University of Maryland Baltimore Dental School - Mirror Yearbook (Baltimore, MD)

 - Class of 1947

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University of Maryland Baltimore Dental School - Mirror Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 120 of the 1947 volume:

DEhfTISTRY-PHAFiMACY 8£J)|I|VER£1TY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE MARYLAND COLLECTiOIST DENTISTRY LIBRARY fALTIMORE COLLEGE O ' 0EN7AI S ' oc-v Published by the one hundred and eighth student body of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Alaryland. cJDeclicctL ion TO Dr. Joseph C. Biddix, Jr. This volume is respectfully dedicated to Dr. Biddix, a gifted and inspiring teacher, whose professional enthusiasm has fired us all, whose kindly influence has been an aid and inspiration, who is esteemed for the assistance he is ever willing to render, who has taken a sincere interest in each of his duties, and whose judicious counsel and timely encourage- ment have been accepted by every member of the class. LIBRARY DENTISTRY-PHARMACY iUNIVERSLTY OF MARYI-ANO BA1.TIMORE U814 " bid him look into the lives of men As though into a mirror, and from others To take example for himself. " -Terence A d m I H I S t r a t I H President OF THE University Qovernor OF THE State OF Maryland nyl lMlam (PneMorx «Can£, n.. s ? ' Since his graduation in 1914 from the Dental School of the Univer- sity of Maryland, Dr. Robinson has been an increasingly valuable source of strength to his alma mater and to his profession. As the Dean of the School from 1924 to the present he has succeeded in establishing and maintaining high standards of dental education and professional service in the world ' s first dental college. For four years we have been the for- tunate recipients of the thorough training and wise direction contributed by a capable faculty selected and guided by the Dean. Our diplomas will reflect the values derived from the School ' s excellent reputation, which is a very important part of Dr. Robinson ' s contribution to the develop- ment of the B.C.D.S. For over a score of years Dr. Robinson has been one of the most distinguished and most effective leaders in dentistry. As a prolific and st imulating writer, as an impressive speaker, and as a molder of policies and preserver of the worthwhile traditions, the Dean has con- stantly and perserveringly been in the front line in the march of dental progress. We salute Dr. Robinson as a man to be proudly hailed in the story of American Dentistry. ome acutti Meyer Eggna,tz, Orthodontia B.C.D.S. 192 8 . . . Alpha Omega . . . Omi- cron Kappa Upsilon . . . Gorgas . . . impres- sive . . . dynamic personality . . . fiery lec- turer . . . straightens teeth — wishes he could do the same with those drives down the fair- way. Kenneth V. Randolph, Operative B.C.D.S. 1939 . . . Xi Psi Phi . . . Omicron Kappa Upsilon . . . Gorgas . . . stickler for de- tail . . . conscientious teacher and practitioner . . . professional mien . . . Sharpen up those line angles . . . Let ' s take that out and start over again. Brice M. Dorsey, Oral Surgery B.C.D.S. 1927 ... Xi Psi Phi . . . Omicron Kappa Upsilon . . . Gorgas . . . " Colonel " . . . efficient . . . thorough lecturer . . . never idle . . . congenial dignity . . . Gil Dobbs with forceps. Stanley H. Dosh, Crown and Bridge B.C.D.S. 193 5 . . . Delta Sigma Delta . . . Gorgas . . . popular with students . . . students ' favorite conversationalist . . . automobile en- thusiast . . . authority on trailers . . . does 13,000,000 units of Crown and Bridge per semester . . . Where do you want me to sign? Robert Miller Roentgenology and Dental A natomy B.C.D.S. 1937 . . . Psi Omega . . . Gorgas . . . risible outlook . . . canine fancier . . . inimitable chuckler. ■( 6 h f- erSonauueA Eugene Pessagno, Opcrafiie B.C.D.S. 1940 .. . Psi-€)mega . . . Omicron Kappa Upsilon . . . Gorgas . . . genial . . . his soft speech and gentle manner win the hearts of both students and patients . . . refrains from gassing . . . little man of full measure . . . Are you looking for me, Doctor? A. Bernard Eskow, Periodontia B.C.D.S 1938 .. . Sigma Epsilon Delta . . . Gorgas . . . exponent of the bow-tie . . . flying dentist . . . humorist . . . Esquire . . . popular . . . Now that you mention it. Paul A. Deems Orthodontics and Dental Anatomy B.C.D.S. 1928 ... Psi Omega . . . Omicron Kappa Upsilon . . . Gorgas . . . freshman fa- vorite . . devoted alumnus . . . always in- terested in students ' welfare. Guy Paul Thompson, Anatomy West Virginia University 1923 . . . Phi Beta Kappa . . . Maryland Biological Society . . . un- assuming . . . helpful . . . students ' choice for practical examiner . . . favorite table partner at school dances ... I may be wrong. Benjamin A. Dabrowski, Riuentgenology B.C.D.S. 1940 .. . Psi Omega . . . Omicron Kappa Upsilon . . . B.C.D.S. protege . . . barks loudly but has no bite . . . undisputed ruler of the X-ray Department . . . Get away from those files, Doctor! No charge? You ' ll have to get Mac ' s O.K. on that. H 7 y Jj n nbuti To William T. G. Morton belongs the honor and the credit for introducing sulphuric ether as an effective anesthetizing agent in cases re- quiring operative surgery. Fate seems to have assigned him to a set of circumstances in which he was exposed to all the factors relating to the current status of anesthesia, and nature had pro- vided him with those essential qualities of mind and heart that led him inevitably to exploit these factors in the interest of humanity. Morton began the study of dentistry under the tutelage of Dr. Horace Wells and, for a short period of time, was associated with him in a partnership dental practice in Boston. He studied medicine in the office of Dr. Charles Thomas Jackson, a chemist of unusual ability, who had ex- perimented with the exhilarating and anesthetic properties of sulphuric ether. It is a notable fact that Morton approached his task by way of the experimental method. Morton began by experimenting on animals in order to determine the action of the particular agent on the living organism. Having by this method proved both the efficacy and safety of sul- phuric ether in producing anesthesia he applied it to use in operative surgery. On September 30, 1846, he administered ether to a patient for the purpose of extracting a difficult tooth. Subsequently, he made other tests; and finally, on October 16, 1846, Dr. Morton adminis- tered ether vapor to a patient in the Massachusetts General Hospital in preparation for a surgi- cal operation. The patient manifested no signs of pain, and on October 17, the experiment was repeated with equally favorable results. As a consequence of these successful tests Dr. Morton was proclaimed by the medical profession and the people of Boston as the discoverer of anes- thesia. : When Morton ' s experiment with ether proved successful he claimed the discovery of a new agent that would produce anesthesia; he tried to hide its identity from everyone, including Dr. J. C. Warren, the surgeon, and he proceeded promptly to patent the agent under the trade name, Letheoii. However, when the true nature of the agent became known, Morton conceded that he had received assistance in his experiments with ether vapor from Dr. Jackson and freely agreed to share with him the honor and emoluments occurring from the discovery. There can be no doubt of Morton ' s right to the claim that he was the first to administer ether for the definite purpose of producing complete insensibility to physical pain and that the popularization of surgical anesthesia and its world-wide acceptance by science and medicine stemmed from his successful demonstration of it at the Massachusetts General Hospital. And there can be no question of the fact that from his determined, courageous efi orts to convince the world of the safety and efficacy of an agent that he had tested and found efl ' ective in producing complete insensibility to pain, came directly one of the greatest blessings that has ever been con- ferred on the human race. Any subsequent errors of judgment on his part with respect to ma- terial rewards and benefits should be forgotten or looked upon with pity in the light of the posi- tive values of the rich contribution he made to humanity. -( 8 y " One must learn By doing the thing; for tJooiigh you think yon knoiu it, Yon have no certainty, nntil yon try. " — Sophocles e I a s s e $ ne e emopd Four years completed. Four years in which everyone of us has run the gamut of human emotions. We have passed through periods of occasional joy and have plummeted to the depths of despair. Our human resistance has been tried and stretched to the breaking point; a few fal- tered, but the majority of us are here to taste the fruits of our labor. And labor it was, because there were many independent forces cooperating to make our existence miserable. Many times we felt ourselves slipping, and the struggle appeared so hope- lessly futile that the thought of giving in became easy under the mental and physical strain to which we were subjected. Our mettle was tested, tried, and strained in every manner, form, and fashion imaginable, but was not found wanting. From Dr. McCarthy ' s welcoming speech, to the presentation of our diplomas, we have been in a maelstrom of dental life interrupted here and there by a brief interlude that one could call a vacation. We were the Army and Navy class. Under the circumstances of our service many of us who otherwise would not be here, were given the opportunity to study dentistry. The ad- vantages that were given us had never been dreamed of before, even by the most extreme Utopian mind. We had our tuition paid and were allotted our living expenses. All that was left for us to do was to put in the hours and do our best. On that first morning in the hallway of the anatomy building our hearts missed several beats, and when the door to the dissection room was opened, and we saw those metal tables be- decked with their gruesome burdens, we felt like turning tail and heading for Greene Street. The novelty soon wore off, however, and all of us became wise birds who made playmates of our cadavers, along with becoming very familiar with their innards and outards. In histology we were told that we were not expected to be artists, but only to draw what we saw in the micro- scope. If we had followed this advice our books would still be blank, but we used our vivid im- mm- ' ' »: j i H:j,:,„. r ■- » ' j B ;vK ' ■H w ' a. ..laafe.. R «i« - imm k Wm,M ■;. ,%,.. Im MM i%ik M 1 MXSMU ' f m Spw, m « i ■ ' r fi HI " m ■ ■ ■ 1 m ■ ' :- mI 1 p ;: B ; .