University of Maine - Prism Yearbook (Orono, ME)

 - Class of 1965

Page 1 of 312

 

University of Maine - Prism Yearbook (Orono, ME) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1965 Edition, University of Maine - Prism Yearbook (Orono, ME) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1965 Edition, University of Maine - Prism Yearbook (Orono, ME) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1965 Edition, University of Maine - Prism Yearbook (Orono, ME) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1965 Edition, University of Maine - Prism Yearbook (Orono, ME) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1965 Edition, University of Maine - Prism Yearbook (Orono, ME) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1965 Edition, University of Maine - Prism Yearbook (Orono, ME) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 312 of the 1965 volume:

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TT I-""'f'-"1 Prlnolpnl Buildings of the Stats College of Agriculture and the UOCHIHIC Aff! 0f0'10 Realization Of A Dream A Pictorial History Of The Universigf OfMazne "BE IT ENACTED RY THE. SENATE AND HOUSE OF' REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMER- ICA THAT THERE BE GRANTED TO THE SEVERAL STATES . . . AN AMOUNT OF PUBLIC LAND . . ." With these words from the 1862 Morrill Land Act, the Maine State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts became a reali- ty. Although it was established in 1865 in Orono by vote of the first board of trustees, with Hannibal Hamlin acting as its president, the college did not acquire a faculty until 1868. On the 21st of September twelve young men passed the entrance examinations, were admitted, and the infant university, Maine State College, began its educational history. Beginning with a handful of students, a few borrowed in- structors, and several wooden buildings, the college grew and progressed. In 1897 it had undergone sufficient development and expansion to Warrant the official changing of its name to the University of Maine. Not only the students of today and the graduates of the Cen- tennial year 1965, but also those who share in the common heritage of the University shall now recall the past pictorially, bringing to mind all the things "Maine" means to each of us. Many memories whether great or small, linked together, con- stitute our appreciation of a century of widely disseminated learning and growth made possible by our University. 2 ,Twas A Long While Ago Rev. Charles F. Allen, M.A., the first president of the new university, came to Maine in 1871. His administration, one of development and prosperity, was ended in 1879, when he returned to the mini- stry. Professor M. C. Fernald was elected to fill the vacant post in 1879. While he devotedly served the college until 1893, time wrought many important changes. In the spring of 1872, six of the eighteen mem- bers of the first senior class were graduated from the Orono Methodist Church. Four courses had been offered to these early graduates: agriculture, civil engineering, mechanical engineering, and an elec- tive program. This later became the College of Arts and Sciences. In 1872 history was made as Maine became co-educational. Maine charged no tuition to state residents and their board was also provided free. Terms were ar- ranged so that students could teach during the long winter vacations. Time, however, has wrought many important changes. Rev. Charles F. Allen Merritt C. Fernald There Was A Pride In The Infant College Oak Hall, the first dormitory at the University, was built in 1870. Extensive repairs were made in 1895. Fire destroyed Oak in 1936, and a year later a second Oak Hall was constructed on the same site Where the original building stood. The first building erected for college pur- poses Was known as White Hall, but was later named Wingate Hall. It burned in 1890 and on the same site stands the present Win- gate Hall. During President Harris' Administration it was recom- mended in the college report that a Drill Hall and Gym- nasium was needed. Alumni Hall was completed in 1901. The gymnasium was used by the men until 1926 when the new gym was built. Women's physical education classes were held here until 1963, and now the building Will house Maine's educational television station WMEB- TV. "It was generally conceded that thorough training in chem- istry should be a prominent fea- ture of the college." Military training was a part of the regular system of instruc- tion from the beginning of the college. The Spanish-American War raised the patriotic spirit of the students to a high pitch. r rr 4 Q e If And Closeness In I ts Founders These rugged athletes of the University of Maine football team in 1896 are evidence that all was not only studies in the new college. The 19003: A New Era . v Q l 1 Phi Gamma Delta House Mount Vernon House Observatory This View of campus in the early twentieth cent- ury showing Oak Hall, Wingate Hall, the home of the President, Coburn Hall, Alumni Hall and Holmes Hall is taken from the site on which Boardman stands today. The students of the times could not know how dif- ferent this picture would look with the addition of the Fogler Library and a beautiful mall. The early 1900's brought with them the hope of a new century . . . an expanded campus . . . in 1902 President Fellows succeeded President Harris. The Cadet became the Maine Campus . . . and in 1904 the new library Carnegie Hall was built. The appointment of the first dean Usystemized the work of registration and ad- ministration." . . . The summer session was re- vived. The Mount Vernon House built in 1833 was extended in 1898 as the first dormitory for women students. It was located at the site of the present Sigma Chi House. The Phi Gam- ma Delta House shown here in 1899 has since burned and been replaced. The first fraternity on campus the Q.V.T. withdrew from its nation- al affiliations and became part of Phi Gam. The observatory, another revelation in the cam- pus scene, was built in 1900. . . 'Y, .VZ This was actually quite a logical way to meet one of Maine's perpetual problems: too much snow! Why not pack it down and ski to class? The President's house was constructed in 1873. Ex- tensive fire damage in 1893 made many renovations nec- essary, and the porch and tower were added at this time. But Something looks Familiar .4...M.,1qg.,.....n,gn-..u1-n1n-yn11v+s--uw--sqm-qu+n.-n4..,..u4-u1..+,1,.4.,....,. 1 1. sin-4-4,111 5 E Gamma of Qlphn Qbmirrun 13i 5 il , L 1 1 1 if : . !, rr 0 ll i 3 i Kappa Sigma House I F .K ii.. . .....,. , .,,...,.. im... A,,. Ll nwuvmu- num-in mmm. 1---mmm nm-vw I-nwinms l llllvnv IIAIIILIWY llKl.I.llI IRNA! H'uMlTl2n ULN? x'srl:xll -4,141 gqqfaq. 1:42. -.Q ig-5. , :gf ?a q.-...yu.+:l-1.111 n-: 1 -u n1n+a-- The Greeks found their place at Maine in 1900. Alpha Omicron Pi, Gamma chapter, was the first sorority on campus, established in 1908. The Kappa Sigma House, built in 1895, was the first fraternity house erected at the University. The University financed the construction of the house and made an agreement by which Kappa Sig was allowed to purchase the building later. 7 We will Keep Faith with Those who Sleep . Ehitnra amh Euainrari LllilIEIl1ElQ,P1'H Class 1895 ........ 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 Editor Frank Damon . . . E. Everett Gibbs .... Edwin C. Upton . . . Charles A. Pearce . . William B. Morrell ..... .... Joseph O. Whitcomb . . . . . . . Wales R. Bartlett .... .... Nathan A. Chase. . . Ralph M. Conner. Roy H. Flynt ....... Frank L. Flanclers. . . Albert I. Butterworth Thomas A. Malloy. . . L. Roland Lord .,... Walter L. Emerson. . Harold W. Wright. . . nf the lgriam Business Manager j Joseph W. Randlette 1 Perley B. Palmer ,I Charles S. Webster B. R. Johnson ji Herman H. Oswald George W. Hersey Walter N. Cargill Fred L. Martin Harold M. Carr Burton W. Goodwin James H. Sawyer George K. Huntington Harry A. Emery Elmer I. Wilson Warren D. Trask Harry E. Sutton Charles A. C. Porter 8 Founded in 1906 the Senior Skull So- ciety originally consisted of eleven members, chosen at the end of their junior year on the basis of character, scholarship, popularity, and participa- tion in college activities. The object of the society was the betterment of the University by causing friendly feelings between the fraternities and closer uni- ty of the student body. The Skulls still endeavor to perpet- uate the traditions of the University, to promote friendly ,campus relations, and propagate Maine spirit. Through- out the years the society has success- fully maintained its ideals. Membership is the highest non-academic honor for Maine men. A' 1 3 . ff exxm ' WN. xl'-k Even lighter activities engaged the their annual picnic. Today the banquet i Those who Gave their Lives or their Country The First World War raged, but many remained in the University studying to lead the world when peace re- turned. Both equally important, many kept up the spirits with recreation like basketball, while our forces were in- volved in a more serious competition in Europe. I., lergies of others as the freshmen held still held although more formally. Published Weekly by the Students of the University uf Maine. ORONO, MAINE, NOVEMBER 20, 1917 ALI. THIS lll sraiun will ln- gylllllassllnl lllal lllc fam: ly rivalry lllal lr will llc dis- u ul llll- lcnlm ,gli wlln-Mill, l lwzlilxll-ll: awl nmlllirlerl. lun Dnr Nilvi. y llcnrdull. all 'l'lw only wl- in college is on llun Cody, ll Arlclllls anrl l ln. :ls is My- ll llig l'alvlnr ln lm-1 sulfrrfrd fi war, iv: Art llnll lllulrnney fnixu In-ing lln- lwnln. Vfllzcl rrlduce n-nlnlins lu say ilmz whi- lu pick fmlll mes. ELECT EES miller Elmloll af-ll ill Almnlli gnu ul Prcsqnc n ol Angulln GIRLS WANT LETTER PRIVILEGE 'rm fnllfmng lm.-f me mean-.l ll,- llll- '-um.-il..." :mul a mul: Tile. lr-af. .....f.- ln... mf lil-rm. law gall nf ll.: Ullil-mzly me Sh.-wing -all illll-rr--I in zllllelics, The lzlrgc unm- bcr ni wa-lmrl wlnllcnlrl lifes mzule pris- sillll' lllr fr-rmnlirln ui sl-rural llllslcul lizlll lenmf, rlnll ll wmllll of line lllnlnr- inl llal llcuu lllunll. Class cpifil runs heal. mill nn- flnnn ,Wallin-l in bring i--rlll mlm- srulppy iulcrrlllss rmlrevw 'nw ,lllln ll. nr. has flew. :limi the men, arm eager for Xlninc nllllulic la-:mms l., willy ,nl--3 la the lrnnmin-. 'ln-if llrcsrnr- lil lln- games, lln-ir snppurl nl' me llrlnlcrl mx. luslines ro lhnl. ls I. slralngu, lllell. lllat lllnilw wmnun :nnnlll desire tn "mln lln-ir bil," lnl- Mriizll- null llluir nzspcclivv vlnasus? And i:'. :liner lung Imnrq spam in working om lor llmir l-Inv seams llnuy, lon, :nk lor alle prix-ll--gc ui num-illg illc corctl-ll nlnnrmll, lllnnlll il nnl ln- gmnn-ri ln ilvrm? fully: lllix yr-nr gives za "C" lu any CHIC girl wlm. :luring Lln: year. hikes llnlnlrlzll miles, lillggifwnnlerl n-lm play on lllrec Ent teams 'for one year wln llll-ir nnnlul-:lag in the and cn' :llc sccvl Und yum lllvy nn- given Lllcir letters. Maine men, yrnl url' nn len progressive llnlll your frllnws nl Fnllly llllll limbs! nl. ,-ml l...l.l your C..-ull, in lm mlm mall your rival: du? Mzlinu wnmrn ,dn noi rr-nnnl she numerals mr lllc "M" MAINE HOLDS RECORD FOR MEN IN SERVICE The Univrrsily hnr lllc lmnur ui wrnling llw largest lnnnlwrr nl men ima lllr 'aurvlce ul' lllu l-mr lllainv colleges. On llir lists ilvf men ill svru-cu wliiah ham linen rmllnill-rl, rllrru llra llxrni- lmmlmrl and Hillary-lla -lan-va of jgma- lmm and -llllln-grlllllnlul. This num- lll-r does noi inclulln alll, lor Llleru are llunclrcrls ol men in service, Lnikrluwxl lu lllf milf-,gc ilnllll-filers lay rln- l-ml of the year the vnlmller of mc-n whose wllercallloula :irc kllynwn will lu: rnislsfl ro alum: Leven llunllrr-rl. Slullcnls In-gnll lr 'cm-u rnllr-ge wllun mln: war broke out in CH- snmmrr nl lvl-l. A -Llvin alrvrlm ol' mon -unlinnalll' len dm college fur alioln um will imc llzrll years ln enlist in snnlc brnllll- of llln armies of Ellglnnll ur Frnncr. Mnry ioinall mlm French Ambulance scrviru and mum gulf-all the lffell-in Amy. Still -Jlln-rs rsllli-lllxrl in llle Ctmzlflinli ir-rccs, The lncll llllli lcil in llmsc yrars were only an Villllirllliun oi lllc llunrlrccls Illnl zlllslvurckl lllc 'call when the Uiiilcrl Szziirsjijagtergll 'lllc :nn Iliul. In, lilliryflnt- lr-r parfnf March the sllirlcllis bllgdli ln realli: llm! the Unik-rl Smtcsiwas sure lo elnur llll: war and many of lllcln began lo drop llluir college work nnrl enlisl. On mln- rll:cIm-:llion nl wur me rerll mlwemcnl nl mln: nu.-n ln lllb service lla-gan. Bcllvccll ill: lirsl nl April and GIRLS' GLEE CLUB MEMBERS 'l'llv: Sm-ru-lslry uf lllc Gil lm: plllllisllull Ill: fulllm-ill girls wlln have "rl-lea inn" vnulnlrrrsllill In rise Girls llill yunr. ' Al nw lnsl ,imaging ll Miss Evvlinc Sllowlvvmf e Alisa Elelll' Sawyer wang Mzlrpruerilc Merrill secreln Lnsl yutlr, th: clnh was il, lmll lu-en previuusly al :annum gil-ull in Ornno, C gur, mul all lllu Slat: Illini mlm.-ml rl 5-.aus l., lluml llwm, Willi naw re from nm elm nf ,l92l ,thc prnspucha ul even' al Vino? snzlsrm :his fnll, lfirsl sunrallng 'fhrlllla Allllz: Cnrrzlll 'l9, Milalrl lflullu Sawyer 'l9, Enid Cnrinnl: King '20, Doris M gui-rite llullurls 'ZLL Lilla .mum lmlilnq 'zl, cially, Iflm-l:ncl: Sallcy 'El, Pmllil W H f,Cvnlil-lucrlaln Page l sr-:mf MENS' GLEEN C SELECTED Dunalfl M. Lilllly 'l3. l nlv:ll's gluc :lull has an :lumen nl' tllosc who have lnr lllr- rlnll rhis yr-slr. nf llll- r-lull xrnrw lwwiu- Military Department Commissioned Officers, 1916-1917 SOC The Library The Twenties: Roaring A ge Of The F Iappers Robert J. Aley, PH.D., LL.D., served as president of the University from 1910 to 1927. During his administration the opportunities offered upon graduation from the college of Arts and Sciences and the provision of living accomodations attrac- ted an increasing number of female students to the university. Harold S. Boardman, C.E. Dean of the College of Technol ogy, served from 1903 to 1927 1 l l 0 It ' 11 'Juv 4111111111 1 4 1l'p q,111QX J 1111 1-1 510 Osaoann 23 5 E 1 :me QQ5' 19115111 Suninmrg nf Mraivrnrirea Nnitnnal Bct..1 T1lLt'1 11 IX'llJPl 5151111 A113111 F111 c11'1llQ'i P111 1X+1j11Jd SILIIX1 P111 011111111 De1L.1 51511111 511111111 Fpsllon S15111'1 L111 A1p11w Onncron P1 Cburorm Dc111 T111 Dc11'1 L1m1Jr161 C 111 -X1p11 1 P111 Mu LSo1'or1lw1 Dc1t'1 D1.1t1 Dc111 fwxrorityj P111 Inpsllon P1 P1 131.11 P111 fSo1'orityJ S1gn11 P111 Sxgma C111 0111021 1Sororiry-J ilnral P111 F11 Kaplrn Zeta P1 Ennnrurg EF rain-111t1r11 lllh Qnrwtlca Q A1p11'1 71.11 f5x1,flCl.11l1J1"l1J Tau Beta Pi flinginceringj A1p111 L1'll Sxgma KC11e1111ca1J P111 Kappa Phi QSchc1a1'shipJ Scal1b'1rd 11111 Blade fM11lldfV, X1 blgma Pi. QFores1.ryj S1gm.1 'wxgmw S1g1na CB1o1og5J S1gma Delta Chi Uoumqlisticj Enrmrarg 01131111 Bnrirtirs Seuxor Skulls junior Masks U Brothers of Sigma Chi Sigma Chi House L f. , . , --Q -'1' , ,- , . - ,, . .351 , 3- -. ' ' . .l . 1 , v1lf .:u 4. . . .. Q , ' - ,151 . EN I D ? - ' - . , 4 J' Q ::g,,,, . D 'f ' E' ' W ..i1,5f,11', 1 ' .ff .I .L 'Q 55111 I '. ' 'them C111 - q Q A , -umm? Sigma Nu ' ,QM:.1,:L5. 1 . K. " 1W""1' ' -1 ' ,J ey , ' , .. . .. ' M111 1 111111 - V H 1 I 1 -1 ,12 ' .3851 4 1111 3. I I 11 1112, . 1 1 1 Q 1' 1, 11-I Q' , 1 . 1 .I ' . ' 1111, 1 5-'A' 1 ' ' I W ,luxkf ' ..' V . .. X N.. qty.. ' K .. . I' . 1g .9. , ' U 21' 1 7,71 '51 7 11 The Spirit Of The Times . Q In 1926 the University made many needed improvements to the chapel stage, and a new floor was laid for the cast. Valuable and unique lighting equipment was added and everything pointed to a successful season for the Masque. In the fall the constitution and poli- cies of the organization were revised and modernized and set on a firm bus- iness basis. Women students of marked ability were now admitted to member- ship and meetings were held every month. Was Noi All Lighihearied Fun The armistice was signed and the war was officially overg but the memory still lingered . . . In 1922 the General Alumni Association decided upon the construc- tion of the Memorial Gymnasium Armory as a memorial to all Maine men who gave their lives in the services of their country in World War I. With the end of the war came the construction of many new buildings. In 1924 the main building of Stevens Hall was constructed to house the College of Arts and Sci- ences. It was named in honor of the late Dr. James S. Stevens, who was dean of the College for many years. In 1928 Crosby Laboratory and Rogers Hall were built. Crosby Laboratory contains the Laboratories of the De- partment of Mechanical Engineering. Rogers Hall houses the Department of Animal Science and contains laboratories for the manufacture of dairy products. xi .rx xx X l-.I N U Q N - . 2 'W-IF 2.4" ,w A -. JA" 'A' " . .- - Y:fi.W5'f34 . i 4 Lis.. .f .. 'f ,V ,f -- .12 ffv- , - l A M jar! efggcffg ff'-f ifw ' - A xQfQi,lsl'?3?t-12 if 'Q 'Y 1' , .azf w .fa -- wi Q it iq,-Wg? 1 - H '11, 1, ..g f fn, L A J .W . .545.!,!49l41ff'4'4.-'fo' ..,, f f 'ff 43-5' ii? me r ,gi X :.- 4. ffaayk Q o f .ggjir ,724 V.-AMASQQLM, "N-'Eggs ,1 .gi b Nr I l. .lil ' f,' 'l' 0 'W' ' 1 ' 1 'V lu ' :.',:-'z . 1 is ' i ll " dvi", zwgfyi- ,ill gmt' 'I ' "' 7L'Z:'f,WwA if it . 1 V 1 1 Af. i .. , . ,f .. 3,0 , W 1 If , ,A qfi, ,, ,, ,, ik, 12' -. wif A gl . -we rf Nfl- . Wiz 9 Wi' i" XX. f"1f""i Q54 i f ,vi-ff wg , ""'l1'f f ' if Kg -, ' ..wf,?1?l"' " N " "' Mx- l M 1 v" irq L -L H" ' ' fly? ' 1 ' .ff ' 316530 Q 'H' ' .- -1 ir, i .. ,. - .. if f .Ai A V , fn.. F g A - ,1- . C xiff' ' I ,glrfq ' ' ' ' agiwt l y ml. 'W -- .4 -'.:. .- ,,.. Q . , D. 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'ga-f-X Af - . me-ff-A -. - 'f- -' '-1 5-' "Nuff . -M' .J-.':'-"-x'1'-.4' V '-- -ii? -' "'-' - y " 'M .. .1'3RPi'S1QJQf,i5!.v1,,-P:,54-' H.if.j+-,g,.:q.5.:-41N.s5-14 5-h as 'mtv-f,,N x wt " H ' ' -is-w..s"--f?3.,,5fg.1,?",gr'gfGg,5qY3:f5.p:-f , , -- AJ- - , 'I -- ' ".4w"f'T'-5 -91-.br:.a--'sic if ' .-, .. Y"1F"4'w5':'gC.'-we-i"o'N' W-V .. mitxlbrf Funds contributed by the members of the classes of 1922-23 and 1929-32 and contributions received from alumni, faculty, and friends made the construction of the memorial Gymnasium possible. Two campaigns re- sulted in the payment of over 3S480,000. The construc- tion of the Indoor Field Armory was started in 1925. When the Memorial Gym was dedicated on March 13, 1926, the field house was the largest of its kind in the country. It ranks second now to the University of Michigan which claims the largest. .-9" i Dr. C. C. Little, President of the Un- iversity during the twenties. It was Becoming cz Woman is World in the 3019, All Maine Women Women began to play a significant role in the University's history in 1872 when Maine became coeducational. Due to a rapid influx in enrollment, the Women's Student Government Association was founded in 1919 to encourage active participation in self- government, high standards of personal con- duct, and group responsibility among the stu- dents. In 1925 the All-Maine Women Socie- ty was founded as a sister organization to the Senior Skulls. It is the University's high- est honorary, non-scholastic society for wo- men. To promote congenial relationships be- tween sophomores and freshmen and to help the incoming women adjust to campus life, the Sophomore Eagles were organized in 1926. Women were finding their place at Maine in the twenties. Sophomore Eagle Society Women's Student Government 'Maine's women proved they could outshoot any man through participation in their own rifle club. After the twenties the Women's Athletic Association followed a system of inter-class competition, for varsity sports for women were abolished in 1931. Earl Carroll, New York producer, elected Melba Gifford, '34 Crightl, and Dorothy Sawyer, '35 fleftl , as the two loveliest coeds at the University. Mr. Carroll found it too difficult to choose between the two young ladies. As The Universigf Grew Out Of The Depresszon f"""'- Stevens Hall, 1924, is the center of the College of Arts and SCIGHCQS Its two wings, North and South Stevens, we1e constructed 1n 1933 15 V fi -, A xwm ,,. ,,, I ' 1 F I X a 1 ii 1 if Wr- . , S U :TC ' l I , 1 , I , K x lu -.AQ " ' A Y? ' Jiifdw 1 A.. -- -4 W ff W W 1' , N 5, ,gf fx- 19 . W UWLWMAW- 1 Y wwfmw A w ., " A . 'IJ ' n . Mig-f"n w 5- ,X , -L A mi W ,Q X .A -3, f 2 v K W .Q f . ,-zaf11, ,.Az' I ' W . " ." g,., t M id- ' 'U' My 'Q W W, VM A A my , V- 158' 1 L,:-, I - 'P . e' '- mf. ' Y . ' 1 N - wh- A A :iz I ' . if-J. C' TT- W W ! , f gg- :E AT f,j: :1, If . ,Q ,. .1 Vv 1 A,qA -if U ff -H 1 gaa.f?g,AQ3-HA V' 1 , , ,. .,u Wen ,W WWA ,- ,fwu f- Kg wgwx Mx Wm Mx iw aww vb X wk WM W9 ,, MQW K A M lm.-, "" w M r f- - 'Z . 1 L 115 ' I pw , , Progress Appeared Everywhere Dr. Harold S. Boardman, who was President of the Univers- ity during the thirties, graduated from Maine in 1895 and re- ceived degrees from Maine, Colby, Rhode Island, and Bates. In the late thirties, President Arthur A. Hauck provided the leadership that was necessary for the efficient and progressive function of the University as it continued to expand. The physical aspects of the campus changed with the addition of Oak Hall in 1937, the Agriculture Engineering Building in 1938, Merrill Hall, 1931, and Colvin Hall in 1930, which became a cooperative dormitory in 1961. Throughout the thirties, athletics continued to play an active role in campus life. Varsity basketball again occupied a position on the Maine athletic schedule in 1936, after a six year absence. Although the schedule included but one game with Northeastern University, the eagerness and enthusiasm with which this single game was attended by the student body justified having a regular schedule in 1937. As the campus grew and prog- ress appeared everywhere. Some familiar scenes . . . the cannons never changed. Winslow Hall, erected in 1908. was one of the principal class- room buildings and center of the College of Agriculture. This marked the 'beginning of a new epoch in the history of the college. For the first time, suitable and well-equipped class- rooms and laboratories were provided for the students. 17 .wg i 1' Rh.. H, lui- '."f , , .. Z . 4 R Lrg 'sr i .J hi .ly H ,nfl '-1 Bridge T0 The Present Dedicated in October, 1963, the Lengyel Hall, is a living memorial to the first head of wo- men's physical education at the University. The spacious, modern building has a double gymnasium for classes and competitive indoor sports, a dance studio, lecture rooms, offices for the Department, and locker and shower facili- ties for both men and women. The department was formerly located in a wing of Alumni Hall, now being remodeled to house Maine's educa- tion television network. Outdoor athletic fields next to Lengyel Hall provide room for outdoor hockey, lacrosse, arch- ery and golf. Outside room facilities, modern equipment and a new gym enable the depart- ment to contribute actively to the development of all women students through a diversified program. As a tribute to Dr. Arthur Hauck's twenty-four years of service to the University, the Hauck Auditorium stands as evi- den-ce of the appreciation and generosity of the alumni, stu- dents, faculty, and friends who made the building possible. The 600 seat auditorium will serve as a cultural center for the University. Here concerts, ballets, dramas, movies and many lectures will be held to educate and entertain all. Maine Masque will use its facilities for production and classwork headquarters. The auditorium will also be used for conferences, assemblies, and church services. The University Bookstore, long housed in Fernald Hall, will have spacious new quarters in the basement of the building. During twenty-five dedicated years spent in service to the University, Miss Helen Len- gyel, the first head of the women's physi- cal education department, made progress the key word of her work. She enlarged her staff from one assistant to four faculty members 'and changed from a program of one competi- tive team sport to one for physical education majors, offering a Bachelor of Science de- gree. Her life was truly dedicated to the ad- vancement of the Maine program in physi- cal education. I9 The Maine Masque was formed in 1910 from an organization that was previously known as "The University of Maine Dra- matic Club." The 40's brought an opportunity for experience in all phases of acting and technical aspects in dramatic produc- tions. The Masque was selected to tour Europe and North Afri- ca in 1959. Last year, 1962, Maine Masque formed a new stu- dent group organized along the lines of a theatrical honor so- ciety. The main objectives of the new organization are to pro- mote theatre at the University and to honor those students who have made outstanding contributions to the Maine Masque The- atre. Football got its start at the University in 1892. Until 1896 the football teams played their home games on the same field in which Corbett and Dunn now stand. During the two world wars drafting and reserve status changes kept the Black Bear athletes in continual bewilderment. Yet in the 40's many mem- bers of the Maine teams made the All-Maine Eleven. Two out- standing players, Jack Zollo and "Moose" Murdoch received recognition to the Little All-America squad in the mid-forties. The year 1947 saw Maine clinch its first State Series title in 13 years. This provided a pleasing contrast to 1945 when the team lost every game. 20 mm- IA. 'S . - -'Sf - , 9 .ff 1 ' - ' g -' -' ' W , 'N V- .f""i.FF92- "L ---Y QQ 47 Av- . ,Q 't 'Z' .- . LT- - r j.. s - A ' sa .J., ... 1 13.6216 "-i E-r' ' 555' M-!!"'b Y U ,I ,.., . ---,,.. .....- 1 .. ,. 2115 an js, ' - . Q yr ' 1 """"" isiillvlifi-gl-12--'?"1W -3. '- N 4 ' ', . .js gg.: ---1 - -1:55522-F53-Lf1""Q,,Q,E.::'Eg.3 i I , A J , -- - :Z ., -V - -f --1:-'Ef221e:ef:?: 9 Y ,Sl J-L . ' 1. -5 , 1' T. , -, -s- 1- rv fi - ' : -vii.. '-, ,fn ,.,,, 1 ' zu - ,xv --N Q Q ' i . ,gp ,f--ag gf ff- ,J-111,53 - . .,,.. . 3 , . -ag ,' F f'r - fi r , '-1 -ff -.Fm ,L . . v 1113.-A5 ' ,V . 371:53 154. 'f 3232? 43,31 W -" . ,+.ttQi- wa... .1 ug, ' J- -r ' V . .. ...wl',iI'...l ' . . . 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"9f::1fS.- - 1 . 11 'S '- - 1. 11,-1-1, 1. ,'.!71f"Tf'.: 5 -.1jg1"f. M1- -Q 1,..4-'Iv-.gb-A-'LV151,-,g 14- -x31T.x:- -.-.Lt-,155 'A r"":'-.-., 4.. ' ' L"-in-ies ,--1.7 ' '35-J-r ',1'7s1,,,'I--' M' ' 'ffl ' . .. " .. .- . '- ' ' r ff , , .vars 1v'1 :ix 4' ' . '- '-.qw -- r". ' ,. ,, . I ' "W-".ZQa??lli,s,dr'.Q, 'L457-'5Qt'7.'ll'i5H'Mifr'.'11 +1 .-'P ' . I , E' 1 :H -5 far.:-1' .'1,,1.:h'5. v W, ,uv W.I,1u ..-'Gum' ' ,sf Wf5r':L-2471: 9:65-"Q 11 World War PRI M Dedication: "T 0 The Veteransv ,--......-.l,...n . . . . . lm-.11f.m'e.:.1 Q-,uw .2 .2-f.-ff,f1n-nav-gfrfggriz-:a-f1f:-17, ,- . 1 . t - .AE,.v,..,.. .,,,.. , A 1, ,v,, .I ......4n1 In 1897 the library occupied two rooms on the first floor of Coburn Hall. By 1904 the continued increase in the use of the library necessitated additional space. A gift of 51550, 000 by Andrew Carnegie in 1905 made the construction of Carnegie Hall possible. The present library was built in 1940 with the aid of a fund-raising campaign by alumni, faculty, students, and friends. The completion of the main reading room in 1950 put the final touches on the library. In 1962 the Library was named in honor of Dr. Raymond Fogler, a former president of the Board of Trustees. Coburn Hall sl" 11 .xl x iii! 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' ' . . 1wn.,+w,,is-f,mi.-?..1,, 1 , H ' l'"l'nllEQlf2l'iQl'Ilri'' 'l , -1 tm " I ls" Y H ' '- ' , ,Q 1- - f ilm , - Q awww' gl ,,.L'Eif- " . - 1 .. P'-'1' 'iw ' . 2 ,ni ,v 5 T'dEii?,,g'.if?l1'- . , ,. if ' - .,e2?'fh'1'V -. A .. g,iBi"i::,13Sa1 . lf ' ' , - i s A 1 if i ll'-1 la bil' 'N Progress has always been a keyword at Maine: it is evident in our motto, "Dirigo," I leadg and it is evident in the face of our cam- pus. The South Apartments Ctopl, torn down now, gave way to the modern design and materials used in the University Park, which houses many faculty members and married students. 23 In 1959 the wings of Aubert Hall were com- pleted to house the chemistry and chemical engineering departments of the pulp and paper division. Gannett Hall, a dormitory, and Hitchner Hall were among the new buildings added to the growing campus. Spacious class- rooms, modern laboratory facilities, and glass gave the Physics Building fbottomj the as- pect of a promise of improvement everywhere, as the University followed the changing times through the fifties. S xx-N "N fi- 'alibi 3 . lf . 3, Ari: In this A ge of Science . . . .X 3, Lord Hall was used by the Department of Electrical Engineering, and a Soil Mechan- ics laboratory is located here. The building was named for the late Hon. Henry Lord, a former president of the Board of Trustees. With the recent stress on science and technology, colleges and universities are being called upon to provide men of science both for instruction and re- search. Realizing these needs, the University is con- tinually expanding its facilities for research and undergraduate study. As a result, numerous grants are being awarded for critical research. The greatly increased number of corporations interviewing sen- iors in the spring is also indicative of the quality of University science and engineering graduates. V' '13 ff' -., lf -. . 3 , 'H -es ' iff!-1, ts- ,Q -'vw' -p5.iL4T5g.g. 9 -11. gf, It -116,43 " 1 -'za-..:zf',' - Q r ., 5 - 3 ilk. 1 gg ' . ' "' , . . 3 'W 'U lj ---- Q A' .A ,'f ag 1 Tl U 'ms if ' 1 ' , . will ' ,L -ggVf2q"":6I-fn 5-15,1 YE" ,A ,mn Wi! A tif' Ti' ,g.,Et:.:.? I' Fic, I f fi er ur wb -f' 'ft N . T- NQ 1 .V il-ll' 'e 4' - 5.ilf'z" -'hilffigl L. lllgnilli Ullllllt -4' N' :""rr -.. ' 7' ' A I' fl :qs 'v-A tbl-.:BUllL'IllG ' r 'H -2 . TQ? 4 -ligjjte ,, Ebe l. -J,-,N ' . I ,f VTX l53'?'3'5dS 'V - A l , ' e 'lil-1 "Ai ' 'r f " ' 1 ' .f-w .1 ' ,3 -' V ..,, 7. , . .H W' . .Pell li?-Jrvzw. 1 - f - , .Q . In - Q ' "nan ' W .,,p V 4 , hw -vm - - ., 1 Q X47 Pt--'i 1: f- i e , Qs, . ., - 'LQ+'.'fF" "W il l J f " w. , " ,5 .- ,QN' Lq,- ...fix U , To comply with the need for new science buildings, the University constructed the Physics Building in 1957. This modern build- ing contains offices, classrooms, large lec- ture halls, and laboratories for the Depart- ment of Physics. -7 I Q - ,. '. ..'--1 3- '.zaf-wi.-fiaf'y --'Nx A --Q' 1' l - M..-,.,, .,. v l -: --. . - ' 1 , affffT:"r'?C':rfrs. ERT' 'ff' isifznf g., -.vw 55. ,-prix. H- ,I ,..f::i,?9v,Qh ,St-'ghijif 'f,,.,af,. 1.'.w:'vumwglqs-Q.-xg' . . F., . :me : ,, l , ,gl W1 , , lr 4 1 .ti A .. 54,11 '. ' um 2:-.mfg +,'a,.:1:iaf',.j:. . "" r-wif s'g.qhg,g,j 1,'.:,s:" ,bjytsl-ff-'+-g, .kg1v' 5,1-f.-s.'--W-.f1.1.1 ' .il - -az, '.,, . :.. -es4',q:,..-1 ,. :.'2"1..11.' f"'A ' ,l gf'-'.,i.g,,fWi1'g.'jl'f".-'- ..'..u-5-,Q .i f 1 N ,ll-1,-ju ' i . , i. V Ana' of Construction . . . The Memorial Union, constructed in 1953, is a memorial to the University of Maine men who gave their lives and those who served in World War II. It is the gift of students, faculty and friends. The Union is the center of student activities and recreational programs on the campus. It has a Memorial Room, meeting rooms, lounges, offices, the campus famous snack bar, the Den, and game rooms. Bowling alleys, offices for the director of Religious Affairs and for student organizations, a faculty-alumni lounge, dining room, and addition- al meeting rooms were added in 1961. :pf ............... , I " -M -1'..W.Tf,l7.Jn: Stodder Hall was built in 1956 as a Women's dor- mitory with a cafeteria. Stodder has living con- veniences for 170 students. It was named in honor of the late Mrs. Anne E. Stodder, of Bangor, a benefactress of the University. The Commons was constructed in 1958 as a cen- tral dining hall for men students. Fifteen hundred persons can be served here cafeteria-style in the two large halls. . ,ts--'r,E"l'-'x' ' ,.-:..,.,: . .,. -.-W 'V "H.,.e-'g",.'-1- ' 'Nh ,- 4 .. - .1 -.va 2-...-.--1g1,f.'1-1.11. r- . Civil ,gms iytflvzqw ly ilrtliiw C ii lf? ' 1 -V -s 3 'x-If 'fwuihgwtuwml xl ww al Gigi-lilffaliaa fiiafr-P? yd' 'ff 3 We ag, 51-L Y, Lqhariri 539-.Sf -eq, H 5 'Xl x., kc n 9 3 "5"7'A?":J' Wm? S'1XQxfY1ls3 1255 1 X A it fa w 'lst 5 r he Ki 'steam'-L1 RXQX1? A! in W v'f"B' nfl VTX I 1-tr 'Qixw lg-'FXr'gYslt:,'1f-'r 5 wx ir alraafgg 1,3 Hiwldllttrrwl 1 J 'L- J, -yi N nfl lvl l 9 W mms, wwf' The Tradition O True Friendliness There has always been a pride in the spirit at the University. These Words are taken from a speech of Dr. Hauck, President of the University during the 50's. "Probably no two of us would define or envisage the Maine Spirit in exactly the same Way. This is as it should be, for one of the purposes of a university is to develop individuality. Yet I am sure that all Maine men and Women would agree on loyalty as the primary and constant element of the Maine Spirit. This loyalty is expressed by the students in many Ways: in open-hearted friendliness, in mutual helpfulness, in willing cooperation - win or lose, in scrupulous care for our reputation for good sportsmanship, and in steady striving to uphold, enhance and honor high standards of academic achievement. Nor is the Maine Spirit exclusively a student attitude permeating day- to-day campus life. It finds expression, less demonstratively perhaps, but with lasting effect, in the devotion of the members of the facility and the administration. Its influence is seen in the lives of the alumni, and it has its fruits in theircontinuing pride in and active support of their alma mater. The Maine Spirit is, in its Widest sense, everything that contributes to finer human relationships and good citizenship. It is to be cherished as a potent and durable influence, making life fuller and richer for both undergraduate and alumnus." This year "Fill the Steins to dear old Maine" is a line familiar to every student at the University. The Memorial Union Governing Board has instituted a Stein Collection to accumulate in the Memorial Union a com- prehensive collection of steins from any and all sources. The popularity of the Maine Stein Song suggests the appropriateness of developing and identifying this collection with the University of Maine. Steins of vary- ing size, decoration, fabrication and origin will be valid pieces for this collection. Of The Students . N i xx . wrt i i wr' W " "I , i l . Spirit has always been a part of campus personalities. Lovely faces enthusiastic athletes . . . winter festivities . . . and care- free fun. Valerie Beck Cabovel, crowned Winter Carnival Queen by President Elliott, will always live in the hearts of her class- mates and the students who knew her. Pic- tured with Carnival King, Bill Lawlor, in her Sophomore year, Val radiated the best of Maine spirit and attained one of the Uni- versity's highest honors that of all All-Maine Woman. Spirit was the password during Mayor Pete Bar- ry's administration during the 50's. "Maverick", a familiar figure gallantly riding his faithful steed around the football games, was interested in every part of our campus and active in many activitiesg "he always put his heart into everything he did here and made it a success." 27 i KORE xv ' 2: x X it W , -ll! x 7 'WA' sw , f I, l . rr R nissan KUMHWA my "Nr-... RAILROADS 'T AIRFIELDS ---- MAIN ROADS PORTS --' - --Q mvsns A rum-M Q ,.sANcsJu And while the campus hummed with events, the fight- ing went on in Korea and a few men left for the army. There were not many, hardly enough to be noticed, some were inducted and some enlisted, but in every fraternity, in every dormitory there was an empty chair, an empty desk. There was talk of a deferment test to be given stu- dents, and the boys began worrying about the future. It became difficult studying with such insecure prospects, and grades fell off. More boys were taking advanced R.O.T.C. than ever before. In the background of every campus activity lay the knowledge that the army might snatch you away anytime. The band is the oldest musical group on campus and has had a unique history, As a military unit, the band served in the Spanish-American War and again in France during World War I. Until World War II, the band was strictly a military organization, but in 1944 a new unit, entirely separate from the R.O.T.C., was formed under the name of the University of Maine Varsity Band. The 1950 Prism was dedicated to the Band, the only organi- zation ever to be so honored. I , , , . . +.4qp-4-ur-4.45-4-as.L-un-un-Q-sr4vvQ'1 A--A--vlan-LJA1 nnfsatmrr :mtg-Qnsgnqf asus: 1 - - 3115? 4. -. ' L , . J . , W V 91 In 1952 the Maine Ski Team completed one of its most successful seasons. The team kept its membership in the Senior division of the Inter-collegiate Ski Union. The I.S.U. consists of the highest scoring ten teams in the Eastern United States and Canada. In the same year Coach Chester A. Jenkins' cross-country team won the State title, tied for the Yankee Conference crown, took third in the New Englands and were 15th in a field of 39 colleges at the National meet. In 1953 Coach Hal Westerman produced one of the best football teams the University had seen for a long While. The end of the season found the Black Bears hold- ing titles in both the State Series and in the Yankee Con- ference. In the afternoon on Maine Day the students laxed and watched a parade of floats sponsored 1'9- by fraternities and dormitories. Lambda Chi Alpha won first place with the "Gold Rush of 1849," a part of the theme "Periods of History." Maine Day remains the only official holiday of the Universi Today this ski jump is condemned lf S i . w ,K , I 1' I ,wiwlnllwfi xl, .. ri-,?.'IQ I in , fl 13114 l........uf" -P A . iiir v ty. X EX 1 Q XE r kr A-W xp as -.. ,., 1 1 0' 1 dw fi F ,.....lf Jwjykm wwzux , 1 , Ji -fi f Q 1 , L' ..,...-- Q6- .......-' ?' A..-s 5 I ,---0' i ,I -nnmvvn " I x .....,..w--sr ,V f iv ,,,,,....-o-"-'4 5 X R I .Q 1 t I """ A1 1, . .f ,, i 'V lk'-1 V , .. g V . I UG-uf-m-vnW'wM ! X . ll 4 ii, W U 4 , . ' , if' - , . H ti J V- , . I ' . ug ' ., . 'f ,Q-1? C MP 'Q ,AL ' l ii' JI K ., N .4 7' 'liMl'17!""m"'M U ll I "wi I 'l' ww" " H 4 ,ti I if .N I ' -lt. H. V mu I an '-sq P '-, I. 1 wi .Q ...A-4 ia -A President Lloyd H. Elliott, shown above with Maine's traditional mascot, replaced retired President Arthur Hauck in 1958. Dr. Elliott came to us from Cornell Uni- versity where he was assistant to the president. He has been a capable administrator, leader, and has proved a willing friend to all. Edith G. Wilson, who was Dean of Women at the University of Maine from 1933 to 1962, received her B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Southern Cali- fornia and did graduate work at Columbia University. Miss Wilson, known by all for her congeniality, is presently Assistant to the President for Institutional Re- search. The 1964 PRISM was dedicated to her in recog- nition of her many years of service to the University. Vincent A. Hartgen, head of the Art Department is a dedicated and imaginative leader whose talents have in- spired many students - not only art majors, but those who have come here with little knowledge and no inter- est in art. Through the art exhibits and shows, his paint- ing, especially the woodland scenes, are famous through- out the areag and the dream of many a student is to purchase a "Hartgen" before graduation. And Of The Faculty 30 I i U Wh Has Brought Us T 0 The Present Commencement exercises 1963 and every year, classes are larger. As year after year goes by, the past is not forgotten, stirred by class reunions at Homecoming and Graduation. As we approach the University's Centennial, we begin to look back at the tradition, sentiment, and memories which have been a part of every graduating class. As though it could have been yesterday, the past is indeed with us on this, the eve of the Centennial. For anyone who was a part of the record crowd at Home- coming, 1963, the day will always be more than a memory. The nation was shocked by President Kennedy's assassination, but to Maine the news was unbelievable, as he had been in our midst so vivacious and warm only a few short weeks before his death. Homecoming '63 will be a living part of the minds and hearts of thousands throughout Maine's history. Looking To The Future Ano' Tomorrow Is Today S Dream The University of Maine at Orono comprises a total of over 2,700 acres, much of which is devoted to experi- mental forests, graze land and or- chards. Nearly seventy-two major buildings comprise the plant of the cam- pus. The present campus can be divided into two major sections, the early cam- pus along the Stillwater River, and the later campus oriented in a more formal manner along the Mall. The University is controlled by a Board, of Trustees, comprised of eleven members, eight of which are appointed by the Governor for seven years. Two members are appointed for three years by the Governor upon the nomination of the General Alumni Association, and the State Commissioner, of Education is an ex officio member. A record University of Maine enroll- ment of 5,291 this fall emphasized the need for enlargement of the facilities. Many improvements have taken place, but others will be completed in the fu- ture. This year dining halls "for men only" and "for women only" are a thing of the past with our modern co-educational dining facilities . . . Outstanding high school seniors recommended by their teachers are taking regular college courses in a unique new program at the University . . . Adult evening courses are one of the in-school instructional programs telecast by the University's new educational television s t a t i o n, WMEB-TV. There were seven new buildings con- structed on campus last spring: two stu- dent dormitories, Aroostook and Andro- scoggin Hall, a new dining. hall, East Commonsg two classroom buildingsg-a women's gymg the Hauck Auditoriumg one electrical engineering buildingg and an office building for the agricultural department. As the enrollment of the University increases in the decade 1960-1970 ex- pansion in instructional, athletic, liv- ing and parking space and facilities are now being planned. The twelve students of 1868 would hardly recognize their University now. Foreword In honor of the Centennial Anniversary of the University, may this PRISM be a unique reminder of what a cooperative enterprise our University is. Portrayal of our many and varied activities em- phasized how much teamwork is involved in our campus life-how much we all owe to each other . . . In this age of science with construction going on around us everywhere to build a better Maine, We must "consider how through the years the work of devoted men and women - trustees, teachers, stu- dents, and alumni - has gone into the building of the University of Maine as we know it today. An awareness of our obligation tof, one and an- other and our indebtedness to the Work of uncount- ed pioneers of inquiry who have been blazing trails through the centuries before us, is fundamental. to American life. When we think of the iti legacy that has come to us, we are filled- with new' hope the future. Let us join hands with men of good will to solve the problems of our generation as we progress towards Maine's second Centennial through higher learning more widely disseminated. ' Taken in thoughts of H Dr. Arthur Hauck .-. A f, A W'iL.,qL ,, -A .. r:-N- -- -z--,. X' - f-at . "1 ' -" rf'-L-H .Q gl ,. 5 ' . - . Q '-,,,.- ,-su- s- m...g, 'x .- -- :LM qs , f .- l .4 1 X--.. .aah . it . -.g 4.-.,, - -. h I uf- - -.4 g.7- .g --.-,V-f-Q. ,, .a5""F"'?g:."f'5"'- ' '- 31 ' ' S' :1,,-- T . "-'---1: -,q . , - 'Tz-"yy, g.. .j,l...' ...-, is YH:-e--.nL.,.,, , , ' Q -4 .' "' -1 X A -- 1. 1 ..' ' , 1 1 ' -Q---HL-, - '-, J' -"-1..- xrfqu- df- Q Fifwiz-, W "EE'i'l?kF'i::rE-- -'---ww' -I f nf Q Tv..-mf! ji- ' it ' ez " 1 z w:g1,-.'3f5'-:3-.--ti'7,-f.g3l-17143.-V V : 53.1 Z E .tx 3 W K y Q me ,fe , '-- ' 4 " '15 . 5 31-,Riff lr -Zi, R ia, . -ff Q- -url if ' ., g Table of Contents Dedication . . . . 36 Administration . .6 . . 38 Maine Life . . . . . 60 Organizations . .. 78 Sororities . . . . .136 Fraternities . . . . .154 Juniors . . . . . .196 Athletics . . . . .226 Seniors . .tte . . . .260 Patrons . .... 290 Index . .... 293 K C 1 ii .1 ,J Q .EI .f x Q V 'f,,, . 2' x 'Q-6 '-A , x 5-vu X. ws 9 4, la Q X 1-Sa 5- s 1 is-1? . hs, D l., -,,."ffcs- ' 'T in 3 ' . Y ,wu- . 1 ," QINGA f K' -Y ,I ci? sg! arf" . V- d', P' 'fi n LI, uf'-n I k 11. 1? f' ' -fx, 'f -.4 ,? . may img -. :ig a ' iv Xp, 1. JS vw in I - , -' - ,R Q ' fb A A Hn' Y, Q- '-" K 3 'q.. I. ,-.,s '-30 kl i i .4-PQ. H' ' ' rv I F 'r'.',,,g -A -N 'nf 'P " 'L '-ts Q 1 wg, pill AY. 9 .- " 1 70. S 9 tb . 5 ' '- 'K "" X- L -. .. in J 'qi' 1. ' N 'i "in" - . Y 1' 1? ' "ne ,sh if 5 2 Q Q A :Q -I A . 5 W Al- 1 .wb N Q t Q . 1 -1 It ' , ' vi. ' Q' L-'H ' - -. 'f - -4 vs 3 - 1 ' S I, Q "Of all the sunshine that brightens our lives, there is no beam more complex and more brilliant than that distinguished as College Life. I Knowing well the refractive power of the common prism on solar light, we have placed this PRISM, though we trust that it is not so fragile as one of glass, in the beam of under- graduate life at Maine . . . and leave our readers to judge how well it has broken its rays into their component colors." 1894 PRISM .To the many whose lives have been mirrored by the many PRISMS of Maine-with ad- miration and gratitude for those of the past who have de- dicated themselves to the found- ation of a great institution, with respect for those of the present who are contributing to the growth of a great univer- sity, and for those of the future who will further the progress of an even greater university, this Centennial Anniversary Edition of the PRISM is dedi- cated. We at Maine were privileged to have our lives touched by the life of our late President Kennedy. Events which Univer- sity chroniclers will term as historic and momentous - and events which will live on in the hearts of those who were present, occurred on our cam- pus Homecoming Weekend when President Kennedy visited and addressed the student body and became an .Alumnus of Maine. Then only a month later the news of the President's death came as an imcomprehensible shock to the University. Presi- dent Kennedy became a part of those who have given their lives to maintain the ideals which we hold so dear at Maine in striv- ing to build a better University and a better world. DeC ltion 1 if-M I. And here at Maine a tragic accident took the life of Judd Keller, an outstanding student. Judd was a Senior Skull, the president of Lambda Chi Alpha, president of the IFC, and an active participant in many cam- pus activities. The student body had a profound respect and great love for him. Our abiding thought is a deep sense of grati- tude for his life and what it meant to us as individuals and as a college. May his unseen presence continue to walk through our memories. Our hearts' are filled iwith sorrow at his untimely passing as they were for our President, but let us thank God that we were privileged to have had them with us for so long. Remembrances of those who are no longer here are all about us in the deeds of those who continue to carry on the Maine spirit-the many people of the present without whose help it would have been impossible to publish this book. Faculty and student body worked together to publish this record of Maine's past. Without the en- thusiastic help of Mr. James MacCampbell, the head of the library, the PRISM staff could never have presented a truly re- fractive view of Maine's past. Almost five thousand person- alities are blended to form the future of thee University of Maine. The result is a compo- site personality - conservative, but not reactionary, spirited, but not boisterous, studious, but not intellectual, and always, al- ways friendly. Five thousand personalities blended together- but refracted by the light of a PRISM-to show progress to- wards an even greater univer- sity as it moves to its second Centennial. .q -EF. ' ASW' 71 ' 5 - ,I g . . - 4 I -I ,SR 'RI : I 'vw-I p If K U 'gfgz ' v i 5 W- .. I A. . , I .. I . I .5 - I -- . wmv 4'-s - I S . , i I ,Z .Q -:--N. .Il I V , ei ---1.6.15 In .U H Q Q-w. ,Bk .jf "- 4 - 1' X? 3 , ,i H I - ,Q N at 'Bit -. X 'hs' 1 1 ' MU- - ' lf '. L ' 'M ' "Nm - Y ' my-:L - k ,. x . "". QQ' 5 .If A . I S, I- .fe ah- ,iv X .Ir ., .IV . , 1 1. F 4 4- -.