University of Wisconsin Superior - Gitche Gumee Yearbook (Superior, WI)

 - Class of 1933

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University of Wisconsin Superior - Gitche Gumee Yearbook (Superior, WI) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 208 of the 1933 volume:

Ex til Libris j r JIM DAN HILL LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SUPERIOR SUPERIOR, WISCONSIN 54880Foreword The 1933 Gitche Gurnee is a record of one brief year at S. T. C. It has been the desire of the staff to make this yearbook a link in the history of this College, portraying to the extent possible, the events which in one way or another touch the lives of all who have contributed by their efforts in making this year one of progress. The spectre of lean purses has taken away some of the pomp and ceremony which characterizes more prosperous times, but fundamentally, the same spirit of work and play which has permeated the life of this school from its beginning, may be found in the daily life of all those upon whom Superior has bestowed its opportunities. Should this Gitche succeed in keeping alive memories long after College days are past, the Gitche will find satisfaction in having played its humble part.Dedication r-T- HE 1933 Gitche Gumee wishes to honor the Alumni who have gone forth from Superior State Teachers College during its 37 years of service to the state. In honoring but a few, the Gitche Gumee wishes to pay its full measure of tribute to the countless number who are rendering daily service to their community, be their efforts unsung and their only reward a feeling of satisfaction in work well done. In the accomplishments of its Alumni, may the College find renewed inspiration for the future. May the ideals and visions fostered by the Alumni serve to guide the class whose record this 1933 Gitche chronicles.iy Bronsky has made a success of her chosen profession, teaching. Upon her graduation from Superior Normal, Miss Bronsky accepted a position in the element tary grades at Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. Later she taught in a Duluth high school, from which position she came to Superior Normal as a critic. She was appointed state supervisor of elementary grades, which position she held for several years. Return ing again to Superior, she became head of the Intermediate department. In 1929, she became assistant professor of education at Ohio State University. Both as a student and teacher, Miss Bronsky has contributed by her talents to our college.Charles J. Anderson is one of the early grad' uates of Superior Normal School, a member of the class of 1903. His present position as dean of the College of Education, University of Wisconsin, is the result of extensive training and experience. He taught in the public schools of Wisconsin until his appointment as assistant state superintendent of public instruction. In 1926, he became assistant professor in the School of Education, University of Wisconsin. He has lectured at Cornell and the University of Southern California during summer sessions, and has conducted educational surveys of schools in Virginia and Wisconsin. His active participation in the state and national teachers associations has been recognized by election to important offices. The Lincoln Readers, Triangle Arithmetics, Reeding Objectives, Visiting the Teacher at Worl{, Supervision of Rural Schools, are among the text books which he has written with others.c able of (Contents Book I ' ' ' ' THE COLLEGE Administration Departments Scholastic Organizations Graduates Book II ' ' ' ' COLLEGE LIFE Extra Curricular About the Campus Social Organizations Book III ' ATHLETICS Football Basketball Minor Sports Woman’s Sports Book IV . . . . FEATURES College Foibles AdvertisingaMMiiii 1111 tfiiiaif nil iiiiirr Trrrrrni Thomas W. MacQuarrie entered Superior State Normal School in 1896, the year of its opening. Following his graduation in 1900, he taught in the schools of Wisconsin. In 1917, he moved to California, accepting a position as a high school teacher in the Lincoln High School of Los Angeles. At the out' break of the war, he enlisted, becoming a captain in the army; later he was promoted to a major. Upon his return, he was made director of vocational edu-cation. United States Vocational Schools, at Camp Lewis, Washington. From 1920 to 1921, he acted as co-ordinator of the United States Veterans Bureau, Stanford University. He resumed teaching in 1924 at Stanford. Before accepting his present position in 1927 as president of San Jose State Teachers College, San Jose, California, he was a member of the faculty of the University of Southern California. He is the author of the MacQuarrie Test for Mechanical Ability.JIM D. HILL Pre » id e n I oo'U’tgffos ©lyrajssSixteen ADMINISTRATION ... History o In 1803, after much agitation from various parts of the state, the Legislature voted to increase the number of normal schools from six to seven. A number of cities made bids for the new school, but the choice finally narrowed down to three: Superior, LaCrosse. and Eau Claire. From this group, the Legislature chose Superior as the site of the new school upon Superior's agreeing to contribute the land and materials for the college. The building was erected and made ready for occupancy in 1890. At the time of the opening of the school, there was scarcely a residence east of Hammond Avenue. The first president of Superior Normal was J. C. McNeill, of Kansas City, Missouri. Before his selection as president, he had been assistant superintendent of schools in Kansas City, where he had made a study of education for teachers in the elementary grades. In September, 1890, the college opened with an enrollment of 150 students. By the end of the school year, the enrollment had increased to 2-17 students, these coming from twenty counties in Wisconsin and from five states outside of Wisconsin. The training school during that year reached a total of 187 pupils. The faculty of the normal and training school numbered 15. In 1907. the first summer schools of the state normals were held at Superior and at Whitewater. The success of these schools caused the Board of Regents to organize summer sessions in all of the normals of the state. As Superior Normal increased in size, it became more and more difficult to find accommodations for the students. In 1905), the state erected Crownhart Hall as a dormitory for women. It was named in honor of Mr. Crownhart. a member of the Board of Regents, from Superior. For some time before 1914, there had been a demand for higher education in the normal schools. In that year, the college course, which was two years above high school but which offered no professional training, was established for the purpose of preparing students for entrance in the junior year at the University and at liberal arts colleges. Later, by the addition of professional work to the two year college course, the three year high school training division was created to prepare teachers for two and three year high schools. In 1923, the college course was abolished, and in 1925, the Legislature passed an act allowing the normal schools to organize a four year course for the preparation of teachers for senior high schools. By that act, the Superior Normal School became Superior State Teachers College, authorized to grant B.E. degrees. Additions to campus buildings have been numerous. The McCaskill Training school was built on the campus. Tubbs' Gymnasium was named in honor of Ira I. Tubbs, athletic director for many years. Gates Field was named in honor of Clough Gates, former regent. The present building was made necessary by the destruction of the old building by fire. The most recent addition is the new library, a magnificent structure completed during this year. The college is well equipped physically and academically to prepare for teaching. j- the (College Seventeen ... ADMINISTRATION history oj the Y eoi Superior Stale Teachers College began its school year with an enrollment of 738, an enrollment slightly under that of the past year. While the depression was responsible to some measure for this drop, it may be added that many former students returned to college because of the lack of employment. Three new members were added to the faculty: Dr. Paul K. Walp, Dr. Franklin D. Scott, and Professor William A. Schleip, the first two being added to the social studies field, while Professor Schleip replaced Frank C. Evert in the music department. Work on the new library addition was watched eagerly by all, for its completion meant relief from the crowded conditions existing in the main building. Several delays occurred which prevented the occupancy of the addition until some weeks after the beginning of the second semester. Upon its opening, the college was given a large reading room seating 100; the textbook and reserve libraries were moved into the new quarters. To be of greater service to the student body, the library was opened in the evenings, an innovation to which the students responded enthusiastically. The new stacks of steel construction—and commodious—have a capacity for SO.(HX) volumes. A trophy room was added in which to house the trophies won by the college. Paintings presented to the college during the present and former years are to he hung in the library. Suites of offices for conferences were set aside for the faculty in the new wing. In keeping with its policy of providin'' recreation for students, the college has sponsored a series of dances throughout the year. The student body cooperates with the social committee by selecting a social chairman in the fall. Admission to these dances has been by student pass. Other dances of social organizations, registered on the social calendar and given under the supervision of the club advisors, lia.e provided a variety of entertainment. The assembly program has featured college, local, and out-of-town talent, a noteworthy program being that of Tony Sarg and his Marionettes. The athletic program of conference, non-conference, and intra-niural games, has provided a well-rounded schedule of sports. The football season was highly successful, while basketball, not quite so fortunate in the number of games won, brought to the college opposition of high class caliber, featuring university and Minnesota college opponents. Musical organizations of the college were featured at these games. Night football at Gates Field was played under the powerful lights purchased last year by the athletic committee. Winners m intra-mural competition were rewarded with plaques. In forensics, the college made a highly satisfactory showing, winning fourth in extempore in the state contest, annexing state and interstate honors in oratory, and competing in state and regional debate schedules. The oratorical victories won by Superior representatives have given to Superior permanent possession of the trophy competed for in the state contest. Interstate laurels have been garnered with a high degree of regularity for the past four years in oratory and extempore. In other extra-curricular activities, students have been given opportunities for a wider sphere of activity. College publications have been under the direction of the Board of Publications, composed of a faculty committee and the editors and business managers of the publications. The annual Vodvil was highly successful in entertainment value, and brought forth talent from all the organizations entered. The college used the medium of radio to send its message to the Northwest. Biweekly programs were given Mondays from radio station WEBC. Faculty members spoke on various phases of the work of the college; various units of the music department contributed to the program, and soloists were featured on some of the broadcasts. While prospects for positions for graduates appear far from bright, the college graduates a large class well-trained in the principles and methods of teaching, and sends them forth with a liberal education of inestimable value. The college closes the year with pleasure in the accomplishments and activities, and feels that those leaving will remember Su| erior State Teachers College as a center of education with a program supplying the various needs of all those who attend. 3 O'? (§5011 3U5MSS 1ADMINISTRATION . . Eighteen Miss Ellen M. Clark, as Dean of Women, has gained the respect and friendship of the student body. To give to the women of the school a comfortable rest room. Miss Clark, in cooperation with Dr. Hill, is aiding in the work of converting the old library room into a restful lounge for women students. The room is a well-lighted, attractive place to be ready for occupancy before the close of the year. The women appreciate the fine understanding and sympathetic spirit which distinguishes the personality of their dean. ♦ Air. Omer L. Loop, Dean of Men, has contributed to the welfare of the men of this college by his interest shown in the luxurious lounge and club room. Red leather furniture, attractive lamps, smoking stands, and card tables, make this spot one of the most-frequented centers of college activity. Mr. Loop is to be commended on the fine spirit he has manifested during the year, and for his supervision of school dances and social events. ♦ Nineteen ADMINISTRATION THORPE M. LANGLEY. M. A. 1922 REGISTRAR JOYCE WILLIAMS RECORDER MA8EL MCKINNON Secretary to the President ZELDA JEAN SOROKA FACULTY SECRETARY GLADYS BOCK FINANCIAL SECRETARY IRENE SUTLIFF CLERK Ofl'iJ’cgffOS ©HOMESFACULTY... CARLTON W. SMITH. M.A. 1896 MATHEMATICS A.O.. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA M.A.. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN JAMES A. MERRILL. LL.D. 1900 GEOLOGY O.S.O.. STATE TCACHCRS COLLEGE. WARRENSOURC. MO. S.O.. HARVARD UNVCRSITY LL.O.. MISSOURI VALLeY COLLEGE CAROLINE W. BARBOUR 1902 EDUCATION CHICAGO KINOERCARTEN INSTITUTE TEACHERS COLLECE. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO HARRIET L. EATON 1902 LIBRARIAN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. OSHKOSH. WISCONSIN PRATT INSTITUTE. LIBRARY SCHOOL. NEW YORK ALBERT D. WHEALDON. M.A. 1903 CHEMISTRY B.S.O.. STATE TEACHERS COL-LEGE. WARRENSBURG. MO. A.O.. UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI M.A.. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY OF BERLIN. GERMANY HARVARD UNIVERSITY NONA MacQUILKIN. M.A. 1911 ENGLISH PH.e.. UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO M.A.. TEACHERS COLLECE. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY I 3 O'=7 (SCO @ ©1DMSST went y-one FACULTY AGNES V. KIRK. M.A. 1911 PRINCIPAL OF JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL O.L.. LINDENWOOO COLLEGE PH.O.. NORTH CENTRAL STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE. MISSOURI PH.O., UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO M.A.. TEACHERS COLLEGE. COLUMBIA CARL J. ROLLEFSON. M.D. 1912 PHYSIOLOGY A.O.. ST. OLAF COLLEGE M.O.. RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE IRENE CURTIS. M.A. 1912 MUSIC 8.S., TCACHCRS COLLEGE COLUMBIA M.A.. TEACHERS COLLECE. COLUMBIA VOLNEY E. ORAMAN 1912 MANUAL TRAINING ROCKPORT NORMAL. NEW YORK OSWEGO STATE NORMAL TIMOTHY J. MCCARTHY. M.S. 1914 BIOLOGY U.S.. UNIVERSITY OK WEST VIRGINIA M.S.. MICHIGAN STATE COLLEGE H. C. ALMY. M.A. 1917 EDUCATION PH.B., UNIVERSITY Of WISCONSIN M.A.. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA @37 (§53(1 ©tyKISSFACULTY Twenty-I wo BERTHA L. CARNS. M.A. 1919 EDUCATION PH.B.. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN M.A.. TEACHERS COLLCCC. COLUMBIA VERNON E. VAN PATTER. M.S. 1920 DIRECTOR OF DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL D.S.. SOUTH DAKOTA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY M.S.. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN JOANNA E. TEERINK. M.A. 1920 SUPERVISOR B.A.. STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE. CCOAR FALLS. IOWA M.A.. TEACHERS COLLCCC. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY BLANCHE L. BARSE. M.A. 1921 SUPERVISOR O.CO.. STATE TEACHERS COLLCCC. SUPERIOR. WISCONSIN M.A.. TEACHERS COLLCCC. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY FRANK E. VITZ. M.A. 1921 ENGLISH A.O.. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN M.A.. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN UNIVCRSITY OF PHILIPPINES GRACE E. BARNEY. M.A. 1921 FRENCH A.0.. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN M.A.. UNIVCRSITY OF MINNESOTA OIJON UNIVCRSITY. SORDONNE UNIVCRSITY. FRANCE T wenly-lhrcc FACULTY EDWIN M. SCHRIE8ER. M.S. 1922 PHYSICS-ASTRONOMY A.B.. UNIVERSITY OP ILLINOIS M S.. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA LILIAN B. WHELAN. B.S. 1922 CRITIC B.S.. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA TEACHERS COLLEGE. COLUMBIA JANE REHNSTRAND 1922 ART STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE. SUPCRIOR. WISCONSIN ART INSTITUTE AND ART HANDICRAFT OUILO. MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA LEWIS ANO ART INSTITUTES OF CHICAGO COLUMBIA ANO STANFORD UNIVERSITIES ELIZABETH MONGER. M.A. 1922 CRITIC U.S.. TEACHERS COLLEGE. COLUMBIA M.A.. TEACHERS COLLEGE. COLUMBIA GERTRUDE UNTHANK. A. B. 1923 SUPERVISOR A.B.. UNIVERSITY OF NCORASKA CINCINNATI MUSIC CON-SERVATORY UNIVERSITY OF CHICACO NCW YORK SCHOOL FINE ARTS UNIVERSITY OF PARIS EDWARD L. BOLENDER. M.S. 1923 BIOLOGY B.S.. MIAMI UNIVCRSITY M.S.. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN IOWA STATE COLLEGE @otir §ffijs ©uorassFACULTY T wenty-foW S. HORACE WILLIAMS 1923 SUPERVISION-PSYCHOLOGY PH.O.. UNIVERSITY Or CHICAGO M.A.. UNIVERSITY Or COLORADO M.A.. TEACHERS COLLEGE. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OR WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN HELEN E. LOTH. M.A. 1924 LATIN-GERMAN A.O.. VALPARAISO COLLEGE PH. B.. UNIVERSITY Or CHICAGO M.A.. UNIVERSITY Or CHICAGO FLORENCE H. WALDC. 8. ED. 1924 ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN O.CO.. SUPCRIOR TEACHERS COLLEGE UNIVERSITY Or IOWA MINDA P. HOVLANO. 8.EO. 1924 CRITIC O.CO.. STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE SUPCRIOR. WISCONSIN TEACHERS COLLEGE. COLUMBIA OOROTHY C. WAITE. M.A. 1923 HISTORY A.O.. UNIVERSITY Or NEBRASKA M.A.. UNIVERSITY OF NCQRASKA UNIVERSITY Or CHICAGO COLUMBIA UNIVCRSITY HERBERT M. WEEKS. B ED. 1925 CHEMISTRY O.CO., STATE TCACHERS COLLEGE. SUPCRIOR. WISCONSIN UNIVCRSITY OP IOWA ©oTtgffos ©tytwssTwenty-five FACULTY BESSIE A. BENTON. M.A. 1025 GERMAN UNIVERSITY OP MUNICH. GERMANY M.A., UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA A.O.. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA EVANOE BECKER. B S. 1925 CRITIC D.S., UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA MARY 8. DEATON. M.A. 1926 ENGLISH O.A.. MISSISSIPPI STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN M.A.. COLUMUIA UNIVERSITY MARJORY A. BURKE. B. ED. 1927 CRITIC B.EO.. STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE. SUPERIOR. WISCONSIN A T KATHRYN OHMAN. M.A. 1926 ENGLISH A.I).. OCLLCVUE COLLEGE M. A.. UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CELIA B. CARSLEY. B ED. 1927 SUPERVISOR O.EO.. STATC TEACHERS COLLEGE. SUPERIOR. WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY OF IOWA FACULTY.. CHARLOTTE WILLIAMS. 8. S. 1028 CRITIC B.S.. UNIVERSITY Or IOWA ida w. flogstad. m.s. 1028 MATHEMATICS IOWA STATE COLLEGE M IOWA STATE COLLEGE T wenty-six DAISY B. FULTON. B ED. 1028 CRITIC B.60.. STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE. SUPERIOR. WISCONSIN BERENICE COOPER. M A. 1028 ENGLISH A.B.. BELOIT COLLEGE M.A.. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN LOIS M. PENNIE. B.ED. 1928 CRITIC B.EO.. STATC TEACHERS COLLEGE. MOORHEAO. MINN. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HAZEL A. SEGUIN. M.A. 1920 BIOLOGY B.A.. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN M.A.. TEACHERS COLLECE. COLUMBIA @Ui7(g50a @031X1311E a T wcnty-scvcn FACULTY INEZ J. RICHARDS. M.A. I 030 ENGLISH .A.. UNIVERSITY OP WISCONSIN ■ A.. UNIVERSITY OP WISCONSIN EDWARD C. WHEREATT. 8.ED. 1930 ATHLETICS B CO.. STATC TEACHERS COLLEGE. SUPERIOR. WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY OP WISCONSIN LOUIS J. CAREY. PH.D. 1931 ECONOM ICS-SOCIOLOGY O.A.. CONNECTICUT WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY M. A.. NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY PH.O.. NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY MARY B. DAVIES. M.S. 1931 PHYSICAL EDUCATION A.B.. WHEATON COLLEGE. MASSACHUSETTS M.S.. WELLESLEY COLLEGE WILLIAM A. PITKIN. M.A. 1931 HISTORY F. D. SCOTT. PH.8.. M.A.. PH.D. 1932 A.a.. OEPAUW UNIVERSITY M.A.. UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO HISTORY OOANC COLLEGE UNIVERSITY OP ILLINOIS UNIVCROITY OP CHICACO HARVARD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENTS . . Thirty Fleer, Plows, Sandberg Paulus, Stevens, Anderson, Schildt KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY OFFICERS l-'lrst Semester Dolores Fleer..................President.......... Dorothy Sandberg............Vice President........ Ruth Stevens...................Secretary.......... Eleanor Schildt................Treasurer,......... Second Semester .... Evelyn Plows .......Lulu Paulus Hazel E. Anderson ...Eleanor Schildt The Kindergarten-Primary department carried out an interesting program under the direction of its officers and its advisors, Miss Barbour and Miss Barse. At the meetings, held regularly twice a month the programs varied from discussions of the problems and trends in child education to informal, musical, and social events under the direction of student committees. The department made its customary donations to the McCaskill Fund, and a special welfare contribution of clothing to needy children at Christmas time. The twenty-fourth annual Spring Tea was given May 13, in the Kindergarten-Primary rooms at the McCaskill school. Pastel shades in flowers pud candles gave a delightful background for this occasion. Guests of honor included the faculty of the college and the parents and friends of the students. The aim throughout the year has been to build up and maintain a spirit of fellowship and comradeship, coupled with a growing appreciation of the opportunities which our college offers for professional training in the elementary field. Thirty-one . DEPARTMENTS Halverson. Kay, Kuhlmey, Oiudici INTERMEDIATE OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Ethel Olson.........................President....................Eleanor Halverson Eleanor Halverson.................Vice President..........................Iris Ray Dorothy Kuhlmey.....................Secretary....................Dorothy Kuhlmey Catherine Giudici...................Treasurer....................Catherine Giudici Jean Me Arty................................................Social Chairman Eileen Durfee Under the leadership of Miss Dorothy Waite, advisor, the Intermediate department has enjoyed a successful year. Meetings were held every other Tuesday, at which time all business of the group was transacted; frequent social programs were provided by the social committee. At the beginning of each semester, a"Get-Acquainted" party was held, the purpose of which was the introduction of the new members to the rest of the group. Several new articles have been added to the home room this year, including a picture of "St. Marks.” which was purchased by the group. The Spring Tea was held April 29. in the small gymnasium of the college. The colors of yellow, green, and violet, were used in the decorative effects, and carried out the Spring theme beautifully. Mothers and friends were invited guests for the occasion. The receiving line was headed by Dr. and Mrs. Hill, and included the officers of the department. The program was well arranged and contributed to making this a highly successful affair. The work this year has done much to create a friendly and cooperative feeling among the members of the group, both through educational and social functions. ©OTFStaiDEPARTMENTS Thirty-two Suomala, Sandberg, l.chtlncn, Persons, M. Carlson C. Johnson, Anderson. Czckalski. Erkklla, A. Johnson RURAL DEPARTMENT OFFICERS Axel Johnson Irene Sandberg Clinton lohnson Nancy Barnes Wmfnri MEMBERS Muriel Abrahamson Ina Erickson Gladys M. Nelson Mary Ellen Albee Alice Erkkila Anna Nordin Lulu M. Alho Theresa L. Fell Ellen Nvberg Ebba Anderson Lily Haapala Alice Olgren Edgar Ayers Arlene Johnson Gwendolyn Olson Nancy Barnes Axel Johnson Lillian Olson Ruth Brekke Clinton Johnson Gladys Persons Signe Brcvik Harold Johnson Estelle Peterson Helen Carlson Lawrence Johnson Maurice Peterson Marian Carlson Viola Lehtinen Harriet Pooler Jeanette Cleary Ruth Lein Irene Sandberg Mary Dec Craig Bernard Lindelof Velma Suornola Margaret Czekalski Ebba Magnussen Ruth Swanson Margaret Dahl Helen Muttoncn Lois Terry Joe Moran out© do a ©ooMaa m Thirty-three . . DEPARTMENTS SIGMA RHO OFFICERS Edgar Ayers ... Irene Sandberg Clinton Johnson Nancy Barnes .. .... President Vice President Treasurer Secretary "Our civilization rests at bottom on the wholcsomeness, the attractiveness, and the completeness, as well as the prosperity of life in the country.”—Theodore Roosevelt. In 1908 Theodore Roosevelt, then President of the United States, in the appointment of the Country Life Commission, redirected the attention of America to the resources which the nation has in rural life. Since the report of this body in January. 1909, there has been a growing interest in the human aspects of rural life. In 1915 the need for teachers trained in rural ideals was recognized, and rural subjects were added to the curricula. This was followed in 1919 by the organization of the Rural department. The Sigma Rho is affiliated with the American Country Life Association which was organized under the direction of Theodore Roosevelt. The purposes of the organization arc: 1. To promote discussion of the problems and objectives in country life and facilitate the means of their solution and attainment. 2. To further the efforts and increase the efficiency of persons and agencies in this 3. To disseminate information calculated to promote a better understanding of country life. 4. To aid in rural improvement. The Sigma Rho has also its social life. The first party of the year was “Stunt Night.” The club was divided into six groups, each group being responsible for one stunt. The annual Christmas party was held at the Billings State Graded school. South Superior. An interesting program was given by the children of the school, assisted by the club members. After the program, lunch was served by our group. The P.T.A. of the school were the guests of honor. Two club meetings have been held in the Kindergarten room of the McCaskill. The programs have been excellent. The social hour following the program consisted of games and dancing. field.DEPARTMENTS . . Thirly-lo.tr Anderson. Card. Grantors Christenson, .Mills. Carlson, Itergsten GRAMMAR JUNIOR HIGH OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Anne Anderson......................President............................ Lois Card Carl Granfors....................Vice President.................Lloyd Christenson Russell Mills......................Secretary....................Mildred Carlson Ruben Bergsten ...................Treasurer....................Elenor Rylander The Grammar Junior High has had an interesting program of events during the past year. Meetings were held every other Tuesday for the purpose of transacting business. An illustrated lecture was given by Miss Dorothy Waite on "My Summer in Greece.” The Kindergarten-Primary group were invited. The lecture was well attended. Among the events held in the department was a "Get-Acquainted” party at the home of Air. Almy. The evening was spent in games and contests, with refreshments being served at the close. A successful dance and bridge party was given at the college gymnasium; the money obtained was given to the McCaskill Friendship Fund. The group also held an all-day picnic at Mr. Almy’s summer home in May. Mr. H. C. Almy is advisor and head of the department. Thirty-five . . SCHOLASTIC Loop. Is.it cll.i. Wall. Ndman. Peterson Rocsscl, Carlstcdt. Kortesmn, Jones, Sandberg DELTA OMEGA EPSILON Forensic Honorary OFFICERS .................................. President ............................. Vice President .........................Secretary-Treasurer MEMBERS George Peterson Henry Carlstedt Fred Roessel Russell Jones Berenice Kushner LeRoy Isabella Carl Ritzman Finn Kortesnia Vernice La vine Irving Eizenberg Clarence Lindquist lohn Lcnroot Gladys Nciman Fred Boehme Rowcna Loop Richard Conness Marcella Wall Ben Liebowit . Arthur Sandberg Roger Cheever Willard Martinson Laura Beglinger ADVISORS Miss Nona MacQuilkin Mr. Frank E. Vitz George Peterson Fred Roessel .... Berenice Kushncr mmLicbowitz, Moore, Doby. Horton, Scliricbcr W.illcmlcr, Smith, Ooldfinc, Johnson. I'inn. Kiimsiii.hi Hcllingluin. Covet, Singer, Rnntn, Cannday, Yokum KAPPA RHO EPSILON Science Honorary OFFICERS James Canaday ... William Bellingham Fred Yokum....... Merton Singer.... ........ President ...Vice President ........Secretary .......Treasurer MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS Freshmen ................... 5 hours of A, 10 B Sophomores...................7 hours of A, 13 B Juniors and Seniors..........9 hours of A. 15 B to be earned in the following subjects: chemistry, physics, geology, zoology, botany, embryology, and mathematics. MEMBERS Ben Uebowitz loe Goldfine william Bellingham iantes Canaday [enneth Wnllendcr Sherman Covet Harry Doby Allan’ Horton Merton Singer Fred Yokum Frank Johnson Thomas Moore William Smith Hugo Ranta Howard Kunsman ADVISOR Mr. E. A. Schrieber 1Thirty-seven . . SCHOLASTIC OWL AND 5ERPENT Senior Honorary Membership in the organization is limited to fifteen Seniors with the highest scholastic records of the previous year. James Canaday and Clara P. Johnson head the list in the total number of grade points. MEMBERS James Canaday Clara P. Johnson Rose Lavine Ruby Lundquist Louise Krause Joe Moshen Margaret Knapmillcr nnc Anderson Nanna Sorenson Martha Stewart Ossie Widdes Clarence Cox Myrtle Jenson Betty Ross Elizabeth Talvity Rowena Loop i mSCHOLASTIC . . Thirty-eight 5IGMA DELTA PHI Social Science Honorary The requirements for eligibility are as follows: Thirty hours of history—social science; must have completed one semester of the Senior year; and must have an average of 2.25 grade points. MEMBERS Arthur Sandberg Rose Lavinc Henry Carlstedt Ruby Lundquist Violet Smith John Swiatek ENGLISH HONORARY The requirement for membership is unusually high, being 40 hours of English work with a grade point average of 2.25. MEMBERS Olga Olson t a ©fl'TSCGii oiyraasCLASS ORGANIZATION . . . Forty SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS Ruby Hoff .... Clarence Cox .. Janies Canaday .......... President .... Vice President Secrcta r y-T rea s u re r Forty-one . . CLASS ORGANIZATION The 5 enior Glass "THE NINTH GUEST” By O wen Dovi» Under the direction of Sam Kielley, the Senior class play, "The Ninth Guest,” was presented in the college auditorium on May II, 1933. The play, a thrilling mystery, has been presented in many of the large cities of the country to capacity audiences. The cast for the play was as follows: Jason Osgood........................... Mrs. Chisholm.......................... Dr. Reid .............................. Tim Salmon............................. Henry Abbott .......................... Peter Daly ............................ Jean Trent............................. Silvia Inglesby........................ Hawkins................................ Harrie Zeleznick ...Mablc Fjerstad ..Clarence Cox ... Fred Canaday ... Harry Baker .. Irving Johnson Margaret Green .... Rowena Loop .. Fred Roessel Henry Carlstedt, general chairman, appointed the following committees to have charge of the management of the play: Music ............ House ........... Costumes.......... Properties ....... Business Manager Stage Manager .... Publicity........ .... Jay Jorgenson Elizabeth Turney ...Rowena Loop .. Irving Johnson . Henry Carlstedt .... Ben Liebowitz ....Sam Kielley ©inrigeos otyjGflss ■ ■ ————■— DEGREE GRADUATES . . . JARL W. AHO MILDRED O. ANDERSON HARRY BAKER Supcrior. Wis. Superior, wis. Superior. Wis. M.S.T. OCPARTMENT M.S.T. DEPARTMENT M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR SCIENCE MAJOR HISTORY MAJOR HISTORY. SOCIAL MINOR MATHEMATICS GERMAN CLUB GERMAN OANO COLLEGE ORCHESTRA MINOR FRENCH GIRLS' GLCE CLUB SCIENCE MINOR GEOGRAPHY Y.M.C.A.. -2B VOOVIL. '20 TRACK. 30 PEPTOMIST STArr. '30 CLASS OFFICER. 32 TENNIS TEAM. '32 SOCIAL CHAIRMAN. '32-'33 WILLIAM BELLINGHAM Duluth, minm. M.S.T. OCPARTMENT MAJOR--SCIENCE MINOR--MATHEMATICS KARRA RMO EPSILON. SCCY-TREAS.. 31 VICC-PRCSIOCNT. 32 TRACK. 30. 31 OASKCTOALL, '31 LE ROY BORG SUPERIOR. Wis. M.S.T. OERARTMCNT MAJOR--HISTORY MINOR--SOCIAL SCIENCE rex rRATER Nl T Y CASK CTO ALL. "31. -32. '33 CO-CAPTAIN. 32. 33 rOOTOALL MANACER, '31 VOOVIL. -3I--33 WAYNE BRITTAN Superior. Wis. M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---MATHEMATICS MINOR---SCICNCE LAMOOA DELTA CHI. SEC Y. -3I- 32 VOOVIL. -30. 'll, 32 BOXINC. '30 •A FULL HOUSE" -IT WON'T DC LONG NOW RCPTOMIST. -32 BUSINESS MANAGER  Forty-three . . . DEGREE GRADUATES FRED CANADAY Duluth. Minn. M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---SCIENCE MINOR--MATHEMATICS LAMOOA DELTA CHI, Co-chairman, vodvil. -33 VOOVIL, '32. 33 FOOTOALL. '30-'32, CO-CAPTAIN, "32 COLLEGE GOLF CHAMPION, '30. '31 •A FULL HOUSE-SENIOR CLASS PLAY BAND. '30, -31 ORCHESTRA. 30. '31 JAMES CANADAY Duluth. Minn. M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--SCIENCE MINOR—MATHEMATICS KAPPA RMO CPSILON. PRESIDENT. '32 SCIENCE GROUP. SECT. '31. '32 SENIOR CLASS. SECRETARY VODVIL. '32 HENRY CARLSTEOT Duluth. Minn. M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--ENGLISH MINOR--SOCIAL SCIENCE SIGMA DELTA PHI DELTA OMECA CPSILON CHAIRMAN. SENIOR CLASS PLAY COMMITTCE ORATORY. 32 CITCHC STAFF. -33 CLARENCE F. COX PEARL L. DAHL PEARL M. OAHL Duluth. Minn. Superior, wis. Superior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--SCIENCE MINOR--SOCIAL STUDIES DELTA THETA UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA. ‘23 SENIOR CLASS VICE-PRCSIDCNT SENIOR CLASS PLAY OWL AND SERPENT M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---MATHEMATICS MINOR—GERMAN GERMAN CLUB W.A.A.. PRESIDENT. -30 VOOVIL. -30. 'SI. ‘32 M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---ENCLISH MINOR--SOCIAL SCIENCE DEGREE GRADATES Forty-four FRANK DYMESICH Ashland, wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--SCIENCE MINOR--MATHEMATICS WALLACE EDBURG Superior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--HISTORY MINOR--ENGLISH OELTA THETA HOMECOMING CHAIRMAN, 33 DOROTHY EOELSTEIN SUPCRIOR. WIS. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--ENGLISH MINOR--FRENCH GITCHC STAFP. '33 GIRLS- GLEE CLUB FLORENCE M. ELMSLIC Superior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--ENGLISH MINOR--SOCIAL SCICNCC CERMAN CLUB Y.W.C.A.. 29. ■30 COLLEGE ORCHCSTRA. 29 PETER FERGAL Supcrior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR—SCICNCC MINOR-----GERMAN BASKETBALL. ALL NATIONS TOURNAMENT CHAMPIONS. 33 GERMAN CLUB. HOMECOMING PARAOC. ‘31. '32 ALICE FORSJORD Superior. Wis. 4-VR. INTERMEDIATE MAJOR---ENGLISH MINOR---SOCIAL STUOICS ©o'iFtgooii ©tyoaaaam LOIS STELLA FRANKLIN Superior. Wis. 4-YR. KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY MAJOR---ENGLISH MINOR---MUSIC SIGMA PI ORCHC6TRA. '33 GIRLS' CLEECLUO. '30-33 VOOVIL. ‘32. '33 EVA GARLAND Spooner, wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---ENGLISH MINOR--HISTORY r.t.A.! WELFARE COMMITTEE. '30. '31 FLORENCE CORINNE HAGLUND Superior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---ENGLISH MINORS—GERMAN. LATIN GERMAN CLUD ALPHA KAPPA VICE-PRESIDENT. '33 ' MILTON L. HANSON Superior, wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---BIOLOGY MINOR---SCIENCE Y. M. C. A. CUN CLUB VOOVIL. '30. '31 JOHN HAUGEN Superior, wis. MAJOR---SCIENCE MINOR---MATHEMATICS FOOTBALL. '31. '32 OASKCTOALL. '30 WANDA HELLERUD MlLLTOWN. WIS. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---ENGLISH MINOR--SOCIAL SCIENCE SIGMA GAMMA CHI DEGREE GRADUATES Forty-six RUBY M. HOFF Superior, wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---MATHEMATIC MINOR---ENGLISH LAMBDA SIGMA LAMBDA. VICE-PRESIDENT. ‘3 . 33 GERMAN CLUB. '31. '32 INTER.CLUB COUNCIL. ‘32-‘33 SENIOR CLASS. PRESIDENT JUNIOR CLASS. SCC'Y. '3 roOTOALL QUCEN. '32 GITCHC STArr. '33 ARNOLD HULL JOHNSON Superior, wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR--GEOLOGY, GEOGRAPHY IOTA OELTA CHI. PRESIDENT. ‘32-‘33 VOOVIL. 1. '32. '33 GITCHC STAPP. 33 IRVING JOHNSON Superior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--HISTORY MINOR--SOCIAL SCIENCE rOOTBALL. ‘2B-‘3I BASKETBALL.‘20 PCPTOMIST, '2 PROM. '2 SENIOR CLASS PLAY RUSSELL T. JONES Poplar. Wis. O.J.M. DEPARTMENT, SECY. '31 Y.M.C.A.. SEC Y.. '30- 3I SECY. 31. 32 VICE-PRESIDENT. ‘32- 33 VOOVIL CHAIRMAN. ‘33 SIGMA DELTA PHI OELTA OMEGA EPSILON. PRESIDENT. ‘32 OWL AND SERPENT. VICE-PRESIDENT. ‘32 CXTEMPORC. 30. ‘33 SENIOR CLASS PLAY COMMITTEE. 33 JAY R. JORGENSON Superior. Wis. c.j.h. department OELTA THETA COLLEGE OAND. ‘2S-33 ASST. DIRECTOR. ‘32. 33 COLLEGE ORCHESTRA PRESIDENT. C.J.H. OCPT.. ‘31 PRESIDENT. SENIOR CLASS. ‘32 SENIOR CLASS. CHAIRMAN. RING AND PIN. 33 CHAIRMAN. PLAY MUSIC INTRA.MURAL SPORTS VOOVIL. ‘32. ‘33 HARRIET ELLA KANER Duluth. Minn. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--MATHEMATICS MINOR--SCIENCE ©OIF® MS @(y[?0SSForty-seven . DEGREE GRADUATES FLORENCE KEAOUGH Superior, wis. FRANCIS G. KNIGHT SPOONCR. WiS. EINO N. KORTESMA Brule. Wis. C.J.H. DEPARTMENT MAJOR HISTORY MINOR SOCIAL SCIENCE M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR SCIENCE MINOR SOCIAL SCIENCI M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR ENGLISH LAMBDA DELTA CHI PRESIDENT. '32 33 VICE-PRLSIOENT. '32 PEPTOMIST ASST. EOITOR. '31 EOITOR. '31. '32 GITCMC STAFF. '33 DELTA OMCCA EPSILON ORATORY. '32 LOUISE RUTH KRAUSE BRUCE. WiS. M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---ENGLISH MINOR--GERMAN ALPHA KAPPA. SECY.. '32 CCRMAN CLUO. SECY.. '32 CLCE CLUB OWL ANO SERPENT VOOVIL. '32 ROSE SEINA LAVINE Superior, wis. BEN LIEBOWITZ Superior. Wis. M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---HISTORY MINOR---FRENCH. ENGLISH SIGMA OELPHA PHI OWL ANO SERPENT H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---SCIENCE MINOR---MATHEMATICS KAPPA RHO EPSILON PRESIDENT. '32 GERMAN CLUO TREASURER. '32 DELTA OMEGA EPSILON TENNIS. '31. ‘32 VOOVIL. '32 ORATORY. '32. '33 ALTERNATE. 33 EXTEMPORE. '32. 33 ALTERNATE. '33 DEGREE GRADUATES . . . Forty-eight OLGA MARIE LISKA Superior. Wij. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---ENGLISH MINOR---FRENCH. SOC. SC. ROWENA LAVERGNE LOOP Superior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--ENGLISH MINOR--SOCIAL STUDIES LAMBDA SIGMA LAMOOA. TREASURER, '32 INTER CLUO COUNCIL. '31. '32. see-v..Treat... '31 DELTA OMEGA ePSILON GERMAN CLUO, '33 GIRLS' GLEE CLUO ORCHESTRA, '31. '33 ORATORY. '33 CITCHE STAFF. '32 •IT WON'T OC LONG NOW' •A FULL HOUSE" SENIOR CLASS PLAY VOOVIL. '3l- 33 RUBY ESTHER LUNDOUIST Siren. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--HISTORY MINOR--ENGLISH SIGMA PI PRESIDENT, '31, '32 SeC'Y.. 31 VOOVIL CHAIRMAN. '33 INTERCLUO COUNCIL. '3I.'32 PRESIDENT, '31.'32 SIGMA OELTA PHI GITCHE STAFF. '33 VOOVIL. '31.'33 BUSINESS MANACCR. '31 GENERAL CHAIRMAN. ‘32 HOMCCOMINC QUEEN CONTEST DORIS MARIE McCORKELL Superior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---HISTORY MINOR---ENGLISH CARLCTON COLLEGE. ‘3|.'32 TAU ALPHA CHI, TREASURER. '30 31 TRIXTERS.'31 PEPTOMIST. 30. '31. EDITOR. '30. '31 GITCHE STAFF. '31, '33 VOOVIL. '30 MARY CATHRYN MAHON Superior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--ENGLISH MINOR--SOCIAL STUDIES TAU ALPHA CHI, PRESIDENT. '30. '33 PEPTOMIST. MANAGING EOITOR, ‘31 VOOVIL. '30. ‘31 PROM QUEEN. ‘31 JOE MOSHEN DULUTH. Minn, H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR--ENGLISH SIGMA OELTA PHI OWL AND SERPENT » Forty-nine ... DEGREE GRADUATES » WARREN NELSON Comstock, wi . M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR—science MINOR----SOCIAL STUDIES OLGA MARIE OLSON Superior, wis. M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--CNOLISH MINOR—BIOLOGY MARION ORAVA MAPLE. ' WlS. 4VR. KINOCRCARTEN.PRIMARY MAJOR—ENGLISH MINOR-----SOCIAL STUDIES PEPTOMIST. 1», -JO. 31, ' 32 V.M.C.A. RIPLE CLUD. 30. 31 INTRA-MURAL UAS K CTOALL LAMBDA SIGMA LAMBDA PRESIDENT. -32- 33 INTCRCLUD COUNCIL. 33 PEPTOMIST. ASST. EOITOR. '33 GITCHE STATE. '33 ENGLISH HONORARY VOOVIL. -33 ♦ JEAN H. PENNER Superior. Wis. C.J.M. DEPARTMENT CAMMA PHI EPSILON, SEC-Y -33 SOCIAL CHAIRMAN. 32 GERMAN CLUD FRED ROESSEL MINONC. Wis. M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR—SCIENCE MINOR-----MATHEMATICS Y.M.C.A.. 31 OELTA OMEGA EPSILON. VICC-PReSIOCNT. 33 ORATORY. 32. 33 EXTEMPORE. 32. ‘33 INTRA.MURAL BASKETBALL. '32 SCC Y-TRCAS.. JUNIOR CLASS BETTY CAROLINE ROSS Superior. Wis. M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---ENGLSH MINOR--TRENCH LAMBDA SICMA LAMBDA PRESIDENT. 32 INTERCLUO COUNCIL CRLS' GLEE CLUD OWL ANO SERPENT VOOVIL. -31. '33 GITCHE STATE, 33 @017(SMS » DEGREE GRADUATES Fifty LUCILLE JANE RUSSELL Superior, wis. G.J.H. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---ENGLISH MINOR--HISTORY LAWRENCE COLLEGE. 'IS. ! TAU ALPHA CHI ARTHUR GORDON SAND8ERG Superior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR—ENGLISH LAMBDA DELTA CHI. secy.. -32. ‘33 VOOVIL CHAIRMAN. '32 CO-CHAIRMAN. '33 HOMECOMING CHAIRMAN. '32 Si cm a oelta phi DELTA OMEGA EPSILON PCPTOM 1ST STAPP. '31. '32 GITCHE STAPP. ASST. EOITOR. '32 EDITOR. '33 EXTEMPORE. '32 -A PULL HOUSE' CATHERINE SHAW Duluth. Minn. 4-YR. INTERMEDIATE DEPT. MAJOR--HISTORY MINOR--ENGLISH GAMMA PHI EPSILON, PRESIDENT. '31 VODVIL. '31. '32. '33 BUSINESS MANAGER. '33 SOCIAL CHAIRMAN. 33 3ITCHE STAPP. '30. '31. '32. '33 TRIXTCRS PEPTOMIST BARBARA DREW SMITH Superior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---ENGLISH MINOR---SOCIAL STUDIES OELTA SIGMA. VICE-PRESIDENT. '32. '33 VOOVIL. '30. '31. '33 PROM COMMITTEE JOHN SWIATEK Superior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---SOCIAL STUDIES MINOR---GERMAN Y.M.C.A SIGMA DELTA PHI VOOVIL. '31. '33 ELIZABETH B. TURNEY Superior. Wis. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---ENGLISH MINOR---SOCIAL STUOIES OELTA SIGMA. PRESOENT. 32-33 INTERCLUB COUNCIL, '32. '33 VOOVIL. '30-'33 ©a'u’SDas @ sdkjsiiFifty-one DEGREE GRADUATES CLARA LOUISE WANHAPIHA Calumet. Mich. M.S.T. OEPARTMCNr MAJOR--SCIENCE MINOR--HISTORY E. PHILLIPS WHEALOON Superior, wis. M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--SCIENCE MINOR--GEOLOGY AND CEOGRAPHY TEX VODVIL. 30--33 OSSIE WIDOES Duluth. Minn. H.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--PHYSICAL SCIENCE MINOR--BIOLOGY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE OWL AND SERPENT FLORENCE YALE FRED YOKUM Superior. Wis. Superior. Wis. M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR---HISTORY MINOR---ENGLISH OELTA SICMA GITCHESTAPP. 31, 32 ASST. COITOR. 32 PCPTOM 1ST, 20, 30 PROM COMMITTEE, 31 M.S.T. DEPARTMENT MAJOR--SCIENCC MINOR--MATHEMATICS OELTA THETA  GRADUATES Fifty-two MARY ELLEN ALBEE Smell Lake. Wis. 2-YH. RURAL SIGMA R MO CLCC CLUB. I. 2 HAZEL ELIZABETH ANOERSON Grantsburg, Wis. 2-VR. K.P. VICC-PRCS.. 2 EDNA ASKOV Cushing. Wis. 2-VR. INT. SIGMA GAMMA CHI W.A.A ALYCE ASPLUND Duluth, Minn. 2-VR. G.J.H. CLCC CLUB MARJORY AUTREY Superior, wis. 2-VR. K.P. DELTA SIGMA VOOVIL. '92. '93 VERONA MAY BENSON BlRCMWOOO, WIS. 2-VR. INT. V.W.C.A MABEL BIRKHOLZ Rice Lake, Wis. 2-VR. INT. SIGMA GAMMA CHI V.W.C.A SIGNE BREVIK Superior, wis. 2-YR. RURAL Fifty-three GRADUATES VIOLA BROWN Superior. Wi». RUTH BROWNELL STELLA CAMERON Superior. Wis. Danbury, wi®. LOIS CARD Superior. Wi®. 9 YR. O.J.H. 4-VR. K.P. 2'YR. O.J.H. ENCU®H MAJOR 8IOMA CAMMA CHI SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR 4-VR. O.J.H. PRES.. 29 SIGMA PI. SEC Y., 93 BUS. MGR. VODVIL. '99 MILDRED CARLSON LLOYD CHRISTENSON MYRTLE COATS EDWINA CURTISS Superior. Wi®. Superior, wi®. Iron River. Wi®. Virginia. Minn. 2-YR. O.J.H. GAMMA PHI EPSILON. • EC'Y., '32 TREAS.. 92. ‘99 VODVIL. '32. '33 2-VR. G.J.M. VICE-PRES.. 33 Y.M.C.A. SCC'Y.. '32. '33 VOOVIL. '32. '33 BAND. '31. '92. '33 ORCHESTRA. '32. '33 INTRA-MURAL OASKCT-OALL 2-YR. O.J.H. V.W.C.A 2-YR. INT. ©O'iFtgMS ©UPKISSGRADUATES Fifty-four HELEN DAHLSTROM Shell Lake. Wit. 2-YR. INT. SIGMA GAMMA CHI WELLINGTON S. DAVIS Duluth. Minn, h.s.t. HSTORY MAJOR SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR rOOTBALL. '32 EILEEN DURFEE Duluth. Minn. 3-YR. INT. SOC. CHR.. -33 GERMAN CLUD Y.W.C.A PEPTOMST. 22. '33 HAZEL ENSIGN. B.E. Ouluth, Minn. 4-YR. K.P. MADELINE FAVELL. BE. Rice Lake. Wis. 4-YR. INT. ALPHA KAPPA. PRES.. '31 SECY.. '32 CERMAN CLUB GIRLS' GLEE CLUO PROM COMMITTEE. '30 SENIOR PLAY COMMITTEE ©o'u’ssos ©lyixiss MABEL FJERSTAD Superior. Wis. 3-VR. G.J.H. LAMBDA SIGMA LAMBDA VOOVIL. '31. "32 -A PULL MOUSE' ALLENE GILBERT Minonc. Wis. 2-YR. K.P. MARGARET H. GREEN Superior. Wis. 2-YR. K.P. TAU ALPHA CHI VICE-PRES.. '32 VOOVIL. '33Fifty-five GRADUATES MARGARET M. GREEN MARGARET JUNE HOARD Duluth. Minn. GUNDERSON Superior. Wis. 3-YR. K.P. SUPERIOR. WIS. 2 VR. K.P. SIGMA PI 2-YR. G.J.H. INTCRCLUD COUNCIL. PCPTOMIST. '32 •32-33 OITCHE. 33 ARYLE HOFFMAN Superior, wis. RUBYHOUIDER Rice Lake. Wis. 2-vr. INT. SIGMA PI SIGMA GAMMA CHI V.W.C.A MARION IHRIG CCNTURIA, WIS. 2-YR. INT. SIGMA GAMMA CHI DOROTHY JACOBSON Ashland. Wis. 2-YR. K.P. ADELAIDE JOHNSON Superior. Wis. 3-YR. G.J.H. @37(5 DUS GRADUATES Fifty-six AXEL JOHNSON Superior, wis. 2-YR. RURAL CLINTON JOHNSON MlLLTOWN. WlS. 2-YR. RURAL SICMA RMO RUSSELL JOHNSON iron River, wis. 2-YR. O.J.H. Y.M.C.A. BAND. 32. '33 VOOVIL. '33 RUTH KERR Hiodinc. Minn. 2-YR. K.P. SICMA PI, SECY., '32 VOOVIL. '32, '33 MARGARET KNAPMILLER 8IRCHWOOO. WIS. 3-YR. C.J.H. SICMA CAMMA CHI AUDREY KNUTSON WCOSTCR. Wi . 3-YR. K.P. SICMA PI VOOVIL. '32. '33 DOROTHY KUHLMEY Superior. Wis. 2-YR. INT. SEC Y.. '32. '33 GLEE CLUO. '32. '33 HELEN LEE Superior, Wis. 2-YR. INT. DELTA SICMA VOOVIL. '32. '33 'St wmm @(J5ij’ §50SFifty-seven GRADUATES ELAINE LeVESQUE NEW RICHMOND. WlS. 2-YR. K.P. BERNARO LINDELOF BRULE. WlS. I.YR. RURAL SIGMA RHO GERTRUDE LUMSDEN Duluth. Minn. 2-YR. INT. ROSABELLE MANLEY Superior. Wis. 3 - YR . G.J. H. TAU ALPHA CHI VICE-PRES.. -32 PRES.. -33 CAROLINE MATSCH Aitkin. Minn. ELIZABETH MAZZO Spooner. Wis. MAY MORTON Superior. Wis. BETH MUELLER Evclcth. Minn. 2-YR. K.P. 2-YR. INT. SIOMA GAMMA CHI SIGMA CAMMA CHI V. W.C.A.. PRES.. -32 W. A.A. GITCHC. '32 2-YR. K.P. ALPHA KAPPA PRES.. '32 TRCAS-. ’33 INTERCLUO COUNCIL •32. ’33 2-YR. K.P. TAU ALPHA CHI. SECY.. 33 ©rnrigDos ©ivirass GRADUATES . . . Fifty-eight LUCILLE NOROHOLM Superior. Wis. j.vr. O.J.M. GAMMA PHI EPSILON VOOVIL. '99 ELLEN OLSON Rhinelander. Wis. 2-yr. O.J.M. SIGMA GAMMA CHI ETHEL OLSON Superior. Wis. 2-VR. INT.. PRES.. 39 TAU ALPHA CHI INTCRCLUO COUNCIL PEPTOMIST. '92 GLADYS PERSONS GOROON. WIS. 2.YR. RURAL SIGMA RHO EVELYN PLOWS Duluth. Minn. 2.YR. K.P.. PRES.. '33 GLEE CLUO. '32 MARGUERITE ROYCRAFT Superior. Wis. 2«VR K.P.. SEC’Y., 31 SIGMA OMEGA. VICE-PRCS.. '32 ELYNOR RYAN Superior. Wis. 2.YR. INT. TAU ALPHA CHI DOROTHY SANDBURG Superior. Wis. 2.YR. K.P VICE-PRCS., '32 .. . GRADUATES FLORENCE SATHER Spooner. Wis. 2-vr. K.P. ALPHA KAPPA. PRES.. JJ FLORENCE SHERLOCK Superior. Wis. i.vr. INT. SIGMA OMECA. PRES.. '32 PHYLLIS SNELL Clear Lake. Wis. 2-YR. K.P. SIGMA GAMMA CHI W.A.A. RUTH STEVENS MONTREAL. WIS. 2-VR. K.P., SECY.. 32 SIGMA GAMMA CHI V. W.C.A W. A.A. MARTHA STEWART Superior, wis. J.YR. K.P. JANICE SUMMERFIELD Trego. Wis. 2-YR. INT. ROSE SUPLICK Superior. Wis. RUTH SWANSON Ashland. Wis. 2-YR. RURAL SIGMA RHO ©uiTtgoas ©(grassGRADUATES Sixty VALBORG THOMPSON Stanley. Wit. 2-YR. C.J.N. W.A.A. MARGIE TICKNOR Ashland. Wis. 2-YR. K.P. ALPHA KAPPA MARY JANE WINSLOW Duluth. Minn 2.YR. K.P. TAU ALPHA CHI AUGUST FRONCKIEWICZ ETHEL SLOCUM ELIZABETH DONLEY ALICE PAULUS ANNA M. ANDERSON HELEN DWYER MARGARET WICKSTROM WILLIAM TALVITIE OTTILIA 8AKKER FLORENCE LARVEAU LOUELLA PETERSON MILDRED AITKIN EMILY OLSON CLARICE MCDERMOTT NORMA OLSON SVEA CARLSON CLARA P. JOHNSON ALTA ENGH LULU PAULUS MILDRED PETERSON STELLA SWIDERSKI EBBA ANDERSON NANCY BARNES MARION CARLSON GLADYS SLOCUM © □cnr s OG S  Frank T. McNally, donor of the McNally forensic award, is a graduate of the class of 1904. In college, he participated in athletics, journalism, and forensics. It is interesting to note that he was at one time business manager of the Gitche Gurnee. In 1904, he was chosen school orator, representing Superior in the state contest at Platteville. His oration was adjudged second, the highest honors that Superior had yet received. Upon graduation, he began in insurance work, rising to his present position of district manager of the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company, with headquarters in Minne apolis. To encourage forensics, he offers annually a sum of money to be given to winners in oratory and extempore. The college appreciates the interest shown in it by one of its early alumni, and feels that the award is a recognition of the high ranking Superior has maintained in state and interstate competition.FORENSICS . . Sixty-six llcrcnicc Ku.hncr Dr. F. Scoti. em Extempore speaking was under the direction of Dr. Franklin D. Scott, a new addition to the college faculty. While attiacting only a few contestants, the contest was marked by excellence of speech and preparation. Ben Liebowitz, Fred Roessel, and Russell Jones were veterans of past years, while Berenice Kushner and George Peterson, members of the debate team, were new in this division of forensic work. The contest demands a wide fund of knowledge and reading of many current periodicals. Topics are drawn an hour before the contest is to begin, thus giving but a short period to organize the materials for the speech. After three elimination contests, Berenice Kushner was de- ore dared winner. She immediately began preparing for the state meet at White Water on March 17, 1933. Competing against the other teachers’ colleges of the state, .Miss Kushner won fourth place. The winner in the contest was the representative of LaCrossc in both extempore and oratory. In the Inter-State contest. LaCrossc annexed first place, thus giving to Wis-. cousin a clean sweep of the coveted honors. as Superior ably won the oratory prize. Dr. Scott finds satisfaction in the high caliber of competition which exists here; under his coaching. Superior will be a formidable entrant in the state meet in future years. ♦ I Miss MacQuilkin. oratory coach, issued a call for entrants in the yearly contest. Thirteen candidates responded and began preparing for the first contest on November 3. Those entering were John Lenroot, Harrison Seely, Fred Roessel, Donald Kunsman, Kino Kortcsma, Marcella Wall, Leltoy Isabella. Rowena Loop. Gladys Nciman, Fred Boehmc, Irving Eizenbcrg. Ben Licbowitz, and Carl Ritzman. Further elimination contests were held December I and December 15. Competition for the prized honor of representing Superior was keen, and gave the judges difficulty in choosing the final winner. Carl Ritzman. His oration, "Things in the Saddle," was a message of optimism to tide us over the effects of the economic conditions we are living under; the title was based on the quotation from Emerson, “Things are in the saddle and ride mankind." Ben Lie-bo witz placed second, with Rowena Loop winning third. Winning school honors is but the beginning. Carl Ritzman and Miss MacQuilkin began preparing for the state contest to lx- held at White Water on March 17, 1033. Hours of practice in delivery and revamping of the material was necessary; the title of the oration was changed to “Eternal Growth.” On the evening of March 17. Carl Ritzman competed against the pick of the nine state schools and re- ceived the unanimous decision of the judges for first place. Realizing the quality of competition entered, the winning of this event was a direct reflection on the amount of work and effort spent by the speaker and the coach. The Inter-State contest at Macomb, Illinois, was the next step, and Ritzman now not only carried the hopes of Superior but those of Wisconsin as well. On April 18, in competition with speakers from Illinois and Iowa; Carl Ritzman won first place, thus adding to the unprecedented record Superior has made in the past four years. Dennis McGenty. Ernest Fiedler, and Marvin Goldstein have brought state and interstate laurels to Superior, while Grace Walsh, the other entrant during this period, winning second in the state contest, was offered a scholarship for excellence in speech work. The student body had an opportunity to hear the winning oration at an assembly program staged in honor of Carl Ritzman and Miss MacQuilkin Friday, April 21. Miss MacQuilkin, remaining in the background. modestly disclaimed her share of the honors, but the speakers she has coached have spoken for her more eloquently than words; her record as coach here has been exceptional in the annals of the inter-state circuit. FOREN5IC5 Sixty-eifihl Oraio ETERNAL GROWTH Nothing made by man since the dawn of creation has been perfect. It is as ridiculous to expect perfection from man as it is to expect poctiy Ironi an anthropoid ape. A perfect product demands a perfect craftsman; but man has not yet reached that stage of excellence in the process of evolution. This truth is self-evident; hut, nevertheless. men continue to expect fellow human beings whom they put in control of their destinies to mould infallible governments out of inferior constituents. The road to human perfection is not scaled by decades, by generations, or by centuries. It extends infinitely into the misty realms of the future. It is a difficult, tortuous road. Often as he plods slowly along man is stopped by apparently insurmountable obstacles. Discouraged by the delay he becomes bitter, pessimistic, cynical. In such state of mind we have in the United States found ourselves during the last few months. Our march toward Utopia has been called to a halt while we ponder the next move. Hour terrible years filled with sorrow and suffering have passed and we are still deliberating. The cause of this delay is not a lack of knowledge. Libraries have been written on the causes of the depression. We do not want for expert advice. Every well-informed economist can show at a moment's notice exactly what is wrong and how to correct it. It is not lack of money. We are the wealthiest people in the world. Millions of dollars have been poured into the national industrial machine, and it is still cold with the chill of death. The government has supplied every restorative known to man and still insurance companies report increases in the number of suicides; gaunt, hunger-wracked, unshaven men still haunt our railroad yards at night and forage in refuse cans for food by day. What is this unseen force, this insidious opiate, that paralyzes our national life? You have felt it many times. Students have felt it in their pounding hearts as they entered the examination room. Parents have felt it as their loved ones lay on a sick bed. The soldier in France felt it as the bullets whistled around him and Death stalked by his side. It is FEAR. Blind, unreasoning fear has plugged the channels of trade, filled the hoarder’s money vaults, and strangled the business life of the nation. The great American public is immersed in an apathetic torpor of defeatism, designation and gloomy despair have dammed up the greatest reservoir of human energy known to man. That old drive that carried us into the bleak frontiers to change them into blooming gardens is gone. Young men are not dreaming dreams nor old men seeing visions. We are buried under the rule of things, "truths,” facts with which the laboratories and lecture platform have overwhelmed us. We have lost our sense of proportion in the overabun- CjiM K't iiun Sixty-nine . . TOREN5IC5 ETERNAL GROWTH dance of material wealth in the world which science has made so accessible to us. 