-„„.. . . » :i ' ■ " I ; ■ OFFICERS Picshioif . Edmond Vanden Bosche Vice President Seymour Ash Secretary Robert Mohn Treasurer Alvin Kronthal Sergeaijf-at-Ariiis Charles Cox Historian Robert Posner -I 10 h aginations and were able to concoct something approaching what we were supposed to see. In bio-chem we added that " teeny bit " of acid, as in- structed by the good Doctor Vanden Bosche, and results were amazing. Physiology was a madhouse— of cats, frogs, terrapins, and kimograph drums, which would always record when the experiment did not require. The Boley gauge was master in our Dental Morphology, and its readings meant the difference between an acceptable carving and one that brought Ernest b. Nuttall, d.d.s. Honorary Chss PrcsiJi ' nf the statement, " All right, get another block and start again. " After each lab in bacteriology we awaited the symptoms: nausea, vomiting, coma and death — which fortunately or unfortunately failed to develop. Pharmacology was a course in dental ethics and professional mien. Until we delved into pathology, we did not realize that the human body could be plagued with so many maledictions. Operative and Dr. Randolph made point angles, lines of force, cavo-surface bevels, and the thirty-three steps all there was to dentistry. The clinic at last! We thought that setting foot on the floor would be a panacea for all our ills. More disillusionment! Reprimands followed in incessant succession; we did nothing right and everything wrong. Seven hundred points seemed monumental; even prophys were difficult to complete. Patients seemed to take the brunt of it all, having to return six or seven times before the cavity preparation was checked. This spasm of uncertainty passed and we eventually pre- pared the teeth with endoform accuracy. Prosthetics proved to be a nightmare of mistakes and redundant work. Plaster hardened too quickly, bite blocks warped, and centric was only some- thing we read about. Crown and bridge was a matter for the patient fellow; after all the Doctors Dosh and Nuttall had only four hands. There was always a piece of calculus in some hidden gin- gival pocket distal to the third molar that Dr. Biddix would deftly dislodge to the students ' em- barrassment. Assignments in the different departments permitted us welcome mental relaxation from the dreary thought that points meant everything. The Senior year brought a change in the school policy. No more points — at least that ' s what they told us! The strain was just as great; for progress reports had to be compiled and signed each hour, and the thought of having to be busy each minute made many wish that the point system, with its small bit of freedom, would return. As Seniors we had reached the peak of knowledge. The feeling of knowing what it was all about replaced the uncertainty we had shown as Juniors. We were approaching the end with a spirit of exultation, mingled with an almost inconceivable thought of what we would do should graduation find us with too few root canals, too few gold foils, and an over-abundance of amalgam. Disappointments and patients who refused to return to get that Class III foil checked, all made our lives a Uttle more full of anxiety, and put quite a strain on those who in their own minds (no point system, you know) thought that the require- ments of last year ' s senior class were not equalled by the restorations that they had completed this year. Writing of these things seems all too inadequate and expressionless. Reading of these things might give an impression that life at the B.C.D.S. was one horrendous nightmare following an- other. Perhaps it was, and yet in retrospect we feel certain that it wasn ' t. At least, it had become a new way of hfe, and the thought that we shall never see all the familiar faces together again leaves us with a bitter-sweet feeling. R. PosNER, Historian -I 11 y JL Tint Row: J. Baldacchino, E. Lee, L. Rapoport, S. Gottlieb, C. Cox, M. Soltys, R. Alvarez, J. Hughes, S. Ehrenhalt, J. Langley, S. Kotula, W. Hartsock, S. Johnston. Seccu Row: L. Nathans, W. Seifcrt, J. Traylor, C. Isaacson, J. Fritz, W. Roth, F. AscioUa, R, Lamb, J. Hohing, D. Cray, M. Scamp, E. Eckerd, J. Binderman, J. Gill. ThinI Row: C. Olive, R. Mohn, R. Posner, F. Ehrlich, B. deHosson, A. Schaeffer, W. Coleman, R. Nielsen, R. Hepler, T. Sikes, M. DryHenich, R. Eschenburg, C. Hopkins. First Row: W. Couk, G. Cljik, li. Kayc, W. Smitli, R. Giier, M. Fagan, F. McCall, E. Stcinhuf, t. Vandcn Bosche, S. Londeree, A. Kronthal, A. Schwartz. Second Row: W. Talbott, L. Greene, H. Yerger, P. Lambert, R. Dorobiala, E. Gramse, W. D ' Abbraccio, P. Bingham, N. Bookstaver, J. Ballouz. Third Row: J. Belott, R. Flinchbaugh, G. Attanasio, G. Heroux, N. Han nan, C. Beck, J. Bell, J. Vila-Santana, S. Ash, R. Chouinard. Absent: T. Clark, A. Lombardi. s. eniorS i 13 ROBERT A. AL ' VAREZ " Bob " . . . Caguas, Puerto Rico . . . University of Day- ton, Johns Hopkins University (B.S.) . . . Army . . . Latin lover . . . married . . . ex-mayor of Linden Avenue . . . argumentative. FERDINAND ASCIOLLA " Fred " . . . Providence, Rhode Island . . . Providence College . . . Army . . . Psi Omega (Chaplain 3, Secretary 4) . . . genial . . . rotimd ... in the clutches of . . . Rath- skellerian . . . penurious note-taker. SEYMOUR ASH " Sy " . . . Elizabeth, New Jersey . . . Union Junior Col- lege . . . Army . . . Alpha Omega (House Manager 3) . . . Class Vice President 4 . . . Tonight ' s a festive occasion . . . It ' s Jcannie, not Jenny ... ale fellow . . . anchorite. s. eniop i 14 K JOSEPH P. ATTANASIO " Joe " . . . Linden, Ne r Jersey . . . Union Junior Col- lege, University of Maryland (Pi Kappa Psi) . . . Army . . . Psi Omega . . . The Count . . . six-a-day man . .• . superenergetic . . . ex-tonsorialist. JOSEPH F. BALDACCHINO " Baldy " . . . Barnesboro, Pennsylvania ... St. Francis College (Beta Kappa Phi) . . . Army . . . Psi Omega . . . garrulous . . . lilliputian . . . congenial . . . newly vi ' ed. JOSEPH M. BALLOUZ " Joe " . . . New Martinsville, West Virginia . . . Marietta College, Hahnemann Medical School (Alpha Sigma Phi) . . . Psi Omega . . . quiet . . . neo-orthodontist . . . mys- terious character . . . ex- " Good Humor Man " . a add ■I 15 h s. eniof CHARLES F. BECK I " Charlie " . . . Yonkers, New York . . . Syracuse Uni- versity (Theta Chi) . . . Army . . . basketball star . . . Xi Psi Phi (President 4) . . . Interfraternity Council 3, 4 . . . father . . . ambidextrous . . . truant from sports and music world . . . popular. JOSEPH S. BELL " Joe " . . . Waterbury, Connecticut . . . University of Connecticut (Phi Epsilon Pi) ... Army . . . Alpha Omega (Secretary 3, President 4) . . . Class Vice President 3 . . . Literfraternity Council (President 4) . . . Mirror 4 . . . not single . . . The Bell tolls for Mitzi . . . Can I borrow your ...?... congenial. JOSEPH E. BELOTT " Joe " . . . Newark, New Jersey . . . University of South Carolina (B. S., Kappa Sigma Kappa) . . . Army . . . Psi Omega . . . gymnast . . . ex-school teacher . . . beaver . . . recluse. 16 I- a adS JACK BINDERMAN " Bindy " . . . Beckley, West Virginia . . . West Virginia University . . . Army . . " T Alpha Omega . . . trenchant commentator . . . Doctor, I have a question . . . Your bid- in the sidepocket-checkmate. PAUL D. BINGHAM " Bing " . . . East Jaffrey, New Hampshire ... St. An- selm ' s College (A.B.) . . . Navy ... XI Psi Phi . . . Class President 1 . . . married . . . Nancy says No . . . amic- able . . . personality smile. NELSON D. BOOKSTAVER " Bookie " . ■ - Teaneck, New Jersey . . . University o± Maryland . . . Navy . . . Journal 1, 2, 3 . . . Gorgas . . . Interfraternity Council 3, 4 . . . Sigma Epsilon Delta (Treasurer 2, President 3) . . . Cherchez la femme . . . last of the SED ' s . . . AO ' s stepchild . . . music for " do-re-mi " . i 17 y ROLAND A. CHOUINARD " Chouin " . . . Fall River, Massachusetts . . . Assumption College, University of Maryland . . . Army . . . Xi Psi Phi (Secretary 3) . . . Gaver Seminar . . . Fauchard ' s interpreter . . . G.A. ' s conscience . . . hates histamine. GEORGE A. CLARK " George " . . . Lisbon, New Hampshire . . . University of New Hampshire (lacrosse) . . . Army . . . Xi Psi Phi . . . Gaver Seminar . . . teetotaler . . . always C B . . . shadows Chouinard . . . Culbertsonian. THORBURN R. CLARK " Thorb " . . . Pearl River, New York . . . Colorado Col- lege (Beta Theta Pi) ... Army . . . married . . . father . . . anything for a laugh . . . baseball enthusiast . . . me- tabolism plus. s. eniof i 18 K WILLIAM J. COLEMAN " Willie " . . . Baltimore, JVlaryland . . . Potomac State (Phi Sigma Nu) . . . Army . . . Psi Omega . . . benedict . . . outspoken . . . professional . . . fearless Willie . . . shuttle route: Clinic to Student Health Office. WARREN W. COOK " Warren " . . . Frostburg, Maryland . . . Western Mary- land College (soccer) . . . Army . . . Xi Psi Phi (Editor 4) . . . Gaver Seminar . . . Interfraternity Council 3, 4 . . . married . . . bridge fiend . . . casual dresser — express- ly for comfort . . . makes C B an Operative Clinic . . . Dosh disciple. CHARLES W. COX " Charlie " . . . Morgantown, West Virginia . . . West Virginia University (Phi Kappa Psi) ... Navy ... Psi Omega . . . Class Sergeant-at-Arms 4 . . . congenial . . . quiet . . . little admiral with big stuff. a add ■{ 19 f 3 eniop DONALD L. CRAY " Don " . . . Springfield, Massachusetts . . . American International College . . . Navy . . . Xi Psi Phi . . . en- gaged . . . saxophonist of no note . . . conscientious . . . Randolphphobia. WILLIAM H. D ' ABBRACCIO " D ' Abbrach " . . . Providence, Rhode Island . . . Provi- dence College (Ph. B.) . . . Navy ... Psi Omega (Junior Grand Master 3, Grand Master 4) . . . Interfraternity Council (Treasurer 4) . . . distinctive profile . . . good- natured . . . DryHenich ' s second-hand sartorialist. BERNARD S. deHOSSON " Gus " . . . South Orange, New Jersey . . . University of Maryland (Theta Chi) . . . Navy ... Psi Omega . . . unostentatious . . . cheerful . . . sleepy. no}- a UJd ' Ray ' RAYMOND J. DOROBIALA . Buffalo, New York . . . Canisius College (A.B.) . . . Army . . . Gorgas . . . tennis devotee . . . pipe addict . . . from command car to Ford . . . It ' s the Bandbox tonight, fellows! . . . S-u-r-r-e-n-d-e-r! METRO DryHENICH " Metro " . . . Perth Amboy, New Jersey . . . Rutgers (B.S.) . . . Navy . . . Psi Omega . . . Gorgas . . . sun- worshipper . . . Band Box to Rio . . . beau brummell . . . polished and competent. EVERETTE A. ECKERD " Eck " . . . Hickory, North Carolina . . . Duke Uni- versity . . . Army . . . inlay specialist . . . equestrian . . . understands Ehrenhalt . . . B.T.C. motorman. ■(21 y « " SAMUEL H. EHRENHALT " Sam " . . . Long