University of Idaho - Gem of the Mountains Yearbook (Moscow, ID)

 - Class of 1950

Page 1 of 390

 

University of Idaho - Gem of the Mountains Yearbook (Moscow, ID) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1950 Edition, University of Idaho - Gem of the Mountains Yearbook (Moscow, ID) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1950 Edition, University of Idaho - Gem of the Mountains Yearbook (Moscow, ID) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1950 Edition, University of Idaho - Gem of the Mountains Yearbook (Moscow, ID) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1950 Edition, University of Idaho - Gem of the Mountains Yearbook (Moscow, ID) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 390 of the 1950 volume:

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A .f A Q Q Qi: ig ji rs N 5 u. Q53 ,X i 'Q ami .Q pi .-w,. 12 1 ..: , . A qf, ...,. 4 , ,F-an Sc X Q NCME wa- w 9 , W n 1 4 , 1 n 1 I 1 . X NA Q w 2 W . s E F L i s E 1 4 E 3 s ! 1 5 5 5 F 5 1 EBM OF THE MOUNTAINS ghfom- fame flomax ,yffsaavkzfe aQ?cws.- fmy fgllflfliff fame 22154215 A me 48 of the Annual Publication of the Associated Students of the University of Idaho, Moscow 1 :- f W 4 za? 1. an 4 in 1 in W9 Q- Q fm J?" . is A - ,xnym Av, , 1' K-,gh '- Vw' ' , .7 lm J favs rf WV' 5 I MQ in r-4 ,Q qu, - 'ez Aw V, 'A N1 'kt RL! ,ivaf ,f b 7,1 'Tux ' ., 1 X v,k,,A,,, swf, Nw. 1 ', J: H., ' Us k, I Q f ,V 'V vi ' ' , - " , , :wg ' f 'A g 'V' V If ff " ' ' , Ml 3? f .EQ S -h.'.1rA , if -M" nf, f f' 2 1-5 A MM V mf A A IN C ,X Q T , wa 4 .Q ,X ' ' A ,L ,Rl Aww? I , 'Q y . ii" 7 2 wg, V M ' up Q l 1 W Qf wig... W . 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V - , . rl K . M M ..:, , ,, 1 Q. Q . " Q , lf' 2 F' f , fm ' . 'n' f . ' J ..,. A . , ..'Y1..f ,Q , ff A .7 , ,H-,il'E:, N M ' Y in Mm M W f ,wif ff1i'f-my-. . , W " fi" W N " an K 1 YT 1 - K t A 3 , Y ,M 1 ' ,ck 'TE' if , W - W' " ' A .MF " Q A k 1 'wi 32' it 5 :W at 'x ' N ww P 2.7 ' is " ' f ' ,QQ yur, A Lf' P "" . , . ' "5S:f Q f L ' ff? -wr-4 y Q .T ., 1 . A 'WY -A si N :K - x N7 A , - . ' - In .- Y' 'w- - xl. N14 - F , g K fx rf 5 - 7' " -4'--f-M I - , 'V ' 1 K .mn . Mana 1. f 5 A -Meme 'B M . .Z Wm..Wm,i,, - .mm My L,.. ,w wmm W.. . . A Q Y ,xy M ' 5 . , A fn . 1 - V , 3 . A ,,, ,, .1 V' .... .. -1 AA. K N . ,V k 5, . , New X 'H ' ik C. A. Robins Greetings to you ot the University ot Idaho! Your institution, as one ot the oldest in the state ot Idaho, has a wonderful record ot service to the people ot the state. Through its activities it is to be anticipated that many more worthy contributions to the economy ot Idaho will be made, both in research and in the training ot our young people tor service. As the mid-point ot the century is reached, we look forward with high hope and fine ambition. C. A. ROBINS Governor IO lie came by rented livery, that convocation spcfalwr ol llie year l000, up the sand-surlaced curving road to the pile ot granite steps that lunneled upward to the single building that was then the University oi ldaho. He came to address a student body ot l06 eager youths. l-le came by plane, this assembly speaker ol l050. Before landing he circled the ll00-acre campus studded with nearly a hundred build- ings to get the feel ot the 3500 students he would address on the subject, Hllmerica at MidfCentury s-Wliat Lies Ahead?" How he comes, the assembly speaker ot the year 2000, or il he comes, rests largely with you, the students ot today. lt he comes, it will be to a vastly larger group. Qur plans and visions tor the tuture should continue at the expanding scale we've just experienced. lt he doesn't come, it will be because we tailed to solve the social, political and technological problems we inherited and created. We can meet the challenge it we will. l. li. BUCHANAN President J. E. Buchanan azzmfcjfffeyefzfs The highest honor that a state can conter upon one ot its public-spirited and responsible citizens is a call to service as a member ot the Board ot Regents. The Regents Work Without pay. Their experience, understanding, and judgment are given gratis to the citizens oi the state through educational guidance. ldaho's Board is composed ot tive members appointed by the governor, and one, the State Superintendent ot Schools, who is an ex-officio member. They form the supreme governing body ot education in the Gem state. With their varied experience and backgrounds, board members cannot be given too much credit in the molding ot the University ot ldaho of today g and tomorrow. Alton B. Jones, W. F. McNaughton, Maude C. Houston, Governor C. A. Robins, Emory A. Owen, John D. Rernsberg, J. L. McCarthy mn afyfkff Any tather will tell you that being dad to one or two young men is a big job. Dean Lattig is "dad" on the campus to almost 3,000. During the past year, he had an additional duty vital to the inter- ests ot all studentse serving as taculty coordinator in the construction ot the new Student Union building. During the spring semester, students missed Dean Lattig's sincere smile and those triendly chats they used to have with him. He was on sabbatical leave touring the United States to study stu- dent housing and health problems. X E471 0 2643777671 Dean Carter works closely with A.W.S. and the Panhellenic council. House- mothers and hostesses depend on her Wisdom tor assistance. Last year she wrote a lllandbook tor l-lousemothersn as a guide tor them. Women students who come to her tor advice are greeted by a cherry, "Hello, honey girl." She helps them tind part- time jobs, sees that they are Well- adjusted to campus lite and happy in their environments. Grace and dignity step into a room when she enters. Young ldaho women look to her tor mature guidance. H. E. Lattig Louise Carter D Director nl Student Allamrs -md Dean of Men f:-an of Women yfyfzfffzzkzllfmziife Qdbfbzk C. C. Sullivan Property Agent Q A multitude of special problems is handled by these officials who keep the university's various departments running smoothly. G. C. Sullivan, property agent, distributes a large variety of supplies and makes out long inventories for university storerooms. Many students enter and leave the infirmary each day. Doctors R. M. Alley and Cr. E. Cwen are busy keeping up with the huge task of looking after student health, expecially in the rush period which precedes finals. Work wasn't lacking in this year of expansion for university engineers, Cfagon and Hilton. The shifting office of Buildings and Grounds was at times difficult to find. Decker, chief of the counseling center, is kept busy helping students get started down the right educational road. Bond, student counselor, takes care of housing off campus. Through the year, veterans at ldaho confer with these men about vocational, educational, economic, and social problems. Kenneth A. Dick, bursar and business manager, and loseph W. Watts, deputy bursar, are responsible for the administration of university finances. They keep the books on funds, and do more arithmetic in a day than the average individual does in a year. The man who has held the office of director of the department of field service since it was begun in l947 is Harlow Campbell. Non-resident instruction, placement, and field service are included in the work of his office. Director of lnformation R. S. Gibbsledits releases and sends out pictures that publicize the university. l-le is assisted by Newt Cutler. Lee F. Zimmerman, librarian, is responsible for millions of printed words on file at the university. l-le is proud of the 27 new metal carrells which have been installed this year for researchers. The library has been reorganized to speed up its functions and services. The university is supported and helped by some ll,OOO graduates and former students of the institution, with whom the Alumni Association is now in contact through genial lames M. Lyle, alumni secretary. D. D. DuSault, registrar, is the custodian of those grades which students struggle so hard to make. The academic records of every student from 1892 to date are found in the registrar's files. G. E. Owens and R. M. Alley G. Gagon and W. Hilton C. O. Decker and C. H. Bond J. W. Watts and K. A. Dick University Physicians University Engineers Student Counselors Deputy Bursar and Bursar lit as 1n.. -'km il I ll? J 3 Harlow Campbell R. S. Gibbs Lee F. Zimmerman James L. Lyle. Jr. lT4luw.itnm.it lfiel-,t Servzwe Direr-tor of information Librarian Alumni Secretary University purchasing is centralized for efficiency, and the man in charge is the purchasing agent, L. C. Warner. l-le has purchased new eguipment for the Student Union and has worked out specifications and done research for the cafe, auditorium, bowling alleys, and the kitchen. Director of physical education and athletics, George Greene, has the big job of coordinating the many fields of physical education. Warner H. Cornish, family housing director, fills a position which is comparatively new on the ldaho campus. Married students are aided by Mr. Cornish in finding housing on or near the Campus. ldaho's emphasis on a worthwhile research program of value to industry and business uncovers useful information that is handled by l... C. Cady, executive secretary of the research council. The problem of housing university students is that of director of dormitories, lames Bowlby. The assigning of rooms in all men's and women's dormitories is done through this office. Over SOO freshmen took six tests this year. ln charge of this was Clair L. Woodward, psychometrist. l-le also had a big job of getting grades to advisors by the time of enrollment. University Field Agent Guy Wicks makes trips throughout the state as a representative of the university, contacting annually thousands of high school students. i l i 'H 'lik D. D. Dusault L. C. Warner George W. Greene Warner H. Cornish Registrar Piiri-liii::1liq Agent Director of Physical Educfitiori Family ltoiisirig Director L. C. Cady James Bowlby Clair L. Woodward Guy Wicks l7fxe:'utlve Secretary Dirrlvtor of l7r1rmitor1c11 Pfzyizliovxifatrist Fielrl Agent l5 mmaf ,Manager For very good reasons, Gale Mix is known as ldaho's walking encyclopedia. l-le's always ready with a big grin and a help- ing hand for any student with a complaint or a problem. ln affairs concerning ASUI organizations and procedures, Mr. Mix answers hundreds of questions a day. Campus organizations and faculty alike invariably find solutions to their problems in his endless knowledge of student affairs. Mr. Mix is a dependable listener and ad- visor for a job of huge proportionse that of filling the requests of the numerous activity groups, the executive board and student body representatives. l-le eagerly awaited the completion of the Student Union building. Trying office conditions, such as the day the chandelier fell on his noggin, added to the headaches of the general manager, but Mr. Mix, with the assistance of his staff, operated effi- ciently, even under these conditions. afzmzzfyfkzfzayefikf Lgfzzlff A large part of the work of both the Gen- eral Manager and the Athletic News Direc- tor falls into the hands of the ASUl office staff. Barbara Clements, office secretary, is working under Mr. Mix for the second year and has charge of all typing and clerical duties. Handling ASUI funds and serving in the capacity of assistant to the General Manager is Beverly Foster. Mrs. Clements and Mrs. Foster are both graduates of the University of Idaho. Wilson Bowlby directs seating arrangements and ticket sales for all ASUI functions. Mika? Mwx Qmcfafi Keeping the press posted on the current activities of ldaho's athletic teams is the never-ending job of Ken Hunter, university Athletic News Director. Much of his time is spent traveling ahead of the athletic teams, making arrangements for contests with other schools, and pro- moting ldaho's athletic program through- out the state. Mr. l-lunter's 'llieutenantsu for the year were lohn Martin and Allen Derr. Martin and Derr performed the task of writing the articles to be distributed to newspapers both inside and outside the state. CAPTURING THE GOLDEN FLEECE I HUIEJIQH FEW", ' " "W Nw 3 f- ' NEA' 7' gm? 5 Skt . 57, 2,,f2'1AEcxv I S' N ' ,N ffm v- N ' - EQ Lgacvizf 475292117125 0!lQdl1l:?dA2?Il6' ' ,,,..,--,., 04, ,,,....,-- xi? f' n ,IT L , W f fzzhfw 71 N ' Q , mm.-W,-n-1-'W"' . nw Q :LZ - -. ,. ff f ,V :L-f:,n.:l Gx,,,- ,ga ,V yn? x . f A,fM,Q.,g.-r , , f was f ' . , . ,. N ff, -QQS K! , , ag XX .EV f X QW! 52 ' fm 7 1 , I 4 1 J ' '4" ff' . 1 A A xx ,WV -'S 'V ,x-fx.- Y2?14V'Q"i'4.f?j lfw, X- " g' ' il? Poised agginst the vastness of winter 5 g M W Lgaefkzffiianallyy Fall . . . Winter . . . spring Qmfllb' gmmbx flvzcmf ,fhffkfs Cgwizzfzye gfuhnfx Q in wg 'gtg 2 ' r wi 5: we 25 Q W E 'H 3 Q X Qi, Aa we 4 , z 9 1 x A 8 vga im, 3? Q it 3' wwf A fu- M QQ , 4952 5:1 A fm gms? I K Q' 1 M 1, I . . ww il 3 wg 1 A Q Q. 5 W at -.1 P P was W Q..w F :Q LN- M V t W ,ji , M 25 ' W ar 5 .... Q 5. 3 Q, W ig , Y 'wx 1 if gg.: 154 5 1' 'lb if mr! Q up gum it Ks will x - Q Fig Q, R. if . 4, V air Q A f-M..-k....,,N... ,.......no-X . vwwnmf -aww'-M""" ffm Kappas extend key to frxendsh1p A Gamma Phl afternoon rush party Jean Ottenheimer, Panhellenic It has its serious moments, too president, welcomes rushees "Sailing, sailing, over the Delta main" Dee Gees anchor a few more 18 Rushees get acquainted with Alpha Phis First comes huggin' . . . then comes scrubbin Lonardo lounges Courses, conflicts and confusion Please print plainly Caught in the Corral CHANGE CASHIER Egad! Eternal eight o'c1ocks i.pt io,d ffkmbff 19 der, 1949 Homeco ming Q Queen Bea Red-haired Miss Bea l-lelancler, pretty Gamma Phi from Lewis- ton, reigned over Idaho's l9-49 Homecoming. Governor C. A. Robins officially crowned Miss l-lelander at the halt-time ot the ldaho-WSC game. She was chosen from the gueen canoli- dates by the men's living groups after the l'Kick-oft" dance. 794-'9 ,Mage- Go rnor Rob ns t h s the pass g parade Miss Ket presides over the Ad Building coffee pot ra 1 10h. Pajlarna-clad Coeds serpentine through men s lxvlng g p t H g t d t rou sin rue ornecornln HOMECOMING COMMITTEE Front Row: Ralph Crane, Clint Peterson, Marvin Jaegels, Jack Gregory Gary Nefzger . . . Back Row: Al Rutherford, Morga 'I' ' ' F1 h' B bM lt ovey Cchaxrrnant, Francis erc lnger, o ou on Vernon Bahr, Donna Jean Broyles, Ann Kettenbach, Sally Norris. amwmfkzg 6411 X7 "i fm' We it-4 Q, k,paf-531.151 Twenty-tive thousand a1umni and students jammed Nea1e Stadium to watch the 1daho-WSC game Gctober 15. 1daho 1ost again! The score was 36-13. Queen Bea He1ander presided over the windy 1949 ce1e1oration. Friday night pajama-c1ad coeds serpentined through men's 1iving groups to MacLean Fie1d tor the pre-game ra11y that teatured fireworks ga1ore. The Townmen's Trio p1ayed tor the '1Kickott" dance in the atternoon. Saturday mornings parade and house dec- orations were un1imited by expense or theme restrictions. Some ot the most outstanding and origina1 entries in the history ot 1daho tradition were presented. Phi Gamma De1ta captured the a11-overparticipation trophy for the second con- secutive year. Beta Theta Pi p1aced second. F1oat winners were Sigma Nu and De1ta De1ta De1ta, tirst tor men and womeng Beta Theta Pi and Pi Beta Phi, second. House decoration top honors went to Tau Kappa Epsi1on and Kappa Kappa Gamma. Wi11is Sweet and De1ta Gamma came in second. The Homecoming Dance c1imaxed the week- end. Music by Wyatt Howard and his orchestra delighted the capacity crowd. Genera1 chairman Morgan Tovey, whose hard-working committee p1anned the weekend ot ga1a entertainment, pre- sented intermission awards. Footba11 Captain Cari Kii1sgaard received a p1ague from the ASU1 and A1urnni Association tor his service and participation in varsity sports. Agwa- Hands of Friendship float wins a first for Sigma Nu Pretty rnermaids bring home a trophy for Delta Delta Delta as 1 4 13 Vg Q N vwgzwgawz, 5,553 f A " i 'K' al 5.5210 ,Q 2 X ll ix Vandal flag of victory over Sweet's cougar The TKE's sent the Cougar to the South Seas for a first prize wi f Prize-winning Kappas' "Lux" is with them Sigma Chis tackle a man-sized job by night Thersociety of Insignificant lVlen's float was "better late than never" King Nefzger reads Jason's rally comments that started a delayed bomb reaction v Tower painters saw a scrawny WSC painted over the big, yellow "I" on game day Willis Sweet was host to queen candidates: Bea C Helirlder. GBY19 Slevin. Betty Biker, I-I0iS Larchi Presentation of Captain Killsgaard's service plaque and house winners' awards was made and Bonese Collins hy Chairman Morgan Tovey 23 Striped barber poles invite Dad to enter the Sigma Nu door m Q ii a.,,.i..?B e aa 4 L. , fr, - !g,.,s, .e,.., J' x M 5 ".:'yw? , x .2 Band and card section performed in unison at half-time of the "Deflate Oregon State" game. Idaho lost 35-25. A1 Petrie was general chairman of Dad's Day. Dean Mosher in charge of card section, Jack Gregory, erncee: Orval Hansen, dance chairman. Thetas had Dad coming greatest distance, Kappas had most Dads. Tri-Delts won :most welcome doorznat trophy. It's a beautiful day as the Phi Delts welcome Dad 24 Gamma Phis suggest a restful smoke after the Idaho-OSC game Imaginatively-costumed couples at the Idaho-WSC Executive Board party in Pullman -06 Allen Derr and Ruthella Evans said Cougar-ville hosts didn't treat them like prisoners despite the jailbirdpostumes The Idaho Vandal, portrayed by Jack Gregory, knelt on a Cougar skin as he offered Bob Moulton an ancient Nordic helmet eww Wm' B Lt A "Jason" Martin and President Moulton received solace from WSC Coeds at the end of their traditional walk after the "Homecoming of de-feet" -.v ...., we E 25 mzbuxg President J. E. Buchanan received the Alpha Phi Omega Memorial plaque honoring Idaho students who gave their lives in World War II from Bert Humphrey, president of the Boy Scout honorary. Buchanan in turn gave the plaque to Vern Bahr for presentation to the students. .fy .0 .l 0 fill' 5.1 Vt 'DV ljts il, 2 E 9 ii i 2 4 3 A 2 Representatives from 23 colleges and universities attended the three-day Borah Outlawry of War Conference which began April 24 with forums and discussions that sought ways to obtain world peace. Dr. Hans Morgenthau, University of Chicago, delivered the opening lecture, "New Efforts to Achieve Peace." The afternoon speaker was Dr. Harold Benjamin, University of Maryland, who spoke on education in our atomic age with criticism for too much emphasis on the past and not enough on the future. Dr. Charles E. Martin, University of Washington, pointed out the second day of the conference that the atomic Weapons dilemma We are in presents "the supreme test of man's political and social control over his inventive genius and scientific discovery." Dr. l. B. Condliffe, University of California, spoke the third day on interna- tional trade. Dr. lohn Brogden, Unitarian minister from Spokane, chose for his topic, l'What Can Religion Contribute to World Understanding?" Dr. Boyd A. Martin was general chairman for the third annual Borah con- ference, There were lll delegates from eight states in attendance. Nearly 3,000 students attended each lecture in Memorial gymnasium, which was built after World War l as a monument to peace. William L Shirer spoke at Idaho January 23 NL L. -i Dr. C. J. Brosnan delivered what critics called the "outstanding speech of his Before the Borah Conference began Shirley Jacobsen, Tom Rigby, Marv Wash- career" when speaking on the life of the late Senator William E. Borah at the burn, and Allen Derr looked over the geographical world situation with Dr. Outlawry of War Conference. Boyd A. Martin, chairman of the conference. 26 Wzzifkzg i The annual Awards Assembly October 21 recognized student achievement and scholarshxp ldaho students who have heard the murmurings ot a third world war which threatens the total destruction of civilization attended the special events asseme blies with more than usual interest. Two men noted as radio commentators and authors spoke to large student audiences in Memorial Gymnasium. They were William L, Shirer and Stuart Chase. Mr. Shirer spoke on the Red menace and China's conversion to Communism in his lecture, "Where Are We Going?" Mr. Chase, an economics expert, told students his ideas on depressions in his speech, 'tFull Employment." Donald Grants lecture explained the situation in postfwar Germany as he had seen it. The psychological approach of the German mind to international affairs was a main part ot his address. The one speaker of the year whose topic concerned not the world ot war but the world of literature was Bruce Marshall. The Scottish author of "Father 1Malachy's Miracle," Wlhe World, the Flesh and Father Smith," t'Yellow Tapers llor Paris," and "Vespers in Vienna" gave aspiring young authors some inside ltips on "How to Write a Best Seller." Stuart Chase, noted author and commentator, spoke March 3. H-aa., ffWr5i'?r tfffff if Q it' ft fl 5.22 ---- 5 Ii :I z":::7" A "'l:' S FF' I f? sf if ' V ' 5g,f 'Q - f W7 G 4 .l ffwgiii -r --' F 1 rssgag fsg 5 rr . tlr. f to F J it :h" Li . :gf V .,.- ,...- N. is X-1 -ay i -1. , ...Y .-.....r .- .. ,YY Donald Grant, world traveler and expert on foreign affairs, addressed Idaho Bruce Marshall, writer of best-selling novels, gave aspiring authors some txps students October 4. October 31 THE Joan Litchfield Kappa Kappa Gamma Carolyn Craddocle Louise Miller Gamma Phi Beta Delta Delta Delta A112551 F ALL. . . Six hundred super-critical beauty expertsethe co-eds ot the University of Idaho-selected the twelve Gem beauties tor l95O. Each girl's living group votedtor the one girl in their own house or hall Whom they considered the most beautiful. Dames Club selected the veteran's wife of their choice. From their selection ot fair ladies is seen the reflection ot a wornan's idea of true beauty-- the kind that comes from inside and shines out in lovely eyes and enchanting smiles. Shirley Ball's vitality and glow . . . the mature and mysterious glamor of Lois Cundall Black . . . Carolyn Craddock's sky blue eyes and Willowy poise . . . the sheen of Colleen Ebbe's blonde hair, her tranquil smile . . . Clarice Hove Willa Schumann Jo Garner Alpha Phi Forney Hall Pi Beta Phi Colleen Ebbe Kappa Alpha Theta Shirley Ball Alpha Chl Omega Polly Lawson Hays Hall FR W Nancy Kay Ricks Evelyn Jensen Lois Cundall Black Delta Gamma West Sixth Vets' Village Ridenbauyh lo Garnerfs Warmly alive brunette coloring . . . the steadfast intelligence and charm of Clarice Hove . . . Evelyn lensen's modesty and pride as a young mother . . . Polly l..aWson's sparkling blue eyes and lightly freckled ivory skin . . . the dark flashing eyes and captivating smiles that belong to loan Litchfield . . . Louise Miller's radiant joy sweeping over the contours of her cheeks and smiling lips . . . Nancy Ricks' enchanting youthful- ness . . . the natural grace and gentleness of Willa Schumann . . . these are the marks of beauty that have won for the fairest of all their places as outstanding campus beauties. 31 SAE dance featured apple bobb Q2 'Y b ing and lipstick brands on foreheads Gary Sessions, Ag Bawl chairman, presents prizes to "best dressed" guests Ed Rowbury, Rosalee Reisnauer, Jackie Mitchell, and Bill Last fbyifzyfifs Mau:-ine Williams was crowned SAE Fx-osh Queen The ATO pledge dance was typical of m any held in the fall T he Tri-Delts' pledge dance featured balloons Whfel Rain, shine or snown- classes go on and on Hello Walk became a slippery-slide on winter nights hmm' Je f -' TS U " 5 k k "I i Silver thaw turned the campus into a winter wonderland The cold was felt even by "Stoney," our Spanish-American War soldier ei' WNW? E ,1 Aw' ' . ff ' W ' "" mv. .7 53 1 M 2 j ,iw 7 .- TQM . .k wg x- 5-1 -'-. ffl by The most talked about family on campus Maulchek and Toska and X I their Samoyed breed offspring Alpha Chi Juliets applaud their serenaders 7 ' Z WM Z5 ATO serenaders fill the crisp winter air with song Alums' kiddies meet Santa Claus, portrayed by Bill Last, at the annual Pi Phi Christmas party The Kappas' pink elephant sported an argyle cap tl' Z , ' , I Myra 4 .fiw ,Q Delta Tau Delta won second place in snow sculpturing with their boxers. Smokey" came in fourth place for the SAE boys 'W yi, -, , Howard Rue, Ski Club president, presented Winter Week winner-'s trophy to Yvonne George and Jo Nelson, Delta Delta Delta, at the Ski Club dance when me! Although blackened February snows and a warm sun handicapped the lK-Ski Club Winter Week, the snow sculptors and skiiers entered in lively competition for the festivities and trophies. Slalom racing events were won by Beta Theta Pi with Kappa Sigma placing K second. Tri-Delta, the only women's team entering, drew first place in their division. Individual slalom racing honors went to Hank Gandiaga, SAE, who covere the course in 33 seconds. Second high was Fred Rich, Kappa Sigma, with 34 seconds. Dorothy Galey, Delta Gamma, took individual honors in women's slaloms with a time of 42 seconds. Yvonne George, Tri-Delta, was second with 49 seconds. l Members ot the art department faculty judged TKE's "Snow White" first in snow sculpturing, the Delts' "Boxers" second, Tri-Delts' "King Winter" third,, and SAE's "Smokey" fourth. Slalom racing and exhibition jumping by members of the varsity ski team were attended by 500 fans gathered at the Idaho ski area near Troy Dancing in Memorial Gym beneath holly and mistletoe Sophomore songsters' serenade was led by Norman Logan ff Q :mae The traditional Holly Week festivities sponsored by the sophomore class were brought to a climax with the crowning of Miss Christy Anne Sargent, Ridenbaugh Hall, as Holly Queen for 1949. She was crowned by Bob White, class president, land introduced by Carmen Cavallaro, who played tor the gala Yuletide cele- bration. Marvin lagels was dance chairman. Decorations featured holly and lighted Christmas trees. "Mistletoe Inn" was a special attraction. Program chairman was 'Elizabeth Fitzgerald and Andy Christensen was in charge ot ticket sales. The traditional serenade to living groups with carols was carried on by songsters ot the Class ot '52. Lonnie Rentrow and Virginia Barton were serenade co-chairmen. General Chairman Paul Araguistain coordinated the committee work that resulted in a week tinged with Christmas spirit before the holiday's vacation began. Carmen Cavallaro presented Christy Anne Sargent as the 1949 Holly Oueen. The "Poet of the Piano" and his orchestra were tired out Saturday night but Holly Week committee was headed by Paul Araquistain assisted by Shirley Greg ory, co-head: Janet Fulton, Marilyn Evans, Andy Christensen, Lonnie Renfrow Virginia Barton, Elizabeth Fitzgerald, Marvin Jagels, Dick Newton, Bert Johnson Ken Keefer, and Dave Nye. revived Sunday to present a top-form concert in Bohler gymnasium. - -.+.......,,x. "Dream" was the theme for the Engineers' all-campus ball January 14 with Displays by individual engineering departments provided ingenious decorations. music by Clyde Land. Pat O'Connor was general chairman for the dance. The Electrical Engineers won with an electricity-producing dam that ran a model power plant. 111111115 ln the whirl ot winter tun, more parties and tiresicles claimed campus attention than a dozen Gem pages could picture. We give you a sampling ot the typical costume and formal dances that were a part ot the hilarious happenings ot wintera-fthe social warmers that comloatted the chills ot snowy evenings. Phi Kappa Taus decked in miners' costumes for the Forty-Niners' dance Sunday dancing in the wornen's gym helped make up for the loss of the Bucket 38 Hays Hall became the Double-H ranch for their barn dance ff Wenfhys Delta Chi pirates treat 'em rough Kappa Sigma house party featured Apache dancers Willis Sweet's Confusion dance provided plenty of cracked tailbones ATOS and Esquire Girl Finalists -Front Row: Virginia Korn, Alpha Chi Omega: Bruce Tingwall, social chairman, Bonnie Scott, Hays Hall . . . Back Row: Beverly Benson, Delta Gamma' Boyd Barker president' Joanne White Kap a 1 1 1 1 P Kappa Gamma: De Forrest Tovey, dance chairman, and Shirlie Vorous, Alpha Phi. Miss Vorous, who proves that girls are made of sugar and spice, was announced the winner in a telegram from Esquire magazine. Joanne White was named Maid of Honor. 566065 .WN M Sigma Chi barn dancers made hay while the moon shone Sweet's Cabaret was one of the most lavishly decorated dances of the year A 3 - . -' ' ' ' ' f "' , M f Wim, , . n i ,,., W ' , -:Z5af:s5:.5: ' wgmiikvgviiigiiiif 'H ,Q 4 -z.51g:., , xg. .. L, an ..,,. A .! 3 V. W Ag A., . I . " ' ":f., I '.-www "Nautical Nightmares" was the theme of the novel Lambda Chi Alpha yardage dance. A large ship sailing for a distant f 2 rl ' tropical island gave the house a South Seas air of romance. Dancing took place on the ship's deck. The main feature of iigwilg the festivities was the crowning of Marion Wilson as Lambda Chi "Sarong Girl." She had the best yard of all. A . farm' Queen , ...M "'ws,...,,..,.,,, Dreamy dancing at the Sigma Nu pledge dance Delt beards bristled on the campus weeks before the Russian Ball The Philharrnon mmf Anne Bollinger's programs tailed to arrive on Cctober 6 in time for her concert in Idaho. She announced her own numbers and asked the audience, 'lCan you hear me?" From the rear of Memorial Gym came the reply, UBaby, we don't need to hear you as long as we can see you!" With that beginning the statuesgue blonde from Lewis- ton, Idaho, began singing what she later remembered as the happiest concert ot her tour. The young Metropolitan Opera soprano charmed the audience with her sparkling personality and made a triumphant return home that eve- ning. Two days before Pullman had welcomed Italo Tajo, out- standing bass-baritone, as the opening artist on the Mos- cow-Pullman Community Concert series. Pullman was host again tor the October 24 appearance ot the Philharmonic Piano Quartet. The talented members of the guartet were Iohn Seales, Max Walmer, Bertha Melnik, and Ada Kopet. Christopher Lynch captivated a capacity audience in Memorial Gym on December 5. Eugene Bossart accompa- nied the Irish tenor. Elena Nikolaidi as Carmen t ph r Lynch sang in Memorial Gym Italo Tajo appeared at Pullman Wikis gg Qn lanuary 6, the Trapp Family Choir sang pre-classical airs and lilting madrigals in Bohler Gym. The program was flavored by peasant costumes of their native Tyrol and the rarely heard block-flute and spinet music used by this guaint family. With a foremost reputation as one of the greatest younger virtuosos of our time, Tossy Spivakovsky played in Moscow February lo and amazed his listeners with the sheer wiz- ardry of his violin technique. Born in Kiev, Russia, and brought to this country before he was a year old, Sascha Gorodnitzlds exceptional talent for the piano was discovered in childhood and cultivated until he stands now in the very limited front row of star pianists. Gorodnitzki played in Moscow March l. Elena Nilcolaidi, Greek contralto, appeared at Pullman May 6. Though unknown to American audiences, she is highly rated on the continent. Nikolaidi's concert con- cluded the l949-50 series of gifted artists. Idaho's own Anne Bollinger at Theta reception with President Buchanan The Trapp Family delight Of stellar rankfSascha Gorodnitzki TOSSY sPiVak0VSkY'b 11 t R 1 t wzefim f Lgfymrz if Dreams came true for Eleanor Powell, Alpha Phi, as she was crowned the Sweet- heart of Sigma Chi. Jack Lein, president, presented the traditional Sweetheart pin to Miss Powell. Twenty-two coeds vying for the title of Sweetheart of Sigma Chi were entertained with a series of dining engagements, a fireside, and the annual Saturday afternoon l'Derby" at the Sigma Chi house. After the "Derby" the race was narrowed to six final runners. They were Shirlie Vorous, Bonese Collins, Donna Kjose, Marlene Hopkins, Connie Baxter, and Eleanor Powell. The formal Sweetheart dance was held December lO at the Moscow Legion cabin after dinner at the Moscow hotel. As mem- bers sang the l'Sweetheart of Sigma Chi" Eleanor Powell walked down the aisle to one of the biggest thrills of her life. President l. E. Buchanan crowned the l8-year-old freshman from Moscow the l949 Sweetheart. cfzfmha emily ggi J rn Townley and Bonese Collins with Jirn Aston, general chairman, and Beverly Carl Painter and his orchestra from Lewiston played for the strictly formal aff nson at the Interfraternity ball. sponsored by lnterfraternity Council. Tuxedoes for the men and corsages for the women were in order for the strictly formal lnterfraternity Council ball held February l7. Decorations for the gala affair included the crests and colors of each fraternal chapter on the campus. General chairman for the ball was lim Aston assisted by Bryan Lawrence and Darwin Cogswell, decorations, lack Krehbiel, programs and tickets, Dick Magnuson and Darrell Congdon, cleanup, lim Knudsen, dance band, and Clarence lohnston, publicity. sv M sf'-f 'fits f. -nz, fs!! N . L fig- W . 'fr . V ' at 4 gl fi ,.w'W, 31,9 N , M I W2 W ' as 1 " wagwg-R, KW MDE? yr 1 .g,x.,gW 5 faq M:-qw ,V 'WV UU' 1 me 5 Q1 X N.. ... Wm f f : . f-1 1:2 5 1 filf lf r if' ' ,:...::,.:..:.5:,:: .,.,...,,.,.,.,.:, . V V I A L ,, Q, 'x' 'if' A l Q ' B usa"1:'.egQ M.. v xfw , ws X, nl K' qv' A V' A an fa K v .4 tuxg 155 S ,-QL "Vg ,'AQ"'.f Vs ,ly . bl tif' an-3 f X 1 ,' we W if? , 'A w. S 1 ' f :wwf K 92055 Qkaffbx The freshmen stood by their colors and decorated the March 17 dance in Irish green The crowning of Queen Connie Baxter, Pi Phi, and King Bruce Mcln- tosh, Fiji, highlighted the annual freshman dance March 17 in Memorial Gymnasium. A kiss and crown were received by Miss Baxter from orches- tra leader Glenn Henry, who announced she had been elected Queen Bruce McIntosh and Connie Baxter, Fresh King and Queen of the Leprechauns of the Freshmen. An lrish crown was presented to Bruce as he was pro- claimed King of the Ball. A general election among freshmen from each living group determinedzthe winners on March l5. Wading af Xie 506671 Glenn Henry and orchestra provided music for the "Wearing of the Green" Frosh festivities featured an all-campus dance on St. Patrick's Day The green of spring and St. Patrick's Day burst forth on the campus when the not-so-green Class of '53 sponsored their lrish shindig. Glenn Henry, a top newcomer in Hollywood music circles, arrived with his band but without his featured vocalist, Maxine Elliot, who was unable to appear. The 'lWearing of the Green" dance was decorated with green and White crepe paper, shamrocks, and leprechaun figures. A giant shamrock formed the background for the orchestra. High school seniors throughout the state were invited to participate in the activities carried on during freshman week as guests of the "green" class. Bill Taylor was general chairman for the frolics. 46 ZW Umm? Dancers at the Senior Ball were framed with a background of orchids Elaborate decorations and elegant touches such as the fresh Hawaiian orchids made the Senior Ball a triumphant affair and one of the biggest all-campus dances of the year. "Blue Orchids" was the theme for the ball. Wyatt Howard's well-liked orchestra provided the music for the Wyatt Howard's ,vivacious vocalist added a M1110 the ban highly successful last fling of the Senior class. An orchid lane entrance directed couples into the ballroom. Original sets depicted many familiar scenes on the ldaho campus and included a replica of the ul" tower. g72l2l77ly4Ad7lf tgefzw gay ooevvvv - ,,.v- v .-v- o 0 , 4 o 4 Q Q v if ' "' , 7 1' - - A A O '.V. A Q . Music by Wyatt Howard of Seattle drew one of the largest crowds of the year Intermission t t ' ment brought forth old time burlesque characters The old dogs of the Class of '50 came up with some new tricks for the Senior Ball held May 6 in Memorial Gym. Qrchids imported from Hawaii were presented to each lady attending the dance, and the decorations enhanced by indirect lighting were acclaimed the most outstanding of the year. Memorial Gymnasium was turned into a tropical paradise of blue orchids by sophisticated senior planners under the general co-chairmanship of Ken McCormack and lean Pugh. Rosemary Fitzgerald and Clarence lohnston handled decorations, Marv Washburn, tickets, Valeta Hershberger and Sue Beardsley, invitations and programs, Elmer Buoy, clean-up, Orval Hansen, publicity, and Morgan Tovey, lack Lein, Mary lane Breier and Lou Driggs took charge of scenes. lim Farmer, Stan Tanner, Betty Wood, Don Smith, and Dick Boyle worked on the decoration committee. 47 Lady Hell Divers form a star for capacity audiences watching the annual water show in Memorial gym pool. Ann Kettenbach was the Mistress of Ceremonies. Oh what a flurry was caused by the surrey as it took Janet Sundeen, Dick Wartena, Jo Paulson, Ed Fiester, Jody Getty and Tom Gentry to an old fashioned picnic in the water. 9641! QINIPJ Howard Humphrey, Bill Brown, Gene Todd and Bill Ringert sing in the Phi Ed Fiester plays his ukulele as Joanne Hopkins, Patsy Lee and Jo Peters sing Kappa Tau barbershop quartet and revive old tunes for the April 29-30 "Gay with him, "Cruising Down the River" in a novel act from the Hell Divers' Nineties" water show. show. "H , Ha, I won!" cries the gent with the greenbacks. Casino kings " S loon" for muckers were the big a who opened the Golden Nugget a boss, Art Griffithg cage man, Rick Chamberlain: whoopee boy, Joe Bill Buhng card shark shill, Harry Lynch, and Emmons: swamper, promotion rnan, Barney Brunelle. Bob Maize and orchestra had that nonchalant air as they played for ' ' d 1 vis. couples clad in gxnghams an e Mavieik gal E . Ball. Here they parade to a ca e At intermission prizes were awarded to best-dressed coup es a lx -walk rhythm. drinks and pre z ' n at the annual affair, as was 1 t the Muckers' Shootin' craps was a popular diversio t el bar provided by the Associated Miners. the soft yfblszsf jfbscaw feel- 7950 Jean Ottenheimer was named "Moscow's Miss Coed of 1950" as the highlight of the "Tick-Tocks of Fashion" style show March 22. The fashion show was sponsored by the Moscow junior chamber of commerce assisted by the Jay-C-Ettes. Lawrence Peretti, president of the univer- sity chamber of commerce group, directed the coed con- test and Aris Peterson wrote the dialogue narration used to describe the various styles modeled by Idaho coeds representing downtown dress shops. At the beautifully-decorat ed Pi Phi initiation dan ce awemm Betas sport white 'a k 1 c ets and black ties for uppe:-c1assmen's clinn er dance Couples at th e Theta spring formal relax on the patio as they sit one out formed the backdrop Alternating strips of pastel crepe paper f'orney's "Over the Rainbow" spring formal Qlwmzz 5 for ,frzmffb ff4fQzxcef1f Lois Messerly was chosen from a field of five finalists as Lambda Chi Alpha's first annual "Crescent Girl." A brown-eyed brunette, 20-year-old Lois was then entered in the national contest with a chance of winning three expense-free days at the beautiful Edgewater Beach hotel in Chicago during the Lambda Chi national convention in September. Lois won the "Sweetheart of Sigma Chi" title last year. Chrisrnan's grape punch ma de a hit at the Presidenfs t able Bouncing balloons added to the gaye y t ofthe Delta Gamma i nitiation dance gf my l. Liars' reward tor lim Paras, second from lett, and Kathryn Ann Mautz, seated next to himw-dates with the Queen Bea and UBeartracks" Killsgaard, tor telling the biggest Whoppers in the Argonaut contest . . . 2. Ridenlcaugh candle dancers performed at the Christmas Qrchesis recital . . . 3. Elmer McProud doesn't seem to understand this pig's Latin , . . 4. Bob Gartin and Bev- erly Burke do some clowning . . . 5. "Butch" says they treated him better at ldaho . . . 6. ldaho's famous landmark gives orange juice instead ot Water . . . 7. l-lome for Christmas on the Student Special . . . 8. Yuletide spirits rise as the train carries stewed-ents back to civilization . . . 9. Perpetual Perch Poachers . . . lO. No- torious Nesters . . . ll. Bye-bye Bucket Blues. 4 - UQJNIWQ l. Country Bull . . . 2. Local Bull . . . 3. More BulleBoh Riddle lights his own . . . 4. lailbirds Marion Wilson, Vida Frischknecht and Eleanor Powell at the Home Ec style show . . . 5. Mortar Board rehearses the Spinster Skip skit . . . 6. Cn the Warpath . . . 7. Attic Club card party . , . 8. Some ot the oddest ot the odds and ends in the spring clean-up . . . 9. Mac Parkins holds his own at the Ag Bawl . . . lO. Screwloalls and Senator Taylor . . . ll. Going Qriental at the Forney Hall Mardi Gras . . . l2. Gaudy Gert and Ugly llce trophies . . . l3. 'Ten-shunt Military Ball inter- mission inspection . . . lil. Bridge tournament at Chrisman l-lall. as li? MI' s , i sun Sioux Led by the Little International Queen and her court, the parade consisted of representatives of all military units, floats entered by the 13 depart- ments of agriculture, and downtown business firms. Little International Manager Dave Thacker here discusses some of his plans witl committee members Harry Isaman, Ralph Hart, Lamont Smith, Doug Weiq mann, Don Brighton, Floyd Gephart, Don Wagoner, Gary Sessions, Jack Lacy wx! The climax of the school year, tor many students, cam the week ending April 29 with the Little lnternationa Livestock show, sponsored by the Ag Club. The which consists ot a series of practical contests in a phases of agriculture, climaxes weeks of float and dis play preparation and livestock grooming as well as othe sorts of preparation necessary tor competing in the V' rious contests. The work of the Litt ager and his committee begins with the first of the scho year, tor there is much organization and planning to d shovx le International ma It was a trophy-earning night for the Weinmann boys, Doug and John. Placing high in the final event gave Doug Cleftl a narrow vic- tory margin and the huge "High Man of Little International" trophy. A picturesque part of the parade was the horse-d rawn hitch reminiscent of by-gone days. lame of the finest pie-gulpers in the university are glimpsed in action here. ' - ' test 'rancis Flerchinger, who hadn t eaten for two days, won the pie eatlng con .nd the first place awardfanother pie. 72 e fzfzzibfzfzf The theme ot the 1950 show was "The Little lnterna- ional Eyes ldaho's Agricultural Future " l-lighlight ot he tinal night was the crowning ot Carol Korvola as ,ittle International Queen. Another center ot interest his last night was in the iield house where the iinal ivestock competition was completed. A multitude ot iwards was given to those who placed high in the 'arious contests. One ot the purposes ot the Little lnter- iational is to give the aggies practical show ring knowl- edge. Little lnternational originated in 1924 and is entirely student planned. An amusing feature was the coed cow milking contest. Marya Parkins ' ' h B t P les, who had too much foam on her mi1k.-Con- won the txe wxt et y y fusing to some of the contestants was the bull that had somehow slipped into the lineup. i il' as .1 -QQ . l l v The Queen and her court Douglas Weinmann, high man of the showy Princess Erlene ' W d d Dave Thacker, Little International manager. Clydeg Queen Korvola, Ruth oo , an 55 Apologies to Beta Theta Pi for not pic- A e.Q, 1 ig :IZ P . . Q . turing these men who came out with Qi '.i.i. if 3 , , i top honors in the 1950 Song F est. "My M 'Tr 24. , . i'A A Abunz In N A. "': if ' Q Beta Mother" and "Dance Comradesu fs 5 a is 'if s . 2 were their Winning Selections Sum . Yi 3 .V ' g QEQV Q 5 ,'q1i 53 A , under the direction of Stewart Mc- i A "2 LF' ' A, i 'zil 1 'Q M Cormack. 45 3 f rig W 'Q' Q, Second place honors were shared X- . Vit A .' 5 f y A y by Kappa Alpha Theta and Sigma I ,yi 3 4 Alpha Epsilon, who were led by Ello- , T ii. J ' 1 2 S mae Holden and lohn lordan. s P? 3 A loyce Walser and Wallace Johnson, I f y presidents of the sponsoring music VZ 35 A 5 2 y .ggi honoraries, Sigma Alpha Iota and Phi l fi Mu Alpha, announced the winners at g the Mothers' Day Song Fest and also f l':l " awarded the winning trophies. Cal 3 V3 f A 'T A Z' 'mg Lyons was chairman of the Song Fest 5ffi1ifi11i5QsS:.T1'rif2,l fffgiriidlfiflsgfwffiiecf''asigqisfiitii'tggifgbfgiiq'gong Fest in the COmmifte9- Peasant dancers circled gaily over the Ad building lawn in bright native costumes. W Hundreds of mothers, guests and students assembled on the east Ad lawn for the Saturday afternoon dancing, music and awards presented for the Mothers' Day week- end. The forty-first annual May Fete, under the direction of Mortar Board and their sponsor, Professor lean Col- lette, started with the traditional procession of the May Queen and her Royal Court to their places of honor on the green throne platform backed by the equally tradi- tional chartreuse draperies. Fifteen outstanding junior women were tapped by Mortar Board members. Those receiving red roses were Bonnie Shuldberg, Mary Louise Will, Carol Bowlby, Donna lean Broyles, Anne DuSault, Louise Blenden, Barbara Swanstrom, l-lelen Means, loan Rowberry, Tane Members of American folk dancing classes did a spirited square dance to the tunes of the old piano and the calling of Billie Reeves, instructor in the Physical Education department. Queen Phyllis LaRue ot Hays Hall was elected by the Associated Women Students ot Idaho as the senior Woman most deserving to reign over the forty-first annual May Fete. Phyllis served as secretary to the ASUI Executive Board in her senior year and was voted the Woman ot the year by the Argonaut. Her other activities included Vandaleers, University Singers, Spurs, presi- dent ot Kappa Phi, vice-president ot Wesley Foundation, election board, vice-president ot Hays Hall, and Mortar Board. Marie Hargis, Hays Hall, was elected as the out- standing junior Woman suited to be her Maid ot Honor, and Christy Sargent, Ridenbaugh Hall, was honored among sophomore Women as Page tor Her Majesty. ,Wk Fisk, Pam Gaut, Beverly Schupter, Betty Peters, Ianice McCormick, and Marie I-Iargis. Tapped as an honorary member ot the Idaho chapter was Mrs. Iesse Buchanan. Iunior men tapped by Silver Lance were Pete Wilson, Allen Derr, Dale Benjamin, Marvin Washburn, Bob Mays, David Ulmer, Keith Bean, and Vern Bahr. Don Deerkop received the Holy Grail ot the Intercol- legiate Knights. Valeta Hershberger was chosen WRA's outstanding senior Woman. Vida Baugh received Alpha Lambda Delta's senior award tor the highest scholastic Her Majesty Phyllis LaRue, Queen of the May Fate attainment among all senior women in tour years ot college Work. Certiticates tor maintaining at least a 3.5 grade average tor tour years Went to Shirley Tanner, Ieanne Foster, Vida Baugh, and Elizabeth Bean. In an impressive recessional, the Queen and her hon- ored subjects retired, marking the end ot another gala May Pete at Idaho. Her Majesty's Spurs performed for the Queen with the traditional winding of the Maypole. Barefooted members of the sophomore women's honorary presented their ever-lovely dance clad in pastel formals of spring. Later they introduced the girls whom they had tapped the night before to he next yea:-'s Spurs. afzcwzmy Qeyfws The University of ldaho conferred honorary degrees upon four men for their outstanding service and achieve- ment in their fields. They were l-larry W. Morrison, president of the world- wide Morrison-Knudsen construction company, Stanly A. Easton, president of the Bunker l-lill St Sullivan Mining Sz Concentrating company of Kelloggg lames W. Girard, forestry consultant with Mason, Bruce and Girard, and former assistant director of the U.S. Forest Survey, and E. T. fddings, Dean H y W. Morrison, Stanly A. Easton, James W. Girard, E. J. Presldent J. E. Buchanan, arr Iddings, and Governor C. A, Robins. Emeritus of the University of ldaho's College of Agriculture. ii' A dffdkll M12 At the university's 55th annual baccalaureate and commencement services Tune 4 and 5, approximately 6,000 guests assembled to wit- ness the largest graduation in ldaho's history. The Rt. Rev. Frank A. Rhea, Episcopal Bishop of ldaho from Boise, delivered a baccalaureate address that strengthened faith in man- kind's future. At commencement, Edwin Palmer l-loyt, editor and publisher ol the Denver Post, spoke of the three "F's"fffaith, the future and fear. He was surprised by the hearty response to his crack, Hldaho as a state has more to boast of than baked potatoes and screwball senators." Graduation day in l950 marked the successful fulfillment of a great challenge. The sons and daughters of Idaho who arrived in the A ml fall of l946 in alarming numbers had received the education they demanded. Four turbulent years of transition and association with their alma mater gave them mutual benefits of growth and expansion. wh Rt. Rev. P. A. Rhea speaks at Baccalaureate 1 l The Graduates of Mid-Century listen to Bishop Rhea's baccalaureate address in Memorial gymnasium. forges! Sum Candidates for degrees in l950 num- loered 915 with 800 receiving bachelor's degrees and the remainder receiving master's degrees. The majority ot the veterans ot World War ll had finished their interrupted tor- mal education. Four years of vast changes and improvements in the university's tacilities and training were the direct result ot the Class ot '50's influx. A peak ot achievement towered high at the mid- century graduation. 077Z77Z!7Z6'Z77ZZ7Z 9,,9-9-0A Neal and Colleen Christensen, brother and sister recelve their diplomas from Registrar D. D. DuSault wxth double Commencement speaker Edwln Palmer Hoyt happxness. Members of the Class of '50 are still undergraduates as they waxt ln caps and gowns before rnarclung into Memorial gymnaslum to become the focal point of the Commencement exercises. '1x.i':'?T-' Preparatory to the erection of the new Student Union building was partial The new Student Union Building was completed August. 1950. This S700,000 demolition of the north end of the old structure. Students did without the building houses all ASUI offices and is the center of student activity on the ballroom, lounges, and permanent offices while awaiting a new center. Idaho campus. Regent Joseph L. McCarthy breaks ground for Administration Building, Unit No. 5, repeating a performance of his father, Regent J. F. McCarthy, who broke ground for Unit No. l in 1906. Looking on are Fred. Skog and Dean Eldridge Csecond and third from leftl who witnessed the original ceremony 44 years ago. 'ESL ities gffizzfzszblfz 'lWe are not building the new, we are merely replac- ing the old," said President lesse E. Buchanan of the university's 53,788,800 building program. Paced by a suddenly progressive legislature, the program pro- vides for the construction of seven major buildings and several minor units. Cf supreme interest to most of the students is the Student Union annex, decorated in soft, soothing, pastel shades of lemon yellow, scar- let, shocking pink and glaring green. This structure features downstairs bowling alleys, a first floor cafe- teria, second floor theatre, ballroom, coke bar and lounge, and third floor publication offices. A SYOQOOO project, the Student Union building is financed by bonds which will be retired by student fees. Three frame forestry buildings had to be moved to clear the space for the The work on the Engineering Classroom Building, which was well started Engineering Classroom Building. Here the wood conversion laboratory is last fall, slowed to a standstill with the deluge of mid-winter snow. The shown precariously turning a corner on the jaunt to its new home near foundations are seen above, with the Kirtley addition lying beyond. Pine Hall. 'W I With the wings of the Administration Building on either side, the new A phase of the construction unknown to many students is the Building and Administration Building annex, foundation work of which is shown above. Grounds workshops, located adjacent to Pine Hall. A11 shops for repairs will house the Registrar, Bursar, and other administrative offices of the and equipment manufacture and supply stockroorns are found here. University. az affhnxhuvbbn The million-dollar Agricultural Science building, completed this summer, is of functional design. The work of the school of engineering will be cen- tralized with the completion of the Kirtley Lab Annex, for use by the electrical engineers, and the Engineer- ing Classroom building. Due to be completed April, l95l, the 33600000 Music Hall will contain all music offices, practice rooms, and an auditorium, leaving Ad lO2 entirely to classes and drama. Letters and Science will gain the present offices of the administrative officials when these people move to the ultra-modern Ad annex. This is only the beginning of ldaho's long-range building program, three dorms and a Home Ec build- ing Will rise in the near future. The proposed Music Building, built in astrict Gothic style, will complete another side to the desired "Gothic Ouandranglef' now consisting of the Administration and Science buildings. The Agricultural Science Building, standing like a gaunt skeleton silhouetted against the sky, was rushed to external completion before the winter snows set in. ' ' . armani' , r . T . , .cf ,,E,w..,,,,immW ,,,,,,,MM,z :-., 5 .r M1 'L,, 1 .-..,..- f r 3 12" xr it 5' "VW, il . fi gg ii f 'ri f1"'fg:,D'1'T1v .Q P Q t -- - F' FH' w---1 -.4-..: QW! fit !"!i.,., " f ix . ,F , ,4 ,Y 1, .,, 1 , Q4 in . . w 5 f 1 1 rw if M, A. xi is :si as EE . in IH ,isa .. - - . 4 Si-W A "" - 'i ' ' A' is .e L' rr ig M fs .tw If it g . x . . V .... .. .i.. .....,. ,. ussgggigfgit - X, K, ui 1-Q Ku agar PEOUDSED E AS MOCSQQW ITL,-J K1 X Hall M. Macklin, head of the Idaho Music department, turns the first soil for the Music Building, which will replace the multitude of frame buildings now pock- marking the campus. S i i i i W . jf rf' L , 4, iid, , 7 nf 7 "A" , t r M ra E! . fi fq 2 X 4 Richard Kakisako tunes his ukulele whilelSeet Lau prepares to show Tom Tagawz Hawaiian hula of their native country. Adding an Oriental flavor from China are, left to right: Yuan-Shi Yin, Teh-Yuan Lee, and Henry Hung Yuan. shown reading the home town news after having a cup of tea imported from China. Leo Cespedes from Guam served during the year as chairman of the Cosmopolitan Club, an organization where foreign students meet and exchange ideas and customs. Cgwiafzge 4,gfZl62Q'ill,5 "Meet me in Moscow" could be the slogan used by the university exchange students. Norway is represented by l-laakon l-laga, lohii I-lovland, Tor Lyshaug, Magnar Sater, Kare Reed, alf majors in civil engineering, and Paal Mylclebust, whg is studying mechanical engineering. Skiing seems tc have attracted them as a point of similarity betweed Norway and ldaho. Sverre Kongsgaard, who held the Norwegians 'rar Lyshaug, Kare Reed, Magna, safer and Ole saafvedf enjoy the comforts unofficial national distance title tor a while last winter of "lodge skiers" before making another sl-xi run. They all received Fulbright scholar- ships, and come from the same institute at Oslo, Norway. Tomas Tomasson of Iceland explains to forestry major Ken Parkin of England Left to right, AHarlon Qlson and Qon Wills discuss politics with Henry FitzRoy that Iceland is not entirely covered with ice and that trees do grow there. and Ken Parkin, B:-:tam s delegation to Idaho. 62 fn the University of Munich, Bavaria, comes Catherine Bildt. ' holdia Pa1n?n51oi1'i6I"seif'hThe atm t was her Personal friend Paal Myklebust and Haakon Haga recall experiences in Norway and talk over future plans for a tr p a pro essor 0 ar 3 unlc ' to South America for Paal and three more years of school for Haakon. Nhen he was with the university ski team, was 'eunited with his wife just before the Christmas holidays this year. Lomas Tomasson from lceland is a political sci- ence major studying for the diplomatic corps. -le and Kenneth Parkin of England received :cholarships from the ldaho Federation of Wom- en's Clubs. Ken is Working for a master's degree n forestry and longing for the time he can play 'cricket' again. Henry FitzRoy, a junior in ex- ractive industries, says he Will return to Hlong, ight evening in England" when he graduates. j Tom Tagawa, Richard Kakisako, and Seet Lau ire a long Way from the oriental food and gar- ienia gardens of Hawaii. Forestry, business, and iociology are their respective majors. Seet plans b do radio Work in America but Tom and Rich- ird will both return to Hawaii. Leo Cespedes, Jresident of the local Cosmopolitan club, will 'eturn to Guam to teach. Catherine Bildt of Munich, Bavaria, left her Eosition as a teacher of dramatics at the Acad- ,my of Munich to come to ldaho and learn Eng- "sh. Future plans include directing plays in Los ngeles. Latin America is well represented by Victor ranada of Paraguay, lose Roberto Bou of Puerto ico, Eduardo Cruz from Colombia, and Hum- edo Macedo, an agriculture major from Peru. he good neighbors reported that they were inpressed with the campus system of voting. i Yuan-Shi Yin, Henry Hung Yuan, and Teh- uan Lee uphold China's interest at ldaho. Yin lvas a professor of law at the University of Shang- ai When Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek was resident. Though Yin would like to return to hina, his political convictions keep him here j here he hopes for a career teaching political acience. After they receive their advanced de- grees in education and labor management, -lenry and Lee Will return to China and do what hey can to make living better for their people. was I5 GOOD READINU . Mr. and Mrs. Sverre Kongsgaard of Norway catch up on their current reading in the library. From "South of the Border" come Jose Bon, Humfredo Macedo, Victor Granada, and Eduardo Cru To the accompaniment of a guitar and castanets, they sing the songs of their respective countries Puerto Rico, Peru, Paraguay, and Colombia. 63 ymffzszf 1900925 f3Zl!!!Z'dl92'Il5' Wwe 1761? Wfbfaiy Rosemary Fitzgerald Pat Slack Helen Means President Vice-President Secretary The Associated Women's Council, composed of five elected officers and two representatives from each Women's living group, is the ruling body of the Associ- ated Women Students. Among their most notable achievements in l949-l95O were the highly successful fall orientation program for freshmen Women, and the operation of the point system, devised last year by Mortar Board. Under the auspices of the council, the Royal Court for the May Fete was chosen in an election held in Febru- ary, along with the election of next year's officers. Cfficiating for the group this year was Rosemary Fitzgerald, president, with Dean Louise Carter, advisor. Qther officers were Pat Slack, vice-president, Helen Means, secretary, lanice McCormick, treasurer, and Barbara Swanstrom, orientation chairman. Janice McCormick Treasurer Barbara Swanstrom Orientation Chairman Row One: Anne Dusault, Mary Ellen Stefanac, Jane Clark, Pat Nelson, Jean Ottenheimer, Helen Brown, Barbara Schaff, Colleen Christensen Row Two: Rose Ellen Schmid, Joan Raymer, Helen Means, Pat Slack, Rosemary Fitzgerald, Janice McCormick, Barbara Swanstrom Carol Rounds, Yvonne George . . . Row Three: Evelyn Inghrarn, June Thomas, Louise Blenden, Phyllis LaRue, Jackie Mitchell, Corrine Schumacher, Joan Rowbex-ry, Bernadean Reese, Betty Bonnett, Carol Bowlby. SUI Robert Moulton President is s. .fs ,..m5i15i W. - . Q W El if mfigs 15525555252 f 2 Ig f ' A 'fi . . K . 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Egg: it 1: . .m y .. if is , tw ws 6222242 51 Wk K saree s: viii? ' . Www " :f. .. ' " D. Wi .,... . e :SM if M22 15-f-' 1 f22z'1f - 1222112 fi. . 2 5.1, 1355 in X . 4 " if: K -'-- W.. Y- :::-.. '- Q J 'Qi ..:i5i5f5..:.ME3f 45 ,T . . 1 A Z 2. V -v',,...., A Zan V 2 ik it 11 .-1:: .:,::,. I 1 , 5 ., j..-. ... -I 5' as Igf"5f" 'Q 5? 5 5:3 ., ....Q .. :3 3 E si ... 5 e 1. :,,g-3,535 1 Ls ,g ,. U 11.31 5,5 .1.:.::::E:'E ,,f 1 f"' E -as 5 if if 9 lg. fl sivzalfs . . . F EM S .. .5 . . if :g- if " ' Ez IRQ? 22:2 .31 . i ... :.. :Mg a -:- .jign :5i. 12 51- -' . G -z. .. ,.,, ..:4,E,:,:.. ,,,. , M. sa Del Klaus The Executive Board plans the course of student activities. Government for the students and by the students on the University ot ldaho campus is carried out by the ASUI Executive Board. Made up of nine members elected in the spring by the student body from the incoming junior and senior classes, the student body president, and three ex-officio members, this board discusses and acts upon all stu- dent matters at their Weekly meetings. Elected to the board were: Bob Moulton, presidentg Ken Briggs, vice-president, Phyllis LaRue, secretaryg and members Keith ludd, Bob Mays, Pete Wilson, Bette West, Del Klaus, Bob lonas and Dick Geisler. Ex-officio members of the board were the editors of the Idaho Argo- naut, lohn Martin, and later, Allen Derrg President of AWS, Rosemary Eitzgeraldg and General Manager Gale Mix. The board was advised this year by Dr. H. Walter Steffens, head of biological sciences. Gne of the busiest and most progressive boards in campus history, the group was challenged by many problems never faced by past boards. The new Student Union Building presented varied problems under student control and the Executive Board gave birth to a new committee to cope with these problems. The student placement system was revised to base all appointments on the merit system and make possible campus-wide participation, the orientation program was car- ried out by the Student Activities Board, and a complete revision of the Campus Chest was seen. A coalition committee consisting of four members each of the lndependent and Greek parties gave invaluable aid to the Board on matters involving party situations. Among the further accomplishments of the group this year were the revised teacher rating forms, the appearance of bigger and better "name" bands on the campus, and the financial backing of the Blue Key sponsored Uliampus Key." l All the members of the Executive Board serve without pay Cand sometimes without honorl, except for the steak dinner meetings once a month. And just as seeds planted in the spring cannot be judged until the harvest in the fall, neither could the electors in the spring of l948 determine how the crop would turn out. But now that the final harvest has been completed, we see indeed that only the finest seeds were sown. Peter Wilson Robert Jonas Dick Geisler U Kenneth Briggs Vice-President SA W' Jerry Haegele Vern Bahr Shirley Jacobsen Dave Ulmer The NSA committee, composed ot Vern Bahr, chairmang Dave Ulmer, lerry l-laeqele, Shirley lacobsen, Marv laqels, and Ruthella Evans, handles the representation ot ldaho in the National Student Associa- tion. lt serves as an information source to the Executive Board and as a qeneral service committee. Phyllis LaRue Secretary Robert Mays Bette West Keith Judd W. Churchman Don Deerkop F. Flerchinger R. Fothergill Pine Pine Campus Club Lindley M. Jagels T. Johnson S. Johnstone K. Kornher Pine Willis Sweet Willis Sweet Willis Sweet Dan McDevitt H. McDevitt Jerry McKee V. Orazem Lindley Lindley Willis Sweet Forney Rae Salisbury Rose Schmid B. Shuldberg S. Sonnichsen Forney Hays l-lays Willis Sweet Vern Bahr Van Briggs Dick Gibbs M. Glenn Chrisman Campus Club Lindley Pine G. Hemovitch W. Hollingsworth Cleon Kunz J. Lawrence Ridenlvaugh Lindley LDS Pine Claire Letson L. Marsyla N. Pabst Hal Pickett Campus Club Forney Campus Club Willis Sweet Janice Rankin Ruth Reichert E. Strange G. Stringham Forney Hays Ridenbaugh Willis Sweet M. Sullivan John Tovey H 2 6 Z M. Washburn B. Wormald Ridenbaugh Chrisman Chrisman TMA The independent Caucus represents the Independent students on the campus. Each titty students living in the various halls on the campus are represented by a member in caucus. The activities ot the caucus are ot a political nature, con- sisting ot the selection of independent political candidates, setting the basis ot independent policies, and furthering the interests ot all independent students. The success ot the l95O spring election campaign, under the management ot Bill Hollingsworth, was shown by the lndependents' overwhelming victory, in which they retained control ot the execu- tive board and elected their presidential candidate, Vern Bahr. Dan McDevitt led the caucus this year, assisted by Sonnich Sonnichsen, vice-president, and Georgie Hemovitch, secretary. ,...., 'V' ,ws P. Araquistain Phi Kappa Tau Ernrnalyn Ball Alpha Chi Omega A. Christiansen Phi Gamma Della Helen Hays Kappa Alpha Theta Helen Means Della Gamma G. Stonemetz Kappa Alpha Theta Wfzffm' 62116115 The United Party Caucus is the Greek political body, consisting ot two representatives from each Greek letter house. The main purpose ot this group is the selecting ot United Party candidates tor political ottice and to manage the campaign. interest in the election is stimulated by awards to the houses having the best participation. Also, the United Caucus formed a coalition committee with the independent Caucus to advise the ASUT president on political attairs. Greek members ot this committee were Paul Araguistain, Andy Christiansen, lim lngalls, and Donna lean Broyles. Gtticers ot the caucus were Pete Wilson, presidentg Donna lean Broyles, secretaryg and Emmalyn Ball, treasurer. or '-Q31 Dick Benscoter Tau Kappa Epsilon Mary Clyde Della Gamma Jim Ingalls Della Tau Della Martel Morache Della Cfhi Robert Strom Sigma Chi Betty Bennett P1 Beta Phi Molly Cramblet Gamma Phi Bela Duane Kirk Della Tau Della Bob O'Conner Phi Gamma Drllla Connie Teed Pi Bela Phi Carol Bowlby Della Della Della Perry Dodds Beta Theta P1 Wayne Knudtsen SAF Ray Radford Kappa Sigma Betty Thompson Alpha Phi Mary Jane Breier KKG Anne Eggleson KKG Harry Lamson l.amlvda Chi Alpha Fred Reich Kappa Sigma Jean Thomson Delta Delta Delta Donna Broyles Alpha Phi Bill Goodman Sigma Nu Otto Leuschel Phi Della Theta Jerry Rockwood SAE Elwood Werry Della Chi Eugene Bush Beta Theta Pi Pat Hankins Gamma Phi Beta Dick Magnuson Sigma Nu LeRoy Routh Lambda Chi Alpha Pete Wilson Alpha Tau Omega John Ascuaga Phi Della Theta Terry Carson Alpha ffhi Omega Orval Hansen Sigma Clit Roger Maxwell Phi Kappa Tau A1 Rutherford Alpha Tau Omega Bob Worthington Tau Kappa Epsilon 45fzmQfzf JQZQZIIWZS germ! V 5 M' R w One: Marvin Washburn, Betty Peters, Rose Ellen Schmid, Mary Jane Breier, Dick Boyle, Raymond dford, Aris Petersen . . . Row Two: Kenneth Goldsberry, Dean Mosher. Consisting ot the editors of the Argo- naut, Gem ot the Mountains, Blot, and the station directors ot station KUQl, as well as several ex-otticio members, the Publications Board approves recommen- dations tor the major positions on all campus publications, including KUQI. These recommendations come from the retiring editors of the respective publica- tions. The decisions ot the board must then be approved by the executive board before becoming tinal. The main project ot the Student Activi- ties Board Was an orientation plan for the tall of l95O, as well as a new plan tor l95l orientation. Under the chair- manship ot Dick Boyle, the group also led a drive to acguaint the students with the accomplishments ot the university. The annual Intercollegiate Bridge tour- nament and an all-campus dance on October 5 were also sponsored by SAB. l-lalttime entertainment planned by the board tor basketball games included fencing, introduction ot the Vandal Hel- met, the Lewiston band, sguare dancing, l-Club initiation, a tumbling team and balancing act, and the annual Spur Waddle. Row One: June Thomas, Dale Benjamin, Marie Hargis, John Martin, Phyllis LaRue, Del Klaus . Row Two: Dave Lewis, Bob Finlayson, Allen Derr, Bob Moulton. fgufffbahbns 5051521 This national professional journalism fraternity this year celebrated its first anniversary on the ldaho campus. With a membership restricted to men who intend to enter some phase of journalis- tic worlc, this organization endeavors to improve campus publications and to maintain relations with editors and pub- lishers all over the state. The group Was led this year by Newt Cutler and lohn Dillon. Mary Jane Breier, June Thomas, Kathy Burleigh, Sheila Darwin, Sally Norris, Betty Peters, 1.pg,,,,r . . t i " f . ,, - ,V llllliiw' V ie - fz, 1 ap V. . kr Zfefzz 517mg Q -if-, . is 4 rs- ww -", ff, ll. lv Lg-lyme 96610 fill' Row One: John Dillon, Dale Benjamin, Lee Bath, Oz-val Hansen, Allen Derr . . . Row Two: Earl Cos tello, Stan Riggers, Jim Teague, Dick Toevs, John Martin, Professor Paul Scott fadvisorl . . . Row Three: Phil Johnson, Karl Klages, Bert Johnson, Sherman Black, Phil Schnell. Theta Sigma, local journalism honorary, is composed of women with a satisfac- tory grade average Who profess an inter- est in the field of journalism. Activities during the year included a reception for college women interested in journalism, the annual banguet with Sigma Delta Chi, and the traditional Matrix Table in the spring. Kathy Burleigh served as president, Sheila Darwin acted as secre- tary, and Mary lane Breier was treasurer. John Martin Editor First Semester Allen Derr Editor Second Semester The "Arg" covers the campus What better indicator is there of Tuesdays and Fridays than groups of people scattered all over the campus reading the "Arg." Virtually everyone reads the Argo- naut, the university's official newspaper, either to find his name in print, to see what is occurring about the campus, or merely to be reading a newspaper. But before this paper "hits the streets," there is a great deal of work that must be accomplished. People begin gathering in the office each Monday and Thursday afternoon and start work on their assigned tasks. The news must be gathered by the reporters and then cor- rected, authenticated, and rewritten by Various persons of the Argonaut staff. Then all copy is checked by the news editor, who assigns a head or has one written. After the story has a head and is ready for the printer, it goes to the manag- ing editor, who counts the inches that the story will occupy and checks the content of the article. When the dusk begins to fall, a few of the "higher- ups" pack up all the copy and move to the ldahonian plant, where the paper is printed. The copy must there be formulated, the ads placed, and all copy proof-read. This last task falls upon the shoulders of the night editor, who heads the proof-reading staff. mug Emma 72 Sheila Darwin Earle Costello Virginia Smith and Joanne Hopkins Mary Stefanac and Warren News Editor Sports Editor Society Editor and Assistant Circulation Manager 479 1761779 Z! like a mid-winter snowfall. Finally the night's work is done, and the product of their labors goes through the linotype and later the printing press, and the next day's Argonaut is complete. Individual features, such as "lason's Golden Fleece" and various articles by Bill Hansen, Qrval Hansen, and lerry Kinsey enlighten the pages of the Argonaut. The editorial content is of professional guality and highly readable. Keeping a running score of the social functions fo twenty-eight living groups and innumerable organiza- tions Was the work of the social editor, Virginia Smith, and her staff. The sports staff, headed by Earl Costello, did an outstanding job in covering all the campus sport- ing events, although they were sometimes confronted with little to Work with. Editors lohn Martin and Allen Derr have hoped that the Work of the staff, which begins with the reporters' assignment book in the Ad building entrance and ends with the circulation staff, has succeeded in supplying the students with some measure of enjoyment in the 67 issues that they have managed. E: vi Bert Johnson Managing Editor Bonnie Graham and Jack Mosman Business Manager and Advertising Manager Tom Mitchell Night Editor Jack Barnes Bill Hansen Virginia Orazem Francis Flerchinger Photographer Feature Editor Rewrite Editor Copy Editor 73 1 azefsaeassal 3' N. PROOFREADERS: Glen Stringharn, Vernon Gallup Tommy Mitchell. ...amd ai 5 REPORTERSfRow One: Janet Fulton, Don Hardy, Sheila Janssen, Barbara Wahl, Jerome Kinsey, Francis Flerchinger . . . Row Two: Margaret Curtis, Dean Holt, Marilyn Pond. f ...,.,,...-., ..:-:-RC' 4 a if a AW. A I ' E The Argonaut received the National College Press' All-l-lonor Award for the second semester of the school year l94-84949. The Argonaut was selected tops in competition with schools of egual enrollment in addition to being selected first in all competition. Special awards were given to Editor lohn Martin for editorial management and to Argonaut writers Stan Godecke and Howard Reinhardt for outstanding reporting accomplishments. Martin attributed this award to a very cooperative staff, without which these high journalistic standards could not have been made. And although the victim ot many blasts from irate readers, the Argonaut had achieved the ultimate in college newspapers. SPORTS STAFl"7Row One: Earle Costello, Stan Riggers . . . Row Two: Bud Hagan, Karl Klages, Phil Johnson. Loretta Lefevre . 