treasurer Margaret Flynn Marjorie Shaw EHzabeth Desmond LAMBDA DELTA MU Misses Drinkwater, Desmond, Grayson, Reynolds, Ward, Baker, Puffer, Mosely, Kelso, Fitch, Cameron, Nichols Misses Langton, Day, Stanton, Deering, Albrecht, Mclnerny, Keavy, Beauregard, Webber, Berthiaume, Hayward, Campbell, Bowler Misses Skiffington, Delap, Wisly, Bergstrom, Grant, Gagnon, Fiske, Lucchesi, DuBord, Sullivan, Haye, McNamara, Chap- man, Barney, Williamson Misses O ' Neil, Lane, Pease, Shaw, Johnson, King, Rice, Smith, Flynn, Pelissier, Dunham, Vassos «w . n • i. f.i f I f $ i ' I f I fi f.f I t,!,t:,t ft [182] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Marguerite and sisters sliiinljer. . .Peggy, Marg and oilier siiiuulhict.. Lambda Delt ' s formal frolic. . .Three little tricks. CLASS OF 1940 Agnes Dunham Myra Graves Margery Johnson Virginia Pease Helene Pelissier Katherine Rice Marjorie Shaw Marjorie Smith CLASS OF 1941 Evelj ' n Be rgstrom Sylvia Campbell Elizabeth Desmond Helen Fitch Margaret Fljnn Marion Hoye Doris King Priscilla Lane Flora Lucchesi Florence O ' Neil Jean Puffer lona Reynolds Mary Sullivan Eleanor Vassos CLASS OF 1942 Elizabeth Barney Marguerite Berthiaume Constance Beauregard Phyllis Drinkwater Dorothy Grayson Jean McNamara Phyllis Mclnerny Rita Mosely Evra Ward Nancy Webber CLASS OF 1943 Frances Albrecht Mary Bowler Marie Chapman Winifred Day Wilma Fiske Evelyn Gagnon Helen Grant Barbara Hayward Mary Keavy Harriet Kelso Frances Langan Maybelle Skifiington Margaret Stanton Janice Wisly Alpha Chapter -ft 183 T MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX OFFICERS IN URBE President Marion Bullard Laura Everson Marion Smith 1 ' ice-pn ' ,iiileui Eleanor West Priscilla Oertel Secretary Esther Pratt Treasurer Rosa Kohls Intersororify Thelma Glazier Marion Tolman ALPHA LAMBDA MU Misses Callanan, Smith, A. Monk, Morgan, Woodward, Gasson, Bigwood, Butement, Glazier, Holmberg, Cook, Cambridge, Bascom Misses Wheatley, Kell, S. Maisner, Ronnholm, Vannah, Wright, Coates, M. Tolman, Tower, Belk, P. Tolman, M. Everson Misses Millett, Kinsley, Youland, Mahon, Bradley, Krawiec, Gallagher, Snyder, Wheelock, Kozak, H. Maisner, Gilchrest, Plichta Misses Bak, Jackson, Firth, Pratt, Oertel, L. Everson, Kohls, Barton, C. Monk, Banus, Chapin DSl 1 [184] Ht THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Jackie and Ester, forsaking sex - . . Alpha Lambdas count calories . Crammina ' for Chem and Home Ec. . .The sisters swina- it. CLASS OF 1940 Mildred Bak Anna Banus Beryl Barton Hazel Chapin Laura Everson Margaret Firth Thelma Glazier Olive Jackson Rosa Kohls Carolyn Monk Priscilla Oertel Esther Pratt Margaret Vannah CLASS OF 1941 Elizabeth Bascom Eleanor Birchard Roberta Bradley Katherine Callanan Virginia Coates Margaret Everson 4. Kathleen Kell Regina Krawiec Stella Maisner Marion Millett Rose Plichta Helen Smith Beverly Sn.yder Marion Tolman Phyllis Tolman Harriet Wheatley Dorothy Wright Dorothy Youland CLASS OF 1942 Kate Belk Barbara Buteraent Marion Cook Marion Gallagher Charlotte Gilchrest Mary Kozak Helen Maisner Phyllis Tower Helen Watt CLASS OF 1943 Beverly Bigwood Frances Gassou Norma Holmberg Dorothy Kinsley Helen McMahon Alice Monk Phyllis Morgan Dorothy Ronnholm Laurel Wheelock Ruble Woodward 185 Alpha Chapter Z OFFICERS FACULTATE IN URBE President Ethel Blatchford Piirnell Kathleen MacDonald Evelyn Gould Mrs. Walter Maclinn Vice-president Mrs. Maxwell Goldberg Beatrice Wood Mrs. Stanley F. Olbrych Secretary Irnia Malm Treasurer Millicent Carpenter Intersorority Catherine Leete Muriel Sherman PHI ZETA Misses Crimmin, Tracy, Cooney, Berger, Goodhue, Chase, Gassett, Ellis, Cooper, Helyar, Prest, Johnson, Mann, Pederzani, Leeper, Berry Misses Walker, Ferrante, Bailey, Ball, Beaubien, Barton, M. Cobb, E. Cobb, Gillette, Webster, Baker, Fish, Lobacz, Alger, Miller, Elder Misses M. Hall, Harrington, Farnsworth, Little, Bobbins, Jewell, Aldrich, Burgess, Badger, Agambar, Sherman, G. Archibald, Phillips, Koonz, M. J. Carpenter, P. Archibald, Tyler, Smith Misses Critchett, Doran, Leete, Howe, M. Carpenter, Wood, Gould, Malm, Irwin, Morley, Abrams, F. Hall, Davis IClOX AA.. t §§ ' 9 fl ' il ' % iT ft S ' f f «» H- » f- % 1 % Jt f E ! f t t !:, S f f S ' |. ! " » i K K K K K K St KJ l 9F [ 186 ] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Sorors entertain prospective rushees. . .The crystal sees " a Tlieta Clii " Mrs. Allen helps . . . Her proteges count calories CLASS OF 1940 Betty Abrams Erma Alvord Louise Bowman Millicent Carpenter Kathleen Cooper Katherine Doran Barbara Farnsworth Evelvn Gould Frieda Hall Elizabeth Howe Marjorie Irwin Eleanor Jewell Barbara Little Catherine Leete Irma Malm Dorothy Morley Patricia Robbins Beatrice Wood CLASS OF 1941 RoseElaine Agambar Gladys Archibald Priscilla Archibald Priscilla Badger Cvnthia Bailey Annetta Ball Rosalie Beaubien Shirley Burgess Ann Cooney Ruth Crimmin Barbara Critchett Jean Davis Gladys Fish Anna Harrington Irene Johnston Bertha Lobacz Jeanne Phillips Muriel Sherman Jean Tyler CLASS OF 1942 Nancy Alger ThjTza Barton Mary Berry Anne Chase Betty Cobb Mary Cobb Ethel Gassett Eleanor Gillette Martha HaU Ruth Helyar Elizabeth Leeper Margery Mann Alice Pederzani Dorothy Prest Jane Smith Evelyn Walker CLASS OF 1943 Marjorie Aldrich Ruth Baker Helen Berger Mary Jean Carpenter Jean Elder Ruth V. Ellis Elena Ferrante Rosalind Goodhue Doris Johnson Elinor Koonz Daphne Miller Helen Smith Olive Tracy Betty Webster Alpha Chapter 4. C H U S E T T S 187 ' STATE COLLEGE INDEX T OFFICERS President Dorothea Smalley Vice-president Anne Corcoran Secretary Virginia Gale Treasurer Elizabeth Spofford Intersorority Vivian Henschel Dorothea Smalley IX IRBE Katherine O ' Brien SIGMA BETA CHI Misses M. Gale, Hedlund, Lane, EjTe, Durland, Avery, Carlisle, Barrus, White, Shirley, Gutfinski, Merrill, Moulton, Handforth, Avella Misses Taylor, Sanderson, Nagelschmidt, Judge, E. Brown, Janis, Waldron, Richardson, Martin, Scott, Farrell, Delorey, Grise, Holton, Wise Misses Merritt, Scully, Daub, Carnall, Spofford, Smalley, V. Gale, Henschel, Luce, Little, Stewart, Bates, J. Brown 188 it THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY From the sublime ... to the ridiculoii.s Studies stop for tea . . . Dorothea explains love . CLASS OF 1940 Elizabeth Bates Anne Corcoran Virginia Gale Alberta Johnson Virginia Little Nancy Luce Dorothy Rourke Dorothea Smalley Elizabeth Spoilord Jacqueline Stewart CLASS OF 1941 Ruth Barrus Elaine Delorey Marcelle Grise Vivian Henschel Helen Lane Bertha Merritt Elizabeth Reynolds Margaret Robinson Patience Sanderson 4. Marion Scully Jean Taylor CLASS OF 1942 Marion Avery Esther Brown Jean Carlisle Priscilla Durland Margaret Gale Norma Handforth Norma Hedlund Helen Janis Mary Judge Marjorie Merrill Elizabeth Moulton Marion Xagelschmidt Patricia Newell Martha Shirley Anne Waldron CLASS OF 1943 Frances Avella Jean Brown [189: MASSACHUSETTS Bea Carnall Florence Daub Mildred EjTe Eileen Farrell Blanche Gutfinski Mary Holton Lillian Martin Virginia Richardson Priscilla Scott Anne White Marv Wise Alpha Chapter hy taBhTaXt STATE COLLEGE INDEX T OFFICERS President ' Ida Davis Vice-president Roma Levy Secretary Helen Alperin Treasurer Miriam Miller SIGMA IOTA Misses Wolkovsky, L™ch, Marshall, Stein, Sacks, Wainshel, EUis, M. Cohen, A. Cohen Misses Golilnuin, Adelsuii, Lappen, Fox, Davis, Freedman, Alperin, Gordon, Miller 1 [ 190 ] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY it Girls dream, study, Frank happy. . .Trudy dreams as usual . . Morpheus . . . Marshmallows . CLASS OF 1940 Ida Davis Roma Levy CLASS OF 1941 Helen Alperin Marion Freedraan Miriam Miller Phoebe Stone CLASS OF 1942 .Dorothy Adelson Edith Fox Florence Goldberg Gertrude Goldman Frances H. Lappen Barbara Wainshel CLASS OF 1943 Ann August Ann Cohen Marion Cohen Ruth Ellis Estelle Lynch Anita Marshall Miriam Sacks Rivka Stein Gertrude Wolkovsky Alpha Chapter 191 I MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX CTIVITIES AND CTION % ACTIVITIES In this section devoted to academic activities are descriptions of more than a score of student organizations. All of these non-athletic non-scholastic activities affect the campus life of every student in some way. Probably half of the upperclass students of the college participate in at least one academic activity, and some devote more time to academic activity than they do to studies. Including as they do, such widely different organizations as musical groups, publications staffs, dance committees, class officers, and student governing groups, dramatic and oratorical associations, and in addition another score of campus religious, scholastic, and recrea- tional clubs, academic activities constitute a major feature of col- lege life at State. The task of exercising general supervision over all the academic activities lies with the Academic Activities Board, which consists of two faculty appointees, two alumni appointees, a general man- ager, the President of the College, and the managers of each student organization. Although the Board has authority to exercise general supervision over Academic Activities, in actual practice, the various academic groups function independently. The main work of the Board is to recognize outstanding academic work by granting silver, gold, and diamond-chip medallions to students who have participated successfully. Furthermore the Board awards a Con- spicuous Service Cup for outstanding service on the part of a senior; and gives a fifty dollar prize to a manager. Serenade at milady ' s windows. . interest in performance. . .sweet sleep Schreiber, Powers, Lindsey, Gleason, Cowling, W. Shepardson Terry, Prof. Dickinson, Dr. Goldberg, Miss Davis, Dean Machmer, Prof. Rand ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES BOARD Man with the stick . . . Santa, dear Santa . . . Annual sing 4 195 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX Morse, Blasko, Hager Reagan, Tappin, Irzyk, Johnson ADELPHIA One of the most coveted honors of State College life comes to a junior when he is " tapped " by seniors of the Adelphia society. Outstanding as leaders in campus activities, the Adelphia members are composed of seven senior men elected by their predecessors. In addition, several men are recognized by initiation into Adelphia at the end of thnir senior year. Admission to this honorary society is based on the record of the first three years. " Promotion of good fellowship and the fostering of the highest ideals at Massachusetts State College " has been the aim of Adelphia since its inception. The society directs rallies before State ' s most important football games. Beginning the season with a huge torchlight parade, the rallies present varied programs . . .A bonfire. . . Prof essois ' Speeches . . .The one and only Dean Burns. . .Coaches. . .Gridiron stars. . . Fireworks. . .State songs . State cheers. . .Band music. It also directs certain student activities essential to a well- rounded college life, but for which no other organization or support exists. Before Thanksgiving, it conducts a campus-wide drive for Red Cross contributions. Fraternities, sororities, and the four classes are contacted either directly or at Convocation. The average student is unaware of the significance of Adelphia. He admires the insignia and the maroon coats, but it is usually not until his second oj third year that he even knows a member of the society. The real purpose of the society is to honor those students who have made worth-while contributions to student life during their first three years of college. Inevitably some men are picked because they are good fellows or have made fine athletic records, but Adelphia more than any other society on campus recognizes the men who have turned in capable performances in extra-curricular activity, but because of their quiet manner have failed to win campus fame. 196 It 1 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Wlicnever a isilinf; ' tfaiii arrives on campus in its l)iis, it re- ceives the welcome of State College ' s official " hosts, " the ten soph- omore members of the Maroon Key. In recent years athletic teams from other colleges have been impressed with the spirit in the Key society; so impressed, in fact, that several colleges considered founding Key societies. At present there are chapters of the Key society in many of the leading colleges in the United States. Each chapter takes its name from the colors of the college at which it is located. Each freshman is rather rudely acquainted with the Maroon Key at the Abbey serenade a week or so after registration. Cause for friction is added to the natural soph-frosh rivalry by the activi- ties of the Maroon Key; for it is the duty of Key members to en- force the " serenade " week — theirs is the duty of swinging paddles. It is all for the good of the freshmen, they say, for the maroon- topped neophytes also learn college songs and cheers at the " dawn serenade. " In the spring of the year the freshmen elect ten classmates to the Maroon Key Society for the coming year. The ten are chosen from a list of eighteen candidates, in turn selected by the Senate from thirty-two nominees proposed by fraternity and non-fraternity men. Election to the Maroon Key is often the start of a college career of extra-curricular activity. Like Adelphia, the Maroon Key is perhaps more an honorary society than an active campus group. It adds atmosphere to the campus, especially during the first few weeks of the fall, to have a sprinkling of Maroon Key hats at student gatherings. And it gives the honored men something to remember all their lives. . . and all through college, a hat to wear on rainy days. MAROON KEY Sullivan, Potter, Holmberg, Atwood Zeitler, Werme, Bullock, Eaton, Evans 4. 197 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX z SENATE The welfare of the student body is the concern of the Senate, the student governing body composed of juniors and seniors. Rebel- lious frosh who have been tossed into the College Pond for not wearing their caps, perhaps do not agree that the Senate has pro- moted their welfare. They heartily disapprove of the clause in the constitution authorizing the Senate " to take disciplinary measures with reactionary freshmen. " On the whole, though, matters under the control of the Senate deal with more serious student affairs. The Senate this year re- vised class election rules to prevent campus politics, which in previ- ous years appeared to be degrading the esprit de corps of the major- ity of students. It, moreover, made routine appointments to stu- dent committees and sent delegates to two college conventions. It decreed that cheer leaders should be selected by competition and that girls be allowed to compete. The outstanding action taken by the Senate this year was the appointment of a preliminary committee to consider the possi- bility of a High School Student Leader Day at Massachusetts State College. The work of this committee may have far-reaching results in bringing outstanding students to State. The committee plans to send invitations to high school students who meet the scholastic requirements for State and are proficient in such extra- curricular activities as athletics, music, dramatics, or school publi- cations. They will be given a glance at State College life — a basket- ball game, moving pictures of the college, and perhaps a banquet. The committee earned its own funds for the initiation of sub-fresh- men day by staging a variety show on campus. At times, students accused it of being a stagnant club of campus " big-shots. " However, few students would wish to abolish the Senate; for even students like their " big shots " and many have their own secret aspirations. Crimmins, Blasko, Burr, Hager Jackimczyk, Tappin, Reagan, Irzyk, Nelson 1 198 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY S Misses Hall, Stewart, Mclnerny Misses Shaw, Leete, Bailey, Beynolds Coeds who leave the straight and narrow path and sow wild oats while undergraduates of State College are guided aright through the assistance of the W.S.G.A. Regular semester meetings or special meetings called by the president of the W.S.G.A. take up cases of coed transgressors and enforcement of rules. Strictest rules are ordained for freshmen coeds, but