Branch, New Jersey . . University of Southern Cahfornia, New York University (Tau Epsilon Phi) . . . Army . . . Alpha Omega . . . Five dollars for lunch and I ' m still hungry . . . Sam the man . . . the aesthete . . . the Jacob Epstein . . . Been weight lifting. Can you really tell? FRED EHRLICH " Freddie " . . . Baltimore, Maryland . . . University of Maryland . . . Army . . . Alpha Omega . . . Gorgas . . . Harry James of the rheostat . . . egregious raconteur of unusual people . . . mobile features . . . Picadilly Circus. RICHARD W. ESCHENBURG " Dick " . . . Mt. Clemens, Michigan . . . Michigan State College (B.S., Delta Chi) . . . Army . . . Psi Omega . . . whittler . . . married . . . photographer . . . terpsichorean hound . . . d ental truant, that is . . . Hapsburg chin. s. enior A 22 } MAURICE J. PAGAN " Morris " . . . Coventry, Rhode Island . . . Providence College (B.S.) . . . Army . . . Psi Omega (Senator 3, House Manager 3) . . . Mirror (Associate Photography Editor 3, Photography Editor 4) . . . Class Treasurer 1 . . . daguerreotypist . . . engaged ( " H " ) . . . natator. RALPH W. FLINCHBAUGH " Ralph " . . . Toledo, Ohio . . . Ohio State . . . . Psi Omega . . . Gorgas . . . Gavcr Seminar . ous . . . well read . . . conscientious . . . eidetic . . and Fritzious. . Army . uxori- Damon JACKSON W. FRITZ " Jack " . . . Baltimore, Maryland . . . Washington Col- lege (Lambda Chi Alpha) . . . Army . . . meticulous worker . . . conservative . . . genial. a add -123 1- s. eniof JAMES P. GILL " " Jimmy " . . . Warwick, Rhode Island . . . Providence College . . . Army . . . Psi Omega . . . ultra-conservative . . . sincere . . . solid worker. STANLEY H. GOTTLIEB " Stasch " . . . Annapolis, Maryland . . . University of Maryland (B.S.) . . . Army . . . Alpha Omega . . . Mirror 3, 4 . . . What odds will ya give me? . . . the body . . . Hon . . . Babe . . . Ace . . . Shrewd . . . Hoss . . . posses- sor of the unusual. EDWARD J. GRAMSE ' " Ed " . . . Holyoke, Massachusetts . . . Union College (A.B.) . . . Psi Omega . . . somambulistic . . . timid soul . . . unlicensed hacker . . . better late than never . . . likeable. •[ 24 V a add LYNN P. GREENE " Greenie " . . . Rome, New York . . . Hartwick College (Alpha Kappa Pi) ... Army . . . Xi Psi Phi . . . Gaver Seminar . . . fast operator . . . never gassed . . . energetic. ROBERT N. GRIER " Buddy " . . . Morgantown, West Virginia . . . West Virginia University . . . Navy . . . Psi Omega . . . Class President 2 . . . married . . . youthful . . . saddle shoes . . . Cox ' s counterpart. NEIL E. HANNAN " NeiUie " . . . Troy, New York . . . Siena College (B.S.) . . . Psi Omega . . . expert on malocclusion . . . Cox will tnke care of you . . . match ya . . . easy-going . . . fraternal. i 25 y WILLIAM D. HARTSOCK " Don " . . . Hagerstown, Maryland . . . Gettysburg College (B.A., Sigma Epsilon) . . . Army . . . Psi Omega (Historian 3) . . . saddle-broken . . . emissary to the Nurses ' Home . . . Let ' s go hunting . . . amenable. ROY F. HEPLER, JR. " Roy " . . . Huntington, West Virginia . . . Marshall College . . . Army ... Psi Omega . . . Senior Senator from West Virginia ... I never smile before five P. M. . . . enjoys Dr. Miller . . . alopecious . . . sensitive. GERALD J. HEROUX " Jerry " . . North Uxbridge, Massachusetts . . . Col- lege of the Holy Cross (A.B. ) . . . Navy ... Psi Omega . . . Gaver Seminar . . . happy . . . firm believer of Dr. Worm ' s Theory . . . the man with a voice. s. enior i2%y JOHN M. HOMING " John " . . . Lonacoiimg, Maryland . . . University of Maryland .... Army . . . Psi Omega . . . Gorgas (Presi- dent 4) . . . Gaver Seminar . . . Student Council 3 . . . Mirror 4 . . . conscientious . . . amicable. CHARLES H. HOPKINS " Spec " . . . Ironton, Ohio . . . Miami University, Mar- shall College (B.S.) . . . Army ... Psi Omega (Editor 4) . . . Gorgas (Treasurer 4) . . . Gaver Seminar . . . authority on Tic Douloureux . . . fraternal . . . Have you seen Traylor? JOHN T. HUGHES, JR. " Johnny " . . . Selma, North Carolina . . . Wake Forest College (B.S., Pi Gamma Sigma) . . . Army ... Psi Omega . . . Gaver Seminar . . . H-e-r-e-! . . . real Confederate . . . Mayor of Irvington . . . No suh . . . cheerful . . . indus- trious. a a66 -i 27 |. s. enLOf ,, r..- CLARENCE E. ISAACSON " Clarence " . . . Portsmouth, New Hampshire . . . Uni- versity of New Hampshire (B.S.) . . . Army . . . Gaver Seminar . . . reluctant Santa . . . married . . . bibliophile- phile . . . jolly good fellow. SAMUEL W. JOHNSTON, JR. " Sam " . . . Orlando, Florida . . . University of Florida, Wake Forest College (B.S., Alpha Phi Omega) . . . Army . . . Psi Omega . . . family practice . . . harbor habitant . . . world traveler . . . ingenious . . . never says no. BURTON B. KAYE " Burt " . . . New Haven, Connecticut . . . Yale (B.A.) . . . Army . . . Alpha Omega (Historian 3) . . . Gorgas . . . Class Historian 2 . . . Mirror 4 . . . journal 4 . . . classifier of personalities . . . aristocratic tastes . . . genuine Harvard accent . . . likes the ladies. 23 i ic a66 STAI JLEY M. KOTULA " Stan " . . . Baltimore, Maryland . . . University of Mary- land . . . Navy . . . Psi Omega . . . Gorgas (Secretary 4) . . . forever smiling . . . sparkling personality. ALVIN D. KRONTHAL " Al " . . . Baltimore, Maryland . . . University of Mary- land . . . Army . . . Alpha Omega . . . Class Treasurer 3, 4 . . . married . . . Damon Runyon of class . . . infectious humor . . .. his pocket is his instrument case . . . Beaver Club (President 2) . . . encyclopedist of sports. ROBERT F. LAMB " Bob " . . . Deal, New Jersey . . . University of Mary- land (Thcta Chi) . . . Navy ... Psi Omega ... 15 years without refilling . . . married . . . in genuous. -{29f PAUL R. LAMBERT " Paul " . . . South Charleston, West Virginia . . . Mar- shall College . . . Navy . . . Psi Omega . . . quiet . . . ad- mirer of all femininity . . . How ' d you like the one Lon- deree ' s working on? . . . S-t-u-u-u-vi! JAMES H. LANGLEY " Jim " . . . Manchester, New Hampshire ... St. An- selm ' s College, University of New Hampshire . . . Army . . . Xi Psi Phi (Monitor 4) . . . dentist to the seminary . . . determined . . . still water. EDWARD B. LEE " Ed " . . . Bath, New York . . . Hartwick College (Al- pha Kappa Pi) ... Army . . . Psi Omega . . . married . . . silent one . . . amiable . . . good natured. s. eniof i 30 Y ANGELO R. LOMBARDI " Lombo " . . . Palisades-Jark, New Jersey ... St. Peter ' s College, Fordham University . . . Army . . . Psi Omega . . . eagerest of all beavers . . . night-watchman of B.C.D.S. . . . NO-ooo! Yessss! STUART R. LONDEREE " Stu " . . . South Charleston, West Virginia . . . Mar- shall College . . . Navy . . . Psi Omega . . . Gaver Semi- nar . . . class ingenue . . . versatile lover . . . sparkling per- sonality . . . Have you heard this one? -Jf i! : FRANCIS M. McCALL " Mac " . . . Regard, Missouri . . . Missouri Valley Col- lege (A.B., Beta Beta Beta) . . . Army ... Psi Omega . . . Gorgas . . . Gaver Seminar . . . Journal (Student Editor 4) . . . Mirror 4 . . . ex-school teacher . . . basso-profundo . . . professional attitude — U-u-u-h-h-h! a add 31 V s. eniof ROBERT L. MOHN " Bob " . . . New Bern, North Carolina . . . Wake Forest College (B.S.) . . . Psi Omega . . . Gorgas . . . industrious . . . ex-pedagogue . . . easy-going Southerner . . . well liked. LEE C. NATHANS " Lee " . . . Providence, Rhode Island . . . Brown Univer- sity (Pi Lambda Phi) . . . Navy . . . Alpha Omega (Treas- urer 3) . . . Ehrlich ' s understudy . . . Ehrenhalt ' s Bos- well . . . cute repartee . . . Detroit Tigers grandstand man- ager . . . likeable. REVERE A. NIELSEN " Rip " . . . Greenbelt, Maryland . . . University of Mary- land . . . Army ... Psi Omega . . . Gorgas . . . diligent . . . meticulous worker . . . " reserved Revere " . . . sincere. 32!- i i lc CldS CLARENCE S. OLIVE " Olie " . . . Fayetteville, North Carolina . . . Davidson College (Phi Gamma Delta) . . . Navy . . . Psi Omega . . . This Side of Innocence . . . Suh, ah think . . . B.C.D.S. an- cestry . . . six-chair office . . . earnest. " ROBERT P. POSNER " The Poz " . . . Freeport, New York . . . Bucknell Uni- versity (B.S., Sigma Alpha Mu) . . . Army . . . Alpha Omega . . . Gorgas (Vice President 4) . . . Mirror (Edi- tor 4) . . . Class Historian 4 . . . impeccable . . . Barry- more profile . . . would-be Heifitz . . . physical culture enthusiast. LEONARD RAPOPORT " Rap " . . . Baltimore, Maryland . . . University of Mary- land (B.S., Alpha Zeta Omega) . . . Army . . . Alpha Omega . . . Mirror 3,4... Class Treasurer 2 . . . Gorgas . . . married . . . master of repartee . . . There ' s no word 1 don ' t know . . . polished polisher . . . happy combination of the sublime and the ridiculous . . . fascinating memory. -I 33 Y WILLIAM K. ROTH . " Bill " . . . Baltimore, Maryland . . . University of Mary- land, Loyola College (B.S., track) . . . Navy . . . Xi Psi Phi . . . vocal virtuoso . . . Nancy says — . . . benedict . . . smiling countenance. AARON SCHAEFFER " Schaf " . . . Baltimore, Maryland . . . Western Maryland College (B.A.) . . . Army . . . Alpha Omega (Vice Presi- dent 3 ) . . . Gorgas . . . Mirror 4 . . . Class Vice president 2 . . . Class Historian 3 . . . scholarly . . . Where ' s Poz? . . . conscientious . . . future orthodontist . . . witty. AARON SCHWARTZ " Air " . . . Baltimore, Maryland . . . University of Mary- land . . . Army . . . Alpha Omega . . . looking for a mil- lion-dollar baby . . . Are you one, or are you going to be oj le . ' ' . N20. instructor mimic ker . quick wit inhale s. enior 34 I- WALTER J. SEIFERT " Walt " . . . Ridgewood, Queens, New York . . . Long Island University . . . Army . . . married . . . ardent hun- ter (animal) . . . bilingual . . . easy-going. THOMAS E. SIKES, JR. " Rebel " . . . Greensboro, North Carolina . . . University ot North Carolina . . . Army . . . Psi Omega . . . Gaver Seminar . . . professional attitude . . . Southern gentleman. WILLIAM B. SMITH " Smitty " . . . Baltimore, Maryland . . . University of Notre Dame . . . Navy . . . Xi Psi Phi . . . Mirror (2, 3, 4) . . . Good reason for the 6 5c haircut ' s return . . . papa . . . dependable and unostentatious. a add ■I 35 K s. eniof MITCHELL M. SOLTYS " Mitch " . . . Reading, Pennsylvania . . . Albright Col- lege (B.S.) . . . Army . . . found himself lost when Seifert married . . . steady and industrious. MARSDEN F. STAMP " Marty " . . . Elmira, New York . . . Syracuse Univer- sity . . . Navy . . . Xi Psi Phi . . . Student Council 1 . . . Gaver Seminar (Chairman 4) ... distinguishedly grey . . . professional mien . . . married . . . the people ' s choice. EDWARD J. STEINHOF " Ed " . . . Fall River, Massachusetts . . . Providence College . . . Army . . . Xi Psi Phi . . . Gaver Seminar . . . duck pin expert . . . pulchritude critic . . . smiling face. ■i 36 I- a aJJ WILLIAM M. TALBOTT " Squeak " . . . Baltimore, Maryland . . . Loyola College (B.S.) . . . Army . . . Xi Psi Phi . . . Gaver Seminar (Treas- urer 4) . . . married . . . fugitive from barber chair . . . happy disposition. JACK R. TRAYLOR " Jack " . . . Huntington, West Virginia . . . Yale Uni- versity, Marshall College . . . Army . . . Psi Omega (In- terrogator 2 ) . . . Gaver Seminar . . . Class President 3 . . . Where ' s Speck? . . . master of the engagement . . . letter writer . . . immaculate dresser. EDMOND G. VANDEN BOSCHE " Vandy " . . . Baltimore, Maryland . . . Pennsylvania State College (B.S.) . . . Navy . . . Psi Omega . . . Gaver Seminar . . . Gorgas . . . Mirror 2, 3, 4 . . . Student Coun- cil 2 . . . Class President 4 . . . slightly hyperemic . . . ac- tive . . . industrious. -137}. JORGE VILA-SANTANA " Jorge " . . . Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico . . . University of Puerto Rico (B.S., Phi Sigma Alpha) . . . Army . . . mar- ried . . . pop . . . good-will ambassador . . . popular all along the line. HOWARD C. YERGER " Yerg " . . . Fairlawn, New Jersey . . . Pennsylvania State College (B.A., Phi Kappa Sigma) . . . Army . . . Psi Omega . . . Class Vice President 1 . . . scion of a political family . . . shuttle route to New Jersey . . . amiable . . . competent. s. enioi a adJ -; 38 }■ ■(39h OL 40 1- s. eniord ■{ 41 LIBRARY DENTISTTRY-PHARMACY yMIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SALT! MORE ne juni uniorS As the last sands of the sophomore year are washed upon the inexorable shores of time, the class finds itself torn between the conflicting emotions of deep humihty and boundless confi- dence. This dilemma was fostered upon us by the strict supervision we had received clinically, and the unknown quantity of the personal equation. Out of this chaos, this confusion, came a new sense of professional dignity that alternately challenged the abilities and ennobled the spirit of the group. Because of a long orientation period, the transition was bereft of the clamorous enthusiasm that traditionally characterizes the begln- nin of the junior year. There was a situation ahead that would allow no procrastination, that would not tolerate the whims and capriciousness of human nature, that would refuse to counte- nance the imminent Impetuosities of inexperience. For these reasons we are now a staid, conserv- ative aggregate whose only desire is to emulate those who have gone before, and to perpetuate a pattern for those who shall come to the B.C.D.S. when we are but dust. As juniors we had the distinction of Introducing into the School a new system of credit tabu- lation for clinical operative procedure. This system seeks to subordinate expedience and all its dire implications, to the benefit of the patient, his comfort, and his indivlduahty. It was not without trepidation and anxiety that we approached our new assignments. We hope to accomplish those assignments with the same benignity of spirit and altruistic concern that have characterized the endeavors of the hundred and more classes that have preceded us. We ardently wish that the judiciousness of our instructors In all things dental will continue to be tempered by a quality of mercy that Is not strained. And If some continue to find caries in full dentures, remember: " Who of us is perfect? Even the sun has spots " . A. Monaco, Historian OFFICERS President Joseph Kenneally Y ' lce President Leo V. Ready Secretary Robert Coleman Treasurer John Stephens Sergeant-at-Arins Dick Dykes Historian Anthony Monaco i 42 y First Row: F. Iturrino, W. George, A. Bobenko, P. Loflin, J. Stephens, P. StroUo, J. Medina. W. Scrahan, J. Doherty, N. Allen, W. Davis, J. J. Lee, R. E. Lee. Second Rou : A. Aria, R. Neish, S. George, W. Allen, S. E. Zimmerman, J. Thompson, J. Apple ' oaum, J, Carroll. W. Bloxom, W. Dodson, G. Millert, N. Kerico, J. Page. Third Row: B. Williamowsky, S. Kukucka, B. Gordon. C. DeVier, D. Dykes, S. Nord, E. Johnston, J. Kenncally, W. Biddington, T. Walter. Firsf Row: C. Sanitago, P. Heininger, B. Ward, M. Reichel, L. Melendez, D. Lewis, R. Coleman, A. Vikell, E. R. Zimmermann, A. Quincero, L. Copen. Second Roic: H. Stanley, A. Monaco, F. DaviU-Lopez, E. McGrath, F. Pavel, E. Rapp, J. Scribner, C. Meinhold, D. Gold, H. Goldberg. Third Ron: R. Cabanas, M. Guerrieri, E. Hinrichs. W. Eridinger. j. Fen:on, L. Ready. J. Grirtin. P. Eazzalari, H. Gerken. DL -[ 44 j. 3 ' untord n 45 ' r ne opn r omoreS Sixteen men and a girl entered the sophomore year. They were all that remained of the en- tering class of ' 49. In September transfers swelled the roll to a substantial nineteen. We continued our career of " famous firsts " . We were the first class to use Dr. Shay ' s new bacteriology manual; the first to use the new crown and bridge endoform; and, of course, the first sophomore class that did not attempt to " gas " the freshmen. However, the thrill of being sophomores did not overshadow the fact that we were here to learn — and no instructor let us forget that for a minute. We were introduce d to all the myriad wonders of bacterial infection, cavity preparation, heart action, foil condensation, and denture construction. Lunch hours suddenly were absorbed by tcchnic labs; Picozzi started to use his own equip- ment; Bricken was clocked in the bacteriology lab doing a three-minute mile (with a culture in each hand) ; the fog in Herman ' s eye and the college ring on his finger both disappeared; Parent became the custodian of our crown and bridge lecture bulletin board. OFFICERS President John E. Parent Vice President Theodore Leizman Secretary Bernice Fox Treasurer Albert C. Picozzi Sergcant-at-Arms . . Norton J. Bloch Historian George Spiegel -i 46 Y First Row: A. Picozzi, R. Simmons, P. Hernandez, T. Leizman, B. Fox, E. Kostas, A. Rekant, V. Dicfcnbach, N. Bloch. Second Row. H. Bricken, J. Parent, M. Burgin, G. O ' Roark, J. Callahan, G. Spiegel, W. Muhlbauer, S. Herman. Absent: C. Milne, C. Lynn. Suddenly we found ourselves absorbing a major portion of the knowledge being hurled at us. We realized how important a responsibility would be placed on us by our patients in the not too distant junior year. Only then did we gratefully realize that our foundation was firm indeed, and a fine basis to which we could add our clinical experience. G. Spiegel, His for ran 147 1- ne -,■48 j. 49 t- LI8RAKY BALTIMORE OOLLEQE Of n ?NTAL SURGERY ne vesh men With hopes high in our hearts, and but one purpose in our minds, 106 potential dentists, representing 18 states, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, and Iraq, entered the B.C.D.S. on September 9th, 1946. This was a far cry from the khaki and blue of the not too distant past. The great major- ity of us were resuming plans that had been interrupted by a call to arms. After a mad day of registration, we found ourselves in a whirlwind of laboratories, books, lectures, and finally, examinations. In no time at all confusion resolved itself into a calm, order- ly precision and we soon felt that we had been attending dental school for years. That our class was far different from any previous freshman class was evident to even the most uninitiated among us. Almost half our class has left the ranks of bachelorhood and included among that number are twenty " proud papas " . Far from serving as a deterrent, that factor has managed to add a note of seriousness to the entire business of study, with the consequence that the greater portion of the class is attacking its studies with great zeal and fervor. Half a hundred alma maters are represented, ranging in longitude from as far West as the University of Wisconsin and to the East as far as the Dental School of Paris. And militarily, a survey shows that the total number of years spent by the class of 1950 in all the branches of serv- ice is over 300. An astonishing average of 3 years of military service per man. An article published in a recent journal mentioned that classes similar to ours would be in- teresting to watch from the standpoint of the wide variations in age, abilities and experiences. We construe that as a challenge and we throw down the gauntlet. K. Kline, Historian iKI ! S i VMl WM § wm ■ nMH JH ■i wMl OFFICERS Picsidciit Robert G. Jones Vice Pirsh cij -.. Joseph H. Sheppe Secretary Daniel G. Smith Treasurer Gilbert R. Paul Sergeanf-af-Arnn Michael Ventura H ' ntorian Kenneth K. Kline ! 50 }■ f;rs Roil-. W, Cunningham, M. Bulmash, A. Nosal, R. Oelschlaeger, D. Gjbriele, R. Hess, R. Muma, M. Nordeck, M. Ventura, C. Courtney, A. Gale. ScconJ Row: J. Hyson, C. Stine, S. Silverman, A. Bushey, W. Carrier, J. Carroccia, R. Whitney, R. Lynch, J. Whisnant, P. McCoy, P. Wain- wright, G. Hyre. Third Rou.-. J. Diaz-Gonzalez, H. Teyker, W. Mitchell, E. Frontera, T. Garvey, J. Cox, H. Davenport, W. Langfield, C. Martin, C. Eshelman, G. Paul, M. Fossas, R. Durocher, D. Scotti. Foiirlh Row: A. Nassir, R. Narutowicz, C. Hahn, L. Claggett, W. Michel, L. Schmitt, R. Roque, L. Cook, S. Ratner, H. Shapiro, C. Noya, C. Absher, L. Noel. First Row: H. Whitford, C. Wheeler, W. Strang, D. Smith, J. Kernan, A. Phifer, L. H,;rriscn, L. Lortz, H. Schwing, F. Matthews. Second Row: J. Sheppe, M. Sagawa, C. Rader, J. Savage, C. Sarratt, M. Rosso, D. McElroy, C. Horan, V. Hart, K. Kline, G. Orraca, J. McCauley. Third Row: J. Tralins, R. Kirvin, S. Eakes, E. Zernzach, C. Schxvatka, R. Rymcr, J. Young, R. Lowman, C. Shultz, R. Jones, ,1. Rohr, J. Fisher, J. Torres, L. Williams. fourth Row: G. Mannix, G. Yates, R. Rising, K. JarrcU, R. Jernick, D. Bloom, ]. Mayer, R. Torres, A. Hannah, E. Epstein, B. Wells, J. Rod- riquez, N. Yoho, D. Troup. he s re6yi men 52 ' He ivorks and blows the coals And has plenty of other irons in the fire. " — Aristophanes A c t i t e s Robert P. Posner Editor-in-Chief Maurice J. Fagan Photography Editor W. Bryce Smith and Edmond G. Vanden Bosche Business Managers i 54 :- OL Wi irror BOARD OF EDITORS Robert P. Posner Editor-in-Chief W. Bryce Smith d ■ ir _ ,, _ ' , Bus ness Manaeers Edmond Vanden Bosche Leonard Rapoport : . . . .Assistant Editor Maurice Pagan Photography Editor Ben a. Williamowsky _ Feature Editor John M. Hohing Fraternity Editor David Lewis ] Cartoonists Stanley Gottlieb ASSISTING STAFF Joseph Bell James C. Page Burton B. Kaye Stuart M. Ratner Stanley Kotula Myron S. Reichel Francis McCall Aaron Schaeffer Daniel Smith George Spiegel FACULTY ADVISORS Gardner P. H. Foley Edward C. Dobbs Fi ARRY B. McCarthy 55 j- he Aoupnctt STAFF Editor Gardner P. H. Foley STUDENT STAFF F. M. McCall, Senior, Chairman B. B. Kaye, Senior E. B. Ward, junior B. Fox, Sophomore D. Smith, Freshrnan ADVISORY BOARD George M. Anderson J. B N Robinson Business Manager B. A. Dabrowsk.1 Burt B. Ide -[ 56 y student ctiuiueS ( ouncli FACULTY MEMBERS Burt B. Ide, D.D.S Cba ' ninan Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S Secretary-Treasurer Edward C. Dobbs, D.D.S. Assistant Secretary Grayson W. Gaver, D.D.S. Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S. Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S. STUDENT MEMBERS James H. Langley Senior Representative, Chairman Ben a. Williamowsky junior Representative Viron L. Diefenbaoh Sophomore Representative Joseph P. Rohr Freshman Representative M ' " fiis i. ifrr 1 K 1 ,•1 ■Hj 1 1, 1 ' Ix w».. iiHiui. 2ifi w ' 21 Ip4 iTi ■ •XaS H 1 i I H e H! » .■ " " " " -;;. p ' _ - iiSnf sa H ' 4 ' i T. i i 1 -J 1 i r ;.::-li!ii- M 9Btm m F K ■■■■■■Mmi .,. M ' • - -! 57 y L oraad K donioioalcai S ociet OFFICERS President John M. Hohing Vice President Robert P. Posner Secretary Stanley M. Kotula Treasurer Charles H. Hopkins Historian Robert L. Mohn Sergeant-at-Arms R. W. Flinchbaugh The Gorgas Odontological Society was founded in 1916 on principles of scholastic ability, character, and professional bearing. The organization was founded to honor Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a remarkably erudite man; a man to whom dentistry owes much for the benefits which it today enjoys. At first the organization was somewhat gangling, and unprepossessive; but gradually the young society began to formulate more definitive rules and more exacting requirements. As of i 5S First Row: F. Ehrlich, R. Dorobiala, M. DryHenich, L. Rapoport, R. Posner, J. Hohing, S. KoLula, B. Kaye, N. Bookstaver, C. Hopkins, E. Van- den Bosche. Seccnil Row: S. Zimmerman, S. Kukucka, G. Millert, F. McCall, R, Niehen, R. Mohn, A. Schaeflfer, N. Allen, W. Dodson, W. Allen, M. Reichel. Third Row. R. Biddington, R. Grzeczkowski, H. Guerrieri, W. Fridinger, B. Williamowsky, E. Zimmermann, T. Walter, J. Page, H. Gerken, J. Medina. 1945, requirements for entrance into the Society were made quite stringent so that today mem- bership is restricted to a selected few. Gorgas ' second post-bellum year found the return-to-normal organization routine almost complete. Several meetings were held during the school year, and guest speakers, outstanding men in their chosen fields, spoke of the latest developments in dentistry. The climax to this banner year of activity was reached on May 16 at the Hotel Stafford, which was the scene of the formal dinner-dance. Dr. A. Harry Ostrow of Washington, D. C, an alumnus of the B.C.D.S., was the guest speaker, and he delighted his listeners with an instruc- tive talk on the present-day aspects of public health dentistry. This affair also served as the oc- casion for the presentation of certificates of membership to the seniors, and of membership keys to the juniors. 59 he i cJDenial J c eminur OFFICERS Preskhnf Marsden F. Stamp Secretary William M. Talbott Treusnrer. Edmond G. Vanden Bosche This organization was founded in 1942 as a memorial to one of this college ' s most esteemed teachers. The seminar group established for itself four main purposes: (1) to encourage and stimulate thought and activities along lines of research related to dentistry; (2) to acquaint its members with the latest developments in dental science; (3) to render its members more adept in the presentation of scientific papers; (4) to promote a more rational insight into problems which confront us, as future members of the dental profession. Fint Ron-. J. Hughes, L. Greene, J, Langley, S. Londeree, C. Isaacson, W, Talbott, M. Stamp, E. Vanden Bosche, F. McCall, C. Hopkins, R. Choui nard, T. Sikes. Second Row. L. Copcn, P. S.roUo, D. Lewis, J. Kenneally, J. Griffin, J. Hohing, J. Traylor, G. Clark, W. Cook, J. Heroux, H. Stanley. Third Roil-. D. Gold, W. Allen, S. Zimmerman, F. Davila-Lopez, J, Thompson, L. Ready, A. Picozzi, J. Parent, J. Medina, G. O ' Roark, P. Her nandez, V. Diefenbach, B. Ward. •{ 60 V Jjrnterh rciternit ( ouncli OFFICERS President Joseph Bell Secretary Nelson Boorstaver. Treasurer William D ' Abbraccio The Council is composed of members from each of the four fraternities, whose responsi- biUty is to serve the best interests of both the School and each member fraternity. Since its founding in 1945 it has been an important factor in promoting the goodwill and fraternalism present in all student relations. ieiy ' A mystic bond of brotherhood makes all men one. — Carlyle r a t e r i t A- O. wieact ALPHA CHAPTER Founded at Baltimore College of Dental Surgery IN 1892 Flower: Lily Colors: Bine and White Journal: The Frater OFFICERS OF PSI OMEGA Grand Master William H. D ' Abbraccio Junior Grand Master William P. Dodson Secretary Frederick Asciolla Treasurer James Gill Chaplain Paul Loflin Edifor Charles FiopKiNs Chief Inquisitor Edward Sikes Senator Robert Lee Historian William Hartsock Inside Guardian E- R pp Chief Interrogator Harold Stanley House Manager Maurice Fagan i 64 h First Kow: A. Monaco, W. Dodson, J. Stephens, J. Gill, F. McCall, J. Lee, H. Stanley, W. D ' Abbraccio, S. Johnston, N. Hannan, F. Pavel, J. Bclott, C. Olive. Second Kow. J. Medina, W. Biddington, S. George, R. Flinchbaugh, P. Loflin, P. Strollo, M. Fagan, G. Vanden Bosche, J. Hughes, R. Grzecz- kowski, M. Guerrieri, N. Allen, T. Walter, C. Cox, R. Lee. Third Roiu: R. Mohn, E. Lee, W. Allen, F. Davila-Lopez, B. deHosson, S. Kotula, E. McGrath, R. Lamb, F. AscioUa, J. Ballouz, W. Coleman, R. Eschenburg, J, Griffin, H. Gerken, W. Strahan. Foifrth Row. H. Hopkins, G. Heroux, A. Lombardi, P. Lambert, S. Londeree, J. Thompson, L. Ready, G. Attanasio, H. Yerger, J. Hohing. J. Traylor, R. Hepler, R. Nielsen, T. Sikes, D. Hartsock, R. Grier. SENIOR MEMBERS Asciolla, F. Attanasio, G. Baldacchino, J. F. Ballouz, J. M. Belott, J. E. Coleman, W. J. Cox, C. W. Cray, D. L. D ' Abbraccio, V. H. deHosson, B. S. DryHenich, M. Eschenbur.g, R. W. F.igan, M. J. Flinchbaugh, R. W. Garcia, G. P. Gill, J. P. Gorski, J. T. Gramse, E. J. Grier, R. n ' . Hannan, N. E. Hartsock, W. D. Hepler, R. F. Heroux, G. J. Hohing, J. M. Hopkins, C. H. Hughes, J. T. Johnston, S. W. Kotula, S. M. Lamb, R. F. Lambert, P. R. Lee, E. B. Lombardi, A. R. Londeree, S. R. McCall, F. M. Mohn, R. L. Nielsen, R. A. Olive, C. S. Sikes, T. E. Traylor J. R. Vanden Bosche, E. Yerger, H. C. MEMBERS OF PSI OMEGA JUNIOR MEMBERS Allen, N. D. Allen, W. R. Biddington, W. R. Chavoor, A. G. Davila-Lopez, F. E. Davis, W. H. Dodson, W. P. Doherty, J. C. George, S. R. Gerken, H. J. Griffin, J. B. ' McGrath, E. B. Medina, J. E. MoUis, C. A. Monaco, A. Page, J. C. Pavel, F. Rapp, E. R. Ready, L. V. Santiago, C. A. Scribner, J. H. Stanley, H. R. Grzeczkowski, R. A. Stephens, J. A. Guerrieri, M. B. Hinrichs, E. H. Kerico, N. N. Lee, J. J. Lee, R. E. Loflin, P. H. Strahan, W. T. Strollo, P. J. Thompson, J. C. Walter, T. R. Ward, E. B. Zimmermann, E. SOPHOMORE PLEDGES Lynn, C. A. Milne, C. R. Muhlbauer, W. F. Parent, J. E. FRESHMAN PLEDGES SOPHOMORE MEMBERS Callahan, J. M. Kostas, E. A. Carroccia, J. Courtney, C. H. Fisher, J. G. Fossas, M. R. Frontera, E. Gabriele, D. E. Hart, V. T. Hess, R. Horan, C. M. Hyre, G. R. Kernan, J. H. McCauley, J. W. McCoy, P. D. R. Narutowicz, R. J. Noel, L. S. Nordeck, M. D. Nosal, A. Noya, C. J. Oelschlaeger, R. E. Orraca, G. E. Rader, C. W. Rodriguez, J. J. Rohr, J. P. Rosso, M. A. Rymer, R. M. Sheppe, J. H. Shultz, C. C.- Teyker, H. W. Torres, J. R. Ventura, M. H. Wells, B. S. Whisnant, J. F. Whitford, H. Williams, L. E. -1 65 y liiyhci kJi ip meaa t A ZETA MU CHAPTER Founded at the University of Maryland in 1907 Flower: White Rose Colors: Black and Gold Journal: Alpha Onicgan OFFICERS President Joseph Bell Vice-President Aaron Schaeffer Secretary Ben Williamowsky Treasurer David Lewis Historian Joseph Applebaum Seroeant-at-Arms Myron Reichel H 66 ]- lint Roil. ' : S. Gottlieb, B. Kaye, B. Williamowsky, A. Schaeffer, B. Fox, J. Bell, D. Lewis, M. Reichel, J. Applebaum, L. Nathans. Second Kow. L. Rapoport, B. Gordon, T. Leizman, A. Kronthal, M. Burgin, G. Spiegel, N. Bloch, J. Binderman, L. Copen. Third Kow. D. Gold, S. Ash, R. Posn;r, N. Bookstaver, S. Herman, H. Goldberg, A. Schwartz. MEMBERS SENIORS JUNIORS SOPHOMORES PLI S. Ash J. Applebaum N. Bloch H. Bricken J. Bell L. Copen M. Burgin A. Rekant J. Binderman B. Friedman S. Herman M. Bulmash S. Ehrenhalt D. Gold T. Leizman E. Epstein F. Ehrlich H. Goldberg G. Spiegel A. Gale S. Gottlieb B. Gordon A. Goodman B. Kaye D. Lewis S. Ratner A. Kronthal M. Reichel H. Shapiro L. Nathans B. WiUiamows ky - S. Silverman R. Posner D. Troup L. Rapoport A. Schaeffer A. Schwartz -1 67 j. Xi A- P t ETA CHAPTER Founded at Ann Arbor, Michigan, February 9, 1889 Flower: American Beauty Rose Colors: Lavender and Cream Journal: Xi Psi Phi Quarterly OFFICERS President Charles F. Beck Vice-President Paul D. Bingham Secretary Roland A. Chouinard Treasurer James C. Carroll Master oj Ceremonies Randolph Bloxom Chief Herald W. Bryce Smith Sentinel Joseph P. Kenneally Guard Robert G. Hill Monitor James FJ. Langley -1 68 J- Seated: F. Iturrino, A. Quintero, R. Cabanas, L. Greene, W. Smith, R. Chouinard, C. Beck, P. Bingham, J, Carroll, E. Johnston, J. Kenneally. Standing: J. Langley, W. Cook, C. DeVier, V. Bloxom, G. Clark, J. Fenton, W. Roth, D. Cray, R. Coleman, W. Talbott, P. Heininger. MEMBERS SENIORS C. F. Beck P. D. Bingham R. A. Chouinard G. A. Clark W. W. Cook D. L. Cray L. P. Greene J. H. Langley W. K. Roth W. B. Smith M. F. Stamp E. J. Steinhof W. M. Talbott PLEDGES C. E. Dolan R. T. Durocher R. Dykes C. F. Hahn K. K. Kline W. H. Langfield R. H. Lortz R. H. Jernick R. G. Jones R. J. Kirvin D. J. McElroy G. E. Mannix A. Picozzi R. E. Roque J. L. Savage C. J. Stine P. C. Wainwright P. A. Weber C. G. Wheeler JUNIORS W. R. Bloxom A. Bobenko R. V. Cabanas J. C. Carroll R. J. Coleman C. DeVier J. P. Fenton W. A. George P. L. Heininger R. G. Hill F. L. Iturrino E. R. Johnston J. P. Kenneally W. R. Neish E. Quintero -(69). A- Q vneaci f ' J, 70 J- A- Q meaci •1 71 } wnu Jm eaa T f ' Xi Psi Pk ■{ 73 Wc omen of E.C.2)S. " The frivolous ivork of polished idleness. " Sir James Mackintosh 9 e a t u r e s pO n. «: ? Leach Cross . . . Outstanding contender for the light- weight boxing title, 1906-1920. Zane Grey . . . Sportsman-novelist ... 