-- in -I -- 14 Q 'P ... I f' .1 ' pr w I ?3"1'-af 9 I A ' - . ' 'W'-.Bal - L " if W AT .fa .4 ' R" ' -- . I: Ik - 4 4 we giif' f- '15??'2':ii'.? . - . " -.f--5 if af V ,. . -, I7 new .2 ,.i.4Qj:Iu.. ,.1.- .-,K 5 . f LI I an -4 any I. Q .w. 'Q 'III I. -39 'W ,f. 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I I - V 'ff 1 7 11 ' '. L '53 , kqdi. ,-- dv-sl iw 0 vgibqsf, - .bl ii T? Y H' J, ' H -F' s ' wssjf- , ew" J- Vi - ,-. I , -Y - . ', is 5 - JI .4 I -.X I , ' in . G gl Q .jwj T 1, 1 '--ri 'j 1 ,L xejujrq "-f., , ur ' K " L " y-"rw . ls 'IA "A ' 4 f J -'H ,Q -- , ,vK.,'f.,l5 'flq'-5 yi f.-bw, ' E.-sc.-v.a,,,,g,,1, J ' bt 1-W0 H it ' - ,F-HQQEA. :ft U, , .,g.J,?, ' '. 1. , vm: -5 ?"""". :"'."". . :' N, , "-Lgf Sip'-'F' , H5 , 1 .., ..,:.""'-41'-q..:,.'. I ' , Q ,fl ff .5 ' ' ""'-fa, ff' 1-,kg .. . J' H' - :iff 4 ' --12.5411 'ff ' 3 "'- ', ,iqla 1. I f 5 F. -pf--. - ,"1T".u, 1 'J q '25 , Y ,1' ilk ' -.nf -A .4 -, - -' - ' I .K-2.3, j ,-'Jr 7 . , . 1 ,. V I. V V T1 -' T 6- , 3, . ' -..- atm., V , V A sv' J 1 1- 1 N vfl- " nl , i?, : Wzff, :gn , 1-124, 1 Z . . r . O .. 7 O-5 .ix ic., ,A - ' r' ' '. 4 du ' " - ' ' 7 , I A. ' 4 , -,f'v4L..r!"' , 4 ' 9' Il , a " fr". .H . "W ' , ., , A . - - Aa ' , :WV , A jf' . A X , 's g u n Ja I I- V Nl! ' j It. as , ' N "' I Q " '. 1 I 451, - ' Y 1 4 -, . d . . t t . A d - Y ...N Wt I J 1,5 A A 1-' .,.v-g:N.1-,,,,gmw,A.:YNLP?-SL., X -Q.:-. tw Mx Y V In 'F A 353 : w.- -' V ""' ' . - - - K vp-A. x - fm" ' '-'AIR ' . Q..-mi' .naw-. ' - A 'xx ,, Ry g 1 A-A , , , f -Wx-f V - A 'J EA ' 1' Y I ' .x ,wv 'N' l ' 1 : V - ' F' - 1 'L"3.-.,1g'Q"f X ' - , M . , N4 -s ., ., Y A ' 1 ,,, , .vlflili-glibiiwbi ?u,..vh,?5,5 X CE: x1x?NAq1M,eQ-v E111 1 I-.3 r - - , . -- f. V iw -V ig 9-1 , N . V . k - - 73X-xbv .EV .I V-tv .If-.JL ' :VV ' ' K 'ai-'ky' N ' 1.12 ,XK " '-:"uK." Y 1 President Elliott ". .. To Work unceasingly for the highest quality education of which each student is capable and to compromise this goal with no one. I believe this to be the fundamental pur- pose of a university and to that end I give my energy and devotion in clear conscience." With these words Dr. Lloyd Hartman Elliott accepted the office of ninth President of the University of Maine. There is no doubt that President Elliott is carrying out his aims. Be- cause of his efforts, the Legislature awarded the University a significant increase in appro- priations to meet a rapidly rising enrollment. At home President Elliott is shown at his X desk fleftb and on campus fbottomj at the ?" annual ROTC Review. Dr. Lloyd Hartman Elliott in 1936 was a teacher of languages in the elementary grades and high school of Widen, West Virginiag 1939 -1942 he was principal of the Widen School system. During World War II, Dr. Elliott was a lieutenant commander in the U.S. Naval Re- serves. In 1954 he was appointed an assistant professor of educational administration at Cor- nell University, and later in 1956 appointed assistant to the president of Cornell. In 1958 Dr. Elliott was installed as the ninth president of the University of Maine. As a leader, administrator, and friend of all, Presi- dent Elliott is successfully living his aim to work unceasingly for the highest quality of ed- ucation of which each student is capable. Two sides of President Elliott are shown tleftl in his home with Mrs. Elliott, and Cbe- lowl during former President Kennedy's visit at Homecoming-the President and the man. ,Aa -X, .Q 5 V ' r, S -sgsrf' ' ' -f' Vice President for Academic Affairs: H. Austin Peck A.B., M.A., Ph. D., L.H.D. Vice President Peck received his A.B. from Tufts in 19245 his M.A. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy fTufts Universityl in 19479 and his Ph.D. from the same school in 1952. He received his L.H.D. from Tufts in 1963. Mr. Peck came to Maine in 1948 as a member of the faculty. He was Director of the School of Business Administration from 1959-61. In 1961 he became the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Assistant to the President for Institution- al Research: Miss Edith G. Wilson B.A., M.A. Miss Wilson received her B.A. in 1923 and her M.A. in 1928 from the University of Southern California. In 1931 she came to Maine as YMCA Secretary. Miss Wil- son became the Dean of Women in 1933 and she held this office until 1962 when she became Assistant to the President for Institutional Research. The .I.P.'s Registrar, Director of Medical Services Curricula, Director of Extramural Pro- gram: George Howard Crosby, B.A. Mr. Crosby received his B.A. from Col- by in 1936. From 1947 to 1950 he was Reg- istrar at Iolani School in Honolulu, From 1950-55 he was with the medical branch of the University of Texas in Galveston, Texas where he served as Registrar, Di- rector of Medical Services, Curricula, and Director of Intramural Programs. Mr. Crosby came to the University of Maine as registrar in 1955. The Deans Dean of Men: John E. Stewart B.A., M.A. Dean Stewart received his B.A. in 1927 and his M.A. in 1928, both from the Uni- versity of Maine. After teaching mathe- matics at Maine for several years, he was appointed Assistant to the Dean of the Col- lege of Arts and Sciences. He became Dean of Men in 1950. Off campus, Dean Stew- art's hobbies are carpentry, fishing, and hunting. 43 ' - r . 5962? '2- slei i - '--sew - - lg xt Y M '+V . ,..,. .ff l Assistant Dean of Women: Miss Elizabeth D. Willson B.S., M.A. Miss Willson received her B.S. degree in Secondary Education from Colorado State University. She earned her Masters in Guidance at Arizona State University. Before coming to Maine in 1963, Miss Will- son spent a year as head resident of a dor- mitory at Oswego State Teachers College, Oswego, New York, and a year as resi- dent of a dormitory at the University of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York. i1'2f S'e-f-f -if ' Assistant Dean of Meng Barry Millett B.A., M. Ed. Barry Millet graduated from the Uni- versity of Maine in 1956 and did gradu- ate study at Boston University where he received his M. Ed. in 1961. Mr. Millet has made many improvements in Fresh- man Week and he started improvements in the Fall of 1960 by shortening the or- ientation period and starting classes two days earlier. He was an assistant to the Dean in 1956 and became Assistant Dean of Men in 1961. dministration Hs Y Philip J. Brockway B.A., M.A. Director of Placement Peter C. Crolius B.S. Director of Development Henry L. Doten B.S., C.E., P.E. Business Manager Harry W. Gordon A.B. Treasurer fu? -ff' A James A. Harmon B.S. in Ed. Director of Admissions Nelson B. Jones Ph.D. Director of Memorial Union , Francis S. McGuire Director of Plant and Facilities Prescott H. Vose B.S., M.B.A. Controller The over-all success of any organization depends on the success of its several departments. The admini- stration is a vital part of an ever increasing univer- sity. The job of unifying, supervising, and generally keeping the University running smoothly is a most important part of campus life. Our administration admirably and intelligently creates the reason and fluidity necessary to keep the University operating at the highest level. Their vision and advance planning assures each student of an education which will be a valid foundation for a productive life. Howard A. Keyo B.S. Director of Dept, of Public Information and Central Services James C. MacCampbell Q William C. Wells B.A. Director of Residence and Dining Halls Robert C. Worrick B.S. Director of Student Aid B.A., M.A., Ph.D. University Librarian T. Russell Wooley B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Executive Director General Alumni Association Colleges D College is' coffee in the den between classes . . . touch- . . . college is more than the sunlight hours . . . rush to down passes . . . cram exams . . . hard work . . . slow classes eight to ,five . .. and then there is five to eight work .. . things to do . . . points of view .. . College is . . . the long, dark hours . . . the lonely hours . . . thel rushing to eight o'clock classes . . . and yet here at Maine tired, exhausted hours before exams . . . l I l l l J -df lllb 1- -:1f me .- fl. as - jlpsdigw'-.W 4. ,,,!,, X , Q' ., f 1 ,, .,,,t-.,,t. ,Y-.,-.. .,.-smwmse.,........n,... 4. .,,....,.......,. .... -....., ..., , . . H Wl"w'2- ill' 4 ,D , W W ,nfs J, I ' I +-P--' X l I l 1 l l i Q' l sew .' 2 ' l K A J. iil 1 n ill I l , U V' ' 4 niiif' Our primary goal we were told was to get an English themes dramatic screams. listening, education and somehow something got through to talking thinking, walking seelng, being ...l us . . . and we did learn . . . because we wanted to . . . this is college . . . this and more. and college is professors, books, labs equations, JIS Trustees The University of Maine is controlled by a Board of Trustees which has su- preme authority in all matters pertain- ing to its management. Eight members are appointed by the governor of the state for seven years. The present mem- bers are: Mr. Arthur Benoit, Mr. Charles Crossland, Mr. Ralph Cutting, Mr. Rob- ert Haskell, Mr. Hubert Hauck, Mrs. Beatrice Little, Mr. Owen Smith, Mrs. Helen Pierce, and Mr. Kermit Nicker- son, ex officio. Miss Edith Wilson serves as clerk of the Board. Shown to the left are W. Gordon Rob- ertson, the vice-president of the Board, Dr. Lawrence Cutler, president, and Dr. Lloyd' Elliott, president of the Universi- ty. Advisors The 1965 PRISM wishes to express its appreciation to two members of the faculty who provided invaluable guidance and assistance during the production of the book. Many thanks to our Faculty Advisor, Mr. Dave Tol- man Qleftl and Business Manager, Mr. Henry Hawley ,,. v. -al, , . if V frightl. This is Mr. Tolman's first year as our advisory he also works as an information specialist on pictures for the University. Mr. Hawley, a professor of business and economics, has worked with the staff in previous years. Byron L. Bondurant , , B.A.E., M.S., P.E. Head of Dept. of Agricultural Engineering Eg 75- 1-A-7:5 - - Y-, T Ji' Francis H. Bird B.S., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Poultry Science College of Agriculture When the University began in 1868, the College of Agriculture had one instructor Samuel Johnson. Only a few freshman courses existed, and others were added as the first students progressed' toward their senior year. The College now provides a wide selection of programs varying from biological and agricultural sciences to home economics. Completion of the four year program results in a Bachelor of Science degree. In addition, the College offers two-year preparatory courses in veterinary science. dairy manufacturing and food processing, as Well as a two-year vocational training program first offered in 1890. Proficiency in a professional field and a liberal training for effective citizenship are common objectives among the various units of the College of Agriculture. Richard J. Campana B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology George F. Dow B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Director of Agricultural Experiment Station 48 'Winthrop C. Libby B.S., M.S. Dean of College of Agriculture David H. Huntington B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Assistant Dean iw o Wallace H. Elliott B.S., M.S. Head of Dept. of Agricultural Education Frederick H. Radke B.S., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Biochemistry Bruce R. Poulton B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Animal Science Winston E. Pullen B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Agricultural Economics Winston Hall, oldest center of Agricultural Activities. k 'Roland A. Struchtemeyer B.S., M.A., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Plants 8: Soils Alvin R. Wlnitehill A.B., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Bacteriology 49 Geddes W. Simpson S A.B., M.A., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Entomology J. Franklin Witter B.S., D.V.M. Head of Dept. of Animal Pathology Merrill Hall School of Home Economics The School of Home Economics pro- vides a curriculum which co-ordinates the knowledge from all fields of learning emphasizing an understanding of hu- man needs and family living in all as- pects-physical, social, economical, and aesthetic. The students receive training not only in their major but in the arts, humanities, and sciences. The School provides an educational base for pre- professional employment and offers a Bachelor of Science degree. Supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Home Eco- nomics department is presently engaged in a study to determine the effect of monotony and fatigue on fat metabolism in rats. Shown left are Barb Bickmore and Carolyn DeMarino as they prepare aspecimen. D lu LX i ' Jean MacLean B.S., B.N., M.S., M.A. Director of School of Nursing School of Nursing .xx N x Sandra Vogell adjusts traction with the aid of an instructor. f 'X NN Demonstration of emergency oxygen as part of Ward Adminis- tration. J. Matthews, M. Gerrish, M. Coffin, and D. Dunlap are Established in 1958, the School of Nursing, which is a division of the College of Arts and Sciences, combines a liberal arts education with profes- sional preparation in nursing. The first two years of liberal arts study at the University are followed by two years of work in hospitals and other health agencies throughout the state. This concentrated program advances the qualities and abilities which in- sure the growth of competent and un- derstanding nurses. Joseph M. Murray B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Dean of College of Arts Ka Sciences College of Arts and Sciences In 1899 the University was formally divided into four colleges. The divis- ion which corresponded to the New England classical college was given the name of the College of Arts and Sciences. From the beginning, the University of Maine placed a strong emphasis on educational programs designed to provide its students with a cultural background. Today the College has expanded and is composed of fourteen departments, a School of Business Administration, and a School of Nursing. As a major ob- jective, the College endeavors to furnish opportunities for students to ac- quire knowledge and skill i'n the arts, humanities, and sciences. Carl M. Flynn B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Dean of Arts and Sciences Kenneth W. Allen Clarence E. Bennett Edward F. Dow Wofford G. Gardner B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Ph.B., Sc.M., Ph.D. B.S., .A.M., Ph.D. A.B., M.A., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Head of Dept. of Head of Dept. of Head of Dept. of Speech Zoology Physics History and Government 52 I Brooks W. Hamilton A.B. Head of Dept. of Journalism Herrold E. Headley B.S., M.M., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Music Edwin K. Miles B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Foreign Languages and Classics John E. Hankins B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of English 5-. Arthur M. Kaplan B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Psychology r , w " " " . 1 , ' k " X U 1 ' -12. . - . ' Q1 ' "' ft . LA , W s - f f, ' -1 " , w e - 1Q ' ."4 V I -. A e , ' .- Ar" wx ' ,V .ill T A ' QTP- ff 'f s f+ E, is 4 Y ,- -fr ,'IlliL" ' ' " . j V ff-Ein:-'ki. fijgfibgg hiss:-2 ,q:wpfgx.i-.'5Eu,f-Q,-'J 3 VL-4: Z"1j'fg 1 V 'iii 5153 If ,... " ' -' ' wie' 1 5 1' 'hf' V'-' Z 1 -grzixif-, l541F'l:f1P' 3 iw xr-fi. fzgasishl' 41 in i?L.i.CT:"- ,'p,m,3t!qi9- f ..3g1,fip1,-3 p I 1.2.1 1 ,1i,j1fw" g 'ILJLL-" . ," A M . 'W' ff Glenn M. Vernon B.S., M.S., Ph. D. Head of Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology 53 Vincent A. Hartgen B.F.A., M.F.A. Head of Dept. of Art Spofford H. Kimball B.S., M.A., A.M., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Mathematics and Astronomy Charles F. Virtue B.A., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Philosophy -3...g,vdi" South Stevens School of Business Administration Q William S. Devino B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Director of School of Business Administration The School of Business Administration is a division of the Col- lege of Arts and Sciences. It offers curricula leading to the B.S. degree in Business Administration with major programs in Market- ing, Finance, Accounting, and Industrial Management. The primary objective of the program of the School of Business Administration is to develop students' abilities to assume the re- sponsibilities of business management. Given this basic orienta- tion to management development, the school's curricula are aimed at providing the broad training which is necessary for successful bus- iness management in the present rapidly changing economy. No attempt is made to provide detailed, specialized training i'n particu- lar business tasks. The program aims, rather, at developing skills and attitudes of mind that Will enable the student to cope success- fully with the changing problems of business management in the years ahead. 54 College of Technolog The College of Technology recommends a Bachelor of Science degree upon completion of any of its curricula. Each department is designed to provide the education and training necessary to pre- pare students for successful living in the modern world. Students progress from the basic fundamentals of science and engineering to the highly specialized and technical fields of their choice in chem- ical engineering, civil engineering, pulp and paper technology, elec- trical engineering, mechanical engineering or engineering physics. In addition to the professional courses, students must also acquire a broad background in the humanities. Each department offers a program of study and research leading to a Masters' degree with the Chemistry Department having the College's only Ph.D. pro- gram. Offering about 175 courses, the College of Technology is rec- oginzed as one of the top colleges of its kind in the country. John W. Beamesderfer B.s., M.s., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Chemistry Ralph E. Armington B.s., M.s., Ph.D., P.E. Head of Dept. of Electrical Engineering Lyle E. Jenness B.S., M.S., P.E. Head of Dept. of Chemical Engineering Matthew McNeary B.S., M.S., P.E. Head of Dept. of Engineering Graphics Thomas H. Curry B.S., Ph.D. Dean of College of Technology Gennaro L. Goglia B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Head of Dept. of Mechanical Engineering George K. Wadlin, Jr. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., P.E. Head of Dept. of Civil Engineering Mark R. Shibles B.A., M.Ed., L.H.D., Sc.D. Dean of the College of Education Director of Summer Kenneth B. Fobes Sessioniand General B'S. Extension DWISIOT1 Assistant to the Dean of the College of Education Roland J. Carpenter B.S., M.Ed. Assistant Director of Summer Session College of Education "If a teacher is to educate he should be well educated." To maintain such a standard as this, undergraduate pro- grams in the College of Education require that each student include a substantial amount of work in the hu- manities, a concentration of academic work closely as- sociated to the area of special teaching interests, and basic professional Work in psychology, education, and modern teaching practices. The College also provides in- Frank W. Myers B.A., M.Ed. Assistant Director of Summer Session struction in professional subjects, essential to the pre- paration for teaching, to undergraduate students from other divisions of the University, and to students regis- tered With the Faculty of Graduate Study. Through the use of closed circuit television, team teaching, and group discussions, field specialists in education are training more capable teachers, administrators, and counselors. Rome E. Rankin M.A., Ph.D. Director of Physical Education and Athletics Viola K. Kleindienst B.A., B.S., M.A., Ed.D. Head of Women's Division of Physical Education Stephen Clark determines forest types and stand composition by inter- preting and measuring air photos while Edmund Dinsmore looks on. School of Forestry The School of Forestry first opened in 1903 with four students g there were 225 students in 1963. Today opportuni- ties for the individual interested in wildlife, forestry, and conservation are offered, for the school intends to provide its students with background training needed to manage and to harvest forest land and wildlife crops for present and future needs. In addition, it plans to train those who want to engage in products and businesses closely allied to for- est crops. The University Forest, a tract of 1,750 acres, is managed by the school and used extensively for field labor- atory Work and for research. A large percent of the forest land' managers and leaders in Maine today are graduates of the school here at the University. Albert D. Nutting B.S. Director of the School of Forestry '57 Lee Bingham, a graduate student, is shown doing re- search for his thesis in his major field, Plants and Soils. Franklin P. Eggert B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Dean of Graduate Study Graduate Stud Graduate study is the final period of formal academic growth entered upon by many outstanding and ambitious students. Pro- grams of study leading to the degree of Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy are of- fered by the University. The Ph.D. is awarded in the fields of American history, animal nutrition, chemical engineering, chemist- ry and general-experimental psychology. An applicant for a Master's degree must have an undergraduate major or equivalent in the proposed field for his advanced work. A thesis is required of candidates for the Masters and Ph.D. de- grees. All work for the Masters degrees must be completed in eight years 3 the Ph.D. and M.Ed. in ten years. Graduate programs in education may be carried on during the Summer Sessions. The Certificate of Advanced Study, designed for teachers and school administrators, is awarded for the comple- tion of a program of thirty hours of planned study beyond the master's degree. The professional degree of Forest Engineer is granted upon com- pletion of appropriate requirements in graduate study at the Uni- versity. 58 BEE Q P-2 1 College Is Not All Classes The last ten pages have depicted the University from Monday to Fridayg but all is not colleges and classes at Maine-spirit is a vast part of our campus, rich in tradition. The tradition of the Maine "Hello", the fresh- rgian beanie, the campus Mayor, and our mascot the Black ear. A new addition to our campus is the class gift of 1962, a statue of the Maine Black Bear, shown at the left, standing proud and fierce overlooking the Mall. Inter- nationally-known wood sculptor, J. J. Bourgault of St. Pomphile, P.Q., Canada designed the finished product- a symbol of our mascot. The twelve foot bear is carved from laminated Maine Pine and is treated for outdoor exposure so that it will last almost indefinitely. Standing in front of the Memorial Gym overlooking the Mall, the bear will play a major role in future University tradi- tions. N ow from Friday to Monday-the next section of the book depicts an important part in any campus. Maine Life is a pictorial review of the social life at the Uni- versity of Maine. ii- R Au n 4--... , 1 w - . 9 ' qgpu -in ' ' w I Y' c 'sw - A 2 ff' rg, as U ' I . u 'Zi 1 "' N I E pf Y V I., 4 YI" P . vi , 'vvxn .'?' YL I QE, 5 q I xg Q ZA ' 2 1 ' if 1 1-4 U f-l Q A V A, Vf'.,." I I it 5 A ' ' f ' '. if .fn ' h ai. . ' Ar l V P... ' H J .,g lr. X M " 1 f gg ' .. " -f - .EL 1, , ' qrsfq-sg Y ", . ,..v. 'Z , 5 Ji Q, nf..-. -'-S-R 1: ' f. A A N , ' G , fl V- ,N ' A ff. A I if 'f 4 4' P, 1 . 1 awk A a -,,- , 4- : -- v 1. ""-' 9 f " Alb' Aff ' lgrrsk, I gf 'xi 15, 2 . 1' is . 1 li I I -2 A l . hx ' 5 ' lv P Q Q ,gg-VV -1, J ,g f qi . If L. .. w'.2',' ' Aw - .-"'- -' A' . " g' " H A 'F ,-'F , . ' Y f , wif? ' , AV .' ' 3 ,-. , . Q ka: Y -- , "R V' . W fu- ,- f ' I '-41 X s -- 4 '- - ' W nr v- Q -4 L l L AMG 1 Q Q - + r Q . 1 fx 1 , . , A :yy 2 . - 0 .1 V 'W . ,4..?,' V' ,. " ' ' ' t bf- .4 .J-' Y .. P 1' :AQ l ,N -3 i .f - U ', YK V :Q E I ' If 1 + ' ' . .gum i JN ' ,, .qlzhf -qv 4 r-GA 5 0 ' b 53" -' , X Tw vw: -we-KM 1' ' I .Q Q U 1 ' 4, , 1 l , A I Q " Q by 1' 'Q . 5 . ' V ' ,gt L ' 'E ' QL' " 0 X I we ' " - ml- , ' gf? 4" .1 I X Q -f f ur ,.:' ,590-",. ,,, 3" 1 I 'Q .I-I gin' X " 21. V 5 XX I i a 592 L-1 N ': 'F Mia-5 ,, . - A D .ig K P V I ' 4 7 -., Q.. s 1 D h X055 'fi J A 'M K I 1 :-QW' ':'i.2Q'3 . Y- X - T", I 4- i 1' U 40" q'f7fE"F'E Z. . Q. 1.-5' I Q - 1 ,.. Mb 4-. , Q mb aine Life 'nr' ,P- s 'I -Qi jim 4 ' ' "9 iff? ,Q ,.'7s Q Q . Q i lqw-. I ' Q Q-.: a m W . n f' QW 5 frm -"Qs'f, .v M, 9 L - wh"-'l 1 .. A v , s f-. l.. L f"U1'F A -2 rg-AI""' A fa Q 132 5 WA 5' .-Q .- tri Z am 2 i 'u18i' 'f Lx, is 1,7 1 E ' E, . X 1 all: V 1 .V ..-'? Q - W ww . '- ' 'P wh:-an ,snap ,. J WA if 4 x as W All three candidates gave speeches at the rally on Maine Day before the voting. Char- lie Weaver took us all to Mount Idy his home town in his hilarious letter from Ma- ma. Arnold Weiss, Sir Arnold of the Square Table, fleftl is de- livering his campaign speech. With rousing p r o m i s e s Crightl, he read the points of his campaign. Mayorality Campaign .. , I , I, , A ."' Qf -,- , ., 1 L I ' ,f rf?- 1 ' DL -, Lf, 1' 4 ,A- A , .-F "' A I. I A 1 I . Ip.- v1 f W - . rl -.. u-,- i .. n' I They loved the Bunnies coming . . ' ma V ,f F The victor, Pocket-Size Play- boy Marshall Sterns, brought a new twist to the campus with his sophisticated cam- paign and lovely Bunnies. 62 - - gi 5 : , Q W g. z ,J ne, 1 . u f O Q! C - ,..,, in rl ' we ff Ted Babine with enthusiastic onlookers. Spring has come, there is an air of expectancy as everyone awaits Maine Day, and no one recognizes the campus. With Bunnies bustling around, the Den looks more like a Playboy Club than a snack bar. Everyone expects to find dragons, not books, in the library as knights are jousting on the steps, while Charlie Weaver reads a letter from Mama. But no one is amazed, for it's only the annual mayoralty campaign beginning again. And the 1963 Mayoralty campaign started with three vigorous personalities vying for the leadership of cam- pus spirit. The persuasive terms of Marshall Sterns, the Pocket- size Playboy consisted of "Bunnies"! Bunnies playing How they loved those bunnies . . polo on the mall one morning, and "swinging Bunnies" twisting at a Bunny hop on the lawn by Penobscot! Sir Arnold Weiss staged skits of the gallant knights of old as his supporters roamed the campus in resplend- ent purples and reds, bedecked with swords, but minus horses. The third candidate was Charlie Weaver, Ted Babine. Charlie took us all back to Mt. Idy as he presented his home town beauties in a bathing suit contest. The playboy captivated the heart of the campus, and Marshall Sterns was announced as our new Mayor at the Maine Day Dance. Coming or GOING! 'v' : -A .v , x Maine Da Pigs in puddles and rambling roosters, and Maine Day was no longer an exchange of textbooks for rakes and shovels. The only official campus holiday was entirely differ- ent in 1963. The May morning was chilly, but spirits were not dampened. Greased pigs, rambling rooster races, volleyball and softball games, and a mad scramble of hand- ball highlighted the morning. At noon the drizzling rain forced the gigantic barbeque indoors as the newly elected campus mayor, Marshall Sterns, made his first official ap- pearance in the gym. The picnic ended with an informal jam session carrying on the spirit of Maine Day . . . FUN! Lovely ladies in a greased pig contest. WTF T gfii 1 l ,J i 39 i i Ya! 7 -"A+ v- 444 Jig. -g4J At the dance in the Gym after the annual IFC Sing, the students cast the ballots to elect our campus may- or. Delta Tau Won the Sing for the second consecutive year last spring. Hats, hot dogs, and games fleftb kept the spirits high through the drizzling rain. Everyone participated in the games. The new Skulls, announced at IFC Sing, helped boost the spirit at the faculty-student baseball game Crightj and the Eagles and owls directed the volleyball schuffle fbottomj. Q lr .fi f TA' 934451- N' as fee Zplgxiinks Homecoming Pleasant memories of Homecoming 1963 will live on in the hearts of the largest crowd ever to gather at the University, for it was on October 19 that former President John Kennedy visited our campus. Everything about the Warm, sunny day was excep- tional as, amidst a crowd of 15,000 cheering alum- ni and students, the former President delivered his speech, parts of which are reproduced on the next page. Dr. Elliott conferred upon him the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws after which former Pres- ident Kennedy enthusiastically joined in singing the Stein Song. Another celebrity on campus was Nancy Shaw chosen Homecoming Queen Friday night at the annual dance. Also Friday evening the Hauck Audi- torium Was dedicated "to the new urgency of learn- ing" in a memorable ceremony. , Y L l Martie McHale, Tom Baron, and Ted Babine amusing the crowds at the rally Friday night. ,Jr The lovely contestants for Homecoming Queen. Standing: Suzanne Young, Nancy Shaw, Jan Churchill: Kneeling: Jackie Beck, Linda Breed. Presidential Address Uln the year 1715, King George I of England do- nated a valuable library to Cambridge University- and, at very nearly the same time, had occasion to dispatch a regiment to Oxford. The King, remarked one famous wit, had judiciously observed the con- dition of both his Universities - one was learned body in need of loyalty and the other was a loyal body in need of learning. "Today some observers may feel that very little has changed in two centuries and a half. Critics of our modern universities have often accused them of producing either too little loyalty or too little learning. But I cannot agree with either charge. I am con- vinced that our universities are an invaluable nation- al asset which must be conserved and expanded. I am deeply honored by the degree you have awarded me today - and I think it is appropriate that I speak at this University, noted for both loyalty and learning, on the need for a more exact understanding of the true correlation of forces in the conduct of foreign affairs." "A year ago it would have been easy to assume that all-out war was inevitable - that any agree- ment with the Soviets was impossible - and that an unlimited arms race was unavoidable. Today it is equally easy for some to assume that the Cold War is over - that all outstanding issues between the Soviets and ourselves can be quickly and satisfactori- ly settled - and that we shall now have, in the words of the Psalmist, an 'abundance of peace so long as the moon endurethf "The fact of the matter is, of course, that neither view is correct. We have, it is true, made slight progress on a long journey. We have achieved new opportunities which we cannot afford to waste. We have concluded with the Soviets a few limited, en- forceable agreements or arrangements of mutual ben- efit to both sides and the world While the road to that peace. is long and hard, and full of traps and pitfalls, that is no reason not to take each step We can safely take For without our making such an effort, we could not maintain the leadership and respect of the Free World. "Historians report that in 1914, with most of the world already plunged in war, Prince Bulow, the for- mer German Chancellor, said to the then Chancel- lor Bethmann-Hollweg: 'How did it all happen ?' And Bethmann-Hollweg replied: 'Ah, if only one knew! My fellow Americans, if this planet is ever ravaged by nuclear war - if 300 million Americans, Russians and Europeans are wiped out by a 60 minute nuclear exchange - if the pitiable survivors of that devasta- tion can the endure the ensuing fire, poison, chaos and catastrophe - I do not want one of those survivors to ask another 'How did it all happen?'g and to receive the incredible reply: 'Ah, if only one knewf "Therefore, while maintaining our readiness for war, let us exhaust every avenue of peace. Let us al- ways make clear both our willingness to talk, if talk will help, and our readiness to fight, if fight we must And it is in that spirit - the spirit of both preparedness and peace -- that this Nation today is stronger than ever before - strengthened by both the increased power of our defenses and our increased efforts for peace And in the months and years ahead, we intend to build both kinds of strength - during times of detente as well as tension, during periods of conflict as well as cooperation - until the world we pass on to our children is truly safe for diversity and the rule of law covers all." The crowds lingered on after the Presidential address to watch the Black Bears fight the U-Conn Huskies on the gridiron in 800 temperatures. -Jil From morning until night, Homecoming was a busy week- end. Saturday morning the judging of the displays was held. Highest honors were given to Phi Gam fleftl for the fra- ternities, Hart Hall for women's dorms, and Cumberland for Men's. X ,,, ..:-.-.:, .ef -, J.-1. ,- ..i A. Y. 4I:i,ii:1i ze . ' s 1 .f -.15-i 4 The cheerleaders, All-Maine Wo- men, Skulls, Eagles and Owls led the enthusiastic crowd to one of our best rallies. A new touch to the Homecoming week- end was the fireworks display held later that night. 519 G Z7 5+ i fi 'innfu 1 I .1 O f I 1? Q3 , It . 1 . Q3 . fi l ip, 4 ! I I EIT," FT' .-'., f jg "' V 'mi ,,..f-' ' "'-44 1, J' E ', ., .-'.W.M'? 1 sk' ,H-3' -f ' . 1 1 V an P. ' " ' .1 f ff A , V , 4. ' , E ' . iw' 2, Wi Jl.'C'v.'Pfgg11.-' Q IQ Snowtime pranks began Winter Carnival Weekend: Barb Bickmore threa- tens Al Leathers, and the other candidates for King and Queen look on. Left to right are Al and Barbg top row, Janet Lavoie, Jane Budd and Phyllis Mayo, bottom row, Doug Hutchins, Ken Poole, and Paul Sherburne. I. Internatio ,ll II, - 2 5. ' l 'Ill lm Im 1 " Ill ll' HPI lr ll nil ll , Mr ' WAT EBYSWKXWQSKX. b Q' QQQVLT ':.NN2As l I A broom bowl, pictured above on the next page, between the history and government ma- jors and faculty began the weeke'nd's activi- ties on Friday afternoon. Everyone worked in- dustriously on the s'noW sculptures. Some of the prize winning sculptures pictured- above are Gannett Hall's "The Cold War", first prize in Men's dormitories, Alpha Gamma Rho's "Beatles, Beethoven, and Basie", honorable mention for the fraternitiesg and Delta Tau Delta's "International Puppet Show", first prize for the fraternities. Shown left are the horse and sleigh carrying students to the events held Saturday morning on the hill be- tween Sigma Nu and the hockey rink. 11 xvg ,- N-4 C'- .-A as 15' Bnowtime Friday night a fireworks display near the gym sig- nalled the beginning of the Winter Carnival Ball which featured Les Nadeau and his orchestra. During inter- missio'n Phyllis Mayo and Al Leathers were crowned Queen and Kina' to reiszn over the weekend. Saturday morning a band, shown below, roused the students for the Snow Events, the feature of the Winter carnival. The events included a three-legged snowshoe race, a progressive toboggan pull, a tug of War, and saucer races, participated in by couples. There was a bon- fire at the rink and hot cocoa was served to the partici- pants in the games and to the spectators. .-T6 -U ix A J fifff ac jm-1IPg,g. ,. A 'J . ' -.Le , ,N . N N-N122 1. - -1 Q. ,J 71 -S 1., Q 4 I Saturday afternoon of Winter Carnival Week- end was particularly exciting as the campus swung "Around the World with Basie". Inter- nationally famous, Count Basie and his band pro- vided entertainment jazz-style. The Well-renowned band was enthusiastically received as it played before a jam-packed audience in the Memorial Gymnasium. It was "From the Alpines to the Brandywines' as the folksong group entertained Sunday af- ternoon for the second consecutive Winter Carni- val. Originating at the University of New Hamp- shire, and formerly known as the Tradewinds, the group has appeared at colleges and universi- ties along the East coast and was featured on ABC-TV's Hootenanny. Congratulations to the Winter Carnival Com- mittee and the faculty advisor, Prof. William Sezak, Whose diligent Work and careful planning made the whole Weekend a success. The heads of the various committees were Ken Poole, Les Bar- ry, Ernie Jackson, Wayne Johnson, Hank Sch- melzer, Katy Wyman, Sue Keene, Jackie Fourni- er, Jake Jakubowycz, Kathy Gould, Jan Churchill, Sa'ndy Willis, Barb Bickmore, Paul Sullivan, Heather Cameron, Richard Larrabee, Barbara Rider, Steve Cowerthwaite, Dave Simard, and Gin- ny Hilyard. "f :if lf - '- Kam 1 I ,-1,-,i-1 Q w,. C- 2, ,,i 'Q : - 1 f ' If Xfginta"Cg:niva1'Qu an 1' 1 41'-J it gif . ng 'fx '5 ' JT .il J. WWNII. Q If -you I I 6 ' -f fs ,YQ 1 . ' 1 H Q A, K ' i I S B A C i 9 . N. O I Q I A I . I 3 I 4 1 u. 'H lf. a,n 0 1-H' .5-I YQ ft' I f M M-ligg .-""" df nl""N -I-X. W -..ni gs., YY? 's xx, X 1 C A ' 'W 1vf,,U Q X X xg? .L 3 Q fi "MW-s is -34 NS x Honorary Cadet Colonel San- na Crossley is shown left with Captain Poole, the new Queen Jayne Wareing, and President Elliott. Cadet Jurgenson presents Kar- ol Wasylyshyn through the arch of Swords Crightj. et Forrest presents Honorary Cadet Honorary Cadet Heather Cameron ol Snyder through the arch of swords shown here with Cadet Ken Poole. re the ball. 75 Y R L 1 .?i""7' rv- -V . ,,, Q ai f if ,N 1 ui .1 5 K 'fa .- 31 9 I .:... 1 I M11 , Ba11'QueeIgk 1 U 1 ' ' 5 I ' , 44:' f I ' ' x , 1' -naw 5 f wwf If ':'-: s vi. --4 'T l gl 17 ,l SHT' n A wv . 1 - 3 .A.'. : sf' ' - .-5 an 9 A ' T-- 'r . : . - -+'- .ip ' 5 -' ' i ,. - '-.' ' , Q., -. s I-31 fr .vw if -ke Q A . u K, 5934. 'ff v,, -'Q-.'f+.Q 1 ff ., " . I . ' . .-1z-- -Ure . ' . 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I i .73 ent ofqtlie Seni 3 ' " " Paul Sheyburqg Mr rf r -Q, , 'A I f 'am 57. f.- -,W 4 X, ,3.sxe . ,,..1" Marg.: .,,. - X.. Mfzfift ', ' A 1 I A . W.: i 11 . Wx A1 I m 111 Q '31 ,J in C' X ' rt I Y Q I . 1' X ' 4 ' . nk--Q Kagan? ' if wx.--.zi is - . ,lv 4 - O- R 4 -a .'... My 1 I I X ,WL 1 -.. - fn ' x I L ' cw f ll , :Q :mi an - ' '1 A I r ,' 2. J "HL:- .- b .k. ' ' : V :, 'VUE' I A by . my I ,f F . Z", Ve?" V.: .iv ,J 1 4, 'LK' B LJ 7' V "1 f v' ' 'IWTT f ' Pggessidelit 0 i the L: gg W xCyr 'N' 'X I AA Q, 1 Ex 1 1 , ' vm J 'fi J .5-. -T1 IT I 4 F i 1 F ,I v a . 5 nl i , N ' 1 1 Q 9 1 X W fa N Q1 2' A lj I gg W F E, ' e mf 1 u I sl V ' i W 4 1 P 5 M 4 4 'V ll G I ,mg 5 I 4 LL-2 Avg 1 1 , ' 'W 1l' I H mr A vu 3 , 1 - r if , Vi ,. A. . ft-W, 'f A V i V .y ip r ,. u 1,-2,-'L V ,bi 'X f ' f F R '22 7:71 1 - L T Txul' X ' I 1 , Am ., 'Y : , 1 I A L ' N ' '4 TR w .L , ' , .- A s l 1 . - ' -' 4 I L 'f I A F .V vt- -5, - y A'.'-fx , 'V zlz 4 if V r ' , ai. 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' .1 , 'P ZH- 4 I I, , . 29 Q ax, , r Li ef fxy? Z, ,, ,, :'fg,. Wg' X nm.. - - -. .Q x Q-at Simi' M . 1 0 JE! W 'Vs n" I v - 1 1 w I 4 '-. Q Fa J N 4 I 1- M , . 4 V ,Q ? .1 ....g- 141 'J ' gf ii , ,S ,T, ' , N .V 1, e +- I -W 2 IP 1 1 I 21 2, ffg if Vg A H -w 1 1. an vw r. w, "TF 521394 ne?" R . ,Qs ...b V., .fl 'I kit. x i ,. W V e 1 "-'FQ 1.7-Q ,K z '- ,,q.+..L..,,, . ', N .F - N es- , fp -4' .Q ww: E! President of Rgbert- ChaQWQQk -5 .1-'L We vs ,gm -ea -4 ,ml E?-E::""""' I-11" lil?- nsm- -""'- --1-H+ -2-1 I ' ' .ini 'qnm11li..,4'f'1 i - I 1 ' --'-i s in 1 llil 5?--':""-2"-"5'f'5"-'5'5-:1-E-E Il-'.?S'-1'-1n'I'-I-Hn'.I-'H-'-L--1 Standing: Mary Brooks, Sue Keene, Elsa Ilvoneng Seated: Jackie Baldwin, Mary Goucher, Barbara Hinkson, Mary Day, Nancy Poole. Senior Skulls Founded in 1907, the Senior Skull So- ciety is an honorary society whose mem- bers are selected on the basis of charact- er, scholarship, popularity and participa- tion in extracurricular activities. The tap- ping of new Skulls occurs in the spring of each year at the Interfraternity Sing. The Skulls endeavor to perpetuate traditional customs, to promote friendly relations among students, administration and facul- ty, and to propagate the Maine Spirit. Membership in the society is recognized as the highest non-academic honor for Uni- versity of Maine Men. All Maine Women The All-Maine Women, founded in 1925, is the Highest non-scholastic honor a girl can re- ceive at the University of Maine. Each spring about ten junior girls are tapped to serve as members for the ensuing year. Selection is bas- ed on character, scholarship, leadership, digni- ty and service to the University. Their primary purpose is that of promoting and maintaining ideals, standards, and traditions of the Uni- versity. The activities of the All-Maine Wo- men include assisting with the orientation of freshmen and transfer women in the fall, spon- soring a Transfer Coffee, Homecoming Dance and Coffee with the Senior Skulls, assisting with Parents' Day, Commencement and other similar University functions. First row: Ken Lane, Bob Chadwick, Judd Evans, Second row: Al Le ers, Larry Emery, Jerry Ellis, Paul Sherburne, Ted Sherwoodg Third r Clem McGillicuddy, Ken Poole. A .A Seated, front row: Elaine Frost, Pat Tofuri, Carol Jesraly, Sherry Grace, Linda Barstow, Bonnie Hetzel. Second row: Jo Greenhalgh, Becky Gordon, Penny Lynch, Linda DeLorme. Third row. Anita Auclair, Kim Waddell, Barbie Barth. Standing left to right: Carol Coakley, Sue Rice, Fran Hibbard, Nancy Erickson, Lee Cheetham, Pat Wood, Carla Tukey. Sophomore Owls The Sophomore Owl organization, estab- lished in 1910, is the highest non-scholastic honor awarded a sophomore male student at the University. The group, endeavoring to retain the standards and objectives set by the first Owl Society, hold weekly meetings in order to co-ordinate campus activities more efficiently. The Owls work closely with the Skulls, All-Maine Women, and their sister or- ganization, the Sophomore Eagles to promote Maine Spirit, explain University rules, and help freshmen adapt to college life. Readily identified by the black dot worn on their fore- heads, the Owls will continue in the spirit of the first Owl Society, "to advise, to assist, to administer." ,i..-.1- Sophomore Eagles The Sophomore Eagles Society, founded in 1926, is the highest non-scholastic honor awarded at the University to sophomore wo- men. As big sisters, they help the freshman women in adjusting to college life. The Eagles also aid the administration with Freshman Orientation Week, Parents' Day, and other similar functions. Each spring, twenty mem- bers of the freshman class are selected on the basis of creditable scholarship, moral stand- ing, and participation in campus activities. First row: Tom Foley, Jim Maynard, Peter Paiton, Chip Cyr. Sec ond row: Mike McKeen, Sarge Means, Dale Worthen, Bruce Cary Skip Thayer. Third row: Paul Sullivan. Fourth row: Floyd Horn Bob Kocsmiersky, Lester Fisher, Mike Skaling, Charles Bonney. 87 Student Governing Boards M, ,1- 3.'tit'iL' T Panhellenic Council The president plus a junior and senior delegate from each of the eight sororities comprise the Panhellenic Coun- cil. Advised by Dean Zink, the Councillis the governing body for the sororities on campus. In the fall it provides each rushee with a copy of the Rushee Handbook, which helps to acquaint her with the sororities on campus. In conjunction with the Inter-Fraternity Council, the Council sponsors Greek Weekend, during which the Panhellenic Sing is a noted attraction. At the spring assembly it awards a Scholarship Plate to the sorority which has achieved the highest accumulative average for the academic year. Seated: Barry Beadyg Dave Richardson, Sec.-Treas.g Brad Jenkins, Pres.: Craig Milne, V. Pres.: George Morton, Wendell Blanchard. Standing: Ken Lane: Bob Hardisong Stan Roberts: Larry Woodworth: Daniel Gilbert. 88 Kneeling: Glenna Co norsg Barbara Waters Tina Vermetteg Barbar Day. Seated: Peggie D raps, Nancy Poole, Ja Churchill, Treasg Mar Holmes, V. Pres: Helen Nardino, Pres: Sand Willis, Sec: Jane Tom kinsg Jackie Gauthie Standing: Helen Bloom Sandy Farrar, Kat Crowley: Susan Keene Sue O'Donnellg Mar Brooks: Linda Moranc Judy Moses: Karen Da boryg Doris Stewart. Inter-Fraternity Council The I.F.C., composed of the president of ea of the sixteen fraternities on campus, is respo sible for establishing the rules governing frate nity life at Maine. Each fall the Council sponso a Muscular Dystrophy drive. During the sprin the Council awards trophies to the fraterniti attaining the highest scholastic average and a cumulating the greatest number of points in i tramural activities: sponsors the I.F.C. sing, noted attraction of Maine Day, and in conjun tion with the Panhellenic Council, sponsors Gre Weekend. M'g5 Row 1: Marvin Glazierg Roberta Billsg Nancy Jewell, Mary Kate Foote, Fred Wilesg Jane Labbeg Georgeanne Ellis, Debbie Burr. Row 2: Jim Scroggyg Bob Hammondg John Daw- song Errol Briggs, Richard Glidden, Dave General Student Senate The purpose of the General Stu- dent Senate is to serve as an over- all student governing body. It acts as a liason between the stu- dent body and the administration and supervises all student activi- ties on campus. While doing these things, the Senate promotes and maintains the interests of the Uni- versity, and by regular meetings, which are open to the entire stu- dent body, the Senate serves as a common ground for the develop- ment of intelligent student opin- ion. Rumphledtg Mark Scott: Arthur Bearceg Stan Sloang Mike Striarerg Benson Caswell, Peter Culley: Scott Lewis. Row 3: Peter Cloughg Mike Turnerg Ernie Jacksong Conrad Berth- aiume. Seated: Karol Wasylyshyn, Secretary, Ted Sherwood, President, Parker Denaco, Vice-Pres., Pam Nelson, Treasurer, Mr. Hakola, Advisor, Stan Sl0a'n, Ernie Jackson, Arnold Weiss. 89 ij 1 Q- Associated Women Students The Associated Women Students is the Women's student government on campus. From the Executive Board spring all the various branch boards of A.W.S.-Standards, Activities, Judicial. The overall program is carried out through the house councils in the dormitories. The A.W.S. Constitu- tion and the privileges and regulations for women students are published annually in the Maine Handbook. Some of the activities of A.W.S. in- clude Woman's Week, the Last Lecture series, and Spring Assembly. JUDICIAL BOARD S e a t e d: Barbara Law- renceg Carla Tukeyg Ca- - milla Gueretteg Wendy Buckleyg Barbara Hink- song B a r b a 1- a Watersg Barbara Rider. Standing: Joyce Ring, Kate Crowley. EXECUTIVE BOARD Seated: Patti Tofuri, Sec.g Heather C a m e r o n, 2nd Vice Pres.g Mary Goucher, Pres.g N a n c y Troland, T r e a s .5 Miss Elizabeth Wilson, Advisory Jacque- line Towle, Standards. Standing: Wendy Buck- leyg Sue Healyg Sandy Willisg Diane Dunlap 5 Mary Brooksg Stephanie Barry, Publicityg Barba- ra Hinkson, Chief Justice. J Gig' i . -, r' .A , fi I- 1- r'l.., r 90 Seated: Brian McDennett, Robert Perkin, John James, burne, Darryl Lamson, Edsel Spenser, Robert Leso, Neal Wendell Tremblay, John Erskine, Paul Aldrich, Michael Haee, Robert Battese, Richard Parker, Avard Walker, Graham, Franklin Witter, advisor. Standing: Russell Sher- Doug Cooney. Circle K Club Sponsored by the Kiwanis Club, Circle K is first and foremost a serv- ice organization. In its third year at the University, Circle K is taking an active part in campus life and com- munity affairs, lending a helping hand during freshman orientation, Homecoming Weekend, and Parents Day, hosting at many University func- tions, and raising and donating funds to local charities as well as assisting them in their activities. The local club plays a key role in the New England District of Circle K, publishing the dis- trict bulletin and having two mem- bers serve on the New England Board. OFFICERS: Wendell Tremblay, President, John Erskine, Vice-President, Paul Aldrich Treasurerg John James, Secretary. 