all women students enrolled in the four-year course become automatically subject to super- vision by the dreaded and ridiculed " old women, " as they are popularly known on campus. Like the Senate in some respects this women ' s governing body sees to it that freshman berets be worn until October 12th of the first semester. Initiation, too, in all its glory blooms forth in the hands of the sophomore women who issue certain additional rules approved by the W.S.G.A. Council. Sophomores themselves en- force the rules which provide for as picturesque a week as the milder old-fashioned " Hell Week " of the men students. Even the topic of dating is subjected to the supervision of the council. Freshmen coeds, for example, find themselves restricted to two dates a week until Christmas in order that they may spend more time on " grinding. " Rules like these have given the W.S.G.A. an aura of despotism and have made them the butts of good-natured joshing, though their purpose as stated in the con- stitution is " to make each member gain a feeling of responsibility and a conception of citizenship. " From the time coeds begin wearing their white berets on entering State College to their last year as seniors they find their college life intimately tied up with the Women ' s Student Governing Associa- tion. The very existence of this governing body illustrates the principle of democracy permeating State College and proving the capability of students to control and lead their curricular or social activities. W.S.G.A. 199 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I Osmun, McCutcheon, Hager Miss Shaw, Pike, Blodgett, Miss Smalley HONOR COUNCIL EXAMINATION BC Dean Lanphear has given us one of the strongest arguments for retaining the Honor System. Speaking of State College he says, " This is an ideal environment. If there can be no honor in a selected group, what hope is there for the world at large . If the Honor Sys- tem cannot work here, I cannot see what hope there is for society. But, in a last analysis and from personal experience, I am positive that students here are honest and should try their hardest to main- tain the system, for it alone can prepare them for life. " The Honor System was introduced at State College as a result of a series of talks on college life given by Dean Lewis in 1921. After a long period of research, a constitution was ratified establishing the Honor Council. The Council acts as a court for trying cases of alleged dishonor, and its power of conviction includes power to expel an offender from college. The broadest purpose of the council is to uphold and interpret the Honor Constitution. In 1934 a clarification of purpose was made and the student body voted amendments to the constitution. At a forum held in 1939 faculty and student opinion showed itself to be overwhelmingly in support of the system, despite agitation and a campaign by the Collegian for sweeping revisions of the system. The most significant result of the forum was an amendment to the constitution calling for the election of a faculty advisor. Dr. Goldberg, who has had years of acquaintance with the system, was elected. Despite this change, it can still be said that the Honor System belongs to stu- dents without faculty or administration interference. The majority of students accept the system as adequately successful and a vast improvement over the proctor system which it replaced. 1 [ 200 ] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY 3t On the State campus last year the Student Religious Council hegau a new seven-college Interfaith Conference. Timely and thought-provoking, the conference in 1940 took as its topic the subject, " Religion and Democracy. " The initiation of the yearly conferences indicates the vigor with which the Religious Council is pursuing its general aim. Composed of representatives of the three religious denominations on campus, the council seeks to encourage religious activity and to achieve a unity of religious spirit in the entire college. The major activity of the council in furtherance of its aim is sponsorship of Sunday Vesper services. " This vesper service, " said one student speaker, " with the representatives of the three religious groups on campus speaking side by side from the same platform, is symbolic of the cooperative spirit which translates into effective form the best in our respective religions. " Tolerance, marriage, the Bible in relation to our modern living, college life and current af- fairs are discussed in the Sunday vesper talks of nationally-known Christian and Jewish speakers. Students, it is conceded by the college administration, are likely to sacrifice their spiritual development to the constant pres- sure of studies and the great variety of social and extra-curricular activities. The college recognizes the need for a council and its work in bringing vital social and religious questions to students of all faiths. The council in no way conflicts with, but rather supple- ments, other student religious clubs. At State College, religious activity in this age of religious indif- ference, though not influencing the entire student body, still is well above average in comparison to other colleges. Through good speakers and a wider program. Rev. David A. Sharp, director of religious education, hopes to arouse an even greater interest among State students. STUDENT RELIGIOUS COUNCIL Anderson, Heyman, Moriece Miss Davis, Miss Pratt, Yanow, Miss Delorey, Miss Bates 4. 201 J MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX Editor-in-Chief, Edith Clark; Associate Ediior, Arthur Noyes; Art Editor, Mat- thew Tuttle; Assistants, C. Foster Good- win, Bradford Greene; Literary Editor, Richard Glendon; Ass-istants, Harold For- rest, Chester Kuralowicz, Mary Donahue, Herbert Weiner; Sports Editor, Thomas Johnson; Assistant, George Litchfield. Photographic Co-editors, D. Arthur Cop- son, Dana Keil ; Assistants, Howard Hunt- er, Margaret Marsh; Faculty Adviser, Dr. Maxwell H. Goldberg. INDEX The work of producing the Index promptly in May is an all-day, all-night, all-year task. It is a diiEcult but absorbing process of arranging boards, organizing the dummy (the future yearbook in out- line form); and then settling down to months of assignments, typing, and dead- lines. Electing their own heads, making suggestions, worrying, working together, the thirty members of the three upper classes take pride in the completed Index. The Index is not merely a compilation of dry facts; it is intended as a lasting picture of the State campus. State stu- dents, and State activities. Though prim- arily for the seniors to thumb over in later years, it is also of value to the under- graduates as an easy means of contact with the activities of the college. From recent editions of the Index the value of informal photography has be- come increasingly obvious. Consequently, the 1940 Index board has used informal " shots " in picturing everyone from hazed freshmen to relaxed professors. In ap- pearance alone, consequently, the Index makes a more attractive book and funda- mentally carries out the purpose of the 1940 board — that is, to take the student Gordon, Greene, Kaplan, Goodwin, Ketchen, Kuralowicz, Kagan, Weiner, Johnson Miss Doubleday, Miss Marsh, Hamel, Blodgett, Eaton, Litchfield, Keil, Miss Lappen, Miss Donahue Tuttle. Shaw, Glendon, Noyes, Miss Clark, Schreiber, Powers, Copson, Prof. Dickinson 202 St z THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Micky exhausted — Hank can take it . . . Fran, Gould, and Lois laboring . reader " behind the scenes at Massachu- setts State College. " Since perhaps the first small land- grantish Index, the editors have taken pains with the artistic motif of the book, for such can assure or prevent, to a large degree, the success of the book. In this year ' s edition the Old Chapel Chime is consistent from cover to cover. For the sake of simplicity and effective organization, all work is divided among individual boards, whose type of work is evident from their titles — Literary, Sta- tistics, Art, Athletics, Business, and Pho- tography. Seniors may weary of informal shots; the Collegian may wonder about the date of publication ; and students may notice the smoke and noise of the Index office in the " Mem " Building, but the Index progresses steadily. The members with their steady assignments and all-too- strict dead-lines, are not likely to forget its existence. Yet the yearbook staff does not seek glory or constant, loud recognition of its labors. It is sufficient if, after the distribu- tion of the 1940 Index this May, the college gives an honest evaluation and approval to the brain-child of thirty weary board members. YEARBOOK Business Manager, Henry Schreiber; As- sociate Business Manager, John Powers; Assistanis, R. Alden Blodgett, George Hamel, David Kagan, Joseph Gordon, Frances Lappen, Gould Ketchen. Statis- tics Editor, Donald Shaw; Associate Sta- tistics Editor, Robert Eaton; Assistants, Sumner Kaplan, Lois Doubleday; Faculty Adviser, Prof. Lawrence S. Dickinson. 203 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I ■Lit f 9 : Ff It 1 1 1 ' i Iff " Martin, Dwyer, McCutclieon, Kuralowic?, Bart, Manix, ' anMeter, McCarthy, Bell Atwood, Polcblopek, Gordon, Cox, Fox, LaFreniere, Litcbfield, Golan, Barreca Misses Tully, Kenny, Potter; Radner, Nottenburg, Lalor, Rabinovitz, Misses Dunklee, Stewart, DeRautz, Luce Prof. Dickinson, Rodman, Powers, Hall, Lindsey, Noyes, Howland, McCartney, Filios, Hyman, Miss Donahue COLLEGIAN ssors, Like U. S Senai an ' t Astree On Neutrali Editor-in-Chief, Arthur Noyes; Associate Editor, John Filios; Managing Editor, Kenneth Howland; Campus Editor, Har- old Forrest; Art Editor, Mary Donahue; Sforts Editor, Bert Hymen; Secretary, Loretta Kenny; Business Manager, Roger Lindsey; Subscription Manager, Robert Hall; Circulation Manager, Robert Rod- man; Advertising Manager, Charles Pow- ers; Business Assistants, Joseph Gordon, Walter Lalor, Charles Bishop, Richard Cox, Edward O ' Brien, David Van Meter, Harold Golan, Robert Nottenburg. Collegian editorials in the past year have aroused wide-spread comment — favorable and unfavor- able; but the editorial aim, that of making stu- dents read and think, has been realized. Keyword of editorial policy is Service: editorials, instead of philosophizing or discussing international politics, concern themselves primarily with State College, Collegian editorial campaigns have been responsi- ble to a large degree for the change of the col- lege ' s name and for the recently-granted right to give an A.B. degree. This year consideration of the need for " Massachusetts State University " and the " Honor System " have dominated the subject matter of editorials. A " live " make-up and " live " news coverage have made the Collegian the top-ranking weekly collegiate newspaper of all New England. With such a record the board is proud not only of the results of its editorials but also of its other sections. Humor, administration notes, co-ed activities, " swing, " classic music, and opinions of other col- leges — these, in the six regular columns provide reading that appeals to most preferences. Newest of Collegian features is Joe Bart ' s column, " Our Colleagues, " analyzing subjects of universal inter- est in the collegiate world. Wednesday night finds the editors at the print- ing house in Amherst — Carpenter and Morehouse. There they " put the Collegian to bed, " writing deadline stories, proofreading and polishing up 204 1 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY technical points until one or two in the morning. For students seriously considering a career of journalism, the experience thus obtained in the technical details of editing and publishing is in- valuable. State College alumni, who received their first tr aining on the Colleyicni board, are found on the staffs of daily newspapers all over the United States. The work of the business board is as little under- stood by the student body as the work of any other undergraduate activity. Trekking " down to town " for advertisements or doing bookkeeping work on contract advertisers, the business board is noted for its efficiency and reliability. Through- out the year, over thirty issues of the Collegian, or a total of about forty thousand copies have been distributed weekly to the entire vmdergradu- ate body and mailed to hundreds of subscribers. Typical of all colleges is the student attitude toward the Collegian. The editor has yet to hear praise for any issue; yet let typographical errors appear and the mail brings a batch of deprecating letters. Then, inevitably, students complain that the humorous columnist is never humorous. Again, the physical and biological departments complain that liberal arts stories dominate the n ewspaper; and liberal arts professors write diatribes of com- plaint because a report of a professor at a Jink- town concention had not been printed. In spite of the apparent inappreciation, however, the Col- legian by its consistent high qviality has justly earned its " First Class Honor Rating " by the Associated Collegiate Press. Cuiujnis liepnrlcn; IJcniard Kox, Nancy Luce, .Jacqueline Stewart, Everett Spenc- er, Peter Harreca, .Joseph Bart, William Goodwin, Chester Kuralowicz, Harold McCarthy, Kathleen Tully, William Dwyer, George Lilch field, Robert Mc- Cutcheon, Louise I ' otter, Irving Ilabino- witz, Alan Bell, Marguerite DeRautz, Dorothy Dunklee, Henry Martin, Stan- ley Polchlopek. Sports Assistants, Milton Atwood, Edward LaFreniere, .John Man- ix, Ephraim Radnor. FacuUy Advisers, Prof. Lawrence S. Dickinson, Dr. Max- well H. Goldberg. ilQ50otbu0ett0 ®olU NEWSPAPER Bob Jones, Art, Phil, Chet, Ken. . Manager .Toe, Writer Forrest, Editor K.. .H. -ft 205 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX T COLLEGIAN QUARTERLY For students and faculty members who write, the college organ of expression has been the ever-evolving Collegian Quarterly. Pub- lished seasonally, the literary magazine has at last reached a new maturity and won the approval of its student readers. Criticism of past issues in terms of " Morbidness " and " Dryness " has turned into optimism with a new format. The history of the Quarterlij reveals a progress exceeding most of the originator ' s dreams. In the spring of 1937, Kenwood Ross, then business manager of the Collegian, made a year and a half of re- search, writing to sixty colleges, and afterward made possible the first issue as a subsidized two-page supplement of the Collegian. In the course of years the magazine grew from a two-page, to a four- page, to an eight-page supplement, and finally to the magazine form. It is a commonly accepted fact that the success has been due greatly to the Quarterly editors and chiefly to the students them- selves. In a college the size of State, budding composers are certain to appear; at State in particular, writers have, relatively speaking, been more than bountiful. " To publish under student editorship, undergraduate, faculty, and alumni creative work four times a year, " was announced as the basic policy at the start. Elaboration of this policy resulted in an improving Quarterly. Urged by the expansion of the college, the editors will be able to print fiction, articles, and poetry of the high- est standards. " This is the story of the Quarterly, " say the present editors, " but it is only the beginning. Each succeeding issue draws more and more manuscripts. The torch is yet to be carried on to the heights of Olympus. So far the Muses have smiled on us, and we are su re they will continue until the Quarterly is recognized as more than ' a college magazine ' . " Lindsey, Kuralowicz, McCartney, Miss Donahue, Dr. Goldberg 1 206 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ft Nottenburg, Hyman, Shaw, Rosemark, Radding Miss Donahue, Miss McNamara, Hayes, Miss Tully, ScolHn, Miss Couture Before he even sets foot on campus, every State freshman re- ceives his copy of the Freshman Handbook. The first week at college finds freshmen carrying that " Bible " daily from the hour of their first class until bedtime, gradually absorbing bits of information from the compact compilation of State College traditions, songs, cheers, and activities. Every new student discovers that his little maroon covered " Bible " is indispensable and indeed, it is a minia- ture course in college orientation. The Freshman Handbook board is chosen in the latter part of the year from the Sophomore class. Using most of their second semester and part of their summer vacation, the editors publish their version of the handbook, and have it ready for mailing to all members of the incoming class before September. Adjustment to a new routine of study and life is a problem which must be solved early in the freshman year. This adjustment the handbook hopes to assist by its sections on student government, religious and academic activities, customs, social activities, ath- letic activities, and Who ' s Who at Massachusetts State College. Entering college is not like buying a third class ticket to Utopia nor does college resemble more than slightly the modern screen versions of collegiate life, say the handbook editors. College is " fun " but freshmen meet many problems. The handbook hopes to help them to realize, in the midst of the first week ' s confusion, that college is not all play and n o work. Though insignificant in size, though ridiculed by all three upper classes, the handbook sets the incoming frosh on the right foot and provides an introduction to four years of life at his chosen Alma Mater. It expresses the hopes of faculty and older students that the new-comers may easily establish a place upon the State College campus. 