44 Western novels. Bill Osmanski . . . Football star of Holy Cross College and professional Chicago Bears. John Siegel . . . Football star of Columbia University and professional Chicago Bears . . . former hne coach at U. S. Naval Academy. John " Jock " Sutherland . . . Football coach at Pitts- burgh University and of the professional Brooklyn Dodgers and Pitt Steelers. W ' . D. McClelland . . .Football star at Pittsburgh . . . former Boxing Commissioner of Pennsylvania. Eddie Farrell . . . Professional baseball star from 192 8- 1934 with New York Giants and New York Yankees. Dave C. Danforth . . . Baylor University baseball star . . . graduate B.C.D.S. while pitching for Baltimore Orioles . . . holds International and American Asso- ciation league strike-out records ... in professional baseball for 22 years . . . member of Chicago White Sox and St. Louis Browns . . . former instructor at B.C.D.S. Walter G. Kendall . . . Founded S quantum Kennels . . . originated Boston Bulldog breed . . . outstanding golfer, fisherman, bicyclist . . . author of Four Score Years of Sport. Sb. ema L JLSU S ruan t6 Maurice William . . . Philosopher . . . author of The So- cial Interpretation of History . . . praised openly by China ' s Dr. Sun Yat-sen . . . honored by China with " Order of the Jade " . . . wrote Sun Yat-sen Versus Communism . . . referred to as " dentist who changed world history. " Thomas William Parsons . . . Poet and essayist ... the poet of " Tales of a Wayside Inn " . James E. Garretson . . . Philosophical writer under pen name of " John Darby " . Henrik Shipstead 1923-1946. U. S. Senator from Minnesota from mP - Edward Maynard . . . Honorary graduate and faculty of B.C.D.S. . . . inventor and perfector of Maynard Small Fire Arms. T. B. Welch . . . Made formula for Welch ' s Grape Juice. John Greenwood . . . Invented fife . . . fife major at Bunker Hill. Adalbert Johann Volck . . . Special agent of Confed- eracy during Civil War . . . famed for sketching and cartooning during the war . . . graduate of B.C.D.S. Solyman Brown . . . Well-known poet and prose writer of his time . . . called " poet laureate of the Denta Profession " . Norman W. Kingsley . . . Outstanding sculptor of his time . . . inventor of the art of pyrography in portrait " V reproduction. J Carey Middlecoff . . . Outstanding contender for ama- teur golf championship of America. " Doc " Prothro . . . Former manager of the Philadelphia Phillies. 1 .,- " Witl. R. f eare h ■ ..JX Nielsen: quiet and meticulous manner to the Senior lab. Traylor: bottle of anti-alopecia pills to Dr. Anderson. Hartsock: hat on top of the locker. Hepler: five o ' clock smile to Dr. Scherr. LoMBARDi: roots in Dr. Cappuccio ' s maxillae to Heroux. Sikes: Southern drawl to New England. Johnston: houseboat to Dr. Aisenberg and fishing party. Vila: moustache. Ehrenhalt: alarm clock to Baltimore Sal- vage Company. Baldacchino: growth hormones to Physiol- ogy Department. Ash: one-treatment Root Canal to Pathology Department. Mohn: Olive still green. Londeree: address with Audrey. Hannan: classical case to Orthodontia. Olive: without asking why. Hopkins: a " spec " on the horizon. Langley: morning calls to Kenneally. Yerger: Penn Station . . . for the last time. Kronthal: equipment at school. PosNER: nothing . . . " he never leaves any- thing. " Rapoport: one profession for another. Steinhof: root tip to Dr. Edwards. G. Clark: gastro-elasticity to Alcoholics _ Anonymous. Binderman: that patient to a lucky Junior. Flinchbaugh: with quite a dish — " Petri " — . Eschenburg: sculptured pipe to Nick. Alvarez: bottle of cologne to Biochemistry Department. Talbott: hair at O.K. Barber Shop. Attanasio: his title " The Count " to future Royalty. Cook: Dr. Dosch: to ride home alone. Fritz: silently. McCall: a blue collar in his locker. Gottlieb: betting odds to Jack Doyle. Ballouz: Miss Hagan alone. Eckerd: inlay holder with Frank Taylor. eaue - - - Seifert: Soltys. Soltys: Seifert. Gramse: the Juniors without a ride. Hohing: efficiently. Bell: ubiquitousness to Dr. Biddix. Beck: Bullets with four. Belott: horizontal bars to Dr. Dabrowski. Bingham: apartment to a lucky couple. Bookstaver: as fast as I can. Chouinard: well-used French dictionary. T. Clark: unsupported enamel rods with Miss Cross. Coleman: the Student Health Office. Cox: sahva at Ph 7. Cray: radio voice to Kaye. D ' Abbraccio: profile to Dr. Bryant. deHosson: without saying much. Dorobiala: Charles Street without a Mayor. DryHenich: with a respelled name. Ehrlich: on a high note. Fagan: shutter open and finally getting a pic- ture. Gill: booth No. 1 south side at Rathskeller. Asciolla: booth No. 2 north side at Raths- keller. Greene: ripe. Grier: water from " fountain of youth " to S. E. Zimmerman. Heroux: with a song. Hughes: fo ' de South. Isaacson: Johnston without a dentist. Kaye: $21 shoes to be resoled. Kotula: perennial smile to Dr. Bevins. Lamb: Reynolds pen under water. Lambert: the Cubs without a rooter. Lee: thesis without a title. Nathans: Ehrenhalt without a sympathizer. Roth: lunch bag at home. Schaeffer: Dr. Randolph ' s section-finally. Schwartz: impression of head to bur manu- facturers. Smith: golf clubs with Dr. Edwards. Stamp: congeniahty to Dr. Bryant. Vanden Bosche: B.C.D.S. with one Vanden Bosche. i 78 h csLJen tlsts u erdad Patients have a habit of arriving late for appoint- ments. I wonder if it ' s because they get frightened as the time approaches? Jittery patients thumb through many more magazines than I can afford. Nowadays patients insist on a running documentary on what I ' m doing or plan to do, thereby taking up much of my productive time. If a patient breaks an artificial tooth or denture, he always claims it happened while he was eating mashed potatoes, when actually he was probably trying to crack a walnut with it. The public doesn ' t seem to mind rising prices in al- most every commodity, but let the dentist charge more to keep up with the general trend, and they are sure to call it unethical. Strides made in dental techniques have now practical- ly eliminated pain. People are ignorant. You use novocain to extract a tooth but that still leaves an open socket in the mouth. Of course an open wound is going to hurt when the anesthesia wears off and the patient should expect it. After carefully rigging a contraption in the patient ' s .mouth to keep a cavity free from moisture, the patient invariably probes it with his tongue or upsets it by making an unnecessary comment. Parents don ' t realize how important care of children ' s teeth is. But they do expect special rates for children even though it ' s much more difficult and takes far more patience to work on them. My dentist always keeps me waiting in his office for a half hour in spite of the fact that I have an appoint- ment. Magazines in dentists ' offices are practically antique and the page I want is always torn out. I like to know what ' s going on, but most dentists love to prepare things behind your back and then spring them on you in a pincer movement. It seems to me dentists ought to be able to do more permanent work on artificial teeth. It ' s pretty embar- rassing to have a bridge break in company or to have a plate fall out of your mouth. Everything is becoming so specialized now, it ' s as hard to find a general dental practitioner as it is to find a medical one. And the high prices these specialists like to charge! I hate the drilling. There ought to be a way to elimi- nate this drawn-out pain. Consider the irony when a dentist gives you a shot of novocain and pulls a tooth. He claims credit for being painless, but doesn ' t mention the sleepless night you put in after the stuff wears off. My dentist stuffs my mouth full of cotton and metal gadgets so I can hardly breathe, let alone talk, and then he expounds all his pet theories on everything from poli- tics to horse racing. When I was a child, we used a piece of string and a door knob if we had a toothache. But my dentist insists en pampering my child ' s teeth and charges as much for her as he does for me. — Cosmopolitan Magazine, Nov. 1946. i 79 y ,,--« 75 " :?r: 3S s i 80 j ne I ' lati inum By Phillip Louis Collins ' ' lllin Dr. Arthur Ryley drummed thin fingers on the desk of his new office at 32 Handel Allee, and waited for his first patient. A Httle nervous but happy, he reflected on the new Ufe he was beginning in BerUn. The only American dentist in the German capital! With all the clerks and secretaries of the embassy, and the representatives of so many American businesses flocking to the bustling city, his future seemed assured indeed. It was October 1889 and the warm autumn sun, streaming through the open windows, played drowsily over his glistening equipment. There was a sharp knock at the door. Before the den- tist could scramble up to open it, a tall, broad, breath- less man in ill-fitting clothes entered and quickly slammed the door behind him. Dr. Ryley could not help noticing the deep lines of apprehension on the strong face and its look of relief after the door had closed. The man pointed to his jaw and gestured violently. " Will it hurt? " he asked in a strangely accented Eng- lish. Dr. Ryley, though somewhat astonished at the ap- pearance of his first patient, smiled professionally and indicated the chair. " You are an American doctor? " Ryley nodded. " Good! They say Americans do not waste time. " The man ' s voice was deep and sonorous. " I haven ' t much time, " he continued. " Even at this moment they might be on their way. Always they fol- low me! Always they watch me! I do not know if I shall be able to contain myself much longer. " He shrugged his shoulders despairingly. " Who is following you, my good man? " asked the somewhat mystified Dr. Ryley. " Why the detectives, of course. One would think I was a common criminal. Never for a moment am I out of their sight. " The stranger laid his head on the rest of the dentist ' s chair and said abruptly: " Enough of this. My tooth is aching terribly. Get on with your work. " Ryley began examining the man ' s mouth. He was dis- concerted yet curious, for the visitor with his forward direct manner, his immobile yet sensitive features, his rich, deep voice and poorly tailored clothes presented a puzzle. The dentist had the peculiar feeling of having seen his patient before. He soon completed the exam ' nation and informed the man that all he needed was a simple filling. He was told to proceed and put in a filling of the best material available. " The best material is quite expensive. I am sure you would be as well satisfied with a cheaper material; for instance, porcelain or . . . " " Nonsense, doctor. Nobody ever told me anything was expensive. What is this material? " " Why platinum, of course, " said the dentist. The man in the chair burst into laughter. " Platinum! platinum, you say! Why I own more platinum than anyone on earth. " And he laughed heartily at what he evidently considered a fine