University of Wisconsin Superior - Gitche Gumee Yearbook (Superior, WI)

 - Class of 1927

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University of Wisconsin Superior - Gitche Gumee Yearbook (Superior, WI) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 208 of the 1927 volume:

"“Books thoroughly delight us, speak to us, console us.” George Eliot. "Volqmp o 2l bp @ylcbi£ Glpipp mqcjfi qocj popfiolpcj id TJ Jftr of 0q?£ )7yol£0£ hcpcjT cj qocj S§§1 fw£o[y SpvpoSSSby [b£ XlE QO pfby S£oyw clqss of J fq[p Jfoytrql C L cj of fh£ Cyfie of JTqp£TioT r fqfe of m £§ HTscodsId 83S1S"‘But natheles, whul I have tyme and space, Br that I ferthcr in this tale pace, CDe thinkcth it acordaunt to resoun. Go telle you al the condicioun Of ech of hem.” Chaucer. Contents Taculty Seniors Organizations Activities Athletics Satireuntti; "Across the meadows bare and brown, Ghc windows of the wayside inn Gleaned red with (ire-light through the leaves of woodbine, hanging from the eaves Ghere crimson curtains rent and thin.” Congfellow Qty IFomwirxt As in the jast the works and thoughts of men were preserved for the future through writing; so it has been the aim of the editors to put into this book a record of the activities and achievements of the students of Superior Normal during this past year. As the lights of the Wayside Inn glow out into the darkness and betoken the warmth, cheer, and life within, so may this book pierce the haze of gathering years and help each student in remembering the good fellowship and keen joy they found at college. i •« A .X' A IPmmttatum The Senior class presents this hook to President Oillett, who has taken such a human interest in every student in the school, who is directing the growth of this college into one of the leading institutions of learning in the country, whose industry and scholarship has been a source of inspiration to all the students.IDe dedicate this booh to those authors, who like ‘Pindar Chaucer (Dilton George Eliot Shelley Longfellow Galsworthy Olive Schriener Joseph Conrad Charles Pickens have used literature to "interpret the ways of God to (Dan.” John COilton"CDakc me thy lyre, even ns the forest is; lOhat if my leaves arc falling like its own! 3he tumult of thy mighty harmonies IDill take from both a deep autumnal tone, Sweet though in sadness. 'Be thou, Spirit fierce, CDy spirit! Be thou me, impetuous one! Drive my dead thoughts over the universe Bike withered leaves to quicken new birth! And, by the incantation of this verse Scatter, as from an unextinguished hearth Ashes and sparks, my words among mankind! Be through my lips to unawakened earth £?he trumpet of a prophecy! O wind If winter comes, can Spring be far behind?” Bercy B. Shelley How happy is he horn and taught That servctli not another's wilt; Whose armor is his honest thought And simple truth his utmost skill. Whose passions not his masters are. Whose soul is still prepared for death. Not tied unto the world with care Of public fame, or private breath; Who envies none that chance doth raise Or vice, who never understood How deepest wounds are given by praise; Nor rules of state, but rules of good; Who hath his life from rumors freed. Whose conscience is his strong retreat; Whose state can neither flatterers feed. Nor ruin make accusers great; This man is freed from servile bands Of hope to rise, or fear to fall; Lord of himself, though not of lands; And having nothing, yet hath all. —Sir Henry Woften.MANITOU FALLS icticffte 5umeedf e Site fie Suniee c ' CARLTON W. SMITH. A. B. Mathematics, 1896 University of Minnesota University of Wisconsin Columbia University ALBERT I). WHEALDOX. M. A. Chemistry. 1903 University of Missouri University of Wisconsin University of Berlin Harvard University • FACULTY JAMES A. MERRILL, S. B. Geology, 1902 William Jewel College North Central Teacher's College, Mo. GRACE GEARY History and Arithmetic, 1909 I-orest Park University —11— HARRIET EATON Librarian, 1902 Oshkosh Normal School Pratt Institute Brooklyn, N. Y. CAROLINE W. BARBOUR Principal. Kindergarten Training. 1909 Chicago Kindergarten Collegiate Institute Teacher’s College Columbia University Chicago UniversityOfie £iitcfu guinea AMY BRONSKY. Pll. B.. M. A. Director of Intermediate Department, 1910 University « l Wisconsin Columbia University NONA MacQUIl.KIN. Pit. B. English. 1911 University of Chicago University of California Columbia University V. E. BRAMAN Manual Arts. 1912 Normal Training School. New York Oswego .Manual Training School C. J. ROLLEPSON. M. D. Medical Advisor Physiology, 1912 St. Olaf College IRENE CURTIS. B. S. Mustlc. 1912 Obcrlln Conservatory Columbia University FACULTY AGNES V. KIRK. Ph. B. Director of junior High School. 1911 l.indenwood College North Central Teachers' College University of Chicago University of California —12—3fie Sitcfic JSumee FACULTY t. j. McCarthy, m. s. Agriculture lUology. 1913 West Virginia university Michigan Agriculture Cnllegv BU.KN At. CLARK. A. B. Dean of Women History. 1913 University ol Chicago Graduate work O. I.. LOOP. A. li.. At. A. History. 1919 University ol Indiana H. C. ALMY. I’ll. B. Psychology Pedagogy. I9IS River Palls Normal University ol Wisconsin V. E. VAN PATTER. At. S. Director of Teacher's Training. 1920 Dakota Wesleyan University. University ol Wisconsin. PRANK E. VITZ. A. B.. At. A English. 1921 University of Wisconsin —13— eJfW 25itcfie jinnee IRA I. TUBBS. B. A. Athletic Director Coach, 1921.. William Jewell College Sterling College, Kansas FACULTY BLANCHE E. HARSH Kindergarten Wood's Kindergarten ami Primary Scliool Teenhers College. Columbia JOANNA TEERINK, B. A. Assistant Director, Teacher's Training. 1922 •Iowa Stale Teacher's College JANE REHNSTRANI) Art, 1922 Art Institute. Chicago Columbia University Applied Art School. Chicago Lewis Institute. Chicago Minneapolis School of Arts Lcland Stanford E. H. SCHRIEBBR. A B.. M. S. Physics. 1922 Southern Illinois Normal Washington University, St. Louis University of Illinois University of Wisconsin THORPE M. LANGLEY. A. B. Geology and Geography. 1922 Superior State Normal University of Wisconsin British Training School.. St. Omer —14—Site fie S»»iec GERTRUDE UNTHANK. A. B. Supervisor of Music. Training School. 1023 University of Nebraska Earlham College Chicago Art Institute Cincinnati Conservatory of Music New York School of Fine anil Applied Arts S. HORACE WILLIAMS. Ph. B.. A. M. Psychology, 1923 University of Chicago University of Colorado University of Wisconsin Columbia Teacher's College IRENE TORVICK Kindergarten Critic, 1924 Superior Normal Teacher's College, Columbia University HELEN E. LOTH. Ph. B.. M. A. Latin and Spanish. 1924 University of Chicago University of Southern California MINDA P. HOVLAND Critic. First Grade, 1924 Eau Claire Normal University of Minnesota FLORENCE WALDE Text-book Librarian. 1924 Superior Normal ity-Olu? Sitcfta JJumee c FACULTY NANCY GILLIAM. A. B. Critic Fourth Grade. 1925 Colorado Slate Teacher's College DOROTHY WAITE A. B., M. A. History. 1925 University of Nebraska MRS. BESSIE A. BENTON B. A. French. 1925 University of Minnesota EVANDA BECKER Critic. Fourth Grade. 1925 Superior State Normal University of Minnesota ABIGAIL PITT Critic. Third Grade. 1925 Superior Normal GRETCHEN PALMATIEK A'unit Department. 1925 Milwaukee Normal University ol Chicago -1C-NEI.I. K. GLEASON. I'll. It. Critic. Fifth Grade. 1925 Stevens Point Normal University ol Wisconsin .MARY E. E.MGH. A. It. Fnglisli. 1926 University ol liullnna University ol Chicago 3fie fiitcfie Jjumee FACULTY ISABEL K. WALLACE. A. It.. M. A. Psychology. 1926 University of Rochester Bryn Mawr College University ol Chicago .MILTON WEEKS Assistant in Chemistry. 1925 Superior Normal RUTH ALICE ZEI.EZNICK Assistant Librarian. 1925 Superior Normal HAZEL A. SEGUIN’. It. A. Biology. 1926 University ol Wisconsin Lake Forest College —17—MRS. CAROLYN SCHWARTZ A. B.. M. A. Critic. Fourth Grade. 1926 Columbia University 3fic Site fie umee FACULTY MARY B. DEATON, A. B.. M. A. English, 1926 Mississippi State College Columbia University MYRA M. HOWIE. B. S. Home Economies. 1926 University o( Minnesota Iowa State College LILIAN B. WHELAN Critic of Seventh and Eighth Grades, 1922 Superior Normal University of Minnesota BERTHA TRUDELI.E Critic. Sixth Grade, 1922 Superior Normal School Columbia University FLORENCE TENNEY, B. S. Physical Education, 1926 University ol Minnesota -I -JiitcfiG £hmiec JOYCE'WILLIAMS Registrar MABEL M'KINNON Clerk MABEL WALTZ Clerk BERTHA L. CAKNS. I'll. B. Director. Rural Depart me nl. 1919 Platteville Normal Crane School University of Wisconsin GRACE E. BARNEY. A. B.. M. A. French. 1921 Superior Normal University ol Wisconsin University ot Dijon. France University ol Minnesota KATHRYN OILMAN. B. A. Social Science Critic. 192S Bellevue College University ot Chicago HUI.DA MATTSON Nurse Crownlinrt Hall GLADYS BOCK Clerk. Training School. 1925 MRS. ANNA TAYLOR Matron Crownhart Hall 19—0 Dfw Jiitcfte umee ©Pfwrtimttg This I beheld, or dreamed it in a dream— There spread a cloud of dust along a plain; And underneath the cloud, or in it, raged A furious battle, and men yelled, and swords Shocked upon swords and shields. A prince’s banner Wavered, then staggered backward, hemmed by foes. A craven hung above the battle's edge, And thought, “Had I a sword of keener steel— That blue blade that the kings son bears,—but this Blunt thing—!" he snapt and flung it from his hand. And lowering crept away and left the field. Then came the king's son, wounded, sore bestead And weaponless, and saw the broken sword. Hilt-buried in the dry and trodden sand, And ran and snatched it, and with battle-shout Lifted afresh he hewed his enemy down, And saved a great cause that heroic day. —Edward Rowland Sill.§ ?ttta b "punters of gold or pursuers of fame, they all had gone out on that stream.........bearers of a spark from the sacred fare.” Joseph Conradw - tifie Sitcfta umee SENIORS Ballou Churcliill Hanson SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS President Secretary Treasurer Elvin Cliurcliilt Betty Hanson Evelyn Ballou Bln and Hint; Committee Dorothy l.arscn. Chairman Delia de Diana Edwin Kommes Cap and dawn Committee Betty Hanson, Chairman Susie Okonck Thomas O’Neill Mary Marsh SENIOR ACTIVITIES Baccalaureate Committee Clara Iverson. Chairman Thomas Shaw Annie l.amoe Clast Blay Committee I.eRny Jacobsen. Chairman Evelyn Ballou Maurice Wrlcht Dammar Carlson Friday, April 22 Friday. May 20 . Sunday, June S Wednesday. June b Thursday. June 9 SENIOR CLASS PLAY "You and I." by Philip Harry RECEPTION TO SENIORS AND FACULTY President and Mrs. A. I). S. (iillelt BACCALAUREATE ADDRESS President A. D. S. Cillctl Normal School Auditorium Hotel Androy Normal School Auditorium Normal School Auditorium CLASS DAY EXERCISES Normal School Auditorium COMMENCEMENT Address by Herbert Hoover. Secretary ol Commerce —21—Jjitcfie Quince SENIORS EDITH K. ALZENB................Jesse Lake. Minn. Rural Sigma Rlin. Girls' Glee Club. PLOKENCE ANDERSON Grammar Junior Ili h Sigma Gamma Chi '25. '26. '27. Sccrctar-Treasurcr. '20. W. A. A.—Vice-President. Y. W. C. A.—President. ’2ft. HELEN ANDERSON Grammar junior Ilinli Sigma Omega—President. '27. Sigma Gamma Chi Cabinet. Y. V. C. A.—Vice-President. '2ft. W. A. A. '25. ’26. LOUISE ANDERSON Intermediate MARGARET K. ANDERSON.... Rural Sigma Rho. Danbury, Wis. MARION ANDERSON Kinder garlen-Rrlmary Lambda Sigma Lambda. Secretary '27. Vodvil '27 Owl and Serpent. MARIE ANDERSON .Superior, Wis. Intermediate3fte itcfie Eunice » ASTRID ANDERSON. .South Ranee. WIs. Rural Sigma Rho, MARGARET ANGVICK .South Ranee. Wis. Intermediate ISABELLE BALDWIN.................. Kindergarten-Primary Girls' Glee Club. Graduate ol l.a Crosse Normal. .Sparta, Wis. PRANCES BALL .Superior. Wis. Intermediate Applesauce EVELYN BALLOU..................... Kindergarten-Primary Department President 27. Alpha Kappa—President '2f . Senior Class Treasurer. Yndvll—'20 27. "Goose Hanes High.” "Applesauce.” .Superior. Wis. LILLIAN BARIBEAU Saxon. Wis. Rural Sigma Rho.■ RUTH HERGENE..................... Dallas. NVIs. Grammar Junior High Department President '26. Sigma Omega—President '26. Owl and Serpent. Sigma Gamma Chi '27. G. A. A. MARY BERTRAND......................Superior. WIs. Grammar Junior High Sigma Omega. Girls' Glee Club. Prom Committee '27. GLADYS BI.OMGRKN..................Frederic, Wis. Kindergarten-Primary Lambda Sigma Lambda. Vodvll '27. LILLIAN BECK...-....................Nibbing, Minn. Kindergarten-Primary Alpha Kappa—Treasurer '27. Sigma Gamma Chi. CONSTANCE BEECHER Superior, Wis. High School Training Girls' Glee Club—President '27. Prom Committee ’26. BERYL BELL__________________________ Superior. Wis. Grammar Junior High Alpha Kappa—President ’27. Vodvll ’26. '27. GltClie Art Editor '27. EUNICE BOLINGER..—...............Superior, Wis. Intermediate W. A. A. 3fie £iitcfW tfumee c i I i I 1 « i i — 21-•OLGA BROWN............................Superior. Wis. Intermediate Department Vice-President '26. Secretary '27. Alpha Kappa—Secretary ’27. RUTH ELIZABETH BYBERO......Superior, Wis. Grammar Junior High DORA CAMPBEl.t....................Evclctli. Minn. Kindergarten-Primary Sigma (ia hi inn Ctrl. DOROTHY CAI.DWELI................... Ladysmith. Wis. Intermediate Sigma On in in a Chi. Y. W. C. A. DAOMAR CARLSON........................-...Superior, Wis. High School Training l.amtidn Sigma l.amtida. President ’27. Peptoinist ’2fl, ’27. Gitclic ’27. Vodvil '25, ’27. Secretary ol English Group '27. •25— AGNES M. BRENIIOLDT............Cushing. Wis. Grammar Junior High G. A. A. Sigma Rho. Y. W. C. A. HARRIET CATHERINE BOWSER...........Superior, Wis. High School Training Drama Study—Secretary '25. President '26. "Happiness.” Owl and Serpent. Secretary of English Group ’26. ejfm £iitcl e }jiitnee c r SENIORS—1 — 3 fie tiiicfui umee SVEA CARLSON..........................Bennett. WIs. Kindergarten-Primary NORMAN J. CHRISTENSON.........Luck. WIs. Grammar Junior High LILLIAN CHRISTOPHERSON.........Mnndovl. WIs. High School Training Glee Clul) '25. ’27. G. A. A. '25. ELVIN CHURCHII.I High School Training Lambda Della Chi. President ’27. Owl and Serpent. Peploinist—Editor ’2.r . Gitche—Associate Editor ’2fi. F.ditor-in-Chiel ‘21. "Goose Hangs High.” Debate ’25. ’2fi. ’27. Orator ’26. Extempore ’25. '27. Senior Class President. ’27. Social Committee. Athletic Cabinet ’26. ’27. LUCY PATRICIA COCKSON Rural Sigma Kho—President. GOLDIE COHEN Grammar Junior High W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. FRANCIS COUNIHAN .Superior, Wis. High School Training Lambda Sigma Lambda. Sigma Delta Phi.-27— 3fte 3itcfie £junu e ELLEN DA HI..........................Superior, Wis. Intermediate Orchestra '26. '27. HAZEL DAHI..........-............. Superior, Wis. High School Training Sieina Pi. W. A. A. '26—President '27. Y. W. C. A—Secretary '26. DALLAS DARROW............................. Superior, Wis. High School Training SiK na Delta Phi. Y. W. C. A. '26. '27. Orchestra '25, '26. '27. PLORBNCE It. DE POI................. Itcssmer. Mich. Intermediate Sicilia Gamma Chi. DELIA lie DIANA Hurley, Wis. Kinder gar ten-Primary Social Committee ’26. '27. "Prom” '26. ESTELLE DICKMAN............................Superior. Wis. Kindergarten-Primary ETHEL M. EATON..................... Duluth. Minn. Intermediate Sigma Pi. Vndvll '26. '27. ''Goose Hangs High’’ '27. Peptoniist '25. '26.df e Uitcfic Uumec SENIORS Mil.I.IB A. EKEBERG McIntosh. Minn. Rural Vice-President ol Department. Sigma Rho. CAROL BKSTROM..........................Superior. Wis. High School Training Lambda Sigma Lambda '26, ’27. Vodvil ’27. FLORENCE ERICKSON.............Port Wing. Wis. High School Training Gamma Phi Epsilon. Vodvil '26 Y. W. C. A. ALICE MARY EVON..._.................Superior. Wis. Rural Sigma Rho. LLOYD FITZGERALD...............Duluth, Minn. High School Training GLADYS D. PLATT...............Stanley. North Dakota Intermediate Sigma Gamma Chi. DORIS FOX--------------------------Virginia. Minn. Grammar Junior High Lambda Sigma Lambda '26, '27. Treasurer '27. Vodvil '26. '27. "You and I." Owl and Serpent. —2S-JlUUUfc dfie Sitefu» Suniee MAP. P. FREEMAN........................ Ccnturi . Wis. Kindergarten-Primary Alpha Kappa '27. Sicilia Gamma Chi ’26. ’27. Y. W. C. A. '26. '27. W. A. A. ’2G. MARIE FRIIS........................... Superior, Wis. High School Training Gamma Phi Epsilon. President '27. Gitchc Stall 25, ’26, '27. Vodvll '27. GENEVIEVE FRONCKIEWICZ..._.......Superior. Wis. Intermediate EDNA MAE Gil.I.....................Superior, Wis. Intermediate Alpha Kappa—Treasurer '26. GOI.DIE HENRIETTA GOTHAM..............-...Bnylield. Wis. Grammar Junior High Sigma Gamma Chi ’26. '26. '27. Y. W. C. A. '26. ’27. Secretary ’27. GEORGE GUSTAFSON............ Port Winn. Wis. Grammar Junior High Sigma Delta Phi. Chairman of Senior Ring and Pin Committee ’25. PEARL GUSTAFSON............ Karat Sigma Rho—Secretary ’27. .......Webster. Wis.3fu JSitcfie utnee ‘ SENIORS RUTH (JUSTAI-SON..................Fort Wins. Wis. High School Training GRACE HACKER...............-......-...Superior. Wis. Grammar Junior High SYLVIA HAF.SKY....................Chisholm. Minn. Kinder gar ten-Hrimary Sigma Gamma Chi. ERNA HAMILTON...............-.....Iron River. Wis. Kinder garlen-P rimary FERN HAGRF.F.N..............-.....-...Superior. Wis. Grammar Junior High HETTY A. HANSON.....................Superior. Wis. High School Training l.nmbda Sigma Lambda. President ’2fi. Secretary Senior Class. Gitclie 25. '20, '27. Prom Committee 26. '27. Owl and Serpent. Sigma Delta Phi. Social Committee. •'Kenipjr.” "You and I." RUBY HANSON.......................... Draper. Wis. Grammar Junior High Sigma Omega. Vice-President '27. Prom Committee ’27.eJfic J5itc fie Gurnee JANE HARRISON------------------------Mason. WIs. Kinder cor ten-Primary Three Arts—Treasurer '27. Sigma Gamma Chi. Vice-President. Vodvll 26. G. A. A. RUTH H. HAUO-----------------------------Duluth. Minn. Intermediate MYRNA HEBERLEIN........._...Solon Springs, WIs. Grammar Junior HI eh Three Arts. "Hansel and Grctcl” '27. Vodvil '26. JOHN HENNESY.. Hi Cl' School Trainlnc ...Superior, Wis. EDWARD HILTON...................... ...Superior. Wis. HICh School Trainlnc Lambda Delta Chi. Secretary '27. Lambda Delta Chi Trio. Sigma Delta Phi. "The Goose Hangs High." "Applesauce.’’ Cheer Leader '27. Peptoinist Stall. Gltche Stall. Hand ’27. Rally Committee. Stage Manager ol "Hansel and Gretel.” CECIL HIPPI.E.—-------------------- Hibblng. Minn. Kinder car ten-Primary Drama Study '25, 26. '27. Vodvil '26. "Cassclis Engagement.” RUTH HOARD------------------------ Clear Lake. Wis. Grammar Junior Hleh Sigma Gamma Chi Y. W. C. A. '27. Delegate to National Student Conlcrencc. W. A. A. '26. '27. Athletic Board. Varsity Basketball. -31Ofte itcfie 9umce PHYLLIS M. IIOOAN. Kcrrick, Minn, Kirulergarlcn-Pr!. c. Sicilia Gamma Chi. .Wentworth, Wis. Sigma Rho. MYRTI.E IIOSTAGF.R.................... Kinder garicn-Prii. ary Three Arts. President '26. '27. Sicilia Gamma Chi '25, ’2fi. Senior Ring and I’in Committee. G. A. A. '25. '20. .Superior, Wis. RUTH ISAACSON Superior. Wis. Kinrtcrgurlcn-Prlmury CLARA IVERSON........................ High School Training Sigma Pi— Vice-President '23. President '27. Owl and Serpent. Vodvil-—Business Manager ’2l . General Manager "27. Pcptomist '25. ’2l . '27. Managing Editor '26. (iilclic—Assistant Editor '26. "27. Prom Committee ”20, ”27. Sigma Delta Phi "20. '27. Secretary-Treasurer "27. Social Committee '25. '26. Royal Plush '25. '26. '27. .Mason. Wis. I.E ROY JACOBSEN Pour Year High Lambda Delta Chi. Vodvil '25. ‘•Applesauce’' "27. Glee Club. Chairman ol Senior Class Play Committee. "You and I.” Prom Committee ’27. Superior. Wis. ’ h ioI Vrainingtifie 9itcfie Quince N’INA I.. JACOBSON..............Cumberland, Wis. Intermediate Y. W. C. A. KATHARINE At. JEGLOSKY.............Gilbert. Minn. K in tier marten-Primary Alpha Kappa. Sigma Gamma Chi. Vndvil ’20. "27. JANICE JEWETT.....................Superior. WIs. (trammer Junior I Huh Orchestra. HBATRYCE At. JOHNSON.................Amery. WIS. Rural Sigma Rho—Treasurer '27. BERNICE JOHNSON...................Superior. Wis. Grammar Junior Hi ah ELSIE At. JOHNSON.................Superior. Wis. Intermediate GLADYS JOHNSON....................Superior. Wis. Grammar Junior lliuh Alpha Kappa. Vndvil ’26, ’27. Prom Committee '26. Basketball '26HELEN M. JOHNSON.................Washburn. Wis. Grammar Junior High Sigma (iamma Chi ’27. Senior Ring anil Pin Comniitlee. ZEI.DA JOHNSON............... Intermediate Y. W. C. A. W. A. A. Si ma Gamma Chi .Milltown. Wis. TYYNE KAARI..........................Hurley. Wis. Rural Sigma Rho. ROSE J. KENNER.................Duluth. .Minn. Intermediate AVIS MARIE KIRBY.................... Hurley, Wis. X Grammar Junior High AGNES E. KOKKO...........................Nnshwauk, Minn. Intermediate Y. W. C. A. 27. EDWIN KOMMES..........................Superior, Wis. High School Training Kappa Rho Epsilon. Ofie 5itcfte Quince c "Site fie umce DOROTHY A. I.ARSEN....................Spooner. Wis Intermediate Sigma PI—Treasurer '27. Sigma Gamma Clii—President '27. Chairman o! Senior Pin and Ring Committee. HELEN M. LARSON...................Rice Lake. WIs. Klndereartcn-Primary Y. W. C. A. Sigma Gamma Clii. MYRTLE ALICE LARSON................Superior. WIs. Intermediate MILDRED LE JEUKE......................Cumberland. Wi . Grammar Junior Hint Simula Gamma Clii '25. ’2fi. ’27. Y. W. C. A. ’2.V Treasurer ’26. Vice-President. ’27. Sigma Omega, ’20, ’27. NORA I.EITZKE.....................Abbotsiord. WIs. Kindergarten-Primary Sigma Gamma Clii. Y. W. C. A. IIELENE I.ESZYNSKI......................Superior. Wis. Intermediate Owl and Serpent. CI.AUOINE I.IBERATO...............Iron wood. Mich. Grammar Junior lllfth W. A. A.I HELEN MANLEY.......................... Superior. Wis. High School Training Three Arts Vodvil '25. MARY MARSH---------------------------Superior. Wis. Kindergarten-Primary LA VERNE LIND...........................Poplar. Wis. Klndcrgarlc n-Primary Y. W. C. A. W. A. A. OLGA I.OKEN ............ Thief River Palls. Minn. (h corner junior Hijh Sigma Omega. Sigma Gamma Chi. W. A. A. Athletic Hoard. ANNA MAJERLE----------------------- Ribbing. Minn. Kinder garten-Prln.ary Sigma Gam 111:1 Chi. Y. W. C. A.—Treasurer ’27. ANNIE I.OMOE................... Advanced Rural Department President ’20. Sigma Rlto. Y. W. C. A. ....Superior. Wis. MAYME L. MAKEI.A. Sigma Rlto. Rural East Lake. Minn. 35itcfie Quince SENIORS3 3fie tf itcfie jinnee SENIORS HRMA I.. MARTINDAI.E.................Superior. WIs. Kindergarten-Primary MONA McCABE........................ Virginia, Minn. Grammar Junior High Department Vice-President '27. Three Arts—Vice-President '27. Sigma Gamma Chi ’2.r». ’26. ’27. GI.ADYCE .McKHOUGH..................Milwaukee, Wis. Kindergarten-Primary Milwaukee Normal. RUTH .Mel.El.I.AN.—..................Superior. Wis. Kindergarten-Primary Three Arts ’26. '27. Vodvil '27. MILDRED McMAHON......................Superior. Wis. High School Training Alpha Kappa ’25. ’26. ’27. I.EOI.A MELLON....................... Iron River. Wis. Intermediate Department Vice-President. Gamma Phi Epsilon. Owl and Serpent. RUTH E. MOLINE...................Wentworth. Wis. Rural Sigma Rho. —37—tJhe i itcfie Eunice SENIORS ESTHER.!.. MOORE.................Superior. XVIs. Rural Sigma Rho. DOROTHY MOYI.AN....................... Superior. Wl . (iranunur Junior lliuh HELEN MURRAY........................Hlhblng. .Minn. Rural Department Trenrurer '27. Sigma Rho. Sigma Gamma Chi. FLORENCE MUSOI.P.......................Ilibbing. Minn. Grammar Junior I Hull Y. W. C. A.—Vice-President. W. A. A. "27. EDNA NEII........................... Superior. Wis. Ktiuleruar ten-Primary Drama Study ’2.r . '26. "27. Vodvll '26. EUNICE NELSON..........................Superior. Wis. Intermediate. Sigma Pi. MYRTLE NELSON........................... Poplar. Wis. Intermediate Y. W. C. A. —38— i ! » A. EUGENE PETERSON.....................Superior, Wis. Hinti School Training «0 WILLIAM NOLAN.........-...-.......Ironwood. Mich. High School Training Lambda Delia Chi—President '20. Social Chairman ’2»i. '27. Gitche '25. '26. Peptomist Stall. Prom Committee ’25. ’26. "Goose Hangs High." "You and I." Vndvil '25. '26. History Group—Vice-President. MRS. JOSEPHINE NORTH.............Shell Lake. Wis. Intermediate Department Vice-President. Y. W. C. A. SUSIE OKOKEK.......................Spooner. Wis. Advanced Hu rat Sigma Rho—Secretary ’26. ESTHER OLSON....................Iron River, Wis. Intermediate Gamma Phi Epsilon. GERTRUDE OUIMETTE...................Abbotsford. Wis. Kindergarten-Primary Sigma (inmma Chi. W. A. A. ’26. ’27. Treasurer '27. JESSIE PAUI.US.........................Superior. Wis. High School Training Dfie Uitclie Eunice 3fW SitcfW 5umee SENIORS IRENE PEI.I.ERIN......................Superior IgA School Training Lambda Sigma Lambda ’2.'». 2«». 27. Vodvil '27. LORETTA PERI.HERO..................Hurley Rural Sigma Rlio. ENOENIE PERRIN.................Star Prairie Grammar Junior High Alpha Kappa '20. '27. Vice-President. Sigma Gamma Chi. Vodvil '27. Social Committee ’27. ADA PERSON--------------------------- Virginia. Intermediate Sigma Omega Vice-President '20. HII.DUR PETERSON...-.....-...........Saxon. Intermediate TIIEI.MA PETERSON....................Harron. Intermediate Sigma Omega. Sigma Gamma Chi '2d. '27. PATRICIA PHELAN...................Watersmeet. Intermediate Department President ’27. Sigma Omega. Vice-President ”2(i. Secretary ’27. . Wis. . Wis. Wis. Minn. Wis. Wis. Mich. —•10—3fie Jjitcfie Quince MYRTI.lv I'lllI.A1 AN.......Lake Nebagamon, Wis. IIlull School Training (lice Club '25. ’26. DOROTHY PROFFIT Clovcrton. Minn. Intermediate Y. W. C. A. (ill.DA REBELI.A...................................Mcllcn. Wis. Intermediate FRANCES RISDON....................... L ulutlt. Minn. High School Training Lambda Sicilia Lambda '27. University nf Wisconsin. Peptomist '2-1, 25. 27. Managing Editor '25. Editor-inChief '27. (iitclic Staff "25. "27. Debate Team. '25. '27. Sigma Delta Phi "2-1. "25. "27. Publicity Manager Vodvil '27. Assembly Committee '27. Prom Committee "27. Chairman Lambda Vodvil '27. LEONA EVELYN ROME...................Danbury. Wis. Rural Sigma Rlto. FERN ROCKWOOD.......................Superior. Wis. Kindergarten-Primary Three Arts '26. "27. "Hansel and Orelel.” Glee Club. OLIVE ROI.LA........................Duluth. Minn. Kindergarten-Primary df e Sitcfte Suniee CLARENCE R. ROSVAI.I.......Duluth. Minn. Grammar Junior lli h Gltclie Art Stall. ALICE SAFPORD......................Superior. Wis. Kindergarten-Primary Slcinn Pi. "Applcsausc.” Sprinu Festival. OLIVE E.SATHKR ................... Scnndon. Minn Intermediate Department Secretary '2.' . Alpha Kappa. V. A. A. Sicilia Gamma Chi. DELL A. SCHANDORIT.....................Luck. WIs Grammar Junior Welt Y. W. C. A. I.KNORE SEEGER...............Wakdicld. Mich. Intermediate SiRina Ganiina Chi. RUTH SHALEEN.....................Duluth. Minn. Kinder garlen-Pr Imary Si ma Pi. Chairman l K.-P. Tea ’2 i. Vodvll Committee ’27. THOMAS SHAW.—.................. Superior. Wis. Grammar Junior Illy ItDfie Biicfie jinnee HEI.BNK SIIOI.UND.. Sigma Rho. If lira I •Superior. WIs. ANNA SKARIS.. Y. W. C. A. Grammar Junior III ah ..Giles, WIs. GLADYS SMITH.................... -..Superior. WIs. Grammar Junior Hit’ll Lambda Sigma Lambda. Owl and Serpent. Orchestra '27. Sigma Delta Phi. ,NEZ SM,TH---------------------------Cheek. WIs. Kindergarten-Primary Wisconsin University. Sigma Gamma Chi. W. A. A. Cheer Leader '27. Vodvil '27. HELEN SOKNSON............. Mural Sigma Elio. Department President '27. Y. W. C. A. Sigma Gamma Chi. ■Cushing. WIs. MARJORIE STENEHJEN New Richmond. Wis. Kindergarten-Primary Three Arts. Vice-President ’2d. Treasurer ’27. Sigma Gamma Chi. Social Committee ’2l . '27. EVELYN STROM Sigma Rho. .........Spring River, Minn. MuralMAROARP.T STRUM................ Superior. WIs. Intermediate ZAIDA SWANSON....................Solon Springs. WIs. Rural Sigma Rim. IRMA SWENSON........... SI. Paul. Minn. Grammar Junior High Sigma Omega. W. A. A. MARIE THOMPSON..................... .....Stanley. WIs. Grammar Junior High IVORA TOI.I.ERUD...........—------ Superior. WIs. Intermediate Department President ’27. Alpha Kappa—Vice-President ’26. Owl an dSerpent. I.UCII.I.E TOMPKINS...........—.Minneapolis. Minn. Four Year High Sehool Training Three Arts. LEAH TOUKVILI.E.—.......................Superior, Wl . Intermediate —II— Of»e Quincefjfic Sitcfie Eunice SENIORS AI.ICE VIOLET WALLIN..............Superior. Wis. Grammar Junior High GLADYS WANOEN........................Superior. Wis. Kindergarten-Primary K. P. Ilislorian ’27. Orchestra ’2li. May Festival '26. DORIS WARD,--------------------------Superior. Wi . Intermediate Sl ma Pi. DOROTHY WEADE........................Superior. Wis. High School Training Gamma Phi Epsilon '26. '27. Secretary '27. Y. W. C. A. '26. ’27. W. A. A. '26. ’27. ARAMELI.A WELSH-------------------- Bayfield. Wis. High School Training Three Arts. "Ilertsel and Gretcl." SiRina Gamma Chi. MARTHA WALTERS........................ Hurley, Wis. Kindergarten - Primary I". EI.EENE WHITE.................Rhinelander, Wis. Grammar Junior High Sigma Gamma Chi.cJfW JJitcfW Jjunice SENIORS EVEI.YN JEANETTE WILLIAMS Superior. Wis. Intermediate Sigma Pi—Secretary-Treasurer '27. Vltlvll '26. '27. Cheer Leader ’2.r». '26. ANNA V. WILSON. Kindergarten-Primary Alpha Kappa. Sigma Gamma Clii. W. A. A. '26. Bayfield. Wis. MARGARET WILSON. Superior. Wis. High School Training Gamma Phi Epsilon—Treasurer '26. '26. Y. W. C. A.—Secretary ’26. ’27. MAURICE K. WRIGHT.................... Superior. Wis. High School Training Fex. Decoration Prom Chairman ’27. Peptomist ’25. ’26. ’27. Oltchc Stall ’27. President of History Group '27. Class Play Committee ’27. Band '27. Orchestra ’25. '26. VodvJI ’27. Inter-Fraternitv Basketball. JOHN JOHNSON.......... High School Training Duluth. Minn. THOMAS MITCHELL Duluth. Minn High School Training University of Minnesota—3 years. Chairman ol Music Committee Prom ’27. MABLE O. KVARNES Intermediate Superior, Wis. E. —46—©rgantzaltnna As u Rome was so organized that the parts might work together for the good of the whole,” so a school should be. CeasarZ7 Ippartmfittfl ” Every man who rises above the common level receives two educations: the first from his instructors; the second—from himself.” Gibbons.rlfte JjitcfW 5umce HIGH SCHOOL TRAINING —47— VanKIcck St. John Wright llnrlhnlomcvv Longcvajr l.cstcr St. John Robert Van Meet. Robert l.ongcway OFFICERS President, Science President. History President. English I.ester St. John .Maurice Wright l.owell liartholomcw ln accordance with the usual custom, the High School Training Group was divided into three sections, Science. History, and English. SCIENCE Under the leadership of Prof. A. I). Whcnldon. the Science group has made considerable progress during the past year. Several scientific movies have been presented for the group during the past semesters and Prof. E. H. Schrieber has given a series of lectures on the “Einstein Theory of Relativity." HISTORY Prof. O. L. Loop was adviser for the History group during the past year. Varied and interesting programs prepared by a special program committee have been brought before the group this year. Informal debates on subjects of timely interest have proved very instructive. ENGLISH The year's group meetings of the English department have been a pleasant combination of serious, intensive thought on phases of English teaching and humorous lectures. Miss MacQuilkin has again acted as adviser of the group. Among the speakers who have appeared before the group are Pres. A. D. S. Gillctt, Prof. G. M. Snodgrass, and Prof. Frank E. Vitz.Ofie Sitcfie jinnee Anderson North Phelan Anderson Shipley OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Patricia Phelan President Ivor Tollcrud Josephine North Vlce-I’roulent l.eola Mellon Marie Anderson Treasurer Olga BroWM ............. Secretary ... .... Margaret McDonald Edith Shipley ... PrtlS Representative Evelyn Cal«H»» Director: AMY BRONSKY Superior Normal was one of the first schools in the country to offer specialized training for teachers of the intermediate grades. It did this because it recognized that the problems of the middle grades are very definite and distinct, and that in order to solve these intelligently and efficiently, teachers need special training. In September, 1923. a two year course leading to a diploma was established. The movement to raise salaries of grade teachers to the level of those of high school has for its slogan, “Equal Pay for Equal Training. Skill and Experience.” In order to provide such training for intermediate grade teachers. Superior Normal in the fall of 1920 offered a specialized third year of training which will be followed in September. 1927, by a fourth year. Graduates from this fourth year course will receive the degree of Bachelor of Education. The student wishing to prepare to teach in the Intermediate grades is eligible for either the two or the four year course. The Intermediate Department is well represented in the musical, literary, athletic, and social activities of the school. During 1920 and 1927 in addition to participating actively in the general school life it entertained at a formal tea, and enjoyed several informal “get-togethers." INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT tfie liitcfie Quince KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY -40— Evans Henson Shaken Barbour Wangen Straus President, first semester President, second semester VIcc-PreMdcnl Secretary______________ Treasurer . Historian .. „ Faculty Adviser Social Adviser ..... Student Welfare ‘To Do Is To Realize" OFFICERS Margaret Henson ....... Evelyn Ballou Pern Siroud --------- Grace Evans Ruth Shaken . . Gladys Wanccn Caroline w. Barbour Irene Torvkfc Blanche L. Barsc This year, more than ever before, the Kindergarten-Primary department has more nearly reached its ideal that of being a highly organized group working as an independent club. The Monday morning group meetings have been carried on in a very business-like manner and various business affairs of the group have been discussed. Because of the strong feeling of friendship which exists between the members of the department, it has been made possible for social welfare work to be successfully done outside of the group. At Christmas time the department did local welfare work in purchasing and dressing dolls which were distributed among the needy children of the city. Birthday Teas arc annual functions of the department. Members of the group arc divided according to the months in which their birthdays occur. Five birthday teas are given during the school year. The last Birthday Tea is automatically the Annual Spring Formal Tea and is the one big social affair of the department during the school year. This year it was held on Saturday afternoon, April 9, in the Kindergarten rooms of the Training School. Owl and Serpent elections this year included two members of the Kindergarten-Primarv department on the list. The group has also made its annual contribution to the McCaskill Friendship Fund. "Education is just growing up in the right way."—I)r. F. A. Bonser.Sitcftc Jjumee GRAMMAR-JUNIOR HIGH Hnwcnstcln I.arson Conroy Smith Johnson McCabe First Semester Florence Strauch Mona McCabe ____ Lcnorc Conroy Capitola Kennedy OFFICERS — 1’residenl ... Vlcc-Presidcn. . Secretary ... . Treasurer Second Semester .... Bernic« Johnson Gladys Smith . Grace Larsen Eunice Howenstine The Grammar-Junior High department has been considerably larger in number flf f It lO nt'ilF Kiilitrn (list f t lltii nioiiitlnn ltn»i ires' r Z.. 1.2. • 1IIIVH1 W ■ 1%'IUV I HIM J till I ••• II ' this year than ever before due to the granting of three-vear degrees in this department. The group has been acting this year under the advisorship of Prof. H. C. Almy and Miss group Grace Barney. During the first semester of the school year, the primary activity of the Grammar-junior High department was a luncheon which the department served in November. The luncheon was held on the third floor of the main building from the Domestic Science rooms. Over 2(X) persons were served. The money from the function was used to augment the group's pledge to the McCaskill Friendship Fund. Gladys Smith was general chairman of the luncheon. On Friday afternoon. April 22. the annual formal spring tea of the department was held. This was the primary activity of the second semester of this year. Approximately 200 guests attended the tea which was the most successful ever given by the group Spring colors and dainty spring flowers were used as decorations. Group meetings of the department have been talks, discussions, and studies of the problems of the teaching profession.Quince c RURAL DEPARTMENT .McKinney Murray Kkrbcrg Sorenson l.amoc Dennis Gustafson Okonck OFFICERS First Sc metier Second Semester A MM Lmim President Helen Sorenson Mildred Ekeber; Vice-President .....Ruth McKinney Susan Okonek... Secretary ... Pearl Gustafson Martha Dennis. Treasurer . „ __Helen Murray Under the advisorship of Miss Bertha Cams, the Rural department has enjoyed a most successful year. The first social event of the school year was the annual Hallowe’en costume party held in the music room on the Friday before Hallowe'en. Games and dancing were the entertainment and refreshments were served. The second annual social event of the first semester was the Christmas party which the department gave in the music room on Friday, December II. At this affair, a cantata entitled "The Christ-child" was presented. Recitations and musical numbers completed the evening's entertainment which was climaxed by the distribution, to each guest of a gift from the prettily-decorated Christmas tree. On Friday. April I. the annual April Fool Stunt Party of the department was held in the music room. Hilarious laughter from the regions of the music room proved the success of the party and aroused a great deal of curiosity among the other students in school. The final affair of the year for the Rural group is to Ik a picnic held the Saturday before Commencement. Group meetings during the first semester were concentrated on one general project: the study of programs for opening exercises of schools. Groups of girls presented different types of programs. Meetings of the second semester have been given over to the analysis and study of the school laws of Wisconsin and the general organization of the educational system of this state. —51—3 fie Jiitcfie 5umee = 5 sirara n cw.'Wj co o . ? . Su.- pew- •' - 0 - ou y a.- Tcti a.cA cWy. t4 — V ; Quy Wy o A crt-ei X Ah«. feezes'a Vv'.- cx t« w o s i - t4Pf oM-Q'f o oax. vftce. oV Aioctvn V yatAxes V fx XvcAs. MVak Xt iS 00»S XsiNN Hx.ee, 09 A" e w - xe . XA . Mft. 5§ t fc f 't I t'w1 T i 1 SM 0tv - - 01 ! S |-W A - Yfe Iwt "NVy Vo . - oev - o Stt -«i A w0 Mw-1 9 jx Ouj»Vt —32—35itcfie umee SCHOLARSHIP RECORD Arnnvicli Carslcy Bcrjjenc Fiedler Hanson Johnson Bishop Bowser Eaton Mellon The ten students in the group above received the highest grades in the Superior Normal last semester. No one of them received any marks lower than "A” and they differ only in the number of hours carried. Hours of “A' Ruth Bergene .......................................... IS Celia Carslev ......................................... IB Marjorie Bishop........................................ 17 Ethel Eaton ........................................... 17 Ernest Fcidlcr......................................... 17 Betty Hanson .......................................... 17 Leola Mellon........................................... 17 Catherine Bowser ...................................... IS Waldemar Johnson ...................................... 15 Bessie Arnovich ....................................... 