University of Wisconsin Whitewater - Minneiska Yearbook (Whitewater, WI)

 - Class of 1939

Page 1 of 172

 

University of Wisconsin Whitewater - Minneiska Yearbook (Whitewater, WI) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 172 of the 1939 volume:

brin g5 glor Y to am ' ' ' neWs in 12 213144 Published by the Student Body of the STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE WHITEWATER, WISCONSIN JUNE,1939 F mnees Hewemcm, Editor - Donald Heyrmcm, Business Manager Miami 0 38 4mg 739?. . . 0 Graham Street entrance . . . most popular entrance for the students. CAMPUS ACTIVITY . . . . . . . 3 FACULTY . . . . . . . . . . . 17 CLASSES . . . . . . . . . . . Q7 ATHLETICS . . . . . . . . . . 55 ACTIVITIES . . . . . . . . . . 73 TRAINING SCHOOL . . . . . . 129 INDEXES . . . . . . . . . . . 156 The front campus . . . covered with snow af- ter the first snowfall. 20m gag! fmfian t0 Me 961 students enrolled this year . . . most in the history of W. S. T. C. . . . kept Miss Clem and Mrs. Fricker busy checking enrollment cards during registration on September 7 tupper lefo . . . after students fill out cards and pay the fees, Dr. Lee, Miss Benson, and a group of other teachers make receipts and hand out student activity cards Uower lefo. . . The longest line can always be found outside the textbook library where Virginia Marsh, Anabel Walter, and Jim Bower hand out books tcenterl . . . Shortage of books causes much difhculty both in the library and in Classes . . . open for weeks after registration to clear up all difficulties. Annual girlsl sing . . . held on the liret Thursday night . . . keeps all the girls out of mischief for one night . . . Sponsored by the W.S.G.A. which arranges for every new girl to have a big sister . . . started recently, but goes over big with both new and old students . . . gather at log cabin for bonfire and sing . . . then to Hamilton Gym for dancing and refreshments tupper rightl . . , practiced getaacquainted song and journeyed to President Yoderls home to sing it . . . group singing and a candy bar ended the evening . . . On Friday afternoon all students from freshmen to seniors gathered in the auditorium for the hrst assembly of the year tlower rightl . . . President Yoder welcomes the new as well as the 01d and discusses the lldo" and lldonltll rules. A mixer sponsored by the W.S.G.A. aids in keeping the students busy tupper lefty . . A identification slips help in getting acquainted and gives the freshmen away by the color . . . n0 stags and no outsiders after flrst mixer . . . Every organization on the campus took its turn to have the welleknown hgetlacquainted" party . . . every kind of party held, but the treasure hunt given by the a cappella choir gained much popularity as shown in the upper right picture . . . gathering plates, old clothes, etc., keeps everyone on the run to see who can get back first. . . . The freshman reception was held at the Bassett House on a Sunday afternoon in early fall . t . Miss Knosker as chairman arranged the annual affair . . . so the freshmen, boys as well as girls this time, were again taken care of for a few hours . . . The program put on by the faculty proved of great interest . . . especially the reading on freshmen by Miss Holcombe, and a comet solo by Mr. Mear . . . refreshments were served and the faculty and freshmen became better acquainted Oowerlefty . . . From early full to late spring, Mel Koeppen and Don Collins were continually 0n the g0 . . . not only taking pictures, but developing and printing as well Gower righty ?tejAm 2n jgecepfian . . . 0244i 297462?ch fa The campus . . . kept in perfect condition by iiBillie" Reider attracts outsiders as well as the students . . . students attending classes in the central building make many trips up the hill as do the training school students t0 . . . October finds the Minneiska getting well under way . . . outdoor pictures scheduled and students excused from classes to get their picture taken tn . . . Assistant editor, Louise Bayer, gets her first taste of picture taking. . . . A constant stream of students going to and from Graham Street entrance can be seen any time during the day as shown by this birdiSeeye view CO . . . The Royal Purple editor, Louise Bayer, .md her assistant, Mel Koeppen take time out to have their picture taken at Cincinnati t9 . . . taking a bus tour while attending the Press convention helped them become better acquainted with the city. . . Joint academic and commercial club parties in the girlsi gym were held regularly throughout the year . . . gathering in the hall to discuss current day problems helped pass time away while preparing the gym and gathering the orchestra together m. . . . The first day of school found eightyaseven men assemblying back of Hamilton Gym for football practice . . . Practice held every night enabled Minnie photogra' Abmecamz'nf Kay . . . phers to catch a picture of Hoefs taking roll call tm . . . Jitterbugs take over the floor at most mixers put on regularly by Classes, faculty, and organizations m. . . . The largest event of the school year occurred in early fall . . . Homecoming . . . On October 14 an organized pep meeting was held showing that school spirit was in no way lacking . . . the unruly mob lead by the Pep Band and Bill Dubats were successful in breaking up classes, but teachers Joined in the spirit too GU after taking over complete control of the school . . . same mob proceeded to hike around the campus my . . . Houses to be decorated and floats to be trlmmed caused the loyal members to disband and go to work . . . Lucille Janz proceeds to finish the thermometer for W.S.T.C. tlm . . i The regular pep meeting held in the evening puts the cheerr leaders on the spot Qt . . . after cheering, listening to the famous football heroes, and singing school songs, the entire crowd departed t0 the north end of Hamilton Gym . . . the bonhre which was built by the freshmen in the afternoon GM and fire works 018W this yeaa were displayed . . . Spirit aroused t0 the extent that this same crowd journeyed to the business section of the city to attend the annual iifreeii show tSi . . . Late in the evening jam sessions were held to entertain the alumni and friends my i 7y0mecaminf 2jamaze .... The day arrived and in spite of the usual rain the parade was held . . . iiThis is no bull" was proven by the Chi Delts with their humorous float in . . . iiStevens Point Here We Comeii, warned the W.A.A. girls tD . . . The Hacket House proved that Stevens Point was washed up before the game even started with their washing 0n the roof L70. . . . Always on the job at football games and especially at homecoming is Doc Evans and his all famous movie cam! era OD . . . a good movie is the result . . . Something new and different this year, was the group of W.S.T.C. coeds led by the cheerleaders til . . . Marchr down the field displaying the purple and white Colors added spirit to the game, . . . In spite of rain and wet weather, the band continued to march through the main street t6l . . . Between touchdowns they man'tqed to see the game from behind the fence tSl . . . Climax of the day was the Homecoming Dance in Hamilton Gym my... Large crowds attending basketball games are kept in suspense all through the game t9l . . . Cheerleaders, Bill Fulton and Joe Stajnert, lead cheers on every occasion through! out the year UOl . . . Jimmie Ford and Melvin Frank cover all football games and obtain material for the Royal Purple OD . . . A mad rush for the outdoors and another place of interest is seen 0 D . . . Mixers held regularly throughout the year help entertain the students and chase away any signs of that homesick feeling . . . the all popular jitterbugs gain much attention OD. f0 KajfeMalZ WZerU . . . Each organization on the campus has its regular meeting night . . . against all rules to cut in on these dates . . . Alpha Club listens to Miss Beckwith and takes imaginary trip to Mexico on evening of November 25 00m . . . Open assembly pro, grams are another feature of the school year . . . held during regular class periods . . . Variety of entertainment from music to lectures to entertainers . , . famous archer receives appreciation from the audience Oower lefO . . . The annual Christmas tableau produced by the music organizations . . . well attended by the student body . Tableau accompanied by various musical choruses Gower righty 6115121 4146K 50cm! ff 2 . . . Most popular boy and girl on the campus . . . Beatrice Brczv mm and James Mullen as chosen by the student body at the Joe Kollege Jig . . . Led the grand march which is the main event of the evening. Freshmen go to the board fur a little instruction in Mr. Gost math class . . . Problems and fig! urcs to bc juggled by those at the board . . . notes and dates to be kept straight by those in their seats . . . especially those in the back row. The annual Stunt Night of W.S.T.C. was held February 10 . . . Stunts were numerous and all rated well above the average . . . hThe College Special't put on by the Alpha Sigmas brought magazines to life . . . Out of hChild Life" came the Rag dolls to do their dance tn . . . Sigma Tau Delta portrayed campus activities . in America collegesWWhitewater t3 . . . The Delta Sigmas built forts, snowmen, and made snowballs out of cotton to produce their stunt thinter VVonderlamdv . . . Snowballs hghts, music by the trio and numerous other acts entertained the audience for ten minutes CO . . . A cappella surprised the onlookers with something new and different . . . H.M.S. . . . His Majestyts Ship 00 . . . All went to put over the biggest and best Stunt Night in history. z'yAf fallWZan'e " EM . . . The semester and the year come to an end A . . Library is overcrowded With the many ambitious students Oi . . . or are they just the ones Who left everything until the end? . . . Faculty meetings held throughout the year . i . Every teacher attends . . . no excuses . , . Miss Thomas gives report on a phase of geography work Of . . . The last few days of school are set aside to complete minor duties . . . One big duty is hnding all the books you drew out at the beginning of the semester . . . Virginia Marsh and Anabel Walter again busy checking in books and checking on books that are missing 00. . . . One important day in the minds of every student, but one day every teacher would like to forget is the day the Minneiska is distributed . . . classes, halls, and even Graham Street entrance are Cluttered with students and their Minnies m. 19 38 Junior Prom Howard Olds, Eunice Anderson, William Goers, Dorothy Bisely, Fred Peters, Carole Anderson, Anthony Koenings, Genevieve Mullen, Dorothy Zehme, Robert Cory, Virginia Marsh, Arthur Mussal, Virginia Webb, Lowell Nickodem. 0 King Koenings and Queen Mullen KWWQWWWgW were Tony Koenings and Gen Mullen . . ruling and queen added color to the broadcast over supreme with the Queen was her court of honor . chosen by faculty and students, one sorority girl from each sorority 0n the campus and two independents were selected . . . Eunice Anderson, Dorothy Bisely, Carole Anderson, Dorothy Zehme, Virginia Marsh, and Virginia Webb add beauty to the scene. . . . Maurie Sherman and his orchestra provide the music . . . Half hour broadcast tfirst time in historw 0f the grand march gives outside listeners an idea of what a really grand party it was . . . descriptions of the court, but mostly of the king WCLO,Janesville. . . . Decorations in modern white and black motif cleared the floor giving the most room possible for the 300 couples . . . Pillars in white gave a Grecian appearance . . . much paper to be cut . . . hopes that the cardboard would hold . . . glue and paste always ready in case something should happen . . . all worries of the decoration chairman Loren Thompson . . . All juniors help in the manual work . . . some even offer mental help . . . grand prom. ginmeeeaW are the senior aces of 1939 . . . voted as best by faculty members on scholarship, personality, partio ipation, and leadership. . . . Lucille Janz . . . most popular in .37 . . . highr est scholarship average of sorority girls in ,38 . . . president of her sorority, Theta Sigma, and secrer tary of interrsorority council in junior year . . . . . Pi Omega Pi member as well as W.A.A., commercial club, and mercier. . . . Robert Schultheis . honors . . secretaryrtreasurer of senior class . . . began early to gain extra . president of forensics in sophomore year . . . business manager of Minneiska in junior year and student adviser this year . . . Chi Delt president, interfraternity council, band, and memr bership in Pi Omega Pi add to honors. . . . Virginia Marsh . . . academic ace devoted most of her time to music organizations . . . A cappella choir, band, madrigals, orchestra, all claim her . . . Academic Club presidency in senior year with Pilgrim Fellowship and W.S.G.A. keeps her last year busy. . . . Kent Austin . . . of basketball fame wins Academic honors with W a Club and sophomore Class presidencies . . . Academic club, Phi Chi fraternity and photography club are other main interests. . . . Mary Hull . . A second Theta Sigma winning ace honors . . . held two presidencies during jun! lor year, that of primary Club and treble clef . . . music is main interest as evidenced by membership in a cappella choir and orchestra. Commercial Aces: Janz Lower righw, Schulr theis Uwower lefth Academic Aces: Marsh Lower canted, Austin Upper lefty Primary Ace in conference with Miss Williams: Hull, Upper righQ. MW RM at the annual banquet in June alumni gathr ered at the Congregational Church to bid honor to the classes graduated . . responses of classes of 5'0, 25, 10, and iive years ago, as well as the . . Charles Hill of the Whitewater department store Chosen as president present graduating class of the alumni association . . Hanna Larson keeps herself busy as secretary arranging for the banquet this June. Reunion at Milwaukee in the fall . . . Audi, torium restaurant again place of meeting and feastr ing . . . alumni greeted by Franklin H. Zellhoefer . Over 200 hundred at, tend . . . Present and future teachers bump into in place of president each other on streets . only Window shopping sometimes wonder if it is a Whitewater con! vention then look forward to June as much as students. 0 With pompoms in their lapels alumni prove they are just itkidsii after all . . . Homecoming gives one good reason for coming back to revive old memories and cheer the present team on to victory. O A front view of the CCIP tral building at Whitewater with the insert showing how Mr. Yoder keeps the faculty informed on policies by holdr ing regular meetings. MR. YODER under the guidance of President C. M. Yoder, the kindly, whiterhaired gentleman who reigns supreme . . . from his office in the central building to the far ends of all sections of school . . . from White . . When he returned to his ofhce after a brief vacation last water to New York and Washington . summer, he found many problems . . . enrollment figures astounding . . . 961 students entered this year . i . rooms to be found . . . courses to be lined up . . . a shortage of teachers to face . . all come in the stride of the president of a teachers college as popular as Whitewater. . . . Additions came to his many regular duties this year . . . besides seeing that everything ran O.K. from the furnaces and fixings t0 the teachers . . . Mr. Carlson on a leave of absence left some of the regular duties of the Director of Commercial Ede cation . . . Dr. Nelsonis illness left his duties as Personnel Director to the President . . . College 18 MR. DOUDNA MR. SEYMOUR Life and Problems to be taken care of . . . 395 Freshmen meeting twice a week . . . The daily output of letters from the main office tall dictated by Mr. Y0de0 almost doubled . . . from the regular administrative letters to letters everything regarding teachersi positions, summer school cur, riculum, requests for catalogues, and information to parents concerning their sons and daughters. . . . Personal contacts must be taken care of . . . conventions such as the National Education A550, ciation at Cleveland in March to be attended . . . Even politics play an important part in the Presi' dentis life . . . always with the interest of eduI cation and the college at heart . . . Governor Heilis threatened budget slashing caused much con! cern and worry . . . Whitewater is already scrimp' ing too much on needed money . . . Legislative problems called Mr. Yoder to Madison several times. pm a; '38-'39 This busy life full of problems does not hinder Mr. Yoderls everyzready smile and constant Will' ingness to aid any and every student at all times. . . A With the President in his political work and always behind him in administration policies are Secretary Doudna 0f the Teachers College Board of Regents, Madison, and Regent Seymour 0f Elkhorn . several conferences :1 year and many contacts keep these men together working for the better . . W.S.T.C. . . . ment of a cause . "Power behind the thronell is indeed the proper . Miss Maeta Lewerenz, in her own ofllce adjoining that of the President, handles the financial work of the title for the oHice force of the college . . school . . . does the buying and paying of bills . schedules the use of the buildings for every! thing from candy sales to the Junior Prom. . . . Miss Olive Werner takes the brunt of meeting . handles all of the dictation for the President and this year did much people in the outside office . . 0f the placement work in the absence of Mr. Carl! MRS. DAHLE MISS LEWERENZ MRS. SHUKART MISS WERNER son . . . regular duties are to relieve Mr. Yoder of routine . . . passes out doctors.a cards . . . hane dles N. Y. A. cards . . . etc. takes care of the mail, Mrs. Ann Dahle, across the hall from the Presi' dentls oHice . . . . this year handled most of that work after secretary to the Registrar in name Dr. Nelsonls illness . . . She keeps the combinar tion to the huge safe which holds all the records of the school . . A Transcripts for summer sessions and advanced study . . . aid in liguring courses . welcoming new students . . . answering in! quiries . . . keeping and recording grades . . . all fall in the line of her duties . . . Recreation in her new house 011 Highland street. . . . Mrs. Mattie Shukart, formerly Mattie Chesemore . . . just Mattie to most people . . . more than eflicient right hand llman', to Mr. Roseman . . . handles his dictation and does much to aid place ment . . . keeps track of graduating studentsa records and keeps them informed about opene ings. MR. CLAY J. DAGGETT MR. CARLSON Standing: Mr. Foland, Mr. Fricker, Miss Benson, Mr. C. E. Dagget, Mr. Abell. Seated: Mr. Randall, Mr. Crouse, Miss Bisbee, Miss Clem, Q: '55; ' V 5W 4W MW 14W due to the death of two of our teachers, Mr. Cobb and Miss Alvord, the retirement of Miss Thatcher, and the huge increase in enrollment . . necessary to fill vacancies and handle the extra work. . . Mr. Clay J. Daggett returned from Madison Where he had been working on his Ph.D. last summer to take over the guiding reins of the commercial department along with duties as Director of Academic Education . . In spare time he built a new home and welcomed a '7 lb. 5 oz. daughter for the iihousewarmingh . . . Replaced Mr. P. A. Carlson, Director of Commercial Edus cation . Carlson is taking a welleearned leave of absence for a year . . working on research material for his courses here and at Northwestern University where he has taught for the past tWO summers. Miss Jane Clem, head of the typewriting department, is con! tinuing work on her revision of WThe Technique of Teaching Typewriting" traveled on Great Lakes last summer for "seah air . . . Miss Edith Bisbee completed iiBrief Form Drills" for publication this year . . has begun work on :1 methods book in shorthand . . main interest out of school is peach nursery . . . She kept mixers in hand for first semester . . acquired new dog, Vii . . Miss Marie Benson returned to duties after teaching summer school at Northwestern . . Kept alumni interested in school as Chairman of Alumni Committee. emphasized tranSr cription more than ever this year . Mr. H. J. Randall kept busy with new law courses . . . 225 students for first six weeks . . . brushed up on principles at Columbia last summer . . . He is an actor at heart . . . played uBig Bad Wolf" in faculty hcuteup" . . . Mr. W. H. Fricker de, cided to make his accounting courses tougher . . . got the idea while working on his PhD. at Wis consin last summer . . . will be on hand to greet the hold folksh next summer . . . Raised hrst tulips in town by the thutJJ. . . . Increased demand for commercial work necessil tated new teachers . . . four in past year . . . Mr. W. J. Abell replaced Mr. Cobb for the second semester of last year and continued on this year . took over accounting methods Classes . . . edited hCommercial Education Bulletinh . . . taught accounting and supervised practice classes . . . Mr. Claire E. Daggett and Mr. J. C. Crouse are the new supervisors at the City High . . . both handled college classes . . . Daggett taught accounting and Crouse taught typing . . . Mr. Daggett is 21 graduate of Whitewater . . . Class 0f 31. . . . MHR. G. Foland arrived after the first six weeks to relieve the congestion in business law classes . teaches accounting also . . . supervised praCr tice teachers in bookkeeping at College High. . . . Primary Bulletin, pictures, displays, directors conferences, meetings, etc. keep Miss Margaret Williams constantly on the go as director of primary work . . . Will attend summer session at Columbia next summer and see the Worlds Fair in off mo! ments . . . Miss Mary Madden is constantly on MISS WILLIAMS the job criticizing tconstructivelyJ beginning teach, ers . . . can be seen any day with some first grade students . . . Mrs. Scholl, formerly Miss Merle Wilson . . . married last August to a retired post ofhce official . . . plans to travel next summer . . . climax to be San Francisco Fair . . . handles the third and fourth grades of primary school . . . supervises practice teachers. . . . Miss Clara Tutt took time out from her duties to attend the convention of the Association of Childhood Education at Atlanta, Georgia . . . Has charge of the kindergarten pupils . . . makes life and work interesting for youngsters . . . plans to remain in Whitewater next summer to take care of her recently completed home . . . gardening is her hobby . . . Mrs. Rose Fischer will continue her teaching through the summer session of this year . . . Will accompany Mr. Fischer on a west, ern tour for four weeks after July 29 . . . this is another of the tours for students of geography . . . A new member to the primary staff is Miss Angeline BroEel . A . replaced Miss Sagl this year . came to us from the University of Minnesota where she was working on her Ph.Di last sume 1116f. . . . Dr. H. G. Lee constantly works on his courses in sociology and criminology both in and out of school . . . special interest is education in prisons . spent Easter holiday at Waupun with his son, Richard . . . studying, of course . . . plans to complete study with a Visit to Washington State Prison and Sing Sing . . A Dr. G. H. Nelson, Registrar, started the year as usual . . . interest of students welfare at heart . . . unusually large col! MRS. FISCHER, MISS BROFFEL, MRS. SCHOLL MISS TUTT, MISS MADDEN DR. NELSON lege life and problems classes . . . left in January due to break in health . . . spent some time at sanitorium at Oconomowoc and then traveled to Indiana. . Mr. W. P. Roseman, Director of Training School, continued to hold his practice teachersl conferences every Thursday . . . new idea for commercial people . i teach in all sub! jects . . . Conventions popular this year . . Pro! gressive Education Association at Columbus, Ohio; Health Education Association at New York; and Rural Life at Ithica, New York . . . will attend National Education Association this summer. Between supervising in the rural school, Miss Mabel Beckwith finds time to study birds for a hobby . . she traveled to Mexico last summer and intends to see Alaska this summer . . . Mr. J. M. Tice . . llDaddy" to most students . MISS BECKWITH MR. TICE MR. ROSEMAN finished his services in royal style . . . will retire this year, but put in the busiest one of his life . . . Freshmen crowded his penmanship classes to overflowing . . . cooperative marketing popular . . . His plans for the future are not definite . lbI am too young to restfl he says . . . we will be hearing more of him . . llEncore une fais, slel vous plaitv and similar expressions can be heard from N205 as Miss Bertha Lefler teaches French and German . . Sponsors Theta Sigma and High School groups on the side. The silver haired lady seen in the lower halls i5 Mrs. I. U. Wheeler, Director of Rural Education . . . She puts the ruralites through their paces . attended convention at Lexington, Kentucky in November . . holds monthly meetings of teachers in the field in this territory. . MISS LEFLER MRS. WHEELER Music is a hobby and vocation with Miss Marion Jordalen . . . teaches all through the grades of all departments and in College . . . directs Treble Clef and sponsors Piano Club on side . . . assisted at the University of Wisconsin Music Clinic last summer . . . she will travel for a rest this sum! mer.... Mr. C. H. Wellers and his cottage are inseparable . spends most of his time lwhen not in schooD there . . . built it himself . . . students always welcome . . . Will leave it for nine weeks this summer for study . . . Familiar sight in boots, bate tered hat, and Model iiA" truck. . . . How many dots per minute . . . follow lines with pencil . . . trace objects in mirror . . . all go into making psychology interesting and helpful MR. WELLERS MISS JORDALEN under Mr. C. 0. Wells . . . returned to teaching after a semester and summer session at the Uni! versity of Chicago working on Ph.D. . . . will complete that work this summer . . ing and popular is Dr. George Beery, recent addie tion to statistics staff . . . had fellowship at Unie varsity last year . . . author of HStudy of Trans! portation of High School Pupils in Wisconsinl, . . . A travel is his hobby and he has carried it on extensively . . . Young, smilr Geography is no problem A . popular speaker about school . . . llMarriage Relations" outstanding topic. . . . DR. BEERY. MR. WELLS DR. EVANS, DR. WEIDMAN .w MR. FISCHER, MISS THOMAS History in all its forms and periods takes the time of Dr. E. H. Evans and Dr. J. M. Weidman . . . between them they handle the hundreds of freshmen from all fields advanced courses in American and European History also . . . Dr. Evans accompanied Mr. Fischer on the eastern field trip last summer . . . is working on uOutline Study for the Freshman Coursell . . . movie camera and little liNed" are his chief outside interests . . . Dr. Weidman traveled to Oklahoma and New Mexico last summer . returned with a bride . . . former Miss OlMalley . . the demon llflu" kept him from his classes for two weeks this year . . . missed sorely by the freshies. C201 and C202 house the equipment of good geographers and those who know what it is all about . . . Mr. W. C. Fischer and Miss Olive Thomas . . . widely diiferent in manner of presentation, but covering the same material . . . Fischer with his feet in the waste basket and Miss Thomas behind her speakers stand . . . between them they handle conservation and a variety of geography courses . . . Mr. Fischer led an eastern tour last summer and will take a group to Alaska this summer , . . Miss Thomas continued her work in conservation by traveling and actually observing the points about which she lectures . . . will work on her PhD. at Wisconsin this summer . . . Chairman of faculty social committee that produced ilLittle Red Riding Hoodll. . . . Whitewater is an extremely interesting place for Dr. D. H. Webster . . . teaches literature of all kinds, sociology, and journalism . . . helps with debate . . . Won first prize with his play slThe Generalsll in a contest of the Wisconsin Dramatic Guild . . . Will spend his summer in town garr dening, swimming, and playing tennis . . . will travel to the New York Worldls Fair and visit the New England states . . . Miss Helen Knosker disbanded her classes for a few days last fall when kept down with appendicitis Led faculty in welcoming the Freshmen in the fall A . . sponsored a prose writing contest in college . . . sponsors English fraternity whose main interest is to develop writers . . . Miss Laura Hamiltonls new course in advanced corre spondence proved to be a popular one . , . handles rrost of the freshmen besides her literature Classes . . , took over sponsorship of Pi Omega Pi in Mr. Carlsonls absence special hobby is her shiny new Ford V8 . . . Mrs. Opal Wells came back this year after accompanying Mr. Wells' to Chicago while he attended school . . . She studied dura ing the summer working toward her Masters . . . handles the English and practice teachers in her field in the College High School. . . . Mathematics . . . six hours required for all students and minors are becoming popular . . . taught by Mr. T. T. Goff and Mr. O. H. Bigelow . . . both have freshmen in algebra and commercial mathematics . . . Mr. Goff has a course in machine computation while Mr. Bigelow handles the advanced courses . . . Mr. Bigleow traveled in the western states last summer between golfing . . . carries hobby into school.. . . sponsors the col! lege golf team A . . working on a revision of his text in geometry . . . Mr. Goff continued to make his many trips speaking on iiOddities of Figuresli . . . plans to publish his extensive works on geneology . . . Wrote a new book, llRecreation in Mathematics" . . . If and when he Finds a few minutes of spare time, he plans to begin work on a revision of his iiBusiness Mathematicsii and write a book on "Machine Computationll . . . Relaxed in northern Wis! consin and Canada for a short time last summer and plans to take another brief vacation this year. . . . Mr. R. C. Clark . . . i"Docli to you . . met more freshmen than ever but successfully taught them about life . . . from the amoeba to man . . . last summer session tried a new course in iiGeneticsli . . . proved to be very popular. . . His main interest is in biology, however . . . writing workbooks in biology for both college and high school classes . . . Took time out to see northern Wisconsin last summer and plans to see the New York Worldis Fair this summer . . . Mr. J. J. Chopp, the newest addition to the science department has completed his second year . . . his white jacket and himr self are familiar any place in the building . . . hobby is to see how things run and what is going on . . . versatility is widely known . . . magiz cian of some repute . . . an artist . . . with pen and with handling people . . . slmixingli at mixers outstanding . . . Traveled last sumr mer and plans to work on his PhD. degree this summer. . . . With little E"Billygl growing into a real young fellow, Mr. R. W. Prucha spends as much time with him as possible . i . In school, he has taken over two classes of conservation to relieve the congestion . . . athletic department faired well under his work as chairman of committee . . . Photography classes and club are ever increasing in size . . . His summer will be devoted to study for his PhD. at the University of Wisconsin . . . Mr. R. J. Brooks, "chief cngineerll of the chemistry lab and lecture room, rated a special honor this year . . . his article on iiGas Generz atorsw was published in the EiJournal of Chemical Educationli . . . He is kept busy teaching . . . taught summer session last year and will again this year . . . does plan to find time to tour Canada this summer. . . . MRS. WELLS, MISS HAMILTON, MISS KNOSKER, DR. VJEBSTER MRi BIGELOW. MR. GOFF MR. CLARK, MR. PRUCHA, MR. CHOPP, MR. BROOKS MISS POTTER, MISS BJORKLUND Art is a required course for the Rural :md Primary teachers . . . Miss Flora Potter and Miss Ethel Bjork- lund do the teaching . . . in the west wing over the girlsa gym is their domicile . . . Work of Miss Bjorke lund in teaching primary children is outstanding . . . may be seen in the art rooms and in and about the primary rooms . . . Miss Potter is continually active in the field of art . . . brought several famous artists be fore the students this year . '. . made several visits to . Miss Bjorklund studied Swedish are when she Visited relatives in Sweden last sume various exhibits . . mer. . . . Home economics falls in the line of duty for Mrs. Mary Fricker . . . teaches cooking and sewing to primary and high school students . . . sewI ing and problems of home to college girls . . . Her advice is requested and given to faculty members and others . . . from building homes to making dresses. . .. Dramatics attract a great deal of attention due to the active work of Miss Florence Holcombe . . . . . directs Senior Class Play . . . teaches . directs all plays of Thespian English and dramatics. . . . Miss Edith Knilans this year replaced Miss Thatcher as head librarian after Miss Thatcheris resignment . . . Results of study on Masters degree at University of Illinois shown by new system of handling reserve MRS. FRICKER MISS HOLCOMBE books . . . Miss Leora Harris was shifted into Miss Knilansi former position . . . she formerly ruled over the Children,s library . . . The third local young lady member of the library staff is Miss Mildred Brigham . . . added this year to take the place of Miss Harris in the Childrenis library . . . graduated from Whitewater in 1937 . . . Miss Ruth Wilkinson is zmr other new member of the book crew . . . formerly was in the library at Platteville Teachers College . . . came here after studying at the University of Wisconsin last year . . took the place of the deceased Miss Alvord . . . plans to travel through the East and Canada next summ er. MISS HARRIS, MISS BRIGHAM, MISS KNILANS, MISS WILKINSON o Entering Graham Street Entrance, students climb three flights of stairs to the library to study for tomor' rOXXnS 16580115. 1455.25 GAUTHIER, JANZ, ANDERSON NlWJedofilteJM is my picture O.K.? . . . . . letters of application . . . U. S. Post thce Dept, has boom in business. . . . stand the seniors . . . 128 credits earned by June 9 . . . diplomas handed out then . . . much to take care of during the year . . . must arrange classes to complete minors and majors Iand still have some time freeI . . actually teaching the kiddies t0 IIjump through the hoopII . . . quote from W. H. Fricker . . . attend weekly conferences with Mr. Roseman the attributes of a good teacher learned to a u'Im . . . letters of recommendation must be gathered . . . faculty members, 01d teach, ers, minister, and others must be contacted . . . application blanks to fill out . . personal data sheetsw-Do I smoke?eHow many credits have I in English? . . . shall we have Class play or shall we have a picnic or both , . . learn to walk with mortarrboard. . . . must attend class meetings . . . Jobs . . . big feature of year I . . how much money can we get . . . where should we try to teach . . . 28 wear a suit in case of a personal interview . In a year will be alumni . . . look back at last year . . . best class in history Of you donIt believe it, ask themI . . publishers, and speakers . . I . outstanding athletes, musicians, more honor students than Freshmen . . . placed 50 on honor roll. . . . Dr. Lee still sponsors class with Ed. Gauthier as president . . . active in Pi Omega Pi, band, menIs Chorus, Phi Chi, debate, and generally . . . Carole Anderson chosen Vice'president . . . popular Alpha Sigma from Whitewater . Lucille Janz . . . W.A.A., Pi Omega Pi, Thespizm, Theta Sigma, etc. . . . most popular girl in a38 . . . elected secre' taryrtreasurer strictly on merits. . . . Seniors today . . . teachers tomorrow. LOIS JANE ADAMSON Madison Elementary Teachers Primary Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: A Cappe1la Choir, 3, 4; Choral Club, 1; Treble Clef, 2, 3; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pythian Forum, 3, 4; Thespian, 3. CAROLE ANDERSON A2 Whitewater Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1: Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; W. S. G. A., 2, 3. DORIS ANDERSON Janesville Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Choral Club, 3, 4; L. S. A., 1, 2. MAXINE ANDERSON Cambridge Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 4; Pythian Forum, 1. 