University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI)

 - Class of 1941

Page 1 of 164

 

University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 164 of the 1941 volume:

If-tho hall is dark.... Rooms are empty, too...."Empty room" .... But---- S ATURDAY... Sunday... especially Sunday... Monday... they are to be found ... overrunning the building, the campus, the dorm and the Eat Shop and Tea Room... armed with suitcases... trunks... chewing gum... tennis rackets... books... typewriters ... cigarettes... golf clubs... and anything and everything that Pandora ever let out of the box... representatives from all over the state ... from the south, Racine... from the north, Rhinelander... and, contrary to Kipling, the east, Appleton... and west, Blair... DO meet ... here at C.S.T.C___but don't forget all the other Podunks and Squedunks in Wisconsin are represented, too... Like a bunch of termites on a sight-seeing party... they infest the building... swarm in the damdest places... "just to see what is here"... looking for the main office on the third floor... then back down stairs... trying to make head or tail out of the catalogue... looking for the freshman room... pushing... crowding... shoving... trying to take placement tests and make out programs all at the same time... swapping places in the lines... looking for the text library... looking blue — 4 —about the red tape... counting out their $28.00 in one dollar bills (say! was that a moth?)... asking Joyce Larson "What is the Iris”? (Now do you know, dear freshmen?)... taking Don Aucutt seriously when he tries to sell them a seat in the front of the assembly so that the teachers will see them and give them a good grade... That night... wandering about the town ... peeking in the windows of places to see if they know anybody... before entering... just walking to see what kind of a town it is... discovering the Wisconsin River at the end of Main street... looking at Deanna Durbin on the screen at the Fox, or Gene Autry at the Lyric... rushing back to the dorm to be in before lights out... this later to become such a familiar sight... the boys being men and not coming in till 12:00... brave, aren't they?... Later, much later they are still talking... boys:... blonds, brunettes, red-heads, peroxide, blue eyes, black eyes, brown eyes, thin, slim, tall, small... girls:... that cat in the stylish dress... that good looking chap that was three people away during registration... — 5 —. . . very, very, sophisticated and observing, they arrive... (note: they, too, come, as do the freshmen, but they arrive)—especially the sardonic sophomores ... all nonchalantly go through the routine and seemingly, boresome duties of enrollment... then wander around and around... noting with a sage nod that the flag pole still sways just as it always has, back and forth ... that the grass is still green... and that the W.P.A. boys are still building air raid shelters under the lawn or attempting to enter the shower rooms the hard way... Of course they jovially backslap among themselves... but to the freshmen they are cool... (this batch of freshmen must prove that they are eligible to join their select group)... that night they adjust a tie, or apply powder and doll themselves up in preparation for............................ — 6 —— 7 —Hl-YA! Did you have a good summer? Can you pay me back that two bucks you owe me from last semester?" "Look, there's Bill and Joe! Hi there, fellows! How are you. anyhow? Let's go down on the lawn for a while. Gee—is it good to see you!" "Did you get your old room back at the Dorm? Good—Say I'm up on 'third', too!" "Tell me about everything. Let's see your class schedule. How about going over for a coke?" So we meet the gang. Old acquaintances are renewed; new friends are made. Over the proverbial coke, we find that we have scads of things to talk over with our friends. We gab for hours about summer jobs—places we visited—gals and guys we met—new faces here at school—old ones that have failed to return. Our eyes search each booth in the Eat Shop for the sight of a friend, or someone we'd like for a friend. The old hangout is crowded. The mid-afternoon crowds of students fill it with young life and happy, friendly laughter. Fellows walk around with coke bottles to their lips —but with their eyes on the door for new arrivals. We leave our booth reluctantly, in spite of the fact that we shall be seeing the old familiar place many more times during the school year. We pass the Dorm... Girls are sitting on the steps and the porch comparing class schedules, discussing those things which are of most interest—and concern at the present moment.As we walk down the wide walk curving its way to the main entrance of the college, we wonder what is before us. We dream for a moment of things that will happen in this building, and we wonder if we will ever have a small part in carving its future. Our future. Here in the building we meet about seven hundred fifty other futures, each being moulded by the capable hands of our instructors. To all but the freshmen, we find meeting up with these old friends of ours, for friends they are, just as exciting as meeting our student friends. Yes, we are all here. Friends, freshmen who are about to become our friends, instructors and people in the town whom we have come to know. All of us, bound together by common ties, ambitions, hopes, and fears. All of us, striving to better our lives in some manner. So............. Mout Ijcui Jiaoe, Met OuA. Gait, We Patent 7a y u — 9 —Eight O'clock class! Year 'round pastime Readin writin' Having funFOR 1941A.LL day Monday the students mix and mull indiscriminately throughout the building. Searching first for the director of their division, following each hint and rumor they hear as to his whereabouts. Usually when they get where he is. he isn't there. So they go merrily on until at last they corner him. quite by accident, in his office. Then comes the problem of filling out cards with their names and all the histories of their families for generations back. Then, too, they have the pleasant little Job of making out their programs, trying desperately not to be in B. S. 103, Eng. 109, and French 159. all at the same time. At last! Their programs are Just the way they want them. They trip merrily back to where they last saw their director, only, he isn't there. The hunt is on and at last, foot-weary and tired, they find him. Back in his office! He glances at the program. Isn't it a shame, but French 159 has been shifted and it now conflicts with Eng. 109! And so the merry-go-round continues, until at last their programs pass muster with everybody but themselves, for they end up with five eight o'clocks. Friday afternoon classes, and classes until five at least three days a week. But wait! They aren't done yet. Their programs are O. K. Every card has been signed, and now all they have to do is pay their money and they're through (they think). With renewed strength because they believe the end is in sight, they dash upstairs to pay their fees. But look, at least six hundred persons have the same idea and they are quickly told just where to find the end of the line. Now comes a period of watchful waiting. Watchful because they will sneak ahead every chance they get, and waiting because the paying process goes on at a snail's pace. But, as all things must have an end, they finally pay their $28 fee. Now they can go home. Wait a minute. Haven't they forgotten something? How about their texts? So, off they go. An hour or two afterwards (or so it seems), loaded down with books they drag themselves wearily home. — 12 —"Tho Frosh Mixor wa a grand success . . T HE poor freshmen! After going through enrollment Monday and Tuesday it's a wonder they can even get their shoes on for Tuesday night, when social event number one of the school year takes place. Of course, you know what it is—the freshman mixer. For the suave upper classmen the mixer is only an occasion for appraising the new bunch of "Greenies". But what a different story for these most maligned of the classes. Their mixer starts, not at eight o'clock but somewhere around noon on that fateful Tuesday. For the girls especially, there are a thousand and one things to be done. Their whole wardrobe must be carefully checked and rechecked, dresses discarded, reselected, and discarded again, until they themselves cannot tell white from black. Their hair must be just so, the exterior decorating must be without fault. Do not think, however, that the boys have it all sugar and cream. Their wardrobes too are checked and the crease in each pair of pants is critically examined to be sure of its knife-like edge. Their shoes must shine in polished splendor. Each hair must be in place. Eight o'clock! The freshmen of 1940-'41 are on parade. Scared, wide-eyed, unsuitably dressed, (for this is a VERY informal dance) freshmen girls stand lined against the walls. Others more bold dance around with the sophisticated upper classmen who come to see what they can see. Yes, THIS IS THE FRESHMAN CLASS . . . — 13 — New Feature — "Froah Hop" — No Band, but —— eil men We come to college, having left high school as dignified seniors, full of the respect and admiration given us by the underclassmen of our prep school days. But here we must step down to the lowly ranks of freshmen again, underprivilged and inferior. It is hard for us to forget our previous superiority, but in time we adjust ourselves to being mice rather than men. But we are full of hopes and aspirations, since we know that soon we are to become the sophomores of the year 1941-42, and will have regained some of our "long-lost" privileges. Into the school with such an attitude came the class of '44, and, like all the previous classes, feeling a little skeptical about the whole situation; but they have banded together into a very useful and worthwhile organization, and have entered into the midst of school life to maintain a record worthy of any freshman class. This year's crop of Freshmen has brought us many illustrious and noteworthy personalities, for out of the ranks of the green have come outstanding figures in all the walks of school life... From the class of '44 we have such fine athletes as Ray Warren, Ray Terzynski, Denny Helixon, basketballers all—and of all-conference caliber too; Ted Shrake and Or land Radke, boxers; Jay Swett, Bob Schunk, and Harold Lyon, up and coming footballers... In the musical organizations we have Mike Mlissett, Merle Jenks, Ruth Lindsay. James Salay, Charles Larsen, and Harvard Erdman (the Gene Krupa and mainstay of the College Playboys' rhythm section)... In dramatics, Ray Minton, Frank Friday, Bill Fryer, Esther Moreau, and John Cowan loomed forth as possibilities for the future... Well worthy of mention are such good students as Dorothy Bever-sdorf, Jacqueline Stauber, Paul Jedamus, Jeanne Peters, Fred Wink (who. incidentally, is no slouch as an athlete, either), Kathleen Schaefer, Herman Wedderkop, and Anita Campbell... Then, too, we cannot forget those who shined their lights in the lesser fields like photographer Paul Paster-nacki, Jr., and artist Bunny Glisczinski... From the Freshman class came our three able cheer leaders, Billy Eichhom, Mike Blissett, and June Todd. Not to be overlooked are the sports enthusiasts: Jack Rasmussen, Alice Grube, and Mary GROUP 1 Row 1—L. Brock, L. Anderson, H. Burant. G. Benthe, A. Andorsen, I. Peters. M. Blissett, C. Gear. O. Livingston. Row 2—R. Brown, J. Broun, M. Adams, J. Albertie, D. Wright, D. Bolongia, E. Borgen, L. V. Barnum, A. Britten, H. Wedderkop, A. Lloyd. Row 3—D. Beversdorf, D. Bestul. E. Bosinski, E. Brylski, L. Christ, E. Artz, A. Severs, A. Campbell, D. M. Averill, M. Berger. Row 4—J. Stauber, C. Yoder, S. Schmidt, T. Parrott, B. J. Coates, H. Kaufman. V. Schotz, L. Bauemfelnd, J Bowersock Row 5—J. Swett, Krueger, B. Schunk, Borchardt, V. Cammach, D. Becker. GROUP 2 Row 1—J. Cowan. J. Edwards. R. Cooper, R. Daniels. A. Fahrnor, H. Erdman, G. Harvoy. D. Hanson. Row 2—A. Beadle. I. A. Curia. M. Francis, B. Ellman, M. E. Condon, J. Jossart, A. Grube, B. Eichorn, B. Fleischman, M. Hickey. Row 3—M. Cole, I. Dobbs, B. Cornwell, M. Krueger, L. Chylek, L. Fox. D. Drew. E. Clark, A. Prentice. Row 4—S. Fonstad. M. Crummey, V. Clark. P. Eckels, R. Chrouser, M. Collins, M. Dean, H. Firkus, E. Hales. Row S—T. Kurtzwoil, R. Craig, D. Durkee, F. Friday, B. Coates, E. Gardnor. K. Geer; or the pinballers par excellence, Jiggs Cam mack and Nip Krueger. We must not omit the downright good sports and fine friends like Kay Laumer, Gus Pentz, Dan Durkee, Eddy Lawrence, and Ruth Michelsen. "Rushing" season of the second semester proved that these kids were not scholastic drudges. Merle Jenks, Jerry Neuenfeldt, Orland Radke, Bob Torkelson, Norm Wanta, Frank Stec-kel, Bob Menzel, and Glenn Hebert are some of the freshman fellows who joined fraternities at — 14 — 1940 - 4! mid-year. Orian Madsen, Ruth Chrouser, Ruth Thompson, Phyllis Eckels. Beverly Hoppenstedt, Brldgetta Fleischman, Jeannette Rich, and Thelma Peterson are some who pledged sororities at the same time. We also should acknowledge the freshmen who keep the refreshment centers going. The current freshman class has again been prominent socially on the campus— they entered into all the recreational activities and never let a class officers—President, Jimmy Smith; Vice-president. Esther Moreau; Secretary, Winnie Leykom; and Treasurer, Dan Durkee. They filled their offices well. We must include the fine freshmen bowlers like Allan Nueske and Bill Winsor (who is just a freshman at heart), and those comely misses who provided themselves as dates for Negard, Fisher and Vincent; in addition to those coke-loving CROUP 3 Row 1—M. Jenics. Holixon, C. Jusrts. B. Fryor, C. Meinhardt, A. Lisanlt, Row 2—B. Hold. B. Gundlo. J. Gilman. B Gllsczinski. K. Gullikson. J. Henrlch . V. Jacobson, I. Gootchy, M. Pr y. G. Pits. Row 3—M. Hcnko, D. Zonk or. J. Gullikson. B. J. Frost. B. Hop-for.sied, E. A. Lawror.os. K. Laumsr. M. Hodman. M. McGir.lsy. Row 4—T. Gundorscn. A. Haines. L. Holman. I. Johnson. V. Joyce. M. Karloski, G. Henick, L. Justmann. J. Leary. Row —J. Luock, G. Green, F. Lonsdorl, P. Jedamus. L. Kowalski. J. Salay. GROUP 4 Row I—O. Peterson, G. Lake. N. Karau, C. Mayor. J. Salvtn, R. Minion. Row 2—1. Morgan. K. Peterson. I. Minton. R. Mcllhattan, K. Lea, N. Wanta, J. Kurth. A. Murphy. J. Malek. Row 3—A. Knutson. A. Kr.ottor. M. Ward, E. Klueb, G. Koch. K. Kelly, L. Lane, L. Lemke. B. Lowe, R. Lindsay. Row 4—P. Pasternak!, E. Owen, E. Moreau. B. Nelson. E. Luts, C. Kostuch. M. Kjer, E. Mastey. A. Moldonhauor, B. Padour. Row 5—J. McCawley, A. Nueske, M. Krause, B. Monzol, C. Larson, L Roe. social function pass by. They have been omnipresent at all athletic contests, assemblies, for-mals, and parties, and have been the moving spirit of the Thursday nickel shindigs over in the GROUP 5 Row 1—G. Hanson. J. Palmer, A. Paysa, B. Prenwost. R Mohr. F. Steckei. Row 2—M. A. Holvedt. O. Powell. E. Owen, A. Meronek. O. Madsen, M. Moe. V. Muellor. J. Rich, H. Swenson. M. Stevens. Row 3—D. Rouman. R. McArthur. R. Michelsen. T. Peterson, P. Noble. V. Rohde. E. Pronr, S. Rogers. R. Quads, L. Torgerson. Row 4—G. Quinn, D. Quinn, I. Ramskuglor. t Oronozinski. J. Todd. V. Schrank. C. Weinmcnn. N. Rosmussen, M. Schulz. M. Untiedt. Row S—R. Wanserskt. C. Olson. H. Stock, K Schenk, A. Olingy. GROUP 6 Row 1—C. Tasmussen, R. Torkelton. J. Smith, B. Worden. E. Szy-manski, E. Wells. Row 2—C. Smith, C. M. Winter. E. Williams, I. Thorsor.. M. Sparks, E. Zeniner. N. Stay. Row 3—M. Wlpperiurth. P Precourt, J. Thompson. R. Thompson. K- Schaefer. D. Podhola, V. Warren. P Umlauft. Training School Gym... We don't believe that some of the regulars like Ronnie Craig, Gardy Harvey, Lois Bauerfiend. or Betty Held have missed many, if any, of those get-togethers this year . . . Moreover, the class of '44, put on the Freshman Hop, one of the best informal dances of the year, despite the fact that the band failed to arrive. — 15 —t 1. Intricacies oi Arithmetic .... 