14DfW 5itcfie Eunice Valine Hilton (iusiafson Iverson Carsley Da r row Smith Hanson Fox ’ Kisilon Counlhan Johnson SIGMA DELTA PHI Founded 1917 OFFICERS President....... Vice-President... Secretary-Treasurer Sergeant-at-Arms Ellsworth Carlstcdt Celia Carlsley Frances Counihan Dallas Harrow MEMBERS Doris Fox George Gustafson Betty Hanson Edward Hilton Clara Iverson Harold Hrandenhoft Margaret Lang Clara Iverson Edward lliltnn Alice Johnson Frances Risdon Gladys Smith Mabel Valine df a Jiitcfie Jutiiee Gagnon Olson Komnies Hennessey Sandwick Slokuni Johnson Sisk KAPPA RHO EPSILON Founded 1921 OFFICERS President Vice-President Sccrctary-T rcasurcr Waldemar Johnson Carl Olson . Harvey Sisk Gerald Gagnon John Hennessy Waldemar Johnson Edwin Komines MEMBERS Carl Olson Einar Sandvick Harvey Sisk Roger Slokuni HONORARY MEMBER E. II. SchrleberBergenc Weadc Weiss Toller ud Hanson Siuilli Anderson Wangen Pox Plhlman Dowser Lesezynski Iverson Eaton Mellon OWL ANI) SERPENT Pounded 1920 OFFICERS MEMBERS Marion Anderson Doris Pox Gladys Smith Ruth Bergene Betty Hanson Ivora Tnllerud Catherine Dowser Clara Iverson Gladys Wangen Elvln Churchill Helen l.cszynski Dorothv Weadc Ethel Eaton l.enln Mellon Nick Wclsc Grace Geary Myrtle Pihlman HONORARY MEMBERS A. 1). S. Gillctt Glough Galesdfie JfttcAe Quince c Jnlin$on Lynch Neil Hippie Metzger McCorkell Buchanan Anderson McDonald Orvald Bowser Lyons Merrill ('illicit Itowser Drennlng Conroy Ramstcad Johnson Gordon DRAMA STUDY I'oundcd 1911 OFFICERS President ..... Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Florence Anderson Hcllc Howscr Catherine Howscr I'aith Buchanan Lenora Conroy Verna Drenning F.li nheth (illicit Nona MacQuilkin Margaret McDonald . .. Faith Buchanan ........ Edna Neil ...._ Kathryn Johnson MEMBERS Loretta Gordon Cecil Hippie Alice Johnson Kathryn Johnson Hernce Lyons Margaret Lynch ..Helen Merrill HONORARY MEMBERS Mr. and Mrs. Thorpe Langley Agnes Kirk Margaret Metzger Norenc McCorkell Margaret McDonald Edna Nell Frances Orvald l.ols Ram stead Ellen M. Clarkrffie Sitcfic Sumce Kiichli Martin Giddings McCabe Harrison I'cderson Evans Harbour Olsen Larsen llostager l.yness Franklin Torvlck Mcl.cllan Harsc Rockwuod Grignon Sell alter Welsh llvberlein Stenehjem Bcrntsnn TAU ALPHA CHI Founded 1012 First Semester Myrtle llostager .... Mona McCabe.......... Myrna lleberlein ..... Marioric Stenehjem Virginia Barker Mildred Berntson Grace Evans Virginia Franklin Katherine Giddings Marie Grignon Jane Harrison Myrna Hcbcrlcin Myrtle Hosfager Irene Torvick OFFICERS .... President .... Vice-President .... Secretary .... . Treasurer MEMBERS Patricia Kiichli Grace Larsen Virginia Lyncss Charlotte Martin Mona McCabe Ruth McLennan Margaret Megawa Marian Nelson Helen Olsen HONORARY MEMBERS Blanche Barsc Second Semester ........ Ruth Mcl.cllan ...... Grace Evans Patricia Kiichli Marjorie Stenehjem Alvida Oswald Frances Pederson Charlotte Ramshaw Fern Rockwood Margaret Schaffer Marjorie Stenehjem Aramella Welsh Shirley Wclshlnger Caroline Barbour3lie yitcfic Quince Barnard Ekstrom Smith Pcllcrin Hanson Davis Anderson Tonskemper Fox Carlson Johnson BlooiRfcn Corncalius Cminilian Kennedy Harney Persgard Parrish Morrcy Herschlcb Risdon Aras Peterson LAMBDA SIGMA LAMBDA Founded 1914 OFFICERS President .... Vice-President Secretary ... T reasurer Marian Anderson Ruth Aras Gwendolyn Harnard Gladys Hlomgrcn Osemar Carlton Kathleen Corncalius Frances Counihan Margaret Davis Virginia Eckman MBMRP.RS Carol Ekstrom Doris Fox Marcella (Scary Hetty Hanson I can Harrington tuth Herschlcb Winifred Johnson Capitola Kennedy Mildred Morrcy Dorothy Parrish Grace Harney Irene Curtis HONORARY MEMBERS Joanna Tecrlnk Dagmar Carlson ...... Hetty Hanson Marian Anderson .. Doris Fox Irene Pcllcrin Gladys Pcrsgard Grace Peterson tanc Reno ranees Risdon {uric Riimmcl iladys Smith Helen Tonskemper Ella Mac Walter Mr. and Mrs. O. I.. Loop Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Wlicaldon" ■ ' £filcfu umec Freeman Tollcrud Beck llowenstine Gill Ballou Jnlm$»n Jegloskcy Saltier Bell Perrin Woods Fuller Burdick Parrish Williams Rehnstrand Johnson Rohie Turnbull Bern Wilson Brown First Semester ALPHA KAPPA Founded 1916 OFFICERS Second Semester Beryl Bell l.illian Beck MEMBERS Evelyn Ballou Bernice Fuller EuRcnia Perrin l.illian Beck Edna Gill Doris Ruble Beryl Bell Eunice Howenstine Olive Sathcr Ethel Berg Katherine JcRlosky Ivora Tnllcrud Oljja Brown Elvn Johnson Meredith Turnbull Jean Burdick Gladys Johnson Greta Williams Mildred McMahon Anna Wilson Ruth Freeman Grace McMullen Dorothy Woods Dorothy 1. Parish HONORARY MEMBERS Jane Rehnstrand .Mr. and .Mrs. H. C. Almjr Gertrude Unthank Mr. and Mrs. I. I. Tubbs —80—t)( e Sntcfie 29umee Green Odegard Larsen Shaken , Williams Nelson Iverson Larson Cooke Dahl Ward Wilson Eaton SIGMA I»I Founded 1916 OFFICERS President —......................... -.................. Clara Iverson Vice-President Ethel Eaton Secretary . Evelyn Williams Treasurer ............................................ Dorothy Larsen Marguerite lljur Geneva Cooke Hazel Dahl Ethel Eaton Grace Green MEMBERS Clara Iverson Dorothy Larsen Ruhv Larson Margaret McDonald Eunice Nelson March Odcgard Alice Salford Ruth Shaleen Doris Ward Evelyn Williams Helen Wilson HONORARY MEMBERS Amy Mronsky Kathryn Oilman Cornelia .McCabe Mr. and .Mrs. Thorpe M. Langley .Mr. and Mrs. O. M. Snodcrass .Mr. and Mrs. E. II. Schrieber 3 fie 5itcfie Quince —02— Swenson Bergstrom Olson Denison Wliclnn Wicklcne Bertrand l.okken Olson Lc Jcunc Hansen Bcrgenc Johnson Phelan Lanke Person Canlicld SIGMA OMEGA Founded 1924 OFFICERS First Semester MEMBERS Ruth Bergene Mary Bertrand Hazel Bergstrom Dorothy Brunk Marie Canlicld Frances Denison Gladys Erickson Katherine Foreman Lillian Whelan Ruby Hasun Hazel Johnson llo Johnson Lucille Lanke Hclga Larson Mildred Lc Jcunc Olga l.okken Mary McQuadc Edna Olson Second Semester ......... Ruth Rcrgene .... Ruby Hanson ...... Patricia Phelan .. Florence Wicklenc Ruth Olson Ada Person Martha Phelan Pllrlda Phelan Edith Shipley Irma Swenson Ruth Wick Florence Wicklcne HONORARY MEMBERS Nona MacQuilkin Vernon Van Patter Ellen At. Clark Agnes V. Kirk S. Horace Williams Isaticllc Wallace3f e JSitcfie %umee - Wilson Bishop Jordahl Whitman Wilson Engberg Allkcn Bennett Erickson Culhane Carlstedt Tolonen Jones Jutin Gilmore l.edin Valine GAMMA PHI EPSILON Founded 1925 first Semester •Marguerite Gilmore ... •Mabel Valine......... Dorothy Wcade Louise Jones........ •Mildred Aitkeii Eunice Bennett Marjorie Bishop Gladys Bonainie Esther Carlstcdt .Margaret Culhane Helen Engberg Florence Erickson Marie Frils Mary Deaton OFFICERS .......... President ...... Vice-President Secretary ... Treasurer MEMBERS Marguerite Gilmore Elsie Hanson Margaret Johnson Louise Jones Ruth Jordahl Lucilc Jutin Eleanor l.edin Blanche Shaw Carol Starkey HONORARY MEMBERS Dorothy Waite Second Semester .......-.... Marie Friis ........-... Marjorie Bishop ..... Louise Jones idred Tolonen Mabel Valine Dorothy Wcade Gladys Whitman Evelyn Wilson Margaret Wilson Dorothy Wood .Mary Zyginanski Mrs. A. D. S. Gillett Isabelle Wallace Mrs. C. W. SmithcJfta 25itcfie Quince —04— Majerle Bcckcr Le Jeune Brcnholdt Anderson Bcrgcnc Wilson Freeman Anderson Booth Y. W. C. A. Founded 1912 President ..... Vice-President Secretary Treasurer .... OFFICERS MEMBERS Evelyn Anderson Goldie Gotham Hazel Anderson Dorothy Henderson Ruth Hergcnc Ruth Hoard Vivian Booth Hazel Hnnglund Agnes Brcnholdt Ruth Kunert Evelyn Colenso Agnes l.okko Beulah Corwin Annie l.amoc Anna Curzel Nora l.citzkc Goldie Cohen Mildred l.e Jeune Frances Denison Claudine l.ivcratn Florence Erickson l.a Verne l.ind Mae Freeman Anna Majerle Ruth Freeman Gladys Gagnon Florence Musoll HONORARY I Agnes V. Kirk Dorothy Waite Bertha Trudelle Mrs. V. E. Braman Kvanda Becker Mildred l.e Jeune . ..... Florence Musoll .. Goldie Gotham . Anna Majerle Myrtle Nelson Ellen N'orecn Josephine North Ruth Olsen May Pork Desiderin Peterson Hildur Peterson Dorothy Prnflit Margaret Savage Dell Schondorff Helen Sorenson Elvira Thompson Dorothy Weade Margaret Wilson Isabelle Wallace Mary Deaton Mrs. A. I). S. Gillenrifie £fitcftc guinea Larsen Anderson I .a r sen Harrison l.e Jeune Freeman Slcnehjcm Perrin Johnson SIGMA GAMMA CHI Founded 1921 OFFICERS President .............. —........................... Dorothy Larsen Vice-Presidents ........................... Jane Harrison. Mildred l.cjeune Secretary.............................. -.......... Florence Anderson Treasurer .....................-....-............-......... Ruth Rergene Social Committee Marjorie Stcnchjcm. Eugenia Perrin, Grace Larsen. Ruth Freeman Dean and Adviser .......................................... Ellen M. Clark Grace Alcorn Mildred Aitkin Florence Anderson Helen Anderson (iwendoliuc Harnard Lillian Heck Margaret Henson Ruth Hergene Hazel Bergstrom Mildred Hcrnstroni Vivian Booth lean Hurdick flora Campbell Dorothy Caldwell Marie Canlield Evelyn Colenso Heulali Corwin Anna Curzel .Martha Dennis Frances Dennison Florence De Pol Margaret Donalds Rac Feeley Gladys l-'latt May Freeman .MEMHEKS Ruth Freeman Dorothy Fulmer Kathryn Giddings Edna (irckela Goldie Gotham lean llarrngilon Ruth Hoard Phyllis Hogan Kathryn Jeglosky Elva Johnson Hazel Johnson Helen Johnson Zclda Johnson Avis Kirby Hilda Koski Patricia Kiichli Dorothv Larsen Grace Larsen lielga Larson Helen Larson Nora Lcitzke Mildred l.e Jeune Olga Lokken Mona McCabe Mary McQuade Eileen Maloney Anna Majerle Margaret Murphy Helen Murray Edna Olsen Alvda Oswald Gertrude Ouimette Eugenia Perrin Thelma Peterson Olive Satlier Lcnore Secger Jane Reno Marian Sinko Inez Smith Margaret Smith Margaret Savage Helen Sorenson .Marjorie Stcnchjcm Aramella Welsh Ellene White Gladys Whitman Mae Winchester Greta Williams Anna Wilsonf 3fte Sitcfic Quince SIGMA RHO I'oundcd 1921 OFFICERS President ........ Vice-President l-UCy Cockson Margaret Anderson Secretary Ebon Blombcrg Beatrice Johnson Treasurer MEMBERS Pearl Gustafson Florence llolfmicr Mabel Holm Edith Holmquist Myla asa Beatrice Johnson Tyyne Kaari Anna Larson Hazel Larson Ann Lamoc May me Makela Amy Moline Esther Moore Edith Alzcnc Astrid Anderson Margaret K. Anderson Margaret L. Anderson Lillian Baribeau Ebon Blombcrg Frances Carter Lucy Cockson Marjorie Crawford Marain Davis Martha Dennis Millie Ekeberg Alice Evon Helen Murray Buclah McKenney Evelyn Newman Susie Okenek Loretta Perlberg Leona Robie Helen Sholund Helen Sornson Lolita Spooner Evelyn Strom Zaida Swanson HONORARY MEMBERS Gretchen Palmatier Bertha L. Camstifie JJitclie iJumee t i Rnbic Maloney Anderson Henderson Hoard Dahl Tenney Stroud Oulmettc W. A. A. Founded 1927 BOARD OF CONTROL Advisor . . Florence Tenney Hazel Dahl Florence Anderson. Marjorie Bishop Ruth Hoard Gertrude Oulmettc Olga Lokkcn Dorothy Henderson Doris Robic Head ol Basketball Eileen Maloney The Woman’s Athletic Association was known until last spring as the Girls’ Athletic Association. During the first semester our constitution and point system were revised, and we became eligible to join the A. C. A. C. W. (Athletic Conference of American College Women.) This organization is national in its membership and is active in keeping the W. A. A.’s of Colleges and Universities informed on the activities of other schools. Every three years a National Conference is held and Superior has as its aim for 1930, the sending of a representative to this meeting. The purpose of the association is to "promote a higher physical efficiency among the girls of the Superior Normal College by fostering an interest in all gymnastics and athletic activities.” The organization is open for membership to all girls of the school. To provide an incentive for greater interest a point system is used. Awards are as follows: W. A. A. monogram ............................. 100 points W. A. A. pin .................................. 500 points Letter......................................... 1000 points The wide choice of sports which the constitution enumerates gives every girl a chance to take part in the activities in which she is interested. The chief activities arc Field Hockey, Basketball. Baseball, Volleyball. Hiking, and Skating. Others include Swimming, Coasting, Tennis, Skiing, and Elective Gym. -«7-Titie Sitefie 5mnec o4 Nolan Smith Halstead Saterstrom Kinney Boss Hilton Johnson Churchill Rolla Harding Stigney Jacobson l.ouiscll Dann Ink Van Patter Jensen Van Klcck Hutchinson l.ovcrudc Tower Iverson LAMBDA DELTA CHI Pounded 1912 OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Donald Jensen President Elvin Churchill Don Kinney. Vice-President Waldemnr Johnson Secretary Elvin Churchill Treasurer Charles Hutchinson MEMBERS Charles Hutchinson Lewis Ink lohn Iverson Leroy Jacobson Donald Jensen Waldeniar Johnson Donald Kinney Arthur Larsen Paul l.ouiscll Clarence l.ovcrudc HONORARY MEMBERS Frank E. Vita Vernon Van Palter S. Horace Williams Ira I. Tubbs Willis Boss Elvin Churchill Herbert Dann Lester Johnson Robert Halstead George Harding Marry Heydon Edward Hilton Walker Green Robert Martin William Nolan Carl Rnlla Palmer Sat erst rum Lloyd Smith Calvin Stigney Glen Torp Fred Tower Robert Van Klcck Dan Mahoney I I I I 3( e Sitcfie Eunice Letourneau Nichols LoiiRCway Jacobson Gallagher Korean Ryan Henning Erickson Ycrka McGowan Gilson Tierney Nadolski McCarthy Calkins Cliattcrson Wcstlund Brown IOTA DELTA CHI Pounded 1919 OI-IICERS Second Semester Wallace Wcstlund Leslie Gallagher .ctourneau l-'irst Semester William l.a Valle ... President Vice-President . Secretary Treasurer Raymond Cliattcrson Clarence Robert Longeway Lawrence Nichols Lawrence Nichols MEMBERS Leo Gilson Bernard Gray Rolland Henning Emmet Korean Lawrence Jacobson Harold Klingbiel William La Valle Waller Lambert Clarence Lctourneau Robert l.nneeway George McGowan HONORARY MEMBER T. J. McCarthy Thomas Murphy Stanley Nadolski Lawrence Nichols Thomas O’Neill Kenneth Pepper George Pune Thomas Ryan Prank Tierney Wallace Wcstlund Charles Yerka John Brown Charles Calkins Raymond Cliattcrcnn Manley Christenson Basil Christmas Robert Connery Quentin Davis John Dreisbach Ralph Erickson Leslie Gallagher Prank Geffe dfxc Eunice Hillman Dauplaise Lcggatc Ploof Thayer Sandvick Applcijuist Elingrccn Williams West Bcrkelman Sandclin Greeley Erickson PI IOTA CHI Pounded 1922 OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Joseph Thayer. President ... .Max Elnigrcen Harvey Sisk Vice-President Harvey Sisk Max Elmgrccn. ... Treasurer Ernest Hillman .MEMBERS Apelquisl. R. W. (ireeky, Mlrven Sandclin. Carl Herkelman. Charles Lee cate. Donald Sandvick. Elncr Dauplaise. George Hillman. Ernest Sisk. Harvey Elmcrcen, Mcxhcld Niemi. Edwin Thayer. Joseph Erickson. Walter Ploof, George West. Grover HONORARY MEMBER S. Horace Williams ° tjfie H'ltcfxc iJuttiee Chrismphcrson Kernan Whcaldon Dclaliiint Stack McCorkcll Wright Hansen Camp Newman St. John Dlffor Oenry Weiss Hansen McKay Harbour Beck Scliibsted Kernan Swanson Weeks O'Brien l.everoos Hughes Robert Beck Myron Christoplierson Harold Camp Gerald Crawford Janies Dclahunt Warren Diffor Everett Geary Lowell Gilfin Henry Hansen Lloyd Hansen MEMBERS Myron Harbour John Horst Charles Hughes Frank Kernan Harlan Kernan Janies Lavallc Reidar l.everoos Leo McCorkcll James McKay Courtland Ncwinon John O'Brien Ralph Scliibsted Lester St. John Dean Shuimvay Martin Swanson Donald Stack Milton Weeks Nick Weiss Albert Whealdon Maurice Wright3fie iJitcfie Gurnee o l.onRCway, Coach O'Neill Jacobsen Tierney l.amhert. Mascot Calkins Puns: Erickson The lota Delta Chi Basketball Team easily captured the inter-club basketball championship by decisive victories over every one of their opponents. The team was composed of former fii h school and normal school stars. Keen interest was manifested right to the very last by all the clubs. Jerry Camp managed the league very successfully. League Standing Won Lost Pet. lota Delta Chi 8 0 100. Pi lota Chi 5 :t (52.5 Hex 5 :t 62.5 Kno-Klub 1 7 12.7 Lambda Delta Chi 1 7 12.7 ALL FRATERNITY BASKETBALL TEAM Picked by Hobby Longcway First Team Calkins Kernan Jacobsen O'Neill Thayer Second Team El m green Sandvick Kinney Pung Schibsted —72—Arttuiltra '"Ghe carpet was up, the candles burnt bright . . . merry voices and light-hearted laughter rang through the room.” Charles Dickensdfie llitcfie jinnee c i HIGH LIGHTS Tuesday, Sept. 21—First football rally. Ira Irl gives his annual discourse (with illustrations) on "How To Act Intelligent At A Football Game.” Saturday, Sept. 25—Hibbing football game at Hibbing. Friday, Oct. 1—Dr. Powell of the University of Wisconsin gives his first lecture on "Literature.” Saturday, Oct. 2—We play Virginia Junior college on Gates’ Field. Saturday, Oct. 9—We beat Stevens Point at Stevens Point, 3-0! Hooray! Wednesday. Oct. 13—Bill Nolan gets elected Social Chairman in assembly. Thursday, Oct. 14—Football team plays for us on the stage in assembly. (Editor's note: This was not a musical number.) Saturday, October 16—We beat Northland 25-0 on Gates Field. Monday, Oct. 18—Seniors elect Elvin Churchill to lead them through the coming year of storm and strife. Thursday. Oct. 21—Bob Van Kleek and Art Larsen get a chance to help Elvin and Don get out the Gitche. Saturday. Oct. 23—Eau Claire Game at Eau Claire. Wednesday, Oct. 27—Co-eds plight their fortunes with different sororities. Friday, Oct. 29—Bum day. L)r. Otto talks on "The Self." Saturday. Oct. 30—Homecoming. We win front Stout and celebrate with a mixer in the Saturday , Nov. 13—We play River Falls and lose the state championship by such a teeny bit! So near and yet so far! Wednesday, Nov. 24—We start Thanksgiving vacation at noon. Wednesday, Dec. 1 —Professor Vitz gives a lecture on the Philippines in assembly. This is the first time we have ever heard the lecture in its organized form. Saturday, Dec. 4—Drama Study gives annual football banquet in music room. Chatterson is elected captain for next vear. Wednesday, Dec. 8—Grammarjunior High serves keen luncheon on third floor. We all go and eat baked beans and pie. Friday, Dec. 10—L. D. C. play, “Applesauce,” is presented to capacity audience. Friday, Dec. 17—An elaborate Christmas program is presented in assembly—one of the best ever given at Superior Normal—and we are dismissed for Christmas vacation. Monday, Dec. 27—Iota Delta Chi formal Christmas dance at the Androy. Tuesday, Dec. 28— Fcx formal. We tread the marble of the Androy to the tune of Jess Cohen's orchestra from Madison. Collegiate? Yea. bo! Wednesday. Dec. 29—Fex dinner-dance at the Androy. Some were still dancing when the orchestra was playing "Home, Sweet Home.” Friday, Dec. 31—Lambda Delta Chi dinner-dance at the Spalding in Duluth. Monday, Jan. 3—We get back to school and rest up. Friday, Jan. 14—We play Marquette at basketball in the gym. Thursday, Jan. 20—Oratory tryouts in assembly hall. Foley gets first place and will represent us in the state meet. Friday, Jan. 21—Churchill wins extempore tryouts and will speak for Superior in the inter-Normal contest. Monday, Jan. 24-Wednesday, Jan. 26—Exams. Thursday. Jan. 27—We register for another four and a half months. Monday, Jan. 31—New semester with 635 enrolled. Friday. Feb. 18—Hot campaign features assembly and Don Stack is finally elected Prom Chairman. Tuesday, Feb. 22—Durant lists ten greatest thinkers. He does not include any of us in the list. Washington’s Birthday program in assembly. Wednesday, Feb. 23—Van takes over the Principalshin of the Training School. Friday, March 4—Connery is elected for President of the local Normal Forensic League. We lose to Stout in basketball, 21-28. Doggone! But we heat Eau Claire in debate on the McNary-Haugen bill. Monday, March 7—Every one practices madly for Vodvil. Thmursday, March 10—Every one ceases studying on account of Vidvil. Friday, March 11—Vodvil issue of Peptoniist appears with eight pages. Fex comes from behind and wins the fifty smackers. Saturday, March 12—We play the last cage game with Eveleth and win. Thursday, March 17—Superior delegation leaves for Eau Claire to atend the State Oratorical contest. Friday, March 18—Foley ties for third place in state meet. Churchill places fourth. Friday, April I—We win front Hibbing Junior College in a debate on the McNary-Haugcn bill. Thursday, April 7—Faculty gives stag in gym for the men students. McCoy tells us how to live on water. Thursday, April 21—Knight speaks all day. Friday, April 22—Senior class puts on “You and I. Friday, April 29—We promenade in "the foyer of the Douglas County Court House." —73— t)(ui }) tclie Quince ____________BAND_________ HOME COMING RALLY 1 A LACK THRATH 10 FRIDAY INITE, OCTOBER 19th, 1926 BRAT STOUT MANI.BY CHRISTIANSON Football Captain CLOWN BAND HOMECOMING CROWD HOMECOMING Homecoming, the first big event of the school year was the occasion for hoboes, hilarity, parading, and cheering. The culminating feature of all this enthusiasm was the football game between the Superior Normal college and Stout Normal college which was one of the most exciting games of the season. Don Stack and Edward Hilton were in charge of arrangements, and deserve much credit for the success of the affair. —74—( 1 1 f ! 