University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA)

 - Class of 1938

Page 1 of 360

 

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1938 Edition, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1938 Edition, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1938 Edition, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1938 Edition, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1938 Edition, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1938 Edition, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1938 Edition, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1938 Edition, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1938 Edition, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1938 Edition, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1938 Edition, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1938 Edition, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 360 of the 1938 volume:

v J A - (Y " i, YEARBOOK OF MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AMHERST, MASS. Mitchell F. NeJame — Editor-in-Chief Elmer R. Lombard — Business Manager 9n (Ae madefui manneAj ime pfieMni an. i uAUiaitd JTLaiAacAuA tU ate 1937-1938 Vondell ■% " No bookless life — however full and rich — can ever give a modern man any satisfactory sense of just exactly what he is or where he belongs. For, at best, such a life must be lived in the world as it is to-day. And the world as it is to-day is a result of what the world has been in the past. Unless we understand that past we cannot understand what we are. " J. L. Bennett. 8A£x:ted in tde i extfi c4 1935 Vondell Lawrence Sumner Dickinson His Alma Mater, once his creditor, Is now in debt to him; she realizes His scorn of plodded paths, his liking for Exacting and enduring enterprises. She traces his contributive career To nineteen-ten, his talisman and token; In play-production he was pioneer; His relay record still remains unbroken. To-day she owes to him preeminence In golf course maintenance and mysteries; In Academics too, his business sense Inspires and steadies student energies; And thus he gives expression to intense Albeit discriminating loyalties. F P. R. 3-AencAUaii Old Qkapd and 9.and YJfUnwJiLcii )3ui£dUi - -nr-i " ' ' -■: jrr ' .x:.:: A t " t- r-s i-i. ii »i Vondell JA JAuiJbejeA. MEMBERS OF THE BOARD ORGANIZATION OF 1937 ▼ MRS. LENA EDGE WILSON of Pittsfield (Term expires 1938) HAROLD L. FROST of Arlington (Term expires 1938) DAVID H. BUTTRICK of Arlington (Term expires 1939) DAVID J. MALCOLM of Charlemont (Term expires 1939) JOHN F. GANNON of Pittsfield (Term expires 1940) DAVIS R. DEWEY of Cambridge (Term expires 1940) JOSEPH W. BARTLETT of Boston (Term expires 1941) PHILIP F. WHITMORE of Sunderland (Term expires 1941) JOHN CHANDLER of Stei-ling Junction (TeiTn expires 1942) FREDERICK D. GRIGGS of Springfield (Term expires 1942) NATHANIEL I. BOWDITCH of Framingham (Term expires 1943) WILLIAM C. MONAHAN of Framingham (Term expires 1943) MRS. ELIZABETH L. McNAMARA of Cambridge (Term expires 1944) JAMES T. CASSIDY of Dorchester (Term expires 1944) MEMBERS EX OFFICIO His Excellency CHARLES F. HURLEY Governor of the Commonwealth HUGH P. BAKER President of the College JAMES G. REARDON Commissioner of Education WILLIAM CASEY Commissioner of Agriculture OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES His Excellency CHARLES F. HURLEY of Boston, President NATHANIEL I. BOWDITCH of Framingham, Vice-President ROBERT D. HAWLEY of Amherst, Secretary FRED C. KENNEY of Amherst, Treasurer [18] OAe VMAickjni HUGH POTTER BAKER D.Oec, LL.D. " Massachusetts State College may be thought of as a family of four persons liv- ing together in the closest relationship. We may think of these four persons as the student body, the Alumni body, the Fac- ulty and the Administration. Mutual respect, mutual friendliness, and mutual interest are the factors which make these four groups function success- fully as a family. Four groups with their eyes fixed on a common goal — the con- tinued success of the College — cannot fail of accomplishment. " [19] Ldminiiii ' iatlon Front Row: Grayson, Munson, Machmer, Baker, Sievers, Verbeck, Wood. Second Row; Warner, Lanpheor, Proy, Erickson, Emery, Glotfelter, THE ADMINISTRATION HUGH POTTER BAKER, D.Oec, LL. D. President Born 1878. B.S., Michigan State College, 1901. M.F., Yale University, 1904. D.Oec, University of Munich, 1910. LL.D., Syracuse University, 1933. Spent several years with U. S. Forest Service examming public lands in Central Idaho, Wyoming. Nebraska: field studies in New Mexico, Washington, Oregon. Assistant Professor of Forestry, Iowa State College, 1904-07. Pro- fessor of Forestry, Pennsylvania State College, 1907-12. Dean and Professor of Silviculture, New York State College of Forestry, 1912-20. Executive Secretary, American Paper and Pulp Association, 1920-28. Manager Trade Association Department, Chamber of Commerce of the United States, 1928-30. Dean, New York State College of Forestry, Syracuse, 1930-33. Fellow, A.A.A.S., F.R.G.S. (London). Member, 2nd R. O. T. C, Fort Sheridan. Illinois, August — November, 1917. With 46th Infantrv and member of General Stafi, 1917-19. Major, 6. R. C. President of M. S. C, 1933- . Married. WILLIAM LAWSON MACHMER. Ed.D. Dean, Professor and Acting Head of Mathematics Department Bom 1883. A.B., Franklin and Marshall. 1907. A.M., Franklin and Marshall, 1911. Columbia University. 1912. Ed.D., American International College, 1936. Teacher in Public Schools of Penn. Head of Department of Mathematics, Frank- lin and Marshall Academy. Instructor in Math- ematics, M.S.C., 1911. Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 1913. Associate Professor of Math- ematics, 1919. Professor of Mathematics and Assistant Dean. 1920. Acting Dean, 1922-23. Acting Dean and Registrar, 1923-25. Dean, 1926- . Assoc. Secretary of New England Col- lege Entrance Certificate Board. Advisory Com- mittee of Eastern Assoc, of Deans and Advisors of Men. Sec. Franklin Harvest Club. Phi Beta Kappa. Phi Kappa Phi. Pi Gamma Mu. Alpha Sigma Phi. Adelphia. Married. FRED C. KENNEY Treasui ' er Born 1869. Ferris Institute. 1890-91. Previously employed; Manistee and Northeastern R. R. Co. Michigan Agricultural College. Treasurer, M.S.C., 1907- . Married. FRED J. SIEVERS, M.S., Director of the Experiment Station and Director of the Graduate School Born 1880. B.Sc, University of Wisconsin, 1910. M. S., University of Wisconsin, 1924. Instructor in Soils. University of Wisconsin, 1909-1912. Agronomist, Milwaukee County School of Agriculture and Domestic Science, 1912-13. Superintendent. 1912-17. Professor of Soils. State College of Washington. 1917-28. Member of the American Society of Agronomy, American Association of University Professors, Irrigation Institute, International Farm Congress. Fellow American Association for the Advance- ment of Science. Director of Herman Frasch Foundation for Research in Agricultural Chem- istry. Theta Chi, Sigma Xi, Alpha Zeta, Phi Kappa Phi. Married. [20] A.dmLnUtAaUa-tt THE ADMINISTRATION MARSHALL OLIN LANPHEAR, M.Sc. Assistant Dean and Professor Born 1894. B.Sc, M.S.C., 1918. M.Sc, M.A.C., 1926. Previously employed, Mount Hermon School for Boj ' S. Soil Survey in Massachusetts. American Agricultural Chemical Co. Instructor in Agronomy, M.S.C., 1921-24. Assistant Pro- fessor of Agronomy, 1925-26. Assistant Dean and Assistant Professor in charge of Freshman Orientation, 1927-36. Professor, 1936- . Phi Kappa Phi, Kappa Sigma. Married. ROLAND H. VERBECK, B.S. Director of Short Courses Born 1886. B.S., M.A.C., 1908. Cornell Uni- versity, summer school, 1910. Bureau of Uni- versity Travel Tour on European Agriculture, 1911. Harvard Graduate School of Education, 1916-17. Harvard Summer School, 1924. Pre- viously employed, Principal Petersham Agri- cultural High School, 1908-10. Prmcipal Parsonsfield Seminary, Maine, 1910-16. 1st Lieut., Commanding 281st Aero Sqadron, A.E.F., France, 1918-19. Director, New York State School of Agriculture at St. Lawrence University, 1919-24. Director of Short Courses, M.S.C., 1924- . Mem- ber National Education Association. Phi Sigma Kappa. Married. WILLARD A. MUNSON, B.S. Director of Extension Service Bom 1881. B.S., M.S.C., 1905. Partner, Munson-Whitaker Co., 1905-07. Farmer, 1908-15. County Agricultural Agent, 1915-20. Director, Division Markets, Massachusetts Department of Agriculture, 1920-26. Director, Massachusetts Extension Service, M.S.C., 1926- . President, Massachusetts Fruit Growers Association, 1919- 21. President, National Association of State Marketing Officials, 1926. President, New England Research Council on Marketing and Food Sup- plies, 1923-28. Member, Association of Land Grant Colleges. Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Sigma Kappa. Married. ROBERT D. HAWLEY, B.S. Secretary of the College Born 1895. B.S., M.S.C., 1920 as of 1918. Supervisor of Extension Courses, M.S.C., 1920-21, 1922-24. Extension Editor, 1925-26. Secretary of the College, 1926- . U. S. Army, 1917-19. Second Lieutenant Infantry, A.E.F., 1918-19. Member, Eastern College Business Officers ' Association. On leave of absence for one year, studying at the Graduate School of Business Administration, Boston University. Adelphia, Phi Sigma Kappa. Married. JOHN K. BROADFOOT Assistant Treasurer Born 1884. Previously employed, Agent, American Express Company. Clerk, Central Vermont Railway Company. Cashier, M.S.C., 1915. Assistant Treasurer, 1924- . Married. GUNNAR S. ERICKSON, B.Sc. Business Officer Born 1897. B.Sc, M. A. C, 1919. Boston University, College of Business Administration, 1922-24. Previously employed. Alliance Realty Co., N. Y. C. Beard and Abney— C. P. A. ' s, N. Y. C. Business Officer, M. S. C, 1935- . New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Married. BASIL B. WOOD, A.B. Librarian Born 1881. A.B., Brown University, 1905. Previously employed, City Library, Springfield. Camp Libraries, Camp Gordon, Ga., Camp Lee, Va. Crerar Library, Chicago. Berkshire Athenaeum, Pittsfield. Public Library, Westerly, R. I. Librarian, M. S. C, 1924- . Delta Upsilon, Phi Beta Kappa. Appalachian Mountain Club, Randolph Mountain. Club. Single. GEORGE E. EMERY, B.S. Field Secretary and Assistant Alumni Secretary Born 1904. B.S., M. S. C, 1924. Field Secre- tary and Assistant Alumni Secretary, M. S. C, 1929. Sigma Phi Epsilon, Adelphia. Married. EMERY E. GRAYSON, B.S. Director of Placement Service Born 1894. B.S., M. A. C, 1917. Y. M. C. A. College, Springfield, Mass., summers 1924-25. Previously employed. Farm Bureau Work, Gardner, Mass., 1917-18. Field Artillery, Camp Taylor, Louisville, Ky., O. T. C, 1918. Baseball Coach and Assistant Coach in Football and Basketball, Amherst College, 1924. Associate Professor of Physical Education, Amherst Col- lege. Coach of Baseball, Basketball, Assistant Coach of Football, Amherst College, 1926-27. Assistant Football Coach, M. S. C, 1919. Coach of Two-Year Athletics, 1919-24. Director of Placement Service. Adelphia. Alpha Sigma Phi. E. C. P. O. Formerly Vice-President, now Presi- dent, Eastern College Personnel Officers. Married. GUY VICTOR GLATFELTER, M.S. Placement Officer Bom 1893. B.S., Penn. State College, 1919. M.S., Iowa State College, 1920. Iowa State Experiment Station. U. S. Department of Agri- culture, Washington, D. C. Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry, M. S, C, 1921-1933. Placeinent Officer, 1933- . Kappa Sigma. Eastern College Personnel Officers Association. Married. MARGARET HAMLIN, B.A. Placement Officer for Women B.A., Smith College, 1904. M. S. C, 1913-14. Placement Officer for Women, M. S. C, 1918- . Eastern College Personnel Officers Association. Single. FRANCIS CIVILLE PRAY, M.S. Assistant College Editor Born 1909. B.S., M. S. C, 1931. M.S., M. S. C, 1932. Assistant College Editor, M. S. C, 1934. Phi Sigma Kappa. Married. JOSEPH WARNER, JR., A.B. Assistant College Editor Born 1913. A.B., Amherst College, 1934. Pre- viously employed, Springfield Union, (editorial staff), 1934-35. Daily Hampshire Gazette, North- ampton, (editorial staff), 1935-37. Assistant College Editor, M. S. C, 1937- . Psi Upsilon. Married. [21} 7ho §elloA EtneAUi PROFESSORS EMERITI HENRY T. FERNALD, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology, Emeritus Born 1866. B. Sc, University of Maine, 1885. M.S., University of Maine, 1888. Graduate Student at Wesleyan University, 1885-86. Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University 1887-90. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1890. Professor of Zoology, Penn. State College, 1890-99. State Zoologist of Penn. 1898-99. Assistant Professor of Entomology, M. S. C. Experiment Station, 1910-30. Fellovi ' , American Association for the Advancement of Science. Massachusetts Nursery Inspector, 1902-18. Director of Graduate School, M. S. C, 1927-30. Professor Emeritus of Entomology, 1930. Beta Theta Pi, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa. JOSEPH B. LINDSEY, Ph.D., D.S.C., Goessmann Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, Emeritus Born 1862. B.S., M. S. C, 1883. Chemist, Massachusetts S tate Experiment Station, 1883-85. Chemist, L. B. Darling Fertilizer Co., Pawtucket, R. I., 1885-89. Student at University of Gottingen, Germany, 1889-92. M.A., Ph.D., University of Gottingen, 1891. Student at Polytechnic Institute, Zurich, Switzerland, 1892. Associate Chemist, M. S. C. Experiment Station, 1892-95. In charge of the department of feeds and feeding, Gatch Experiment Station, 1895-1907. Chemist, M. S. C. Experi- ment Station, 1907. Vice-Director of M. S. C. Experiment Station, 1911-32. Goessman Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, 1911-32. Former member of the American Chemical Society. Fellow in American Association for the Advancement of Science. Member of the American Society of Animal production. Goessmann Professor Emeritus of Agriculture, 1932. Alpha Sigma Phi, Phi Kappa Phi. FRED WINSLOW MORSE, Research Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus Born 1865. B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1887, M.S., 1900. Assistant Chemist, Mass. State College Experiment Station, 1887-88. Assistant Chemist, N. H. Agricultural Experiment Station, 1888- 1889. Chemist, 1889-1900. Vice-Director, 1895-1909. Professor of Organic Chemistry, N. H. College of A. and M. Arts. 1890-1909. Research Professor of Chemistry, Mass. State College Experiment Station, 1910-35, Acting Director, 1912-13. Member of A. A. A. S. Member of American Chemical Society. Research Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, 1935. Phi Beta Kappa. JOHN E. OSTRANDER, Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus Bom 1865. A. B., C. E., Union College, 1886. Assistant in sewer construction. West Troy, N. Y., 1886. Assistant on Construction, Chicago, St. Paul, and Kansas City Railway, 1887. A.M., Union Col- lege, 1889. Instructor at Lehigh University, 1891-92. Instructor in Civil Engineering and Mechanic Arts, University of Idaho, 1892-97. Professor of Mathematics and Civil Engineering, and Meterologist at Experiment Station, M. S. C, 1897-1928. Member of Intei-national Commission of Teaching Mathe- matics, 1900-11. Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, 1928. Phi Kappa Phi. FRED C. SEARS, M.S., Professor of Pomology, Emeritus Born 1866. B.Sc, Kansas Agricultural College, 1892. Assistant Horticulturalist, Kansas Experi- ment Station, 1892-97. M.Sc, Kansas Agricultural College, 1896. Professor of Horticulture, Utah Agri- cultural College, 1897. Director of Nova Scotia School of Horticulture, Wolfville, N. S., 1897-1904. Pro- fessor of Horticulture, Nova Scotia Agricultural College, Truro, N. S., 1905-07. Professor of Pomology, M. S. C, 1907-36. Professor Emeritus of Pomology, 1936. Honorary Doctors Degree, Kansas State Col- lege, 1937. Phi Kappa Phi. [22] Ji hicxdhjUve. I " «i VICTOR A. RICE Head of Division Front Row; Morkuson, Tague, Sanctuary, Parsons, Lindsey, Eisenmenger, Gunness, Lindquist, Graham, Frandsen, Thayer, Pushee, Newlon, Barrett. Second Row; Isgur, Muller, Foley, Yegian, Vondell, Kucinski, Colby, Westcott, Brown, Tetro, Hauck, Mack, Santa, Creek, Ensmenger, Everson. DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE VICTOR ARTHUR RICE, M.Ag. Professor and Head of Animal Husbandry Head of Division of Agriculture Bom 1890. B.S., North Carolina State College, 1916. M.Ag., M. A. C, 1919-23. Amherst College, 1922-26. Assistant State 4H Club Leader, 1916-19. Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry, 1919- 30. Professor and Head of Animal Husbandry. Head of Division of Agriculture. Kappa Alpha, Alpha Zeta, Phi Kappa Phi. Married. ROLLIN HAYES BARRETT, M.S. Professor of Farm Management Born 1891. B.S., Connecticut State College, 1918. M.S., Cornell University, 1925-26. Vermont State School of Agriculture, principal for five years. Assistant Professor of Farm Management, M. S. C, 1926-37. Professor of Farm Manage- ment. Married. WALTER S. EISENMENGER, Ph.D. Research Professor of Agronomy; Head of Department of Agronomy Born 1887. B.S., Bucknell University, 1912. M.S., Bucknell University, 1914-16. University of Penn., 1913-14. Columbia University, summers, 1919-23. A.M., Ph.D., Columbia University, 1925-26. Research Professor of Agronomy, M. S. C, 1931-34. Head of Department, 1934- . American Society of Agronomy. American Association of Plant Physiologists. American Chemical Society. American Association for the Advancement of Science. Lambda Chi Alpha. Married. JULIUS FRANDSEN, M.S. Professor of Dairy Industry and Head of Department Born 1877. B.S., Iowa State College, 1902. M.S., Iowa State College, 1904. Assistant in Agricultural Chemistry, Iowa State College, 1902-04. Dairy Chemist, Hazelwood Creamery Company, Portland, Oregon, 1904-07. University of Idaho, 1907-11. University of Nebraska, 1911-21. Dairy Editor and Counselor, Capper Farm Press, 1921-26. Professor of Dairy Industry and Head of Department, M. S. C, 1926- . Phi Kappa Phi, Gamma Sigma Delta. Married. JOHN CAMERON GRAHAM, B.S. Professor of Poultry Husbandry and Head of Department B.S., Wisconsin University, 1911. Formerly with Public Schools, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Asso- ciate Professor of Poultry Husbandry, M. S. C, 1911-14. Professor of Poultry Husbandry and Head of Department. Fellow, Poultry Science Association, 1935. Married. CHRISTIAN I. GUNNESS, B.S. Professor of Agricultural Engineering and Head of Department Born 1882. B.S., North Dakota Agricultural College, 1907. Instructor, North Dakota Agri- cultural College. Professor of Agricultural En- gineering, Head of Department, M. S. C, 1914. American Society of Agricultural Engineers. Phi Kappa Phi. Married. [23] Jl hicAjJtbuAjt DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE ADRIAN HERVE IJNDSEY, Ph.D. Professor of Agricultural Economics and Farm Management, and Head of Department Born 1897. B.S., University of Illinois, 1922. M.S., Iowa State College, 1922-23. Northwestern University, Summer 1926. University of Chicago, Summer 1927. Ph.D., Iowa State College, 1925-29. Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1923-25. Iowa State College, 1925-29. Professor of Agricultural Economics, M. S. C, 1929-35. Head of Depart- ment, 1936- . Professor of Farm Management. Pi Gamma Mu. Married. WILLIAM CROCKER SANCTUARY M.Sc. Professor of Poultry Husbandry Born 1888. B.S., M. S. C, 1912. Studied at Cornell University. M.Sc, M. S. C, 1932. For- merly at New York State School of Agriculture. Professor of Poultry Husbandry, M. S. C, 1921. Phi Delta Kappa. Married. ALLEN EMIL ANDERSON, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering Bom 1899. A.B., University of Nebraska, 1923. M.A., University of Nebraska, 1924. Ph.D., Har- vard University, 1934. Previously at University of Nebraska. University of Oklahoma. Kirks- ville, Mo., State Teachers College. Harvard University. Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Wagner College. Assistant Professor of Agricul- tural Engineering, M. S. C, 1937- . Sigma Xi. Married. LUTHER BANTA, B.S. Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry Bom 1893. B.S., Cornell University, 1915. Studied at Cornell University, 1915. University of Wisconsin, 1931. Previously at Cornell Uni- versity, 1917. Ohio State University, 1922. New Jersey State Department Markets, 1926. In- structor in Poultry Husbandry, M. S. C, 1918-21. Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry, 1921- . Sigma Pi, Lambda Gamma Delta. Poultry Science Association, American Poultry Asso- ciation. Married. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON, M.Sc. Assistant Professor of Agronomy Bom 1888. B.Sc, M. A. C, 1910. M.S., M. S. C, 1936. Acting Foreman Grounds Service, 1912. Foreman Grounds Service, 1913. Super- intendent of Grounds, 1915. Instructor in Horti- culture and Superintendent of Grounds, 1919. Assistant Professor of Horticulture and Superin- tendent of Grounds, 1924. Assistant Professor of Horticulture, 1930. Assistant Professor of Agronomy, 1932. Coach of Track, M. S. C, 1911-22. Business Manager Academic Activities, 1932- . Member, Phi Sigma Kappa. A. A. A. S., American Society of Agronomy. Married. MARION EUGENE ENSMINGER, M.A. Assistant Professor Animal Husbandry Born 1908. B.S., University of Missouri, 1931. M.A., University of Missouri, 1932. Previously employed: U. S. Department Agriculture, Soil Erosion Station, Bethany, Missouri. Soil Con- servation Service, Urbana, Illinois. U. S. Depart- ment of Agriculture, Far m Security Administra- tion, Robbs, Illinois. Assistant Professor Animal Husbandry, M. S. C, 1937- . Alpha Zeta, Lambda Gamma Delta. Block and Bridle Club. Single. RICHARD CAROL FOLEY, M.Sc. Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry Bom 1906. B.Sc, M. A. C, 1927. M.Sc, M. S. C, 1930-31. Previously employed, Stannox Farm, Sherborn, Mass. Temporary Instructor m Animal Husbandry, M. S. C, 1929-32. Research Fellowship — Intensive Grassland Management, 1929-32. Instructor in Animal Husbandry, 1932- 36. Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry, 1936- . Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Phi Epsilon. American Dairy Science Association. American Society of Animal Production. Single. HARRY G. LINDQUIST, M.S. Assistant Professor of Dairying Born 1895. B.S., M. A. C, 1922. M.S., Univer- sity of Maryland, 1924. Studied at Ohio State University, 1925-27. Summer School, Ohio State University, 1932. Baltimore City Health De- partment, 1924. University of Maryland, 1924-25. Instructor in Dairying, M. S. C, 1927-29. Voca- tional Instructor in Dairy, 1929-36. Assistant Professor of Dairying, 1936. Married. MERRILL J. MACK, M.S. Assistant Professor of Dairy Industry Born 1902. B.S., Penn. State College. M.S., University of Wisconsin. Graduate Fellow, Uni- versity of Wisconsin. Instructor in Dairying, M. S. C, 1925-27. Assistant Professor of Dairy Industry, 1927- . Alpha Zeta, Phi Kappa Phi. American Dairy Science Association. American Public Health Association. American Association for the Advancement of Science. Married. MINER JOHN MARKUSON, B.S. Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering Born 1896. B.S., University of Minnesota, 1923. Previously employed: Harry Jones Arthur Dahlstrom, Minneapolis Architects. Extension Architect and Assistant Professor Agricultural Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Assistant Professor Agricultural Engineering, M. S. C, 1925. Co-author " Soil Management for Greenkeepers " . " Dairy Barn Construction " . Married. [24] L ' dudiuAje. DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE CLARENCE HOWARD PARSONS, M.S. Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry and Superintendent of Farm Born 1904. B.S., M. S. C, 1927. M.S., M. S. C, 1933. Instructor of Animal Husbandry, 1928-29. Synthetic Nitrogen Products Corporation, New York. Fieldman in New England, 1929-1930. Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry and Superintendent of Farm, 1931- . Phi Kappa Phi, Adelphia, Q. T. V. Married. WILLIAM HENRY TAGUE, B.S. Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering Born 1892. B.S. in Agricultural Engineering, Iowa State College, 1924. Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering, M. S. C, 1929- . Married. CHARLES HIRAM THAYER Assistant Professor of Agronomy Born 1884. Instructor in Agronomy, M. S. C, 1919-36. Assistant Professor of Agronomy, 1936- . American Society of Agronomy. Married. JOHN NELSON EVERSON, M.S. Instructor of Agronomy Born 1887. B.S., M. S. C, 1910. M.S., M. S. C, 1935. Chemist for Fertilizer Companies, 1910-18. Chemist Central of Georgia Railway, 1919-30. Assistant Director of Shell Petroleum Sales School, 1930-31. Institutional Fellow, M. S. C, 1934-35. Soil Specialist, M. S. C, 1934-36. Instructor of Agronomy, M. S. C, 1936- . American Chemical Society. American Institute of Chemists, 1923. Married. JOSEPH FREDERICK HAUCK, M.S. Instructor of Agricultural Economics and Farm Management Born 1911. B.S., Rutgers University, 1936. M.S., Rutgers University, 1937. Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Economics, Rutgers University. Instructor Agricultural Economics and Farm Management, M. S. C, 1937- . Alpha Zeta. Varsity Tennis Coach at Rutgers Univer- sity. Married. BENJAMIN ISGUR, M.S. Instructor of Agronomy Born 1911. B.S., M. S. C, 1933. M.S., M. S. C, 1935. Instructor of Agronomy, 1934- . Phi Kappa Phi. Single. JOHN BAXTER NEWLON Instructor of Agricultural Engineering Bom 1884. Electrician, 1918. Special student M. I. T., 1921. Instructor of Agricultural En- gineering, M. S. C, 1919- . Married. GEORGE FREDERICK PUSHEE Instructor in Agricultural Engineering Born 1887. I. C. S. Contractors and Builders Course, 1906. Teachers Training Class, Spring- field, 1914-15. Summer School Teachers Train- ing, M. S. C, 1924. Special Courses, M. S. C, 1924-25. Instructor in Agricultural Eiigineering, M. S. C, 1916- . Married. JOHN HENRY VONDELL Instructor in Poultry Husbandry and Plant Superintendent Born 1898. U. S. Veterans Bureau, Baltimore, 1921-22. Poultry Plant Foreman, M. S. C, 1923-29. Instructor in Poultry Husbandry and Plant Superintendent, M. S. C, 1929- . Member Poultry Science Association. Member, Special Advisory Board on Hiking, National Park Ser- vice, Department of the Interior. Married. [25] Hame Ecancwucl MISS EDNA L SKINNER Head of Division 1 loiil Row: Dr. Mitclnell, Miss Skinner, Miss Knowlton. Second Row: Miss Briggs, Mrs. Coolidge, Mrs. Cook. DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS EDNA L. SKINNER, M.A. Professor, Head of Division of Home Economics and Advisor of Women B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1908. M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- sity, 1928. Previously employed. Teachers College, Columbia University. James Millikin University. Professor, Head of Division of Home Kconomics and Advisor of Women, M. S. C, 1919- . Phi Kappa Phi. M.Ed., honorary, Michigan State Normal College, 1922. Single. HELEN S. MITCHELL, Ph.D. Research Professor of Home Economics B.A., Mount Holyoke, 1917. Ph.D., Yale, 1921. Director Nutrition Research, Battle Creek Sani- tarium, 1921-29. Professor Physiology and Nutri- tion, Battle Creek College, 1924-35. Research Professor of Home Economics, M. S. C, 1935- . Member of American Society of Biological Chemists, American Dietetic Association, Amer- ican Institute of Nutrition, Society of Experi- mental Biology and Medicine, American Home Economics Association, Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, Iota Sigma Pi. Publication: Co-author, " Nutrition in Health and Disease. " Single. HELEN KNOWLTON, M.A. Associate Professor of Home Economics A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1903. Instructor Atlanta University, 1903-05. Teacher in High Schools, 1905-12. Graduate Student and In- structor, Cornell University, 1912-16. Head of Home Economics, Dean of Women, New Hamp- shire State College, 1916-18. Y. W. C. A., Secretary, 1919-24. M.A., Teachers College, 1924. Professor of Home Economics, M. S. C, 1934. Associate Professor, 1935. SARA M. COOLIDGE, M.S. Assistant Professor of Home Economics B.S., Michigan State College, 1924. M.S., Michigan State CoUege, 1927. Graduate work, Universities of Chicago and Wisconsin, Iowa State College. Instructor Muskegon Hackey Manual Training School, 1915-22. Instructor, Michigan State College, 1927-31. Nutritionist, Detroit Dairy and Food Council, 1931-32. Head of Home Economics Institute, Detroit Free Press, 1932-33. Instructor, Chicago Teachers ' College, 1933-34. Assistant Professor of Home Economics, West Virginia, Wesleyan College, 1934-35. Assistant Professor of Home Economics, M. S. C, 1935- . Sigma Xi. MILDRED BRIGGS, M.S. Assistant Professor of Home Economics B.A., DePauw University, 1920. M.S., Iowa State College, 1923-25. University of Minnesota, 1930. Previously employed. University of Min- nesota. Assistant Professor of Home Economics, M. S. C, 1931. Kappa Alpha Theta. Single. GLADYS MAE COOK, M.Sc. Instructor in Home Economics B.Sc, Battle Creek College, 1934. Internship in Nutrition at Indiana University Hospitals and Medical Center, 1934-35. M.Sc, M. S. C, 1936. Research Fellow in Home Economics, M. S. C, 1935-36. Research Assistant in Home Economics, 1936-37. Instructor in Home Economics, 1937- . American Dietetics Association, National Home Economics Association, Connecticut Valley Home Economics Association. [26} UcfJiUcuiUUie RALPH A. VAN METER Head of Division Front Row: Hubbard, Blundell, Holdsworth, Snyder, Cole, Thayer, Chenoweth, Miss Hughes, Ross. Second Row: Turner, Maclinn, Curtis, Southwick, Clague, Arnold, Otto, Tramposch, Bailey, Tuttle DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE KALPH ALBERT VAN METER, Ph.D. Professor of Pomology Head of the Department of Pomology Head of Division of Horticulture Bom 1893. B.S., Ohio State University, 1917. M.S., M. S. C, 1923-1930. Ph.D., Cornell Univer- sity, 1930-35. Extension Specialist in Pomology, 1919. Extension Professor of Pomology, 1922. Professor of Pomology, 1923- . Delta Theta Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi. Married. LYLE LINCOLN BLUNDELL, B.S. Professor of Horticulture Bom 1897. B.S., Iowa State College, 1924. Employed, Olmsted Brothers, Landscape Archi- tects, BrooklLne, Mass., 1924-31. Professor of Horticulture, M. S. C, 1931- . Gamma Sigma Delta. Married. WALTER WINFRED CHENOWETH B.S.Agr. Professor of Horticultural Manufactures; Head of Department of Horticultural Manufactures Bom 1871. A.B., Valparaiso University, 1899- 1909. B.S. Agr., Missouri University, 1910-12. Chillicothe Normal School, 1903-1910. Instructor and Associate Professor of Pomology, M. A. C. 1912-18. Professor of Pomology, M. A. C, 1918- . Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, Alpha Zeta. Author of " Food Preservation " , " How to Make Candy " . Married. ARTHUR KENYON HARRISON Professor of Landscape Architecture Bom 1872. Previously employed, Warren H. Manning, Landscape Architects, Boston, 1898- 1911. Instructor in Landscape Gardening, M. A. C, 1911. Assistant Professor of Landscape Gardening, M. A. C, 1913. Professor of Land- scape Architecture, M. S. C, 1933- . Faculty member Commons Club. Married. ROBERT POWELL HOLDSWORTH M.F. Professor of Forestry; Head of Department of Forestry Bom 1890. B.S., Michigan State College, 1911. M.F., Yale University, School of Forestry, 1928. Royal College of Forestry, Sweden, 1929. Pre- viously employed. United States Forest Service, University of Arkansas. Business. Professor of Forestry, M. A. C, 1930- . Senior Member, Society of American Foresters. Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Gamma Rho. Captain 74th Infantry, U. S. Army, World War. Married. GRANT BINGEMAN SNYDER, M.Sc. Professor of Olericulture; Head of Department Born 1899. B.S.A., Ontario Agricultural Col- lege (Toronto University), 1922. M.Sc, Michigan State College, Summer 1927 and 1928. Ontario Agricultural College, Horticultural Foreman and Plant Hybridist. Instructor of Vegetable Garden- ing, 1922-25. Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening, 1925-35. Professor of Olericulture and Head of Department, 1935- . American Society for Horticultural Science. American Society of Plant Physiologists. Vegetable Growers Associa- tion of America. Married. [27] Uah.tlcu£hiAe DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE CLARK LEONARD THAYER, B.S. Professor of Floriculture; Head of Department Born 1890, B.S., M. S. C, 1913. Cornell University, 1914. Assistant in Floriculture, Cornell University. Instructor in Floriculture, Cornell University. Graduate Assistant in Flori- culture, 1913-14. Instructor in Floriculture, M. S. C, Spring Term 1917. Associate Professor and Head of Department of Floriculture, 1919- 1920. Professor and Head of Department of Floriculture, 1920- . Alpha Gamma Rho, Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Alpha Xi, Adelphia. U. S. Army, 1918. Author of " Spring Flowering Bulbs. " Married. REUBEN EDWIN TRIPPENSEE, Ph.D. Professor of Wildlife Management Born 1894. B.S., Michigan State College, 1920. M.S., University of Michigan, 1933. Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1934. Previously em- ployed, United States Forest Service — Region 9, Milwaukee, Wis. School of Forestry, University of Michigan. School System, City of Saginaw, Michigan. Professor of Wild-life Management, 1936- . Alpha Zeta, Seminar Botanicus, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Sigma, Sigma Xi. Married. FRANK A. WAUGH, M.S. Professor of Landscape Architecture; Head of Department Born 1869. B.Sc, Kansas State College, 1891. M.Sc, Kansas State College. Cornell University, 1898. Koenigliche Gaertner-Lehranstalt, Dahlem, Germany, 1910. Ecole de Beaux Arts, Fontainebleau, France, 1937. Previously em- ployed, University of Vei-mont. Dartmouth College. Oklahoma A. M. College. Head of Division of Horticulture, 1907-1932. Professor of Landscape Architecture. M. S. C, 1932- . Kappa Sigm a, Phi Kappa Phi. Married. JOHN ALBERT CLAGUE, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Horticultural Manufactures Born 1905. B.S., University of Washington, 1929. M.S., M. S. C, 1931. Ph.D., M. S. C, 1935. Research Fellow, Experiment Station, 1929-1930. Research Assistant, Experiment Station, 1930-1936. Assistant Professor, M. S. C, 1936- . Pi Kappa Phi. Married. SAMUEL CHURCH HUBBARD Assistant Professor of Floriculture Born 1890. Cornell University, Department of Floriculture, 1916-21. Vice-President and Manager, F. W. Fletcher, Inc., 1915-16. C. N. Pierson, Inc., Cromwell, Conn., 1909-15. Green- house Foreman and Instructor, M. S. C, 1921-28. Assistant Professor of Floriculture, 1928- . Married. J. HARRY RICH, M.F. Assistant Professor of Forestry Born 1888. B.S., New York State College of Forestry, 1913. New York State College of Forestry, 1914. M.F., New York State College of Forestry, 1936. Assistant Professor of Forestry, 1933- . Sigma Xi. Society of American Foresters (S. A. F.). Pi Kappa Alpha. Married. OLIVER COUSENS ROBERTS, B.Sc. Assistant Professor of Pomology Bom 1895. B.Sc, M. A. C, 1919. Teacher of Agriculture, West Lebanon Academy, Maine, 1920-22. Foreman of Pomology Department, M. S. C, 1922-26. Instructor in Pomology, 1926- 35. Assistant Professor of Pomology, 1935- . Theta Chi. Married. ALDEN PARKER TUTTLE, M.S. Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening Bom 1906. B.S., M. A. C, 1928. M.S., Penn- sylvania State College, 1930. Instructor in Vegetable Gardening, M. S. C, 1930-36. Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening, 1936- . Gamma Sigma Delta. Married. JAMES DILLON CURTIS, M.F. Instructor in Forestry Bom 1905, B.A., University of British Columbia, 1929. B,A,Sc., University of British Columbia, 1930. M.F., Harvard University, 1934. Previously employed, British Columbia Forest Service. Instructor in Forestry, 1935- . Alpha Delta Phi. Canadian Society Forest Engineers. Society American Foresters. Single. WILLIAM HENRY LACHMAN, M.S. Instructor in Olericulture Bom 1912. B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1934. M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1936. Instructor in Olericulture, 1936- . Gamma Sigma Delta, Pi Alpha Zi. Single. WALTER ARNOLD MACLINN, M.S. Instructor in Horticultural Manufactures Bom 1911. Research Fellow, M. S. C, 1934. Research Fellow, M. S. C, 1936. B.S., M. S. C, 1933. Oregon State College, 1935. M.S., Massa- chusetts State College, 1935. M. S. C, 1936. Chemist, Murray Co., Boston, Mass. Instructor in Horticultural Manufactures, M. S. C, 1936- . Theta Chi. Single. JAMES J. ROBERTSON, B.A. Instructor in Landscape Architecture Bom 1906. B.A., Carnegie Institute of Tech- nology, 1930. Instructor in Landscape Archi- tecture, M. S. C, 1930- . Married. DONALD ERNEST ROSS, B.S. Greenhouse Foreman and Instructor in Floriculture Department Bom 1896. B.S., M. S. C, 1925. Previously employed, A. N. Pierson, Inc., Cromwell, Conn. The Rose Fann, White Plains, New York. Greenhouse Foreman and Instructor in Flori- culture Department, M. S. C, 1928- . Alpha Gamma Rho. Married. EMIL JOHN TRAMPOSCH, B.S. Instructor in Horticulture Born 1913. B.S., M. S. C, 1935. Commercial Horticulture. Instructor in Horticulture, M. S. C, 1937. Adelphia. Married. [28} Tlfu Cccd and Bioto icat iP cienceA CLARENCE E. GORDON Head of Division Front Row: Alderman, Davis, Clark, Alexander, Peters, Ritchie, Chamberlain, Gordon, Moore, Osmun, Machmer, Torrey, Lentz, Powers. Second Row: Woodside, Sweetman, Ross, Mrs. Shaw, Shaw, Swenson, Morston, Fessenden, Vinol, Boutelle, Stevens, Serex, Miller, Anderson. DIVISION OF PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES CLARENCE EVERETT GORDON, Ph.D. Professor of Zoology and Geology Head of Department Head of Division of Physical and Biological Sciences Bom 1876. B.Sc, M. A. C, 1901. Clark University, Summers 1901 and 1903. B.Sc, Boston University, 1903. A.M., Columbia Uni- versity, 1906. Ph.D., Columbia University, 1911. Rensselaer Polytechnical Institute, Spring of 1915. New York State Museum, Spring of 1915. Harvard Medical School, Summer of 1915. Science Master at Cushing Academy, 1901-04. Assistant Professor of Zoology, M. S. C, 1906- 1910. Professor of Zoology and Geology, Head of Department, 1910-1930. Head of Division of Physical and Biological Sciences, 1927- . Head of Department of Entomology, Zoology and Geology, 1930-37. Professor of Zoology and Geology, Head of Department, 1937- . Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, Fellow A. A. A. S., Fel- low Geological Society of America, Member Paleontological Society, Member American Geo- physical Union. Married. CHARLES PAUL ALEXANDER, Ph.D. Professor of Entomology Acting Head of Department Born 1889. B.Sc, Cornell University, 1913. Ph.D., Cornell University, 1918. Instructor, Cor- nell University, 1914-17. University of Illinois, Natural History Survey, Curator of Collections, 1919-22. Assistant Professor of Entomology, M. S. C, 1922-1930. Professor of Entomology, 1930- . Alpha Gamma Rho, Gamma Alpha, Adelphia, Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi. Fellow, Entomological Society of America. Fellow, A.A.A. Science. Fellow Entomological Society, London. Member, Entomological Society, France. Married. LEON ALSON BRADLEY, Ph.D. Professor of Bacteriology Born 1896. B.Sc, Wesleyan University, 1922. Ph.D., Yale University, 1925. Assistant in General Bacteriology, Yale University. City Bacteriologist, New Britain, Conn. Assistant Professor of Bacteriology, M. S. C, 1925-1935. Professor of Bacteriology, 1935- . Beta Theta Pi. Sigma Xi. Society of American Bacter- iologists, President of Connecticut Valley Section, 1935-36. American Public Health Association. Married. G. CHESTER CRAMPTON, Ph.D. Professor of Insect Morphology Born 1881. A.B., Princeton University, 1904. M.S., Harvard, 1921. M.A., Cornell, 1905. Student at Freiburg and Munich, 1907. Ph.D., Berlin University, 1908. Instructor in Biology, Prince- ton University, 1908-10. Professor of Entomology and Zoology, South Carolina State Agricultural College, 1910-11. Assistant Professor of Ento- mology, M. S. C, 1911-15. Professor of Insect Morphology, M. S. C, 1915- . Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. JOSEPH S. CHAMBERLAIN, Ph.D. Goessmann Professor of Chemistry Born 1870. B.Sc, Iowa State College, 1890. M.Sc, Iowa State College, 1892. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1899. University of Berlin, 1908. Oxford University, 1930. Assistant in Chemistry, Iowa State College, 1891-93. In- structor of Chemistry, Iowa State College, 1894-97. Instructor of Chemistry, Oberlin Col- lege, 1899-1901. U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Chemistry, 1901-09. Associate Pro- fessor Chemistry, M. S. C, 1909-1913. Professor of Organic Chemistry, 1913- . Head of Chemistry Department and Professor of Organic Chemistry, 1928-34. Goessmann Professor of Chemistry, 1934- . Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Delta Tau Delta. American Chemical Society, A. A. A. S. Author: " Text Book of Organic Chemistry " , " Organic Agricultural Chemistry " . Co-author of " Chemistry in Agriculture. " Married. [29} 9Ai Uccd and Bioio-qLcal iP.citnc£ DIVISION OF PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES GEORGE E. GAGE, Ph.D. Professor of Bacteriology and Physiology and Head of the Department Born 1884. B.A., Clark University, 1906. A.M., Yale University, 1907. Ph.D., Yale University, 1909. Social Student in Pathology, University of Michigan, Summer of 1910. Physiological Chemist, Sodium Benzoate Investigation, U. S. Department of Agriculture, 1908. Associate Biologist, Maryland Experiment Station, 1909- 1910. University of Michigan, 1910. Biologist Maryland Experiment Station, in charge of Pathological Investigation. Assistant Professor of Animal Pathology, M. S. C, 1912-1920. Head of the Department of Serology, Central Depart- ment Laboratory, A. E. F., France, 1918-19. Professor of Animal Pathology and Head of the Department of Veterinary Science and Animal Pathology, M. S. C, 1920-27. Professor of Bac- teriology and Physiology and Head of the Department. 1927- . Kappa Phi, Phi Kappa Phi. Single. JOHN BECKLEY LENTZ, V.M.D. Professor of Veterinary Science and Head of Department Born 1887. A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1908. V.M.D., University of Pennsyl- vania, 1914. Assistant in Veterinary Science, M. S. C, 1916. Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science, 1922. Professor of Veterinary Science and Head of Department, 1927- . Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Sigma Kappa. Married. VINCENT A. OSMUN, M.Sc. Professor of Botany and Head of Department Born 1880. B.Agr., Connecticut State College, 1900. B.Sc, M. A. C, 1903. B.Sc, Boston University, 1903. M.Sc, M. A. C, 1905. Storrs, Connecticut Experiment Station. Instructor in Botany, M. S. C, 1905-07. Assistant Professor of Botany, 1907-14. Associate Professor of Botany a nd Acting Head of Botany Department, 1914-16. Professor of Botany and Head of Department, 1916- . Q. T. V., Phi Kappa Phi. Married. CHARLES ADAMS PETERS, Ph.D. Professor Inorganic and Soil Chemistry Bom 1875. B.Sc, M. A. C, 1897. B.Sc, Boston University, 1897. Student, M. A. C, 1897-98. Ph.D., Yale, 1901. Student, University of Berlin. 1908-1910. Graduate Student, Yale, 1910-11. Professor of Chemistry and Head of Department, University of Idaho, 1901-09. Ex- change Teacher, Friedrichs Wedersche Oberreal- schule, 1909-1911. Assistant Professor of In- organic and Soil Chemistry, M. S. C, 1911-12. Associate Professor of Inorganic and Soil Chem- istry, 1912-16. Professor of Inorganic and Soil Chemistry, 1916- . Alpha Sigma Phi, Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi. Author of " The Preparation of Substances Important in Agriculture. " Married. WALLACE FRANK POWERS, Ph.D. Professor of Physics and Head of Department Born 1889. A.B., Clark College, 1910. A.M., Clark University, 1911. Ph.D., Clark University, 1914. Associate Professor of Mathematics and Physics, University of Richmond, 1914-16. In- structor in Physics, Simmons College, 1916-17. Instructor in Physics, New York University, 1917-1920. Assistant Professor in Physics, Wes- leyan University, 1920-25. Professor of Physics and Head of Department, M. S. C, 1925- . American Physical Society. American Associa- tion of University Professors. Alpha Sigma Alpha. Married. WALTER STIENTZ RITCHIE, Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry Head of Department Bom 1892. B.Sc, Ohio State University, 1916. A.M., University of Missouri, 1918. Ph.D., University of Missouri, 1922. Assistant Professor of Agricultural Chemistry and Assistant Chemist in Experiment Station, University of Missouri. Professor of Chemistry and Head of the Depart- ment, 1934- . Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Chi Sigma, Delta Tau Delta. American Chemi- cal Society. American Institute of Chemists. Married. RAY ETHAN TORREY, Ph.D. Professor of Botany Born 1887. B.Sc, M. A. C, 1912. M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University, 1918. Instructor, Grove City College, 1912-15. Instructor, Wesleyan Univer- sity, 1918-19. Instructor in Botany, M. S. C, 1919-21. Assistant Professor of Botany, 1921-1933. Associate Professor of Botany, 1933-37. Professor of Botany, 1937- . Single. ORTON LORING CLARK, B.Sc. Associate Professor of Botany Bom 1887. B.Sc, M. A. C, 1908. Ethical Culture School, 1908-1910. Columbia University, 1909-1910. Student at Universities of Rostock, Munchen and Strassburg, 1911-13. Assistant in Botany, University of Strassburg, 1912-13. Assistant Physiologist, Experiment Station, M. S. C, 1913-1927. Assistant Professor Botany, 1915-1927. Associate Professor of Botany, 1927- . Phi Sigma Kappa. A. A. A. S. Married. FRANK C. MOORE, A.B. Assistant Professor of Mathematics Bom 1879. A.B., Dartmouth College, 1902. Studied at Dartmouth, 1903, Columbia, 1916. Instructor Mathematics, Dartmouth. Assistant Professor of Mathematics, University of New Hampshire. Assistant Professor of Mathematics, M. S. C, 19 18-33. Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1933- . Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi. American Association for Advance- ment of Science. Association Mathematics Teachers in New England. Mathematical Asso- ciation of America. Chi Phi Fraternity. Married. [30} TKit Uccd and RCoEaglccd tP cieticed DIVISION OF PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES PAUL SEREX, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Chemistry Bom 1890. B.Sc, M. A. C, 1913. M.Sc, M. A. C, 1916. Ph.D., M. A. C, 1923. Studied at University of Chicago, 1917, Columbia Univer- sity, 1921. Instructor, University of New Hamp- shu-e, 1915. Graduate Assistant, M. S. C, 1913-15. Assistant, M. S. C, 1915-19. Instructor, M. S. C, 1919-24. Assistant Professor of Chemistry, M. S. C, 1924-33. Associate Professor of Chemistry, M. S. C, 1933- . American Chemical Society. Phi Kappa Phi. Married. GEORGE W. ALDERMAN, B.A. Assistant Professor of Physics Bom 1889. A.B., Williams College, 1921. Instructor in Physics, 1921-26. Assistant Pro- fessor of Physics, M. S. C, 1926- . Married. HAROLD DANFORTH BOUTELLE Ch.E. Assistant Professor of Mathematics Bom 1898. B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Insti- tute, 1920. Ch.E., Worcester Polytechnic Insti- tute, 1921-22. University of Iowa, Summer 1934. Instructor in Mathematics, M. S. C, 1926- 36. Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 1936- . Member, Mathematical Association of America. Married. RICHARD WILLIAM FESSENDEN Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chemistry Bom 1902. B.S., M. S. C, 1926. M.S., M. S. C, 1928. Ph.D., Columbia University, 1931. Gradu- ate Assistant, Columbia University, 1928-31. Graduate Assistant, M. S. C, 1926-28. Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chemistry, 1931- . Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Lambda Upsilon, Sigma Xi. American Chemical Society. Married. MARY E. GARVEY, B.S. Assistant Professor of Bacteriology B.S., M. S. C, 1919. Instructor in Bacteriology, M. S. C, 1921-35. Assistant Professor of Bac- teriology, 1935- . GEORGE ANDREWS MARSTON, M.S. Assistant Professor of Mathematics Bom 1908. B.S., Worcester Polytechnic In- stitute, 1930. University of Wisconsin, 1932. M.S., State University of Iowa, 1932-33. State University of Iowa, Summer 1935. Massachu- setts Institute of Technology, Summer 1937. Previously employed: Turners Falls Power and Electric Co., Westfield, Mass. U. S. Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, Colorado. Water Resources Branch, U. S. Geological Survey, Boston. In- structor of Mathematics, 1933-37. Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 1937- . Sigma Xi, Lambda Chi Alpha. American Society of Civil Engineers. American Geophysical Union. Married. WALTER McKINLEY MILLER, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics Bom 1896. Ph.B., Lafayette College, 1918. M.A., Pennsylvania State College, 1923. Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1927. Cornell University, 1932. Previously employed: Pennsylvania State College. University of Illinois. Bowdoin Col- lege. Marquette University. Tufts College. Assistant Professor of Mathematics, M. S. C, 1935- . Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi. American Association University Professors. Mathematical Association of America. Married. RANSOM CLAYTON PACKARD, M.S. Assistant Professor of Bacteriology Born 1886. B.S.A., University of Toronto, 1911. M.S., M. S. C, 1933. Previously employed: North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station. Vocational Instructor of Bacteriology, M. S. C, 1927-37. Assistant Professor, 1937- . Married. [31] ' PAi Lcat anxi RLaio-( Lca£ i icLencel DIVISION OF PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES HARVEY LEROY SWEETMAN, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Entomology Born 1896. B.S., Colorado State College, 1923. M.S., Iowa State College, 1923-25. University of Minnesota, 1925-27. Ph.D., M. S. C, 1929-1930. Previously employed: State of Colorado, 1922. U. S. Bureau of Entomology, 1923. Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station 1925-27. Wy- oming Agricultural Experiment Station, 1927-29. Assistant Professor of Entomology, M. S. C, 1930- . Member, American Association for Advancement of Science. American Association Economic Entomology. American Association Economic Entomology (Eastern Branch). En- tomology Society of America. Ecological Society of America. Limnological Society of America. American Society of Zoology. American Asso- ciation of University Professors. Alpha Zeta, A. G. R., Gamma Sigma Delta, Phi Kappa Phi. Married. HERBERT E. WARFEL, M.S. Assistant Professor of Zoology Born 1902. A.B., Western State College of Colorado, 1926. M.S., Oklahoma University, 1931. Cornell University, 1937. Previously employed; Public Schools, North Dakota, Colorado, Okla- homa. Broaddus College, University of Maine. Oklahoma Biological Survey. Assistant Pro- fessor of Zoology, M. S. C, 1931. Phi Sigma, Beta Beta Beta, Sigma Xi. American Society Hepetologists and Ichthyologists. American Society of Mammalogists. American Association of University Professors. In charge Game Refuges, State Forests of Massachusetts, Summer 1935. Sabbatical leave of absence, 1937-38. Married. GILBERT LLEWELLYN WOODSIDE, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology Born 1909. B.A., DePauw University, 1932. M.A., Harvard Univ ersity, 1933. Ph.D., Harvard University, 1936. Assistant Professor of Biology, M. S. C, 1936- . Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi. Married. WALTER HENNICKS HODGE, M.S. Instructor in Botany Born 1912. A.B., Clark University, 1934. M.S., M. S. C, 1934-36. On Faculty of Summer School, Clark University. Graduate Assistant in Botany, M. S. C, 1935-36. Instructor in Botany, 1936- . Kappa Phi. Single. NATHAN RAKIETEN, Ph.D. Instructor in Physiology Born 1908. B.S., Wesleyan University, 1929. Ph.D., Yale University, 1930-33. Porter Research Fellovvr, 1933-34. Instructor in Physiology, M. S. C, 1934- . Sigma Xi. American Asso- ciation for the Advancement of Science. Single. WILLIAM HAROLD ROSS, Ph.D. Instructor in Physics Born 1909. B.A., Amherst College, 1929. M.A., Amherst College, 1930. Ph.D., Yale University, 1934. Laboratory Assistant, 1933-35. Instructor in Physics, 1935- . Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi. American Physical Society. American Associa- tion for Advancement of Science. Phi Delta Theta. Single. FRANK ROBERT SHAW, Ph.D. Instructor in Entomology and Beekeeping Born 1908. B.S., M. S. C, 1931. Ph.D., Cor- nell University, 1936. Assistant in Morphology and Insect Histology, Cornell, three years. Instructor in Economic Entomology, Cornell. Assistant to Experiment Station Entomologist, summers 1930-34. Observer in Weather Bureau, 1930-34. Instructor in Entomology and Bee- keeping, 1935- . Sigma Xi. Entomological Society of America. American Association of Economic Entomologists. Married. MIRIAM MORSE SHAW, M.S. Instructor in Zoology Bom 1905. B.S., St. Lawrence University, 1927. M.S., M. S. C, 1930. Carthage High School teacher, 1927-28. Graduate Assistant in Ento- mology, M. S. C, 1928-30. Technical Assistant in Entomology and Zoology, 1930-32. Instructor in Zoology, 1932- . Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi. American Association for the Advance- ment of Science. Limnological Society of America. Married. NELSON PIERCE STEVENS, Instructor in Chemistry M.S. Born 1912. B.S., M. S. C, 1935. M.S., M. S. C, 1937. Instructor in Chemistry, M. S. C, 1937- . Kappa Epsilon. American Chemical Society. Single. JOHN DAVID SWENSON, M.A. Instructor in Mathematics Born 1909. B.S., New York University, 1932. M.A., Columbia University, 1936. Instructor in Mathematics. M. S. C, 1936- . Married. [32} i£o-cict£ !£cLeitcel ALEXANDER A. MACKIMMIE Head of Division Second Row; Larcom, Rozman, Rohr, Dubois, Helming, Cary, Purvis, Dow, Neet, Smart, Colwell, Goldberg. DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES ALEXANDER ANDERSON MACKIMMIE, M.A. Professor of History and Head of Division of Social Sciences Born 1878. A.B., Princeton University, 190ti. M.A., Columbia University, 1914. Centre de Estudios Historicos, Madrid, 1922. University of Florence, 1936. Previously employed: Truro, N. S., Colchester Academy. Instructor of French and Spanish, M. S. C, 1908-11. Assistant Professor of French and Spanish, 1911-15. Asso- ciate Professor of French and Spanish, 1915-19. Professor of French and Spanish, 1919-24. Pro- fessor of History and Economics, 1924-o5. Professor of History, 1935- . Head of Division of Social Sciences, 1928- . Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi. Married. ALEXANDER EDMOND CANCE, Ph.D. Professor of Economics and Head of Department Born 1874. B.A., Macalester, 1896. Graduate Certificate, Wisconsin State Normal School. M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1906. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1908. Previously em- ployed: Avalon College, Professor of Greek and Literature. Professor of Greek and History, High School, Jamesville, Wisconsin. Principal, Ash- vUle Industrial School. Supervisor of Practice, First Penn. State Normal School. Fellow in Economics, University of Wisconsin. Instructor in Agricultural Economics, Department of Rural Social Science, M. S. C, 1908-10. Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, Department of Rural Social Science, 1910-12. Associate Pro- fessor in Department of Agricultural Economics, 1913-14. Head of Department, Associate Pro- fessor and Supervisor of Agricultural Surveys, 1915-35. Professor and Head of Department of Economics, 1935- . Phi Kappa Phi. American Economic Association. Chevalier d ' Agriculture, France. Alpha Sigma Phi. Married. HARRY NEWTON GLICK, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology Born 1885. A.B., Bridgewater College, 1913. Columbia College of Expression, Chicago, Sum- mer 1912. University of Chicago, Summer, 1913. A.M., Northwestern University, 1913-14. Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1920-23. Principal graded school, 1904-06. Teacher of History, 1914-15. Teacher of Science, 1915-17. Manager of farm, 1917-20. Professor of Psychology, M. S. C, 1923- . Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Delta Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi. Member of International Con- gress of Psychology. Member of American Philosophical Society. Member of American Association of University Professors. Married. ARTHUR NELSON JULIAN, A.B. Professor of German Born 1885. A.B., Northwestern University, 1907. Berlin University, 1910-11. Columbia University, Summers 1932, 33, 34. Instructor in German and Greek, Elgin Academy, Elgin, Illinois. Instructor of German, M. S. C, 1911-19. Assistant Professor of German, 1919-23. Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 1923-24. Assistant Professor of German, 1924-25. Pro- fessor of German, 1925- . Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Gamma Delta. Married. WALTER EVERETT PRINCE, A.M. Professor of English Born 1881. Ph.B., Brown University, 1904. A.M., Brovim University, 1905. Instructor in English, University of Maine, 1905-12. In- structor in Public Speaking, Bangor Theological Seminary, 1905-06. Instructor in English and Public Speaking, M. S. C, 1912-15. Assistant Professor of English and Public Speaking, 1915- 1928. Associate Professor of English, 1928-33. Professor of English, 1933- . Sphinx, Brown University. Phi Kappa Phi. Member, The Shakespeare Association of America, Inc. The National Association of Teachers of Speech. Michigan State College, Visiting Professor of English, Summer Session, 1937. Single. [33] iP.o.cUd iP.clejn.ce6 DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES FRANK PRENTICE RAND, M.A. Professor of English and Head of Department of Languages and Literature Bom 1889. A.B., Williams College, 1912. M.A., Amherst, 1914-15. Instructor, University of Maine, 1913-14. Instructor in English, M. S. C, 1914-21. Assistant Professor of English, 1921-27. Associate Professor of English, 1927-33. Pro- fessor of English and Head of the Department of Languages and Literature, 1933- . General Manager of Academics, 1919- . Phi Sigma Kappa, Delta Sigma Rho, Adelphia, Phi Kappa Phi. Publications: " Yesterdays at Massachusetts State College " . Poet. Dramatist. Married. WINTHROP SELDEN WELLES, M.Ed. Professor of Education and Head of Department of Education Born 1875. B.S., University of Illinois, 1901. M.Ed., Harvard, 1922-29. State Normal School, Wisconsin, 12 years. Superintendent of Schools, Illinois, 5 years. Professor of Education, M.S.C., 1919- . Phi Delta Kappa, Sigma Phi Epsilon. Married. WILLIAM GOULD VINAL, Ph.D. Professor of Nature Education Born 1881. Bridgewater Teachers College, 1903. B.S., Harvard University, 1906. A.M., Harvard, 1907. Ph.D., Brown University, 1924. Previously employed; Marshall College, West Virginia; Salem Teachers College, Mass.; R. I. College of Education; College of Forestry, Syracuse Uni- versity; Western Reserve University. Professor of Nature Education, M. S. C, 1937- . Sigma Xi. Fellow American Association Advancement of Science. Married. CHARLES FREDERIC FRAKER, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Modern Languages Bom 1888. A.B., Colorado College, 1919. M.A., Harvard University, 1920. Ph.D., Harvard Uni- versity, 1930. Previously employed; Colorado College, Harvard University, Northeastern Uni- versity. Assistant Professor Modern Languages, M. S. C, 1931-37. Associate Professor of Modem Languages, 1937- . Married. STOWELL COOLIDGE CODING, A.M. Associate Professor of French and Music Born 1904. A.B., Dartmouth College, 1925. A.M., Harvard University, 1927. Further study: Boston University, Summer, 1926. Smith College Summ er School of Music. M. S. C. Summer School. Ecole Francaise. Middlebury. Comedie Francaise, Paris. Instructor, Rice Institute. In- structor of French and Music, M. S. C, 1927. Assistant Professor of French and Music, 1929. Associate Professor of French and Music, 1937. Phi Beta Kappa, Kappa Phi Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Sigma Phi, Gamma Delta Epsilon. President, Western Massachusetts Modem Lan- guage Association, 1936. President, New England Modem Language Association, 1937. Married. HAROLD WHITING GARY, A.M. Assistant Professor of History Born 1903. A.B., Williams College, 1925. A.M., Harvard University, 1926. Further study: Uni- versity Scholar, Harvard, 1926. Yale University, 1929-30, 1932-33. Instructor, Gushing Academy, 1926-29. Yale University, 1930-32. Instructor in History, M. S. C, 1933-36. Assistant Professor in History, 1937- . Married. THEODORE CUYLER CALDWELL, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of History and Sociology Born 1904. B.A., College of Wooster, 1925. M.A., Harvard University, 1925-26. Ph.D., Yale University, 1931-34. Instructor, College of Wooster. University of Nebraska. Juniata College. Assistant Professor of History and Sociology, M. S. C, 1935- . Married. FREDERICK MORSE CUTLER, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of History and Sociology Bom 1875. A.B., Columbia University, 1895. B.D., Columbia University, 1895-98. Ph.D., Clark University, 1920-22. University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, Professor of History and Sociology. Massachusetts State Teachers College, Worcester, Assistant Principal and Professor of History. Assistant Professor of History and Sociology, M. S. C, 1926- . Pi Gamma Mu, Sigma Phi Epsilon. Lieutenant Colonel, Reserve, U. S. Army. Married. PHILIP LYLE GAMBLE, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Economics B.S., Wesleyan University, 1928. M.A., Wes- leyan University, 1929. Ph.D., Cornell University, 1929-33. Instructor, Cornell University, 1929-32. Instructor, Wesleyan University, 1932-35. As- sistant Professor of Economics, M. S. C, 1935- . American Economic Association. American Association of University Professors. Sigma Chi, Phi Kappa Phi. Single. MAXWELL HENRY GOLDBERG, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of English Born 1907. B.S., M. S. C, 1928. M.A., Grad- uate School, Yale University, 1930-32. Ph.D., Graduate School, Yale University, 1932-33. Fur- ther study: M. S. C, 1928-29. Amherst College, 1928-29. Instructor in English, M. S. C, 1928-30. Instructor in English, M. S. C, 1933-34. Assistant Professor of English, 1934- . Adelphia, Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Epsilon Pi. Modern Lan- guage Association of America. Modern Human- ities Research Association. American Association of University Professors. Married. [34] iP.oc.iat tP dien ceA. DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES CLAUDE CASSELL NEET, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology Born 1905. A.B., University of California at Los Angeles, 1930. M.A., Clark University, 1932. Ph.D., Clark University, 1935. Special Psychol- ogist, New Jersey State Hospital, summer 1931. Assistant and Fellow in Psychology, Clark Uni- versity, 1932-34. Instructor in Psychology, Uni- versity of Nevada, 1934-35. Lecturer in Psy- chology, Sept. 1935. Instructor in Psychology and Education, M. S. C, 1935-36. Assistant Pro- fessor of Psychology, 1936- . Associate Member, American Psychological Association. Member, American Association for the Advancement of Science. Married. CHARLES JAMES ROHR, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of PoUtical Economy Born 1905. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1931. Instructor, University of Baltimore, 1929-30. Trinity College, 1930-36. University of Maine, 1936-37. Assistant Professor of Political Econ- omy, attached to Economics Department, M. S. C, 1937. Tax Policy League. Governmental Re- search Association. Administrative Assistant, Emergency Education Program, W. P. A., Con- necticut, 1936. Member sub-committee Connec- ticut Tercentenary Commission, 1935. Research Consultant to the Connecticut Commission on Reorganization of State Departments, 1935-36. Kappa Alpha. American Political Science Asso- ciation. Publications: " The Governor of Mary- land: A Constitutional Study " . HAROLD WILLIAM SMA RT, A.B. Assistant Professor of Law and Economics Born 1895. LL.B., Boston University, 1918. A.B., Amherst College, 1924. Special Instructor of Law, M. S. C, 1923. Part time Instructor Law and Sociology, 1923-26. Instructor Law, Sociology, Business English and Dramatics (SSA) 1926-36. Assistant Professor, Law, Public Speak- ing, Accounting. Dramatics, (SSA), 1936- . Phi Delta Phi, Woolsach, Delta Sigma Rho, Mes- guers. Kappa Epsilon, Adelphia. Married. FREDERICK SHERMAN TROY, M.A. Assistant Professor of EngUsh Bom 1909. B.S., M. S. C, 1931. M.A., Amherst College, 1935. Visiting instructor in English, Amherst College, 1936-37. Instructor in English, M. S. C, 1931-37. Assistant Professor of English, 1937- . Phi Kappa Phi. Single. CLYDE WALTON DOW, M.S. Instructor, Department of Languages and Literature Born 1907. B.L.I., Emerson College, 1931. M.S., M. S. C, 1935-37. Boston University, 1937-38. Graduate Assistant, M. S. C, Department of Languages and Literature, 1935-37. Instructor, Department of Languages and Literature, 1937- . National Association of Teachers of Speech. National Association of Speakers Clubs. Phi Alpha Tau. Married. [35] yiocCaE iP cLencei. DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES CHARLES NELSON DUBOIS, M.A. Instructor in English Born 1910. A.B., Middlebury College, 1934. Diploma in English Language and Literature, University of London, 1935. M.A., Middlebury College, 1935. Previously employed: New Hampton School, New Hampton, N. H., 1935-37. Assistant to Dean, Bread Loaf School of English, summers 1933-37. Instructor in English, M. S. C, 1937- . Phi Beta Kappa, Kappa Delta Rho, Kappa Phi Kappa, Pi Delta Epsilon. Married. FREDERICK CHARLES ELLERT, B.S. Instructor in German Born 1905. B.S., M. S. C, 1930. Further study: University of Heidelberg, summer 1930. Mid- dlebury College, summer 1933. Amherst College, 1930-31. Columbia University, summer 1935. Instructor in German, M. S. C, 1930- . Adelphia. Married. VERNON PARKER HELMING, Ph.D. Instructor in English Born 1904. A.B., Carleton College. Northfield, Minn., 1925. Ph.D., Yale University, 1928-32. Instructor, The American University of Beirut. Syria, 1925-28. Knox College, 1932-33. In- structor in English, M. S. C, 1933- . Phi Beta Kappa. Modern Language Association. Married. LEONTA GERTRUDE HORRIGAN, B.S. Instructor in Enghsh Born 1914. B.S., M.S.C., 1936. Instructor of English, M. S. C, 1936- . Phi Kappa Phi. Single. RUSSELL CARPENTER LARCOM Ph.D. Instructor in Economics Born 1903. A.B., Harvard College, 1925. M.B.A., Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration, 1928. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1937. Instructor, Lake Forest College, Kenyon College. R. L. Day and Company, Bos- ton. Instructor of Economics, M. S. C, 1935- . Member American Economics Association. Married. C. COLLIS LYLE, JR., M.A. Instructor in German Born 1912. A.B., Cornell University, 1933. M.A., Cornell University, 1934. University of Munich, summer 1936. Instructor in German, M. S. C, 1935- . Single. ALBERT WILLIAM PURVIS, Ed.M. Instructor in Education Born 1903. A.B., University of New Bruns- wick, Canada, 1931. Ed.M., Harvard University, 1935. Principal of Secondary Schools, 5 years, New Brunswick. Teacher in iTunior High School, 1 year. New Bininswick. Teacher in Normal College, 1 year, Nova Scotia. Instructor in Education, M. S. C, 1936- . Single. FRANK BURTON STRATTON, M.M. Instructor in Music Bom 1908. B.S., M. I. T., 1929. M.M., Eastman School of Music, 1930-33. Instructor, Phillips Academy, Andover, 1934. Instructor in Music, M. S. C, 1934- . Phi Sigma Kappa. Married. JOHN PAUL WILLIAMS, Ph.D. Director of Rehgious Education Born 1900. A.B., Baker University, 1922. B.D., Garrett Biblical Institute, University of Chicago, 1925. Ph.D., Columbia University, 1937. Pre- vious employment: Wesley Foundation, Urbana, Illinois. Park Avenue Baptist Church, N. Y. C, Director of Religious Education, M. S. C, 1928- . Kappa Sigma, Pi Kappa Delta, Phi Delta Kappa. Fellow National Carnival on Religion in Higher Education. President Association of College Pastors Eastern Section. Married. [36] ' PAi Ucui Sducatian CURRY S. HICKS Head of Division s o r. r ■■7)_ o Mi i i Sk u ' = ' i[Mi i t L .L Si iK I I flTTH m Front Row: Fngard, Miss Blatchford, Dr. Thoroman, Miss Callahan, Dr, Radcliffe. Second Row; Gore, Boll, Briggs, Derby, Gricius, Rogers, Caraway. DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION CURRY S. HICKS, M.Ed. Professor of Physical Education and Head of the Division of Physical Education Bom 1885. Michigan Agricultural College, 1902-03. B.Ed., Michigan State Normal College, 1909. Edward Hitchcock Fellow in Physical Education, Amherst, 1909-10. M.Ed., Michigan State Normal College, 1924. Assistant in Physical Education, Michigan State Normal College, 1908-09. Director of Athletics, Michigan State Normal College, 1910-11. Assistant Professor in Physical Education and Hygiene, M. A. C , 1911-14. Associate Professor, 1914-16. Professor, 1916- . Head of the Division, M. S. C, 1935- . Married. HAROLD MARTIN GORE, B.S. Professor of Physical Education and Head of the Department of Physical Education for Men Born 1891. B.S.. Massachusetts State College, 1913. Studied further: Harvard University, 1916. Assistant in Physical Education, M. S. C, 1913-16. Assistant Professor of Physical Education, 1917-26. Professor of Physical Education, 1926- . Head of the Department of Physical Education for Men, 1935- . Q. T. V., Adelphia. Married. ELBERT FRANCIS CARAWAY, B. S. of A. Professor of Physical Education Bom 1905. B. S. of A., Purdue University, 1930. Studied further: Purdue University. 1931-32. M. S. C, 1937. Assistant Coach, Purdue Uni- versity, 1931-32. Coach, Edinburg High School, 1932-33. Coach, Lehigh University, 1933-36. Professor of Physical Education, Head Coach, Football, Baseball, M. S. C, 1936- . Lambda Chi Alpha. Married. ERNEST JAMES RADCLIFFE, M.D. Professor of Hygiene; Head of Department of Student Health Born 1898. M.D., University of Toronto, 1923. Rome, Ga., in practice. Professor of Hygiene and Student Health Officer, M. S. C, 1930- . Phi Rho Sigma, Medical fraternity. Served three years in Canadian Field Artillery during the war. Married. LAWRENCE ELLIOT BRIGGS, B.S. Assistant Professor of Physical Education Bom 1903. B.S., M. S. C, 1927. Springfield College Summer School, 1927. Boston University Extension Courses, 1932. Instructor in Physical Education, M. S. C, 1927-36. Assistant Professor of Physical Education, 1936- . Secretary- Treasurer, Western Mass. Basketball Coaches Club. Theta Chi. Varsity Club. Member of Board of Directors, United States Eastern Amateur Ski Association, 1937. Chairman, Com- mittee to Draw up Unit plans Skiing and Skating for Public Schools of Mass., 1937. Secretary, W. M. W. S. C, 1937. Chairman National Junior Skiing Committee of National Ski Association, 1937. Single. LLEWELLYN LIGHT DERBY Assistant Professor of Physical Education Bom 1893. Unclassified Student, M. S. C, 1915-16. Assistant in Physical Education, 1916-17. U. S. Army, 1917-19. Returned as Instructor in Physical Education, 1919-20. Varsity, Freshman and S. S. A. Coach of Track, 1921- . Harvard Summer School in Physical Education, 1921. Springfield Summer School of Physical Educa- tion, 1925 and 1930. University of Illinois Sum- mer School of Physical Education, 1926. M. S. C, Summer School, 1931. Assistant Professor of Physical Education, 1927. Secretary-Treasurer, Eastern Inter- collegiate Athletic Association, 1926- . Recreation Director, M. S. C, Summer School, 1935- . Member Advisory Committee, New England Inter-collegiate Amateur Athletic Association, 1932-35. Member, Association of College Track Coaches of America. Member, National Collegiate Track Coaches Association. Married. [37] ' P.Pu CcaC SducaUati DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION MARGARET REBECCA THOROMAN, M.D. Assistant Professor of Hygiene Bom 1901. R.N., Methodist Hospital, Indian- apolis, 1925. A.B., Indiana University, 1932, M.D., Indiana University, 1935. Studied further; Indiana State Teacher ' s College, 1919-22. Bel- mont Hospital, Worcester, Mass. Assistant Pro- fessor Hygiene, M. S. C, 1937- . Nu Sigma Phi. Single. ETHEL WINIFRED BLATCHFORD, B.S. Physical Director for Women Born 1910. Posse-Nissen School of Physical Education, 1929. B.S., Massachusetts State Col- lege, 1934. Recreational therapist — Taunton State Hospital, 1929-30. Instructor of Physical Education, M. S. C, 1934-37. Physical Director for Women, M. S. C, 1937- . Delta Psi Kappa. Single. LORIN BALL, B.S. Instructor in Physical Education Born 1898. B.S., M. S. C, 1921. Superior (Wisconsin) Coaching School, 1924. Attended University of Wisconsin Summer School, 1923. Director of Stockbridge School Athletics and Coach of Stpckbridge School Football and Bas- ketball, 1925- . Coach of Freshm.an Basketball, 1921-25. Coach of Freshman Baseball, 1922-24. Senior Leader, Camp Najerog for Boys, 1924- . Coach of Varsity Baseball, 1925-31. Coach of Varsity Hockey, 1925- . Instructor in Physical Education, 1925- . Treasurer, Western Massa- chusetts Boaid of Approved Basketball Officials, 1924-25; President, 1930-33. Varsitv Club. Q. T. V. Single. KATHLEEN CALLAHAN, A.B. Instructor of Physical Education for Women Born 1910. A.B., West Virginia University, 1929. Certificate of Hygiene and P. E., Wellesley College, 1931. Studied futher; Chalif ' s, New York City, N. Y., 1932. Bennington Summer School of the Dance, 1935. Instructor, Florida State College for Women, 1931-33. Instructor, Radcliffe College, 1934-37. Instructor of Physical Education for Women, M. S. C, 1937- . Orchesis, Chi Omega, Boston Board of Officials. Single. WILHO FRIGARD, B.S. Instructor in Physical Education Born 1912. B.S., M. S. C, 1934. Instructor of Physical Education, Coach of Varsity Basket- ball, Assistant Coach of Varsity Football and Baseball, 1936- . Phi Kappa Phi, Adelphia, Lambda Chi Alpha. Married. SIDNEY W. KAUFFMAN, M.Ed. Instructor of Physical Education Bom 1904. B.S., Springfield College, 1931. M.Ed., Springfield College, 1934. Director of Health and Physical Education, Public Schools, Wiconisco, Penn. Director of Health and Physical Education, Public Schools, Newport, Vt. In- structor of Physical Education, M. S. C, 1935- . Married. JOSEPH RICHARD ROGERS, JR. Instructor of Physical Education Bom 1906. Worcester Poltyechnic Institute, 1926-30. Metropolitan District Water Supiply Commission. Instructor of Physical Education, M. S. C, 1931- . A. S. M. E. MaiTied. [38] yjuutoAi Conner Aplmgton Stewart DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS HORACE THURBER APLINGTON Lieutenant Colonel, Cavalry, U. S. A. Professor of Military Science and Tactics, and Head of the Department Born 1886. A.B., Columbia University, 1907. Second Lieutenant, U. S. A., 1911; First Lieu- tenant, 1916; Captain, 1917; Major, 1920; Lieu- tenant Colonel, 1935. Graduate Cavalry School, Advanced Course, 1923. Command and General Staff School, 1924. General Staff Corps Eligible List. Professor of Military Science and Tactics, M. S. C, 1935- . Delta Psi. General Staff Corps Eligible List. Graduate of Ordnance School, 1925; Cavalry School, 1927; Command and General Staff School, 1936. As- sistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics, M. S. C, 1936- . FRANK CRONK Staff Sergeant, U. S. A. Instructor in Military Born 1894. Enhsted, 1914. Corporal, 1915; Sergeant, 1916; Staff Sergeant, 1937. Instructor in Military, M. S. C, 1921- . LEO BUFFINGTON CONNER Major, Cavalry, U. S. A. Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics Bom 1894. B.S., United States Military Aca- demy, 1917. First Lieutenant, 1917; Captain, 1920; Major, 1936. Graduate Troop Officers ' Course, U. S. Cavalry School, 1917. Graduate U. S. Infantry School, Advanced Course, 1931. Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics, M. S. C, 1935- . HAROLD PAUL STEWART Major, Cavalry, U. S. A. Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics Born 1893. Second Lieutenant, 1917; First Lieutenant, 1919; Captain, 1921; Major, 1937. ROY TANNER Staff Sergeant, U.S.A. Instructor in Military Born 1885. Enlisted 1908. Corporal, 1912; Ser- geant, 1914; Sergeant First Class, Quartermaster Corps, 1915; Staff Sergeant, 1937. Instructor in Military, M. S. C, 1930- . JAMES A. WARREN Master Sergeant, U. S. A. (Major, Cavalry-Reserve) Instructor in Military Born 1884. Private, Corporal, Cavalry U. S. A., 1901-04. Private, Corporal and Sergeant, Cav- alry U. S. A., 1910-17. Captain and Major, Field Artillery, 1917-20. A. E. F. in 1918-19. Master Sergeant, 1937. Instructor in Military, M. S. C, 1921- . [39] In Memoriam WILLIAM PENN BROOKS, Ph.D. Born — November 19, 1851 Died — March 8, 1938 [40] WILLIAM PENN BROOKS The career of Dr. William Penn Brooks is suggestively the story of the Massachu- setts Agricultural College. Tenth of a good old New England family of eleven children and having both studied and taught in the public schools, he came up to college, belatedly by a couple of terms, as a member of the Class of ' 75. Those were the pioneer days of President Colonel Clark. Brooks and Clark were of the kind of men who inspire each other. They did. There is significance in the following story: Brooks had been collecting data in con- nection with a sap-running experiment which was later to elicit compliments from Louis Agassiz, and Clark interrogated him in the presence of a Legislative Committee, " So you can tell which trees will run freely and which will not? " " No, sir, " answered Brooks, " I can tell which trees hare run freely and which have not. " It was in 1873 that Brooks and five classmates brought into being the fraternity Phi Sigma Kappa, which at the present time has a roll of forty-five chapters. At a recent anniversai-y of the founding in the local chapter house the speaking program was as follows: National President Hamilton, Founder Brooks, his son-in-law George A. Drew, and his grandson, William Brooks Drew, the two Drews, together with his son Sumner Brooks, all being members of the parent chapter. Brooks followed his president to our scion college at Sapporo, Japan, and from 1877 to 1888 was there in residence as professor of agriculture and botany and for four years president ad interim. When he resigned this post he was decorated with the Fourth Order of the Rising Sun by the Emperor, and in 1919 he was recipient of the honorary degree Nogaka Hakushi by the Japanese Department of Education. The cherry trees on Farview Way are a lovely symbol of his decade in the Orient. Brooks came back to Amherst to take up pioneer work in agriculture under his old teacher, Hem-y H. Goodell. In connection with his professoi-ship of agriculture he acquired a doctorate magna cum laiide in Germany in 1897 and published a three volume textbook under the title Agriculture. As manager of the college farm he built the " new barn " on the present site. From 1905 to 1917 he was Director of the Massachusetts Experiment Station. For two years, 1905-06, he was President ad interim of the College. In 1921, at the age of seventy, he retired and was made professor-emeritus. Two years later Dr. Butterfield was to resign his presidency and the agricultural program as the dominant institutional policy was over. Thus Dr. Brooks came in with this program, accompanied it around the earth, and with it retired from active life. His sunset years have been as one would wish them. After the death of his first wife, Eva Bancroft Hall, he was again married, to Mrs. Grace L. Holden, who survives him. He sometimes wintered in Florida, but not until after he had given his Christ- mas party for the children on Farview Way. He had three great-grandchildren of his own now: Marcia and Cynthia, the daughters of William B. Di-ew; and Benjamin W. Drew, Jr. A liberal in religion he was none-the-less a zealous member of the Unity Church to the time of his death. In 1932 his Alma Mater conferred upon him an honorary Doctorate of Agriculture. At the age of eighty-four he flew to California, un- attended, to visit his son. Dr. Sumner C. Brooks at the State University. Throughout his life he was a forward-looking, scholarly, kindly and high-minded gentleman. This College is proud in his memory. [41] Thayer OFFICERS President, Harry D. Brown ' 14 Vice-President, Alden C. Brett ' 12 Secretary, William L. Doran ' 15 Treasurer, Clark L. Thayer ' 13 Assistant Secretary, George E. Emery ' 24 GEORGE E. EMERY THE ASSOCIATE ALUMNI Yesterdays at Massachusetts State College by Frank Prentice Rand is a fascinating, informal story which tells, in dramatic narrative, of the inception, growth, and develop- ment of our College from 1864 through 1933. The Associate Alumni engaged Professor Rand, in 1931, to write the book. In the fall of 1933, after nearly two years of careful reseai-ch, of editing and checking, the volume was ready for publication. Yesterdays received immediate and enthusiastic acclaim. Louis Lyons ' 18, writing in the Boston Globe, called the story " as exciting as a football game. " Dr. Joel E. Goldthwait ' 85 said, " I wish it might be used as a textbook in English, letting our students see, among other things, how much of poetry can be part of prose. " [42] A iuOJCJUxie. Ubmrrwi THE ASSOCIATE ALUMNI The publication and distribution of this history is but one of numerous projects which have been undertaken and carried to successful completion by the alumni organization. Alumni Field, Memorial Hall, the Physical Education Building were all planned and built through concerted, organized alumni effort. The Associate Alumni was founded in 1874, its object " to promote, in every proper way, the interests of the College, to foster among the graduates a sentiment of mutual regard, and to promote and strengthen their attachment to their Alma Mater. " To this day the organization has continued — with that object in view — as a helpful, vital influence in the history of Massachusetts State College. There is a Board of Directors composed of sixteen elected members who meet several times each year, with the other officers, to discuss and plan the work of the Associate Alumni. The Directors are. to 1938: to 1939: to 1940: to 1941: Eleanor Bateman ' 23 of Boston Joseph H. Forest ' 28 of Boston George C. Hubbard ' 99 of Sunderland Loring V. Tirrell ' 19 of Durham, N. H. Michael J. McNamara ' 17 of Hartford, Conn. David Potter ' 16 of Worcester Albert W. Smith ' 22 of Springfield Theoren L. Warner ' 08 of Sunderland Walter T. Bonney ' 31 of Springfield John J. Maginnis ' 18 of Worcester Lester Needham ' 14 of Springfield F. Civille Pray ' 06 of Amherst Richard J. Davis ' 28 of Boston Thomas P. Dooley ' 13 of West Roxbury George W. Edman ' 21 of Pittsfield Ralph F. Taber ' 16 of West Newton MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE ALUMNI CLUBS AND ASSOCIATIONS Massachusetts State College Club of Central and Northern California Chairman, Clifford F. Elwood ' 04 Massachusetts State College Club of Southern California Chairman, Clarence H. Griffin ' 04 Fairfield County (Conn.) Alumni Association of Massachusetts State College President, John A. Barri ' 75 Massachusetts State College Club of Hartford, Conn. Secretary, Peter J. Cascio ' 21 Massachusetts State College Club of New Haven, Conn. Chairman, Richard W. Smith ' 17 [43] MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE ALUMNI CLUBS AND ASSOCIATIONS Massachusetts State College Alumni Association of Washington, D. C. Secretary, Irene L. Bartlett ' 29 Massachusetts State College Club of Florida Chairman, Myron G. Murray ' 22 Massachusetts State College Western Alumni Association, Chicago, 111. President, Walter A. Mack ' 17 Massachusetts State College Alumni Club of Boston President, Thomas P. Dooley ' 13 Secretary, Charles B. Cox ' 30 Massachusetts State College Club of Middlesex County, Mass. President, Harry D. Brown ' 14 Massachusetts State College Club of Essex County, Mass. Secretary, Oliver R. Putnam ' 36 Franklin County Massachusetts State College Alumni Association President, George Fuller ' 14 Massachusetts State College Alumni Association of Southeastern Mass. Chairman, Erford W. Poole ' 96 Massachusetts State College Club of Hampden County, Mass. President, Ralph S. Stedman ' 20 Massachusetts State College Club of Worcester County, Mass. President, Robert J. Allen, Jr. ' 35 Massachusetts State College Club of New Brunswick, New Jersey Secretary, Lyman G. Schermerhorn ' 10 Massachusetts State College Club of Central New York President, Ellsworth Wheeler ' 26 Massachusetts State College Club of New York City President, Thomas L. Harrocks ' 16 Secretary, Walter C. Paige ' 91 Massachusetts State College Club of Cleveland, Ohio President, Henry F. Staples " 93 Central Ohio Alumni Club of Massachusetts State College, Columbus, Ohio President, Murray D. Lincoln ' 14 Massachusetts State College Club of Philadelphia, Pa. Chairman, Thomas J. Gasser ' 19 Massachusetts State College Club of State College, Pa. Secretary, Harlan N. Worthley ' 18 Massachusetts State College Club of Providence, Rhode Island President, Willis S. Fisher ' 98 Maine Alumni Club of Massachusetts State College Secretary, Albion Ricker ' 28 San Joaquin Alumni Club, Fresno, California Chairman, Perez Simmons " 16 The word " Alumni " is commonly unde rstood to refer to both men and women graduates of Massachusetts State College. Both Alumni and Alumnae are members of the previously-named clubs and associations, and attend the meetings. However, for social purposes, Alumnae have formed the following local groups. These Alumnae Clubs bear the same relation to the Associate Alumni as do the Alumni Clubs. Essex County Alumnae Club Chainnan, Aimee Geiger Bennett " 24 Plymouth and Barnstable County Alumnae Club Chairman, Ruth Faulk ' 29 Hampshire County Alumnae Club Chairman, Mary E. Garvey ' 19 Franklin County Alumnae Club Chairman, Ruth Flint Gay ' 24 Middlesex County Alumnae Club Chairman, Ruth Hurder Howe ' 22 Suffolk County Alumnae Club Chairman, Gertrude Maylott Tomfohrde ' 30 New York Alumnae Club Chairman, Pauline Spiewak ' 31 Hampden County Alumnae Club Chairman, Ruth Stone Shaine ' 30 Worcester County Alumnae Club Chairman, Zoe Hickney White ' 32 {44] SAaduate MioaC GRADUATE SCHOOL 1937-1938 V AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS Alfred A. Brown, B.S., M.S. William Kling, B.S.S. Raymond Pellessier, B. S. William F. Buck, B.S. Malcolm S. Butler, B.S. Ellen R. Connery, B.S. J. Elizabeth Donley, A.B., M.S. Joseph T. Elvove, B.S., M.A. Joseph F. Hauck, B.S., M.S. WiUiam H. Booth, B.S. Walter S. Colvin, B.S. H. Robert DeRose, B.S., M.S. Raymond B. Farnsworth, B.S. Louis W. Ilgen, B.S., M.S. Daniel C. Plastridge, B.S., M.S. Philip B. Shiff, B.S. Chester W. Smith, B.S., M.S. Robert C. Tetro, B.S., M.S. AGRONOMY Benjamin Isgur, B.S., M.S. Elfriede Klaucke, B.S. Karol Kucinski, B.S., M.S. John M. Zak, B.S. ANIMAL HUSBANDRY Carl Eraser, B.S., M.S. BACTERIOLOGY Amedeo Bondi, B.S., M.S. Ernest R. Higgins, B.S. Kenneth L. Bullis, D.V.M. Guy R. Vitaghano, B.S. George S. Congdon, B.S., M.S. Frederick J. Wishart, B.S. Robert H. Guiberson, B.S. BOTANY Marguerite Bourgeois, B.S.. M.S. Chester E. Cross, B.S., M.S. Herbert Goodell, B.S. Irene Goodell, B.S. Walter H. Hodge, A.B., M.S. Eunice M. Johnson, B.S., M.S. John R. Wood, A.B. [45} 9Aaduate iP.cko-ot CHEMISTRY Chester I. Babcock, Jr., B.S. Ruth M. Barlow, B.A. Abraham H. Belsky, B.A. CorneUus K. Cain, B.S., M.S. John Calvi, B.S., M.S. Robert A. Caughey, B.S., M.S. Mary A. Cawley, B.S. George C. Crooks, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. Emery A. Emerson, B.S. Myron Kollen, A.B. G. Harry Lewis, B.S. Robert S. Meyer, A.B. Alfred E. Newton, B.S., M.S. George E. O ' Brien, B.S. George E. Pease, B.S., M.S. George R. Richason, B.S. Nelson P. Stevens, B.S., M.S. Stuart P. Stiles, B.A. Enoch F. Story, B.S., M.S. Sidney Wilhams, B.S. Stanley M. Freedman, B.S. Herbert Jenkins, B.S., M.S. Leo D. Lipman, B.S. Oscar Margolin, B.S. Marguerite Bicknell, B.A. Ruth Blassberg, B.S. DAIRY INDUSTRY Thomas J. Savaria, B.S., M.S. Alphonse Savoie, B.S. Myron A. Widland, B.S. Thaddeus M. Yonika, B.S. ECONOMICS M.S. Gordon B. Dennis, B.S., M.S. ENTOMOLOGY William B. Becker, B.S., M.S. Vernon A. V. Bell, B.S. Herman Broudy, B.S., M.S. Harry Gouch, B.S., M.S. John F. Hanson, B.S. Richard Holway, A.B., M.S. Walter M. Kulash, B.S. George E. Nettleton, B.S., M.S. Harry D. Pratt, B.S. Miriam Shaw, B.S., M.S. Frederick J. Spruijt, M.S. Philip C. Stone, B.S., M.S. William E. Tomlinson, B.S. Frederick W. Whittemore, B.S. EDUCATION Eleanor Ackerman, B.S.E. John E. Avery, B.S.E. Irving D. Baker, A.B. Harry A. Barnicle, B.S.E., M.S. Lewis W. Bartlett, B.S. Doris Beaudreault, B.S.E. George Bernique, B.A., M.S. Roger G. Bertrand, A.B. Jennie P. Blaisde ll, B.S.E. Walter E. Bohman, B.S.E. Grace L. Boyden, B.S.E. Alfred A. Bracy, B.S. Lawrence D. Brady, B.E.S. Edward J. Burke, B.S. Louis J. Bush, B.S. Paul J. Cadrin, B.S. Milton W. Cannon, B.A. Calton O. Cartwright, B.S., M PhylUs R. Chambers, B.S. S. Wilham J. Clancy, A.B. George A. Cooley, B.S. Laura G. Cooley, B.S. Thomas F. Coughlin, C.E., M.S. Ulmont C. Cowing, B.S. Francis J. Crane, B.A. Mary M. Crowley, B.S.E. Eugene K. Currie, A.B. Henry A. Czelusniack, A.B. Frederick T. Dacey, B.S.E. Robert L. Deady, B.S.E. Clyde W. Dow, B.L.I., M.S. Roy Dunkerly, B.S. Martin J. Eai ' ls, A.B. Helen ElHs, A.B. Philip Ely, A.B. Mary A. Fleming, B.S.E. Anna A. Flynn, B.S. Wilho Frigard, B.S. [46] 9Aaduute Mioai James F. Gallant, B.S., M.S. Alfred F. Gay, B.S. Edward K. Gleason, B.S. Cleo R. Goderre, B.S. Albert J. Gricius, B.S. Margaret B. Hartt, B.S.E. Helen M. Hawley, B.S.E. Eleanor W. Healy, A.B. George E. Higgins, B.S.E. Louise A. Hopkins, B.A. Catherine N. Hubbard, B.S. Richard Hubbard, B.S. Harold C. Hurley, B.S. Raymond N. Jenness, B.S.E. John R. Kallock, B.P.E. Florence J. Kane, B.S.E. Mary C. Kane, B.S. James Karr, Jr., B.S. Emil E. Keiler, B.S.E. Isaac Klein, B.S., M.S. Thomas K. Klein, A.B. Richard C. Kopp, B.A. Thomas B. Landers, Ph.D. Clarence J. Larkin, B.A. Lester H. Levine, B.S., M.S. Madehne H. Lincoln, B.S. Roger N. Lincoln, A.B. Harold E. Lynch, A.B. Melvin A. Lynch, B.S.E. Edward Martin, B.S. Walter F. McAndrews, B.S.E. Edward Meyer, B.L.I., M.S. Raymond A. Minzner, B.S. Carroll P. Moore, B.S., M.S. Gilbert Muir, B.S. Gerald T. Murphy, LL.B. Dorothea M. Nagle, B.S.E. M.S. Samuel Neuman, B.S., M.S. M. Josephine O ' Brien, A.B. Katherine M. O ' Donnell, B.S.E. Ralph W. O ' Rourke, B.S.E. Marian L. Perry, B.S.E. Dorothy Pierce, B.S.E. Edward P. Ponte, B.S.E. Ruth Pushee, B.S., M.S. Richard W. Reay, A.B. Phillip Robinson, B.S. Jeanette M. Roney, B.A., M.S. Grattan Rooney, B.A. Hyman Rosnick, B.S. George E. Russell, B.A. Robert T. Sartwell, B.S. Florence Saulnier, B.S. Glen F. Scrivnor, B.P.E. GUve Smith, B.S.E. Peter G. Staszko, A.B. Lilhan E. St. Clair, B.S.E. Calton M. Stearns, B.S., M.S. R. Moore Stelle, A.B., M.S. John B. Sullivan, A.B. Stanley A. Sydla, B.A. Harry E. Tatoian, B.A. Vernon A. Tetreault, A.B. Carroll E. Thayer, B.S. Howard Thomas, B.S., M.S. Mrs. William H. Tufts, B.S. WiUiam H. Tufts, B.S. Walter S. Utley, B.S. Donald M. Vaughn, B.P.E. Eric C. Vendt, B.S. Roger Warner, B.S. Edward J. Whalen, B.S.E. Richai-d A. Wilkinson, B.S.E. Frank W. Yeaw, B.M., B.A. Elmer H. Allen, B.S. FLORICULTURE Robert F. Stevens, B.S. FOOD TECHNOLOGY Domenic DeFelice, B.S., M.S. Augustino C. D ' Ercole, B.A., M.S. Carl F. Dunker, B.S., M.S. William B. Esselen, Jr., B.S., M.S. Myer Glickstein, B.S., M.S. Edward W. Harvey, B.S., M.S. Arthur S. Levine, B.S., M.S. Mary E. Lyons, B.S.E., M.A. Walter A. Maclinn, B.S., M.S. William S. Mueller, B.S., M.S. Julius Novick, B.S., M.S. {47} 9Aaduate i£cAo-o.C Julia B. Austin, A.B. Ward N. Boylston, A.B. Harry D. Gafney, B.S. Herman Goodell, B.S. Constance Hall, B.S. Elizabeth W. Baker, B.S. Mildred F. Goldfaden, B.A. Elizabeth W. Hager, B.S. HISTORY-SOCIOLOGY Irene Jefferson, B.S. Katherine G. Keefe, B.A. Chester W. Osgood, B.A., M.A. Francis C. Pray, B.S., M.S. HOME ECONOMICS Caribel F. Morton, A.B. Katherine L. O ' Brien, B.S. Arnold M. Davis, B.S. HORTICULTURE Rudolph Monosmith, B.S., B.L.A. HORTICULTURAL MANUFACTURES John W. Bernotovicz, B.S., M.S. Sylvester C. Mitchell, B.A. Lavada Curtis, B.S. Charles W. Morrison, A.B. Harlan A. Howard, B.S. Kenneth R. Newman, B.S., M.S. Abraham Kobren, B.S. Hem-y Kushlan, B.S. Ernest M. Mills, B.S. Abraham Mindell, B.S. Robert B. Clark, B.S. Kenneth F. Fales, B.S. Murray W. George, B.S. Carl S. Gerlach, B.S., B.L.A. Howard Gilbertson, A.B. Dean N. Ghck, B.S., B.L.A. Kenneth R. Higgins, B.S. Frank P. Goulding, B.S. Ohver C. Roberts, B.S. Edwin F. Poland, B.S. John Ruffley, Jr., B.S. Kevin G. Shea, B.A., M.S. Philip N. Simon, B.S. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Charles Krtil, B.S. Charles E. Meyers, B.S., B.L.A. Walter H. Nickens, B.S. Henry M. Renfro, B.S. Louis E. Roberts, B.S. Robert W. Thorndike, B.S. Emil J. Tramposch, B.S. POMOLOGY Lawrence Southwick, B.S. Max E. Turner, B.S. Albert B. Landis, B.S. POULTRY SCIENCE Arthur C. Richardson, B.S. Roland F. Becker, B.S., M.S. Thomas J. Callahan, B.S. Angelo F. DeAngelus, B.S. Louis M. DiCarlo, B.A., M.S. Calvin S. Hannum, B.S. Ralph A. Arnold, B.S. Phyllis Baker, B.A. Lucille C. Brouillet, B.S. Lorimer H. Brown, B.S. Sophia V. Butkevitch, B.S.E. Mary G. Diaz, B.S.E. Charles E. Eshbach, B.S. Charles E. Foth, B.A., M.A. Robert D. Hawley, B.S. Leslie M. Kelly, B.S.E. PSYCHOLOGY Margaret M. Josko, B.S.E. Francis C. Ollry, A.B. Ruth E. Scott, B.S. William H. Torno, B.S.E. UNCLASSIFIED George Marston, B.S., M.S. Dorothy E. McQuestion, A.B. Helen F. O ' Leary, B.S. Lillian M. Prendergast, A.B. Beatrice F. Seager, B.S.E. Stewart Seass, B.A., M.A. Jessie E. Stacy, B.S., M.A. Tabea C. Sweinberger, B.A. Eleanor A. West, B.S. [48} M jc A H| B " " E M M H ' . 4 • i u etcvid c4 1938 PRESIDENT Herbert E. Brown VICE-PRESIDENT Ruth E. Wood SERGEANT-AT-ARMS Frederick C. Riel 6.tal6. a yiitteie£.tt Hundred ClfuAt( -£L fvt Four short years ago, a group of neo- phytes arrived on the State campus amidst a veritable flood. Although rather disappointed in our first impression of the muddy net-work of entrenchments criss-crossing the campus, we soon be- came acclimated to our environment and attached to it. During our first few weeks, we became acquainted with our fellow classmen, electing the following as offi- cers: Francis Riel, President; Ruth Wood, Vice-President; Jessie Kinsman, Secre- tary; Frederick Sievers, Treasurer; David Mildram, Class Captain; Jack Slocomb, Sergeant-at-Arms. Class spirit was strong from the beginning so that when the traditional clashes came with our rivals, the class of ' 37, we were not outdone. Victory came to us in the events of Razoo Night, Freshman-Sophomore field day, soccer, football, and basketball. Our only defeat was in the rope pull. Though a few of our members found the final exams really final, the majority of the class of ' 38 survived to emerge as sophomores in the fall. And now it was our turn to show our ability in class rivalry. But our super- iority proved to be in age alone, for we were defeated by our " inferiors " in the majority of athletic events. We proved to be men of brains, not brawn. To the class offices, we elected Francis Riel, President; Ruth Wood, Vice-President; Jessie Kinsman, Secretary; Frederick Sievers, Treasurer; David Mildram, Class Captain; and Frederick Riel, Sergeant-at- Arms. Later, due to the withdrawal of our first two officers, we elected Herbert Brown and Elthea Thompson to fill these vacancies. In the Burnham Declamation contest, the class of thirty-eight shone — thanks to John Hoar and Frank Brox, who won first and second places respec- tively. The Sophomore-Senior Hop came as a fitting climax to the achievements of our second year in college. Due to the success of the dance, our future position of prominence in social life on the campus was guaranteed. [52] aM. c4 1938 TREASURER Frederick J. Sievers SECRETARY Jessie Kinsman CAPTAIN David E. Mildram GtoM. 0 LCfxeleen Himd td OJ uAhj -Eiqlhi Our junior year was successful, though unmarked by outstanding events. Class officers that year were Herbert Brown, President; Ruth Wood, Vice-President; Frederick Sievers, Treasurer; Jessie Kins- man, Secretary; David Mildram, Class Captain; and Frederick Riel, Sergeant-at- Arms. Members of the class achieved honors by elections to Adelphia, Honor Council, and Senate, as well as to leader- ship in other outstanding college activ- ities. Evolving from freshmen to stately seniors, the class began its final year with the spirit and zeal typical of a well- balanced group of students anxious to cooperate in academic, athletic and social activities for the ultimate benefit both of the College and of itself. In the fall of the year, through the medium of Adelphia, the senior class stirred up college spirit in the form of several successful football rallies. Mean- while, the Senate leaders continued to mold student life and to guide student government along the proper course. Naturally enough, all of the College athletic teams were headed and supported by many hard-working members of the class of 1938. As for social life, seniors did much to make this phase of college life successful by planning, attending, and enjoying the dances and Social Union programs as well as other forms of entertainment. Scholastic development was by no means neglected, as shown by the fact that almost 250 students are to be gradu- ated in June, several of whom were elected to the honor society. Phi Kappa Phi. The day rapidly approaches when we will leave behind four years of memories and will carry away with us the experi- ence and the culture that was granted to us not only by twenty odd years of time but by four glorious years at Massa- chusetts State College. [53] Crawford William Adams 65 Leyfred Terrace, Springfield, Mass. Born 1915 at Springfield. Graduate Classical High School. Major in Pre-Medical. Newman Club, 2, 3, 4. Carnival Comm., 2 (Secretary), 3 ( Vice-Chairman) , 4 (Chairman). Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4. Psychology Club, 4. Soccer, 2, 3 (M), 4 (M). Swimming, 1. Hockey, 2 (M). Spring Track, 2, 3 (M), 4. Baseball, 1. Robert Edward Alcorn 69 Hampden Street, West Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at West Springfield. Graduate West Springfield High School. Major in Mathematics. Wes- ley Foundation, 4. Mathematics Club, 2, 3, 4. Cross- country, 1. Spring Track, 1, 2. Winter Track, 1, 2. Alpha Gamma Rho (Chaplain, 3, 4. House Manager and Treasurer, 4.) Royal Phillip Allaire 26 Dickinson Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1915 at Northampton. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Mathematics. Radio Club, 3. Mathematics CIuId, 1, 2, 3, 4. Senior Nominating Committee, 4. Q. T. V. Marshall Bigelow Allen Wheeler Avenue, North Grafton, Mass. Born 1915 at Worcester. Graduate Mount Hermon School. Major in Economics. Informal Comm. 4. Military Ball Comm., 4. Interfraternity Ball Comm., 3, 4. Rifle Team, 1, 2, 3, 4. Football, 1. Swimming, 1. Advanced Military, 3, 4. Interiraternity Council, 3, 4. Theta Chi (Social Chairman, 2, 3. Marshal, 3. President, 3.) [54] QioiA c4 1938 Philip Brigham Anderson Wayside Inn Road, Framingham, Mass. Born 1914 at Belmont. Graduate Framingham High School. Major in History. Cross-Country, 1, 2. Spring Track, 2. Winter Track, 1. Alpha Sigma Phi (House Manager, 4.) Rexford Hanson Avery 1 1 taring Street, Shrewsbury, Mass. Born 1916 at Worcester. Graduate Worcester Academy. Major in Economics. Maroon Key, 2. Carnival Ball Comm., 2. Theta Chi (Secretary, 3, 4.) William Blodgett Avery Shelburne Falls, Mass. Born 1917 at Charlemont. Graduate Ai-ms Academy Major in Animal Husbandry. Orchestra, 1, 2. Band, 1, 2, 3. Christian Federation, 1, 2. Outing Club, 1, 2. Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 4-H Club, 1, 2. Dairy Cattle Judging Team, ' 36. General Livestock Judging Team, ' 37. M. S. C. Meats Judging Team, ' 37. Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M). Baseball, 1, 2, 3. Advanced Mihtary, 3, 4. Sigma Phi Epsilon (President, ' 38). Warren Sears Baker, Jr. Spring Street, Hanson, Mass. Born 1917 at Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Graduate Whitman High School. Major in Chemistry. Ad- vanced Military, 3, 4. Q. T. V. (Treasurer, 1935-1938). [55] Elinor Prescott Ball 19 Rockville Park, Roxbury, Mass. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate High School of Practical Arts. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. History-Sociology Club, 2, 3. John Frederick Bargfrede 60 Old Middletown Road, Pearl River, N. Y. Born 1916 at Pearl River. Graduate Pearl River High School. Major in Animal Husbandry. Outing Club, 1. Dairy Club, 1. Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Livestock Judging Team, 1937. Soccer, 1, 2. Baseball, 1. Sigma Phi Epsilon (Librarian, 4). Elizabeth Sherwood Barton Middle Street, South Amherst, Mass. Born 1916 at South Amherst. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 3, 4 (Class Representative). Phi Zeta. Richard Wallace Barton 51 Amity Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1916 at Providence, R. L Graduate Deerfield Academy. Major in Economics. Animal Husbandry Club, 4. Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4. C56] e£aii (4 1938 Davis Wortham Beaumont 51 Amity Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1917 at Amherst. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Chemistry. Physics Club, 3, 4. Radio Club, 3, 4. Chemistry Club, 3. Mathematics Club, 2, 3, 4. Cross-Country, 1, 2, 3 (M). Spring Track, 1, 2. Advanced Military, 3. 4. Edgar Sidney Beaumont 51 Amity Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1915 at Ithaca, N. Y. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Band, 1, 2, 3. Bay State Revue, 2. Horticultural Show Committee, 3, 4. Landscape Club, 2, 3, 4. Cross- Country, 1, 2 (M). Spring Track, 1, 2. Theta Chi. Marian Rose Becher 63 Pleasantview Avenue, Longmeadow, Moss. Born 1917 at South Hadley Falls. Graduate Classi- cal High School, Springfield, Mass. Major in Home Economics. W. S. G. A., 3 (Vice-Pres.), 4 (Pres.). Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3, 4. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3 (Vice-Pres.), 4. Mother ' s Day Tea, 3 (Chairman). 75th Anniversary Student Comm. Lambda Delta Mu (Vice-Pres., 3). Harry Louis Belgrade 10 Wilson Avenue, Northampton, Mass. Born 1914 at Easton, Penn. Graduate Bulkeley High School, New London, Conn. Major in English. [57] Mederic Howard Beloin 32 Elmwood Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1914 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Economics. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. Bay State Revue, 1, 2, 3. Newman Club, 3, 4 (Church Program Comm.). Psychology Club, 3. International Relations Club, 3, 4. Q. T. V. (Chaplain, 1935-37). Kenneth Ellis Benson 312 Washington Street, Winchester, Mass. Born 1916 at Winchester. Graduate Winchester High School. Major in Horticultural Manufactures. Horticultural Show Comm., 4 (Chairman Hort. Mfg. Comm.). Phihips Brooks Club, 2. 4-H Club, 1, 2 (Historian), 3, 4. Alpha Gamma Rho (Steward, 4). William Erving Bergman 30 Church Street, Shelburne Falls, Mass. Born 1916 at Laurinburg, North Carolina. Gradu- ate Arms Academy. Major in Chemistry. Bay State Revue, 3. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Football, 1. Phi Lambda Tau (Sergt.-at-Arms, 3. Vice-Chancellor, 4). Joseph Raymond Bianco 46 Quincy Street, North Adams, Mass. Born 1914 at North Adams. Graduate Drury High School, North Adams. Transfer Syracuse University. Major in History and Economics. Newman Club, 2, 3, 4. International Relations Club, 3. 4. L5S] eCaiA a| 1938 Edwin Alexander Bieniek 9 Ivy Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1915 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4. Mathematics Club, 4. Swimming, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M). Irving Binder 188 Walnut Avenue, Roxbury, Mass. Born 1916 at Somerville. Graduate Boston Latin School. Major in Pre-Med. Band, 1, 2. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Bay State Revue, 3. Pre-Med. Club, 3. Mathematics Club, 3. Cross-Country, 1. Inter- fraternity Council, 2, 3, 4. Phi Lambda Tau (Scribe, 2, 3. Chancellor, 4). Ruth Lydia Bixby Sunderland, Mass. Born 1916 at Sunderland. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in French. Index, 3 (Assistant Art Editor), 4 (Literary Editor). Sigma Beta Chi. Harry Linwood Blaisdell 57 Beacon Street, Greenfield, Mass. Born 1915 at Dedham. Graduate Greenfield High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Hort. Show Comm., 3. Outing Club, 1, 2, 3. Landscape Club, 2, 3 (Vice-Pres.), 4 (Pres.). Junior and Senior Nominating Comm. Interfraternity Ball Comm., 3, 4. Chairman of Program Comm. for Graduation, 4. Football, 1. Soccer, 2. Swimming, 2. Interfraternity Council, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-Pres.). Phi Sigma Kappa (Pres., 4). {59} Norman Perkins Blake 15 Wilson Avenue, Maiden, Mass. Born 1914 at Maiden. Graduate Maiden High; Bridgton Academy. Major in Economics. Student Senate, 4. Maroon Key, 2. Student Religious Council, 4 (Vice-Pres.). Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Pres.) Carnival Ball Comm., 2, 3. Sophomore-Senior Hop Comm., 2 (Chairman). Military Ball Comm., 4. Inter- class Athletic Board, 2. History-Sociology Club, 2. Football, 1. Hockey, 1. Baseball, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M). Advanced Military, 3, 4. Lambda Chi Alpha (Pres. 3-4). Earl Alfred Blomberg 97 Boutelle Street, Leominster, Mass. Born 1915 at Leominster. Graduate Leominstei ' High School. Major in Economics. Student Religious Council, 1. Outing Club, 1. Psychology Club, 4. Mathematics Club, 1. International Relations Club, 2, 3, 4. Honorable Mention for Leon A. Pond Mem- orial Award, 4. Football, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4 (M). Swim- ming, 1. Spring Track, 1, 4. Q. T. V. Esther Lillian Bloom 21 Allendale Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Graduate Classical High School. Transfer Springfield Junior College. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Glee Club, 2, 3. Menorah Club, 2, 3, 4. Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4. Phi Kappa Phi. Sigma Iota (Secretary, 3. Vice- Pres., 4). Fred William Bode 114 Market Street, Lawrence, Mass. Born 1915 at Lawrence. Graduate Lawrence High School. Major in Agricultural Economics. Dairy Club, 3. Mathematics Club, 1, 2. Cross-Country, 1, 2. Spring Track, 2. Baseball, 1. [60} eiud 4 1938 Carl John Bokina 7 Prospect Street, Hatfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Hatfield. Graduate Smith Academy, Hatfield. Major in Agricultural Economics. Psycho- logy Club, 3, 4. Inter-class Athletic Board, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary). Basketball, 2 (M). Winter Track, 2 (M), 3 (M). Alpha Sigma Phi (Marshal, 3). Stanley Milton Bozek 19 Franklin Street, Easthampton, Mass. Born 1915 at Hazleton, Pennsylvania. Graduate Easthampton High School. Major in Economics. Band, 2, 3, 4 (Drum Major 2, 3, 4). Music Record Club, 3, 4. Football, 1. _.:.r _ : _ Richard Irving Bray 388 Essex Avenue, Gloucester, Mass. Born 1916 at Gloucester. Graduate Gloucester High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Mathematics Club, 2, 3, 4. Cross-country, 1. Spring Track, 1. Warren Clarence Bray East Street, Granby, Mass. Born 1913 at Granby. Graduate South Hadley High School. Transfer Springfield College. Major in Economics. 4-H Club, 2, 3, 4, (Pres. 4). International Relations Club, 2, 3, 4. (President 3, 4). Model League of Nations, 1, 2, 3, 4. (Executive Comm. 3, 4). Delegate to Am. Country Life Conference, Michigan 1936, Kansas 1937 (Elected Vice-Pres.) Vice-Pres. New England Country Life Conference 1937. Swim- ming, 2. [61] Gilbert Dearborn Bristol Hampden Road, East Longmeadow, Mass. Born 1915 at Worcester. Graduate West Spring- field High School. Major in Pomology. Soccer, 1. Cross-country, 2. Spring Track, 2, 3. Alpha Gamma Rho (Vice-Pres. 3). Elinor Brown 7 Pleasant Street, Leicester, Mass. Born 1917 at North Adams. Graduate Leicester High School. Major in English. Honor Council 4. Women ' s Debating Team, 1, 2. Senior Nominating Comm. Intersorority Council, 3, 4 (Secretary-Treas. 3). Phi Kappa Phi. Lambda Delta Mu (Secretary 4). Herbert Earl Brown 98 Main Street, Ashland, Mass. Born 1914 at Attleboro. Graduate Ashland High School. Major in Economics. Adelphia, 4 (Presi- dent). Student Senate, 3, 4 (Vice-Pres.). Honor Council, 4. Maroon Key, 2. Class President, 2, 3, 4. Student Rehgious Council, 3. Newman Club, 2, 3, 4. Carnival Ball Comm., 2. Dad ' s Day Comm., 2, 3, 4. Sophomore-Senior Hop Comm., 2. Football, 2 (M), 3 (M). Baseball, 2. Advanced Mihtary, 3, 4. Lambda Chi Alpha. Frank Arthur Michael Brox 412 Broadway, Dracut, Mass. Born 1913 at Dracut. Graduate Lawrence High School. Major in English. Roister Doisters, 1, 2, 3, 4. Football, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M). Advanced Mihtary, 3, 4. [62} eioiA a(. 1938 William Augustine Bullock 35 Everett Street, Arlington, Mass. Bern 1914 at Cambridge. Graduate Arlington High School and Bridgton Academy. Major in History. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Football, 1, 3 (M), 4 (M). Hockey, 1, 3 (M), 4 (M) (Captain). Basket- ball, 1. Spring Track, 1. Baseball, 1. John George Bush 82 Fourth Street, Turners Falls, Mass. Born 1916 at Turners Falls. Graduate Turners Falls High School. Major in Education. Football, 1. Basketball, 1, 2 (M), 3, 4. Baseball, 1, 2 (M), 3, 4. Robert Daniel Buzzee 104 East Street, Easthampton, Mass. Born 1917 at Easthampton. Graduate Easthampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Dad ' s Day Comm., 3, 4. Chemistry Club, 4. Soccer, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). Winter Track, 1. Advanced Military, 3, 4. Interfraternity Council, 3, 4. (Secretary 3). Phi Kappa Phi. Kappa Sigma (Grand Scribe 4). Cynthia Ellen Carpenter Sterling Junction, Mass. Born 1916 at Auburn. Graduate Worcester North High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Women ' s Glee Club, 2, 3. Wesley Foundation, 2, 3, 4 (Secre- tary 2, Treasurer 3). Alpha Lambda Mu. [63] F. Fairfield Carr 32 Coolidge Road, West Medford, Mass. Born 1915 at Newtonville. Graduate Newton High School. Major in Economics. Index, 3. Cheer leader, 1. Football, 1. Swimming, 1. Hockey, 1. Advanced Military, 3, 4. Theta Chi. Edward Francis Caruso 15 Patton Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Graduate Springfield Classical High School. Transfer Springfield Junior College. Major in Pre-Med. Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 4. K John Bernard Casazza 1 Abbot Street, Merrimac, Mass Born 1915 at Merrimac. Graduate Merrimac High School. Transfer Norwich University. Major in Bacteriology. Newman Club, 3, 4. Bacteriology Club, 3, 4. Q. T. V. Arthur Daniel Casey 114 School Street, Franklin, Mass. Born 1913 at Franklin. Graduate Franklin High School and Dean Academy. Major in Economics. [64] e od c4 1938 Florence Mildred Cederberg 821 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. Born 1915 at Rockport. Graduate Boston Girl ' s Latin School. Christian Federation, 3, 4. Psychology Club, 4. International Relations Club, 2, 3, 4. Jessie Josephine Chose 81 Craiwell Avenue, West Springfield, Mass. Born 1913 at Fitzwilliam, New Hampshire. Gradu- ate West Springfield High School. Major in Home Economics. Outing Club, 1. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 4-H Club, 2, 3, 4. Alpha Lambda Mu, (Pledge Chairman 1935, House Chairman 1937-38, President 1937-38). Philip Botcheller Chose 44 Woshington Road, Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Pittsfield. Graduate Springfield Classical High School. Major in Pre-Med. Honor Council, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary 3, President 4). Christian Federation, 2, 3, 4. Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 4 (President 2, 3, 4). International Relations Club, 3. Swimming, 1, 2. Lambda Chi Alpha (Pledge trainer, 2. 3). Edward Theodore Clopp 20 Pine Street, Florence, Mass. Born 1916 at Northampton. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Orchestra, 1. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4. Music Record Club, 3. Chemistry Club, 4. [65] Norman Clark 107 Billings Street, Sharon, Mass. Born 1915 at Sharon. Graduate Sharon High School. Major in Mathematics. Roister Doisters, 2. Mathematics Club, 2, 3, 4. Joint Comm. on Inter- Collegiate Athletics, 3. Baseball, 3 (M) (Manager). Advanced Mihtary, 3, 4. S. A. E. (Warden, 4). Charles Wilson Collins 215 Forest Street, Medford, Mass. Born 1916 at Medford. Graduate Medford High School. Major in English. Football, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). William James Collins 24 Essex Street, Salem, Mass. Born 1913 at Salem. Graduate Salem High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Bay State Revue, 3, 4. Roister Doisters, 2, 3, 4. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-Pres., 4). Football, 1. Soccer, 2. Spring Track, 1. Q. T. V. (Vice-Pres., 3,4). Leon Winston Cone 314 North Main Street, North Brool field, Mass. Born 1914 at Worcester. Graduate North Brook- field High School. Major in History. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. International Relations Club, 3, 4. Foot- ball, 2, 3, 4 (M). Basketball, 1. Baseball, 1. Alpha Gamma Rho (Vice-Pres., 3, Pres., 4). [66] eioM, c4 1938 Gladys Martha Corkum 30 Lincoln Street, Methuen, Mass. Born 1917 at Lawrence. Graduate Methuen High School. Major in Psychology. Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3, 4. (Cabinet 2, 3, 4). Psychology Club, 3, 4. (Secretary 4). Henry Vincent Couper Great Road, Littleton, Mass. Born 1916 at Littleton. Graduate Littleton High School. Major in Entomology. Band, 1, 2. Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4. Mathematics Club, 3. Soccer, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M), (Captain 4). Hockey, 1. Base- ball, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4. Phi Sigma Kappa. Vernon Francis Coutu Erving, Moss. Born 1916 at Orange. Graduate Orange High School. Major in Chemistry. Class Nominating Comm., 3. Bay State Revue, 3, 4. Orchestra, 1. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4. Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Mathematics Club, 2, 3. Sigma Alpha Epsilon (Sergeant-at-Arms, 3, 4). Stella Ida Crowell Bernardston Rood, Greenfield, Mass. Born 1915 at Greenfield. Graduate Greenfield High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 3, 4. Intersorority Council, 3, 4. (Pres., 4). Sigma Beta Chi, (Vice-Pres., 4, House Manager, 4). [67} Kathleen Teresa Curtin Tyringham, Mass. Born 1917 at Tyringham. Graduate Lee High School. Major in Home Economics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Clifford Alvin Curtis 75 East Main Street, Hopkinton, Mass. Born 1916 at Waltham. Graduate Waltham High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Physics Club, 2. Psychology Club, 3, 4. Mathematics Club, 2. Foot- ball, 1. Basketball, 1. Baseball, 1. Advanced Mili- tary, 3, 4. Lambda Chi Alpha. Frank Melvin Cushman 63 Porter Street, Maiden, Mass. Born 1916 at Maiden. Graduate Maiden High School. Major in Psychology. Band, 1, 2. Psychology Club, 3, 4. Soccer, 1, 2, 3. Baseball, 1. Edward William Czelusniak 69 Parsons Street, Easthampton, Mass. Born 1912 at Easthampton. Graduate Wilhston Academy. Major in Education. Football, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4. Basketball, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M), (Cap- tain). Baseball, 1. [68] eioiA (4 1938 Albert Alan Davidson 112 Belle Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Graduate Classical High School. Major in Chemistry. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Mathematics Club, 4. Robert Clifford Dewey 30 Cross Street, Gardner, Mass. Born 1915 at Gardner. Graduate Williston Acade- my. Transfer Syracuse University. Major in Flori- culture. Horticultural Show Comm., 4, (Publicity Mgr.). Outing Club, 4. Landscape Club, 4. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Frederick Leiand Dickens Fountain Street, Ashland, Mass. Born 1914 at Ashland. Graduate Ashland High School. Major in Poultry Husbandry. Joint Comm. on Inter-collegiate Athletics, 2. Baseball, 2 (M), (Manager). Q. T. V. (Treasurer, 2). Marguerite Elizabeth Dolliver 10 Bellevue Road, Belmont, Mass. Born 1917 at Cambridge. Graduate Belmont High School. Transfer Mills College. Major in Entomology. Orchestra, 2, 3, 4. Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4. [69] John Thistle Dunlop 62 Grape Street, Chicopee, Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Graduate Chicopee High School. Major in Floriculture. Horticultural Show Comm., 4, (Floriculture Chairman). Land.scape Club, 3, 4. Class Nominating Comm., 3, 4. Lambda Chi Alpha. Joseph Francis Dunn 4 Leicester Street, Brighton, Mass. Born 1915 at East Boston. Graduate Brighton High School. Major in Agricultural Economics. Dairy- Club, 3. Cross-Country, 1, 2. Spring Track, 1, 2. Baseball, 1. William Eaton 173 Main Street, Waltham, Mass. Born 1916 at Waltham. Graduate Waltham High School. Major in Economics. Index, 3, 4, (Statistics Co-Editor) . International Relations Club, 3, 4. Advanced Military, 3, 4. Football, 1. Swimming, 2. Lambda Chi Alpha. Charles Grant Edson 37 Thornton Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at West Springfield. Graduate South Hadley High School. Major in Mathematics and Physics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Radio Club, 3. Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. [70] aM. (4 1938 Theodora Elizabeth Edson 39 Liberty Street, Brointree, Mass. Born 1916 at Braintree. Graduate Braintree High School. Major in Enghsh. Index, 3, (Statistics board). Outing Club, 1. Psychology Club, 4. Nicholas Daniel Eiiopoulas 143 Primrose Street, Hoverhill, Mass. Born 1915 at Greece. Graduate Haverhill High School. Major in Dairy Industry. Phi Kappa Phi. Q. T. V. Henry Byron Elkind 96 Chilton Street, Belmont, Mass. Born 1917 at Worcester. Graduate Boston Public Latin School. Major in Horticultural Manufactures. Academic Activities Board, 4. Bay State Review, 3, 4. Roister Bolsters, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Manager). Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Bacteriology Club, 3. Alpha Epsilon Pi, (Lieutenant Master, 3). Lloyd Howard Ellegaard 17 Washington Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1914 at Hartford, Conn. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Physics and Mathematics. C71] Charles Edward Elliott 24 Whitney Avenue, Beverly, Mass. Born 1917 at Beverly. Graduate Beverly High School. Major in Entomology. Horticultural Show Comm., 4, (Store Manager). Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4, (Yearbook Editor). Advanced Military, 3, 4. Kappa Sigma. Walter Nathon Epstein 49 Angell Street, Dorchester, Mass. Born 1916 at Roxbury. Graduate Boston Public Latin School. Major in Pre-Med. Band, 1. Glee Club, 3. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4. Chemistry Club, 3. Burnham Declam., 1, 2. Cross- country, 1. Robert Earle Evans 21 Summer Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1916 at Northampton. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Entomology. Fernald Ento- mology Club, 3, 4. Swimming, 2. Spring Track, 1, 2. Virginia Mary Pagan 9 Allyn Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at New Haven, Conn. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in EngUsh. Bay State Review, 4. Newman Club, 1. Sigma Beta Chi. [72] uiA c4 1938 Eleanor Dorney Fahey 133 Highland Avenue, Winthrop, Mass. Born 1917 at Winthrop. Graduate Winthrop High School. Major in Enghsh. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Dad ' s Day Comm., 4. Soph-Senior Hop Comm., 2. Women ' s Athletic Association, 3. Senior Nominating Comm., 4. Phi Zeta, (Academic Chairman, 4). Albert Humphries Farnsworth 31 Chesterfield Road, Worcester, Moss. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduated Worcester Aca- demy. Major in Pre-Med. Carnival Comm., 4. Outing Club, 2, 3. Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3, 4. Pre- Med. Club, 4. Soccer, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Kenneth Thomas Farrell 22 Linden Street, Brookline, Mass. Born 1914 at Brookline. Graduate Brookline High School. Major in Bacteriology. Academic Activities Board, 3. Index, 3, (Business Manager). Orchestra, 1, 2. Band, 1, 2. Men ' s Glee Club, 3. Bay State Review, 3. Bacteriology Club, 4. Football, 1, 2. Soccer, 2. Baseball, 1, 2. Alpha Gamma Rho (Vice- Pres., 3). Robert Sidney Feinburg 108 Washington Street, Brighton, Moss. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduate Brighton High School. Major in Economics. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Football, 1. Soccer, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). Hockey, 2, 3, 4 (M). Spring Track, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4. Winter Track, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4 (M). Alpha Epsilon Pi. {73} William Bragdon Ferguson 7 Pork Place, Ludlow, Moss. Born 1916 at Ludlow. Graduate Ludlow High School. Major in Economics. Collegian Business Board, 1, 2, 3, (Subscription Mgr., 3). Outing Club, 1. Joint Comm. on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3, 4, (Exe- cutive Comm.). Theta Chi, (Asst.-Treas., 3, Treas. 4). Basketball, 2, 3, 4 (M) (Manager). Frances Pola Filipkowski Whotely, Moss. Born 1915 at Whately. Graduate Deerfield High School. Major in History. Alpha Lambda Mu. Jack Finkel 38 Algonquin Place, Springfield, Moss. Born 1917 at Worcester. Graduate Worcester Classical High School. Major in Chemistry. Menorah Club, 3, 4. Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Phi Kappa Phi. Richard James Fitzpatrick Rochdale, Mass. Born 1916 at Rochdale. Graduate Leicester High School. Major in Animal Husbandry. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Dairy Cattle Judging Team, 2. General Livestock Judging Team, 3. Meats Judging Team, 3. Swimming, 1. [74} eCadA (4 1938 James von Appenzellar Fleming 136 Lincoln Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in History and Sociology. Outing Club, 4. International Relations Club, 3, 4. Bacteriology Club, 4. Football, 1. Basketball, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. Stanley Allen Flower 164 Dresser Street, Southbridge, Mass. Born 1915 at Worcester. Graduate Mary E. Wells High School. Major in Enghsh. Collegian, 2, 3, 4, (Managing Editor). Roister Bolsters, 2. Carnival Comm., 4, (Chairman of Publicity). Press Club, 3, (Secretary), 4. Collegian Prize for Feature Stories. Swimming, 1. Alpha Gamma Rho, (Secretary, 3). Alfred Forbush 98 Edgewood Avenue, Longmeadow, Mass. Born 1915 at Amherst. Graduate Springfield Tech- nical High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Landscape Club, 3, 4. Cyrus Edwin French 266 Vermont Street, West Roxbury, Mass. Born 1915 at Chesterville, Maine. Graduate Me- chanic Arts High School at Boston. Major in Chem- istry. Maroon Key, 2, (Sec. -Treasurer). Band, 1, 2. Carnival Ball Comm., 2. Soph-Senior Hop, 2. Mili- tai-y Ball Comm., 4. Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, (Exec. Comm.), 4, (Treasurer). Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3. Inter-Class Athletic Board, 2. College Ring Comm., 3, 4. A. B. Degree Comm., 3, 4. R. O. T. C. Rifle Team, 2, 3, 4. Swimming, 1. Advanced Military, 3, 4. Theta Chi (Secretary, 3), (Vice-Pres., 4). [75] Robert Wilcox Gage 58 Grant Street, Needham, Mass. Born 1917 at Concord. Graduate Needham High School. Major in Pre-Med. Student Rehgious Coun- cil, 3, 4. Christian Federation, 2, 3, 4 (Pres.). Pre- Med. Club, 3 (Treasurer), 4 (Secretary). Betty Frances Gaskill 44 Graves Street, South Deerfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Groton, Conn. Graduate Deerfield High School. Major in English. Bay State Review, 4. Psychology Club, 3, 4. Y. W. C. A., 1, 2. Sigma Beta Chi. Hnff ■|[ B - - 1 Berthier Lyman Gibbs 85 Vine Street, Saugus, Mass. Born 1916 at Saugus. Graduate Saugus Higii School. Major in Poultry Husbandry. Animal Hus- bandry Club, 4. 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Executive Board 3, 4). Poultry Club, 2, 3, 4 (Sec.-Treas., 4). Inter- Collegiate Poultry Judging Team, 2. Inter-Collegiate Dairy Cattle Judging Team, 3. Soccer, 1, 2, 3. Lane Giddings 45 Taconic Avenue, Great Barrington, Mass. Born 1916 at Great Barrington. Graduate Searles High School, Great Barrington. Major in Pre-Med. Index Student Photographic Editor, 3, 4. Collegian Photographic Editor, 3, 4. Orchestra, 1. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4. Bay State Review, 3. Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 4. Nominating Comm., 3. Amherst Camera Club, 2, 3, 4 (Executive Comm.). Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M). [76] QlaM. c4 1938 Ann Gilbert 48 Stone Road, Belmont, Mass. Born 1914 at Ithaca, N. Y. Graduate Northfield Seminary. Major in Home Economics. Index, 3, 4 (Art Editor, 3, 4). Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Landscape Club, 2. Home Economics Club, 3, 4. Proctor in Adams House, 3. A. B. Degree Comm., 3. Costumed Operetta, 2, 3, 4. Horticultural Show Ex- hibit, 3. Phi Zeta, (Assistant Treasurer, 3), (House Manager, 4). Joseph Stanley Gill 11 Spring Street, Bondsville, Mass. Born 1915 at Pittsburg, Perm. Graduate Palmer High School. Major in Dairy Industry. Edward Hadley Glass 36 East Street, Lexington, Mass. Born 1917 at Waltham. Graduate Lexington High School. Major in Entomology. Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3, 4. Swimming, 1, 2. Sigma Alpha Epsilon, (Treasurer, 3), (Pres., 4). Robert Patrick Gleason 82 Massasoit Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1917 at Northampton. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Radio Club, 3. Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball, 1, 3. [77] Shirley Bliss Goldberg 24 Dana Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1914 at Springfield. Graduate Classical High School. Major in English. Collegian, 1, 3. First Prize, Poem-of-the-Month Contest, 1934. Mother ' s Day Comm., 1935. A. B. Degree Comm., 1936-37. Collegian Quarterly, Editor, 1937. Intercollegiate Original Poetry Contest, 1937. First and Second Prizes, Poem-of-the-Month Contest, 1937. Phi Zeta. Abraham Bernard Goldman 81 Devon Street, Dorchester, Mass Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate Roxbury Memorial High School. Major in Pre-Med. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4. Mathematics Club, 2. Joint Comm. on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3, 4. Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M) (Manager). Phi Lambda Tau. Samuel Joseph Golub 94 Cass Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1915 at North Middleboro. Graduate Classical High School. Major in Botany. Menorah Club, 4. Ed. -in-Chief, 1939 Freshman Handbook. Soccer, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). Winter Track, 1. Baseball, 1. Phi Lambda Tau. William Butterworth Graham 14 Robinson Court, North Andover, Mass. Born 1916 at Providence, R. I. Graduate Johnson High, North Andover. Major in Dairy Industry. Col- legian, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Advertising Manager). Bay State Revue, 3. Roister Doisters, 3, 4. Bacteriology Club, 4. Dairy Club, 4 (President). Interfraternity Ball Comm., 4. Interfraternity Council, 3, 4 (President) . Q. T. V. (President, 3, 4). [78] e oAA a 1938 Julia Tice Graves 16 Main Street, Sunderland, Mass. Born 1917 at Sunderland. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Economics. Lambda Delta Mu. Walter Albert Green 77 Bellevue Road, Lynn, Mass. Born 1916 at Lynn. Graduate Lynn Classical High School. Transfer Tufts Engineering School. Major in Agricultural Engineering. Outing Club, 2, 3, 4 (Ski Comm.). Animal Husbandry Club, 2, 3. Swim- ming, 3, 4. Spring Track, 3 (M) . Winter Track, 3 (M) . Theta Chi. Saul George Gruner 17 Prospect Street, Pittsfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Pittsfield. Graduate Pittsfield High School. Major in Chemistry. Bay State Revue, 1. Roister Doisters, 3. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Pre-Med. Club, 3. Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Mathematics Club, 3. Freshman Handbook Committee, 1. Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4. Winter Track, 1. George Henry Guenard Forest Avenue, Dracut, Mass. Born 1913 at Lowell. Graduate Lowell High School. Major in Psychology. Psychology Club, 3, 4. Spring Track, 2 (M), 3, 4. Winter Track, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4. £79] Gertrude Josephine Hadro 37 Clark Street, Easthampton, Mass. Born 1915 at Easthampton. Graduate Easthampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Newman Club, 1, 2. Chemistry Club, 3 (Reporter), 4 (Secretary). Mathematics Club, 1, 2. Bacteriology Club, 3, 4 (Sec- Treas.). Women ' s Athletic Association, 2, 3 (Badmin- ton Chairman). Lambda Delta Mu. Herbert Milton Halpern 1774 Northampton Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1916 at New York, N. Y. Graduate Wilhston Academy. Major in Economics. Menorah Club. 1, 2, 3, 4. Football, 1. Phi Lambda Tau (Scribe, 4). Edward Handverger Village Street, West Medway, Mass. Born 1915 at Medway. Graduate Medway High School. Major in Animal Husbandry. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Dairy Club, 3. Animal Husbandry Club, 2, 3, 4. Joint Comm. on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3, 4. Football, 1. Cross-Country, 4 (M) (Manager) . Spring Track, 1, 2, 3 (Assistant Manager) . Phi Lambda Tau. William Hughes Harrison, Jr. 566 Haverhill Street, Lawrence, Mass. Born 1916 at Lawrence. Graduate Methuen High School. Major in Chemistry. Academic Activities Board, 4. Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Business Manager). Collegian Quarterly, 4 (Business Manager) . Chemistry Club, 4. Bacteriology Club, 4. Joint Comm. on Inter- Collegiate Athletics, 4. Basketball, 1. Swimming, 2, 3, 4 (M), (Manager). Phi Sigma Kappa (Secretary, 4). £80} etoAA c4 1938 Philip Hanley Haskins Berlin Road, Williamstown, Mass. Born 1915 at North Adams. Graduate Williams- town High School. Major in Mathematics. Mathe- matics Club, 3, 4. Cross-Country, 1. Spring Track, 1, 2, 3. Winter Track, 1, 2. Theta Chi. Russell John Hauck 56 Winslow Avenue, Norwood, Mass. Born 1915 at Norwood. Graduate Hebron Academy. Major in Economics. Orchestra, 2. Carnival Comm., 3, 4 (Chairman of Social Comm.). Informal Comm., 3, 4. Football, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4. Basketball, 1. Base- ball, 1, 2, 3. Kappa Sigma. Saul Heller 5 Westminster Terrace, Boston, Mass. Born 1916 at New York City. Graduate Roxbury Memorial High School. Major in Agronomy. Conrad Joseph Hemond, Jr. 406 Pleasant Street, Holyoke, Moss. Born 1916 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Mathematics. Band, 1, 2, 3 (Assis- tant Manager), 4 (Co-Manager). Press Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Football, 1. [81] Harold Crean Hemond 406 Pleasant Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Chemistry. Band, 1, 2, 3 (Assistant Manager), 4 (Co-Manager and Student Conductor). Physics Club, 4. Radio Club, 4. Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Alpha Gamma Rho. Thomas Hennessy, Jr. 29 Carver Road, Newton Highlands, Mass. Born 1917 at Roxbury. Graduate Newton High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Swimming, 1. Hockey. 1, 3, 4. Spring Track, 1. Winter Track, 1. Baseball, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Edward William Higgins 78 Scituate Street, Arlington, Mass. Born 1916 at Skowhegan, Maine. Graduate Ar- lington High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Rifle Team, 1, 2. Kathryn Hill 72 Poplar Avenue, West Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Graduate Ridgewood High School, Ridgewood, N. J. Transfer New Jersey State College for Women. Major in Home Economics. Outing Club, 4. Home Economics Club, 3, 4. [82] eiaiA (4 1938 John Sherman Hoar 1817 North Kenmore Street, Arlington, Virginia Born 1917 at Delta, Colorado. Graduate Wauwatosa High School, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. Major in English. Adelphia, 4. Bay State Revue, 3, 4. Roister Doisters, 1, 2, 3 and 4 (Pres.). Men ' s Debating Team, 1, 2, 3, 4 (President) . 75th Ann. Student Comm. Cross-Country, 1. Spring Track, 1. Winter Track, 1, 2. Served on Comm. for Election Rules, 3. Leiand Worthington Hooker 31 Hawthorne Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Graduate Classical High School. Major in Forestry. Bay State Revue, 3. Carnival Comm., 3, 4. Outing Club, 1, 2, 3 (Vice-Pres- ident). Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3. Swimming, 1. Advanced Military, 3, 4. Leroy Kingsbury Houghton, Jr. 25 Richwood Street, West Roxbury, Mass. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduate Boston English High School. Major in Education. Band, 2. Bay State Revue, 3. Carnival Comm., 2, 3. Football, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M) . Hockey, 1. Baseball, 2, 3. Advanced Mihtary, 3, 4. Lambda Chi Alpha. Almeda Howard 75 West Street, Northampton, Moss. Born 1915 at Chicago, 111. Graduate Summit High School, N. J. Transfer Sweet Briar College, Virginia. Major in Psychology. Lambda Delta Mu. [83] Benjamin Gordon Hurwitch 50 Bloomfield Street, Dorchester, Mass. Born 1917 at Dorchester. Graduate Boston English High School. Major in Economics. Bay State Revue, 3. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Carnival Comm., 3, 4 (Chairman Transportation Comm.). Joint Comm. on Inter-CoUegiate Athletics, 3, 4. Football, 4 (M) (Man- ager). Phi Lambda Tau (Historian, 2, 3). Ralph Ingram 75 Queen Street, Falmouth, Mass. Born 1915 at Bonne Bay, Newfoundland. Graduate Falmouth High School. Major in Entomology. Dad ' s Day Comm., 4. Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4. Cross- country, 3 (M), 4 (M). Winter Track, 2 (M), 3 (M). Baseball, 3 (M). Kappa Sigma. Richard Randlett Irving 42 Summer Street, Methuen, Mass. Born 1915 at Lawrence. Graduate Methuen High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Academic Activities Board, 2, 3, 4. Orchestra, 1 (Assistant Manager), (Manager, 2, 3, 4). Horticultural Show Comm., 3, 4 (General Chairman). Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Landscape Club, 2, 3, 4. Board of Managers, Combined Musical Clubs, 2 (Chairman), 4 (Publicity). Swim- ming, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). . Advanced Military, 3, 4. Kappa Sigma (House Comm., 3), (Assitant Steward, 4). Mitchell Irving Jackson 24 Linden Avenue, Fairhaven, Mass. Born 1915 at Maiden. Graduate Fairhaven High School. Major in Economics. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Carnival Comm., 3 and 4 (Treas.). Football, 1, 2. Basketball, 1. Phi Lambda Tau (House Manager, 2), (Treasurer, 3). [84} eioiA (4 1938 Seymour Theodore Jacobson 20 Saratoga Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Paterson, N. J. Graduate Springfield Classical High School. Major in Chemistry. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Freshman Handbook Comm., 1 (Busi- ness Board). Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4. Mathematics Club, 2, 3. Bacteriology Club, 3, 4. Football, 1. Basketball, 1. Swimming, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). Phi Lambda Tau (Sports Captain, 3). Ruth Rita Jefferson 660 Main Street, West Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at West Springfield. Transfer Spring- field Junior College. Major in Distributed Sciences. ■j% ' Doris Wynne Jenkins 491 Main Street, Shrewsbury, Mass. Born 1914 at Mineola, Long Island. Graduate Shrewsbury High School. Major in Landscape Archi- tecture. Horticultural Show Comm. (Store Chairman, 4). Landscape Club, 3, 4 (Secretary-Treasurer, 3, 4). Women ' s Athletic Association (Cabinet, 3, 4). Phi Zeta (President, 4). Herbert Harry Johnson 26 Metcalf Street, Roslindale, Mass. Born 1915 at Roslindale. Graduate Mechanic Arts High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Landscape Club, 3, 4. Football, 1, 2. Hockey, 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball, 1. Theta Chi (First Guard, 3. His- torian, 4. Athletic Chairman, 4). [85] Kirtley Leverett Judd 50 Burton Street, Springfield, Moss. Born 1915 at Springfield. Graduate Classical High School. Major in Economics. International Relations Club, 3, 4 (Secretary, 4). Soccer, 1. Carol Julian 4 Fairview Way, Amherst, Mass. Born 1917 at Amherst. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Women ' s Athletic Association, 4 (Basketball Manager) . Lambda Delta Mu (Treasurer, 3, 4). Eleanor Burton Julian 4 Fairview Way, Amherst, Mass. Born 1916 at Amherst. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in History. W. S. G. A., 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary, 3. Treasurer, 4) . Freshman Handbook, 1. Women ' s Athletic Association, 3, 4 (Soccer Manager). Lambda Delta Mu. Martha Dorothy Kaplinsky 306 Chestnut Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1916 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Home Economics. W. S. G. A., 4 (Adams House Chairman, 4). Women ' s Glee Club, 1. Bay State Revue, 4. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Sec- retary, 3). Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Mother ' s Day Comm., 3, 4 (Banquet Chairman, 3. General Chairman, 4). Class Nominating Comm., 3. Sigma Iota (Historian, 2. Treasurer, 3. President, 4). [86} WL o 1938 Julian Herman Katzeff 1589 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. Born 1917 at Dorchester. Graduate Boston Latin Scho ol. Major in Distributed Sciences. Index, 3 (Literary Editor). Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Sports Editor, 2. Associate Editor, 3. Editor-in-Chief, 4). Student Religious Council, 2 (Vice-Pres.). Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Pre-Med. Club, 3 (Secretary). Senate A. B. Degree Comm. Freshman Handbook, 1. 75th Ann. Student Comm. Alpha Epsilon Pi. Thomas Francis Kelley 37 Seal Road, Waltham, Mass. Born 1917 at Concord. Graduate Waltham High School. Major in Entomology. Newman Club, 2, 3, 4. Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3, 4 (Sec.-Treas. 3). Pre-Med. Club, 4. 4-H Club, 2, 3. Football, 1. Swim- ming, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. Marieta Gibson Ksnyon East Douglas, Mass. Born 1915 at East Douglas. Graduate Douglas Memorial High School. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Glee Club, 4. Christian Federation, 3, 4. Outing Club, 4. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Richard Coleman King 38 Walnut Place, Newtonville, Mass. Born 1915 at Boston. Graduate Newton High School. Major in Economics. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Bay State Revue, 2. Cheer Leader, 1, 3. Class Nom- inating Comm., 1, 2. Rifle Team, 1, 2, 3. Football, 1. Advanced Military, 3, 4. Theta Chi. [87] Helen Kingsbury Waushacum Lake Form, Sterling, Mass. Born 1915 at Sterling. Graduate Worcester North High School. Major in Home Economics. Wesley Foundation, 2, 3, 4. Home Economics Club, 3, 4. Jessie Kinsman 27 Perrin Street, Roxbury, Mass. Born 1917 at Roxbury. Graduate Girls ' Latin School. Major in Economics. Honor Council, 4. Class Secretary, 1, 2, 3, 4. Carnival Comm., 2, 3, 4 (Sec- retary, 3, 4) . Sophomore-Senior Hop Comm., 2. Psy- chology Club, 3. Intersorority Ushering Chairman, 4. Sigma Beta Chi (Rushing Chairman, 3. President, 4). Rowland Klaucke 613 Plantation Street, Worcester, Mass. Born 1915 at Manchester, England. Graduate North High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Foot- ball, 1, 2. Hockey, 2. Alpha Gamma Rho. Maxwell Irving Klayman 19 Cunningham Street, Roxbury, Mass. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate Boston Latin School. Major in Agricultural Economics. Collegian, 1, 2, 3. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. International Rela- tions Club, 2, 3, 4. Football, 1. [88] eiodA o4 1938 Ruth Elinor Kodis Henshow Street, Leicester, Mass. Born 1917 at Leicester. Major in Distributed Sciences. Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4. Christian Federation, 1, 2. Bacteriology Club, 2, 3, 4. Bernard Lester Kohn 168 Ruthuen Street, Roxbury, Mass. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduate Boston Latin School. Major in English. Academic Activities Board, 3, 4. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Manager, 3, 4). Bay State Revue, 1, 2, 3. Roister Bolsters, 1. Combined Musical Clubs (Pres., 4). Swimming, 1. Hockey, 1. Spring Track, 1. Baseball, 1. Alpha Epsilon Pi. Frank Peter Kuklewicz 179 Avenue A, Turners Falls, Mass. Born 1916 at Turners Falls. Graduate Turners Falls High School. Major in Physics. David Allison Lamb 5 Burnett Avenue, South Hodley Center, Mass. Born 1915 at Holyoke. Graduate Mount Hermon. Major in Distributed Sciences. Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4. Chemistry Club, 4. Spring Track, 1. {89] John Lavrakas 59 Elton Avenue, Wofertown, Mass. Born 1915 at Watertown. Graduate Watertown High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Land- scape Club, 3, 4. Football, 1. Hockey, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M) 4 (M). Baseball, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). James Donovan Lee Maple Street, Chester, Mass. Born 1915 at Niagara Falls, N. Y. Graduate Chester High School. Major in Agricultural Economics and Farm Management. Bay State Revue, 1, 2, 3, 4. Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3, 4. Wesley Foundation, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-Pres., 3. Pres., 4). 4-H Club, 4. Base- ball, 1. Alpha Gamma Rho (Chaplain, 3). Lawrence Levinson 26 Dorothy Road, Arlington, Mass. Born 1916 at Somerville. Graduate Somerville High School. Major in Dairy Industry. Bay State Revue, 1, 3, 4. Roister Bolsters, 1, 2, 3, 4. Student Religious Council, 3, 4 (President, 4). Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Council, 3. Pres., 4). Dairy Club, 3, 4. Solveig Utne Liljegren 102 Kemper Street, Wolloston, Moss. Born 1911 at Gothenburg, Sweden. Graduate Quincy High School. Major in English. Phillips Brooks Club, 3, 4. Choir, 4. [90] eioM. c4 1938 Norman Elliott Linden 22 Summit Avenue, Everett, Mass. Born 1915 at Everett. Graduate Everett High School. Major in Chemistry and Geology. Football, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4 (M). Hockey, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). Baseball, 1, 2. Advanced Mihtary, 3, 4. Theta Chi (Librarian, 4). Melvin Theodore Little 615 North Street, East Weymouth, Mass. Born 1915 at Dorchester. Graduate Weymouth High School. Major in Languages and Literature. Football, 1. Cross-Country, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). Spring Track, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4 (Captain). Winter Track, 2, 3, 4. Elmer Ralph Lombard 70 Stratford Avenue, Pittsfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Graduate Pittsfield High School. Major in Entomology. Index, 3, 4 (Assistant Business Manager, 3. Business Manager, 4). Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4 (President, 4) . Swimming, 1, 2. Interfraternity Council, 3, 4. Alpha Gamma Rho. William Francis Lonergan, Jr. 35 West Alvord Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Graduate Cathedral High School. Major in Pre-Med. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3, 4. Football, 1, 2. Spring Track, 1, 2. Interfraternity Council, 3, 4. Sigma Phi Epsilon (Historian, 3. Secretary, 4). [91] Robert Stephen Lyons 20 Goodrich Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Graduate Classical High School. Major in Economics. Student Senate, 4. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Military Ball Comm., 3, 4 (Chairman, 4). Football, 1, 2. Basketball, 1. Base- ball, 1, 2 (M), 3. Advanced MiUtai-y, 3, 4. Inter- fraternity Council, 3, 4. Lambda Chi Alpha (Secretary 3. Treasurer, 4). Richard Lockwood Mabie 39 Pleosant Street, Sharon, Mass. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduate Mount Hermon. Major in Pre-Med. Orchestra, 1, 2, 4. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4. Bay State Revue, 3, 4. Robert Douglas MocCurdy 214 Orchard Street, Watertown, Mass. Born 1914 at WoUaston. Graduate Watertown High School. Major in Dairy Industry. Bay State Revue, 3. Roister Doisters, 1, 2, 3, 4. Carnival Comm., 2, 3 (Chairman Sports Comm.). Outing Club, 1. Dairy Club, 3, 4. Dairy Products Judging Team, finished third in National Intercollegiate Contest. Football, 1. Swimming, 1, 2. Baseball, 1. Advanced MiHtary, 3, 4. Lambda Chi Alpha. Lois Rogers Macomber 5 Cottage Street, Fairhaven, Mass. Born 1917 at Fairhaven. Graduate Fairhaven High School. Major in Psychology. Roister Doisters, 1. Carnival Comm., 3. Psychology Club, 4 (President). Burnham Declamation, 1, 2. Sigma Beta Chi. [92} eCau c4 1938 Wiliiorti Anderson MacPhail 431 Court Street, North Plymouth, Mass. Born 1916 at Plymouth. Graduate Plymouth High School. Major in Mathematics and Civil Engineering. Maroon Key, 2. Carnival Comm., 4. Mathematics Club, 3, 4. Football, 1. Basketball, 1. Spring Track, 2. Baseball, 1 . Kappa Sigma (Guard, 3. Treas., 4). Lillian Russell Mann 18 Holland Avenue, Westfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Homer, N. Y. Graduate Westfield High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Walter Charles Mayko 153 Walnut Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1911 at West Spi ' ingfield. Graduate West Springfield High School. Transfer Univ. of Texas. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 3, 4 (Vice- President, 3. President, 4). Alpha Sigma Phi. Donald Sanford McGowan 320 Pleasant Street, Holyoke, Mass, Born 1914 at Holyoke. Graduate Mount Hermon. Major in Economics. Advanced Military, 3, 4. Spring Track, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). Winter Track, 2 (M), 4. Kappa Sigma. [93] David Elliot ' Mildram 83 Greenwood Avenue, Greenwood, Moss. Born 1915 at Wakefield. Graduate Bridgton Preparatory School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Maroon Key, 2 (Vice-President). Class Captain, 2, 3, 4. Sophomore-Senior Hop Comm., 2. Landscape Club, 3, 4. Football, 1, 3. Hockey, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M) . Baseball, 2, 3 (M) , 4. Phi Sigma Kappa (Vice- Pres., 4). Elaine Helen Milkey 16 Main Street, Montague City, Mass. Born 1916 at Montague City. Graduate Turners Falls High School. Major in English. Sigma Beta Chi. Carol Frances Millard Segregonset, Mass. Born 1916 at West Stockbridge. Graduate Taunton High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Women ' s Rifle Team, 1, 2. History-Sociology Club, 2. Y. W. C. A., 1. Barbara Mitchell Miller 38 Virginia Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Graduate Classical High School. Transfer American International College. Major in Economics. International Relations Club, 3, 4 (Vice-President, 3, 4). Lambda Delta Mu. [94] eioiA. o(. 1938 Edward Theodore Mish North Main Street, South Hodley, Mass. Born 1915 at South Hadley. Graduate South Hadley High School. Major in Forestry. Yale Forestry School Student, 1937-38. Football, 1. Alpha Gamma Rho. Walter Kimball Mitchell, Jr. 16 Miles Road, Newton Highlands, Mass. Born 1916 at East Milton. Graduate Newton High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Bay State Revue, 1, 2. Horticultural Show Comm., 3. Landscape Club, 2, 3, 4. Football, 1. Swimming, 1. Baseball, 1. Theta Chi (Editor of Newsletter, 4). Edwin Lewis Moore Amherst Rood, West Pelham, Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Chemistry, Bacteriology, and Hor- ticultural Manufactures. Chemistry Club, 4. Frances Lillian Morley Mount Pleasant, Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at Grand Rapids, Michigan. Amherst High School. Major in English. Graduate Phi Zeta. [95] Helen Carew Morris 27 South Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1917 at Palmer. Graduate Monson High School. Major in History and English. Index, 3, 4 (Statistics Board, 3. Statistics Co-Editor, 4). Psy- chology Club, 3. International Relations Club, 2. Alpha Lambda Mu. Robert Karl Morrison 54 Strong Avenue, Pittsfield, Mass. Born 1914 at Pittsfield. Graduate Pittsfield High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Pre-Med. Club, 4. Baseball, 1. Kappa Sigma. Laura Edison Morse 63 Kilburn Road, Belmont, Mass. Born 1916 at Belmont. Graduate Belmont High School. Transfer Lasell Junior College. Major in Distributed Sciences. Newman Club, 3, 4. Bacter- iology Club, 3, 4. Lambda Delta Mu (Social Chair- man, 4). Roy Hepworth Moult 58 Broad Street, Lynn, Mass. Born 1913 at Long Island City, N. Y. Graduate Lynn Classical High School. Major in Chemistry. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Roister Doisters, 2, 3, 4 (Stage Manager). Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Swimming, 1. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. [96] udA. o(. 1938 Mitchell Francis NeJame 21 West Main Street, North Adams, Mass. Born 1916 at North Adams. Graduate Drury High School, North Adams. Major in Mathematics. Aca- demic Activities Board, 3. Adelphia, 4. Index, 3, 4 (Business Manager, Recipient of $50.00 Manager ' s Prize, 3). (Editor-in-Chief, 4). Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Subscription Manager, 3, 4). Band, 1, 2. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Mathematics Club, 2, 3. 75th Ann. Student Comm. Freshman Handbook Comm., Literary Department. Cross-Country, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M) (Captain, 4). Spring Track, 1, 2 (M), 3, 4. Winter Track, 1, 2, 3, 4. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Phyllis Louise Nelson 110 Wildwood Avenue, Arlington, Mass. Born 1917 at Arlington. Graduate Arlington High School. Major in Social Sciences. Women ' s Glee Club, 2. Bay State Revue, 2, 3. 4. Psychology Club, 3 (Secretary). Women ' s Athletic Association, 3 (Hockey) . Phi Zeta (Vice-President, 3. Social Chair- man, 4). Edward George Newman 40 Spring Street, North Brookfield, Moss. Born 1916 at North Brookfield. Graduate North Brookfield High School. Major in Chemistry. Chem- istry Club, 4. Football, 1. Spring Track, 2. Winter Track, 1, 2. Kappa Sigma (Steward, 4). George Niden 104 Greenlawn Avenue, Newton Center, Moss. Born 1917 at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Graduate Need- ham High School. Transfer Ohio University. Major Pre-Dental and Chemistry. Adelphia, 4 (Vice Pres.). Senior Nominating Comm., 4. Football, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4 (M). Swimming, 1. Hockey, 3 (M),4 (M). Spring Track, 2. Baseball, 2. Kappa Sigma (President, 4). {97] Kenneth Gordon Nolan 7 Spruce Street, Danvers, Moss. Born 1914 at Peabody. Graduate Danvers High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Outing Club, 2. Psychology Club, 3. Alpha Sigma Phi (Vice-Pres., 4). William George Noonan 96 Cedar Street, Haverhill, Mass. Born 1916 at Haverhill. Graduate Haverhill High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Newman Club, 3, 4. Bacteriology Club, 4. Mary Patricia O ' Connell 20 Fairmount Avenue, Wakefield, Mass. Born 1916 at Wakefield. Graduate Wakefield High School. Major in English. Collegian, 2. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary-Treasurer, 3, Vice-Pres., 4). Press Club, 3. Phi Zeta (Treasurer, 3, 4). William Gregory O ' Donnell 38 Thayer Street, Milford, Mass. Born 1916 at Milford. Graduate Milford High School. Major in English. Band, 1. A. B. Degree Comm. Baseball, 1 (Asst. Manager). Phi Kappa Phi. Phi Kappa Phi Scholarship. [98} etaiA 4 1938 James Barnes Olivier 118 Lincoln Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Pittsburg, Penn. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Economics. Football, 1. Hockey, 1. Spring Track, 1, 2. Winter Track, 1. Kappa Sigma (Grand Master of Ceremonies, 4; Social Chairman, 3, 4). Donald Osley 14 Chestnut Street, Hatfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Hatfield. Graduate Smith Academy. Major in Distributed Sciences. Soccer, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). Basketball, 2, 3. Alpha Sigma Phi. Alfred S. Page Shay Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1915 at Springfield. Graduate Springfield Classical High School. Major in Economics. Basket- ball, 1. Baseball, 1. Kappa Sigma. Evelyn Maude Parker 12 Howe Street, Orange, Mass. Born 1916 at Greenfield. Graduate Orange High School. Major in History and Sociology. History- Sociology Club, 1. Sigma Beta Chi (Secretary, 3). [99] Robert Cowan Perkins 262 Sunderland Road, Worcester, Mass. Born 1916 at Worcester. Graduate Worcester Clas- sical High School. Major in Entomology. Carnival Comm., 4. Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3, 4. Inter- fraternity Council, 3, 4. Football, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4 (M). Phi Sigma Kappa (House Manager, 4; Auditor, 3, 4) . Barbara Sanborn Phillips 25 Shattuck Street, Greenfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Bridgeport, Conn. Graduate Green- field High School. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Glee Club, 1. Roister Doisters, 3, 4. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. History-Sociology Club, 2. Y. W. C. A., 1. Albert William Pollard 103 Massasoit Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1915 at Northampton. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Agronomy. Virginia Mabel Pond 12 Miles Street, Greenfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Greenfield. Graduate Greenfield High School. Major in Economics. [100] eioM. (4 1938 Wendell Judson Potter 14 Natalie Avenue, Melrose, Mass. Born 1914 at Maiden. Graduate Melrose High School. Major in Chemistry. 1935 Index, 3; Circula- tion Manager. Chemistry Club, 4. Mathematics Club, 3. Spring Track, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Paul Sears Putnam 189 Silver Street, Greenfield, Moss. Born 1916 at Greenfield. Graduate Greenfield High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Outing Club, 2, 3. Landscape Club, 2, 3, 4. Football, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4. Basketball, 1, 2 (M), 3, 4. Theta Chi. Maxwell Pyenson North Otis, Mass. Born 1916 at North Otis. Graduate Lee High School. Major in Poultry Husbandry. 4-H Club, 2, 3, 4. Poultry Club, 2 3, 4. Intercollegiate Poultry Judging Team, 1935. Swimming, 1, 2. Spring Track, 2, 3. Alpha Epsilon Pi (House Chairman, 2, 3, 4) . Wentworth Quast 6 Concord Street, Natick, Mass. Born 1916 at Haverhill, Mass. Graduate Natick High School. Major in Psychology. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa (Steward, 4). [101] Sylvia Arline Randall Taylor Street, Granby, Mass. Born 1917 at Belchertown. Graduate South Hadley High School. Major in Psychology. Women ' s Glee Club, 4. Bay State Revue, 4. Psychology Club, 3, 4. Intersorority Council, 3, 4. Alpha Lambda Mu. Horace Hillman Randlett Springfield Road, Palmer, Mass. Born 1914 at Palmer. Graduate Palmer High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Theodore Albert Rice 7 Harvard Street, Wellesley, Mass. Born 1916 at Roxbury. Graduate Wellesley High School. Major in Economics. International Relations Club, 3, 4. Football, 1, 2. Spring Track, 1. Winter Track, 1, 2. Baseball, 1, 2. Phi Sigma Kappa (Treas., 4). Frederick Charles Riel 11 Fourth Street, Turners Falls, Mass. Born 1914 at Shattucksville. Graduate Turners Falls High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Class Officer, 2, 3, 4 (Sergeant-at-Arms) . Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4. Football, 1, 2 (M). Basketball, 1, 2, (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). Baseball, 1, 2, (M), 3 (M) (Captain), 4 (Captain). [102] a (4 1938 William Charles Riley 21 Fairfield Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Holyoke. Graduate South Hadley High School. Major in Dairy Industry. Student Senate, 3, 4 (Treas.). Informal Comm., 4. Soph.- Senior Hop Comm., 2. Military Ball Comm., 4. Dairy Club, 3, 4. Football, 1, 2. Basketball, 1, 2, 3. Spring Track, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4. Advanced Military, 3, 4. Interfraternity Council, 2, 3, 4. Sigma Alpha Epsilon (Deputy Archon, 4). William Edward Roberge 91 Montgomery Street, Westfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Westfield. Graduate Westfield High School. Major in Physical Education. Inter-class Athletic Board, 2, 3, 4 (Vice Pres.). Football, 1, 2, 3 (M) , 4. Spring Track, 1, 2, 3 (M) , 4. Winter Track, 1, 2, 3, 4. Sigma Phi Epsilon (Marshal, 1, 2. Guard, 2, 3. Comptroller, 3, 4). " All Sig Ep " Football team, 3. Charles Rosenbloom 145 Essex Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1915 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in History and Sociology. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. International Relations Club, 2, 3. 4. Phi Lambda Tau. Dean Leonard Rounds 12 Hanscom Avenue, Reading, Mass. Born 1915 at Reading. Graduate Reading High School. Major in Entomology. Fernald Entomology Club, 3, 4. Football, 1. Swimming, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M), (Captain, 4). Spring Track, 3. Kappa Sigma. [103] George Stephen Rozwenc 5 Franklin Court, Northampton, Mass. Born 1916 at Boonton, N. J. Graduate Northamp- ton High School. Major in Physics and Math. Index, 3 (Editor-in-Chief). Swimming, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4. Robert Rustigian 146 Salem Street, Medford, Mass. Born 1915 at Boston. Graduate Medford High School. Maior in Bacteriology. Bacteriology Club, 3, 4 (President). Louise Baldwin Rutter 177 Weston Street, Waltham, Mass. Born 1916 at Waltham. Graduate Waltham High School. Major in Home Economics. Bay State Revue, 4. Dad ' s Day Comm., 2, 3, 4. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Lambda Delta Mu (Portal Guard, 1. Social Chairman, 3. House Chairman,4). , Jane Elizabeth Schopfer 120 Hillcroft Avenue, Worcester, Mass. Born 1916 at Passaic, N. J. Graduate Worcester North High School. Major in Home Economics. Lambda Delta Mu (House Manager, 4) . [104} eioAA (4 1938 Ethel Frances Seal 81 Beaconsfield Road, Worcester, Mass. Born 1916 at Worcester. Graduate Classical High School. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Wesley Foundation, 2, 3 (Secretary), 4. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Marion Shaw Belchertown, Mass. Born 1917 at Belchertown. Graduate Belchertown High School. Major in English. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3 (Council), 4 (Coun- cil). Phi Kappa Phi. Chester Sherman 35 Lincoln Avenue, Amherst, Mass. Born 1915 at Springfield. Graduate Chicopee High School. Major in Botany. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. Bay State Revue, 1, 2, 3. Carnival Comm., 3 (Skating Comm.). 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3. Frederick John Sievers 35 Fearing Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1916 at Milwaukee, Wis. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Economics. Student Senate, 3 (Secretary), 4 (President). Adelphia, 4. Class Offi- cer, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Treasurer). Carnival Ball Comm., 3. International Relations Club, 2. Football, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M), (Captain). Basketball, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4. Spring Track, 2 (M). Kappa Sigma. £105] Donald Lawrence Silverman 54 Elm Hill Avenue, Roxbury, Mass. Born 1917 at Roxbury. Graduate Boston Public Latin School. Major in Economics. Adelphia, 4 (Sec- Treas.). Index, 3, 4 (Associate Editor). Collegian, 2, 3, 4 (Circulation Manager). Interfraternity Ball Comm., 4. Delegate Nat. Interfraternity Conf., 4. Football, 1. Soccer, 2, 3 (M), 4 (M). Hockey, 1. Spring Track, 2, 3. Winter Track, 2. Baseball, 1. Interfraternity Council, 3 (Treasurer), 4. Alpha Epsilon Pi (Exchequer, 3. Pres., 4). Stephen Israel Silverman 162 Seaver Street, Roxbury, Mass. Born 1917 at Chelsea. Graduate Roxbury Memorial High School. Major in Mathematics. Mathematics Club, 3, 4. Football, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M). Basketball, 1. Hockey, 2. Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4. Alpha Epsilon Pi, (Sentinel, 3. Exchequer, 4). Frank Alphonse Slesinski 40 Meadow Rood, Northampton, Mass. Born 1916 at Northampton. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 4. Football, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M). Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4. Spring Track, 2, 3, 4. Jack Tibbitts Slocomb 1167 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. Born 1916 at Providence, R. I. Graduate Brockton High School. Major in Foi-estry. Maroon Key, 2. Class Officer, 1 (Sergeant-at-Arms). Horticultural Show Comm., 4 (Forestry Chairman). Hockey, 1, 2. [106} eeoM. c4 193.8 Philip Smardon 130 Main Street, Belfast, Maine Born 1915 at Portland, Maine. Graduate Crosby High School, Belfast, Maine. Major in Landscape Architecture. Horticultural Show Comm., 4 (Land- scape Chairman). Landscape Club, 3, 4. Cross- country, 1. Spring Track, 2. Kappa Sigma (Vice President and House Manager, 3-4). Rodger Chapman Smith West Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1915 at Holyoke. Graduate Kimball Union Academy. Major in Agricultural Economics. Col- legian, 2. Christian Federation, 1, 2. 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Phi Sigma Kappa (Auditor, 3). Russell Eaton Smith Smith Lone, Methuen, Mass. Born 1917 at Methuen. Graduate Mount Hermon School. Major in Animal Husbandry. Soccer, 2, 3. Interfraternity Council, 3, 4. Alpha Sigma Phi, (Corres.-Sec, 2-3. Pres., 3-4). Phyllis Maude Snow 320 Prospect Street, Brockton, Mass. Born 1915 at Brockton. Graduate Thayer Aca- demy, Braintree, Mass. Major in Home Economics. History-Sociology Club, 2, 3. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Danforth Foundation Fellowship, 1937. Phi Zeta. [107} Harry Miles Snyder 12 Sherwood Rood, Medford, Mass. Born 1916 at Bellefonte, Penn. Graduate Arlington High School. Major in Forestry. Freshman Play, 1. Dad ' s Day Comm., 2. Kathryne Ida Spaight 129 Sumner Avenue, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Graduate Agawam High School. Major in Home Economics. Lambda Delta Mu. Edna Angle Sprague Bridge Street, Hamilton, Mass. Born 1917 at Hamilton. Graduate Hamilton High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Student Religious Council, 4. Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3, 4. Mother ' s Day Comm., 3, 4. Alpha Lambda Mu (Alumnae Secretai-y, 4). Christine Alan Stewart Cook Street, Boylston, Mass. Born 1915 at Boylston. Graduate Worcester High School of Commerce. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Lambda Delta Mu. [108] etoM. a( 1938 Mary Elizabeth Streeter 83 Wellesley Road, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1916 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Home Economics. Outing Club, 1. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Phi Zeta (Secretary 3-4). Barbara Jeanette Strode 10 West Street, Marblehead, Mass. Born 1917 at Lynn. Graduate Marblehead High School. Major in English. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3 (Assistant Manager), 4 (Manager). Bay State Revue, 2, 4. Roister Doisters, 2, 3, 4. Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3, 4. Phi Zeta. Alfred Milton Swiren 33 Kenwood Terrace, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Graduate Classical High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Academic Activities Board, 4. Index, 3, 4. Collegian, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Sports Editor, 3, 4). Men ' s Debating Team, 1, 2, 3, 4, (Manager, 4). Student Religious Council, 3, 4. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Burnham Declamation, 1. Flint Oratorical Contest, 3 (1st Prize) . Soccer, 1, 2. Winnifred Hope Taylor 51 Strong Avenue, Pittsfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Pittsfield. Graduate Pittsfield High School. Major in Home Economics. Orchestra, 1, 2, 3. Women ' s Glee Club, 1. Bay State Revue, 4. Mother ' s Day Comm., 3, 4. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Psychology Club, 3, 4. Alpha Lambda Mu, (Pledge Secretary, 2. House Chairman, 2. Vice- Pres., 3). [109] Herbert Arthur Tetreault 197 Prospect Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1917 at Northampton. Graduate St. Michael ' s High School. Transfer St. Anselm ' s College. Major in Chemistry. Index, 3, (Statistics Editor). Chemistry Club, 3, 4. Sigma Alpha Epsilon, (Secretary, 3-4; Social Chairman, 3-4). Edith Gwendolyn Thayer 180 East Street, West Bridgewater, Mass. Born 1916 at West Bridgewater. Graduate Howard High School. Major in English. Orchestra, 1. Bay State Revue, 4. 4-H Club, 1. History-Sociology Club, 1. Phi Zeta, (Portal Guard, 4). Frederic Russell Theriault 18 High Street Place, East Weymouth, Mass. Born 1915 at Dorchester. Graduate Weymouth High School. Major in Pre-Med. Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4. Mathematics Club, 4. Elthea Thompson 75 Day Street, Norwood, Mass. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduate Methuen High School. Major in English. Class Vice-Pres., 2. Soph.- Senior Hop Comm., 2. Intersorority Council, 3, 4 (Vice-Pres.) History-Sociology Club, 2. Phi Zeta, (Social Chairman, 3). [110] eicuA c4 1938 John William Tindale 3 Hampfon Road, Brockton, Mass. Born 1916 at Brockton. Graduate Brockton High School. Transfer Univ. of Virginia. Major in Agri- culture. Football, 2. Kappa Sigma. Maurice Tonkin 89 Harrison Avenue, Fitchburg, Mass. Born 1918 at Hartford, Conn. Graduate Revere High School. Major in Languages and Literature. Collegian, 2, 3, 4 (Campus Editor). Music Record Club, 4. Student Religious Council, 4. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-Pres.) Phi Lambda Tau. p ■ pp 1 i 1 1 )M i Richard Washburn Towie Joy Place, Cohasset, Mass. Born 1915 at Cohasset. Graduate Osgood High School. Major in Psychology. Adelphia, 4. Student Senate, 3, 4. Maroon Key, 2 (Pres.). Carnival Ball Comm., 2. Informal Comm., 4 (Chairman). Soph.- Senior Hop Comm., 2. Military Ball Comm., 3. Psychology Club, 4. Advanced Military, 3, 4. Foot- ball, 1, 2, 3 (M), 4 (M). Hockey, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4 (M). Spring Track, 1, 2, 3, 4. Winter Track, 1, 2, 3, 4. Basebah, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), 4. Lambda Chi Alpha, (Vice-Pres., 2-3). Louisa Elsie Towne Rockwood Road, Norfolk, Mass. Born 1917 at Norfolk. Graduate Walpole High School. Major in Home Economics. Outing Club, 1. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3 (Treasiu-er) , 4 (Pres.). 4-H Club, 1, 2. Mother ' s Day Comm., 3. Phi Zeta. {Ill] Floyd Wayne Townsley Ashfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Ashfield. Graduate Sanderson Aca- demy. Major in History. Honor Council, 2, 3, 4. Dad ' s Day Comm., 4. Military Ball Comm., 4. Men ' s Rifle Team, 3, 4. Senior Class Nominating Comm., (Chairman). Advanced Military, 3, 4. Football, 1, 2. Winter Track, 3, 4. Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4. Lambda Chi Alpha. Phila Kellogg Vaill Monson, Mass. Born 1915 at Monson. Graduate Monson High School. Transfer American International College. Major in Bacteriology and Chemistry. Nicholas John Valvanis 1 Central Street, Haverhill, Mass. Born 1915 at Haverhill. Graduate Haverhill High School. Major in Chemistry. Delia Roberta Walkey High Street, South Hanson, Mass. Born 1916 at North Hanson. Graduate Whitman High School. Major in Home Economics. Collegian, 2, 3 (News Editor). Women ' s Glee Club, 2. Student Religious Council, 3, 4 (Secretary). Newman Club. 1, 2, 3, 4. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 (Pubhcity- Manager, 3, 4). 4-H Club, 1, 2. Phi Zeta, (Historian, 2, 3, 4). [112} QloM. c4 1938 William Fuller Welcker 95 Lincoln Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in English. Index, 3 (Associate Edi- tor). Psychology Club, 3. Swimming, 1, 2, 3. James Francis Wheeler Worcester Street, Natick, Mass. Born 1915 at Natick. Graduate Natick High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Landscape Club, 3, 4. Swimming, 1, 2. Alpha Gamma Rho. Howard Eric White North Pleasant Street, North Amherst, Mass. Born 1909 at Mansonville, Province Quebec, Canada. Graduate Enosburg Falls High School, Vt. Transfer Becker Business College, Worcester, Mass. Major in Animal Husbandry. Walter Augustus Whitney, Jr. Ashfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Ashfield. Graduate Sanderson Aca- demy. Major in Distributed Sciences. Mathematics Club, 4. Football, 1. Cross-Country, 2. Spring Track, 2. Baseball, 1. [113] Carl Richard Wildner Belchertown Road, Amherst, Mass. Born 1915 at Holyoke. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Dairy Industry. Orchestra, 1, 2, 4. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 4. Dairy Club, 2, 3, 4. Bacteriology Club, 4. Advanced Military, 3, 4. DeVoe Holmes Willard 206 Goodwood Gardens, Roland Park, Baltimore Maryland Born 1916 at New York. Graduate Episcopal High School, Alexandria, Va. Transfer Hamilton College. Major in Agriculture. Animal Husbandry Club, 4. Animal Husbandry Judging Team, 4. Psi Upsilon. Margaret Dorothy Wilson 69 Sycamore Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Languages and Literature. Sigma Beta Chi. Douglas James Wood 97 Chestnut Street, Florence, Mass. Born 1916 at Greenfield, Graduate Mount Hermon School. Major in Pre-Med. Pre-Med. Club, 3, 4. Football, 1, 2,3,4 (M). Q. T. V. [114] eiuiA c4 1938 Lois Virginia Wood Williams Street, West Upton, Mass. Born 1917 at West Upton. Graduate Upton High School. Major in Home Economics. Outing Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Bacteriology Club, 3. Alpha Lambda Mu, (Vice-Pres., 4). Ruth Elizabeth Wood 28 Sycamore Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Graduate Technical High School. Major in Floriculture. W. S. G. A., 1, 2. Class Vice-Pres., 1, 2, 3, 4. Women ' s Glee Club, 1. Bay State Revue, 3. Carnival Ball Comm., 3. Women ' s Athletic Association, 2, 3, 4 (Tennis Manager). Lambda Delta Mu, (Lambda Chairman, 2. Pres. 4). Morjorie Helena Woodin 9 Grand Avenue, Millers Falls, Mass. Born 1916 at Adams. Graduate Turners Falls High School. Transfer Our Lady of the Elms College. Major in English. Newman Club, 2, 3, 4. Clare Pauline Youngren 15 Blodgett Street, Orange, Mass. Born 1917 at Orange. Graduate Orange High School. Major in English. [115} FORMER MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1938 George Bruce Adams Myron Alport Marjorie D. Annis Lois A. Barnard Lewis K. Bartlett Barbara E. Bassett Abraham Bercovitz Nelson B. Betts Joseph Bialer Earl Blake James H. Bolton Gerard R. Bourdeau Frank Brenna Harold M. Broderick Warren E. Bryant John W. Burns Gardner L. Burt Lydia T. Carpenter Herbert S. Collin Vivian R. Cook Hilda C. Crosby Edward H. Day Samuel D. DeForest Terence A. Denehy Debriddhi Devakul George B. Dinan James C. Downs Richord A. Eddy Norman A. Emery Alfred Eramo Carl A. Estes Sabin P. Filipkowski Kathleen L. Fletcher Herman S. Freedman Freeman W. Frost Agnes P. Gaughan Lillian E. Gemme Elaine G. Geraghty Joseph W. Gibson Eugene P. Gieringer Francis L. Gillis Margaret Anne Goyette Laurence H. Grimard Kenneth B. Gunn Elizabeth E. Honson John H. Harris Norma I. Harry Nancy Hayes Benjamin Hirsch Robert G. Hirst Dorothy A. Hughes Donald B. Jackson John Kabat William K. Kaynor Frank W. Kingsbury Everett L. Kneeland Eva M. Knight Walter S. Knight Hilda R. Kreyssig Sidney J. Kurnitsky Miles J. Leavitt Frederick B. Lindstrom Gardner C. Lombard Anna E. Lovett Margaret T. Lovett Frank M. Lyon William J, McKinney John F. McMahon Horry Metoxes Frederick J. Meyer Joy E. Moore Louise D. Morgan Edward M. Munson, Jr. Willard S. Munson George E. O ' Brien Robert T. O ' Neill Walter H. Perry Ruth E. Philip Muriel Phillips Pauline E. Podlenski Norland H. Pratt Sally L. Pratt John E. Rice, Jr. Frances S. Richmond Viola L. Rock Francis J. Rogers Milliard Rosenberg Edward S. Rudzki George I. Ryer Lee S. Sannella Elizabeth T. Scoce Philip T. Schneider Frank Sherman Emil Smaha Felix E. Soderman Emma M. Taft Harvey J. Tripp John A, Tuttle Frank L. Umansky Osgood L. Villaume Norman E. Walker Ruth E. Walker Elizabeth J. Wostcoat John White Martha White Jeon Whitney Roy M. Wiggin Stanley H. Wiggin Edith A. Williams Fritz A. S. Winblod [116) 5 eian. a§ 1939 CLASS OFFICERS President, Gordon E. Najar Vice-President, Constance C. Fortin Sergeant-at-Arms, Charles Rodda, Jr. S cUd. a Ylineittn Uun d ed JM t ' Hine In the fall of the yea r nineteen hundred and thirty-five, nearly three hundred and fifty new students were greeted by Pro- fessor Lanphear as the first class of post- war-babies — the class of Thirty-nine. Like all freshmen classes, we felt utterly green and confused. But it was only a short time before we had started on the road that has led us, and is still leading us, to prominence and prestige on the campus. That first fall, class elections brought to the front Richard Bowler as our President; Eleanor Nugent, our Vice- President; Constance Fortin, Secretary; Donald Calo, Treasurer; Lloyd Copeland, Captain; Walter Zajchowski, Sergeant-at- Arms. With the exception of the usual fall battles between the fi-eshmen and sophomores, our class quietly and un- conspicuously went its way on campus until the spring brought the Roister [118] eiaii. c4 1939 CLASS OFFICERS Ti-easurer, Robert B. Glass Secretary, Dorothy E. Nichols Captain, Howard N. Staff 6 04.4. o Iflineiten. Uutid ed OMhii -Yllne Bolsters ' presentation of " Othello " . At that time, one of our members, Constance Fortin, rose to great prominence and made us very proud when she alternated in the leading women ' s parts with a noted upper-class woman. Then Maroon Key elections made Robert Packard President of that honorary society; Howard Steff, Vice-President; John Click, Secretary; and Robert Cole, Donald Cadigan, Gordon Najar, Robert Swanson, Richard Bowler and Stephen Kosakowski, members. The fall of ' 36 brought our class back to Amherst eager for great accomplish- ments. Due to the fact that many of our athletes were on varsity squads, we were forced to submit to the fresh force of the class of ' 40 in the rope pull and interclass games — but we could not feel too badly about that. Gordon Najar was our new President; Constance Fortin, Vice-Presi- dent; Dorothy Nichols, Secretary; Robert [119} eicai c4 1939 Glass, Treasurer; Howard Staff, Captain; and Charles Rodda, Sergeant-at-Arms. Roger Cole and Frank Southwick were newly elected to the Maroon Key. Then came the first snowless Winter Carnival. Even though the weatherman ruled out sports and did his best to dampen our spii ' its, he could not spoil the big Carnival Ball, the Chairman of which was a mem- ber of our class — John Glick. It de- finitely became our big night when one of our classmates, Marjorie Damon, was chosen Carnival Queen. Then in the spring came the important elections to the Senate. William Howe, Robert Cain, Francis Riel, and Frank Southwick were chosen to be our senators. The Roister Doisters ' presenta- tion of " The Night of January 16th " brought before the footlights several class members, to whom we cannot help point- ing with pride. We cannot neglect to mention that one of our members, Beryl Briggs, won the second place in the Burn- ham Declamation contest, bringing more honors to our class. As the last undertaking of our Sopho- more year, we took in hand the Soph- Senior Hop, which was very successfully run under the chairmanship of William Howe, assisted by his committee — Mabelle Booth, Constance Fortin, John Glick, George Haylon, and Gordon Najar. This last fall saw the class of ' 39 as a dignified and serious-minded group of juniors. One of its first acts was the re- election of all the officers of the previous year. During Christmas, we were be- reaved of one of our very best members. It was a sad blow to all of us when we heard that death had taken Thomas Enright. The last event occuring before we sub- mitted this history was the second snow- less Winter Carnival. Once again we took in hand the Carnival Ball, with William Howe as chairman and Mabelle Booth and Robert Cain on his committee. The Roister Doister play, " Not Without Hope " , one of the highlights of the Carni- val, again brought members of our class before the footlights. And so we leave this history with the promise of many other activities to come with our members at the helm. Clifton Morey has already been elected to the captaincy of the 1939 football team. More recently Emery Moore and Mabelle Booth have been elected to the posts of Editor- in-Chief and Associate Editor of the Col- legian for the coming year. Thus we look forward with great expectations to our last and biggest year as undergraduates. [120} ML (4 1939 Robert Searle Al ien Montsoraery Road, Westfield, Mass. Born 191S at Westfield. Grad- uate Westfield High School. Major in Horticulture. Band. 1. Spring Track, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. H. Gardner Andersen 1046 Centre Street. Newton Centre, Mass. Born 1916 at Providence, R. I. Graduate Newton High School. Major in Economics. Christian Federation, 2, 3. Swimming, 2, 3. Advanced Military, 3. Phi Sigma Kappa . Rita Anderson 61 Northampton Street, Easthampton, Mass. Born 1917 at Proctor. Vermont. Graduate Easthampton High School. Major in Home Economics. Sigma Beta Chi. Milton Edward Auerboch 26 Commonwealth Avenue, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Pre-Med. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. 3. Bav State Revue, 1, 2, 3. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3, Math- ematics Club, 3. Soccer, 1, 2, 3 (M). Phi Lambda Tau. John Murray Balcom 124 Greenleaf Street, Born 1918 at Boston. Graduate Quincy High School. Major in Economics. Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3. Wesley Foundation, 2, 3. Phillips Brooks Club, 2 (President) 3 (President). Cross-Country, 1, 2, Sigma Alpha Epsilon (Eminent Cor- respondent, 3). Harvey Ellis Barke 11 Stoddard Street, Plymouth, Mass. Born 1917 at Plymouth. Grad- uate Plymouth High School. Ma.)or in Floriculture. Football, 1. Hockev. 1, 2. Baseball, 1, 2. Alpha Sigma Phi. William F. Barrett 6 Orchard Street, Adams, Mass. Born 1917 at North Adams. Graduate Adams High School. Major in Chemistry and Math- a tics Ma Che istrv Club, 2, 3. Mathematics Club, 2, 3. Football, 1. Basketball. 1, 3. Baseball, 1. Sigma Phi Epsilon (Marshal, 2, 3). Lawrence Matthews Bortlett 41 Lawrence Road. Medford, Mass. Born 1916 at Concord, N. H. Graduate Medford High School and Dean Academv. Major in Entomol- ogy. Entomology Club, 3. Sidney Harold Beck 106 Harvard Street, Maiden, Mass. Born 1916 at New Haven, Conn. Graduate Hillhouse High School. New Haven. Major in Dairy In- dustry. Roister Doisters, 2, 3 (As- sistant Manager). Joint Comm. on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3. Fresh- man Handbook. 1 (Business Mana- ger). Hockev. 2, 3 (Manager). Alpha Eiisilon Pi. Wallace George Beckman 43 Villa Parkway, Springfield, Mass. Born 1915 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Entomology. Fernald Entomol- ogy Club, 3. Alpha Gamma Rho (Secretary 3). Max Belgrade 10 Wilson Avenue. Northampton, Mass. Born 1915 at Eas on. Pa. Grad- uate Bulkelev High School. New London. Conn. Major in Chemistry. John Bemben Box 419, East Street, Hadley, Mass. Born 1916 at Hadley. Graduate Hopkins Academv. Major in Math- ematics. Basketball. 2, 3. Base- ball, 2 (M), 3. George Cobb Benjamin 107 Maple Street, Lee, Mass. Born 1916 at Pittsfield, Grad- uate Lee High School. Major in Pre-Med. Collegian, 2, 3. Military Ball Comm., 3. Pre-Med. Club, 1. 2. 3. Class Nominating Comm., 3 (Chairman). Soccer. 1, 2 (M), 3. Advanced Military, 3. Phi Sigma Kappa. James George Bennos 4 nicltinsnn Street. Amherst. Mass. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in English. Soccer, 1. Stanley Bettoney 776 Central Street, Stoughton. Mass. Born 1918 at Philadelphia, Pa. Graduate Stoughton High School. Major in Floriculture. Q. T. V. George Herman Bischoff 113 Westfield Road, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Holyoke. Graduate Holvoke High School. Major in Chemistrv. Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3. Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3. Ad- vanced Military, 3. Lawrence Hubbard Bixby Sunderland, Mass. Born 1917 at Sunderland. Grad- uate Amherst High School. Ma]or in Agricultural Economics. Outing Club 1, 2, 3. Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3 (President). 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3 (Treasurer and His- torian). Football, 2. Cross-Country, 1, 3 (M). Spring Track, 1, 2. Irving Blassberg 30 Park Street, Turners Falls, Mass. Born 1917 at Turners Falls. Graduate Turners Palls High School. Major in Chemistry. Men- orah Club, 1, 2, 3. Chemistry Club, 2 3 Mathematics Club, 2, 3. Phi Lambda Tau. Mabelle Booth 11 Bentwood Street, Fo. boro, Mass. Born 1919 at New York City, N Y Graduate Foxboro High School. Major in Economics. Col- leo-ian 2 3. Bay State Revue, 6. Soph-Senior Hop Committee, 2. Lambda Delta Mu. Bertha Barbara Boron 14 Thayer Street. South Deerfleld, Mass. Born 1916 at Chicopee. Grad- uate Deerfleld High School. Major in History. Geraldine Irene Bradley 886 Main Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at New Haveu, Conn. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Psychology. Carnival Comm., 1. Outing Club 1, 2 3. Psychology Club, 3. 4-H Club, 2, 3. Phillips Brooks Club, 2, 3. Charles Leiand Branch 83 Dana Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1917 at Waterville, New York Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Zoology. Pre- Med. Club 2, 3. Soccer, 1, 2. Basketball, 1. Winter Track, 2. Phi Sigma Kappa. James Lewis Bronn, Jr. High Street, Westvvood, Mass. Born 1913 at Norwood. Graduate Dedham High School. Transfer Boston University. Major in En- tomology. Fernald Entomology Club, 3. 4-H Club, 2, 3. Q. T. V. Pauline Jean Brett Franklin Street, Duxbury, Mass. Born 1917 at Forrest Hills. Grad- uate Northfleld Seminary and Dux- burv High School. Major in Home Economics. Press Club, 2. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. Women ' s Athletic Assoc, 2, 3 (Bowling Mgr.). [121] e£ai.i a 1939 Beryl Frances Briggs Gingerbread Lane, Ashburnham, Mass . Born 1918 at Fitchburg. Grad- uate Gushing Academy. Major in Home Economics. Roister Doisters, 1, 2, 3. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. Women ' s Athletic Assoc. 3 (Manager of Swimming). Inter- sororitv Council. 3 (Secretarv- Treasurer). Lambda Delta Mu. Pauline Emelya Brisset 89,5 Hampshire Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Holvoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in French and Economics. Newman Club, 1. 2, 3. International Rela- tions Club, 3. Arthur David Broadfoot 24 Stockbridge Road, Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at Amherst. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Economics. Swimming, 1. Kappa George Brody 62 Brunswick Street, Roxbury, Mass. Born 1918 at Boston. Graduate Roxbury Memorial High School. Major in Zoologv-Genetics. Band, 1, 2. Bay State Revue. 1, 2. Men ' s Debating Team. 3. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3. Carnival Comm., 3. An- imal Husbandrv Club, 1, 2. Math- ematics Club, 2, 3. Poultry Club, 1, 2. Freshman Handbook, 1 (Ed- itor) . Boxing, 1,2,3. Cross-Country, 1, 2, 3, 4 (M), (Manager). Spring Ti-ack, 1, 2, 3 (M), CManager). Winter Track, 1, 2, 3 (M), (Man- ager). Bacteriology Club, 2, 3. Comm. Intercollegiate Athletics, 3. Donald Emerson Brown 111 Wiillis street, IJcvcrly, Mass. Bora 1918 at Germantown, Pa. Graduate Beverly High School. Major in Zoology. Outing Club, 1, 2. Pre-JIed. Club. 2, 3. Radio Club, 2. Sigma Alpha Bpsilon. Rita Marie Buckley 38 Cross Street, Beverly, Mass. Born 1917 at Salem. Graduate Beverly High School. Major in Home Economics. Bay State Revue, 3. Newman Club, 3. Home Econ- omics Club, 1, 2, 3. Sigma Beta Chi. Philip Eugene Burgun 37 Chapel Street, Canton, Mass. Born 1917 at Jamaica, N. Y. Graduate Canton High School. Major in Economics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Carnival Comm., 2. Sigma Phi Epsilon (Rushing Chairman, 2, House Manager, 2). Donald Winslow Cadigon 53 Beacon Street, Greenfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Greenfield. Grad- uate Greenfield High School. Major in Zoology. Maroon Key, 2. Roister Doisters, 1, 2, 3. Christian Fed- eration, 1. Dad ' s Day Comm., ]. 2, 3. Outing Club. 1. Advanced Military, 3. Q. T. V. Robert Emery Coin Co . Ma Born 1916 at North Adams. Graduate Deerfleld Academy. Major in Forestry. Orchestra, 2, 3. Stu- dent Senate, 3. Bay State Revue, 2. Soccer, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M). Spring Track, 2. 3. Winter Track, 2, 3. Advanced Military, 3. Kappa Sigma. Donald Calo 149-18 41 Avenue, Flushing, New York Born 1919 at New York City. Graduate McBurney School. Class Officer, 1 (Treasurer). Chemistry Club, 1, 2. 3. Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3. Soccer, 1. Swimming, 1, 2 (M), 3. Advanced Military, 3. Phi Sigma Kappa. Abraham Carp 96 Elm Hill Avenue. Boston, Mass. Born 1918 at Boston. Graduate Boston Latin School. Major in Psychology. Collegian, 1, 2, 3. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3. Pre-Med. Club, 2, 3. Psychology Club, 3. Interfraternitv Council, 2, 3. Alpha Epsilon Pi (Historian 2, Sentinel 3). Wellington Elmer Cassidy 14 Pleasant Street, North Andover, Mass. Born 1917 at New Brunswick, Canada. Graduate Johnson High School. Major in Chemistry. Q.T.V. Ronald Hole Chapin ■Jl Liuclen Avenue, Greenfield. Mass. Born 1916 at Greenfield. Grad- uate Deerfleld Academy. Major in Chemistry. Theta Chi. Charles Frederick Christie North Pleasant Street, North Amherst. Mass. Born 1916 at Everett. Graduate Waltham High School. Major in Chemistry. Spring Track. 1. Leon Stanley Ciereszko 80 Maple Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 1 ,2, 3. Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3. Elizabeth May Clapp 8 Harvard Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Home Economics. W. S. G. A. 1, 2, 3 (Vice-Pres.). Home Econ- omics Club, 1, 2 (Secretary), 3 (Vice-Pres.). Sigma Beta Chi (Treasurer 3). Robert Salisbury Cole 20 High Street, Westfleld, Mass. Born 1918 at Springfield. Grad- uate Westfleld High School. Major in Recreational Planning. Carnival Comm., 1, 2, 3. Outing Club, 1, 2, 3 (Vice-Pres.). Radio Club, 1, 2. Swimnii«g, 1. 2, 3. Advat ced Mil- itary, 3. Alpha Sigma Phi. Roger Martin Cole 9 West Street, Marblehead, Mass. Born 1917 at Canton, Maine. Graduate Marblehead High School. Major in Zoology. Maroon Key, 2. Orchestra, 1 (Assistant Mana.ger). Band, 1. Outing Club, 1, 2, 3. Soccer, 1, 2, 3. Hockey, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Doris Colgate Concord R oad, Billerica, Mass. Born 1918 at Billerica. Grad- uate Howe High School. Major in Entomology. Outing Club, 3 (Sec- retary), 3 (Secretary!. Fernald Entomology Club, 3 (Secretary). Grace B. Cooper Stockbridge, .Ma.ss. Born I ' M s ,11 si.i.kbridge. Grad- uate " Willi. hi, Hill .School. Major in Home I , les. Index, 3. Home EeMi.un.ies Club, 1, 3. [122] eiai.1 4 1939 Lloyd Bordwell Copelond Roger Herman Decker Oi ilrai n, Jla ss. Boi ' n 1917 at Greenfield. Grad- Ui! ite Arm; Aci demy, Shelburne Fi ills. Ma, jor in Chemistry. Class Officei ■. 1 (Temporary Captain). C( jlleg ian 3. Cross-Coun try, 3. Bi jsketball. 1. Ad vanced Military. 3. 11 JIa Ivan Roper Cousins 110 Franklin Street, Greenfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Fitchburg. Grad- uate Greenfield High School. Major in English. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. Bay State Revue, 1, 2, 3. Roister Doisters, 1, 2, 3. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Donald Harry Cowles 24 Colborne Road, Brighton, Mass. Born 1917 at Westfield. Grad- uate Briahton High School. Major in Forestry. Collegian, 1, 2. Car- nival Comm., 2, 3 (Chairman Win- ter Sports). Psychology Club, 3. Football, 1, 2, 3. Spring Track, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha (Vice-Pres. 3). William Hayward Cox 192 Summer Street, Born uate Major 1916 at Bridgewater. Grad- iridgewater High School. Entomology. Pernald Entomology Club. Justine Cotta Crosby 49 Clinton Place, Newton Center, Mass. Bnrn 1917 at Newton Center. Graduate Newton High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 2, 3. Sigma Beta Chi. Shelagh Agnes Crowley 32 Beauview Terrace, West Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- ua ' e West Springfield fligh School. Major in Home Economics. Lambda Delta Mu. Eleanor Savel Curtis 96 Stafford Street, Worcester, Mass. Born 1917 at Worcester. Grad- uate South High School. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. Mildred Ann Czajkowski Box 107, Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at Hadley. Hopkins Academy. _Majc Economics. Hom 1, 2, 3. Graduate in Home Club, Marjorie Eva Damon Havdenville, Mass. Born 1917 at Florence. Gradua Williamsburg High School. Maj in English. Sigma Beta Chi. Beatrice Louise Davenport North Avenue, Mendon, Mass. Born 1913 at Mendon. Graduate Gushing Academy. Major in His- tory. Alpha Lambda Mu (Social Chairman 2, 3). Dorothy Mary Decatur Draper Road. Wayland. Mass. Born 191S at War lar id. Grad- UE ite Wa ivland Hi gh Sc: ho( )1. Ti-ans- £e r Rad cliffe. Ma jor in H omt j Econ- omics. Newn lan Club, 2, 3. Home E conom ies Club, 2, 3. 4-H Club, sttield, Mass. Born 1919 at Westfield. Grad- uate Westfield High School. Major in Chemistry. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. Wesley Foundation, 3. Radio Club. 2. Chemistry Club, 2, 3. Mathematics Club, 1, 2, 3. Alpha Gamma Eho. Raymond Alphonse Degraff 50 West Glen Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1918 at Holyoke. Graduate Holvoke High School. Major in Chemistry. Q. T. V. Edgar Wellwood Dimock Charlton Street, Oxford, Mass. Born 1917 at Worcester. Grad- uate Oxford High School. Major in Dairy Industry. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Dairy Club, 1, 2, 3. Cross-Country, 1. Q. T. V. Ethel Winnifred Dixon Leverett, Mass. Born 1917 at Monmouth, Maine. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. 4-H Club, 2, 3. Joseph Anthony Doherty 20 Warren Street, Revere, Mass. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate Revere High School. Major in Zoology. Pre-Med. Club. 1, 2, 3. Soccer, 1. Spring Track, 1, Win- ter Track, 3. Kenneth Ronald Dorman 7 Highland Terrace, Gilbertville, Mass. Born 1916 at Gilbertville. Grad- uate Hardwick High School. Major in Dairy Industry. Band, 1, 2. Spring Track, 1. Winter Track, 1. Sigma Phi Bpsilon. Doris Hopkins Dyer 63A Main Street, Saugus, Mass. Born 1917 at Saugus. Graduate Saugus High School. Major in Psviliolngy. Psychology Club, 3. Class Nominating Comm., 3. Sigma lirtN Chi (Social Chairman 3). Elizabeth Dockham Eaton J ' lr H.I i.ki... Mil Born 1910 at Holvoke. Graduate Holvoke High School. Major in Engfish. Bay State Revue, 1, 3. Christian Federation, 2. Lambda Delta Mu. Eva Margaret Eldridge Hnili;c Street, South Yarmouth, Mass. Born 1918 at South Yarmouth. Graduate Yarmouth High School. Major in French. Bay State Revue, 3. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Outing Club, 1. Sigma Beta Chi. Everett Warner Eldridge, Jr. 38 Converse Street, Palmer, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield, uate Palmer High School, in Economics. Football, 1, ketBall, 1, 2, 3. Advanced Military, 3, Interfraternity Council, 2, 3 (Ti-easurer). Theta Chi (Marshal Richard Duncan Elliott 16 Stevens Street, Winchester, Mass. Born 1916 at Winchester. Grad- uate Winchester High School. Major in Olericulture. Outing Club, 1, 2, 3 (Corres. Sec). Dairy Club, 1, 2, 3. Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3. 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3. Cross- Country, 1. Sigma Alpha Epsilon (Historian) . Grad- Major »» c " • si [123} eecm. (4 1939 Marjorie Harrold Esson 127 i ' ' airiiiount Street, Dorcliester, Mass. Born 1917 at Dorchester. Grad- uate Dorcliester High School for Girls. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Athletic Association, 3 (President). Frederick Dickinson Estabrook 14 Park Street, Florence, Mass. Born 1916 at New Britain. Conn. Graduate Mount Hermon. Ma.ior in Civil Engineei-ing. Spring Track, 1. Winter Track, 2. Kappa Sigma (Assist. Treas. 3). Francis Thomas Fanning 31 State Street, Milton, Mass. Born 1915 at Milton. Graduate Kents Hill School. Major in Econ- omics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Football, 1, 2. Baseball, 1, 2. Phi Sigma Kappa. Francis John Forren 7 Burt Street, Adams, Mass. Born 1915 at North Adams. Graduate Adams High School. Jrajor in Chemistry and Bacteriology. Soccer, 1, 3. l.eo Daniel Fay 28 Aldworth Street, Boston, Mass. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate Jamaica Plain High School. Major in Animal Husbandry. Q. T. V. Maurice Feotherman Born 1916 at Natick. Graduate Natick High School. Major in Economics. Freshman Handbook, 1 (Assoc. Ed.). Football, 1. Bas- ketball, 1. Spring Track. 1. Win- ter Track, 1. Alpha Epsilon Pi (Quarterly Correspondent 3). Myron Wolf Fisher 32,5 Shirley Street, Winthrop, Mass. Born 1918 at Hudson. Graduate Winthrop High School. Major in Dairy Industry. Index, 3 (Assist. Art Ed.). Collegian, 3. Bay State Revue. 1. 2. Carnival Coram., 2, 3 (Trans. Comm.). Swimming, 1, 2. Phi Lambda Tau. ileanor Frances Fitts Born 1917 at Northboro. Grad- uate Northboro High School. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. Bay State Revue, 1, 2. Home Economies Club, 1, 2, 3. William H. FitzPatrick 168 Main Street, Amesbury, Mass. Born 1916 at Newburvport. Graduate Governor Dumnier Acad- emy. Major in Horticultural Man- ufactures. Band, 1, 2. Newman Club, 1, 2. Carnival Comm., 2. Elizabeth Peer Flynn Belchertown, Mass. Born at Springfield. Graduate Classical High School, Springfield. Major in Psychology. Wilma Ruth Foerster 45 Lau-ler Sti ' eet, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1918 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Psychology. Berfrom Fogel 4 Maple Street, Ro.xbury, Mass. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduate English High School. Boston. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 3. Football, 1. Alpha Epsilon Pi (Historian, 2). Joseph S. Folkner 333 West Florida Street, Denver, Colorado Born 1918 at Denver, Colorado. Graduate Regis Preparatory School. Denver. Transfer Colorado State College. Major in Landscape Archi- tecture. Newman Club, 3. Land- scape Club, 3. Phi Delta Theta. Constance Claire Fortin 18 Gates Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Holvoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in English. Class Officer, 1 (Sec). 2 and 3 (Vice-Pres.) . Bay State Revue, 2, 3 (Comm. in charge). Roister Doisters. 1. 2, 3 (Vice- Pres.). Student Religious Coun- cil, 2 (Secretary). Newman Club, 1, 3 (Council Member), 3. Sopli.- Senior Hop Coram., 2. Intersororitv Declamation Contest, 1, 2. Fresh- man Hazing Comm.. 2. Freshman Handbook Comm., 1. M. S. C. Radio Programs. 2, 3. Intersorority Council, 3. Phi Zeta (Vice-Pres. 3) . Ralph Longwell Foster Colrain, Mass. Born 1917 at Greenfield. Grad- uate Greenfield High School. Major in Chemistry. Donald Maxwell Fowell . la ■il K Novtliain]il()n, Mass. Born lUlG at Columbus. Ohio. Graduate University of Toronto Schools. Transfer University of Toronto Schools. Major in Zoology. Bay State Revue, 2. Roister Doisters. 2. 3. Pre-Med. Club. 3. John Joseph Galvin 5 Edward ' s Square, Northampton, Mass, Born 1916 at Brattleboro, Vt. Graduate St. Michael ' s High School. Maior in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 1, 2. Soccer, 1. Basket- ball. 1. Baseball. 1. Sigma Phi Epsilon. Richard Alden Giles Main Street, Cummington, Mass. Born 1917 at Cummington. Grad- uate Northampton High School. Major in Botany. Outing Club. 2. 3 (Trails Coram.). Spring Track. 2. Baseball, 1. Sigma Alpha Ep- silon (Eminent Herald, 3). John Ferol Click 6 North Hadley Road, Amherst, Mass. Born 1917 at Freenort. Illinois. Graduate Amherst High School. Kimball Union Academy. Major in Economics. Maroon Kev. 2 (Seo.- Treas.). Band, 1 ,n in :il Hall Comm., 2 (Chairni,-,u . I ' ,, l,.,l„av Club, 1, 2, 3, S,,|.t -. rni, Hop Comm.. 2. Bunili.iin I r, h, mkh ion Contest, 1. 2. Fooll)all. 1. Bas- ketball. 2, 3. Intertraternitv Council. 2. Kappa Sigma. Lewis Lyman Glow Brookiine Strecl. Bast Pepperell. Mass. Bern i:)ir, ,■,! i:;,-! r,.,,| rroll, Gr;i.lii:ilr I ' lpii, ' ,, II III II .. liiHll. David Goldberg 276 State Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1916 at Newark, N. J. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Mathematics, Sylvia Goldman 9 Lamar Avenne, Worcester, Mass. Born 1917 at Worcester. Grad- uate Classical High School, Wor- cester. Major in Bacteriology. Wo- men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. Bay State Revue, 3. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3. Chemistry Club, 2, 3. Sigma Iota (See., 3). Frederick Dickinson Goode, Jr. 139 Hancock Street, Auburndale, Mass. Born 1916 at Brooklyn, N. Y. Graduate Newton High School. Major in Mathematics. Soccer, 1. Theta Chi (Guard, 3), Harold Thomas Gordon 71 Center Street, Hoiyoke, Mass. Born 1918 at Holvoke. Grad- uate Holyoke High School. Major in Zoology. Chester Allen Gove 239 School Street, Walpole, Mass. Born 1916 at Walpole. Graduate Walpole High School. Major in Economics. Collegian, 1, 2, 3. Soccer, 1. Hockey, 1, 2, 3. Phi Sigma Kappa. Emerson Wallace Grant Bridge Street. Middleboro, Mass. Born 1917 at Easton. Graduate Vermont Academy. Major in Ani- mal Husbandry. Animal Husbandry Club. 1, 2, 3. Dairy Cattle Judging Team. 3. Advanced Militar , 3. Phi Sigma Kappa. James Oliver Stanley Graves 9 Pairview Terrace, Greenfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Hatfield. Graduate Greenfield High School and Deer- field Academy. Major in Animal Husbandry. Animal Husbandry Club, 2, 3. Spring Track, 1. In- terfraternitv Council. 3. Alpha Gamma Rho (Vice-Pres.. 3). Charles William Griffin 934 Dwight Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in English. Men ' s Glee Club, 3. Football. 1. Spring Track, 1, 2 (M). Winter Track, 1, 2. Ad- vanced Military, 3. Lambda Chi Alpha. Marion Elizabeth Gunness 105 Butterfield Terrace, Amherst, Mass. Bo Amli. 1918 at uate Amherst High srh nl in Distributed Sen m Club, 2. Women ' s . ilil,iii 1, 2, 3 (Manager .if H;i.lii Bettina Hall 75 Carpenter Street, Foxboro, Mass, Born 1918 at Foxboro. Grad- uate Foxboro High School. : lajor in Pre-Med. Colle!;ia n. ■. " HihI ' s Day Coram., 3, 3. I ' n Mnl ' lnli. 2, 3. Women ' s Atlilcn, ,., i. n. 3 (Secretary), 3 ( n- I Ti-hIimii 1 . Lambda Delta Mu. [124] au, c4 1939 Thomas Edward Handforth 161 Jlain Street, West Jledwiiy, Mass. Born 1915 at Quiiicy. Graduate Medway High School. Major in Economics. Band, 1, 2, 3. Bay State Revue, 1, 2, 3. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Alpha Gamma Rho. William James Hanigan, Jr. 24y White Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1914 at Ludlow. Graduate Cathedral High School. Transfer American International College, Springfield. Major in Chemistry. Newman Club, 2, 3. Chemistry Club, 3. Mathematics Club, 3. Football, 3. Alpha Sigma Phi. Marjorie Eulala Harris 40 Josliu Street, Leominster, Mas Born 1915 at uate Leominst Transfer F r a Teachers Colleg Wi Gle State Rev. .. Home Economi 4-H Club, 1. 2, letic Associatioi Mu. Leominster. Grad- er High School, n i n g h a m State !. Major in Home a n d Floriculture. Club, 1, 2. Bay Outing Club, 2. :s Club, 1, 2, 3. 3. Women ' s Ath- , 3. Lambda Delta George Joseph Haylon 13 Broad Street, Pittsfleld, Mass. Born 1917 at Pittsfield. Grad- uate Pittsfleld High School. Major in History-Sociology. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3 (Publicity Secretary). Informal Comm., 3. Dad ' s Day Comm., 2, 3 (Chairman). Soph.- Senior Hop Comm,, 2. Student A. B. Degree Comm., 2, 3. Ad- vanced Military, 3. Interfraternity Council, 3 (Secretary). Lambda Chi Alpha. Paul Harlow Haynes 155 High Street, Southbridge, Mass. Born 1918 at Worcester. Grad- uate Mary E. Wells High School. Major in Mathematics. Mathe- matics Club, 2, 3. Frank Clifford Healy 119 Buckland Street, Buckland, Conn. Born 1917 at Buckland. Grad- uate Manchester High School, Conn. Major in Chemistry. Newman Club, ' 3 Carnivtl Comm 3 (Assist. Treas.). Chemistry Chtb, 2, 3. Mathematics Club, 2. Joint Comm. on Inter-Collegiate Athletics, 3. Football, 1, 3 (Assist. Mgr.). Win- ter Track, 2, 3. Baseball, 1, 2. Advanced Military, 3. Sigma Phi Bpsilou (Marshal, 2, Guard, 3). Jeanette Herman 2 Homestead Park, Boston, Mass. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate Memorial High School for Girls. Major in Chemistry and Bacteri- ology. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. Bav State Revue, 3. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3. Chemistry Club. 2, 3. (Reporter). Bacteriology Club, 3. Sigma Iota. David Winford Hornbaker 31 Indian Hill Road, Worcester, Mass. Born 1917 at Worcester. Grad- uate North High School, Worcester. Major in Chemistrv. Cheerleader, 3. Basketball, 2. 3 (Assist. Mgr.). Baseball, 1. Theta Chi. William Wallace Howe, Jr. 4 Main Street, Dalton, Mass. Born 1917 at Pittsfleld. Grad- uate Dalton High School. Major in Pre-Dental. Student Senate, 3 (Secretary). Carnival Comm., 3. Carnival Ball Comm.. 3 (Chair- man). Soph. -Senior Hop Comm., 2 (Chairman). Class Nominating Coram., 2. Football, 1, 2. Advanced Military, 3. Theta Chi. Herbert Shurtleff Howes 8 Rice Street, Middleboro, Mass. Born 1917 at Middleboro. Grad- uate Memorial High School. Major in Economics. Carnival Coram., 3. Class Nominating_ Comm., 3. Swim- ming, 2 (M). Kappa Sigma. Stephen Malcolm Jablonski 8 Power Street, Greenfleld, Mass. Born 1918 at Greenfield. Grad- uate Greenfleld High School. Major n Chemistrv. Spring Track, 2. Winter Track, 2. Sigma Phi Ep- siloii. Elizabeth Shirley Jasper 7(i Virginia Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Christ- ian Federation, 1. Home Econom- ics Club, 1, 2, 3. Badminton Club, 2, 3. Swimming Club, 2, 3. Lambda Delta Mu. Joseph John Javorski 5 Alden Avenue. Thompsonville, Conn. Born 1916 at Thompsonville. Graduate Enfield High School. Transfer American International College. Major in Chemistry. David Hammond Johnson 40 Mapleton Avenue, Suffteld, Conn. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Suffield High School. Ti-ans- fer University of Colorado. Major in Economics. Sigma Phi Epsilon (Historian, 3, Pledge Master, 3). Laurence Edward Johnson 598 Dwight Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Grad- uate Williston Academy. Major in Economics. Soccer, 1, 2, 3. Kappa Sigma. Charles Nelson Julian 4 Farview Vay, Amherst, Mass. Born 1914 at Amherst. Grad- uate Amherst High School. Major in Physics. Honor Council, 1. 2, 3 (Secretary). Band, 1, 2. Radio Club, 1, 2 (President). Phi Sigma Kappa. Arthur Milton Kaplan 57 Marlborough Street, Chelsea. Mass. Born 1918 at Chelsea. Graduate Chelsea High School. Major in Bacteriology. Bacteriology Club. 3. ng, 1. Alpha Epsilon Pi. Anne Fern Kaplinsky 306 Chestnut Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1918 at Holyoke. Grad- uate Holyoke High School. Major in English. Bay State Revue. 3. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3. Sigma Iota (Corres. Sec. 3 ). Coleman Katz 119 Homestead Street, Roxbury, Mass. Born 1918 at Boston. Graduate Boston Latin School. Major in Pomology. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Bay State Revue, 1, 2. Freshman Handbook, 1. Football, 1. 2, Phi. Lambda Tau (Sergeant-at-Arms, 2, Bursar. 3). Mary Margaret Keefe 37 West School Street, Westfleld, Mass. Born 1918 at Westfleld. Grad- uate Westfleld High School. Major in History. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Lambda Delta Mu. Katherine Eleanor Kerivon 959 Chestnut Street, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. Born 1917 at Newton. Graduate Newton High School. Major in French. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Lambda Delta Mu. Louis Kertzman 10 Magnus Avenue, Somerville, Mass. Born 1919 at Somerville. Grad- uate Somerville High School. Major in Dairy Industry. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3. Hockey, 1. Alpha Epsilon Pi (Scribe, 3). Edmund M. Keyes South Valley Road, West Pelham, Mass. Born 1916 at Pelham. Graduate Hopkins Academy. Hadley. Major in History. Soccer, 1, 2. Winter Track, 1, 2. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. James Sumner King 19 Great Road, Maynard, Mass. Born 1917 at Bath, Maine. Grad- uate Lawrence Academy. Major in Mathematics. Class Nomiinating Coram., 3. Mathematics Club, 3. Lambda Chi Alpha (Sec, 2-3; Treas., 3-4). Aileen Louise Kingsbury 109 River Street, Br , Mas Born 1903 at Braintree. Grad- uate Braintree High School, Thayer Academy. Transfer Plymouth Nor- mal School, N. H. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 2. 3. Dorothy Lillian Koehler 32 Maple Street, Greenfleld, Mass. Born 1916 at New Haven, Conn. Graduate Greenfleld High School. Major in Home Economics. Wo- men ' s Glee Club, 1. Christian Fed- eration, 1, 2 (Sec), 3 (Vice-Pres.). Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. 4-H Club, 1. 2. 3. Stanley Joseph Krowka 108 Franklin Street, Northampton. Mass. Born 1916 at Northampton. Graduate St. Michael ' s High School. Northampton. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 2, 3. Donald S. Lawson 18 College Farm Road, Waltham, Mass. Born 1917 at Waltham. Grad- uate Waltham High School. Major in Economics. Band. 1, 2. Soc- cer, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Leo Joseph Leclair 1 1 South Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at Amherst. Grad- uate Amherst High School. Major in Engli,sh. Bay State Revue, 3. Roister Doisters, 2, ' 3. [125] e aii ck(. 1939 Richard Everett Lee 96 Morgan Street, New Bedford. Mass. Born 1918 at New Bedford. Graduate New Bedford High School. Major in Pre-Med. Class Officer, 1 (Sergeant-at-Arms). Pre- Med. Club, 2. Football, 1, 2. Men ' s Rifle Team, 1, 2. Class Nominat- ing Comm., 2. Lambda Chi Alpha. Charles Edward Lehr 68 Parkside Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1915 at Chicago, 111. Grad- uate Cathedral High School, Spring- field. Transfer American Interna- tional College, Springfield. Major in Economicli. Psvchologv Club, 2, 3. Football, 2, 3. Basketball, 2. Spring Track. 2. Alpha Sigma Phi. Leonard Maurice Levin 35 Maple Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1917 at Northampton. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Men ' s Debating Team, 3. Soccer, 1. Parker Earl Lichtenstein 66 Sargent Street, Melrose, Mass. Born 1915 at Somerville. Grad- uate Melrose High School. Major in Psvchologv. Psychology Club. 2. 3. ' Football. 1. Baseball, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Clifford Ellwood Lippincott IDA Laurel Street, Lee, Mass. Born 1917 at Philadelphia, Pa. Graduate Lee High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Men ' s Glee Club, 2. Outing Club, 3. Swimming, 1. Advanced Military, 3. Phi Sigma Kappa. Marjorie Litchfield 7 5 Central Avenue, Hyde Park, Mass. Born 1917 at Newton. Graduate Hyde Park High School. Major in Home Economics. Outing Club, 2. Home Economics Club, 2, 3. Sigma Beta Chi. Clifford Norton Luce 59 Granville Avenue, Worcester, Mass. Born 1914 at Danvers. Graduate Worcester South High School. Major in Floriculture. Band, 1, 2, 3. Theta Chi. Thomas Graves Lyman 8 High Street, Easthampton, Mass. Born 1916 at Easthampton. Graduate Williston Academy. Major in History. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Roister Bolsters, 2. Soccer, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M). Hockey, 3. Winter Track, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Julia Mary Lynch 3 8 Mill Street, Westfleld, Mass. Born 1918 at Westfleld. Grad- uate Westfleld Pligh School. Ma.tor in Modern Languages. Orchestra, 1, 2. 3. Newman Cllib, 1. 2, 3. Lambda Delta Mu (Vice-Pres., 3). Margaret Phyllis MacDonald Huntington, Mass. Born 1917 at Northampton. Graduate Huntington High School. Major in Home Economics. Christ- ian Federation. 1, 2 (Secretary), 3. Home Economics Club, 1, 2 (Class Representative). 3 (Secretary). 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3 (Program Chair- man). Outing Club, 2. Lambda Delta Mu. Margaret May Madden 17 Annis Street, Methuen, Mass. Born 1917 at Methuen. Graduate Edward P. Searles High School. Major in Home Economics and English. Index, 3. Women ' s Glee Club, 1. Christian Federation, 2. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. Isaac Edward Malkin -109 Blossom Street, Chelsea, Mass. Born 1915 at Boston. Graduate Chelsea Senior High School. Major in Horticultural Manufactures. Band, 1, 2, 3. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3. Justine Gordon Martin 31 Lakeville Road, Jamaica Plain, Mass. Born 1915 at Arlington Heights. Graduate Ro.xburv Memorial High for Girls. Major in Home Econ- omics. Home Economics Club, 2, 3. Bacteriologv Club, 2, 3 (Vice- Pres.). Women ' s Rifle Team, 1, 2, 3. Lambda Delta Mu. Marian Isabel Maschin 8 Oak Street, Westfleld, Mass. Born 1918 at Westfleld. Grad- uate Westfleld High School. Major in English. Women ' s Glee Club, 1. 2, 3. Christian Federation, 1. 2, 3 (Cabinet, 2, 3). International Re- lations Club, 3. 4-H Club, 1, 2. 3. Bay State Revue, 1. Donald Stewart Mayo 421 Hollis Street, Pramingham, Mass. Born 1917 at Pramingham. Grad- uate Framiugham High School. Major in Physics and Mathematics. Physics Club, 3. Psychology Club, 2. Football, 1. Cross-Countrv, 2, 3. Hockey, 1, 2 (M). Alpha Sigma Phi. William Blake McCowan 70 Berwick Street, Worcester, Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Grad- uate North High School. Major in Economics. Psychology Club, 2. Soccer, 2, 3. Alpha Sigma Phi (Treasurer, 3). James Meehan 84 Towerhill Street, Lawrence, Mass. Born 1917 at Lawrence. Grad- uate Lawrence High School. Major in Economics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Cross-Countrv, 2. Spring Track, 1. 2. Winter Ti-ack, 1. Alpha Sigma Phi. Mary Theresa Meehan 1225 Dwight Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Putnam, Conn. Graduate Woodstock Academy, Woodstock, Conn. Major in Eng- lish. Collegian, 1, 2, 3. Newman Club, 1. 2. 3. Aliiha Lambda Mu. Seaton Crawford Mendall 89 Peirce Street, Middleboro, Mass. Born 1917 at Middleboro. Grad- uate Middleboro Memorial High School. Major in Eutomologv. Pernald Entomology Club, 3. Kappa Sigma. Frances Somerville Merrill Nortli Main Street, Raynham Center, Mass. Born 1917 at Manhattan, Kan- sas. Graduate Tnunlon High School. Ma jo Roisto val Co Comm., 2. W.iiHiii ,s kulc Team. 2, 3 (Manager). Women ' s Athle Assoc, 2, 3. Sigma Beta Chi (Alu nae Sec, 2, 3). [126] eiaiA o-l- 1939 Ethel Meurer 79 Mapleclell Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Technical High School. Major in Chemistry. Lambda Delta Mu. Clara Evelyn Hakans Mickelson 113 Old Common Koad, Millbury, Mass. Born 1917 at Millbury. Grad- uate Millbury High School. Trans- fer Framingham State Teachers College. Major in English. Christ- ian Federation, 2. Outing Club, 3. Alexander Andrew Miller 47 Woodbridge Avenue, East Hartford, Conn. Born 191S at South Windsor, Conn. Graduate Rockville High School. Major in Chemistry. Chem- istry Club, 2. Swimming, 1. Hockey 1. Baseball, 1. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Douglas Duncan Milne 22 Myrtle iJoulcvard, Lurchmont, New York Born 1917 at Simsbury, Conn. Graduate Lexington High School. Major in Phvsics. Roister Bolsters, 2, 3. Physics Club, 2. Radio Club, 2. Sigma Alph.a Epsilon (Treas- Emery Moore 46 Ashcroft Road, Sharon, Mass. Born 1917 at Winthrop. Grad- uate Sharon High School. Major in Botany. Collegian, 1, 2, 3 (Make-up 3). Interfraternity Council, 3. Phi Sigma Kappa. Fulton A. Moorehead 12 Olen Street, Melrose, Mass. Born 1916 at Belmont. Graduate Melrose High School. Major in Forestry. Hockey, 1, 2, 3. Phi Sigma Kappa. Clifton W. Morey 17 Harriet Avenue, Belmont, Mass. Born 1915 at Cambridge. Grad- uate Belmont High School. Major in Physical Education. Football, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M). Hockey, 1, 2 (M). Spring Track, 1. Winter Track, 1, 2. Baseball, 1, 2 (M). Kappa Sigma. Edward Lawrence Morin 1 McClure Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1915 at Northampton. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Horticultural Manufac- tures. Newman Club, 2, 3. Hockey, 3. Baseball, 1. Kappa Sigma. Robert Harold Muller 3 Birch Road, Darien, Conn. Born 1918 at New York City. Graduate Darien High School. Major in Economics. Index, 2, 3 (Photography). Carnival Comm., 2, 3. (Publicity Photography). Advan- ced Military, 3. Lambda Chi Alpha (Social Chairman, 2, 3). Alvon John Myerson S3 Beals Street, Brookline, Mass. Born 1918 at Cambridge. Grad- uate Brookline High SchooL Major in History. Bay State Revue, 3. Alpha Epsilon Pi (Scribe, 2). Gordon Ellery Nojar Highland Street, Housatonic, Mass. Born 1915 at Housatonic. Grad- uate Searles High School, Gt. Bar- rington. Major in Psychology. Maroon Key, 3. Class Pres., 2, 3. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. Roister Doisters, 2. Carnival Comm., 3, (Chairman, Ski Comm.). Soph- Senior Hop Comm., 2. Outing Club, 2, 3. Psychology Club, 3. Football, r. Spring Track, 2. Phi Sigma Kappa. Shirley Elizabeth Nestle Ti-iangle Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at Northampton. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Economics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Outing Club, 1. Dorothy Elizabeth Nichols 64 King Street, Westfield, Mass. Born 1917 at West Willington, Conn. Graduate Westfield High School. Major in English. W. S. G. A., 2, 3 (Secretary). Class Secretary, 2, 3. Index, 3. Student Religious Council, 2, 3. Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3. Lambda Delta Mu. Olive Freeman Norwood 15 Eureka Terrace, Worcester, Mass. Born 1917 at Worcester. Grad- uate South High School. Major in Home Economics. Bay State Revue, 3. Roister Doisters, 2, 3. Home Economics Club, 1. 2, 3. Ring Comm., 2, 3 (Chairman). Sigma Beta Chi. Grace Patricia O ' Donnell Granville Road, Westfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Westfield. Grad- uate Westfield High School Major in Modern Languages. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Lambda Delta Mu (Corres. Sec, 3). Elizabeth Janet Olson 108 School Street, Manchester, Mass. Born 1917 at Beverly. Graduate Story High School. Major in Bac- teriology and Chemistry. Christian Federation, 1, 2, 3 (Cabinet). Out- ing Club, 3. Robert Wesley Packard 32 Woodbine Street, Worcester, Mass. Born 1916 at Worcester. Grad- uate South High School. Major in Economics. Maroon Key, 2 (President). Carnival Comm., 3 (Vice-Chairman). Carnival Ball Comm., 2. Football, 1, 2, 3. Tbeta Chi. John Alfred Parker Ashby, Mass. Born 1916 at Townsend. Grad- uate Mount Hermon. Major in Chemistry. Soccer, 1, 2. Theta Chi (Ass ' t. Treas., 3). Nancy Parks Century Farm, Sherborn, Mass. Born 1918 at Boston. Graduate Newton High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 3. Women ' s Athletic Assoc, 2 (Vice- Pres.). Intersorority Council, 3. Sigma Beta Chi. Ray Parmenter 466 King Street, Franklin. Mass, Born 1917 at Franklin. Grad- uate Franklin High School. Major in English, ilndex, 3. Music Record Club, 2, 3. Psychology Club, 2. 3. Soccer, 1. Interfraternity Coun- cil, 3. Alpha Sigma Phi (Scribe, 2, Secretary, 3 ' . {127] eioAA 4 1939 Joseph Paul 359 Bridge Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1917 at Northampton. Graduate Northampton High School. Ma,ior in Landscape Architecture. Band 2 3. Landscape Club, 3. Football, 1. Spring Track, 1. Cross-Country, 1. George Anthony Pereiro 1657 Northampton Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1918 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Pre-Med. Pre-Med. Club, 2, d. Advanced Military, 3. Q, T. V. (Chaplain, 2 " , 3). Ellsworth Phelps, Jr. 135 Crescent Street, Northampton, Mass. Born at Washington, D. C. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Mathematics. Outing Club, 2 Cross-Countrv, 1. Basketball, 1. Baseball, 1, 2. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Laurence Kent Pickard Elm Street, Salisbury, Mass. Born 1917 at Rowley. Grad- uate Amesbury High School. Major in Farm Management. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3. Animal Husbandry Clnb, 2d. Cross-Country, 1. 2 (M), 3 (Ml. Spring Track, 1, 2 (M), 3. Winter Track, 1, 2, 3. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Stanley Podolak 79 Maple Street, Easthampton, Mass. Born 1916 at Easthampton. Graduate Williston Academy. Major in Economics. Soccer, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M). Basketball, 1, 3. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Richard Lyman Powers 1574 Westfleld Street, West Springfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Springfield. Grad- uate West Springfield High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 3. Mathematics Club, 3. Soc- cer 1. 2. Interfraternity Council, 3 Si -ma Phi Epsilon (Marshal, 2, Vice-Pres., 3). John Jacob Pratt Ripley Road, Cohasset, Mass. Born 1914 at Cohasset. Graduate Cohasset High School. Major in Entomology. Band, 1. Fernald Entomology Club, 3. Football, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. Frederick Purnell 2 Tyler Place, Amherst, Mass. Born 1917 at Agawam. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in English. Virginia Pushee 1147 North Pleasant Street, North Amherst, Mass. Born 1917 at Northampton. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3 (Ass ' t. Mgr. 3). Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. 4-H Club, 1. 2. Alpha Lambda Mu. Frances Bullard Rathbone 21 Rutherford Avenue, Haverhill, Mass. Born 1916 at Newton. Grad- uate Haverhill High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Press Club, 1, 2 (Secretary). Women ' s Ath- letic Assoc, 2, 3, 4 (Vice-Pres., 2, Cabin Manager, 3, 4). Sigma Beta Chi. Irwin Douglas Reade 66 Duvey Avenue, Whitman, Mass. Born 1917 at Brockton. Grad- uate Whitman High School. Major in History. Cross-Country, 2 (M). Advanced Military, 3. Q. T. V. (House Manager, 3). Milton Paul Reiser 318 Clifton Street, Maiden, Mass. Born 1917 at Chelsea. Graduate Maiden High School. Major in Economics. Menorah Club, 3. Phi Lambda Tau. Eunice Moore Richardson Hospital Cottages, Baldwinsville, Mass. Born 1916 at Natick. Graduate Worcester South High School. Major in Olericulture. Y. W. C. A., 1. Outing Club, 3. 4-H Club, 1, 2. 3. Francis James Riel 11 4th Street. Turners Falls, Mass. Born 1914 at Shattuckville. Graduate Turners Palls High School. Major in French. Student Senate, 3. Maroon Key, 2. Class Officer, 1 (President). Inter-Class Athletic Board, 1. Football, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M). Basketball, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M). Baseball, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M). Everett Roberts 293 Franklin Street, Quiucy, Mass. Boru 1915 at Quincy. Graduate Quincy High School and Norfolk County Agricultural School. Major in Animal Husbandry. Honor Coun- cil. 2, 3. Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2, 3. Class Nominating Comm., 3. Soccer, 1 2, 3 (M). Advanced Military 3. , Q. T. V. (Sergeant-at- Arms. 2, Corres. Secretary, 3). Charles Rodda, Jr. 18 Manchester Terrace, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Springfield Technical High School. Major in Chemistry. Class Officer, 2, 3 (Sergeant-at-Arms) . Collegian, 2 (Business Boar d). Dad ' s Day Comm., 3. Mathematics Club, 3. Soccer, 1, 2 (M), 3 (M), (Captain, 1). Lambda Chi Alpha. Harold Davies Rose 26 Bailey Street, Medford, Mass. Born 1916 at Medford. Grad- uate Medford High School. Major in Entomology. Fernald Entomol- ogy Club, 3. Cross-Country, 2, 3. Sidney Rosen 32 Abbot Street, Dorchester, Mass. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduate Boston Latin School. Transfer M. 1. T. M,ajor in French. Collegian, 2, 3. Collegian Quarterly. 2 (Assoc, Editor), 3 (Editor). Menorah Club, 2, 3 (Corresponding Secretary). Morris Rosenthal 87 Fairview Avenue, West Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at New York, N. Y. Graduate West Springfield High School. Major in Cliemistry. Albert Henry Ross 101 Westville Street, Dorchester, Mass. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate Boston English High School. Trans- fer Tufts. Major in Economics. Football, 1. Spring Track, 1. Winter Track, 1. Henry Arthur Salmela 112 Parker Street, Mayuard, Mass. Born 1915 at Duluth, Minn. Graduate Maynard High School. Transfer Michigan State Normal College. Major in Pliysics and Mathematics. Swimming, 3. Q. T. V. Joan Sannella 120 Maplewood Terrace, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Recreational Planning. Nomin- ating Comni., 3. Bay State Revue, 3. Roister Doisters, 2, 3. Women ' s Rifle Team, 1, 2. Lambda Delta Mu. James Harvey Savage Cliestuut Street, Lynnfield Center, Mass. Born 1913 at Lynnfield Center. Graduate Coburn Classical Insti- tute. Major in Bacteriology. Senate, 4. Bacteriology Club, 3, 4. Vincent Raymond Schmidt 622 Summer Street, New Bedford, Mass. Born 1914 at New Bedford. Graduate New Bedford High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3 (Vice-Pres., 3). In- ter-Class Athletic Board, 1, 2, 3, (Secretary, 2, President, 3). Men ' s Rifle Team, 1, 2, 3. Advanced Mil- itary, 3. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Ernest Schwartz 72 Lebanon Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Holyoke. Graduate Springfield Technical High School. Major in Chemistry. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3. Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3. Soccer, 1. Interfraternity Council, 3. Phi Lambda Tau (Historian, 3). Bernice Sedoff 10 Nevada Street, Winthrop, Mass. Boru 1917 at Boston. Graduate Winthrop High School. Major in History. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Menorah Club, 1, 2, 3 (Secretary- Treas., 3). Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Intersorority Council, 3. Sigma Iota (Historian, 2, Treas- urer, 3). Eleanor Louise Sheehan 98 Beacon Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1918 at Holyoke. Grad- uate Holvoke High School. Major in Entomology. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Outing Club, 3. Fernald Entomology Club, 3. Lee Charles Shipman 57 Copperfield Road, Worcester, Mass. Born 1916 at Worce ster. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Horticultural Manufactures. In- dex, 3. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Psy- chology Club, 2. Alpha Sigma Phi. Belva Marie Sinclair 33 Prince Street, Northampton. Mass. Born 1918 at Northampton. Graduate St. Michael ' s High School. Major in Home Economics. Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Sigma Beta Chi. Charles Edward Slater Tyringham, Mass. Born 1917 at Pittsfleld. Grad- uate Lee High School. Major in Animal Husbandry. Outing Club, 2, 3. Dairy Club, 2. Animal Hus- bandry Club. 1, 2, 3. 4-H Club, 1, 2. 3. Poultry Judging Team, 2. Poultry Club. Cross-Country, 1, 2, 3. Spring Track, 1. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. [128] -mm (4 1 39 Raymond E. Smart, Jr. Leverett Street, North Amherst. M.iss. Born 1918 at Springfield. Grad- uate Amherst High School. Major in Recreational Planning. Band, 2, 3 Swimming, 1. Baseball, 1. Advanced Military, 3. Francis Eliot Smith 52 Eobbins Road, Arlington, Mass. Born 1916 at Cambridge. Grad- uate Arlington High School. Major in English. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. Bay State Revue, 3. Bethany Parker Snow ,54 Kennoth Street, West Ko.xbury, Mass. Born 1917 -at Boston. Graduate Jamaica Plain High School. Major in Languages and Literature. Out- ing Club, 3. Women ' s Athletic Association, 1, 2, 3. Franklin Wallburg Southwick 49 Jelt ' erson Avenue, White Plains, N. Y. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate White Plains High School. Major in Pomology. Student Senate, 3. Maroon Key, 2. Horticultural Show Comm., 3 (P ' omology Chair- man). Nominating Comm., 2. Foot- ball, 2. Basketball. 2, 3. Lambda Chi Alpha. George Joseph Spelman 35 East Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1917 at New London, Conn. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Chemistry. Swimming, 2, 3. Q. T. V. Inez Evelyn Spofford 18 Winches;er Street, Haverhill, Mass. Born 1917 at Haverhill. Grad- uate Haverhill High School. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Glee Club, 2. Christian Federation, 1. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. Alpha Lambda Mu. Edmund Stawiecki 4 Brandon Road, Webster, Mass. Born 1918 at Jewett City, Conn. Graduate Bartlett High School. Webster. Major in Pre-Med. Men s Glee Club, 2. Newman Club, 1, 2. Pre-Med. Club, 2. Q. T. V. (Act- ing Vice-Pres.). Howard Newton Steff Old County Road, North Dartmouth, Mass. Born 1915 at Dartmouth. Grad- uate Dartmouth High School. Major in Entomology. Maroon Key, 2 (Vice-Pres.). Class Captain, 1, 2, 3. Carnival Ball Comm., 2. Pern- aid Entomology Club, 3. Football, 1. 2. 3 (M). Basketball, 1. Base- ball, 1, 2 (M). Theta Chi. Jack Steinberg 255 Spruce Street, Chelsea, Mass. Born 1918 at Chelsea. Graduate Chelsea High School. Major in Pre-Med. Freshman Handbook, 1. Football, 1. Swimming, 1. Base- ball, 1. Courtney Stetson, Jr. 43 Traverse Street, Athol, Mass. Born 1916 at Irving, Graduate Templeton High School. Major in Economics. Swimming, 1, 2, 3. Theta Chi. Edward Forrest Stoddard C.H ' hilual, ' Ifoad, FraniinslKim. Mass. Born 1916 at North Abington. Graduate Framingham High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Landscape Club, 3. Psychology Club, 2. Football, 1. Cross-Coun- try, 2, 3. Baseball, 1, 2. Alpha Siga Phi (Marshal, 3). Marion King Stomberg 56 South Street, Florence, Mass. Born 1917 at Bridgeport, Conn. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3. 4-H Club, 1, 2, 3. Alpha Lambda Mu. Norman Edward Stone 30 Babcock Street, Brookline, Mass. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate Newton High School. Major in Bacteriology. Index, 3 (Business Board). Joint Comm. on Inter- Collegiate Athletics, B. Hockey, 1. B aseball, 1, 2, 3 (Manager). Al- pha Epsilon Pi (Historian, 3). Mortti lllmari Suomi WellQeet, Mass. Born 1917 at Wellfleet. Graduate WellQeet High School. Major in Agricultural Economics. Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3 (Vice-Pres., 2, President, 3). Dairy Club, 2. An- imal Husbandry Club, 2, 3. Soccer, 1. Sigma Alpha Epsilon (Ass ' t. Treas., 3). Robert Warren Swanson 4 Pigeon Hill Court, Rockport, Mass. Born 1916 at Rockport. Major in Economics. Maroon Key, 2. Leo Walt Tannanbaum 239 Walnut Avenue, Ro.xbury, Mass. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduate Roxbury Memorial High School. Major in Entomology. Bay State Revue, 3. Menor.ah Club, 1, 2, 3. Pernald Entomology Club, 3. Foot- ball. 1. Bernice Eleanor Taylor Box 176, BeUhertown, Mass. Born 1917 at Chicopee. Grad- uate Belchertovvn High School and Mary A. Burnham School. Trans- fer Smith College. Major in Flori- culture. Gordon Franklin Thomas 88 Pleasant Street, East Bridgewater, Mass. Born 1918 at Brockton. Grad- uate Brockton and East Bridge- water High Schools. Major in Agronomy. Christian Federation, 2, 3 . Daii-y Club 2. 4-H Club, 1, 2. Hockey, 1. Advanced Military, 3. Interfraternity Council, 2, 3. Q. T. V. (Sergeant-at-Arms, 2-3, Vice- Pres., 3-4). John Vincent Townsend Brockway Road, South Hadley, Mass. Born 1917 at Carthage, N. Y. Graduate Manlius Military School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Band. 1. Landscape Club, 3. Psy- chology Club, 2. Cross-Country, 1. Alpha Sigma Phi. Margaret Elizabeth Truran Church Street, Stockbridge, Mass. Born 1919 at Stockbridge. Grad- uate Williams High School. Major in Home Economics. Robert Edgerton Ullmon HI Ha! Nu iipto . la Born 1915 at Northampton. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Economics. Music Record Club, 2, 3. Physics Club, 2. Foot- ball, 1. Swimming, 1, 2. Morrill Thayer Vittum 1136 Boston Road, Haverhill, Mass. Born 1919 at Haverhill. Grad- uate Haverhill High School. Major in Chemistry. Wesley Foundation, 1, 3. Outing Club, 1, 2, 3 (Pres- ident). Physics Club, 2, 3. Radio Club, 2, 3. Chemistry Club, 3. Mathematics Club, 2, 3. Swim- ming, 1, 2, 3. Baseball, 1. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Walter Thompson Wakefield 9 Ball Street, Worcester, Mass. Born 1917 at Worcester. Grad- uate South High School. Major in Entomology. Men ' s Glee Club, 2. Pernald Entomology Club, 3. Pre- Med. Club, 2. Swimming, 1, 2, 3. Theta Chi. Eleanor Ward 162 Bowdoin Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Home Economics. Collegian, 1 2, 3. Home Economics Club, 1, 2 3 (Junior Exec, member). WO ' men ' s Athletic Association, 1, 2 3, Intersorority Council, 2, 3 Alpha Lambda Mu ( Acting Treas. 3). Elizabeth Rose Warner Main Street, Sunderland, Mass. Born 1918 at Sunderland. Grad- uate Amherst HigV School. Major in Historv. Outing Club, 3. Wo- men s Athetic Assoc, 1, 2, 3. Francis Albert Warren Ashfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Ashfield. Graduate Sanderson Academy. Major in Chemistry. Lambda Chi Alpha. Ervin Leonard Welch 378 Swains Pond Avenue, Melrose, Mass. Born 1917 at Melrose. Graduate Melrose High School. Major in History and Economics. Hockey, 1, 2. Phi Sigma Kappa. Mary Lees West 2(J2 Clinton Street, New Bedford, Mass. Born 1917 at New Bedford. Grad- uate New Bedford High School. Major in English. Lambda Delta Mu. Marciene Romsdell Whitcomb 6 Central Avenue, South Hadley Falls, Mass. Born 1916 at Holyoke. Graduae Wilbraham Academy. Major in Dairy Industry. Band, 1, 2. Hockey, 1. Sigma Phi Epsilon. Ralph Wilfred White 45 Hunnewell Avenue, Brighton, Mass. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduate Boston Latin School. Major in Chemistry. Psychology Club, 2, 3. Football, 1. Pni Sigma Kappa. Julie Mead Whitney Oakwood Road. Orange, Conn. Born 1917 at Hadley. Graduate New Haven Hillhouse High School. Major in Psvchology. Home Econ- omics Club, 1. Psychology Club, 3 (Vice-Pres., 3). Lambda Delta Mu. [129] XIM. ol 1939 Edmund Gillette Wilcox Stockbridge, Mass. Born 1915 at Stockbridge. Grad- uate Williams High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Land- scape Club, 3 (Vioe-Pres.). Theta Chi. Marjorie Frances Wilcox 207 Pomeroy Avenue, Pittsfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Orange. Graduate Pittsfield High School. Major in Home Economics. Lambda Delta JIu. Gerhard Max Wilke 600 Canal Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1918 at Werdan in Saxonv. Germany. Graduate Holyoke High School. ' Major in English. Soccer, Edward Buck Willard 17 Cheriton Road, Wollaston, Mass. Born 1917 at Hartford, Conn, Graduate North Quincy High School. Major in Landscape Archi- tecture. Outing Club, 1, 2, 3. Landscape Club, 3. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Elliot Tllden Wilson 34 Summer Street, Weymouth, Mass. Born 1917 at Weymoi uate Thayer Academy. Mathematics. Outing Mathematics Club, 2, 3. Hockey, 2, 3. Spr Win Epsilon. Track, Sii th. Grad Major ii Club, 3 Soccer, 2 5 Ti-at-k, 1 ma Alphi Merton Frederick Wilson 32 Bardwell Street, South Hadley Falls, Mass, Born 1915 at South Hadley Falls. Graduate South Hadley High School. Major in Chemistry. Chem- istry Club, 2. Basketball, 1. Kappa Epsilon. Joy Henry Winn 7 Egmont Street, Brookline, Mass. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduate Boston Public Latin School. Major in Chemistry. Transfer Providence College. Collegian, 2, 3 (Business Board, Ass ' t. Bus. Mgr., Circula- tion Mgr.). Band, 2, 3. Men ' s Debating Team, 3. Pre-Med, Club, 2, 3. Chemistry Club, 2, 3. Spring Track, 2, 3. Winter Track, 2, 3. Alpha Epsilon Pi. Leonard Charles Wirtanen 19 Pon tiac Sti reet. Quiuey, , Mass. Born , 1917 at Qui ncy. Gr aduate Quincy Senioi • High School. Major in Daii ■y Industry. Q. T. V. (Sec- retary. 2). Henry Wojtasiewicz 44 Park Street, Chicopee, Mass. Major te Chicopee High Ch Falls. School. Q. T. V. Frank John Yourga 23 Laurel Street. Greenfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Montague City Graduate Greenfield High School Major in Chemistry. Mathematic Club, 3. Walter Andrew Zajchowski 10 Nonotuck Avenue. Chicopee, Mass. Born 1917 at Chicopee. Grad- uate Chicopee High School. Major in Horticultural Manufactures. Class Ofiicer, 1 (Sergeant-at-Arms) . Football, 1, 2, 3 (M). Hockey, 1. Q. T. V. Lucy Anne Zaskey Mt. Warner Road, Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at Hadley. Hopkins Academy. Majo omics. Newman Club, 1, Club, 2, 3. Stanley Frank Zelazo 42 North Summer Street, Adams, Mass. Born 1917 at Adams. Adams High School. Chemistry. Football, 1, Basketball, 1, 2 (M), 3. 1, 2. Graduate ■ in Econ- !, 3. 4-H Graduate Major in 2, 3 (M). Baseball, [130] In Memoriam THOMAS JOSEPH ENRIGHT Born: June 26, 1916 Died: December 25, 1937 Graduate Pittsfield High School. Major in EngUsh. Collegian, 1, 2, 3 (Associate Editor). Newman Club, 1, 2, 3. Freshman Handbook (Editor- in-Chief). Lambda Chi Alpha. A reflective thinker, a cheerful worker, and a dependable leader, Thomas Enright made a lasting impres- sion on all who knew him. His untimely passing has left a gap in the class of ' 39. [131] eioAA. a§ 1939 FORMER MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1939 Alexander Alexion Willis E. Allen Clyde L. Becker Robert E. Berry Sidney M. Boice James H. Bolt Wilfred A. Bourque Karl H. Burnett Charles W. Cassidy Roger Coyer Edna M. Chaffee Kenneth Cohen Lester Cohen Julia B. Colby Marjorie L. Copeland Vivian E. Cordes Henry L. Daly Henry H. Dow Charlotte L. Donahue Joseph P. Donoghue, Jr. Michael C. Doolan Russell E. Duvol John R. Edwards Gertrude H. Fay Maurice Fogel Arnold E. Freedman Harry F. Friedman W. R. Gaffney William A. Gorside Kenneth W. Gould Helen H. Hollos Robert B. Hoskins Frank D. Hawthorne Sumner L. Horwitz Ira L. Jackson Robert Jenney Rose K. Jenson Peter V. Johnson Thomas C. Kenney Elizabeth Kenyon Anthony Kieliszek Richard W. Kilburn Herbert B. King John E. Kitson Louis C. Knorr William M. Knott Stephen R. Kosakowski Everett M. Kruger Abraham E. Landsman John R. LePage, Jr. Walter R. Leslie Lewis G. Luchini John Manna Edward G. Meade Robert J. Murphy Eleanor C. Nugent Horry W. O ' Connell Tracy 0. Page Gerald M. Pormenter Peter P. Pasturszok William L. Poole Paul W. Prescott Hyman I. Raiklen Bertha A. Randall Ralph N. Reed Virginia M. Reid Roy R. Reisinger Blanche Richmond Lee L. Sanborn Donald L. Songster Nancy V. Scaltrito Muriel E. Scorborough Charles Schwartz Ella G. Shevenell Priscillo M. Smith Robert A. Smith Philip Solar Milton A. Stafford Frank M. Stone Charles W. Strotton Norman T. Thomas Pauline J. Todd Rodney C. Turner Wilna G. Valentine Ruth E. Woddell Jock Woldman Isabelle P. Walker James B. Walsh Orrin E. West Thomas J. Wilcock Horace B, Wildes Melvin Wintman Celia M. Wojcieszek [132] .. " e£aiA a 1940 CLASS OFFICERS President, Myron D. Hager, Jr. Vice-President, M. Marjorie Smith Sergeant-at-Arms, George L. Atwater 1 u hk ■ 1 h L ' QtaM. 0 yLitteleeti Hundred OioJiii The September of 1937 blessed our College with the reappearance of the class of 1940 — the same, yet not the same; for with its return, the members had proudly cast aside their humble status as fresh- men, and from the elevated position of sophomores looked down with kindly pity upon the bewildered neophytes of the class of ' 41 whom they sought to initiate into the ways of sophistication. Thus, having attained collegiate maturity, they assumed the responsibility of guardians of the frosh; the morning sun witnessed strange scenes before the Abbey and Thatcher Hall as ranks of freshmen, marshaled by able sophomores, strained their lungs in learning the gentle art of serenading. It also might be said that certain freshmen will not soon forget the exercise of sophomoric might on the memorable evening of November 16, when the lions of their class were tamed [134] eeoM. c4 1940 CLASS OFFICERS Treasurer, Robert I. Sheldon Secretary, Virginia Gale Captain, Lawrence H. Reagan QicM. a ItLtieieen Hundred OxPiii by having their manes clipped, and were afterwards given an object lesson at the college pond in the old analogy of the " little frog in the big puddle. " But the sophomores had not forgotten their previous year, when they elected Frederick Watson, President; Marjorie Smith, Vice-President; Virginia Gale, Secretary; Robert Jones, Treasurer; Larry Reagan, Captain; and Alan Smith, Ser- geant-at-Arms. Nor did they forget the defeat of their traditional enemies in the rope pull and soph-frosh football classic; nor the ducking they gave their sophist- icated rivals in the swimming meet. To be sure, they tasted occasional defeat, as on Razoo night; yet they rose undaunt- ed to stand high on their established re- putation, and forged ahead in their second year. Thus in 1937-38, the class of 1940 is fulfilling the brilliant promise of its past. [135] etadd CK 1940 The sophomores are now firmly estab- hshed in the Hfe of M. S. C— They, as academic veterans, have successfully counter-attacked three barrages of exam- inations, with few casualties, and they look forward to a successful campaign throughout the remainder of their college career. In athletics, the class generally distinguished itself — not only as a class group, but also through the support of many of its members in inter-fraternity and varsity sports. Socially, the sopho- mores were represented at every campus dance, both formal and informal. More- over, their delegates served well on vari- ous dance committees, while two of their number, Erma Alvord and Lorraine Creesy, were among the regal attendants of the Carnival Queen at the Winter Car- nival Ball. In addition, the class was well represented in all other extra-curriculcir activities. Two sophomore girls, Erma Alvord and Alberta Johnson, were chosen as drum majors of the College Band, thus having the honor of being the first co-eds ever to become members of that organiza- tion. Thus stands the class of 1940, and such is its present history as it looks forward with confidence to its future. [136] QJUiM. o(. 1940 Sidney G. Abramovitz 9 Riverview Avenue, Beverly. Mass. Born 191S lit Salem. Graduate Beverlv High School. Major in Chemistry. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Pre-Med. Club, 2. Cross Country, 1. Spring Track, 1, 2, (Ass ' t. Man- Track, 1, 2 (Ass ' t, Ma ger). Betty Vignes Abrams 12(i Harvard Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Home Economics. Phi Zeta. Arthur Adelson 14 Cottage Street, Chelsea, Mass. Born 1918 at Chelsea. Graduate Chelsea High School. Major in Phy- sical and Biological Sciences. Men- orah Club. 1. 2. Mario Paul Alfieri 24 Railroad Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1916 at Northampton. Girad- uate Amherst High School. Major in Economics. Alpha Sigma Phi. Erma Stuart Alvord 8 Stevens Street, Turners Falls, Mass. Born 1918 at Greenfield. Grad- uate Turners Falls High School. Major in English. Band, 2. Roi- ster Bolsters, 1. Christian Feder- ation, i. Dad ' s Day Coram., 2. Freshman Handbook Comm., 1. Freshman Hazing Comm., 1. Phi Zeta. Jean Marie Archibald 164 Montague Road, North Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at Truro, Nova Scotia. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 2. George Leonard Atwater 2 Linden Avenue, Westfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Westfield. Graduate Westfield High School. Major in Chemistry. Class Sergeant-at-Arms, 2. Phi Sigma Kappa. Mildred Marion Bak Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. Born 1919 at Hadley. Graduate Hopkins Academy. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Alpha Lambda Mu. Anna Matilda Banuskewic 45 Longfellow Avenue, Pittsfleld, Mass. Born 1918 at Pittsfleld. Grad- uate Pittsfleld High School. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Glee Club. 1. NeM ' man Club, 1, 2. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Alpha Lambda Mu. Vincent Jason Barnard 201 East Main Street, North Adams, Mass. Born 1917 at North Adams. Graduate Drury High School. Major in English. Football, 1, 2. Basket- ball, 1. Swimming, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. Charles Henry Barney 13 Hadley Street, South Hadley, Mass. Born 1917 at Holyoke. Graduate South Hadley High School. Major in History. R. 0. T. C. Rifle Team. 1. Basketball, 1. Swimming, 1. Spring Track, 1. Sigma Alpha Epsilon, (House Mgr., 2). Beryl Hazel Barton 1U77 Massachusetts Avenue, North Adams, Mass. Born 1919 at North Adams. Graduate Drury High School. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Glee Club, 1. 2. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. 4-H Club. 1, 2. Alpha Lambda Mu (Sec. and Treas. o£ Pledges, 1). Mary Elizabeth Bates 247 First Street, Pittsfleld, Mass. Born 1919 at Pittsfleld. Grad- uate St. Joseph ' s High School. Major in Home Jilconomics. New- man Club, 1, 2 (Sec. and Treas.). Sigma Beta Chi. Bernard James Beagarie 7 Prospect Avenue, Greenfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Granville, North Dakota. Graduate Greenfield High School. Major in Social Sciences. Geoffrey Hamilton Beames Woods Hole Road, Falmouth, Mass. Born 1919 at Pontiac, Michigan. Graduate Woodstock Academy. Major in Horticulture. Spring Track, 1. Winter Track, 1. Robert Lorenzo Benemelis 236 Sargent Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1918 at Pittsfleld. Graduate Williston Academy. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 1. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Robert Harold Bernstein 39 Olmsted Drive, Springfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Springfield. Grad- uate Springfleld Classical High School. Major in Agriculture. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Bay State Revue, 1 (Pianist). Menorah Club. 1, 2. Outing Club. 1. Football, 1. Phi Lambda Tau (Pledge Pres., 1). Deane Allen Beytes 43U Court Street, North Plymouth, Mass. Born 1919 at Providence, R.I. Graduate Plymouth High School. Major in Physics. Football, 1. Swimming, 1. Hockey, 1. Kappa Sigma. Eleanor Birchard 79 Cedar Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1919 at Springfleld. Grad- uate Springfield Classical High School. Major in Pre-Med. Trans- fer American International College. Richard Franklin Bloke Southville Road, Southville, Mass. Born 1918 at Arcadia, Florida. Graduate Southboro High School. Major in Chemistry. Christian Federation, 1, 2 (Treas.). Outing Club, 1, 2. Mathematics Club. 2. 4-H Club. 1, 2. International Re- lations Club, 2. Q. T. V. John Edward Blosko Born 1919 at Amherst. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Football, 1, 2 (M). Basketball, 1, 2. Harris Blouer 142 Fuller Street, Brookline, Mass. Born 1917 at Revere. Graduate Brookline High School. Major in Chemistry. Band, 1, 2. Charlotte Esther Bluemer Southampton Road, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1918 at Holvoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Eorl Kenneth Bowen 34 Elmdale Street. West Springfield. Mass. Born 1918 at Colonie, N. Y. Graduate West Springfleld High School. Major in Pre-Med. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Pre-Med. Club 1, 2. Soccer, 1, 2 (M). Spring Track, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. Richard Norman Bowler 113 Franklin Street, Westfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Westfield. Grad- uate Westfield High School. Major in English. Class Pres., 1. New- man Club. 1. Soccer, 1. Basket- ball, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. [137] eeoAd. o.(. 1940 Louise Bowman 39 Eailv Avenue, Medford, Mass. Born 1918 at Everett. Graduate Medford High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2 (Treas.). Freshman Hazing Comm. Plii Zeta. Glenn David Boyd 16 Fearing Street, Amlierst, Mass. Born 1919 at Mexico, N. Y. Graduate Mexico High School and Academy, Mexico, N. Y. Ma.ior in Chemistry. Marie Tullner Bradshaw 33 Lincoln Street, Chicopee Palls, Mass. Born 1919 at Chicopee Falls. Graduate Chicopee High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Clement Edmond Brault 3.541 Acushnet Avenue, New Bedford, Mass. Born 1918 at New Bedford. Graduate New Bedford High School Major in Pre-Med. Mathematics Club, 1, 2. Newman Club, 1. Hockey, 1. Alpha Gamma Kho. Roger Whiftemore Brown, Jr. 36 Outlook Drive, Lexington, Mass. Born 1918 at Concord. Graduate Lexington High Scliool. Major i]i Economics. Outing Club, 1. Soccer, 1, 2. Lambda Chi Alpha. James Bernard Buckley 31 Graver Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Chemistry. Newman Club, 1, 2. Football. 1. Soccer, 1. 2. Hockey, 1, 2. Winter Track, 1. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Morris Hyman Burakoff 16 Poplar Street, Boston, Mass. Born 1918 at Maiden. Graduate Chelsea High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Herbert Vane Burns 3 Colonial Street, Gloucester, Mass. Born 1918 at Gloucester. Grad- uate Gloucester ?Iigh School. Major in Phvsical and Biological Sciences. Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2. Janet Whittemore Campbell 24 Amherst Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in English. Collegian, 2 (Assoc, Ed. Collegian Quarterly). Music Record Club. 1, 2. Press Club. 1. Sigma Beta Chi. Millicent Carpenter 17 .Mcdfield Street, Worcester, Mass. Born 1918 at Putnam, Conn, Graduate North High School. Major in Social Sciences. Phi Zeta. Leo Gary Carroll 367 Pleasant Street, Bridgewater, Mass. Born 1917 at Bridgewater. Grad- ate Bridgewater High School. Major in History and English. Robert Norman Cashmon 22 Searle Avenue, Easthampton, Mass. Born 1918 at Easthampton. Grad- uate Easthampton High School and Williston Academy. Major in Phys- ical and Biological Sciences. Soc- cer, 1, 2. Basketball, 1. Sigma Phi Epsilon. Melvin H. Chalfen 125 Peterborough Street, Boston, Mass. Born 1918 at Boston. Graduate Brookline High School. Major in Botany. Orchestra, 1. Freshman Handbook, 1. Outing Club, 1. Swim- ming, 1. Phi Lambda Tau. Hazel Ruth Chapin East Road, Sheffield, Mass. Born 1918 at Sheffield. Grad- uate Sheffield High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Econ- omics Club, 1, 2. 4-H Club 1 2 Alpha Lambda Mu. Robert Morgan Chapman 4i: I.,.rhii,T Kdad. Bclni, nt. .Mass. Born 1918 at Scranton, Pa. Grad- uate Belmont High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Spring Ti-ack, 1. Winter Track, 1. Kaiqia Sigma. Edith Marjorie Clark -Main Street, Sunderland, Mass. Born 1918 at Sunderland. Grad- uate Deerfleld High School. Majo in Social Sc Christian Fed- Isodore Cohen 8 2 Floyd Street, Porchester, Mass. Born 1916 at Boston. Graduate Boston Latin School. Major in Pre-Med. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Bay State Revue, 1. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Phi Lambda Tau. Frederick Cole 1608 Carew Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Springfield. Grad- uate Springfield Classical High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Outing Club, 1. 2. Chemistry Club, 1, 2. Swim- ming, 1. Hockey. 1. Baseball, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Kathleen Freda Cooper 2 Mount Pleasant Amherst, Mass. Bom 1919 at Castor, Alberta. Canada. Graduate Aiaherst High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2 (Soph. Kep.). Phi- Zeta. D. Arthur Copson 1173 Adams Street, Boston, Mass. Born 1918 at Boston. Graduate Boston English High School. Trans- fer Boston College. Major in Pliys- ical and Biological Sciences. PJii Sigma Kappa. Anne Katherine Corcoran 5 Myrtle Street, Stoneham, Mass. Born 1919 at Providence, R. I. Graduate Stoneham High School. Major in Home Economics. Class Nominating Comm., 1. Newman Club, 1, 2. Home Economics Club, 1. 2. Sigma Beta Chi. Douglas Hadfield Cowling rjd Cunuunuwivillh Avenue. WcM Concord, Mass. Born 1917 at Fairhaven. Grad- uate Fairhaven High School. Major in English. Band, 1, 2, Winter Track, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. [138} eiaiA 4 1940 Lorraine Creesy 504 Centve Street, Newton, Mass. Born 1918 at Worcester. Grad- uate Watertown High School. Major in Social Sciences. Women ' s Glee Club, 1. Phi Zeta. Robert Miller Creswell 8 Creswell Road, Worcester, Mass. Born 1918 at Worcester. Grad- uate Worcester Academy. Major in Landscape Architecture. Student Religious Council. 1. Christian Fed- eration, 1. Outing Club, 1. Kappa Sigma. George Morton Curran 17 Madison Avenue, Northampton, Mass. Born 1918 at Northampton. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Social Sciences. Music Record Club, 2 (Sec.-Ti-eas.). Gerald Michael Dailey 10 Atherstone Street, Dorchester, Mass. Born 1918 at Boston. Graduate Sharon High School and Cathedral School. Major in Economics. New- man Club. 1. 3. Outing Club, 1. Psvchologr Club. 2. International Relations ' Club. 2. Football, . Basketball. 1. Kappa Sigma. Frank Robert Lee Daley, Jr. 58 Nonotuck Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1919 at Waltham. Grad- uate Holyoke High School. Major in Chemistry. Student Religious Council, 1. Christian Federation, 1. Football, 1. Winter Track, 1. Baseball, 1. Q. T. V. (Dance Comm., 2). Frank Herbert Dalton 241 High Street. Greenfield, ilass. Born 1917 at Lynn. Graduate DeerBeld Academy. Major in Chem- istry. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Franklin Milton Davis, Jr. 146 Trapelo Road, Waltham, Mass. Born 1918 at Maiden. Graduate Waltham High School. Major in English. Collegian, 1, 2. Football, 1. 2. Hockey, 1, 2. Theta Chi. Ida Bessie Davis 84 Stevens Street, East Taunton, Mass. Born 1915 at Taunton. Graduate Taunton High School. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. 4-H Club, 1, 2. Sigma Iota. Anne Sophie Dec 8 West Street, Hadley, Mass. Born 1918 at Hadley. Graduate Hopkins Academy. Major in Home Economics. Home Economies Club, 1, 2. Alpha Lambda Mu. Emile Eugene Deneault 101 High Street, Greenfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Greenfield. Grad- uate Greenfield High School. Major in Social Sciences. Collegian. 1. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Newman Club, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Charlotte Lee Donahue 2352 Washington Street, Ne vton Lower Falls, Mass. Born 1917 at Newton Lo ver Palls. Graduate Newton High School. Major in Landscape Archi- tecture. Newman Club, 1, 2. Out- ing Club, 1. Landscape Club, 1. Kotherine Hazel Doran 26 Lincoln Avenue, Antlierst, Mass. Born 1918 at Amherst. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Home Economics. Phi Zeta. Currie Hayes Downs 38 Tucker Street, Lynn. Mass. Born 1918 at Lynn. Graduate Lynn English High School. Major in Pre-Med. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Alpha Sigma Phi (Custodian, 2). Agnes Dunham Valatie, New York Born 1918 at San Juan, Porto Rico. Graduate Glynn High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Lambda Delta Mu. Robert Francis Dunn 23 Adam Street, Pittsfleld, Mass. Born 1918 at Pittsfleld. Grad- uate St. Joseph ' s High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Class Nominating Comni., 1, Newman Club, 1. Football, 1. Basketball, 1. Swimming, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha (Captain, 2.). Robert Bowker Eaton 173 Main Street, Waltham, Mass. Born 1918 at Waltham. Grad- uate Waltham High School. Major in Chemistry. Outing Club, 1. Soccer, 1. • Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Laura Verlin Everson Pleasant Street, North Amherst, Mass. Born 1913 at St. Louis, Mo. Graduate Savannah High School, Georgia. Transfer University of Illinois. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Alpha Lambda Mu. Paul Richard Fanning 31 State Street, Milton, Mass. Born 1915 at Milton. Graduate Kent ' s Hill Preparatory School. Major in Social Sciences. Newman Club, 1, 2. Mathematics Club, 1, 2. Football. 1, 2. Baseball, 1, 2. Phi Sigma Kappa. Reaetta Barbara Farnsworth 31 Chesterfield Road, M orcester, Mass. Born 1 918 at Worcester. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Econ- omics Club, 1, 2. Phi Zeta. Isabel Kathryn Fenton 61 Newson Avenue, West Springfield, Mass. Born 1918 at West Springfield. Graduate Elmhurst Academy, Prov- idence. R. I. Transfer Manhattan- ville College. Major in Pre-Med. Paul Thomas Ferriter 31 West School Street, Westfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Westfield. Grad- uate Westfield High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Newman Club, 1, 2. Pre-Med. Club, 1. Football, 1, 2. Basketball, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. Vernon LeRoy Ferwerdo R. 2, Box 157A, Racine, Wisconsin. Born 1918 at Rockford, 111. Graduate William Horlick High School, Racine, Wis. Transfer Kansas Wesleyan University. Major in Psychology. [139] e oM o. 1940 John Edward Filios ad. Westfleld, jrass. Born 1916 at Westfleld. Grad- uate Westfield High School. Major in Physical and BioloKical Sciences. Collegian, 1, 2. 4-H Club, 1. Sfanley Finik South Hadley, llass. Born 1918 at South Hadley. Graduate South Hadley High School. Major in Chemistry. Foot- ball. 1, 2 (M). Margaret Asquith Firth 38 Swan Street, Lawrence, Mass. Born 1919 at Lawrence. Grad- uate Lawrence High School. Major in English. 4-H Club, 2. Alpha Lambda Mu. George Francis Flanagan 55 Clark Street, Easthampton, Mass. Born 1919 at Easthampton. Graduate St. Michael ' s High School. Major in Entomologv. Men ' s De- bating Team, 1, 2. Newman Club, 1, 2. Soccer, 1. Sigma Phi Ep- silon. Urban Cyril Fleming 53 Howard Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 191S at Holyoke. Grad- uate Holyoke High School. Major in Chemistry. Newman Club, 1, 2. Robert Thomas Foley 6 Burnett Street, Turners Palls, Mass. Born 1918 at Turners Falls. Graduate Turners Falls High School. Major in Physical and Bio- logical Sciences. William Gregory Foley 20 Hanson Street, Salem, Mass. Born 1917 at Salem. Graduate Salem High School. Major in Pre- Med. Nominating Comm., 1. New- man Club, 1, 2. Pre-Med. Club, 1, 2. Cross-Countrv, 1. Hockey, 1. Winter Track. 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. William Olcott Foster 66 Main Street, Marion, Mass. Born 1916 at Medford. Grad- uate Tabor Academy. Major in Agricultural Economics. Bay State Revue, 2. Roister Doisters, 1, 2. Men ' s RiQe Team. Theta Chi. Alex Fox 1245 Dwight Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1918 at New York, N. Y. Graduate Technical High School. Transfer Springfield College. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Bernard Hyman Fox 124 Porter Street, Maiden, Mass. Born lOr? at New York, N. Y. Graduate Maiden High School. Transfer Harvard. Major in Chemistry. Harvey From 8 Shannon Street, Worcester, Mass. Born 1918 at Worcester. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Soccer, 1, 2. Winter Track, 1. Alpha Epsilon Pi. Paul From 82 Fox Street Worcester, Mass. Born 1918 at Worcester. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Bacteriology. Soccer, 2. Basket- ■faall, 1. Baseball, 1. Lawrence John Freeman 149 Everett Street, Southbridge, Mass. Born 1918 at Southbridge. Grad- uate Wells High School. Major in Mathematics. Virginia Gale 25 Rockawav Avenue, Marblehead. Mass. Born 1918 at Gloucester. Grad- uate Marblehead High School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Class Secretary, 1, 2. Outing Club, 2. Sigma Beta Chi. Philip Carl Geoffrion 56 Hampton Street, West Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Williston Academy. Major in Economics. Football, 1, 2. Basket- ball, 1. Spring Track, 1, 2. Win- ter Track, 1, 2. Sigma Phi Epsilon. Vern Winslow Gillmore 22 Main Street, Gilbertville, Mass. Born 1918 at Chichester, N. H. Graduate Hardwick High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Football. 1. Spring Track. 1. Alpha Gamma Rho. Arnold Irving Glashow 23 Brookledge Street, Roxbury, Mass. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate Boston Latin School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Menorah Club, 1. 2. Psychologv Club, 2. Football 1. Wrestling. 1. Robert Butterfield Glass 92 Appleton Street, Arlington, Mass. Born 1916 at Somerville. Grad- uate Belmont High School. Major in Forest Entomolgy. Class Trea- surer, 1. 2, 3. Bay State Revue, 2. Chew Leadej-. Fernald Entomol- ogy Club, 2. Football, 1. Swim- ming, 2. Theta Chi. Thelma Nellie Glazier Leverett, Mass. Born 1918 at Leverett. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Home Economics. Outing Club, 2. 4-H Club, 2. Alpha Lambda Mu. Charles Leslie Gleason, Jr. Hanover, Mass. Born 1918 at Hanover. Graduate Hanover High School. Major in Economics. Orchestra, 2. Band, 1. 