'Things are in the saddle and ride mankind" even as Emerson warned us over fifty years ago. In the midst of our possessions we sit dumh-founded. The old courage that won the victory for a handful of patriots over an army of British regulars is gone. The most saluablc of all our assets has melted away—gone with traditional religion into the discard. When we had this power to release during the World War, it produced billions of dollars and millions of men ready to offer their lives. And for what cause? To fight a distant enemy, on foreign soil, for fanciful and little understood reasons. The enemy of the hour is rampant on our own soil, in our own homes, and still we cower like sheep in a storm. In a frenzy to place the responsibility for our plight we deplore the corruptness of our government and the chicanery of our politicians. Bulky volumes castigate the perfidy of human nature when vested with authority. Ministers thunder exhortations on honesty and integrity at their congregations to no avail. All this criticism can serve only one purpose. It can very effectively stifle hope and initiative, and thus kill two absolute prerequisites to constructive and courageous action. Yet the raucous chorus swells in volume. Alarmists everywhere are voicing a fatalistic and spineless pessimism suggestive of the puerile patterings of disgruntled school-boys. On every side hardy and resourceful Americans are grasping frantically at fantastic panaceas spewed forth in endless number by parlor statesmen and unemployed Napoleons. Sunshine patriots discouraged by a temporary adversity are eagerly pledgng their services to alien attempts to destroy the government for which their ancestors have fought and bled. A pusillanimous doctrine of cynicism and despair has even seeped into the minds of recognized leaders in thought. Erudite educators and thinkers, supposedly immune to sudden frights at illusory apparitions on life's highway, are painting gloomy portraits of a world devastated by revolutions and technocrats. Some of these critics have even declared that this period of disorder heralds the approaching finale to our western civilization. In fact this sentiment is wide-spread enough that a very little more impetus given to its disintegrating and sterile philosophy would bring to pass in our midst the very catastrophe it wishes to prevent. That there is much suffering in the midst of plenty is a patent and deplorable truth. But that this condition is the prelude to the eclipse of our civilization is less well established. The present state of affairs is man-made and therefore amenable to man's corrective genius. in a world whose every citizen has been seared by the brand of economic uncertainty, it is incredible that their united wisdom after the event will not move to remedy evils exposed in the general denouement. Already there is a noticeable improvement in attitudes and clarified vision. History in these days of distress has taken on a new meaning. It is something more than a dull subject useful only to pedagogues and orators. In its dusty pages reposes the wisdom of Experience, the teacher whose dictates are omniscient and for all time. The United States just prior to 1929 is now seen as a profit-seeking, materialistic nation whose economic life was a senseless admixture of low wages and high prices, war-debts and high tariffs, extravagant business expansions and huge unsold surpluses. Out of this present chaos is coming the conviction that the science of economics is as applicable in the field of government as in the college lecture-room. With such clear thinking on the part of the electorate, governments whose policies are dictated by mere expediency and the idle whims of human nature will soon become a thing of the • past. It is becoming increasingly evident that the world is an orderly world and that people who violate its laws must abide the consequences. This present deplorable economic paralysis is a deserved judgment visited upon an improvident people by inexorable economic laws. In our struggle for the star of humanFOREN5IC5 . . Seventy ETERNAL GROWTH happiness, we have foolishly reached out into the void for the prize while balancing ourselves on a ladder constructed of false values and vain hopes. Inevitably, we were plunged from our precarious perch into the abyss of chaos and depression. And now as we begin the laborious climb out again, it is time we realized that we cannot sow wild oats and expect to reap milk and honey. It is time we realized that our salvation lies entirely within ourselves. It is time that indignant taxpayers blamed their own indifference and neglect at the polls for the indifference and negligence of those they put in office. It is time we called a halt to this ridiculous comedy of modern life in which man governs himself in the first act. and upbraids the government in the second, in which man carouses in drunken revelry in the third act and curses God. government, and bad weather for the hangover in the fourth. It is time we stopped criticizing and settled down to mending the defects we abuse. Western civilization can and will be saved when we throw o this "gloomy fearfulness” and face the future with courage born of the realization that our civilization is adolescent, not senile. The virility and youthful wholesomeness of our social structure are evident in the generous, hopeful response made during the Inst few weeks to the unwavering leadership at Washington. A bruised and broken populace, smiling through its tears, is setting to work with renewed energy in the belief that the future still belongs to them. Out of the period of suffering we are coming, no longer a deluded people whose brains are anesthetized by a fairy tale of prosperity around the next corner. We are now a thoughtful people convalescing from a devastating sickness, terribly sobered by our narrow escape. We plainly see that there are serious difficulties yet to be overcome and great problems still to be solved, but we see them now in their true perspective as the accumulated evils of decades and even of centuries of human activity, many of which arc deeply imbedded in the ancient emotions and prejudices of mankind. And the knowledge that they will not submit to an over-night cure, we are bringing ourselves to face with unflinching courage. What folly to despair! Our stock of resources is great: a world of material wealth which science is daily increasing; a people whose intellectual grasp has never before been equalled. I cannot help believing that we stand on the threshold of a glorious, new era in world history, which will exceed the dreams of the most abandoned idealist. While "critics peep” and "cynics bark” at minute flaws, the “soaring fabric" of our civilization is being fashioned into a better and happier pattern under the master touch of the supreme craftsman, Eternal Growth. The disconnected, labored weave of Ignorance is gradually being supplanted by the ordered beauty of the deft stroke of Knowledge. Shoddy, broken threads of nationalism and race hatred, relics of an earlier time, are being deleted to Ik replaced by the silken, sinuous strands of Internationalism and world-wide understanding. And out of the faded pictures of forgotten ages is emerging an awe-inspiring figure. Modern Man, godlike in his dominion over all. "Bliss is it in this dawn to be alive" and to be "young is very heaven!” Seventy-one . . FORENSICS Ritrman. Kushncr, Peterson Debate X Superior State Teachers College was represented in the debate schedule by two teams, one composed of veterans of college competition, while the second team was composed mainly of newcomers to collegiate debate work. Berenice Kuslmer, a veteran of last year's team and college extempore champion, was a member of the first team. Carl Ritzman, oratory champion, was the other member of the team. George Peterson. debate manager, acted as alternate to Miss Kuslmer and Mr. Ritzman. Teams from Nibbing, Itasca, and Duluth Junior Colleges were met in the pre-conference schedule. South Dakota State. Iowa State. Mayfield Teachers. St. Cloud t Teachers, Platteville Teachers, and Northern Teachers College were debate opponents in the Northwest Intercollegiate Debate tournament at St. Paul; the College of St. Thomas played host to the meet. Superior progressed ably into the semifinals of the state meet held at Stevens Point, losing only after a close decision of the judges, to Platteville. The question debated throughout the year was the Pi Kappa Delta question. “Resolved, that the United States should agree to the cancellation of the interallied war debts." The team met efficiently both sides of the question. I FORENSICS . . Seventy-two Debate Vernice Lavine and Clarence Lindquist, first year students and veteran debaters from Superior Central, made up the college squad No. 2. Under the new regulations. the teams debate both sides of the question, instead of debating under the old scheme of affirmative and negative teams. Gladys Neiman, a member of the debate team of 1929, ably alternated for Mr. Lindquist and Miss Lavine. This team met contestants of Hibbing, Itasca, and Duluth Junior Colleges during the pre-conference schedule, and ably conducted themselves in the Northwest Intercollegiate Debate tournament at the College of St. Thomas, St. Paul. Teams from St. Thomas. Hastings College. Eau Claire Teachers, and South Dakota State were met in the tournament encounters. In the state contest at Stevens Point, this Superior team was eliminated as the result of decisions given in four debates by expert judges. The Pi Kappa Delta question, “Resolved. that the United States should agree to the cancellation of the interallied war debts," was the subject for the debates. ©HIT® MSI (Iconic Peterson Debate Manager .Mr. Prank E. VH . Debate Coach . . . FORENSICS Debate Coach Prank E. Vitz was fortunate in having veterans of last year’s debate team return to participate in debate. Carl Ritzman, Berenice Kushner, George Peterson. and Gladys Neinian, able speakers with college experience, responded to the call for debaters. Two new members to college debate. Clarence Lindquist and Vernicc l.avine. however, had secured valuable training at Superior Central in debate work. Under the new ruling of the debate conference, each school is to choose two teams of two members, prepared to debate both sides of the question. This new ruling, while requiring more training and preparation, makes each debate team more versatile in defending the question chosen by Pi Kappa Delta for this year’s debate. George Peterson was selected as debate manager to make arrangements for meets with other schools. Both teams acquitted themselves in a creditable manner in the various meets entered. With these members returning for the following year, Superior should be well represented in debate. The state meet will be held at Superior next year. 1934 being Superior's turn to play host to all forensic competition in the state conference. ©UncoilPUBLICATIONS . . . GITCHE GUMEE EDITORIAL STAFF Seventy-four Every editor dreams of giving to the college the best annual in its history—a bigger and better book in many respects over those "of the previous years. For the Oitche, since its inception as a quarterly periodical, has reflected credit to the institution; the names of eminent alumni on the staff roster testify to the importance which college students attach to the annual. The editor may have his dreams, but these are often dampened by the more practical consideration of keeping within the budget. During the periods of depression, the business staff has by odds the greatest share in making the book a success, and it is a no mean achievement for the business management to issue a book in such a period as this. While limited bv human weaknesses and a necessitated economy program, tne aim of this annual has been to strive for changes in arrangement and appearance, and to lend a more informal and intimate touch. We realize that much more could have been done; our hope is that our efforts may meet with some degree of approval, and that succeeding staffs may profit by our mistakes. ARTHUR SANDBERG. Managing Editor.................................................... Francis Knight Associate Editors................................ Howard Kunsman, Doris McCorkell SUB-STAFF Literary................................................................... Olga Olson Clubs ..................................................... Ruby Hoff, Ruby Lundquist Make-up ........................................... Katherine Metzger, Harris Johnson Features ............................................. Arnold Johnson, Henry Carlstedt Departments and Scholastic .............................................. Carl Grantors Faculty.................................................................... Betty Ross Sports.....................................Kenneth Wallender, Louise Keeler, Lily Salay Snapshots................................................... Roy Knutson, Della Farmer Art....Marguerite Roycraft, Charles Larson, Tony Yaworski. Rov Brandser. Fred Boehme Seniors.............................................. Dorothy Edelstein, Gladys Nciman Grantor , l.unduuist. Metzger, A. Johnson, Hod. McCorkell. Kunsman Wallendcr, Ldclstein, Salay. Knight. Ross. It. Johnson. I.arson Fanner, Knutson, Olson, Keeler, Roycralt, Nciman, Carlstedt Seventy-five . . . PUBLICATIONS GITCHE GUMEE BUSINESS STAFF We have tried to work with the editorial staff in making possible a worthy annual, in keeping with the limitations that must be observed in regard to available sources of revenue. The year has been one of many discouragements, but these have been more than offset by what we have succeeded in doing. The annual, while not as elaborate or large as last year, is a yearbook which does credit to the times and to the college. The editorial staff, we feel, has striven to give you the utmost within its possibilities, and while we feel th.it in prosperous time more might have been accomplished, our hope is that the 1933 Gitche will be accepted in a spirit of overlooking its demerits and a realization of the difficulties which went into its makeup. MIKE BARR. Assistant Business Manager ................................................. John Berg Advertising Manager......................................................... Leo Singer Advertising...................Ruth Lurye, Charles Howe, Carl Richards, Abe Kempinsky Typists.................................................Lienor Halverson, Catherine Shaw Bookkeeper ......................................................... Margaret Gunderson Circulation Manager......................................................... Joe Goldfine PUBLICATIONS . . . PEPTOMI5T STAFF Francis Knight Della Farmer EDITORIAL STAFF FIRST SEMESTER Editor-in-Chief.............................................................Francis Knight Associate Editor ............................................................ Alice Olson Associate Editor.................................................................... Della Farmer Associate Editor ............................................................. Mary Martin Sports Editor ................................................................Allen Miller Assistants...............................Merton Singer. Lorraine Sauter. Elsie May Chase Society Editor............................................................... Ethel Olson Assistants..................................................Adele Cooke. Catherine Doyle Features.......................................................................Olga Olson Doyle, Olson. Gunderson. Cooke. Peterson I Patterson. Chase. Sauter, Miller, Durfec, Johnson Seventy-seven . . . PUBLICATIONS PFPTOMI5T STAFF Wayne Itrillan Orville Kuitl Business Manager Advertising....... Circulation ...... Bookkeeper ....... Advisor........... BUSINESS STAFF FIRST SEMESTER .................................... Wayne Brittan Herbert Bartelme, Jean Lindsey, Herbert Bartholomew ................................. Emmett Johnson .............................. Margaret Gunderson .................................Berenice Cooper EDITORIAL STAFF SECOND SEMESTER Editor-in-Chief .................................................... Della Farmer Associate Editor.................................................... Olga Olson Copy Editor........................................................ Lorraine Sauter Sports Editor................................................................ Allen Miller Society Editor ............................................................. Bertha Benson Assistants..........................................Catherine Doyle, Adelc Cooke Forensics........................................................ George Peterson Departments......................................... Thomas Patterson, Sylvia Dorf BUSINESS STAFF SECOND SEMESTER Business Manager................................................... Orville Ruid Advertising.........................................Herbert Bartelme. Jean Lindsey Circulation................................................................. Harris Johnson Bookkeeper....................................................Margaret Gunderson Advisor......................................................... Berenice Cooper ©O'u’cSGOS ©tytKias ■T MMUSIC . . Seventy-eight Chase. Franklin. Stewart. Rcichcl. Alby, Curtis Carlson. C. Johnson. I.uryc. Moss. King. Eilclstcin. AsplunU Kultlmey. Kinney. Jensen. Orr. Loop, Ogllvic GIRLS’ GLEE CLUB The Glee Club has appeared at a number of functions in and out of school. The organization appeared at the Christmas program in the auditorium, singing a group of numbers, and featuring its members as soloists on the program. The club appeared at the Duluth-Superior K. P. Association, the Methodist Church Dedicatory services, the K. P. Tea, Lenten Vesper services at the Congregational Church, and at the Middle River Sanitorium. A special assembly was given in May. Annually, the College sponsors a concert tour. The club also appeared three times with the musical units of the college on the bi-weekly broadcasts. MEMBERS Dorothy Kuhlmey Eileen Kennv Elsie May Chase Evelyn Jenson Rowena Loop Marion Carlson Mary Ellen Albee Martha Stewart Kathleen King Director, Mis Mae Ogilvic Eleanor Reichel Ruth Lurve Dorothy Edelstein Nan all Orr Lois Franklin Clara P. Johnson Alice Asplund Irene Curtis Erickson, Jenson, Keeler, Zyginunt STRING QUARTETTE The string quartette is a newly-organized unit which has made great progress in the playing of chamber music. Membership is based on proficiency of performance, and it is considered an expression of achievement to be included in this group. The quartette has appeared during some of the bi-weekly broadcasts, and has given recitals at church programs and other functions where music of this type is appropriate. Evelyn Johnson, first violin, Wilbur Erickson, second violin, Valentine Zygmunt, viola, and Louise Keeler, cello, compose the personnel of the group. Professor William Schleip has acted as director. @o'ir §ras ©odkissMUSIC . . Eighty COLLEGE ORCHESTRA During the past year, the college orchestra lias grown to an organization of thirty members, with well balanced instrumentation and a high degree of performance. The scope of the orchestral program has been increased by the bi-weekly series of broadcasts over radio station WEBC. These programs have consisted of various types of music, including standard overtures, operatic selections, and lighter salon pieces. Soloists have been featured on these broadcast periods. Music lovers of this region have been given an opportunity to learn of the fine work being accomplished by this unit of the college’s music department, during the Monday night series. In addition to the broadcasts, the orchestra has played at several assembly programs, and has contributed its services to the college Vodvil and the Senior class play. The high light of the season was the formal concert presented in the spring, at which Earl Rymcr, talented young pianist, was featured in a concerto for piano and orchestra. Howard Kunsmnn. baritone, and Mae Ogilvie. contralto, appeared as vocal soloists. The orchestra has been under the direction of Professor William Schliep, who came to this faculty from River Palls State Teachers college. Violins— Toivo Peterson Evelyn Jenson Wilbur Erickson Joy MacLennan Helen Hyatt l.ois Terry Rowena Loon Muriel Abrahamson Prederick Krcmplc Paul Bell Marie Farmer Willard Martinson Cello— Valentine Zygmunt Bass— Clara Cleveland Elizabeth Donley Piano— l.ois Pranklin rintcs— Eugene Silverness Edward Singer Clarinets— Edwin Olson Leo Singer Horns— Einar Cannelin Elsie May Chase T ram pc Is— lay Jorgenson Lloyd Christenson Trombones— Henry Charbonneau Permit Knutson Drums— William Redmond ©floras Eighty-one . . MUSIC COLLEGE BAND Membership in the college band has increased to 35 during the past year. New uniforms were purchased early in the fall, making the band an attractive marching unit. It contributed to a successful athletic season by appearing at the various home games played during the football and basketball seasons. An excellent repertoire of peppy marches and selections offered entertainment and added spirit to the events. On February 3. the band took a trip to River Falls, to play at the River Falls-Superior encounter. The trip was a successful and enjoyable one for the group. During the Homecoming events, the band led the parade downtown. During the basketball season, a singing unit was featured with the baud. On March 20, the band broadcasted a delightful program over station WEBC. The director of this organization has been Professor William Schliep. Clarinets— Kdwin Olson Lucille Williams Wilford Kronberg Leo Singer Russell Jones Herbert Bartelme Ford Campbell Flute— Edward Singer Saxophones— Roy Hircheimer Theodore Albec Maxine Gouldie Aldo Frillici Harold Rudolph Horns— Linar Cannelin Elsie May Chase Cornets— lay Jorgenson Lloyd Christenson Russell Johnson Clarence Campbell Trombones— Henry Charbonneau Kcrmit Knutson Ray Olson Jar I Aho Baritones— Willard Martinson Noble Meline Tubas— Alpha llinz Charles Koenig Alfred Rosbcrg Drams— William Redmond Elmer Larson ©OTFSMS ©lyMSSGERMAN ASSEMBLY . . Eighty-two G erman On Thursday, May 5, 1933, the members of the German club presented the annual program, featuring music and a short play, in the college auditorium. The play, as well as the musical numbers, was entirely in German. Edward Fergal as director of the German band, led his unit in typical German numbers. Members of the band were Edward Singer. Cornelius Beecher, Willard Martinson, Alpha Hinz, Edwin Olson, and Henry Charbonneau. A German prison scene. “Karzcr Scene,” presented a chorus of German students. Members of the cast were: Prisoner...................................................................Peter Fergal Guard ................................................................ Kenneth Lorimer Fraternity men: Ronald Widness, Harold Benton. Norman Thompson, Clarence Lindquist, Frank Shepard, Walford Erickson, Julian Oyaas, Maynard Hopkins. Harold Mahnkc, Harold Berg. Harry Doby, Arnold Ledin, John Lenroot, Harold Peterson. The play, "Wie Man’s In Amerika Macht," was given with the cast as follows: Herr Mettlcr............................................................ Charles Larson I ran Mettlcr............................................................. Violet Smith Betty Mettler.................................................................... Laura Beglinger Herr Stahlman ........................................................ Gordon Wickman Herr Maurer.............-........................................... William Harris I he program was under the direction of Mrs. Bessie A. Benton, German instructor. Minna Eileen DurfeeThe position of social chairman is one of the most coveted honors in the college. As in past years, competition among the candidates was keen, though friendly. Banners, handbills, placards, blotters, were some of the mediums employed by I groups to advertise their candidates. Jay Jorgenson, Delta Theta. James Barrett, lota Delta Chi. George Peterson, Lambda Delta Chi, and Harry Baker. Independent, were the four candidates 'entered this year. Campaign strategy of various kinds was employed for the bloc of votes controlled by the Kno-Klubs. (After the preliminaries of speeches and booster talks were over, the vote of the college swept Harry Baker into office. Under his management, the social year has been unusually successful, giving to the college a series of dances of informal and formal nature. The best dance orchestras at the Head of the Lakes have been procured for these affairs. The gymnasium. the scene for social functions, lent itself to a variety of decorative effects, featuring subdued lighting. For each of the dances. Mr. Baker appointed student committees to work with him in making these dances successful. Harry Baker deserves the commendation of the student body for the effort lie has exerted in providing the great number of dances given during the year. c 00 0 0 G O 0 -C '-A Homecoming has been an annual event at Superior for a number of years. Plans for this year's Homecoming were in the • hands of a committee headed by Milton Weeks of the faculty. At a meeting of the men’s social groups. Wallace Edburg, Delta Theta, was chosen to act as general chairman. He appointed committees to aid in decorating the stadium, and oaring for the parade on Armistice In keeping with past traditions, the choice of Homecoming Queen was left with the IKjent body of the college. Five soror-"sponsored candidates, these being ppen; uby Lundquist; Delta Sigma, Lambda Sigma Lambda. Helen Klippcn; Sigma Pi, R ‘ Hetty Lemon; Gamma Phi Epsilon, Mildred Carlson; and Tail Alpha Chi. Ethel Olson. Selection from this group was difficult, the final vote revealing a difference of but nine votes in the balloting which Ethel Olson won. with Ruby Lundquist second. The winning candidate— small, blonde, blue-eyed—headed the parade with Mr. Edburg. Ruby Lundquist. Betty Lemon. Helen Klippcn, and Mildred Carlson were guests of honor at the Homecoming dance. The celebration included a parade, the game with Milwaukee. and the dance as a climax. Parade entrants were original and attractive. Lambda Delta Chi, entering a still merrily bubbling, guarded by Francis Knight as the vigilant woodsman, carrying slogans "Brewing Trouble for Milwaukee." "More Kick than Whitewater." “Spike Milwaukee With Superior Spirit.” and "We’ve Got The Game All Bottled Up." attracted much attention, and won the loving cup offered for first prize. Lambda Sigma Lambda, with a huge tank wagon and street cleaners following, advised Superior to "Clean Up Milwaukee." This entry was second; third place was given to the convict-clad Tau Alpha Chi. who used the patrol-wagon to announce that "Superior Convicts Milwaukee." Other novel entries were sponsored by Sigma Pi, with their huge Yellowjacket carried by three members; the Fex entry, "Sleigh Milwaukee.” a sleigh mounted on a wagon; Delta Theta, with a hay rack and a Chic Salish building; the faculty, with Gay Ninety costumes; the German club with a huge sausage machine; the Y.M.C.A. hearse; the Intermediate "Superior’s Vanquished Foes" ghosts; and the Drama Study Mill-Walk-Key float. The game, played on a cold day, provided excitement galore, with the highly-sntisfactory score m Superior’s favor. The dance was well-attended, bringing to a close a most successful Homecoming day. This interesting study is called “A Girl Eating Pie,” though p e r ha p s you’re not looking at the pie! □ Two ambitious basket-eers have a “bally” good time. Tis Eoley and Mc-Faul, the prides of Mcllcn and Park Falls. Grantors and the “frail,” “that way” about each other, give us love’s old sweet smile. □ “It Don’t Mean A Thing If It Ain’t Got That Swing," says Buchanan as he teed off. □ Allen and Lemon, a couple of Dramas, emerging from a sylvan retreat. “I don’t like this ‘Berg’,” says Lemon. □ The pick of the “maleless" ball pose in their best bib and tuck. Wiles, Buros, and Salay showing who'll wear the pants in their families. □ Just 4 5 there, says Doc Rollefson. Where’s the frat pin? □ Erbeck and Braun, of River Falls, “Just before the battle, mother.” r e rerm, young man. be “Fcrm.” Librarian, coach, and super-salesman: ties, sixty cents or two for one dollar. 