5 r ? ° dfie yitclie iiumec c"4r WILLIAM NOLAN. Social Chairman lii the early part of October, William Nolan was elected Social Chairman for the school year. Under his leadership, several afternoon mixers and all-school evening dances were sponsored. Mr. Nolan deserves a great deal of credit for these successful affairs, outstanding among which are: October 16—Mixer after the football game. October 30—Homecoming dance given in the gymnasium at which 600 active and alumnae members of the college were entertained. November 13—Mixer in the study hall. December 17—Christmas dance for the students. February 5—Mixer in honor of the students entering the second semester. March 12—Dance held in the gymnasium after the Eveleth College and Superior Normal basketball game. Ofie £huuee THIRD ANNUAL COMPETITIVE VODVIL “The Trystine Place"—Fex Fraternity One of the outstanding activities of the school vear was the Third Annual Competitive Vodvil. sponsored by the Sigma Pi sorority, on Friday evening. March II. The auditorium was crowded to capacity and an eager, appreciative audience viewed the finest Vodvil ever presented in the history of the school. Much of the success of this performance must be attributed to A r. Thorpe M. Langley, under whose direction the committees and acts co-operated. The winning entry of the program was "The Trysting Place.” a one-act comedy presented by the Fex fraternity. The act was awardd $50.00 in gold. "Pieces of Eight.” the contribution of the Drama Study Sorority, was awarded second place and $25.00 in gold, while the act of the Lambda' Sigma Lambda sorority. "Rhapsody in Blue.” received third place with no money prize. The judges of the evening were: Mr. Earl Braman, supervisor of music in the Superior public schools; Mr. Mendenhall, dramatics instructor at Superior Central High school; and Miss Doan, dramatics instructor at Duluth Dcnfeld High school. THE COMMITTEES MISS CLARA IVERSON. General Chairman BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Hazel Dahl. Chairman Ruth Bergene Ralph Erickson Katherine Bowser Everett Geary Doris Robie Don Jensen George Gothner PUBLICITY Ethel Eaton, Chairman igm Mabel Valine Jane Harrison Frances Risdon Miss Jane Rehnstrand Dorothy Larsen Margit Odegard Eunice Nelson Maurice Wright Carl Olson Thomas Shaw Palmer Saterstrom ART Walker Greene Geneva Cooke Margaret McDonald Ruth Shalcen HOUSE COMMITTEE Doris Ward Grace Green Ruby Larson STAGE Edward Hilton. Stage Manager Willis Strickland Ethel Eaton William Nolan Margaret Bjur George Harding Kingsley Swanstrom. Electrician MAKE-UP Robert Martin —7S—; j » I t 3fie J5itcf»e Sumee PIECES OF EIGHT” - Drama Study THE PROGRAM OVERTURE Superior Normal Orchestra.......................Miss Irene Curtis. Director Act I . "THE RISING OF THE MOON" lota Delta Chi ................................. Ralph Erickson, Chairman Act II "HARMONY BOYS" Lambda Delta Chi................................George Harding. Chairman Act III "THE RENDEZVOUS” Gamma Phi Epsilon ............................... Evelyn Wilson. Chairman IV “PIECES OF EIGHT" Delta Sigma ............................. Kathryn Johnson, Faith Buchanan Act V "PIANOLOGUE" Sigma Pi...........................................Ethel Eaton, Chairman Act VI “THE TRYSTING PLACE" F. E. X.........................................Maurice Wright. Chairman Act VII "UN ROMANCE EN ESPANA" Alpha Kappa ..................................... Beryl Bell, Chairman Act VIII "RHAPSODY IN BLUE" Lambda Sigma Lambda..............................Frances Risdon, Chairman RHAPSODY IN BLUE” - Lambda Sitfma Lambda —77—tffie JiitcAe £timee from COMMITTEE MEMBERS Decoration Committee Maurice Wright, chairman; Frank Bry-any, Faith Buchanan, Ernmelt Malheson, Constance Beecher, Ernest Hillman. Marcella Geary. Willis Boss, Frances Orvaltl. Helen Manlev. George Oothner, lames McKay. Ralph Erickson. Frances Rlsdon, Catherine Mahan. Warren Whitley. Mary Bertrand. Ruby Hanson. Myrtle Hostager. .Mildred McMahan. Dorothy (.arson. Jessie Paulus. Eleanor Kelly. Thomas Ryan. Thorne Wardman, Jerry McKeough. Palmer Saterstrom. John O’Brien, Roland Henning. Margaret Horan. William McNamara. Pearl Gustalson, Wayne l.utlier. and Margaret Mercy. Music Committee Thomas .Mitchell, chairman; Robert Lon qc way. Ella May Walter. Helen Olson. Frances Ball. Catherine Bowser. Patrick McGill. Rcltlar l.everoos. Patricia Stein. Anna Wilson, and Mahle Valine. Special Decoration Committee Miss Betty Hanson, chairman; Verna Drcnning. Evelyn Ballnu. Ruth Gothner. Dorothy E. Parish, Ruth Jourdahl, Jerry Marceau, Helen Merrill. Della De Diana, Ethel Baton, and Fern Rockwond. Program Committee Thomas O'Neill, chairman: Beryl Bell. Evelyn Williams. Leslie Gallagher, Warren Differ. Aramella Welsh. Kenneth Fit . Edward Hilton. Mildred l.e Jeunc. General Arrangements Committee Calvin Stigney, chairman; Jeanette Birmingham. Elvira Thompson, Doris Fox, Allan Emmcrt. Eugene Peterson, Dorothy Wood. Ruby Larson. Charles Yerka, Carl Erickson and Donald Kinney. DONALD STACK. Prom Chairman —'7.1— I • I I i tffW J5itcfie Quince Amid the splendor of a medieval setting, the Annual Junior Promenade was held in the Douglas County Court House, April 29, 1927. The tall marble pillars and wide stairways of the building were effectively draped in gold, with metal shields, coats of arms, and vari-colorcd banners encrusted with the Normal college letters. Approximately 400 couples danced to the strains of Mainella’s eleven-piece orchestra, and it was unanimously accorded that the Prom of '27 was one of the finest ever given in the history of the school. The high light of the evening was the grand march led by Mr. Donald Stack, general chairman of the event and Miss Bernice Lyons, the Prom Queen. Second in line was Mr. Maurice Wright, chairman of the decoration committee, with Miss Kathryn Johnson as his guest, followed by Mr. Elvin Churchill, president of the Senior class, and Mrs. Churchill. Mr. William Nolan, chairman of the social committee, with Miss Grace Larson, was fourth in line while Mr. Thomas Mitchell, chairman of the music committee, with Miss Faith Buchanan, was fifth in line. Sixth, seventh, and eighth places respectively, were given to i r. Thomas O’Neill, chairman of the program committee, and Miss Marie Sweetnam; Mr. Calvin Stigney, chairman of the general arrangements committee, and Miss Huby Hanson; and Mr. Walter Greene, chairman of lighting effects, and Miss Eugenia Perrin. GUESTS OK HONOR President and Mrs. A. D. S. 01 licit Vice-President and Mrs. C. W. Smith Recent anJ Mrs. Clough Gates Mr. and Mrs. V. E. Van Patter Mr. and Mrs. T. I. Roth Mr. and Mrs. A. I). Whcaldon Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Val T. Hochnc Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Pulton Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Mahan PATRONS AND PATRONESSES Miss Ellen Clark Miss Jane Rehnstrand Mr. and Mrs. Thorpe l.anglcy Miss Myra Howie Miss Lillian Whelan Miss Kathryn Oilman .Miss Hazel Seguin Mr. and Mrs. I. I. Tubbs Miss Nancy Ellen Gilliam Atiss Irene Torvick Atr. .Milton Weeks Floor Committee Carl Olson, chairman; Donald Jensen. Edmund HoM. Ulnar Sandvick. .Martin Swanson. Joyce Thompson, and Waller Nelson. Special Committee George .McGowan. Janies Dclahunt, Leona Ruble. l.cRoy Jacobson. John Butler. Dorothy Caldwell. .Mcrna Hcberlicn. GladysBIoingrcn. Cecil Hippie. Ruth Her-gene. Kathryn Jcglosky. Rovclla Kopsteln, Evelyn Wilson, Edward Kommes. Frank Gc c. Gene Burdick. Clara Iverson, and Gladys Erickson. BERNICE LYONS. Prom Queenrlf e Jiitcfta «5umee £ tag Pari D On April 7 the faculty of the college sponsored a stag party for the men students. The stag was held at the gym and about one hundred and fifty men were present. The boys divided into two groups. One group, captained by Tommy O’Neill, was called the "Jiggs Outfit," and the other group, called the "Ole’s Gang,” was led by Martin Swanson. The following are the results of the stunts of the evening: Boxing Match—Chatterson and Green—Draw. Wrestling—Miller and Rung—Won by Miller. Tug-of-War—Won by the Oles. Necking contest—Won by the Oles. Hand Wrestle—Won by the Oles. Indian Wrestle—Won by the Oles. Three-Legged Race—Won by the Oles. Basketball Relay—Won by the Jiggs. Crossing the Ice—Won by the Jiggs. After the stunts, the faculty served lunch to the gang. Beer from the keg. fresh Hamburgers, and hot dogs made up a welcome meal. The last thing on the program was the baseball game between the two clans. Mr. McCarthy acted as umpire and handled the job very well. All in all everybody had a whooping good time and the faculty is requested to have another stag next year. 7O iiv. yf I i Publtrattima “ pleasant, sure, to sec one’s name in print; A book’s a book, although there’s nothing in’t.” Byron I i m . K. x is mm ll f (fi % WfCl J r u I  Wr by Prof. + . !i ) will coach « •W -'. The rJvwing students ha. . the production: MaiD Thomas O’Neil: N -ulanson; RodoricH ll'icobxon; Veron f n. Doris 1 R ”f V. W ' short rev. hK- Maitlan !"' is to he a p; ' MM with life. He has A m having his son, Roderick, become a I)ECII ED nary, bile a (iatiot «»» ««• .ir.ihi'tff llmvovnr elftc Jfitclie umee THE PEPTOMIST NAMES PROM SSISTANTS FOR COMING FUNC t. Mitchell. O'Neil, Stijrney. Committee Heads E NOT elk errs SENIOR DUCTION Presen ta- lc. c .on... son, do:.'. )rom will tal c pS . 'some ..me , although I he exact date and [class piny, given on l'» definite- |»ros. A. day, Man PRESI1) GOES ’ Interesti Cor Texas. vb lion of th Teachers' Supei imp .f tr Ul ."I S III. 1 •!? • OS. Some of hirst Semester William Foley ..... Charles Mutcliinson Arthur Larsen .. ..... Editor .... Managing Editor Business Manager Second Semester . Frances Kisdon ...... William Foley ..Palmer Saterstrom -81-c3fte Jjitcfie $umee c ' (ittrlje taff BLVIN CHURCHILL. BUUor-in-Chld DONALD JENSEN Business Manager 1 lit editorial staff of the 1927 Gitche Gurnee has introduced some new features into the book. For the first time, the art work of the annual has been done by students of the college. It has been the purpose of the editors to show up the funny side of school life in the satire section. This section is to be taken wholly in fun. This year’s book is the work of the entire Gitche staff. The business staff has made it possible for the Gitche Gurnee to be made a better and more expensive book. The expenses this yar have been increased over $300.00. The engraving bill was increased $175.00. the photography bill $75.00. and additional miscellaneous expenses amounted to over $50.00. GITCHE STAFF OFFICERS Editor-in-Chief................................................................ Elvin Churchill Associate Editor....................................................... Robert Van Kleek Assistant Editor................................................................Clara Iverson Art Editor .............................................................. Beryl Bell Art Theme Editor................................................................Grace Churchill Club and Photography Editor.................................................... Betty Hanson Senior and Activity Editor.............................................Dagmar Carlson Satire Editor.................................................................. Mable Valine Snapshot Editor.............................................................. William Nolan Cartoonist.................................................................... Walker Greene Department and Dramatic Editor.........................................Frances Risdon Athletic Editor...................................................... Maurice Wright Forensics Editor ..................................................... William Foley Advisor ........................................................................ Miss MacQuilkin BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager ........................................................ Don Jensen Assistant Business Manager.................................................... Arthur Larsen Advertising Managers................................... Lester Johnson. Ruth Gothner0 rlfie ]5iCcfie Gurnee (Sitrl|p Art §taff Cfccnt Bell Reims! rami Rosen I Grace Churchill .Mabel Valine Grace Churchill Beryl Bell ■Miss Rclmstraiul Walker Greene GITCHE COMMITTEES THEME COMMITTEE Miss MacQuilkin Besse Arnnvltch Ben Usan SATIRE COMMITTEE Maurice Wright Frances Risdon Walker Greene ART COMMITTEE Clarence Rnsval Faith Buchanan Olal Sorenson Ruth Herschleb Fern Stroud Assistant Editor Gitche Guinee Si— Assistant Business Manager Gitche Gurnee dfxe J-Jumee GIRL’S GLEE CLUB Corwin Alzene Thompson C'olcnso I.ankc Nelson McLcllan Davis Olson Bertrand Beecher Baldwin Rockwood Curtis Bennett Mailman Darrow Mercy President ........ Vice-President Secretarjr-T reasurer Constance Beecher Beulah Corwin Membership in the Girls' Glee Club is a result of competitive examination. The purpose of this club is to furnish music for school functions. It has been an important factor in the radio broadcasting programs which the Normal College has given on Monday nights over VEBC. This organization, accompanied by the College Trio, represented the school at the Inter-State Forensic Contest at Eau Claire, Wisconsin. First Soprano Margaret Mercy Ruth Olsen Ruth Mcl.cll.in Fern Rockwood Dallas Darrow First Alto Mary Bertrand Beulah Corwin Isabel Baldwin Second Soprano Evelyn Colcuso Constance Beecher l.ucile l.ankc Second Alto Joyce Thompson Marian Nelson Edith Alzene Marian Davis Irene Curtis: Directort}f e I itcf e Quince’ HAND Hilton O'Riley Swansirom Saterstrom Kinney Wandschnclder Torp Slack Beecher Erickson Wright Jacobsen The College Band has appeared at all football rallies and basketball games. It has been a means of arousing school spirit and interest in Athletic contests. The band is the most recent musical organization of the College and gives promise of being the most popular. Plcolo Cornels Edward Hoff Cta rinds Olcn Torp Philip O’Riley Saxophones Donald Slack Joyce Wandschnclder Tuba LcRoy Jacobsen Palmer Salcrslrom Cornelius BccClirr Willis Boss Mellaplione Kingsley Swansirom Haritonc Edward Billon Trombone Don Kinney Drums Maurice Wright George Harding Director—Palmer Salcrslrom —66-3fie liitcfie Quince Riley Harding Corwin Froncklewicz Jewett Bennett Colcnso Saterstrom Kinney Curtis Holt Davis Wangen Wangen Dalit Membership in the orchestra is open to all players of instruments, limited to special school programs, plays, and vodvil. Its appearance is Oboe Donald Stack Flute Edward Hoff Clarinetx Glen Torn Philip Riley Trumpet Palmer Saterstrom Trombone Donald Kinney Drums. George Harding Plano Eunice Bennett Leader—George Parrish Viola Beulah Corwin Cello Harvey NVangen Director—Irene Curtis 3 fie Jiitclu umee Geflc Wilbur Hilton Kinney Person Tower Erickson Saterstrom President .......... Vice-President ..... Secretary-Treasurer Don Kinney Frank Geflc Ralph Erickson The male quartet for the past few years was expended this year into a Glee Club, consisting of nine members. Together with the Girls' Glee Club and as an organization in itself it has effectively contributed to the programs of civic clubs, school, and radio. First Tenor Frank Geflc Don Kinney Edward Hilton First Bass LcRoy lacobson Oliver Wilbur Second Tenor Frederick Tower Ralph Erickson Second Bass Palmer Sattcrstrom Marcus Persons Irene Curtis: DirectorJfuimtstni Is a man only to hold beliefs when they're popular?” J. Galsworthy.3 7ifw 5itcfie Sutfiee DEBATE Foley Vltx Churchill Hutchinson The negative debating team this year was composed of three veterans from the preceding year. Charles Hutchinson, captain and third speaker, had been a member of last year's Normal team and previously had debated for Duluth Central High School. Elvin Churchill, first speaker, had been on Superior Normal debate teams for two years, after having debated with Duluth Denfeld teams. William Foley, second speaker, had been a member of last year's negative team, and had debated previously with Superior Central High School teams. Following is the record of the negative team: Superior Normal. 07; Fiver Falls Normal, 10. (expert judge.) Superior Normal. 3; Northland College, 0. (local judges.) All the members of the negative team are leaving Normal this year, either graduating or transferring to the University. The negative team was coached by Prof. Frank E. Vitz.tffta Site fie 5uniee = ? DEBATE Connery Thompson VH« l.ouiscll THE AFFIRMATIVE TEAM The affirmative team had a very successful season, having gone through the year without a defeat. The question debated was "Resolved: That the Essential Features of the McNary-Haugen Bill Be Adopted.” The team defeated Eau Claire by a score of 100 to 90 (expert judge) and triumphed over Hibbing by a decision of 2 to I (three judges). The team is composed of Elvira Thompson, who captained the team, and is a veteran of last year’s college team and a former debater at Denfeld High school; Paul Louiscll, former Duluth Central debater, and Robert Connery, who debated on the Duluth Central team. Miss Thompson and Mr. Connery will be back again next year and will form the nucleus upon which to build a strong team. Much of the success of the team is due to the fine coaching of Mr. Vitz. —DO— tJfie 5itcfte 5unicc I) E B A T E Ol!M n RiMlnn Thompson 'IU GIRLS’ DEBATING TEAM Question: "Resolved. That the Trial by Jury Should Be Abolished." A debate was scheduled with the girls' team of Hibbing Junior College, April 18, but due to the sudden illness of one of the debaters, the contest had to be cancelled. Miss Thompson has debated two years with the state team, and was with Denfeld. of Duluth, before that. Miss Kisdon was a member of the girls' team that defeated the girls' team from Northland College two years ago. Miss Olson was one of the triangular debaters of Superior Central High school.rjffie 25itcfie 25umee CONNERY FOLEY CHURCHILL ©ratnry In the local Normal oratorical contest which was held on the afternoon of January 18, William Foley was awarded first place, which carried with it the position of school orator. Second place was won by Ben Usan, while Miss Elvira Thompson received third. Foley’s oration in this contest was entitled. “La Follette, a Prophet of Democracy.” Usan spoke on "A New United States,” while Miss Thompson's oration was on the subject, "Modern Barbarism.” The other contestants were: Arthur Larsen, Lawrence Wilbur, Charlotte Marshall, and Paul Louisell. Elvin Churchill won first place in the extempore speaking contest held January 19. Charles Hutchinson was given second place in this contest, and Ernest Hillman received third. The general topic was, "Th« Political and Economic Problems of the Middle West Farmer.” Foley represented Superior in the state inter-Normal oratorical contest held at Eau Claire Normal March 18. His oration which he delivered in this second contest was entitled, "Southward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way.” He tied for third place in this state contest, which was won by River Falls. Superior was represented in the state extempore contest by Elvin Churchill, school extemporaneous speaker, who received fourth place at Eau Claire. Both Foley and Churchill were coached by Miss Nona MacQuilkin. Ben Usan, alternate orator, and Robert Connery, President of the Superior Normal Forensic League, represented Superior at the