2. Cross-Countrv, 1. Basket- ball, 1. Spring Track, 1. Kappa Sigma. Richard Russell Glendon 4 Ware Road, Winchester, Mass. Born 1918 at Winchester. Grad- uate Winchester High School. Major in History. Outing Club, 1. 4-H Club. 1, 2. Siania Alpha Ep- silon. Florence Sylvia Goldberg 28 Quint Avenue, Allston, Mass. Born 1918 at Boston. Graduate Brighton High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Women ' s Glee Club, i, 2. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Chemistry Club, 2. Sigma Iota. William Francis Goodwin 15 Wheelock Street, Winthrop, Mass. Born 1918 at Winthrop. New- man Club, 1, 2. Spring Track, 1. Winter Track, 1, Kappa Sigma. Mark Harold Gordon R. F. D. No. 1. Springfield, Mass. Born 1913 at Clayton, Ohio. Graduate Classical High School. Transfer American International College. Major in Landscape Architecture. Evelyn Atherton Gould 6 Hartshorn Road, Walpole, Mass. Born 1918 at Cambridge. Grad- uate Walpole High School. Major in Social Sciences. Women ' s Glee Club, 1. Phi Zeta. Myra Cambell Graves Main Street, Sunderland, Mass. Born 1918 at Sunderland. Grad- uate Northfield Seminary. Major in Home Economics. Home Econ- omics Club. 1, 2. 4-H Club, 1. Lambda Delta Mu. Sidney Greenberg 73 Narragansett Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Trans- fer Springfield College. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Men ' s Glee Club. 2. Menorah Club, Burton William Gregg Westminster West, Vermont Born 1918 at Marlboro, N. H. Graduate Brattleboro High School, Vt. Maior in Animal Husbandry. Animal Husbandry Club. 1, 2. 4-H Club, 1. 2. Harold Emory Griffin 7 Adanae Avenue, Dorchester, Mass. Born 1917 at Bos ' on. Graduate Boston Latin School. Major in Chemistry. Christian Federation, 1. Soccer, 1. Basketball, 1. Arthur Alexander Hagelstein 194 School Street, Stoughton, Mass. Born 1918 at Dorchester. Grad- uate Stoughton High School. Major in Pre-Med. Alpha Gamma Rho. Myron Dexter Hager 127 Main Street, South Deerfield, Mass. Born 1917 at South Deerfield. Graduate Deerfield Academy. Major ill Pre-Med. Honor Council, 1, 2. M.,i(i.ii. K.v, 2. Class President. 2. M-ii i.lr,. Club, 1, 2. Football. I l;;(-l..ili ill. 1. Baseball, 1. Frieda Lillian Hall 152 Hawthorne Road, Braintree, Mass. Born 1918 at East Braintree. Graduate Braintree High School. Major in Home Economics. Math- ematics Club, 2. Phi Zeta. John Walton Hall Marshfleld, Mass. Born 1918 at Burlington, Vt. Graduate Jlarshfield High School. Major in Pomology. Robert Hayes Hanley 17 Bancroft Park, Hopedale, Mass. Born 1918 at Hopedale. Grad- uate Wilbraham Academy, Major in Social Sciences. Soccer, 1, 2. Winter Track, 1. Malcolm Bennett Harding, Jr. 84 Court Street, Westfleld, Mass. Born 1918 at Westfield. Grad- 11,11, • W. lli. ' l.l High School. Major in rin-ir;ii .ii.il Biological Sciences. Imh.i ' Hockey, 2. Baseball, I , riii Simula Kappa. [140] etdU o.( 1940 Thomas Waldo Herrick Ti-emont Street, South Uuxbury, ilass. Born 1917 at Duxbury. Grndunte Jlount Hermon. Major in Chem- istry. Football, 1. Basketball, 1. Baseball, 1. Kappa Sigma. Ralph Brewer Hill 26 Summer Street, Ipswich, Mass. Born 1918 at Newton. Graduate Manning High School. Major in Economics. Men ' s Rifle Team, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Franklin Hopkins Leverett, Mass. Born 1917 at Hartford, Conn. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Outing Club, 2. Arthur Fanner Howe 1 Rockland Street, Brockton, Mass. Born 1918 at Brockton. Grad- uate Tilton Academy, N. H. Major in Chemistry. Outing Club, 1. Soccer. 1, 2. Lambda Chi Alpha. Elizabeth Margaret Howe 19 Dexter Street, Pittsfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Pittsfield. Grad- uate Pittsfield High School. Major in Floriculture. Christian Feder- ation, 1. Horticultural Show, 2. Women ' s Rifle Team, 1, 2. Phi Ze.a, 2 (Ass ' t.-Treas). Howard Mason Hoxie 44 North Elm Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1919 at Northampton. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Frederick Kenneth Hughes 134 Dartmouth Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Holyoke. Graduate Williston Academy. Major in Chem- istry. Chemistry Club, 2. Lambda Chi Alpha. Marjorie Buck Irwin 4B9 North Main Street, Palmer, Mass. Born 1918 at Ardmore. Pa. Grad- uate Palmer High School. Major in Sociology and Psychology. Fresh- man Handbook. 2. Freshman Hazing Comm.. 2. Women ' s Athletic Asso., 2. Phi Zeta. Albin Felix Irzyk 37 Mason Street, Salem. Mass. Born 1917 at Salem. Ciraduate Salem High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Football, 1, 2 (M). Baseball, 1. Olive Georgina Jackson 54 High Street, Monson, Mass. Born 1917 at Three Rivers. Graduate Monson High School. Major in Social Sciences. Alpha Lambda Mu. Priscilla Jacobs Washington Street, HoUiston, Mass. Born 1917 at Pramingham. Grad- uate Holliston High School. Major in Animal Husbandry. Outing Club, 1. 2. Animal Husbandry Club, 1, 2. 4-H Club, 2. John Chester Jakobek Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. Born 1919 at Hadley. Graduate Hoi)kins Academy. Major in Social Sciences. Basketball, 1. Richard Herbert Jaquith 4S Massasoit Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1919 at Newton. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Soccer, 1, 2. Eleanor Fronces Jewell 48 Barnard Road. Worcester, Mass. Born 1918 at Worcester. Grad- uate North High School. Major in Home Economics. Orchestra, 1, 2. Bay State Revue, 2. Newman Club, 1. ' 2. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Phi Zeta. Alberta Margaret Johnson College Highway, South wick, Mass. Born 1918 at Southwick. Grad- uate Danforth-Dunbar School. Transfer Brenau College. Major in Home Economies. Band, 2 (Drum Major). Carnival Comm., 2. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Sigma Beta Chi. Louis Fingal Johnson 7 Hillside Court. Gloucester, Mass. Born 1919 at Gloucester. Grad- uate Gloucester High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Band. ' 1. Cross-Country. 1, 2. Winter Track, 2. Lambda Chi Alpha. Margery Deane Johnson R. P. D., Ashland, Southboro, Mass. Born 1919 at Boston. Graduate Southboro High School. Major in Languages. Christian Federation, 1. Outing Club, 1, 2. Lambda Delta Mu. Robert Lincoln Jones Princeton, Mass. Born 1917 at Worcester. Grad- uate Worcester Classical High School. Major in Wildlife Manage- ment. Class Ti-easurer, 1, 2. Band, 2. Outing Club, 1. Football, 1. Spring Ti-ack, 1. Kappa Sigma. Robert Arthur Joyce 291 Locust Street, Florence, Mass. Born 1918 at Northampton. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Ne vman Club, 1. 2. Spring Track. 1. Winter Track, 1. Robert Charles Kennedy 16 Macomber Avenue, Nofth Dartmouth, Mass. Born 1915 at Milford. Graduate Holy Family High School and Bris- tol County Agricultural School. Major in Floriculture. 4-H Club, 1, 2. Cross-Country, 1. Bartholomew Francis Keville 7 Porter Street. East Lynn, Mass. Born 1918 at East Lynn. Grad- uate English High School. Major in Bacteriology. Newman Club, 1, 2. Soccer. 1. Winter Track, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. John Forrest Kirsch 393 St. James Avenue, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Technical High School. Trans- fer Springfield Junior College. Major in Economics. Band, 2. Basketball, 2 (Ass ' t. Mgr.). Theta Chi. Rose Frieda Emma Kohls 31 Buttonwood Street, Dorcliester, Mass. Born 1918 at Kiel, Germany. Graduate Girls ' High School, Boston. Major in Chemistry. Women ' s Glee Club, 1. Alpha Lambda Mu, (Academics Chairman, 2). Carl Ernest Kokins Monroe Street, Ashland, Mass. Born 1918 at Schenectady, N. Y. Graduate Ashland High School. Major in Chemistry. Newman Chib, 1, 2. Football, 1, 2. Basketball,!. Baseball, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Herbert Krauss 204 Columbia Road, Dorchester, Mass. Born 1917 at Philadelphia, Pa. Graduate James Monroe High School, N. Y. City. Major in Pre- Med. Menorah Club, 1. Spring Track, 1. Phi Lambda Tau. Ruth Daisy Lamon 1701 Massachusetts Avenue. North Adams. Mass. Born 1918 at North Adams. Graduate Drurv High School. Major in Floriculture. Christian Federation, 1, 2. 4-H Club, 1, 2. Everett Walter Langworthy Middlefield Street, Chester, Mass. Born 1918 at West Springfield. Graduate cniester High School. Major in Social Sciences. Phi Sigma Kappa. Roland Eugene Lanoue 35 Mason Street, Brockton, Mass. Born 1915 at Brockton. Grad- uate Brockton High School. Trans- fer Arkansas University. Major in Bacteriology. Bacteriology Club, 2. Joseph Phelps Larkin 215 Arsenal Street, Watertown, Mass. Born 1918 at Watertown. Grad- uate Watertown High School. Major in Chemistry. Football, 1, 2 (M). Basketball, 1. Baseball, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. Vasilis Lavrakas 59 Elton Avenue, Watertown, Mass. Born 1917 at Watertown. Grad- uate Watertown High School. Major in Chemistry. Football, 1, 2. Basketball, 1. Winter Track, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. Catherine Martin Leete Maple Road, Briarcliff JIanor, New York Born 1918 at Mt. Kisco, N. Y. Graduate Briarcliff High School. Major in Social Sciences. W. S. G. A., 2. Bay State Revue, 2. Phi Zeta. Arthur Joseph Lepine 241 v„ Maple Street. Holyoke, Mass. Born 1918 at Holyoke. Graduate Holvoke High School. Major in Pre-Dental. Orchestra, 2. Band, 1. 2. Swimming. 1. Hockey, 1- Gerold Joseph Levitch 98 Conway Street, Gireenfield, Mass. Born 1918 at New York City. Graduate Greenfield High School. Major in Social Sciences. [141] Roma Dina Levy 37 Springside Avenue, Pittsfield, Mass. Born 191S at Turners Falls. Graduate .Pittsfield High School Major in Bacteriology. Collegian, 2 (Sec). Menorah Club, 1, 2. Out- ing Club, 1. Women ' s Rifle Team, 1, 2. Sigma Iota (Historian, 2). Roger Hurfin Lindsey 114 Church Street, Ware, Mass. Born 1919 at Ware. Graduate Ware High School. Major in Ph sical and Biological Sciences. oiu-ian, 1. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Barbara Little 50 Marlboro Street, Newburyport, Mass. Born 1918 at Newburyport. Graduate Newburyport High School. Major in Bacteriology. Phi Zeta. Nancy Elizabeth Luce :! ' ,) (Hi.Hlri.li Street, l- ' it.li},iir--. Mass. liorn 1917 at Boston. Graduate Fitcliburg High School. Major in Home Economics. Collegian, 1, 2. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Sigma Beta Chi. Phillips Edward Luce 16 Event Street, Framingham, Mass. Born 1917 at Framingham. Grad- uate Framingham High School. Major in Entomology. Fernald Entomology Club, 2, 3. Pre-Med. Club, 2. Football, 1. Cross-Country 2. Hockey, 1. Baseball, 1. Alpha Sigma Phi (Custodian, 2). Donald John Mahoney 89 Pearl Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Providence. Grad- uate Vermont Academy. Major in Chemistry. Men ' s Glee Club, 1. Kappa Sigma. James Walter Malcolm 169 Beech Street. Holyoke, Mass. Born 1913 at South Hadley Falls. Graduate Holyoke High School. Transfer Springfield College. Major in Social Sciences. Student Relig- ious Council, 1. Football, 1. Basketball, 1, 2. Kappa Sigma. Dona Harold Molins 8 Nottinghill Road, Brig ' nton. Mass. Born 1919 at Boston. Graduate Latin School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Pre-Med. Club, 2. International Relations Club, 2. Soccer, 1, 2. Winter Ti-ack, 1. Alpha Epsilon Pi (Sentinel, 2). William Joseph Molley 19 Russel Street, Thompsonville, Conn. Born 1918 at Thompsonville. Graduate Enfield High School. Tran.st ' er Providence College. Major in Pliysical Education. Q. T. V. Irma Isabel Malm 15 Chadwick Street Worcester, Mass. Born 1919 at Worcester. Grad- uate North High School. Major in Social Sciences. Women ' s Athletic Association, 2 (Secretary). Phi Zeta. Charles Francis Mansfield H Jenny Lind Street, Taunton, Mass. Born 1918 at Taunton. Graduate Taunton High School. Major in Chemistry. Maroon Key, 2. Box- ing, 1, 2. Football, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Roland Charles Marriott Ashfield, Mass. Born 1910 at Springfield. Grad- uate Commerce High School. Major in Psychology. Robert Kendall Morsh 1 Wachusett Street, Rutland, Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Grad- uate Rutland High School. Major in Agricultural Economics. Bay State Revue, 2. 4-H Club, 1, 2. Football, 1. Soccer, 2. Baseball, 1. Alpha Gamma Eho. Helen Alison Marshall Pelham Road, Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at Amherst. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Social Sciences. Robert Ansel Martin 37 Pleasure Avenue, Pittsfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Pittsfield. Grad- uate Pittsfield High School. Major in Forestry. Victoria Katherine Matuszko R. P. D., No. 3, Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at Hadley. Graduate Hopkins Academy. Major in Social Sciences. Newman Club, 1, 2. 4-H Club, 2. Gerald Edward McAndrew 365 James Street, Barre, Mass. Born 1916 at Barre. Graduate Barre High School. Major in Chem- istry. Maroon Key, 2. Roister Doisters, 1. Carnival Comm., 2. Newman Club, 1. John Joseph McCarthy 29 Arlington Street, Worcester, Mass. Born 1914 at Worcester. Grad- uate St. John ' s Academy. Major in Social Sciences. Collegian, 1. Roister Doisters, 1, 2. Carnival Comm., 2. Newman Club, 1, 2. Freshman Handbook. (Business Mgr.). Burnham Declamation Con- test, 1. Dorothy Merrill 47 Florence Avenue, Norwood, Mass. Born 1918 at Milton. Graduate Norwood High School. Major in Home Economics. Collegian, 1. Christian Federation. 1. 2. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Lambda Delta Mu. John Edward Merrill, Jr. 16 Nowell .Avenue, Southbridge, Mass. Born 1918 at Beverly. Graduate Mount Hermon. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Math- ematics Club, 1. Nominating Comm., 2. Spring Tr.ick, 1. Winter Track- 1. Kappa Sigma. John Calvin Miller Charlton, Mass. Born 1918 at Worcester. Grad- uate Chariton High School. Major in Horticultu re. 4-H Club, 1, 2. Winter Track, 1, 2. Spring Track, 1. Alpha Sigma Phi. Carolyn Emma Monk ( li;ini|inrv Street, I. r.. 1(111, . iiiss. Burn 1919 at Gardner. Graduate Groton High School. Major in Home Economics. Collegian, 1, 2. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. 4-H Club, 1, 2. Alpha Lambda Mu. [142] XXM. (4 1940 Paul Moriece Netmocke Lodge, Meudon, Mass. Born 1912 at New Haven, Conn. Gradu.ite New Haven High School. Transfer University o£ Hawaii. Major in Landscape Architecture. Dorothy Ruth Morley Mount Pleasant, Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at Muskegon, Mich- igan. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. 4-H Club, 1. Phi Zeta. Herbert Irving Morris 95 ' Washington Street, Dorchester, Mass. Born 1918 at Boston. Graduate Jamaica Plain High School. Major in Chemistry. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Alpha Epsiion Pi. Roy Eorl Morse 683 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. Born 1915 at Boston. Graduate Roxbury Memorial High School. Major in Bacteriology. Band, 1. 2. Mathematics Club, 2. Swimming. 1, 2. Kappa Sigma. Maynord Fowie Moseley, Jr. 10 Imrie Road, AUston, Mass. Born 1918 at Allston. Graduate Jamaica Plain High School. Major in Forestry and Botany. Orchestra, 1. Men ' s Glee Club. 2. Swim- ming. 1. Robert Henry Mosher 2 Westfleld Road, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1919 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club. 2. Soccer, 1. Basketball, 1. Alpha Sigma Phi, (Secretary, 2). Richard Kenneth Muller 13 Fearing Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1919 at Orono, Me. Grad- uate Amherst High School. Major in Mathematics. Mathematics Club, 2. Kappa Sigma. John Joseph Murphy 605 Western Avenue, Lynn, Mass. Born 1916 at Lvnn. Graduate Classical High School, Major in Landscape Architecture. Student Religious Council, 2. Newman Club. 1, 2. Landscape Club, 2. Chem- istry Club, 1, 2. Football, 1, 2. Swimming, 1. Spring Track. 1. Winter Track, 1, 2. Baseball, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Carl Felix Nelson 586 West Broadway, Gardner, Mass. Born 1914 at Gardner. Graduate Gushing Academy. Transfer Holy Cross. Major in Landscape Archi- tecture. Lambda Chi Alpha. Michael Neznoyko R. F. D. Bo-M 215, Hadley, Mass. Born 1919 at Easthampton. Grad- uate Hopkins Academy. Major in Chemistry. Dominic Edward Nietupski Miller Street, Ludlow, Mass. Born 1917 at Ludlow. Graduate Ludlow High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Spring Track, 1. Alpha Gamma Rho. Lewis Frank Norwood 125 Main Street, Rockport, Mass. Born 1916 at Rockport. Grad- uate Essex Agricultural School. Major in Floriculture. Phi Sigma Kappa. G. David Novelli 116 High Street, North Agawam, Mass. Born 1918 at North Agawam. Graduate Agawam High School. Major in Bacteriology. Alpha Sigma Phi. Arthur Alfred Noyes 367 Woodward Street, Wabau, Mass. Born 1917 at Lafayette, Ind. Graduate Lawrence Academy. Major in English. Collegian, 1, 2. A. B. Oomm., 1. Cross-Country, 1, 2. Spring Track, 1, 2. Winter Track, 1, 2. Theta Chi. William Brown Nutting Temple Street, West Boylston, Mass. Born 1918 at Worcester. Grad- uate West Boylston High School. Major in Entomology. Daniel John O ' Connell 47 Bardwell Street, South Hadley Falls, Mass. Born 1919 at South Hadley Falls. Graduate South Hadley High School. Major in History. Foot- ball, 1, 2. Basketball, 1. Spring Track, 1. Sigma Alpha Epsiion. Priscilla May Oertel Washington Street, Hanson, Mass. Born 1919 at Hanson. Graduate Whitman High School. Major in Home Economics. Women ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Bay State Revue, 2. Christian Federation, 1, 2. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Alpha Lambda Mu. John Raymond O ' Neill 220 Sargeant Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1918 at Holyoke. Graduate Holvoke High School. Major in Social Sciences. Football, 1. Bas- ketball, 1. Baseball, 1. John Vincent Osmun 16 Northampton Road, Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at Amherst. Grad- uate Deerfield Academy. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Maroon Key, 2. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Carnival Ball Comm., 2. Soccer, 1, 2. Hockey, 1. Kappa Sigma. Ralph Francis Palumbo 312 Lancaster Street, Leominster, Mass. Born 1916 at Leominster. Grad- uate Leominstr High School. Major in Botany. Newman Club. 2. Nom- inating Comm., 2. Lambda Chi Alpha. Willard Ginn Patton State Street, Cushman, Mass. Born 1895 at Framingham. Grad- uate Framingham High School. For- mer Member of class of 1917. Major in Social Sciences. 13 years County 4-H Club Agent. Phi Sigma Kappa. James Warren Poyson, Jr. 1544 Main Street, Millis, Mass. Born 1918 at Millis. Graduate Millis High School. Major in Pre- Med. Carnival Comm., 1, 2. Out- ing Club, 1. Liter-class Athle ' ic Board, 1, 2. Football, 1, 2 (M). Spring Track. 1. Theta Chi. [143] aiA 4 1940 Virginia Helen Pease 47 East Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1919 at Amherst. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Social Sciences. Wesley Foundation, 1, 2. Burnliam Declamation, 1. Lambda Delta Mu (Alumni Sec., 2). Helene Elizabeth Pelissier Russell Street, Hadley, Mass. Born 1918 at Hadley. Graduate Hopkins Academy. Major in Social Sciences. Newman Club, 1. Lambda Delta Mu. Lester LeRoy Phillips, Jr. 44 Holmes Road, Pittslield, Mass. Born 1917 at Indianapolis, Ind. Graduate Pittsfield High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Student Religious Coun- cil, 1. Swimming, 1. Kenneth Vernon Pike 23 Westminster Street, Pittsfleld, Mass. Born 1917 at Pittsfield. Grad- uate Pittsfleld High School. Major in Forestry. Outing Club, 1. Cross- country, 1. Basketball, 1. Alpha Sigma Phi (Secretary. 2). George Thomas Pitts, Jr. Her ck St Beverly, Mass. Born 1917 at Beverly. Graduate Brighton High School and Hunt- ington Prep. School. Major in Botany. Maroon Kev, 2 (Sec- Treas.). Carnival Ball Comm., 2. Freshman Handbook Comm., 1. Freshman Nominating Comm., Swimming, 1, 2(M). Theta Chi. Richard John Plichta Strong Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1919 at Holvoke. Graduate Amherst High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Band, 1, 2. Q. T. V. Edwin Michael Podolak B.ix 123. Middle Street, Hadley. Mass. Born 1919 at Hadley. Graduate Hopkins Academy. Major in Chem- istry. Charles Arthur Powers, Jr. 68 Robinson Avenue, Braintree, Mass. Born 1918 at Wollaston, Mass. Graduate Braintree High School. Major in Chemistry. Collegian, 1, 2. Orchestra, 1, 2. Band, 1, 2. Men ' s Glee Club, 2. Class Nomin- ating Comm., 2. Kappa Sigma. John Joseph Powers 47 Onota Street, Pittsfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Pittsfleld. Grad uate Pittsfleld High School. Major in Chemistry. Newman Club, 1. 2. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Esther Pratt 8 Kingmont Street, Greenwood, Mass. Born 1917 at Melrose, Mass. Graduate Wakefield High School. Major in Psychology. Women s Glee Club, 1, 2. Bay State Revue. 2. Christian Federation, 1, 2 (Sec- retary). Wesley Foundation, 2. Outing Club. 2. Psychology Club. 2. 4-H Club, 2. Alpha Lambda Mu. Leroy Fletcher Prouty, Jr. Barney Estate. Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Social Sciences. Temporary Class Pres., 1. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Men ' s Debating Team, 2. Newman Club, 1, 2. Carnival Comm., 2 (Vice-Pres .). Ring Comm., 1, 2. College Choir, 2. Operetta, 2. In- ternational Relations Club, 2. Football, 1. Spring Track, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. Lawrence Hunneman Reagan 31 Colonial Avenue, Dorchester, Mass. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate Jamaica Plain High School. Major in Botany. Maroon Key, 2. Class Captain, 1, 2. Dad ' s Day Comm., 2. Carnival Comm., 2. Football, 1. Hockey, 1. Alpha Sigma Phi. Ralph Herbert Reed Main Street. Northfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Northfield. Grad- uate Northfield High School and Mount Hermon. Major in Physical and Biologica Mia Reinap R. F. D.. No. 2., Nobscot Road, Pramingham, Mass. Born 1917 at Estonia, Europe. Graduate Waltham High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Women ' s Glee Club, 1. Melvin Reismon 11 Cummings Road, Brighton, Mass. Born 1918 at Korbury, Mass. Graduate Boston Public School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Pre- Med. Club. 1. Spring Ti-ack, 1. Winter Track, 1. Phi Lambda Tau. (Sergeant-at-arms, 2). Katherine Louise Rice 103 Westford Circle, Springfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Econ- omics Club, 2. Lambda Delta Mu. William Henry Richards, Jr. 406 Elm Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1918 at Hartford, Conn. Graduate Northampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Lambda Chi Alpha. Patricia Jane Rabbins 29 Laconia Road, Worcester. Mass. Born 1918 at Boston, Graduate North High School. Major in Social Sciences. Phi Zeta. Robert Rodman 949 Blue Hill Avenue, Dorchester, Mass. Born 1919 at Boston. Graduate Boston Latin School. Major in Pre- Med. Collegian. 1. 2. Menorah Club. 1, 2. Football. 1. Hockey, 1. Baseball. 1 2. Alpha Epsilon Pi. (Corres. Scribe. 2). Rino Joseph Roffinoli !I7 .Snutli street, Williamstown, Mass. Born 1916 at Italy. Graduate Williamstown High School. Major in Chemistry. Alpha Sigma Phi. Mary Rogosa 55 Cherry Street, Lynn, Mass. Born 1917 at Lynn. Graduate Lynn English High School. Major in Economics. Menorah Club, 1, 2. 3. International Relations Club, Sidney Walter Rosen 42 Sanderson Avenue, Lynn, Mass. Born 1918 at Lynn. Graduate English High School. Major in Horticultural Manufactures. Men- orah Club, 1, 2. Pre-Med. Club, 1. Cross-country, 1, 2. Winter Track, 1. Spring Track, 1. Alpha Epsilon Pi. Edwin Malcolm Rossman 50 Parkvale Avenue, Allston, Mass. Born 1918 at Winthrop. Grad- uate Boston Latin School. Major in Economics. Winter Ti-ack, 1. Spring Track. 1. Alpha Epsilon Pi. Dorothy Jean Rourke 84 Marion Street. Springfield, Mass. Born 1919 at Palmer. Graduate Classical High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Women ' s Rifle Team, 1, 2. Women ' s Ath- letic Association, 1. Sigma Beta Chi. Alfred Howard Rudge 23 Adelle Circuit, Worcester, Mass. Born 1918 at Worcester. Grad- uate South High School. Major in Social Sciences. Football. 1. 2 (M). Basketball, 1, 2. Baseball, 1, 2. Theta Chi. Sylvia Russell 281 Chestnut Street. Lynnfield Centre. Mass. Born 1918 at Salem. Graduate Wakefield High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1. Lambda Delta Mu Winslow Edwin Ryan 62 Park Street, Hudson, Mass. Born 1918 at Manchester, N. H. Graduate Hudson High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Football, 1, 2. Basket- ball. 1. Baseball, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. Theodore Soltzman 167 Howard Avenue, Ro.xbury, Mass. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate Jamaica Plain High School. Major in Agronomy. Menorah Club, 1. Football, 1. James Joseph Sanderson Washington, Mass. Born 1918 at Springfield. Grad- uate Dalton High School. Major in Chemistrv. Soccer. 1. Basket- ball, 1. Winter Track, 1. Spring Track, 1. Leo Joseph Santucci 232 South Main Street, Palmer. Mass. Born 1917 at Palmer. Graduate Palmer High School. Major in Mathematics. Football, 1. 2 (M). Baseball, 1. Francis Richard Saunders 32 Trask Street, Gloucester, .Ma. ' ss. Born 1918 at Gloucester. Grad- uate Cxloucester High School. Major iii Chemistry. Band. 1. David Sawyer 50 Lucerne Street, Dorchester, Mass. Born 1918 at Dorchester. Grad- uate Boys High School. Major in Chemistrv. Roister Doisters, 2. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Alpha Epsilon [144] etcWL a§ 1940 Evi C. Scholz State Line, Mass. Born 1918 at West Stockbvidge. Graduate Willi;ims Hii;h School. Major in Distributed Sciences. Cross-Coiintrv. 1. 2 ( .M ) . Baseball, 1. Alpha Sigma Phi. Norman James Schoonmaker South East Street, Amherst, Mass . Born 1918 at Gerinantown, Pa. Graduate Westtown High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Maroon Key, 2. Soccer, 1, 2. Kappa Sigma. Henry Marcus Schreiber 185 Grovers Avenue, Winthrop, Mass. Born 1918 at Winthrop. Grad- uate Winthrop High School. Major in History. Menorah Club, 1. Basketball, 1. Alpha Epsilon Pi. John Paul Serex 69 Lincoln Avenue, Amherst, Mass. Born 1918 at Northampton. Grad- uate Williston Academy. Major in Social Sciences. Football, 2. Theta Chi. Everett Shapiro 7 Deering Road, Boston, Mass. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate Latin School. Major in Cheraistrv. Bay State Revue. 1. Menorah Club, 1. Phi Lambda Tau. Donald Houghton Shaw 215 Washington Street, Belmont. Mass. Born 1916 at Belmont. Graduate Browne and Nichols School. Major in Social Sciences. Freshman Hand- book, 1. Soccer, 1. Basketball, 1. Q. T. T. Marjorie Clarinda Shaw North Main Street, Belehertown, Mass. Born 1918 at Holyoke. Graduate Northfield Seminary. Major in Home Economics. Lambda Delta Mu. Robert Irving Sheldon 90 Hampden Street, West Springfield, Mass. Born 1918 at Springfield. Grad- uate West Springfield High School. Major in English. Maroon Kev, 2 (Pres.). Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Carnival Comm., 2. Dad ' s Day Comm., 2. Soccer, 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. Daniel Edgar Shepardson 63 Simonds Street, Athol, Mass. Born 1918 at Athol. Graduate Athol High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Roister Doisters, 1, 2 (Ass ' t. Elec- trician). Outing Club, 2. Math- ematics Club, 1, 2. Cross-Country, 1, 2. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Wilfred Britton Shepardson 63 Simonds Street, Athol, Mass. Born 1916 at Athol. Graduate Athol High School. Major in Chem- istry. Outing Club, 2. Mathemat- ics Club. 2. Cross-Countrv. 1. Hockey, 1. Spring Track, 1. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Arthur Sherman Lanesboro, Mass. Born 1919 at North Adams. Graduate PittsfieM High School. Major in Forestry. Sidney Carl Siegal 38 Forrest Street, Winthrop, Mass. Born 1917 at Dorchester. Grad- uate Winthrop High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Mathematics Club, 1. Bernard Silberberg 26 Esmond Street, Dorchester, Mass. Born 1918 at Revere. Graduate Boston Latin School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. 1. Hockey, 1, 2 (Assistant Ma Alfred Jay Silfen 130 Belmont Avenue, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Trans- fer American International College. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Edgar Burton Slater Tyringham, Mass. Born 1918 at Pittsfield. Grad- uate Lee High School. Major in Social Sciences. Outing Club, 1, 2. Cross-Country, 1, 2. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Dorothea Florentina Smalley 78 Downing Street, Worcester, Mass. Born 1918 at Worcester. Grad- uate South High School. Major in Home Economics. W. S. G. A., 2. Newman Club, 1, 2. Home Econ- omics Club, 1, 2. Sigma Beta Chi. Frank Browne Smith 10 Parker Street, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1919 at Holyoke. Graduate Holyoke High School. Major in Chemistry. Band, 1, 2. Bay State Revue, 1, 2. Newman Club, 1, 2. John Smith Vining Hill Road, Southwick, Mass. Born 1919 at Fall River. Grad- uate Westfield High School. Major in Chemistry. Alpha Gamma Rho. Marjorie Marion Smith 194 Middlesex Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School. Major in Home Economics. Class Vice- President, 1, 2. Home Economics, 1. Lambda Delta Mu. Everett Royal Spencer, Jr. 3 Francis Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Mount Hermon, Major in English. Kappa Sigma. Frank Henry Spencer 439 Elm Street. Northampton, Mass. Born 1919 at Northampton. Grad- uate Northampton High School. Major in Social Sciences. Men ' s Rifle Team, 1. Football, 1, 2. Basketball, 1. Baseball, 1. Elizobeth Horriet Spofford 46 Housatonic Street, Lee, Mass. Born 1919 at Lenox. Graduate Lee High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Sigma Beta Chi. Sidney Spungin 50 Grove Street, Greenfield, Mass. Born 1913 at Orange. Graduate Greenfield High School. Major in Chemistry. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Chemistry Club, 1. Phi Lambda Tau. Eric Stahlberg 44 Slate Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1917 at Northampton. Grad- uate Northampton High School. Major in Chemistry. Football, 1, 2. Basketball, 1. Kappa Sigma. Frank Raymond StanisiewskI Triangle Street, Amherst, Mass. Born 1916 at Amherst. Grad- uate Amherst High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Football, 1. Robert Staples 33 Olive Street, Northampton, Mass. Born 1917 at Philadelphia. Pa. Gradu ate Northampton High School. Major in Physical and Biological Sciences. Football, 1, 2. Jacqueline Louise Stewart 65 Lincoln Avenue, Amherst, Mass. Born 1919 at San Antonio, Texas. Graduate Leavenworth High School. Major in Home Economics. Collegian, 1, 2. Carnival Comm., 1. Home Economics Club, 2. Sigma Beta Chi. Mary Allerton Stewart Bay Road, South Duxbury, Mass. Born 1917 at Duxbury. Grad- uate Duxbury High School. Major in English. Harold Frederick Storey Union Street, Millis, Mass. Born 1917 at Millis. Graduate Millis High School. Major in Agronomy. Nominating Coram., 1. Football, 1. Swimming, 1. Spring Track, 1. Theta Chi. Homer Lincoln Stranger Summer Street, Kingston, Mass. Born 1916 at Plymouth. Grad- uate Kingston High School. Major in Dairy Industry. Alpha Sigma Phi. Harold Louis Straube 60 Haines Drive, Bloomfield, New Jersey Born 1919 at St. Louis, Mo. Graduate Bloomfield High School. Major in Entomology. Outing Club. 2. Swimming, 1, 2. Theta Chi. Albert William Sullivan 27 North Main Street, South Hadley Falls, Mass. Born 1918 at Holvoke. Graduate South Hadlev Falls High School. Major in Pre-Med. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Bay State Revue, 2. Men ' s Debating Team, 2. Phi Sigma Kappa. Eugene Francis Sullivan 487 Chicgpee Street, Willimansett. Mass. Born 1916 at Springfield. Grad- uate Chicopee High School. Trans- fer Springfield College. Major in Pre-Med. John William Swenson 5 Montvale Road, Worcester, Mass. Born 1918 at Worcester. Grad- uate North High School. Major in Social Sciences. Student Religious Council, 1. 2. Lambda Chi Alpha, (High Epsilon. 2, 3). CH5] QldiA a§ 1940 Gerald Lloyd Talbot 342 Pearl Street, Springfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Springfield. Grad- uate Classical High School, Trans- fer University of Wyoming. Major in Agricultural Economics. Men ' s Glee Club, 2. Newman Club, 1, 3. Animal Husbandry Club, 2. Sigma Phi Epsilon (Pledge Pros.). David Scott Tappon 39 Byfield Road. Waban, Mass. Born 1914 at Spruce Pine, North Carolina. Graduate Cambridge School and Kendal Green School. Major in Entomology. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Warren Rawford Tappin, Jr. 133 Grove Street. " Winchendon, Mass. Born 1918 at Winchendon. Grad- uate Murdock High School. Ma.ior in Ma hematics. Kominating Comm., 3 Football, 1. 2 (M). Basketball, 1. Baseball. 1. Lambda Chi Alpha. Priscilla Winslow Taylor 224 Jamaicaway, Jamaica Plain, Mass. Born 1917 at New York, N. Y. Graduate Jamaica Plain High School and Mass. School of Art. Major in Social Sciences. Lambda Delta Mu. Roy Clifton Taylor Bernardston Road, Greenfield, Mass. Born 1919 at Greenfield. Grad- uate " reentield High School. Major in Chemistry. Chemistry Club, 1. Dean Thomas Terry West Warren Road, Palmer, Mass. Born 1918 at Waterbury, Conn. Graduate Palmer High Sclmo!. Major in Pre-Med. Newman Club, 1, 2. Debating Club, 1. 2. Fcniahl Entomology Club, 1, 2. Pre .Med. Club, 2. Chemistry Club, 3. Math- ematics Club, 1. Football, 1. Spring Track, 1. Winter Track, 1, 2. Chester Howard Tiberii North Main Street, Charlton, Mass. Born 1918 at Charlton. Graduate Charlton High School. Major in Dairy. Orchestra, 1. Band, 2. George Burton Tobey, Jr. 250 Cochituate Road, Framingham. Mass. Born 1917 at Kingston. Grad- uate Framingham High School. Major in Forestry. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 2. Christian Federation, 1, 2. Wesley Foundation, 1, 2. Hockey, 1. Alpha Sigma Phi. Barbara Tolmon 530 Burncoat Street, Worcester, Mass. Born 1918 at Worcester. Grad- uate Classical High School. Trans- fer Smith College. Major in English. Malcolm Parker Trees 14 Randell Road, Maynard, Mass. Born 1917 at Maynard. Graduate Maynard High School. Major in Botany. Carnival Comm., 2. Out- ing Club. 1, 2. Football. 1. Lambda Chi Ali.ha. Matthew Nathan Tuttle 15 Beekert Avenue, Revere, Mass. Born 1917 at Boston. Graduate Lynn Classical High School. Major in Landscape Architecture. Menorah Club, 1, 3. Carl William Twyble 111 Main Street, C-iilbertville, Mass. Born 1917 at Gilbertville. Grad- uate Hardwick High School. Win- ter Track, 1. Spring Track, 1. Margaret Viola Vannah 7 Hampden Court, Monson. Mass. Born 1919 at Westbrook, Maine. Graduate Monson High School. Major in English. Alpha Lambda Mu. Helena Joan Webber 159 West Street, Winchendon, Mass. Born 1918 at Amherst. Graduate Murdock High School. Major in English. Newman Club, 1, 2. Robert Thomas Wetherbee Bolton, Mass. Born 1917 at Marlboro, N. H. Graduate Hudson High School. Transfer Clark University. Major in Chemistry. Howard Dexter Wetherell Loomis Street, Westfield, Mass. Born 1917 at Westfield. Grad- uate Westfield High School. Major in English. Christian Federation, 1. Swimming, 1. Phi Sigma Kappa. Esther Hammond Wheeler R. P. D., No. 4, Manchester, New Hampshire Born 1918 at Concord, N. H. Graduate Concord High School. Major in Home Economics. Home Economics Club. 1, 3. Chemistry Club. 1. 2. 4-H Club, 1, 2. Nathan Leonard Wilansky 54 Kidgewood Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. Born 1919 at Holyoke. Grad- uate Holyoke High School. Major in Mathematics and Physics. Men ' s Glee Club, 1, 3 (Ass ' t. Manager). Bay State Revue, 1, 2. Menorah Club, 1, 2. Soccer, 1, 2. Basket- ball, 1. Phi Lambda Tau. Francis Wing Sandwich, Mass. Born 1918 at Sandwich. Grad- uate Henry P. Wing High School. Major in Marine Biology. Cross- country, 1. Theta Chi. Wilfrid Murray Winter 6 South Street, Wrentham, Mass. Born 1917 at Milford. Graduate Chauncy Hall School. Major in Entomology. Outing Club, 1, 2. Alpha Gamma Rho. John Joseph Witek 55 Colrain Street, Greenfield, Mass. Born 1916 at Greenfield. Grad- uate Greenfield High School. Major in Pre-Dental. John Ferris Wolfe 19 Jeft ' ersou Road, Winchester, Mass. Born 1918 at Winchester. Grad- uate Winchester High School. Major in Forestry. Wrestling, 1. Alpha Gamma Rho. Beatrice Wood Williams Street, Wi Ll.l JIa Born 1919 at West Upton. Grad- uate Upton High School. Major in Home Economics. Outing Club, 1. Home Economics Club, 1, 2. Phi Zeta. Wallace Warren Wyman 74 Highland Avenue, Westfield, Mass. Born 1919 at Blandford. Grad- uate Westfield High School. Major in Mathematics and Physics. Christ- ian Federation, 1, 3. Radio Club, 1. Football, 1. Alpha Gamma Rho. Julian Henry Zabierek Perham Street. Chelmsford, Mass. Born 1918 at Holyoke. Graduate Chelmsford High School. Major in Economics. Q. T. V. Myer Samuel Zelbovitz 35 Vale Street, Chelsea, Mass. Born 1917 at Chelsea. Graduate Chelsea High School. Major in Pre- Med. Menorah Club, 1. Football. 1. Basketball, 1. FORMER MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1940 Robert A. Beattie Charles W. Bennett Harold A. Brunner Jean Carpenter Thomas A. Casey Ralph G. Clark Edmond J. Dereg Robert A. Ducy Evelyn D. Ellery Ruth V. Garipay Carl A. Goodrich, Jr. David E. Hennessy Stanly H. Hitchcock Paula Y. Holmes John S. Ingham Richard P. Joseph Albert I. Kelfer Dorothy M. Kelly John H. Kelso Raino K. Lanson Sumner C. Levy Sidney S. Lipshires Mary E. Maddocks Dovid M. Marcus Genevieve E. Messer Roland G. Meunier Roger W. Morgan Morton J. Pearlman Dorothy B. Phipps Elizabeth H. Purdy Helena E. Reynolds Leonard I. Rice Anthony S. Rojko Walter R. Rubinwitch Walter F. Russell Florence P. Sconnell Myrtle R. Sherry Myron H. Sichol Carlton V. Smith Benjamin Spungin Luson E. Stutsman Bernard Tolnick George D. Vigue Frederick J. Watson Robert J. Williams Harold Willson, Jr. George A. Winchester Nathan Winer Edgar H. Woodbury Richard W. Woytisek Fred L. Wright, Jr. Sidney Zukerman IN MEMORIAM John J. Mango [146} e i eia5d c4 1941 CLASS OFFICERS President, Robert L. Leary Vice-President, P. Jeanne Phillips Sergeant-at-Arms, Paul L. Skogsberg QCoM. a§ yiitteteeti Uuixd ed OioAJU Ont The President, the Dean, and the Regis- trar sat back and wiped their respective brows. And with very good reason — they had just finished accepting the last of the 360 members of the class of 1941, and the school year of 1937-38 was for- mally ushered in. Freshman week — callow youths walk- ing with naive maidens who had a weather eye out for scavenging seniors. Psycho- logical tests — conclusive proof that we had forgotten more than we ever knew. Fra- ternity rushing — eager upperclassmen breathlessly shaking hands, discussing college life, serving cider, doughnuts, and bologna, for the benefit of the already be- wildered freshman. Classes start — dazed neophytes stumbled out of Dr. Torrey ' s first lecture, uncertain whether they were in three dimensions or six, but firmly convinced of one of two things — either Dr. Torrey is one of the most brilliant men on earth, or he is thoroughly pixylated. Under the tutelage of Dean Lanphear, the new- comers were made aware of the phases of [148] a5l a f94f CLASS OFFICERS Treasurer, Ronald M. Streeter Secretary, Barbara J. Critchett Captain, J. Edward E. O ' Connor Qiall o YUtieiejejn. Uun d ed 0:a ty.-One Venus and the location of the Abbey, and were in other ways oriented in space and time. Hazing started and incipient Romeos serenaded the fair damsels in the Abigail Adams House. Under the influence of a piece of pine an inch thick, four inches across, and about two feet long, the new collegiates committed to memory the cheers, the Medley and the Alma Mater in time to be well prepared for the first football game. The next week the women carried their books around in pillowcases, refused to speak to boys, wore mismated shoes, and were otherwise duly initiated. All through the fall, the men wore on their heads ridiculous bits of maroon cloth which they smirkingly tipped to the sedate senators during the first weeks of school; and the girls tried to discover the most becoming angle for their white berets in hopes of attracting an upper- classman. This bit of horseplay ended on Columbus Day for the girls, but the " men " suffered the indignity until the Thanksgiving Recess, when refractory [149] eioM. c4 1941 freshmen explored the submarine section of the campus. But first the sophomores took due precautions so that the plebes would not get their hair wet. (This pre- caution consisted of removing the offen- sive stuff with a horse-clipper.) The first red-letter day of 1937 was September 25th, at precisely 13 minutes before five o ' clock, w hen the sophomores reached the end of their rope and took a bath as a consequence. A few minutes later, fireworks started in the young-stock barn. With characteristic masculine forti- tude, both classes rushed to the rescue of any damsels in distress, to be greeted only with " moos " . In spite of this first disappointment, the valiant heroes worked side by side with the Amherst fire chief. They didn ' t save the barn, but few of them will every forget the day. Two other red-letter days of the fall were Razoo Night when the freshman showed what the sophomores were made of, and Mountain Day which taught the hikers of the virtues of patience and per- serverance if they hoped to get any supper. The freshman were proficient in other sports besides hiking. The swimming team won the inter-class meet, the cross- country team had a fine season, and intra- mural basketball proved to be one of the most popular winter afternoon pastimes. During the winter the freshmen faced their first final examinations. But most of the class came back for the second se- mester in order to become, older, wiser, and sophomores. eiaiA o. 1941 Rose Elaine Agambar 39 Hitchcock Street, Holyoke, Mass. Helene Dorothy Ahearn 268 River Road, Winthrop, Mass. Casty John Ajauskas 54 Lincoln Street, Brigliton, Mass. Lazarus Alexion 221 Green Street, Fairhaven, Mass. Donald Pearson Allan 20 Winch Street, Fitchburg, Mass. Gordon Allen Pine Acre, Elm Street, Concord, Mass. Vernon Cooke Allen Plain street, Millis, Mass. Edward Everett Anderson Central Square, Middleton, Mass. Rita Marjorie Anderson 7 Emerald Street, East Bridgewater, Mass. Helen Mae Antaya Gladys Glencross Archibald Leverett Road, North Amherst, Mass. Priscilla Bales Archibald 115 Russell Avenue, Watertown, Mass. Haig Aroian Charlton Street, Oxford, Mass, Edward Wilmorth Ashley Dr. Braley Road, East Freetown, Mass. Gabriel Irving Auerbach 26 Commonwealth Avenue, Springfleld, Mass. George Seymour August 19 Fruit Street, Northampton, Mass. Albert Wesley Aykroyd 2 Warden Street, Worcester, Mass. Robert Todd Babbitt 14 Elm Street, Wellesley Hills, Mass. Ellen Priscilla Badger Clapboardtree Street, Norwood, Mass. Francis Gerald Bagge 1489 River Street, Hyde Park, Mass. Cynthia Haven Bailey Brewster Road, Kingston, Mass. [150] eiadA (4 1941 Harry Louis Baker 10 Henry Street, JIalden, Mass. Mariely Baker 28 Northampton Road, Amherst, Mass. Annetta Horrimon Boll 440 North Street, Dalton. Mass. Edword Balmer 40 Hill Street, Whitinsville, Mass. Allen Ralph Bardwell 122 Pine Street, Florence, Mass. Peter Joseph Barreca S9 Dalton Avenue, Pittsfleld. Mass. Ruth Emeline Barrus Lithia. M.iss. Joseph Bartosiewicz 51 Maple Street, Northampton, Mass. Elizabeth Blanche Bascom Main Street, Leverett, Mass. Rosalie Agnes Beaubien 85 West Main Street, Millers Falls, Mass. Norman James Beckett 100 Jacques Street, Somerville, Mass. Harrison Lee Bennett Soutli Sudljury, Mass. Kenneth Taylor Bergeron 914 Main Street, Worcester, Mass. Evelyn Sofia Bergstrom 1.S8 Melbourne Road, Pittsfleld, Mass. Richard Jolles Bernson 29 Lancaster Terrace, Brookline, Mass. Isoac Bialer 42 Union Stuset, Holyoke, Mass. Jerome Biederman 76 Selden Street, Dorchester, Mass. Richard Alden Blodgett 88 Lakeside Street, Sin-ingfleld, Mass. Ernest Albert Bolt, Jr. Windsor, Mass. Merton Philip Bornstein 39 Pearl Avenue, Winthrop, Mass. John Bodfish Bourne Huzzavds Bay. .Mass. Lawrence Joseph Boylon 19 Cottage Street, Franklin, Mass. John Joseph Brack •2{5 Westcott Street. Dorchester. Mass. Roberta Helen Bradley Southfield. .Mass. George William Bragdon 641 Lowell Street, Methuen. Mass. Robert Anthony Breglio 136 Rimmon Avenue. Chicopee, Mass. David Truman Brewster 98 Preston Street, Hathorne, Mass. Marguerite Brielman 21 Britton Street, Pittsfleld, Mass. Harold Arnold Briesmaster 180 Main Street, East Northfield, Mass. Edward Broderick 169 Irene Street, Willimansett, Mass. Elizabeth Willard Brown 40 Norwood Terrace, Holyoke, Mass. Albert Charles Brox 412 Broadway, Chester Herman Budz Meadow Street, Housatouic, Mass. Ralph Francis Bunk 43 Sohier Road, Beverly, Mass. Shirley Marie Burgess 11 Field Street, Brockton, Mass. Edward Leon Burke 18 Winter Street, Clement Franklin Burr 289 Main Street, Easthampton, Mass. Garnet Louise Cadwell 19 Spring Street, Orange, Mass. Dorothy Calkins Oak Hill, Harvard, Mass. Katherine Tappan Collanan 64 Elmlawn Road Braintree, Mass. Sylvia Campbell 39 Kno.x Street, Palmer, Mass. Pauline Isabel Carew 19 Homer Street, Worcester, Mass. Frank Albert Carlson, Jr. Westfleld State Sanatorium, Westfleld, Mass. Seymour Allen Cherenson 201 Shore Drive, Winthrop, Mass. Kathleen Jean Clare Williston Junior School, Easthampton, Mass. Virginia Mae Coates 184 Cottage Street, New Bedford, Mass. William Sebastian Coffey 9 Sanderson Avenue, Northampton, Mass. Arthur Irving Cohen 251 Marvin Street, Springfield, Mass. Herbert Morton Cohn 53 Te-xel Drive, Springfield, Mass. Alton Brigham Cole 588 Main Street, West Medway, Mass. Ann Wilhelmina Cooney 212 Bridge Street, Northampton. Mass. Elizabeth Mary Crafts Whately, Mass. Richard Graham Crerie 58 Hadwen Road, Worcester, Mass. Ruth Lillian Crimmin 65 Westover Street, West Ro. bury, Mass. John Paul Crimmins 10 Gifford Drive, Worcester, Mass. Barbara Jane Critchett 8 Hillcrest Place, Amherst, Mass. Richard Browne Curtis 233 Church Street, Marlboro, Mass. Varnum Pierce Curtis, Jr. 96 Stanford Street, Worcester, Mass. [151] eiaM, 4 1941 Walter Thomas Daniels 34 River Street, Dalton, Mass. George Godfrey Davenport, Jr. Box 446, H(i|.edale, Mass. Edward Lawrence Davis Waslii I Av ( ' lu ' lsfa. Mass. Jeon Anwyl Davis 35 Vorcester Lane, Waltliani, Mass. Muriel Elinor Decker 145 Westfleld Road, Holyoke Mass. Marion Elaine Delorey 13 Crosier Avenue, Pittsfield, Mass. Esther DePalma 12 Garden Street, Feeding Hills, Mass. Betty Desmond Riverside Road, Simsbury, Conn. Norman Carl Dondero 31 Plavstead Road, Jlidlord, Mass. Barbara Ann Dooley m .Martin Street, West Roxbury, Mass. Paul Murray Dooley 84 Martin Street, West Roxbury, Mass. Mory Rita Doyle 18 Lvnwood Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. Franklin Harmon Drew 62 Curtis Terrace, Pittsfield, Mass. Frederick Prescott Drew 52 High Street, Dedham, Mass. Robert Elsworth Dukeshire Pond Street, Ho])kintou, Mass. Eugene Thomas Edson 175 Baldwin Street, Lowell, Mass. George Emil Erikson 125 Shearer Street, Palmer. Mass. Mary Odelia Ethier 30 Crystal Street, Worcester, Mass. Margaret Lucille Everson North Amherst, Mass. Robert Stanley Ewing 11 y Main Street, Easthampton, Mass. Robert Dasher Farber General Delivery, Wrentham, Mass. George Campbell Feiker 2137 Bancroft Place, N. W., Washington, D. C. Frances Rosalie Field 51 Lawler Street, Holyoke, Mass. Eugene Joseph Finnegan 41 Edgerlv Road, Boston, Mass. Robert David Firestone i:;(i .XiinuUick Street, Holyoke, .Mass. Gladys Elizabeth Fish 53 Edward Avenue, Pittsfield, Mass. Helen Julia Fitch 30 Brenton Terrace, r ' ittsfleld, Mass. Margaret Flynn 124 Ingham Street, Willimansett. Mass. Arthur James Gleason Foley 9 Fairfax Street, Ashmont, Mass. Harold Everett Forrest 186 Brattle Street, Athol, Mass. George Fotos 39 Main Street, Amherst, Mass. Frank Joseph Fox Ascension Farm School, South Lee, Mass. Dana Christian Frandsen 35 Lincoln Avenue, Amherst, Mass. David Allen Frank 69 Crawford Street, Roxbury, Mass. William Emil Franz R. P. D., 3, Waterbury, Conn. Marion Gertrude Freedman 9S Bclliniham Street, (•hrK,.;i, .M.iss. Carroll Ellwood Freeman West Main Street, Millbury, Mass. Carl Emil Friedman 8 Wardman Road, Ro-xbury, Mass. Allan Tacy Fuller, Jr. 439 Plymouth Street, East Bridgewater, Mass. William Hall Fuller Main Street, Lancaster, Mass. George Albert Garbowit 39 Prospect Street, Pittsfirtd, Mass. Doris Madeline Giehler (il Eliuwooil Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. Winifred Leslie Giles Cummington, Mass. Harry Stanton Gilman 344 Harvai-.l Street, Br i.kli .Mil Elizabeth Gilson 241 Highland Street, Taunton, Mass. Stephen Francis Gooch 96 Cherry Street, North Adams, Mass. Anthony John Goode 606 Cottage Street, Athol, Mass. Clinton Foster Goodwin, Jr 20 Commonwealth Avenue, Haverhill, Mass. William Thomas Goodwin 24 Silver Street, South Hadley, Mass. Joseph Robert Gordon, Jr. 8 Congress Street, Greenfield, Mass. Thomos Parke Gordon 55 New South Street, Northampton, Mass. John Davidson Gould 250 Ocean Avenue, West Haven, Conn. Marcella Joan Grise New Braiutreo Road, North Brookfield, Mass. Pauline Viola Grise Church Street, Ware, Mass. [152] ai ol 1941 Barbara Anne Hall 116 Winthrop Street, Taunton, Mass. Robert Edward Hall Grove Street, Upton, Mass. Robert Francis Halloran 146 Federal Street, Northampton, Mass. George Felix Hamel 3 Assumption Street, Worcester, Mass. Anna Elizabeth Harrington 44 High Street, Amherst, Mass. Louise May Hartley Wvben Street, Westfield, Mass. John William Haskell 66 Mary Street, Arlington, Mass. Wilfred Bostock Hathaway 121 Davenport Street, Taunton, Mass. John Michael Hayes 217 Cambridge Street, Worcester, Mass. Richard Boscom Hayward 31 Clinton Street, Taunton, Mass. Virginia Marie Heath 85 Ya Division Street, Brockton, Mass. William Arlington Hendrickson First Parish Road, Scituate, Mass. Vivian Victoria Henschel 192 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. Mary Eleanor Herring Ulster Park, New York City, New York Bernard J. Hershberg 191 Elm Street, Gardner, Mass. John Taylor Heyman 17 Washington Road, Springiield, Mass. Marshall Lowell Holt Warren Avenue, Chelmsford Center, Mass. Calvin Henry Hood, Jr. Rockland Heights, Northampton, Mass. Douglas Channings Howard Rear 32 Crescent Avenue, Beverly, Mass. Russell Wreath Howard 827 North Street, Pittsfleld, Mass. Kenneth Arthur Howland Chestnut Street, South Duxbury, Mass. George Perkins Hoxie 31 Bridge Street, Northampton, Mass. Marian Barbara Hoye 39 Granite Street, Taunton, Mass. Erwin Stuart Hubbard R. F. D. 2, Poughkeepsie, New York Phyllis Dean Hutchinson 55 Stafford Street, Rockdale, Mass. Walter Graves Irvine, Jr. 25 Bollinson Road, Worcester, Mass. Stanley Arthur Jackimczyk 13 Oak Street, Florence, Mass. Donald Paul Jackson 18 Gates Road, Shrewsbury, Mass. Woodrow Richard Jacobson Winthrop Avenue, Ivoryton, Conn. James Young Jamison 19 Pulsifer Street, NewtonviUe, Mass. Doris Marie Johnson 64 Grand Street, Springfield, Mass. Margery Deane Johnson R. F. D., Ashland, Mass. Thomas Wells Johnson Main Street, Deerfield, Mass. Carleton Parker Jones, Jr. S Nutting Avenue, Amherst, Mass. Mary Jane Jones 28 Tahanto Road, Worcester, Mass. Elliot Harold Josephson 58 Townsend Street, Boston, Mass. William Alan Joyce 291 Locust Street, Florence, Mass Muriel Ruth Kabler 410 High Street, Wareham, Mass. David Milton Kogan 134 East 51st Street, Brooklyn, New Y ' ork Sumner Zaiman Kaplan 7 Parkman Street, Brooldine, Mass. Dana Alton Keil 70 Lindsey Street, Attleboro, Mass. Kathleen Margaret Kell 31 Clapp Street, Stoughton, Mass. Paul Zelman Keller 257 Dickinson Street, Springfield, Mass. Edward Jeremiah Kelley 10 Downes Avenue, Scarsdale, New York Loretta Christine Kenney 17 Rockview Street, Palmer, Mass. Edwin Wallace King, Jr. 9 Franklin Terrace, Melrose, Mass. Howard Francis King, Jr. Sunimitt Street, Millville, Mass. James Herbert King 65 Charlotte Street, Worcester, Mass. Mary Doris King 44 Kim Street, Solomon Klaman 36 Algonquin Street, Boston, Mass. [153] xiiA c4 1941 Milton Klevansky 22 Oldfields Street, Roxbury, Mass. James Jacob Kline 65 Mcljellan Street, Dorchester, Mass. Richard Hooper Knight 52 Elm Street, Melrose, Mass. Hiag Koobatian 28 Hermitage Lane, Worcester, Mass. Joseph Krinsky 68 Johnston Road, Dorchester, Mass. Chester Leon Kuralowicz 19 Catherine Street, Willimansett, Mass. Edward Amedee LaFreniere 8i Monroe Street, Chicopee Falls, Mass. Walter Russell Lalor 432 HoUis Street, Framingham, Mass. Helen Elizabeth Lane 1147 Saratoga Street, East Boston, Mass. Prlscilla Elizabeth Lane 590 Pleasant Street. Brockton, Mass. Thelma Eloise Lapp 49 Bay State Road, Pittsfield, Mass. Hamilton Laudani 123 High Street, Lawrence, Mass. Edwin Mitchell Lavitt 41 North Park Street, Rockville, Conn. Robert Lombard Leary 26 Maple Street, Turners Falls, Mass. Stephen Bartlett Leavitt 770 Kempton Street, New Bedford, Mass. Jane Leighton 23 Williston Road, Auburndale, Mas.s. William Henry Lennon 197 Middlesex Avenue, Medfoi-d, Jliiss. Thomas Richard Leonard, Jr. R. F. D., Ea. ' it Taunton. Mass. Richard Henry Lester 9 Highland Street, Daniel Herman Levine 78 Wellington Hill Street, Boston, Mass. Beulah Sarah Levy 69 June Street, Worcester. Mass. Bertha Elizabeth Lobacz 36 Thompson Street, Amesbury, Mass. Dorothy Jean Long 33 Maple Street, Maiden, Mass. Charles Porkhurst Loomis 138 Court Road, Winthrop, Mass. Jason Ronald Lotow 760 West End Avenue, New York, N. Y. Earl Atchinson Lovejoy 10 Laurel Street, Watertown, Mass. Rebecca West Lovell 643 Lincoln Street, Worcester, Mass. Flora Dora Lucchesi 108 Nonotuck Street, Holyoke, Mass. Francis MacDonold, Jr. 11 Sartwell Avenue. Somerville, Mass. Gregory John Macdonald 10 Maple Street. Sturbridge, Mass. Stello Ruth Maisner Leverett, Mass. Ian Malcolm Charlemont, Mass. John Charles Manix Howard James McCallum 6 Center Court, Northampton, Mass. Harold Timothy McCarthy 59 Broad Street, Salem. Mass. Richard James McCarthy 22 Holland Avenue, Westfield, Jlass. Robert Joseph McCartney 233 Lafayette Street, Salem, Mass. Mattie Florence McFadden Reading. Vermont Frederick Wilson McGurl 211 Hamilton Street, Worcester, Mass. Manson Kirk McKowon 81 Ne yhall Street, Maiden. Mass. Charles LeGro McLaughlin 4 Nutting Avenue, Amherst, Mass. Edwin Joseph McLaughlin 347 Oakland Street, Springfield, Mass. Theodore Clapp McQuestion West Street, Hadley, Mass. Joseph Francis Meder 244 North Street, Northampton, Mass. Bertha Louise Merritt Cataumet, Mass. Irving Meyer 58 Linden Street, Springfield, Mass. Walter Theodore Miles 19 Pleasant Street. Dalton, Mass. John Calvin Miller R. P. D., Charlton. Mass. Joseph Thomas Miller Oakham Road, Barre Plains, Mass. Miriam Miller 29 Maple Street, Brookfield, Mass. Marion Burnham Millett 23 Melrose Street, Adams, Mass. Roy Linden Minich 122 Dexter Street, Maiden, Mass. Lincoln David Moody 30 Sunset Avenue, Amherst, Mass. Robert Moreau 405 Marlborough Street, Boston. Mass. Barbara Morehouse 307 Cabot Street, Newtonville. Mass. Sumner Martin Morrison 280 Humboldt Avenue, Roxbury, Mass. John Charles Morytko 9 Sibley Avenue. Westfield. Mass. Umberto Posquale Motroni 62 Emerald Street, Boston, Mass. Carl Albert Nastri 55 Maltby Place. New Haven. Conn. Robert Alfred Nelson Rockland Street, North Easton, Mass. Constance Marie Nestle Triangle Street, Amherst, Mass. [154] au o4 1941 John Nickolopus 51 Pleasant Street, Lynn, Mass. Baxter Bordwell Noyes 127 Leyden Road, Greenfield, Mass. John William Nye 14 Otis Street, Needham, Mass. Marcelo Jose Oben Central Aguirre, Puerto Rico Edward Joseph O ' Brien 18 Nutting Avenue, Amherst, Mass. J. Edward Emett O ' Connor 87 Pine Street, Holyoke, Mass. Florence Marie O ' Neil 14 Howard Street, Ludlow, Mass. Edward Elliot Oppenheim 388 Spring Street, Brockton, Mass. Peter Pacocha 56 Glendale Street, Easthamptou, Mass. Robert Everett Pardee 54 Dexter Street, Springfield. Mass. Henry Myron Parzych 80 Devens Street, Greenfield, Mass. Edith Mae Patten 48 Marlboro Street, Newburyport. Mass. Christopher Paul 332 Talbot Avenue, Dorchester, Mass. Arthur Avrum Pava 28 Somerset Street, Springfield, Mass. Robert Rice Peters 2250 Dixwell Avenue, Hamden, Conn. Phyllis Jeanne Phillips 44 Holmes Road, Pittsiield, Mass. Rose Helena Plitcha Strong Street, Amherst, Mass. Wallace Frank Powers, Jr. 10 Fearing Street, Amherst, Mass. Paul Nickolas Procopio 264 Boylston Street, Brockton, Mass, Alfred Adam Prusick 10 Devens Street, Greenfield, Mass, John Joseph Prymak 61 Kingston Street, Lawrence, Mass. Jean Puffer 23 Garfield Street, Fo. boro. Mass. Bruno Francis Pulnick 76 Main Street, Hopkinton, Mass. Chester Carlos Putney R. P. D. No. 1, Orleans, Vermont. Myrtle Irene Raymond 120 Batch Street, Beverly, Mass. Lionel George Reder 142 Strong Avenue, Pittsfield, Mass. Stanley Copeland Reed 127 Myrtle Street, Brockton, Mass. John David Retallick 6 Wallace Place, Pittsfield, Mass. lona Mae Reynolds 41 Church Street, Thorndike, Mass. Edward Adams Richardson 47 Highland Avenue, Ayer, Itass, Robert Bertram Riseberg 90 Howard Street, Waltham, Mass. Leslie Myron Rivlin 223 Francis Avenue, Pittsfield, Mass. Shirley Palmer Robbins 69 Hancock Street, Lexington, Mass. Ada Margaret Robinson 24 Hubbard Street, Concord, Mass. Walter Clark Rockwood, Jr 10 Assipee Street, Walpole, Mass. Robert Ames Rodriguez 40 Washington Avenue, Northampton, Mass. Doris Marie Ross 133 Brown Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. Walter A. Ross, Jr. 29 Hobson Street, Springfield, Mass, Albert Stanley Rouffa 1471 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass, Russell John Rucker Hyannis, Mass, Patience Monteith Sanderson 16 Hastings Street, West Roxbury, Mass. Hanssen Schenker 44 Brookline Avenue, Holyoke, Mass, Harold Vincent Scollin, Jr. 51 Barham Avenue, North Quincy, Mass, Marion Elizabeth Scully 24 Adam Street, Pittsfield. Mass, David Harold Searle 92 Londonderry Road, Marblehead, Mass, Irving Willard Seaver 160 Gulf Street, Shrewsbury, Mass. Benjamin Harold Shanker 14 Dedham Street, Wrentham, Mass. Bernice Mae Shaw North Main Street, Balchertown, Mass. Samuel Petter Shaw 88 Pearl Street. Middleboro, Mass. Muriel Edith Sherman 26 Pine Street, Palmer, Mass. Henry Benjamin Sherr 70 Cottage Street, Chelsea, Mass. Alden Arthur Sherwin, Jr. Main Street, West Townsend, JLiss. Robert Siegel 15 Roxton Street, Dorchester, Mass. Alan Silverman 54 Elm Hill Avenue, Roxbury, Mass. Frank Melville Simons, Jr. 19 Everett Street, Stoneham, Mass. Donald Angus Simpson 296 Franklin Street, Holyoke, Mass. Paul Lester Skogsberg 9 Beckman Street, Worcester. Mass. David Skolnick 27 Trident Avenue, Winthrop, Mass, Tracy Bernard Slack, Jr. North Amherst, JIass. Francis Leo Slattery 11 King Street, Dorchester, Mass. f iV. [155] eiaid o.( 1941 Carlton Vernon Smith Hillsville, Road, North Brookfield, Mass. Elmer William Smith 1(5 West Center Street, Florence, JI.1SS. Frederick Edward Smith 84 Brighton Aventie, BlooniHeld, New Jersey Helen Margaret Smith 33 Beacon Street, Athol, Mass. Richard Neilson Smith 384 East Street. Chicopee Falls. Mass. Richard Spofford Snow Tonsct Road. Orleans. Mass. Beverley Snyder 10!) Kochelle Street, Springfield, Mass. Matilda Martha Sobon 29 Kendric k Street, Lav Ma George Hodges Soule 36 Keith Street, Springfield, Mass. Barbara Longley Staples 18 Western Avenue, Beverly, Mass. Lucille Helen Stein Monson State Hospital. Palmer, Mass. Hyman Julius Steinhurst 906 Reenwood Street, Boston, Mass. Henry Albert Stevens, Jr. 426 Main Street, Great Barrington, Mass. James Alexander M. Stewart, Jr 14 Fruit Place, Amesbury, Mass. John Bushnell Stewart 7 Roseland Road, Worcester, Mass. Phoebe Isabel Stone 800 Blue Hill Avenue, Dorchester, Mass. Ronald Mather Streeter 83 Welleslev Road. Holyoke. Mass. Charles William Sfyler 55 Princeton Street, Jefferson, Mass. Mary Margoret Sullivan Brinifield Inn. Brimfield. Mass. Peter Joseph Szwaluk Pine Nook, R. F. D., South Deerfleld. Mass. Jean Francis Taylor 92 Mount Auhurn Street. Watertown, Mass. Raymond Ellsworth Taylor 34 Park Street, Maiden. Mass. Richard Bliss Taylor 21 Mansfield Street, AUston, Mass. Raymond Winchel Thayer 5817 London Road, Duluth, Minnesota. Mildred Arlene Thomas Bo.-c 157, R. F. D., 3, Amherst, Mass. Henry Smith Thornton 23 East Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass. Robert Connor Tillson Commonwealth Road, Cochituate, Mass. Marion Esther Tolman 65 Elmwood Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. Phyllis Tolman 530 Burncoat Street, Worcester, Mass. Mary Margaret Tormey Kathleen Mildred Tully 35 South Street. Southbridge, Mass. Lawrence Dana Tuttle 82 Pleasant Street, Leicester, Mass. Ellsworth Arnold Twible 111 Main Street, Gilbertville, Mass. Jean Gates Tyler Stockbridge House, M. S. C. Campus Amherst, Mass. Jean Underbill South Ashfleld, Mass. David Farnham VanMeter North Amherst, Mass. Eleanore Mildred Vassos 57 Bloomfield Street, Springfield, Mass. Charles Edward Vautrain, Jr. 1S50 Northampton Street, Holyoke, Mass. Herman Charles Vieweg Box 21, Fitchburg, Mass. Richard Woytisek Vincent Little River Street, Westfield, Mass. Robert Norman Walker 20 Center Street, Winthrop, Mass. Thomos Edward Walkey 182 High Street. South Hanson, Mass, William Thomas Walsh 249 Springfield Street, Feeding Hills, Mass. Kenneth Frank Waltermire 341 St. James Avenue, Springfield, Mass. Arthur Leonard Wonnlund, Jr. 144 Mount Vernon Street, Arlington, Mass. Everett Lee Warner 33 Northampton Road, Amherst, Mass, William Fitts Warren 26 Park Street, West Roxbury, Mass. Arthur Wendell Washburn R. F. D. 190, North Attleboro, Mass. Edward Arthur Watts 8 Station Avenue, East Weymouth, Mass. Eldredge Hinkley Welton ISO Park Street, Newton, Mass. Eleanor Elizabeth Wentworth Stanley Street, Amherst, Mass. Zone Paul Wernick 64 Forest Park Avenue, Springfield, Mass. Harriet Elizabeth Wheotley Main Street. Chester, Vermont Harold Bancroft White Pelham Road, Pelham, Mass. Susanna Wilder Main Street, Northfield, Mass. Walter Anthony Wileikis Summer Street, North Amherst. Mass. David Williams 120 Main Street, Peabody. Mass. Jeannette Williams 123 Oklahoma Street, Springfield, Mass. Edgar Clifton Witt R. F. D., 1, Granby, Mass. Kenneth Douglas Witt R. F. D., 1, Granby, Mass. Helen Ann Woynar 41 Main Street, Hatfield, Mass. Nellie Marie Wozniak 30 X Street. Turners Falls, Mass. Dorothy Eleanor Wright Stockbridge Road. Lee, Mass. Albert Ybnow 43 Millet Street, Dorchester, Mass. Dorothy Marion Youland 35 Winslow Avenue, West Somerville, Mass. [1563 MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE iS63 - 2ilamand jtJuUe. - i93S M . ASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE is concerned with the intellectual, moral, social, and physical development of its students. As a State-supported institu- tion, it must also prepare each student to assume the responsibilities of useful citizenship in the society and state in which he will live upon graduation. With these ends in view, the college recognizes five objectives. 1. Intellectual training, that the student may think, judge, and appreciate better and become more intellectually interesting to himself and others. 2. Training for productive work, that he may have both the desire and the ability to engage in successful and useful work after graduation. 3. Social training, that he may live harmoniously with others. 4. Health training, that he may come to understand his own health resources and maintain the bodily and mental vigor necessary for a useful and happy life. 5. Recreational training, that he may leam to use his leisure time in a wholesome way and refresh himself for the work ahead. HUGH P. BAKER President IIDAY, APRIL 4, 1863. TUS hRtnSLATUKB. THE ACKK ITLTOmAI. COIiXOE. U tb« ' Senat« two addi iond bHIs were r nhjir r to tbe »nbi«t of the tplrttarml — Ik bin iceorpomtiog tde tnu ' ess of the rbovKt tfr ' - ' J ' " " " - ' ' « JleS ' ' . comistin of WilicT, Gepr({ 3 It Lotiag, C. L. ' FUot, du DarU and otbcr memben of ti « board of i tuic, -n- ' vitie luail powanof irosieesof Aiiie (uail powan of irosiees of u H " -«e of t ' le croptriy to bo helc •xree Of - " " jaUf, i«porU to be a Ue 1. J iy yV 1. " trn«:CT to detL__, tb« i ,iti}t - " c Me of at lea Ma- " X p MASS. EDUCATORS 8eveBty:t; tgf,i„ _ J|,4 FLOCK TO PARLEY ON M. S. C. CAMPUS Ninth Annual Conference of V Principals and Supervisors Opens: U - id € ecuUuied. to State Colleq«fcghKBaker ' » ;ge ColUg AMHERST, July 1 (U.E)— Massa-l Ac fi _ c Gov tW cboietts State college today re- ,, »u Preside " " , c JacaW ' c«tiNa a $4500 bequeat from the u„rter a» , L Scote % 5 " eSkte of Betsy C. Pliikerton o ' U ceW " C ' t» ;tneMed e g c ' ' -ff , •ceater. L ' ' %..-monyT - _ £- s S- o . ,„ . rc ?, : «W " ' °» i ;;, ' ' t e ' ' )f jboi?.° o na Willi i " ' . :io « ir .f$ 4 olleec. rhurs- •-3i ' = cf|.s A inning 3f the act- ns. dl- H.S.C., £j rcleef hmai) le D aid ' t By N ' TWO-YEAR GROU fTO GET diploma; MONDAY MORIVIN( 4 ' •« ' Commencement Program oi W ■ Stockbridge School Starts Davk Today With Class Swat _. lor ( ricnic , Collegiate Sti o.SS ' " ' tt vriei - ' a collej ,.. 1 ouid a.ihe,e f ' e Goal of Students aching „( scie or Altnost Half Centu CTk CflUl VrTOl C0LLEGEGETS CHI» S 0l ' c .plli LnB » " 1 Mastachusetts State Set Is Gift o NUtulA » 1 B. H. Smith, Brooklyn Special to THB N«w York Times. =!S5S!S5 5 " fc«J4ayl.— Mas I _ " II ' IIIMIIIM MUII . „ _ I Mm a fm " " " ' ' ' ' ' ' " ' ' ' fciii I- nT Special to Thb N«w York Times. EXCEPTIONAL MENU ADDRESS SUN. CHAPt fATE COLLEGE ro CONTINUE ?f f ii; irAnrDciiin , on Poe ' V Novel Ar« HEADLINE-A Beautiful Campus Frames Modern Facilities HE beautiful 700-acre campus with more than 40 major buildings is located in Amherst, overlooking one of the most picturesque sections of the Connecticut Valley. Equipped with modern labora- tories and classrooms and staffed with a capable faculty, Massachusetts State College offers a unique opportunity for a broad and effective education. " Old South " — Administration Building HEADLINE- All Freshmen Live In Modern Dormitories ' A ELL-EQUIPPED dormitories for fresh- man men and women provide " campus homes " for all first-year students. Many upperclass students live in the thirteen fraternities and four sorority houses which are operated by students under supervision of the college administra- tion. Freshmen take their meals in the College Cafeteria where menus are supervised by a qualified dietitian. Abigail Adams (lop) is Women ' s Dormitory; Thatcher Hall Houses 150 Men HEADLINE-Studies Go Hand-in-Hand With Activifies AMKERST, June 20— A troop of cavalry, made up of 23 Juniors, stu- cisnts of Massachusclis Siate Col- ;egt, left the campus this morning for the annua) R. O. T. C. summer camp at Fo:d Ethan Allen, Vt. The U ' oop will arrive at summer camp on June 20, and cadets will undergo a three-week trainini; c ui ' sc a:; part ■of their nrilitary lr:-iin;ng at the coUefis, A Co-ed Wields the Baton Spr. ' p.gfieU Union Students to Give Piays in French AMHERST. May 20— As a demon- stration of their woik in studying the li ' rench language, a group of Massa- chusetf? Stpie College students will present three ■-ne-act plays at 7.30 Thursday evening. Stowell C. Goding, assistant professor of Freneh, an- nounced today. The presentation of the plays has lioen planned to include enough E.ng- U.=h to attract and please, an audience whose French is not quite up to par. .V feature of the series will be a tHay tjie theme of which is the misadven- r.ircs of a young ' American who ap- pears in sports clothes at the French jpera where full dress is required. The titles of the plays and tlie playwrights are as follows: " Back Bay. " by Lou- cille Bronillet of Springl ' ield ; " A I ' Op- era, " by Eleanor Curtis of Worcester, F. nd " Chez Lyons. " by David S. Tap- pan of Boston. Regardez ! Les Acteurs. HEADLINE " State " Interprets Sports Program Broadly Boston Herald ' CARRY-0 ER VALUE " Most educational institutions einpliasize — in llieir catalogues at least — the theme of " ath- letics for all. " Massachusetts State College at Amhersi, is now proceeding a step further, Be- iieving correctly that skill in the major games like football and baseball (which, incidentali ' . :t. still encourages) is of little use to a man after he leaves college, the athletic directors are requiring freshmen to learn the essentials of golf, tennis and swimming, sports which ha e an obvious " carry-over value. " Later they may, if they care to, develop their talents in badmin- ton, archery and hiking. " Sports tor all " is more than an idle dream; it is a program which has been realized at Massachusetts State. " The Spirit of Clean Sport " (top); AH Students Enjoy the Pool. HEADLENE-Science Courses Mean Knowledge -And Jobs A LWAYS a leader in science fields, State offers major study in Bacteriology, Chem- istry, Physics, Entomology, Geology, Physiology, Zool- ogy, Botany, Mathematics and Engineering as well as in the strictly agricultural Corner of Zoology Laboratory (top): Below, a Student attacks a Biology Problem. HEADLINE- Emphasis Is Laid On Cultural Development New York Times .S.C.E ITS CULT President Baker Points to the Year ' s Advances in Providing Music and Art on Campus.. NEW LIBRARY AS A CENTER Departments Are Reshaped in Organic Conception — Social Contacts Are Widened. Special to The New Yosk Time?. AMHERST, Mass., Jan. 25.— An increase in cultural emphasis was the outstanding- event of the past year at Massachusetts State Col- lege, President Baker said today in connection with the preparation of his annual report to the trus- tees. " Increasing- cultural opportuni- ties for students at the college has been, from the first, one of the aims of the administration, " he continued. " There is more and better music on the campus, monthly art ex- hibits are made available to stu- dents and there is a keener inter- est in the spiritual -welfare of the student body. " Students relax in a DormitorY Read- ing Room between classes. GoodeU Library, o ne of the most modern in the country, houses a quarter million books and pamphlets. Pilts field Eagle DEAN MACHMER OF M. S. C. PLEADS FORiNDIVIDDAL " AMHERST, April 19, (. ' P).— Pat- terns in education to fit the " in- dividual " student rather than Ibr " typical " student wore urged to- day by Dean William L. Machmcr of Massachusetts Statf Collese. In a public statement, Deait Machmei- said that undue ernphasis upon " curriculum " in education hs tended to shape individuals into " types. " While admitting that standards of scholastic achievement must be maintained, Dean Machmer said these standards " must make more allowance for individual differ- ences. " " The principal task of a college is to lead students to independent mental accomplishment. " he said. " Educators must constantly keep in mind the conduct, habits, atti- tudes, and particular inrerests, in addition to the scholarly nature, of I he individual student. " HEADLINE-Courses For Women Are Well Planned All courses are open to women students. Many however, like those shown in the dress construction class above, study dietetics, home-making, clothing and other phases of Home Economics. Springfield (Ere.) Union " The Homestead, " home economics practice house, v here students learn by doing all the tasks of successful home making. COLLEGE WOf S ' iiS Upturn in Employment of Graduates at M. S. C. Pointed Out by Miss Hamlin AMHEKST, Knv. 4— TIippp lias beoii s dislinct upturn in em) lo. ni nt oi pnrtunitics for wonirn collcffe gracl- iiatpS: Miss Mavsaict H.imlui. place- ment officer for woincn at iMassachu- sptts State College, said today. Miss Homlin reported that ' JU per cent of the womou graduates of last year ' s class at M. S. C. are tvw employed oV engas ' ed in f;u ' tlier stinlj. " The women si ' adualing in llie class of 1937 have found more oriixnliuiilies f ' lr positions along lines for wliicli tliey have trained, than tliuse of i re- ■ious years, " Miss Hamlin pointed out. HEADLINE-M.S.C. Still Leads In Agriculture F ROM the day when it was chartered, in 1863, to the present, Massachusetts State College has always recognized its obliga- tion " to teach subjects related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, so as to promote liberal and practical education. " The College has never lost sight of this obligation and its courses in the Divisions of Agriculture and Horticulture are stronger today than ever before. Many of its Alumni in these fields have acquired international reputations which are evidence of the achievement of the College in these studies. Agricultural research at Massachusetts State has laid the ground work for many important agricultural industries. Its service to the Commonwealth in these fields has long been recognized as significant. Springfield Union M. S. C Horticuitumi Show Attendance Is Largest Ever AMHERST Xov 7— The largest ' " attended hoiticultuial show e cr held at ' " S C fame to a closr tori ' cht with J3 751 persons at Bnst n Trrmicript Scholarships Given to Dairying Students (.Opfcial lo the Transcript! AMHERST, Oct. 16— Twelve stu- dents at Massachusetts State Col- lege today received Hood scholar- ship awards that are given each year to those majoring In dairying. Dean William L. Machmer, an- nounced the awards of $50 each to four members of each of the upper ihree classes. They are made pos- r.rcle by the gift of Dr. Charles H. Hood. Springfield Republican STATE COLLEGE WINS IN FRUIT JUDGING Amherst, Nov. 23— (. P)— Ma.s. n- chu. ' !etts State college today won the annti.nl intercollcaiato. fruit nndsi!i=r contest. Each year students in Horticulture and Floriculture carry their training into practice and arrange the annual " Hort Show. " HEADLINE -Special Services Help Students At College Springfield Republican Dean Machmer Greets New Students. 11 STUDENT advisory service, orientation week, an employment bureau, a health service, and a student aid committee are evidences of a strong determination that each student shall receive individual attention so that his life at college may be interesting and profitable. PLANS MADE FOR M. S. C. ORIENTATION WEEK Amliorst, Sept. 19 — " liow to Ivccomi: p collcs ' e . ' student in one week " miahi nell be the. title fnr the diversitieU l- ' cgram n( activitie.s which fresh- men at Massachusetts State nnllege wjH tHke part in beginning Mondaj;. " Oi-ientaiiou veel(. wiiich begins thi ' ce diiys before college opens for the upncr classes, will help the frcsh- .mcn to bridse the difficult period of adjustment to new surroimilumi;, new conditions of studj-. and unfamiliar ) ulcs and rcgulation! , " Dean William L. Machmer said today in explaining the prorram. •■Condition, ' ? at college are markedly di ' treiit from those which the aver- age f " cshin,iu lias become accustomed to in secondary schools, " he added. ' In these few days of readjustment we liope to introduce the freshman to the social Jife of the campus, in- struct him in the difficult matters of schedules and credits, explain to him the various student organizations in Tvhich he will be asked to participate. " An innovation this year will tie a ehort summary of the history and the traditions of the college recounted to the freshmen by Prof Frank Pren- tice Rand, head of the English de- partment and author of the latest college history, " Yesterdays. " Orientation week will not be all speeches and social events, however. After registration each freshman will be given a physical examination and a series of mental tests and then photographed for the college files. Each freshman giil will be taken on- a tour of the campu.s. while freshmen men are to meet with their proctoi.5 jn dormitory groups. Springfield Union Students at M.S.C Earned . 