9l ,, . , i ii? 5521 ir, Y Row 1: Tom Keller, Ellen Bracket, Ann Fifield, Jon Carrier, kanen, Nancy Curtis, Martha Hunt, Joan'Co-nnelly, Ann Leger, Mary Lou Waggleg Row 2: John Penler, Jane Labbe, Keith Janet Viger, Sue McGrath, Ruth Brewer, Pat Ellwell, Lee Hig- Helmer, Judy Anderson, Pat Garland, Gordon Bruce, Dick Kaplin, gons, Mary Willard, Sue Koch, Claire Joyce, Winston Robbins. Wendy Culekeyg Row 3: Mike Keller, Kathy O'Keefe. Carol Kar- Memorial Union Activities Board The Memorial Union functions with two boards. The Governing Board, composed of representatives of the faculty, administration and student body, defines the policies, and is responsible for the operation of the Memorial Union. The Activities Board, composed of students, is responsible for the program and activities of the activity committees. This board includes the officers of the Union plus the chairmen of the Dance, Games and Tournaments, House, Movie, Music, Special Events, and Publicity Committees. A college union is a university organization whose objective is to provide a general community center and an out-of-class educa- tional program for the campus which is social, cultural, and recreational. Seated: Mrs. Barushok, Advisorg Linda Morancy, Treasurer, Bob Chad- wick, President, Ency Whitehill, Secretary, Standing: Bob Dumaisg Barry Klienburg, Vice- Presidentg Pat Carlin. t Muab Governing Council: Dr. Wooley, Mr. Jones, Linda Standing: Mr. Harmon, Barry Kleinburg, Pat Carlin, Morancy, Bob Chadwick, Ency Whitehill, Mr. McNeary. Bob Durnais, Parker Denaco. Off Campus Women The OCWO provides op- portunities for women liv- ing off campus to actively participate in various activ- ities with women students living on campus. During the year the organization scheduled many events and held the annual get-togeth- er pizza party in the fall. The OCWO takes an active part in the Good Will Chest Drive and presents Queen candidates for Hornecom- ing, Calico Ball, and the Military Ball. Jane Wareing, Corresponding Secretaryg Ann Sheehan, Recording Secretaryg Eleanor Murray, Vice Presidentg Georgianna Ellis, Treasurerg Roberta Fowler, President. 93 'E Q7 Seated: Virginia Bellin- gerg Gail Kellyg Pat Coffmang Carol Smithg Monique Plante. Standing: Margaret Snowy Betsy Hallg Patri- cia Fellows. House Presidents The presidents of upperclass women's dormitories are seniors, chosen in the spring for the coming year by the residents in those dormitories. Vg, .. ,l 51 niiilvg - '1- "1 H iliqigf Head Residents lst row: Mrs. Ingraham fCumberlandJ, Mrs. Hash- ey fSouth Estabrookl, Mrs. Bark CStodderJ, Mrs. V. Oberg' CGannettl, Mrs. Tomlinson CPenobscotJ Mrs. Graham CColvinJ, Mrs. Smith fChadbournel Standing: Mrs. Spenser, fAroostookJ, Miss Jane Han- nan Cgraduate assistant-Hartl, Miss Sandra Shaw Uzraduate assistant-Yorkj, Mrs. Lucas fKennebecJ, Mrs. Warren fHartJ, Mrs. Lovely iAndroscogginl. Junior Residents- 'ii -i, Seated: Merry Ring, Martha Beaudoin, Janice Bonnie Adams, Camilla Guerette, Nancy Libby, Adri- Churchill, Sandy Moores, Sally Day, Jean Woods, anne Christakos. Jackie Beck. Standing: Crystal Mayo, JoAnn Hull, Selected- on the bases of scholarship, integrity and leadership, Residents aid freshman women in becoming adjusted to college life. The residents are assigned to individual dormitories, and act as a liaison between students and administration. Senior Residents fifli . i q 2 Seated: Carol Mboria, Sandy Cole, Claire Caron, Harriet Kate Crowley, Elso Anderson, Joan Cluny, Betty Cote Epstein, Barbara Lawrence. Donna Blake, Laura Hubbard. Nancy Bradstreet, Eileen March. Standing: Carolyn Devoe, Pat Greene, Dottie Thompson, 95 Resident Counselors ll' 1 " 'Y l 'FET ll' lliflui '- Ilazgn li.l li: :il i I 8 I , m, 9 .-Eff' . A , , - "-fe' DUNN COUNSELORS: Win Fei-nald, Don Quigley, Bob Ray, Charles Little, Pete Pullen, Ron Dearbourne, Ron Bowie, Charlie Hill. The resident counselor system forms an important link ors give aid in the administration of dorm business, and i'n the chain of command that begins with the individual give individual counselling and guidance to men in their student and reaches the Dean of Men's office. Counsel- sections. We 1 ll l l Y- 1 9 l est' E CHADBOURNE 8: ESTABROOKE RESIDENTS: Seated: Larry Peter Duncan, John Gilbert. Standing: Thomas Cole, Ken Ste- Emery, John Heath, Dave Libby, Conrad Bernier, Gary Norton, wart, Ralph Johnson, Matthew McNeary. 96 GANNETT COUNSELORS Seated: Lauren Kidd, Bob Jordan, Eric Stowe, Bob McCluskey, Daniel Woodman, Bill Brooks Standing: Jer- ry Shay, Steve Melgarde, Gary Tib- betts, Dick Robinson, Dale Worthen CUMBERLAND COUNSELORS Seated: David Trubeeg Frank Van Antwerpeng Owen Wellsg Joseph Wes- ton. Standing: Craig Deaking Newell Weston. Resident Counselors 5 . l l l l AROOSTOOK COUNSELORS Seated: Mike Skaling, Paul Sher- burne, Phillip Brown, Terry Holmes, Paul Berry. Standing: David Hemmingway, David Record, Steve Drotter, Stephen Abramson. CORBETT COUNSELORS e ted Al Zinnerman Dou Hutchins Don Sorrey, T S a : , g , Charles Wallace. Standing: Craig Hannon, Ken Vail lancourt, Dan Sorrie, Bob Elsik, Mike Desisto. CENTRAL DORM COUNCIL Seated: Bruce Glasier, Jim Foote, Ray- mond Roberts, Gary Sawyer, Jay Smith, Richard Cook, Winston Robbins. Stand- ing: George Jones, Russ Peterson, Peter Rutherford, Norman Viger. 419 - XJQDKM Phi Beta Kappa Barbara Lawrence, and Betty Cote are the two members of Phi Beta Kappa the honor society of the College of Arts and Sciences. Established' at Maine in 1923, Phi Beta Kappa recognizes attain- ment and promise in the academic field by selecting for mem- bership undergraduates whose accumulative point averages are not lower than 3.0 after completing five or more semesters of college Work or 3.3 after completing less than five semesters. n-"1 . s r 1 1 Q5 I 99 Honor Societies Neai Mathetai Neai Mathetai, which means "young- Scholar", was established in 1925 and pro- poses to promote a higher standard of learn i'n g and to encourage scholastic achievement among freshman women. The ten top-ranking freshman women, select- ed on the basis of their scholastic record for the fall semester, are tapped each spring. Row 1: Jerraldine Batchelder, Ann Cath-cart, Joline Ridlon. Row 2: Shan Gillespi, Francis- Hib- bard, Mary McDonald, Jill Guignon, Mimie Vin- cent. Pi Kappa Delta The purpose of Pi Kappa Delta, the national forensic honorary society, is to promote an interest in inter- collegiate oratory, debate, and public speaking. The activities of Pi Kappa Delta include co-sponsorship of the Maine High School Debate Tourna- ment and Clinic. The members of the society also participated in the Brand- eis University Invitational Debate Tournament, the Central Connecticut State College Tournament, and the University of Vermont Invitational Debate Tournament. Row 1: Danial Lilley, Kathy Anecette, Bev- erly Huntley, Sharon Jenkins, Stewart Rich, John Goode, Janice Churchill, Ted Sherwood, Howard Cote. Row 2: Wayne Johnson Ver- mim Avey, Don Quigley, Stan Sloan, Royce F ood. Honor Societies Mu Alpha Epsilon .12 l Alpha Zeta Alpha Zeta is an honorary fra- ternity in the College of Agricul- ture. Members are. selected from all agricultural departments ex- cept the schools of forestry and home economics. Alpha Zeta's ob- jectives are to further the agricul- tural profession, to promote scho- lastic achievement, and to develop character and fellowship among its members. The fraternity works closely with the dean and has been exceedingly active throughout the year. Seated: Peter Young, treasurer, James Rudbeck, vice-president, Daniel Woodman, chroniclerg Raymond Vermette, president, Gorden Towle, secretaryg Robert Murgitag Dennis Smithg advisors Prof. Jewett and Prof. Hutchinson. Standing: George Morse, Michael Sawyer, James Sargeant, Donald Kinerson, Amos Gay, Kenneth Vaillencourt Mu Alpha Epsilon, the University's ho'no1 ary music society, was established on camp twenty-one years ago. Its members are selec ed from those with high interest and achiev ment in music, instrumentally and vocally. Th organization sponsors Christmas Vespers an Pops Concert and works in conjunction witl the Concert Committee in adminstering th University Concert Series program. The aim are to promote and maintain a high standar of musical achievement here at the Universi It is directed by I-Ierrold Headley, head of t music department. Seated: Joyce Ring, Clair Caron, Pamela Trojano Jill Olson, sec.g Standing: Robert Miller, preside David Jowett, William Dockstader, Herrold Headl advisor Mr. Philip Nesbit. WL' 0, i all " Q' 'A 5 Xi Sigma Pi Xi Sigma Pi is a national fore" fraternity founded in 1908 as a local ty at the University of Washington and tionalized in 1915. Gamma Chapter was lished in 1917 here at the University of The objectives of Xi Sigma Pi are to and maintain a high level of forestry education, to work for the of forestry, and to promote fraternal among earnest workers engaged in activities. Gamma Chapter sponsors the nual Christmas Tree Sale and the Annual estry-Wildlife Banquet. Row 1: Bob August, Neil Hansen, Tim LaFarge, rector Nuttingg Row 2: Tom Newman, Dave Dan Schroeder, Carl Forrest, Bart Harvey, Prof. r er, Row 3: John Lane, Gary Richardson, Dr. C coran, Dr. Griffin, Pete Allen. Eta Kappa Nu Eta Kappa Nu IS the national electrical en- honor society which promotes fra ielations among electrical engineers the country. This organization at- to impiove the standards of the pro in the institutions where chapters are It also assists members to become engineers and better citizens. : William Stinson, Dennis Hurlburt, William Prof. Turner, Robert Carlson, and Al Hun- Row 2: A1 Wilkinson, Raymond Desjardins, Davis, and Warren Prince. ll r.., Tau Beta Pi Tau Beta Phi is the National Honor Society ich has recognized high achievement shown by udents in the College of Technology, for one ndred years. Students are elected on the basis outstanding character, integrity, scholarship, d professional attitudes. Ladies are not eligi- to become members, but are frequently award- a special badge. Tau Beta Pi serves the Uni- rsity by offering a tutoring service to fresh- 'n w 1: Bruce Alpert, Cliff Ouelette, Ray Baum, Richard vidson, John Fenton. Row 2: Bradford Hilton, Robert ckmore, Robert Carlson, Dennis Hulbert. Row 3: Donald ss, Alan Hall, Robert Fisher, Gregory Campbell, Wil- Stinson, Martin Sclair. Row 4: Gordon MacKenzie, uricg Caron, Blaine Davis, Raymond Desjardin, John war . 49 'A 313: ..., I I.,-1 I Phi Kappa Ph1 Established in 1900, Phi Kappa Phi recognizes attainment and promise of those students whose accumulative point averages are not lower than 3.0 after complet- ing five or more semesters or 3.3 after less than five semesters. The society is open to all undergradu- ates, and was founded at the Uni- versity of Maine. Seated: Barbara Lawrence, Robert Foss, Pauline Turcotte, Elsa Anderson, Dana Bullen, Joyce Ring, Dorothy Bradford, Bruce Albert, Myrna Stanley, and Gor- don MacKenzie. Standing: Lynn Green- haugh, Peter Pullen, Allan Hall, John Sutherland, Ray Desjardins, and .Blaine Davis. lOl Sigma Mu Sigma Sigma Mu Sigma is the honorary psychology so- ciety founded' at the University of Maine in 1928. This society has the double purpose of arousing and maintaining an active interest in the field of psychology. The activities of Sigma Mu Sigma in- clude monthly meetings, lectures and the annual Sig- ma Mu Sigma Banquet. Special projects for the year are the Bangor State Hospital Proj ect, the Pine- land Project, and the Retarded Children's Christmas Party. Scholarships presented annually by Sigma Mu Sigma are the Charles Alexius Dickinson Psychology Award and the Dr. Coulton Award. lst row: Myrna Stanley, Lynn Greenhalgh, Carol Bishop, Diane Hayden. 2nd row: Jill Olson, Franklin Ward, Kate Crowley, Barbara Lawrence. Sigma Pi Sigma Sigma Pi Sigma is a national physics honor society founded to stimulate interest in phy- sics among college students. The chapter at Maine was established in 1949 and currently has 29 active members. Membership in the society is offered to students having high scholarship and showing promise of achieve- ment i'n physics. Dr. Gerald S. Harmon serves as advisor to the group which sponsors pro- grams of technical interest throughout the year. First row: Nancy Clement, William Wilyer, Fred New- man, Matthew Mcneary. Second row: Bob James, Bruce Alpert, Mrs. Margaret Wilyer, Robert Foss. Third row: Dan Lawrence, Edward Hoar, Ted Laut- zenhiser, Winfield Fernald. Fourth row: Al Hall, Jim Kelley, Bob Anderson, Jack Richardson. 1P' Fi Kappa Delta Pi Kappa Delta Pi is the honorary society of the College of Education comparable to Phi Beta Kappa of the College of Arts and Sciences. Education majors in their junior and senior years who have taken at least six credit hours of education courses and who have maintained the minimum required point aver- age are eligible for membership. Seated, lst row: Dana Bullen, Nancy Bradstreet, John Sutherland CPres.J, Peter Pullen, Pauline Turcotte, Linda Singer. Standing, 2nd row: Beverly Watson, Linda McClaine, Chris Mayo, Sally Archer, Judy Rich. 3rd row: MaryAnn Mastroluca, Pat Morse, Bonnie Masterman, Carol Bishop, Peggy Galloupe. 4th row: Dottie Thompson, Nancy Steputis, Ron DeLaite, Claire Caldwell, Katty Wyman. lO2. Religion Newman Club The Newman Club is the organiza- tion for Catholics on the secular cam- pus. It provides its members with opportunities to develop the spiritual educational and social outlook of ma- ture, intelligent Catholics who are in time with the finest traditions of their faith and culture. Left to right: Bruce Kemelgor, Pres-identg Estafaye Slossberg, 2nd Vice-Presidentg Patricia Brenner, Secretary-Treasurerg Richard Kaplan, lst Vice-President. Episcopal Executive Board The Executive Board of the Episcopal C h ur c h is the Episcopalian religious group on campus. Students and faculty participate in the varied programs of re- likious and social events at regular meet- ings. The members participate in the Altar Guild and Acolyte Guild. The board is under the guidance of Father Theodore Lewis and Father Alvin Burn- worth. Seated: Sue McCleer, Mary Thomas, Sarah Don- avan, Donna Blake, Standing: Philip Jacobs, Dave Peterson, Father Theodore Lewis, Craig Deakin, Robert James. IO3 Sitting: Greg Foster, Cor. Sec., Peggy Haley, Treas.3 Ron Cole, Pres., Georgeann Guidxnore, Historian, Steve York, Rec. Sec.g Standing: Claudette Ouellette, Soc. Chmn.g Nancy O'Marag Shirley Eliasg Fr. Cormier, Ass't. Chaplain, Terry Carroll, Educ. Chinn., Florence LeClair, Publicity Chinn. Hillel Foundation Hillel Foundation is the Jewish Commun- ity on campus, organized' to preserve Jew- ish religious and cultural values, encour- age creative Jewish life, and train students for community leadership. Hillel, under the direction of Dr. Eliot Epstein, provides holiday a'nd festival serv- ices in addition to regular weekly services, a speaker-supper program, and an oppor- tunity to meet Jewish students on campus and at other colleges and universities. IF Li ii Q17 Seated: Dale Worthen, sec.-treas., Sandy Moores, president, Allan Arch, vice-pres- ident, John Pickering, Advisor, Standing: Bill Flewelling, Patricia Hayden, Jill Guinon, Kim Waddell, Barbara Waters, Vernon Palmer. Inter Varsity Christian Association Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship is a na- tional, inter-denominational religious organi- zation. Its purpose is to intelligently present the claims of Christ and to consider their im- plications for our lives, to present an oppor- tunity for Christian growth and fellowship, and to recognize the Christian's responsibil- ity for world evangelism. Inter-Varsity's campus program includes weekly meetings with guest speakers, prayer and Bible study, and informal activities. Dr. Herma'n DeHaas, associate professor of bio-chemistry, serves as advisor. Maine Christian Association The Maine Christian Association is the Protestant Church at the Univer- sity of Maine. Its concern has been to raise significant and challenging ques- tions so that the Christian faith might be made relevant to students. Through a meaningful program it provides wor- ship services, study groups, and infor- mal activities. This year the MCA suc- cessfully sponsored a Coffee House, an informal meeting place where students can discuss, hear noted speakers, and make new acquaintances. The Rever- end John Pickering serves as Protest- ant Chaplain and advisor to the cab- inet at the M.ff.A. Row 1: Nancy Horrocks, sec., Janice Rich, public. chairman, Alan Johnson, pres., Gordon Whitten, vice-pres., Rebecca McDougall, soc. chairman, Janice Davis, treas. Row 2: Eugene Walker, librarian, Roger Rowland, foreign stu- dents chairman, Peter Meier, freshman contact chairman, Dr. Herman DeHaas, aldvisor, Arnold Sodergren, Bible study chairman, William Birdsall, missions c airman. ,Il Student Religious Association The Student Religious Association is a body representing the religious faiths on the campus . 4- of the University of Maine. It is an instrument effecting a flow of ideas and understanding amongst the denominations at Maine. The ac- tivities yearly pursued are: Brotherhood Week, a Religous Arts Festival, clothing drives for the needy, and speakers and lectures on the idea of Religion. The Reverend Harvey Rates is advisor to the group. fm. Q, ,4 'W 1 'i i s Seated: Dave Ferland, Sue Oliver, Sandra Moores, Bruce Kemelgor, Pam Trojanoski, Standing: Barry Cobb, Carrie Burton, Ron Cole. IO4 ' -' u i ..i L'11"', X 1 ,- ,, , ,. Agriculture Animal Dairy and Science Club PF, 1 t A lt! The Animal-Dairy Science Club, a mem- ber of the American Dairy Association, holds monthly meetings to stimulate in- terest through speakers and films in the animal-dairy science field. Three major activities of the group are their Fitting and Judging Show held every fall, the publication of a year book, "Milklights," which is distributed to all universities in the United States, and a student-Faculty outing. Row 1: Amos Gay, Lee Smith, Wayne Thurston, Murn Nippo, Arthur Scraba, Peter Youngg Standing: David Chote, Arron Witcomb, Burt Taylor, Lee Merserve. Mike Sawyer, Paul Nolton, Jake Occute. :H Medical Science Club Under the leadership of President Jon Greenlaw, the Biology Club attempts to further the understanding and knowledge of the University student in the fields of sci- ence. During the year the club offers such activities as lectures, films, and field trips which are open to all in- terested students. Seated: Judy Gilmore, Sharon McGraw, Joseph Warren, Fred Blades, Dick Rata, Dr. Hutchins, Standing: Jim Reily, Jerry Find- len, Susan Weston, Elaine Jurdik, Ray Philippon, Diane Huse, Dor- othy Piipo lO5 ......f,i Rock and Hammer Club Rock and Hammer, a club for Geology majors and those interested in this field, is organized for the purpose of broadening knowledge and interest in Geology. It does this through the presentation of guest lecturers and papers and through participation in fields trips. Advisor to the club is Dr. Frank Howd. Seated: Daniel Smith, president, Elizabeth Look, secre- tary-treasurer, Standing: Richard Parker, vice-pres1- dent. I NM i ek , Seated: Amos Gay, Dave Anderson, Carl Gibbons, Wayne Thurston, Dave Ballard, Steve Briggs, Virginia Yeaton, Susan Bell, Breta Bryant, Beverly Conway, Standing: Paul Leeman, Burt Taylor, Dave Stebbins, John Carlson. 4-H Club Maine's 4-H Club was organized to keep an active interest in 4-H work for those who have been members before coming to college and for all others who are interested. The purpose of the club is to unite all campus 4-H members in a workable and useful organization and to promote in- terest in 4-H Club work. ', if '- 7-i.L'.r W ,elf ' , K f T Home Economics Club Designed for those college students interested in professional home eco- nomics and homernaking, the Home Economics Club is organized under its own constitution. It is affiliated with the State Home Economics Associa- tion and the National Economics As- sociation. Under the guidance of the advisor, Miss Margaret Thornbury, the activities which are planned and carried out at monthly meetings, de- velop professional skill, attitudes, and abilities and increase knowledge and cultural and social interests. Seated: Alice Ann Hashey, Nancy Morgan, Sally Duncan, Paula Holmgren. Standing: Sue Bell, Charlene Leonard, Margorie Libby, Jane Grey, treasurer, Freda Gammon, presi- dent, Kathy Twitchell, vice-president, Lois Goldschmidt, secretary. IO6 Row 1: Ellen Sexton, Jack Carter, Dennis Kingsbury, Carol Simnsg Row 2: Duane Folsom, David Powers, Francis Higgins, Bryant Young, Paul Leeman, Bill Page, Mich- ael Taylor, Robert Holt, Norman Howes, Lawrence Smith, Dana Craig, Charles Phil- brown, Steve Jacobs, Art Kelley. Twaggie Club The Twaggie Club is an organization composed of stu- ment the knowledge and heighten the interest of the stu- dents enrolled in the Two Year Agricultural Program. dents in the various agricultural fields. This organization holds bimonthly business meetings Various fund raising projects are carried out by the during which guest speakers deliver informative talks on members of the club. The proceeds derived are used for various phases of agriculture. The topics covered aug- different organizational functions. l e l i Row 1: Gary Morse, Douglas Meservey, Marshall Ashley, president, Prof. Beyer: Row 2: Daniel Pinkham, Ray Goulet, ,Art Ellison, Bob Barr, Jim Robbins, Row 3: Bill Boehner, Norm Guyaz, Charles Wilson, Robert Bruce, Gorden Bell, Mal Call, Row 4: Robert August, Jim Davenport, Gary Richardson, Charlie Forrest, Bart Harvey, Dave Thomson, Cliff Keene, Row 5: Tim Bradley, Errol Briggs, Bob Leso, Pete Ripple, James Thomson, John Hescock, Walt Seaha, Bob Thompson, Tim La- Farge. IO7 Forestry Club The Maine Forestry Club is open to Forestry and Wildlife students, alum- ni, and all others at the University who are interested in Forestry and Wildlife. The main aim of the club is to further interest and understanding of a general and professional nature among the members concerning For- estry and Wildlife. The club brings members together for discussion and lectures on topics of a professional nature. Language Der Deutscher Verein 1902, is one of the oldest organization at the University. This honorary soci ety was established for the purpos of studying Germany, its language culture, and civilization in order t further understanding between th United States and German-speakin as adviser to the group. Seated: Glenna Bradeen, Myrna Stanley, Gene St. Peirre, Betty Kazalski, Standing: Knut Jaeggi, John James, William Hennings, Paul Zunder-Platsman, Kent Mathews, George Letto, Cindy Mortus, Hermann Klinger, Stuart Rich. International Club The main purpose of the In- ternational Club is to promote better understanding among the people of all nations. Their mot- to, "Beyond all nations-man- kind," exemplifies concisely their goal of world understanding. Their main activity for the year is the sponsorship of the Inter- national Festival in cooperation with the Maine Christian Asso- ciation. Barbara Davis, John Tierney, Rendell Jones, Vernon Palmer, P r o f e s s o r Schoenberger. I Row 1: Sally Parlin, Barbara Davis, Miriam Figueria, Beatrice Alkalay, Jane Frizzel, Gail Brackett, Linda Hepburn, Betty Kazalski, Judy Gilmore, Sec., Grace Keene, Cinthia Mortusg Row 2: Jaswant Singh, Alberto Esquival, George Champlin, Treas., Pramod Chandra, Arun Dasgupta, Alvaro Diaz, Pres. Paul Sunder-Plassman, Chun Koo, Jongil- zwe Sobentu, Akbarali, Thobhani, Olukayode Oluwole, Pantelis Mpanias, Debotosh Chakrabarty, George Lehto, Mohamed Kebir, Reginald Montas, Fred Brume, Vice-Pres. Politics and International I Relations Club The Politics and Internationa Relations Club seeks to promot increased awareness of politica issues both within its member ship and among the student body as a whole. To this end, it pro vides a forum for the exchang of opinion and sponsors a num ber of speakers whose views dif fer widely. This year the club wat revive.d after a period of quies cenceg it counts as its advisor both Professor Schoenburger an Dr. Collins. .ul Der Deutscher Verein, founded ir countries. Dr. Kenneth Miles server Music Steiners In 1958 the Maine Steiners were eard' for the first time at the Mrs. aine Fashion Show. Since then the teiners have become a Maine tradi- ion. With a love for singing and Blue lazers as their trademarks, they have ppeared at many campus and off- ampus functions. The appearances of his year's group, under the direction if "Woody" Mansur, included Home- 'oming and a program for the South- ern Kennebec Alumni. Left to right Judd Evans Dick Sweet Bob Montemozra Paul Sheibourne Larry Newth John Littlefield Telry Nelson and Dave Curren Absent when photo was taken Tom Greene Seated: Pam Trojanoski. Standing from left to right: Lydia Spencer, Jan Blake, Paula Johnson, Sherry Gibbons, Rosalie Fenalson, Natalie Jackson, Ann Cushing, Nola John- son, Jane Grey, and Beth Jane Ellis. 9 Dirigos This year the D1I'1g'OS had nine regular slngers and three substl tutes These girls sing Without ac companlment depending strictly on dynamics blend and movement of musical phrases to produce the desired effects In the Dirigos the girls have an opportunity to par- ticipate in a light form of singing. The group rehearsed four hours a week under the direction of Pame- la Trojanoski During the year they made several appearances both on and off campus including those of Homecoming Weekend and Winter Carnival 1 -- - 1 --. ..i . -..,. l ' 'T L n- li - Row 1: Tim Conway, Robert Bigger, Woody Mansug Row 2: Mary Persinger, Sue Hanna, Sue McCleer, Karen Gibbons, Mary Batson, Gretchen Ebbeson, Joyce Har- burger, Sue Meyer, Clair Caron, Linda Lord, Row 3: Mr. Headley, Pauline Stewart, Dave Jowett, Jill Guinon, Martha Beaudoin, Don Brown, Jack Fabello, Brenda Barnes, Weston Evans, A1 Fernald, Cob Blake, Jack Banks, Bill Docksteder, Stephen Read. University Chorus The University Chorus, conducted and directed by Herrold Headley is composed of students selected for their musical interest and ability. Through- out the year the society participates in such activities as the annual Christ- mas Vespers, Music Night, Scholar- ship Convocation, Pops Concert, and makes several joint appearances with the Bangor Symphony Orchestra. University Singers The University Singers have a statewide reputation of excellence for their extensive and varied repertoire and singing ability. Organized in 1956 to replace the Madrigal Singers, this select vocal ensemble, directed by Her- rold Headley, is drawn from the chor- us and is limited to upper-classmen. During the spring, the Singers went on tour of Northern Maine. Their pro- gram included selections from West Side Story and some of Brahm's love songs. Christmas Vespers University of Maine Chorophonic Soci and Orchestra to present Handel's siah for Christmas Vespers this year performance was one of the best musi productions ever held by the Univer and thoroughly enjoyed by all. The Ch ophonic Society, a chorus of 150 was companied by an orchestra of 52 pie newly organized for this performance, f the soloists: Barbara Hardy, Fr Gray-Masse, Harvey Bates, and Rich: Hayden. Herrold Headley, Sprague P fessor of Music, and head of the dep ment of music conducted. The Univers Brass choir, under the direction of Phi Nesbit, played carols and noels prior the Messiah. Four outstanding soloists joined 1 4 M .'I s c 6 e a 'W W, , gs-J . f' R A .Q 1 , 1 . , N- ' Ls ' 'N lk '3 2 X? X5Y,'l.X?:i'4- XX. .N u ku xr i Xa 4 3 , I V :' , ' l"1. I x I' M? Y QV ' Q ' . ' " 'x ' "- . "V H 'W v! F' MT X 'T WW S Q 'J 6 E x 1 1 -X,, X 4 X A.. .- , 1 X' A XX I . I , , V 1 . '1 .441 NE ?i,'+e'Q. ,ffwx NV 5x1Lgf'P .f .4 ,. if 5 , , - "qWJX?4:E'?A!t2i+ 3-- E1' f .' lf EXW 3 1fF'2Jcf2'f ' - ,-5 Nh" iii . . J " A X ,,' 111 lx .. ,sqisi gif .x..' 5.- - N df- " 'Qfiipxh five- V 'X Q f- 'A 'bn N ' . Y ,ik , k r +3 F Aw f:fL f55f-'- i gs: 27' 3 Y' f41.?i'f .' '.f'ff'Q7i'j--, P fuk. 25 K . . I g,:gg3n3jr: 'Q-1'f"'-4.53 j,j',TT?'!'fgf' ' Ik"-121:15-:1,! 14:-sri!!!-., "' W 1 1 l Athletics -f 1" v tl. Seated: D i c k Flaherty, "Mn Club "M" Club members are all letter winners in varsity athletics at "Maine" The purpose of this organization is to promote cooperatio'n and further the development of spirit and traditions in all endeavors in varsity sports, for the good of the university and the student body. Intramural Athletic Association The Men's Intramural Association promotes and governs intramural sports. The association provides opportu'nities for competitive and Wholesome partici- pation among those male students who did not participate on varsity teams. Some of the events sponsored by the or- ganization are touch football, bas- ketball, paddleball, indoor and outdoor softball, wrestling, boxing, a'nd volley- ball. Under the capable direction of Har- old Woodbury and Samuel Sezak the club has fostered the ideals of good sportsmanship. Larry Coughlin, Jerry E1- lis, Horace Horton, Ken- neth Beals,A1lan Leathersg Row 2: William Revere, Bill Brewer, Floyd Horn, Dick Davidson, Skip Cyr, Bob Michaud, Norm Vigerg Row 3: John Furman, Charles Bonney, Dick Na- son, Dave Lahait, Robert Biggars. Seated: Jack Curtis, Dennis Hurlburt, Philip Brown, Dave Priest, Row 2: Professor Harold Woodbury, Kent Daigle, Charlie Burnham, Tom Depres, Richard Glidden, Dave Brand, Jim Leroy, Russ Penny, Professor Sezakg Row 3: Rick Wood- ruff, Dick Nason, Carol Worth. 'Q ef 99 it ii iw Seated: Estefayc Slosberg, Katy Thorpe, Jocelyn Gen- est, erta Sue All women are members headquarters, promote and Gretchen Thomas, Elsa Ilvonen, Judy Rich, Rob- Fowler, Lee Charest. 2nd row: Jeanette Guinard, Ginn, Joan Strickland, Isabell Johnson, Libby Dougheity, Karen Olson, Nancy Steputis, Enga Dalh, Sandra Arbour, Sharon Cort, Tenny Gavaza, Margaret Mercer, Jane Thompson. 3rd Row: Mary Thomas, Clair Colwell. Pamela Hennessy. Pem Club students majoring in physical education of the "PEM" Club. Located in its new Lengyel Hall, the club's main purpose is to further encourage interest in athletics among the women at Maine. Many improvements have taken place in the general PEM program. Some of the activities sponsored by the club i'nclude a barbeque, a Christmas party, a "splash" party, and special guest speakers in the field of physical education. Along with the new Lengyel Hall, the new and improved Pem Club program is another addition to our growing university. Officials Club The Officials Club, open to all students provides an opportunity for discussion of rules and techniques of the sports in sea- son. The girls learn to officiate these sports and are affiliated with the Eastern Maine Board of Women Officials, through which the girls obtain official ratings. Advisor to the club is Mrs. Peggy Homans. Seated: Mary Thomas, Claire Colwell, Sharon Cort. Standing: Jeanette Guinard, Gretchen Tho- mas, Enga Dalh, Isabell Johnson, Joan Strickland, Katy Thorpe. Archery Club The archery club is open to all under- graduates. All equipment is provided by the Wome'n's Physical Education Depart- ment. The club sponsors tournaments, 'novelty shoots, and practice sessions for everyone. A tassel system is used whereby mem- e r bers receive tassels for different levels of shooting achievement. Instruction is provided in both tar- get and field shooting by certified Tecla- Wooket archery camp graduates. Everyone is welcome and no experience is necessary. l Seated: Jane Kelley, Roberta Fowler, Linda Estes. Standing: Connie Bates, Joan Strickland, Ed Hoar, Hazel Constantine, Jeanette Guinard, Dave Cookson. -rw, -V L, r fig - - 143 1 F zfflff ' A . :,, f-fri,-' 5 ' ' R' ' ' '-i uq 2: e--yr? ra ,fi -A 1 Riagg . nw? -' X ' i zu , Those pictured: Jocelyn Genestg Martha Perham, Presidentg Lee Charest, Secretary-treasurerg Pat .ggfi X Olcottg Nancy Steputisg Dave Le " WV Clair. was - Gymnastics Club Under the direction of Mis.s Lavere Shaffer, the new- out the year. The first of these clinics featured' Bud ly formed Gymnastics Club endeavors to promote greater Beyers, head gymnastic coach at the University of Chi- skills and techniques in the field of gymnastics. This is cago. Active members not pictured are Larry Bundlett, done with the aid of clinics which are attended through- vice president and Art Ellison. II4 Seated: Harold Plum, Vice Pres., Elizabeth Hawkins, Helen Dickenson, Jim Ross, Pres., Charlie Motram, Treas., Pat Weith, Shelia Dowd, Jim Mitchell. Stand- ing: Rick Ladd, Bill Brewer, Aza Garner, Jim Went- worth, Bill Lynch, Bonnie Zink, Bill Fedler, Will Cald- well, Bob Sprague, Earl Stein, Fritz Mumson, Ad- visor Dr. Martin. Maine Outing Club Fall activities of the M.O.C. included Climbing trips at Mt. Katahdin and in the Bar Harbor area. Several work expeditions to the club's cabin at Sugarloaf in pre- paration for winter skiers were organized. The club ex- Modern Dance The Modern Dance Club, under the di- rection of Miss Eileen Cassidy, is composed of students who enjoy dance and are inter- 1 ested in developing new dance skills. In Modern Dance, free, u'nrestricted move- ment is used as the medium of communi- cating a certain idea, mood, feeling, or sit- uation. Each movement flows through the whole body and helps to condition the body by developing strength, flexibility, coordi- nation, agility, and control. The club has been active in such university functions as the annual Christmas party, Pops Concert, University Music Night, International Fes- tival, and Play Days. IIIIEEE tends a welcome to all University of Maine students and faculty interested in outdoor Activities from canoeing the St. Croix to snow-shoeing up Trout Mountain. Left to right.: Karen Garvy, Shelia Kelley, Barbara Knox. H5 o.. Engineering .tix -A., The Maine student branch of the American Society of the Agricultural Engineers, organ- ized in 1946, is one of 42 author- ized branches in the nation. Its main objectives are to bring agricultural engineeri'ng stu- dents together, and to offer these students an opportunity to meet professional agricultural engineers. At the monthly meet- ings professional engineers lec- ture on various topics of interest to the students. The organiza- tion is supported financially by student-conducted tillage proj- ects in the fall and spring. Row 1: Dave Carter, Robert Kittredge, Scott Kelly, Neil Webster, William Paulson, Row 2: Dennis Waskiewicz, Lawrence Flewelling, .Arthur Littlefield, Neal Hallee, Stephen Chase. American Chemical Society The American Chemical Society student af- filiate is an organization designed to promote interest in the field of chemistry. The objec- tives of the society are to enable the members to become better acquainted with other chem- ists and to stay abreast of the latest develop- ments in the profession. These objectives are achieved by lectures, movies, and field trips throughout the year. Seated: Robert Foss, Pres., Richard Parker, vice-pres., Jonathon Stoney Standing: Robert Clark, Absent, Prof. James Wolfhagen, advisor. s o 5 1 l l H. ! L Li fI'u li fu i 51's-a ' Wiser f T . 2 4 l 1: i l Amateur Radio Club The University of Maine Amateur Radio Club maintains a legal amateur radio station on campus for its members and those who have amateur licenses. The club trains inter- ested students in radio theory and Morse Code in order that they may obtain an amateur li- cense. This year the club provided radiogram blanks at the Memorial Union whereby a'ny- one could' have a message sent anywhere in America free of charge. Seated: Robert James, Gilbert McLaughlin, Edward Martin, William Dockstader, Roland Cyr, Standing: Keith Helmer, Horace Clark. American Society of l Agricultural Engineers 28 .,l I ig... 1453- Fil l .wg Vis, K . I- '-5, Ki I Seated: Dana Dolloff, president, John Howard, Bob Blackmore, Donald Jacobs, Dr. Durst, advisor, Larry Cavon, Donald Paiste, Roger Ireland, vice-president, Standing: Maurice Caron, Gary Cram, Peter Duncan, treas. John Gilbert. American Institute of The Student Chapter of the AIChE CAmerican Insti- tute of Chemical Engineersl is comprised of chemical engineering students who desire to learn more about their future profession than can be obtained in the class- room. This is accomplished by obtaining industrial speak- ers Who explain and discuss their positions in areas Chemical Engineers ranging from sales to production. Lectures, movies, and discussions on subjects of interest to the members are also held. Student membership permits attendance at regional AIChE meetings and facilitates entrance into AIChE fthe national society of the professionj upon graduation. American Society of Civil Engineers The Student Chapter of the American Society of Civil Engi- neers provides the student with opportunities for contacts in the engineering profession, to become better acquainted' with faculty and classmates, and to keep abreast of the latest develop- ments. The purpose of the Stu- dent Chapter is to help the stu- dent prepare himself for the pro- fession. Seated: Terry Hannon, secretary, Dick Clark, Jeff Case, Eldon Morrison, Standing: David Craig, Myron Eames, Ray Backman, Bob Kelley, Bob Johnson, Richard Burns, Wayne Hamilton, advisor. I I7 American Society of Mechanical Engineers The Maine Student Section of the Amer- ican Society of Mechanical Engineers has been an active professional organization since 1913. One of its main aims is to bri'ng mechanical engineering students together and to offer these students an opportunity to meet with personnel, and professional mechanical engineers. Throughout the academic year, the ASME sponsors speak- ers, movies, and also sends delegates to the Regional Convention. Advisors are Profes- sors Richard Hill and John Lyman. Row 1: Bill Currier, Maurice Webb, George Redmond, Norm Perault, Bill Weatherbee. Row 2: Richard McNeary, Joseph Percival, Bob Anderson, Stanley Roberts, Clifford Martin, Dayton Cannan. Row 3: Philip Dumais, Richard Robinson, Roland Parady, Clifford Ouelette, Patrick de Arinott, Bruce Heanessler, Bradford Hilton, Harry Bridge. Row 4: Bruce Toothaker, Robert Stickney, Ben Bramhall, Colby Fahey, Eric Hodgkins, Edward Douglass, Paul Gooding. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers The Institute of Electrical and Electron- ics Engineers is the largest professional en- gineering society in the world. Its object- ives are scientific, literary, and education- al. In over 200 Student Branches through- out the world, members receive technical publications, visit communications and power facilities, and attend technical lec- tures delivered by prominent engineers and scientists. Row 1: Jack Ham QV. Chairman Publicityj, Alan Hall fTreasurerJ, Albert Huntoon tChairmanJ, Eugene Walker CSecretaryJ, Robert Carlson fExecut1ve Vice Chairmanj, Michael Cambell CV. Chairman Membershipl. Row 2: Raymond Rioux, Philip Milliken, Brian Hodgkin, Dennis Hurlburt, James Puffer, Willis Tompk1ns,'Charles Hall, Robert Ray, Dennis Merrill. Row 3: Jim Grant, Lestefr' Kickey, Dave Libby, Warren Prince, Michael Miller, Thomas Davis, Raymond Desjardins, Horace Clark. Row 4: .Iohn Perry, Franklin VanAntwerpen, Elbridge Lenfest, Phil Provost, Charles Monteith, Blaine Davis, Donald Lessard. 118 c Debating Council The goal of the Maine Debating Council is to encour- age better speech on the U'niversity of Maine campus through the promotion of intramural and intercollegi- ate forensic activities. Debaters become eligible by participating in either intramural or intercollegiate debates. Members of the council travel exte'nsive- ly throughout the northeast representing the Univer- Press Club .EL 12. 39 Q mg. Q i MAINE DEBATE CLUB Stuart Richg Don Quig- leyg David Lilleyg Ca-they Anicettig Berverly Hunt- leyg Wayne Johnson: Ver- non Areyg Stan Sloan. Standing: Ted Sherwoodg Royce Flood. .sity in competition against teams from all over the na tion. The council presents University of Maine debate keys at the end of each year to debaters who have qualified through active participation. This year's of ficers of the council are: Stanley Sloan, Presidentg Ver non Arey, Vice-Presidentg Beverly Huntley, Secretary and Henry Goodstein, Treasurer. Mary Tyler Carol Hebold Carolyn Zachery Stanley Eames Phyllis Mayo Jim Brown Organized in 1947, the Press Club strives to main- ciation of the profession. The club is open to all stu tain a professional aspect and develops through associ- dents, but is composed mostly of students majoring in ation of people with similar interests, a greater appre- journalism and those i'nterested in newspaper work. Student National Education Association When a student joins an NEA chapter, he is expected to become a member of his state education of teacher's associ- ation. These state associatio'ns are affiliated with the National Education Association. They are the voice and ac- tion agency for the teaching profession, and they work con- tinually to improve education in a democratic society. Since our primary interest is the welfare of children, our direct concern is the development of adequately prepared, socially adjusted, and effectively functioning teachers. Shown right are Gary Tibbetts, president, Mrs. Bishop, Advisor, Carol At- wood, secretary. Row 1: Kath Konecki, corres. sec., Nan Starbird, rec. sec., Vee Flavin, pres-. Heather Oliver, 2nd vice- pres., Mary Carter, lst vice-pres. Linda Grover, treas. Row 2: Pam Ebbeson, Gwen Smith, Barbara Sampson, Joan Perkins, 'Gertrude Elwell, Hedy Schoeman, Fran Hibbard, Vicki Jones, Mary Holt, Carlene Cardg Row 3: Carol Rivers, Nancy Cook, Carol Richardson, May Ann Ward, Sandy Niles, Danny Doran, Gail Knoght, Carol Pike, Mavis McKinnon: Row 4: Bonnie Zink, Mary Bradeen, Nancy Walter, Anne Thibideau, Barbara Corey, Joyce Seely, Mary Rucker, Mary: Smith, Ann Claverie. Mrs. Maine Club The Mrs. Maine Club is a student wives organi- zation and all wives of students are invited to attend. Members enjoy listening to guest speakers and par- ticipating in such activities as bowling, exercising, casserole suppers, and card parties. The Club spon- sors a Well-Babe Clinic in Merrill Hall and the Maine Cub Nursery School which benefits all u'niversity families. University of Maine Associated Nursing Students The University of Maine Associated Nursing Students was established in 1959 and became an official organization i'n 1960 with membership open to all nursing students. Its purpose is to promote closer relationships among nursing students, to pro- vide an opportunity for incomi'ng freshmen to get acquainted with upper-class students, to create active interest in profession- al nursing organizations, to make others aware of the baccalaur- eate nursing program at the University of Maine, and to provide nursing students with an opportunity to hear speakers or dis- cussions on various phases of nursing and medicine. uzo ld' I pm us Young Republicans Club The YGOP is an active organization on campus which enables members to discuss issues with Re- publician leaders and to receive political educa- tion through workshops a'nd activities in Republi- can campaigns. Under the auspices of the YGOP, Donald Luk- ens, President of the National Federation of Young Republicans, visited the campus, and Gov- ernor Reed spoke at Maine. The club also main- tains close contact with Congressmen Stan Tupper and Clifford Mclntire and with Senator Margaret Chase Smith. Left to Right: Don Quigley, Gregory Foster, Professor Cook, Charles Washburn, Diane O'Dounel1, Vernon Palmer. -.,..,, ., --,-.,, VI ll' L iv Public Management Club The Public Management Club is for the ben- efit of students majoring in public manage- me'nt and any student interested in this field. Guest speakers such as town and state offi- cials, business executives, and management ex- perts are invited to give informal talks during the year. The club is also host for one meeting of the Central Maine Manager's Association. Seated: Eben Marsh, Lucky LaChance, Elaine Porter, James Greene, John Dow, Sec.-Treas., Toby Averill, Pres. NL ll af Q pl l l """ - -1 gl J President. Sharon Jenkins, Bradley Ronco, Treas., Barbara Prescott, Vice Pres, e l1H dCd Pt" S' t .A1' MD ld Sc. Judith we , owar o y, aricia imon on, ice c ona , e , Standing: Joel Eastman, Nancy O'Mara, James Henderson, Duane l2l "Young Democrats Club The Young Democrats is a 'newly recognized organization on campus with a membership of thirty. The purpose and policy of the club is to promote and contribute, in all of its endeavors to the growth and influence of the Democratic Party, to increase Party responsibility and to enlist active support and interest in a politi- cal organization and political affairs on cam- pus. Members of the club have had an opportuni- ty to participate in state-wide Democratic programs and assist in the program of voter information and registration procedures. The Young Democrats have also sponsored partisan and non-partisan speakers at their monthly meetings. The advisor of the club is Dr. James Clark Assistant Professor of Government in the His- tory and Government Department. Elected officials for the year were: Presi- dent, Duane Cropleyg Vice President, Barbara Prescott, Secretary, Alice McDonald, Treasur er, Bradley Ronco, 'sr i .M . Q I - N V , 1 N v v ,,,, N ' VEL, Q .vfrn I . l I as Y P-,-:LQ A- Y lvl ,Ein 0 l Q R L n 34' W 1. Q L A E '. 1 I 114' I 1 ,., K I ff 4 . Y-63 A, ffl? ' ' 'P qi . 5 bi 11' -' Jw iff? ,f .x 5. .Lf liill it ff I I I 145 What is The Maine Campus? A collection of pages of newsprint? A series of pictures? All these things, but something more. It is a small group of students who return early each fall, leav- ing jobs in order to get out an issue for Fresh- man Week. Then each week means another issue and each issue means planning stories, a'nd finding pictures. Typewritten stories must be converted into lead type. Pictures must be converted into engravings, and this costs money. Members of the business and advertising staff must go out and get ad- vertisements. Shown above are Stan Eames, city editor, Keith Grand, editor-in-chief, Carol Zachery, assistant editor, and Pete Thomson, editorial editor. MAINE ""Cf A Progressive Newspaper Serving A Growing University Now we are ready to put all the pieces together-to make newspaper. Each page must be assembled, fractions of inches. are the largest deviations allowed. Headlines are written. They must not only fit the space allowed, they must fit the stories, they must catch the eye and interest the passerby. And there's always 'next week! The Campus is a student newspaper. It is a collection of pages of newsprint, a series of pictures, and assortment of news and features and columns. It is something more, too. Shown above are more of the staff-Carol Farley, society editor, Carol Helbold, Bon'nie Glatz, make-up editor, Mary Tyler, copy ed- itor, and left, Jim Brown and Avard Walker, business managers. l23 YN 4 ' 2 +3 333 ,, li 1, ., l .,vr' PRI The PRISM is published annually by the jun- ior class of the University of Maine. The class of 1965 is proud to have been the Centennial Class of the University and to have been able to publish this book as a record of Maine's past. In compiling the history, the staff has borrow- ed from the rich record supplied by past PRISMSQ we Wish to thank them all for their contributions to our book. We hope that this book will recall pleasant memories of his college years for each alumnus. Shown at the left are Paula Reddy, editor of the 1965 PRISM and Jim Brown, the bus- iness manager. Assistant editors Nancy Baron and Sue Weaver are pictured belowg the staff is shown hard at Work-on the next two pages. -u. W, l . J U, 1. 