2. Mathematics applied 3. Free pluq for the ice-cream .... 4. Wal. I'll tell ya. 5. Lovey dove! .... 6. In the army? .... 7. Informal dancing. 8. In the fall—the young man's fancy!.... 9. Conservation class field trip .... 10. People .... 11. All work and no play 12. More people .... 13. ditto .... and in the g m u + i i A lower right hand corner: Wow! t1U e soon conic to L znow D ECEMBER 1, 1940 was the day—that President William C. Hansen took up his duties as President of Central State Teachers College. Since then he has been unceasing in his efforts to increase efficiency of the college, both in the administration and the student divisions. Preceding his coming to C.S.T.C., President Hansen was superintendent at Stoughton, Wisconsin. Other educational positions he has held are many and varied, giving him a wide background for his present work. He may be likened to the proverbial son, for in 1911 he graduated from C.S.T.C., only to return in the capacity of President in 1940. Thus, to students of C.S.T.C., we can call him an example, par excellence, and an inspiration for us. President Hansen, in the few months he has been here, has done great things for C.S.T.C., and will do greater, for he has the complete cooperation of students and faculty. — 17'ecut MR. H. R. STEINER MRS. E. PFIFFNER 13 ON'T look at the picture above, and imagine the following combination: a beaming smile (wide and everlasting), a hearty handshake, and a genuine chuckle. Now add a good sprinkling of mirth-quaking iokes (the humorous kind), a line (fisherman's), and—well, there you have our genial "Master of Ceremonies"—Dean Steiner. Mr. Steiner became Dean of Men way back when—or, ALMOST, and has been guiding the men students of C.S.T.C. through woeful worries since. Although we can't verify Mr. Steiner's alleged possession of a rich bass voice, we do know that he constitutes a one man cheering section on Schmeeckle field (he's a member of the Athletic Committee and an ardent football fan). PrIOR to 1940, Miss Mary Neuberger had been acting as nurse and Dean of Women. Last year Miss Neuberger was unable to devote much of her time to "Deaning", since the health offices were enlarged, and her services were needed there. Because of her excellent work in the guidance department of the local high school, Mrs. Elizabeth Pfiffner was asked to become a member of the college faculty and to act as Dean of Women. During this, her first year at C.S.T.C., Mrs. Pfiffner has admirably won the confidence of and counseled the women students. Next year she is planning to inaugurate a guidance program with the purpose of training our future teachers in high school guidance work.i 'SJ J ILSON S. Delzell was appointed Regent of the College in 1939 after the death of Mr. Martens, the former Regent. It is necessary that there be one regent for each teachers college in the State, who, when called together under the direction of a regent at large, function as a board of directors on all matters pertaining to the teachers colleges as a whole. Mr. Delzell confers with the President of the College on matters pertaining to the school and acts for the state in an emergency such as occurred when President Smith passed away during the school term. Mr. Delzell is very active in all civic affairs, is member of the local board for draftees, and is in the oil distribution business. He has four children, a daughter and son, Suzanne and Wilson Jr. in the training school and two sons. Bob and Jim. in private schools. — 19 —Miss Susan E. Colman chairman of the Committee on Advanced Standing, took time out to attach her signature (''Sue”) to this page. Unlike Mr. Colby, who may be drafted from the radio department into the army, Miss Colman plans to teach again this summer session, and then brush up her roller skating (honest). Mr. Evans acquired the flashiest bus among the faculty this year and even his seven year old puppy—Jerry—sniffs at the "old Packard”. Mr. Burroughs is secretly delighted at the "professional orientation” for next year—that means an increase in the speech department membership. According to idle rumor, Miss Adele (pronounced ad-a-ley) Davidoff is leaving Central State for better climes next year—Good Luck! Miss Carlsten's handwriting is similar to Mr. Nixon's, and we kinda like Miss Davis' interesting lettering. Miss Carlsten’s art department is producing artistes in ever increasing amounts, and Miss Davis was plagued this year by prospective draftees who wanted to "parley-voo" in 6 lessons—just in case. This fatalistic attitude is not Iris policy, but while we're on the subject we might add that Miss Allen's home-ec girls will keep — 20 —ALLEN. BESSIE MAY Home Economics Graduate. Iowa State Teachers College. 1903: B. S.( Columbia University, 1912: M. A.. 1920; Summer Sessions: Columbia and Chicago Universities. At Stevens Point Since 1913. BURROUGHS. LELAND M. English, Speech A. B.. Wabash College. 1913; Graduate King's College of atory, Pittsburgh, 1917: M. A., University oi Michigan. 1932: at Stevens Point since 1920. CARLSTEN. EDNA Art Threo yoar Normal Art Course. Chicago Art Institute. 1917: B. A. E., Art Institute. 1932: Summer Sessions, Universities of Chicago and Illinois. At Stevens Point since 1923 COLBY, J. DONALD Radio B. S., Central State Teachers College, 1938. At Stevens Point since 1938. COLMAN. SUSAN E. Director of Primary Graduate, Superior State Teachers College. Four Year Course, 1911: Kindergarten Course. 1914; Ph. B.. University of Wisconsin. 1929; Ph. M.. 1930. At Stevens Point since 1931. CUTNAU. EDITH P. Training School Diploma. Oshkosh State Normal School. 1914; Ph. B.. Ripon College. 1917; University of Chicago. 1920; Ph. M.. University of Wisconsin, 1939. At Stevens Point since 1938. DAVIDOFF, ADELE Physical Education B. S., Univorsity of Wisconsin. 1937; M. A.. Toachers College, Columbia University, 1938. At Stevens Point since 1938. DAVIS. MILDRED Foreign Language A. B., Stalo University of Iowa. 1922; Foreign Travel and Study. At Stevens Point since 1928. DIEHL. LEAH L. Training School Ph. B.. University of Chicago. 193C; M. A.. Univorsity of Chicago. 1934. At Stevens Point sinco 1923. EVANS. CHARLES C. Biological Science B. S.. Ohio Wesleyan University, 1908; Graduate School. Yale University; University of Wisconsin. 1914: M. S., University of Chicago, 1928. At Stevens Point since 1920. — 21 —FAUST, GILBERT W. Chemistry B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1934; M. S.. University of Wisconsin, 1940. At Stevens Point since 1935. FINCH, JOSEPHINE House Mother at Nelson Hall GLENNON, BERTHA English B. A. University of Wisconsin. 1924; M. A., University of Wisconsin. : 1939. At Stevens Point since 1940. HANSON, GERTIE L. Geography and Radio Diploma, La Crosse State Normal School, 1914; Ph. B., University of Wisconsin, 1930; Ph. M., 1935; Fellowship student and University of Wisconsin. 1938-1939. At Stevens Point since 1920. HERLING, JOHN P. Assistant Librarian A. B.. University of Wisconsin, 1938; Librarian's Certificate, University of Wisconsin Library School. 1938. At Stevens Point since 1938. HERRICK, ALFRED J. Principal, Training School Diploma. Stevens Point State Normal School, 1902; Ph. B., University of Wisconsin, 1909. At Stevons Point since 1912. JAYNE, CLARENCE Training School Whitman College; Diploma. State Normal School, Cheney, Washington, 1927; A. B. , University of Washington, 1929; Ph. M., University of Wisconsin, 1936. At Stevens Point since 1929. Work nearly complete on Doctorate. JENKINS, WARREN G. History A. B.. Miami University, 1929; M. A., University of Wisconsin, 1932. At Stevens Point since 1934. KNUTZEN, NORMAN ELROY English, Men's Glee Club Graduate, Throe-year High School Teachers Course. Stevens Point Teachers College, 1920; A. B., Lawrence College, 1927; M. A.. Lawrence College, 1929; Chicago University Graduate work, 1930. At Stevens Point since 1931. KOTAL, EDWARD L. Athletic Director, Physical Education Ph. B., Lawrence College, 1926: Summer Session, Columbia University. 1930; Summer Session, Southern California. 1939. At Stevens Point since 1930. LAVIGNE, BESSIE Rural Demonstration School Diploma, Stevens Point State Normal School; B. S.. University of Minnesota; Summer Session, University of Minnesota. 1938. At Stevens Point since 1924. LOOMER, ZELLA G. Training School A. B., University of Wisconsin. 1920; M. A., 1937. At Stevens Point since 1938. — 22 —le u the gas flames cooking in the home-ec labs as long as the major is in effect—or at home, if the privates get back on furlough. Mrs. Cutnaw, eighth grade critic, has two school children of her own—one of them in the fourth grade class of Miss Diehl the training school pupils' idol. Eddie Kotal strikes us as being one pretty good cartoonist, as is Mr. Knutzen, who is rather adept at inscribing landscapes upon Northern fungus— ask him to show you a product of his little-known hobby. Mr. Knutzen had hopes of taking the glee club to San Francisco this summer, but the draft sort of botched up matters and the glee club will have to be content with the prospects of going to Chicago next year. Mr. Faust is fast improving his bowling game. He plans to acquire his Ph.D. soon. He and Doc Pierson of the biology department are still the most eligible bachelors on the faculty. The people belonging to these signatures didn't request that we do so, but we avoided consulting Mr. Jayne, handwriting analyst, for analysis of the signatures —very diplomatic of us, n’est-ce pas?. Miss Hanson plans to introduce daily student-produced radio pro- — 23 —grams from our studios downstairs next fall. Mr. Herrick's hobby is his farm, where, each summer he relaxes from the worries of the school year. Miss Zella Loomer of the training school, takes over Mr. Steiner's history course each summer session. Miss Bessie La Vigne reigns supreme at the demonstration school. C.S.T.C. was very fortunate in obtaining the services of Miss Bertha Glennon from the P. J. Jacobs High school this past year. Mr. Jenkins favors Miss Hanson's radio policy; Mrs. Finch's dorm policy is still ten thirty or else. Mr. Mott's classes are characterized by his unique juggling, while Mr. Neale's picture studies play a prominent part in his lectures. ''Doc'' Nixon frequently takes time out from calculus and algebra to expound on the educational set-ups of teachers colleges in various states and seems to favor the educational system of Ohio State Prison. Mr. Morrison is an expert on the archeological history of Turkey, and Miss Meston has done some traveling too. Mr. Menzel returned to his Alma Mater to coach football and boxing. Mr. Michelsen, the best dressed male faculty member, gives all his directions with a baton. Mr. Lyness's hobbyLYNESS. ARTHUR S. Biological Science B. S., Kansas State Teachers College, 1916; University of Chicago; M. S., University of Iowa. 1932; Ph. D.. University of Iowa. 1933. At Stevens Point since 1934. MANSUR, LULU Acting Librarian Library School. Columbia University. At Stevens Point since 1911. MASON. SYBLE Assistant Librarian B. E. in secondary Education, Central State Teachers College, 1928; Librarian s Certificate, University of Wisconsin Library School, 1936. At Stevens Point since 1930. MATRAVERS. CHESTER H. Philosophy, Psychology, and Education Ph. B„ University of Wisconsin, 1920; Ph. M., Univorsity of Wisconsin, 1928; Teachers College at Columbia. At Stevens Point since 1935. MENZEL. ALFRED E. Athletics, Biological Science B. E., Central State Teachers College. At Stevens Point since 1939. MESTON. HELEN Home Economics B. S.. Doane College. 1907; B. S.. Columbia University. 1920; M. A., 1929. At Stevens Point since 1920. MICHELSEN, PETER J. Director of Music Graduate of the Seminary, the Military School of Music, and the Music Conservatory of Oslo, Norway; Graduate of the Vander-Cook School of Music. Chicago. At Stevens Point since 1931. MORRISON. ROBERT History A. B.. Dartmouth. 1928; M. A.. University of Chicago. 1930. At Stevens Point since 1939. MOTT. JOSEPH Education B. S., State Teachers College. Kirksville. Missouri. 1920. At Stevens Point since 1923. NEAL. OSCAR W. Director of Rural Education Denison University; B. S., Fremont Normal College. 1897. At Stevens Point since 1915. NIXON. O. FLOYD Mathematics A. B.. Indiana University, 1914; M. A.. University of Chicago. 1922; Ph. D.. Ohio State University. 1932. At Stevens Point since 1937. PFEIFFER, LYDIA M. Training School Diploma. Oshkosh State Teachers College. 1921; Ph. B.. University of Wisconsin. 1927; M. A.. Teachers College. Columbia University, 1932. At Stevens Point since 1927. — 25 —PFIFFNER, ELIZABETH Dean of Women, History Diploma. Stevens Point Normal. 1926; Central State Teachers College, B. E., 1929; University of Wisconsin. Ph. M.. 1937. At Stevens Point since 1939. PIERCE, BURTON R. Training School Diploma, Stevens Point State Normal School. 