50,000 More Than 60 Per Cent Shared in Money Last Year, Report Shows AMHEP.PT. . pvi! :T (AD-ljii.loi - graduates at Massachusetts .State Col- lego earned iSn.OOO during the la. ' i college year, the institution reported today, announcing formation of a cen- tra! • ' jnriUtco on student aid to servo as " rleanug house " for scholarshipr. loan.s and undergraduate employment. More than 6 ' ) per cent of the stu- dents earned monc ' , the college said, and average oarning.s per studciU were ?. ' ' 0. i: ' Students Enjoy Their Dormitory Recreation Room. HEADLINE-Diverse Acfiyities Enrich College Life Springfield Union ONE-ACT PLAYS Roister Doister Dramatics Part of Program for Commencement Saturday AMHERST, June S— Three one-act plays ti ' Cornelius Aver Wood of An- dover will be olfcred as the commence- ment dramatics presentation of the Roister Doislcrs, .Massachusetts Stale College student dramatics organization. The plays vill be staged on Sat irday evening in Bowker Auditorium, Stocl;- bridsc Hall. Christian Science Monitor btate College Weekly Celebrates AiinJv;;5 r arv AMHERST, Mass., Feb. 7 The CoUegian, student ■ newspaper at Massachusetts Gollr: ' celebrated its 65th ,-i..i»ry yesterday with a spec page edition. Featuring 5 picture ' - ' • ' - c . ' ind student activities rlie ; contained a resume of its lifo discussed editorially the cui progre. ' s of the coileire. ?ckly State i.nni- 1 12- 5; pus a per and rural She ' s Honorary Colonel at The Military Ball. Boston Transcript Mass. State Team to Debate in South Special to the Transcript AMHERST, Dec. 6— A southern, trip which will include stops at .seven coll ges is planned this year by the debating club of Massachusetts Stat? CoUei e. De- bates will take place at. the fol- lowing places during the April trip: Rider College, Trenton, N. J.; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia: University cf Rich mond, Richmond Va.; North Carolina State College, Raleigh, N. C; Roanoke College, Salem, Va.; Randolph-Macon Col ' .er.F. Ashland, Va.: and Rutgers Uni- versity, Brunswick, N. J, Student Press Correspondents Face Deadline. HEADLINE -Commencement Is An End And A Beginning Boston Globe M.S.C.AWARI Class Cay ExerciSES Take Place in MornlnE Springfield Union START M. S. C. COMMENCEMENT N Commencement Day students step from the undergraduate body into the Association of Alumni. They are sent into the world prepared to make their way in life. Graduates of Massachusetts State College are found in practically every field of human endeavor and many of them have so built upon their sound college training that they are now leaders in business, in industry, in agriculture, and in the professions. A certain obligation is recognized by graduates of Massa- chusetts State College. As recipients of education at this state- supported college, they cheerfully recognize their obligations to turn their education to the benefit of society as a whole, not only through their work but also through their very mode of living, their every contact with the society which helped provide their education. Commencement Exercises Are Held in The Rhododendron Garden. MoMcududAeiti Stcde QolUcfe UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGE — Freshmen and Sophomores take a general basic course. Juniors and Seniors may major in one of the following divisions: Physical and Biological Sciences, Social Sciences, Horticulture, Home Economics, Agriculture, and Physical Education. Additional fields of specialization are provided in Recreational Planning and Wildlife Management. GRADUATE SCHOOL — The Graduate School offers courses of study toward advanced degrees in many fields of knowledge. STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE — This is a two-year vocational course in Agriculture. Students may major in the following specialized fields: Animal Husbandry, Dairy Manufactures, Poultry Husbandry, Floriculture, Fruit Growing, General Horticulture, Vegetable Gardening, and Wildlife Management. SUMMER SCHOOL — Each year the College offers a six weeks ' Summer course which includes a wide range of academic subjects and credit for the undergraduate or certain graduate degrees. WINTER SCHOOL — During the winter, the College offers certain vocational courses in Agriculture and allied fields ranging from one to eight weeks in length. The Massachusetts Extension Service and Experiment Station also maintain headquarters at the College and cooperate with the instructional program, especially in research fields. AaieAnUleA FRATERNITIES T The aim of the fraternity is to unite individuals of divergent tastes and interests in a common bond of fellowship, to integrate individual desires, and to focus them in the welfare of a higher entity, the fraternity. While some try to raise the member to a contemplation and exemplification of the high ideals of wisdom, truth, and righteous- ness, while others strive to infuse merely a spirit of social companionship, all frater- nities succeed in binding together their members in mutual fellowship and good will. INTERFRATERNITY AWARDS At the first meeting of the school year, the Interfraternity Council decided which three fraternities should receive cups for their ranking in the Interfraternity Comipe- tition of 1936-37. The purpose of the annual competition is the promotion of friendly rivalry among the various fraternities. Prizes are awarded on the basis of academics, which consist of the Interfraternity Sing, Snow Sculpturing, and House Inspections; scholarship; and athletics, which include football, soccer, basketball, volley ball, track and baseball. Theta Chi received the first prize; Kappa Sigma was a close second, and Q. T. V. ranked third. £174} .nteApialeAnih Qaunxui Front Row: Lonergan, Riley, Allen, Blaisdell, Graham, Haylon, Eldridge, Lyons, Buzzee. Second Row: Thomas, Silverman, Schwartz, Smith, Parmenter, Moore, Powers, Graves, Milne, Glick, Carp, Binder, Lombard. INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL OFFICERS President, William B. Graham, ' 38 Vice-President, Harry L. Blaisdell, ' 38 Secretary, George J. Haylon, ' 39 Treasurer, Everett W. Eldridge, Jr., ' 39 The Interfraternity Council, which meets on the first Wednesday of every month, is composed of two men from each fraternity. Its purpose is the strengthening of the bond of friendship between these organizations. Besides renewing the annual competition, the Council also sponsors an Interfra- ternity Convocation every spring. It also holds a banquet, at which the junior mem- bers of the Council are given keys in recognition of their work. President Baker, Dean Machmer, and one other interesting speaker are invited. The Council was represented at the National Interfraternity Conference in New York by Donald Silverman, ' 38. This year an entirely new set of rushing rules was instituted, the main feature of which was the elimination of second semester rushing. A " Fraternity Bible " was published for the first time in order to give the freshmen the history, meaning and importance of fraternities in college life. A new committee was formed to work in conjunction with the Student Life Committee in an effort to attain greater harmony between the students and faculty. [175} a.o.v. pi. o n n ' r «-; A f, : ,: » O fi % - %r % r Front Row: Solmela, Wirtanen, Blomberg, Beloin, Baker, Graham, Collins, Roberts, Casozzo, Wood, Stone. Second Row: Bagge, Cassidy, Irzyk, Ajauskas, Brann, Zojchowski, Brock, Stawiecki, Sherwin, Dimock, Zabierek, Degroff. Third Row: Wojtasiewicz, Show, Bettoney, Bloke, Molley, Daley, Jackirmczyk, Coffey, Pereira. Q. T. V. FRATERNITY FRATRES IN COLLEGIO Royal S. Allaire Warren S. Baker, Jr. Mederic H. Beloin CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Earl A. Blomberg William J. Collins J. Bernard Casazza Nicholas D. Eliopoulas William B. Graham Douglas J. Wood Stanley Bettoney James W. Brann Donald W. Cadigan Wellington E. Cassidy Raymond A. Degraff Edgar W. Dimock CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Leo D. Fay George Pereira Irvin D. Reade Everett Roberts Henry Salmela George Spelman Edmond J. Stawiecki Frank Stone Gordon F. Thomas Leonard C. Wirtanen Henry Wojtasiewicz Walter A. Zajchowski Richard F. Blake Frank R. L. Daley, Jr. CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Albin Irzyk William Malley Donald H. Shaw Julian H. Zabierek Casty J. Ajauskas Francis G. Bagge John J. Brack William S. Coffey Pledge CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE George P. Hoxie Stanley A. Jackimczyk Harold T. McCarthy Robert J. McCartney Joseph T. MUler Alden A. Sherwin, Jr. Frederick E. Smith [176} a. 0. V. Q. T. V. FRATERNITY Founded at Massachusetts Agricultural College May 12, 1869 Colors: White and Brown As the oldest fraternity on this campus, Q. T. V. has a history that is nearly as long and fascinating as the history of the college itself. But since last year a brilliant new phase of development has com- menced. In the late Spring of 1937, the house instituted an annual formal dance as a part of the regular fraternity program. Last Spring the dance was held on the 15th of May and was a tremendous OFFICERS President, William B. Graham Vice-President, William J. Collins Secretary, Leonard C. Wirtanen Treasurer, Warren S. Baker, Jr. Soon after this, a project was started to improve the beautiful interior of the famous old Fearing estate which has been the home of Q. T. V. since 1915. A timely examination of the woodwork re- sulted in having the entire house redecorated on the inside. This work was supplemented by re- conditioning the tennis court in the rear of the house, a task which will take two years to com- plete satisfactorily. When the house has been re- painted on the outside, the ambitious program which began this year will be completed. The fall term found Q. T. V. activities shifting from improvement of the estate to preparation for the inter-fraternity competition. The announce- ment of awards in 1936-37 inter-fraternity competi- tion came out in October, and found Q. T. V. in third place. As a result of fall rushing, the house pledged fifteen men — eleven freshmen, two sopho- mores, and two juniors. And as the first semester came to a close, Q. T. V. was leading in inter- fraternity football and volley ball leagues, later emerging in first place in both. In retrospect, the scholastic, academic, athletic, and social activities of Q. T. V. during this past year have heralded a new era of accomplishment for the fraternity, as well as a period of even greater service to the ideals of the college. Such a year justifies the reverence which Q. T. V. men feel for the tradi- tions of their long-established brotherhood. The chapter thus becomes more than a mere fraternity; it becomes an admirable heritage, on this same campus where it was founded as a literary society so many years ago. INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL William B. Graham Gordon The Lorin E. Ball William E. Cole Harold M. Gore FRATRES IN FACULTATE A. Vincent Osmun Clarence H. Parsons Emil J. Tramposch FRATRES IN URBE ley John E. Bement Francis ( Leo V. Crowley William B. Essele Albert J. Gricius Elliot K. Greenwood Ralph Haskins Gerald D. Jones Joseph G. Kennedy Albert Parsons [177] Jtfii J iqjma Ko fipa , % ( - :W-% w - , •, ; M " f ' Front Row: Gove, Quosf, Famsworth, Hennessey, Rice, Harrison, Btoisdell, Mildram, Perkins, Potter, Welch, Colo, Moore. Second Row: P. Fanning, White, Julian, Grant, Couper, F. Fanning, Benjamin, Mooreheod, Litchenstein, Lippincott, Nojar, Lindsey, Cowling, F. Cole, R. Cole. Third Row: Dalton, Knight, Hill, Copson, Saunders, Wetherell, Allen, Hording, Hanley, Bolmer, Keil, Gordon, Alexion, Johnson, Snow, Sulliycn. Fourth Row: Murphy, Atwater, Kokins, Norwood, Deneoult, Lawson, Davenport. PHI SIGMA KAPPA FRATRES IN COLLEGIO CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Harry Blaisdell, Jr. William Harrison, Jr. David Mildram Vincent Couper Thomas Hennessy, Jr. Robert Perkins Albert Farnsworth Edward Higgins Wendell Potter Wentworth Quast Theodore Rice CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Robert Allen H, Gardner Anderson George C. Benjamin Charles Branch Donald Calo Roger M. Cole Joseph A. Doherty Frank Fanning Paul Fanning C. Allen Gove Emerson Grant C. Nelson Julian Donald Lawson Parker Lichtenstein Clifford Lippincott Thomas Lyman H. Emery Moore, Jr. Albert F. Moorehead John J. Murphy Gordon Najar Irving Welch CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY ■George Atwater Fred Cole Arthur Copson Douglas Cowling Frank Dalton Godfrey Davenport, Jr. ' " Eugene Deneault, Jr. Robert Hanley Malcolm Harding, Jr. Ralph Hill Everett Langworthy Roger Lindsey Charles Mansfield Louis Norwood, Jr. Francis Saunders Albert Sullivan H. Dexter Wetherell Edward Balmer Joseph Gordon CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE Thomas Johnson Dana Keil " Richard Knight John Nickolopus Baxter Noyes Richard Snow Pledge [178] 9M ifiqma Kctfipa PHI SIGMA KAPPA ALPHA CHAPTER National Organization Founded at the Massachusetts Agricultural College, March 15, 1873 Forty-five Chapters Twenty-four Alumni Chapters Publication: " The Signet " Colors: Silver and Magenta Red .tttWWer ' The Alpha Chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa has kept up its reputation of being an active fraternity. Last spring, it held its annual celebration of Founder ' s Day in mid- March. A program of speakers at the house was followed by a visit of undergraduate members, alumni, and friends to the shrine of the national fraternity — the metal seal situated on the south side of old North College where the fraternity had its beginning. After the pilgrimmage refresh- ments were served at the chapter house. During the spring, the environs of the house were re-landscaped, and a parking space was constructed in the rear of the house. At Commencement, twelve members were lost to the house through graduation. With the return to college in the fall of 1937, the entire house was re- decorated and repainted inside and out to put it in order for the fall rushing season. Nine freshmen and three sophomores pledged Phi Sig. The chapter was fortunate in having as guest during rushing " Pop " Clark, well known State and Alpha alumnus and former football coach of the college. Fall initiation resulted in the addition of four men, swelling the membership to one of the largest on campus. Beginning a winter of social activity, the Amherst House dance set a festive note. During the season, several successful " Vic " parties and the annual Faculty Whist Party were held. One of the chap- ter ' s five junior military majors was on the Military Ball committee, and will be chairman of this com- mittee next year. On February 15, 1938, the chapter was host to the National Grand President of the fraternity. Earl F. Schoening of Chicago. Interfratemity competition in sports was especial- ly keen during the fall season. Alpha reached the semi-finals in football and the finals in soccer, losing in the latter to Alpha Sigma Phi by one goal in the third overtime period. The winter sports season was not as successful. Defending champions in volley-ball, the chapter team was defeated in the semi-final game, and split two tournament basket- ball games. The house was fortunate, however, in having as members the captain and manager of the newly formed ski team. In addition, two of the brothers were chairmen of committees for the Winter Carnival. In all, the Alpha chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa has had a very successful year. OFFICERS Hair.v L. Blaisdell, lint, David E. Mild William H. Ha Tlieodore A. Eic son INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL L. Blaisdi ' U H. Kmery JIo FRATRES IN FACULTATE William H. Armstrong Orton L. Clark Charles R. Creek Lawrence S. Dickinson Robert D. Hawley John D. Lentz Willard A. Munson Francis C. Pray, Jr. Frank B. Strattou Frank Prentice Rand Roland H. Verbeck FRATRES IN URBE Frederick Adams Albert F. Burgess, Jr. Warner H. Carter George C. Hubbard Charles S. Howe Raymond H. Jackson How;- F. Civille Pray L. Everett Roberts Philip H. Smith George E. Stone Robert W. Thorndil Vernon K. Watson rd H. Wood [179] Kappa ifiqma n n o f«t o ( f?» p p Front Row: Glick, Rounds, Morrison, Elliot, Olivier, Buzzee, Srmardon, Niden, MocPhail, Sievers, Newman, Ingram, Irving, Morin, Gleason. Second Row: Morey, Osmun, Stohlberg, Powers, Chapman, Page, Merrill, Daley, Schoonmaker, Budz, R. Jones, Hernck, McLaughlin, Howes, Morse. Third Row: Scollin, Walkey, Daniels, Bennett, Bnesmaster, C. P. Jones, O ' Brien, Van Meter, Nye, Goodwin, Mahoney, Curtis, Babbitt, Foley, Beytes, Creswell. KAPPA SIGMA FRATRES IN COLLEGIO CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Robert D. Buzzee Charles E. Elliott Russell J. Hauck Ralph Ingram Richard R. Irving WUliam A. MacPhail Donald S. McGowan Robert K. Morrison Edward G. Newman George Niden James B. Olivier Alfred S. Page Dean L. Rounds Frederick J. Sievers Philip Smardon John W. Tindale John Bemben Arthur D. Broadfoot Robert E. Cain CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Frederick D. Estabrook John F. Glick Herbert S. Howes Lawrence E. Johnson Seaton C. Mendall Clifton W. Morey Edward L. Morin CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Dean A. Beytes Robert M. Chapman Robert M. Creswell Gerald M. Dailey Charles L. Gleason William F. Goodwin Myron D. Hager, Jr. Thomas W. Herrick, Jr. Donald J. Mahoney Charles L. McLaughlin John E. Merrill, Jr. Roy E. Morse Richard K. Muller John V. Osmun Charles A. Powers, Jr. Norman J. Schoonmaker Samuel P. Shaw Eric Stahlberg Robert T. Babbitt ♦Allen R. Bardwell ♦Chester H. Budz ♦Arthur J. G. Foley Dana C. Frandsen CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE Robert E. Hall ♦Donald P. Jackson ♦C. Parker Jones, Jr. ♦Howard J. McCallum ♦Roy L. Minich ♦John W. Nye ♦Edward J. O ' Brien ♦Harry V. Scollin, Jr. ♦Frank L. Slattery ♦John B. Stewart ♦Ray E. Taylor David F. VanMeter ♦Thomas E. Walkey ♦Harold B. White Pledge [180] Ka ]xpa iqjmxt KAPPA SIGMA GAMMA DELTA CHAPTER T Established May 18, 1904 National Organization Founded at the University of Virginia, December 10, 1869 One Hundred and Seven Chapters Eighty-six Alumni Chapters Publication: " The Caduceus " Colors: Scarlet, Green and White In the approximate college year that this takes in, the history of Gamma Delta chapter of Kappa Sigma has been both eventful and progressive. Within the fraternity itself study rooms have been redecorated. The dining room has been re- modeled and attractively panelled. Partitions have been built around the furnace, thus making a furnace room and improving the game room. New rugs and furniture have improved the appearance of the main rooms. The latest acquisition is a new combination radio and victrola that adds much to the many social activities. In addition to inside improvements, the house was painted during the summer vacation. A more permanent step in the history of Gamma Delta was the acquiring of an option of an ideal building site close to the campus. TTiis is a definite step toward the acquiring of a new chapter house which expansion will make necessary in a few years. While the improvements and changes within the fraternity have been progressive, campus activities have been more eventful. In scholarship, academics, social activities, and athletics Kappa Sigma has been well in the fore. In scholarship Gamma Delta was fourth out of the eleven fraternities for the second semester of last year. In addition to the general scholarship, one member was elected to Phi Kappa Phi. In Interfratemity competition, Gamma Delta was runner-up in volley ball, winner in soccer, and winner of the Interfratemity Track Meet last year. As a result of the three aforementioned activities, scholarship, academics, and athletics. Kappa Sigma took second place in last year ' s annual Intefratemity Cup Competition, adding another cup to a pre- viously won cup for first place. This year members of Kappa Sigma have been active in the Horticultural Show, on the Informal Committee, and in the Winter Carnival. In social events at the fraternity, the Amherst House Dance and the Christmas Party were outstanding. Equally outstanding was the part played by Kappa Sigma men in college athletics. In addition to members on all State teams, Kappa Sigmas held the following captaincies: swimming, hockey and football. The aim of a college education is to develop a well-balanced personality; the aim of Kappa Sigma is to develop such a well-balanced personality based on good fellowship. OFFICERS President, George Niden Vice-President, Philip Smardon Secretary, Robert D. Buzzee Ti-easurer. William A. llacPhail INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL Eobert n. Buzzee John F. Glick Oran C. Boyd Kenneth D. BuUis Guy V. Glatfelter Marshall O. Lanpl: FRATRES IN FACULTATE d Edward B. Holland ck A. McLaughlin Frede Frank A. Waugh J. Paul Williams Chest George Cutler James A. Poord Calvin S. Hannum Edward W. Harvey FRATRES IN URBE Babcock, Jr. Edward Hazen Ezra L. Shaw George P. Smith Robert F. Stevens E. Joseph Tliompson :n Tufts [181] OAeia il Front Row: Eldridge, Mitchell, Johnson, Putnam, Luce, Carr, Linden, Avery, Allen, French, Ferguson, Hoskins, King, Beaumont, Green, Wilcox, Packard. Second Row: Irving, Retallic, Storey, Cox, Hornboker, Miles, Noyes, Gordon, Seaver, Davis, Wing, Burr, Foster, Poyson, Goode, Porker, Wakefield, Chopin, Streeter. Third Row: Welton, Skogsberg, Griffin, Thoyer, Curtis, Gould, Rockwood, Ewing, Hathaway, Tuttle, Hubbard, Crerie, Straube, Fuller, Rucker. Fourth Row: Kirsch, Stetson, Howe, Glass, Walker, McKown, Peters. THETA CHI FRATRES IN COLLEGIO Marshall B. Allen Rexford Avery Edgar S. Beaumont F. Fairfield Carr Ronald Chapin William H. Cox Everett W. Eldridge, Jr. Frederick D. Goode, Jr. CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Philip Haskins Herbert Johnson Richard C. King William B. Ferguson Cyrus E. French Walter Green CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE David W. Hornbaker William W. Howe Robert W. Packard John A. Parker Howard N. Steft Courtney Stetson Arthur E. Sullivan David S. Tappan Norman E. Linden Clifford N. Luce Walter K. Mitchell Paul S. Putnam Robert Ullman W. Thomas Wakefield Edmund G. Wilcox CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Franklin M. Davis, Jr. Willard O. Foster Robert Glass Harold Griffin Wesley Aykroyd Kenneth Bergeron ♦Clement F. Burr Richard Crerie Robert E. Ewing Allen T. Fuller, Jr. James H. King John Kirsch Arthur A. Noyes James Payson George T. Pitts, Jr. Howard A. Rudge CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE Thomas Gordon John Gould Wilfred B. Hathaway E. Stuart Hubbard Walter G. Irvine, Jr. James Y. Jamison Stephen Leavitt Walter Miles Robert Peters John Retallick Walter C. Rockwood, Jr. Russell Rucker John P. Serex Harold F. Storey Harold L. Straube Francis Wing Irving W. Seaver Paul Skogsberg Ronald M. Streeter Raymond Thayer Robert N. Walker Pledge [182] OMxi i THETA CHI THETA CHAPTER ▼ Established December 29, 1911 National Organization Founded at Norwich University, April 10, 1856 Fifty Chapters — Twenty-five Alumni Chapters Publication: " The Rattle " Colors: Red and White An intensive drive for athletic and academic honors culminating with the award of the Inter- fraternity cup has brought Theta Chi a high posi- tion among State College fraternities. In competi- tions, Theta gained first honors in the annual house inspection, captured the baseball crown for two victories late in the ' 37 school year, and has con- tinued to win semi-final berths in football, basket- ball, volley-ball and soccer. Theta Chi men are found on all varsity teams with its largest represen- tation being ten men on the football squad. The chapter led all fraternities in rushing with a total of thirty-one pledges. Since that time, four- teen of them have been initiated into the fraternity. Socially the house has more than held its own. At Amherst week-end house dances, Theta had the largest number of guests, some of whom came from places as far distant as Ohio and Florida. Bowery Ball, the outstanding social event in the chapter year, was held May 14. Johnny Newton ' s band supplied the music and guests attended dressed in the costumes of the early ' eighties. Under the direction of social chairman Bob Packard, the house held many " Vic " parties during the year, including the annual Christmas party, the tea dance the Saturday of the Winter Carnival and the tea dance following the Boston College baseball game. Under the direction of the four majors in land- scape architecture in the house, Theta is landscap- ing the grounds with the intention of improving the outside appearance of the new house. Other work to be done includes the surfacing of the driveway and remodeling of the chapter room in the house. Theta has a Senate member and officers in both the Junior and Freshmen classes. House members serve on the Collegian and Index staffs, and they have been members of committees for the Winter Carnival, A. B. Degree, and various dances. Four hold high ranks in the R. O. T. C, being promoted for the spring drills. A Theta is a member of the Honor Council while three serve on the interclass Athletic Board. Two members of the house were elected to the Maroon Key, sophomore honorary society. The Theta Chi Glee Club, under the direction of Dick King, gained a first place in the stunt night competition of the Boston Tea Party, annual frater- nity regional convention. OFFICERS President, Marshall B. Allen Vice-President, Cyrus E. Trencli Secretary, Rexford H. Avery Treasurer, William B. Ferguson INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL Marshall B. Allen Everett W. Eldridge FRATRES IN FACULTATE Lawrence E. Briggs Fred J. Sievers Oliver C. Roberts William G. Sanctuary Walter A. Maclinn FRATRES IN URBE Hubert Elder Enos F. Montague [183] .Lgmu Ttfd EpAitan Front Row: Barrett, Healy, Powers, Lonergon, Avery, Roberge, Bargfrede, Burgun, Johnson, Second Row: MacQuestion, Warner, Geoffrion, Copeland, Talbot, Whitcomb, Farren, Flanagan, Jablonski. SIGMA PHI EPSILON FRATRES IN COLLEGIO William B. Avery CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT John F. Bargfrede William F. Lonergan, Jr. William E. Roberge William F. Barrett Philip E. Burgun Lloyd C. Copeland Kenneth R. Dorman CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Francis J. Farren Ralph Foster Frank C. Healy Stephen M. Jablonski David H. Johnson Richard L. Powers Marciene R. Whitcomb George F. Flanagan CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Philip C. Geoffrion Gerald L. Talbot William Joyce Pledge CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE Ian Malcolm Theodore McQuestion Everett Warner [184} d lqjnia TiPii SpM ati SIGMA PHI EPSILON MASSACHUSETTS ALPHA CHAPTER T Established April 27, 1912 National Organization Founded at Richmond College November 1, 1901 Sixty-seven Chapters Twenty-five Alumni Chapters Publication: " The Journal " Colors: Purple and Red The outstanding event of the year 1937 for Sigma Phi Epsilon was its twenty-fifth anniversary banquet which was held at the Hotel Kimball on April 10, 1937. Among those present at this banquet was W. L. Phillips, one of the founders of the fraternity and at present the Grand Secretary. W. L. Phillips was this year cited by Banta ' s Greek Exchange as one of the thirteen greatest living fraternity Greeks. Others presents were David Caldwell, who represented this school in the Olympic Games, Albert W. Dodge, Arthur N. Ray- mond, and many other alumni of the College and of Sigma Phi Epsilon. The National Conclave of the fraternity, which was held on September 7, 8, and 9 in Cleveland, was attended by Dick Powers and Bill Avery of this chapter. Bill Avery went as the guest of the Philip Morris Company, for he was one of the ten winners of the prizes awarded by that company to oustanding Sig Eps. In athletics, Sig Ep was well represented. In interfraternity sports last year Sig Ep finished close to the top. Sigma Phi Epsilon has four men who are military majors, one of whom had the honor of escorting the honorary colonel to the Military Ball. There have been three extremely novel parties held at the Sig Ep house during the fall of 1937. The first of these introduced the " Big Apple " to the campus. Because the house was too small for this dance, every one moved out on the front lawn for an hour! Another of these parties was the barn dance held as " open house " on October 16. Many couples attended to try out bam dancing for the first time. On Amherst Week-end Sig Ep presented the most novel stunt of the year. At ten o ' clock that Saturday night, twelve men from the house pre- sented the RUSTY BALLY (Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo)! The costumes were scanty and the dancers a bit cold, but all the spectators seemed to enjoy the mock ballet! The rest of the year was also successful, not only in social activities but also in all other phases of college life. OFFICERS President, William B. Avery Vice-President, Richard L. Power Secretary, William F. Lonergan, J . , , _, Lonergan, Jr. er, William E. Roberge INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL P. Lonergan, Jr. Richard L. Pov FRATRES IN FACULTATE George E. Emery Ralph L. France Frederick M. Ciitler Richard C. Foley Winthrop S. Welles Malcolm C. Butler John Schoonmaker FRATRES IN URBE Harold Elder Benjamin Cummii [185} £amMa d MpAa Front Row: Kelley, MocCurdy, Towie, Eaton, Townsley, Brown, Bloke, Lyons, Fleming, Curtis, Dun lop, Houghton, Chase. Second Row: Trees, Blodgett, Muller, Howe, Warren, Barnard, Southwick, Swenson, Cowles, Prouty, King, Lee, Griffin, Foley, Bowler, Johnson, Haylon, Roddo, Simons, Stewart. Third Row: O ' Conner, Hughes, Richards, Levrokas, Tappin, Ferriter, Larkin, Waltermire, Sheldon, Heyman, Nelson, Brown, Voutrain, Dunn, Pratt. Fourth Row: Drew, Goodwin, McCarthy, Keville, Lester, Leory, Allen. LAMBDA CHI ALPHA FRATRES IN COLLEGIO CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Norman P. Blake John T. Dunlop Leroy K. Houghton, Jr. Robert MacCurdy Herbert E. Brown William Eaton Thomas F. Kelley Richard W. Towle Philip B. Chase James A. Fleming Robert S. Lyons Wayne F. Townsley Clifford A. Curtis Donald H. Cowles Charles Griffin George J. Haylon Vincent J. Barnard Earl K. Bowen Richard N. Bowler Roger Brown, Jr. Robert J. Dunn CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE James S. King Robert H. Muller Richard E. Lee John Pratt CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Paul T. Ferriter William G. Foley Arthur Howe Kenneth Hughes Louis Johnson, Jr. B. Francis Keville Joseph Larkin Vasilis Lavrakas Carl Nelson Ralph Palumbo Leroy F. Prouty, Jr. William Richards, Jr. Charles M. Rodda, Jr. Franklin Southwick Francis A. Warren Winslow Ryan Robert I. Sheldon John Swenson Warren R. Tappin, Jr. Malcom P. Trees Donald Allen R. Alden Blodgett Franklin Drew C. Foster Goodwin, Jr. CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE John Haskell Richard Lester John Heyman Richard McCarthy ♦Marshall Holt J. Edward O ' Conner Robert Leary Frank Simons, Jr. James Stewart, Jr. C. Edward Vautrain, Jr. Kenneth Waltermire Pledge [186] larnMa d Mphxi LAMBDA CHI ALPHA GAMMA ZETA CHAPTER T Established May 18, 1912 National Organization Founded at Boston University November 2, 1902 Seventy-eight Chapters — Forty Alumni Chapters Publication: " Cross and Crescent " Colors: Purple, Green and Gold For twenty-five years Gamma Zeta of the Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity has been prominent in the history of Massachusetts State College. Today we see our alumni outstanding in the professions of medicine, law, journalism, agriculture, and other fields of endeavor. While the former sons of Gamma Zeta have already won their positions in life, the present undergraduate body is making commendable accomplishments upon the campus. The present group has done so well in the extra- curricular activities which this campus offers that today it possesses a record of achievement second to no other campus group. At all times in the history of this fraternity at least three-fourths of its members have been actively engaged in such widely diversified activities as football, soccer, base- ball, track. Student Senate, Maroon Key, Adelphia, Roister Doisters, Glee Club, special campus com- mittees, class offices and social committees. Yet the prestige of Gamma Zeta extends even beyond the Massachusetts State campus in that it is con- sidered a leading unit within the powerful Inter- national Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity. Although the house itself is, perhaps, one of the older houses upon the campus, it is, nevertheless, one of the most completely appointed dormitories at Massachusetts State. Yearly purchases of furniture and accessories insure Lambda Chi of comfortable and presentable accommodations. Prudent house management has kept the house in an excellent state of repair, and today the maintenance costs are exceedingly slight. Execution of the plans which have already materialized will call for the complete renovation, remodeling, and refurnishing of the present struc- ture, offering suitable accommodations for forty-five men. Re-building will commence within a year. The personnel of Lambda Chi Alpha consists of sixty-one men — forty-five members, and sixteen pledges. Although ten men were lost by gradua- tion this June, the initiation of fifteen candidates in April insured the fraternity of maintaining its maximum house strength. Restricted pledging has assured this group men of high quality who will continue to uphold the high traditions and accom- plishments of Lambda Chi Alpha. OFFICERS President, Norman P. Blake Vice-President, Donald H. Cowles Secretary, James S. King Treasurer, Robert S. Lyons INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL Robert S. Lyons George .J. Haylon FRATRES IN FACULTATE Elbert F. Carawa Walter S. Eisenn Wilho Frigard George A. Marston FRATRES IN URBE William F. Buck Kenneth R. Higj Alan S. Chadwick Norman Myrick [187] Alpha yiLgma 9M Front Row: Stoddard, Lehr, Parmenter, Osley, Nolan, Smith, Bokina, Anderson, Pike, Shipman, Barke. Second Row: Hamel, Nastri, MocDonold, Mayo, Townsend, Breglio, Luce, Mosher, Porzych, Honnigan, Franz, Walsh, Bolt, Meehon, Lolor, Hoyward, King, Novelli. Third Row: Roffinoli, Tobey, Scholz, Dooley, Allen, Downs, Motroni, Laudani, Brewster, Gooch, Dukeshire, Borreco, Howard, Beckett, Miller. ALPHA SIGMA PHI FRATRES IN COLLEGIO Philip Anderson Carl Bokina CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT David Lamb Kenneth Nolan Walter Mayko Donald Osley Russell Smith CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Harvey Barke William Hanigan, Jr. Charles Lehr Samuel Alferi Phillips Luce Robert Mosher Vernon Allen Peter Barreca Norman Beckett Ernest Bolt, Jr. Robert Breglio Donald Mayo James Meehan Ray Parmenter Frederick Purnell CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY David Novelli Kenneth Pike Lawi ' ence Reagan Rino Roffmoli CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE David Brewster Paul Dooley Robert Dukeshire William Franz Stephen Gooch George Hamel Richard Hayward Russell Howard Howard King, Jr. W. Russell Lalor Hamilton Laudani U ' mberto Motroni Lee Shipman Edward Stoddard John Townsend Evi Scholz Homer Stranger George Tobey, Jr. Carl Nastri Henry Parzych Alfred Prusick Stanley Reed William Walsh Pledge [188] Mpha tPiqma 9M ALPHA SIGMA PHI GAMMA CHAPTER ▼ Established 1913 National Organization Founded at Yale University 1845 Thirty-two Chapters — Ten Alumni Associations Publication: " The Tomahawk " Colors: Cardinal and Stone Gamma Chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi, an out- growth of the old College Shakespearean Club, de- veloped from 1913 to the present from a strictly literary club to a group with cosmopolitan interests. Winning second place in scholarship for the second semester of 1936-37, and receiving a com- plete house renovation both outside and inside, the fraternity began the first semester of 1937-38 with a strong membership of twenty-four pledges. Thoroughly equipped for the interfraternity sport contests, Alpha Sig entered the lists for football and soccer. Winning the soccer championship and capturing second place in football, the fraternity completed the fall competition in interfraternity ath- letics. Although somewhat handicapped in volley- ball. Alpha Sigma Phi won the basketball cham- pionship, thus ending the first semester of 1937-38 with the highest number of points among the eleven fraternities at Massachusetts State. Alpha Sigma Phi also has an adequate repre- sentation in the varsity sports of football, cross- country, basketball and baseball. In addition to the usual " Vic " parties and the dances of Amherst Week-End, this fraternity held a Spring Formal and Alumni Card Party in the Spring of 1937; but in 1938 the Spring Party was restricted to a formal dance. The highlight of the social season was the banquet on March 12, 1938, celebrating the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Gamma chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi. At a reunion of such unusual significance, the spirit of fraternal life shows in all the great tradi- tions of fellowship and brotherly love. Preceding the Initiation Banquet, Gamma held an alumni reception at the chapter house, welcoming the re- turn of the largest alumni gathering which has been held in many years. At the National Convention of Alpha Sigma Phi held in Chicago, Gamma chapter was represented by delegates Phillip B. Anderson and John Town- send. The significance of such a gathering of fraternity delegations lies in the fact that the subsidiary chapters of the national organization are drawn into the parent body, revivified and sent forth with renewed spirit and a sense of national unity. OFFICERS President, Russell E. Smith Vice-President, P. Brigham Ande Secretary, Ray Parmenter Treasurer, Lee Shipman INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL Russell E. Smith Ray Parmenter FRATRES IN FACULTATE Alexander Cance Earle S. Carpenter Edwin F. GaskiU Stowell C. Golding Emory E. Grayson Joseph B, Lindsey William L. Machmer Sumner R. Parker Charles A. Peters George W. Prescott FRATRES IN URBE Edward B. Eastman Walter B. Hatch Alexander A. Lucey Stephen P. Puffer Mpfia tpMlon. 91 Front Row: Winn, Steinberg, Feotherman, Kotzeff, Pyenson, Kohn, D. Silverman, Feinburg, S. Silverman, Elkind, Fogel, Sawyer, A, Kaplan, Second Row: Rodman, Schreiber, Sherr, Bernstein, Stone, Myerson, Carp, Riseberg, Klomon, Siegal, Rossman, Malins, Cherenson, Lotow, From. Third Row: Freedmon, Frank, Auerbach, Bailer, Morris, A. Silverman, Yanow, Firestone, Kline, Morrison, S. Kaplan. ALPHA EPSILON PI FRATRES IN COLLEGIO Henry B. Elkind. Jr. Robert S. Feinburg CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Julian H. Katzeff Maxwell Pyenson Bernard L. Kohn Donald L. Silverman Stephen I. Silverman Sidney H. Beck Abraham Carp CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Maurice Featherman Louis Kertzman Bertram Fogel Alvin J. Myerson Milton A. Kaplan Jack Steinberg Norman E. Stone Jay Henry Winn Harvey Fram Dana H. Malins CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Herbert I. Morris Edwin M. Rossman Robert Rodman Sidney Rosen David Sawyer Henry M. Schreiber CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE Gabriel I. Auerbach Richard J. Bernson Isaac Bailer Merton P. Bornstein Robert Farber Robert D. Firestone David A. Frank Carl E. Friedman Sumner Z. Kaplan Paul Z. Keller Solomon Klaman Milton Klevansky James J. Kline ■ Jason R. Lotow Sumner M. Morrison Robert B. Riseberg Henry B. Sherr ♦Robert Siegel Alan Silverman Albert Yanow Pledge [190 J Mpfia £pAi£mi 91 ALPHA EPSILON PI PHI CHAPTER T Established 1916 National Organization Founded at New York University, 1913 Twenty-two Chapters — Fourteen Alumni Chapters Publication: " Alpha Epsilon Pi Quarterly " Colors: Blue and Gold The most important event of the year for Alpha Epsilon Pi was the moving of the chapter from its old house on Crosby Avenue to its new home on Fraternity Row. Plans were completed in June, 1937; and at the beginning of the school year in the fall of 1937, after the house had been com- pletely redecorated and refurnished. Alpha Epsilon Pi was ready for a happy and prosperous regime in its beautiful home " on the Row " In spite of the loss of outstanding seniors through graduation, Alpha Epsilon Pi was still well repre- sented in the various campus activities, both ath- letic and academic. In the Interfrateniity Com- petition, Alpha Epsilon Pi was again among the leaders. Throughout the year, numerous " Vic " dances were held. The most successful dance of the year, however, was the one held on Amherst Week- End. The house was gaily decorated, and was filled to overflowing by many alumni as well as under- graduates. The feature of the night was, of course, the " Big Apple. " Another outstanding event for Alpha Epsilon Pi, was the annual Convention held at the Hotel Pennsylvania in New York City on New Year ' s week-end. Phi chapter was represented by Don Silverman, Al Carp, and Bernard Kohn. On March 5, Alpha Epsilon Pi held its annual induction. Three freshmen were initiated. After the ceremony, a banquet was held at the " Lord Jeffery Inn " . The speakers at this affair included Dr. Goldberg and Dr. Fraker. At the conclusion of the banquet, everybody adjourned to the house to enjoy a gay " Vic " dance. Not only in social activities, but also in other fields the members cooperated to make their frat- ernity life successful. OFFICERS Master, Donald L. Silverman Lt. Master, Bernard Iv. Koliu Scribe, Jack Steinberg Exchequer, Stephen I. Silverman INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL Donald L. Silverman Abraham Carp FRATRES IN FACULTATE Dr. Maxwell H. Goldberg- Arthur S. Levine [191] Mpha 9 cunma Rda Front Row: Lombard, Wheeler, Kloucke, Lee, Alcorn, Graves, Cone, Bristol, Flower, Benson, Forrell, Marsh. Second Row: Oben, R. Cole, Smith, Decker, Handforth, Bell, Gillmore, Winter, Brault, Wolfe. Third Row: Lovejoy, Broderick, Wyman, Styler, Kurolowicz, Monix, Hogelstein, Taylor, Leonard, A. Cole. ALPHA GAMMA RHO FRATRES IN COLLEGIO Robert E. Alcorn Kenneth E. Benson Gilbert D. Bristol CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Leon W. Cone Kenneth T. Farrell Stanley A. Flower Roland Klauke James D. Lee Elmer R. Lombard Edward Mish James F. Wheeler Wallace G. Beckman Robert S. Cole Clement E. Brault Vern W. Gillmore Arthur A. Hagelstein Edward Broderick Alton B. Cole Eugene T. Edson William H. Fuller CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Roger H. Decker James O. Graves CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Robert K. Marsh John Smith Dominic E. Nietupski Wilfrid M. Winter CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE ♦Chester L. Kuralowicz John C. Manix Thomas R. Leonard, Jr. Marcelo J. Oben Earl A. Lovejoy C. Vernon Smith Thomas E. Handforth John F. Wolfe Wallace W. Wyman Charles W. Styler Richard B. Taylor Arthur W. Washburn Pledge [192] Alpha 9xumrui Rfio ALPHA GAMMA RHO MU CHAPTER T Eastablished April 28, 1917 National Organization Founded at University of Ohio, April 4, 1908 Thirty-one Chapters Twenty-eight Alumni Chapters Publications: " Sickle and Sheaf " " Mu Crescent " Colors: Green and Gold The annual initiation and alumni banquet of the Mu Chapter of Alpha Gamma Rho was held on March 20, 1937, at the Hotel Northampton. This banquet marked the largest turn-out of alumni in recent years. Nine new initiates were also present. Alpha Gamma Rho placed first among all national fraternities at State in scholarship for the 1936-37 semester with an average of 78.48. The chapter also reached the finals in the interfraternity baseball competition, but lost the final and decisive game to Theta Chi. The members of the house started the new college year off right by returning early to redecorate the interior of the house, which had been rewired dur- ing the summer. The kitchen equipment was also improved by the purchase of a new refrigerator. As a result of the fall rushing season we obtained thirteen freshmen pledges. In interfraternity sports we were less fortunate. In touch football we won the first game, but were defeated by a slight margin in the second game. In the soccer competition we also won one and lost one. In basketball we made a very poor showing, losing both gam es, but in volleyball we reached the finals only to lose to another strong team. Socially, Alpha Gamma Rho has had a big year. Of course, the Amherst house party was the biggest social event. The house was decorated in an eve- ning sky motif and " The Georgians " of Worcester provided the music. We have also held our share of " Vic " parties this past season. A very successful house function was the alumni-freshmen smoker. This brought into closer understanding our alumni, pledges, and members. Perhaps the most important outcome of this affair was the forming of an alumni chapter of Alpha Gamma Rho at the Massachusetts State College. We have now received our charter and have a full-fledged alumni chapter. The men of Alpha Gamma Rho have been very active in campus affairs. Because of the snowless winter carnival, we were denied the opportunity of competing for the snow sculpturing cup which we won last year. The financial condition of Alpha Gamma Rho is very good; and, to sum it all up. Alpha Gamma Rho has had a very successful and enjoyable year. OFFICERS Noble Ruler, Leon W. Cone Vice-Noble Ruler, James 0. G Secretary, Wallace G. Beckma Treasurer, Robert E. Alcorn INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL er R. Lomljaril .lames O. Graves FRATRES IN FACULTATE Charles P. Ale.xander Ellsworth W. Bell Arnold M. Davis James W. Dayton William Doran Richard W. Pessendei Robert D. Holdswortl Adr H. Lindse Donald E. Ross Harvey L-. Sweetman Robert Tetro Max E. Turner Clark L. Thayer Frederick S. Troy FRATRES IN URBE Vernon Bell J. Lee Brown Charles Eshbach Murray W. George Walter Howland Walter Kulash Donald Lacroix Earle H. Nodine George Nettleton George C. Smith [193] ig na Mpha EpAiCan First Row: NeJame, Schmidt, Coutu, Moult, Clonic, Riley, Gloss, Tetreoult, Milne, Bolcom, Elliot, Suomi, Brown. Second Row; D Shepordson, Keyes, C Slater, Miller, Willord, Borney, O ' Connell, Wilson, Yourgo, Phelps, Vittum, Giles, Ashley. Third Row: Smith, Buckley, Powers, Anderson, W. Shepordson, Moody, Glendon, Goode, Allen, Goodwin, Pardee, LoFreniere, Wannlund, Benemelis, Eaton. SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON FRATRES IN COLLEGIO Norman Clark Vernon Coutu CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Edward Glass Mitchell NeJame Roy Moult Herbert Tetreault William Riley John Balcom Donald Brown Richard Elliott Richard Giles Edmund Keyes CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Alexander Miller Stanley Podalak Morrill Vittum Douglas Milne Vincent Schmidt Edward Willard Ellsworth Phelps Charles Slater Elliot Wilson Lawrence Pickard Martti Suomi Frank Yourga Robert Benemelis James Buckley Robert Eaton CLASS OF NINETEE N FORTY Richard Glendon John Powers Daniel O ' Connell Daniel Shepardson Wilfred Shepardson Edward Slater CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE Gordon Allen George Feiker Edward LaFreniere Edward Anderson Harold Forrest Lincoln Moody Edward Ashley Anthony Goode Robert Pardee Frank Carlson, Jr. William Goodwin Richard Smith Henry Stevens, Jr. Arthur Wannlund, Jr. Edward Watts Pledge [194] d uyna ULpJhxx S pAitcyn SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON MASSACHUSETTS KAPPA CHAPTER ▼ Established October 30, 1937 Formerly Kappa Epsilon — Founded Feb. 1, 1913 National Organization Founded at The University of Alabama, March 9, 1856 One Hundred and Eleven Chapters Eighty Alumni Chapters Publication: " The Record " Colors: Purple and Gold The history of Sigma Alpha Epsilon at Massa- chusetts State College is at present not very vol- uminous. It may be considered as having its be- ginning in the Spring of 1937, at which time the local fraternity of Kappa Epsilon presented its petition for acceptance into the national fraternity. This petition sponsored by Leon C. Stowell, now a trustee of the national organization, was heartily received by its national officers as well as by all Sigma Alpha Epsilon chapters. The actual decision, however, was not to be made until the assembling of the National Convention of S. A. E. at Chicago in August. To this meeting four representatives of Kappa Epsilon were sent. These men were: Edward H. Glass, Douglas D. Milne, Ellsworth Phelps, Jr., and Edward B. Willard, who presented the case for acceptance in person. And a very able job they did. On August twenty-eight the National Convention in session unanimously declared the acceptance of the local Kappa Epsilon Fraternity as the Massachusetts Kappa Chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. The former members of Kappa Epsilon will long remember having received post cards bearing the single word, " accepted. " This meant that they were about to become members in one of the nation ' s strongest and largest fraternities, a distinction that amply repaid the efforts expended in seeking ad- mission. The early months in the fall of 1937 were filled with excitement and anticipation; for the date of informal initiation and installation had been set for October thirtieth. Slowly the date approached. Preparations reached a climax; the long-awaited day arrived. With representatives from nearly every New England chapter present, the " informal " initia- tion began and lasted throughout the morning. In the afternoon the guests attended the Mass. State- Amherst football game. In the evening, the formal initiation and installation took place. Thus the Massachusetts Kappa chapter, the 110th of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, came into existence. Since October thirtieth, the chapter has initiated nine undergraduates and four members of its alumni, including Doctor G. Chester Crampton, Professor of Entomology. The fraternity has several members active in many phases of athletics and academics. As a new chapter of S. A. E., Mass. Kappa, believing that a college fraternity should justify its existence not only by giving men a home and companions, but also by helping to develop their potential abilities, has established monthly speaking contests under the direction of Brother Garrison, Head of the Department of Public Speaking of Amherst College. Based on such sound accomplish- ments, the future history of S. A. E. at Mass. State is full of promise. OFFICERS ineiit Archon, Edward Glass iiient Deputy Archon, " William Riley .iueiit Recorder, Herbert Tetreault linent Treasurer, Douglas Milne INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL William Riley Douglas Milne FRATRES IN FACULTATE Guy Chester Crampton Gunnar E. Er FRATRES IN URBE B. C. Bottomly Robert J. Montgomer; Robert Dewey Henry Parsley Steward Garrison Henry Benfro Lloyd P. Jordan John Euffley.Jr. H. C. Sproul CI 95] 0.au Ep ltatz JtPii f f f Front Row; Fisher, Jackson, Goldman, Golub, Katz, Bergman, Binder, Halpern, Schwartz, Hurwitch, Jacobson, Rosenbloom, Reisman. Second Row: Spungin, Cohn, Krauss, Reiser, Rivlin, Shapiro, Bernstein, Wilansky, Shanker, Kagan, Cohen, Rosen, Blossberg. Third Row: Steinhurst, Rouffa, Skolnick, Biederman, Garbowit, GHman, Lovitt, Reder, Boker, Levine, Krinsky, Cohen, Hershberg. TAU EPSILON PHI FRATRES IN COLLEGIO William E. Bergman Irving Binder Frank M. Cushman CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Abraham B. Goldman Samuel J. Golub Saul G. Gruner Herbert M. Halpern Edward Handverger Benjamin G. Hurwitch Mitchell I. Jackson Seymour T. Jacobson Charles Rosenbloom Milton E. Auerbach Irving Blassberg CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Milton Reiser Sidney Rosen Myron W. Fisher Coleman Katz Ernest Schwartz Robert H. Bernstein Melvin H. Chalfen CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Isadore Cohen Melvin Reisman Herbert Kraus Everett Shapiro Nathan Wilansky CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE Harry L. Baker Jerome Biederman Arthur I. Cohen ♦Herbert M. Cohn Pledge George A. Garbowit Harry S. Gilman ♦Bernard J. Hershberg David M. Kagan Joseph Krinsky Edwin M. Lavitt Daniel H. Levine Irving Meyer ♦Lionel G. Reder Leslie M. Rivlin Albert S. Rouffa Benjamin H. Shanker David Skolnick ♦Hyrnan J. Steinhurst [196] 0.(ui pAi£on VJhi TAU EPSILON PHI TAU PI CHAPTER T Established March 12, 1938 Formerly Phi Lambda Tau Founded February 14, 1934 National Organization Founded at Columbia University, October 10, 1910 Forty Chapters — 35 Alumni Chapters Publication: " The Plume " Colors: Lavender and White In May 1937, the members of Phi Lambda Tau unanimously voted to become legally organized and established as a corporation. The headlines of the first issue of the Collegian the following September announced the high schol- astic standing of Phi Lambda Tau for the previous spring. It was the seventh consecutive semester that Phi Lambda Tau was ranked highest among all the fraternities on campus. Also, four of its seniors were honored by election to Phi Kappa Phi. Upon return to their Eames Avenue house in September, the fraters were engaged in improving its usefulness and appearance. Several pieces of new furniture were added and the entire house was redecorated. During the fall season, the fraternity took active part in interfraternity athletics. In basketball, volleyball, and soccer the number of defeats and victories was about equal. The social activities of the house included several informal dances and smokers. The most elaborate and colorful of the dances was the annual Round Robin, held on the Amherst week-end of October 29th. In keeping with the Hallowe ' en spirit, the house was decorated with a truly " Aggie " barnyard scene and a memorable field scene in orange and blue. Less elaborate but equally successful were the several smokers, which were characterized by companionable discussion and singing. Most note- worthy was the smoker held during the early part of February of 1938 in celebration of the fourth anniversary of the fraternity and in honor of its founders. Upon the unanimous decision of the fratres. Dr. Nathan Rakieten of the Physiology Department was approached on the matter of his becoming affiliated with Phi Lambda Tau as a faculty advisor. He expressed an earnest interest in the fraternity and a desire to offer his services. The main business of Phi Lambda Tau during the winter was the petitioning of the National Fraternity, Tau Epsilon Phi, for membership. After the approvals of the Student Life Committee and President Baker were received, final arrangements were made with the central office of Tau Epsilon Phi. On January 11, 1938, the local fraternity was formally pledged as the Tau Pi chapter of this national fraternity. All members and pledges were included in the ceremony, which was conducted by representatives of the national office. The final in- duction ceremony and banquet were planned for March 12, 1938. The old local organization of Phi Lambda Tau looks forward hopefully to an active future as a member of the nation-wide organization of Tau Epsilon Phi. OFFICERS Chancellor, Irving Binder Vice-chancellor, William E. Be Scribe, Herbert M. Halpern Bursar, Coleman Katz INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL Ernest Schwartz Irving Binder FRATRES IN URBE Irving Lipovsky Leo D. Lipman Widlansky [197] 9M Bjda Kappxi AMucyciaJdxm. PHI BETA KAPPA ASSOCIATION President, Joseph S. Chamberlain Vice-President, Mrs. J. Paul Williams Secretary-Treasurer, William H. Ross Mrs. L. K. Bullis Joseph S. Chamberlain Guy Chester Crampton Charles N. DuBois Mrs. Gunnar E. Erickson George L. Farley Henry T. Fernald MEMBERS Stowell C. Coding Vernon P. Helming Arthur N. Julian William L. Machmer A. Anderson Mackimmie Walter M. Miller Helen S. Mitchell Frank C. Moore William H. Ross Mrs. Frank Shaw Mrs. J. Paul Williams Basil B. Wood Gilbert L. Woodside THE SOCIETY OF THE SIGMA XI MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE CHAPTER Established April 14, 1938 National Society Founded at Cornell University, 1886 Seventy-four Chapters — Thirty-five Clubs Publication: " The Sigma Xi Quarterly " Colors: Electric Blue and White The society of The Sigma Xi is a scientific organization to which the members are elected on the basis of outstanding scientific research. Undergraduates who show promise of ability for research in science are elected as associate members. OFFICERS President, C. R. Fellers Vice-President, W. S. Ritchie Secretary, Henry Van Roekel Treasurer, C. P. Alexander NOMINATING COMMITTEE C. R. Fellers, Chairman Ex Officio F. J. Sievers J. E. Fuller Dr. Charles P. Alexander, Entomology Dr. Allen E. Andersen, Engineering Dr. Hugh P. Baker, Forestry Dr. Arthur B. Beaumont, Agronomy Dr. Herbert F. Bergman, Botany Dr. Oran C. Boyd, Plant Pathology Dr. Leon A. Bradley, Bacteriology Prof. Walter W. Chenoweth, Horticultural Manufactures Dr. WUliam G. Colby, Agronomy Mrs. Sara M. Coolidge, Nutrition Dr. William H. Davis, Plant Pathology Dr. Carl R. Fellers, Nutrition Dr. Richard W. Fessenden, Chemistry Director James A. Foord, Resettlement Administration Dr. Monroe E. Freeman, Chemistry Prof. Arthur P. French, Pomology Dr. James E. Fuller, Pomology Dr. Clarence E. Gordon, Geology Dr. Emil F. Guba, Plant Pathology W. H. Davis C. E. Gordon MEMBERS Dr. Charles S. Howe, Astronomy Dr. Linus H. Jones, Plant Physiology Dr. Clifford V. Kightlinger, Plant Pathology Dr. Malcolm A. McKenzie, Plant Pathology Prof. George A. Marston, Engineering Dr. Walter M. Miller, Mathematics Dr. Helen S. Mitchell, Nutrition Dr. Carl Olson, Jr., Veterinary Pathology Dr. Charles A. Peters, Chemistry Dr. Nathan Rakieten, Physiology Prof. Harry J. Rich, Forestry Dr. Walter S. Ritchie, Chemistry Dr. William H. Ross, Physics Dr. Frank R. Shaw, Entomology Prof. Fred J. Sievers, Agronomy Dr. Reuben E. Trippensee, Biology Dr. Henry Van Roekel, Veterinary Science Dr. William G. Vinal, Nature Education Prof. Herbert E. Warfel, Zoology Dr. Gilbert L. Woodside, Zoology 9AL Kappxt 9M •0- 1 1 " ' X Charles P. Alexander John G. Archibald Hugh P. Baker Alexander E. Cance Joseph S. Chamberlain G. Chester Crampton William L, Doran George L. Farley Carl R. Fellers Richard W. Fessenden Richard C. Foley Charles F. Fraker Julius H. Frandsen Roland Becker Marguerite E. Bicknell James A. Foord Cornelius K. Cain Chester E. Cross Malcolm S. Butler William E. Bergman Ruth L. Bixby Esther Bloom Elinor Brown THE HONOR SOCIETY OF PHI KAPPA PHI Massachusetts State College Chapter Established in 1904 National Society Founded at University of Maine, 1897 Forty- eight Chapters Publication: " Phi Kappa Phi Journal " Colors: Black and White Phi Kappa Phi is composed of faculty, graduates, and undergraduates of all departments of American universities and colleges. Its prime object is to emphasize scholarship and character. OFFICERS President, Maxwell H. Goldberg Vice-President, Merrill J. Mack Treasurer, Robert P. Holdsworth Secretary, Arthur N. Julian Corresponding Secretary, Elizabeth Donley HONORARY MEMBER Walter Dyer FACULTY Arthur P. French George E. Gage Philip L. Gamble Harry N. Glick Stowell C. Coding Maxwell H. Goldberg Clarence E. Gordon Christian I. Gunness Frank A. Hays Robert P. Holdsworth Edward B. Holland Leonta G. Horrigan Arthur N. Julian Marshall O. Lanphear MEMBERS Joseph B. Lentz William L. Machmer Merrill J. Mack A. Anderson Mackimmie Frank C. Morse Fred W. Morse Willard A. Munson A. Vincent Osmun Ernest M. Parrott Clarence H. Parsons Charles A. Peters Walter E. Prince Frank P. Rand Victor A. Rice Walter S. Ritchie David Rozman Fred C. Sears Paul Serex Frank R. Shaw Jacob K. Shaw Frederick J. Sievers Harvey L. Sweetman Clark L. Thayer Ray E. Torrey Reuben E. Trippensee Frederick S. Troy Ralph A. Van Meter Frank A. Waugh MEMBERS RESIDENT IN AMHERST Mrs. Christian I. Gunness Joseph B. Lindsey Elizabeth Hager John E. Ostrander Ralph W. Haskins Harry D. Pratt Charles S. Howe Ralph W. Redmond GRADUATE STUDENTS (1937 Spring Election) Carl S. Gerlach Dean Glick (1938 Spring Election) John F. Hanson Olive Smith CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-SEVEN (1937 Spring Election) Milton Silverman Myron A. Widland CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Robert D. Buzzee Jacob Finkel Stella I. Crowell Robert W. Gage Nicholas D. Eliopoulas William G. O ' Donnell George E. Stone Olive Turner Mildred A, Weeks Myer Glickstein Marion Shaw Frank A. Slesinski Harry Snyder Phi Kappa Phi Scholar: 1937-38, William G. O ' Donnell Phi Kappa Phi Convocation Speaker: April 29, 1937 Professor Eduard Prokosch, Director of Graduate Studies in Germanics at Yale and President of the Modern Language Association of America. Topic: " Language and Life. " Phi Kappa Phi Convocation Speaker: April 21, 1938 Sir Herbert J. C. Grierson, Lord Rector of the University of Edinburgh. Topic: " Some Rec- ollections of Literature and Literary Men. " [199} 94vteAdalaAU( Qauticil Front Row: Misses Randall, Briggs, Crowell, Thompson, Brown. Second Row; Misses Koplinsky, Porks, Ward, Fortin, Sedoff. INTERSORORITY COUNCIL The Intersorority Council, which is composed of tv o representatives from each of the five sororities, meets once a month to regulate business and social relationships and to promote harmony and good will between the sororities. Besides supervising the rushing rules, the Council has charge of such social functions as the Round Robin, Patroness ' Tea, Mother and Dad ' s Day entertainments, the Sing and Declamation Con- test, and the annual Intersorority Ball. The Council annually presents two plaques, one for the sorority maintaining the highest scholastic average, and the other for the sorority winning the Sing and Declamation Contest. This year the scholarship plaque was awarded to Sigma Iota, and the latter plaque went to Phi Zeta. The Ball, which is always a highlight of the spring social season, is open to all co-eds. The dance this spring was held on April 22. Many couples spent an enjoyable evening dancing to the popular music furnished by Ken Reeves and his Orchestra. At the banquet, which is held in May, the junior members of the Intersorority Council receive gold keys. [200] dUg nia 9xda Front Row: Misses Goldberg, Sedoff, Goldman, M. Kaplinsky, Bloom, F. Koplinsky, Herman. Second Row: Misses Freedmon, R. Levy, Kabler, Davis, B. Levy, Miller, Stone. SIGMA IOTA ALPHA CHAPTER Founded at Massachusetts State College, May, 1934 Colors: Blue and White In May, 1934, Sigma Iota was founded at Massa- chusetts State College. Its purpose was to bring together girls of similar interests and to foster friendship and cooperation. Its aims are to uphold the ideals of honesty, refinement and culture, and to foster the ideals of the Massachusetts State College. In the past year, Sigma Iota won the Intersorority Scholarship Plaque, which is awarded annually to the sorority on campus with the highest scholar- ship. Sigma Iota placed third in the Intersorority Declamation Contest. Despite its small membership, Sigma Iota partici- pates in all intersorority activities. OFFICERS President. Martha Kaplinsky Vice-President, Esther Bloom Reco rding Secretary, Sylvia Goldman Corresponding Secretary, A. Fern Kaplinsky Treasurer. Bernice Sedoff INTERSORORITY COUNCIL Martha Kaplinsky Bernice Sedoff SORORES IN URBE Ruth Blassberg SORORES IN COLLEGIO CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Esther Bloom Martha Kaplinsky Sylvia Goldman CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Jeanette Herman Fern Kaplinsky Bernice Sedoff Marion Freedman Muriel Kabler Pledge CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Florence Goldberg Roma Levy CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE Beulah Levy Miriam Miller Phoebe Stone [201} Mpha £am£ida Ylflu Front Row: Misses Kohls, Meehon, Morris, Randall, Sprogue, Wood, Chose, Davenport, Carpenter, Taylor, Spofford, Pushee. Second Row: Misses Oertel, Jackson, Barton, Pratt, Stomberg, Firth, Bonuzkewic, Chapin, Everson, Glazier, Snyder, Millett, Plichta. Third Row: Misses Bascom, Antaya, Tolman, Wright, Coates, Monk, Hutchinson, McFadden, Callanon, Bradley, Wheatley, Youland. ALPHA LAMBDA MU SORORES IN COLLEGIO Cynthia Carpenter Jessie Chase Frances Filipkowski CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Helen Morris Edna Sprague Helen O ' Hearn Winifred Taylor Sylvia Randall Lois Wood Beatrice Davenport Mary Meehan CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Virginia Pushee Inez Spofford Marion Stomberg Eleanor Ward Mildred Bak Anna Banuzkewic Beryl Barton Hazel Chapin Anne Dec CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Laura Everson Margaret Firth Thelma Glazier 01ive Jackson Rosa Kohls Carolyn Monk Priscilla Oertel Esther Pratt Margaret Vannah Helen Antaya Elizabeth Bascom Roberta Bradley Katherine Callanan Pledge CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE Virginia Coates Phyllis Hutchinson Marion Millett Rose Plichta Beverley Snyder Marion Tolman Harriet Wheatley Dorothy Wright Dorothy Youland [202] Atpjhxi £curdda )Uu ALPHA LAMBDA MU ALPHA CHAPTER Founded at Massachusetts State College October, 1931 Colors: Blue and Silver The purpose of the sorority is to develop charac- ter in achieving scholarship, in strengthening friend- ships and in maintaining high moral standards. After it was founded in 1930, Alpha Lambda Mu ' s first reports are packed with evidence of enthusiasm, good fun, and real sisterhood. In the fall of 1934, the sorority established its first home at 70 Lincoln Avenue. The following year, 1935, found the soror- ity at 51 Phillips Street, which is the present resi- dence. Last fall, the sorority pledged fourteen freshmen. The pledge formal, which is an annual affair, was held on January 15 at the Lord Jeffery Inn. The Knights of Rhythm furnished the music. On January 8 we held an alumni banquet at the Farley Club house. Thirteen former members at- tended and an enjoyable time was had by all. Several " Vic " parties, sleighrides, and banquets have made this year a memorable and an enjoyable one. OFFICERS President, Je.ssie Chase Vice-President, Lois " Wood Secretary, Helen O ' Hearn Treasurer, Eleanor Ward INTERSORORITY COUNCIL or Ward Sylvia Randall [203] £curMa £le£6a Wu o ' ? o f n Jl Front Row: Misses Howard, MocDonald, Josper, E. Julian, Miller, Brown, Lynch, Wood, C. Julian, Rutter, J. Graves, Becher, Booth, Sannello, Nichols. Second Row; Misses Staples, Merrill, Harris, Russell, Shaw, Rice, O ' Donnell, Martin, Briggs, Smith, Pelissier, Pease, Wilcox, Vassos, Lane, Nestle. Third Row: Misses Cadwell, Eaton, M, Graves, West, Kerivan, Morse, Raymond, Johnson, Keefe, Reynolds, Lucchesi, Puffer, Ross, Desmond, Flynn, Bergstrom, King, Compbell. Marion R. Becher Elinor Brown Julia T. Graves Gertrude J. Hadro Almeda B. Howard Mabelle Booth Beryl F. Briggs Shelagh Crowley Elizabeth S. Jasper Elizabeth D. Eaton Bettina Hall LAMBDA DELTA MU SORORES IN COLLEGIO CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Carol Julian Eleanor B. Julian Laura E. Morse Barbara M. Miller CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Mary M. Keefe Katherine E. Kerivan Julia M. Lynch Marjorie E. Harris M. Phyllis MacDonald Justine G. Martin Ethel Meurer Louise B. Rutter Jane E. Schopfer Kathryne I. Spaight Christine A. Stewart Ruth E. Wood Dorothy E. Nichols Grace P. O ' Donnell Joan R. Sannella M. Lees West Julia M. Whitney Marjorie F. Wilcox Agnes A. Dunham Myra C. Graves Margery D. Johnson Dorothy Merrill Evelyn S. Bergstrom Garnet L. Cadwell Sylvia Campbell Margaret Flynn Betty Desmond CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Virginia H. Pease Katherine L. Rice Sylvia Russell CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE Loretta Kenney M. Doris King Priscilla E. Lane Flora D. Lucchesi Constance M. Nestle Jean Puffer M. Marjorie Smith Helene E. Pelissier Marjorie C. Shaw Priscilla W. Taylor Myrtle I. Raymond lona M. Reynolds Doris M. Ross Barbara L. Staples Eleanore M. Vassos Pledge [204} £am£ida SdMa nflu LAMBDA DELTA MU ALPHA CHAPTER Founded at Massachusetts State College October, 1931 Colors: Green and Gold Lambda Delta Mu was founded in the fall of 1930 when the old open sorority, Delta Phi Gamma, was broken up to form three separate smaller groups. This sorority was founded with the aun of forming deep friendships among girls bound together by mutual interests in academic and social activities. In the fall of 1934, Lambda Delta Mu secured a house on 4 Sunset Court, which it has proudly maintained ever since, and which has consistently won places in house inspections. From the beginning it has been the purpose of the sorority to maintain a well-balanced group that will cooperate among themselves and with the rest of the college. It has been rather successful in carrying out this purpose, judging from the schol- astic, academic, and social prominence of its mem- bers. In addition to its own social functions, among which are formals, teas, and " Vic " parties, it co- operates with the rest of the college to make such events as Dad ' s Day and Mother ' s Day successful by providing entertainment of all kinds. OFFICERS President, Ruth E. Wood VieePresident, Julia il. Lynch Secretary, Elinor Brown Treasurer, Carol Julian INTERSORORITY COUNCIL Elinor Brown Beryl P. Briggs SORORES IN URBE Wilho Frigard Jlrs. Leslie Kimball [205] iP,iqnia B ta QJhl Oi oof oor f f a« A Front Row: Misses Porks, Bixby, Rothbone, Clapp, Parker, Kinsman, Crowell, Milkey, Goskell, Fagon, Macomber. Second Row: Misses Eldridge, Corcoran, Bates, Campbell, Dyer, Damon, Litchfield, Crosby, Merrill, Anderson, Sinclair, Buckley, Norwood. Third Row: Misses Luce, Grise, Spofford, Smolley, Johnson, Stewort, Gale, Henschel, Barrus, Sanderson, Robinson, Merritt, Sculley, Heath. Ruth Bixby Stella Crowell Virginia Fagan Rita Anderson Rita Buckley Elizabeth Clapp Justina Crosby Mary Elizabeth Bates Janet Campbell Anne Corcoran Ruth Barrus Marcelle Grise Virginia Heath Pledge SIGMA BETA CHI SORORES IN COLLEGIO CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Elizabeth Gaskell Jessie Kinsman Lois Macomber CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Marjorie Damon Doris Dyer Eva Eldridge Marjorie Litchfield Frances Merrill CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Virginia Gale Alberta Johnson Nancy Luce Dorothy Rourke CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE Vivian Henschel Helen Lane Bertha Merritt Margaret Robinson Elaine Milkey Evelyn Parker Dorothy Wilson Olive Norwood Nancy Parks Frances Rathbone Belva Sinclair Dorothea Smalley Elizabeth Spofford Jacqueline Stewart Patience Sanderson Marion Scully Jean Taylor [206} Ig.ma B eta Pd SIGMA BETA CHI ALPHA CHAPTER T Founded at Massachusetts State College October, 1931 Colors: Blue, Black and White In the 1930 ' s a club was formed on campus open to any girls who wished to join. This group divided into two sections, one of which became Sigma Beta Chi. Since then it has rapidly grown in num- bers and in spirit. Last spring Sigma Beta Chi received a plaque for winning the Intersorority Sing and Declama- tion Contest. On April 23 a banquet was held for the alumnae at the Mount Pleasant Inn. In the fall the house was materially improved by the addition of new furniture, curtains, and rugs in time for rushing. Twelve freshmen were pledged. Members of Sigma Beta Chi have shown leader- ship in various campus activities, such as student government, various clubs, and literary publica- tions. They have also been prominent in social affairs. In the sorority itself there have been many novel " Vic " parties in addition to two annual formal dances. But these social functions did not prevent the sorority from winning second place among the sororities in scholarship last year, thus approaching its ideal of well-balanced development for its mein- bers. OFFICERS President, Jessie Kinsmau Vice-President, Stella Crowell Secretary, Evelyn Parker Treasurer, Elizabeth Clapp INTERSORORITY COUNCIL Stella Crowell Nancy Pa SORORES IN URBE Ruth Campbell Burgess Katherine O ' Brien [207] 9M Zeta -F A o o o n ili Q £L n Front Row: Misses Barton, Mrs. Goldberg, Fohey, Thoyer, Thompson, Streeter, Jenkins, Fortin, O ' Connell, Nelson, Gilbert, Strode, Snow, F. Morley. Second Row; Misses Fornsworth, Abroms, Robbms, Little, Jewell, Hall, Carpenter, Malm, Cooper, Irwin, Alvord, Leete, Bowman, Wood, Gould, Doran, D Morley, Howe, Creesy. Third Row; Misses Burgess, Phillips, Shermon, Archibald, Tyler, Patten, Bailey, Fish, Boll, Lobacz, Beoubien, Horrington, Davis, Critchett, Leighton, Agombar PHI ZETA SORORES IN COLLEGIO Elizabeth S. Barton Eleanor D. Fahey Ann Gilbert Mrs. Shirley Goldberg Doris Jenkins CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Frances Morley Phyllis Nelson Mary O ' Connell Phyllis M. Snow M. Elizabeth Streeter Barbara Strode Edith G. Thayer Elthea Thompson Louisa E. Towne Roberta D. Walkey CLASS OF NINETEEN THIRTY-NINE Constance Fortin Elizabeth Abrams Erma Alvord Louise Bowman Millicent Carpenter Kathleen Cooper Lorraine Creesy CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY Katherine Doran Barbara Farnsworth Evelyn Gould Frieda Hall Elizabeth Howe Marjorie Irwin Eleanor Jewell Catherine Leete Barbara Little Irma Malm Dorothy Morley Patricia Robbins Beatrice Wood Rose Elaine Agambar ♦Gladys Archibald Priscilla Archibald Cynthia Bailey Annetta Ball Rosalie Beaubien CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE Shirley Burgess Ann Cooney Barbara Critchett Jean Davis Gladys Fish Anna Harrington Jane Leighton Bertha Lobacz Jean Phillips Muriel Sherman Jean Tyler Pledge [208j 9AL Zda PHI ZETA ALPHA CHAPTER T Founded at Massachusetts State College February 11, 1932 Colors: Black and White Phi Zeta Sorority was founded at Massachusetts State College on February 11, 1932, with nineteen charter members. In 1933 the sorority occupied its first house on Lincoln Avenue. This same year the first issue of the sorority publication, " The Philum ' , was published, and the custom of having an Alumnae Banquet before the Amherst- State foot- ball game was established. In 1934 the sorority moved to its present home on Pleasant Street. Two Alumnae Chapters, the Alpha Chapter in Boston and the Beta Chapter in Spring- field, were formed, and the Phi Zeta Mother ' s Club was organized. The list of twelve patrons, patronesses, and ad- visors, chosen from faculty members, was completed in 1936-37. In the fall of 1937, Phi Zeta took in eighteen fresh- men pledges, making a total number of fifty-two persons connected with the sorority. Phi Zeta ranked first among the sororities in scholarship at the end of the first semester. Phi Zeta has always taken an active part in all academic activities and since 1934 has continually won house inspection. This year Phi Zeta won the Intersorority Sing and Declamation Contest held in the Memorial Buildmg on AprU 13. The out- standing social function of the sorority is the an- nual Pledge Formal, which is always held at the Lord Jeffery Inn. It has become the annual custom for the underclass sisters to give a Farewell Banquet for the Seniors of the sorority during Commence- ment week-end. OFFICERS President, Doris Jeiiliins Vice-President, Constance Fortin Secretary, Betty Streeter Treasurer, Mary O ' Connell INTERSORORITY COUNCIL Elthea Thompson Conslance Fortin SORORES IN FACULTATE Ethel Blatchford SORORES IN URBE Mrs. Elmer Allen Kathleen MacDonald i i ' ixt - i»mjm I .1 ' Itf liirii {209} »:l iSL Jm. " ' S , ' A,deipk la Front Row: Silverman, Brown, Niden Second Row; NeJame, Towie, Sievers, Hocr ADELPHIA OFFICERS President, Herbert E. Brown Vice-President, George Niden Secretary-Treasurer, Donald L. Silverman Adelphia is the sole senior honorary society at Massachusetts State College. It is composed of men chosen for their outstanding work on campus by the de- parting members of Adelphia. In May 1937, the departing Adelphia chose Herbert E. Brown, John S. Hoar, Mitchell F. NeJame, George Niden, Fred- erick J. Sievers, Donald L. Silverman, and Richard W. Towle to continue as mem- bers of Adelphia. A faculty member, George " Red " Emery, was also elected to the society. The group commenced the 1937-38 col- lege year by sponsoring a series of rallies before the important home football games, — those with Bowdoin, Amherst, and Tufts. A novel combination of fireworks, torchlight parades, and excellent speakers plus the customary bonfire, singing, cheer- ing, and band music helped to make the rallies a success. Among the outstand- ing speakers were Frederick D. Griggs, a Trustee; M. O. Lanphear, Assistant Dean; Eb Caraway, Head Coach; Guy Glatfelter, and Doctor Bradley. Adelphia sponsored a highly successful Red Cross drive, collecting for the worthy cause a sum over $200. [2121 iPje nxxit iM ' A ' :± ' ' ' ' ' n r A P Front Row: Savage, Howe, Sievers, Brown, Riley. Second Row; Bloke, Towie, Lyons, Southwick, Riel, Coin. SENATE OFFICERS President, Frederick J. Sievers Vice-President, Herbert E. Brown Secretary, William W. Howe, Jr. Treasurer, William C. Riley During the past year the Senate, student governing body composed of juniors and seniors at Massachusetts State College, made many important contributions to the Avelfare of the student body. It participated in many campus activities, managing a freshman-sophomore track meet last spring and Razoo night this fall. It took disciplinary measures with reactionary freshmen when necessary, revised class election rules to prevent campus politics, and made appointments to student com- mittees and sent delegates to two college conventions. As representatives of the student body, it voted for the return of the Senior Fence in front cl South Col- lege. In addition to handling student affairs, the Senate made many material contri- butions. It gave the infirmary sixteen earphones for the radio and an electric razor. It purchased uniform and baton for the drum major of the band, made part payment on new jackets for Adel- phia, and donated $10 to the Red Cross Drive Committee and $100 to the Winter Carnival Committee. Thus the Senate has fulfilled its func- tion as the student governing body. {213] )7lala-an Ke( yf- jc Front Row: Osmun, Sheldon, Pitts, Hoger Second Row: McAndrew, Schoonmoker, Reagan, Washburn MAROON KEY OFFICERS President, Robert I. Sheldon Vice-President, Alan C. Smith Secretary-Treasurer, George T. Pitts, Jr. The Maroon Key is an organization of ten sophomores elected by their class. The members are chosen from eighteen can- didates which are selected by the Senate from a list of thirty-two nominees sub- mitted by a forum of fraternity and non- fraternity men. The Maroon Key acts as host to visiting athletic teams and to other visitors to the Campus. It also gives counsel to fresh- men in regard to their conduct. This honorary society has chapters in many of the leading colleges of the United States, the name being determined by the college color. During the past few years there has been an increasing spirit of brotherhood among the societies in these colleges. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has expressed their appreciation of the service rendered to them by our Maroon Key, and Bowdoin commending the efficiency of the Key society not only at Massachusetts State College but at other colleges, has expressed a desire to form a like organization. [2HJ Ha-noJi Sauttcit M-O HMr L Ujt cJi Front Row: Townsley, Chase, Julian Second Row: Hager, Miss Kinsman, Brown, Roberts HONOR COUNCIL OFFICERS President, Philip C. Chase Secretary, C. Nelson Julian In its eighteenth year at Massachusetts State College, the Honor System as a method of conducting examinations is one of the most significant and far-reaching institutions on the campus. Throughout its history it has periods of great efficacy and periods of indifference on the part of the students. Its history during the past year has been one of renewed enthu- siasm and energy. Cases treated (up to March 1938) numbered eleven. At a forum held on February 24, faculty and student opinion about the system was expressed. It was overwhelming in sup- port of the system. The O ' Connell case was a highlight in the year ' s work, a case which asserted the power of the Honor Council to interpret its constitution even above faculty ruling. A new liberalizing trend is seen in the future of the system, together vith a spirit of cooperation. [215] lUamen i. iPJuderd Q ou- Amrvejni Alio-clcdloti Front Row: Misses Julian, Becher, Clapp Second Row; Misses Smalley, Nichols, Leete, Kaplmsky THE WOMEN ' S STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION OFFICERS President, Marian R. Becher Vice-President, Elizabeth M. Clapp Secretary, Dorothy E. Nichols Treasurer, Eleanor B. JuHan The W. S. G. A. includes in its member- ship every woman student of the four year course at the college. The seven officers forming a council are chosen by the vote of all the co-eds. This council represents the interests of the Student Government on the campus and also acts as an advisory and governing body for its members, its decisions subject to faculty approval. Each year two representatives of the council attend a conference wtih girls from other co-educational colleges in New England, to discuss matters of stu- dent government and to bring back new ideas to this campus. Marian Becher and Martha Kaplinsky were the delegates last Spring. The W. S. G. A. presents a scholarship in the spring to a senior girl with out- standing scholastic ability and personality. Jessie Kinsman was the winner of this award last year. The W. S. G. A. helps the freshman to become acquainted in the fall by sponsoring teas in the Abbey, and by giving a co-ed party. The Council also sponsors a Mother ' s Day weekend in May, at which the girls entertain their mothers with athletic events, a tea, a banquet, and a program of formal enter- tainment. [216] iPJudent ReiLqioul Q iuicii Front Row; Miss Wolkey, Levinson, Miss Nichols. Second Row: Swiren, Murphy, Bloke, Tonkin. STUDENT RELIGIOUS COUNCIL OFFICERS President, Lawrence Levinson Vice-President, Norman P. Blake Secretary, D. Roberta Walkey The Religious Council at Massachu- setts State is comprised of three repre- sentatives of the three religious organ- izations on campus: the Newman Club, the Christian Federation, and the Men- orah Club. The Religious Council ar- ranges and sponsors the Sunday evening Vesper services in the Memorial Build- ing, as well as an annual series of lec- tures for the student group. This year. Professor James T. Cleland of Amherst College gave three well-attended lectures on Feb. 17, 18, and 20 on " The Basis of the Christian Religion " . A significant innovation in Vespers this year was the service conducted by the Student Religious Council on Sunday, March 20, at which a representative of each of the three religious organizations presented very interesting lectures. The three lectures were: " The Message of Amos for Today " ; " The Message of Jesus for Today " ; and " The Message of New- man for Today " ; which were given by Lawrence Levinson, ' 38; Robert W. Gage, ' 38; and William G. Foley, ' 40; respect- ively. This service with the three representa- tives speaking side by side from the same platform is symbolic of the harmonious functioning of the Student Religious Council. £217] Axiadtmic Jiciiif-itied. B a-aJid Front Row: Swiren, Mr Emery, Dean Mochmer, Dr Glick, Miss Strode Second Row: Kohn, C. Hemond, Elkind, Harrison, Lombard President Baker, Ex Officio Dean Machmer, Chairman Professor Rand, General Manager ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES BOARD Professor Glick, In charge of Medal awards Professor Dickinson, Advisor of Bus. Mgrs. Mr. Emery, Secretary STUDENT MEMBERS William H. Harrison, ' 38, Collegian Elmer R. Lombard, ' 38, Index Richard R. Irving, ' 38, Orchestra Hem y B. Elkind, Jr., ' 38, Roister Doisters Barbara J. Strode, ' 38, Women ' s Glee Club Alfred M. Swiren, ' 38, Debating Bernard H. Kohn, ' 38, Men ' s Glee Club Conrad J. Hemond, ' 38, Band The Academic Activities Board is a good example of cooperation between students, faculty, and alumni at the Col- lege. The Board is composed of two fac- ulty appointees, two alumni appointees, the general manager of Academics, the President of the College, and business managers from each of the student organ- izations represented. The Academic Activities Board is the group which deter- mines the administrative policies of the various activities, and which decides upon the award of medals and special academics prizes. [218} AimaAdd ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES AWARDS— 1937 The Conspicuous Service Trophy was awai-ded to Kenwood Ross for his work in producing the hterary supplement to the Collegian. The Manager ' s Prize of fifty dollars was awarded to Mitchell F. NeJame for his out- standing work as manager of the Index. Ralph B. Gates, ' 37 John S. Hoar, ' 38 Albert S. Thomas, ' 37 ACTIVITY DIAMOND CHIPS Band Roister Doisters Debating GOLD MEDALS Louis A. Breault, ' 37 Richard R. Irving, ' 38 Barbara K. Keck, ' 37 Bernard L. Kohn, ' 38 Mitchell F. NeJame, ' 38 Robert J. Spiller, Jr., ' 37 Collegian Orchestra Orchestra Men ' s Glee Club Index Band NAME ACTIVITY SILVER MEDALS Stanley M. Bozek, ' 38 Band Alma R. Boyden, ' 37 Women ' s Glee Club Ivan R. Cousins, ' 39 Men ' s Glee Club James J. Dobby, ' 37 Roister Doisters Ann Gilbert, ' 38 ' Women ' s Glee Club ' William B. Graham, ' 38 Collegian Harlan A. Howard, ' 37 Band Lawrence Levinson, ' 38 Roister Doisters Frederick B. Lindstrom, ' 38 Collegian Lucille A. Monroe, ' 37 Roister Doisters Ethel F. Seal, " 38 Women ' s Glee Club Donald L. Silverman, ' 38 Collegian Barbara J. Strode, ' 38 Women ' s Glee Club Clifford E. Symancyk, ' 37 Collegian ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES AWARDS — 1938 The Conspicuous Service Trophy was awarded to Mitchell F. NeJame for the reorganization of the Index Boai ' d so as to make it more distinctly an all-college group, and for the increasing of the financial support for the production of the Index. The Manager ' s Prize of fifty dollars was awarded to Henry B. Elkind, Jr. for his outstanding work as manger of the Roister Doisters. NAME ACTIVITY SILVER MEDALS Milton E. Auerbach, ' 39 Men ' s Glee Club Ruth L. Bixby, ' 38 Donald W. Cadigan, ' 39 Robert E. Cain, ' 39 William Eaton, ' 38 Constance C. Fortin, ' 39 Ruth E. Kodis, ' 38 Ehner R. Lombard, ' 38 Julia M. Lynch, 39 Richard L. Mabie, ' 38 Robert D. MacCurdy, ' 38 Harold E. Moore, ' 39 NAME ACTIVITY DIAMOND CHIPS Richard R. Irving, ' 38 Orchestra Bernard L. Kohn, ' 38 Men ' s Glee Club Mitchell F. NeJame, ' 38 Index Alfred M. Swiren, ' 38 Debating GOLD MEDALS Stanley M. Bozek, ' 38 Band Vernon F. Coutu, ' 38 Band Henry B. Elkind, ' 38 Dramatics Stanley A. Flower, ' 38 Collegian Lane Giddings, ' 38 Index Ann Gilbert. ' 38 Index William H. Harrison, ' 38 Collegian Conrad J. Hemond, ' 38 Band Harold C. Hemond, ' 38 Band Julian H, Katzeff, ' 38 Collegian Lawrence Levinson, ' 38 Dramatics Donald L. Silverman, ' 38 Index Barbara J. Strode, ' 38 Glee Club Helen C. Morris, ' 38 Roy H. Moult, ' 38 Arthur A. Noyes, ' 40 Joseph Paul, ' 39 Charles A. Powers, ' 4 Index Dramatics Orchestra Index Dramatics Orchestra Index Orchestra Band Dramatics Collegian Index Glee Club Collegian Band Band [219} 9.nde Front Row: Junior Board: Fisher, Miss Modden, Parmenter, Miss Nichols, Muller, Miss Cooper, Stone. Second Row: Sophomore Board: Schreiber, Miss Clark, Eaton, McCarthy, Noyes, Prouty, Glendon, Show, Miss Pease, Powers THE 1938 INDEX In June 1937, the Index Board was reorganized. The Board changed from a Junior Board to one composed of members from the three upper classes. In this .system, the seniors hold the major positions, while the juniors and sopho- mores act as assistants. Under the new arrangement, many develop- ments have been made. Extension of competi- tion has been insured and the interest in the Index has been more widely distributed through the student body. The Index has become a major academic activity, with the successful staff member given opportunity for participation dur- ing most of his college career. Continuity of experience and spirit in the Board is assured, and there is a better representation of the classes in the recording of college activities. In addition to the reorganization of the staff last June, there was a restatement of general policy. Application of this policy has tended to make the Index a continuous history of college events from the undergraduate point of view. The Index also has undertaken to record the less spectacular, but often the more important, forces now shaping the Massachusetts State College of the future. DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG Literary Advisor RUTH L. BIXBY Literary Editor LANE GIDDINGS Photographic Editor ANN GILBERT Art Editor [220] 9.ndea. DONALD L. SILVERMAN Associate Editor MITCHELL F. NEJAME Editor-in-Chief ELMER R. LOMBARD Business Manager THE 1938 INDEX The success of this book is due to the co- operative endeavor of all the members of the Board. Special recognition should be given to those who were most instrumental in carrying this book to successful completion. The Board wishes to thank the following; Ruth Bixby, for her excellent handling and expansion of the literary department; Lane Giddings, whose ser- vices were indispensable, for his outstanding work in making a photographic Index a reality, and also for his willingness to assist in all other phases of the work; Ann Gilbert, for her super- vision of the art department and her collabora- tion with both Mr. Giddings and Mr. Fisher in selecting and arranging photographs; and Myron Fisher, for his clever sketches and artistic ideas. We present the 1938 Index as a history of Massachusetts State College during the year of 1937-38. Through literary endeavor and photo- graphic representations, we hope to aid the readers in recalling to mind the pleasant inci- dents and outstanding events in their college lives. WILLIAM EATON Statistics Co-Editor HELEN CAREW MORRIS Statistics Co-Editor ALFRED M. SWIREN Literary Department PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON Business Advisor [221] G,aiCeq,Can Front Row; Tonkin, Giddings, Graham, Silverman, Flower, Dr, Goldberg, Kotzeff, Harrison, NeJame, Swiren, Moore, Noyes Second Row: Rodman, Fisher, Yanow, Miss Levy, Miss Compbell, Miss Stewart, Miss Merrill, Miss Hall, Miss Monk, Miss Booth, Miss Luce, Copson, Howland, Filios. Third Row; Powers, Lindsey, Winn, Copelond, Davis, Bart, Kuralowicz, Forrest, Goodwin, Carp, Rosen. THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN JULIAN H. KATZEFF, ' 38, Editor-in-Chief STANLEY A. FLOWER, ' 38, Managing Editor THOMAS J. ENRIGHT, ' 39, Associate Editor EDITORIAL BOARD Campus MAURICE TONKIN, ' 38, Editor MABELLE BOOTH, ' 39 LLOYD B. COPELAND, ' 39 BETTINA HALL, ' 39 MARY T. MEEHAN, ' 39 FRANCES S. MERRILL, ' 39 JOSEPH BART, ' 40 JOHN E. FILIOS, ' 40 NANCY E. LUCE, ' 40 CAROLYN E. MONK, ' 40 JACQUELINE L. STE ' WART, ' 4{ ROMA LEVY, ' 40, Secretary KENNETH HO ' WLAND, ' 41 ■WILLIAM T. GOODWIN, ' 41 HAROLD FORREST, ' 41 KATHLEEN TULLY, ' 41 CHESTER KURALOWICZ, ' 41 Athletics ALFRED M. SWIREN, ' 38, Editor FRANKLIN M. DAVIS, JR., ' 40 ARTHUR A. NOYES, ' 40 D. ARTHUR COPSON, ' 40 ALBERT YANOW, ' 41 Photography LANE GIDDINGS. ' 38 Stockbridge Correspondent HAROLD PHILLIPS, S ' 38 Collegian Quarterly SIDNEY ROSEN, ' 39, Editor JANET CAMPBELL, ' 40, Associate Editor Financial Adviser PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON Faculty Adviser DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG BUSINESS BOARD WILLIAM H. HARRISON, ' 38, Business Manager WILLIAM B. GRAHAM, ' 38, Advertising Manager DONALD L. SILVERMAN, ' 38, Circulation Manager MITCHELL F. NEJAME, ' 38, Subscription Manager ABRAHAM CARP, ' 39 GEORGE BENJAMIN, ' 39 E. EUGENE DENEAULT, ' 40 CHARLES A. POWERS, JR.. Business Assistonts ALLEN GOVE, ' 39 J. HENRY WINN, ' 39 ROGER H. LINDSEY, ' 40 ROBERT RODMAN, ' 40 [222] QaiCtgian COLLEGIAN NOTE: A critique of New England Collegiate news publications, in the Colleg iile Revieiv. char- acterizes the Collegian as: " Solid, substantial, and with a definite editorial policy. " The ALusach isetts Collegian has occupied a well-deserved position of prominence at Massachusetts State College during the past year. Published weekly, the paper is recog- nized as representing the student body and voicing its opinions. The Collegian has been rated highly in several surveys of collegiate weeklies, receiving a " First Class Honor Rating " by the Associated Collegiate Press. The Collegian, read by students, faculty, administration, and alumni, keeps them in- formed about student and faculty events, as well as the general development of the College. In its editorial column, the paper presents the attitude of the student bod y. During the past year, the Collegian has continued its support of the movement in favor of grant- ing an A. B. degree and on January 19, is- sued an " extra " at the close of the Trustees meeting at which action on the degree was again postponed. The Collegian again ex- pressed itself in favor of a reading and study period before final examinations. The paper has followed closely the movement toward the establishment of a " University of Massa- chusetts " , stimulating interest in having such a " University " established at Amherst. The Collegian cooperated with the Brown Daily Herald in its nation-wide peace poll on col- lege campuses. Co-operating with the committee in charge of preparations for the Diamond Jubilee celebration of the College, a special twelve page issue of the Collegian was prepared under Editor Julian H. Katzeff. This special edition which appeared on February 10, at- tempted to give a bird ' s-eye view of the Col- lege — " a survey of its growth and develop- ment during the past seventy-five years, its present status, and its potential value in the future. " Other " extras " of the Collegian included one about the Winter Carnival week-end, and another about the Model League of Nations which was held at Massa- chusetts State College this year. ' ■ " «-S? « , JULIAN H. KATZEFF Editor-in-Chief WILLIAM H. HARRISON, JR. Business Manager [223] Qoiie. icui QjuoAteJiti SIDNEY ROSEN Associate Editor SHIRLEY B. GOLDBERG Editor COLLEGIAN QUARTERLY " Blessed by the administration, the academic activities board, and the depart- ment of languages and literature, and financed and edited by the Collegian, the first number of the Collegian Quarterly, a literary supplement, is appended to to- day ' s issue. " With these editorial words, the Colle- gian Quarterly, a two-page experiment, came into the limelight at the beginning of the second semester of the year 1936-37. To Kenwood Ross, ' 37, go the honors for providing a base upon which the Quar- terly could be planned and published. Mr. Ross contacted some sixty colleges in an attempt to determine the best methods of producing a college literary publication. After a year and a half of research, enough information was gathered and the actual work was begun. Shirley Bliss Goldberg, ' 38, was ap- pointed Editor and Sidney Rosen, ' 39, As- sociate Editor. The policy of the Quarterly was clearly defined: " to publish under student editorship undergraduate, faculty, and alumni creative work four times a year. " Two successful issues during the semester proved that Mass. State had plenty of latent literary talent, in spite of any comments as to " farmers " or " Aggie " . The year 1937-38 saw a change in the editorial board. Sidney Rosen, ' 39, be- came editor, and Janet W. Campbell, ' 40, Associate Editor. The first issue also marked a change in the Quarterly itself; it had grown from two to four pages, and it was made more attractive by the ad- dition of cuts. The second issue of the year saw even a greater change; the size was reduced by one-third, and two more pages were added. The Collegian Quarterly is no longer an experiment — it is now well established. It has grown rapidly, and