5 7 B 9101 31415161718 20 '11 7.7. '13 '14 '15 2728293031 Typists are a very 'necessary part f any staff a'nd the PRISM was ortunate to have an enthusiastic nd able group. Shown here are artha Hunt, Sally Day, Margar- t Wilde, Judy Kimball, head ty- ist, and Ann Fifield, our staff. HA' 1' Shown here fseatedj are the sports editor, Joan Strickland, and' the photo editor, Roberta Roak, with the sorority editors, Caroline Fuller and Sylvia Tapley standing behind. 1? 'wmiff The history staff : Barb Bick- more, Carol Blood, and KathyKaz- mierazak are working here with the index editors, Nancy Libby and Sharon Anderson. in Leonard were the fraterni editors who initiated a n change in the book by usi individual shots of the br thers. Glenna Renegar and T e 1 Maine Masquers. ' 11-11 1 f' -fi ,if ' fini in ll i I nl ' I I I IR v-I li-5 gl.lhHr':l5 Ill , . W lil 4' l nv. tw 59 i .6 .. W-xi Front row: A. Weiss, J. Bacon, R. Clark, E. Kazalski, Mr. Barushok, Mr Bost, Mr. Bricker, Mr. Cyrus, R. Niles. Standing: O. Thibodeau, S. Buck P. Clough. The Maine Masquers is a newly-formed student group which has been organized along the lines of a theatrical honor society. The main objectives of this 'new organiza- tion are to promote theatre at the University of Maine and to honor those students who have made outstanding contributions to the Maine Masque Theatre. In accordance with this the Maine Masque Theatre has been changed from a club to the official University thea- tre under the direct supervision of the Department of Speech. The Maine Masquers will function as a student organ- ization Which is completely separate from the Maine Mas- que Theatre. This new organization will, however, retain the insignia of the theatre, which is a large "M" super- imposed over a dagger and an actor's masque. Students will be invited to become members only after compiling a selected number of points based on actual workin the theatre productions. Shown right are Lois Ingeneri and Roy Clark in re- hearsal for one of the many Masque productions. l Xa ', I 11. Q ' '.. J -, . 3 ,,, A 1 . ' ,, f -62: ' W ,, . . 'H - xi -' " , wx l :L KZ 54' N U 533 .N 0 1 l N-A 'bun- . ,1-M'-'Z W if ,ff I r I I, 4 4 Y X, f , If ff W 5 1 E a 44 1. J, N ..,v rl Ju. .. , ..x. A -- sua. 'w,...u.n' 7"""' 'NW' 1.1.nA L AME ?.25-,-' X T-'.-- n- ',.1 !. - .' ll, ,g,,'.2n- .l iq . 4 . , "'?': ' ff ff- ? " "7fu2T.Ci9'I.w f V- - . 1 , ,vfii-'JP' I ,..-v,. 1.- .1, '7m.u.'Y ' G' wi! " ,f Av I 4 5' u ' jf ,,:' W .i' 4 , , K ' w I -1:-qwfff' ' Q ' F?" 5' I z..f1r1,zHrB -via: I N QV: W "TF7LE'PL'v' f N: 'X 'U N, I I 'Q , 2 . , Y I F in , y -' l ' H - V .F ,. V, -73. Y' 2,3 YM ' Anfvklvx Ava ' f' ' V1 V1 V1 3' r V KJV A 11 "M 3 2 "f pw 4 L, up , 1 ,531 -145 w. fa r yn W -Q Y.+v-1 S E' " ' mi -sw,-..,.x ieuumu,,' ..,. .,-. 1- A strange combination of circumstances, histori- cal as well as in the events of the play's creation, has made The Diary of A.nne Frank a drama unex- celled in this generation. Here Howard Honig, who played Mr. Frank in the play, reads Anne's diary. Bonnie Wheaton Ccenterb and Maruti Archanta Cfar rightj were the Dutch Nationals who took it upon themselves to preserve the lives of the eight people trapped in an attic in Germany. Under the pressure of unspeakable duress, thir- teen year-old Anne Frank never exhausted the pos- sibilities of amusing herself. In this scene, Ritty Burchfield as Anne's sister helps Anne, played by Lois Ingeneri, get dressed up for a big date with Peter Van Daan. The Diary of Anne Frank The only time in which the eight people trapped in the attic could move around was at night. This was their only chance for some freedom, and then it was in very limited amounts. With all their tensions and Worries they did not forget the Jewish Holiday Han- ukah, which they are celebrating in this scene. Left to right are Anna Carparelli and Tom Gray as Mr. and Mrs. Van Daang Marge MacGraw as Mrs. Frankg Lois Ingeneri as Anneg Howard Honig as Mr. Frankg Ritty Burchfield as Margaret Frankg Roy Clark as Pc-iter Van Daang Arnold Weiss as Mr. Dus- se. Red Roses for Me Red Roses For Me portrays the lives of the work- ing people of Dublin and their efforts to establish the good and beautiful things, the red roses, in life. There are underlying plots of Catholic versus Prot- estant, worker versus employer, and right versus wrong. In Act III fpictured at rightl Ayamonn Breydon played by Ron Savoy, the hero of the play, convinces momentarily-at night, near a bridge over the river Liffey, hemmed i'n by dark, tomblike, stone buildings-a group of listless beggars, symbolic of Dublin's poor, that it lies in their power to restore splendor to their city and thus to Ireland. As he speaks, a golden glow appears in the sky. The build- ings shine and listeners change. A pretty, red-haired young girl frighth played by Jackie Curtis, dances a jig with Ayamonn. An old woman Cleftl portray- ed by Janiece Bacon, discards her drab shawl and discloses a bright, brave green dress. One of the underlying plots in the play is the Catholic element versus the Protestant element. Here the Breydon's Catholic neigh- bors are worshipping their beloved statue which is held by Janiece Bacon as Dympna. On the far left are Anna Carparelli as the aged Eeada and Jackie Curtis as Finoola. Throughout the play Ayamonn Breydon throws himself into his battle for truth, justice, and fair- ness with eagerness and strength. Ayamonn eventually wins but he achieves his success at a very high price. In the last act before the be- ginning of the strike, the. Protes- tant rector warns Ayamonn to be careful. In the foreground from left to right are Jean Gervais as Shiela Margaret Edgar as Ayamonn's mother, Ron Savoy as Ayamonn, and Don Vafiades as the Protes- tant rector. 1 - 1'-er N... W --1851 "..:!w. We-f1Fa.. r- ,,,.,Q,A ,. The Annual ROTC Review of 1963 was held on a bleak May afternoon at Memorial Field Reserve Officers Training Corps The graduates of the University of Maine Reserve Officers Training Corps program are candidates for ap- pointment as second lieutenants in several bra'nches of the Organized Reserve Corps and may be commissioned in the regular Army. Advanced course students are given the opportunity to apply theories learned in the class- room by practical experience at summer camp. The an- it nual Formal Inspection and Regimental Review cere- monies are held each spring. At this time, the Honorary Lieutenant Colonel presents awards to the outstanding Cadets. The highest award is the silver alumni sabre, bestowed upon the outstanding military student of the graduating class. Judith Hale, one of the honorary Cadet Colonels, greets President Lloyd Elliot during the review. ff: I ,qw wut., J, ,M V if NP: Militar Seated: Ken Vaillancourt, Dan Smith, Ken Poole, Standingg Tom Newman, Gerald Forrest, Allan Fernald, Ernest Torok, Ed Jurgen- son, Ernest Whitehouse, Howard Wiley. Scabbard and Blade' Under the leadership of Captain Ken Poole the D Company, 2nd Regiment of the National Society of Scab- bard and Blade strives to maintain and raise military standards of education, to develop the qualities of good officers, and to promote better relations amo'ng cadet ,. officers. The honorary military society consists of elect- ed, advanced ROTC cadets and was instituted at Maine in 1916. The society holds annually a Military Ball at which time an Honorary Cadet Colonel is crowned and commissioned. Front Row, Left to Right: Dave Rumfelt, Glen Bel- yea, John Gould, Charles- Bourne, Mike Severance, John Johnson, Hugh Hastings, Wayne Davis. Back Row, Left to Right: Brian Curtis, William Deacon, A"'i 4 . -1 Tom Hartford, Charles Murphy, Darrell Spencer, John Ireland, James Jandreau, Bob Biggor, Ed Martin, Howard Wiley, Wayne Robbins, Lewis Flagg, Keith Helmer. Left to right, Row 1: Robert Dogan, Bruce Hut Alan Wilcox Danial Strunk Stephen Edwards chinson, Keith Helmer, G. Bickford Forrest, Alan Wayne Raymond Row 3 Joel Rosen Arnold Moriis Robertson, Raymond Lombard, Capt. William Tucker Robert Berniei Roger P1109 Carl Winship Joel man. Row 2: Al Douglas, Scott Devin, John Grovei Blanchette Pershing Rifles Pershing Rifles is a national, military, and fra- ternal organization founded by John L. Pershing at the University of Nebraska in 1894. The national organization is composed of 163 active companies which include over 8,700 members. Membership is open to Freshmen and Sophomores enrolled in the ROTC program where the respective companies are located. Juniors and Seniors may actively partici- pate in the organization as officers only. Company M., Twelfth Regiment, located at the University of Maine, is commanded by Captain G. Bickford Forrest and assisted by a staff consisting of lst Lt. Alan Robertson, Operations Officerg lst Lt. 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X . 1. .,, 'f 1 'f- ,I -V '- -an Mr Q ' ,- '-:wil-3.14, 5 ' ' 3 Wx "' n."',-li' , 3f.fv .e. 1 5: ' Q 2- 'w uw ' . . . 1 u P Q A Jocelyn Gencst Frances Hibbard Dawn Crocker Nancy Ray Sandra Arbour Sue Casey Tina Johnson Mary Holmes l 1 V f Q ' 9g 3 . a 'Wwdagnv Ta v""1 'C' X l. 1. in ,J I' yll ' 'S l l' 4:1 IN - -0 Ir, K. A .Ig-5, l if ft Y? Nina Higgins Jill Olsen June Tompkins Barbara Anders Eleanor Murray Patricia Elwell Marybelle Walsh An drienne Christak Susan Johnson Deborah Johnson Ency Whitehill Edwina Laughton Catherine Roberts Mary Miller Linda Mansfield Polly Briggs Shirly Irving Diane Hatchfield Carol Gelo Bonny McKay Nancy Cleaves Linda Holden Susan Dryan Virginia Yeaton Rushing Skit Underway Marybelle Walsh, Debbie Johnson, Sandy Arbour :il A fi : af .. '-liiiff f l il!-f l V -, A W H.. . ' vw, . 5' at 7' Y F4 ,. Alpha Chi Omega Delta Theta Chapter 1959 Alpha Chi Omega was founded at De Pauw Uni- versity on October 15, 1885. On the Maine campus the sorority started as Gamma Chi Alpha in 1957. In October of the following year, the sorority became a pledge colony of Alpha Chi Omega and it was in- stalled as Delta Theta Chapter on April 24, 1959. It was the first new sorority on campus in 33 years. Our chapter's philanthropic project is the Hyde Re- habilitation Center in Bath. Campus activities during the year include: a shoeshine, a bazaar, food sales, a Founders' Day supper, pledge formal, pledge tea, the favorite professor's tea, and a spring and fall outing. Row 1: Nora Hitchings, Claudia Jameson, Ann Leger. Row 2: Geraldine Cormier, Carol I-loffses, Carolyn Demarino, Mary Dannert, Ju- dith Fricke, Pamela Ebbeson, Gwendolyn Smith, l39 Judy Purzycki. Row 3: Susan Tibbetts, Sharo Murphy, Brenda Bennet, Jane Longo, Murie Duckett. A ,Cx -A 20 1 wb .1 1 ,- , H l -5 f '. -4' ' f L .1 Mr with K 2 W N 'i L -if , . +. v 'A 4 I . , A P I 1 A V l 14- V ll vi ' I i, l I AL L s v . 2171 ? L' r .fir ' Wit r ,:," ,. , ,. ,JA -5 5 -3-2:-l ,F 5 , , r 1 -s ,' f' , ' I N: V, P 'Ay 1 552 ' -.'.' V HI. Y Helen Smith ,wi S' . .56-L ap '- . alia w R :lil-, 'l I " iw la' ll ll S f .KH Heather Cameron Carol Coakley Betty Hopkins wwf l , 3 :H " i a-fvtl , . 'fn 'be F' l fs I I ? X Y B, ' . iw: L . Sandra Dow Dona Atwood 'l l4O l L.. '-mr -.41 L Dianne Campbell Pris Maden Jackie Curtis Sharon Graffam xv-1? Anna Carparelli Leslie Bailey Jane Hocket Bunny Day Carla Tukey Helene Nardino Linda Beam Margaret Thurlow Elizabeth Lawrence Jackie Baldwin Judy Dillaway Sally Day Beatrice Beam J :mice Bacon Sherry Grace Jan Salter Bonnie Roberts Jean Dole Lee Cheetham Lynne Brown Linda Singer Lorna Peabody Eileen Grossman Sue Conant Row 1: Do Do Beam, Marcia Lynch. Row Ginny Green, Ann Brooks, Dawn Susi, Jane Pressley, Julie Nutting, Peggy Judy Kaylor. Row 3: Liza Hoyt, Paula I 1 w, x X l t . ,gigs Shower for Frontier Nursing Service Lester, Merriby Sweet, Donna Gildart, Brown, Cheryl English. Missing: Jean L. Alpha Omicron Pi Gamma Chapter 1908 Gamma Chapter of Alpha Omicron Pi was the first sorority established on the University of Maine campus, being or- ganized in 1908. Nationally, it has exist- ed since its founding at Bernard College of Columbia University on Januray 2, 1897. AOPi's philanthropic projects include supporting the Frontier Nursing Service in Kentucky and working with the child- ren at the Bangor Children's Home. On campus, AOPi's are busy with their fall outing, founders' day tea, pledge formal at Sigma Chi, parents' day, initiation banquet, rose outing, slave sale, and sell- ing date books and mums. ,1 wig 'F ... Vi: 1 ldl Treasurer Harriet Epstein , 4 , fri' 0' . V. 'Y 5 ii -ef 4 elm -2' V Mary Lyford Becky Gordon Sue McGrath I 42 6 ' 15 ,ff .-f 1 A, .A Maryanne Warren Jan Howard Cyn Breare Nancy Mclntire Sue Allen Nancy Smith Judi Rice Jean Miller Sharon Anderson Nancy Spear Caroline Fuller Carol Benn Patty Hutchinson Carrie Burton Pam Woolley Sue Bell Bonnie Foster Joyce Britton Huguette Labbe Ginny Lou Bellinzer Pris Morin Paulette Keller Charlotte Grant Tina Abbott Claire Fifield Joan Clunie Betty Cote Nancy Steputis Claire Brown Carol Inforati Debbie Burr Cindy Duncan Judy Moses Sonja Weeks l 'E' is Alice Cnlderwood Secretary Jackie Towle President lpha Phi Delta u Chapter 1963 Alpha Phi was founded at Syracuse University on October 10, 1872. The Delta Nu colony became a chap- ter on May 16, 1963, now the youngest sorority on campus. Alpha Phi is upheld by its three C's of standards: Character, Conduct, and Culture. We give annually to our national philanthropy, Cardiac Aid. During the past year, the Phi's have held an all sorority party, a Santa's workshop, and were honored by winning the Panhellenic Greek Sing. We also join- ed our brother fraternity, Lambda Chi Alpha, in giv- ing the underprivileged children of the Bangor area a Christmas party. Jackie Beck Vice-P resident Half an hour left before stage time. Judy Moses and Jackie Beck. Nancy Tre K7 Standing: Myrna Cowan, Debbie Cook, Pam man, Leslie Brocksbank, Liddy Matyola, Barbara Gould, Linda Keesey. Seated: Dianne Rynn, Thompson. Absent: Candy Buck, Carol Rivers, Judy Maines, Sue Chadbourne, Margery Fur- Dianne Robarts. 143 Pearson BSlll'el' fa Faith Vautour if Sue Mills Peggy Delay Nancy Ci ane President - IQ 'Q ,qt 'Qs vw., wa- 3' i21biaa?::,2: M in N eene Q9 2 ,T-P 'WW if A4 43 Put Greene Bonnie Liberty Sandy Larlee Sylvia Tapley r -Q., 32. sf' Ale-ik Mg' 'E Qx Je. Penny Lynch Diana Lewis Carolyn Young Linda Curtis Carol Full Bea Allen Mary Goucher Sandy Deetjen Roberta Roak Sue Goodridge Ann Brown Suki Koch Marthe-Ann Beau Jane Dudley Elaine Kelley Gay Atwood Margaret Edgar Barbura Cramer Diane Derby Karen Damborg Nancy Erikson Nanci Hiester Ann Rathbun Nancy Page Chi Omega Xi Chapter 1921 Chi Omega was founded at the University of Ar- kansas in 1895 by four young women. Its basic pur- pose was friendship. Another purpose, scholarship, was exemplified in 1930 when the National Achieve- ment Award was authorized. This award is not given yearly, but only when it is deserved. Two recipients of it have been Margaret Chase Smith and Madame Chiang Kai-Chek. Over the last sixty-three years the small group in Arkansas is well remembered, and as our chapters have grown to one hundred thirty-four, the basic purpose of friendship of that original group is still held dear. Our Xi Beta chapter was established in 1921 by Beta Chapter from Colby College. Each year at Maine we begin with our fall outing. From here on there are many activities-Vocations Night, Ushering at Maine 'Masque, Art Tea, Pledge Formal, Parent's Day, and finally our spring outing. This year, as in the past, we are again working with the retarded child- ren at the Orono School. Another Chi O Spring Outing What's everybody looking at? i 'T Row 1: Jane Budd, Sharon Dow, Robbie Ruth- 3: Barbara Fulle, Linda DeLorme, Margaret erford. Row 2: Janet LaVoie, Debbie Far- Mercer, Cherry Edmunds, Sally Goucher, Liz well, Nona Libby, Pam Vaccaro, Sue Hanna, Smart, Pat Rodgers. Karen Adkins, Sue Rice, Cindy Fuller. Row 145 Calla Home Natalie Jackson Jo Dlllon Eleanor Greenleaf L. Deonne Jackman Pat Tofuu Marjorie Llbby Elmabeth Brown Noune Malcolm Diane Davis Jo Ann Grecnhalxzh Linda Jordan Chrystal Mayo Chelsea Stenger Bax bm a Wnlmm-th Margaret Young Susan Downing Judy McNutt Maw Doe Martha Gifflth Elizabeth Pellxter J . ,,.,45 Erne tine Pero President ll Linda Greenhalgh Vice-President Delta Delta Delta ' Alpha Kappa Chapter 1917 Tri Delta was founded at Boston University on Thanksgiving Eve in 1888. Two foresighted young students organized Delta Delta Delta as a national from its start, the only fraternity so set up at that time. This year Tri Deltas celebrate the 75th anniversary of the organization, now one of the three largest fraternities for women. Alpha Theta, a local group at the University of Maine, recognized the high ideals of Delta Delta Delta and in 1917 became Alpha Kappa chap- ter of the national organization, joining two other sororities on this campus. Dr. Ava Chadbourne, for whom Chadbourne Hall is named, is one of our local founders and still wears our number one pin. Maine Alpha Kappas today recognize the same ideals held by their founders and find them a guiding force in their lives. The Delta's philanthropic project is a scholarship to a U. of M. student, given with money ear-ned from the annual fashion show. Other activities include a pansy breakfast, a scholarship party, a Christmas party with Delta Tau Delta for local underprivileged children, parents' day and fall and spring outings. 121.19 nie Masterman Secretary 0 Y' x 0 i '4' Alaiym,-pay Q - Row 1: Lee Chiarini, Connie Survant, Janet gane, Jacki Smith, Nancy Cain, Dee Dee Mceachern, Paula Cushman, Cindy Cashman, Walters, Donna De Courcy. Missing: Joany Waleria Lukas, Kathy Jackson, Lynne Seaver. French, Julie Warren. Row 2: Pearl Robinson, Kay York, Patty Big- l47 Pamela B Treasur r -2 'Q' w '1 ,A-J 1-.lv arg, .Ni-,. K. 'Tn'-'b new N ,...,, -16 1 , 1.1 ,, ,, V-L ...ASL "1 I- 1 I ' 7 Q H- ' se I l "" 1' il E. - 4 -iv i' We J H 1,2 ' "ig, sly. by f ,Y 1 E ., uni ' ' 1 L: .:.,.:., , . F ,N , vu-I X , . o ,A , 1. X 7- V I I .rw -Carolyn Robertson Bobbie Lott Betsy Hall Carolyn Mboria. Eleanor Schutt 435. Carolee Sampson Pat Wood Barbara Barth Pat Dowd Linda Fales Nikki Gregory Carol Cross Carole Hatt Barbara Biggane Linda Thompson Carrie Somers Bonnie Wheaton Nancy Walter Carol Smith Sandy Patten Brenda Menges Ardra Thurlow Marilyn Mehlman Bonnie Monsulick Kim Waddell Brenda Babcock Jean Burnham Mary Brooks Nanette Starbird Kitty Hoyt Sue Healy Susan Smith Lois Goldsmith Marie 'Whited Lovina Alley Donna Swett Rosemary Pelletier Jane Andrews Georgann Guidmor Linda Levesque Libby Doughty K1 Standing Andiea Pulkkinen, Lee Saucier, Katherine Thorpe, Carol Perland, Judith Duby Pris Smith Seated: Sarah Libby, Isabel Johnson, Nancy Cook, Dorothy Foster Patricia OConnell Gail Dcttmer. Missing: Diane Dixon. I S Delta Zeta Alpha Upsilon Chapter 1924 Delta Zeta, the largest in chapters of the national sororities, was founded in 1902 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Alpha Upsilon chapter was installed at the University of Maine in the fall of 1924. The chapter gained much recognition scholastically and socially. In 1936, however, the sorority was disbanded due to the depression, but the charter remained on campus and in 1947, Alpha Upsilon was reactivated. Since then, it has continued to grow and to maintain its excellent scholarship record. DZ group activities include an Animal Fair, Fall outing, Mother's Day Banquet, Senior breakfast, and Founder's Day tea. Philanthropic activities include Gallaudet College for the deaf, Carville Hospital, and several local projects. 149 F? M 1, I r .1 1 .N A . N Q 1 1 1 1 :A . M 1 'Q l 'FU 1.1-22, M11 DQ! .-.- .l -3 -:1.,1. ,f , , "lv 'li Y r . .7 s ' Q 1 6 Q", ., 1 af? .. , ' Pamela Kenoyer 5 Sue Holmes Joyce Allen 4 Q ,ics- l.-'-1.1,H ll L S 'af 'V 3 Sue Bodwell 5 Lyn Holbrook 1 Pam Nelson Donna Jobber 5 Marion Mantai jf? 'Ju .. I' Joan Fairbank A Monique Plante , Q 11? 9 1 U' Y Row 1: Nola. Johnson, Jennifer Row 2: Mary Arno, Sue Dodge, Carol lee, Sally Flamand, Linda Tinlin, fl. Susan Myer Barbara Boucher Sandy Willis Sue Maltby Sharon Taylor Adele Danahy Flower Wasylyshyn Ellie Winn Wendy Bulkeley Donna Colfer Bonnie Hetzel Carol Jesraly Ursula Pickart Tonda Olson Jackie Fournier Nancy Troland Peg Galloupe Lois Ingeneri Judy Holmes Judy Payson Carolyn DeVoe Bev Smith Sue O'Donne11 Janet Blake 150 Adams, Judy Sullivan. Row 3: Eri Phi Mu Pi Chapter 1911 In 1912 Phi Mu became an active part of the Maine campus, bringing with her the rose and white colors and our en- chantress carnation. Phi Mu is the second oldest sorority at the University and also the second oldest national sorority in the United States. To us our philanthropic projects are very important because they are an out- ward symbol of one of our main purposes for being a sorority-service. Through- out the years Phi Mu has undertaken many worthwhile activities. For many years Pi chapter has joined with Phi Mu Delta, our brother fraternity, for a Christmas party at the Bangor Children's Home. We have been making regular vis- its with the patients at the Bangor City Hospital for many years and also join with our alumnae to present a musical night there. Traditionally, Pi chapter has held sales, stag dances, ushering at Maine Masque. Other events are the Founders Day Ban- quet, Pledge Formal, a Spri'ng Bazaar to raise money for the Barbara Bosworth Scholarship, a spring outing, and the final and memorable activity, the senior party. l.. QTQQQQ Q . .: .. ' 1 .i,. ,Ls-V .V .K v, ', .vii -425,1 A I ,,x,,, ,vp-"mi, 'S0fE,UHlgf' fire., 1 M , 1 " Al 1 1 Ar f es, .6 'uf' if oode, Carol Smith, Karen Mantai, Katy arquez, Margaret Burrows, Sue Fides, aren Troland, Sandy Burke. -S Phi Mu Pledges present their gifts. l5I J-PX.- '27 ut. Sandy Farrar President ." a 1- - Nancy Bradstreet Vice-President . , i 3 ,4 ' , ' Eff Mfiv l ' 1 'Zn -A 44. ,- it -3, if Connie Coyne Secretary j, H Z?-ZTQPY, . f 1 1' 3,214 - :api Q .--are-" f.'.Lg,, qv Q.:-N N -'gr Z," , - if ' '5 1 F ' , sz J i 1 I vi ff f ll i ll ' . Sandy Cole Treasurer 5 L Barbara Bristol Baxbaxa Bxckmore Ann Eddy Stephanie Bauy - - J acquehne Gauthier Mary Cate Foote Linda Barstow Bonnie Adams Julie Love Barbara Hinkson Donna Robertson Jewell Flint Geraldine Adams Sandra Moores ip ha' ' ' Y ' l I I l r L ' . 4 I N 'ff' ,A .1 i W e- " A '51, Suzanne Whitaker Linda Cate Nancy Fox Barbara Rider Suzanne Young Pamela Goodwin Kathy Gould Jayne Wareing Jackie Wolfe Paula Reddy Karen Helliwell Barbara Waters Jean Woods Gail Kelley Judy Kay Susan Weaver Eleanor Main Gail Ferris Many McDonald Linda Breed .T on Wilkinson , lx .A - 1712! ,fp 'L ' f-r 'i.,.iYJ .6 - N v. ' I H .V I L- , l -ff Fi 1-lu. ' Wg: '-'Y' I lj aww .- " 'hi .1 v'-dll, Y ' 3' ' I L"i AA Elsa llvunen President Q l 1 1 I ill' ' 4 I 1 f 'F' v "i 1 is It gig! it Katherine Sturgis Vice-President Mai 0,7 r I U 1 0 1 ,. , 0 l' QQ ' ,' 93' - a -gg.: 'wax rff, o if N 12-Q1 EE: ', , -' L-, 5 5, .lj-1 is ,'..2'fx2il Jwaff ", 3 'mi iff . 6 I: x'. F '-.J ?,., - :wa 1. '. I 3, fifgi' - 9 T 0, '-'JT - 'Q' "f.'4'l'.- . ,f, ' 'Th 1' 'tlhwwii 4 I ','i3Mf"2. 5l V 'fifi ..5y3""' X 1 -, is I . ' :riffs , - . r I . f X., 1 Q . .-N 0 4' -fy . - :rw I J fy w I :YQ ', ,H 4 J,,:1.,. 0- 4. 4 4 1' A, f 'Qi ff" 9 '."-2 -' 'VBS " T ' -stiff' X ' - Q v. 'g,c'5' I Q, l- 5, 3375: -'ai' . -4..".5-'.,:3,, , ..,,--M ' Q. A .' 'Q 'efv .-.fa 1 A ' 1'-1 5 1 . 0 'jzt ,, ' ,' 4. fn I' 1 at ,g y ,' ' ' igiliy ' n , ,. 7'1' V 5' Q 3 'gl' 1 I vt . ,, Q X I Q ar Ji sl ,' at .v Pi Beta Phi Pi Beta Phi, the oldest and largest in mem- bership of the Greek women fraternities, was founded under the name of I. C. Sorosis in 1867 at Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illi- nois. Maine Alpha Chapter was installed in 1920. Our philanthropic projects are the Set- tlement School in Tennessee and a scholar- ship here at Maine. Campus activities include the fall and spring outings, cookie shines, Christmas party, Pledge Formal at our brother fraternity, Phi Gamma Delta, Candy Apple, Muu Muu and Arrowcraft sales, Mother-Daugh- ter breakfast, Strawberry breakfast and Senior Farewell, World Problems Night, and Pi Phi Night. ne Alpha Chapter 1920 ff F A 1 'J 'Q ,Xi il m,.f l L Row 1: Mary E11 lin, Martha Steeves, Glenna Renegar, Barb- ara Fredrick, Debbie LeClaire, Nancy Wy- man. Row 2: Donna Belleau, Nancy Bates, Flanagan. en Peterson, Stephanie Ka- Dena Woods, Irene Turcotte, Jean Gilbert, Mary-Lou Wakely. Missing: Wendy Sleeper, Carol Snyder, .Andi Witham, Mary-Jean if 4 , gf ,, . Y mi., . , Jil ..- 4 r Joyce Ring Treasurer Typical Pi Phi Outing -Q.. ' - fix. rf?"-Q fr- . -x 5 M., W J b , W , f-i.:, Q. , 5.1, .,., YY, ' v Zi. ---- .1 ' Mb ,,' n 1, . -Q Q VA. , . X5 0-UW, V I ,. Qu ML, if Q- ,: .f.T'rN?'tf.,-f gif., -L10 ,- W- - 5 - lc' l'::", :35,563.?6 'nf 3- "ff qt 'AWP' 5 Q5 sm' ' ,' r ' ,QQ rl."-Q. 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X X X X , -1. 2,1 X1 sXXX,X 1 ,F XXX, I SX XX Kirx X,1XX..X X ' ' ' - ' . . -'-1.1-r ,- X X, X X- 1 J .X Y ' l.Ax'.-' .-V. 1 V 1 l 1 A. 'I-a 4, ., J YTJ 'Q A Z," Q ,, ..,,, S f . '11 , 1 'Z HW- Amos Gay Bruce Brockway David Laurence Raymond Hitchcock Karl Weber William Shoener Lawrence Risso Stephen Clark Robert August Errol Additon Wayne Thurston George Morse Amos Orcutt Peter Smith Robert Swartz Thomas Newman Charles Fillebrown Douglas Meservey Ernest Torok Thomas Lord Stephen Chandler Kenneth Stratton Lee Meserve Robert Spalding Fred Burnett Russell Kinerson Lawrence Flewelling Ernest Harvey Donald Kinerson Paul DcMerchnnt James Carnegie Richard Gary Malcolm Call David Abell Burton Taylor Frank Tupper Anthony Yuodsnukis Stephen Briggs James Sargent Burton Copson Darryl Brown William Tennett Albert Larson Michael Sawyer William Paulson Robert Black Paul Andrews Alpha Gamma Rho Psi Chapter 1924 Psi chapter of Alpha Gamma Rho was found- ed at the University of Maine in 1924. Alpha Gamma Rho is the only social-professional fra- ternity on the Maine campus and it selects its members from those students pursuing collegi- ate courses in Agriculture and related fields. The 'Grabbas' are again this year active in campus social and other extracurricular affairs. Dave Richardson is the secretary of the Inter- fraternity Councilg Tony Yuodsnukis is the Outdoor Editor of the Mai'ne Campus and Steve Briggs is the president of the campus 4-H club. The total student membership of Alpha Zeta inctyldes 304k AGR's, and that of Xi Sigma Pi 50 0. Social events for the year included Spring and Fall houseparties, The Woodchopperls Brawl, the Homecoming Banquet and Dance a'nd after game drop-ins. .. -.v. fun- .. ,. 't ,vj.j.g'-153-Q. 'l'1'.f-1 - 1' 'Algal' .:' if 5:19 ' ' ' " 2 1 J Fsfj: ? , , ' - i5a1efff'Z'Sf iw-,i , '- Bill' ' MJ' A Q' .efffgjffggflggggj-ggi:-' , A '4-'f11'5.-11: .+f':r?nf,,-, . ' "wigs:wlfifgiiliiziitfzz1-A, ' ," ll-x'iJg-ay.: 1:23, fwsfl ' ,i "3 'V'-A .f:915:E-E ri- .t,j::. VY Y 1 Y ' I Y,.,, EJAAQQ g Fqpyp, Pu.: Jim Sargent l57 ' CY u,-u lvl' WN-sl -9 ,4- Q ,Q-Q ,rf -169' vw w--, 1 ,ui Nb-1 1T"3 A,- Keith Calef Theodore Babine William Hord David Farrar Bernard Beaudoin William Smaha Jon Eagleson Scott Woodman 3 N1'. David McLeod Earl Freeman William Chase Henry Voss William Walker Terrance Holmes John Murphy Frank Raymond James Foote Michael Feener James Teri-is Robert Spence James Demakis Douglas Clukey James Reilly Robert Garland Edward Jurgenson Mrs. Helen Brooks Alpha Tau Ome a eta Epsilon Chapter 1891 Maine's chapter, Beta Upsilon of Alpha Tau Omega was established at the University on April 10, 1891, becoming the third fraternity on cam- pus. Beta Upsilo'n was located on North Main St. in Orono until March 12, 1931, when it was de- stroyed by fire. Until May of 1932, when our pre- sent house was opened, the brothers lived in vari- ous other fraternity houses and in a house on Park St. in Orono. The ATO's helped to,ge'nerate the Maine school spirit at the football rallies and games this past year with a bear cub mascot named "Cindy Ban- anas", which the house took care of. ATO was prominent in the community with various projects and setting up a blood bank. The social calendar "pace setter" were Homecoming with all the "ole gradsu, then Fall House parties, Winter Carnival, Spring Houseparties, and our well known Daisy 1 ae Party. The Alpha Taus managed to be well re- resented in campus activities once again this year. en Lane and Bob Chadwick had the honor of ei'ng Senior Skulls. Bob Chadwick was President 'of MUAB, and Bud Freeman was captain of the sailing team. We are proud to have with us gain this year Mr. Libby, our cook, and "Ma" eeks serving her 13th year as our ever faithful ousemother. Seated: Beecher Washburn, John Pratt, Peter Burke, Howie Schaeffer Dick Gliddeng Standing: Dave Blais, Paul Tsuignant, Dan Peterson, Bob Reid John Hoyt. HE I Zifllml uf 1, ir Ui 'll' rv ik' I. "ln 'mV til l Q iii! W fe- M ppm XY X X their N X S x X6 X Qfittse NWXN BN, XXX J f xQ vii x x 2 ' t Mxka V-WV wr-,Ot X QMQVXTX, ken neth Lane President Robe! t Chadwick Vice-President Charles Boux ne Secretary Paul Beaudom Treasurer g--v gd' ,"?' ., 'VTP' Raymond C:-non Mark Hambleton Sterlm Clockedile Wllson Gagnon Donald Chase ,Q Daniel Peabody Robert Booney Rufus Brown Jeffery Chapman Charles Peabody Robert, Doucette Allan Robertson Michael Hope John Laban John Langley av: Phillip Davenport Stephen Steidle Ronald Russell George Blessing Bruce Ives John Mitchell J. Tucker Taylor Donald Child Perley Boucher Leo Lurochelle :QQ Harrison Moyer Raymond Vermette Raymond Cheney Mrs. Whitman Richard Grimm Donald Kelley Karl Turner John Bishop David Vmllancourt Arthur Grant Edmond Rancourt 160 Beta Theta Pi fEt " tx., 3' ,l- ' . Q . 1- 'C .JlllLLli.1mi,.J. llfl YW' E E a ' ff" ' llllllgirllllgill tif"llillllll. it lilllllllwl 'M 'Nui l' Gr X 45 ill. Ati, lx Kun-'V' a Chapter 1879 In 1879 Eta chapter of Alpha Sig- ma Chi became Beta Eta chapter of Beta Theta Pi. It was in this manner that Beta, the oldest fraternity on campus, came to Maine. Beta Eta can boast of 83 years of distinguished tra- dition on the Maine campus. Beta has the largest diversification of the fra- ternities, having a nearly equal distri- bution of members in each of the four colleges. The highlights of our social season are Snuffy Smith Party and French Party, in addition to Fall and Spring Houseparties. l il' . --tif' iff c Don Chase, Phil Davenport ,gf -2- .,.., . l6l s A . . h X i ' -LN .-.l Yvlllldm Gal tley Robez t A1 nold Robext Bazley Vernon XRVIIIREI' l I A, 56,2 Delta Tau Delta Gamma Nu Chapter 1908 Gamma Nu Chapter of Delta Tau Delta has been active in various circles at the University since its establishment on this campus in 1908, and it has received natio'nal recogni- tion for its scholastic achievement. Delta Tau is well represented in campus activities: Junior Class Vice Pres., David Simardg Senior class president, John Howard, President of IMAA, Dennis Hurlburt, Senior Rep- resentative of MAA, Al Leathersg Tau Beta Phi, John Ho- ward, John Gilbert, Robert Anderson, Dennis Hurlburt g and Mu Alpha Epsilon, Al Fernald. Bruce Cary is a sophomore Owl and A1 Leathers is a Senior Skull. Some of the annual events of the house include Spring and Fall House parties, Jamaica Party, and' several theme parties. Last spring the Delt's won IFC Sing for the second consecutive time. This year the brothers welcomed to their chapter Mrs. Katherine Lyon as their new housemother and "Stubby" Sherman as the new chef. Both have contributed immeasur- ably to the spirit of the house. Alan Fernald at piano. Paul Harnden Bill Flewelling, Jerry Robinson, Thomas Haitford E lIIIIIII"""1IflIIIl lIIIIIII Ililll - 'iif '..' tli -"" ' 1, fx ":1f 47 TA U x 4 'Y' Arthur Di Mnurn Thomas Kinnelly Thomas Murphy William Perkins John Jean fs- Cruig Milne President Kappa Sigma Psi Chapter 1886 John Hutchins K The first fraternity house on the Maine Campus was constructed by V lgfgl i"i' 1 Psi Chapter of Kappa Sigma. Founded at the University of Maine on Jan- illttllll1willll,ill1'll4ll,lllljlllllHitll3lat NglMIl lllll nary 1, 1886, Kappa Sig's origins can be traced back to the University W fMtlggi5'ffJk of Bologna in 1400. Kappa Sigs are in many different campus activities. They are the current campus football champs and are defending titles in willylmlkigl-ifgLfgmllllstl such events as paddleball and free-throw. They are Well represented in varsity athletics. Co-Captain Dan Severson leads ten Kappa Sigs on the if KL5jp.5f31ml'ri'yl5ll1 ,lylllQyllfyll.l0I X gridiron. Brothers are also members of varsity baseball, basketball, track, and soccer teams. Socially and Intramurally Kappa Sig is tops. QNX X li - -Z, 5 L I 6 1. V up iii V F" H N Kgs 'H g'.",l A-1 J! -'f 3 , . .1?"-1 Kappa Sig's Football Team 165 -Ji .3 Daniel S Trea "Z fer!! Charles Hanson Warren Myrick Thomas Coonley Richard Kennedy Arthur Wheaton William McCombs John Jukubowycz i Victor Finnemore Richard Hammons Hazen Mallory Henry Schmelzer Albert Sargent George Roberts Robert Scott. Stephen Pineo Douglas Merrifield Vite Vitale Roderick Cross Richard Larrabee Charles Little Brian Gardner John Geittmann Boyd Bergen Frederick Hussey Bessie Hill Douglas Benning Thomas Edge Daniel Hillnrd Richard Nolan Bruce Bayuk Lawrence Emery Edward Fairfield Robert Murxzita Arnold McKee Mark Good Thomas Lim-,cott Juhn Holmes George White gals :ll will in ar' Av lfffwf 1 su! Q Lambda Chi Alpha Beta Chapter 1913 Beta Chapter of Lambda Chi Alpha, which has to date initiated 854 men, is the seventh oldest Lambda Chi Chapter in the country and was founded here at Maine in 1913. Lambda Chi is especially noted for its active highlights being fall and spring houseparties, Gay Nineties Night and Toga Party. The men of Lambda Ch are pursuing diversfied sub- jects, ranging from Education to Forestry, resulting in a composite which is an invaluable source of inspiration and information. Lambda Chi's are well represented in campus activi- ties. Larry Emery is a Senior Skull and Dick Larrabee is Chairman of Greek Weekend. Scholarship, social activities, and school spirit give the men of Lambda Chi every right to be proud of their chapter. A!,.,g.c,gidam ccrgzqsqew gi , -1 , lv N -11' -N-1 iflkf -My jg rl' i S -ief .A , . ' . A i, Ja. F ij if H +- fgihvy X AY " ,Jw I . x, Affl'-3643, xx L -A,..z Stan Clark, Fred Bailey, Ed Flynn, "Skip" Roberts ff ,X s 'ii 1 f-Pi Nm ey Peter Macphee Richard Cattelle Marshall Magee Charles Michaud John Lane Stephen Gorden George Redmond Lewis Murray Larry Johnson Stanley Walker Douglas Cutchin Beulah Smith Dana Barnes John Fox Raymon d Sawyer Philip Soule Gerald Ellis David Tyler Allan Twombly Wayne Fitzgerald Dominic Ceresosimo Lester Fisher John Wentworth John Barrett Burtt Mclntire Thomas Rolfe Robert Kirk Michael Zubko Gerry Whiting Brian Smalley Ronald Mafzuire Clement McGillicudcl John Richardson Neal Harvie David Harnum Garland Strang James Fowler Ted Fraser Michael Skaling James Whitten Douglas Avery Richard DeVarney John Inness Frank Hobbs Peter Duncan John McGonagle John Furman Ernest Smith Ronald Corbin Donald Lippke Eld-on Morrison Stuart Stromberg Richard Perkins William Riviere Steve Knight Peter Culley Breen Morang Alan Zimmerman Craig Hannon Newell Weston Horace Horton Paul Nelson Roger Sawyer Peter Keene Murray Spruce Robert Johnson Scott Ballard rry Woodworth P d t resi en Q ' lbs? Phi Eta Kappa 1906 Phi Eta Kappa, founded on the Maine campus in 1906, is recognized as one of the strongest local fraternities in the nation. Phi Etas take pride in their active participation in campus organizations and functions. Jerry Ellis is a Senior Skull, Presi- dent of the M-Club, and captain of the indoor, out- door, and cross country track teams. Clem McGilli- cuddy is also a Senior Skull. Sophomore Owls in- clude Les Fisher and Mike Skaling. Horace Horton, is president of the Junior class. For the fifth con- secutive year Phi Eta Kappa has retained the B.C. Kent Intramural All Point Trophy, winning cham- pionships in track and basketball. Scholastically Phi Eta has ranked in the upper quarter of fraterni- ties for the past three years. Social activities include the Indian Party, Buchaneers Brawl, and Spring Formal. We welcomed back our housemother, "Ma" Smith, for her third year. Hugh Morgan Phil Brown .. . 95? f Axpvl gf ? vpbu L 5,4 . Q g i rp i .wlmanf-Nwma ww-ovuvuwawvwl ' 5 . 4 , .,,,, I 5 ""-'- 3 cw. N 5 ,.ss :"" In Mmawaarfmnmfffgiw V F512 Larry Woodworth, Moose Smalley, "Ma" Smith, Pete Culley 43 Richard Acheson Alan Sawyer 2 'TJ l Scott King David Crabtree Maurice Webb Thomas Barron Fred Paganucci Leon Pxnkham Joseph Williamson David Willette use Martin Godfrey ,gg Wxnfxed Stevens Stuart Gexald Gary Hanson if' Thomas Robinson James Van Valkenburgh Kenton Wright lvlerrill Rumrnel Richard Johnson X ,vw 0 ,, Texxy Chadbom ne Darrel Hubbs aw' Paul Stimpson Scott Lewis Douglas Johns Marshall Stern John Lee Rowland Hastings Charles Morgan Robert Mills 1 as WSE, Wayne Robbins ' John Vickery .fu .V ' , ll K , l I John Johnson 1 4 I I Stuart Rich ' 1' ' F" I" . ll 'll lim' f1.:j":'f . ' - . V if 1 .jf N 'J if ' fhrli- Vid., AV: I -l:1:E3:.-.11. 5.HlV 'im I 'm .JJ ' 'ie ll- '-.' N .ll'W""1ll . 1 'll l,!l"fil'jlV ',4W "l, " qv Q.. Lowell Sherwood A ',-if ' MM' 'T1:'.' J , 1: 1. -. 1 s- . Wfezv . ,- Robert He-as 15 . f'j74v'a,,3.3,g 4, ,J1"f'-gfM4,, 'Z' ' , ,, 21,-f-f'-'QM' wcvyw 1 if Dough Prlde -41.1 ' ' ,yW,,c".. ,-WH N 1. . ' fu. fc" f' , 1 fm, -M A-tg. af 'mf ff' v .ljfu I' 17'4,gv'y5lv, fi? -1. if .J , -1-.tug I 1.-, f -.I We S wk ill i 1 W 1 In ' 4' ffl . N Q- A." ::y r VV : fgw Xifqs ' W' Ronald Graves N MQ -.,- A Mrs. Blaise-311 my Ufdfn. 170 Phill!! Harmon Philip Norton R. Ewen Farnham Recording Secretary Phi Gamma Delta Omega Mu Chapter 1899 November 24, 1899, the National fraternity of Phi Gamma Delta admitted' to its ranks the Omega Mu Chapter at the University of Maine. The first house was opened at the present site of the Lambda Chi house. In 1924 the house was destroyed by fire and the new chapter house was constructed at its present location at the extreme southern end of the campus, in 1925. We began the social season with house parties, Figi Island parties, and a Christmas Party for the children of St. Michael's Home with our sister soror- ity, Pi Beta Phi. Figi's ranked first by winning the homecoming display this year. Leading Phi Gam's on campus are Ted Sherwood, Senior Skull and president of the General Student Senate and Marshall Stern, our campus mayor. It -E.',.,r, w,-.1 ..,:.TlN5, I L 1963 winners of Homecoming Display. -11" 1 .1 .Q lf' ,--1 'ff' Clement Exronis Wayne Lourlci' Maurice Rowan Peter Pullen Duvirl Svcnclsen 'Kenneth Howe Peter Averill Thomas Ryan Thomas Tuthill John Robutson 'Z Vllilliam Pottcl' Wayne Cobb Donald Arnold lioliert Jovrlon Churlcrs Prince William Gould Leowncl D1C'ulo Dmiel Salnsbuxv Fvxnk B1-,hop Waync. Iohn-,on Stephen Wil-,on John T ihimen Wxll nd Tlvnt HMM Biulgo Dennis Vogel Robvrt Kizah Eugene Monahan Paul Shcrlnurne Paul Sullivan 'Nillinrn Ahrcnc John lrclanll Eslwnrzl Fzlnwcll Dnvil Kcrriiznn Avzuwl Walker Stephen Carleton James Butler Robert Michuuzl Charles Taylor Edwarcl Fernalrl Axel Larson Dale Worthen Charles Bonney James Henneberry Thomas Hardcustle w i .w Ronald Poitras Gordon Evans M1 5. Kathel me Kneeland l .lim Iflemicberry, John Ireland, Fred Wildes. Phi Kappa Sigma Alpha Delta Chapter 1898 Alpha Delta Chapter of Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity was formed in 1898, at the University of Maine, from the local Omicron Epsilon Eta Pi Society. Phi Kap has always been Well represented in campus activities, and this year is no exception. To mention a few of the Phi Kaps who are active in campus organizations:Judd Evans and Paul Sherburne-Senior Skulls, Charles Bonney, Maurice Rowan, Paul Sullivan, and Dale Worthen-Sopho- more Owlsg Avard- Walker-Circle "K" President and Business Manager of the Maine Campus. There are members of Phi Kap in every major varsity sport, including Dave Svendsen-captain of the basketball team. The social calendar at the "House"is highlighted by Homecoming, Ara- bian Night's party, Harold's Clubg Spring House Parties, and various week- end functions-all chaperonecl by our gracious house-rnother, Mrs. Knee- land. vii, If Nv'5i Jr 41- W-,fe FQ U ii? P c , X 'll M ,. QQ eww J --' K: Ernest Jackson Bentley Keene Robert Spear Norman Fitzgerald Richard Shaw Arthur Dudley Willard Deering Jon Woodbury Lawrence Coughlin John Gray Stephen Goodridge Lewis Snow ' William Barbour Phi Mu Delta Nu Epsilon Chapter 1926 Nu Epsilon Chapter of Phi Mu Delta was estab- lished at the U'niversity of Maine in 1923. Phi Mu's take part in many campus activities. Ken Poole is a Senior Skull. Many brothers are on the varsity athletic teams. Included in the fourteen members on the football team is co-captain Earl Cooper. The brothers of Phi Mu were again ru'nners up in the intramural football championship, and throughout the year took part in intramural basketball, track, paddleball, and indoor softball. Present members of the Sophomore Owls are Floyd Horn, Bob Kocsmier- sky, and Bob Woodbury. Phi Mu Delta's social activi- ties include the a'nnual Homecoming Party and Shipwreck Party. We welcomed back for her fifth year, "Ma" Carter, our housemother, and our cook, Ed "Foo" Young. Kenneth Poole President John Abbott Treasurer William Cook lst Row: Doug Gerald Graffam. Jeff Hall, John Newell, Charlie Williamson. Hathaway, Reg Pelletier, Jeff Sanborn, Bob Brewer, 2nd Row: Jim Seawell, Woody Fliesher, Floyd Horn, Hutchins. 3rd Row: Norm Ness, Ron Lanza, Charlie McDonough, Bob Kocsmiersky, Rob Cantewell, Terry l75' 1 x" -' . fi i F- . F.. P ir .ie v ' R 1. fl-. . if . N E 'N -. .zxl W, 'wr l fi-' 'V - -mf 'ff J f pi J ,ff an ' , " 2 X. 'f fl FQ' . , E 1 A V 6 J 57 ,H , Q , Vx W, J 'I 4 " I fi 4? l ll ,P S 'I , ,,. , .. 4: .V iii-. , - mf A . .y l x M A X 4 . , f I .I Vw' W l 'Y X i 4 Q W A M A G-It Q. 5 if ,ll , Z .1 .n . ,4 . . l ...A . ,. 9. .yi .91-f' . g.. , .7 :E i l. -5, , Vi W3 , 'Q-vi V! . X 14 X X 1 r -x r-U ' ' ' .1 "' ' """" 'I fr' V 1 ' r gl 6: - V ' 'v fu... ' V X l ' N r L , -" i ' ' ' ' b . V 1 j - N I 1 , Donald Derrnh V -3 b - A l A .4 Joseph Frustaci 'Q Q sn V I ,Vx I Bruce Hauck N Zigi' " g l ' "-2 i,,- .2 'I gy . Jqaff Victor Nelson , , f Y f ' Er- i Raymond Jean F, Reuben Chase -. Q' . ' 1 - fm .Q 2 Jack Wilkinson , gl' ' 1' . V T 6. if Roland Cyr M . - ' Q ' ' ' I X i lf' Peter Clouirh ,F . ' ' ' ,fl l , Q ' lg V Norman Chabot H V 7 . x Maurice Bouchard , l 1 ll Mark Sweeny f . r fn- N ' l V . i ' 1 -' 7. r. N. A 'U-Sf Y "" 1 ea-' I V L Q ex fag.. David Kirk ' A-' i I ' gf' , Ralph Gimxey b ,i , HQ: l ' K Brad Jenkins T if' X 3 Q ' P Q I fv A l William O'Connel1 l ' ' Brian Turnbuugh L Laurence Hover J A I ,lp - William Simonten ' I ' 1 N ' -12, 1 t F 1- George Winfz ' 6 5 rv ' J ' . J . -P fi ,N ..... Ai-mia Delnite '- .,,, 1 - i V H3 r . X 'H J i t 'Q i 1. L. Gorden i L' ' ' ,I Mrs. M. Pray " -u '. ' Y . x ' -. JY! 3 Philip Webber Victor Mercer Ronald Turner Clifford Ouellette Dewey Chase John Sutherland Thomns Hauck Philip Morse Terry Osgood James Dolloff Alan Riley James Coleman Allan Ramsdcll Dana Dolloff John Fearon Thomas Paiement Ruhr-rt Hurd George Blaisdcll William Flahive Joseph Murray Marshall Hall Donald Sorrie John Tele Willinm Weatherbie Bruce Coles Roland Heirmon Stephen Armstrong R. 'Pnradis 'nv V u ,X 335 grid" .inf 1 f ill er,-ET::f:1r eexuigg- -- .., 4 if '5'i.:zi? are-EE? -- Y VA- 'germ-5-21 4 xigiisg-11 -.i,.::::-7 L, , if K-1 : H- -Q- 53 -5 ? 1-:Lv . Hr f ff Sigma Chi Rho Rho Chapter 1902 Sigma Chi Fraternity was founded in 1855 at Miami Universi- ty, Oxford, Ohio. Rho Rho chapter was established in 1902 at Maine. The pledges initiated last fall are carrying on the philoso- phy and ideals of the founders-that men of different tempera- ments, talents and- convictions, working together toward a com- mon goal, can best achieve their personal goals in life. The present chapter house was constructed in 1935 after a fire destroyed the original building located near the Orono bridge. During the past summer the present house was renovated. During its sixty-one years on the campus Sigma Chi has con- tinued to maintain an outstanding activities record. Brad Jenkins is president of the IFC, Chip Cyr is president of the Sophomore Owls, and John Sutherland is president of Kappa Delta Pi. This year Mrs. Mary Pray returned for her fourteenth year as Sigma Chi's housemother. sr 1 . is A , ' ' '. ,M I W I A, -' .. -.vi N A -1. A ZI' '2 is ' . .- . L' 1 O ft' th' 1 K . . , I -,, . Roger Irelnnd Donald McBeLh President Vice-President AX, . 'WU 95 I 'S l 4 1 x l .1 3. 4 V Ls X Fi Ss 5 xl it 13. ' Edwin Douglass sf X If 4 Robert Jucius J N fan f ls Mrs. Estelle Philbrook Richard Pelletier Leo Millett Richard Randall Philip Grant Brian Cook Douglas Sxdelmger Douglas Getchell . , X I if ' v 1,4-"1 Q-U . ' V I w I i l N ly X., n Q fi' Stanley Roberts President , Jeffery Robertson Phjilgg Qga1E11tiqtDoug' Sidelingel., an 3.V1 6 . I 1? -X ngf hkfv 1+ if - ' K 'A 8 ' - w '.. I I, 1 ' Richard Morin l 2 . 4 'l ' Y 5 . -1 i i .f Qgsx ga John Davis Grevis Grinnell Neil Iverson David Fent Dennis Furington Jason Magill 178 We in .,. ru vga., 4' JJ..- t f V -V .V 'V m m e n Ji E . iff L J! .3 At, . -:uf , Henry Garfield Norwood Olmsted Lyle Cramer Vice-President Secretary Treasurer aggi ,. 55. -Ili' " A EQ .sig - D 1 ll- Richard Morin, Brian Cook. Sigma Nu Delta Nu Chapter 1903 Sigma Nu was founded at the Virginia Military Institute in 1869. Delta Nu Chapter at the University of Maine celebrates its Golden Anniversary this year. Many repairs and improvements have taken place in the Great White Castle this year under the leadership of Stanley Roberts, President. Plans are being made for further repairs throughout the coming year. These improve- ments reflect the initiative and ambition of the brotherhood of Sigma Nu. Sigma Nu has departed' from the status quo of a social fraternity, to that of one looking for more and better ways to produce Well educated men for our ever advancing society. This year we welcome our talented housemother, Mrs. Estelle Philbrook, for her third year with us, and our new cook, Mr. Earl Terrill. I79 Alan Tltcomh Bruce Whlttemme Graham Cuuv Thomas Cow Charles Richardson Alnulcl Monns Nlvmn VanKnk John Kimball Peter Ezzy Allen Holmes John Duncan David Swett J umm Ross John Corson Avenll Huff Fzedenck Cole Geox ge Kimball James Tompkins Jeffezy Huether if ,I ': ET Robert Martin Robert Sprague Kent Johnson Richard Day Sherman Laughton James Mundy James Sunbor Willium Stanton Mm-k Anrlerson Wesley Day Paul Graves Robert Degon Dean Titcomb Joseph Sala Charles Treat Edwax d O Connell Mai tin McCam Lany Buck David Shibles Richard Faloon Karl Kelley Lewis Flag! Gerald Forrest William Paradise Paul Nickerson Roland Libby Kenneth Murray Mrs. Townsend lull--, Nu' '..-! , ,.... lu. f'1"x, dell Blanchard President Sigma Phi Epsilon Alpha Chapter 1948 Outstanding academic achievement is an import- ant goal of Sigma Phi Epsilon. Sig Ep has won the fraternity scholarship trophy for two consecutive semesters-the fall of 1962 and the spring of 1963. The Maine Alpha Chapter of Sigma Phi Epsilon was installed on May 30, 1948. By this time, Sigma Phi Epsilon was firmly established throughout the Unit- ed States. Founded in 1901 at Richmond College, Vir- ginia, Sig Ep soon became one of the largest nation- al fraternities. I'n 1950, the Maine Alpha Chapter achieved national fame by changing Hell Week to Greek Week. Sig Eps participate in campus athletics and activities. Tom LaHaise is a key member of the ski team. James Ross is President of the Maine Out- ing Club. Social events include Fall and Spring Houseparties, Hawaiian Party, Klondike Night and Parent's Day. Sig Ep also sponsors annually a Christ- mas party for the underprivileged children of the area. Mrs. Evelyn Townsend of Belfast remains our housemother. Her companionship, assistance, and kind cooperation make Sig Ep an enjoyable place in which to live. gi. . f. .fl n, fil l ' ' CI- iii P at 1 .Ei W 'Ze 'N 41+ Paul Ringwood Marvin Glazier ik -5 Qi Xxd! J, l Richard Field Barry Zern Stanley Brinster is Donald Mclemore James Baker Lawrence Bader Enoch Zuchman Stetson Orchard Alan Spector Glenn Rapaport John Whitmore Robert Tuman Michael Fox Charles Friedman William Steele I f'.i",gg HJ 'giiamf ., A..V f ,-,K -. . .,.