1 lie ooys in the monkey suits” look pleased about something. The one on the end must have forgotten about the “Wall.”The new library takes shape, with steel framework in place. Half the college learns about riveting by gazing out the windows. Steam shovels digging, the groaning of trucks . . . in-between-the-class audiences . . .the attraction of a hole in the ground for a crowd. Then the buildings begin to take shape. Riveters toss red-hot rivets . . . the framework goes up and up . . . Masons . . . carpenters . . . electricians . . . structural iron workers . . . plumbers . . . walls begin to rise . . . bricks to take their places ... mortar being mixed . . . crowds still watch. The exterior is ready . . now to wait as floor after floor goes in . . . the smell of paint . . . classrooms taking form . . . the final touches ... at last, the new library is ready. Quiet, restful, inviting students—and try to find a vacant place! Good old Crownhart, with its vine-clad entrance, and its welcoming doorway through which eager swains pass in search of maidens fair. □ Jim Barrett sees the sign the lotas put up for him. It must have cost a pretty penny, thinks Jimmy. □ Roger Cheever shows what the well-dressed Pex will wear. Why Roger! such scan ties! □ The Olsons of Superior inveigle a few friends to pose with them. □ Some Alpha Kappas put on their best Sunday smiles to greet the camera. ’Tis Nancy, May, and Roberta who register on the Verichrome. □ George Peterson, the Balsam Lake boy, who also ran for social chairman. Well, the L.D.C's can’t win every year. □ The Iota Cabin got on the road to ruin. All that’s left of happier days and nights. □ Yonson. the yanitor, Jekyl and Hyding as he wipes grimy fingerprints from doors. □ Jay Jorgenson, with his curtain-raiser sign, paid for by Delta Theta. □ A bit of landscape and water-scape from Billings Park across to the hills of Duluth. ■■ PfTPj) CAM av SOC1A! CICUMitl chairman!When autumn are falling— □ Some of the hoys stand in the library entrance and discuss the high price of peanuts in Alaska. □ The big bay window of the library. Professor Williams reading one of the books in preparation for the scholarly book he will issue “soon. The football boys line lip for a bit of a tussle with Milwaukee. leaves Fcrm and Fontecchio— just a couple of “the boys” —get Adelc to smile for them. The observatory, framed in a leafy bower. □ The back-step gang, featuring Russell, Thuiie, Meyer, Barkcll, Shibsted, and O'Rourke. The L.D.C's put on an initiation. Knight closes his eyes and says: “It hurts me worse than you.” □ The new library in late afternoon, with the more studious in attendance. COLLEGE VODVIL . . Ninety Vodvil In the 1933 Vodvil which played to capacity houses in the College auditorium on the evenings of March 16 and 17. the Sigma Pi sorority won first place with "A Russian Street Scene.” Second prize went to the Drama Study for their “When Fanny Was A Girl’s Name.” A melodrama, “Love’s Rugged Path,” presented by the Fex, was awarded third honors. □ □ □ The curtain raiser in the Eighth Annual Vodvil, a presentation of the L.D.C., featured Cal Cabboway and his Hotcha Band in a night-club setting. The program of “hot” music was a background for the "interpretative” dancing of Red Hot Rosy from Harlem Heights and for the rhythmic contortions of the dusky “Cal.” □ □ □ In the prize-winning “Russian Street Scene,” the offering of the Sigma Pi, the rapid but smoothly moving sequence of dancing and music combined with the colorful costumes and unexpected touches of humor to produce an act of prize winning calibre. □ □ □ The Gamma Phi entry. “Harlem Moon,” was a song and dance act built around the popular song of that name. The act included group and individual dancing and singing. □ Q □ "The Vanishing American," the Y. M. C. A. act, told the story of the disappearing American Indian in the form of a monolog given by an “Indian Chief.” During the course of the monolog, hunters and lovers moved about in the background and a vocal solo and a medicine dance were given. □ □ □ “Maybe the Morgue,” entered by the Lambda Sigma Lambda, featured a group of alleged corpses singing “I Ain’t Got No Body.” Tap dancing and a vocal solo. ’'I've Got A Date With An Angel,” were included in the act. □ □ □ The Fex melodrama, "Love’s Rugged Path,” portrayed the trials of "Our Nell" in her struggle against the machinations of the mortgage-foreclosing “Squire” and her triumph over the forces of evil as she proclaims that "Lips that touch liquor shall never touch mine!” and that "Virtue is its own reward.” □ □ □ "Puzzled,” by Tau Alpha Chi. had as its theme song. "Juggling A Jigsaw." The act included singing and dancing with a jigsawish background. □ □ □ "When Fanny Was A Girl’s Name," presented by the Drama Study, employed an authentic appearing barroom-background for a series of “floor shows” under the direction of a "Kernan” type master of ceremonies. Included in the “shows" were the Bean Sisters, bathing beauties from Boston’s Burning Beach, fully clad in bathing suits of 1900 vintage; the Floradora Sextet; and the inimitable Yale “singing” "A Bird In A Gilded Cage.” % □ □ □ The lota Delta Chi act, "Backstage With the Podunk Dramatic Club,” gave a humorous interpretation of what goes on behind the scenes in an amateur stage production. CARD J BENSON KANE PERRY FARMER I 933 V O D V I L A D MINI S T R A TION Piling it higher than usual . .. but anything for that pictorial effect. □ A corner of the men's lounge, with the less-than-usual quota of loiterers and students. □ The A I p h a K a p p a s again, with out-of-town representatives posing on Crownhart steps. □ Editor Sandberg says, “I’ll stick to my guns.” □ The brothers Larson sit on the back steps of “hum” with old dog Tray. Vern Wright demonstrating how he made that run at River Falls that the old meanie of a referee called back. □ “You'll eat them words or you’ll taste fist,” says Armstead. □ A River Fallsian sends this up to show his sad plight. If we had known that, we'd have tried a lit-tale harder to “stave” off defeat. Hashers. Why Fred, that isn’t a bottle on the tray, and so close to college, too? Three Lambdas, with Holton for a background. □ Tubbs’ Gymnasium, in sunlight-and-shadows effect. □ The tree-lined entrance to college. A collegian steps into the sunlight for a bit of air, and the Gitchc man snaps him. Emmett Johnson . . . munching a bar with the pause that refreshes. □ The Dramas put on their best smiles for this Pepsodent ad. A musical interlude at Crownhart, with Krause tickling the ivories. The Gamma Phis rehearse for their Vodvil act, with a hold display of limbs. □ The sisters Slocum pause downtown to get snapped. However, you can’t snap anything on Ethel without getting snapped back. Christenson and Bell, of the “Y” boys, pause in front of Haney’s. Why anyone should walk out in the snow for pictures is beyond us, but take them we did. The Spooner bloc, with Bill Harris thrown in for good measure. □ Crownhart, from the side.Alma Mater spells “welcome" with white rocks. As traditional, the alumni responded with White Rock. □ The Dramas — such heartless beasts — say "Grind Milwaukee.” After three minutes of guessing, a spectator said, “I see, that’s supposed to be "Mill-Walk-Key.” Don’t mind that; you did a good idea right! □ To inform the uninformed populace, the athletic committee kept this sign in the assembly. Believe it or not, that’s a footballer in that thar sign. □ Johnny Dietrich shows lie can ride the horse as well as throw the ------. Monty Allen lends his horseman to lead the parade. □ With all Theta restraint, this subtle entry attracted some attention. Not that it means anything. but the Northland boys used the same idea. However, it’s common enough. The K.P. girls drive about with Dolores Fleer chauffeur mg. □ The L.D.C’s raided the police station for this artistic "still-life” float. And Pappy Francis from the wilds of Spooner, turns mountaineer to guard those ornate bottles garnered from various collegians. □ A carefully planned parade, says we, with horses to head it and the Lambdas following. □ The stadium on the student side fills up with a goodly crowd, much to the delight of the box office. 'Twas a chilly wind that blew, but Superior warmed up for the occasion to win.SOCIAL CLUBS . . Ninety-six All Girls' Tec October 19, 1932, was the date chosen by the Inter-Club Council (or the annual All Girls’ Tea. All girls in the school are guests at this time, being presented to the presidents of the various social groups, faculty members, and administrative heads of the college. Alpha Kappa and Delta Sigma members were in charge of the decorations, working under the chairman, i.ulu Paulus, and assistant chairman, Margie Ticknor. A well-planned decorative scheme transformed the small gym into a lovely setting for this occasion. Invitations were issued by members of Sigma Omega sorority, headed by Florence Sherlock and Mildred Hotzfield. The reception committee, composed of members of Sigma Pi sorority, was headed by Margaret Green as chairman. Entertainment was in charge of Lambda Sigma Lambda, with Adcle Cooke acting as chairman. Tau Alpha Chi and Gamma Phi Epsilon sororities were in charge of refreshments, with Beth Mueller as chairman. Over three hundred college women attended the Tea. An excellent program, featuring piano solos by Lois Franklin, violin solos by Evelyn Jenson, readings by Mrs. Dorothy Ekstrom Peterson, and vocal selections by Mae Ogilvie, was prepared by the committee. Tea was poured by the following faculty members: Mrs. Bessie Benton, Miss Grace Barney, Miss Jane Pehnstrand, Miss Ida Flogstad. Miss Nona ALacQuilkin, and Miss Katherine Ohman. In future years, the lovely new lounge room will be the scene of the Teas. The success of the function this year was due to the work of Miss Ellen Clark and Marcella Wall. ©O'u’cSKISInler-Club C ounci Inter-Sorority Governing Body ALPHA KAPPA May Morton, Marcella Wall TAU ALPHA CHI Rosabcllc Manley, Dolores Fleer GAMMA PHI EPSILON Alice Swanson. Eleanor Halverson SIGMA OMEGA Mildred Hotzficld, Florence Sherlock DELTA SIGMA Elizabeth Turney, Marion Banks LAMBDA SIGMA LAMBDA Ruby Hoff. Olga Olson SIGMA PI Margaret Green, Lavaun Lange ©U'TcSKIS ©MfcjsaSOCIAL CLUBS . . Ninety-eight Conroy, Pa ulus Lindquist. Ticknor, Sccombe. Sathcr. McEwen Wall. Krause, Haglund, .Morton, Favcll First Semester May Morton OFFICERS Second Semester Alice Sccombe Louise Krause Lulu Paulus Miss Jane Rchnstrand ADVISORS Miss Gertrude Unthank SOCIAL CALENDAR The social year for the club was inaugurated with a series of rushers. ft During the winter season, an informal jjl dance, the Snow Ball, was given in the Little Gym. Mrs. Chapin, wife of one of the exhibitors, attended the traditional Studio Tea given in the art room of the college. Works of two famous ft artists were exhibited for art patrons of the Twin Ports. The annual cottage party was held at Solon Springs late in the spring. The club did not participate in the college Vodvil this year. Members were entertained throughout the year at social meetings given by local members. The members look back upon a successful and enjoyable year. Ninely-nine SOCIAL CLUBS r FLORENCE SATHER—Always happy and cheerful . . . pleasantly plump . . . infectious giggle . . . Spooner lassie and K. P. graduate. FLORENCE HAGLUN'D—A tiny voice, a tiny girl . . . weakness: Latin and A's . . . leaves the fold in June. LOUISE KRAUSE—Personality to spare . . . hails from Bruce . . . two years at Carle-ton . . . likes tall men and Crownhart vestibule . . . honor student and graduate. LULU PAULUS—Plump . . . enjoys cabin parties . . . looking for a K. P. job after graduation . . . has a shadow: Bob. NANCY CONROY—Another Central Parker . . . quiet . . . lots of energy for the size . . . plans attending U. of N. D. next year. MADELINE FAVELL—Established a record by staying four years at Crownhart . . . Is it because “he" is at the old home town. Rice Lake? Matriculates. ROBERTA McEWEN—An unobtrusive, lovely girl . . . good companion for mirthful moments . . . excellent hostess . . . East Ender. MAY MORTON—Industrious . . . conscientious . . . dependable for responsible tasks .... pleasant but reserved . . . graduates. ALICE SECOMBE— Hails from Ladysmith . . . finds it hard to get in Dorm on time each night . . . Howard withdrew her from circulation the first year . . . still that way the second year. MARGIE TICKNOR—Flippant . . . pert . . . this Ashlander . . . but much sought after . . . changeable as spring weather. Ends stay at S. T. C. MARCELLA WALL—Spooneritc who finds life interesting . . . athletic . . . oratorical . . . socially minded . . . witty . . . prefers cave men. I % @37(§gos ©cyuoss mi i Metzger. ILink . McRachcrn. Smith, Knllclson. Turney Autrejr. I.cmon, Whitmore, Yale, Gfffin, Pager tin Conner. .McCarthy. Allen. Webb. Lee, Bowser OFFICERS Elizabeth Turney.........................................................President Barbara Smith...................................................... Vice President Katherine Metzger....................................................... Secretary Sue Gif fin...............................................................Treasurer Agnes Kirk ADVISORS SOCIAL CALENDAR Nona MacQttilkin Pledging activities were begun in the fall with a breakfast rusher. White Rose pledge dinner, and a rusher tea. During the fall season, the sorority sponsored an informal dance at the college gymnasium. To climax the football season, the annual banquet was tendered for the squad, coaches, and trainers. A tea for the mothers of the members was given during the winter season. A joint bridge-luncheon for Delta Sigma and Lambda Sigma Lambda members took place at the Androy Hotel. Hotel Duluth was the scene of the Spring Formal. The customary cottage party ended the social program for the club. Second prize was won in the competitive Vodvil with a clever act. a burlesque on the Gay Nineties. The club also entered a decorative float in the Homecoming parade. OO'iJ’tSKISI One hundred one [ka CoAfj q iZA h . . . SOCIAL CUJB5 yCt£f ■ 2Ju y :s Y Delta Sigma 7sa Jane Allen.................."Foolish”.......................................... pulutli Marjorie Autrey............."girlishly irresponsible".........................{Superior Betty Bowser................"jovial"...........................................Superior Marion Banks................."childish".........................;..............Superior Jean Conner................."so. so”...........................................Superior Margaret Fagerlin...........“mediocre”.........................................Superior Sue (3iffin................."plain”............................................Superior Betty Lemon................."utterly unsophisticated"..........................Superior Helen Lee...................“retiring”........................................Superior Marjorie Maloney............"meticulous”.......................................Superior Katherine Metzger..........."compassionate"....................................Superior Janet McEachern............."plump”............................................Superior Mary Florence McCarthy......."lace and ruffles”................................Superior Lela Rollcfson..............“coy"..............................................Superior Barbara Smith..............."regular"..........................................Superior Elizabeth Turney............"masculine”........................................Superior Alary Jane Wilson..........."naive”............................................Superior Ruth Webb...................“regal"............................................Superior Florence Yale..............."blase"............................................Superior Virginia Whitmore..........."emaciated"........................................Superior Mary Elizabeth Almy........."ingenious"........................................Superior Cordelia Marvin............."raucous"............................................Duluth ♦ I 3 (JIT § MS ©(iPMSSSOCIAL CLUBS . One hundred I wo Wickstrom, Dwyer. Halverson Swanson. Shaw. Farmer. Ruros. ImiUici XaiiKcn. Nordholm, Wickstrom. Carlson, Fenner OFFICERS First Semester Helen Dwyer.... Marie Farmer.... Jean Fenner..... MiUlred Carlson Juanita Boss.... Second Semester ....President.....................Eleanor Halverson ..Vice President.............................Mildred Carlson ....Secretary...................................Marie Farmer ....Treasurer........................ Alice Swanson .Social Chairman.................... Catherine Shaw SOCIAL CALENDAR Novel rushers entertained the pledges of the sorority during the fall rusher season. Late in the fall, an informal dance was given at the Morgan Park Clubhouse in Duluth. A Carnival Dance during the spring season was an outstanding event, taking place at the college gymnasium. Social meetings at homes of members contributed to an enjoyable program. To close the year, the annual cottage party was held at Lake Nebagamon late in "the spring. A well-rehearsed act was entered in the college Vodvil, featuring harmony singing. dancing, and solos. ©fl'U’tgMB ©lyiKJSSOne hundred three SOCIAL CLUBS » Gamma Phi Epsil on JUANITA BOSS—'"Nita" ... A slender Miss who drives a big car . . . enjoys dances . . . devotion steady. Third year. DOROTHEA BUKOS—'"Sis” . . . tennis . . . all athletics . . . excellent tap dancer . . . small, dark, smiling . . . weathered two years at S. T. C. MILDRED CARLSON—"Milly" . . . football queen candidate . . . small, blonde, dainty . . . usually well dated . . . graduating. HELEN DWYER—“Tommy" ... A Duluthian . . .graduates . . . intellectual . . . reserved ... "I must be good, whatever anyone says or does.” MARIE FARMER—"Midge" . . . cute, we calls her . . . blonde . . . appeals to masculine ego . . . second year. CATHERINE GIUDICI—"Pat" . . . dark . . . vivacious ... a throaty blues voice front a little girl . . . stays at Crownhart . . . first year. ELEANOR HALVERSON—"Ellie” . . tall . . . restful to the eyes . . . organizer type . . . humorous . . . one year left. Superiorite. JEANETTE HAUGEN—"Jeanne” . . . light of foot . . . weighty on the heart ... a first year member. LUCILLE NORDHOI.M—"Lucy” . . . "I'm happy with my Lloydy, why aren't they all contented like me?" . . . graduates. JEAN PENNER—"Tiny" . . . quiet around school . . . interesting . . . small . . . dark haired graduate from East End. CATHERINE SHAW—“Cats" . . . low voiced . . . genial ... a fixture in the Gitche office as typist ... A Duluthian who graduates. ALICE SWANSON—"Allie” ... a hard worker who finds time for things besides books . . . Interclub representative. MARGARET WICKSTROM—"Margie" . . . we wonder what fires burn behind that placid exterior? . . . reserved . . . commutes from Duluth. ♦  e .lS 2-f%jtJJU- ' TU i 6 J Jpr Szr JsotJ- lfnKx SL i W ’£0 r -XZZ s' Loop. Swanslrom, Ounu, Hoff. Cooke. Conrad Ackley. 0. Olson. Ross. Pjersted. Klnj:, S. Olson Wold. Dully. Colder. Ogilvlc. Merita, Klippen. Nelson OFFICERS Olya Olson .... Ruby Hoff.... Helen Klippen Helen Conrad ..... President Vice President .... Secretary .... Treasurer SOCIAL CALENDAR A "Kid'’ rusher and a "Blue” luncheon began the social year. Two formal initiations were given during the fall and spring months. A tea for mothers was an early event of the calendar. A bridge supper, open to friends of the sorority, was given at the home of Helen Martin. Alumni entertainment took place at a tea; on St. Patrick's day. the alumni entertained the actives. A joint bridge-luncheon in conjunction ent ,uj . “■ (Jvio, '.HA, i ' a srK+rK-0 with Delta Sigma, occurred at the An-droy Hotel. A Pall Informal and a 4 spring Informal were two wcll-attend- r, ed social events. In closing the year. sXU 1 die members entertained at the custom- • . arv cottage party and the traditional - Se uor Breakfast. The club partici- T . , ated m the Homecoming parade, win- ‘'K . C.iJL . ,1 • J and a,so sponsored an ) college Vodvil. iuJfjL LJris rru A iA 'V®1 (Uc - a _ O' ' SOCIAL CLUBS ami DUFFY John Marshall LambcL spontaneity Duluth maid ► • ■ ' ■ i'v im, u ji i i mtirsnau gradual capers and cut-up . . . our Billy G0vlt Oruff ’ ' ' 'Minneapolis • 'VERENA SWANSTROM-Freshman . . sn,r., ' ' ”D"ily ‘ . . . tall and slim . . . and we have i cs • • • loves color "Ked her . . . ••Verona.” MAE OGILVIE—The voice of the Lambdas o , , , . . . talent minus temperament . ■, ‘vco,e 1 descent . . . sings with a smile wonderful girls, say we . . . "Mae. HELEN KLIPPEN—Saleswoman superb n„, .. , . , . alive . . . chemistry fan . . . peppy and pert 111 '"flippy” C ,mber ' complc,dy SYI.A OLSON—Duluthian . . . titian and trim label her “Andy’s." • . Sophomore call her "Sal" but MABLE FJERSTAD—Senior . . . Superior , . , , . . ... trnunnr n irnutw ■ • • natural chairman . . . works like a "Mabe." ' ’ drama,,cs « »obby . . . determined but deserving Khorn Simnlslene?1' tr?ks lo school from Central Park . . . was born to Ik a good listener . . . likes to sing . . . and smile . . . "Katey." ADELE COOKE—“Duluth Sophomore . . . determined . . . direct . . . walks to get places . . . sensitive but not sentimental . . . looks up . . . and likes it . . . "Dell.” HELEN CONRAD—Beauty queen . . . yet businesslike . . . holds the Lambda family purse . . . inherited the liking for science . . . “Helen." DOROIHY ACKLEY—I ops the school in scholastic honors . . . hats off to you, Dorothy. Ohio lass . . . anecdotes galore . . . perfect hostess . . . “Dorothy. BETTY ROSS—Lambda president '32 . . . capable and critically honest . . Senior . . . literary subtle and sincere . . . . Owl and Serpent "Betty.” IRENE NELSON—Billings Parker . . . likes dramatics . . . and knows her make-up . . . crisp handwriting . . . clear-cut thinking . . . "Irene.” PAULA MERILA Freshman . . . full fledged member already . . . willing to work . . . original . . . appreciative . . . Superior . . . “Paula.” MARION GUMZ—Sophomore . . . booster with enthusiasm ... a hearty laugh . . . best of sports . . . never half-hearted . . . loyalty personified . . . "Gumzie." DOROTHY WOLD—New member . . . Duluth . . . Pepsodent ad . . . Junior . . . came to us from Duluth J. C. . . . thinks "Gerry” is a nice name . . . “Dix.” GENEVIEVE COLDER—Could extend any story to a novel . . . makes life interesting . . . sympathetic . . . hospitable . . . Sophomore . . . "Gen.” RUBY HOFF—Senior class president . . . football queen .. .and now she graduates ... of whom it can be said, "She is popular' . . . "Ruby. OLGA OLSON—Poetry comes from her fingers the only Senior to make English Honors . . . . she graduates as our president •Olga." HELEN MARTIN—Sunshine . . . never complains . a tonic for the pessimist . . . generous . . . Superior . . . the school's neighbor . . . Helen. « S aswu ta s rrrw SS SSTW —" •• •' • “ - and we’re proud of her . . . "Rowena. __t__ . @ a1cos SOCIAL CLUBS . . One hundred six Trcbllcnck, Andrews, Sherlock Olandcr, Berj . Hnulldd. Apclquist OFFICERS Florence Sherlock........................................................... President Norma Olson.............................................................Vice President Elsie Olandcr .................................................... Secretary-Treasurer SOCIAL CALENDAR A series of bridge parties began the fall activities for members. Pledges were entertained at rushers and the formal pledging dinner. The first sorority dance, the Balloon Dance, was held at the Androy Hotel. Throughout the year, members have been entertained at social meetings and bridge parties. An annual event, the cottage party, was given during the spring holiday period. Ote hundred seven . . SOCIAL CLUBS Sigma Omega JEANETTE ANDREWS—A South Superior Miss pleasantly interested in most everyone; we like her individualistic swagger. Graduates. MARGARET BERG—A wit that is ever ready with a comeback. A first year Superior girl. MILDRED HOTZFIELD—She has her moods . . . usually sweet, but we can imagine her otherwise. Time much taken up by a certain young man. Graduates. ELSIE OLANDER—Carrying on the blonde tradition of ' digging" money ... in this case, treasurer of the club. An East Ender who graduates. NORMA OLSON—Back for more education after graduating . . . we wonder if "he” has anything to do with it. A Range girl of pleasing personality. FLORENCE SHERLOCK—Addressed as Madam President of the club . . . artistic . . . drives a car from Central Park. Also on the graduating list. ARDELLA TREBILCOCK—A Freshie with a kindly disposition ... a bit reserved . . . the type to confide in. GERALDINE APELQUIST—A February graduate from Itasca ... a wide circle of friends won by sympathetic understanding and tact. SOCIAL CLUBS . . One hundred ci lil Farmer. Jenson, BJur, Perry, Kurrascli. Lcchy Card. Hanks. Moulder. Kerr. Kane, Christenson. Orcen l.undquist, Oiroulx, Benson, l.juje, Wedin. Knutson. Franklin First Semester Lavaun Lange... Ruby Lundquist Ruth Kerr....... Grace Ferry..... OFFICERS Second Semester ...President................................Agnes Kane Vice President............................Bertha Benson ...Secretary.................................Lois Card ..Treasurer.................................Grace Giroulx SOCIAL CALENDAR In beginning the social program for the year, returning members were entertained at a social meeting. During the rusher period, a number of rushers were given. Throughout the year, social meetings for members and alumni were held at homes of members. Several meetings were held at homes of Duluth members. The social program was ended with the cottage party at Lake Nebagamon. The act entered by o the sorority in the Vodvil won first M place. Lois Card was named general chairman in charge of the Vodvil. s| on-sored by the Sigma Pi. A novel pa-y rade entry attracted attention in the Homecoming parade. A queen candi-u date was entered by the club in the ° queen contest. One hundred nine . . SOCIAL CLUBS Sigma Pi MARGARET GREEN—"Marg," the life of the party, who thinks that the grass is always Greener on the other side of the bay. GRACE PERRY—Grace, with that red hair and those ideas about everything. EVELYN JENSEN—“Ev,” with the eyebrows she doesn’t want mentioned, so we won’t, but there’s still the eyes themselves, and her fiddle, "and Ray says—.’’ LAVAUN LANGE—“l.avin,” a mischievous madonna who aspires to greater heights. AGNES KANE—"Agnes,” with the kind of a face that goes with braids and sprigged print frocks—and the grace of a gypsy maid. RUBY LUNDQUIST—"Ruby.” the all-school co-ed, with all the qualifications on the posters last fall. All she needed was another plank in her platform. LOIS ERANKLIN—"Lois.” like nobody else at all. and all the better for it—with a rare smile and a way with the black and white keys. JEANNE KURRASCH—"Jeanne.” with a perfect finger wave and at least one phone call before the meeting is over. LOIS CARD—"Lois." the perfect business manager—any kind of business. GERALDINE HANKS—"Jerry," the only person we know who can look worried and twinkle at the same time. AUDREY KNUTSON "Audrey." with big eyes and a charm all her own. BERTHA BENSON -"Bertha," sympathetic, with journalistic tendencies, and a remarkable amount of energy for her size. GRACE GIROULX—“Grace.” Bertha’s afternoon shadow, very certain about everything. RUTH KERR—"Ruthie,” our delegate at the coffee shop and the owner of the most notorious laugh in the corridors. LENORE WEDIN—"Lenore,” what with wide eyes and a questionable, innocent air. to say nothing of an alarming giggle. MARIE BJUR—"Marie,” with a slight lisp and a slighter poundage. RUBY HOULDER—"Ruby," sole representative at the Dorm, with a dignity which becomes her. PERN CHRISTIANSON—"Kern," with a whimsical smile and everybody’s friendship. VIOLET I.EEHY—"Vi.” happy-go-lucky and ready for fudge—or any other excitement the gods have to offer. DELLA FARMER—"Della,” just another small town girl, always in a grand rush, but handy in an emergency. SOCIAL CLUBS . . One hundred ten Fleer. Manley. Tuckwood, Johnson, Mueller, Hilmer Green. Mahon. Cudd. Ryan. McCorkell. Corcoran Olson, Doyle, Rogers, Russell, Harbour, Winslow OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Rosnbdlc Manley.......................President.................................Mary Mahon Lucille Russell....................Vice President....................Margaret Green Beth Mueller..........................Secretary................................Betty Rogers Dolores Fleer.........................Treasurer..............................Dolores Fleer SOCIAL CALENDAR Rushing season began with a bridge-luncheon. A progressive dinner was given for the formal pledging ceremony. A novel Gingham dance took place durinrr the fall social season. A post-Lenten Formal was an event of the Spring calendar, taking pjace at the Eagles ballroom. Alumni were entertained at a Bridge Tea. Enter- tainment at homes of members con- S tinned throughout the year. The social program was concluded with the cottage party given late in the spring. The club entry in the Homecoming parade won third place. An act was entered in the college Vodvil. featuring a chorus, singing, and dancing. @017(§530 OODKISSOne hundred eleven . . SOCIAL CLUBS Tau Alpha (§hi MARY A AHON—An interesting and rare combination oi brains and beauty. Holds the distinct honor of having twice been Prom queen and twice T.A.X. president. ROSABELLE MANLEY—Smart, well groomed, possesses immeasurable poise. A horn leader. T.A.X. president ’32. Dances well. DELORES FLEER—Petite, dainty, just our blue-eved blonde. An unceasing worker-prominent member and president of K.P. department. ELINOR RYAN—A passionate lover of honesty, straightforward and frank, brilliant conversationalist, sparkling wit, sincere and candid. RUTH HILMER—Hails from Ladysmith. Just a Freshman who has already set innumerable manly hearts aflutter. Tall and slender—refreshing. BETH MEULLER—An Evclcth lassie. Possessor of that rare “Yardley" type of beauty. Dashing and vivacious. BETTY ROGERS—Hails from Hibbing. Unceasingly active. An exponent of what the well-dressed college girl should wear. DOROTHY HARBOUR—Of a sweet and retiring disposition. A good listener. Can always be depended upon in emergencies. LUCILLE RUSSELL—Formerly of Lawrence College. Is an excellent student and charming hostess. MARY JANE WINSLOW—A Duluthian. Sweet and lovely, good natured and a steadfast friend. MARGARET GREEN—Exotic, dusky brunette. The personification of the American Girl 1933 (plus). ELVA MARIE TUCKWOOI)—One of the college’s most likeable co-eds—regal, yet unassuming. A new member, yet already showing herself to be a willing worker. Formerly of Lawrence. DESYL HUBBARD—Beauty queen—blonde and blue-eyed. Likes her men big and strong with dark, curly hair—preferably a basketball player. MARION CUDD—River