business meeting of the Wisconsin State Normal Forensic League, held at Eau Claire. The prizes for oratory, which were given by Mr. Frank T. McNally, an alumnus of Superior Normal, and a former orator of this school, were awarded to William Foley, school orator, and to Ben Usan, alternate orator. Foley was given the first prize of fifty dollars in gold, and Usan was given the second prize of twenty-five dollars. • 1Ofw J itcfic Quince S’uutliuiarft the (Eourar of Empire ©akes its I0ay The imperialism of Great Britain has been a subject which American sentiment has loudly bewailed. Her crimes in India, her misdemeanors in Africa, her injustice in China have furnished material for many eloquent denunciations which American audiences have vociferously praised. We have taught the children in our schools to regard with horror the competitive acquisition of landed properties. The right of each nation, however small, to self-determination has been one of our unwritten laws. At spheres of influence, we have raised our pious eyebrows as we would at gambling dens, flourishing under the protection of unscrupulous hypocrites. So thoroughly did we disapprove of the insidious imperialistic policy of benighted Europe, and so earnestly did we desire that its contaminating influence should never violate our Western hemisphere, that we formulated that opinion in the Monroe Doctrine. In this document, we proclaimed to the world that we had crossed our fingers against ever allowing our sinful brothers across the seas to come over to our unsullied continents for the purpose of interfering with the unhampered development of the nations on their soil. Pleased with our own self-righteousness, most of us have been content to reflect upon ourselves as the self-appointed guardians of weaker nations—as the hope of the down-trodden in this bad world of empire-mad nations. But behold! In this twentieth century, upon arousing ourselves from a dream of self-congratulation, we are confronted by an extraordinary spectacle. While we have been unaware, one of the most significant phenomena of this century has been taking place under our very eyes. A persistent force, rarely called by name, is increasingly making its presence felt, among us. Coming into being under the sheltering wing of the Monroe I)oc-trine, it has been fostered unwittingly because it claimed to be the companion of peace, progress, civilization, and culture. And now as it grows to maturity and assumes its horrid shape, we recognize it. The thing which we hated, we have become. American imperialism is staring us in the face. The international press today is aflame with this truth. Our government is assuming toward the smaller countries geographically and politically within our reach a definitely aggressive policy. The French L'Humanite proclaims that "The American imperialism of 1927 is more dangerous than Germany's was in 1914.” The London Spectator remarks that Central and South America recognize that the Monroe Doctrine, which was originally presented to them as a shield, is fast assuming the form of a dagger. The people of these countries look toward the future with serious apprehension. The Berlin Lokal-Anzeiger is quite outspoken in its conviction that the policy of North America is now showing "itself in its true colors, as a policy of might against the independence of small countries.” "North American imperialism, at one time overbearing, at another time conciliatory, shrewdly calculating the main chance in every complex situation with a foresight that envisages centuries, never acting on impulse, never forgetting, insensitive, unafraid, pursuing its world policy with complete prevision,—that imperialism is the most efficient agency of conquest that has ever been exhibited in the history of the world." During the last thirty years, it has underlain the activities of our country to such an extent that today, the United States is tampering with the human rights of over thirty-six million people, not one of whom is a voting member of our republic. We have "intervened by force at least thirty times in the internal affairs of nine supposedly sovereign and independent nations.” Our investments in the coutries which lie in the neighborhood of the Caribbean Sea alone amount to over three billions of dollars. In four of these states we have our own collectors of customs. The United States controls all agencies of public opinion in these countries, and has the cables in its hands. In an endless number of different ways we are subordinating to our purposes these Latin-American countries, wonderfully productive and capable of almost unlimited development. "Never in the course of history has the world witnessed a process of expansion so irresistible and so marvelous." Our immediate motives at the time of action have always seemed to be sound, in 1898 we rescued Cuba from Spanish misrule. We assumed a virtual protectorate overdfxe Jiitcfie Jiutnee Panama in 1003 to insure the success of the canal. In 1905 we extended our influence into the Dominican Republic lest European creditors despoil the little country. Protection of the property of our own citizens and of that of Europeans caused us to interfere in Nicaragua in 1012. We landed marines in Haiti in 1015 to stop a reign of horror. And so the story runs. Each case seems easily justifiable. But the fact remains that, regardless of the sincerity of our direct motives, the unpleasant consequences of each experience are invariably the same. More and more of our wealth is being invested in these countris where it yields generous returns to us, while the native financial condition is not improving in a proportional degree. And the people in these countries regard our continued presence in their midst with more and more apprehension. Our positioin in relation to our smaller neighbors is yearly becoming more difficult. Its ramifications insidiously underlie all of our political and economic life. The recent Mexican and Nicaraguan affairs, with their religious and financial complications, are intruding themselves far into the domestic life of our country, and we arc becoming involved in actions which we should blush to own. Let us recall just one incident. Why. in 1023. when Charles E. Hughes was Secretary of State, the representatives of Central American powers met in Washington, and we. wih them, signed a treaty in which we promised not to recognize any other government which might come into power through a coup d’ etat, or revolution in their countries. That was in 1023. but in 1026 Adolpho Diaz was given the support of the United States at the time when, by virtue of President Solorzano’s resignation, J. Bautista Sacasa. Nicaragua’s vice-president, should legitimately have come automatically into power. The record of Diaz is well known. In 1010 he was an employe of a Pittsburg mining company, at a salary of one thousand dollars a year, and contributed six hundred thousand dollars to the revolution then in progress in Nicaragua. Shorn of its embellishment, this transaction of ours in Nicaragua reads like this—the United States, a great world power, in its dealings with a small neighbor, broke its word and raised to a position of great power a man of unsavory reputation. At the present time, our diplomats, fearing an enraged public opinion, may deem it wise to modify temporarily their plans for aggression, but no matter what settlement is made in this present crisis, Mexico and the other Caribbean countries, like the poor, we shall have with us always. The matter is far from ended; and there is little doubt that sooner or later, action will be resumed to insure our dominance in the south. Southward the course of empire takes its way, and from the present outlook, the American empire may ultimately bestride the entire area bounded by the Monroe Doctrine. Is this the course the United States of Lincoln and Washington really wishes to pursue? Is the greatest free government in the world to give a large share of its attention to insuring additional financial returns to persons who are already burdened with wealth? Is the idealism of our past to become mere materialism in the future? If so. then let us seal the pages of our former history that future generations may not recall how this same country, once devoted its best efforts to establishing religious freedom, and to striking the shackles from slaves. At least let us acknowledge what we are doing and be consistent. Let us not sanctimoniously vote for prohibition with one hand, while we raise the embargo on arms against Mexico with the other. Let us not shun the Turk for his treatment of the Armenian, while we send our battleships and land our marines, in violation of treaty agreements, to safeguard our investments in Nicaragua. In the name of Justice and Civilization the imperialists of America have professed to pursue their policy, and by Justice they shall hereafter be judged. If the course is continued, let them see to it that by Civilization they be not condemned. This country that was conceived in liberty and has so often taken sides with right against might, is now treading on treacherous grounds. We are in grave danger of losing sight of the great traditions that have guided us wisely through many a sin-beset way. "Lord GotI of Hosts, be with us yet. Lest we forget,—lest ivc forget." 3fte Eunice Sramatirn To Professor Thorpe M. Langley goes the credit for being the power behind the throne in Superior Normal dramatics for the past two years. As a result of his efforts and continued interest, the stage equipment of this school far surpasses that of any Normal in the state. We have one of the best amateur stages at the Head of the Lakes. Over SI.000 has been spent on the stage in the past two years. Of this sum, over §000 has been donated by the members of the Sigma Pi sorority. This donation was made possible through the three Vodvil performances which that sorority has sponsored. Among the accessories added to the stage in the past two years have been: a spot-light, $75; foot-light dimmers, $258; two floodlights, $70; two valences. $100; one slide-track. $75; and lights, $35. The L. I). C. fraternity attended to the painting of one set of scenery last year at an expense of $50 to the club. A silver sheet for use in showing moving pictures has just this spring been installed on the stage. This, with the moving picture equipment which was just previously installed, makes a value of $400 for moving picture facilities alone. This money was donated by the state. Besides lending his efforts in the actual equipment of the stage, Professor Langley has coached four very successful plays in the oast two years. They are: “On the Hiring Line,” ‘The Goose Hangs High,” “Applesauce, and “You and I." The careful training of the four casts which produced these plays has gained an enviable reputation in dramatics for Superior Normal. Three Vodvil performances have also been put across under Professor Langley’s direction. From the production of "Applesauce” in December to the last curtain call of the Senior Class Play, "You and I,” presented on April 22. the theatrical season at Superior Normal has been one of note. Three plays, a vaudeville show, and a short skit produced in assembly comprise the list of successful dramatic efforts. "Applesauce,” the three-act comedy presented by the members of the Lambda Delta Chi fraternity on Friday evening, December 10, was one of the outstanding events of the school year. Some heretofore undiscovered talent was brought to light by Prof. Thorpe M. Langley, who coached the production, and more than one request was received to have the play repeated. The skit produced in assembly on Friday morning, January 7, by the members of the Lambda Sigma Lambda sorority for the purpose of advertising the movie which the club sponsored at the Princess during the weei of January 8-13, proved the cleverest piece of advertising which was ever presented in Superior Normal. The skit was written by Frances Risdon and was coached by Frances Kisdon and Ruth Louise Herschleb. "Hansel and Gretel.” the play which was put on by the Three Arts sorority, was prepared especially for children and was given only at matinee performances. The play will long be remembered by the grown-ups who saw it, as well as the little people for whose special enjoyment it was produced. 1927 Vodvil, sponsored by the Sigma Pi. passed into history in a blaze of success. It will long be remembered in the annals of the school. Eight acts, all worthy of professionals. were presented to an audience of over 1,000 persons which crowded the auditorium to capacity. Three of the acts were immediately booked with theaters in the Twin Ports. Thorpe M. Langley directed the production. "You and I," Phillip Barry’s brilliant comedy, which was put on by the members of the class of ’27 on April 22. was another high light in the school year. Again Professor Langley coached the cast, all members of which had had previous theatrical experience in amateur plays. The production was notable in the list of Senior Class plays. —95—“APPLESAUCE By Barry Connors Presented by the Lambda Delta Chi fraternity on Friday evening, December 10. 1926, in the Normal Auditorium. Coached by Thorpe M. Langley. MEMBERS OF THE CAST Ma Robinson............................................Alice Safford Bill McAllister............................. LeRoy Jacobson Rollo Jenkins................................ Donald Jensen Hazel Robinson .............................. Frances Ball Matt McAllister............................ Donald Kinney Pa Robinson ................................. Edward Hilton Jennie.........................................Evelyn Ballou BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager ........................... William Nolan Advertising Manager .................... Palmer Saterstrom Property Manager......................... Waldemar Johnson Stage Manager ............................... Paul Louisell —98—3fie umee Ofi “UPSTAGE" Skit presented in assembly by the Lambda Sigma Lambda sorority on January 7, 1927. Coached by Prances Risdon and Ruth Herschleb. Written by Frances Risdon. CAST Ruth Louise Herschleb Capitola Kennedy Gladys Blomgren ......Lloyd Hanson ......Dagmar Carlson .......... Doris Fox ......Calvin Stigney ... Winnifred Johnson .......... Red Geary .... Gwendolyn Barnard ......Margaret Davis ....... Irene Pellerin ... Helen Tonskempcr .......Orvo Lemberg Pages.......... King........... Queen ......... Norma Shearer Oscar Shaw..... "Dizzy” Blonde Villain ....... Suzanne ....... Dolly.......... Elise.......... Izzy .......... Dancer......... “HANSEL AND GRETCHEL" Coached by Miss Helen Cross and presented on February 25 and 26, 1927. Given by members of the Three Arts sorority. CAST Grctel.................................................. Marie Grignon Hansel.......................................Myrna Heberlein Father................................................... Jane Harrison Mother....................................... Ruth McClellen Witch.........................................Mona McCabe Story-teller..................................... Grace Evans Sandman ..................................... Fern Rock wood Children ............................ Training School pupils —97—3fie Jiitcfie Sunioc DRAMATICS “YOU AND I 5)- Phillip Barry Presented by the members of the class of 1927. The Senior Class Play, coached by Prof. Thorpe Langley. Presented Friday evening, April 22, 1927. Maitland White . Nancy White..... Roderick White Veronica Duane . Geoffrey Nichols G. T. Warren .... Etta........... CAST ..................Thomas O'Neill ................... Betty Hanson ...................LeRoy Jacobsen ...................Myrna Heberlein ...................William Nolan .................... Don Jensen ...................... Doris Fox BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager Publicity Manager William Nolan Frances Risdon‘•‘W'MHIIW'3fta iiilclie SlIMM Ira Irl Tubbs, Director of Athletics at Superior Normal since 1921, has clone much to encourage athletics at Superior. His comprehensive knowledge of sport, his ability to develop players, and the constant attention he devotes to his men. are some of the many qualities of his instruction that have contributed greatly to the Superior Normal’s achievements in athletics. He is one of the Northwest's foremost advocates of clean sportsmanship and a high type of athletics. Carlton W. Smith Vernon E. Van Palter Edwin H. Schricher Manley Christenson George Pung Everett Nelson Lawrence Jacobson Andrew Rrnccune Thomas O'Neill Harold Camp Harvey Green Kenneth Pepper HOARD OP CONTROL Ira Irl Tubbs Thorpe M. Langley Prank E. Vitz WINNERS OF THE FOOTBALL l.ester St. John James La Valle Ralph Schibstcd l-rank Getfc Mitchell Miller Wallace Nygaard BASKETBALL Wallace Wcstlund Clarence Lctourncau Ray Chatterson Timothy J. McCarthy Vernon E. Hraman Ray Chatterson William Dolan Leslie Gallagher Stanley NtdoMI Stanley Nadolski l.ester St. John William Dolan —09-5fie }jilcfu Sumac Not the least satisfying thing about the football and basketball seasons was the fine rooting produced under the guidance of Yell Leader Eddie Hilton and his assistants, Inez Smith. Gladys Persgaard, and Muriel McKenna. Matters never got too dark for this corps of yell leaders to have plenty of pep for themselves and the whole rooting section. Harold "Jerry" Camp, Assistant Coach, is a great favorite on the campus with his good sportsmanship and active interest in the men. This fall, the football squad had the benefit of his untiring energy in caring for the men, which was no small factor in sustaining the morale of the teams. A serious worker with an unselfish desire to aid the teams to do their best, Student-Manager Robert "Bob” Longeway maintains a position of high esteem with the teams. His ever ready assistance did much to promote the efficiency and general well-being of the men. -too-JfanthaU CAPTAIN M A Nl. E Y CHRIS TIA NSONrlfie Jiitcfu? £juim e THE 1927 FOOTBALL SQUAD Ira I. Tubbs..................................................................... Coach Harold Camp.......................................................... Assistant Coach Manley Christenson ................................................. Center (Capt.) Thomas O’Neill..........................................................Fullback Wallace Nygard.................................................................. Center George Pung...................................................................... Guard Lester St. John ............................................................... Guard Raymond Chattcrson ............................................................. Tackle Everett Nelson.................................................................. Tackle James La Valle.................................................................. Tackle William Dolan...................................................................... End Lawrence Jacobson.................................................................. End Ralph Schibstcd .............................................................. Halfback Charles Gallagher ............................................................ Halfback Andrew Bracconc......................................................... Fullback Sylvan Tatkin ................................................................ Halfback Frank Geffe............................................................. Halfback Stanley Nadolski.......................................................Quarterback Mitchell Miller.........................................................Halfback Harvey Green ............................................................ Quarterback Ralph Erickson...................................................................Tackle Gustolph Graylcs............................................................... Utility Donald McLean...................................................................Utility John Blltkr ................................................................... Utility Herbert Dnnn .................................................................. Utility James McKay ................................................................... Utility “A fighting determination with the never-give-up spirit" is an apt characterization of Superior Normal’s 1926 eleven. The repeated demonstrations of the efficiency of the Superior machine were sufficient evidence to place this year's team on a plane with the best ever produced by the school. The personnel of the 1926 Yellow Jackets was exceptional for its quality. A thorough mastery of strategy, analysis, technique, combined with an irresistible spirit, made it an inevitably successful organization. THE SEASON Superior ......................() Superior ......................13 Superior ...................... 3 Superior ......................25 Superior ...................... 0 Superior ......................19 Superior ...................... 0 60 S SCORE Hibbing......................... 0 Virginia ........................0 Stevens Point................... 0 Northland ...................... 0 Eau Claire ..................... 0 Stout .......................... 6 River Falls .................... 2 8 VIRGINIA-STEVENS POINT The Yellow Jackets and Virginia played a listless game before a small crowd. Although the Black and Gold team only scored a 13 to 0 victory, they outplayed their aggressors in every department of the game, but did not have the punch to nut the ball over in the pinches. However, in the third quarter Superior worked the ball up to the three-yard line and Tatkin took it over for a touchdown. In the fourth quarter O'Neill plunged through the center for the second touchdown. Superior won its first conference game when it defeated Stevens Point by a score of 3 to 0. Superior failed to get the breaks, having taken the pig skin across the Stevens Point goal line three times, but each time a player was off side. With but five minutes left to play, Jacobson dropped back to the forty-yard line and put a neat place kick between the goal posts, winning the game for Superior. —101—u Valle ERICKSON NADOI.SKI NIBBING In early September Conch Tubbs began putting his men through long workouts, and the fine reports from the training camp were spread everywhere by the interested local followers. The Yellow Jackets showed their mettle in the season's opener against the strong Hibbing eleven. Although the offense was weak, the line was a bulwark in defense and held the Ore Diggers to a scoreless tie. Rung, at guard. Nelson and Chatterson at tackle played good ball. Driesback skirted the field while O'Neill did the plunging.Jfitcfie £?uttiee NYOARD MILLER BROCCONE NORTHLAND The Yellow Jackets used the air, speed and plenty of zip and sting to chalk up a 25 to 0 victory over the beefy Northland eleven. Gcffe and Tatkin played great ball at the half positions. Geffe thrilled the crowd by dashing seventy-four yards for a touchdown. In the fourth quarter three straight passes brought the ball to the four-yard line from where Tatkin made a flying leap landing over the goal. The goal kick was missed. The game proved that blocking, clever deception, and good tackling are greater factors towards winning than is mere beef. —KM—rffta Jfitcfie ]5umee RUNG SCHIBSTED JACOBSON RIVER FALLS In the first quarter of the River Falls-Superior clash. Superior looked like a winner, but River Falls won its second consecutive W isconsin Normal School Conference Football Championship by defeating Superior by a 2 to 0 score. Although the game was played in a sea of mud it provided many thrills. O’Neill’s fumble which contributed to the'safety which gave the River Falls aggregation victory was excusable, the ball being covered with slime. Superior showed flashes of speed during the final ten minutes of play. The game ended in darkness when the last punt by River Falls put the ball on the fifty-yard line.app — 1U — tiftc 5itcfu J utnee ST. JOHN CIIATTERSON EAU CLAIRE O'NEILL At Eau Claire the Yellow Jackets went up against a strong team and a large Homecoming crowd. The game was hard fought and ended in a scoreless tie. Superior showed up well on both offense and defense but failed to penetrate the strong Eau Claire line. Eau Claire made only one first down; Superior made four. Tatkin made a flashy twenty-five yard return on a fumble. Jacobson, O’Neill, and Nelson starred for Superior; Metz did the best work for Eau Claire.3fie Sitefie Sunice McLEAN GEFFE DOI.AN STOUT Before a large Home-coming crowd the Yellow Jackets downed the Stout Institute eleven by a 19 to fi score. A high wind was the only drawback to the encounter. Tatkin made a thirty-yard run and scored for Superior in the third period. Shermak of Stout made a twenty-nine-yard run off tackle and evened the score. The Home-coming crowd went wild when the teams tied—Stout 0, Superior 0. Superior cut loose in the fourth period and ran up the score to 19 to 6. — 10C-cMu i itcfic Eunice —107— TATKIN OALLAOHER MARQUETTE The Yellow Jackets buzzed ineffectually about the Marquette team which piled up against them a 21 to 0 score. Superior's high class line of attack was smothered time after time by the strong Marquette team. Many of the Superior men praised the work of the Marquette machine. Christensen, St. John, Schibsted, and Miller played great ball. KThe Superior Normal gym is one of the best and largest in the Northwest. It was huilt and equipped at an expense of $75,000. The court is said to be the equal of any in the Big Ten. It is of maximum standard size, the large court being ideally suited to collegiate ball as it is played today. It has a seating capacity of 1,500 and is arranged in a most convenient manner. A small court, adjoining the large one, is of sufficient dimensions to provide a suitable place for other basketball games and athletic contests. The gymnasium is regarded with great pride by the students and local people, and many exciting contests are anticipated within its walls. It is a most valuable addition to the institution, and one that will be forever appreciated by the students and the people of Superior. dfW ]5Kcfu Sumee OUR GYMNASIUM —10S- rffie Jiitcfie I umec lafikptball BASKETBALL SQUAD Captain Stanley Nadolski ............................... Forward Kenneth Pepper ......................................... Forward William Dolan ......................................... Forward Ray Chatterson .......................................... Center Harold Camp...............................................Center Captain-elect Clarence Letoumcau ......................... Guard Wallace Westlund........................................ Forward Harvey Green...............................................Guard Lester St. John .......................................... Guard Frank Kernan .......................................... Center Harlon Kernan.............................................Center Ralph Shibsted.............................................Guard George Rung................................................Guard Charles Calkins......................................... Forward SEASONS SCORE Superior ............................. 25 Superior...............................20 Superior ............................ 22 Superior ............................. 25 Superior ............................. 22 Superior.............................. 24 Superior ............................. 18 Northland .......................... 18 Eau Claire 20 Hibbing 36 Eveleth 34 River Falls Oshkosh 27 La Crosse 26 Marquette 30 29 Eau Claire 35 Virginia 31 Eveleth -100- -3flc 5itcfie ,K TOURNKAU The 1927 Superior College basketball team was not successful from the standpoint of winning games, yet it was a decided credit to the school because of the exceptionally fine spirit shown by the members in the face of the many difficulties they were forced to meet throughout the season. The team was always in the pink of condition and so was always able to put up a fast game. The greatest difficulty the team had to overcome was the inability to work together and to take advantage of opportunities to score. no- t)f Q 25itcfie 25umee GREEN CHATTBRSON WESTLUND This weakness can he largely attributed to the fact that constant changes had to be made in the line because of sickness or ineligibles. The team was led by Captain Nadolski, who did much to keep up the morale and spirit of the team. The team were greatly disheartened by the lack of interest and backing on the part of the students of the college, who failed to help the team through its early adverses. —ill— CAMP ST. JOHN Next year's team will he captained by Clarence l.e Tourneau who. at the position of guard, was one of the mainstays of this year’s team. Almost the entire squad will he hack next year, and great things are expected of the 1928 team. Coach Tubbs, who has trained many great teams, worked hard to hold the team together, as he did. and to keep the men in a fighting mood. Every coach has hard seasons and this happened to he Coach Tubbs’. —112—g»atirf "Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody’s face but their own.” Jonathan Swiftrffte Jfitcfie Eunice RolltY ov f WOv , 1fifie 9itcfie Quince BEHKI RE VARD !! HEART ROBBERS STORAGE UNBREAKABLE. nwntc ”Tl too I X ymt - RUSH ORPBI HAMDi_E WfTHCAKE RAG I LI USB NO H00K33fie 5itclic J9mm?e MY IDEAL GIRL My Ideal Girl is not wholly a product of my imagination; she is really the embodiment of all the good qualities I've noticed in girls that I know. One's Ideal Girl doubtless changes; probably next year my Ideal Girl will be altogether different than she is this. Regardless qf what Y. M. C. A. workers insist. I’m not looking for a pal. who will be just a good friend; I’m looking for a girl that I can have a good time with, and of whom I can be proud when I’m with her in a crowd. The first requirement, of course, is that she be pretty. I don’t necessarily mean the Baby Face type, or the ‘beautiful but dumb” style, but an attractive and intelligent looking girl. She can use all the makeup she needs to be better looking, but my Ideal Girl won t need much. She certainly has to have bobbed hair. She has to have what we fellows speak of as a “hot figure”—rather thin, not too tall, and she has to know how to carry herself well. She’s a good conversationalist, but not “the life of the party." I can talk with her on almost any subject, and she has brains enough to discuss it intelligently. She has initiative enough to keep the conversation going when the interest begins to lag. and above all. she has a well-developed sense of humor. Any girl without this sense of humor is immediately eliminated. My Ideal Girl knows how to act in public, so when I take her any place where some of my friends are, she will show that she is accustomed to being in society. She will show a knowledge of social customs, and above all, when I take her to the Country Club or some other place where there are many older society people, she will show a decent reserv. She isn’t conceited, but on the other hand, she hasn’t any inferiority complex. She’s confident of herself, but not boastful. She's able to do something better than most people, something that’s worth while. It may be some form of art, or music; it may be writing, or public speaking; it may be athletics, or some special phase of school work. But she has to be able to do something which will lift her above the rest of the girls. She dresses well. This is an important requirement. Her clothes don't necessarily have to be expensive, but they must be pretty. She doesn’t go to extremes. Her clothes are fashionable, but not pointedly so. On the other hand, she isn’t old fashioned in her clothes; she doesn’t wear sombre colors without any distinctiveness. Perhaps this is. in a sense, a cruel requirement, for certainly many girls can not afford pretty clothes without considerable sacrifice, but still it is something that a fellow looks for carefully, and ordinarily doesn’t say anything about. Nevertheless, it is one of the most important factors in making up his own mind about a girl. And she has to know how to wear her clothes well. I don’t know what the reason is, but some girls seem to have mastered the trick of wearing clothes, while others haven’t. She isn’t prudish. Here again I differ with the Y. M. C. A., and here, I think. I agree with most fellows. She doesn't object to an occasional necking party, in fact, she rather likes it. when she's with a fellow whom she really likes and admires. Certainly, no fellow has any respect for a girl who will neck anybody who comes along, just for the sake of another date. But on the other hand, when I’m with a girl whom I've been out with once or twice before, and whom I really like. I get a big thrill out of necking, and. strange to say, if I really like her to start with, I fall for her even harder when we’ve necked a little. Incidentally, .it seems even sweeter if I have to work pretty bard for it, but I do sometimes get discouraged if she doesn't lead me on a little—not too much, but a little. But once again I want to emphasize that no fellow can respect a girl who will neck everybody, or even very many fellows. It ought to be a one-fellow, one-girl proposition, at any given time. I don't mind if she smokes a little. In fact, if she wants to smoke, I’d just as soon buy the cigarettes. Personally, if a fellow smokes, I don't see any reason why a girl shouldn’t either. Of course, neither should smoke a great deal, but an occasional snioke certainly is soothing. My Ideal Girl does not drink. I know a wonderfully fine girl in Normal’, almost ideal in nearly every other respect, who drinks, largely because her parents do. I admire her very much on account of her other accomplishments, but I can not reconcile myself to her drinking. One does not get drunk by smoking, so there’s really no very serious effect resulting from it; but with drinking it's different. Now. here’s where what is known as a fellow’s "male vanity" comes in—I want my girl to show some interest in me, I want her to like me. but I don't want her to get the idea that we’re practically married and that I'm tied down to her. I’ve mentioned the qualities which seem to me to be most important in my Ideal Girl. I’ve referred all along to what I personally like or dislike, and to what my own reactions were to certains forms of conduct. I’ve done this because I know my own mind better than anyone else's. and because I was discussing my own Ideal Girl. Probably I'll never find a girl with all of these qualities, but if I ever do find a girl who is pretty, a good conversationalist. a good dancer, self possessed, outstanding in some field, a good dresser, a good sport, and self respecting. I'll have found my Ideal Girl. But above all things, she won’t be boyish, she’ll be the "eternal feminine." —115—»VP)!g f yCdlie Gurnee 04 Snt Itrknta’ i tiUr Inx 2V" Deor Miss Dickens: My wife objects to my teaching school because I'm so good-looking and all the girls hound me to death. I can't help it if I’ve got “It,” can I? The worst of it is, I'm teaching Geology and sometimes we get in dangerous places and I have to carry the girls across deep gulleys, etc., and my wife imagines things. What shall I do? ' PERPLEXED. Answer: Divorce your wife immediately. Nothing is more dangerous than a jealous woman. Evidently she does not appreciate the glory of your position. Most women would, you know. But don’t give up the ship. You will never find another like it. DOT DICKENS. Dear Miss Dickens: I'm a disillusioned young lad of twenty years. All the women in my life have proven fickle and shallow. I have absolutely sworn off making a fool of myself over another. My ideal girl is non-existent. Bill is evidently still looking but he too will come to earth with a thump. I haven't the heart to warn him. Don’t you think it pathetic to see a young fellow like me so fed up on life? I have tasted everything and nothing satisfies. I don't want sympathy—merely your candid advice. DONNIE JUAN. Answer: Enter a convent and take the veil. DOT DICKENS. Dear Miss Dickens: I am a popular girl attending a school which I think is just lovely with one exception. My discomfiture is extremely great when I am forced to run a queer sort of gauntlet in descending from one floor to another. A group of complacent human beings of the opposite sex drape themselves in a pre-arranged manner on the walls and railings. This is accomplished in such a strategic way that lately I have only dared run it spiritually, while remaining bodily on the floor above. These staircases are also used as cloakrooms by the aforesaid members thereby increasing their privacy and frightening innocent people like myself from a public thoroughfare. What do you advise? VIRGINIA B. Answer: The above is a convincing argument in favor of the re-installment of the hat-pin. Don’t talk to me about equal rights! Since the passing of the hat-pin, man has had the balance of power. This is positively the only weapon which could have shaken these creatures out of their stubborn immobility. My heart goes out in sympathy to you. DOT DICKENS. Dear Miss Dickens: This is a rush order. What arc the symptoms of love? I'm dying of fright. FLEE HOP JOHNSON. Answer: Symptoms classified— Day-dreaming during Van Patter’s quizzes. Memorizing "Sonnets From The Portuguese.’ 2. 3. Insomnia. 4. Studying in the assembly hall. I have prepared a special lotion called “L’amourine" which is guaranteed to absolutely cure all kinds of love: fickle, puppy, passionate, true, liberal, and conservative. This has never failed me. Trial bottle sent on receipt of 10c to cover cost of postage. Do not neglect this opportunity to regain your equilibrium. DOT DICKENS. Dear Miss Dickens: I’m in love with two women. Which one shall I choose? A CORNET PLAYER WITH SAX APPEAL. Answer: The one who won’t have you, of course. DOT DICKENS. -118- 3fie Jjitcfie Suincc A MODERN MOTHER GOOSE Little Ed Hilton Looks like lie's wilton Exhorting the crowd to cheer. He heaves up a sigh And lets out a cry And says. "Not all the king's horses nor all the king’s men could get this darn crowd to yell!” SPLASH The sun riseth over the eastern horizon, But then, why shouldn't it? Over the eastern horizon, pink, the sun riseth. Pink sun. Eastern horizon. Horizon, beautiful word. Riseth the sun, Apollo-like, Or. perhaps, Venus-like. At any rate, not Bacchus-like. Prohibition! Well, over the pink horizon the rising sun easterns. Or, better, the rising horizon over, pinks the eastern sun, Or. better still— But then, what of it? Who cares? —Rockets. POME Oh, has her gone? Oh, has her went? Oh, has her life I all alone? Her can always come to we Us can never go to she. Oh. cruel fate, most unkind, Which took I fore and Left she hind. It couldn't was, ain’t it? —Rockets. A man may smile in the face of death. But there never will be found, A man who can draw a placid breath When his garter's coining down. —Rockets. A man who was fond of his moisture. Had a wife who had come from a cloister; She objected to drink, So he said, "Wife, I think That I should have wedded an oyster." I guess the only effect Dr. McCoy had upon Mrs. Haney's lunch menu was that water was put in the catsup. Lets’ open a bottle of ink and make things write. -no-3fta Jlitclie Eunice THE FINAL SESSION At the last meeting of the Haney club the following resolutions were passed: Resolved: I. That in order to co-operate with the Association for the Prevention of Cruelty to Dumb Animals, the Haney club desist from eating "hot dogs.” 2. That a sergeant-at-arms'be appointed to examine each man before leaving the club rooms in order that the stock of Haney silverware be not depleted. 