4L 207 FRESHMAN HANDBOOK I MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX Mendall, Edminster, Beckman, Benemelis, Litchfield, Smith, Gray, Nau, Powers ■ Janes, Handforth, Shaw, Johnson, Thompson, Miller, Terry, Potter, Eldridge, Burnham Casper, Scollin, Cowling, Miss Miller, Mr. Farnum, Miss Kenny, Eskin, Schenker, Waller BAND Bandmaster, Charles P. Farnum; Student Leader, and Manager, Douglas H. Cowl- ing; Brass, Frank Smith, Kenneth Beck- man, Leslie Benemelis, Harris Blauer, Sherman Davis, Talcott Edminister, Willis Janes, Warren Pushee, Everett Raynes, Carl Sprague, LeForest Gray, Thomas Handforth, Robert Hemond, Otto Nau, Robert Mott, Robert Rise- berg, George Litchfield, Ralph Mendall, Jr., Charles Powers, Arthur Waaramaa. " What our band needs is a little ' oomph ' !!! " said a fair coed after the State College band ' s first gridiron appearance. And that word best de- scribed the change which took place in the per- formance at the remainder of the season ' s games. At the first game, while maroon and white rooters watched half-heartedly during the half, a brightly-clad band marched onto the field. After a whistle blast, a lengthy series of marching and backing produced a recognizable " M. " Came the Amherst game, however, and the band began to swing out in a jaunty fashion never before seen at a State football contest. Forming J-E-F-F and S-T-A-T-E, as if by magic before the peal of the whistle had died away, the band added to the increasing perfection exhibited during the last six years. In 1933, an entire reorganization resulted in the birth of the present band. Each year, new progress has been made. Most noticeable forward step was the purchase of the professional-looking uniforms worn by the band. Next came new instruments to improve the quality of tone. And this year the band scored a real hit with the students by adding new zest in its marching formations. Credit for this increased enthusiasm can definitely be traced to Student Manager Douglas Cowling. Without the faculty assistance tendered to the other musi- cal organizations, he has performed a professional job of disciplining and planning. In the actual 1 208 HUNDRED AND FORTY marching formations, he was ably aided by Assist- ant Manager Eldridge and Drum Major Eskin. Band Master Farnum also deserves praise for the excellent concert standard set this year by the band. Each year Mr. Farnum starts with a band in which there is only a small nucleus of experi- enced members; for freshmen predominate in band membership. It is his job to knit this group of raw musicians into a unit which will render some of the truly inspired pieces which are given every year. This year ' s several concerts, both on and off campus, featured solos by Frank Smith, trumpeter and Samuel Shaw on the piccolo. The fall season was more complete than in the past few years, with exhibitions at five home con- tests and two away from home games. When State won the football game with Worcester Poly- tech, the band added to the occasion, but was not at its best. However, at the Coast Guard game in New London, the performance of the band, de- spite the handicaps of extreme cold and the poor lighting of a night game, was excellent. In the past, uniforms, instruments, and in- struction have produced a fine looking, fine play- ing organization. This year, strong leadership and perseverance in drill have made a snappy march- ing group. An essential part in the color of college sports and college life, the band has made an amaz- ing number of improvements. The State College Band has finally captured that elusive and magic quality called " OOMPH. " Drum Major, Daviil Kskiii; Siyiial Drum Major, Daphne Miller, June Kenny; Reeds and Drums, Harold Scollin, Philip Cochran, Henry Miller, Spencer Potter, John Terry, Jr., Samuel Shaw, Richard Perry, Abraham Klaman, Chester Tiberii, Robert Johnson, Albert Eldridge, Preston Burnham, Murray Casper, Christopher Paul, Hanson Shenker, Waller Stearns. The grand entrance . " The songs we love so well " . 209 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX ORCHESTRA Since the opening concert of the year, the college orchestra has retained a place of leadership among campus activities. It has been customary in the past for the orchestra to begin its activities in the fall with the rest of the college. This year, however, the orchestra took a leap or two forward and began in the summer to write to incoming freshmen about the organization, inviting them to join. To the average student, however, the orchestra ' s season opened on November 16 at student convocation. It played at the Bay State Revue and the Dads ' Day Show. It also took an active part at the birth of a new college musical event, the first annual Christmas concert. This year, just as at last year ' s performance of the " Mika- do, " the orchestra provided accompaniment for " The Gondoliers, " the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta presented this spring. Further evidence of its wide-awake attitude during the past musi- cal year was shown when it made a set of recordings by means of the new equipment of the college. These recordings will not only be heard over the radio station in the Tower Room but will also be broadcast through other radio stations in Massachusetts. Having rounded off a year ' s work with appearances in the second annual Music Week program in May and at graduation exercises in June, the orchestra is grateful to its well-known director, Doric Alviani, and regards its rise to recognition with pride. It has not only completed a second successful year, but has also doubled and tripled its size within a few years. One of the busiest musical organ- izations on campus, the State College orchestra has supplemented various student activities and has set a record in its history. With Progress for a keynote, it has gained a reputation for accomplished performances and its members are recognized as a polished instru- mental group, contributing to State ' s increasing musical tradition. King, Miss Fox, Miss Flagg, Miss Peck, Babbitt Levine, Grays, Gleason, Miss Berry, Miss Kelleher, Perry, Shaw, Gewirtz, Trufant, Goldman, Miss Alperin, Mr. Alviani, Miss Tarbell Miss Avella, Miss Jewell, Mendelson, Weinhold, Shaw, Miss King, Miss Stanton m M j: _J R » ' r » ' ' f sm " 4: - ( ■i!V " WHnHRE ' n i «1 f ! 210] 1 it THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY 1 i t t t « 1 1 1 t ft A t t t t t 4 Andrew, Bralit, Gooch, Ferriter, Joyce, Hathaway, Burnham, Gleason, Sheldon, Moody, Dunn, Irvine Misses Stohlman, Gagnon, Day, Stanton, Mathes, Brown, Davis, Milner, Drinkwater, Buteman, Handforth, Gillett Misses Archibald, Burgess, Politella, Fiske, Little, Mr. Alviani, Misses Hall, Johnson, Berthiaume, Beauregard, Goldman It is the beginning of the five o ' clock vesper service on Sunday afternoon. The voices of the choir blend, fugiially at times, singing the opening hymn. Then, as the audience Hstens in deep silence, the voices descend to pianissimo and die away. Later the audience joins the choir members in a few songs, and the services end with another hymn by the choir alone. In this capacity at vespers, the choir performs an important duty throughout the school year. The new charm which is thus added to the vesper services fully explains the rapid growth and importance of the choir as a musical group at State college. The group, under the direction of Doric Alviani, consists of approximately thirty-five men and women undergraduates, and attracts even more candidates. In fact, be- cause of the large number of interested students, the possibility of a freshman choir has been seriously considered. A recent innovation, color, has given the choir visual, as well as vocal, appeal. Maroon robes, instead of the customary black ones, add a certain originality to the weekly program. The activities of the choir also bring it into contact with other musical groups. For example, one of the outstanding series of con- certs occurred during the Christmas season. At the Christmas vespers, the program of traditional carols also included singing by the men ' s and women ' s glee clubs. During the following week, the choir and musical clubs joined with the orchestra in a recital at Stockbridge Hall, and a few days later sang at the Belchertown State Hospital. Thus ended the Christmas schedule, one of the out- standing events in the yearly activities of the college choir. CHOIR 4L [211] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I MEN ' S GLEE CLUB The members of the Men ' s Glee Club are now quite accustomed to donning formal dress and leaving the campus to give an outside concert. For, throughout the year, besides their campus activities, the club makes many appearances at colleges and churches in sur- rounding cities. Such apparently pleasant work, however, is not done without careful preparation. Weeks of rehearsal under the direction of Doric Alviani are spent before the club presents itself as a musical group, said to be equal in rank with the Vassar and Princeton Glee Clubs. During the past year the club has appeared not only in college concerts, convocations, and Social Unions, but also in the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta " The Gondoliers " — the sixth Gilbert and Sullivan work presented at State College. The selections this year have been as varied as the occasions themselves. They have also become more elaborate, featuring difficult arrangements by David- son, conductor and arranger for the Harvard Glee Club, as well as some by Deems Taylor. Sea chanties and American folk medleys have also been included in the programs. Expression in song is the aim of the Men ' s Glee Club, and in its work it has become the testing-ground of those interested in music on the State campus. Its advance to a place among New England ' s finer glee clubs has laid a partial basis for the increased spirit of singing on the entire campus. Responsible for the rise of the glee club are a junior, Wilfred Hathaway, for his work as accompanist, and the director, Doric Alviani, for the efficient organization. Finally, the spirit of all the members contributes to the success of the club as a nucleus of campus music. Popularity of glee clubs, which are becoming important elements in outside professional groups, has extended to State College where audience support has been the most enthusiastic for decades. Heyman, Hathaway, Nye, MacCormack, Perry, Collard, Slack, Moody, Mendall Gordon, Newell, Dunn, Goodwin, Walkey, Bornstein, Hayes, Courchene, Williams, McCartney Shaw, McGurl, Bralit, Gleason, Richardson, Klubock, Greenberg, Auerbach, Goldman, Kipnis Merrill, Lindsey, Firestone, Cole, Mr. Alviani, Powers, Andrew, Martin, Sheldon, Ferriter 1 St Misses DePalnia, Tarbell, Kelleher, Heermance, VanMeter, Barrus, M. Davis, Tolman, Richardson, Moseley, Handforth Misses Burgess, G. Archibald, Berry, Berthiaume, Stanton, Lane, Goldman, VanBuren, Belk, Mothes, Alperin Misses Long, Little, J. Archibald, Bergstrom, Mr. Alviani, Misses J. Davis, Giles, Oertel, Kohls, Barton The Women ' s Glee Club has lent a fresh variety this year to programs featuring the combined musical clubs — in the 1940 oper- etta " The Gondoliers, " in the Social Union concert, and in the musical observance of Christmas on campus. The cl ub, however, has also gained campus favor in its own right. This is evidenced in the special appearances, radio broadcasts, and annual trips which have recently been added to the singing schedule of the club. During the year, several nights a week were taken up with re- hearsals for performances. New songs, including " My Hero " from " The Chocolate Soldier " and an old 16th century " Echo " song, filled the Memorial Building auditorium as the coed singers prac- ticed for important performances. Whether singing light operatic selections or popular numbers, the Women ' s Glee Club has been judged by the Collegian to be the most versatile singing group on the State campus — for the sake of rivalry — even on a par with the Men ' s Glee Club. A few years ago, the Women ' s Glee Club combined with the orchestra and the Men ' s Glee Club under the management of one board. Composed of managers and assistant managers of each club, this board plans joint concerts, and elects its own secretary, publi- city chairman, and stage manager. Aside from its value as sound organization, this form of cooperation has given the Women ' s Glee Club, as well as the other musical groups, the benefit of singing with an entire range of voices. The club ' s activities provide not only good singing for the stu- dents, but also a respite from academic study for both its members and its audiences. Thus the Women ' s Glee Club, founded on the initiative of the coeds themselves, has grown into a valuable ad- junct to the other musical clubs giving to the college and to its own members a fuller meaning through the medium of song. 213 WOMEN ' S GLEE CLUB MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX Washburn, Hubbard, Hager, Osmun STATESMEN There are four men on campus dashing around from breakfast time until midnight. Classes and study take only part of their day. They belong to clubs and committees; they sing in the glee club or choir; they are class or fraternity officers; they work for room or board. Then, in addition to all this, they find time for quartet re- hearsals and for eleven performances in less than a semester. The quartet members, John Osmun, Myron Hager, Wendell Wash- burn, and Stuart Hubbard, " Statesmen " in deed as well as name, are the busiest men on campus, yet paradoxically enjoy them- selves as fully as any student. " We could sing forever, " they say. Five thousand persons in this vicinity, including State College students, heard the Statesmen ' s singing in the first three months of the year. Since the September 28th convocation, the quartet has given a total of eleven performances. In the fall it gave a novel outdoor sing at the annual Mountain Day at Mt. Tom State Park. Dads ' Day and the Bay State Revue programs also featured the popular quartet, which, later in the fall, traveled for concerts to Greenfield, Amherst, Hadley, Orange, Cbicopee Falls, and Belcher- town. The second half of the year included appearances on other trips and at Social Union. Continuing their frequent singing dates, the Statesmen gained the usual audience support with their repertoire of favorites — " Talk about Jerusalem Morning, " " Who Did? " , and " Women " — done in their own striking style. The popularity of the Statesmen, which has led to the formation of the Bay Staters, is still on the upswing and promises to make the quartet an estab- lished tradition at the college. 