University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA)

 - Class of 1893

Page 63 of 194

 

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1893 Edition, Page 63 of 194
Page 63 of 194



University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1893 Edition, Page 62
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Page 63 text:

tically colleges, because in them there was a common life under authority. Prof. Free- man, writing of the Oxford and Cambridge of today, says, " A college is before all things a foundation. It is a house built and endowed for the dwelling and maintenance of students. The primary idea of a college is not the teaching of anybody j it is the maintenance in an incorporated society of some of those who come to profit by the teaching and other advantages of the university. " We see then that the word college in the thirteenth century, meant something quite different from the nineteenth century institution called by the same name. It is inter- esting to notice also how different are the ideas presented by this word to different per- sons living at the same time and even in the same country. Going to college ! What meaning do these words convey to the mind of the undergraduate ? Here is one, the circumstances of whose life have thus far made it a continuous holi- day, in which every wish has been gratified and every want supplied. He is going to college because most of the fellows of his set are going. Did not his father and grand- father, too, graduate from college ? Surely, " to go to college " is the thing to do. Another sees in the college a place for " a good time. " " I expect, " he says, " to be on the base-ball and foot-ball teams, and to win prizes in athletics. " Still another, whose eyes have been opened, in some measure, to the wondrous world around him, in whose mind a desire for knowledge has been awakened, and who has some appreciation of the nobleness of a consecrated life, looks forward to the college as the place where fresh impulses are to be received, increased power secured, and a still broader view of duty and truth and the meaning of life obtained. An Agricultural College ! What do these words mean 1 To one mind they present the idea of a place from which must be graduated practical farmers, ever ready, because of their college training, to guide the plow with a steadier hand and to wield the axe for a surer blow. Another, a father whose partial eyes detect in his son signs of promise not revealed to the duller sight of a less affectionate vision, regards the agricultural college as wholly unworthy of state or national support, because, forsooth, the college has not given this son the power to gather from the reluctant soil a harvest so rich and golden that there is no longer need for the tired limbs to plod and the weary hands to toil. Far different was the thought of the wise legislator who would offer the first fruits of his country ' s vast domain at the shrine of education, and appropriate to each state from the public lands of the nations the means for " the endowment, support and maintenance of at least one college, where the leading object shall be to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts in order to pro- mote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of hfe. " G. F. M. 47

Page 62 text:

TKe Worcl College. It has been said that words are fossil thoughts. If by this is meant that words, apart from the idea conveyed by them, have neither life nor power, the statement and the metaphor contained in it may be correct. Not so, however, if we mean that a given word always expresses the same thought, that there is neither growth nor change in the idea brought to the mind by it, that the pictures presented by it are always and every- where the same. What is a fossil. ' ' " A substance dug from the earth ; " " the petrified form of a plant or animal in the strata composing the surface of our globe. " During all the centuries since the plant or animal found its grave, it has undergone no change. Geologists tell us that a mammoth buried in the ice of Siberia can have even its eye-balls preserved for some such time as even one hundred thousand years, and that a grass-like plant, buried in the far more ancient coal-beds, may keep so perfectly that it remains flexible to the present day. This characteristic of permanence does not belong to the thought expressed by a given word ; and not the least interesting feature of the study of language is to trace the changes in the meaning of words, to see that the thought presented by them to our minds is wholly unlike that presented to the minds of those who lived hundreds of years before us. An interesting illustration of this fact is furnished by the word college. A Latin word, coming into the English through the French, its first idea is simply that of a " collection, body, or society of men invested with certain rights or engaged in common pursuits. " As early as the thirteenth century there was founded in Paris a " college " that was merely a boarding-house. The university established there attracted a throng of students eagerly desiring its advantages, many of whom sought lodging and some sort of protection and superintendence at a moderate cost. To supply this want the " college " was founded, the name at first having been specially applied to the houses of the religious orders, where were accommodated those young men who meant to devote themselves wholly to a " religious " life. From France our word, having the meaning just explained, passed over into England. The monastic institutions that early had a home in Oxford and Cambridge were prac- 46



Page 64 text:

(Xlass Toem. Time, with her swiftly fleeting years, Bears all our fates upon her scroll : Our joys and sorrows, hopes and fears, Which years, in passing, will unroll. When first we left our father ' s home, Dim was the path our feet must tread ; On untried seas we launched our bark. While clouds of doubt around us spread. But passing time makes plain the way Which once was filled with doubts and fears Our college days will soon be passed And numbered with forgotten years. Forgotten — not while time shall last, Or stars shall shine in heaven ' s deep blue ; These years will ever treasured be On memory ' s page, in hearts so true. With classmates round us, tried and true. Why should we fear old Fate ' s decree ? Love binds us with a golden cord — Our loyal love for Ninety-Three. 48

Suggestions in the University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) collection:

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1890 Edition, Page 1

1890

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1891 Edition, Page 1

1891

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1892 Edition, Page 1

1892

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1894 Edition, Page 1

1894

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1895 Edition, Page 1

1895

University of Massachusetts Amherst - Index Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1896 Edition, Page 1

1896

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