1921; Ph. B.. Ripon College. 1927; M. A.. Teachers University of Icwa, 1937; Summer Session. University of Chicago. At Stevens Point since 1923. PIERSON. EDGAR F. Biological Science Iowa Wesleyan College, 1933; M. S.. University of Iowa. 1936: Ph. D.. 1938. At Stevens Point since 1938. REPPEN. NELS O. Social Sciences A. B., University of Wisconsin, 1926; M. A.. University of Wisconsin. 1927; Ph. D.. University of Wisconsin, 1932. At Stevens Point since 1932. RIGHTSELL, RAYMOND Director of Secondary Education, Physics A. B.. Indiana State Normal College. 1915; M. A., University of Cincinnati. 1930. At Stevens Point since 1920. ROACH. MAY M. Rural Education Diploma. Stevons Point Normal School, 1910; B. S.. University of Minnesota. 1931. 1934. 1935, 1938. At Stevens Point since 1914. ROGERS, T. A. Chemistry B. S., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1911; M. S., State College. Pennsylvania. At Stevens Point since 1914. SCHMEECKLE, FRED J. Agriculture. Chemistry A B.. State Teachers College, Kearney, Nebraska, 1917; M. S.. University of Minnesota, 1924; Summer School. At Stevens Point since 1918. STEINER. HERBERT R. Dean of Men, History Diploma. Stevens Point State Normal School. 1910; Ph. B.. University of Wisconsin. 1922: Ph. M., 1929: Harvard, 1931. At Stevens Point since 1918. THOMPSON. VICTOR E. Industrial Arts Diploma, Stout Institute. 1904: Ph. B., University of Wisconsin, 1916; Ph. M., 1929. At Stevens Point since 1918. — 26 —seems to be studying specimen's of human nature. The fifth grade has made great progress under the leadership of Miss Pfeiffer. The psychology department will miss Mr. Matravers greatly next year. The plan in the Physics lab is Mr. Rightsell's most recent interest. "T. A." is still the best food chemist in these parts—an lookit that smilel We still think Mr. Steiner is the most handsome member of the faculty. Occasionally Mr. Thompson's shop pupils wander into Mr. Schmeeckle's conservation lectures. Mesdames Tobias. Van Arsdale, and Williams, teacher critics of the primary department, and Mr. Pierce, teacher critic of the junior high department, are all of the M.D.B.T.S.J.H., C.S.T.C., ST. PT. W., U.S.A. Dean Pfiffner—see page 18. "Doc” Tolo—for an excellent photograph see snap shot panel page 108. Geography?—Ask Mr. Watson. Dr. Reppen is our “Wizard of Oz.“ Miss Wilson— that quiet lady of the home-ec department.TOBIAS. ADDA Training School Ph. B., University of Chicago. 1926; M. A.. Teachers College, Columbia University. 1931. At Stevens Point since 1926. TOLO. HAROLD M. History A. B.. Luther College. 1921; M. A.. University of Minnesota. 1926: Ph. D.. University of Illinois. 1934. At Stovons Point since 1935. VAN ARSDALE. GLADYS Training School Two year Diploma. Iowa State Teachers Collego, 1925; A. B., Iowa State Teachers College, 1931: M. A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 1933; University of Chicago. Summer School. At Stevens Point since 1934. WATSON. CHARLES F. Director of Intermediate Grade and Junior High School Education Diploma Plattevillo State Normal School. 1901; B. S., University of Chicago, 1908; M. S.. 1928. At Stevens Point since 1913. WILLIAMS. MILDRED L. Training School B. A., Iowa State Teachers College. 1932; M. A.. Teachers College. Columbia University. 1940. At Stevens Point since 1940. WILSON, EMILY Home Economics B. S., Kansas State Teachers Collego. 1917; Ph. B.. University of Chicago. 1918: M. S., Kansas State College, 1930. At Stovons Point since 1921. WINSOR. WILLIAM Chemistry Assistant B. S., Central State Teachers College. Stovons Point, 1940. At Stevens Point since 1940. — 28 —uni Office cSlajj Hurry! Scurry! Librarians move at this pace all the time. Did any one say that the li-brarianship is a simple job? Don't ever believe it. Miss Mansur, head librarian of the college does a fine job of keeping the library in order, such as keeping records, selecting books, helping students etc. Miss Mason and Mr. Hurling, both very able assistants to Miss Mansur, are kept running also. Miss Mason is in charge of cataloging books, purchasing magazines etc., while Mr. Hurling keeps an accession record, besides doing many odd jobs. lust ask any T.L.T.C. Student. Mrs. Donald Krider, formerly Miss Van Derra, is commonly known to all students as "Mary Jane". Her pet fondness is classical music as well as personalities in dramatics (and we do mean Don) Miss Carolyn Rolfson, secretary-treasurer of the college board of administration, though hard worked, always keeps smiling. In her spare time (of which she has very little) she has a hobby of collecting blue glass. Miss June Lindeman came here in 1938, and won the hearts of all, but now she has taken a position with the government at Washington D. C. Miss Marie Swallow is secretary to the placement committee, no small job. Her hobby is Wisconsin, in all its phases, and she, quote "has not found a place to equal it!" Mrs. D. Kridor Miss Carolyn Rolfson Miss Juno Lindoman Miss Mario Swallow — 29 — Mr. J. Horling Miss Sybil Masonua we ll ua the s 11 unite nance Mrs. Jonas—This capable arm of the maintenance service takes care of all the girls' locker rooms, the white kitchen, and Mr. Michelsen's room. For this reason she is better known to the girls than to the boys. Her hobby is baking birthday cakes, and showing the girls in the Home Ec. department a few tricks her hobby has taught her. When at home she spends her spare time raising flowers, and can wield a mean pruning shears. Mr. Stien—If you ever have a crossed wire, or a burned out connection, (light, of course) just call Mr. Stien. He is the chief engineer of the college and his main job. much to the appreciation of us students, is keeping the building warm in winter. John Urbanowski—John the janitor is a permanent character around school, who never forgets a face and whose "Hello, there" lets us know we're back in school when the semester starts. He is general handyman around school; sweeping halls, cleaning rugs, dusting, and washing boards are his chief duties. If you want a door opened or an errand run just call on John. His services are always at your command. Frank Mansavage—Frank has a variety of duties which take him to the main building, the training school, and the demonstration school. Everyone knows one of his duties—cleaning up the Training School Gym after dances, fights, basketball games, or anything else the students happen to organize. His most important duty, however, is one of acting. He loves it, too, and so do the kids at the Training School. He's Santa Claus at Christmas. Mrs. Higgins—What would the Dorm be without a general overseer? Even Miss Neuberger and Mrs. Finch find it hard to keep the girls in line, but with the help of Mrs. Higgins their task is lightened. She manages the Dorm kitchen with a firm, yet pleasant, personality which has won the admiration and respect of all the girls. Mr. Davis—Though Mr. Davis' duties are only in the Training School, he is the lifelong friend of every Senior. He's the Training School janitor, and what a help he is to those struggling practice teachers. He is always ready to lend a helping hand in any predicament, and has perfected a walk that is as noiseless as a cat on felt. You can never hear him, but can find him only by looking. Mr. Parks—Whenever anything is broken, out of order, or just "caput" around the building, it winds up in Mr. Parks' repair shop. We don't believe that any job in the repair line has ever stumped Mr. Parks. Sc, if you want it fixed, see Parks. That's the motto of the school. — 30 —utie an Doctor Marrs, commonly known as "Doc", is a friend of the students as well as being their doctor. His cheery "hello" wherever you meet him seems to pep any one up. Even to go into the health quarters and see the spick and span equipment and the white starched uniforms seems to scare the "bugs" out of you. This year his drive to eradicate tuberculosis was ever stronger. This health service is greatly appreciated by all the college students and faculty. Doctor Marrs devotes a great deal of his time to this service and should be highly recommended on his unfailing and untireing work. Quiet, and unassuming, he is almost forgotten by the students until something happens to them; then they fully appreciate him and his work. Nurse Mary Neuberger is indispensable in the health service. She is very expert in injecting medicine with the new spray, and does she clear your head out! Go and find out just what she can do about that cold, and you'll see. Another of her duties is to keep files of all the case histories of the students. These she meticulously keeps; and if a student is sick, these records show just what has been the matter with him before, and what course to follow. In addition to helping Dr. Marrs. Miss Neuberger checks the rooms in the dorm at least once a week, and insists that all rooms be clean and neat. Now do you believe that the health service has a job? Three cheers for them! — 31 — Dr. Fred Marrs Nurse Mary Neubergerasso-oi his nnota-llege. holar- om we these -32-STUDENT-SCHOLAR -EDUCATOR FRIEND — 33 —Wcome Grab your partners—Keep in line ... i And Who ate we ? The PtfnWUU Candlelight supper, to pep up spiritFirst and To thee, O Country Another my waySeptember 1940 PointersWin Opener From Stout 20-0 Backiictd: Carnahan, Peterson, Fritsch. Posluszny Linemen: Anderson. Dorsha. Reading. Menzel. Goodrich. Otto. Hanijt Pointers Lose Dull Game To River Falls 13-6 Fumbles and Poor Blocking Cost Game Minus the services of their all-conference half-back, Louis Posluszny, and having only the part time playing of Jim Hanig and Co-Captain Roy Otto, the C.S.T.C. Pointers lost to the River Falls Teachers 13 to 6. at Schmeeckle Field. The Falcons scored in the opening quarter after a bad punt went out of bounds on Point's 21 yard line. Trecker made a first down to the 9-yard line and Deiss brought it back to the 3-yard line. Boettcher, the fullback, then went over for the score, and tackle Dubbe kicked the extra point. The red and white Gridders scored their second decisive touchdown in the third quarter on four plays. They recovered a fumble on Point's 13-yard line and Boettcher scored from the 3-yard line. but Dubbe failed to convert the extra point. The Kotal men scored their only touchdown in the first quarter. A 40 yard pass from W. Peterson to Carnahan gave Point the ball on the Falls 30 yard line. Koehn picked up 3-yards at center, then on the next play broke clear on a cutback to score on a 27 yard run. Fritsch missed a place kick for the extra point. Missing signals when on the verge of scoring, poor blocking and costly fumbles brought the downfall of the Purple and Gold gridders. Though this opening game does not spell a good season for the team, it must not be taken as a final indication of their power. Many of the best players were on half rations, 3nd the full strength of C.S. T.C. was not revealed. We have a wall of strength in players such as Fritsch, Posluszny, Holm. Otto. Van Dyke and Kachr. Future games will tell us how to best judge the first game of the season. Promise Speed And Power For Conference Schedule Central State Teachers defeated Stout Institute in a non-conference engagement by the formidable score of 20-0. This was the first game of the '40 season for the Pointers. Coach Kotal and assistant Coach Ted Menzel, to aid in the victory, took twenty-nine men to Mcnomonie. Injuries forced Coach Kotal to make last-minute changes in his starting lineup, sending Bud Menzel of Stevens Point to the center position in place of Kenneth Parr of Rhinelander, and Bob Reading of Stevens Point to right guard in place of Harold Lyons, Greenwood. Because of the abundance of back-field material, and lack of good linemen, Kotal shifted a number of his backs to the foreward wall, including Jim Hanig of Merrill. Joe Goodrich of Wis. Rapids, La Verne Van Dyke of Little Chute, and Neil Druckcry of Shawano. PASS NETS FIRST GOAL Little of the first quarter had elapsed Continued on page 38, col. 1THE POINTER Pointers Win Opener From Stout 20-0 Continued from page 37, col. 3 before the Pointers made their first touchdown. Ted Fritsch opened the game by kicking off to the Stout 21. Wchrwein returned to Stout's 28. Unable to make a first down. Stout punted to Posluszny on the Point 26. Bill Peterson skirted left end to the Point 24 and Posluszny went around the other flank and got to the Stout 49 before being downed. A line play, with Peterson carrying the ball, set Point back to its own 47. Then a short pass, Posluszny to Peterson, netted the first goal. Fritsch did not convert the point. KOEHN GOES OVER Bill Carnahan checked a Stout rally by intercepting a pass on the Point four-yard strip. An exchange of punts, carried the ball to the Stout four. Posluszny was injured and was replaced by Frank Kochn, who drove over for Point's second marker. Fritsch booted for the point, and the half ended with the Kotalmcn out in front, 13 0. OTTO SCORES FOR POINT Stout lost the ball on Peterson s interception of a pass, which paved the way for Point's third touchdown. The marker came on a pass from Carnahan to Roy Otto. Peterson kicked the extra point. All in all, Point made 13 first downs, and Stout 4. Out Of The Bag GERHARDT HOLM: from Tigcrton... a Tiger in the field.... oldest member of the team.. .. playing again after teaching for three years..... one of the best guards.... a Chi Dell.... • • • LA VERN VAN DYKE: Senior................. climaxed four years of excellent ball playing for C.S.T.C............. Hails from Little Chute.... plays left end.... one of the best at snagging passes.... A Chi Dclt... . Inspiration: Nancy. • • TED FRITSCH: Co-Captain elect.... all Conference full-back---------from Spen- cer. ... a jarring blocker.... a battering ram on offense. ... Chi Dclt.... Junior. • • • JAY SWF.TT: Freshman.... hails from Eagle River.... reserve end.... keep an eye on him! (continued on page 41) Pointers Score Homecoming Win Over Oshkosh, 12-0 Fritsch Kicks Two Goals; Koehn Scores The C.S.T.C. Pointers won their first homecoming game in six years when they defeated their arch-rivals, the Oshkosh Titans 12-0. before the largest crowd to witness a game at Schmeeckle Field in recent years. The Purple and Gold Griddcrs looked good in securing their second conference victory. They made 13 