1 214 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ft- A coed slips into a classroom while a lecture is in progress. The professor stops and halt ' -sarcastically asks, " Do you think we ought to hold up class for all tardy sophomores? " " I ' ve been hav- ing trio rehearsal. It ' s hard to rush over here from the other side of the campus in time, " the coed replies and the lecture continues. An instance like this shows the pep and energy required of the new coed trio. With characteristic spirit of all musical clubs and groups on campus, the Statettes have managed to squeeze their trio work into their average college day, and have livened campus musical entertainment. A few semesters ago, Doric Alviani, director of student singing, organized, and presented to State College, a women ' s trio. Chris- tened " the Statettes " by the Collegian, the trio was launched on what is developing into a diverting and lasting part of music on State ' s song-filled campus. To the three coeds, it means more than just an opportunity for solo work. They have had, in their own words, " an exciting time and a great deal of fun singing for all sorts of people. " Dressed in similar gowns and outlined by stage- lights against the dark background of Bowker curtains, they make an appealing picture when they sing at campus functions. In the new broadcasting studio in South College the Statettes joined the Statesmen and the other campus groups in radio pro- grams in the second semester of the year. Now radio listeners over all Massachusetts will be able to hear the trio ' s interpretation of songs from popular hits to Strauss waltzes. Like their friendly rivals, the Statesmen, they are helping to make Massachusetts State College an increasingly important place on the musical map. STATEHES Misses Moulton, Berthiaume, Archibald 4. 215 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I MUSIC Sheldon, Washburn, Hubbard, Auerbach, Hager, McGurl, Dunn, Osmun DOUBLE QUARTET Unique among New England college music groups are State ' s new vocal and instrumental combinations. The flute ensemble, first heard at the Social Union, is one of the rarest instrumental quartets. The double quartet, which is composed of the Statesmen plus Robert Dunn, Fred McGurl, Gabriel Auerbach, and Rob- ert Sheldon, is not only outstanding itself, but with the Stat- ettes forms a college Septet. The double quartet appeared at the combined musical clubs Social Union, and the Septet in a joint concert with Westfield Teachers ' College. Making their debut early this fall, the Bay Staters are fol- lowing in the large footsteps of the Statesmen but are applying a different type of tonal quality and song presentation. Under the direction of Doric Alviani, State College music groups are producing music of the finest calibre. FLUTE ENSEMBLE Shaw, Perry, Allen, Miss Kelleher BAY STATERS Bralit, Andrew, CoUard, Cole C| ' ■■i ' ' 1 1 -W " f f ■ ff T - f Tt r -«- W , : ,.« j 1 216 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY j Slie i. Woiner, Lebeaux Weisslierg, Terry, Fox " I wouldn ' t for the world have given up matching wits with fellows of my age in debates at other colleges, " said a veteran senior debater in his final season with the State College Debating Club. Students seriously interested in the art of forensics find the debat- ing society one of the most absorbing of extra-curricular activities, and, at the same time, derive the value of practice in public speak- ing. The varsity team spent most of the winter in preparation under the coaching of Prof. Walter E. Prince. Meanwhile, the newer members of the team saw action in practice debates in December and January with Amherst College and during February with A.I.C. " Resolved that the married woman ' s place is in the home, " was the question in the interclass battle of words-wit-wisdom in Febru- ary between the freshmen and sophomores. Three prominent and pretty coeds were judges. During March the debaters engaged in home debates with M.I.T., and with Yeskiva College of New York City. The annual thousand-mile Southern trip took place at Easter vacation. Because last year ' s tour to the South was so successful, the team this spring invaded South Carolina. Questions debated on the trip were: " Resolved that the U.S. should follow a policy of isolation to- ward all countries outside of the Western Hemisphere engaged in civil or international strife. " " Resolved that legislation should be enacted to provide for con- scription of wealth in time of war. " After the Southern trip and a short trip to Boston, a convocation debate with the Boston University women ' s team concluded the season for the debating team. DEBATING T(S " TAinT--TIS-T -9. 217 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX f ■ f 1 t Bolt, Kaplan, Styler, Moody, McCarthy, Trufant, Winter, Silverman Scollin, Flynn, Miss Reynolds, Auerbach, Barreca, Irzyk, Aykroyd, Greenfield Miss Newell, D. Shepardson, Miss Firth, Sullivan, Miss Alvord, W. Shepardson, Hoxie, Dailey, Miss Janis ROISTER DOISTERS OrFicEHs: President, Albert Sullivan; Vice-president, Erma Alvord; Business Manager, Wilfred Shepardson; Electrician, Daniel Shepardson. Seniors: Isadore Cohen, Gerald Dailey, Barbara Farns- worth, Margaret Firth, Willard Foster, Albin Irzyk, Catherine Leete, Wilfred Winter. Freshmen in saddle shoes, sophomores discard- ing their reversibles, co-eds in knee socks, seniors in military uniform — in short, members of all four classes mount the Old Chapel stage weekly, recite memorized lines scene by scene, act by act, and under the guidance of Professor Rand polish their acting of first one and then the other of their two annual plays. Meanwhile the stage manager con- fers with Professor Rand on sets and lighting and the crew goes industriously to work constructing background. . . These are the rehearsals of the Roister Doisters, proceeding unobtrusively until the time for pro- duction of the plays in January and at commence- ment. Grease-paint, foot-lights, and first nights at- tract dozens of would-be Thespians. Students with the blood of the theatre running in their veins gain prominence in the Doisters slowly and with much solid work. In his freshman year, a student may compete in fall try-outs and gain a mere supernumerary part. The following year he may act in a bit part. Then in his junior and senior years, if the play being produced calls for his type, he is given a lead or co-lead part. At the night of a performance, the climax of his student acting career arrives. . .as the curtains part for Act One. The activity of the Roister Doisters represents more than an unofficial drama laboratory. Years of State College play production have manifested 218 I St HUNDRED AND FORTY the value of Roister Doister plays as entertain- ment and cultural soiu ' ces. Outstanding inlays from years gone by are still remembered . . . the morality play in Grinnell Arena, Shakespeare ' s " As You Like It " in the Ravine, and the 1939 Commence- ment play, " Our Town. " The student dramatic society has tested and is continuing to test new and interesting dramatic forms. Remembered years after graduation is the cama- raderie of the Roister Bolsters which is more of a club than a cut-and-dried acting organization. In- formality, democratic voice in the society ' s plans and plays, cooperation, and friendly joshing make rehearsal periods the most vivid experiences of college life for the select few. And in June during commencement, when the Doister play is finally enacted, the annual banquet of the society is given. To it all alumni who have once been Roister Doisters are invited to renew olden days, to meet classmates, and to make the acquaintance of neo- phyte Doister members. The society ' s activities are not limited to the production of two yearly plays for the college in Bowker Auditorium. Sometime during the year an authority on a phase of the modern theatre speaks to the Doisters. In addition, the entire soci- ety goes to see an outstanding modern play in Bos- ton or in Springfield each year. It is easy to see why the Roister Doisters keep, year after year, the prestige which its long record of activity has es- tablished at State College. Underclassmen: Wesley Aykroyd, Nan- cy Alger, Gabriel Auerbuch, Earnest Bolt, Anne Chase, Robert Ewing, Helen Filch, Edward Flynn, Mason Gentry, Eric Greenfield, George Hoxie, Helen Janis, Paul Keller, Elizabeth Leeper, Harold McCarthy, Patricia Newell, Rob- ert Perry, lona Reynolds, Harold ScolHn, Alan Silverman, Charles Styler, Philip Trufant, Francis Ward. DRAMATICS Principals in T. G. D. I. B. cast. . .Author Barreca and Prof. Rand. 4. -219 J MASSACHUSETTS STATE COtLEGE INDEX ZOOLOGY CLUB Illustrated lectures played a large part in the Zoology club program this year. Known as an exact and ever-progressing science, zoology finds a logical place on campus in a club dedicated to the purpose of keeping students informed on its various pha- ses. Speakers and informal student discussions make it an active and purposeful organization. Club meet- ings supplement the laboratory suc- cessfully in this way as members will testify. CHEM CLUB The Chem club, though compara- tively new, is one of the fastest grow- ing and most popular clubs on campus. The selection of prominent speakers who deliver lectures to the club in- clude representatives from all phases of the industries. Such talks, supple- mented by moving pictures, offer the prospective chemical worker a vivid picture of the world he is about to enter and the profession he expects to concentrate in. PRE-MED CLUB The Pre -Med club was organized in the spring of 1936 and its purpose is to help and satisfy the students of Massachu.setts State College who are interested in making medicine their life-work. The bi-weekly program presents to the students the aspects of the medical profession. Besides talks given by competent authorities, the club this year offered a most in- teresting and informative series of movies. 1 FERNALD ENTOMOLOGICAL CLUB The Fernald Entomological club was founded on this campus in 192.5 and named in honor of Dr. Henry T. Fernald who founded the entomology department at this college. The prim- ary purpose of the club is to acquaint students of entomology with the out- standing men in the field and with the outstanding advances in entomologi- cal work. The club is composed of one of the largest single student groups on campus. 220 HUNDRED AND FORTY » LANDSCAPE ARCHITEC ' TI ' RE CLUB Students majoring in Landscape Architecture comprise the active mem- bership of the Landscape Architecture club. The club, in furthering the in- terest of its members, tries to procure numerous speakers in an effort to af- ford the student a better insight into the various aspects of the club. In the spring of the year, a trip is usually taken for viewing the latest landscape developments. MATH CLUB The Mathematics club, under the guiding hand of Professor Moore who founded the club, offers both pleasure and knowledge to the students who are interested in mathematics. At the meetings, talks are usually given by one or two of the students on various mathematical topics. These talks are followed often by stimulating and in- formal discussions which tend to give the members a broader and more in- tensive background. ENGINEERING CLLTB The Engineering club provides an entertaining and valuable service to engineering majors at State College. Although most of the interested mem- bers are students who are planning on entering some phase of engineering work, the club provides lectures to which all are invited and entertained. This year, the club presented a very instructive lecture on the Amherst Water System given by Superinten- dent Brehms. C H U S E 221] STATE HOME ECONOMICS CLUB The aim of the Home Economics club is to acquaint the girls of that major with the post-graduate work in that field. Speakers are customarily at the meetings — during the past year commercial demonstrators and cloth- ing experts were present. The main incentive to the club work is the awarding of the. Danforth scholar- ships bj ' which two girls attend a summer conference in the mid-west. INDEX I POULTRY CLUB Regular weekly or fortnightly meet- ings are held through the entire year by the Poultry club, one of the largest clubs on State College campus. In ad- dition, some of the most successful poultry men in New England speak at the meetings. In this way the club maintains its reputation for being vitally serviceable to students plan- ning to do intensive work in poultry and proposing to make it their career. ' Wis- Km M " - 9 ffl P ' l ' ' i „... ; ;. Ji fc£ DAIRY CLUB The Dairy club was founded in January, 1934, by the Students of the Dairy Industry department as a re- sult of the direct need for such an or- ganization. The club, during the year, arranges trips through dairy plants in order to give students first hand in- formation about modern dairies. The club also presents to its members speakers who are well-informed upon phases of the dairy industry. ANIMAL HUSBANDRY CLUB The Animal Husbandry club is open in its membership to both four- year and two-year students who are interested in animal husbandry and agriculture in general. The main pur- pose of the club is to sponsor a regular series of talks by authorities on live- stock. Appropriate movies from the LT.S. Department of Agriculture are also shown making the meetings both interesting and valuable to the stu- dent. 1 HORT. MAN. CLUB With Professor Chenoweth and the rest of the department cooperating, the Horticultural Manufacturers club has made strides in keeping an ab- sorbing series of meetings from Sep- tember to June. As in most of the sci- entific clubs, it has engaged speakers of note and has fostered a spirit of interest among its members. Its func- tion is to prepare the serious student for practical work in the field. 222 " HUNDRED AND FORTY l CURRENT AFFAIRS CLUB The Current Affairs club of Massa- chusetts State College was formerly known as the International Relations club. The change of name represents n shift in emphasis in the discussions (if the club. The club, to which Prof. • ary acts as advisor, is connected with the Carnegie Foundation of New York and is periodically sup- plied with the literature on current national and international affairs. 4-H CLUB Among agricultural activities on campus, the 4-H club rates a high place in its function of providing an outlet in 4-H activities for students of both the four-year and two-year courses. With its reputation of being one of the older clubs on campus, it reviews all phases of 4-H aims and ac- complishments. Its connection with an outside organization permits means of giving its members a useful back- ground. OUTING CLUB The Massachusetts State College Outing club was founded by enthusi- astic hikers who saw the advantages of organized hiking. Since then the activities of the club have been broad- ened to include dances, and meetini;-. at which speakers can offer camping and hiking suggestions. Cabins and trails are maintained by the club which also has charge of the guiding on Mountain Day. PSYCHOLOGY CLUB The primary purpose of the Psy- chology club is to serve the students as an agency whereby they may hear topics of psychological interest and authoritative speakers on such topics. The program of the club is planned so as to help and interest every student as well as to further the education of psychology majors. A young science, psychologj ' offers much to vivid dis- cussion. 4. -tzs MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I CHRISTIAN FEDERATION One of the most active campus organizations is the Christian Feder- ation, which any student may join. Its aim is similarly catholic — to de- velop equally the religions and mental growth of its members. The Federa- tion is divided into various commis- sions; that of Dramatics, for example, presented a series of sketches during Lent of the past year. Other activities of the group include speakers, sup- pers and conferences. MENORAH CLUB The Menorah club gathers in its fold every Jewish student on campus. Its purpose is twofold: (1) to keep alive and awaken a vital sympathy for an enjoyment of Jewish customs and traditions; and (2) to encourage an understanding of the Jewish cultur- al heritage. This platform is fulfilled by a program of discussion groups and both educational and social gath- erings. NEWMAN CLUB The Newman club, the campus or- ganization for the frequent meeting of Catholic students, is affiliated with the federation of college Catholic clubs of America and sends delegates to the annual conference. Its activi- ties include monthly communion breakfasts — with the traditional scrambled eggs — discussion groups, and one outstanding lecture. Our innovation in the past year was the giving of two informal dances. WESLEY FOUNDATION The Wesley Foundation gathers the Methodist students for the purpose of discussing religion with the social problems of modern society. Such weekly discussion groups meet at the home of Dr. Adrian Lindsey. The group ' s major project during the past year was a play presented in April. Delegates also attend near-by con- ferences. An outstanding one attended in February included Norman Thomas as a speaker. 