2, 3; Thespian, 2, 3. FLORENCE ARNOLD AS Whitewater Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3. 4; Choral Club. 1, 2; Treble Clef, 3: L. S. C. 5., 1. 2. 3: W. S. G. A., 3; Thespian, 1, 2. KENT AUSTIN $XE Janesville Academic Teachers Academic Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: ""W Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 1VicerPresJ; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2; Pho- tography Club, 2, 3; Sophomore Class President. ROBERT BAKER KAII Troy Center Academic Teachers Photography Club, 2, 3, 4. BARON BARKER KAl'I Whitewater Academic Teachers Academic Club, 3, 4; Band, 1, 2; Merfs Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4; Photography Club, 3, 4. HARLEY BARNEY XAP Frederic Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 3, 4. HELEN BARRETT Racine Commercial Teachers Kemper Guild. 4. ELGIE BEEDE Merrillan Commercial Teachers W. A, A., 4; Wesley Foundation, 2, 3, 4. ELIZABETH BELITZ ETA, KAH Cochrane Academic Teachers Academic Club, 4; W. A. A., 2, 3: L. S. C. 8., 4; Pythian Forum, 4: Forensics, 4. 29 HENRY BERTODATTO XAP Chisholm, Minnesota Academic Teachers Men15 Chorus, 3, 4; Photog' raphy Club, 3. EDWARD BIEDRON dIXE South Milwaukee Commercial Teachers Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pilgrim Fellowship, 4; Pythian Forum, 4, 1PresJ. ANN BILL Genoa City Academic Teachers Academic Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. DOROTHY BISELY ASE, HQH Kewaunee Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 3; Commercial Club, 2, 3: Minneiska, 3, 4: Royal Purple, 2, 3, 4; Choral Club, 2; Mercier, 2, 3, 4; Photography Club, 4; W. S. G. A., 4, 1Treasj; InterrSorority Counl cil, 4. ALICE BOSSMANN Horicon Commercial Teachers W, A. A., 1, 2, 3; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Treble Clef, l, 2, 3. HARVEY BRONSON ETF Elkhorn Commercial Teachers "W13 Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Commerr cial Club, 2, 4; Vice'President of Junior Class. CHRYSTAL BELLE BRUNK Rice Lake Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Commerr cial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pilgrim Fellowship, 3, 4, 1Sec.-Treas.1. VERNA BRUNS A2 Milwaukee Commercial Teachers Commercial Club. 1, 2, 3, 4: Treble Clef, 1, 2. FRANCIS CAPPER cPIKE, ETA West Salem Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 2, 3, 4. 1Vice; Presj; Band, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation, 3, 4. ALICE CHRISTIANSEN AXE, KAII Clinton Junior High Teachers Academic Club, 2, 3, 4; W. A. A., 1, 2; A Cappella Choir, 2. 4; Choral Club, 1, 2; Treble Clef, 3: Pilgrim Fellowship, 3, 4: W. S. G. A., 3, 4, 1PresJ; Pythian Forum, 1, 2, 3; Inter Sorority Council, 3. NORMAN CHRISTIANSON XAP Stoughton Commercial Teachers Mercier, 4. DONALD COLLINS Rio Academic Teachers Minneiska, 2, 3, 4; Royal Purr ple, 2, 3, 4; Photography Club, 2, 3, 1PresJ, 4; Academic Club, 4. MARIE COLLINS mm, HSZH South Pekin, Illinois Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 3, 4; Commercial Club, 3, 4; Minneiska, 4; Piano Club, 4; Mercier, 3, 3; Photog' raphy Club, 4 4566.1; Thespir an, 3, 4. FLORENCE CONNER H5211 Elkhorn Commercial Teachers Minneiska, 3, 4: Royal Purple, 3. 4: Choral Club, 2, 3, 4. GLENN COOK dDXE Williams Bay Commercial Teachers Commerdal Club, 2, 3, 4: M61135 Chorus, 1, 2. JUNE DALY Beloit Elementary Teachers XV. A. A., 1: Primary Club, 1, 2. 3, 4: Choral Club, 1; Thespi' an, 3. JUNE DAVIS Walworth Elementary Teachers W. A. A., 1; Primary Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Royal Purple, 2, 3, 4; Piano Club, 4. LESTER DECK KAH Whitewater Academic Teachers Academic Club, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation, 4; Photography Club, 1, 2, 3, 4TreasJ, 4. DONALD DEMERATH XAP, Aw Menasha Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 3, 4: Men,s Chorus. 1, 3, 4: Thespian, 7., 3, 1Vice-PresJ, 4. BEVERLY DRISCOLL Ashland Commercial Teachers 4P05trGraduate1 BERNICE EMMERT Johnson Creek Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 2, 3, 4; Choral Club, 1, 2, 4; Pilgrim Fellowship, 1, EDWARD GAUTHIER $XE, IIQII Oconto Falls Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 4; Minr neiska, 3, 4; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4: Men's Chorus. 3, 4: Mercier, 1, 2, 3, 4: Debate, 3. LAVERNABELLE GOELZER 222 Plymouth Commercial Teachers W. A. A1, 1: Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Treble Clef, 1, 2, 3, 4: Pilgrim Fellowship, 1, 2. ANDREW GOODMAN XAP Troy Center Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mercier, 1, 2, 3, 4; Forensics, 2, 3, 4. 31 THOMAS GRAHAM XAP Whitewater Academic Teachers Band, 1, 2, 3, 4. EDITH GRAPENTINE Elkhorn Junior High Teachers Academic Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, 3Sec.r Treasj; Choral Club, 1, 2, 3; Forensics, 3. JANE HAHN ASE Racine Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4Ser Treas.3, 4; A Cappella Choir, 2, 3, 4; Piano Club, 2, 3, Uyresj; Treble Clef, 2, 3, 4; Thespian, 2; Forensics, 2. GRETCHEN HAMMARv LUND GET Janesville Elementary Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2; Primary Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1Pres3; Choral Club, 1; Treble Clef, 2, 3, 4; L. S. C. S., 3, 4. ALLEN HARBORT $XE Madison Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 2; M61135 Chorus, 2, 3, 4, 4Presj; Photogr raphy Club, 2, 3. BERNARD HASTREITER XAP, HQII Thorp Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 2, 3, 4; Minr neiska, 3, 4; Mercier, 2, 3, 4; Thespian, 2, 3. Crreasj; Inter Fraternity Council, 4. 32 MARGARET HEIDE ETA,H9H Fort Atkinson Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 2; Royal Pur- ple, 2, 3, 4; Choral Club, 2; Treble Clef, 3, 4; Thespian, 2. JEAN HENDERSON 222,AW9,HQH Whitewater Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1; Thespian, 1, 2, 3, 4; Minneiska, 2, 3, 4; Pilgrim Fellowship, 3, 4; W. S. G. A., 2, 3, 4PresJ. FRANCES HERREMAN A21 Pardeeville Commercial Teachers Minneiska, 2, 3, 4, 03611100; Mercier, 3, 4; W, S. G. A., 1; Thespian, 3, 4. DONALD HEYRMAN $XE, IISZII Whitewater Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Minneiska, 3, 4, 4Bus. Mgrj; Men3s Chorus, 3, 4, 4Treas3; Mercier, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4Vice'PresJ. FRANK HOFRICHTER Hillsboro Commercial Teachers LILLIAN HOLLISTER GET Delavan Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 3; Commercial Club, 2; Treble Clef, 3, 4. MADELYN HOLM Williams Bay Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 3; Choral Club, 3; Piano Club, 1, 2; WCS' ley Foundation, 1. MARY HULL BET Milton Junction Elementary Teachers Primary Club, 2, 3, 1Presj, 4: A Cappella Choir, 3, 4: Or chestra, 2, 3, 4; Treble Clef, 3, 1Presj, 4. OLLIE JACOBSON Oconomowoc Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 4. MILDRED JAMES IISZH Whitewater Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foun' dation, 1, 2, 3, 4; Forensics, 2, 3, 4, 1SeCrTreas3; Photography Club, 4. LUCILLE JANZ BET, IIHII Dancy Commercial Teachers W, A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4: Commerr cial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Mercier, 1, 2, 4; Photography Club. 4: Thespian, 4; SecretaryTreasurer of Senior Class; Inter'SOrority Council, 3. ANITA JAQUITH AXE, HQII Palmyra Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 2. ANTIONETTE JOHNSON GET Baraboo Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 3, 4; Choral Club, 1; Wesley Foundation, 3; Inter-Sorority Council, 3, 4. THORA JUNTWAITE ABE Troy Center Commercial Teachers W. A A., ,2, 3, 4; Commer' c1a1C1ub, 2,3, 4,1Sec Treas. 1; A Cappella Choir, 2, 3, 4; Choral Club, 1; Treble Clef, 4; Wesley F0undat10n,3 4; W. S. G. A., 4. SELMA KALLESTAD Cashton Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 3, 4; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Minneiska, 2, 3, 4; Choral Club, 2, 3. 4, 1Presj; L. S. A., 1, 2, 3, 4. JOSEPH KAUTZ CPXE Madison Commercial Teachers Unost Graduate1 Commercial Club, 4. IRENE KIRBY AS Edgerton Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 4; Royal Purple, 2, 3, 4; Choral Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Thespian, 3, 4. JEAN KITTLESON .1de Delavan Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3; W. A. A., 3; A Cappella Choir, 4; Choral Club, 3: Thespian, 2, 3 1PresJ, 4. 9 HUGO KLANN IbXE, HQH Milwaukee Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 2, 3; Men3s Chorus, 2, 3; InterrFraternity Council, 4. MELVIN KOEPPEN q3XE, HQH Walworth Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3; Mini neiska, 3, 4; Royal Purple, 1, 2, 3, 4. 3Ed1tor3; Photography Club, 3, 4; Pythian Forum, 2, 3, 4. MARTHA KREFT AE, HSZH Sturgeon Bay Commercial Teachers VJ. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Commerr cial Club, 1, 2, 3; Royal Purple, 2, 3, 4; Band, 2; Wesley Founr dation, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4Treasj; Photography Club, 3; W. S. G. u LUCILLE KRUEGER A21 Manitowoc Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Commerv cial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; A Cap! pella Choir, 3; Choral Club, 1; Treble Clef, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4. WAYNE LAITALA HQH Chisholm, Minnesota Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 3, 4; Photography Club, 1, 3, 4; Pythian Forum, 3. HERBERT LANGEN Whitewater Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 3, 4; Mcn35 Chorus, 2, 3; Photography Club, 2, 3, 4. 34 RICHARD LEE ETI', KAII Whitewater Academic Teachers Academic Club, 3, 4; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; A Cappella Choir, 4; Men3s Chorus, 3, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3. CHAPMAN LEFFINGWELL quE Whitewater Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 3; A Cappella Choir, 4; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Madrigals, 2, 3, 4; Men3s Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4. MATT LEWEIN diXE Milwaukee Commercial Teachers 3133733 Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. PAUL LEWEIN QDXE Milwaukee Commercial Teachers "W" Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4Pres3; Commercial Club, 1; A Cappella Choir, 3, 4; Men,s Chorus, 2, 3, 4; Thespian, 4. VIRGINIA MARSH Elkhorn Academic Teachers Academic Club, 2, 3, 4, 4Presj; A Cappella Choir, 3, 4; Band, 1, 2; Madrigals, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pilgrim Fellowship. 4; W. S. G. A., 2. BETTY MARSHALL Whitewater Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Band, 1: Photography Club, 4; Kemper Guild, 4. ALBERTA MARTENS Columbus Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4, 4Presj; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra, 3, 4; L. S. A., 3, 4; Forensics. 2, 3, 4. RAYMOND MCCOY XAP Evansville Junior High Teachers Academic Club, 2; WNW Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Men15 Chorus, 1, 2, 1Vice-Pres3, 3, 4; Pilgrim Fel' lowship, 1, 2, 4Treasj, 3, 4; Photography Club. 4; Secretary, Treasurer of Sophomore Class. IRMAGARD MESSERr SCHMIDT Whitewater Academic Teachers Academic Club, 3, 4; W. S. G. A., 4; W. A. A., 1, 2, 4; L. S, C. 5., 1, 2, 3, 4, 4SecJ; Photogr raphy Club, 3, 4. HAROLD MEYER mm Larsen Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 4; Thespir an, 1, 2, 3; Royal Purple, 1, 2; Debate. 3, 4; Men3s Chorus, 4; L. S. C. S., 1, 2, 3, 4. ISABEL MEYER Jefferson Elementary Teachers Primary Club, 4. VERA MILLIS H911 Whitewater Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4. JOSEPHINE MOE 2122 Stoughton Commercial Teachers Thespian, 3, 4; Choral Club, 1; Treble Clef, 2, 3; L. S. C. 5., 1, 4Treasj, 2, 3, 4; W. A. A., 1; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3; Debate, 2; Pythian Forum, 3. GERALD MUIR Fort Atkinson Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 3, 4; A Capr pella Choir, 3, 4; Men,s Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4; Photography Club, 1, 2, 3; Pythian Forum, 2, 3, 4; Forensics, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A., 1, 2, 3, 03115.3; Band, 1, 2. MYRTLE NELSON Whitewater Commercial Teachers 4PostrGraduate1 Commercial Club, 3, 4; L. S. A., 3, 4; Thespian, 4, 4TreasJ. MARIAN NIEBUHR Verona Elementary Teachers Primary Club, 2, 3, 4: L. S. C. S., 3, 4. RUTH NORTON Merton Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Choral Club, 4; Piano Club, 3; Photography Club, 3; Thespian, 2, 3, 4; Forensics, 2, 3, 4; Kem' per Guild, 4, 4SerTreas3. RALPH OTT $XE Milwaukee Commercial Teachers 33W" Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4Ser Treas.1; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Photography Club, 4; Jun- ior Class President. 35' CELIA OWCZARSKI, A211, A151 Pulaski Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3; Royal Purple, 2, 3, 4; Choral Club, 4; Mercier, 1, 2, 3; Thespian, 3, 4. MARION PEDLEY Kenosha Elementary Teachers Primary Club, 3, 4; Choral Club, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation, 4. KENNETH PETERSON XAP, A1142 South Wayne Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 1Pres.1, 4; A Cappella Choir, 2, 3; Mens Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4; L. S. A., 4; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pythian Forum, 4; Thespian, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1Vice' Pres.1; SecretaryATreasurer of Junior Class. RALPH PETERSON . Weyauwega ,1. ,, . Commerc1a1Teachers ll 3" Band , 11 4.16? 11326: 1, 32,4;L Wesley Mundation, 1, 2'; 4 Phw Traphy C1ub,'3, 1 hny J IRENE PIPPEL A;11, 'Hszu " -Bayfield . 1 Commercial Teachers W A'. A., 2, 3,4;Comm1r .cial Cub, ,91 2, 3, 4; A Choir, 2, 31 4 Sec'l reas.1 1Choral Club, 1; esley Fou da tlon, 1, 2, 3, gFres. 1, 4' Inter - Sorority C0unc11.4 FRANCIS PLYER XAP, 111211 Mellen Commercial Teachers W" Club. 3, 4: Royal Purple, appella :. '1 GERALDINE PRIELIPP BET Janesville Elementary Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2; Primary Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Choral Club, 1, 2. MARY PUERNER Fort Atkinson Elementary Teachers Primary Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Band, 1, 2; Piano Club, 3, 4. WILLIAM REISENAUER 'PXE Tomah Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 4; Band, 1. 2, 3, 4; Men's Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1V1cerPres.1; Orchestra. 1, 2, 3. ,FHERBERT SCHAEFER :11 Milwaukee Cptnmercial Teachers 'R a1Purp1e,2, '3, 4; L. 5 CS, 1"1 2, 3,54; Photography Club, 3 51, AGNES EKCHMIDT 115111 Rhinelander Commercial Teachers JCommercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Royal Purple, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pilgrim Fellowship, 1, 2, 3: Wesley Foundation, 4; Pythian Forum, 1, 2, 3, 4. MABEL SCHOENKE AEE Whitewater Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3; Pythian Forum, 2. ROBERT SCHULTHEIS XAP, H911 Washburn Commercial Teachers Minneiska, 2, 3, 1Bus. Mng, 4; Band, 2, 3; Forensics, 1, 2, 1Presj, 3, 4; IntergFraternity Council, 3, 4. WILMAH SCOTT GET Augusta Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 2, 3. 4: Choral Club, 2: Treble Clef, 3. JUNE SHADEWALD ESE Richland Center Commercial Teachers W, A. A., 1, 2: Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. VICTOR SHUDLICK A410. Rice Lake Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pythian Forum, 1, 2, 3; Thespi- an, 1, 2, 3, 4,1Sch. CHARLES SHUMAN leE Whitewater Academic Teachers Academic Club, 2, 3, 4: Way Iey Foundation, 2, 3, 4: Presir dent of Freshman Class. MARIAN SIMONSON Lone Rock Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 2. 4: Band, 3, 4: Choral Club, 4. EUGENE SKIBBA 1IiXE Stevens Point Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 4; Mercicr, 4. EDXVARD SKOUMAL XAP Milwaukee Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 3. 4: Men's Chorus, 1: Wesley Foundation, 1. RAYMOND SOMSEN $XE, IIEZII Woodville Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 3, 4: Wesley Foundation, 3, 4. LAWRENCE SPEEL IHZII Appleton Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 4: Royal Pur' pie, 3, 4; Mercier, 3, 4. JEAN SPOONER Ladysmith Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 4: Commercial Club. 1, 4; Choral Club, 1: Treble Clef, 2, 3, 4. ADELINE STIRN IIEZII Colgate Commercial Teachers Commercial Club. 1, 2: Piano Club, 2. 37 HELEN STIRN Colgate Elementary Teachers Primary Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. RUTH STOIK AXE Rice Lake Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4: Commerr cial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mercier, 1, 2, 3, 4; Photography Club, 3. GENEVA STONE 222, A110. Whitewater Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3; Choral Club, 1, 4, 4Vice'PresJ; L. S. A., 1, 2, 3, 4Vice'Pres3, 4; W. S. G. A., 3, 4, 4Vicer PresJ; Thespian, 1, 2, 3, 4SecJ, 4. MILNER STOVE HQII Seneca Commercial Teachers 1Commercial Club, 3, 4; Men3s Chorus, 1, 2; L. S. C. 5., 3, 4. MARJORIE STRITZEL Seymour Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, Royal Purple, 3, 4; L. S. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Thespian, 1, 2, 3, 4 ALICE SUGDEN Mukwonago Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Band, 1, 2. HARRY SUGDEN IIQH, ETA Mukwonago Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 4; Men1s Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4Treas3, 4; Photography Club, 3. LORAN THOMPSON 4PXE, ETA Beloit Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pythian Forum, 1; Y. M. C. A., 2. LAWRENCE TROVINGER ETF, mm Lake Geneva Academic Teachers Academic Club, 1, 2, 3, 4Vicer Presj, 4; Royal Purple, 3, 4; Pilgrim Fellowship, 1, 2, 3, 4; Photography Club, 3, 4; Thespi- an, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4Presj. JOHN TRUESDALE KPXE Richland Center Commercial Teachers s3W" Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Royal Purple, 2; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4Vice'PresJ, 4; Junior High Coach, 3, 4. JOYCE TUBBS A2 Seymour Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4Treasj, 4; W. S. G. A., 4. MARY VANCE ETA Delavan Junior High Teachers Academic Club, 2, 3, 4; W, A. A., 2, 3; Photography Club, 4; Junior High Organization, 1. HAROLD VIETH ETF, HSZH Marinette Commercial Teachers L. S. C. 5., 2, 3, 4, 4Presj; Commercial Club, 4; Photog! raphy Club, 4. KEITH WALSH Reedsburg Academic Teachers Academic Club, 4; Mercier, 4; Photography Club, 4; Thespian, 4. 1TreasJ. ANABEL WALTER AZ Platteville Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 3, 4; Treble Clef, 3, 4, 4VicerPres3; Wesley Foundation, 3, 4. CLEMENTINE WELTER Whitewater Elementary Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3; Primary Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Mercier, 3; Photography Club, 3. ELEANOR WENDT HQII Walworth Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4: Commcr' ciaI Club, 1; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mercier, 1, 2, 3, 4. LA VERE WILLE Fort Atkinson Commercial Teachers W. A, A., 1, 3; Commercial Club, 3; Photography Club, 3. ARDITH WINTERS A2 Ladysmith Elementary Teachers Primary Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; A Cappella Choir, 3, 4; Choral Club, 1; Treble Clef, 4; W. S. G. A., 4. ALBIN WITKOWSKI 3DXE Stevens Point Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 3, 4; Mercier, 4. ARLINE WRIGHT Elkhart, Indiana Elementary Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Primary Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; A Cappella Choir, 2, 3, 4: Choral Club, 1; Treble Clef, 2, 3, 4, 4PresJ: Pythian Forum, 3, 4; Thespian, 3; Wesley Foundation, 1, 2, 3, 4. HENRY YANKOW ETI', HQH Lomira Commercial Teachers Commercial Club, 2, 3, 4; Royal Purple, 3, 4, 4Bus. Mng: Band, 4; Orchestra, 4; L. S. C. 8., 2, 3, 4; Photography, 2, 3, 4. DOROTHY ZEHME GET Janesville Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Commerl cial Club, 1, 2, 3; Choral Club, 2; Pilgrim Fellowship, 1; Photog- raphy Club, 4; Thespian, 4; InterrSorority Council, 4. RUTH ZIMMERMAN ESE Argyle Commercial Teachers W. A. A., 1, 2, 3; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Founr dation, 1, 2, 3. 39 am'a'w HULICK, ROGERS, SCHULTZ are the Juniors . . . with a total of 62 semester credits . . personality and character traits deemed desirable obtained junior classifxcation . possess for teaching success . . during first semester . . semester. . . . . required courses flnished . Ioafmg theme of second Activities and talent directed toward Junior Prom election of king on February 9 sets Jim Mullen tmost popular mam on the throne to rule the gala affair . romance in air . . . . Club Moderne scenery creates . April 28 . . . hours extended refreshments served in the cafe in the balcony. . t . for dancing . . . Harry Hulick moves one step up on class election day . . . president . . . George Schultz takes over social function of the class with the vicerpresidency . . 4 Betty Rogers promised to keep the minutes as well as the money of the class . . . Mr. R. C. Clark, 40 good old hDoc," Chosen to smooth the troubled waters. . . . Upper quarter commercial students added to Pi Omega Pi . . . 19 in all . . . mixer sponsored in February . . . offlces carried away by chosen few . . . Bill Dubats adds commercial club presidency, managing editor of Royal Purple, Phi Chi leader ship to his laurels . . . John Dettmann . . business manager of the Minnie . . . takes over commercial club meetings when Bill is absent . . . Virginia Horkan bosses IVIerCier members on Tues, day evenings . . . Louise Bayer heads Royal Purple staff for first semester. . . . . assistant Football and basketball stars . . . Lyons, Dicke hoff, Ransom, Strohacker, Schmitt, Boutelle, Karar betsos, Koenings, Hulick, Hungerford, appear on the rosters. . . . Juniors, indeed, but worthy of the name. Allen Anderson Arnold Backus Baker Beilke Bergmann Boutelle Bower Brice Brobst Brockhaus Bromley Brunswick BuHham Burton Carlson Chape Chase Christiansen Crerar Davis Dawe Dettinger Dettmann DickhOfT Dubats DuBois Edwards Ellis Essmann Fahland Featherstone Feuerstein Fierhammer 41 Fleming Foss Fosterling Gage Garfoot Gaskell Georgi Gerlach Gillis Gilman Godfrey Good Graham Graper Groelle Haag A. Hahn C. Hahn Haines Hanson Harper Hartcnberger Hnss Herreid Hinkle Holtz Horkan Howard Hugill Hulick Hungerford C. Jacobson H. Jacobson Jeffrey L. Johnson V. Johnson Kingsland Klein Korpal Kroening Lobstreter Luckow McGary McGrath Miller Miller Murdock E. Nelson Pfefferkorn Ransom Rogers Schley Nerbovig Onsrud Place Rennemo Rohde Schoenmann Nickos Parsons Pounder Reid Roherty Schmitt Powell D. Richardson Romaine Schreiber Priske G. Richardson Rose Schroeder Prouty Riesch Saunders Schultz ' Scola Sherman Simonson Slauson Smith Speck Stamm Stacker Steiber Stein Stobie Stock Strohacker Stromberg Sundberg Teske Tonn Torhorst Torrey Torsrud Tyvand Vincent Walker Wutke Wentzel Weckler Weiss Welkc Welkos West Westlake Wezeman Williams Winn 0 Every Thursday afternoon at 3:45 Mr. Roseman and the Seniors discuss Wreacher Personality, in the High School Assembly . . . the above picture proves that most of them were there physically but not mentally. 0 February 9 finds the Juniors casting their votes for Prom King . . . no stuffing of the ballot box was said to have taken place but the top picture proves that Louise Bayer, Harry Hulick, and Miriam Ellis were not constantly on the job. WRW completed at least 28 semester . memories for second year . . . credits . . . sophomore classification . . of large frosh class dispelled when meet even larger class of "greeniesh. . . . Enrollment much easier than year before . . . can find E301 without trouble . . . know where the bank is . . . fees up to $22.00 this year . . . include hMinnieh . . . courses easier to lay out . . . many familiar faces. . . . Do not stop with end of book line . . . step right . locate new sponsor in Mr. J. J. Chopp . . . magical biology instructor . . . inspired class with versatile ideas. . . . into activities . . Though underrclassmen, sophomores prove their . outstanding in all activities . . . three members on cheer leading squad . . . Glenn Keuler, Bill Fulton, and John McCombemake more noise mettle . . KGXQAGM 022:5 MULLEN, BAHR, LEE than ever heard in stadium . . . most popular boy and girl both from sophomores . . . hSkiph Mullen and hBeeh Brennan . . . elected by student body at Joe Kollege Party . . . Earl Fritz and Eddie Gulan named on AIIIConference football squad . . . others winning letters . . . A1 Farina and Dave Wirth . . Wilbur Sweet represented school in swimming meet at Janesville . . . Denny Sattler and Harold Fuchs go to Kenosha for Golden Gloves tournar ment . . . Fuchs lost decision in final bout . . . Shatz tuck and Farina stand out on Basketball squad. . . February 4 Class goes social as a group . . . spon' sored first allzschool mixer of second semester . . . music by Karl Keppe . . . mixing by Mr. Wells, social chairman, and Mr. Chopp . . . write your name and hunt for your partner. . . . Olaf Lee represents school at extempore contest at Illinois Wesleyan University on December 2 and 47 Top Picture-Bottom Row: Gyland, Beighley, Gutzmer, Jerome, Adamski, Bierbaum, Aldrich, Bjorklund. Second Row: Dunbar, Frey, Flister, Clapper, Millis, Gilbert, Chesemore, Kroken, Boyd. Third Row: Cartier, Doering, Boos, Gardiner, Gehrlich, Bahr, Brennan, Karpen. Fourth Row: Goodman, Ford, Fulton, Graves, Finney, Dudley, Smiley, Funk, Arvold. Fifth Row: Fry, Fridie, Fronek, Fritz, Arnold, Cooper, Frank, Boutelle. Top Row: Fuchs, Conley, Gulan, Buckingham, Copeland, Loretti, Anich, Anderson, Curi. Bottom PicturHBottom Row: Benn, Jacobson, Knudtson, Baron, Berg, Hummel, Farney, Henry. Second Row: Keegan, Kuba, Haase, Ketterl, Hutchinson, Koenings, Henderson, Church, Bancroft. Third Row: Goerlitz, Feldt, Farrow, Bullock, Jacobs, Arnold, Hanchman, Cronin. Fourth Row: Sattler, Kamnetz, Graske, Haasl, Howe, Keuler, Hunt, Kresen, Harnden. Fifth Row: Hoefs, Heller, Fritz, Edwards, Jackson, Coalwell, Johnson, Kolb. Top Row: Bellas, Greig, Droegkamp, Keel, Engelstad, Conforti, Helgerc, Bull, Ludden. 3 . . . also won honors at local debate tournament and discussion contest . won third place in latter. . . . Class led by Olaf Red Lee . . . vivacious orator from Deeriqeld . . . active in debate . . . president of forensic association . . . treasurer of Chi Delta Rho . . meris chorus, and L. S. C. S. . . . James Skip, Mullen . . most popular man . . . viceipresident . outstanding athlete at Milton high school . . . carried over to college . . . plays on football and 48 basketball squad . . . broke rib in football game . . . member of Sigma Tau Gamma . . . A rose between two thorns . . . Ruth Baht . . . . . . brownteyed brunette Alpha Sigma from Doylesf secretarY'treasurer town . . . Frenchrhorn player in band and orchestra $ec0nd only to Bis y . . . Scholarship is no problem for sophomores . . . placed 38 on honor roll for first semester . . . Jane Bjorklund made straight ' A s . a class putting in a powerful bid for recognition. 49 ??rejAm en REESE, KNILANS, GREENHALGH Mali 30221159242 gm are the Freshmen . . . C. J. Daggett reveals results of intelligence tests . . tile . . . only 9 per cent in lower . . . not iidumhh . . . history. . . . . 83 per cent in upper quarr iigreenii but 395 enroll for largest class in Confused mob go through traditional enrollment line . . . helped by iiBig Sisters" . . . already rushed by fraternities and sororities . . . photographed by "Minnieii photogs . . . standing in line over half an hour only to find i: is the wrong line . . . cards to . books to carry home to give that iicollege" 100k. . . . fill out t . . money to hand over . . Girls taken to annual bonfire and sing at the 01d log cabin . . . songs and dancing . . . refreshments . and the trip to get acquainted with President Yoder at his home . . . help to relieve that home! sick feeling of the first night . . . allrschool mixer 3'0 the first weekend away from home . . . 110 wish to leave now. . . . Greenness soon wears off . . . faculty reception at Bassett House . . . Miss Holcombe waves green flag as she addresses iiwe greenies" . . . fraternity smokers . . . sorority parties . . . teas . . . treated like royalty . . . wait untilpledged . . . Soon step out to show their abilities and talent . . . Mary Jane Beneditz winner of national Constitution essay conr test . . . Jesse Banta wins McMains four year voice scholarship. . . . Popular choice at class election . . . Ivan Reese, president . . . City High is his Alma Mater . . . athletics favorite sport . . . decided to Change to music . . . member of a cappella Choir, band, orr chestra, and merfs chorus . . . Art Greenhalgh for Viceepresident . . . ranked 6th out of 103 in graduz ating class at Baraboo . played football and 30111 G 250116 badsea Be le Beacbs Boshex! $ 11$ 0110111 310$ $111153 1w 1' 9011. N1 5a 11132310111160. 366:3: Tbkawg dea Va 6an 311111000er113, Cog. 559W denck $01111: :dbegtias 13 M 011a 150 0115 gm CXa M? a 0001: edxmiow Pfdgegw 103131560 XXng'ADa Y9; 30W avg, 131:,cw, 911115111351W$a 101:;31. 592:153 3633': :QeMda ho mE'A $39 1 M50115 To? gov?- Maw 0nd Row: : cGa11ag1161', Francis. Fran , Greenh 1131g11, ge1sta , ewey Sec 5, Duehning, D Fisher.Th1rd Row D01an, Da , 1 E , 1 ' curt rth Row:Fam11ng, Derivan, gherty Davidson, eson, , - 11612 Froemm m1ng Famey, En T1omas Georg Engan, ngebretsen, runewa1d Gray, Fer E5011, an a. D21 t ow. Fee Gu111ckson.Ge11r1, guDoughs Top Row: Dey ock Graves, Gardner, Erickson, Fero. ow: gom R. 6 3 0 W' 099 a , WKEAFM owzw. vaiw: . . ' m ksO SEW aka Hg 8. 3th onw . YD gigt. dkaS, ke'fs ' u mi a o m X . Le CY a Xa$aMansaeLeW $ 'Wim a tom ow;n1giocii$x Ldezbudehk Bot ehm 3 n. gnmws, 936w ex: Cxdw LWd es 0X33ngN AW! ' LS; Kkedfivbit, work as well as scholarship . . . Dr. E. H. Evans again chosen sponsor of beginning class. . . . W.S.G.A. council adds Mildred Littlejohn, Elin basketball . . . also held class offices . . , Mary abcth Henderson, Maxine Davidson, Marion Hed, Knilans was only woman to gain office . . . product and Pat Plumb . . . athletics draw great supply of of College High . . . outstanding in extracurricular power from Frosh . . . nine men received letters in 52 football . . . Jim Barker, Carl Chesnik, Art Cullen, Karl Fryday, Howard Olson, Walter Shinkus, and Clem Wisch . . . Basketball draws more with Don Gau, Allen Hoyum, John Farney, Erbine Krause, VVillard Pitzner, and Jim Henderson seeing action . . . In the cheering held, Marion Hed and Josephine Stajncrt get the boys to yell . . . HO" also elected new drum major . . . shows how to twirl the old VI b1 Bottom Row: Weber, Thingstad, XVood. J. Ward, G. Zimmerman, Wolfe, Trost, Trescher. Second Row: Wilber, I. Zimmerman, Thurber, Taylor, VVashburn, Zander, A. Walsh, Wergint VVentworth. Third Row: Wolfenzien, Walther, Trachte, Udey, Wisch, Thialen, Wezeman. Wagner. Fourth Row: Tilburg, Stejani, F. Walsh, H. Olson, Serfling, Truesdale, Watrous, Wilson. Fifth Row: Theologc, Thomas, Yelton, Traynor, Slattery, Shinkus, Thayer, H. Ward. Top Row: Meyer, Schmidlkofer, StauHacher, Winsor, Wilson, Young, Vandermause. baton . . . Swimming team boasts Francois Judkins, Walter Radowski on winning team. . . . uHell Week" for pledges find new romances . . . result of byes'no" dates . . . new talent found as put into action by actives . . . trips to cemetery . . . bricks to count . . . fence posts to erect . . . lanterns to carry . . . shoes to shine . . . floors to scrub . . . the pledges really can take it. . . . Give visiting debaters something to talk about . . sponsor mixer during tournament, February 18 . music by Chappie Lefhngwell . . . journalistic field invaded in early May . . . take over guiding reins of the Royal Purple for an issue . . showed how to put it on top. . . . Intelligence proven when 48 make honor roll . . . . College Life and Problems outstanding . . . twice a week . . . learn technique of library from Miss Knilans . . . life from Dr. Nelson and visiting speakers . . . blind school presents music program . . . braille system explained in detail . . . Dr. Lee speaks on Crime . . . Lieutenant Young . . . Speech Clinic. . . . Classes come right in stride . . Commercial students find well rounded program . . . penmanship from bDaddyh Tice really puts s4 rhythm in their souls . . . Algebra and bGeneology" from Mr. Goff as well as new parlor tricks with figures . Phy. Ed. from Agnew and Goodhue puts new Vigor in the muscles . . . stiffness too . . . Henry VIII with a little English History on the side from Dr; Evans. . . . Academic frosh must decide what to do and have much more liberty in choosing than do Com, mercial . . . what to major in and how to fix out the program to have most leisure time . . . Geoge raphy held trips . . . nrst sign of spring fever. . . . Miss Williams shows future kindergartners the how,s and why,s of teaching the kiddies . , . fundar mentals of music from hjordy" adds to apprecir ation of music . . . playground work brings real bliferlikeh situations and child problems to the foreground. . . . Rural aspirants look forward to cadet work and . Mrs. Wheeler actual practice in the schools . . trims off the rough edges. . . . Freshmen now . . . they have come to stay . . . a place already made by them . . . in all activities. among the top 0 Front entrance to Hamilton Gym basketball scenes like the insert are common :ZEEEthCMHfAXetzcg COACH C. H. tCHICIQ AGNEW . . . Dean of Conference Coaches . . . completed twenty successful years at Whitewater. . . . Active in handling Frosh Gym classes tupper lefo and Sophomore Gym Theory Classes on the Gridiron every afternoon at 3:30 teaching newcomers to block and tackle tupper righD . . . getting old and new alike in trim for action . . . Present at all games . . . rain or shine . . . s own going to field with ball tmiddle leftt and in conferencee With Kaeser and McCoy tmiddle righO . . . Uower lefo Chick and Ernie Kaeser in a typical pose while watching a game . . . He is always ready in case of an injury as can be seen in the lower center picture. At his desk in the Gym Uower rlghtt . . . dark suit, white shirt. and black bow'tie . . . Director of College Athletics . . . directs all Physical Education for men . . . Coaches football, basketball, and track . . . directs intramural activities of all kinds . . . basketball, swimming, boxing, tennis, etce Chick started duties at W'hitewater in February, 1919 . . . graduated from here . . . starred on football and baseball teams while in school . . . Now rated as the oldest coach in the line of duty in the Southern Conference . . . highly respected by coaches and students alike. Bottom Row: Heller. VJirth, P. Lewein, DickhoE, Hulick, McCoy, Bronsont Conforti. Coach Agnew. Second Row: Gulan, Ludden, Ott. Austin, Cullen, Olson, Koenings, Arvold, Chesnik. Top Row: Barker, Wisch, M. Lewein, Ransom. Strohackcr, Fritz, Lyon, Plyer. Truesdale. W0" 6M Sponwu 8W9 tournament organized for first time in school... in keeping with motto of club "to get more students participating in athleticsw . . . all men who desire may enter . . . large turneout. . . . Boxing is latest of intramural sports sponsored by ""W men . . . tennis in spring . . . basketball in winter . . . swimming . . . golf. . . basketball tourna! ment largest ever this year. . .. Besides intramural sports for college men, the club sponsors the district class iiBii high school basketball t0urnament...inc1udes many southern W'isconsin high schools . . . boys are shown real sportsmanship . . . one of many ways Club has to induce athletes to attend Whitewater...aid the young boys to find places to room, board, and work. . . . Organization is composed of twentyefive men . . . must have earned MW in one of major sports to be eligible for membership . A . new members receive pins on admittance . . . group helps members in purchasing "purpleii sweaters to back letters . . . club pays half . . . members stand rest . . . graduate ing seniors are awarded blankets at finish of year Of in good standing . . . finances to back these enterprises made by candy sales at football and basketball games. . . . Members meet in Hamilton Gymnasium the first Tuesday of every month . . . heads get together to find new ways of building the college manis physical status , . . success is proven by activi' tles. . . . The meetings were led this year by Paul Lewein . . . scrappy guard on the football team . . . hails from Milwaukee . . . has been leader on gridiron for four