3. That, in order to show the club’s patriotism in the present national crisis, a boycotte be placed on chop suey. 4. That, the soup silencer invented by our worthy brother Jacobsen, be adopted and used bv all members of the club. f . That, in order to discourage all outsiders from trespassing in the club rooms, all members remain in their seats at the counter until said outsiders lx seriously discomfited and the potatoes are gone. THREE O’CLOCK ON FRIDAY IN THE RECREATION HALL (With apologies to Clement C. Moore.) ‘Twos Friday a I three and all through the Rife Not a student was giggling, not even a Fcx: They were standing in line—brows furrowed with care, In hopes that Ruth Alice soon would be there. The darlings stood gazing with love in their eyes At the books on the shelves full of both facts and lies So near, yet so far, Ruth's dear little gate Caused many a stude to he late for her date. Did they shed bitter tears?—no,, never a one; They said staunchly always "Work before fun." Ed. carried his Kiehkofer open in hand And tried vainly every vague reference to land. Douglas and Hitchcock and Marshall and Hall. And Carver and Taussig, he asked for them all Bat when he discovered that Paul had been there And proved such a hog, he near tore his hair, And his fellows just stood there with pitying looks As he gave up Fcon and look other books. Big ones and little ones, brown ones and green ones And finally, burdened with volumes and volumes He left us, with daring resolve in his face To read them in spite of all ribbons and lace. They say Helen T. once gave up Homecoming To finish a term theme loo long a-running. I won’t vouch for this, tho' I dare say it's true. If you do not believe me, you know what to do. Nothing does fill me with more real disqust Than to hear a professor all peevish and fussed Ask what we do with our precious week-ends When that Rcc on Friday such a true message sends. M. V. FOOLOSOPHY They say that science takes things apart and analyzes them and that foolosophy takes these parts and puts them back together again, but in the recently organized foolosophy class headed by the Honorable Professor Williams, the parts are nut together in such a way that the original is unrecognizable—in putting together the different parts in the theory of evolution, man is put where the mule belongs and the monkey where man belongs. ’ However, I don't know but what the foolosophy class is right for is not man continually making a monkey of himself and is not man stubborn like the mule? This sentence might lx called foolosophical. The big project of the season was a study as to how the angle worms got in the cave troughs after a rain. Horace Williams concluded, after examining the worms in the troughs, that they were not there. However, Geary, the flashy young man flame of the class was not to be hoodwinked by such a remark and said thev must have splashed up from the ground. Camp, the stalwart, said he would get at the root of the matter and go back to the original causes. He stated that it was one of the curses which A oses brought upon the earth with his wicked walking stick. The class concluded that Camp had found the truth and he was sent to the foot of the class. —Adv. —120—Bair t. Vit_. iM, {■WJ {• ?• r •»!•»« la IwiiiuM aata'Jtll 1? tl M aMeh. 19 act, 51 »!1| t« . a llulj Ulimi la • j.r «,. air u it •f !» « »ia»J.U 1 ,’ " • - f»rcatl«« f»-.«fc la cr ____ tt m f»r lll« f,t». s ss:.“?.w.r t3£ :ferev£ jsk - ■ ■ . .. 4ft • r. flftr («ti Mr 4% for ••$ iBiurt. Il »lll t Vo • . :«t ,'v lr t Mr, to OH'tl r r.r . 4 ’Ul U r-'“ ”• “'«-! UM •■' ’1 I f« 1 ! • « f»if, ail ail; atari a ral IE ? ’? f “ “Ul tnr '•'•■• • fall aa ll» ata. ,»,•(!», If M atari ant r allliM rata aa am fara f ar rail a « far ,» aal. .H,) rur.t . 11 ft Hal Bill f M It rata m it carcaaaaa tt fwn'a l'aai 1’ ’" ’ • • • ,h • II alii ttaa la ••(! ttat tt alll t , tr. aallaljtBr arj ..irtai:, .n tta ..7 ttmt. j„ alii .111 iii • “ r ’-’ ,,U ' « ••»•. aM a. ainVall", .lit__________fr !:sv T r "»’•». ar-l irattlM tkai aa III! rn'r ia'a it Mb'3,1 7 jU - A laara irrl . 1. 3. lllUaaa .ar-.-MBf Ca. Prin: What’s your name? Cadet: Miss Jenkins, sir. Prin: Do you expect to be called Miss J------? Cadet: Oh, no sir, I have an alarm clock. Pepper: Last nipht my room-mate fell downstairs with two pints of liquor. Mrs. Johnson: Did he spill any? Pepper: No, he kept his mouth shut.3he Jjitcfa Quince frx HHMittga Itefnrp tlrp fJrnm MINUTES OF TIIE YOUNG MEN'S MEETING The young men of Superior Normal held their 20th annual meeting in the recreation room to discuss the proper conduct at the Prom. The meeting was well attended and a bore to all except Bobby Longeway. who was taking notes on what was said to present them to his frat brothers. The business taken up was varied and inclusive. The matter of taking a bath was seriously considered, but it was voted down on the grounds that it would interfere with the weekly Saturday night baths. "Stacomb” was decided upon as the official hair paste. Bill Foley and Lester St. John objected to this motion on the theory that it would take the beautiful curls out of their hair, but their contentions were over-rid. Necking in the Court House was forbidden and it was mutually decided upon that this activity would be reserved until after the dance. Cal Stigney objected on the grounds that he had to go to work right after the dance. His case was taken up before the group and it was decided that a special room would be devoted to this purpose for those who had to work after the dance (fifty men reported that they worked nights.) Six inches was decided upon as the proper distance which should separate the men from their partners—(a fee of ten cents was decided upon for breaking this rule.) Roland Henney thought this a harsh rule and said that he did not have ten cents. Ed. Hilton and Norman Christianson were appointed as official measurers and treasurers. (They kept fifty per cent of all they collected, and Eddie is now contemplating the purchase of a seat on the "exchange.”) Dean of Men Van Patter then gave a brief talk to the group and congratulated them upon what they had accomplished and remarked about the fine spirit that had been manifested by all. (Cheers.) The meeting was brought to a close by the motion for adjournment. MINUTES OF THE YOUNG LADIES' MEETING In conjunction with the boys' annual meeting for the Prom, the girls staged their annual conflab in the assembly. Miss Clark. Dean of Women, presented that matter of conduct at the Prom to the girls and was very kindly received. The matter of ear rings was first brought up. Ethel Eaton, of the Sigma Eta Pi. made a motion that they be barred from the dance. Betty Hanson, of the Lambs, objected very seriously to this motion on the grounds that it would be against the constitution of their club. Further discussion ensued and finally the entire matter was dropped. Certain points of etiquette were taken up. It was decided that the words of correct introduction would be “Howdja Do?" instead of ""Pleased Ta Meet Ya.” In consideration of the fact that most of the boys’ Tuxes would be rented, an act of cooperation was passed wherein each girl pledged herself to hold her head sufficiently far from her partner so that the powder on her checks should not be left on his lapel. However, it was pointed out that this would not interfere with the boys' necking act because overcoats would be worn by the boys going home from the dance. Next was taken up the matter of proper dressing at the dance—much chewing of the rag. A compromise was finally reached and it was decided that to the knee cap was the official length. The ringing of the fourth period bell brought the meeting to a close. —122—3fie Sitefie I umee Tlfo® EvasIiiJfnaDini ©is Mu® Mai® Louise Liz. 4 2) r dy Cake £aler SKe.% Fffet'PtnHet'JCT — GR MD -RESULTS-Dfie liitcfie umec rnfrsBnrH Qmt’t IGikr Ulmtiipa Young gentlemen professors hardly ever seem to understand we girls, I mean, they never seem to see why the date of the Prom is so much more important to us than the date of some battle at which really nothing occurred but fighting. It’s most embarrassing, and annoying, too. Just yesterday, one of the Profs was very insulting to me for not being attentive, I mean, in not listening to him rave about an old king in England who really did nothing but get himself married three or four times; why, our DeWolf Hopper has a longer and far more sensational record. It was very, very necessary that I give my attention just then to Bill Nolan, who's got a Tux, or to Bobby Beck, who’s got a car. It was almost impossible to decide. Then I got a very good idea from the Prof.'s lecture on King Henerv. I decided to go with Henery Hanson for he could borrow his brother’s Tux. and get his dad’s car. The lecture wasn’t such a flop, after all. I think the Prof, would feel happy if he knew I had gotten something very important out of his talk. Professors would be very nice gentlemen, but they seem to be very interested in dull things, so, of course, they can not be expeetd to undrstand modern girls. —128-3fta £ itctie SumccOfte ]5itcfie Bumee t ' r Eczema: What would any Christian woman bo doing out this late in a car? Dandruff: The same thing any heathen woman would, I presume. O’Neill (acting): My kingdom for a horse. .... . , Nygard (in gallery): Will a jackass do? O’Neill: Sure, come right down. It Pays To Advertise « I Read.'am. an weep- . r— »'i M-H— - «■»• » NilMAw k 10 Great Novel P| |WA- -------------- s "'Let Us Taste Life While We May3fta £iitcfie Suttieu ®he §pljtn;x We arc indeed fortunate in having in our midst one who can so paternally shower beams of his intellect on us. He does this much in the same vein that Rockefeller very graciously hands out ten cents to the waif on the street Sunday mornings. We can feel the presence of this colossus and he properly inspired and awed by his kindly grit and educational countenance—never faltering in the pursuit of training young minds in the complicated laws of why eggs are higher on Tuesday than gasoline on Thursday and whether or not it is advisable to run at or away from a hear encountered in the woods. (Don't carry fish poles.) His classes at the beginning of the year filled with timid souls scared to the nth degree by this sphinx-like creature whirling a watch fob and capable of suddenly popping a question that involves too much necessary thought-work for the average student to relish. He deliberately gives a test in which the student would be asked to mark the following, false or true: "I. If Washington had cut an apple tree instead of a cherry tree, what effect would it have had on the French Revolution? “2. If ‘Dakota Maid Baking Powder is Better, why is ‘Pillsbury’s Best ?" It would include statements of a double negative nature which only a genius can coin and which put his students in such a quandry that they arc not sure who won the war—the Democrats or the Republicans! But on the whole or half as the case may be, Mr. V. P. is a typical example of the numerous advantages (according to him) of being raised on a farm and attending a one-room school house; and of what fishing on the Brule will do for one mentally, physically, and sociologically. —132—Site fie S»tm c tJfie }5itcfie 9umec Auingrapljs 3fic Sitcfie Gurnee Autographstihe 9itcfte Gurnee W' iaf He who designed All nature hath wrought, e us u admire. 'Tis the beautiful Amnicon— dashing with tireless joy ever onward, Over hidden rocks— with stone-bound shores and pine trees overhead. -GREENFIELD KODAKS FINISHING J SUPERIORyW GREENFIELD PHOTO SUPPLY CO. 1328 TOWER AVE.Dlhe Jlitcfte Jjumoe m RECREATION Kussey fHotor Co. Billiard Parlors STUDEBAKER Best Tables in the City SALES SERVICE 928 Tower Avenue Phone Broad 2540 Superior, Wis. Service Station, 1805-7 Winter St. Serve it and You Please all Drink Our Perfectly Pasteurized MILK AND CREAM Russell Creamery Co. Phone, Broad 317 1625-27 Broadway Superior, Wisconsin Dclahunt—Have you ever been in love ? Pat Stern—It’s none of your business! Dclahunt—Huh, woman, you don’t know me. Mr. Williams—Good morning, my dear friend. Yesterday I met your wife, but she didn't see me. Mr. Van Patter—Yes, that’s what she told me. Chatterson—Goodnight, dear, and I’ll see you in the morning. Marie G.—Good night, Ray, but before you go—I think you have my gum. “Do you mean to tell me that you have lived here 10 years and cannot tell me the quickest way to the station ?’’ “I've been a taxi driver all those 9f “Better lower the shades, Eunice.” “Why?” “Two below outside.” Camp—I made the team, fellows. Longeway—Quit your kidding. When did you become coach. “Herb, don’t you know you shouldn’t smoke on the campus?” “Sure, I’m not smoking. I’m just holding this for a fellow.” Harbor—If you were walking along a dark road at night, how would you protect yourself? Carl Olson—I’d whistle, “Hail, Hail, the Gang’s All Here!” Ryan—I)o you think your public understands your arguments? Foley—Not fully, I hope, I may want to contradict them almost any day. Slocum—I had a real time at the dance last night. Sish—But you can’t dance. Slocum—Well, did anybody? “Are you a college man?” “No, these are papa's pants."Dfie JiitcfW £uniee G !" THE OLD RELIABLE BANK OF COMMERCE SUPERIOR, WISCONSIN Established 1888 1117 TOWER AVENUE Saving Department—Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent—Safety Deposit Vaults Three Per Cent Interest Paid On Savings Deposits cJfie dndrevD SELF-OILING WINDMILL EQUIPPED WITH HYATT ROLLER BEARINGS DUPLEX MANUFACTURING CO. SUPERIOR. WIS. ERLANSON LUMBER CO. Home “"11 Bill Dinq” EAST END THE SOPHISTICATED FROSH “I love you. I love you. I want you for my own. Say, what’s your name ? Lulu: (on phone) You honey? Honey: Yes this is honey, Lulu. Lulu: Honolulu, great heavens, Pm on long distance. Coed Ever show you the place where I hurt my hip ? Frnter: No, leme see it? Coed: Then, let’s drive over there.tffxe itcl'ic 5uim e here it is! a Corona with Standard Keyboard THOUSANDS of big machine-users have been asking us to give them a sturdy, compact Corona with the four-bank, singleshift keyboard. So here it is—with not only the standard keyboard, but standard 12-yard ribbon, standard 10-inch carriage, standard type-bar action and every other feature necessary to a standard office machine. Come in and see it, or phone and we will bring it to you! THE NEW MODEL IS HERE-SEE IT Superior Typewriter Company Broad 485 1105 Tower Avenuerlfie J5itcfta Gurnee Maadzines.. .. WE SUPPLY YOUR NEWSDEALER WITH PUBLICATIONS THAT ARE OF GREaT HELP IN YOUR SCHOOL WORK. ALSO OTHERS THAT ARE OF INTEREST DURING YOUR RECREATION PERIODS. Interstate News Co. DISTRIBUTORS FOR SUPERIOR, WISCONSIN 116 West Michigan Street Hutchinson: Oh, for 40 years 1 have sought you. Give me back my grandfather’s papers. Father: How long have you been engaged to her? Swanson: Don’t know, forgot to look at my watch. I.ouisell: What papers? Hutchinson: The cigarette papers. Prof. Loop: If there are any dumbbells in the room, please stand up. Saterstrom: What place should gentlemen smoke? A long pause, then finally a lone freshman stands up. Is in the room, please stand up. lone A. I). S.: Through the mouth and nostrils. Loop: What! Do you consider yourself a dumbbell? apples. Clerk: Winesap? Col. Hilton: Cider, Jackass! Col. Hilton: Gimme a peck of Frosh: Well, not exactly that, sir, but I hate to sec you standing all alone! Dependable Hardware sold from Michigan to California and Oregon. No matter where you are in the Northwest you can get Marshall - Wells hardware.0 tJfic J iCcfie Jluinee McClellan Par Duluth, Minnesota I Der Co. This Annual Printed on 80lb Butler's Artisan Enamel DcInhunt—Where arc you going with that little shovel? Riley—Going to bury my past. Delahunt—Man, you need a steam shovel. St. John—I got a splinter in my finger last night. Lovcroos—I told you to be careful when you mussed that girl’s hair. George Ploof—Please, honey, just another kiss before I go. Miss Bjur—Well, all right, but you must hurry. Papa is coming home within an hour. Harvey Greene—Can you play the lather song from "Lux?” Ruby Larson—After 1 brush up on it. Chas. Calkins—Do you like sauerkraut? Doris Fox—I’m sure I must. I like all kinds of fish. “Nora, go up on the next floor and tell those people to make less noise.” "Must I wait for an answer, ma’am?” Cal Stigney (at the Prom)—Who’s that they arc throwing out over there. Bill Nolan—That’s a Freshman who walked into one of the booths and began to look for the telephone directory. Tommy O’Neill—Er-er—excuse me, Mr. Swcctnnm. I—I've courted your daughter for the past four years and —I want to marry her. Mr. Sweetnam—You surprise me! I thought you wanted a pension. Doctor (to melancholy patient)— Try to cultivate a cheery disposition. Whistle and sing at your work. Ruth Alice—That’ll come a little awkward, doctor. I’m the reading-room attendant at the Normal. Harold—1 heard that someone had recently given 500 kises. What would you do if some boy friend asked you to help him outdo this record? Elvira—I’d tell him to beat it! Sid—What is your car, a five-passenger? Bill—Yes, but I can get eight in it if they are well acquainted.'JfW liitcfie 5umec A combination of the cultured and the practical represents the ideal in education for the auer aqe person................... Hartley litstupaa £ rimnl PHONE. BROAD 1527 Tower and Eleventh Truax Block Superior, Wis. Vit7,: How long is a million years to you? St. Peter: About a minute. Vitz: How much is a million dollars to you? St. Peter: About a cent. Vitz: Lend me a million, will ya? St. Peter: Yes, in a minute. Night-watchman (at Dorm) Going to kiss that girl? Bill Nolan: N-N-No. Night-watchman: Then hold the lantern. EAT AT THE Conqress ... J Cafe 1125 Tower Avenue UNCLE SAM WATCHES over your money in this ban k This Bank Pays Interest on Savings Accounts Quarterly.3fte JiKcTie Jinnee Roth Bros. Co. SUPERIOR’S LEADING DEPARTMENT STORE CORRECT APPAREL FOR COMMENCEMENT I Nor mines tern Oil Co.'s AIM IS TO BE THE Best Concern for Superior in I Superior “Does Cal Stigney, the student live here? “Well he does live here, but I thought he was a night-watchman.” Biddy: There’s a caterpillar in my lettuce ? Mrs. Haney: That’s all right. It won’t eat much. Nurse: (Giving baby the bottle) Now watch me feed him. Eve. Williams: Feed him! Hurray, to what? GLASS.... Ornamental Glass, Mirrors and Resilvering. Plate and Window Glass. Auto Windshields and Sedan Glass. RITZINGER GLASS CO. 1216 Ogden Ave. Phone, Broad 648ri( e £iitcfie Eunice S»p«rior’ Smartest Shop for Women Toioer A oc. at Thirteenth Street Superior, Wis. Devoted to the sole of Women's and Misses' Smart Suits, Coots. Dresses, Millinery and Accessories. (MAIN FLOOR) In Our Basement Store ) ’on will find Suits, Coots and Dresses, Millinery, Sweaters, Hosiery, Undergarments, etc., at very moderate prices. Ask Your Grocer For FACE VALUE CANNED GOODS M. J. B. Coffee Wets cer Cigars Xom Moore Cigars RIDE ON INDIA TIRES Dolan-Horton Co. IMPORTERS WHOLESALE GROCERS SUPERIOR. WISCONSIN utanamt’a dlrutrlrg lisHiirtinn tutit Extra Ualitr ib ])lurrh utt Jruirlri| from uiuubhu’b Twenty-six years in Superior has established that enviable reputation. The spirit of giving is best expressed in u gift from the Jeweler’s. A joy today and a keepsake sweet with memories for all time to come. £ t)raffpr'« anb Hlahl’s PENS AND PENCILS (£. A. 8 uimumu eljr Hallmark Iruirlrr 1313 Tower Ave. Superior, Wis. Fresh: (rushing into the library) Quick, I want Caesar’s Life. Ruth Alice: Sorry, but Brutus bent you to it. Prof. Simon Horace Williums: This exam.will be conducted on the honor system (cheers). Class, go to the auditorium take scats ten part in alternate rows of three, (groans). Janitor: Shall I take this rug out and beat it? Pung: That’s no rug, that’s my room-mate’s towel. Cam cron-S prow fs Pfiarmacy Co. THE PRESCRIPTION STORE 1420 Tower Ave. Superior, Wis.cJfte Sitcfie umec A PROSPEROUS APPEARANCE PROMOTES SUCCESS THIS STORE WILL HELP YOU TO DRESS WELL and SUCCEED MUD J 1 ClOTMINC CO FOR THIRTY-SIX YEARS SUPERIOR’S LEADING STORE FOR MEN AND BOYS Siegel broS. 720-722 Tower Avenue WHERE SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES ARE SOLD FLORSHEIM SHOES Sieg “Roll It” Caps Jake: Where ya’ been? Miller: In school last two years, taking medicine. Jake: Finally get well? Brute Longcway: I composed a new song for you. Delicate: What is it? Brute: “I’m sorry I made you cry but your face is much cleaner now.” Don J.: Shall we take the shortcut? Shirley: No, mother is expecting me home early.rifie JJitcfu Eunice THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF SUPERIOR Congratulates the Class of 19 2 7 On their exceptional record at our Normal. The City of Superior Louiselle boarded a bus and asked the conductor: “What’s the fare from here to Ashland?” “Twenty cents,” said the conductor. Louiselic got off and started to run beside the bus. After some distance he got on again and inquired, “And what's the fare now?” The Con. replied, “Forty cents.” Paul, “IIow’s that?” Con., “Well, we’re going away from Ashland.” Student: If someone offered you $2,000,000 to abolish compulsory chapel, would you do it? Proxy: Doubtless. Student: Then what would you do with the money? Proxy: Oh, probably in the course of time we’d build a new chapel. An absent-minded man called upon his old friend, the family doctor, one evening. After chatting for a couple uf hours the doctor saw him to the door, and, as he was shaking hands, said, “Come again soon, old fellow; family all well, I suppose?” “Good heavens! exclaimed his visitor; “that reminds me. My wife’s in a fit.”