74 ' CIRCULATION STAFF: Alice Sturgess, Mary Swanby, ADVERTISING STAFF: Lewis Ladwig, Jack Mosman, Bonnie Fi B y J t H l Sh 1 y regory. sm WW The Argonaut dignity received a severe blow when the offices were moved into the coke room off the cafeteria. This move was necessitated when the workmen removed the north wall of the previous office in their vicious path of construction. Things were just a little crowded in the coke room office, and once a staff member wedged him- self into a chair, he stayed there. lt was a chummy, intimate, but highly unsatisfactory, office. Better things were hoped for. '."'flq e, onnie Graham, Pat Sweene , ane o man, ire 5905766 Wednesday, March 8, 1950, is a day that will go down in history, for it was on that memorable day that the Argonaut staff moved into their new offices on the first floor of the new Student Union Building. Large windows with a beautiful Alpha Chi exposure, fluorescent light- ing, and a genuine aisle for walking added to the enhancement of the new office, which is easily acces- sible from the outside. Bigger and better Argonauts should emit from this bigger and better office. MAILING STAFF: Mary Ellen Stefanac, Warren Johanson, Marilyn Green, Lois Dodson, Mary Kay Johnson, Lorraine Bernat. E f June Th Editor Sault ditor nnell Editor 52 gwl 6' The melodrama of the hook without a home, or "Lost Amidst the Upheaualf' ul-lallelujah!" we said, 'lWe're going to have a great big new Student Union building and a great big fine office with golden walls and water fountains that give soda pop, and air-foam chairs to sit in. Hallelujah!" Know what we got? Moved. Moved from our nice beaverboard palace to a corner of Gale Mix's old office, which we shared with Bob Moulton and Blot. Later, we felt pretty good having the small lounge upstairs, that is until the day they took away the wall between us and the large ballroom. ln and out, in and out, came the brick layers, the carpenters, the painters, the plasterers. The dust flew thick and heavy, the wintry blasts chilled our bones and turned our hands blue as we scribbled on the tables. Sometimes we would sit and dream of our golden- walled office with the soda pop fountains. After five there were no lights and no noise from the hammers and buzz saws and razing crews to distract us. l-low lovely it was to sit in the guiet dark with cement mixers and stacks of lumber around us, writing our dreams in the dust. But we weren't getting anything done! K 1 Klages Lee Bath and Sally Norris Andy Tozier and Tom Mitchell Jerry McKee and Bruce Scranton S orts O gamzatio Living Groups Activities I' Z5 jwunfafhx All of us got busy pestering the daylights out of :Jeople to get pictures, to give us information. Soon we had drawers full of stuff, but we didn't dare photo- nount our pictures, for in the midst of dust and dirt and wandering visitors, we were afraid all would be ost. Besides, didn't they tell us that in two weeks our offices would be ready? Well, two weeks- two months afour months and where were we? ln the same spot with the builders threatening to evict us to the streets. WE were holding up THEIR progress. Then it was Easter and still no copy ready to send. We took the bull by the horns and moved our furni- ture to the partly-finished third floor. So what if there was no tile on the floor? So what if there were no lights, no phone? There were the walls and heats blessed, blessed heat. We were overcome with happiness. All this was worth waiting for. From Easter until late lune, we have risen early and gone to bed late, reluctant to stay away from our offices for a moment. To classes We went, but we were only waiting for the moment when we could return to our greyswalled, chartreuse- ceilinged-with-a'water-fountain-down-the-hall office and begin work. Why were we so eager? Because it was later than we thought! So we had to enjoy our- selves and lick them stickers for them pictures, write that copy for them printers, and crop them pictures for them engravers. ln short, dear students, we had to get this book to press! ,sw 5 tw These are the photographers whose pictures recorded the vis ries found in this book. Kneeling. Roland Wilde, Phil S h 11 Standing: Jack Marineau, Wendell Gladish, Leo Freier t N t pictured was the staff head, Orval Hansen, who officiated t and many others. Bob Nixon and Brian Williams Photomoun Fairy A t Betty Thompson Clyde Winters Merilyn Peterson Jo Garner Q t ' I Index Classes Social . ECTS drift Faced with mounting all the pictures in this yearbook after the new offices were occupied were the photo- mounters, Bob Nixon, Joyce Becker, Frank Gunn and Bill Luscher. It is the work of the art staff, Stan Soderberg, Marilyn Brodd, Peggy Pruett, not only to draw the cartoons but also to draw the dummy. Marian Davidson, absent from the above picture, did the distinctive cartoons for the organization section, while Soderberg did those appearing in the sports pages. Entire Year Recorded . . . Advertising and Activity Lists Eliminated You'll notice that we have made changes. The deletion of advertising eliminated the position oi business manager and so two associate editors were appointed. Requests tor more faculty pictures were heeded in this, the second year ot the G'fem's new policy ot covering the entire school year trom September to lune with tall delivery of the finished book, a precedent set by Phil Schnell in l949. Senior activity lists were eliminated because ot space limitations in picturing the largest number ot seniors ever known in 48 years ot Gem publication. All that we could get into the book is here. Frankly, we don't know how we did it, but golly, we hope you like it! And sincerely, it's been happy and thrilling work to create the l95O Gem oi the Mountains for you students that made history ot this mid-century year as we have recorded it. If this were technicolor, you could see the various shades of green exhibited by our cigar-smoking sports staff, Crusty Hamon, Phil Johnson, Bud Hagan, Karl Klages, and Jerry Kinsey, who did their work with dependability and initiative. -sxsx The hard work and dependability of the secretaries, Donna Kjose, Corinne Lauriente, Mary Thompson, and Helen Payne, Beatrice Helander, Marilyn Phillips, Lilli Flo Pratt, Joan Deshazer, Jean Marker, Sharon Osrnund- son, was expressed beautifully by Bev Balka, unfortu- nately not pictured, who. when told we quit when we got tired, replied, "Chl I thought we just dropped dead." fffe Zmiaiady As the man was without a country, so was the Gem with- out an office. The small former upstairs lounge was the staff's first real office, which served adequately until the workmen tore down the wall connecting it and the large ballroom. No heat and no lights complicated a situation already dismal due to the incessant dust and noise. The above staff members stare aghast as pneumatic hammers resound at full blast. Xie peamanenf After the Gem staff was virtually stalemated by the previous conditions, the new office, consisting of a large working room and a private editor's office, was looked upon as sheer utopia. lndustry reached its highest peak as the Gem crew worked fast and furious to make up for lost time. New desks, large sunny windows, and Blot exchange issues next door gave the staff the final im- petus to produce your l95O Gem of the Mountains. At regular intervals, various Gem problems were discussed in the quiet somberness of a staff meeting. Above. Editor Thomas, having read another nf her vicious ultimatums, smugly awaits its effects upon staff members Dusault, Mitchell. Pruett, Frank, Bunnell. and McKee. Bob Finlayson and Marie Hargis Editors Jo Korter and D Walenta onna Business M gers U IVERSITY of IDAHO gh! With five fine issues a year, BLOT no longer is the campus unwanted child. A direct descendant of the late lamented Blue Bucket and of Vanlda, Blot began its fifth year of publication by offering five issues Where there had been four and presenting the first in those long registration lines. This involved considerable summer editorial work for Editor Finlayson. lt gave its readers a cartoon cover and forty pages of features, fiction and humor, and served as a Welcome to the frosh and an introduction to the "Big Seven" on the campus. The second issue came a little over a month later, sported Homecoming Queen Bea l-lelander on its cover, and included action shots of the big day itself. By this time the circulation staff had picked up about one thousand subscribers. Ken West and Bob Gax-tin STAFF HEADSfRow One: Ann Eggleson, Don Nepean, Bethea Decker, Assistant Business Manager and Managing Editor Bob Reeves . . . Row Two: Sherm Black, Fred Farmer. M' Life was rather cozy in the cloakroom-turned-office that Blot occu pied for the first three issues. Here Finlayson, Hargis, Black, Nepea Gartin, Reeves and Walenta met and planned each issue. The staff of the magazine was proud of the big forty- page Christmas Special, featuring Vivian Tones as Miss Santa Claus. This issue included three-color pages for the first time in the history of Blot, and retir- ing editor Bob Finlayson offered the campus reading public what many called uthe best issue yet." At the semester the reins of the magazine passed into the hands of Marie Hargis and her acting man- aging editor, Bob Gartin. lo Korter turned over the books to Donna lo Walenta. There was no appreciable change of policy under the new management. The magazine still stressed original art and literary works with a slight de-emphasis on humor. The profile of Shirley Ball, strikingly silhouetted by the ingenious lab work of Dwain Rosa and Earl Brock- man, was on the cover of Hargis' first Blot, which came out in March. The inspired pen of Bob Finlay- son took "A Backward Glance" at the old Blue Bucket and at the Flapper Era. Early in April, the staff moved out of the old Bucket cloak room which it had called home for so many months and into the spacious quarters on the third floor of the new annex. Here they settled down to pro- duce the fifth issue of Blot. A review of the Peters' one- acts, a biographical sketch of Stan Hiserman, and the announcement of loan Wittmann as Blot's Miss ldaho Co-ed of l95O were highlights of this 32-page edition. With a permanent home, the magazines staff gave promise of shaking down into an efficient, working organization and planned to issue even bigger and better Blots in the future. CLERICAL S'I'AI"1"'4Jane Clark, Nancy McIntosh, Barbara Livingston, Lois Maddox, Marian Clift, Bethea Decker. ART STAf'FvFront Row: Don Nepean, Kenneth Keefer . . . Back Row: Alfred Hayward, Neal Christensen. CIRCULATION STAFF-Bob Reeves, Gloria Moore, Don Ouane ADVERTISING STAI"'F7Sl1irley Gregory, John Tovey, Fred Kopke, Jean Pratt, Bob Gartin, Donna Walenta, Ken West, Marilyn Pond. Dick Toevs and Jim Teague Editors Boyd Barker and John Barinaga Business Managers We Jalal cgfzgzkzem Contains technical knowledge and research data, as well as a few jokes. Pride and joy of the College of Engineering is its guar- terly publication, The Idaho Engineer. This magazine deals with all specialized phases and latest developments in engineering. Some of the outstanding features of The Idaho Engineer are articles written by talented undergraduate engineers at the University of ldaho, who submit their ideas on inter- esting topics relating to engineering. Another item of special interest is the Dean's Scratch Pad, which is a general report on varied subjects from Dean lanssen to the readers. Each issue features news items from the five engineering organizations, as Well as all the latest happenings of the Associated Engineers and Sigma Tau, engineering hono- rary. Circulation of the magazine reaches out to alumni in all corners of the United States, as well as to other engi- neering schools. Before the magazine can go to press, there is a great deal of work that must be accomplished, such as gathering news, soliciting ads and so forth. However, deadlines were met under the capable management of editors Dick Toevs and lim Teague. Qther staff heads were business manager lohn Barinaga, advertising manager Del McNealy, circula- tion manager Ed Stell and photo editor lohn Nesbitt. Faculty advisors are Professors N. F. l-lindle and F. l-l. Hall. Seated: Jim Teague, John Spink, Del. Robison, Ed Stell, John Barinaga, Del McNea1y, Dick Toevs . . . Standing: Al Rolseth, Jim Huff, Andy Kirsch, John Pline, Alan Huggins, Stan Thomas, Boyd Barker, Dick Miller, Fred. Hyland, Prof. N. F. Hindle. Z4 JM 922565 Z Serves many purposes, forestry year- book, alumni directory and text. The ldaho Forester is published each May by students in the School of Forestry and is the official publication of the Associated Foresters. The book serves a dual purpose, being considered both a technical magazine and an annual for the School of For- estry. As a technical magazine, The ldaho Forester features articles by students and faculty members on forestry sub- jects and those related to forestry. The annual section of the book is divided into several units. Une of these units gives a complete roster of all the l95O forestry graduates. Another section tells of the activi- ties of the Associated Foresters and Xi Sigma Pi, national foresters' honorary. All forestry alumni are listed in a directory at the back of the book, along with articles on outstanding graduates. Many scenic pictures of ldaho nature and Wildlife were featured this year, under the supervision of lohn Vanden- burg, photo editor. The ldaho Forester is distributed to all members of the Associated Foresters and to all alumni of the School cf Forestry. The l949-l9S0 staff was headed by Glen Youngblood, editor, l-loward l-leiner, business manager, and Dave Fel- lon, advertising manager. Dr. F. W. Tisdale was the faculty advisor. Howard H Youngb Editor Business Manaq Seated: Bob McMahon, copy editor: Claire Letson, faculty editor: Dr. E. W. Tisdale, advisor . . . Stand- ing: Russell Griffith, editorial assistant: John Blom, assistant advertising manager: Dave Fellin, adver- tising manager. ein Jo G az-ner Editor Betty Thompson Editor 45fzfaQf1f ,ygnnffaaa Traditions, activities and mlanners are found in this ASUI publication. To Welcome the ldaho freshmen to the campus each fall, ASUI publishes the Stu- dent Handbook. lt contains greetings from the ASUI President, the President of the University and the Director of Student Affairs. Also, it serves to orient the some- what bewildered frosh on university tradi- tions, activities and regulations. And of interest to upperclassmen as well as the newcomers is the complete constitution and by-laws of the Associated Students of the University of ldaho. lo Garner guided the Student Handbook through the reefs of production this year. dw' 622112 The Idaho Coed Code, now found in the Student Handbook, is a publication of the Associated Women Students which aids in the orientation of freshmen women to the campus. Brief welcoming messages by the incoming AWS president and Dean Louise Carter aid in this orientation. lt also con- tains brief discussions of the proper clothes and manners, a review of feasible activi- ties, and a resume of proper study habits. Also included in the Code, which was edited this year by Betty Thompson, are the AWS constitution and other rules and regulations affecting women students. 607172-ll zgemekzxly Lyle and the Jacksons keep the alums aware of Idaho and of each other. Acting as a liaison between the university and the alumni, and among the alums them- selves, is the job ot lim Lyle, alumni secre- tary. Until Mr. Lyle assumed the position tour years ago, there was no contact with the students after graduation. Now, in addi- tion to his regular task, he works with the university on Homecoming, Commence- ment, University Day, et Cetera. Through Mr. Lyle the public is becoming conscious of the university, its expansion and its goals. James Lyle Alumni Secretary yffumfzf fffaunhfh Published tour or tive times a year, the Idaho Alumni Roundup gives information on outstanding ldaho grads, as well as the activities of innumerable others in the "Through the Years" columns. And all noteworthy campus events and honors are listed, to keep the grads campus-conscious. All reunions or other alumni events are given special attention, as are the results ot such meetings. Most ot the news comes from the alumni themselves, and this year was edited by Frank and Virginia lackson. Frank and Virginia Jackson Co-Editors Dale Ben'arnin and Dave Lewis J Station Directors Dave Nye and George Poulas t Station Director and Production Director KU I A new modern studio, new equipment and more personnel give KUOI more prestige. With the impetus ot new studios next year, station KUQI, 'wllhe Voice ot the Vandal," has become a distinct service to students at the University ot ldaho. Over seventy students Worlc together twelve hours a day to bring to the campus a variety ot programs. Students at the station work under the same pressure and with the same equipment that one finds in a com- mercial station. Not only does it give students a chance to Work on a campus activity, but it gives them practical radio operation and experience. At the beginning ot each year, KUOI auditions titty students interested in announcing, including both men and women. KUQI is represented nationally by the lntercollegiate Broadcasting System. lBS provides a large membership ot college stations with information concerning engi- neering problems, program procedure and station operation. g Swanstrom and Dale Kassel Don Stilson and Robin Faisant Wilson Churchman and Bob Burnham Ch t A uncer and Special Events Director Program Directors Business Manager and Chief Engineer A small group of ldaho students started the station in the fall of l945. Since then, it has improved by leaps and bounds. New equipment has been installed since KUOI went under ASUI in the spring election. The new studios that KUOT will occupy next year were especially constructed for radio production. Soon, the familiar phrase "broadcasting from the third floor of the Engi- neering Annex Building" will be heard no more. Almost three thousand records are the source of most of the station's programs, which are the familiar disc- 1oclqey type. These records represent popular, semi- classical and classical music. Transcriptions and script shows comprise the remainder of the programs. Before becoming a function of ASUI, KUOl has been student owned and operated. The only revenue obtained came from music broadcasts for house dances. The in- creased funds have made i'The Voice of the Vandal" a station of which all members are proud to be a part. CLERICAL STAFF: Charlotte Henry, Valerie Robinson, Mary Kay Johnson, Pat Sweeney. TRAFFIC STAFF: Lorraine Bernat, Colleen McDonald frscord libra- rianh, Joanne Hutchinson, Lois Dodson. ENGINEERING STAFF: Earl Donnan, Dale Kassel, Jac Caward. Don Deardorff, Jim Cox. Asa .Wien-,ing Hmmm fvw :E 55' 5' Q gl. Qml ANNOUNCERSfRow One: Jerry McKee, Don Deardorff, Seet Lau, Barbara ANNOUNCERS-Row One: Acel Purdy, Dale Kassel, Donna Melis, Jim Columbus, Arlene Ralph, Willy Stemple, Frank Stone . . . Row Two: Jac Cox . . . Row Two: Don Hardy, Dale Eve:-son, Doug Thorp. Caward. Roy Parker, Charles Winters, James Heaphy, Glen Stringham, Pete Bradley, Ted McDaniels. 147725 Miss Jean Collette Mr. Ronald C. Kern Professor of Drama Technical Director After making the rounds of the new shows on Broadway last fall, lean Collette returned to the ldaho drama department filled with ambitious plans and new ideas for the year ahead. She believes that variety is the spice of playgoing and presented shows widely different in type. "The Glass Menagerie," t'Twelfth Night," and "The Great Big Doorstep" presented serious drama, classical literature, and grass root comedy in the three major plays of the season. Studio productions took on new importance. U l-lut productions featured settings and original costumes that were especially designed. The striking color combinations and stylized lines of period Costumes for "Everyman" and the Shakespearean production were created by Mation Featherstone. Mr. Ronald C. Kern served his first year at ldaho as technical director. Miss Collette was able to emphasize intimate studio production and to supervise the preparation of more vehicles for presentation this year, comparatively free from worry over the endless details of the backstage organization and production that Mr. Kern handled. In classes and in practice he put across his ideas for modern set designs with more eye-interest and better sight lines. Every opportunity to see shows by touring players and the Washington State College group was eagerly grasped by ldaho drama students who were anxious to experiment with new techniques in theatre. A beginning toward arena-style production was made when one-acts were presented in special performances for various organizations in living rooms and meeting rooms. Shakespeare, Tennessee Williams, and Betty Peters, along with other dramatic offerings ranging from serious drama to comedy, were offered to ldaho audiences this year as Collette headline attractions in Variety. This year saw even more than the usual hustle and bustle around the U Hut and on the auditorium stage with the calendar packed full of production dates. Larger classes in interpretation and play production not only "do bled in brass" but played the strings on the side trying to keep up with the increased dramatic activity. Student designing, crew-work, directing, and acting under the supervision of Miss Collette and Mr. Kern turned out big and little shows that rated the name of 'tgood theatre." Ullliklll fbi! These Dionysian torchbearers keep the spirit of theatre alive on the campus. Selective mem- bership is based on acting and technical work for drama pro- ductions. By arranging play- going exchanges with Pullman, the opportunity for seeing col- lege theatre is increased. Two formal initiations, a spring ban- quet, and the annual picnic were included in the year's ac- R O : M . R ld C. K C d ' J, J C bl , M ' H ' , B'11 Dav'dson, Elaine Androes, - - - Dzgna Tlzan Eroyllgi . . Rowe'T'xxlvoT Ml-ZT!lDorg1TlTy Kzx-rf, Ri:lT1Ren:1zeTlTMalx-ian Davidson, Colleen Chris- tlvltles' Harry Dalva Served as t , H D 1 , M' J C llette Cadvisorl . . . Row Three: Bonnie Shuldberg, Marvin Alexander, - 6dlTZSn EBIBIZ N:allaChrlZTerTs:l:rn, Igorm Green, Tom Robinson, June Thomas, Larraine Cole, Bette West. group presldent- wi gig l WIMQZWZ Laura - V Colleen Christensen Tom - Rich Pennell Amanda Larraine Cole The Gentleman Caller - Bill Davidson Student Directors lune Thomas, Elaine Androes Student Technical Director and Stage Manager - - Harry Dalva Laura emerges from her shell to listen to Jirn's tThe Gentleman Caller? encouraging words about a wonderful world waiting for her to conquer: perhaps with him she could have. Tennessee Williams' guiet, intense drama ot Tom, Laura, Amanda, and the Gentleman Caller opened ldaho's play season in Qctolser. The Wing- field tenement apartment reverberated with the tinlqling glass ot crushed souls as the idealistic characters were torced to tace a realistic world. Mood lighting was to the scenes as music is to the lyrics ot a song. "The Glass Menagerie" was a tremendous experience tor the audience and a revealing analysis ot mixed-up humans. Curtain calls with spot lighting ot the actors stirred the aesthetic sense ot the admiring spectators in this 'tplay ot memory." Amanda wishes on a star for happiness and good fortune for her Tom, the hero of the story, remembers his mother and sister, and laughter Laura. tells his story of escaping them, but not being able to forget them. MMM MQW Viola - 5 Marian Davidson Olivia - - - lanet Robinson Sebastian - Neal Christensen Orsino - - Norm Green Malvolio - - - Harry Dalva Sir Toby Belch - - Rich Pennell Sir Andrew Aguecheek - lack Hoag Marie ----- Bette West Antonio - - Bob Mackay Feste - - lack Gregory Fabian - - Dale Kassel Sea Captain - Bob Bunting Student Directors Marie l-largis, Colleen Christensen Student Technical Director Marvin Alexander Stage Manager - Ken Goldsberry The grand finale sees the twins reunited and each with his proper lover, Malvolio thwarted, and the comics victorious. The Bard spoke again and sang, too, when his HTWelith Night" Was put on the boards March lO-ll. Feste, the clown, opened the play with a "l-leigh and a ho, the wind and the rain" sung so slyly that tew realized that Gregory was improvising to the tune ot Ulvlaybef' Scenes ot Shakespearean grace and beauty by the Romantics were mingled with the hilarious antics ot the Comedian group. Resultaff a most entertaining l'Night." Marion Featherstone designed the authentic and colortul costumes tor both "Every- man" and Wfweltth Night" with one eye on her sketches, the other on the budget. Thus both productions were elaborately costumed with a ward- robe planned tor adaptability. Mr. Shakespeare, your play written tor the Globe did all right at ldaho too! You should have seen the ring-down with the entire cast singing your lyrics! Heigh ho. To the Comics' delight, Malvolio falls for the hoax of a planted letter. Together at last-a Viola and Orsino, Olivia and Sebastian. The clever Viola has W0 Their superior will soon be a laughing stock. he love of O ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' t rsxno by wooing Olivia for hmm while disguised as her own brother 4752 QM! 1517 Mrs. Crochet - Commodore - Gilfllif Marie l-largis - - Harry Dalva Evvie Crochet A Colleen Christensen Topal Crochet - - Elmo Crochet - - Fleece Crochet Arthur Crochet Mr. Tobin - Mrs. Dupre Dewey - Tayo Delacroix Larraine Cole Keith Keeter Kenneth Keeler A - Bob Cvartin Bill Davidson loy Ann Rossman - Normand Green - - lohn Miller Mrs. Beaumont Crochet Student Directors Colleen Ebbe Gene Lewis, lim Marshall Student Technical Director Keith Keeler Stage Manager - Morton Grinker The landlady has a hard time collecting five dollars for a rnonth's rent. Fleece shows her the e scratch on his leg caused by the disrepairs of the hous . Raunchy Kern's wild cry ot HGive 'em hell, kids!" resounded backstage as curtain time tor HThe Great Big Doorstep" neared. For weeks crew-doers had made lilies tor the third act in spare moments trom building and paint- ing the cajun shack with its stu-pend-able doorstep. The actors had searched the campus tor Louisiana diction hints and tennis shoes. After the shortest rehearsal period ever given a Collette play, everything was ready. At 8:15 the curtain rose on the spring comedy. An intrinsic joy telt by the players who were creating anew rolled over the sea ot attending faces in spilling, splashing waves ot communicated delight. The emotional response ot an audience sharing a mutual happi- ness was tided back to the actors. Everybody was happy emphatically so as magic moment ot 'llive" theatre spread a warm glow throughout the auditorium. The Commodore complains of his gastric upsets because the neighbors e Crochet family tries to help Arthur get his jaws unlocked after he attempted to put a pool ball in his mouth to win a nickle bet. have heennoverfeeding him again. Bob Bunting and Norm Green allegorize Death coming to Everyman in this classic medieval morality play. "Everyman" was co-directed by Neal Christensen and Harry Dalva . . . Dalva, Christensen, and Davidson dream of "Flower Gold" riches in the one-act written by Mrs. Martha Knight of Pullman and directed by Gene Lewis. Oscar Wilde's merry farce, "The Importance of Being Earnest," was acted by the advanced interpretation class under the direction of Jean Collette and presented to the public in the U Hut . . . "Hansel and Gretel," a children's theatre piece, was added to the production schedule. A special performance was given for Moscow schools, with Jim Marshall directing. fgeffyif Wfze-57575 Three showsf studentfdirected, studenteacted, and student-Writtenfe -by Betty Peters, a U ot l junior major- ing in English, were presented March 28, 29, and 30 as studio productions. An understanding ot dramatic elements plus the ability to create highly actable scripts indicates that Miss Betty Peters is on her Way to success with a multitude ot dramatic moments ahead. Www ww "" :Nj Z c , if We L .:,, c.,i "My Paul," directed by Marie Hargis, cast Donna Jo Walenta, Bruce Tingwall, Bonnie Shuldberg, and Mary Louise Will in a serious drama with a southern Idaho setting . . . "The Thirteenth Level," directed by Colleen Christensen, featured choreographic movements by actors Johnny "Reporter" Miller, Orval "Devil" Hansen, Dale "Beelzebub" Kassel, and Bette "Pauline's Mother" West, and a large supporting cast. Around the dinner table in "Like Ordinary Folk" sit Joy Ann Rossman, Judy Cople, Andy Tozier, Ann Kettenbach, and Jim Marshall discussing the com- ing ofthe agent fTom Robinsonl. This play was directed by June Thomas . . . Inset: Betty Peters, University of Idaho junior, who has written, in addition to these three plays, innumerable poems, short stories, and articles. Fishnets and kegs change a palace into a pier C t 1 g t g p t bl h h f th p ffgfzcisfaye Mmenfs Ever watch a show from the "wings" or the lilies?" Ask any member ot the ldaho drama department what it's likeffthey have seen all that goes on behind the velvet curtain. Here the actor is a technician and the technician an actor. Drama students learn how to run the switchboard, to construct, paint and erect stage settings, to apply their own make-up, and to sew costumes and make props. Scene designing, directing, and studying theories ot play production are all a part of a thespian's education. The art of acting is learned in classes ot interpretation, improvisation, and pantomimic action. Finding out what goes into a play along with the spoken line and stage action is gathered formally in the classroom and then empirically on crewfdo. Theres no limit set on the his- trionic knowledge and skill that may be obtained work- ing backstage on Utechnicalf' th e e 'pk z Marian Davidson adjusts Harry Da1va's plume L dy b b T Ifth N ght b 225512 Idaho dehators talk their way , through a very successful season. Dr. Albert E. Whitehead Debate Coach and Professor ot Speech A busy schedule kept Idaho debaters on the go all year. Coach A. E. Whitehead took his teams all over the Northwest to argue the national guestion, l'Resolved: That the United States should nationalize the basic non-agricultural industries." The season began with a second place win by Dave Ulmer and Orval Hansen at the Northwestern Intercollegiate meet at Whitman College. In November, Idaho sent tive ot its top debaters to Stanford University where they won eight and lost tour debates in the Western Speech Association meet. In Ianuary Meredith Glenn and Kent Lake won second place honors in the University ot Idaho-sponsored Inland Empire junior debate tournament. The annual trek to the Linfield College meet at McMinnville, Oregon, came early in March. A tew days later Dave Ulmer and Herman McDevitt met a team ot West Point cadets on the Idaho campus in a non-decision debate. Meanwhile, Dean Holt and Kent Lake won first in the Idaho Speech Associa- tion meet at Caldwell. In April, Dave Ulmer and Lois Odberg placed third in the Montana University invitational tourna- ment at Missoula. Coach Whitehead took delegates Herman McDevitt and Crval Hansen to Eugene, Oregon, to represent Idaho at the Pacitic Forensic League meeting. In the final event on the calendar, Idaho's Shirley Iacobsen and Qrval Hansen met Stantord's Dave Leavitt and Forest Barr on the Idaho campus in an exhibition debate. Vlwxzfy Qafafe Row One: Kent Lake, Kenneth Kornher, Dick Gibbs. Torn Wright . . . Row Two: Shirley Jacobsen, Renee Mathews, Sheila Janssen, Dan McDevitt . . . Row Three: Dr. A. E. Whitehead Kadvisorl, Herman McDevitt, Dave Ulmer, Marvin Ja- gels, Roger Swanstrom, Dean Holt, Orval Hansen. ee Mathews and Elsie Crey, women's win- n s from Alpha Phi. Em Lgl?77Zd a Row One: Shirley Jacobsen, Mary Louise Will . . . Row Two: Dr. Whitehead tadvisorl, David Ulmer, Orval Hansen. To stimulate interest in debate and to recognize outstanding achievement in intercollegiate debate is the two-fold purpose of Delta Sigma Rho, national debating honorary. Membership is extended to both men and women students who have distinguished themselves in intercollegiate debate at the University of Idaho. Each year the fraternity sponsors a men's and women's intramural debate tournament. All campus living groups are invited to enter teams in the competition for trophies awarded to the winning house or hall. Members of the fraternity also serve during the year as hosts to visiting debate teams. Their welcome was extended to visiting debaters twice during the last year. ln March a team from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point was on the ldaho campus, and again in April a barnstorming team from Stanford stopped in Moscow. Officers for the current year were Dave Ulmer, president, and Mary Louise Will, secretary. Dr. A. E. Whitehead, debate coach and head of the speech department, was group advisor. New initiates added to the rolls in May included Herman McDevitt, Lois Odberg, Kent Lake, lames Aston, and Richard Gibbs. cfzzkrmzzmf Qefafe 9642771215 X w lt 1 32, . 'ggi i f gtg? ,L -A-3 5 'H 'bf fsrj .. -if' : i lfir r inc isive A. . -' 5 1 li'-ff .::'li .. John Peterson and Charles Blanton, men's winners from Kappa Sigma. Rho, Alpha Phi emerged victorious in the women's division, Kappa Sigma, with Lindley Hall as runner-up. ln the intramural debate tournaments sponsored by Delta Sigma fol- lowed by Kappa Kappa Gamma. Winner among the men was agfymzz Hale 627215 This national professional music fraternity for Women has for its purpose the promotion of the highest standard of professional ethics and culture among Women students. Membership is limited to music majors or minors who show promise in the field. Activities included a fall reception for new music students, monthly musicales, and the All-Campus Sing. Officers Were Barbara Clauser, presidentp loyce Walser, vice-presidentg and Rita Reynold, secretary. P14110 ywffzz Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, national musical fraternity for men, has for its aims the development of true fraternal spirit, advancement of the mutual Welfare and brotherhood of music students, and the creation of a sense of loyalty to the Alma Mater. Qrganized on this campus in l936, Phi Mu Alpha has since that time taken part in many activities of a musical nature, their all-campus Song Fest being the best known. Ronald Peck led the group as president, assisted by Vice-President Calvin Long and Secretary Herald Nolies. 96 Seated: Lorraine Rudolf, Beverly Schupfer, Barbara Clauser, Jeanne Foster, Pat Rambo . . . Standing: Jean Daily, Ellomae Holden, Lois Bailey, Elaine Androes, Joanne Peters, Helen Hays, Rita Reynold. Row One: John Schaplowsky, Rus- sell Baurn, S. Keith Forney, Ronald Peck, Calvin Long, Calvin Lyon, James Geddes . . . Row Two: Bob Culbertson, Jim Teague, John Spink, Wallace Johnson, Ralph Fothergill, James Huff, Ben Stro- behn, Jerald Haegele, Pat Day, Glen R. Lockery. The Vandaleers, ldaho's celebrated mixed choir, had a very active season divided between concerts, tours, and guest appearances. Two concerts were given during the year, commencing with the traditional Christmas program ot hymns and carols, which was rebroadcast Christmas Eve by l4 ldaho and Washington radio stations. The Vandaleers demonstrated their diversity in the tinal home concert ot the season by singing tour sepa- rate groups ot songs sacred numbers, operatic selections, tolli ballads, and ldaho college songs. The highlight in the lite ot any Vandaleer is the annual tour, which this year was to southeastern ldaho tor a series ot l9 concerts. Shorter tours were made to Qrotino, Wallace, and Spokane, as well as a special concert tor the northern ldaho educators' convention. Mr. Glen Loclcery, director ot the Vandaleers, is welleversed in the art ot choir-directing, as is perhaps best exhibited by the tame ot the ldaho Vandaleers. Glen R. Lockery Dlresrlzlr Qwmlzkms A portion of the Vandaleers poses with Mr. Lockery in front of the bus which took them on their tour to Wallace. Row One: Donna Brown, Pat Rambo, Louise Miller, Mary Driscoll, Gay Deobald, Tally Brown, Greta Beck, Glen Lockery Cconductorl, Nancy Shelton, Barbara Sweet, Joan Martin, Moena Glenn, Nancy Hamilton, Willa Schumann, Hazel Howard . . . Row Two: Joan Goble, Bernice Bauer, Ellomae Holden, Marlene Hopkins, Joyce Fisher, Sally Norris, Lorraine Rudolph, Naomi Nokes, Susan Staley, Janet Robinson, Jean Whittemore, Patsy Lee, Margaret Mehl, Lou Driggs, Joanne Hopkins, Jeanne Foster, Joanne Peters . . . Row Three: Bob Culbertson, Bob Lind, Saylor Jeppson, Frank Haglund, Tom Wright, Gary Nefzger, Bob McKay, Rex Moulton, Howard May, Jack Gregory, Calvin Long, Clarence Aresvik, Reed Durtschi, Bob Allison, Wayne Jeppson . . . Row Four: Bob Maize, George Poulos, Larry Limbaugh, Jay Fitch, Lon Renfrow, Ben Strobehn, Gordon Scott, Charles Weinmann, Jerry Goecke, Dave Coulter, Jim Hammond, Ed Frandsen, Jack Pepper, Bruce Sweeney, Bruce Gordon. Violins: Carole Crouch, Lois Bailey, Lowell Jobe, Lorene Millsap, Inez Hosch, Marjorie Moline, Eleanor Macler, Rose Marie Jager, Loralee Epperson Peggy George, Adrienne George, William Davidson . . . Viola: Haleen Gunther, Arnold Westerlund, Louis Huber . . . Violincello: Mary Jasper Johnson Donna Burch, Maurice Ritchey, Pat Harris, Miriam Little, Jean Mann Blewett, Harriet Huber . . . Bass: Don Hannah, Alice Bue, Bob Nobis . . . Flute: Anne Hoyt, Pauline Lawson, Shirley Churchill . . . Piccolo: Jeanne Foster . . . Oboe: Barbara Clauser . . . Clarinet: Earl Spencer, John Sheeley . . . Bassoon: Kermit Hosch, Arthur Woodbury . . . Trumpet: Richard Atwood, Lee Robinson . . . French Horn: Calvin Lyon, Ralph Fcthergill, Jim Huff, Donald Hinsverk . . . Trombones: Jerry Haegele, Fred Schmidt, Wallace Johnson . . . Tuba: Louis Spink . . . Percussion: John Jordan, Dale Kassel. Wfzzifmxffy 0 6746535 In addition to many concerts, the University Orchestra played the processional and recessional at the commencement exercises held this spring. Playing under the masterful baton of Director George Michael, the University Symphony Crchestra exhibited a Well-rounded repertoire to substantiate its reputation for excellent performance. Mr. Michael joined ldaho's music staff only this year, replacing Professor Carl Claus, currently on leave of absence. The first musical venture of the year was late in lanuary, when Rossini, Rachmaninoff, and Beethoven lived again during the winter concert. Featured soloist was Ellomae l-lolden, pianist, Who played the first movement of Rachmaninoffs Second Concerto. And in the spring concert held on the last day of April, individual efforts were also featured. Soloists Louise Miller, Naomi Nokes, Lois Bailey, John Sheeley, leanne Pratt, and Robert Nelson were accompanied by the orchestra on a Wide selection of vocal and instrumental treats. Providing the music for baccalaureate and commencement marked the end of the well-played and well-received l95O season. George A. Michael Director Variety and versatility were the aims of the director of the University Band, Kermit l-losch. He desired, and received, a band that could play moving concert music, as well as a brisk march. Everyone became familiar with the band's brilliant black and gold uniforms as they marched and played during the football games this fall. And in addition to playing at sport functions, the band presented two concerts during the year. ln the first, a varied program ranging from popular marches through modern con- temporary numbers was played, as well as "Mood l3astorale," a vivid tone poem by Professor l-lall Macklin. The second concert, which com- memorated National Music Week, featured works of American, British, and Russian composers. This latter group was also performed in Potlatch, previous to its presentation here. A new innovation employed this year was the recording of all the works given by the University Band, Kermit F. Hosch lil fl-.ntl ty- w ' 5 P' , lam- illwllilfy gan! 4 Erecting their music stands on the Ad lawn, the University Band supplied the musical background for the annual May Pete. Members: Anne Hoyt, Jeanne Foster, Barbara Clauser, Arthur Woodbury, John Sheeley, Frank Gunn, Mary Harris, Larry Limbaugh, Wallace Taylor, June Carr, Ann Pickett, Floyd Wanamaker, Russell Baum, Ronald Peck, Edward Anderson, Jack Wigen, Norma Jean Stralovich, Vida Frischknecht, Frank Stone, Jack Peterson, Howard Humphrey, Larry Giles, Barbara Rinaldi, Richard Atwood, Willis Knox, David Earle, Jerry Whiting, James Riggs, Lee Robinson, Ralph Fothergill, Calvin Lyon, James Huff, Donald Hinsverk, Stanley Bray, James Landers, Fred Schmidt, Gary Baxter, Robert Duncan, Wallace Johnson, Louis Spink, Ray Harris, Don Hannah, Stewart McCormack. Ken Smith. Warren Shepherd, Ted Torok, Gail Graham, Jean Daily, Joan King, William Taylor, Jerry Haegele, Kay Humphreys. Norman Fitzsimmona, Dr. Hex-von Snider. l M sl x "WW, fe Members: Ken Anderson, Leroy Anderson, Gene Asher, Claudia Bales, Delores Beadles, Lorraine Bernat, Genette Bertrand, Ruth Bielaer, Betty Bowen, Barbara Brockrnan, Beryl Budd, Joe Cannon, Lou Carlson, June Carr, Paul Clausen, Bonese Collins, Frank Cochrane, Marian Cook, Clara Crom, Helen Daniels, Ruth Dimond, Lois Dodson, Virtona Douglas, Bob English, Jack Ewasen, Jay Fitch, Cecil Fleck, Jim Ford, Bob Fullmer, Lillian Garner, Jim Geddes, Marianne Gessell, Henry Gilbertson, Moena Glenn, Carolyn Goodwin, Kathleen Gray, Jack Gregory, Bill Gugler, Jack Guilloz, Norman Harold- sen, Sharon Henderson, Dean Holt, Roger Hovis, Burt Humphrey, Caryl Ingebritsen, Joan Jansen, Jim Johnson, Keith Judd, Joye Kern, Helen Kersey, Lewis Ladwig, Michaela Lane, Joe Larkin, Corinne Lauriente, Lauretta Lefevre, Leon Lind, Betty Loren, Chloe McKeever, Bob McMahon, Joan Martin, Howard May, Donna Melis, Dick Moore, Alice Nesbitt, Earl Ness, Joan Parks, Jo Pence, Jack Pepper, Carol Peterson, Shirley Pettijohn, Marilyn Pond, John Relk, Faye Sargent, Francis Schulz, Marge Schauer, Maribel Scupfer, Don Scott, Beth Scott, Gordon Scott, Ed Shane, Katherine Shane, Francis Sherwood, Elmer Sperry, Malcolm Stahl, Norman Stuechle, Alice Sturges, Mary Swamby, Pat Sweeney, Barbara Sweet, Donna Thompson, Jean Thom- son, Dean Thornton, Morgan Tovey, Andy Tozier, Beth Tunnicliff, Eileen Tysor, Vera Ulinder, Fred Van Engelen, Ruth Van Engelen, Harriet Walrath, Bob Webb, Lillian Weeks, Ken West, Rose Marie Whitney, Marilyn Williams. fzzbfms fy Lgfkzymx i Their major Work of the season was the presentation of ' Elijah, 3 6 T Q X . Norman Logan Keith Forney Director, University Singers Director, Madrigal Singers vocal background for the May Fete held this spring. MMMZQJWX tgfhgelx ldaho's Madrigal singers, under the direction of Keith Forney ltalian and English schools. A Christmas Serenade with can Waltzes," was given as the climax to this very successful sea ui- 4' 'Y'f,25 'X Qi ff v 'f ft Wifi ff-' 'R This rw . , jf'T"isf'g f . r. ,ry g son for ldaho's newest singing group. 'gg 4, A H, R A .5 4 ,L ,fx P -- wx' 5 ,, , yr, ' ,Q-5 , U 2 -wig 5 - v ' 'Vit , 4 ,. , f ' Q 4 . " -" ' it X Q' iff I. . if ,rss ,Tl 'X-:lv s, , m Asks., A .. , N ,, ,J ., -.f e, 'L '1 N J. W , ,X lw.4xi..Je.f..w"51.f?"rs.,,.1-'t,,,,4 wifi, fag., Kfggjgjj Ligf-'f,5.',,1 ,r .L.,5'2stzw41,,,1' Row One: Sally Norris, Jody Raber, Joyce Fisher, Naomi Nokes, Bernice Bauer, Mary Driscoll . . . Row Two: Bob Lind, Gary Nefzger, Ben Stro- behn, Calvin Long, Mr. Forney tconductorl. WT Take l8O mixed voices, blend them into close harmony, add a spirited refrain, and you have Norman Logan's recipe for the University Singers, the largest musical group on the campus the religious oratorio by Felix Mendelssohn. This work, one of the most popular of its kind, is given once every college gen eration and features many soloists drawn from both faculty and students. ln addition, the University Singers provided the have been active for two years. Choosing its members through tryouts, this group sings numbers from the sixteenth century dles opened the year's activities for the Madrigals, and a spring concert, which highlighted the Brahms' Hlaielzeslieder The ldaho Pep Band, resplendent in their red and brown unitorms, greeted the opening whistle ot the basketball season with a brassy march, or per- haps one ot their well-known l'tillers." But whatever it was, the Pep Band blasted its way into the musical field this year. Perhaps the Pep Bands greatest claim to glory is the annual Pep Band Show, which this year was considerably toned down over previous years. The show was divided into two parts. The tirst part emphasized comparatively serious music, while their 'tlazz Panorama" dominated the second halt. lohn Sheeley, senior music major, was the student director ot the group, the members of which are chosen from the University Band. Earlier in the season, the Pep Band presented a series ot l7 band concerts during an extensive tour ot south- western ldaho high schools. The ldaho Pep Band, in tultilling a need for "brass inspiration," merits the applause ot all the students. E John Sheeley Director eh fgdildf The Idaho. Pep Band is well known for the musical interludes they supply at all Idaho varsity basketball games, and especially for their Hquickies Clarinets: Frank Gunn, John Sheeley, Howard Humphrey, Earl Spencer, Larry Limbaugh, Bill Taylor, Forrest White, Arthur Woodbury Saxophones Ed Anderson, Earnie St. John, Wallace Taylor . . . Bass Clarinet: Jack Peterson . . . Trumpets: Richard Atwood, James Burns, Willis Knox Jim Riggs Bob Olson, Eddie Williams . . . Trornbones: Jerry Haegele, Wallace Johnson, Fred Schmidt, Russ Irwin . . . French Horns: Ralph Fothergill Cal Lyon . . . Baritone: Stanley Bray . . . Bass: Don Hannah, Bob Nobis . . . Percussion: Joe Dion, Warren Sheppard. Colonel Charles Hudson Professor of Military Science and Tactics "Fall infcome on, you guys, come-to dresser-ight dress . . . huh-ten-chunfno talking there . . . Pah-rah-hacle restfsnap those rifles-out . . . At restedisrnissedln So that the United States would be provided with trained military personnel in any emergency, the Morrill Land Grant Act stipulated that military training must be given at all land-grant colleges. And today, the ldaho ROTC detach- ment's stated mission is the preparation of junior officers who will serve the nation's needs in time of emergency. A two-year course in Military Training is compulsory for all physically fit males attending the university. Those who take two extra years along with their regular college courses may win a commission in the United States Army. The ROTC program comprises about 350 individuals, of Whom 48 were enrolled in the advanced courses. Colonel Charles F. Hudson, Professor of Military Science and Tactics, assisted by Major l-larley Miller, executive, and four other officers and six enlisted per- sonnel, heads the department and offers this instruction. Twenty-five cadets attended the required summer camp at Fort Lewis, Washington, accompanied by five members of the ldaho permanent staff, Who serve as instructors. ARMY STAFFfRow One: Sgt. Derrill Quigley, M.Sgt. Frank Rutledge, ARMY SENIOR OFFICERSfRow One: Robert Strom, Fred Reich, Cliff Sgt. Robert Moore, M.Sgt. Paul Curd, Sgt. Jesse Vickers . . . Row Two: Elledge, John Miller, John Black, Roy Hooper . . . Row Two:Williarn Gray, Major Harley Miller, Capt. Conrad Underdahl, Capt. Weldon McBride, Capt. Thane Johnson, Leo Winegar, Robert Lyons, Fred Beckman, William Henry Zimmerman, lst Lt. Rex Blewett, M.Sgt. John Rundall. Sweet. "Now listen, you guys, this may appear in the Gem, -and then you turn this, which raises that " "But, sir, which end does the bullet--'?" so I'1l flunk anyone who doesn't look enthusias- tic!" lflfdly germ! Row One: William Taylor, Horace Nealey, Howard Humphrey, Robert Johnson, My- ron Johnston, Darrell Callihan, Jack Springer, Donald Johnson . . . Row Two: Fred Schmidt, Kenneth Kornher, Stanley Bray, Dallas Fuller, Guy Allee, Edward Downen, Richard Eller, Wallace Taylor, Robert Parish, Lewis Petrinovich . . . Row Three: Gene Pollan, Richard Kline, Skip Pierce, Edwin Clizer, Tom Gentry, Pat Duffy, Kenny Farmer, Jerry Jacobson, Jerald Haegele . . . Row Four: Stewart McCormack, Ray Harris, Louis Spink, Ivan French, Dick Newton, Arnold Bahr, Fred Kopke, John Pline, Norman Fitz- simmons . . . Row Five: Norman Kennedy, Dale Kassel, David Beadles, Kenneth Smith. The Military Band, representing the top musical talent ot the RCTC and ARQTC units, supplies the rhythm tor the cadets marching in parades, inspections and retreats. The extra duty thereby involved was somewhat enhanced loy the extra halt- credit the members receive. Also, the group, led by Kermit Hosch, went formal this spring and presented an outdoor con- cert on the Ad lawn. Row One: Ralph Miller, Robert Taylor, Gerald Van Hardenberg, Dean Lenander, Joseph Fisher . . . Row Two: lst Lt. Rex Blewett, M,Sgt. John Rundall, Boyd Burt, Carlyle Brough, Gordon Kreisher, Richard Kline, Robert Wilkinson, Martin Ourada, Roy Eastman, Howard Chadwick, M.Sgt. Francis Rutledge, Capt. Conrad Under- dahl, rifle team coach. ,W QM W Twenty-two Wins and only six losses in postal meets was the season's record ot the Army Rifle Team, made up ot volunteers from the Idaho RCTC unit. ln competition tor the Hearst trophy, the team placed second in the Sixth Army Area, losing to the University of San Francisco by just two points. Three victorious shoulder-to-shoulder matches were tired against the Navy Ritle Team. Row One: Robert Strom, Cliff Elledge, Bill ' Sweet, Fred Reich, Roy Hooper, Bill Gray, Dan O'Connell . . . Row Two: Phil Schnell, Al Prince, Farley Cherry, Bill Rowberry, Art Perkins, Dick Geisler, Tom Boyd, Ma- jor H. N. Miller, advisor. ldaho's sixth regiment ot Scabbard and Blade, a national society organized in l905, picks its junior and senior members on a basis ot character and proficiency in military sciences. Parley Cherry was elected to represent the group at the national convention in Cleveland, Chic. Choosing its new initiates in the spring, Scab- bard and Blade was the co-sponsor ot the annual Military Ball. Row One: Carl Stamm, Burt Humphrey, Michio Kaku, John Lesher, Fred Cully . . . Row Two: Gerald Van Hardenberg, Herbert Schroeder, Dale Douglas, Dale Everson, William Shaw, Thomas Bucklin, Stuart Hutchins, Clayton Boyce, Philip Meagher, Don Ouane, Chester Takatori . . . Row Three: Meade Kohl, Paul Clausen, John Lacy, Harlan Olson, Gary Nefzger, Don Amos. James Oates, Roy Kaku, Frank Kleist, Lester Diehl, Bob Reeves, Don Waltman, Clayton Turner, Bruce Whit- more . . . Row Four: Dale Scott, Elroy Brandt, Boyd Burt, Bruce Gordon, John Kugler, Dick Bershon, James Cranston, John Telgener, Harley Jordan, John Hecht- ner, Harvey Pate, Harry Brizee, William Nelson . . . Row Five: Virgil Muck, Vernon Thomas, Del Naser, Lee Boyle, Eugene Thometz, John Ghigleri, Donald Trupp, K A Melvin McCoury, Robert Betts, Robert ' Dxincan, Robert Peterson, Michael Chu- f ' t ril a. Outstanding RCTC students are tapped tor this national military honorary. The group is characterized by snappy drills in their annual competition with the navy drill team. Qther projects are tlag raising ceremonies at football games, a spring picnic, and participation in arranging the annual Military Ball. Otticers last year were Carl Stamm, captain: Burton Humphreys, tirst lieu- tenant, and lohn Lesher, second lieutenant. 'ts C gifs f . 5622554 J fm! 154142 is . we 5 .. wage eflsizkzg ffffks Major Edward E. Lundak Professor of Air Science and Tactics "Hup, hup, hup, hoo, hee, hor" chanted these Air volunteers f?J, marching in the soggy Homecoming Day parade, The Air Force ROTC became a separate detachment on the ldaho campus for the first time this year, with Major Edward Lundak as Professor of Air Science and Tactics. Qther officers assigned to the unit were Major Terry Miller, Assistant Professor of Air Science and Tactics, Captain Robert lones, in charge of sopho- more training, and Captain Monte Robertson, unit adjutant. Underclass cadets number 355, with advanced students totaling 85. The latter group study and drill five hours weekly, and are paid 27 bucks a month for their labors. Successful graduates are commissioned second lieutenants in the Air Force reserve, and the most distinguished are tendered regular Air Force commissions. The advanced students may specialize either in administration, with the reguired summer encampment at Hamilton Field, California, or in communica- tions, camping for the summer at Scott Field, lllinois. in preparation for the annual inspection in the spring, all the ARQTC students were seen performing early drill in the wee hours of the morning, in addition to the regular Thursday stint. This practice was rewarding, however, for the idaho detachment received a rating of excellent for this area. AIR STAFF-Row One: M.Sgt. Garth McDaniel, Captain Monte Robertson, AIR STUDENT STAFF-Row One: Alfred Prince, William Woodland, Par- M.Sgt. Russell Windham . . . Row Two: Major Jerry Miller, 'I'.Sgt. Ottie ley Cherry, Louis De Moss, Allen Derr . . . Row Two: Arthur Perkins, Ken- Guin, S.Sgt. Richard Kyle. neth Briggs, Jack Lacy, Orson Anderson, Robert Mays, Robert Worthing- ton, Frank Whitsel. Major Lundak introduces these juniors to the vu-scope, with which he can write on the black- board without turning around. Surrounded by the Navy and one of their ships while in summer camp "But there really aren't so many knobs," points out Major Miller, instructor in advanced corn- munications. near Hamilton Field, in Calif., these Air Force cadets don't look happy. fi GYMNASIUM ANNEX 9.0.19 Asn-msc: Row One: Alan Huggins, Norman Tilley, Allen Derr, Pax-ley Cherry, Robert English, Carl Starnm . . . Row Two: Jay Green, Boyd Barker, Gary Sessions, Bob Geisler, Winston Bishop, William Olesen, Keith Judd, Charles Muehlethaler, Paul Daily . . . Row Three: Preston Bair, James Dun- ham, Max Herrington, Frank Whitsel, Harry Isaman, Frank Pentzer, John Ma- theson, Herald Nokes, Brian Brunzell. final! agawfy Named in honor of General of the Army H. H. Arnold, the Arnold Society of Air Cadets is the newest of the military honoraries. lts aims are to encourage greater teamwork, technical knowledge, and cooperation among ARQTC students. And although new to the campus, the group got into the swing of things by co-sponsor- ing the Military Ball. The faculty advisor is Major lerry Miller. 4756! I Q mm William Olesen, P. J. Daily, Parley Cherry, Alfred J. Prince, Carlyle Brough. ln its first year on the campus, the ARQTC Rifle Team became noted throughout the Northwest for its ballistic prowess. Inter- collegiate competition is held by means of telegraphic matches, in which each team fires at its home ground, and then the scores are compared. ln ccmpetition for the Hearst Trophy, the Idaho team took first ribbons over twenty other schools in the western region, and ninth place in competition with one hundred forty- one schools in the nation. ...... A The NRO boys were obliged to do early morning drill last spring. And some of these mornings they were so sleepy they couldn't stand up straight. The University ot ldaho is one ot the 52 leading colleges and universities in the United States having a Naval RCTC unit. Cne hundred eleven students are enrolled in the program, and, upon graduation, these Vandal midshipmen will become commissioned otticers in the regular Navy, Naval Reserve, Marine Corps, or Marine Corps reserve. Twelve otticers and enlisted men, led by Captain C. A. Chappell, teach these students basic navy tundamentals tor the lirst two years, and then tackle such complex subjects as navigation, engineering, and gunnery. All students take a three-hour course each term tor tour years. Regular stu- dents take three summer cruises ot six weeks each, and contract students take one cruise ot three weeks duration. Regular students, appointed as the result ot a nation-wide competitive examination, receive S550 per month plus tuition and books. They are commissioned into regular service. Contract students, who receive about S27 tor the last two years alone, receive reserve commissions. This year Stanley Tanner and Russell Mottett received commissions as ensigns in the United States Navy. I m ,Q Captain C, A. Chappell Professor of Naval Science 45 1 .nt R223 iv Q BATTALION OFFICERS Row One: John Clayborne, Roger Allen, Charles THE NAVY STUDENT OFFICERS are those who, lacking the educational Mendenhall. Robert Smith,Henry Holt, Jacob Kertz, Daniel Piraino . . . Row background equivalent to their rank, enroll in school for five semesters, Two: Robert Possum, Russell Moffett, James Landers, Norrnand Green, where they specialize in science and mathematics. This extra training thus Wendell Gladish. James LaGrone, Jerry Rockwood, George Tanner. enables them to compete with the regular navy officers. Cgdyk mf! M0501 My ,lbxlzff tggzfzmf mit, W W The Eagle and Anchor Club, organized in the early part of l947, provides extra-curricular ac- tivities, fellowship and development of leader- ship among midshipmen. Some of the highlights of the past season were the highly informal 'Shipwreck Dance," and the "Navy Ball." Offi' cers of the group are Stan Tanner, CQ, and lerry Rockwood, executive, with Hal Cottrell, mess treasurer. Row One: Tanner, Riedesel, Shauer, Johnson, Byrnes, Dough- erty, Mccreight, Bruins . . . Row Two: A. Johnson, Coombs, Enes, Tyksinslxi, Wheelock, Burroughs, Nicholas . . . Row Three: D. Johnson, Prisby, Bull, Donovan, Jackson, Hoover . . . Row Four: Gordon, Wills, Taylor, Jessup, White . . . Row Five: Parker, Boyden, Wood, Knopp, Rosenthal . . . Row Six: Hespelt, Hearn, Holder, Thorp, Ingersoll, Mueller. The NROTC Precision Drill Team was organized in October, l948, and since then their blue uni- forms and white web belts have become familiar sights on the campus and in town. ln the short time which it has existed the unit has established a reputation for prowess in military drill, which it exemplified this spring by defeating three other marching teams in a drill contest. The unit commander is lohn Clayborne. Row One: John Clayborne, Theodore Ingersoll, Prank Gunn, John Keller, Wm. Tyksinslxi, Jack Mccreight, Robert Dougherty . . . . Row Two: James Landers, Roger Allen, William Hoover, Richard Bellamy, George Mueller . . . Row Three: Wendell Gladish, Frank Wheelock, Jack Rosenthal, Harold Gordon, Richard White, William Enes. The Navy Rifle Team, composed almost entirely of freshmen, completed a very successful season, considering their lack of experience on the fir- ing line. Two trips were made during the season, one to Pullman for a match with WSC, and an' other to Seattle for a triangular match with Washington and Oregon State. Kneeling: Dougherty, Prisby, Shauer, Johnson . . . Standing: Sgt. West, Wood, Taylor, Byrnes, Gordon, A'Better watch out, Stemple, you can't sneak out with that model." Commander Pugh may be stating a fact. IFS the one-ball in the side pocket for these middies in the exclusive Hofficers' Club." but these seniors seem to doubt it. wganfbabbnx 4972441132 Ayqffzaaaafbs M155 fluff! gwillff s IIyN gf!!! Key Goal of AH Activity Men The first Kampus Key off the presses is examined by Editor Orval Hansen, one of Blue Key's most active members. These contestants didn't win first prize, but their skit at the Blue Key talent show was judged an outstanding hit by the audience. A blue key is their emblem . . . worn among the keys proclaiming the wearer a member ot many other campus honoraries . . . membership reguirements include scholarship, leadership, and extra-curricular activi- ties . . . service to the university is their goal . . . including an information bureau during registration . . . guide service tor high school seniors on University Day . . . new project was publication ot the Kampus Key edited this year by Qrval l-lansen . . . a tall mixer acguaints new students with college tunctions . . . general campus clean-up day to prepare ldaho tor Mother's Day . . . Morgan Tovey was president . . . other otticers were Rich Pennell, vice-presidentg Phil Schnell, secretaryg Clint Peterson, treasurer. Row One: John Barinaga, Francis Flex-chinger, Ken McCormack, Rich Pennell, John Martin, Dave Ulmer, Bob Culbertson . . . Row Two: Gary O. Sessions, Al Denman, David Thacker, Kenneth Briggs, Fred B. Watson fadvisorb, Morgan Tovey tpresidentl, Dean Mosher, Ox-val Hansen, Phil Schnell . . . Row Three: Jim Farmer, Clint Peterson, Bill Sweet, Norman Farnham, Bill Gartin, Herb Carlson, Bob Finlayson, Bob Moulton, Vern Bahr, Del Klaus, Bill Hansen. New Uniforms Brighten Campus Thirteen outstanding senior Women were chosen to keep Mortar Board ideals burning throughout the l949-l95O school year . . . membership in this group is the dream oi every college Woman . . . Narthex Table invitations are extended on May Day morning at an annual serenade . . . May baskets are left tor those chosen . . . tapping includes the pre- sentation ot a single red rose at the annual May Fete . . . group keeps busy during the year with the annual Mortar Board mum sale at Homecoming . . . a mum is now standard equipment at every Homecoming game . . . the Spinster Skip highlights the April activities . . . the annual event was announced at the women's houses with a highly entertain- ing skit . . . highlight of tapping was the invitation ot Mrs. lesse Buchanan to membership . . . Shirley Tanner was presi- dent . . . Rosemary Harland, vice-president . . . Aris Peterson, secretary . . . Sheila Darwin, treasurer . . . Valeta Hersh- berger, historian . . . Group advisors are Dr. and Mrs. Boyd Martin, Dean Louise Carter, and Miss lean Collette. Row One: Sue Bearclsley, Aris Peterson, Shirley Tanner, Rosemary Harland, Phyllis LaRue, Bette West . . . Row Two: Sheila Darwin, Marge Walters, Gay Deobald, Jean Daily, Cla:-ice Hove, Valeta Hershberger. Sue Beardsley Jean Daily Sheila Darwin Gay Deobald Rosemary Harland Valeta Hex-shberger Clarice Hove Phyllis LaRue Aris Peterson Shirley Tanner Donna L. Vassar Marge Walters Bette West 0541102 Outstanding Service Wins Ribbon of Silver Lance Membership in this local honorary is a culmination ot three years ot outstanding leadership on the campus . . . meetings are intreguent . . . members represent all phases ot campus activity . . . Bob Moulton, student body president, held political ottices tor tour years . . . earned membership in Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Eta Sigma . . . l-lerb Carlson gained national tame by Winning the national collegiate boxing championship for three years . . . was selected outstanding boxer tor l95O . . . Dean Mosher, track letterman, yell king, and Vandaleer, also found time to serve on l-lomecoming and Dad's Day committees . . . Tom Rigby, as president ot lndependent Caucus, Delta Sigma Rho, and lnternational Relations Club, was a four-year varsity debater . . . Del Klaus, active in journalism, served on the ASUI executive board and led the senior class as prexy . . . Ken McCormack, football star tor three years, was a member ot Phi Eta Sigma, junior class president, and vice-president oi the senior class. Torn Rigby, Ken McCormack, Del Klaus, Bob Moulton, Herb Carlson, Dean Mosher. Herb Carlson Del Klaus Ken McCormack Dean Mosher Bob Moulton Tom Rigby zghms Sophomore Waddlers Serenade and Serve "We are the Spurs, we're boldly marching on," expresses the mottoauflt your serviceniot the ldaho Spurs . . . two are chosen from each women's house and hall on the cam- pus tor outstanding gualities ot leadership and service . . . no university tunction is complete unless these smiling women in white are ushering . . . other activities include selling cottee and hot dogs at the football games . . . the Spur Waddle and the winding of the Maypole are two events anticipated by the entire campus . . . a familiar sight and sound to all is the clanking spur worn everywhere tor a week by each new pledge . . . big moment ot the year is the naming ot the l'Spur ot the Moment" at the Spur-l K danceg this year it was Maralee McReynolds . . . president this year was Marcella Minden . . . other otticers included lanet Fulton, vice-presidentp Elaine Cope, secretaryg and Virginia Qrazem, treasurer . . . Mrs. W. H. Boyer is advisor. t f i EH F t E im .. M ,z 4 Row One: Connie Teed, Pat Rambo, Beth Lillard, Margaret Austad, Maralee McReynolds, Marilyn Evans, Naida Whybark . . . Row Two: Mrs. Katy Rae Boyer, Deloris Knight, Joyce Becker, Janet Fulton, Marcella Minden, Elaine Cope, Virginia Orazem, Mary Louise Will . . . Row Three: Mary Jean Geertsen, Helen Daniels, Betty Thompson, Beverly Balka, Pat Albertson, June Schalkau, Helen Church, Alice Henry, Joan Martin, Evelyn Burks, Jeanne Nagel, Beverly Benson. 116 cfzfmcafkgfdfe filly! 5 Loyalty and Service Guide Idaho Knights Sophomore honorary for service and loyalty . . . two fresh- man men are elected to represent each living group . . . 2.0 grade average reguired for initiation into Ball and Chain chapter . . . silver and gold knight's head worn on white sweater emblematic of lK's , . . cooperated jointly with Spurs to sponsor boxing tournament . . . ushered at football, basketball, and boxing games . . . Spur-lK ex- change and picnic held . . . biggest activity was selling of programs at Homecoming . . . lntercollegiate Grail Cup for outstanding service presented to Don Deerkop at May Pete . . . lim Geddes chosen "Knight of the Night" by chapter . . . officers were Dave Ulmer, lohn Grubb, Don , Meacham, Bob Greer, Boyd Barker, lohn Hasbrouck and Wilbur Gard. w One: Thomas H. Gentry, James W. Geddes, Donald Deerkop, Warren Peterson, Chester Takatori, Harold Hen:-ie, Lloyd Dunn . . . Row Two: David dles, Benjamin Nicholas, Bob Greer, John Grubb, Dave Ulmer, Boyd Barker, Kenneth Keefer, Paul Lonardo . . . Row Three: Don Mitchell, J. Mossman, G ne McNee, Charles Wood, Elwyn Larson, Jim Miller, Stan Riggers, Cleon Kunz. ki Q ,,i 3? iii' 49 'A bcgrffiij zz am zz eo ee l-i e fi -1 M W A S R Scholastic Goals Achieved by Women W Z re X A purely scholastic honorary . . . composed ot all freshman Women ffl, Q K Q X who earn a 3.5 grade average during their tirst semester at ldaho . . . f Q a tea given in the tall acquaints prospective members with the organi- 'W' s- ff fl A X zation . . . presented the Alpha Lambda Delta award to Vida Baugh at Hp? the May Fete . . . otticers Were lune Schalkau, presidentg Connie Teed, ff 'I xl l j I Vice-presidentg Nadine Tisdall, treasurerg Caryl lngebritsen, secretary. '7 Y f rt lsaili .7 'f Row One: Nadine Tisdall, Janet Fulton, June Schalkau, Caryl Inge- ritsen . . . Row Two: Margie Kin- ney, Joan Raymer, Betty Thomp- son, Jody Raber, Connie Teed. zu O s o 5 ft U rl m '1 - E. --QQW' 99'ssts Bug--gin: .-omD-- .+g: 'tfigl 'P 5fs?5r 252522 . rv-Zllll L. Henry, Gary B Johnston, Michio Schroeder, Dean J Row Two: William Waters, Kick Raiv B roughs, Roy Kaku, Kuper, Frank Schrontz, Reed Durtschi, El- vin G. Mation . . . David M. Sampson, Robert Gartin Don Theophilus, Jr H N 1 ey. Gordon Henning, Richard An drews, Roy Parker, Todd Frohman . . . Row Four: Edwin Clizer, Rich- ard W. White, Torn Bergerud, Bill Boyden, Ken Giles, Skip Pierce, John Bengston, Albert Bracke- husch, Robert Mitchell. hge M 5 y Hi! C912 cglymfz 5- t my N , . , . , , K A dl! High Scholastic Attainment Wins Membership k-! 'K' J ln if ' X' f 1 Exceptional scholastic achievement is the requirement tor treshman mer Wishing to join this honorary . . . established at Idaho in l934 . . . initia ' ' tion requires a 3.5 or better . . . initiation banquet is major tunction o . the year . . . publication ot "How to Study" was last year's project . . . Myron E. lohnston, lr., was president . . . Michio Kalcu, vice-president 5 Gary Bassett, secretaryp and Herb Schroeder, treasurer. ll8 r i Q - W zz 1 mage l r' gf! fi ff ' U K . , , . Honorary Presents University with Memorial Plaque l l Sa x at 1 Previous training in scouting plus satisfactory scholastic standing are ,X 4 requirements for membership in Alpha Phi Omega . . . Craudy Gert fa 0 2 and Ugly lke contest held yearly . . . funds received helped pay for 'X K-fd' the World War ll memorial plaque in the Student Union building . . . f members this year painted the "I" tower . . . Bob Culbertson served as H president . . . was aided by lohn Evans, vice-presidentg Cecil Fleck X I.. " and Don Wills, secretaries, and Bill Stemple, treasurer. Q Ln J -MM 4 M " Row One: Jack McCreight, Lloyd , Fred Kopke . . . Row Two bert Culbertson, Cecil Fleck, r me. a. W EF EPO 5 :r' D- 5 gg UI '4 O ff' 5 Q ohn W. Evans, Don Wills, James chutt . . . Row Three: Ted Torok, ger Allen, Ted Ingersoll, Jim V eorge Vehrs, Bob Kleff ner, John Bengtson, Burt Hum phrey. Row One: Jean Whittemore, Janie MacMillan, Bob Nixon, Kenneth Keefer, Harold Gerber, James Mar- shall, Sharon Henderson, Nancy omggiggg t at 3 2: 2: 511 ,Q o c S 3 -J S e o: Kaye Fletcher , Dick Meyer, Howard imms, Fred Farmer, John Meyer, ank Gaylord, John Schaplowsky, . Guilloz, L. G. umphrey, Alton Harris, Frank unn . . . Row Three: Charles Behre, Bob Riddle, Chet L. Shaw- ver, Walt Foltz, Don Fowler, Marvin Utter, Keith Keefer, Loran Mercier, Bert Stanford, Jim DePartee. QQ? ,aww W Artists Feature Christmas Cards, Bridge Party Unusual club of art and architecture students . . . donated two hundred and fifty dollars for modern furnishings at art building . . . money raised by making and selling Christmas cards and by annual bridge party . . . picnic held at ski lodge . . . annual spring formal was big success . . . club head was Harold Gerber, lim Marshall, vice-president, Kenneth Keefer, secretary, Norman Tilley, treasurer, Pete Sabolchy, social chair- man. 119 owes ff Z Q? Student Wives Sponsor Outstanding Style Show Q2 A local organization, this group tirst met in 1941 . . . made up ot Wives ot students and married women students . . . handcratt, bridge, and social meetings are among their activities . . . big event each semester X-Z is the party "the girls" give tor their hubbies . . . Norma Blackburn served as presidentg lean lones, vice-president, Barbara Backus, secre- tary, Max treasurer. ine Steward, corresponding secretary, and Lillian Van Epps, J ff' 6, 7 .rr Tj O Row One: Marjorie Ann Deinhard, Martie Mast, Lillian Van Epps, Bar- bara Backus, Mrs. Louis Cady, Norma Blackburn, Dolores Juve, Jean Jones, Jean Fritts, Carrna Morgan, Meda Coupe . . . Row Two: Sheila Sullivan, Beverly Taylor, Jackie Fairley, Myrtle Bean, Phyllis Reynolds, Maui-ine Turnbull, Hel- ene Gilliland, Dorothy Lewis, Mary Niece, Shirley Elledge, Ardath Cum- mins, Belva Ellis . . . Row Three: Virginia Whetsler, Rita Hanley, Maxine Stewart, Louise Newbry, Evelyne Jensen, Inge Voch, Andrea Zagelow, Jerry Little, Beulah Clat- felter, Jeanne Judd, Phyllis Per- rine, Laurel Campbell. Alyce Titus, Elizabeth Seelos . . . Row Four: June'Welling, Vivian Sipila, Ruby Lind, Dora Stevenson, Nellie Mae Tripp, Marie Wood, Adelia Cole, Betty Shanahan, Anne Jeanette Al- brethsen, Barbara Nelson, Bobbie Lou Hansen. Seated: Virginia Korn, Erma Jean Jackle, Margaret Weber, Mrs. W. P. Lehrer, Jr. fadvisorl, Joan Row- berry, Loralee Epperson . . . Stand- ing: Gloria Badraun, Glorian Maule, Jo Garner, Alma Anderson, Arden Johnson, Shirley Jackle, Jean Whittemore. 1 5 Z mf, 4 ,M T ix Vw "NS f W, rs 4 ff , V f 1 . Z' - 120 EDMMW Masonic Daughters Continue Projects Membership made up ot lob's Daughters who are in good standing . . . a comparatively new chapter on this campus . . . has given much help to the Moscow 1ob's Daughters . . . meets once a month . . . the year's big social event is the annual Christmas party held with the Moscow lob's Daughters . . . otticers were Margaret Weber, president, loan Rowberry, vice-presidentg Erma lean laclile, secretaryj and Mrs. W. P. Lehrer, advisor. L at My Mr! it Vi at ' Sq Ag Students Sponsor Little International x -f 2 . Organized in l9l8 . . . agricultural or ag engineering majors constitute Q O W membership . . . Ag Bawl held . . . box social with Home Ec Club was - 'ct next . . . Ag Banquet and participation in Little lnternational ended if activities . . . lohn Turnbull was president with Darrell Bienz, vice- , president: lohn Lawrence, secretary, and Ed Rowbury, treasurer. X S l f if Row One: George Sullivan, Ken- neth Frederiksen. John A. Law- rence, Gary O. Sessions, David Thacker, Jesse Beckman, John J. Sinden . . . Row Two: Paul Schwa- bedissen, Douglas J. Cook, Fred A. Beckman, Ed Rowbury, Vern Bahr, Bruce Gordon, L. Dean Hale . . . Row Three: Lee Dean, Floyd C. Rowbury, David Craner, Norman C. Jones, Frank Morrison, Keith Judd, Lynn T. Stevenson . . . Row Four: Ward Sutton, Lee B. Boyle, John S. Townsend, Jr., Jack O'Leary, Fran- cis Flerchinger, Gerald Weaver . . . Row Five: Francis E. Ryset, Robert D. Schild, Alden H. Fitch, Harry F. lsaman, Jr., Orville H. Roberts, George O'Leary, Don Mitchell . . . Row Six: Delno Moore, John D. Turnbull, Dale Everson, Darrel Bienz, Norman Haroldsen . . . Row Seven: Jim Baggett, William Meyer, John Henry Paulson. Row One: Lee Bean, Zimri Mills. Bill Berry, William Nelson, Eugene Craig, Marvin Hetrick, Ted Diehl . . . Row Two: Russell Baum. Paul Corak, Donald Stewart, Richard Lloyd, William Walkington, Theo- dore McDaniel, Robert Pittard . . . Row Three: Rhys Tovey, Richard Miller, Kenneth Smith, Galen Mc- Master, Alfred Anderson, Martin Ourada, Glenn Meares, Leslie Ab- bott, Wayne Robison, Joe Schmid fadvisorl, Donald Rydrych, Gerald Van Hardenberg, Vernon Gallup. Mx gmxqaief 2 ity Cgfzgrfzms Field Trips, Smokers Highlight Group Activities Aim is to acguaint Ag Engineers With the professional field . . . Won the Little international Cup for the best float three out of four years . . . Engineer's Ball . . . annual field trips . . . officers include Zimri Mills, president: Galen McMaster, vice-president: Robert Pittard, secretary- treasurerg Russell Baum, scribe: Dick Toevs and Leslie Abbott, engineer- ing council representatives . . . loe Schmid served as advisor. Xx 1 X R ll fl f Q N' X ,J l o 1 X fliemmzf Cgfzgzrzemx Chemical Engineers Pave Way for Atomic Age Theodore Deobald headed this chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers . . . their chief function is the promotion of interest in the chemical engineering profession . . . membership made up of all men enrolled in that department of the university . . . other officers were Lawrence Morrison, vice-presidentg lames l-luff, secretary-treas urerg Perry Trout and l-larold Brammer, representatives . . . Dr. C. C. Reiser is the group advisor. Row One: Carl Pharis, Bryan Ram- bo, Delbert McNealy, James Welsh, Sherman Weisgerber, Gale McMur- trey . . . Row Two: Richard Kearns, William Burns, Aclson Starner, John Mayo, James Petersen, Wil- liam Briggs, Clair Christiansen . . . Row Three: Donald Cox, Richard Stitt, William Farley, James Bur- I ton, Cabell Fearn, James Mecham, George Harolclsen, Vernon Hyatt . . . Row Four: Douglas Finkeln- berg, Jean Collins, Frederick Bag- ley, Boyd Kramer, Robert Barton, Richard Nichols, Wayne Hall. f ball' fs: mg? 