-V. ld-1' , a 1474 .i -L., 'kit , W ,WK il '- 1 ' . fr. ,q ,. .f.. nfl-1574 I vw::EN,...,, f-I---'J1,i.' -,.,, ifxgfn SQ, tp 1 V "Hn" N., . ., ii., 'yall' - ,, , - VX s- .W ,HI 5, '1 'il5ai,., ff lf-ff' ' giizlll. gg. 1 iffy 4, i"?Q-ifig 3. O rf i' gg it ,.: aww if' 1 -mn.. I ' if-5 .V .j V. 1 , ' I '!'f"N1vj'f:i:l:lv 2, , 8""il.., 1' - f. . my 1 3 'M , ,,-v. "Frm 4-I ' 'Yi'-,J ,. W -'E i r A vi' ww ' ,. if ii -4 A J an-.Z Barry Cobb John Carter Owen Rogers David Rumfeldt Arnold Weiss Tau Epsilon Phi Tau Zeta Chapter 1929 Tau Zeta chapter of Tau Epsilon Phi was estab- lished on this campus in 1929. The concept of fratern- ity life which TEPs adhere to is that it is a sub- ordinate part of the institution at which it is located, and that its main function is to assist its members by encouraging scholastic and social attainment on campus while maintaining a beneficial social Contact with their Brothers in other chapters. Although em- phasis is placed on good scholarship, TEPS are also active in many campus activities. The Concert Band is represented by Greg Bisson who is its president, while Arnie Weiss serves the Senate as its Committee Coordinator. This year we welcome back our House- mother, Mrs. Margaret Cobb and our very capable cook, Tommy Tear. r fl I 5 ff if gr Owen Rogers, Marvin Glasier, Robert Tuman Edward Shultz, James Baker, Barry Cobb, Alan Spector, Richard Halpern. Rupert. Grover John Schott President Vice-President 2? 'L Gregory Bisson Secretary Carl Stewart Treasurer I .-.q, vi' rf TKE f!'?. C f5f?fvv 1f'fTr,,, Tau Kappa Epsilon eta Upsilon Chapter 1947 Beta Upsilon Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon origi- nated in the fall of 1947, when a group of Veterans formed a club called Chi Rho Sigma. On April 19, 1948, Chi Rho Sigma voted to become a colony of TKE. On December 11-12, 1948, Chi Rho Sigma was formally instructed as Beta Upsilon Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon. TKE has three Sophomore Owls: Peter Paiton, Sarge Means, and Jim Maynard. Allan Arch is Vice President of the Maine Christian Association and Tom Morse is Student Chairma'n of the Social Af- fairs Committee of the University. Tau Kappa Epsilon is a relatively young fraterni- ty on the Maine Campus with a proud past and a brilliant future. Vvv V A typical evening at TKE ' N w . 'i S fl lm . ,. ' p . 1 ' 1 L' ' . I, , 7,1 l ' l l L ,rl 3 i - V 'HC ' I M H-.l Q 3 B' : V. . 'E I ' , ' Q' 1' ' -V: . ' , ' 'T' ' ,N ' l 1 , 1- ,E fr -, ' 13' L " ' l' 1 ' " l k ' I' . pf f' I l Q 7 ' . ., l , - f Jeffrey Chase 3 Craig Lund Richard Dolloff Thomas Scala Donald Stanhope 'I Ernest Whitehouse Paul Ralph Dennis Waskiewicz Wayne Harvey Jerry Savitz Earl Johnson Fletcher Carter Richard Williams Paul Flaherty James. Jenkins Donald Young Anthony Smith Allan Weeks Brian MacMillan Robert Mitchell David Palmer Augustus Moody .fi David Jowett Clarence Atwood William Porter Stephen Manchester Sheldon White Arthur Henry Vern Avery Verne Beruke Virginia Martin The Theta Chi s seive dinner. A w 4' ff' ,V ,-'I,hL I h - f-S A' T hfhh like mm S, 'i'5""l pi 'I' M C 7 ' I T 95 x Gamma Chapter 1907 Gamma Chapter of Theta Chi is the third oldest Theta Chi Chapter and has over 900 alumni on her records. Many new traditions on the Maine campus were initiated by Theta Chi. Our house-jackets were the first to be seen at Maine and Theta Chi initiated the change from "Hell Week" to a "Greek Week". Socially, Theta Chi is active year round with Fall House Party, Dirty Pete's Saloon, Apache Party, Spring House Party and the Spring House Party forming the major social events of the season. .IS7 A, if ' i' 5 Q at l f y f"l"llanlIl' 6 'Pj-F21 i 5 'W NP' nib" Ly ' f if N ,Q w - 71 A, ,'.. . V v . 1-V ,- ,. , , -, gf ,, I . . , --1 ' L A-9. 'Q 'f-sa.-"-Hi! L I , Y :V V M -L F9 ,,-, ,, ., f, . ,3:. , , ' - - -, TA! fguf. -2'--'-',v'-f., . 5 ' ' ' -:fax J. .ufw Q w A x w A ""'9l'nv-5 'Y f wwf M312 n 1" -' g. ,v 'Avi' "k vi ws. ,srmp L gy 5-Qrffaj A 4 ,iq N . ," , I , X X . --on-Q-FH., 1 .. , V I! :VL sv-X, -1-1, n.-vmawggqyggvmg-g5f,.xa.,,,im ..:-.mwg - -' :J 1 " 5 .N -v 4 , L V 7. Q' W ,lf . I - ff" . 'f f1 'w -' ff H ' u. ---- 3 . 2 2 sp x K R ,ar . v ' ' ' ' .v 'X ' 'Mi' .. V4 ,r 1 v , , , ,. '.:-:nfl-LL if Qz f eff ' J - . ' L-. - 13 15-2i':f,J.F',w-.-:S-l45Qi --52, ' , V, -' A V J --.- . - I 1 , 3 Y - ,Q 1, X 4 . , I 1 if Us b if f"'G'1 '- in V b A a : l V X ' F 1 v' X i w I 1 J ,gi ' -I J ,+I nw: uw ,f:'5:H7 ' !1':'H":,ws wang. ww' 4,1 Aiihhi .L , .U A 1: a.,,In,: .Hgh 1-'qlfill W 1. .ffm 'tm ' 55' 'W-'Y'-il'Q" liffi: I VF- F- q'Ff"iH-LA-,"iv1a:4Jn.vg3 -if f V 1Eg-,:,m,1m:.- 4 ., ' .Q 'L - , V , . ,. , -.."T1'i!?iE.P, J':'1Ti"..l..:Q... 'L .' ' 353 , -, i ,,m.l A '. 'V N in A , V X . -G+...-,.5 .YA Q, -uzrwae-wvliig-W ' 5? ,f i 'Z' ' is-rE'..L'ri1'-f7'lZ' 5? -' , -- N- . . 5. 3"'.?.+'mfQ,ju'-:-' ' , ' --- "1 'Y' gT' ug 'W rg JA" ' ' - 'R -- ,Qc ' 'f 533' L.p bf - . 'Lf .. 'lf ' f V . 1 L , Ir. , Y' 1 Il .- 3 , w , 1 , Y -' iv 1' gf: , if 51 v . l . , v Y - , e--':, :- L : - ' M. ' lbg- - V4 ,. .. 1 f g -5- V :Q , 7, 'lay N 5 'v , H " " 5 'ww . J ' ' w Jil -' 'L"" ff ' , I ' 1 . a , ' - '1 L . ' 1 ' bl y ' ,, - N 5 -n - .. , I I k ' ! Y X I Q V -' " W lc 4 . I' A in . Ax' LQQ x , . . ,Q L z wx. I :1 '.,4 . ' A-rg 13 "-r- gf-,FE A 4 W J' v ri Freshmen, always the friendliest of the four classes, often gather in rooms to talk over problems. Shown here in a Balentine after-lunch session are Carol, Paula, Joyce, Kathy, Dianne, Donna, and Kathy. 'T Seated: Mac McBride, Meriby Sweet, Bill Gillette, Mary Ellen Peterson, Nola Johnson, Doug Weaver, Steve Gilman. Standing: Linda Keesey, Karen Troland, the freshman executive council. On September 12, over 1100 freshmen swept on to the University of Maine Campus. It wasn't long before registration was over, beanies were distributed, new acquaintances formed and old acquaintances renewed, and- Freshman Week ended. As confusio'n and uncertainty wore off, enthusiasm and activity began to characterize the new members of Mai'ne's family. High school memories faded as prelims, football weekends Houseparties, sorority rushing, the Den, and the Maine Spirit took over. Vigorous campaigning led to the election of Bill Gilette, president, Mer- iby Sweet, vice-president, Mary Ellen Peterson, secretary, and Nola Johnson, treasurer. Mr. Ar- thur Mayo is the class advisor. ai., .- -w-- ---: Outstanding events during the year were the Freshman Banquet, skating party, publication of the traditional Newsletter, reporting frosh activ- ities, and the realization that they had become a part of a new life. This was the beginning. 190 T The Freshmen begin to get into campus activities during their second semester. Above are shown Beta pledgesg freshman men are rushed by fra- ternities all fall and usually join in February or March. -f Fred Richards is shown with his parents, above, enjoying Fresh- man Parents' Day. This is held on a Saturday early in October to acquaint the parents with their son's or daughter's college life. A group of parents are sharing experiences flower leftl in front of the Union on this day. Boys join fraternities and every freshman girl eagerly awaits the phone call which will be her in- vitation to the big week- ends on campus. Below are Barbara Milligan and her date at Military Ball. , - - Y 'iff' ' 2,1 J 1 1 'iii se ' 1 l I ' - iii, gg , The Sophomores play a large part in the Fresh- men's initiation to college life. 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"5 N 'u s" "W:- - .A'+um.N: ,.b ,Q 5 x I .I ,I Seated: Pat Tofuri, Sarge Means, vice-president, Elaine Frost, treasurer, Mr. MacCampbell, advisor. Standing: Bruce Cary, Paul Sullivan, Barbara Currie, Peter Pai- ton the sophomore executive council. The Sophomores have once again proven that enthusi- asm is not to be left behind with freshman memories, but that it continues to manifest itself each year. While continuing its traditional activities, the Class of '66 ex- panded its program this year to include a "Battle of the Bands" dance. This was a year of joining, for here were opportunities to become members of varsity squads, offi- cers of organizations, brothers of fraternities, and more mature individuals of a demanding world. Dave Inman, president, Sarge Means, vice-president, Elaine Frost, sec- retary, and Paul Sullivan, treasurer served as class lead- ers along with the executive board, Mr. James MacCamp- bell is the class advisor. Having survived the rigors and growing pains of two years, the Class of '66 had not reached the halfway mark and was anticipating its new role, that of becoming a Junior Class. Nancy Shaw, shown left, is a happy sophomore ex- periencing the joys of "being somebody on campus." Nan- cy was Homecoming Queen this year. Sophomore year becomes a year of activity or whether it's intiation into a fraternity and as- suming chores around the house as Les Fisher is doing at Phi Eta below, or finding that you can spend most of the day in the Den, as the sophomore girls are doing, Crightj. we Many sophomores have found a prominent place on cam-- pus this year. Dave Harnum is shown below in a football game, and Jayne Wareing frightl was Queen of Military Ball. l95 Janie and Skip enjoy the new integrated din- ing' areas, they are shown here in Stodder Hall. . ,v, 4. . 'gi '1-,mi .img-. JAILIWF Zggf' L w, 7"e,,i". x, rw N4 --1 -L . --- .5 -, iwfxy I A '-,mr 'E ' J .' ' .. V gr ? 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' x. . 1 . ,....-.., L ' .T A , , -.J ' ' F ' 4 il' vu-.s"A 1 L' 5, M ' ' 1 ii A 5:- ' -'i Ax ' f'.1"'s-ef-eq. ' . ,Wx - 1 . V ,MNH N, U f . . . 1-f!'?'vvf'j-::-yf,gm14.--5-:,- .... N V' ' - - A Q X 2 -W ',,fj'J4-!'j"l' :Ln fffvff' . ' " 'M,.-i"a-NL'-1':' JM v . "H, 1 M., - . ' 'TAM 'gym ' . , ivy 4 0 ,ww -fff K f f .,1,.a 3:4 N 1 A Y ' yn! . ' - , 1 'gg 1. ' J- -4 L-1: , 5 , " f. V , '- ' - V , , ,-A-wg V -42, ,.jsffe-2' 1 Q5 : , .," slit. 4 ,. V 'uv V, V 1 ,- Y ' i . , A . LGT, V gt, ,I ,mini . K . , 1 , ' 'N 1 wa: -N . - A W K FG. 'NJ .R ' r 4 Junior Class Executive Council: seated: Jackie Four- Woods, treasurer fabsentl, Dave Svendsen, Stuart Has- nier, Beth Wiley, Horace Horton, president, Katy Wy- kell, advisorg and standing: Dick Larrabee, Peter Cully, man, secretary, David Simard, vice-president, Jean Barb Rider, and Hank Smeltzer. 'N N x 'f' A Junior knight on Maine Day. l98 Junior year comes to a close, and senior year ap- proaches. Each one knows that this is the time to begin realizing our goals. Next year will be our last look at college life. Behind us we have left a lighter full of memories. Ignite the flame and we were studying for our first round of prelims . . . we were dancing on the sawdust in the gym standing under a blinking light trying to say goodnight . . . beginning to lead the committees on campus Mountains of cigarettes were smoked, and oceans of coffee consumed-all in pursuit of an education we now know is drawing to a close. ROBERT ACK LEY BONNIE ADAMS Munsnn Brewer Math Sociolupzy It ' . 7' '-N lr, A SUSAN ALLEN LARRY ANDERSON Ncwcnstlc Fnrn1inm.on Educnlion Electrical Engzinccrimz A+ I SANDRA ARIIOUR Augusta Education .I XII JANIECE BACON Mercer Speech AUII I QI' DONALD ARCHER Fmnklin Wildlife lilunngelncnt PATRICIA BALLARD St. Albums, Vt. Medicnl Technology STEVIIANIE HARRY IIOYVAIKD RATES Buvksporl Ornnn Mntlwnmtics Butuny ll IN' ROBERT ADAIR Midlnnd Pnrk, N. J. Elect.ricn.l Engineering Q' I MA RK A N DERSEN Westbrook Elcctricnl Engineering Xlblf SARAH ARCHER Ellsworth Education EVA BAMFORD Auburn Eclucntinn , X KAREN BATES Pntten Nursing l99 LINDA AKERS Andover English 7 SHARON ANDERSON Brewer Education A+ f KAREN ARMSTRONG Camden English ALAN BANISTER York Harbor Mechanical Engineering' ROBERT BATTEESE. JR. Dnmariscotta Agricultural Science Y "I 1 PAUL ALDRICH Augusta Animal Science JANE ANDRENVS Westbrook Education .XZ X is LINDA ATWOOD Farmington English . Q, ,QQ L, i ta I J! li ROBERT BARKER Bangor Business Sz Economics X, 1 LEE BA U ER Mexico Romance Languages SHELI A ALLEN Bangor Math D X NY r q rv- 'ni ll r Q 1 E if I -4' f LINDA ATI-IERTON Portland Nursing AKD Qc . V., I EDWARD AUSTIN Sanford Education NANCY BARON Auburn Education S' l BRUCE BAYUK No. Plainfield, N. J. Chemical Engineering 'FN 'Lf A RTII UR BEA RCE Bangor English CONRAD BERTIHAUME Biddeford French MARY BEAT!-IAM Houlton English RAYMOND BISBEE Andover, Mass. Education WILLIAM BLACK DOROTHY BLACKSTONE Rockland Presque Isle Mechanical Engineering Engligh c " ' -R- BONITA BOONE MARGARET BOOTHBY Lincoln Anson Nursing Home Economics MA RTIIE BEA UDOIN Sanford English X!! CATHERINE BISIIOI' North Scituate, Mass. Mathematics TRUDY BLANCHARD Mars Hill English AXE! CYNTHIA BORDEN Newton, Mass. Psychology JOAN BRAGDON BENJAMIN BRAMHALL CYNTHIA BREARE Lincoln Concord, Mass. Mt. Tabor, N. J. French Mechanical Engineering Zoology fggilllllvr xx .IACQUELINE BECK Brewer Education All' RICHARD BISHOP So. Orange. N. J. Business and Economics MURIEL BOLDUC Auburn Nursing WILLIAM HARBOUR Linculnville Biochemistry ERROL BRIGGS Harrison Wildlife Management ZOO BOYD HEIIGEN. JR. Wnyne, N. J. Chemical Engineering TXA 1ll!EE!Y GREGORY BISSON Madison History 'I' E'-I' RICHARD BOOKER Holden Civil Engineering '1 OANNONS CHARLES BOURNE, JR. Ogunquit Business nnd Economics A'l'l.l POLLY BRIGGS Portlnnd Government A Xi! NW l QI El, LEN IlRACKE'l"l' Samford Mnthenmtiuei SHARON BRIGGS Freedom English and French DONNA IIYERS Sprimzfielil, Mass. Government STEPII EN BRIGGS Animal Scienve Turner A I'I' LURANA IIROWER Augustin Zoology sv JOHN IIUCKLEY Fnlmnuth Zoology ANNE IIYIIAM Thomnston, Conn. English 7 KEVIN BRISTOL South Kent, Conn. Chemical Engineering 'l'IiE ANN BROWN Dover, Mass. llistory Xi! 6-H S , 1 WENDY BUCKELEY Marblehead, Mass. Mnthemutics lllll rj' DA VID CAIL Waltham, Mass. Mathematics JAMES CARNEGIE WILLIAM CA'I"I'ELLE TERRY CHADBOURNE North Vnssnlboro Tennfly, N. J. Pittsfield Wildlife Mnnxipzcment Mathcinnti'-a Business and Economics Al'l' 'I'lIIi ZOI JOYCE BRITTON Exeter. N. H. Elementary Education All' JAMES BROWN Wnterford History Sz Government x MARY BURKE Newport French A LICE CA LDERWVOOD Waldoburo Elementary Education Alf' ALFRED CHAMBERLAIN Ellsworth Mechanical Engineering ATA DAVID BROOKS Eastport Electrical Engineering AXA ff? FRED BRUME Narri. Nigeria Chemical Engineering LINDA BROOKS Penfield. N. Y. French CLAYTON BRYANT Rumford Forestry CHARLES BURNI-IAM CAROLINE BURTON Dumont, N. J. Kittery Education Physical Education 8: Zoology A41 TERRA NCE CAMPBELL Wiscasset Civil Engineering PATRICIA CARLIN Auburn History and Government rrryo ei BRUCE CI-IAMPEON Greenville Geology GEORGE CI-IAMPLIN Portland Mechanical Engineering STEPHEN CHANDLE. New Gloucester Forestry A I' I' LILIETTE CHAREST Lewiston Physical Education 6 French Qs SHARON CHRISTY Portland Nursing STAN CLARK Milltown Agricultural Stabilization Sz Conservation l XA CLAIRE COLWELL Stonington Education ANTHONY CIIANDONNET Lewiston Theatre if DONALD CHASE Sharon, Mass, Engineering Physics llflll NANCY CLAIR Wellesley Hills, Mass. Education NANCY CLEMENT Millis, Mass. Engineering Physics f- -V -, .,,. JANET COMMOSS North Windham History h f 7 'T SUSAN CHANDONNET Lewiston Spanish l Rf' ' i WILLIAM CHASE Augusta History Q Government ATI! ' -I HORACE CLARK Wilton Electrical Engineering ANNE CLOSSON Ambler, Pa. Nursing DANA CONNORS Easton Public Management B 1 i 14385: 14, i Ai nf Vt STEVEN CHANEY Wiscnsset Chemical Engineering THOMAS CHOATE Hallowell Mechanical Engineering LINDA CLARK Dalton, Mass. Sociology A41 BARRY COBB Augusta Psychology TEI' SUSAN CONWAY Portland Sociology 202 'ii K . , I J, it ,Q S Q JEFFREY CHAPMAN Orono Civil Engineering lillll SW K WILLIAM CHRISTMAS Bangor Zoology l . Q. fb MARION CLARK Alfred Education . A' THOMAS COLE Deer Isle Educntion RICHARD COOK Portland Biochemistry gh -, I 'L' ' if I THOMAS COLLINS Hallowell French THOMAS COONLEY Medford Lakes, N. J. Business Administration HALL RONALD DEA RBORN Dexter Mechanical Engineering RACH EL COTE Sanford Education SANNA CROSSLEY Millinockct French rg I THOMAS DAVIS N-w Portlnnfl Electrical Engineering I nr i wn.i.Alm nEEmNo Orono Education A! . If LAWRENCE COUGLIN Augusta Eilucntion .I ACQUELYN CURTIS Lulzcc Spccch AUII WILLIAM CALDIVELL Hallowell Civil Engineering' PARKER DENACO Bangor History 6 Government ANNE IIUIISDN SUSAN DODGE SARAH DONAVAN Pittsfield Gurzlincr Portland English Social Work Sociology 203 CONSTANCE COYNE Portland Sociology I KA REN DAM BORG Rendfield English X9 'ix -5 JONATHAN DAY Both Civil Engineering LEONARD DICARLO No. Andover Business Administration DIA NE DORR Woodlnnd Sociology 'l i LYLE CRAM ER. Union Biology-Education EN u PHILIP DAVENPDRT West Springfield, Mass, Mechanical Engineering IIUII RICHARD DAY Harrison History 8: Government DSE LESTER DICKEY Camden Electrical Engineering ELIZABETH DOUGHTY Cape Elizabeth Education In RODERICK CROSS Skowhegan Pre-Med AXA .IANICE DAVIS New Sweden Education SALLY DAY Newton Lower Falls, Mass. English AOII ANDRE DIONNE Lewiston Engineering Physics ' ,ear HELEN DOWNING Bangor Elementary Education I I STEPHEN DROTTAR MARY DUDLEY CYNTHIA DUNCAN Lisbon Falls Winthrop Cakland Civil Engineering English Education .-NP .5 'Mt I , , ' 4 I 1: ' ' n , . I i . 5 Q. - . 14 ' x.- ' ,L I ,X . .f N 5 i Y 4 -' ' Y -L E C i" DAVID DUNHAM SCOTT DUNHAM DIANA DUNLAP BBULZDI' Yarmouth Portland Electrical Engineering Biology Psychology shim X52 1 MYRON EAMES RICHARD EARL PRISCILLA EASTER Livermore Falls Brunswick Wilton Civil Engineering Mechanical Engineering SOCIDIOIIY MARTHA ELLIOTT Calais Romance Languages A 6 RICHARD ENNIS North Caldwell, N. J. Business Administration BETHJAYNE ELLIS So. Portland Medical Technology ,.. '7 1 JOHN ERSKINE Presque Isle Business Administration ROBERTA ELLIS Augusta Nursing PAMELA EVANS Wellesley, Mass. Psychology -A x 1 , , .I0l-IN DUNCAN, JR. Chzippaquu, N. Y. Accounting DMC FRANCES DURRELL Farmington Sociology ROBERT EDWARDS New Portland Engineering Physics T. 4' HAROLD ELLSXVORTII Mnlden, Mass. Biology 5. 1, I SALLY EVANS Livermore Falls Nursing 204 Q 'im ' u x 1 11 w SALLY DUNCAN Presque Isle l-lame Economics W SLT ' duff JOHN EAGLESON Kennebunkport English A TD ROBERT ELCIK Liribon Falls Chemistry S' I PATRICIA ELWELL Westbrook Education AX!! V! -it , AY' W W RUN ALD EVERSON Opzunquit Mathematics iw- . CIIARLES EMERY Skuwhegnn Forestry 6 PETER EZZY Vun Buren Agricultural Science 2'l'E HALL DIANE FONTAINE Melrose, Mass. Sm:i0l0Ky JACQUELINE FOUIINIER Lewiston liludurn Lunprunggus 'MI G' DA VID FA NT Portlund Chemistry IIN I. ANN FIFIELD llnn forth l.ni.in LIN DA FLECK Harrison Iimliluulion LUCI LLE FONTAINE Iinnlror Educ-ntion F1 if 1 1 , W EI'iS'l'IER FOX Old Town Aggriculturul Stabilization KL Conservation CAROL FA RLEY Presque Isle English ORIGENE FILIAULT Westbrook Mcchnnical Engineering RACHEL FLETCHER Auburn Business Administration MARY FOOTE Syracuse, N. Y. Education IIIN' SUZANNE FROSCH Trenton, N. J. German 205 I 6 , -I , jf STEPHEN FEIMAN New York, N. Y. Chemical Engineering JERRY FINDLEN Fort Fairfield Pre-Med. s X LAWRENCE FLEWELLING Euston Plant and Soils ATI' 4 DONALD FOSS Cape Elizabeth Chemistry ,- CAROLINE FULLER Ellsworth Sociology JW' E? 4 i " .f KEITH FERLAND Portland Mathematics , 'W l f X PAUL FLAHERTY, JR. Portland History OX F if E ,,.--ff L' F. iq 7 LOUISE FLINT Old Town Mathematics GREGORY FOSTER Skowhegan History 8: Government ' s5! i' X i. ' Z' I X 1' , -r I wif JOHN FURMAN Wellesley, Mass. Psychology 'I-'IIK WVINFIELD FERNALD Westbrook Engineering Physics LAURIE FLAVIN So. Portland Mathematics .AAA K ATHERINE FOGG Madison Sociology KATHERINE FOSTER Oakland Education CLAIRE GAGNON Lewiston Mathematics BEU LAH GALLO Millenccket English RICHARD COLLINS Auburn English ATA S ir li 1 x ' fy .IUDITH GILMORE Dryden Zoolog-y + ,Fw 'A ight 1 ' 15? 9, A AE PAMELA GOODWIN Westborc, Mass. Home Economics HB-if W KATHRYN GOULD Lisbon Falls English l'I1l4' LEE GAMAGE FREDA GAMMON Mexico Hebron Business 5: Economics Home Economics Y 4 ul l l , ' ,Q l?"' 1- . tr T 'hiv' , Y V Pj' WILLIAM GARTLEX AMQS GAY Lisbon Biddeford Math Agricultural Stabilization a MARTIN GODFREY South Portland Business Administratior I A l , f IMRE GORONDI Argentina Chemical Engineering EN CHARLOTTE GRANT Waterville Education Ad? Conservation MARSHA GOLDBERG Chesnut Hill, Mass. Education ROBERT GOSSELIN JACQUELINE GAMMON So. Paris r f 1 Sociology nd X I Augusta Mechanical Engineering T" lg 5- " . .4 5 . S DONALD GRAY Hallowell Education DAVID GETCHELL Auburn English Q I5 I LOIS GOLDSCH MIDT Appleton Home Economics AZ A NN GOUCHER Westford, Mass. Education PAULA GREENWOOD Northport, N. Y. History l DORA GARDNER Milu Educution y.- DOROTHY GIBHONS Lynnfield, Mass. Education .xv-y A DAVID GOODWIN Old Town Mechanical Engineering ANN GOULD Wellesley Hills, Mass. Education GREVIS GRINNELL Washington History Q Government , ., L , v-'. " -cs.. 'A :T'g'f""fff4e'1Tf f --1 -in -- A Q JOHN GOULD Auburn History Sz Government ATU CAMILLA GURRETTE Wutcrvillc French wr LENGY Nif'fI"9'7 V1 , HALL I ' '- s, lg 5, ge , .. ...... ..... .. 'S-' , 7 v ,S 2 D ni l"'l ' in A-ry MARSIIA HARRIS Auburn Education ROIIERT IIAYWARD Purtlnnzl History all Govcrnment l l GEORGANN GUIDMORE Izlnngor Zoology AZ JUDITII IIALE Micldlcboro. Moss. History Ka Government WILBUR HAMMOND. JR. East Ilirnln Business Arlxninistrntion ' 'V , A1 'l'HOM AS HARTFOIID Lewiston Mnthcmntics .VI'A SUSAN IIEALY Rexnling, Mass. English .IZ G X Q U '. E 4' I J. 1 l I f 1 JEANETTE GUINARD NORMAN GUYAZ THOMAS HABIF Falmouth Westport, Conn. Havffhllll MESS- Physical Education Forestry Chemistry 5 '1,,.. 1 ' X. r 1 , -, DOUGLAS HALL DONALD HALLEE LARRY HALLOWELL Pownal Waterville Perham Civil Engineering Chemical Engineering Education yu . 1 -ia ' 12.15. ' . A if W' 'Y ' gilt 'I lu . "X 1 TERRENCE HANNAN PAUL I-IARNDEN LEON HARRIMAN l'f0'fli0l'l ' Rnngeley Winthrop CWII Enlfllleering Business 8: Economics Education .KTA KZ ALICE HASHEY New Brunswick Home Economics ELIZABETH IIEATI-I Milo Education l l I 1 R. s -1 tv HOWARD HASKELL, JR Hollis Center Business Administration LINDA HEATH Wilton Zoology 207 CAROLE HATT Machias Education .XZ CAROL HEBOLD Cumberland Journalism JAMES I'IAC'KE'l'l' Portland Romance Languages JILL HAMILTON Newport Sociology 'P JOAN HARRIS Biddeford Home Economics i H: ,ai PATRICIA HAYDEN Windham English K A REN HELLIWELL Kittery Point Nursing H1341 KEITH HE-LMER Warren History x "-, .1 -, NINA HIGGINS South Portland Pre-Med ri l JOHN HOLMES Needham, Mass. Business Administration AXA CARLA HORNE Winslow Home Economics MYRON HOYT Newport, R. I. Mathematics f , I.,-. . I A DAVID HEMENWAY West Grove, Pa. Sanitary Engineering VIRGINIA HILYARD Calais Education JUDITH HOLMES E. Hartford, Conn. History NANCY HORROCKS No. Highlands, Calif. Education . IM ,gm ' f , x JEFFREY HUETHER Southport, Conn. Botany il lf tv DONALD HERRICK Reading, Mass. Mathematics will L, EDWARD HOA R Winthrop Engineering ELIZABETH HOPKINS Stockton Springs French . 7-K s A , iii. HQRACE HORTON Blue Hill History Ke Government .IO ANN HULL Hilton, N. Y. Civil Engineering ' u MARY HIBBITTS Bangor French ERIC HODGDON Lewiston Mechanical Engineering 95' A I HERBERT HOPPE Portland Mathematica SUE HOUSLEY Norwell, Mass. llistory SL Government 'El MARTHA HUNT Sheffield, Mass. Business Administration 208 PATRICIA HICKS Eastport Ilistory JUDITII HOLBROOK Reading, Mass. History JANE HORMELL Melrose, Mnss. Nursing af I -ff KENNETH HOWE Lincoln llistury 8: Governnlcnt STEPHEN HURD West Hartford, Mass. Mechanical Engineering l '- 5 J" L4.:,:11. 3-1'7'Tf'1j', sl-foie' f ' .milrwi V .QE-:lull ,J-,'i'.3..,.,,i": fl "':.1ll ' 1" ,rv .--4 N!-1. ,- ll f"1'l. 'xl' '3'- -. l l l 1 l l LARRY IIOWER Mllforll, Conn. Biology ZX 'iii' V- 3 . l l , l cl 5, ' 11 xi Q xl" l EDWARD II U RT Sanford Mathematics V l l 5, MEM .l it 'I ,I UNION SUSAN JOHNSON Westwuml, Mnss. Medicnl 'l'uc-hnulopry S'I'EI'lIANIE KANE Cnpe ldliznlwlh Psycho Iogy A 3 FREDERICK H USSEY Sknwhelan Psychology A XA Q' Q I JOIIN .IAKUIIOIVYCZ Gnrdincr History Ez Government .INA NANCY JEWELI. Keznr I-'nlls llismry Ka Government WAYNE JOHNSON Rockland I-Iixtury 8: Government 'I-II I v CAROL IIARRKAINON Iloclicsler, N. Y. Education W MARILYN HYLAN Brewer Hmne Economics DORIS JA LIIERT Fort Kent Nursing sr' 9 . 1 I JAN JOHANSSON Bangor Mathematics RO BERTA JONES Old Orchard Education ROGER KASS River Edge, N. J. Biochemistry 209 LOIS INGENERI Bangor Education 'IGI JOHN JAMES Portland German . - '1 V IN fs? J ALAN JOHNSON Presque Isle Mechanical Engineering JUDITH JORDAN Portland French .IUDITH KAY Reading, Mass. Education IIINI 'x JOHN IRELAND Dover- Foxcroit Mathematics 'PHX ,. ig: JAMES JANDREAU Saint Frnncis Mathematics PAULA JOHNSON Caribou Physical Education .IERRALD JUNKINS Presque Isle Forestry x GRACE Ii EENE Auburn Arts u NATALIE JACKSON Portland Home Economics .us SHARON JENKINS Togus History 8: Government J -s , - S' i 1' f s PETER JOHNSON Belgrade Lakes Mathematics 'PRE -I if li . M1 STEPHANIE KA LIN Needham, Mass. Education II Illb BARBARA KNOX Bangor Education ANNA CARPARELLI Bangor Speech 8: Drama ' L5 S BRUCE KEMELGOR Newton, Mass. Psychology "'l JUDY KIMBALL Pittsfield, Mass. Psychology DAVID KREITON Brownfield Engineering Physics l KIRSTEN LARSSON North Brewer Journalism WILLIAM EMAN UELSON Portland History qi, RICHARD KENNEDY Portland Chemical TXA 4 .4 A ROBERT KNOWLES Portland Mathematics 37' LORING KYDD Deer Isle Mathematics PIERRE LAUSIER Caribou Electrical Engineering rf ELISE KELEIIER Needham, Mass. Education SUSAN KENNEDY Milbridge Education S UZAN N E KOCH Reading, Mass. Psychology X9 HUGUETTE LABBE Madison Modem Languages A41 a DON LAVERRIERE Biddcrford Mechanical Engineering X PAULTTE KELLER Montclair, N. J. Home Economics Afl' 6' RONALD KENOYER Union Education CAROL KOVACII Enzlewood, N. J. Medical Technology PATRICIA LANGIS Westbrook Education RICHARD LAWLER Falmouth Zoology 210 I, KARLENE KELLEY Mnchuis Education . DAVI D KENT Clinton Aninml Science LOUIS KRAUSE Pittsfield Latin I Rv L. ROBERT LuI'lER RE Bidderfold Mathematics T 4' - 4 Y c ROBERT LA W LER Falmouth Zoology LEO LAROCIIELLE Luwisuin Chemical En5:incerinl: llllll 'W lil.lZAllE'l'll LAWRENCE Opelika, Alubuma Ilmnc Ecomonics AUII HAL XCYAINQ I WILLIAM LUCAS Gnrfllnvr lnlcrlmtiunnl llelnlionn ELAINE M A N'I'IiR Auburn Mntlwnmtivs 4' N -f .IEFFERY LEIGIITON Hampden Highlands Psychology WAYNE LEWIS Ilurvnrd, Mass. Psychology SQL--rx SQ., ' CII AIKLES Ll'l'I'LE Rockland l'1'e-Med I'X A WALERIA LUK AS ELBRIDGE LENFEST Augusta Electrical Engineering 1 MAIUORY LIIZBY Orono Ilomc Economics is-' 's X , JERRY LONDON Iloulton Civil Engineering M A RCIA LYNCH LL CH ARLENE LEONARD Orono Home Economics AKD N A NCY LIBBY Millinocket Sociology ELIZABETH LOOK Reading, Mass. Geology N. 1 PATRICIA MAI-IAN 'W EDWVARD LEONARD, III Boothbay History And Government ATA SH A RON LIBBY Yarmouth Home Economics ,f JULIA LOVE Melrose, Mass. English l'IB'I1 LINDA MANSFIELD Pnrtlunrl llunovcr, Mass. Millinocket Melrose, Mass, EHKIIHII English Sociology Home Economics AXQ .1 nncnmsl. Mluzxowsxi NORMAN MARQUIS CLIFFORD MARTIN ROBERT MASON Winthrop Fort Kent Ossining, N. Y. Orono l'0f'GHl-l'Y l'llSl0l'Y Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering 2Il 5' N ren' ' 7 PAUL LESSARD Gardiner Agricultural Engineering ARTHUR LILLEY Loring Air Force Base Mechanical Engineering Q FRED BRICK LOWREY Houlton Psychology S X DONNA MANSON Westbrook Education .ll CRYSTAL MAYO Bangor Education All ALICE MeDONA LD Derby Government HARRY McNALLY Bangor Bacteriology Q- ,ff-1 -, T 1 -uf . 1 ' . ' L, . X if' L. , XVILLIAM MELANSON Rumforcl Mechanical Engineering Q f, FRANCIS MILLER Portland History CHARLES M ONTEITH Rockland Electrical Engineering vs .i ,S REBECCA McDOUGALL Boothbay Latin RICHARD MCNEARY MAJORIE McGRAW East, Blue Hill Government 4' DOUGLAS McPIKE Oroym Hampden Highlands Mechanical Engineering Business 1 .L v X NY-i is , STEPHEN MELGARD ROGER MERCHANT Thomasbon Huntington Business Forestry , cal 1 ,. '. 1 .- Wi " V ' , 5' :A - MICHAEL MILLER KAREN MILNER Greenbelt, Maryland HDUIWH Electrical Engineering EUHCIIUOH ' if-:f "'r TT I 3 l .Ii e l ff- I . .I .54 . A ' ' 1 -4 1 M, :-, 1 , , ,.-555 " QM. 3, I DOUGLAS MONTEITH FLOYD MONTGOMERY Vermont Rockland Forestry Education Al'I' QQ.. WILLIAM MclN'I'IRE Wiseasset Forestry MARILYN MEHLMAN Scarboro Education AZ EILEEN MEUNIER Sanford Business Administration IIEATRICE MILVANEY Yarmouth English DORIS M OODY Washburn J ou rnnlism 212 LINDA McLAIN , Culnis Education GP PETER MEIER Syracuse, New York Mechunicnl Engineering JAMES MICIIAUD Grand Isle Civil Engineering 1 JEAN MITCHELL EDWARD MOFFITT Eliot Olfl Town Physics Biochemistry ROGER MOODY CAROL MOON Camden Sllffy History Zovlogy x. V-,115 ,A wg-sl I - ,,..',l' if f ffl, -as X , gy 11 PHYSICS 'w WV -. of R , 'ifwwd :H V. - 'L ' .AQ . J S H il' 1' I 7 4 4 ' Z D ax F1 1 Yo ' 2' j .X --MAIN?-l' ,' ianlzniswrli MOORE Ynrmouth Sociology BRENDA MORRISON Poi-Llnnd Zoology MARIANNE MULVIIIILL Phoenix, Ariz. Education VICTOR NELSON Milford, Conn. Mechnnlcul Engineering' MURN NIPPO New York. N. Y. Animal Science ROBERT NEWELL l-Inmpden Highlands Chemicnl Emrincerinpr i f 4' . I l it Y -I iii fe I--maui f V1 .'3Efzf:2i:'f- DONALD NODINE Raith linctoriolozy up . ,A if X l X I f LAWRENCE MOORES Hancock English GEORGE MORSE Waterford Agriculture A l'l' ROBERT MURGITA Rockland Bacteriology AX.-X rl? , ,Q V I 'Z'9'- ' 13. SETH NEWLIN Scan-srlale. N. Y. Zoology GARY NORTON Huntinirton, N. Y. History und Government 213 SANDRA MOORES Bang-oi' English II IN? MEREDITI-I MORSE Middletown, N. J. Botany ANN MURPHY Portland Sociology JOHN NICHOLS Wuterville Zoology 1 Qx l 4,4 , K, H .IEANNE NOYES Bangor English :qs LINDA MORANCY Saco Mathematics .XZ -i THOMA S MORSE Bangor Biochemistry 'FKE l BRIAN MURPHY Lewiston Electrical Engineering LILLIE NICHOLS South Windsor, Conn. Home Economics AAA JOHN OBEY Orland Mechanical Engineering ALBERT MOREAU Presque Isle Mechanical Engineering il q si x - 3, THOMAS MULHERN Portland Civil Engineering ' 'Biff Q z ,.,..... R WILLIAM NANOS Portland History . I ' L. ti 5 RICHARD NILES Orono Secondary Education MARY 0'CONNOR New Brunswick Home Economics 4: JOSEPH 0'DONNELL North Quincy Agricultural Sciences ,L eg, gh RICHARD OUELLETTE Berwick Electrical Engineering LORNA PEABODY Melrose, Mass. Sociology non ROBERT PETRO Plattsbury, N. .Y Education JUDY PLUMMER Standish Sociology SUSAN OLIVER Bailey Island Education Tv? ALLEN PAGE Bangor Animal Science '7 ROSEMARY PELLITIER Orono Psychology 1 M . ' l .f Y 'isx si i GEORGE PHIL Brunswick Chemical Engineering PETER POLK Bangor Business K: Economics v l GRETHE OLSEN Stonington Mathematics JOHN PAGE Fort Kent Mechanical Engineering RE r f BRIAN PENNELL Old Town Chemical Engineering DANIEL PINKI-IAM Damariscottu Forestry BARBARA PRESCOTT Camden History Gu Government JOHN OLSON Gorham Wildlife Science f V DONALD PARKER Portland Zoology 1 4 ..l l LAURENCE PERKINS Falmouth Civil Engineering L. . ROBERT PLA ISTED Livermore Falls History ALICE I'RlNE Loring A.B. Sociology 214 VS 'I Q0 v If ,A OLUKAYODE OLUWOLE Yuliu, Nigeria Electrical Engineering A JOHN PATON Troy History Ah Government I KATU RYN PERRY South I'ortland English L W .. 5 x I DONALD PLANTE Berwick Electrical Engineering CHADBOURNE NORMAN PLOURDE Lincoln Elcctricnl Engineering ELIZAIIETII PURCELL DENNIS PURINGTON Vulhullu, N. Y. Civil Engineering Nursing: liowcluinhnm HALL 'Y'wYC'. -. ' 1: 1 l ' .li ,fy vgfsrffl l'r x I -.f1AlNI1'1, CIIARLES IIIEL. JR. Pcliqunnnodsh, N. J. Erlucntlun BAE ALAN lt0IiliR'l'SON Wunhuni, Muses. Sociology PATRICIA RAMSDELL Pnilswnrth I7'l'c-nch .fs SHARON RECORDS Livcrniure English G JANICE RICH Charleston Iilnirl ish i MEREDITI-I RING Bethel Erlucntiun i CAROLYN ROBERTSON Lewiston l'1du1-ntinn .IZ 'CL GLENN RA POPORT Portland French TE-'I' PAULA REDDY Kittery Enlllish II II'lv JUDITH RICH Southwest Harbor Educntian ROBERTA ROAK Auburn Home Economics XII 6' I x MARTIN RAY Ridley Park, Pa. Chemical Engineering GLENNA RENEGAR Elkins Park, Pa. Education IIIN' U . 1 4 I a JOHN RICHARDSON Millington, N. J. Engineering Physics WINSTON ROBBINS Falmouth Chemistry F-' . M iv 1' ll DAVID ROBERTSON Auburn Meclmnical Engineering 215 RICHARD ROBINSON Dexter Mechanical Engineering N. ROBERT RAY Waterville Electrical Engineering ex be I CYNTHIA RENSKI Cherryfield Education I' ' i N I, 5' i X P' ,ii ALICE RIDEOUT Old Orchard Sociology BONNIE ROBERTS Snco Speech :IUII M A RIE ROBY Cape Elizabeth English FRANCIS RAYMOND Lewiston History A T52 1 I I RICHARD RHODA Houlton Zoology BARBARA RIDER Needham, Mass. English IIIW JUDY ROBERTS Bar Harbor Education v . . V KENNETH ROCKWELL Little Silver, N. J. Forestry GEORGEANN ROLLINS Eliot Home Ecomonics THOMAS RYAN W esthrook Zoology 'l'liE KOHAIIIG SARI BEKIAN Portland History ' ' - W lx I G MICHAEL SCIARAFFA Rumford Chemistry NED SHERRY Mzinhasset, N. Y. Education 'PKI CYNTHIA ROMANO South Portland Govemment f ,- 177 HLINN SALISBURY, JR. Portland Math S K MARGERY SAWYER Cornish Home Economics P s JAMES SCROGGY Bangor English STAN SLOAN Montpelier, Vt. History and Government .lsr . Q4 . vel - gl L 1 gb . 4 DANTE ROMANO. JR. South Portland Zoology JANET SALTER Walthilim, Mass. Sociology .A 'V L QF ix X 'vi V, ' BONNIE SCI-ILOSBERG Chestnut Hill, Mass. Bacteriology ALLAN SHAW East Holden Math BEVERLY SMITH Newton, Mass. French fllll S ' t 1 1 1 CATH EIIINE It UNYON Augusto Education -I Q, 17... 4 0 G W I A L SA RGENT Melrose, Mass. Zoology 4 N HANK SCHMELZER Stow, Mass. I-Iistory and Government HREN DA SHAW Vcnzie Speech .il NANCY SMITH Upper Montclair, N. .l. Zoology A41 6 'ii . -.-Ti SUSAN RUSH Mllinocket French JAMES SARGENT Auburn Agricultural Stablizution on Conservation ELEANOR SCIIUTT Lewiston Sociology fl i ' ' It ,, ' es' Q a 5 4. I 'LU-7 . J' KENNETH SI-IEA Ellsworth Civil Engineering ROIIERT SPEAR Wulclohoro Agricultural Science 'Dill , A H, U., A. d . ai V i Q A - '.' E,' ,1 v ANN SIIEEI-IAN Orono Latin .VIP C' I EDSEI. SPENCER Newcastle Biochem istry 'ww PENOBSCOT Cl HALL xdyff ii Om .I QM N 5 -. s 'ti - 1951? 2 A X. l- ' ' D dir? F7 ' x ff " l 1-...ww ,.. 1. ,, only-12' GRETCHEN THOMAS Marshfield, Mnss. Education BRUCE TOOTIIAKER Phillips Macliunivul Engineering: ELSIE STAN LEY llcsfonl Accounting 1 K EN N ETH STEWART Orono Educntion MARY LOUISE SWENSON Miumi, Flu. Home Economics M AIIY THOMAS Camden Education I DAVID STERLING Orono Education CAROLINE STONE Oxford Nursing DAVI D SWETT Belfast Mechanical Engineering EIMS JANE THOMPSON Milton, Mass. Education ALLEN TOZIER CHARLES TREAT. III cl Town Rundolph Business Administration History und Government E'l'E MA RIC STERN Portland Zoology LUIE STOVER South Portland Entomology E , DONNA SWETI' Dixfield Government .AZ ,4- WILLIAM TH URLOWV, IV Brunswick Chemistry XP JACQUELINE TREMBLAY Lewiston French ond English Oxford '25 WINIFRED STEVENS Bangor Sociology FRANCIS ST. PIERRE Brunswick Engineering Physics 'mimi l ' I 1 . N 43' ' 'i X., A 'li nf . SYLVIA TAPLEY Ellsworth Sociology XI? , ij l ll viii E Q- ,BARRY TITCOMB Falmouth Mathematics x DORIS STEWART Eastport English AQ JOAN STRICKLAND Old Orchard Beach Physical Education 3 , 1 L w ' ci CHARLES TAYLOR Bridgton Education KIIIQI JANE TOMPKINS Island Falls Zoology A XII PAMELA TROJANOSKI NANCY TROLAND Bangor Hinghani, Mass. Mathematics Educution AUII 'MI STANLEY TU PPER Farmingdale Psychology ROBERTA VANWART Winthrop Psychology CAROL WALL Tenants Harbor Nursing BARBARA WATERS Kittery English Il B42 , , L, LINDA WEBSTER Round Pound Education DONNA TURNER Waldoboro Education NORMAN VIGER Pittsfield Mechanical Engineering l.., SANDRA WILLIS South Windham Psychology QM, BEVERLY WATSON Brewer Education OWEN YVELLS Kittery History 8: Government Q L Lt. 9, , 1 l WILLIAM TURNER Eastport Mathematics PRESCOTT WADSWORTH Manchester, Conn. Business Administration CHARLES WALL Brunswick Engineering Physics DONNA WEAVER Ornno Education .XZ SALLY WENTYVORTH Kennebunk History Sc Government I K ATI-I LEEN TWITCHELL Bryant Pond Home Economics ll'1 EUGENE WALKER Pittsfield Electrical Engineering -1 ' L 1 'J 5 V 7' 5 'ff'-ff Y DENNIS WA RD Seursport Mathenmtics SUSAN WEAVER Kittery French IIIN' 'I l vf Jil' . I w - ,. 'ix - 1 " V A 911 A1,nEm' wEsC0'r'r Sebago Lake J ournnlism 218 MYRON VAN KIRK Limestone Civil Engineering XKIWE RICHARD WALKER Fryhurg Education LINDA WATERHOUSE B ryunt Pond English PA MELA WEBB Stonington Educn tion NEWELL WESTON Portlnnd Arts ,,,,,,., ....-,..-+. - --.- vr- - .lr 2'-. , sf' ." if .4 I Q .li 't A ld H 5" 1.-.. A....' ,. -LJ RAYMOND FOGLER BRENIQVA WEIIBEIC Bur Hnrbor History dz Government THOMAS WIIITE Levant Iincteriology ll HW , gf uY"0 ., 'sl K3-so XQYAINY:-f X 'x , A. , .Z 19" ., fi in AQ!! 4 H' 'J -1' 5 i ' l D Jing VW U' If .... WILLIAM WOODS Bowdoin lm In Mechanical Engineering ALAN ZIMMEIIMAN Mirllxllid Pnrk, N. J. Entomology 'I'lI li A El.l.l0'l"I' WIIITELY Glen Cove, N. Y. Forestry v I if ,i 3' .'. IIICIIAIID WILLIAMS Guilford lliswry 8: Government mx JACQUELINE VVOLFE Glen Ridge, N. J. Enirlisli lllI4l' PAM WOOLLEY Oruno French CATI IIEIII NE WYMAN II runswiek llinlugy All 'I I up ' GORDON lVl'l l'I'I'EN Portland Engineering Physics JOSEPH WILLIAMSON. JR. Gnrdi ner Business Administration ATA 6' VALTON WOOIJ. JR. Ouklnnd Public Management JUDITH WRIGHT Portland Psychology ...W I JOHN RINGIIAL New Sweden Electrical Engineering 2 l 'Fa -l .--nv I I -I' 6, LISHETH YVILEY Nu. Attleboro, Mass. Government 'I 6? I GEORGE WING Portland Sociology EX I JON WOODBURY Orono Chemical Engineering 'DJIA wo, 'TT' CATH ERINE BOSSE Old Town Sociology RICH A RD WOODSIDE Ornno Psychology M ARY WILLARD Bethel Education ' 1 7 I JAMES WITHERS Solon Chemical Engineering JEAN WOODS Kittery Psychology IIB? JANICE WYMAN Augusta Education JUDITH WILLIAMS Gorham French All MARDI WILSON Newbury, Mass. French LINDA VVOODS Lincoln, Mass. Muthemytics CAROLYN ZACHARY Essex Falls, N. J. Journalism Yi ge mlilo 1TY CNA- M. we it is ,fb Y AQ.. 3 lien I,,f C, " "----. ......, 1865 DONALD ARNOLD Freeport Mechanical Engineering 'VKX RICHARD BACKE Rocky Hill, Conn. Chemistry NORM AND BELIVEAU Biddeford Education CONRAD BERNIER Brunswick Chemical Engineering JOHN BISHOP Eastport Mechanical Engineering BSII RONALD BOARDMAN Skowhegan Mechanical Engineering MAURICE BOUCHARD Brunswick Educatio EX DIANNE BUCHANAN Brownville Junction Education WILLIAM CALDWELL Hallowell Chemical Engineering ALAN CARPENTER Bangor History NORMAND CHABOT Business 8: Economics Auburn EX JOHN ABBO'I'I' North Anson Business K: Economics WMA JEAN ALLEN Auburn Education MARSHALL ASHLEY Cumberland Center Forestry ROBERT BAILEY Saco Business 8: Economics ATA GLENN BELYEA Gorham Zoology LIONEL BERUBE Orono English JAMES BIZIER Bangor Chemical Engineering DAVID BONE York Electrical Engineering PAMELA BRALEY Augusta History A Government AAA WILLIAM BUCK LEY Bridgewater Business Administration KIETH CALEF Orono English THERESA CARROLL Ellsworth Falls History Su Government GA RY CH ASE Brownville J unction Education MARUTI ACHANTA Andkra, India Theatre WILLIAM ALLEN Orono Chemistry JAMES ATVVELL Farmington Chemical Engineering WALTER BARRETT Elliot Education RONALD BELYEA Caribou . Agricultural Sciences DOUGLAS BEST Riverside, Conn. Wildlife Management FRANK BLACK ETT Augusta Business Ad ministration JOHN BONELLO Oceanport, N. J. Business Administration LY NNE BRAWN Oakfield Education FREDERICK BURNETT Richmond, Vt. Forestry AFP HEATHER CAMERON Northeast Harbor Education AOII FLETCHER CARTER Winterport Psychology 4-JK GILBERT CHASE East Blackstone, Mass. Zoology 220 NEA L ADA MS Wiscassett Mechanical Engineering CHARLES ANDERSON Falmouth Chemical Engi neeing TKE DAVID ATYVOOD Cape Elizabeth History Ez Government WAYNE BEAROR North Anson Speech CRAIG BENNETT Abbot Village History dz Government ROBERT BIGELOW Farmington Psychology A T9 FREDERICK BLADES Avon. N. J. Zoology MYLES BOONE Easton, Mass. Education PHILIP BROWN Gray Chemical Engineering KAREN BURNHAM Snco English DAYTON CANNAN Madawaska Mechanical Engineering J OH N CASEY Kezar Falls History 8: Government PETER CHASE Levant Education WILLIAM AKRENS Gurden City, N. Y. History 8: Government J OHN A PPLIN Wiscasset Education RA Y A U STI N Bi-idgeton Education KE BERNARD BEAUDOIN Biddeford Business dl: Economics JAN BENNETT Orono Mechanical Engineering ROBERT BIGGAR Dover - Foxcroft Chemistry GEORGE BLAISDELL Wesley Chemical Engineering CATH ERI N E BOSSE Old Town Sociology THOMAS BROWN Dexter Mechanical Engineering ROBERT BURRILL Orono Education ROBERT CANTWELL Albany, N. Y. Government SUZANNE CASEY Reading, Mass. Government ANU REU BEN CHASE Touml Pond Education ZX DONALD AIKEN Sudbury, Mass. Chenilcnl Engineering ALLAN ARCH Pompano Bench, Flu. History TKE ANDREW AVERI LL South Paris History STEPHEN BELANGER' Bath Zoology RICHARD BENNETT Bethel Agricultural Sciences TINA CBILLSJ JOHNSON Winston Salem, N. C. Sociology AXU ERIC BLEICKEN Old Town Agricultural Sciences ROBERT BOTSFORD Orono Zoology ROBERT BRONE Augusta Agricultural Business and Economics 'MIA DAVI D BUSH Hallowell Business Sn Economics BARRY CARLE Bangor Mechanical Engineering JOHN CASWELL Belfast Journalism OX DON A LD CHILD Bath Electrical Engineering HU ll ADIII ENNE CII RISTAKOS Bucksport Zoology IIARRY CLEMENTS l"ori.lnnd Business K: Economics BARBARA COLE Purtlnnd Nursing ROIIERT COMMEAU Bradley Geology CASSAN DRA COUSINS Old Town Education WILLIAM CREDIFORD. .IR Alfred Chemistry DOUGLAS CUTCIIIN Wutcrville History dz Government WAYNE DAVIS Greenville Engineering Physics PAUL DEMEIICII ANT Euston Agricultural Sciences AT I' WILLIAM DOCK STAIJER Hopkinton, Mass. Physics ELISAIIETII DUDLEY Winthrop English IIOIJNEY DUIIGIN Auburn Education KE NELSON ELLS Cnmden Electrical Engineering JANICE CHURCHILL Winterport Government AAA REBECCA CLIFFORD Bnngnr Education LA URENCE COLE Brewer Sociology JAMES CONLIN Brookline, Mass. Mathematics STEP II EN COW PERTH WA ITE Kents Hill History B, Government CAROL CROSSON Buckspnrt Home Economics A NN CYR Waterville Education BARBARA DAY Ilinghum, Moss. English WILLIAM DENNETT York Merhnnicnl Engineering JAMES IJOLLOFF Oronu Chemical Engineering EX WARREN IJUDLEY Winthrop Chemical Engineering RICIIARD DYER Cumberlnnd Center I"orcstry ALICE ERVIN Corinna Education DAVID CH UTE Portland Education PETER CLAUGH Portland Biochemistry EX REBECCA COLE Gray Psychology RONALD CORBIN Waterville Education 'MIK THOMAS COY Dover-Foxcroft History DDE PETER CULLEY Dover-Foxcroft Zoology MALCOLM DOGGE'I'I' Thomnston Electrical Engineering CRAIG DEAKIN Weymouth, Mass. English MICHAEL DESISTO Roslingdalc, Mass. Psychology RODNEY DOUGLASS Scorboro Speech PHILIP DUMAIS Mzidnwaska Mechanical Engineering STANLEY EAMES Hallowell J ournnlism RICHARD FALOON Howland ZIIPE Educntion CHESTER CLARK Bangor Theatre MARTHA COGGESHALL New Britain, Conn. English JAMES COLEMAN Stoneham, Mass. Education EY ROBERT CORMIER Bangor Zoology 'PRED DAVID CRABTREE Nelrose, Mass. Education WTA ROBERT CUNNINGHAM Waterville Education CLAUDE DAIGLE Gorham Agricultural Science RENE DECHAINE Waterville Education RICHARD DICKSON Bangor Business Administration HX A VA RD DOW Lewiston Psychology ROBERT DUMAS Auburn Electrical Engineering MARGARET EDGAR Bur Harbor English XII WILLIAM FENLASON Sherman Mills Education ELAINE CLARK Skowhegnn Mathematics STANLEY COHEN Waldoboro History sit Government 'PMA RICHARD COLT Rochester, N. Y. Biochemistry JOHN CORSON Damoriscotta Electrical Engineering' 224215 NANCY CRANE Falmouth Foreside RICHARD CLARK Leeds Junction Civil Engineering WILLIAM COLBY Waterville Zoology 'ITMJ DEBORAH COMEE Bethesda, Md. Romance Languages NORMA COTE Old Town Psychology DUSTIN CREAMER Bangor Education Electrical Engineering XY? RICHARD CURRIER BRIAN CURTIS Calais Brooks History 6: Government Forestry DIANE DAVIS JOHN DAVIS Biddeford Houlton Education Engineering Physics ARNOLD DELAITE Brunswick Education EX AUDREY DINGLEY DAVID DINSMORE Bath Augusto Zoology Business Administration ARTHUR DRESSER ARTHUR DUDLEY Holden Kezar Falls Mechanical Engineering Education JANICE DUNBAR WILLIAM DEMTON Portland Veazie Education Electrical Engineering ROBERT EDGECOMG ALBION EDWARDS Lincoln Farmington Chemical Engineering THOMAS FERGUSON Rumford Electrical Engineering Qtgffv A mil? Z ""ll'3U Business Administration D 1 fa Q2 'X ,rm Z 3 5575 41 'f".Hf5'i" loss 7 ,... ........... ....... if H an rt ., I4 TTY A 1:11100 .gr all 1 llhgsfv -iq 1 xy fling? 1865 - MQ- ' 5 SHARON FOLSOM Stillwater Psychology NORMAND FOURNIER Lewiston Civil Engineering ROBERT FULLER Lewiston Business Q Economics STUART GERALD Belgrade History 6: Government 'PFA PAUL GOODINE Skowhegnn Mechanical Engineering BERNICE GRANT Old Town Education MICHAEL HALEY South Paris Education WMA SUSAN HARBURGER Kennebunk Sociology JANE HASSEN Bangor Education JOAN HEMMINGER Millburn, N. J. Education LENORE HIGGINS Cape Elizabeth History AX!! DARRELL FERNALD East Millinocket Physics PAUL FITZHENRV Augusta Business Q Economics R21 RONALD FONTAINE Gray French ROBERTA FOWLER Old Town Education THOMAS FURMAN Winslow Electrical Engineering TANJA GERRISH West Peru Education WAYNE GOODRICI-I Kennebunk English RONALD GRAVES Brewer Electrical Engineering DAVID H U LL Farmington Education DAVID GARGREAVES Jackman Station Electrical Engineering HUGH HASTINGS Orono Education ROBERT HENDERSON Bruwnville Junction English MARILYN HIGGINS Mnpleton Nursing EDWARD FERNALD Westbrook Civil Engineering LEWIS FLAGG Waldoboro Wildlife Management SWE JOYCE FOSTER Carmel English .I OH N FOX Skowhegan Mathematics KIPHK DAVID GAMAGE Rockland Chemical Engineering BEVERLY GER RY N ewfield Psychology STEPHEN GORDON Portland Chemicnl Engineering FRANCIS GROLEAU Livermore Falls Mechnnicnl Engineering MARSHALL HALE Old Town Mechanical Engineering CHARLES HA RLOW Runiford Education ROWLAND HASTINGS III Augusto Education VAUGIIN HERSEY, JR. Houlton Business Administration PETER HIGGINS Dennysville .Agricultural Business and Economics 222 WILLIAM FIEDLER Kittery Mechanical Engineering RICIIARD FLAIIERTY Salisbury, Mass. Education 'PRE LINDA FOSTER Portland Education JOHN FRA RY Farmington History KENNETH GARDINER Old Town Mechanical Engineering GORDON GILLETTE Westbrook Biochemistry .IULIEN GOSSELIN Lewiston Education DOUGLAS GROVER York Chemistry SALLY HALLIDAY Gardiner Mathematics PIIIP IIARMON Offord Sociology 'l'l'A DOUGLAS I-IATIIAWAY Yarmouth Education RICHARD IIE'I"I' Elliot Education ROBERT HIGGINS Bangor Electrical E ngzineering IIAWN FILMORE Orono Zoology WILLIAM FLAIIIVE Smnchnm, Mass. Education EX STEPHEN FOSTER Portland Psychology GERA LD FREEMAN Cape Nenldick Zoology HENRY GARFIELD Dennis, Music. Civil Engineering EN IV I N'l'II ROI' G I LLIS Lislmn Falls Geology ATA WILLIAM GOULD Orland Zoology 'IYKE RUPERT GRUVER Bethel Electrical Engineering T IMP R0 IIERT IIA MILTON VICTOR FINNEMORE Newport Zoology .I X A LINWOOD I-'LEISCIIER Portland llistory St Government TERRY FOSTER Bangor Mechanical Engineering DALE FUGEI. Iinngor Education CATIIY GAW Boothbay Eilucntion GARY GOODIN Orono Eflucntion ARTIIUR GRANT Bridgewater, Moss. Agricultural Sciences Itrlll .IOIIN GURRY Newton, Mass. Psychology I'I'lC ANDREW IIOPGOOD DiXfi0lll South Paris Chemical Engineering Education RONALD IIARMON PATRICIA HARVEY Caribou Lewiston Mechnnicul Engineering Education EX WALDO HAYES GARY HEDSTROM Bangor Stockholm Electrical Engineering RICHARD II EVEY Biddeford Chemistry CIIARLES IIILI. Mexico Electrical Engineering Agricultural Sciences RALPH IIICKS limitport Civil Enlzineering ORMA N IIIN ES Brunswick Education 'IYHA JARED HOLDEN Morristown, N. J. Education IX ROBERT IIURD lirnnawick Education SX AMELIA JOHNSON Monnmuth Education LINDA JORDAN Fnlmouth Fnreairle Sociology CA Il LO IC EM PTON Winthrop Education AXA lillr5SEI.L HENERHON ALLEN HOLMES .Iel'fe1'son Wildlife Management 2I'I'l5 WILLIAM HUIID Melrose, Mass. Mnthenmlaics A'l'H DAVID .IOII NSON Winslow Education DAVID JOSEPH Waterville llusiness dz Economics K2 l.AllRENC'Ii KENISTON 'l'u1nifield, Musa. Iinizinoerinrr Physics 'I'l'.J SCOTT KERIG llainvillv, VL. Augusto Forestry Muthenintics API' .IOIIN KRAWZAN JANE LABBE Winter llnrbor Van Buren Mcchnnlcnl Eni.:Inuerin1: History KL Government RAYMOND LANE HOWARD LARRAIIEE Lmnbert Luke Ornno Electrical Engineering: Business Atlininistration TIIEODORE LAll'I'Zl'INIIISER JAMES LAWRENCE Mnguolln, Mass. Engineering Physics DONALD LESSAID Bicldelliral Electrical Engineering: CAICOLE LAIRD East Lebanon Education JOII N Nr.