224 ' HUNDRED FORTY l PHI BETA KAPPA President Stowell C. Coding Vice-president Mrs. GunnarE. Erickson Secretary- Treasurer ' ernon P. Helming MEMBERS Mrs. K. L. Bullis Josepii S. Chamberlain Guy C. Crampton Charles N. DuBois Mrs. G. E. Erickson George L. Farley Stowell C. Coding Vernon P. Helming Arthur N. Julian William L. Machmer A. Anderson Mackimmie Walter M.Miller Helen S. Mitchell Frank L. Moore William H. Ross Mrs. Frank Shan- Basil B. Wood Gilbert L. Woodside IN AMHERST Ray Stannard Baker William R. Hamlin Nelson L. Haskell Mrs. A. S. Thomson William R. Wheeler 4l 225 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX T SIGMA XI OFFICERS President Henry Van Roekel Vice-president Charles P. Alexander Secretary Helen S. Mitchell Treasurer WiUiam H. Ross MEMBERS George W. Alderman Charles P. Alexander Allen E. Andersen John G. Archibald John S. Bailey Hugh P. Baker Emmett Bennett Herbert F. Bergman John H. Blair William Booth Arthur I. Bourne Oran C. Boyd Leon A. Bradley Kenneth L. Bullis Joseph S. Chamberlain Walter W. Chenoweth William G.Colby Sara M. Coolidge Guy C. Crampton William H. Davis William L. Doran Carl F. Dunker Walter S. Eisenmenger Carl E. Fellers Richard W. Fessenden Ralph L. France Henry J. Franklin Monroe E. Freeman Arthur P. French James E. Fuller Clarence E. Gordon Emil F. Cuba Christian I. Gunness Frank A.Hays Edward B. Holland Linus H. Jones Clifford V. Kightlinger Ray M. Koon Arthur Levine Malcolm A. McKenzie Merrill J. Mack Walter A. Maclinn George A. Marston Walter M. Miller Helen S. Mitchell William S. Mueller Carl Olson Raymond T. Parkhurst Ernest M. Parrott Charles A. Peters Wallace F. Powers Harry J. Rich Walter S. Ritchie Arnold D. Rhodes ■ William H. Ross Frank R. Shaw. Jacob K. Shaw Fred J. Sievers Marion E. Smith Frederik J. Spruijt Harvey L. Sweetman Frederic Theriault Jay R. Traver Reuben E. Trippensee Henrj ' Van Roekel William G. Vinal Warren D. Whitcomb Harold E. White Gilbert E. Woodside Robert E. Young John M. Zak MEMBER IN AM- HERST James A. Foord 1 [226] PHI KAPPA PHI OFFICERS President Marshall O. Lanpbear Vice-president Charles F. Fraker Secretary Arthur N. Julian Treasurer Richard Foley Corresponding Secretary J. Elizabeth Donley Charles P. Alexander John G. Archibald Hugh P. Baker Oran C. Boyd Alfred A. Brown Marion Bullard Alexander E. Cance Joseph S. Chamberlain Walter W. Chenoweth Richard Colwell G. Chester Crampton J. Elizabeth Donley William L. Doran George L. Farley Carl R. Fellers Richard W. Fessenden Richard C. Foley Charles F. Fraker Julius H. Frandsen Arthur P. French Wilho Frigard George E. Gage Philip L. Gamble Harry X. Click Stowell C. Coding Maxwell H. Goldberg Clarence E. Gordon Christian I. Gunness Frank A. Hays Robert P. Holdsworth Edward B. Holland Leonta G. Horrigan MEMBERS Arthur N. Julian Marshall O. Lanphear Joseph B. Lentz William L. Machmer Merrill J. Mack A. A. Mackimmie Walter M. Miller Frank C. Moore Willard A. Munson A. Vincent Osmun Ernest M. Parrott Clarence H. Parsons Charles A. Peters Walter E. Prince Frank P. Rand Arnold D.Rhodes Victor A. Rice Walter S. Ritchie David Rozman Paul Serex Frank R. Shaw Jacob K. Shaw Frederick J. Sievers Edna L. Skinner Marion A. Smith Lawrence Southwick Harvey L. Sweetman Clark L. Thayer Ray E. Torrey Reuben E. Trippensee Frederick S. Troy Ralph A. Van Meter Frank A. Waugh Gilbert L. Woodside IN AMHERST Walter A. Dwyer James A. Foord Mrs. Christian Gunness Ralph W. Haskins Fred W. Morse Ralph W. Redmond Fred C. Sears Mrs. Frank Shaw- George E. Stone Olive Turner Mildred A. Weeks 1940 MEMBERS Millicent Carpenter Robert Chapman Rosa Kohls Paul Moriece N. James Schoonmaker Marjorie Shaw M. Marjorie Smith Robert Staples SCHOLAR 1939- ' 40 Marjorie Shaw 4. STATE Officers: President, Alden C. Brett ' 12, Belmont; Vice-President, Albert W. Smith ' 22, Springfield; Secretary, Marshall O. Lanphear ' 18, Amherst; Treasurer, Clark L. Thayer ' 13, Am- herst; Executive Secretary, George E. Emery ' 24, Amherst. Board of Directors: To 1940: Walter T. Bon- ney ' 31, Springfield; John J. Magin- nis ' 18, Worcester; Lester Needham ' 14, Springfield; F. Civille Pray ' 06, Amherst. ALUMNI The Associate Alumni of Massachusetts State College have served their Alma Mater for genera- tions. One of the most active alumni groups for land-grant colleges in this part of the country, the Associate Alumni of State College this year have added two necessary dormitories (a men ' s and a women ' s) to their long record. Students, faculty, and citizens of the state owe a debt to the far- sightedness of the organization. " To promote, in every proper way, the inter- ests of the college, to foster among the graduates a sentiment of mutual regard, and to promote and strengthen their attachment to their Alma Mater " has been their ideal. Gathering for fond reminiscences at Commencement, they feel the College ' s bond of fellowship. And the year round they serve the college by the sixteen-member Board of Directors who meet frequently with other officers to plan and discuss the work of the Asso- ciate Alumni. Frank Prentice Rand ' s dramatic " Yesterdays, " a narrative of the College from its birth, was written at the behest of the alumni. Moreover, their work extended in years past to other long- needed additions to the campus. Alumni Field, Memorial Hall, the Physical Education Building were all built through their concerted efforts. Founded in 1874, alumni have been directly concerned in the growth of the College. Officers of the Associate Alumni, Executive Secretary 1 [228] ft- Down through the years. . .they always come back. Massachusetts State College Alumni Clubs and As.sociations and their leaders are as follows: Central and Northern Cali- fornia, Clifford F. Elwood ' 04, 2830 Regent St., Berkley; Southern California, Dr. Clarence H. Griffin ' 04, 5240 Ellen- wood PI., Los Angeles; Hartford, Conn., Peter J. Cascio ' 21, Box 294, West Hartford; New Haven, Conn., Richard W. Smith ' 17, 205 Church St., New Haven: Washington, D. C, Irene L. Bartlett ' 29, 3A 1422 N St., N.W., Washington: Western, Chicago, 111., Walter A. Mack ' 17, 1500 West 95th St., Chicago; Boston, Mass., L. F. ' -ancis Kennedy ' 24, 73 Edgemoor Rd., Belmont; Middlesex County, Mass., Harry D. Brown ' 14, Wyman Rd., Billerica; Essex County, Mass., Mary Ingraham Jones ' 27, 286 Dodge St., North Beverly; Soiitheasfern Mass., Erford W. Poole. ' 96, Box 129, Room 4, Chapman Bid., New Bedford; Hampden County, Mass., Ralph S. Stedman ' 20, Springfield St., Wilbraham; Worcester County, Mass., Andrew Love ' 25, Worcester North High School, Worcester; New Brunswick, N. J., Ljman G. Scher- merhorn ' 10, 109 N. 6th Ave., Highland Park, New Bruns- wick; Central N. Y., Ellsworth Wheeler ' 26, 48 Jefferson Ave., Geneva; New York City, N. Y., Bernard H. Smith ' 99, 9314 Ridge Blvd.. Brooklvn: Cleveland, Ohio, John A. Crawford ' 20, 3491 Edison Rd " , Cleveland Heights; Philadelphia, Pa., Dr. Thomas J. Grasser ' 19, Warren Ave., Malvern; State Col- lege, Pa., Harlan N. Worthley ' 18, 501 E. Hamilton Ave., State College, Pa.; Maine, Albion Ricker ' 28, Turner; Fresno, Calif., Perez Simmons ' 16, 912 Terrace .Ave., Fresno. For social piirpo.ses, the Alumnae have formed the following local groups, which bear the same relation to the Associate Alumni as do the Alumni Clubs: Essex County, Aimee G. Bennett ' 24, 62 Dayton St., Danvers; Pl.vmouth and Barn- stable County, Ruth F. White ' 29, 22 Rockland St., Brockton; Hampshire County, Mary E. M. Garvey, Marshall Hall, Massachusetts State College, Amherst; Franklin County, Ruth F. Gay ' 24, Groveland; Middlesex County, Ruth H. Howe ' 22, Lowell Rd., Concord; Suffolk County, Gertrude M. Tomfohrde ' 30, 301 West State St., Glenn Cairn _ rms Apt. D-10, Trenton, N. J.; New York, Pauline Spewak ' 31, 629 Chauncey St., Brooklyn; Hampden County, Ruth S. Shaine ' 30, 133 Ellington St., Longmeadow; Worcester County, Zoe H. White ' 32. 93 Princeton St., Worcester. ASSOCIATIONS Board of Directors: To 1941: Richard J. Davis ' 28, Boston; Thomas P. Dooley ' 13, West Roxburv; George W. Edman ' 21, Pittsfield; " Ralph F. Taber ' 16. West Newton. To 1942: Erford W. Poole ' 96, New Bedford; David P. Rossiter ' 37, Maiden; Zoe H. White ' 32, Worcester; Alfred E. Wilkins ' 15, Wakefield. To 1943; Harry D. Brown ' 14, Billerica; Wil- liam L. Doran ' 15, Amhenst; Mary E. M. Garvey 19, Amherst; Lawrence L. Jones ' 26, North Beverly. 4. [ 229 ] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX RADIO The Tower Room Studio in South College after years of promise and months of postponed labor was finally put into use early in 1940. Extension service programs were the first to be relayed to WHAI, WSPR, and WSYB. Of most student interest, however, is the Colleqian sponsored program, presented every Monday. The first of these programs was broadcast February 26. The first program included a Roister Doister skit, a sports sum- mary for the week, an interview with twice-Queen Ann Cooney, and musical selections by the Statettes. Francis Pray of the College News Service is in charge of the studio and Bill Goodwin, ' 41, of the Collegian Staff is student manager of the CoWe(7ia?i-sponsored program. Alan Bell, Francis Ward, John Hayes, Bob McCartney, Gabe Auerbach and Isadore Cohen were selected " stand-by " announcers and have been used according to the demands of the programs. Dick Glendon, George Langton, Nellie Wozniak, and Bob Mc- Cartney were chosen as script writers. In addition to the continuity scripts by the regular writers, the five minute skits, presented by the Roister Doisters have been written by interested students. Having its own radio station is a distinct advantage to State College. Several times in the past students and faculty connected with the college have been on the air, but there has always been the disadvantage of having to travel some distance to the broad- casting studio. This disadvantage is minimized by the presence of a studio in Amherst. Another distinct advantage in having a studio on campus and regular programs is the fact that more people will become ac- quainted with the State College to their profit and the college ' s. Seniors on the 15-minute program. . .and Bill Goodwin of the Collegian. 230 1 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Jt Coeds on the wing. . .and the one-and-onlj ' " Chuck " Twenty thousand pilots a year is the aim of the Civil Aero- nautics Authority. State College is to supply twenty of those each year. Twenty State students were chosen from the many appli- cants to take the course which is being offered to college students all over the country by the C.A.A. In all 72 hours of ground work and 55 flying hours are presented in this course which is open to graduate students, seniors, and juniors. Ground school instructors are volunteers from the State faculty. The actual flying is done at the Barnes Airport in West- fleld. Among the 20 chosen for the course were two girls, Nancy Luce and Roma Levy. The men are: Ed Beaumont, Shorty Wilcox, and Dave Tappan, graduate students; Art Howes, Dan Shepardson, John Filios, John Powers, Chet Tiberii, Bill Foster, and Gerald Talbot, ' 40; Joseph Miller, Clement Burr, Walter Miles, Harold Forrest, Robert Tillson, Jack Haskell, and Richard Heyward, ' 41 ; and Ev Barton, ' 42. The ground school instructors include: Dr. Ross and Mr. Minz- ner of the Physics Department, Mr. Lanphear, Assistant Dean, and Professor Tague and Mr. Marston of the Engineering Depart- ment. The committee in charge are Dr. Andersen, Dr. Ross, and Captain Theis. The students are required to keep individual logs of their flying hours, together with information required by the Authority such as the wind velocity, direction of the wind, and height of the ceiling. Entrances in the log are made before and after the flight. Because of nervous strain and tension the students are not permitted to fly for more than thirty minute periods. After two hours they are al- lowed to go up again. The flight instructors, Dave O ' Connor and Dick Kaufman, work under the direction of Chuck O ' Connor, airport manager. C. A. A. 4. 231 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I ATHLETICS Curry Hicks, in a mood of reminiscence this fall, recalled an inci- dent many years ago when the " Aggies " played a football game with Harvard. On its return from Cambridge, the team was met in the center of Amherst by the entire student body and carried on the crowd ' s shoulders back to the campus. It mattered not that the team had lost; the students knew that the players had done their best, and that was enough to arouse admiration and worship. This, in all probability, would not happen today. Pre-game ral- lies are rapidly losing their significance at this college: post-game enthusiasm doesn ' t approach that of past years. Many feel that the dearth of wins on some sports in recent years is the cause of this lessening of fervor for athletic prowess on this campus. However, the truth is that the average student today looks at games more sensibly than his predecessors. He sees the contest as a game, played for the joy of combat and the demonstration of physical skill, and does not feel that any team must win at any cost if the college is to progress. Of course, we are not foolish enough to state that students have little interest in the success of varsity sports. Undergraduates and alumni alike may not demonstrate the spontaneous enthusiasm of previous years, but they still have a very sincere desire that every State team make a good showing. Most of them believe, though, that this showing may be obtained without making gods of the players and without resorting to drastic means with the coaching staff. Joseph R. Rogers, Jr., Elbert F. Caraway, Wilho Frigard 232 i ■ THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Griffin, Lavitt, Johnson, Schreiber, W. Shepardson, D. Shepardson JOINT COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS Llewellyn I,. I erli . I-orin E. Ball, Lawrence E. Briggs 4. 