_____________________________ Connery: Do you mean to say that that stuff will remove my beard if I just pour it on my face? Longcway: Absolutely; the other day the boss spilled some on the rug and the next morning we came in, we found linoleum. Traffic Cop to Cause of Jam—What are you, a farmer? Cause—No, but if 1 ever get out of here I’m going to be one. “Well," said the judge, sternly, “do you say you are guilty or not guilty?” The prisoner drew himself up with calm dignity. “Your honor,” he protested, “I didn’t think when I came here I should be expected to do your work.” Tim—What’s your boss named? Sam—He’s named Regulator. Tim—Why? Sam—All the other bosses go by him. Hilton—Does your girl make eyes? Dauplaise—Not much! She specializes in noes._______________3fie Jiitcfte Eunice Call Broad 238 - FOR THE LATEST IN SPORTING GOODS FEATURING Johnson Motors Johnson Bicycles KRYODON GOLF CLUBS OLD TOWN CANOES EVERYTHING FOR OUT-DOOR SPORTS Superior Hardware Co. Corner Belknap Street and Tower Avenue Cfhis "Qitche Qumee" is bound in the Tyomies’ Rook Hinderyt the only up-to-date booh bindery in Superior. Tyomies Society 601-3 Tower Aoe. Superior. Wis. Compliments of Popkin l Furniture Co. 518-520 Tower Avenue SOLS AGENTS FOR Burkey and Gray Furniture Congratufations to tfie CCass of 1927 from Superior’s Most Popular Store MORAN'S0( c £ itcfte SJuniee o Compliments of Scott-Graff Lumber Co. Duluth, Minnesota They had been married 13 years. Just 13 years. “I adore you more every day,’’ Jake told her. “I love you, sweetheart,” she whispered. “You are the only woman in all the world, I want to be with,” he murmured. They had been married just 13 years. Though, of course, not to each other! Phil Riley, arose from his table in a fashionable dining-room and walked toward the door. He was passing the house detective at the entrance when a silver sugar bowl dropped from his bulging coat. Riley glanced calmly, at the officer, then turned with an expression of polite annoyance toward the occupants of the room. “Ruffians,” he said, “who threw that?” The Home Newspaper of the Northwest The Duluth Herald3he Uch putnee PECK-POSTER MOTOR COMPANY |Jriscilla IBemitu jsbnppc Euerthiny Pertaining to BEAUTY CULTURE EXPERT MARCELLING PERMANENT WA VING Open Evening by Appointment 1210 Tower Aoe. Broad 102 SPEAK TO SPEAKES FOR YOUR Building Material and Coal THE SPEAKES CO. SUPERIOR WISCONSIN Joe—Did she ask you to call again? Lee—No, but it amounted to the same thing. Joe—Whaddya mean? I jc—Well, she said, “I’d like to see you come here again! Father—Why did you put that mud turtle in your sister’s bed? Son—Because I couldn't find any frogs. Inquisitive—Ellen, what’s become of old Simon? Ellen—Ho done die wid lead pois-onin.’ Inquisitive—Lead poisoning? I didn’t know Simon was a painter. Ellen—Nossuh, he was in dc chicken business. Marion—Why, Aunty; you’re not as stupid as you look. Aunty—Well, dear, we can’t all be alike. Sap: Is he dumb? Head: He is so dumb that he thinks t .c St. Louis Cardinals are appointed by the Pope. Haughty Lady: My man, three pounds of lobsters, if you please. Fish Man: Yes, ma’am, shall I wrap them up? Haughty Lady: I think you had better, my man, I don’t believe they know me well enough to follow me home. Quarterback: 18-92-21. Hip—Hip— Voices in the stands: Hooray! Kate: I can’t imagine why Edna wore a chiffon dress last night. Myron: Oh, I saw through that right away. Cal: I’ve bought a new car so now I don’t have to walk to the bank to make deposits. Banker: No, now you can ride to the bank. Cal: No, I don’t have anything to deposit. When were the lii t books of the Bible written? During a baseball game. What do you mean? Well, it starts out, “In the Big Inning.”3fte Jjitcfie Quince Hanes’s Sandimch Shop 1802 WEEKS AVENUE PHONE, BROAD 1816 HEADQUARTERS FOR Fitger’s Roof-Garden Chocolates Romance Fudge “Qreat Lakes” Note Book Filler JNational Candy Co. PARIS Chocolates Honey Bee Sweets MEET ME AT THE ONLY PLACE Tommy: I want permission to be away three days after holiday vacation. Dean Van Patter: Oh, you want Capitol Cartel three more days of grace! Tommy: No, I want three more days of Marie. Tea Rooms Bryant: What’s the dif’ between a Ford and a bathtub? Edna: Nice to be in, but not to be 1114 TOWER AVENUE seen in. SUPERIOR, WISCONSIN Berthiaume Bros. Business Men’s Lunches 11:00 A. M. to 8:00 P. M. Grocers Butchers Bakers WE SPECIALIZE IN HOME MADE CANDIES AND ICE CREAM We invite your account. We sell the best for less. People tell us our store is different. Six deliveries daily. Phone, Broad 260 1026-28 Tower Ave. Superior, Wis. itcfui Eunice lL?e Specialize in High School and College Annual Engrauing buckbee ITLears Co. Designers and Engravers of School Annuals St. Paul. Minnesotae)fic liitcfie Dumets This Number of CThe Qitche Qumee u?as printed bi] the ................ House of ...Somerui. Tower al Thirteenth Makers of Fine Stationery and Office Supplies. Mrs.: Docs my gown look like it’s slipping off my shoulders? Mr.: No. let’s go. Mrs.: Then you’ll have to wait It’s supposed to l ok that way. “Lux against us." said the Gold Dust Twins to the Grandma Washing Powder. Barber—Hair cut, sir? Purser—Yes. but don’t cut it too short, I don’t want to look effeminate. Now, children, guess this one: Why does a woman put her hand on her chin when she thinks? Give up? Well, to keep herself from interrupting. Alma—Was he on his knees when he proposed? Nina—No, indeed! I was on them. Lady Collector: Will you please help the “Working Girl’s Home?” Fletcher: Certainly, where are they? Opera House Drug Co. J. S. HADLEY, Pres. Corner Tower Ave. and Belknap St. Superior, Wis. REAL ESTATE RENTALS INSURANCE LOANS (gtftT. (S. Nnuton (En. 1005 Tower AvenueOhe Jjiicfuz twice Compliments of American lExrfyange lank upprtnr, Ifarnttmn Priest’s PI IOTA CHI FRATERNITY We started out some years ago Pfiarmacy To establish minority rule. We’d edit, manage, supervise, “THE KODAK STORE” And run the whole dam school. Eastman Supplies We failed because we did not sec, Drugs and Sundries When making out our plan, That editing takes editors, 1012 Tower Ave. Superior And managing, a man. Wisconsin eJovoer 5 CorciC Co. Ccincly Kitcfien LUNCHES CANDY ICE CREAM Flowers of Quality 1020 Tower Ave. Superior, Wis. 1128 Tower Ave. Phone, Rroad 456r. cMtf Atcfu? Jjumee c We Appreciated Chocolates Hanson-Boyden Co. DISTRIBUTERS YOU WANT THE BEST— WE FURNISH IT Sunderland, Euans and Acjen The Oldest Insurance Agency in the City of Superior. INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS Fire, Automobile, Liability and Bonds E. T. Safford Co. Successors to THE FRITZ-CROSS CO. Stationery, Office and School Supplies Dennison Decorative Papers 1122 TOWER AVE. Station Agent: Upper or lower? Clara Iverson: I’ll take a lower. Station Agent: Sorry, but they’re all taken. Miss Curtis: Where is Berlin? Slim: In New York, writing a new song hit. Marie: Was the Iota party last night a good one? Chatter: It was great while I lasted. Travel by Hus Nortljlattli Sraitsportatimt (£0. FOR INFORMATION CALL Melrose 440 - 1057 Broad 402Ofie iiitcfui Suttiee Anton Johnson Fancy Groceries and Meats HAY AND FEED Butter and Eggs a Specialty Phene: Broad 233 1820-21 Iowa Avenue PLANTS AND CUT FLOWERS Funeral Designs a Specialty Superior 3FCora( Co. William BerR, Prop. FLORISTS Green Houses at Billinas Park 3302 21st St. Broad 836-K Phone—Broad 295 1410 Tower Ave. Superior Have your— SHOES REPAIRED HATS CLEANED SHOES SHINED AND DYED Ladies’ and Gents’ Clothes Steam Pressed and Dry Cleaned. Our work is our best advertisement. THE FRISCO M26 Tower Avenue Broad 746 ROLAND C. BUCK, Inc. EAT BUTTER “Sunrise” Engineers AND “Land O’ Lakes” are Rood kinds to buy. They arc U. S. National Bank Bldg. made here at home by the Superior. Wis. Twin Ports Co-op. Dairy Association South SuperiorDfie Sitefxe ]5uinee • Always Glad to Help the Normal For Insurance of Life Values SEE Vogue Booterg Pear Benson DISTRICT AGENT 1120 Tower Avc. Superior 1111 Tower Ave. Superior. Wit. Suits Pressed Hats Cleaned Shoes Shined Superior Shoe Shining Parlor Jfetmmt Jlnudrij (En. 1207 Tower Avenue 1314 Tower Avc. Broad 2195-W Superior Ma and Pa had a terrible time get-tin' married. Pa wouldn’t marry Ma when he was sober, and Ma wouldn’t marry him when he wuzzent. Louiscll: “Hear about Hutchinson going insane?” Torp: “No, what was the matter?" Louiscll: “He bought a score card at the game and neither team scored." Geary getting killed carrying the Irish national flag through Mike’s pasture? Dclahunt: No, what’s Red got against Mike? Stack: Nothing at all. but one of Mike’s bulls is color blind. Iota: Can you see me? Pi Iota: Yeah. lota: Well, see me home, will ya? Efficient Service Strictly Confidential 5ri-State tfeaefters’ Bureau JFargo, flortfi Dakota3(W 5itcfie Quince PeopCe s Drug Store HEADQUARTERS FOR TCormal Softool Supplies Fancy Stationery, Fountain Pens, Eastman Kodaks and Films. Everything to Make a Student's Fife Pleasant While in Superior. Special Postofficc Sub-Station Here for Your Convenience. People’s Drug Store 1121 Belknap Street Superior, Wisconsin “Say, mister, is your store on the car line,” “Yes, son.” “Well, you’d better move it, the car’s coming.” Dean: Where are your parents? Co-ed: I have none. Dean: Then where are your guardians ? Co-cd: I have none. Dean (Puzzled): Then where are your supporters ? Co-ed: Sir! You are forgetting yourself! Doris Robe: Is it true that sailors have a girl in every port? Hub Dunn: Nope! We don’t stop at every port. “Why do they always call a sailboat a she?” “Because the rigging costs so much?” “No; because they make a better showing in the wind.” Kindi) Service Jerrard Seguin AN EXCLUSIVE Insurance ©pttral £ l|up ALL KINDS Kitidy Opticaf Co. Loans Bonds 1109 Tower Avenue Roy F. Kidd, Mgr. Broad 821 CALL BROAD 208D elite Sitcfte Eunice Cleanincr a,.d Pressing J A little K« «llno nnil a hot Iron doe not innin eleuninc anil prc »lnjr. To rlran tliorouidily onr ■niiot have the nrrrutnry much lurry, material. extractor , germ killer . dry room , etc. To |ire« utInflictory one munt have the IntPkt nnil be»l machine.. We, call your attention to the fact that our xliop are equipped with all tliCMC tlilm; and our workmen are up to the minute. Your overcoat, .null, drr , klrt or rlouk receive our eloHCkt attention and our work I U'AKANTKKI . All we u k I a trial order and you will call aicaln. We nend for and deliver. Phone tin and our ropre entail ve will he right out. Yale Laundry Co. 911-15 Ogden Ave. Phone, Broad 215 THE UNIVERSAL CHOICE OF UNIVERSITY MEN iliei Kuppenheimer Qood Clothes Eks trom’s Tower at Seventh, Superior, Wis. Mrs. Langley: Thorpe, what kept you out so late last night? Mr. Langley: I was out with a chiffonier. Mrs. Langley: Chiffonier? Why, you don’t know what you are talking about. A chiffonier is a swell little dresser. Mr. Langley: I say, I was out with a chiffonier. Mrs. Ix)op: Your husband looks like a brilliant man; I suppose he knows everything. Mrs. Van Patter: Don’t fool your- self; he doesn’t suspect anything. Henning: My ancestors were of the first family that settled here. Foley: It’s a good thing they came when they did. The immigration laws arc stricter now. F. D. PRIEST 2131 E. Fifth St. Priest s Pharmacy 1012 Tower Ave. J. E. NICOL 3Frni?ral Simtor 1314 Ogden Ave.Jiitcfta Sfuinee Christenson Larson GROCERIES AND MEATS Quality Groceries Sanitary Meats TELEPHONE: BROAD 1231 1514 Belknap Street Superior, Wis. Mai] Furniture Company Euerqthitig for the House TOWER AND BELKNAP SUPERIOR. WIS. The Style for Young Men Roqal Park Royal Park Style Originates from the Fashion Parks Designing Rooms. SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY Floan Leveroos Superior—St. Paul—Duluth'Jfie JlitclW iliimee ®rpi alp-ffrry (Ha. 1 4 0 8 TOWER AVENUE SUPERIOR, WIS. WE WISH TO THANK THE NORMAL SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR THEIR LIBERAL PATRONAGE" df e Cliche Sunicc Remember CAMPBELL Lumber Supply Co. Any day can be washday if you “SEND IT TO HAWKINS” Havukins Laundry 1312 Ogden Ave. Broad 73 Genasco Lalite Shingles Klglit over your oltf roof. Permanent unfading colors Pin hazard eliminated. Weatherbest Stained Shingles l ui on over old siding, keeps furnace heat In mid summer heal out Miss Sequin: You are not afraid Insulation ( Balsam Wool gnveo the Fuel Bill CelOleX of insects, ave you? Co-ed: No, indeed! I feel perfectly safe with you. An Englishman looking into an American plumbing company’s window display. “I say, Archie, just fawncy placing one’s bawth tub in such a conspicuous place!” Upson-Board and Sheelrock For reclaiming cracked ceilings and walls. Make nn extra room in the attic or line tlie garage. Metal Weather Strips on windows and doors will exclude cold and dust; prevent rattling Tommy: You look sweet enough to eat. Marie: All right, where shall we eat? Homes and Garages or any other kind of building Display Rooms 1830 Tower Avenue Quality Groceries SUPERIOR RUG Fresh Meats CLEANING CO. OUR SERVICE MEANS YOUR SATISFACTION THE OLDEST RUG CLEANING Lindberg-Thompson Co., Inc. CONCERN IN SUPERIOR 1202-01 Belknap St., Superior, Wis. 522 John Ave. Broad 832 Compliments PICTURE FRAMING of Have Us Frame Your Class Pictures, Diplomas. Etc. Wisconsin State Ban ft Badger Glass Paint Company W. R. SEXTON. Mgr. 1515 Tower Ave. Broad 559cJfu? J5itcfie JSumee L J Make it a Qood One, It's Just as Easy . tjou younq folks are forming habits that mill stick to you all your lines. Reading should be one of these habits. Not all of your readinq, but some of it. should be newspaper reading. IJour newspaper habit should be a good one. Form it now by reading CThe Superior Telegram Wonderful Flour Compliments of Duluth-Superior Milling Co. G. H. St. John Co. Carlson Bros. Company Incorporated ROOFING and Sheet Metal Works Phone, Broutl 314 1216-18 Banks Ave. Superior, Wis. American Heating Company Superior, Wisconsin3f»e Sitcfie Quince Chandler Motor Cars interior uitrp $c iJtatnr (Eo. 1705 TOWER AVENUE OIL ■ ■ TIRES - - GAS SLOGANS FOR FRATERNITIES Alpha Kappa—“It Pleases Us To AND SORORITIES Please You.” Fex—"Proscription Experts." Sigma Pi—“Always at Your Service.” Iotas—“When Better Athletes Are Born Iota Will Pledge Them.” Langley (Gitche Auditor, glancing L. D. C.—“We Seek to Speak.” over the accounts): Mr. Jensen, do Pi Iota Chi—“Builders of Men.” you ever take any money out of the cash drawer? Don: Yes, occasionally I take out Three Arts—“Quality as Repre- sented.” car fare. Drama Study—“We Satisfy.” Langley: Hm, where do you live Lambda Sig’s—“We Live to Learn.” now, Urbana, III., or St. Paul. '"The cover for A this annual was created by The DAVID J. MOLLOY CO. 2857 N. Western Avenue Chicago, Illinois MnMUt Cm ..... ikli Mi. ...k H Ik. k 4lii COME AND SEE US FOR YOUR Building Material and Fuel NORTHERN SUPPLY FUEL CO. 910 Tower Avenue.3 fie $itcfie Gurnee CANDY SODA NONE NICER WE AIM TO PLEASE Bunt- g ttUtuan 1118 Tower Avenue NONE NICER LUNCH ICE CREAM DIRECTORS Y11,1.1AM It. HANKS. President. c. ii. scndkki.axd. of Sunderland. Kraus »V Anen. ICeal Kstatc. I BA It HKNSON Vico President. I,. C. BAllNBTT. or Harnett Record Co., Contractors. It. A. UAI I KIIKI Uenernl Supt. North XX’extern Fuel Co. JOHN I.. HANKS Vice President JOHN A. MU K PHY. Att'y G. N. Hallway Accounts Solicited and Every Accommodation Consistent with Conservative Banking Extended to Customers SUPERIOR. WISCONSIN OFFICERS WM. K. HANKS President. PKAK HKNSON X’lce President. J. I,. BANKS X’lce President. J. M. KKNXKDY Caahler. K. I |. BANKS Anal. Cashier. A. B. Hit ICK SON Asst. Cashier. Unilctl States Depository ‘FOUR FLOORS OF GOOD FURNITURE” at CThe Qrand Ranids “The Quality Kind” YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD 1301-03-05 Tower Avenue Superior. Wis.Sitefte Eunice c " WEBSTER MANUFACTURING COMPANY MANUFACTURERS OF CHAIRS STOOLS DINING ROOM FURNITURE BREAKFAST ROOM SUITES DINETTE SETS SHOWING TABLE WITH HINGED DISAPPEARING LEAF COMING INTO POSITION FACTORY AT SUPERIOR, WISCONSIN BRANCHES AND SHOW ROOMS Lima, Ohio; Chicago, 111.; Joliet, 111.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Portland, Ore.; San Francisco and Los Angeles, Cal.3fW 2?itcfu umea Cf5ar£mm arim'Iln We now have on display the latest models of Direct Action P utiy j ljnppc 228 BOSTON BLOCK ' Gas Ranges equipped with the famous Lorain Oven Regulators. The Newest and Best in every Branch of Beauty “The Gas Range With a College Education” Culture. Prices are very moderate and terms very liberal. We Specialize in Permanent Waving Superior Water, Light BROAD 155 Open for Appointments Every Evening and Power Co. COMPLIMENTS OF flationaC BROADWAY Seacftcrs Clgcncy, $nc. INDIANAPOLIS TIRE SHOP National in Scope Phone, Broad 188 Individual in Service 1711 Broadway OFFICES IN SEVEN CITIES 1. A. immts PICTURE STUDY In The Grades mortuary Licensed Embalmer and Funeral Director By 0. W. NEALE 64 MASTERPIECES—456 PAGES Story of each picture, biography of painter, suggestions for language, poems, beautifully illustrated, artistically bound. Just the book you need. Price $2.40. postage prepaid. A. B. WELLS. 1515 Belknap St. Broad 694 R1 3612 10th Ave. So.. Minneapolis. Minn.Dlw Jfitclie £junu! Normal riiool gmpprtor, Hisrntumt IDishes Qod Speed and Best of Luck to the Class of 1927 (Urntrara QJn Hr (Dffrrrft During 1927-1328 I. One-Year Courses for: Rural School Teachers. II. Two-Year Courses for: Kindergarten-Primary Teachers. Intermediate Teachers. Grammar and Junior High Teachers. Rural School Teachers. III. Three-Year Courses for: Junior High School Teachers and Principals. Principals of State Graded Schools. IV. Four-Year Courses for: Teachers and Principals of High Schools. Kindergarten-Primary Teachers. Intermediate Teachers. Junior High Teachers. All lead to Bachelor’s Degree. Summer School, June 20 to July 29 Fall Term Opens September 12, 1927 Superior Coaching School Conducted By Glen S. Warner of Leland Stanford, Football. Forrest C. Allen, University of Kansas, basketball, and the treatment of athletic injuries. Dates—July 18th to July 30th, 1927. UOrite for Catalogue and Informationor iide ®e»clFts flo km ?Iibrarg J3Z8I3 54980UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-SUPERIOR 3 1U3 00177625


Suggestions in the University of Wisconsin Superior - Gitche Gumee Yearbook (Superior, WI) collection:

University of Wisconsin Superior - Gitche Gumee Yearbook (Superior, WI) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Superior - Gitche Gumee Yearbook (Superior, WI) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Superior - Gitche Gumee Yearbook (Superior, WI) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Superior - Gitche Gumee Yearbook (Superior, WI) online yearbook collection, 1928 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Superior - Gitche Gumee Yearbook (Superior, WI) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

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