years. . . broke ankle in first conference game this year. . . missed most of season . . . sideline is singingr . . . melts chorus and a cappella choir . . . and plays concertina. . . . Harry Hulick, Junior Class President from James; Ville was, vicelpresident . . . made his letters in basketball . . . three years of competition already and one more to go . . .broadcasts football games in fall. . . . Ralph Ott, another Senior football star from Milwaukee . . . . . four years of steady work in backfield is his record. . . . secretary and treasurer . Coach C. H. Agnew sponsored the group. F ootball Bottom Row: Schmitt, Strohacker, Sherman, Gulan, Klann, P. Lewein, Ply, M. Lewein, McCoy, Bronson. Second Row: Kaeser, Stejani, H. Barker, Boutelle, Huschka, Karabetsos, Wisch, Molnar, J. Barker, Farina, Agnew. Third Row: Opitz, Fritz, Whitnall, Shinkus, Mayer, R. Koenings, Douglas, A Cuilen, Olson, Brittelli. Fourth Row: Arvold, Chesnik, Wirth, Fryday, Lyon, Peters, Mullen, Ransom, Mathison. Fifth Row: Ferguson, Mueller, YVard, Ortmann. Injasoulian, Tabaka, Judkins, Sattler, Jansky. Top Row: Hoefs, Austin, Shattuck, Bull, Graves, Sundberg, R. Cullen, Clowes, Dudley. OW fade 7am for third place in conference standing. ..defeats seven men donned suits for practice . . . solid by Platteville and Milwaukee ruined chances of background of veterans including Captain Will championship for second year...early season Sherman, McCoy, Ransom, Dickoff, P. Lewein, prospects looked good . . .Agnew met largest turnz Bronson, Arvold, Gulan, Strohacker, Plyer, Ott, out Of candidates in his twenty years...eightyl Schmitt. and M. Lewein . . . Freshmen turned out in droves with many promising men...Barker, Chesnik, Cullen, Fryday, Olson, Shinkus, and Wisch all looked good. . . . Coach Agnew had hard task outlined...t00 many fellows for one man to handle properly . . . late fall made the weather too warm for real drill ...f1ghting mosquitoes added much to the task ...did manage to get the boys in shape for first tussle . . . was able to put three full teams on 'ICaPtain Sherman calls the field against Milwaukee Extension. . .. Wlmy, for Whltewater to k give the team a chance to , clean the mud from faces, Backfield coach, Erme Kaeser, returned to help Agnew after second game . . . had a week to put the boys in final shape before the first conference game against Platteville . . . October 8 . . . compe' tition previous had been too weak for real test. . . . Two defeats came in first and last conference games . . . both on foreign helds. . . . Victors tied for first honors . . . though Quakers did not lead the conference as in 1937, they did gain national recognition . . . Eddie Brietz, Associate ed Press Sports Writer, mentioned the purple outfit on three different occasions . . . the lighted tower signifying victory made the column . . . the super mosquitoes pestered spectators, ate up players, and out'did any bugs ever heard ofeeven New Jersey mosquitoesewhen Brietz got wind of them . ..a suggestion by the columnist that professional scouts should keep an eye on Will Sherman was taken by the Green Bay Packers. ..result is that 11Wi1111 signed a contract to play with that 'kproai team next season . . . first time in history that a southern conference man has been given this opportunity ...nobody can dispute the wise decision of the Packers if they have seen Sherman in action . .. every play is his position . . . did more tackling and punt blocking than any man on the local squad and any other conference team. . . . Three Whitewater men were placed on the Southern iiAll'Conference" team by the annual conference of college coaches early in December . . . Captain Sherman was picked for center for his superior work at that position and as a siroving back" on defense. . . Earl Fritz was chosen at end, and Eddie Gulan at quarterback as a result of his excellent kicking throughout the season...Pau1 Lewein and Harvey Bronson were given honorable mention for their work at guard. . . . Wednesday, December 14, marked the end of the football season with the annual banquet for those earning letters . . . Coach Agnew presented twat to twenty deserving men . . . Bronson, M. Lewein, P. Lewein, McCoy, Ott, Sherman, Dick; hoff, Schmitt, Strohacker, Farina, Fritz, Gulan, Wirth, Barker, Chesnik, Cullen, Fryday, Olson, Shinkus, and Wisch on the receiving end . . . six of these men are seniors and have seen their last action on the gridiron for W.S.T.C. . . . fourteen will be returning to form the nucleus of a power house for 1939. o A forward and lateral pass combination from Gulan to Fritz to Strohacker nets ten yards against Mission House before 1iStroii is brought to the ground. O GlefO Whitewater line stops an Oshkosh play dead at the line of scrimmage. eRighQ Dave Wirth intercepts a Jordan pass. WHITEWATER 38 2 MILWAUKEE EXTENSION 0 First game of season after two weeks of fundaI mentals . . . September 24, on home field. . . Agr new saw the "cream" of 87 candidates in action for flrst time . . . prospects of power . . . three full teams saw action . . . entire Freshman team in game by beginning of second quarter . . . scqre 190 at half . . . veterans saw very little action . . . Frosh standouts were Brittelli, Farina, Chesnik, and Fry day. . . . WHITEWATER 54 - MISSION HOUSE 7 Second game on home field . . . October 1 . . . competition again not strong enough to test real strength . . . Freshmen again saw most of the action . . .visitors scored only time in first part of second half . . . Plymouth boys could not cope with superior ability and reserve power of Whitewater team . . . ball in Mission territory most of game . . . mosquitoes drove spectators home early. . . . WHITEWATER 0 - PLATTEVILLE 7 October 8 at Platteville saw ms: conference game . . . also nrst real competition . . . Platteville-Jldark horsell 0f the conferenceestepped into light . . . dampened championship hopes of Agnew and team . . . outstanding play of local team came in last 60 quarter. . . Klann intercepted a Platteville pass . . . ran sixtyeyards . . . team could not take advantage of this opportunity . . . Paul Lewein, all conference guard . . . left game and team for season with a broken ankle. . . . WHITEWATER 6 2 STEVENS POINT 0 October 15 on home field . . . Homecoming . . . alumni in stands . . . rain and muddy field . . . tradir tional enemy, Stevens Pointeperfect setup for Homecoming game . . . Quakers retained reputar tion for winning 0n Homecoming . . . only one touchdown, but enough . . . came in second quarter with famous lltouchdown pass play" . . . Gulan t0 Wirth for Winning score...Fritz ran 100 yards for touchdown in third quarter. . . called back for stepping out of bounds . . . Olsonls touchdown in last quarter also called back...Sherman, Gulan, and Fritz lead attack throughout game . . . Stevens Point was outclassed in all phases of play. . . . WHITEWATER 21 2 JORDAN COLLEGE 13 Non'conference but outstanding game of season . . . October 22 on home field . . . Marty Gharrity, coach of Jordan College . . . former pupil meets mentor llChickll Agnew . . . game was all Jordanls for first half . . . Jordanled13 t0 0 . . . superior type of play shown . . . Between halves llpeprtalk" spurred on Agnew'is men . . . came back like chamr pions . . . three touchdowns in succession . . . StrOr hacker, Farina, and M. Lewein, carried ball over . . . Farina converted in each case . . . lack of reserve power shown in Jordan team . . . the iimentor" still rules his pupils. . . . WHITEWATER 25 e OSHKOSH 14 October 29 on home fields . . . copy of last years game at Oshkosh . . . scores on opening play . . . Gulan ran 80 yards in first two minutes of game for first score . . . outstanding single play of entire season . . . second touchdown followed in next few minutes . . . third score came in third quarter with a Vicious passing attack down field...Farina to Cullen brought score . . . last score in final quarter after series of line smashes . . . Oshkosh scored fourteen points in early part of second half . . . could not overtake local team . . . Schmitt played excellent defensive game . . . Sherman, Cullen, Wisch, and Fritz outstanding. . . . WHITEWATER 7 e MILWAUKEE 26 Last hopes of championship shattered . . . defeat at hands of Milwaukee, cerchampions with Platter ville , . . pass from Gulan t0 Cullen in third quarter gave only touchdown for Whitewater. . . Farina converted for seven point total . . . local team off form throughout game . . . fumbles were numerous . . . outclassed by superior punting and endwork of 0 Manager Jansky sprays the boysi legs with nFlit" to keep the mosquitos away during prac- tice. Milwaukee. . . failed to take advantage of scoring opportunity in second quarter when the ball was lost on downs 0n the Milwaukee three yard line. . . . A poor ending to a fair season was the last game for Whitewater for seven seniors-Ralph Ott, Harvey Bronson, Ray McCoy, Will Sherman, Matt Lewein, Paul Lewein, and Fran Plyereall members of the championship team of 1937 . . . third place in conference standing is best they could garner against superior playing of Platteville and Milwau' kee, CO'ChampS of southern conference. 0 tLefO Capt. Sherman and Schmitt break up a run near the sideline with Ott ready to prevent any slips. tRighQ Al Farina gets going on a ten yard run to Stevens Pointis 25 yard line. Basketball Bottom Row: Farina, Krausc, Hoyum, Pitzner, Smith, Gau, Plyer. Second Row: Coach Agnew, Lyon, Shattuck, Boutelle, Austin, Farney, Koenings, Hulick. Top Row: Hoefs, Bohlman, Radowski, Henderson, Hermsen, Koth, Jansky. 94W Wei 7W in GM with four wins and four losses . . . Coach Agnew was faced with nearly fiverscore aspirants from which to Choose a team . . . several key positions to hll . . . returning regulars were Hulick, Shattuck, Hungerford, Koenings, Plyer, Austin, and Lyon . a powerful nucleus for a good team. . . Out of the new material several proved to have the hstuEh required . . . Farina tbrother 0f hPopU, Mullen, Henderson, Hoyum, Boutelle, Hermsen, Krause, Pitzner, and Gau...backed up veterans and pushed them for positions. . .. Seasonhs play opened on the local court on Saturday, December 10. . . opposition was Aurora College . . . didnat have power to stop Purple . . . score ended 57 t0 6...Agnew used twenty'one men of whom ten were new. . . much power diSt played . . . The next game against Northwestern 62 on December 12 was a repetition of the hrst one . . . decidedly Whitewaterhs all the way . . . . Mis' sion House came next on list and ended like the Score at end was 53 to 33 Whitewater . . two preceding . . . Whitewater by a score of 32 to 17 . . . Gau, Pither, and Hoyum outstanding of the new men played by Agnew. . . . Conference play started at Platteville on January 6. . . first defeat of season by score of 48 to 45 . . .Whitewater missed 14 free throws. . . Koenr ings out of the game due to an injured ankle . . . Austin started piling scores with sixteen in this game . . . Plyer and Can each had eight points. . . . Another noneconference game with Milton gave the boys :1 chance to brush up a bit . . . won 51 to 43 . . . Hoyum, Austin, and Plyer did most of the playing and scoring . . . Hoyum netted eight points in three minutes. . . . Milwaukee at Whitewater, January 17 . . .highv est total score and most fouls called in history of Hamilton Gym . . . Whitewater fmished flrst by 58 to 38 . . . 53 fouls were called . . . Koenings returned to action and played a stalwart game . . . Hoyum was llhotll . . . got 21 points. . . Austin again netted 16 points. . . . In a wild game at Stevens Point the local team was beaten by a 40 to 30 score...later won because of forfeit. . .Nimz, highrscorer of the game, was ineligible. . . . Avenged a defeat by beating Platteville . . . rough game with four men going out on fouls . . . score of 37 to 24 gave Whitewater the lead of the conference. . . . Lead was only temporary as Oshkosh handed out a pretty trimming . . . 49 to 37 . . . the next week, February 2 . 1 . Plyer, star guard, was out of the game with an infected foot, . . . At Milwaukee, February 14, the Gulls returned the medicine received here . . . Hoyum watched by two men all night A . . Milwaukee won 55 to 35 . . . Quakers off form . . . made only live of nine teen free tosses . . . Austin netted fourteen points. February 24, Oshkosh defeated the locals on our floor by 32 to 29 score . . . free throws won the game. . . Oshkosh played a superior type of ball ...C0ntrolled rebounds and outplayed Whiter water. . . . The last game of the season . . . Stevens Point on local floor . . .Whitewater won by a 43 to 36 score . . . neck and neck all through the game . . . Hoyum missing from line'up because of "Hull. . . outstandr ing game of season with Austinls shots from corner catching everybodyls attention. . . . With a total final standing of ten wins and four losses, the Quakers placed behind Oshkosh and Milwaukee in conference standings. . . Austin was lldeadeeye" garnering highrpoint honors of conr ference . . . Plyer came through with the outstandr ing season of his career. . . both Austin and Plyer will graduate in spring...have completed their service for Whitewater. . . . Shattuck, Gau, Farina, Hermsen, Koenings, and Lyons played outstanding ball all season to con! tribute materially to successful season , . . much material to back them for championship team next year. 0 tLefO A mad scramble for the ball under Platteville's basket. tRighO Plyer, Hoyum, and Shattuck ready for the rebound of 3 Milwaukee shot. Track 7W Place SW in state meet for second consecutive year... beaten out by Milwaukee both times. . .. Forty cinderrlovers reported to the hrst call in spring...f1ve letter men were among that group ...Goers, Rowbotham, Leahy, Wendorf, and Strohacker. . . . First competition came on April 26...trave1ed t0 DeKalb for triangular meet between DeKalb, Milwaukee, and Whitewater. . . Strohacker scored only first for Purple by coming through in the low hurdle event . . . competition was too tough for rest of the boys. . . . Milton College was an easy "take'1 on the local track on May 2 . . . 88M; to 313K; . . . Fran Ludden and Kenneth Keuper outstanding with eleven points each . . . Ludden placed first in the 440 yard and 220 yard dash, third in broad jump, and ran on the winning mile relay team. . . . Keuper, Freshman star, collected a third in 120 yard highrhurdles, first in shotrput, and flrst in javelin. . .. May 7 saw Oshkosh at Whitewater . . . Purple group won with sixteen point margin . . .won seven out of thirteen events. . . Ludden and Ken! per again caught the laurels...each won five events...all of the dashes, the hurdles and the shotput. . . . The annual Milwaukee, Oshkosh, Whitewater triangular meet was held on May 21 at Oshkosh. ...Milwaukee won with Whitewater a close second....Fran Ludden again came through in the clashes . . .won the 220 yard and the 440 yard . . . the most exciting race of the day when Ludden nosed out Moore of Iinlwaukee in the 440... Keuper won ten points with a broad jump of 19 feet 8 inches and a shotput 0f 41 feet...Str0r hacker came into the light in the low hurdles which he won easily. . . . Competed against Milwaukee, LaCrosse, Oshr kosh, and Stevens Point in the State meet on May 28 . . . held on local track . . . garnered 331A; points for easy second to Milwaukee, last yeafs champs. . . . Strohacker took the low hurdles in record time for a first . . . Goers netted a second in the discus throw . . . Ludden placed third in the 220 yard dash and second by less than a yard in the 440 yard . . . the relay team brought home a second. Bottom Row: Strohacker, Ludden, Christianson, Funk, Leahy, Haasl, Yankow, Glassco. Second Row: Coach Agnew, Stein, Rowbotham, Jackson, Goers, Stecker, Keuper, Bull, Koenings, Loomer, Whitnall, Kettwig. 64 Miscellaneous Athletics $Wfo414ll is the theme of the Whitewater Athletic Depart, ment under the direction of C. H. Agnew . . . Continually working for enlarged athletic program to include all men students . . . Between his duties as coach of major sports, Agnew finds time to act as director of intramurals . . . assisted by Bill Hoefs . . . MW Club aids by sponsoring and helping about . . . referee the tournaments. . . . INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL is the oldest of the allestudent activities. . . still the most pop- ular...this yezlris tournament drew more and better players than ever before. . . started on January 12 . . . 140 players on 16 teams . . .teams named after colleges and universities over the country. . . played two games a night and two or three nights a week . . . After four weeks of play, four teams still in running . . . Lyola, Detroit, Butler, and Minnesota played off championship . . . Lyola won . . . The winners were captained by Klein and backed by Barney, Breese, C. Arvold, R. Arvlod, Olson, McQuade, Meyers, and Graves . . . Butler won second place . . . Champs receive gold basketballs while second place men get silver medals . . . Trachte 0f the Minnesota team was high point man of the tourney. . . netted a total of 101 points in 6 games. . .. SWIMMING CLUB organized for first time last fall . . . Mr. Chopp sponsors group with Wilr O Croph Track men get off on a 100 yard dash in meet with Oshkosh on local Cinders . . . tSeconcD Strohacker displays the hurdle style which gave him many points during the season . . . tThird1 Keuper in a sweat suit practicing his get-away . . . hBottomh Intramural Champs show their fighting spirit under basket. bur Sweet as coach...aroused much enthusiasm . . . thirty conteStants turned out for the all'school meet . . . prizes given . . . Members teach those who cant swim the fundamentals . . . Team or, ganized which competed against Janesville High School and La Crosse Teachers. . . . TENNIS again drew many aspirants with ability . . . team finally organized which gained second place in the state meet held at Stevens Point on May 27 . . . rain caused a move to Oshkosh to play on dry courts . . . Luckow and Boutelle in doubles brought home the bacon...0ther competition against Milton, Northwestern, Milwaukee, and La. Crosse. . . A GOLF fans saw their sport executed in fine style for the second year at Whitewater . . . Veterans Koeppen, Mode, Knilans, and Bowyer defeated Milwaukee, Oshkosh, and Milton in early season to make a record of nine straight wins in two years . . . took third place in state meet at Oshkosh on May 27 with a total of 654 strokes. . . Mode was low man with 158 strokes . . . Mr. Bigelow again coached teami . . . BOXING was started for the hrst time late this year . . . Intramural tournament took place April 19 and 20 with about twentyrfive men competing in two nights. 0 iToph It,s a good two points for the iibare-backsi, in an intramural game . . . iSecondh The newly organized swimming club relaxes between iidipsii on the ledge of the Gym pool . . . tThirdh Racqueteers Boutelle, Burch, Baker, and Ransom pause from their practice to give the photographer a picture . . . tBottomh Bowyer, Mode, Koeppen, and Knilans, represented Whitewater on the greens in nine straight victories. Girls Athletics under the able direction Of Miss Florence Goodhue and Miss Marcella Thomson . . . yearls Helen . . sister to last . keeping a watching eye on an increasing number of girls is a bigger task each year . health equipment kept in shape and in . weightsmust be Checked carefully . . watched . . . USE. . . . As Director of Womenls Athletics, Miss Good! hue fmds it her job to teach the Freshmen and Sophomores the art of various sports besides uhow to teach themll . . . Gym Theory at 8:1? every day . . . Gym floor work Classes go on all day long. ..everything from PingIPong to Archery and Hockey . . . College Seniors down to hrst 0 Miss Thomson and M?ss Goodhue inspect the archery equipment prior to the spring season. graders in the Training School fmd her directions helpful and interest, 11151.... Outside of her coaching work, Miss Goodhue sponsors W.A.A. and W.S.G.A. . . . two most active or ganizations on the campus . . . also her duty to keep tab on all of the girls who do not get home on time .llcards" enough in her offxce to hold a Card Party. . . stories enough to write a book . . . at least an edition of llCollege Humorll . . . always ac tive in behalf of the girls of school ...llkeep them healthy physically, mentally, and nlorally.l is motto of Miss Goodhue. . . . Miss Thomson replaced her sister when the latter became the wife of a prominent local printer . . . Miss Goodhuels rightehand "man" . .. takes care of the recreation program of the rural school . . .teaches col; lege students dancing . . . tap and natural . . . object is graceful motion and perfection of execution . .. swimmingr classes have increased and become more popular than ever with her at head . . . Senior life saving awards given for first time . . . hardly enough archery equipment to take care of prospects... rhythmic analysis introduced this year . . . taught by Miss Thomson. . . . Each year the Womens Sports become more varied . . . added a shufflerboard court this year . . . has proved to be popular sport . . . llTen offll pop! ular lodging place for discs . . . tournament n60 essary to settle competltion. . . . Womenk Athletic Association W; 14. 74. EM hit a new high in membership figures . . .W.S.G.A. rooms too small to hold meetings . . . had to hold them in High School assembly . . . Freshmen were initiated Monday, September 19 . . . dancing, ch00 olate milk, and cookies featured. . .. Doing a fme job of leading this group is Alberta Martens . . . commercial senior ath1ete, musiz cian, and debater . . . Wilma Hass was chosen viceIpresident by group . . . Verna Mae Johnson, secretary . . . Carol Yoder, treasurer . . . Miss Goodhue sponsors group. . . . WewMeMm... Regular meetings held every iirst and third Mon! day of month . . . business and social events dis, cussed and carried on. . . . Various activities are carried on and honor points are awarded for participation...regular attendance at meetings . . . winning contests . . . playing in contest . . . membership on honor teams . . . two points per hour for participation . . . all count for total of 600 points to Win a purple W ...1000 points entitles owner to a white flannel jacket with the later on it. Top Picture Bottom Row: Evans, Drinkwater, Dahl, Burglund, Beeten, L. Christiansen, Holtz, Jackson. Sec- ond Row: Ewalt, Stajnert, Audley, Church, Bancroft, Folkrod, Jacobson, Kraft, Feuerstein. Third Row: Gallagher, Engan, Fleming Cordts, Baumgartner, Frank, Addie, Cronin. Fourth Row: Hass, Haesler, Doering, Hanchman, Gillis, Bender, Collins, Hill, Bullock. Fifth Row: Clark, N. Christenson, Boos, Dewey, Brunswick. Bahr, Hart, Dobbs. Top Row: Hahn, Janz, Harpen Ess- mann, Juntwaite, Brunk, Johnson, Benn, Bailey. Bottom Picture Bottom Row: Martens, O Connor, Zehme, Wright, Marshall, Stoik, Yoder, Millenbah, Kildow, Second Row: Sturtevant, Zafis, Loss, Mansur, Kingsland, McKinley, Wagner, Wezeman, Goodhue. Third Row: B. J. Rose, A. Rose, Wollenzien, Trescher, Walsh, Kallestad, J. Walker, Schunk. Fourth Row: James, Tibbitts, Weber, M. Millis, Pepper, Moore, McMahon, McGary, Founder. Fifth Row: V. Millis, Marks, Miller, Vincent, Marx, Tess, Scola, Keegan. Sixth Row: D. Peterson, Koenings. Johnson, Georgi, Ward, Sundberg, M. Walker, Riesch, Zimmerman. Top Row: Beede, Lemker, Mohns, Krueger, P. Peterson, Romaine, Sucharski, Yochum, Lough. Letter and Jacket Women Back Row: Kreft, Founder, Martens, Riesch, XVn'ght, Yoder, Juntwaite, Collins, Church, Pepper, Hass. Seated: Johnson. Bancroft, Brunk, Stoik, Harper, Pippel, Keegan. 14mg 14M New 14W All interested women may joint W.A.A. . . .over 125 interested . . . carried on more activities than any other organization on campus . . . early fall to late spring, . t . First; action shown last fall by going camping ...annual trip postponed from preceding spring . . . weekend of September 23 . . . Lake Ripley was scene . . . r10 hroughing it". . . had two cottages with radios and 3.11 modern conveniences...girls enjoyed swimming, canoeing, horseback riding, and hiking. . . . Athletes began to get in action early. . . hockey aspirants fought mosquitoes to begin practices . .. learned new ways of dodging their opponents by dodging the "buzzers". Hinterrclass competition held as well as games among various teams picked from group . . . varsity fmally chosen composed of: Martens, Sundberg, Bancroft, Founder, Hass, Koenings, Riesch, Johnson, Juntwaite, Clark, and Fleming . . . October 18 the varsity played against Milwaukee on the Milwaukee Downer field and were defeated . . . November 19 they beat Carrol on the same field. . . . When the weather forces the girls to move in! side, their attention turns to basketball, volleyball, and swimming . . . participation among members in various kinds of tournaments and contests lends interest to the sports and t0 the group . . . Play Days for outside competition keep the spirit up . . . teams are picked to participate from those showing up best in local competition...this yearhs Play Days were at DeKalb on February 25, Wisconsin University on March 4, and Carrol on March 25 . . . the girls send basketball, volleyball, and swim, . . Milton college played basketball and were guests at a social hour on March 6. in the local gym. . . . ming teams . PingrPong is considered a minor sport . . . high interest nevertheless . . . sixteen players entered in tournament . . . Marion Marx winner. . , . The newest sport of all . . . shufHeeboard . . . proved most popular. . . tournament held in which Ellen Peters and Mary Helen OhConner defeated Mildred Meyer and Margaret McGrath for the championship. . . . Miss Thomson handles the pingrpong and shufHeroard along with her classes in dancing, archery, and badminton . . . winter season is a busy one for the Gymnasium . . . in use at all times. . A . With spring out come the bows and arrows and tennis racquets . . . the knoll on Graham Street is a 69 0 Basketball games become most exciting during the winter months in the gym. Even though girlst rules are used . . . plays are worked out with the aid of Miss Goodhue and the captains. 0 During the second nine weeks volleyball games are most pop- ular. After learning the technique of hitting the ball, teams are chosen and tournaments held. 0 Every first hour on Monday and Wednesday, the tank in Hamilton Gym is given over to the girls interested in swimming. Senior life saving awards were given this year for the first time. O Rhythmic Analysis . . . intro- duced to the students this year by Miss Thomson is a form of natural dancing with the rhythm analyzed. Tuesday and Thursday at four oiclock is the regular practice hour . . . but practice outside of class is necessary if you want to remember the steps. 0 Marion Marx . . . champion ping-pong player for second year is shown practicing some trick plays. She is willing to play anybody and will be out to win the championship again next year. 0 Hockey games are played and tournaments are held in early fall. This year the girls not only learned to dodge the ball, but learned to dodge mosquitoes as well. Imam umm- i l I 6m m dangerous place to stroll . . . while the tennis courts are in constant use . . . girls applying the principles learned in classes . . . proper grip, stroke, and stance. . . . The girls have other interests besides active come petition in athletic events . . . meetings held every first and third Mondays of month are scenes of interest . . . business is discussed . . . speakers enter' tained . . . social hours held. . . . The initiation party held on September 19 was a hilarious affair. . . early in the fall Miss Thomas lectured and showed pictures of her recent Western Trip...on December 6, Miss Jane Whitney of Milwaukee spoke . . . she is member of the United States hockey team . . . told of her trip with the team to Australia, New Zealand, and Fiji Islands. . . . Outstanding features of business meetings is the lunch and fun which follow . . . games are played, dancing, and eats. . . . A tradition about the campus is the annual W. A. A. Stunt Night. . . prizes are offered for best stunts . . . $10 for first . . . put across so well that people sit for two hours and are pleased . . . audi' torium packed each year. . . proceeds of Stunt Night applied to getting something that will be useful to student body. A . . Social life is taken as seriously as athletics . . .the Christmas Party held in the Gym on December 5 outstanding. . . 10c gifts were the vogue . . . dolls, cars, bottles and nipples, etc. . ..dancing, games, and more refreshments made the affair a jolly one for the ikChristrnas Spiritfi. . . Milton College treated to a Social Meeting after game March 6. . . . March 31 is another traditional date for W. A. A. members. . .the annual Two and Two party ...one girl dresses as a man and escorts another iifair damselii. . . decorations and programs are provided for this affair by girls and iihermeni, alike. . . . Monday, May 15 rounded off the season for this organization ...0Hicers were elected on April 3...iina1 meeting is a banquet . . . letters and jackets awarded to women at this time. . . . All taken together, W. A. A. provides more activities and a bet, ter rounded program of recreation than any organization on the campus . . . girls constantly betterr ing themselves for their chosen profession physically, men, tally, and morally. O Stance is the important feature of archery so these girls practice faithfully under Miss Thomsonis direction. 0 Most popular form of entertainment on the campus is dancing with music furnished by the popular colleg swing band . . . name 1y Chappieas Campus He ti vz'fied Academic Club Soft .L'W ad Mm provide incentive for the Academic students at their starlight formal November 14 . . . Eddie Theisr senis orchestra played under the sky of blue . . . November 17 is red letter day . . . Superintendent F. C. Bray, Fort Atkinson, speaks . . . importance of good study habits told and listened to . . . but not followed. . . . More about what is expected of a teacher . . . annual banquet at Methodist Church, January 19 . real food . . . plenty of it . . . Professor Jensen 0f Delavan is guest speaker . . . talent out, side the group shown by Violin solo . . . Irene Chape . . . vocal solo . . . Jesse Banta . . . most important talent discovered in group singing. . . . More dancing to give something different . . . 0 Joint parties with commercial club feature dancing to Wayne King and Tommy Dorsey . Jitterbugs go into their dance when swing music comes forth from behind the mike. O Irwin Nye Calls the aca- demic students together on the first and third Thursday of every month to discuss questions of vital import- ance. 74 this time phonograph . . . February 16 . . . More guest speakers . . . Professor Charles Jahn, ElkI horn, March 2 . . . Lyman Jeffords, Fort Atkirr son, May 4 . . To end successful season have last big feed at picnic May 18.. Joint meeting with Thespian . kidsi party . . . results in short dresses . . . hair iibbons, suckers, and dolls. Activities planned by president, Virginia Marsh, and assistant Irwin Nye . Edith Grapentine holds open palm for money and dues . . Floyd Froemming, Bruce Shattuck, George Stobie, Charles Shuman give voice of class opinions as their reprer sentatives . . . J. J. Chopp . . . magician . . . new sponsor. Bottom Row: Wood, Stebbins, Jerome, Johnson, Jacobson. Schilt, Gutzmer. Second Row: Rankins, Zimmerman, Hund, Ottow, Volenberg, Schauffert, Manogue. Third Row: Peach, Fanning, Douglas, McWilliam, Conley, Chadwick. Fourth Row: Lein, Snyder. Littlejohn, Lunde, Recknagcl, Haesler, Audley. Top Row: Gray, Ridgeman, E. Veum, Nuernberg, Beighley, Gyland, Sherman. I. Veum. Kwtmjuf 1.7m RM to American Country Life Association meeting November 2 to 6 . . . University of Lexington host: . . . six rural sophomores, Nora Beighley, Vera Gutzmer, Belle Gyland, Bernice Jerome, Betty Rankins, and Ann Schilt made the trip . . . Mrs. I. U. Wheeler, sponsor, also attended . . . Mrs. Guy Stroup, Mrs. R. G. Wheeler, Naperville, Illir nois, and Miss Ruth Kutz, were chaperons . . . took turns in driving . . . program centered around topic, hDisadvantaged People in Rural Lifeh . . . Visit Berea College . . . given special consideration due to contacts with Rev. Huntingr ton A . . once considered pastorate of local Conr gregational Church . . . lectures and banquets highlights . . . visit to Mammoth Cave and Man, ofrWar. . Initiation of freshmen October 27 . . . no shagging . . . no duties . . . only doughnuts and cider . . . plus ghost stories, halloween games, childrenhs games, and dancing . . . Frances Mickele son provided music . . . Learning to cook is one . . human guinea pigs taken care of at supper meeting, November 14 . . .each member contributed to meal . . . planned before hand. . . . of major activities . No troubles of raising money after selling Jelloe six delicious flavors . . . money in bank . . .proj' ect to become annual . . . Mexico brought to rural rooms by Miss Beckwith at; meeting of November 29 . . . souvenirs of recent trip dis played . . . movies and slides shown . . . cos! tumes in color but no bull tights . . . More trips taken . . . tour to Europe . . . especially Switzer' land and France . . . February 6 . . . chili sup' per . . . Sarah Boyd talked on trip to Chicago with the 4H Club . . . Back to Whitewater again and election of ofhcers. . . . Ann Schilt leads first semester . . . Betty Ran- kins, Viceepresident, calls meeting to order only once during year . . . Frances Conley calls herself sec! retaryztreasurer . A . Evelyn Sherman keeps school posted through the Royal Purple 4 . . Evelyn Sherman elected president for second semester . . . Anita Nuernberg and Virginia Gray were her . Mrs. I. U. Wheeler is the assisting ofhcers . . sponsor. . . . Automatlc membership when enrolled in rural course in September . . . 38 members during pres, ent year . . . dues 25 cents a semester . . . keep money on hand for rainy day . . . meetings, sup! pers, lectures, trips . . . hnally gold Alpha pin awarded each member . . . pride and joy of rural department. 75' Commercial Club 0 At the beginning of the year commercial club meetings were held in the girPs gym every first and third Thursday of the month . . . President Bill Dubats called the meetings to order. Magic edapd 6W4 commerce students to distant places . . . theme . guest speakers give glories of other parts of the world. . . . of meetings is transportation . . Freshmen learn of organization on registration day at end of line . . . pay commercial club dues . . . president Bill Dubats gives whyhs and where thget acquaintedv resolutions made to forehs . . . Further proof , . . party on September 12 . . . join. . . . . increased membership required more room . . . Program chairman Eddie Biedron making long distant calls to provide speakers . . . 325' members hard to . . House committee got tired of lugging changed meetr Gir15s gym new place of meetings . . please . chairs up two flights of stairs . . . ings t0 auditorium. . . . Harold Snell speaks on November 17 . . . as, sistant general manager of Alaska railroad . . . popular belief of icy country dispelled . . . flowers and modern housing seen . . . igloos and icebergs things of ancient history. . . . All'school mixer in Christmas setting adds to prestige and social life of school . . . Santa's stock 76 ing becomes program for dancers . . . Wally Miller5s orchestra shOWs talent of neighbor college . . Ferdinand the Bull comes to life . . . starts round of spring dances on Feb ruary 25 . . . story of the bull given for benefit of all who can read . . . Earl Kemp plays fast and slow to please . . . mostly fast. . . . . . . Milwaukee . Annual banquet at "Con" church closes season of active membership . . . joint meetings with Academic Club features music of Wayne King and Tommy Dorsey from behind the mike. . . . New amplifying system bought by club . . . profit made by renting it out to school organizar tions . . . music by the worlds maestroes for dancing after meetings . . . donation to WAA,A. for stunt night . . . true broadcasts. . . . Magic carpet travels to Sweden under the direo tlon of Miss Bjorklund . . . flrst showing colored moving pictures . . . History of glasses . . . pow, er behind the lens . . . d0 . . . all told in moving pictures. . . . why we see things as we Cabinet meetings with Miss Laura Hamilton, sponsor . . . Bill Dubats as president attended 0 President Bill Dubats . . . active in other extra curricular activities such as Minneiska, 00p left pictura . . . oint dances with academic club held in the girl, ment after the regular meetings etop righo . . . Eating ice cream was t! acquaintedh' parties Renter pictureh . . . Paper ballots ate ha semester ofhcers m the auditorium Umttoml debate, etc. s gym are common entertain- le climax to most of the hget nded out prior to the election of second y g llUt to V6 VICC'P dent Iolln d5 g1 r651 ever meetln SO , . Thora h how her 110 u n - - last etltoget n all e 0 h S H Clt sgene of g Dettman a ch c t r 1 t e eaven y - . ken . . , new in h h ' e drmkmg bro . d he minutes of the last meetl g f more records of coffe all to be Juntwalte rea t . that the program was car - ' to It Eddie Bledronkiy Louise Bayer brought the ried out to a - - . club to headlines in the Royal Purple. ' set ecords of ice cream and p1e r " uet. broken at next years banq Prima'ry Club GWHKGZWWJM by the Primary Club . . for the group in stunt night February 10 . . . . win honorable mention representative of organization . . . verses and . . J for . M for Mullen, . hoping he selects from the drawings of faculty and students hJordyf the music instructor . the prom king . 