shall, with the College, continue to grow until, perhaps, it becomes an independent campus activ- ity. The presence of a course in Creative Writing in the college curriculum has shown the need for an outlet for student creative Uterary work; the Collegian Quarterly is the answer. [224] RoiiieA TixyUteAA - ? n T f e r ' Front Row: Miss Merrill, Levinson, Miss Sannello, MocCurdy, Miss Strode, Hoar, Miss Fortin, Elkind Miss Norwood Moult, Miss Briggs. Second Row: LeCloir, Brox, Collins, Beck, McCarthy, Cousins, Miss Alvord, Miss Phillips, Fowell Gruner Nojar Milne, Foster, Graham, Sullivan. ' ' R«oii-r 0»i«:t» ROISTER DOISTERS OFFICERS President, John S. Hoar, ' 38 Vice-President, Constance C. Fortin, ' 39 Business Manager, Hem-y B. Elkind, Jr., ' 38 Assistant Manager, Sidney H. Beck, ' 39 Stage Manager, Roy H. Moult, ' 38 Technical Assistant, Charles H. Schauwecker Electrician, Douglas D. Milne, ' 39 Scenic Artist, James Robertson, Jr. Director, Frank Prentice Rand It has often been said that entertainment of the audience is the first requirement of a dramatic presentation. That the maxim is true, at least to the extent that failure to hold the attention of the audience renders a play worthless, few dramatic enthusiasts will deny. If, however, entertainment is the first requirement of drama, it is likewise the lowest. A play must rise above the level of mere entertainment in order to be of lasting interest. To a large degree contem- porary drama of the stage and screen does not so rise. Shakespeare ' s plays, on the other hand, though they provide some of the richest of entertainment, attain the heights of artistic achievement largely through other values. College di ' amatic societies, favored by audiences of higher than average intellectual capacity, are in a position to take unto themselves an elevated mandate: to provide with their entertainment some morsels of spiritual nourishment which may prove worth the while of the audience, and to test new and interesting dramatic forms which the professional theatre does not dare to attempt. In the adoption of such a mandate the Roister Doisters are no exception. A glance at their activities of the last two years may serve to indicate their policy. The Nighl of Janu iry 16. a modern murder mystery, was rendered something of a psycho- logical experiment by the presentation of two dramatically different readings of the same evi- dence, the reactions of the audience and jury being tested by independent verdicts. The program of three one-act plays at Commence- ment, 1937, was in recognition and encourage- ment of the promising work of an amateur playwright, Cornelius A. Wood. Make-Believe Angeline. given its premiere by the Roister Doisters in the Bjy Stale Revue, was written by Louis Breault, ' 37, a former member of the Society. Not W ithout Hope, written by the director of the Society, involved the reproduc- tion of considerable historical detail not only as to fact but as to character and mood, and cannot fail to be of significance to members of the audience in their future associations with the two great poets, Wordsworth and Coleridge. Ralph Roister Dotster. chosen by the Society for the 1938 Commencement, holds an important place in literature as the first regular English comedy, is the source of the Society ' s name, and has peculiar interest in connection with the Diamond Jubilee celebration of the founding of the College. In addition to producing these plays, the Society has sponsored as speakers Walter Pritchard Eaton, and Mr. Kennedy of the cast of Orson Welles ' modern Julitis Caesar. It has also visited Springfield en niasse to see Othello and the Pulitzer Prize play, Yoti Cant Take It With You. The Roister Doisters are sincere in trying to follow a policy which offers educational and cultural values as well as entertainmer)t, on a plane as high as the intellectual level of the College — and the Society — will permit. John S. Hoar, ' 38. [225} Ro-ilteJi .oidteAd. PROFESSOR FRANK PRENTICE RAND Director JOHN HOAR President MAKE-BELIEVE ANGELINE by LOUIS A. BREAULT Angeline Barbara Strode, ' 38 Tim Leo LeClair, ' 39 Princess Constance Fortin, ' 39 Eric Lawrence Levinson, ' 38 Duchess Olive Norwood, ' 39 Stagehand Albert Sullivan, ' 40 1st Guard ' William Collins, ' 38 2nd Guard Frank Brox, ' 38 1937 COMMENCEMENT PLAYS JUNE 12, 1937 THE TUMBLER OF NOTRE DAME by CORNELIUS AYER -WOOD FRANCOIS Ivan R. Cousins, ' 39 CHRETIEN Eugen P. Gieringer, ' 39 INTRUDER Donald W. Cadigan, ' 39 HUBERT John S. Hoar, ' 38 JACQUES Robert D. MacCurdy, ' 38 ABBOT OF ST. MAURICE Lawrence Levinson, ' 38 PHILIPPE Frederick W. Goodhue, ' 37 THE VIRGIN Constance C. Fortin, ' 39 THE LAST GEPUIRE by CORNELIUS AYER WOOD MAGGIE Beryl F. Briggs, ' 39 NORA Lucille A. Monroe, ' 37 PATCH Francis J. Thomas, ' 37 AUBREY Gordon E. Najar, ' 39 GINSBERG Saul G. Gruner, ' 38 EAMON John J. McCarthy, ' 40 PEGGY PLUM by CORNELIUS AYER WOOD SERVANT Sidney H. Beck, ' 39 PEGGY Barbara J. Strode, ' 38 POLLY Joan R. Sannella, ' 39 PRUE Erma S. Alvord, ' 40 BLACK CAT Leopold J. LeClair, ' 39 WITCH Olive F. Norwood, ' 39 KING COLE Lawrence Levinson, ' 38 MINISTER Harold I. Watts, ' 37 PEDANT John S. Hoar, ' 38 PRINCE CHARMING Robert D. MacCurdy, ' 38 GOOD FAIRY Frances S. Merrill, ' 39 CHILDREN David Snyder Casandra Caroway [225] Ro-UieA, MlteAi NOT WITHOUT HOPE by FRANK PRENTICE RAND WORDSWORTH John S. Hoar, 38 MARY HUTCHINSON Beryl F. Briggs, ' 39 DAME GAMAGE, Mary ' s great aunt Olive F. Norwood, ' 39 DOROTHY WORDSWORTH Barbara J. Strode, ' 38 SARA HUTCHINSON Erma S. Alvord, ' 40 CAPTAIN JOHN WORDSWORTH - Robert D. MacCurdy, ' 38 f Donald N. Fowell, ' 39 FRENCH CITIZENS . ,„„ [ Ivan R. Cousins, 39 GARCON Leo J. LeClair, ' 39 CAPTAIN BEAUPUY Donald W. Cadigan, ' 39 ANNETTE VALLON Constance C. Fortin, ' 39 MOLLY FISHER Joan R. Sannella, ' 39 COLERIDGE Lawrence Levinson, ' 38 CAROLINE Marilyn L. Westcott 1938 COMMENCEMENT PLAY JUNE 11, 1938 RALPH ROISTER DOISTER by NICHOLAS UDALL RALPH ROISTER DOISTER Lawrence Levinson, ' 38 MATHEW MERYGREEKE John Hoar, ' 38 GAWYN GOODLUCK John Glick, ' 39 TRISTRAM TRUSTIE Donald Fowell, ' 39 DOBINET DOUGHTIE Joan Sannella, ' 39 TOM TRUPENIE John Pratt, ' 39 SYM SURESBY Alvan Myerson, ' 39 SCRIVENER Robert MacCurdy, ' 38 HARPAX Frank Brox, ' 38 DAME CHRISTIAN CUSTANCE Beryl Briggs, ' 39 MARGERIE MUMBLECRUST Olive Norwood, ' 39 TIBET TALKAPACE Elizabeth Eaton, ' 39 ANNOT ALYFACE Marian Maschin, ' 39 [227] ISxwxl Front Row: Pratt, Mollis, Mobie, Halhawoy, Scollin, Giddings, Show, Plichta, Gleoson, Babbitt, Clapp, Smith, Fitzpotrick, Coutu. Second Row: Tiberii, Smart, Goodwin, Wilansky, Riseberg, Bozek, Miss Jolinson, Director Fornum, Miss Alvord, H. Hemond, Ogden, Lepine, Cowling, Malkin, Hayward. Third Row: J- Paul, Howard, Powers, Trible, C, Hemond, Schenker, C. Paul. MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE BAND Director, Charles B. Farnum of Holyoke DRUM MAJORS OFFICERS Stanley Bozek, ' 38 Erma Alvord, ' 40 Alberta Johnson, ' 40 Student Manager — Conrad Hemond, Jr., ' 38 Student Director — Harold Hemond, ' 38 Assistant Manager — Joseph Paul, ' 39 ( f M ' J L f u«. t The band this year completed the most suc- cessful season since its reorganization three years ago. The fall program included, besides the customary appearances at all of the home foot- ball games, a trip to the night game with the Coast Guard Academy at New London, where- the Band combined with the Service Band for a street parade and concert late in the afternoon. At the Bay State Revue it presented a concert program. The Band did much in the way of radio work with a half hour broadcast over a Springfield Station on Alumni Night and with the making of electrical transcriptions of college songs to be used on other college radio programs. [228} Bxuid The winter period was marked by an appear- ance on the Winter Carnival program and also a concert at the High School Basketball Tourney. The annual convocation program was held earlier than usual this year, on February 24. This concert featured solos by Miss Erma Alvord, ' 40, on the Chimes; Vernon Coutu, ' 38, on the Trum- pet; and Conrad Hemond, Jr., ' 38, on the Bass Horn. The spring season consisted of the feature concert of the year which is presented annually as a part of the Mother ' s Day celebration. This concert was the last public appearance in the Band of six senior members who are all charter members of the reorganized band and have played with the group for four years. They are Edward Clapp, Vernon Coutu, Richard Mabie, Lane Giddings, Harold Hemond and Conrad Hemond. Other events on the spring program included an appearance at the Diamond Jubilee Celebration, radio appearances, short trips, a combined concert and dance held late in May. The greatest innovation of the year was the introduction of two co-ed Drum Majors into the personnel of the band, as assistants to senior Drum Major Stanley Bozek. The two girls, who were chosen as a result of competition in which fifteen young women participated, were Miss Erma Alvord and Miss Alberta Johnson, both of the Class of 1940. These two were trained for their fine performances at the Amherst and Tufts games, respectively, by Drum Major Bozek. Other innovations were the adoption by vote of the Band of a Constitution of management, thus completing the formal reorganization of the band started four years ago; and the awarding of emblems for service in the Band. The Band also received an increase in appropriation from the Student activities taxes which was used to purchase some new instruments, uniforms and music. [229] OAcAeA.t a f ,D r. o n f " NiT Front Row: Miss Ahearn, Miss Critchett, Miss Kodis, Irving, Cain, Miss Lynch, Miss Jewell, Miss Millett. Second Row; Plichto, Shonker, Ogden, Fuller Miss Dolliver, Mr. Strotton, King, Gleason, Powers, Shaw. THE ORCHESTRA Director, Frank B. Stratton OFFICERS Manager, Richard R. Irving, ' 38 Assistant Manager, Robert E. Cain, ' 39 C ve M M, Under the direction of Frank B. Stratton, the college orchestra has played for several success- ful seasons, giving an annual spring concert, assisting at the production of the operetta, Ruddigore. and playing for the Annual Bacca- laureate and Commencement exercises for the respective years of 1937 and 1938. During the season of 1936-37 the Orchestra assisted at several informal concerts given by the Com- bined Music Clubs, and accompanied the Glee Clubs in their presentation of the operetta, Utopia Limited. THE COMBINED MUSIC CLUBS In the Fall of 1936 the three music clubs, the Women ' s Glee Club, the Men ' s Glee Club, and the Orchestra, combined under the management of one board, consisting of the Manager and Assistant Manager of each club. The success of this combination has been demonstrated by the joint production of the operetta, Utopia Limited, in 1937, and by the later production, in 1938, of the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, Rud- digore (or The Witch ' s Curse). [230] 0.peA£Ua RUDDIGORE THE WITCH ' S CURSE by W. S. GILBERT and ARTHUR SULLIVAN ROSE MAYBUD, a village maiden ROBIN OAKAPPLE, a young farmer RICHARD DAUNTLESS, his foster-brother DAME HANNAH, Rose ' s Aunt ... OLD ADAM GOODHEART, Robin ' s servant MAD MARGARET SIR DESPARD MURGATROYD, of Ruddi ore ZORAH 1 professional bridesmaids RUTH Barbara Strode, ' 38 Ivan Cousins, ' 39 Myron Hager, ' 40 Rosa Kohls, ' 40 Milton Auerbach, ' 39 Marian Maschin, ' 39 Albert Sullivan, ' 40 Bertha Antes, S ' 38 Ethel Seal, ' 38 SIR RODERICK MURGATROYD, the late Baronet Isadore Cohen, ' 40 BRIDESMAIDS: Marian Millett, Ida Davis, Cynthia Carpenter, Winifred Giles, Kathryne Spaight, Mabelle Booth, Beryl Barton. BUCKS AND BLADES, ANCESTORS: John Osmun, Fletcher Prouty, Carl Wildner, Roger Decker, Francis Smith, Roger Lindsay, Erwin Hubbard, George Tobey, Roy Moult. Of the three Gilbert and Sullivan operettas presented by the musical clubs in recent years, popular as well as critical approval has definitely placed " Kuddigore " as the best work done so far. Much of the credit for the success of " Ruddigore " is due to the work of Mr. Frank B. Stratton. The careful choice of an appropriate cast, the excellent vocal and acting ability displayed, and the technical excellence of production were also contributing factors toward success. The story of " Kuddigore " presented a number of difficulties that had to be overcome. There were two roles that required the actors to com- pletely change their character: The part of " Robin Oakapple " , taken by Ivan Cousins, ' 39, demanded a change from a bashful, hesitant nature to one of villainy; the other role, that of the wicked, scheming " Sir Despard Murgatroyd " was well handled by Albert Sullivan, ' 40, espec- ially in his transformation to a respectable, mild citizen. Marian Maschin, ' 39, as " Mad Margaret " and Myron Hager, ' 40, as " Richard Dauntless " presented creditable performances both m sing- ing as well as acting. Among the leads, Barbara Strode, ' 38, displayed the outstanding feminine voice, while Isadore Cohen, ' 40, took high honors with what was probably the best male voice. The support given by the other characters and the orchestra were important in making the operetta a high-rating production. Another obstacle was found in the second act, when the ancestors of the House of Ruddigore were to come to life by stepping from picture frames. The life-like work done on the portraits by Mr. James Roberston of the Landscape Ar- chitecture department was largely responsible for the effectiveness of this scene. This added to the weird effect of the scene and made it one of the most impressive parts of the operetta. It can be said that the excellent presentation of " Ruddigore " has set a high standard for pro- ductions to come, and the increasing importance of the musical clubs will undoubtedly sei-ve to make future productions even more successful. [231] rrien ' l 9lee tiul n ' ' n rs r T - i ' ■i ' W Front Row: Osmun, Hoger, Decker, Wildner, Kohn, Moult, Auerbacli, Tappin, Prouty. Second Row: Shaw, Powers, Cousins, Barnard, Talbot, Mr. Stratton, Griffin, Hubbard, Lindsay, Biederman, Koobatian. THE MEN ' S GLEE CLUB Director— Mr. Frank B. Stratton OFFICERS Manager, Bernard L. Kohn, ' 38 Assistant Manager, Fletcher Prouty, ' 40 Jhlu CJUL. Under the direction of Mr. Frank B. Stratton, the Men ' s Glee Club has given very successful concerts for several years, both on campus and on tours. In 1936, for example, the Club, in conjunction with the College Radio Program, presented a few numbers over Station W.B.Z. in Springfield. This broadcast met with such favor, that the club was invited to give a similar concert from Station W.G.Y., Schenectady, N. Y. En route, stops were made at Cummington and North Adams, where the Club presented musical programs of great variety. In 1937, the Club confined its travels within the boundaries of Massachusetts. At the present writing, proposed concerts are scheduled in Boston, Cummington, Athol, and Schenectady. As has been the custom, the Men ' s Glee Club took part this year in the annual Social Union program sponsored by the Musical Clubs. For their effective work in this program they re- ceived great praise in campus circles. They sang the following five numbers: " Ave Verum " Mozart " De Animals A ' Comin ' " Bartholomew " Ode to Big Business ' Mason " The Long Day Closes " Sullivan " Landsighting " Grieg In line also, with the musical work on campus, the Club has taken a prominent part in establish- ing Gilbert and Sullivan tradition which began in 1936 with the presentation of " Trial by Jury " , followed by ' Utopia Limited ' ' in 1937. This year, the Club participated in the presentation of " Riiddigore ' ' . a performance which won the acclaim of all who saw it, and it is sincerely hoped that this presentation has won a host of new Gilbert and Sullivan admirers. The future of the Men ' s Glee Club is bright indeed, and is a true reflection of the talent which the men of Massachusetts State possess in things cultural. [232} U x men Siee uA Front Row: Misses Fitts, J. Davis, Maschin, Strode, Pushee, Seol, Kenyon. Second Row: Misses Millett, Oertel, Pratt, Barton, Giles, Mr. Stratton, Misses I. Davis, Antes, Kabler, Youland. WOMEN ' S GLEE CLUB Director— Mr. Frank B. Stratton OFFICERS Manager, Barbara J. Strode, ' 38 Assistant Manager, Virginia Pushee, ' 39 fimim ' sMi. OU. The Women ' s Glee Club was founded in 1934, and since that time it has achieved a position of importance in the musical activities of the college. Early in the year 1937 the club com- bined with the Orchestra and Men ' s Glee Club to be governed under the board of the Com- bined Musical Clubs. In the spring of 1937, the Women ' s Club, combined with the others, gave concerts at Sunderland and Belchertown. In September, 1937, the Women ' s Glee Club started the year with thirty-five members. They gave a short program in the Old Chapel in con- junction with a play written by Barbara Strode. This program was repeated by them in one of the Tuesday afternoon Fine Arts Programs in November. The Women ' s Glee Club sang six numbers in the Social Union of April 8, 1938: " Sapphic Ode " Brahms " O Can Ye Sew Cushions Bantock " Maidens of Sandomir " Moussorgsky Prayer, from " Hansel and Gretel " Humperdinck " As Torrents in Summer " Elgar " Twenty-Eighteen " English Folksong The women ' s chorus and the feminine leads for the operetta " Riiddigore " by Gilbert and Sullivan were chosen from members of the Women ' s Club. This operetta was presented with great success on April 29 and 30. In April a new assistant manager was named, Jean Davis. Under the management of Virginia Pushee, the Women ' s Glee Club looks forward to a successful year for 1938-39. £233] YlfUn ' i. ££iating. iEadet Front Re Second f Levin, Hoar, Prof Prince, Swiren, Levinson Brody, Winn, Terry, Prouty, Sullivan, Reiser DEBATING Coach, Prole Walter E. Prince OFFICERS Captain, John S. Hoar, ' 38 Manag-er, Alfred M. Swiren, ' 38 1938 SCHEDULE Monday, February 21 Mass. State at Amherst, Amherst, Mass. Wednesday, February 23 Amherst at Mass. State Tuesday, March 8 William and Mary at Mass. State Thursday, March 31 Mass. State at Hofstra College, N. Y. U., Hempstead, Friday, April 1 Mass. State at Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, Saturday, April 2 Mass. State at Loyola, Baltimore, Md. Monday, April 3 Mass. State at William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va. Tuesday, April 4 Mass. State at Korth Carolina State, Raleigh, N. C. Wednesday, April 5 Mass. State at Atlantic Christian, Wilson, N. C. Thursday, April 6 Mass. State at Randolph-Macon, Ashland, Va. Friday, April 7 Mass. State at Rider, Trenton, N. J. Thursday, April 14 Convocation Debate — A. I. C. Wednesday, April 30 Loyola at Mass. State. The membership of the Debating Society, the largest in recent years, included John S. Hoar, Alfred M. Swiren and Lawrence Levinson, ' 38; Leonard M. Levin, Milton P. Reiser, George Brody and J. Henry Winn, ' 39; Fletcher L. Prouty and Albert W. Sullivan, ' 40; and Harold V. Scollin and Edwin M. Lavitt, ' 41. Early in October about twelve candidates appeared at the first meeting. The Society ran training practice ses- sions until Christmas vacation ; afterwards it held weekly practice debates before Coach Professor Walter E. Prince until spring recess. During this period a schedule was built up which in- eluded a dual debate with Amherst College on the reso- lutions, " that the Consumer ' s Co-operative System is a more satisfactory system of consuming and producing goods tlian our present system. " This was the first for- ensic relationship between these two colleges ever to take place. In addition, nine debates on a ten-day southern tour and three home debates were scheduled on the Pi Kajjpa Delta Debating Fraternity Resolution; " Re- solved that the National Labor Relations Board should be empowered to enforce arbitration of all industrial disputes. ' ' In the three home debates State defeated William and Mary College and Loyola College, and in the first inter- collegiate convocation debate in the college history, John Hoar and Alfred Swiren defeated American Inter- national College by an audience decision of 395 — 159. C234} Otini OAataA.ixxt£ QonleU. -Tw ' I ' StViJ. Thomas, Miss Blassberg, Prof. Prince, Lilly, Swiren, Breault, MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE FORTY-SECOND FLINT ORATORICAL CONTEST MEMORIAL HALL FRIDAY EVENING, JUNE 11, 1937 AT EIGHT O ' CLOCK First Prize of $30.00 awarded to Alfred M. Swiren Second Prize of $15.00 awarded to Louis A. Breault Presiding Officer PROFESSOR WALTER E. PRINCE 1. Mathematics Seeks Truth. RUTH BLASSBERG, 1937 2. Eugenics or Deterioration? FRANCIS J. THOMAS, 1937 3. " Peace on Earth ... " MAX LILLY, 1937 4. American Liberty — What Has Become of It? ALFRED M. SWIREN, 1938 5. Our Democracy and the Press. LOUIS A. BREAULT, JR., 1937 JUDGES DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG MR. RALPH W. HASKINS MR. VERNON P. HELMING [235] Rwiftdam .edamcdlati Click, Miss Briggs, Sullivan, Mr, Dow, Miss Hall, McCarthy, Miss Pease. SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL BURNHAM DECLAMATION CONTEST The Burnham Declamation Contest, an annual competition between the Freshman and Sopho- more classes for the award provided by the T. P. Burnham Fund, was held on May 13, 1937. Because of the keen interest in this contest it is held before the entire student body at the regular Convocation period, and because of the intense rivalry between the two participating classes the quality of the declamation is always high. BOWKER AUDITORIUM THURSDAY, MAY 13, 1937 Ou mAcufn. Mx oMoti First Prize of $15.00 awarded to Arthur Sullivan Second Prize of $10.00 awarded to Beryl Briggs Honorable Mention to John Click Clyde W. Dow, Chairma?! PROGRAM Arthur Sullivan, 1940 Bettina Hall. 1939 John Click, 1939 1. ' The Tell-Tale Heart " 2. Selection from " Tristram " 3. " The Congo " 4. " How Bateese Came Home " ..... Virginia Pease, 1940 5. Selection from " Riders to the Sea " .... Beryl Briggs, 1939 6. Wolsey ' s Farewell, from " King Henry VHP ' . John McCarthy, 1940 Edgar Allen Poe Edu ' in ArUngton Robinson Vachel Lindsey William Henry Driimmond John Synge William Shakespeare JUDGES Professor Frank Prentice Rand Professor Walter E. Prince Professor Charles F. Fraker (Due to illness Professor Prince was unable to attend. Dr. Maxwell H. Goldberg acted in his place.) [236] WinieJi Qwwm.al Qo mjuittee Front Row: Flower, Jockson, Packard, Miss Merrill, Adams, Gieringer, Miss Kinsman, Prouty, McCarthy, Hauck. Second Row: Howes, Healey, Townsley, MacPhail, Hooker, Howe, Najar, Sheldon, McAndrew, Hurwitch. 1938 WINTER CARNIVAL The 1938 Winter Carnival, February 11th and 12th, marked the third consecutive year that the event has been held. It also marked the second consecutive year that the event has been held without benefit of snow. And, perhaps, the very absence of snow was a factor in making this year ' s carnival unique among carnivals and firmly establishing it as a student function and tradition. Certainly the Winter Carnival, as an annual affair, can now take its place in the front row of student activities, for by virtue of its unusual position it was enabled to score several " firsts ' in student affairs, both at M. S. C. and among our colleagues. The election of candidates for carnival queen, for example, marks a " first " in this section of the country. Wide and favorable publicity was gained for the college through this election, an d it is worthy of note that A. I. C. and Springfield College, as well as several non- coUegiate groups, quickly took advantage of the idea. The roller skating derby which supplanted the skiing program, was another " first " , as was the interfraternity golf tournament. These were new and novel, and it was pictures of the former events that obtained the benefits of the large circulation figure of the Boston Record for the first time in the history of the College. But now for the Carnival itself. The highlight of the weekend was, of course, the Ball held in the Drill hall with Frank Dailey and his band supplying the music. During the Ball, Jessie Kinsman was elected queen by the judges, to be crowned " Queen Jessie I " by President Baker the following evening. Another important milestone was passed during the two-day frolic with the Roister Doister presentation of Professor Rand ' s play, " Not Without Hope " . The skating program under the direction of Frances Merrill was an entertaining feature of the Carnival. Skating races, figure and comic skating by professional skaters, and informal skating to music were all enjoyed by participants and spectators alike. Another interesting feature was a series of boxing and wrestling matches conducted by Robert Perkins. Other events followed rapidly. An informal dance, swimming meets, basketball game, hockey game, band concert, and Social Union aU combined to create what will pass down in student history as the " Snowless Snow Carnival of 1938 " . [237] UtLnteA Qwiniu-ai RcM Qammlttee yti jL Gutmi BsJl Front Row: Howe, Miss Booth, Cam Second Row: Pitts, Reagan, Hager THE 1938 WINTER CARNIVAL BALL Whether we have skiing or golf, ice-skating or roller-skating, we still have the Winter Ca rni- val; and regardless of any weather conditions we still have the Carnival Ball. The highlight of each carnival season is the Ball with its happy crowd of dancers, its charming queen and her escorts, and its joyful spirit of carnival rejoicing. This year ' s Carnival Ball truly lived up to all expectations. After the last echos of the Old Chapel bell, as it tolled nine o ' clock, died far up the valley the first couples arrived at the Drill Hall. They were the first of a merry throng of revelers who soon would jam the old Hall to the corners. As they entered, they heard the inusic of Frank Dailey ' s Orchestra — the band with the " Stop-Go " rythm and the " dead-pan " leader. Then while Mr. Carnival Reveler climbed to the top floor to stow his coat. Miss Carnival Reveler fixed her hair and powdered her nose again to make sure that she would look her best when the time came to select the queen and her court. Then they went down onto the dance floor. At the door she was given a souvenir Carnival bracelet and then they both were ushered thru the long line of patrons and patronesses. Later as they danced around the hall they noticed that they were in a large ice cavern accompanied by a few stray penguins, who were also in tuxes (minus bow- ties). The orchestra was on a throne of ice- cakes. All in all there was much more of the appearance of winter about the Carnival Ball than about the Winter Carnival itself with its Maytime atmosphere. After a few short hours of dancing the grand march was formed and the judges prepared to select the Queen of the 1938 Carnival. The Orchestra played a march and school songs while everyone marched, singing the Alma Mater, up through the middle of the hall in the face of the bright spot-light, while Prof. Barrett took moving pictures. The following few minutes were minutes of real suspense; but soon the judges announced that Jessie Kinsman, ' 38, had been chosen queen and that her court of honor consisted of Lois Macomber, ' 38, Evelyn Savage, of Mount Holyoke, Constance Fortin, ' 39, Erma Alvord, ' 40, Lorraine Creesey, ' 40, and Constance Carney of Dedham. Queen Jessie was then pre- sented with a large loving cup and regally crowned by President Baker. After this there was a short intermission, and the crowd which once jammed the Drill Hall now spread out in several directions in search of refreshments. However they soon returned to dance until two o ' clock in the huge ice-cavern and to live to the utmost those few fleeting hours in the spirit of the 1938 Carnival Ball. But at last the orchestra played " Goodnight Sweetheart. " Mr. Carnival Reveler climbed — a bit wearily — upstairs for his coat, and Miss Carnival Reveler slipped into hers; and as the last couples left the darkened hall the Old Chapel bell again awoke and rang out twice, symbolizing that for each couple that left the hall there were two happy people who had really enjoyed the Ball — and . . . that it was quite late, in fact high-time to hop in bed and relive the dance in the magic of dreamland. [238] Front Row: Ingram, Miss Alvord, Haylon, Miss Rutter, Townsley. Second Row; Brown, Slieldon, Reogon, Miss Fohey, Codigan, Rodda, Buzzee. DAD ' S DAY— 1937 The eleventh annual Dad ' s Day was held November 13, 1937. In spite of the poor weather, a record crowd of dads enjoyed the day on cam- pus as guests of their sons or daughters. The dads were greeted at Memorial Hall by some of our attractive co-eds and, at ten o ' clock witnessed a horse show conducted by the R. O. T. C. cavalry. The sophomore class of twenty cadets were shown in a walk and trot class, the junior class displayed their skill in horse- manship, and the seniors closed the show with a well-executed drill and exhibition jumping. The committee for the horse show consisted of Floyd Townsley, chairman, Robert Buzzee and Donald Cadigan. In the afternoon, the Massachusetts State foot- ball team met R. P. I. on a mud-covered field. The dads braved the rain and cold to watch the Statesmen defeat the surprisingly strong eleven from R. P. I. and, between the halves, the sophomores and freshmen staged their annual six-man rope pull under the supervision of the student Senate. The program for the day was completed by the presentation of the Bay State Revue, a show entirely staged by the students. Just before the show President Hugh P. Baker, presented by George Haylon, ' 39, chairman of the Dad ' s Day committee — greeted the dads and other guests. The highlight of the program was the presenta- tion of a one-act play written by Louis A. Breault, ' 37 and directed by John Hoar, ' 38. Also on the program were the Ballet Maroon, a com- edy dance, two student magicians, and a musical novelty presented by the combined Sororities. Thus ended another successful Dad ' s Day. [239] .Q-pk- je niofi Uop. ' Cenoii-jiuu ' ) ' Front Row: Miss Fortin, Howe, Miss Booth. Second Row: Haylon, Glick, Najor. SOPH-SENIOR HOP— 1937 Chairman, William W. Howe, ' 39 The last big event before the class of 1937 left this campus was the Soph-Senior Hop, held on the fourteenth of June. President and Mrs. Hugh P. Baker and Dean and Mrs. William L. Machmer were guests of honor. Major and Mrs. Leo B. Conner and Dr. and Mrs. Ernest J. Radcliife acted as chaperons. The Drill Hall, where the affair was held, was very effectively decorated in a black and white silhouette motif. On the walls were figures of students in cap and gown and of other people engaged in campus activities. The orchestra for the affair was Mai Hallett ' s, which delighted everyone and helped to make the Hop a great success. The members of the Hop Committee were: William Howe, Chairman; Constance Fortin, Mabelle Booth, John F. Glick, George Haylon and Gordon Najar. [240} n Mnal Qcwtmittee. ' n tt mu fCrttitmiStdt. Front Row: Towie, Riley. Second Row: Hoylon, Houck, Allen. INFORMAL COMMITTEE Chairman, Richard W. Towle, ' 38 The Informal Committee launched the social season at the College on Saturday evening, October 2, following the Bowdoin game. Students danced to the music of the Knights of Rhythm from Holyoke. Continuing in the same mood, a " Big Apple " dance was held on Saturday evening, November 20, after the Tufts game. Johnny Newton ' s orchestra from Greenfield, featuring our own Vernon Coutu, supplied " hot " rhythm, much to the pleasure of those attending. As has been the custom in the past, the members of the Tufts football team were guests. With a change in mood the Committee spon- sored an " Old Clothes " dance on Friday evening, January 21. Johnny Newton and his popular orchestra again manvifactured swing in a modern manner. Prizes were awarded to the two couples with the most original costumes. The yearly series of informals, including such varied entertainment features as " Big Apple " dances, " Old Clothes " parties, and dancing con- tests, has become one of the more popular col- legiate functions. [241} .nithAo- ' io- ' iiU BuiJi 6o-mirUttee ■fii« »0 i»». j fc 3aM Front Row: Misses Crowell, Thompson. Second Row: Misses Randall, Briggs, Kaplinsky. INTERSORORITY BALL Chairman, Elthea Thompson, ' 38 FROM A CO-ED ' S DIARY April 23, 1938— I had a wonderful time at the Intersororiiy Ball last night. Dave looked smooth, even though he was tired after his long ride on the train. The boys at Mass. State aren ' t the only ones who have imports! The programs were cute. They were white with a dainty green design and a green tassel. Mine went very well with my new green eve- ning gown and my corsage of white roses. We arrived at the D rill Hall at 9:30. It was fun going through the receiving line because I knew most of the chaperones and guests quite well. They were President and Mrs. Baker, Dean and Mrs. Machmer, Major and Mrs. Conner, Prof, and Mrs. Smart, Dr. and Mrs. Goldberg, Dr. and Mrs. Neet, and Mr. and Mrs. Burke. Two of the co-eds on the dance committee, Elthea Thompson and Stella Crowell, were also in the line with their escorts. Other members of the committee were: Sylvia Randall, Martha Kaplinsky and Beryl Briggs. The decorations were unusual and effective. Steve Hamilton and his student helpers cer- tainly did a grand job. There were evergreens and snapdragons and forsythia on a background of blue crepe paper, and the band played behind a colonade decorated with flowers and vines. Speaking of the band, it was very good. And Ken Reeves was cute-looking. Everybody was surprised and pleased when two students, Fletcher Prouty and Bill Cox, sang special numbers. During intermission we went with Bob, who had his dad ' s car for the occasion, and his girl friend and another couple to Van ' s. Loads of kids from the Ball were there. It was funny to see them dancing to the nickelodeon long after the intermission had ended, but I shouldn ' t say anything because we did too! We didn ' t exchange many dances because I wanted Dave to myself. I was having such a good time that I couldn ' t believe it when it was 2 o ' clock. But I consoled myself by remember- ing that there will be another Intersorority Ball next year, and I ' ll certainly be there! [242] 9nteApiateAtul( Butt QammLttee Front Row: Hoylon, Blaisdell. Second Row: Silvermon, Gllck, Allen. INTERFRATERNITY BALL chairman, George J. Haylon, ' 39 Boy, oh boy! It seems that the Interfraternity Ball gets better and better with each successive year. I think that I ' ll always remember Friday night, May 6, 1938. It still remains clear in my mind. .... it was a typical warm Amherst spring evening ... as we drove down the road towards the " Mem " building we caught the sweet lilting strains of soft music as it floated across the hushed campus . . . hurrying to the Drill Hall, and satisfying the ticket taker, we moved on through the door onto the dance floor to be astonished by the unique, artful decorations that had transformed the plain hall into a beautifully majestic ship, even to the extent of realistic life preservers and rigging . . . well up at the prow we found a congenial group of guests and chaperones: President and Mrs. Baker, Dean and Mrs. Machmer, Major and Mrs. Conner, Dr. and Mrs. Radcliffe, and Prof, and Mrs. Thayer. Not until we had finally become settled did we appreciate the novel metal programs that bore the intials of every fraternity on the cover — truly an interfraternity affair with all groups included. The band ... I can still picture it ... in formal dress seated aloft on the deck of the S. S. Fraternity . . . tall, handsome Charlie Barnett with his melodious saxophone . . . the blending harmony of a coordinated group . . . the one word that best describes the band is smooth . . . well do I recall the colorful sight at inter- mission as the beautiful women in their smart evening gowns and the tall men in their well- fitting white jackets strolled out arm in arm to have a chat, sip a " coke " or take a walk. . . . After a short spell we all returned to thoroughly enjoy the remainder of the nicest Interfraternity Ball ever held on this campus . . . I ' m certain that all of the three-hundred couples thank the committee composed of George Haylon, Donald Silverman, John Glick, Marshall Allen, and Harry Blaisdell for a perfect evening . . . I ' m sure glad that I ' m a fraternity man. [243] UafiJticuiiWvcd iPJhMJU- QammLUee Front Row: Dewey, Miss Jenkins, Irving, Southwick, Smardon Second Row; Kochakion, Jessel, Elliot, Slocomb, Benson, Dunlop 1937 HORTICULTURAL SHOW Chairman, Richard R. Irving, ' 38 The 1938 Horticultural Show was a history- making event at Massachusetts State College. Good weather combined with excellent publicity saw a record-smashing attendance of 23,752 people — the largest attendance at any college event. Headed by Richard Irving, the committee consisted of Philip Smardon, Robert Dewey, Doris Jenkins, John Dunlop, Jack Slocumb, Charles Elliott, Frank Southwick, Kenneth Ben- son, and the Stockbridge School members, James Jenkins, John Jessel, and Vaughan Kochakian. Professor Clark L. Thayer was faculty advisor and mainstay of the student committee. The central feature was a formal garden en- closed by a white lattice fence. Grass panels bordered by paths and beds of brilliantly colored chrysanthemums completed a pleasant picture. The whole was terminated by a latticed summer house on a raised terrace. Human interest was added by a croquet set on the lawn and by per- sonal effects in the summer house. Careful attention to arrangement provided much needed circulation and maintained an un- equaled feeling of " show unity " . The outstanding new exhibit this year was that of 30 Christmas wreaths entered by the Garden Clubs of Massachusetts. This exhibit was well received. Awards were given Richard Irving, Student Chair man, James Jenkins and Jack Slocumb for outstanding work toward the success of the show. Exhibitors awards were given to Marjorie Harris, largest number of points winner in vase arrangements of flowers and vegetables; Stanley Hitchcock, sweepstakes winner in pomology; Alfred Forbush and Harry Blaisdell, informal arrangement covering 100 square feet; Clifford Lippincott and John Kennedy, S. S. A., miniature 100 square feet arrangement. Judges were E. I. Farrington, Secretary of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, A. Kenneth Simpson of the Berkshire Garden Center, and Miss Dorothy M. Anderson of Smith College, a member of the Botanical Department. [244} YJfliiilaAA Bxdi Qommittee jf»i ! f , es " imA S xl£ Front Row: Townsley, Lyons, Allen Second Row: Bloke, Riley, French, Benjamin MILITARY BALL chairman, Robert S. Lyons, ' 38 On Friday evening, December 10, 1937, the Military Ball opened the formal dance season with the best dance put on by the soldiers in recent years. An innovation at the affair was the colorful ceremony accompanying the appointment of Honorary Colonel Dorothy Nichols, who was selected by the vote of the junior and senior cadet officers. Miss Nichols, escorted by William Avery, walked to the front of the hall beneath the arch of sabers formed by a double line of cadet officers. She was officially recognized by Lieutenant-Colonel Aplington, and then led the column of cadets from the hall. The decorations of blue and gold added much to the colorfulness of the occasion, the silhouettes of soldiers being especially effective. The music, provided from 9 P. M. to 2 A. M., by the Fenton Brothers ' Orchestra, was tho- roughly enjoyed by the couples attending. Invited guests were: President and Mrs. Hugh P. Baker, Dean and Mrs. William L. Mackmer. Lieutenant- Colonel and Mrs. Horace G. Apling- ton, Major and Mrs. Leo B. Conner, and Major and Mrs. Harold P. Stewart were the chaperones. [245] iP nioA. )7li£itaAi Ylflo p- ' ii m -m W ff •f ;l- r ' ? t;f Fnnll u TiuIp Eaton BlaK i l i i iiH i uin nt i niq Fr ii h Liiiln uili I nl hi Second Row: Avery, Buzzee, Baker, Lyons, Carr, Elliott, McGowon, Riley, Hooker, Morrison, Brown, Irving, Clark. CADET OFFICERS FOR 1938 Cadet Colonel Norman P. Blake Cadet Lieutenant Colonel Floyd W. Townsley Cadet Majors Marshall B, Allen Robert K. Morrison Cadet Captains Robert S. Lyons, Adjutant Norman Clark Cyrus E. French Richard R. Irving Richard W. Towle Cadet Lieutenants Herbert E. Brown, Adjutant Norman E. Linden, Adjutant William B. Avery Warren S. Baker, Jr. Davis W. Beaumont Robert D. Buzzee Frank A. Brox Frank F. Carr Clifford A, Curtis William Eaton Charles E. Elliott Leland W. Hooker Richard C. King Robert D. MacCurdy Donald S. McGowaa William C. Riley Cadet Master Sergeant H. Gardner Andersen Cadet Staff Sergeants Squadron Sergeants Major Lloyd B. Copeland Frank C. Healy Color Sergeants Robert S. Cole Robert E. Muller " TifiLik TligURUL Cadet Sergeants (Color Guard) Lawrence E. Johnson Gordon F. Thomas Cadet First Sergeants George C. Benjamin Ralph L. Foster Charles W. Griffin Seaton C. Mendall ANNUAL ROTC NIGHT RIDE The tenth annual night ride open to members of the Senior Class, held May 25, 1937, was won by Cadet Captain Wendell E. Lapham. A tie resulted for second place between Cadet Colonel David A, Peterson and Cadet Lieutenant John Ruffley, Jr., with fourth place going to Cadet Captain Fred- erick W. Whitttemore, Jr. The ride featured the regular controlled ride, with an added test in leadership and reconnaissance. The name of Cadet Lapham was the last name to be placed on the 316th Cavalry plaque. The plaque was presented to this unit by the officers of the 316th Cavalry in the spring of 1926, at the time of our first night ride, and has ten silver name plates on which the names of each year ' s winner is engraved. [246] nioA )7li£ltaAt YEaj,oJid iQ f isr49r ♦ • " , .» i ' f : f ; f ; 1 WW WW W W ' S WW WV _ Front Row: Cole, Colo, Foster, Healey, Pereiro, Eldridge, Johnson, Com, Reode, Roberts, Lippincott, Schmidt. Second Row: Thomas, Muller, Hoylon, Cowles, Copelond, Codigon, Griffin, Bischoff, Benjamin, Grant, Mendall, Andersen. R.O.TC. 1937 ANNUAL ROTC HORSE SHOW In line with the policy adopted for the first time last year by this department, the Annual ROTC Horse Show was managed by a committee of Cadet Officers from Lhe Senior Class. The show was held Friday, June 11th, and consisted of seven classes, four cadet classes, one co- ed class, one civilian saddle class and one childrens ' saddle class. The judges v ere Lieutenant William C. Brown, 3rd Cavalry (M.S.C., ' 35) and Lieutenant John L. Wood, 3rd Cavalry (M.S.C., ' 36). The Stowell Trophy for the Junior showing the most improvement in horsemanship was awarded to Cadet Sergeant Floyd W. Townsley, ' 38. The trophy for excelling in markmanship was awarded to Cadet Warren S. Baker, Jr., ' 38. Frederick F. Whittemore, ' 37, won the Senior Cadet Jumping contest at the Sixteenth Annual horse show on June 11 at 2:00 P. M., in the riding park which ushered in the sixty-seventh com- mencement of Massachusetts State College. Anthony J. Nogello and Louis A. Breault, Jr., were the winners of the first prize in the Senior Cadet Pair Jumping. Results in the students classes were as follows; Junior Cadet Horsemanship — 1st, Richard W. Towle; 2nd, William B. Avery; 3rd, Richard C. King; 4th, Donald S. McGowan. Senior Cadet Jumping — Frederick F. Whittemore, Jr.; Albert J. Gricius; Robert A. Bieber; and Louis A. Breault, Jr. Co-eds Horsemanship — Doris Jenkins; Katherine Machmer; Bettina Hall; and Nancy Parks. Sophomore Cadet Horsemanship — John J. Galvin; Harold G. Andersen; Sidney H. Beck; and William H. Cox. Senior Cadet Pair Jumping — Anthony J. Nogelo and Louis A. Breault, Jr.; James F. Cutter and David A. Peterson, Robert P. Holdsworth, Jr. and Walter B. Moseley; and Albert Gricius and John E. Landers. [247] R. 0. J. e. 1937 MARCH TO ROTC CAMP The present class of senior military men at Mass. State College will always remember a six weeks ' hike of approximately five hundred miles. The experience gone through by these men during the past summer was one which, it is generally agreed, turned a class of proud though poor horsemen and soldiers into a group of better trained and thinking cadet officers who began to realize the more important and valuable aspects of a sound military training. But for a brief resume of the trip itself. . . . The entire trip was planned to be travelled over back roads, through beautiful country: gorgeous lakes, green forests, and magnificient mountains. Starting on the third day out, a five day rain tried without success to dampen the spirits of boys whose soreness of the first few days was rapidly disappearing. I suppose the routine camp duties are much the same each year — K. P., with its pots and pans and potatoes to peel; guard de- tail, with its sleepy-eyed " guards " armed with rake and lantern and chasing runaway horses at midnight in the rain; and fatigue detail, with its own unique complications. The route of the trip took us through small country towns, and each noon we pitched camp in another spot, each one so much nearer to our destination and ideal for our purpose. Our camps led from Amherst to South Deerfield; to Colrain; to Wilmington; to Jamaica where the pleasure of our Sunday layover was enhanced by the nearness of a natural swimming pool; to Man- chester Center where, as protection from the rain, beds were made on the seats of the fair-grounds ' grandstand; to Wells; to Lake Bomoseen; to Lake Dunmore where wrinkled dress uniforms became center of attraction at the local dance hall; to Bristol where camp was well provided with orderlies ranging anywhere from five to ten years of age; to Fort Ethan Allen where a welcoming band ushered us in as the horses pawed the ground in anticipation of a well- earned rest. The route home consisted of the same camping grounds except for the omission [248] R. 0. 0. e. of South Deerfield as the last day was spent in coming directly to Amherst from Colrain. Familiar sayings such as, " Currycombs and brushes — Stand to heel " and " Two men on a horse " , kept us on our toes; but the trip was by no means all work and no play. The class of ' 38 military men boasted an undefeated baseball team which successfully downed six out of six. The Jamaica town team was plowed under on their own pasture; at Bristol the town team finally succumbed in the tenth innmg, the " army " winning by one run; at Fort Ethan Allen the Mass. State men combined with Norwich to form a powerful nine which took over in stride the local C. C. C. unit, the Winooski town team, and the Ethan Allen Post champions; and the final game in the series was at Manchester Center where the reputed champions of the C. C. C. camps in Vermont were doomed in an atmos- phere so full of insects that one could hardly see the ball coming. Again at the Fort routine was undoubtedly similar to that of years past. Mornings were spent on the range while sore shoulders and bruised eyes became general expectancies. The red flags in the pits were waved with the usual enthu- siam while the bullets cracked overhead. After- noons were spent in mounted drill followed by a not-too-welcome, " Currycombs and brushes " , after which real showers in real wash-rooms would daily run out of warm water. The class of ' 37 had the distinction of being the first class to have a mythical orderly whose name was Julius; the class of ' 38 had the honor of having Julius, in person, accompany them during the entire trip. Julius received attention galore, even to the extent of being bathed in citronella when mosquitoes were abundant, but evidently Julius ' horse-sense was unappreciative of all his attention, because he was definitely the " men- ace " of the picket line. The class of ' 38 also had its own mythical orderly, " Walter " by name, who reigned over the camp and kept peace and quiet or otherwise. But to be serious, though, we of the class of ' 38, who are now senior military men, should like to say that the understanding, kindness, and efficiency of Colonel H. T. Aplington and Major H. P. Stewart along with the co-operation of Tech. Sgt. Warren and Staff Sgt. Tanner was fully appreciated and was responsible, to a great extent, for making the 1937 march to camp an unforgettable and pleasant experience. [249] etid CHEMISTRY CLUB OFFICERS President, Walter C. Mayko, " 38 Vice-President, George H. Bischoff, ' 39 Secretary, Gertrude J. Hadro, ' 38 Treasurer, Cyrus E. French, ' 38 Reporter, Jeanette Herman, ' 39 In this second year of its existence the Chem. Club has broadened its selection of speakers t include representatives from practically all phases of industry. The club year 1936-37 closed with a banquet, held in Draper Hall, at which the retiring president, Anthony Ferrucci, turned over the duties to his successor, Walter C. Mayko. The present club year opened with a meeting held on September 28, 1937 at which the business of the coming year was discussed. It was de- cided to hold two meetings each month when possible. The meeting place was to be Goess- mann Laboratory. At the meetings speakers talked on subjects of interest, such as petroleum, gas, paper, and water purification. On December 16, 1937, the CIu ' d, in conjunction with the Place- ment Service, presented Mr. A. V. H. Morey, a nationally-known chemist, who spoke on " Per- sonnel and Educational Requirements for Car- eers in Industry " . The Club acquired from the Dupont Corporation for showing on March 10, 1938, a technicolor talking picture " The Wonder World of Chemistry " . Students of nearby col- leges were invited to attend this meeting. Trips to nearby industrial plants were planned by the Club in order to see practical applications of theories learned in the classroom. The Club sponsored the placing of two bronze plaques on the trees in front of Goessmann Lab- oratory in honor of Dr. Joseph S. Chamberlain and Dr. Joseph B. Lindsey. This year closed with a banquet and the in- duction of the new officers of the Club. BACTERIOLOGY CLUB OFFICERS President, Robert Rustigian, ' S- ice-President, Justin Martin, Sec.-Treas., Gertrude Hadro, ' The Bacteriology club, reorganized in 1937, entered its second year with a strengthened three-fold purpose similar to that which brought the organization into existence: namely, to acquaint the students with present day activities in the field of bacteriology by means of speakers, to give them a sense of their importance as a professional group, and to bring the students in closer contact with the department. The success of the organization in its first year was again repeated in 1938. With the generous aid of the faculty and the support of the students the club has no doubt made a permanent place for itself among campus organizations. Meetings this year were held once a month, at which times outside and campus speakers presented talks on various phases of the science of bacteriology. An attempt to mnke the meetings more informal was successful, and the discussions and refreshments that followed the talks added to the enjoyment of the meetings. New membership rulings instituted this year have done much to enliven the club. Membership was for- merly open only to seniors taking advanced bacteriology courses and to graduate students. Juniors were taken in as associate members with the possibility of becoming members if they continued in bacteriology. At present, however, membership requirements are such that a student taking any course in bacteriology and interested in the science is eligible. This change has enlarged ■the group and given to beginning students in bacter- iology a chance to see the value of the profession in a better perspective. [250} SEuli FERNALD ENTOMOLOGICAL CLUB OFFICERS President, Elmer R. Lombard, ' 38 Secretary, Seaton Mendall, ' 39 The Fernald Entomological Club was founded on this campus in 1925. It was named in honor of Dr, Henry T. Fernald, who founded the en- tomology department at this College and who was one of the pioneers in the field of economic entomology in this country. The purpose of the Club is to acquaint its members with the outstanding men in this field and the outstanding advances that are contin- ually being made. Besides visiting speakers, the students offer short talks of different types. Such talks include personal experiences in entomology, results of research work, and book reviews. The subject matter is also varied, including all phases of entomology. Thus the members receive a complete survey of the current work in ento- mology. The activities of the past year included the third annual Fernald Club Picnic which was held on May 2, 1937, at Pine Island Lake in West- hampton. The picnic was a great success with the largest number ever attending. At the first meeting in the fall several members gave short interesting discussions on their sum- mer experiences, including state work on the Dutch Elm disease, government work as student technicians, and a trip to Europe. At the next meeting of the club, held October 7th, Wilfred Winter ' 40 gave an illustrated lecture on his trip with MacMillan to the Ai-ctic Circle. Dr. K. D. Roeder of Tufts College was the speaker for the following meeting on December 10th, having as a subject, " The Nervous System and Sexual Life of the Praying Mantis " . At the January meeting many humorous and educa- tional incidents during Dr. Alexander ' s travels to the Gaspe the past summer were described. Another prominent speaker was Dr. Harold H. Plough of Amherst College, who discussed muta- tion, temperature and evolution. The United States Department of Agriculture was repre- sented by the next speaker, Dr. C. H. Batchelder of the Connecticut Experiment Station who spoke on his work in the control of the European Corn Borer. In addition to the monthly meetings of the Fernald Club and the annual picnic, the club sponsors and publishes a year-book which is sent to all Entomological Clubs, interested friends and alumni. This year-book includes surveys of recent entomological work in the department, alumni news, brief articles on each junior and senior member, a summary of the graduate work and other articles of contemporary interest. The 1938 Yearbook, under the editorship of Charles Elliott, assisted by Elizabeth Dolliver with con- tributions from all student members of the de- artment, is one of the most complete and out- standing accomplishments of the Fernald Club. THE PSYCHOLOGY CLUB OFFICERS President, Lois Macomber, ' 38 Vice-President, Julie Whitney, ' 39 Secretary, Gladys Corkum, ' 38 The purpose of the Psychology Club is to serve as an agency through which the students at Massachusetts State College may gather to discuss topics of psychological interest and to hear authoritative speakers on such topics. Mem- bership is open to any student at the college, without obligation. The speakers this year were chosen from the faculty and graduate students. Francis Ollry, a graduate assistant in psychology. introduced the subject of " Heredity " at an early meeting, which was followed up a week later with a presentation of the same topic by Prof. Victor A. Rice. Dr. Claude C. Neet gave a re- view of vocational opportunities in the field of psychology, and Dr. Harry N. Glick spoke on the " Power of Suggestion " , after which he gave a demonstration of hypnosis. Other programs with outside speakers were also planned. [251] eiuAi MATHEMATICS CLUB r, Professor Prank C, Mo The Math. Club was foxiiided seven years ago through the efforts of Professor Moore, who has been active in the Club and instrumental iu its success. Tlie meetings aiford real pleasure to those interested in mathematics. One or two students give reports at each meeting. Following is a list of the meetings: March 18, 1937. Proof by Mathematical Induction, D. W. Beaumont, ' 38. The Mathematics of the Polar Planimeter, C. G. Edson, ' 38. Nov. 3, 1937. Higher Plane Curves, Roger Decker, ' 39. Solution of Cubic and Quartio Equations, Royal Dec. S, 1937. Hindu-Arabic Notation, Frieda Hall, ' 40. Jan. 11, 1938. Dynamic Symmetry, Ruth Jefferson, ' 38. Comments on Relativity, George Brody, ' 39. Feb. 15, 1938. Alignment Charts, Davis Beaumont, ' 38. Richardson Slide Rule, Daniel Shepardson, ' 40. The Copernicus of Antiquity, Norman Clark, ' 38. March 8, 1938. Cartography, Robert Alcorn, ' 38. Theory of Numbers, Charles Edson, ' 38. These reports usuallv followed by informal PRE-MED. CLUB OFFICERS President, Philip Chase, ' 38 ice-President, William Collins, Secretary, Robert Gage, ' 38 Treasurer, Douglas Wood, ' 3f Organized in the spring of 1936, the Pre-Med. Club has aimed to promote the interests of the ever-increasing number of students who come to Mass. State for their preliminary medical training. Its program consists of bi-weekly meetings, at which various aspects of the medical profession as well as related topics are pre- sented by competent and outstanding men. Dr. L. N. Durgin of Amherst, presented in a very vivid manner the contribution which the Electro-cardiogram is making to the understanding of cardiac irregularities ; Dr. Zawaiki, of the Northampton State Hospital gave a realistic pic- ture of the problems of an institutional doctor, especially in connection with disorders arising from venereal dis- eases; two outstanding dentists of Springfield outlined the various preventative dental health measures to which the profession is attempting to direct attention. One of the most outstanding meetings of the year was that at which Dr. Gage of the Physiology Dept. of the College gave generously of his research and experience on the problem of " Blood Typing " . Two meetings of unusual interest were one at which a fascinating surg- ical moving picture was shown, and another at which some of the seniors v} o had been accepted at medical school told of experience.? during the all-important inter- Be side planning for the regular meetings, it has been an object of the Club to make occasional trips to near- by institutions where first-hand observation can be made of medicine in practice. This year, with the aid of Dr. Zawaiki, a trip was arranged to the Northampton State Hospital, wiiere several of the type cases which he had previously mentioned were actually seen. In the absence of Dr. Warfel, our regular ad enjoying a year ' s leave for study, Dr. Woodside ha irved very capably as our advisor. ho [252] eM.3 M. S. C. 4-H CLUB Melbv Brady, Asst. State Club Leader OFFICERS President, Warren Bray, ' Vice-President, Cliarles BotMeld, S. Secretary, Dorothy Decatur, Treasurer, Lawrence Bixby, The first organized 4-H Club on this campus origin- ated in 1928. Previously there had been many clubs formed only for short indefinite periods. The enthusiasm of the increasing number of former 4-H members in the student body instigated the formation of liiis club with its definite project of leadership and leader training. The name K. 0. Club was chosen in recognition of the fact that former 4-H members wished to " Karry-ou " in college. As Miss Gladys E. Sivert, one of the early founders of the club said, " We named our club Karry-On because of the joy we had received from our 4-H club work before we came to M. S. C. and because we wanted to carry on our 4-H Club work to others. " Gradually the club broadened in scope. Prominent speakers and members of the faculty addressed the club and a variety of entertainments " were included in each year ' s program as the club grew-. In 1934 under the capable direction of President George Simmons, a new constitution was drawn ui). setting forth not only the necessary rules and regula- tions, but also the ideals of the club. This firmly entren- ched the K. 0. Cub as a campus activity. Last year the club became a member of the Youth Section of the American Country Life Association. A representative was sent to the annual conference and in February the M. S. C. 4-H Club was host to the annual conference of the New England Youth Section of the Association. Meetings are held on the first Wednesday of each month. An educational, a recreational, and an inspira- tional phase ' is included in every one. Former 4-H Club members and all other interested students are welcome. The Club has grown successfully with the College until now it is one of the largest organizations on campus with the potentiality of being the largest. HOME ECONOMICS CLUB OFFICERS President, Louisa Towne, ' 38 Vice-President, Elizabeth Clapp, ' 39 Secretary, Phyllis MacDonald, ' 39 Ti-easurer, Louise Bowman, ' 40 Social Chairman, Lois Wood, ' 38 Publicity Chairman, Roberta Walkey, ' 38 Class Representatives Elizabeth Barton, ' 38 Kathleen Cooper, ' 40 Eleanor Ward, ' 39 Kathleen Kell, ' 41 The purpose of the Home Economics Club is to develop a professional spirit among the members; to keep up with current topics of the home economics world; to bring members in contact with larger home economics organizations and to cultivate friendships among girls in this field. Any girl is eligible for membership if she has taken ten credits in courses required of Home Economics majors. All Home Economics majors are active mem- The Club originated in 1929 with Ruth Sivert as president. The small club grew with the increasing en- rollment of Home Economics majors. Today more than 44% of the women students at Massachusetts State College are majoring in Home Economics, which accounts for the breadth of the Club ' s activities. Tlie Club is afaiiated with Home Economics Clubs of four other colleges in Massachusetts. This association holds an annual meeting at the time of the Massachusetts State Home Economics meeting. In the summer of 1937 Dorothy Morley, ' 40, was chosen to represent all the college Home Economies Clubs in Massachusetts at the meeting of the American Home Economics Association in Kansas City. Five club meetings are held yearly, including a tea in the Abbey Center in December and a banquet in May. Speakers who will be of general interest to the club members are obtained. The Home Economics Club does not center all its interests within the club. It strives to aid a worthy cause annually. This year a sum of money was pre- sented to the Woman ' s Club to provide a Merry Christ- mas for a needy family in town. [253] eiuk ANIMAL HUSBANDRY CLUB OFFICERS President, Lawrence Bixby, ' 39 Vice-President, Cliarles Bothteld, S ' 3g Secretary, William Collins, S ' 38 Treasurer, Elliot Williams, S ' 38 students igricultu embers. dry Club, one of the oldest organ- ; oi)en to both tour-year and two- ■e interested in animal husbandry iieral. This year there are about 70 The main purpose oi the Club is to sponsor a series of talks by authorities on livestock. Tlie program this year included worthwhile talks by R. 0. Robie, manager of Castle Hill Farm, Whitinsville ; L. T. Tompkins, di- rector of the Bureau of Animal and Dairy Industry, Boston; Cecil Ford, manager of the New Bedford Milk Producers Association ; Vere Culver, manager of the Baker Farms at Exeter, New Hampshire; and J. G. Watson, editor of the New England Homestead, Spring- field. Appropriate films from the U. S. Department of Agriculture were sliown with each program, making the meetings more interesting and valuable. In addition to the series of talks, the Club sponsored for the first time a judging contest, which gave exper- ience in judging livestock and stimulated fellowship. DAIRY CLUB OFFICERS President, William (Iraham, ' 38 Vice-President, James Deery, S ' 38 Secretary, Sidney H. Beck, ' 39 The Dairy Club was formed in Januar, students of the dairy industry departmer result of a need felt by them for such ai The purpose of the club is to present to students, the dairy others are well dustry. ho light be vho nforr 1934 by the as a direct 3rganization. ,11 four year interested, various on some phase of From that time on meetings have been held about once every month during the college year. The club has been fortunate in securing excellent speakers for its meetings, The topics that have been covered are: sanitation, dairy plant machinery, wholesale and retail marketing, organizations of research, dairy products judging, by- products of the dairy industry, and current legislation. At the March meeting of the club an interesting talk and exhibit was given on " Advertising and Salesman- ship " , by a member of the N. W. Ayer advertising con- cern of Boston. The members were shown the various types of advertising done in the dairy world and also in other products. The comparison showed the lack of advertising for dairy products and it also showed the need for it. A discussion on " Qualities of a Milk Inspector " was held at the April meeting. This afforded valuable infor- the dairy rning the public health iidustry. The dairy products jud year. The members we rk connected with iful ; team enjoyed Joseph Gill, ' 38, William Graham, ' 38, Robert MacCurdy, ' 38, and Nicholas Eliopoulas, ' 38 as alternate. The coaches were profes- sor M. J. Mack, and Professor H. G. Lindquist. The team received a cup for first place in cheese judging at the Eastern States Exposition held in Springfield. September 1937. In October, Coach Lindquist, Gill, Graham and MacCurdy journeyed to New Orleans, La. to participate in the National Dairy Exposition ' s Stu- dent Judging Contest. MacCurdy was awarded second place in milk judging, and Graham received third place in cheese judging, fourth place in butter judging, and fifth place in judging all products. The team was third in rank, out of the seventeen colleges competing, in judging all products, and was the recipient of a $600,00 scholarship for graduate study. The scholarship was awarded to Robert MacCurdy for excellence in scholar- ship by the dairy industry department of the college. Several members of the club made a tour of the larger dairy plants in Springfield, Worcester, and Boston. The (rip offered an opportunity for first-hand information and inspection of modern dairies. Professor J. H. Frandsen accompanied the members on the trip. [254] ecuSid MASSACHUSETTS OUTING CLUB OFFICERS President, Morrill Vittum, ' 39 Vice-President, Robert S. Cole, ' 39 Corresponding Secretary, Richard Elliot, ' 39 Recording Secretary, Doris Colgate, ' 39 Treasurer, James Jenkins, S ' 38 The Massachusetts State College Outing Club was founded about ten years ago by enthusiastic hikers who foresaw the advantages of organized hiking. Since this time the Club has grown so that its program includes many different kinds of hikes. During the past year scheduled hikes were to Mount Haystack, Greylock and Mon- adnock, short hikes to Mount Toby, and Warner, and also supper hikes to Sky Pastures and a joint overnight trip with the Mount Holyoke Outing Club to Northfield. The Club also holds monthly meetings at the 4-H Club House at which various speakers offer camping suggestions, relate their experiences as hikers, or tell other things of interest to those who enjoy hiking and the out-of-doors. Cabins and trails on Mount Toby are main- tained by the Club which also has charge of guiding on Mountain Day. In the past year the Outing Club assisted with the Winter Carnival held by this College. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE CLUB OFFICERS President, Harry Blaisdell, ' 38 Vice-President, Edmund Wilcox, ' 39 Secretary-Treasurer, Doris Jenkins, ' 38 Students majoring in Landscape Architecture comprise the active membership of the Land. Arch. Club. Professors Frank A. Waugh and A. K. Harrison serve as advisors. The Alumni Conference of Landscape Archi- tecture was of particular interest to the mem- bers and gave them a better insight into the various aspects of the field. It is expected that this spring numerous Alumni speakers will be entertained by the Club, and a trip for viewing landscape developments may be taken. MUSIC RECORD CLUB OFFICERS President, Leonta G. Horrigan Secretary, George M. Curran, ' 40 Faculty Advisor, Stowell C. Coding The Music Record Club supplements the Carnegie Collection by purchasing from time to time records of contemporary music. In ad- dition its members are allowed to enjoy in their own homes any of the records in the 30 albxims now owned by the Club. It is open to both faculty and students. {255] eiuh INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB OFFICERS Presideat, Warren C. Bray, ' 38 Vice-President, Barbara Miller, ' 3 Secretary, Kirtley Judd, ' 38 Advisor, Prof. Harold C. Gary The International Relations Club of Massachusetts State College is oue of many such clubs to be found among New England colleges. Collectively these clubs form the New England International Relations Club As- sociation, a federation formed for the purpose of ex- changing information and ideas. Tlirough its connection with the Carnegie Foundation of New York, the club is periodically supplied with the newest books on world topics of all kinds. This outstanding collection of ref- erence works is to be found in the reference room of Goodell Library. It numbers over ninety bound books, not including many more pamphlets and leaflets. The purpose of the organization is to encourage stu- dent interest in international affairs, both current and historical. Speakers are sponsored who discuss per- tinent contemporary topics, almost always tracing their interesting origin and development. Prof. A. A. Mac- Kimmie of M. S. C Prof. Laurence Packard of Amherst Evan P. Derby of the London, (Eng.) were three of the speakers of the College and P: School of E 1937-38 session. In addition to sponsoring speakers, the club partici- pates in discussions of subject material centered about one theme. Much of this work leads toward preparation for participation in the sessions of the New England Model League of Nations, which are held each spring at some New England college or university and to which each I. R. C. unit of the New England Federation sends delegates. The meetings of the League are patterned directly after those of the Geneva League and provide excellent experience for those participating. The most recent session of the Model League was held on the M. S. C. campus in March, 1938, at which time the college entertained over three hundred visitors from leading New Englaud colleges. THE WESLEY FOUNDATION OFFICERS President, Martti Suomi, ' 39 Vice-President, Richard Taylor, ' 41 Sec.-Treas. Ruth Crimmin, ' 41 The Wesley Foundation was established in 1935, by Rev. Stead Tliornton, former pastor of the Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church of Amherst. He wished to promote an opportunity for a small group of Methodist students, though not excluding students of other faiths, to meet Sunday evenings at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Adrian H. Lindsey for the purpose of discussing vital religious and social questions. Under the guidance of Rev. Thornton and Rev. Arthur Hopkinson, Jr., its present leader, the organization has grown to its opti- mum size of twenty members. The aim of the M. S. C. Wesley Foundation is to instill within its members a conscious realization of the power of Christianity and its application to both the common and the crucial problems of society. The program for 1937-38 was as successful as it was varied. Its members took an active part in the Con- necticut Valley Student Christian Movement Mid-winter Conferer ce at Northfield and the Greater Boston Method- ist Student Conference at Cambridge. Several members of the Foundation served the Amherst Methodist Episco- pal Church as Sunday-school teachers and leaders of the Epwortli League. On one occasion they conducted the regular morning service. In addition to its regular discussion meetings, the group was privileged to have as ii. formal speakers. Dr. Hornell Hart, Dr. J. P. Williams, Rabbi Fishman, Dr. Harry N. Glick, and Miss Georgia Harkness. [2561 e£ui5 THE NEWMAN CLUB OFFICERS President, Normau Blake, ' 38 Vice-President, Mary P. O ' Connell, ' 38 Secretary-Treasurer, Mary E. Bates, ' 40 Puljlicity Secretary, George Haylon, ' 39 Tlie purpose o£ the Newman Club ot Massachusetts State College is to unite the Catholic students of the College in order to promote their spiritual, intellectual and social development. Chief among its activities this year were the Com- munion Breakfasts, held at least twice a semester. At these occasions the Club sponsored guest speakers who ably presented the Catholic viewpoint on world problems I ' ud lay action. On the third Thursday of each month the Club held its regular meeting. Tlie annual Newman Lectu year by Professor Walter ] aepartnient, who entitled his of Reason. ' ' . Prince of the English talk — " Newman as Man The Club has attempted to strengthen its affiliations with the National Federation of College Catholic Clubs by sending delegates to the monthly meetings which are held in Boston, and by circulating among the members " The Tryst " , official publication of the Federation. CHRISTIAN FEDERATION OFFICERS President, Robert Gage ' 38. Secretary, Estlier Pratt, ' 40 Treasurer, Richard Blake, ' 40 ■ The Christia 1936 by combi men and the " ! local brynch of n Federation was formed in the spring of ning the former Christian Association for JT. V. C A. for women; as such it is a the New England Student Christian Move- ment. Membership is open to any one enrolled in the College who earnestly desires to cooperate in fultilling its purpose of seeking the meaning of life and living in realistic awareness of the relationship of this meaning to our present-day society. The work of the organization is varied in accordance with the emphases which are considered most vital. This year a very active Dramatics Group has produced plays pertinent to a religious interpretation of modern prob- lems. These plays have been presented several times both in Amherst and neighboring communities. Perhaps most lu table was their presentation as the basis of a week-end deputation to Sterling, Mass., a project under- taken in cooperation with the Amherst College Christian Association. Another outstanding feature of the year ' s program was the Armistice Day meeting, at which a condensed version of " Bury the Dead " was offered by Beryl Briggs. Lawrence Levin son. John Walter Epstein, all prominent members oi matic circles, to a large and deeply-mo college dra- d audience. In December, two members were sent with representa- tives tiom the Menorah Society and the Newman Club to participate in an Intercollegiate Interfaith Conference at Brown University. On the week-end of March 5, nine members were sent to the Mid-winter Conference of th New England Student Christian Movement at North- luld, Mass. These intercollegiate conferences are an important part of the program, since they aid in keep- ing our organization in contact with other active groups throughout New England. This year special emphasis has been placed upon work with the freshmen. Sunday evening meetings have been held at which the new members of our Collge community could come into more intimate contact with the work of the Federation than had previously been possible. Later in the year a Freshman Cabinet was formed to ad- minister to the needs of the group. [257] eeui5 PHILLIPS BROOKS CLUB OFFICERS ddent, John Bale The Phillips Brooks Club of the Massachusetts State College was founded in 1937 by the Reverend George Leslie Cadigan of Grace Church, Amherst. Its purpose is to unite the Episcopal Students of the college and of the Stockbridge School of Agriculture in an organization of mutual religious interests, and problems, and to pro- mote their spiritual, social, and intellectual development. Talks by professors from this college and others and informal discussions are held weekly in the Goodell Library Music Room. This year we have had Reverend Henry N. Parsley of Grace Church as our advisor. Each year the Rev- erend Charles Cadigan, Rector of Grace Cliurcb invites all Episcopal students at Massachusetts State and Stockbridge to a supper at the parish house, at which time the plans for the coming year are discussed. MENORAH CLUB OFFICERS President. Lawrence Levinsoii, ' 38 Vice-President, Maurice Tonkin, ' 38 Secretary, Bernice Sedo£f, ' 39 Corresponding Secretary, Sidney Rosen, Student Religious Council Represeutati Alfred Swiren, ' 38 The Menorah Club includes in its membership every .le-vvish student in the college. Its purpose it two fold: (1) to keep alive or awaken a vital sympathy for and enjoyment of Jewish customs and traditions; and (2) to encourage an understanding of the Jewish cultural heritage. The Menorah Club cooperates with other religious groups and integrates its activities with the larger religious purposes of the college through The Student Religious Council. To carry out its general aims the Menorah Club spon- sors numerous activities both to secure variety in its programs and to appeal to different interests. It brings outside speakers to the campus; it sponsors the Friday evening services, holiday parties, study groups, the Menorah Bulletin and the purchase of books and periodicals. The outstanding event during the first semester of the scholastic year was the freshman reception. Attended by almost all of the Jewish students it was very " impres- sive through its happy combination of interest and dig- nity. Tlie most notable fact of the meeting was the clear indication that a larger group of students were now more actively interested in the Menorah Club than in any previous year. The Purim party stood out above all other Menorah undertakings during the second semester. Sidney Rosen, ' 39, presented his closely knit play " Hamantaschen and Stiches " , which he wrote, produced and acted virtually unaided: Rabbi Habas delivered an amusing and infor- mative talk on Purim, while the reading of the story of Esther gave everybody the opportunity to get vicarious vengeance by hissing and stamping at the mention of Haman. The two memorable speeches of the year were given by Abraham Lipsitz of Amherst College on his experi- ences during the preceding summer in Palestine and in Switzerland while the Zionist Congress was going on; and by Carl Alpert, editor of the Jewish Advocate, on Zionism. The Menorah Bulletin, edited by Sidney Rosen, was a new venture of the Menorah Chib. Its general purpose was to keep the students informed about the activities of the Menorah Club. Through its two representatives the club took an active fart in arranging the programs of The Conference of the Connecticut Valley Association for Jewish College Students. Tliese conferences were well attended by Mass. State delegations. [258} Actiidtie VESPERS The Vesper Services sponsored by the United Religious Council are held each Sunday at five o ' clock in the Memorial Building. At these services, religious leaders — Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish — and laymen who are interested in religious topics address the students and faculty who are seeking the spiritual -alues which such a service can give. The series was opened in 1937 by Dr. James Gordon Gilkey of Springfield. One of the outstanding speakers was Professor William Lyon Phelps, whose topic was " The Platform of Christianity " . Mrs. Marguerite H. Bro, of the Congregational Council for Social Action, spoke with great vitality and enthusiasm. She urged her audience " to dig the wells our fathers dug and dig them deeper " . Rabbi Milton Steinberg gave an address upon " Religion and Democracy " , in which he stated that it is only through political democracy that religion has a chance to survive. Bishop Charles Wesley Burns of Boston emphasized the great need of knowing the eternal verities in the present day when times are so disjointed. Dr. Brewer Eddy of Boston spoke on the importance of world Christianity achieved through missionary work. Other religious leaders included in this program of Vesper services were Professor S. Ralph Harlow, whose subject was " Does Psychic Research Throw Light on the Christian Hope of Immortality? " ; the Reverend Jeffry Campbell, who spoke on " Isaiah — A Prophet of God " ; Rabbi Abraham Feldman of Hartford; Bishop W. Appleton Lawrence of Springfield; Dr. Grady Feagan of Arlington; Professor Hans Kohn of Smith College and Father T. Lawrason Riggs of Yale University. Several members of the faculty also spoke at these services. Professor Frank A. Waugh had as his topic " Discipline " . In an address on " Humility and Tolerance " , Dr. Maxwell Goldberg emphasized the theme of " Live and let live. " On the Sunday before the Christmas vacation Dean William L. Machmer spoke on " A Prophesy Fulfilled — Some Reflections. " An outstanding event of the year was a series of three talks given by Professor James T. Cleland of Amherst College on " The Basis of the Christian Religion " . The first lecture during the convocation period on February 17th was " Thou Shalt Love Thyself " . The subject of the second lecture on the next evening was " Thou Shalt Love Thy Neighbor " . The climax was reached in the final talk at the vesper service in which Professor Cleland took up his third point— " Thou Shalt Love Thy God. " Another highlight was the service on March 20. For the first time in the history of the College, the speakers were student representa- tives of three divergent religious faiths on campus. Lawrence Levinson, ' 38, told about the ideas of justice which Amos emphasized. Robert W. Gage, ' 33, described Jesus Christ ' s search for truth and his interest in human beings. William G. Foley, ' 40, contrasted the idealism of Newman with the lack of tolerance in modern society. " This vesper service " , said one of the student speakers, " with the representatives of the three religious groups on campus speaking side by side from the same platform, is symbolic of the cooperative spirit which translates into effective form the best in our respective religions. " SOCIAL UNIONS Of great interest this year have been the Social Union programs, which have done well in carrying on the tradition of preceding years. First came the Boston Srnfonietta under the direction of Arthur Fiedler, who is recognized for his work at the well-known " pop " concerts. The varied program which was presented was enthusiastically received by all who attended. After this came the annual Bay State Revue, which was haUed as " one of the best " . The program opened with a few selections by the college band. Then came James Lee and Robert Marsh with some old Irish songs, the intersorority skit with its chorus and specialty numbers, Foster and Freeman with their magic, and the college orchestra with its selections. The first performance of " Make-Believe Angeline " , a one- act play by Louis Breault, ' 37, was given by members of the Roister Doisters. The high spot of the program proved to be a ballet specialty done by five male " co-eds " . A detailed descrip- tion follows this article. Then to our campus came Blanche Yurka with her dramatic monologues. She presented comedy sketches of the past and present, which were of great interest to everyone. In January, Earle Spicer, the baritone soloist, delighted his audience particularly with his ballads. Soon after this the Jitney Players again came to our campus and presented " Diplomacy " , a revised and modernized version of Sardou ' s play, which was an important late nineteenth century drama. Its humor and interest held the audience from beginning to end. As a part of the Winter Carnival program, the Social Union sponsored the Varsity Club Male Quartet. [259] ActLmitie SOCIAL UNIONS The last of these programs for this year was the combined Musical Clubs Concert, with both Glee Clubs and Orchestra doing a fine piece of work. Julia Lynch afforded her audience much enjoyment with a group of violin selections, and the guest artist, Lorin Clark, contributed much to the pleasure of the program with his baritone solos. And so another year of pleasant Social Union programs ended. We only hope that we may continue to have equally enjoyable pro- grams in the future. THE BAY STATE REVUE A few years after the War a group of students here gave expression to their pent-up abilities and produced the first Bay State Revue. For several years the Revue was one of the events of the year. In the early thirties, however, the depression hit the Revue and enthusiasni ran low. At that time, had it not been for the whole-hearted support of a few people, we might have lost our annual Revue. Then along came the Revue of 1936 to bring the show to life again. The spirit of this new awakening carried over into 1937, and one of the best Revues of all time was produced as a part of the Dad ' s Day Pro- gram before two capacity crowds. After nearly drowning during the afternoon while watching State beat Renssalaer in th? pouring rain, and then enjoying dinner at the various fraternity houses, about four hundred Dads assembled at Bowker Auditorium to wit- ness the second presentation of the " 1937 Bay State Revue " . Gene Gieringer, as master of ceremonies, introduced the band for the first number. Here again the band showed that it could truly be called the best in State ' s history as it played several numbers and then introduced one of its drum majors, Erma Alvord, who played a chime solo. After this our genial Gene stepped before the curtains and introduced those two ragamuffins from old Erin — Jim Lee and Bob Marsh. Their " harmonious " duet soon had the crowd roaring with laughter. This was followed by a bevy of Floradora girls, a specialty dance by that famous dance team of Fagan and Gaskell, a very " sophisticated " act by that charming little charmer, Joan Sannella, and finally a real Rippling Rhythm Tap-Dance by Betty Eaton. This fast succession of good acts had the audience on the edge of their chairs throughout the first half of the program. Those two mystic magicians, Freeman and Foster, then showed us some real trickery as they produced a package of lighted cigarettes and " burnt " dollar bills from nowhere. During the intermission, the orchestra played some music until Master Gene returned with his greatest find — the one and only Ballet Maroon. The graceful " co-eds " tripped fan- tastically to the lilting tune of " Narcissus " . They were resplendent in ribbons, pink tarleton skirts, and extraordinary eyelashes. After this act the audience was so overcome that it did not appreciate the short serious play which ended the Revue. The Roister Doisters presented " Make-Believe Angeline " written by one of our recent alumni, Louis Breault, ' 37. It was ably acted and although not in the same light vein as the rest of the program, it was very interesting. When the final curtain fell on the Revue, ade- quate proof had been shown that there is talent in this college, that the Band, Orchestra, and Roister Doisters are worth seeing and hearing, and that State really has some " Co-eds " . FINE ARTS SERIES The second annual Fine Arts Program which was held Tuesday afternoons at the Memorial Building, was popular not only with people con- nected with Massachusetts State College, but also with other people of Amherst as well. The Fine Arts Council, in charge of the series, was com- posed of eight members: Frank A. Waugh, chairman, Stowell C. Coding, Miss Edna L. Skinner, Frank Prentice Rand, Harold W. Cary, Miss Ethel W. Blatchford, Ort on L. Clark, and Basil B. Wood. The two meetings in October were given to members of our faculty, — Professor Frank A. Waugh and Professor A. Anderson Mackimmie. Mr. Waugh, flutist, who was accompanied by Miss Laura Kidder at the piano, was the first composer to have played his own compositions on this campus. Professor Mackimmie, having just returned from a tour in Europe, gave us, with the aid of slides, a vivid description of the city of Florence, which has been the cradle of much in the fine arts of the world. In November, [260] AcUmiUed FINE ARTS SERIES (Continued) Robert Wolcott, a native of Amherst, but at the present a resident of Springfield, gave a lecture on the art of mural and landscape painting, il- lustrated by the exhibit of his own works which was in the Memorial Building at that time. At the second program of the month, Robert Francis of Amherst, was featured, this time as a violinist instead of a poet, as he was last year. His recital was accompanied by Mr. Stratton, instructor in music at our college. Selections by Handel, Bach, Brahms, Fauve, and Ravel comprised the program. For pleasant variation, Mr. Duncan Phillips, well known art critic, in his talk entitled " The Artist Sees Differently " , led a discussion on the differences between the classic and romantic types of painting. Mr. Phillips was sponsored by the American Federation of Arts. Miss Barbara Strode, of the class of 1938, wrote, directed and acted in her own one-act play, " Maids in a Muddle, " for the Fine Arts audience on November 23rd. The purpose of the playlet was to show the need for a new women ' s building. It had numerous showings throughout the state. The month closed with one of the most out- standing programs in the Fine Arts series this year. Mr. Doric Alviani, Supervisor of Music in the Amherst Public Schools, presented a song recital in his rich baritone voice. So thoroughly did he captivate his audience that encore upon encore was requested. In December, Professor Walter E. Prince, whose subject was " Another Dark Lady, " gave a brief survey of the theories which have been set forth to explain the identity of the woman who seems to have been the subject of many of Shakespeare ' s sonnets. The latest theory, which is aired by Pauline K. Angel, is not the one to which Professor Prince subscribes. It is based on a poem written in 1594. Professor Prince showed how this poem supports the theory, but he takes his stand with those who grant Shakespeare a margin of privacy which he obviously wanted; for the poems were not written for publication, nor does the sonneteer mention the young lady ' s name. In another Fine Arts program of December, one of the most unusual and fascinating arts, that of Japanese prints, was described by H. Irving Olds, who is connected with the F. A. R. Art Gallery of New York. Japanese prints as we know them were not made after 1850. In an attempt to perpetuate the old prints by making accurate copies, Toyohisa Adachi, with Mr. Olds as American agent, established the firm of Adachi-Olds. Mr. Olds demonstrated the art of Japanese printing from the carving of the cherry blocks to the affixing of the last color to the mulberry bark paper. A survey of the history of this art, from the works of Moronobu to Hiroshige, further enlightened the audience. Many of the beautiful prints that had been on exhibit in the lounge were shown again, and the unexpected pleasure of viewing the rarest trea- sures of the art, the triads, was offered by Mr. Olds. Three panels, each made with a separate set of carved blocks as if they were single pic- tures, compose one large scene. Members of the audience lingered, even after the lecture had closed, to inspect the prints. The new year opened with a most interesting program by Mr. J. B. Newlon of the Agricultural Engineering department of the College. The history of Iron Working, from, the time of the Egyptians, 6000 years ago, up to the present day, was summarized. Mr. Newlon then explained fundamental formations in ironwork, and showed some of his specimens of antique locks, latches, hinges, andirons, slicers, and other articles made of iron. Madame Sahla, mother of Mrs. Hugh P. Baker, was one of the outstanding artists on the Fine Arts ' calendar for January. Her songs were featured as part of the program in which Mr. Stratton gave a recital on the orgatron . In a talk of the same month Professor Julian, of our Ger- man Department, presented two reels of motion pictures of Germany. One depicted the life of the Hessian peasants, and the other one, which met with great favor from the audience, con- cerned a Hessian wedding, showing the bride ' s fancy costume with its elaborate head dress and fourteen skirts, and the peculiar wedding cus- toms. In this month, too, Professor Frank Prentice Rand gave an informal talk on Eugene Field — his idiosyncrasies and his works. This was one of the most delightful programs of the season. The two meetings for February, that of the eighth, and that of the fifteenth were provided for by the Music and Literature departments respectively. The first was a joint music recital with Amherst College, and the second was a review by Dr. Helming entitled, " Two Southern Novels " . The long anticipated two-piano recital by Mr. and Mrs. Stratton opened the meetings . for March. This recital was one of the most popular programs of the Fine Arts series. The brilliant work of these two pianists received the enthusiastic acclaim of the listeners. Next came the Dance Recital under the direction of the [261] AxiUjiMile FINE ARTS SERIES (Ci.iM liuU-(l) Physical Education Department. It attracted a very large audience. The interesting and novel program included twelve dances by the co-eds, and an unforgettable Sword Dance by the men. Professor Clark discussed on March 15th, the Family Art Exhibit in the Memorial Building. Contributors were all connected with the College. The meeting was very interesting. At the last meeting of the season, Mme. Ii-ma Labastille, in one of her series of lectures, showed examples of the colorful costumes and designs of Mexico and South America. After the season was formally closed, the Fine Arts Council sponsored a two-day visit by Pro- fessor Asplund of the Stockholm Institute of Technology. One of the Professor ' s lectures treated of " Swedish Architecture Since 1920: Its Problems and Trends. " Professor Asplund ' s visit to the campus proved of great interest to those who are patrons of the arts. Thus the successful series of programs pre- sented by the Council came to a close. On the basis of attendance, the most popular programs were: the Dance Recital, the Song Recital by Doric Alviani, the Song Recital by Mme. Sahla and the Orgatron recital by Mr. Stratton, and finally, the Recital for Two Pianos by Mr. and Mrs. Stratton. There was a marked increase in attendance this year as compared with last year. ART EXHIBITS For several years the college has enjoyed art exhibits in the Memorial Building and the Goo- dell Library, and occasionally at Wilder Hall and the Physical Education Building. To Professoi ' Frank A. Waugh goes most of the credit for beginning and continuing these exhibits which arouse so much interest among students and faculty. In the Memorial Building there are almost always exhibits of oil paintings, water-colors, etchings, woodcuts, Japanese prints, or repro- ductions of famous paintings. The best liked collections were the oil paintings of New England by Robert Strong Woodward, Herschel Logan ' s wood cuts, the set of colorful Japanese prints, the collection of prizewinning etchings, and the Family Art Exhibit. As a result of the recent developments in pho- tography, there has been a growing interest and appreciation of this medium as a form of art- istic expression. Through the cooperation of Mr. John H. Vondell, instructor at the college and secretary of the Amherst Camera Club, and Mr. Basil B. Wood, head of the Goodell Library, students and others who are interested have had, since November, 1935, the opportunity of seeing the best photographs of today. In addition to the prizewinning prints of the monthly con- tests of the Camera Club, which is mainly a campus organization, but also includes members from surrounding towns, there are always on view photographs on a variety of subjects. They include exhibits from other camera clubs in the United States, one-man shows of photographs by such noted experts as F. Allen Morgan and Avery Slack, and photographs from technical magazines, including " American Photography " and " Camera Craft. " FOREIGN MOTION PICTURES students from Massachusetts State College, Amherst College, and Amherst High School, with the cooperation of the Amherst Theater, liave the opportunity to see every year at least five moving pictures in French or German, for only fifty cents. This year the German pictures were given on Tuesdays, at 4:30 from the 16th of Nov- ember to the 14th of December. The films were " Das Madchen Johanna, " " Masquerade in Vienna, " " Emil und die Detektive, " " Amphitry- on, " and " Hermine und die 7 Aufrechten. " The French pictures were shown on Mondays at the same hour, from February 14 to March 21. They were " Merlusse, " " Une Soiree a la Come- die Francaise, " " Helene, " " Mile. Mozart " (with Danielle Darrieux) " Les Bas Fondes " and " Ma- thies Pascal. THE COMMUNITY CONCERTS The Community Concert Series, which is held in Bowker Auditorium at Stockhridge Hall, is open both to townspeople and the college. Tlie concerts are given on a subscription basis. Members are permitted to at- tend, without additional charge, community concerts in other cities. The Community Concert Series presents well-known musical artists, especially in opera and symphony. Helen Jepson, leading soprano of the Metropolitan Opera Association, gave the first concert before a large group of appreciative listeners. Captivating the aud- ience with her grace and charm and with her beautiful renditions of the aria, " Un fel di vedremo " from Madame Butterfly, another aria, " Ah fors e lui " from La Ti-a- viata, and her last piece, " Thy Sweet Singing " , by Olmstead, Miss Jepson gave proof of her superlative position as operatic interpreter. At the second concert, Dalies Prantz, brilliant young concert pianist, delighted the audience with his delicate and restrained renditions of Bach ' s " Three Choral Pre- ludes " and with his facile and scintillating performance of the Chopin " Etudes " to which the latter part of the program was devoted. The third concert marked the first appearance of an interpretive dance group at the Community Concerts — Miriam Winslow and her Dancers, accompanied by a versatile pianist. The audience enjoyed particularly Miss Winslow ' s interpretation of the swift emotional sweep of Chopin ' s " Prelude " , and her comic dance, " Hornpipe " , by LuUy-Purcell. Four of her dancers. Misses Cousens, Maclaren, Magrath, and Morse, delighted the audience with their clever and capricious " Little Women " , by Tschaikowsky. At the conclusion of the performance the entire ensemble gave an exquisite and delicate interpretation of Handel ' s great Hymn, " Lai-go " . The fourth .iiul hi«t COllCCI ■t nl ■ fhf series in Amherst, the Concertin.i m,,,)..,-. ■■I of 1 tvo „„,-., r, :,,!