first downs to Oshkosh's 8. The Titans made only two first downs by rushing. Ted Fritsch was the outstanding player of the game with his two-field goals and in blocking out two men on Frankie Kochn s touchdown sprint. The Kotalmen went to work and scored a touchdown in four plays after they received the opening kickoff, but it was nullified because of an offside penalty. The discarded touchdown was scored after three straight first downs brought the ball to the Oshkosh 33 yard line where Posluszny dropped back and hurled a pass to Fritsch who, with the aid of a beautiful block by Carnahan, scored unmolested. The first score came when the Pointers marched to two first downs the next time they took the ball on an exchange of kicks. When Oshkosh held them on the 13 yard line Fritsch dropped back to the 23 and kicked a perfect field goal with Carnahan holding the ball. Early in the second quarter Poslusz-] ny, Koehn and Fritsch alternating in carrying the pigskin, brought it from their own 23 yard line to the Oshkosh 19- At this point the attack failed to materialize in three plays and on the fourth down Fritsch dropped back to the 29 yard marker and again kicked a perfect field goal. The final scoring for the afternoon occurred midway during the second quarter when the Kotal gridders scored on a sustained drive from their own 30 yard line, where Koehn with the aid of good blocking, went around his left end and scored the only touchdown of the game. Kotalmen Trounce Pioneers Pointers Show Power, Beat Platteville in Conference Game. The Purple and Gold gridders opened their conference schedule auspiciously, Saturday by defeating Platteville, 28 to 0 at Schmeeckle Field. The Pointers, beaten 26 to 0 by the Pioneers last year, held the advantage throughout the game, scoring 14 first Continued on page 39, col. 1THE POINTER KOTALMEN TROUNCE PIONEERS Continued from page 38. col. 3 downs to the invaders’ seven. Led by her three skitterbugs, Kochn, Posluszny. and Peterson, who darted and streaked all over the field, the Kotalmen displayed flashes of a powerful offense in scoring a touchdown in the first and fourth quarters. The scoring started after three minutes of play in the first quarter when Frankie Kochn. our hip-swiveling quarterback. shook off a couple of tacklers on his own 20 broke into the clear and, with the aid of some fine blocking, ran all the way for an 80-yard touchdown. Ted Fritsch then converted the extra point. That completed the scoring for the first half. In the third quarter after Posluszny and Fritsch had pushed the ball downfield to the 23 yard line. Kochn again broke away on a 25 yard taunt around his left end for the second tally. Posluszny paved the way for the third touchdown early in the fourth quarter when he ran 30 yards around end to place the ball on the 30-yard line. On the next play he passed to Van Dyke to put the ball on the 20 yard marker. Kochn went through tackle for ten yards and passed to Van Dyke who took the ball over his shoulder on the 3-yard line, and scored unmolested. Peterson intercepted a pass on Plattcvilie's 33 yard line and set the stage for the last touchdown. He picked up 11 yards for a first down on the 22, and then went through tackle, eluded a couple of tacklers. and scored. Stars in the Point line were: Jim Hanig and Co-Captain Dorsha, ends; Co-Captain Roy Otto, tackle; and Kenneth Parr, center. Carnahan and Fritsch also looked good in the backfield along with Koehn, Posluszny and Peterson; Carnahan, by his fine tackling, and Fritsch with his fifty yard sprint zigzagging to the Plattevillc 10. Pointers Play 6-6 Tie With Eau Claire Peds OUR COACHES Coach Eddie Kotal has been leading the destinies of Central State's football teams since 1931, and since that time Central State has become a prominent figure j in the football world. Her teams rank with the best in the middle-west. Since then her gridiron machines have compiled a record of 46 victories, 18 defeats and 9 ties, winning the conference championships in 1933. '34 and 35. Mr. Kotal graduated Irom Lawrence College where he starred in football, basketball and baseball. After this he played professional football with the Green Bay Packers, and was named on the "All-Pro Team ". Last year he finished fourth among the leading grid-mentors in a nation wide poll sponsored by the Chicago Tribune. Assistant Coach Ted Menzel was very instrumental in coaching the line. He gave the line men special attention and moulded it into one of the best in the conference. Fumbles Prove Costly: Prevent Easy Victory The Purple and Gold gridders were held to a 6 to 6 tie by an inspired Eau Claire Teachers College aggregation before a large crowd under the floodlights as Crosley Field in Eau Claire Friday night. Intercepted passes halted Point's offensive marches and the Kotalmen suffered because of several costly fumbles. The Pointers had an excellent opportunity to score in the opening quarter but didn't take advantage of it. Ted Fritsch sent a high spiral sixty yards down the field where it was caught on the fly by Schafer who was immediately hit, fumbled, and Point recovered. A pass, from Posluszny to Carnahan brought the ball to the 12 yard line, but Posluszny fumbled on the next play and the threat halted. Eau Claire scored early in the second period when they recovered a Point fumble on the 19 yard line. Schaefer then raced to the Point 13 and Kolstad made it a first down on the 9. Schaefer circled his own right end for the touchdown, taking a lateral from Kolstad. Kolstad's plunge for the point failed. Central State came back strong and scored midway in the second period after a sensational 77 yard run by Schaefer Continued on page 40, col. 1THE POINTER CO-CAPTAINS Pointers Play 6-6 Tie With Eau Claire Peds Continued from page 39, col. 3 of Eau Claire wi$ nullified because of clipping. Koehn kicked to Shea who ran to his right and then iateraled to Schae-fer who reversed the field, and, aided by effective blocking, raced 77 yards to cross the goal line. After the play was recalled. Koistad punted out to his own 31. Bill Peterson replaced Koehn in the backfield and on the first play brought the ball to the 14 yard marker. Peterson gained four yards and Fritsch picked up a couple more. On the next play Peterson went over for the tally. Fritsch's placckick for the point was low and wide. The Kotalmen missed a chance to win on a safety late in the fourth quarter when quarterback Schea of Eau Claire was trapped behind his goal line, but three Point tacklers failed to bring him to the ground. Hanig, Peterson and Rades starred for Central State. Pointers Score For Dads, Beat St. Cloud By 12 To 6 KOEHN AND PETERSON SCORE FOR C.S.T.C. The St. Cloud "Huskies", who had dominated everything they played in Minnesota, met defeat in the hands of a fighting C.S.T.C. squad by a score of 12-6 before a Dad's Day crowd on Schmceckle Field. The Purple and Gold gridders who apparently did not read the clippings of the Minnesota boys out gained and outplayed their rivals in all phases of the game. They scored 15 first downs to the visitors' 8. St. Cloud scored their lone touchdown in the first period on three successive first downs after an exchange of kicks. They made a first down on a penalty and then added another on Fiiippi's dash around end from punt formation. On the next play Filipp faded back to his 42 and threw a pass to Bierhaus who caught it on the Point's 38 and continued to run 18 before being hauled down. Klien and Filippi picked up a first down to the eight, and then Fillippi went over from the eight standing up. The Huskies failed to convert the extra point. The Kotalmen, upon receiving the kickoff, drove to St. Cloud's 12 yard line before the first quarter ended. When the second quarter was opened. Fritsch brought the ball to the 10 yard line. Peterson. on a cutback, went to the seven. Fritsch picked up four more on a line plunge and then fumbleJ on the next play to end the threat on the 2 yard line. This ended the scoring for the first half. Coming back to the game, determined to win, the Pointers scored on the second play after receiving the kickoff. fter a two yard gain put the ball on the 40, swivel-hipped Frankie Koehn sped '.round his left end for a 60 yard touch-Sown. Fritsch's place-kick attempt for the extra point was N.G. The winning touchdown was scored i few minutes later, after the Kotalmen received the ball on an exchange of punts. Koehn returned the punt from his own 18 to the 25. At this point Bill Peterson threw a pass to Van Dyke who caught it on the St. Cloud 40. and continued to the 20 yard line before being brought down. Koehn went around left end for 5 yards and Fritsch powered through for five more and a first down. On the next play Peterson went around end for the tally. Fritsch's attempt to convert the extra point was blocked. A golden tackle, well worth his weight in that precious metal is Roy Otto, the Pointer’s captain. In this wire-thatchcd footballer are combined the speed of a fullback, an ace tackler's deadly eye, and the savvy of a natural tactician. All-conference tackle in 39 and ’40, Roy will come back as a senior next fall to terrify the opposing linemen. The 215 pound wrecker never stops trying for quicker ways to flatten the vaunted backfield parade of the Titans and other foes. Reared in football-minded Shawano, where youngsters cut their teeth on cleats, Roy crashed the Central State lineup the first day he drew on a varsity jersey. With his advent the erstwhile sieve-like Central State line was no longer open thoroughfare to enemy ballcarriers. He plugged those like a plumber! Greg l orsha, built like the proverbial brick smokehouse, yet may earn a niche alongside Central States immortals. This sawed-off Sampson holds his ground solidly even when double teamed by husky rivals. His grab-bucket hands are handsomely designed to enable him to fend off interferers or fight his way out of a mouse trap. Greg is at the bottom of every tangled pile. Keep an eye on this cagey, vicious-blocking wing. A crunching blocker and a terror at spilling rival formations, the stocky, durable Greg is practically a sixty-minute man. He moves the defensive tackle like a snowplow clearing a garden path. Competing only in six-man intramural football during his freshman year, Greg came out for the varsity last year and earned a starting birth. Last fall he again held down the left flank and was a headache to the opposition throughout the campaign. — 40 —THE POINTER C.S.T.C. Beats FRITSCH AND PETERSON STARS Governor At Game Playing an inspired game of football and aidfd by some long runs by halfback William Peterson, a determined Central State Teachers College eleven defeated the powerful Milwaukee Teachers Green Gulls, 21-19, before a large home-coming crowd at Milwaukee. This was the first homecoming defeat suffered by the Kluege men in eight years. The victory left Coach Eddie Kotal's team undefeated in the conference race and they can win the title by defeating Whitewater next week. Governor Julius P. Heil dedicated the new Pearse Athletic field during the half. The Pointers went to work and scored early in the first quarter. After bringing the ball down the field on runs Milwaukee 21-19 by Fritsch and Koehn. Bill Peterson faded back and threw a pass to Frankie Koehn, who scampered 20 yards for a touchdown. Ted Fritsch converted the extra point. William Peterson aided by some good blocking cut through left tackle from his own 40, reversed the field and ran 60 yards to score the Pointers' second touchdown. Fritsch kicked the goal to make the score 14-0. The Green Gulls, led by F.ckenrod, Geske, and Krzoska, came to life and scored two touchdowns to trail 14-12 at the half. The Milwaukee boys brought the home crowd to its feet when they scored on a sensational long pass from F.ckenrod to Krzoska to take the lead for the first time, late in the third quarter. This didn't demoralize the determined Purple and Gold Gridders, for they came right back to score the winning tally. With the ball on the 33 yard line Bill Peterson took the ball, cut in through tackle, and streaked down the field for 67 yards and a touchdown. Fritsch's automatic toe again sent the ball through the uprights for the extra point. The game proved costly, as Bud ', Harold Menzel was lost to the squad for the rest of the season due to a broken arm. Out Of The Bag LOUIS POSLUSZNY: Sophomore.... A Chi Delt.. . A strong man of the team.... can run you ragged.... do everything, and do it a little better than most of his contemporaries. • • • FRANKIE KOEHN: Sophomore............... hails from Little Chute.... a sprinter.... also a driver.... a 50 yard dasher..... Chi Delt. ... Sorry girls, but he's a steady (Micky's the name!) • • ♦ GREG DORSHA: 40 Co-Captain............ Junior___ A Stevens Point product.... A cagey, vicious, blocking end.... a 60 minute man. ... moves opposition like a snow plow. • • • KENNETH PARR: Co-Captain elect... Junior----All Conference Center-----re- sides in Rhinelander. ... can smell a “center alley" pass and snare them 9 out of 10 times.... a Phi Sig. • • JOE GOODRICH: The Wis. Rapids Flash.. .. sophomore.... fleet in the backficld... a terror in the line.... a Chi Delt. • • • ROY OTTO: Co-captain '40.... Junior. ... At home in Lindhurst. ... 200 lbs of high speed and a hurtling charger. ... All-conference tackle..... a good man. • • DAN YOUNG: Senior.... Bancroft... a tough, very tough, roving center.... A Phi Sig. .. Team will miss his playing next year__good luck to you. Dan. • • • FRED FINK: Sophomore............ from Marshfield. ... excellent field general... a strong man of the back line. ... a Phi Sig-a good man. • BILL CARNAHAN: Sphomore................ from Marshfield.... an excellent auarter-back on 1st string.... Just missed being all-conference. • • ♦ OSCAR PETERSON: Freshman "call me Harmon”.... from Wausau.... reserve fullback.... good man to have on the team. • • IERRY LA FLEUR: The kid from Wa-neno... . Sophomore.. .. can throw a pass sixty yardsTHE POINTER TOP ROW: F. Kalkofen. Van Dyke. Parr SECOND ROW: Rade . Carnahan. Fritsch Out Of The Bag LEON KALKOFEN: At home in Anti-go. ... Sophomore.... excellent kicker... a trustworthy quarterback.... a happy-go-lucky fellow ... a swell fellow. • • • HAROLD LYONS: Freshman----from Greenwood and a hard charging guard... stepped into a starting birth from the start this year. 4 • t HAROLD SCHMIDT: A sophomore from Gresham------ an excellent reserve lineman.... keep an eye on this player next fall. 4 4 4 JAMES HANIG: Junior.... joined the Marines.... a terrific tackier.... good on ghosting through the line to nail ball carriers. ... extra good in all sports.... A Chi Dclt. • • • TERRY MICHAL: Sophomore. . from Mosince..... Will get a starting berth next year. ... a tough fibered guard. Continued on page 43. col. I POSSIBILITIES OF THE ’41 SEASON "Let's do it this year!" is the rallying cry on the campus. Followers of the Central State Teachers College Pointers, watching for the comeback of the lightning teams ever since the glorious campaigns of '33. '34. '35 and '36. arc rubbing their hands with glee. A conference title is in the air for the Purple and Gold gridders. Head Mentor, Coach Kotal, admits his team has possibilities. Man power is plentiful, high test at least, in the majority of positions. But one factor leaves the possibilities of a successful season to a question mark—that question is: how about the Draft? From this year's powerful eleven that won 5 games, lost 2 and tied 1. and just missed copping the conference title. Coach Kotal is sure of losing six players. | La Verne Van Dyke. Dan Young and Anton Anderson will be lost via the graduation route. Jim Hanig has joined the marines. Bob Reading is in the air corps and Bud Menzel will not risk the chance of breaking his arm again. The rest of the boys will be back, unless their Big L'ncle. Uncle Sam, calls them, or if they don't join the air corps, navy, or marines. Every member of that fast, speedy, jitterbugging, hip-swivelling backficld we hope will be back again to see action. 1940 CAPTAINS: FRITSCH PARR Hardest hitting, fastest stepping fullback the Wisconsin Teachers Conference has ever seen is Ted Fritsch, 1941 Co-Captain. Born into a great football family, Ted seems to have the same durability as his two brothers, and a power on those inside tackle smashes that is peculiarly his own. As well as a great plunger, he's a devastating blocker, a high, hard runner in the open, and facile pass-snatcher. Fritsch's weakness? He can't shake off the seventh or eighth tackier. In three years of playing, he has wice been picked as all-conference full-sack, an enviable record! The brightly burnished fly-wheel of the lively Central State squad is Co-Captain Kenny Parr, a fighting 190 pounder who plays center. He's a hair-trigger, bulls-eye-smacking snapper back, and a cunning defender. Defensively, Ken possesses a sixth sense that gyroscopes him into the path of practically every play. This is no random-tossed bunch of roses. Actual figures, tackles made or assisted in. and his team mates, will bear out this statement. Ken is all over the lot on defense, ranging from sideline to sideline like an eager Llewcllcn on a hot scent. Kenny was picked as all-conference center for the second successive time in his three years of play, another enviable record. Stimm, Sullivan, Borchardt — 42 —THE POINTER QUAKERS TROUNCE POINT, 45-12 Take Crown Of Southern Division Kotalmen Fail To Match Play Of The Milwaukee Game The Whitewater Quakers handed the Central State Gridders an unexpected 45-12 trouncing at Whitewater last Saturday to win the Championship of the Southern Division of the Teachers College Conference. This was the worst defeat that a Point team coached by Kotal has absorbed. The Championship fray was predicted to be a dog tight—the battle of the season—but it failed to meet these requirements. The Agnewmen rose to their heights and played their best game of the year. In fact, it would be safe to say that it was the best performance ever exhibited by a Whitewater eleven. They scored more points in this game than they did in all of their three conference games put together and performed like real champions. Anything short of a Big Ten team would have been defeated by them Saturday. The Pointers on the other hand were at their worst. The spark and scoring power that had carried them through five victories was missing and the breaks went against them during the critical moments. The line that had held conference opponents to 19 points and the rest of the opposition 21 points, was battered to pieces. Also the scoring power that had accumulated a total of 105 points was lacking. No direct reason for this humiliation can be stated except that one team was red hot and the other was off its peak. The Kotalmen played the ball they are capable of doing when they defeated the powerful Milwaukee State aggregation 21-19 a week before to ruin the Green Gulls' homecoming. They had too much power for a very good Kluege team that had defeated St. Norberts and Carroll College. H«nig. Goodrich. Schunk. Fink, Caskey. Michal. Mcnzcl. Al Kalkofen. Kulidas. OUT OF THE BAG Continued from page 42, col. 1 LEON KAI.KOFEN: At home in Anti- go. ... Sophomore----- a trustworthy quarterback.... a good blocker--hap- py go lucky guy and a swell fellow. • ♦ • BILL PETERSON: A wow of a passer. ... excellent kicker_can't be beat in the broken field game.... Sophomore from Kaukauna.... C.A.A. flyer of no mean ability. » • • BUD MENZEL: Junior--------Socialite as well as footballer___ Phi Sig.... a sixty minute man.... deadly tackier.... the team calls him "crack-'em-down-Bud". • BOB SCHUNK: Freshman from Marshfield.... A very tough, rugged boy in the line.... will be expected to hold down a first string position next fall. Out Of The Bag FRED KAI.KOFEN: from Amigo.... 3 rugged guard.... Coach will expect much from him next year---a quiet chap most of the time. • • • ROLI.AND RADES: Knows Shawano very well.... as illusive on the field ui the Indians on the Shawano reservation are in the woods_his hobby is push- ing opposing linemen out of the play. • • • « HOWARD STIMM: Sophomore-----------can't be lost in Stevens Point, his home. ... this is his second year on the squad-big things are expected of him next year---his flame: Mildred Steinberg. • • • ANTON ANDERSON: Senior.... a dependable end.... we're sorry to lose him. ROBERT READING: a hard driving guard from Stevens Point.... he is like a bull-dog, for he never gives up. ♦ ♦ • JIMMY SULLIVAN: Lives in town.... Sophomore----- We all call him ''Sully''.... A Phi Sig.... plays at the quarterback position.Koehn on a touchdown jaunt, around endicet FRESHMAN President: James Smith Vice President: Esther Moreau Secretary: Winnifred Leykom Treasurer: Dan Durkee SOPHOMORE President: Norman Halla Vice President: Robert Shorey Secretary: Rozella Berg Treasurer: Florence Theisen JUNIOR President: Harold Menzel Vice President: Charles Dodge Secretary: Lucille Weiher Treasurer: Katherine Piehl SENIOR President: Gerald Torkelson Vice President: Rollie McManners Secretary: Doris Soderberg Treasurer: Evelyn Hillert -45 —... and that word is FELLOWSHIP. Fraternity and sorority memberships offer close relationship among students who have as their mutual interest the personality growth and personal achievements of their fellow members. The intimate associates of the fraternity and sorority discover abilities which rarely display themselves in formal classes. On our campus there are four groups— "Greeks": Omega Mu Chi and Tau Gamma Beta, sororities, and Chi Delta Rho and Phi Sigma Epsilon, "Frats". These groups start college social life early each year, usually with a pre-homecoming dance, soon followed by pledging. The pledging "season" lasts from four to six weeks, beginning with 'rushing parties", to which prospective members are invited for the purpose of letting prospects and members "look each other over". Second, lively parties follow, and attendance by non-members is — 46 —A avc a limited to those who have received invitations from the fraternity or sorority to become members. Even as the reason for the existence of social groups, as outlined above, so is there also rority pledges are collected; Omegs, newspa per skirts (!?), swimming suits (no explanation needed), notebooks (informal hourly diaries required of all pledges); Tau Gams, bags of peanuts, umbrellas, rollerskates, no make-up, and a reason for the "spanking": both actives and pledges learn to know the personalities and character of pledges and actives respectively; and of course, the whole procedure is a lot of fun. (believe it or not, but the pledges enjoy it as much as the actives). Just ask around. again, swimming suits. The Pan-Hellenic dance climaxes formal initiation, at which the former pledges breath freely for the first time in weeks. Later come the "formals". But that is only the social side of fraternity life. The intellectual side is quietly The distinctive marks of pledging are: Chi Delts—cowbell—big and clangy. red lanterns, and the only painted paddle on the campus developed in the regular college curriculum, and encouraged and rewarded by the group. The Greeks maintain a high scholastic average. (blue and white); Phi Sigs, "loud" red bow ties, worn about the neck in orthodox style, unpaint- Truly the fraternities and sororities are a real part of college life. ed paddles—(one hole about % of an inch in diameter, (The purpose of the hole is to minimize resistance during the flight of the instrument), raw eggs, upon which autographs of so- Chi Dolt Officers: 1st Row: Kulldas, Ungor. Mover- don, Sword, Sanborn, Vlncont 2nd. Row: Poslus -• j, F. Nixon, Burkman, Ackerman. Shcski. Siebort, G. Torkelson Tau Gam Officers: Rondeau. Russoll, Rose. La Brot, Wlrkus, Theisen. Gleeson. Winch Omega Mu Chi Ofiicers: Piehl, Larsen, Smith, Ku-las, Anderson, Novitski. Steltor, Larson. Boo, Murty, Rogers Phi Slg Ofiicers: Mullarkey, Monxel, Vig. Becker. Babenroth, B. Nixon, Perry — 47 —Chi 3)e ta lb FOUNDED in 1930—have built up a strong organization—worthwhile membership—active in C.S.T.C. social and academic liie—athletics, glee club and student publications—definite benefit to this college—prominent alumni in the teaching profession—loyal too, and proud of their frat brothers, and they have reason to be—The Chi Delts: There's Siebert, Editor of Pointer—Burkman, president of Sigma Zeta. stage and theater man—Ackerman. Sigma Tau Delta, Alpha Psi Omega, Editor of Iris—The Torkelson Brothers, Carl. Robert and Jerry, mainstays of the glee club— Brenner. (Golden Gloves, Wisconsin Rapids and Chicago). Steinfest. Radke. boxers—Koehn and Posluszny. carry the pigskin. Faculty Advisors: Messers Knutzen, Rightsell and Tolo. First Semester OFFICERS Second Semester [everden osheski JUNIORS 40RES Gordon Steinfest Harry Slabosheski ........................President.......................Sherman Sword Sherman Sword ....................... Vice President .....................Merville Merverden Merville Meverden ........................Treasurer.......................Jack Ackerman Bob Burkman ..............................Secretary . r ................James Unger Gerald Torkelson ..................... Corres.-S etary ... ..............Jack Vincent Louis Posluszny ............................ GmwC. .TSry . .j............Jim Kulidas Earle Siebert ......................... Paqf'HellenK; ...................Richard Sanborn Gerald jdta-ies Hanig A)ato Kingston Floydf Nixon Len Ropella Robert Schrank Sherman Sword C-Krhardt Holm Jack Gear James Kulidas Wayne Peterson Roger Olson 3, Robert Earle Sffel rt Gerald TtoScelson Jack Ted Fritic Francis K Frank Koe Dennis Roberts Richard San" Clarence Sol James Unger Kenneth Brenner Joseph Goodrich James Neuenfeldt Louis Posluszny Merle Je — 48 — nft IIIIHC4mtt r 44u Cl Y OUNG, peppy organization—began in 1926—has been a huge success since then—always ready to "back" an activity—new ideas and ambitions—scholarship pin—awards to Patty Markee and Jack Stauber—winter formal—happy crowd—well attended—Twenty-five new pledges the second semester—Every one a "peach"—The O meg's Torch Bearers: Science and math whiz. Barb Gerdes—Joyce Larsen (Mrs. La Brot to those who know her!)—The Senior Trio: Nancy Steiner, redhead; Dorothy Larson, blond; Betty Smith, brunette—good students every one—but can have fun, too— Faculty Advisors: Miss Glennon; Miss Mason. Honorary Members: Miss Davidoff; Mrs. Tolo; Miss Loomer. Patronesses: Mrs. C. Cashin; Mrs. P. Taylor; Mrs. Schwahn. First Semester OFFICERS: Second Semester Cora Mae Anderson......................... President ........................ Joyce Larsen Joyce Larsen..................................Vice President................. Betty Smith Barbara Gerdes .....................Corresponding Secretary................. Rita Novitski Ruth Rathke ..........................Recording Secretary................... Janie Rogers Dorothy Larson.............................Treasurer......................... Dorothy Larson Ruth Stelter .........................Press Representative................... Lillian Boe Kay Tyler.................................. Chaplain ........................ Leona Kulas Beverly Murty............................. Historian ........................ Beverly Murty 1L O, mea.i SENIORS Cora Mae Anderson Evelyn Hillert Dorothy Larson Kathryn Piehl Betty Smith Lillian Boe Leone Kul ; Margart Helen Rc Neva I Ruth Ctfe Miriam Beverle Dorn Betty Marguerite Cr Barbara Gerdes Marjorie Jacobs therine Mozuch Rathke Steiner Lawrence adsen eau Shirley Fonstad Beverley Hoppensted Jeanette Levi Ruth Michelsen Betty June Frost Jeanne Peters Carol Smith Janet Thompson Ruth Thompson — 51 —i it a O LD, established fraternity—only member on our campus belonging to a national social organization—"The House" on Main Street a popular and congenial hangout—high scholastic averages—very active alumni association—fellows prominent in all phases of school life—strong bonds of unity—they stick together—The Phi Sigs: a fair sampling—Bud Menzel, he knows everybody, and everybody knows him—Bob Nixon, "most prominent Phi Sig". whistles at certain girls—Dan Young, super boxer and Golden Gloves winner—musicians: Wishlinski. Perry, Kohler. Dodge and Pliner—Basketballer Oik—"Mr. Larsen" (Adrian La Brot to those who don't know him). Faculty Advisor: Mr. Schmeeckle Honorary Members: Messers. Pierson. Kotal and Burroughs. OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Bob Nixon................................. President ....................... Leonard Vig Bob Oik..................................Vice President..................... Bob Becker Bob Becker .............................Rec.-Secretary...................... Harold Kahler Bob Baebenroth.............................Treasurer........................ Bob Nixon jtary ................... Bob Baebenroth Loy Mullarkey......................... ..................................... Jack Perry Bud Menzel...........................€ adpl,..................... Bob Oik Robert Raebenr Charles Dodge Gordon Lew iso Maurice Ande Robert Fische David Hennic Adrian La Brot August Bentz Glenn Hebert Robert Menzel rthur Seidel aymond Skatrude elvin Wunsch :k Perry rt Shorey loward Stimm las Wishlinski Phillip McLaughlin Frank Steckle Robert Rifleman Charles Orthman Robert Johnson -52-Began way back in 1909—has played an important role in school and community life since that time—steady standards and ideals—strong and prominent alumni— successes of year. teas, dinners, parties—busy girls scholastically—active in school affairs—pleasant and friendly club rooms—student loan fund—especially prominent: Flutist Betty Johnson, “but she won't be Johnson very long" quote-unquote—soprano soloist Gertie Rondeau—“Chiz" Reichel, who has an amazing alto voice and an amazing "Techniques" scrapbook—Eileen Rose, who's not happy unless she's busy, and she always is—La Rae Winch, 2nd semester president, also heads Primary Council— Honorary Members: Miss Mildred Davis. Mrs. R. Morrison Faculty Advisors—Miss Meston and Mrs. Cutnaw Patronesses: Mrs. E. T. Smith. Mrs. F. N. Spindler, Mrs. E. Kotal First Semester OFFICERS Second Semester Margaret Johnsen ......................... President .................... La Rae Winch Doris Soderberg.........................Vice President................... Mary Anne Gleeson Fay Wendorf.........................Corresponding Secretary.............. Florence Theisen Eileen Rose ..........................Recording Secretary................ Gertrude Rondeau Aloha Walter ............................. Treasurer..................... Aloha Walter Rita Russell ........................... Pan Hellenic ................... Carmelita Wirkus Alice Wagner.........................Press Representative................ Madeline La Brot JUNioas. Stana Kamke Kathryn Bowersock Margaret Johnsen Eileen Rose La Rae Wine Linda Bom Madeline La Brot Charlotte Reichel Aloha Walter Mary Ann Gleeson Betty Johnson erberg lita Wirkus cille Neuman ice Wagner Li cille Weiher Patricia Carver Betty Fitzke Janet Hla a KathryfiVohler KatWyn M calf Mc ie Ocvir GertKide R Brigetta Fie line Catlin ft mice Greve oria Jogslen ginia Lynagren ixine McGuire jou6 Reitc e Shier — 55 —J. Rogers, E. Soibort. H. Mtnzol, R. Rum«)1, Mrs. Piiifnsr, Mr. Steiner. R. Nixon, C. Anderson, H. Slabosheski This organization of the social fraternities is the “Greek N.L.R.B."—Composed of the President and one elected member from each of the four organizations on the campus— the officers follow in alternating sequence: Chi Delta Rho, Phi Sigma Epsilon, the presidency, and Omega Mu Chi and Tau Gamma Beta the secretary—sponsors formal pledge dances for the Greeks and their guests each semester— OFFICERS FOR 1940-41 First Semester Second Semester Harry Slabosheski.....President........Leonard Vig Chi Delta Rho Phi Sigma Epsilon Janie Rogers........Secretary .......LaRae Winch Omega Mu Chi Tau Gamma Beta MEMBERSHIP First Semester Chi Delta Rho: Harry Slabosheski Earle Seibert Omega Mu Chi: Janie Rogers Cora Mae Anderson Phi Sigma Epsilon: Harold Menzel Robert Nixon Tau Gamma Beta: Rita Russell Margaret Johnsen Second Semester Chi Delta Rho: Sherman Sword Richard Sanborn Omega Mu Chi: Joyce Larsen Katherine Piehl Phi Sigma Epsilon: Leonard Vig Robert Becker Tau Gamma Beta: LaRae Winch Carmelita Wirkus — 56 —lust think! All this year we have been lowly sophomores, but. with the coming of exams we will be JUNIORS! Juniors! with all the privileges and perrogatives of that exalted class! Of course, we are proud of the record that we made this year. We think that we're pretty good, don’t you? Just look at the record that we made in the organizations of the school. Look at our scholars; and what about our members who showed the rest of the school what real athletes can do for the teams. All in all, WE think that WE know all the answers. That is, all but one. The one thing that we cannot figure out is just why the rest of the school calls us those "sophisticated Sophomores" in that tone of voice. Oh! well! It doesn't matter. In case you don't know us, well here we are................ — 57 —e Mtuo-tA- CROUP 1 5ow i— • Btonnan. E. Catlln. C. Caakoy, M. L. Buttor. How 2—E. Campboll. P. Catv«, R. Bu o. Row S-—P. Ccahln, B. Carnahan. N. I. Burroughs. CROUP 2 Row I—E. D Guoro O. Crawford. D. Crossgrove. C. Dtnein. Row 2—J Ehlora, B. Chylok. J. Cook. E. France. Row 3—R. Chenoweth. K. Cody. G. Conover. GROUP 3 Row 1—I. Goar, V Grounko. N. GonsSorowski Row 2—M Giuonsiern. K. Gchrke. D. Hanlsh, J. Hlava. Row 3—D FloSataa, G. Rondeau A. Barber. What makes a class? Have you ever tried to answer this question? What made the sophomore class this year? Could it have been Myron Sharkey or Norm Halla, each with his mighty left? Or. maybe it was Bill Carnahan with his spectacular football playing. Of course, we can’t forget about the football playing of Jerry La Fleur either. It seems as if Central State was put on the map with its one and only Ken Brenner, who won the Golden Gloves championship at Wisconsin Rapids and later went to Chicago representing Central Wisconsin. For those who do not know him. he is a sophomore, too. The sophomores are well represented in the band by Lois Andre, Tom Wishlinski, Jack GROUP 4 Row i—L. Kalkofcn. J. Porry, B. MalockI, I. Bray. D. Hennsck. Row 2—F. Tholnon. V. Lundgron, M. McGuire, V. Slrope. Row 3—H. Kohler. D. Kordua. F. Kalkofen. Perry, Pat Carver. Glendy Chapin. Harold Kahl-er. Clarence Nelson, Gladys Connover, Florence Theisen, Marjorie Loberg, Jean Meydam, Olive Crawford, Norbert Gonsiorowski, Miriam Gruenstern, and "D. J.” Raddant. With these outstanding personages they couldn't help but be an outstanding sophomore class. The melodious voice of Gertrude Rondeau will never be forgotten, especially the way she sang in the girls' trio at the home concert of the Glee Club. Other sophomore vocalists are Wilma Anderson. Mary Louise Butter, Pat Carver, Janet Hlava, Marjorie Loberg, each one of whom did her bit in the completing of the Glee Club's perfection. Incidentally, do you remember who among — 58 — the sophomore class it was that was almost murdered and buried in the basement of an old house? Of course you dol It was Iris Precourt in "Love from a Stranger", which was presented the first semester. And, of course, no class is without its social register, its "blue-blooded" 400. The most enviable record of any of the socialites was made by Betty DeGuere. who did not miss a single formal the whole year (for confirmation ask Don Aucutt). Another of the social register, who, though her "steady" has joined the ranks of the selective" service, has not been absent from the social life of the campus is Neva lane Burroughs. Another who seems to get around even though Hatch did leave school is Pat Cashin. Really, these girls should be able to outtalk even Roy Arndt, who, with his colleague, Don Krider, made an enviable record for C. S. T. C. in the debate tournaments and contests. Oh, gee, we mentioned the Girls' Glee Club, but forgot the Boys'. We couldn't do that, could we, girls? So, to start with those who seem to be vocalizing all of the air and the rehearsals, we must start with Duane Phaneuf, who is soloist for the baritone parts, and by himself, between groups of numbers on the concert tours of the club. But then, no soloist is better than the group which supports him. so the rest of the fellows who did excellent work this year (and who represent the spirit of the sophomore class) are Erwin Frisch, Gilbert Halverson, Adrian La Brot, Tom Langton, Robert Malecki. Fred Mozuch, Roger Olson. Fred CROUP 5 Row 1—J. Hafntt. R. Soil L. Maichow, E. Lang . G. Rob rts. Row 2—G. Jocston, M. Johnson, E. Rusch. O- Hesiod Row 2—G. Lodgintki. J. La Fleur. B. Conan!. Schwierske. Arthur Siedel and Vernon Smith. Each of these men deserved much credit, and a reminder that the future of the Men's Glee Club has been, like the torch in their favorite song, "from failing hands we throw the torch, be yours to hold it high,” thrown into their hands by the outgoing seniors, and it is up to these Sophomores to aid the Club to reach new heights in the coming years. You also must recall Wednesdays at 3 o'clock. You don't? That's the day and time the "Pointer" came out. Yes, and there were plenty of sophomores on the Pointer Staff who worked hard to beat that deadline, so that you could read and enjoy yourself. Surely you remember Glendy Chapin’s "Collaboration Comer." Doc Kulidas' "From the Locker Room," and Florence Theisen's "Gym Antics." Then there were the kids that got the stuff, the reporters Wilma Anderson. Pat Maguire, Bob Malecki, Vernon Smith, and Ginger Nelson. Oh, yesl We almost forgot to mention Jane Shier and Alva Thompson, the proof readers, and Marjorie Reitan of circulation staff, and John Kelley, the dear old copy editor. They did a swell job, didn't they? Remember the kids who wrote in "Student Sparring," and "Public Opinion?" Remember Lee Malchows' screwball articles? The boy has wit and when he’s serious, he can really dish it out. Then too. we can’t forget Don Kordus who helped a great deal in making the theaters of Stevens Point do some remodeling, so that we could be comfortable and really enjoy a movie once in a while. I’d say that group e Row I—B. Shorey. T. Withlinski, M. Booth. E. Lyons. Row 2—B. Autik, E Kryshak, G. Borden. H. Nioman Row 2—F. Schwietsk . M. K. Goer. V. Brunner. — 59 —1940-1941 GROUP 7 Row 1—). Nounfeld!. G. Nelson, P. Morkee, C. Nelson. Row 2—M. Loberg. J. Kuildas, EL Neriien, B. Murty. Row 3—J. Meydam. R. Ahles. P. Maguire. GROUP 8 Row 1—H. Stlmm, B. Dietrich. H. Park. Row 2-R. Olson. J. Kvhl. D. Phaneuf. M. M. Nelson. Row 3—w. Peterson. J. Negard, R. Mullaikoy. GROUP 9 Row 1—8. Hanson. W Peterson. J. Shoir. B. Vonderlioth, lano Rosin. Row 2—H. Schmidt. D. J. Raddant. M. Reitan, C. E. Torkolson. Row 3—-G. Brill, 1. Precourt, I. M. Wood. J. Quinn. w© have a good politician in the making. Now, gentle reader, after reading this little writeup (which gave us no end of trouble) do you blame us for saying that we have an group u Row 1—M. Sharkey, W. Anderson, E. Beach. J. Sullivan. Row 2—A. Zimmirman, D. Slxel. E. Jakel. Row 3—L. Grimm. L. Abrahamson. GROUP 10 Row 1—C. Schultz, E Zavrowski. A. Thompson. Row 2—O. Wilkins, E. Via, M. Waaa. Row 3—D. Abrahamson, E. Maddy, K Brenner. outstanding sophomore class? Or that we left the question at the first unanswered. Or is it that it is no single person that makes a class, but the combined efforts and records of all? GROUP 12 Row 1—R. Swonson, W. Schuarschmid:. R. Arndt. Row 2—L Andre. J. Saunders. T. Barber. — 60 —Once again history has transposed itself, and 1916 has become 1940. Battle flags flying, marshall strains in the air, conscription on every tongue, mushroom camps—WAR Selective service is calling, and many of the students of Central State are either selectees, or volunteers in this, the Nation's greatest emergency. To these "The Iris" of '40-'41. the epoch years in America's history, extends a hearty hand clasp, and a "Bon Voyage" to: Bill Miller Herbert Trankle Harry Oiingy Leonard Koehl Donald Abrahamson Ben Glennon Bill Oik Roger Bernstein Jim Hanig Bob Burkman Warren Soteber Dick Sanborn Gerhardt Holm Tony Anderson Merle Jenks Charles Miller Roy Hendricks Carl Jusits Jack Taylor Gus Binnebose Clarence Benke George H. Cashin Douglas Fonstad Robert Redfield Jake Frane Robert Bishop Dick Staeger G. Pershing Sappenfield Merville Meverden James Kulidas Bill Larson Maynard de Golier Bob Oik Lyle Grimm Chet Caskey Jim Scribner "fylxHAteM. rU aA." To Thee who watches the stars on high, Who guards the flocks, as in fields they lie: Watch o'er our hoys. Now war's mad toys. Pale flowers are they Fresh from life's garden medley— Some light, some dark. Vet each contains the spark devine Which marks them, God, as one of Thine. Let not these blossoms, Flushed with the bloom of youth. Afire with the flame of ambition. Holding aloft, in eager hand, the torch of truth, Be severed from their parent stalk. Still, If war these toys must break, And cause many a heart to ache; If these blossoms yet must fall— Gather them, each and all Within the circle of thy arms. And, o'er the grave, wherein they lie. Send from beside Thy throne on high A Seraph, brandishing a sword of Light, To guard them through their long, dark night. — 61 — TO JOIH THE COLLET6E ORGANIZATIONS■ .. an organization? Take your favorite field of interest, look around, and Jtart right in. What is your pet peeve? Could it be photography? acting? debate? any of the fields of science? Or could it be that you are interested in affairs of the church? Perhaps you are concerned with social science, or singing, reporting, editing, just plain "mutual admiration" societies, or sports? All you have to do is to pick your poison, and we have it. Just for instance, let's pretend that you are interested in acting. What would you like to do best? II it is "hamming", we have the stage which presents plays under the competent direction of Mr. Burroughs and Mr. Jenkins. If it is directing, then the College Theater "workshop" productions are what you want. Then again, if you're handy with an awl and a saw. there is the workship on third floor, where we build all the sets. High above the stage is the catwalk where the lighting is handled. If you're interested in this end of play production you would be as welcome as the "flowers in May." Perhaps you have a penchant for argumentation. If so, Mr. Burroughs will be glad to hear of it. as he is always on the lookout for debaters. Along these same lines are the Social Science Club and Bloc. These are composed of just plain arguin' fools. Music is always popular, and if you like to strain a tonsil now and then, or toot a flute. Mr. Michelsen or Mr. Knutzen, depending upon the variety you like, will be glad to oblige you. Don't forget, too. that whether it is Sebelius or Sousa that intrigue you. we have band and orchestra. These organizations, however, are more than juBt to entertain people. Their purpose is to train future teachers in the handling of school activities. One of the growing demands on teachers is that they be competent in the