-CON N ELI. Brewer M usie M ICH AEI. McGliE Culnberlnnd Center History llflnrex Hill Psychology S'I'IiI'IIEN LEWIS Wnlmn, Mass. Psychology Hllfl-IA RD LORD Furl, lfnirfiulcl Hiocheln islry DOUGLAS MMDONALD Old Town Erlucn tion IIUDNHY MrK A Y I Ion ltnn Zoology 'I-FA DONALD IIOLMSTROM St. Geox-go Educn tion DAVID HYATT Wayne Mathenmtics JOHN JOHNSON North Hampton, Mass. Zoology ROBERT JUCIUS Bar Harbor Engineering: Physics SX MICHAEL KESSOCH Hampden Highlands Mechanical Engineering PAUL KINSLEY Westbrook Sociology ERIC LAIITI Skowhegan History RICHARD LARRABEE Lubec Mathennitics ' .I XA PATRICIA LEARY So. Portland Zoology ROLAND LIBBY Limestone Mechanical Engineering DDE HAROLD LOUDER Lexington, Mass. Psychology 'I-KE MARGARET M acDONALD Augustn Education HUGH MacKENZIE Cronston, R. I. Mechanical Engineering RONALD HAULE Springvale Education :VII RIIODA IRVINE Muttawamkeag N ursine: RALPH JOHNSTON So. Windham Zoology BRENTLEY KEENE Bucksport Education MICHAEL KILGORE Portland History RICHARD KNIGHT Yarmouth Education DAVID LAMB Gardiner Business Q Economics AXILL LARSON Providence, R. I. Forestry WRX DAVID LECLAIR Oronn Education JOAN LITCHFIELD Camden English THOMAS McCARTHY Bangor Mathematics CHARLES IVIcDONOUGH Portland Zoology JAMES MCL-ELLA N Clinton Civil Engineering GEORGE HOWA RD Guilford Mechanical Engineering NEIL IVERSON Scurboro Education EX BRYANT JONES Orono Journalism CHARLOTTE KEENE Old Town Home Economics GEORGE KIMBALL North Waterford Chemical Engineering DIPE WILLIAM KNIGHT Ellsworth History 8: Government IX RUDY LANDRY Livermore Falls Mechanical Engineering 'I'IlE EDWINIA LAUGHTON Hnrtland Psychology LAURENCE LEIGHTON Cope Elizabeth Zoology WA YNE LITTON Portland History MARY McCLELLAN Bangor English RONALD McDUFF Brunswick Mathematics STANLEY MacMILLAN Old Town Civil Engineering AVERILL HUFF Gorham Civil Engineering- ESIIE GREGORY JACKMAN Whitinsville, Mass. Education WILLIAM JONES Bath Zoology K AREN K ELLY Stoneham, Mass. Education DONALD K ENERSON Danville, Vt. Forestry AFI' PATRICIA KOI-'FMANN Deer Isle Bacteriology MARTIN LANE Richmond, Va. Electrical Engineering GEOFFREY LAURENCE I-Iingl-iam, Mass. Zoology RA LPH LEPAGE Old Town Education DONALD LOGAN Small Point Beach Mechanical Engineering -mu WILLIAM MCCOMBS, III Pembroke, Mass. History h Government ' 9' ' mmm VA V Z Ski frwiiil 1U g.z 1865 , , '5 D 'VAZ flfliui' ' YY , 5 nv JW Q, 1U5s..f 1865 ,............. ...... ..., . f' 1: 9, 1 f i f I-'4 M . W lingo? . E JAMES MUNDY Brewer History 8: Government CLARK NEILY Cape Elizabeth Physics SUSAN O'DONNELL Orono History 6 Government VERNON PALMER Caribou Government MARILYN PERIVAL Orono Mathematics HILLES PICKENS Quebec, Canada Journalism JOSEPH RAYMOND Bangor Chemistry ROGER RICHARDS Clinton Educational WAYNE ROBBINS Bath Education MICHAEL ROUND Orono Education PETER S AWTELLE South Paris Mathematics 'FRE DEBORAH MAGUE Milbridge Agricultural Sciences RAYE MOODY Monroe Zoology CHARLES MURPHY New York Biochemistry JOHN NEYVMAN Cape Elizabeth Sociology CATHERINE 0'K EEFE Wayland, Mass. Education GORDON PARRITT Brewer Education 'IIKZ LEIGHTON PERKINS Penobscot Mathematics HAROLD PLUM Old Town Forestry STEPHEN READ Bingham Electrical Engineering CHARLES RICHARDSON Waterville Agricultural Sciences 224112 GEORGE ROBERTS, JR. South Portland Mechanical Engineering AXA DAVID RUMFELDT Tahawus, N. Y. Chemical Engineering TER!" ALAN SAWYER Augusta Business Administration 45I'A NORWOOD MANSUR Augusta, Conn. Music RONALD MOORE Topsham Mechanical Engineering THOMAS MURPHY Portland Mathematics YVAYNE NEWMAN Lubec Agricultural Sciences NORWOOD OLMSTED Charleston Mechanical Engineering WILLIAM PARSONS Dexter Theology ROGER PERKINS Orono Electrical Engineering RICHA RD PORTER Westbrook Chemical Engineering THOMAS REED Farmington Chemistry WILLIAM RICHARDSON Brownville Junction Psychology DOUGLAS ROBINSON Westbrook Littleton, Mass. TERRANCE RYAN Stillwater Agricultural Sciences RAYMOND SAWYER Portland Electrical Engineering MARION MANTAI Darien, Conn. Psychology MARY MOSKI Portland Pyschology ELEANOR M URRAY Vcazic Sociology PHILI I' NORTON Bar Harbor Education WILLIAM OWEN Brunswick Electrical Engineering NANCY PEARSON Bangor History 8: Government DON A LD PETERSON Bangor Business Administration J AM ES PUFFER Orono Electrical Engineering JA MES REI LLY Biddeford Zoology RICHARD RIDING Shrewsbury, Mass. Forestry MELVIN ROBINSON West Wardsboro. Vt. Forestry JOSEPH SALA Madison Education 22-145 ROGER HOLMES Portland Zoology DORIS MARTINEAU Lewiston Erlucntion SHARON MOUNT Hallowell English KENNETH MURRAY Hinyrhnm, Mass, Zoology GORDON 0'DONNELL Orono I-Iistory Sr Government FREDERICK VAGANEECCI Augusta Business le Economics PA LM ER PEA RSUIN Senrsport Chemical Engineering MARTHA I'E'l'ERSON Idaho Falls. lduho English MYRIEL PUNCOCIIA R Brewer Mathematics IIICIIARD RIIOADES Portland Electrical Engineering PA ll L RIVARD York History TIIOM AS ROBINSON Enfield lllathenintics DAVID SARGENT South Windham Entomology SYLVIA SAWYER Waterford English PARVIS MOAREFI Tehran, Iran Engineering Physics RICHARD MOUNTFORT Waterville Wildlife Management GEORGE NAGEM Waterville Business Administration MICIIAEL O'DONNELL Orono Ilistury Sz Government THOMAS PAIEMENT Brunswick Mechanical Engineering ELIZABETH PELTIER Iloul ton Education MARILYN PETTENGILL Brunswick Business Administration DELMA R RAYMOND Philips Chemical Engineering JAMES RICHARDS Rnntror Public Management WILLIAM RIVIERE Iluth Mechanical Engineering ALFRED ROMANO, JR. Portland History CIIARLES SAUNDERS Brunswick Education PIIILIP SAXER Bangor G nvernmcnt IIARIIARA SCO'I'I' Portland Sociology ROBERT SM AIILI DCE Northcnist Ilnrlmr liim-liernisti'y l'AUL SMITII Gardiner Mechnnicul Engineering M URRA Y SPR UCI? l"nInmuth Clnnnicnl Enirinc-orinp: 'I'lI li IIENNETII S'l'RA'I"I'0N Exist Millinnckct M IFIIAEL SEVEIIANCE KL-inichnnkpurt Eli ncntion DAVID SM A R'I' I Inultnn Fhcinicnl Engineering LEWIS SNOW Stonington Business Administration PAIILINE STEIYART I'nrtInnd Iinirlish M ICIIAEI. S'I'RIAR Hnnxtnr Forestry Business Adniinistrntion .tl'I' NANCY 'l'IIIIIODIiAll EDWARD TODD Cnriluon Gnnc Ncdvlivk English Znnlnlfy I-'RANK 'I'UI'I'IiR DAVID TURNER Pnrtlnnal Ilullizi Center Ructoriolugy Chemical Engiuccriln: JAMES VAN VALKENIIIIRGII .IANICE Vlill.I.EllX Arlington, Minis. Rnnpzur llusineeis und Iivoiimnicu lingliuh 11-l'.x GIEORGIQ WARD JOSEPII WARREN Portlaind Orono English Zoology .IEFI-'REY WIEINSTEIN DENNIS WIIITI-I Portlnntl Brower linizineerinpr Physics Forestry GORDON WIII'l"I'IiN JAMES WIII'I"I'I-JN Portland Lcc Erigincering Pliynics DON A LD WILSON M ooschcnd I"nrcstry ELW Y N WOUSTER Buckspurt Mechnnicul Engineering llistory Sz Government 'PII Ii CAIIULE WI NG Monmouth English CLA YTUN WORS'l'IiR Kinirinun Ed nvntion RICII ARD SIIAW Venzie Ed ucntion BARRY SMITH Meriden. Conn. Meulninicnl Engineering FRANK SOINI Westbrook Enginecri ng Physics SPENCER STEWART Reading, Mnss. Ayrriculturul Sciences IILIN STRICKLAN D Cnnnnn Education LINDA TOR ARZ Calais Joumalisin RONALD TU RN ER Yarmouth Education SX DAVID VERRILL Old Orclmrd Mathematics EX CHARLES WASIIBURN Bangor Il istory and Government MICIIAEI. WIIITE Phillips Civil Enizinc-cring 'FIIOMAS WIGIIT Portlnml Znoluiry IGRNICST WOOD. JR. Sn. l'orll:nnl liulncutinn REGINALD WORTIILEY lloulton lil :ithonmtics IIAMILTON SHERMAN Kerhonkson, N. Y. Forestry BRYAN SMITH Meriden, Conn. DAVID SIMARD Auburn Business Administration ATA ERNEST SMITII Lneonia, N. H. BRIAN SM ALLEY Auburn Education -IDI-IK MURRAY SMITH West Buxton Mathematics Spanish Electrical Engineering EIIPIC GEORGE SOUTIIER AUSTIN SPENCER GEORGE SPLANE Winthrop Patten Portland Electrical Engineering Chemical Engineering Psychology PAUL STIMPSON JANET STODDARD JOHN ST. PIERRE Portland South Portland Old Town Mathematics Psychology Education 4'l'A .IONATI-IAN STUBBS DAVID SVENDSEN JANICE SWIEK Dover. Mass. Needham, Mass. Caribou Medical Technology Histoiy Q Government Sociology 'PKI JAMES TOMPKINS ANTON TOPOLE RICIIARD TOWNSEND Islnncl Falls Old Town Winthrop Zoology History 8: Government English II'I'I5 WlI.LIAM TURNER TIMOTHY TWOMBLY SANDRA URQUIIART Enstport Buxton Portland Mathematics Business Administration Education DAVID VERRILL PETER VILES PAUL VINCENT Fnlinouth Turner Lewiston Civil Engineering llistory and Government Business und Economics WILLIAM WATERHOUSE I'lIILII' WEIIIIER ALLAN WEEKS Greenbush, New York North Anson Sanford Mathematics Mechanical Engineering Electrical Engineering IIUII HX VICTOR WHITEIIOUSE GARY WHITNEY CARLETON WHI'IvI'EMORE Brewer Old Town Sl-:owhcgun Government Education Business Administration Tlili JEAN WILCOX FRED WILDES EDWARD WILLIAMS So. Portland Vuxton Orono Government History KL Government Psychology 'Mill SHARON WOOD SCOTT WOODMAN Old 'l'own Beverly, Mass, English Mechanical Engineering ATS! 611-Y . 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' , V 1 lxl A .N q ' 1 S 'X ' ' 6...-' ':,, :gixh M N ,F -x V . , N- ' . x 1 I' L V ., N K I ffxw ' , I . P f " . Rf f - "A ."-"A . . H MH- lf. - 2 Nw I V 31 x t' .N-w' .,gN.-,i-V1 U X . .. 61 . . -, -I.. 45' x M- ' .1 f..,- '--R ,f , IN . , . 'IM-L'1.Nf':,',, 3-,W-5 T - " " ' , ' -Z" -'1C"1: l.:"' ' ?"7 fl ' 'V ...Lu--.. .... , -..-1..w. M. f,.,...,.....,.-.. - F ,,.,.........,....., L. . si' L ..x..., , , , A A 1 4 Row 1: M. Haley, C. Merrill, R. Boucher, W. Per- kins, D. Derrah, D. Joseph, D. Keene, R. Austin D. Soler, R. Dumas, Row 2: R. Durgin, N. Sherry R. Flaherty, D. Brown, E. Smith, P. Soule, Cooper, D. Severson, D. Crabtree, R. Sawyer, R Clark, C. Harlow, R. Lanyag Row 3: D. Nolan, Ji Hutchins, L. Worthley, E. Chamberlain, P. Reid- man, W. Hirst, D. Harnum, D. LaHait, J. Mc- Gonagle, J. Brown, B. Riviere, V. Walker, L. Har- riman, B. Hurd, F. Horne, C. Harneyg Row 4: B. Kocsniersky, D. DeVarney, D. Avery, J. Fahlgren, R. Rogerson, P. Smith, T. Trafton, A. Riley, J. Libby, B. Rush, E. Thayer, F. Tenore, E. Fair- field, W. London, S. Parent. Varsity Football During the 1963 season, the Maine Bears fought hard and obtained a 5-3 record. Sophomore Dick DeVarney set his third University passing record and led the State Series with 6 of 11 completed passes and an average of .544. In other passing records, Devarney also had the most complet- ions in one game C 16 against U. Mass.J and most completions in one season, f55J. Mike Haley, in the State Series, led with 8 touchdowns for 48 points. Roger Boucher booted 24 extra points to lead in the State Series. By booting these 48 points, Boucher, a senior, broke the career record' which previously had been set in 1925-6. The University of Mai'ne's football program was directed, for the fourth straight year, by Freshman Coach, Linwood Carvilleg Varsity Head Coach, Harold Westermang and As- sistant Varsity Coaches, John Butterfield, Walter Abbott, and Dave Rand. This year the University's football squad was led by two seniors: co-captains Earle Cooper 1445 and Dan Severson C703 pictured at the left. 228 No team can live without the valuable assistance of its coach and managers: John "Rocky" Furman Cleftj, Coach Westerman, and Dave Cail Qrightj. The spirit of the crowd cheers the team to victory, and the mascot of the University the Black Bear boosts the crowd's enthusiasm. ,Q if . 'll ..n.4..4 229 fs The University's program is being di- rected for the fourth straight year by Coach Westerman fleftl and his assis- tant Dave Rand. The fans are an important part of every gameg and the University of Maine fans are loyal. 9 1 -'?4 .1- September 21, at Orono Black Bears . . . 7 Redmen . . . 14 On September 21, the Black Bears proved that they are a strong team by upsetting the heavily favored Redman from Mass. The. game was highlighted by the passing of Dick DeVarney and the rushing of Frank Harney. By capitalizing on penalties and Mass. mis- takes, the Bears held their ow nthroughout their first game. W henMssa. was on its first offensive drive, Ray Aus- tin intercepted a Whelchel pass on his own 26 to start a 74 yd. drive to paydirt. In 18 plays DeVarney completed 7 passes, three to Harnam and two to Ned Sherry. The drive was capped by DeVarney's one yard rush for the touchdown, and Maine led 7-0. From here on in, Whelchel methodically mixed his plays with Palm doing most of the carrying. After a re- turn of punts, Mass. initiated its final scoring rush from the Maine 40. Again mixing plays, Whelchel got the ball to the 5 for the final touchdown. 1 ?tE"".x 55? September 28 at Rhode Island Black Bears . . . 16 R.I. Rams . . . 230 20 October 5 at Orono Black Bears . . . 14 Catamounts . . . 13 The University of Maine rode to victory on the strength of Roger Boucher's second point after the touchdown of the afternoon. When the game start- ed, it looked like Maine would run roughshod over the Cats, but a Vermont offense that was slow in starting proved differently. The first Bear score came in the first period with Keene sweeping for the touchdown. Vermont even- ed the score in the second period. After working the ball to the Maine 25, Ken Burton slanted for a corner and went in untouched for the score. Ver- mont then took the lead in the third period after initiating their aerial game. Quarterback Scott Fitz led a drive that was mostly accomplished through the airlines before Ken Burton again found run- ning room and made the score. Maine worked the ball to the one where Perkins crashed through for the score and Boucher kicked the winning point. October 12 at U.N.H. Black Bears . . . 28 Wildcats . . . 8 Raymond Sawyer ,cw . 1 ' x -k xt' N - ' f Q 'ggi N Q'-, X 3 6 3 5 ' ', ,- 'X,.i,::' A If c. ' ': LR x. . - V Dave Brown .'5 , J' Y , ,- S ,Q L M, , 22: 1 I - n , X V 1 L "" 'V X , ' -.1-.1--11-in-11' Q . -,-:':--....-,...-......,. l as-sr is if it i glut' int' -3.5! 5.-IV: inns ,-."1' Q l' G .1.b'.1xl,1:a- .untill lrhufxnsgs-Qu--..gnlfair m11.+ig1f-SET'-': 1'3-tv' -us-.1gf'1:srtfiu.l'4uC-Ig'-1 n2N,gQ:n .. L, , .f ,.:.. As- -np. --r '-44 I, pr-1-1. E 3.1 --,: 4 ' i1'Mil"" 'UI V. 51 -,- I - N 1,-rv , ' QLWM: f Mdsj W -- 'j' - -- - ' ' ,,-1 . , ,,,,,. , M , Pat Reidman ba 5 A A, V Q 9,-la' 2 ,51- Fvlk N Dave LaHait if T x 'Q Vg., an I X F , 2" V .Lv Q Phil Soule L 1-QQ., A 'LN Leon Harriman W ,E N '47 ,la fx Jr: .Pb .fi 1 53-3' Don Doruh ' mm Leon Worthley 1: 521 A 5? L Don Soler ...4 .L ,..-rj. . 1 MX 4.1-I' N , Y I: 'EFSIQK L .Y Jack Brown GL-Q na 'gd i v Q- it 9 October 19 at Orono Black Bears . . . 35 Connecticut . . . 12 On October 19, before a packed stadium Maine scored its soundest homecoming victory in years with a 35-12 decision over Connecticut. This is the largest score Maine has accumulated against a U. Conn. team since the 49-19 victory in 1951. It was a great afternoon for the Bears as they really looked impressive before the large homecoming throng. Roger Boucher, who kicked five extra points needed only eight more to break the all time extra point record of 47. A Connecticut fumble recovered by Dave Brown led to the Bear's first touchdown. Connecticut came right back, however, moving 80-yards in a series of plays. But U. Conn. could not compete with the Bears as they con- tinued to score in the second, third, and fourth quarters. October 26 at Bates Black Bears . . . 49 Bobcats . . . 0 Veg-1 J1s,5 t vi I X 1 November 9 at Orono Black Bears. . .0 Saturday, November 9, the Polar Bears from Bowdoin swamped their heavily favored opponents by a score of 7-0. Before 5,200 fired up, but very wet fans, the Black Bears lost the offensive punch that had carried them to decisive victories previously. Except for a very few instances, the clash could be termed a battle of the de- fenses in which the ball changed hands frequently. In the first half, deep penetrations were almost non-existent for both teams. Breaks were a definite disadvantage in that Maine lost yardage and downs with offsides, a clip, and faltering running plays going against them. Bowdoin. . . 7 In the fourth quarter, Westy began juggling the line- up to find the right combination. Ends and half-backs were substituted frequently on Maine's part. A drive that originated on the Bowdoin 24 signalled Maine's down- fall. Ryan carried to the 35, then Paul Soule to the 46. A first down on the 47 was followed by the long bomb to left end Frank Drigotas, who carried all the way to the Maine 5. A pass to reserve fullback Bruce Alememan was good for the only touchdown in the game. The point after was good, and Bowdoin led to end the game 7-0. Cheerleaders "Beat Colby, Maine's gonna win" was one of the enthusiastic chants used by our squad cheering the Black Bears on to many victor- ies this year. Eight men were a new and spirit- ed addition to the group. Working with "Play- boy" Stearns, they planned rallies, organized torchlight parades, and participated in the Homecoming fireworks display. The candidates for the squad audition each spring, this year thirteen girls and eight boys comprised the 1963 cheering squad. If rr- ""' B 'il 1 A - . ,ni , W Y Y "'09""'h8' A . . Kneeling: Pat Mahan, Heather Cameron, Diane Davis, Chadbourne, Chip Cyr, Peter Paiton, Bruce Cary, Paul Elaine Kelley Ccapt.J, Bev Smith, Ruth Brewer, Jan Sullivan, Ken Wright, Mike Desisto. Churchill, Kathy Davis. Standing: Sarge Means, Terry 6 Boosting the spirit of the team and the crowd during the football season and also providing en- joyable half-time entertainment, the Majorettes added glamor and sparkle to the home football games. Each spring tryouts are held for those qual- ified and interested. They are chosen on their abili- ty in an individual routine and in group partici- pation. This year the squad made a trip to the Uni- versity of New Hampshire and appreared on WABI television. By their cheerful smiles it is evident the majorettes enjoy their performances, and they have certainly had a most succesesful season. Standing: Cynthia Brown Caroline Burton Ursula Pickart Kneeling: Dianne Grifflth Nancy Lee Q Qu: 4 Xl 5 'au 4 if E2 1 . . ,K u' 'J1fff i9I'q'r F E Fil E2 jf- ET: . clam u 5. W ,- 6-"H I fl? P :L IA4' Manager, Jim Dickerson, Bill Flahive, Bob Woodbury, Vanidestine, Coach Brian McCall, and Captain Dave Scott Dunham, George Spreng, Bruce MacKi'nnon, Gar- Svendsen CKneelingD. land Strang, John McGonagle, Dave Harnum, Dennis Maine Opposition 110 .... Brandeis ........ 70 85 .... Colby ..... .... 6 9 59 .... Vermont ........ 60 51 .... Vermont ........ 75 88 .... Bates ..... .... 7 6 69 .... Bowdoin ........ 43 70 .... Boston University .... 80 77 .... U.N.H. ......... 76 78 .... Bowdoin ........ 72 81 .... Rhode Island .... 114 58 .... Connecticut ..... 71 85 .... Colby ...... . . 69 54 .... Bates ........... 48 78 .... Massachusetts 87 53 .... Connecticut ..... 80 75 .... Bates ....... .. 81 76 .... U.N.H. ..... .. 75 84 .... Bowdoin ........ 69 82 .... Rhode Island .... 99 67 .... Colby .......... 90 92 .... Massachuse.tts 90 240 Under th e direction of Coach Brian McCall, this year's Varsity Basketball team had only three letter- men from last year's team. Since he. had a young team, McCall stressed the impor- tance of student support con- cerning the fortunes of his team this year. Overall the team had more height than last year's successful fresh- man team. Denny Vanides- tine, Bill Flahive, and captain Dave Svendsen provided the backbone for this year's team and were counted on heavily to keep the Bears moving. Maine used its old style of fast breaking basketball with an increase in controlled ball this year. This was Coach Mc- Call's sixth year at the Uni- versity of Maine in which he has had 71 victories against 44 defeats while copping three State Series and two Down East Titles. December 2 at Orono Black Bears. . .110 Brandeis. . .70 The Bear Cagers surprised a number of people with a stunning upset over a favored Brandeis team. Coach Brian McCall used his complete team in the 110-70 vic- tory and this proved' to be a vital factor in downing the Brandeis quintet. Maine, in playing a fast-break brand of basketball, wore down the Brandeis starters while they themselves substituted freely. Everyone seemed to be hitting for the home club as was not the case for Brandeis. Gary Goldberg, a sophomore, started the game with several quick goals but he was benched in the second half. Another starter, Stu Paris, kept the Brandeis quintet in contention through much of the eve- 'ning with his 22 point output. Dave Svendsen is blocked out of the play as Brandeis players pull down the rebound. Garland Strang is shown outjumping Brandeis' Stu Paris. For the Bears the scoring was pretty evenly distribu- ted with the exception of the leadersg Gillette with 23 poi'nts and Brewer with 22. Svendsen with 11, Vanides- tine with 13, Woodbury with 10, also paced the Bears. Maine started the game off quickly with a series of bas- kets to tear down a controlled style of ball that Brandeis tried to employ. At half time, Maine had a 53-39 lead and there still seemed to be a chance for Brandeis. How- ever, the second half proved their downfall. Toward the end of the game, the crowd began to howl for more and Maine added 10 points to their score to drown all hopes of victory for Brandeis. 241 Dave Svendsen goes up for a rebound in the game against Bowdoin, December 14, as Dave Harnum looks on. The Maine offense was successful in shutting out Bowdoin's driving game and this, combined with a floor shooting average of around 207, didn't give the Polar Bears a chance. Maine's scori'ng was evenly distributed with the top three of Svendsen, Strang, and Gillette notching ten apiece. A one man show by Mike Napolitano, 12 points, was the only thing the Bowdoinites had to cheer about all evening. Again, Coach McCall cleared the bench and this depth along with strong rebounding action put together the win- ning combination for the Bears. December 14 at Orono Black Bears. . .69 Bowdoin. . .43 The game between Maine and Bowdoin on December 14 proved to be hardly a contest at all. A slow, methodi- cally played game saw Maine shoot below par with the Polar Bears being very inconsistent. Although they were able to slow Maine's fast-breaking style of offense, the Polar Bear offense was rigid. Maine 1'a'I1 the ball when they could, but a floor shooting average of around 40 didn't help matters. This was one of the few times when Maine dominated the scoring from the start. Half- time saw a mere 34-17 tally on the scoreboard and from then on, there simply was no contest. Dennis Vanidstine pops one over the outstretched hand of Steve Ingram in Maine's romp over Bowdoin. Dave Svendsen scrambles for the ball in the Maine-Bates game. Maine players John Gillette and Bob Woodbury are shown in the background. January 18 at Orono Black Bears. . .54 Bates. . .48 Maine's victory over Bates was their sixth, straight State Series conquest without defeat. Although the Bears made only 24 goals in 83 shots, the Bobcats were having the same trouble in hitting the basket, getting 20 goals in 87 attempts. The Bears went ahead from a 15-all tie in the opening half when John Gillette made successive goals. Bates came back to halve the score at 21-21 when Bob Mischler made a basket, but the Bears ma'naged to take a 25-23 halftime lead. Everyone expected an explosion in the second 20-min- ute stint after the low-scoring first half, and it appear- ed that this was going to be the case when Maine piled up a 43-34 edge. But the Bobcats kept picking away at the Maine advantage and at 1:15 to go, Bates trailed by five 51-46. The Bears however, stayed in the game and the 11-point lead that they racked up minutes after the second half began, helped them win the game 54-48. 243 John Gillette gets caught by a Bates player as he goes up for a basket. l Bill Flahive dribbles down the court, keeping the ball away from the Bobcats. John McGonagle tries a shot in the Maine-UConn game, February 8. 1 A UConn Huskie blocks John Gillette as he goes up for a basket. 244 George Spreng attempts a jumpshot. February 8 at Orono Back Bears. . .53 Huskies. . .80 After carrying a 30-26 lead into halftime, the Bears fell prey to UU. Conn. A low scoring first half with a good ball control game provided McCall's hoopsters with their early lead. They succeeded in their goals in the first half, but not in the second. John Gillette was the early key to success as he poured 14 points through the hoop in the first half a'nd continually out-rebounded the taller Huskies. U. C0nn's Toby Kimball and Ed Slomcenski were held to seven and four points respectively, and Al Ritter dunked ten to keep the Huskies in the ball game. The second half saw a collapse of Mai'ne's ball control game as UConn reared back from a four point deficit into a quick 36-34 lead. Maine was forced to run with the Huskies from here on in while UConn shot 71 'Zn from the floor. With ten minutes to go, UConn held a 14 point lead, 51-38, raised it to 67-49 with four minutes left, and carried away a 80-53 victory at the final buzzer. John Gillette was the offensive key in the Maine lineup with 22 points, while Dave Svendsen set up plays and looked good on defense. Womerfs Athletic Association The purpose of the Women's Athletic Association is to provide various sports and club programs for all University women. W.A.A. begins its programs in the fall with the annual Freshman Get- Acquainted Picnic. The Associ- ation sponsors such activities as co-recreation nights, Sports Days with other colleges, the homecom- ing hockey game, and tourn- aments in softball, badminton, volleyball, hockey, basketball, ping pong, and tennis. Club activities include the following: Archery, gymnastics, modern dance, offic- ials, and square dance. W.A.A. ends its yearly program with the annual banquet for all women who have participated in any activity. as 6 i Left to right, Row 1: Martha Perham, El- Glenna Renegar, Nancy Steputis, Gret sa Ilvonen, Pam Hennessey, Jocelyn Gen- chen Thomas, Sharon Cort, Jane Thomp est, Sandy Arbour, Judy Rich, Bobbie Fow- son, Jean Garner, Tenney Gavaza, Jeanette ler, Barbara Wing. Row 2: Mary Lou Guinard, Lee Charest. Row 3: Mary Swenson, Sally Wadleigh, Nancy Spear, Thomas, Ginny Malcolm, Claire Colwell Pat Olcott, Sandy Guptill, Karen Olson, Joan Strickland. W.A.A. Co-Recreational Evening which was held in Lengyel Hall, the new wome'n's gym- nasium. Left to right: Pam Hennessey, Gretchen Thomas, Julie Henderson. 245 All Maine Field Hockey Team Front: Joan Fairbanks, Pat Olcott, Lee Charest Nancy Hollingshead. Row 2: Pam Hennessey Jocelyn Genest, Gretchen Thomas, Pat Rogers Sandy Arbour, Liz Norris, Sally Wadleigh, Mar- garet Ferguson, Sherry English. Ski Team There are two types of ski events, Alpine which in- cludes downhill and slalom races and Nordic which in- cludes cross country and jumping events. The strongest and most dependable competitors in the Alpine Events are Steve Parent, Tom La Haise and Norm Viger, Par- ent won the slalom event in the State Meet and LaHaise, who is the team captain, won the downhill event. Those who show promise are Junior, Keith May, who placed second in the down hill event in the State Meet and Soph- omores Charlie Dumas and John Pratt. Art Dudley in the Nordic events, is outstanding in cross country and Chip Taylor is a good performer in both cross country and jumping. Viger shows good potential in cross country and Parent is an outstanding jumper and won the Class C jumpi'ng at Franconia, N.H. Dec. Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb Feb Feb 28-29 4-5 11-12 1-2 7-8 14-15 28-29 Schedule Nordic Events at Lyndonville, Vt. Nordic Events at Franconia, N.H. Hanover CN.H.J Invitational Stowe Cup Races at Stowe, Vt. Maine Championships at Waterville EISA Jr. Meet at Kingfield and Oro EISA Sr. Meet at Williamstown, Mass. 1, 'YL Row 1: Dave Hall, Charles Dumas, Keith May, Paul Vincentg Row 2: Arthur Dudley, Charles Taylor, Tom LaHaise, Steve Parent, Norman Viger, Coach Si Dunklee. 246 Women's Rifle Team 4 Left to right, lst row: S. Houseley, J. Staples, P. Leary, J. Caldwell, L. Eichhorri, S. Dowd. 2nd row: Coach Chartier, P. Kelly, J. Callahan, J. Morrison, A. Christakos, V. Veilleux, M. Wallace, K. Seaman. Menls Rifle Team Left to right, lst row: Coach Chartier, J. Chapman, Jenkins, J. Taylor, D. Harrison, J. Nichols, J. Coffin P.Hubba1'd, K. Beal, J. Olson, B. Brewer, Captain Bond. D. Garland, J. Chandler. 2nd row: N. Davis, D. Kreiton, D. Manchester, J. 247 Q -1 T ,4 ll F1 H S L. G Jim Dean shattered all records in the pole vault with a jump of 13' WA". Arnie Delaite Indoor Track In the first meet of the season Maine upset UNH 93-30. Dick Nason set a university record in the 35 pound weight- 58' 3M". At present this is the third best throw in the country. Jim Dean set a university pole vault record 13' 6152 Maine slid by Bates in the second meet with a 68W-535 win. Maine swamped B. U. with a 93-20 victory. Jim Dean shat- tered all records in the pole vault with an amazing leap of 13' 7152 Nason set a meet record in the 35 pound weight, and Lahaite tied the record in the high jump. The Maine tracksters succumbed to Brown University by the score of 73-40. Nason in the 35 pound weight and Dean in the pole vault set two new meet records. Arnie Delaite won the shot put and Dave Lahait won the high jump. 248 --ni' 4 U, 4 John McG0nag1e throws the di .5 ' W 'I S E., , z E 4 A' f as - : - in , Z, ,vlgu ' ag' , La-A . ' E V' 'FT 1 3 E AIN f V i is F U5 42" V ... T we ' p , 5 V V W . 'H --f-,l ,,i..,.- -. ' .4.., I.. ,T ' . Left to Right, lst row: V. Mercer, B. Hadlock, R. Mac- Donald, B. Thomas, D. Haskell, D. Gaw, C. Nesbit, B O'Connell, J. Holmes, M. DeSisto, D. Doloff. 2nd row: T. Murphy, B. Keene, V. Nelson, L. Anderson, T. Flynn, R. Flaharty, R. Richards, M. Haley, R. Corbin, R. Bis- bee, D. Josephs, L. Coughlin, R. Chreatian. A Connecticut player rounds the bases for a run. YU: MINI if . Baseball The 1963 Baseball team under Coach Butterfield had an over all total of 9 wins and 12 losses. The team placed third in the Yankee Conference with 4 Wins-5 losses and third in the State Series With 3 wins-3 losses. Coach Butterfield stated that the team lacked adequate defense, but showed vast im- provement offensively. The team was a pleasant surprise because many times there were as many as seven starting sophomores. Bill Thomas was the outstanding pitcher winning five and losing five. 250 ssl . , . B -'f '1 . . , . ,-Q Y, A . .. . . ' Y M., ' ., . .' ..,-EL T' Bump Hadley tags his man at the plate. Mar. Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr. May May May May May May May May May May May Southern Schedule Maine at Villanova Maine at V.P.l. Maine at V.P.I. Maine at Loyola Maine at Princeton Maine at Columbia Regular Schedule Maine at Mass. Maine at Mass. Conn. at Maine Conn. at Maine Maine at Bates Maine at Colby Bowdoin at Maine Bates at Maine R. I. at Maine R. I. at Maine Colby at Maine Maine at Vermont Maine at Vermont N. H. at Maine N. H. at Maine Maine at Bowdoin Mike Haley Left to right, row 1: J. Ferris, D. Harriman, B. Cary, B. Coles, S. Sones, M. McNeil, C. Merrill, B. Hauck, S. Cummings, C. Newell, D. Perkins, S. Foye. Row 2: Coach Woody Carville, Manager R. Pike, M. Strong, L. Fisher, D. DeVarney, D. Kelliher, T. Linscott, S. Means, A. Amoroso, D. Swain, R. McGuire, S. Pineo. sf. ...a. w.-is 1.1. Freshman Baseball Under the direction of Coach Linwood "Woody" Car- ville, the 1963 Freshman Baseball Team compiled a rec- ord of 6 wins-2 losses. Through the power hitting of Dick DeVarney, Carl Merrill, Dick Kelliher, Dick Perkins, and Mike McNeil and the pitching of Les Fisher C3 wins- 1 lossl, Charlie Newell, Tom Linscott, and Arnie Amo-G roso Call 1 win-0 lossesj, the team battled its way to! a fine season. Coach Carville announced' at the Freshman Baseball banquet that Dick DeVarney and Carl Merrill had been named honorary Co-captains of the team. V Schedule Me. Opp. 12 ..... .... M .C.I. .. ... . .6 3 ..... .... B owdoin . . .... .2 18 ..... .... M .C.I. ....... ..... 5 10 ..... .... B owdoin ....... ..... 7 1 .... .... M e. Portland ... .....O 7 .... .... M e. Portland . . . . . . . .6 1 .... .... C olby ....... ..... 6 1 .... .... C olby The 1963 freshman track team had an undefeated season. ln the first meet against Bangor, Fred Judkins set the second best time i'n the two mile run in Univer- sity of Maine history and a new meet mark. John Fahl- gren set a new meet record of 50.0 in the 440 which was bettered only by McPhee of the varsity track team. Three meet marks were broken against M.C.I. by How- ard Shaffer in the 880, Fred Judkins in the mile and Mike Skaling in the pole vault. In the Triangular Meet the Maine Frosh won twelve of fourteen events. Bob MacFarland ran the fastest half mile in the U. of M. Frosh history. In the Deering Meet, Judkins beat his own record, set earlier, when he ran the fastest mile ever run in freshman track at the University. Left to right, Row 1: Coach Styrna, J. Fahlgren, M. Skaling, B. McCluskey, F. Judkins, J. Ballinger, H. Shaf- fer, Row 2: R. Kirsted, D. Glidden, J. Lee, J. Graggam, Maine Opposition 90 .... ..... B angor . . ......... 35 83 .... ..... M CI .................. .... 3 7 88 .... ..... W aterville High School .... .... 4 0 88. . ..... Old Town High School .... . . . .26 81 .... ..... D eering .............. .... 5 4 Frosh Track B. Ellis, D. St. Jean, B. MacFarlandg Row 3: Manager, F. Brown, F. Hobbs, J. Wakefield, D. Perkins, B. Brock- way, R. Arnold, L. Badder, R. Russell, C. Hannon. Spring Track Coach Ed Styrna's 1963 trackmen compiled an out- standing track record last spring downing Boston Col- lege and New Hampshire. They took first place in the State Meet and Yankee Conference Cfor the third con- secutive yearj. At the Boston College Meet, Arnie Delaite broke the University record for the 16 pound' shot put by throw- ing 50 feet 6 inches. Delaite beat his own record i'n the New Hampshire Meet in shot put competition by throwing 51 feet 11 inches. At the same meet, Pete Mc- Phee broke a University record in the low hurdles with 24.1 seconds. With 9.8 seconds in the 100 yard dash in the State Meet, McPhee added new University and State records to his record-breakers. At the Yankee Conference in Storrs, Conn. Maine tot- aled 79 points. First places were taken by Dave Parker in the 440, Baron Hicken in the high and low hurdles, Dick Nason i'n the hammer throw 3 Pete McPhee in the 220 3 and Jim Dean in the pole vault. With twenty-eight colleges represented, Maine secured third place in the New England Collegiate Champion- ship Meet. Nason paced third in the hammer throw, De- laite, third in shot put and in javelin, breaking a Univer- sity record, 203 feet 10 inches, McPhee, second in the quarter mile, Hicken, third in the high hurdlesg Dean, second in pole vaulting, setting a new University record of 13 feet 4fV,, inches, and Parker fifth in the 220. Schedule Me. 65 .... .... B oston College 103 .......... U.N.H. ..... . State Meet ......... Yankee Conference ..... N.E. Collegiate Champ. Opp. ..20 ..28 .lst .....1st .3rd Left to right, Row 1: G. Morton, B. Wentworth, B. son, P. McPhee, B. Blood, J. Ellis. Row 3: A. Worden, Heinrick, T. Carter, D. Chase, H. Horton, J. Dean. Row B. Hicken, R. Sirois, R. Cole, D. Nason, J. McGonagle, 2: L. Hodges, D. Parker, R. Johnson, B. Hanson, D. John- A. Delaite, A. Warren, M. Spruce, L. Brown. 2511 Baron Hicken jumping the hur- dles. Baron won the high and low hurdles at the Yankee Conference at Storrs, Conn. Hicken also won the New England Collegiate cham- pionship Meet. Arnold DeLaite, who broke the University record for the 16 pound shot put at the Boston College Meet and again broke the same record in the New Hampshire Meet. Jerry Ellis is a Senior Skull, president of the M-Club, captain of the indoor and outdoor track teams, and captain of the cross country team. 255 Golf The 1963 Golf team had an overall record of 6-3. The three losses were to teams in the Yankee Con- ference. In State competition the team was unbeaten and Won the Maine Intercollegiate title. Gordon Cur- ry, a senior, won the State individual championship with a 36-hole medal score of 151. Sophomores Tom Lahaise and Norm Viger finished second and fifth respectively with scores of 157 and 159. In the New England medal play the Maine team came in fourth out of six New England teams. T' I Varsity Schedule Maine Opposition 215 .... ..... C onnecticutt ........ 415 2 .... ..... R hode Island .. .... .5 5 .... .,... B ates ........... .... 2 3 .... ..... N ew Hampshire ....... 4 4 .... ..... B owdoin ......... .... 3 4 .... ..... C olby ......... .... 3 5 .... ..... B ates... ....2 4 .... ..,.. C olby .... .... 3 6 .... ..... B owdoin .... .... 1 Left to Right: R. Hess, N. Viger, D. Leclair, B. Whit- more, A. Leathers, T. LaHaise, G. Curry. g 'I -s 'Vi . , va Freshmen Left to right: J. Towle, J. Pratt, S. Hope, F. Bishop, R. Hetzler. 256 First row, left to right: K. Oluwole, R. Brown, S. Clark, Chase D Best J Chandler W Robbins Third row B. Friedman, B. Tuman, A. Sargent, J. Jakubowyey, G. Coach Dunklee R Michoud D Dollof R Doucette D Carpano. Second row: T. Hauck, T. Edge, C. Bonney, S. Chase I Gorondi Soccer Under the direction of Coach Dunklee, Maine entered the varsity soccer competition this fall for the first time in the history of the University. The Bears played six contests, meeting Bates, Bowdoin, and Colby twice each in Maine State Series competition. The season record' of 0-6 was due to the injuries of two experienced regulars and the lack of depth. The Maine State Series soccer league was founded last year with Bates, Bowdoin and Colby participating in the initial competition. Colby and Bowdoin tied for the crown. Informal soccer workouts have been held at Maine for the past two years in anticipatio'n of this year's schedule. The season was not without its high points, and many individual performances were excellent. Goalie Steve Clark and fullback Rufus Brown were named to the first team of the All-Maine Soccer Squad. Co-captains elect, Doug Best and Don Chase, received second team recog- nition. Since only two starters were seniors, the pros- pects for next year seem better, and the team is looking forward to a much improved season. 257 - Liilm. 40?- TQ' First row left to right F Judkins D Davidson, G. Coach Styrna, M. Magee, H. Shaffer, F. Land, B. Mc- Ellis H Hoiton K Hansen B Heinrlck Second row: Cluskey, G. Graffam, Manager, Albert Worden. Cross Country During the 1963 season, Coach Styrna's cross country club placed very well against their competition. Cross country competition is entirely a team effort in which the team with the lowest score is winner. The season started with a Triangular Meet in Boston with three of the top teams in New England. Maine placed second with 41 points. In their second meet Maine downed New Hampshire and Maine won a triangular meet against Bates and Vermont. Maine also downed' St. Anslems by making a perfect score of fifteen points. There was a four-way tie for first-Ellis, Heinrich, Judkins, Shaffer-Horton fifth, Hansen sixth, Davidson seventh. Maine scored 29 points to win the Yankee Conference. Ellis placed second, Heinrick third, Shaffer fourth, Judkins sixth and Horton fourteenth. This was a good finish for the meet. In the N. E. Collegi- ate Championship Meet held in Boston, Maine placed second with twenty-four colleges represented and 119 men in the meet. In the I.C. 4A Meet in New York, Maine placed second in the Collegiate Division. Ellis placed sixth, Heinrick seventh, Shaffer thirteenth, Jud- kins fourteenth and Horton twenty-third. 258 Varsity Tennis Gene Elliott and Dave Greely, co-captains, led the 1963 team unsuccessfully as far as Wins and losses were concerned yet did well from the standpoint of achieve- ment. ln the State Series Bill Deering was runner-up in the singles championship, and he and Gene Elliott Won the doubles match. They also reached the number one finals in the Yankee Conference, but bowed to Massachu- setts in three hard-fought sets. Team score consists of six single matches and three double matches. They played good tennis, but had lack of depth and team strength which hurt the over-all season record of three wins and seven losses. Bill Simonton was elected captain of the 1964 team. Left to right: Coach Dunklee. Brian Smith Mark Stein Ray Jean Dave Greely, Gene Elliott, Bill Deering, Bill Simonton, Geoi ge Wing, Bob French , . xv... , f X15 U 4 ,L 1' , r. 1 1 N i .. ,. , .n,4,.., A ,I- - 1- ,--N 1 "' ' ' ig- ' "H - - , -1:-ff.. ,4 1 . 5 M- Img! ,Q IQ ,X ,L 54 , , xl .V-:I W. W V ' U2 1 M ' . 'lu My I tgp J -w Wu" ' W 1 w X I If X H A " A I' . + "MM -1 If ' W M J . W m ,tv gg W W 'mx L, K , H Il A .ggnw M 'sw -jr-fQ ,:?I'- , - , 1 -:gi 7 211- A 1, 't,::,. Q. rw- q,:g.s:N-ff.1.11g , uf in ' - ' - -2,-,rg vaj., , :jg H W "MI u M11 . -fi, V . 5 m I, Q r ' K . . -:gi PM fl YA' .. . ., I WSW." 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Sandy Farrar, secretary, Donna Jobber, and Mat Mc- 262 Four years ago we came to the University eager to learn and make new friends. This period of our lives is about to end, yet we shall always cherish the memories as we go our different ways. Here we have met defeat and victory. Now the world lies at our feet waiting for us to place our mark upon it. With these four years of experience behind us, we are able to accept the challenge of the future and go out to meet it. We thank the University for the ideals and goals it has given us and the education to pursue them. A favorite pastime of the seniors is de- picted left as the Balentine girls enjoy an after lunch game of bridge. no I LA GERALDINE ADA MS Corinna Education ll llll' r LAURENCE ALLEN South Portlnnd Pulp Sz Paper Technology DAVID ANDERSON Sudbury, Mums. Engineering ATA DOUGLAS ARCIIIBALD Kittery Point Business Administration ATU RAYMOND MAKER Bangor Civil Engineering L... HOPE ADAMS Cambridge, Mass. Englisli PATRICIA ALLEN llidrlorford Erlucntion V. ELSA ANDERSON Dover-Foxcrofl. Math Sin A4 DONA ATWOOIP Kcnnchunk French Allll AILEEN IIAMFORD lllt.. Vernon Sociology l PAULA ADLEMAN Bangor Education PETER ALLEN Orono Wildlife Management 4 .l UDITII ANDERSON Stockholm Education ROBERT AUGUST Northampton, Mass. Forestry A I' I' G ERA LD BANKS China Education ,.. 9.1, .,. ., -,1,,,-, , '-on V WN ' A 1 V ,. Wm g MARIE ALEXANDER Albion English LOVINA ALLEY Brewer English AZ PHILIP ANDERSON Portland Govemment X- BRENDA BABCOCK West Groton, Mass, Sociology NANCY BARNES Augusta Sociology AAA L 4- -Fha ELIZABETH A LLEN Bangor Education 1 J BRUCE ALPERT Bangor Engineering Physics 6' 'W ROBERT ANDERSON Mars Hill Mechanical Engineering ATA TED BABINE Charlestown, Maas. Math ATU 1. v, -'I ' J. : 4, ' ,QA li: A F A I 35 if 1 CAROL BARR Belfast French AXE . ' . L A JOAN N ALLEN Bangor Psychology TIMOTHY AMERO Auburn Education JOHN APPLIN Wisonsset Education RAYMOND BACKMAN Bangor Civil Engineering ROBERT BARR, JR. Holden, Mass. Forestry 'Q' THOMAS BARRON Lewiston Psychology 1bl'.X , 1, - 'i -' , I RICHARD BENNER Cape Elizabeth Education BETTEJANE BILLINGS Westbrook Education .XZ - T4-yr PAUL BLANCHARD Bangor Mechanical Engineering A BARBA RA BOUCHER Cupe Elizabeth French 'MI Fee- - REBECCA BARTLETT Bangor Sociology X51 RODERICK BERG Stockton Springs Electlical Engineering ,-" V fr' ' L A CAROL BISHOP Orono Education AX!! HELEN BLOOM Jackson Heights, N. Y. Psychology AKD ROGER BOUCIIER Auburn Education KI l l 3 , , Q all fi ! L. PA ULETTE BARTON Rockland Government .wi , . 1 , 1 ui , , 4 .iLf I FRED BERQUIST Boothbay Harbor Math ,lei V r ' ' 'F . fl i Q ROBERT BLACKMORE Rumford Chemistry J 15S I H- -Q , X' 1 A REGINA BOHLIN Dennis, Mass. Nursing uv PETER BOURQUE Bath Wildlife Management 264 KENNETH BEAL Southwest Harbor Wildlife Management AXA SCD-1 xi' JON BERRIAN Livingston, N. J. Mechanical Engineering DONNA BLAKE Norridgewock Education .XZ DANIEL BOOBAR Portland Mechanical Engineering 2'l'E HARRY BOWDEN Brewer Education ANN BECKER West Hartford, Conn. Education JAMES BERRY Morrill Agricultural Business nnd Economics .i'r.x ELIZABETH HLANCHARD Cumberland Center Sociology 2 JOANNE BORDEN Newton, Mnss. Education RONA LD BOWIE Lewiston Education BA RRY BEEDY Auburn Civil Engineering TK E JOYCE BICKFORD Pittsfield Modern Languages MEMORIAL if N , , v . l , IIOIIOTII Y BRA DFOIID Dex ter Modern llnnprunpfms 'x Fl 4" -v i DAVID IIRUWN Ricliuionil Aprriculturnl Sviernrc-s 'MIA GYMNASIUM ai NA NCY BRA DSTIIEET Lisbon Fnlls Eclucntion 'l'Il 5 ELIZABETH BIIOWN Merrick, N. Y, Sociology AAA ROBERT BRUCE Bar Harbor Forestry .IOANNE BURKE Portlnnrl Education ., 1 il Q5 I 4 I CLAYTON BUTCHER, J Lisbon Fnlls Education R. WILLIAM IIREIVER Rochester, N. Y. Electrical Engineering ' -1.11 JACK BROWN Old Town Education 'lfll K LOUISE BRYA NT Newcastle Education ELLEN BURNS Nobleboro Medical Technology 4 SIIIELA CALLAIIAN Kittery Mcrlicnl Technology 265 HARRY BRIDGE Guilford Mechanical Engineering 'Mill PHILIP BROWN, JR. Caribou Business Administration 'IIIIK Q' STEVEN B UCK Beverly, Mass. Education RICHARD BURNS Rumford Point Civil Engineering G REGORY CAMPBELL Bangor Chemical Engineering l . Q51 MA RY BROOKS Brunswick Mathematics .IZ - 6? INS. "Fx PHYLLIS BROWN Portland French JOHN BUCKLEY Portland History 6 Government JEAN BU RNHAM Kennebunkport Education AZ 'i"'AL:Tr.-vt ,-L i ' .-' ..i ' ' . i 'f l .1 I X .w MICHAEL CAMPBELL Lewiston Electrical Engineering F34 B WILLIAM BROOKS, III Cornish English WILLIAM BROWNE Augusta Agricultural Sciences -MIA KEITH BURDEN Presque Isle Business Administration AXA DEBORAH BURR South Portland Education A41 I Oz 4, AJ ' . sf. uf i .. WFP 4 x ROBERT CARLSON Cumberland Centex' Electrical Engineering JOHN CARTER Newport Electrical Engineering TE'-If .IACQUELINE CHAPIN Camden Education ROSE MARIE CARTER Belfast Home Economics A SUSAN CARTER Portland Education STEPHEN CHASE ROBERT CHENARD North Whitefield Waterville Agricultural Engineering Education an , w V 1 " s 7 E 522 I 'G hp T ARTH UR CLACK Orono Civil Engineering A PATRICA COFFMAN Andover, Mass. English MARY COOK Blaine Nursing LEROY CLARK Glenburn Speech W H M , I 1 M L,s .1 RON COLE Portland History XVILLIAM COOK Fairfield Biochemistry 'PMA ANNE CLEMONS Brunswick Education ' ni. Jywnav X ,49 ,Q if ' 'T L A24 SA NDRA COLE Wenham, Mass. English 'PM ' W i x :.. , BURTON COPSON Belfast Agricultural Sciences A l'P LAWRENCE CASAVANT Lewiston Mathematics D AN C HENEY New Harbor Education lm Il WAYNE COBB Deland, Fla. Mechanical Engineering 'DNB H -W N ANCY CON ANT Skowhegan English AUII ,-.,,, x,,..,..,. BRUCE COSON Skowhegun Education 266 JEFFERY CASE Harvard, Mnss. Civil Engineering 9X ROBERT CHADWICK Kittery Government A Til DAVID CHOATE Windsor Agricultural Sciences A A MOLLY COFFIN Freeport Nursing All GLENNA CONNORS Bowdoinham Education AZ ELIZABETH COTE Portland English Mi' CORY CIIURCII Auifuatu Animal Sciences ICI CORBETT HALL J EAN COUIICH ESNE Aubum English WILLIAM CURRIER Ornno Mechanical Engineering ATA 71 ' ' Q Q' DAVID CRAIG Bangor Civil Engineering --il A KATIIRYN CUSHMAN Old Town Education GEORGE DAVIS. JR, Sknwhegnn History DONA LD DERRAH Portland Mathematics XX PAUL DILLAWAY Wurren History and Government SARAH CRAIG Bangor English RAYMOND CUSHMAN Old Town Civil Engineering PETER DEANE Peaks Island History nnd Government EAI! 4' RAYMOND DESJARDINS Lewiston Electrical Engineering ARTHUR DiMAURO South Portland Education R22 267 '1 BARBARA CRAMER Reading, Mass. French XII SUSAN DALEY Falmouth Foreside English STEPHEN DEMORA, JR. Stratford, Conn. Biochemistry CAROLYN DEVOE Augusta Education WM . W " f H" ' W L, ,nit 9 Q - 1 'f .