0 At the Xmas tea held in the halls of the training school, presi- dent Gretchen Hammarlund assisted by the other officers of primary club, poured the tea and entertained the faculty . . . The Campus A B Cs were told by the primary girls at stunt night as shown in the upper right picture . . . Supervision of the playground is only a part of the duties of a primary senior. kindergarten the one to rule the prom . . . short dresses . . . hair ribbons . . gum chewing . . . pranks . . hair pulling . . allwhile the teacher Marjorie Klein turns her back. . . Meetings every fourth Thursday of the month during third hour . called by Gretchen Ham- marlund president . . . all students in Primary Curriculum are members . . . business matters and social life advanced by group. . . . Frances Mickelson tickled the ivories for the annual reception for the freshmen in September . . . girlls gym scene of merriment . . . circus food for refreshments . . . pink lemonade and cookies . . . games played . . . drop the handkerr chief, ring around the rosy, farmers in the dell . . . Critics were guests of the evening . . . start year for kindergartners. . . . Henrietta Holtz wins honor of Vice'president for the entire year . . . plans parties, games, and 160 tures . . . Genevieve Mullen devotes her time to the books . ance in the account at the bank. . . . . . Barbara Dunbar keeps a credit bale On December 12 the halls of the training school took on a Xmas air . . . trees decorated . . . blackboards written with the spirit of the season . windows carried pictures and stories of the merry Xmas time . . . Club rooms decorated . . . meetings . . . carols sung . . . choice of dancing and cards . . . refreshments of ice cream and cookies. . . . Faculty and primary freshmen honored at annual Christmas tea in Hall of training school . . . pres! 0 Primary club held its an- nual Xmas party in the club rooms at their regular meet- ing in December . . . Games were played and Frances Mickelson furnished music for dancing while refresh- ments were served. ident Gretchen poured . . . Christmas carols . . . piano playing . . . Frances Mickelson and Rose Bceten got together on duets . . . loaned tree to music department for their pageant. . . . Valentine's day finds new cupids . . . hearts . . . bows and arrows . . . Danny Cupid worms way into hearts of all who come . . . dancing and novel games . . . Chinese checkers becomes the fad of the entire school . . . dialect and costumes picked up . . . slant of eyes accomplished by glue and tape . . . Rosemary Beeten helps those with dancing feet with piano playing . . . refreshments in red and white show Cupid coming through the Jello dessert, cookies, candies . . . Valentine greetr ings in favors . . . sophomores as hosts really put on a great party. . . . Annual spring formal was no April Fool . . . April 1 in girlls gym honors only primary girls . round up season for members . . . music and decorations . . . much fun with runs in stockings . . . lights out . . . cards at home . . . telephone calls . . . all for April Fool . . . end season for seniors who graduate in June. . . . Farewell to seniors . . . farewell to members . . , looking forward to next year. Minneiska Seated: Connor, Henderson, Koeppen, Bisely, Herreman, Mr. Randall. Second Row: Koth, Marx, Greenhalrh, WolH. M. Collins, Dcttmann, Sundberg, Riesch, D. Collinst Rogers, Gauthier, Bower, Hanson, Kallcstad, Weiss, Heyrman, Dubats, Bayer. file 409$ 10 Galleqe with school activities in pictures . . . groups . . . dances . . . games . . . no privacy . . . Minnie photogs out to get the best in pictures . . . every thing worth taking . 4. . nose for news and eyes for good shots . . . Registration day begins real work . . . Editor, Frances Herreman, and student adz Viser, Bob Schultheis, meet with Mr. Randall for weekly conferences. . . . Original plans gone over again . . . staflC to be organized . . . pictures to be scheduled . . . planks to be erected . . . then the day for the pic tures . . . Mr. Buell out behind the gym peeking from the big black shawl . . . not trying to hide his camera but only himself . . . organization editor, Bill Dubats, calling all short ones down to this end . . . tall ones in front on the chairs . . . not so far from the ground that way. . . . Time out from work for a little recreation . . . National Convention at Cincinnati . . . Fran and Bob with business manager Donald Heyrman and assistant editor Louise Bayer get better acquainted . new ideas . . . better books . . . All'Amerl ican rating on last yeafs Minnie merits picture in Cincinnati Post . . . back again with new ideas . new friends . . . old dummy destroyed . . . new one drawn up. . . . 80 Budget flnally fixed . . . more pictures needed . call meetings of photographers Donald Collins and Melvin Koeppen . . . Monday evenings set to do work . . . midnight oil burned while picture sizes, tone qualities, and shapes are discussed . . . new cuts to be made . . . new faculty members to be interviewed . . . Cameras Click to catch stUr dents unawares . . . private lives probed into to get informal poses . . . then begin the writer 0 Editor, Fran Herreman, and business manager, Don Heyrman get together to dlscuss both the editorial and business side of the Minneiska. Minnie office scene of much activity . . . files . . best ones found on the floor . . . pic! tures being pasted . . . wrong move of the scissors . glue to be used again . . . this time to patch cutework . . t business staff raising funds . . . adr vertising to be solicited . . . students pay dollar from activityfees . . . alumni to be contacted . . . money to be collected . . . Comes March 31 and only the index to be completed . . . copy sent to the printer . . . proofs back again . . . pictures to the engraver . . . short breathing spell until book arrives . . . Banquet held in honor of event . . . farewell to present staff . . . School ends and 1939 Minnie makes its play for the title, "AllIAmerr lean . . . . strewn . Mr. Randall meets business men and sends all work to staff as sponsor . . . Frances Herreman and Bob Schultheis, editor and student adviser, respectively, bear brunt of work . . . Mel Koepe J pen, Don Collins, Bill Dubats, and Louise Bayer see that all pictures are taken and writeeups come plcted . . . Betty Bower draws circles and fits school activities into it . . . Betty Jane Sundberg and Harvey Weiss carry on in the sports world . . . games to attend . . . snaps to be taken . . . writeeups to be written . . . Dorothy Bisely rounds up seniors . . . tries to crowd all their activities 111to one inch . . . Arlisle Wolff does the same for the juniors . . Marion Marx interviews the faculty . . . Jean Miller, Marie Collins, Viola Hzmchman carry on as oHice llboysv . . . called in whenever there is work to do . . . Florence Con! nor, Anna Lou Riesch, Betty Rogers, and Selma Kallestad see that all copy is typed and prooferead . . . Art Greenhalgh, Lloyd Koth assist John Dette mann who assists Donald Heyrman in the business cycle . . . Ed. Gauthier barters for books of other schools . . . all work to put out second AlleAmere iczm yearbook. o Familiar scene in the Domestic Science rooms and around the building shortly after Xmas is Mr. Buell, Lou, and the famous camera . . . tupper lefQ . . . An All-American rating on the 1938 Minnie gave Louise Bayer, Bob Schultheis, and Fran Herreman a chance to get their picture in the Cincinnati Post and also in the Minneiska Gower lefO . . . Minnie photographers, Don Collins and Mel Koeppen work and then play, but are usually too tired to play as shown in the lower right hand picture. THE 120m VOL. 39 Z-841 STATE TEACHERS COLLEQ Interests of Many of Interest to Many Policies Governed By Editorial Board For entire school year . . . All the news worth printing brought to life in weekly paper . . . ofhcial publica- tion of entire student body of college Editorial board directs policies at meetings held once a month . . improvements in paper due directly to board . . . Editor Louise Bayer acts as chairman while assistant ed- itor Mel Koeppen keeps permanent record of issues discussed and decided . . . Paper offlcials and advisors become members of board for one semester . . . gen- eral appearance of paperM how long shall the columns be?ewhat size type shall be used?ewhat style of headlines ? e changing the banner head on front page to give more roomeall de- cided by the big six. . . . Circulation manager Hen- ry Yankow greets all stu- dents with a smile and a paper during the noon peri- od and fifth hour on Monday . . . Faculty find papers in boxes as work of "Hankb and assistant George Schultz saves some worry for Art Ransom business manager When he totals the figures on the expense division of the bud- the second semester to give out the usual assignments . . at the Press office on Saturday morning is shown in the bottom picture . . . Naomi Yochum, Mel Koeppen and the Lintoype setter are hard at Work. Mel Koeppen calls the Royal Purple meeting to order every Monday night of . The usual scene get . . . expense column decreased by personal handing out of pa- pers. . . . Alternating between four and six- page paper . . . due to overselling of advertising . . . ttRagged Ann" headlines make first appearance in attempt to wipe out balanced front page appearance . . . causes much disturbance in Journalism classes . . . gives something to be criti- cized and commented upon . .. worse than pulling teeth . . . try- ing to please most readers . .. Fan mail increases . . . contribu- tions for Campus Crier even from out-of-town readers . Eldred Speck deviates from his sport page to give the ttgals" a break on his HDissertation on Women,s Hair't . . . Trouble in gaining admittance to athletic contests dispelled when press cards become possession of ttofiicials". DURPLE HITEWATER, WIS. MONDAY, JUNE 12, 1939 N0. xx New Ideas Gained At Convention when staff higher-ups decide to Work during Teacherts Convention . . . November 5 becomes big day as classes are cut to udrive to Cin- cinnatii, . . . Two days of discus- sions, newspaper critical clinics, field trips, bus tours, view of Cin- cinnati University, walks to Gov- ington, Kentucky over toll bridge where toll of 2 cents just about breaks business manager and keep- er of finances Art Ransom. . . . Work during: the day . . . lec- tures to attend during the evening . new acquaintances to be made . . new ideas to be tried out on the folks back home . . . banquets and dances . . . and the trip back home again. Koeppen Presides Second Semester when first issue makes its appear- ance . . .divides time between jour- nalism and photography brings action shots into paper . . . Henry Yankow takes over duties of selling the advertisers and col- Seatede Second ROWeOwczarski, Stritzel, Schaefer, Schmidt, Speel, Ellis, Kreft, Pepper, Wolff, Yochum, Marx. Third Row- lecting from them later on . .. George Schultz decides to supervise the grab-it-on-the-run-in-the-corri- dor system assisted by Bernard Tolzman . . . Howard Olson gets into step as circulation manager . . . new system of exchanges in the college library kept in trim order by ttOleh . . . William Du- bats becomes Melts first right hand man in the position of assistant editor and secretary of the editorial board. . . . Two new positions created to give editor more help down at the ttPress" Eldred Speck and Larry Trovinger become ofiice boys with the official title of Associate Editors . . . Harvey Weiss seeks new glory in Whitewater through his columns in the sport depart- ment . . . reigning as sport editor he keeps all the boys working. . . . Proof to be read as the ink seeps into the best clothes . . . argu- ments to be settled with the press man . . . Are there two "pts" in A Cappella? . . . press man al- ways wins out . . . final publicity . hounds who just must get their story in the paper . . . no consid- eration even if the paper had been put to bed. E: v w Bayer, Mr. Goffn Dubats, Trovinger, Weiss, Fronek, Norregaard, Serfling, Speck, Cory, Collins, Schultz, Brown, Yankow, Hulick, Ransom. Puzzle Addicts Honored at Annual Banquet when cash prizes given to winner of most correct solutions . . . free theatre tickets for first two correct solutions handed in . . . lined up by Mr. Goifis room as fifth hour bell rings . . . mad scramble to reach the man of the moment . . . papers 10st . . . results to be tab- ulated. . . . New pins presented to two edi- tors of year . . . new stone sets on gold "wish for editor and busi- ness manager . . . first time pin given to business staff member . . . Five- and six-semester staff in e m b e r s honored with gold pins. . . . Dr. Evans and Mr. Goff serve as faculty members of the editorial board for another year . . . Mr. Goff serves as publicity sponsor too . . . No information gotten from him as to who wrote the story on the debate trip . . . who edited the Campus Crier . . . or who had a peeve against the assembly speaker . . . Always the editofs best friend, Mr. Goff stands as the diplomat between the staff, the student body, the faculty, and the administrators. Bisely, Frank, Conner, Heide, Koeppen, Kirby, Chase, Ketterl, Bergmann. McComb, N ye, rather than educate at their annual concert before the college auditorium on Wednesday, January 18 . modern music was played -. . . went back into history and geography . . . illustrated in music the evolution of modern llHarlem Swing" from the African jungles . . . Composition and score by a modern composer, David Bennett . . . other scores played were llBallet Egyptianll a concert suite by Alexandre Luigini, a medley of fine old Strauss waltz melodies, isussian and Ludmillall by Glinka . outstanding number by group was song hit of todaye"Deep Purplellehrst attempt at serious music by Peter de Rose, composer of many modern pieces of music . . . Rex Mack entertained With his golden trombone during intermission. . . . This year, for the hrst time, the band entered an act in Stunt Night . . . first on program and got the crowd into a fine humor . . . Chappy LeH-"mgwell had the directors baton leading ten members in llHumoresqueeWhols Next?"eboys sometimes counted 5A3 time instead of 3A but did get laughs. . . . Group composed of over seventy members ree hearses on the auditorium stage every Wednesday hfth hour . . . every member is an accomplished 84 musician from leading high school bands of the state . . . do much sight reading and explore all types of music . . . Besides rendering concerts, band is active during the various athletic contests . . . lend music for all football games . . . lead the activities at Homecoming from time of bonfire until the game is over the next day . . . play at basketball tournaments . . . generally make them! selves useful. . . . Inspiration for music stands out on the diminw tive director, S. E. llEddiei, Meat . . . netist from 5way back . . . has played in every expert COY' thing from Sousals band and symphony orchestras t0 circus bands . . . knows all kinds of music thore oughly . . . He was one of the original members of the American Bandmasterls Association Which was formed in Boston in 1930 . . . composed of bandmasters of United States, Mexico, and Canada . admittance is by outstanding achievement in the field and passing a rigid examination . . . Mr. Mear directs college band, city high school band, and the city band . . . has assisted at the Uni! versity of Wisconsin summer clinic for the past ten years . . . always plays an outstanding part in national music conventions . . . a fitting man to prepare musicians to carry on their trade. 0 Grouped around the baton of Director Meat. over seventy members get into their groups to take a few warmrup notes before a concert. Membership includes: Comets: Boutclle, Graske, Nelson, Keuler, Klein, Salverson, Krueger. Bass: C, Jacobson, Mikkclson, Sullivan. Baritone: H. Jacobson, Niere, Biedrom Hoefs. Clarinet: Dewey. Millis, Prust, Lee, Sucharski, Hartenberger, Cartier, Benzer. Helgeson, Langager, Leffmgwell. Oleary, Martens, R. Peterson, Schroeder, Rose, Ryan, Wendt. Flute: Hanchman, Howard, Robinson Tubbs. Saxophone: Hungerford, Yankow, Wiedenhoeft, Simonson. Serfling, Milligan. Fero. Alto: Aplin. String Bass: Wilbur. Drums: Francis, Reisenauer, Graham. Fulton, Bromley. Mellophone: Founder, Dobbs, Todd, Doering. French Horn: Powell, Dougherty. Bassoon: Keuler. Trombone: Clark, Stocker, Winnie, D. Peterson, Mack, Lowe, Keefe. Johnson, Featherstone, Dettmann. Drum Majors: Hinkle, Mathison, Stajnert. Orchestra Front Row: V. Marsh, Chape, Biedron, Martens, Skibrek, Howard, Leffmgwell, Hanchman, M. Marsh, Tubbs Peterson, Nerbovig, Coon. Back Row: Folkrod, Hull, Brunk, Marx, Panzenhagen, Pas, Capper, Mr. Mear, Hunger, ford, Lowe, Dettmann, Wilbur, Fulton, Honzik, Wezeman, Georgi, Dewey, Dougherty, Bahr, Dobbs, Nelson, Graske. , Mwu'c- 71w spice of Lye is theme of members of the College Symphony Orchestra . . as possible . . . need for audiences to be kept quiet and satisfied . . . Among appearances this year were all of the . try to provide spice as thoroughly seen in action every time there is Thespian productions . . . before, between acts, and after . . . accompanied the assembly program on December 14 . . . Childrenk Theatre Play skKing 0f the Golden River" . for Christmas Tableau . . . February 2 played a short but pleasing concert for an open assembly . . provided music . . . Florence Folkrod, pretty freshman Violinist, made her fiddle htalkh, in solo . . . hLiebesfreudh . . . for an encore she thwung out" With hHow You Going to Keep hEm Down on the Farm?" . . . anyway that is what was announced . . . a swiftly moving concoction of accidentals. . . . Freshmen bolstered ranks considerably to make better group than last year . . . lost the services of h'Bis" and her French Horn, but rounded out . fifteen . backed up organization with new instrumentation . . fiddles gave out soothing effects . . With three golden saxophones. ,two mellow horns . . . two tubas and the "slappingh of a hdoghouse" tmodern jargon for bass VioD . . . 86 three comets for brass requirements . . . three . three Clarinets gave mel; . three soft but firm trombones back, ed the comets . . . flutes for obligattos . low tones . . an oboe and bassoon for weird effects . . . piano and drums for rhythm . . . a wellerounded setup of expert musicians to handle any type of music. . . . With Walter Graske and Eleanore Dougherty handling the music, the orchestra was kept well supplied With all types . . . from marches to high symphony . . . Sousa proved most popular com, . played his hEl Capitanf hNeW York Hippodrome," and uStars and Stripes . wThe March of the Little Tin Sole diersf by Pierve . . . hLes Patineius Waltz tThe Skatersy," by Waldteufel . . . First Movement from the hMilitary Symphony," by Hayden . . . poser 0f marches . . Forever" . . hkSymphonie Miniature No. 2 in D Minor,, . . . Ferde Grofds hMississippi SuiteH . pling of the many numbers prepared and rendered . . just a same on various occasions. . . . Orchestra was led through tough spots in music by Director Mear during rehearsals every Wednesi day at 3:45 on the auditorium stage . . . student directors wielded the baton at most of concerts. Piano Club 8W Jaw; W 5W with the expert movement of fingers and wrists . . . piano music is the result . . . such is the pastime of members of the Piano Club . . . a dozen quiet, unassuming members of the feminine sex . really active when facts come out . . . meet! mgs held on Monday nights with varying program . . . October 17, Miss Hazel Peterson, local piano teacher, played for the group . . . November 28, started a series of topics on the life and work of Chopin . . . Frances Arnold presented the hrst 0f the group . . . Perry Hackett, child virtuoso, play' ed some of Chopints works . . . December 5, got away from serious music for a Christmas Party for members in the Music Room . . . January 9, Bunco Party . . . cookies and orangeade. . . . February 13, Miss Lorna Rhodes from city high played selections from MacDowell and Grieg for group . . . February 27, the group entertained at Seated: Harper, Nerbovig, Arnold. Second Row: Swanson, Collins, Specht, Carlson, Meyer, Kingsland, Bronson, Streeck, Holtz, Miss Jordalen. a party at the home of Miss Hazel Peterson . . . cards, Chinese checkers, and refreshments . . . March 26, presented a Sunday afternoon musicale in the College Auditorium sponsored by the Federae tion of Women's Clubs. . . . Group was led the first semester by Marcella Nerbovig with the gavel; Charity Krumdick, vice, president; Frances Arnold, secretary'treasurer . . . Second semester officers were Alyce Schunk, Janis . Miss Jordalen, music instructor, has sponsored the group . . . ree Swanson, and Berniece Harper . . placed Miss OhMalley who resigned upon her mar! riage to Dr. Wiedman . . Mrs. Roxa Pritchett and Mrs. Geo. Ferris acted as patronesses . . . Piano Club is the only organization on the college campus that is a member of the Whitewater Fed! eration of Womengs Clubs. . . . Finer appreciation of the piano and its music and better poise before an audience are the aims of the Piano Club. A Cappella Choir Bottom Row: Haferman, Adamson. Pippel, Dettingert Dunbar, Jacobson, Sylvester, Kittleson, Wiedenhoeft. Nerbovig, Mickelson, Schroeder. Second Row: Rose, Stromberg, Trost, Hahn, Henderson, Schley, Mr. McMains, Lean, Holtz, Bjorklund, Rogers, Winters. Third Row: Juntwaite, Koenig, LeHingwell, Gilman, Banta, Wright, Marshall, Hull, Knudtson, Gardner, Marsh. Top Row: Lewein, Bronson, Lee, Place, Prust, Thayer, Dettmann, Muir, Makholm, Zingle, Loreti, Tyvand, Tesmer. eancew, decadd, ancz Rectum all come in the line of duty for singers of A Cappella . . . fortyeeight voices produce music of a delicate tone quality and blend . . . none better in the state . . . newcomers strengthened the tenor sec, tion which suffered from graduation last spring . . . new white satin stoles added color to uniforms and beauty to group as a whole. . . . Organization led this season by Arthur Koenig, Edson Gilman, and Irene Pippcl, backed by a board of directors composed of Koenig, Johnson, DeGraff, and Marsh . . . Mr. McMains led the Choir for the third year of its existence. . . . Library of choir is made of best of choral music literature . . . among the numbers sung are icGlori Patriii by Palestrian, ikGIory to the Trinityai by Rachmaninoif, iLBless the Lordia by Ivanoff . . . contemporary composers contributed uHymn t0 the Night" by Noble Cain, iiDark Waterii by James, and iiLover Come Back to Meii by Sigmund Rom, berg. . . . 88 Besides singing, the Choir held a scavenger hunt on October 3 . . . members hunted in weird places for silly objects . . . prizes were given and re freshments served . . . October 15, Homecoming, A Cappella held openrhouse at McMainsi studio for returning members. . . . Broadcasts over Milwaukee, Madison, and James, ville stations were made in spring in coordination tour includes trips to Milwaukee iSimpson M. E. ChurchL Burr Iington, Fort Atkinson, Palmyra, and a iinal home with annual spring concert tour . . . concert. . . . Newest field to conquer was the making of reef ords from the University of Wisconsin radio station, WHA . . . hrst time attempted was this year. . . Finest music written rendered by this group . . . highest sopranos t0 the lowest of the basses . . . singing together in perfect harmony without ac! companiment. Choral Club Bottom Row: Brockhaus, Christiansen, Burglund, OiCOnnell, Simonson, McGrath, Lean, Moan. Second Row: Stone, Leucinger. Trost, McGary, Hass, Pounder, Day, Rankins, Mr. Sayre. Third Row: Francis, Hillier, Rose, Crerar, Gyland, Cordts, Haesler. Pedley. Fourth Row: Audley, Hund, Emmett, Haag, Kallestad, Littlejohn, Wollenzien, Wagner, Gumble. Fifth Row: Anderson, Bronson, Wolfe, Koenings, Haines, Krueger, McLernon, Van Hoof. Sixth Row: Naegele, Johnson, Nuernberg, Masche, Owczarski, Norton, Hart, Campbell, Clark. Top Row: Gillis, Jacobs, Hahn, Mullen, Kirby, Baron, Hutchinson, Stebbins, Ketterl, Hammarlund. Wlum Women 4W aMw it is news in any manis town . . . such is the case with Choral Club . . . Mr. Sayre 0f the City High School successfully leads group for second year . some fifty womenis voices follow his every move tof the batony . . . group meets for re, hearsal every Wednesday afternoon in the club rooms. . . . Organization led by Selma Kallestad, a veteran of four years . . . Geneva Stone another senior is Viceepresident . . . while Bunnie Koenings, sophoI more, collects the dues of fifty cents a semester and records events in the little book. . . . Honorable mention was more than earned on February 10 at the W.A.A. Stunt Night . . . the alligirl orchestra led by Hazel Brockhaus conducted styled after the . questions and an, a iECampus Quiz" program . . . numerous radio broadcasts . . swers in music . . . students were too smart . . . didnit hear the gong at all. . . . Accompanied by Lucille Francis at the piano . . group presented several concerts during year . . . gave a rendition before the student body . . . pre sented the annual joint concert with the menis chorus in May . . . feminine voiceslend the beauty required in every manis life . . . musical or other! wise. . . . Choralists have always tried to bring out the beauty of old and new songs . . . Choice is not on technicality but opportunity of soft and sweet blending of tonal quality . . . sing music of come posers of the 01d schooleSchubert and MendeISr sohneand modern writersiEdwards and Victor Herbert . . Song" and iLI Love Life" typify music handled. . . . . popular favorites like i'Gypsy Love Choral Club is a new organization . . . in its second year . . . was made of the enthusiasts left when Miss Baker retired and disbanded her group . . . Mr. Sayre, popular menis chorus director and amateur radio enthusiast called in to lead the group . . . his one chance to lead women. wa 'V ne Alone 1 x tenors have a . . . Chappie . new ideas p'ear before assembly of City High students . college assembly . . . best and biggest thrill r015 . . . introd Cwidian - , to sing before own people . . . Madison East High baritones chat to p1. School wins new admirers for group . . . state new members ad ed ction . . hospital for insane . . . all return . . . no strag ing shown by old me ers W glers on that trip . . . talk about the poor fellows . sometimes think of themselves . . . sing again xDJs t ong" really puts on the of the desert and again . . . until the end of the year. Bottom Row: Schenk, Reisenauer, LefH gwell, Harbort, Muir, Demerath, McCoyyMiss Carlson. Second Row: Wilson, Rennemo, Koenig, Welkos, Mullen, 0. Lee, Reck, Graske, Mr. Sayre. 1rd Row: Poulos, Howard, McGraw, Bull, Thayer, Heyrman, Dettmann, Peterson, Hinkle, Reese. Top Row: Helgert. Bronson, Su den, R. Lee, Gauthier, Cory, Oppriecht, Niere, Engelstad, Honzik, Tesmer. ,5: M Q Treble Clef Bottom Row: Harper, E. Marshall, Berg, Wright, Miss Jordalen, E. Henderson, Knudtson, Krueger. Second Row: Haferman, Mickelson, Onsrud, Wezeman, Oberg, Langager, Kingsland, Webb, Voegeli. Third Row: Dunbar, Roherty, Weber, Schroeder, Hanchman, Keegan, Dettinger, Thomas. Fourth Row: Feldt, Gerlach, Mansfield, Nerbovig, Skibrek, J. Henderson, Gyland, Murphy, Trost. Fifth Row: Dobbs, Meissner, Roberts, Bjorklund, Baht, Arnold, Walter, Puerner. Sixth Row: Chape, Nelson, Fahland, Holtz, Hammarlund, Pokrandt, Hull, Goelzer, Bayer. Top Row: Johnson, C. Marshall, Juntwaite, Specht, Hollister, Heide, Richardson, Bender. hgamem" Game 5W cast over WHA . . . at our wee small door . . . someone came singing, Iim sure, sure, sure . . . Who was it? . . . the Treble Clef . . . first time in history made public appearance outside of spring concert . . . comper tition strong . . . many try out . . . 60 members in organization . . . few new members. . .droves of old members returning . . . only superior voices added . . . Miss Jordalen again sponsor. . . . Singing disbanded for one night . . 4 had Thanksgivmg party to honor new members . . . get acquainted with your neighbor . . . turkey favors, bingo, prizes and dancing . . . members prove ability to play piano as well . . . take turns to provide music . . . Chinese checkers for those with eyes to see . . . jumps to make . . . marbles to move . . . refreshments in form of iigreen spot" and cookies . . . then down to work. . . . Special part practices for each group of voices . sing with your neighbor . . . blend your tones . . . entire practices . . . flnally concerts . to appear before Wisconsin Teacher"s Conr vention at Capital Theatre, Madison, February 18 . icy roads prevent trip . . . few make it . . . busses stalled in Whitewater . . . compensation came in spring . . . sing before state convention of superintendents at Madison . . . radio broadr mothers tuned in to hear daughters . . . sweethearts listen for that one voice . recording made of broadcast . . . played and replayed . . . improvement when hear own voices . used in practices. . . . Glory in Whitewater . . . sing for Kiwanis club at Hotel Walworth, March 7 . . . encores . . . "Someonew favorite of pieces sung . . . iiVirgin Slumber Songqi sung at Christmas pageant . . . "Snowii and uStorm Songii . . . soft and sweet . rough and stormy . . . voices carry equally well . . . appear before home audience in prelude to special assembly . . . spring concert in May . mothers and fathers guests of group . . . iiEcho Song" rings through auditorium . . . letis sing then . . . and they did . . . over and over again. . . . Combine with music organizations for spring formal . . . president, Arline Wright, leads the way . . . Anabel Walter, assistant, first in line . . forms part of echo choir . . . Ruth Bahi- sees action as secretary . . . Marcella Nerbovig collects 50 cents each semester . . . dispensing much of it for new music . . . Ruth Johnson sounds pitches . . . With a song in their hearts they lead the way. 91 Madrigals o LefEngwell, Banta, Schley, D u n b a r , Mr. McMains, Chape, Marsh, Tyvand, Tesmer. is practiced in traditional manner by eight mixed vidual appearances over radio stations WCLO and voices . . . sing in old informal manner about table WHA . . . educational and interesting music . . . . old love songs restored in present day . . . bring back music and singing of early centuries in Third year of the organization . . . furnish popr various countries . . . All members soloists . . ular interludes for all Choir concerts . . . indig Paul McMains directs. Studentsh Open F 0mm MW Reldiaw is topic of speech by Dr. Beery Which drew biggest attendance of year at Open Forum meeting . . . Dr. Evans spoke on be Henry VIII Should Returnh . . . Alonzo Pond, archaeologist . Mr. O. E. Loomis 0f Rockton, Illinois . . . A11 go into making the open forum meetings an interr esting place to be . . . Credit due to Gerald Muir as president first semester and Jess Miller who did the arranging for the rest of the year ' ' ' C' H' Well- Seated: Hinkle, Schley, Muir, Yochum, Mr. Wellers. Second Row: James, Wright, ers acts as sponsor. Bellas, Thompson, Lough,Mi11er. 92 W. S. G. A. In em of Gallege cue for W.S.G.A. mail service provided for stur dents . . . twice a day, on arrival of mailman, mail is sorted . . . on bulletin board . . . one of many services to StU' dents of this organization . . . Organize shbig sisterh movement to help the floundering freshman girls . . . show them about town, school, etc. . . . get them acquainted with other students and school life . . . Sponsor annual "Sing" and bonfire by the log cabin on September 8 . . . get Frosh acclimated . . . flrst mixer included in this program . . . Johnny Kurtz provided music . . . broke up stag line by sitting near door. . . . names typed on slip and posted another aid to During year daily duties include the mail SEIV' ice . . . poviding telephone for students, use . selling typing pads and notebook paper . . . and handling a hlost and foundh department . . . notices posted on bulletin board and advertised in Royal Purple . . . keeps the Graham Street bullea tin board in shape . . . organized manner of post! ing notices with printed signs for each organization .arrange shGuest Tickets" for mixers . . . Bought new tables and chairs for club rooms. . . . Womerfs Self Government Association is comr works for bet' terment of conditions in school and in woments posed of all women in college . . . boarding and rooming places . . . each woman is entitled to a vote on policies . . . composed of representatives from each class . . . new Frosh elected this year were Mildred Littlejohn, Elizabeth Henderson, Maxine Davidson, Marion Hed, and Pat Plumb. . . . ofhce committee Besides daily duties, girls try to provide benee ficial programs for girls . . . sponsor speakers for assemblies . . . sometimes invite men . . . Mr. Sanford, author and lecturer, spoke on EhVocations" on February 9 . . . Mr. Pescheret, etcher from Whitewater . at Marquette Univcr51ty. . . . . . Miss Mannix, dean of women Miss Goodhue sponsors group who elected three Alice Chris- tiansen, popular academic senior, president . . . member of Kappa Delta Pi, Delta Sigma, and A Cappella Choir . . . . . Dorothy Bisely, treasurer A . . seniors and a junior for ofhcers . . . . Geneva Stone, vicerpresident and Joan Roberty, secretary. Seated: Marx, Anderson, Bisely, Christiansen. Roherty, Arnold, Littlejohn. Second Row: Hed, OhBrien, Messer' schmidt, Mikkelson, Plumb, Davidson, Kreft, Henderson, Stone, Rogers, Juntwaite, Fosterling, Mickelson, Tubbs, Volcnberg. Thespicm hWic" 5W QM WP to play the part of the old man in Thespianis prize! winning stunt on February 10 . . . iiVic" pan' tomimed passages from the current favorite iiOId Folksi, . . . a one man display of excellent prin' ciples learned as a member of Thespian dramatic organization . . . under Miss Holcombeis direCr tion, club learns the inner secrets of acting and play production . . . every detail is covered thoroughly from building a stage setting to waiting for applause after a good "crackh. . . . Group meets in the dramatic work shop on alternating Wednesday evenings . . . regular busi' ness at meetings is the planning of major prOdUC' tions . . . following business fields is always an excellent diversion . . . educational along the dramatists line . . . Lectures on various phases of playxproduction are presented . . . practice in makeup, lighting, staging . . . actual one'act plays presented frequently . . . every member of the group gets his chance to display particular talents . . . Play reviews are presented by members and guests . . . on November 2, Mrs. R. H. Dixon presented a review of de Rather Be RightH by George Kaufman . . . humorous takeeoff 0n Presi dent Roosevelt and his administration . . . at in tervals entertainments are given . . . songs, instrue mental selections, and refreshments. . . . While work is going on at all times, major pro, ductions are given before the public . . . uDouble Door" on November 15 . . . life of the Van Brets ruled by Victoria . . . Virginia Peters took the part of Victoria . . . January 31, Martin Richmond tWoodrow Stangld jumps ahead of time twenty years in "Thunder on the Leftii . . . modern life and love was portrayed on March 7, in iiLavender and Old Lace" starring Jean Schroeder as Hepsey . . . Popular student price of 20c instituted for first time . . . while not a major production the entire stage production of HHot Lemonade" is significant in work of group . . . held on the auditorium stage, the evenings work consisted of the entire production of the play . . preparation, staging, makerup, acting, and tearing down the stage setting . . . a faculty reception was held on the stage after the production . . . punch and cookies provided the refreshments to go With the pause . . . Intimate touch with the professional theatre is gained by attending plays at the Davidson Theatre in Milwaukee. . . . Thirty-one prospective dramatists and dramatic teachers were initiated into Thespian on October 7" . . . met first the acting oiiicers . . . Lawrence Trovinger, president; Frances Arnold, Vice'presi! dent; Alma Keegan, secretary; Keith Walsh, treaSI Both first and second semester ofhces of the Thespian dramatic club gather together for a picture . . . Bottom Row: Hctt, Brockhaus, Peterson, Nelson. Top Row: Owczarski, Trovr inger, Arnold, Keegan. acting Hower Ier . . . urer . . . SeCOnd semester officers installed at Val! entinek party . . . Hazel Brockhaus, president, Social life provided by social hours after meet! with Victor Shudlick, and Myrtle Nelson aiding ings, parties after plays, and topped off by the her. . . . annual spring formaL I 95 XVhitewate'r F o're'nsic Association Seated Row: Powell, Martens, Norton, Bjorklund, Belitz, Haines. Second Row: Goodman. Dr. Evans, Williams, Eeske, Kelley, Conforti, Norregaard, Dubats, Koenings, Lee, Gauthier, James, Mead, Chase, Bull, McGraw, Edwards, ettmann. Pm am! 60444 W01 ZW this year as has been the custom of the Forensic Association in the past , . . Whitewater debaters irked their brains with at least four different QUCS' tions this season . . . Decks Cleared for action first time at Discussion Contest at Bloomington, Ill. . . . Lee, Dubats, and mentor Evans make trip . . . Dubats placed third . . . Lee fifth. . . . Call to debate tournament at Normal, 111., Jana uary 13 and 14, answered by four teams . . . Muir, Dubats, Lee, Goodman, Chase, Norregaard, Teske, and Conforti, accompanied by Dr. Evans and Dr, Vv'ebster, represented Whitewater. . . . WThe American women are even more beautiful than I expected!" . . . so stated Christopher Mayr hew, dynamic Oxford debater, when the Oxford! Cambridge team visited Whitewater for a debate on November 1 . . . hI would like to see your three shelves of books on speecheamazing, really amaze ing," added Philip Noakes of Cambridge . . . Muir and Dubats participated for the Purple in the in, ternational debate. . . . 