Falls Miss. Athletic. Fascinatingly breathless voice. Sighs eloquently—only she spells it "Cy.” ETHEL OLSON—Football queen '32. The “five foot two eyes of blue" girl. Central High grad. DOROTHY BOUCHART—Unusual and mysterious. Stages traditional T.A.X. breakfasts successfully. Worries about her bridge(?). FLORENCE JOHNSON—The despair of two Fex and the joy of all. A charming bit of femininity. DORIS McCORKELL—Of most unusual talent and ability and yet not lacking in the social graces. Very loquacious. Former editor of Peptomist and prominent on the Gitche staff. Formerly of Carleton College. ROSE CORCORAN—A weakness for fads and piano players. Her voice has charms. ALICE OLSON—One of “the” Olsons. A smile and friendly greeting for everyone. Prominent on the Peptomist staff. A friend in need. CATHERINE DOYLE—Impetuous. Has a hobby for checkers. An up and coming journalist. Natural and winning. Always looking for excitement.SOCIAL CLUBS . . One hundred twelve Dahlstrnni. Keeler, Zygmunt. Oolcy Wedin. Matscli. Mario. Ardern. Hirkhol Henson, Sauter, Chase. Fleet. Stebbin . Payne OFFICERS Pint Semester President Second Semester Vice President Edna Stebbins T reasurer Gertrude Fleet SOCIAL CALENDAR The year has been spent in a variety of entertainment. Several dances were on the social calendar of the group. Hikes were enjoyed. During the Tri-College conference, the YAV.C.A. members helped to entertain visiting repre- sentatives from Northland College and River Ralls, here for the Y.M.C.A. meeting. Social meetings have been numerous. Relief work has been contributed by the organization to the charitable workers of the city. on17(§sos otyKJSsOne hundred thirteen . . SOCIAL CLUBS Y. W. C. A. MABLE BIRKHOLZ—Obliging to one of the Y. M. ELSIE .MAY CHASE—Musical Miss—here in body, heart elsewhere. DOROTHEA COX—Speedboats and records are her mania. HELEN DAHLSTROM—We ve heard say she's bashful! GERTRUDE FLEET—A timorous little red head. ROSE MARIE INFELISE—Oh. faithful scholar! MARGARET JONES—Comes a ways for her daily education. LOUISE KEELER—Talks with her ’cello. EILEEN KENNY—A silent worker in school . . . but . . . ALICE McCAULEY—Music, music everywhere . . . even in her heart. CAROLINE MATSCH—Buxom "Ma” Matsch from the Dorm. EVELYN MOYLE—Just hailed from Texas. ELLEN OLSON—A Rhinelander Miss acquiring the stern mien of a schoolmarm. IRMA OOLEY—A booster from Menominee with a male for solace. NANAH ORR—A lovely voice neglected by an industrious girl. DOROTHY PAYNE—A smile from ear to ear. LORRAINE SAUTER-A Walter Winchell for the Peptomist cause. EDNA STEBBINS—An empty place in her heart to fill now that-is gone. VIVIAN WEDIN—The girl with the bright ideas—and such a little girl. VALENTINE ZYGMUNT—A musician from a big university. ELIZABETH MAZZO—A dependable worker . . . and a brunette, boys! JESSIE ARDERN—New in the group but always dependable. VERONA BENSON—Who shows what smiles can do to brighten corners. © (Scoa ©(yfcjsiiSOCIAL CLUBS . . One hundred fourteen Knnpinillcr, .Moyle. Moulder. Ticknor, Orr, Favcll. Oolcy Hervi, Schultz. Sorenson. Burgeson, Iltrijc. Askov, Katon Hllcn Olson. Wcdln, Wiles. Krause, Secombc. Cameron. Stevens Emily Olson. Hellcrud. Fleet, Stebbins, Snell, Birkliolz. Oiudiei Members Edna Askov Caroline Matscli Mabel Birkliolz Norma McDonald Stella Cameron Evelyn Moyle Hazel Crandall Ellen Olson Helen Dahlstrom Emily Olson Madeline Favell Irma Oolcy Gertrude Fleet Nanah Orr Catherine Giudici Phyliss Schultz Wanda Hellcrud Alice Sccombe Martha Hervi Josephine Sherman Ruth Hilmer Phyliss Snell Ruby Moulder Margie Sorenson Marion Ihrig Edna Stebbins Beatrice Katon Ruth Stevens Margaret Knapmiller Margie Ticknor Louise Krause Vivian Wcdin Ethel Wiles One hundred fifteen . . SOCIAL CLUBS Sigma Gamma 0k, The dormitory sorority, known as Sigma Gamma Chi, was organized by Miss Ellen M. Clark. Every girl living at Crownhart Hall is eligible to membership in this organization; at the same time, this does not preclude membership in any of the college sororities. This dub is entirely a student organization, which operates on the principle of the honor system. It is directed by officers who arc elected in the month of May for the ensuing year. Former presidents have been Bernice Belleva, Rose Klink. Ruth Lewis, Nancy McGill, Ann Darlington, Edna Grekela, Dorothy Larson. Grace Spaeth, Stella Arasim, and Olivia Holema. The purpose of the organization is to engender a fine social spirit which will develop the highest type of college women. A student loan fund has been established for members living in the Hall. Every girl has the privilege of borrowing small sums of money from this fund. Certain traditional functions are carried out by the girls each year. The first social event of the year is the Senior-Junior banquet held in the dining room of the dormitory. At this time, the seniors extend a sincere welcome to the newcomers, i and each girl is presented with a favor as a token of good will. The next event is the annual fall tea, at which the girls of Crownhart Hall are the hostesses. The tea is held in the living room of the Hall, and is attended by friends, relatives, and faculty members. A masquerade party is held in the recreational room of the dormitory to celebrate the Halloween season. Another occasion which is attended by special guests is the Christmas party. The girls take part in a candle light procession and march from the second floor into the dining room singing "Silent Night." Carols arc sung and a speech is given by the guest of honor. Two events in the spring bring to a close the social activities of the year. These are the annual spring tea and the farewell banquet which the Freshman girls give in honor of the graduating members. All these activities are planned for and carried out by committees. It is the wish of the old members that these traditions will be carried out by succeeding members. ©O'u’csgosSOCIAL CLUBS . . One hundred sixteen •Jocial Cal enaar Sept. 12—THE SCHOOL year begins. Sept. 16—All School Dance. Sept. 29—YAV.C.A. Reception. Sept. 30—Fex Dance, Tower Hall. Oct. 4—All Girls’ Tea. Oct. 7—lota Dance. Oct. 14—Peptomist Dance. Oct. 16—All School Dance. Oct. 28—All School Dance. Oct. 29—Sigma Omega Dance. Androy. Oct. 31—Sigma Gamma Chi Halloween Party, Dormitory. Nov. 3—First Oratorical Contest. Nov. 5—“Y” Party, Little Gym. Dance, Woodman Hall, Fex. Nov. II—Homecoming Events, Dance. Nov. 15—Grammar-Junior High Party, Little Gym. Nov. 16—Senior-Junior Banquet, Crownhart Hall. Nov. 17—Lambda Sigma Lambda. Alpha Kappa Rushers. Nov. 18—Lambda Delta Chi Dance, Gym. Nov. 19—Sigma Pi Rusher. Nov. 21—Three Arts, Gamma Phi Epsilon Rushers. Nov. 22—Sigma Omega Rusher. Nov. 29—Sigma Omega, Alpha Kappa Rushers. Nov. 30—Delta Sigma, Sigma Pi Rushers "Y” Father-Son Banquet. Dec. I—Gamma Phi Epsilon Rusher. Oratorical Contest. Dec. 2—All School Dance. Dec. 3—Tau Alpha Chi Dance. Sigma Gamma Chi Tea. Delta Sigma Breakfast Rusher. Dec. 5—Tau Alpha Chi Rusher. Dec. 8—W.A.A. Banquet. Dec. 9—All School Dance. One hundred seventeen . . SOCIAL CLUBS Social (Calendar Dec. 10—Gamma Phi Epsilon Dance. Dec. 13—German Club Christmas Party. Dec. 10—Oratorical Contest. Dec. 26—Fex Christmas Dance, Androv. Dec. 28—lota Christmas Dance, Androy. Jan. 7—Lambda Sigma Lambda Dance. Gym. Jan. 13—Peptomist Dance. Jan. 20—All School Dance. Jan. 28—Alpha Kappa Dance. Feb. 3—All School Dance. Feb. 10— Peptomist Dance. Feb. 14—Intermediate Party. Feb. 18—“Y” Dance, Little Gym. Feb. 24—Peptomist Dance. Feb. 25—Lambda Delta Chi Dance, Gym. March 3—All School Dance. March 16—Vodvil. March 17—Vodvil. March 24—All School Dance. Rural Department Party. April 7—Men’s Stag. Alpha Kappa Tea. April 21—"Y” Dance, Onaway. April 22—Gamma Phi Epsilon Dance. April 25—W.A.A. Bridge Party. April 28—"S” Club Dance. April 29—Intermediate Tea. Tail Alpha Chi Spring Formal. Eagles. May 5—All School Dance. May II—Senior Class Play. May 12—Delta Sigma Dance, Hotel Duluth. May 13—K.P. Annual Tea. May 19—Senior Reception and Dance. 307 (grasSOCIAL CLUBS . . One hundred eighteen DcVInck, Born. Nlckolas, McCorkell, Wlicaldon Knutson. Conne . Horton. Ritzman, R. Chccvcr Olson, I'ontccchlo, McNally, Gif fin. Avis, AhlStrom SOCIAL CALENDAR Entertainment for returning members was an event of the early fall program. Stags and initiation followed the nine-week period. Several closed "Hard Time” dances were given during the fall season. A banquet for actives and alumni was a fall event. The annual Christmas Formal was given during the holiday period at the Androy Hotel. Numerous out-of-town alumni attended. Several alumni dances took place during the spring season. Plans for a house-party are pending. The club entered a float in the Homecoming parade, and its Vodvil entry won third place. Social meetings at homes of members have been numerous, with many alumni in attendance. @07 § DOS ©ODKJSaOne hundred nineteen . . SOCIAL CLUBS LE ROY BORG—Monicker: "Popeye" ... a useful man on hardwood courts . . also known in indoor sports—especially those played in the evening. HAROLD AHLSTROM—Very shifty (noticeable in the Vodvil) . . . tall, powerful Norse physique . . . big and bad . . . oh, girls! LAWRENCE HORAN—The beastly villain who tried to do little Nell wrong . . . And “Curly” is such a nice boy . . . dramatic . . . operatic. CARL RITZMAN—The champion orator of Wisconsin . . . narrator of extraordinary yarns . . . “Is that tapioca?" . . . one of the best on a dance floor. DICK CONNESS—A natural born leader ... a fine student . . . ’32 class play lead . . . debater. WALTER McNALLY—Just an old smoothie . . . the lad the co-eds dream about . . . sweet dreams, ladies. MERTON GIFFIN—Look for a red-head with a broad smile—that’s Mert. Another Gif-fin of the Gif fins. GENE COLLINS—Captain-elect of basketball . . . all around good boy. that’s Gene. FRED FONTECCH10—Trainer of the football squad . . . basketball manager . . . always in demand by the co-eds . . . everybody’s friend. ROY KNUTSON—A happy-go-lucky Scandinavian ... a good one-hand driver . . . boyish looking and shy. JAMES O’DAY—Sure and yer right, it’s another son of Erin who possesses an everlasting smile. ROGER CHEEVER—“Squirt” . . . permanent fixture in hallwavs . . . where there’s women, there’s Chcevcr . . . makes up for lack of size by big heart. VERN WRIGHT—Football is bound to go over big with Vern to make River Falls look to its laurels . . . watch out for this shifty runner. WILLIAM CHARBONNEAU—Bill is one of our Don Juans who very carefully combines politics and women with startling results. PHILLIPS WHEALDON—"Wolf,” "Phil the Fox." "The Caveman from the Brule,” and many other aliases . . . notwithstanding, a likeable student. DICK O’DAY—Dick is the "gas and oil” man for the Fex fraternity. ELI NICHOLAS—The handsomest man in the fraternity ... a he-man popular with the women . . . ask him to show you the pictures in his room. HOWARD CHEEVER—Director of the winning Vodvil act ... a tireless student and a very likeable fellow. ART AVIS—A local boy who is destined to go a long ways in an athletic career. ROBERT PARISH—Shy and bashful . . . rates with the college’s best basketballers . . . a one-woman man. ALLAN HORTON—Combines highest scholastic records with a friendly personality . . . time for work and play . . . always a gentleman. EDDIE OLSON—A versatile blond—that's Eddie ... a first-class musician, athlete, scholar. JOE McCORKELL—An Irisher who is always full of vim, vigor, and-even after those long Duluth trips. FRANCIS DeVINCK—"Curly” . . . with a mop of kinky hair . . . accomplished actor, athlete, orator. SOCIAL CLUBS .. One hundred twenty Archainbault. Paulson, Thunc. Miller Nelson. White, Gradin. Gnlder. Johnson Smith, Noble, Jenson. Wickinan, Isabella, liuchanan Second Semester ....Robert Jenson ....Robert Gradin ....Phillip Paulson ...William Smith OFFICERS First Semester Arnold Hull Johnson......................President. Robert Gradin......................Vice President. Donald Golder............................Secretary. William Smith............................Treasurer. SOCIAL CALENDAR The fall season began with several stags given in honor of pledges. Formal initiation took place after the nine-week period. A fall dance was given during the football season, and another dance of informal nature was given in the spring. The annual Christmas Formal was well attended by alumni and actives; this was given at the Androy Hotel. The club participated in the Homecoming events and parade, and entered a dramatic skit in the competitive Vodvil. Entertainment for alumni and actives has been varied, and has completed a successful year for the club. ©UTTSMS ©lytKISSOne hundred twenty-one . . SOCIAL CLUBS lota Delta @hi NVYNN NOBLE—Eyebrow lifter. The girls say lie's cute. He does, too. A Superior product. Ambition still latent. DONALD COLDER—Five feet, eight inches. Fair complexion. No scars. Frequent subject of conversation. "BOB'" JENSEN—Golder's pal. Conscientious. Not Irish. Present lota president. Usually docile, hut sometimes unruly. JAMES BARRETT—End. Graceful basketball guard, and plenty good. Sophomore president. St. Cloud. Tall—but look at the pictures for the rest. "BOB” OR ADI N—A swell crooner, the ’32 Vodvil Bing Crosby. Billings Park. Neglects the women. "BILL" SMITH—The reason the Iotas rated highest scholastically among the fraternities. Very bashful. "GOODY” NELSON—King Bongo of Vodvil defamity. Tackle. Heap big story-teller. Soppy about Verna. DONALD WHITE—Commutes between his girl in Spooner and Superior. Track, miler. Secretly listens to harmonicas. HARVEY BUCHANAN—Just a big, strong he-man with his pants pressed. Hopes to be a doctor. Superior. "TONY" CRONIN—Superior. "There were always too many women in my life.” He has something. "ARNY” JOHNSON—lota president. Tall, blonde. Often seen with Helen Conrad, too often. Ardent W.C.T.U. worker. Superior. FRANCIS ARCHAMBAULT—Superior. Usually identified by a ready smile and a curl over the forehead. LEROY ISABELLA—Spooner. Much too loud-mouthed. He sure can make the prancin’ pebbles prattle profitably. GORDON WICKMAN—Unobtrusive. What we mean is quiet. Football. Kind face. Freshman. Ashland. JERRY THUNE—Fullback three years. Golder’s Vodvil dancing partner. Calls three pies a light lunch. Good-natured. Out-of-doorish. St. Paul. "PHIL" PAULSON—Local product. Blonde. Gentleman, student, and member of the Radiator Club. Junior. LOUIS CHRISTIANSON—Quarterback 30 and '31. Stocky. East End. In love spring or no spring. "BILL” McKINNON—Better known at Marquette U. Just look for a Buster Keaton countenance. East End. "OLE” HAUGEN—"Ay want to go home now.” Basketball center. A little fellow, six feet, five. You know him. Don’t be sil. JIMMY MUNRO—Tall and silent. Dark hair that sets on his head like a pancake. Smacks of the open spaces. ©O'u’tglXISSOCIAL CLUBS . . One hundred twenty-two Kniulit. Sandberg. Pllson. Peterson Meyer. Grantors. Canaday, Itriltan. I.omoc Clongli. II. Jotinson, l.edin, Ely. Kuld OFFICERS First Semester Francis Knight.........................President.............. George Peterson.....................Vice President............ Harris Johnson.........................Secretary.............. Emmett Johnson........................ Treasurer.............. Second Semester ..George Peterson .....Orville Raid Arthur Sandberg ....Gerald Cooke SOCIAL CALENDAR In honor of the returning members, the organization entertained at a stag. The Log Cabin of the Androy was the scene of the first pledge stag.’ Further entertainment of pledges took place at the home of William Foley, alumnus, and at the cottage of Herbert Dahl, at Middle River. Social meetings were held at homes of members throughout the year. During the fall and winter season, the fraternity sponsored two dances at the college gymnasium. Sev- eral "Hard Time" dances were given by alumni members for the actives. The annual Spring Banquet was held late in the year. Awards to members are made at this time. Several cottage parties given by alumni are a part of the soring season. The club entry in the Homecoming parade won first prize; the club also entered an act in the Vodvil which featured the club orchestra and dancing. One hundred twenty-three . . . SOCIAL CLUBS a Delia CL i GEORGE PETERSON—Executive type . . . president of fraternity . . . debate man- ager . . . debater . . . tennis player . . . well-dressed man from Balsam Lake . . . one year more. ORVILLE RUID—Claim to fame: attended Lawrence . . . came to Superior because of depression . . . finds night life fascinating .. . a sartorial ad for Pcptomist manager . . . "Rind," but nice ... A Loretta. Wis., Sophomore. WILLIAM REDMOND—Thinks he's a musician . . . only a drummer . . . scat singer unusual . . . blind dates a hobby . . . lives in Superior . . . good dancer . . . second year. CLARKE CROFT—Lancaster, Wisconsin, flash of gridiron fame . . . all-state halfback two years . . . not so tall, but all around athlete . . . good mixer . . . third year. DONOVAN CLOUGH—Freshie with wavy hair . . . proud possessor of cottage at Am-nicon . . . lives uptown . . . likes football . . . Vodvil female impersonator . . . blues singer. ORVILLE LOMOE—Itascan who commutes to college in decrepit Chevy . . . three years left for both to hold out . . . laughs at life and own jokes. ARNOLD I.EDIN—Calls Mason. Wis., home . . . spends time in Superior . . . constant affection . . . ad man Gitche and Peptomist . . . one time business manager Pep. f ... diploma due ’34. SIDNEY PILSON—Ex-Chicagoan . . . |H ssessor of blond locks women envy . . . pulchritude above par . . . treats women coldly after newness wears off . . chiseler, beware! FRANCIS KNIGHT—Spooner product . . . parks feet on editorial desks of Peptomist and Gitche . . . "pappy" to the boys . . . dry humor . . . atrocious cigars . . . strong pipes . . . regretfully graduates • CARL GRANFORS—Hails from Allouez . . . centers affections on Ogden Avenue lassie. . . . military man . . . banjoist . . . blond . . . another year to go. WAYNE BRITTAN—Fuller Brusher . . . Billings Parker . . . ’33 graduate . . . boxer . . . first semester Pep manager . . . good matured . . . appeals to both sexes. EMMETT JOHNSON—Quiet and reserved . . . improves upon acquaintance . . . known for cottage on Minnesota Point . . . Sees "her" in Duluth . . . second year. FRED CANADAY—Three-year football man . . . co-captain '32 . . . golf champ two years . . . sponsors good stags . . . dramatics: fraternity and Senior plays . . . Duluth . . . graduates. GERALD COOKE—Football center hashing way through college . . . found at Coffee Shop . . . waited until second year for heart attraction . . . good mixer from Spooner. NEIL BINKLEY—Another fellow getting checks from Spooner . . . big . . . footballer. . . . works at Coffee Shop . . . Park Falls Miss wears his gold football . . . second year. HARRIS JOHNSON—Of Cab Calloway fame . . . blond . . . "Dual" personality . . . Gitche photographer . . . enthusiastic . . . friendly . . . usually smiling ... A Spooncrite with two more years. ARTHUR SANDBERG—Ye Gitche editor . . . witty . . . friendly . . . educated in Superior. Seattle . . . Vodvil eccentric dancer . . . intellectual but interesting . . . extensive traveler . . . original . . . all around man . . . graduates. PLEDGE LIST Harold Meyer. Phillips. Wis. Roland Ely, Superior, Wis. • John Almstedt. Superior. Wis. Edwin Giese. Spooner. Wis. SOCIAL CLUBS . . One hundred twenty-four Thompson, Wright, Carey. Vllz, Teskc, Wldncss Prior, Swiatck, Boehntc, Vorous, I. Anderson. R. Johnson W. Nelson, F. Johnson, K. Nelson, Christenson, Larson, liultner R. Erickson. W. Erickson, Jones, Van Cleve, Shepard. Sexton First Semester Fred Boehme......... Russell Jones....... Walford Erickson ) Lloyd ChristcMison | Norman Thompson... Frank Johnson....... Harold Benton....... Vaughn Vorous. Donald Prior I Paul Bell i OFFICERS ...President... Vice President... ....Secretary... ...Treasurer.... ...Chaplain..... Sergeant-at-arms. Social Chairman. ...Athletics.... Second Semester .......Donald Prior ....Walford Erickson f Lyle Van Cleve .Norman Thompson .....Frank Johnson ....Kenneth Nelson ..... Frank Shepard I Maynard Hopkins SOCIAL CALENDAR A series of smokers began the social program for the year. The Tri-College Conference, including representatives from Northland and River Falls, was held in Superior. Entertainment and a banquet were provided by the local club. The Father and Son Banquet was a successful event of the program. Representatives were sent to the Min- neapolis Y Conference. The annual Lilac Time dance was given again. Several camping trips and toboggan parties were events of the winter season. Late in the spring, a cabin party was held. An act featuring the Indian motif was entered in the Vodvil, and an entry was made in the Homecoming parade. One hundred twenty-five . . . SOCIAL CLUBS Y. M. C. A. RUSSELL JONES—Whose accomplishments make a long list . . . drives from Poplar . . . managing type . . . conniving politician . . . studious . . . gets a B.E. degree. HERMIT KNU rSON—Identified by a sweater with a “W” . . . which means Webster, Wisconsin . . . works at the "Y” ... a modest Freshman. RUSSELL MILLS—Bashful . . . good looking ... a plugger and a student . . . came to us last fall. KENNETH NELSON—"Biff" ... a baseball pitcher . . . East Endcr . . . efficient ser-geant-at-arms . . . second year. DONALD PRIOR—A husky chap . . . president of group . . . "D.H." . . . old timer . . . stock of stories . . . Boy Scout worker . . . possessor of a drawl. FRANK SEXTON—An excellent photographer . . . literary bent . . . very much “that way” . . . owner of a bear cub. FRANK SHEPARD—A lad with limber feet . . . dogger . . . lives in East End beyond the tracks . . . always receptive to cabin party suggestions. JOHN SWIATEK—Comes from cosmopolitan Allouez . . . speaks German. French, Polish. Spanish, Czech, and even English . . . social science honorary . . . graduating. TONY TESKE—Mature looking . . . second year . . . Billings Park claims him . . . goes in for basketball . . . found doing chemistry most of the time. NORMAN THOMPSON—Elongated East Endcr . . . "Paderewski” . . . financial wizard . . . treasurer for three years . . . specialty: story telling and acting. A Junior. LYLE VAN CLEVE—Basso pro fun do . . . cheer leader ... a little man who likes conferences . . . especially at Kau Claire. VAUGHN VOROUS—Deserted S.T.C. for Bayfield . . . tenor in Glee Club . . . "Send us a berrv box." RONALD WlDNESS—Expert marksman of Rifle club . . . Pcptomist headline: "Widness shoots high score” ... so constant Peptomist can use the same headline each week . . . tennis player. RUSSELL WILLEY —Belongs to the East End trio . . . second year student. CLIFFORD ANDERSON—A Sophomore . . . always in a rush . . . drives a Chevy . . . shv and studious. IRVING ANDERSON—Blond and romantic . . . first year . . . charming singer of “Pale Moon” ... off to a good start. PAUL BELL—Labeled Ruhinoff . . . dispenser of sage advice . . . orchestra ... a tenor . . . travels . . . second year. HAROLD BENTON—From U. of Minnesota . . . most eligible bachelor . . . foreman for Whitney Brothers . . . pal to German students . . . member Double Quartette. FRED BOEHME—Moody. aspiring artist . . . works at Haney’s . . . sermonish, deep voice ... a leader in the group. LLOYD CHRISTENSON—Known as "Chris" ... a Billings Parker . . . graduates . . . band and orchestra will miss him. ART EDELSTEIN—Genial gentleman . . . affects a moustache . . . enjoys social events. RALPH ERICKSON—A Poplar Romeo . . . labeled a musician . . . found at the Androy. ... a Freshman with a liking for German. WALFORD ERICKSON—Pianist superb and budding organist . . . accompanies Scoutmasters' Quartette . . . super-salesman . . . Sophomore. RAY HULTER—Suspected of musical talent because he carries a violin case . . . always busv in the Chem. lab . . . singer . . . Irv’s pal . . . Freshie. AtAYNARD HOPKINS-An athletic man from East End . . . football, basketball . . . drives an Auburn . . . husky ... a second year man. FRANK JOHNSON—Dignity personified . . . the Chief of the Vodvil . . . brainy but not conceited ... a student of medicine . . . completes one year. MARSHALL JOHNSON—Picks his women from South End ... a freshman . . . somewhat of a student . . . imitates Swede Indians. RUSSELL JOHNSON—An Iron Riverite ... a trumpeter of the college band . . . tall . . . pleasant . . . Gets his diploma. CHARLES LARSON—An authority on everything Swedish . . . music, literature, and jokes . . . versatile musician . . . banjo, Jew’s harp, accordion . . . tom-tom . . . from Shell Lake and preparing for a doctor. WARREN NELSON—From Comstock . . . hard worker . . . quiet and moody . . . sleeps in classes . . . Senior and science major. FRANK HUDSON—A post-graduate part time teacher at Webster Tech . . . oratorical . . . literary . . . humorous. SOCIAL CLUBS . . One hundred twenty-six Erickson, Harris. Dahl, Rollefson. Durfee, C. I.arson. l.cdln Harr. Regllngcr, Singer. Conroy. Wick man. Hntzfictd. Finn Salay. Sautcr. Wallcndcr, Elmslio. Lindquist. Iloglund. Lcchy A. Larson, Swiatek, Krause, Stebbins. Koski, Widness. Huclianan Laura ............. Horace Stand field........... Louise Krause................ Gordon Wickman .............. OFFICERS .................................... President ................................ Vice President ..................................... Treasurer SOCIAL CALENDAR The Club was organized for the promoting of interest in the German language and literature. Social events are of typical German character, featuring menus of Teutonic variety. A toboggan party was given during the year at Billings Park. The club sponsors a German play given each year in the assembly for the students. The club serves successfully in providing a common interest for a’ large group of students. ©lyrasaOne hundred twenty-seven . . SOCIAL CLUBS German GORDON WICKMAN—Honest Gordon from Ashland; he keeps our money intact. BILL HARRIS—Traveled and sophisticated; the hero of the German play. KENNETH WALLENDER—Otir tall vice president; the standby of all occasions. PEARL DAHL—She hands out the German books to would-be Deutschen. VIOLET LEEHY—She does love to sit in the front row! MILDRED HOTZFIELD—Our post-graduate member; long may she wave! RALPH ERICKSON—Dependable Ralph; we couldn’t get along without him. EDNA STEBBINS—Happy Edna; and we’re happy, too, to have her. LAURA BEGLINGER—Our kleine Praesidentin; page Georgie Price! LOUISE KRAUSE -She and Ben are almost charter members of the German club. FLORENCE HAGLUND—The smallest bundle of biggest smiles. CLARENCE LINDQUIST—Let’s have him debate auf deutsch. ARNOLD LEDIN—Does he take German because Mildred does? LAILA KOSKI—Our "maid,” our musician. FLORENCE ELMSI.IE—A charter member and a valuable one. NANCY CONROY-Sweet little Nancy! MIKE BARR—The Gitche stands as a monument to his business sagacity. ALBIN E. LARSON—The future Dr. Larson from Bayfield; der Herr Doktor. LEO SINGER—Is it Leo or Ed? HARVEY BUCHANAN—Er ist immer froehlich. MILTON FINN—The champion "A ’-gcttcr EILEEN DURFEE—Sweet Eileen, why didn't we know you before? LEI.A ROLLEFSON—Ein nettes Maedchen, unsere Lela. CHARLES LARSON—From Bayfield. Shell Lake, and points west. RONALD WIDNESS—Tall, looks serious, hut oh. lie’s full of fun! LILY SALAY—Unlike the lilies of the field, she works and spins. JOHN SWIATEK—Edit deutsch; an outstanding charter member. LORRAINE SAUTER—Die deutsche Musikanerin. f mm as. r c -c r oJ V o ™c -V- 1 w W lJ-K- ,0 ■ xfi +' i ' Z v i,t w ©utsixis ©lyrasd Loren McQueen is a graduate of the class j of 1912. While in college, he was a basketball and football star. After com' pleting his course, he taught at Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. Later, he enrolled in the University of Wisconsin School of Agricuh ture. Upon graduation, he worked for a pulp paper company in Indiana until the Good' rich Tire and Rubber Company secured his services as efficiency expert. He made a success of the work by eliminating many time-consuming movements. As a guide for the office department, he compiled Better Letter Writing. After thirteen years with this company, he became manager of Sales and Credits, General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio.rOOTBALL . . One hundred thirty-four Coacli Whereatt From one of the most feared ends to ever play under the Orange and Black banner to one of the most feared coaches in the Wisconsin Conference is the enviable record of Coach Ted Whereatt. He began his college career at Superior Normal in 1920. after four brilliant years at Superior Central where he teamed with such stars as Ernie Nevers. John Hancock. Paul "Putty" Nelson, and Scott Mclntire. During his three years here he starred in football, basketball, and track, being captain in football and basketball. Upon graduation he accepted a position as teacher and coach at Mellen, Wisconsin, where he remained until his appointment to the college faculty. His first year was marked with unusual success on the gridiron. his teams losing only two football games. The 1931 Yel-lowjacket team was rated the greatest in the history of the school. In his second year of college coaching. Coach Whereatt had guided a green team to the state championship through a season which boasted only of victory. Although this year's team did not enjoy the success of the 1931 eleven, it ended a glorious season tied for second place in the conference standings. Ted cannot only be complimented as a successful coach, but as a model to athletes, who some day aspire to be teachers and coaches. Only through hard work and clean living has Ted achieved his present position, and that is his aim in coaching. Captain Canatlay Captain Crnti Captain Erbcck ©inrcSMS @iOne hundred thirty-five . . FOOTBALL The Scjuod Sixty aspiring gridders representing fourteen high schools in Wisconsin. Minnesota, and Michigan answered Coach Whereatt's call for football candidates the first day of school. Although all were not able to play, much credit is given to Dr. Walp's “Daffy-dills' for building up the varsity. Many of these boys had never participated in football before, but. if they continue in the same unselfish attitude on future squads, they will become the valuable material that Coach Whereat! will depend on next fall and in following years. C«pi«in Thune Capuin B»ritli ARTHUR AVIS Superior, Wis FULLBACK NEIL BINKLEY Spooner,Wis. END The Football Season When the Orange and Black warriors succeeded in turning back the strong Milwaukee team in the Homecoming contest, they proved that Superior was still in the upper bracket of the Wisconsin conference. This game, which brought the season to a close, was the eighth in a series of gruelling games. The Yellowjackets had some gaps of strategic importance to fill at the opening of the season. The powerful undefeated eleven of the previous year had suffered through graduation and other losses. Coach Whereatt, Line—Coach Ferm, and Backficld—Coach Walp had to shift and balance a team from a squad of eleven letter men and some promising material for an early season game with the Marquette Teachers. Lacking an experienced line. Coach Whereatt concentrated on a clever running attack. The Yellowjackets met his call for strategy with eight games replete with drive and skill. The Orange and Black grid-ders, hard-pressed several times, displayed inherent ability. courage, and the results of good coaching. Their blocking, line-smashing, and shifty style of play made them one of the most feared teams in the conference. Under the skillful tutelage of Coaches Whereat! and Ferm, the Orange and Black warriors tasted the nectar of victory six times; they also tasted the dregs of defeat twice, but met defeat like champions, throwing forth a defense that was hard to penetrate. After leading the conference for half of the season, the Steecec machine lost by a one point margin a hard-fought battle with a determined River Falls team; this loss cost the Orange and Black the championship.The Steecees took a flying start to win over the reputably better Marquette Teachers team 19 to 0 in the season opener. Doped to win the game, Marquette was outclassed by a brilliant exhibition of running and defense. Superior uncovered a new double shift in this game which helped them to out-trick the heavier Michigan team. The second non-conference game with the high-stepping Carleton College gridsters was marked by the worst defeat in three years for the Yellowjackets. Primed for the West Point trip the following week, the Carls unleashed an attack of passing, sweeping end runs, and line bucking that completely bewildered the Orange and Black. Although Superior countered doggedly to the Carl attack, the Minnesotans were too much for the smaller Steecees, and the final score was 27 to 0. Captain Nordly of Carleton was the outstanding performer on the field. The next week, Coach Whereatt’s machine met a fast, hard-hitting Aberdeen Teachers team. Smarting from the lop-sided defeat of the previous week, the Steecees measured blow for blow with the heavier South Dakota team from the very outset. With but 17 seconds of the first half remaining, Harris scored a 30-yard pass from Thune. The extra point was added, giving the Superior team a 7 to 0 edge over the visitors which lasted throughout the rest of the tilt. The game was marked by the clean, hard playing of both teams—only 25 yards in penalties being imposed on both teams during the contest, and these in the final quarter. JOHN HAUGEN Superior, Wis. END GERALD COOKE Spoone r, Wis. CENTER DONALD EDBURG Superior, Wis. TACKLE GERALD HARRIS Superior, Wis. HALFBACKHENRY HULTER Superior, Wis. GUARD LOUIS JOHNSON Superior, Wis. GUARD HAROLD MEYER Phillips, Wis. halfback SAM KIELLEY Superior, Wis. END The Orange and Black worked as a unit, while Lc-Innd, hard-plunging fullback for Aberdeen, was the outstanding player for the visitors. Superior opened its drive to repeat the State championship by making Stout its first conference victim with a score of 27 to 6. Displaying gaudy new blue and white uniforms, the huge Stoutoni-ans appeared likely winners over their smaller opponents. This impression was shortlived; the faster Yellowjack-ets dazzled their opponents with a well balanced running attack. Unable to gain through the alert defense of the Superiorites, Stout filled the air with passes, but only one was effective in scoring, coming late in the fourth quarter. The seconds played through the greater part of the last half, and battled the Stout crew on more than even terms. Then came the battle of battles on River Falls’ Homecoming day—Superior's fierce fight with River Falls, which the Falcons won 7 to f . An unsuccessful rally in the second half to overcome the Falcon’s one point lead will go down in Superior’s football history as one of the hardest fought and grittiest comeback attempts ever made by an Orange and Black aggrega-gation on foreign turf. With Jerry Thune removed from the game because of a knee injury, and other backs incapacitated because of injuries, a stout-hearted Steecee team out-ran, out-tackled, and out-blocked Falcon gridders, only to lose the game which would have meant a second consecutive state championship for Superior. In the third period, Wright squirmed, twisted, and dodged his way 40 yards to a» touchdown, only to be called back because of an off-side by one of his team-mates. Superior pained 253 yards to 112 for River Falls, and the Yellowjackets piled up 18 first downs to the Falcon's f , but, the game is still measured in touchdowns and points. The next week, Superior romped to a 20 to 6 victory over the Fan Claire Teachers at Eau Claire. Coach Where-att left the first string in Ioiir enough to pile up a margin and then injected his second team to relieve the bruised regulars, not yet fully recovered from the hectic battle of the previous week. The high light of the contest was a f 0-yard run for a touchdown by Jerry Cooke, center, who intercepted a Blue and Gold pass. The Duluth Peds journeyed across the bay the following week to play a crippled Stee-cee team. Five regulars, Gerald Harris. Vern Wright, Jerry Thune, Neil Binkley, and Cleve Waite, were unable to compete because of injuries sustained in practice and in previous games. The Yellow-jackets displayed a thorough knowledge of fundamentals and used it to advantage in scoring a 20 to 0 victory over Duluth. Croft's 50-yard run for a touchdown, made possible by a perfect block near the goal-line by Jim Barrett, was one of the best of the season. Homecoming—to climax its 1032 play, Superior met Milwaukee on Armistice day in its first afternoon home game, and defeated the Brewers 19 to 13. It was a nip and tuck game between the two best offensive teams in the Wisconsin conference, and one of the best games ever played on a Superior gridiron. Milwaukee scored its first touch- ELI NICKOLAS Ironwood, Mich. GUARD EDWIN OLSON Superior, Wis. QUARTERBACKFOOTBALL . . One hundred forty Assistant down ns the result of a fumble by Wright on the initial kickoff. As if endowed with super-strength and power, the Yel-lowjaokets immediately retaliated after a series of bewildering end runs and line smashes. As the teams left the field for the first half, the score was f to fi. Avis scored Superior’s second touchdown on a spinner play through the line from the one-yard line. The kick by Croft was good. The Brewers evened the score in the fourth quarter, but Croft’s second touchdown of the day tucked the game safely away for the Yellowjackets. This game was the last for the five co-captains and was a fitting tribute to their good sportsmanship and clean, hard play for the past three seasons under the Orange and Black banner. At the close of the season. Vern Wright, halfback was elected captain of the 1933 squad. The co-captain policy was abandoned by a vote of the letter winners who will be back for the 1933 season. Croft was chosen as halfback on the All-State team from a poll of the conference coaches. Four Steecee warriors were placed on the second All-Conference team. These were Jim Barrett, end: Art Avis, quarterback: Harry Erbeck. guard; and Harrie Zele .nick. tackle. The Season's Seores Superior Superior 19 0 Marquette Carlcton 0 27 Superior 7 Aberdeen 0 Superior 27 Stout 6 Superior 0 River Falls 7 Superior 20 Fan Claire 0 2f Duluth () Superior 19 Milwaukee 13 The success of the Yellowjackets in the past two seasons has been due largely to the well-coached lines that they have been able to place on the field. No small amount of credit is due to Line-Coach Quentin Perm, who worked with untiring patience to build up a strong forward wall. Perm, an alumnus of the school, was an All-State guard for two years. Manager Steve Yellish, although he could not take his place with the team on the field, was as instrumental in each win as the men on the team. He was always ready with an encouraging word for the disheartened when things looked darkest, and an admonishing word for the overconfident. He will he missed by all who are back for next year’s team. Sieve Ycllisll. l-oiilh.ill .M;m;iger SOT (§50IINEIL BINKLEY CENTER The Basketball Season JAMES BARRETT GUARD i ARTHUR AVIS GUARD LEROY BORG F OR WARD Although Superior did not end its basketball season among the lenders of the Wisconsin Teachers conference, an inexperienced Yellowjacket team finished the year with a display of power that placed it above the lesser teams of the league, and showed potentialities of a strong 1033-34 quintet. Shaped around Co-Captains Barrett and Borg, Coach Whereatt placed a quintet on the floor which was always a threat, although not always a winner. The Yellowjnckets won over some of the better teams, only to lose to weaker teams. In floor play the Peds were incomparable in the Conference, and the defense was usually close, but the inability to ring the bell via the basket route cost the Steecees many games to otherwise inferior teams. Whatever the Yellowjackets accomplished was due to the unswerving faith and guidance of Coach Ted Whereatt; and next year, with all but James Barrett and LeRoy Borg back in the fold, the wiley mentor should produce a championship team. Superior’s eighteen - game schedule began with an exhibition game between a group of S.T.C. satellites of yesteryears and the l932-’33 proteges of Coach Ted Whereatt. Led by Jim Barrett and Andy Borg, the Yellowjackets displayed potential strength in every department of play to win over the highly-touted alumni by a score of 31 to 22. Coach Whereatt used all of his men in experimenting for the best combination, and to all observers, the team appeared to be headed for a successful season. The Duluth Teachers five journeyed across the bay in the next week. After trailing 21 to II at the end of the EUGENE COLLINS FORWARDn ■ OLAF' HAUGEN CENTER FRANCIS DE V1NCK FORWARD j "iVEKW HARRIE ZILEZNICK guard WILLIAM O'ROURKE FORWARD third period, they extended the local Peds in a last quarter rally, that fell three points short of victory for the visitors. The game ended 26-23. Enrico for Duluth a n d O’Rourke for Superior were the outstanding performers on the court during the evening. During the Christmas holidays, Coach Whereatt's bas-keteers met two crack teams: Hamline, the defending champions of the Minnesota conference, and the University of North Dakota led by the massive Ted Meinhover. Hamline eked out a two-point margin in the overtime period to defeat the locals 26 to 24. In the next game, with Meinhover (6 ft. 7 in.) being efficiently taken care of by our local pachyderm, Ole Haugen (6 ft. 6 in.), the Nodaks were held to a final score of 28 to 27. This was truly one of the most spectacular games ever witnessed on the local court. The Yellowjackets opened their conference play against a fast, high-stepping La Crosse team. Although the Peds led the defending conference champions 22 to 18 at the half, failure to connect with the hoop in the final canto cost Superior its chance for victory. Bill O’Rourke and Gene Collins were unable to compete in this game because of transference from another school to Superior at the beginning of the semester. Martin Even made his initial appearance as a Yel-lowjacket in this contest, and was easily the outstanding performer on the floor before he had been in the game many minutes. The final score score was 38 to 27 in favor of the downstaters. Failure to connect with their barrage of long range shots prevented the Marque 11 c MARTIN EV GUARDOne hundred forty-three Coach Whcrcall BASKETBALL Teachers from scoring a win over the Ycllowjackcts the following week. With Collins and O'Rourke at their regular oosts. the Peds were in danger at no time during the contest, easily winning the came 32 to 10. On the next week-end Coach Whereatt took his team for a brace of games in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Marquette avenged the loss of the previous week by turning back the Superiorites 28 to 27. Unable to penetrate the tight defense of the Ycllowjackcts, the Northern State lads resorted to long shots, which overcome a Superior lead of two points at the half and gave them victory. On the following night, Superior made a gentle slaughter of Michigan Tech, 20 to 15. The Yellow-jackets were never pressed through the contest. In a slump that had characterized their practice through the week, the Peds suffered a 39 to 31 defeat by Eau Claire in their second conference game. Superior seemed bewildered at the fast breaking offense of the Zornmcn. and were unable to ward off the attack of the Eau Claire Peds. Borg was the high point man for Superior, garnering ten points. Nelson of Eau Claire was the main cog in their success of the evening. Clicking once more. Superior won a one-sided victory over Michigan Tech in their second encounter, -II to 21. Both teams displayed good offensive form, hut the Ycllowjackcts' superior defense forced @ [JIT (SMS the Houghton warriors to long range shots. Journeying to River Falls, Superior lost its third conference game to the Falcons. Marksmanship from the free throw line gave the Falcons a one-point victory, 31 to 30. The game was nip-nud-tuck throughout, but the inability of Superior to make its free throws cost the Orange and Black the game. In the Duluth gym, the Ycllowjackcts ran amuck over Duluth, scoring a 42 to 25 victory. The Peds' superiority over the Teachers in every department of the game was evident from the start. Such a dazzling offense and tight defense had not been used by Superior thus far in the season. After the brilliant displav at Duluth the Ycllowjackcts suffered a set-back the following week. 19 to 16, at the hands of Stout. The excellent form that had featured the Duluth game, was missing. In the next game at La Crosse, the Yel-lowjackcts rose to defeat the Maroons 28 to 23. This was the first loss for the defending champions, and toppled them from first place. Completely controlling the ball, Superior presented an offense that dazzled l.a Crosse. La Crosse was unable to penetrate effectively the tight Orange and Black defense, and were forced to their long range guns. On the same trip. Coach Whercatt's cagers revenged an early season defeat by Eau Claire by decisively drubbing them 38 to 22. By using an excellent defense coupled aBASKETBALL . . One hundred forty-four Fred Ponlccchlo. Ila-kciloll Manager with an inspired offense, the Peds had little difficulty in attaining their second conference win. After missing twenty-four shots during the evening. Collins swished the ball through the net ns the gun ended the pame, to set Superior ahead by one point in a nip-and-tuck battle with St. Mary’s. It was another "off" game and the Peds missed seventy-one out of seventy-seven tries at the basket. The game throughout was close, with the Winona quintet leading by one point until thirty seconds before the end of the game. Collins’ shot was the high-light of the season, and gave Superior a 16-15 victory over the Redmen. Revenge is sweet, but nothing was ever sweeter than the 33 to 21 victory the Peds scored over their ancient rivals. River Falls, in their second meeting. Displaying a passing attack which was the best ever witnessed in the Tubbs gymnasium, and an air-tight defense, the Yellowjack-ets stung their opponents into a decisive submission. Captain Jim Barrett played the best game of his college career, and. passers that completely bewildered with Collins and O'Rourke, formed a triumvirate of the Falcons. Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Superior Tke Season s Score ' • Duluth Hamline or 'tR Marquette 11 'to 41 91 Kau Claire St. Mary's River Falls -.30 Stout 34 ©o'Tsixia ©(yiwssOne hundred forty-five . . BASKETBALL In their last game, the Feds lost by a four-point decision to the Stoutonians in their famed "cracker-box” gym. After what seemed a victory for the Yellowjackets, Stout forged ahead in the waning minutes to win 34 to 30. Ten letters were awarded by the athletic committee at the end of the season. Co-Captains Borg and Barrett, and Captain-elect Collins, were the veterans to receive letters. Those who were awarded letters and sweaters for the first time were William O'Rourke, Francis DeVinck. Olaf Haugen. Neil Binkley, Art Avis, Martin Even, and Harrie Zeleznick. Fred Fonteethio was awarded a manager’s letter and sweater. CL eer Leaders Our three cheerleaders, Theodore Soloski, Ethern Van Armen, and Lyle Van Cleve, needed no introduction to Head of the Lakes sporting fans when they took charge of the Hep Department of Superior State Teachers College. All had been popular young cheerleaders at Superior Central before their college days, where they ruled over the pep activities for three years. Last fall the Athletic Board elected the three pepsters as the college cheer lenders, and awarded them orange jackets with the college emblem, an "S" with a megaphone on it. Because the students were hard to assemble in a mass at the games, veil-leading was made difficult, but these two cheer kings and their queen did a commendable piece of work. However, the response they were able to "raise" from the student body at the pep assemblies even excelled the expectation of the most pepless. These three will be back next year, and much is expected from them. Van Clevc. Van Armen. Soloski One hundred forty-seven MEN’S ATHLETICS Tennis The Annual Tennis Tournament of the Superior State Teachers College was won in 1932 by Thomas McGill. By virtue of his win in the final round McGill was presented with the silver Tennis Trophy offered each year to the winner by the school. The runners-up, Harry Baker, James Nemacheck, George Peterson, and John Behrinbrinker, were awarded gold medals for their achievement. This sport has become firmly established as one of the most popular of spring sports, and each year finds an increasing number of participants. This year thirty-two aspirants reported for the initial drawing. As the State Tennis Tournament at Stevens Point Teachers College drew near, a tennis team of the four runners-up (McGill was unable to go to represent the school), was organized for the meet. The Ped representatives were eliminated in the first and second rounds of play. A Tennis Tourney was also held during the Summer Session and Ronald Widness, an S.T.C. student, emerged victorious over his competitors. A gold medal was his reward. Golf By winning over more than a score of competitors, Frank Malnati, a sophomore in the college, was crowned the 1933 golf champion of the Superior State Teachers College. Frank is a Duluthian and learned his golf on the Enger Park course. He has been prominent in the Head of the Lakes tournament play in the past few years, and has always been a close competitor for high honors. The Athletic Board awarded him a costly bronze statuette as a trophy. After the tourney a golf team was formed. On it was Frank Malnati, the 1932 winner, Fred Canaday, the 1930 and 1931 winner, who was barred from competition in 1932, Goodwin Nelson, runner-up to Malnati, and Roger Thompson, who was third in the tournament. This team met local teams but did not take to the road because of a shortage of funds. This sport is becoming more popular with the male students every year, and each year finds a larger number of competitors striving to win the coveted trophy. Last year a law was passed forbidding the previous winners from entering future contests. They would, however, be automatically awarded a place on the school golf team providing that they were in good standing in the college. out® sun ©tyrass The coaching school of the summer session of 1932, with Howard Jones of Southern California, Dave McMillan of Minnesota, and a gang of coaches garnered from all parts of the country. □ Gordon Harmon, Northwest Golden Gloves Champion, shows what it takes to he a ring-leader, it took a national champ and a “nice” referee to put him out of the finals at Chicago. The college takes off its hat to Gordy and says “Better luck next time, old man.” □ Poppa Walp, showing how he looked to the admiring co-eds at the University of Virginia. What a man! What poise! What stamina! □ Champs and trophies. Malnati for golf. Thune for the pentathlon, and McGill for tennis. Good work, fellows, you earned what you got. □ Loop, a big Hoosier, in his scintillating football days at his Alma Mater. Indiana. □ A big crowd watches Superior perform under the arc lights. They, as well as the boys, go into a huddle on these chilly nights.One hundred forty-nine . . . MEN'S ATHLETICS All Nation s The Hebrews, for the second time in three years of tournament play, succeeded in retaining the All Nations’ championship by defeating the English in the final round 22 to 15. The Jewish quintet established an early lead over their rivals and was never once threatened during the contest. Mike Barr, diminutive Hebrew forward, was the high scorer of the fracas with a total of nine points to his credit. The personnel of the champions was Captain Harrie Zeleznick. Edward Singer, Leo Singer. Mike Barr, Martin Even. Joe Goldfinc, Merton Singer. Arthur Edclstciu. and Peter Fergal. In the opening tilts of tournament play the Swedes defeated the Germans 25 to 18. and the Italians were smothered under 25 to 9 by the Jewish lads. The English quintet eked out a 19 to 17 win over the Sons of Erin, and in an exciting overtime contest the Norwegians were victorious over the Finns. In the semi-finals the English defeated the Swedes, while the Hebrews disposed of the Norwegians in easy fashion. As a preliminary to the championship game the Irish defeated the Swedes 28 to 12. P entalUon The third All-College Pentathlon, sponsored each year by the Evening Telegram, replaced the annual college track schedule in the spring of 1932. A group of sixty-two men. inspired by the costly silver statuette trophy, turned out for the event and after a few days of limbering-up exercises were ready to begin the events. Jerry Tlume. a three letter man in football and co-captain of the 1932 football team, led the field with a score of 4858.08 points at the end of the trials to win the coveted trophy. Merton Singer followed closely behind Thune with 4748.48 points. The next five in order of points scored were: Clarke Croft. 4712.45 points; Michael Foley, 4570.04 points; Donald McConvillc, 4504.13 points; Chester Pepper, 4525.73 points; and Harry Erbeck, 4415.73 points. The events in the Pentathlon are the Broad Jump, the Shot Put. the Javelin Throw, the 100-Yard Dash, and the 275-Yard Run. This equitable selection of track and field events gave the field performers and cinder-path men alike fair competition. The basis of scoring was as follows: 100-vard dash—II seconds, scored 1000 points. 275-yard run—23 seconds, scored 1000 points. Javelin—132 feet, scored 1000 points. Shot Put—34 feet, scored 1000 points. Broad Jump—19 feet, scored 1000 points. Every male student in the college is eligible for competition in this annual event, except the previous first-place winners. Each year finds the Pentathlon increasing in popularity among the male athletes and becoming more established as the major spring sport of the college. Previous winners of the Telegram Trophy were Joseph Lcsczynski and John Mestnick, both of whom were letter winners in the three major sports. One hundred fifty-three . . WOMEN’S ATHLETICS Basketball An enthusiastic response to the call for basketball material from the women of the college showed that this game was as popular with the girls as with the boys. Participants from every department entered into the competition. Practices were held three days a week under the management of Edna Stcbbins and supervision of Miss Davies. After several practice games, devoted to general technique and fundamentals, department teams were selected. A round-robin series was in progress when the Gitche went to press so the final results were not known. Several games for late spring have been scheduled with the Central High school team and the college varsity. Those on the varsity team were: Pearl I.. Dahl (f.). Nettie Campbell (f.), Lily Salay (f ). Florence Anderson f.). Evelyn Moyle (g.). Myrtle Harmon (g.)t Elsie May Chase (g.). Ehba Aho (g.), and Edna Stebbins (g.). Volleyball Sixty girls answered the call for volleyball candidates this year. With Elsie May Chase as manager, practices were held after school every Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday for a period of six weeks. The following girls, after a series of elimination tilts, were chosen for the first squad: Lily Salay. Elsie Mav Chase. Evelyn Moyle, Ruby Halverson. Dorothy Maki, Pearl L. Dahl, and Valborg Thompson. Substitute's were Rosa Marie Infclise and Edna Stebbins. Because no other school in the immediate vicinity has instituted volleyball as part of the girls' athletic program, only intra-department games were played. The High School Training group was the lirst place winner this year. The Grammar-Junior High team was second. I ield Hockey Field Hockey was introduced by Miss Davies last year, and it has not yet reached the wide-spread popularity among the girl athletes that’the other sports have. However, a satisfactory turn-out was the result of a call for hockey fans made by manager Edna Stebbins. A complicated and strenuous game, hockey was nevertheless enjoyed by all who participated in spite of bruised ankles and skinned shins. Practices were held three times a week under the directions of Miss Davies. h I Individual Sports RIFLE CLUB The Rifle Club began its practices early in February under the direction of Oscar Mullvaiu and practiced every Wednesday after school for the remaining part of the year. Non-members were allowed to compete in the "shoots" this year. Toward the end of the season the co-eds showed remarkable skill and unbelieveable improvement. The high scorers were: Edna Stebbins. Valborg Thompson, Evelyn Moyle, Bertha Wyman. Mablc Birkholz. Elsie May Chase, and Irene Sandberg. TENNIS Without a doubt, this is the most popular individual sport in the W.A.A. curriculum. During the winter months the girls kept in trim by playing in the small gymnasium. Last spring, under the direction of Dorothea Buros. a tennis tourney was held. Sixteen girls entered, and at the end of the competition Virginia Whitmore was declared the winner. She received a trophy, a small gold tennis ball, as a reward for the achievement from the Women's Athletic Association. Another similar tournament is being held this year. SKATING Plenty of ice made possible by continued cold weather provided ample opportunity for outdoor skating this winter. The various city rinks were well patronized by the fairer sex of the college, ns was determined by the score cards handed in at the W.A.A. office. Delores Pederson and Ruby Halverson are the two outstanding skaters in the organization. WOMEN’S ATHLETICS . . One hundred fifly-foui Cleveland. Wile . Zygmunt. Thompson Hoard. Schultz. Keeler. Su-bbins, Giudtei Sal.iy. Dahl. Rich. Ch.isv. Cohen W. A. A. Lily Salay ..... Dorothea Buros Ethel Wiles..... Louise Keeler ... Elsie May Chase Edna Stebbins ... Miss Davies..... OFFICERS .......................................President ..................................Vice President .......................................Secretary .......................................Treasurer .............................Volleyball Manager ............................ Basketball Manager ........................................ Advisor W. A. A. SONG (Tune: “Peggy O’Neil”) If she hikes and swims, my dear. She's a W.A.A. And plays tennis all the year She’s a W.A.A. If she plays baseball with vigor and vim. Goes into the game just fighting to win; If she unlocks her locker and goes out for soccer Oh. she’s a W.A.A. ©tyraaa IOne hundred fifty-five . . WOMEN’S ATHLETICS W. A. A. Edna Askov Tennis. Basketball Superior, Wis. Elsie May Chase Superior, Wis. Baseball Volleyball Superior, Wis. Basketball Volleyball Skating Volleyball Basketball, Baseball Volleyball Basketball Delores Pederson Carmen Rich Volleyball Lily Salav Volleyball Edna Stebbins Valborg Thompson Basketball Ethel Wiles Valentine Zygmunt Helene Cleary WOMEN’S ATHLETICS . . Co-Ed Pr One hundred fifty-six rom The Eighth Annual Co-ed Prom of the Superior State Teachers College was held in the college gymnasium on the evening of Friday, October 21. under the sponsorship of the W.A.A. Edna Stchhins was general chairman. The dancing started at nine o'clock and ended at eleven-thirty. Dimmed lights and novel decorations added much to the inale-less promenade atmosphere created by tuxedos and evening gowns. “King" Ethel (Bobby) Wiles led the grand march with Miss Phyllis Snell as "his” guest. The W.A.A. President. "Mr." Lily Salay, was next in line and escorted Miss Florence Haglund. Following in the line of the Grand March were "Mr." Dorothea Btiros and Miss Clarice McDermott. "Mr." Edna Stebbins and Miss Caroline Matsch. and "Mr.” Jeanne Walmslcy and Miss Louise Krause. At ten-thirty a novel half hour program was presented, after which dancing was resumed. Guests of honor included Airs. V. E. McCaskill. A iss Inez Richards, and Mrs. Benton. Tumble Down Lodge, the W.A.A. cabin on Minnesota Point, was the scene of many activities in the past year. In the fall before ice had filled the bay the club journeyed to their rendezvous at regular intervals for picnic suppers. After these suppers a program was given around a large bonfire on the beach. Marshmallow roasts and songs were always in vogue. Then home again across a moonlit, reflected bay. Occasionally a week-end party was given. On May 12 the girls crossed the bay to spend the week-end for the last time this year on a party which was a farewell party for the seniors and an initiation ceremony for the new members. At the annual Hockey-Volleyball Banquet, held in the gymnasium on the eighth of December, thirteen new members were formally initiated into the W.A.A. Awards in the form of orange and black monograms, were given to the new members, and the letter award was given to Lily Salay for attaining the KXJO point goal in W.A.A. work. The decorations for the banquet followed the Christmas motif. Guests of honor included Miss Clarke and Miss Richards. Talks were given by three former presidents of the club: Pearl L. Dahl, lone Johnson, and Jeanne Walmslcy. and by the advisor. Miss Davies. New members received into the club at this time included: Clara Cleveland. Helene Cleary, Gertrude Fleet. Edna Askov, Gertrude Lumsdcn, Delores Pederson, Ruby Halverson. Phyllis Schultz. Valborg Thompson. Ethel Jackson. Catherine Guidici. Carmen Rich, and Dorothea Cox. D ownKatherine Lenroot, at present representing the United States Government on the International Commission on Child Welfare at Geneva, Switzerland, is a Superior Normal graduate who has entered a career allied with education. Upon completing further work at the University of Wisconsin, she was associated with child welfare work in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Her present position, assistant chief of the Children's Bureau at Washington, has provided numerous opportunities to represent her department at international conferences in Europe, Cuba, and South America. Articles by Miss Lenroot have appeared in newspapers, magazines, and government bulletins. While in college, Miss Lenroot took active part in journalism work, being on the staff of the Gitche Gurnee. iwmmmmmmsmsBmmOne hundred sixly-one How Soon Will You Have A Business Position? Summer Courses V V Greater individual How soon will you be depositing regu- choice is allowed in larly your pay check for $100, $150 a arranging courses dur- month, or whatever your first position ing the summer. You in the business world pays you? may choose from the That depends on how you capitalize the following subjects: summer months. Shorthand Typewriting We are constantly asked to recommend Bookkeeping Higher Accounting our graduates for responsible positions. Those who enroll this summer qualify ahead of the large crowd that always Advertising enroll later in the year. The new term, Civil Service beginning June 12 and 19, offers many Business advantages. Write your name below Correspondence and return this ad for complete infor- Salesmanship mation. Business Administration V V C DULUTH BUSINESS UNIVERSITY Christie Building; Duluth, Minnesota Name------------ Address------------------ ©otscos ©lyrassOne hundred sixty-two PHILLIPS “66” GASOLINE AND MOTOR OIL Distributed By 77 NortherhOIUompan V Broad 518 Duluth, Minn. Superior State Teachers Athletes Receive Honor Sweaters Manufactured By kelson Knitting (Dills Co. Duluth, Minn. Manufacturers of Knitwear for Athletes The Home of QUALITY MEATS AND GROCERIES Lindberg Thompson 1202 Belknap Broad 783 PRESS COMMENTS. 1933 VODVIL Act I: Cab Calloway should have seen the L. D. C. impersonation of his varied talents—he’d have given up music for bootblacking. Harris Johnson, as Cab himself, endeavored to coax music from a variegated orchestra, with questionable "scat singing". And could pickaninnies see themselves as Sandberg sees them, a respectable colored maiden would shame to walk the streets. @0TF(§ffiJS ©(DKISSOne hundred sixty-three . • w NEWS wiih SPORTS the MARKETS ! uXutl) Kett s- Trlbune tyhe orninq fYewspaper o f the HVorthwest DAILY r SUNDAY HOME DELIVERED If CARRIER BOY Daily Sunday J 15$ a week. y Where you can buy Quality Shoes for the whole family at Lower Prices. Family Shoe Store, Inc. Broad 2421 702 Tower Ave. Act IT: Soviet Russia brought to your very front door by spindly-legged drummer and a chorus of scrub-women. No wonder the Russians had a Revolution! The dolls were cute, at least. We didn’t know the singer knew Russian or was it? Jflortuarg • Licensed Embalmers 1314 Ogden Ave. Broad 847 ©(ytnissOne hundred sixty-jour fancy’s Grocery, Confectionary and Grill 1802-04 Weeks Avenue Barsness Nut Goodies and Candies We Specialize in Dupasco Brand Notebook Fillers A FULL LINE OF COLLEGE SUPPLIES MEALS AT ALL HOURS Faculty and Students Always Welcome Carbon Burned Broad 411 Dependable Welding Superior Welding Service 1809 Winter St. Oxy-Acetylene and Electric Welding, Brazing and Cutting of All Metals in Any Shape or Form “Service that counts," says Edith, “in equipping the modern home with Ice and Coal." She prefers Act III: Same old huts, canes, of many Vodvils back? Well, how could they be different and original, anyway? We liked the grin of the moon and the tap dance, but tssk, tsk, such a rusty falsetto from such a nice little girl. Edilh Biown Peoples Ice Coal Co. Also Distributors of Genuine Coolerator Refrigerators 919 Tower Ave. Broad 503 One hundred sixty-five OFFICERS WM, B BANKS Chairman J. L. BANKS Prc»idcni J. M. KENNEDY C»hi«r R. L. BANKS A rt. CYtshlcr A. E. ERICKSON Asst. Cashier UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY ® THE ® FIRST NATIONAL BANK ESTABLISHED ® 1887 ® DIRECTORS WILLIAM B. BANKS Chairman C. H. SUNDERLAND of Sunderland. Evans Agon. Real Estate L. C. BARNETT ol Barnett Record Co.. Contractors B. A. GALLEIIER General Supt. North Western Fuel Co. JOHN L. BANKS President JOHN A. MURPHY Attorney G. N. Railway E. P. FULTON ot Pcppard A: Fulton Co. Accounts Solicited and Every Accommodation Consistent With Conservative Banking Extended to Customers. SUPERIOR, WISCONSIN. Practice Tends To Make Perfect After Four Years of ‘Soda-Jerking’ Dody Is Considered An Expert George Grieve Androy Drug Store Prescriptions Drugs Sodas “Our Malteds Are Different” Androy Hotel Building Broad 319 £urye Furniture Company Cor. 6th and Tower. Broad 68 Superior, Wis. Act IV: Heap big chief Sour Face and the rest of the big chiefs couldn’t bring back the vanished American (and perhaps we’re glad he vanished!)— even with such a wigwam. Perhaps the trouble was you were really too nice amidst the vulgarity of the rest of the acts. You know, even a jewel cannot shine in the gutter. One hundred sixly-six H. Cedar Jewelry Store 1215 Tower Ave. Bingham Hardware Co. All Sports Equipment 1009 Tower Avenue Converse Wilson Goldsmith Act V: Morgue, did you say ? Even the faculty suffered—they couldn’t get the point. Oh, well, the mental caliber of the Owl and Serpenty Lambdas. Ghostlike dancing, “Heavenly” singing—and a lot of unruly feet! Act VI: Charming weren’t they, and such realism! Sneering villain, distressed maiden, the old mortgage, a sawmill with vacuum cleaner sound effects! Lips that touch liquor oh well, I never did like to touch lips What we’d like to know is what made Me------’s fadeout so genuine? UNCLE SAM WATCHES over your money in this bank. This Bank Pays Interest on Savings Accounts Quarterly srrj’.) Broad 279 1504 Tower Ave. Superior, Wis. Large Stocks of Quality Clothes at Lowest Prices ©o'ur’tscos ©lyuassOne hundred sixty-seven Act VII: Such laboring and then not getting it. But who might not lose her balance on a night like that! Besides, those kicks were so puzzling for Us Three Arts! And then, we all felt like dancing solos anyway! Act VIII: More bustles pulled out of moth balls, but we liked it for one thing—such an accurate diagnosis of April 7th. We wonder if first hand information does help to get that realism? The scenery could stand up after all, and then— the smack of pretzels. The gilded cage, and the bird, and the Bean sisters. For smooth get-away use Turney’s gasoline. You Will Do Better at F. S. Kelly Furniture Co. 1001 Tower Avenue Superior, Wis. Always Glad to Help the College Vogue Bootery 1120 Tower Avenue Superior, Wis. PEOPLES A PROSPEROUS APPEARANCE PROMOTES SUCCESS Where the Big Pictures Play This Store Will Help You to Dress Well and Succeed SY-Joseph s Co. Tower Ave. at Thirteenth St. SUPERIORS SMARTEST SHOP FOR WOMEN Devoted to the sale of Women’s and Misses' Smart Suits. Coats, Fur Coats. Dresses and Accessories Leading Store for Men and Boys @ITir §l50S ©JOMSSOne hundred sixty-eight WHO WOULDN’T SMILE at a warm, crisp, generously buttered and overflowing box of Pop Corn from the ‘Red LDagon “Service With a Smile” JENNY PETERSON, Class of ’32 “Nothing but the best and the freshest,” says Clark. When ordering candy for the Stationaire he insists on (9 cBrien’s Cash cio)agon “SERVICE THAT COUNTS” 1402 Cypress Avenue Phone: Broad 1054 SUCCESS STORIES Sig. R. Butts While in college, I always “forgot” my cigarettes at home or in my locker. Though cursed with a ix or memory, I did not try to pull the same alibi on anyone more than once a month. At political meetings, I managed to get in the cigar line at least three times. Thus, I smoked my way through college on nothing a year. Upon my graduation, I saw the terrible waste in the tobacco industry. I immediately organized the street cleaners union to collect cigar and cigarette butts. I turned to making a popular ten cent brand, and my one-time friends are my most ardent customers. No one will bum this brand! Motor Inn., Inc. 12th and Ogden Ave. Superior’s Leading1 Garage AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIES STORAGE — REPAIRS ©fl'ircgffos ©yKiasOne hundred sixty-nine "Pep" says Miss Davies "is as essenlial in ihe human as well as in a car . . She Prefers A EYROLET Mils Davies Larson Chevrolet Co. ... .. 1413 Tower Avenue Provident Mutual Life Insurance Co. of Philadelphia An Unblemished Record of 67 Years A. C. SPROWLS, JR. 0. E. ROESELER 1024 Tower Avenue Telephone Broad 941 Act IX: A good representa- tion of what liquor can do to inspire hectic dramatic success. And Goody would be so interpretive—even to his kid gloves. Well, give us Iota talent any day! Badg er Shoe Shop lllO' o Tower Ave. Superior, Wis. Superior Laundry Co. “We’ll Clean It Or Dye” A ST. PAUL EPISODE IN THE LIFE OF STANDFIELD. PH. D. OF K. OVs 1—Old Mister Mcon beamed Jovially when Mickey entered the dance hall intent upon an evening of pleasure. But alas, deep-dyed villainy was in the hatching. Send it to the Haunrinj of iluafity Superior, Wis. @ IJ IF (5 GO G One hundred seventy Flowers . . . . Professors L. E. Bodenler and J. T. Mickarty, after a great deal of time and effort spent in research and investigation of the antisocial clubs of Superioi! State Teachers College, have, after a due process of deliberation and first-hand evidence, selected the following floral emblems for these various organizations: ALPHA KAPPA—Wall Flower. Found close to walls or on edge oi “things”. (Not from choice.) SIGMA OMEGA—Trailing Arbutus. Getting scarcer every year. Remaining specimens found in seclusion. TAU ALPHA CHI—Quack Grass. Looks like the real thing to the unknowing. Hard to eradicate once it gains a foothold. DELTA SIGMA—Poison Ivy. Highly irritating to some. Attractive to the eye, but dangerous to the touch. LAMBDA SIGMA LAMBDA—Fly catcher. Trap the unwary with a sugary sweetness. GAMMA PHI EPSILON—Mo(u)rning Glory—Retire at sunset. Y. W. C. A.—Cockleburr. Hangs on to anything which goes by. SIGMA PI—Cowslip. Reminiscent of pastoral surroundings. LAMBDA DELTA CHI—Beard Tongue. That fuzzy morning after effect. IOTA DELTA CHI—Cactus. Able to store large quantities of moisture to carry over dry periods. Y. M. C. A.—Baby’s Breath. Sweet and innocent as the breath of an infant. DELTA THETA—Fraxinella or GAS PLANT. Thrive in moist places. BLACK ANI) WHITE—Trailing cup-flower. Always a few—behind. FEX (4 5)—Primrose, from the primrose path. One hundred seventy-one The Northwest’s Greatest Hotel Offers Moderate Prices for the New Low Price Era 1 Person 2 Persons 76 rooms, private bath, double bed $2.00 $3.00 451 rooms, private bath, double bed 2.50 3.50 33 rooms, private bath, double bed 3.00 4.00 21 rooms, private bath, twin beds - 4.00 44 rooms, private bath, twin beds - 4.50 21 rooms, private bath, twin beds - 5.00 21 rooms, private bath, twin beds - 6.00 Other rooms En Suite with bath, $6.00 to 10.00 Daytime rates $1.00 to 6 P. M. CURTIS HOTEL TENTH ST. 3TP4AVES. MINNEAPOLIS One hundred sevenly-lwo Those Who Enter the School of Life Must Choose Between Working Together or Working Alone WHICH WILL YOU CHOOSE? In Co-operation with your neighbor and fcllowman you have the solution to every economic problem distressing the world today, and the means for building a new system, with opportunity and Justice for all. in place of the old order. We encourage you to know more about Consumers’ Co-operation, to Judge it by the record of its actual achievements, and to test for yourself our claim that the road to a secure and brighter future for the people is only through Co-operation! Central Co-operative Wholesale Owned by and serving more than 150 Also publishers of The Co-operative local Co-operative stores in the Builder. Twice a month; sub- Lake Superior Country. scription, $1 per year. SUPERIOR. WIS. An Attractive Girl with an attractive outfit befit an ad for The Shopping Center of the well dressed girl . . . Ul l AS I. Inc. Catherine Doyle (Eoimmmitu JBa ittgs Jiank Corner 8th and Tower Avenue Superior, Wisconsin. 2—The air was full of shrieks. A quavering voice yodcled ’•Police! Police!” Two dastardly villains had attacked our little Mickey. OUT (SMS ©MM a aOne hundred seventy-three Vacation Time! NOW IS TIIE TIME TO MAKE PLANS FOR YOUR SUMMER RECREATION. The lakes and woods of the Vermilion country will offer welcome relief from the school grind of the past winter. Take advantage of the recreational opportunities afforded by the nearness of this wonderful district called "The playground of a Nation" and plan on spending some period of your vacation in the great out-of-doors of the Arrowhead Country. The Duluth. Wissabe 6c 'Northern Railway operates g-xxl passenger trains daily between Duluth and Vermilion Range points, such as Tower. Ely and Winton, and sells round trip tickets good for 30 days’ return, based on fare and a tenth, which is equivalent to 2c per mile. These low fares make it possible to get there and back at a very nominal cost. WHEN YOU GO Duluth, Missabe Northern Railway Company “Use The Missabe” C. E. CARLSON President G. C. ROSS. Traffic Manager Phone: Melrose 2828W 405 East Superior Street Duluth, Minnesota 3—A burning cigar quivered in the hands of the chief as he dispatched the minions of the law to rescue our collegian from the wrath of the gangsters. Home Cooking Ice Cream Exclusive Home Made One hundred seventy-four Make Every Trip By Bus Go by Northland Greyhound— the most economical, convenient and delightful way to travel! Frequent daily schedules to all Northland points — straight-through service to practically any point in America — free stop-overs at principal cities or points of interest—liberal return privileges on round-trip tickets—AND fares that save you dollars on every trip. College Headquarters are in the Gitche office. See Arthur Sandberg or Mike Barr for full information. Or write: NORTHLAND GREmOUND 509 Sixth Avenue North Minneapolis, Minn. ®l|e Rational ftlank of (Commerce OF SUPERIOR Established 1888 Charles A. Chase. Pres. Edward L. Cass, V. Pres. Jas. M. Crawford, Cashier Richard J. Oyaas, Asst. Cash. Member Federal Reserve System 1117 TOWER AVE. MOVING STORAGE Baggage and Parcels to all Parts of Superior and Duluth COAL AND WOOD Superior Duluth Transfer Co. 911 Tower Ave. Broad 138 4—Shrieking siren announced the coming of the guardians of law and order. Help is on the way! One hundred seventy-five Popular Students depend on Popular lunches at 1 reasonable Prices They Insist on the Capitol Candq . Tea Rooms 1114 Tourer Aue. 'Quick and Neat Service t Specially " Home Made Ice Cream. Candy and Pies Sandwiches. Chops. Fned Chicken and Chop Suey. Pineapple. Lemon and Orange Sherbets Hardware, Sporting Goods, Roofing and Paints. The Best Goods at the Lowest Prices. Kou Corcoran M. BERGER HARDWARE 522-524-526 Tower Ave. Broad 292 5—The sputter of speeding motorcycles brought additional reinforcements. Oh. Mickey, what is thine fate? Just one more moment! yi (public Utility is measured by the service it renders the public. We aim to give the best service possible at the lowest cost to the consumer. Students are cordially invited to visit our plants and offices; perhaps we can show you some things of interest. Superior R ater, £ight power Go. One hundred seventy-six Marge Aulrey “Marge,” like lots of others IS A GOOD FRIEND of the People’s Drug Store Corner Belknap and Baxter Come in and get acquainted . Try our Hot Sandwiches or a real Malted Milk. Broad 1064 Gongratulations! Class of 1933 Wisconsin State Bank TOWER FLORAL ASHBYS’ 1428 Tower Ave., Superior When You Think of Flowers of QUALITY Phone Broad 456 We Telegraph Flowers The Universal Choice of University Men KUPPENHEIMER GOOD CLOTHES 6—The city ambulance, with headlights ■gleaming, rushed to the scene, ready to administer to the needs of a small town boy in the clutches of ruffians. OO'u’tSKIS OUPMSSOne hundred seventy-seven Whether it be after the Game or the Dance, you’ll always meet the Gang at SKuot-Sullivan 1418 Tower Avenue Helen Conrad Helen Klipprn yl« OI«on CANDY SODA ICE CREAM LUNCH WHETHER IT BE DRY CLEANING OR LAUNDRY WORK You can always depend on the ‘Hale 911 Ogden Avenue O. H. BRAYTON Special Agent. “Worry kills men. Life insurance kills worry.” The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States 14 U. S. National Bank Bldg. Superior, Wis. LONEY CLEMENS INSURANCE 1717 Winter Street 7—But lo and behold! This is not our Mickey! This yegg stretches in celestial slumber. Our Mickey has dispatched him with a hefty swing!One hundred seventy-eight Dr. Wtip Just as Dr. Walp, Rick s Pickwick is New and Very Popular. Both are Unanimously Approved by the Student Body and the Faculty . . . After the Theatre, Game or Dance, stop and have one of those sandwiches and special Pickwick Beverages tc here the College Crow d G oes Kick s Pickwick 1811 T2orth 12th St. Happy and Refreshed Betty has just enjoyed an Ice-Cold bottle of Coco Cola Beuy Lemon Coco Cola Bottling Co. 1020 Ogden Ave. Broad 833 When 111 Let Us Fill Your Prescription Community Drug Store 714 Tower Ave. Broad 33 8—The arm of the law gathers a badly-battered toughie, much the worse for his encounter with Horace, the pugilistic pride of S. T. C. One hundred seventy-nine (ttmttpltttmttB of Antmran lxri|angp lank S’lijiFrinr, ViBrottafn GLASS AND WINDSHIELDS Stewart’s Quality Paint Products Hygenlc and Dekko Kalsomine Wallpaper, Oil and Lead at Reasonable Prices Louis Kempinsky Glass Co. VALSPAR LACQUERS 1701 N. Sixth St. Broad 2688 9—Our hero! The man of the moment! Mickey has defended himself with his trusty right! Moral to gangsters: Beware of Standficld. for a small town boy may pack a big town punch. I I No Wonder . . . Jimmy can stand the "Gaff.” He drinks a glass of milk with every meal. Always Insist On Pasteurized Milk from Erickson Bros VALLEY BROOK CREAMERY “Milk With That Creamy Taste” 1711 Winter St. Broad 27 Jim Bail'll ©a'u’fgcod ©lyjMsaOne hundred eighty Having a secret desire to penetrate into the mysteries of that holy of holies, a Greek letter club, Izzy Sherlock secreted himself in the meeting place of Chi Lambda Theta, one of the powerful campus organizations. Carrying his trusty notebook and a pencil, he crouched in a corner of the room. Quietly, with pencil poised, he awated while the straggling members of the fraternity seated themselves. Reproduced below, verbatim, are the sensation revelations of the meeting: ... Hold the dice. Hey, pipe down you guys, meetings called to order. Where’s Smith, the secretary?., singing at the choir meeting. . he should be a good whiskey tenor by this time.. .was that guy lit up last night . we’ll have the treasurer’s report... (groans, aaah's) .. .we can let that bill go for awhile yet, we’ve only owed it for a year.. next.. $16.00 in the treasury.. just enough for a good beer party.. .when do we eat?.. (Chorus: when do we eat?).. good harmony boys, but let’s get the business out of the way.. yeah, almost time for another brawl fellows.. .who’ll we get for the “shaps’?.. .• naw, they’re “wet blankets,” they stay all evening and they want the lights left on.. let’s not tell Loop about this one . aw, lay offa those Dorm dames, they've got to get in early.. don’t take her, she “can’t take ’em!”.. the last time I took her back she had beer on her breath, and the whole Dorm a reception committee ..yeah, she’s 0.' K., I had her down at the Ritz last night . aw, let the dance go till next time., next . (Chorus: when do we eat?).. now for the waiting list .. .let’s get in some new members.. we owe a lot of bills . who is he .. .never heard of him.. .he's a “pill,” but his dad’s got lots of bucks, a car, and a cottage at Anmicon.. pass the ballots... he passed fellows . he took my girl out once, wait till I get him.. no pillows or pads, and wait till we paddle his...next . Herbert Hoover., what did he do.. .nothing.. .next.. .how about Jones . he’s got a good Tux that you can borrow, but you might have to lengthen the sleeves a little., let’s keep him on the waiting list., next . Blatz take him in . Does he knew how to make beer! . yeah, but it’s cheaper to buy it now.. Goopus . let's vote on him., a standing vote... hey, that’s unconstitutional . ah to.. , we’ve lost the constitution... drop him, drop him.. can the dice, fellows, the meeting’s still on .. who’re we putting up for the social chairman election?.. Say, Mike, you write out his speech.. .make it about ten words . that’s all he can memorize., be sure to say he’s democratic . tell everybody he isn’t stuck up, just near sighted.. pat everybody on the back for the next two weeks.. who are the Jews going to support.. tell them he eats Kosher sandwiches . I smell coffee., when do we eat . when do we eat . meeting adjourned . and then she told me to go home .. .so I sez to Vitz: You can’t flunk me. [Editor’s note: Since writing the above report, Izzy Sherlock has joined a fraternity. His investigation was a result of sourgrapitis, confesses Izzy. Next week we have arranged to print his sensational revelation “Why I Think I Will Make a Good Fraternity Man.”]One hundred eighty-one FOR ANYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC SEE 6Drysdale-Cperry Go. 1418 Tower Avenue iM Oil Tinting, Copying and Enlarging CHILD PHOTOGRAPHY OUR SPECIALTY OJ'u’igffiJS OCLDKISS One hundred eighty-two These Dorm Lassies Thrive on Berthiaume Bros. Quality Food Products During the past 40 years of progressive business, Berthiaume’s have handled Sanitary, Wholesome, Delicious and Healthful Foods. 