233 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX J FOOTBALL The 1939 varsity football team ' s record of two wins, five losses, and two ties is not very impressive on paper. It is not the purpose of this review to excuse that re- cord. The poor showing may have been a result of any one of a combination of sev- eral factors : the opponents may have been better trained, the State athletic set-up may be faulty, the schedules of class and laboratory may have interfered, or other schools may offer better inducements for promising high school players. A discus- sion of such things does not belong in a yearbook, for its function is to record the year ' s events as they actually happened. Despite the disappointing record, it is a fact that the brand of football that State played this fall was head and shoulders above that of the last three or four years. With the exception of Tufts contest, no game was lost until the final whistle. Top- heavy scores were not foisted week after week on weary players and rooters. Op- ponents did not throw in substitutes for experience as frequently as in past seasons and when those opponents went away, they knew that they had been in a ball 1 Scrimmage puts ' em on the ball. . .the Big Game behind the 8-ball. . . [234] NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTr St Brady (M), Simmons (M), Triggs (M), Bishop, Werme (M), Dwyer (M), Wolk, Gilmau, Mahan Krasiiecki, Eldridge, Seery (M), Kennedy, Evans (M), Zeitler, Freitas (M), Clark (M), Novelli Click, Lester, Kimball, Bullock (M), Lavrakas (M), O ' Connell (M), Prusick, Skogsberg (M), Cohen (M), Larkin (M), Allan (M) Santucci (M), Rudge (M), Irzyk (M). Nelson (M), Geoffriou (M), Blasko (M); Malcohn (M), Norwood (M), Harding (M), Blauer, Payson (M) game. Many an observer elainaed that even in defeat, State played interesting football — something that was rarely said in 1937 and 1938. One of the reasons for the improved play of this year ' s team was the wealth of material. Much attention was given during the season to sophomore stars such as Freitas, Evans, Bullock, Brady, Clark, or Seery. However, the seniors on the club were the bulwark of defense and contributed much to the offense. In the line were regulars like Captain Blasko, O ' Connell, Geoffrion, Lavrakas, Payson, Malcolm, Nelson, Norwood, and Rudge who performed yeoman service week after week. The backfield included Barrel Harding, Gino Santucci, and Al Irzyk. State supporters have hopes for next year in football; but make no mistake, these seniors will be missed. Their weight and experience counted for plenty when the going was tough. The junior class also SUMMARY OF THE SEASON September 29 at Springfield M.S.C. Springfield October 7 at M.S.C. M.S.C. 14 Bowdoin 19 October 14 at M.S.C. M.S.C. 6 Conn. U. 7 October 21 at Kingston M.S.C. 20 R. I. State 23 October 28 at Worcester M.S.C. 7 Worcester November 4 at M.S.C. M.S.C Amherst 13 November 14 at New London M.S.C 6 Coast Guard November 18 at M.S.C. M.S.C 7 R.P.L 7 November 25 at M.S.C. M.S.C 7 Tufts 34 4. 235 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I contributed its share of stars. Probably the most outstanding was Captain-elect Ralph Simmons, who was picked as all New England guard. Paul Skogsberg, Al Prusick, Joe Larkin, and Don Allan also would be assets to any team. The season opened with a night game at Springfield College that gave a mighty lift to State rooters ' hopes. The Caraway- men gave an exhibition of fight and heads- up football that very nearly produced a touchdown just before the first half ended, although the final outcome was a scoreless tie. The above mentioned sophomores were brilliant on the offense. Most of the spectators quickly forgot the slow start that State displayed, but this fault was to plague the team through the whole season. The first home game was a 19-14 defeat by Bowdoin. An offside penalty, inter- cepted pass, and several narrowly missed touchdown heaves were the breaks against State that gave the Polar Bears the mar- gin of victory. The fourth quarter marked some exciting play as the home team frantically strove to overcome the Bow- doin lead. The University of Connecticut game was a heartbreaker. Although in a daze for the first three periods, — the States- men opened up on a 76-yard touchdown drive in the last quarter to give the locals six points advantage. The freshmen were already ringing the chapel bell of victory when two last minute Connecticut passes tied the score and the try for the winning extra point was successful. On the following Saturday, Rhode Island proved to be another jinx for the team. The Rams scored in the first three minutes, but Irzyk came back in a few minutes to knot the score. State scored again to have Rhode Island again tie the score. A double scoring act was put on again, in the second half, but Keaney kicked a 46-yard field goal to put the game on ice for Rhode Island — 23-20. In the first official play of the next game Don Allan ran 65 yards behind a beautiful blocking to give, with the extra point, State a 7-0 win over Worcester Tech. The Statesmen spent the rest of the afternoon trying to prevent an Engineer score and managed to produce only three first downs in the whole game. With Amherst already having lost three games and with State fielding a much improved team this year the Mar- oon forces were given a fair chance in the traditional home-town rivalry. This fact gave State rooters a gleam of hope for a change. But State could not overcome the 13 point advantage that the Sabrinas garnered in the early part of the game, and End runner on the loose. . or a lightning line plunge. 1 [236] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Jt Ebb confers on a fine point . . The game goes great guns the contest ended with a score of 13-0. The pre-game " experts " had figured the State passing attack to balance the Am- herst strength on the ground, but the home passes seemed almost invariably to find their way to opponents ' arms. The second victory of the year was scored at Coast Guard ' s expense to the tune of 6-0. The lone touchdown came in the last quarter after an 80-yard drive with Bud Evans, State ' s sophomore hope, going over for the score. State was wor- ried by the Sailors ' passing combination but outplayed the Cadets through most of the decidedly one-sided game. Before a crowd of Dads, the club played probably the most exciting game of the year the following week to tie Rens- selaer 7-7. According to Ebb, this Tech team was the finest to face us all season. It was well-trained and stacked with plenty of good material. Its touchdown came in the first few minutes of the game and it dominated the first half. However, the second half saw State begin to make first downs. It wasn ' t until the fourth period, though, that a long Seery to Skogsberg pass touched off a drive that ultimately ended in a score. The season ' s record would look a lot better without the inclusion of the Tufts game. This 34-7 pasting was a sad affair and not easily imderstood. The Tufts first team seemed to score at will, and the only time State looked good was when Evans ran back a punt to a touchdown. State certainly did not look like the team of the previous week, and the explanation was, as usual, not easily discernable. Predicting for State teams can never be reliable: there is always the very likely possibility of flunks or ineligibilities, or the interference of work and studies may cause promising players to drop out. However, it will do no harm to go out on the limb and say that State will go places next year. Graduation is taking a load of weight from the line, but there are some beefy boys ready to fill the gaps. Captain Ralph Simmons has a lot of football under his belt and should do a good job of lead- ing his charges in the right direction. There is plenty of spirit among the soph and junior players, and the frosh will be fighting to make a regular position. There is some talk of giving the coaches a new set-up that will give them every chance to show their abilities. On the whole, things look rosier for next year. 4L 237 ? MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX SOCCER In remembering 1939 as the tenth an- niversary of soccer at Massachusetts State College soccer men realize that one man has been responsible for the develop- ment of the game from an informal sport to one of the most consistently successful games on campus. Larry Briggs has shown his ability as a coach by his record of 34 wins, 8 ties and 21 defeats against the best in New England. Many of his stars have been men who have never played the game before coming to college. Several of his inexperienced teams, as for instance the 1939 club, have improved vis- ibly during the season demonstrating ex- cellent coaching. This year ' s team was handicapped by the loss of some really outstanding play- ers. The forward line, the full-back posi- tions, and the goal were all empty from graduation. It was necessary for Larry to find replacements and to develop a sys- tem of play suited to the new team. He had seniors, Jakobek, Howe, Schoon- maker, Buckley, Bowen, and Captain Brown around whom to build. Burr, Gould, Aykroyd, Klaman, Silverman, and Jacobson were the juniors with var- sity experience. Ev Langworthy, a senior, came out for the first time this year, and did a fine job at center forward until he Inirt his leg in the Springfield game. The outstanding find of the year was Vern Smith who was also a beginner; he de- veloped rapidly into the first string goalie and his ability was demonstrated by the low scores in the last part of the season. The team started the season with " in- experience " written all over it. Rensse- laer ' s fine team had no trouble at all hand- ing State a 4-0 setback. For the Dart- mouth game, the boys had a long trip which might as well not have been taken, and absorbed an even worse shellacking to the tune of 6-1. After these two games, Larry decided to change the style of defense ; for he now realized that this team could not hope to play the game that Podolak and Auer- bach had made so successful. The results Bench conference . . . kicks and tricks . . . time out for tired toers . Jl ( y 238 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Briggs, Rodda, Barton, Golub Jaquith (M), Johnson, Osmun (M), Kaplan, Papp, Ewing, Hibbard, Rodman, Potter Silverman (M), Meyer (M), Gould (M), Erickson (M), Arnold (M), Jacobson (M), Klaman (M), Simons (M), Mullany (M), Stewart, Smith (M) Roffinoli, Jakobek (M), Schoonmaker (M), Buckley (M), Brown (M); Howe (M), Aykroyd (M), Powers, Motroni of the change in style were shown in the next game when State beat the Univer- sity of Connecticut 2-1. Jim Buckley scored the two goals. Vern Smith gave a masterful exhibition of goal tending, and Jakobek was a new man under the changed defense. Despite the fact that the next game was a 2-0 defeat with Springfield, the team had not suffered a letdown. At Hartford, the next week, the team did not look nearly as good in beating Trinity 2-0. The Amherst game was a disappoint- ment, although little chance was given for the Briggsmen to win before the game. State looked better than the Lord Jeffs during most of the game, but the two goals by Coleman of Amherst clinched the game at 2-1. The season ' s finale was a satisfying one, for it was a victory over M.I.T. with a score of 3-1. As a team should be in the last game, the Statesmen were their best of the season. M.S.C. M.S.C. 1 M.S.C. 2 M.S.C. M.S.C. 2 M.S.C. 1 M.S.C. 3 SUMMARY OF THE SEASON September 30 at M.S.C. Rensselaer 4 Dartmouth 6 Conn. U. 1 Springfield 2 Trinity Amherst 2 M.I.T. 1 October 7 at Hanover October 14 at M.S.C. October 21 at Springfield October 28 at Hartford November 3 at Amherst November 11 at M.S.G. 4. 239 z MASSACHUSETTS STATE COttEGE INDEX CROSS COUNTRY Outstanding for the 1939 Maroon har- rier squad was Captain Chester Putney who more than lived up to the faith placed in him by his election to the captaincy in his junior year. " Chet " consistently showed the spirit and character for which his team chose him, and was the first State runner to cross the finish line in every race of the fall. Following Putney in prominence in the year ' s records was a trio of sophomores, Dave Morrill, Ralph Bunk and Bill Kim- ball. Other runners who were consistent scorers were veterans Kennedy and Hay- ward and senior Art Copson. After losing the first three meets, the Maroon and White runners came back to show what they really had by winning the last three and placing second in the Con- necticut Valley run. First to visit the campus was highly touted Northeastern. Running on painfully weak ankles. Cap- tain Putney tied for second with Kimball to hold the score down to 24-31. The following week, journeying to Boston, the Statesmen really tasted de- feat at the hands of the M.I.T. harriers. Again suffering from ankle trouble. Put- ney was the only State runner to place in the first six. The last loss was a close one, dropped to Worcester Tech by only four points. Taking the first two places, the Techmen scored 26 to the local ' s 30, al- though the latter placed six of the first ten. The remainder of the season is more pleasant to relate. Springfield furnished the first victim of the mid-season come- back. A quadruple tie for second place gave State a 22-33 win. The Maroon hill-dale team really cov- ered itself with glory the next week by edging Wesleyan to take second in the Connecticut Valley Championships. As predicted, Connecticut University walked away with first, but as unpredicted, State nosed out the Wesleyan outfit by one point, taking all places from 13 to 17. This contest is also scored as a dual meet The winner — by a nose. . .while spectators wait for a score. 1 240 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Derby, Greenfield, Merrill (M), Shepardson Kimball (M), Johnson (M), Kennedy (M), Putney (M); Copson (M), Hayward (M), Bunk (M) ■ft with Amherst. This year the Jeff ' s weak team easily yielded the second win of the year, 20-41. Eleventh in a very fast field was State ' s lot the following week at Boston in the N.E. IntereoUegiates. However, the harriers ' trip to Hartford proved a fitting climax to the season. The final score against Trinity in this last run was 27-28 with State supporters holding their breath as the Hartfordites took first, third and fifth. As a fitting reward for his consistent second-place showing, William Kimball was picked as next year ' s captain. Doing exceptionally well in his sophomore year. Bill should follow Putney ' s fine leader- ship of this year, both in spirit and run- ning. A word of praise is due Coach Llewelyn Derby for turning out, in his 18 years at State, the sixteenth team to maintain a .500 or better average. Balance was the point stressed by " Derb " this year, and it should be an even bigger factor in putting at least two-thirds of the 1940 meets in the win column. [241] SUMMARY OF THE SEASON October 14 at M.S.C. M.S.C. 31 Northeastern 24 October 21 at Boston M.S.C. 42 M.I.T. 18 October 28 at Worcester M.S.C. 30 W.P.I. 26 November 2 at M.S.C. M.S.C. 22 Springfield 33 November 7 at Springfield M.S.C.— Second Place November 7 at Springfield M.S.C. 20 Amherst 41 November 13 at Boston M.S.C— Eleventh Place November 17 at Hartford M.S.C. 27 Trinity 28 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I BASKETBALL M.S.C. 39 M.S.C. 25 M.S.C. 26 M.S.C. 30 M.S.C. 23 M.S.C. 34 M.S.C. 19 M.S.C. 42 M.S.C. 42 M.S.C. 36 M.S.C. 37 M.S.C. 35 M.S.C. 43 M.S.C. 38 M.S.C. 22 December 12 at M.S.C. Trinity ( December 13 at M.S.C. Middlebury 34 January 6 at M.S.C. January 10 at M.S.C. Springfield 43 Williams 34 Amherst 24 January 13 at Amherst January 17 at Worcester Clark 58 January 20 at Middletown Wesleyan 43 February 7 at M.S.C. Rhode Island State 85 February 9 at M.S.C. Tufts 40 February 10 at New London Coast Guard 38 February 14 at M.S.C. February 17 at Storrs February 20 at M.S.C. February 24 at Troy Amherst 48 Conn. F. 65 W.P.I. 64 March 2 at Boston Boston University 48 With Captain Howie Rudge the only letterman returning from last year ' s team, State was hardly expected to have as strong a team as has been the custom in recent years. Although Bill Frigard ' s men won only one out of fifteen games during the season, the team improved with every game and before the season was over gave its followers many a thrill and chance to cheer. The men in Maroon never gave up trying and accomplished the unexpected when it defeated State ' s traditional rival Tufts, although it lost to Amherst, Springfield, and Worcester Tech, who were all in turn beaten by Tufts. A review of the season will show that, while the Statesmen seldom won, the games as a whole were hard-fought, thrilling, and close. The season opened at home on Decem- ber 12 against a powerful Trinity team. Trinity, used its greater reserve strength to defeat State 63 to 39. Coach Frigard, experimenting with his inexperienced squad, used substitutes freely in an at- tempt to find his best combination. Cap- tain Rudge, playing his usual good floor The Frigardmen warm up . . . also, Bobby, Lou, and Vern . 1 [242] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY j I ! 