96 An audience of 500 Wisconsin retail dealers and representatives meeting at Milwaukee gave Schulf theis and Lee an audience shifteofropinion decision in a debate against Beloit College on November 9. . . . hDoc" Evans in a dither for weeks now . . . Whitewater tournament is just around the corner . must have judges . . . Mrs. Dahle calling . , . hHave you any rooms there for the debaters? . . . Please have your pledges on hand . . . need timekeepers . . . The big moment arrives . . . 205 participate . . . getetogether in auditorium precedes first round Friday afternoon . . tana takes home the Kiwanis shield . . . Oshkosh . AugUSI cops coveted Governor Heil trophy . . . Platte, ville was second . . . Charleston and Augustana tied for third . . . Fairchild of Charleston wins Dlscussion Contest . . . Gilman of Augustana seer ond . . . Lee of Whitewater third . . . Banquet at Guild Hall sets record . . . no speeches either before or after dinner . . . where else but at a debate tournament could this happen? . . . St. Paul tournament at St. Thomas College . . . Lee, Goodman, and Dubats accompanied by Dr. Evans left early Sunday morning, February 26 . . . return on March 1 . . . Details lacking 0n tourney ment, but reliable source reports that Lee made stops at several towns on both ways of trip . . . Coach Evans refuses to comment . . . Leess EXt tensive acquaintance With members of the opposite sex gives rise to conflicting rumors regarding stops. . . . Junior debaters have their fling . . . Chase, Norregaard, Bull, Engelstad, Williams, Korpal, Teske, Comforti, Mead, Kelley, Koenings, and McGraw debated in the junior division of the Delta Sigma Rho tournament held in Madison on March 24 and 23' . first time in this tournament . . . Team entered in senior division for . . Lee and Dubats get the call . . . They also compete in Discussion 0 Forensics members take time out debating for their annual banquet, as seen in upper left picture . . . Cambridge'Oxford debate team visits Whitewater and picture taken of DU' bats, Mayhew, Mr. Carl, son, Noakes, Muir . . . Debate tournament trO' phies shown before they leave Whitewater in hands of winners . . . Debaters at Normal, Illinois, are Goodman, Lee, Conforti, Dr. Webster, Norregaard, Dubats, Muir, Chase. and Dr. Webster in lower right corner. Contest and both get to semi'finals before elimz inated. . . . Finals of local Discussion Contest are held March 30 . . . Muir gets hrst place . . . Lee second . . . Mead third. . . . Season is wound up with miscellaneous discussion panels and speaking engagements . . . All activity climaxed with Annual Forensic Banquet in April . . . debators and orators are awarded iiWh keys, cups, and a kind word from Coach Dr. Evans and Assistant Coach Dr. Webster . . cers were Olaf Lee, president, Bill Dubats, Vice! . departing ofiir president, and Mildred James, secretary and treaSr urer. . t . Statistics: Lee iiviewed with alarmh on an aver, age of 17 times per debate . . . Dubats iipointed out thatii for an average of 21 . . . Muir iimy friendeclis quite consistently at an even 20 per . . . Goodman iiarummed" to the tune of 71 per contest. Photography Club ll Wiewfincfw" PM for first time this year by Photography Club . . . dittoed circular with information relative to ph0r tography and the doings of the club members . . . want ad section most popular . . . only Club on campus that publishes its own edition. . . . Organizatlon formed three years ago under direCz tion of Mr. Prucha . . . worked on lidark roomll along with photography classes . . . today the room is one Of best equipped in school . . . memr bership is limited to forty . . . hlled to limit all of time . . . idea is to further the art of picture taking . . . members have their own cameras and take pictures . . . dark room is theirs two days a week for developing and printing their own pictures. . . Business meetings held twice a month . . . edur cational phases of the photo line are hashed and rehashed . . . a series of lectures provided by the Eastman Kodak Company were given by different members of the group . . . topics such as ilCrimI inal Photography" and iiPolarized Lightll were handled . . . lantern slides illustrated the topics and gave further interest. . . . Views of school, trees, animals, and People seen posted over the bridge on both the second and third floors every spring and fall . . . Photography Clubls biennial exhibit . . . Members print up their favorite hshotll in the best possible manner and compete for prizes . . . flattery of the weaker sex surely draws much publicity. . . . Group takes part in various exhibits . . . largest one this year was one covering the entire state of Wisconsin held at the Hotel Pfister, Milwaukee, on March 10 to 12 . . . competed with outstanding photographers of state. . . . Though difiicult for the true camerabug, the club does deviate from serious side of life . . . hold ane nual picnic in spring . . . dandy opportunity for shutterbugs to get views of candid cameraists who shoot pictureetakers who look for bathing beauties and other sights of interest . . . llWatch the Birdiew during Stunt Night developed the art of picture takingefrom stiff neck for subject to stiff neck for photog. . . . Mr. Prucha still sponsors the organization . . . oiiicers leading the group first semester were Al Teske, Rhode, Bisely, and Millis . . . Second semz ester leaders were Carl Hanson, Edwards, Collins, and Stobie. Bottom Row: Bisely, James, Mr. Prucha, Groelle, Zehme, Marshall. Second Row: Collins, Marks, Thayer, Vance, Messerschmidt, Webb. Third Row: Barker, Funk, Sullivan, Harbort, Goodman. Fourth Row: Deck, Klein, Nicholas, Wilson, Millis, Koeppen. Fifth Row: Trovinger, Stobie, Peterson, Mode, Rohde, Brown. Top Row: Carlson, Wirth, Teske, Welkos, Hanson, Baker. Pythian F 0mm Seated: Chase, Schley, Keegan, Biedron, Rose, Mr. Wellers, Muir. Second Row: Dubats, Masche, Wright, Klein. Alft, Kruegcr, Meuler, Lau, Hahn, Christiansen, Duehning, Lloyd, Trovinger, Bayer, Edwards. Third Row: Zimmerr mann, Powell, Schmidt, Stock, Bierbaum, Brennan, Bahr, Haines, Van Hoof, Leucinger. as shown in October at Lake Koshkonong . . . Pythian Forum members rollic on the greensward round about Mr. Wellersi cottage . . . enthusiastic reports continue to roll in long after the last leaf has fallen . . . no flat tires. . . . Edward Biedron elected president . . . Alma Keegan is vicerpresident . . . Betty Jane Rose writes the minutes and handles the money, if any . , . Hazel Schley turns on high pressure as befits a publicity chairman . . . Ruth Meuler, program chairman, hunts talent. . . . Barn dance in girls gym is big success . . . DUr bats has to be scissored out of Chaseis Overalls, borrowed for the occasion . . . McKenna, as baree foot boy With shoes on, succeeds in snagging three members with hook on his fish pole when he swings around, . . . Debate team composed of Alma Keegan, Janet Powell, and Marjorie Klein Wins over'Marquette at Milwaukee . . . Girls still talking about Marquette hospitality. . . . Ethel Alft wins prize tone candy bar slightly usedi for writing best Christmas poem . . . all copies have been lost, luckily. . . . Kids party in girls gym is too realistic . . . jane itor refuses admittance to three members on the grounds that they should be home in bed . . . lollypops are distributed . . . Carmen Steiber cries because she didnt get two . . . Chase forgets about the stick in his and swallows it in toto iiPeckis Bad Boyw benefit movie for the forum gives members a chance to demonstrate salesmam ship. . . . Bob Chase elected president second semester . . . Cable Edwards, vicelpresidnet . . . Margie Klein, secretary and treasurer . . . Janet Powell, program chairman . . . Louise Bayer, Royal Purple reporter . . . Arline Wright, publicity chairman. . . . Stunt night is Pythianis night to howl . . . Evans pushes his baby carriage . . . Tice gets a perfect pushrpull, with a lawnmower . . . WellI ers staggers under a load of tools . . . Webster gives a demonstration in unnatural walking . . . Fischer manfully tries to extricate his foot from a waste paper basket by swatting himself on the head , . . Ethel Alft guiding genius. . . . Marquette debaters pay a return visit to meet Alma Keegan, Ethel Alft, and Marjorie Klein . . . Marquette, the victor, stays for dance held in its honor. . . . Season wound up with picnic in April . . . swimming, food, and what have you. 99 Kemper Guild Sealed: Nelson, Gil! man, Marshall, Fulton. Second Row: Mikich, Barrett, Engebretsen, Norton, Wollenzien, Audley. is Kemper Guild . . . pioneer organization of Stu! dents of St. Lukeis Episcopal Church . . . r10 dues levied and everybody is welcome to come to the meetings . . . held every Sunday night in the Guild Hall . . . business meetings followed by 50' cial hour . . . games of new and novel types played. . . . Kemper Guild is the newest of student religious organizations . . . organized this year for the first time . . . under direction of Reverend Barr . . . Named after Bishop Kemper, a pioneer missionary in Wisconsin . . . has descendants living in White; water . . . First organization of Episcopal students on campus . , . localin character . . . have drawn up a constitution for a permanent organization . . . Janet Nelson, daughter of Dr. G. H. Nelson, is responsible for most of it . . . she is only a High School student but is active in the church. . . . Organization is new and has a very limited memr bership at present . t . seldom more than a dozen . . . however, it has founded something and 13109 pects of rapid expansion are prevalent . . . already active on behalf of members . . . Picnic held at 100 Wellersi cottage on November 20 . . . Meetings ordinarily taken up with business, such as framing constitution . . . invariably followed by social hour . . . meeting devoted once a month entirely to social purposes . . . others for the purpose of increasing knowledge of religion and world affairs . . . Speakers introduced include Mr. Fischer, with a movie and talk on his recent eastern trip . . . Dr. G. S. Beery, new education professor, spoke on iiImproving your Personality", on March 5. . . . OHicers are elected once a year for a full yearis term . . . William Fulton held the presidentis chair this season . . . Edson Gilman was elected vice! president . . . Betty Marshall was secretary and treasurer for the first semester, with Ruth Norton taking over the duties for the second semester . . . Dr. Weidman, lanky history professor, sponsors the group. . . A Truly a pioneer organization . . . first of its kind on campus . . . named after a pioneer Bishop . . , promises to live and give competition to any religious organization in the line of activities and benefits to members. Bottom Row: P. Peterr sen, Stritzel, Knudtson, M. Marshall, Jerome, Schilt. Second Row: Mikich, C. Jacobson, Flister, Cordts, M. JaC' obson, Mickelson, Stone. Third Row: Kallestad, Nerbovig, Gyland, D. Peterson, Campbell, Haesler. Fourth Row: Swanson, E. Nelson, C. Marshall, Martens, M. Nelson, Bender, Lunde. Top Row: Stove, Froemr ming, Johnson, Fritz, Jackson, Norregaard, K. Peterson, Tyvand, Kamnetz. eWW 80W W filming is general topic of discussion at Lutheran Students activity all over the country among Lutheran Association held every second Sunday of the students. . . . month . . . various phases of subject led by difr Eleven members attended the Regional Confer, . whole rou enters into dis; . . . . g p ence held at the Memorial Union 1n Madison on ferent students . . cussion . . . settle every phase of our living. . . . December 4 . . . kept Up'tO'date on activities of Meetings of the group do not only include dis, other groups in this part Of the country - - . give and take ideas . . . those attending the conference were Ken Peterson, Fred Norregaard, Milner Stove, Myrtle Nelson, Marilyn Marshall, Marcella Nerr bovig, Elaine Nelson, Carol Jacobson, Valborg Knudtson, Margaret Johnson, and Lyle Johnr cussions . . . September 11 was first meeting to welcome new students . . . after introductions around, refreshments were served and games played . . . September 22, iiweinersii were the Chief in! terest on the breezy heights of the bluffs . . . October 23 called for a Halloween Party with deer SOH- . . - orations and pumpkin pie With whipped cream ' ' ' Lyle Johnson was elected president for the cur; though delayed somewhat the true Valentine spirit rent year and took charge of the meetings . . . W35 aroused 0n February14 - ' - Topped OE activ' Milner Stove as Vicerpresident was always ready ities with a banquet in spring. . . . to take over . . . Inga Flister handled the money and the duties of secretary . . . Miss Benson re! turned as sponsor after her absence of a semester while attending Northwestern last year. . . . Guest speakers gave variety to the meetings theme selves . . . Dr. Lee gave out on iiBad Boys of Wisconsinli on October 2 . . . no insinuations . the history and work of the L. S. A. through All Lutheran students are welcome to join L. S. out the United States was explained by Rev. F. A. A. . . Shietz, national advisor 0f the organization . . . . without initiation or anything . . . meet! ings held in church parlor . . . Sunday evening though comparatively new on our campuseorganr ized since 1935-the organization is a flourishing entertainment of a religious, educational, and social value all mixed in one. M ercie'r 11PW Que," Rm 6W at Mercier meetings . . . Arlene Lohstreter acted as chairman on February 21 . . . questions on religion, current events, jokes, popular songs . . . much difiiculty caused among members . . . Ethel LeClair caught the highest number of answers With George Sullivan running a close second . . . One of many ways in which the Mercier members keep amused and uprtOrdate. . . . Meetings held in the club rooms every first and third Tuesday of the month . . . variety is spice of meetings . . . open forums on religion . . . dis' cussions of current events . . . Father Downs and Father Miller asked to speak to group on occasions . meetings usually end in girlis gym With danCr mg and mixing . . . iiNickii Nickolas kept busy polishing the ivories. . . . Probably the oldest young peoples religious or ganization on the campus . . . been in existence for over twenty years . . . member of national organ, ization named after Cardinal Mercier . . . groups in most schools throughout the country . . . A11 Catholic students may join . . . dues 50 cents a semester . . . keep organization on top. . . . Local group knows how to do things outside of meetings . . . early morning breakfasts seeming to be their specialty . . . December 11 brings group together at Aunt Mattieis after early Mass . . . ham and noodles and hot cross buns enough en! couragement for anybody to get up on a Sunday morning . . . Lynn Jeffords, graduate of White water in 1911 speaks at breakfast . . . now on faculty at Fort Atkinson . . . St. Patrickis day calls for another occasion . . . another breakfast . . . members received Holy Communion in 3. group during 8 oiclock Mass . . . fill Aunt Mattieis pi' oneer room for the traditional feast . . . Herman Rauch of Milwaukee spoke to group . . . director of conciliation for the Wisconsin labor board . . . Easter breakfast again held . . . details not avail; able as this book goes to press. . . . Late nights contrast with early mornings . . . besides mixers held after meetings, C.Y.O. party given at the K. C. hall . . . refreshments and bingo featured . . . Annual formal held on December 3 0 Receiving line at Mercier formal shows president Virginia Horkan and escort bidding tthowdyh to Larry Trovinger and Ethel LeClait. 102 in the Meds gym . . . flrst formal of school year Virginia Horkan acted as president for the cur . . . Babe Schonath and his masters of modern rent year . . . Donald Heyrman, John Graham, syncopation from Watertown furnished the music Bob Mead filling the other leading positions of to a packed floor. . . . Mercier. Wesley F oundation O Wesleyans change to candy manufacturers as Martha Kreft and John Dettmann try it out . . . Bob Chase and Joyce Pfefferkorn munch on their cake while riding the streets in the Homecoming parade . . . Wesley basketball team brings home the bacon as members Allen, SerHing, Banta, Knilans, Jeffrey, Nolop, Somsen, Loomer, Truesdale, Mr. Randall have their picture taken. WW 30in; certainly does not describe the work of Wesley Foundation 132 young Methodists . . . full force meets in church every Sunday evening at 7:00. . . . Started year With Mr. Randalrs advice to new students on September 11 . . got acquainted the second week hunting for beans . . Panel dis cussions prove effective with large group . . . topics under theme of WThe Marks of an Educated Manh . . . Speakers imported . . Clark, Dr. Beery, Mr. Schuller, Mr. Fischer, Rev. Vander Graff, and Rev. Beers . . Parties light! ened spirit at intervals . . Halloween with corn, pumpkins, and cider . . . Christmas with carols and skSant:yh Clark . . . dancing in girls, gym on 104 . included Mr.. january 6 . Chinese checkers and schottisches . . . Valentine Party . . hhheartsh decided by dice . . . Joint dancing party with Pilgrim Fellow; ship on March 24. Suppers and songefests . . . January 15 mixed quartette concluded meal with hThe End of a Per, fect Dayh, . . . joint meal and meeting with Pilr grim Fellowship on February 26 . . . Homecoming spectators saw WesleyB generous thlympuf pass, ing out cake . . Werenht satisfied with hhhectic" homecoming . . . hiked to Warnefs cabin on Sunday . . swatted mosquitoes. . Plays directed, staged, and presented . . . 0A Certain Just Manh on October 23 . . . Mrhe Christmas Party" with HaZel Schley as the sophistiz Top Picture- Bottom Row: Bailey, Jacobs, James. Brockhaus, E. Johnson, Juntwaite, Dougherty, Bahr. Second Row: Folkrod, DeLange, Gerlach, Hanchman, Henderson, Dettinger, Hillier, Day, Gumble. Third Row: Chadwick. Feldt, Douglas, Crerar, Deininger, Kreft, Foss, Bromley. Fourth Row: I. Anderson, Ellis, W. Bronson, Chape, Chase, Brunswick, H. Jeffrey, Hugill, Goodman. Fifth Row: Boutelle, Howard, 0. Anderson, Deck, Banta, P. Johnson, Dawe. Allen. Top Row: Edwards, F. Bronson, Capper, Luckow, Welkos, Oppriecht, Peterson, Dettmann, Hungerford. Bottom Picturb Bottom Row: Schley, West, Specht, W'right, Wentzel, Lean, Richardson, Stebbins. Second Row: Wentworth, Lensing, Pfelferkorn, Peach, Lowe, Oberg, Pippel, A. Rose, Trost. Third Row: Littlejohn, Washburn, Powell, Taylor, Masche, Nelson, Lemke, B. J. Rose. Fourth Row: Stromberg, Schmidt, Torsrud, Vincent, Lloyd, Schuhmacher, Zimmer' mann, Wolfe. Fifth Row: Palmer, Knilans, Nye, Shuman, Speck, Brown, Fosterling, Walter. Top Row: Remeikis, Thompson, Graves, Shudlick, Somsen, J. Truesdale, C. Truesdale, Serfling. cated llCamillall and her kid brother llGus" played . made out last vice'president, ning each activity on calendar . . by Ken Brown, will long be remembered . . . Drs. Jeffrey and Hanchman cure all in the Church Night play . . . Conclude with Easter play in auditorium . other college groups invited. . . . uCathedral in the Pinesll . . . second prize in Stunt Night . . . Basketball team practiced every Tuesday night in the girlsl gym . . . Eight o"clock every Tuesday morning . . . 01hr cers gather in E208, room of their sponsor, Mr. Randall . . . Cabinet guides activities . . . John Dettmann, president, gets aid of all officers in planr spring and followed closely . . . Kenneth Allen, asks appropriations for basketball trips . . . Martha Kreft obtains the necessary checks . . . Hazel Brockhaus suggests committees for next party . . . program chairman, Irene Dettinger, and music director, Irene Chape, confer over program details . . . Cable Edwards, secrer tary, and Ruth Baht, membership chairman, plan for a good turnout at next meeting . . . Arlisle Wolff promises good bulletin board publicity . . . Success is a mle with Wesleyans. L. S. C. S. 4Mcz4cm0a5 steady as a rock . . . L. S. C. S. members prove Claus . . . club took on new form . . . llDaddyll what can be done by a church organization . . . Tice gave out all presents . . . including the stag in its second year, membership boosted to over tionary to write home . . . fireplaces, cookies, and forty . . . meetings held every second and fourth carols were send'ofls for the Christmas season and Thursday of the month . . . church parlors scene the trip back home. . . . of open discussions on world affairs . . . Divorce . . . Suicide . . . Church and State . . . Every Parties planned bY committee aPPOinted bY pres; second Thursday . . . second meeting of month ident Harold Vieth . . . Louise Bayer, vicerpresir shows good fellowship . . . and food . . . main, dent, as chairman of all social groups gets committee stay of college students . . . special meetings once members and subIchairmen working - - - Irma- a month sponsored by the college group. . . . gard Messerschmidt completes four years as secree . , . taryetreasurer of the group . . . first when only a Hlkes to Warmers cabln . . . watermelon races . . f b 11 b .1 ll local orgamzatlon . . . then when college group ...oota ames...osvs.1rs...1rs . . . l , g ye g , g comes 111t0 belng . . . llDaddyll Tlce helps w1th commg out on top . . . sleddmg and skatmg par! . . . . humor and adv1ce. . . . t1es . . . recept1on for new members 1n September . anniversary celebration for silver wedding of White elephant party:everyone wearing old Rev. and Ivlrs. Loeper in October . . . mock wed, clothes and trying to sell all they have; George ding with Alfred Teske as the studious young pastor Washington party with flags, stories, and conse' . . . Norbert Loeper as the feminine light . . . uences; s ellin bees . . . ori inalit . . . wra , highlights of their life given. . . . q p g g y p sody . . . dogs vs. cats . . . all come out know' Thanksgiving and turkey . . . special party in ing how to spell - - - alumni given banquet in May church parlors . . . turkey runs . . . turkey faV' - - . honor graduates . . . firm as an oak is the ors . . . but only chicken dinners for lunch . . . theme . . . farewell for Herbert Schaefer . . . lcandy bars at thatl . . . Christmas brings Santa founder of group. Bottom Row: Asplund, Tonn, Belitz, Berg! mann, Lau, Nuern' berg. Second Row: Revs Loeper, M. May! er, Goerlitz, Frey, Hed, Leucinger, Mr. Tice. Third Row: Messer' schmidt, Bayer, Grune' wald, Meuler, Niebuhr, Wawirka. Fourth Row: Marks, Georgi, Hahn, Hammarlund, Bolton, Schauer. Top Row: Schaefer, Lee, Makr holm, Teske, H. Meyr er, Vieth, Frank. Pilgrim F ellowship 4W 8W Reaiaecl when the members of Pilgrim Fellowship traveled around the world in two hours . . . meeting of . . . October 23 the country air called . . . group went for a hay ride . . . when straw was shaken from ears, they wound up eatingecup cakes and . . . Japan, Fan Ball; China, Cup of Tea; Africa, cocoa . . . Fishing Pond at church bazaar on De Game Hunt; England, Shakespearean Wedding; cember 3 caught many a sucker . . . donations Ireland, Potato Relay; and San Francisco, cranberry . Christmas calls for February 5' . . . countries visited by playing games made enterprise profitable . . carols and the Pilgrims furnished them on Decemr ber 11 . . . cocoa heated after the cool air . . . November 20 . . . 25 cents . . . many fills were eaten when sherbet and cookies. . . . Other meetings equally interesting . . . speak, ers such as R. E. Ladd of Evansville; Hilton Hanna, home cooking . . . 26g? hsmdfint tOf $3116 Univeisity; PNiYEZi Kirani guest saw the meat loaf, banana bread, and pumpkin ur 15 Ste :zte:ain:::::1:;; :2: 0::pngZdOE; pie . . . such Is the versatile life of members of eat your fill of etcher - - Pilgrim Fellowship. . . . magical hand . . . movie of the early Congregai .group discussions on Organization is composed of Congregational tional Church in America . . . iiWhat shall we do when we . . . brought interesting young people . . . no definite membership as everybody is welcome to meetings . . . attendance of 30 every Sunday evening in the various subjects . . have nothing to do?" average ideas of idle time . . . surprising the number who church parlors . . . meetings were presided over this year by Henrietta Holtz . . for many of the ideas leading to the various actiVI overlooked the item of sleep . . . social hours at intervals with the playing of Chinese checkers, ana' ' she 15 respon51b1e grams . . . refreshments of pop corn, hO'made H ' 1t1es . . . Wilma Hass was present every Sunday to take over iiin caseii . . . Crystal Belle Brunk transcribed the minutes of meetings and handled candy and apples . . . all go into making the meet ings something to look forward to. . . . the cash taken in . . . Mr. Bigelow is sponsor. Hosts of activities carried on outside of meetings Bottom Row: Poke randt, Holtz, Christianr sen, Brunk, Marsh, Skibrek. Second Row: M. Thomas, Musgrove, McLernon, Stock, Reid, Streeck, Benee ditz. Third Row: Trost, Baumgartner, Kildow, Prouty, Gillis, Johnson. Top Row: Biedron, McCoy, Trovinger, P l a c e , Wilson, Thomas, Dale. Delta Psi Omega Bottom Row: Stone, Shudlick, Brockhaus, Keegan, Owczarski. Second Row: Dettmann, Trovinger, Peterson. Standing: Dubats, Kittleson, Collins, Henderson, Arnold, Scola. tScMWa "3W ancl WW4 go to prove that dramatists have other talents . . . September 27 was the date and the members were the cooks . . . iiWork if you want to eat,, was motto . . . after doing the dishes the group saw iiLove Finds Andy Hardyii at the local Strand. . . . October 28, members of Delta Psi fell right in the midst of Homecoming on Langdon Street . . . "Ceiling Zeron by Frank Wead was idea of trip . the University of Wisconsin players did the acting . . . Chocolate Shop provided refreshments for the group . . . March 31, the outstanding event of the season . . . trip to Milwaukee to see iiThe Sea Gull" with the Lunts . . . Mrs. Lunt was formerly Lynn Fontaine . . . play at Pabst Theatre . . . February 14, group went local . . . saw iiHonolqu" at local theatre. . . . Eating seems to be the favorite sisportii of Delta Psi . . . cooked their own breakfast in Workshop annex . . . November 29 held a dinner at Aunt Mattieis . . . ham, sweet potatoes and iiiixinsii . . . Chase and Trovinger provided entertainment . . . Chase had advantage . . . he carried the coffee . . . December 14 was date of novel Christi mas party . . . after cooking and eating bacon and eggs, gifts were exchanged . . . dishes had to be washed before classes . . . Again on Valentines Day . . . cooked own meals at workshop . . . 108 comic valentines exchanged . . . Miss Holcombe tagged iigossipii. . . . Delta Psi Omega, first honorary Greek organ! ization on campus . . . continues to maintain rigid standards . . . limited membership of twenty . . . must belong to Thespian actively and must have some outstanding dramatic ability . . . Miss Hole combe was one of the original charter members of the local chapter and still acts as director . . . her life is devoted to dramatics and she misses no opportunity to provide the best of dramatic ex' hibits to the members of Delta Psi . . . Group works for the better things in drama . . . keeps in touch by actually visiting and watching famous actors at work. . . . Specially recognized on November 29 were Marie Collins, Celia Owczarski, Alma Keegan, Frances Arnold, and Hazel Brockhaus . . . after serving their apprenticeships in Thespian . . . showed that they were worthy of membership in Delta Psi . . . Ceremony was conducted by director, Miss Hol- combe; stage manager, Geneva Stone; assistant stage manager, Kenneth Peterson; and business manager,John Dettmann . . . oihcers of the organ. ization . . . named after leaders in actual produo tion. Kappa Delta Pi lem 04am 144a fbue honors are given . . . Kadelpians . . . all Acar District convention in Milwaukee, March 10 and demic students with averages above upper quartile 11 . . . Mr. Daggett and members attend . . . mark h ' ' Jumors and Semors e ' e 1ntend to care sessions on education and trends in Wisconsin . . . r n ' cai . . . ' . . . . . . . y 0 1n field Of edu ton newest fratermty partlcularly 1n dlstrlct . . . latest actxvmes me on campus . . installed January, 1938 . . e four . . . sented . . . back home with new ideas to try out charter members 1n graduatlng class thls year. . . . in future schools . . . if they get jobs . . . n0 First social highlight . . . homecoming break! fast . . . Sunday, October 16 . . . initiate six new members . . . and entertain alumni . . . climax of Oiiidating With gavel during fifSt semester was homecoming activities . . . Mr. Clay Daggett, job of Baron Barker . . . Irwin Nye takes over sponsor - - - suggest plans for Kadelpian trip to for second half . . . Alice Christiansen did the Europe in 1940 . . . members think of staying in worry . . . upper quartile . . . always work. . . . penIandrink work . . . Richard Lee carried the sch 1 . . . r m m ' . . 00 . e e her good standmgs necessary bank book .Walter Mode, h1storlan, pasted . dec1de to teach . . . come back as alumm , . . plctures . . . kept notes for future generatlons 0f . perhaps take trlp anyway. . . . . ' . Kappa Delta P1 members . . . rev1ew progress and . Leadlng actlxvzlty 0f the year 15 Pubhcatxon Of growth of fraternity . . . book grew . . . new one Issues of bulletln, "AModern Trends 1n Educatlon . e . . . . , purchased . . . pxctures . . . chppmgs . . . bull . school admlmstrators, supermtendents, prm' . . . . .. . letm Issues . . . proud possessmn of Delta Nu Clpals, teachers . . . all crltlcs 0f magazmes . . . latest activities in education throughout the nation chapter e ' n boast Of alumm n ' ' future members . one issue gives qualiiications of graduating - ' - present members - - - to carry on work begun Academic seniors . . . published each year. . . . this year. ! Maj 109 A 1 ?ga A3 A Js Ky ivfkhrlstl ,Mer 91er i559: Secoljyiiq W ers, Biker ?inlleraDefk N; v '5, w , :1 A A3! X y A Wx V . A :4 x - .JN , Jr: XL w , :.,J A ??Vfwvf q, wAL'J AX Mr Li; A XX WJ x5 Km j Np jy ff ' .3qu . J ; Pi Omega Pi Seated: Connor, Hastreiter, Bisely, Gauthier, Miss Hamilton, Heyrman, Schmidt, Jaquith. Second Row: Wendt, Millis, Godfrey, Fleming, Rose, Scola, Stock, Brobst, Lewis. Third Row: Pippel, Stirn, Pepper, Heide, Groelle, James, Lloyd, Edwards, Sundberg. Fourth Row: Kraft, Bayer, Janz, Bergmann, Moan, Yankow, Vieth, Klann, Wolff. Top Row: Stove, Plyer, Sugden, Laitala, Dubats, Speck, Koeppen. 6W 20 em to become members of Pi Omega Pi . . . honr orary fraternity for commercial students . . . meetings on the third Monday of the month . . . only B average students invited for membership . work of two years counted for admission . . . transfers may have three years to boost grade up.... Alumni file one of projects of year . . . all memr bers have groups to locate . . . former members . . . home town . . . place of business . . . honr ors since graduation from Whitewater . . . when completed will show history of members since orr ganized in 1932 . . . Miss Hamilton takes over sponsorship . . . Mr. Carlson on leave of absence . . . Mr. Crouse has life membership . . . spoke on chapter at Ball Teachers College in Indiana at November 16 meeting. . . . Twentyrtwo members initiated on November 9 . . . first group guests of fraternity at movie llRich ManePoor Girl" . . . sponsored by organization . whole student body help in ticket sales . . . The Bulletin discontinued this year . . . contained news of year and alumni . . . file to take its place 110 . . . Other chapters organized during year . . . One at Pennsylvania . . . subject to approval of all other chapters. . . . Of the midryear graduates first to be placed were members of fraternity . . . Vera Millis at Neenah . . . Hugo Klann at Viroqua . . . placed at end of first semester . . . Jean Henderson secured posir tion at Jefferson . . . succeeds Irma Biggin, former president of group, who accepted a. new posir tion at Milwaukee Vocational. . . . Ed. Gauthier led group for the past year . . . Donald Heyrman, Viceepresident, helped when needed . . . live at same house . . . in direct con! tact with each other . . . Dorothy Bisely, secree tary, informs alumni and chapters . . . Bernard Hastreiter keeps national dues paid, and leaves a balance in the bank for the local group . . . Agnes Schmidt as historian attends to the alumni hle and social functions of the group. . . . Climax of years activities was the formal bani quet at Heaven City . . . seniors leave guiding reins to next yearls cream of the crop. Sigma Tau Delta Seated: Vance, Heide, Miss Knosker. Second Row: Thompson, Miller, Sugdcn, Holtz, Capper. Rm GMMW appear in English fraternity members . . . twelve to fifteen juniors and seniors with major or minor in English . . . chosen by Miss Knosker, director . must carry upper quarter grades in English . . . divided in two sections . . . one open for present members and alumni of Sigma Tau Delta. . . . other allows WOI'k . . . sponsor prose contest any member of student body . . . Miss Beulah Charmley, sponsor, judge of material submitted . winning contributions published in Rectangle, official magazine of the fraternity. . . . Meetings held second and fourth Wednesday of month . . . Miss Knosker's room scene of readings, plays, and poetry presentations . . . between 4 and 5 o1clock . . . Begin year activities with picnic at Log Cabin on November 9 . . . ribbon pledging . . Elsbeth Miller, Henrietta . buffet supper on November 15 was beginning of formal of new members . Holtz, Loren Thompson, Harry Sugden . . mitiation ceremony . . . candlelight service . . . book reviews . . . included Miss Charmley1s latest work, 11Fly1'ng Joy" . . . new members receive crimson rose, the symbolic emblem of the fra' ternity. . . . Founders1 Day celebrated with banquet January 19 . . . attended plays in body . . . traveled to Milwaukee and Madison . . . saw Helen Hayes and other stage celebrities . . . Miss Knosker see Iected national historian of 62 chapters in United States . . . Volume of contemporary literature awarded winners of each division of prose contest . contains works of other chapters. . . . Margaret Heide selected by Miss Knosker to lead group V . . portrayed queen of England in Stunt Night production . . . Loren Thompson saw wit of Americans as king of England . . . reviewed campus activities of American collegesaWhiter water . . . Original book reviews submitted by each member for criticism .. chatting about them. . . . . spend evening Mary Vance keeps record of meetings conducted by Margaret Heide . . . Miss Knosker, director, and Miss Charmley, sponsor, carry on work of acting ofhcers. 