joke. " Go to it, go to it! Money means nothing to me. Platinum it shall be. " The American dentist quickly and skillfully filled the stranger ' s tooth and the man stepped from the chair, a smile on his face. " That wasn ' t half as bad as I expected, " he said pleas- antly as he reached for his pocketbook. He opened it and stopped. His face grew red and flushed. The pocket- book was empty. " I am exceedingly sorry, doctor, " he stammered. " I must have forgotten to fill it when I left this morning. " Dr. Ryley looked at the fellow and smiled. " It ' s quite all right, old man, " he said softly. " It ' s really my fault; I should have known better. Well, I wish you luck with the police. " " Not the police, I told you, but the detectives. And as for your money, have no fear. I will send somebody to pay you. Yes, you shall be paid very well indeed. " " I understand. Of course, " said the uncomfortable Ryley. " Run along now. " The stranger stared at him for a moment with his deep eyes. Then he smiled, turned on his heels and left. Arthur Ryley returned to drumming his desk. Two hours later, there was another knock at his door. Opening it, Ryley was confronted by two well-dressed elderly gentlemen, who asked him politely if he was the same American dentist who had filled a man ' s tooth with platinum a few hours before. Ryley, suspiciously, admitted that he was. " Let us introduce ourselves, then, " said one of the gentlemen. " I am Count Vorontzoflf-Dashkoff, Minister of the Imperial House of Russia. At the order of his Imperial Majesty, Czar Alexander III, I have the great honor and pleasure to give you this deed of donation. You are now the owner of the Imperial Platinum Mine of Iss-Touru, in the Ural mountains. " " And I, " said the other, " am Privy-Counsellor Vish- negradski. I am prepared to purchase the Emperor ' s gift from you for twelve million rubles. " Arthur Ryley returned to the United States with his fortune — about $6,000,000 — and he never filled another tooth. ' Reprinted from Thh Month, January 1947. oi y LIBRARY BALTIMORE COLLEGE Of DENTAL SMRnfTRY 3. amoud rJLast l Uordd As Spoken to . . . Dr. Randolph: Dr. Dabrowski: Dr. Robinson: Dr. Miller: Dr. Williamson: Dr. Kaufman: Mrs. Reed: Miss Cross: Dr. Bryant: Dr. Biddix: Dr. Dosh: Dr. Grempler: Dr. Aisenberg: Dr. Browning: Dr. Dobbs: Dr. Gaver: Miss Pound: Dr. Hahn: Dr. Leonard: Dr. Karn: Dr. Anderson: Margaret: Cliff: The Dealer: Dr. Nuttall: Mr. Foley: Dr. McCarthy: This is only for amalgam . . . the line angles don ' t really have to be sharp ... do they? I ' m taking the blue envelope; I left the white ones at the Frat House. I wonder if I could take off a day early to make my reservation to Irving- ton? Will you show me how to get a good lateral plate shot? Will you check this base plate? The crown of this tooth looks pretty sound . . . should we extract with- out an X-ray? Put a little more on the slab ... I might make a mistake. Place a call for someone to return my unsupported enamel rods. Shall I call out restorations and cavities? Find the calculus! ! Wanna buy a supercharger? Is amalgam here to stay? Did you ever see a case like this before? Will you help me solder? Does Dentistry have a future? This porosity doesn ' t look bad . . . does it? I gave you that button, Miss Pound. Hey Bill! ! ! Have you tried Carter ' s liver pills? Do I have to follow these steps? I think we can move these around in a week. Don ' t you have one with buttons? Is this coffee? Can I have these teeth at one o ' clock? Will this peg lateral support 12 units? Clark? ... Is that a school? Am I going to graduate? A 82 Y cJ ecidi uum A 83 (■ Zhe ' Doctor ' s Address Alvarez, Roberto A. 41 Betances Street, Caguas, P. R. Asciolla, Ferdinand 74 Brush Hill Road, Providence, Rhode Island Ash, Seymour 810 Vine Stre et, Elizabeth, New Jersey Attanasio, Joseph P 14 Knopf Street, Linden, New Jersey Baldacchino, Joseph Barnesboro, Pennsylvania Ballouz, Joseph M 164 North Street, New Martinsville, West Virginia Beck, Charles F 45 Rockland Avenue, Yonkers 5, New York Bell, Joseph S 296 N. Main Street, Waterbury, Connecticut Belott, Joseph E. 86 Jefferson Street, Newark 5, New Jersey Binderman, Jack Jr 3 04 Woodlawn Avenue, Beckley, West Virginia Bingham, Paul East Jaffrey, New Hampshire Bookstaver, Nelson D 193 Norma Road, Teaneck, New Jersey Chouinard, Roland 652 County Street, Fall River, Massachusetts Clark, George A., 2nd 60 Dickinson Street, Lisbon, New Hampshire Clark, Thorburn R 20 So. Summit Street, Pearl River, New York Coleman, William J., Jr. 2810 Chelsea Terrace, Baltimore 16, Maryland Cook, Warren W 81 Bowery Street, Frostburg, Maryland Cox, Charles W 322 Beverly Avenue, Morgantown, West Virginia Cray, Donald L 106 Harmon Avenue, Springfield 8, Massachusetts D ' Abbraccio, William H 613 Chalkstone Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island deHosson, Bernard 251 Kingsland Terrace, South Orange, New Jersey Dorobiala, Raymond J.; 26 George Urban Boulevard, Buffalo 11, New York DryHenich, Metro 372 Jeffries Street, Perth Amboy, New Jersey Eckerd, Everette A . Route 1, Box 114, Granite Falls, North CaroUna Ehrenhalt, Samuel H 119 Pavilion Avenue, Long Branch, New Jersey Ehrhch, Fred 5114 Queensberry Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland Eschenburg, Richard W 263 Euclid Avenue, Mt. Clemens, Michigan Fagan, Maurice J., Jr 28 Whaley Hollow Road, Coventry, Rhode Island Flinchbaugh, Ralph R. F. D. 3, Richmond, Indiana Fritz, Jackson W. 1808 E. 32nd Street, Baltimore 8, Maryland Garcia, Guillermo P. Box 104, Aquadilla, Puerto Rico Gill, James P. 1026 Warwick Neck Avenue, Warwick Neck, Rhode Island Gorski, Joseph T 39 Whitcomb Street, Webster, Massachusetts Gottlieb, Stanley. 46 J 2 Southgate Avenue, Annapolis, Maryland Gramse, Edward 5 8 Franklin Street, Holyoke, Massachusetts Greene, Lynn 708 W. Court Street, Rome, New York Grier, Rolsert N 324 Washington Street, Morgantown, West Virginia Hannan, Neil E 2 006 Fifteenth Street, Troy, New York Hartsock, William D 93 3 Mulberry Avenue, Hagerstown, Maryland Hepler, Roy F 2345 Ninth Avenue, Huntington 3, West Virginia Heroux, Gerald J Maple Street, Uxbridge, Massachusetts Hohing, John M. , 67 E. Main Street, Lonaconing, Maryland Hopkins, Charles H 329 Neal Avenue, fronton, Ohio Hughes, John T Selma, North Carolina Isaacson, Clarence E 116 Sparhawk Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire . Johnston, Samuel W 519 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore 1, Maryland- Fo ' ' - - " ' ' ' ' , ' " " • Kaye, Burton 266 Orchard Street, New Haven, Connecticut Kotula, Stanley M 2518 Fleet Street, Baltimore 24, Maryland Kronthal, Alvin 4103 Barrington Road, Baltimore, Maryland Lamb, Robert F 3 N. Beechfield Avenue, Baltimore 29, Maryland Lambert, Paul R 719 Second Avenue, South Charleston 3, West Virginia Langley, James H 249 Young Street, Manchester, New Hampshire Lee, Edward B. 2 3 Robie Street, Bath, New York Lombardi, Angleo R 25 5 Eighth Street, Palisades Park, New Jersey Londeree, Stuart R. 15 Curry Street, South Charleston, West Virginia McCall, Francis M Bogard, Missouri Mohn, Robert L. 610 Pollock Street, New Bern, North Carolina Nathans, Lee C 136 Edgewood Boulevard, Providence 5, Rhode Island Nielsen, Revere A. 2-K Gardenway, Greenbelt, Maryland Olive, C. S 214 Dobbin Avenue, Fayetteville, North Carolina Posner, Robert 102 Lexington Avenue, Freeport, New York Rapoport, Leonard 3229 Powhatan Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland Rodriguez, Marcus R. Box 285, Bayamon, Puerto Rico Roth, William K 621 Plymouth Road, Baltimore 29, Maryland Schae ' ffer, Aaron 2 5 37 Loyola Southway, Baltimore 15, Maryland Schwartz, Aaron 5102 Litchfield Avenue, Baltimore 15, Maryland Seifert, Walter J. 1615 Hancock Street, Ridgewood 27, New York Sikes, Thomas E., Jr Box 426, R.F.D. 7, Greensboro, North CaroHna Smith William B 1315 Ramblewood Road, Baltimore, Maryland Soltys ' Mitchell M 112 5 Spruce Street, Reading, Pennsylvania Stamp, Marsden F 16 59 W. Church Street, Elmira, New York Steinhof Edward J 411 East Main Street, Fall River, Massachusetts Talbott, ' William M 3206 Beverly Road, Baltimore, Maryland Traylor ' Jack R • 2729 Fourth Avenue, Huntington 2, West Virginia VandenBosche, E. G H28 Bolton Street, Baltimore 17, Maryland Vila-Santana, Jorge 13 Norte Street, Rio Piedras, Puerto R.co Yerger Howard C, III 5-07 Boyd Avenue, Fairlawn, New Jersey A Parting Word The last page — the close of a chapter — the Finis is written to the scholastic lives of seventy-four students. Yet there will be another volume far richer in chapters, far fuller in meaning , a volume entitled " Service to Humanity. " With this page the 1947 Mirror is completed, a task that required the cooperation of a very able staff and competent advisor, Mr. Foley, who willingly contributed their time and efforts to its production. My appreciation to Miss Chomet, Miss Ezekiel, Mr. Hicks, Mr. Love, Miss Rice, Miss Yent and the Library Staff for their valuable aid and helpful suggestions. Let this Mirror reflect the scenes of a nostalgic past when we think to look back on the days of toil and strife, of joy and pleasure, that were a part of the four years through which we passed during our preparation for the careers that lie ahead. Robert P. Posner. -30- Many Thanks and Best of Luck to the Class of 1947 Jjui iefi B. Benhn C mjimij Established 1856 Dental Supplies and Equipment 709-11 N. Howard St. • Baltimore 1, Md. Frank Taylor-College Representative 90 1- 1 ' ' V k I " " locate? What do I need? What " ' ii iii .JmI about financing? You know all the questions by heart. But no text-book has ever been written to tell you the answers— because every year, for every man, the answers are different. We believe that it ' s our responsibility to you to know these answers. We keep up-to-the-minute records of all conceivable statistical data of every possible location for a dental office in our territory. We know what you ' ll need for equipment — we ' ll guide you in your selection for the maximum operating efficiency. " After June . . . what lies ahead? " is not going to be easily solved for you. A thousand and one details must be settled to your complete satisfaction — and that ' s our responsibility to you — an assignment that we ' re happy to take over with just one objec- tive ... to assist you in realizing your ambition to be a successful practitioner of dentistry. •FOR MODERN MATERIALS • • CALL ON THE L. D. CAULK COMPANY IO6-IO8 W. Centre Street (HART a sTOETZER, BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND oi y Compliments ot A FRIEND Dentists ' Samples WI I SON ' S ■liiBiwgii JBe Perfect Adhesive for " Dentures