- - -. NORMAN DINEEN Calais Forestry CAROL CROSS Rockland Education AZ BLAINE DAVIS Orono v I I RICHARD CUNLIFFE Loring Air Base Chemical Engineering ELLEN DAVIS Bangor Electrical Engineering Education T ,N V' 11 A RUTH DEMPSEY Stillwater Nursing' JOANNE DILLON Newbury, Mass. 4 ,V -L, , ,I MARGARET DERAPS Falmouth Foreside Education XXI JUDITH DILLAWAY Warren Speech AOII L ,L et. Wei fl W ' , Education Tift 'Tm WILLIAM DINNEEN. IR. Bridgton Business and Economics NORMAN DODGE North Edgecomb Wildlife Management JUDITH DOLE Augusta Home Economics PETER DUNCAN Oakland Chemical Engineering GEORGIANNA ELLIS Bangor Education ,,,. V E, ,ii H ARR! ET S. EPSTEIN Rockland Speech A 1 ll'I JOAN FAIRBANK Beverly, Mass. Education filll 6-' ' .P ' Vg? WILLIAM DOUGHTY South Portland Biochemistry NANCY DURETTE Waterville French ARTHUR ELLISON Mendowbrook, Pa. Forestry OX PAUL ERSKINE Westbrook Chemical Engineering EEF? ---an ?? N EDWIN DOUGLASS Richmond Mechanical Engineering EN ANN EDDY Batlihurst, N. B. Home Economics FIB-If LAYVRENCE EMERY, JR. West Paris History Gi Government AXA MARY FAY Westfield, N. J. Nursing 'idl RODERICK FARHAM. JR. Bangor B - V - .--. , i 'iii' i A , il -A . , Q: V-4 il.. A 'V 4 L.-. V L. A. JOYCE FARMER Rockland English Business Administration 'PFA NOLA DOW REBECCA DOW 'ffflflfltli Rockland Sociology English Q it ll- I D 6' Y -I . H , im? JANET EDE CAROLE EDWARDS Orono South Paris Education Education AX!! NORMAN EMERY West Paris History I. DONALD FAHERTY So. Portland Zoology SANDRA FARRAR I-Iimrhum, Mass. Business and 'PM 268 4 PAUL EMERY So, Portland Education L A COLBY FAHEY Princeton Mechanical Engineering DIANE FARNHAM Bath Education JANE IJUDLEY Bangor Home Economics ,ang L 2 Slliil LEY ELIAS Fairfield Educntion A CUMBERLAND PATRICIA FELLOWS ljucksport Guvornmunt XII 1 1' ru-1 Li. -.. J' , , ff" .' ,,- , .-M, L CAROL FINK Nisknyunn, N. Y. Mathematics HALL L. JUIIN l"ENTON Old Town Civil Engineering' NORMAN FITZGERALD Aupzixntn Education 'MIA CA RL FORREST Wilmington, Vt. Forestry NA N CY FRYE Enfield Education T JACQUIELINE G Fairfield, Conn. Education Illlfll 4 V -n xo, if Q DAVID FERLAND Portland l-I istory EL Government 4' If I WAYNE FITZGERALD Bnth Education 'bil li GERA LD FORREST Harrison Mathematics r . 'U MARGARET GALLOUPE Bath Education 'I-Rl AUTHEIR FREDERICK GAY Fitchburg, Mass. Civil Engineering 269 , . ii x I G- . i ALLAN FERNALD Pittsficlil Business Administration .KTA ELLEN FLETCHER Bath Education QC? M AXINE FORSTER Dedham, Mass. Sociology IIIN' on JEROME GAMACHE Plainville, Conn. Entomology 'JS J OCELYN GENEST Lewiston Education AX!! l or U . , ' uf mx JUDITI-I FERNALD Orono English EDITII FLINT Bath Psychology IIBHIP ROBERT FOSS Bangor Chemistry S' ROBERT GARLAND Waltham, Mass. Journalism MARJORIE GETCHELL Winslow Sociology Rn ix ...X X A GA YLE FERRIS Brewer Education llB'b 1 4 ROYCE FLOOD Bangor Speech RICHARD FRENCH Stoneham, Mass. Mechanical Engineering ATA 4 ' x 1 RICHARD GARY Mechanic Falls Agricultural Stnblization Ez Conservation DANIEL GILBERT Windsor Business K: Economics OX JANICE GILLETTE Gorham Education 6 ROY G OULD East Union Business Administration THE LINDA GREENHAUGH Orono English AAA 4. 'fe ' ' HETSY HALL Kennebunk Education AZ ROBERT HARDISON Caribou Civil Engineering .nu IR S GARY GILLIGAN Sheffield, Mass. Civil Engineering EDWARD GRAFFA M Rockport Mechanical Engineering ATA SANDRA GUPTILL Cedar Grove English N lk! 1 I I JOHN HA LL Boxford, Mass. Civil Engineering . , 1 .F MARCIA HARITHAS Arlington, Mass. Zoology Ji MERRILYN GLEW Augusta Animal Sciences SHARON GIIAFFAM Bath Education AUII NONA HAGGETT Bridgton Zoology fiqigl- , ka , 'fi l I! - 'qi ijifilf- N ' JACK HAM Millinncket Electrical Engineering A 2 lf' XY BRADFORD HARDEN Auburn Education MARILYN GOODRICH Fort Kent Home Economics AX!! MICHAEL GRAHAM Portland Education 1 MARGUERITE HALEY Mt. Kim, N. Y. Education :slag DEBORAH HANNA Rockport English XY! 'j- .4 33:3 ll .ga V 'l ' i ci L A JUDITH HARTLEY Cape Elizabeth Home Economics 270 WAYNE GOODRICH Kennebunk English ELAINE G HANATA Norwalk, Conn. Sociology A LAN H ALI. Millinocket Engineering Physics l M A RGA RET HANSON Portland Education ERNEST HARVEY, JR. Greenville I-'urestry A I'l' MARY GOUCIIER Eliot Mathematics xxz A L PATRICIA GREENE Rockport Spanish XII RAYMOND FOGLER IJB RARY viii' ,f-V DIANE II AYDEN Augusto Psychology WILLIAM HENRY Cape Elizabeth Sociology JOHN IIAYES. Jll. Wells Chemicnl Engineering .1 . bv ' JONATHAN HESCOCK Monson Forestry .l MARILYN HOLUIIOOK Hingham, Mass. Psychology 'DM J ANICE IIOOD Eliot Sociology LU ELLA H UBIILING Bangor Education M in 5, BRUCE HEANSSLER Deer Isle Mechanical Engineering ROBERT HESS Manchester History 'bl'A , ,mg VIRGINIA HEATH Wilton Home Economics EDGAR HIGGINS Howland Psychology LINDA HOLDEN SUSAN HOLLA NDER Sanford Philadelphia, Pa. Education Agricultural Sciences AXSI A42 1 ' 1 A A S r 'iq V 17.1 ,, I I A t . PAUL HOPKINS Winchester, Moss. Psychology 6 7 DAVID I-IUMPI-IRIES South Portland Government 271 JOHN HOWARD Hackensack, N. J. Chemical Engineering ATA ALBERT H UNTOON Kittery Electrical Engineering LL 'TL' ,A fy. F, I l r I 1 . ' f l QL GD ' 1. , 1 its -i , MARCIA HEBERT Yarmouth Education X A " in mg-L . A . L 1' BRADFORD HILTON Cumberland Center Mechanical Engineering SUE HOLMES Shawnut Education '-PM CATHERINE HOYT Biddeford Education AZ - H., DENNIS HURLBURT Newport Electrical Engineering ATA r ew U. li BERND HEINRICH Dryden Zoology BARBARA HINKSON Longmeadow, Mass. Psychology II B47 5 TERRANCE HOLM ES Otter Creek Education ATI! X if , LAURA HUBBARD Round Pond English 1141 RICHARD I-IUSSEY Skowhegan Business Administration DOUGLASS HUTCHINS Penobscot Agricultural Sciences WMA ROGER IRELAND Fort Fairfield Chemical Engineering EX ROBERT JAMES East Greenwich, R. I. Engineering Physics ROBERT JOHNSON Westfield, Mess. Civil Engineering ROBERT JORDAN, JR. Falmouth Business and Economics 'MCE 5 Y N X JOHN I-IUTCHINS Gardiner Mechanical Engineering KE SAMUEL IRELAND Ogunquit Electrical Engineering BRADFORD JENKINS, JR. Milton, Mass. Business and Economics EX rib , JOANNE JONES Westboro, Mass. History and Government DAVID J OIYETT Springvale Mathematics HX FL' if 19. ROLAND HUTCHINS Penobscot Mathematics A SHIRLEY IRVING Gorham English AX!! i 3 J UDITH JOEL Bethesda, Md. Home Economics STANLEY JONES Orono Civil Engineering , . .ffl 'S I, , Q A ctame Joyce Milton, Mass. Education I kc- fri rj tj 5 CARL HUTCHINSON Houlton Agricultural Sciences il Q , 5 l f 1 l g'4 DEONNE JACKSON Fayette Medical Technology AAA CAROLE JOHNSON I-Iolden, Mass. Philosophy ELIZABETH JORDAN South Portland History nncl Government EDWARD JURGENSON Portland Business and Economics ATO 272 ,V 4-Is., iw -si 3 s .7 t Jn A L. ELSA ILVONEN Owls Head Education llllflr ERNEST JACK SON Norway History HNIA l MARION JOHNSON Bangor Sociology , A-"1 l. , fi' Q . 5 f RAEBERTA JORDAN Rockland Nursing CATHERINE KANE Wantagh, L.I., N. Y. Spanish 6' f ici' r RICHARD INGRAHAM, JR. Old Town Psychology 1' ur ROBERT JACKSON Millinocket Pulp and Paper Technology ,W -' . ,I fa' -ff MEMORIAL l We , 1 8' , .-,., A , X I I'E'I'EIl KEENE Glens Fullu, N. Y RICIIARD KAPLAN Wnbnn, Mass. Zoology HIS'-0l'Y 'I'IIIi -sv if E' IIOBEII-'I' KIAII DAVID KIMBALL Brewer Rumford Education Engineering Physics 'PKI UNION , '2.wf'91 Q. VIRGINIA LAWRENCE Cupe Elizabeth Education JOHN KARKOS, JR. Lisbon Falls Mechanical Engineering .ITA BARRY K LEINBERG Waldoboro English ALAN LEATI-IERS Orrington Zoology .STA l. . if BRIAN LISTER ARTHUR LI'I'I'LEFIELD Caribou Southboro, Mass. History And Government Agricultural Engineering SUSAN KEENE Glens Falls, N, Y. Education X!! L JANET LAFFIN Westbrook History Il Q' K I BRUCE LEIGHTON Limestone Civil Engineering ANN LIZOTTE Caribou French ...ii ELAINE K ELLEY Cape Elizabeth Psychology XII l 6. X. il .QB . SHERMAN LAUGHTON Bangor Business and Economics SWE In ' lull .. 'll wlf' ROBERT LESO Casco Forestry 5 ,ie s ' L. DOUGLAS LOOK Jonesboro Education KE CRAIG LUND MARY LYFORD PATRICIA Mx-1cFAWN GORDON MncKENZIE S1100 Corinth, N. Y. Rumford Westbrook Business and Economics English Mathematics Engineering Physics IIX A41 273 l GAIL KELLEY Caribou English HIM? DANIEL LAWRENCE. JR. Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Engineering Physics BONNIE LIBERTY Auburn History XI? LINDA LORD Belmont, Mass. History and Government AOII BRIAN MCMILLAN Belfast Chemical Engineering GX PRISCILLA MADEN Pittsfield French I PHILIP MASON Gorham Agricultural Sciences In N ' 4 SANDRA McCANN Westboro, Mass. Education v , I 1 F Y' 4" SHARON McGUFFlE Stonington Education ' f 6' FRANCIS MEISSNER So. Portland History dn Government Q. -x , .if JEAN MALACINSKI Norwood, Mass. Education wi x iii BONNIE MASTERMAN Milo English AAA MARY McCARTI'IY Presque Isle Education fc 3 ' L E si JAMES LAFFERTY Rangeley Business 6 Economics . -,I 59 .M ' .il I 5 -1 N ., i VICTOR MERCER, .IR Dennisport, Mass. Education PIX KENNETH MANTAI Darien, Conn. Botany MARIANNE MASTROLUCA Portland Education V R' l- 1 DOUGLAS MCCOBB Dresden Civil Engineering U. SHEILA McMANUS Bangor Nursing DENNIS MERRILL Glen Cove Electrical Engineering 'ii 5 EILEEN MARCH Reading, Mass. History nk Government .IUDITH MATTIIEWS Fairfield, Mass. Nursing AZ NEAL McCURDY Lubec Education Bi-J li MATTHEW McNEARY Orono Physics ATA RAYMOND MERSEREAU Mars Hill Business Administration -274 Lt i ROGER MARTIN ROBERT MARTIN Falmouth Brower Wildlife Management Forestry EIME sf' nr , '11 ,X 1. CAROLYN MBORIA DONALD McBETI-I Snco Melrose, Musa. Education Business da Economics AZ EX JOHN McGONAGLE Lnconin, N. II. Education .IUDITH McNU'I'l' Sebago Lake English .IAA I'I'l I LLIP M ILLIKEN Portland Electrical Engineering CARNEGIE DIANA MILLS Auburn Education PATRICA MORSE Cumberland Center Education HALL ZSE. PATRICIA MILLS East Meredith, N. Y. Psychology 4: '15, 1 Q' -., x ff GEORGE MORTON South Paris Math IIIKIZ IIELENE NARDINO Clifton, N. J. English AUII WILLIAM NICHOLL, JR. Kittery History Q Government 'FRE . va JILL OLSEN Bath Moth AXII N .4 S USAN MILLS Orono English XII L .IUDITII MOSES Portland Zoology , .i W "Tl v PLA CRAIG MILNE Lexington, Mass. i Education K E PETER MOSHER Bangor Agricultural Sciences A FP l MARY NEYVELL Hampden Highlands Nursing I H ,li G EOR-G E NODDIN Lincoln Chemistry -or HA RRY OSGOOD Westbrook Education EX 275 FREDERICK NEWMAN Peabody, Mass. Engineering Physics TKE .- ., E-hi E ,, L . JUNE NORTON South Portland Psychology ,w CLIFFO RD OUELLETTE Frenchville Mechanical Engineering ZX 'TE ' in S- 'if W 1 ., ik Q,-Y I -5-. wh .-r' " Els. JAMES MORIN Old Town Education I W. w HARRISON MOYER, JR. Caribou Business Administration HGH 1 1 i Z Q '. , :, rl A THOMAS NEWMAN Wethersfield, Conn. Forestry A l'P E DORCAS NUTFING Oxford Home Economics .f ROBERT PAPE York Education GARRETT MORRISON Sudbury, Mass. Geology 1 r 'f ff-X iaz::t'.l. - it 41 , , z ' Vi . v frg KENNETH MURCH Bangor Civil Engineering I-IILARY N ICKAU Westfield, Conn. Psychology MICHAEL 0'DONNELL Orono History KL Government N .I UNE PARKER Kittery Math S MICHAEL PARKER Longmeadow, Mass. Forestry A l'l' JUDITH PAYSON Union Home Economics 'PM JOSEPH PERCIVAL Wiscnsset Mechanical Engineering V' RICHARD PETERS Kittery Education RICHARD PLANTE Berwick Education RICHARD PARKER Saco Chemistry EDGAR PEARSON. JR. Bangor Psychology ,QA MARILYN PERCIVAL Orono Mathematics SANFORD PHIPPEN Hancock English vi 'Hi , ' s ii KENNETH POOLE Bath Business Administration 'PMA SALLY PARLIN Portland Romance Languages LOUIS PELLETIER Auburn Speech EN 4 7 ANN PERKINS Portland Nursing XI! b 4 RALPH PILSBURY Palermo Civil Engineering N A NCY POOLE Pemziquid Education A 1 I II AAI l lv G i ' x ,Y 3, . MARGARET PARSONS Lewiston Education AXIZ -Q - is 5 ,,.9' ARDERN PENDLETON Snarsport Education NORMAN PERRAULT Biddeford Medical Engineering gd' 5 X We DAVID PLAISTED Kittery Mechanical Engineering SANDRA PA'l'l'EN Carmel Sociology -Q gf" .I OHN PEN LER Portland Forestry BRENDA PERRY Orono Education AAA MONIQUE PLANTE Biddeford French llfll SYLVIA POTTER Westport, Conn. Sociology 276 AN N POVVERS Augusta Education .LLI f Klint . A la J L BARBARA PAYN Banrcor Sociology ELAINE PENLEY West Puris Nursing AX!! l l Q 133' Q ,f .' ' qi TR7 i. lL 'V 4 'ij' 1? 'J i 4 DAVID PRIEST PETEIZ PULLEN EDMOND RANCOURT YVILLIAM RANDALL llnmxuluy Dover-Fnxvroft Mexico Skowhegan Mnthcmntics Education Education Business Administration 'MIA ZIAE r ST f' 'iv' G' 0 ' 8' I . Y ' .1 DAVID RECORD Livermore Fnlln Chemical Engineering HALL IJEANNA REED Buxton Education KAIIYL RICKER. liluu Hill Nursing' L. 1 LOUISE ROBBINS McKinley English SD l'A'l'lllCIA ROBY Cnpu Elizabeth lliatory l PATRICK REIDM AN Portland Education KE NANCY RICKER l 4 Augusta Nursing 'sr ff! K MARY ROBERTS Corinna Education , .:- lk ' 1 NANCY RUSSELL New Harbor Education 277 VAUG HN REYNOLDS Bangor Speech liflll 6. h-.AH ,f l JOYCE RING Bath History 6 Government IIBQ RAYMOND ROBERTS Wuhan, Mass. Business Administration MICHAEL SAWYER Cornish Animal Science A l'l' ., A NANCY RAY- Cupe Elizabeth Home Economics AKD STUART RICH Old Town Government RAYMOND RIOUX Lewiston Electrical Engineering STAN LEY ROBERTS Both Mechanical Engineering PIN of xg A JAMES SANBORN Bridgton Chemical Engineering Tlflflfl RANDALL RAY Cape Elizabeth Education I 2 GARY RICHARDSON South Portland Wildlife Management N 4 ix , 4' lu, , S H . i PETER RIPPLE Youngston, N. Y. Forestry DAVID ROGERS Winthrop Mathematics M ORTON SCLAIR Bangor Engineering Physics 7 "'Ym DANIEL SEVERSON Cambridge, N. Y. Education KZ LARRY SHIRLAND Howland Mechanical Engineering A CAROLYN SHAW East Holden Home Economics 5' WILLIAM SHOENER Chatham, N. J. Forestry AVI' ANTHONY SMITH Biddeford French ! zlz Qi S U SAN SMITH Belfast Education I DONALD SOLER Boothbay Iflarlmr Ed ucntion CA ROLE SMITH Belfast Education AZ C IIA R I.0T'l'E SNELL Hallowell English DONALD SORRIE Andover, Mnss. Mechanical Engineering EN 4 GERALD SI-IEA Presque Isle Psychology fbK2 CAROL SIDOFSKY Brooklyn, N. Y. Chemistry DANA SMITH, III Thomaston History and Government l I 57 5? I F I I F , lx Nl A-wi H K CAROL SNOW Whitman, Mass. Mathematics 1 MYRNA STANLEY Southwest Harbor Modern Languages 1 PAUL SIIERIIURNE Milo Education 'PHE CORINNE SIMMONS Rockland Speech HELEN SM ITII Concord, Mass. Mathematics A 0 II .L , , f , H ' L' '- .ftl V .mg , 41, ,L l MARGARET SNUIV Braintree, Mass. English GAYLE STAPLES Charleston Psychologry 278 LOWELI. SIIERWOUD, JR. Stillwmmr History 8a Government 4'l'A 'S ,, ,I LIN DA SINGER Gardiner Education KATHLEEN SMITH Havertown, Pa. Nursing I ' 1 J"'.1 ARNOLD SODERGREN Stockholm Zoology l J UDITII STEARNS Waterford Chem istry DAVID SIIIBLES Brewer ELI ucatlnn 2l'l'IC WILLIAM SMAIIA Portland Business Administration A 'l'l1 STEVENS NANCY STEPUTIS CARL STEWAIUI' llnngor Culnis Eflucntinn Mm-liunicnl Engineering ,Qu N NANCY STONE hover-Fnxcruft Nursing HALL 'l'Iil' STU ART STROM IIEIIG Num-zlhnni, Mass. Mothcmntics 'MIK IEI..IZAlIIS'I'II TAYLOR Gurlnun Mathematics PETER TIIOMPSON Guilford .lournxilisni 9 'fl Lu uf' lr ,ii f I V G ICORG E TODD Euston Enfzinccri ng Physics MARTIN STICKLE Jamaica, N. Y. Bacteriology I f SIIEILA STRIAR Bungor Education ,, ,,,,i Ar. NANCY TAYLOR Belfast Home Economics ANNIE TII URLOW Bangor Education AUII -css" GORDON TOWLE Old Town Biochemistry 279 ERIC STONVE Lisbon Falls History Ancl Government up-..- KATI-IERINE STURGIS New Glouster Education II lvl' J PERSIS TAYLOR Augusta Sociology 4 ARDRA TH URLOYV Winslow Sociology .XZ LINWOOD TOWNSEND Winthrop Education EUGENE ST. PIERRE i 'T , . . , ' 1 JONATHAN STONE Portland Orono German Chemistry . 'Q ATV' 1 1 : E-I 7, i' I t A Q I ffs. i 17. :I JOAN SULLIVAN JOHN SUTIIERLAND Auburn So. Portland Zoology Education IX f'-rf E ' , .M ' 1 ,. -nwll 1 -' L' Z 4. , . A .. T4 ANN TIIERRIEN DOROTHY THOMPSON Bangor Stanford, Conn. History 8: Government Education 1 - ,if 'X i, ,Q 1- fl' GARY TIBBETTS ALAN TITCOMB Bingham Newport Mathematics Forestry Eflili BARBARA TR UE Stonington Education AZ .- l ADRIANN TUCKER Cherryfield Mathematics l S' Q. ., I , ai! PAULINE TURCO'I'I'E Skowhegan Education .4 ERNESTINE VERMETTE Westlioro, Mass. English All FRANKLIN NVARD So. Portland Chemistry 'ow L-fi 4. 5 GORDON WEEKS Bristol Education f W L HOWARD WILEY Warren History Gr. Goverrnnent K i ROBERT UPHAM Augusta Civil Engineering ' nl li 7 fix G! l. RAYMOND VERMETTE Lewiston Bacteriology DENNIS WASKIEWICZ Amherst, Mass. Agricultural Engineering BX .IOLENE URQUHART Portland Mathematics ,N 'G' M A RY VERRILL Old Orchard Education TOBIAS WATSON Stratford, Conn. I-Iistory' - -f . A ,L rx .in -Hi-T -Pr' 1, VAEETSQK' ' H - f'Z.'i?9A,f' i 'lg,,':?'W': 5 SONJA WEEKS ARNOLD WEISS Winchester, Mass. Bangor Education Speech .VII 'FEI' ms-' ,' -9 Q ' . - J L , fi JOSEPH WILEY No. Attleboro, Mass. Forestry JOIIN WILKINSON, JR. Reading, Mass. Civil Engineering IX DAVID VAILLANCOURT Westbrook French III-I Il ROLAND VIOLE'I'1'E Old Orchard Education F ll ,ai ' . , i P MAURICE WEBB Hallowell Mechanical Engineering EY I lu 1 18' lf' A WILLIAM WHITMAN Pittsfield Wildlife Management CA ROL WILSON Needham, Mass. Mathematics 280 v f-., Va 'am FRANKLIN VAN ANTYVERPEN Nutley, N. J. Engineering Physics .:g, tk HENRY VOSS, JR, Barrington, R. I. Business Administration ATI? PHILIP WEBIIER, JR. North Anson Mechanical Engineering 'mu 4 Q -1. E- ROGER WIIITNEY Old Town Education GH! A CHARLES WILSON Chinn Forestry FAITH VA UTO UR Hallowell History K: Government XS? i :- ,M MAY WALLACE Camden Education g , IS HANNIBAL HAMLIN 3 U 1 DAVID WILSON York llcnch Educnlion 1 Q CIIAIILENE WOLllAUl"l'Eli H oultn n English HALL ri? . DAVI D WILSON Enstport Mutlielnutics '-wil Q 'N . 1 fa-r"" 'X DANIEL WOODMAN Falmouth Buctcriology IUCIIAIZD WYMAN Winn Mathematics Qs f ANTHONY MCCLAUGHLIN lzlulh Education 'MIA RENDLE JONES Richmond Ilistory SL Government X Q, X 'r. N ,qv i. .. -. K if DONALD WILSON Mooscheml Forestry T Wy il . ' -. I LA RRY WOODWORTH Iloulton Agricultural Sciences KI' l I K To STEPHEN YORK East Blue Hill Mathematics ' il 1 I nf- N FRED BAILEY Bangor Business Administration .I XA ,H fy I- A N N ROBINSON Gorham Agricultural Sciences 28l 'Q' g ... .7 new 4' MARLA NVILSON Southampton, N, Y. French Y 'cried i LEON WORTHLEY Stillwater Education DAVID YO UNG Dixfield Civil Engineering FORREST WING Orono Education MAHLON WORCESTER Portland History SL Government LESTER YOUNG Old Town Education G' 4,-f PA UL BERRY Cumberland Center English i tw DAN A SMITH Thomaston History DAVID HINKS Orono Education 'I' E41 RALPH ST. JOHN Fort Kent Mathematics we ELLEN WINN Ogunquit Education 'bil i - Ja . 'ix l Lf Y : GERTRUDE WYMAN Monson Education ANTHONY YUODSNUKIS Rochester, N. Y. Forestry ATP 14 Q I .. A I Q7 xi , - FP , - 4,4 - A ALICE HOMEYER Orono Sociology YT ' AVARD WALKER Owls Head Business ,Administration 'MCE RICHARD ACIIESON Hallowell Psychology 411'A CHARLOTTE ARANGO Bar Harbor English JAMES BAILEY Bucksport Mechanical Engineering CURTIS BARTOL Brewer Psychology VIRGINIA BELLINGER Littleton, Mass. Sociology A11 MA RGARET BERRY Buxton Psychology WAYNE BISHOP Bangor Electrical Engineering AUGUSTINE BOMBARD Ogunquit Education WILLIAM BOURBON Orono Education GAIL BRACI-IET'I' Boothbay Harbor Sociology LION BRIGGS Groton, Mass. Agricultural Sciences DAVID BROWN N orway Education TI-IURSTON BURNS Windham Hill Mathematics FREDERICK AI-IEARN Old Orchard Education JEAN ARMSTRONG Cape Elizabeth Psychology JACQUELINE BALDWIN Albion, New York Home Economics LINDA BEAM Bar Harbor Sociology AOR DOROTHY BENSON Bradley Education RONALD BILLINGS Monson English ROGER BLACSTONE Caribou Business da Economics ROBERT BONNEY Mexico Biochemistry M ARCIA BOUTELLE Camden Romance Languages DAVID BRANN Plainfield, N. J. Forestry AXA JOHN BROCH Alfred Agricultural Sciences FRED BROWN Mexico Mathematics JUDITH CAMPBELL Orono Home Economics DOUGLAS ALCOX Augusta. History sit Government CAROL ATWOOD Solon English SCOTT BALLARD Hallowell Agricultural Sciences WIIK PAUL BEAUDOIN Biddeford Business Administration GAROLD BENSON Mars Hill Mechanical Engineering ROBERT BIRCHENAUGII Slingerlands, N. Y. Mathematics WENDALL BLANCHARD Waldoboro Civil Engineering LELAND BOOHER Brewer History MARCIA BOWER Milford Education HELEN BRA UNSTEIN Orono Chemistry I-IELENE BROOKS Hallis Center History IRENE BROWN Orono Speech PHILIP CAMPBELL Lydonville, Vt. Education 282 GWENDOLYN ALEXANDER Brunswick English TALBET AVERILL Old Town Public Management BRENDA BARNES Fort Fairfield Education ROGER BELANGER Waterville Government LOUISE BERNARD Skowhegun Home Economics AMO BISIIOP Readfield Mathematics ROBERTS BOGGS Waldoboro Civil Engineering RICHARD BOUCHER Biddeford Pulp 8: Paper Technology FRANCIS BOYLE Old Town Business St Economics COLE BRIDGES Calais Business Administration '-PI'.l PAUL BROOKS Canton, Mass. Forestry A VII BRUCE BUCKLEY Needham, Mass. Education A XA DOUGLAS CAREY Colchester, Vermont Forestry PI-IILII' ANDREWS Plninvllle, Mass. Wildlife Management AVI' RAYMOND RACKMAN Bangor Business Arlministration DANA BARNES Fort Fairfield Agricultural Sciences ERIC BBLLEFONTAINE Cupc Elizabeth Education . M, , " is: ' ,ie EDUCATION CLARE BROWN Staten Island, N, Y, Home Economics :WP UANA IKULLEN Old Town Education CLAIRE CARON Auburn French JOHN CARTER Mount Desert Education RACHEL CHASE Orono Home Economics J 0A N CLUNIE Falmouth Education WILLIAM COOK Orono Physics BUILDING DONALD DYER Hangm- Mathematics THOMAS EDGE Dowington, Pa. Agricultural Sciences AXA SHARON ESTEY Caribou English RICHARD CATTELLE Tenafly, N. .l. Mechanical Engineering DIANNA CIIRISTAKOS So. Portland Education ROLA N Il COLE Wells Education EA RLE COOPER Bath Education -DJIA KENNEDY CRANE III Glen Cove Business dt Economics RAYMOND CULLINANE Wcstficlrl, N. J. Forestry RAYMOND DAUPHINIE Bangor Business Administration MARY DAY Bangor Psychology A XII LESTER DICKEY Camden' Electrical Engineering RA LI'II DROPER Woodland Mechanical Engineering HOME DYER Belfast Education LINDA EICHORN Holyoke, Mass. German .IAM ES ETTER Bangor Education RICHARD CANELERO Portland Geology ROBERT CLARK Old Town Chemistry FRANKLIN COLGAN Jackman Station Zoology ROBERT COUPE Bangor Education ROBERT CROCKETT Orono Agricultural Sciences JAM ES CURRIE Howland Mechanical Engineering JAMES DAVENPORT Wychoff, N. J. Forestry PATRICK DEARMATT Keats Hill Mechanical Engineering CHARLES DIPERRI Wiscasset Business Administration HUGH DRISKO Columbia Falls Education LINDA DYK E Canton Sociology ROBERT ELLIOTT Calais Mathematics GORDON EVANS Portland Education HPKE 283 JAMES CHAPMAN Wilmington, Del. Mechanical Engineering STERLIN CLOCHEDILE Yarmouth Electrical Engineering H1141 ALAN COLLEY Portland Education ROBERT COUTURE Saco Psychology DUANE CROPLEY Gardiner Education JON CURTIS Ticonderoga, N. Y. Chemical Engineering RICHARD DAVIDSON Rosemont, Pa. Chemical Engineering RONALD DeLAlTE Kingman Education RICHARD DABLE Milo History Q Government KE DON A LD DUBAY Auburn English ATR THOMAS DYKE Lewiston, N. Y. Pulp K: Paper Technology G ERA LD ELLIS Phillips Education JOHN FABELLO North Bridgton English ATA LENERETT CHASE Round Pond Business E Economics EX DOUGLAS CLUKEY Dexter Mechanical Engineering ATI! JAMES CONLEY Greenville Junction Mechanical Engineering TKE JAMES COX Lincoln Education ATA CATHERINE CROWLEY Kittery History JOHN CUTLIFFE Old Town Psychology DIANE DAVIS Milo Education FREDERICK DENICO Orono Chemical Engineering RICHARD DOLLOFF Westbrook Civil Engineering OX .THURLOW DUNNING Freeport Civil Engineering CARL EASTWOOD Rangeley Zoology RALPH EILLIS Manset Zoology JEAN FENNY Middletown, Mass. Home Economics DAVID FARRAR Lynnfield. Mass. Education ATR ROBERT FISHER Hartland Chemical Engineering THEODORE FRASER Rumford Mathematics 'IIIIK NANCY FROST So. Portland Psychology DOUGLAS GETCI-IELL Augusta Mechanical Engineering ZX DONALD GOULD Jackson Heights, N. Y. History Kr. Government KEITH GRAND Loring AFB Journalism JOHN GRAY Madawaska History dn Government ROMA GUY Fort Kent Education JON HANDY Winchester, Mass. Bacteriology JOYCE HARBURGER Kennebunk English NEIL HARVIE So. Portland Mathematics RALPH HERSY Scarboro Education JOHN FEARON Orono Zoology LINDA FLEWELLING Skowhegan Education CEDRIC FREEMAN Boonville, N. Y. Chemical Engineering YVILSON GAGNON Orono History dz Government JOHN GILBERT Madswaska Government MICHAEL GOUZIE South Portland Electrical Engineering ALDEN G RANT Portland Education THOMAS GRAY Madawaska History dz Government DOUGLAS HALL Pow-nal Psychology GEORGE HANSEN Vinalhaven Mathematics JOHN HARRINGTON Westbrook Electrical Engineering MILLARD HAYDEN Guilford Electrical Engineering FREDERICK HILL Orono Mechanical Engineering MICHAEL FEENER Andover Business Administration A TQ WILLIAM FOLEY Portland Electrical Engineering EARL FREMAN. JR. Kennebunkport Zoology ATG BARNEY GALINSKY Glovcrsville, N. Y. Civil Engineering ATS! JOHN GILBERT Elmira, N. Y. Chemical Engineering JOEL GRAFFAM Bath Education J A MES G RANT Lincoln Electrical Engineering J OANNE G REEN Orono Home Economics RICHARD HALL Calais Government CHARLES HANSON East Eddington Electrical Engineering BRUCE HARTFORD Andover, Mass. Wildlife Management GLENNYS HEATH Stillwater Education DA VID H INCKS Lincoln Center Education 284 ERNEST FERLAND. JR. Augusta Mechanical Engineering JAMES FORTINI Plymouth, Mass. Education NORMAN FRENCH W. I'Im'I.ford, Conn. Agricultural Business At Economics AM OS GA Y Biddeford Agricultural Sciences AFP SUSAN GOODRICH Rockport Education ALDEN GRAHAM Portland Education WILLIAM GRANT Dexter Government JANE GREENLAW Island Falls Education CLARA HAMMER Orono Education N EIL HANSON Greenville Forestry CHARLES HARVY Augusta Education JOHN HEATH Bar Harbor Education RAYMOND HITCHOCK Springfield, Vt. Forestry RENATE PINK Portland Medical Technology SUSA N FORTUNE Falmouth Zoology J A NE FRIZZELL Cumberland Frcside English DANA GERALD Fairfield Civil English UK THOMAS HARVY Old Tomm Education SOLVEIG HENNINGS Falmouth Education WILLIAM HOCI-I Rockland Education PHYSICS T BRYAN IIODGKIN Lewiston Electrical Enkinccriagr ESTIIER HOPKINS Orleans. Mass. I-Ionic Economics FRED J AMES Portland Education LAWRENCE JOHNSON Bangor Zoology for ,Afro BUILDING I l l RONALIJ LEWIS Orono Chemical Engineering N A NIEI. LI LLEY Hangar Zoology ROIIEIFI' MacDONALD Brirlgton Business 8: Economics MILLARD MANN Oronu Agricultural Sciences 'I'lIOMAS HODGKINS Cape Elizabeth Education TIIOMASINE HOUSTON Guilford English DONNA JOBDER Waterville Sociology IIENDLE JONES Richmond History A Government WILLIAM KEUP Orono Education J OIIN LA BA N Winchester, Mass. Forestry KAREN LARNAY Glens Falls, N. Y. Nursing CHASE LAMAID Orono Psychology BARBARA LAW RENCE Hath Sociology BRENDA LIHBY Bangor Education DONALD LIPPIZE River Edge, N. J. Forestry ROGER MADRELL Ellsworth Zoology BRIAN MARTIN Onkland Forestry MARY HOLMES Orono History Q Government J EFFREY HUETHER Southport, Conn. Botany DOUGLAS JOHNS Bath Psychology ELIZABETH KAZALSKI Brunswick German ROBERT KING Millinocket Mechanical Engineering TIMOTHY LaFARGE Mount Carmel Forestry MARY LAMOREAU Bowdoingham Nursing JOSEPH LAROU Portland Electrical Engineering RONALD LEEMAN Orono Agricultural Sciences DENNIS LIBBY Millinocket Mechanical Engineering JEAN LI'I"l'LEFIELD Albion Nursing MARSHALL MAGEE Eighty Four, Pa. Mechanical Engineering EDYVARD MARTIN Caribou Psychology 285 ALICE HOMEYER Orono Sociology CYNTHIA HUSTON Auburn Education EARL JOHNSON Long Island Engineering Physics JANE KAZUTOW Columbia Rails History Sz Government GARY KINNEY Bangor Biochemistry THOMAS LAHAISE St. Johnshury, Vt. WILLIAM HONAN Portland Business Administration FRANK INGEROSKI Portland Education ERNEST JOHNSON Sanford Engineering Physics JOHN KELLEY Brewer History Ez Governmenti ROBERT KIRK Hloulton Chemistry DAVID LAHAIT Salisbury, Mass. Chemistry Education JOHN LANE KENNETH LANE Orrington Ssco Education Education EDWARD LARRABEE ARTHUR LAWRENCE Bath Rockland Mathematics Education JOANNE LEGOI-'F DIANA LEWIS Winslow Darien, Conn. Sociology Education REGINALD LIBBY Bangor Zoology THOMAS LONGSTAFF DAVID MacDONALD Unity Waterboro Philosophy Psychology ELLIE MAIN GEORGE MANN Bath Sherman Mills History Psychology PHILIP MATHIEU NANCY MAYER Westbrook Portland Psychology Mathematics VERNON McFARLAND Bar Harbor Education ANASTATIA McLAUGI-I LIN Brewer Education BRENDA MENGES Segregonset, Mass. French MA RTHA MILLIKEN Westbrook English ELIZABETH MOORE Lyndonville, N. Y. Medical Technology HUGH MORGAN Glen Ridge, N. J. Business Administration CYNTHIA MORTUS Mexico English JOHN MURPHY Portland Business 8: Economics SHARREL NILSON Guilford Sociology WILLIAM O'CONNELL Lewiston Engineering Physics HILTON PAGE Orono Speech WiLL1AM PAILLSON West Bosford, Mass. Agricultural Engineering AFI' GEORGE PINKEY Tamaqua, Pa. Forestry CLEM McGILLICUDDY I-Ioulton Government GILBERT MCLAUGHLIN Guilford Mathematics THOMAS M ICKEWICH Waterville Mathematics KENNETH MILLS Falmouth Education HENRY MOORE No. Vassslboro Forestry ELDON MORRISON Perry Civil Engineering CH ARLES MOTTRAM Stratford, Conn. Mathematics ROBERT MURPHY Portland Chemistry M ARY NOONON So. Portland Education DIANE 0'DONNELL Portland History Q Government DAVID PALMER Waterville Pulp dr Paper Technology GX J OH N PERRY Bangor Electrical Engineering JOYCE PITMAN Camden History 8. Government MARTIN McI'IALE Hempstead, N. Y. Speech JOSEPH McLAUG HLIN Bath Education JEAN MILLER Braintree, Mass. Medical Technology ROBERT MITCHELL Portland Business Sz Economics OK LESTER MORAN Rockland History KZ NORMAN MORSE Orono Mathematics THOMAS MULHERN Portland Civil Engineering BETH MURRAY Gorham Medical Technology JOSEPH NORTON Old Town Civil Engineering TONDA OLSON Winthrop Sociology ROLAND PARADIS Frenchville Mechanical Engineering JANE PETERSON Bangor Education WILLIAM POTTER West Bath Mechanical Engineering 'DRE 286 NANCY McINTIRE Pcrhum Home Economics DAVID MCLEOD Cope Elizabeth Mathematics ROBERT MILLER Orono Education EUGENE MONAHAN Millinocket Business Administration 'PKI CHARLES MORGAN I-Iollis Center Electrical Engineering PIIILLIP MORSE Danvers. Mass, Sociology JAMES M URPHY Lewiston English SY LVIA NILES Monmouth Education BRENDA OVERT Skowhegnn Education NA NCY O'MA RA Gardiner Government .I AM ES PARR Mexico Psychology MARSHALL PETTINGILI. Berlin, N. H. Mechanical Engineering THOMAS POWER Orono Education FRANCIS McKAY Bangor Muthomntics MARILYN MELKONIAN Oronn Education RRADBURNE MILLET Springfield, Mass. Emrincering Physics CHARLES MONTGOMERY Orono Chem ical Engi necrinir STODDER RARRY PATREE Syracuse, N. Y. Civil Engineering J A M ES PEW Fulmnuth Foreside Psychology EARL PRIDE Orono Education gre I 1 I I v WARREN PRINCE Camden Electrical Engineering GEORGE REDMOND Dover-Foxcroft Mechanical Engineering WILLIAM RIIlEOU'I' Ileinpstond, N. Y. Geology JOHN ROIIERTSON Old Town Zoology CAFETERIA V .I ls- IJANIELI, SPEAR Jersey City. N. J. Mcchanicnl Engineering WILLIAM STEGEMAN Occun Purk, N. J. Botany WILLIAM STINSON Wolwich, Conn. Electrical Engineering PHILIP PROVOST Bangor Government E UGEN E REES Sangerville Government MARTHA RI DLON Kezni' Falls ALAN HAMSDELL Monmouth Agricultural Sciences DALE RICHARDSON Mount Desert Botany ARIE RIPLEY Newton Center. Mass. Sociology Sociology DAVID ROGERS JAMES ROSS Winthrop Hudson, N. H. Education Mechanical Engineering ZHIIE DOROTHY RUSSELL ELIZABETH RYAN Gary North Brewer Education History M Government QUENTAN SAWYER HAROLD SCOVILLE Orono Orono Mechanical Engineering Education WALTER SEAHA Windsor Locks, Conn. Forestry NVILLIAM SIMONTON Portland History DENNIS SMITH South Paris Biochemistry CAROLYN SOMERS Limstonc English .XZ DARRYL SPENCER Old Town Mathematics INARA STEGMANIS Bangor Bacteriology RICIIARD STALL Oquossoc Agricultural Sciences LEYTON SEWELL Island Falls Botany .I OH N SIMPSON Millinocket Zoology HENSLEY SMITH Lexington, Mass. History RICHARD SOPER Bar Harbor Physics LOUIS STACH Sebago Lake Mechanical Engineering RICHARD STEPHEN Melrose, Mass. Business nt: Economics .I UDITH STONE South Paris Nursing 287 DEANNE RANCOURT Rockwood Biochemistry ERNEST RICHARDSON Pawtucket. R. I. Forestry LAWRENCE RIPLEY Sangerties, N. Y. Botany ANNE ROUNDY Camden English EDYTHE SAUNDERS Westbrook Education DAVID SCRIBNER Old Town Education STANLEY SHAW Orono Education ANTHONY SMITH Bangor Entomology PETER SMITH Hampden Highlands Agricultural Sciences PHILIP SOULE Orono English PETER STANZILIS Orono Education MARSHALL STEARNS Bangor History St Government will ROBERT STRUBBE Maplewood, N. J. Agricultural Science WILLIAM RANDALL Skowhegan Business Administration PATRICIA RIDDLE Willoughbey, Ohio Home Economics REDINGTON ROBBINS Pleasant Point Civil Engineering ROGER ROWLANDS Morrill Education WILFORD SAUNDERS Portland English ATU MARY SCRIBNER Old Town Business E Economics JAMES SHEPPERD Orono Business Administration DANIEL SMITH Bangor Geology RA LPI-I SM ITH Camden Mechanical Engineering CHARLES SPEAR Tarriffville, Conn. Forestry WILLIAM STEELE Freeport Education TEI' ROBERT STICKNEY Madison Mechanical Engineering ATA ROBERT STURGIS Portland Mathematics J AMES TERRIS Springfield, Vt. Biochemistry ATO YVAYNE TH URSTON N orwuy Agricultural Sciences ATP CLYDE TURNER, JR. Gorham Electrical Engineering DENNIS VANIDESTINE Eddington Education JOHN VICKERY Bangor Civil Engineering DONALD VITELLO Cambridge, N. Y. Business Administration SANDRA VOGELL Cnstine Nursing NVILLIAM WVEATHERBIE Cape Elizabeth Mechanical Engineering ZX JEROME NVEBSTER Limestone History KL Government AARON WHITCOMB Readfield Agricultural Sciences KENNETH YVIKSTROM Rockport, Mussl Mechnnicnl Engineering THE CI-IA RLES WOOD Orrington Chemical Engineering DAVID SWETT Bangor Education OMER Tl-IIBODEAU Fort Kent Zoology JOHN TIERNEY Brunswick History Ka Government CRAIG TURNER Mars Hill English JOHN WVEBSTER Boothbay Harbor Education ERNEST WI-IITEI-IOUSE Sanford Education 9X ALAN WILKINSON Ellsworth " ' Electrical Engineering BRUCE WORCESTER Orono Agricultural Sciences A LFRED TAYLOR Pittsfield Chemical Engineering JOHN THOMAS Waterville Education SUSAN TOOMEY Phillips English :AAA TIIOMAS TUTHIIIL Orono Business 8: Economics LUKE SH ARON TAYLOR I-Iullowell Education DAVID THOMPSON Orono Forestry 'NIA ERNEST TOIIOH Fairfield, Conn, Forestry ATP MARY TWITCHELL Fairfax, Va. Journalism S 1" MAI!'I'IIA 'I'EEI,E Corinth English DAVID TIIOMPSUN Belfast Education .IAt'QUIZl.INIi TOWLIS Fai rl'iel4l lilulliemntics A 'I' ROBI'lli'l' TYLER lVlnnchester, N. II. French ATA mln..-.v V AROOSTOOK HALL WVILLIAM WEILER O1-uno Engineering Physics JOYCE WHITMORE Ellsworth History dn Government BARBARA WILMARTI-I Attleboro, Mass. Medical Technology A LBERT WORDEN Ellswoi'1.h Education PATRICIA WEITH Darien, Conn. Nursing BRUCE WII ITTEMORE Neezlhani, Mass. Forestry EIDE DAVID WILSON Bangor Education DONA LD YOUNG Ashland Mechanicnl Engineering 288 DA VI li W ICNTWO lt'I'II Old Town Chem istry GEORGE WIERSMA Midland Pnrk, N.J. Wildlife Miiniifgelnent Al'I' S'I'I'II'HEN WILSON Bath Forestry 'PKI PETER YOUNG Buckfield A griu ulturul Sciences GORDON TENNETT Reading, Mass. Agriuulturul Sciences JAMES TIIOMSON III IIin1:h:nn, Mnss. l"ox'cstry S,-IRA 'l'IlACY Muchins linglisli IJENNIBTII VAILLANCOURT Fort Kent Agricultural Sciences RAYMOND VARISCO Stuninirtnn lluslnesn 8: Economics RONALD VIG UE Berwick Education DENNIS VOGEI. Glens Falls, N. Y. l"sycliuluL:y 'PKI JA N ET WA LLACE Camden Education LLOYD WEAVER Ashlamrl Meclnmiuul EnI:ineerini5 'DICE AIITIIUR WIIEATON Grnnll Luke Strenm History AXA DAVID YVIGGIN York Bench Engl ish MARIE WING Binghnm hlzlurul. lun As a last tribute to the seniors, one they will always have with them after graduation: The Maine Stein Song Fill the steins to dear old Maine! Fill as the rafters ring! Stand and drink a toast once again 3 Let every loyal Maine man sing. Drink to all the happy hours, Drink to the careless days, Drink to Maine, our Alma Mater- The college of our hearts always! To the trees! To the sky! To the spring in its glorious happiness! To the youth! To the fire! To the life that is moving and calling us! To the Gods ! To the Fates! To the rulers of men and their destiniesg To the lips! To the eyes! To the girls who will love us someday! Fill the steins to dear old Maine! Fill as the rafters ring! Stand and drink a toast once againg Let every loyal Maine man sing. Drink to all the happy hours, Drink to the careless days, Drink to Maine, our Alma Mater- The college of our hearts always! They come back year after year . Homecoming and Parents' Weekend and Maine js still the same Book later and a quest for and quiet the movemito the library 'Q .-,Lt Hart Hall H house? r and we have ia., integrated areas limhmi Eg 4 is the same ,Q there is a wg, ,Ev Q system -of for reserve couples and an the Den the cafeteria are often used , the same the library, with varying . . . and the Alumni after year . . MMM MMMM 1 Mr. and Mrs. Josiah P. Alford Mr and Mrs. E. S. Allen Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Anderson Mr. and Mrs. Tibor J. Bebek Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Bengis Mr. and Mrs. E. C. McGraw Mr. and Mrs. Clifford G. Mclntire Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. McKenney Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Morse Adams and Jordan, Inc. A. J. Goldsmith's Arthur Chapin Co. Bangor and Aroostook Railroad Bangor Clothing Co. Bridge Construction Co. Brown and White Paper Co. Canteen Service Co. Charter House Hotels Chute Drapery Co. Cole's Express Crowell, Lancaster, Higgins, 81 Webster Eastern Trust and Banking Co. Eastland Woolen Mill, Inc. Edward Vantine Studios, Inc. Footman's Dairy, Inc. Gass Office Supply Gesell Institute of Child Development Great Northern Paper Co. Humpty Dumpty Potato Chips J. E. Chandler's Loring Short and Harmon Maine Paper Tube Corporation Merrill Trust Co. Moosehead Manufacturing Co. North Waterford Spool Co. N. H. Bragg Sz Sons Paul V. Adams Trucking Co. Pine Tree Tanning Co. Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Scott Trailer Sales, Inc. S. D. Warren Co. Standish, Ayer, 81 McKay, Inc. Taterstate Frozen Foods T. S. Pinkham, Inc. W. H. Gorham Co. Utterback Corporation Index y I7 i ' A silence envelops the campus broken only by the dawns and goes 'noise reigns supreme in the dorms lighting of cigarettes . . . turning of pages . . . and typ- as everyone packs for home . . . Finally, silence descends ing of late papers as final exams draw near the on the campus and only graduation remains to end chimes play "The Bells of Saint Ma1'y's" . . . Students -another year at Maine . . . enter the library for the first time . . . and exam week i . 1 3 is lu-its VAL:-is , ' xt, And finally the long awaited and prayed for day of ly realize that a phase of life .. . is closed to them .. . graduation dawns when men and women proudly forever. accept their diplomas . . . and then pause . . . and wistful- 292 l'ACl11.'l'Y Alkalny, Beatrice, 108 Blackmore, Robert, Caron, Raymond, 160 Bread, Jennifer. 150 A Allen. Kenneth. 52 Arniinmnn, llnlph,l15 I? Uuruahok, Fern, 112 liaruahok, .1nna'ea, I27 llcamsrlerlvr. John. hh llenoett. Clarence. 52 lloyer. 1i'rnnk, 1110, 107 Bird, Francik. 48 Bond, llurnoll, 247 llondurnnt., Byron, 48 Host, James, 127 llrlrkor, llcrnlwl, 127 Brorkway, Philip, 44 Butterliclal, J1vhn,25l C Campnnn, Rirhnrvl, 411 Carpenter, Roland, 56 Chartior. l"nu1. 247 Ulu-lvllc. Llmvmnl, 252 Cook, 1lenry,12l Con-ornn, 'l'hmaas, 11111 1"r4lliu:a, l'rte1'. 44 vrnnlly, 1iownrAl,42 Harry. '1'homnn, 55 Cutler. lmwronor. 47 cyl-us, lfiflgnr, 127 ll Uellans. llerman, 10-1 llovinu, Wllllum,5-1 Linton. l1enry,4'l Daw, lillward, 52 Daw, George, 48 Dunkleo. Sllnn. 246, 257, 2517 Dnrsl. liirlmril. 117 E 1517551-rl. Franklin GH l'llliol.1-. Lloyd. -10. -ll, 47, 75 Elliott. Wallnrv. 411 F I"lyaa. Carl, 52 lfobcx. Kenneth, 611 G Llnrdncr. Wo1'l'nrrl, 52 Goglin, Gennaro, 55 Gordon, Harry, 441 Grlff1rl,l1alpll,1lJlJ Il llamllton, Urookn, 511 llnmilton, Wayne, 117 linnklna, John, 511 llarmon, Jnmrn, 46, till llnrtgen,V1nvcnl.hIl llnwluy,1lcnry. 47 llendiey, llerroiil, 611, 1110, 110 lluntinlzton. Duvld, 48 lluti-hiumoa, lf:-7-:lm-ii-k, lun .I Jeviyiena, Lyla .lc-wen. I..loyd, 1011 ilunes, Nolnou, 40, 1125 K Kaplan, Arthur, 511 lieyn, lflownrd. 45 Kimball, Spuffurd, 53 Klelmlienxsl. Viola, lil? L Libby, Wln lhrop, 48 M Mcllnll, lirian, 240 Mae cnlnpl-ull, .nnne.l, -15. 10-l McCarty, Curtin, 122 McCnire,1-'ranrin, '15 Marhoau, Jean. 61 MrNonry. Matthew, 56, 5151 Martin. l"n--Ivric, 115 Miles. hlalwin, 571 Mlllctl..1.lal'ry,41l ll1array,.loa1-ph,B2 lllyera, Frunk.5l1 N Nexlvit, Philip, lllll Nmtialr. Alla-rl, 100 I, Pork, Austin, -12 l'irki'rin5:, John, 10.1 1'aultou, l1rurr,4D Pullon, Winslun, -lil If llmlke, l"n-ilcrick, 411 llnnkin. lhunc, bil llnln-rtson, W. Gordon, 47 S Sclinwilmuror, Waller, 108 Suznk, Samui-1, 112 Sliillllos, Mark, mi sannann, omni.-n, dll S11'wart,.Iol1n,-iii Strurhtemoyrr, llnland, -ill Smyrna, 1iilmuml,241l,251l, 268 1. Tolamll. llnve, 47 Turkormnn, William, 135 V Vernon, Glenn, 511 Virtue. Charles. 511 v-ne, imnnna, -is W Wnrllln. George. 517 Welln, WiIl1axn,46 Westerman, llnrolil, .2211 Whltrhlll, Ali-ln, 411 William, Elizabeth, -18, 00 Wllnon, Edith, 42 Winslow, Donald, 122 Wit1er.1"rimklin,41l, 01 Womlhary,1larold, 112 Wuolev, '1'. ltolmell. 46. 1111 Worrlrk, liuhcrl, -15 Z Zi n k, Ma ry, 43 S'I' 11111-IN TS 11 Abbott, John, 175 Abbott, 'l'lnn, 1-12 Abell, David. 160 Abramson, Stephen, Dil Aohoson, lllrhnrd, 170 Ackerman, John, 11171 Arkley, Iioherl, lllll Adair, liuln-rl. 11111 Adarna, llonniu, EIB, 152, 11111 Adams, Gurnldinv, 102, 21121 Adamo, llopo, 2111! Adams, lllnrlenr, 150 Addlwn. Errol. 1511 Adkins, Karen, 145 Adlunmn. Paula, 2611 Ahereno, William, 172 Aihen, Donald. 1811 Akorn, Limla, lllll Aldrich.1'aul,l1l,1U1I Aleaamler. Marlo, 26:1 Index 117, 264 All:-rm, llon Allen, Eliz Allen, Joann, 263 Allen, Joyce, 150 Allen, Lau Allen- Patricia. 263 Allen, Peter, 100, 263 Allen. Shclin, 1017 Allen, Susan,142, 190 Alley, Lnvinn, 143, 20:1 Alpert. Bruce. 102. 203 Anmro, Timothy. 2611 Aim-es, llrian, 184 Amoroso, Arnold, 1611, 252 Anders. 11 1 Andonmn, , 144 nbeth. 236 renee, 2611 nbnra, 1718 David, mz, 20:4 Anderson, Elan, 05, 263 Anderson, Judith, 92, 2621 Amlurwon. Larry, 105, 250 Anderson, Mark, 130, 1951 Anderson. Philip, 2113 AIlt1l:r:40n lioberl., 10E, 118, 11111, 21511 Anderson, Anderxon Sl1nron,126, 142, 1119 Williau-11.18-1 Anilri-ws,'.1nne, us, nm anmwn, rnnl, im: Auirellv, Kathy, 011, 1111 Applin. John. 21121 Arbour. Sandra, 113, 15114, lflfl, 15151, 2-15 Arrh, Allan 104. 184 Ari-linnta. Muruti, 130 Archer. DonalLl,190 Archer, Sarah, 102, 1110 Arulliluald, Douglas, 2113 Arey. Vernon, 99.1111 Arnuxtrung, Karen, 15111 Armstrong, Stephen. 176 Arno, Mary, 150 Arnold, llonnlrl, 172 Arnold. liollerl-. 162. 253 Ashley, 1l71nrahnll,107 Atherton. Lindn. 1911 Atwood, Carol, 120 Mwund, Clarence, 1811 Atwood, Donna, 1110. 2611 Atwood, Gny, 144 Atwnnri, Linda, 190 Aurlair. Anita, 87 August, Robert, 100, 107, 1511, 2621 Austin. Edward. 199 Blackstone, Dorothy, 200 Blades, Fred, 105 Blnisdell, George, 176 Blake, Cob, 110 Blake, Donna, 95, 103, 149, 264 Blake, Janet., 109, 150 Blanchard, Elizabeth, 264 Blanchard, Paul, 264 Blanchard, Trudy, 138, 200 Blanchard, Wendell 88, 181 Blanchette, Joel, 135 Blessing. George, 160 Blood, Carol, 120 Blood, William, 254 Bloom, 1-1elen,88, 139, 264 Bnnralnnn, Rolnna, 154 Bodwell. Sue. 150 Boehner. William, 107 Bohlin, Regina, 264 Bolduc, Muriel, 200 Bonney. Charles. 87' 112. 172. 257 Bonney, Robert, 160 Boobar, Danial, 181, 264 Booker, Richard, 200 Boone, Bonita, 200 Boone, Myles, 164 Boothby, Margaret, 200 Borden. Cynthia, 200 Borden. Joanne, 264 Bossa, Catherine, 219 Bouchard, Maurice, 176 Boucher. Barhara. 264 Boucher, Pcrley, 160 Boucher, Roger, 228, 26-1, 164, 112 Bourne. Charles. 134, 200 Bourque, Peter, 264 Bowden. Harry, 264 Bowie, Ronald, 95, 26-1 Bracketl.. Ellen. 92, 200 Brackett, Gail, 108 Bradeen, Mary, 120 Bradford, Dorothy, 265 Bradley, Tim, 107 Bradstreet, Nancy, 95, 102, 151, 262 Bragdon, Juan, 200 Brnley, Pamela, 147 Bramhall, Benjamin, 113. 200 Brann. David, 112 Brearc, Cynthia, 142, 200 Breed, Linda, 66, 152 Carpnno, Guy, 162, 257 Carparelli, Anna, 129, 130, 131, 140 210 Carrier, .1on, 92 Carroll, Terry, 103 Carry. Bruce, 89 Carter, David, 116 Carter, Fletcher, 180 Carter, John, 182, 266 Carter, Mary, 120 Carter. Rose Marie, 2113 Carter. Susan, 265 Carter. Tim, 254 Cary, Bruce, 37. 162, 194, 236, 250 Cary, Herbert, 164 Caaavant, Lawrence, 266 Case, Jeffery, 117, 260 Casey, Sue, 138 Cashman. Cindy, 147 Caswell, Benson, S0 Cate, Linda, 152 Cnthenrt, Ann, 99, 14.1 Cattelle, Richard, 1613 Cnttolle, William, 201 Caulrlerwood, Alice, 143 Cuvon, Lawrence. 117 Cersosimo, Dominic, 168 Chabot. Norman, 176 Chaflhourne, Sue, 143 Chadbourne, Terry, 201, 170, 236 Chadwick, Robert, 84, Bti, 92, 93, 266 Chakrabnrty, Dobatosk, 108 Chamberlain, Alfred, 162, 201 Chamberlain, Earl, 223 Chanipcon, Bruce, 201 Champlin, George, 108, 201 Chandler, John, 247, 257 Chandler, Stephen, 156, 202 Chanilonnet, Anthony, 202 Chanllnnnet, Susan, 202 Chandra, Pramod, 108 Chaney, Steven, 202 Chapin, Jacqueline, 206 Chapman, Jeffrey, 1110, 202, 247 Chureait, Liliette, 113, 114, 202, 2115 Chartier, Art, 97 Chase. Dewey, 176 Chase, Donald, 160, 202, 101, 254, 257 Chase. Jeffrey, 186 Chnsr. Robert. 184 Chase, Stephen, 116, 256, 206 Chase, William. 202 Austin, Ray, 16-l, 228 Averill. llnter. 172 Avurill,'1'albot, 173, 121 Avery, Douglas. 1158, 228 Avery, Vera, 180 If uaaneu. Brenda, ns, zmx isnlnnn, rm. nz, cn, eos lin.-lgnlnnn. wminn., :sl n..nn.n.n, nnynnnnl, 117 llncon, Janice, 122, 127, 1111, 1115, 140, 1110 Brenner, Patricia, 103 Brewer, Robert, 17 5. 240 Brewer, Ruth, 02, 236 Brewer, wnlnni, 112,115,247,2G5 Bridge, Harry, 1113, 265, 172 Briggs, Errol, 89, 107, 200 Briggs, Pony, 125, 138, 200 Briggs, Sharon, 200 Briggs, Stephen. 156, 201 Brinster, Stanley, Bristol, Barbara, 1 182 52 Bristol, Kevin, 184, 201 Britton, Joyce, 142, 201 llmler. Lawri-nee. 253 lhxllry, Frlrtl, 166, 167, 281 llailuy. Leslie, 1-10 Brooksbank. Leslie. 143 Cheatham. C. Lee, 87, 140 Chenard, Robert, 266 Cheney, Dan, 266 Cheney, Raymond, 100 Chiarini, Lee, 147 Child, Donald, 160 Choate, David, 105, 266 Choate, Thomas, 202 Chreatian, Robert, 250 Christnkos, Adrianne. 95. 138. 2-11 Christmas, William, 202 Christy, Sharon, 202 Church, Curly, 164, 266 Bailey, llobert, 162 Baller, James, 182, 183 llaker, Raymond, 21111 Baldwin, Jnekie, 86, 140 Flallard, Patricia, 100 llullnrtl. Scott, 168 Ballinpzer, James, 162. 2571 llnmfuril. Aileen. 2611 llnmfm-11, Fiva, 11:9 1ianisl.er,Alan,111U l1nnks,Gornld, 110, 201! llarlrour. William. 200. 174 llarkor, llohert, 1011 Ilnrnus, Urenrla, 110 Ilarnc-5, llama. 1118 Barnes, Nancy, 1411, 24115 llaron, Nancy,l24,15Ill llarmi, 'I'-nn, ms llxlrr, Cnrul, 21111 llnrr, Itnborl. Jr., 107, 21111 llarrett, John, 11311 llnrrull, Tlionma, 2611, 170 liar-ry, Stephanie, 510, 125, 152, 100 llarsluw. Linda, 87, 152 linrth. llarbnrn, 87, 148 llnrtletl., lcebnera, 1-15,2114 llnrtonl Carol. 1111 liarlon. Paulette, 264 llutr-ln-lrler, Jcrraldine, 00 llatea. Connie, 114 Bates, lloward, 109 llxilra. Karon. 1011 lintna. Nnnry, 153 llataon. Mary l1al.lD0rll', 11obErl.,11l, 1110 liaurkvr. llarlmru. 150 ann'-r. Lei-, 19:1 llnxion. Jill, 1-111 llnyuk, llruco, 1611, 109 lloady, Barry, B8 Heal, Kenneth, 112, 160, 2117, 264 lloam, Bcatrive, 140 llama. 