111 Inter'Sorority Council Seated: Johnson, Mill, enbah, Yoder, Zehme, Anderson. Second Row: Pippel, Hahn, Bayer, Bisely, Sund' berg, Krueger, Hen, derson. nawammwmpm is the InterrSOrority Council . . composed of two representatives from each sorority and their presie dent . i . ofhces rotate each year . . . Toni John- son takes over meetings this year . . president of Theta Sigma group . . . Dorothy Bisely, Delta Sigma president was secretaryftreasurer. Began season with freshmen tea in September . set rules for semester rushing . . see that all abide by rules . problems of sororities dis' cussed at meetings . . friendly cooperation air 0 Novelty rush parties like the Tri Sigmas put on last fall are but one of the results of the work of the Inter- Sorority Council. of all meetings no rivalry here . . . Really big event is interesorority dance on January 14 . . . honor all new pledges and actives 0f the four groups music by Larry Travis . decorations in top hat motilf . . . hats and canes . . dancing silr houettes . waltzers minuets no jitr terbugs . close another semester with close hare mony among members. Rushing rules, pledging, Alvord trophy, bowling all activities of Council. IntertFmtemity Council Seated: Schultz, Ott, Hastreiter, Weiss. Sec- ond Row: Schultheis, Truesdale, Tesmer, Bull, Lee. 0W Men 6W9 to formulate plans for annual ball and other fraz ternity actlvities . . . February 11 was important date . . . Hamilton Gym decorated in red and white with hearts and cupids . . . Wally Millefs popular Milwaukee orchestra gave out khsweet swingh from a huge heartrshaped bandstand at the north end of the gym . . . three presidents and guests met dancers as they entered through heartr studded archway. . . . o Cupid given the run-around when Mar- tha Kreft, A n d r e w Goodman, Ethel Alft, Bill Dubats, Marthann Walker, and Harvey Weiss see Carol Yoder and George Luckow through the line at the interfratemity ball. Third year of existence for this organization . . . big feature is the EtBallh Which attracts as much attention as the Prom . . . work for future frae ternity beneflts of mutual goodwill and cooperaI tion . . . carry on other activities . . . Interfra' ternity bowling on three Sundayts in March . . . Touch football in fall keeps the boys warm . . . Spring brings competition in soft ball. Alpha Sigma Top Picturee Seated: Lohr, Krueger, Tubbs, Ellis, F. B. Arnold, Rogers, 1. J. Anderson, J. Roherty. Second Row: Mikkelson, Stromberg, G. Richardson, Simonson, R. Roherty, Kroken. Third Row: Flood, Ewalt, Bahr, F. R. Arnold, OhBrien, Koenings. Fourth Row: OhConnor, Groelle, Mullen, Stieber, Kirby, Henry, D. Richardson. Bottom Picture- Seated: Church, C. Anderson, Walter, Bruns, Kreft, Winters, Herreman, Hed. Second Row: Broughton, Winn, Mansur, Pepper, Schoenmann, Wolff, Smith. Third Row: Chape, Gaskell, Saunders, Bower, Sundberg, Bierbaum, Davidson, Meyer. Top Row: Duehm'ng, Dolan, V. Peters, Zimmermann, Henderson, Palmer, Stocker, E. Peters. Welcome to 0144 JW greeting of Alpha Sigma sorority in September . nowlocated 0n Cottage Street . . . and proud of it too . . . Didnht give much time for girls to catch their breaths before they had Open house party . .1 . September 18 to be exact . . . played cards and served refreshments. . . . A buffet supper and scavenger hunt marked the flrst rush party . . . final directions of the evening, hNow go to where Greek letters shine, to meet 114 true friends and also dine," . . . so girls returned to WThe Househ . . . prizes awarded and pieralae mode served . . . Bassett House scene of next gete together . . . Formal dinner is second rush party . . . background of candlelight . . . Irene Chape played violin solo . . . Rubensteinh uMelody in 1:m . welleknown Alpha Sigma Trio rendered medi ley of songs . . . group singing also on the program . . . Mildred Meyer accompanied. . . . HOMECOMING . . . that word spelled forr tune for the Alpha Sigmas . . . won hrst place on their house decorations and on their float decorar tions . . . Float entered in most original division . . . depicted spider tWhitewateQ ensnaring a fly tStevens PoinQ in a web . . . Caption, uThe catch of the season11 . . . House has canopy lead! ing from porch to sidewalk . . . 11Welcome Alumr n1", . . . footballs on each side of the house . . . part: of decorations . . . not for use . . . Floodz lights illuminating house makes it most effective . . . More than eighty attend Homecoming lunche eon . . . forty were alums . . .Lorrain Winters, secretary of Alumni Association gave response . . . Mrs. Cleo Goff Bartels who was president of Alumni acted as Chairman of afternoon . . . Alpha Sigma trio of a few years back rendered selections . . . Dora Duerst, Dorothy Burgdorff, Charlotte Saalsaa t . . Luncheon prepared by two of mothers . . . Mrs. T. T. Goff and Mrs. MCKeand . . . Informal reception at house after game . . . doughnuts and coffee help "warm up". . . . October 13 sees formal pledging ceremonies . . . seventeen new pledges for group . . . Buffet supr per after pledging . . . October 29 hold allrschool mixer amid autumn atmosphere of corn shocks, pumpkins, scare crows . . . Swingrcopaters of Hartford furnished the music . . . Regardless of 0 Alumni honored at Homecoming banquet when Alpha Sigma actives play host . . at the tthouseh with refreshments . school activities pledges found time to give dinner for actives . . . after the dinner girls completed sewing project for needy children. . . . Hell Week . . . joy of every sorority on the campus . . . Alpha Sigs didn,t forget trip to cemr etery . . . n0 makeup for pledges either . . . um! brellas and overnight bags as usual . . . plus a night of makefbeh'eve freckles and braided pigtails . stunts to be given . . . College Grill set as stage. . . . 11C011egc Specialh leaves on time . . . just long enough to give third place to entry in stunt night performance . . . May 19 sees spring formal in the Melfs gym . . . July 22 is summer formal at Riviera . . . Del Courtney doing the honor. . . . Hats off to Frances Herreman editor of Minneiska . . . Anabel Walters, Miriam Ellis, Irene Chape . trio with Mildred Meyer as accompanist . . . three Class secretaries from sorority . . . Carol Anr derson, Betty Rogers, Ruth Bahr . . . Joan Roherz ty secretary of W.S.G.A. . . . Officers for the year: Lucille Krueger, president; Florence Arnold, vice'president; Miriam Ellis, sec retary; Betty Rogers, treasurer; Joan Roherty, corre' sponding secretary; Iva Jane Anderson, and Gen Mullen, Sergeantzatrarms; Joyce Tubbs, pledge mas; ter; Mrs. Fricker, sponsor. . Pledge party ends . . Alpha Sigs out for a little air and get their pictures taken . . . Simonson, Herreman, Pepper, Anderson, Smith, Wolff, Roherty, Saunders watch the birdie . . . The Web and the Spider find the girls hard at work on prize-winning float. 115 Chi Delta Rho Top Picture, ActiveSe Seated: Mr. Prucha, Hastreiter, Rennemo, Barney, Goodman. Second Row: Plyer, T. Graham, Lee, K. Peterson. Sullivan, Christianson, Bertodatto, Demerath, Hassl. Third Row: McCoy, Hinkle, Slauson, Tesmer, Skoumal, L. Petersen, Beilke, Arnold. Bottom Picture, Pledges- Seated: Koudelik, Theologe, Shattuck, Poulost Winsor, Olson. Second Row: Remeikis, Kenzler, Austin, Harrison, Oppriecht, 5W7 Game but the Chi Delts caught the tail end of winter for a sleigh ride . . . March 6 was the day . . . cold snap following the heavy snow . . . two horses, 3. hayrrack, and guests made up the party . . . re! ports were that iipeople have more fun than any, body." . . . first time the boys have tried such a party but not the last. . . . Term started off for the boys on September 8 with a smoker for new and 01d fellows alike . . . over fifty fellows played cards, sang, ejaculated the bovine, and did nothing in the crowded chapter 116 Hartel, Hittesdorf, Helwig, Turner, Meyers. room laden with the bluish haze of Turkish t0, baccos . . . lunch and a general songfest wound up the evening of welcome for newcomers to the campus . . . Another smoker for formal pledging was held in September when eighteen fellows were presented with the black and gold shields. . . . Came Homecoming and 609 Main was again the scene of hilarity and what have you . . . decorae tions supreme tuntil the raim . . . alumni with their clothes getting mixed taccidently or otherr wisei with others . . . Banquet at the house at supper time . . . attended by all actives, some pledges, and many welcome old faces . . . Bilkey, Hickey, Daggett, Bruns, Reese, Davidson, Winsor, Holt, Dike, Erickson, Hafeman, Jones, and Koudelik all present and eating . . . when finger'bowl was passed, found out where the actives first contacted their traditional line. . . . Quiet a necessity for some time after that week end Uinancesl . . . the boys made good use of the fall weather to play touchefootball on Sundays . . . did some studying, too. . . . December 4 saw Barney, Rennemo, Schultheis, Sullivan, and Tesmer traveling to Madison to at tend the State Conclave held in the Memorial Union . . . no new oilicers were elected . . . Barney retained position of Bursar and Schultheis, Grand Historian. . . . The following Friday in the girls gym, the annual pledge party again held as a Christmas affair . . . crest surrounded by blue lights and a Christmas tree with colored lights in each corner for atmos' phere . . . repair crew always on hand to replace burned bulbs . . . ran out of new ones early . . . Moonlight Waltzes without a moon . . . gifts for pledges and guests . . . Mr. Beery seemed to em joy his little car . . . and the rubber panties for Mr. and Mrs. Prucha . . . Another party on Jan, nary 11 and 12 . . . a movie party . . . for lie everybody was invited . . . "Going Placesll at the Strand Theatre . . . packed house both nights. . . . Then came llhelleweek" . . . so many meek little lads offering toothpicks . . . llYes Sir? llI would be glad to, Sirll . . . similar unfamiliar remarks heard . . . lanterns and specially designed paddles always present . . . the joint llyes and noll dates with the Alpha Sigma pledges . . . llHay Foot, Straw Footll. . . . 80 went the year for the fellows from the brown house at 609 Main . . . came spring and summer near . . . June 3, the date . . . THE event . . . the annual spring formal . . . Saturday noon start, ed the affair . . . shoes to clean, trousers to press, corsages to order, etc., etc., . then off to the party . . . eat, spreadethe usual, and dance . . . and finally home . . . when? . . . Another completely successful year for this group . . . outstanding men all over campus . . . Schmitt, Plyer, and McCoy on football squad; Plyer star guard on basketball team; Olaf Lee, Andy Goodman, and Schultheis in forensics . . . Olaf brought home honors in discussion contest . . . Ken Peterson still generally holding honors; Bill Tesmer getting lower than ever with his bass voice . members found in menls Chorus and band and others. . . . thcers for first semester: Schultheis, president; Barney, vice'president; Goodman, treasurer; Ren- nemo, secretary . . . Second semester: Goodman, president; Christianson, Vicerpresident; Lee, treasurr er; Tesmer, secretary; Mr. Prucha, sponsor. 1"This is no bulPl and Koudelik picks up ax to prove it . . . Out on the porch Arnold, Lee, Barney, McCoy, Slauson, Christianson, and Schultheis are shotewith the camera. 117 Delta Sigma Epsilon 14W 7Wa9m the baby second consecutive year in running for the trophy . . . year winning it . . . in possession of Delta Sigma sorority . . . of the sorority groups . . . second consecutive scholastic . . . social . . . little sister somebody to notice. . . . Freshmen rushed at buffet supper, sing, and the! atre party . . . September 20 is first rush party of season . . . Domestic Science rooms scene of aC! tivity . . . walls foretell cooking ability of Delta Sigs . . . meals do too . . . adjourn to theatre . . . full stomachs . . . no aches and pains . . . about 60 girls make up list entertained . . . Three days later celebrate Founderqs Day . . . wear sorority colors . . . special courtesies to students and faC' ulty . . . no apple polishing meant. . . . October 4 marks final rush of first semester . . . Mother Goose comes to school . . . drawings, figl . . Mrs. O1Connor1s dancing school . . . dancing feature of evening . . . Jack and Jill separate . . . Woman who lived in the shoe forgets trouble for one evening . . . Mistress Mary, though quite contrary, promotes good fellowship and brings out the sun at the dance . . . Humpety' ures, favors . Seated: Pippel, J; Hahn, Owczarski, Bisely, Stoik, L. Christiansen, Fosterh'ng, Juntwaite. Second Row: Sylvester Dumpety is put together . . . but broken again at the end of the party. . . . Pledging takes place October 19 . . . eleven make vows to be true to Delta Sigma . . . pledge duties already piled up . . . one week of rest when hell week begins for last yeafs pledges . . . OCtO' ber 26 marked end of activities as pledges for five . . . Duties given again to eleven new pledges . . . yellow ribbons . . . no makezup . . . shoes to shine . . . waituntil11yesIno" dates . . ances at the house every evening . . . new rhymes to remember . . . new courtesies to be extended . . . final initiation . ter members . . perform; . new glory in active chapz . . Homecoming brings results . . . first alumni return for game . . . honored by win! ning first prize in most beautiful float division . . Victory the goal of Whitewater . . formals . . . football heroes . . girls in . . forecast result of game in afternoon . . . Luncheons and dinners planned for first alumni . . new actives meet . new pledges congratulated with more duties . . . former members . . more fun for the ac; tives. . . . Crerar, Feldt, DeLange, Chesemore, Beneditz, A. Hahn, Viskoe. Third Row: Zander, Roberts, Wawirka, A. Christiansen, Doering, James, Hron. Top Row: Sanders, Alft, Asplund, Wentzel, Jaquith, Schoenke, Schley. 118 Dorothy Bisely, blonde senior, was chosen as president . . . handled the position with same pre' cision noticeable in other activities . . . Minneiska, W.S.G.A., W.A.A., etc. . . . Irene Pippel as vice president puts pledges on best behavior . . . Celia Owczarski sees that the alumni are informed about activities and takes care of the business writing as corresponding secretary . . . a bit proud of . . Jane Hahn records the minutes of meetings and preserves the records . . . Ruth Stoik sees that all bills are paid . . . does not hesir tate When there is money to be collected . . . Sergeant'atrarms, Ruth Fosterling, helps historian, Alice Hahn, write down the news and keep an ac! curate story of the life and working of Delta Sigma . served as chaplain this year, while Thora Juntwaite kept the girls entertained with parties, teas, etc, as social chairman . . . achievements . . Lorraine Christiansen . . . Helen Roberts, assistant treasurer . . . Anita Jacqulth, alumni secretary . . . Pledges elect ofEcers too . . . Ruth Ches- more in charge of meetings . . . Dorothea Hron sees that all doings are told to active Chapter through her minutes . . . Mrs. Wells served as sponsor for group. . . . With the dawn of a new year, D. S. E. took advantage of the snow to invest in a sleigh ride . . . Mrs. OiCOnnor,patroness, and Mrs. Wells, sponsor, entertained at the OSCODHOF home after the ride . . . fire! place, weiners, and marshmallows . . . Mr. O'Connor showed model City . . . in' terests girls in architecture and sculpture . . . January 18 began social life. Actives pity pledges . . result is a the! atre party . . . iiFour Daughters" puts new ideas into little sisters . to use them though until after hell week food . . . . no chance in February . . . fun and 0 Delta Sigmas entertain rushees in Mrs. OtCon- noHs studio . . . Bisely, A. Hahn, Christiansen, Prouty, J. Hahn, Owczarski, Schunk, and Chese- more stop for a while on their porch . . . Victory won for group in Homecoming parade while Owczarski, Juntwaite, and Prouty hold up the football for victory. double iifis'i for D. S. E. girls . . . must obtain them some place as they are never on report cards . reason for scholarship trophy. . . . Winter wonderland carries over until February 10 . . . win first honorable mention in stunt night . snowballs tcotton, they told afterwardsy . . . snow men . . . Christmas trees, wonder is Where they found the trees at that time of the year . . . Harmony trio makes first appearance . . Irene Pippel, Thora Juntwaite, and Violet Feldt . . . Walking and singing . . . Then wind up season . annual spring formal . . . May 27 . . . end of third year for sister sorority. Phi Chi Epsilon Bottom Row: Stangel, Biedron, Chase, M. Boutelle. Second Row: Somsen, LeHingwell, Dubats, Klannt Gauthier, Mr. Goff. Third Row: Reisenauer, Arvold, Fischer, Allen, Hunt, Millis, P. Lewein, Korpal. Fourth Row: Jansky, Knilans, Sharpe, Nye, Sweet, Baker, Torhorst, Cook, Koeppen. Fifth Row: Harbort, Witkowski, Heyrman, Shuman, Jacobson, Droegkamp, Ransom, Ott, Capper. Top Row: Schultz, Shattuck, Hulick, E. Boutelle, Austin, Mead, M. Lewein, Dettmann, Hungerford, Thompson. 4WdMW in spring to wind up a full year Of Phi Chi Epsilon . . Crystal Ball Room of Hotel Schroeder was the scene . . social activity . . more than seventy five actives and pledges swung their fair ladies . alumni, well represented, did a little swinging of their own . . . dividends paid on glee clubis half hour practices before each meeting . . . Chap! py Leifingwellis warblers rewarded with nice hand . . . Kautz accompanied on the ivories. . . . Warm glow of Homecoming properly wound up with a banquet at Guild Hall before the home coming dance . . . alumni and actives out in full force . . . each member invited his father 01' a male guest . . . Master of ceremonies, Hugo Klann, called on Gasper Farina and Kermit Schultz . . Mr. H. C. Lefiingwell spoke for the fathers present . . . Mr. P. A. Carl, son and Mr. Dwight Warner addressed the assemr bly . . . iiChapii led the boys in group sing! to speak for alumni . ing. . .. Rain during the night changed exterior house decorations . . . crepe paper color ran slightly . . . Phi Chis resurrect horse drawn hearse of am cient vintage for parade float . . . pledges equip; ped with paperemache heads and blankets play horse . . . mourning buggy preceded by six paII bearers in black robes . . . sign over hearse reads, "Here Lies Stevens Point" . . . everything come plete down to and including the corpse . . . wins first priZe in most humorous division of parade. . . . Pledge party in honor of the new actives and Earl Galleis . decorations pledges held on November 18 . . . orchestra furnished the music .. consisted of paddles over the entrance . . . symr bol 0f the past for some, of the future for others. . . . Hell week found pledges running around with a bottle of catsup in hip pocket . . . tense moment in Miss Bisbeeis shorthand class when pledge bounces bottle on the floor . . . bottle didnit break, but . . . llIlll make the president Clean it up if itls . . Whisk brooms and hair ribbons add to charm and poise 0f pledges . . . all over the floorll . Chesnickls hair ribbon particularly becoming. . . . Sponsored WThe Girl Downstairs," movie benez fit . . . not a new version of llWhy donlt you come up some time?" . . . Mel Koeppen selected as editor'inrchief of Royal Purple for second semester . . . Bill Dubats man, aging editor. . . . Irwin Nye elected president of Kappa Delta Pi, academic honorary fraternity . . . Bill Dubats, president of commercial club . . . John Dettmann, Vice'president . . . Edward Gauthier elected preSr ident of senior class . . . Harry Hulick, president of junior class . . . Ivan Reese, president of fresh! man class. . . . Stunt Night . . . auctioned off and soldarestriC' tive wearing apparel item to a male member of the faculty . . . didnlt know they used them . . . described as no stoop, no squat, n0 squint . . . Telescope equipped with searchlight for night work sold to dean of women . . . pitch fork sold to member of the faculty, who, according to his own motion pictures, knows how to use it . . . memory . Bids from feminine faculty members sounded suspiciou5r maybe the ladies had course sold to another faculty member . . 1y like pledges . . . colds. . . . Fraternity basketball team plays in Janesville tournament . . . Kent Austin selected hall tourna' ment man" and awarded trophy . . . Kent se' lected as center for all star team of southern con, ference. . . . Hugo Klann was president hrst semester . . . William . Raymond Somsen, treas! Edward Gauthier, viceapresident Reisenauer,secretary . . urer . . . Kent Austin, corresponding secretary . . . George Schultz, historian . . . Maurice Bou- telle, sergeant'atearms . . . Art Ransom, pledge master. . . . Second semester, William Dubats was elected . Chapman LeH-ingwell, Viceepresident . . Allen Har- . Irwin Nye, corresponding SCC' president . . . . . Raymond Somsen, treasurer . bort, secretary . . retary Melvin Koeppen, historian Harold Droegkamp, sergeantratearms . . . Art Ransom, pledge master. Seated: Tyvand, H. Barker, Dudley, Reese, Greenhalgh, Loretti, Eastman. Ransom. Second Row: Trachte, Powers, Wilson, Froemming, Halgeson, Kutz, Myre, Kautz. Third Row: Speck, Huschka, Olson, Gehri, J. Barker, Derivan, Injasoulian. Fourth Row: Molnar. Benzer, Douglas, Truesdale, Erickson, Radowski, McQuade. Top Row: Nolop, Wirth, Yach. Gullickson, Hill, Mayer, Chesnik. 121 Sigma Sigma Sigma Top Picture- Seated: Yoder, Stone, Millenbah, Henderson, Brennan, Goelzer, Boyd, Second Row: Dahle, Knilans, Webb, Onsrud, Gage, Lewis, Tibbitts. Top Row: Hammarlund, Mathison, Yochum, Burton, Marshall, Benn, Murdock. Bottom Picture Seated: Brobst, Good, Steger, Shadewald, Moe, Zimmerman. Second Row: Carlson, Lavering, Engebretsen, Dunbar, Voegeli, Grosinski, Walker. Top Row: Wiedenhoeft, Schmid, Peterson, Dewey, Plumb, Dobbs, Walther, Marx. 5';me 649p 8W fireplace of Alpha Xi chapter Sigma Sigma Sigma old fashioned food . . . Cider and doughnuts . . . sorority . . . mark Chapter as most efficient . . . September 22 marks rushing period . . . Octoberi sorority duties . . . consider activities and the way give final party . . . formal dinner at Aunt Matr they are carried on . . . hope to retain permanent tie s . . . rushees on best behavior . . . seek to possession . . . Summer formal at Riviera on Lake impress actives . . . show they Will be worthy of Geneva . . . prove one of efficiencies . . . keep membership in most eiflcient. . . . group together durmg Vacatlon. . - - White and purple Chrysanthemums . . . money, Entertain rushees at bay ride in country . . . making scheme . . . Homecoming celebration in' old fashioned party . . . old fashioned fun . . . complete without TriSig pompoms . . . alumnienr 122 tertain'ed at dinner at Green Shutters . . . game In afternoon . . . tea at house after game to end week of activities and planning . . . wait until next year for big reunion. . . . Regional meet in St. Louis calls seven actives and Miss Benson to Missouri over Teachersa Cone vention in November . . . Marion Carlson, Jean Henderson, Marion Marx, Mae June Millenbah, Geneva Stone, Marthann Walker, and Carol Yoder . shopping tours, ceremonies . . . round table discussions . . . home and back to social life again . . . Sponsor entertains at informal tea November 20 . . . actives and pledges all invited. . . . Joe Kollege Jig . . . November 19 . . . most popular Jimmie Mullen Wins girlsa hearts . . . boys give allegiance to Beatrice Brennan, Tri Sig candi' date . . . music by Johnny Kurtz . . . grand march . . . pompoms for Greek letters . . . spot lights . . . everyone out . . ular for one evening. . . . . reign of most pop, Alumni and pledges honored at sorority house December 10 . . . then thoughts turn to Christmas . . . Kris Kringle . . . Santa Claus . . . gifts to exchange . . .lunch to serve . . . hearts to be played kards usedh . . . them home to mothers . . . friends . . . sweethearts . . . Back again to hnish season . . . Valentine party on February 5 o Brennan, Voegeli, Goelzer, Steger, Burton, Millenbah, and Moe sit and watch the people go past . . . Joe Kollege Jig finds each girl voting for her most popular man . . . Cocktail party at House entertains rushees. . more hearts ths time on cardboardh . . . Practice makes perfect . . . next victim? . . . human hearts? . . . New pledges, new actives come into being dur' ing second semester . . . candlelight ceremony at house . . . then came Honolulu . . . rather the girls went to HHonoluluh . . . only the picture show . . . pop corn balls made afterwards . . . thrown and eaten . . . pledges then decide to en! tertain . . . Party given in girls, gym . . . couple affair . . . guests include Miss Benson, Miss Hamr ilton, and Mr. and Mrs. Weidman. . . . Officers of sorority showed Jean Henderson, preSr ident . . . Mae June hallienbah, vice'president, took over When Jean accepted oosition in Jefferson High School . . . . corresponding secretary, Geneva Stone . . , sentinel, Marth- . keeper of grades, La Vernabelle adviser, IVIiss Benson. . . . recording secretary, Carol Yoder treasurer, Beatrice Brennan . . . arm Walker . . Goelzer . . . Rummage sale on March 4 gives extra Shekels in the pocket . . . adds to gala aHair in spring . annual formal in mengs gym . . . May 6 is red letter day for past, present, and future memr bers . . . another season drawn successfully to a Close, Sigma Tau Gamma 6W RM Z0 70p in milk can . . . bowling trophy given by Phi Chils during stunt night performance . . . Dr. Lee uses for waste basket . . . turns tables on brothers who thought they had llput something overll . .. bowling tournament won by Sigmas this year . . . possession of real bowling trophy . . . Sigma Shambles puts rhythm in the bones . . . stunt night entry receives honorable mention for Sigma chorus . . . stage director Richard Lee drills in dance routines . . . originaltoo . . . chorusllgalsll drill . . . Sigma swing band makes first appearance in music for the act . . . ballet dancer, Bill Breese, comes and goes . . . pledges get chance of life time to boo actives . . . planted in crowd . . . cheer Breese as he goes through acrobatic stunts. . . . Fraternity moves next to Phi Chi house . . . no need for spyrglasses now . . . no broken windows or neighbor feuds . . . at least not to mention . cats found on stairs . . . balls thrown on lawn . . . all go into making life more interesting . . . Social activities begin With smokers, pledge parties, banquets, dances . . . forty members . . . twenty'flve pledges show large variety of interests and talents. . . . Homecoming banquet October 15 revives old brotherhoods . . . alumni guests of honor . . speeches . . . toasts . . . Walworth Hotel scene of action . . . enter float in parade . . . pledges decorate house with lighting effects featuring huge purple llWll . . . then back to work again. . . . But not for long . . . pledge party on November 11 brings back more Old friends . . . music by Earl Galle and orchestra . . . decorations With silver stars and midnight skies . . . attendance over seventy couples . . . pledge paddles serve as dance programs . . . not used for paddles during evening . . . only a place to sign your name. . . . approximate miniature On January 28 new idea for get'together . . 4 informal dance in girlls gym . . . same month sees smoker for actives With sponsor Dr. Lee serving as host . . . Interrfrat ball in February keeps presir dent Harvey Weiss on the g0 . . . hearts to be cut . . . cupids to be made lpaper onesy . . . streamers to be made . . . Pledges again honored . this time at slBoweryll dance . . . Girls gym Seated: Dr. Lee, Bull, Bronson, Weiss, Yankow, Fronek, Koenings. Second Row: Spencer, Tabaka, Smiley, Gilman, Funk, Strohacker, Klein. Third Row: Kelley, Jost, Kolb, Lee, Vieth, Reynolds, Sundberg, Whitnall. Fourth Row: McGraw, E. Fritz, Jackson, Stobie, Conforti, Tolzman, A. Fritz, Luckow. Top Row: Trovinger, Norregaard, Hanson, Peters, Stecker, Mullen, Teske, Keel. 124 turnedinto club . . . flickering candles . . . tables . music by llJoe Phonograph" . . . Harold Vieth as bartender . . . old clothes and costumes . wild and woolly . . . prigs never had a chance . . . Breese shows off strength . . . sweep girls of? feet . . . only to prevent his toes being stepped on . . A jitterbugs try to outdo each other . swell time was had by all . . . ready for more. . . . National Convention at Cleveland, Ohio, calls Harvey Weiss, December 27 to 30 . . . brought home new ideas . . . try them at next meetings . . pledges get whiff of new fangled tones at hell week initiation . . . Sentinels seen walking around school with guns . . . courtesies at the door while a llgentleman" opens the door . . . bricks to count . . . tombstones to find . . . dates to bring back . . . then real dates for the boys . relieved after not talking to girls for week . then find out they cannot talk on this one night of nights . . . try to give actives the slip . . . think they succeeded until next meeting . .. swats tell different story . . . Informal initiation postponed because of cold weather . . . February 13 actives think it about time . . . colder still . . . fine night to be out in the cold . . . "We wont be home until morning" . . . rather surprised be cause they werenlt. . . . Unusual group? . . . definitely yes . . . Harvey Weiss as sports editor of Royal Purple . . . presie dent of interrfrzlt council . . . next yearls president of commercial club . . . James Mullen, most pop, ular man and prom king . . . Harold Vieth, presir dent of L.S.C.S. . . . Henry Yankow, business manager of Royal Purple . . . Alfred Teske photo clubss president for first semester . . . Robert Strohacker assistant in the school bank . . . Rich! ard Lee, favorite saxophonist . . . Lawrence Troy, inger, associate editor of Royal Purple as well as Thespian head . . . Football, too, calls its heroes . . . Strohacker, Mullen, Bronson, Sattler, Sundr berg, Koenings brothers, see action during the season . . . Basketball gets its share with Koenr ings, Gau, Krause, Henderson. . . . thcers responsible for the success of the year . . . president, Harvey Weiss . . . ViceIpresident, Harvey Bronson . . . secretary, Henry Yankow . treasurer, Tony Koenings . . . corresponding secretary, Fred Norregaard . . . correspondent, Walter Smiley . . . historian, Given Klein . . . sergeant'at'arms, Ervin Fronek . . . chaplain, Al- bury Bull . . . sponsor, Dr. Lee. 0 Sigma boys stand on porch the better to see you . . . Hanson: Gilman, Stecker, McCraw, A. Koenings, Klein, R. Koenings, Conform are the guilty ones. Pledgese Seated: Koenings, Breese, Henderson. Second Row: Adams, Vandermause, G. Rath. Meyer, Achen. Third Row: Clowes, Klonowski, Holloway, Traynor, Ortmann, Walker. Top Row: Bronson, Stauflacher, Honzik, Prust, Li Rath. Seated: Peters, Coach Spencer, Klein. Standing: McGraw, Stecker, Fridie. Theta Sigma Upsilon m, Seated: Bayer, Hull, Johnson, Horkan, Hugill, Hammarlund, Janz. Second Row: Engan, Lowe, DuBois, Ketter, Garfoot, Scott, Priske. Third Row: Feldschneider, Moore, Addie, Meuler, Torsrud, Nickos, Thingstad. Top Row: Prielipp, Lough Thayer, Evans, Zehme, Brunswick, Hollister, Cartier. 7am 5W 74m from Theta Sigma group . . . Lucille Janz Wins . . highest scholastic average . Mary Hull . president of Treble commercial honor . of sorority girl this year also . . chosen primary senior ace . . Clef also . and sorority crests . . . . Rose sweaters with silver shields . new idea of Theta Sigmas this year . . . attracted attention of entire school . worn on all sorority holidays and special occae sions . . . Good oldrfashioned picnic marked first pledge party held at City Park . . . traditional Wiener roast and marshmallow roast, too . . . G0 in for oldrfashioned theme in a big way . . . Homecoming float won honorable mention . . . oldefashioned girleToni Johnsonwperched on top of car . . . afraid of falling off . . . almost wrecke With slogan, llWe did it then; we can do it againf helped Whitewater ed in downpour of rain . . . on to victory . . . Afterethergame tea at the house for the alumni and teterartete . . . Homecoming banquet at Aunt Mattiels. . Highlights of social activities . . . Mrs. Leflingl Well and Mrs. Carlson entertain at pop corn feast 126 Gladden . . . Early morning breakfasts given by Mrs. Bigelow and Mrs. Daggett . . . Christmas party at Miss Leflerls home . . . Chinese checkers . . . the game thatls all the craze . . . Authors . . . to inspire the literature lovers Cl . . . Anagrams to help improve vocabularies tmaybel . . . to top it all off ice cream designed With Christmas trees. . . . Chili supper to provide for that Sunday evening meal problem . . . large turnout . . . so large in fact the sorority girls had to go out to supper after it was all over With . . . held the Sunday . another on the Sunr day before Easter vacation . . . Ten baskets for poor families as Christmas gifts kept girls busy wrapping packages buying groceries some boy made happier with marbles . . . balls . . . dolls for the girls . . . food for the par; evening before Christmas . . ents. . . . Hell week with its sorrows and joys . . . sorI rows for the pledges . . . joys for the actives . . . rooms cleaned . . . shoes polished . . . dresses re' made . . . skirts shortened . . . fingers pricked . girls seen carrying torches . . . but not for the purpose the ordinary reader might think . . . rose ribbons and candy pleased actives most. . . . Tea for faculty members at the house on Feb, ruaryS . . . Patronesses, pledges, sponsor, sorority presidents, and faculty are honored . . . Allr college mixer, too, brings sorority into school limel h'ght . . . Dr. Beery serves as trafhc manager and mixer . . . Music by Larry Travis . . . Christmas trees provide atmosphere for mixer December 2 . . . Every now and then a rummage sale or a candy sale helps to raise money . . . A11 goes toI ward buying the new sign . . . proud of the rose letters on silver backgrounds. . . . Final spree 0f the year . . . spring formal in Romeo and Juliet settings aid to show alumni how . . farewell for graduates . . . plans made for summer formal . . . Duty of con! welcome they are . ducting meetings given to Antoinette Johnson . . . elected president of the sorority . . . besides which her duties as prexy 0f Interrsorority council keep her busy . . . When Toni isrft there Virginia Horkan takes over . . . pledges really get to know this ofhcer for she rules supreme as pledge master . . . Mary Hull had the task of taking the minutes . Betty Hugill kept the bank always hounding for money . . . at the meetings . . balance . . . Louise Bayer as editor brought the sorority news in . . Miss Bertha Lefler as sponsor made herself fond in the printed form in the national magazines . memory of the chapter. . . . Lucille Janz awarded sorority scholarship brace, let . . . custom of local chapter . . . givi em to outstanding student each semester . . . Louieas fourth chance to wear the bracelet . . . most popular last year . . . secretaryrtreasurer of senior class . .. Theta Sigmas well represented in school activities . , . Virginia Horkan, president of Mcrcier . . . Gretchen Hammarlund, president of primary club . . . Dorothy Ketter, court of honor . . . Louise Bayer editor of Royal Purple . . . 29 actives and 9 pledges make up chapter roll. 0 Theta Sigs entertain at formal ban- quet at Aunt Mattie,s . . . The pause that refreshes finds Prielipp, Garfoot, Hugill, Torsrud, Horkan, Nickos, Johnson, Ketter, and Zehme out in front. 