'Q iii at egg il' Row One: Theodore Deobald, Law- rence Morrison, James Huff, Perry Trout, Harold Brammer, Dr. C. O. Reiser . . . Row Two: Kenneth Clat- felter, Douglas McCallum, Keith Bowman, Jonathan Rice, John Borg, Charles Crothers, Tommy Ambrose . . . Row Three: Eugene Coppinger, Kenneth Hayden, Ever- ett Weakley, Todd Frohman, James Maxwell, Jack Kendall, Franklin Wheelock. V7 ,ZZ 1- : y L, W 2 0 0 n C rw flylildiif X '-L Dam Field Trip Exhausts Group f I 7 ,J sf X ,Af 'L UU National organization including all civil engineers . . . field trip to ff U X 'l McNary Dam . . . Northwest Student Conference and annual banquet S D made up other events . . . lohn Mayo was presidentg lames G. Mechan K., J vice-presidentg Adson Starner, secretaryg Cabell Fearn, treasurer 122 .1 K 0 l l me' , Sharie! Sfzqzkzems Double-E Maiors Inspect New Lab Quarters l Organized on campus in l9l2 . . . composed of all electrical engineers . . . a Lab party and dance plus a steak try are main events . . . otticers Were: chairman, Donald Laprayg vice-chairman, Donald Baumgartnerg secretary, William Adams: treasurer, Frederick Hylandg and advisor, Mr. I. Hugo lohnson. sw, i X E xi 'L '-'ei S-ra Row One: Frank Kilian, George R. Williams, James Bell, Dan McDev- itt, Joe Eyrich, Carlyle Brown, Bur- ton Van Epps, Joe Clegg. John Barinaga . . . Row Two: William Burstedt, Charles Abbott, Donald Miller, Finas Harvey, John Pline, Carl Starnrn, Carl Meserve, Clyde Manghan . . . Row Three: James Grothaus, O. Zane Coupe, Ladd Sutton, L. V. Roe, Don Fullmer, William Parish, H. E. Hattrup, Prof. J. H. Johnson, Ruel Barrus . . . Row Four: Wayne Johnson, Keith Dedrick, Willard Roe, Ken- neth Allen, Melford Friend, Don Lapray, William Fisher, Jerry Frick . . . Row Five: Thomas Johnson, Milton F. Barton, Frederick Hy- land, Donald Baumgartner, Theo- dore Rosenau, Roy F. Doupe, Ed- ward W. Purdy, Roger Cone. gfwwidfl haf C9 primers Field Trips, Banquets, Movies Activate Group .411 Consists ot all students in the department ot Mechanical Engineering . . . is the student branch ot the American Society ot Mechanical Engineers purpose is to promote the protession on campus . . . field trips, banguets, and movies concerning engineering comprise the year's activ- iies . . . otticers included lohn Nesbitt, chairman, Alfred Horch, vice- chairmang lohn Spinlc, secretary, and George Haugland, treasurer. Row One: Prof. Henry F. Gauss, Nelson William, Delbert Robison, Carlton McMulIin, Merlin Francis, Stanley Thomas, Louis Harame, Bruce Whitmore . . . Row Two: John Nesbitt, Kenneth Sipila, George Bellos, Jr., Robert Dx-exler, Ronald Reese, Jim Teague, Torleif Aune, Roger Hovis, Robert Mc- Creedy, John Sandell, Joseph G. Davis, Al. Horch . . . Row Three: B. W. Gibson, Dale Nesbitt, George Webb, James Schuff, Walt Young- strom, John Evans, Alfred Byrne, Charles Shoun, John Gael-xel, John Spink . . . Row Four: Edward Stell, Rex Hill, James Flanagan, Clayton Boyce, George Kinsolving, Donald R. Adams, Gordon Henning, James M. Peterson, Robert Hendron, Jas. Fiala, John Caswell, Ralph Schier- man, Richard Sheppard, George Haugland . . . Row Five: N. F. Hin- dle, J. T. Norgord. f ,ff m X 'H 5 ' V i if, ' XXGUIZQJZ! Qlvlesfefls J' , , , W i N Woodchoppers Ball Wms Campus Notice , "' Q, BX .. W One of the oldest clubs on campus . . . promotes interest in forestry profession among forestry students . . . highlight of year's activities was Woodchoppers' Ball featuring Paul Bunyan's visit to Vandal land with ff his ox, Babe . . . a fall banguet, participation in forestry week, Forester's banquet, and a lug Band kept club's year filled with activities . . . Bruce k Colewell was president, Walter L. Robinson, vice-president, lohn Tkach, x secretary, Glen Youngblood, treasurer, Charles Muehlethaler, ranger. Row One: Carmichael, Gorsuch, Fellin, Whitt, Driver, Seale, Deters, Tisdale, Dalke, Clark, McGee, Youngblood, Holton, Davis . . . Row Two: Egger, Engwer, Fulcher, Hunter, Basile, Wood, Andrews, Ellis, Wohletz, Matzner, Herman, Burchard, Martin, L., Holt, Finney . . . Row Three: Cook, F., Mc- Mahon, Hoskins, Merrick, Krajew- ski, Hutchinson, Adams, Andrus, Bennett, Robinson, Welker, Pfaff, Martin, D., Verdal, Favor . . . Row Four: Noble, Coffey, Stratton, Hau- mont, Hoskins, Klehrn, Parkin, Ruiz, Wright, J., Estheirner, Par- due, Tschanz, Chadwick, Martin, D., Grosch, Kalk . . . Row Five: Venishnick, King, Lacher, Tanner, Batten, Root, Johnson, A., Cherry, Muehlethaler, Lee, Sallee, Betts, I Oehmeke, Carlson, Johnson, D., Williams . . . Row Six: Haussrnann, Blom, Holm, Foucar, Hodgins, Ba- ker, Schmitt, Taylor, Pyrah, Robin- son, L., Roller, Crabb, Ohms, Estes, Wiggins, Letson, Howard . . . Row Seven: Bruins, Hicks, Laurent, Col- well, Tkach, Griffith, Thomas, Schroeder, Reugger, Neitmann, Jr. Row One: Jack Fletcher, Art Ran- dall, Donald Dahle, James Moha, Adrian Alb:-ethsen, William Lall- man, Merrill Nielsen . . . Row Two: James Tinto, Joe Rumble, Verdo Johnson, Leslie Niece, Ray Troxell, Charles Golding, Barney Brunelle, Alice Nesbitt . . . Row Three: Joe Emmons, Melvin Stinson, Donald Jess, William Buhn, Harold Lynch, Willis Wiedenman, Phillip Beeson, Oscar Klemens . . . Row Four: Ted Scott, James Roy, George Glarborg, Oliver Harris, Arthur Griffith. Mel- vin Baillie, James Morgan. I ll '47 .2 Cx W W XXGUIWQZZX Wharf 'KP' They Find the Gold in "Them Thar Hills" All students registered in earth science, mining, geology, and metallurgy are eligible for membership . . . the annual Muckers' Ball features Wild y. Z f"'f:Q!,-X West atmosphere, gambling for high stakes, and informal attire . . . fxx. Q Y 5 members go prospectin' during spring picnic held in honor of School -J of Mines faculty . . . view Weekly movies or hear lectures related to the E mineral industry . . . Don Dahle Was president, Harold Lynch, vice- president, and George Glarborg, secretary-treasurer. 124 m 1 , u yP iff Cf? "wif lu, j X i s if l 5 tw Row One: Reynold George, James May, Julius Peterson, Ray Rigby, Kathryn Ann Mautz, Ina Mae Wheeler, Jeanne Pollett, Jay Stout, Len Bielenberg, Robert Burns, Francis J. Rasmussen . . . Row Two: J. B. McKinley, Reginald Reeves, Delwin Hobza, John Dick, John Noggle, E. C. Lasl-xi, R. F. McLaugh- lin, K. G. Bergquist, C. H. Creason, W. L. Rowberry, Ray Durtschi . . . Row Three: John G. Gray, Jr., Jas. Hunt, William Perry, Joseph Za- vesky, Charles Kiblen, Walter Cur- nutt, Gregg R. Potvin, John Turn- bull, Richard Schou, W. F. Deira- hard, Chester Graham, Peter Wil- son, Charles Blanton, Tom Feeney, Eugene Bush . . . Row Four: Donald Purcell. Robt. Yost, Russell Shaud, Nash Barinaga, Charles Richard- son, John Stover, Lloyd McClin- tick, Lloyd G. Martinson, Lloyd Browning, Robert Glasby, Edward Stanwood III, J. V. Smith, E. D. Bedford, Dean Edward S. Stimson . . . Row Five: Berne Jensen, Art Sutton, Douglas Kramer, Richard McFadden, Gordon Foster, Robert Hodge, Frank B. Barton, Robert Lyons, Bill Simmons, Nels T. Sahl, Edward J. Aschenbrenner, James Ingalls, Alfred Kiser, Stanley Schmidt. al Better Business Relations Fostered by Students EW! ma! 5a Mock Trials Give Young Lawyers Experience Budding young lawyers . . . sponsor a supper-dance each semester . . . prominent legalists address the group during the year . . . Ray Rigby presided as Chief lustice at the Honor Court with Lloyd McClintock and lack McKinley, lustices . . . Tom Feeney led the group as prexyg Ernest Bedford, Vice-president, lim lngalls, treasurerg Berne lensen, secretaryp Reed Clements, sergeant-at-armsp Pete Wilson, recorder. I -. . .W Row One: Donovan Vowels, Arden Gorsline, Marion Homan, C. Wil- liam Wardrop, Chester W. Graham, Dale Chaney, Wayne Phillips, Wal- lace Larsen . . . Row Two: Roy Vance, Dean Welch, Lawrence Pe- retti, Betty Bowen, Ruth Reichert, J. Robert Jackson, Thomas R. San- ford, Stan Ellsworth, William R. Sanford . . . Row Three: Art Becher Carl Guderjohn, Robert MacDon- ald, Don B. Lindsey, Brent Harris, Don Carley, Jerry Bunnell, Myron E. Johnston, Robert W. Clark, Richard Cline . . . Row Four: Har- old Lenke, Donald Brudie, John Zwiener, Leonard Rodig, Richard L. Campbell, Jim Wolford, Richard Corbett, Tom Glenny. 1 'P I' 3955 Created to increase interest in civic and commercial affairs and in the School of Business Administration . . . membership is open to all students enrolled in that school . . . banguet in the spring was the big social event . . . administrative gavel wielded by Lawrence Peretti . . . assisted Dy Harold Lenke, secretary, and Art Becher, treasurer. 67140772551 af Qwzmmre ff E I X .-...m- KJ H!! ,mmf A 9 1 1 , I Water Bugs Presented "Gay Nlnetles' Show ll I, " ff Proficient water bugs . . . their annual water show featured water X W X V , N 7, guadrilles to the tunes ot the Gay Nineties . . . spectacular diving and x Lf v' swimming exhibitions provided additional interest . . . a hay ride and 'X X X S f ' barn dance provide dry-land activities tor the group . . . new pledges 'A' K X E " wear swimming caps tor a week prior to initiation . . . president was Ms? J X lim Farmer, vice-president, Ed Fiesterg secretary-treasurer, Mary Ellen f A Stetanac. X! if I Row One: Carole Crouch, Margaret Austad, Carol Shaffer, Pam Gaut, Jim Farmer, Betty Biker, Eleanor Wilson, Joanne Hopkins, Janet Sundeen . . . Row Two: Jo Paulson, Mary Ellen Stefanac, Joanne Peters, Betty Loren, Colleen McDonald, Ann Kettenbach, Fran Hodgins . . . Row Three: Charles Clark. Harry Wilson, Jo Nelson, Becky Barline, Pat Patton, Jody Getty, Don Med- ley . . . Row Four: Donald McMa- hon, Chase Barbee, Dick Merrill, Thomas Wright, Gerald Weaver . . . Row Five: Robert Hatch, Phillip Kinnison, Bud Hagan, Carl Kinney. Row One: Dorothy Galey, Howard Rue, Donald Hayes. Betty Biker, Phil Kinnison . . . Row Two: Keith Paz-due, Howard Chadwick, Robert MacDonald, Nadine Buswell, Bar- bara Kitchens, Faye Sargent, Bar- bara Livingston, Don B. Lindsay, Edwin Shane . . . Row Three: Kay Humuhries, Mark McCarrol. Nancy Magle, Peggy George, Yvonne George, Adrienne George, John Ed- wards. M551 Pri x! . ,fkffj F A ty armor 0 XX X J Hickory and Wax Group Sponsor Ice Carnival PM 59 A relative newcomer to campus organizations . . . tirst niet tour yea 5- C' fo ago . . . has since become one ot the most active groups on the camp 1 YM . . . sponsored skiing instruction for beginners . . . initiated ldalio's fi' K Q 1- winter carnival, awarding trophies for the best snow sculptures . . KL'-' Howard Rue served as presidentg Fred Boyle was vice-presidentp ai Betty Biker acted as secretary. 1' 4 Effnxxs 126 WSE? 4'-ff UM 5' -F l trier E , X Aj J Row One: Don Mitchell, Norman Fitzsirnrnons, Cecil Link, Clair Hollingsworth, Bob Allison. Donald Sova . . . Row Two: Mrs. Martha Soniville Cadvisorl, Joyce Merrell, Hazel Havens, Nadine Buswell, Nor- ma Hunt, Margaret Faust, Pearl Gibson, Marge Hattan, Cherie Wis- wall, Lou Carlson, Ronell Hillman . . . Row Three: Wallace Taylor, Kenneth Hoagland, Frank Morri- rison, Kenneth Kornher, Gerald Comstock, Jerry McKee, Ray An- stine, Clarence Hoagland, William Meyer, Martha Allison. Home Ec Day Highlights Activities Head, Hand, Health, Heart Carry On Crganized to promote 4-l-l on the campus and throughout the state . . . all tormer members and interested people are eligible . . . social attairs included square dances, suppers and Weiner roasts . . . co-host to regional convention of Mu Beta Beta, national 4-l-l service honorary . . . lerry McKee and Ray Anstine served as presidents with Donald Mitchell and Lou Carlson, Vice-presidentsp Marjorie l-lattan and Hazel l-lavens, treasurers, and Cherie Wiswall and Norma Hunt, secretaries. Row One Joan Jansen Arden Johnson Elaine Cope Lona Car ney Phyllis LaRue Jackie Mitchell Peggy Powers Norma Hunt Velva Ailor Shirley Belle Anderson Vida Frischknecht Ruth Wood Row Two Marybelle Carnie Dorothy Lipp Maybelle Gardner Joan Row berry Caryl Ingebrltsen Maralee McReynolds Gay Deobald Shirley Tanner Carolyn Hansen Rose Schmid Anna Mae Handel Erlene Clyde Margorie Hattan Row Three Eleanor Powell Marilyn Williams Sheila Darwin Beverlee Randall Joan Brown Mary Ellen Stefanac Pat Albertson Elizabeth Fitzgerald, Edith Fisk, Mary Hard- ing, Mary Patano, Irene Horning, Cherie Wiswall . . . Row Four: Do- lores Uria, Margaret Hocklander, Carolyn Webb, Ella Bahr, Betty Pyles, Margaret Faust, Sylvia Auger, Jo Korter, Merilyn Petersen, Peggy George, Pat Jordan, Marya Parkins . . . Row Five: Patricia Posnick, Lavonna Eyrich, Lois A. Saunders, Mary Sterner, Lou Carlson, Nadine Buswell, Patricia Wyrick, Maimie Jardine, Phyllis Larson, Linda Mar- syla, Betty Trout, Mary Bates, Ar- lene Talbott. 'ggi W7 5 f it Q., 11. v are Vlembership made up ot all Women majoring in home economics . . . Pw- M1 vg,,,,. ,,...ff he year's major project is Home Bc Day held each spring tor ldaho ngh school seniors . . . money-raising projects include hot dog sales at -lomecoming and Dads' Day games . . . annual dance provides social ontacts with Ag Club members . . . officers included laclcie Mitchell, aresidentg Betty Lea Trout, vice-president, loan lansen, secretary, Mar- garet Elie, treasurer, and Elaine Cope, historian. We W frm ,, il ll Z 2 rj l lm! X g 127 fm em yykhfi fi Active Townmen Unite Socially 54 Q V , Qrganized to give ott-campus men an opportunity to participate in K if campus activities . . . besides social events, they also enter teams in V U' intramural competition . . . organized fellowship is their goal . . . Mal- fl' qw Colm Stahl led the group as president, assisted by l-larry lsaman, vice- I 3 presidentg Clayton l-larmsworth, secretaryg Otis lohnson, treasurer, and Vic DeVries, social chairman. 4 l La Row One: Wayne Runnion, Eugene Pickerd, Kenny Farmer, Lorin La Foe, George Crnkovich, Malcolm Stahl, Jose Roberto Bou . . . Row Two: Floyd Gephart, Harry F. Isa- man, r., Everet Headrick, Bruce Worrna ,Jerry c ultz, Victor De- ries, Bob Sonnic sen. Row One: Carl Yocom, Ralph Mil- ler, Humfredo Macedo, Bob Reed, Norm Lodge, Dick Lint, Bob Schild . . . Row Two: Harriet Halstrom Lucille Schrom, Lois Bush, Celia Hall, Joan Jacobs, Elzo Mink, Eliza beth Fitzgerald, Jo Pence . . . Row Three: Bill Taylor, John Holt. Ned Stuart, Charles Swain, Fred Bliss, ,HW fn? rg, -ff' ,'--" " " W fp, . , if C 1 ms rr ll? it , , Horsemen Give Campus a Western Air " fi Q QQ? ig' S 7 'i Newest club on the campus . . . was organized this year to promote ar A ,, 9 active interest in horsemanship at ldaho . . . group activities includeo 5 X cross-country canters and moonlight horseback rides . . . members wor .9 honors and silver belt buckles for participation in intercollegiate rodeo: . . . president of the organization Was Ned Stuart. 128 I. R. C. ' , , WM , A 4 me V' nn' s:ssm'fZ,P.f , The Northwest Regional Conference of lnternational Relations Clubs, held this year in Moscow, attracted a record number of delegates. lnternational Affairs Hold Group Attention Educational discussion group on foreign relations, world affairs, and foreign modes of living . . . open to all students . . . weekly meetings held . . . highlight of year was Northwestern Regional Conference with attendance of over l54 delegates from the Northwest . . . banquet climaxed two-day conference . . . early spring found eight delegates at sub-regional lnternational Relations Club Conference . . . Sherman Black and Marvin Wash- burn attended national meeting of lnternational Relations Club last winter . . . ofiicers were Sherman Black, presidentg Leo Cespedes, vice-president, and Bonnie Shuldberg, secretary-treasurer. Row One: Bill Roden, Vida Baugh, Maxine Seely, Ramona Bills, Pat Slack, Elenore Rigby, Thomas Rigby . . . Row Two: Margaret Black, Sherman Black, Bonnie Shuldberg, Leo Cespedes, Lou McKenney . . . Row Three: E. M. Hausa, Marvin Washburn, Ken Parkin, Jerald Moss, Warren Johnson, Dick Bershon, James Hsthcrn, Donald Mills, Leroy Amos, R. E. Hosack. .f- 6 Ch mmm Mya!! Dean Eldridge has the honor of breaking ground for the new home of the Christian Institute as other guests at the ceremony look on, Council Solves Church Problems Acguaints students with spiritual possibilities . . . composed ot representatives from each denominational group . . . initiated and sponsored Religious Emphasis week . . . conducted Thanksgiving Day service in the university auditorium . . . Easter Sunrise service held . . . enjoyed picnic last tall . . . tirst unit ot 350,000 Campus Christian Center to be completed by midsummer tor occupancy when college begins . . . will provide ottices, counseling rooms, lounges, chapel, and loan library . . . otticers iirst semester were Gerald Comstock, presidentg Ralph Miller, secretary-treasurer . . . second semester found Ralph Miller as president and Marjorie Peer secretary- treasurer. Row One: Reed Durtschi, Margie Peer, Ralph Miller. Dr. Cscar M. Adam. Elizabeth Wilcox, George Hespelt . . . Row Two: Harold A, Brarnmer. Allen G. Ingebritsen, David C. Coulter. John Meyer. Dale B. Douglas. Donald D, Trupp. I ' 'll EX Qlzfzfmdzny fd!! it is Episcopalidn Students Hold Fellowship Meetings Episcopal denominational organization . . . organized to give instruction and promote friendship among students . . . officers were lanet Mackey, president, Anne DuSault, vice-president, Barbara Schaff, secretary, Rosemary Harland, treasurerg advisor, Reverend Norman E. Stockwell. t K .. "I 4 'lllllll ,g Row One: Barbara Schaff, Dolores Jonas, Connie Teed, Harriet Hal- strom, Barbara Storms . . . Row Two: Reverend Norman Stockwell, Rosemary Harland, Shirley Petti- john, Mrs. Norman Stockwell, Dona Griffith, Lee Coumerillx, Vir ona Douglass, Anne Dusault, ane Mackey . . . Row Three:Albert Ruiz, Jay Stephens, Kenneth Foucar. les Seeber, Bill Ross, Bob Far- Robert Rowett John Bailey Row One: Pauline Lawson, Ruth Van Engelen, Helen Jeane Terry, Janice McCormick, Hazel Bell . . . Row Two: Sverre Scheldrup, Fred Van Engelen, Bob McMahon, David Klehm, Ben W. Chichester, John Paul Dyer, Roger Chichester. Sv 1,,,g.i 5 fdftzsztkzfz tgomzae tsl Qt t we R' E2 L Round Table Topics Found in Monitor R This newly-organized club was established to unite Christian Scientists S on the campus . . . weekly services and round table discussions held Y during the year . . . sponsored a lecture on religion during the spring Nxwvxo X. semester . . . Bob McMahon served as president . . . aided by Dave W l Klehm, vice-president, Helen Terry, corresponding secretary, Polly Law- son, clerk, and Roger Chichester, treasurer. 132 c l J t l Cr l Ss- 5 C3 X E 4 -2 K Row One: Hazel Havens, Cherie Wiswall, Delnores Knoles, Alice Henry . . . Row Two: Joan Jansen, Dolores Beadles, Deloris Knight, Gay Deobald, Margaret Wills, Mrs. Clifford Dobler, Ruth Reichert, Mrs. Mildred Bliss, JoAnna De- Meyer, Rose Schmid, Joan A. Mar- tin . . . Row Three: Della Olson, Ann Brooks, Roberta Day, Barbara Edholzn, Fairy Frank, Claire Cor- nell, Marya Parkins, Barbara Clau- ser, Ella Bahr, Mrs. Virginia Mc- Auley, Mrs. J. Hugo Johnson . . . Row Four: Daisy Carrick, Winifred Hokanson, Peggy Powers. Joan Parks, Pat Wyrick, Joyce Fisher, Marilyn Williams, Barbara Sweet, Marjorie Thompson, Hazel Howard . . . Row Five: Phyllis LaRue, Dor- othy Lipp, Joye Kern, Ina Wheeler, Dorothy Kerby, Pat Harris, Acel Purdy, Betty Hassler, Ann Pickett, Marybelle Carnie. Methodist Students Sponsor Meetings, Dinners Methodist student organization since l929 . . . designed to benefit its ffoin pd ' Candy Sales Help Methodist Students' Treasury Methodist Women students comprise this group . . . a Thanksgiving banguet honored alums in Christian service . . . a Candlelight Service was presented at Christmas . . . and supper was served in the Upper Room at Easter, signifying the Last Supper of Christ . . . final event of the year was a senior farewell banguet . . . Ruth Reichert was presidentg lanice Rankin, vice-presidenty Rosie Schmid, recording secretary: lo- Anna DeMeyer, corresponding secretaryg Marybelle Carnie, treasurer. Row One: Glenn Barker, Kenneth Briggs, David Beadles, David Coul- ter, Frank Morrison, Glen Greeley . . . Row Two: Frances Schodde, Marilyn Williams, Winifred Hokan- son, Ann Brooks, Hazel Howard, Ann Pickett, Betty Hassler, Janice Rankin, Robert Lind . . . Row Three: Rev. Ernest Goulder, Phyllis LaRue, Joan Jansen, Joan Martin, Dolores Beadles, Joan Parks, Hazel Havens, Rose Schmid, Carolyn Han- sen, Mrs. Mildred Bliss . . . Row Four: Claire Letson, Cherie Wis- wall, John W. Jones, Ralph M. Mil- ler. Acel Purdy, Darrell Brock, Don Carroll, William Perry, Peter Breys- se . . . Row Five: Joe Schmid, Dave Dunham, Ralph Fothergill, Wilbur Gard, Reginald Reeves, Frank Pentzer. M452 r 4 X. fiklji msky 9222010262171 Sh members socially, spiritually and intellectually . . . any interested stu- dent may participate . . . annual "Mountain Sunday" picnic, semesteriy exchange meetings with a similar WSC group, and the annual trip to sd X Pacific Northwest Methodist Student Conference make up activities of Nw MJ the year . . . president of group was Kenneth Briggs, Phyllis LaRue, , J N vice-president, Lois Bailey, secretary, Robert Lind, treasurer. fm. 'lim of MQ 'Zim ff sul ,r 133 .6 S A ll' os if fe! 6' cg ' . 2 om az 2 nz lyme Q12 X l Church Ideals Fostered by Members A-J f Hyde S. lacolos led this religious organization through last year . . . a N X X pledge dance and sweetheart dance highlight the social activities . . . W the local chapter was organized during l938 and the group was founded l yy V, at Salt Lake City in l934 . . . special interest programs, picnics, dances ' ,A held each month . . . other officers were Shirley Tanner, vice-president, ft fxx Pearl Gibson, secretary, and loan Coble, treasurer. Row One: Kenneth Keefer, Dale yd Loren Brinkerhoff, George Tanner . . . Row Two: William Nelson, N ma Hunt, Frank Haglund, Joa Coble. Stanley Tanner, Reed Durt schi, Boyd Burt. FU H. mite er, P il Leigh, Don Ne- pean, Leonard Brackebusch . . . Row Two: Bud Owens, Barbara Sm' h M t F El ltc ger, argare aust, ea- nor Powell, Carol Erickson, Caryl Ingebritsen, Marjorie Hattan, Nor- man Pabst . . . Row Three: Nelson Gibson, Art Brackebusch, Haakon Haga, John Blom, Richard Miller, Ralph E. Schierrnan, Kare Reed, Harold A. Brammer, Jack Rosen- thal. J M OZWAZMII cgfuehfzf igfddikbbil Church Projects, Devotionals Occupy Group ' ff f-fi Q 7 l:..,d- 3st, be ilu l l SQ Activities include weekly Sunday afternoon meetings and occasional C. special services and programs . . . organized for all students of Lutheran ' preference . . , outstanding speakers highlight meetings . . . Allen G. I 5 4 I lngebritsen was president . . . assisting him Were George Haugland, 5 I vice-president, lohn Rosenthal, treasurer, Caryl lngebritsen, secretary. ' 1 L-QD 134 Wt N 5.2.5 W 7 e X qi JLG I of 520771527 "Wearin' of the Green" Tradition Upheld St. Patrick's Dance is major function of this group . . . an organization for Catholic students . . . other activities include mixers, discussion meetings, communion breakfasts, a Christmas party, and picnics . . . lohn Tkach was president . . . other officers were Francis Flerchinger, vice-president, Colleen McDonald, secretary, Perry W. Dodds, treasurer. 4 5 Row One: Francis Flerchinger, Perry Dodds, Durman D. Look, "Happy" Ferree, Kenneth E. Her- man, Warren Crabb, Herman J. McDevitt, Ramon J. Poitevin, Paul H. Tobin, Robert C. Dougherty, John R. Gaiser. Tommy Wright . . . Row Two: Bill Hassler, Mary Bata- no, Peggy Swope, Aldo DeSantis, Vito Tagliareni, Father Schmidt. Frances Misson, Doris Moore, Don- na Jo Walenta, Jane Blakely, Joan Churchman, Marion Wilson, Kath- leen Gray, Michaela Lane, Dario Toffenetti, Jr .... Row Three: Fr. Robert J. Waldman, Barbara Rin- aldi, Eloise Pape, Nancy McIntosh, Rita Bahm, Pat O'Connor, Lauretta La Fevre, Marie Norton, Janie Mc- Millan, Barbara Wahl, Jean Ham- mer, Jackie Mitchell, Norma Stra- lovich, Nadine Stanek, Dolores Uria, Mary Sternor, Delores Crooks, Laverna Lawrence, John G. Tkach . . . Row Four: Jim Wright, Ralph Wilder, Robert B. Johnson, Don Johnson, John Feely, William F. Perry, Joseph Zavesky, Andrew Kirsch, Graham McMullin, Jim Vergobbi, Hank Gandiaga, Louis Bollar, Jim Henry, David Schmitt, Joseph H. Kavanaugh, Glen De- Bruine, Frank Kettenbach. Row One: Ethel Doyle, Nancy Shel- ton, Beverly Garrett . . . Row Two: Bob Schild, Ruth Dimond, Rev. Kenneth L. Holmes, Beth Tunni- cliff, Ward Sutton . . . Row Three: Dale Douglas, Ben Strohbehn, Vance Fitch, Don Jensen. Sf.--' Q 5? E Q , am Wiffmms ffm! lf J Baptist Students Unite for Inspiration Ejlqf --- , Ben Strohbehn presided over this organization of Baptist students . . . X l U activities include devotional periods and fellowship . . .first event of year I l f is reception honoring new students . . . major functions include the , annual Christmas program and lawn parties . . . other officers were l Dale Douglas, vice-presidentg secretary-treasurer, Ethel Doyle. ' 135 msbwrhsfer gurlz' Group Merges With Westminster Forum A group made up ot women ot the Presbyterian and Congregational churches . . . its purpose is to provide Christian tellowship and expe- rience tor members . . . sponsored Thanksgiving Vesper Service, an impressive ceremony . . . an art exhibit sponsored by the group brought thanks from many art lovers . . . Phyllis Andrew served as president, lody l-lutchison, vice-presidentg Bernadean Reese, secretary-treasurer. 136 ft, Q'f'?5 ,.,56x N1 JI t-kg: 7 if Q f-if jf V 0 , lily 3 as f W rg? 1. L - tk, 1 :E 6 X - Row One: Charlotte Henry, Erlene Clyde, Marlene Monrce,Jacque1yn Lee, Esther Uhlman, Edith Stough, Betty Brock . . . Row Two: Pat Al- bertson, Jody Getty, Anne Marie Eggleson, Elizabeth Wilcox, Phyllis Andrew, Betty Loren, Florine Hahne, Rae Salisbury, Margaret Williamson . . . Row Three: Ellc- mae Holden, Ruth Bieber, Donna Burch, Mary Jane Harris, Gail Gra- ham, Dorothy Sylvester, Harriet Lee Walrath, Joan Cox. ARGONAUTS AT HOME gQIl.."'E.lll 1 iaiij pm-, an fl 4 f , , A - ,iff .. A .. L 14 I f.5 X if fl: W. hw ' fq-Hmm gig itww-X I Mi ..... 5 K' Q5 H ofzwkzy giazzjs W. . , J N ,K y ...aj Y L w Q ij K gg., 4 .WM , .K w ' .4w.u.f,,..Wm ff W may ,, , U , my W rw Wh' .funn Wfqii' ' BW K ,vs 2. -ww, 1 ' S, r -f. 7 -agw .- ,W M ,, ,W,. V . ,W , , TWA, ,W Mgenaud 5? 1 H Flickering lights . . . glistening snow . . . Christmas on the Ad building lawn 1 - '-' 1 I Y N 1 I I N .V u , ,N , I i s, li' I 5 . 'hi .3 1-ig -sul X 43i'?flfQi-I If 31 , 'A t A if t ff? F- 122151 Q - L ,- ,J fs Ofzlfzkzg g76'Z!f5 We mmen fgefwzlw' ram' fgefwem W2 My zzmiefkfzzb' aufzcf Panhellenic Council has as its principal function the organization and supervision of women's rush at the beginning of each semester. Two members from each of the eight sororities make up this group which also has a goal: the encouragement of better scholarship among all women students. The council has made arrange- ments under the War Qrphan plan to provide food, clothing, medical care and educational opportunities for a twelve-year-old French girl, Eliza. Cfficers were lean Qttenheimer, president: Lucille Driggs, vice-president: and Norma Whitsell, secretary- treasurer. Row One: Carolyn Craddock, Molly Cramblett, Lucille Driggs, Jean Ottenheimer, Norma Whitsell, Beverly Bressler, Mary Jane Breier . . . Row Two: Mar- jorie Laznprnan, Jo Garner, Rosemary Harland, Joyce Free- land, Laura McVicker, Berna- dean Reese, Colleen Ebbe, Helen Means, Eleanor Paulson. fzfeikafeinffy QWIIUI. The lnterfraternity Council was organized as an agency to coordinate the social and political activities of the fraternities. Two men from each fraternity chapter make up this organization which acts in solving scholarship problems, supervises and regulates rush, and performs as a liaison agent between the university administration and the fraternities. First semester officers were: Dick Boyle, president: Bill Gartin, vice-president: lack Lein, secretary: Robert Worthington, treasurer. Acting as second semester officers were: Dale Benjamin, president: Darwin Ccgswell, vice-president: Ernest Bedford, secretary: Eugene Pederson, treasurer. Row One: Bill Sweet, Win Bish- op, Jim Aston, Jack Krehbiel, Jim Knudsen, Jim Marshall, Stan Riggers . . . Row Two: Gene Bush, Dan Pederson, Ernie Bed- ford, Dale Benjamin, Dar Cogs- well, Dale Anderson, John Kos- ter . . . Row Three: Darrell Cong- don, Robert Magnuson, George Goble, Bill Gartin, Gale Bair, Dick Boyle. Bill Mayer, Maurice Holland, Clarence Johnston. 137 "After the ball is over" The pink shuttered house hidden behind a row of poplars . . . 'ldeep in the heart of each Alpha Chi girl" . . . national started in l885, ldaho's chapter in 1924 . . . Harding girls, both line cheerlead- ers, also in many other activities . . . neighboring Sigma Nus keep things live- ly all year 'round with snowball fights, softball games and just being general nuisances . . . a take horse, after having passed into the great beyond, was given a lovely burial in conjunction with the Sig Nus, with a good lrish "wake" folk lowing . . . colors are scarlet and olive green, flowers are the red carnation and smilax. 38 y74Mzz fi! Umm ...i"" ' Row One: Lo:-alee Epperson, corresponding secretary: Mrs. Hankins, housemoth P t West, second vice-px-esidentg Alma Anderson. treasurer . . . Row Two: Margaret Web vice-president: Shirley Ball, social chairmang Caroline Jenkins, president. 'W 1 1 .il ffNt nw sr my ,W pf-X QD we fv- Alma Anderson Dorothy Anno Emmalyn Ball Shirley Ball Norma Carson Catherine Church Helen Church Helen Daniels Mariorie Dean loy East Beverly Eggers Margaret Eke Marilyn Grams Anna Mae Handel Ann Harding Mary Harding Rose Marie lager Caroline lenkinss Arden Johnson Susanne lones Virginia Korn Patricia Lyons Lois Maddox Marjorie Moline Mary Patano Betty Pyles Beverly Quick Bernadean Reese Carol Rounds loyoe Schmidt Lucille Schrom Carol Shaffer Clarice Sokvitne Kathleen Stevens Margaret Stewart LaVerta Swope Eileen Thomson Margaret Welver Dianne Wendling Patricia West lean Whitte-more Patsy Will arnson Florence Wohlichl Beverly Wright Gertrude Zapp Mary Ann Zapp X 4 139 .X ,fm Pix No dummy . . . must he rummy 'Way down by sixth street, at the tar end of the row . . . long walks to classes keep the girls trim for their share oi Queen trophies . . . Shirlie Vorous, Esquire Girl . . . lean Ottenheimer, Miss Mos- cow Coed . . . Eleanor Powell, Sweet- heart ot Sigma Chi . . . Donna lean Broyles, next year's Homecoming chair- man . . . tirst coed ever to hold that position . . . also house gavel wielder . . . April l is turnaloout day for pledges and members . . . "0pen up your hearts and sing ot Alpha Phi" . . . I-lallowe'en party with the Fijis . . . Lamloda Chis staged a tug-ot-war with us . . . we got tugged into UParadise." 140 Row One: Eleanor Ann Rich, pledge trainer: Arlene McClellan, social chairman: Mrs. Martin, housernother: Eleanor Paulson, president . . . Row Two: Leola Sumner, house manager: Barbara Ulrich, treasurer, Beverlee Randall, corresponding secretary: Joan Irving, scholarship chairman. Rlla Bahm Ellene Blower Dawn Bolton Beverly Bressler Donna lean Broyles Evelyn Burks Laura Compton Norma Dauqherly loAnna DeMeyer Carol Erwkson lean Gerrauqhly Helen Herriliqfon Doris Homuih Claricve Hove Erma lean laclcle Shirley' lackle Dorrn: lense-n loan lrvlnq Phyllls Kooch Elsie Krey Arlene McClellan lo Magee Bvrnlce C. Marlin Marxlyn Morloerk Pnl Nelson Pnl O'Connor lnulse Qmdley Mary O'Ne1ll loan Ottenhelmer loan Parks Eleanor Paulson llels-fn Payne Eleanor Powell Mona Pulliam Beverlee Rendell Eleanor Rich lu Ann Schleqel Frances Schodde Beverly Schuster Gayle Slevin Paula Smith Carolyn Snowcly Leold Sumner Patti Terry Belly Thompson Mary Rae Thompfon Dr-xrleen Trlvhltls Mn rqaret Torell Martha Tuller Barlvdra Ulrich Slurlle Vnrous lane Walter Zoe Wendle Alice Wrlson luamla Wxlson l4l QM QM ,Em awk y Spring cleaning l'Tri-Delta true" . . . the pillared house at the tar end ot "fraternity row" . . . senior Women honored at Pansy break- fast . . . sunrise dance . . . Aris Peterson, activity woman, and Valeta Hershberg- er, P.E. pride and joy, both big guns around the place . . . sun porch open to the Sig Chis', Betas' and Delts' View . . . other annual events . . . the Deans' dinner . . . no ptomaine cases yet . . . yearly alumni bridge get-together . . . annual and perennial dream . . . not realized yet, but someday We'll swim in our basement . . . maybe soon, if Para- dise floods. 142 OW He! V'k,p 'd i: . G vxce-presxdent Row Two: Phyllis Andrew, treasurer-g Carol Bowlby Betty Wood, recor ding secretary. 4.4- . .Nw ' it , Phyllis Andrew Betty Lu Bailey Beverly Ballca Carol Bowllvy Barbara Brockman Donna Brown Yvonne Dlclflook lerry Early lris Fisher Norma French Yvonne George Marianne Gessel Carolyn Goodwin Gail Graham Florine Halma Mary lean Hansen Valeta Hershlverqer Vivian lones Barbara Kitchens Michaela Lane Barbara Livingston Belly Loren Maralee McReynolrl Laura McViClcer Louise Miller lo Nelson Sally Norris Aris Peterson Beverly Powers: Faye Sarqenl Donna Thompson lean Thomson Eaiher Uhlman Charlolle Weeks Pat Welizm Robe Marie Wlnln Norma Whitsell Phyllis Whiisell Betty Wood Ruth Wood 'X , .Q Patwyriuh J x Q, X r N ' 'Q tsl 143 x L , QM? gamma DG decorators came xn second Singing of 'lthe bronze, the pink, the blue" . . . Dee Gee gals like their tamed green piano and the cream White roses . . . tounded at Lewis School, Mississippi, 1874 . . . Nu chapter installed in 1911 . . . the green-shuttered house on the corner is home to many campus person- alities . . . Bev Benson, ATC Esquire Girl finalist . . . Polly Paokenharn, last year's Blot Coed . . . Helen Means, Phi U and house president, also Mortar Board along with Barb Swanstrorn . . . pre- Mothers' Day cleanup, Waking up the ATQ's . . . they repaid the next a.rn. . . . sun porch gives girls that healthy UCali- forma" look. 144 Row One: Sue Beardsley, treasurer: Jean Carter, secretary . . . Row Two: Beverly Ben 1 hairman: Helen Means, rush chairmang Mrs. Larsen, housemother: Marge L man, president. Marilyn Anderson Ma rqaret Austad Sally Barbour Bernice Bauer Sue Beardsley Greta Beck Beverly Benson Betty Biker lean Carter Erlene Clyde Mary Clyde Bonese Collins Marian Cook Mary Driscoll Ruthella Evans Marcene Foreman Gerry Fox Dorothy Galey Betty lo Garlzer Coralee Hart Gretchen Helmsworth Laura Lee Hopkins Marlene Hopkins Alene Kelly Dorothy Kerby Marjorie Lampman Corinne Lauriente Patsy Lee Bonnie Matthews lane Matthews Helen Means Ollie Marie Packenham Patsy Pieser loan Raymer Nancy Ricks lody Rundstrom Barbara Schatf Elizabeth Scott Norma Siple Phyllis Stricker Nancy Weitz Elizabeth Wilcox Ellen Wilderman Maurine Williams lean Wordal 1 'N X - 1 , ff' F Q K Q jx bvfK gzwfldy 3442! Mardi Gras balloons and memories Frisky freshmen oorralled for study table in newly redecorated smoker . . . a rose and serenade to the engaged girl . . . Liars' contest winner Kathryn Mautz and Ina Mae Wheeler, both future lawyers . . . President lane Fisk, also WEA prexy and new Mortar Board . . . I une Thomas, Gem Editor . . . Betty Peters, playwright, and Bev Schupter, Phi Bete, also tapped for Mortar Board . . . 'Dear old Forney, we all love you" . . . Ioyce Watser, solo- ist . . . Gay Deobald, Mortar Board and Phi U . . . Virginia Orazem edits "The Idaho Independent" . . . Chrissie's an- nual spring lecture on the Hhoo-rah" bushes . . . demitasse spoons presented to seniors at annual banquet . . . the end of another year. 146 R O C IJ Miller, president: Mary Jones, treasurer: Shirley Forrey, social ch man . . . Row Two. June Thomas, vice-president: Mrs. Chrisman, housemotherg Mary L Flizabeth Adams Velva Ailor leanne Anderson Shirley Anderson Elaine Androess Ella Bahr Louise Ball Mary Lee Bates Helen Brown Frances Butler Marybelle Carnie lune Carr Margaret Clark Barbara Columbus Elaine Cope Claire Cornell Clara Crom Roberta Day Betty Ruth Deeston Ruth Dunond Helen Draqseth Blanche Erickson Emma Erickson Margaret Faust Edith Fisk lane Fisk Shirley Forrey lean Frahm Fairy Frank loan Gehrirg Pearl Gibson Delma Gilbert Kathleen Gray Nancy Hamilton Elva lune Harlan Marion Hartwell Marjorie Hattan Wimfred Hokanq Betty Lou Hooper Irene Horninq Carlene Hortinq Hazel Howard , l x x ' 5 K g f ' X 'L 'Ut 147 ., Norma I-lunt Caryl lnqehritsen loan lansen Alice lohnson Mary lones Helen Kersey loan King Margie Kinney Phyllis Larson LaVerna Lawrence lacquelyn Lee leanne Lindstrom Dorothy Lipp Shirley Lonqeleig Chloe Mclfeever Linda Marfsyln Kathryn Mmilz Carol lean Miller leanne Miller Marlene Monroe Della Olson Virginia Qmzern Eloise Pape Marya Pfirlzinsz Margie Peer Patricia Posniok Peggy Powers Margaret Pruett Genevieve Puckett Barbara Rinaldi Rae Salisluiry Willa Scliixnmnn Marilael Schupfer Beverly Schupler Nancy Shelton Esther Simons Mary Sterner Barbara Stewart Norma Stralavich lune Sutton Shirley Tanner lune Thomas Betty Lea Trout Doris Trout Beth Tunniclllf Dolores Uria lackie Watts Carolyn Webb Ina Mae Wheeler Hazel Wren 148 ,- rin -:"" Qvr Q 0 HW JW! "Grin and bear it, Connie!" Built 'way back in l927 . . . this dorm tor women has many traditions . . . Diary Dance, second semester . . . trosh sneak . . . and dinner . . . revenge comes with senior tubbing in the cold and early a.m. . . . spring formal dinner-dance . . . scin- tillating set includes Marie Hargis, Blot editor and May Fete Maid ot Honor . . . Phyllis LaRue, May Queen and Mortar Board member . . . Lois Bailey and her magic Violin . . . lanice McCormick, new AWS prexy . . . Rosie Schmid and Pat Slack, other personalities . . . trophy tights with Willis Sweet ended in snow- barricaded iront door . . . spring picnics on the lawn . . . second tloor serenades . . . many memories . . . "my darling Hays girl." Row One: Phyllis LaRue, vice-president: Amie Kaisaki. secretaryg Carolyn Hansen, treas urer . . . Row Two: Rose Ellen Schmid. social chairman: Mary McBride, assistant house rnotherg Elizabeth Bean, president: Mrs. Samms, housemother. Maxine Abbott Gwena Allen Martha Allison Sylvia Auger Lois Bailey Betty Base Vida Bauqh Elizabeth Bean Hazel Bell Patricia Berry Ruth Billings Betty Bowen Dorothy Bowman Shirley Bromseth Caroline Brown Elizabeth Burke Lois Bush Ethlyn Calcote Lona Carney Daisy Carrick Barbara Clauser Lorraine Cole Lee Coumerilh Imogene Crowell Reta Darling Virtona Douglass Barbara Edholm Marilyn Evans Bonnie File Eileen Foley Maybelle Gardner Beverly Garrett Moena Glenn Donna Griffith Celia Hall Harriet Halstrom Connie Hammond Carolyn Hansen Marie Harqis Alice Henry Barbara Heyer loan lacobs Maimie Jardine 150 uw 'Je '53 ,x nv fi? Marlorie lohnstone loye Kern Deloris: Knight Phyllis LaRue Pauline Lawson Lauretta Lelevre lerry Leslie Estelle Loiko lamce McCormick Catherine MacMillan Margaret Mehl Elzo Mink Frances Misson Marie Moulton Alice Nesbitt Donna Norton Marie Norton Carol Organ losephine Pence Shirley Pettijohn Ann Pickett loan Price Ruth Reichert Valerie Robison loy Ann Rossman Mariorle Schauer Virqlnia Scheuttele Rose Ellen Schmid Katherine Shane Bonnie Shuldberg Lucia Spencer loan Staples Alice Sturges Mary Swanby Patricia Sweeney Irene Thomas Tolmie Tyser ete Walters ardell 44. Helen Way lolitta Weeks Yvonne Wolf X mme X751 ffgeffz Rehearsing "Maybe" with Uke "Eve was the first girl the Gamma Phis took in" . . , ldaho's first national soror- ity . . . next-door neighbors, the mighty Tekes, are prey to red-hot football sguad . . . Teke gazers necessitated new win- dow blinds . . . grades took an upward leap this year, and was everyone happy! . . . Bea Helander, Homecoming Queen . . . Anne DuSault, Gem cog and Mortar Board . . . 'lGamma Phi girl, I love you . . . with your sweet smile and your smart style" . . . annual Sigma Nu snowball fight was easy . . . there was ample am- munition . . . flapper Kettenbach . . . and Gamma Phi trademark-the ukulele. 152 'Sw am Row One: Joyce Becker, corresponding secretary: Mrs. Meagher, housemotherg Carolyn Craddock, president: Norene Dygert, house manager . . . Row Two: Pat Hankins, treasurerg Anne DuSau1t, recording secretary: Molly Cramblet, vice-president. lflcavmr An1l13r::On lwyce Banker Fern Bracvlxl Beverly Burke lane Clark Marian Clill loan Cox Carolyn C,Tmflrl0r:li Molly Cjrmnlvlelf Bethea Decker Mary Frances Densow loan DeShaZer Anne DuSa11ll Norenc Dyqeri Mfn'Y lmw llverlzen Palsy Gray Pi-1tHank1nf: Pal Helwlmrfl Bea He-lander Carolyn lolmrwsson Ann Keitenlxmrh Donna Kyurn Colleen Mcwlfnlve Nancy Mcglnfosh Mary Lou Mclienney lean Marker Shirley Ochs Sharon Olzmundson Marilyn Phillips Lilli F10 Prcxll Pd! Rivell Julianne Smith ldnei Sundeen Margaret Williamson fffzhhzz WWE Wm "Old man winter, here we come!" "Theta lips are smiling, Theta eyes are too' '... the "castle" won allecampus honors for highest grade point this year . . . May picnic supper with the SAE's . . . sunbathing in the back yard . . . hasher's delight . . . won Dad's Day trophy lor dad coming the greatest dis- tance . . . Bette West, past executive board member, lively in campus circles, drama and Mortar Board . . . Sheila Dar- win Phi U prexy, news editor of Arg, and Mortar Board . . . recent engage- ments counted tive diamonds from the ATO house alone . . . winter fun when three ATQ's built a snow tort on the Theta front lawn. 154 Row One: Joanne Hutchinson, treasurerg Mrs. Bender, housernother: Rita Reynolds t y Row Two: Colleen McDonald, social chairman: Bette West, vice-president re ar . . . cille Driggs, president. fo ,X vs. 3. Patsy Albertson Beth Atchison Lorraine Bernal Colleen Bickford Betty Brock loan Brown Natalia Brown Lois Carothers Shirley Churchill Sheila Darwin Lois Dodson Lucille Driqgs Colleen Ebbe loyce Fisher lanet Fulton Rae Gentry Marilyn Green Louise Grider Patricia Harris Helen Hays Charlotte Henry Rhoda Hill Fllomae Holden loanne Hutchinson Evelyn lnqhram Mary Kathryn lohnson Colleen McDonald Martha Sue Neal Patricia Patton Helen Pohlocl Rita Reynolds Lorraine Rudolf lla Sample Lois Saunders Betty Ann Skinner Marry Ellen Steianao Georgia Stone-metz Barbara Sweet Dorothy Sylvester e Tisdall nne Tufts VanEnqelen Bette West Marilyn Williams Margaret Wills ffidffd Kafka gamma Marg Fijis in the field: Kappas at bat With the 1950 song-test cup in the new trophy case, this year's stock is com- plete . . . the tront door again subjected to the role of parking lot . . . rated three new Mortar Board members . . . hashers raised much ruckus, pulling fake strikes and sneaks . . . Homecoming brought forth first prize for huge laundry-soap boxes . . . lackie Mitchell, Home Ec club president . . . Lois Messerly, Lambda Chi Crescent Queen . . . Shirley lacobsen, debater, has personality plus . . . found- ed at Monmouth college in 1870, Idaho in 1916 . . . the Kappas sing, "There's a Warm spot in my heart tor KKG . . . for the girl who wears the little golden key." 156 Row One' Janet Mackey, treasurerg Jo Korter, social chairman: Rosemary Harl Mitchell, vice-president: Merilyn Petersen, house manager. .wwif .vf '3- 40:31 gf i fi? rig w w ,f . -'K ...M 'x V Q Meyif . ,. llwgielhikg . e I.: 5? ., 3.4 Q 1 Becky Barlme lane Blakely Mary lane Breier Mnrllyn Brodd loan Cflxurchman Cfmul Crouch Mfuqnret Curhs Ann Pfqqleson lean Foster Cfdrmen Gancliaqa Dom Gaudxn Pam Gaul Arlllenne George Pwqqy Georce luAunGel1y ln-.an Hlnmner l?o:aexndry Harland Frances Hodglns Mary Hooper lmsnne llopklns Slnrley ldcolwsen Slu-lla lnnssen Pm lwrdfm lwm Koller' lfus luarch Bellm L!lldrd loan l..1fchf1eld Vxrqlnm Lofqren lnnel Mackey Nancy Maqel Ixus Messerly lm-k1uM11cl1ell Dons: Moore Slnrley Nelson M-srllyn Pearson lmmne Pelers C'nr'ul Peierson Mezrllyn Peterson M.ur1lyn Pond lrmn Rowlverry lL1neSr:lmlkau lm-qllswlxrxe SCOTT Vlrqlnm Srmtlx Summ Staley lfnllilx fltm1ql1 Hurlmra Wahl Dfmrm lo Walenta Mury Lmnse Wxll Arm Williams lo-in Wlttman K l s yciqgw . ,ag .",' ' Qs .ljf ' ,sy Q. 5 Q 1 5 7 Annual Xmas party for kiddies UOn a Pi Phi honeymoon" . . . founded at Monmouth in 1867 . . . ldaho Alpha established 1923 . . . each girl sings a solo of honeymoon song when she gets a pin or diamond . . . annual l-lalloWe'en party with ATO's . . . they get their revenge next year . . . Rosemary Fitz- gerald, AWS prexy, executive board, etc. ad infinitum . . . theater style house decorations at Homecoming . . . Kathy Burleigh, the Southern gal, president oi Theta Sigma, active in journalism . . . yearly battle With Delts tor furniture . . . telephone serenades to pin-passing males . . . 'ln the land of love and kisses" . . . we'll Win for our Pi Phi. 158 P! 56115 X951 Row One: Shirley Gregory, social chairman, Joyce Freeland, president: M H y h mother . . . Row Two: Betty Bonnett, vice-presidentg Jody Raber, pledg beth Fitzgerald, corresponding secretary: Connie Teed, scholarship chax Gloria Eaclraun lean Bales Conme Baxter Rulh Bielzer Belly Bonnelt Donna Burch Kathy Burleigh .loan Colule Elizabeth Davidson Pauline Deqqendorfer Elizabelh Filvqerald loan Fiizqerald Rosemary Filfqerald loyce Freeland lo Garner Lillian Garner Bonnie Graliam Shirley Gregory Mary .lane Harris Sharon Henderson lanel Holman Ruth Loirpeicvli Liane Love Evelyn Mr'C'am'lless Glorian Maule Marilyn Mingus Shirley Molen Gloria Moore Rose Murdock leanne Naqel Naomi Nolces lo Paulson Jody Ralier Corrine Schumacher Norma See lrene Simi: Barbara Siormr: Connie Teed Marian Vallad Phyllis Vivlcery Harriei Walraih Eleanor Wilson Marian Wilson 159 ,wfzfauyfi JW!! 'KRorneo, Romeo, wherefore art thou?" Noted tor good-looking Women . . . only Women's co-op dorm on campus . . . tra- vived costume al Christmas . not "pie ditions include newly-re party with Forney . . . annu Serenade ot living groups . . in the sky" but under the table . . . result ot becoming engaged . . . Colleen C ' tensen, actress adept . . . lean Pug senior class secretary . . . Christy Sar- gent, Holly Queen . . . poetess and feature Writer . . . Louise Blenden, president ot Crchesis . . . l'Dance ot the Candles" at Christmas recital . . . Carol Korvola, Little lnter- national Queen . . . spring and Winter formal dances . . . social grace abounds at numerous teas and receptions. hris- tl, Ramona Bills, l6O mr Row One: Louise Blenden, treasurer: Colleen Christensen, vice-president: Mrs. Christian- son, housemother: Elenore Strange, president . . . Row Two: Arlene Ralph, freshman ' ' work chairman: Delores Beadles, secretary: Marcella Minden, ' ' tte chairman: representative , Hazel Havens, ' ' ' ' dining room chairman: Lois Cundall, etlque '- ' ' ' ' ' P h, schol- socxal chairman. Joan Martin, ' ' ' N 'd Whybark, house activities chalrrnan, Jean ug Patrxcla Lynch, bookkeeper, ax a arship chairman: Virginia Barton, song leader, lnriiwse Anderson Charlotte Baker Patricia Baker Dolores: Eeadles Gonette Bertrand Rnimrna Bills 1.015 Cundall Black l.rnui::ee Blentlen Barliara Brevick Anna Brooks Patricia Brown Nadinp Buswell Lon Carlson Cfwllepn Christensen Rossa Marie Cone DPLOr9s Crooks Miriam Downing Marilyn Dustin Lavonna Eyrich Eliiinluotli Fitch Be-tty Hnrssler Hnxnl Havens Georgia Hemovich Rranwll Hillman Anne Hoyt C'arol Korvola Patricia Lynch Kathleen McEvers liine Mcldlone loan Martin Marcella Minden le-nnottn Pugh I-Xcel Ann Purdy Arlene Ralph Patricia Rambo lv Elenore Strange Rig Christy Sargent lima Schlader Mfixinff Seffly llowolltx Sitton N i hnf St melt M irq im! nullix n M iiicurio Thmnp Ver i Ulinder N1it1iWhyl1rk Ch rm W1 will it X x , X KY 4 ' 'Q -Q 161 4K ' ,H C ' . ' . f' 'fa Arte'-nn 'llulltritt f W , ro 'L , i L at ' 1- :L 1 N 'a mark!! mmf gifllfigil A C9 X Pat Hankins and Sonny Parris look at diamond e Iifdydmifl rings Betwixt and between the vet and co-ed Arose a romance, and they were wed. Housing troubles began, so the school said They would provide a roof and a bed. How wonderful to have a trailer or apartment, Sketchily equipped with things borrowed and lent! Every month they watched for the checks Uncle sent And stretched them tar to cover groceries and rent. , l 3 all ' Mary Stringer became Mrs. George Lea 5 A 5 ef, Ck Miss Debbie Toevs takes a bath with help from Daddy The younger populace never lacks sandbox playmates A 1. M. .,.. -.-ma. E .sEf22:i13 'WZ it-. if fit an W' x my ' tes ..., 1 : :..,.:-. 'E:" "f-5 ig in West Sixth Vets' Village houses 145 veterans and their families t A 6 J Mr. and Mrs. Bill Williams welcome a new member to Z d y their family Fighting the coal stove left both a wreck, While drafts around doors gave all a stiff neck. When wives had iobs- the housework, l'Oh, heck, Darling, is there time between classes to swab down the deck?" After the addition came new problems galore, And, although the wee one they certainly adore, lt's stumbles and grumbles during feeding at four While wondering how to last one sleepless night more. The kitchen sink soon became the baby's bathing placeg To mop as fast as kiddies splash was always a losing race. After bragging of smiles, came the disgrace When company arrived and gazed at a screwed-up face. fxxl Kiddies' clothing was shown at the Dames Club style show with a plentiful supply of young models from the village But how quickly they grew and were out taking knocks As they played with the gang in the neighborhood sandbox. While Mom's home with baby, Bud's out throwing rocks: When you bring him inside, he takes apart clocks. It was hard to believe, but at last came the day, l'lt never can be," how oft they did say. But at last each has a degree P.H.T. and BA. And the vet and co-ed are merrily on their way! EOBI FEARN ' G d t' d f M . dM .Maurice Johnson We Qzjhma ..::d':1:f.':.,:Y of ' an 'S 163 ,fm am WW Another good bull session "Dear old ATO" . . . located handily, next to rejuvenated Bucket . . . nucleus was Elwetas . . . 25th founding anniver- sary celebration this year . . . boys ar- rived this tall ahead of house manager . . . redecorated rooms in vivid colors . . . annual Tin Can dance held in De- cember . . . Shirlie Vorous, Alpha Phi, picked as Esquire Girl . . . Peter Wilson, BMOC . . . always buzzing at election time . . . past Sigma Tau prexy and 4.0 student, engineer lohnny Barinaga . . . lack Gregory, entertainer superb, lives here, has own radio program . . . Vandy keeps the boys Well ted . . . claimed intramural volleyball title for the third straight year. 164 Row One: Peter Wxlson, px-esxdent, John Holmes, vnce-pres d t 'I' G nger , . . Row Two: Boyd Barker. corresponding se etary: Gaz' om uilfoy ySessions,record1 q t y 1 5.2 lk. 'ff L, '- . -...N-1 nw 'lv Don Amos lames Atchison Ted Baker lohn Barinaqa Boyd Barker William Boyden larnes Briqqs William G. Hriqqa lnnmie Bulkley John Burrouqlxs Clifford Cahill Roberl Clark Edwin Cllzer Richard Corlioll Roberl Dawson Richard Eimers Stanley Ellsworlh Thomas Focncy Virgil Fellon lay Fitch Kenneih Frederlksen Bernel Fullrner lohn Gregory Philip Guilloy Thomas Ginlloy lames Guy R. Hanigan Maurice llollunml lohn Holmes Myron lohnslon Calvin lones Khalil lones Lawrence lonos Lee Kelley Richard Kline Willis Knox lohn Kosier Wallace Larsen William Last Roland Masinqill Herberl Mead Kennelh Meppen William Meyer Thomas Mitchell Francis Milhouq Lawrence Monroe lohn Pepper Clifford Prali Frank Reich William Riqlay Wallace Schmidl Gary Sessions Harold Sims Neal Smiley Richard Snnili Oron Smith Nels Sollverry Geralfl Swanson Lyle Tapper An. Eugene Thoinelz Delzloresl Tovey Al Wagner lohn Wagner Peter B. Wilson J f X Q5. rt my Q fs wi r ji ' Em Maia I A sober bunch 'iWe all drink from the same canteen" . . . more men live here than in any other fraternity . . . grades zoomed high this year . . . activities, many and varied, with Harry Turner winning a seat on next year's executive board . . . lerry Bunnell appointed next year's Gem ed . . . the Indian Dip went off tine, as usual . . . came spring and the boys limloered up their vocal cords . . . to take a tirst place in the Mother's Day song test . . . Betas still don't claim the ownership ot any Wooglin hide . . . always the annual Miami Triad event to look forward to . . . Beta, Theta, and Pi . . . now retired, lout still living on in our memories . . . dear- est thing we lcnow, next to our beloved housemother, Mrs. Scott. 166 Row One: Gerald Bunnell, secretar 5 Mrs. Scott, housemotherg William C d d Y Boyd, house managerg Ralph Carpenter, vice-president assistant house manager: William Wright, president. Vernon Batt Robert Beesley Iohn Bengston Patrick Birch Thomas Boyd Thomas Bucklin Gerald Bunnell Eugene Bush Donald Carley Ralph Carpenter Dale Chaney Reed Clements William Code lames Connors Rohert Culbertson John Cummins Brucre Curtis lohn Drips Normand Green Donald Harrison Kenneth Howard Ronald Hutter Stuart Hutchins Richard loset Erwin lolinson Frederick Kopke Richard Lint Norman Lodge William Lodge lack McClaran Kenneth McCormack Stewart McCormack Vernon McCormack Glenn Miller lohn Miller lohn Noggle Glenn Paine Rolrert Parish Earl Pharris Wellington Pierce Bert Poole Wilbur Ruleman loseph Savage lohn Scull William Shaw Frank Shrontz William Simmons Thomas Smith 44. Arnold Souders Elmer Stout William Taylor George Vehrs Alton Vogt Albert Wohlschlegel William Wright 'l dj X Qzffzhzzx fbi! 1 'Q L F 'Q J , Q N "Stru1-nmin' on the old banjo" The long, one-story building on Sixth street houses one group ot males that doesn't mind eating its own cooking . . . with aid from l'Smolcy" and Mrs. Sulli- van, the boys learn true cooperation . . . one of the important personages here is Francis Flerchinger, man oi many fields . . . Dave Hiner, one more lively lad, especially on the cinder path . . . Glenn Darnall, active on the diamond tor Idaho . . . the dorm is newly brightened by a fresh coat of paint . . . one more sign of spring . . . each May, on some unan- nounced but cool evening, the seniors are given their "Paradise Creek dump" . . . new Ag Science building and Kirt- ley laboratory additions supplement this portion of the campus. 168 tg Norman Pabst, presidentg G. C Mrs. Sulhvan, hostess, Don Kees, secretary-treasurer. 40-'K ,4- '70 ,W um., Raymond Arte Nathan Afalimean Edward Aepitarte lames liaqqett David Beadlefs lohn Blom Howlwert Donnell Keith Bowman Harold Brammor Van Briqqs Bernard Brunello Roger Cliiffliesztvr Herschel Clark David Coulter Eugene Cram Glenn Darnall Dale Everson Rlford Faull David Fellm Francis Florfrlnnqer Norman Flynn lolwn Fonlmurq Garrett Fnrlnos lames Fulton Willwur Gard Larry Gilofs Charles Golding Harold Gordon Rolwert Gorsmnrli Lee Gorssuczli Richard Groqory Russell Griffith Kenneth Hack Donal Hardy Leonard Hoililula David Hiner Saul Hirssulilmrq Lester Hiitcrliinson Floyd Iverson Ronald lessaup Harley lordan Donald Kees Milton Koppanrg William Leavell Phil Lelqlw Gaylord Ln-nker Claire Lcetson Leon Luce Humfredo Mavcdo Donald MacKinnon lohn Meyer Ralph Miller Alvon Mooliel Frank Morrison Willianm Fl. Nelson William H. Nelaon Raymond Olson Norman Pabst lolin Paulson Roy Pylel Lawrence Rappapori Norman Roqers William Rossa Edwin Rowlviiry lack Smilli Robert Stmqfvr Donald Stilson Roqer Slynfwr Wendell fllynor George Sullivan Averill Tlmyer Raymonrl Truxoll Alan Truf-:zdale Floyd Wanamakor l GF 169 - ". . . and plentiful punchbowln Hall ot the presidents . . . outgoing and incoming ASUI prexies, Bob Moulton and Vern Bahr . . . dances were many . . . with respective themes of "Winter Wonderland" and "New Moon" . . . also wild and woolly 'Sagebrush Stampede" . . . other goings-on such as snowball battles with next door neighbors at Sweet . . . didn't prevent grades from being second from the top . . . more wheels . . . Bob Finlayson, ex-editor of Blot . . . Marv Washburn, president oi NSA . . . and 2nd semester hall leader . . . also varsity swimmer and trackman, Don Miller . . . named in honor of Briga- dier General E. R. Chrisman of Idaho military fame . . . new ag science build- ing across the way . . . gives Chrisman hallers much improved view. 170 R O S11 t man flmmfzfz fztzff ne: Bob McMahon, secretary: Mr. Welch, proctorg Mrs. Welch, hostess Mex-1 tton, reasurer . . . Row Two: Arland Hofstrancl, president: Jim G:-ah ial chair : Ladd Sutton, vice-president: Willie Stevenson, intramural manag 'BQ' 6' Juv -Q. YY Q- ,....-- ,ps ,-,-.1 Vernon Bahr Fred Beckman lesse Beckman lames Bell Claudio Bermensolo Richard Bershon William Bolton, lr. Richard Brosss Beryl Budd loe Carson Vernon Choate Gerald Comslock Gordon Cook lames Corluell Keith Dedrxelc Glen Done-r Ralph Duhn Donald Endieoll loe Eyrich Robert Finlayson Roberl Garrell Roy Gikxu Henry Gillnerlson, lr. Gerald Gordon Donald Grieh lerry Haeqele Chris Harrlqfeld Cecil Hathaway larnes L. Henry Arland Holsslrand Henry Holi Rosel Hyde Max King Gerald Kllnk Dean Koethl-no Bill Kornolo loseph Larkin Kennelh Lind lohn Lynam Roberi McMahon Elven Maison Glenn Meares 171 Conrad Morriwk Donald F. Miller lohn l, Miller Donald Mills Ellery Morrison Claude Morrow Jerald Moss Koborl Moullrm Charles Muelilolhaler GllberlN1choIson Donald Parker Frank Penlxer George Peterson Daniel Pirrnno EugenePi91:lior George Pool Angelo Sczarrpello Robert Sclieloslce Herberi Schroeder Wayman Slndcn Gordon Smilh Herlverl Slcinnmnn Willard Slevenson Donald Slolls lay Sioui Merle Stralion Ladd Sullon Chester Taka lori Frank Takalori John Thomas lohn Tkach Wesley Tollivur John Tovey Andrew Tozier William Van Werlh lames Walker Marvin Washburn r,4,w, ,M ". . . and a Happy New Year!" Cldest men's hall on the campus . . . occupants sent Xmas greetings to whole town . . . via big electric sign on the root . . . newly-elected executive board member, Ralph Fothergill, lives here . . . as does Phi Bete l-larry Dalva, outstand- ing in dramatics . . . also dramatics stu- dent Marv Alexander, new Curtain Club president . . . another Phi Beta Kappa, Ken Briggs, does his studying within these walls . . . annual Liars' Club brought forth some wild tales . . . situ- ated so that odors from science hall sometimes intrude . . . but just a few steps to go to classes . . . home ec girls make a practice ot inviting Lindleyites over for dinner in home management house. Row One: Herman McDevitt, social chairman: Kenneth Keefer, secretary ' 'd t R T Rh tG'hb t e Dr Wi in son. vice-presi en . . . ow wo: o er 1 s, reasur rg . gg s Wiggins, hostess: Dave Thacker. president. Leslie Abbott George Albright Marvin Alexander lerry Asker lohn Aslcer Truman Baily Norman Barber Milton Barton Charles Battles Clarence Bauqh Pele Bonin Clayton Boyce Weldon Branch Dale Braucher Kenneth Briggs Don Brighton Franklin Bruins Edward Bullock William Chetwood David Craner Merle Craner lehn Cuiler Harry Dalva Harold Deeds William Driver Evan Ellis Kenneth Estes Ralph Fothergill Ernest Gerber Richard Gibbs Robert Gibbs Arden Gorsline William Grosch Wendell Hanson Thomas Haumoni Howard Heiner Harry Hendron George Hespelt Wendell Higgins Roy Hollifielcl Dean Holt Norman Holton Marion Homan Roger Hovis Kenneth lenkins Bert lohnson Philip A. lohnson Verdo ,lohnson Warren H. Johnson lohn lones 174 me sw .Vw .,rL ,.-fer go- xii- Ncrman lones Keith Keeier Kenneth Keeier Donald Kuper Henry Land Donald Lapray Robert Lind Richard Lloyd Charles Lord Gene McCullough Daniel McDevitt Herman McDevitt Galen McMaster Donald Marlin James Maxwell Richard Meyer Bradley Nell lohn Nesbitt Harvey Pate Roy Peairs Ronald Peck lohn Pline lohn Rinard Orville Roberts Willard Roe Charles Rohrer lohn Sandell Edwin Shane Clyde Sletaqer Lester Smith Robert Smith lchn Spinlc Richard Straw Harold Suchan Herbert Swanson Whitman Syinmes lames Tale Dale Thacker David Thacker Stanley Thomas Vernon Thomas Dean Tisdale lohn Townsend Perry Trout lames Walkinqton William Walkinqto Everett Weakley Russell Westbrook Vance Williurn William Woodland 175 "Migl1ty Bennett was at the bat . . . ' Delta Chi, originally founded as a law fraternity, 1890, at Cornell . . . became a social fraternity in l92l . . . in l924, local chapter, Kappa Delta, began . . . spring formal and other dances in the spacious third floor sleeping porch . . . Waterfights with Thetas an outlet for en- ergy . . . Del Klaus, activity man on the campus, cigarette king in the house . . . Keith Bean, Blue Key, hurdler, and foot- ball, is prexy . . . Pirate Dance rates praise . . . spring picnics, Winter snow fights, and snow lady for ice carnival . . . scholastics and antics in the English colonial chapter house at the foot of Hello Walk. l76 26615 d Werry, vice-presidentg Dan Pederson, presidentg D Gene Allen Gaylord Anclroes Keilh Bean Davld Bevk George Bellos Ray Boehm lames Bryan Osborne Casey Parley Cjllerry Clan Clmfstensen Charlie Clark Riclxarcl M, Davis Gordon Eluinqer Ricilmrzl Eller' Keillx Ellis: Wxlliam Fxnerson Frank l'llr1e:r'::un Edwln lfnqerl lerdld lfvfmrs Tony Gmlalcm Frank Gfiylunl llarrnlrl Cell er Boll llmxrzfm Altmn llqrrlp' Robert Henzlron Louls lllrszzlmmn lames llylnnd Clarenve lohnston Millwurn Kenworlldy lermne Knnsey Dellxerl Klnufs Carol Mum-rr: Russell Mrullell Mariel Morache l. Mosman Benjamin Nicholas lolmn Nmlmlas George Neumeyer Daniel OT 'nnnnell Eugene Pederson Wallan"e Polxlod Donald Read Rolwert Rowell Eclwarrl Savnrm Edrnv Fllmtln L Guslav Verllal Ellwood Werry Sidney Werry lack Wlqen Charles Wnlllamson Delt beards getting the works Russian Ball, afternoon smorgasbord, and costumes in the evening . . . out- standing social function . . . battle with Pi Phis over furniture, with customary loss of trophies . . . pin-passing members given a mattress ride to the lucky girl's front porch . . . after being generously smeared with lipstick . . . then the lucky stiff gets his breakfast cooked by the woman as other members watch . . . "My Delta sweetheart true" . . . Dar Cogs- well works hard on campus activities, grades and such, still finds time for throwing the discus . . . the retiring po- litical brothers, Dick and Luke Boyle . . . after a long siege in power, now content to sit back and relax . . . just in passing, copped men's scholastic honors. 178 Qeia ZW QM? ,wx 4-1 YQ? Louis Boyle, house manager: Dan Wicker, vice-president: Adson Stax-ner, president: Russell Baum, recording secretary: William Briggs, corresponding secretary: David Maub, treasurer. Russell Baum Donald S. Becker Thompson Berqerud lames Bessent Leonard Bielenherg Richard Boyle Louis Boyle Elroy Brandi William Briqqs Darwin Coqswell Charles Dulty lohn Edwards Robert Foley Merlin Franc1:: Donald Hartman lohn Haslxrourlc Gordon llenninq Marion lliskey Wesley lloalst Alan Huqqins lames lnqalls Donald L. lcnhnflcun Duane Kul' lohn Kuqley Bryan Lawrence Mark Mcffarroll Lawrence McLean Richard Miller Richard Moore Glen Olin Richard Orme Roberl Peterman Elmer Peterson lack Peterson William Peterson Richard Prater Robert Rawlins lames Roupe Wllber Rowluerry Mauno Sami Francis Schulz Kenneth Smith Adson Starner Frederick Vanlfnqelen Russell Viehweq Robert Welmh Kenneth West Robert Daniel Donald Peter K. Boll Zunmerrnan 5 Jim- UM Muscle games Something new on the campus . . . the transformation of ldaho Club into an athletic dorm . . . result to be bigger and better teams . . . naturally person- alities Were numerous . . . seniors Carl Kiilsgaard, lim Chadband, and Morris Rose will be missing from the football line-up in the fall . . . While Dick Geis- ler, basketball ace, and boxer Pug Ellis will both be gone, too . . . lohn "L" Reager, famous for Washboard Concertos . . . pretty busy turning out for varsity athletics . . . and keeping in training . . . but ldaho Clubbers still found time to produce topnotch intramural teams . . . loafing in the lounge . . . reading maga- zines . . . or relaxing with a strenuous game of checkers . . . favorite occupa- tions here. 180 social chairman Kerfman, proctor: Mrs. Kerfman, hostess . . . Row Two: Jim Chadb 3 Bill Mullins, secretary: Jerry Diehl, presidentg Vern Baxter, intram 1 Tommie Azul vrosse Marvin Beqlilil Frederick Bowen Clillon Brewer Harry Erizec lames Chadluaml Willard Clioules Roy Easlmavi Donald Ellis: Edward Fieslor Edmond Fisher lames Fondlwu rg Dirk Geisler Marvin Glassscocgk lames Hanuerii Rolweri Holder David Holmes Ben Jayne Carl Kiilsqacird lohn Mack David Mdrliiidfile Ronald Nicholas George Puolos lolin Re-eager Morris Rose William Sanford Charles Swain llomer Woolf lames Wriqlil Richard Zyzak "Let's talk this thing over" First national fraternity on the campus . . . brought here in l905, founded na- tionally at the University of Virginia, in H369 . . . the annual all-day l-louse Party is an event of renown in campus social circles, drawing girls from all groups . . . spring formal is most important high- light of second semester . . . a banguet in conjunction with the WSC chapter celebrates Founders' Day . . . Vandal star Bob Mays, still with another year of eligibility to pack the pigslqin through the line . . . lohn Martin, past Argonaut editor, publications board, multi other activities, usually found with Del Klaus, the Cigarette King. 182 mafia Lgl?77ld R O ' Dennis Bryan, vice-president: Bill Sweet, presid C R T J L yg George Goble, treasurer. DW ne sam M rw 'K-Q '13 Bernard Baker Robert Baxter lohn Beach Charles Blanton Paul Blanton Frederick Bliss: Montforri Brooks Dennis Bryan Joe Burns Bill Cameron Conard Christensen Louis Cosho lames Cranston Charles Creason lames Crockett lack Elliott Kenneth Fruizcar Thomas George .lohn Ghiqlerx Max Glaves George Guide Elmer Goss:-fit Donald Harper Roland Hodqinss Glenn Holm larnes Lane Vernon Lowry Mandius Lunflal lohn Martin Robert Mays Delbert Naser Murray Numbers Harlan Clson Keith Ormond Clinton Peterson Donald Prisby Raymond Radford Fred Reich Herbert Sarnms loseph Shreve Jerald Smith Harold Silvers William Sweet George Tissaw Kenneth Tolmie Robert Tolmie David Ulmer Daryl Wittenberqer Christmas comes but once a year Not too old on campus, but many na- tional chapters . . . We're still living some distance from the campus but have a fine home now . . . Epsilon Gamma chapter brought to Idaho in 1927, kept disappearing and reappearing . . . you can't keep a good bunch down . . . founded at Boston University in 1909 . . . pledges stole shoes, sox ot members and distributed them among the sorori- ties . . . took time to chase them down and decide whose were which . . . Lois Messerly chosen Crescent Queen . . . entered in the national Lambda Chi con- test. . .Fred Farmer, Gem photographer . . . Stu Dollinger, a Finleyman through and through and composer of "Maybe" . . . the 'lyardage dance"-wow! 184 3772502 fi! ywia Row One: Chuck Lynberg, treasurer: Grant Radford. vice-president: Jack Doy Linck, house managerg Don Loofbourrow, secretary. 52vv 1. 1 ,pfv- GCD- A. nw Roger Aslvlyy Douglas Aurnlmmruer Phrllip Beeson George Blosser Richard Carlmlxn lack Doyle Robe-rl Enqhsh Fredferxvlz lffxrnlrzr Robert Fnrmvr Donald Fovdwsvh Nelson Gllnscm Ralph Havorkamp Harold Hrrnric Leo luvc lead Kaull Harry l.an1g-rm Wayne Lfzwlr Charles Lynlxorq lohn Mc:Qulllm Roherl Maize Dorvalcl Nluflrtlxfllxl lames Tlmnms Moore Allan Pelrm Paul Polk Grant Radford LeRoy Rwullx Howard Rub Norman Trlluy An. Ichn Wester Leo Wineqar "Raggmopp" or Bachfit sends us! Where Deakin ends there is a building known as Uthe convent" . . . most of the men here hash at different women's groups . . . consequently they get the low-down on all the females . . . just ask 'em . . . Hyde lacobs, one of the active campus politicos, has his headquarters here . . . Cleon Kunz, one of the co- assistant chairmen for next year's Home- coming celebration, is another who often is found Working on this or that com- mittee . . . student battalion commander in the NRGTC program for this year was Stanley Tanner . . . annual Gold and Green Ball held in conjunction with Lambda Delta Sigma . . . LDS Sweet- heart crowned at this gala affair . . . Vandaleers and concert band both aided and abetted by LDS boys. 186 OZ. M156 d Durtschi, social chairmang Frank Gillette, president nw fx we---. Donald Balces David Beckslead Dale Daniels Reed Durischi Lauray Fereday Richard Fisher Vernon Gallop George Gardner Verl Gessel Frank Gilleite Frank Haglund Pay Harris Dean Holyoalc Hyde lacohs Lynn lohnson Cleon Kunz Dan Lotl William Nelson Herald Nol-:es Don Parker Lawrence Rasmussen Lamonl Smith Stanley Tanner Wallace Taylor Dale Waters Pi! ,fpebffz Zfefzz 5 R . MQ: 8? WEP H 2 ' f Q t ' 1 , - -zff A X .Q .y ffmp mf- : 5 51" ss-sz 1 4 'S M E ' 'Seven no tx-urnp" "We Phi Delts, tried and true" . . . Miami Triad affair was a huge success . . . many and novel tubbings . . . each ldaho vic- tory finds the boys clanging the news . . . more muscles this year than last, due to increasing Wins for Idaho teams . . . did- n't bother to steal Butch this year . . . he inflated the house bill too much, anyway . . . blue front door still shines in the afternoon sun . . . founded at Miami Uni- versity, l848, locally in 1908 . . . bridge games are an everlasting affair in the library . . . nothing like a good Phi Delt jam session . . . especially if Fiester is around . . . he thinks his name is Fiesta. 188 Row One: John Row Two manager. 'HRM-W : John EHR if . 3 s' Holmes, rush chairman: Ernie Bedford, president: A1 Rolseth, warden . . . Ascuaga, social chairmang Jim Klason, vice-presidentg Herb Dodge, house W1111.1111 A111115 1?o1,1e1'1 A111111 101111 A:11:u11q11 Gary B11:1::e11 Earl Br0f:1411111r1 EJWI1111 CT1111ru11111a11 Roqzar 1'J.1v1f1:-1111 Burlon D111111::on George Dodge George Folleelt 11111105 1111111111: 1a111efs11f1111111o1141 Frank 11s1!111::w111111 GP41111v11rA111y 101111 Nz1r1111111 W1111a111 1110111111111 Saylor 11-p11:11111 Roberi 11111se:1 101111 Kayls-wr Frank Ke119111111cz11 LQ11 K11:1wl11111 Iames K1111c1s:o11 Evan 1,aFu11et1e 0110 1..c1111c:11e1 Davld MUCI11111 101111 M1'G1111q11 Nathan Marlmu D510 N91-'1111 Robcrt Neflfson Robert 0151111 1ack Pvrry R1L111a1'11 Pe-1011111111 101111 P111111 Ke-i111 131e1111111 111111111 113111111-111 T11eOdore'- S1-1111 151111113 311111911 Frank 51111111 1:11111 S11111.1ee11 T11U111a:s Telluplr- Ke1111et11 Wwqnlv 1.e:11e1 W1111e1 1 189 Pi! gamma Qebtz Truer words were never spoken HA snug little nook . . . an easy chair . . . an hour spent . . . in smoke-wreathed air" . . . founded l848 at lefferson Col- lege . . . Mu lota chapter established in l92l . . . color is purple . . . officers? . . . no one can find out . . . Gem was forced to picture four jackasses . . . Andy Chris- tensen has made quite a name . . . Va- rious committees, last year's Frosh presi- dent . . . now on executive board . . . Rich Pennell, actor and sometimes come- dian . . . home of up-and-coming basket- ballers Hartly Kruger and Bill Mather . . . within these ivy-covered walls car- toonist Stan Soderloerq dreams up his Wild ones . . . Fiji islanders' dance known and loved for the girls' grass skirts. 90 Donkey Serenade James Aston Alan Atwood Richard Atwood Fuqene Babin Harold Barnes Ruel Barrus Robert Barstow Robert Beckwith Carlyle Brough Raymond Burns William Burns Andrew Christensen Robert Christensen William Clarke Rarel Clauser Roger Cone Ralph Dunkle Lloyd Dunn Leo Freiermuth Robert Firllmer lolmny Gaiser Richard Garlock lames Geddes Kenneth Giles Torn Glenny larnes Grenfell W. L. Guqler Burton Humphrey .lanies lohnson Richard E. Johnson lordan Kanikkeherq Bruce Kennedy Karl Klaqes Hartley Kruqer lohn Lacy George Led lack A. MCEntire Bruce Mclntosh Eugene McNee lohn Mast William Mather Raymond Miller larnes Mitchell Dean Mosher lnmes O'Connor Robert O'Connor Richard Pennell R. l. Porterin George Racely loseph Rumble Donald Scott Thomas Shull Donald Smith Stanley Soderberq N. G. Speropulos Elmer Sperry Cyrus Sweet Dean Thornton Robert Tidd lolin Tobin Paul Tobin Harry Townley Cecil Ture Tom Tudder Dwane Welch Don Wolcott 191 f9ff1'ffzzWfz ffm Nw "Ah--please get up." . . . "Huh-uh!" Founded in 1906 at Miami University . . . Beta Gamma chapter organized in 1947 . . . carnations to the gals who Wrangle a pin . . . just our Way of expressing sat- isfaction . . . house functions include the autumn pledge dance, costume ball . . . autumn football game is held with the Alpha Kappa chapter from WSC, Win- ner receiving traditional Ulittle brown jug" . . . Paul Araguistain, sophomore vice-president, member of multi ASUI committees . . . Howard Humphrey, pep band member . . . one of our favorite sports is displaying the red front room to visitors and friends . . . crazy cars With canaries on aerials yet. 192 11 Congd 'ii' Roberl Acoclc Paul Araquisiain Phillip Baltaqlia Bonnie Brocfks William Brown Bryan Brunzell Richard Chamberlain lflberl Cleaveland Darrell Conqdon lames: DePartee Edward Downer: Chester Harper Howard Humphrey Andrew Kirsch Iolm Leslier Donald MCM-ahan Robert Mclvianaman Delbert McNealy Donald Mal-ci liimess Marshall Room' Maxwell Roberi Mushlitz Robert Oehmel-ze Robert Riddle William Rinqerl Tlieodore Saulie lnlin Snow Wayne Stewari Roger Swanstrom Glenn Talbott lamps Teaque Fr-pil Thompson liluqene Todd lldrry Wilson Glen Youngblood 193 - me ff ff Rub a dub dub three men ln a tub The largest living group on the campus . . . large, blue-grey wings branch out to house over 300 men . . . new ideas and spirit in campus affairs often origi- nate here . . . home of several campus bigshots . . . lohn Lawrence led the group through two semesters . . . Keith ludd was appointed co-assistant chair- man for Homecoming next year . , . Wil- son Churchman, first semester KUOI business manager . . . new cannon was stolen and only after a good tussle re- turned to its place on the lawn . . . Pine Lodge trip, taken each year . . . largest commissary on campus, only one that provides burgers for hungry men . . . Homecoming float showed new spirit of "more activities for everyone" program inaugurated in hall this year. 194 Row One: Arlie Caudle, intramural manager: Robert Lewis, treasurer: John Lawrence, president: Roger Allison, vice-president: Robin Faisant, secretary: Stewart Ailor, social chairman . . . Row Two: Robert Carlson, freshman representative: Lavon Palmer, junior representative: Grant Simons, assistant proctor: Dave Fitzgerald, proctor: Pat Day, assist- ant proctor: Eugene Root, senior representative: Charles Winter, sophomore representative. Richard Allen Roger Allen Ralph Allison Robert Allison Dan Anderson Alva Axt Eugene Baisch lohn Beer George Birdt Orrin Blalock lohn Bloom Wayne Borrowman Richard Bowmer Peter Breysse Louis Brinlcerhoff Darrell Brock Donald Brooks Reid Brower lack Buerkle William Eurchard Boyd Burt Rolnert Carlson Howard Chadwivk lack C. Chuqq Michael Chunilla Wilson Churchman Harold Collett Ruelven Cooley Gordon Cordes lac Coward Keith Coyne David Crane Lloyd Damsey Richard W. Davis Patrick Day Don Deardorff Glen DeBruine Donald Deerkop Donald Denton Charles DeR0se Wilmar DeWitt Earl Donnan Roy Driskill Arthur Duncan Kenneth Duncan Robert l. Duncan Howard Edwards Ralph Erlandson lohn Evans Y Robert Evans Leroy Fayle lames L, Eiala Dave Fitzgerald Wallace Flodberq Dallas Fuller Vern Gassar 195 lames Gerard Wendell Gladish Meredith Glenn Kenneth Goldsherry Glen Greely Robert Greqq Carl Guderjohn Frank Gunn l. P. Hall Farrell Harris lohn Haulwner lames A, Henry Ralph Hill Ronald Hill Donald Hodge David Holt T. R. lnqerisoll Jerry lackson Wayne Petsmn Donald lest: Axel lohnszon Georqe Iohnson Richard lohnsslon Ronald lfilinsztnn Keith lncltl lohn lutila Michio Kaku loe Kendall Carl Kinney Marvin Kisstler Kent Kolirinq l'lmi.ald Kfmif-ffl-1 Raymond Krancthefz Lewis Ladwiq Walter Landecvlg lames Landers: lohn Laurenve Torn Laurent Billy Leatham Oliver Lee Gene Lewis Lawrence l.imlwrnuqh Calvin T. Lonq Donald Lonq Harold Lynch Maurice Lynfvh Tor Lyshanq Robert Muffreerly Donald McManarnon David McCreight Robert Marlcinson Frederick Maizner Dale Milich Gerald l.. Miller Kenneth Miller Edward Moe lames Morrison Dean Osborne Lavon Palmer 196 H-1, -my ,e-fm. f-5.1 wx N1- 'JP EZ '--. ...v .ow 'G'-15 Q fw- -Q 'har 3 32' "-2 '62 'PMG v-A., -wx --up Kvllll Parduu Ruy Parker Rurhard Parrolle l-lnward Palz Wxlllam F. Perry lwhn l. Palerson Carl Pharrls Rwlverl Phillips Clarlh Powell lames Pr1r:e Reqxnald Reeves: Cflaylon Reynolds lack Reynolds Donald Riqqin lfuqcnc Rorvt lohn Roscnllxal Pallrxn Rm-:, llurman Rosle Ralph Scfluerman lamess Schull Allen Sharp Richard Sheppard Donald C. Smilh Theron Snulh Waller Speclman Gerald Sperrazo Burl Slanlord Gofvrqc Sleward licrnhard Slroluehn Ward Sullrvn Wallacze Stacy Dale Tanner Rwlffxrl lallfm lameza Txnlo Tomas: Toxnassml Theodore Torolf: Rhys Tovey Donald Tschanz Roluerl Uhriq lolm Voorhees Lloyd Walers Donald Wallwreuhl Hel: Webster lohn D. Whlle Rlczhard While Kenneth Whollancl Elden Widner Wlllis Wicclenman Ralph Wllflvr l'I1nrn0llW1llc1n.s David Williams Donald Willis Cflaylon Wilson 'lllmmasz Wxlson Bulen Wolford lanxess Womeldorlf lame Wommank Marxon Wrxqhl lescph E Zavers 197 Guess which one is the senior rgfyma gjygfgd CSZXIZWI "Violet, emblem of fraternity" . . . new- est chapter house on the campus . . . boasts largest front lawn . . . parking lot to alleviate traffic . . . one of the largest and oldest fraternities in the nation . . . founded in 1856 at Tuscaloosa, Ala., established here in 1919 . . . The Bowery costume dance . . . placed second in the Mother's Day song fest . . . claims such stalwarts as King Block, football . . . Howie Berger, tennis . . . and, of course, Warren lohanson, one of 1daho's most outstanding milers . . . Dale Benja- min, KUO1 station manager . . . also the home of many Vandal tankmen . . . spring formal winds up a colorful social calendar. 198 Row One: Bill Stemple, secretary: Dale Anderson, presidentg Mrs. Lemon, housemother: Dale Benjamin, vice-president . . . Row Two: William Winkle, social chairman, Jim La- Grone, treasurer. 