-., pnsenled an unusual and tinniii- ' ' ' ( lih Mi lliirl one dif- ferent types i.i insir njn, ' riLil . .111, III.. UN 111 ..i(.s, duets. trios, quartet , and qu IMlfl.-,. til, ;■ elKseniblc g.ive an ex- cellent and varied presi entatii an. ranging from Brandel ' s " Concerto a Quattro ' ' in D Minor, to Grainger ' s " Shepherd ' s Hey. " [262} ActimiUed M. S. C. CONCERTS The Music Committee of Massachusetts State College, which has charge of the musical pro- grams in the Social Union and Fine Arts series, also brings to the campus annually four out- standing musicians or groups of musicians. The Committee brought honor to the College by in- stitutmg two years ago, the practice of securing musicians for two-day visits to our campus. The first of the four musical programs during this school year was offered on November 17, 1937, when Ben Haggin, well-known music critic, gave a lecture on " American Music: Im- provised Jazz, " illustrated with recordings of " swing " music. On December 13, and 14, Richard Lorleberg, violin-cellist, and his sister, Crete von Boyer, pianist, gave three informal concerts, culminated by a formal concert in the Memorial Building. A varied and interesting program, featuring a composition by Mr. Giorni of Smith College, was given on January 16, 1938, by the Spring- field Symphony Civic Orchestra. The last event in the series took place on March 22 and 23. Mme. Irma Goebel Labastille, pianist, gave four lectures on " The Romance of Latin America in Melody and Rhythm. " The lectures included a piano recital, group singing, sound motion pictures, slides, and talks on in- struments and costumes. The M. S. C. concerts, which are varied and educational, are well attended. They are free and open to the public. CARNEGIE ROOM A few years ago, Massachusetts State College was one of the colleges which received a music set from the Carnegie Corporation. This col- lection consists of a Capehart phonograph, 130 albums of records preserving the best music from the earliest times to the present day, many scores, and numerous books on music. It is housed in the music room in the basement of Goodell Library. Every afternoon except Sat- urday it is available to anyone who likes music. THE MODEL LEAGUE OF NATIONS With world sanctions and the preservation of international peace as its principal problems, the New England Model League of Nations conducted its eleventh annual assembly at Massachusetts State College on March 18 and 19, 1938. More than three hundred students, representing the majority of New England colleges, gathered to act as delegates of the various nations of the world in an effort to reach a greater understand- ing of the problems and intricacies of inter- national relations. Each nation, through its delegates, presented its difficulties and individual problems to the assembly for discussion and consideration. The major questions considered were: political inter- vention in affairs of small countries; intellectual cooperation between nations; protection of rights of political minorities; international trade and tariff barriers; the mandate of Palestine; and political conditions in the Far East. Individual committee meetings drew up pro- posals and resolutions, as a result of their invest- igations and discussions, which they presented to the plenary sessions for consideration and ap- proval. The discussion, conducted as similarly as possible to that of the League of Nations, was made doubly interesting in view of the European crisis which existed at that time. High points of the assembly were: the Russian resolutions to brand Germany, Italy and Japan as aggressor nations and to take action against them; Austria ' s dramatic withdrawal from the League ; and Lithuania ' s unconditional acceptance of the Polish ultimatum. The Collegian, in an editorial published dur- ing the convention, expressed the following opin- ion: " Although the League of Nations itself has appeared to lack the harmony necessary to bal- ance and judge world problems, members of the Model League are well able to discuss situations without the weight of reality, greed, and self- ishness driving them to seek individual rather than collective weKare. " The invasion of delegates for the first assembly of its kind on campus was handled by a com- mittee of State students headed by Warren Bray, ' 38. Fraternity and sorority houses and local inns solved the housing and food problems. The two- day convention was concluded with a tea dance in the Drill Hall, Saturday afternoon, March 19. CONNECTICUT VALLEY STUDENT SCIENTIFIC CONFERENCE On April 23, 1938, the Eighth Annual Conn- ecticut Valley Student Scientific Conference was held on the campus of Amherst College. Dr. Selig Hecht of Columbia University, one of the most prominent men in the field of vision, opened the Conference with an illustrated lecture, " The Nature of Vision. " Included in the 175 papers and demonstra- tions presented at the Conference were seventeen papers by students in various scientific depart- ments at Massachusetts State College. There were 534 guests attending the Con- ference, representing eleven Connecticut Valley Colleges: Mt. Holyoke (the originator of the Conference in 1930), Smith, Connecticut College for Women, Connecticut State College, Amherst, Williams, Wesleyan, Trinity, Springfield, Dart- mouth and Massachusetts State. Martha Kaplinsky, ' 38, acted as chairman of the Home Economics Division. At the dinner and business meeting which closed the Conference, Williams College was designated as host for the Conference in 1939. The local departmental chairmen, Samuel J. Golub, ' 38, Frederick R. Theriault, ' 38, Richard [263} IdtimJdjeA CONNECTICUT VALLEY STUDENT ((- ' .nKludf,i) SCIENTIFIC CONFERENCE Bray, " 38, Davis W. Beaumont, ' 38, Harry Pratt, Lois Wood, ' 38, and the Campus Chairman Walter C. Mayko, ' 38, selected Richard Giles, ' 39, as Campus Chairman for the 1939 Conference. The following are the papers and demonstra- tions given at the Conference by Massachusetts State College students: 1. The Cesaro Curves: Finite Area with In- finite Circumference — Frederick R. Theriault, ' 38. 3. Bacterial Polysaccharides — Guy R. Vitagliano, Graduate Student. 3. Methods of Studying Fecal Flora — Robert H. Guiberson, Graduate Student. 4. A Discussion of Pine Brachyblast and Re- gressive Evolution — Samuel J. Golub, ' 38. 5. Methods in Myceticulture — Frances B. Rath- bone, ' 38, and Leland W. Hooker, ' 38. 6. Methods in Botanical Microtechnique — Rich- ard Giles, ' 39, and Emery Moore, ' 39. 7. Preparation of Acetanilide and its Deriva- tives — William E. Bergman, ' 38. 8. Development of Fresh Laid Hen Eggs — Al- bert Landis, Graduate Student. 9. Can Labels — Jessie J. Chase, ' 38. 10. A Study of Vitamin C Adequacy in Relation to Food Costs — Jane E. Schopfer, ' 38. 11. The Effects of Potassium Iodide and Kelp on Cholesterol Induced Athenosclerosis — • Mildred Goldfaden, Graduate Student. 12. Use of Electrometer Tube in the Measure- ment of Ionization Currents — Harold C. Hemond, ' 38. 13. Reflector Mirrors — Conrad Hemond, Jr., ' 38. 14. The Stroboscope, Its Operation and Applica- tion — Davis W. Beaumont, ' 38. 15. A Geiger-Muller Counter—Royal Allaire, ' 38. 16. Insects of the Humus — Walter M. Kulash, Graduate Student. 17. Dioxan Method for Hydra — Edna Sprague, ' 38. All the papers were exceptionally well done and invited attention and praise for the students who presented them. They will provide the goal for the next conference. STUDENT BROADCASTS Since January, 1937, students of Massachusetts State College have taken part in numerous radio broadcasts. Most of these broadcasts were edu- cational in nature, with both faculty and students participating. The greater part of them went on the air from a local station, but not a few were over a network. The first series of broadcasts in which under- graduates took part was entitled " Humanizing the Classics " . These broadcasts were sponsored by the Department of Languages and Literature. Messrs. Dow, Fraker, Goldberg, Lyle, Prince, Rand, Stratton, and Troy were in charge of var- ious broadcasts from January 18, until May 17, 1937. Students did not take part in all broad- casts, but in many of them. For example, the prize winners of the Burnham Declamation Contest of last year declaimed at the broadcast which was directed by Mr. Dow. Another time, a miracle play modernized by Professor Rand was dramatized by meml ers of the Roister Doisters. The purpose of these broadcasts, as the title indicates, was to arouse the interest of the listeners in literature and help them to gain a better appreciation of it. These broadcasts were put on from Station WSPR. Another group of broadcasts was called " The Old Naturalist " . Cast in the title role Professor Charles H. Thayer, of the Agronomy Depart- ment, assisted by various college scientists, gave talks to a group of nature students. The parts of these students were played by undergraduates, who asked questions of " The Old Naturalist " . Any technical points which arose were settled by the visiting scientist on the program. These talks covered a wide variety of topics concerned with nature, and included such subjects as earth- worms, insects, amphibians, and forest laws. These programs started on March 19, 1937, and appeared for the succeeding twelve weeks over the Colonial Network from station WSPR. Beginning on May 16, 1937 and running for a month were four talks sponsored by the Place- ment Service called " From School to Work " . The purpose of these broadcasts was to help high school students decide upon then- life work. Here again, the parts of high school students were taken by members of the student body, who sought information from Professor Glatfelter, Mr. Grayson, and Miss Hamlin of the Placement Service. A program alo?ig practical lines has been put on by the Extension Service under the direction of Mr. G. O. Oleson in conjunction with students. These discussions have been concerned with various subjects, such as home economics, 4-H Club work, markets and gardens. Various problems have been considered, and solutions to them have been offered in an interesting manner. The College Band has gone on the air twice during the past year, once in April, when station WBZ invited it to play because of the fine rep- utation which it has established; and again, on October 28, 1937, for an Alumni broadcast. It has become the custom for the band to play on one Alumni broadcast a year, and it has been very well received. On both programs spirited marches were offered, and, in addition, some classical pieces jmd the Alma Mater, Finally, a unique broadcast of " the man in the street " type was sponsored by the Winter Carnival Committee on February 10, 1938, in order to gain publicity for the Carnival. The seven candidates for Carnival Queen selected by the students, were interrogated by the announcer about the different activities that were to be a part of the Carnival program. Stanley Flower provided the comedy relief in a very entertaining way by his attempts to procure a partner for the Carnival Ball. WSPR was the medium for this broadcast. [264] bdtmitlti WIDENING HORIZONS IN STUDENT LITE RARY ACTIVITY " Still is the unspoken word, the word within The world and for the world, ... " T. S. Eliot ... In Opinion and Touchstone, poem by Sidney Rosen, ' 39, " Synagogue Cellar " . ... In Collegiate Review, critique by. ditto, " An Appreciation of T. S. Eliot " : poem by ditto, " La Reine de Saba " ; essay on Pater, by Ruth Adams, " To Know and Be Known " . ... In anthology. Contemporary American Men Poets, poems by Rosen, " Labor — Post Mortem " , and " Joe Venuchi " . ... In Touchstone, critique, by William O ' Donnell, " The Odessey of Henry Adams " . ... In Mercury, satire, by ditto, " How to Become a Legislator " . ... At Intercollegiate Original Poetry Contest, Amherst College, May 1937, Shirley Alberta Bliss, ' 38, reads selections from her own poems. . . At Intercollegiate Poetry Reading, Smith College, May 1937, Lucille Monroe, ' 37, interprets a group of Shakespearean Sonnets. ... At Intercollegiate Poetry Reading, Mount Holyoke College, May 7, 1938, John S. Hoar, ' 38, interprets Shelley ' s " Ode to the West Wind " . . . . THE NEW CURRICULUM This year marked an important and widely approved change in the number of credit require- ments for graduation. Now, instead of 72 credits, Juniors and Seniors are required to struggle with a mere 60 credits in order to graduate, that is, if they have successfully completed the re- quired and elective work of the first two years. Under this new plan. Juniors and Seniors are now normally carrying five three- credit courses or 15 credits a semester. In fact, they are not allowed to take more than 17 credits during the semester, unless they have an average grade above eighty in all previous courses. The mini- mum number of credits for specialization in one department has been fixed at 15 credits; the maximum, at 30 credits. According to Dean Machmer, the Chairman of the Faculty Com- mittee on the Course of Study, the aim of this new system is not less work, but " more effective and thorough mastery of definite course con- tent. " M. S. C. JUDGING TEAMS— 1937-1938 DAIRY PRODUCTS R. D. MacCurdy, ' 38 J. S. Gill, ' 38 W. B. Graham, ' 38 Standing — 9th at Eastern States Exposition. 3rd at New Orleans where team won $600.00 schol- arship, awarded to MacCurdy. FLOWERS Miss R. E. Wood, ' 38 Miss C. E. Carpenter, ' 38 J. F. Dunlap, ' 38 Standing — 2nd at International Flower Show, Toronto, Canada. Miss Wood 2nd in Contest, Miss Carpenter 4th. LIVESTOCK W. B. Avery, ' 38 R. E. Smith, ' 38 R. J. Fitzpatrick, ' 38 D. H. Willard, ' 38 F. W. Kingsbury, ' 38 Standing — 3rd at Eastern States Exposition. 23rd at International Livestock Exposition, Chicago. Fitzpatrick 2nd at Eastern States Exposition. MEATS R. E. Smith, ' 38 R. J. Fitzpatrick, ' 38 W. B. Avery, ' 38 Standing — 2nd at Eastern States Exposition. Avery high man in contest. 9th at International Livestock Exposition. Smith high man in contest judging lamb, 4th in beef. POULTRY F. L. Dickens, ' 38 R. Parmenter, ' 39 G. Brody, ' 39 Standing — 6th Eastern Intercollegiate Judging Contest, New York City. DAIRY CATTLE J. O. Graves, ' 39 R. D. Elliott, ' 39 L. H. Bixby, ' 39 Standing— 7th at Eastern States Exposition. Team 3rd in Ayrshires. Graves 5th in Ayrshu-es and Guernseys. {265} A.B . S ee Qomtniitee ( - r f Hnifll j| ■||W- H H S hK I B ' w l l H H H| J ffg KI W ' H H E u 4 N H ES |9 Front Row: Miss Strode, Hoylon, Mrs. Goldberg, French. Second Row: O ' Donnell, Miss Gilbert, Brown, Miss Becher, Hoar. TOWARD THE A. B. DEGREE The present movement for the adoption of the A. D. degree at our College is an expression of a strong tendency that has been active here for a number of years. It is part of a slow and steady general movement toward the liberalizing of our undergraduate curriculum so as to realize to the full the spirit and the tradition of the Land- Grant Colleges. This general movement, comparable to similar movements at other Land-Grand institutions, has made itself felt, to some degree, ever since the founding of our College; but it has been especially active for at least a decade. Three major currents of conviction have united to give momentum to the present movement for the Bachelor of Arts degree at the Massachusetts State College: (1). the active sentiment of Alumni and other friends of the College; (2) cooperation of the Faculty and of the Administration; and (3), the persistent conviction of the student body. The dominant expression for the Arts degree at our College has come from the undeigraduates, beginning, approximately, with the class of ' 27 or ' 28. This expression has arisen from an inner need whichstudents have increasingly felt for the full and free development of liberal arts courses on our campus, and for the adoption of the degree that would both recognize and consolidate this development. The steadily growing wave of student sentiment toward the A. B. degree has been revealed in a number of ways, — especially since the spring of ' 34. Student forums have emphasized undergradu- ate concern for the degree. " Various college clubs have gone on record as favoring the degree, — among them, the Chemistry Club, the Dairy Club, the Fernald Entomological Club, and the Pre-Med Club. Answers to questionnaires submitted to the student body have similarly shown the student desire for the Arts degree. The Collegian, too, under the successive editorships of Raymond Royal, ' 34, Theodore Leary, ' 35, Charles Kshbach, ' 37, Louis Breault, ' 37, Fred Lindstrom, ex ' 38, Julian Katzeff, ' 38, and Emery Moore, ' 39, has published communications from students and alumni, news reports, and editorials — all pointing in the direction of the A. B. degree. Two student committees have occupied themselves especially with the matter of the Arts degree. The first of these was the special Curriculum Committee, appointed in the fall of 1933 by President Baker, and made up of seven members of the class of ' 34: E. J. Clow (Physical and Biological Sciences) Harriette Jackson (Social Sciences), H. C. Potter (Agriculture), Nelson Wheeler (Horticulture), Elizabeth Wheeler (Home Economics), Alvan Ryan (Social Sciences), Donald Smith (Physical and Biological Sciences). In its report submitted in June, 1934, this Committee recommended the recognition of a Division of Humanities, which would offer majors leading to the Arts degree. [266} TOWARD THE A. B. DEGREE (CnilthlUrd) The second committee was a logical sequence to the first. Appointed by the Senate to represent officially the student interests in the degree, the first Student A. B. Degree Committee began activity in the fall of 1935. Calvin Hannum, ' 36, was chairman. Other members were: Leonta Horrigan, ' 36, Dorothy Nurmi, oG, George Munroe, ' 36, Shirley Gale, ' 37, Lucille Monroe, ' 37, Henry Moss, ' 37, and Carl Swanson, ' 37. Smce then the Student Arts Degree Committee has been replenished as original members have been graduated. To date, students who have served on the Committee are the follow- ing: Herbert E. Brown, ' 38, Karl Burnett, ' 38, Shirley Bliss, ' 38, Cyrus French, ' 38, Ann Gilbert, ' 38, Frederick Lindstrom, ex ' 38, William O ' Donnell, ' 38, George Haylon, ' 39, and Arthur Noyes, ' 40. Following its appointment, the Arts Degree Committee worked for two college years in its attempts to make a full study of the whole problem. Its members interviewed students, faculty mem- bers and officers of the administration ,alumni, trustees, and others interested in the College. They made inquiries of state colleges that had already adopted the Arts degree; and, in order to make certain that the degree was warranted at our College, they made a careful comparison of our offer- ings in the Liberal Arts with those of over a hundred reputable colleges and universities granting the A. B. degree. At last, in the spring of 1937, this Committee drew up and, with the approval of the Senate and the W. S. G. A., presented to the Board of Trustees, a petition requesting, in the name of the student body, the immediate institution of the Arts Degree. The full text of this historic document follows: PETITION I. whereas we, the duly constituted representatives of the undergraduate students of the Mass- achusetts State College are firmly convinced: (1) That college degrees should correspond to the courses pursued for such degrees; (2) That for certain of the courses of instruction, (namely some of those in the Division of Social Sciences) offered and pursued at the Massachusetts State College, the degree of Bachelor of Arts is the traditional and appropriate degree; (3) That similar courses of instruction pursued at other reputable colleges do lead to the Arts degree; (4) That approximately a third of the students at the Massachusetts State College are pursuing such courses; and that the number of these students is increasing; (5) That such students, erroneously awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science, find themselves inconvenienced and even handicap)ied by lacking the degree consistent with the studies that they have pursued, and the professional endeavors that they wish to follow; II. Whereas we note: (1) That the Massachusetts State College is at present engaged in modification and expansion of its curriculum; (2) That a careful survey of the present curriculum at the Massachusetts State College has shown that the introduction of the degree of Bachelor of Arts for properly qualified students would involve little or no immediate special costs, or administrative inconvenience; (3) That, far from working to the disadvantages of undergraduates not pursuing courses lead- ing to the proposed degree, the adoption of the degree of Bachelor of Arts would actually work for their benefit; (4) That the introduction of the degree of Bachelor of Arts would thus, without appreciable expense, cooperate with the efforts of the College to be of wider, more comprehensive, more representa- tive service to the sons and daughters of the citizens of Massachusetts, and, hence, to the Common- wealth as a whole. HL And whereas we further note: (1) That the granting of the degree of Bachelor of Arts is in full harmony with the history and the tradition of the Land Grant institutions; (2) That the Charter of the Massachusetts State College permits the adoption of a degree such as that of Bachelor of Arts, by action of the Board of Trustees of the College, without special action by the Legislature of Massachusetts; [267] :7Ae t.YS. ©.e ee TOWARD THE A. B. DEGREE (Continued) (3) That the Admmistration of the College has already emphasized, in public, the soundness of the principle of the Bachelor of Arts degree for the College; (4) That the Board of Directors of the Associate Alumni of the Massachusetts State Colle ge have expressed themselves in favor of the immediate adoption of the degree of Bachelor of Arts by this college; (5) That numerous Alumni, both as groups and as individuals, have expressed themselves as heartily in favor of the same procedure; (6) That the undergraduates of the Massachusetts State College, irrespective of their own immediate lines of study, have more than once declared themselves to be in favor of the immediate adoption of the degree of Bachelor of Arts for properly qualified students; (7) That the special Student Committee, appointed by the Administration to make a study of the undergraduate curriculum of the College, has recommended the adoption of the degree of Bach- elor of Arts; (8) That the special Faculty Committee, appointed by the Administration to make a similar study, has recommended the adoption of the degree of Bachelor of Arts. IV. And furthermore, whereas we heartily endorse the sentiment of the Father of Land Grant Legislation, Senator Justin L. Morrill, who said: " The design was to open the door to a liberal education for this large class [in- dustrial] at a cheaper cost from being close at hand and to tempt them by offering not only iotind liter.iry imtniction. but something more applicable to the productive enjoyments of life. It would be a mistake to suppose it was intended that every student should be- come either a farmer or a mechanic, when the design comprehended not only insrtuction for those who hold the plow or follow a trade, but such instruction as any person might need — with all the world before them where to choose — and withont the exclusion of those who might prefer to adhere to the cLissics [now more generally known as the liberal arts]. " v. We, therefore, do hereby seriously and respectfully petition the Board of Trustees of the Massachusetts State College to take such action as is necessary for the immediate institution of the degree of Bachelor of Arts, to be awarded to the undergraduates who are pursuing courses of study traditionally and appropriately associated with that degree. At its next meeting, the Board of Trustees acknowledged the student petition by appointing a committee of its own to consider the question of an A. B. degree for our College. Before this Committee, on Tuesday, December 14, 1936, there appeared several representatives of the student attitude, as well as representatives of the faculty and the alumni. Among the students who came before the committee were the following members of the Student Ai-ts Degree Committee: Georjie Haylon, ' 39, and Cyrus French, ' 38. In addition, there were others chosen from the students at-large: Barbara Strode, ' 38, Marion Becher, ' 38, and John Hoar, ' 38. Those who heard the students present their case commented very favorably upon their manner and upon what they had to say in justifica- tion of their Petition for the Arts degree. Two days later, on December 16, 1936, the student delegation submitted documents, statistics and arguments supplementing the evidence that they had offered during the hearing. Among the inclusions were the following: (1) A report by John Hoar concerning steadily solidifying student opinion in favor of the A. B. degree; a report by Cyrus French concernmg the strong majority sen- timent in favor of the Arts Degree among the M. S. C. scientific clubs; a statement in favor of the A. B. degree by Marion Becher, representing majors in Home Economics and the W. S. G. A.; a report by Barbara Strode concerning the lively interest in things esthetically cultural at our College; a copy of a very significant letter (March 3, 1936), from Dean H. D. Newton, of the Division of Arts and Sciences at the Connecticut State College to Carl Swanson, then Secretary of the Student A. B. Degree Committee; a summary of the study made by the Student A. B. Degree Committee concerning A B degree curricula at one hundred varied, at least reputable, and, in a number of instances, noted colleges and universities; an excerpt from an address by Dr. Goldberg to the Essex County Alumni (November 1935), in which the speaker pointed out the fundamental errors of those who msisted upon practical justifications for the adopting the Arts degree; and a statement from Professor Mackimmie, who, speaking as Head of the Department of History and Sociology, justified his sympathy with the student petition for the degree. [268} TOWARD THE A. B. DEGREE (ColllilUltMl) In her statement, Marion Becher affirmed that, in the interests of the other students to whom the Arts degree would bring greater advantages, all Home Economics majors were hoping for the adoption of that degree; and that the women students of the three upper classes were " one hundred per cent in favor of the degree. " In his letter, Dean Newton assured Carl Swanson that, as regards the recently adopted A. B. degree at Connecticut State College: (1) No cost was connected with the installation of the A. B. curriculum; (2) No new courses had been added especially for use in the A. B. curriculum; (3) No new administrative or department set-up was necessary; (4) The new curriculum seemed to be attracting the attention of the better prepared high school graduates. Dean Newton closed his letter with best wishes for the success of the student movement for the A. B. degree at the Massachusetts State College. The summary of the study made of one hundred colleges and universities concluded that " our curriculum is sufficiently broad to make possible our granting an A. B. degree without additional courses " ; and that a " graduate of M. S. C. who has majored in the Department of Languages and Literature, and who receives a B. S. degree upon graduation, has completed a course of study that is equivalent (and in many cases identical) to the course of study that a person receiving the A. B. degree has completed. " Hopes for the immediate granting of the A. B. degree, however, were disappointed when, at its meeting of Wednesday, January 19, 1938, the Board of Trustees cast a large-majority vote to postpone final action of the Petition until September, 1938. Yet student efforts towards the Arts de- gree, by this time exerted over a period of about ten years, had not been altogether in vain. At this same meeting, the Board of Trustees requested President Baker and Dean Machmer to " devise administrative machinery for the granting of the degree. " Undergraduate opinion was quick to express itself, in an " Extra " put out that very day by the vigilant Collegian : John Hoar, ' 38: " We should recognize that further postponement in granting the degree is likely to be a serious detriment to the college. " William Graham, ' 38, President of Interfraternity Council: " The trustees are probably doing the wisest thing. At least, they ' re showing more interest than they did last year. " Barbara Strode, ' 38, member of the Student Committee on the A. B. degree: " I think that the student body of the college will be disappointed. The senior class will consider themselves still under a handicap they hoped to be rid of, and we will all be uttering silent prayers when the trustees meet again next September. " Frederick J. Sievers, ' 38, President of the Student Senate: " The decision of the Trustees, I ' m sure, is a disappointment to those of our student body who have eagerly and hopefully awaited a decision which would have prompted more i mmediate action. " Gordon Najar, ' 39, President of the Junior Class " The action of the Trustees is a disappointment to the Juniors. " Marion Becher, ' 38, President of the W. S. G. A.: " It is my conviction that, as students of this college seriously want the advantage of the A. B. degree, their appeal should continue to be heard. I hope this decision does not mean a negative attitude on the part of the Trustees. " Mitchell F. NeJame, ' 38, Editor of the Index: " Although I expected some definite action at this last meeting, I believe the Trustees made a cautious and wise move in referring action to their next meeting. I do hope, however, that at that time they will act, giving serious consideration to the desires of the student body. " [269] TOWARD THE A. B. DEGREE (C(,ntiiiueil) Chairman of last year ' s A, B. Degre e Committee: " The decision of the Trustees in regard to the A. B. degree is certainly regrettable. The granting of the degree should be, by now, merely a matter of administrative rou- tine. The desire on the part of the Trustees to put off their decision may be interpreted as a challenge. Since they are making an issue of it, we should no longer consider it necessary to treat the matter with caution and delicate whispering for fear of being called agitators. " I am tempted to say ' come on, let ' s fight ' but perhaps we should be philosophic about it; for, after all, there must be a limit to the supply of pretexts for delay, and that limit must soon be reached. " Julian Katzeff, Editor-in-Chief of the Collegian: " Once again the Board of Trustees has seen fit to postpone action on the granting of the A. B. degree at the Massachusetts State College. Once again, this time apparently to make certain of a " mandate from the public " , the Trustees have " shelved " the im- portant issue of the day. After the opinion of students, faculty, alumni, and friends of the college, throughout the state, has been vehemently expressed, this decision was en- tirely unexpected. It was a blow to those who expected, confidently, that, after having had the opportunity to study the situation the Trustees would act favorably, and that the A. B. degree would at last become a reality at the State College. Nothing of the sort has happened; and once again we are left to wonder about the ultimate outcome of this important issue. " Up till now, discussion of the granting of the A. B. degree has been for the most part confined to those who are immediately connected with the College. If the Trustees now feel that they need reassurance from the people of the Commonwealth, the matter must be taken off our campus and brough t before the citizens of the State. If the stu- dents feel the need of the A. B. degree — and there is no doubt that they do — it is necessary for them, as well as for all others interested, to impress the rest of the people of the State with the need that the College has for the degree. " The Trustees will meet again in September of this year to take a final vote, which may be favorable or unfavorable. During the time that elapses between now and next fall, it is imperative that public opinion should be expressed once again in favor of the imme- diate granting of the degree. Students, faculty, alumni, as well as all the other people who are interested in the welfare of Massachusetts State College, should take it upon themselves to make their opinions in this matter known. " In the columns of its regular weekly issue for January 20, 1938, the Collegian offered more detailed comment concerning the stand taken by the Trustees with regard to the student petition for the A. B. degree: " In spite of the fact that the decision of the Board of Trustees came as a surpris- ing blow to all of us, the present situation as regards the granting of the A. B. degree is not at all without hope, and the outlook for the granting of the desired degree may be considered somewhat favorably. " Since the time that the present movement first saw light, over ten years ago, much progress has been made; and yesterday ' s action may be regarded as one more step toward the granting of the A. B. degree. Since the time that students and faculty first voiced themselves in favor of the degree, many arguments against its adoption have been raised and discarded. The argument that it is not within the province of a Land Grant college to award an Arts degree, that this college did not have the facilities to ofl ' er such a degree, that a great immediate expense would be incurred, . . . these and many other arguments have been raised and discarded in the past. " Similarly, the points made yesterday against the immediate granting of the A. B. degree will, in all probability, suffer the same fate as those raised in other years. That the awarding of an A. B. degree will increase the pressure for admission to Massachusetts State College, and thus cause an expensive expansion of the college, need never be a reality. In past years, just as at present, we have had enrollment quotas which have been [270] Oht A.B. © e TOWARD THE A. B. DEGREE (C.nlinu.Ml) adhered to, and which dehnitely restrict the number of students of each year ' s entering class. There is no reason why such quotas could not be sustained after an A. B. degree has been granted. A quota regulating the number of qulaified students to be admitted each year would safe.guard against any inadvisable expensive expansion which, it is felt, might burden the taxpayers of the State. The A. B. degree should be considered, not with any fear of an increased expense, but with the purpose in mind of granting an Arts degree within the limits of the college ' s present enrollment. " The desire of a ' mandate from the public ' which was recommended at the Trustee meeting seems unnecessary after the vigorous appeals that have been made for the degree by the students, faculty, alumni, and other friends of the college, who are a substantial part of the public. The desire for an Arts degree at M. S. C. by the public has been expressed in no uncertain terms. " If, because of the awarding of an A. B. degree at the State College, a large number of students will desire admission here,— and fears to that effect have been expressed,— we should have, in that very situation, the ' mandate from the public ' What better indication that an Arts degree for this college is desired by the general public than that more sons and daughters of Massachusetts citizens will apply for admission after an A. B. degree is adopted? Do we, then, not already have the ' mandate from the public ' ? " We hope that the Trustees will reconsider their objections to the immediate grant- ing of the A. B. degree. In the meantime, once again everyone interested in the College should raise his voice in favor of the Arts degree at Massachusetts State College. " Since January, the students have been acting in response to the Trustees ' call for a " pubhc mandate " . In the Collegian for March 3, 1938, there appeared the following brief but poin ted editorial by Emery Moore, ' 39, new Editor-in-Chief of the Collegian, who continues this publication ' s tradi- tional championing of the A. B. degree: " BOOST FOR A. B. DEGREE " " More to be desired now than any one other influence on the question of the A. B. degree is news of accomplishments such as that of William O ' Donnell, whose literary efforts have been accepted by the American Mercury. " When a college of our type, striving for a Liberal Arts degree, can show that there are produced from the student body, men and women, who are truly accomplished in the so-called ' cultural subjects, ' and who have creative ability sufficient to write articles accepted by leading literary magazines, it has taken a stride toward an Arts degree, which can have a great influence on those people now contributing to the ' public man- date. ' " The growth of the Debating Team, both in membership and program, is one more fact which is before the public eye. With such increase in interest as it and various other clubs are now enjoying, there will eventually reach the public eye some of these activities which denote interest and participation of the student body in cultural affairs. " Durmg the first week of April the need of an Arts degree at our College was again emphasized when Mr. Reardon, State Commissioner of Education, publicly expressed himself in favor of the grant- ing of an A. B. degree at the Massachusetts State College. In addition, there is hope in President Baker ' s statement at the Annual Boston Alumni Banquet on April 2: " An A. B. degree from the Col- lege—why yes, of course. If the work leads logically to such a degree. " The Collegian editor wrote concerning the significant statements of Commissioner Reardon and President Baker: " After nearly ten years of agitation and thorough investigation on the part of the stu- dent body and faculty of the College, hope for the A. B. degree has taken a new rise with these statements from President Baker and Commissioner of Education Reardon. . . . That President Baker has expressed favor toward the A. B. is welcome news. Commissioner Reardon ' s approval, the appointment of two new trustees with liberal ideas, all point to an Arts degree in the near future. The concerted effort of students and faculty has partly finished its work. " [271] :7Ae A.n. ©.e e TOWARD THE A. B. DEGREE (Conduded) Meanwhile, the Student Committee continues to operate. New members: Mabelle Booth , ' 39, Franklin Davis, ' 40, John Filios, ' 40, and Myron Hager, ' 40 — have been added to our ranks. The next move it would seem, is the correlating and the close uniting of the three main currents of conviction for the A. B. degree: that of the students, that of the faculty, and that of the alumni and other friends of the college, especially the parents of students. By adopting a unified program of action, they will then be able to marshal that " public mandate " which the Trustees have called for. Students have welcomed the news concerning a report of an Alumni Committee, composed of Ralph F. Tabor, ' 16, Chairman; Alden C. Brett, ' 12, and Joseph Forest, ' 28, and instructed to make a carsful study of our College, — first, in comparison with other Land Grant institutions, and, second, in relation to the educational needs of the state. This committee, on the basis of its independently conducted study, has unanimously recommended that " The Associate Alumni make every effort to secure action by the Board of Trustees favorable to the offering of the A. B. degree. " Similarly wel- come has been the news that at last one Alumni class, that of 1928, through its President, Jack Quinn, has recently appointed a Class A. B. Degree Committee to work in conjunction with the students for the adoption of the A. B. degree by our College. [272J eoMe £i (XCPJUiMUm mmuUUZTjb CONVOCATIONS Although it may seem difficult at times to give up an hour every Thursday morning at 11 o ' clock, what would the students do without the opportunity to meet in one body? There is much more to be derived from this weekly assembly than mere educational benefit; its social values are vastly important. Before con- vocation itself, you will see numerous groups of students who may not have any classes together chatting about approaching social events. Sororities or fraternities may form their little cliques, but no one is ever left standing alone. Every one seems to feel himself an essential part of a large, vital institution. As the groups stand on the steps of Stockbridge Hall or in the lobby, there is a feeling of reluctance about entering the auditorium; all are engrossed in their conversations. At last, however, as the final bell rings, there is a surge toward the inside doors. The majority of the students are seated by eleven o ' clock, but there are always a few laggards who make themselves conspicuous by coming in late. The students quiet down as President Baker or Dean Machmer rises to make announcements. Then other announcements are read by the President of the Senate. Sometimes these may elicit hearty laughter from students and faculty because of incongruous wording of statements. The speaker is then introduced by some mem- ber of the faculty. Economics and International Relations seem to be the most popular subjects (from the speakers ' point of view, not from the students!) In spite of their lack of interest or understanding, however, most students are courteous enough to put on a semblance of attention. As the hands of the clock slowly approach 11:50, a little uneasiness is apparent in the assembly. Students begin to shuffle their feet or slip on their coats. If the speaker is human and at all sympathetic (and most of the speakers are) he will quickly come to a conclusion. He then sits down amidst an enthusiastic hand- clapping contest. On the edges of their seats, the students await the final dismissal. Then ensues a mad rush into the lobby for copies of the Collegian. Then there is an even madder rush for the Cafeteria. THE " LI BE ' On campus all roads lead not to Rome but to the Goodell Library, or as it is more popularly known, the " Libe " . Witness the " Abbey " signing- out sheet. How often the destination is the library! And you may be sure that co-eds aren ' t the only ones who frequent the " Libe. " But actually, the Library offers something to everyone. The studious come here in search of a quiet place to study; the socially-minded, to meet someone; the musically inclined, to listen to the phonograph; the men students, to find a date — dare we say the co-eds do the same? In the morning, before eight o ' clock, there are students standing on the steps waiting to be admitted. And at ten o ' clock at night there is a general outpouring of students, mostly in couples, in response to the warning bell for closing. Let ' s visit the Library in the afternoon. As we enter, we notice that the lobby is rather noisy. The upholstered settees provide students with a convenient place to sit and relax from the strains of studying, or just to loaf and talk. Immediately in front of us, in the stacks, is a student searching for a book, carefully repeating its number lest he forget. Another one has taken his troubles to the charging desk where he is explaining them to a member of the staff. In the catalogue alcove some freshmen are learning how to look up books. In the reference room, newspapers lie scattered about on the table. Someone is leaning over the unabridged dictionary. Someone else is look- ing through the " Reader ' s Guide to Periodical Literature " . What is that fellow doing with six volumes of the Encyclopedia ByiLiniiica? Prob- ably, he is writing his weekly theme for fresh- man composition. On the other side of the lobby is a reading room. How quiet it is! On the wall above the shelves of magazines the minute hand of the clock audibly jti ' ks out the passing minutes. Suddenly the high spot of the " Pilgrim Chorus " is heard coming from below. Evidently the phonograph is in use downstairs in the music room. Let ' s go upstairs. In the upper hall we stop to look at the current Camera Club exhibit. [273] e e e £i4e THE " LI BE ' (Concluded) We can also look into the College history room where all books and papers pertaining to the history of the College are preserved. At the end of the hall is the " Reserve Cage " , where books are kept which are to be used for assigned reading. Inside, a student is always on duty. Beyond is the upstairs reading room. It is not so crowded now as it is in the evening, when it is often difficult to find an empty chair, espe- cially the night before a " Pat ' s " exam. It is never really quiet here. Lights click, papers crumple, notebooks snap, and chairs scrape. Several couples are studying together. A big fellow with an " M " on his maroon sweater, judging by his scowl, is less at home over his chem-books than he is on the gridiron. Some students are diligently studying. Others are ob- viously day-dreaming. And there is one in the corner taking a nap. As we go downstairs again and leave the Goodell Library, we can look across the way to the Old Chapel in which the library used to be not so very long ago. and can better appreciate the advantages of the new building. LIFE IN THE ABBEY What stories the Abbey walls might relate if they could talk! What humorous, pathetic, ironic tales they would be. New faces appear regularly (and often disappear rapidly), but the same stories might be told year in and year out with only the slightest variations. But let ' s take a peep into this namesake of old Abigail Adams and see for ourselves what the life is like. In the daytime a more unpopular place is not to be found on campus — that is — with the ex- ception of a few minutes when the ever looked- for mail-man arrives with his cargo of pleasures and disappointments. From 8:02 A. M., when the last student bangs her way out to an 8 o ' clock class, until dinner time the dormitory is as quiet as a real abbey. But, classes over, life begins. Down in the " center " the " Vic " blares forth D psy Doodle and some swing arrangement of Loch Lomond, while an ardent trucking enthusiast shows her less accomplished sisters how it is done. Draped over the chairs are a few more serious students, en- grossed in the latest issues of Lije. One wonders how they can concentrate even on that, in such noise. Down in the laundry the water is running full blast from all the faucets. Some one yells in an attempt to be heard above the din, " Where ' s my other stocking? " and dives frantically into a pile of miscellaneous clothes. In the hall the buzzers all seem to be ringing at once. From one of the rooms comes " Fresh- man — answer the buzzer! " All over the building comes the cry " Marie-e-e! — Telephone! " But Marie is never to be found. But later on in the evening things quiet down — they have to. If any unruly student does start an outbreak, down comes the stern proctor with the sharp command " Girls, quiet hours! " Woe be it unto the practical jokers who will persist in setting off alarm clocks, making pie- beds, and doing all sorts of mischief. Late at night the grinds and social butterflies alike seem to be bothered by the hunger urge. Down the coiTidor to the kitchenettes can bs heard the shuffle of bedroom slippers, accom- panied by much giggling. A few moments of silence, and finally burnt odors of cocoa or tea issue forth, proclaiming that a midnight snack is in order. Without fail a whole crowd collects in the room which boasts the most food. Crackers, peanut butter and cheese, cookies and cakes from home disappear as if by magic. This kind of a party almost always leads into one of the most predominate phases of dormitory life — the " biill session " . Now these sessions provide an opportunity for all parties to air their opinions about sororities and fraternities, religion, movies, professors, and almost any other topic of common interest. More often than not, they hinge on a deliberation of the defects and merits of a certain male element. Imagine the embarrassment of the members of one " bull session " when they discovered that the other side of the campus had been under the window listening in. Once in a while, frightening blasts of the fire alarm late at night arouse the inmates of the Abbey to much excitement. Out of the doors pour sleepy-eyed damsels with their hair done up in curlers, and sleepy scowls on their faces. The belle of the ball would scarcely be recog- nized in this condition. The fire proctor demands, " Where ' s your flash- light and towel? " " Uh? " grunts the dazed Freshman. But now, shall we examine a typical Abbey room? After all, the rooms are used to sleep in and even to study in at times. On the door is a big sign " Keep Out " , but that doesn ' t mean a thing. You walk in just the same. The walls are well covered with banners and drawings. Draped around the mirrors are dance programs and numerous souvenirs of " conquests " , while " the one and only " smiles affectionately from the bureau. Incidentally, each year the awful sophomores collect these love tokens, display them before the whole dormitory, and make the poor Freshmen sing for them, if they want them back. But one must admit that the girls rooms are, for the most part, pretty and cozy, in spite of the fact that " kittens " do like to crawl under the beds. Yes, life in the Abbey has its ups and downs, but it is lots of fun. And every year when com- mencement comes around and trunks and bags are packed, the girls turn for a last look at the home they are leaving and sigh as they remem- ber the happy days they have spent there. [274] ecf£ 9e £4e- TMxTTI f M I. 0. TESTS I. Q. (Intelligence Quotient) tests have become as much a part of the first week at college as freshman caps. They are just one of those burdens which all freshmen must endure. Even though the neophyte may have no desire to determine the amount of gray matter under his skull, he must, nevertheless, submit to the tests. Each potential graduate must be classified. He is either a moron, or a genius, or an idiot. The intelligence tests will give the answer. When the time for the intelligence tests has arrived, all the freshmen are herded into a huge auditorium. Here the newcomer must struggle with the bewildering tests which are supposed to determine his abilitiy as a student. He finds that most of the tests are about the same. Starting off with relatively easy questions and problems, the tests always end with complicated enigmas that Einstein himself would hesitate to tackle. The artificial language tests are noteworthy in this respect. The freshman may master the first few sentences, but when he comes to the last few, he is utterly perplexed. Nowhere could he find a more confused mass of nonsense. When he tries to write Franklin ' s famous saying which begins, " Early to bed, early to rise ... " in the artificial language, he may end with something like this: " Igi tigokogo, igi tiyako nigno umpa nono, dodo, esco nutto. " The bewildered freshman may slip by the ar- tificial language tests somehow; but when he comes to the mathematics tests, he is trapped. These tests go from the mildly insane to outright demeniia praecox. If a freshman obtains the correct answers, it means one of two things. Either he, too, is insane, or he has misunderstood the questions. Here is a typical mathematical problem which a freshman might receive: " If four were sixteen, and five were ninety- three, what would the reciprocal of the square root of twenty-two be? " It is no wonder that most freshmen, thinking that they are playing a game of golf during this test, try for the lowest score. The freshman finds that the rest of the intelli- gence tests are as bad as the artificial language and mathematics tests. There are memory tests, vocabulary tests, and general information tests. When the freshman has completed all the tests, he is in a quandary. He probably has come to believe either of two things. He may believe that he is a moron even though he never sus- pected his feeble-mindedness before, or he may believe that all psychologists are completely in- sane. Personally, I favor the latter belief! —Student No. 4961 (I. Q. rating, -6) ROPE PULL Dear Dad, We met the enemy and we beat them; they are now as wet and as muddy as the water and mud of the college pond could make them. Yes, sir, we pulled the sophomores through the pond. (Confession: I was so hot when the tug of war ■was over, that I envied the sophomores splash- ing in the pond ' s cool water.) Though freshmen have traditionally battled sophomores at Mass. State College ' s rope-pull, no freshmen were ever more eager to win than we, as we gathered in the cage to organize. From the balcony, my roommate, who watched our snake dance grow out of the confusion, said we were a blurr of freshman caps and old clothes. As our snake dance left the cage and paraded across the meadow, where we took our positions along the heavy rope stretching across the pond, we were outwardly gay and confident, and in- wardly anxious. While the Senate examined the rope and supervised last minute preparations, we dug footholds for ourseh-es. Wlien the starter ' s gun exploded, we fell on the rope and then pulled to the chant of, " Catch, catch, heave. " For a hot, sweaty, exhausting eternity we strained on the rope; but the sophomores also were straining, and the rope only whipped the surprised waters of the pond. Then slowly, as the sophomores became exhausted, we pulled the center marker of the rope toward our shore. When the time was up the sophomores were still on the opposite bank, but they had lost twenty yards of rope and had to swim the pond. £275] eMe.( £A4e MOUNTAIN DAY Mount Toby had been slumbering, its deep pine-scented seclusion undisturbed by Outing Club members and forestry students. But one day in October it was suddenly aroused by an invasion of youthful humanity pouring out of trucks, cars and busses. Soon mobs of noisy, carefree students scrambled and swarmed every- where. It was Mountain Day! The Alnid Mater had rung out on the chapel chime. Classes were dismissed for the afternoon, ending the possi- bility of further excuses — " I know it was assigned, but I didn ' t prepare it because 1 thought today would be Mountain Day. " Students had piled into busses and trucks near the Abbey, and had competed with the rattling by singing lustily. Finally they reached their destination. Then the long climb began. After the first mile or so, the line of hikers became thinned and elongated. Finally, the top of the mountain was reached. Most of the students rested on the grass around the two fire towers, but other would-be explorers looked for springs, caves and cabins, following a leader cr the conflicting directions of those who had " just come from there. " Many climbed the tower to admire the view, display their Tarzanian dexterity, or take candid camera shots of their less energetic friends. As the afternoon began to wane, all descended the mountain to Roaring Brook, where they satisfied their appetities with cider, coffee, sand- wiches, rolls, apples and hot dogs which they roasted over campfires. " Twilight shadows deep- ened " , but soon a bonfire blazed high. Around it gathered the tired but happy students to cheer and sing " the songs they love so well. " The crowd gradually dispersed in couples and groups to the waiting busses. A few brave souls walked the six miles home. At last the mountain was deserted, but it, like the students, looked forward to the next Mountain Day. POND PARTY Suddenly I was aroused from the depths of a math problem by a cry from the dormitory hallway — " The freshmen are being thrown into the pond! " A sly grin broke out upon my face. Those poor freshmen had been caught without t heir maroon caps, but I, who had not been wear- ing my cap, had been wary enough to evade the eyes of the Senate members. Without stopping to think, I slipped on my jacket and dashed over to the section of the pond in front of the Mem- orial Building. The blackness of the night hid me from pry- ing upper-class eyes, as I stood watching the events with a feeling of security and condescen- sion toward my less fortunate classmates who were being heaved bodily into the animated frog puddle. All at once, as if in a dream, I heard a voice exclaim, " There is a freshman without his cap on! " I suddenly became wide awake as the upperclassmen milled around me. I struggled, pleaded and swore. An unexpressible feeling of helplessness spread over me as I described half an arc in space prior to my " dip " ; then, with a resounding splash, I felt myself suckecl into the depths of the clammy mud. Wet, cold, muddy, sheepish, and resentful, I hurried back to my room without waiting to get one of those " peachy haircuts " my brethren were given — " just a little fuzz. " And I remembered a quotation I had read once — " Pride cometh before a fall. " HELL WEEK " Bang! Wham! " No, nobody ' s been shot; that ' s just two big brothers warming up their paddles on the posteriors of two pledges. The time is Monday, March 14, 1938, at seven in the morning; the place is the fraternity house, and the occasion is the beginning of Hell Week. These two fresh- men pledges have arrived fifteen minutes late for the setting up exercises scheduled for 6:45 A. M. On the sixth and last stroke of the paddle, one big brother, in an attempt to give his all for his fraternity, cracks six inches of wood off the end of his paddle. He claims that the paddle was weak anyway. With this parting shot still in their minds, the two tardy pledges are sent [276] Ca e £t HELL WEEK (Coiiohuird) scurrying after their more fortunate brethren, ah-eady on their way to breakfast. It often occurs during the day that a pledge has the misfortune to meet one or two fraternity brothers between classes. Each brother assumes his prerogative of aslcing the neophyte for a cigarette, a large wooden match, and several unbroken Necco wafers. Woe to the dog who hands the frater a broken wafer! Next morning the pledge delegation is at the fraternity house promptly at 6;45; that is, ail but two initiates who arrived at 5 o ' clock to polish shoes and brush clothes. Until 7 the whole group is put through a very rigorous routine of exercises, the agony being in charge of a very capable sophomore. The exercise consists of such manly feats as full-knee bends on one foot, running in place with the knees up to the chin, duck-walking up and down a bank- ing, and doing twenty-five or more " push-ups " . If a pledge is unwise enough to feel tired during the course of the exercises, he is allowed to " rest " ; that is, he is directed to stand on his right leg, extend the upper part of the left leg forward, let the lower part of the leg hang loose from the knee, place the right elbow on the left knee, the chin on the heel of the hand, and relax. (Try it!) This " neophyte slaughter " continues through the week till Friday night. Then, feeling that they should illustrate their real ingenuity in humiliation, the brothers invite all of the pledges to attend a conference to be held that evening. Almost as soon as the prospective members begin to arrive, the fun commences. Till about ten, the brothers are entertained by neophytic en- deavors at poetic recitations, strip-teases, vocal solos, and wrestling and boxing matches. Then an hour of reckoning is held, and each pledge is called to account for his misdemeanors of the past week. According to the extent of his short- comings and the whim of the judge, a penalty of whacks with a paddle is then meted out to each one. Then, feeling that the neophytes need lelaxation in the free, open air, the members inform them that a hike will take place the following evening. 1= Accordingly, Saturday evening finds the group starting out from Thatcher Hall, walking out to the railroad tracks, counting out 1,792 railroad ties to find the next clue, then walking, walking, and ividking. About three-thirty in the morning they meet several of the fraternity brothers on a lonely road. The first impulse is to seize and quarter the devils who are responsible for this wet, cold, snowy outrage; but on discovering that the fraters are there to lead them to food, the pledges check the impulse. The food, as it turns out, consists of hot dogs roasted over a campflre. Needless to say, this repast tastes as pood to the cold and hungry group as a chicken dinner would at home. The snack has a great deal to do with the almost cheery spirit, which, in spite of the weather, prevails on the five-mile trek home. Once back at the fraternity, cold, wet clothes are changed for warm, dry ones, frowns are changed for tired smiles; and the animosity which has prevailed during Hell Week is a thing of the past. —William T. Goodwin, ' 41 THEME WRITING AT TWO From the one light left burning, the long cor- ridor sinks away into a shadowy gloom. Since midnight (two hours ago) scraping chairs, clos- ing doors, and rising voices have faded into a silliness weighted with sleep. To me, as I sit propped at my desk, the unreality of it all is emphasized by the metallic ticking of the clock on the bureau; this is the time for clocks to tick and corridors to brood, seemingly free of all human existence. I am out of place. In my room, I stare down at a half finished theme. Over and over, I read the last sentence; my mind revolves slowly about the idea but cannot penetrate it. My thumb aimlessly rolls a twisted shred of an eraser, and the words " Let Dave Do It " look up monotonously from the advertisement on the blotter. The bitter smoke of my pipe feathers my mouth, and a rank smell of stale steam and smoke deadens the air. Now, the steam pipes begin to knock and grind. As though trying to sneak up on me, the noise starts softly, then works into a crescendo of banging, and giving up the attempt, dies away; but I know it will start again, and I wait for it. It tortures my nei-ves exquisitely, and my hands twitch until the " thing " finally stops. Finally silence settles again, and even the rushing wind outside dies away. _ As time moves on, I begin to despair of ever finishing the theme, of ever being able to say, " That ' s done " , and go to bed. I cannot think. Goading myself on, consciously, and offering myself sleep as a reward, I blink my smarting eyes and find words and form sentences. Out of the silence, I form sentences. At last I finish what I call a theme (I hope the professor will!). And now ... to sleep! William F. Warren, ' 41 [277] A MOMENT ' S MONUMENT A ONE-ACT PLAY by DEAN TERRY Time: A day in January Characters OUR HERO ROOMMATE FRATERNITY BROTHER Other odd characters found on every campus SCENE I (3rd floor room at North College) ALARM CLOCK: Ting-a-ling, ting-a-ling. Time to get up! OUR HERO: (yawning) Aaaah! (sleepily). What time is it? ((Looks at clock). Half-past five? ROOMMATE: What the ! Shut up that clock! (Our Hero shuts off alarm and goes back to sleep. All is quiet.) (A little later). ROOMMATE: What time is it? ALARM CLOCK: 7:35. (Roommate leaps from bed, shakes Our Hero.) ROOMMATE: Get up, we ' ll be late for Pat ' s! (Great activity in room.) ROOMMATE: (While dressing.) What was the idea of setting the alarm for 5:30? OUR HERO: Oh, Oh! Gosh! I just remembered; I was going to learn a sonnet for Public Speaking this morning. No breakfast for me! ROOMMATE: (leaving). See you at Pat ' s. SCENE II (Bowker Auditorium) PROF. PRINCE: There are three schools that I wish to discuss this morning, etc., etc. OUR HERO: Gosh, I ' m tired. Shouldn ' t have gone to Grandy ' s after the show last night. PROF. PRINCE: And don ' t let me find Spenser spelled with a " c " and Jonson with an " h " , etc. OUR HERO: (asleep) Bzzzzz Wheee; Bzzzz Whee. CLASSMATE: Hey! Wake up! The period ' s over. OUR HERO: Huh! so soon? (yawns) Aaaah! Now to hear Prof. Gordon discuss smooth black guinea pigs and rough white ones. SCENE III (Room D, Fernald Hall) PROF. GORDON: (taking a few pills) Now, I wish to have your individual attention. This matter of Genetics is very important, etc., etc. OUR HERO: This is a good period to finish learning that sonnet. " Let me not to the — to the — to the, " Oh, heck! " To the marriage of ti-ue minds admit impediments. " PROF. GORDON: Now turn to the slide on the red-eyed fruit fly. In this case, etc., etc. OUR HERO: " Love is not Love which — which — etc. " PROF. GORDON: Now in the F-2 generation. Oh! is that the bell? That will be all. OUR HERO: Gee! so soon? This period seems shorter when you ' re doing something else. Now to Chem! [278] A MOMENT ' S MONUMENT SCENE IV (Goessmann Auditorium) PROF. SEREX: A pupil in this class gave the formula for silver chloride as AgCU. That ' s where I ' ve got 75% of you flunked, you don ' t know your fundamental chemistry, etc. OUR HERO: " Love is not Love which alters when it alterations find. " PROF. SEREX; (Forty minutes later). When we give you a slip marked Ila, we mean you to, etc. OUR HERO: (as bell rings). Here ' s where the fun begins. " Let me not to the marriage of — of — of " SCENE V (Room in Old Library) DR. HELMING: Now we ' ll hear. . . . (Our Hero gets up and nervously stumbles through sonnet 116, Shakespeare. Sits down.) (Deep silence) DR. HELMING: You did fairly well, but in this tjrpe of poetry you must practice intonation, etc. etc. (Bell rings about 10 minutes too late as far as Our Hero is concerned.) SCENE VI (On Way to Fraternity Dining Room) OUR HERO: (to Fraternity Brother) Helming only gave me a sixty, and after all the time I spent on it, too! FRATERNITY BROTHER: (a very talkative fellow) Yeah! OUR HERO: I wonder what we ' ll have, I ' m hungry! FRATERNITY BROTHER: Me, too! SCENE VII (Same as I) OUR HERO: Well, I ' m all through for the day. Have a lot of studying to do this afternoon. (Turns on radio. Finally gets music loud enough to drown out trombone on fourth floor.) OUR HERO: Guess I ' ll make my bed. (Makes bed, then lies on it. Radio plays lullaby, with results.) OUR HERO: (Hears door slam, yawns) Ooooh! I guess I fell asleep. Is that you? ROOMMATE: Huh! Sure! Aren ' t you going to supper? OUR HERO: Of course. What time is it? ROOMMATE: Six o ' clock. OUR HERO: Wow! I ' ll be late for supper. (Puts coat on, rushes out door.) SCENE VIII (Same as VI) OUR HERO: (running) Gee! The house seems awful far when you ' re in a hurry to get there. (on way back from supper) OUR HERO: I think I ' ll stop in and bowl a string. (goes into Mem Building) SCENE IX (North College Again) OUR HERO: (climbing stairs slowly) I guess those eight strings took all my pep as well as my money. Maybe after they build a new Physics Building, they ' ll put elevators in North. OUR HERO: (enters room) (to roommate) Hi, chum! There are some swell radio programs tonight. 