127 First allzschool mixer gives boys chance to show their ability and strength in push! ing through . . . John Hickey and Lorraine Haase shown on steps of court house just after obtaining the license . . . Phythian Forum entertains at Barn Dance in girls, gym in lower left corner . . . Yes'N0 " dates line up before going to picture show . count DOSES . . . count OH. 128 o The north wing of the college Wiewed from Graham StreeO houses most of the College High classes. Mzhixzqfloo! 7W 14WW of Mr. Elmeris sojourn at Whitewater College High School celebrated this year . . . Throughout his stay he has won the admiration of both teachers and students, especially students . . . College high iikids" think he is just about iitopsil as far as principals go, especially in letting them go to college assemblies and signing their excuses so cheerfully the hrst period of each school day. . . . Mr. Elmer Student Council members: Seated: Fish, Hill, Perry, Thayer, Farnham. Back row: Miles, Friemoth, Bollerud. 130 Although very modest and anxious to give credit to others whenever possible, Mr. Elmer is really the iiWorks,a that runs the big Clock of the daily college high routine . . . Many problems from day to day, students being excused to visit deceased dentists, all solved ably and with a smile where others would frown. . . . Students are justly proud of their principal . . . graduating seniors will be regretful to take leave of him in June . . . Lifelong friendships with everyone in the senior Class tells the story better than too many words. . . . One of the most active organizations in the makeup of the College High School is the Student Council . . . Made up of each class president and a Chosen student council member . . . a total of eight members. . . . Work of the organization is to take care of entertainment and student activities in the course of the school year . . . Members this year have cooperated and really worked i . . result being one of the most successful years on record . . . By Easter of the current year seven mixers had been sponsored . . . acclaimed iihowling suc' cessesH. . . . A social chairman takes the lead in organizing mixers, informal parties, and assemblies . . . Doris Thayer filled the position this year . . . Students elected Effie Perry to call the meetings of the council, and with the help of the entire council, contributed to the many social activities which were presented. 0 Mr. Elmer tupper righO keeps a watchful eye on his iihel'd" from the main entrance as they carry through their school life . . . Margaret Powell, Roberta Larkin, Lorene Kell, Ann Hickey, Marion Hill and Virginia Perry disregard sidewalks in preference of the driveway . . . Thanksgiving gave Bernice Taft, Janet Nelson, Marion Hill, Darlene Skindingsrude, Margaret Walsh, and Miss Thomson an opportunity to show their spirit by distributing baskets to the poor . . . Willis Farnham doesn,t seem to mind the snow and cold as he poses for a picture on the steps of the Junior High entrance . . . Come spring and amateur dramatists, Jim Bower, Art Carlson, and Frank Wilcox, rehearse their murder scene in the open. p-l 4?. .3 .i V .gem'az 4m; Hill, Bower, Calkins, Fish wen 4d 7W" is final activity of senior class as a group . . . given on May 3, class play characters were seen as iiJack, the little big shotm instead of Jim Bower . . . the Perry as the thirteen year old iiwould be" actress is stage struck, but good sense is given by grandmother who during her life was Bernadine Breidenback . . . Art Carlson showed how a. stern father would act . . . directed by Mrs. Wells, the cast gave the best in dramatic productions. . . . Besides the class play, activities centered around graduation and final exercises . . . Candy sales held during the year netted profit to be used for the alumni banquet in early June . . . The class picnic at Waukesha Beach during the last week of school ended social functions . . . Wednesday, June 7-egraduation . . . Class day exercises held 132 at night instead of a speaker for first time. . . . After the class elections Marion Hill emerged as president . . . an honor student . . . she was chosen as the D.A.R. good Citizen girl . . . award given at graduation . . . athletics 0n the side, with special interest in tennis and swimming keep her busy . . . James Bower, vice'president, little "big shot" of the class play took every activity in the school . . . Arthur Calkins suc' ceeded in cornering even the worst Scotchman in class for dues . . . receiving his oratorical ability when his oration, iiDonit Let It Happen Herew gave him a chance to enter the district tournament . . . Bruce Fish came over from City High to grab the position of student council representative . . . his motor scooter plays only second to aviation which is his main interest. DONALD ANKOMEUS Whitewater uLost and Found" Lambda P51, 3, 4; Newspaper Staff, 3 ALICE BARKER Whitewater WThe Love Bug W111 Bite You,a Dramatics, 4; Glee Club, 1, 2; G.A.A., 1, 2, 4; Lambda P51, 2, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 4; Opere etta, 2; Junior Band, 2, 4; Declamatory, 2, 4; Hockey Team, 1, 2. JAMES BOWER Whitewater ."This Can1t Be Love" Vice'President of Senior Class; Secretarerreasurer of Junior C1ass; President of Sophomore Class; Operetta, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3;Footba11, 3;Basketba11, 1, 2, 3, 4; Paper Editor, 1; ""W Club, 1, 2, 3; Lambda P51, 2, 3, 4; A Cappe11a, 4; Kittenball, 1 2, 3: Dramatics, 4: Quartet, 1, 2, 3,4. BERNADINE BREIDENBACH Eagle uYou1re a Sweet Little Headache" Lambda P51, 3, 4; Glee Club, 3, 4: A Cappella, 4: Trio, 4; G.A.A., 3; Declamatory, 3, 4. WARREN BREIDENBACH Eagle 13D0n1t Drop a Slug in the Slot" Lambda P51, 1, 2, 3, 4; Footr ball, 1, 2, 3. KATHERINE BUENING Whitewater uNice Work If You Can Get It', G.A,A., 3, 4; Band, 3, 4; Girls, Conference, 3, 4; Camera Club, 3, 4; Lambda P51, 3 HARRY CAIR D Whitewater uYou Must Have Been A Beautiful Baby" Camera C1ub,3,1Sec.Treas.,1 4; President of Junior Class; Lambda Psi, 2, 3, 4, Sec. Treas.1; Operetta, 3; Basketball, , W1, Club, 2, 3; Glee C1ub,1:i 2 3, 4; A Cappella, 1, 2, 3, Quartet, 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis, 43; Dramatics, 4; erY, 2; President of Freshman Class; Iviinneiska StafT, 4; Kittenball, 1, 2,3. ARTHUR CALKINS Fort Atkinson "Love Thy Neighbor" Lambda Psi, 1, 2, 3, 4; Kittenr ball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Football, 3, 4; "W1, Club, 3, 4; Student Coune C11, 1: Secretary and Treasurer of Senior Class; Glee Club, 4; A Cappella, 4; Declamtory. 4; HiaY, 2; Dramatics, 4; Track, 4. ARTHUR CARLSON Whitewater "1 Get Along Without You Very We1111 Camera Club, 3. 4; Lambda Psi, 2, 3, 4; Operetta, 3; Minneiska, 3, 4; Newspaper Editor, 1; Dramatics, 4; Quartet, 1, 2, 3, 4: Mixed Chorus, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2; A Cappella, 4. BRUCE FISH Whitewater 11Fcrd1nand the Bull" Football, 2. 3: Basketball, 2, 3; Track, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Student Counc11,4: Quartet, 2, 3; Lambda P51 2, 3, 4, Dramatics, 4; W" Club, 2, 3, 4. MARIAN HILL Whitewater those Funny Old H1115" G.A.A., 1, 2, 3, 4, 1V1cerPres.1; Lambda P51, 2, 3, 4Sec:Treas.1, 4; Girls Glee Club, 1, 2; Declam' atory, 1, 2, 4; Dramatics, 4: Student Council, 3; President of Senior Class: Camera Club, 3, 4. 1Pres.1: Hockey Team, 1, 2, 3: Volleyball Team, 2, 3, 1Cap' tain1: Girls1 Conference, 2, 4: Mixed Chorus, 1; Newspaper Staff, 1. ION E KA KAC Whitewater "Shes the Girl Friend Of the Whirling Dervish" Glee Club, 4; Lambda Psi, 4; G.A.A.,4. 133 ELA INE KELCH Whitewater "What Have You Got That Gets Me?n Lambda Psi, 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2; President of Fresh, man Class; Girls3 Conference, 2, 3, 4; G.A.A., 1, 2. LORENE KELL Whitewater 3"Sleepy Time Galu Lambda Psi, 2, 3, 4; Cirrs Glee Club, 1, 2; G.A.A., 1, 2, 3, 4: Camera Club, 3, 4; Declamatory, 1; Hockey Team, 1, 2; Volley, ball Team, 1, 2; Girls3 Confer ence, 2, 3, 4: Newspaper Staff, 1, 2, 3; Dramatics, 4; Mixed Chorus, 1, 2. VIRGINIA KITZMAN Whitewater "Say It With Music33 Trio, 1, 2, 3, 4; Mixed Chorus, 1, 2, 3; A Cappella, 4; Lambda Psi, 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta, 3; Dramatics, 4; G.A.A., l, 2, 3; Hockey Team, 1, 2; Girls3 Con' ference. 4; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 1Sec:TreasJ, 4; Band and Orr chestra, 1. DOROTHY KRAUS Whitewater uI'm Putting All My Eggs in One Basket" Lambda Psi, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 2; G.A.A., 1, 2, 3; Band, 1; Mixed Chorus, 2; Declamar tory, 1. ROBERTA LARKIN Whitewater 33After Looking At You" Glee Club, 1; Dramatics, 4; G.A.A., 1, 2, 3, 4, 3PresJ: Philo Sophio, 2, 3, 4; Camera Club, 3, 4, 4Sec.rTreasJ; Hockr ey Team, 1, 2, 3, 4: Volleyball Team, 2, 3; Girls3 Conference, 2, 3, 4; Newspaper Staff, 2, 3. LA VERNE LEIN Fort Atkinson uXVhile a Cigarette Was Burning" Glee Club. 1, 2: Mixed Chorus, 1; Philo Sophie, 1, 2, 3, 4; Kit tenball, 1, 2, 3, 4: Secretary and Treasurer of Freshman Class. VIRGINIA MCGINNIS Whitewater uAfter Talking It Over" G.A.A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 2, 4; Philo Sophie, 2, 3 4; Camera Club, 3, 4: Girls3 Conr ference, 2, 3, 4; Volleyball Team, 1, 2; Hockey Team, 1 2: Dramatics. 4: Mixed Chorus. 1, 2. CHRISTINE McLEAN Whitewater uWhere Are You?" Philo Sophio, 2, 3 4; Girls' Con; ference, 2, 3, 4; G.A.A., 1, 2. 3, 4: Camera Club, 3, 4; Hockr ey Team, 1, 2, 3: Volleyball Team, 2, 3: Dramatics, 4. DAN MITCHELL Whitewater 33Show Me The Way To Go Home" Basketball, 2; Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 1; Dramatics, 4: Philo Sophio, 2, 3, 4; News' paper, 3, 4Editor1; "W31 Club, 2, 3. PHYLLIS MORGAN Milton Junction "Now It Can Be Told33 Glee Club, 1, 2; Declamatory, 3: G.A.A., 1, 2, 3, 4: Camera Club, 3, 4, 1PresJ; Philo Sophio, 2, 3, 4, 1Pres.1; Hockey Team, 1, 2; Volleyball Team, 1, 2; Girls3 Conference, 2, 3, 4: NeWspaper Staff, 1, 2, 3; Dramatics, 1, 4: Mixed Chorus, 1, 2. EFFIE PERRY Whitewater "Dinner For One, Please Jamesn Glee Club, 1, 2; Dramatics, 4: Dclamatory, 1. 4: G.A.A., 1. 2, 3, 1Sec.rTreasJ, 4: Philo Sophia, 1, 2, 3, 4; Minneiska Staff, 3, 4, 3Editor1; Camera Club, 3, 4VicerPres.3, 4:Student Council, 4, 1Pres.1: Secretary and Trea5r urer of Junior Class: Hockey Team, 2; Volleyball Team. 2: Girls3 Conference. 2, 3, 4: NEWS' paper Staff, 1, 2, 3, 4Editor3. ALICE RABENHORST Whitewater s3Let Yourself 0031 Philo Sophio, 2. 3, 4: G.A.A., 3: Girlsq Glee Club, 4: A Cap, pella.4. o Doris Thayer and Mr. Elmer keep hard at work at the latteHs desk while Effie Perry takes it easy during an off moment. CLIFFORD RITSEMA Whitewater wThe Day You Came Along" Philo Sophie, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; A Cappella, 4; Operr etta, 3; Kittenball, 1, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD ROWLEY Whitewater "When Paw Was Courtixf Maw33 Philo Sophie, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4Vicer PresJ; Camera Club, 3, 4, 1Sec.r Treasj; Declamatory, 4; Dram! atics, 4. NEIL SHUMAN Whitewater 3Tm An Old C0whand3, Philo Sophio, 2, 3, 4; Football, 2; Glee Club, 1; Kittenball, 1, 2, 3, 4. FRANK WILCOX Whitewater uShe Done Me Wrong" Boys' Glee Club, 1, 4: Philo Sophie, 2, 3, 4: Football, 2: Basketball, 2, 3: Track, 3, 4: Kittenball, 2, 3, 4. EDWARD STURGIS LaGrange .11 Got Rhythm" Philo Sophio, 3, 4. DORIS THAYER Palmyra hI Won't Dance" G.A.A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council, 2, 4; VicerPresident 0f Sophomore and Junior Class; Minneiska, 3, 4; Newspaper, 2, 3; Girls, Conference, 2, 3, 4: Camera Club, 3, 4: Hockey Team, 2, 3; Volleyball Team, 2, 3; Glee Club, 1; Dramatics, 4. MARGARET EKLUND THOMAS Whitewater t3An Old Flame Never Dies" Glee Club, 2, 3, 4: Mixed Chorus, 2, 3; Glee Club, 3, 1PresJ; A Cappella, 4; Lambda Psi, 2, 3: Operetta, 3: G.A.A., 2, 3; Girls3 Conference, 2, 3; Declamatory. 3: Dramatics, 4. PROM KING election causes excitement among the juniors 0f the College High School . . . Don Walsh receives the honor and immediately sets out to do his best in making it the ureal thingh Raising the evasive bucks to hire hTommy Temple" for the From was a job for neither man nor beast . . . however he did succeed in doing it. . . . Class feeling gets to be the all, important thing 0 Juniors elected deft to with the juniors righO Willis Farnham, . president; Donald Belk, - C1355 rlngs vice-president; Daniel are to be selected Davis sec.-treas. . . . Don Walsh, student council and many heated member does not appear arguments are sure 0" Plat"?- to result . . .fmal opinions are voiced and the president sets about to order both pins and rings . . . no argul ment when they are finally distributed . everyone goes home with a feeling of "prideh in their selection. . . . Juniors all do their part in preparing the stage and collecting flowers for the graduation exercises . . . Two junior girls are selected each year to lead the semors 1n the blg . Keith Marshall, sec.- event. . ' . treas. and Paul Hodge, , vice-president, backed up At the beame Bob McGinn,presigent. in ' runnin the So omore nlng Of each year class tfith Williafn Miles the fTESthn and representing them on the sophomores meet student council. to elect their 0er cers and class sponsors A . . with elections over, they sit back and forget class meetings until it comes tune to make a httle money. The big problem of each class 15 how to make money . . . Candy sales come to the aid and every class has its turn . . . much running around results before the tables and chairs are ready 0 Freshmen officers were prohlems as to se Ueft to righo Ivy Weav- leCtlng the best er, sec.-treas., H o w a r d - , Bollerud president, Bon- salesmen really 1m nie Friemoth, student portant . . . prOf' council member . . . vice- its help pay for the Eggssltierlfn,d::::trgptiz; . . 7 anelska pages. on picture. 136 gadgmf 20225014142! M mm Juniors F Teshmen and Sophomores Minneiska Staff 711a; em, 7w, saw and finally, they conquered . . i llMinniell staff chosen at the beginning of the year find work a bit easy at first . . . but later oneoh! my! . . . They met at Perryls at the bend in the road tPrairie Streeo and got to work after getting a swell Thayer, Belk, Hickey, Caird, Perry, Carlson lkswing" band on the radio. . . . llDopeli was gathered for each of the seniors and various activities writ ten up in their own style tinimitable, they call i0 . . . News and what is itkeverything from soup to nuts discussed . . . everything and everybody . . . Money to pay for pages and subscriptions did not enter into the dis, . . Art Carlson had that all taken care cussion . 0f. . . . The 1939 College High Section . . . best ever . . . If you dont approve, give the staff ten min, utes head start. Photo Club metlzeeampwl this year is the College High School Camera Club . . . began last fall with members from the physics and chemistry classes only . . . Since then restriCI tions have been modified . . . Membership fee for new members was set at fifty cents . . . old memr bers, twentyrfive cents . . . it pays to join early. . . . In January, the club had its first exhibit . . . prizes offered from the funds of the group . . . Mr. Clark and Mr. Chopp, as judges, selected Marian Hillls exhibit for Bottom Row: Rowley, Carlr son, Mr. Brooks. Caird, Walsh. Second Row: Miss Marsh, Buening, McGinnis, Perry, Kell, Larkin, Houghr ton. Top Row: Hickey. Thayer, Hill, Morgan, MC' Lean, Powell. first place . . . Ann Hickey received second and Dick Rowley third. . . . Oilicers elected were Marian Hill, president; Donald Walsh, vicezpresident; and Dick Rowley, secretary'treasurer. M usic Groups practice takes much of the time of the various sing, ing organizations in the College High School . . . The Girls, Glee Club, composed of twentyrsix members and directed by Miss Marion Jordalen, meet once a week under the accompaniment of Margaret Heide . . . prepare for the Christmas recital and spring tourney. . . . Throughout the entire year, the student body of the College High enjoys the chorus activities pree . Much credit is due to Miss Jordalen for the success of this sented in their assembly programs .. group. . . . Another organization that won recognition in the musical world was the Boys Glee Club . . . Every Tuesday, fifteen boys meet with Miss Jor' dalen to exercise their vocal chords . . . Accom' panied by Carmen Stieber, they entered the con, Girls Glee Club- test at Milton against a very high grade of com! petition . . . though small, they showed an interest and enthusiasm which brought them through with flying colors. . . . Under the capable leadership of iiJordy," other wise known as Miss Marion Jordalen, A Cappella Choir, the third music group, got under way early in fall with about Sixty reporting for duty . . . members from both junior and senior high schools . . . plans laid from the beginning of the year to enter the music contest at Milton in the spring . . . Meetings were held only once a week-Frir day . . . individual work was necessary to accome pIish the high peak hoped for. . . . XVith due cooperation, they have worked into one of the finest a cappella choirs in southern Wisconsin. Bottom Row: Breidenbach, Gehri, Shuman, Rogers, Dixon, Powell, Kakac, Jones. Second Row: Miss Jordalen, Nelson, Kitzman, Hickey, Schoenke. Kyle, Kalb, Perry, Ridgeman. Top Row: Piepenberg, Retrum, Houghton, Bales. Rebenstorf, Frey, N. Uren, Furley, M. Uren, 139 Top Picture, Lambda Psie Bottom Row: Ione Kakac, Gehri, A. Hickey, Hill, Bidwell, Kyle, Kalb, B. Friemoth, Kitzman. Second Row: Huth, Barker, Bennett, Bales, Frey, Dixon, Furley, Kinateder, King, Graham. Third Row: Kelch, Houghton, Buening, Kraus, E. Friemoth, Kell, Irma Kakac, Haferman, Cummings. Fourth Row: Baumgartner, D. Bushey, Holman, Hand, Jones, B. Breidenbach, Draeger, Hackett, Kraus, Baker. Fifth Row: Barth, Bollerud, Hare, L. Bushey, Caird, Carlson, Calkins, Bystrzychi, J. Breidenbach. Top Row: Hodge, Davis, Fish, Felch, Farnham, Bower, W. Breidenbach, Belk. Bottom Picture, Philo Sophio- Bottom Row: Powell, E. Perry, Morgan, Thayer, Schoenke, V. Perry, McLean, Madsen. Second Row: Retrum, M. Walsh, N. Uren, Piepenburg, M. Larkin, Littlejohn, Nelson Taft, M. Uren. Third Row: Higgins, D. Shuman, C. Larkin, Weaver, R. Larkin, C. Rebenstorf, V. Ritsema, McCune. Fourth Row: Miles, Marshall, McGinnis, Rabenhorst, Rogers, Winkleman, Meisner, E. Mitchell, Riesen, Fifth Row: McGinn, Meske, Revi, Luebke, Schaller, Wutke, Witkunski, D. Mitchell. Top Row: Reid, Rowley, Sturgis, H. Rebenstorf, C. Ritsema, J. Wilcox, F. Wilcox, Trewyn, D. Walsh, N. Shuman. mm aWw - 3W into two groups . . . Members with surnames be! Philo Sophio is the other literary organization ginning with A through K may become members of the high school . . . thcers of this organize: 0f the Lambda Psi . . . OHicers for this year in! tion are Virginia Perry, president; Richard Rowley, cluded Ann Hickey, president, who called meetings vice'president; and Donald Walsh, secretary'treas! to prepare and practice for assembly programs . . . urer . . . All students whose names begin with L Cyril Schaller, as Vice'president, took charge of the through Z are eligible to join . . . This year both social functions of the group . . . Arthur Carlson, of the societies wound up in grand style, having as secretaryrtreasurer, took charge of the funds . . . successfully presented many Monday morning 35' Meetings held to plan programs. . . . semblies. 140 Spring Air Attracts Students 0 Spring has come-much to the sorrow of Frank Wilcox, Art Carlson, and Jim Bower, who find it difficult to part with their toboggan for the summer . . . Lorene Kell, Effie Perry and Doris Thayer tupper righQ dontt seem to mind, however, as they pose without coats . . . Harry Caird Gower lefo finds it necessary to work on Saturdays, but the chicken dinner he is fixing keeps him happy . . . The final step in spring is the school picnic and Kenneth Adsit, Bruce Fish, and Edward Mitchell dress for the occasion. 141 F ootball wt 6 M D? m .. Bottom Row: McLean Davis, D. Mitchell, York, Hodge, Wilcox. Second Row: Farnham, E. Mitchell, Meisner, Krueger, Miles, Mr. Ritzman. Third Row: Schaller, Walsh, Calkins, Luebke, Meske, Swallow. Top Row: Reid, Rebenstorf, McCaslin, Hare, Busher, Barth. 3M Wm in feague for the College High boys shows that it was the size of the opponents rather than the caliber that caused the downfall of the football squad . . . Entering the Rock Valley Conference last year, enthusiasm ran high before any league games were played . . . Again coached by iiFritzt, Ritzman, a squad of thirty reported for duty at the be ginning 0f the year. . . . L Due to the loss of nine men from last yearis squad, the team was handicapped by a lean season . . . Starting with a bang, the boys defeated the Watertown iiBii team 12,0 in their hrst game . . . Due to the size of the competing schools, the . Opposing teams were able to back up their regulars with a much stronger string of iisubsii than the College High had to offer. . . . A game bunch of boys suffered defeat through the conference competition . . . lost to Milton Union 1616 . . . In the contest with Evansville, College High again came out on the bottom with a defeat of 13,0 . . . Jefferson took them into camp 142 with a score of 390 . . . Lake Mills handed them their worst defeat of the season with a iinal score of 440 . . . It was not until their final game that they battled their way to the top, winning the Brodhead game by a score of 2019 to close the season with four defeats and two wins . . . the first and last game giving their only wins. . . . Only two men will be lost from the squad this year . . . these two, however, are a couple of the most valuable players College High has witnessed . . Captain Dan Mitchell and Arthur Calkins played their last game for the in recent years . College High . . . Captain Dan Mitchell is one of the few to have four letters to his credit. SEASONS RECORD C. H. S. ...................... 12 Watertown iiBii ........ O C. H. S. ...................... 6 Milton Union ............ 16 C. H. S. ...................... O Evansville .................. 13 C. H. S. ...................... 0 Jefferson 19 C. H. S. ...................... 0 Lake Mills .................. 44 C. H. S. ...................... 20 Brodhead .................. 9 Basketball Seated: Krueger, Walsh, Bower, Farnham, Wilcox, Caird, Barth. Second Row: Essock, Rebenstorf, Davis, Marshall, Mitchell, Henderson, McGinn, Hodge, Swallow. Back Row: Perry, Meisner, McLean, York, McCaslin, Schaller, Reid, Mr. Ritzman. GO-GW this year are the College High basketball players . . . It is believed to be the most successful season in the history of the school . . . The boys lost their two warmrup games, but the cooperation prevalent brought steady improvement . . . The preps came out on a very long end of the season with eight wins and two losses in conference com! petition . . . entitled the boys to the COICham' pionship With Lake Mills. . . . The preps went through the first half of the season undefeated only to be upset by a powerful Lake Mills five and the "giant killing" Jefferson team. . . both games were played away from home . . . undefeated on local court . . . The smooth working team was an unexpected xidark horse" in the conference . . . only team to beat Evansville, Rock Valley Conference Champions of last year, twice. . . . Winding up a fine season, the team turned to the although highly fav' ored in the betting, they started in a somewhat feeble way . . . ranks had been weakened by the . . When they played Juda, it was Brodhead tournament . . . flu epidemic . the first time the team had been together for a week . . . They beat a surprisingly good Juda team and lost to a strong Brodhead team by one point, although they trounced Brodhead twice in conference competition . . . Playing for third place, the boys lost to a championship New Glarus team. . . . The Quaker preps lose Jim Bower and Harry Caird, two regulars, by graduation SEASONTS RECORD C. H. Marshall .................... 18 C. H. Marshall .................... 24 C. H. Lake Mills .................. 8 C. H. JeHerson .................... 9 C. H. Evansville .................. 22 C. H. Milton Union ............ 12 C. H. Brodhead .................. 10 C. H. Lake Mills .................. 29 C. H. JeEerson .................... 20 C. H. Evansville .................. 16 C. H. Milton Union m.....34 C. H. Brodhead .................... 18 143 Junior High School Mr. Ritzman, Miss Langemo, Mr. Schuller. SW Welfaae ably directed by hands of three ofEcials of Junior High School Department . . . Keeping school inr teresting . . . developing new habits of skill . . . teaching how to follow instructions . . . forming new extrarcurricular clubs . . . all worked out in greatest detail by Mr. Schuller, principal, and his two assistants, Miss Langemo and Mr. Ritz! man. . . . Besides his work as oflicial of the department, Mr. Schuller directs the orchestra, sponsors the student council, and still finds time for his outside interests . . . His chief interest this past year was the survey he made of the Wisconsin junior high schools . . 86 schools throughout the state were used as material ., . .r divided into several divir sionS, such as administration, staff, curriculum, visual and radial instruction, programs, extra; curricular programs, and trends were all studied . . . The results were published in a form of a 144 bulletin and sent to all the junior high school principals and all city superintendents and other parties who were interested. . . . Dramatics under Miss Langemols direction are tended beyond the classroom . . . Her work in English culminated in the creative work of her students in the publication of the Junior Journal . . . Received her master's degree from the Uni versity of Wisconsin . . She plans to attend the University again this summer to help here with her work as the friend to the Junior High Depart' ment. . . . Mr. Ritzman not only developed a junior high school basketball team, but has sponsored a new organization, the Science Club, during the past year . . . His extra activities include his work on his masterls degree to be completed this year at the University of Iowa. 44W in Wed, 4W jnJeec! are the members of the junior high faculty to the junior high students . . . helping them through the trying years of their upper class activities, the faculty meet the students on their own level to guide and direct them in their school life both in and out of the classroom. . . . Miss Bjorklund supervises all the art work in the department . . . creative ability and special art interest is followed in work by each student inr . Mr. Schuller helps with all sub jects, teaches classes, and directs the orchestra and dividually . . student Council. . . . MiSS Langemo, in the English work, helps students develop their own special ability in the journalistic lines . . . Miss Lefler teaches general languages to the eighth graders as well as starting the ninth graders with a course in French. . . General business supervision is the work of Mr. Randall while English is the special line followed by Mrs. Wells . for the soul is advanced by Miss Jordalen . . . A . . Music to the ears, and music Seated: Bjorklund, Schuller, Langemo, Lefler. Standing: Randall. Wells, Jordalen, Fricker, Beery, Ritzman. special feature was the establishment of the junior senior a cappella choir this year . . . both glee clubs are under her able direction . . . Teaching the girls how to cook and to sew is the duty of Mrs. Fricker . receive training in the home economics necessary . . Not only girls but boys, too, to live. . . . Mr. Beery took over the work of Mr. Bigelow in the math department . . . Algebra was made easy even for the busiest pupil under his direc' tion . . . Mr. Ritzman, besides his work with the basketball and football teams, gave the boys swime ming lessons, tumbling practice, and various ball games . . . Other junior high faculty members not appearing in the picture are Mr. Wellers of the speech department who shows the boys the whys and wherefores of manual training . . . from pounding a nail in straight to sawing a board with the grain . . . Miss Thomson, shows the girls how to keep fit in the physical education work she offers. The Student Body 146 Top Picture, Ninth Gradk Bottom Row: Albright, Madsen, McLaughlin, Hinds, Johnson, Mor' gan. Second Row: Lemke, Hinish, Bulkr ley, Hansen, Rutoski, Mitchell, Wilson. Third Row: Kling, Hickey, Skindingsrude, Rennemo, Williams, Albrecht. Fourth Row: Thayer, Nelson, Dav, idson, Henderson, Lein, Swallow, Krue' ger. Top Row: Perry, Brown, Wellers, York, McLean, McCaslin, Lee. Middle Picture, Eighth Gradk Bottom Row: Hinish, Eklund, Lewis, Saund' ers, Rutoski, Brown. Second Row: Stamm, Ankomeus, Draeger, Winkleman, Wiemer, Stone, Farney. Third Row: Schaller, Skin! dingsrude, Reid, Barr, Albright, Warner. Top Row: Bower, Hurlbut, McLean, Olson, Hack! ett, Buening, ChenOt wethl Bottom Picture, Seventh Grade Bottom Row: Miller, Wellers, Nelson, York Dow. Second Row: Entress, Mitchell, Bromley, K a d i n g. Third Row: Daggett, Rogers, Larkin, Sho' ber, Meisner. T o p Row: Clark, Furley, Winklcman, Skinding srude. o Handicraft club gives students chance to prove special ability in special lines of art work. 0 Science club one of new organiza- tions this year . . . Aim of club given in motto of National Science Forum of which it is a member. 0 Special plays presented for programs by dramatic club . . . oral expression in debate and declamatory work offered for those specially talented. 0 Use of the dark room given to the photo club . . . new this year, mem- bership limited at first to science stu- dents . . . later open to any interested. junior Journal Front Row: Farney, Hackett, B. Albright, Bromley, Clark, Bower. Second Row: Warner, Stone, Schaller, Tarpley, E. Hinish, Kading, T. Winkleman, Rogers, J. Winkleman, R. Mitchell, Nelson, Miller, Curry, B. Mitchell. Third Row: B. Albright, Perry, Henderson, Skindingsrude, Hinds, Rennemo, Ried, Bulkley, Miss Langemo. Back Row: R. Hinish, Williams, Ecklund, Davidson, Chenoweth, Buening, Huie, Albrecht, Mikkelson. gm 14W educate in two ways . . . both the group and the individual have the opportunity for achievement . . . The Handicraft Club promotes the recrear tional spirit and the practical appeal of making things for themselves which are useful and beaUr tiful . . . The art club also helps the student to discover any special ability or special interest in some field of art. . . . The Science Club meets each week on Thursday the fourth hour . . . boys get together to talk about events in the field of science and to observe simple scientific projects . . . The club has re ceived a Charter from National Science Forum and each boy received 21 Science Forum button signifyr ing that he is a fullefledged member of the club. . . . The Junior High Dramatic Club is one of the new organizations of the past year . . . Students having a special interest in dramatic productions are members . . . Besides producing several plays for programs, members have pursued private inter ests in oral expression by doing some work in informal debate and declamation . . . the club has functioned under the joint sponsorship of a facule ty member and student teachers. . . . 148 Photography Club also organized this year . . . fourth hour on Thursday is meeting day for photo enthusiasts who listen to lectures on photography . . . A dark room has been built and supplies needed for developing and printing are furnished . . . Hikes give opportunity for pictures . . . thcers elected were Gordon Henderson, president; Robert Lee, vicerpresident; Allen Rogers, secretary; Jean Hinds, treasurer; and Irmagard Messer- schmidt, student advisor. The students of the college junior high have continued through the past year the publication of the Junior Journal, a venture which was first inaul gurated February 17, 1937 . . . This literary activity affords an opportunity for those interested in doing original writing to submit school news items, editorials, features, humorous material, and other contributions appealing to junior pen, men. . . . The staff is organized into various departments . . . These operate under the direction of the editorrinlchief who this year was Barbara Albright . . . Her two assistants, the associate editors, were Beverley Lewis, and Charles Wellers . A . The project is supervised by Miss Langemo. Glee Clubs Top Picturb Bottom Row: Saunders, Ecklund. Bromley, Wilson. Mitchell, Curry, Miller. Second Row: Wiemer, Tarpley. Kading, Brown, Winkleman E. Hinish, Entress, Lempke. Third Row: Hickey, Skindingsrude, Williams, Clark, Hinds, Johnson. Rennemo, Madson, Morgan, Miss Jordalen. Top Row: R. Hinish, Rutoski, York, Kling, Nelson, Mikelr sen, Albrecht, Albright, Huiei Bottom Picturee- Bottom Row: Meisner, Daggett. Shober, Skindingsrude, Rogers, Stone. Farney. Second Row: Hurlbut, Hackett, Bower, Perry. Chenoweth, Reid, Barr, Miss Jordalen. Top Row: Kraus. Winkleman, Schaller, Clark, Lee, Krueger, Swallow, Furley, Warner. MW swam! in both glee clubs of the junior high school division . . . Girls" Glee Club raised to over 30 members, while Boysi Chorus, 3 new venture 0n the campus, claims 25 for their group . . . A new group just organized is the A Cappella Choir composed of both junior and senior high students . . . with 5'0 members they planned to enter the contest at Milton the latter part Of April . . . selections were to be "Ding Dong Merrily" by Davis, and iiSun Beams from Heavenii by Christianson . . . The concert at Whitewater in connection with the Treble Clef of the college department was their first appearance before a home group. . . . Another representative of Whitewater at the Milton contest was the girlsi glee club of 30 mem' bers . . . HButterflyb by Jenkins, and iiNight Song" by Closkey were the numbers presented for approval which won recognition for the girls . . . Practices every second hour with Miss Jordalen directing, and Margaret Heide and Carmen Stieber accompanying brought forth the hoped for results. 149 3Wa gamed! by addition of more strings, a flute, clarinet, and two more cornets making a well'balanced total of 25 pieces . . . An important change was instituted when the senior high school schedule was adjusted so as to permit students to take orchestra and band . seven senior high students played this year. . Engagements during the year included a Parent, Council meeting in November, the Christmas pro! gram, the Hobby Show in March, the junior high school spring program in May, and promotion day exercises . . . In the district music festival held at Milton on April 27r28 the orchestra competed in Class C, one step higher than in 1938 . . . hThe Mignonette OvertureH by BaumanneSeredy, the hhMinuet" from Mozartk El; Symphony, and the tLGavotte" from hIphigenia in Aulist, by Gluck were the contest numbers. . Student Council members form the executive board for the junior service league which includes all students in the junior high school . . . Newly organiZed last year, main activity is finding some! thing interesting for the students. . . . Sponsored the hobby show in March, and plans made for a bulletin to be published and sent to the students and anyone interested , . . Coune cil members elected by ballot and included three from each grade . . . include presidents and council representatives from the classes . . . Mr. Schuller sits in on most meetings offering advice . . student opinion and voting rules however . , . Henrietta Albrecht served as president this year assisted by Beverly Lewis, secretary. 0 Under the direction of Mr. Schuller, the enlarged or- chestra won recognition at the music contest at Milton in April . . . seven senior high students joined orchestra after the new arrangement of schedules. 