handling of a wide variety of outside activities in both the grade and high school. Perhaps on the following pages you will find an organization of which you would like to become the director in some school, as well as having a swell time, for they are social, too.In the ten years of its existence, this organization has increased its membership by more than two hundred per cent—now boasting a "population" of sixty-five members. The band has gained also in popularity—and is well known throughout Wisconsin. The aims of the band are many, and are as "noteworthy" as its music; foremost purpose is to train future high school band directors. This year witnessed Norbert Gonziorowski again twirling in flashy style, with the "gang" stepping smartly after. Homecoming brought a temporary "menace" in the form of a jazzy "sauer kraut" alumni band—Arnold Jindrick, Kenneth Storandt, Sonny Olingy, Fred Parfrey, Marguerite Adams Westphal, John Steiner. Gerald Eyler, Mae Michaels, and all the rest, with Parfrey as director; but all "jealousies" disappeared with the food at the Band Alumni banquet. Weekly broadcasts are given from the band room, transmitted by remote control apparatus through WLBL. This year the broadcasts were announced by radio's golden-voiced, soft-throated Duane Phaneuf. Among annual events sponsored by the band are the Clinic—at which Mr. Michelsen directs and interprets tournament numbers for the benefit of high school bands and their di- rectors; the home concert during which "From Africa to Harlem" is traditionally by popular demand—(congratulatory telegrams were received this year from all points north, west, east, and south—tenth anniversary—one from Ex-President and Mrs. Frank S. Hyer in Florida); the band festival, held this year April 18—on this glorious day high school bands and glee clubs (as many as fifty) move in and practically take over the entire city—to say nothing of the college building, training school, and Nelson Hall. Souvenirs of the festival include grass stains on new uniforms, sponge balls on rubber strings, and—for those who kept in step— engraved cups and placques in reward for marching and playing; and of course the annual trips. The itinerary this year included Neillsville, Blair, Cadott, Green Lake, Weyau-wega, Shawano. Incidentally, the trips really were as much fun as work. To quote Florence Theisen: "A good time was had by all"—including Dorothy Jane Raddant, who found Blair most entertaining. According to the statistics on the first ten years, by 1951 the band should have 180 members—but we think we'd be content to hear it in its present size. FOUR CHEERS FOR THE BEST CHEERING SECTION EVER ORGANIZED ON SCHMEECKLE FIELD! 1 — 64 —j Flute: Betty Johnson, Virginia Scholtz, Robert Dietrich Oboe: Betty June Frost, Jean Meydam Bassoon: Eyleene Atkins, Marjorie Prye Clarinet: Frank Pliner, Marjorie Loberg, Olive Crawford, John Lueck, Emmert Lange. Kathryn Kohler, Gloria Joosten, Gladys Pils, Gladys Connover, Margie Thompson. Betty Held. Verna Mueller, Neosha Stay, Gary Hanson, Lois Andre, Etta Owen, Ruth Thompson, Mildred Moe Bass Saxophone: Charles Dodge Bass Clarinet: Melvin Wunsch, Glendy Chapin Snare Drums: Harvard Erdman, Jack Rasmussen Alto Saxophone: Tom Wishlinski, Loretta Gotchy, Gordon Green Tenor Saxophone: Norbert Gonsiorowski, Miriam Gruenstem Baritone: Dorothy Nelson. Robert Mohr. Milllcent Blissett, Charles Larson Cornet: Jack Perry, Clarence Nelson. Harold Kahler, Florence Theisen, Joseph Palmer. DeNyse Martin Tympani: Ruth Michelsen French Horn: Henry Hryniewicki, Leota Brandt, Jean Kurth, Mary Hotvedt, Ruth Chrouser, Michael Krause Bass Drum: Dorothy Jane Raddant Trombones: Patricia Carver, Edward Wells, LaVem Barnum, John Edwards, Betty Lowe Bass: Rollie McManners. Rose Mary McArthur, Marguerite Berger, Marvin Yost — 65 —GIRLS' GLEE CLUB Ninety voices, belonging to ninety charming young ladies; this is the Girls' Glee Club, whose membership this year was so great that rehearsals were shifted from Mr. Michelsen's room to the auditorium. The Girls' Trio, which to all appearances ran stiff competition to the other eighty-six voices, this year adopted a new member. Ruth Lindsay. A coronet to the Trio for its excellent work at the Home Concert. Mr. Mi-chelsen may well be proud to be the director of such promising voices. Indeed, not only should he and the school be proud of these three voices, but of the entire ninety. So. with the applause of the school in their ears, they close their season by gracing the Baccalaureate service, and do their bit in sending their graduating members out into their chosen field. In their ranks this year, the girls boast instrumentalists galore, (many of the members have chairs in the band room). In the roll call of these singer-instrumentalists are such well known girls about school as Marjorie Loberg and her clarinet; Betty Johnson, with her flute and Dorothy Jane Raddant and her wood pile (to those who don't know it, it is a marimba), and many others. -66 —ORCHESTRA Under the able direction of Peter J. Michel sen, the orchestra made great advancement in this 1940-41 season. For ten years this organization has been one of the leading parts of the music department, having twenty-eight students who meet twice each week for rehearsal. The orchestra has a repertoire which is one of the finest, having full orchestration for over four hundred compositions. Its purpose is to encourage an appreciation of good music among the students, and to give its own members the enjoyment of reading the music of the masters. The orchestra's cooperation with other activities of the school has proved it of worth to both those who take part and those who listen. Some of its public appearances this year have been the Christmas concert in which all the musical organizations of the college (with the exception of the band) took part; Baccalaureate and Commencement exercises are always made complete by the orchestra. The members of this organization have an annual dinner, the purpose of which is to promote fellowship and friendship. This year the orchestra dinner took place at the Belmont Hotel. It seems queer, but the boys sat on one side of the table, and the girls on the other. What’s the matter, boys? Afraid? Let's work for a bigger and better orchestra every year. This is the battle cry of the members. The "Iris'', together with the rest of the school, says congratulations to Mr. Mi-chelsen and a fine organization. — 67 —With the loss of twenty-eight of its best men, the glee club met in the fall to start an uphill climb to where they could hold their own against all other organizations, and go out on the road representing the College at its best. All men were tried out for placement as far as voice blend and position. Many new men stepped in the breach and have done a marvelous job of filling the vacancies. All work and no play makes poor singers, so early in the fall the glee club gathered at Iverson Lodge for the annual Men’s Glee Club "Hoot and Holler". It seemed to do the trick, as the boys stepped into the rehearsal collar and began to pull together smoothly. With Gerald Torkelson's hands on the reigns and Mr. Knutzen, our able director giving the orders, the Central State Men's Glee Club was off to a flying start. Let us not forget lames Unger, the Business Manager." nor Walter Jacobsen, the Librarian, whose efforts were freely given and were so necessary in keeping the business and music in order. Then followed many long and probably arduous rehearsals which at the time the new men could not see the need of but later in the year they saw the reason and some of them regretted their laxness in practice. During the first few weeks of rehearsals many accompanists were given tryouts and finally Muriel Waid was selected to tickle the ivories for the boys. She has proved her weight in gold to the organization and they are going to miss her (especially Merle) next year. Along about the first of December, Christmas music was handed out and the glee club informed that they were to participate in the Christmas Concert given by the College Music Department. For the first time the music enthusiasts of Stevens Point and surrounding localities were able to hear a full chorus composed of the entire Men's Glee Club and Women's Glee Club. In January the Glee Club moved to new quarters, Studio A of the College Radio Studios, where Mr. Knutzen predicted better working conditions and better music. His prediction proved to be true and the improvement was apparent. The Glee Club started their tours in February by going to Amherst with a group consisting of about thirty voices, and featuring Betty Johnson as flute soloist. The concert was a success and gave some indication of what the year was going to be like. Our next con- — 68 —certs were given at Gillett, Pulaski. Marion, and Tigerton. Two soloists, James Salay and Merel Jenks made their debuts. Gerald Torkelson, Duane Phaneuf, and Tony Klein were the veteran soloists. Continuing on through the year the Glee Club sang concerts at Wausau, Medford, Chippewa Falls, Colby, Thorp, and Merrill with Dorothy Jane Raddant as Marimba soloist, Betty Johnson, as flute soloist and our accompanists Muriel Waid as piano soloist. One of the high spots of the Glee Club's year was its annual Spring Concert given April 27th and 28th in which the Madrigal singers from Colby. Wausau and Stevens Point assisted. The concert held up the tradition of the Glee Club and was pronounced a huge success, thus giving the boys another feather in their caps. Early in May the Glee Club traveled to Fond du Lac for the State Sing of the Wisconsin association of male choruses held there. Being the only college group represented they had a double load; to live up to last year's standards and to win new laurels for the school. The Glee Club stood the test and proved themselves worthy of their name. Winding up the year we sang at Wisconsin Rapids, Wautoma, and finally the commencement exercises at the College. It might interest you to know that up to this year the Glee Club has travelled 50,000 miles, visiting approximately 150 towns at an expense of only $1,000, to the College for seven years service. This marvelous record has been due to the never ending effort of the director and the ability of the business managers. Next year the Glee Club will be back depleted in numbers by the draft and graduation, but with the same enthusiasm the club had this year. What the year will bring none can predict, but we are safe in saying that as in other years the Glee Club will be a shining example to the school and of the school. — 69 —SOCIAL SCIENCE CLUB 1st Row—C. Miller. Dr. Reppen. N. Fronok 2nd Row—E. Waeholz. S. Sword 3rd Row—G- Torkolson. O. Holt. P. Andorson During the past few years, indeed, within the memory of some who are still in school, there has been a phenomenal growth of organizations. The Social Science Club is no exception. for it was founded in 1937 under the leadership of the able Dr. Reppen. It is the boast of the club that it takes only the "cream of the crop", for the scholastic requirement is 2.2, and a major or minor in social science. Meetings could not be any more informal if the members tried to make them so. All that is needed to make a meeting is one controversial idea (convoy system), and two members, and three packages of cigarettes, and they're set for the evening. There are no holds barred, the only rule at meetings being that only one person talk at a time. To promote a more closely knit organization. and to insure free and easy discussion with everybody participating, member- ship in the club is limited to twelve. This rule was made by the founders, as they believed that any group over twelve was too unwield-ly to be called a "discussion group." Under the able direction of Olney Holt, (Tiny), the group has gone on this year to wage some pitched battles over the "Crisis"... First So mo»tor OUicers Second Semeitor Norman Fronok ........President---------------Olney Holl Phillip Anderson — Vic President ........ Charles Miller Oon Aucutl...... Socrelary Treasurer__ Norman Fronok Advisor---------- Dr. Reppen — 70 —BLOC CLUB Ui Row—Mr. JCnuaon. Dan Durkoo. Phil Andoroon. Ed Lightbody 2nd Row—Jack Ackorman. Jim Smith. Jim Unger This organization is composed of a select group of students who like to talk—about anything: art. literature, dramatics, world events, inventions, eugenics, genetics .and so on ad infinitum. Any subject is worthy of their attention. No constitution and no officers bind the members, for complete informality is their key-note. The only person who could possibly be called an officer is the chairman of the evening. His duty is to introduce any guest, and to see that the discussion gets under way. after which he is indistinguishable from the other members. There is no meeting place, for each member entertains the club at his room, or at some place else of his selection. Twice a month this mutual admiration society meets, exchanges ideas and argues. Throughout the year guest speakers are asked to join the group for the evening and help along the discussion of their fields. This year Mr. Evans discussed the navy, in all its manifold aspects taken from his personal experience. At another meeting, at which the topic was inspired by the book "Heredity and You", Dr. Pierson gave an informal lecture on eugenics and genetics. t — 71 —Row 1—R. Stelter Iris Precourt. Mr. Burroughs. Margaret Beckor. Evelyn Murgatroyd Row 2—Donald Krider. Roy Arndt, Norman Fronek. Don Kordus A successful debate season was experienced by C.S.T.C. this year. Coached by Leland M. Burroughs the participants became conscience of contemporary history. The participants for the year 1940 and 1941 were: Margaret Becker and Evelyn Murgatroyd; Donald Krider and Roy Arndt; Ruth Stelter and Iris Precourt; Don Kordus and Norman Fronek. All of these debaters did an enviable job. C.S.T.C. congratulates you. Central State Debate season began October 23. 1940 with a Wisconsin Valley Tournament. Mr. Burroughs attended a meeting in October where it was decided that the first tournament would be held in December here at the college. To become a member of the debate squad one must participate in a number of local tournaments, and also must have selected a debating partner. Formerly one credit a year was extended to members of the Forensic Society. This year credit was given only to active debaters. Our debaters made an excellent showing for C.S.T.C. in the tournament of January 10. 