1 B ' P 1 2 6 ' ' 11 Schreiber (M), Allan (M), Krodvma (M), Seerv, Wall, Silverman, Frigard Triggs (M), Smith (M), Walsh (M), Rudge (M), Norwood (M), Miles (M), Breglio (M) game, and Bill Walsh, a promising junior, led the State attack. The team took its second defeat of the season from a fast passing Middlebury club, 34 to 25. It was definitely an off- night for State until the last few minutes of the game, when the team returned to the form of which it is capable, but the rally was too late and fell short of a win. On returning from the Christmas vaca- tion. State suffered a defeat, 43 to 26, from Springfield, one of the best college teams in the vicinity, who were superior to State in height, experience, and man- power. State ' s defense showed great im- provement and the team fought hard from the opening whistle. The scoring for State was divided among Allan, Walsh, Frodyma, Smith, and Rudge. Continuing to improve with each game, the Frigardmen led a strong Williams team almost the entire game before finally succumbing 34 to 30. The Statesmen played aggressive, spectacular game, and Williams was very lucky to escape with- out an upset. In the first game of the annual Town championship series, Amherst edged State 24 to 23 in a low scoring hard-fought game packed with thrills for everybody and heart-break for State. With nine minutes to play Amherst forged ahead 24 to 23 and the rest of the game was fast and thrilling but failed to produce a score. Bad breaks, which seemed to be working overtime to haunt the team this year, played a large part in the defeat. 4. 243 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX On January 17 State journeyed to Worcester to play a much publicized Clark team. With Strzelecki giving a daz- zling exhibition of basketball. State went down to defeat to the tune of 58 to 34. The entire team, with Walsh and Miles taking the cheers, continued to play an improving brand of basketball. In the last game of the first semester the Statesmen faced Wesleyan at Mid- dletown and came back at the wrong end of a 43 to 19 score. Playing on a surface vastly different from the State cage, the team had trouble with the out-of-bounds lines and repeatedly lost the ball. Frody- ma starred for State. Resuming play after mid-semester ex- aminations, the Statesmen faced Rhode Island State, probably the outstanding team on the New England schedule. Modlezewski tossed 23 points for the Rams and he was ably assisted by Con- ley, Rutledge, and Keaney. During the first half the Rams lived up their press notices rapidly building up a wide lead; State came back strong in the second half to bring the final score up to 85 to 42 in favor of the Rams. A favored Tufts team came to the cage on February 9 and was surprised by an aggressive, hard-fighting Maroon team that refused to be beaten. Coach Fri- gard ' s men played a fine brand of basket- ball and after a thrilling see-saw battle, the Statesmen were rewarded with their first win of the season. The home team had trouble in stopping Tibbs of the visitors, but Miles and Walsh piled up points until State won 42 to 40. After the Tufts game State ' s bad luck returned for the rest of the season. Coast Guard edged out a victory 38 to 36, Feb- ruary 10, after State had led by 15 points at one time in the second half. In the second and deciding game for the town championship. State succumbed to Amherst 48 to 37. Swamped by a dev- astating first half attack, State rallied in the second half but it was not enough to overcome the high lead of the Lord Jeffs. Smith and Rudge for State, and Norris, Hicks, and Reed for Amherst led the scoring. State traveled to Storrs on February 17 where Connecticut University gave State a basketball lesson. The Frigard- As onlookers inspect the prospects. . .practice still — good shot! [244] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Alan tries. . in the tj-pical afternoon scene. . .fingers crossed. . men were never in the game, Connecticut running up a 19 to lead before State could score a point. The Statesmen never gave up fighting, however, and managed to rally in the second half to bring the final score to 65 to 35. On February 20, State played a power- ful Worcester Tech team to a standstill during the first half of a keenly fought game in the local gym, but in the second half were unable to stop Forkey and Bel- los, who scored 43 points. All the States- men played a fast headsup game, with Norwood setting the pace in scoring. The game was much closer than the final score of 64 to 43 would indicate, for Worcester scored freely in the last few minutes of the game. Failing to hold an early lead the Frig- gardmen went down to defeat at the hands of Rensselaer Polytech at Troy on February 24. The Maroon made a fast start but failed to keep the pace. As has been the case all season, Dame Fortune smiled on the opponents, and State failed to get the breaks at a crucial moments. BiU Walsh starred for State, getting 14 points and playing a sterling floor game. The Statesmen closed their hectic sea- son on March 2 in Boston against Boston University. The Beantowners proved far too strong for the Maroon and after ten minutes of play led by 19 to 3, Frigard ' s men played without the services of their injured Captain Rudge. Walsh led the State attack in a second half rally that fell far short of pulling the team in the win column. The final score was 48 to 22. The final game of the season brought down the curtain on one of the most de- pressing records a State basketball team has compiled in recent years. Neither the team nor the coaching can be held re- sponsible for this showing, however, they have had more than their share of hard luck, ineligibilities, injuries, and sickness. With a few breaks at the right time, the record might have looked much different. There is hope, however, for Lou Norwood and Captain Rudge will be the only lettermen lost by graduation. Moreover, the freshmen showed several promising players in their games this year and should combine with the now experienced sophomores and jimiors to compile a com- mendable record in 1941. 4. 245 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX SWIMMING " The miracle man of New England coaches " modestly said last year ' s Index concerning swimming mentor Joe Rogers, when he coached his team to five straight wins. 1940 has seen swimming advance from a minor puddle splash to the out- standing sport in the eyes of Maroon rooters. The reason for this — an unde- feated season. Even in Aggie-Army- Harvard-Dartmouth days, it would have been good, but now, it is little short of miraculous. Joseph Jodka, the vmassuming sopho- more from Lawrence, held several records when he entered college and has been adding to his glory ever since. After Jodka, the next point meriting attention was team strength. For it was this quality which accounts for the outstanding per- formance of the 1940 swimming team. Included in the men who made this show- ing possible are Avery, Coffey, Hall, Jones, McCallum, Morse and Prymak. Worcester Tech visited the local pool first. They journeyed home with 27 points to State ' s 48. Connecticut Univer- sity, visiting the pool four days later, felt lucky to get home with their suits, as the Rogersmen captured first in every swim- ming event. The U-Conn ' s did capture first in the dives and enough " show " places to gain 19 points. But, meanwhile, State was having a little meet among her own swimmers, while rolling up a 56 count. Jodka, although not pushed turned in a college breaststroke record of 2:33:7. Nip-and-tuck battles between Morse and Coffey in the 440-yard event and Avery and Jones in the 50-yard free style added spectator interest. The locals next took to the road and duplicated their home feat. Wesleyan, barely nosed last year, took the same medicine as Connecticut, winning only the dives. Although the score was 55-20, the times turned in were rather slow. The Coast Guard meet, also away, proved a real record breaker. Joe Jodka became a public hero, as he set up a New England for the 60-foot pool. His time was 2:29:6. Two other records were also shattered at that meet. The 400-yard Prize amphibian . . .and Joe ' s Water Circus at a meet . [246] It Griffin (M), Averv (M), Hall (M), PrMii.ik (Mj, Jones (M), McCallura (M), Rogers. Chapman, Jodka (M), Pitts (M), Morse (M), Coffey (M), McCarthy. Filios, Palumbo (M). relay team composed of McCallum, Jones, Hall, and Pitts, broke the New London pool record, while the medley relay shattered both a pool and college record. Prymak, Jodka, and Jones made the team. Coast Guard ' s firsts in the dives and the 60 and 100-yard free style races gave them 30 points to the States- men ' s 45. The last home meet saw the largest score of the season, the home team mak- ing 58 to a scanty 16 gained by Bates College. The relay team, this time com- posed of Prymak, Jodka, and Captain Pitts, broke the college record established the week before. Closest race of the eve- ning was Coffey and Morse ' s battle in the 440-yard free style. Coffey finally came out the winner, turning in the fastest time which either had shown all season. Graduation takes Swimmers Morse and Pitts and Diver Palumbo. It will take a little support to make an undefeat- ed team next year, however, as has been said, Joe Rogers — " the miracle man. " M.S.C. 48 M.S.C. 56 SUMMARY OF THE SEASON January 13 at M.S.C. January 17 at M.S.C. W.P.I. 27 Conn. U. 19 February 10 at Middletown M.S.C. 55 Wesleyan 20 February 16 at New London M.S.C. 45 Coast Guard 30 February 27 at M.S.C. M.S.C. 58 Bates 16 N.E.I.S.A. at Williamstown M.S.C. 12 (Fifth) (Won by Brown) 4L 247 T MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX M.S.G. 49 M.S.C. 60 M.S.C. 49 SUMMARY OF THE 1939 SEASON April 22 at M.S.C. April 29 at Hartford May 6 at M.S.C. B. U. 86 Trinity 66 Tufts 86 May 13 at Worcester M.S.C— Fifth Place May 27 at Storrs M.S.C. 26 1-3 Conn. State 108 2-3 TRACK Broken records, an average season and expectations of a better season next year present the chief highlights of the 1940 track record. Individual performances were outstanding, but lack of team strength resulted in a mediocre win-loss report. The short distances and field events showed concentrated strength, but State ' s scanty representation in the long distances several times was the de- ciding factor of a meet. The season opened with the K. of C. and B.A.A. meets in Boston. The dual meets were split. Strong Connecticut University met strong opposition, but came out ahead 45-36. The Indians from the Springfield Y.M.C.A. College went down rather easily to a 54-36 defeat. The triangular meet with Tufts and Worcester Tech found State in second place. The following week State played host for the Connecticut Valley Champ- Derby, Klaman, Haskell, Green (M), Kimball, Lavitt (M) Greenfield, Adams (M), Skolnick, Criramins (M), Mosher, Freitas (M) O ' Connell (M), Palumbo, Merrill (M), Joyce (M), Tappin (M), Copson (M), Budz (M) 1 [ 248 ] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY St ionships and very nearly made itself a poor host, for the Maroon squad led the meet fully three-quarters of the way. Then, a clean sweep of the middle and long distances left the U-Conn ' s with 48 points to the Statesmen ' s 40. The final meet of the winter season saw the Maroon go down to a superior Northeastern team, 54-15. The many broken records of the 1940 season form a more interesting story. Per- haps outstanding under this heading was pole-vaulter Chester Budz. Returning to State after a year ' s absence, he broke the existing college record for the long distance, shattering his record several times. Using his own unique form, baseball captain Warren Tappin took all comers and bettered the college ' s indoor broad jump record by several inches. Ed O ' Connor, after previously com- peting in all the other short distance runs, came through in the 300-yard with a new college record in the Connecticut Valley Championships. In the same meet, ' ■fJ?C his classmate. Jack Crimmin, sprinted to a new 35-yard time of 4.8 seconds. An- other record was also dislodged in this Valley affair, run on one of the fastest tracks ever seen in the cage. Chester Putney, a consistent placer all year in the mile-run, bettered the college record in this event, although he finished third in the race. These marks, with the outdoor records of Captain Joyce in the hurdles and New England Champion Curtis in the javelin throw, make an impressive list of individual performances. Many of these stars will be with the team next year, and a few of this year ' s freshmen are coming up to add team strength. Derby, W. Jojce, McCarthy (M), Copson, Crimmins, Frandsen (M), O ' Connor (M), Putney, Abrahams Nye, Riseberg, Johnson, R. Joyce (M), Powers, Curtis (M), Tillson Jablonski (M), Healy (M), Salmela, Palumbo 4. [249 1 SUMMARY OF THE SEASON April 26 at M.S.C. M.S.C. 15 Williams 4 M.S.C. 6 April 28 at M.S.C. Bowdoin M.S.C. 8 May 3 at Amherst May 6 at M.S.C. Amherst 4 M.S.C. 14 May 10 at Worcester Trinity 1 M.S.C. 6 May 13 at M.S.C. First W.P.I. M.S.C. 2 Second Tufts M.S.C. 6 Mav 16 at M.S.C. Tufts 3 M.S.C. 8 Conn. State 7 M.S.C. 5 May 17 at M.S.C. May 19 at Durham Wesleyan 6 M.S.C. New Hampshire 4 M.S.C. 2 May 20 at M.S.C. Conn. State 1 M.S.C. 6 May 24 at Springfield Springfield 2 M.S.C. 2 May 27 at M.S.C. B.C. 8 M.S.C. 9 May 30 at Schenectady June 10 at M.S.C. Union 6 M.S.C. 5 Amherst 2 BASEBALL The varsity baseball team for 1939 enjoyed an excellent season of twelve wins and only three defeats. After a successful pre-season trip to Pennsylvania, the Statesmen got off to a whirlwind start in the regular season by winning nine in a row. Their streak was halted by Wesley- an and stamped on by New Hampshire two days later. They hit the comeback trail against Springfield, but Boston College was too strong. However, Union succumbed to the Maroon onslaught, and Amherst was taken into camp for the second time of the season on Commence- ment Day. Before going into the season, it might be well to say a word about the men on this club; for some of them were out- standing for a college team. Probably the two most prominent players were co- captains Johnny Bemben and Fran Riel. Bemben, who pitched good ball for three years of college competition, held down first base when he wasn ' t hurling in his senior year and did a bang-up job in both positions. Riel had his best year of pitch- ing and was always a dangerous hitter. While State is at bat, the boys on the bench knock on wood. [250] I THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ( aniwav, .Jiickiuiczvk, Spniicr. Allan i. |), [{...liiian Twvble (M), King (M), Irzvk (M), Tappm (M), Riidge (M) P. Fanning (M), Keyes (M), Morey (M), Riel (M), Bemben (M), Steff (M), Phelps (M), F. Fanning (M) Carl Twyble, the third pitcher, was also extremely effective in his first year of varsity play winning four and losing one. Perhaps these three did so well because they had such an effective receiver in Steff. Another pitcher, Frank Fanning, showed plenty of promise on the spring trip, but an injury early in the season kept him out of action. Beagle Morey ended his college playing career with a fine season both in the outfield and at bat. Captain-elect for 1940, Warren Tappin, led the team in batting and was depend- able in the field. The infield varied as the games rolled by, but Howie Rudge, Al Irzyk, and Stan Jackimczyk held the pitchers ' worries down to a minimum. The team as a whole was a remarkably close unit, possibly because of the spring trip which was a joy ride for all concerned. Remarks about the tent required to uniform the voluminous Frank Spencer caused no particular animosity. Bud King ' s chatter would invariably send Paul Fanning into gales of laughter which would cause the rest of the team to grin even if the chatter did not. Fran Riel liked to lead the bus in choruses of " Hinkey dinkey parley vous. " Johnny Bemben did his best to keep Carl Twy- ble ' s mind off the game at Union by con- stantly referring to the girl on the bleachers. Ebb ground away on his tobacco all season, and is reputed to have worn the same pair of socks for the dura- tion of the first winning streak. Even Dickey the bat boy, who bossed all the other kids, was an essential part of the unity of the club. The season opened at home with a 4. [251] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE I N D E X walk-away from Williams 15-4. Riel held the Ephmen to seven scattered hits, while the home boys banged out thirteen hits. Bemben garnered two triples, and Fran Riel hit three out of five times at bat. Carl Twyble pitched the next game in which he blanked the Bowdoin Polar Bears 6-0. Five State hits combined with seven Bowdoin