555-'A SEIQ ww naw mann :sum fungus .avg fh? 5 was KT C112 i WMM? Wh!! ,WNW WGBH s ESQ! WMU WH! 32 MH AW! WB! EERE! W ami Iii!! K Dale Anderson Clarence Aresvik Chase Barbee Dale Benjamin Howard Berqer Odell Black Robert Bloornqiiisl Charles Bottinelli Darrell Callihan Patrick Driscoll Thomas Edmark Edward Frandsen Todd Frohman Henry Gandiaqa Daniel Gardner Robert Gleason Howard Griggs George Hargrave lohn Harris Robert Henderlider lames Huff Vaughn lasper Donald lensen Eddie lohnson Robert B, lohnson Wayne Knudtsen lames LaGrone Maurice Loomis Calvin Lyon Theodore MCDaniels LeRoy Maqden Philip Meagher Dale Mendenhall Marvin Michel Earl Newell lames Oates Leland Obermeyer lerry Rockwood Thomas Rowland Joseph Rueqqer d Scfhielve Skinner Smith n Stemple Stern l Stevenson nd Stominel d St. Clair 3 Robert Swanson Duane Taylor lames Varley lames Verqohlvi Louis Whitsell Charles Williams Kent Wilson William Winkle AL Sig Chis dig in for Homecoming "She's the sweetheart ot Sigma Chi" . . . sang brothers, as they picked Eleanor Powell to reign over the dance . , . much time spent in digging the grave ot the cougar . . . hut the cougar sneaked away for another year . . . those who loosen their grip on the white cross are slapped in a stock . . . one ot the most ettective tubbing systems known . . . the Pratt dinner a lively attair . . . Phi Bete Crval Hansen also works hard tor all publica- tions . . . PhilYSchnell, past Gem editor . . . character and prexy lack Lein . . . election board chairman Lee Bath . . . midnight and all-night jam sessions are still occasional attairs . . . annual crab feed . . . Mexican hat dance. OO Freml ll-111l1'y Gale B-111' Rolvorl Harlwur Lee Bath Ken Be2rq11111::l Dean Brown Vernon Cfalclwrzll W1nslo11CIl111rc:l11ll Vlnconl Conley lulm Cf11ll1ur11 Serge Cfwval lam-Qs Cox KennCll1 Dolvlclll Alvin Dcr1111a11 LeRoy Depalmo Goorqo Dm1al111c1 Stephen Douglas Bob Drake R1cl1arnl l"1vl1,l lcimcs Forrl Gcorqo Fr:-1f1cr Ivan Frenczh Alfred Hagan Orval Ha11::m1 Reed Hansen Wilham l'la11:zm1 Richard Harden WCv1flr1ll llr'1 rcll R11gl'1arrl lurnu la111cs:lar'k1:r111 lvlarvm lar111l1: W1ll1a111 lnwoll Pl1il:p lol111:o11 Dale Kassel Charles Kerr ldwk Krohlnlol lolm 1.0111 Shellwy l.011a111lor Keith l..enz1nqOr Will1a1n Lusnzher lack M4:Frerle-rick G. M. Mc:M11ll1n Horace Ne-aloy Don Nepean Dick Newlon Reber! N1xo11 Pichard Ohms: R1Chard Parsell Francis Pratt lames Rmnlmrdl lack Rolnmellc Davld Sampson Plul Sclhnoll Barr S1u1ll1 Robert Slcvoluzzon lohn Stoddard Charles Slory Robert Slrmm Bruce Swormcy Gordon Taylor Don Tl1r:opl11l11L, l. F. Tl1u111p:1r1n Do11qla::Tl1arp Richard Tucvp Darlo Toflonello Seth Tulllo Bruin Will1ams Lew1s W1Il1ams lames Wilson Thomas Wriql'1t Bom Yraqui "Whoopee l" wlnhe White Star" shines for the Sigma Nus . . . they captured the intramural class A basketball crown . . . but won no decisive victory in their annual pre- dawn snowtight with the Gamma Phis . . . sports Well represented here with . . . Ted Diehl, one of the mainstays on the football sguad . . . as Well as lerry Diehl, president ot ul" Club . . . boxer Herb Carlson, national champ again . . . bas- ketball stars Bob Wheeler and Dick Reed . . . and Hell Diver prexv, lim Farmer . . . first place was won with their Homecom- ing tloat . . . sunbathing DG's on one side and Alpha Chis on the other raised havoc With spring studying . . . Hallow- e'en party with Alpha Chis in the tall . . . plus many other activities made l95O a big year for the Sigma Nus. O2 4.gl?77ld zz hard Magnuson, vzce-presxdentg Ted D hl p d t J k B 1 gh house managerg Ron Hy de , social chairman. Marvel Arnsworlh lack Barraolouqh Charles Berry lohn Black Herberl Booth Herbert Carlson Vernon Carlson Glen Casolwoll Daniel Creswell Ioseph Dlckxnson Gerald Diehl Theodore Diehl Roberl Duncan Norman Farnham Garry Farmer lames Farmer Roberl Garlln William Garlin William Goodman RobertGoodw1n Wilburn Granlund W1llxam W. Gray Pairiclc Halnllton Roger Hartman Donald Hayes: Donald Haynes Roy Hooper Ronald Hyde loseph Kass Phxlmp Kznnlson lames Kvnmson ,lames MCKev1li Richard Maqnuson Oils Nlaloy Harry Osborne Arthur Perklns Roloerl Pelerson Don Quane Lonny Penlrow Roberl Reeves Don Rinqe lohn Telqencr Gary Urle Donald Wallxnan lohn Woqher Earl Wheeler Rolverl Wheeler Frederlclc Wxllell . ,4 S4 F Cramming for finals Members zealously guard their mascot cannon . . . kept to be tired on initiation dates and ldaho victories . . . Apache dance features slinky French costumes . . . on St. Patricks day a party is held in honor ot a mythical lrishman . . . Q'Flaherty, who never shows up . . . consequently the "Royal Qrder ot the Crimson Cross" capitalizes on his ab- sence . . . initiates new members . . . rival order, the "Black Shack," initiates at the same party . . . Tau Kappa Epsilon is tast growing . . . thirty-two chapters established since the end ot World War ll . . . Tekes are tootball players, journal- ists, trackrnen, radiomen, baseballers, committeemen . . . Al "lason" Derr and car are traditions . . . t'SWeetheart ot TKE" is a favorite campus song. 204 7997 A 1 1,9 "tw .J ZW Kafka Cghszlvz Row One: Dave Bull., scholarship chairman: Win Bishop, president: Bob Griffx at-arms: Dale Stallings, treasurer . . . Row Two: Bob Greer, historian: Bob Sim Don Johnston, vice-presidentg Lloyd Heap, pledge trainer. .QP qv- W mf:- 'B'-" -ff -Q. .pug QP Edward Anrlerson lames Baker Gary Baxter Charles Belire Richard Benszcroter Winston Blestmp Ttxurman Blavk lliirrifmii H-.yfl Llewellyn Bminard David Bull lames Burns: lames: Ctiaallrantl Moire Clmrteiyfz Rifhard Cknrnlie Pm1lDaaly Riclianl ll:-ly:-n William Docilmltl Allen Den' Stanley Guflerke Gerald Goecrke Gerald Green Robert Greer lnwrerive tl.m::fm Lloyd llrlitp lames llenpy Maurice- llorlen Donald Hunt Don Hutcliinson Donald Iolinstmi Gene Larson George Lee David Lowry Douglas Mr'Bricle Max Matthews Paul Moore William Nash lim Paras: Roluert Prtnrrl George Powell William Rode-n Robert Sims: Calvin Spfsrlu: Dale St-ill1nq.n Lawrenczf- Stone Plnllip Wilder Robert Wortliinqton lolin Ziemann 205 960743 gweef ftzff Famous for its stairway and massive lounge . . . engaged in trophy battle with Hays Hall . . . campus intramural champs, winning football and cross- country . . . senior dunking by fire bose led to flooded floors . . . basement floor was a four-inch ocean . . . famous for social functions . . . 'lCabaret," in the Crchid Room . . . and free leis featured at "Beacl'1combers Ball" . . . "Confu- sion" dance and broken limbs on the slide . . . Bob lonas, exec board, led ball prominents . . . also Larry Peretti, CC. prexy . . . Morgan Tovey, Homecoming chairman . . . chief forester, Bruce Col- well . . . Rosie, dietician for both Sweet and Chrisman . . . many prominents in many activities . . . in all, 192 men call Willis Sweet home. 206 Row One: Ed Grahn, assistant proctorg Don Brudie, presidentg W Mrs. Lairmore, hostessg Clinton Chase, secretaryg Don Dirkse, soci 1 h Kenneth Allen Lafayelte Allen lohn Allyson Orson Anderson Willnur Andrew Richard Andrews Dale Andrus Ray Anistine Arnold Bahr lohn Baillie Lloyd Bell Darrel Bien! Charles Bonar Donald Borden Frank Bowles Lee Boyle Melvin Brown Donald Brudie Donald Baumqartner Billy Bnrqqraf Donald Campbell Omar Campbell Raymond Carney Clinton Chase Neal Christensen Charles Clark Warren Cllonznqer Bruce Cfolwell Robert Crooks Frederic Cully Leverett Curtis Raynold Davis Gilbert Deklotz Donald Dirlcse Roy Doupe Troy Doupe Robert Drexler lames: Dunham Larry Eisner Henry Fitzroy Norman Fitzsimmons Dan Follcins lohn Fox lerry Frick, lr. Thomas Gates Polmerl Gerard William Greenwood Clarke Hamon Norman Haroldsen Brenl Harris Ralph Hart Kenneth Hayden Clarencre Hoagland Kenneth Hoagland Clair Holllnqsworlh William W. Hunt Paul Hyde Harry lsaman Rafael llmenex Arnold lohnaon Thane lohnson Von lohnson Stowell lohnstone Robert lonas Toshio Kaku Norman Kennedy Oscar Klemens Meade Kohl Kenneth Kornher Boyd Kramer Paul Kunkle Donald Larson l " 207 ,X 'lv J? im 'ff we SCM' W ...ff Elwyn Larson Quentin Larson Virqil Larson George Layos Blair Lewis lack Liherg Ray Liherg Robert Liberq Donald Lindsay Cecil Link Ellverl Lonq Lennart Lundslrom Richard McFadden Gerald McKee Rolnert MeMurtrey Rolnert MacDonald lames Marlin Carl Meserve Donald Mitchell Billee Mixer Kay Montgomery laines Morgan lloward Morton Rex Moulton Guy Nanve lack Nelson Sherman Neslwitt Theodore Nowak David Nye Kenneth Oliason lames Parsons Kent Paynter Lawrence Peretti Hal Pickett lloward Piokren laines Pline Rirthard Raivio Bryan Rambo Arthur Randall Ronald Reese Loren Robinson Wayne Robison Charles Rogqe George Rose lohn Schaplowsky David Schmitt Charles Seeher Robert Sell Bernard Shalz Charles Shoun Sonnich Sonniehsen Donald Sova Robert Spaldinq Lloyd Spicer Carl Stamm Bert Steiner Harold Stevens Dean Stevens Keith Stevens Glen Slrinqham Arthur Sutton Morgan Tovey Frederick Troeh lohn Urquidi Donald Utter lohn Vandenherq Donald Wagoner lohn Waqoner William Wardrop Gerald Weaver Douglas Weinmann Kenneth Weisman Dean Welch lames Westacot Franklin Wheelock .lerry Whiting Clyde Winters Norman Wood l-lerhert Wooalall Lee Woods Gary Wyss Burton Younq Richard Zarinq lnhn Zwiener VANDALS ATTACK :l,, ::........::: .. l X , K- Ei. ,I H55 7 , if 4 A 44 1 A f: " 4" ta i1..K?,-'F M ff" ,gif 1 X W 54RffFj wi gg 45,6c?Y7f5 , Lf- f e ii Z 'K 2? 3 S Q aw gi 4-: WJIMIIZA My fx .'. X B - f- 'W H 3 Q7 H ix, K ffg X l W " f W xi , 'lsr 1- - . ' "uf Zh... ' A,Jg In Q-xg, , f1?,f.I2?naiL1g,'f'7T'q?1flZZ'3i,f1ZE2'me at 1 'V' iv HEY:-1..,Tl' Zia a A falsify mmf cfzmmwzz 5 Mayan Lgmff Mba! aghcwfs WWW I KI ges Editor -' ' Lwg5,fff X itol. IE.: Vnwk r 4. , , , ggi? yym 4,-mmf G THE NOISE DEPARTMENT . . . Cheerleaders Chuck Williams, Mary Harding, sister Ann Harding and Wally Larsen whooped it up from the sidelines Spring Legs and Leather Lungs THE SPQRTS SEASCN had its ups and downs and so did the ldaho yell team. Bringing the Vandal cheering section out of the final quarter blues is always tough Work. It took more than saddle shoes, ilying arms and that ability to leap in the air. Yell King Gary Nefzger, with the able help of Wally Larsen and Chuck Williams from the male sex and a feminine touch added by the Harding sisters, deserves a pat on the back for a thankless job. 5 Zfifi, -.'.f 2 L .-112, -N551 U M l is lb ' " 1 Wwxvqstswww V JA x K I tvgww' :Sy 'psig' 'W 'fr len - ' - N, f it '-" . W-. 5' .t f Q in ' X f ff - M.. ' - IQ' 1 ,533 7 1 ' ,ggx jf ,'-W f'iwfW , f 'f" sigw,125ff7fr: ,, Q V , W: ' 'N 1'Zii 1Q'J,f, . . M555 V 7 7,51 Zizgfwwifx 'Ji -I-.35'E3,:5:,::.,,:?-5'I'i:I':" mii f-'A Q , " A T223 X -:I:I' - rv 'r- s f ',g:,4,:3,fwss41 ,.., 1.11111-la W,Wff4,,,4' f'?i3s,ff, 5s ft gg , waz. .L sm wwivw - M' If X, f.,,z.vw55xskqa?Si,WfUa-Mgr-se,Wm-Y eve 1 ffafzih . se f M ""'3.' -N e QUE?-'2.ai'sg2'2 .,.. -:- -, ,Q--55g:jfk-:Q.ZZ2E::5:j' ' , ga -J.sw'effigy3'i?'3-'f13:?Qf,213efgig'Kr .Af 1559, wi-M ffffw f' 1 1,'f:5fgfK1ga::s2g?sqg, 5 - ,V W ,.,, -f-r W YELL KING . . . Gary Nafzger ROAST THOSE DUCKS . . . Yell King Gary Nefzger kindles the fire WE WANT A TOUCHDOWN . . . Homecoming Queen and her Court Q "" '- ' ...,. .,..,,. . . .,.,., ...... , Q , :L ' :'E. , " g.:Z1..5.,:ZsI'2".2213I:,i:Z:E::::Ei::',.:.1- t """ ' Wlgwp- as f A-fikawsi M fr 1 M, L 4 ix W -rr u 1 N U rv ,J ,F I K ? A l ff- 1' - ...., . .,.. .,..,.,... W-- , ' .. ., .,.,,::. -2: I , --H-.,.r.. ,...,.. z ..., : .,.,,.,.,.,, .,,, , .,.,.. , . em,-'f ,.-,- . -,--'- .--.-. 1 - join in on the chant Fireworks with a Short Fuse THIS ENERGETIC GRQUP drew up the home- coming rally plans. Yetls, fireworks, card tricks and a skit brought cheers from some sections and jeers from others. Seated at the working table are Marcella Minden, Dick Boyle, Ann Kettenbach, Gary Nefzqer, David Beadles and Dave Uhner. HERE WE HAVE IDAHO . . . Ssvonty-piece Vandal band and Idaho card section add to Homecoming color LIKE TWO GRAPPLERS FROM THE MAT WORLD, Stanford guard Cap Cook 1133 wrestles with back Glen Christian C361 in an effort to shake loose from the Idaho blocker and get a clear shot at ball-packer A1 Schireman 181 Pacific Coast Conference CALIFORNIA .,.. UCLA ,.....,. STANFORD ..... USC .,,,,....... OREGON STATE ..., , . OREGON ,...,.. WASHINGTON.. WSC ........,. IDAI-IO .....,, MONTANA ..,., Won Lost Pc . I PF 1000 220 .714 186 .667 185 .667 159 .625 180 .286 153 .286 126 .250 114 .200 85 .000 40 PA 80 149 67 105 161 164 203 205 191 123 Heefgzzff PIGSKIN PLAYMAKERS . . . Dixie Howell, Steve Belko, Babe Curfman, Gene Harlow. and Bill Godwin. STILL BUILDING TOWARD THE FUTURE, the Idaho coaching staff didn't expect the Vandals to engineer any mountain-moving miracles during the 1949 corduroy schedule. Even so, Idaho was extremely formidable last season, except when they drove down inside their opponents' 15-yard stripe. Then they were like Samson after a visit to the barber shop. HEAD COACH MILLARD F. HOWELL, former Alabama all-American in 1934, coached at New Mexico, Loyola, Arizona State and Alabama before coming to Idaho in 1947. His Vandal squads have won ll and lost 17 contests while playing progressively tougher schedules. GUARD COACH GENE HARLOW, all Southeastern conference fullback in 1939, left Alabama with Howell in '47, END COACH RAY CURFMAN, all-Border conference star at Texas Tech, is a newcomer to the Idaho staff. TACKLE COACH BILL GODWIN, one of Georgia's greatest centers, came to the Vandal campus from the Boston Yanks. Godwin resigned at the end of the season. FRESHMAN COACH STEVE BELKO, former outstanding Idaho athlete, handles freshman football duties. ,' .. W it f iii, , g, , 7 . :"g 1 i X 'I A ,zi- " ' A 255 I .. X gs y t . -FHL., . .,.. 1 I Q .,... I A 533 Will Overgaardtiii' Roy Colquittfk-A' Carl Kiilsgaardikfkii' Senior Tackle Junior, PCC Guard Semor Tackle, Easl-Wessl Shrlner M Newi- HEADING FOR THE FIRST SOUTHWEST INTER- SECTIONAL . . . First row: Steve Douglas, Ronald Nicholas, Max Glaves, Roy Colquitt, Billy Mullins, Ken McCormack, Tom Ambrose, Morris Rose. Sec- ond row: John Brogan, Bob Mays, Glen Christian, Orville Barnes, Marvin Beguhl, Jim Hammond, Al Schireman, Ken Larsen, Wilbur Ruleman, Evan Richey, Lowry Bennett, Jim Hatch, Ted Diehl. On Stairs: Jerry Diehl, Keith Bean, Rich LeDuc, Ben Jayne, Verne Baxter, Jim Tallant, John Reager, Will Overgaard, Carl Kiilsgaard, King Block, Max Her- rington, Jim Chadband, Bill Fray, George Ballew, Bud Riley, Torn Trees. 4 IT AIN'T POLITE TO TAKE MORE THAN ONE AT A TIME . . . Regardless of what Emily Post says, fullback King Block sets for a double block on Willa:-nette's Ewaliko 1641 and Clabaugh 1891. The key block set John Brcgan f5l off on another ground-gaining jaunt. Jrzfzia 7 Whzmefk 0 V A N D A L I S M ! September 17, 1949 Idaho Will. First downs ,............ 21 ll- Yards gained rushing .,,,. 450 86 Yards gained passing ...., 154 29 Total yards gained .,..... 585 91 Forward passes attempted ..... 20 9 Forward passes completed ..... I 2 Yards lost penalties .....,..... 50 48 Opponent fumbles recovered .... 2 1 Punting average .... . . 36 35 Bob Mays-ki' lunior Halfback Keith Beani'-A' Stephen Douglas-k Jim Harnrnondrkikir lunior Quarterback Sophomore Guard Senior Quarterback IDAHO SPENT a major share of its time in striped territory September 17. In the 1949 foot- ball curtain-raiser the Vandals staged a terrific show by smothering little Willamette University under an avalanche of touchdowns. A list of the ldahoans who starred in the game would be as long and shiny as a comet's tail. Coach Howell and his staff put everything but the squad bench into the ball game in an effort to keep the score from mounting. The Vandals crossed the goal line four times in the opening period, picked up two more counters in the second, and added seven tallies in the final quarter. l-lalfback Glen Christian led the scoring parade with two goal crossings and three con- versions for 15 points. lohn Brogan, Al Schire- man and Ken Larsen scored twiceg Ben layne, lim Chadband, Bud Riley and Al Foucar getting the rest. Will Overgaard kicked four good place- ments. Q 1 ' ' 1 ief: M GY' SAY! WHO'S YOUR MANICURIST? . . . End Rich LeDuc C253 shows Oregon's Woody Lewis C303 and Ear1Ste11e C215 the latest methods in finger count- ing. Lewis, however, is more interested in LeDuc's manicure and reaches out to make a closer examination cfazfzft 0 way fl 47 THE UNIVERSITY OF CREGON, rated a peren- nial powerhouse by experts within the PCC, cut loose with devastating speed and a star-studded backfie1d in Eugene to deal the Vandals their first setback of the 1949 campaign. For three minutes 1daho's claim of having its strongest team in 25 years seemed justified. The Vandals, still fresh from the Willamette Univer- sity runaway, took the opening kickoff on their own 25 and drove all the way down to the Cregon 24. The Ducks throttled the drive at this point and ldaho never threatened thereafter. The pitching arms of Oregon's Deadeye Dick passers were stored in mothhalls most of the afternoon. Cnly when the Ducks' ground attack bogged down did f1ippers Earl Ste11e and lim Calderwood take to the air 1anes. Regardless of the score, the ldaho line was eXceptiona11y strong. N0 DUCK HUNTING! September 24, 1949 Idaho Oregon First downs ........... W 12A 16 Yards gained rushing ...... 158 -233 Emirdsrgained passing. . 18 157 Totai yards gained ,....,.,.. . . . 176 390 Forward passes attempiend ...... . . T 20 13 Forward passes completed .,... .EW W 3 M71 Yards lost penalties ....,. T .... . . 40 Y Opprgent fumhles recovered ..... . . A E7 5 Punhnq average. .. . . . . 39 Jim Chadbandii' lunior Fullback Vern Baxterfk-A' Ben Jaynai' Max Herringtonik lunior Center Sophomore End Junior Tackle BROGAN AND TEXAS SUNSHINE BOTH WERE HOT . . . John Brogan measures off twelve more yards of Texas real estate on the 100-yard plot of greensward in Austin's Memorial Stadium. Brogan ranked fifth in the PCC rushing department. He gained 1399 yards in eight games. JZQJJ 7 Tom Treesffi' Jim Tallanti George Ballew -ki'-k Senior Guard lunior Guard Senior End I - LONGHORN STAMPEDE ...,, .:.:..:3, .., october 1, 1949 Idaho Texas ul l - ' 1 First downs ...,,. . . . . , . 14 16 :" I : Yards gained rushing. . . . , , . 158 318 f ",. 5 Yards gained passing ,... . . . 93 139 f' ' . -,,, , Total yards gained. . . , . . . . . . . . . . 251 457 apr, eiafd 71 W ,--' 2 Q U digg rl, I ' Forward passes attempted. . . . . . . . 14 ll . h "'2 ':-:--?, 5 ' ' Forward passes completed. . . , . . 6 6 ' if I IAA I M: Yards lost penalties. , , . . . . . . , . . . . 20 so- - A :li A 5 Opponent fumbles rebgvered. . . . . . . 2 3 I?:iirRI2ai?b:i Punting average. , . ....... . . 29 32 was 56 LIVING UP TO ALL pre-season press notices, a well-coached Texas university eleven outscored the fighting but out-manned ldaho club in Aus- tin. The contest Was the first big intersectional tilt for Idaho since 1946. Blair Cherry's Texans found the going plenty rough during the first 30 minutes of the game with the Longhorns Walking off the field in a 7-7 deadlock at the half. ldaho's lone touchdown and conversion knotted the count with one min- ute and 25 seconds remaining before the inter- mission period. The Idaho drive started on the Texas 47. lohn Brogan flipped a pass to Orville Barnes. The play carried 27 yards to the Longhorn 20. Terry Diehl then moved to the four on a statue of liberty and King Block capped the drive three plays later by bucking over from the one-foot line. Will Overgaard converted. The touchdown was the first score yielded by Texas in three games. All-Coast Tackle Carl Kiilsgaard played 52 minutes in the 96-degree temperature. Coach Cherry commented, UI Wish We had Kiilsgaard on our ball club. 1-le is one of the finest tackles 1 have seen this year" Carl was named on the Texas all-opponent team. ' in th L S 5.2 , si FUTURE CHIROPRACTORS . . . Fullback Jim Chadband Ctwisting headl, tackle Marvin Beguhl C45l, and end George Ballew C63 collaborate as they give Cougar halfback Don Paul a soothing massage. Paul became so relaxed he dropped the porkhide. Idaho recover-e Jrzfzia 5 Wfzxfffkzgbfz 451212 55' RUTGERS BEAT PRINCETCN in l930, the Queensmen's first win over Princeton in 35 games. Kansas knocked over Nebraska in l944, the layhawkers' first decision from Nebraska in 28 contests. lust proof that a jinx is eventually snapped. At Vandalville, ldaho is still waiting for the break. WSC again smothered the Silver and Gold last fall for the Cougars' twenty-second consecutive triumph over ldaho. The Vandals have not won from their cross-state-line rivals on the gridiron since l925. A homecoming crowd of 2l,500 watched ldaho virtually fumble away the ball game. A total of eight ldaho bobbles fell into WSC hands, and the Cougars, taking advantage of the gifts, guickly converted two of the miscues. After a scoreless first period, WSC fired the boilers and scored three timesf two counters coming via the Vandal fumble route. lerry Diehl skirted left end early in the third period for ldaho's first score. Late in the fourth quarter, Glen Christian romped 76 yards for the second tally. Will Overgaard split the uprights for the Vandals 13-point total. d. .,., I, , .N ' 'tk ,S J I vii: - : :. :, :. - -.r:. .-. . Max Glavesi' Glen Christianfk John Brogan-ki' Sophomore Quarterback Sophomore I-lalflzack Junior Quarterback THIS WAS THE YEAR! October 15, Idah WSC First downs .....,,...,,. .... 9 l l Yards gained rush g .,.. . . . . .... 255 l9O Yards gained pass g ........... ..,. 5 O 26 Total yards q . .,,..... ..., 3 05 216 Forward passes attempted , . l2 9 Forward passes completed .....,... . . 3 3 Yards lost penali .........,.. . . . . 20 50 Opponent fumbles recovered ..,.,. . , l 8 Hunting average ....... .... 2 8 30 King Blocktt lunior Fulllvack LET'S SEE, NOWfWHAT SIZE PANTS DO YOU WEAR? . . . White C781 of Willamette takes a measurement of Bub Ri1ey's C37 waist. Guard Wilbur Ruleman i293 looks on as though he thinks the whole idea is a waste of time, especially the work of the Bearcat who is checking Ri1ey's footwear. He's even lying down on the job. JM 47 Lowry Bennetti Sophomore End Jerry Diehliif Senior Halfback THE LITTLE October 22, 1949 BROWN STEIN Idaho Montana First downs .,.....,. . . 20 16 Yards gained rushing ..., . . . 335 148 Yards gained passing .... l 2 Total yards gained ...,..,. . , . 356 150 Forward passes attempted .... . . 16 26 Forward passes completed ..... 9 15 Yards lost penalties ..,...... . . 50 65 Opponent fumbles recovered ..,.. 1 1 Punting average ..., ,..,.,. , . 38 34 Orville Barnesfi' l unior End Ken McCorrnacki'i"k Senior Guard mvlhild 79 ID!-ll-IO CAPTURED one conference game and booted itselt out ot the deep, dark PCC cellar by soundly trouncing Montana State University in Missoula. The victory gave the Vandals pos- session of the ulsittle Brown Stein" for the sec- ond straight year. The Grizzlies dropped a l3-7 decision to WSC earlier in the season and established themselves as a threat in the conference loop. Idaho, how- ever, was playing its sharpest since the Wil- lamette game. Using a plunge and buck offense, Idaho reg- istered three guick touchdowns in the opening quarter and added two more TD's in the third. A pair ot six-pointers in the final frame com- pleted the Vandal scoring for the afternoon. ldaho haltback lerry Diehl slashed over for three touchdowns to lead the onslaught. King Block, lim l-latch, Bob Mays, and Keith Bean contributed the other tour counters. .f in L , -,ig 'f in .4 it K. JUST LIKE THE JAYCEE DAYS . . . Halfback Bob Mays ill shows Boise fans that he can grind out yardage for Idaho as he once did for BJC. Keith Bean 1213 and King Block C41 clear a path for Mays by cutting down Portland back John Freeman CZZJ. JM 49 DlXlE'S "MAYBE T" was served without cream and sugar to Portland University in Boise. And the recipients didn't like the taste ot it one bit. ldaho lost little time in running up the score- board at their NSouthern Idaho Homecoming." The ball game was barely three minutes old when l-laltback Terry Diehl opened the scoring column on a 25-yard dash. lohn Brogan followed suit moments later with a 27-yard romp. Bob Mays tired a 45-yard pass to end Gene Bates tor TD number three, and from that point, the ldaho scores came as tree as substitutions. By intermission the Vandals led 28 to O. A Bob Mays to Crville Barnes combination and a 63-yard run by Mays accounted tor touch- downs tive and six in the third period. ln the tourth quarter l-laltback Tim Hatch put the cap on the Vandal scoring when he knited over his own lett tackle and raced 7l yards. jgaiflz af 7 BOISE STAMPING GROUND October 29, 1949 Idaho Portland First downs ,... . . .... . ef 16 Yards gained rushing ..... 7. . . 377 230 Yards qained passing ..... .,.... 2 6 37 Total yards gained ......... . .. V403 2677 Forward passes attempted ..... . B 13 Forward passes completed ..... ..... 2 5 Yards lost penalties ,.,,......,.. . . . 105 Opponent fumbles recovered. . . . 7 74 i V Punting averaqe ,.,..,...., . 42 36 , ,.,., . ,,V,j g ,,.. , ..... .tif W. . AEE i if 7 t 5525 7 iii. X -Ifssi'iif.jf?12:f:: Morris Roseff Wilbur Rulernanifif lunior Guard Iumor Guard y k:::.... 1.3 1 : A " .r f .Q Marvin Beguhlf-k lunior Tackle Rich LeDuc'ki' Junior End 2 AH, COME ON HORSE-WHOA! . . . Vandal workhorse Jerry Diehl 1175 carries his rider, fullback Andy Knudsen C33J, with him on a trip toward the OSC goal. Diehl was inches short of paydirt on the run. Idaho scored on the next play. JM025 Megan bw 55 Bill Frayfi' Tom Ambroseffi' Ted Diehliirf Junior Tackle Senior Center Senior Quarterback 5 glli I f ,, . ,.,. A llzllb 1 TRACK MEET 11: , November s, 1949 Idaho osc I -:s:-,----:A-,v - IIIQV I f,-- ' First downs ..,,......,............ . . . 1 1 14 ,.V' ':"' I V in ' Yards gained rushing. . .. 173 263 3 K , QVQ Q ,-': Yards gained passing. 219 LST if "'i' -:::A Total Yards Gained .......... . . , . B92 414 Al -iill : In -A Forward passes attempted .,..,. , . . 14 18 lvv' ,----. '-v f" E Forward passes completed .... . . . , . 8 6 :T-E-TEEEE l':: -'-l Yards lost penalties ,..... . . . . . . . . . . . 36 75 T A Opponent fumbles recovered 1 1 Jim Hatchfffi' Punting average. 38 43 Senior Fullback CONFERENCE WIN NUMBER TWO was almost in the bag. ldaho placed a 12-to-O lead on the scoreboard, then yielded the advantage to Ore- gon State in a point-a-minute ball game. A Dad's Day crowd Watched the sputtering Beavers throw their machine in gear and move off the field with a 14-12 half-time lead. The contest was everything but easy-going for both squads and "mix it up and make it rough" was the theme for the day. Terry Diehl, lim Hatch, and lohn Brogan took turns lugging leather down field for the Vandals' opening counter. Diehl topped the drive With an 18-yard spurt around end. ldaho tallied again in the opening seconds of the second quarter when Brogan hit the bull's-eye on a dart pass to Keith Bean. The Vandals crossed the goal stripe two more times in the free-for-all second half. Max Glaves lofted a 20-yard pass to Brogang he took it on the dead run and galloped 55 yards to the goal. Later in the fourth stanza, T im Hammond pitched a pass to Bob Mays who raced 76 yards for the counter. A DAY AT THE RACES . . . Fullback King Block Ml just hauled in a Brogan pass and heads into Indian territory. The play carried thirty yards. End Rich LeDuc C255 sends one Redskin to the dirt with a rolling block on the 43. Richard Abraham t30l, Stanford 211-pound center, finally tagged Block. JM 0 THE IDAHO SQUAD showed that it packed plenty of "hard noses"-aa laconic description of kids who can take it-f when they invaded Palo Alto for the season final. The Vandals were hit and hit hard by Stan- ford, but came out of the melee fighting. lt was just a bad afternoon for the ldaho lads. Stanford couldn't do anything wrong and Idaho couldn't get started. That told the story. Rose, McColl, Mitchell, Benson, and Klien each scored a Stanford touchdown, the other four being marked by Hugasian and Mervin. Gary Kerkorian split the uprights nine times. lohn Brogan, the Vandals' chief threat of the contest, rolled up a total of lOl yards in 13 car' ries for a seven-yard average. ln the ldaho for- ward wall Roy Colquitt, Tom Trees, Billy Mullins, Wilbur Ruleman and Carl Kiilsgaard were the main stalwarts. After the game Howell com- mented, l'Next to Texas, Stanford was the best team I have seen all season." 45z?zfz,Z2M 65 Bill Mullinsii lunior End John Reager-A' Sophomore Tackle November 12, 1949 INDIAN WARPATH Idaho Stanford First downs ........... . . ll 13 Yards gained rushingf-T.. HT45 349 Yards gained passing .... . . T 68 173 Tami yarasgaaneaf .... ..,. 2 13 522 Forward passes attempted ,... 26 ISTT Forward passes completed ..... 5 8 Yards lost penalties ........... . . 87 40 Opponent fumbles recovered .... 1 3 Punting average. . . . . . . 34 41 Evan Richeyi' Sophomore Tackle Ken Larsent Sophomore Center PCC Northern Division Won Lost Pct. PF WASHINGTON STATE .... 11 OREGON STATE .,,..,. . 8 WASHINGTON. ., . 8 IDAHO .......,.. . 7 OREGON .,... , 6 687 812 SOO 761 SOO 824 .437 736 .375 776 PA 718 748 814 779 859 gd f5af5fzf CHUCK'SCOURTMEN...Frnto:Roylos ur: 0eRy,ur:' o r w r n , g a d Ge rg e g a d Dick Reed, guard: Rod Pollard, forward: J ln M11 d g Middle row' Stuart Dollinger, forward: Bob White, forward: Herb Mead, forward: Bob Pritchett, forward: Ken Barker, ce t B k N k Stallworth. center: Bob Wheeler, center: Sam Jenkins. guard: Joe Grove, guard: Dick Geisler, guard. Cheerful Chuck's Crew Cuts Conference Capers LOOK OUT FOR TDAHO on the maple court. The Vandals proved themselves this season by 1etting other conference guintets know that Tdaho was tired of being the doormat for the Northern Division. Coach Finley adapted his style of play to the ability of his sophomore-junior hoopshooters. The combination wrinkled the brows of rival coaches. A 1ifetime basketball record shows that as a player and as a coach, Finley has been on the winning side 816 timesf on the 1osing end 55 times. ln three years of coaching at Vandalvi11e, his courtmen have won 44 conference and pre- conference contests against 49 defeats. Idaho rang up 828 points in 16 pre-confer ence outings for a 66.7 average. ln conference p1ay they f1ipped in 736 counters for a 46-point game average. Idaho's Five Top Scorers fConference games onlyl TP Ave, Pritchett 140 8.7 Geisler. 135 8.4 lenkins. 116 7.2 Wheeler.. . . . 92 5.7 Reed ,.... , . , 68 4.2 Coach "Cheerful" Chuck Finley IDAHO DRILLS FOR OKLAHOMA OIL . . . Bob Wheeler and Nick Stallworth go up for a Phillips 'A66" rebound in Boise. Their height, however, couldn't off-set towering Bob Ku:-land Ca 7-footer not shownj and the AAU champions won 50 to 39. P Qin 2167206 may Joe Groveivk George Rey-ki Stuart Dollingex-'k 6' 1" Senior 5' 9" Junior 6' Sophomore Idaho Idaho Idaho Idaho Idaho Idaho Idaho Idaho Idaho Idaho Idaho Idaho Idaho Idaho Idaho BARNSTORMING . . I . .GO Eastern Washington. , , . . I ...H48 Gonzaqa.,........,..... . . . . ,6O PortIand University. . . I I . . .UM39 . . A . .54 Seattle University. . . I . . . ,. . ....42 Eastern VVashinqton.,.... .....48 VVyonnnq..H.......M... .....4O lVyonnnq.... .... ..., u4I Iovva State.. .. ..,, ...,.53 Drake ......, ..i.. .....66 b4orninqskie..... ..... .....45 Nebraska... .. ..,,. .....63 Lawrence'Iech..U .... ...,.55 Duquesne..H. . ...M ......45 C3onzaga,.,....... ..., PhHhpsU66H i..... .,,. Idaho ....,. 69 WaIIaCe All-Stars ..... ,... HERE'S A HAIR-RAISING EXPERIENCE . . . Nick Stallworth, 6-foot 6 h J center. applied an arm-lock on Art Ollrich of Drake, then leaned back the tie-up. Niclx's hands were chilled and Art was thrilled. Bob Whitei' Herb Meadink Doctor Jacobson 6' 3" Sophomore 6' 3" Iunior University Trainer OREGON STATE COLLEGE was the only Northern Division team to hand ldaho a tour-Way defeat. The Beavers captured the two Memorial gymnasium contests by wide margins and con- tinued the pace on their home court. The closest score ldaho could register against the detending Northern Division champions was a 48-44 count in a game played at Corvallis. Statistics Player: Games FG FT PF TP Wheeler, C ..., 4 12 7 9 31 Pritchett, t ..... 4 1 l 9 8 31 Mead, g ,...... 4 9 2 7 20 Geisler, g .,... 4 7 4 9 18 Tenlcins, g ..,.. 4 7 3 7 17 Barker,c.. .. 3 3 8 7 14 lrons, t ........ 3 3 5 5 1 1 Millard, g ..... 3 2 7 5 1 1 White, t ....... 3 3 O 5 6 Stallworth, o. , , 3 1 3 5 5 Rey, t ...,..,,, 2 O 1 O 1 Reed, t ..,..... 3 O 1 2 1 Dollinger, g. , , 1 O O 1 O Pollard, t ,,.... F 1 O O W 1 58 50 71 156 Idaho .... . . . Idaho Tdaho .... . . . 1daho .... , . . Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon State State State State SMILE NICE AND LOOK AT THE BIRDIE . . . Roy Irons, G-foot 2-inch Junior FELLA'S, CAN'T WE SETTLE THIS SOME OTHER WAY He b M 11 d 5 f es past a State player and kicks for the lay-in. llginch Sophomore guard, and Bob Wheeler, S-foot 5 unch Jurnor center tra a saver. THE VANDALS gained a series split with the University ot Washingtoii. At Seattle in the con- ference openers, Wasliington took the tirst game in an easy fashion but was pressed all the way by ldaho tor the second win. The Vandal hoop- sters leveled the count with the Huskies at Mos- cow when they slapped down the visitors twice in Memorial gym loetore capacity crowds. Statistics Player: Games FG FT PF TP Pritchett, tn .. 4 l8 l2 l4 48 Wheeler', c ..,. 4 l2 7 4 3l lenlcins, G ,., 4 l2 5 l2 29 Geisler, g, .. 4 8 lO lo 26 Stallworth, c 3 6 2 lO l4 Reed, t . . 4 3 6 13 l2 Mead, g . 3 3 2 8 8 White, t . 3 3 O l 6 Rey, t . 2 l 2 l 4 Miiidfa, q. 4 i 2 5 4 ldaho .... .... W ashington, . . . . .67 Dollinger, g, . . 2 O 3 2 3 ldaho .... .... W ashington. , . . , ,44 L' 2 5 Cf 3 i ldaho .... .... W ashington. . . . , ,4O 68 52 QQ 133 Idaho ,... ..,, W ashington, , . . . .45 SHUCK TOLD BOB TO BE ON HIS TOES FOR THIS ONE . . . Bob Pritchett, a HI, GIRLS, SEE ME? . . . While Hal Arnascn of Washington wa t th co 5-foot 2-inch Junior forward, sneaks past Marc Metzger and flips in a cripple Dick Geisler, 6-foot 2-inch Senior forward, drives around him a d f la p Prom underneath. A 54-48 LOSS to the University of Oregon at Eugene prevented ldaho from making a clean sweep in the Duck series. The Vandals had little trouble with Oregon and as a result, managed to score the tirst ldaho conference Win in the Willamette Valley since 1946. Two victories over Oregon at Memorial gym broke a tive-game con- ference losing streak for ldaho and set them right-side up for the remainder ot the season. Statistics Player: Games FG FT PF TP Geisler, g ,.... 4 15 15 17 45 Reed,t ......., 4 16 6 12 38 PrHcheH,f ,.... 4 14 7 11 35 1enkHw,g ...., 4 12 11 14 35 Stallworth, c. ., 4 6 7 1O 19 hons,t ,....... 4 5 3 5 13 VVheehH,c, , 4 2 7 15 11 Barken c ...... 4 3 2 6 8 WVhne,f .... . 2 1 O 4 2 NhHard,g ...., 2 O 1 2 1 Mead,g .,,. .. 1 O O 2 O Rey,f ..,... . 1 O O O O PoHard,f .,,... 1 H O O iQinn Q 74 59 98 207 l 1daho.,. .M62 ldaho... ..,44 ldaho... .H53 ldaho... ...48 Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon TICKLISH? Dick Reed, 5-foot 9-inch Junior guard, disregards Will Urban's TENSE MOMENT . . . Sam Jenkins, 6-foot 3 11 S pho o e gua d pl yful nne nd heads down the alley for an Idaho two-pointer. of his left-handed hooks against Oregon Sa set art st insurance man all season. Idaho 4......, Idaho ......., Idaho .....,.. Idaho ........ Washington Washington Washington Washington State ,,.... State .,.... State ....,. State ...... TI-IE MOST NCDTABLE ACCOMPLISI-IMENT of the I949-50 Vandal cage troupe was the double victory posted over Washington State's Northern Division champions. Idaho didn't win at home but they staged a pair ot thrillers on the Pullman court. They won the tirst game on a last-second basket by Sam Ienlcins and the other in a triple overtime session. Idaho was the only loop sguad to pin a double Win on the Cougars. Statistics Player: Games FG FT PF TP Geisler, g ,..,. 4 I5 I6 I I 46 Ienkuw,g ..... 4 I4 7 7 35 PrncheH,t ,.,.. 4 II 4 I4 26 VVheelen c . 4 4 Il I8 I9 Reed,t ,,... . 3 6 5 4 I7 Irons,f., .. . 4 2 3 9 7 Barken C . 4 2 3 I2 7 hhHard,g .... 4 2 3 2 7 Stallworth, c. . . 2 I 2 I 4 Rey,t .,....... 2 2 O I 4 DoHingen g... I I O I 2 Mead,g ,....,. 2 O I I I VVhue,f ....,.. AW3 YWUAILW Q W I O 60 55 82 I75 DOK, RON, MOVE YOUR LEFT HAND IF YOU STILL WANT FIVE FINGERS . . . Ken Barker, 6-foot G-inch Sophomore center, has the all for Idaho and aims to keep it. Ken gave warning to WSC's Button and center Gene Conley ISD was shocked at the language. 2 30 A COUPLE OF MISSES! . . . Ther-e's nothing ladylike about the way Bud Lawson and Milt Wilson pitch leather. Lawson, a 155-pound Sophomore decisioned the Cougar lad in a crowd-raiser. Spokane Invitational O IDAHQ. . . . . 27 Gonzaga ...,.... . . 21 Washington State. . , 16 Eastern Washington. . . O M1 475 3 aww THE 1950 RINGMEN . . . Kneeling: Herb Carlson, 165, Wallac k l35 W 11 D Y k Blackfoot: Len Walker, 145, Wallace: Bud Lawson, 155, Teko h 1 ff T d D h 17 Thane Johnson, 155, Idaho Fallsg Larry Hanson, heavyweight, R gby B h 165 W K 155 P Doyle Haskins, 155. Moscow. Frank? Fighters Floor Fist Flingers TGP-FLlGl-ll COAClrllNG trom Frank Young landed ldaho mittmen three championships this season. The Vandals were virtually superb in every department as they tought all odds and climbed to the top ot the lntercollegiate tistic ladder. ldaho hammered out six wins in seven dual matchessfwon the tirst Spokane lnvita- tional Boxing tournaments ecopped their second consecutive Pacitic Coast Conterence boxing title-fand then topped it all ott by sharing the NCAA Boxing Championship honors with Cron- zaga University. Senior l-lerb Carlson, ldahds l65-pounder, punched his Way to become the only Collegian in coast ring history to win tour individual PCC titles. At State College, Penn- sylvania, Carlson Won his third NCAA boxing crown and the lohn S. Rowe memorial trophy. Len Walker, Winner ot the national l35-pound title the previous year, walked away trcm the Penn State ring with the NCAA l45-pound crown. Malik? g if Qiufzas' IDAHO 7 January 13: pounds: pounds: pounds: pounds: pounds: pounds: pounds: Heavyweight: Attendance: EASTERN WASHINGTON I Memorial Gymnasium Frank Echevarria, t.k.o. over Ralph Isile, EWCE. iI:02 of the third round.D DeForest Tovey, Idaho, decisioned Hib Bender, EWCE. Norm Walker, Idaho, decisioned Pat Coleman, EWCE. Len Walker, Idaho, decisioned Gene Fix- dahl, EWCE. Bud Lawson, Idaho, t.k.o. over Pat Hart, EWCE. 0:36 of the third roundj Herb Carlson, Idaho, t.k.o. over Shannon Haitt, EWCE. C34 secs. of second round.J Ted Diehl, Idaho, won by forfeit. Herman Pein, EWCE, t.k.o. over Larry Hanson, Idaho. lDid not answer the third round bell. Approximately 4200. OUCH' . . Ted Diehl, 175-pound Senior, winces as he takes a chopping ght t the heart in his battle with Carl Maxey of Gonzaga. But it's no g fthe Gonzagan hasn't lost a bout in 30 collegiate appea nce IDAHO 5 January 27: l25 pounds: pounds: pounds: pounds pounds pounds: pounds vyweigh Attendance: WASHINGTON STATE 3 Bohler Gymnasium Frank Echevarria, Idaho, t.k.o. over Phil Largent, WSC. CDid not answer the third round bell. Larry McLaughlin, WSC, decisioned De- Forest Tovey, Idaho. Norm Walker, Idaho, decisioned Ierry McHugh, WSC. Len Walker, Idaho, won by forfeit. Milt Wilson, WSC, decisioned Thane Iohnson, Idaho. Herb Carlson, Idaho, won by forfeit. Fought exhibition with Chuck Morgan. Ted Diehl, Idaho, t.k.o. over Iohnny Blacken, WSC. C55 seconds third round.J Hubert Christianson, WSC, decisioned Larry Hanson, Idaho. Approximately 3600. HEAD HUNTING . . . DeForest Tovey, l3O-pound Junior, senses the kill and drive lc right to the head of Hib Bender. The Cheney boy weathered the storm but lost the de IDAHO 5 January 20: l25 pounds: pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds: ITS pounds: Heavyweight: Attendance: GONZAGA 2 Memorial Gymnasium Frank Eohevarria, Idaho, decisioned Ned Boyle, Gonzaga. DeForest Tovey, Idaho, decisioned Bill Macy, Gon- zaga. Norm Walker, Idaho, decisioned Iim Riley, Gon- zaga. Len Walker, Idaho, decisioned Gil Kelsey, Gon- zaga. Eli Thomas, Gonzaga, decisioned Bud Lawson, Idaho. Herb Carlson, Idaho, met Ioe Stephens, Gonzaga: no contest. fStephens, hemorrhage of right eye after round one.I Carl Maxey, Gonzaga, decisioned Ted Diehl, Idaho. Don Ellis, Idaho, by forfeit. 4500. TAKING A MOUTHFUL . . . Norm Walker, 135-pounder, gives Everett Conley a dose upper-cut, which must be tough medicine to swallow, judging from the Cougar' E 145-POUNDER WHO WASN'T THERE . . . Len Walker. 145-pound Junior, proved an sive target for Dwaine Dickinson, who misses badly with a left hook. Dickinson hit the one and Walker hit a raw decision. IDAHO 3 WISCONSIN 5 February 17: Madison, Wisconsin 125 130 135 145 155 155 175 pounds pounds pounds pounds: pounds pounds pounds Heavyweight: Frank Echevarria, Idaho, decisioned Steve Grein- han, Wisconsin. lim Sreenan, Wisconsin, decisioned DeForest Tovey, Idaho. Norm Walker, ldaho, decisioned Les Paul, Wis- consin. Dwaine Dickinson, Wisconsin, decisioned Len Walker, Idaho. Ted McNeal, Wisconsin, clecisioned Bud Lawson, Idaho. Herb Carlson, ldaho, decisioned Dick Murphy, Wisconsin. Gerald Meath, Wisconsin, decisioned Ted Diehl, Idaho. Vito Parisi, Wisconsin, decisioned Don Ellis, Idaho. A ' fenqia nce: 12,500 WZ! 4972121 497224625 IDAHO 7 February ll: 125 pounds: 130 pounds: 135 pounds: 145 pounds, 155 pounds. 155 pounds: 175 pounds: Heavyweight: Attendance: WASHINGTON STATE I Memorial Gymnasium Frank Echevarria, Idaho, decisioned Ed McLaughlin, WSC. DeForest Tovey, Idaho, decisioned Phil Largent, WSC. Norrn Walker, ldaho, decisioned Everett Conley, WSC. Len Walker, Idaho, decisioned Nip Long, WSC. Bud Lawson, Idaho, decisioned Milt Wil- son, WSC. Herh Carlson, Idaho, won hy forfeit. Ted Diehl, Idaho, decisioned lim Aiken, WSC. Huhert Christiansen, W5C, decisioned Don Ellis, Idaho. 5200 largest crowd ever assembled in Meniorial Gymnasiuni. LOVE THY NEIGHBOR! . . . Don Ellis, Senior heavyweight, displays mutual affection for his cross-state rival by hammering an educated right to the short-ribs of Washington State's Hubert Christianson, IDAHO 5 GONZAGA 3 February 23: 125 pounds: 130 pounds: 135 pounds: 145 pounds: 155 pounds: 165 pounds: 175 pounds: Heavyweight: G FOR HIS EOUILIBRIUM . . . Frank Echevarria, 125-pound Sophomore, exploded A a right to the jaw of Ned Boyle. The blow neatly placed the Bulldog on the canvas with Attendance- of rubber legs. Spokane Armory. Frank Echevarria, Idaho, decisicred Gcrf don Siinanton, Gonzaga, DeForest Tovey, Idaho, de-cisiored Vifes Langford, Gonzaga. lim Reilly, Gonzaga, decisioned Norm Walkei', Idaho. Len Walker, Idaho, t.k.o. over Iiin Sullif van, Gonzaga. C1112 ct the third round.D Eli Thomas, Gonzaga, t.k.o. over Bud Lawson, Idaho. H56 seconds third round.D Herb Carlson, Idaho, won hy forfeit. Carl Maxey, Gonzaga, decisioned Ted Diehl, Idaho. Don Ellis, ldaho, t.k.o. over Gary Schu- hach, Gonzaga. 0:13 ot second round.D 3,500. 235 4752 zzaffb mx! :mf X5 234 IDAHO 65 March 11: 125 pounds: 130 pounds: 135 pounds: 145 pounds: 155 pounds: 165 pounds: 175 pounds: Heavyweight: Attendance: EASTERN WASHINGTON Wallace, Idaho Frank Echevarria, Idaho, won by forfeit. DeForest Tovey, Idaho, decisioned Herb Bender, EVVCE. Ncrm Walker, Idaho, decisioned Pat Coleman, EWCE. Len Walker, Idaho, decisioned lim Sim- cnton, EWCE. Thane lohnson, Idaho, drew with Gene Fixdahl, EWCE. Herb Carlson, Idaho, t.k.o. over Everett Hilton, EWCE. K1 rrinute of first round,J Ted Diehl, Idaho, won by forfeit. Herman Pein, EWCE, decisioned Don Ellis, Idaho. 2500. PCC Tournament Idaho .......... . . 25 San lose State. . . . . 22 Gonzaga ......... ,. 21 Washington State, . . , , 19 UCLA. . . . . 14 SWING AND SWAY WITH SAMMY KAYE . . . Someone must be play- ing a hit tune. Norm Walker bangs a right to the head and takes a short left to the body in a slugfest with Ed Martin of San Jose State. IT ISN'T AS SOFT AS A BEAUTY REST MATTRESS . . . Echevarr must have been in a hurry the night he met Robert Coyle of UCLA Coyle sat down with a thud and went to sleep after "the boundi Basque from Blackfoot" tagged him on the chin. The 52-second knock out of round one set a new tournament record. March 23: PACIFIC COAST INTERCOLLEGIATE BOXING TOURNAMENT 135 pounds: 145 pounds: 155 pounds: Heavyweight: March 24: 125 pounds: 130 pounds: 135 pounds: 145 pounds: 155 pounds: 155 pounds: 175 pounds: Heavyweigh March 25: 125 pounds: 130 pounds: 135 pounds: 155 pounds: fi Sacramento Auditorium-W Quarter-Finals Norm Walker, Idaho, decisioned Pete Babin, UCLA. Len Walker, Idaho, t.k.o. over Frank Duffe, Chico State. CReferee stopped bout 30 seconds, third round.l Thane lohnson, Idaho, decisioned Gene Fixdahl, EWCE. Don Ellis, Idaho, decisioned lack Sche- beries, San lose State. Sacramento Auditorium-- Semi-Finals Frank Echevarria, Idaho, knocked out Robert Coyle, UCLA. H52 seconds of first round: new tournament record.J DeForest Tovey, Idaho, decisioned A1 Ta- foya, San lose State. Norm Walker, Idaho, t.k.o. over Ed Mar- tin, San lose State. CDid not answer sec- ond round bel1.l Floyd Wilson, UCLA, decisioned Len Walker, Idaho. Stan Marcil, San lose State, decisioned Thane lohnson, Idaho. Herb Carlson, Idaho, t.k.o. over lack Small, UCLA. CReferee stopped bout in second round.J Carl Maxey, Gonzaga, decisioned Ted Diehl, Idaho. Hubert Christiansen, WSC, decisioned Don Ellis, Idaho. Sacramento Auditorium- Finals Mac Martinez, San lose State, decisioned Frank Echevarria, Idaho. lim Reilly, Gonzaga, decisioned DeForest Tovey, Idaho. Everett Conley, WSC, decisioned Norm Walker, Idaho. Herb Carlson, Idaho, t.k.o. over Raul Diez, San lose State. 61:20 of third round.j Jiffy? 67 -fiaffznzbfzs National Tournament 'hail' ldaho .... . . 18 Gonzaga ..,... . . 18 Michigan State .... . . 13 Louisiana State. . . . . 12 Penn State. . , . i 12 San 1ose State .... . . 10 Washington State. . . . 9 Syracuse ..,. . 8 Maryland. . . . 7 Wisconsin ......... . 2 Catholic University ,... . 1 Minnesota ...,.,. . 1 Miami CFloridal. i . . 1 1950 NCAA BOXING CHAMPIONS . . . Chuck Drazenovich, heavyweight, Pennsylvania State: Carl Maxey. 175, Gonzaga: Herb Carlson, 155, Idaho: Eli Thomas, 155, Gonzaga: Len Walker, 145, Idaho: Everett Conley, 135, Washington State: Ted Thrash, 130, Louisiana State: Mac Martinez, 125, San Jose State . NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC FSOCIATION BOXING TOURNAMENT arch 30: 5 pounds O pounds 5 pounds 5 pounds 5 pounds: larch 31 : 5 pounds 5 pounds pril l: 5 pounds 5 pounds State College, Pennsylvania-- Quarter-Finals Neil Qtsthun, Minnesota, outpointed Frank Echevarria, ldaho. lirn Sreenan, Wisconsin, outpointed De- Forest Tovey, ldaho, lack Tierney, Michigan State, outpointed Norm Walker, Idaho. Len Walker, 1daho,outpointed Pat Daugh- erty, Michigan State. Herb Carlson, ldaho, outpointed Paul Diez, San lose State. State College, Pennsylvania? Semi-Finals Len Walker, ldaho, outpointed Nip Long, Washington State. Herb Carlson, ldaho, outpointed Lloyd Iones, Louisiana State. State College. Pennsylvania-'Finals Len Walker, ldaho, ouipointed Ben Dol- phin, Syracuse. Herb Carlson, ldaho, outpointed lim Role Iier, Syracuse. -Q-: W, :Sift - ., .MM-ff 4 .2235 ' 3 5 fi . WHAT HE NEEDS IS A BULLET-PROOF VEST . . . Herb Carlson, 165-pound Senior, shoots a bullet right to the breadbasket of Syracuse's Jim Rollier, Carlson carried his battering body attack down- stairs after drawing blood from Ro11ier's nose and mouth. 235 F"Zi I f fm ls as fv- M"w all Wlrlll-l HAPPY NEW YEAR ringing in their ears, the ldaho ski sguad scored third place honors in the Annual Red Mountain, BC., Intercolle- giate 4-Way event. Following the appointment of Gene Harlow as ski coach, the team scooted to a third spot standing in the Northern Division meet at Emida. A few weeks later they guickly took to the snow at Snoqualmie Pass and placed sixth in a field of ten. l-ligh spot of the season came at McCall. Sverre Kongsgaard soared to a first in the jumping division and the squad ranked second in the team scores. With new members from Scandinavia, the traveling six wound up the season with several brilliant indi- vidual performances. Kare Reed proved his value in winning the Northern Division Cross- Country race, Tor Lyshaug, a fellow country- man, pushing him all the way. 541 5 M215 CAPTAIN FRED BOYLE well on his way in the Northern Division Slalom race. Fred pl ninth in this event and third in the combined 4-way. He was one of the team's most sistent scorers. THE 1949-50 SKI SQUAD . . . Coach Gene Harlow, Sverre Kongsgaard, Tor Lyshaug, Bob Duncan, Kare Reed, Fred Boyle, Dan Creswell, Dick Iorns, Paul Myklebust. 235 DISPLAYING GOOD DISTANCE FORM, Fred Boyle EMIDA SKI BOWL . . . Washington State's playground in Scenic sails to a fifth place in the Northern Division meet. Idaho. On the Sluts Third Intercollegiate Ski Meet Red Mountain, British Columbia . . . Idaho Third Payette Lakes Annual Open Ski Meet McCall, Idaho . . . Idaho Second Northwest Intercollegiate Ski Union Snoqualmie Pass, Washington . . . Idaho Sixth NORTHERN DIVISION MEET Emida, Idaho Washington State College ..,....... . . . University of Washington. . . . . . University of Idaho. . . . . , University ol Montana. . . . . , Oregon State College. . . . . , 390 386 346 294 240 WHISTLING THE TUNE, "Slippin' Around," Dan Creswell slips into sixth place in the downhill event at Red Moun- tain, B.C. He also scored a ninth place in the Northern Division meet. SVERRE KONGSGAARD takes off on a flight that won him the Northern Division Jumping event. This flying superman leaped to second place at the Red Mountain, B.C., meet and soared in first at the Payette Lakes Open Ski Meet. 237 -as f x cv 14-X io M f 'I f I Q f 1 If I I I 1 ff' 4, . ff o c f 'P' it W K x XX IDI-Xl-lO'S WATER THRASHERS were sunk by most of the conference opponents this season. The Vandals, however, did splash out a league Win over Montana State University and a non- conterence triumph over Eastern Washington. Coached by versatile Eric Kirkland, the pool men came up with some promising material. Captain Carl Kinny had good times in the lOO- yard tree-style events. Dick Wartena turned into an outstanding distance man and placed third in the 440 at the Northern Division meet. Ken Lyons placed titth in the individual medley at the ND and lim Farmer gathered in points as a diver. Ed Fiester helped the team in the sprints and relay. ffwfffmfkv SWIMMING HARD IN HARD WATER kick and stroke across the pool. VANDAL MERMEN . . . Front Row: Ed Fiester, Dick Wartena, Gene Root, Carl Kinney, C Row: Torn Gentry, Charles Clark, Wayne Stewart, Ken Lyons, George Vajda, Gene Thometz 238 COME ON IN THE CI-ILORINE'S FINE . . . Ken Lyons, Ed Fiester, Dick Wax-tens. and Carl Kinney test the water. In the Tank University ot British Columbia. ., . . . 52 Idaho .,..,,................. . . . 50 Eastern Washington ......,,. . , 7 Washington State ,,.. . . . 63 Idaho ,.......,.... , . . 21 Oregon ..... . . . 62 Idaho ,......,. . . . 22 Oregon State. . , . . , 44 Idaho ..,..... . . . 38 Idaho ..,, ..... . . . 45 Montana ...,...,. . . . 39 Washington State. , . . , , 59 Idaho ,..,,,....., . . . 25 Idaho, , ............. , . . 49 Eastern Washington ,...,,, . .,,.,.,,.........,.. 34 PCC NORTHERN DIVISION MEET WSC .......,............................,.... IOO Washington ..... . . . 88 Oregon ..... . , , 34 OSC ..,. . , . 21 Idaho, ,...,. . 9 Montana ,.,, . 4 ALL RIGHT, SHOOT! . . . Jack Keller. Wayne Stewart. Tom Gentry, and Don Miller prepare for the starter's gunfnot the camera. WHAT A HELL OF A SPOT FOR AN EMPTY POOL . . . Jim Farmer executes a swan dive. 239 ? 5 M Jw! Wm X IDAHO GOLFERS were understroked by most of the Northern Division sguads this season but they did register a comfortable win over Mon- tana University. The Weak cards scored by Idaho do not show the valuable experience individual linksmen gained during the course of the sea- son. Four regulars will return for another year on the fairway, giving Coach Frank Iames a strong foundation for the 50-51 campaign. Coach Frank James VARSITY GOLF: Fred Stringfield, Bill Ames, Coach Frank James, Dick Ioset, John Miller, John Drips, and Jim Townley lNot pictured: Burt Holt and Chase Bax-bee.J 240 Jim Townley John Milleri Dick I Idaho Idaho Idaho On the Fairway Idaho ........ 3M Idaho ........ 18M Idaho ........ 3 M Oregon ......... Washington State. . . Cregon State .... Washington ..... Montana ........ Washington State. . . 22 22 23 QBVZ SM 235 John Dripsi' Fred Stringfieldi' Bill A In My ' H13 at f w ff EJ ln I P5 ,EEEZQ 2263 IDAHO N ETMEN didn't have a winning season. Most ot the team tussles were entered on the Wrong side of the ledger, but some fine individ- ual Work brightened the year. Stuart Dollinger supplied most of the scoring tonic for Idaho by Winning over halt of his matches. At the North- ern Division meet, Hal Barnes defeated Oregon State's number two man, 6-3, 6-3, while Ewel Grossberg lost to Montana in three close sets. fffzzcief zz ms Coach Eric Kirkland VARSITY TENNIS: Coach Eric Kirkland, Jim Crane, Jack Scull, Hal Barnes, Captain Ewel Grossberg, Bob Baxter, Bob Zimmerman, and Stuart Dollinger. 242 Bob Baxtex-if Hal Barnesiii' Jack Sculli' Hi ! ' ms, suwowa'-ugh """"""W' On the Court Idaho . . . . . O Idaho ..... . . I Idaho .,.,. , . 1 Idaho . . , . 2 Idaho . , , 4 Idaho . . . . 3 Idaho . . . I Idaho ...., . . I Idaho ,.,. . . O Idaho. A . . . . 4 NORTHERN Washington State Washington State ..,... Montana .,,...,. Whitman.. .... Vanport I.C.. . .. Vanport I.C.. . .. Oregon State .... Oregon ...,... Washington. . , Whitworth .... DIVISION Washington ..,...............,. I3 Washington State. . ,H6 Montana .....,...,, . . , 5 Oregon ...,......, Oregon State ,... Idaho. ....,.. . .,.4 ...4 ...O Jim Cx-anef Ewel Grossbex-gi' Stuart Dollingerfki' 24 I HAD THAT PLATE CLEAN ENOUGH TO EAT OFF OF moans Umpire Bob Finke as he watches Hal Hunter kick up a dust storm on a shde for the home dish. The Idaho outfielder scored with ease under the stretching Cougar catcher, Clayton Carr. PCC Northern Division Won Lost Washington State ,,.. , . . 13 2 Washington ...... . . 9 6 Oregon .... . , 6 10 Idaho ,...... . . 5 10 Oregon State .... . . 5 10 Pct. .867 .600 .375 333 333 55250 1950 BASEBALLERS-First Row: Don Hunt, Glenn Dax-nall, Joe Zavesky, Rod Grider, Bob Linck, Bob Pritchett, Nick Stallworth . . . Second Row: Don Harrison, Van Briggs, Bill Simmons, James Atchison, Tobe Masingill, Pete Bre Idaho. , . Idaho ...., . . . O Idaho ..... . . . 5 Idaho ..... . . . 6 Idaho. . . Idaho. . . Idaho. . . Idaho. . . Idaho. . . Idaho. . , Idaho ..... . . . 8 Idaho. . . Idaho. . . . . . 9 Ball Bashers Boast Better Baseball STRIKEOUT STORY ysse . North Idaho College of Education .... 4 North Idaho College of Education .... 5 North Idaho College of Education North Idaho College of Education CCalled in ninth-rainl Washington State ........,.,... Great Falls CPioneer Leaguel .... Spokane CWestern Internationalj. North Idaho College of Education Boise CPioneer Leaguel .,,,..... College of Idaho .,,..,.,....... College of Idaho .........,,.... North Idaho College of Education Montana State University .,..,... 8 6 12 5 5 1 4 6 O 6 6 THE IDAHO DIAMOND CREW ranked high in crowd appeal this season but low in Northern Division conference standing. Coach Finley's nine looked stronger in every department this season even though they did land on the cellar step with Oregon State. The Idaho mound staff was capable but the Vandal hitting left some- thing to be desired. Southpaw Bob Pritchett was the top Idaho pitcher. Pritchett turned in a Won 2-lost 3 record during conference play. Ozzie Kanikkeberg, who worked mostly in relief roles, won I and lost l in conference play. Cless Hinck- ley and Don Hunt posted l-2 records during ND play and Lloyd Schiller had a O-2 record. Sec- ond Baseman Tobe Masingill was the most con- sistent wood swinger at the plate. Masingill slashed I7 hits in 53 appearances for a .305 mark. Rightfielder Ice Zavesky hit at a .255 clip and catcher Dick Merrill was slapping the apple at the .241 mark. For Finley fa 4 Corvallis, April 174 Corvallis, April 18- Moscow, April 28- Moscow, April 29- IDAHO OSC IDAHO OSC IDAHO OSC IDAHO OSC ab rh a ab rh a abr h a abr h a abr h a abr ab f h G ab f h H Msngll, 2b 4 1 3 3 eabma, C 4 1 2 o Msngii, 2b 4 1 1 3 Gdbma, C 4 1 1 2 Msngii, 2b 5 o o 4 Gabma, C s 1 Msngll, 2b 5 1 1 3 Gdbrod, c 5 O 3 O Hunter, lf 4 1 O O Fawcett, 2b 5 2 2 6 Hunter, lt 3 1 O O Fawcett, 2b 4 O 1 4 Merrill, c 4 1 2 1 Fawcett, 2b 3 1 Hunter, lf 3 1 O O Fawcett, 2b 3 1 1 2 Grider, 3b 4 O 2 1 Chrstnsn, lb 6 1 3 O Grider, 3b 4 1 1 O Chrstnsn, lb 4 1 2 O Grider, 3b 2 1 O 1 Chrstnsn, lb 4 O Grider, 3b 4 1 1 O Chrstnsn, lb 5 1 1 O Zavesky, lb 5 O 1 3 Snyder, rf 6 1 1 O Zavesky, lb 4 1 3 1 Snyder, rf 2 O O O Zavesky, lf 4 1 2 O Snyder, rf 4 O Prtchtt, lb 5 O O 1 Snyder, rf 4 3 2 O Prtchtt, p 3 O O 1 Harper,1t 2 2 O O Pritchett, p 4 O 1 2 Graham, rt O O O O Prtchtt, lb 4 O 1 O Stoltz, cf 4 O Stllwrth, ss 3 O 1 1 Kratve, lt 4 1 O O Kanikbrg, p 1 O 1 O Clngman, c 2 1 O O Stllwrth, ss 3 O O 1 Kratve, lt 2 O O O Stllwrth, ss 3 1 2 3 Harper, rt 4 O Merrill, c 4 O 2 1 Clngmn, c 2 1 O O Stllwrth, ss 4 O O 1 Stoltz, cf 2 1 1 O Harrison, rf 2 O O O Harper, lt 2 O 1 O Harrison, rt 3 1 O O Tanselli, ss 4 1 Harrison, rt 3 O O O Tanselli, ss 3 2 2 4 Harrison, rt 2 1 O O Tanselli, ss 3 1 1 9 Linck, c 4 O 1 1 Stoltz, cf 3 O O O Darnall, ct 4 O 1 O Akers, 3b 1 1 Darnall, ct 4 O O O Akers, 3h 2 O O 2 Linck, c 3 1 2 4 Akers, 3b 3 3 2 2 Simmons, ct 3 1 1 O Tanselli, ss 4 1 O 4 Kanikbrg, p 3 O O 5 Krafve 1 O Schiller, p 1 1 1 2 White, p 1 O O O Darnall, ct 3 1 1 O Ericson, p 5 1 1 4 Akers, 3b 2 O 1 2 Berg, p 4 O Hinckly, p 2 O O O Berg, p 3 O O 2 lobes 1 O O O Ericson, p 3 O O O i Zavesky 1 O O O -- e?+ Ferrill 1 O O O Totals 32 5 814 Totals 34 4 Briggs 1 O O O Totals 34 5 1O 13 Totals 38 14 13 21 White 1 O O O -- - Nelson 1 O O O Totals 35 4 6 8 Totals 31 9 910 -1- ff-- Totals 31 5 8 8 Totals 33 3 612 IDAHO, ........... .... 2 20 OOO OOO-4 IDAHO.. ,,., . ..,.,..,. OO2 200 OO1f 5 OREGON STATE ....., lOO O10 O10- 3 OREGON STATE ....,. OOO OO4 OO! OREGON STATE ....,., O15 111 OOx-9 OREGON STATE ..,.., O40 162 10x-14 IDAHO. .,.........,... 310 OOl OOX- 5 IDAHO ,......... ...... O 30 O10 10 E+Stallworth 2, Masingill, Schiller, Akers 3, Tanselli 3, White. RBI-Pritchett, Goodbrod, Snyder 4, Clingman, Tanselli, Akers, Berg. HR-Tanselli, Snyder 2. SB-Hunter 2. Left on-Idaho 16, Oregon State 8. WPfHinckley. PB-Clinqman. SO-Schiller 5, Hinckley 27 White 4, Berg 4. UfWestover and Hanke. Attendance-3000. E-Pritchett 3, Zavesky 2, Hunter, Grider, Stallworth, Linck. RBlfGrider 2, Darnall, Good- brod 3, Snyder, Clingman, Tanselli 2, Akers. 2B-Tanselli, Ericson, Masingill, Grider, Linck, Zavesky. HR-Akers. SBiChristianson, Hunter. DP+Ericson to Tanselli to Christiansong Tan- selli to Fawcett to Christiansen. BBfPritchett 9, Kanikkeberg 23 Ericson 5. SO-Pritchett 4, Eric- son 2. Lett onfldaho 7, Oregon State lO. U-Westover and Hanke. Attendance-2400. E-Tanselli, Akers, Zavesky, Stallworth. RBI -Akers, Harper, Christianson, Zavesky, Pritch- ett 2, Masingill. 2BfAkers, Harper. HR-Mas ingill. BB-Erickson 5, Pritchett 3. SOfErick- son 4, Pritchett 5. Balk-Erickson. DP-Masin- gill to Linck. Lett onfOreqon State 5, ldaho 6. U-Sabol and Finke. Attendance7l2O3. E-Masingill, Merrill, Kannikkeberg, 1 brod, Fawcett, Snyder, Akers. RBI-Mas Merrill, Zavesky 2, Stallworth, Goodbrod, cett, Christianson 2. 2B-Merrill, Christie SB-Grider. BB-Kannikkeberg 107 Be SO-Kannikkeberg 4, Berg 2. WPfKan1 berq. Lett on-Oregon State 11, ldaho 8 Sabol and Finke. Attendancef1400. OREGON STATE COLLEGE SERIES wth 35351 ., Si no VS'Iat1,t'. BL YOU'RE OUT . . . But Ump-I'm the first baseman. The Beaver batter who hit me the apple, he's the one who's out. My gosh, read your rule book. victory. ldahc was set down in one-two fashion by Oregon State in Corvallis. The Van- dals suffered a 14-5 setback on a 13-hit attack by OSC in the first game. In the second Corvallis encounter, Idaho jumped off to an early two-run lead but OSC cut loose in the third frame and came out on top with a 9-4 The Vandals evened the series when they snapped up two in a row from OSC in Moscow. Bob Pritchett hurled a mas- terful six-hitter against the Beavers in the opener. Ozzie Kanikkeberg pitched a seven- hit affair against OSC in the second game. Kanikkeberg goose-egged the Beavers in every inning but the sixth. Ozzie Kanikkebergrkickfk Tobe Masingillirkrkf Bob Linckikrk 1 Pitcher Second Base Catcher 246 Bob Pritchetbki' Hal Hunterikir Nick Stallworthiok Pitcher and First Base Lett Field Shortstop Ioe Zavesky poked a home run for Ida- ho's only extra base hit during the first Oregon game in Eugene. The Ducks set Idaho down 12-4. The second Eugene contest was a complete reversal ot form tor both clubs. Idaho unlimbered their hitting power and pounded out a 17-12 win. Idaho leveled Ott their four-game series with the Oregonians at MacLean field. Oregon bashed out a 12-3 decision in the first contest. Bob Pritchett chalked up his second conference win ot the season when he put Oregon down 9-7. CAUGHT SLEEP-WALKING . . . Bob Pritchett puts the tag on an Oregon runner who took a big turn around first base and found himself in a hot box. ene, April 19- Eugene, April 20- Moscow, May 3- Moscow, May 4- IDAHO OREGON IDAHO OREGON IDAHO OREGON IDAHO OREGON aboha aboha aboh aboh abrha abrh a abrha abrha 1, 2b 4 3 O 4 Stratton, lb 5 2 2 O Msngll, 2b 5 1 3 Owens, ct 5 6 2 Msngll, 2b 2 2 1 3 Stratton, lt 5 2 1 O Msngll, 2b 2 3 0 2 Stratton, lf 3 1 1 0 c 4 0 0 O Nelson, 2b 5 2 2 2 Hunter, lt 5 2 1 Nelson, 2b 4 1 1 Hunter, lt 3 O 1 1 Nelson, 2b 5 3 3 2 Hunter, lt 3 1 1 O Nelson, 2b 4 1 1 2 ', lt 3 2 0 l Strader, rt 4 2 2 0 Grider, 3b 5 2 1 Stratton, lt 4 3 O Grider, 3b 3 O 0 O Strader, rt 4 0 0 O Grider, 3b O 2 O 3 Kimball, 3b 3 1 1 2 Ly, 3b 3 2 1 2 Salter, ct 3 1 1 O Zavesky, ri 4 0 2 Strader, rt 5 2 2 Zavesky, rt 4 0 O O Sugura, c 4 0 1 3 Zavesky, rt 4 2 2 O Sugra, rf, cf 4 O O O l, c 4 2 O l Owens, ct O O 0 O Prtchtt, lb 613 3 Sugura, c 5 8 4 Prtchtt, lb 2 O O 1 Kimball, 3b 5 1 O 1 Prtchtt, p 3 O O 3 Strader, lb 5 1 1 2 t, lb 411 1 2 Kimball, 3b 4 O 1 5 Stllwrth, ss 5 2 3 Settcase, lb 5 5 1 Stllwrth, ss 4 O O 2 Salter, ct 5 1 1 O Stllwrth, ss 4 0 O 3 lones, ci 3 O O 1 es, rt 3 2 0 O Schmer, 3b 1 1 1 1 Linck, o 4 2 1 Kimball, 3b 4 O 2 Linck, c l O O 2 Settcse, lb 3 1 l O Merrill, c 4 O 1 0 Tom, rf 2 1 O 1 ,h, ss 3 2 O 4 Coley, ss 5 2 1 2 Darnall, of 4 4 1 Coley, ss 4 1 O Simms, ct 3 1 O O Coley, ss 2 3 1 O Choules, lb 3 1 1 0 Coley, ss 5 1 2 3 p 2 0 1 2 Settcase, lb 514 4 O Hinckley, p 6 0 1 Salter, p 1 O O Schiller, p 3 O 0 7 Krause, p 4 1 2 3 Darnall, ct 4 O l O Smith, c 3 0 1 0 ll, p O O O l Smith, c 2 3 1 1 Kankbrg, p O 0 O Haans, p 2 O O Merrill 1 0 O O Harrison, lt 1 O 1 O lohnson, p 1 0 0 0 :,p 1 0 O O Krause, p 3 O 1 4 Johnson p 0 0 O Harrison 1 0 0 0 Rogers, p 3 l 1 0 Rogers, p 0 0 O O Rose, p O O O Choules 1 O 0 O - 1-- Rose, p 0 O O O Mills, p O O O -- -- Totals 28 9 711 Totals 36 7 811 -- -- Tom 1 0 O Totals 30 3 2 16 Totals 37 12 10 9 otals 31 24 317 Totals 37 271615 Krause, p 1 l O Totals 44 26 16 Totals 40 27 12 O ....... .... 0 10 010 020- 4 IDAHO ...,............ OOO 319 103-17 OREGON .... ...lOl 100 O54-12 OREGON .... ...020 OOO 050- 7 BON ....,......... 500 221 70v-12 OREGON ,.,........,.. 310 090 206--12 IDAHO ......,.......,. OOO 020 010- 3 IDAHO ......,......... 323 000 010- 9 -Masingill, Linck, Choules, Stallworth, 2, Salter, Schmer, Coley, Smith. RBI- :y 2, Merrill, Hunt, Strader 3, Salter d, 2, Krause. 2B-Settecase 2, Smith, HR- :y, Strader. DP-Stallworth to Masingill to ettg Hunt to Stallworth to Pritchett, Stall- to Pritchett, Pritchettp Kimball to Nelson tecase. BE-Hunt 4: Rcgers 4. Krause 3. Darnall 1, Krause 3, Lett on-Idaho 7, Ore- , U-Hanke and Westover. Attendance- E-Grider, Pritchett, Owens, Settecase, Kim- ball, Coley, Krause. RBI-Masingill, Hunter 2, Grider 2, Zavesky 2, Pritchett 3, Linck 2, Hinck- ley, Darnall, Stratton, Strader 3, Sugura 4, Kim- ball, Coley, 2B-Masingill, Hunter, Grider, Owens. 3E-Masingill, Stracler, Kimball. HR- Zavesky, Sugura. SE-Linck 2, Darnall 2, Krause. BB-Hinckley 65 1-laans 2, Iohnson 4, Rose 2, Mills l. SO-Hinckley 2, Haans 5, Iohn- son 1, Mills 2, Krause l. WP-Hinckley. Balk- Hincklev. PB-Sugura 3. Lett on-lclaho 7, Ore- gon l0. U-Hanke and Westover. Attendance- 2200. E-Masingill 3, Hunter, Stallworth 3, Linck 3, Simmons 2, Schiller. RBI-Masingill, Hunter, Zavesky, Stratton 2, Nelson, Strader, Salter, Coley. 213-Nelson 2, Sugura, Masingill. 3B- Hunter. SB-Nelson, Slater. BE-Krause 8, Schiller 4. SO--Krause 8, Schiller 3. WP- Krause. Ball:-Krause. HPB-Nelson, Coley 3, Settecase CSchillerJ, Lett on-Oregon 7, Idaho 5. U-Sabol and Finke, Attendance-1400, E-Kimball, Masingill, Grider, Stallworth 2. RBI-Nelson, Kimball 2, lohnson 2, Rogers, Choules 2, Harrison, Darnall. 2B-Strader, Tom, Masingill, Grider. BB-Iohnson 10, Rogers 6, Pritchett 5. SO-lohnson 2, Rogers 1, Pritchett 6. DP-Kimball to Nelson to Straderp Masingill to Stallworth to Ohoules. WP-lohnson. Balk- Iohnson. Lett on-Oregon 8, Idaho 12. U- Sabol and Finke. Attendance-1400. U IVERSITY OF OREGON SERIES 247 E-Carroll 2, Coleman, Pritchett, Stallworth. E-Grider 2, Masinqill, Stallworth, Linck 2, EeGrider, Hunter, Zavesky, Stallwo Moscow, April 253 Pullman, May 9- Pullman, May 19- Moscow, May 20- IDAHO WSC IDAHO WSC IDAHO WSC IDAHO WSC ab h a ab r h a ab r h a ab r h a ab r h a ab r h a ab r h a ab ' Msngll, 2b 4 2 3 McGuire, cf 5 1 1 O Grider, 3b 5 O O 1 McGuire, ct 5 2 3 O Grider, 3b 3 O O 3 McGuire, cf 5 O 1 O Grider, 3b 4 O 1 4 McGuire, cf 3 1 Hunter, lf 3 O O Carroll, 2b 3 1 l 1 Hunter, lt 4 O 2 O Carroll, 2b 4 1 2 1 Hunter, lf 4 O O O Carroll, 2b 5 1 2 2 Hunter, lf 4 2 1 O Carroll, 2b 4 I Grider, 3b 4 1 2 Coleman, ss 4 O 1 3 Msngll, 2b 4 O 2 1 Coleman, ss 5 3 3 4 Msngll, 2b 2 O O 1 Coleman, ss 5 1 1 l Msngll, 2b 4 2 1 3 Coleman, ss 5 C Zavesky, rt 4 1 O Tappe, lf 3 O 1 O Zavesky, lb 3 O O O Tappe, 1b 3 3 2 O Zavesky, rt 4 O O O Camp, lb 1 1 O O Zavesky, rf 4 1 1 O Camp, lb 2 Prtchtt, lb 4 3 1 Brnswck, rf 3 2 O O Prtchtt, p 4 O O O Brnswck, rt 5 1 1 1 Prtchtt, lb 4 O O O Tappe, lb 3 1 O 1 Prtchtt, lb 5 O 1 O Tappe, lb 3 I Stllwrth, ss 4 O 4 Carr, c 2 1 O O Schiller, p O O O O Carr, c 5 1 1 1 Stllwrth, ss 4 l 1 5 Brnswk, rt 5 3 4 O Stllwrth, ss 5 O 1 3 Brnswck, rt 4 . Linck, c 3 O 2 Paul, 3b 3 1 l 6 Briggs 1 O O O Paul, 3b 5 O 3 3 Darnall, ct 2 O O O Paul, 3b 5 O 3 4 Merrill, c 4 1 1 1 Paul, 3b 4 . Darnall, cf 3 O O Camp, lb 4 O O 1 Stllwrth, ss 5 O 2 5 Boytz, lt 4 1 l 1 Linck, o 1 O O 2 Boytz, lf 3 O O O Darnall, cf 3 O O O Watson, lt 3 f Atchison 1 1 O Dolguist, p 4 1 2 2 Merrill, c 4 1 l O Dolquist, p 4 l 2 2 Hinckley 1 O O O Watson, lf O 1 O O Atchison 1 O O O Boytz, lt 2 C Hinckley, p 2 O 2 Harrison, rt 3 O O O Foster, p O O O O Kanikbrg, p 2 O O 2 Carr, c 2 1 l 1 Hunt, p O O O O Carr, c 3 l Harrison O O O Darna11,ct 3 O 2 1 Atchison 1 O O O Keogh, p 4 O O O Schiller, p 4 O 2 5 Foster, p 1 C Kanikbrg, p O O O -+2 Y---- gift- ---- Dolquist, p 1 C Perry 1 O O Totals 36 1 9 8 Totals 40131813 Totals 28 1 1 13 Totals 38 912 9 lorrison 2 C -1- Conley, p 1 C Totals 33 8 14 Totals 31 7 713 Keogh, p O C Totals 38 6 916 Totals 37 S IDAHO ........,........ OOO OOO O21-3 IDAHO ...,,.....,......, OOO OOI OOO 1 IDAHO ..,............., OOO O10 OOO-1 WASHINGTON STATE.O6O OOO l WASHINGTON STA'I'E.OOO SOO 200-7 WASHINGTON STATE..4OO 1OO 62x-13 WASHINGTON STATE.3OO Oll 22x-9 IDAHO ,.,,.....,....... 2OO OOO 4 E-Linck, Darnall, Coleman 2. RBI-Masiw gill, Gricler 2, McGuire 2, Camp, Dolquist 2. 2B-Coleman, Paul, Atchison. 3BeTappe. SB -Carroll, Tappe, Brunswick 2, Paul. BBS Hinckley 8, Dolquist 4. SO-Hinckley 1, Ka- nikkeberg 1, Dolquist 4. DPfColeman to Campy Carroll to Campy Stallworth to Masingill to Pritchett. Lett onfWashington State lO, Idaho 8. U-Sabol and Finke. Attendance-1 7OO Cestj WASH! GTON RBleMasingill, McGuire, Coleman, Tappe 3, Brunswick 2, Carr, Paul 3, Dolquist. 2B-Cole- man. 3BeColeman, Paul, Dolquist, Darnall 2. HRfTappe. SB-McGuire 2, Carroll, Coleman, Tappe, Brunswick, Paul. Lett on-Idaho 15, Washington State 7. BBfPritchett 2, Dolquist 7. SO--Dolquist 3, Foster 2, Pritchett 3, Schiller 1. WP-Dolguist. BalkeSchi1ler. PBeMerrill 2. U-Sabol and Ulrich. Attendancee3000. STATE Paul, Carr. 2B-Carroll. HR-Brunswick 2. SBfCarroll, Coleman 3, Tappe, Brunswick, Paul, Boytz, Watson. Lett on-ldaho 9, WSC 9. BBfKeogh 9, Kanikkeberg 4. SOfKeogh 3. UeUlrich and Sabol. Attendance 18OO test.l. COLLEGE DON'T STRAIN YOURSELF, NEIGHBORfI've got the ball in my glove and I've got my foot on the bag. All you got was exercise from a run down the first base line. Washington State's Lee Dolguist ruined the MacLean field conference opener when he effectively scattered eight lda- ho hits for a 7-3 win over the Vandals. WSC shelled out a marathon 13-1 Win over ldaho in Pullman. Glen Darnall swung the big stick tor Idaho when he socked out two triples. Rod Keogh made it three straight Wins for WSC over Idaho when he twirled a 9-1 triumph in Pullman. Cougar Coach Buck Bailey lost a bat- tle With the plate umpire at MacLean field and was ushered from the premises, but the Cougar nine Won their battle and posted a 9-6 Win over ldaho. Schiller, Coleman, Paul, Foster. RBI-Hui Masingill, Pritchett 2, Schiller, McGuire 2 roll 3, Coleman, Tappe, Paul. 3B-Sc HRfCarroll. SBfMcGuire 2, Tappe, Pritchett. BBfFoster 1, Dolquist 1, Con Keogh 1, Hunt 3, Schiller 4. SO-Dolqi Conley 2, Keogh l, Schiller 6. WP-Do Lett on-Washington State 8, Idaho 9.U- and Sabol. Attendance-2200. SERIES Don Harrisoni' Right Field Lloyd Schillerik Dick Mez-rillir Joe Zaveskyi' Pitcher Catcher Right Field and First Base 248 Don Huntrki Glenn Darnallii' Cless Hinckleyi' Pitcher Center Field Pitcher ldaho dropped its Northern Division conference opener to Washington in Se- attle, 8-2. The Vandal nine capitalized on a shaky start by Husky pitcher Bob Moen, and hugged a two-run lead at the end of three frames. Moen then settled down and blanked the Vandals the rest of the route. Don Hunt, backed by brilliant ldaho fielding, hurled himself out of the tight spots and nosed out the University of Washington 6-5 in the opener in Moscow. ln the second session at MacLean field, Washington covered the Vandal outfield with l7 bingos that dropped DECAPITATED-Wasl-xington's first seeker wasn't clipped by the ball. He just went out of his head Rod Griderink Third Base Seattle, April 14- ldaho 8-1. Moscow, May 15- stretching for a wild throw. Zavesky safe at first. Moscow, May 16- IDAHO WASHINGTON IDAHO WASHINGTON IDAHO WASHINGTON ahrha abrha abrha ahrha abrha abrha Msngll, 2b 2 1 O 3 Tucker, 2b 5 O 1 1 Gricler, 3b 4 O O 3 Herns, cf 5 O 2 O Grider, 3b 3 O O 5 Herns, cf 6 O O O Linck, c 4 O O 1 Swanson, ct 3 2 1 O Hunter, lf 4 1 1 O Hyamta, 2b 2 1 O 2 Hunter, lt 2 O O O Englrt, ss 5 O O O Prtchtt, p 4 1 O 1 Andrinq, lb 4 2 2 1 Msngll, 2b 3 1 1 4 Tucker, 2b 2 O 1 1 Msngll, 2b 2 O O 3 Rodland, rf 4 2 2 O Choules, lb 4 O O O Glssmn, 3b 5 3 2 2 Zavesky, rf 4 O O O Redland, rt 4 1 1 O Zavesky, rf 4 O O l Andring,1b 5 3 5 O Hunter, lf 3 O O O Kmmrle, rf 2 O O O Prtchtt,1b 4 O O O Andring, lb 3 1 1 O Merrill, c 4 O O O Moen, lf 4 O 4 O Stllwrth, ss 4 O 2 O Mullen, lf 5 O O O Stllwrth, ss 3 2 O 3 Glssmn, 3b 5 O l 1 Stllwrth, ss 3 1 O 6 Swanson, lf O O O O Grider, 3b 3 O 1 1 Lndberg, c 4 O 2 1 Darnall, cf 3 1 1 1 Mullen, lf 2 O O O Prtchtt,1b 3 O O O Glssmn, 3b 5 1 O O Harrison, rt 2 O O O Englrt, ss 4 O 2 1 Simmons, c 3 1 O 1 Moen, lf 2 O 1 O Darnall, ct 2 O O O Lndberq, C 5 2 4 2 Darnall, of 4 O O O Moen, p 4 1 1 2 Merrill, o O O O O Lewis, c 5 O 1 O Hinckley, p 3 O 1 2 Tucker, 2b 2 O O 2 Hyamta, 2b O O O O Choules 1 O O O Grant, ss 3 1 O 3 Harrison 1 O O O Hyamta, 2b 1 O O O ----- -- Hunt, p 3 O 1 O McCrtny, p 4 1 3 1 Bell, p 4 O 2 O Totals 3O 2 312 Totals 36 811 8 Peterson, p O O O O ---- ------ --- --Y ---- Totals 27 1 1 17 Totals 41 817 4 Totals 37 5 11 8 Totals 32 6 4 13 IDAHO. ..,...,........ O02 OOO OOO- 2 WASHINGTON ........ 2OO OO1 110- 5 WASHINGTON ......,. OO2 OOO 411- 8 WASHINGTON, ,...... OO1 O30 13x- 8 IDAHO .......,........ OOO O40 O2x- 6 IDAHO .,.,............ OOO 100 OOO- 1 E-Andring, Linck 2, Stallworth. RBI-Stalk worth 2, Glassman 5, Lundberg 2. 2B-Tucker, Lundberg, Englert. HR-Glassman. SB-Swan son 2, Andring, Lundberg. DP-Andring to Lundberg to Moen, Stallworth to Masingill to Choules. BB-Moen 5, Pritchett 6. SO-Moen 7, Pritchett 4. Left on-Washington lO, Idaho 7, U-Anderson and Fidler. Attendance-150. E-Heyamota, Andring, Lewis 2, Grant 3, Hunter, Masingill. RBI-Andring 2, Tucker, Glassman, Rodland, Hunt, Hunter 2, Masingill, Darnall. 2B-Hunt. 3B-Hunter. SB-Heya- mota, Rodland, Andring 3, Grant, Stallworth, Darnall. DP-Heyamota to Grant to Andrinqp Grider to Masingill to Pritchett. Left on-Wash- ington lO, ldaho 5. BB-McCartney 3, Hunt 6. SO-McCartney 4, Peterson 1, Hunt 4. PB- Lewis 2. Balk-Peterson. WP-Hunt. U-Sabol and Finke. Attendance-1500 test.J, E-Grider, Hunter, Merrill. RB1-Hinckley, Andring, Moen 3, Glassman, Lundberg 2, Bell. 2B-Moen. 3B-Rodland. HR-Lundberg, And- ring. SB-Andring 3. DB-Stallworth to Pritch- ettg Stallworth to Masingill to Pritchett 2. Left on-Washington lO, Idaho 7. BB-Hinckley 4, Bell 8. SO-Hinckley 3, Bell 8. U-Finke and Sabol. Attendance -2000 Cest.J. U IVERSITY OF WASHINGTON 249 YOU'RE DOING FINE, CAL . . . BUT YOUR SHADOW CAN'T EVEN GET OFF THE GROUND-Cal Sparks jumped like a kangaroo and sklms over the bar at the Oregon State meet in Corvallis. PCC Northern Division University oi Oregon ..... University oi Washington ..., Washington State ........ University oi Idaho ,.,, Oregon State ..,..,..,... Montana State University ..... 56 385 28 175 165 SZ W 1950 TRACK SQUADfI"'irst Row: Norm Barber, Myron Hodgson, Glen Christian, Ted Nowak, Cal Sparks, Chuck Behre . S d R D M 1 Dave Martindale, John Allyson, Ron Huffer, Vern Widner, Keith Bean, Bob Parish . . . Third Row: Manager Orval Hansen, N F 11 d C D C 1 D H V J h W J h C S H ax-win ogswel, ave iner, on o nson, arren o anson, oach tan iserman. Stan's Spirited Sprinters Score Successful Season lDAl'lC'S TRACK SQUAD lacked only depth in ranks, a prime prerequisite for gaining victories. The Vandals failed to Win a single dual meet, but in many cases they captured the majority of first place honors. Don Miller, Vandal 440 spe- cialist, turned in the best mark in Northern Divi- sion competition When he breezed through the guarter-mile in 49.6. Warren lohnson recorded a 4219.1 mile against Washington University in Seattle. The leather-lunged junior then gar- nered a second in the mile event at the Pacific Coast conference track and field meet at Berke- ley. Two other Idaho entries also placed in the PCC session. lohn Allyson ran fourth in the two- mile event and Keith Bean finished fifth in the high hurdles. Norm Farnham qualified for the 880-yard run but he didn't make the trip to the California city. Farnham won the Northern Divi- sion title in 1:56.l. Track Mentor Stan Hise Jaffa! Wigan 88 Saturday, April I5-Neale Stadium: Mile Runff-Iutchins, Oregon, first, Iohanson, Idaho, sec- ond, Bachlund, Oregon, third. Time-4-:4O.I. 440-Yard DashaMiller, Idaho, first, Armstrong, Idaho, second, Countryman, Oregon, third. Time-O:52.l. Pole VaultfRasmussen, Oregon, first, Hickok, Oregon, and Pickens, Oregon, tie for second. Heightfllt feet. High Jumpfliolden, Oregon, first, Lewis, Oregon, Smith, Oregon, Sparks, Idaho, and Martindale, Idaho, tie for second. Height-5 feet 8 inches. Shot PuteAnderson, Oregon, first, Paxton, Oregon, second, Earl, Oregon, third. Distancee44 feet I inch. 100-Yard Dash-Henthorne, Oregon. first, Cleary, Ore- ond, Christian, Idaho, third, TimeeO:9.7. 