0 Lee, Tarpley, Huie, Bower, Williams, Albrecht, Nelson, Clark, Rogers, Farney repre- sent classes on the Junior High Student Council. Basketball ' J Seated: Truesdale, Bower, Reid, Olson, Buening, McLean. Second Row: Thayer, Winkleman, Albright, Lee, Schaller, Farney, Meisner. SW 3141 SucceMM was the season for the junior high basketball team . . . Practices under the direction of Mr. Ritzman and John Truesdale were held in preparation for the tournaments to be played at Fort Atkinson, Walworth, and Whitewater. Overtime games seemed to be the fashion as far as the junior high basketeers were concerned . . . Every game went into overtime periods with the Whitewater boys coming out on top most of the time . . . Winning from Fort Atkinson 18'17 after one overtime period the boys took on Edger- ton only to play two extra overtime periods before they emerged the Victor by a score of 18,15 Palmyra was another easy victim for the boys when they took them after another overtime period 2420 . . . Then came defeat. Traveling to Edgerton they received their first .Jeiferson handed the second defeat while on Whitewatersl home court defeat of the season . . . . Both games were hardrfought and decided only through overtime periods. The influenza epidemic which hit this section of the state about the middle of February was so severe that all games remaining were cancelled as were the tournaments at Fort Atkinson, Walworth and Whitewater. Howard Buening was the llhot shotll of the team getting the larger percentage of points in about every game . . . This years team was une usually large . . Gerald Olson topping the team with his 5 feet 10 inches . . . Arden McLean as guard played his last game with the junior high team this year . . Dave Bower and Lawrence Reid will also be serving notice on a few of the positions on the high school llBll team for next year. Although the team belongs to the Y.M.C4A. the games are scheduled separately by the coaches . . . As was the case last year, most of the team was drawn from the eighth grade, the four mentioned above being the only ninth graders making the squad . . . As compared with last year, the season was unusually short but equally as successful. Primary Department 0 First graders proudly explain their display during the Christmas festivals in the upper left hand picture . . . Stopping just before they reach the building, first graders wait until no danger before crossing the street in the upper right picture . . . In the lower left picture, the fifth grade carolers are entertaining during the Christmas Pageant . . . First graders sit down for a lesson in writing in the lower right picture. 9W eWm followed in training school . . . subject correlar tion in social science, art, music, history, and geography, blends courses into one main idea . . . preparing for life with lifelike situations . . . No individual courses are given . . . only one course with different lights and side'lights. . . . Twentyefive children in the kindergarten under Miss Tuttis supervision are the first ones to gain experiences in schools. . . . A glance through the kindergarten door might reveal a group very busy in the doll house, trying to keep house as good housekeepers do . . . AnI other group may have been noisily sawing and hammering at the construction of a boat large enough for several Children . . . On another day the children may have been gathered around a live rabbit or some other pet, or they may have been intently listening to a story . . . Whatever the business of the hour, smiling faces showed that school is fun . . . They have learned to work together and to obtain habits that have made them ready to be big iiGrade Oneh folk at the end of the year. . . . Special teachers and visitors through the year have complimented the first grade in its happy, 152 cooperative, good conduct . . . Stories, a farm, a post ofhce, a bank, and other community projects have kept the children busy and provided them with information and an opportunity to practice the three Ris in ways that have been fun . . . A special feature of the year was the use of the typewriter . . . The children started by typing individual words, guidance being given in the correct position of the fingers on the keys . . . they unconsciously developed a knowledge and interest helpful to them in their readings, spelling and writing. . . . The major interest in the second year was scie ence . . . In a just having fun way" they learned about the weather and the many Changes that take place in the great outtofrdoors during the change of seasons . . . They did their bit in helping iiBilly" beautify the park near the log cabin . . . Under his direction, they transplanted the wild flower specimens used in the garden unit . . . Their marker near the tree they saw being planted shows the grade and the year it was planted . . . In this way, they have a record of their activity in future years. . . . In the social studies program of grades three and four, emphasis is placed on ere, ative expression . . . The third grade de veloped the study of various types of Indians located in the United States in early day pioneer life . . . Wisconsin and particularly Whitewater life is portrayed . . . Their activities included the cone struction of a miniature log cabin, dressing dolls as pioneers, molding Indian bowls, making booklets containing original stories and pictures, and filling in outline maps of the state of Wisconsin. . . . The fourth grade Course consisted of the study of the life of the people in various faraway lands representing ex! tremes in geographical location . . . As much as possible, the idea that people live as they do because of their environe ment was stressed . . . construction of Viking boats, writing diaries of trips, dressing dolls, making miniature Eskimo igloos, and others helped to maintain in! terest. . . . Discovering what has made America a great nation was the work of the flfth grade . . . Building a frieze depicting the lives of the early explorers, writing and producing plays about Columbus, southern plantation building, pictures and models of all types of transportation and comr munication facilities that grew out of the development of the west kept them busy and contented . . . In studying iiAmerica Todayw the chief interest was the relation of the United States to Other nations and the responsibility of citizens in developing world friendships . . . Music, in folk songs, enlightened their course. t . . Castles and Mohammedan life was the interest of the sixth grade . . . during the unit on the Middle Ages, original plays were written and produced . . . Sea life, the second unit, brought Francis Drake t0 the children through stories, poems, pirates, and treasure hunts . . . New York City and the difference between living in a large and a small city brought the season to a close after the conservation unit stressing Wisconsin forests. 0 Francis Drake was of special interest to these students of the sixth grade in the top picture . . . First graders go marketing at their vegetable market in the second picture . . . The library corner is popular among the second grade students shown in the third picture . . . Typing is first interest of this first grader in the bottom picture. 133 7939 300m ' ' Students notice and appreciate these merchants Who display the blue and White placard of WW 4M 71m 1939 MW" A E? P FOOD STORE Owned and Opyrated by the Great 4tlantir and Pactfc Tea Co. AUNT MATTIES COTTAGE Uyhere Ewery Student is a Guest ILA M. BAYER, O. D. Glasses Scientfmlly and Accurately Fitted BAYERhS JEWELRY AND GIFT SHOP Wxatch and Jewelry Repairing BRICK'S HILLTOP DINETTE Candy, Sandwiches, and Plale Lunches CHADYhS JEWELRY STORE Jllusic and Instrumentx CHAMBERLAINhS Clofhing and Show CUMMINGSh MOTOR COMPANY Roy J. Cummings, Proprietor Chevrolet-Oldsmohile Sales and Servit'e CURRYhS WALGREEN SYSTEM DRUG STORE Drugs With a Repulation DOYONIRAYNE LUMBER COMPANY Phone 6 DUERSThS MARKET Phone 5Ih111 Center Street DUFFINhS REXALL DRUG STORE Save with Safety EVERHARDT AND COMPANY Ford, Ihlerrury, and Lincoln Sales and Service ELLA CHAFFEE FAY, M. D. Donation FIRST CITIZENS STATE BANK Real Banking Service FISH LINE STORE Groceries, Meats, Fruitx, and Candfes R. L. Fish, Proprietor 15'4 FROEMMING FLORIST Corsages-Flowers for All Owasiom DR. E. W. GOELZ Dentist GOLDEN RULE SHOE SHOP hVe Jim to Please GEBHARDT PLUMBING AND HEATING CO. Phone 587W I'IACKETTB FOOD STORE Groceries, Frexh Fruits, and Frosled Foods HALVERSONhS The Quality Store HILLhS SHOE STORE Baxter Brown and Brou'n-Bilt Shoes and Hosiery for the Family HOL'TS FIVE POINT GROCERY Fresh Vegetables, Meat, and Groreries JOHNSONhS MARKET Just a Real Market LEONARDhS RESTAURANT AND BOWLING ALLEYS Steaks and Lunches LEVANETZ THE PLUMBER Modern Plumbing and Heating DR. MAUTHE Donation MAYERS STANDARD SERVICE One Stop Does It 1111 MCGRAVVS Sellers of Smart Shoes and Hosiery MIDrCITY BARBER SHOP The Students; Shop DR. RUSSELL H. MILLER Donation OCONNOR DRUG STORE Boole: and Stationery BARNEY OWENS-CITIES SERVICE STATION Where Service Prevailx PARKERS BAKERY Quality Baked Goods Phone 488 PARKERS FIVE POINT GROCERY Quality-ServicewLow Prices THE PFEFFERKORN STUDIO Fort dtkimon Student Photographs our Specialty DR. E. O. SCHIMMEL Donation SKINDINGSRUDE AND LEIN Furniture and Funeral Service THE STUDENTS AND THE STRAND Insefmrable Pals TREUTEUS HARDWARE R. L. Burch 0il Burners, Furnaces Quality Price Friendly S ervice W'ELTYS BEN FRANKLIN STORE The Best School Supplies at Loweyt Prices WHITEHOUSE STORE When Away From Home Illalee This Your Home WHITEWATER COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS BANK Accurate anl Dependable WHITEWATER CONSUMERS COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION Consumers Cooperation -the way to Economic Democracy WHITEWATER GARMENT COMPANY With Compliments WHITEWATER LUMBER COMPANY Jerome Baker, Alarmger WHITEWATER PHARMACY Beauty Shop-School Supplies WHITEWATER PRESS THE WHITEWATER REGISTER Printers and Publishers since I857 WINCHESTER HARDWARE STORE Quality Service WISCONSIN GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY dlways at Your Service 0 In appreciation of their services to the 1939 Minneiska": BUELL STUDIO U'hitewater, W isromin FOWLE PRINTING COMPANY Milwaukee, Wisconsin 0 The main business district of Whitewater . Walworth Hotel. JAHN Es? OLLIER ENGRAVING COMPANY Chicago, Illinois NORTH AMERICAN PRESS JWil-u'aukee, Wisconsin . . looking east from the Gm! 3min ADMINISTRATION AND FA! CULTY .................... 17 College Faculty 20'26 Elmer, J. U. ...................... 130 Junior High Faculty "144,145 Library ........................................ 26 Physical Education for Men ........ 56 Physical Education for Women.... 67 Primary Department Faculty ........ 21 Agnew, C. H. .. 56 Basketball .. "6263 Boxing ........... 66 Football ........ 1.58r61 Gir1s1 Athletics . "67,72 Golf .................................. . 66 Goodhue and Thomson .. . 67 Intramurals ......................... Letter and Jacket Women Swimming ........................... Tennis ....... Track . A1 A. .. 15W" Club .................................... 57 BOOSTERS ............................ 154,155 CLASSES ........................................ 27 Freshmen ............ ..50r54 Freshmen Officers ..... 50 Juniors ................ 4046 Junior 0111cers .. ..... 4 Seniors ............. "2839 Senior Ochers ..... 28 Sophomores ............... "47'49 Sophomore Officers .................... 47 CLUBS, HONOR FRATS, GREEKS ........................................ 73 Academic Club . A Cappella Choir . 88 Alpha Club .............. 75 Alpha Sigma ................ 114,115 Band ................................... 84,85 Chi Delta Rho .116v117 Choral Club ................................ 89 Commercial Club Delta Psi Omega Delta Sigma Epsilon ..... InterrFraternity Council Inter'Sorority Council . Kappa Delta Pi .......... Kemper Guild L. S. A. L. S. C. S. Madrigals ............... Men,s Chorus ......... Mercier Minneiska .. Orchestra Phi Chi Epsilon ...... Photography Club . Piano Club ............. Pilgrim Fellowship Pi Omega Pi ........ Primary Club Pythian Forum . Royal Purple .......... Sigma Sigma Sigma . Sigma Tau Delta ......... Sigma Tau Gamma ........ Students, Open Forum Thespian .......................... Theta Sigma Upsilon . Treble Clef .................... Wesley Foundation Whitewater Forensic Association ................................ 9697 W. S. G. A. ................................ 93 INDEXES ...................................... 156 General ................ ....156 Student Personnel ................ 15'7r160 TRAINING SCHOOL .................. 129 College High School 130143 Junior High School ....... ".1144'151 Primary Department ............ 152'153 VIEWS AND CAMPUS LIFE ...... 1 Alumni ........................................ 16 Campus Activity .. .413 Campus Scenes ..... 2'3 Prom 14 Senior Aces": ................................. 15 9W of SW PW INCLUDES COLLEGE STUDENTS ONLY Achen, Francis, 125 Adams, Alan, 51, 125 Adamski, Ruth, 48 Adamson, Lois Jane, 29, 88 Addie, Betty Jane, 51, 68, 126 Aldrich, Carol, 48, 103 A1ft,Ethel, 51, 99, 113, 118 Allen, Kenneth, 41, 104, 105, 120 Anderson, Carole, 14, 28, 29, 112, 114, 115 Anderson, Doris, 29, 89 Anderson Iva Jane, 41, 93, 105,114 Anderson, Maxine, 29 Anderson, Oris, 48, 105 Anich, Mathews, 48 Aplin, Joyce, 51, 85 156 Arnold, Allison, 48 Arnold, Florence, 29, 114 Arnold, Frances, 48, 87, 91, 93, 94, 108, 114 Arnold, Gilbert, 41, 116, 117 Arvold, Curtis, 51, 58 Arvold, Russell, 48, 57, 120 Asplund, Lillian, 51, 106, 118 Audley, Harriet, 51, 68,75, 89, 100 Austin, Kent, 15, 29, 57, 62, 120 Austin, Morley, 51, 58, 116 Backus, Inez, 41 Bahr, Ruth, 47, 48, 68, 86, 91, 99, 105, 114 Bailey, Ruth, 51, 68, 105 Baker, Robert, 29, 98, 109 Baker, Victor, 41, 66, 120 Bancroft, Leone, 48, 68, 69 Banta, Jesse, 51, 88, 92, 104, 105 Barker, Baron, 29, 98. 109 Barker, Harold, 51, 58, 121 Barker, James, 51, 57,58, 121 Bar-ney, Harley, 29, 116, 117 Baron, Albina, 48, 89, 103 Barrett, Helen, 29, 100 Bartsch, Rodney, 51 Baumgartner, Gloria, 51, 68, 107 Bayer, Louise, 6, 41, 46, 80, 81, 83, 91, 99,106,110,112, 126 Beach, Elenna, 51 Beck, Ruth, 51, 103 Beede, Elgie, 29, 68 Beeten, Rosemary, 51, 68 Behnken, Helen, 51 Beighley, Nora, 48, 75 Beilke, Emmet, 41, 116 Belitz, Elizabeth, 29, 96, 106 Bellas, Harold, 48, 92 Bender, Ione, 68, 91, 101 Beneditz, Mary Jane, 51, 107, 118 . Benn, Eloise, 48, 68, 122 Benson, Jack, 51 Benzer, Dean, 51, 85, 121 Berg, Mary, 48, 91 Berglund, Mary, 51 Bergmann, Lorraine, 41, 83, 106, 110 Bertadatto, Henry, 30, 116 Biedron, Edward, 30, 85, 86, 99, 107, 120 Bierbaum, Mary, 48, 99, 114 Bill, Ann, 30 Bisely, Dorothy, 14, 30, 80, 83, 93, 98, 103,110,112, 118, 119 Bjorklund, Jane, 48, 88, 91, 96 Bohlman, Ernest, 51, 62 Bolton, Kathryn, 51, 106 Boos, Bernice, 48, 68 Borchert, William, 51 Bossmann, Alice, 3O Boutelle, Everett, 41, 62, 120 Boutelle, Maurice, 48, 58 66, 85, 105, 120 Bower, Betty Jane, 41, 80, 114 Boyd, Dorothy, 48, 122 Brady, Jean, 51 Breese, William, 51, 125 Brennan, Beatrice, 11, 48 99, 103, 122, 123 Brice, William, 41 Britelli, Leonard, 51, 58 Broadberry, Bernard, 51 Brobst, Lois, 41, 110, 122 Brockhaus, Hazel, 41, 89, 94, 105, 108 Bromley, Elizabeth, 41, 85, 105 Bronson, Floyd, 51, 88, 90, 105, 125 Bronson, Harvey, 30, 57, 58, 124 Bronson. Winifred, 51, 87, 88, 89, 105 Broughton, Phyllis, 49, 114 Brown, Kenneth, 83, 98, 105 Brunk, Chrystal Belle, 30, 68, 69, 86, 107 Bruns, Verna, 30, 114 Brunswick, Julia, 41, 68, 105, 126 Buckingham, George, 48, 103 Buffam, Jane, 41 Bull, Albury, 48, 58, 64, 90, 96, 113, 124 Bullock, Loretta. 48, 68, 103 Bumbalek, John. 51 Burgess, Lyle, 51 Burglund. Eleanor, 51, 68, 89 Burton. Ruth, 41, 122, 123 Bushey. Reuben, 51 Campbell, Kathryn, 51, 89, 101 Capper, Francis. 30, 86, 105, 111, 120 Carlson, Delmar, 51, 98 Carlson, Marian, 41, 87, 90, 122 Carpenter, Archie. 51 Cartier, Betty Jane, 48, 85, 126 Chadwick, Lucille, 51, 75, 105 Chape,1rene, 41, 86, 91, 92,105,114 Chase, Robert, 41, 83, 96, 97, 99, 104, 105, 120 Chesemore, Ruth, 48, 118, 119 Chesnik, Carl, 51, 57, 58, 121 Christiansen, Alice, 30, 93, 109, 118 Christiansen, Lorraine, 41, 68, 89, 99, 107, 113, 119 Christensen, Nancy, 68, 103 Christianson, Norman, 30, 64, 116, 117 Church, Harriet, 48, 68, 69, 114 Clapper, Darlene, 48 CIark, Marjorie, 51, 68, 85, 89 Clowes, Kenneth, 51, 58, 125 Coalwell, Purcel, 48 Collins, Donald, 5, 30, 80, 81, 83 Collins, Marie, 31, 68, 69, 80, 87, 98, 103, 108 Conforti, Mario, 48, 57, 96, 97, 124, 125 Conley, Edward, 48 Conley, Frances, 51, 75, 103 Conner, Florence, 31, 80, 83, 110 Cook, Glen, 31, 120 Cook, Miriam, 51 Coon, Luella, 51, 86 Cooper, Leo, 48 Copeland, James, 48 Cordts, Ruth, 51, 68, 89, 101 Cory, James, 51, 83, 90 Coy, Annette, 51 Crerar, Vera, 41, 89, 105, 118 Cronin, Evelyn, 48, 68 Crotty, Helen, 51, 103 Cu1len, Arthur, 51, 57, 58 Cullen, Willard, 51, 58 Curi, Frank, 48 103, Dahl, Eleanore, 51, 68, 103 Dahle, Mary Jane, 122 Dale, John, 51, 107 Daly, June, 31 Davidson, Maxine, 51, 93, 114 Davis, Joseph, 41 Davis, june, 31 Dawe, Wilmer, 41, 105 Day, Ruth, 51, 89, 105 Deck, Lester, 31, 98, 105, 109 Deininger, Emma, 51, 105 DeLange, Dorothy, 51, 105, 118 Demerath, Donald, 31, 90, 116 Derivan, Frederick, 51, 103, 121 Dettinger, Irene, 41, 88, 91, 105 Dettmann, John, 41, 80, 85, 86, 88, 90 96,104,105,108,120 Dewey, Helen, 51, 68, 85, 86, 122 Deyer, Donald, 51 Dickhoff, Walton, 41, 57 Dobbs, Mildred, 51, 68, 85, 86, 91, 122 Doering, Helen, 48, 68, 85, 118 Dolan, Janet, 51, 114 Dougherty, Eleanor, 51, 85, 86, 105 Douglas, Elsie, 51, 75, 105 Douglass, Jane, 51 Douglas, Kenneth, 51, 58, 121 Drinkwater, Marie, 51, 68 Driscoll, Beverly, 31, 103 Droegkamp. Harold, 48, 120 Dubats, William, 41, 77, 80, 83, 96, 97, 99,108,110,113,120 DuBois, Rosamond, 41, 126 Dudley, Nelson, 48, 58, 121 Duehning, Ruth, 51, 99, 114 Dunbar, Barbara, 48, 88, 91, 92, 122 Eastman, Ronald, 121 Edwards, Cable, 48, 96, 99, 105 Edwards, Ruth, 41, 110 Ellis, Miriam, 41, 46, 83, 105, 114 Emmert, Bernice, 31, 89 Engan Betty, 51, 68, 126 Engebretsen. Nancy, 51, 100, 122 Engelstad, Francis. 48, 9O Engelstad, Julian, 51 Erickson, Donald, 51, 103, 121 Essmann, Henriette, 41, 68 Essock, Morris, 51 Evans, Gwendolyn, 51, 68, 126 Ewalt, Lorraine, 8, 51, 68, 103, 114 Fahland, Marilyn, 48, 91 Fahland, Charles, 41, 103 Fanning, Margaret, 51, 75, 103 Farina, Albert, 51, 58, 62 Farney, John, 51, 62 Farrow, Betsy Ross, 48 Featherstone, Marshall, 41, 85 Feldsclmeider, Grace, 126 Feldt, Violet, 48, 91, 105, 118 Feller, Robert, 51 Ferguson, Alex, 51, 58 Fero, Robert, 51, 85 Feuerstein, Gretrude, 41, 68 Fierhammer, Mildred, 41 Finney, Proctor, 48 Fischer, Matthew, 120 Fisher, Marjorie, 51 Fleming, Margaret, 42, 68, 103, 110 Flister, Inga, 48, 101 Flood, Mary Jane, 51, 103, 114 Folkrod, Florence, 51, 68, 86, 105 Ford, James, 9, 48 Foss, Juanita, 42, 105 Foster, Marion, 51 Fosterling, Ruth, 42, 93, 105, 118 Francis, Lucile, 51, 85, 89 Frank, Marjorie, 51, 68 Frank, Melvin, 9, 48, 83, 106 Frey, Viola, 48, 106 Fridie, Jack, 48, 125 Fritz, Alvin, 48, 124 Fritz, Earl, 48, 57, 58, 101, 124 Froemming, Floyd, 51, 101, 121 Fronek, Ervin, 48, 83, 124 Fry, Charles, 48 Fryday, William, 51, 58 Fuchs, Harold, 48 Fulton, VJilliam, 9, 48, 85, 86, 100 Funk, Glenn, 48, 64, 98, 124 Furley, Lois, 51, 103 Gage, Jean, 42, 122 Gallagher, Marguerite, 51, 68 Gardiner, Joyce, 48, 88 Gardner, Wayne, 51 Garfoot, Della Mae, 42, 103, 126, 127 Gaskell, Margaret, 42, 103, 114 Gau, Donald, 52, 62 Gauthier, Edward, 28, 31, 80, 90, 96, 103, 110, 120 Gehri, Donald, 51, 121 Gehrlich, Juanita, 48 Gcorgeson, Ruth, 51 Georgi, Sophie, 42, 68, 86, 106 Gerlach, Emmaline, 42, 91, 10 Gessert, Donald, 51 ' Gilbert, Grace, 48 Gillis, Helen, 42, 68, 89, 107 Gilman, Edson, 42, 88, 100, 124. 125 Godfrey, Clare, 42, 103, 110 Goelzer, LeVernabelle, 31, 91, 122, 123 Gocrlitz, Amber, 48, 106 Good, Margaret, 42, 122 Goodman, Andrew, 31, 96, 97, 113, 116 Goodman, George, 48, 98, 105 Graham, John, 42, 103, 116 Graham, Thomas, 32, 85, 116 Grapentine, Edith, 32 Graper, Lois, 42 Graske, Walter, 48, 85, 86, 9O Graves, Irwin, 51, 58, 105 Graves, Jack, 48, 103 Gray, Thelma, 52 Gray,Virginia, 51, 75 Greene, Bernice, 51, 103 Greenhalgh, Arthur, 50, 51, 80, 121 Graig, Richard, 48 Griese, Ruth, 52 Groelle, Dorothea, 42, 98, 110, 114 Grosinske, Mary Lou, 52, 122 Grunewald, Herta, 51, 106 Gulan, Eddie, 48, 57, 58 Gullickson, Alden, 51, 121 Gumble, Celia, 52, 89, 105 Gutzmer, Vera, 48, 75 Gyland, Belle, 48, 75, 89, 91, 101 Haag, Pearl, 42, 89 Haase, Lorraine, 48, 128 Haasl, George, 48, 64, 116 Haesler, Margaret, 52, 68, 75, 89, 101 Haferman, Emogene, 52, 88, 91 Hahn, Alice, 42, 118, 119 Hahn, Carol, 42, 68, 89, 99, 106 Hahn, Jane, 32, 88,112,118,119 Haines, Catherine, 42, 89, 96, 99 Haire, Viola, 52 Hammarlund, Elaine, 52, 89, 122 Hammarlund, Gretchen, 32, 78, 91, 106, 126 Hanchman, Viola, 48, 68, 85, 86, 91, 104, 105 Hanson, Carl, 42, 80, 98, 124, 125 Harbort, Allen, 32, 90, 98, 120 Harnden, Dean, 48 Harper, Berniece, 42, 68, 69, 87, 91 Harrison, Charles, 116 Hart, Betty Jean, 52, 68, 89 Hartel, Robert, 52, 116 Hartenberger, Jack, 42, 85 Hartman, Alfred, 52 Hartman, Harriet, 52 Hass, Wilma, 42, 68, 69, 89 Hastreiter, Bernard, 32, 103, 110, 113, 116 Hed, Marion, 52, 93, 106, 114 Heide, Margaret, 32, 83, 91, 110, 111 Helgert, Edward, 48, 90, 103 Helgesen, Harlin, 52, 85, 121 Heller, Irvin, 48, 57 Helwig, Edward, 52, 116 Hemlock, Robert, 52 Henderson, Elizabeth, 52, 91, 93, 114 Henderson, James, 52, 62, 125 Henderson, Jean, 32, 80, 108, 112, 122 Henderson, Jean 1., 48, 88, 91, 105 Henry, Marjorie, 48, 114 Hermsen, James, 52, 62 Herreid, Robert, 42 Herreman, Frances, 32, 80, 81, 114, 115 Hett, Benedict, 52, 94, 103 Heyrman, Donald, 32, 80, 90, 103, 110, 120 Hill, Charles, 52, 121 Hill, Madelon, 52, 68, 103 Hillier, Marcia, 52, 89, 105 Hinkel, Joyce, 52 Hinkle, Wayne, 42, 85, 90, 92, 116 Hittesdorf, Richard, 52, 116 Hoefs, William, 6, 48, 58, 62, 85 Hofrichter, Frank, 32 Hollister, Helen, 52 Hollister, Lillian, 32, 91, 126 Holloway, Don, 125 Holm, Madelyn, 33 158 Holtz, Henrietta, 42, 68, 87, 88, 91, 107, 111 Honzik, Paul, 52, 86, 90, 125 Horkan, Virginia, 42, 102, 103, 126, 127 Howard, Doris, 52, 85, 86 Howard, Wendall, 42, 90, 105 Howe, Donald, 48 Hoyum, Allen, 52, 62, 63 Hron, Dorothy, 52, 103, 118 Hugill, Betty, 42, 105, 126, 127 Hulick, Harry, 40, 42, 46, 57, 62, 83, 120 Hull, Mary, 15, 33, 86, 88, 91, 126 Hummel, Dorothy, 48 Hund, Hazel, 52, 75, 89 Hungerford, Robert, 42, 85, 86, 105, 120 Hunt, George, 48, 120 Huschka, LaVcrne, 52, 58, 121 Hutchinson, Nora, 48, 89 Injasoulian, George, 52, 58, 103, 121 Jackson, Gordon, 48, 64, 101, 124 Jackson, Phyllis, 52, 68 Jacobs, Arlene, 48, 89, 105 Jacobson, Carol, 42, 68, 85, 88, 101 Jacobson, Howard, 42, 85, 120 Jacobson, Margaret, 52, 101 Jacobson, Ollie, 33 Jacobson, Victoria, 48, 75 James, Donald, 52 James, Mildred, 33, 96, 98, 105, 110, 118 ,ames, Winifred, 52, 68, 92, 103 ,ansky, Archie, 52, 58, 62, 103, 120 .anz, LuciHe, 6, 15, 28, 33, 68, 103, 110, 126 ,aquith, Anita, 33, 110, 118 heffrey, Harlan, 52, 104, 105 IeErey, Lowell, 42 ' Ierabek, Elaine, 52 erome, Bernice, 48, 75, 101 ohnson, Alberta, 52, 68, 89 ohnson, Antionette, 33, 112, 126, 127 ohnson, Ethel, 52, 75, 105 ohnson, Leone, 42, 68 johnson, Lyle, 48, 85, 101 , ohnson, Thomas, 52 .ohnson, Merle, 52, 107 ohnson, Paul, 105 Iohnson, Ruth, 52, 91 ohnson, Verna Mae, 42, 68, 69 ohnston, Allan, 52 ,ost, Robert, 43, 103, 124 , udkins, Francois, 52, 58 huntwaite, Thora, 33, 68, 69, 88, 91, 93, 105, 118, 119 Kallesfad, Selma, 33, 68, 80, 89, 101 Kammer, John, 52 Kamnetz, Harvey, 48, 101 Karabetsos, Charles, 58 Karpen, Evelyn, 48 Kautz, Joseph, 33, 121 Keefe, Donald, 52, 85 Keegan, Alma, 48, 68, 69, 91, 94, 99, 103. 108 Keel, John, 48, 124 Keen, June. 52 Kelley, William, 43, 96, 124 Kenzler, William, 53, 116 Kessel, Robert, 52 Ketter, Dorothy, 43, 103, 126, 127 Ketterl, Adeline, 48, 83, 89, 103 Keuler, Clifford, 43, 85 Keuler, Glenn, 48, 85 Keuper, Kenneth, 64, 65 Kildow, Dorothy, 52, 68, 107 Kilpin, Joyce, 52 Kingsland, Lillian, 43, 68, 87, 91 Kirby, Irene, 33, 83, 89, 114 Kittleson, Jean, 33, 88, 108 Klann, Hugo, 34, 58, 110, 120 Klein, Elizabeth, 52 Klein, Given, 43, 85, 98, 124, 125 Klein, Marjorie, 52, 99 Klonowski, Stanley, 43, 125 Knight, Carmelita, 52 Knilans, Mary, 50, 52, 123 Knilans, Raymond, 43, 66, 104, 105, 120 Knudtson, Valborg, 48, 88, 91, 101 Koenig, Arthur, 43, 88, 90 Koenings, Anthony, 14, 43, 57, 62, 64, 96, 124, 125 Koenings, Bernadette, 48, 68, 89, 103, 114 Koenings, Roman, 53, 58, 125 Koeppen, Melvin, 5, 6, 34, 66, 80, 81, 82, 83, 98,110,120 Kolb, James, 48, 103, 124 Korpal, Joseph, 43, 103, 120 Kosykowski, Eugene, 52, 103 Koth, Lloyd, 52, 62, 80, 103 Koudelik, Louis, 52, 116, 117 Kraft, Louis, 52 Krause, Henry, 52, 62 Kraft, Martha, 34, 68, 69, 83, 93, 104, 105,110,113,114 Kresen, William, 48 Kroening, Henry, 43 Kroken, Ruth, 48, 114 Krueger, Earl, 52 Krueger, Lucille, 34, 68, 91, 112, 114 Krueger, Marion, 52, 85, 89, 99, 103 Krusing, Louis, 43 Kuba, Marie, 48, 103 Kutz, Donald, 52, 121 Laitala, Wayne, 34, 110 Langager, Carol, 49, 85, 91 Lange, Theron, 43 Langen, Herbert, 34 Langer, Helen, 52 Lau, Alice, 49, 99, 106 Lavering, Betty, 52, 122 Lean, Helen, 49, 88, 89, 105 LeClair, Ethel, 52, 102, 103 Lee, 7Olaf, 47, 49, 90, 96, 97, 106, 116, 11 Lee, Richard, 34, 85, 88, 90, 109, 113, 124 Leffingwell, Chapman, 34, 85, 86, 88, 90, 92, 120 Lehman, Margaret, 52, 103 Lein, Ruby, 52, 75 Lemke, Joan, 49, 105 Lemker, Harriet, 52, 68 Lansing, Ellen, 49, 105 Leucinger, Marie, 52, 89, 99, 106 Lewein, Matt, 34, 57, 58, 120 Lewein, Paul, 34, 57, 58, 88, 120 Lewis, Genevieve, 43, 110, 122 Lewis, Mary 52, 103 Littleiohn, Mildred, 52, 75, 89, 93, 105 Lloyd, Lillian, 43,99, 105, 110 Lohr, Violet, 52, 114 Lohstreter, Arlene, 43, 103 Loomer, Gifford, 64, 104 Loos, Irma, 52, 68 Lord, Catherine, 52, 103 Loreii, Al, 48, 88, 121 Lough, Doris, 49, 68, 92, 126 Lowe, Helen Jean, 49, 85, 86, 105, 126 Luckow, George, 43, 105, 113, 124 Ludden, Fran, 48, 57, 64 Lunde, Luella, 52, 75, 101 Lyden, Eileen, 52, 103 Lynch, Jerry, 52 Lyon, Harris, 43, 57, 58, 62 McComb, John, 49, 83 McCorkle, Paul, 49 McCoy, Raymond, 35, 56, 57, 58, 90, 107, 116, 117 McGary, Grace, 43, 68, 89 McGrath, Dorothy, 49, 89 McGrath, Margaret, 43 McGraW, Garfield, 43, 90, 96, 124, 125 McKinley, Joyce, 52, 68 McLernon, Iola, 89, 107 McMahon, Ethel, 49, 68 McNally, Floyd, 52 McQuade, James, 52, 121 McWilliam, Jean. 49, 75 Maas, Franklin, 43 MacFarlane, Ruth, 52 Mack, Rex, 52, 85 Makholm, Roy, 53, 88, 106 Manogue, Gertrude, 52, 75, 103 Mansfleld, Lois, 52, 91 Mansur, Marian, 52, 68, 114 Marks, Ella, 43, 68, 98, 106 Marsh, Martha, 86 Marsh, Virginia, 4, 14, 15, 34, 86, 88, 92, 107 Marshall, Betty, 34, 98, 100 Marshall, Eloise, 43, 88, 91, 122 Marshall, Grace, 52, 91, 101 Marshall, Lucile, 52 Marshall, Marilyn, 49, 68, 101 Martens, Alberta, 35, 68, 69, 85, 86, 96, 101 Mamn, Everett, 53 Marx, Marion, 49, 68, 71, 80, 83, 86, 93, 122 Masche, Lucil1e, 52, 89, 99, 105 Mathison, Elmer, 52, 58 Mathison, Marjorie, 49, 85, 122 Mayer, Hector, 52, 58, 121 Mead, Robert, 49, 96, 103, 120 Meissner, Faith, 53, 91 Messerschmidt, Irmagard, 35, 93, 98, 106 Meuler, Ruth, 49, 99, 106, 126 Meyer, Bernard, 54 Meyer, Floyd, 53 Meyer, Harold, 35, 106 Meyer, Isabel, 35 Meyer, Jerome, 125 Meyer, Mildred, 43, 87, 106, 114 Meyers, Paul, 53, 116 Mickelson, Frances, 43, 88, 91, 93, 101 Mikich, Ruth, 53, 100, 101 Mikkelson, Emma Lee, 49, 85, 93, 114 Millenbah, Mae June, 43, 68, 112, 122, 123 Miller, Audrey, 53, 68 Miller, Elmer, 43, 49 Mi11er, Elsbeth, 43, 109, 111 Miller, less, 53, 92 Milligan, Hugh, 85 Millis, George. 43, 85, 98, 120 M11115, Maribel, 48, 68 Millis, Vera, 35, 68, 110 Minahan, William, 53 Moan, Virginia, 43, 89, 103, 110 Mode. Walter, 43, 66, 98, 109 Moe, Josephine, 35, 122, 123 Mohns, Gladys, 53, 68 Molnar, Louis, 53, 58, 121 Moore, Bess Jo, 53, 68, 126 Morrissey, Ione, 53 Moyer, Olive, 53 Mueller, Ray, 53 Mueller, Richard, 49, 58 Muir, Gerald, 35, 88, 90, 92, 97, 99 Mullen, Genevieve, 14, 43, 89, 103, 114 Mullen, James, 11, 47, 49, 58, 90, 103, 124 Murdock, Louise, 43, 122 Murphy, Eileen, 53, 91, 103 Musgrove, Edith, 53, 107 Myre, Lee, 53,103, 121 Naegele, Dorothea, 49, 89, 103 Neal, Joan, 53 Neilly, William, 53 Nelson, Elaine, 43, 85, 86, 91, 101 Nelson, Helen, 44, 105 Nelson, Myrtle, 35, 94, 101 Nemitz, Ruth, 53 Nerbovig, Marcella, 44, 86, 87, 88, 91, 101 Neu, Iviary Alice, 53, 103 Nicholas, Leighon, 49, 98, 103 Nickos, Lydia, 44, 126, 127 Niebuhr, Marian, 35, 106 Niere, Glenn, 53, 85, 90 Nolop, Francis, 53, 104, 121 Norregaard, Fred, 49, 83, 96, 97, 101, 124 Norton, Ruth, 35, 89, 96, 100 Nuernberg, Anita, 49, 75, 89, 106 Nye, Irwin, 44, 74, 83, 105, 109, 120 Oberg, Ardys, 53, 91, 105 O1Brien, Jane, 44, 93, 114 O'Connell, Genevieve, 53, 89, 103 O'Connor, Mary Helen, 49, 68, 103, 114 O3Leary, Jeanne, 53, 85 Olson, Casper, 49 Olson, Handley, 53, 116 Olson, Howard, 54, 57, 58, 103, 121 Olson, Marce11a, 53 Olson,Marjorie, 44 Olson, Oliver, 44 Onsrud, Ione, 44, 91, 122 Opitz, Norbert, 53, 58 Oppriecht, Clair, 49. 90, 105, 116 Ortmann, Merton, 53, 58, 125 Ott, Ra1Dh, 35, 57, 113, 120 Ottow, Gladys. 53, 75 Owczarski, Celia, 36, 83, 89, 94, 103, 108, 118, 119 Palmer, Lorraine, 53, 105, 114 Pansing, Lloyd 53 Panzenhagen, Ruth, 53, 86 Parsons, Catherine, 44 Pas, Thaddeus, 44, 86 Patock, Marie, 49 Peach, Mary, 53, 75, 105 Pedley, Marion, 36, 89 Pcpper,-Dorothy, 44, 68, 69, 83, 110, 114, 115 Peters, Ellen, 49, 114 Peters, Frederick, 14, 44, 58, 124, 125 Peters, Virginia, 53, 114 Petersen, Pauline, 53, 68, 101 Peterson, Ludwig, 116 Peterson, Doris, 53, 68, 85, 86, 101, 122 Peterson, Helen, 49 Peterson, Kenneth, 36, 90, 101, 108, 116 Peterson, Ralph, 36, 85, 98, 105 Petr, Howard, 53 Pfefferkorn, Joyce, 44, 104, 105 Pippel, Irene, 36, 69, 88, 105, 110, 112, 118 Pitzner, Willard, 53, 62 Place, Robert, 44, 88, 107 Plewe, Dorothy, 53 Piumb, Patricia, 53, 93, 122 Plyer, Francis, 36, 57, 58, 62, 63, 110, 116 Pokrandt, Betty June, 49, 91, 107 Pope, William, 49 Poulos, Chris, 53, 90, 116 Founder, Edythe, 44, 68, 69, 85, 89 Powell, Janet, 49, 85, 96, 99, 105 Powell, Ruth, 44 Powers, Arthur, 53, 121 Presse, Georgette, 53, 103 Prielipp, Geraldine, 36, 126, 127 Priske, Joyce, 44, 103, 126 Prouty, Alice, 53 Prouty, Ruth, 44, 107, 119 Prust, Henry, 53, 85, 88, 125 Puerner, Mary, 36, 91 Pynn, Margaret, 53, 103 Quinn, Frances, 49 Radowski, Walter, 53, 62. 121 Rankins, Betty, 49, 75, 89 Ransom, Arthur, 44, 57, 58, 66, 83, 120, 121 Rath, George, 53, 125 Rath, Leland, 53, 125 Rattunde, Lela, 53 Reck, Clarence, 53, 90 Recknagel, Katherine, 49, 75 Reese, Ivan, 50, 53, 90, 121 Regelein, Laura, 49 Reich, Woodrow, 53 Reid, Jean, 44, 107 Reisenauer, William, 36, 85, 90,120 Remeikis, Frank, 53, 105, 116 Rennemo, Thomas, 44, 90, 116 Reynolds, Merlin, 124 Richardson, Della, 44, 91, 105, 114 Richardson, Gayle, 44, 114 Ridgeman, Lorraine, 53, 75 Riesch, Anna Lou, 44, 68, 69, 80 Roberts, Helen, 49, 91, 118 Robertson, Norma, 53 Robinson. Dorothea, 49, 85 Roche, Isabel, 49, 103 Rogers, Betty, 40, 44, 80, 88, 93, 109, 114 Rohde, Charles, 44, 98 Roherty, Joan, 44, 93,103, 114, 115 Roherty, Ruth Ann, 49, 91, 103, 114 Romaine, Doris, 44, 68 Roppe, Leslie, 53 Rose, Arlene, 44, 68, 105. 110 Rose, Betty Jane, 49, 68, 85, 88, 89, 99. 105 Rusch. Gerald. 53 Ryan, James, 85 Salverson, Harry, 49, 85 Sanders, Virginia, 49, 118 Sarcent, Lois, 49 Sattler, Dennis, 48, 58 Saunders, Anita, 44, 103, 114, 115 Schaefer, Herbert, 36, 83, 106 Schauer, Virginia, 53, 106 SChaufTert, Ulla, 53, 75 Schenk, Clarence, 49, 90 Schilt, Anna, 49, 75, 101 Schley, Hazel, 44, 88, 92, 99, 105, 118 Schmid, Rosemary, 53, 103, 122 Scmidlkofer, William, 54 Schmidt, Agnes, 36, 83, 99, 105, 110 Schmitt, George, 44, 58 Schoenke, Mabel, 36, 118 Schoenmann, Eleanor, 44, 103, 114 Schreiber, Rosalind, 44, 103 Schroeder, Jean, 44, 85, 88, 91 Schuhmacher, Pauline, 53, 105 Schultheis, Robert, 15, 37, 81, 113, 117 Schultz, George, 40, 44, 83, 113, 120 Schumacher, Mary Jane, 53 Schunk, Alyce, 68, 119 Scola, Helen, 45, 68, 108, 110 Scott, Wilmah, 37, 126 Sdano, Arnold, 53 Serfling, Arthur, 54, 83, 85, 105 Shadewald, June, 37, 122 Sharpe, Wesley. 49, 120 Shattuck, Robert, 53, 116 Shattuck, Bruce, 49, 58, 62, 63, 120 Sherman, Evelyn, 49, 75 Sherman, Willard, 45, 58 Shillinglaw, Eleanor, 53, 103 Shinkus, Walter, 54, 58 Shudlick, Victor, 37, 105, 108 Shuman, Charles, 37, 105, 120 Simonson, Marian, 37, 85, 89 Simonson, Roselyn, 45, 114, 115 Skibba, Eugene, 37, 120 Skibrek, Rae, 49, 86, 91, 107 Skournal, Edward, 37, 116 Slattery, John, 54 Slauson, Robert, 45, 116, 117 Small, Eugene, 53 Smiley, Walter, 48, 124 Smith, Francis, 53 Smith, John, 53, 62 Smith, Lorraine, 49 Smith, Robert, 53 Smith, Wilma, 45, 114, 115 Snyder, Dorothy, 53, 75 Somsen, Raymond, 37, 105, 120 Specht, Selma, 53, 87, 91, 105 Speck, Eldred, 45, 83,105, 110, 121 Speel, Lawrence, 37, 83, 103 Spencer, Robert, 49, 124, 125 Spooner, Jean, 37 Stacey, Joan, 53 Stajnert, Josephine, 9, 53, 68, 85, 103 Stamm, Richard, 45 Stangel, John, 49, 120 Statz, John, 53 Stauffacher, George, 54, 125 Stebbins, Phyllis, 53, 75, 89, 105 Stacker, Wilbur, 45, 64, 124, 125 Stefani, Primo, 54, 58 Steger, IVIargaret Mary, 49, 122, 123 Stein, Lawrence, 45, 64 Stieber, Carmen, 45, 103, 114 Stirn, Adeline, 37, 110 Stirn, Helen, 38 Stobie, George, 45, 98, 124 Stock, Mary, 45, 99, 107, 110 Stocker, Virginia, 53, 85, 114 Stoik, Ruth, 38, 68, 69, 103, 118 St011, Gay, 53 Stone, Geneva, 38, 93, 101, 108, 122 Stove, Milner, 38, 101, 110 Strand, Sievert, 49 Streeck, Clarissa, 49, 87, 107 160 Stritzel, Marjorie, 38, 83, 101 Strohacker, Robert, 45, 57, 58, 64, 65, 124 Stromberg, Helene, 45, 88, 105, 114 Sturtevant, Charles, 49 Sturtevant, Vivian, 49, 68, 103 Sucharski, Alice, 53, 68, 85, 103 Sugden, Alice, 38 Sugden, Harry, 38, 90, 110, 111 Sullivan, George, 49, 85, 90, 98, 103, 116 Sundberg, Betty Jane, 45, 68, 80, 103, 110, 112, 114 Sundberg, Francis, 49, 58, 124 Swanson, Janis, 49, 87, 101 Sweet, Wilbur, 49, 120 Sylvester, Edith, 88, 118 Tabaka, John, 49, 58, 124 Taylor, Mary, 54, 105 Teske, Alfred, 45, 96, 98, 106, 124 Tesmer, William, 49, 88, 90, 92, 113, 116 Tess, Geraldine, 49, 68 Thayer, Betty, 49, 98, 126 Thayer, Grant, 54, 88, 9O Theologe, Russel, 54, 116 Thielen, Charles, 54 Thingstad, Ann, 54, 126 Thomas, Frank, 54 Thomas, Horace, 49, 107 Thomas, Margaret, 51, 91, 107 Thompson, Loran, 38, 92, 105, 111, 120 Thurber, Virginia, 54, 103 Tibbitts, June, 49, 68, 122 Tilburg, William, 54 Todd, Leonora, 49, 85 Tolzman, Bernard, 49, 103, 124 Tonn, Frieda, 45, 106 Torhorst, Allan, 45, 120 Torrey, Lawrence, 45 Torsrud, Jane, 45, 105, 126, 127 Trachte, James, 54, 121 Traynor, William, 54, 125 Trebilcock, Eva, 49 Trescher, Marian, 54, 68 Trost, Adele, 49, 88, 91, 107 Trost, Lorraine, 54, 89, 105 Trovinger, Lawrence, 38, 83, 94, 98, 99, 102, 107, 108, 124 Truesdale, Charles, 54, 105, 121 Truesdale, John, 38, 57, 104, 105, 113 Tubbs, Joyce, 38, 85, 86, 93, 114 Turner, Warner, 49, 116 Tyvand, Paul, 45, 88, 92, 101, 121 Udey, Charles, 54 Vance, Mary, 38, 98, 111 Vandermause, Orville, 54, 103, 125 Van Hoof, Helen, 49, 89, 99, 103 Veurn, Eleanore, 49, 75 Veum, Irene, 49, 75 Vieth, Harold, 39, 106, 110, 124 Vincent, Eva, 45, 68, 105 Viskoe, Helen, 49. 103, 118 Voegeli, Marian, 49, 91, 122, 123 Volenberg, Myrtle, 49, 75, 93 Voss, Paul, 49 Wagner, Lucille, 54, 68, 89 Walker, George, 125 Walker, Jane, 49, 68 Walker, Marthann, 45, 68, 113, 122 Walsh, Armilla, 54, 68, 103 Walsh, Frank, 54, 103 Walsh, Keith, 39, 103 Walter, Anabel, 4, 39, 91, 105, 114 Walther, Lorraine, 54, 103, 122 Ward, Hollis, 54 Ward, June, 54, 68 Ward, Ralph, 49, 58 Washburn, Maxine, 54, 105 Watrous, Roger, 54 Wawirka, Ruth, 49, 106, 118 Webb, Marcia, 49, 91, 98, 122 Weber, Marion, 68, 91 Weber, Virginia, 54 Weckler, Lloyd, 45 Weiss, Harvey, 45, 80, 83, 113, 124 Welke, Edward, 45 We1kos, Hilton, 45, 90, 98, 105 Welter, Clementine, 39 Wendorf, Milton, 45 Wendt, Eleanor, 39, 85, 103, 110 Wentworth, Charlotte, 54, 105 Wentzel, Emily, 45, 105, 118 Wergin, Dorothic, 54, 103 Werth, Ruth, 49 West, Eunice, 45, 105 Westlake, Virginia, 45 Wezeman, Eleanor, 45, 68, 86 Wezeman, Marie, 54, 91 Whitnall, Robert, 49, 58, 64, 124 Wiedenhoeft, Beth, 49, 85, 88, 122 Wilber, Joy, 54, 85, 86 Wille, LaVere, 39 Williams, Harvey, 45, 96 Wilson, John, 54, 90, 121 Wilson, Lowell, 45, 98, 107 Wilson, Robert, 54 Wiltsey, Howard, 49 Winn, Alice, 45, 103, 114 Winnie, Robert, 85 Winsor, Howard, 54, 116 Winters, Ardith, 39, 88, 114 Wirth, David, 49, 57, 58, 98, 121 Wisch, Clemens, 54, 57, 58 Witkowski, Albin, 39, 103, 120 W'oldt, Roger, 46 Wolfe, Marcella, 54, 89, 105 Wolff, Arlisle, 46, 80, 83, 110, 114, 115 Wollenzien, Jane, 54, 68, 89, 100 Wood, Annella, 54, 75, 105 Wright, Arline, 39, 68, 69, 88, 91, 92, 99, 105 Wutke, Eunice, 45, 49 Yach, Harry, 46, 103, 121 Yankow, Henry, 39, 64, 83, 85, 110, 124 Yelton, Wilmer, 54 Yochum, Naomi, 49, 68, 82, 83, 92, 122 Yoder, Carol, 46, 68, 69, 112, 113, 122 Young, Lloyd, 54 Zafis, Angelyn, 49, 68 Zander, Elizabeth, 54, 118 Zehme, Dorothy, 14, 39, 68, 98, 112, 126, 127 Zimmermann, Geraldine, 54, 68, 99, 105, 114 Zimmerman, Isabelle, 54, 75 Zimmerman, Ruth, 39, 68, 122 Zingle, Elmer, 88 Zuill, David, 49 , O.Kva:ntk?gklglg9". ' K 0X -.


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