1419 Tower Avenue John Be»B “The Store of Good Clothes.” “Where Style and Quality Is Not Expensive.” a I ■ a -J lothinqCo. Superior, Wisconsin Morion Banki lone Allen Popular girls retain their popularity through smart clothes. They know that Roth’s can be depended upon to help them set the pace for smart creations at popular prices. ‘Roth Bros. Co. Cor. 14th Cower Avc.One hundred eighty-three • . . V VSVVV | “Service With a Smile” Drive in and let A1 or Les “fill er up.” Expert Battery, Crank Case, Greasing and Tire Service at Tuuerson’s Seruice Station Corner Belknap at Cumming Avenue. TEXACO PRODUCTS STACK BROS., INC. PLUMBING AND HEATING CONTRACTORS 1718 WINTER STREET 282 “No, this is not a football signal,” says Louie, “it is the logical number to call when you need ICE AND FUEL Superior Ice Fuel Co. QUALITY COAL Broad 282 1517 Tower Ave. Louie Johnjon Deicyl Hubbard Ogden near 13th. Phone Broad 300 2 A. lomttB MORTUARY Licensed Embalmer and Funeral Director 1515 Belknap St. Broad 694 R1 Northern Supply and Fuel Co. Building- Materials and Fuel 1024 Tower Ave. Broad 941 One hundred eighty-four NORTHWESTERN MOTOR SUPPLY COMPANY Distributors—Jobbers Wholesalers Radios — Boats Johnson Outboard Motors 1018 Ogden Ave. High Grade Work Schwiering’s Upholstery Shop Custom-made Furniture Upholstering, Repairing and Refinishing Slip Covers That Fit Broad 2205 1701 N. 13th St. SUCCESS STORIES Noah Count I was graduated from S. T. C. with a B. S. degree. If I could have held out for three more years, until the new club room was built, I would have flunked my courses regularly with some degree of comfort. People point me out as a horrible example. I’m dumb, know it, and like being comfortably dumb. Tariffs, political speeches, Einstien’s theories, unbalanced budgets, and the proper method to dissect an angleworm don’t bother me because I can’t understand them. Last week I refused a professorship when they told me the job required reading something besides the comic strips. I’m gloriously happy, with no ambition, and the most unsuccessful success that I know of. Woman Is Ever Changeable and Capricious But not so with Descyl. She always sends h e r clothing to Hawkins Laundry “They Satisfy”One hundred eighty-five JOY YING LOW Best Chop Suey—Chow Mein American Dishes Reasonable Prices, Good Service We Specialize in Chop Suey for Parties. Telephone Broad 914 Upstairs, 1307 Tower Ave. OPEN UNTIL 3:00 A. M. CARLSON BROS. CO. Established 1891 Leading Installers of Guaranteed Warm Air Heating Plants Peninsular, Zenith, Western, Round Oak SUCCESS STORIES Ethyl Blowgum I was a history major, but the only date that I can remember is the one that I worked from Alex Gilfinch, the campus romeo. (It was a Waterloo for him!) From home economics, I learned thrift; I economize on lights. Well, to make a long story fit this space, I began cutting paper dolls under the desk so I wouldn’t go nerts. I couldn’t see the figures and often cut an arm or leg off without a twinge of mercy. One day the teacher found the pieces and tried to put them together. I saw her and conceived the idea of jigsaws. That ended college and passing bad checks for me. Now I’m a professional cut-up getting one grand per cut! FASHIONS IN LOVELINESS You buy your hats and gowns after fashion but you first must have our fashion. Superior’s most fashionable women whose coiffures and delightful individuality is their clothes — come to G 1 b e r s o n’s Beauty Salon for their beauty service. This individual service by coiffure artistes patron arrange her her personality. (jiberson’s beauty Salon Broad 304 BALCONY. ROTH BROS. STORE SUPERIOR RUG CLEANING CO. The Oldest Rug Cleaning Concern in Superior 522 John Ave. Broad 832 ELMER G. JOHNSON COMPANY 210 Board of Trade Building Superior, Wis. City property Lots, Industrial Sites, Wharfage, Trackage, Acreage Douglas County Land, Improved and Unimproved Garden, Berry and Chicken Farms. Florence Johnton is given only who help each hair to accent ©mregcos ©tyuossOne hundred eighty-six Any Time Is Lunch Time at Buddies Hut Come In and Have Frank or Ed Make You One of Those Delicious Hamburgers. A Complete Line of Pies, Cakes and Rolls Sandwiches, Candy and Lunches ‘The Place That Made Hamburgers Famous” BUDDIES HUT No wonder Bill’s car runs so smooth. He always insists on “the best” Gas and Oil. Bill Kempiiuky Always insist on TYDOL GASOLINE Distributed By NORTHWESTERN OIL CO. Building Materials and Coal The Speakes Co. Broad 80 My dears, would you believe it? Coming from the brand new Rest Room for Women, a fair young maid was heard to say, “Imagine! not one ash tray—not even a cocktail shaker! Har-ump!” Aha! then what you ask? Well, first and foremost, rumors. Aha! of what you ask. ©O'ij’fgffiJS @53 rasaOne hundred eighty-seven » Heat Your Home With Coal . . SUPERIOR’S COAL DOCKS Are a vital part of it's industrial rating. Order: POCAHONTAS COMMANDER (Kentucky's Finest) SUNKOAL “GREAT LAKES” ELKHORN SILVERASH From Your Fuel Dealer Paul E. Holden Co. INSURANCE 110 U. S. National Bank Bldg. Broad 400 "success stories Iva Lightfoot In college, I had a one o’clock boy friend, but I stayed in a ten o’clock dormitory. He said he wanted to marry me. I loved him. We stayed out late every night and I had to climb up the outside wall to get into my room, at which I became adept. Finally we left for the city. Now I’m the most successful human fly that ever peeked in a window. My boy friend — he’s my manager. Leo Singer The Advertising Manager Assured Us positively “It pays to advertise” in The “Gitche Gurnee” Prove It! The Geo. G. Newton Co. 1005 Tower Ave. Real Estate Loans Insurance GREAT LAKES COAL DOCK. SUPERIOR One hundred eighty-eight "years Click Off, Life Qoes On — and that’s what you see, feel, and read in the Superior Evening Telegram, the pictorial representative of its community. Forty years of portraying history not only duly names the Evening Telegram a pioneer in the Northwest newspaper field, but finds it an unfailingly accurate worker. “What time makes, only The Telegram faithfully gives to you.” The Superior Eueninq Telegram Columbia University Graduate Optometrist HENRY E. GIRZI, 0. D. OPTOMETRIST Examinations By Appointment Phone: Broad 1965 1313 Tower Ave., Superior, Wis. We deem it highly ungrateful on the part of the administration in view of this benevolence on the part of the F.E.X (they donated a picture to the new library, too, by a really prominent artist, so they say) that the fraternity was disappointed by the ruthless abandonment of plans for the Annual Spring Formal of the fraternity. Serve It and You Please All. Drink Our Perfectly Pasteurized MILK AND CREAM Phone: Broad 317 Russell Creamery Company 1625-27 Broadway Visitors Always Welcome Plans and Plates IDEAS like airships, come towards us out of the haze Modern airports have every facility for the convenience of airmen and their crafts. Similarly, we have every modern equipment and years of engraving experience to bring into concrete form the ideas of our hundreds of clients who publish school and college annuals. Developing a theme for such issues which will thrill whenever seen, and bring back happy memories in years to come, calls for understanding, and a wide range of experience You will find that sort of understanding and experience, as well as unsurpassed workmanship when you commit your publication to the BUCKBEE-MEARS CO. ST. PAUL, MINN.One hundred ninety WHEN COLLEGE STUDENTS a Stack FINALLY SETTLE DOWN Co. TO HAVE A HOME OF THEIR The Foremost Creations OWN in Ready-to-Wear. Kileen Madden Cpopkin WILL FURNISH THE BUILDING furniture Go. MATERIALS 518-520 Tower Ave. Broad 1232 13th and Oakes “Where Your Dollar Buys Most” RITZ1NGLR SUCCESS STORIES P. Jama GLASS CO. While in college, I could sleep GLASS in the most uncomfortable posi- Ornamental Glass Mirrors and Resilvering; Plate and Window Glass. Auto Windshields and Sedan Glass. 1218 Ogden Broad 648 tions. I slept through many a lecture in history, literature, and physical education. 1 got so that I even slept through my study periods. Talking in my sleep proved to be my weakness —imagine my embarrassment when 1 talked out loud in Pro- fessor Loop's class. Shortly aft- Best Wishes From erwards, three girls and a pal of “TOM" mine were expelled. My early training has not gone to waste; I am now a tester for the Sleep- E. 0. THOMPSON GROCERY CO. em Mattress Company. I sleep on the job and get paid for it. The NBC Network has purchased all rights to my snoring as sound effects for sawmills, engines, and a pinch-hit for ab- 1422 Tower Avenue Broad 522 | sent crooners. ©ciTtgcfas ©tyrassOne hundred ninety-one You’ll find just the right COAT SUIT FROCK at (Day Furniture UGHTBODY'S At Just the right price, too! Company 0. H. Wendelbo, D. C. Ph. C. Everything1 for the HOME Chiropractor 209 Carlton Building Phone: Broad 3290 1711-13-15 Belknap Superior, Wis. SUCCESS STORIES E. T. SAFFORD CO. Ignatz Zuup I did not suspect that I would School Supplies ever be a success in life until the day that I flunked in nature study and Dean Loop told me i was an undesirable element on the campus. From then on, my future was assured. I had often Parker Pens. Pencils and Desk Sets Ring Books and Fillers Party Favors and Decorations LEATHER GOODS 1122 Tower Ave. Superior, Wis. heard of men starting with only a shoe string and quickly amassing a fortune, so I decided to try it. I finally sold my shoe strings for three cents, but I CONGRATULATIONS had to let the shoes go with them. Now I’ve got a million in TO THE some of the worst banks in the CLAoo oS country. It was all very simple. All I did was to open a chain of nickle-in-the-slot automat res- STOTT BRIQUET CO. taurants with magnifying glass in each of the compartment windows. M. TESKE, Mgr. PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY One hundred ninety-two One hundred ninety-three State Teachers College Superior, Wisconsin Wishes God-Speed and Best of Luck to the Class of 1933 COURSES TO BE OFFERED DURING 1933-1934 1. ONE-YEAR COURSES FOR: Rural School Teachers 2. TWO-YEAR COURSES FOR: Kindergarten-Primary Teachers Intermediate Teachers Grammar and Junior High Teachers Rural School Teachers 3. THREE-YEAR COURSES FOR: Junior High School Teachers and Principals 4. FOUR-YEAR COURSES FOR: Teachers and Principals of High Schools Kindergarten-Primary Teachers Intermediate Teachers Junior High Teachers Principals of State Graded Schools All lead to Bachelor’s Degree. SUMMER SCHOOL, JUNE 19 TO JULY 29 FALL TERM OPENS SEPTEMBER 11, 1933 One hundred ninety-four When You Need An Orchestra, Whether It Be for a Formal or a Mixer, Always Insist On Tfarris-Clatj Orchestra “Home Talent” Call Broad 1479 for Free Estimates Two sure ways of dressing: correctly and economically for Spring and Summer is to secure a Michaels-Stern suit and a Michaels-Stern topcoat. They are your positive assurance of correct style and fine value. Don GoMtr Floan and Leveroos Co. TELL US! Little Redhead—Tell us! How do you manage your lab work so skillfully? Really, you might at least wash your own beakers. □ Amby, dear—Tell us! Don’t you really know that the inorganics maneuver around you to get their unknowns? □ Phil, my love—Tell us! Why don’t you decide on one certain brand of cigarettes? Then we could buy another kind. □ Mr. President—Tell us! Were you made or born? at any rate, whence your extraordinary ability to handle any student problem with the result that regardless of the verdict, the student invariably says, “Hill is certainly a peach?” □ Dr. Carey—Tell us! Don’t you know that it is a reflection on one’s teaching to be forced to fail more than one or two in a junior or senior class? Back in the days before examinations began to cast their ugly shadows on carefree lives, spring l| came.One hundred ninety-five A drink that hits the mark. When overcome by the fatigue of a day's work, always refreshen yourself with an ice cold bottle of Orange Crush, Hires or Aerial (linger Ale The last words in Tangy, Sparkling and Satisfying Beverages. Superior bottling Works 807 Weeks Ave. Broad 1295 (ttnngratulations to the (Class nf 1933 Class nf 16 Art, dear! Must you sing over the telephone? But then maybe you’re right. Serenaders are annoying if one isn’t in the mood. Maybe you were merely being considerate, but personally, Arty, my love, methinks you feel discretion to be the better part of valor and fear the consequences if you stand beneath your Juliet’s balcony. Judging from your voice—maybe you're right. Superior Hardware 1427 Toner Avenue Phone, Broad 258 McClellan Paper Company Distributor of Butler Brand Fine Papers Duluth, Minn. This book is cased in an S. K. Smith cover—a cover that is guaranteed to be satisfactory and is created and SMITH-CRAFTED by an organization of craftsmen specializing in the creation and production of good covers. Whatever your cover requirements may be, this organization can satisfy them. Send for information and prices to The S. K. Smith Co. 213 Institute Place Chicago, 111. oa igsas ©ivjffijggOne hundred ninety-six Ghis Issue of the Gitche from the press of the telegram Job Department Gower at Ghirteenth Superior - ZDisconsin Tim Hoff “Tim” is always ready to sec his old friends and to make new acquaintances Come in and See Him at the Superior Music Co. Instruments Popular and Classical Music 1423 Tower Ave. CONRAD Fur Co., Inc. 1531 TOWI Avc. • Broad JM7 Manufacturers of Fine Furs Since 1897 Then if one grew too bored the F.E.X. with that touching phil-anthrophy of theirs would step in and entertain at the Vasa. “Yah! dat’s vhat aye said. Ve had von swell time. Effrevon took off his coat vhen he got tired of carrying it or vhen its utility was gone. Anyhow, ve haf one goot hop. Yah!” One hundred ninety-seven ADVERTISERS' DIRECTORY ACCOUNTANTS Ralph L. Falstad.......-...192 ATTORNEYS I. W. Bernard--------------192 Cadigan A Cadig.tn---------192 Curran A Slier--------.....192 Dietrich A Daley-----------192 Hanltch. Johnson A FrltSChler ......... -..192 Mile A Dahl.......—........192 F. Bernard Hunt----------- 192 Kennedy A Foley—-----------192 FURNITURE F. S. Kelly Furniture Co.167 l.uryc Furniture Co.-------ICS May Furniture Co.--------191 Popkin Furniture Co. _____190 GASOLINE AND OIL Northern Oil Co___________162 Norhtwestern Oil Co. .....I Sri GLASS ANO PAINT l.ouis Kempinsky Glass Co._l79 Ritzingcr Glass Co.........100 Kilccn-.Mnddcn Co. ---------190 Larson Chevrolet Co. .......169 O'Brien's Cash Wagon........168 Red Wagon ..................168 Speaks Co. -----------------186 Stack Bros Co...............183 Superior A Duluth Transfer..171 Superior Water. Light, and Power Co.-------------------175 MORTUARIES Z. A. Downs__________ 181 J. L. Nlcol...-..... 163 AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIES Motor Inn_______________ 168 Northwestern Motor Supply 184 Tuverson Service Station.183 BANKS American Exchange---------179 Community Savings Bank....l72 First National Bank-------165 National Bank ol Commerce ------------------174 U. S. National Bank.......166 Wisconsin State Bank------176 GROCERIES ANO MEATS Berthiaume Bros. -------182 Lindberg A Thompson...._162 E. O. Thompson__________190 HARDWARE Berger Hardware ________175 Bingham Hardware _______166 Superior Hardware ......195 HOTELS Curtis Hotel -----------171 MUSIC Superior Music Co..... 196 NEWSPAPERS Duluth News-Tribune ...163 Evening Telegram------ 188 ORCHESTRAS Harris-Clay Orchestra..194 OPTICIANS BEAUTY SHOPS Gibcrson Beauty Shop-----185 BOTTLING WORKS Coca Cola Bottling Co____178 Superior Bottling‘Works._195 CHIROPRACTORS O. II. Wendelbo________191 CREAMERIES Russell Creamery Co....188 Valley Brook Creamery.„..I79 DEPARTMENT STORES Moran’s, Inc. —.......—172 Roth Bros..............182 Stack A Co.............190 DRUG STORES Community Drug Store...178 People’s Drug Store......176 Weinberg's Androy Drug.._165 FLORISTS House ol Flowers.--------166 Tower Floral..___________176 FUEL Nclall— Northern Supply A Fuel—184 Peoples Ice A Coal Co---164 Superior Ice A Fuel Co..183 Wholesale— (it. Lakes Coal A Dock Co....................187 Stott Briquet ..------ 191 FUR DEALER Conrad Fur Co.............196 INSURANCE Equitable Life Insurance--177 Paul E. Holden ...........187 Geo. G. Newton....—....—.187 l.oncy A Clemens.---------177 Provident Mutual Life Ins....169 H. E. Girzi____________________188 SCHOOLS Duluth Business University-161 Superior State Teachers College _________________193 JEWELRY H. Cedar Jewelry Co. —.166 SCHOOL SUPPLIES E. T. Salford _________ 191 LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR S. Y. Josephs ..—.....167 Llghtbodys .........-.191 LAUNDRIES AND CLEANERS SHOES AND REPAIRING Broadway Shoe Shop......169 Family Shoe Store.......16; Vogue Bootcry ..........167 Hawkins Laundry Superior Laundry Superior Rug Cleaning 169 185 177 LUNCHES Muddies Hut — Canitol Candy Tea 186 175 173 Haney’s Grill 164 177 Joy Vine Low Rick’s Pickwick 185 178 THEATERS People’s _______________167 TRANSPORTATION D.. M. A N. R. R........I 3 Northland Transportation Co. ..................174 UPHOLSTERY N. Anchcr____________________173 E. Seliwiering ______________184 MEN S CLOTHING cir-: 3% Fkstroms’ .--•■- 194 Sw IS S«srsrL-jp MISCELLANEOUS Carlson Co-operative Wholesale .(W E. 0- Johnson.' WELDING Superior Welding Service.164 GITCHE PRODUCERS Cover—S. K. Smith-------195 Engraving—Buckbce-Mcars IS} Paper—McClellan Paper Co................... 195 Photography—Drysdale- Perry Co. --------- ...ISI Printing—Telegram Job Department ......... 196 OflTr’tSKJll ocyjrasaOne hundred ninety-eight STUDENT 5' INDEX A Abrahamson, Muriel................ 80 Ackley, Dorothy ...................104 Ahlstrom, Harold ..................118 Aho, Ebba ........................152 A ho, Jarl ....................42, 81 Albec, Mary....................... 52 Albee, Theodore ................... 81 Allen, Jane ......................100 Anderson, Anne .................... 34 Anderson, Ebba .................... 33 Anderson, Hazel E..............30, 52 Anderson, Irving..................124 Anderson, Mildred .................42 Andrews. Jeanette.................106 Apelquist, Geraldine..............106 Archambault, Francis..............120 Ardern, Jessie ...................112 Askov, Edna ......................52, 114 Asplund, Alice.................... 52 Autrey, Marjorie .................52, 100 Avis, Arthur ..........118, 136, 141 B Baker, Harry .......................42. 84 Banks. Alarion ................07, 100 Barr. Mike......................75. 126 Barrett, James :...............135, 141 Bartelme, Herbert................... 81 Beglinger, Laura....................126 Bell. Paul .......................... 80 Bellingham, William ................36, 42 Benson, Bertha ................91. 108 Benson. Verona..................52, 112 Berg. John ......................... 75 Berg, Margaret......................106 Bergsten, Ruben .................... 34 Binkley, Neil ................136. 141 Birkholz. Mabel ...............52. 112. 114 Bjur, Marie ........................108 Boehme, Fred :..................74, 124 Borg. LeRoy....................42, 118, 141 Bowser, Betty .....................1 (X) Braaton, Conrad......................136 Brandser, Roy........................ 75 Branstrom, Earl .................... 81 Brevik, Signe....................... 52 Britton, Wayne..............42. 77. 122 Brown, Viola ....................... 53 Brownell. Ruth f.................... 53 Buchanan, Harvey...............120, 126 Burgeson. Carol ....................114 Buros, Dorothea ....................102 c Cameron. Stella ..............53, 114 Campbell, Clarence................ 81 Campbell, Ford :.................. 81 Canaday, Fred ............43, 122, 135 Canaday, James .........36, 37. 40. 43 Cannelin, Einar ..................80, 81 Card, Lois ............34. 53, 91, 108 Carlson, Marion ................... 33 Carlson. Mildred ......34, 53. 85. 102 Carlstedt, Henry ...........35, 43. 74 Charbonneau, Henry................80, 81 Chase, Elsie May, 76. 80. 81, 112, 152, 154 Cheever, Roger ...................118 Christenson, Fern .................108 Christenson. Lloyd....34. 53, 80. 81. 124 Christianson, Herbert..............136 Cleveland. Clara...............80. 154 Clough. Donovan ...................122 Coats, Myrtle...................... 53 Cohen, Carol ......................154 Collins, Gene .1..................141 Conness, Richard ..................118 Connor, leanne ....................100 - Conrad, Helen •......................104 Conroy, Nancy ................98. 126 Cooke, Adele ..................76, 104 Cooke, Gerald .....................136 Corcoran, Rose .....................NO Covet. Sherman .................... 36 Cox. Clarence...............37. 40. 43 Croft. Clarke .....................135 Cudd, Marion ......................110 Curtis, Edwina .................... 53 Czekalski, Margaret ............... 33 D Dahl. Pearl L........43. 126, 152. 154 Dahl. Pearl M...................... 43 Dahlstrom. Helen ..............54, 112 Davis, Wellington ................. 54 DeVinck. Francis1.............118, 142 Doby, Harry ....................... 36 Donley, Elizabeth ................. 80 Doyle, Catherine .............76, 110 Duffy, Elvnor......................104 Durfee, Eileen ............54, 76. 126 Dwyer, Helen Z.....................102 Dymesich, Francis ................. 44 E Edburg, Donald ....................137 Edburg, Wallace....................44. 84 Edelstcin. Dorothy.................44. 74 Elmslie. Florence ............44, 126 Ely. Roland .......................122 Ensign. Hazel ..................... 54 Erbeck, Harry .....................135 Erickson, Ralph ..............124, 126 Erickson, Walford .................124 Erickson, Wilbur ..............79, 80 Erkkila, Alice..................... 33 Even, Martin ......................142 F Fagerlin, Afargaret ...............100 Farmer, Della .........74. 76. 91. 108 Farmer. Marie..................80, 102 Favell. Madeline...........54, 98, 114 Fergal, Peter ..................... 44 Finn, Milton ...'..............36, 126 Ficrstad, Mabel................54, 104 Fleer, Dolores.............30, 97. 110 Fleet, Gertrude...............112, 114 Fontecchio, Fred...................118 Forsjord, Alice ................... 44 Franklin, Lois.............45, 80, 108 Frillici, Aldo ................... 81 G Garland, Eva....................... 45 Giffin, Merton ....................118 One hundred ninety-nine 4" STUDENT 5’ INDEX » Oiffin, Sue ........................100 Gilbert, Arlene..................... 54 Giroulx, Grace .....................108 Giudici, Catherine....31, 102, 114, 154 Golder, Donald ....................120 Golder, Genevieve ..................104 Goldfine, Joseph .....:.........36, 75 Gouldie, Maxine .................... 81 Gradin, Robert .....................120 Grantors, Carl .............34, 74. 122 Green, Margaret M..........55, 97, 108 Green, Margaret H..............54, 110 Gumz, Marion .......................104 Gunderson, Margaret.........55, 75. 76 H Haglund, Florence..........45, 98, 126 Halverson. Eleanor......31, 75, 97, 102 Hanks, Geraldine ...................108 Hanson, Milton ..................... 45 Harbour, Dorothy .;.................110 Harris, Gerald .....................137 Harris. William.....................126 Haugen, Jeanette ...................102 Haugen, John ...■...............54, 137 Haugen. Olaf........................142 Hellcrud. Wanda ...............45, 114 Hervi, Martha ......................114 Hoard, June.....................55, 154 Hoff. Ruby..........40, 46, 74, 97. 104 Hoffman, Aryle ..................... 55 Horton, Allan...................36, 118 Hot .field. Mildred............97. 106, 126 Moulder, Ruby.................55. 108, 114 Hilmer, Ruth .......................110 Hinz, Alpha ....................... 81 Hircheimer, Roy ................... 81 Hultner, Henry .....................138 Hultner. Raymond ...................124 Hyatt, Helen ....................... 80 I Ihrig, Marion...................55, 114 Isabella, LeRoy.................35, 120 J Jacobson. Dorothy ................ 55 Jenson, Evelyn.............79, 80, 108 Jenson, Robert.....................120 ohnson, Adelaide ................. 55 ohnson, Arnold Hull.......46, 74, 120 ohnson, Axel .....................33. 56 ohnson, Clinton ..................33. 56 ohnson, Florence .................110 ohnson, Frank................36. 124 ohnson, Harris ...........74, 76, 122 ohnson, Irving !.................. 46 ohnson, Louis .................. 138 ohnson, Russell...........56, 81. 124 lones, Russell..........35. 46. 81. 124 orgenson, Jay ..............46. 80. 81 K Kane, Agnes ........................91, 108 Kaner, Harriet...................... 46 Katon, Beatrice.....................114 Keeler, Louise.........74. 79, 112, 154 Keough, Florence .................... 47 Kerr, Ruth..........................56. 108 Kielley, Sam..........................138 King, Kathleen ......................104 Klippcn, Helen .................85. 104 Knapmiller, Margaret.........37, 56. 114 Knight, Francis... ......47, 74, 76. 122 Knutson, Audrey..................56, 108 Knutson, Kermit...................80. 81 Knutson, Roy.....................74. 118 Koenig, Charles....................... 81 Kortesma, Eino....................35, 47 Koski, Laila ........................126 Krause. Louise.....37. 47. 98, 114, 126 Kremple, Frederick.................... 80 Kromberg. Wilford k................... 81 Kuhlmey, Dorothy..................31. 56 Kunsman, Howard...............36, 74, 91 Kurrasch, Jeanne......................108 Kushncr, Berenice...-;............66, 71 L Lange, Lavaun..:.................97. 108 Larson, Albin.........................126 Larson, Charles.............74, 124, 126 Larson, Elmer ...................... 81 Lavine, Rose ....................... 47 Lavine, Vcrnice...................... 72 Ledin, Arnold...................122, 126 Lee, Helen.......................56, 100 Leehy, Violet...................108, 126 Lehtinen, Violet .k.................. 33 Lemon, Betty.....k...............85, 100 LeVesque, Elaine .....................57 Liebowitz. Ben....:.'.........36. 47. 67 Lindelof, Bernard ....................57 Lindquist, Carol .................. 98 Lindquist, Clarence..............72. 126 Liska, Olga ....................... 48 Lomoe, Orville.......................122 Loop, Rowena.........35. 37. 48. 80, 104 Lumsden, Gertrude.................... 57 Lundquist, Ruby......37. 48. 74. 85. 108 M MacLennan, Joy ...................... 80 McCarthy, Mary F.....................100 McCauley, Alice .....v...............152 McCorkell. Doris....'............48. 74, 110 AlcCorkell. Joe ....................118 McEachern, Janet.....................100 McEwen. Roberta ..................... 98 AtcGill, Thomas......................146 McNally, Walter ....................118 Alahon. Mary.....f...............48. 110 Alalnatti, Frank ....................146 Manley, Rosa belle...............57. 97. 110 Martinson, Willard...............80. 81 Atatsch, Caroline................57, 112 Alazzo, Elizabeth................57. 112 Atelin, Noble ...................... 81 Aterila, Paula .sk...................104 Aletzger. Katherine..............74, 100 Atcyer, Harold..................122. 138 Atiller, Allen ...................... 76 Aliller, Byron .'....................120 Atills, Russell ..................... 34 Moore, Thomas ...-................... 36 Alorton, ALay..,..:..............57. 97. 98 ll ©HarassV 1 L s n v A c f $ m Two hundred STUDENT 5' INDEX Moshen. Joe......................37, 48 Moyle, Evelvn...................114, 152 Mueller, Beth....................57. 110 N Neiman, Gladys................35, 72. 74 Nelson, Goodwin .:..................120 Nelson, Irene........................104 Nelson, Kenneth .....................124 Nelson, Warren..................49, 124 Nicholas, Eli...f)..............118. 139 Noble, Wynn .........................120 Nordholm, Lucille...............58, 102 O Ogilvie, Mae ........................104 Olander. Elsie ......................106 Olson. Edwin..‘f.......80, 81. 118, 139 Olson. Ellen.....................58. 114 Olson, Emily ...»....................114 Olson, Ethel... '............58. 84. 110 Olson. Olga..........49. 74. 76. 97. 104 Olson. Ray .....S................... 81 Olson, Syla .. ......................104 Ooley, Irma.....................112, 114 O’Rourke, William Orava, Marian Orr, Nanah F Patterson. Thomas Paulson. Phillip Panins, Lulu.....................30. Payne, Dorothy.......................1 Penner, Jean.....................49. I Persons. Gladys...................33. Perry, Grace.....................91. I Peterson, George.:'..35. 70. 71, 76, 1 Peterson. Toivo..................... Pi Ison. Sidney .....................1 Plows, Evelyn.....................30. Prior, Donald ......................1 R Ranta. Hugo V....................... Ray. Iris .......................... Redmond, William.................80, Rich. Carmen.........................I Richards. Carl ..................... Ritzman, CarL.rf.............67, 71. I Roesscl. Fred....................35. Rogers, Betty .......................1 Rollefson, Lela.................100, I Rosberg, Alfred ..V ................ Ross, Betty...L..........37. 49, 74. 1 Roycraft, Marguerite..............58, Rudolph. Harold .................... Ruid, Orville...................77. I Russell. Lucille................50. I Ryan, Elynor.....................58, I 5 Salav. Lily................74. 126. I Sandberg, Arthur.........35. 50. 74. I Sandberg, Dorothy.................30. Sandberg. Irene .................... PSather, Florence. .'..............59. Sauter, Lorraine............76. 112, 1 Schildt, Eleanor..................... Schultz, Phyllis................114, 1 Secombe, Alice.................98, 114 Sexton, Frank .....................124 Shaw, Catherine............50. 75. 102 Shepard, Frank.....................124 Sherlock. Florence.........59, 97. 106 Silverness, Eugene................. 80 Singer, Edward..............80. 81 Singer. Leo....£........75. 80. 81. 126 Singer, Merton .................... 36 Smith. Barbara.. ..............50. 100 Smith. William.................36, 120 Snell. Phyllis.................59. 114 Soloski, Theodore..................148 Sorenson, Margie ..................114 Stebbins, Edna.,112, 114. 126. 152. 154 Stevens, Ruth..............30. 59. 114 Stewart, Martha....................37, 59 Suomola. Velma .................... 33 Suplick, Rose.......................59 Summerfield. Janice ............... 59 Swanson, Alice.................97. 102 Swanson, Ruth ..................... 59 Swanstrom, Verena .................104 Swiatek, John.................50, 124, 126 T |'T Talvity. Elizabeth X.............. 37 Terry, Lois........................ 80 Teske, Anthony.....................124 Thompson. Norman ..................124 Thompson, Valborg..............60. 154 Thtine, Jerome... .......120, 135, 146 Ticknor, Margie. ..........60, 98, 114 Trebilcock, Ardella................106 Tuckwood, Elva Marie ..............110 Turney, Elizabeth....) ....50. 97, 100 V Van Arman, Ethern..................148 Van Cleve. Lyle...............124, 148 Vorous, Vaughn ....................124 Wall. Marcella... L.........35. 97. 98 Wallender, Kenneth) .......36, 74. 126 Wanhapiha, Clara.................. 51 Webb. Ruth ........................100 Wedin, Lenore .....................108 Wcdin. Vivian.......t.........112. 114 Whealdon. Phillips. ...........51. 118 White, Donald......................120 Whitmore. Virginia............100, 152 Wickman, Gordon...............120, 126 Wickstrom, Catherine ..............102 Wickstrom, Margaret................102 Widdes, Ossie ....D............... 51 Widness Ronald................124, 126 Wiles. Ethel..................114, 154 Williams, Lucille ................ 81 Winslow, Mary Jane.............60, 110 1 Wold, Dorothy .....................104 Wright, Vern ......................139 Yale, Florence ....r...........51, 100 Yaworski. Tony .................... 75 Yokum. Fred....................36, 51 z Zeleznick, Harrie....;........139, 142 Zygmunt, Valentine....79, 80, 112, 154 WISCONSIN-SUPERIOR university 001776234


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