120 High Hu:-dlesfBean, Idaho, first, Doyle, Oregon, second, Sullivan, Oregon, third. Time-O:l5.3. 880-Yard Run-McClure, Oregon, first, Farnham, Ida- ho, second, Barber, Idaho, third. 'l'imef2:O3. 200-Yard Dash+Henthorne, Oregon, first, Newton, Ida- ho, second, Christian, Idaho, third. Time-O:I8.8. Javelinflvfissfeldt, Oregon, first, Hodgson, Idaho, sec- ond, Stelle, Oregon, third. DistanoeiI89 feet IO inches. Two-Mile Run-Mundle, Oregon, first, Allyson, Idaho, second, Harper, Idaho, third. Time-IO:25.8. 200 Low Hux-dlesfSmith, Oregon, first, Sullivan, Ore- gon, second, Doyle, Oregon, third. TimeeO:2I.8. Broad Jump-Lewis, Oregon, first, Smith, Oregon, sec- ond, Sullivan, Oregon, third. Distancef22 feet 4 inches. Discus-Anderson, Oregon, first: Hiner, Idaho, second, Speropulos, Idaho, third. Distance-I47 feet 8 inches. Mile Relay-Won by Idaho CFarnham, Barber, Iohansou and Millerl. Timee3:4l. JUST SEVEN MORE LAPS, FELLOWS-Bill Harper and Ron Huffer set the pace on the two-miie run. ' HJ I i ng, mil HOW HAVE THOSE THINGS BEAN, KEITH-The hurdles must be O.K. Keith Bean glides over the final barrier well in front of his Oregon opponent. 252 WE WASTE MORE STRING THIS WAY-War Johanson breaks the tape after whirling a fo lap mile. JM? 55 055 7 Saturday, April 22fBell Field: Mile Runflohanson, Idaho, first, Petterson, OSC, sec ond, Fisher, OSC, third. 'l'imef4:24.3. 440-Yard Dash-Miller, Idaho, first, Armstrong, Idaho second, McKay, OSC, third. Time-O:5I.2. 100-Yard DashfChristian, Idaho, first, Miller, OSC second, Newton, Idaho, third, TimefO:IO. 120 High Hur-dleseBean, Idaho, first, Doyle, OSC, sec ond, Turner, OSC, third. Time-O:l5.2. High 'JumpfEliot, OSC, first, Porter, OSC, second Rinearson, OSC, third. Heightf6 ft 4 inches. Shot PuteDelay, OSC, first, Rinearson, OSC, second Iohnson, OSC, third. Distancef44 feet IOM inches. B80-Yard Run-Farnham, Idaho, first, Leonard, OSC second, Petterson, OSC, third. Time-l:58.'Y. 220-Yard Dash-Newton, Idaho, first, Christian, Idaho second, Sparks, Idaho, third. TimefO:22.7. Javelin-Delaney, OSC, first, Cline, OSC, second, Ri nearson, OSC, third. Distanceel92 feet 3 inches. Pole Vault-Dickey, OSC, first, Holmes, OSC, second Martindale, Idaho, third. HeightfI2 feet. Two-Mile Run-Fisher, OSC, first, Harper, Idaho, sec- ond, Huffer, Idaho, third. Timef9:59.7. 220 Low Hurdles-Bean, Idaho, first, Wells, OSC, sec- ond, Turner, OSC, third. Time-O:26. Broad Jump-Wells, OSC, first, Sheffold, OSC, second, McCafferty, OSC, third. Distancee2O feet 8 inches. Discus-Rinearson, OSC, first, Morse, OSC, second, Hiner, Idaho, third. Distancefl44 feet QM inches. Mile Relay-won by Idaho CFarnham, Barber. Iohanson Miuefp. Time-3f28.e. ' IS THE BALL REALLY THAT HEAVY?+Dave Hiner in the motion of propelling the 16-pound shot. I t l?E GOES ANOTHER WHITE STRING-Norm nham strides through smoothly at the finish tis 880 spin. Jdzia 44 Wiz fffkzgfafz UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ,..,. 'ISM UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON .... 585i IDAHO ....,..............,..,........,...,,... 29 THIS PICTURE WAS A SNAP-Everyone came for the shot. Don Miller and Dick Armstrong wear Idaho colors in the 440 dash. Saturday, April 29fWashington Stadium: 1Parenthetical matter indicates winning dual meet effort? Mile RunfMello, California, first, Iohanson, Idaho 14:19.1l, second, Leslie, Washington, third, Arnot, Califor- nia, fourth, Dexter, Washington, fifth. Timef4:18.5. 100-Yard Dasheltnderson, California, first, Weisman, Washington 19.83, second, Christian, Idaho, third, Maples, California, fourth, Flotierg, Washington, fifth. TimefO:9.7. 440-Yard DashfMiller, Idaho, first, Morgan, Washing- ton 15021, second, Bush, Washington, third, Palmer, Cali- nia, fourth, Barber, Idaho, fifth. TimefO:5O. 120 High Hurdles-Burke, Washington, first, Rademak- er, California, second, Bean, Idaho, third, Steward, Wash- ington, fourth, Donaldson, Washington, fifth. Timef14.5. High Jump---Hagler, California, and Olsen, Washing- ton, tie for first, Garrett, California, third, Martindale, Idaho, and Sparks, Idaho, tie for fourth. Heightffi feet l inch. Shot Put"'Ragatz, California, first, Rush, California, sec- ond, Perry, Washington 146 ft. 85 in.l, third, Dixon, Wash- ington, fourth, Hiner, Idaho, fifth. Distance-47 ft. I4 in.J. 880-Yard Run-Hensey, Washington, first, Clark, Cali- fornia, second, Farnham, Idaho, third, Matland, Washington, fourth, Iackson, California, fifth, Timef1:53.9. Javelin-Roseme, California, first, Baldwin, California, second, Hodgson, Idaho 1179 ft. SVZ in.l, Umsted, Washing- ton, fourth, no fifth. Distancef205 ft. 'YM in, Two-Mile RunfAbhey, Washington, first, Stauffer, California, second, Allyson, Idaho, third, Seamount, Califor- nia, fourth, Richards, Washington, fifth. Time-9:3O.8. 220-Yard DashfAnderson, California, first, Weisman, Washington 1O:22l, second, Maples, California, third, Chris- tian, Idaho, fourth, Floberg, Washington, fifth. TimefO:2l.5. Discusflfiner, Idaho, first, Cook, California 1143 tt. 4.8 ini, second, Perry, Washington, third, Ragatz, California, fourth, Speropulos, Idaho, fifth. Distance-146 ft. 9.1 in. Pole VaultfPaddock, California, first, Brigham, Wash- ington 112 ft, 6 in.t, second, Parish, Idaho, and Martindale, Idagio, tie for third, Wigginton, California, fifth. Heightf13 t. in. 220 Low HurdlesfBurke, Washington, first, Donaldson, Washington, second, Wigginton, California, third, Stewart, Washington, fourth, Bean, Idaho, fifth. Time?O:23.9. Broad Jump---Stanfield, California, first, Grant, Califor- nia, and Bartholmey, Washington 1tieJ 122 ft. 115 in.l, sec- ond, Hublow, Washington, fourth, McCockey, Washington, fifth. Distance723 ft. M in. Mile Relay--Won by California 1Palmer, Arnot, Clark, Iacksonl, Washington, second. Time 3:22,3. Zzfzia 56.5 755' Saturday, May 6ffNeale Stadium: l Shot PutfSwerin, WSC, first, Mataya, WSC, second, Fisher, WSC, third. Distance-47 feet 7 inches. I Mile Rune--Iohanson, Idaho, first, Stimac, WSC, second, 1 Eischen, WSC, third. Time-4:25.3. Javelinfl-Iodgson, Idaho, first, Nelson, WSC, second, Tyreel, WSC, third. Distance-183 feet 9 inches. 440-Yard DashfMiller, Idaho, first, Millard, WSC, sec- ond, Haldeck, WSC, third. Time-0:51. 100-Yard DashfNewton, Idaho, first, Christian, Idaho, second, Thorndike, WSC, third. Time 0:10. Pole Vault---Martindale, Idaho, first, Parish, Idaho, Sul- livan, WSC, and Gayda, WSC, tie for second. Height 12 feet. 120 High Hurdles-Polsfoot, WSC, first, Bean, Idaho, second, no third. TimefO:15. 880-Yard RunfFarnham, Idaho, first, Sewell, WSC, second, Carpenter, WSC, third. Timef1:57.9. 2.20-Yard DashfNewton, Idaho, first, Weise, WSC, sec- ond, Thorndike, WSC, third. Time-O:22.2. Discusflsliner, Idaho, first, Mataya, WSC, second, Fish- er, WSC, third. Distancefl45 feet BM inches. Two-Mile Runfltllyson, Idaho, first, Bob Selfridge, WSC, second, Dick Selfridge, WSC, third. Timef9:58.2. 220 Low Hur-d1esfPolsfoot, WSC, first, Bean, Idaho, sec- ond, Swanheck, WSC, third. Time-O:24.6. Broad Jumpflrliggens, WSC, first, Morgan, WSC, sec- ond, Nowack, Idaho, third. Distancee22 feet GM inches. High JumpfRoberts, WSC, and Padrick, WSC, tied for first, Dave Martindale, Idaho, and I-Iiggens, WSC, tied for third. I'Ieightf6 feet 2 inches. Mile Re1ayfWon by WSC 1I'Iiggens, Deck, Weise and Millardl, Timef3:27. Idaho's timef3:27.7. HEY, WHERE'D IT GO?7Darwin Cogswell lets his flying saucer sail into the competitive field. IN A WHIPPET FINISH-Dick Newton 11eftt and Glen Christian 1centerl finish a close century. 253 cfzzfzffa 65 Mlnfana tgfafe 68 Saturday, May I3-Missoula, Montana: High Jump-Cope, Montana, first, Martindale, Idaho, second, Hasquet, Montana, third, Height-5 feet ll inches. Pole Vault-Martindale, Idaho, first, Iansen, Montana, and Parish, Idaho, tied for second. I-Ieight-12 feet 7 inches. Shot Put+Delaney, Montana, first, Ripke, Montana, sec- ond, Doyle, Montana, third. Distance-41 feet 9M inches. Javelin-Christensen, Montana, first, Hodgson, Idaho, second, Rothwell, Montana, third. Distance-I77 feet. Mile Runflohanson, Idaho, first, Allyson, Idaho, sec- ond, Fleming, Montana, third. Time-4:3O.5. 100-Yard Dash-Luckman, Montana, first, Brennan, Montana, second, Christian, Idaho, third. Time-O:O9.9. 440-Yard DasheMiller, Idaho, first, Heintz, Montana, second, Armstrong, Idaho, third. TimewO:49.6. 120 High Hurdles-Bean, Idaho, first, Badgley, Mon- tana, second, Doyle, Montana, third. Time O:l5. 880-Yard Run-Farnham, Idaho, first, Iohanson, Idaho, second, Fleming, Montana, third. Time-l:57.4. 220-Yard Dash-Luckman, Montana, first: Newton, Ida- ho, second, Christian, Idaho, third. TimefO:2l.8. Two-Mile Run-McChesney, Montana, first, Allyson, Idaho, second, Harper, Idaho, third. Time-lO:O4.5. 220 Low Hurdles-Bean, Idaho, first, Badgley, Montana, second, Anderson, Montana, third. Time 0:25. Broad Jump--Luckman, Montana, first, Nowak, Idaho, third. Distance-21 feet ll inches. Discus-Doyle, Montana, first, I-liner, Idaho, second, Ripke, Montana, third. Distance-l66 feet, 9M inches. Mile RelaywForfeited to Idaho, as I-leintz, Montana, had injured his leg and Luckman had fallen at the finish of the furlong. HERE, YOU CAN HAVE ITvDick Newton touches off Norm fi Barber in the third quarter of the mile relay. NEANDERTHAL MAN WITH A SPEAR?-No, just Myron Hodgson winding up with a javelin. 254 OH, MY ACHING FEET !-John Allyson hits wire with a pained expression after grinding miles. Some joker replaced the white string x a steel cable. Jlffflffmfz Qzbzkzbn . Saturday, May 20-Washington Stadium: 880-Yard Run-Farnham, Idaho, first, Hensey, Wash- ington, second, McClure, Oregon, third, Matland, Washing- ton, and Fleming, Montana, tie for fourth. 'I'imeel:56.l. Javelin-Missfeldt, Oregon, first, Nelson, Washington State, second, Delaney, Oregon State third, Hodgson, Idaho, fourth. Distance-l96 feet 9 inches. Two-Mile Run-Mundle, Oregon, first, Fisher, Oregon State, second, Allyson, Idaho, third, Selfridge, Washington State, fourth. Time-9:32.4. 220-Yard DashfWeisman, Washington, first, Fell, Ore- gon, second, Bullier, Oregon, third, Christian, Idaho, fourth. Time-21 flat. Discus-Doyle, Montana, first, Anderson, Oregon, sec- ond, Rinearson, Oregon State, third, Morse, Oregon State, fourth. Distance-IG4 feet 8 inches. tNew division record. Old record l57 feet 2 inches, by Ed Moeller, Oregon, 1929.1 Pole Vault-Rasmussen, Oregon, first, Pickens, Oregon, second, Martindale, Idaho, and Dickey, Oregon State, tie for third. Height-I3 feet, 9 inches. ZZO Low Hurdl.esfBurke, Washington, first, Donaldson, Washington, and Steward, Washington, tie for second, Smith, Oregon, fourth. Time-O:23.6. Broad Juzmpelsewis, Oregon, first, Higgins, Washing- ton State, second, Luckman, Montana, third, Bartholmy, Washington, fourth. Distance-23 feet 8 inches. Mile Relay-Washington State won fMillard, Wiese, Hig- gins, Eischenl, Washington, second, Idaho, third, Montana, fourth. Timef3:2l.6. Mile RunfHutchins, Oregon, first, Petterson, Oregon State, second, Bachlund, Oregon, third, Lesley, Washington, fourth. Time-4:l8.3. 100-Yard Dash-Fell, Oregon, first, Weisman, Washing- ton, second, Smith, Oregon, third, Cleary, Oregon, fourth. Timee-O:O9.7. 440-Yard Dash-Henthorne, Oregon, first, Miller, Ida- ho, second, Morgan, Washington, third, Countryman, Ore- gon, fourth. Time-O:49.3. 120 High HurdlesaBurlce, Washington, first, Steward, Washington, second, Bean, Idaho, third, Doyle, Oregon, fourth. Time-14.3. tNew division record. Old record, O:l4.4 hy Steve Anderson, Washington, 1930, and Fran Polsfoot, Washington State, l949.J High Jump-Roberts, Washington State, first, Elliot, Oregon State, second, Padrick, Washington State, third, Say, Oregon State, fourth. Height-6 feet 4M inches. Shot Put-Swerin, Washington State, first, Mataya, Washington State, second, Perry, Washington, third, Fisher, Washington State, fourth. Distance-48 feet 4 inches. f N. 1- ,.- ,TQ nr 99 fi if A il fi? fafifw fy i r l T x ' M u THE "I" CLUB works as vigorously tor the advancement ot intercollegiate sports oft the field as they do on it. This year the lettermen organization cooperated With the Alumni Association and held the first Vandal Booster Day in the his- tory ot the university. lerry Diehl and Norm Farnham were acting "I" Club presidents for the school year. MONOGRAM MENfFirst Row: Ken McCormack, Myron Hodgson, Larry Stone, Nathan Marks. A1 Denman, Jim Farmer, Dick Reed . . . Second Row: Ronald as, Wilbur Ruleman, Billy Mullins, ld Miller, Marvin Churchill, John Reager . . . Third Ro . en Christian, Steve Douglas, Robert Strom, Bill Gartin, Norm Farnham, Jim Tallant, Roy Colquitt . . . Fourth Row: Ken Larsen, Tom Ambrose, Vern Bahr, Charles Weinmann, Jim Chadband, Max Herrington . . . Fifth Row: Hal Barnes, Tobe Masingill, Carl Kiilsgaard, Jim Hammond, Dr. W. J. Wilde . . . Sixth Row: Jerry Diehl, Roy Irons, Ted Diehl, Bob Wheeler. Wiki? zzmzgmx ATHLETIC MANAGERS-AFirst Row: Burt Humphrey, Winston Churchill, Wen xsacvkzzffblfz dell Herrett . . . Second Row: Orval Hansen, John Saegner, Jim McKevitt, Jay Couch THE ATHLETIC MANAGERS' ASSO- ClATlCN is composed ot student man- agers ot the various university athletic teams. They accompany varsity athletes on their trips to matches away from home and look after the players' needs and equipment at all times. The main func- tion ot this group, which was organized in l949, is to better the relations ot man- agers With athletic department coaches and the players. N. .nf ' ef? I f f i K as IDAHO FENCING returned officially to the sports scene for the first time since the war. The comeback organizers arranged several foil-thrusting matches and had a bit of loe- ginners' luck. Idaho ............ 2 WSC ....,....... 5 Idaho ,.,, . . . 4 WSC ..., .... . . 5 Idaho .,......,.., 5 Gonzaga ......... 4 Third in Inland Empire Men's Foil Championship Third in Foil's Mask Team Championship Inland Empire Men's Team Foil Championship Spokane Fencing Club ......,.... . . , 3-O Idaho .......,........ . . . 2-I WSC ...,,. . . . . . I-2 Gonzaga .... . . . I-2 in ' M92 me mm! he wzkfms . ggi if 1 . QW- 1 fy I Wt -f iii? Q1gBLi?As 2 5 . R59 Q42 ' 3 N Z ' if ' Q E 5' K 1 ,gftf f 5 K -.Z1"rI.: .E': ,..., l . .E-E Z, i ." ',:!:::':: . - U , 4 ,M ,I 7' r Q if f fa t , l f, H -fr? K 5 H 'isggfffjfl ggi gan Q 3,.li1t5f li 5 GYM TEAM-aFirst Row: Jim Walker, Bill Shaw, Jim Farmer, Coach Dick Smith, Waymen Sinden, Jose Bou . . . Second Row: Captain Don Stilson, George Peterson, Jack Harris, Lees Burrows, Jim Moore. 256 IDAHO FENCERSfKneeling: Edward Holt, James Oates . . . Standing: Dennis Bryan, Walt IDAI-IO PICKED ON WSC for their first venture into gymnastics competition. Coach Don Smith's team came out sec- ond hest, 49-3I, but had no reason for discouragement. Washington State Col- lege was undefeated in all competition. Cutstancling performers for Idaho Were Don Stilson, who won the long horse and placed second in the parallel bars, and Iim Farmer, who was the Vandals' tram- poline and tumbling artist. ,-, I 1 H QM, if ff! :agp Mm 55 5 r rr aims tARDNER, AT IDAHO YOU CAN GET A BUCK that's 'xernpt from income tax. Bareback bronc riding, wild vow riding, calf roping and other rodeo events are now part of collegiate sports. 1daho's first National Inter- eollegiate rodeo team had three rodeo kings crowned luring the season. Captain Ned Stuart won the bronc iding contest in the Montana University rodeo at Mis- oula. ln the Washington State rodeo at Colfax, Bob Lint von the bronc riding event and Floyd Venable took top Lonors in wild cow riding. yunmdv lam - eww NATIONAL INTERCOLLEGIATE RODEO TEAM'-First Row: Captain Ned Stuart, Bob Schild . . . Second Row: Carl Yocom, Jim Betts, Norm Lodge, Pat Lueder, Bill Lodge, Bob Reed, King MONTANA UNIVERSITY RODEO Vashington State ...,.....,.... ...........,...,... Block. . . 357 'Iontana ........,. . 345 Vyoming ...,. . . . 255 lontana State ...., . . , , . .,..,.,...,..,. . , , 121 Llaho .,.........,,., ..., .... , . . .,..,....... . . 87 WASHINGTON STATE RODEO Vashington State .....,,.. ,...........,.. ...,.... . . 460 daho .,....,....., ... H347 Dregon State .... . . 57 92955 gbafgzzf 1949 SQUAD--First Row: Coach Steve Belko, Jack Walsh, Fred Bowen, Ted Fisher, Joe Basile, Dick Zyzak, Bill Oliver, Jim Wright . . . Second Row: Bob Holder, Pete Hester, B111 Botieff, Bill Watson, Dick Peters, Dave Murphy, Jack Pring, Jim Petruzzi, Win Bishop Cassistant coachl . . , Third Row: Larry Moyer, Jim Bergan, Bob Lee, Jerry Ogle- Darrell Pike, Charles Lamberth, Milton Bertrand, Gerald Proctor, Joe Bell, Jack Jones tassistant coachl . . . Fourth Row: Mandius Lundal, Jim Hansen, Earl Meek, Don Roberts, Loren Tedrow, Bob Gleason, John O'Donnell . . . Fifth Row: Morris Dorocke, Bob Sfephens- HBTTY Nelson, George McCarty, Bob Phillips, John Ramos, Don Baker. Wayne Anderson. CQAC1-1 STEVE BELKO mentored one of ldaho's most successful freshman grid teams this season. The "Babes" lost only their season opener to an undefeated Washington Squad in Moscow. ldaho. . . . . 7 Washington ...., . . .20 ldaho. . . . . 13 Washington State, , . , . 7 ldaho... ...2O Utah ......., ,. 6 ldaho. . , . . 13 Washington State. . . . , O 257 Idaho. . . Idaho. . . Idaho Idaho is, X 'S-X' ,,-M' M5 H4 U14 3 WSC Fresh... .. I WSC Frosh. .. .. 6 WSC Frosh. .. .. I WSC Frosh... H19 IF'ROSHiBASEBALL7First Row: Archie Lowry, Jim Price, Bill Boyden, Bob Kust, Nick Bowrner . . . Second Row: Chuck Williams, Keith Stevens, Bob Sell, Rick Sakara, Burt Pool . . . Third Row: Coach Joe Grove, Wayne Anderson, Bob Lynch, Odell Black, Bruce McIntosh, Manager Harold Stevens . . . lNot pictured: Ted Fisherb. I coA.oH STEVE BELKo's 1949-50 Quin would have erased the Wrinkles tron'i the br ot any varsity rnentor. The Vandal trosh We tall, tast and aggressive. They had an eye the hoop and proved it by winning I4 out I7 contests. Idaho ......,. Idaho ....,... Idaho ........ Gonzaga .........,..,., Newport High School .... Eastern Washington. . , . Idaho Grady's, Colfax ,.,..... Idaho Washington State ........ Idaho Hat Freeman, Spokane .... Idaho Metheny Bacon, Spokane. . Idaho Washington State ........, Idaho Grrady's, Colfax ......,,,, Idaho Central Valley High School Idaho Washington State ,....,... Idaho Gonzaga ..,.,.... Idaho Wallace All-Stars. Idaho Washington State ....,.... Idaho Washington State ......... Idaho North Central High School. FROSH BASKETBALLeSitting: Keith Stevens, Gordon Kreisher, Jim Price, Wayne Anderson, Manager Bill Taylor . . . Standing: Jerry Ogle, Bill Mather, Roger Lillibridge, Hartly Kruger, Horace Nealey, Bruce McIntosh. 258 ESH TRACK-First Row: Bruce Sweeney, Glenn Casebolt, Gordon Henning, Don tman . . . Standing: Don Schultz, Pat Duffey, Elven Matson, Larry Eisner, Buck son, Coach Stan Hiserman. ldaho. , . . . , O Washington State. . . , . 7 Idaho. . . . . . 2 Washington State ...., . . . . . , . 5 Idaho. . . . . . O North Central High School. . . 7 Idaho. . . . . l Colfax High School ..... . . . , 6 Idaho. . . . , 5 Colfax High School, . . . 4 FROSH TENNIS-Bob Gleason, Bill Taylor, Saylor Jeppson, Don Bolingbroke, Fred Thompson, Skip Taylor, Coach Kirkland. IDAHO FROSH 5I.5 WSC FROSH 7l.5 IDAHOS FROSH TRACKSTERS lost their only meet ot the season to the Washington State Cou- babes. But, in the eyes of Varsity Coach Stan I-liserman, the meet was a success. Bruce Sweeney, a high-stepping timber-topper, placed with tirsts in the high jump and low hurdles in addition to scoring a second in the high's. ln tield events, Buck Nelson cashed in with top honors in the shot-put, then placed second in the javelin and discus. Qther first place winners were Lorin LaFoe and Glenn Casebolt in the 440 and two-mile events respectively. OSH SWIMMING-First Row: Larry Riedesel, Peter Vajda, Bill Hoblet, Dick nrren, Coach Eric Kirkland . . . Second Row: Wally Landeck, Jim Cranston, Jack ranger, Glen De Bruine . . . Idaho 19, Washington State 49: Idaho 23, Washington ite 45. Steve Belko Freshman Football and Basketball Coach C571 We L Eta Gill K agfgis, TW, lDAl-lO'S SPORTS SCHEDULE didn't end in the Varsity and freshman ranks. An efficient and extensive intramural athletic program offered a field of l2 competitive sports to l3lO campus ath- letes. Excluding track, swimming and cross-country competition, l229 contests Were held during the year. cfm? mu , INTRAMURAL MANAGERSvFirst Row: Jim Townley, Phi Gamma Delta: Bob McManaman, l Kappa Tau: George Gust, Sigma Alpha Epsilon: Bob Sonnichson, Tau Mem Aleph: Willard Stevens. Chrisman Hall: Leon Green, Intramural director . . . Second Row: Larry Cortner, Lambda Chi Alpl Don Harrison, Beta Theta Pi: Vern Carlson, Sigma Nu: Merlin Francis, Delta Tau Delta: Dick Stre Lindley Hall . . . Third Row: Preston Brimhall, staff assistant: Thomas Webb, Campus Club: E Reed, Beta Theta Pi: John Weinrnann, Willis Sweet Hall: Vern Baxter, Idaho Club: Don Folki student assistant: Cleve Henderson, L.D.S. SIGMA NU-"A" Basketball Champions . . . Kneeling: Jack Weiger, Vern Carlson, TAU KAPPA EPSILON-"B" Basketball Champions . . . Kneeling: Jim Paras, Le Marvin Ainsworth . . . Standing: Bill Gartin, Norm Farnham, Lowry Bennett, Pat Brainard, Winston Bishop . . . Standing: Dave Murphy, Harry Boyd, George Powe Hamilton, Earl Wheeler. Larry Moyer, Jim Chadband. 260 Alpha Tau Omega . Beta Theta Pi. . . . Campus Club. . Chrisman Hall . Delia Chi ...,,... Delia Tau Delta ...., . . . Kappa Sigma. . . LDS lnsliiule .... Lindley Hall. . . Pine Hall ...... Phi Delta Theia. . . Phi Gamma Della . . Phi Kappa Tau .......... Sigma Alpha Epsilon Sigma Chi . . . Sigma Nu ....... . Tau Kappa Epsilon Tau Mem Aleph, Willis Sweet Hall.. . . . . Handicappers. . Idaho Club ....... Trailer Village ..,., Lambda Chi Alpha . If LL OTBA FO OUCH N Huupuupuuuupupuw M o m w m Q M A m Q w m o m m m m A 0 O T Q w Q Q m m m M m m O m o Q w o o o o 5 : wi N N, N 8 8 SWIMMING 90 140 165 1 15 100 75 165 200 75 1 15 180 130 55 YBALL D.-A Af,-1,-f,..,-.-A ,-A ,-',-,- A-,..m .CO CDM O'-'CDLJLOJS-O34SU1CDC.Il VOESOOSOOOLDMOOOOMOES VOLLE 1-A Q3 O 156 LL ETEA M,A -MAA ALAQQE,-AAA ABASK O. -mnooouwmmoln NCHA-ocQ Q . G m O O O Q 0 m m O O m O O o o w Q O mf UI' TENNIS . A- , COLD U1 U1CDO7U107CDO7U1 ,gOtJ1c8gO3000OOOOO8g TABLE fO3 .O 55 100 KETBALL BAS "E awQ A m w A m A m Q m w m m w A 2 O m m 0 Q g 2 A w Q O A A 5.5 96 59 86 59 um Lu O CE cn rn rn on O I 70 80 60 60 60 70 90 60 60 70 80 60 100 60 80 70 60 60 925 BALL .-. .-go-JH ,-f,..5,- ,..,..,-- ap.,- cnowe cznQm --on A oooooomoalomoggogwgg SOFT 200 30 70 F 51 Q z 0 5 Q5 e-4 E Q r-1 35 -fn U1 I-I-4 65 60 77 ' '-Q 70 I 70 6715 60 . . , 60 100 90 70 80 6214 60 80 70 9714 100 92 kj 60 90 60 83 LQ 60 8715 80 72' Q 70 , . . 60 831 Q 70 75 . 95 . 95 . CK once-Qornooow omobifuui TRA A A- bi AXA 100 55 75 96 90 515 775 67M 7216 96 5115 85 80 57M 60 ..- E cu wa 5 m '1 1 Q O. ..- 5 EL. I" "3 71 o Q: U o C 'U P 3 0 E 5, U '1 oi 5 F 4. o 5' 5 C: '1 -Q C .-, E1 "1 c 5 Z 0 5 ET 2. no RY UNT CO 33832 355 CROSS 56 95 75 100 62 M A A an z- E O Ili ..1 -11 1-1 O H 1344 1269 90724 811142 101615 120116 1319 47216 945 1149 113915 1059 Li 71615 130615 1020 143112 1171 48612 146915 59 851 241K 755 'SSAA1 1 mf 'X IGMA ALPHA EPSILONA--Swimming Champions . . . Sitting: Chase Barbee, Howard PHI DELTA THETAW-Tennis Champions: Don Bolingbroke Dick Peterson nggs Standing Jim LaGx-one, Wayne Knutson, Ted Edmark, Ed Frandsen, Geo. Gust. Saylor Jeppson, Bob Oleson. Dick Smith Assisiant lniramural Director .WW SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON-Horseshoe Champions . . . First Row: Jerry Rockwood, George Gust . . . Second Row: Chase Barbee, Jim Vergobbi, Henry Gandiaga. 2 KAPPA SIGMA-Track Champions . . . Rich Jordan ffrontl, Bob Mays, Ross Walker, John Beach, Fred Bliss, Harlan Olson . . . Back Row: Terry McMullen, George Goble, Mandius Lundal, Al Foucar, Jack Ghigleri, Dennis Bryan, Rod Pollard. IDAHO CLUB--Softball Champions . . . First Row: Jim Hatch, Marvin Beguhl, Ed Fiester Don Ellis . . . Second Row: Vern Baxter, Jerry Ogle, King Block, Len Walker, Bill Oliver INTRAMURAL CROSS-COUNTRY WINNERS: Glenn Casebolt, Sigma Nu, Kare Reed, Pine Hall: Fred Boyle, Campus Club, Charles Clark, Delta Chi: Bob Clark, Alpha Tau Omega. BETA THETA PI-Ping Pong Champions: John Scull, Jack McClaran, Dale Chaney. DELTA TAU DELTAfGolf Champions: Frank Seaman, Bob Rawlins, Mauno Saari, Ivan Stone. 'EJ .,N.,yZ,5e ip W A l l A GD N A qciki Q glfzfw Q . 34, , f were ltleiQQ J SEPTEMBER WRA started with a Whirlwind F activities that continued through spring finals. 1 the fall, field hockey was the major sport. ixteen women represented ldaho in the North- 'est Field Hockey Association conference at Dregon State College. The volleyball courts wok the bulk of the action during the winter Lonths. Playdays were held with North ldaho Tollege of Education and Washington State. leanwhile, others splashed in the swimming ool. lndividual Sports Day in May offered the 'omen athletes a chance to demonstrate their :ill in badminton, tennis, archery, and golf. articipants were on hand from NICE, Eastern fashington College, WSC, Central Washing- nn College, and Whitworth. The spring season 'as climaxed by a double softball Victory over fashington State. EIADING LADIES--This WRA executive board is composed of me presidents of the various athletic groups . . . Front Row: orma Hunt, Blanche Erickson, Pamela Gaut, Joan Litchfield . Back Row: Marjorie Johnstone, Dorothy Ga1ey,fJean-War- 211, Valeta Hershberger, Jane Fisk, Pat Berry. Mild 5 zmgizwx WOMEN'S PHYSICAL EDUCATION STAFF-Holly Hamburger, fox and dog-trot instructor Miss Margaret Coffey, in charge of individual sports: Mrs. Willa Reeves, dance and orchesis instructor Miss Natalie Wells, team sports and advisor to WRA and "I" Club, Miss Mabel Locke, head of the physical education departmentg Mrs. Mary Swendson, swimming instructor. SWEATER GlRLSfThese women were chosen for the "I" Club because of their outstanding participation and contribu- tions to WRA activities . . . Front Row: Helen Way, Blanche Erickson, Jane Fisk, Jean Wardell . . . Back Row: Sue Beards- ley, Valeta Hershberger, Jean Daily, Mar- jorie Johnstone, Betty Peters, Natalie Wells. AHASHOOT 263 A SWING AND A MISS NO! NO! . . . Don't hit it to me, please I have a weak live STAND FARTHER BACK NEXT TIME, GIRL ORCHESIS RECITAL-The jongleur lies at the feet of the Madonna at the climax of her dance in the Shoot from a five-foot distance. Christmas program. 264 JASON SEEKS EDUCATION llllllllllllll X 1 f JL Q, , , ?1w, ig- :'21- 442, f , ff, I '51 .2 ., J- A fl f Q17 r. K 'I , vrlriki I , 46 ., :W . M , fr , "1 E 5? 4 A5 1 . ff? f . E, Ex., 6- 4, fn ' 4, 1-' . Y N , 2, . Y.. 4 1 ,U f Y. am . M flzssex ' an '5 t ..., 4, H, X , : . ll r ' ,.. M .... ' .fi wi MMEFQ, ,,.w' .1 ' S. M ' m 5J'?,,'ki,5553x - H A Lv, , .D WV. ' K ,Q V S ', .V ff f.f-,V 4 A ,, P ',, 5 , - n . Q 'f - 4 V. ,J A ' 'ly ff,-W 4' 1 H - W aiu ,I iyfx 4 lf , Q b 'H Q if mlm, ft my-5" 4. Q JV . ' :Q ' 6 1,2 ?"NL + -reg , 5- A 3 ' ,LM -f, ' 'Q 55x67 X? i t , J. v R1 ,wha 1 -'K' W, 1 . at " 0. KK fri- ' . V Y' 'f 1 ,kb.,x'6.'3-3. ' ,ivy ' ' M' mf'N"':Q,? wk ,..J"yv 'rfjvkffaf-Nix x 42. Q ' ' 5 N gf ' ' Qi.,-A ,..w'xM.-T , W, , , 1. -v Q -'VG-"L ' -N ip, v M v 7, 4. 4 .. i .,. . f XM ,gf it W "Qu, gl rl. -V , 'L ' I, 413'-iz. 1 5 X in . ""'?":" .P 4 st . 4 N ', 1' . 'Ev' v 2 1 w. v Y' .4 A W, X , it A 4 Q , fi f Q W.-3,2w5-Q' , V' mf. 'Ms fs '3' "' 1233! , ' .4 ,Q ,N ,- wa , , .0 f 1 , - k ,-, V fl. ,A N A . 1 . W ti K Y t Q5 ,H is is 7 3' f W ff r J- r ,, my ..f, a. W- 'fm' Fw , 3:-if 1 , YV mr, w A4 1 A ' A Y' 4 Y, P, x ff ,. Q 1 ". H .lik A Q5 ' f .52 .' -H tp .f- wle, ' 51. ... sf . . ,, 4 'V W. A ! 1,?,,.. .- an Q, , .w.,"e" Q M L X . Y A -yfngll HI! Qs -?g..- gnu-HE.. I' Q ff. KQV? vu if i 'If' if-2 minis ra ion ui in oiaean N Ad t t b ld g f l g d hrick silhoueited againsl the blue M45 Sffmvzfzbfz Z-1+ fy, Qfzcwfy zzfz:f:5!m2Q'fz1? yyfzfffzfkzlbfzkzzzffbfz aww Wx aww fhsxex fllwlflfy may The nine deans of the schools and colleges of the University of ldaho come in direct contact with students and parents through personal letters com- mending high scholarship and in talks over warning slips. Although students do not meet them over the lecture table in classrooms, these men have a very great interest in what is going on in every department under their guidance. They are the vanguards of educational improvements that will better prepare the student for his work and for living a well-adjusted life. The silver-haired daddy of the College of Letters and Science is Thomas Stoner Kerr. He has been at ldaho since l924 and dean since l937. At one time he served as acting president of the university. His texts on Business Law are widely used by American uni- sities. Dean Kerr oversees the work of the eight departments in his division and with a benevolent eye watches for opportunities to introduce new and better approaches to learning. Twenty-three years marks a long period of service in which Dean Ralph l-l. Farmer has studied the working of the School of Business Administration. The univer- sity has profited, empirically, through the years by the knowledge he has gained and put into practice in his work. The efficiency and up-to-date training that marks the School of Business Administration as mod- ern and progressive is proof that Dean Farmer has practiced what he preached. This able administrator's contributions have built a memorial of progress and change. The renown of ldaho's training in agriculture has increased as has the enrollment of students under the guiding hand of Dean D. R. Theophilus. Experi- mentation and research in the l3 departments of the College of Agriculture have yielded valuable results for agriculturists throughout the world. Dean Theo- philus stresses learning by doing, and his boys go home knowing from experience just how scientific and machine age improvements make farming and livestock raising a revolutionized industry. 26 J. F. Weltz D f the School of Educatlo -,xxx N A. S. Janssen e College of E. S. Stimson Dean of the College of Law Wfzfmszfy Dean l. F. Weltzin is a specialist in a specialized field. ln his sixth year as Dean of the School of Education, he has coordinated a teaching program for training education majors to take places in a variety of posi- tions. While his students were learning to teach, Dean Weltzin sought ways to improve the teaching methods used at the University. His integrity in offering the finest training to education majors sets an example of the highest standard for tomorrow's workers in the field of education. Dean Allen lanssen understands the student's view- point toward an engineering education at ldaho be- cause he is a graduate of this university. He has seen many changes since the days when he was an under- graduate. New equipment and new physical plants have been added to the College of Engineering's resources. Expansion planning and supervision have kept Dean lanssen busy, but from his foresight and labor have come such achievements as the comple- tion of the Kirtley Laboratories Annex this year and the beginning of the Engineering Classroom building. Where to put the law students who weren't graduat- ing was a problem that stymied even Dean Edward S. Stimson, but it took a matter as complicated as that to interrupt the steady flow of judicious decisions that he has made for the improvement of the College of Law in the three years he has been at Idaho. Dean Stimson and everyone connected with law claims the third floor of the Administration building's south wing as home. Law students study in their library for hours each day close to the offices of their dean and instruc- tors in a close-knit family of legal specialists. ZW! Dean Dwight S. letters in his long period ot service at the university has brought the School ot Forestry to recognition throughout the nation as tops in class- rcom and tield training. Dean letters is a Yale gradu- ate who came to the University ot idaho trom the University ot Washington. He and Mrs. letters took in the Forester's Ball looking right at home in plaid shirts and levis. While on sabbatical leave this spring, he studied land problems in grazing and erosion in the Southwest and in Mexico. Leaders in the mining industry use the tlotation proc- ess developed by Dean Arthur W. Fahrenwald tor treating approximately 90 per cent ot all ores trom which minerals are extracted. Dean Fahrenwald is considered an expert in the tield ot mining and is widely known tor his process in which ore containing a mineral is crushed, mixed with water and chemical reagents, agitated and aerated so that minerals attach to bubbles and move to the top. He has been at Idaho since l9l9, serving the university and a state in which mining is a leading industry. The Graduate Council, composed ot nine members appointed by the President trom various academic divisions ot the university, is headed by Dean Charles W. Hungertord, who has been here since l9l9. Dean Hungertord guides the studies ot all students who are working tor an advanced degree in one ot the 40 or more departments ottering specialized work. He also serves as head ot the plant pathology department and as vice-chairman ot the research council. He is otten seen in the tamiliar setting ot the greenhouses seeking a better cure tor the disease ot blighted plants. Enroll- ment in the Graduate School reached an all-time high this year. C. W. Hungerford Dean ot th D. S. Jeffers Dean of the School of Forestry A. W. Fahrenwald Dean ot the College ot Mine 9 Graduate S h l 6 Kenne th Hoag Eugene Taylor Boyd Martin P Humanities Mathematics Social Sciences A t cl A h t t fha? X The supervisory duties of the heads of departments require that they keep fully informed on the activities of teaching, research, and service that are carried on in all subdivisions. Upperclassmen have their curricula approved by them and follow the special programs they design for instruction. Cne of the busiest department heads in the College of Letters and Science is Professor Kenneth Hoag, who oversees the Work of the many divisions in humanities such as dramatics, speech, English, journalism, and languages. Professor Eugene Taylor retired as head of mathematics after serving for thirty years. l-le received a big hand of appreciation and the degree of Professor of Mathematics Emeritus at the 1950 Commencement exercises. Professor Boyd Martin guides the Work of history, philosophy, political science, and sociological studies, in addition to securing the finest visiting instructors available for summer classes in Social Science. Professor T. l. Prichard heads the Art and Architecture department and has received increasing recognition for his artistic work outside of the classroom. Dr. William Cone coordinates the teaching and research activities of the Physical Sciences department. Professor Margaret Ritchie maintains the excellence of the training received by her Home Economics girls and sees that graduates are placed in desirable positions after graduation. Professor l-l. Walter Steffens heads the department of Biological Sciences and keeps in close contact With all of his students. l-le is known for being friendly and cooperative at all times. William H. Cone Margaret Ritchie H. Walter Steffens H 11 M M kl Physical Sciences Home Economics Biological Sciences M p William Boyer Opal H. Deliancey S h es Psychology Secretarial Studies C l gy d C' q me fmefzfx Professor Hall M. Macklin takes pride in the achievements of his students in the Department of Music. He has additional problems in planning student recitals and special programs given by the many performing groups in the department. Professor Harlow H. Campbell directs the work of non-resident instruction and other functions of the Educational Field Services department with business- like dispatch. Professor William Boyer is head of the Department of Psychology in the School of Education. He points out the practical means for application of psy- chological findings to everyday situations. Professor Qpal H. DeLancey supervises training of secretaries and stenog- raphers in the School of Business Administrations Secretarial Studies courses. Professor Vernon E. Scheid was recently elected to membership in the Society of Economic Geologists in recognition of his outstanding services in the field of geological research on mineral deposits of the Pacific Northwest. Among the heads of departments in the School of Engineering, Professor Norman E. Hindle handles Mechanical Engineering, Professor Chester A. Moore specializes in Civil Engineering, Dr. Castle O. Reiser supervises Chemical Engineering, and Professor l. Hugo lohnson devotes his time to administering the Electrical Engineering department. Next year they will have new offices in the Engineering Classroom building and bid a fond adieu to the old Engineering building and temporary offices in which they have conducted their business this year. F H le Chester A. Moore Castle O. Reiser H g M h E q q Civil Engineering Chemical Engineering Fl l Q J 31 Merrill E. Deters Edwin W. Tisdale Ernest Wohletz Paul D. Dalke F l P Cl i Range Management Forest Wildlife Wildlife Management fwfr X For those who would ask, 'iWhat's there to study about a tree?" and figure that forestry is a rather simple field, these four men could provide a multitude of answers. Dr. Merrill E. Deters as head of Forest Production might give forth with a lecture in silviculture. Professor Edwin W. Tisdale could explain that well over 75 per cent of the land in ldaho is considered a problem in Range Management as is studied by the School of Forestry. Professor Ernest Wohletz as Associate Director of the Forest Wildlife Range Experiment Station and head of the Forest Wildlife division directs a large part of the research service that communicates valuable information directly to the citizens of the state. As head of Wildlife Management, Professor Paul D. Dalke has the facts and figures about all the inhabitants of the vast areas of ldaho's wild land that remain guite unaware of the benevolent interest this department has in their welfare and preservation. Dr. Leif Verner explains that Horticulture is the study of plants in general, while his colleague, Dean C. W. Hungerford, studies pathological diseases of plants. The head of the Poultry Husbandry department, Professor Clifford E. Lamp- man does research work with nutrition and ration requirements of domesticated fowl, and studies feeding habits of wild birds. Professor D. L. Fourt, head of Dairy Husbandry, could tell you that the word "husbandry" comes from an archaic word meaning uto till the ground," and that where dairying is concerned it applies to the economic management of cattle and their products. Professor C. W. Hickman lets Professor Fourt handle the cow and bull while he directs the study of sheep, horses, swine, and other livestock. Both men are well-trained judges of animal guality and breeding. -if 3? 7 Leif Vex-ner Clifford E. Lampman D. L. Fourt C. W. Hickman H t lt Poultry Husbandry Dairy Husbandry Anim al Husbandry QT' H. A. Winner J. W. Martin Lloyd H. Scrivne P IA k icultural Education Agricultural Engineering Veterinary Science AQ lt l P me fmmfs The Work of the College of Agriculture is divided into l3 departments and carried on by those men who guide the specialized fields students choose for their concentrated upper division studies. Professor H. A. Winner handles the education of agriculture majors who are planning careers in teaching. l. W. Martin, Professor of Agricultural Engineering, has the distinction of belonging both to the College of Engineering and the College of Agriculture. His department combines machine age training with the oldest of the World's professions. Professor Lloyd H. Scrivner, head of Veterinary Science, sees that courses in his department prepare men and Women for admission to veterinary colleges, divisions and schools in the United States. He teaches students to diagnose and cure diseases of poultry and livestock, Professor Paul A. Eke teaches marketing and finance courses along with surveying the Work of the Agricultural Economics department. The recipient of a newly-remodeled office in the Agronomy building that received a general face-lifting last year, Professor K. H. Klages teaches classes in crop production and really knows his sugar beets. Professor V. A. Cherrington teaches general bacteriology as well as special courses with agricultural applications in dairy and soil problems. The head of the Department of Entomology, Professor H. C. Manis, is con- cerned with the study of insects and their habits. His research has solved numerous insect control problems. ln addition to his duties as head of Agricultural Chemistry, Professor Alvin C. Wiese has devoted extensive research to problems of cancer in rats. His findings are being converted to human application. K. H. Klages V. A. Cherrington H- C- Mahii C W Aq y Bacteriology Entomology A lt l Q 6755555555555 555' 5772 5551555 4725555514 5955 M555 The mid-century Gem of the Mountains, in its essence, is dedi- cated to the future of the University of ldaho, which was built by the past and is perpetuated by the student body and faculty of the present, With the return of the veteran, a marvelous maturity appeared in classes and on the campus. Growth and vitality marked the campus as it expanded to handle the all-time enrollment highs. Adjustments were made. New buildings arched against old hori- zons. Profs revamped their teaching methods for larger classes made up of students ranging in age from l7 to 30. Vets' villages and temporary classrooms appeared on the ldaho scene. College didn't stand for the rah-rah, coonskin and jallopy days of the roaring twenties. lt now meant preparation for better living as students sought enduring values and practical training from their studies. lt was still lots of fun. Several thousand young people lived together in an ideal atmosphere of brave dreams, fine learning, busy activity and dazzling entertainment. Beers, cheers, and tears-blood, sweat, and toilf all these composed the presentf l95Oifas it split the twentieth century in twain. As lason goes inside the classroom to seek an education, the Gem follows and presents a lcaleidoscopic view of the school year. They Left Something Behind When They Went Away Orchids all the way around for the Senior Ball! Wyatt Howard played for the l'Blue Orchids" dance that drew one of the big- gest crowds to attend an all-campus affair this year. Orchids were presented to all the ladies. Decorations literally turned Memorial Gym into a college campus covered with familiar scenes. Beside the orchid-bedecked bandstand on either side were two silhouettes depicting a man and woman in caps and gowns. This year saw 920 seniors graduate in the largest Commence- ment in the university's history. The Class of '50 took in the peak of the post-war delayed-education enrollment. A large propor- tion of the Vets were graduated this spring. Definite goals and ambitions prompted their high scholarship. A feeling of respon- sibility and dedication was strong in their approach to college. It is this new attitude which pervaded the campus and class- rooms that we hope will not fade too soon after their departure. The world cannot help but be brighter with their commencement into the business and affairs of life that lie ahead in the second half of an amazing century. SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS mzhzzzhx af Wklldhflfilly Del Klaus, president: Valeta Hershberger, treasurer: Jean Pugh, secretaryg Ken McCormack, vice-president om as mofzzzfzites. . . Xie Ja my 25 wards Sue Beardsley Prominent in WRA, Susie served as Women's "I" Club prexy this year. Truly an activity gal, she has been a hard-working member of Elections Board, Gem, Arg, Spurs, Delta Mu, Orchesis, Kappa Delta Pi, various campus committees and finally the top ot the ladder . , . Mortar Board. Herb Carlson "Herbie" is ldaho's outstanding boxer of all time Be sides being Pacific Coast champ tour years and National champ three years, he was voted outstanding collegiate boxer this year. A Sigma Nu, Herb is also a member of "I" Club, Blue Key, Silver Lance, Executive Board and Chamber of Commerce. Ted Diehl Alternate football captain and boxing co-captain have made this tour-year letterman outstanding on campus. An engineer by trade, Ted is a member ot ASAE, ASCE, Associated Engineers, "I" Club, and president ot the Sigma Nu house. Del Klaus Senior class president "Schmelbert" Klaus is a wheel from way back. Beginning as advertising manager of the Arg, Del went to the top fast, Activities included Executive Board, Publications Board, Silver Lance Blue Key, Delta Chi house manager, and Sigma Delta Chi Sheila Darwin Blot associate editor and Arg rewrite and news editor made her a natural tor Theta Sigma. Being a dietetics major, Sheila is a member of Phi Upsilon Omicron and was cover girl for the National Home Ec magazine, What's New in Home Economics. Mortar Board, Spurs, Home Ec Club, and Panhellenic list her in their ranks. Bob Finlayson From circulation staff to editor ot Blot magazine is Bob s success story. A Blue Key and Sigma Delta Chi member he has served on almost all campus week committees as well as Student Activities Board, Publications Board Rally Committee, Independent Caucus, U Singers Cam pus Chest, and Attic Club. Chrisman Hall claims him as one of their big three. Bob Moulton "Moldy" was ASUI president this year and with that honor little more need ,be said. From Freshman class vice-president to l-K lunlor Knight and Executive Board, Bob Moulton made Chrisman Hall home and let his key chain grow heavy with honors. Few campus organiza- tions, boards and committees have not felt his presence. Election to Phi Beta Kappa came simultaneously with ASUI presidency making him the outstanding activity man ot the campus. Jean Ottenheimer Small, blonde and lovely describes Miss Moscow Coed of 1950. Looks and charm aren't all that make this little Alpha Phi outstanding, because this year she has ruled all Greek letter women as President of Panhellenic Council. Head ol the 1949 Gem secretarial statt AWS and many campus committees have taken just a wee bit ot her time too. Rich Pen nell This super bass has been the pride ot the Vandaleers and drama department. Character leads in many, many ASUl plays have brought cheers from the audience for tour years. Phi Mu Alpha, Scabbard and Blade, and Blue Key have welcomed this active Fiji to their groups. Orual Hansen "King Midas," with the golden touch, is the only senior to complete tour years of college with a straight tour point and is still a top activity man. A tew ot his teats include Alpha Zeta, Phi Eta Sigma, Blue Key, Scabbard and Blade, Delta Sigma Rho, Sigma Delta Chi, Phi Beta Kappa, Elections Board, IRC, KUOI business manager Arg, Gem, Blot, IFC, Dad's Day, Kampus Key editor Varsity Debate, Senior Track manager, and ROTCS outstanding air cadet. its-3,3 '11- :El 9' is The Argonaut s choice. lor outstanding senior woman reached the height ot her success when she was elected May Queen ot 1950. Top activities include secretary ot ASUI Executive Board, Mortar Board, Phi Upsilon Omi- cron, Kappa Phi president, Spurs and Vandaleers. arm! rite sferrrzcaesf shears of file M55 of 15' it A i rrr: eE l Phyllis LaRue Dick Boyle ldaho's own "Mr Anthony" to many troubled students, Dick always seems to make time to sit down and talk things over. Between business classes he has served as president ot Intertraternity Council and Delta Tau Delta, been chairman of Student Activities Board and satin on Student Faculty Committee and Rally Committee meet- inqs, Morgan Touey Willis Sweet's number one man served as Homecoming Chairman and Blue Key president this year. Supporting major titles include sophomore class president, Scab- bard and Blade, Independent Caucus, Election Board chairman, U Band, U Singers, Senior Week, Dad's Day, and Attic: Club. Dave Lewis The top man at KUOI in 1949, Dave has held a seat on the major boards at Idaho, including ASUI Executive Board, Publications Board, and Student Activities Board. Latest venture is the family board when he married a gal from across the state line at WSC. Bette West "Bl" has starred in many ASUI plays, headed various campus committees and made ladies out ot pledges at the Theta house. Elected to .ASUI Executive Board and Mortar Board in the spring ot her junior year, Bette has gained top honors as a member of Kappa Phi, Delta Mu, Spurs, Curtain Club, Sigma Alpha Iota, and Vandaleers. Dean Mosher A little Fiji with big ideas and lots ot ambition and initia- tive pretty well describes this all around activity man. Yell King in l948-49, Dean has been an organizer in all major campus "weeks," Vandaleers, "I" Club, Blue Key, IRC, Phi Alpha Delta, Bench and Bar, and Student Activities Board have welcomed him into their ranks. Ken McCormack Brains, brawn, and a pohtician's hand-shake have made this Beta well-known on the Idaho campus. Alpha Epsia lon Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, three years of varsity football and junior and senior class vice-president are the prooi. "I" Club, Blue Key, and Silver Lance also claim him as a member. On the gospel side, Ken served as president ot Canterburty Club. Carl Kiilsgaard "Bear Tracks," ldaho's football great, was chosen to play in the East-West Shriners' Benefit game last Xmas. A tour-year tootball letterman, Carl became a member ol "I" Club as a treshman and presided over the group in 1949. Ag Club and Alpha Zeta claimed him as a member as did Chrisman Hall until the tall ol l949 when ho ioined his fellow athletes at the Idaho Club, Rosemary Fitzgerald "Fitz" hangs her hat at the Pi Phi house and Nest and rules the Associated Women Students with an iron hand, WRA and Newman Club have claimed her as have Stu- dent Activities Board, Rally Committee, Calendar Com- mittee, Disciplinary Board, Student Union Planning Committee, and ASUI Executive Board. She has also served as Spur prexy and Spur junior advisor. Tom Rigby He should be known as "President Tom" because this former Lindley man has served as president ot the Northwest Regional International Relations Club, Delta Sigma Rho, and Independent Caucus. Varsity Debate has made Tom a well-known speaker on campus, but he had to take a back seat in activities atter he took the matrimonial vows last Xmas with Elenore Strange. A are Professor Banks and class go outside to discuss authors A cross section of Professor Norton Coe's class in the Romantic Period Students Learn the Art of Living and Receive Professional Training Art and architecture, biological sciences, home economics, humanities, mathematics, music, physical sciences, and social sciences are the eight diverse departments that compose the College of Letters and Science headed by Dean T. S. Kerr. The cultural values ot the fine arts and great literature of the World are combined with practical instruction that leads to careers related to the learning each individual pursues. Subjects that build a foundation for a fuller enjoyment of life and that develop a philosophical and clearly-reasoned View of man and his place in the universe are found among the humanities and social science courses, some of which the university reguires be taken by all its students regardless of their major field. The opportunities for specialized study are numerous in each of the departments, but in four years the student has a chance to explore the subject matter of a Wide variety of courses that give him a broad understanding and perspective in years to come. The intangible values that build character are garnered through close relationships of teachers and students in classes that demand deep thinking about problems concerning human relations, purposes and Values. il fur-1-, Betty Jo Howley, Ross C. Alm, and Muriel Stephens are three instructors who Mrs. Rapaich, Norman Six-inger, and Helen Dudley spend many hours in their follow the English depaz-trnent's policy of developing their students' minds along University Hut offices grading freshman English compositions. Part of their work with their speech and writing abilities. is concentrated on helping the student understand more completely the litera- ture he reads. 276 0525215 rm! Lgcrbfzce ,,,,., Professor John H. Cushman, chairman of English, is an authority on great Professor William Banks' deep and sincere interest in students helps them over novels, classic and modern plays, Chaucer and Shakespeare. the rough spots they meet in adjusting new ideas to their philosophies of life His words impart inspiration. Golden Anniversary Year for Letters and Science The Orientation CNon-Degreel Curriculum intended to serve students who are not seeking a degree or Who are having diiticulty in deciding what courses they wish to select Went into etiect this year as a two-year general course in which students may branch out into a Wide exploration ot special interests. The Administration statt ot the college will have more room next year with the completion ot the Ad building addi- tion. All business ottices that are now occupied by the Registrar and Bursar will be located in the annex and their present ottices turned over to Letters and Science. The College ot Letters and Science was established just a halt-century ago in l900. lt is the oldest and the largest ot the nine schools and colleges that make up the University ot ldaho. With l95O marking the golden anniversary year tor this division, there are golden achievements to go along with the occasion. Through the years changes and progress toward better classrooms, better instruction, and higher standards ot developing individuals to attain the maximum goals oi their potential possibilities have been stressed. The combining ot education for living and tor earning a liveli- hood are aims that have made this institution universally respected in its halt-century ot service. Edward Cebull, Bernard Engel, and Hulon Willis share TC 2-105 as their office and hold Professors Howard Packenham, William Tenny, and Theodore Sherman student conferences there. They go over each student's work in regular individual talks teach literature and other upper division classes. Professor Sherman is with members of their classes. supervisor of the non-degree curriculum. L . ,Syst , if , .., . JM m.'li'a-.sei . sk 'Mu ' ., Vx "Qs we-.M lx' Nx NX. e o f""fm.,j5 42 ' 'wif' fic: fi gg, E' fgfgqglq tg? to A QQ: ffggz mv'-""" The Home Ec girls championed the cause of Bean Soup this year by populariz- Ann Harding tries her hand at textile design and painting in a Home Ec lah ing it with a tasty new recipe. Art and Architecture faculty members Austin Kilian, Clayton Page, Robert Garland, Original designs for all types of construction are drawn with tech- Mary Kirkwood, Theodore Prichard, Arnold Westerlund, and John Nevin try out the nical accuracy by student architects who work for beauty and practi- department's new furniture . . . Pottery classes give students of the machine-and-mind cality . . . Norm Tilly explains the work of his team in city planning age a chance to create artistic products with their hands. to other architecture students who worked on this class project. 278 5 S 1 q K xgiiiffk W X' if aj 'ge l' Malcolm Jollie works on bird classifi- Professor Earl Larrison's collection of Snowshoe rabbits shows how protective Dr. Floyd W. Gail is head of botany studies in the department of biological sciences. cation. coloration changes with the seasons. The Larrison-Jollie wildlife research team, trappers de luxe, arranges a collec- Science students record their notes gathered by scientific observation . . . tion of birds they have acquired . . . Dr. Gail assists a student with a cornpli- Boni Yragui works out a chemistry problem and learns the basic processes in cated step in his Botany lab work. chemical analysis. fi' 2 7 Marion Frykman, William Davidson, Miriam Little, and George Michael prac- Louis Huber, Agnes Schuldt, and Keith Forney teach music classes and give tice for a faculty recital. Herman Dah assisted Professor Paul T. Scott in the journalism department this year . . . Professor Arthur H. Beattie, Professor Howard French, Kathryn Beasley, Ellin Silverman, and Professor Claude Ashby teach classes in French, Spanish and German. individual lessons as well. Professor Arthur H. Beattie, chairman of languages, has a Scotch-Irish ances- try but specializes in French. He has written two textbooks on French, received a diploma with honors from the Sorbonne, and was awarded the Academic Palm by the French Government in recognition of his distinguished service in the Arts . . . Miss Rentfro, August Vavrus, Professor Arthur Howe, and Paul Lonar- do teach language and literature courses in Greek, Latin, Russian, Spanish, and French. 280 Problem solvers in the mathematics department are Cyrus McAllister, Miss Professors Lawrence Botsford, Alfred Halteman, Roy Wild, and Mr. George Helen Jeane Terry, Leonard Lind, and Professor Anthony Lebarre. Witter work out answers in Room 303 of the Administration Building. Professor R. E. Hosack, acting chairman of political science, explains the back- ground for current headlines to his students . . . Professor C, J. Brosnan is an authority on American history. His textbook on Idaho history is used in teach- ing throughout distinguished. the State. "Who's Who" lists him among the nation's most i -or-' Professor Harry C. Harmsworth, chairman of sociology, studies human asso- ciations in their various forms and functions . . . Dr. Frederic C. Church, chairman of history, is famous for his bow ties, green shoes, and his knowledge of the history of civilization in its entirety. -r ,g 281 H4654 Cgfixfklfz Qebiz Aloysius, the skeleton, occupies the attention of this group during the year Primarily for pre med students membership is also open to students in fields related to pre med The gualification for initiation is a 2 8 accumulative grade point average, and the big event of the year is the annual initiation banquet Tom Shull served as president of the group, While other officers were Leo Freiermuth vice president, Dave Ulmer treasurer, and Betty Bonnett secretary Row One: Bruce Powell, David Ulmer, Torn Shull, Charles Berry. Stanley Tanner, Robert Webb . . . Row Two: Lee M. Kelley, D. A. Gus- tafson, W. H. Cone, H. W. Steffens. Leo Freierrnuth. Pi! Why ZW Wmwafz Membership in this Home Economics honorary is based on scholarship activities and interest in the home economics profession. The big event of the year is the annual Christmas holly sale and last year the club s special project was the re-decoration of the cloak room in the Home EC department Phyllis LaRue was president assisted by Gay Deobald vice-president: Margaret Elie secretary and Shirley Tanner, treasurer Row One: Joan Brown, Beverlee Randall, Margaret Faust, Janice McCormick . . . Row Two: Miss Marion Featherstone, Sheila Dar- win, Shirley Tanner, Phyllis LaRue, Gay Deobald, Marybelle Carnie . . . Row Three: Marian Hartwell, Meri- lyn Peterson, Joan Rowberry, Jackie Mitchell, Margaret Eke, Sylvia Auger. IU!! gm ff' The oldest as well as the best known of college fraternities, Phi Beta Kappa is recognized as the father of the fraternity system on American college campuses. Griginally a debating society of congenial spirits, Phi Beta Kappa has since become more and more an "honor" society, and now gives recognition to scholarly attainment in the field of liberal arts and sciences. Gfficers were l. Irving lolley, president, and Frederic C. Church, secretary. Elizabeth Adams Boise Ella Bahr- Goodinq Vida Baugh Gooding William Ames Huron, S. Dakota Ted Baker lrwin Elizabeth Bean Teton City Alma Anderson Boise Emmalyn Ball ldaho Falls Morse Bidwell Minneapolis, Minn. 4' 'X Milton Anderson Rexburg Shirley Ball lnkom Jane Blakely Moscow Wilford Anderson Rcxlwurg Mary Lee Bates Driqqs George Blosser Goshen, lndiana Row One: Betty Bonnett, Shirley Ball, Jeanne Foster, Elloznae Hol- den, Shirley Jacobsen, Edith Stough, Lois Siebe, May Burkhart . . . Row Two: Lee Bath, Alfred Prince, Beverly Schupfer, Vida Baugh, Elizabeth Bean, Gladys Crane, Robert Moulton . . . Row Three: Calvin Long, Clinton Chase, Donald Miller, Kenneth Briggs, Harry Dalva, Louis Boyle, George Crane. Orval Hansen. Robert Anno Sylvia Auger Wallace Boise Lawrence Bath Clarence Baugh Salt Lake City, Utah Gooding Herbert Booth Donald Borgen Pocatello Genesee Louis Boyle Id aho Falls May Burkhart Ca rey Ralph Carpenter Boise Beth Copenhaver Blanchard William Davidson Moscow Frederick Farmer Moscow Mary Jane Breier Lewiston Katherine Burleigh Moscow Clinton Chase Lewision Carolyn Cracldock Boise Barbara Day New Meadows Norman Farnham Payeiie Kenneth Briggs Murlauqh Walter Burns Coeur d'Alene Ben Chichester Sandpoint George Crane Fred Brown Kamiah Pieternella Byrne Moscow Colleen Christensen Idaho Falls Gladys Crane Monlpelxer Challis Theodore Deobald Louis DeMoss Kendrick Lewiston Margaret Faust ldaho Falls Robert Finlayson Soda Springs Patricia Brown Payelle Vernon Carlson Wallace Neal Christensen Idaho Falls John Cutler Boise Ora Driggs Gooding Garrett Forbes Portland, Oreqon Keith Browning Arco Marybelle Carnie Coeur d'Alene Kenneth Clatfelter Bend, Oregon Harry Dalva Priesi River Margaret Bke Moscow Jeanne Foster Shelley John Burkhart Carey Lloyd Carothers Sandpoint Fordyce Code Boise Sheila Darwin Lewision Donald Endicott Coeur d'Alene Geraldine Fox Hailey 4 Leo Freierrnuth Carmen Gandiaga Parma Boise Howard Grimms Anna Mae Handel Moscow Moscow Rhoda Hill Ellornae Holden Bonners Ferry Maimie Jardine Coeur d'Alene Patricia Jordan Granqeville Dean Koethke Spirit Lake Boise Donald Jess Nampa Henrik Juve Moscow Joan Korter Moscow Frank Gaylord Calaldo Orval Hansen ldaho Falls John B. Holmes Coeur d'Alene Warren Johnson Indian Valley Lee Kelley Shoshone Phyllis LaRue lfleyluurn Harold Gerber Jeanne Gerraughty Twin Falls Spokane, Wash. Rosemary Harland Marion Hartwell Caldwell Ketchum Betty Lou Hooper Clint Hoopes Midvale Rexburq Robert:Jonas Calvin Jones St. Anthony Menan Joe Kendall Wayne Kious Boise Oakland, Calif. Pauline Lawson George Layos Spencer Rock Springs, Wyo. Verl Gessel Opportunity, Wash. Donald Haynes Russell, Kansas Erma Jean Jaclxle Moscow Mary Jo nes Genesee Barbara Kitchens Boise John Lein Spokane, Wash. Donald Griffin Coeur d'Alene Helen Hays Boise Shirley Jacobsen Rexlaurq Robert D. Jones Twin Falls Gerald Klink Burley David Lewis Twin Falls Robert Lewis Jeanne Lindstrom Twin Falls Lewisville John McGough Helen Marshall Moscow Dietrich Harley Miller Louise Miller Moscow Nezperce Ellery Morrison Robert Moulton Port Orchard, Wash. Hornedale Daniel O'Connell Earl Officer Potlatch Boise Robert Pettygrove Earl Pharris Hansen Hazelton Calvin Long lerorne James Marshall Lewiston Donald Mills Nampa Bradford Neff ldaho Falls Jean Ottenheirner Mountain Home Hal Pickett Oakley Maurice Loomis Meadows Roger Maxwell Sandpoint Jacqueline Mitchell ldaho Falls Merlin Nelson Cedar Rapids, Iowa Eleanor Paulson Troy Betty Pyles N ezperce Laura Lowry Lewiston Lewiston Carol Jean Miller Donald Z. Miller Castleford San Rafael, Calif. Alvon Mochel Russell Moffett Craiqmont Smithfield, Utah John Nicholas Sarah Norris Moscow Pocatello Richard Pennell Aris Peterson Nezperce Lewiston Arthur Randall Beverlee Randall Lewiston Craigmont Kenneth McCormack Calvin McFadden Nampa Gerald Loren Miller Lewiston James Morgan Payette Marie Norton Lewiston Allen Petrie Buffalo, N.Y. Donald Read Kingston 286 Elenore Rigby Charles Rogge Boise Weiser Betty Ann Skinner Paula Smith Preston Boise Merle Stratton Bernhard Strohbehn Wgrley New Plymouth Norman Tilley Hansen Marvin Utter Hansen Patricia West Pocatello John Tobin ldaho Falls Margarete Walters Pilot Rock, Oregon Donald Willard Plummer Carol Rounds Pocatello Richard Smith Blackfoot Stanley Tanner Moscow Eugene Todd Bulil Marvin Washburn Twin Falls: Kent Wilson Ft. Worth, Texas Irma Schlader Orofino Wallace Stacy Boise Shirley Tanner Moscow Morgan Tovey Malod Harold Wayne St. Maries Joan Wittman Lewiston Allen Sharp Payette Joan Staples Coeur d'Alene Gordon Taylor Detroit, Oregon Betty Lea Trout Troy Everett Weakley Orolino Betty Lou Wood Oslaurn Lois Siebe Challis Wayne Stewart Moscow June Thomas Glenns Ferry Perry Trout Burley Margaret Weber Moscow Hazel Wren Ontario, Oregon Irene Sims lndmnapolis, Ind Raymond Stornrnel Boise Marjorie Thompson Burley Cecil True Spokane, Wash Bette West Bulil John Ziernann Moscow Bo on tgcvieef b Moulton, Vida Baugh, and Keith Bean learn to do quick and accurate arithmetic Professor William E. Folz watches as his class tackles a blue book statist the school s modern machinery. quiz. intricacies of Modern Business Demand Educational Preparation Teaching students to know their business as it is conducted in the present-day World is handled by the School of Business Administration which is directed by Dean Ralph H. Farmer. The teaching of business as a profession, until fairly recently in our World, Was learned not in the classroom but by entering some business firm and learning on the job. Today there is a demand from business firms for persons who have secured specific education for specialized positions. Since l925 the university has maintained a separate school to acquaint students With the breadth and complexity of present-day economic lite. General Business, Accounting, Merchandising and Advertising, Foreign Trade, Extractive lndustries, Economics, and Secretarial Studies are the seven major fields from which a student may choose the specialized curriculum he Wishes to study. The school avoids extreme specialized instruction in business practices in accord with the wise attitude that such practices vary greatly among business firms and change rapidly. The school's principal purpose in its educational program is to give students an understanding of the broad principles underlying all business activity. Margaret E. Muir and Ruth Anderson teach typing and shorthand to classes Professor Erwin Graue teaches economics to business majors and applies in the secretarial studies department. theories of practical situations to human relationships in the everyday busin of living. 288 lf ffgrzszizexs P ofessor Willard J. Wilde handles the accountin problems of the School of Assistant Professor Charles E. Marshall teaches marketing and advertising to Q' B siness. his classes. Students gained practical experience on merchandising field trips to Spokane. Students Learn to Predict Trends and Adjust to Changing Business Conditions Students are trained tor specific jobs where this is possible as in learning the operation ot ottice machinery, in accounting and in secretarial Work. No training that may soon be out ot date or inapplicable to the student's tuture Work is stressed. Another aim is to give the student some appreciation of the social and ethical responsibilities ot the businessman. A tinal purpose is to give the student the broad liberal education that is expected ot the man or Woman with a university degree. Personal relationships in the business world require the ability to get along with people and to meet them easily. The school seeks to aid its students in acquiring the background tor this valuable attitude ot congeniality. A business Workshop with research projects and an extensive library ot business reports supplies the School ot Business Administration with the means tor keeping its tingers on the pulse ot business and economic trends in ldaho and throughout the World. Students are taught to meet the conditions ot the changing business world and to make Well-reasoned speculations about the future. udents relax on the Ad building steps before getting "up" to business in the "Do you think he'l1 give a quiz today?" Students take a personal interest in the ond floor classrooms. classroom plans of their unpredictable professors. 9 X951 fi! Maia A dessert bridge party tor faculty members ot the business school and a joint banquet with the WSC chapter highlight the social activities of this honorary. Pi chapter was organized 23 years ago at Idaho, and its purpose is to encourage fraternity and cooperation among Women business majors. The Phi Chi Theta key is awarded to the outstanding graduat- ing senior. President Ruth Reichert was assisted by lanet Mackey, vice-president, and Barbara Sohatt, secretary. Lafayette Allen Eugene Babin John Bacon Chase Barbee Los Angeles, Calif. Moscow Lewiston Caldwell John Bergstrom Leonard Bielenberg Thurman Black Robert Blomquist Sandpoint Genesee Salinas, Calif. Cavecreek, Ariz. Richard Boyle Betty Brabb George Brabb Charles Brady Idaho Falls Craigmont lerome Emmett Harold Barnes Blackfoot James Bloom Mullan Dale Braucher Craigrnont Standing: Barbara Schaff, Alice Johnson, Christy Sargent, Jo Ann Schlegel, Barbara Ulrich, Noreen Rouse, Jean Carter, Ruth Reichert . . . Seated: Alene Kelley, Mildred Kilian, Janet Mackey, Betty Jean Johnson. Robert Baxter Boise Betty Bowen Roberts Dean Brown San Mateo, Calif. Clinton Benedict Moscow Thomas Boyd Twin Falls Donald Brudie Priest River 290 Edward Bullock Oakley Patrick Day Kimlnerly Josephine Durtsch Driqgs Albert Fridenstine ldaho Falls: Lorin Grow Burley Brent Harris ldaho Falls Herbert Carlson Wallace Rex Day McCall i William Emerson Genesee George Galles Clarkston, Wash. Carl Guderj ohn Idaho Falls John Hartigan Lewislon Jean Carter Wilson Churchman William L. Clark Darrell Congdon Boise Jerome Boise Sandpoint Perry Dayton Howard Deeds William Deobald John Dick Bonners Ferry Richfield Kendrick Nampa Bruce Faull Joseph Fisher Ray Fletcher George Follett Gardena Blackfoot Moscow Genesee Wilbur Gard Daniel Gardner Richard Garlock Thomas George Roy Gikiu New Plymouth Coeur cl'Alene Poriland, Ore. Boise Twin Falls Thomas Guilfoy Gordon Hagan James Hamm William Hansen Bovill Porl Angeles, Wash. Moscow Moscow Lloyd Heap Frank Helrnsworth Gretchen Helrnsworth Robert Hendricks Fruztland Moscow Moscow Lava Hot Springs John Davis Twin Falls Glen Doner Wilaiewr Joyce Freeland Coeur d' Alene Donald Grieb lloaciqiiarlem: George Hargrave ldalio Falls: Jay Hirschi ldaho Falls Jay Hunter Rupert Clifford Knudtsen Coeur ci'Alene David Lowry Craiqmont Janet Mackey Lewision Norman Pabst Gifford Marvin Pierce Parma James Jackson Boise Evan Lalrollette Moscow Glenn Lynarn Spokane, Wash. James Michels Moscow Jim Paras Opportunity, Wash. Clyde Porter Los Angeles, Calif, Harold Johnson Si, Maries Marjorie Lampman Moscow Robert Mcchesnie Hope Jeanne A. Miller Nampa Richard Parsell Kooslcia Jeanette Pugh Sf. Maries Khalil Jones Malad Gene Larson Coeur d'Alene Jack Mcclaran Enterprise, Ore. Robert Munson Moscow Eugene Pederson Genesee Raymond Radford Sf. Maries Charles Kerr Boise Harold Lenke Moscow Charles McKinney Hillsboro, Ore. Dale Nelson Moscow , Arthur Perkins Lewislon Ruth Reichert Filer Delbert Klaus Deepcreek, Wash. Blair Lewis Rigby Robert McManaman Buhl Ronald Nicholas Malad Lawrence Peretti Burke Kieth Rieman Hazelton Leo Knowlton Emmeif Norman Lodge Caldwell Laura Mcvicker Boise Robert Olson Newport, Ore. Frank Perrine Twin Falls Norman Rogers Winchester 292 Charles Rohrer Wallace Barbara Schaff Weiser Clyde Sletager Samuels Lloyd Spicer St. Maries Marion Vallad Emmett Rose M. Whitney Phyllis Whitsell Glenns Ferry Ernmett Lester Rookstool Eugene Root William Rose James Ross Patton Ross Thomas Sanford Parma Boise Forence, Ala. Burley Ha7elton Fmrhcld Philip Schnell Bernard Shalz Joseph Shreve Kenneth Siehe Harold Sims George Skinner Moscow Boise Spokane, Wash. Challis Bonners Ferry Emmett Jack Smitchger Don Smith Jack Smith Oron Smith John Snow Arnold Souders Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow Aberdeen Stilnnite Charles Story John Sundeen Wayne Tannahill Lyle Tapper Alan Truesdale Torn Tudder Spokane, Wash Bonners Ferry Moscow Mnlfafl Mullen Lewiston John Wagner Howard Walk Leo Walton William Wardrop Dwaine Welch Dean Welch Gmnqevllle lmfwxszton Rupert Spokane, Wnsslx. Emmett lirnmett Kenneth Wiegele Leo Winegar Norman Wood Herbert Woodall Robt. W. Worthington William Wright Moscow lfmrnett Elk River Betlulelmorn, Pa, Lewiston Lewiston 456' 616' Audio-visual aids are becoming an important part of teaching. Professor Boyer uses some psychology to keep his classes happy. Educational Path Leads to Varied Careers and Opportunities The School of Education, organized in 1920, is a profession school whose aim is to prepare qualified men and Women for careers as teachers, supervisors, educational administrators, psychologists, and personnel officers. Various programs of study are planned to meet certification requirements of the State of ldaho, those of most states, and the requirements and policies of the better public school systems throughout the country. The public schools of Moscow and surrounding communities are used for student teaching. Actual schoolroom conditions are thus provided for observation and for practice in teaching. The four-year training programs are organized in such a Way as to devote approximately one-half of the time to study in subject-matter fields, about one-fourth to general education, and somewhat less than the remaining one-fourth to professional education subjects. The professional education courses include the study of the characteristics of the human individual and his process of physical, mental, and social growthp a study of the backgrounds, objectives, and effects of educationg a study of and practice in instructional methods, and a study of the professional status of the educational Worker. Dora Gaudin is one of the many practice teachers who learn the chalk and Professor Hervon L. Snider teaches classes in the philosophy, sociology, and blackboard technique. history of education. i if . ,Syria , , iiitfltllliiiii it , Fi3553fi3'itEiiI is i Sei 3 " 294 X SQQIUJZQQN Saturday Classes. The temporary classroom buildings are a part of the University's adjustment t suddenly-increased postwar enrollment of education-seekers. Graduates Return to Catch Up with Current Practices The University Placement Bureau renders placement services to Idaho graduates and students Without charge. No graduate of the School of Education, with a reasonably satisfactory record, experiences any great difficulty in finding employment in the field for which he is trained. For many years after their graduation day, teachers come back to ldaho in the summer to keep up with changing ideas and methods in education. Former ldaho students who are teaching in their home state cooperate with the univer- sity in standardizing state-Wide educational curricula to insure a strong, Well-balanced background for high-school students. The Education Workshop serves as a supplementary library for education research. Bulletins, magazines, manuals, and a large variety of textbooks for all grades and types of instruction are supplied in the Workshop. The School of Education acguaints its students with the many career opportunities available to them in public and private teaching, with the Federal Government both in and out of the country, and in industries and institutions. Preparation for work in any field of educational service is offered through a complete program of specialized courses. o Ray M. Berry teaches courses in high school methods, school administration, Professor John Sni.cler's courses deal with elementary, remedial, and other d school finance special studies in instruction. 