1JoDo, 140 lll-am, 1.indn, 140 lloan. lloliurl, 184 llearce. Arthur, 80, 200 lienthain, Mary, 200 111-auiloin, Martha-Ann. 1115. 110. 14-1, 21.10 llerk. Jncquolyne, 66, 05. 1-Ill, 200 Bruker, Ann, 27:4 lleedy, Barry, 185 11011, Conlon, 107 Bell. Husnll. 100. 142 Belloau, 1Jonna,15Zi liollinizcr, Ginny Lou, 114, 142 llelyea, lilen Benn, Carol, 142 llonnur. Richard, 2114 lslennol. Brenda, 130 Benning, Douglas, 1116 Berg, linzlerick, 2114 Bergen, Boyd, 160, 200 Boraier, Conrad, 116 llernier. Robert, 135 Box-quiet, Fred, 264 licrrlan, Jon, 264 Berry, James, 162, 21?-1 Berry, Paul, 08, 281 Berlhlaumr, Conrad, 80, 200 llleruho. Verne, 180 Host, Douglas, 257 Birklord, Joyce, 26-1 lliukmore, liarbarn, 76, 126, 152 lliggnne, Barbara, 1-18 Iligzgallvr Putty, 1417 llilggcr, llaburl, 110, 112, 128, lil-1 llillinga, liellodnne, 1411, 2114 liilla, l1obol'l.n, 89, 146 llinuhum. Lee, 58 Brockway, Bruce, 1511, 253 Brooks, Ann, 140 Brooks, David, 167, 201 Brooks. Linda, 201 Brooks. Mary, 80, BG, 88, 90, 148, 2115 Brooks. William 111, 97, 265 Brower. Lurana, 201 Brocon, Ann, 14-1, 201 Broun, Claire. 142 Brown, Cynthia, 237 Brown. Curl., 184 Brown, Darryl. 155. 2115 Brown. Brown. Brown, Duvifl. 17-1, 228 Donald. 110 Elizabeth, 1-16 Churchill, Janice, 66, 88, 95, 09, 1417 31' Clair, Nancy, 202 Clark, Arthur, 266 Clark, Horace, 1.16, 118, 202 Clark Clark , John, 184 , Leroy, 127, 180, 266 Clark, Linda, 202 Clark, Marion, 202 Clark, Regina1d,22B Clark, Richard, 117 Clark. Robert, 116 Clark Clark Clava Cleav ,Stan, 167, 202 , Stephen, 1511, 164, 257 rle, Ann, 120 ia., Nnnfy, 1:23 Clement, Nancy, 102, 202 B.-own, F. Eugene, mx amwn, Frank, 253 Brown, lrene, 146 Brown, Jack, 228, 205 Brown, Junws, 119, 123, 124, 201, 1.74 Brown, Lawrence, 254 Brown, Lynne, 140 Brown, Marilyn, 1-10 Brown, Philip F., 98, 265 Brown. Philip ll., 112, 169 Brown, Phyllis, 265 Brown, Rodney, 184 Brown, Rufus, 160, 257 Browne, Robert, 174 Clemons, Anne, 266 Clochidile, Sterlin, 160 Closson. Barry, 202 Clough, Paula, 140 Clouxzh. Peter, BD, 127, 176 Cloughlin, Anthony, 281 Clunie, Joan, 95, 142 Conklcy, Carol, 87, 140 Cobb, Barry, 104, 182, 1811 Cobb, Wayne, 172. 266 Cody, Howard, 90, 121 Coffin, John, 247 Coffin, Molly, 51, 266 Coffman, Patricia, 9-1, 266 lfirdrnlll. William, 10-1 llislwv, Raymond, 200, 260 lxisnnn, Cnther1ne,200 lliahnp, Cnrul, 102, 26-1 llishop, Frank, 172, 2511 l1aln1n,,1..l1n, mo Illshop, liitllard, 200 llissoa, Gregory, 1821, 2011 lilnrlt. llollert, 150 lllack, William, 200 Browne, William, 174, 265 Bruce, Gordon, 02 Bruce, Robert, 107, 265 Brume, Fred, 108, 201 Bryant, Clayton, 201 Bryant, Louise, 2013 Buck, Larry. 180 Buck, steven, 127, 2435 Buckley. Bruce, 166 Buckley, John F., 201 Buckley, John li., 265 Buckeley, Wendy, 110, 112, 150, 201 Budd, Jane, 70,154 Baker, George, 1511 Bullen, Dano, 102 Burchficltl. Kitty, 130 Burden, Keith, 265, 167 Burke, Jnnnnc, 265 Burke, Mary. 201 Burke, Sandy, 150 Burnett, Fred, 156 Burnham, Chnrles. 112, 201 Burnham, Jean, 265 Burnham, Jean, 148 Burns, Ellen. 265 Burns, Richard,117, 265 Burns, Robert, 129 Burns, Roland, 128 Burr, Deborah, 88, 142, 265 Burrows, Margaret, 150 Burton, Caroline. 104. 142, 201, 237 Butcher, Clayton Jr., 265 Butler, James. 172 Byers, Donna, 201 Byram, Anne, 201 C Car1,David, 201, 229 Cain, Nancy, 147 Calderwood, Alice, 201 Caldwell. Claire, 102 Caldwell, Julia, 247 Caldwell. William, 115, 203 Call, Malcolm, 107, 150 Callahan, Planet, 2-17 Callahan, Sheila, 265 Cameron, Heather, 75, 00, 140, 236 Cnmpbell,Dlonne,14f.l Campbell, Gregory, 265 Campbell, Michael, 118, 265 Campbell, Philip, 174 Campbell, Terri-mee, 201 Canterwell, Robert, 175 Cannon, Dnyton,118 Card. Charlene, 120 Carleton, Stephen, 172 Carlin, Patricia, 02, 03, 201 Carlson. Robert, 1113, 265 Carnenrie. James, 156, 201 Caron, Claire, 95, 100, 110 Caron. Maurice. 117 Cole, Frederick, 180 Colo. Roland. 254 Cole, Ronald, 97, 103, 104, 266 Cole, Sandra, 95, 151, 266 Colo, Thomas, 96, 202 Colem Coles. an, James, 176 B1-une, 176, 252 Colfer, Donna, 150 Collins, Richard, 162, 206 Collins. Thomas. 202 Culwell, Claire, 1111, 202, 2-15 Commoss, .1 anet, 202 Conant, Nancy, 141, 266 Conant, Sue, 140 Conley, James, 184 Connelly, Joan, 92 Connors, Dana, 202 Connors, Glenna, SB, 1-10, 260 Constantine, Hazel, 114 Conwyu, Kenneth, 112 Conway, Susan, 202 Canwai. Tim. 110 Cook, Brian, 173. 1711 Cook, Debbie, 143 Cook, Keith, 174 Cook, Mary, 266 Cook, Nancy, 120, 149 Cook, Reginald, 174 Cook, Richard, 98, 202 Cook, William, 175, 206 Cuokson, David, 114 Coon. Thomas, 202 Cooney, Douglas, 91 Coonley, Thomas, 166 Cooper, Earle, 228, 174 Copson, Burton, 156, 266 Corbin, Ronald, 250 Corey, Barbara, 120 Corking, Ronald, 168 Cormier, Geraldine, 139 Cormier, Robert, 173 Corson. Bruce, 266 Cnrson. John. 180 Cort, Sharon Ile, 245 Cote, Elizabeth, 95, 110, 142, 2611 Cote, Rachel, 203 Couglin, Lawrence, 11, 174, 203, 250 Courchesne, Jean, 267 Cowan, Myrna, 143 Cowperthwaite, Stephen, 177 Cox. James. 162 Coy, Thomas, 180 Coyne, Constance, 151, 2011 Crabtree, David, 170, 228 Craig, David, 117, 267 Craig, Sarah, 267 Cram, Gary, 117 Cromer, Barbara, 144, 267 Cramer. Lyle, 179, 203 Crane, Nancy, 144. Crocker. Dawn. 138 Crupley, Duane, 121 Crass. Carol, 1-18, 267 Crus:-1, Peter, 162 Crass, llnrlerick. 166, 203 Crossley, Sannll, 75, 133, 1-15, 203 Crowley, Kate. 85. 510, 05, 102 Index Ebliesoa, Gretchen, 110 Ebhesun, Pnnmla. 120, 1351 Erlzly. Ann, 152, 268 Ede, Janet. 268 Edgar, Margaret, 131. 144 Elllge, Thomas, 1110, 257, 262 E4lniunda.Cl1urry,1-15 Cul ley, Pu-lar,85l,108,1G1l,1llB Cunliffe, Richard, 267 Curran. David, 100 Currie. Barbara, 19-1 Currier, William, 113, 207, 102 Curry. Gordon, 2513 Curry, Graham, 180 Curtis, Brian, 13-1 Curtis, .1aek.l12 Curtis. -luckie. 131, 1-10, 203 Curtis. Linda, 1-1-1 Curtis. Nancy, 112 Cushing, Ann, 100 Cushman, Kathryn, 207 Cashman, Paula, 1-17 Cushman, Raynmnrl, 2137 Uutchin, Douglas. 108 Cyr, Roland. 81, 87. 112. 1111. 170. 2315 D Dalglc, Kent,112 Dahl. Enya, 113 Daley, Susan, 207 Diimln..-e. Karen, sa, 144, 20:1 Dnndky, Adele. 150 D......er1, M...-y, 139 . 1 Day, Sa Dasgupta. Arun. 108 Davenport, James, 107 Davenpurl., Philip, 100,203,161 Davidson, Richard, 112, 258 Davis, Barbara, 108 Davis, maine, 118, 267 Davii. Diane, 1-16, 230 Davis, Ellen. 267 Davis, George Jr., 2157 Davis, .1anice,10-1, 203 Davis. John, 178 Davis, Kathy, 236 Davis. Norman, 247 Davis, 'l'h0n1as, 118, 203 Davis. Wayne, 13-1 Dawson, John, 80 Day, Bunny SB, 140 Day, .1 onathan, 203 Day, Mary, BE, 138 Day, Richard L., 203 Day lichard M., 128, 180 lly, 05, 125,1-10, 203 Edwards, Carole, 208 Edwards, Robert. 20-1 Edwards, Stephen, 135 Egonis, Clement, 172 Eichorn, Linda, 2-17 Elcik, Robert, 204 Elias, Shirley. 103, 268 Ellio Elliu Ellis tt, Gene, 250 tt. Martha, 20-1 .Bu!hJayne,10U.20-1 Ellis.Genrgeanna,89,93,2118 ElliS. Gerald. 00. 112, 160, 254, 255, 258 Ellis, Robert, 2511 Ellis, llnherta, 20-1 Ellisnn, Arthur, 107,187, 208 1'I11swnrl.h, Harold, 20-1 Elsik, Robert, 08 Elwell. Gertrude. 120 Elwell, Patricia, 112, 138, 2011 Emanuelsnn, 1-Villiam, 210 1-zmery. ch...-les, 2011 Emer Lawrence Jr., BG, 011, 100, 2138 Y. Emery, Norman, 2138 Emery, Paul, 208 Eng1ish,Cheryl,1-10,2115 Ennis, Richard, 18-1, 20-l EpsLein.l+larric-1, 05. 1-11, 208 Erik E rsk E rslc san, Nancy, 87, 14-1 ine, John 511, 20-1 ine, Paul, 208 Ewquiwal, Alberlu. 108 Ease r,Jal1n, 102 Estes, Linrla, 11-1 Evans, Gordon, 172 Eval .s. .ludd.811. 1011 Evans, Pamela, 20-l Evans, Sally, 20-1 Evans, Weston, 110 Everson, Ronald, 204 F l5'nhello,,1ac'k. 110, 102 Faherty, Donald, 268 Fahey, Colby, 118, 2458 Fahigren. John, 172, 228, 253 Fairbanks, Joan, 150, 2-15, 268 Fairfield, Edward. 160, 228 Feles, Linda, 1-18 Falcon, Richard, 180 llieeins. Edgar, 271 Day, Wesley, 180 Deacon, William, 1311 Deakin, Craig, 117, 103 Dean, Jarues, 2-18, 2511 Deane. Peter, 267 Dearlmurne, Ran, 96, 203 ilc Arlnott, Patrick, 118 De Cnuruy, Donna, 1-17 n.-E.-me, wnam, 17-1, 203, 259 Dcctjcn, Sandy. 14-1 Degun, Ruhert. 180, 181 DeLuiL0- Arnold. 1711, 2:18, 25-1, 255 DeLaite, Ronald, 102 DeLui-nie. Linda, S1,87,145 Deniarlno, Carolyn, 1351 Demercliant. Paul, 160 Dernora, Stephen Jr., 267 Dempsey, Ruth, 2117 Denaco, Parker, 89, 113, 203 Derrah, Donald, 170, 2117, 228 Delinps, Peggy BB, 1:1-1, 207 Delry, Diane, 144 Deschencaux, Charles, 16-1 Desistr.. Mike. 08, 236. 250 Dsjnrdins, Raymond, 118, 267 Pant, David, 205 Famvull, Edward, 172 Farley, Carol, 123, 205 r......er. .r..,-fe, ana F...--.i......, maine, aus rm-..h....., Ewa., 171 l-'arnlnu a, Roderick Jr., 268 F...-...., sandy, ss. 151, 2112, 253 rr..-well, Debbie, 145 x-my, Mary. aus Fear-ann , John, 1711 Fedler. Willinm,115 Feiniaa, Stephan, 205 Fellows, Patrica,S1-1, 1415, 2119 Fenulsen, Rosalie, 100 Fent, David, 178 Fenton . Jnhn, 200 I-'ergu....., !l1arg'aret,245 Flrrland, David, 10-1, 2159 Ferlund, Keith, 205 Fcrnuld. Allan, 110, 134, 1011, 2011 Fernald. Edward, 172 Fernalcl. Judith, 2130 Fernald , Winfield, 00, 102, 205 Ferris, Gail, 152, 2611 l1eVlu'ney, Richard, 1118, 228, 252 Dmlnze. No.-nm., 267 Devin. Scott. 135 DeVue, Carolyn, 95, 150, 267 Diaz, Alvaro, 108 Dicnrlu, Leonard, 172, 203 Dickenson. Helen, 115 Dickerson, James, 2-10 Dickey, Lester, 118, 203 Dillaway,.1ux1y, 1110, 267 Dillaway, Paul, 267 Dillon, Joanne, 1-141, 207 Dilllauron, Arthur, 161. 207 Dineen, Norman, 267 Dinneen . William. 207 Dinsnicre. Edmund, 102 Dionne. Andre, 203 Dehle, Richard, 16-1 Dobson. Anne, 203 Dockstader.Willian1, 100. 110. 116 Dodge, Norman, 207 Dodge, Susan, 150, 203 Dugan, Rubert, 185 Doe, Mu ry, 1-1G Dale, Jean, 140 Dole,.1u1lith.268 Dullugg, Dolloff, Dollcrff, Dana, 117. 170. 250, 257 James, 176 Richard, 180 Donnviln. Sarah, 103, 203 Duran. Danny, 120 Durr. D1 ane. 203 Doueette, Robert, 160, 257 Doughty, Elizabeth, 1111, 1118, 203 Doughty, William, 208 Douglas, A1,135 Douglass, Edwin, 118. 1711, 208 Daw, John, 121 Dow, Nola, 268 Daw. Rebecca. 208 Dew. Sandra, 140 Dow, Sharon, 14.5 Dowd, P at, 148 Dowd, Sheila, 115, 2417 Ferris, Joseph, 252 Fides, Sue, 150 Field, Richard, 182 Fifieltl, Ann, 512, 125, 205 Fifield, Claire,1-12 Figueroa, Miriam, 108 Filiault, 0.-menu, 205 Finrllc-ni,.1erry, 105, 205 Fink. Carol, 260 Finninmre, Victar, 106 Fisher, Lester, 87, 108, 252 Fitzgerald, Norman, 174, 269 Fitzgerald, Wayne, 168, 269 Fitzhenry, Paul, 1154 Flngg, Lewis. 13-l, 180 Flahert Paul 136 187 205 Y 4 . H rimri.-f Richard. 112. zzs, zso Flahive, w.n......, 116,210,243 Flanianil, Sally, 150 Flavia, Laurie, 1-IG, 205 Flavin, Venita, 120, 1-10 F1eck.Lin1ln,205 Fletcher, Ellen. 260 Fletcher, Rachel, 205 Flewelling, Lawrence, 1113, 150, 205 Flewelling, William, 104, 162, 103 Fliuexher. Woody, 175 Flini. Edith, 260 F1lnt..leweIl, 152 Flinl, Louise. 205 Flynn, Ed, 107 Flynn, Tim, 250 Flynl, Willurll, 172 Flu.-11, livJj.'Ce,1lU, 110, 20:1 Fong, Katherine, 205 Foley, Tum, 87 Fontaine, Diane, 205 Fontaine, Lucille, 205 Foote, James, 08 . I-'uf-re, Many, su, 152, 205 Fm.-la. Carl, ion, 101, 259 Forrest, Gerald, 75, 180, 135, 260 Forster, Maxine, 153, 200 Farinxriun, Dennis, 1711 Furman, John. 112. 168. 205, 2251 Furman, Marga ret, 143 G Gagnon, Claire, 205 Gagnon, Wilson, 160 Gallo, Beulah, 206 Galloupe, lllarpzaret, 102. 1150, 21151 Gamache. Jerome, 2611 Gamage, Lee, 2011 Gammon, Freda, 1015, 2116 Gammon. Jacqueline, 200 Gardner. Brian. 1110 Gmlimr. Dan., 2111: Garfield, Henry. 1711 Garland, Richar4l,2-17 Garland, Rcherl, 2110 Garner, Aza, 115 Garner, Jean, 2-15 Gnrtley, William, 102, 200 Garry, Karen. 115 Gary, Richard, 1511, 21111 Gauthier, Jacqueline. 88, 152, 200 Gavuza. Tenney, 113, 2-15 Gaw, Duvirl. 250, 251 Guy, Amos. 100, 105, 150, 2011 Gay, Frederick, 2110 Gay. Panueln. 11121 Geitlmann, John, 100 Gelv. Carol. 138 Gelhert. Daniel, 269 Gunest, Jocelyn, 113. llfl. 1:13, 2-15, Gerald, Dana, 187 Gervais, Jean, 131 Getchell, David. 206 Getchell, Duuizlas, 178 Gntchell, llvlajnric, 209 Gibbons, Cheryl, 100, 2015 Gibbons, Karen, 110 Giggey, anna-., 111: Gilherl. Daniel, 88, 187 Gilbert, -lean, 1551 Gilbert. John, 90,117,162 Gildarl, Donna,1-10 Gillespi, Shan, E10 Gillette, Janice, 270 Gillett0,Jahn,2-10,2-13.2-1-1 Gillette. Willard, 1110 Gilligan, Gary, 270 Gi1lis,Winthrup.l1i3 Gilman. Steve, 1510 Gilmore, .ludiLh.105,10H, 200 Ginn, Susan.113 Glusier, Brute, 08 Glatz Bonnie 2'1 . .1 - Glazier, Marvin,B1l,182, 183 Glew, Merrilyn. 1170 1 Glidden, Richarll, SJ, 112. 2511 Godfrey, lllartin, 170, em: G..1abe.g. M...--.i..., :ofa Goldsmith, Lois. 1013, 1-18, 2015 GuuKl,ll1:n'lf,1G0 Goode, Erika, 150 Goode, Juhn, 110 Gooding, Paul, 118 Guudricll. Marilyn. 1110, 270 Guuciridgc, Sue, 1-1-1 Guollridgc, Stephen, 1711 Goodrich, 270 Goodwin, David, 200 Goodwin, Pamela, 70, 152. 201. Gurdon, Becky, 87, 1-12 Gordon, Stephen, 108 Gurondi. lnire, 200, 257 Gusselin, Rnlwrt, 1132, 206 Guucher, Ann, 200 Guacher, Marv.8:1. 811.110, 1-1-1 Gaucho., Sally, 1.15 squid, An... zoo 00.114, J..i..., rn, em. Gould, Kathie, 152, 2011 Gould. Pain, 1-111 Gould,l1uy, 185, 270 Guulrl, William, 172 Goulet. Ray. 107 Grace, Sherry, 87, 140, 101 Graffnni, Etlwurll. 1112, 270 Graffnrn, Gerald. 175. 358 Graffnln, James, 2521 Grnffam. Sharun. 1-10, 270 Graham. Michael, 270 Granata, Elaine. 270 Grand, Keith, 1251 Grant, Arthur, 1110 Grant, Charlotte, 1-12, 206 Grant,.1amee1. 118 Grant, Philip, 178 Graves, Paul, 180, 181 GHAVQS. Ronald. 170 Gray, Donald, lli-1, 20li Gray. John. 174 Gray, Toni, 1211, 130 Greely, David, 259 Green. Ginny. 1-10 Greene. James. 121 Greene. Patrica, 05, I-111 Greenlaugli,.1o, 87, 1110 Greenlaugh, Lindu. 1-17. 270 Grecnlaugh, Lynn. 102 Greenleaf, Elennur. 1-111 Gregory, Nikki. 1-18 Grey. Jane, 100, 109 Greenwood, Paula, 2011 Griffith, Diane, 237 Griffith, Martha,1-10 Grim. Richard, 1110 Grinnell, Gravis, 170, 2011 Grossman, Eileen, 140 Grover, John, 135 Grover, Linda, 120 Grover. Rupert, 1811 Guerette. Camilla. 00, 05, 206 Guidinare, Georgian, 103, 1.18, 207 Downing, Helen, 203 Downing, Susan, 146 Druttar, Stephen, 08, 20-1 Dryan, Susan, 138 nuby, .ludith, 1-as Duckett, Muriel, 139 Dudley, Arthur, 174, 246 Dudley, .1ane,144, 268 Dudley, Mary, 20-1 Duniais. Bob, 92,0111 Duniais, Philip, 118 Dumas, Charles, 240 Dumas, Robert, 228 Duncan, Cindy, 1-12, 20-1 Foss, Donald, 205 Foss, Robert, 102, 110, 269 Foster. Bonnie, 142 1-'ustexg Dorothy, 140 Foster, Gregnry, 103, 121, 205 Foster. Katherine, 205 Fournier, .11n'kic, 1115, 150. 1118, 205 Fuwler,.1anies, iss Fowler, Roberta. 03, 113, 114, 245 Fox, Nancy, 152 Fox, Juhn,1G8 Fox. Michael. 182 Fox, Webster, 205 Faye, Stanley, 252 Guinnn, .1i1I,119,10-1, 110 Guite, Renaud, 18-1 Guptill, Sandra, 2-15, 270 Guyaz, Norman, 107, 207 H Habie. Thomas. 207 llableton, Mark, 1110 Hachett. James, 207 Hadley. Bump, 250 1-laggett, Nara, 270 1'lale,,1udi1h, 11111, 207 Haley, lllargucrite, 1021, 270 Haley, Michael, 228, 250, 261, 174 Duncan, Duncan, Duncan, John, 180, 20-1 Pc-ter, 07, 117, 108, 208 Sally, 106, 204 Dunham, David, 204 Dunham, Scott, 17-1, 20-1,2-10 Dunlap. Durette, Diana, 51, 90, 20-1 Nancy, 268 Durgln, Rodney, 16-1, 228 Durrell, Francis. 20-1 E Eagleson, Jon, 20-1 Eames, Myron, 117, 204 Eames, Stanley, 1111, 123 Earl. Richard, 204 Easter, Priscilla, 204 Eastman. Joel, 121 Fraser, Ted. 1118 Frerlerirks. Barbara, 1511 French, Norman, 167 French, Richard, 102, 260 Frenvh, Rolierl., 162, 250 Fricke, Judith, 1351 Friedman, Charles, 182 Friedman, Rollei-l., 257 Frizzel, .lane,10H Frusch, Suzanne. 205 Frost, Elaine. 37, 146, 1514 Frustnci, Joseph, 170 Frye, Nancy, 2051 Full,Carol,14-1 Fulle. Barbara, 1-15 Fuller, Caroline, 1215, 142, 205 Fuller, Cindy, 1-15 Fuller, Peggy, 1-10 llall, A1an,102,118 llall Betsy, Sl-1, 1-IB, 270 Hall David, 2-16 Hall, Douglas, 102. 207 Hall, Jeffrey, 175 Hall, John, 270 Hall Marshall 170 Hallee. Donald. 207 Hnllee, NeaI,1l1,110 Hallowell, Larry, 207 Halpern. Richard. 1851 Hara, Jack. 118. 270 I-lami1ton.Jlll, 207 1-l..m..m..r1, xml.-1.-t, sa, lfi-1 Halnniunzl, Wilbur, 207 Hanuaons. Richard. 100 Hanna, Dcharali. 1-111, 207 Hanna, Sue,110,1-15 209 llannun. lla nwcn llan:4Ln llan-mn llansun llanson , llanaun , llannan. llarlxurlt s Craig, UB, 108, 253 Terrence, 117, 207 Kirk. 258 Neil. 100 Bruce, 2511 Charles, 1011 Gary, 170 Margarel., 270 er, Joyce, 110 llarrlrastle. Thmnari. 172 llarllen. Flradferml, 270 llnrdun. Paul. 207 llarnlisnn, Rnhert, 88, 270, 102 llarilhns. Marcin. 270 . 1 1 lla: llnv Charles, 1.28 llurmui , Philip, 171 llarnflen. Paul, 1112, 10:1 llarnr-y, Frances, 113-1 ll...-nay, F.-laik, 228 l1arnuni,l,lnvirl, 1118, 1515, 2221, 2-10, 2-12 llarrimnn, David, 252 llarrunan. l.ean, 228, 207, Ilia l1arris..Ioan, 207 llarria. Marsha, 207 ll...-.-iam., lm-html. 2-H 11artford,'1'homas, 13-1. 102, 207. wa lInrt1cy,.ludith,270 ll a rvey 11 arvey llnrvey llarviu. llashey llaskell , Hart. 100, 107 , Ernest, 1511. 270 , Wayne. 180 Neal. 108 , Alice Anne. 106, 207 . David. 250 llnskell. Howard, 207 llastings, l-luxzh, 13-1 li....ni...f.., n0w1.....1, 170 llntrhlicltl, Diane, 11121 llalhawi llntL. Cn .y,uf.u,n...,1vs rule,1f18,207 l'1nucl4.flrur-e, 170 llauck,'1'horuas. 170. 2137 Ilnwkins, lflizubetli, 115 ln.,-ll.-.., Diane. 102, 271 llnyllen, P..t.iei.., an, 207 Hayes, John, 271 llaywnrd, Robert, 207 Healy, Susan, 110, 1-18, 207 lleanssler, Bruee,118. 271 llealh, iilllnheth, 207 1'10ntl1, John. 90 lleath. Linda, 207 llenth, Virginia, 271 lielltliellte, Al'l.hL1l', 1571 llelierl, Marcia, 271 1iulJulLl,CIl1'ul, 123, 207 lleinrivll, Burnll, 25-l, 2551, 271 llelrinon, Ill.-land. 170 llelllwell, Karen. 1112. 207 llel mer. llenienw llnnders llenrli-rn llvnzlers Keith,02, 1111, 1:14, 1:55, 208 ny, David, 118, 208 on, James, 121 un, Julie, 2115 an.Leah.101 iie....n.my. James, 172, 17:1 lleunuliscy, Pauli, 113, 2-15 llenninzs, William, 108 llvnry, Arthur, 180 llenry,Wil1iavn, 271 llephurn, Linda. 108 llcrriuk, Donald, 208 llescnclc, Jonathan, 271 llmis. Ru 1verL.7l1.17U. 2511. 271 1lelxul,13onnic, 87, 100 llvtzler, Rolnb, 260 llillbnrll, Frances. 87, 110, 120 llllvhitts, Mary, 208 llichrx, 1' atricia, 208 llivken, Buren, 25-1, 255 lliusler, Nanci, 1-1-1 Iliinzins. lllirifinu, Lee. ez. 131. Nina, 138,203 llill, Clinr1os,1l0, 118 1lillar1l,Dnnie1, 11111 lliltun,11racIford, 118, 271 llilyaril 1n..1-1. ci Virginia, 208 1-man. 1711 llinks, David, 281 ln..k....., rx...-lm.-i., sn, fm, 152,271 llirat, Walter, 228 lliteheock, Raymond, 150 llilafhilnls. Nora, 1351 lloar, ifidwarll, 102, 11-1, 208 lluhlws, Frank, 108, 2511 llurkclt, Jane, 1-10 llmllgrlnn. Eric, 208 llazlges, Lorrimur, 25-1 llmlprkin llmhzkin lluffses. s, Brian.1l7,118 s, Eric, 118 Carol, 130 llolliruuk, Judith, 208 llirllirouk, ll1arilyn,1130, 271 llalllen, Linda, 1118, 271 llnllnnder, Susan, 271 llullingstead, Nanuy,24l1 llnl an-H, llolmea, llol mes, llolnxcs. llelmes. llnlnies, Allen. 180 John, 106, 208, 250 Judith, 125, 150, 208 Mary, 88, 1118 Suv. 150, 271 Terrance. SB. 271 ilulnignn, Paula, 1013 llall. Mary, 120 llulnuycr, Alice, 281 llfnnl, Janice, 271 11.4.1-, M ichael, 100, 258 llapklas, Elizalielli, 1-1, 208 lloplcins, Paul, 21 1-n.,.,.u. 1 icrlsert, 208 liarniell, Jane, 208 llnrn, Fluyd, 87, 228, 112,175 llurne, Carla, 1-lii. 208 l1urrucks,Nancy, 104, 208 llortun, lluracc, 112, 108, 2013. 26-1, 25 linuseley, Susan, 2013, 2117 lluvur, Laurence. 170 Howard, Jun, 1-12 lloward, ,luhn,117, 152, 202, 271 lfluwl. L nncth 172, 2011 -, K' . llower, Larry, 208 lluyt, Catherine, 271 Hoyt. Kitl-Y. 118 llayt, Liza, 1-10 llululmid, Franaeu, 138 llulmairl, Laura, 515, 271 llulnharcl, Paul, 2-17 lllllililing, Luella, 271 llulihs, Darrel, 170 nay., nm... zos 1" lluethu . Jeffrey. 180, 208 lluff, Bryce, 180, 1111 llull,.1u llumphr lluat, M lluatley, Ann, 95. 208 ies, David, 271 artha. 92. 126, 203 Rever1y,1P0, 1111 llnnloun, AlberL,11B, 271 llurll, Robert, 170, 228 Hurd, Stephen, 208 llurllvert, lJennis,112,118, 271.11111 llusn-, Di llnssey, llunncy. n une, 105 Frederick. 100. 200 Richard, 271 llutrhi 5. Duuglasei. 70, 08, 17-1, 272 llutcliins, John, 175, 228, 272, 105 Hutchins, Roland, 272 llutchinsoa. Bruce. 135 S, 1118 llntrhinaon. Curl, 272 llulchinsnn. Pnlty 142 llylnn, imilyn. 2151: I llvonen. Elan. 86, 113, I53, 2415, 272 lnfnrnti. Cnrul,1'l2 lnguncrl, Lois, 127, 1110, 156 lngruhunl, Richard, 1611, 272 lnlwms, John. 168 lrelnnd, John, 11111, 171209, 173 lrulnrld, llnizer, 117, 1751, 272 Ireland, Sninuul, 272 Irving, Shirley, 1118, 272 lvernon, Neil, 178 lveu, Bruce, 100 J Index Kreiton, Dnvicl, 210, 247 Kydd, L Loring, 210 Laban. John. 160 Labbe, llupzhuette, 142, 210 Lahlie, Jane, B9, 92 LnChnnre, Lucky, 121 Ladd, Rick, 115 Ln Purge, Tim, 107, 117, 100 Laf1'in,Jnnct, 273 La Hulse, Tom, 181, 246, 256 La llnit, David, 112, 174, 228 Lamson, Darryl, 91 Landry, Rudy, 184 Lane, John, 100. 168 Lane, Ken, 80, 88 Jnckmun. Dounne, 146, 272 .lncknnn, Ernest, 80, 122, 272 Jackson, Kathy, 1-17 Jackson, Jackson, Natalie, 100, 140, 200 linhert, 272 Jnvulm, Donald, 117 Jncolni, I'hlllp, 10:1 Jnemzl, Knut, 108 Jultubuwycz, John, 1011, 200, 257 Julllort, Dnrix, 2011 Janice. John, 511, 108, 200 Jnlnen, liolierl, 102, 1011, 116, 272 Jameson, Cluurlln, 130 Jnnulreau, James. 200 Jenn, John, 104 Jean, Rnyniunil, 1711, 259 LeCluir, David, 114, 256 .lcmlrt-au, James, 111-I Jenlllns, l1rndfur41. 82, 88, 1711, 272 Jenkins, Juniva, lRli, 2117 .lenkinx, Sharon, 01.1, 121. 2011 Jearnly, Carol, 87, 100 Jewell, Nanny, 89, 121 Jubblrr. llonnn, 150, 262 Joel, Judith, 272 Jolinusmon, Jun, con Johns, Douglas, 170 Johnson, Alnn. 104, 206 Johnson, Carole, 272 Johnson, David, 254 Johnson, Johnxwn, .1 nhnson, Dellurnli, 1118, 130 lalillel, 11l1,1-ill John. 1311, 170 Jolnumu, Karl. 180 Jolinsion, J uhnsnn. Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Joliueiun, Juhnewn, Johnaon, Johnson. J ohnaon, Kent, 180 Larry, 168 Marlon, 272 Nola,100, 150, 190 Paula, 109, 200 Peten 18-1, 209 linlph, Dil ltichnrll, 170, 254 Robert, 117, 1118, 272 Susan, 1718, 200 Lungis, Patricia, 210 Langley, John, 160 Lnnzu. Ronald. 175, 228 Larabee, Richard, 1518 Lnrlee, Carol, 150 Larlee, Sandy, 144 Larochclle, Leo, 160, 210 Larrnbec. Richard, 166 Larsen, Kirsten, 210 Larson, Albert, 150 Larson, Axel, 172 Laughton, Erlwinn, 138 Laughtun, Sherman, 180, 273 Laurence, David, 156 Lnusier,1'ierre, 97, 21.0 Lautzenhiscr, Ted, 102 Laverriere, Don, 210 LnVoin, Janet, 70, 145 Lawler, Richard, 210 Lawler, Hubert. 210 Lawrence, Arthur, 187 Lawrence, Barbara, 00, 95, 09, 162 Lawrence, Daniel, 102, 273 Lawrence, Elizabeth, 210, 140 Lawrence, Virginia, 273 Leary, Patricia, 247 Leathers. Alan, 70, 86, 112, 162, Letllnir, Florence, 103 LeClaire, Debbie, 153 Lee, lloliu, 170, 253 Lee, Nnncy, 237 Leger, Ann, 92, 139 Lehtu, George, 108 Leighton. Bruce. 273 Leighton. Jeffrey, 211 Lcnfcat, Elbridge, 118, 211 Leon, Charlene, 211 Leon, Erlward, 211 Leunurd, Charlene, 106,139 Leonard, Edward Ill. 126, 162 Leroy, Jnlnes, 112 Lcssnrd, Donald Lessnril, Paul, 211 Lcso, Robert, 273 O'Mu Johnson, Tlnu, 1118 Johnson, Wnyne, DU, llil, 2011, 172 Johnston, ltnlph, 164 Jones, George, 98 Jones, Jonnnr, 272 Jones, Rendell, 108, 281 Jones, llulvert, 200 Jones, Stanley, 272 Leso, Rubert, 91, 107 Lester, Skip, 140 Letto, Gocrgc, 108 Levesque. Linda, 148 Lewis, Lewis, Lewis. Dinnn, 144 Scott, 89, 170 Wayne, 211 K .lunes,Vlcki,120 Jordan, Elizabeth, 272 Jordan, Judith, 200 Jordan, Roola-rtn, 272 .lurdun, Robert, 07, 172, 272 Jordan, Linda, 146 .lmleph, Dnvid lil-1, 228, 250 Jowrll, Nnncy, 200, 174 Juwelt, David, 101, 110, 185, 272 Joyce, Cl niro, 92, 272 Jucius, Robert, 178 Judkins, Fred, 21lD,25I1, 258 Junkins, Jerruld, 2011 Jnrrlik, Elaine, 105 Jurgelnmn, Edward, 76, 1114, 272 Knlin, Stephanie, 153, 2011 Kane, Stephanie. 200 Kaplan, ltirhnrrl, U2, 1011, 272 Kane, Catharina, 272 Knrkuh. John Jr., 162, 273 linrkkanion, Cnrul, 112, 200 Kass. Ruger, 200 Kuy Judy, 152, 2011 icnylimaudy, no Knznlskl, Betty, 108, 127 linzmlcrnznk, Kathy, 126 Kebir, Mohamed. 108 Keene, Bcnllry, 174, 250 Kccnc,Cllff,107 Keene, David, 228 Keene, Grace, 108, 200 Keene, Peter, 168, 273 Keene, Susan, HG, 1111, 14-1, 273 Kee.1ey,Llndn, 143, 100 Kcleher, Elise, 210 Keller, Mike, 92 Keller, Keller, gllulutif, 142, 210 om, ill. Kelley, Dunuld. 160 Kelley, Elaine, 144. 236, 273 Kelley, Gail, il-1, 152, 273 Kelley, James, 102 Knlley, Juno,11'l Kelley, Karl, 180 Kelley, Kurlene, 210 Kelley, Robert, 117 Kulloy, Sheila, 115 Kelllhor, Illchnrd, 252 Kelly, Pntricin, 2-17 Kelly, Scott, 116 Kcmelprur, liruro, 1011, 10-1, 210 Kennedy, Richard, 166 Kennedy, Susan, 210 Kennedy, Richard, 210 Konoyer, Pamela, 150 Kcnuyer, Runnlil, 210 Kunt, David, 210 Kerrlizun, Dnvld. 172 Kinh, Robert, 172, 270 Kidd, Lauren, 07 Kieriiteuxl, Richard, 2153 Kimball, David, 273 Kimball, George, 180 Kimball, John, 180 Kimball, Judy, 125, 210 Klncraun, Donald, 100. 156 Klnerson, Russell, 156 King, Scott, 170 Kinnelly, Tholnnix, 164 Kirk, David, 170 Kirk, Robert, 168 Kittrelige, Robert, llli Kleinlrcrg, 1!nrry,92, 011, 273 Klin ft-r,11ermnnn.108 Knigslit, Gall, 120 Knight, Steve, 168 Knowles, Robert, 210 Knox, Barbara, 115, 2021 Koch, Susnnne,U2,144,210 Korsiniersky, 11olJert,87, 175, 228 Kulnreki, Kathy, 120, 1-iii Koo, Chun, 108 Kovach, Carol, 210 Krauac, Louin, 210 Libby, Dave, 116, 118 Libby, John, 228 Libby, Marjury, 106, 140,211 Libby. Nnncy,115, 126,128, 211 Libhy,Nonn,145 Libby, Roland, 180 Libby, Snrnh, 1119 Libby, Sharon, 211 Liberty, Bonnie, 144, 273 Lilley, Arthur, 211 Lilley, Danlnl, D0 Lilley, David, 119 Linscott, Thomas, 106, 252 Lipphe, Donald. 108 Lister, Brian, 273 Little. Arthur, 273 Little, Charles, 176, 166, 211 Littlefield, Arthur. 116 Littlefield, John, 109 Lizotte, Ann. 273 Logan, Donald, 174 Lombard, Judith, 121 Lumlmrd. Raymond, 135 London, Jerry, 211 London, Wiley, 228 Longo, Jima Look. Douglas, 164, 273 Look, Eliznhutll. 105, 211 Lord, Lindn, 110, 273 Lurd, Thomas, 156 Lathrup, Thomas, 162 Lott, Bobbie, 148 Louder, Wayne, 172 Love, Julia, 211, 152 Lovejoy, Richard, 184 Lowrcy, Frederick, 122, 211 Lucas, William, 211 Lukas, Wnlerlu, 147, 211 Lund, Craig. 186. 273 llyford, Mnry, 142, 273 Lynch, Marcin, 140, 211 Lynch, Penny, 87, 144 Lynch, William, 115 .H Ml.'Beth, Donald, 177, 274 McBride, Mae, 100 McCam, Martin, 180 McCann, Snntlrn, 274 McCnrthy, Mary, 274 McClnine, Lindn, 102 McCIeer, Susan, 103, 110 Mt-Cluxkey, Robert, 97, 253, 258 McCahb, Douglass, 274 MeCombs.Wi1Iinm,16G McCuIly, Bob, 07 McCurdy, Neal, 161, 274 Mcliennett, Brian, 91 McDonald. Alice. 121, 212 MacDonald, David, 184 Mclllonnld, Mnry, 09, 152 Moc-Donnld, ltohert, 250 McDonough, Charles, 175 McDougall, Rebecca, 104,212 McEarchern, Janet, 147 MacFarlane, Robert, 253 MucFawn, Patricia, 273 MeGilliciddy. Clem, 88 McGonagle, John, 97, 1118, 228, 256. 273 240, 244, 240, 254, 274 McGrath, Susan, 02, 142 McGraw, Mnjorie, 130, 212 McGraw, Sharon, 105 McGulllicuddy, Clement, 168 McHule, Martin, 66 Mclntlre, Burtt, 168 Mclntire, Nancy, 142 Mclntire. William, 212 McKay, Bonny, 135 McKee,Arnuli1, 166 Mclicen, Mike, 87 MacKenzie, Gorden, 273 McKinnon, Mavis, 120 Mchafferty, James, 274 McLain, Linda, 212 McLaughlin, Gilbert, 115 295 Mcllemore. Donald, 182 McManus. Sheila, 274 MacMillan, Brian, 186, 273 McNally, Harry, 212 McNeil, Michael, 252 McNeary, Matthew, 96, 102, 162, McNeary, Richard, 118, 212, 162 McNutt, Judy, 146, 274 McPhee, Peter, 168, 254 Mc1'ike, Douglas, 212 Moden, Priscilla, 140. 274 Madrell, Robert, 185 Magee, Marshall, 168, 258 Mngill, Jason, 178 Maguire, Ronald, 168 Mahan, Patricia, 211. 236 Main, Eleanor, 152 Mnines, Judy, 143 Mulacinski, Jenn, 274 Malcolm, Ginny, 245 Macolxn, Norine, 146 Mallory, llazen, 166 Mnltby, Sue, 150 Manchester, David, 2-17 Manchester. Stephan, 186 Mansfield, Linda, 125, 138, 211 Manson, Donna, 211 Mansur, Woody, 110 Mantai, Karen, 150 Mnntui, Kenneth, 274 Mantai, Marion, 150 Mnnter. Elaine, 211 March, Eileen, 95, 262, 274 Marhowski, Michael, 211 Marin. Roger, 274 Marks, Peter, 1611 Marquez, Knty, 150 Marquis, Norman, 211 Marsh, Eben, 121 Marshall. Bowen, 184 MaL'tin,Clif1'orrl, 118, 211 Martin, Edward, 116, 134 Martin. Robert, 180, 27,1 Mason, Philip, 27-1 Mason, Robert, 211 Mnsterinnn, Bonnie, 102, 147, 274 Mastrolucn, Marianne, I02, 274 Matthews. Judith, 51, 274 Matthews, Kent, 108 Matthews, Ronald, 184 Matyola, Liddy, 143 Mayer, Harrison. 160 Maynard, James. 87, 184 Mayo. Chrystal, 95, 102, 146, 211 Mnyo, Phyllis, 70, 73, 119 Mboria, Carolyn, 95, 148, 27-1 Means, Sarge, 87, 184, 194, 236, 252 Mehlnian, Marilyn, 1-18, 212 Mier, Peter, 104, 212 Meissner, Francis, 274 Melanson, William, 212 Melgard, Stephen. 97, 212 Menges, Brenda, 148 Mercer, Margaret, 113, 145 Mercer, Victor Jr., 176, 250. 274 Merchant, Roger, 212 Merrifield, Douglas, 166 Merrill. Curl. 228, 164 Merrill, Dennis, 118, 274 Mersereau, Raymond. 274 Meserve, Lee, 105, 156 Meservey, Douglas, 107, 156 Merinier, Eileen, 212 Meyer, Susan, 110 Miohuud, Charles. 168 Michaud, James, 212 Michauzl, Robert, 112, 172, 257 Miller. Francis, 212 Miller, Jean, 142 Miller, Mary, 138 Miller, Robert, 100 Miller, Michael, 118, 212 Millett, Leo, 178 Milligan, Barbara, 191 Milliken, Phillip,11H, 274 Mills, Diana, 275 Mills, Patricia, 146, 275 Mills, Robert, 170 Mills, Susan, 144, 275 Milne, Craig, 88, 275,105 Milner, Karen, 212 Milvaney, Beatrice. 212 Mitchell, James, 115 Mitchell, Jean, 212 Mitchell, John, 160 Mitchell, Robert, 186 Moffitt, Edward, 212 Monahan, Eugene, 172 Monsulich, Bonnie. 148 Montes, Reginald, 108 Monteith, Charles. 118,212 Monteith, Douglas, 157. 212 Montemorra, Robert, 109 Montgomery, Floyd, 162, 222 Moozly, Augustus. 186 Moody, Doris, 125, 212 Moody, Roger, 212 Moon, Carol, 212 Moore, Elizabeth, 213 Moores, Lawrence, 213 Moores, Sondra, 95, 104, 152, 213 Moran, Lester, 164 Mornncy, Linda, 88, 92, 93, 213 Mornng, Breen, 168 Moreau, Albert, 213 Morgan, Charles, 170 Morgan, Hugh, 169 Morgan, Nancy, 106 Morin, James, 275 Morin, Pris, 142 Morin, Richard, 178, 179 Morris, Arnold. 135, 180 Morrison, Brenda, 213 Morrison, Eldon, 117, 168 Morrison, Garrett, 275 Morrison, Judith, 247 Morse, Gary, 107 Morse, Cutricia, 102, 275 Morse, George, 100, 156, 213 Morse, Meredith, 213 Morse, Philip, 176, 177 Morse, Thomas, 185, 213 Morton, George, 88, 173, 254, 275 Motram, Charles, 115 Mortus, Cindy, 108 Moses, Judith, 88, 142, 275 Mosher. Peter. 275 Mayer, Harrison Jr., 275 Mulhern, Thomas, 213 Mulvihill, Marianne, 213 Mumson, Fritz, 115 Mundy, James, 180 March, Kenneth, 275 Murgita, Robert, 100.160, 213 Murphy, Ann. 213 Murphy, Brian, 213 Murphy, Charles, 134, 157 Murphy, Sharon. 139 Murphy, Thoman, 164, 250 Murray, Eleanor, 93, 138 Murray, Joseph, 176 Murray, Kenneth, 180 Murray, Lewis, 168 Myers, Scott, 162 262. 274 Myers, Susan, 150 Myrich, Warren, 166 N Nagim, George, 164 Nanos, William, 213 Nnrdino, Helene, 82, ES, 1-10,275 Nason, Richard, 112, 254 Nelson, Craig, 184 Nelson, Pam. 80, 150 Nelson, Paul, 168 Nelson, Terry, 109 Nelson Ness, Norman, 175 Newell, Charles, 175 , Victor, 213, 251, 176, 250 Newell, Mary, 275 Newell. Robert, 213 Newlin, Seth, 213 Newman, Frederick, 102, 184, 275 Newman, Thomas. 100, 134, 156, 275 Newth, Larry. 109 Nichols, John, 213, 247 Nichols, Lillie, 146, 2121 Nickau, Hilary, 275 Nickerson, Paul, 180, 181 Nicoll, William Jl'.,18-1, 275 Nightingale, Richard, 213 Niles, Richard, 127 Niles, Sandra, 120 Nippf, inn-1. 105, 213 Nodo..., -, y , Nmline, Donald, 213 Noir. James, 184 Nolan, Richard, 166, 228 Nulwn, Paul, 105 Norris, Elizabeth, 245 Norton, Gury, 96, 213 Norton, Jane, 275 Norton, Philip, 171 Noyes, Jeanne, 213 Npanias, Pantelis, 108 Nunan, Victor, 162 Nutting, Dorcas, 275 Nutting, Julie, 140 O Obey, John,21i1 Orcute, Jake, 105 O'Connell, Edward. 180 0'C0nnell, Patricia, 149 O'Connell, William. 176, 250 0'Connor, Mary, 213 D'Donnell, Diane, 121 0'Dnnnell, Joseph, 214 O'Donnell, Michael, 275 O'Donnell. Susan, BS, 150 0'Keefe, Kathy, 92 Dlcott, Pat, 11-1, 245 Oliver, Heather, 120 Oliver, Susan, 10-1, 214 Olmsted, Norwood, 179 Olsen, Grethe, 214 Olsen, Jill, 100, 102, 138, 275 Olson, John, 214, 247 Olson, Karen, 113, 245 Olson, Lindn.150 Oluwole, Olnkayode, 108, 214, 257 a Nancy 107,121 r , , . Orchard, Stetson, 182 Orcutt, Amos, 156 Osgood, Harry, 202. 275, 176 Ouellette, Claudette, 103 Ouellette, Clifford, 118, 176, 275 Ouellette, Richard, 214 P Paganucci. Fred, 170 Page, Allen, 214 Page, John, 164, 214 Page, Nancy, 144 Page, Richard, 184 Paiement, Thomas, 176 Paiste, Donald, 117 Paitun, Peter, 87, 184, 194, 236 Pa 1 mer, Palmer. Pape, R David, 186 Vernon, 104, 108, 121 obert, 275 Paradise, William, 180 Parad is Pa rady, Parent, Pa rl-ter. Parker, Pa rker, Parker, Parlin, , Rolland, 170 Roland, 118 Stephen, 228, 246 Donald, 214, 254 June, 275 Michael, 157, 276 Richard, 91, 116, 105,276 nlly, 108, 276 S Parsons, Margaret, 138, 276 Paton, John, 214 Patten, Sandra, 143, 276 Paulson, William. 116, 156 Payne, Barbara, 276 Payson, Judy, 150, 276 Peabody, Charles, 160 Peabody, Daniel, 160 Peabody, Lorna, 140, 21-I Pearson, Edgar Jr., 276 Pearson, Nancy, 143 Pellegrino, David, 162 Pelletier, Louis, 276 Pelletier, Reginald, 175 Pelletier, Richard, 178 Pelletier. Rosemary, 148, 214 Pelteir, Elizabeth, 146 Pendleton, Arilern, 276 Penler, John, 92, 276 Penley, Elaine, 270 Pennell, Brian, 214 Penny, Russ, 112 Pepper, Oliver, 162 Perault, Norman. 11B Percival, Joseph, 118, 276 Perciva Marilyn, 276 1. Perhnm, Martha, 114, 245 Perkins, Ann, 276 Perkins, Joan, 120 Perkins, Laurence, 214 Perkins, Richard, 164, 168, 252, 253 Perkins, Robert, 91 Perkins , William. 164, 228 Perland, Carol. 149 Pero, Ernestine, 147 Perrault, Norman, 276 Perry, Brenda, 276 Perry, John, 118 Perry, Kathryn, 214 Persinger, Mary, 110 Peters, Richard, 276 Peterson, David, 103 Peterson, Mary Ellen, 153, 190 Peterson, Russ, 98 Petro, Robert, 214 Phil, George, 214 Philippon, Ray, 105 Phippen, Sanford, 276 Pickart, Ursula, 150, 237 Pickens, Hillis, 164 Piipo, Dorothy, 105 Pike, Carol, 120 Pilsbury, Ralph, 276 Pinio, Stephen, 166, 252 Pinkhani, Daniel, 167, 214 Pinkhanx, Leon, 170 Plnisted, David, 276 ', 1 Plnisted, Robert. 21-1 Plante. Donald, 2111 Plante. Monique. 94, 150. 276 P11-mtv, Richard, 276 Plourde, Norman, 214 Plum, Herald, 115 Plummer, Judy, 214 Poitrus, Ronald, 172 Polk, Peter, 214 Pamers.Ann,146 Punllz, Kenneth, 70, 75, 76, 134, 175 Pon1c.Nuncy, 86, 88. 141, 276 Porter. Elaine. 121 Porter, William, 186 Potter. Sylvia, 276 Puller, William, 172 Powers, Ann, 276 Pratt, Jnhn, 256 Preble, Gary, 154 Prrscott. Barbara, 121, 214 Prs:ss1ey, Mnry Jane, 140 Price, Roger, 135 Pride, Dnuirlns. 170 Priest. David Il. 2. 171. 277 Prince. Chnr1es, 172 Prince. Warren, 118 Prine, Alice, 21-1 Provost, Phil. 118 Puffcr, James. 118 Pulkkinen. Andrea, 149 Pl1l1en, Peter, 96, 102. 172. 277 Purcell, Ehznbeth, 214 Purings, Dennis, 214 Purzyckl. Judy, 139 Q Quigley, Don, 96. 09. 119, 121 R Ralph, Pnul, 186 Rnmsdell. Allan, 176 Ramada-11. Patricia, 215 Ilnncourt, Edmond, 150, 277 Rnnd, David, 229 Randall. Richnrd. 178 Randall, Wi1liam,277 1!apoport,G1enn. 182. 215 Raw, Rnthhun. Rivhurd. 105 Ann, 144 Ray, Keith, 246 Ray, Nancy. 188, 277 Ray, Mnrtin, 215 Rny, Rands111,2'T7 Rny, Robert. 96, 118, 215 Hnymond, Frunc1s,215 Raymond, Joseph. 184 Raymond, Wayne, 135 Record, Dnvid, 98, 277 Records. Sharon. 215 Reddy, Paula, 12-1, 152, 215 Redmond, George, 118, 168 Reed. Deanna. 277 Recd. Stephan, 110 Rcidman. Pntrick, 228, 277 Renegur, Glenna. 126. 215, 2-15 Ile:-nsh1,CynLhia, 215 Revere, William. 112 Reynolds. Paul, 161 Reyno1ds,Vaughn, 277 Rhoda. Richard, 215 Rico. Judi, 142 Rice, Susan, 87, 145 Rich, Janice, 104, 215 Rich. Judith, 102, 113, 215, 245 Rich, Stuart, 99, 108. 119, 277, 170 Richards. Fred, 191 Richards, Roger, 250 Richnrdaun, Carol, 120 Richardson. Charles, 180 Richardson, David, 88, 157 Richardson, Gary, 101, 107, 277 Richardson. Jack, 102 Richardson, John, IGB, 215 Ilickur, Knryl, 277 Ricker, Nancy, 277 Rideout. Alice, 215 Rider, Barbara, 90, 152, 198, 215 Riding, Richard, 156 R1dIon,Jo1ine, 99 Rid1on,MnrLha Ju, 138 Riley. Alan, 1715, 228 Riel, Chnrhs, 215 Riley, James, 105 Ring, Joyce, 90, 100, 153, 277 Ring, Meredith, 95, 215 Rinsrhnl. John, 219 Ringwood, Paul, 182 Rioux. Raymond, 118, 277 Ripple, Peter, 107. 277 Risso, Lawrence, 156 Rivers, Cnrol, 120 Riviera, William. 168. 228 Rank. Roberta, 126, 14-1, 215 Robbins, James, 107 Robbins, Louise, 277 Robhins,Wu ne 170 134 257 5' v 1 . Winston, 92, 98, 215 Robbins, Ruherts, Bnnnic. 140, 215 Roberts, Cntherine, 138 Roberts, George, 166, 167 Roberts. Judith. 138, 215 Roberts, Mary, 277 Roberts, Raymond, 98, 277 Roherls, Stanley, 88, 118, 178, 277 Robertson, A11an, 135, 160, 215 Robertson, David, 215 Robertson, Donna, 152 Robertson, Jeffrey, 178 Robertson, John, 172 Robinson. Ann, 251 Robinson. Geruhl. 162, 163 Robinson, Melvin, 156 Robinson. Penrl. 147 Robinson, Richard, 97, 118, 215 Robinson. Thomas. 170 Ruby, Marie, 215 Roby, Pntricin. 277 Rockwe1l, Kenneth, 215 Rogers, David. 277 Rogers. Owen. 182. 183 Rodgers, Put. 145, 245 Hogerson, Ronald, 228 Rolfe, Thomas, 168 Ro11ins,Georg:ennn, 216 Ramnno, Cynthia, 216 Romano, Dante Jr., 216 Ronco, Bradley, 121 Rosen, Joel, 135 Rose,.1nmea, 115, 180 Rowan, Maurice, 172 Rowland. Roger, 104 Rucker, Mary, 120 Iiudherk, James. 100 Rnmfe1dt, 1'Jav1d, 134. 182 Rumme1, Merrill, 173 Rumphlcdt. Dave, B9 Runynn, Catherine, 216 Rush, Robert, 228 Rush, Susan, 216 Russell, Nancy, 277 1'lussel1,Ronald, 150, 253 Rutherford, Peter, S8 Rutherford. Bobbie. 145 Ryan. Thomas, 172, 216 Rynn. Dianne. 143 276 S Snecamc. Michael. 134 Sala, Joseph, 180 Salisbury, Blinn Jr., 216 Salisbury, Daniel, 172 Sa1ter,JaneY.. 216 Sampson, Barbara, 120 Sampson, Sanborn, Sunburn, Carolee, 148 James, 180, 277 .Yeffre 175 Y. Surgent, Albert, 166, 216, 275 Sargent, James, 100. 155. 157, 216 Snribikian, Koharig, 215 Snucier, Lee, 149 Szxvitz. Gerry, 186 Sawyer. Alan. 170 Snwyer, Gary, 98 Sawyer, Margery. 216 Sawyer, Michael, 100, 105, 156, 277 Sawyer, Raymond, 158, 228 Snwyer, Roger, 168 Scala, Thnmns, 186 Index St. Pierre, Eugene, 108, 279 St. Pierre, Francis. 217 Strang,Gar1nnd. 168, 2-10, 241 Stratton. Kenneth, 158 Strinr, Sheila, 279 Strnirer, Mike, 89 Strickland, Joan, 113, 114. 126. 217. 245 Strombcrg, Stuart, 168, 279 Strong, Michael, 162. 252 Stuart. Gerald. 110 Strunk. Duv1d. 135 Sturgis, Kntherlne, 163, 279 Sulllvun, Jenn, 279 Sullivan, Judy. 150 Su1llvnn. Paul, B7, 151-1. 236, 172 Survant. Connie. 147 Susi, Dawn, 140 Sutherland. John. 102. 1711, 279 Svendscn, Dnvid, 112, 172, 195, 240, 2-13 Swnin, Dnuglns, 252 Swartz, Rnhert, 156 Sween Mark 176 Schaefer. Paul, 97 Scholsberg, Bonnie, 216 Schmelzer, Hemry. 166. 216 Schoeman. Hedy. 120 Schroeder, Dan, 100 Schultz, Edward,183 Schutt, Eleanor, 1-18, 2113 Sciaraffa. Michncl, 216 Sclair. Morton, 277 Scott, Jnhn, 183 Scott, Mark, 89 Scott, Robert, 1613 Scroggy, James, BB, 2111 Seabury, Stephen, 184 Seaha, Walt. 107 Seaman, Karen, 147 Senver L nne 147 Y. . Sweet, Meriby. 1-10, 190 Sweet. Richard. 108 Swenso n, Mary, 217, 245 Swett, David, 180, 217 Swett, Donna, 148, 217 T Tnpluy, Tnyinr, Tnylnr, Taylor, Tnylur, Taylor. Tny1ur, Taylor, Sylvia, 126, 1-14, 217 Burton, 105, 156 Charles, 172, 217, 246 Elizabeth, 279 J. Tucker, 160. 247 Nancy. 279 Persis. 279 Shnrnn. 150 v Y . Seawell, James, 175 Sealy, Joyce, 120 Seratn, Anhur. 105 Severson. Daniel, 228, 278, 165 Shaffer, Howard, 249, 253, 258 Shaw. Allah, 216 Shaw, Brenda, 216 Shaw, Carolyn, 278 Shaw, Nancy, 66, 611, 71. 194 Shaw, Richard, 174 Tennett, William. 156 Tenure, Frank, 228 Thayer, Charles, BT Thayer, Ernest, 174, 228 Tn. rricn. Ann, 279 Thib-. 'f'uu, Ann,120 Thibodu. ". Omer, 127 T11nbhuni,. Vbarali, 108 '1'honms,GrcL.Ixen,113, 217, Z-15 Thnmns, Mary, 103, 113, 217, 2115 Thomkins. Jann. 83. 217 Shea, Gerald, 97. 278 Shea, Kenneth, 216 Sheehan. Ann, 93, 2111 Thompson, Burhurn, 143 Thompson, David, 100. 107, 174 Thumpson, Duruthy, 95, 102, 279 sherbume, Paul, vo, ao. ms, sa, wa, 172, zva Sherburne, Russe1l,91 Sherry, Ned, 216, 228 Sherwood, L. Ted, 83, 86, 89, 99, 119, 278, 170 Shibles, David. 180, 278 Shirland, Lsu-ry, 278 Shoener. William, 156, 278 Sidelinger. Douglas, 178 Sidolsky, Carol, 278 Simard, David, 162,198 Simmons, Corinne, 278 Simontnn, Putrirn, 121 Simonton, William, 1713, 259 Singer, Linda, 102,14U,278 Singh, Jasunnt, 108 Sirois. Larry, 254 Skaling, Michael, 87, 98, 112, 168, 253 S1oan,SLun,89, 99, 119, 216 Slossberg, Estafnye, 103, 113 Smahs, William, 278 Thon1psnn,.1nmes, 107 Thompson, June, 113, 217, 2115 Thompson, Linda, 1118 Thompson, Peter, 123, 279 Thompson Thorpe, K , Robert, 107 Lherine 1.13. 1-19 n , Thurlow, Annie, 279 Thurlow, Ardra, 148, 2711 Thurlow, Murgaret, 140 Thur1ow.Wi1liam.217 Thurston. Wnyne, ms, 156 Tilrbetts, Gary, 97, 120, 279 Tiblmtts. Susml. 139 Tierney, John. 108 Tinlin, Limln. 150 Titconlb, Auln, 180, 279 Titcomh, Dr.-nn, 180 Todd. Genrge, 279 Tn1'm'i. Patricia. 87. 90. 146. 19-1 Tale, John, 176 Tumpkins, Jnne, 138 Tompkins, John, 180 Smalley, Brian. 168, 159 Smart, Liz, 145 Smith, Anthony, 186, 278 Smith, Beverly, 150, 216, 235 Smith, Brian, 259 Smith, Carole A., 9-1, NS, 278 Smith, Cam! E., 150 Smith, Dana III, 278 Smith, Daniel, 105, 134 Smith, Dennis, 100, 184 Smith, Ernest, 168, 228 Smith, Gwendolyn, 120. 139 Tompkins, Willis, 118 Tucthnker, Bruce, 118, 217 Torok. Ernest. 13-1. 156 Torrent. Gerald, 134 Tuwle, Jncqucl1ne, 90, 143 Towle, Gordon, 100, 256, 279 Townsend. Linwood, 279 Tnzier. Allen. 217 Trultun. Thomas, 228 Trent, Charles III, 180. 217 Trcmhhny, Jacqueline, 217 Tremblay, Wendnll, 91 Smith, Helen, 140, 278 Smith, Jarzki. 147 Smith, Jay, 98 Smith. Kathleen, 278 Smith. Lee, 105 Smlth, Mary, 120 Smith, Nancy, 215 Smith, Paul, 228 Smith. Peier. 156 Smith. Pris. 149 Smith, Susan H., 148 Smith, Susan T., 278 Snell, Charlotte, 278 Snow. Carol, 278 Snow, Lewis, 174 Snow, Margaret, 94, 278 Snyder, Carol, 75 Sobanter, Jonghizwert, 108 Cinder ren Arnold 104 278 ski, Pam, 109, 100, 1011, 141, 217 Trulnnd, Karen, 150, 190 Troiuno 'l'ro1nnd , Nnncy,90.150.217 Trubee, David, 07 True. Barbara, 279 T urker. Adrinrm. 279 Tukcy, Carla. 87. 90, 1110 Tukko, Michael, 168 Tumnn. Rob:-rt. 182. 183. 257 Tupper, Frank, 186 Tulmcr, Stanley, 218 Turcotte, Irene, 153 Turcotle, Pauline, 102, 280 Turnlmugh. Brian, 176 Turner. Turner, Turner. Turner. Turner, Turner, - E . . . Soler, Donal 228, 27B Somers, Carolyn, 148 Sones, Stephen. 252 Sorrie, Donald, 08, 176, 278 Sarrey, Dun, 98 Suule. Philip, 108, 228 Spalding, Robert, 156 Spear. Charles. 156 Spear, Nancy, 11-12,2-15 Spear. Rnberl. 1741 216 Spector, Alun, 1213, 182 Spencer, Edsel. 01. 216 Spencer, Lydia, 109 Sprague, Robert, 115, 180 Spreng, George, 240, 2-14 Spruce. Murray, 168, 254 Stanhope, Donald, 186 Stanley, Elsie, 217 Stanley, Myrna, 102, 108, 278 Stanton. William, 180 Staples, Gayle, 278 Staples, Jacqueline, 2117 Staples, Justin, 129 Starbird, Nnneltc, 120, 1-18 Stearns.Jud10.h. 278 Steele. Wi1liam, 182 Sleeves, Martha, 153 Steidle, Stephen, 160 Stein, Earl, 115 Stenger, Chelsea. 1-111 Y Steputis, Nancy, 102, 113, 114, 1-12, Sterling, David, 217 Stern, Mark, 217, 259 Stern, Marshall, 62. 170 Stevens, Gifford, 162 Stevens, Winfred, 170, 217 Stewart, Carl, 183, 270 Stewart, Doris, BB, 128, 217 Stewart, Kenneth, 96, 217 Stewart, Pauline, 110 Stickle, Martin, 279 Stickney, Robert, 118, 162, 2-10 Stimpson, Paul, 170 St, Jean, Donald, 253 SL. John, Ralph, 181, 281 Stone. Caroline. 217 Stone, Jonathan, 116, 279 Sbcne, Nancy, 279 Stover, Luie, 217 Stowe, Eric, 97, 262, 279 296 Donnll. 218 Duusclns, 177 Knrl, 160 Mike, 89 Ronald, 178 William, 218 Tu:-ton. Thomas. 169 Tuthill, Thomas, 172 'I'witche11, Kathleen, 106, 218 Tw0mbly,AIl1'm. 168 Tyler, David. IGB Tyler, Mary, 119, 123 Tyler, Robert, 182 U Uphx-ml, linger, 280 Urquhart, Joline. 280 V Vncuaro, Pun, 145 Vnfindfes, Don, 1141 Vuillrmcuurt, Duvid, 160 Vaillnneourt, Kenneth. 93. 100, 1311, 280 Vun Anhwerpcn. Franklin, 97. 118, 280 Vnnidstine, Dennis. 240, 2-12 Van Kirk, Myron, 180, 218 Van Vulhcnburgh, James, 170 Van Wort, Roberta, 218 Vantour, Faith. 1-111. 262, 280 Vuillcux, Valerie, 247 Vermctlc. Ernestine. SB. 280 Vermcttc. Ruymnnd, 100, 160, 280 Verrill, David, 177 Verril, Mary, 280 Vickery, John, 170 Viger. Janet. 92 Viger. Norman, 98, 112, 218, 246, 256 Vigue, Ronald. 174 Vincent, Miriam, 139 Vincent, Pnul, 2116 Violette, Roland. 280 Vitale, VME, 1.66 Vogel, Dennis Vugcll, Snndru, 51 Voss, Henry Jr,, 280 W Wnddcll. Knren, 87. 10-1, 1-18 Wndleigh, Sally, 245 Wndswnrth, Prescott, 218 Wagghz, Mary Lou, 92 Wakefield, James, 164, 253 Wnkely, Mary-Lou. 153 Walker, Award, ao, 91. 123. 172, 281 Walker. Eu5zrnc,10'l, 118.122, 218 Wn1ker. 1'1ichnrd.21B Walker, Stanley, 158 Walker, Vernon, 152, 228 Wall. Carol. 218 Wallace. Chnr1un,98.218 Wallace. May, 247, 280 Wn1sh. Mnrybelle, 138,139 Walter, Nancy, 120, 148 Walters, Dee Dec, 1117 Ward, Dennis, 218 Wnrd. Franklin, 102, 280 Wnrd. Mary Ann, 120 Wureingr, Jann, '15, 715, 77, 011, 152 Wnrrcn, Art, 2511 Wnrren, Joseph, 106 Warren, Mnryunne, 1112 Wnsgnxtt, Charles, 102 Washburn. Charles, 121 Wushicwicz. Dennis, 116, 186, 280 Wnsylyshyn. F1ower.75, 811. 150 Wnlarhouse, Lindn. 218 Waterhouse. William, 1111 Wmers. Burhnrn, 88, 00. 104, 152, 218 Watson, Beverly, 102, 218 Wx1Lson,Tuhius, 280 Wvantherhcu, Willimn. I18, 1711 Weaver. Dnunn. 149. 218 Weaver, Dnuglns, 1110 Wcnver, Susan, 124. 152. 218 Webb, Mnurivn,11B,170, 280 Webb, Pamuln, 218 Webber, Brenc1n,218 Wubher, Philip .1x',, 1715, 280 Weber, Knr1, 1511 Webster, Linda, 218 Webster. Neil. 115 Weeks, Allan, IRG Weeks, Gurdon, 280 Weeks, Sonja, 142, 2132, 280 Weiss. Arnulll. 62. 127. 1110. 182. 280 weich, Pm., 115 Wells, Owen, 97 Wentworth. Bruce. 254 Wentworth, James, 115 Wentworth, John, IGB Wentworth, Sully, 218 Weacott, Alhert, 218 Weston. Joseph, 07 Weston, Newell, 177, 1118, 218 Wcstun, Susnn, 1013 Wheaton, Arthur, 1116 Wheaton. Bonnie. 1110.148 Whitaker. Suzanne, 152 White. Gcnrize. 1116 White.Shc1dun, 1841, 187 White, Thonms, 218 Whited, Marie. 148 Whitehill, Ency, 02, 93, 138 Whitehouse. Ernest. 134. 186 Whitehouse. Victor. 184 White1y,E1lintL,219 Whiting, Gerry, 168 Whitman. Peter. 184 Whilnnm. William. 280 Whitney, Ruger, 280 Whittemore, Bruno, 180. 2541 Whitten. Gordon. 104, 219 Whitten, James, 168 Wilcox, Alnn,135 W1lz1e, Murguret, 125 Wildea, Fred, 89, 173 Wiley. liownrd. 134. 280 Wllcy, Joseph, 280 Wiley, Lisl.-nth. 219, 198 Wilkinsonwlonn. 152 Wilkinson. John Jr., 176. 280 Wi11xnrd,Mnry,92,211J Willett. Dnvid, 170 Williams, Judith, 146, 210 Williams, lliuhnrd, 1811, 219 Williamson, Joseph Jr., 170, 21U' Wil1inmrion,Tcrry, 175 Willis, Snndrn, 88, 00, 150, 218 W111s. Owen. 21.8 Wilmnrth. Bnrbxxrn, 146 Wi1sun, Allan, 181 Wilson, Cnrul, 280 W11son,Chm'1es, 107,280 Wllunn, David L., 281 Wi1son, David S., 281 Wilson. Donulrl. 281 Wihxon. Mardi, 2151 W1lson.Mnr1u.28!. Wi1sun, Stephen, 172 Wing, Bnrhnrn, 2115 Wing, Forrest. 281 Wing, Gcorgn, 176, 259 Wing, Raymond. 135 Winn. El1en.150,28l Wimxhip, Carl, 135 Witcomg, Arran, 105 Withers, James, 2113 Wolfe, Jacqueline, 152, 219 Wulhauptur, Chnr1ene,2H1 Wand, Patricia, 87, 148 Wuud, Thomas, 184 Wood, Vnlton Jr., 1112, 219 Woodbury. Jon. 174. 210 Woodbury. Robert., 2110, 2421 Woodman, Dnniel, 117, 100, 281 Woodruff. Rick. 112 Woods, Jenn, 95, 2111 Woods, Linda, 219 Woods, William, 2111 Woodside, Richard, 219 Woodworth, Larry, 88, 281, 1119 Wunllcy, Pnmeln, 142. 219 Woods. Dems. 1511 Woods. Jean. 152 Warden, A1bert,25-1, 258 Worth, Cnrnll, 112 Wurthnn, Dale, BT, 97, 1011, 172 Worzhley, Leon, 228, 281 Worcester, Mnhlon. 281 Wright, Judith, 219 Wright, Kenneth. 21111 Wright, Kentun. 170 Wyman, Catharine. 102, 146, 198, 219 Wyman, Gertrude, 281 Wyman. Janice. 125. 210 Wyman, Nnncy. 1511 Wyman. Richard, 281 Y Yenton, Virginia, 138 York, Kay. 1-17 Young, Carolyn, 111-1 Young, Dnvid, 281 Yuung,Domn1,1H0 Young, Lester, 281 Young, Margaret, 1116 Young, Peter, 1.00, 105 Yuung, Suzanne. 1113. 1713, 152 Yucdsnukls, Anthnny, 1511, 281 Z Zachary, Carolyn, 1111, 123, 210 Zern. Barry, 182 Zink, Bonnie, 115,120 Zimmerman. Alun, 015. 168. 2111 Zuchmnn, Enuch, 182 Zunder-Platsmxul. Paul, 108 -av. .I I.I .II f V ' 3- - . w ,-1 . , gm.-" - ' 'M 53'--' . . . I . P Q' -s- 9. 5, -- I I I I , , , -1 . v --J-. -Q V. 1 ,. , I 0 .. 'L 5? K . Ls 'x 4 N F A ,Q ffl: f-M K I V' " . I. ' V ' A XX . . ' 5 u X I' ' ' cn . . -. ' - g 2 ' V r I JJ, .F v xr .0 . ' l I, 'I -5' qgf I ' I dr 1 x I 'F' " - - . 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