errors spelled . n .v for the invaders from Brunswick. Superior play- ing in the field really decided the game for M.S.C, because Bowdoin made two more hits than the former. Despite the cold that prevailed in early May, Ebb used his traditional " warm weather " pitcher, Johnny Bemben, in the next game to beat Amherst 8 to 4. Ace Williams yielded twelve hits and his team made eight errors to help the State cavise. Bang-Bang bore down in the tight spots so that at no time did the Jeffmen really threaten. The next game was the postponed Connecticut State game. Riel relieved Twyble in the third with the score 6 to 3 against him and pitched magnificent ball until the eleventh when Irzyk ' s triple drove Allan in with the winning run, making the score 8-7. State ' s workhorse, Fran Riel, also pitched the next game, and he allowed six hits, fanned eleven men, and knocked out a home run to help slaughter Trinity 14-1. Carl Twyble came back with a repeti- tion of his Bowdoin score to beat W.P.I. 6-0. Stan Jackimczyk and Howie Rudge starred afield in this one. The tilt with Tufts was an innovation in that it was a double header. Riel pitched the first and Bemben the second, and State won both with scores of 2-0 and 6-3. Warren Tappin was outstanding at the plate. He garnered four out of seven among which was a four bagger. Up to this point in the season, the team had roared through eight wins and was getting a little bit cocky. However, the next two games were a somewhat deflating influence. Wesley an took advantage of some very sloppy State field work and eked out a 6-5 victory. All either team could get was three hits. Bemben pitched winning baseball, but his support gave him his first defeat of the regular season. On Alumni field, the second Connecti- cut game proved to be a thriller. State ' s Riel pitched a five hitter while the op- ponent ' s Mitchell gave only four singles. Diamond diplomacy. . .Tom tete-a-tetes with the manager. [252] THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY » I ' rau heaves a screw-ball . . . and almost fools the batter . Frank Spencer broke up the game with a long fly in the ninth to drive Tappin in with the second and winning run. The lesson taught by the Wesleyan and New Hampshire games was forgotten in the next contest. The team went down to an inglorious defeat at the hands of Bos- ton College. Extremely lackadaisical play practically gave the game away. All of Be mben ' s efforts to stem the tide were fruitless, and an 8-2 shellacking was absorbed. On Memorial Day, State avenged a defeat of the 1938 season by setting back Union 9-6. Carl Twyble had the game well in hand until late in the game when Bem- ben took his place. The club finished off a great season in grand style in the final game of the year. State clinched the town title and insured a successful commencement by beating the Amherst team for a second time 5-2. Fran Kiel was the master, and the oppo- nents did nearly everything he asked. Prospects for 1940, although not so bleak as some woidd picture them, are not as promising as they were in the spring of 1939. Standbys of the past three years, Kiel, Bemben, and StefF all gradu- ated, which left only Carl Twyble as a nucleus for the 19-10 pitching staff and several men with little varsity experience for receiving posts. The team is not to have the impetus of a spring trip for the first part of the sea- son. The 1939 club got the jump on other teams in this vicinity by its pre-season schedule and held that advantage most of the season. Stan Jackimczyk is a question mark for the team because of a physical disability that may keep him out of action. Bobby Triggs is not likely to catch because of a strained ligament in his throwing arm. All of these things combine to give Ebb a few more grey hairs. However, Morey and Phelps were the only other regulars to graduate, and there should be no trouble in filling their shoes. With the exception of the catcher, State will thus field an experienced team which should give the pitchers better support offensively and defensively. The baseball team may not be so successful as in the past, but it will give a good account of itself. 4. [253] Z MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX INTERCLASS ATHLETIC BOARD Skiing and golf may possibly be added to class competition ac- cording to preliminary arrangements being made by the incumbent Interclass Athletic Board. The improvements which are being made on Bull Hill, State College ' s " skiing Mecca, " will make it an ideal place to hold skiing competition provided that the weather conditions are favorable. Composed of two members from each class, the Interclass Ath- letic Board — one of the College ' s active student organizations — conducts the regular class sports competitions and enlivens interest with additions and improvements to its yearly schedule. Each class elects two members who serve throughout their four years at college. As a body, they schedule interclass games in cooperation with the Athletic department, determine the eligibility of team candidates, and award numerals to members of winning teams. Football and soccer in the fall; swimming, track, basketball, and hockey in winter; and baseball, track and tennis in the spring — these are the sports in which the board plans to hold interclass competition. New tennis courts on the campus will make possible a new inter- class tennis competition this spring. The competition will be con- ducted in the form of a tournament, just as this winter ' s interclass basketball games. Results of games held this year were: Football — tie game; soccer — freshmen; swimming — freshmen; basketball — freshmen; basket- ball — freshmen ; hockey — no game ; and winter track — freshmen. The pride of an athletically inclined student (next to the well- known " M " ) are his class numerals. Forty-two numerals were awarded in the sports listed above. These awards marked the middle of another year of interclass sports, a successful form of athletic activity supplementary to the regular varsity sports. Zeitler, Payson, Burr, King 254 1 THE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY Misses Kell, Howe, Pederzani, Bailey, Desmond, Stewart, Morley Misses Rice, Carpenter, Malm, Hall, Irwin, Hoye W. A. A. The purpose of the Women ' s Athletic Association at Massa- chusetts State College is to provide more opportunity for partici- pation in sports by the average college woman. Activity clubs are organized by the managers of the various sports. Each club de- velops a definite program which includes periods of practice and instruction for improvement of skill, interclass competition, tourna- ments and telegraphic meets. The W.A.A. planned a new system of competition this year. In addition to interclass competition, a competitive program among house teams was organized. Class teams are chosen from the house teams and interclass competition takes place after the house sched- ule has been played off. Under this system six groups are repre- sented and organized according to the places of residence of women students. The following groups are invited to send one or more teams to all tournaments — the Abbey, whose residents may not play on any other house team throughout the year; the Indepen- dents, girls who have not affiliated themselves with a sorority, and members of any sorority which does not maintain a house; Lambda Delta Mu; Alpha Lambda Mu; Sigma Beta Chi; and Phi Zeta. The W.A.A. Board is composed of three officers — president, vice-president and secretary; and an athletic council of ten that consists of the managers of the separate sports, and the Physical Director of Women. All students are associate members of the organization, but the voting power is restricted to active members who are girls participating in at least one of the recognized sports. At the time of the annual banquet and installation, awards are made to members who have shown outstanding ability, faithfulness, good sportsmanship, and an active interest in the promotion of their particular sport. -ft 255 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE INDEX I ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Midnight sessions with Milt Fitch and Dean Valz, crowded and rushed days taking pictures with Charlie lanello, comradely help on Index problems at any time of day or night with other students and the faculty, and honest-to-goodness work with all of them — these have made up the actual Scenes Behind the Scenes in the Index Office. Dean Valz of the Andover Press, Ltd., has assured the quality of printing in the Index by his years of solid yearbook experience; he has instilled a new spirit into the members of the board with whom he has worked. The inimitable Milton Fitch, of the Howard-Wesson Engraving Company, provided " editorial inspiration " along with entertaining anecdotes. He, too, took a deep interest in the ' 40 Index — as is evident from his habitually trying to keep his appointments at State in spite of rain, snow, sleet, traffic, lack of sleep, und so weiter in the catalog of Life ' s Vicis- situdes. Professor Lawrence Dickinson, Business Adviser; Dr. Maxwell Goldberg, Editorial Adviser; Professor Frank P. Rand, General Manager; and Mr. " Red " Emery, Alumni Secretary, have all guided and advised the Index, thereby con- tributing to a smoothly operating system in the editing and managing of the book. Only through the sound business policy of Professor Dickinson was a book with the color and comprehensive photography of the ' 40 Index made financially possible. Miss Dorothy Cooper, Mr. Fitch ' s associate, and Miss Barbara Elder, secre- tary to Mr. Valz, likewise did their utmost in helping us meet oin- deadlines. Many of the students on campus, especially Ev Spencer of the News Service, Frank Daley, Marge Irwin, Ralph Dakin, and Ken Witt, have, also, either added to the photography sections or have given their time and valuable suggestions toward the general progress of the book. These are the people — to whom this page is dedicated. Their help has partly gone toward making the difference between a run-of-the-mill book and an outstand- ing publication. Their help has made the work of the board lighter and more pleas- ant. But, most important of all, with their cooperative attitude and work they have largely made possible the publication of the Index the first week in May, at the same time keeping the high quality typical of Massachusetts State College . . . 256 I -J- . qV i ... on Amity Street . . . where the Price is always the Lowest . . . and the Quality as High as the Highest. Just the spot to visit when your room needs an added bit of Furniture. You ' ll obtain fine furni- ture . . . and you ' ll save money at Griggs. GRIGGS FURXITrRE WAREHOUSE . . . Climax that Soph-Senior social whirl at Amherst ' s smartest, smoothest restaurant, . . . known for its quick service, super-clean kitchen, and choicest in foods, including exceptional quality meat or pastry. Always, like an old and loyal friend, the Sarris Candy Kitchen brings you a warm glow of appreciation at your every meal . . . And so — when you want to treat your one-and-only or yourself, when you want to be discriminating, you will welcome Sarris ' convenience, distinction and pleasant atmosphere. THE SARRIS COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN MUTIJAL PLUMBING AND HEATING CO. . . . Headquarters for radio and record-player equipment of all kinds . . . the latest in Victor and Bluebird records. If you have need for repair work of any sort ... if you desire supplies for your fraternity, call us for prompt, free delivery. . . . Recognized for years by its tradition . . . backed by modern equipment, the Amherst Gulf Service Station offers lightning- quick service in filling your tank with the finest in gasolines — Gulf — or in giving its Certified Gulflex Lubrication ... For a smoother-running car tomorrow, see the Gulf Service Station to- day. To the modern " man about town, " the Gulf Station gives sat- isfaction in grooming his car and rejuvenating it with Gulf. . . Not business before pleasure, but business AND pleasure at the Gulf gas sign ! . . . GULF SERVICE STATION CARPENTER and MOREHOUSE • . . Printers of the " Amherst Record " and " Massachusetts Col- legian, " this concern has served the community and college for 98 years. Always regarding printing as an art rather than as a trade. Carpenter and Morehouse is equipped to handle well any printing job no matter how large or how small. THE HOUSE OF WALSH . . . For clothing and haberdashery in every community there is always one shop which is outstanding for its quality and price. In this vicinity it is the House of Walsh. Come in and compare! DEADY ' $ DIBfER . . . where excellent food is obtained at reasonable prices . . . where the mid-day meal is as deliciously satisfying as the mid-nite snack . . . where friendly and courteous waiters are always ready to serve you with the food you want when you w ant it. You will really enjoy the food and the friendly, informal atmosphere of Deady ' s. COLLEGE STORE .... to meet your friends . . . for relaxation between classes . . . or to obtain classroom supplies, the College Store is the place. A soda fountain with experts behind the counter, and everything you ' ll need in books, stationery, wall decorations, or reading ma- terial are to be found at the College Store. DOUGLASS - MARSH . . . the house that sells you dependable furniture of all kinds. Quality merchandise by Whitney, Heywood- Wakefield, Cushman, Nichols and Stone, Shearman Brothers, Gardner Upholstery, Im- perial, and other nationally known lines . . . Red Cross and Spring Air Mattresses . . . I. E. S. floor and table lamps . . . rugs by Bigelow- Sanford, Whittall, Karaghensian, and Roxbury . . . Where good values prevail . . . Where courteous service is outstanding . . . " In Amherst ... At the Head of the Village Green. " f7) " yJL y t ' eadtvav CJiin AMHERST THE LORD JEFFERY THE CAMPUS . . . Pleasant surroundings, delicious food, a scintillating college atmosphere, and up-to-date facilities contribute to the new popu- larity of The Campus . . . you are invited for that snack or supper at the town ' s newest and brightest place for dining . . . located in the heart of Amherst . . . enjoy choice foods at moderate costs every day and every meal at The Campus — where a new experience in eating awaits you. . . . Compliments of Lannon ' s Red White Food Markets located at Amherst, North Amherst, and Sunderland. . . . Quality produce, meats and groceries. LANNON ' S RED WHITE FOOD MARKETS NFW ENGLAND ' S LARGEST COLLEGE ENGRAVERS U4 PoAilcmd Sheet, W Ax:eAie , MoAyiaokidAetU IN THE FIVE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE INVEN- TION OF PRINTING FROM MOVABLE TYPES (JOHANN GUTENBERG, MAINZ GERMANY 1440), THE FOUR HUN- DREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE INTRODUCTION OF THE FIRST PRESS TO AMERICA (MEXICO CITY 1539), THE THREE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST BOOK PRINTED IN COLONIAL AMERICA (CAMBRIDGE 1640), THE TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTIETH YEAR SINCE THE FIRST PAPER MILL IN THIS COUNTRY (GERMANTOWN 1690) AND SINCE THE FIRST NEWSPAPER (PUBLICK OCCURANCES, BOSTON 1690), THE HUNDREDTH YEAR AFTER THE INVENTION OF THE CAMERA (DAGUERRE 1839), THE SIXTIETH FOLLOW- ING THE DEVELOPMENT OF PHOTO-ENGRAVING, AND THE FIFTIETH AFTER THE PERFECTION OF THE MONOTYPE CASTING MACHINE This Book was Printed in April 1940 BY THE ANDOVER PRESS IN ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS ESTABLISHED 1798 INCORPORATED 1887 Another Publication . . . Showing Sargmt Superiority Complete photographic service to the 1940 INDEX SARGENT Studio, Inc. Bostofij Massachusetts


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University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

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University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

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University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

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University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

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