2 9 Ghastly, isn't it?"fProfessor Boyer is explaining that the man at the right has Dr. Burlingame is sure everything will turn out all right. She is classed amo g been hypnotized and thinks his teacher has turned into an ape named Butch. the most brilliant lab technicians in the nation. Educators Apply Psychological Principles in Their Teaching The Department ot Psychology in the school of education is headed by Dr. William Boyer, who teaches classes in general and applied psychology. l-le is assisted by Dr. Giles, Who specializes in guidance Work and who conducts a children's clinic in the summer. This summer two specialists in the field ot treating crippled children will help him in the child guidance clinic. Mr. Welch is the departments research man and specializes in learning. l-le will be on leave next year tor work on his Doctor's Degree. Dr. Burlingame's Work is concentrated on comparative psychology and individual differences. She handles the laboratory experiments and notebook Work ot psychology students. Mr. Miles served as lab instructor this year. He Was chosen tor the position through the departments custom ot selecting the most outstanding psychology graduate tor one year's Work in the laboratory. The principal Work ot the department is engaging in pre-professional training ot psychology undergraduates. General Psychology and Educational Psychology are required courses for the degree ot Bachelor ot Science in Edu- cation. Psychology as the study ot human behavior is considered an indispensable part ot the ueguipmentu needed by men and Women entering educational occupations today. Professor Giles is wondering about the whole affair but with proper guidance he Professor Welch is all for experimenting a bit e ore e ex resses an o inion. b l h bf h p p It e ieves t e monkey business will be cleared up. may be that the man is an ape hypnotized into thinking the ape is a man. Wh knows? 9 6 Dr. Ray M. Berry teaches an advanced education class in the Education Workshop. The literature found in the Workshop provides special information for education researchers. ffahha Q M2 ' Kappa Delta Pi, national honorary tor education majors, was established on the ldaho campus in lune, l928, and has tor its purpose the recognition ot outstanding tuture educators. A 3.0 grade average is required tor membership, as are certain education courses. An initiation dinner, a banquet, and group parties comprised the social tunctions. Ctticers were Carol Qrgan, president, Elaine Androes, vice-president, Sue Beardsley, secretary, and l-larold Skinner, treasurer. Row One: Ruth Tysor, Elaine An- droes, Irene Reich, Helen Sand- quist, Valeta Hershberger, Ethlyn Calcote, Carol Organ . . . Row Two: Sherman Black, Keith Keefer, Le- roy Amos, Virgel Larson, Jack E. Jones, Willard Barnes, Harold Skinner. Leroy Amos Moscow Gerald Becker Coeur ri'Alene Marvin Churchill Moscow Robert Ellis Moscow Jarnes Hammond Cdlciwell Donald Hunt Carey Elaine Androes Earl Arnold Emmett lerome Aarl Bennett Ramona Bills Carey Emmett Herschel Clark Jean Daily Camden, N.l. Craiqmonl Rosemary Fitzgerald Dan Folkins Moscow Worley Virginia Hansen Chris Harrigield Moscow flslilun Lester Hutchison Caroline Jenkins Burley Sugar City Edward Aspitarte Boise Winston Bishop Twin Falls Paul Daily Craiqmorit Edward Frandsen Coeur d'Alene Maxwell Herrington Louisville Miss. James Jennings Moscow Lois Bailey N ampa Anita Burkhart Priesl River Mary Driscoll Mosrcw Dorothy Galey Boise Valeta Hershberger Nampa Marjorie Johnstone Mursinq Betty Base Richfield Frances Butler Bliss Charles Elledge Kansas City, Mo. Calvin Green Driqqs Arclelle Holderness Moscow Wallace Johnson Pierre, S, Dalcola Suzan ne Beardsley Weiser Ethlyn Calcote Paul Donald Ellis Kooskia Joseph Grove Berwyn, Illinois Clarice Hove Troy if--sage ,Avy 'Uh-vi sf N... Wk?- vm W' HEP 16 298 Eugene Jordan ldaho Falls Robert Linck Sacramento, Cahf. Raymond Olson Easfport Frances Schodde Heylwurn Wesley Tolliver Posl Falls Ann Williams McCall Carl Kinney Ray Kerb Quentin Larson Virgil Larson William Last Barney Lewis Castleford St. Marles Pr1e51River Pinehurst Oshkosh, Wis. lvlalad Clfy Robert Lind Joan Litchfield Calvin Lyon Patricia Lyons Mary L. McKenney John Mast Kendrick Lewisfon Kammah Pocatello Challls Kelloqq Carol Organ Ronald Peck Robert Peterman George Powell Ellis Pritchett Lorraine Rudolf Cambridge Carey Payeile Moscow Nampa Cheney, Wash. Harold Sl-:inner Calvin Sparks Herman Steger Lawrence Stone Wayne Thompson Darrell Titus Splrlt Lake Carey Merldmn luronxo lerome Orolmm Harry Townley Martha Tuller Eileen Tysor Donna Lou Vassar Jean Wardell Helen Way Weiser House Hansen Preston Twln Falls Cmeqxumyxt Roy Winegardner Lewislon WU -an ..,... e . - . .-.- . ,,,,3,wm1,Qw .t,,s,,,. ,, ,-.: , .. ,www ..,s.M,.sW s .gggwsm:.: ggi... new -'-' Y ' is in W glam or . mites . wif 3 The primary purpose of the College of Law is to afford a thorough and scientific Mrs. William Folz has the task of caring for the nineteen thousand volumes legal education for students who are fitted to pursue professional study under uni- and complete collection of treatises and periodicals, as well as all standard sity methods of instruction. digests and encyclopedias in the law library. Law Students Trained by Professional Legalists The College of Law of the University of ldaho, headed by Dean Edward S. Stimson, has been in operation since l909. The courses offered are all professional courses leading to the degree of LLB. Normally a student may graduate after three years or six semesters in the College of Law. The curriculum is designed to prepare students for the general practice of law in any American state. Special attention, however, is paid to local law in the western states such as community property, pleading and practice. Courses are also offered in subjects of increasing importance, such as labor law, taxation and administrative law. The accumula- tion of information is subordinated to the more important ends of developing the faculties of the student and of training him in scientific habits of thought, at the same time imparting a thorough knowledge of the law as it actually functions. The College of Law is well trained legal scholars practice law but give their conducted on the theory that the teaching of law is a task reguiring all the working time of who have made special preparation for teaching. The members of the teaching staff do not entire time to instruction and research. Professor W. J. Brockelbank is one of the team of well-trained legal scholars Professor Thomas R. Walenta and his colleagues concentrate to the ends of who have made special preparation for teaching, developing the facilities of the law student and of training him in scientific 300 habits of thought. wad' .Y ' "3'3'13:'7f,':Ei .Ef .:. .. I 4 .j.g:fe+:' ' ffm g E The years may come. the years may go, but the feud between the agqies and the Law students spend hours each day in their law library, studying the decisions lawyers goes on forever. and special problems of law cases. Third-Floor Back Specialists are a Close Knit Family As an essential part ot the curriculum, the Law School maintains a Practice Court, under the direction and control of members ot the taculty. The purpose ot this court is to supplement the classroom courses in pleading and practice by giving the students an opportunity to co-ordinate their knowledge ot procedure with their knowledge ot the substantive law in the oral argument ot guestions ot law. The cases assigned in the practice court cover all the principal tields ot law and eguity. They are litigated in accordance with the usual rules ot practice. An excellent library ot more than nineteen thousand volumes is maintained by the College ot Law. Constantly being added to by gitts and purchases, it contains an unusually complete collection ot treatises and periodicals, as well as all standard digests and encyclopedias. ln order to obtain decisions trom the highest level possible, all the reports ot the Supreme Court ot the United States are maintained, as well as those from the subordinate courts. To round out the potential lawyer's education, works on the general nature and history ot law, legal philosophy, public inter- national law, and on closely related tields ot political science and business practice are also found in the library, which is operated by Mrs. Carolyn Folz, law librarian. A part of Professor George M. Bell's work consists of preparing law students to Professor Robert E. Shea helps to impart a thorough knowledge of the law as it take the bar examination in any state in the United States after they complete actually functions in his classes and gives special attention to local law in the the required six semesters of specialized study. western states. ., 1950 301 Mr-if C. J. Bermensolo J. Charles Blanton Robert N. Burns Eugene Bush Charles Creason William F. Deinhard Alvin Denman Mountain Home Nampa Boise Idaho Falls Rupert McCall Idaho Falls Ray Durtschi G. W. Foster Tony Galdos William T. Goodman J. W. Ingalls Driqgs Spokane, Washinglon Emmeil Moscow Coeur d'Alene Herman McDevitt Pocatello Reginald R. Reeves Giboro, N,C, John A. Stover Moscow Richard Magnuson Wallace Charles Richardson Si. Maries Robert C. Strom Kellogg Kathryn Mautz Wallace W. L. Rowberry Payelle Arthur R. Sutton Weiser J. Dean Mosher Lewision Theodore V. Saulie Buhl W. Syrnmes, Jr. Kellogg John Noggle William F, Perry Klamath Falls, Oregon lersey City, NJ. W. H. Simmons Thomas L. Smith Seattle, Washington Boise John H. Turnbull Ina Mae Wheeler Shoshone Bonners Ferry J. Clinton Peterson Winchester Jay H. Stout Burley Peter B. Wilson Coeur d'Alene 302 Kenneth Bergquist Boise Lloyd Browning Lorenzo Thomas Church Burley Reed Clements Lewiston Louis H. Cosho Boise Thomas Feeney Moscow Charles J. Kiblen Moscow Ray W. Rigby Rexburg J. V. Smith Lewiston if ,-W. pm This professional fraternity was organized to promote high professional and ethical standards in the field of law. lts membership is composed of law students who have shown that they meet those standards of scholarship, ethics, and professional stature that the fraternity advocates. The William E. Borah Foundation Award is presented to the outstand- ing law school graduate each year under the auspices of Phi Alpha Delta. Lloyd G. Martinson served as lustice. Row One: J. B. McKinley, Nels Sahl, Lloyd Martinson, Ray Rigby, Frank Barton, Richard McFadden, Reed Clements, Holger Albrethsen, Jr. . . . Row Two: Jay Stout, Len Biel- enberg, Ray Durtschi, John Stover, James May, Julius Peterson, Doug- las Kramer, Charles Kihlen, Tom Church, Eugene Bush . . . Row Three: Herman McDevitt, Edward Stanwood, Russell Shaud, Jim In- galls, Claudio Bermensolo, Clint Peterson, Ed Aschenbrener, Charles Creason, Charles Blanton, Gordon Foster, Robert Lyons. W...,qq,iWw,s,,e.V . it A . A . 5-325522, 1. Siiiifilii. rr M gg , 9 X, ammum it sauna ky! Agronomy measures meet between classes in the departmenfs remodeled and Seven hundred acres of university farm land, barns, and livestock are d odernized building. to give practical training in agriculture. Top Rating College Has New Million-Dollar Home Long rated as one of the top agriculture schools in the nation, the College of Agriculture had reason to be especially proud this year. The million dollar Agriculture Science building construction began in lune, l949, and was finished in luly, l950. Four stories of the building appear above the sidewalk. There are 50, 000 square feet of floor space and 500, 000 cubic feet of space within the walls. The aggies will not be reluctant to leave their old home in Morrill l-lall to move into a functionally designed building with its plain straight lines uncluttered by frills. The plant and most offices of the thirteen separate departments of the College of Agriculture will be housed in the new building that incorporates such features as a modern mechanical exhaust system for discharging chemical fumes, wall:-in refrigerators for vegetables and meats, a freight elevator, new modern lab equipment, a large lecture room wired for sound, noise-proofed walls, and asphalt tile flooring. Reinforced concrete walls faced with one inch of insulation board with one inch of air space followed by four inches of brick will save on heating costs for the large building through rigorous Moscow winters. These two aggies look a little sheepish. They were late for Pro- Lady Shorthorn in her velvety white gown was a finalist for Little International Queen but Ca sor Hickrnarfs eight o'clock class in Sheep Production. won out. Qgis-if fwlzbaiale First e avation for the new Ag Science building was made June, 1949. Completed during the summer, the million-dollar building is expected to b nearly ready for use in September, 1950. New Hen House Makes Fowl Life Pleasant The Dairy Science building with its modern creamery, and the university's 700 acres of experimental farm land that also provides ideal shelters for fine herds of Holstein and lersey cows, flocks of pure-bred sheep and several herds of pure-bred swine, adds to the facilities provided for training students in all phases of agriculture. Amidst the Vast expansion and construction that has marked this year of changes, the Poultry farm's pedigreed birds were not slighted. A new hen house replaced their temporary dormitories just as Dean Theophilus had promised his feathered friends. A College of Agriculture major receives a well-rounded education at ldaho. Provision is made in the curricula to see that students receive a broad education in culture as well as specialized training in their agriculture major. The thirteen departments offer the best training there is in such fields as animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, horticulture, poultry husbandry, veterinary science and agricultural chemistry, economics, education, and engineering. Th b h h e university's pure-bred swine g t some extra-special instructions about not These black-faced sheep are blue ribbon winners whose pedigree lists a enough eing oggis in the Little International parade. to make their poorer relations red-faced. XXRXNK fl ,rl 3 Henry C. Hansen and James C. Boyd are two members of the university's research Professor C. E. Lampman, poultry department head, takes down feed-ration staff that traced cheese woes to bacteria-killing penicillin found in milk of cows figures as C. F. Peterson, poultryman, weighs the chicken. treated for mastisis. Research and Service Are Stressed by University ln addition to regular schooling, a five-month short course in Commercial Dairying gives men practical Working knowl- edge of modern dairy manufacturing methods that fits them to fill responsible positions in the dairy products industry. Research in the Agricultural Experiment Station turns out numerous scientific findings each year that are converted to practical improvements and new Ways for better utilizations of the land and its products. These valuable additions to agricultural progress are published and circulated directly to the people who can use the information through the services of Extension Workers. The university's three-fold program of Teaching, Research, and Service for the citizens of Idaho is effectively and progressively carried out through the well-integrated organization of the College of Agriculture. Professor Leif Verner, acting head of Horticultureg George Woodbury, Edward Dairy Products Judging Team: Standing from left to right, Professor James C. Owens, Ray Lockhard, and Frank Takatori teach students to improve plant Boyd, coachg Robert Henderlider, Robert Bishop, Don Brighton, Myles Wirth, and fruit quality. and Jack Trautman. 'Q ft fy :. -- . . . . S M fi X .' 5 2 . 3 f3'f1,: ' :U 555 .2- 151 -.a:, -e2e:s .. sz .... sf3itrf:'MI .'.':2:i, si 2 r::,7M.:E? 4 , . i . . .-ss.: a stra. - .Q M 306 ff' s Livestock Judging TearnfRow l: Sonnich Sonnichsen, Robert Liberg, Kenneth Dairy Judging Team Seated: Professor D. L. Fourt Ccoachl, and Keith Ellis Frederiksen, Alan Chaffin . . . Row Z: Professor C. W. Hodgscn Ccoachl, John H. . . . Standing: Ralph Hart, Lamont Smith, and Donald Wagoner. Paulsen, Wallace Peterson, Francis Flerchinger. Idaho Sends Three Judging Teams to Pacific lnternational Members tor the Dairy Products ludging Team were chosen on the basis oi who had the best smellers and tasters tor telling the guality oi milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream. They judged against the experts' ratings in Portland at the Paciiic lnternational in October, placing second, and then went to Los Angeles tor the lnternational Collegiate Contest. The Dairy Cattle ludging Team placed second at the Pacific lnternational Livestock Show, October 8. Lamont Smith placed second high in individual judging and iirst in judging Brown Swiss breeds. Donald Wagoner placed iirst in Ayrshire judging. The Brown Swiss bell, which becomes the property ot the school winning it three times, has been won twice by Idaho in the two years it has been ottered. At the same show, the Livestock ludging Team brought home grand championships tor swine and lamb breeds, and numerous blue and red ribbons were won by other livestock entered in the show. ,yfdfia We This professional agriculture organization has tor its purpose the development ot high standards ot scholarship, character, and leadership in young men interested in the iield ot agriculture. A news letter, The Zipper, keeps alumni informed on recent developments in the field. Activities this year included a joint initiation, banguet, and iormal dance held with the WSC chapter. Kay l-lult was Chancellor, Francis Flerchinger, Censorg and Allen Chatiin, Scribe. Row One: Francis Flerchinger, Vern Bahr, Allen E. Schark, Lewis Wil- liams, Donald Castellaw, Darrell Bienz, Kay T. Hult . . . Row Two: Gerald Comstock, John Lawrence, Richard Ohms, Leonard Bracke- busch, Dale Stallings, Leo Juve . . . Row Three: Carroll Tyler, Ward Sutton, Edwin Rowbury, Frederick Troeh, Jim Holderness, Allen W. Chaffin . . . Row Four: J. C. Boyd, Gary Sessions, Paul Torrell, How- ard Morton, Ralph Pitts, Frank Takatori . . . Row Five: Earl Ballard, John Hasbrouck, Warren Pope lad- visorl, Robert Acoclx, Jack Robin- ette, Frank Gillette, Ray Hulet, Richard Johnson, Hyde Jacobs. 307 Robert Acock Robert Adsero Rupert Coeur cl'Alene Don Brighton Gerald Comstock Mackay Palouse, Wash. Gerald Diehl Keith Ellis Jerome Ogden, Utah Grant Hall Welland Hansen Preston Bancroft Kay Hult Philip A. Johnson Shelley Peck Robert Liberg Lennart Lundstrom Post Falls Deary Robert Alldaffer Burley Donald Castellaw Payette James Farmer Gooding Norman Harolclsen Idaho Falls John Jones Hagerman Robert Mclluley Moscow Eugene Baisch Earl Ballard Hazelton Rupert Allen Chaffin Joseph Cole Blackfoot Preston Francis Flerchinger Kenneth Frederil-:sen Genesee Spencer George Hatley Robert Henderlider Moscow Boise Frank Kettenbach Carl Kiilsgaard Calgary, Alta., Can. Bonners Ferry Vernon McCormack Kenneth Marshall Lewiston Nampa Fred Beckman Emmett Lee Dean Hollister Robert Garrett Wilder Russell Hillman Driqqs Fred Kohl Salmon Ralph Miller Battle Creek, Mich. Darrel Bie nz Bern Gene Demuzio Eagerville, Illinois Dick Geisler Rigby James Holderness Sandpoint John Lawrence Idaho Falls Billee Mizer Nezperce A KJ 8 Robert Moldenhauer Delno Moore Claude Morrow Max Mortensen Howard Morton Rex Moulton Mack Neibauer Heylmrn Burley Troy Rexlviirg Pullman, Wash. Vicfor Newdale, Ore. Sherman Nesbitt Richard Ohms Kenneth Oliason John Paulsen Wallace Peterson Lawrence Rappaport Jack Robinette Eagle Payelte Meridian Troy Nampa Brooklyn, N.Y. Boise Edwin Rowbury Francis Ryset Dale Stallings Gerald Stevenson Orris Suiter George Sullivan William Sweet Slie-lley Rigby Lewisville Espanola, Wash. Pollafcli Ruperl Meridian Frank Takatori David Thacker John D. Turnbull Carrol Tyler Daniel Wicher Alexander Williams Billy Williams Pdriim Paul flirey Twin Falls Glminfg Ferry Soiilli Africa Malia Lewis Williams Harry Wilson William Woodland Boise Eulil Arirrpo 5 fog fdiiwk ' th 's a 'ob that never ends for enginee g students who learn In the fall Kirtley Annex construction was just beginning. rveyxng e campus 1 1 doing in rain, shine, and snow. Engineers Look Forward to a New Home The College ot Engineering has experienced a year ot transition and expansion while preparing to move to new quarters that were under construction this year. The Kirtley Laboratories Annex was completed this spring and the new Engineer- ing Classroom Building that will house all Engineering ottices and classes is slated for completion lanuary, l95l. The Engineers will be in a compact location with laboratories and classrooms next door to each other. The present Engineering building that has stood as a Gothic landmark on the ldaho campus tor nearly a halt century will be razed next year to make room tor the new Home Economics building. Ot medium size as rated among the l5O engineering colleges in the nation, ldaho is recognized as a training center tor engineers that is large enough to provide the finest eguipment and laboratories tor its students while being small enough to give personalized instruction to the work ot each individual. The outstanding accomplishments ot College ot Engineering graduates in competition with engineers throughout the world indicates the excellence oi the training they receive at ldaho. Large industries on the Pacific Coast, in the Middle West and in the East regularly interview and recruit graduates because they know what others trom ldaho have done. At the Engineers' Ball, ASMEs display showed how the auto sometimes does Where a riculture meets engineer-ingfthe Ag Engineers' float for the Litt d t' d t lx Q some xmes oes no wor . International. it Q. f 2 How . . 'IQ miifur i Q .ig .... "'l.. A W 9 if ..,.. n., CA' workb ',.i.: T' f .. ', , ,C '.:.- : iw 5 310 ,f 5 Wwe my C ncrete was poured on winter nights to speed up the progress of the Annex. By late spring, the Annex was completed and ready for new equipment a ti testing rooms to be set up. Vets March Away to Re-Build the World The work of the first year in engineering is basic and the same for all freshmen. At the beginning of the second year, students begin to specialize in one of the five main divisions of the College of Engineering. The particular branches of the profession that offer complete training are Agricultural Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. Cf special note among the eguipment available for practical instruction are such features as a new and complete chemical engineering laboratory, a new hydraulic and irrigation laboratory, a new mechanical engineering laboratory with typical, full-size engines, machine tools, and steam, gas, and aeronautic apparatus, and exceptionally well-equipped groups of electrical laboratories for work in power, elec- tronics, and radio. ln this, the busiest year the five engineering departments have ever known, their largest class in the university's history was graduated. The veterans marched away with their sheepskins to set about rebuilding a war-damaged world. Many of them will return next year for advanced study in cooperation with the Engineering Experiment Station. The College of Engineering sends forth men who use their technical training to design and build all the materials and con- structions that make this a more orderly and solid world in which to live. I tial excavation for the Engineering Classroom building tore up the land across Such work as pouring molds for supporting columns fascinated the passersby the street from the Navy building. throughout the year. The Classroom building will be finished in January, 1951 K af - W Y, Q X 1. i if' A sentimental last look at an old landmark, the Engineering Building. Condemned since 1924, the picturesque Home of the Engineers will be torn down next year zgzyma an Recognition of professional and scholastic achievement in the engineering field is the prime purpose of Sigma Tau, national engineering honorary. Selection for membership is based on scholarship and leadership in the junior and senior years. Awards are made each year to freshmen in engineering for outstanding scholastic achievement. Qfficers were lohn Barinaga, presidentg George f-laroldsen, Vice-presidentp and Don Lapray, secretary. Charles Abbott Row One: William D. Burstedt, Joe Eyrich, Joe Clegg, Arnold Johnson, J. E. Bell, Cecil Hathaway, Robert Sliger, Donald Lapray . . , Row Two: Robert G. Smith, Russell O. Baum, Lawrence Morrison, John Mavo, Rafael F. Jiminez, Ritchie B. Gooch, Stanley G. Thomas . . . Row Three: Ralph Haverkamp, Harold Brammer, James Huff, Theodore Deobald, B. W. Gibson, John Nesbitt, Leslie Abbott, Jacob Kertz, George Hauqland, Thomas H. Johnson, J. H. Johnson . . . Row Four: Harold Suchan, Angelo P. Scarcello, Delbert Robison, Zimri Mills, Perry Trout, Keith Bowman, William Walkington,DonaldBaum- gartner, Clyde Maughan, Lonne V. Roe, Finas C. Harvey . . . Row Five: James Teague, Kenneth Hayden, Joe Kass, George Webb, Frederick B. Hyland, Jerry Frick, Milton F. Barton, Marvin Long, George 1. Haroldsey, John R. Spink, Torleif Aune. Kenneth Allen Fazriield Higl-y John Barinaga Ruel Barrus Buhl Blaulfoo! Paul Bolander John Borg Nlosccnw lvfoscow Richard Allen Tommy Ambrose Boise lerome Milton Barton Robert Barton Tliompson Falls, Mont. Wendell William W. Briggs William Burns Boise Idaho Falls Alfred Anderson Torleif Aune Frederick Bagley Boise Mullan Boise Donald Baumgartner George Bellos Phillip Beeson Genesee Moscow Moscow James Burton Alfred Byrne Clair Christiansen Moscow Moscow Sandpoint 313 Charles Clark Joseph Clegg Roger Cone Oliver Coupe Paul Grace Moscow lerome Donald Cox Eugene Craig Keith Dedrick Weiser lerome Gooding Victor Devries Theodore Diehl Joseph Eyrich James Fiala William Fisher Jerry Frick Milford Friend Richfield lerorne Potlatch Pocatello Nampa Gooding Elk River Don Fullmer John Gaekel William Gartin Ernest Gerber George Glarborg Arthur Griffith Wendell Hanson St. Anthony Caldwell Boise Twin Falls Aberdeen Fairfield Preston George Haroldsen Finas Harvey Robert Hendron Ronald Hill Roy Hooper Alfred Horch James Huff William W. Hunt ldaho Falls Orofino Dillon, Mont. Boise Kellogg Spokane, Wash. Moscow Kuna Walter Huntington Rosel Hyde Donald L. Johnson Verdo Johnson Robert Kerns Richard P. Kerns Oscar Klernens Burley Washington, D.C. Coeur d'Alene Lewiston Cataldo Cataldo Nampa Boyd Kramer Merton Lallrnan Harry Laney Donald Lapray Daniel McDevitt Galen McMaster Robert McMurtry Opportunity, Wash. Nickerson, Nebraska Rupert Filer Pocatello Hansen Shelley 314 Carl Meserve Delbert McNealy Donald MacKinnon Clyde Maughan James Maxwell John Mayo James Mecham Emmell Lewislon lava Hot Sprinqs Buhl Yakima, Wash. Blacklooi Sandpoint Zimri Mills William H. Nelson John Nesbitt Patrick O'Connor James M. Peterson Carl Pharris Robert Pittard Moscow Salmon Cla Culdesac Moscow Hazelion Ontario, Ore. Bryan Rambo Delbert Robison Willard Roe Bernard St. Clair John Sandell Angelo Scarcello Ralph Schierrnan Midvale Weiser Eureka, Monlana New Meadows: Declo Raihdrum Lewision Theodore Scott Charles Shoun Robert Sliger Adson Starner Lynn Stevenson Donald Stewart Ladd Sutton Moscow Caldwell Hasllnqs, Nel,. Coeur cl'Aleme Idaho Falls Boise Caldwell James Teague Donald Utter Marion Vail Burton VanEpps Sherman Weisgerber James Welsh Russell Westbrook Greal Falls, lvlonl. Hansen Nampa Nampa Boise Boise Marsinq George R. Williams Twin Falls to We A T rn L l 5 51-ei. M rrill Hall will be re-named as the School of Forestry building next year. Dean and Mrs. Jeffers get acquainted with Paul Bunyan at Foresters' B 11 Idaho Offers Foresters a Vast Outdoor Classroom The School of Forestry at the University of ldaho attracts more out-of-state students than any other factor on the campus. Every state in the Union is generally represented among the foresters. ldaho's top national rating for excellent training in this field is one of long standing. All foresters follow the same schedule of studies through four semesters followed by summer camp at Payette Lakes. Then in the third year, specialization in wood utilization, forest, range or wildlife management begins. The basic program provides a broad foundation, as well as an acquaintance with several of the fields of professional and scientific activity, any one of which the student may choose to prepare for in his remaining undergraduate years. All forestry students attend summer camp at the end of their second year to become acquainted with the nature of field Work in forestry. Summer camp is held for eight weeks immediately following the close of the spring semester. The work of the School of Forestry goes far beyond the teaching done on campus. Experiment and extension offices are located throughout the state for the supervision of over 75 per cent of ldaho's land that is classified as non-cultivated. Detailed reports of the condition of these wild lands and all things vegetable, mineral and animal that are contained there are carefully kept by the university. Research studies are made of potential utilization possibilities and means of improving these areas that compose over three-fourths of our state. 0 Z fessors Ernest Wohletz, Merrill Deters, and William Folz talk over transporta- Frank Pitkin, manager of the university nursery, finishes packing 150,000 trees d t d t f l t t t d n problems with the Potlatch logging superinten en . es ined or p an ing in ree-s arve areas of southern Idaho. Ilmsnq s ms., . . 6-Wes! y Chow time after a full day of field training at Payette Lakes Summer Camp. Time out from the eight weeks' course for some recreation on scenic shores. "ln the Forest Where the Air ls Clean, So Are a Man's Thoughts" The University ot ldaho is one ot the l6 selected institutions where a collection ot tlora and wood specimens ot all trees in the United States is being assembled. This collection attords an unusual chance tor students to become acquainted with the trees, range plants, and plant diseases ot all species. The arboretum contains over l5O species ot trees. Nearby is a 20-acre torest-tree nursery maintained and operated bythe Schoolci Foremryin.cooperanon'wnh.HMeFederalC3ovennnenttorthe produchon olyoung neestorriannng. A 7,0GOeacre University Experimental Forest is located on the slopes ot Moscow Mountain. Within 40 miles ot Moscow is the largest electrically-operated white pine sawmill in the world. Land that Otters real problems in soil conservation, support ot wild lite, and which is usetul in studying all phases ot management and conversion to recreational or grazing areas,istoundin abundancethroughoutthe make These outdoor classrooms combined with teaching and laboratory experimentation and research provide an ideal training ground tor the type ot torester ldaho produces. Courage and vision coupled with gualities such as courtesy and boundless energy are requirements that a torester must measure up to to make the grade as keeper ot the open range at ldaho. D Lee Hutchins, who is from the Bureau of Plant Pathology in Washington, Dr. Thomas S. Buchanan inspects a white pine infected with the pole blig t D C., and Dr. Ernest E. Hubert do further research on young trees afflicted with disease that presents unsolved mysteries of cause and corrective treatment. p le blight. ftff 5.17715 ' This national forestry honorary is the goal of all foresters, being composed of students selected on the basis of high scholastic attainments in the field and in related courses. Highlight of the year is the annual picnic featuring two-inch steaks broiled to individual taste. Walter L. Robinson served as Foresterg Cmar M. Campbell, Associate Forester, Leonard W. Hoskins, Secretaryg and Paul A. Hoskins, Ranger. Row One: Bruce Egger, Leonard Hoskins, Walter Robinson, Paul Hoskins, Bob McMahon, Russell Griffith, Parley Cherry . . . Row Two: Richard Krajewski, Prof. Er- nest Wohletz, Prof. E. W. Tisciale, Prof. P. D. Dalke, Prof. E. L. Ellis, Mr. R. H. Seale, Prof. M. E. Deters . . . Row Three: Conrad Merrick, Merle Stratton. Charles Batten, Gustav Verdal, Dale Tanner, Lon- nie Williams, Glen Fulcher. Dale Anderson Charles Batten Carl Berntsen Richard Bross Franklin Bruins Donald Campbell Omar Campbell Weiser Claremont, Calif. Staten lsland, N.Y. McCall Boise Sandpoint Weiser Parley Cherry Elbert Cleaveland Bruce Colwell Leverett Curtis Robert English George Frazier Russell Griffith Ola Chevy Chase, Md. Hope Cashmere, Wash. Stoneham, Mass. Beardstown, lll. Harvard, lll. William Grosch Thomas Haurnont George Hicks Saul Hirschberg Arland Hofstrand Leonard Hoskins Paul Hoskins Milwaukee, Wis. Vale, Ore. Gig Harbor, Wash. Hartford, Conn. Snohomish, Wash. Wendell Wendell 8 David Howard Harry Howard Arihur Johnson Thane Johnson Von Johnson Gordon Kalk Richard Krajewski Harley, Illinois Harvey, Illinois: Coeur d'Alene Idaho Falls Rye, Colorado Sandpoint Pulaski, Wis. Thomas Laurent George Lea George Lee Maxwell Lieurance Donald Martin Douglas Martin Charlie Muehlethaler Atlanta, Ga. St. Paul, Minn. Spokane, Wash. Moscow Buiie, Mont. Moscow Rathdrum Clark Noble Herald Nokes Robert Passrnore Eugene Ouadri John Rinard Loren Robinson Walter Robinson Omaha, Nelv. Boise Moscow Moscow Caldwell Prlesi River Grace George Root Edward Savaria David Schmiti Dale Tanner Bryan Taylor Robert E. Taylor Harold Thomas Boise Mackay Milwaukee, Wis. Lorenzo Moscow Moscow Cambridge Dean Tisdale John Tkach John Vandenberg Joseph Venishnick Gustav Verdal Lorin Welker Edgar Williams Twin Falls Younqsiown, Ohio Banners Ferry Renion, Wash. Sandpoinl Salinas, Calif. Moscow Donovan Yingst Glen Youngblood lerome Council iflmv 319 MW Mr. Harry H. Caldwell instructs students in geology and geography courses that The Geology building is the home of the School of Mines. Mineral collections have cultural as well as practical mining value for understanding the earth's forma- and samples of ore from all parts of the state are found inside the showcases tions. that line the hallways. Modern Methods Replace Sourdough Prospecting The sourdough prospector, who played such an important part in the whole mining picture and around whom much of the early history and romance of mining has been written, now plays a secondary although important role in ore- finding. Now, the trained mining geologist, by scientific methods, is more likely to discover important new ore bodies, or, if failing in this, marks those areas in which the prospector's chances are most favorable. The prospector, untrained in the science of geology, sees only the surface and this not through trained eyes, while the geologist-prospector sees the surface, and through this observation is able to predict with intelligence subsurface possibilities. ln August of l9l7 the School of Mines was created as an administrative unit of the university to train men in the technology of the mineral industries and to improve mining operations through scientific research. lnvaluable opportunities to supplement instruction at the school are offered by observation of the best technical practice and actual field training work in the mines of one of the foremost mining regions in the world. ldaho cannot be surpassed as a field for general geologic investigation with numerous natural formations available for students to study. Going downfstudent miners enter the subterranean chambers of a mine to Miners like a gamble, and here the boys have a bet on. He who pans the most study at first hand what they have read in books. ore wins. rrwssveyi W Hifi!! ,f W5 Muckers' Ball with 'igreenbacksi' and an air of the gay nineties brings back the In this geology lab, students benefit from the research of others who have Studi ornance of early mining days. the history and evolution of the earth as recorded by its crust. U of I Surrounded by Natural Wonders and Rich Mines Since its beginning, the school has devoted extensive research to many valuable projects. By Working together with the ldaho Bureau of Mines and Geology to gather basic information on the mineral resources of ldaho, the school has found extensions of old ore bodies and discovered new ones. Benefits in the field of mineral processing over the years should be estimated in millions of dollars for the state alone hundreds of millions on a world-wide basism for many ore-processing machines and techniques, such as Dean Fahrenwald's flotation process, are in use in mining districts all over the World. Remodeling of the Metallurgy building this year caused a shift in the offices of the school. Professor W. W. Staley's office was moved to the temporary Metallurgy building across the street from the university heating plant. Professor Staley accompanies miners on their field trips and tours of field inspection to mining districts of the state. Students of geology and mineralogy have their centers of study ideally situated in locations unrivaled for their nearness to natural wonders such as the Craters of the Moon, the 'River of No Return," and Snake River's "l-lell's-Can- yon," parts of which are the deepest on the continent. Mining students receive their classroom and field training from a university that is located in the geographical heart of a vast mineral area. T e whole bunch got together on a field trip for Professor Staley to take their The Metallurgy building in the process of receiving a complete interior remade p ture in the latest mining fashions. Notice the novel lighting on m'lox-ds' hats. ing for next year's usage. I. A RAF' 4 - n ' A'4T -' fflim.-1'.,1 Vx 321 Student miners record further research information deep beneath the earth's surface. Lg!?77ld mm gfgfkfl Sigma Gamma Epsilon, mineral industries honorary, is made up of scholars in the earth sciences who maintain suffi- ciently high grades to place them in the upper portion of their class. Active on the campus since l929, the group has for an objective the promotion of fellowship within the group. lames Roy served as president, l. Melvin Baillie, vice- president, lames Morgan, secretary-treasurer, and George Glarborg, corresponding secretary. Melvin Baillie Donald Dahle Harold Lynch Mullan Arco Lewiston Row One: Henry E. Holt, Bill Lall- man, Ted Scott, Richard Darey . . . Row Two: Gordon L. Blackburn, Oscar R. Klemens, Melvin C. Stin- son, Arthur W. Griffith, Harold C. Lynch, James H. Roy Cpresidentl . . . Row Three: Don G. Dahle, Adrian E. Albrethsen. George M. Glarborg, James E. Morgan, J. Mel- vin Baillie, Jack L. Fletcher. ddltld Z mg. D rothy deVeau explores media and techniques that interest her as she works for Professor Ross Watson, William Simpson, and Elmer Heinrich work w lx r advanced degree in art. Dean Hungerford, who is also head of the plant pathology department. Enrollment Highest Ever as Graduates Seek More Knowledge Enrollment in the Graduate School broke all records this year as graduates retrned to work on their masters or to do advanced study in their special fields. Research projects abounded and valuable contributions to science, industry, and agriculture were added to the impressive list of serviceable discoveries and inventions made through the university's research and project program. The Graduate School presents an opportunity for its students to become closely associated with mature scholars in the classroom and the laboratory. This year twenty-eight research fellowships and twenty-four teaching assistantships were distributed among various departments of the university. Research fellowships vary from S750 to iTpl,2OO and teaching assistantships from S750 to SLGOO. Most of the research fellowships are given to students who carry on phases of studies in the regular research pro- gram of the experiment stations. This close connection between graduate research and the experiment stations not only aids materially in the over-all research program of the university but also provides the best type of training for the individual looking forward to a career in research. Teaching assistants are expected to give half-time service to teach- ing work. search fellow William Simpson gets down to some fine points in his advanced Charles King's work for his advanced degree in mechanical engineering w study. centered on this turbo-compressor of a German Jurno OCA jet engine. 324 505591 Seymour Levy helps Tom Coulton with his fishnets. Mr. Coulton taught part- Problems in welding were taken up in Henry Si1ha's paper that earned him his time in the zoology department while working on fish pond studies for his M.S. Master of Science degree in mechanical engineering. Summer School Attracts Advanced Learners Graduate work is administered by the Graduate Council composed of Dean Charles W. Hungerford and nine members appointed by the president from various academic divisions of the university. l. Frederick Weltzin, Erwin Graue, loseph Newton, William C. Banks, L. C. Cady, N. F. l-lindle, Merrill E. Deters, Hall M. Macklin, Lee F. Zimmerman, and D. D. DuSault form the present Graduate Council. Graduate students for the i950 summer session outnumbered the undergraduates as high school teachers returned to catch up with current educational practices and the veterans delved further into specialized learning. Those seeking advanced degrees in the arts also increased in number. Over thirty-five departments in the university offer their complete facilities and special instruction to the evere growing number of graduate students who have found that they need additional training to supplement the basic training received in the undergraduate school. Specialized occupations, research positions, and teaching careers call for the advanced preparation that graduate students have found to be more than adequate at ldaho. Visiting director for the summer session of curriculum revision, Dr. William H. During the war, Howard C. Johnson served with the secretariat ofthe Joint Chiefs Anderson lectures to a class of graduate students in the Education workshop. of Staff. Afterwards, he was appointed to the Veto Committee of the United Nations and is now Advisor to the Planning Staff Bureau of United Nations Affairs. While the Assembly adjourned for the summer, Mr. Johnson taught political science courses to lucky Idaho students. 325 Yvonne Anderson Willard Barnes Bill Berry Bernard Bitten Ray Broadhead Ben Brooks William Buhn Philadelphia, Pa. Moscow Moscow Kewanee, lllinois Ruperi Mountain Home Hayward Ralph Burcham Jerry Early Firrnin Falleur Dave Fitzgerald Marvin Glasscock Stanley Godecke James Guy Tensed Moscow Cove, Oregon Walla Walla, Wash. Cullman, Alabama Minden, Nevada Moscow Don Haynes Russell, Kansas William Oeser Philadelphia, P Joseph Smiley Moscow Earl Horning Moscow Kenneth Parkin Bolton, England Elmore Vail Moscow Mary Jasper Johnson Moscow Clifford Pratt Nampa Virgil Vail Moscow Jack Jones Sandpoint Jack Reynolds Weiser Jack Vassar Spokane, Wash. Teh-Yuan Lee China Mauno Saari McCall Yuan-Shi Yin China 2 6 Ho Yuen Mak Mary Meserve Hong Kong Tareywood Ralph Skeels Howard Sluder Lewiston Richfield Upperclassmen Took an Upper Hand in Running the Campus Vaudeville had a comeback when the juniors brought Dick Taylor with his l'Taylor Made Music" to Memorial gymnasium tor the Iunior Prom April l5. The six acts ot the vaudeville show featured a Hollywood chorus ot dancing girls, novelty numbers, and mimic entertainment, mental telepathy, and juggling. Pretty snappy, eh? Try as they might, though, not a single junior romeo wrangled a date from the performers. The Wheels began to roll as the juniors got ready to replace their senior masters both in the classroom and in campus activi- ties. A tine adeptness in the art ot campusology marked the casual poise ot the wise old members ot the Class of '5l. They were beginning to grasp a tilmy something called Hmental and emotional maturity." From the green of trosh days, to the blue ot the sophomore slump, they were emerging to the golden days ot achievement and progress in the subjects they were seeking to master and in the art ot adjusting to a satisfactory concept ot lite and their part in it. JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS JQQDJZQZS 2 yiefmzmf fy flaming sfwzakix 9 f alan-KN: MWA ' Y 25 5 Emmalyn Ball, secretary: Jim Chadband, vice-president: Max Glaves, presidentg Donna Jean Broyles, trea ret 2 Helen Means The DG's president has cut quite a swath for herself in three years. Beginning with Alpha Lambda Delta, Gem, and Home Ec Club as a freshman, her next two years are history. Spurs, Debate, Arg, Theta Sigma, Phi Upsi- lon Omicron, Panhellenic Council, and AWS have all clamored for and received her attention. Barbara Swanstrom Dale Benjamin Heres the 'lVoice of the Vandal" himself, the director of KUOI. Dale has also served as president of the SAE house and lnterfraternity Council, An old timer in jour- nalism, he won a press scholarship, is a member of Sigma Delta Chi, and favors the Arg with a story now and again. Blue Key and Silver Lance have crowned him with success, too. Meet the newly elected president of Mortar Board. Three short years have seen Barb ushering with the Spurs, dabbling in publications, working backstage on ASUI plays, and orienting frosh women through AWS. lf you ever need a hard-working organizer, just call the DG house and ask for Barb-she's a top activity gal. Jack Gregory Marie Hargis "Virg" is one of Hays Hall's most active girls. Being Blot editor and the star of many ASUI plays have made her well-known on campus. Theta Sigma, Mortar Board, and Curtain Club have tapped her for membership, and she was also elected by the women students as May Fete Maid of Honor for 1950. lack has sponsors, no less, for his KRPL program of songs by an lrish tenor. He gave splendid performances as Feste in "Twelfth Night" and as the singing newsboy of "The Time of Your Life." This vandaleer is claimed by the ATOs as their number one character and by the campus as its dry humor man. lncidentally, he's quite an angelfin pep band shows. Paul Araquistain Over at the Phi Tau house, Paul is the number one boy. United candidate for ASUI prexy this spring, he has been the moving force on United Caucus. Vice-presi- dent of sophomore class, Disciplinary Board, Coalition Board, Student Businessmen's Chamber of Commerce and various campus committees have received Paul's attention and guidance. Pam Gaut Heres another Kappa with a lot on the ball. Have you ever seen this kid go into one of her character acts? She's terrific. And you ask if she's been in activitiesfhere are are just a few: Debate, Alpha Lambda Delta, Canterbury Club, Hell Divers, Spurs, WRA, Orchesis, Kappa Delta gi. Hder success was crowned with election to Mortar CGI' . John Martin Donna Jean Broyles You'll see and hear lots about this girl next year because she's going to be Homecoming chairman. A potential wheel from the time she stepped on campus, Donna has been a Spur, junior class treasurer, Alpha Phi president, and a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, Curtain Club, and Student-Faculty Board. "Red Eye" is known on campus for his hot editorials. He brought the Argonaut an All-American rating when he was editor. Distinguishing himself in many fields, he is a member of Blue Key, Publications Board, Sigma Delta Chi, and was recently elected to preside over the Kappa Sig house this year. Gary Sessions Alpha Tau Omega says he's the hardest working man on campus and we pretty well agree with them. Gary has been in a lot of activities and came out on top every time, Blue Key recognized his efforts and made him a member as did Alpha Zeta when they elected him presi- dent, He has also worked on Homecoming, Dad's Day, Little International, and for the Ag Club. l .xqsmgxe 2552? ll. x iiivwww, Mary Louise Will The ability to meet any situation gracefully and force- fully has gained Mary Louise a seat at the head of many boards and committees. She has served as president ot Alpha Lambda Delta and Spurs, and vice-prexy of AWS. Recently she was tapped for Mortar Board because ot her work for Delta Sigma Rho, Varsity Debate, Student Union Board, Arg and dramatics. Vern Bahr Idaho's newly-elected ASUI president lives at Chrisman. Top activities include Blue Key, Silver Lance, Alpha Zeta, Phi Eta Sigma, Scabbard and Blade, Homecoming and multi boards and committees. Last year Vern was voted the outstanding student in the school of agricul- ture. In sport circles, he has been active in varsity boxing. Rose Ellen Schmid Election to ASUI Executive Board was a highlight of Rosie's junior year. A resident of Hays Hall, she has been active in Spurs, Kappa Phi, U Band, Vandaleers, Independent Caucus, AWS, and Home Ec Club. Next year on Executive Board she will act as private secretary to the ASUI president. Bob Culbertson Betty Peters Betty Peters is the "poet laureate" of the Idaho campus. She has been a mainstay of the fiction staff of Blot as well as the Arg. Curtain Club, Theta Sigma, Spurs, Independent Caucus, Student Activities Board, WRA, Gem staff and Mortar Board have favored her with membership and welcomed her talents. Cub is one ot those people who works like a little beaver but is very seldom heard of. Actually he's one of the top organizers in the junior class. A Beta brother, he has served as president of Alpha Phi Omega, Blue Key secretary, and was a member of IKs, Vandaleers, and Phi Mu Alpha. Jane Fisk Dick Reed lt you've ever been to a basketball game over in Memo- rial Gym and seen a streak ot lightning race down the floor, you've seen Dick Reed. He's forward on the varsity five and a two-year letterman. Recently he was elected to ASUI Executive Board. You can generally find him at the Sigma Nu house if he's not playing ball at the gym. Athletic lane has devoted three years to physical activity among women students and was recently rewarded with the presidency of WRA. A spark plug in all Forney Hall activities, she is also their president. Mortar Board tapped Iane this Spring. Her enthusiasm, ability and stick-to-it-iveness make her a much-called-on gal for important iobs. Janice McCormack Ian is presently busying herself as president of AWS as well as of the Hays Hall lassies. To be at the top of AWS you have to have activities back of you and Ian has. The top ones include Spurs, Arg, Debate, Phi Upsilon Omicron, Mortar Board, and scads oi committees and boards. Sherman Black Sherm has probably been mistaken for a professor more times than most professors Currently he is fiction editor of Blot, president oi Kappa Delta Pi and International Relations Club, and a member of Sigma Delta Chi and Blue Key. His prose and poetry show grcal talent in the budding. Allen Derr It you see the Arg editor rattling around the campus in a blue bucket of bolts, that's Al Derr in his limousine. "lason" has been tops in activities tor three years, lives at the TKE house tor at least sleeps therei, and holds membership in Blue Key, Silver Lance, Sigma Delta Chi, Publications Board, and ASUI Executive Board. 3 mzws O Leslie Abbott, Parma Owen Agenbroad, Nampa Gene Allen, Tumtum, Washington Roger Allen, Portland, Maine lohn Allyson, New York City, New York Edward Anderson, Boise leanne Anderson, Boise Orson Anderson, Wallace Phyllis Andrew, Parma Wilbur Andrew, Parma Gaylord Androes, Parma Clarence Aresvik, Coeur d'Alene lohn Ascuaga, Caldwell Roger Ashby, Moscow lohn Asker, Grangeville Beth Atchison, Boise lames Atchison, Glen Ridge, New lersey Alan Atwood, Lewiston Richard Atwood, Lewiston Vernon Bahr, Weiser Betty Lu Bailey, Twin Falls lames Bainbridge, Weiser lames Baker, Des Moines, Iowa Norman Barber, Marsing Elizabeth Barline, Spokane, Washington lack Barraclough, Boise Bernice Bauer, Boise Russell Baum, Ashton lohn Beach, Boise Keith Bean, Sweet Lee Bean, Melba Marvin Beguhl, Caldwell lames Bell, Burley Eugene Bellos, Moscow Dale Benjamin, Coeur d'Alene Richard Benscoter, Kendrick Howard Berger, Lewiston Charles Berry, Moscow Ruth Billings, Newport, Washington lohn Black, Glendale, Calif. Sherman Black, Moscow Louise Blenden, Weippe Ray Boehm, Bonners Ferry William Bolton, Dietrich Charles Bonar, Sandpoint Pete Bonin, Moscow Betty Bonnett, Moscow Wayne Borrowrnan, Idaho Falls Carol Bowlby, Moscow Keith Bowman, Moscow Harold Brammer, Cameron Bill Briggs, Felt Patricia Broadhead, Millwood, Washington Shirley Bromseth, Coeur d'Alene Darrell Brock, Rupert Caroline Brown, Pocatello Helen Brown, Kamiah Ioan Brown, Smelterville Natalia Brown, McCall Donna lean Broyles, Moscow Bernard Brunelle, Wallace Dennis Bryan, Boise Iack Buerkle, Richland, Washington Ierry Bunnell, Kellogg William Burchard, Fresno, Calif. Elizabeth Burke, Trail, B.C. Wayne Bush, Mal ad loseph Butkus, Farmington, Illinois Clifford Cahill, Weiser Iohn Calvert, Butte, Montana Bill Cameron, Moscow Donald Carley, Boise Lona Carney, Idaho Falls Raymond Carney, Idaho Falls Lois Carothers, Omar Carroll, Twin Falls Lewiston Iames Chadband, Santa Monica, Cal Richard Chamberlain, Orofino Roger Chichester, Sandpoint Robert Christianson, Idaho Falls lack Chugg, Rupert Winston Churchill, Gooding Ioan Churchman, lerome Barbara Clauser, Payette Marian Clift, Bay City, Michigan Mary Clyde, Moscow Larraine Cole, Peshastin, Washington lohn Cothern, Buhl Eugene Collinsworth, New Plymouth Vincent Conley, Kellogg if Gordon Cordes, Bonners Ferry Serge Coval, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania Molly Cramblet, Gooding David Crane, Castle Rock, Washington Lyle Craner, St. Maries lames Crockett, Minneapolis, Minnesota Carole Crouch, B oise Robert Culbertson, Rupert Lloyd Damsey, New York City, New York Glen Darnell, New Plymouth lames Daub, Spokane, Washington Norma Daugherty, St. Anthony Marian Davidson, Roger Davidson, Raynold Davis, Margie Dean, Dick Delyea, Kenneth De Moscow Boise Sandpoint Pocatello Coeur d'I-Xlene Ment, Twin Falls wzzbxzx wzws LeRoy DePalmo, Rupert lim DePartee, Buhl Allen Derr, Clarks Fork Wilmar DeWitt, New York City, New York Burton Dinnison, Orotino Donald Dirkse, Grand Haven, Mich. George Dodge, Nampa Roy Doupe, Spokane, Washington Troy Doupe, Spokane, Washington Miriam Downing, Grangeville lack Doyle, Spokane, Washington William Driver, loplin, Missouri Ralph Dulin, Coeur d'Alene Ralph Dunkle, Moscow Anne DuSault, Moscow Colleen Ebbe, Sandpoint Thomas Edmark, Nampa Anne Eggleson, Lewiston lack Elliott, Nampa Evan Ellis, Kooskia Stanley Ellsworth, Twin Falls loseph Emmons, Kansas City, Missouri Blanche Erickson, Kennewick, Wash. Emma Erickson, Kennewick, Wash. Robert Evans, Idaho Falls Donald Fairley, Lewiston Robert Farmer, Nevada City, Calif. Willard Feely, Coeur d'Alene Virgil Felton, Poplar, Calif. Laura Fereday, Boise Richard Field, Boise lane Fisk, Orofino Elizabeth Fitch, Potlatch Henry Fitzroy, England lames Ford, Chicago, Illinois Shirley Forrey, Orofino Ralph Fothergill, Nampa Don Fowler, Alliance, Nebraska Merlin Francis, Parma Glen Fulcher, Nampa lames Fulton, Worley William Funkhouser, Tampa, Florida MayBelle Gardner, Boise Vern Gasser, Driggs Dora Gaudin, Gooding Pamela Gaut, Lewiston loan Gehrig, Shoshone loAnn Getty, Pilot Rock, Oregon Henry Gilbertson, Hyattsville, Maryland Wendell Gladish, Pullman, Washington Max Glaves, Ontario, Oregon Tom Glenny, Lewiston George Goble, Eagle lerry Goecke, Post Falls Charles Golding, Rathdrum Kenneth Goldsberry, Sentinel Butte, N.D. Ritchie Gooch, Moscow Arden Gorsline, Sandpoint Lee Gorsuch, Kamiah Robert Gorsuch, Kamiah Bonnie Graham, Wallace i Wilburn Granlund, Deary Q Patricia Gray, Boise l William Gray, Spring Valley, Calif. Normand Green, Downers Grove, Ill. William Greenwood, Bonners Ferry Robert Greer, King Hill lohn Gregory, Wallace Louise Grider, Boise Cecil Grow, Burley lohn Grubb, Swan Valley Haagensen, Weiser Celia Hall, Glenns Ferry Patrick Hamilton, Buhl Constance Hammond, Boise lean Hammer, Boise R. H. Hanigan, Moscow Carolyn Hansen, Aberdeen, Washington lames Hansen, Boise Lawrence Hansen, Rigby Richard Harden, Spokane, Washington Marie Hargis, Ashton Donald Harper, Boise lohn Harris, San Carlos, Calif. Ralph Hart, Filer Roger Hartman, Cedar Rapids, lowa lohn Hasbrouck, Cascade Cecil Hathaway, Coeur d'Alene Ralph Haverkamp, Ronan, Montana Kenneth Hayden, Coeur d'Alene Harry Heath, Boise Howard Heiner, Weiser Harry Hendron, Dillon, Montana George Henly, Boise Kenneth Herman, Omaha, Nebraska Barbara Heyer, Melba David Hiner, Nampa lack Hoag, Moscow Maurice Holland, Bovill Henry Holt, Charleston, W. Va. Norman Holton, Emmett Roger Hovis, Coeur d'Alene Hazel Howard, Hazelton Rupert Huckabee, Moscow Ronald Hutter, Parma Burton Humphrey, Moscow loann Hutchinson, Orofino Eugene Hyde, Coeur d'Alene mms Milk!!! Ronald Hyde, Rupert Frederick Hyland, Bonners Ferry Allen lngebritsen, Moscow Theodore lngersoll, Orono, Maine Evelyn lnghram, Lewiston Richard loset, Twin Falls loan Irving, Tucson, Arizona Harry lsaman, Lewiston loan lansen, Kimberly Donald lensen, Coeur d'Alene Dorris lensen, ldaho Falls Edgar lensen, Moscow Rafael limenez, Blackfoot Carolyn Iohanson, Troy Alice lohnson, Wallace Arnold lohnson, Twin Falls Philip Johnson, San Mateo, Calif. Reuben lohnson, Caldwell Richard lohnson, Weiser Clarence lohnston, Moscow Donald lohnston, Coeur d'Alene Edward lones, Pocatello William Jones, Hermiston, Oregon Keith ludd, Burley Leo luve, Moscow lordon Kanikkeberg, Kendrick Shirley Karau, Troy loseph Kass, Moscow Keith Keefer, ldaho Falls Donald Kees, Spokane, Washington Alene Kelley, Boise Ann Kettenbach, Calgary, Alberta Max King, Los Angeles, California Philip Kinnison, Melrose, Massachusetts lames Knudsen, Coeur d'Alene Kent Kohring, Bruneau Bill Komoto, Sumner, Washington Carol Korvola, Orofino lack Krehbiel, Spokane Paul Kunkel, Amsterdam lames LaGrone, Highland Park, Mich. Harry Lamson, Fairfield Henry Land, Reno, Nevada lames Landers, Macy, Indiana Corwin LaVoy, Potlatch Edward Leavitt, Spokane, Washington Shelby Lenander, Wardner Gaylord Lenker, Hagerman Claire Letson, Taylor, Wisconsin Kenneth Lind, Burley Leon Lind, Kendrick Richard Lint, Caldwell Harold Little, Priest River Donald Long, Harrison IE. T. Long, Kendrick Charles Lord, Gooding Betty Loren, Kellogg Ruth Lotspeich, Eastport Dan Lott, Hagerman Charles Lynberg, Sioux City, lowa Maurice Lynch, Marseilles, Indiana Pat Lynch, Pocatello Tor Lyshaug, Norway lanice McCormick, Caldwell Robert l. McCreedy, Lewiston Gene McCullough, Palouse Colleen McDonald, Bovill Colleen McEntee, Boise lack McEntire, ldaho Falls Kathleen McEvers, Manson, Washington R. L. McFadden, Nampa lack McFrederick, Salmon lames McGee, Spokane, Washington lames McKevitt, Lewiston Robert McMahon, Spokane, Washington lohn McQuillin, Ridgewood, New York Robert MacDonald, Longview, Wash. Robert Mackey, Lorenzo LeRoy Magden, Spokane, Washington Roger Markinson, Moscow Nathan Marks, Spokane, Washington Berniese Martin, New Meadows Chauncey Martin, Burke lohn Martin, Burke Roland Masingill, Payette lohn Matheson, Pasco, Washington Robert Mays, Boise Herbert Mead, luneau, Alaska Helen Means, Boise Glenn Meares, Riverside, Calif. Dale Mendenhall, Ontario, Oregon ' Conrad Merrick, Spokane, Washington lohn Meyer, Gooding Dale Milich, Boise Donald F. Miller, Weiser Raymond Miller, Elmhurst, Illinois Marilyn Mingus, Emmett lames Mitchell, Spokane, Washington Edward Moe, Wallace Elmer Montgomery, Kooskia Paul Moore, Glenns Ferry Martel Morache, Emmett .lerald Moss, Buhl Patricia Nelson, Genesee Robert Nelson, Boise Shirley Nelson, Lewiston William Nelson, Sandpoint Alice Nesbitt, Sagle mms' mlm? George Neumeyer, Bonners Ferry Earl Newell, Laurens, lowa Gilbert Nicholson, Twin Falls Richard Nickeson, Wellsboro, Pa. Robert Nobis, Kimball, S.D. Theo Nowak, Los Angeles, Calif. Robert O'Connor, Culdesac George O'Leary, Weiser Donald Oleson, Moscow Glenn Olin, Culdesac Della Olson, Hood River, Oregon Mary O'Neill, Mountain Home Lavon Palmer, Grand View Donald C. Parker, Ovid Donald Parker, Mullan Richard Parrotte, lndianapolis, lndiana lames Passmore, Moscow lohn Paterson, Bellevue Kent Paynter, Payette Margie Peer, Culdesac Frank Pentzer, Culdesac lack Peterson, Payette Merilyn Petersen, Payette Daniel Piraino, Staten Island, N.Y. Eugene Pitcher, Thompson Falls, Montana Harold Pohlod, Moscow Wallace Pohlod, Moscow Robert Poore, Lewiston George Poulos, Cascade Beverly Powers, La Mesa, Calif. Francis Pratt, Boise Edward Purdy, Springston Grant Radford, Preston Lawrence Rasmussen, New Plymouth lohn Reager, Kingston Ernest Reed, Hazelton Bernadean Reese, Boise Frank Reich, Kellogg Fred Reich, Arco lames Reinhardt, Lewiston Rita Reynolds, Gooding Eleanor Rich, Blackfoot Nancy Ricks, Boise lerry Rockwood, lona William Roden, Boise Leonard Rodig, Buhl Warren Roe, Boise lohn Rosenthal, West Allis, Wisconsin Toy Ann Rossman, Sandpoint LeRoy Routh, Lamar, Colorado loan Rowberry, Payette Wilbur Ruleman, Memphis, Tennessee loseph Rumble, Albuquerque, N.M. William Sacht, Clarks Fork lla Sample, Buhl lohn Schaplowsky, Boise Virginia Scheutfele, Marsing Rose Ellen Schmid, New Plymouth Corrine Schumacher, Colton, Wash. Beverly Schupter, Kendrick John Scull, San Diego, Calif. Maxine Seely, St. Maries Dewey Selle, Sandpoint Richard Sheppard, Corvallis, Qregon Bonnie Shuldberg, Moscow Thomas Shull, Moscow l !Wayman Sinden, Weiser l Neal Smiley, Kellogg l Barr Smith, Boise Gordon Smith, Salmon Lamont Smith, Preston Lester Smith, Hansen Robert Smith, Redding, Calif. Theron Smith, Moscow Clarice Sokvitne, Moscow Robert Sonnichsen, Coeur d'Alene Sonnich Sonnichsen, Jerome Lucia Spencer, Richland, Washington lohn Spink, Nampa Carl Stamm, Blackfoot Robert Steiger, Ferdinand Dean Stevens, Worley Dora Stevenson, ldaho Falls Robert Stevenson, Espanola, Wash. Willard Stevenson, Caldwell Donald Stilson, San Pedro, Calif. Harold Stivers, Boise lohn Stoddard, Boise Robert Stoker, Pocatello Georgia Stonemets, Buhl Barbara Storms, Ellensburg, Washington Edith Stough, Moscow Elmer Stout, Kellogg Carl Straub, Lewiston Phyllis Stricker, Grangeville Gerald Swanson, Coeur d'1-Xlene Herbert Swanson, ldaho Falls Robert Swanson, Pocatello Cyrus Sweet, Longview, Washington Glenn Talbott, Notus lames Tate, Hope Dale Thacker, Paul Averill Thayer, Hagerman Harold Thomas, Cambridge Stanley Thomas, Nezperce Eileen Thomson, Shoshone Howard Toevs, Aberdeen Richard Toevs, Ephrata, Washington mms mwx DeForest Tovey, Malad Rhys Tovey, ldaho Falls Thomas Trees, Gooding Frederick Troeh, Grangeville Raymond Troxell, Weisspirt, Pa. Donald Tschanz, Mackay David Ulmer, McCall Barbara Ulrich, Coeur d'Alene lohn Urguidi, Grand View Fred Van Engelen, Twin Falls Ruth Van Engelen, Twin Falls Russell Viehweg, Twin Falls Alton Vogt, Caldwell lohn Voorhees, Short l-lill, N.l. Al Wagner, Grangeville Donald Wagoner, Meridian lames Walker, Hornedale William Walkington, Hazelton Walter Ward, Lapwai Gerald Weaver, Lewiston Robert Webb, Roy Thomas Webb, Lapwai Elwood Werry, Shoshone Sidney Werry, Hailey Tohn Webster, Nezperce Robert Wheeler, American Falls Robert C. Wheeler, Mountain Home lohn White, Shoshone Hugh Whitmore, Eagle Elden Widner, Midvale Willis Wiedenman, .lerome Vance Wilburn, Stites Flizabeth Wilcox, Boise Mary Louise Will, Moscow Frederick Willett, Lewiston Donald Wills, Auburn, Massachusetts Peter K. Wilson, Culdesac Thomas Wilson, Boise Daryl Wittenberger, Nampa Florence Wohlschlegel, Idaho Falls Patricia Wyrick, Boise Burton Young, Potlatch Youngstrom, Walter R., Salmon lohn Zwiener, St. Maries Holly Week Traditions Carried On The sophomores brought Carmen Cavallaro to the campus tor the l949 l-lolly Week Dance. The Poet ot the Piano played ior "Holly Frolicsw and Christy Anne Sargent was crowned the Holly Queen ot the year. An arch consisting ot holly and mistle- toe Was constructed along with several lighted Christmas trees to make up the decorations. "Mistletoe lnn," a room inside a room, teatured a towering ornamented tree. The annual Sophomore Serenade ot all the campus living groups heralded the approach ot the Christmas season as softly talling snow descended on the yuletide singers. The sophomores took over their share ot campus activities and concentrated on Nesting and Perching between classes. They began to understand what college was all about and started learning how to live in the adult world they would soon enter as intelligent members ot a complex society. SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 662521122115 a as airs!! fi' 15 al Bob White, president: Dick Newton. t rer: Shirley Gregory, cretary: Paul Ax-aquistain, vice-president 3 Donald Adams, Ririo Marvel Ainsworth, Spokane, Washington Patsy Allucrtsson, leroine Marvin Alexander, Sandpoint Gwona Allen, Franklin Martlia Allison, Caldwell Roger Allison, Caldwell Do1iAriio:s, Birlnl Dan Anclerson, Malarl Marilyn Anderson, Biilil Dale Andrus, ldalio Falls Darwilcl Andrews, Shelley Patil Aragulstain, Caldwell lanies Aston, Opportunity, Wasliingtc Margaret Aiisstad, Boise lainos Baggelt, Gooding l Rita Balirn, Challis Trinnan Baily, Hansen Cale Bair, lclaho Falls Charlotte Baker, Moscow Patriria Baker, Moscow Boyd Barker, Donnelly Beverly Balka, lrlaho Falls Donald Bakes, Boise Roliert Barstow, Moscow losepli V. Basile, Bayonne, New lersey Gary Bassett, Lago Vernon Batt, Caldwell Pliilip Battaolio, Ariisterrlam, New York Ciiifii-les Batlless, Weippe David Beaflles, Seattle, Washington Dolores Beatlles, Seatlle, Wasliinoton loytre Becker, Spokane, Washington l3olier'tBe47kw1tli, Twin Falls lcalin Brier, lafronie Charles Belire, New Providencre, New lersey Hazel Bell, Hagerrrian Lloyd Bell, Meridian Beverly Benson, Opportunity, Vtfaslnngton Patriuia Berry, Craigmont larnof: Bcsrent, Orolino Betty B1ker',Trail, BC. Patrick Birch, Kellogg Lois Ciindall Black, Long Beach, Calit. Paul Blanton, Pasco, Vtfashington Frederick Bliss, Ordnance, Oregon lolin Blom, Eau Claire, Wisconsin Ellene Blower, Portland, Oregon llowlvort Bonnett, Sacramento, Calil. Charles Bottinelli, Kellogg lose Boll, Corozal, Puerto Rico Clayton Boyce, St. Maries Harrison Boyd, Wenclell l.ee Boyle, Virttor Fern Braoht, Lewiston lilewcllyn Brainard, Coeur d'Alene Beverly Bresfflc-rr, Genesee Bartiara Brevictk, Wendi ll Clilton Brewer, Coronado, Calif, Polar Breysse, lersey City, New lersey ltnrios Briggs, Felt Van Briggs, Great Falls, Montana l.orin Brinkerliofl, Ricliland, Wasliinq Barbara Brockinan, Caldwell Earl Brockinan, Caldwell Donald Brooks, Hazollon Monllord Brooks, Boisf- Melvin Brown, Shoshone Bryan Brunrell, Murphy lainess Bryan, Gooding Thomas Buekhn, llayezllon Beryl Budd, l'la7ellon David Bull, Worrfesler, Masszactlxuszollfg Donna Burch, Coeur d'Alene Beverly Burnham, Moscow Evelyn Burks, leromo loc Burns, Boise Nadine Buswell, Viola Vernon Caldwell, Boise Darrell Callihan, Kellogg Richard Carlauhn, Mounlain Home Belly Lou Carlson, Hagerman lune Carr, Twin Falls: loseph Carson, Nome, Alaska Norma Carson, Qnlario, Oregon Dale Chaney, Kellogg William Chelwood, Kaniiah Leo Choale, Lenore Andrew Chrislensen, Blalzklool Helen Church, Lilwluy, Monlana lane Clark, Boise Margarel Clarke, Orolino Edwin Cllzer, Wallace Warren Cloninger, Lewiston loan Cohle, Banners Ferry Darwin Cogswell, Coeur d'Alene Harold Collell, Grand View Laura Cornplon, Blaeklool Rose Marie Cone, Pollalrth lalnes Connors, Boise Frederick Cook, Woreesler, Masasacrhuszells Elaine Cope, Eagle David Coullon, Kendrick Keilh Coyne, Nampa David Craner, Burley Merle Craner, Sl. Maries Delores Crooks, Spiril Lake Rolverl Crooks, Spiril Lake Imogene Crowell, Pocatello Donald Culhane, Spokane, Washinglon Frederic Cully, Coeur d'Alene Bruce Curlis, Orolino Helen Daniels, Malad loseph Davis, Boise Richard M. Davis, Twin Falls Richard W. Davis, Marlinez, Cahl. Gerald Diehl, lerorne Pauline Deqgenrlorler, Kelloqq Gillierl DeKoll7, Filer Ralph DeMarr, Mounlain Home lo Anna DeMeyer, Boise Charles DeRose, Marlinez, Calif, Earl Donnen, Burley Dale Douglas, Moscow Slephen Douglas, Boise Helen Dragselh, Karniah 4 4 Rolmert Drexler, Twin Falls lohn Drips, Twin Falls Arthur Duncan, Grand View lames Dunham, Hagerman Lloyd Dunn, Moscow Norene Dygert, Potlatch Roy Eastman, Filer Howard Edwards, Spokane, Washington Arnold Eidam, Sandpoint Richard Eimers, Grangeville 'Edwin Enqert, Banners Ferry lohn Evans, idaho Falls Marilyn Evans, Coeur d'Alene Ruthella Evans, Preston Dale Everson, Buhl David Fellin, Wallace Thomas Ferree, Mattoon, illinois Edward Fiester, Bellewood, Illinois Richard Fisher, Oxford Edith Fisk, Rupert lay Fitch, Payette Elizalueth Fitzqerald, Moscow Norman Fitxsimmons, Cottonwood Norman Flynn, Weiser Robe rt Foley, St. Anthony Eileen Foley, idaho Falls lohn Fonhurg, Dalhart, Texas Maroonc Foreman, Pocatello Kenneth Foucar, Cody, Wyoininq lohn Fox, Hailey Fairy Frank, Boise lvan French, Lewiston Norma French, Euhl Donald Fritts, Okanogan, Washington Todd Frohlnan, Washington, D,C. Bernel Fulhner, Rextvurg lanet Fulton, Spokane, Washington loyce Garner, Twin Falls Beverly Garrett, Wilder lames Geddes, Banida Mary lean Geertsen, Boise Yvonne George, Kellogg Robert Gerard, Los Angeles, Calif. Richard Gibbs, Burley Robert Gihhs, Burley Nelson Gihhs, Buttalo, New York Pearl Gitnson, Preston Frank Gillette, Declo Meredith Glenn, Twin Falls Carolyn Goodwin, Sweet Elmer Gossett, Nampa Glen Greeley, Emmett Gerald Green, Glenns Ferry Shirley Gregory, Rupert lalnes Grentell, Longview, Washington Donna Grittith, Kellogg Philip Guiltoy, Bovill Kenneth Hacak, Buhl lerald Haegele, Caldwell Richard Hall, Boise Florine Hahne, Pocatello Lee Hamilton, Mountain Home Clark Hamon, Caldwell Patricia Hankins, Nampa Reed Hansen, Idaho Falls Bob Hanson, Dover Donal Hardy, Parma Chester Harper, Port Townsend, Washington Mary lane Harris, Spokane, Washington Donald Harrison, Lewiston Coralie Hart, Lewiston Betty Hassler, Twin Falls Hazel Havens, Moscow lames Heaphy, Farmington, Michigan Patricia Hebhard, Spokane, Washington Leonard Heikkila, Cataldo Georgie Hemovich, Hailey Harold Henrie, Lead, South Dakota Alice Henry, Gooding lames Lee Henry, Gooding Wendell Herrett, Kellogg Helen Herrington, Boise George Hespelt, Palo Alto, Calii. Ronell Hillman, Driggs Louie Hirschman, Ketchum Wes Lee Hoalst, Hammett Frances Hodgins, Salt Lake City, Utah Winifred Hokanson, Troy Roy Hollitield, Hansen Ianet Holman, Palo Alto, Calif, Dean Holyoak, Burley Marion Homan, Payette Mary Hooper, Wallace loanne Hopkins, Boise Laura Lee Hopkins, Culdesac Maurice Horlen, Spokane, Washington Irene Horning, Moscow Iohn Horning, Wallace Carlene Horting, Colfax, Washington Kenneth Howard, Lewiston Alan Huggins, Boise Lawrence Humphrey, Lewiston Iames Hyland, Bonners Ferry Caryl Ingebritsen, Moscow Richard Ioi-ns, Logan, Utah Floyd Iverson, Gooding Hyde lacobs, Declo Marvin Iagels, Buhl Ben Iayne, Enid, Oklahoma Ronald Iessup, Lowell, Michigan William Iewell, Montpelier Arden Iohnson, Bonners Ferry Axel lohnson, Valley Ford, Washington Bert Iohnson, Mullan Robert lohnson, Glasgow, Montana Myron Johnston, Grangeville Lawrence lones, Malad Luther L. lones, St. Anthony Norman lones, Oakesdale, Washington Michio Kaku, Weiser Iohn Kayler, Peck Kenneth Keeier, Idaho Falls ludd Kenworthy, Moscow Mary Kercheval, Nampa loan King, Kamiah Margie Kinney, Sandpoint 4 344 lerome Kinsey, Shoshone Karl Klages, Moscow Deloris Knight, Gooding Willis Knox, Kellogg Meade Kohl, Salmon Phyllis Kooch, Salmon Milton Koppang, Bonners Ferry lohn Koster, ldaho Falls Elsie Krey, Spokane, Washington Cleon Kunz, Victor ,lames Lane, Shelley loseph Larkin, Donnelly Donald Larson, Cusick, Washington Elwin Larson, Meridian Phyllis Larson, Weippe Bryan Lawrence, McCall William Leavell, Gooding .Tackie Lee, Plummer Patricia Lee, Grangeville lohn Lesher, Burley Wayne Lewis, St. Maries lack Liberg, Genesee Beth Lillard, Lewiston Donald Lindsay, Bonners Ferry Barbara Livingston, Buhl Dick Lloyd, Lewiston Virginia Lofgren, Spokane, Washington Estelle Loiko, Freehold, New lersey iohn Long, Moscow Shirley Longeteig, Lewiston lack Lorts, Clovis, New Mexico Philip Lowder, Rupert Leon Luce, Chicago, Illinois John Lynam, Greybull, Wyoming Arlene McClellan, Montpelier Stewart McCormack, Lewiston Theodore McDaniel, Elmhurst, lllinois Donald McMahan, Council lerry McKee, Glenns Ferry Eugene McNee, Shoshone Maralee McReynolds, Spokane, Washingtor Humfredo Macedo, Lima, Peru lohn Mack, Spokane, Washington lohn Mackay, Lorenzo Catherine MacMillan, Moscow Margaret Magee, Genesee Otis Maloy, St. Maries Linda Lee Marsyla, Mullan Cecil Martin, Oakland, Calit. lames Martin, Caldwell loan Martin, Hagerman David Martindale, Oakley Donald Mason, Absarakee, Montana lane Matthews, Spokane, Washington Frederick Matzner, Chicago, Illinois Donald Meacham, Weiser Margaret Mehl, Weiser Richard Merrill, Orotino Lois Messerly, Burke Richard Meyer, Gooding William Meyer, Fenn lames Miller, Weiser lohn F. Miller, Caldwell Marcella Minden, Princeton Frances Misson, Coleman, Alberta Thomas Mitchell, Idaho Falls Carol Moens, Bonners Ferry Shirley Moten, Boise Marlene Monroe, Twin Falls Doris Moore, Idaho Falls tG-loria Moore, New Plymouth t lames Moore, Memphis, Tennessee Richard Moore, Meridian l Frank Morrison, Murtaugh 1 lack Mosman, Cascade t Rose Murdock, Boise , leanne Nagel, Idaho Falls Guy Nance, Beech Grove, Kentucky William Nash, Weston Martha Sue Neal, Ephrata, Washington Gary Netzger, Buhl tack Nelson, .lerome Mary lo Nelson, Skykomish, Washington t Donald Nepean, Moscow Dick Newton, San Fernando, Calif. Beniamin Nicholas, Moscow Robert Nixon, Bonners Ferry Naomi Nokes, Boise Donna Norton, Cambridge David Nye, Gibbonsville Leland Obermeyer, Emmett Patricia O'Connor, Lewiston Virginia Orazem, Mullan Keith Ormond, Rigby Harry Osborne, Kellogg Ollie Packenham, Moscow Robert Parish, Filer Richard Parker, Santa Ana, Calif. lames Parsons, Sandpoint Patricia Patton, Sandpoint loanne Paulson, Spokane, Washington Helen Payne, Rexburg Roy Peairs, Kellogg losephine Pence, Bruneau lohn Pepper, Weiser loanne Peters, Spokane, Washington Elmer Peterson, Payette George Peterson, Idaho Falls Richard Peterson, Idaho Falls Robert Phillips, Priest River R. t. Porterin, Moscow Paul Polk, Los Angeles, Calif. loan Price, Fairfield Donald Prisby, Beverly, Massachusetts Genevieve Puckett, Payette Roy Pytel, Moscow Don Quane, Rupert Martha Ratner, Boise George Racely, Valentine, Nebraska Patricia Rambo, Midvale loan Rayrner, Boise Ronald Reese, Boise Robert Reeves, Rupert Robert Riddle, Mountain Home William Rigby, Idaho