COREGA CHEMICAL COMPANY 208 ST. CLAIR AVE., N. W. CLEVELAND, OHIO (Corega is not advertised to the public) 92 ,■. A Great Variety of COLUMBIA DENTOFORMS Models With Teeth Fixed Models With Teeth Removable Full-Jav and Half-Jaw Partials Edentulous Models Orthodontic Models Deciduous Models Model Base Formers Rubber Dentoform Molds Enlarged Models and Many Special Models If it ' s a model for student technic or teaching . . . We have it — or probably can make it COLUMBIA DENTOFORM CORPORATION " The House of a Thousand Models " 131 East 23rd Street NEW YORK 10, N. Y. i 93 y Compliments of Raymond K. Tongue Co. 1401-02 Court Square Building BALTIMORE, MARYLAND Compliments of Lea Febiger Publishers of MEDICAL, DENTAL and SCIENTIFIC WORKS Washington Square PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA Shop By Phone Shop By Mail Shop In Person BUT BE SURE TO SHOP AT HUTZLER BKTTHERS (2 MEN ' S FURNISHINGS First Floor Saratoga, Clay and Howard Streets Saratoga 4321 i 94 y TYPE A JELENKO SOFT ior Simple Inlays GOLD COLOR For Precision Dental Castings TYPE B TYPE C TYPE C MODULAY nea.u.S.PmT.opr. MED. HARD iorM.O.D. and Simple Inlays GOLD COLOR HARD (Standard Hardness) for Carmichaels, Crown and Inlay Abutments GOLD COLOR FiRMIUAY aeo.u.s.ffir. off. HARD (yet Easily Burnished) ior Carmichaels, Crown and Inlay Abutments GOLD COLOR JELENKO NO. y CAST GOLD P€0. U 5. PRT. Off. ' The PATRICIAN of Casting Golds for 1 -Piece Unit Castings, Clasps Bars, Saddles, etc. GOLD COLOR JELtNKO ELECTRIC INLAY FURNACE With Prometer. For Wax Elimination. JELENKO GOLDS JELENKO PRECISION CASTING EQUIPMENT These superlative Jelenko Golds will meet every casting need. The inlay golds are certified to meet A.D.A Specification No. 5. Jelenko No. 7 is unexcelled among partial denture golds. The Jelenko Equipment shown provides the essentials for Pre- cision Casting. Additional equipment can be added later. In equipping your laboratory, start right — with Jelenko Precision Casting Equipment. Detailed Lifcraturc and Catalogue ott request. J. F. JELENKO CO., INC. Manufactinrn of Dental CoUi and Sprcial ics 11 with Finger Tip 136 West 52nd St. New York 19, U. S. A. Temperature Control. THE ALL -ELECTRIC MELTING CASTING C for your own practice As a working partner, a CDX dental x-ray unit can play a big role in helping you build an early successful practice. It will bring you patients, keep them coming back to you — and pay for itself in a short time. Ask your dental dealer to show you the cleanly designed, finely engineered General Electric dental x-ray unit, built to the highest standards by a long-time leader in x-ray research and manufacture. GENERAL ELECTRIC X-RAY CORPORATION -! 95 Let RITTER Help 1 fon. Plan for DENTAL LEADERSHIP Like the majority of the leading dentists of America, you are planning to equip your office with the best — RITTER . . . And like every successful dentist, you are interested in PLANNING TODAY for TOMORROW. The Ritter Company can help you as it has helped thousands of others — for example: 1. Read " Dentistry ' s Future " and the Ritter Practice Building Studies. Your Ritter Dealer has thera, or write to us for copies. 2. Use the Ritter Statistical Service. We ' ll furnish facts about the communities you may be consider- ing for your practice. 3. Use the Ritter Office Planning Department. We ' ll plan every detail of your layout — including decorations. 4. Your Ritter Dealer will explain the Ritter De- ferred Payment Plan — you pay for your equipment out of earnings. Good business planning starts long before you begin to practice. Let us help you start NOW! Ritter Company, Inc., Ritter Park, Rochester 3, N. Y. Ritter P 10 4 TAND RD NOT DOWN TO A PBICe ROCHESTER, N. Y. 96 y -Compliments of Solomon ' s Pharmacy 523 West Baltimore Street For the Best in Billiards and Delicatessen Patronize the Two Vets CHARLIE ' S LUNCH and BILLIARDS 516-518 West Baltimore Street AL ' S LUNCH Pals Meet At Al ' s 10 S. Greene St. Sa. 9559 Compliments of GLOBUS CAFETERIA 407 W. Baltimore Street Compliments of United Dental Laboratory 225 W. Franklin Street BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND Mulberry 6208 i 97 y 1 impressions are important FREE OFFICE PIANNING SERVICE. EstablisWng an inviting, attractively furnished, eificiently arranged office which will win and hold patients wlio come to you will be easier and more economical if you make use of our free Office Planning Service. Any distributor of S. S. White Equipment will gladly supply full details. Or write to us direct. You should bear in mind that the majority of new patients who enter your office have upon one or more occasions visited other den- tal offices. You can appreciate that visiting an office new to them is a stimu- lus which impels patients to con- sciously or subconsciously make comparisons. It lies within your power to influence these comparisons and mold them in your favor during the initial visit. This is accom- plished through . . Correct personal appearance. . . An attractively furnished and efficiently arranged office . . Operating room equipment so modern that it inspires imm ediate confidence. THE S. S. WHITE DENTAl MFG. CO., 211 South 12th Street, PHIIADEIPHIA 5, PA. " OVER A CENTURY OF SERVICE TO DENTISTRY " -i 98 la prot J a meiL Whether it is English, Spanish, Italian or Greek, a fine restoration is judged by the same standards all over the world. With skilled hands and trained eyesight, every one of our craftsmen has given many years of faithful labor and painstaking study to learn his craft, as the quality of our work shows. " Build good-will with quality-made Seligman Hite Prosthetics. " Seligman Hite A Dental Laboratory of International Repute Baltimore 5, Maryland Park Avenue at Franklin P. O. Box 1937 99 Compliments of MIKE and ED BOLLINGER Only The Best Is Worthwhile Your Choice of This Laboratory Will Guarantee THE BEST IN Craftsmen Equipment Knowledge Techniques Materials And The Best Is Always The Least Expensive ROY H. CASSEL CO. DENTAL LABORATORIES 216 W. Franklin Street BALTIMORE 3, MARYLAND P. O. Box 1397 Mulberry 15437 ]5438 SMITH DENTAL LAB. 201 W. Franklin Street Mulberry 7575 A. T. JONES SONS The Baltimore Costumers Since 1868 Vern on 3473 823 N. Howard St. BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND With the Compliments of HYNSON, WESCOTT DUNNING Incorporated Charles and Chase Streets BALTIMORE, MARYLAND ■{ 100 Q h- mi p l- i 1 1 f TO EACH GRADUATE BEST WISHES FOR SUCCESS from Cooper MARYLAND ' S OUTSTANDING DENTAL LABORATORY 213 W. Franklin St. Vernon 2842 L. G. Balfour Company Attleboro, Massachusetts Manufacturing lewelers and Stationers Representative— MRS. HENRY WITTICH 105 W. Saratoga St., Baltimore 1, Md. Compliments of U. of M. BARBER SHOP 614 West Baltimore Street BENNY and JOE, Props. Phone, Gilmor 0130 GOOD SHEPHERD LAUNDRY Calverton Road and Franklin Street Wet Wash — Thrift — Family Service— Rough Dry DOCTORS ' COATS A SPECIALTY Try Us — It Is Worth While THE HENRY B. GILPIN COMPANY Wholesale Druggists Manufacturing Pharmacists Druggists ' Sundrymen Distributors for BAKER ' S ANALYZED CHEMICALS Baltimore, Md. Norfolk, Va. Washington, D. C. -I 101 1- fr - ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY ARTISTS - ENGRAVERS CATALOG ILLUSTRATORS INDUSTRIAL BUILDING 501 509 E. PRESTON ST BALTIMORE, MD. ' epLfte MULBERRY 2357-2358 $» - -gyfo Compliments ol GAINES AND BAUTZ i 102 K Congratulations To The Class of 1947 CLIFF and SONS Service to the Students of B. C. D. S, Lafayette 0620 Bar Service D. CLIFTON SMITH Best Service For DINNERS— LUNCHEONS— PARTIES— TEAS Fancy Sandwiches a Specialty 240 Wilson Street Baltimore, Maryland -! 103 }• PRINTERS STATIONERS BINDERS EVERYTHING FOR YOUR OFFICE We are proud to have had the pleasure of orking " With The Staff in producing this Y earbook BROWN-MORRISON CO., Inc. 718 Main Street . . . Lynchburg, Virginia A 104 | So-o eAaiw £exideAAJhifi! Ceramic Section Atisfenal Teeth Section Castings- Finhhiiig Section Best Wishes Class of ' 47 Co-operative greets you — class of ' 47! We invite you to make this your own dental aboratory. The experience of thirty-seven years devoted to the developnnent of one of the world ' s foremost dental laboratories is at your service. Co-operative ' s scientific dependable craftsmanship, resources, and skill — which have been endorsed by so many dentists — are at your immediate call. Your future success in dentistry will part- ly depend upon the results you achieve in prosthetics. Therefore, your choice of the Co-opera- tive Dental Laboratories is your assurance that you will be availing yourself of the finest prosthetic skill, service, and equip- ment obtainable anywhere. Yoii arc cordially in- vited to visit our laboratories MARRY B. SCHWARTZ, INC., OPERATING o-operative Dental Laboratories Artisans of Dental Prosthetics 1 2 West Madison Street BALTIMORE, MARYLAND SERVING THE DENTAL PROFESSION WITH DISTINCTION SINCE 1910 i 105 y YOU WILL WANT TO BE IN A COMPLETE WEBER OFFICE is like a stage perfectly set for a great performance. Each major item of equipment . . . Weber Chair, Majestic Unit, RayDex X-Ray . . . is the last word in efficiency and beauty» Each is a model selected to suit exactly the practitioner ' s needs and preferences, located so that his individual operating techniques may function with maximum skill and minimum effort. Plan now to " star " in such a " picture. " A complete Weber office designed and equipped especially for you will be a wise (and surprisingly moderate) investment that will pay big dividends in professional prestige and income for many years. Why not consult your Weber Dealer, and also write Weber for descriptive literature. WEBER DENTAL MANUFACTURING CO. WEBER THE NAME TO REMEMBER IN DENTAL EQUIPMENT CRYSTAL PARK, CANTON 5, OHIO (? FOR REFERENCE Do Nat Take Frem This R«om i


Suggestions in the University of Maryland Baltimore Dental School - Mirror Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) collection:

University of Maryland Baltimore Dental School - Mirror Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1944 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland Baltimore Dental School - Mirror Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1945 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland Baltimore Dental School - Mirror Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland Baltimore Dental School - Mirror Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1948 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland Baltimore Dental School - Mirror Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Page 1

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