7:30— True and False; 8:30— Al Jolson; 9:30- Walter O ' Keefe, etc. OUR HERO: (11:31, turning off radio) Boy! I ' m tired. Guess I ' d better go to bed. Should have done some studying. Oh, well! I ' ll get up tomorrow at 5:30 and do Psych. THE END [279} tMe e. £4e CROSS-SECTION MORNING—! BRRRIIINNNGGG. " Oh, somebody set that alarm early again! What, it can ' t be seven o ' clock. " Slowly dragging one foot after the other, John Frosh wearily makes his way up the corridor, to begin another day. The sounds of the wash- room, the splash of running water, the bristling of tooth-brushes, the gentle slap-slap of wash- cloths on tender faces, the patter of the showers upon naked bodies, suffice to bring the unhappy freshman partly awake. He notices the varying stages of dress and undress of the late risers, the expressions on their faces, from those with eyes half- closed with sleep, hair rumpled, a sour expression marring their visages; to those with faces shiny from recent washing, hair plastered down, a smile wrinkling the corners of their mouths, as they prepare to depart for the morning meal. He sees the sun shining through the window. Another day has begun. He must be off about his business. " Cheerio, mates, see you at breakfast. " HASH—! ! " Oh, good night! a line of waiting people to the front door again this morning. Must I always stand in line? I stand in line at every meal. I stood in line to get my military uniform, to pay my bill, to get my registration card, to gei my registration card signed, even to see the President and be officially welcomed. I stand in line every time I go to a game or a show. Now, here I am in line again. " Tray clashes on tray. Glasses clink. Here someone tips over his orange juice, the orange liquid spilling all over his tray and himself. Here someone stops at a table to speak to a friend. The low hum of conversation is broken by an exclamation as some one notices that the hands of the clock are at seven-fifty. A few late arrivals dash in just before the line closes. Gradually, the noise of conversation dies out as most of the students disappear classward. Only the hurried clash of dishes is heard as the boys clean up the tables. Soon even that is gone. MORE HASH—! ! ! Euclid alone has looked on Beauty bare — It is eight o ' clock in the Math, building. A few students have arrived in the classroom early, to study till the roll is called. The others filler in gradually, talking in loud voices, discussing the day ' s assignment or the latest choice bits of campus gossip. By the time the instructor ap- pears, only a few seats are empty. All but two of these are filled as he prepares his papers for the day ' s work. He calls the roll, and, as he comes to the name of the boy who should be occupying one of the empty places, the sound of feet, pounding up the stairs is heard; and the voice that belongs to the owner of the feet breathlessly answers " Here " , as the boy himself crashes headlong into the room. Five minutes later the other fellow walks in nonchalantly, and assumes his seat with a bored expression on his face. The day ' s routine has begun. ' l l ' l MASS ACTION Chemistry, the hated enemy of the many, the beloved of the few, takes foremost place with all. Poor John Frosh attempts in vain to take coinplete notes as the learned professor mumbles on and on of protons, atoms, electrons, nuclei, and other incomprehensible objects of which the dazed freshman has only a vague idea. The lecture room is waiTn, it reeks of hydrogen sul- fide or something. The murmur from the front of the room continues. There is a vague un- comfortable stirring, a shifting of feet. The seat is hard. John ' s thoughts drift to more enjoyable scenes. The lights grow dim. Soon he is fast asleep. In a moment he is awakened by a rude kick from behind. Again he strives desperately to appear aware of the proceedings, and scribbles something in his notebook. It is not long until the lights fade again. He will wake up at the end of the semester to find that he is passing with a flat sixty, because the professor does not want him in his class again next year. LET SCHOOLMASTERS PUZZLE THEIR BRAINS In English class a grammar test is returned. John hardly dares look at his. It has a red " 45 " neatly marked at the top. John wishes that there had been a decent grammar course in the high school he came from. He reflects un- comfortably that if it weren ' t for good grades in themes, he wouldn ' t be passing the course. The instructor is lecturing on paragraphing. He quotes Cardinal Newman, and immediately there is a two-man discussion between the instructor and that know-it-all in the back of the room. The class listens in disgust. Finally, the lecture is lesumed, and is ended with a reminder of the topic of the next theme, as the class streams out the doors. [280] CoL egpe £l§e CROSS-SECTION (Cunliuuud) ONTOGENY RECAPITULATES—! Botany lecture is over. Hear the boys rave! They worship the unconventional doctor, with his hatred of all that is feminine, his unorthodox ideas of God and man, his beliefs in fourth, fifth, and nth dimensional worlds. It is the most interesting course they have ever taken. But wait till the lecturer falls from metaphysics to onions. Wait till later in the year when there will be no time for expounding profound theories. Wait till the freshmen find themselves unable to take notes fast enough to keep up with the lecturer. Then Botany will be just another course to grumble at. Life will go on as before. RAPID TRANSIT " Isn ' t it a glorious day? The sun is shining. Of course, there is a cloud over there, but nothing will come of that. " John is on his way from French Hall to Stockbridge. As he tops the rise at the north of the College pond he can see students going in all directions on the various walks. The crunch of many feet on the gravel and the hum of voices, is broken by an occasional shouted greeting to a friend headed somewhere else. As a group of girls passes, the freshman gets a faint whiff of powder. He feels his books slipping from his arm as he runs to catch up with the gang ahead. As they climb the steps of Stockbridge, the bell in the Old Chapel strikes the hour. All dash madly into the classroom just as the instructor attempts to close the door. ALL THE WORLD ' S A STAGE! In Orientation, John Frosh listens vaguely to a sketchily scientific e.xplanation of the universe and its units, from super-galaxies down to cor- puscles. He can ' t go to sleep, the seats are too uncomfortable. He could listen to the lecture; but why should he? He has it on good authority from the sophomores that he can pass the course merely by copying the outline as it is written on the board. He feels the heat of the room, packed to capacity with other bored freshmen. White is hotter than red. Therefore, Venus must show phases. He gazes at the back of the neck of the girl in front of him. He draws pictures on his desk-arm. He doodles all over the pages of his notebook. He jumps up when the bell rings — like a punch-drunk pugilist, and is away to the next class. —FOOD FOR POWDER, FOOD FOR POWDER! Now the sun is gone; there is a cold breeze, and John has to tote an eight-pound rifle around a muddy field for fifty minutes. He comes to attention as the sergeant barks a command. He snaps the bolt clear out of his rifle at " Inspec- tion Arms " . He swears inwardly at the blankety- blank that snapped up the cut-off on his rifle. He carries a heavy pair of boots up and down the field to " Hun, ' Too, Hree, Hor; Hun, Too Hree, Hor " , till he no longer has any feeling in his legs. Again he greets with relief the end of the period. ONE BIG HAPPY FAMILY In convocation John Frosh assumes his seat. President Baker, Dean Machmer and a speaker are on the platform. The speaker is just or- dinary, neither more nor less boring that usual. About ten minutes before convocation is over, two or three of John ' s classmates take it into their heads to leave. Immediately the rest of the freshmen start hissing those who have more courage than they. Mitchell NeJame looks dis- gusted. The sophomores look amused. The seniors look bored. President Baker looks in- dignant. Dean Machmer looks worried. The speaker just looks. With the end of convo, comes the rush for Collegians, and the dash for the hashhouse. MENS SANA IN CORPORE SANO At one-fifty-five the freshmen must report for hygiene. What a course! John assures himself and the world at large that he knows more about the subject than that doctor with his eternal " we further recognize " , who, " if he does know anything about the facts of life, is too bashful to tell it. " Oh, well, cheer up, John, the course lasts only half a semester. WHERE, OH WHERE, HAS MY LITTLE DOG GONE! John is trying to find his friend Bill. He ' s been to the library, where some are studying and many are relaxing, but Bill isn ' t there. He ' s been to Bill ' s room at North College, but Bill ' s rommate hasn ' t seen him since breakfast. He ' s been to the Memorial Building, found it thick with smoke, bridge players, and couples gazing soulfully into each other ' s eyes; but Bill is not there. He ' s been all through the Physical Ed. building with its trophy room, its cage, lighted by the afternoon sun, its locker room, bristling with sweaty athletes, its pool, spotted here and there by splashing boys. But Bill is not there. He has searched all over campus, by the pond covered with ripples from a light westerly breeze, down the walk by Goessmann Laboratory, getting a faint whifl: of some mysterious chemical, along the walk from Stockbridge to Alumni Field, over the culvert under which the overflow from the pond trickles, by the College Store, in front of South College and to the football practice field, where at last he finds Bill, deeply intent on watching the scrimmages of the sport he intends to star in. RUNNERS GOING ROUND THE TRACK Having carried his message to Bill, John, out for track, goes to the locker room of the Physical Education Building to change into his track {281] eMe e£ile CROSS-SECTION (Coiu-ludcd) outfit. Thence down to the cage to run around the oval two or three times and be checked off. Back again to the locker room and into the shower room, where a quartet of voices tries to render some of the college songs. Down a short flight of steps, a short run, a jump, a headlong dive, and he lands well out in the pool. Back in the locker room he weighs himself carefully, dresses, argues with Bish, drinks of the best water on campus, and departs. So much for official exer- cise. THE HEART OF A UNIVERSITY Next stop is the library. Listen to that boy and girl over in the comer. If Basil happens by they ' ll catch it. John goes back down stairs to look up a couple of words for English. Then, upstairs again to study. What a lot of women in here today. Say! wait a minute, there ' s one he hasn ' t noticed before. She ' s got something there! He ' ll have to try to date her up. Lookl She smiled! Is that Mary with her? Here ' s where he gets introduced. No. They ' re leaving. Oh, well, better luck next time. Guess he ' ll go out among the shelves. He enjoys just browsing around to see what he can find. Anyway it ' s nearly time for supper. Guess he ' ll go back and stand in line again. He ought to see George and argue that point out tonight. SANCTUARY Two hours later all is quiet in Thatcher except for the loud tick-tock of the clock. The room smells of tobacco smoke. John and his roommate have been trying to study. Suddenly the loud sound of voices in altercation is heard down the hallway. The door of the next room opens, and a positive voice announces, " It ' s after seven-fifteen. " All is quiet again for a while. A shuffling of feet and a few sibilant whispers are heard, then a sharp explosion. The door of the next room opens again and the boy with the positive voice pops out like a jack-in- the-box: " Whawt the blaank yew tryin ' tew dew, blow the door off? " Again silence reigns supreme, but not for long. A bull-session de- thrones it. And it has to center in John ' s room. Later, much later, when the doiTnitory is quiet, he finds time to study history for tomorrow. That finished, he crawls into bed. He tosses and turns for what seems hours, wonders if he ' ll pass that math exam tomorrow, hopes the German teacher will not pull a surprise test, thinks of the girl he saw today, finally, sleeps. Harold E. Forrest, ' 41 [282J « -ife STATER ' s ?n % ' " ■ ' SSS ' SS " y 0-ini QcmimCttee oit 9.ftteA,coMeg.Uite AiMetLcd. ( P Front Row: Carpenter, Grayson, Dean Machmer, Munson. Second Row: Brody, Stone, Harrison, Goldman, Hurwitch. OFFICERS President, William L. Machmer (Dean) Vice-President, Theoren L. Warner, ' 08 Secretary, Earle S. Carpenter, ' 24 Executive Officer, Curry S. Hicks Executive Committee, Willard A. Munson, ' 05 OTHER MEMBERS Emory Grayson, ' 17 Frederick A. McLaughlin, ' 11 STUDENT MEMBERS Benjamin G. Hurwitch, ' 38 — Manager of Football William H. Harrison, ' 38 — Manager of Swimming Abraham B. Goldman, ' 38 — Manager of Soccer George Brody, " 39 — Manager of Track Edward Handverger, ' 38 — Manager of Cross Country Sidney Beck, ' 39 — Manager of Hockey William B. Ferguson, ' 38 — Manager of Basketball Norman Clark, ' 38 — Manager of Baseball JOINT COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS Regulating intercollegiate athletics at M. S. C. and setting policies for the athletic program, is the duty of the Joint Committee on Intercolle- giate Athletics. This body governs all matters of finance, fields, construction, and athletic policy. Among its several duties the Committee must approve of all intercollegiate athletic schedules, of all managerships, and of awards made for excellence in athletic competition. These are but a few of the matters considered each year by the Committee. The joint committee is composed of the follow- ing members: the student managers of each of the recognized Varsity sports; two members of the faculty appointed by the President of the College; three alumni of the college; the Director of Athletics; the Dean of the College, and the President of the college ex officio. [284] Oht %Y ieAeia )L Whidixi Bxyjah,d V " f ' iBWI H Front Row: Schmidt, Second Row: Poyson, Bokina. OFFICERS Faculty Member, Sidney Kauffman President, Vincent R. Schmidt, ' 39 Vice-President, William E. Roberge, ' 38 Secretary, Carl J. Bokina, ' 38 MEMBERS Carl J. Bokina, ' 38 " William E. Roberge, ' 38 Vincent R. Schmidt, ' 39 James H. King, ' 40 James W. Payson, Jr., ' 40 Clement F. Burr, ' 41 Raymond E. Taylor, ' 41 INTERCLASS ATHLETIC BOARD The Interclass Athletic Board is composed of eight members, two elected from each class. Its purpose is the promotion of interclass athletics and the awarding of class numerals and certifi- cates to members of winning class teams in the various sports carried on. Numerals and cer- tificates have been awarded this year to sopho- mores in football, and to freshmen in cross- country, basketball, and soccer. Other sports such as interclass tennis have been suggested and worked on, but interest seems to favor inter- fraternity sports and upperclassmen are difficult to organize for competition in interclass sports. [285] Z a 4% B eJkM - 1937 THE SEASON The 1937 varsity baseball team completed one of State ' s most successful years on the diamond when it closed its season with a 3-2 win over Amherst for its eighth straight victory. The season ' s final record was eleven wins out of fourteen games. Thirty-five candidates answered Coach Eb Caraway ' s first call for cage practice. The squad included five pitchers and eight catchers. Prac- tice continued indoors until the first few days in April when the squad took to the outdoors in preparation for the season ' s opener with Williams. On Saturday, April 17, the season opened on the home field as Fran Riel, pitching his first game for State, set the Ephmen down with one hit as State won 3-0. In both the first and third innings Fred Riel opened with a single and double, respectively, and scored on singles by Russ Hauck. Hauck also scored in the third on Towle ' s single and Mildram ' s long fly. The game was saved in the seventh when, after the only hit of the game and a walk, Couper at shortstop speared a hit and doubled a Williams runner at first to end the threat. The following Monday, however, State was set down by Conn. State at Storrs with three hits to lose 5-0. Fran Riel, playing in the outfield, Towle and Lavrakas were the only Statesmen to garner hits while the Nutmeggers were col- lecting eleven off of Lyons and Bokina. Couper was the fielding star of the day handling eight chances at shortstop without a miscue. Playing again on the home field on Saturday, April 24, the Statesmen lost to Trinity, 8-1. Six- hit pitching by the Trinity hurler and eight State errors combined to lose the game for the Statesmen. Outstanding was the home run of Mickey Kobrosky, Trinity outfielder, who later gained fame in the 1937 Collegiate All-Star New York Giants Football Game. Coming up in the last half of the ninth with John Lavrakas on base and two outs, Fred Riel singled sharply down the third base line to bring in the winning run in State ' s 5-4 win over Bowdoin Friday, April 30. Bucky Bokina went the route for the locals giving up five hits. Bemben led at bat with a triple and single in three times up. On Wednesday, May 5, Fran Riel took over the pitching burden against Am- herst in the third inning with the bases loaded, and proceeded to strike out Benny Myers, Am- herst captain. After Riel allowed only six hits, a scratch single in the tenth inning set the Statesmen down 5-4. Bemben hit a terrific home- run in the third inning. A week later John Bemben in his first mound appearance set a strong Wesleyan team down with two hits, and State won 2-0. The Riel twins featured the game with two double-steals. Fran Riel set Worcester Tech down with two hits, and every Statesman but Bemben hit safely as State won 16-1, on Thursday, May 20. Two days later Norm Blake set New Hampshire down with three hits to give State its third straight win 6-1. On Tuesday, Bokina allowed Tufts only four hits, but a dropped ball by Towle gave the Jumbos two runs to make the score 3-2. The next day the Statesmen went on a 13-hit spree while Bemben was giving the Springfield Maroons two hits to win 8-0. Morey provided the fielding gem of the day when he speared a sure home run. Playing away on the road Fran Riel held Vermont to six hits for a 5-3 win, and Norm Blake set Union down with four hits for a 13-0 win. Steff and Bemben were the leading hitters on the trip. State closed its season with its eighth straight victory when on Saturday, June 12, John Bem- ben, after pitching twelve innings, hit a double to score John Bush with the winning run, 3-2. After the game Fred was re-elected captain for the 1938 season and on the following morning he was presented with the Southern Alumni Baseball Cup. [286] UaA it( BaaeU - 1937 Front Row: Sheffield, Francis Riel, Bush, Loptain Frederick kiei, Davis, Towie, Second Row: Phelps, Silverman, Morey, Lavrakas, Couper, P. Fanning Third Row: Lyons, Bloke, Ingolls, Steff, F. Fanning, Bokino. Fourth Row: Cooch Caraway, Manager Clark. SUMMARY OF THE SEASON Score M.S.C. Opp. Apr. 17 WUliams at M. S. C 3 May 20 " 19 Conn. State at Storrs 5 " 22 • ' 24 Trinity at M. S. C 18 " 25 " 30 Bowdoin at M. S. C 5 4 " 26 May 1 Conn. State at M. S. C 4 3 " 29 5 Amherst at Pratt Field 4 5 " 31 " 11 Wesleyan at M. S. C 2 June 12 THE TEAM Isadore Barr, ' 37 (M) Ralph Ingram, ' 38 (M) Ernest K. Davis, ' 37 (M) John Lavrakas, ' 38 (M) Allen S. Ingalls, ' 37 (M) Robert S. Lyons, ' 38 Norman L. Sheffield, " 37 (M) David E. Mildram, ' 38 (M) Norman P. Blake, ' 38 (M) Frederick C. Riel, ' 38 (M) Carl J. Bokina, ' 38 (M) Stephen I. Silverman, ' 38 John G. Bush, ' 38 (M) Richard W. Towle, ' 38 (M) Henry V. Couper, ' 38 (M) Score M.S.C. Opp. W. P. L at Worcester 16 1 U. of N. H. at Durham 6 1 Tufts at M. S. C 3 2 Springfield at Springfield 8 U. of Vt. at Burlington 5 3 Union at Schenectady 13 Amherst at M. S. C 3 2 Floyd W. Townsley, ' 38 John Bemben, ' 39 (M) Francis T. Fanning, ' 39 Paul R. Fanning, ' 39 Clifton W. Morey, ' 39 (M) Ellsworth Phelps, Jr., ' 39 Francis J. Riel, " 39 (M) Howard N. StefT, ' 39 PERSONNEL Coach Elbert F. Caraway Captain Frederick C. Riel, ' 38 (M) Manager Norman Clark, ' 38 (M) Captain Riel [287] VaMib iP Lfti OAaxik. -1937 ATHLETICS FOR ALL Defending intercollegiate athletics as one of the greatest forces for character building yet de- veloped by modern education, athletic directors all over the country have touched off a half- truism that seems destined to explode in their own faces. It is true that intercollegiate athletics build character. Football, baseball, basketball, and the other common games of the college sport world are all important forces in the building of many qualities. But who do they build them for? In the average college or university some thirty to two hundred students take part in the active intercollegiate athletic program. What happens to the thousands who sit in the stands, who take no part in the competition? The average college student, the average stu- dent at Massachusetts State College, comes in contact with intercollegiate competition only as far as his student activities ticket will carry him. The character-building qualities of sporting events, boasted by athletic directors, is lost to him. What should be done for the student in the stands, is the question that boomerangs back to the physical education heads. Are athletics for the many or for the few? The obvious answer to this question, now asked on college campuses all over the country, is that there should be a program of sports for all — a progranr that gives the average student a chance to get the same benefits that his more skilled, phys- ically superior contemporaries have enjoyed for many years. Massachusetts State College has recognized this important problem and with a program of " athletics for all " is endeavoring to offer every student an opportunity to develop proficiency in some sporting line. Intra-mural athletic sched- ules are an accepted program of the Physical Education Department while non-competing teams in winter sports, boxing, wrestling and fencing are supported. Limited funds keep the department from developing a program that offers athletic competition to all, but the college is headed in the right direction. Intercollegiate athletics are a necessary part of the college program, and are a strong force in the moulding of character, as the directors contend; but the most important phase of the collegiate sport program concerns the college, itself, and the thousands of students whose athletic ability, or rather lack of it, limits their sport participation to intra-mural games. To realize the true objectives of the physical edu- cation directors, athletics for the many must be as well supported as athletics for the few. [288] Vxt ' iditi PypAinq JAacJk - 1937 Front Row: Green, Couhig, Lopham, Captain Thacker, Grant, Hallowell, O ' Brien, Roberts. Second Row: Riley, Griffin, Little, Guenard, Jablonsl i, Slesinski, Feinburg. Third Row: Manager Shift, Sievers, Adams, McGowan, NeJame, Avery, Coach Derby. PERSONNEL Coach Llewellyn L. Derby Captain Edward J. Thacker, ' 37 (M) Manager Philip B. Shiff, ' 37 (M) SUMMARY OF THE SEASON Score M.S.C. Opponents Apr. 24 B. U 58 77 May 1 Trinity 55 V2 70 V2 8 Tufts 461 2 56 W. P. 1 631 2 " 29 Conn. State 59% 751 3 Eastern Intercollegiates at Burlington, Vt. Seventh place, llVs points. Vermont 38 points. May 15. New England Intercollegiates at Boston. Did not place. R. L 25-1 12 May 21 and 22. Arthur C. Avery, ' 37 (M) Alfred W. Basamania, ' 37 (M) Robert E. Couhig, ' 37 (M) James J. Dobby, ' 37 (M) Norman W. Grant, " 37 (M) Elmer W. Hallowell, ' 37 Wendell E. Lapham, ' 37 (M) George E. O ' Brien, ' 37 (M) Louis E. Roberts, ' 37 (M) THE TEAM Robert L. Spiller, Jr., ' 37 Donald K. Tucker, ' 37 Edward J. Thacker, ' 37 (M) Donald F. Thurlow, ' 37 (M) Crawford W. Adams, ' 38 (M) Robert S. Feinburg, ' 38 (M) Walter A. Green, ' 38 (M) George H. Guenard, ' 38 Ralph Ingram, ' 38 (M) Melvin T. Little, ' 38 (M) Mitchell F. NeJame, ' 38 Donald S. McGowan, ' 38 (M) William C. Riley, ' 38 (M) William E. Roberge, ' 38 (M) Frederick J. Sievers, ' 38 Frank A. Slesinski, ' 38 Lawrence K. Pickard, ' 39 (M) Charles W. Griffin, ' 39 (M) [289} Vxiuikx bnx OAacJk - 1937 THE SEASON (Continued from piige 288) With a few outstanding stars but not enough balanced strength, the 1937 spring track forces finished their season without a win but boasting three new marks for the record books. Led by Captain Ted Thacker, the Maroon scored well in every meet but lacked the necessary man- power. M. S. C. — B. U. The season opened April 24 with a 77-58 loss to Boston University on the Hub school ' s Aubumdale oval. The Terriers were paced by Solly Nechtem, basketball star, who turned in winning performances in the sprints and the Jiigh jump. M. S. C. — TRINITY The second meet of the season was lost to the Blue and Gold of Trinity on the local track as the Hartford one-man-track-team Truex dom- inated every event from the century to the javelin. Captain Thacker turned in a winning race in the 440 and Norm Grant cracked the State pole vault mark with a leap of 11:9.8 feet for first honors. Mike Little turned in a winning 880 for the locals when he edged Tom McLaugh- lin of the victors in the last few feet of the race. Wally Green, Bill Riley, Spike Roberge, Larry Pickard, Mitch NeJame and Corky Adams were others who added to the local total. M. S. C. — W. P. I. — TUFTS The following week the Statesmen pulled the wrong type of a surprise when they trailed both Worcester Tech and Tufts in a triangular meet 631 2, 56, 461 2. In this meet Grant again soared to record heights to cop the pole vault honors but the other Maroon point-winners had to be satisfied with seconds and thirds. EASTERN AND N. E. INTERCOLLEGIATES Coach Derby sent a few of his outstanding men to the Eastern Intercollegiates at the Uni- versity of Vermont and the Maroon gained a seventh place ranking among the New England colleges, when Norm Grant tied for first honors in the pole vault; Bill Riley gained a second in the high jump; Mike Little placed second in the half-mile, beating many of the best small college middle distance runners in the east; and Corky Adams threw the javelin for fourth place honors. The next week the State representatives at the New England Intercollegiates at Harvard were held pointless by a fast field. M. S. C. — CONN. STATE The season closed with a 751 3-59% decision to Connecticut State College at Storrs, May 29, as Bill Riley and Wally Green jumped to a new college record on 5:11 in the high jump. George O ' Brien also posted a college mark when he tossed the hammer 136 feet, 51 2 inches. Roberge, Stevens, and Laphsmi gained a clean sweep in the discus while Thacker and Little finished up front in the 440 and 880 events. Mike Little, stellar half-railer, was elected cap- tain of the 1938 team at the close of the season. [290] UaAMhf .o-Ma Front Row: Towie, Cone, Blomberg, Linden, Captoin Sievers, Collins, Bullock, Houghron, Brox. Second Row: Silverman, Slesinski, Wood, Francis Riel, Morey, Steff, Packard, Zajchowski, Harding, Niden. Third Row: Tappin, Hanigan, Davis, Spencer, Blasko, Irzyk, Lavrakos, Larkin, Santucci. Fourth Row: Coach Caraway, Manager Hurwitch, Ferriter, Rudge, Assistant Coaches Frigard and Scrivnor. SUMMARY OF THE SEASON Score M.S.C. Opponents Sept. 25 A. I. C. at Springfield 6 G Oct. 2 Bowdoin at M. S. C 12 9 Connecticut State at M. S. C 7 36 " 16 Rhode Island State at Kingston 6 12 " 23 W, P. I. at Worcester 14 " 30 Amherst at M. S. C 6 41 Nov. 5 U. S. Coast Guard at New London 6 7 " 13 R. P. I. at M. S. C 13 " 20 Tufts at M. S. C 7 THE TEAM Earl A. Blomberg, ' 38 (M) Frank A. Slesinski, ' 38 (M) John E. Blasko, ' 40 (M) Frank A. Brox, ' 38 (M) Richard W. Towle, ' 38 (M) Franklin M. Davis, Jr., ' 40 William A. Bullock, ' 38 (M) Douglas J. Wood. ' 38 (M) Paul T. Ferriter, ' 40 (M) Charles W. CoUins, ' 38 (M) William J. Hanigan, Jr., ' 39 Stanley T. Finik, ' 40 (M) Leon W. Cone, ' 38 (M) Clifton W. Morey, " 39 (M) Malcolm B. Harding. Jr., ' 40 Leroy K. Houghton, Jr., ' 38 (M) Robert W. Packard, ' 39 Albin F. Irzyk, ' 40 (M) Norman E. Linden, ' 38 (M) Francis J. Riel, ' 39 (M) Carl E. Kokms, ' 40 George Niden, ' 38 (M) James Savage, ' 39 (M) Joseph P. Larkin, ' 40 (M) Paul S. Putnam, ' 33 (M) Howard N. Steff. ' 39 (M) Vasilis Lavrakas, ' 40 Frederick J. Sievers, ' 38 (M) Walter A. Zajchowski, ' 39 (M) John J. Murphy, ' 40 Stephen I. Silverman, ' 38 (M) Stanley F. Zelazo, ' 39 (M) Daniel J. O ' Connell, ' 40 James W. Payson, Jr., ' 40 (M) Edwin M. Podolak, ' 40 Alfred H. Rudge, ' 40 (M) Winslow E. Ryan, ' 40 Leo J. Santucci. ' 40 (M) John P. Serex, ' 40 Alan C. Smith, ' 40 Frank H. Spencer, ' 40 Robert Staples, ' 40 i Warren R. Tappin, Jr., ' 40 (M) Malcolm P. Trees, ' 40 PERSONNEL Coach Elbert F. Caraway Captain Frederick J. Sievers, ' 38 (M) Manager Benjamin G. Hurwitch, ' 38 (M) Captain Sievers Coach Caraway [291] VjoAMb ' JjoMcdi THE SEASON Although its record showed only one victory and one tie in nine games, yet the 1937 State Football team played hard, clean ball all season against top-flight teams, week after week with- out a let-up. It was a team which maintained fine spirit throughout although they failed to get any sporting breaks. The play of Captain Fred Sievers in the line and George Niden in the backfield was outstanding all season. M. S. C. A. I. C. Opening with American International College at Springfield on September 25th, State was held to a 6-6 tie. State had two touchdowns called back before Towle ran back a punt forty yards to the five-yard line and Steff scored to equal the touchdovim the Yellow Jackets had made on an intercepted pass. Linden missed the point after touchdown and Fred Sievers ' would- be winning touchdown on a blocked kick was called back giving the Statesmen only a tie. M. S. C. — BOWDOIN Against a strong Bowdoin team on the follow- ing Saturday, State played superior ball through- out the first half. Sievers recovered a Polar Bear fumble on their 34, but State lost the ball on an intercepted pass. Roberge later recovered another Bowdoin fumble, and State carried 30 yards to Bowdoin ' s three, but here the State at- tack, led by George Niden, bogged down and they were unable to score. In the second half the teams were pretty evenly matched except for the first and closing minutes when Bowdoin made two touchdown marches to win 12-0. M. S. C. — CONN. STATE Unleashing a powerful attack, the Connecticut State football team defeated the Statesmen 36-7 on October 9th. The Nutmeggers scored a field goal in the first quarter, two touchdowns in each of the following periods, emd added a fifth in the final quarter before Towle completed two long [292] ItaAlib O ' at aiE AA. i fL kA ' XJW ' C ' J fe i H ; " " ' ' ' " THE SEASON (C.ntinuMl) passes, the second to Al Smith, who scored from the five-yard line. M. S. C. — R. I. Although showing their best form of the early season the following week at Kingston, the Statesmen wers defeated 12-6 by a strong Rhode Island team. In the opening minutes State re- covered a Ram fumble on their 20, and on the first play Towle passed to Larkin in the end zone for a score. State played superior ball throughout except for two 60-yard Ram marches in the second and third periods which gave R. I. the lead 12-6. A blocked punt in the fourth period gave the Statesmen an opportunity to tie the score from the Ram 34-yard line, but the Rhode Island defense tightened, and the States- men lost the ball on downs on the 25. M. S. C. — W. P. I. State went down 14-0 before a revamped W.P.I, team on a rain-drenched field in Worcester, Oc- tober 23rd. Perkins recovered a Tech fumble on their 30, and Towle immediately tossed a 27- yard pass to Tappin, but four plays failed to give the Maroon a score, and Tech, taking the ball on their 20, marched 80 yards for a score. A 59-yard punt run-back in the second period gave the Engineers their second touchdown. M. S. C. — AMHERST The Amherst game October 30th found a top- rate Sabrina team winning 41-6. A 59-yard run, a 20-yard pass to State ' s three, and two line plunges gave Amherst their first touchdown in the opening minutes, and a place-kick gave them a 7-0 lead, but State came right back as Towle threw a 35-yard pass to Putnam, who carried five more yards to the five. Niden picked up a yard, and then Santucci scored off-tackle. Amherst, however, unleashed a fast running at- tack to score twice in the second period, twice in the third, and once in the fourth. [293] ItoA Uy. OiojMaii THE SEASON M. S. C. — COAST GUARD Playing the following Friday night at the Coast Guard Academy, State had three touchdown drives stopped only inches from the goal line before Zelazo scored around end from the one- yard line for a State touchdown, but Linden missed the point-after. The Middies came right back at the start of the second half to score seven points. State marched 80 yards, with Niden and Santucci starring, to the Middies ' five before they were held for downs, and the Middies won 7-6. M. S. C. — R. P. I. In a driving rain. State won its initial victory over R. P. I. 13-0 on Dad ' s Day, November 13th. Towle and Niden marched 55 yards for State in the first quarter and the latter made the first score of the day on a line p lunge. Late in the third quarter Niden and Santucci carried sixty yards with Santucci getting away for two 20- yard runs, and Towle scored again for State on a line buck. Santucci bucked over the extra point. M. S. C. — TUFTS In the season ' s final, State lost a heartbreaker to Tufts 7-0. Halfway through the first period Tufts scored from the 26 on two plays, and although State, with Niden and Towle doing most of the carrying, carried from their own 22 to Tufts ' six, they lost the ball on a fumble. Later Santucci and Towle made three first downs, but Santucci was held inches from the goal line. George Niden ' s 55-yard placement punts with a rain-soaked ball was the feature of the game. At the close of the season. Cliff Morey, out- standing end for two years, was elected Captain of the 1938 team. [294] Front Row: Wilson, Osley, Buzzee, Captain Couper, Silverman, Adams, Golub, Feinburg. Second Row: Manager Goldman, Avery, Auerbach, Rodda, Cain, Lyman, Roberts, Barton, Coach Briggs. Third Row: Assistant Manager McCowon, Bowen, Jakobek, Buckley, Podolak. Fourth Row: Schreiber, Malins, From, Johnson, Osmun. SUMMARY OF THE SEASON Score M.S.C. Opponents Oct. 9 Conn. State at M. S. C 7 " 11 Dartmouth at M. S. C 2 1 " 20 Yale at New Haven 1 2 " 23 Tufts at Medford 4 1 " 29 Amherst at Amherst 2 4 Nov. 6 Trmity at M. S. C 4 1 12 Wesleyan at Middletown 4 4 Crawford W. Adams, ' 38 (M) William B. Avery, ' 38 (M) Richard W. Barton. ' 38 (M) Robert D. Buzzee, ' 38 (M) Henry V. Couper, ' 38 (M) Robert S. Feinburg, ' 38 (M) Lane Giddings , ' 38 (M) Samuel Golub, ' 38 (M) Captain Couper THE TEAM Saul Gruner, ' 38 (M) Donald Osley, ' 38 (M) Donald L. Silverman, ' 38 (M) Milton E. Auerbach, ' 39 (M) George C. Benjamin. ' 39 Robert E. Cain, 39 (M) Roger M. Cole, ' 39 Lawrence E. Johnson, ' 39 Harvey Fram, ' 40 Paul Fram, ' 40 Arthur F. Howe, ' 40 John C. Jakobek, ' 40 Richard H. Jaquith, ' 40 Dana H. Malins, ' 40 John V. Osmun, ' 40 Norman J. Schoonmaker, ' 40 Henry M. Schreiber, ' 40 Nathan L. ' Wilansky, ' 40 PERSONNEL Coach Lawrence E. Briggs Captain Henry " V. Couper, ' 38 (M) Manager Abraham B. Goldman, ' 38 (M) Thomas G. Lyman, ' 39 (M) Stanley Podolak, ' 39 (M) Everett Roberts, ' 39 (M) Charles Rodda, Jr., ' 39 (M) Elliot T. Wilson, ' 39 Earl K. Bowen, ' 40 (M) Glenn D. Boyd, ' 40 James B. Buckley, ' 40 Coach Briggs [295} VxVLiJJ .wiceA THE SEASON Finishing a seven-game schedule with four wins, two losses, and a tie, the varsity soccer team fell just short of its pre-season forecast of being the best local hooters ' club in recent years. M. S. C. — CONN. STATE The Statesmen jumped into an early lead in the New England Intercollegiate Soccer League when they defeated Connecticut State 7-0, in the season ' s opener on October 9 th. The Maroon outclassed the Nutmeggers all the way as Bud Rodda scored four goals supplemented by single tallies by Sam Golub, Don Osley, and Tom Lyman. M. S. C. — DARTMOUTH On the following Monday, the Statesmen de- feated a strong Dartmouth team 2-1. Don Silver- man scored both goals for the Maroon, his first after five minutes of play, and his second goal in the final period broke up a two-period tie. Captain Vin Couper, Don Osley and Bob Fein- burg played outstanding ball. M. S. C. — YALE Traveling to Yale on October 20th, the States- men lost the game 2-1. Playing on a mud-soaked field. Bud Rodda scored for State in seven min- utes, but late in the second quarter the Bulldogs pushed a goal by Bob Feinburg. The score re- mained one-all until late in the final period when a fluke goal from a scramble in front of the net gave Yale a 2-1 victory. M, S. C. — TUFTS Three days later the Maroon came back with a vengeance to defeat Tufts 4-1. Don Silverman scored first with a goal scramble, and then Bud Rodda sank two goals, one on a corner kick from Don Osley and the second on a pass from the latter. Captain Vin Couper scored the final State counter on a penalty kick before the Jumbos made their only score. M, S. C. — AMHERST In the town rivalry game with Amherst on October 29th, the Sabrinas won 4-2, scoring both [296} ItctAUtif iPxuiceJi THE SEASON (Concliuleil) their winning goals in the second overtime period. They got away to a two-goal lead in the second period, but Bob Cain scored for the locals just as the half closed. In the third period Tom Lyman sank a long drive to tie the score, but the Sabrinas came through in the second overtime period to give State its second defeat of the year. M. S. C. — TRINITY On November 6th, Bud Rodda regained a tie for leading New England scorer when he scored three goals, one in the second period and two in the fourth, in State ' s 4-1 victory over Trinity. Bob Cain made the other State tally in the third period. M. S. C. — WESLEYAN In the final game of the season the Statesmen fought a 4-4 tie with Wesleyan to gain fifth place in the league standing. Don Osley scored three goals for State and Bud Rodda made the other. Meanwhile, playing goal for goal, Wesleyan ran up four markers to tie the score and two over- time periods failed to produce any further score. The season was officially closed with a ban- quet at which eleven letters were awarded, and Bud Rodda was elected captain of next year ' s team. The highlights of the season were sum- marized as follows: Corky Adams — aggressive halfback from Springfield — the songbird of the seniors — recently renamed " Sorky " . Bob Buzzee — his throw-in was the envy of all opponents. Vin Couper, Captain — led the team throughout the season and got a black eye for his trouble. Bob Feinburg — his shift to the goalie ' s position had plenty to do with the successful season. Sam Golub — another Springfield lad who came through for M. S. C. He worked hard — to grow a moustache. " Don Osley " — late as usual. [297} UoAdLty. Qfiaii 6outvU( THE SEASON Led throughout the season by Captain Mitchell NeJame, Larry Pickard, and Obie Ingram, Coach Derby ' s varsity cross-country team enjoyed a successful year with three dual wins out of five meets, a second in the Connecticut Valley championships, and a sixth in the New England In tercollegiates. M. S. C. — NORTHEASTERN Opening the season on October 9th, the States- men, still in early season form, were nipped by Northeastern 27-28. Larry Pickard came in ahead of NeJame and Ingram, who followed him respectively, for third pl ace. Evi Scholz placed seventh for State, and Ed Slater ' s brilliant sprint at the finish gave State the ninth place also. M. S. C. — M. I. T. On the following week State, running against M. I. T. in Boston, won 23-32. NeJame, Pickard, and Ingram tied for first for State, Mike Little placed eighth, and Scholz and Bixby tied for ninth. Ed Slatei hurt his ankle on the second mile, but finished up ahead of four other runners. M. S. C. — W. P. I. On October 23rd, the Maroon traveled to Wor- cester where Larry Pickard and Captain NeJame set a strong pace all the way in the Worcester Tech meet and again triple-tied with Obie Ingram for first place. Mike Little, Larry Bixby, and Evi Scholz tied in eighth place for State. CONNECTICUT VALLEY CHAMPIONSHIPS In the first running of the Connecticut Valley Championships here at M. S. C, the Maroon followed a strong Wesleyan team to gain second place ahead of Amherst, Conn. State, Trinity, Springfield, and Coast Guard. Pickard finished best for the locals with a seventh, followed by NeJame at tenth and Ingram at eleventh. M. S. C. — AMHERST The above meet was also scored as a dual meet with neighboring Amherst and the Maroon gained a 23-36 win. Moyer of the Jeffs was credited with first, but Pickard, NeJame and Ingram counted before the next Amherst score. NEW ENGLAND INTERCOLLEGIATES The Statesmen placed sixth on the following Monday at the New England Intercollegiates in Boston which was won by Rhode Island, with Tufts and Maine in second and third places. Pickard was 14th, NeJame 21st, and Ingram 23rd, which places, along with the other State scores, gave the Statesmen a total of 154 points. M. S. C. — R. P. I. In the season ' s closing meet against R. P. I., Captain Mitch NeJame turned in the finest per- formance of his career as a State runner, although State lost 26-31. NeJame was the only runner who could keep pace with Hitchccx of Tech, and he finished second, 25 yards ahead of Pickard. Little placed ninth for State in a sprint finish. The season was closed with a banquet at the " Manse " , Northampton, and Lawrence Pickard, outstanding during the last two years, was el- ected as Captain of the 1938 cross-country team. •F [298] - STATE .- -T J . ' [Z STATE . » (j STATE STATE f , STATE m i ) ' ' ' ' ' " -f BfSTATC J STATE Front Row: Bixby, Little, Captain NeJame, Ingram, Pickard. Second Row; Manager Handverger, Scliolz, Stoddord, C. Slater, Rose, Coach Derby. SUMMARY OF THE SEASON Score M.S.C. Oppo nents Oct. 9 Northeastern at M. S. C 28 27 ' " 16 M. I. T. at Boston 23 33 ■■ 23 W. P. I. at Worcester 23 33 Nov. 1 Conn. Valley Championship at M. S. C 2nd place Wesle yan, first 1 Amherst at M. S. C 23 36 " 8 N. E. Intercollegiates at Boston 6th place R. I., first " 13 R. P. I, at M. S. C 31 26 THE TEAM Ralph Ingram, ' 38 (M) Lloyd B. Copeland, ' 39 Charles E. Slater, ' 39 Melvin T. Little, ' 38 (M) Lawrence K. Pickard. ' 39 (M) Edward F. Stoddard, ' 39 Mitchell F. NeJame, ' 38 (M) I. Douglass Reade. ' 39 Evi C. Scholz, ' 40 (M) Lawrence H. Bixby, ' 39 (M) Harold D. Rose, ' 39 Edgar B. Slater, ' 40 Sidney Rosen, ' 39 M Captain NeJame PERSONNEL Coach LlewelljTi L. Derby Captain Mitchell F. NeJame, ' 38 (M) Manager Edward Handverger, ' 38 (M) Coach Derby [299} Ualditt BadkdtJktii THE SEASON Winning eight games and losing six on a four- teen game card that held some of the stiffest competition in this section, the State Basketball team wound up a successful season to finish in eleventh place in New England college hoop circles. The Maroon averaged better than 47 points a game for a total of 663 as Fred Rial and Ed Czelusniak took top local scoring honors with 158 and 125 tallies respectively. John Bemben was a point behind Czelusniak with 124. MIDDLEBURY AT M. S. C. State ODened its season with a 46-27 win over Middlebury. Fred Riel, who scored 12 points that night and 23 in the first two games sank the opening tally, and Zelazo immediately fol- lowed with another counter. Play slowed down, however, and Middlebury rallied to trail at the half by only 21-18. A second team started in the next period; Fran Riel and Rudge sank five baskets to give State a lead from which they were never headed. M. I. T. at M. S. C. State defeated the Engineers on the next night 53-29. John Bemben, who scored 16 points in the first half, opened the scoring as he dribbled down the floor to sink one from underneath the basket. He followed immediately with two floor shots and another short shot. State rolled up 20 points before Tech scored its second basket. In the closing five minutes of play, Bokina, Putnam, and Southwick sank five baskets for the second team. SPRINGFIELD at M. S. C. On Saturday, January 8, the Statesmen were nosed out 38-37 by Springfield College on Jack- son ' s last minute basket. Fran Riel and Zelazo gave State a 7-1 lead, but Springfield kept plug- ging away and the score at the half was 16-15 for Springfield. The Indians jumped away to a 28-20 lead in the second half, but Ed Czelusniak and Fred Riel led a rally to within three points of the leaders, and then baskets by Zelazo and Putnam gave the home team a one-point lead, but Jackson scored his final counter of the night, to give him 15 points, and the game ended a few seconds later. M. S. C. at WILLIAMS The next Wednesday the team traveled to Williamstown, where they were defeated 36-21. Although the Maroon was pretty well bottled up, Zelazo and Bemben gave State a 6-4 lead at the quarter and 11-9 at the half. Fred Riel started the second half with long baskets, but then the Ephmen, led by Captain Mike Latvis, who netted 19 points, went on a scoring spree. Repeated attacks by the Statesmen were blocked continu- ally and the game ended with the Statesmen far behind. M. S. C. at AMHERST After a 63-31 romp over R. P. I. on Saturday, the Statesmen went to the other end of the town on the following " Wednesday to meet Amherst. Fred and Fran Riel started the scoring, but the Jeffmen, paced by Captain Schweizer, soon ran up a lead which the Statesmen nearly overcame when Fred Riel, went on a lone scoring spree to make the score 16-14, but the Jeffmen came right back to make the score at the half 26-16. State came back with a rally that was climaxed when Fred Riel sank a basket and Czelusniak two foul shots to put State within two points of Amherst, but Michell and Meyer put Amherst ahead (C ' i)iiliiHKHl on l :lse 302) [300] Vwidti BaA ceJU cdt Front Row: Francis Riel, Bemben, Putnam, Captain Czelusnial , Fredericlc Riel, Sievers, Slesinski. Second Row: Coacli Frigord, Barrett, Zelazo, Blasko, Malcolm, Soutliwick, Podolok, Glick, Manager Ferguson. SUMMARY OF THE SEASON Score M.S.C. 0pp. 16 Middlebury at M. S. C 46 27 Feb. 12 17 M. I. T. at M. S. C. 53 29 8 Springfield at M. S C 37 38 ' ' 16 12 WUliams at M. S. C 21 36 15 R. P. I. at Troy 63 31 " 19 19 Amherst at Amherst 37 35 " 23 22 Wesleyan at Middletown 29 57 " 26 9 Rhode Island State at Mar. 2 M. S. C 54 48 Score M.S.C. Opp. Coast Guard at New London 48 27 Amherst at M. S. C 43 47 (overtime) Conn. State at Storrs 51 60 Tufts at M. S. C 61 52 W. P. I. at Worcester 55 59 B. U. at Boston 65 61 Carl J. Bokina, ' 38 John G. Bush, ' 38 Edward W. Czelusniak, ' 38 (M) Paul S. Putnam, ' 38 (M) Frederick C. Riel, ' 38 (M) Frederick J. Sievers, ' 38 (M) THE TEAM Frank A. Slesinski, " 38 William F. Barrett, ' 39 John Bemben, ' 39 (M) John F. Glick, ' 39 Stanley Podolak, ' 39 Francis J. Riel, ' 39 (M) Franklin W. Southwick, ' 39 (M) Stanley F. Zelazo, ' 39 (M) John E. Blasko, ' 40 James W. Malcolm, ' 40 Alfred H. Rudge, ' 40 PERSONNEL Coach Wilho Frigard Captain Edward W. Czelusniak, ' 38 (M) Manager William B. Ferguson, ' 38 (M) Captain Czelusniak Coach Frigard [301] tiautd BdiMlalt THE SEASON again. State again rallied and a basket by Bem- ben tied the score at 35 all. Then Michell missed a foul shot which would have put Amherst in the lead and Ed Czelusniak, with a minute to play, sank a long shot from the floor. The game ended when Keesey of Amherst was about to shoot, and State won 37-35. M. S. C. at WESLEYAN On January 22nd, the Maroon hit another snag against Wesleyan and went down to a 57-23 defeat as Morningstar, Phelps and Sonstroem led the Cardinal attack for the second straight year. RHODE ISLAND at M. S. C. Against Rhode Island on Wednesday, the Riel twins and Bemben led in the victory over a club which boasted only one defeat and New England ' s two leading scorers, but after the lead see-sawed for the first ten minutes, State built up a 13-point lead at the half and they were never headed afterwards. State won 54-48 with Fran Riel scoring 17 points, Fred Riel 12, and Johnny Bemben 15. IVI. S. C. at COAST GUARD Paced by Captain Ed Czelusniak, the State hoop team racked a 48-27 win against the Coast Guard Academy in Billiard Hall, New London, Saturday night. With the opening whistle, Czelusniak and Bemben spearheaded a fast attack, and the Maroon kept widening the margin until the end of the game. In the second half, Fran Riel caged some spec- tacular shots as the locals staged an effective display of team-work, passing and shooting at a fast clip. Frigard used two full teams and two extra men, and only three of the entire squad used in the game failed to score. AMHERST at M. S. C The following Wednesday the Amherst court combine came down here to play and succeeded in annexing a 47-43 thriller that went into an overtime period. With Amherst leading by eight points in the last three minutes of play, Fred Riel scored six points and Fran Riel sank th3 tying counter with only seconds left to play. In the overtime Fred Riel put State ahead with a basket from the floor, but Kydd, Amherst sub- forward, sank another to tie the score at 43 all. Then Keesey sank a long basket from the center of the court and Kydd followed with another to give Amherst a four- point winning margin. M. S. C. at CONNECTICUT STATE In spite of Ed Czeluniak ' s 19 points, the Maroon bowed to Conn. State on Saturday night, 60-51. Czelusniak scored 10 points in the first half to [302] Ua ' i.ut! Bca ztSiM THE SEASON (Concluded) keep State in the running but they trailed 29-18 at the whistle. In the second half, State scored heavily and almost rallied to tie the score but they could not quite overcome the 18 points each scored by Peterson and Pringle, two outstanding New England scorers. TUFTS at M. S. C. On February 23, Tufts jumped ofi ' to an early 15-2 lead, but State fought on and the half ended with State trailing 38-21. In the second half, however, Bemben, Fred Riel and Czelusniak went on a scoring spree to bring the Maroon within seven points of the Jumbos at the quarter whistle. Fred Riel, Zelazo and Czelusniak scored for State and Fran Riel sank a set shot to give State a 51-49 lead with four minutes to go. Then after Benny Collier, Tufts stellar guard, was banished for fouls, State had little trouble in rolling up a 61-52 win. M. S. C. at WORCESTER TECH Apparently troubled by the Engineers ' zone system, the home team lead 31-17 at the half. In the second half. State rolled up 20 points in ten minutes to trail 45-42 with eight minutes to go. Baskets by Fred Riel and Putnam gave State a 49-48 lead with five minutes to play, but then McEwan scored two baskets and Tech went on to win, 59-55. M. S. C. at BOSTON UNIVERSITY In the final game of the season Ed Czelusniak played the best basketball of his college career to lead his team to a 65-61 win over B. U. Racking up another upset for the Maroon, he paced a second period spurt that caught the Terriers ' defense powerless and went on to score 28 points, five more than Boston ' s celebrated and high-scoring So! Nechtem. At the Insignia Convocation of Thursday, May 5, the Dean announced the election of Stanley Zelazo as Captain for the coming year. Stan has shovim himself from his first game last year as a sophomore, as a rugged, fighting, aggi-essive player. An excellent defense and floor man, he possesses more scoring power than the average guard. At the same time, Fran Riel was awarded the Samuel B. Samuels cup for the best average in foul shooting, and John Bemben was given the George Henry Richards trophy as the most im- proved player on the squad. [303] Ua ' iAlti tPAMnurung. THE SEASON Boasting a record of five wins in the six-meet schedule, Coach Joe Rogers ' 1937-38 swimming edition compiled the best record of any Maroon team of the past years. Faced with a seemingly hopeless lack of material at the start of the season, Rogers was able to form a combination that bowed only to strong Williams. M. S. C. — B. U. The squad opened with an easy win over Boston University to the tune of 47-28, when both Captain Dean Rounds and George Pitts, produced two firsts each. M. S. C. — W. P. I. The following week Worcester Tech ' s swimmers fell easy prey to the Statesmen with Anderson, Calo, Rounds, Morse, and Howes all taking honors in the swimming events, while Salmela and Palumbo finished 1-2 in the dives. M. S. C. — WILLIAMS The only loss of the season came on January 22, when the Purple of Williamstown took every first to dunk the locals 55-20 in the local pool. M. S. C. — WESLEYAJSr and M. S. C. — COAST GUARD On February 15, Pitts paced the Maroon to a close 45-30 victory over Wesleyan. Three days later the balance of the team was again shown when Gard Anderson smashed the Coast Guard pool record in the 220 free style, and the relay outfit of Howes, Anderson, Pitts and Rounds splashed to a new record as State swamped the Middies, 58-17. M. S. C. — CONN. STATE The dual season ended as the locals outclassed Conn. State in the local chlorine 49-26. N. E. INTERCOLLEGIATES Finishing behind Brown, Williams and triple- tied Bowdoin, Amherst and Springfield, the Statesmen made a good record in the New Eng- land Intercollegiates at Amherst with George Pitts gaining five of the Maroon ' s nine points. [304} VxfidlU ifMwnmittg. Front Row: Solmela, Manager Harrison, Palumbo. Second Row: Andersen, Jacobson, Bieniek, Captain Rounds, Irving, Howes, Morse. Third Row: Colo, Cole, Stetson, Glass, Pitts, Spelman, Wakefield, Coach Rogers. Feb. SUMMARY OF THE SEASON gpore M.S.C. Opponents 8 Boston Univ. at Boston 47 28 15 Worcester Tech at M. S. C 57 18 22 Williams at M. S. C 20 55 15 Wesleyan at Middletown 45 30 18 Coast Guard at New London 58 17 26 Conn. State at M. S. C 49 26 11 - 12 New England Intercollegiate Meet at Amherst 6th Brown Edwin A. Bieniek, ' 38 (M) William H. Harrison, ' 38 (M) Richard R. Irving, ' 38 (M) Seymour T. Jacobson, ' 38 (M) Dean L. Rounds, ' 38 (M) H. Gardner Andersen, ' 39 (M) THE TEAM Donald Calo, ' 39 Roger S. Cole, ' 39 Herbert S. Howes, ' 39 (M) Henry A, Salmela, ' 39 (M) George J. Spelman, ' 39 Courtney J. Stetson, ' 39 Morrill T. Vittum, ' 39 PERSONNEL Coach Joseph R. Rogers, Jr. Captain Dean L. Rounds, ' 38 (M) Manager William H. Harrison, ' 38 (M) Walter T. Wakefield, ' 39 Robert B. Glass, ' 40 Roy E. Morse, ' 40 Raloh F. Palumbo, ' 40 George T. Pitts, Jr., ' 40 (M) Harold L. Straube, ' 40 Captain Rounds Coach Rogers [305] ItaAUti Uoc ei THE SEASON Boasting an upset win over Northeastern, one of the strongest clubs in New England, a tie with Army, and a 4-2 defeat of A. I. C, Coach Lorin Ball ' s 1938 hockey edition finished with a fair showing for the seven game schedule. Led by Captain Bill Bullock, ace defenseman, the Maroon made a good showing in every game and finished strong to make up for the early season losses. M. S. C. — N. H. Opening January 5, at New Hampshire, the Statesmen put up a strong battle before bowing to the Wildcats 6-4. Outstanding for the locals were John Lavrakas, who rang the bell three times, and Captain Bullock who played a strong defensive game and added the other State marker. M. S. C. — HAMILTON and M. S. C. — BROWN Handicapped by poor ice conditions that al- lowed but little practice, the Statesmen were forced to meet Hamilton and Brown before their attack was functioning on all six. On January 8, Hamilton took a 2-0 thriller from the Maroon at Clinton as Cliff Morey, State goalie stole the day, with a goal-studded performance of 33 saves. Three days later the Ballmen dropped a 5-2 decision to Brown at Providence as Linden, Niden, and Towle looked best for the local cause. A game with Union was rained out. M. S. C. — A. L C. and M. S. C. — ARMY The Statesmen gained their first win of the season on the local ice at the expense of A. I. C, 4-2 with Bullock again the star. January 15, the Maroon traveled to West Point for the annual game with Army, and after two overtime periods the score remained 3-3 and was entered in the books. Lavrakas, Linden and Towle were high- lights in the State machine. M. S. C. — NORTHEASTERN and M. S. C. — B. C. The outstanding upset of the season was scored on January 18, when the highly-touted North- eastern University club with its equally highly- touted Johnny Byrne bowed to Massachusetts 7-3 as Linden, Bullock, Lyman, Mayo, Towle, in fact the whole team enjoyed a field day. The season closed with an anti-climax loss to a Lefty Flynn-paced Boston College team on the College pond 6-3. Off to a bad start the Statesmen were not able to catch the Newton team. M. S. C. — Amherst An informal game was played with Amherst College as a Winter Carnival attraction and the locals gained a 7-4 win over the Lord Jeffs who played very well considering their lack of prac- tice. Next year the Statesmen will be led by Cliff Morey, but the only varsity men returning are Mayo and Lyman and the outlook is anything but bright. [306] UoAdiif Uac Fronr Row: Coach Ball, Lavrakas, Linden, Captain Bullock, Niden, Moyo, Manager Beck. Second Row: Johnson, Morey, Feinburg, Lyman, Hording, Professor Hicks, SUMMARY OF THE SEASON Score M.S.C. Opponents 5 New Hampshire at M. S. C 4 6 7 Union at Schenectady cancelled 8 Hamilton at Clinton 2 11 Brown at Providence 2 5 13 A. I. C. at M. S. C 4 2 15 Army at West Point 3 3 18 Northeastern at M. S. C 7 3 20 Boston College at M. S. C 3 6 William A. Bullock, ' 38 (M) Robert S. Feinburg, ' 38 Thomas Hennessey, ' 38 (M) Herbert H. Johnson, ' 38 (M) John Lavrakas, ' 38 (M) THE TEAM Norman E. Linden, ' 38 (M) David E. Mildram, ' 38 (M) George Niden, ' 38 (M) Richard W. Towle, ' 38 (M) Thomas G. Lyman, ' 39 (M) Donald S. Mayo, ' 39 (M) Clifton W. Morey, ' 39 (M) James B. Buckley, ' 40 Frank H. Dalton, ' 40 Malcolm B. Harding, Jr., ' 40 Coach Lorin E. Ball Captain William Bullock, ' 38 (M) Manager Sidney Beck, ' 39 (M) Captoin Bullock Cooch Ball [307] ItoAi tti WinieA OAack THE SEASON The winter track season opened with the relay team, attending two meets at the Boston Garden. In the opener on January 29, at the Knights of Columbus Meet, the State team placed third behind Boston University and Worcester Tech. The State runners in the mile relay were Rossman, Little, Boyd and Guenard, in that order. In the second meet, the B. A. A. Meet on February 12, the State team came in second ahead of Colby, but trailing the Tufts Jumboes. Mike Little, running second man for the Maroon, registered the best time for the State team, and his work in these two meets indicated his po- tentialities as a short distance runner although in the past he had run only the half and one mile distances. Winning two dual meets and finishing second in a triangular encounter. Coach L. L. Derby ' s in- door track forces finished the 1937-38 season with a better than average record, losing only to Wesleyan in the dual competition and to Tufts in the three-cornered meet. CONN. STATE at M. S. C. The Statesmen opened February 19, with a surprise win over Connecticut State 41V4 to to 39% in one of the most thrilling finishes ever witnessed in the local cage. Going into the run- ning broad jump eight and one half points be- hind the Nutmeggers, the Maroon needed all three places to gain a victory. Dick Towle, Bill Riley and Bill McGowan came through in the clutch to sweep the event and the locals were able to eke out a win. Captain Mike Little raced to a new college record in the 1000 yards against Connecticut, covering the distance in 2:26. W. P. I. at M. S. C. The following Tuesday weak Worcester Tech visited Amherst and had to be content with 25% points in bowing to the Derbjrmen ' s 46% total. Against W. P. I. the Maroon made a clean sweep in the dashes, the mile and the 1000 yard events. Bob Feinburg tied his own mark in the 35 yard dash with a clocking of 4.1. M. S. C. and W. P. I. at TUFTS At Medford the next Saturday, Tufts took all but one first place to swamp State and W. P. I. 74-28-8. Roberge captured the pole vault for the Maroon ' s only win, while the Engineers took but one second and five thirds. (Continued 310) [308] VxiAMti UMnteA CUac Front Row: Riley, Haskins, Feinburg, Captain Little, Roberge, Silverman, Guenord. Second Row: Auerboch, Healy, NeJame, Moray, Winn, Dailey. Third Row: Pickord, Rose, Geoffrion, Cain,. Boyd, Towle. Fourth Row: Rossman, Jablonski, Tappin, C, Griffin, Merrill, Noyes, Terry, Joyce. Fifth Row: Manager Brody, Coach Derby, Assistant Manager Abromovitz. SUMMARY OF THE SEASON M.S.C. Jan. 29 K. of C. Meet (relay) at Boston 2nd Feb. 12 B. A. A. Meet (relay) at Boston 2nd " 19 Conn. State at M. S. C 41 1 4 " 22 W. P. I. at M. S. C 402 3 " 26 Tufts vs. W.P.I. vs. M.S.C. at Tufts 2nd 28 Mar. 19 Wesleyan at M. S. C 41% THE TEAM Robert S. Feinburg, " 38 William E. Roberge, ' 38 (M) Walter A. Green, ' 38 (M) Frederick J. Sievers, ' 38 George H. Guenard. ' 38 (M) Donald Silverman, ' 38 Philip H. Haskins, " 38 Richard W. Towle, ' 38 (M) Thomas Hennessey, ' 38 Floyd W. Townsley, ' 38 Melvin T. Little, ' 38 (M) Milton E. Auerbach, ' 39 Donald S. McGowan, ' 38 Robert E. Cain, ' 39 Mitchell F. NeJame, ' 38 Charles W. Grifiin, ' 39 William C. Riley, ' 38 (M) Frank C. Healy, ' 39 Philip C. Geoffrion, ' 40 William F. Goodwin, ' 40 Robert A. Joyce, ' 40 John E. Merrill, Jr., ' 40 ' Arthur A. Noyes, ' 40 I H Sidney W. Rosen, ' 40 1 -%. B Edwin M. Rossman, ' 40 (M) ' V Warren R. Tappin, Jr., ' 40 " »f Dean T. Terry, ' 40 PERSONNEL Coach Llewellyn L. Derby Captain Melvin T. Little, ' 38 (M) Manager George Brody, ' 39 (M) Captain Little Score Opponents B. U. 1st Tufts 1st W. P. I. 3rd 393 4 251,3 Tufts 74 W. P. I. 8 721 4 Stephen M. Jablonski, ' 39 Richard E. Lee, ' 39 Clifton W. Morey, ' 39 Laurence K. Pickard, ' 39 Harold D. Rose, ' 39 J. Henry Winn, ' 39 Earl K. Bowen, ' 40 Glenn D. Boyd, ' 40 (M) Gerald M. Dailey, ' 40 Coach Derby [309] VxiAAib WJunJbeA DjvcucJIc WESLEYAN at M. S. C. In the final meet of the season three Statesmen posted new college records but the balance of Wesleyan won out 72 to 41%. Captain Little turned in a record breaking 2:04.2 half mile in the local cage while Gus Guenard broke the 440 mark and Wally Green reached a new height in the high jump. SPRING OPENERS The record of the spring track team at pres- ent shows defeats at the hands of Boston Univer- sity and Trinity, both of which colleges boast well-rounded track teams. B. U. at M. S. C. Opening at Alumni Field on April 23, the locals lost a 76-59 decision to B. U. The Maroon showed considerable strength in the dashes and field events, but not enough to outscore the Ter- rier runners. In the dashes Bob Feinburg and Ed Rossman finished one-two in the 100 with Guenard placing third and two-one in the 220, respectively. Mike Little placed second for State in the 880 and Healy took a third in the mile run. In the hurdles, Merrill placed third in the 120 and Joyce second in the 220. Bill Roberge broke the only record of the day throwing the discus 126 ft. 2 in. Riley and Green tied for first in the high jump with a height of 5 ft. 8V2 in. and Wally Green tied Palumbo of State for a second in the pole vault. Corky Adams won the jave- lin throw for State with a heave of 164 ft. 11 in. and Tappin won the broad jump followed by McGowan. Frank Slesinski was the final point wiimer for State with a third in the hammer throw. M. S. C. at TRINITY On the following Saturday, the team travelled to Trinity where they were defeated 76-50. Featuring Captain Mike Little, who took two firsts, the State track team went down before a powerful Trinity aggregation on the Dutch- men ' s saucer at Hartford. Little won both the quarter and half mile for local high point honors, turning in a 52.1 in the 440 and a 2:05 in the half. Corky Adams set a new State College record with the javelin, whipping the spear 170 ft., 2Vi inches. Pacelia soared 11 ft. 3 in. to win the pole vault, and leaped 21 ft. 2% in. to take the broad jump to star for the Hilltoppers. Outside of Little ' s victories, the Maroon was out of things so far as track events were con- cerned, making most of their points in that section on second and thirds. The Derbymen did better in the field events Sievers winning the discus and Riley the high jump while Roberge and Tappin helped out in the shot and broad jump. [310] Utomen ' i. AihteUc A±6cMu.cdiott Front Row: Misses Wood, Hall, Esson, Malm, C. Julian. Second Row: Misses Harris, Kerivan, Gunness, Merrill, Rathbone, E. Julian, Jenkins. THE WOMEN ' S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION The Women ' s Athletic Association was founded on the campus early in the spring of 1925, for the purpose of providing athletic recreation for the women students. Its function is to regulate the women ' s athletic activities; and it provides opportunities for all, as all the women students automatic- ally become members. The Association is divided into clubs, one for each sport; with the clubs the contests are regulated and awards made. The Women ' s Athletic Association awards keys to the girls outstanding in the separate sports. The Executive Committee of the Association is made up of the managers of the different clubs, who cooperate in presenting an attractive recreation program to the students. THE WOMEN ' S RIFLE TEAM Manager, Frances Merrill Priscilla Archibald Roma Levy Jean Phillips Ann Corcoran Virginia Gale Dorothy Rourke Justine Martin Elizabeth Howe TELEGRAPHIC MEETS Week Ending: FEBRUARY 12— University of Washington FEBRUARY 19— Indiana University Carnegie Institute of Technology FEBRUARY 26— University of Maryland University of Nevada MARCH 5— University of Kansas Cornell University University of Wichita (Kansas) Pennsylvania State College Drexel Institute (Philadelphia) University of Kentucky {311} M ' uifnu ' ud yUMdia ActwUie INTRAMURAL ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES The purpose of intramural activities is to help all students acquire favorable attitudes toward recreational sports, to educate the students concerning the outcomes of participation in the different types of sports so that they may select wisely and according to their needs, and to encourage all students to acquire regular habits of athletic recreation. As only a small percentage of the students constitutes the varsity squad in any one sport, the opportunity for the less skilled student to get into competitive athletics can only be made possible through intramural athletics. The intramural athletics are also of social importance; they bring together in a friendly spirit of rivalry, students from all branches of the college. Participation in intramurals gives a better appreciation of varsity contests and awakens interest in them. The program of intramurals is presented for the purpose of supplying every pupil with enjoyable physical recreation. No man is fully educated who has not learned to play, to compete, to keep himself physically healthy. It is the purpose of intramural athletics to help teach this important division of education. In interfraternity sports all teams are placed in divisions which play round robin schedules. All active members and pledges with proper standings are eligible for competition with the exception of varsity players. Leadership in the different sports brings cumulative points to a fraternity; to the fraternity which accumulates the greatest number of points, certain points are given towards the inter- fraternity cup. But the number of men which a fraternity has placed on the various athletics teams also enters into this scoring. For the year 1936-1937, Theta Chi won the interfraternity athletic competition by acquiring 496 points and winning two first places. Kappa Sigma scored a close second by accumulating 455 points. Com- petition included meets in touch football, soccer, basketball, volley ball and baseball. The champion in touch football was Theta Chi, which scored a total of 120 points, 36 points more than any other fraternity. Kappa Sigma took the honors in soccer, leading the field by 36 points, and Phi Kappa Sigma won the volley ball contest by a large margin. Sigma Phi Epsilon won the basketball tourney by a large lead. Theta Chi won the baseball championship by a margin of 50 points, and Kappa Sigma contributed the largest number of varsity men. This year Alpha Sigma Phi is leading the league with 356 points and the soccer and basketball championships, followed closely by Q. T. V., the football winners, with 350 points. The baseball tourney will close the interfraternity year. MINOR SPORTS During the past year the campus has evidenced the growing interest of minor sports. Last spring a tennis tourney was held which drew 32 entries and ran three weeks. Paul Putnam, ' 38, was the medal winner defeating Bob Mosher, ' 40, in the finals. This winter the college sent an eight-man ski team up to the Middlebury College Winter Carnival, but due to adverse weather conditions, the team did not compete. The team was composed of Quast, Farnsworth, and Green, ' 38, Smart, ' 39, and Fuller, Van Meter, O ' Brien, and Jones, ' 41. At present the preliminary rounds of a campus golf tourney are being run off to choose a six-man team to send to the New England Intercollegiates at Oakley. Last spring Johnson and Crowley, ' 37, MacCurdy, " 38, and UUman, Burgen and Alfieri, ' 39, attended the tourney and Bill John- son placed seventh in the tourney. [312] " ' 1 1 inii iiStwiiiiiiyiiini iMll _=,.,,SS£S SS- ?■ 3 W .fV ' f ■- " -■■ - I ' t. .:. COMMENCEMENT 1 937 1937 Qjomjmjejnjcjejtnejni DIARY OF THE SIXTY-SEVENTH COMMENCEMENT Friday, June 11 — As the long awaited completion of my college career approached, I found that a wall had been gradually built up between myself and actuality, which could only be surmounted by a pseudo- actuality — memory. " Something there is that doesn ' t love a wall, That wants it down. " wrote a neighbor. In the future we will pause at the gate of the campus to look back; we will come in our mind ' s eye to recall these happy days now ending; and, so that the picture may hold more to be cherished, we feel that before we leave we owe a tribute, as did those of the class of ' 71 at the First Commencement as expressed in William Wheeler ' s Class Ode: " Ere these sacred bonds we sever Ere we roam life ' s shadowy sea, To the golden clasp, a tribute! Friendship, be our praise to thee! " Yes, that ' s it — the " golden clasp " . The week of festivities opened with the Horse Show. The first and second squadrons, spon- sored by Misses Muriel and Marjorie Cain res- pectively, were led by Cadet Majors Anthony Nogelo and Leroy Clark. Dick Towle of Co- hasset and Fred Whittemore, Jr., of Canton were judged the best men from the junior and senior class of Horsemanship by the Cain sisters. After the show of local saddle horses, which was won by Mrs. Floyd A. Thompson of Amherst, the Co-eds displayed their knack for Horsemanship with Doris Jenkins of Shrewsbury gaining first place. Our sophomore class was represented by John J. Galvin of Northampton as winning con- testant. " Kid " Gore ' s son Harold came through with the laurels for the Children ' s Class. The final competition was senior pair-jumping, which was won by Tony Nogelo and Louis A. Breault. Floyd Townsley, ' 38, of Ashfield won the Stowell Cup for the greatest improvement in Horsemanship; and the trophy for excellence in Marksmanship was presented to Warren S. Baker of Hanson. An unfortunate accident occurred during the senior jumping exhibition, when Allen S. Ingalls of Methuen received a broken collar bone as the result of a spill at hurdle three. Tonight those gifted in oratory entered the Flint Oratorical Contest. Al Swiren, ' 38, won the thirty- dollar first prize with his speech, " American Liberty — What Has Become of It? " Louis Breault received the fifteen- dollars second prize with " Our Democracy and the Free Press " . After the presentation of the speeches, attention turned to the judges: Walter E. Prince, Chair- man, Dr. Maxwell Goldberg, Vernon P. Helm- ing, all of the College and R. W. Haskins, Prin- cipal of Amherst High School. Saturday, June 12 — One could not possibly attend all of the various meetings and reunions held today. The Roister Doister Breakfast, several Alumni meetings, and fraternity and class reunions occupied the morn- ing. In the afternoon there was a concert by the College Band, the Varsity baseball game with Amherst College, an Alumni Tea, and supper engagements at the fraternities. I heard the band and went to the game. There ' s something about a game when you ' re sitting on the winning side, that gives it an added interest, especially if the score ends up 3 to 2 — as in this game. This evening the Roister Doister Plays were pre- sented The Tumbler of Noire Dame; The Last GepHire; and Peggy Plum. Professor Rand can well be proud of the actors in these three plays of Cornelius A. Wood. [326} 1937 Qcwrvnejnjc mejni DIARY OF THE SIXTY-SEVENTH (Continued) COMMENCEMENT p. S. I found this article by Dr. Goldberg in the Alumni Bulletin: 1937 COMMENCEMENT PLAYS It was almost midnight when the curtain was drawn at the close of the Commencement offer- ings of the Roister Doisters. Yet, though most of the spectators had been in Bowker Auditorium since before nine o ' clock, they did not hasten to the exits. They rather remained — to applaud, in the hope that they might be favored with at least one curtain call. The Roister Doisters had added one more dis- tinctive success to their already impressive roll of achievements. Credit for the effectiveness of the production must be widely distributed. Much of it goes to the maker of the plays, Mr. Cornelius Ayer Wood, of Andover, Mass. The creations of this enthusiastic amateur ' s dramatic imagination af- forded a wide range of theme, setting and mood. The first play, " The Tumbler of Notre Dame " , took us back to the monastic life of the Middle Ages, with its incongruous mixture of winebibb- ing and self -mortification; of greed and spiritual generosity, of time-serving and service to Eter- nity made manifest in time. The second play, the " Last Gepuire " , recalled to us the strife of the Irish Revolution of 1918 by depicting what happened when, during the tumult, a colleen, working on a piece of intricately patterned lace that had already cost her mother her sight, looked up long enough to fall in love with one of the hated Black-and-Tan, and to suffer grief and blindness in the chaos of confllicting loyalties. The third play, " Peggy Plum " , transported us to the indefinitely medieval locale of enchanted castles, fairies, witches, and young damsels of gentle lineage, who spoke in startlingly realistic and modern accents. But if Mr. Wood has won much credit as creator of the plays, others are to be noticed for what they did to realize the potentialities that he created: Professor Rand, director of the production; the technical staff, especially for the lighting effects in " Peggy Plum " ; and the actors. Each of the actors deserves specific comment; yet since that cannot be, I must content myself with mention of the following: the versatility of Robert D. MacCurdy, ' 38 of Watertown, Lawrence Levinson, ' 38, of Arlington, and John Hoar, ' 38, of Amherst; the vigorous interpretation of young Nora, in the " Last Gepuire " , by Lucille Monroe, ' 37, of Southbridge; and the effective character work of Donald W. Cadigan, ' 39, of Greenfield, B«ryl F. Briggs, ' 39, of Ashburnham, Barbara J. Strode, ' 38, of Marblehead, and Olive Norwood, ' 39, of Worcester. Nor must we forget Mrs. Alan Chadwick, who contrived to keep little David Snyder and Casandra Caraway awake until their entrance at the very end of the third play. Two years ago, in the pages of the Alumni Bulletin, I congratulated the Roister Doisters for their successful handling of " On Corpus Christi Day " . I now congratulate them again for suc- cess in a far different type of dramatic under- taking. [327} 1937 Qo-tnm€ncem.ent DIARY OF THE SIXTY-SEVENTH COMMENCEMENT Sunday, June 13 — Gold medals were awarded to Cornelius A. Wood, Harvard, ' 17, of Andover, for his contri- bution to the academic life of the College in the form of the Commencement Plays which he wrote; to Louis W. Ross, ' 17, of Newton, for his work as architect in charge of the construction and design of Thatcher Hall, the men ' s dorm- itory built in 1935; and to Bernard H. Smith, ' 99, of Brooklyn, whose contribution was a tribute to his friend, Dr. W. E. Hinds, noted entomologist made manifest in the gift of a chime of 10 bells. This was the main business of the Academics and Varsity Club Breakfast which was held this morning. It was an ideal day for Baccalaureate Sunday; and while the fellows were seated on the lawn awaiting the start of the procession, and rem- iniscing away the time, several attempts were made to give an all-inclusive definition of college. One cited the familiar definition which states that college is the place were you learn more and more about less and less until you finally know everything about nothing. But the one which received the most response was similar to the above but perhaps it embodied more local color in its underlying thought: " College is the place where you learn to do more and more in less and less time until you soon can do everything in no time. " The procession began at 4:30; and the exercises were preceded by a scripture-reading by the ed) Dean. Valensin ' s beautiful Minuet followed the scripture. " Freedom Through Truth " was Rev- erend Penner ' s Baccalaureate Sermon: " If we are ever to be freed from ignorance, hatred, superstition, prejudice, tyranny, exploitation, injustice, or anything which holds the mind and the body of man in bondage, we must allow men everywhere to pursue and seek the truth. And we must allow it in every field — in religion, in philosophy, in sociology, in economics, in busi- ness, and in politics. . . . You who are grad- uating from this college have learned something of what it means to seek truth and pursue it in laboratory and classroom. If your college ed- ucation has given you what it should, it has given you a love for truth. " Thus ran the con- text of his sermon. Betty arrived in Amherst in time for supper so I missed the reception at " Proxy ' s " house. Of course the usual " cap and gown " photographs had to be taken for the Memory book, Hope Chest or what have you, but because of the way the breeze affected my robe I ' ll bet when she gets those pictures I ' ll look like a disappointed observation balloon. Oh well! Monday, June 14 — Class Day! Rain! The moment has finally come — and gone; already a memory! I heard the mantle oration delivered by President Dave Rossiter, who pre- sented the mantle to Herbert E. Brown of Ash- land, President of the junior class. I heard [328] 1937 Sammeftcement DIARY OF THE SIXTY-SEVENTH COMMENCEMENT (Conchulod) Francis Thomas give " A Condemnation of Com- muting " , and " Chick " Cutter talk about the " brethren of the warpath " and the " pink-cheeked, starry-eyed maidens " in his Hatchet Oration. Ken Ross told of the decline of class rivalry in the past years in his Pipe Oration. Also the changes at M. S. C. in the past four years as revievi ed by Walt Guralnick in the Campus Oration, the Class Ode by Lucille Monroe, and the Ivy Oration by Ruth Todt, were presented before the class. But I can remember nothing of these (due perhaps to a sort of lethargj ' that occupied my mind) save this from the Ode: " This youth, when years have made them wise; This eagerness for life within their eyes — May nothing earthly bring that to defeat. " These speeches aren ' t for us — but for posterity This afternoon, the close of the final ceremony of Commencement left me perplexed. Baccalauraus Scientiae! What does it mean? What have I learned? I have learned to live, because I now can recognize my weaknesses and adjust myself to society. Not that I know more than those without a college degree, but rather that I know more of myself in relation to the external world than I would have, had I not chosen higher education. And more directly associated with the degree: a set of tools which I can handle with skill and with which I shall carve and fashion a livelihood. And now we take our leave. The Chapel Bell will toll the hours — hours when we are not here; the hills of Daniel Chester French will still fade in the winter only to burst forth with triumph in the spring. But now Dame Future takes us by the hand; sorceress, enchantress, she tantalizes us with her wand, Indeterminacy. And for our years with Alma Mater we pause to shed a tear, to clasp a hand, to sing a song, to look within ourselves and count the jewels she has given us, which grow brighter as the years slip away — even as the golden tones from the Chapel bells. I can only find true expression of my feel- ings at leaving State in Waller ' s poem " Of the Last " Verses in the Book " : " Stronger by weakness, wiser men become. As they draw near to their eternal home. Leaving the old, both worlds at once they view, That stand upon the threshold of the new. " [329 ] ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The INDEX BOARD wishes to make the following acknowledgments: To Dr. Maxwell H. Goldberg for his helpful suggestions and willing aid as Literary Advisor. To Professor Lawrence S. Dickinson for his complete cooperation with the board as Financial Advisor. To IVL-. Russell C. Knight, salesman for the Bickford Engraving and Electrotype Co., of Providence, R. I., for his ideas, advice, and assistance in the building of this book. To Mr. C. Arthur Nichols and his son, Philip G. Nichols, of the Chas. W. Burbank Company, Worcester, Mass., for their whole-hearted cooperation. To the Garber Studios of Springfield, Mass., which is responsible for the photographs used in this book, excepting those submitted by students and other members of the college. To the Administration for its cooperation in making possible the 75th Anniversary section. To Mr. John H. Vondell for the excellent photographs taken specifically for this book. The Editor joins with the Literary Editor and the Photographic Editor in thanking those students who so willingly contributed to the literary and photographic sections of the INDEX. The Photographic Editor gratefully acknowledges the unprecedented effort of the student body in submitting candid camera shots to be used in this book. Because of the lack of sufficient space, individual acknowledgment becomes an im- possibility. The following student photographers, however, must be mentioned for their large number of contributions and for their wonderful spirit and cooperation in help- ing to enlarge the photographic scope of the book: James F. Wheeler, ' 38 Robert E. Evans, ' 38 Carl R. Wildner, ' 38 Douglas D. Milne, ' 39 Philip Smardon, ' 38 Warren S. Baker, Jr., ' 38 and Mederick H. Beloin, ' 38 George C. Benjamin, ' 39 Frank M. Cushman, ' 38 [330] THE 1038 INDEX IS INDEBTED TO THE AMHERST BUSINESS MEN FOR THEIR CO-OPERATION THE 1938 INDEX BOARD mUchdl 9 .. rU ame. Editor-in-Chief EimeA R. £om£iaAd Business Manager nncuncemeni -to MASS. STATE STUDENTS ytlutuaZ Hexditig. and TttumAltiq. Co. ... a name that brings to mind many needed things . . . Radios, Fraternity House Equipment, Oil Burners, Cutlery, ... as well as anything in the line of Plumbing and Heating, whether new equipment or repairs. You ' ll find this concern one of the places where you should call frequently. [332] OJh £oJid eU li ... to satisfy the inner man ... or for a place to lay one ' s head in peaceful, restful slumber, this smort hostelry stands alone. You will enjoy every minute here. It ' s a " Treadway Inn " — and to the initiated that means all that is fine and enjoyable in one ' s stay " away from home " . George R. Jones, resi- dent manager. [333} . . . the house that serves you with dependable furniture of all kinds . . . for less money . . . and will arrange terms, if you wish. " At the end of the Village Green " , you ' ll find such nationally-known quality furniture as Whitney, Cushman, Heywood, Simmons and Red Cross bedding, Rugs by Bigelow, Sanford, Whittall . . . everything dependable and up to the minute. [334} Qxdttqje. Kand( KitcPiett Boy! There ' s a " spot " ! Good food . . . congenial surroundings . . . pleasant personnel . . . reasonable prices. It ' s a place to satisfy the inner man, that has no peer in New England . . . you will enjoy every minute of your stop at Sarris Brothers. [335] Cddie. .ujiit eA . . . where the smartest . . . the latest ... in men ' s wear, greets your eye and does not flatten your purse. You ' ll like the stock . . . and the people you meet there. Don ' t miss it! [336] [337] ... on Amity Street . . . where the Price is always the Lowest . . . and the Quality as High as the Highest. Just the spot to visit when your room needs an added bit of Furniture. You ' ll obtain fine furniture . . . and you ' ll save money at Griggs. . . . the haven of col- lege men who appreciate Hickey-Freeman Clothes, Burberry Coats, Knox Hats, and all those things a college man wants that are " different " . One purchase at " The House of Walsh " and you ' ll return there again and again. [338] Q afipenteA and . . . founded in 1842 ... a printing and publishing house whose well-earned reputation has extended for beyond the town . . . has served Massachusetts State College and the town of Amherst continuously all those long years. Besides THE COLLEGIAN and THE AMHERST RECORD, this fine concern is equipped mechanically and by experience, to pro- duce any sort of printed matter to your complete satisfaction. [339] " PAIGE ' S " is an age-old institution in Amherst. From the " horse and buggy days " up to their present up-to-date " Super-Service " station, it has proven its claim of rendering real service with courtesy and satisfaction. . . . " Service to All Motorists " . . . Socony products . . . Oldsmobile . . . Chevrolet . . . and everything you could possibly want or need if you own a car. ... 31 Pleasant Street . . . telephone 29. - rmi Trnrrni 1 [( [340] . . . what student ... or other person who likes good food . . . does not know the reputation of this satisfying food shop! The midnite snack or the mid-day meal, is always deliciously satisfying and reasonable in price, not to forget uniform courtesy of its personnel and the " live " crowd that you meet under its roof. [341] fio e MucLLol . . . at Springfield . . . the makers of many of the photographs in this INDEX . . . are also expert in portraiture. So, when you want a portrait to send home to the folks ... or your lady friends ... be sure that the Garber Studios will do a job that will please you and everyone else. [342J THE BICKFORD ENGRAVING ELECTROTYPE CO, 20 MATHEWSON STREET PROVIDENCE, R. I. May we say that it has been a pleasure to have served Massachusetts State College in the production of this INDEX. We have met, and worked with, some fine people in the Faculty, and among the students, and it is our sincere hope that the book will meet every anticipation. CHAS. W. BURBANK COMPANY Worcester - Mass. C. A. Nichols, Pres ident and Treasurer Philip G. Nichols, Director 9nd ' X INDEX Page A, B. Degree Academic Activities Awards Academic Activities Board Acknowledgments 266 219 218 330 211 212 Administration Administration and Faculty 20 17 331 Agriculture, Division of Alpha Epsilon Pi Alpha Gamma Rho 23 190 192 202 Alpha Sigma Phi Animal Husbandry Club Anniversary, 75th Art Exhibits Associate Alumni Athletics 188 254 157 262 42 283 Baseball— 1937 Basketball 286 300 Cross Country Football 298 291 Hockey 306 Interclass Athletic Board Intramural Athletic Activities Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics Minor Sports 285 312 284 312 Soccer Spring Track— 1937 Swimming 295 288 304 Winter Tiack Women ' s Athletic Association Women ' s Rifle Team 308 311 311 B Bacteriology Club Band 250 228 Baseball— 1937 Basketball 286 300 Bay State Revue Bumham Declamation 260 236 C Carnegie Room 263 Chemistry Club 250 Christian Federation 257 Classes 49 1938 (Seniors) 51 1939 (Juniors) 117 1940 (Sophomores) 133 1941 (Freshmen) 147 Clubs 250 Animal Husbandry 254 Bacteriology ... 250 Chemistry 250 Christian Federation 257 Dairy 254 Fernald Entomological 251 4-H 253 Page Home Economics 253 International Relations 256 Landscape Architecture 255 Mathematics 252 Menorah 258 Music Record 255 Newman 257 Outing 255 Phillips Brooks 258 Pre-Med 252 Psychology 251 Wesley Foundation 256 Collegian 222 Collegian Quarterly 224 Combined Music Clubs 230 Commencement — 1937 325 Community Concerts 262 Connecticut Valley Student Scientific Conference 263 Convocations 273 Cross Country 298 Cross Section 280 D Dad ' s Day Committee 239 Dairy Club 254 Dedication, Professor Lawrence Sumner Dickinson 12 Division of: Agriculture 23 Home Economics 26 Horticulture 27 Physical and Biological Sciences 29 Physical Education 37 Social Sciences 33 F Faculty and Administration 17 Fernald Entomological Club 251 Fine Arts Series 260 Flint Oratorical Contest 235 Football 291 Foreign Motion Pictures 262 Foreword 6 4-H Club 253 Fraternities 173 Alpha Epsilon Pi 190 Alpha Gamma Rho 192 Alpha Sigma Phi 188 Interfraternity Awards 174 Interfraternily Council 175 Kappa Sigma 180 Lambda Chi Alpha 186 Phi Beta Kappa Association 198 Phi Kappa Phi 199 Phi Sigma Kappa 178 Q. T. V 176 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 194 Sigma Phi Epsilon 184 Sigma Xi 198 Tau Epsilon Phi 198 Theta Chi .. 182 Freshman Class 147 [344] nde.oc INDEX Graduate School H Hell Week Hockey .... Home Economics, Division of Home Economics Club Honor Council Horticultuie Division of Horticultuial Show Committee I Page 276 306 26 253 215 27 244 INDEX Informal Committee Informal Snapshots ... In Memoriam: William Penn Brooks Thomas Joseph Ennght Interclass Athletic Board Interfraternity Awards Interfraternity Ball Committee Interfraternity Council International Relations Club Intersorority Ball Committee Intersorority Council Intramural Athletic Activities . Q. Tests 220 241 313-324 40 131 285 174 243 175 256 242 200 312 275 Joint Committee on Inter collegiate Athletics... 284 Judging Teams 265 Junior Class 117 Kappa Sigma Lambda Chi Alpha 186 Lambda Delta Mu 204 Landscape Architecture Club 255 ' ■Like ' . The 273 Lije m the Abbey 274 M Maroon Key 214 Mathematics Club 252 Menorah Club 258 Men ' s Debating Society 234 Men ' s Glee Club 232 Military Ball Committee 245 Military Majors: Juniors 247 Seniors _ 246 Military Science and Tactics, Department of 39 Minor Sports . 312 Model League of Nations 263 Moment ' s Monument. A 278 Motintjin Day .... 276 M. S. C. Concerts 263 Music Record Club 255 N New Curriculum, The 265 Newman Club 257 O Opening Section 1-16 Operetta : 231 Orchestra 230 Outing Club _ 255 Phi Beta Kappa Association Phi Kappa Phi Phillips Brooks Club Phi Sigma Kappa Phi Zeta Page 198 199 258 178 208 Physical and Biological Sciences, Division of ... 29 Physical Education, Division of 37 Pond Party 276 Pre- Med Club 252 President Hugh P. Baker 19 Professors Emeriti 22 Psychology Club 251 Q Q. T. V 176 R Roister Doisters 225 Rope Pull 275 R. O. T. C 248 S Senate 213 Senior Class 51 Sigma Alpha EpsOon 194 Sigma Beta Chi 206 Sigma Iota 201 Sigma Phi Epsilon 184 Sigma Xi 198 Soccer 295 Social Sciences, Division of 33 Social Unions 259 Sophomore Class 133 Soph-Senior Hop Committee 240 Sororities 200 Alpha Lambda Mu 202 Intersorority Council 200 Lambda Delta Mu 204 Phi Zeta 208 Sigma Beta Chi 206 Sigma Iota 201 Spring Track— 1937 288 Student Broadcasts 264 Student Religious Council 217 Swimming 304 T Tau Epsilon Phi 196 Theme Writing at Two 277 Theta Chi 182 Trustees 18 V ■Vespers 259 W ■yVesley Foundation 256 Widening Horizons in Student Literary Activity 264 Winter Carnival Ball Committee 238 Winter Carnival Committee 237 Winter Track 308 Women ' s Athletic Association 311 Women ' s Glee Club 233 Women ' s Rifle Team 311 Women ' s Student Government Association ... 216 £345} ] r . » ' .♦ t :m,„m .. -m "


Suggestions in the University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) collection:

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

1935

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Page 1

1936

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

1937

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

1939

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

1940

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

1941

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.