Falls Don Ringe, American Falls 34 346 Patricia Rivett, Boise Orville Roberts, Donnelly Wayne Robison, Rathdrum Albert Rolseth, Libby, Montana George Rose, Murtaugh Floyd Rowberg, Shelley Thomas Rowland, Pocatello Howard Rue, Sandpoint Ioanne Rundstrom, Spokane, Washington Rae Salisbury, Twin Falls Herbert Samms, Moscow David Sampson, Moscow William Sanford, Fairfield Christy Sargent, Weiser Ioseph Savage, Kimberly Iune Schalkau, Spokane, Washington Allen Schark, Genesee Stanford Scheibe, Lewiston IoAnn Schlegel, Pocatello Ioyce Schmidt, Lewiston Wallace Schmidt, Lewiston Herbert Schroeder, Cleveland, Ohio Maribel Schupter, Iuliaetta James Schutt, Idaho Falls Donald Scott, Boise Iacqueline Scott, Seattle, Washington Norma See, Buhl Charles Seeber, Kellogg Gary Sessions, Idaho Falls Carol Shatter, Spokane, Washington Llewella Sifton, Midvale Esther Simon, Fairfield Bob Sims, Seattle, Washington Gayle Slavin, Carmen Donald Chester Smith, Omaha, Nebraska Iulianne Smith, Glenns Ferry Kenneth Smith, Twin Falls Virginia Smith, Shoshone Stanley Soderberg, Orotino Nels Solberg, Kamiah Philip Soulen, Weiser Robert Spalding, Moscow Nicholas Speropulos, Weiser Elmer E. Sperry, Moscow Nadine Stanek, Moscow Bert Stanford, St. Anthony Mary Ellen Stefanac, Mullan William Stemple, Elmhurst, Illinois Philip Stern, Anchorage, Alaska Mary Sterner, Pullman Road Barbara Stewart, Fairfield Kathleen Stevens, Nordman Donald Stolts, Coeur d'Alene Glen Stringham, Idaho Falls Evelyn McCandless Stuart, Kellogg Wendell Styner, Paul Harold Suchan, Buhl Margaret Sullivan, Rupert Leola Sumner, Troy Ianet Sundeen, Bonners Ferry Iune Sutton, Midvale Charles Swain, Iohnson City, Tennessee Roger Swanstrom, Council Willard Swope, St. Maries LaVerta Swope, Moscow Chester Takatori, Parma Arlene Talbott, Omak, Washington Duane Taylor, Oakley Wallace Taylor, Wendell Constance Teed, Boise 'l'l1cnna:: Temple, Monrovia, Cjfilil. lohn llioinass, Dlelriftli Fuqene Thomelv, Bnlvl Helly Thompson, Mrxsvow lean Thonison, Hnllfe, Monlana lolm l",Tl1anm:son, Momzrlw D1-an Tliornlon, l,r:we::lfm RolverlT11lcl, Allvlliliifriviim, New Mr'rxic,u lfnncess llnlo, Pofralollo Nadine Tisclall, Mosfzow Georqe Tissaw, Wallace Dario Tolfenelle, Cfhilzaqo, lllin-nil: Rolworl Tolmie, Parma Tomas Tmnasssson, lcvolancl Marqarol lnorfgll, Moscow Andrew Tower, Veradale, Wasslnnqlon Dennis Trolh, Coeur d'Alene Doris Troul, Troy Donald Trupp, Si. Anthony Marianne Tufls, Spokane, Washinqlon Selh Tutlle, Pasco, Washinqlon Esther Uhlman, Moscow Rolverl Uhriq, Midvale Gary Urie, Veradale, Washinqlon Roy Vance, Homedalo lames Varley, Boise George Vehrs, Caldwell .liminie Verqolwlwi, Kellogg Phyllis Virzlcery, Fmmell lohn Wagoner, Meridian Donna lo Walenla, Moscow lames Walkiziqlon, Havellon Harriel Walralh, Qrolino Donald Wallman, Kellogg Floyd Wanamaker, Wallace www as ,ae lackie Watts, Glenns Ferry Carolyn Welulw, Rouhons Douglas Weinmann, Lewislon Kenneth Weisman, Wendell Kennefh Wesl, Wilder lames Weslacoll, Garfield, Washinqlon Earl Wheeler. American Falls Franklin Wheelock, Haven, Michigan Louis Whilsell, Emmell Norma Wliitsell, Emmell Naida Whyharlc, Deary Bruce Wickward, Moscow Phylip Wilder, Wflruesler, Massachusells Emmell Wilkins, Moscow Brian Williams, Boise David Williams, Malad Marilyn Williams, Moscow Charles Williamson, leronie Marqarel Williamson, Lewislon Marqarel Wills, Twin Falls: Cflaylon Wilson, flairilwirlqe Eleanor Wilson, Weis:-rr lames Wilson, San Fezrnanflo, Cfalil. luanila Wilson, Nampa WilliamVV1nklf-,Filer Cilyclrw Wlnlevyfz, Gif-nn1:Fceriy C'horifv Wiszwfill, Viola Don Wolroll, liurlsvy james: Wommarlc, Floiniers Ferry l.ce Woods, Richllelcl Marion Wriqhl, Twin Falls Gary Vlfyss, Grave Mary Ann Zapp, Nampa Holu Zimmerman, Nampa 4 4 Frosh Frolics Made a Big Hit on Campus There must have been some Irishmen among the freshmen. March l7 was the date set for the frolicking frosh dance decor- ated in shamroclc green with all the trimmings of St. Patrick's Day. Connie Baxter and Bruce Mclntosh were crowned Queen and King of the Leprechauns at the "Wearing of the Green" semi- formal dance. Glen l-lenry's orchestra came straight from l-lolly- wood to add their Hlmpression in Rhythm" to the gala affair. Special guests at the dance were visiting high school seniors who were also shown about the campus and through the various academic departments of the university by representatives from the Class of '53. Not so many veterans appeared in the new crop. Most of the frosh were direct from high school, and properly bewildered by the campus world of activities, wheels, all-campus events and conflicting ideas presented in the classroom. The youngsters soon adopted the "collegiate air" and by second semester were amazing their big brothers and sisters by their Hsavoir faire" in matters curricular and extra-curricular. Oh, those reference papers! FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS ZW6'077ZZf75 U51 Uwmw S Pat Duffy, president: Erlene Clyde, treasurerg Nancy Hamilton, secretaryg Bill Taylor, vice-president S Maxine Alulaott, Spokane, Wasshincgton Velva Ailor, Granoeville George Allzriqht, Greer Rolvert Allison, Caldwell Eleanor Anderson, Spokane, Wtxfhinqton lanlce Anderson, De-sry Shirley Anrlerson, Palrmvo, Wfuzhxnoton Richard Andrews, lerome Dorothy Anno, Wallaue Ray Anstine, Nevperzre Raymond Arte, Mullan Gene Asher, Stanttelcl, Oregon Nathan Ashmearl, Goodinq lerry Assker, Granqeville Douglas Aurnhammer, Mtllluitrn, New lerszey Alva Axt, Sprinq Valley, New York Gloria Badraun, Priest River Arnold Bahr, Gooding Bernard Baker, Parco, W-x::h1nqton lean Bales, Caldwell Louise Ball, Mountain Home Robert Barber, Moscow Sally Barbour, Clarkston, VVas:h1nqton Constance Baxter, Butii Gary Baxter, Br-tue David Beck, Bellevue Gretta Beck, Granqeville Donald Becker, Genesee lesse Beckman, Emmett David Beckstead, Preston Robert Beesley, Rexlmurq lohn Ben ston, Lewiston C3 Thompson Berqf-rnd, Mtnnearvolir, Minnesota Lorraine Bernat lfiwhland, Washincqton Richard Borsflton, Samlpvttnt Genette Bertrand, ldaho Falls Colleen Bicrlmlord, Lowtsrton Ruth Bielver, Biq Ttmlier, Montana George Birdt, New York City, New York Odell Black, Burley Orrrgn Blalock, Le-tha John Bloom, Kelloqq Dawn Bolton, Albany, Calxl. lames Bovard, Portland, Maine Frederick Bowen, Paris, llhnoif: Frank Bowles, Kooskia Dorothy Bowman, Emmett Richard Bowmer, St Maries Williani Boyden, Glen Ellyn, lllinois: Weldon Branch, Midyale Elroy Brandt, Meridian Harry Briyee, Buhl Betty Brock, Orotino Marilyn Brodd, Boise Anna Brooks, Sandpoint Reid Brower, Driqqfs Donna Brown, Lewiston William Brown, Lewiston Carlyle Brouoh, Salmon ltmmie Btilkley, Bxihl Boyd Burt, St. Anthony Billy Bxgroqral, id.1haFallf: Beverly Burke, Boise Raymond Burns, ltlaho Falls Calvin Burns, Oslvurn lohn Burroughs, Nxaqam Falls, New York Lois Bush, Malad Robert Carlson, Lilurgrtyvillo, llltnois Daisy Carrluk, Cratcgmont Don Carroll, Twin Falls Glenn Casebolt, Lewiston Osborne Casey, Mountain Home lac Caward, Caldwell Howard Chadwick, Arlington, Massiaohuseiis Moire Charters, Preston Vernon Choate, Southwiczk Willard Chonlers, Preston Conrad Christiansen, Soda Sprinos Catherine Church, Libby, Montana Shirley Churchill, Snielterville Edward Churchinan, leroine Michael Churilla, lohnstown, Pennsylvania Charlie Clark, Paul Robert Clark, Wallace Paul Clausen, Weiser Erlene Clyde, Moscow Bonese Collins, Richland, Wasliiriqton Barbara Columbus, Wenattrlien, Washington Richard Conclie, Preston Gordon Cook, Kendrick Marian Cook, Kelloqq Reuben Cooley, Westlake, Ohio .lames Corbett, Parma Richard Corbett, Idaho Falls Claire Cornell, Kuna Lee Coumerilk, Mullan James Cox, Boise loan Cox, Lewiston larnes Cranston, Orinda, Calif. Daniel Creswell, Boise George Crnkovich, Mullan Clara Crom, Twin Falls iohn Cummins, Seattle, Washington Margaret Curtis, Crohno Dale Daniels, Malad Reta Darling, Caldwell Elizabeth Davidson, Moscow Robert Dawson, Bovill Roberta Day, Gooding Don Deardortt, Gr-arte Glen DeBruine, West Allis, Wisconsin Bethea Decker, Idaho Falls Donald Deerkop, Palouse, Wasliinqton Betty Ruth Deeston, Moscow Mary Frances Densow, Genesee Donald Denton, Kooskia loan DeShazer, Lewiston Morris Devlin, Hayward, Calif. ioseph Dickinson, St. Maries Yvonne Diddock, Nezperce Ruth Dimond, Moscow Lois Dodson, Spokane, Washington George Donahue, Blackfoot Dallas Douglas, Moscow Virtona Douglass, Seattle, Washington Edward Downen, Lewiston Robert Drake, Downers Grove, illinois Patrick Driscoll, Twin Falls Roy Driskill, Post Falls Charles Duffy, Nampa Kenneth Duncan, Carnliridqe Robert A. Duncan, Twin Falls Robert l. Duncan, Carnluridqe Reed Durtschi, Driqqs Marilyn Dustin, Ricliiield Joy East, Filer Barbara Edholrn, Goodinq lohn Edwards, Marsinq Beverly Eggers, Nezperce Gordon Eisinger, Goodinq Conrad Flkelund, Kellogg Richard F. Eller, Tacoma, Washington Larry Elsner, Gooding Frank Emerson, Genesee Carol Erickson, Troy Ral h Erlandson Los An eles Calif P 1 Q f - Rolierl Ernst, Los Angeles, California Kenneth Flstes, Bremerton, Washington lernld Evans, Cascade Lavonna Eyrioh, Potlatoh Garry Farmer, Gooding Kenneth Farmer, Moscow Leroy Fayle, Leadore Bonnie File, Nyssa, Oregon Edmond Fisher, Davenport, lowa lris Fisher, Emmett loyce Fisher, Twin Falls loan Fitzgerald, Moscow Wallace Flodberg, Pierce Donald Foedisch, Opportunity, lean Frahm, Gooding Vida Frischknecht, Moscow George Frye, Rifle, Colorado Dallas Fuller, Emmett Robert Fullmer, Burley lohnny Gaiser, Moscow Vernon Gallop, Rigby Henry Gandiaga, Twin Falls Betty lo Garber, Caldwell George Gardner, New Plymouth Lillian Garner, Twin Falls Robert Gartin, Boise Tom Gates, Wendell Rae Gentry, Lewiston Adrienne George, Kellogg Peggy George, Kellogg lames Gerard, Terreton Marianne Gessel, Opportunity, Washington lohn Ghigleri, Wallace Delma Gilbert, Preston Kenneth Giles, Moscow Larry Giles, Emmett Robert Gleason, Lewiston Moena Glenn, Kimberly Milton Goddard, Trail, B.C. Robert Goodwin, Boise Bruce Gordon, Weiser Harold Gordon, New York City, New Gail Graham, Kellogg Marilyn Grams, Spokane, Washington Kathleen Gray, Culdesac Marilyn Green, Twin Falls Robert Gregg, Potlatch W. L. Gugler, Spokane, Washington Richard Gregory, Princeton Howard Griggs, Twin Falls Frank Gunn, North Merrick, New York Allred Hagan, Moscow Frank Haglund, Grace lanies Haines, Lewiston lulius Hall, Miami, Florida Harriet Halstrom, Grangeville Nanoy Hamilton, Weiser laines Hansen, Bancroft Mary lean Hansen, idaho Falls Ann Harding, Nezperce Mary Harding, Nezperoe Elva lune Harlan, Colville, Washington Alton Harris, Mountain Home Farrel Harris, Eagle Washington York Patricia Harris, San Carlos, Calif. Ray Harris, Mountain Home Donald Hartman, Spokane, Washington William Hassler, Moscow Marjorie Hatton, Moscow John Hauhner, Spring Valley, New York Alfred Hayward, Clarkston, Washington Everett Headreok, Troy Beatrice Helander, Lewiston Sharon Henderson, ldaho Falls Gordon Henning, Dillon, Montana Charlotte Henry, Jerome James A, Henry, Milwaukee, Wisconsin l Eloise Herman, Genesee Wendell Higgins, Hagerman Ralph Hill, Nezperce Marion Hiskey, Twin Falls Clarence Hoalqand, Glenns Ferry Kenneth Hoagland, Glenns Ferry Margaret Hocklander, Mullan Donald Hodge, Palouse, Washington Roland Hodgins, Salt Lake City, Utah Robert Holder, Waterloo, Iowa Clair Hollingsworth, Preston Glenn Holm, Spokane, Washington David Holmes, Wilmington, Ohio David Holt, Nampa Dean Holt, Nampa Doris Homuth, Spokane, Washington Marlene Hopkins, Culdesac Anne Hoyt, Caldwell Howard Humphrey, Council Norma Hunt, Preston Stuart Hutchins, Minneapolis, Minnesota Don Hutchinson, Fairbanks, Alaska William lnghram, Lewiston Shirley Jackle, Moscow Thomas Jackson, Long Beach, Calif. Joann Jacobs, Council Rose Marie Jager, Great Falls, Montana Sheila Janssen, Moscow Vaughn Jasper, Council Kenneth Jenkins, Genesee Saylor Jeppson, Lewiston Wayne Jepson, Jerome Allen Johnson, Coeur d'Alene Donald Laverne Johnson, Genesee Eddie Johnson, Buhl Erwin Johnson, Boise George Johnson, Homer, Alaska James Johnson, Burley Laurence Johnson, Moscow Lynn Johnson, Preston Mary Johnson, Newport, Washington Richard Johnston, Orofino Ronald Johnston, Orotino Stowell Johnstone, Marsing Susanne Jones, Nampa Vivian Jones, Nampa Harley Jordan, Hepburn John Jutila, Mullen Roy Kaku, Weiser Dale Kassel, Blackfoot Jed Kaull, Great Falls, Montana Norman Kennedy, Nezperce Bruce Kenney, Idaho Falls Dorothy Kerby, Juliaetta John Kercheval, Coeur d'Alene Joyce Kern, Farmington, Washington Helen Kersey, St. Maries Duane Kirk, Payette Andrew Kirsch, North Bergern, New Jersey M. l. Kistler, Gooding Donna Kjose, Spokane, Washington Richard Kline, Twin Falls Donald Konicek, Buhl Frederick Kopke, Boise Virginia Korn, Eugene, Oregon Kenneth Kornher, Gooding Raymon Kranches, Smelterville Hartley Kruger, Spokane, Washington Iohn Kugler, American Falls Donald Kuper, Wendell John Lacy, Spokane, Washington Lewis Ladwig, Elmhurst, lllinois Lorin LaFoe, Moscow Walter Landeck, Glendale, Calif. Michaela Lane, South Dakota Lois Larch, Idaho Falls Wallace Larsen, Wallace Corinne Lauriente, Trail, B.C. LaVerna Lawrence, Deary Billy Leatham, Shelley Oliver Lee, Wallace Laurette Lefevre, Davenport, Washington Phil Leigh, Parma Keith Lenzinger, Clayton Donald Lesak, Cicero, Illinois lerry Leslie, Veradale, Washington Otto Leuschel, Lewiston Ray Liberg, Post Falls Laurence Limbaugh, Payette Cecil Link, Nampa Dorothy Lipp, Bonners Ferry William Lodge, Caldwell Liane Love, Buhl Vernon Lowry, St. Maries Mandius Lundal, Osborn William Luscher, Libby, Montana Douglas McBride, Wendell Mark McCarroll, Payette David McClun, Preston David McCreight, Port Huron, Michigan Kathryne McGahan, Troy lune McHone, Kooskia Bruce Mclntosh, Lewiston Nancy Mclntosh, Idaho Falls Chloe McKeever, Kendrick Lawrence McLean, Colbert, Washington Donald McManamon, St. Maries Graham McMullin, Canada Lois Maddox, Kellogg Nancy Magel, Twin Falls Robert Maize, Moscow Donald Maki, Lake Fork lacgue Marineau, Moscow lean Marker, Boise William Mather, Spokane, Washington Elven Matson, Nampa Bonnie Matthews, Idaho Falls Max Mathews, Hilo, Hawaii Glorian Maule, Payette Philip Meagher, Moscow Kenneth Meppen, Idaho Falls Loran Mercier, Aberdeen, Washington Marvin Michel, Plummer Glenn Miller, St. Anthony Kenneth Miller, Sandpoint Richard Miller, Lewiston Elzo Mink, Council Donald Mitchell, Terreton Francis Mithoug, Coeur d'Alene Marjorie Moline, Great Falls, Montana Laurence Monroe, Elko, Nevada Marilyn Morbeck, Coeur d'Alene Iames Morrison, Moscow Marie Moulton, Weiser Robert Mushlitz, Lewiston Delbert Naser, Council Horace Nealey, Aberdeen William Nelson, Montpelier Truman Newbry, Twin Falls Murry Numbers, McCall Iames Oates, Gooding Shirley Ochs, Genesee Bob Oehmeke, Cannon Ball, North Dakota lack O'Leary, Weiser Harlan Olson, Hill City Louise Omaley, Howe Richard Orme, St. Anthony Dean Osborne, Potlatch Sharon Osmundson, Idaho Falls Glenn Paine, Boise Eloise Pape, Mountain Home Keith Pardue, Ordnance, Oregon Roy Parker, Los Angeles, Calif, Marya Parkins, Marsing Ioan Parks, Moscow Mary Patano, Kellogg Harvey Pate, Nampa Howard Patz, lerome Marilyn Pearson, Boise .lack Perry, Lewiston Robert Perry, Sandpoint Carol Petersen, Payette Robert Peterson, Sandpoint William Peterson, Genesee Shirley Pettijohn, Castleford Marilyn Phillips, Spokane, Washington Ann Pickett, Wendell Howard Pickren, Downey Wellington Pierce, Twin Falls Patsy Pieser, Lewiston Iames Pline, Nampa lohn Pline, Nampa Helen Pohlod, Moscow Greta Polson, Letonia Marilyn Pond, Idaho Falls Bert Poole, Idaho Falls Patricia Posnick, Mullan Eleanor Powell, Moscow Garth Powell, Idaho Falls Peggy Powers, Salmon Richard Prater, Glenns Ferry Lillian Pratt, Star Iames Price, Driggs Iohn Pring, Dishman, Washington Margaret Pruett, Seattle, Washington Mona Pulliam, Anderson Dam Acel Ann Purdy, Portland, Oregon Beverly Ouick, Spokane, Washington Richard Raivio, Mullan Arlene Ralph, Clarks Fork Robert Rawlins, Coeur d'Alene Raymond Remp, Libby, Montana Lonny Rrenirow, Wendell Clayton Reynolds, Potlatch Lawrence Riedesel, Moscow Donald Riggin, Cambridge Barbara Rinaldi, Kellogg William Ringert, Buhl lohn Roberts, Elk Rapids, Michioan Valerie Robison, Weiser Herman Rosse, New York City, New York lames Roupe, Spokane, Washington Robert Howe, Mountain Home ,loseph Rueqqer, Havel Crest, lllinoi Wayne Runnion, Coeur fl'Alene lean Ray Russell, Granqovillo Faye Sargent, Pittsluurqh, Pennsylvtim 1 Lois Saunders, Hazelton Marjorie Schauer, Naples Rolnert Scheloske, Weiser Rolvert Schild, Pocatello Lucille Schron, Granqeville Francis Schulz, ldaho Falls Willa Schumann, Potlatczh Beverly Schuster, Spokane, Washinqlon Elizabeth Scott, Lewiston Gordon Scott, Colville, Washington Wesley Scott, Post Falls Robert Seeles, Pocatello Robert Sell, Sandpoint Edwin Shane, Emmett Katherine Shane, Emmett William Shaw, Boise Nancy Shelton, Moscow Francis Sherwood, Boise Frank Shrontz, Boise lohn Smden, Moscow Norma Siple, Homedale Lois lean Settle, Moscow Edrue Smith, Ketchum Edward Smith, Pocatello Frank Sinith, Los Angeles, C'alit. Keith Snodqrass, Meridian Carolyn Snowdy, Spokane, Washington Don Soya, Blackfoot Walter Speelman, Opportunity, Washington Gerald Sperrazzo, Brooklyn, New York Susan Staley, Moscow lohn Stazel, Veradale, Washington Herb Steinman, Ashton Harold Stevens, Worley Keith Stevens, Worley George Stewart, Craiqmont Margaret Stewart, Moscow Bert Steiner, Lewiston Norma Stralevich, Kelloqq Richard Straw, Stites Frank Stone, Nampa Alice Sturges, Chicago, lllinois Roger Styner, Paul Ward Sutton, Midvale Mary Swantvy, Spokane, Washinqton Bruce Sweeney, Lewiston Patricia Sweeney, Sioux Falls, South Dakota Barbara Sweet, Meridian Dorothy Sylvester, Spokane, Washinqton Robert Tatko, Craiqmont William Taylor, Twin Falls Ivan Teare, Moscow lohn Telqener, Sandpoint Patricia Terry, Spokane, Washinqton Donald Theophilus, Moscow lrene Thomas, Wapato, Washington Vernon Thomas, Nezperce Donna Mae Thompson, Spokane, Washington Fred Thompson, Burley Mary Thompson, Moscow Douglas Thorp, Moscow Darleen Tibbitts, St. Anthony Paul Tobin, Potlatch loan Tolmie, Homedale Kenneth Tolmie, Parma Theodore Torok, Pine lohn Tovey, Malad Iohn Townsend, Hagerman Beth Tunnicliti, Moscow Vera Ulinder, Potlatch Delores Uria, Gooding William Van Verth, Payette Grove, Pennsylvania Shirlie Vorous, Clarkston, Washington Donovan Vowels, Princeton Barbara Wahl, Boise Donald Walbrecht, Shoshone lane Walters, Boise Richard Warren, Docton, Washington Dale Waters, Rigby Lloyd Waters, Mountain Home Bobby Webster, Ierome Charlotte Weeks, Boise Io Etta Weeks, Swan Valley Iohn Wegher, Durango, California Nancy Weitz, Caldwell Patricia Weltzin, Moscow Zoe Wendle, Spokane, Washington Dianne Wendling, Soda Springs Richard White, Aurora, New York Ierry Whiting, Spokane, Washington Bruce Whitmore, Moscow Iean Whitmore, Moscow Keith Wiedenheft, lerome Iack Wigen, Canada Donald Wilde, Lake Fork Leslie Wilde, Eagle Roland Wilde, Moscow Ralph Wilder, Meridian Ellen Wilderman, Moscow Charles Williams, Burley Maurine Williams, Spokane, W Patricia Williamson, Palouse, Alice Wilson, Moscow Marian Wilson, Buhl Kenneth Wohllaib, Twin Falls Albert Wohlschlegel, Idaho Falls Yvonne Wolf, Burley Burlen Wolford, Gooding ashington Washington David Womeldorii, Coeur d'Alene Ruth Woods, Glenns Ferry Homer Woolf, Idaho Falls Ioan Wordel, Big Timber, Montana Bruce Wormald, New York City, Ne Beverly Wright, Lewiston lames Wright, Lansing, Illinois Thomas Wright, Lewiston Carl Yocum, Pullman, Washington Boni Yragui, Twin Falls Gertrude Zapp, Nampa Richard Zaring, American Falls Richard Zyzalc, Carnegie, Pennsyl w York vania 347 163, 340 Babin, Eugene Elmer ........ . . . 219: Abbott, Abbott, Abbott, Acock, A Charles Thomas, . Leslie Wayne ,... Maxine Eloise .... Robert Noel ....., ,...l21 .,.. 193 Adams, Donald Richard ..... Adams, Elizabeth Adelia. . Adams, Glenn Henry .... Adsero, Robert Wayne. . . Agenbroad, Owen Darst ,,,,, Ailor, Stewart Glenn .,.... Ailor, Velva Caroline. .... , .....ffff127 Ainsworth, Marvel Rufus ..,.........,..,.. Albertson, Patsy Eloise .....,. Albrethsen, Adrian Edysel ..,, Albright, George Edward .... Alexander, Marvin Romeo .,,. Alldaffer, Robert Cecil ....,, 116,127,136 ....88, 90, 93 1 123 174 1501 307 123 147 147 280 155 124 174 174 1 1 1 1 1 1 313 330 347 308 340 283 124 308 330 194 349 340 340 323 349 340 380 Al Lee, Guy Louis ........ . , . ..,. , . . . 104 Allen, Gene Wilburn ..,, .,.,. ..., 3 3 0 Allen, Gwena .....,.,.. . .,.,.. 150, 340 Allen, Kenneth lames .,.. .... ,.,, . . 123, 207, 313 Allen, Lafayette lunior. . .,,,...,....,.... . 207, 290 Allen, Richard Gordon ..........,..,..,... 195, 313 Allen, Roger Baker .......... 109, 111, 119, 195, 330 Allison, Martha lane ...,. ,........ . . . 127, 150, 340 Allison, Ralph Roger ..,.... ....,......... 1 94, 340 Allison, Robert Quimby ............ 97, 127, 195, 349 Allyson, lohn A ......... .....,. 2 07, 251, 254, 330 Ambrose, Tommy W .......... 122, 213, 220, 255, 313 Amos, William Frank .... ............ 2 40, 241, 283 Amos, Don Albert .......,. ............... 1 05, 348 Amos, Leroy Albert ......... ....... 1 29, 297, 298 Anderson, Alfred Burt lr ..... ............ 1 21, 313 Anderson, Alma Eilene .... .... 1 20, 138, 139, 283 Anderson, Dale Vernon .... .... 1 37, 198, 199, 318 Anderson, Dale Evans .,... .......,., 1 95, 340 Anderson, Edward Allan ..,, ...... 9 9, 101, 330 Anderson, Eleanor Eloise .,,, ..... 1 53, 349 Anderson, Imogene lo ...,.. ,... 1 47, 330 Anderson, Janice Geneva ..... . . 161, 349 Anderson, Kenneth Lee ...., .,..,.. 1 00 Anderson, Leroy Malcus ..... ..,.,.... 1 00 Anderson, Marilyn lean ....,.. ..... l 45, 340 Anderson, Milton Alphonso. . . .....,...... .283 Anderson, Orson Eugene .... . . , . 106, 207, 330 Anderson, Shirley Belle .....,. ....... , . . 127, 349 Anderson, Wayne Delbert ..... ........... 2 57, 258 Anderson, Wilford Mack .... . ....,,...,....... 283 Andrew, Phyllis Ethel ...... .... 1 36, 142, 143, 330 Andrew, Wilbur Louis ...... ........... 2 07, 330 Andrews, Donald Ardell ................,.. 124, 340 Andrews, Richard Carlton ,......,... . . 118, 207, 349 Androes, Elaine Muriel .......... 88, 89, 96, 147, 298 Androes, Gaylord Marvin ,,,,,,.. .....,......... 3 30 Andrus, Dale Rolland .....,. . .,... .124, 207, 340 Anno, Mary Dorothy ......, ....,..,.... 1 39, 349 Anno, Robert Roy ,..,,. . . . .,.,..,........... .283 Anstine, Ray Howard, ......... , .... , . . 127, 207, 311 Araquistain, Antone Paul ...... 69, 192, 193, 207, 328 339, 340 Aresvik, Clarence .......... .......... 9 7, 199, 330 Armstrong, Richard Merrill .... . .....,... 253 Arnold, Earl Emerson. ....... ....,... 2 98 Arte, Raymond Vincent ..,...... . . . 349 Aschenbrener, Edward loseph ..... .,.., 1 25 Ascuaga, lohn loe ............. . . .69, 188 Ashby, Roger William ..,... . . 185, 330 Asher, Gene Tunney ...... , . 100, 349 Ashmead, Arlin Nathan. . . , . .... . . .349 Asker, lerry Richard ......, . . 174, 349 Asker, lohn Oliver lr ...... . ...,. 174 Aspitarte, Edward Frank ..... , ....... 298 Aston, .lames Howard ....... . , 137, 340 Atchison, Beth Tillotson .,.,. ........ 1 55, 330 Atchison, lames Edward ..... ......,... 2 45, 330 Atwood, Alan Francis ....... ............... 3 30 Atwood, Richard Thomas ....,....... 98, 99, 101, 330 Auger, Sylvia Cecilia ..,.......... 127, 150, 282, 283 Aune, Torleif ..............,.,.........,. 123, 313 Aurnhammer, Douglas Robert ......,....... 185, 349 Austad, Margaret Helen .,,.,.,,... 116, 126, 145, 340 Axt, Alvin Frederick ..,...,... .,.....,.,. 1 95, 349 B Bacon, lohn Earl ........ Badraun, Gloria Grace. Baggett, lames Ronald. . Bagly, Frederick Ralph. .,..l20, Bahm, Rita Noriene ...,. ..,. , .... 1 35, Bahr, Arnold lustin ..., ..,........... 1 04, Bahr, Ella. . ...........,....,.... 127, 133, Bahr, Vernon Allen ..,.... 67, 68, 113, 121, 255, 302, Bailey, Bailey, Bailey, Betty Lu . ...... . . lohn William .... Lois Maxine .... Baily, Truman Arvis ..,.. .' ,' .' .' .361 36 1 Baillie, lohn Melvin ....... ....... 1 24, Bainbridge, lames Leo, , . . . , . ,.., . . . . . . Bair, Preston Gale ........ .... 1 08, 137, Baisch, Eugene Ralph ..... .........,.. Baker, Bernard Rae ...,... ..., 1 24, 183, Baker, Charlotte Louise ...,, ........... Baker, .lames Gilbert. . . Baker, Patricia Marie .,., Baker, Bakes, Ted. . ........ . Donald Bruce .... Bales, Claudia lean ..,,. Balka, Beverly La Don .... Ball, Emmalyn. ..,.... , . Ball, Evelyn Louise .... Ball, Shirley Ann ....... . .'.'.1oc5 , .... 116 . , . .69, ...,......138,4 139: Ballard, Ballew, Earl Leroy ....,......,.,..., George . ......,.,....,.... . . Barbee, Frank Chase lr ...... 126, 199 Barber, Norman Dale. . 1 1213 261 Barber, Robert Henry .,... .......,.,..,...l74Z 159, 121, 201, 141 207: 147 171 328 143 166 1 74 2071 26 1 26 7 161: 161, 261 187: 159 143 283 1471 139 307: 216 262 251 201 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 290 290 349 340 313 340 349 283 231 330 330 132 298 340 323 330 340 195 349 340 330 340 283 340 349 340 327 349 283 308 21 7 290 330 349 451'z1zzQfz1' 4615645 Barbour, Sally Lou ,,.,. Barinaga, lohn ........,.. Barinaga, Nash loseph. . . Barker, Barker, Barline, Barnes, Barnes, Barnes, Barnes, Boyd Craighton. . Kenneth Ray ..... Elizabeth Muir, . . Harold Truman ,,.., lack Arthur ,..... Orville Lee .,... Willard .....,.,. Barraclough, lack Thomas. , Barrus, Ruel Hale ........ Barstow, Robert Angus. . Barton, Frank Vincent .... Barton, Milton Francis ,... Barton, Robert Erle ..... Barton, Virginia Lee .... Base, Betty Laurine ..,.. Basile, loseph Hugh ..., Basile, loseph Vincent .,.. Bassett, Gary Williams .... Bates, Mary Lee ....... Bath, Lawrence Lee ...... Batt, Vernon Maynard, . . . Battaglia, Phillip ....... Battan, Charles Roy ....., Battles, Charles Henry ...... Bauer, Bernice Barbara ..,... Baugh, Clarence Melville .... Baugh, Vida Marie .......... Baum, Russell Oliver ...... 96, 99, Baumgartner, Donald George. Baxter, Constance Laurel ..,.. Baxter, Gary Glen .......,.. Baxter, Robert Lewis ......... Baxter, Vernon Eugene ,..,. . . Beach, lohn Churchill lr .,,.....,..,.. Beadles, David Owen .,... Beadles, Delores Alta .....,.. Bean, Elizabeth ......... Bean, Elvan Lee ...,.. Bean, Keith Allen .,......... Beardsley, Alice Suzanne .... Becher, Arthur Lawrence ..,.. Beck, Christy David ......., Beck, Greta Marie ....... Becker, Donald Leslie ....., Becker, Donald Stanton ....,., Becker, Gerald Lester ........ Becker, loyce Eleanor ...... . . ....82, 113, '.'.'f.62,'16sf . .....242, 243, .fff123f fff127Q146,' ....71, 76, ..fQfQs7j '166,' fff fQ12sf 166,' 121, 176, 123, f f f f .'1s3,' 2421 180, 213, 215, 163, 104, 100, 133, 160, ., ..,... 149, ' 213,'214I 21s,' ....114, 144, . 78, 116, Beckman, Fred Arthur ...... ,...., 1 02, Beckman. lesse Karl ......... Beckstead, David Woolley .... Beckwith, Robert William .,... Bedford, Ernest Dresser ..... Beer, lohn Francis .....,.. BeesleY, Robert Lynn ,,... Beeson, Phillip Alan .... . . . Beguhl, Marvin Ray ..... . . . Behre, Charles Walter .,.. Bell, Hazel Bernieta ..... Bell, lames Edgar .,.., Bell, loe Wafford ..... Bell, Loyd Schirmer ..,, Bellamy. Richard Elroy. . . Bellos, Eugene ,..,..... . Bellos, George Fotos lr. . . Benedict, Clinton Henry ..... Bengtson, lohn Howard ....,. Benjamin, Dale LeRoy. .70, 71 Bennett, Aarl lohnson .,..... Bennett, Lowry Milton, ...,.. Benscoter, Richard Lyle .,... Benson, Beverly lo ....... . . Bergen, lames Mangan .,.... Berger, Howard Peter .,.,..., Bergerud, Arthur Thompson, Bergquist, Kenneth Glenn .... Bergstrom, lohn Charles.. , . Bermensolo, Claudio l,. . . Bernat, Lorraine Marie. . . . . . Berntsen, Carl Martin .... Berry, Billy Emerson, . . . Berry, Charles Arthur ..,. Berry, Patricia lean ...,..., Bershon, Richard Yale ,...... Bertrand, Genette Elizabeth. . Bertrand, Melton Arthur ..... Bessent, lames Thomas, . . . . Betts, lames Calvin .,.,. Betts, Robert Daryl ,...... Bicktord, Colleen layne ..., Bidwell, Morse Leland .,..... Bieber, Ruth Margaret ....... Bielenberg, Leonard Herman. Bienz, Darrel Rudolph ,.,..., Biker, Betty Anne ....,,..... Billings, Ruth ............ Bills, Ramona Laverne .... Birch, loseph Patrick ..... Birdt, George .,.....,..... Bishop, Robert Louis. ,...,.. Bishop, Winston Howard ...,. Black, lohn Ray ,... ...... Black, Lois Cundall ...., Black, Odell Sirle ....... Black, Sherman Eugene ...... Black, Thurman McTarnahan. Blackburn, Gordon Lee .... ,, Blakely, Kathleen lane ...... Blalock, Orron ,.,....,... Blanton, limmy Charles .... Blanton, Paul Leslie ..,,... Blenden, Louise Ellen .... Bliss, Frederick David ..,..,.. Block, Milbourne King .,.... Blom, lohn Olaf ........ 197. 152, 121, 121, 126f 2131 217,' 124, 219, 119, 132, 123, ,Q I '. '. .1-1.8, , 86, 137, ...l16, '.'.'76,'67 ...105, 119, 198, 2131 '144,' 118, 125, iso 1 129, 100, 136. 125, 121, 126, 129 137 166 199: ,...71,80 .fffss ...ffas ......83 136 125 1 145 123 164 1 229, 157, 255, 213 262,' 123, 174, 160, 150, 124, 1 18, 147, 261, 167, 193, 124, 174, 145, 174, 283, 179, 207, 159, .99, 243, 260, 262, 21 1, 161, 150, 121, 251, 288, 145, 274, 146. 171, 171, 187, 137, 195, 167, 185, 262, 251, 150. 173, 207,' 123, 199. 213' .68, 145, 'issf 179, 201, 171, 155, 263 1 171, 161, 173 124 1551 163 179, 207, 145, 150, 161 167 195 204 260 102 161 258 129 329 157 .195 185 .183 160,161 183 .213 214.217 124 1 262 257, 134, 1 1 313 125 340 233 330 290 73 218 297 330 313 340 125 313 313 161 298 257 340 340 283 283 340 340 318 340 330 283 288 330 313 349 349 290 262 330 340 340 283 330 252 330 163 298 125 349 '349 .349 179 I 299 308 349 349 . 340 188 340 349 313 330 340 340 330 257 340 1 1 1 330 313 290 349 329 298 260 330 340 257 330 349 303 290 302 319 318 121 282 340 349 349 257 340 257 165 349 283 349 290 307 340 330 298 340 349 306 257 298 330 340 349 297 330 290 323 283 349 302 340 330 340 221 262 340 Blomguist, Robert Andrew ..,,, . . 199, 290 Bloom, lames Robert ....,.,. ........ 2 90 Bloom, lohn Robert ..,.,... ..,. 1 95, 349 Blosser, George Edgar. . . ..., 187, 283 Blower, Clara Ellene ..,,. . , . , 141, 340 Boehm, Raymond Lee ..... ...... 3 30 Bolander, Paul Earl .,.. ,.... ,... .... 3 1 3 Bolingbroke, Donald Dave. . . .... 259, 261 Bollar, Louis Paulo. ,.,..,. ......,. 1 35 Bolton, Marilyn ...,..,.... ..., 1 41, 349 Bolton, William Edward .... .... 1 71, 330 Bonar, Charles Frank ..........,..... ,.., 2 07, 330 Bonir, Pete Domenic .........,....... .... 1 74, 330 Bonnett Howbert, William ....,....... . . , . 124, 340 Bonnett, Mary Elizabeth .... 65, 69, 158, 159, 283, 330 Booth, Herbert Raymond .............. ........ 2 83 Borg, ,lohn Olaf ......,.........,.... ,... 122, 313 Borgen, Donald Edgar ....... .... 2 07, 283 Borrowman, Wayne Nelson. .,., 195, 330 Botieff, William lohn .,...., ..,... 2 57 Bottinelli, Charles Angelo lr.. . , , . ..,. 199, 340 Bovard, lames Chester ...... . ..... , ...,.... 349 Bowen, Betty B ........ .......,... 1 00, 125, 150, 290 Bowen, Frederick Arlow ...,,........ .... 2 57, 349 Bowlby, Carol Marie ,,.., ...... 6 5, 69, 142, 143, 330 Bowles, Frank lr. .........,..,.,.... , . . , 207, 349 Bowman, Dorothy Marie ..,,. .,,.,.. .... 1 5 0, 349 Bowman, Keith Rhead ...,... ..,... 1 22, 259, 330 Bowmer, Richard Glenn ..... ..,......... 1 95, 349 Boyce, Clayton David ...... .... 1 05, 123, 174, 340 Boyd, Thomas Gregg ........ ..,. 1 05, 166, 167, 290 Boyd, Truman Harrison .lr .... ............ 2 60, 340 Boyen, Ralph William lr. , . ,... 111, 118, 258, 349 Boyle, Frederick Henry .... .,...... 2 36, 237, 262 Boyle, Leo Blaine .....,.. ...., 1 05, 121, 207, 340 Boyle, Louis MacGregor .......... 178, 179, 283, 284 Boyle, Richard Gordon ........ 70, 137, 211, 275, 290 Brabb, Betty Louise Lenz. . . .....,.,. , ...... . 290 Brabb, George lacob ......,. ....,.. .....,.. 2 9 0 Bracht, Fern Arlene .,........ . . . 153, 340 Brackebusch, Leonard Albert .... , . . 134, 307 Bradley, Richard Leigh ........ .,...,. 8 7 Brady, Charles Olen ......., .... , . , ...... 290 Brainard, Llewellyn Albert. , , . ..... .,.... 2 60, 340 Brammer, Harold August ..... . . . 122, 131, 134, 330 Branch, Weldon Earl. ..,.. .......... 1 74, 349 Brandt, Elroy D.. .,..... . . .... 105, 179, 349 Braucher, Dale 1 .,...........,.,.,,....... 174, 290 Bray, Stanley Mervin .......,....,.... .99, 101, 104 Breier, Mary lane ,.... ...., 6 9, 70, 71, 137, 157, 284 Bressler, Beverly Lee .,........,.,,... 137, 141, 340 Brevick, Barbara lean .......,.,....,..... 161, 340 Brewer, Clifton Carroll ...... ...,..,.. ......... 3 4 0 Breysse, Peter Adrian ........,.....,. 195, 245, 340 Briggs, lames Marvin ,..........,.. .......,... . 340 Briggs, Kenneth Ralph .... 67, 106, 113, 174, 183, 284 Briggs, Van William .........,...,... .68, 245, 340 Briggs, William George ....,......... ........ 3 30 Briggs, William Winfield .... ....... 1 78, 179, 313 Brighton, Don Hintze ..,... .,... 5 4, 174, 306, 308 Brimhall, Preston B. ...... ..... ......... 2 6 0 Brinkerhoff, Lorin C. ..,. ........ 1 95, 340 Brizee, Harry Alfred lr ..... ..... 1 05, 349 Broadhead, Patricia Allen. . . . ....... . 330 Brock, Betty Lou ......,,... . . .136, 155, 349 Brock, Darrell William ..... ..... 1 95, 330 Brockman, Barbara .,.,.. , . , 100, 143, 341 Brockman, Earl Francis. . . ............ . 341 Brodd, Marilyn Ann .... ...... , .78, 157, 349 Brogan, lohnnyR ......... .... 2 13, 214, 216, 217 Bromseth, Shirley Mae ...., .......... 1 50, 330 Brooks, Anna Belle ....,. ..... 1 33, 161, 349 Brooks, Bennie Lynn. ...,., ............ 1 93 Brooks, Donald Clark .....,.. . . . 195, 341 Brooks, Montford Meholin .... ..,.. 1 83, 341 Bross, Richard Harold ..... . ........ 171, 318 Brough, Carlyle Aldous .... . . . 104, 108, 349 Brower, William Reid ........ . ,... 195, 349 Brown, Carlyle ............... .,...... 1 23 Brown, Caroline Sarmiento. .,.. 150, 330 Brown, Dean Bruce ,,.,.. .... . , .,.. 201, 290 Brown, Donna Lee ........ ...... 9 7, 143, 349 Brown, Fred Clark ..... ............... 2 84 Brown, Helen Alice ...... .....,... 6 5, 147, 331 Brown, loan Marilyn ....... .... 1 27, 155, 282, 331 Brown, Melvin Edward, , . . ,... . . .207, 261, 341 Brown, Natalia lean ......... ...... 9 7, 155, 331 Brown, Patricia Lou .......,,. .... 1 61, 284 Brown, William Arrnistead ..... ..... 1 93, 349 Browning, Keith Matson ..,.. ........... 2 84 Browning, Lloyd ,...... ..... ....,..,. 1 2 5, 303 Broyles, Donna lean Naomi ......,... 69, 88, 141, 327 328, 331 Brudie Donald Mathew ...,,.. 125, 206, 207, 261, 290 Bruins, Franklin Brewer ........... 111, 124, 174, 318 Brunelle, Alvin Bernard ................... 124, 331 Brunzell, Bryan Worth ................ 108, 193, 341 Bryan, Dennis Dale .......... 182, 183, 256, 262, 331 Bucklin, Thomas Culver ...........,.., 105, 167, 341 Budd, Beryl Duane ....,.. . . . . 100, 171, 341 Buerkle, lack Philip ....... ..... 1 95, 331 Buhn, William Kenneth .... ........... 1 24 Bulkley, limmie Dale ..... ............... ..... 3 4 9 Bull, David Morse .................... 111, 204, 341 Bullock, Edward Allen .................,.,. 174, 291 Bunnell, lohn Gerald ...... 76, 79, 125, 166, 167, 331 Bunting, Robert Dale ...................,..... 90, 92 Burch, Donna Mae ..,..,.......... 98, 136, 159, 341 Burcham, Beverly lean Freeburg ........... ..... 3 41 Burchard, William lunior ......... . . . 124, 195, 331 Burggraf, Billy Dean ..,..,...... ...... 2 07, 349 Burke, Beverly Anne ...,.,. ..... 1 53, 349 Burke, Laura Elizabeth ........ . . . 150, 331 Burkhart, Anita lane Mclnnis .... , . ..... 298 Burkhart, lohn Napier ...,.... . . . .... .284 Burkhart, May Napier .... ,.,.., . .,.,.. 2 83, 284 Burks, Evelyn Rosalie .....,,..... , . , ,l16, 141, 341 Burleigh, Katherine Georgeanne ......... 71 159, 284 Burnham, Luther Charles 111, ..... ..... ..... 8 6 Burns, Calvin Earnest ..,.,..... . . . .... .349 Burns, loe Howard ........ . . . 183 341 Burns, Raymond Andrew .,.. .349 357 Burns, Robert Neil ....... Burns, Walter larnes lr .,.. Burns, William Cedric ...... Burroughs, lohn Bradford ,.... Burrows, Lees loslyn lr ..,.. . Burstedt, William Donald ,... Burt, Boyd Frank ......,... . . Burton, lames Arthur .... . . . I f 'f,'164,' iii ics Bush, Eugene Lorin .... .... 6 9, 125, 137 Bush, Lois Lucille ..... ............,. Bush, Wayne Bowen .... ,..,..,..,,. Buswell, Nadine Louise ..,. ..., 1 27 Butkus, Joseph lohn ..,,. Butler, Frances Lillian. . . . Byrne, Alfred Francis ......... Byrne, Pieternella Lanting .,.. Byrnes, Peter loseph ..,.... C Cahill, Clifford Alan. , . . , . . Calcote, Margaret Ethlyn .,.. Caldwell, Vernon Paul ..... . Callihan, Darrell Albert ..... 111199 iso ' .1404 f f f Calvert, lohn Howard ,,.., ,,,.,.... Cameron, Bill E.. .,...... ,.,... . . Campbell, Donald Paul .,... . . . Campbell, Omar Madison ..... . . . Campbell, Richard LeRoy ..... . 125,302 101,284 .....313 118,349 ,.H 256 .... 123 195,349 ,.,. 313 167 302 150,349 .... 331 161,341 ..,. 331 147 298 123,313 ..., 284 111 .... 331 297 298 201,341 199,341 .,H 331 183 331 207,318 207,318 125 Cannon, loseph Henry ..... .,..... .... 1 0 0 Carbuhn, Richard Alan. . . ..,...... 185 341 Carley, Donald Stiles .,,... ..... , . 125, 167 331 Carlson, Betty Lou ......,., ..., 1 00, 127, 161 341 Carlson, Herbert Gustav ..., .... 1 13, 115, 231, 234 235, 274, 291 Carlson, Robert lohn ....,., .... 1 24, 194, 195 349 Carlson, Vernon Franklin ,.... ....,....,. 2 60, 284 Carmichael, Ralph L, ....,.. ,.,.,.. , . , . . . 124 Carney, Lona Mae .,...,.. .,..,.,.. 1 27, 150, 331 Carney, Raymond lr .... ,..........,.. 2 07, 331 Carnie, Marybelle ..,.....,, 127, 133, 147, 282, 284 Carothers, Lloyd Archie .....,...,....,... .... 2 84 Carothers, Lois Sheneberger ........,...... 155, 331 Carpenter, Ralph Windsor .... , .,.... 166, 167, 284 Carr, Paulina lune, ....,... .... 9 9, 100, 147, 341 Carrick, Daisy Dee ,.....,. ...... 1 33, 150, 349 Carroll, Don Lynn ,.,. . . .........,.. 349 Carroll, Omar Eugene ..... ..,,..... 3 31 Carson, loseph Harold ,.... ......,., 1 71, 341 Carson, Norma lsabel. . . ........ 69, 139, 341 Carter, Margaret lean ,.... .... 1 44, 145, 190, 291 Casebolt, Glenn Leslie .... ....,.. 2 59, 262, 350 Casey, Osborne Elliott ........ ......... 2 50 Castellaw, Donald Wayne ..... .... 3 07, 308 Caswell, lohn Willard ....,., ...... 1 23 Caudle, Arlie Edward lr ....................... 194 Caward, lac Edmond,. .,.,. . , ,.., ,...,.,. . 87, 350 Cespedes, Leopoldo Sanchez .................,. 129 Chadband, lames Frank ...... 180, 213, 215, 217, 255 260, 327, 331 Chadwick, Howard William ....... 104, 124, 195, 350 Chaftin, Allen W, .,..,....... ,......,. . . .307, 308 Chamberlain, Richard Edwin. . . .......... 193, 331 Chaney, Dale Marvin ................. 167, 262, 341 Chase, Clinton lrvin ......,..,..,. 206, 207, 283, 284 Cherry, Parley Edmond ..,... 105, 106, 108, 124, 218 Chetwood, William Earl ....,.,.,..,.,.,... 174, 341 Chichester, Ben Willard ,.,. ...... , . ,... 132, 284 Chichester, Roger 1 ........ . . . 132, 331 Choate, Leo Edward ......,.. ,...... , 341 Choate, Vernon Cecil .......... . . . 171, 350 Choules, Charles Willard ............,... ,... , . 350 Christensen, Andrew Alexander, ..,.,... ,,... 6 9, 341 Christensen, Anna Coleen ..... 65, 88, 89, 90, 91, 160 161, 284 Christensen, Dee Conard ...........,...,... 183, 350 Christensen, Neal R. ..,,......,..,...,.., 81, 90, 284 Christensen, Robert Baynham ......,.,.,.,..... 331 Christian, Glen Elwood ........... 212, 213, 217, 235 251, 253 Christianson, Clair Curtis ..... ...,.,.,. ,... 3 1 3 Chugg, lack Claude ,..,... . , ..... 195, 331 Church, Catherine Lillian ..... ...,,... 1 39, 350 Church, Helen Margaret .... .... 1 16, 139, 341 Church, Thomas .......... . , . , ....... 303 Churchill, Shirley Anne .... ,... 9 8, 155, 350 Churchill, William Marvin .... ...... , 255, 298 Churchill, Winston Herbert ..... .... 2 Ol, 255 331 Churchman, Edward Fletcher .... ....... .... 3 5 0 Churchman, loan Clair ...,......,.,.,. 135, 157 331 Churchman, Wilson Francis ......... 68, 86 195 291 Churilla, Michael Stephen ,..., . .,.,.,. 105 195 350 Clark, Charles Ewing ,,.. 126, 207, 238, 262, 314 350 Clark, Dewey Ellsworth ........,..,.,...,. ,.,. 1 24 Clark, Herschel Pettit. , ...,...,...,...... ..,. 2 98 Clark, lane .......,... ...65, 81, 153 341 Clark, Kenneth Gale ,... .,.......... 3 50 Clark, Robert William ..... ,..... 1 25 262 Clark, William Donald ...... . .... 291 Clarke, Margaret Alberta ..... ..... 1 47 341 Clatfelter, Kenneth Alvin ..,..,.........,.,. 122 284 Clausen, Paul Carlton .,,.............. 100, 105 350 Clauser, Barbara Mae ...... 96, 98, 99, 133, 150. 331 Clayborne, lohn William lr ................ 109, 111 Cleaveland, Elbert Channing .............. 193, 318 Clegg, lcseph Louis ........... ..... 1 23, 314 Clements, Reed ...,.,........ ....., 1 67, 303 Clitt, Marian Lyle .....,, ..... 8 1 153, 331 Clizer, Edwin Eugene ...........,.... ,104, 118, 341 Cloninger, Floyd Warren ,,..,............. 207, 341 Clyde, Erlene Mae .....,. 55, 127, 136, 145, 348 350 Clyde, Mary Elizabeth .................. 69 145 331 Coble, loan ..,.....,....,..,.,. 88, 92, 97, 159 341 Cochrane, Frank Addison ........,... ,......... 1 00 Code, Fordyce William ..,...........,. 166 167 284 Coffey, Boyce Baldwin .....,......,.,......... 124 Cogswell, Darwin Dwaine .... 137, 179, 251, 253 341 Cole, Joseph Wayne ................,......... 308 Cole, Laverne Larraine .... . . .88, 89, 91, 150 331 Collett, Harold Edwin ..,.... ........... 1 95 341 Collins, Bonese Elonno ....... ....., 1 00, 145, 350 Collinsworth, Eugene Russell .... ........... 3 31 Colquitt, Roy Sutton lr ........ ......... 2 13 255 Colombus, Barbara Ann .... ........,. 8 7, 147 350 Colwell, Bruce Edward ..... .... 1 24, 207 261 318 Compton, Laura May ...........,......... 141 341 Comstock, Gerald Maurice ....,.., 127, 171, 307 308 Condie, George Richard ,.,, .....,.... 3 50 Cone, Roger Reed ......,. 358 '153 314 Cone, Rose Marie .,,....,., ..........,. 1 61, 341 Congdon, Darrell Guerdon ........ 137, 192, 193, 291 Conley, Vincent Charles ..,, ,........... 2 01, 331 Connors, lames Patrick ,... ..,..,. . . 167, 341 Cook, Douglas lesse .,..,.... ....... ,,.. 1 2 1 Cook, Frederick Thomson. . , .... 124 251, 341 Cook, Gordon Bruce ...... ....,,.. 1 71, 350 Cook, Marian Christy .... .,,... 1 00, 145, 350 Cooley, Reuben Hall ....... ,...,...... 1 95, 350 Coombs, Wendell Paul .... ................. 1 1 1 Cope, Mabel Elaine ,,.. . . , .... 116, 127, 147 341 Copenhaver, Beth Eilene .... .......... ..., 2 8 4 Coppinger, Eugene Alan .... .,....... .... 1 2 2 Corak, Paul loseph ........ . .... 121 Corbett, lames Leroy .... . . . 171 350 Corbett, Richard Arlan ...... ,.,... 1 25 350 Cordes, Gordon William ..., ....... , . 195, 331 Cornell, Lila Claire ........,. .... 1 33, 147, 350 Ccrtner, Claude Lawrence .... ....,. . , . , 260 Cosho, Louis H ......,..... . ..,, 183, 303 Costello, Earle Evans, ...... .,.. 7 1, 72, 74 Cothern, lohn Raymond ,,,,, . . . 201, 331 Couch, lay Ellsworth .......,. , .... 255 Coulter, David Chamberlain. . . ,.,..,. 97 131 Coulton, Thomas Evans lr .,..,.., ...... 3 25 241 Coumerilk, Beula Lee McKenna ........ 132 150, 350 Coupe, Oliver Zane ........... .... 1 23 314 Coval, Serge Sherwood .,,.. ..,.,. 2 01 331 Cox, Donald Laird ...,.. .....,,,.,., 3 14 Cox, Elizabeth loan .... ..,. 1 36, 153 350 Cox, lames Richard ..., ....... 8 7 201, 350 Coyne, Keith Milton ..... ........,., 1 95, 341 Crabb, Warren Francis .,.. ........,... 1 24, 135 Craddock, Carolyn loy .... ,... 1 37, 152 153, 284 Craig, Eugene Sidney ..... ..,.,,......,. 1 21, 314 Cramblet, Molly Eileen ,,....,. 69, 137, 152 153, 331 Crane, David Aaron ..... ....,......... 1 95, 331 Crane, George Ralph .... ...,. 2 83, 284 Crane Gladys Pfeiffer .... ...... 2 83, 284 Crane, lames Oral lr .... ....... 2 42, 243 Craner, David Arthur ,... ..,.. 1 21, 174, 341 Craner, Lyle Aamodt .,,,.. ...... . . . . . . . 331 Craner, Merle Richard ...,. , .,......... 174, 341 Cranston, lames Wilson ,.... .... 1 05 183, 259, 350 Creason, Charles Henry ..... ....... 1 25, 183, 302 Creswell, lames Daniel ....... ,..,.. 2 36, 237, 350 Crnkovich, George Thomas ,,... ...... 1 28, 350 Crockett, lames Bruce, ......, ...... 1 83, 331 Crom, Clara Colleen ,.,,.... .... 1 00 147, 350 Crooks, DeLcres Marian ..... .... 1 35, 161, 341 Crooks, Robert Thomas ...... .......... 2 07, 341 Crcthers, Charles Calvin .,.. .....,.... ,.,. 1 2 2 Crouch, Carole lean ......, ...,. 9 8, 126, 157, 331 Crowell, Imogene .,..........,..,,....,,, 150, 341 Culbertson, Lloyd Robert ....... 96, 97, 113, 119, 167 329, 331 Culhane, Donald Eugene ,... ,....,.......... 3 41 Cully, Frederic Raymond ,.., ..,. 1 05, 207, 341 Cummins, lohn Daniel, , . . . ...... 167, 350 Curnett, Walter Eugene ..... ....,..... 1 25 Curtis, Albert Bruce lr .... . , . 167, 341 Curtis, Leverett Bartlett ..,. ...... 2 07, 318 Curtis, Margaret Alene .... . . .74, 157, 350 Cutler, lohn Elbert ..,...... , . . . 174, 284 D Dahle, Donald Gordon ....,,.,,............ 124, 323 Daily, lean Elton Dammarell ..... 96, 99, 114, 263, 298 Daily, Paul lames. .,....................., 108, 298 Dalva, Harry Owen ....... 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 174 283, 284 Damsey, Lloyd ...,...., . . .,,......... 195, 331 Daniels, Dale Russel ,,,. ..,........ 1 87, 350 Daniels, Helen lean .....,. .... 1 00, 116, 139, 341 Darling, Rita Marie .......,. ,....... . . . 150, 350 Darnall, Glenn McClellan ............. 245, 249, 331 Darwin, Sheila Claire ..... . . .71, 72, 114, 127, 155 275, 282, 284 Daub, lames Edmund ..,......,.......,... ..,. 3 31 Daugherty, Norma lean ..,,,. ,.., ..,.,.... ,... 3 3 1 Davidson, Elizabeth lane ...,..,,..,....,,. 159, 350 Davidson, Marion Alma Sherman ...... 88, 90, 93, 331 Davidson, William Thomas ......,. 88, 89, 91, 92, 284 Davis, lohn Delmar ...,....................... 291 Davis, Ioseph Gerboth ..... ......,... 1 23, 341 Davis, Raynold David .... .... 2 07, 331 Davis, Richard Marvin ..... ,..,.. 3 41 Davis, Richard Waldo .... .,,. 1 95, 341 Davis, Robert Murl ........... ..,.,.. 1 24 Dawson, Robert lohn ...,....... , ,....,., 350 Day, Barbara loyce Knapton ..., .........,. 2 84 Day, Patrick O .,............ .... 9 6 194 281 Day, Patrick lean .,....... . . .,.... .... 1 95 Day, Rex Alvin ..,...... ....... .... 2 9 1 Day, Roberta losephine .... ..,. 1 33 147 350 Dayton, Perry Alan lr.. . ...... .. . . 291 Deahl, Gerald Dean ..... .... .... 3 4 1 Dean, Lee Harrison .... . . . 121, 308 Dean, Marjorie Ruth ..... ..,...... 1 39, 331 Deardorff, Don Lee ,..... ...,.... 8 7, 195 350 DeBruine, Glen Alan ....... ..,. 1 95, 259, 135, 350 Decker, Bethea Lorraine ..,. ,.... 8 0, 81 153, 350 Dedrick, Keith K .......... ...... 1 23 171, 314 Deeds, Howard Merle ....,.. ...... 1 74, 291 Deerkop, Donald August ..., .... 6 8 195 350 Deesten, Betty Ruth .,.,,,.... .... 1 47 350 Deggendcrfer, Pauline Ann ..... . . . 159 341 Deinhard, William Francis .,.. .... 1 25, 302 DeKlotz, Gilbert Frank lr ,.,. .... 2 07 341 Delyea, Richard Leo ....... . .... 331 DeMarr, Ralph Algernon .... ,.,. .... 3 4 1 DeMent, Kenneth Park .... ...... 2 01 331 DeMeyer, lo Anna ........ ..,... 1 33 141, 341 DeMoss, Louis William .... ........... 1 06, 284 Demuzio, Gene .,,,,.....,.. ,......,.,.,.... 3 08 Denman, Alvin Lindsley ...,. ..,. 1 13, 201, 255, 302 Densow, Mary Frances ..., ............. .,.. 3 5 0 Denton, Donald August .,,......,....,..... 195, 350 Deobald, Gabriella Mae ....... 97, 114, 127, 133, 282 Deobald, Theodore Lee .... . . , .......... 122, 284 Deobald, William Albert .... ............ .... 2 9 1 DePalmo, lesse LeRoy ..... ....... 2 01, 331 DePartee, lames Howard ,............. . 119, 193, 331 DeRose, Charles Edward ..... .....,.... , . . 195, 341 Derr, Allen Richard .,,, 70, 71, 72, 106, 108, 329, 332 DeSantis, Aldo .,.......,......,,........ ..., 1 35 DeShazer, Barbara loan ,.......,,...... 78 153, 350 de Veau, Dorothy Hoel ..,, .... ..,. 3 2 4 Devlin, Morris Marvin. . . , DeVries, Victor Leslie .... Dewitt, Wilmar Weston .... Dick, lohn Hale. .,,..... . , Dickinson, loseph Baker. . . . . . Diddcck, Yvonne Doris .... , ...,. . . Diehl, Gerald Everett .... 180 213, 218 Diehl, Lester Cleveland ..,....,,...... Diehl, William Theodore ....., 121, 202, 232, 234, Dimond, Ruth lanet. .,,,.. . . ......100 Dinnison, Richard Burton . ......,.,,. . Dion, .loseph Pierre lr ...., Dirkse, Donald lames .... Dodds, Perry Walter ...,. Dodge, George Herbert .,.. Dodson, Lois Elizabeth ..... Dollinger, Stuart ,.... ...... Donahue, Dennis George .... Doner, Glen Irving ......., Donnan, Earl Leslie .......,. Donovan, Orval Edward .,.., 97 ..-223 Dorocke, Morrie ...,..........,,..... Dougherty, Robert Charles .........., Dou las Cla ton Ste hen .. 201,213 Q 1 Y P - - Douglas, Dale Burton .......,...,. 105 Douglas, Dallas Richard. . . Douglass, Virtona lean ..,.. Doupe, Roy Francis ....... Doupe, Troy Francis. , . ,,.. . Downen, Donald Edward. , . , Downing, Miriam Rose .,... Doyle, Ethel .,...,....,.. Doyle, lack Shaw ...... Dragseth, Helen lean ..., Drake, Robert William ..... Drexler Robert Ludwi . g .... Driggs, Ora Lucille. ,.,...... Drips, lohn Barr. .....,. Driscoll, Mary Elizabeth, . . . Driscoll, Patrick lames ...,. '. '. '. 1166 19511 157 I '159,' 195 125 . . . . . 143 220 255 213 220, 255 274, 135 147, 206 207, ......69, ..... 188, 100, 155 224, 242 .... 201 214 131 is? 123 207 104 isli 123, 154, ......167:240 ....97, Driskill, Roy Dean ..,......,..,,.,... Driver, William Robert ..,..,......... Duffy, Charles Warren lr ..... 104, 179, Dulin, Ralph Vernon ..,. .....,.,.,... Duncan, Duncan, Duncan, Duncan, Arthur Thomson .........,... Kenneth Eugene. . Robert Allen ..... Robert lay ........ Dunham, James Kennicott. . Dunkle, Ralph Mason ...,.. Dunn, Lloyd Albert ...,.,... . , , . ,,.... . Durtschi , lohn Ray ...... . . , Durtschi, losephine Bauman. . . . , . . . , . . . Durtschi, Reed Robert ........ .97, 11 8. DuSault, Mary Anne. , .65, 76, 79, 132, Dustin, Marilyn leanne .........,...,.. Dygert, Helen Norene ....,.,.......... E Earle, David Andrew. ,,,.. . , Early, Geraldine Myra ...,, East, loy Lenore .......,. Eastman, Roy Earl lr ..... Ebbe, Colleen Ann ........ Echevarria, Franky ......,.., Edholrn, Barbara Lucille ..,,. Edmark, Thomas Linder ,,.. Edwards, Howard Leslie ..... Edwards, lohn Amesbury .... Egger, Bruce Emil ...,..... Eggers, Beverly .lane .,.. Eggleson, Anne Marie .,... Eidam, Arnold loseph ,.... Eimers, Richard William ..... Eisinger, Gordon Vern .... Eke, Margaret Louise ,....... Ekelund, Conrad Maurice .,.. Elledge, Charles Clifford .... Eller, Richard Lon ........ ""99,'9iQ . f.'69,'9Of Eller, Robert Vernon .,.,, .,.......... Elliott, lack Bruce ....., , , .,......,. . Ellis, Donald Davis ..... .... Ellis, Evan Lindill ..,. Marlow Keith ..,... Ellis, Ellis, Robert Dean ......... Ellsworth, Stanley Donald. , . Elsner, Larry Edward ...... Emerson, Frank Vaughn. , . Emerson, William Sage ....,, Emmons, loseph Newton .... Endicott, Donald Lee ...... Enes, William Perry ....., Engert, Edwin Arthur .... English, Robert Barnes ..... Epperson, Loralee ..,...,. Erickson, Blanche Allean .... Erickson, Carol lean ...... Erickson, Emma B ....... 231, 233, ioof 559 '195 ifsi 152, 'iss fffficif ....100, Erlandson, Ralph Emil ..... Ernst, Robert loseph Ir ..,.. Estes, Kenneth Monroe. . . . Estheimer, Carmon Reynold Evans, lerald Lee ....,,,.., Evans lohn Warren ........ Evans, Marilyn lean ..,. Evans, Robert Earl ..,. Evans, Ruthella ....., Everson, Ewasen, Dale Oscar. , . lack Richard .... Eyrich, loseph Fred ..... , , Eyrich, Lavonna Priscilla. . . F Fairley, Donald Ellsworth. , . Faisant, Robin Denys ...,... Farmer, Frederick Parks. . . Farmer, Garry Hilton ....,. Farmer, .lames Eugene lr. . . Farmer, Kenneth Dale ...... Farmer, Robert Baldwin .,,, Farnham, Norman Gardner. Faull, El ford Bruce ......., ...87, ...80, 171 195 'iii 255 135 150 207 261 193 161 185 147 201 207 155, 241, 145, 199 195, 172, 348 171, 195, 195, 236, 105, 108 332: 'iss 302, 153, 161, 153, I 1 1 350 314 332 291 350 350 308 105 231 314 350 332 101 332 135 332 350 243 350 291 341 1 1 1 257 135 341 341 350 350 332 332 350 332 135 332 341 350 342 284 342 298 350 350 332 350 332 342 350 350 350 207 342 342 126 291 187 350 332 350 342 . 99 ........ 143 ..,.,....350 .....l04,342 137,155,332 231,233,234 133,150,350 ..N 199,332 .... 195,342 ,,. 179,350 ..M 124,318 .,H.139,350 136,157,332 ..,,.H. 342 .........342 ..,......350 139,282,284 .........35l 102,105,298 .,.......104 .........351 . .... 183,332 234,262,298 .174,332 .307,308 . ..,.... 298 ....,125,332 259,301,351 . .,..... 351 ..,......291 ... 124,332 .... 171,284 ,.,..... 111 , ........ 342 108,185,318 .98,120,138 147,263,332 134,141,351 .... 147,332 U. 195,351 , ....... 351 .,H 127,174 .,...U. 124 .........351 123,195,342 116,150,342 .... 195,332 .....145.342 105,121,342 ........ 100 123,171,314 127,161,351 ...,.,.. 332 ,.M .86,194 119,185,284 ..,..... 351 126,239,255 256,308 104,128,351 132,185,332 251,253,255 260,284 .,...... 291 .127, 134, 147, Faver, Frank Joseph. ..,.... . , Faust, Margaret Victoria ..... Fayle, Leroy Verl ....... John Brophy ...,,., Feely, Feely, Willard Laurence ,..., Feeney, Thomas William .... Feelin, David Gene ..,... Felton, Virgil Vittitoe ...., Fereday, Lauray M ........ Ferree, Thomas Joseph ..... Fiala, James Lon ,....,.,.. Field, Richard Wesley ..,.. Fiester, Edward Eldon, . . . Fife, Bonnie Jean ,...,....,. Fike, Darrell Marlin .....,... Finlayson, Robert Milton ,... 7 Finney, Donald LeRoy .,..... 282 'iss '125 124 187 135 .......123, 195 .,..238, 239,262 , ...,,.,.. 75, ,80, 111131171 150 275 Fisher, Edmond Clayton. . . Fisher, lris Margaret .,...,. Fisher, John Marvin ...... Fisher, Joseph Elgin .... Fisher, Joyce Ruth. .,... . Fisher, Richard Daryl ...,.. Fisher, William Leonard. . . "' ,..,..,....,..,1.64 ....97, , 155 187 Fisk, Anna Jane ..,,...,.,. Fisk, Edith Frances ,...... Fitch, Alden Henry ....,. Fitch, Elizabeth Grace ,.,. . Fitch, Jay Delbert ........ , . . Fitzgerald, David Maurice. . . Fitzgerald, Elizabeth Ann .... Fitzgerald, Joan Marie ..... Fitzgerald, Rosemary ........ FitzRoy, Henry Charles. ,.... Fitzsimmons, Norman Dean .,.. Flanagan, James Erlen ...,... Fleck, Cecil Edward ......., Flerohinger, Francis Henry. . Fletcher, Clarence Ray .... Fletcher, Jack LaRoy ....... Flodberg, Wallace Dale .... Flynn, Charles Norman .... Foedisch, Donald Carol .... Foley, Eileen May ....... Foley, Robert Henry .... Folkins, Dan Lee ......... Follett, George Howard .... Foltz, Walter W ......... Fonburg, John D. Jr ....... Forbes, Garrett Osborne ..... Ford, Alden James ......., Foreman, Marcene Sue .... Forrey, Shirley Ruth ..,.. Fossum, Robert Ross ...,... Foster, Gordon William .... Foster, Jeanne Lorene. . . Fothergill, Ralph Robert ....... Foucar, Kenneth Allen .,.... Fowler, Marion Donald ...,,, Fox, Geraldine Ruth ....,.. Fox, John Carson ...,.,...,. Frahm, Martha Jean .,.,..,. Francis, Merlin Frederick Jr, ...,.. 123, Frandsen, Edward Mathis .,.. Frank, Fairy Faye .....,.,.., Fray, William Henry ....... Frazier, George David. . . , . Frederiksen, Kenneth Roy .... Freeland, Joyce Ann ....... Freiermuth, Leo J ........ French, lvan Sylvester. . . French, Norma Jean ........ Frick Jerr Jr .. ..... , ....... 123, .,..147, 263, 329, l27,l47, 161, ......97,100, 194, ....127,158,159, .......65159,274, .99, 104, 127, 207, ...,...........100, ......55,68, 73, 74, 121, 135, 307. ..........l24. ...195, .....l85, ......150, ,....,..179, ...207,260, ...100,20l, ......145, ....l46, 147. Fridehsting, Albert Edward 'IH . ' it ....... . Friend, Clarence Meltord Jr ...., .,... Frischknecht, Vida Veda ..,.. Fritts, Donald Harry .,,,.., Frohman, Louis Todd .,.. Frye, George Marion ..... Fulcher, Glen Dale .... Fuller, Dallas Odell ,,.. Fullmer, Bernel R ........ Fullmer, Don Kendall ....,. Fullmer, Robert Eugene ...... ......,.. Fulton, Alonzo James ........ Fulton, Janet Margaret ...... Funkhouser, William Howard G Gaekel, John Walter ....,,... .... Gaiser, Johnny Robert ..,.. Galdos, Tony ............. Galey, Dorothy ...,...,...., Galles, Gecrge Raymond .... Gallop, Vernon Eldroe ...,. Gandiaga, Carmen Anne ,... Gandiaga, Henry Joseph .... Garber, Betty Jo ......,... Gard, Wilbur Edward ..... Gardner, Daniel George. . . , Gardner, George F. ,....... Gardner, Mina MayBelle .... Garlock, Richard Loren ,........,.. .... .77, 84, 120. Garner, Joyce Olive ...... Garner, Lillian Louise ...... , . Garrett, Beverly Dawn ....... Garrett, Robert Bryant. ........,........ . . Gartin, Robert Thompson .... Gartin, William James ...,... Gasser, Vern Eudean ...,,...,..,......... Gates, Thomas William, .... , , ..,.,. . . . Gaudin, Dora Joy .,.......... Gaut, Pamela Eleanor ........ Gaylord, Frank Everett ...........,..,,.... Geddes, James Whitehead. . . Geertsen, Mary Jean .... .... Gehrig, Jean .,......,.... Geisler, Dick Gaylen .,., . . . Geisler, Robert Jr ...... Gentry, Rae Ann ......,. Thomas Henry .,,. Adrienne Vir inia. . Gentry, George, g George, Hilmer Reynold ..... George, Peggy Ann ..,...., George, Thomas Edward .... 284 124 351 135 332 303 342 332 332 342 314 332 342 351 257 284 124 351 351 257 291 351 342 314 332 342 121 332 342 195 342 351 298 332 342 123 1 19 1 13 308 291 323 351 342 351 342 342 298 291 1 19 342 284 332 342 332 109 .......,.....l25,302 ...,96,97,98,99, 157 283,284 ....68, 96, 98, 99, 101 174,332 .124, 132, 183, 262, 342 119,332 145,284 , ........., 207,342 147,351 179,260,332 .......97, 199, 261, 298 ,. .77, 79, 133, 147, 342 213,220 201,318 ........121,307,308 ....l37,158, 159, 291 .......,77,282,285 .....104, 201,342 . ..... 143,342 123,207,314 .291 123,314 .. ...... 99,127,351 ....l18,122,199,342 ,. .,..,.....,... 351 ..,,.l24,318,332 ...104, 195,351 , .......... 342 123,314 100,351 .. ..,..,.......... 332 ....,..74,116, 155,342 123,314 135,351 ............302 ..,145, 263,298 . .,.......... 291 ...74, 121, 187, 351 157,285 . ..., 135, 199, 262, 351 145,351 291 199,291 187,351 ..........127,15O,332 .... 291 137,159,342 ..,......100, 159,351 ........,135, 150,342 171308 ...80, 81, 91, 118, 351 1l3,137,255,260 314 195 332 207 351 ,,.,.....157,294 332 126, 157,263,328 332 119 235 100342 ........116,153 342 147 332 .66, 105, 227, 233 308 108 155,351 ...104, 238, 239 .....98, 157 ...98, .1157 183 351 125 351 291 George, Yvonne Helene .... ..,. 6 5, 143 342 Gephart, Floyd Clinton ..,.. ......, 5 4, 128 Gerard, James Harry ..,.. . . . 196, 351 Gerard, Robert George ..... , . . 207, 342 Gerber, Ernest Fred ......... , . . 174, 314 Gerber, Harold Eberhard ,... . . .... 119, 285 Gerraughty, Elizabeth Jeanne ..... ....,. 1 41, 285 Gessel, Marianne Edna .....,,. ....., 1 00, 143, 351 Gessel, Verl Leroy .......... .,..,..,... 1 87, 285 Getty, JoAnn Margaret ..... ,.... 1 26, 136, 157, 332 Ghigleri, John Philip ...., ..... 1 05, 183, 262, 351 Gibbs, Richard Fox ..... , , ..,.. 68, 94, 174, 342 Gibbs, Robert Mitchel ...... . , .... 173, 174, 342 Gibson, Burton Wesley ..,.,.. .,..... .... 1 2 3 Gibson, Nelson Charles Jr ..,. .... 1 34, 185, 342 Gibson, Pearl Alice ......., ,... 1 27, 147 342 Gikiu, Roy,,. .,..,..,...... ...... l 71, 291 Gilbert, Delma, ..... , ..,,,.,.. ,,... . . . .147, 351 Gilbertson, Henry Walter Jr ........,,.. 100, 171, 332 Giles, Edwin Larry ...,.,,..,..,..,..,...,.. 99, 351 Giles, Kenneth Merle ,.....,..,.,..,.. .... 1 18, 351 Gillett, Frank Clark ......,... 186, 187, 231, 307, 342 Gladish, Wendell Leonard ...., 77, 109, 111, 195, 332 Glarborg, George Myron ,,,,, ..,.. , . . . 124, 314, 323 Glasby, Robert Vernon ......................., 125 Glaves, Virgil Max ...,...,.. 183, 213, 217, 327, 332 Gleason, Robert Otis. .,.......... 199, 257, 259, 351 Glenn, Meredith Shuttleworth .......,... 68, 196, 342 Glenn, Moena ......,.,........,.. 97, 100, 150, 351 Glenny, Tom Horner ...,...,..,........ .... 1 25. 332 Goble, George Gordon .,..,. 137, 182, 183, 262, 332 Goddard, Milton Ellis .....,.,,................ 351 Goecke, Gerald John ........,... ,....... . 97, 332 Golding, Charles Louis, , ...... ..,...,.. 1 24, 332 Goldsberry, Kenneth Brown ..,. .. .70, 90, 195, 332 Gooch, Ritchie Belton ........ ............ 3 33 Goodman, William Thomas ................ .69, 302 Goodwin, Carolyn Ruth .,............. 100, 143, 342 Goodwin, Robert Dale ......................,.. 351 Gordon, Gerald Bruce ........ 97, 105, 121, 171, 351 Gordon, Harold Jerome ............,..,......... 1 1 1 Gorsline, Arden Edmund ,.,.....,.,,.. 125, 174, 333 Gorsuch, Howard Lee ....,. , .... , , . 124, 333 Gorsuch, Robert Virl .,,... .,.,........., 3 33 Gossett, Charles Elmer .... ..,..,...., 1 83, 342 Graham, Alice Gail ..... .... 9 9, 136, 143, 351 Graham, Bonnie Mae ..... . . .73, 75, 159, 333 Graham, Chester Walter. . . .,.,....... , 125 Graham, James Martin ..... ....,....... 1 70 Grams, Marilyn Jean .....,.. . . . 139, 351 Granlund, Arthur Wilburn ..... ....,......... 3 33 Gray, John Golden Jr ........ ................ 1 25 Gray, Kathleen Viola ....... .... 1 00, 135, 147, 351 Gray, Patrice Merle ...... .....,..... 1 53, 333 Gray, William Wallace ..,.. ...... 1 02, 105, 333 Greeley, Glen Harlin .,.,. .... , . 196, 342 Green, Calvin Edgar .... , ..,...,. 298 Green, Gerald Delain ...... ...,.,...,.,., 3 42 Green, Jay Dawayne ........, ....,.....,...,. 1 08 Green, Marilyn June .....,..,.......,.. 75, 155, 351 Green, Normand Worchester ,.... ,88, 90, 91, 92, 109 166, 167, 333 Greenwood, William Frederick ........,..... 207, 333 Greer, John Robert ,......,................ 204, 333 Gregg, Robert Donald ...................., 195, 351 Gregory, John Bernard Jr ....... 90, 97, 100, 328, 333 Gregory, Richard Samuel ..........,............ 351 Gregory, Shirley Anne .... 75, 81, 158, 159, 339, 342 Grenfell, James Waldo .......,..,.............. 342 Grider, Helen Louise ..,,..,...,....,.,,... 155, 333 Grider, Rodney James. . , . , . . , .245, 249 Grieb, Donald Robert ..... ...,., 1 71, 291 Griffin, Donald Chester. . . ............ ,285 Griffith, Arthur William. . . , .... 124, 314, 323 Griffith, Donna Jean .... , . .... 132, 150, 342 Griffith, Robert Marvin .... ............ 2 04 Griffith, Russell Felbeck .... . . . .83, 124, 318 Griggs, William Howard Jr. . . .... 199, 261, 351 Grimms, Howard Allen ..... ...... 1 19, 285 Grinker, Morton Charles .... ,.......,... 9 1 Grosch, William Charles Jr, , , .,.. 124, 174, 318 Grossberg, Ewel Zellman ...,. , . .,...... 242, 243 Grothaus, James William. , . ..,..,......,.. . 123 Grove, Joseph Phillips .,,. .... 2 24, 233, 258, 298 Grow, Cecil Wood ........ ................ 3 33 Grow, Lorin Wayne ........ ............... 2 91 Grubb, John Frank ........... ............. 3 33 Guderjohn, Carl Richard ..... .... 1 25, 195, 291 Gugler, William Lawrence. . . ...... 100, 351 Guilfoy, Philip Leo. , ....,.. ....,.......... , 342 Guilfoy, Thomas Patrick .,.,. .,.....,.,... 1 64, 291 Guilloz, Jacques Macon ..........,..,..,.. 100, 119 Gunn, Frank Wilbur ...... ..,. 7 8, 99, 101, 111, 119 196, 351 Gust, George William Jr .,,. ........ 2 60, 261, 262 H Haagensen ............. . .........,....,. 333 Hack, Kenneth Wayne. , . . .........,...... 342 Haegle, Jerald Robert .,... . . .67, 96, 98, 99 101 104, 171, 342 Haga, Haakon ....... , . . ........... .... 1 34 Hagan, Alfred Chris ..... .. .74, 78, 126 201 351 Hagen, Gordon Edward .... .....,..,.. .,.. 2 9 1 Haglund, Frank G ....... ......... 9 7 187 351 Hahne, Florine Denice .... .... 1 36 143 342 Haines, James Lee .,.,.. ...... . .. . 351 Hale, Leonard Dean .... . . .... 121 Hall, Celia Orill ....., . . . 150, 333 Hall, Grant Bodily ....,.. .,.. ..... 3 0 8 Hall, Julius Place ..,.,...... , ..,.. 196, 351 Hall, Richard Franklin ,,,,..., ,..,,.. .,... 3 4 2 Halstrom, Harriet Shirley ..... ,.,. 1 32 150, 351 Hamilton, John Patrick ...... ...... 2 60, 333 Hamilton, Lee Walter Jr .... ..........,. 3 42 Hamilton, Nancy Alice .... ..,. 1 47, 348, 351 Hamm, James Oliver ,,., .........,. .... 2 9 1 Hammer, Jean Marie: ..... . . ......., 135 157, 333 Hammond, Constance .........,........... 150, 333 Hammond, James Carlyle ..... ,97, 213, 214 255, 298 Hamon, Clarke Alfred ........ ..,...... 7 8 207, 342 Handel, Anna Mae. ........ .....,.. 1 27 139 285 Hanigan, Richard Hayden .... .........., .... 3 3 3 Hanlcins, Patricia Joyce ..... , . , .69, 152 153 343 Hannah, Donald Lloyd .... ........ 9 8, 99, 101 Hansen, Carolyn Lou ..,.. . . , 127, 149, 150, 333 Hansen, James Edward ..... , ......... 257 351 Hansen, James Joseph .... . .,..,...... 333 Hansen, Mary Jean .......,.. Hansen, Milton Reed ,....... Hansen, Orval Howard. . .69, Hansen, Virginia Marjorie. . . Hansen, Welland Andrew .... Hansen, William Dale ....... Hanson, Bob ......... ,,., Hanson, Lawrence lrving .... Hansen, Oliver Wendell .... Harame, Louis Harry ...... .......,..200,201, 71, 82, 94, ss, 113, 251, 255, 275, 283, "Q'f.'.7s,'118f 261, .. 174, 351 343 201 285 298 308 291 343 333 314 123 Harden, Richard Eugene .... ..,....,.. 2 01, 333 Harding, Marion Ann ...... . , . .139, 210, 278, 351 Harding, Mary Rosalie ...., , ..,.. 127, 139, 210, 351 Hardy, Donal Loy ....... , . ,.......... 74, 87, 343 Hargis, Marie Etta ........,... 70, 80, 88, 90, 91, 150 328, 333 Hargrave, George Kenna ....,..,..,....... 199, 291 Harlan, Elva June .....,..............,.... 147, 351 Harland, Rosemary ...... 114, 132, 137, 156, 157, 285 Haroldsen, George lvan ....................... 314 Haroldsen, Norman Victor ......... 101, 121, 207, 308 Harper, Chester Zane, . .... . .......... 193, 343 Harper, Donald Perry .... .......... 1 83, 333 Harrigfeld, Chris Lewis. . . , ...,.. . . 171, 298 Harris, Alfred Ray ..,..... . .... 99, 187, 352 Harris, Alton Raymond ,.,. .,.. 1 04, 119, 351 Harris, Brent Johnson ..,. .... 1 25, 207, 291 Harris, Ershel Farrel ..... ....,... 1 96, 351 Harris, John Gilbert ..,,. ..... 1 99, 256, 333 Harris, Mary Jane .,...,.,. . . ,99, 136, 159, 343 Harris, Oliver Wendell Jr .,,,,..,.....,........ 124 Harris, Patricia Ann ,,....., ..,.... 9 8, 133, 155, 352 Harrison, Donald Francis ..... 167, 245, 248, 260, 343 Hart, Coralie Ann ,.,..,............. ..... 1 45, 343 Hart, Ralph Daniel ........ ..... 5 4 207, 307, 333 Hartigan, John William ,.,. ....,........ 2 91 Hartman, Donald Fred ...., . . . 179, 259, 352 Hartman, Roger Leon ........ . . , ......, . 333 Hartwell, Marion Grace ,,.,. . . . 147, 282, 285 Harvey, Finas Charles ...,.. .... 1 23, 314 Hasbrouck, John Herman .,.. .... 1 79, 333 Haskins, Doyle. ..... ..... ,........... 2 3 1 Hassler, Betty Joy ,,..,,.,... . . .133, 161, 343 Hassler, William Bernard .,.. ........ 1 35, 352 Hatch, James Albert ....... . . .213, 220, 262 Hatch, Robert LeRoy ...... . , . .,..... 126 Hathaway, Cecil William .... ...... , . . 171, 333 Hathhorn, James Robert. . . , ............. . 129 Hatley, George Burton .... ................. 3 08 Hattan, Marjorie Ann ...... .... 1 27, 134, 147, 352 Haubner, John Admir .....,. .......... 1 96, 352 Haugland, George Toralt .... ..,. .... 1 2 3, 134 Haumont, Thomas Warren ......,...... 124, 174, 318 Haussman, Joseph Gabriel ...... ,.,,.,......... l 24 Havens, Hazel Myra ....... 1. .127, 133, 160, 161, 343 Haverkamp, Ralph Eugene ,..,.,.,...... . . . 185, 333 Hayden, Kenneth Don .......,.,....... 122, 207, 333 Haynes, Donald Gene ...., ...,....... . . .285 Hays, Helen Anne ,..... . . . ,... 69, 96, 155, 285 Hayward, Alfred Stanley. . .,.. ..,...... . 81, 352 Headrick, Everett LaVerne. , . . . , . ,.... 128, 352 Heap, Lloyd Raymond ,..,.. ..... 2 04, 291 Heaphy, James Cullen Jr. . . , . .87, 343 Hearn, Thomas Muir ,,...... ..... 1 11 Heath, Harry Wesley ......... ....... 3 33 Hebberd, Patricia Margaret ,... .... 1 53, 343 Hechtner, John Howard ....,. ..,..,...... 1 05 Heikkila, Leonard Robert .... .............. 3 43 Heiner, Howard Roy ......,. , ..,.. .83, 174, 333 Helander, Edith Beatrice ....,. . . .78, 153, 211, 352 Helmsworth, Frank William. . , .........,.. , 291 Helmsworth, Gretchen Ann .... ....... 1 45, 291 Hemovich, Georgie Ann ,.,.. .... . 68, 161, 343 Henderlider, Robert Melvin .... ...... 1 99, 306, 308 Henderson, Cleve Parley. . . . .............. . . 260 Henderson, Sharon Wynona ....... 100, 119, 159, 352 Hendricks, Robert Rex ....... .....,.......... 2 91 Hendron, Harry Hayden .... ......... 1 74, 333 Hendron, Robert Harold ................... 123, 314 Henly, George Bernard Jr ....,.... . . . ........ .333 Henning, Gordon Elmer ...... 118, 123, 179, 259, 325 Henrie, Harold Paavo .,., ..,..,......... 1 85, 343 Henry, Alice Louella ..., , . . , . 116, 133, 150, 343 Henry, Charlotte Ann ...... . . .87, 136, 155, 352 Henry, James Aloysius Jr. , . . ..., 135, 196, 252 Henry, James Lee .........., . . 118, 171, 343 Herman, Eloise Marion ........ . ........, 352 Herman, Kenneth Edward .............,.... 135, 333 Herrett, Wendell Everett .............., 201, 255, 343 Herrington, Helen Corinne .,............... 141, 343 Herrington, Maxwell Gordon. . 108, 213, 215, 255, 298 Hershberger, Valeta Rose ......,.. 114, 143, 263, 273 297, 298 Hespelt, George Gordon. . ,. ..,. 111, 131, 174 Hester, Peter Jerome ....,..,. .......... 2 57 Hetrick, Marvin Benjamin ..,.. , ....... 121 Heyer, Barbara Jean ........ . . 150, 333 Hicks, George Washington .... . . 124, 318 Higgins, Wendell Alfred .... . . 174, 352 Hill, Dale Ralph ........... . . 196, 352 Hill, Rex Albert ......... .,...... 1 23 Hill, Rhoda Marie ..... ...... l 55, 385 Hill, Ronald Earnest ..... .....,...... 3 14 Hillman, Ronnell ..,..... .... 1 27, 161, 343 Hillman, Russell Gheen .... ...... ....... 3 0 8 Hinckley, Vernon Cless .... .....,......... 2 49 Hiner, David Lorrine ...... .... 1 68 251, 252, 333 Hinsverk, Donald Wayne .... .,..,.,....... 9 8, 99 Hirschberg, Saul Benjamin .... .....,..,..... 3 18 Hirschi, Jay Richard ......... ,... . 291 Hirschman, Louis Henry ..... ,..... 3 43 Hiskey, Peter Marion lr .... .,.,.. 1 79, 352 Hoag, Jack Durio ,..,,..., . . ,....., .90, 333 Hoagland, John Clarence ..... .... 1 27, 207, 352 Hoagland, Loren Kenneth ..... .... 1 27, 207, 352 Hoalst, Wes Lee Walter ..... ...... 1 79, 343 Hobza, Delwin Wendell ....... ........ ..... 1 2 5 Hocklander, Margaret Lena. . . .... 127, 128, 352 Hodge, Donald Mason. .,.., ...... 1 96, 352 Hodge, Robert Brisco ...... , . ............. 125 Hodgins, Frances Eleanor. , , .... 126, 157, 343 Hodgins, John Roland ...., .... 1 24, 183, 352 Hodgson, Myron James .,,,,..,....,... 251, 254, 255 Hotstrand, Arland Duane .....,..,..... 170, 171, 318 Hokanson, Winifred Lenore ............ 133 147, 343 Holden, Ellomae .......... 96, 97, 136, 155 283, 285 Holden, Robert William ...,,,,,... ..... 1 11 257, 352 Holderness, Ardelle Sarah .,..,....,...... ..... 2 98 Holderness, James Skiffington ..... ..... 3 07, 308 359 149 104 Holland, Maurice Eugene .... .,., 1 37, 333 Hollitield, Roy Frank .......,.., ..... 1 74, 343 Hollingworth, William Marvin, . . . ........ . . . . 68 Hollingsworth, Clair Maylon .... ..,. 1 27, 207, 352 Holm, Glenn Elbert Miller .... ..., 1 24, 183, 352 Holman, Janet ..,........., .... 7 5, 159, 343 Holmes, David Lee .,,.... .......... 3 42 Holmes, John Bernard.. . . ......, .285 Holmes, John Wendell ..,. ......... . . 164, 188 Holt, Burton Wheeler. . . ................. . 124 Holt, David Martin .... ,.,,........., 1 96, 352 Holt, Dean Arthur ...... . . ,74, 94, 100, 174, 352 Holt, Henry Edward .... ..,.. 1 09, 171, 256, 323 Holt, John Arnold ........ .... , .......,.., 1 24 Holton, Carl Linwood, . . , ...,... .,.. 1 24 Holton, Norman Lloyd .... ....,. 1 74, 333 Holyoak, James Dean ..... ,....... 1 87, 343 Homan, Marion William .... .... l 25, 174, 343 Homuth, Doris Margaret .,,. ...,.. 1 41, 352 Hooper, Betty Lou, ....... ..... 1 47, 285 Hooper, Mary Catherine. . . ....,. 157, 343 Hooper, Roy Sumner ..... .... 1 02, 105, 314 Hoopes, John Clint ,....,. ,...... .... .... 2 8 5 Hoover, William Sands ..,.. .,........., .,.. 1 1 1 Hopkins, Joanne ...... . . . ..,. 72, 97, 126, 157, 343 Hopkins, Laura Lee ....... ...,..,..,. 1 45, 343 Hopkins, Marlene Ann ...,. ...... 9 7, 145, 352 Horch, Alfred Henry ,.... .... ...... 1 2 3, 314 Horlen, Maurice Bernard ,,., ......,. .... 3 4 3 Horning, Irene Louise ....,. ..., 1 27, 147, 343 Horning, John Frederick ..,, ...... . . , . 343 Horting, Evelyn Carlene ...,. ..... 1 47, 343 Hoskins, Leonard Wayne ..... ........ 1 24, 318 Hoskins, Paul A. ......,..,. ,....,.... 1 24, 318 Hove, Clarice Rae ......, ..,,.... 1 14, 141, 298 Hovis, Roger Terrance ...... . . . 100, 123 174, 333 Howard, David Ray ......... ......... .,.. 3 1 9 Howard, Harold Kenneth ..... .......... 1 67 343 Howard, Harry William Jr .... .,......,.. 1 24 319 Howard, Hazel June ....,.. . . . .97, 133 147 333 Hoyt, Elva Anne .......,,...,...... 98, 99 161 352 Huckabee, Rupert Joseph ..... ,.......... . ..... 3 33 Huff, James Eli. ,....,.. 82, 96, 98, 99, 122 199, 314 Huffer, Ronald Carl ..,.,........, 167, 251 252 333 Huggins, Alan Freeman ,.... . ..,... 82, 108 179 343 Hulet, Ray ...........,., ...,..,.. .... 3 0 7 Hult, Kay Theodore ....,... ..,....,..., .... 3 0 8 Humpherys, Kaye Fletcher .......... ,... ..... 9 9 1 19 Humphrey, Burton Rowe ..... 100, 105, 119, 255 333 Humphrey, Howard Delaine .... 99, 101, 104 193 352 Humphrey, Lawrence Grant ..,,.........., 119 343 Hunt, James Earl ,.,....,.......,.....,.., .... 1 25 Hunt, Norma ............,. . . . 127, 148 263 352 Hunt, William Donald ..., ,..... 2 45 249 298 Hunt, William Wilbur ...,. ......,. 2 07 314 Hunter, Harold Carleton .... .... 1 24 244 247 Hunter, Jay Powers, . .,.... .,.... .... 2 9 2 Huntington, Walter Collis.. . . ,... . . . . . . 314 Hutchins, John Stuart .... ...... 1 05 167 352 Hutchinson, Don Lee ..,.. ,.... ....... 1 2 4 352 Hutchinson, Joann ...... . , . .87, 154, 155 333 Hutchinson, Lester .... ......... ..,. 2 9 8 Hyde, Paul Eugene .,.,.. .... 2 07 261 333 Hyde, Ronald Gregory ..... ....,. 2 02 333 Hyde, Rosel Henderson ...,,. ...... 1 71 314 Hyland, Frederick Burnell. . . .,.. 82 123 333 Hyland, James Vernon ...... , . . . . . . . 343 I Ingalls, James Wendell ,,,.. Ingebritsen, Allen Gail .... Ingebritsen, Caryl Enid., ....69, 125 ...100, 127, Ingersoll, Theodore Robert ........ 1 1 1, 1 19, lnghram, Evelyn Frances ..., ....... 6 5 lnghram, William Reid ..... lorns, Richard Vaughn ..... loset, Richard Ray ......., Irons, Roy Dee ..,.. . . , . . Irving, Ruth Joan .....,..,. Irwin, Russell Harvey .,.... lsaman, Harry Franklin Jr. . Iverson, Floyd Arley ....... J Jackle, Erma Jean ........,. QQ 'QQf54f .fffff201 ..,167,240 .,....223 H..H14d ..,.l24 Jackle, Shirley Marie ..,...,..... .... 1 20 Jackson, Frank Lee .......,..,....,....... Jackson, Thomas ....,..,.......,...,.,.., Jackson, Virginia Gertrude McDonald. . . Jacobs, Hyde Spencer ..,,..,.......... 157 Jacobs, Joann. ..,.....,....,.....,..,.. , . Jacobsen, Shirley Lou ....... Jacobsen, Jerry ......... Jagels, Marvin Albert ...., Jager, Rose Marie .... . . . Jansen, Martha Joan ......... 67, 94, 95, 157 100 127 133 Janssen, Sheila Anne ............ I . . .74, 94 Jardine, Mamie Eliza Faye ............. 127 Jasper, Vaughn Elvin ........ ..... . Jayne, Ben Anderson ..,.... Jenkins, Caroline .....,..,. ....213, ....138 Jenkins, Kenneth Leslie ...., , ..... Jenkins, Samuel Leroy .... Jennings, James Perle ,.., Jensen, Berne Kemball. . . Jensen, Donald Melvin. . . ffffiss Jensen, Dorris Anne. . . ..... .,.... Jensen, Edgar Bjornson ..,, . Jeppson, Saylor Call ,.... Jepson, Wayne Arlan ...,. Jess, Donald Albert ....... . Jessup, Ronald Bertrand .... Jewell, John William ...... ,.,.259, 105 1 1 1 1 Jiminez, Rafael Francis ...... ....,.,. Johanson, Carolyn Maxine .... . ,... .... Johanson, Warren Alex ..... . . , .72, 75, Johnson, Alice Marie ,,... ,..,148 Johnson, Allen Dale .... Johnson, Arden Alberta.. . Johnson, Arnold Alfred, . . Johnson, Johnson, Johnson ,..120, 127, Arthur Benjamin .... .,..,... Axel Andreas ..... ...,.... Berthil Clarence ..,. Johnson: Betty Jean ...... Johnson, 360 Donald Laverne. ...,71, 73, 179, 131, 134, 196, 155 236f 241 228 141 121 207 302 333 343 334 334 352 343 334 255 334 101 128 334 343 141,285 141,352 .... 85 111,352 .... 85 307,343 150,352 283,285 .... 104 201,343 139,352 148,334 157,352 150,285 199,352 215,343 139,298 174,352 228,233 .... 298 .... 125 199,334 141,334 .... 334 261,352 .97,252 196,285 111,343 201,343 207,334 153,334 251,252 290,334 111,352 139,343 207,334 124,319 196,343 174,343 ,....290 179,352 Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Donald Lloyd ...... Donald MacGregor Donald Ralph ...,.. Eddie Clifford ..... George Harold .... Harold ......,... James Bruce .... Laurance Davis. Lloyd Erwin ...,,. Lynn F .....,...... il .. ."' .. ...199, 314 104 111,124 352 ...196,352 .,......292 ....,.100,352 ............352 ...119, 167,252 . ....,..... 187,352 Johnson, Mary Alice Jasper. . .....,..,...,... 98 Johnson, Mary Kathryn .,... ....,. 7 5, 87, 155, 352 Johnson, Philip Anderson ......... ......,,. 1 74, 308 Johnson, Philip Wendell ,..,..... 71, 74, 78, 201, 334 Johnson, Reuben Fredrick Jr .,,...,,..,,....,.,. 334 Johnson, Richard Elbert ..... ,,..........,., 3 34 Johnson, Richard Eugene ...... .....,... . ,.... 3 07 Johnson, Robert Brydon ..... . . ,..... l 11, 199, 343 Johnson, Thanel .,.. ..... 6 8 102, 207, 231, 234, 319 Johnson, Thomas Harry ,........ , , . ,.... . ..,... 123 Johnson, Verdo Zellner ....,...,....... 124, 174, 314 Johnson, Von Jerome .... ...,.... 2 07, 251, 319 Johnson, Wallace Arthur... ,. .96, 98, 99, 101, 298 Johnson, Warren Hartley .... .... 1 29, 173, 174, 285 Wayne Harlan ,..,... . ,.,..,.. .... , . Clarence Edward ..,. ,...,...... 1 37, Johnson, Johnston, Johnston, Donald Eugene ..,. Johnston, Myron Edward .... Johnston Richard Alan ....,. Johnston Ronald Dale Johnstone, Marjorie Jean.'.l.'.' Johnstone, Stowell Raymond. Jonas Dolores ...,. .....,.. Jonas: Robert James. .,.... . Jones Calvin G ,.,.. .... Jones, Edward LaVell .... Jones, Jack Edwin... , . . Jones, Jean Butler ....,,,. Jones, John William Jr. .. Jones, Khalil H. ..,..., .. Jones, Lawrence Covert ..., Jones, Luther Lewis, ..,. . Jones, Mary Agnes ..... Jones, Norman Carrol .... Jones, Robert Damian, . .. Jones, Suzanne ......... Jones, Vivian Grace ..... Jones, William Eugene. . . Jordan, Eugene Harvey .... Jordan, Harley Allen .... .. . Jordan, John Richard .....,. Jordan, Patricia Jean Judd, Keith Ray ...... .... 6 7 Jutila, John Wayne.. Juve, Henrik Dahl Jr. ,. .... Juve, Robert Leo ,.., K Kaisaki. Amie ...,.. .....,.... 1.2.7. ,125 ...........196, . .l04,118 ,, .......... 196 ...l51,263 .....68,207, ' ff1f5sf207 .....257, .ffff174 .....261, ....,261 'fff14GQ145 ...93,l21,175 . ....,.....,., l.d5g ...143 .98 . ,157 ,l00,108,l21,196 ....................,.l96 Kaku, Michio .......... . . Kaku, Toshio CRoyl ,... .... Kalk, Gordon Frank.. ....,.. ..., . . Kanikkeberg, Jordon Stuart. . . . . . . Kanikkeberg, Oswald ...,.,....... . . Karau, Shirley Claire ...... Kass, Joseph Wilfred, ...........,. . . Kassel, Emory Dale. .86, 87, 90, 92, 98 Kaull, Jed Dorman ,........ Kavanaugh, Joseph Hildwar Kayler, John Clayton .......,....... . Keeter, Keith Boyd .....,.... ,.9l, 119 .81, 91,119 Keeier, Kenneth Howard. . Kees, Donald Joseph ....... Keller, John Albert ...... Kelley, Alene May ....... Kelley, Lee McDowell ..... Kendall, Jack Bryan ..,,. Kendall, Joe Earl .,.,.,.... Kennedy, Norman Lee ..... Kenney, Bruce Warren .... Kenworthy, Milburn James. 'H"'ff155Q507 'QfQ105'115f1Qs .. .,., 105 118,207 104f201 .......... .... 185 a .......... ........ 175f297 173,175 .......... .....15s .U..U......Hl1L U. 145,290 Kerby, Dorothy Jean , .... .........,., Kercheval, John Dawson. . . Kercheval, Mary Josephine Cath .... . . Kern, Joye Ann ....... . . . , ..,....100 Kerns, Richard Paul ................ , . Kerr, Charles Wesley .... Kersey, Helen Janet ...... ............ Kertz, Jacob Donald ,...... ..,........ Kettenbach, Frank William Il ,.... .... Kettenbach, Harriett Ann ...... 92, 126 Kiblen, Charles Joseph. . .,....,.,. , . . Kiilsgaard, Carl Christen .... Kilian, Frank Bernard Jr. . . Kilian, Mildred Hull ..... King, Charles Douglas. . . King, Joan Lea ......., King, Max Richard ..... ...,213 Kinney, Carl Edward ......... 126, 196 Kinney, Margie Anne ...... Kinnison, Frank Donald Jr ..,..,....... Kinnison, Philip Taylor ...... Kinsey, Jerome Kay ..........,. . Kinsolving, George Leighton .... .,., Kious, Wayne B ....,.......,. Kirk, Sherman Duane. ..,. . . Kirsch, Andrew Francis. . Kiser, Alfred Clay ...,... Kistler, Marvin John ....... Kitchens, Barbara Lucile. . . Kjose, Donna Lea ..... , . Klages, Karl William, . . . Klason, Karl James ...., Klaus, Delbert Irvin ...... , .... , Klefiner, Robert Sylvester .... . Klehm, David Stewart .,,... Kleist, Frank William ,..... Klemns, Oscar Rolland ..... Kline, Richard Dean ,... . Klink, Gerald Edwin ..... Knight, Barbara Deloris, . Knoles, Delores June ..... Knopp, William August .,.. Knowlton, Leo L. ....,. . . Knox, Willis Ancil ........ Knudson, James Thomas ,... . Knudtsen, Clifford Wayne ..... 282 ..lH104 1551145 iasfisi ffQ1201 100,148 .ffj155 153 211 125 1255 .99 124 , 238 274 148 171 239 148 1174775 1 1 1 . .,.,... 69,170 ...82,135,193 .ffQfffQ155 U... .H..143, .,.U..U..H.78 M...71,74,76,78 67'70f115,115 273,274 fffffffff124 207 514 125 ...........l71 H..1l6,l33,151 .QQfe5Q101 137 1 ,..69,199J26L 123 334 334 343 352 352 298 352 132 285 285 334 297 120 308 292 343 343 285 343 285 352 352 334 299 352 262 285 334 352 285 334 342 352 319 334 246 334 334 352 352 135 343 334 343 334 239 334 285 122 285 352 352 343 352 352 343 352 314 292 352 109 308 334 303 308 123 290 324 343 334 299 343 126 334 344 123 285 353 353 125 353 285 153 344 188 176 292 1 19 132 105 323 353 285 344 133 1 1 1 292 344 334 292 Koethke Dean Gatewoo 1 d .... Kohl, Ernest Fred .,..,.... Kohl, Meade Wesley ...,.. Kohring, Kent Gerhard ...,. Komoto, Bill Katsuki ....., ffff105 Kongsgaard, Sverre ........ ............. Konicek, Donald Edward ............,,.... Kooch, Phyllis Dean ...............,.. Kopke, Frederick Lee ..... Koppang, Milton Orvin ...... . Korb, Ray Everett ......... Korn, Virginia Lea ....... , Kornher, Kenneth Lee ..... Korter, Joan Elizabeth ...., Korvala, Carol Virginia ....... Koster, John Earl. . .... . . . Krajewski, Richard Max ..,.. Kramer, Douglas Duane. . . Kramer, Richard Boyd ...... Kranches, Leonard Raymon. Krehbiel, Jack Steward .... Kreisher, Gordon Darrell .... Krey, Elsie Martha ........ Krugher, Hartly Henning ..., Kugler, John Brindley ....... Kunkel, Paul Chandler .... Kunz, Cleon Burton ...,.,.. Kuper, Donald Graham ..... L Lacher, Theodore Victor ,... Lacy, Jack Selman ......,, Lacy, John Charles ......... Ladwig, Lewis Reimann ..... LaFoe, Lorin George. . . . . LaFollette, Evan Price ..... LaGrone, James Rex .... . . Lake, Kent Easton ......... Lallman, Merton William. . Lamberth, Charles Robert, . . Lampman, Marjorie ....,... Lamson, Harry Gene ...... Land, Henry Clayton Jr ..... Landeck, Walter Andrew Landers, James Homer, . . . Lane ames Lewis , J .......... Lane, Michaela Low ....... . Laney, Harry Cleo ........ Lapray, Donald Howard. . . Larch, Lois Clair ........... Larkin, Joseph Lindbergh ..... Larsen, Kenneth Harold. , . Larsen, Wallace Howard. . Larson, Andrew Elwyn ..,.., Larson, Donald Spencer ..... Larson, Gene Francis ..... Larson, Phyllis Ann ....... Larson, Quentin Wayne ..... Larson, Virgel Axel ....... 68, .81, 104, 's4f104' g.J55 1fff5sf15s , ..... 118 .....,75, iosfissfiss fffffffff124 . .. .137, 144 . ........ 69 ,109,111, 119 . .,...... 182 100,135 4ffffQ125 ffj100 H..213 N..125 .....ffff127 .....,...208 LaRue, Phyllis May ..,...... 65, 67, 70, 114 Laski, Edwin Cummings. . . Last, William Dane ...... Lau, Seet Beak ........... Laurent, Thomas Henry ..... Lauriente, Corinne Diana. . . . LaVoy, Corwin Donn ...... 149, 151, 275 .ffffff124 U..78,1O0 .rIg. 120 , 127, .80, 127, 156, 1 1 1 1 Lawrence, Bryan Eldon ................,.. Lawrence, John Allen .... 68, 121, 194, 196 Lawrence, LaVerna Jean .......,,...... 135, Lawson, Clark Guinther.. . Lawson, Pauline Carol .... Layos, George Jack ..... Lea, George Dewey Jr .... Leatham, Billy Virgil ...... ,...98, 132, 171 207f 196 171, 236, 196, 141 16f 139, 207, 157, 161, 137, 124, 207, 196 201 104 141 253 105 201 181 175 fs4 105 195 128 261 314 145 185 175 259 196 183 143 125 175 157 171 221 210 208 207 148 208 297 127 282 251 156 145 170 307 148 230 15h 205 '15s 1 1 1 1 1 1 Leavell, William Gordon ,.,. .........., .... Leavitt, Edward Plato ....... ..........., .... LeDuc, Richard Wallace .... ...., 2 13, 215, 219, Lee, George Edward ..... ....,...... 1 24, Lee, Jacquelyn Sue ..... ...... 1 36, 148, Lee. Oliver Malcolm .... . ..,......... 196, Lee, Patricia Ann ..... .......... 9 7, 145, Lee, Robert Rue ..... ......,...., ..,. Lefevre, Lauretta ....... ,74, 100, 135, 151, Leigh, Phil M. ...,....... ......,....... 1 34, Lein, John Nave ...,,..... . ......,. 200, 201, Lenander, Shelby Dean ..... ..., 1 04, 201, Lenke, Harold Robert ...,. ...... 1 25, Lenker, Gaylord Frank ..., . . , , . . , . Lenzin er, Keith William ..., ...... 2 01, Lesak, 7Jonald Karel ...... .....,,...,. Lesher, John Miller ...,. . . . . 105, 193, Leslie, Jerry Lee ......... ,,....... 1 41, Letson, Claire Erwin .....,.. . , .68, 83, 124, Leuschel, Otto Herman Jr, . . . .,..... .69, Levy, Seymour Harry ..... ........... Lewis, Barney J ..,...,.. ..,........ Lewis, Blair Stanley ..... ..,..,,.. 2 08, Lewis, Donald David .... . . .70, 86, 275, Lewis, Robert Eugene ..... .... 9 1, 194, 196, Lewis, Wayne Edward .... ....,.... , 185, Liberg, Jack Donald ...,. ...,...,. 2 08, Liberg, Ray Walired .......... ........ , 208, Liberg, Robert Martin ........,. .... 2 08, 307, Lieurance, Maxwell Thurlow .... ......,...,.. Lillard, Beth Marie, ............ .,.. 1 16, 157, Lillibridge, Roger Albert ......,.. , .......... Limbaugh, Lawrence Wesley Jr .......,... 97, 99, 196, Linck, Dexter Maurice .....,...........,...,,.. Linck, Robert Oliver ....., ..., 1 84, 245, 246, Lind, Kenneth Simmon ..,. .,,..,..... 1 71, Lind, Leon Paul .......... , .........,.. . Lind, Leonard Gustat ..... .... ,.... ........... Lind, William Robert .............. 97, 100, 175, Lindsay, Donald Boyd ................. 125, 208, Lindstrom, Jeanne Katherine Stanney .....,,, 148, Link, Clifford Cecil .....,.........,.., 127, 208, Lint, Richard Eldon ...........,..,...,.... 167, Lipp, Dorothy Lenore .... .... 1 27, 133, 148, Litchfield, Joan Dolores ..,. ....,.. 1 57, 263, Little, Harold Ewing. , , .... . ..,....... . . . Livingston, Barbara Ann .... . , .81, 143, Lloyd, Richard Wayne ...... , . . .121, 125, Lockard, Raymond Gilbert .... . .,...... . Lodge, Norman Clark ....,. ..... 1 67 Lodge, William Murray. .... Lofgren, Virginia Eleanor. . . 25f 285 308 344 334 334 237 353 344 353 344 299 353 353 285 334 344 319 125 314 353 334 258 344 353 179 334 344 353 124 100 353 353 353 292 334 94 323 257 292 334 334 353 334 344 353 314 314 353 344 255 353 344 344 292 344 299 299 133 285 125 299 87 319 353 334 344 308 353 231 285 285 319 353 344 334 221 319 344 353 344 257 353 353 285 334 292 334 353 353 344 353 334 353 325 299 292 286 285 344 344 353 308 319 344 258 101 353 261 298 334 100 334 298 344 285 353 334 353 298 334 344 344 306 292 353 344 Nowak, Theo Thomas. . , .97, 100, 2101 Loiko, Estelle .,...........,....-----.---,, 151, 344 Long, Calvin Thomas. ,,... 96, 97, 100, 196, 283, 286 Long, Donald Charles .............,..,...,. 196, 334 Long, Elbert Thomas lr ..........,.....,.... 208, 334 Long, lohn A ......,.... ....,.. 3 44 Longeteig, Shirley Rae ...... .... l 48, 344 Loofbourrow, Don ............ ..,... 1 84 Look, Durmond Kwok-Ming ..... .... 1 35 Mc McAuley, Robert Earl, , . .,.,.., , , . 308 lMcBride, Douglas La Vaughn .... ,,..., 3 53 ,McBride, Mary Muriel .......... . . , ..,. 149 lMcCand1ess, Mary Evelyn ..... .... 1 59, 346 ' McCarroll, Mark Evans ..... .... 1 79, 353 McCarty, George Albert ,... . . . . . . . , . 257 McChesnie, Robert Lee ..... . . . ....... . 292 McClaren, lack Keith. .,... . . , 167, 262, 292 McClellan, Arlene Ann ..... . . . 140, 141, 344 MoC1intick, Lloyd Carl ,,....... ....... , . , . 125 McClun, David Ezra. .,,.,................ ,... 3 53 McCormack, Alvin Vernon ....,............ 167, 308 McCormack, Benjamin Stewart ..,... 99 104, 167 344 McCormack, Kenneth Robert ...... 113, 167, 213 218 255, 273, 274 286 McCormick, lanice Marie ,... .... 6 5 132 151, 282 329, 335 McCoury, Melvin Wayne lr. . . ,...,..., . , . . 105 McCreedy, Robert lames .... ...... 1 23 196, 334 , McCreight, David lohn ..,.. .... 1 11 119, 196, 353 McCullough, Gene Glen ,,... .........., 1 75 335 McDaniel, Theodore Lewis lr. .,.... 87 121 199, 344 McDevitt, Daniel Bernard ....... 68, 94, 123, 175 314 McDevitt, Herman loseph. .68, 94, 155 173, 175 302 McDonald, Edith Coleen ..,..,. 87, 126, 154, 155, 335 McEntee, Margaret Coleen ....,........,.. 153, 335 McEntire, lack Arthur ....,.,..,...,...... .... 3 35 McEvers, Kathleen Letha .,,.... ....., 1 61, 335 McFadden, Calvin lames ......... ....... , . . . 286 McFadden, Richard Lawrence .... . . . 125, 208 335 McFrederick, lack William, . , . . ....., 201 335 McGahan, Kathryn leanne ,... ,.... .... 3 5 3 McGee, lames Bates ......,. .... l 24 335 McGough, lohn Witt ...... ...,.....,.. 2 86 McHone, lune Rose ..... ......,... 1 61, 353 Mclntosh, Bruce Lewis ,,.. ............ 2 58, 353 Mclntosh, Nancy leanne ..., .,.... 8 1, 135, 153, 353 McKee, Gerald O ...,... . .. .... 68, 76, 79, 87, 127 208, 344 McKeever, Chloe Francesca ..,. ...,.. 1 00, 148, 353 McKenney, Mary Louise ....., .,.. 1 29, 153, 299 MoKevitt, lames Douglas .... ...... 2 55, 335 McKinley, lack Bernard ...... . . . . , . . 125 McKinney, Charles Clifford .,.., .... 2 92 McLaughlin, Robert Francis ...... . . . . . . . 125 McLean, Lawrence Sutherland .,.,....,..... 179, 353 McMahan, Donald Earl ....,.,..,...... 126, 193, 344 McMahon, Robert Ormond ..... 83, 100, 124, 132, 170 171, 318, 335 McManaman, Robert Francis ....... 193, 196, 260, 292 McManamon, Donald Ray ,,... ......,... ,... 3 5 3 McMaster, Galen Milton ,....... ...... 1 21 175, 314 McMullen, Terrence Daniel. .... ....,. ,,.. 2 6 2 McMullin, Chester Carlton ...... .,.,,. ,..... 1 2 3 McMu1lin, Graham Michael ..... .,.. 1 35, 201, 353 McMurtrey, Robert Gale ,..... ...,.. 2 08, 314 McNealy, Delbert Dean ..... ...,... 8 2 193, 315 McNee, Ernest Eugene .... , . .,...,.. ..., 3 44 McQuillin, lohn Parker ..... ,...... ,...... 1 8 5, 335 McReynolds, Maralee Lois... .. , . ,116, 127, 143, 344 McVicker, Laura Mae ...,,.. .,., 1 37, 142 143, 292 M MacCallum, Douglas Harding .... .,.,... .... 1 2 2 MacDonald, Robert Dean ......, .... 1 25, 208, 335 Macedo, Martin Humphredo, . . . ..,... . . . , 344 Mack, lohn Foster ........,.,. ........ 3 44 Mackay, lohn Thomas ...... ................. 3 44 Mackay, Robert Emmett .,.....,.......,.. 90, 97, 335 Mackey, lanet Caro1yn,, ..,.. 132, 156, 157, 290, 292 MacKinnon, Donald Lewis .......,........ .... 3 15 MacMillan, Catherine lane ,,...... 119, 135 150, 344 Maddox, Louise Lydia ...... ........ 8 1 139, 353 Magden, LeRoy Frank ........ ...,.,.,. 1 99, 335 Magee, Margaret Winnilred ..., ...,...,. 1 41, 344 Magel, Nancy Noreen ...........,...,. 119, 157, 353 Magnuson, Richard George ..,.,.,,. 69, 137, 202, 302 Maize, Robert Morris .,......... . . .,.,. 97 185, 353 Maki, Donald Edward ....,,...... .,...... 1 93, 353 Makinson, Donald Whealdon ..... . . .... 196 Maloy, Otis Cleo lr ........,... . . . . . . . 344 Marineau, Arlan lacque ......,....,,..,..... 77, 353 Marker, Mildred lean ......,........... 78, 153, 353 Marks, Nathan Gordon .................... 255, 335 Marshall, 1-1arcldlames...92, 119, 137, 192, 193, 286 Marshall, Helen Louise ...........,,...,.. , . . . 286 Marshall, Kenneth Wilson ..,.,.,.......... .... 3 08 Marsyla, Linda Lee .,,........,.... 68, 127, 148, 344 Martin, Berniece Loyota Campbell ...... 141, 335, 345 Martin, Cecil Vergil lr, ...............,... .... 3 44 Martin, Chauncey William ....... ,..... . .,.. 3 35 Martin, Donald Roy. . .,.... .... 1 24 175, 319 Martin, Douglas Moran ,... ........ 1 24, 319 Martin, Iames Carroll ...., ,........ 2 08, 344 Martin, loan Ardeth ..,., .... 9 7, 100, 116, 133 160, 161, 344 Martin, lohn Edgar ........ . . .70, 71, 72, 113, 183 328, 335 Martindale, David Rulon lr ................ 251. 344 Martinson, Lloyd Gaines ........................ 125 Massingill, Roland Lee .,..... 245, 246, 255, 261, 335 Mason, Donald Edward ,......,... .,........,... 3 44 Mast, lohn Taylor ...............,.............. 299 Mather, William Wicks. , ..... .... 2 58, 353 Matheson, lohn Alexander .,., ..,...... 1 08, 335 Mathews, Max ...,...,..,.. .......... ..,., 3 5 3 Mathews, Renee .,........ ....,.,.....,... 9 4, 95 Matson, Elven Gene ........ ..,. 1 18, 171 259, 353 Matthews, Bonnie Rae .....,. ...,,..,... 1 45, 353 Matthews, lane Lenore ....... , . .,....,.. 145, 344 Matzner, Frederick Theophile .... .... 1 24 196, 344 Maughan, Clyde Vivian ........ ...... l 23, 315 Maule, David William ......,. ....... ..... 1 7 8 Maule, Glorian Margaret ..... .... 1 20, 159, 353 Mautz, Kathryn Cecilia ..... .... 1 25 148, 302 Maxwell, lames William .,.. ..., 1 22 175, 315 Maxwell, Roger Franklin ,.... .,.. 6 9, 193 285 May, Howard Aree ........ .,.. . 97 100 May, lames lunicr .....,.. .........,..,. . . 125 Mayer, William Valentine .........,............ 137 Mayo, lohn Strand ...,............ , . .,..,..,.. 315 Mays, Robert Daly ........,... 66, 106, 183 213 214 219 262, 335 Meacham, Donald Herbert, ........... ,... 1 87, 344 Mead, Herbert Malcolm ..... ...,.,. , 225, 233, 335 Meagher, Philip lames .... ,......... 1 05 199, 353 Means, Helen Marie ....., ,,... 6 5, 69, 137, 144, 145 328, 335 Meares, Howard Glenn lr. . . .....,... 121, 171, 335 Mecham, Iames Glenn .,.. , ..,...... 315 Medley, Donald Ioseph ..,. ...,..,... l 26 Meek, Earl Eugene ........ .,.....,.,. 2 57 Mehl, Margaret Ann ........ . . , .97, 151 344 Melis, Donna Lorraine ........ , . . . .87, 100 Mendenhall, Charles Dale .,... . . , . 199, 335 Mendiola, Thomas lohn ,,,,.. ..,,. 2 61 Meppen, Kenneth Harry ...., ..........,.. 3 53 Mercier, Loren Alfred ..... . .,.. ..., 1 19, 353 Merrell, loyce Ann ........ ..,............. 1 27 Merrick, Conrad George .... .... 1 24, 172, 318, 335 Merrill, Richard Willard ..... ....... 1 26 248, 344 Meserve, Carl Guy .....,. ..... 1 23, 208, 315 Messerly, Lois Lee ....... ..., 1 57, 344 Meyer, lohn Macy ..,.,.. ..... 1 19, 131 335 Meyer, Richard Bibbins .... , ...... 119 175, 344 Meyer, William Carl ......, .... 1 18, 121, 127, 344 Michael, Charles Richard .... ,..,..,........, 1 99 Michel, Marvin Lee ............,.,,..........,. 353 Miiler, Richard Stanley .,.,.... 82, 121, 134, 179, 353 Milich, Dale William ..... ,....., . . .... 196 335 Millard, lohn Herbert ..., . .,.,.. .... 2 23, 226 Miller, Arbie Glenn Ir. . . ...,.,.. .... 1 67, 353 Miller, Carol lean ....... .,.,....., 1 46, 148 286 Miller, Donald Francis ..,....,,.,.,..., 123, 172 335 Miller, Donald Zaring ..,. ,239, 251, 253 255 286 Miller, Gerald Lochenvar .,,,..,..........,.... 196 Miller, Gerald Loren ..... , . , ..........,.... 286 Miller, Harley Neivell ..,. . . . . . . . 286 Miller, leanne Alice ..... ...,. .... 1 4 8 Miller, leanne Bernice. . . .....,..... , 292 Miller, lohn Frederick, .... . . .167, 241 344 Miller, Gilbert lohn ..... ,.., 9 1, 92, 102 Miller, lohn lames ....,.. . , , . 172 344 Miller, Kenneth Wayne .... . . . . , . 196 353 Miller, Louise Marilyn ,.... . . , .97, 143 286 Miller, Marlene .......... , .,..,.... 148 Miller, Ralph Mervin ..... , . . 104, 131 308 Miller, Raymond Leo ..... .......... 3 35 Mills, Donald Leon ,....,. . , . 129, 172 286 Mills, Zimri Edwin ......., .... , . . . .,.. 121 345 Millsap, Lorene Elizabeth ......,............... 98 Minden, Marcella lean. ..,., 116, 160, 161, 211, 345 Mingus, Marilyn Camille ............. ,.., 1 59, 335 Mink, Elzo Eileen ........ ,..,.,.. .... ..., 1 5 1 353 Misson, Frances Florence .... ........ 1 35, 151, 345 Mitchell, Donald Ray .,.,.... .... 1 21, 127, 208, 354 Mitchell, lacqueline Teresa,. . . .65, 127, 135, 156 157, 282 286 Mitchell, lames Brantley ..... , . .,..,..,..... 335 Mitchell, Robert Glen ..., ...,.,,..,........ , 118 Mitchell, Thomas Anthony ......., 73, 74, 76, 79, 345 Mithoug, Francis Neal .,,,... ...,........... 3 54 Mizer, Billee lack ......,., .... .... 2 0 8, 308 Mochel, Alvon Lyle .... ....... 2 86 Moe, Edward Andrew .... . . 196 335 Moes, Carol Francis ,...,. , . .,.., 345 Moffett, Russell Golden, .... . , 109 286 Moha, lames Anthony .... . . , ..... , . 124 Moldenhauer, Robert Thomas .... .,........ 3 09 Molen, Shirley Jeanne ........, . .,......... 159 Moline, Marjorie Louise ..... .... 9 8, 139, 354 Monroe, Laurence Kisler ..,. ..,....,., 3 54 Monroe, Marlene .......,., .... l 36 345 Montgomery, Elmer Kay ...., .... 2 08 335 Moore, Clarence Paul ..., .....,... 3 35 Moore, Delno Huber .,..... , .... 121, 309 Moore, Doris Ann .,...... . . . 135, 157, 345 Moore, Gloria Rae .... , . . .8l, 159, 345 Moore, lames Thomas ..,. . . 185, 256, 345 Moore, Richard Lee ..,.. ......,. 1 00, 179 Morache, Martel .......... ..... .... . 6 9, 335 Morbeck, Marilyn lean ..... ........,.... 1 41, 354 Morgan, Iames Edward .,.. .... 1 24, 208, 286, 323 Morrison, Frank Davis ,.,. ...... 1 21, 127, 345 Morrison, lames Akin lr .... ........ 1 96, 354 Morrison, Lawrence ...... .,...... 1 22 Morrison, Melvin Ellery ..... .... 1 72, 268 Morrow, Claude Wesley ...,..,.,..,. .... 1 72, 309 Mortensen, Max Christian ....,..,............., 309 Morton, Howard LeRoy ....... , ....,.. 208, 307, 309 Mosher, lesse Dean. ..,..,.... 70, 113, 115, 274 302 Mosman, lack Herbert, .... ....,....... 7 3, 75, 345 Moss, lerald Carl .....,., ....,.. 1 29, 172, 335 Moulton, Ann Marie. . . ....,..,..,... 151, 354 Moulton, Floyd Rex. . , . ........,.. .97, 208, 309 Moulton, Robert Ellis ,.... ..... 6 6, 70, 113, 115, 172 275, 283, 286, 288 Moyer, Larry Richard ...... ...,........ 2 57, 260 Muck, Vergil Edward ........ .... . . . . . . . 105 Muehlethaler, Charlie loe ..... .... 1 24, 172 319 Mueller, George William .... .......... ..., 1 1 1 Mullins, Billy Paul ......... .... 1 80, 213, 221 255 Munson, Robert lr ...... , ..... .... 2 56, 292 Murdock, Rose Marion ..... .... .,.. 1 5 9, 345 Murphy, David Eugene .... .... 2 57, 260 Mushlitz, Robert Wilson .... Myklebust, Paal, ....,..,. , . N Nagel, leanne ....,..,. . , . Nance, Lewis Guy ...,... Naser, Delbert Merlin ,... Nash, William 1, .,....,. . Neal, Edgar Franklin, ..., . , . Neal, Martha Sue ........,.,..,...... 104 118 Nealey, Horace Donnell .,.... I Neff, Bradford Telyea .... ,.,,.. .... Nefzger, Gary I, ...,..... . , . Neibaur, Mack William .... . Nelson Nelson N elson: lack Harold , .... Dale Wendell .... Nelsen, Nelson, , Mary loAnn. .. Merlin Wandel .... Patricia Pauline. , 1 116, 1.05 501 '105 Q65 I 1 1 I 193 159 208 183 155 258 175 Q08 ' 123 143 T41 1 I 354 236 345 345 354 345 l 19 345 354 286 21 l 309 345 292 345 286 335 Nelson Nelson, Nelson, Nelson, , Rasmus William .... Robert Victor ..... Shirley Lorraine. , . . William Edward ,... . Nelson, William Henrick. ,.... Nepean, Donald Nance ........ Nesbitt, Alice .leanette ........ 100, 124, 134 Nesbitt, lohn Franklin .... ........... 1 23 Nesbitt, Sherman Lindy ..... . Ness, Earl Duane ,.,.., . , , . Neumayer, George loseph .... Newbry, Truman Clarence ,... Newell, Earl Richard ,,,,.,,.. Newton, Richard Whitney .... Nicholas, Benjamin Franklin. . . Nicholas, .lohn Thomas .lr ..... Nicholas, Lester lohn ......,.. Nicholas, Ronald William ..... Nicholson, Gilbert Allen ..... Nickeson, Richard Edward .... Niece, Leslie Edward .................. Nielsen, Merrill Longhurst ,,.....,.,... Nixon, Robert Iames ..,.,., . . . . Nobis, Robert Staples ..,,....,......... Noble, Clark Ralph ,.., . , ..,. . Noggle, lohn Warren George .,......., Nokes, Herald Stanger .,.,......,..... Nokes, Naomi loan, .,.. , ..,. . Norgord, lohn Theodore .,....,..,...., Norris, Sally .........,..... 71 Norton, Donna lo .,,,,,, ,.., Norton, Viola Marie ..... , ..,...... . Numbers, Murray Don .,.. Nye, David Donald ...... O O'Connell, Daniel Walter ,... O'Connor, lames Patrick ..... O'Connor, Patricia Ann ...... O'Connor, Robert lerome .... O'Donnell, lohn Douglas .,,,. O'Leary, Andrew George ..,, O'Leary, lack Stowelle ..... O'Neill, Mary Loraine .... Oates, .lames Henry .,..,.., Obermeyer, Leland Owen .... Ochs, Shirley Marie ........ Oehmeke, Bob Gee ....,. Officer, lulius Erle1r,.. Ogle, lerry Lee .....,.. Ohms, Richard Earl .... Ohms, Charles Arthur .... Olesen, William Olat .lr .,.. Oleson, Donald Richard .... Oliason, Kenneth Edward .... Olin, Glenn Edward ........ Oliver, Billy Eugene ...... Olson, Della Marie ,.... Olson, Harlan Ray ....... Olson, Raymond Arthur, . , . Olson, Robert Fjelde. , .... , . , ..... , . Omaley, Francis Louise .,.,...,.,.,., Orazem, Agnes Virginia, , Organ, Carol Virginia. . Orme, Rich E. .,.,.,.... , Ormond, lay Keith ..,,..... Osborne, Ca rl Dean ,................ Osborne, Harry Hamilton .,.... Osmundson, Sharon Clare ..... Ottenheimer, Bernice lean .... Ou rada, Martin loseph .......,...,.., Overgaard, Wilford E.. . . Owens, Robert George ...., Owens, Edward William.. . , P Pabst, Herman Norman .,,.. Packenham, Ollie Marie. . Paine, Glenn Forrest .... Palmer, Lavon Wesley .... Pape, Eloise Barbara ...... Paras, lim George ...... Pardue, Roland Keith ..... Parish, Robert Stuart .,,.. Parish, William Robert .... ...l05, 121, 187, 257 259,351 .....335 157,335 121,335 123,315 ......80,81,20l,345 ,l51,335 ,175,315 ..........,.208,309 100 ....335 . ........ ...,. 3 54 , ,.,..,,.,. 199,335 ..,l04, 201,253,254 339,345 .,.,.345 . ..., 286 .,..286 ...255,292 172,335 .,..336 124 124 .77, 78, 119, 201, 345 .98, 101,336 124,319 125,167,302 108,187,319 ,..,.97, 100, 159,345 .... 123 , 76, 97, 100, 143, 286 151,345 135,151,286 ...,208, 251,338 183,345 .,..86,208,345 105,286 ....315 ....l35, 141, 345 .69,336 ...., 257 121,336 . ,... ..... 1 21,354 141,336 ...105, 199,256,354 199,345 153,354 ..,.l24, 193,354 ....286 ....257, 258, 262 ......201,309 124 . .... 108 ,,.26l,336 ,..208,309 179,336 .,.,..,,257,262 ......133 148,336 ...l05, 183, 262,354 .....299 101,292 141,354 .68, 73, 116, 148, 345 151,297,299 179,354 183,345 196,354 .,..345 153,354 .65, 137, 141, 275, 286 104,121 ....213 123 ...306 ....68, Parker, Don Carlos .,.,. ..... , . . , . . . . Parker, Donald Neil ..,.,. ..,...,.,..... Parker, Richard Dale ,,...,.,.,..,..,. . Parker, Roy Alfred .......,.... 87, ll 1, Parkin, Kenneth Frederick ....., , ...,..... . Parkins, Marya Ann .....,.. ..... 1 27, Parks, Mildred loan ...... . , . 100, Parrish, Robert Everett ....., Parrotte, Richard Ernest .... Parsell, Richard Charles .,,. Parsons, lames Eugene lr. . . Passmore, lames Carter .....,. Passmore, Robert Willard. . , . . Patano, Mary Grace ......, Pate, Harvey Ellis ........ Paterson, lohn lames. . . Patton, Patricia Ann .... Patz, Howard Colby .,.... Paulsen, lohn Henry ..,.... Paulson, Eleanor Elizabeth .... Paulson, loanne ,,.,,...... Payne, Helen Loretta ...,. Paynter, Kent Stanford ..,. Peairs, Roy Stanley .,,,...... Pearsen, Marilyn Bernice ..... Peck, Ronald Frederick ,,... Pederson, Eugene Dan, . , ...137 ....96, 99 137 Peer, Margie Lee ....... , . . .,... . . . . Pence, losephine Theresa ......,......, Pennell, Richard Lee ..... Pentzer, Frank Arthur .... Pepper, Harry lohn lr ..., Peretti, Lawrence Ellis ...,. Perkins, Arthur Hewette .,.. Perrine, Frank Ledyard ..... Perry, lack Derrell ,,..... Perry, Robert Eugene .,,.. Perry, William Francis ,... 88, 89, .,.l25 134,168,292 ...., 145,345 ...., 167,354 194,196,336 135,148,354 260,292 124,197,354 167,251,345 ... .... .123 187,336 172,336 ... .U. 345 118,197,354 124,129 133,148,354 133,141,354 ... .,.. .104 197,336 ... 201,292 ..H. 208,345 ... ..,. 336 ... .M. 319 127,139,354 105 175,354 197,336 126 155,345 197,354 121,307,309 140,141,286 126,159,345 .78,141,345 ..H. 208,336 175,345 157,354 175,299 176,292 131,148,336 100,151,345 113,275 286 108,172 336 .97 100,345 125,208,292 .92 105 106 ... ,U. 292 .., .... 354 .,, .H. 354 135 197 302 361 Robinson, Wayne Lee ....... Rosenau, Theodore William .... Peterman, Robert Rae, ..................... 179, 299 Peters, Betty Lorraine ........ 70, 71, 92, 93, 263, 329 Peters, loanne Catherine ........ 96, 97, 126, 157, 345 Peters, Richard Eldon, .... ..,.....,....,..,. 1 57 Petersen, Aris Margaret ....... 70, 114, 142, 143, 286 Petersen, Carol Ellen ......,.. ,..... . . . 100, 157, 354 Petersen, Merilyn Mae... ,77, 127, 156, 157, 282, 336 Peterson, Elmer Vernon ....,........,..,.., 181, 345 Peterson, George Lawrence ,...... . , . . . 172, 256, 345 Peterson, lack Dale .....,..... ,... 9 9, 101, 179, 336 Peterson, lames Melford .... . ,..,... . .,... 123 Peterson, lames Monroe .... ....... , . ..,.,. 315 Peterson, lohn Clinton .... .... 9 5, 113, 183, 302 Peterson, lulius Grant ...... ......,....... 1 25 Peterson, Richard Dowman, . . . ......,.. 261, 345 Peterson, Robert Frederick .,.. .... 1 05, 354 Peterson, Wallace Angelo ..... .... 3 07, 309 Peterson, William ......,... .... 1 79, 354 Petrie, Allan Kendrick .....,.. .......... 1 85, 286 Petrinovich, Lewis Franklin. . . ............... . 104 Petruzzi, lames William .,,., ..,...,.......... 2 57 Pettijohn, Shirley Ray ,.,.... .... 1 OO, 120, 151, 354 Pettygrove, Robert Allred. . . ............... 286 Pfaff, George Albert ...... ....,........, 1 24 Pharris, Carl lerome. . . , . .... 197 315 Pharris, Earl Roy ....,... . ..,.. 167 286 Phillips, Marilyn Helen .... .... 7 8, 153, 354 Phillips, Robert Dewey .,.. .,.. 1 97, 345 Phillips, Robert Marvin .... ......,.,.,. 2 57 Phillips, Wayne Aaron .... .............. 1 25 Pickerd, Eugene Dale, . . .,.....,....,. . 128 Pickett, Bonnie Ann ...... ,... 9 9, 133, 151, 354 Pickett, Hal Gene ,,,,. ..... ,...... 6 8 , 208, 286 Pickren, Howard loseph ..... .,........ 2 08, 354 Pierce, Marvin Lewis ......... .,..... ,,,.. 2 3 1, 292 Pierce, Wellington Conrad ,... .... 9 9, 104, 167, 354 Pieser, Patsy Avis, , ........ ......,.,. 1 45, 354 Piraino, Daniel ,,,. .,..... ..., 1 0 9, 172, 336 Pitcher, Eugene Clinton ..... ..,.... 1 72, 336 Pittard, Robert Thurlow. . . ....,.......... 121, 315 Pline, lames Leonard .... ..,...,.......,.. 2 08, 354 Pline, lohn Clinton lr .....,.., 82, 104, 123, 175, 354 Pohlod, Harold Edward .... .....,............. 3 36 Pohlod, Helen Louise ,.., . . . .,........... 155, 354 Pohlod, Wallace Richard ,... ....,. 3 36 Poitevin, Ramon loseph ..., ......, 1 35 Polk, Paul Lyle .,,,,..,.. .... 1 85, 345 Pollan, Roland Gene ...,... ...,.. 1 04 Pollard, Rodney Allen ,,,.... Pollett, leanne Sibyl Griggs. Polson, Greta ...,,...,..,..,......... Pond, Marilyn .........,.. ..,. 7 4, 81, Poole, Bert Leslie .,,.... Poore, Robert Thomas. . . Porter, Clyde Robert ...... Porterin, R. l .,.. .... ,,,.. . . . . . .. .. .... 223, 100f157 ..,.,H,.167,258 Pyles, Betty lane ........ 128 Posnick, Patricia Arlene ,... ,... . . . Potvin, Gregory Remmington ,..,, . . . Poulcs, George Argis ........... ,... . . Powell, Bruce Duane ,...... . . .... . . Powell, Eleanor Rhoda ..... Powell, Garth .........,.. , .,.., Powell, George Edward ..... ..,.., Powers, Beverly lune ..,.. ..,..., Powers, Peggy Gene, ...., Prater, Richard Neal ,.,...,. .... . . Pratt, Francis Chapman ..,,. . . . . Pratt, leanne Chapman ..,. . . . Pratt, Lillian Florence. . . Price, lames Wallace .... ..... Price, loan Elizabeth ..... ...... Prince, Alfred lames .,... Pring, lohn Arthur ..,... .......,. Prisby, Donald Edward ........,... Pritchett, Ellis LaMarr ....,... 227, ,.,.127, ....127, .H.1O5 233f 127f145 QQ55f97 '134 133 272, 141, 197 1260 143 148 179 201 .75,153 197,258 . ..,. 151 106 111 245 Proctor, Gerald Phillip. .........,.,.,.. , . Pruett, Margaret Ruth ..,..,.......,. 78, 79 Puckett, Genevieve Ruth ..., Pugh, Lucille leanette ...... ""150f151 Pulliam, Mona Lamoyne .,,,, ........,.. I 108 257 183 247 148 148 273 141 Purcell, Donald Hemsley .... ,.,...... , . . . . Purdy, Acel Ann .......,. ,... 8 7, 133, 161 Purdy, Edward Wright .... .,....... 1 23 139 Pyrah, Duane Brown ..,. Pytel, Roy Roman .,.... O Ouadri, Eugene Bruno ..... Ouane, Don Oliver ..... ffff51f105 Quick, Beverly lean ........ ...... 1 39, R Raber, Martha lo .,,.,...... .... 1 00, 158, 159, Racely, George lackson .... .....,.....,... Radford, Grant Nelson ........ . ,..... 184, 185 Radford, Raymond Murdoch .... . . .69, 70, 183, Raivio, Richard Theodore ..... ,..,.. 1 18, 208, Ralph, Arlene Grace ....... , . . . .87 160, 161, Rambo, Bryan Clifford ..,. ....,.......... 2 08, Rambo, Patricia Faye ,.,, .... 9 6, 97 116, 161 Ramos, lohn Paul ....... ...,.....,........., Randall, Arthur Guy .......... , . .,.... 124 208, Randall, Beverly Ardene ...... 127, 140, 141 282 Rankin, lanis Arlene ...... .....,....,... ..., Rappaport, Lawrence ...,... . . . ,...... . . . , Rasmussen, Francis lesper ..., . . . . . . , . Rasmussen, Lawrence Mack ,... ..,..... 1 87, Rawlins, Robert Wesley ....... ..,.. 1 79 262 Raymer, loan Harriet ,...... ...... . 65 145 Read, Donald Lee ,,..., .,.......... ,.,. Reager, lohn L ..,,.. .,.. ,... 2 1 3, 221, 255 Reed, Ernest Nelson lr ..... ...... . . . . , . . Reed, Kare .,.......... ,... ,... 1 3 4, 236, Reed, Richard William ,... .... 2 23 228, 255, Reed, Robert Warren .... Reese, Bernadean loy. . . Reese, Ronald Roi ....... Reeves, Reginald Ray ,...... flf55 137 123 125 Reeves, Robert Milton ..... ,..., . . .8O, 81 Reeves, Willa Mae Steelman .....,........ Reich, Chloe lrene lohnston .,.......... Reich, Frank lunius ...,,..,...........,.. Reich, Fred Royal .......,..... 69, 102, 105 Reichert, Ruth Edda ...... 68, 125, 133, 151 Reinhardt, James Frederick ................ 1362 257, 139, 208, 197 105 183 290 201 262 125 354 354 354 336 292 345 354 125 336 282 354 354 299 336 354 354 336 81 354 354 345 283 354 345 299 257 354 345 292 354 125 354 336 286 124 345 319 345 354 345 345 336 292 354 354 315 345 257 286 286 68 309 125 336 354 345 286 336 336 262 329 260 336 345 302 345 263 297 336 336 292 336 Relk, lohn ...,...,.......... Remp, Raymond Halstead ...., Renfrow, Lonny Lee ........ Rey, George ..,,......... Reynold, Rita lean Page ....,. Reynolds, Clayton Everett. . , . Reynolds, lack McDonald ..... Rice, lonathan Everett .......... , . . . Rich, Eleanor Ann .......,.. Richardson, Charles Calvin lr .... . . . . . . Richey, Evan Arnold ,....... . . . . . . . . Ricks, Nancy Kay ..,,....... Riddle, Robert Voyne ....... Riedesel, Lawrence Edwin, . . Rieman, Kieth Miles ......... . Rigby, Ray Wendell. ....,......... . . Rigby, Thomas Hazen Merrill .......... Rigby, Elenore Strange ....... ...... 6 8 Rigby, William Frederick ..,.. Riggers, Stanley Howard ..., Riggin, Donald Edward. . . Riggs, lames Howard ,... Riley, Edward lones lr. . . Rinaldi, Barbara loyce .... Rinard, lohn Ezra ....... Ringe, Louis Don ...... Ringert, William Fred .... Rivett, Patricia Anne ...... Roberts, Edgar Donald ..... Roberts, lohn William. .,.. . Roberts, Orville Herman .... Robinette, lack Douglas. , , Robinson, lanet Claire ...... Robinson, Loren Edward. ,.... Robinson, Thomas Emery lr .... Robinson, Walter Lee ..,,... Robinson, Delbert E ........ Robinson, Valerie loy ..... . . . Rockwood, lerry Rushton .... Roden, William Craig ...,, Rodig, Lamar Leonard .,.. Roe, Lonnie Vergil. .,.. . Roe, Warren Lewis lr. . . Roe, Willard Alvin ..... Rogers, Norman lr ...... Rogge, Charles Arthur .... Rohrer, Charles Eugene ..... Roller, Robert Otto .,...... Rolseth, Albert Ogden ..... Rookstool, Lester ...,.... Root, Eugene Allen. . , . . . Root, George Albert ,,.... Rose, George William ...... Rose, William Morris, ..... . . Rosenthal, lohn Damon .,,..... Ross, lames William ....... , Ross, Patton Armour ..... Ross, William Robert .... Rosse, Herman loris. . . Rossman, loy Ann ........,. Rounds, Carol lrene ......... Roupe, lames Edward .......... ........ Rouse, Noreen Teresa Ruen .... Routh, Elmer LeRoy ..... ..... Rowberry, loan Marguerite .... Rowberry, Wilber Lee ..... Rowbury, Edwin C. .... . Rowbury, Floyd C ........ Rowett, Robert Mellen ....... Rowland, Thomas Edward. . . , . Roy, lames Henry. ...... . Rudolf, Lorraine Mae .,... Rue, Howard Richard ..,..., Ruegger, loseph Allan lr ,,.. Ruiz, Albert lerome ..... .................. Ruleman, Wilbur Chris lr .,....... 167, 213 Rumble, loseph Newton ....... Rundstrom, loanne Kathryn .... Runnion, Duncan Wayne ,.... Russell, lean Ray Smith ..... Rutherford, Alan West ..,.. Rydrych, Donald lerry ...... Ryset, Francis Edward lr .... S St. Clair, Benard Wilfred. . , St. lohn, Ernest Alvin ..... Saari, Mauno lohn ...... Sacht, William Walter ..... Saegner, lohn George .... Sahl, Nels Theodore ..... Salisbury, Rae Louise ...., Sallee, Robert Wayne ........ Samms, Herbert Carithers ,... . ..... . Sample, lla leanine ......... Sampson, David Moody ,... Sandell, lohn Russell ...... Sandguist, Helen Ruth ...... Sanford, Thomas Robert ...... Sanford, William Raymond. . . Sargent, Christy Anne ...... Sargent, Faye Vyanne ........ Saulie, Theodore Valentine ..... , . . Saunders, Lois Ann .......... Savage, loseph Samuel ..... Savaria, Edward Donald .................. Scarcello, Angelo Palm ................... Schaff, Barbara lane. ....... . . Schalkau, lune Gladys ,... .... Schaplowsky, lohn Andrew .... Schark, Allan Edward ....... Schauer, Marjorie Nadine ..... Scheibe, Stanford Sidney ..... Scheloske, Robert Fred, . . ,... . Scheuffele, Virginia Grayling. . Schierman, Ralph Eugene ,,... Schild, Robert Dale ,..,...... Schiller, Lloyd Daniel ......... Schireman, Alvin Theodore ,... Schlader, lrma Cecilia ........ Schlegel, loAnn Teresa ........ 65 Schmid, Rose Ellen ......... ...,1OO . ...., 354 ......H..97 354 .....,H,.223 224 N..96,154 155 336 ......H. 197 354 ...,.....,., 197 ......,. 122 .... .,..140,141 335 125 302 213 221 ...H. 145 336 H..119,193,345 H..1l1,259,354 ..U.....N..292 ,... 125,303 115,129 274 ,150,151,257 .....,.....,...345 ....,.71,74,137 ...n, 197,354 ......H.,99,1O1 ..H..213 216,218 H..99,l35 148,354 ..H.,..,.175,319 .,.......,,345 U. 193,355 ..n. 153,345 ..,...... ,....257 ,..............355 .....H..l21,175,346 U..20O,2O1,3O7,3O9 . .....,.,..... 90,97 ..,H..l24,2O8,319 .....H..,..u.55,92 .95,99,124,315,319 ,.,..N..82,123,315 ....,H,.87,151,355 ....H..121,2O8,346 69,109,199,262,336 ....H.....H. 129,336 ..H....,H. 125,336 .. .,....... 123 .., .....,.. .335 .,. 123,175,315 ......,,.,..292 ..U..208,287 H. 175,293 ,.......,, 124 ....U..82,188,346 ......,,........ 293 M..194,197,293,238 ,...H.124,172,319 n.....H 208,346 . ...... 213,219,293 .,....H.....H..123 H,111,134,197,336 ...........,... 293 H.....H 197,293 U,,...N...132 .,...H. 197,355 ...91,92,151,336 .U..65,139,287 179,354 . .............. 290 ,., ..... 69,185,336 H..65,12O,127,157 282,336 H..1O5,125,179,302 ...H..121,3O7,309 H.....n 121,346 ..... 132,355 ...U. 199,346 U.....U 124,323 ...95,97,155,299 H.....N 185,346 ...U..124,199,355 124,132 ,218,319 255,336 ...H.... 124,336 . ... 145,346 H. 128,355 ....H 355 .... 96 . ,.,.., 121 ..,.121,309 .,. 199,315 ... .... 101 ... 179,262 . .... 335 ........,.. 255 ......... .... 125 N..68,136,148,346 ...,... ..,. 124 183,346 ,.....n 155,335 H..118,2O1,346 ....123,175,315 ., ..., ..., 297 ., .... 125,293 .....H. 125,346 N..161 290,346 N..10O 143,355 ... 193,302 N..127 155,355 ...H.....H. 157 345 ..,. 319 172 315 65,132,145 290 293 .....H.116,157 346 .U..96,119 208 335 n.....n 307 345 H..1OO 151,355 ....H 199,346 . ........ 172 355 ...H....,U.151,336 ..,.123,l34,197,315 ...121,138,257,355 ....,....,.,. 248 ..H.....H. 212 213 ..n.....H. 161,287 ....U..141 290,346 ,68,7O,127 133,149 151 329,337 .... 121 Schmid, William loseph .... ,.,... ..... , . , Schmidt, Fred Donald ....,. . . . .98, 99, 101, 104 Schmidt, Margaret loyce ..... . , ....... 139, 346 Schmidt, Stanley Otto ..,.... ............,. 1 25 Schmidt, Wallace Cameron ........ ,....,.,..,.. 3 46 Schmitt, David William ,..,, ...... 1 24, 135, 208 319 Schnell, Philip Henry ...... 71, 77, 105 113, 201 293 Schodde, Frances Ellen .............. ..... 1 41 299 Schou, Leon Richard lr ............ ..,,....,.... 1 25 Schroeder, Herbert August. . . 105, 1 18, 124, 172 346 Schrom, Anna Lucille ................ . ..., 139 355 Schultz, George Thomas .... .............,..... 2 59 Schulz, Francis Arthur ..,.. . . 100, 179, 355 Schumacher, Corrine Rae, . ,. . . , .65, 159, 337 Schumann, Willa Vopel ,... .,.. 9 7, 148, 355 Schupfer, Beverly Anne .... ..,. 9 6, 283, 337 Schupfer, Maribel Mae ..... .... 1 00, 148, 346 Schuster, Beverly Nadine ............. 141, 148, 355 Schutt, Harold lames., ........... 119, 123, 197, 346 Schwabedissen, Paul William .,...... , . .......,. 121 Scott, Wallace Dale, .......... ....... .....,. 1 O 5 Scott, Donald Allen .......... . . ..... 100, 346 Scott, Elizabeth Anne ..... . . 100, 145, 355 Scott, Gordon William .... ..... 1 00, 355 Scott, lacqueline ....... ..... 1 57, 346 Scott, Theodore. ..,......... . . . 124, 315, 323 Scott, Wesley Donald ...,.........,........,..,, 355 Scranton, Harvard Freeman .lr .......,...,,.,.,.. 76 Scull, lohn Duncan ..,..,..., 167, 242, 243, 262, 337 Seaman, Frank Craig .......................,... 262 See, Norma Marie .......... ............., 1 59, 346 Seeber, Harold Charles ..... . . . 132, 208, 346 Seelos, Robert George .... .........., 3 55 Seely, Maxine Leora .... . . , 129, 161, 337 Sell, Robert Lee .,..., ......... 2 07, 258, 355 Selle, Dewey Dean ,..... .............., , . , . 337 Sessions, Gary Owen .......,, 54, 108, 113, 121, 164 307, 328, 346 Settle, Lois lean. ,.,., ........,........ 3 55 Shaffer, Carol lean ..... . . . 126, 139, 346 Shalz, Bernard Louis ...... ...,. ' . . .208, 293 Shane, Edwin Howard ....., . . .100, 175, 355 Shane, Katherine Luella .... . . . 100, 150, 355 Sharp, Allen Wesley ..,.,. ........ 1 97, 287 Shaud, Russell Clifford ..., .........,.... 1 25 Shauer, Walter Harry. , . . . ................ ,111 Shaw, William Rupert ,... . . , 105, 167, 256, 355 Shawyer, Chester Lee ..... ,,,.. ......... 1 1 9 Sheeley, lohn Channing .... .,,..... 9 8, 99, 101 Shelton, Nancy Caroline .... .... 9 7, 135, 148, 355 Shepherd, Warren Robert .... ..,...,...,.... 9 9 Sheppard, Richard Hallam .... ..... 1 23, 197, 337 Shepperd, Warren Herrick ...,. ........... 1 O1 Sherwood, Francis Homer .... ........ 1 00, 355 Shoun, Charles Walter ..... . . . 123, 208, 315 Shreve, loseph Milburn ..... ...., , . . 183, 293 Shrontz, Frank Anderson ..... ...,. 1 18, 167, 355 Shuldberg, Bonnie Barbara ...., . . .68, 88, 92, 129 151, 337 Shull, Thomas Earl ......... ...... 2 82, 337 Siebe, Kenneth lob. . . ..... . 293 Siebe, Lois Marjorie ..... .... 2 83, 287 Sifton, Llewella Ann ..,.. ......... 1 61, 346 Silha, Henry William ...... ............... 3 25 Simmons, William Harry .... . . ,125, 167, 245, 302 Simon, Esther Anne ...... ,.......... 1 48, 346 Simons, Richard Grant .,.. .....,....... 1 94 Sims, Harold William. . . .,,.,. .293 Sims, lrene Mae ........ .... 1 59, 287 Sims, Robert Bennett. ..,.. ...... 2 04, 346 Sinden, lohn loseph, ...,... ........ 1 21, 355 Sinden, Wayman Frank ..... . , . 172, 256, 337 Sipila, Kenneth Erland ..... .....,,... 1 23 Siple, Norma Ellen ,,.....,.. .... 1 45, 355 Skinner, Betty Ann McCune .... . , . 155, 287 Skinner, George Edward ..,.. . . .199, 293 Skinner, Harold Edward .... ,... 2 97, 299 Slack, Patricia Rose ....... .... 6 5, 129 Slavin, Gayle Carolyn .... . . .141, 346 Sletager, Clyde lrvin ....... . . , 175, 293 Sliger, Robert Warren ........... ...., 3 15 Smiley, Ellis Neal ............... ..,., 3 37 Smitchger, Helen Barbara Traeger. . . ...... . 134 Smitchger, lack Harvey ..,........ .... 1 34, 293 Smith, Barr Neff lr, .....,..,.,. ..,. 2 O1, 337 Smith, Don Carey. ..,..... ...,.... 2 93 Smith, Donald Chester lr .... , . . . , 197, 346 Smith, Edith Virginia ,..... .,., 7 2, 157, 346 Smith, Edrue R ....,.... ........, 3 55 Smith, Edward Alvin ...... . . 199, 355 Smith, Frank Milner ........ ........ 3 55 Smith, Gordon Clarence .... ..... 1 72, 337 Smith, lack .............. ............,,.. 2 93 Smith, lerald Vickers .... . . ....... 125, 183, 303 Smith, lulianne ,.,.,. .,...,.............. 1 53, 346 Smith, Kenneth Emerson ....... 99, 104, 121, 179, 346 Smith, Lamont ,..... ..... ....,.. 5 4 , 187, 307, 337 Smith, Lester .,..,....... .........,.... 1 75, 337 Smith, Oron Howard lr ...., .... ,.,.,.,.. 2 9 3 Smith, Paula leanne ...... ,... 1 41, 287 Smith, Richard King. . . . .....,,. . , 287 Smith, Robert Giese ..... . . . 109, 175, 337 Smith, Theron Eldon ...... ...... 1 97, 337 Smith, Thomas L .,... ...... ......... 3 0 2 Snodgrass, Donald Keith ,.., . . ...... 355 Snow, lohn Dow lr ......... ,.. . . . 193, 293 Snowdy, Carolyn Lee ......,,... . . . 141, 355 Soderberg, Paulmer Stanley lr .... , ..,. 78, 346 Sokvitne, Clarice Estelle ,....... .... 1 39, 337 Solberg, Nels Leroy, ....,...,. .............. 3 46 Sonnichsen, Robert William, . , . , ..... 128, 260, 337 Sonnichsen, Sonnich C ....... .... 6 8, 208, 307, 337 Souders, Arnold Seymour .... ......... 1 67, 293 Soulen, Philip Boone ....... ............ 3 46 Sova, Donald D ,......... . . . . ,127, 208, 355 Spalding, Robert Thomas .... .....,... 2 08, 346 Sparks, Calvin .,..,......... .... 2 50, 251, 299 Speelmon, Walter Dwaine ,... ........ 1 97, 355 Spencer, Earl ........,...... ,...... 9 8, 101 Spencer, Lucia Lily ..........,. . . . 151, 337 Speropulos, Nicholas George .... . . . 197, 346 Sperrazzo, Gerald ..... ..,.,.. ........, 3 5 5 Sperry, Elmer Lee .,....................... 100, 346 Spicer, Lloyd Wayne .................. 208, 261, 293 Spink, lohn Robert ,....... 82, 96, 104, 123, 175, 337 Spink, Louis Ray ,.......,.. ......... ....... 9 8 , 99 Springer, Erland lack .,.,....... ............., 1 04 Stacy, Wallace Oliver .... ....., 1 97, 287 Stahl, Malcolm Keith. . . .....,.. 100, 128 Staley, Susan Elaine ,,.. .... 9 7, 157, 355 Stallings, Dale Grow, . . . . . ,204, 307, 309 135, 199 Vogt, Alton Leroy ..,.... Stallworth, Frederick Nicholas .....,.... 224, 225 233 245, 247 Stamm, Carl William ....,..,. 105, 108, 123 208, 337 Stanek, Nadine Delores. . .,......., 135, 161, 346 Staniord, Bert Ross ...,... .,....... 1 19, 197, 346 Stanwood, Edward III .... ...... .... 1 2 5 Staples, loan Kathryn ...,, ...... 1 51, 287 Starner, Adson Earl ..... ...... 1 78, 179, 315 Stazel, lohn Clarence ,... ..,..,..... ..,. 3 5 5 Steianac, Mary Ellen ..,. ,. .65, 72, 75, 126, 127 155, 346 Steger, Herman Fred .,.., ......... .... 2 9 8 Steiger, Robert lohn ........ ..,.,... 3 37 Steiner, Bert Edward .,...... ......,.. 2 08 355 Steinmann, Herbert Gust ,,... .....,..,. l 72 355 Stell, Edward Frank ,,,,,.,... ........,.. . 82 123 Stemple, William Dwelly. . . , . .... 87, 198 199 346 Stephens, lay Charles ...... ......... ..., 1 3 2 Stephens, Robert lames. . . .,..... . . . . 257 Stern, Philip Henry ..... .,...... 1 99 345 Sterner, Mary loann ,..,. .... 1 27 135 148 Stevens, Harold Dunkle ..,. .... 2 O8 258 355 Stevens, Herbert Dean .... ..,...., 2 08 337 Stevens, Homer Keith .... .... 2 O8 258, 355 Stevens, Kathleen Rae .... ...... 1 39, 346 Stevenson, Dora Kelly ...... ..,..,... 1 20, 337 Stevenson, Gerald Robert ,,... ..., 1 99, 309, 337 Stevenson, Lynn Thomas .... ....,... 1 21 315 Stevenson, Robert Dewell ..... ,..,.,. . , ..,. 201 Stevenson, Willard Davis. . . . , . 170, 172 260, 337 Stewart, Barbra lean ..,,. ...,.,..,. 1 48, 345 Stewart, Donald Pierce ..,.. .....,.. 1 21, 315 Stewart, George Albert ..... . .... 355 Stewart, lohn Price ...... .,..... ,... 1 9 7 Stewart, Margaret lune, ,... ,,.,........ 1 39, 355 Stewart, Wayne Fred. ..,... . . , 193, 238, 239 287 Stilson, Donald Wyman .,..... ....... 8 6, 256 337 Stinson, Melvin Clarence ..... ,....... 1 24 323 Stivers, Harold Warner .,... . . . 183 337 Stoddard, lohn Warren .,,.. . . . 201 337 Stoker, Robert Thomas ,... . . . . . . . 337 Stolts, Donald Allan, ....,.. . . . 172, 346 Stommel, Raymond Walter. . ..,.. 199, 287 Stone, Frank Seymour .... . . .87, 99, 355 Stone, lvan Lial .,........, , . . . . . , . 262 Stone, Lawrence Warren ..... ...... 2 55 299 Stonemets, Georgia Lea ....,. ..,,.. 6 9 155 337 Storms, Barbara Elizabeth ..., ...... 1 32, 159, 337 Story, Charles Flower 11 .... . , . . , . . .200, 201 293 Stough, Edith Catherine .... . , . 136, 159, 283, 337 Stout, Elmer Allen .....,,. .......... l 67, 337 Stout, lay H,. ..,....... .,.... 1 25, 174 302 Stover, lohn Arlin ...,,.,. .,....,....,. 1 25, 302 Stralovich, Norma lean ..........,.. 99, 135 148, 355 Stratton, Merle Wayne .,..... 124, 170, 172 287, 318 Straub, Carl Coleman .....,......,....... , . . , 337 Straw, Richard Theodore ..........,.,. 175 260 355 Stricker, Phyllis loye, .......... ..,.,.,,.. 1 45 337 Stringiield, Kenneth Frederick .,...,.,..... 240, 241 Stringham, Glendon Lemaun .,,.. 68, 74, 87 208 346 Strohbehn, Bernhard Edward ........ 96, 97 100 135 197, 287 Strom, Robert Charles .... 69, 102, 105, 201, 255, 302 Stuart, Edwin Zaring ....,.....,,......... .... 2 57 Stueckle, Norman Dean ....,.......,...... .... 1 00 Sturges, Alice Carolyn .... .... 7 4, 100, 151, 355 Styner, Roger Allen ...... ......,.. .... 3 5 5 Styner, Wendell Ames ...... ....,.. .... 3 4 6 Suchan, Harold Laverne .... , . . 175, 346 Suiter, Orris lohn. , ....... ..,. .... 3 0 9 Sullivan, George Burton. . . . ..,.., 121, 309 Sullivan, Margaret Theresa . ..... 68, 161, 346 Sumner, Leola Dell ,...... . , . , 140, 141, 346 Sundeen, lohn David ......... ....... . . , . 293 Sundeen, Mary Ann lanet .... ,... 1 26, 153 346 Sutton, Arthur Robert ..... .....,.,. 1 25, 208, 302 Sutton, lune Marie ....... . , ......,.,... 148 346 Sutton, Ladd ,........ .,..,,.. 1 23, 170 172 315 Sutton, Ward ......... , ,. .121, 135, 197, 307 355 Swain, Charles Naive ,... ,....... ...,... .... 3 4 6 Swanby, Mary Leslie, . , ...... 74, 100, 151, 355 Swanson, Gerald Roger. . . .,....,.. , . . . 337 Swanson, Herbert lohn .... ........ 1 75, 337 Swanstrorn, Barbara ...... ..,.,... . 65, 328 Swanstrorn, Hugh Roger. .. , .... 86, 94, 193, 346 Sweeney, Bruce Lawrence .....,... 97, 201, 259, 355 Sweeney, Patricia Ann .... , . , . .75, 87, 100, 151, 355 Sweet, Barbara lean .....,..,. 97, 100, 133, 155, 355 Sweet, Cyrus Bardeen 111 ................. .,.. 3 37 Sweet, William Edman ,,..,.. 102, 105, 113, 137, 182 183, 309 Swope, LaVerta Beulah ..,,. ......... 1 35, 139, 346 Swope, William Edward. . . ...,.., . . . . 346 Sylvester, Dorothy Anne. . . ..., 136, 155, 355 Symmes, Whitman lr ..... ...,.. 1 75, 302 T Tagliarena, Vito loseph ..,.... ...,..,.. , . . . 135 Takatori, Chester Takeshi ..... ...,.,.. 1 05, 172, 346 Takatori, Frank Hirashi ..... . . . 172, 306, 307, 309 Talbot, Glenn Evariste .... ........ . 193, 337 Talbott, Arlene Patricia ..,. ..,. 1 27, 161, 346 Tallant, lames Arthur ..... ,... 2 13, 216, 255 Tannahill, Wayne Davis.. . .,..,.,,.,...... . 293 Tanner, Dale Loren ....... ....., 1 24, 197, 318, 319 Tanner, George Stanley ...... 109, 111, 187, 282, 287 Tanner, Shirley Louise ....... 114, 127, 148, 282, 287 Tapper, Lyle Gilbert lr. . . ....,..,....,. . . . . 293 Tate, lames Henry ...... ..,....,.,.,. 1 75, 337 Tatko, Robert Alfred .... . . . 197, 355 Taylor, Byran Ellis ........ .,... 1 24, 319 Taylor, Duane Herbert ........... ....,... 1 99, 346 Taylor, Gordon Chris ...,,..,. ,.,,........ 2 01, 287 Taylor, Robert Eugene ........,...,,... 104, 124, 319 Taylor, Wallace Reed ,.., .99, 101, 104, 127, 187, 346 Taylor, William Brian lr ...... ........ . 111, 259 348 Taylor, William Ward ......... 99, lOl, 104, 167, 258 259, 355 Teague, lames Ellis, ,. .. 71, 82, 96, 123, 193 315 Teare, lwan Dale ......,...........,.,... .... 3 55 Tedrow, Loren Allen ..,....,.... ,.... .,., ..... 2 5 7 Teed, Constance Lucy .... 69, 116, 132, 158 159, 346 Telgener, lohn Pemberton ,...,...........,. 105 355 Temple, Thomas Herbert ,..,...............,... 347 Terry, Helen leane ....,.... ....... 1 32 Terry, Patricia lane ....... .... 1 41, 355 Thacker, Dale Seaman ,.,, .,.. 1 75, 337 Thacker, David Louis ..., . . .54 Thayer. Theoph Averill Sheldon ,.... . . ilus, Donald R. lr, ,, Thomas, Harold Eugene .......,., Thomas, lrene Esther ....,.....,.. Thomas, lohn McCarthy ........... Thomas, lune Arlene .,..,., 65, 70 Thomas Thomas Thometz, Eugene loseph ...,.... Thompson, Betty leanne .... .69, , Stanley George ........,. , Vernon Kenneth ,,.... . . . 77 Thompson, Donna Mae ......,.... Thompson, Fred Thomas lr ........ Thompson, lohn Frederick ..... Thompson, Marjorie lane .,.. Thompson, Mary Rae ....,. Thompson, Wayne A .... ,55,113, 121,173 175,309 ....118, 201,355 .....124, 319, 337 ,,.,..,,.151,355 ...,....172,347 71, 75, 79, 88, 89 146, 148 .82, 123, 175 ...,,105,175 ....,lO5, 238 ,84,116, 141 , ..,. 100, 143, .,...193, 259, ....,...201 ...133,161 .....78,141 Thomson, Eileen .......... Thomson, lean Louise ....... Thornton, Dean Dickson ..... Thorp, Robert Douglas ,.... Tibbitts, Vera Darleen, ,... Tidd, Robert Luzerne ,,... . Tilley, Norman Dewitt .,.,... Tingwall, Bruce Edward ,.,. . Tinto, lames Halliday ....,. Tisdale, Eldon Dean ..... Tisdall, Dolores Nadine .... Tissaw, George Howard. . . , . Titus, Darrel Earl ...... , . . Tkach, lohn Gabriel ..... Tobin, lohn Thomas ..., Tobin, Paul Harold lr .... Todd, lsaac Eugene ..... Toevs, Howard ......,..,. Toevs, Richard Earl ,,,,,,., . Tottenette, Dario Louis lr. Tolliver, Wesley Vernon, Tolmie, loan ....... .,...., Tolmie, Kenneth Dean ..,... '.'f.69,'iOOf '143 ,. .,.. ioof 111 ...37, ,201 ...,.....,.141 ', 1634 issf 273, Q '. '. '. '121,' i24f 1'37,' , , ......... 175 .,........155 ,......,..183l . '.'12'4,'i35Q '172 , .'...V.2. 1.35 ..,.......193 '.','.'.'7i,'82f 261 .....135,201 ........172 .....151 . ..183 Tolmie, Robert E ......... ..... . . . 183 Tomasson, Tomas Armann ..... Torell, Emma Margaret ...... ..........141 ........l97l Torrell, Paul lames ,....... ..........,..,., Torok, Theodore Elwyn .... ....... 9 9, 119, 197, Tovey, DeForest ...,.............. 231, 232 234, Tovey, lohn David ................,. 68, 81, 172, Tovey, Morgan William lr .... 100, 113, 208, 275, Tovey, Rhys. .,...,............,....., 121 197, Townley, Harry lames ............ 240, 241 260, Townsend, lohn Sheldon lr .........,.. 121, 175 Tozier, Andrew Fremont ,,..,... 76, 92, 100, 172 Trautman, lack Carl ,...... .,... , ...... . . . . Trees, Thomas Bradley .... , ....., 213, 216, Troeh, Frederick Roy ...... . . .208, 307 Troth, Dennis Lynn .,.... .....,..,.. Trout, Betty Lea ......, . . . 127, 148, Trout, Doris Elaine .,.... ..... 1 48, Trout, Perry Ream lr .... ,. .. . . . 122, 175, Troxell, Raymond Charles. . . ...,. 124, True, Cecil Leslie lr ...,.. .......,,. Truesdell, Alan Ray ....,. .....,...,.. Trupp, Donald Dean ....,. . . . 105, 131 Tschanz, Donald Boyd ..... . . . 124, 194 Tudder, Tom William ,... ....,...,..,. Tufts, Marianne Lou ....... .......... 1 55 Tuller, Martha Ray ......... ..........,, 1 41, Tunnicliit, Beth Bernice ..... .,.. 1 OO, 136, 148, Turnbull, lohn Drager ..... ..,..,..,. 1 21 Tuenbull, lohn Howard ..,. Turner, Clayton Colburn ..., 125 Tuttle, Seth Lowell. .,..... . , . . , .... 201 Tyksinski, William Alan ..... ................ Tyler, Carrol Lenox ..,.... ............ 3 07, Tysor, Ruth Eileen ...,,.. . , . . 100, 151 297, U Uhlman, Esther Evangeline .,.,,.,..,.. 136, 143 Uhrig, Robert Lee ,.,...,......,..,...,.. . 195 Ulinder, Vera Rosamund ,............ . , 100, 161 Ulmer, David Dan ..,.....,. 67, 94, 95, 113, 183 272, 282 Ulrich, Barbara Ann ..,.. ..,.... 1 40, 141, 290 Uria, Dolores Gloria ..... .... 1 27, 135, 148 Urie, Gary Ray .... , ..,... . . Urquidi, lohn Carmelo .... Utter, Donald Eugene .... Utter, Marvin Lee ..... V Vail, Marion Luther ....,.. Vajda, George Edward .... Vajda, Peter Thomas ...... .....208 Vallad, Marion loyce. , .....,... ........ . Vance, Roy Lewis,, ....,.............. . . . Vandenberg, lohn Stephan ...,.,..,..., Van Engelen, Frederick William. . . Van Engelen, Ruth ............... Van Epps, Burton Lorenzo .........,....... Van Hardenberg, Gerald Glen .... Van Verth, William Lee ......... Varley, lames Francis ......... Vassar, Donna Lue Taylor .... Vehrs, George lames ,....... Venishnick, loseph Carl ..... Verdal, Gustav Adolf ...... . . . Vergobbi, limmie Dean .... .... 261 208 119 287 337 355 347 347 355 355 347 237 355 299 139 347 347 356 356 347 287 92 347 319 347 347 299 219 287 356 287 337 337 347 299 356 356 347 347 347 307 356 337 356 287 337 299 356 347 306 337 337 347 287 347 287 338 287 293 347 338 293 347 299 356 309 302 105 347 1 1 1 309 299 347 347 356 21 1 338 338 356 347 338 315 287 ... 315 ..... 238 .. ..,.. 259 159,293 125,347 208,319 100, ,179,338 100,132,155,338 123,315 .H,.1O4,1O5 121 ..U. 172 356 ,.... 199,347 ....U. 114,299 .H..119,167 347 U.....H. 124 319 .....124 ,'31s 262 Vickery, Phyllis Helen ..... Viehweg, Russel Forest ,.... ...........157 ..........179 ...167 ...197 Voorhees, lohn Dettmar. . Vorous, Shirlie Lee ........ Vowels, Donovan Eugene ,... W Wagner, Al lames lr ..,..... Wagner, lohn William ..... . . Wagoner, Donald l, ....... . Wagoner, lohn Alfred ..,... Wahl, Barbara Lu .....,...... . . . Walbrecht, Donald Augustus. . , . ..,... . . . . 141 125 261 363, 208 157 197 319 347 347 338 338 338 356 356 338 293 338 347 356 356 Walenta, Donna losephine ,... ..... 8 O, 81, 92 135 157, 347 Walk, Howard Paul. ..,,. . , .....,...... .... 2 93 Walker, lames Gilbert ..,........,..... 172, 256 338 Walker, Leonard Ralph ....... 231, 233, 234, 235, 262 Walker, Norman Everett ............... 231, 232 234 Walker, Ross Richard .,................... .... 2 62 Walkington, lames Laurence .............. , 175, 347 Walkinqton, William Gurney ......,..,. 121, 175, 338 Walrath, Harriet Lee ,... ......... 1 00, 136, 159, 347 Walsh, lohn Francis lr ....... ..,,....,.. .... 2 5 7 Walter, Nancy lane ....... .....,.., l 41, 356 Walters, Margarete Ann ..,. .,.. 1 14, 151, 287 Waltman, Donald Glenn ..., ...... 1 05, 347 Walton, Leo O'Rene ......... .... .... 2 9 3 Wanamaker, Floyd Eugene ..... .,.... . 99, 347 Ward, Walter Elmer ...,,.... ........ 2 56, 338 Wardell, Barbara lean. .,.... ..., 1 51, 263, 299 Wardrop, Charles William .,.. , ...... 125, 208, 293 Warren, Richard Eddy ...... ......... , . . , .259, 356 Wartena, Richard Allen .,.....,............ 238, 239 Washburn, Marvin Ralph ....... 68, 70, 129, 172, 287 Waters, Elmer Dale .....,., ,..,.., . , 118, 187, 356 Waters, Lloyd Stephen ....,.. ..,..,., 1 97, 256 356 Watson, William Murdoth .... , ..... .... 2 57 Watts, lackie LaVell ....,... ...,..,. 1 48 347 Way, Helen Audrey ...... . . . ,.,. 151, 263, 299 Wayne, Harold Earle lr. . . ........ , . ,,.. . . . . 287 Weakley, Everett Allen .........,..,.,. 122 175 287 Weaver, Gerald George ...... 121, 126, 208 261 338 Webb, Carolyn Mae ...... .,.....,.,. 1 27 148 347 Webb, George ......... ............ .... 1 2 3 Webb, Robert Taylor ..., ...,. 1 00, 179, 282, 338 Webb, Thomas ......,... ........... 2 60, 338 Weber, Margaret Marie ...., ..... 1 26, 138, 139, 287 Webster, Bobby Lee ..... ..,..,.,... .... 1 9 7 Weeks, lo Etta Rose ...... ..,..... 1 51, 356 Weeks, Lillian Charlotte ,,,, .,.. 1 00 143 356 Wegher, lohn Smitham .......,..,....,... 260, 356 Weinmann, Charles Gray ..,..,....,..,.., .97 255 Weinmann, Douglas Hobson ,... 54, 55, 208, 261 347 Weinmann, lohn Myron .,....,..,..,... 54, 260, 261 Weisgerber, Sherman Nash ....,.,,....... .... 3 15 Weisman, Kenneth Walter .,.. ..... 2 08 347 Weitz, Nancy Ann .....,.... ...... 1 45 356 Welch, Dwaine Leroy .... ..,.....,... 2 93 Welch, Leslie Dean ....... .... 1 25 208, 293 Welker, Lorin l. ....,...... ..,... 1 24, 319 Welsh, lames Lawrence .... . . , . . . . . 315 Weltzin, Patricia lean ..... , . . 143 356 Wendle, Zoe Ann ...,....., .... , 141, 356 Wendling, Dianne Lenore .....,.. , .....,.. 139, 356 Werry, Ellwood Vines, ......,..,....... 69 176, 338 Werry, Sidney Eugene .,..,....,.....,... .... 3 38 West, Bette lanice ..,,,. . . .67, 88, 90, 92 114, 154 155, 274, 287 West, Kenneth Lee ..,,,, .... 8 0, 81, 100 179 347 West, Patricia Ann ,,..... . . , ...,. ,..,. 1 38, 139 287 Westacott, lames Roscoe ......,.........., 208 347 Westbrook, Russell Frederick ..... ..... 1 75 315 Wester, lohn Franklin ..,....... ......... 1 85 338 Wheeler, Earl Wayne ........ ........... 2 60 347 Wheeler, lna Mae ........ ..... 1 25, 133, 148, 302 Wheeler, Robert Aubrey .... ........ 2 33, 255 338 Wheeler, Robert Cyrus ................ 179 224 338 Wheelock, Franklin Kimball ...,... 111, 122 208 347 White, Forrest William ...,... .,.. , . . , . . . . . 101 White, lohn Cooper ......,, ..,..,..... ..., 1 9 7 White, Richard Wallace ..,. . . . 111, 118, 197 356 White, Robert Bothwell. . . . . ,..... 225 233 339 Whiting, lerry Max .....,,. ..... 9 9 208 356 Whitmore, Bickie Bruce .... .... 1 05 123 356 Whitmore, Hugh Cozad .... ....... .... 3 3 8 Whitney, Rose Marie ...... .... 1 00 143, 293 Whitsel, Frank Lloyd ...,. ...... 1 06, 108 Whitsel, Frederick Louis. . ........ 199, 347 Whitsell, Norma May ....... .... 1 37 143 347 Whitsell, Phyllis Florence .... ......... 1 43 293 Whitt, Charles Richard ..... ........,.. ..... 1 2 4 Whittemore, lean Ann .... ..,... 9 7, 114, 120, 139 Whybark, Naida loanne. .,.. ,.... 1 16, 160, 161 347 Wicher, Daniel Edward ..... ,,.,... 1 78, 179, 309 Wickward, Bruce Glenn .... . . , ..... , .... 347 Widner, Verne Elden ....,.,. .... 1 97, 251, 338 Wiedenheit, Keith William ..... ...... .... 3 5 6 Wiedenman, Willis Warren ..... .... 1 24, 197, 338 Wiegele, Kenneth George .... ...... .... 2 9 3 Wigen, lack Conrad ......... ..... . 99, 355 Wiggins, Edward lra ....... ....... ,... 1 2 4 Wilburn, Vance Allen .... ,....,,. l 75 338 Wilcox, Elizabeth Anne ..,,. . . . 131, 136, 145, 338 Wilde, Donald Gordon ..,, .,..,.., 1 79, 356 Wilde, Leslie Wayne ..,,. , .... , , .... 356 Wilde, Roland loseph ...,. . ,..,. . 77, 356 Wilder, Philip Henry ,..,, . ,... . . , .... 347 Wilder, Ralph Arthur .,..,. ,.., 1 35, 197, 356 Wilderman, Ellen Marie ...... , . . . ...,.... 145 356 Wilkins, Emmett Luke .,..,,....,.....,..,. 197, 347 Wilkinson, Robert loseph ....,..,..,...... .... 1 04 Will, Mary Louise ..,,..... 92, 95 116, 157, 329, 338 Willard, Donald Hugh .... ,......,... ..... .... 2 8 7 Willett, Frederick Allen .,........ ....... .... 3 3 8 Williams, Alexander, .... . . .... 309 Williams, Alice Maurine .... . . . 145, 356 Williams, Ann Lloyd ...... ........ 1 57, 299 Williams, Billy Freeman .... ........... .... 3 0 9 Williams Brian Chris ....,...,......,.. 77, 201, 347 Williams, Charles Edward ......... 199, 210, 258, 356 Williams, David M. ........ ...,....... 1 97, 347 Williams, Edgar Lonnie ..... ..... 1 01, 124, 318, 319 Williams, George Robert ,............,.... 123, 315 Williams, Lewis Harrigiield ...... .... 2 Ol, 307, 309 Williams, Marilyn Louise ...,. 100, 127, 133, 155, 347 Williamson, Charles Franklin ............,. .... 3 47 Williamson, Margaret Ellen ............ 136, 153, 347 Williamson, Patricia Lynne ................ 139, 356 Wills, Donald Stewart ..,.......... 111, 119, 197, 338 Wills, Margaret loy ........ ....... 1 33, 155, 347 Wilson, Alice Mae ....,.. ........ 1 41, 356 Wilson, Clayton Arthur ..... ....... .... 3 4 7 Wilson, Eleanor Louise ..,.. .... 1 26, 159, 347 Wilson, George Harry lr, . . .... 126, 193, 309 Wilson, lames ,.......... ......, 2 01, 347 Wilson, luanita leanne .... ........... 1 41, 347 Wilson, Kent Hale ,.,,,. ............. 1 99, 287 Wilson, Marion Irene ...., ........... 1 35, 159, 356 Wilson, Peter Bottum ..... ..., 6 6, 69, 125, 164, 302 Wilson, Peter Kuhl, ...... ............. 1 79, 338 Wilson, Thomas Reed ..... ........... 1 97, 338 Winegar, Leo Fay ...... .... 1 02, 185, 293 363 Winegardner, Roy Richard. . , Winkle, William Frederick, . . Winters, Charles Albert ...... Winters, Clyde Rambouillet. . Wirth, Myles Kenneth .....,. Wiswall, Cherie Ellen ...... Wittenberger, Daryl Emil .... Wittman, loan Marguerite ..,. Wohllaib, Kenneth Dale ...,. Wohlschlegel, Albert Lee lr. . Wohlschle el Florence Beata. . . 9 . Wolcott, Don E. ......,..,. . Wolf, Yvonne Louise ........ Wolford, Burlen Frederick. . . Wolford, lames loseph ...... Womeldortf, David Lee. . . Wommack, lames Elmer. . . Wood, Betty Lou ......... Wood, Charles Dallas ....,., Wood, Norman Winfield ..., Wood, Ruth Elizabeth ,...,. . . 198,199,347 194 77,93, 208,347 ......306 127, 133, 161,347 .,..,.......183,338 . .......,.. 157,287 356 ,..167,356 ,..139,338 ..,..347 ...150, 356 ...197,356 ..........125 ,..,...197,356 ....,...197,347 ,...142 143 287 .,....,...111.124 ..,.,.......208,293 55, 127, 143, 356 208,293 Woodall, Herbert Randall, .,.. ..,..,.., 364 Woodbury, Arthur Neum .... . . . Woodland, William Ross ,... . , Woods, Lonnie Lee ..,..,, Woolf, Homer E ...... ,... Wordal, lean Frances ,..... . . Wormald, Bruce ...,,..... Worthington, Robert Wylie. . . . , . Wren, Hazel Delila .......... , . . Wright Wrightl lames Edward .,.. Beverly Josephine .,... ..... .. ,..... 124,' Wright, Marion lunior .,...,..,...... Wright, Thomas Calvin, . . ,94, 97, 126, Wright, William Donald .,...,...,.... Wyrick, Patricia Louise ....,....., 127, Wyss, Robert Gary ..,.... ...,.. Y Yingst, Donovan. . . . ..98,99,l01 106,175,309 H..2O8,347 ....H,..356 H. 145,356 .68 128,356 .69 106,293 H. 148,287 H. 139,356 135,257,356 ... 197,347 135,201,356 166,167,293 133,143,338 H. 208 347 ....319 Yocom, Carl George ..,. Yost, Carl Robert ...,...,, ...,..,... Young, Burton Douglas. Youngblood, Glen B.. . . . . .... Youngstrom, Walter Ray .... .......... Yragui, Bonifacio ..,....,. Zapp, Gertrude Therese Zapp, Mary Ann ......, Zaring, Don Richard .... Zavesky, loseph Edward .,..201 125, 135, Ziemann, .lohn Oliver. . . , .... . . . . . Zimmerman, Bob Lee. . . Zwiener, John George, . Zyzak, Richard Henry. . , ..,.179, ....125, 257,356 .,.. 125 208,338 193 319 .....123 ,279,356 139,356 139,347 208,356 197,245 248,249 .....287 242,347 208,338 257,356 F l ya any W No volume of the Gem of the Mountains has ever been produced without meeting and overcoming special difficulties. Neither has a Gem come into existence without the cooperation, sacrifices of time and labor, and spirit of loyalty and devotion such as the kind given by the staff of this book. My special gratitude goes to lerry Bunnell, Karl Klages, Bob Nixon, Fairy Frank, lerry McKee, Clyde Winters, Lee Bath, Sally Norris, Phil lohnson, Tom Mitchell and Andy Tozier who, when reliability and skill were needed, gave forth with a Willing determination to get things done, To the secretaries and photomounters who accomplished their jobs with efficiency and without expectations of glory or reward, I can only offer my admiration and thanks for wonderful support. A special feeling remains with me for the Gem photographers. Behind the pictures in the book lies the story of what it took to obtain a pictorial history of the year. Their contribution and my thanks are equally inexpressible in mere words. Working with each staff member has been a rich and rare experience. Every one of them had a vital interest in the Gem and I shall always believe that each one did his and her best-even when the ship seemed to be sinking. Throughout the year the trip has been an adventure. My broader thanks go to those students and members of the faculty and administration whose interest and grand cooperation rang like cheers from the shore raising the spirit of the Argos crew and thereby easing the rougher crossings. When the bad times are forgotten, memories of these supporters will still fire a sharp glow of faith in human nature. In a class apart stands General Manager Gale Mix who always had the right solution for every problem. I-le moved mountains of obstruction from our path as though they were only very small molehills. An acknowledgment of my indebtedness is far from complete until I thank Rafe Gibbs and Newt Cutler in the Publications office, Hutchison's, Sterner's, and Rudy's studios, and Kyle's Photo Shop for their cooperation and fine work. Western Engraving and Colortype of Seattle and Syms-York Company of Boise gave us the benefit of their long experience and wisdom in the production of All-American yearbooks. Kingscraft produced our covers with high fidelity to our wishes and we thank them for the quality of their work. For all who helped plan and produce Volume 48 of the Gem of the Mountains, there is discovered a bit of rewarding truth more precious than the capture of a golden fleece. The golden memories known only to those who shared the experience of creating this book are locked within its pages and made more priceless by the knowledge that it took the combined efforts of all of us to do the job. The sincerest hope of the staff is that each reader may find many enduring memories of happy moments on these pages. We have captured our golden fleece from simple but heart-warming recollections of the time when we were busy preparing this record of you and what you were doing at mid-century. May you enjoy it-and thanks for the memories. l UNE THOMAS, Editor agrtzffcyfffia Qin qfffie jwunkzrns Editor-in-Chief - - JUNE THOMAS Associate Editors Jerry Bunnell, Anne DuSauit Activities Photomounters JERRY MCKEE, BRUCE SCRANTON - - - Co-editors BOB NIXGN .-.......... Head Brian Williams, Bill Luscher, lim Wilson, Frank Gunn, loyce Becker Organizations LEE BATH, SALLY NORRIS lim Roupe, assistant Art FAIRY FRANK - - - - Co-editors Sports KARL KLAGES ----------- Editor Phil lohnson, assistant editorg "Crusty" I-lamon, le- rome Kinsey, Bud Hagan ------Editor Peggy Pruett, Marian Davidson, Stan Soderberg, Marilyn Brodd Index CLYDE WINTERS Living Groups ANDY TOZIER, TOM MITCHELL ---- Co-editors - - Editor Dorene Anderson, assistant Classes MERILYN PETERSEN - Photographers CRVAL HANSEN ----.----- Head Phil Schnell, Dwain Rosa, lim Brockie, lack Mari- SOCIUI neau, Roland Wilde, Leo Ereiermuth, lack Barnes, Wendell Gladish, Earl Brockman, Pat Hamilton 366 IO GARNER - - Secretaries BETTY THOMPSON --------- Head Beverly Ballia, Corinne Lauriente, Mary Thompson, Helen Payne, Evelyn lnqhram, Beverly Schuster, Carolyn Snowdy, Louise Crrider, loan Parks, Donna Kjose, Pat Weltzin, Pat O'Connor, lo Ann Schleqel, loy East, Marilyn Phillips, Sharon Osmundson Editor Editor Introductory Section ..,.. Administration. ..,., . . CAPTURING THE GOLDEN FLEECE Activities and Events . SOCIAL CHRONOLOGY Fall .,...,.,...,........ Beauties .............. Winter. . . Concerts .....,,. Spring ,......,, . . . Construction. .,..... . Exchange Students. . . POLITICS AWS .............. ASUI ,,., ...,. ,...., Independent Caucus ,.... United Caucus ...,........ Student Activities Board. .... Publications Board ......... PUBLICATIONS Sigma Delta Chi ..,. Theta Sigma ......... Argonaut ........,.,,. Gem ot the Mountains .... Blot ,...,.,...... .... . Idaho Engineer ....... Idaho Forester ........ Student Handbook. . . . . Alumni Roundup ..... KUOI ..,....,......, DRAMA Curtain Club ...,. DEBATE Delta Sigma Rho ...,. MUSIC Phi Mu Alpha ..., Sigma Alpha Iota. . . Vandaleers .......... University Orchestra. . . University Band .,.... University Singers. . Madrigals .......,.. Pep Band ..,.,. ROTC Rifle Team ,...... Military Band .,,... Pershing Rifles ....... Scabbard and Blade. . . AROTC Airmen's Activities. NROTC Rifle Team .,.,....... Eagle and Anchor ,.,.. SERVICE HONORARIES Blue Key .,........... Mortar Board ......,.. Silver Lance .,.,..... Spurs ...,..,......... Intercollegiate Knights. . . Alpha Lambda Delta. . . Phi Eta Sigma ,......, Alpha Phi Omega .... CLUBS , Attic Club ....... Dames Club. . . . Delta Mu ..... Ag Club ..,..., Ag Engineers.. . . Chemical Engineers Civil Engineers. . . Electrical Engineers Mechanical Engineers Associated Foresters. . Associated Miners. . Bench and Bar ,..,.... Chamber of Commerce. Hell Divers .......... Ski Club ....,...... 4-H Club .......... Home Ec Club. . . .. Tau Mem Aleph ..,. Q22 lbw 421421 1 10 17 28 33 42 45 60 62 65 66 68 69 70 70 71 71 72 76 80 82 83 84 85 86 88 94 96 96 97 98 99 100 100 101 104 104 105 105 106 111 111 113 114 115 116 117 118 118 119 119 120 120 121 121 122 122 123 123 124 124 125 125 126 126 127 127 128 Riders' Club. . . . IRC ................ CHURCH GROUPS Interchurch Council .... Canterbury Club ..... Christian Science. . . Kappa Phi ...,...... Wesley Foundation .... Lambda Delta Sigma .... Lutheran Students.. . . Newman Club ....,... Roger Williams Club .... Westminster Forum ..... ARGONAUTS AT HOME Living Groups INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL ........ PANHELLENIC COUNCIL ..................... THE WOMEN larranged alphabeticallyi. ...... . . BETWIXT AND BETWEEN Carranged family style? ........ THE MEN Carranged alphabeticallyj ............. VAN DALS ATTACK Varsity and Intramurals ATHLETIC DIRECTOR ........ YELL TEAM AND RALLIES .... RALLY COMMITTEE ........ FOOTBALL .,......,...... BASKETBALL ...,.... BOXING ....... SKIING ...... SWIMMING .... TENNIS ...... GOLF ........ BASEBALL .......... TRACK .....,........... FRESHMAN SPORTS ..... INTRAMURALS .....,.. WOMEN'S SPORTS ............ IASON SEEKS EDUCATION Faculty and Classes DEANS ,.....,.....,........, HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS ..,.... SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS ......,. ..... SENIOR PERSONALITIES ..,............. COLLEGE OF LETTERS AND SCIENCE .... Alpha Epsilon Delta ......,............ Phi Upsilon Omicron .......,........ Phi -Beta Kappa ......... Seniors ................ SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ..... Phi Chi Theta .......... Seniors ................... SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. , . Kappa Delta Pi ........... Seniors ................ COLLEGE OF LAW ..... Students in Law ...,..,.... Seniors ..................... Phi Alpha Delta ............... COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE .... Iudging Teams .............. Alpha Zeta .................. Seniors ....,......,,..,,...... COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING ..... Sigma Tau ..,...,,.......... Seniors ................,.. SCHOOL OF FORESTRY .... Xi Sigma Pi ............ Seniors .............. SCHOOL OF MINES ...... Sigma Gamma Epsilon .... Seniors ....,..,........ GRADUATE SCHOOL ..... Graduate Students .... IUNIOR CLASS ......... Iunior Personalities. . . . . SOPHOMORE CLASS ,.... FRESHMAN CLASS ...... Student Index ........ Acknowledgment ..... Gem Staff .......... 128 129 131 132 132 133 133 134 134 135 135 136 137 137 138 162 164 209 210 211 212 222 230 236 238 240 242 244 250 256 259 262 265 268 273 274 276 282 282 283 283 288 290 290 294 297 298 300 302 303 303 304 306 307 308 310 313 313 316 318 318 320 323 323 324 326 327 328 339 348 357 365 366


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