1941. Two debating teams from C.S.T.C. took part in the ninth annual invitational debate tournament at Normal. Illinois. One team com- posed of Roy Arndt and Don Krider won three out of six debates. Margaret Becker and Evelyn Murgatroyd won five out of six. Hemisphere Should Form a Permanent Union” "Resolved, That the Nations of the Western was the subject debated. Thirty-four colleges from six states were entered. Dr. H. L. Ewbank, director of debating and radio work at the University of Wisconsin, was the speaker at the banquet. The week before Christmas. December 19. 20. 21. Iris Precourt and Ruth Stelter, the women's team, and Roy Arndt and Don Krider, the men's team, participated in non-decision debates with Eau Claire and River Falls State Teachers' Colleges and Mankato, Minnesota. In the debate tournament of February 12. 1941 the Pointers became very prominent, with Don Krider and Roy Arndt taking five out of six and the women winning three. This was the Red River Valley meet which was held at Concordia College. Moorehead, Minnesota, with more than 100 colleges and universities participating. Opponents of the Point's men teams were Mayville, S. D., Dickenson, N. D.. Montana State and Abedeen, S. D. colleges. The girl's teams debated against St. Catherine (St. Paul — 72 —Minn.), St. Olaf (Northfield, Minnesota), Jamestown. S. D., Luther College (Decorah, Iowa), Macalester (St. Paul), and St. Cloud, Minnesota, Colleges. The annual debate tourney was held here in the college the week of the 19th. Twenty-five men's teams and twelve women's teams participated from Monmouth. Illinois; St. John's Minn., St. Olaf, Minn., Iowa Teacher's; Macalester, St. Paul. Minn.; Eau Claire, Wis.. Concordia. Minn.. River Falls, Wis., Superior. Wis., Luther, Iowa. Carroll. Waukesha, Wis., University of North Dakota; Ripon, Wis., Platteville. Wis., and four teams from Central State. The debate teams from C.S.T.C. were comprised of Evelyn Murgatroyd and Margaret Becker; Ruth Stelter and Iris Precourt; Don Krider and Roy Arndt; Norman Fronek and Don Kordus. In this tournament each school would enter two teams in each division. Unlimited substitutions were made, but each team had to be able to alternate sides, affirmative and nega- tive. on the question. Each team participated in eight rounds of tournament. The C.S.T.C. debaters can, and should, feel very proud of the work which they accomplished during this school year. They travelled further than any other organization on the campus. They went to Fargo, North Dakota where they debated against many out of state teams. Next year the debate squad will feel a blow which might bother them for a while, but never fear, there is more material to pick from. With Evelyn Murgatroyd and Margaret Becker graduating, the forensic society will never be the same. Don Krider, who is also graduating, will be missed not only in debate but college theater and many other organizations. We can't forget Coach Leland M. Burroughs and the ever untiring work which he did this year. Being so capable in coaching any kind of speech work, C.S.T.C. is very fortunate in having such a member on its faculty. Congratulations, Mr. Burroughs, on your fine work and your production of excellent debaters. — 73 —NEWMAN CLUB The officers who guided the club this year were: FIRST SEMESTER—President, Jim Bag-nell; Vice president, Kay Metcalf; Secretary, lohn Kelly; Treasurer, Pete Terzynski. SECOND SEMESTER—President, Anthony Schwartz; Vice-president. Marie Eisen-hammer; Secretary, Kay Metcalf; Treasurer, Terry Kurtzweil. In 1939. this active club became a member of the National Newman Club. Under Father Geimer, they have established religious, intellectual and social life on the campus. Other very valuable leaders are Miss Mae Roach, Miss Glennon, Miss La Vigne, and Mrs. Pfiffner. At the beginning of the year there were many students shuddering before their initiation. They had jolly times at their sleigh ride parties. etc. On Palm Sunday the members joined for Communion at St. Stephens which was followed by a breakfast served in the basement of the school. This year, a Study Club was formed. They had many interesting Round Table discussions which were very valuable to the students. — 74 — FRIENDLY "21 I 1st Row—Keith NoJson. Mr . Kolth Nelson, A. Do Canter. Miss Roach Mrs. Norman Fronek, Roy Hendrichs 2nd Row—M. Hanish. Lauretta Ruttner, Esther Erickson. Warren Soderber, M. Christensen, Mabfe Roth Muriel Waid 3rd Row—N. Fronek. E. Beach. M. Elsenhammer A. Schwartz, D. Mott, L. Sorenson. C. Kagel This unique organization is the product of "The Twenty-one Who Came Back".... Twenty-one graduate students who returned to C.S.T.C. to complete their degree requirements, each has had at least one, and as high as ten years teaching experience in the field. Indeed, the one pre-requisite for membership is teaching in the field. Members of this club, who gather together due to mutual interests, have two aims, the first being the encouragement of normal school graduates, and two-year college graduates, to continue their education and obtain their degree requirements. The second is the rehabilitation of those students who have been out of school for a period of time. The "Friendly 21" endeavors to aid them in fitting more closely into the student body. The "Friendly 21" is probably the most informal club in the school, according to its president. Keith Nelson. Meetings are irregular and consist mostly of "bull sessions," about teaching problems, school boards, and the like. First Semester Oiiicers Second Semester Keith Nolson .......... President Anthony Schwarti Warren Soeteber .... Vice President .. Ella Beach Marie Elsenhammer...... Secretary ..... Dorothy Mott Roy Hendrichs....... Club Reporter .......Roy Hendrichs3rd Row—Seibert, Unger. Joswiak, Boo. Murgatxoyd. Hiorl, Krtdot 2nd Row—Kaplun. Catlin. Neuman. Procourt. Gorde . Smith let Row—Mr. lonkins, Burkman. Wood. Ackerman, HiUert. Mittlesteadt, Mr. Burroughs College Theater was founded in 1936 by a group of students interested in stagecraft. Though not connected, College Theater and Alpha Psi Omega work very closely, and their aims are. in general, the same. Any student in school may participate in any of the phases of dramatics and play production in which he may be interested. It is from this active group of students that members are chosen to form the small working body that sponsors productions. It is the aim of College Theater to foster an interest in dramatics, both on the campus and in the community of Stevens Point. Every play is chosen upon its fulfilment of the phrase "good theater" and general interest. It is the policy of College Theater to present two types of productions each semester. One, the "workshop production", is a series of one-act plays, the purpose of which is to discover new talent on the campus. By talent, is meant not only acting ability, but interest in directing, set-building, lighting, or general stage management. The second type of production is the three-act play. This is the major production, and represents intense work and cooperation of all the departments of the theater. The one-act plays which were presented the first semester of this year were. "Greek Meets Greek", "John Brown", and "A Hospitable Fancy". In "Greek Meets Greek" we were shown the typical fraternity life, especially around rushing season. Indeed, so realistic was the acting and the idea behind the play, and the time of presentation so propitious, that there were several very, very red ears in the audience. Bill Fryer, a freshman and a promising theater-man. did an excellent job of convincing Ronald Craig that he, Ronnie, should pledge his fraternity, and not that "terrible Alpha Delta". This production rang the bell twice. As each "workshop production" aims to give a wide and varied experience to its audiences. the next play. "John Brown", was the exact opposite of "Greek Meets Greek". This was a serious portrayal of the last days of the famous figure in history, whose hatred of slavery drove him to commit crimes without score against the South, and led to the civil war. Bob Handeyside, another freshman, in his portrayal of this character, gave an emotionally restrained, tense, and living characterization. A bouquet of roses to him. Carl Bandeline, a Wisconsin Rapids product, looked stunning in his "bloomers" of brilliant red when he fell through the trap door in "A Hospitable Fancy". This playlet was a — 76 —comedy on the romantic side, and. though it took a mistaken identity (imagine, Carl being taken as a philanderer!), and a trap-door to do it, the hero got his woman. "His woman" being Esther Moreau, who did an excellent piece of acting as the reluctant bride to be, but who in the end. is just putty in the hands of Carl. This year only one three act play was presented. This was because of the squeaky floor on the stage. These squeaks, so noticeable last year in "Our Town", are going (sometime before next semester) to be eradicated by the W.P.A., who are laying a whole new. squeakless floor for the theater. As the work was scheduled to start sometime this second semester, it was impossible for the theater to play a production which required as much preparation as a three act. However, the three act produced the first semester in some measure made up for the loss during the second. "Love From A Stranger", was. in the opinion of the school, one of the best received plays that College Theater has presented. With Bob Handeyside playing the role of the "stranger", we find Iris Precourt quite absorbed in his looks and line. It is the story of a blue-beard who has murdered five wives and wishes to make Iris his sixth victim. In the end, however, after a narrow escape from death, Iris goes back to her true love, played by Jim Unger. With a good supporting cast, consisting of Isla Mae Wood, Ruth Noble. Ray Minton, and Hannah Kaufman, "Love From a Stranger" was a huge success. The workshop productions of the second semester were: "The Passing of Chow Chow", "The Gent", and "Life Line". These plays, student directed, were well received, and the students want more. — 77 —1st Row—F. Thouon, E. Murgatrovd. !. Wjohor, M- Riotan. G. Chapin. 2nd Row—M. Murrish. P. McGu»r . M. Martini, V. Goriko. M. Roinhart, ]. Poggamtller. L Boo, E. Siebort 3rd Row—J. Shier. C. Wirkus. B. Hein 4th Row—B. Malecki, J. Kelly, I. Hanig, I. Kulidau. E. Cress Wednesday! What is Wednesday? That is the day the Pointer is issued. The Pointer being a weekly publication, it can and certainly does, contain gossip as well as news. The primary aim of this publication is to bring to the student body of C.S.T.C. timely, interesting, unprejudiced news of college life. The Pointer of '40-'41 has undergone many changes, but nobody can deny that it does hold a prominent place in the life of Central State. This year more than ever before, it has acted as an organ of student opinion. When Editor Earle Seibert announced this platform it met with the wholehearted approval of the student body. Especially prominent among the "Student Sparring'' and "Student Opinion" columns was the name "Ed. Lightbody" who seems to have a definite, fixed. Rock of Gibraltar-like opinion on every question of the day. and can support it against all comers. At random, we can remember Nikolai, Solberg, and Stimm who "opined" very emphatically. Especially outstanding in this year’s Pointer are the editorials, for which Earle deserves much credit. All of them were pertaining to the present European situation, and admirably expressed a student's opinion. This year is the first time that the editorials of this publication have been discussed to such a great degree. Of course, we can't forget the rest of the staff, and their work. Surely none of the student body will ever forget the "Collaboration Corner." That is the first article to be read by anyone who picks up a copy. Glendy and Jerry did a fine piece of "Winchelling". and stood on their own two feet even under drastic criticism. Doc Kulidas and his "From the Locker Room” gave us a good resume of the sports of the year. "Doc”, as you all know is student sport manager in the college. This gives him the necessary qualifications to handle such a column well. Of course, we can't forget to give due credit to Jim Bagnell, Sherman Sword, and Florence Theisen for their contributions. The cartoons by Elizabeth Cress were timely and well executed. The whole staff is to be congratulated on the handling of a difficult job. However, extra credit must be given to Keith Nelson, and his business staff. They worked under great difficulties, financially, and though the Pointer was sometimes delayed, they saw to it that we received an even better Pointer the next week. It's a fascinating game, this newspaper work. Ask any of the staff and they will tell you that, to see your work in print, and to know that it will be read and criticized by the whole student body (don't forget that we have an exchange, also, and that Pointers are sent to the four corners of the state) gives one both a chill and a thrill.EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-chiel News Editor . Features ... . Sports ........ Art Editor .. . Copy Editor . Reporters .. . Prooi Readers...... Typists ........... Press Release Editor Business Manager............ Assistant Business Manager Circulation Manager......... Circulation Stall........... Advisor..................... .......................Earle Siebert ....................... Marcelle Martini ....................... Glendy Chapin, Gerald Torkelson, Jim Bagnell, Sherman Sword ....................... James Kulidas, Florence Theisen, Jack Rasmussen ....................... Elizabeth Cress ....................... John Kelly ....................... Fay Wendorl. Wilma Anderson, Patricia Maguire, Robert Malecki. Vernon Smith, Robert Schrank. Gunvor Nelson ....................... Evelyn Murgatroyd, Jane Shier, Alva Thompson ....................... Margaret Murrish. Alice Wagner. Betty Hein. Viola Gericke ....................... Lillian Boe BUSINESS STAFF ....................... Keith Nelson ....................... Janet Poggemiller ....................... Mary Rinehart ....................... Aloha Walters, Dorothy Wirkus. Lucille Weiher. Marjorie Reiten ....................... R. M. Rightsell — 79 —Row 3—C. Krohn. D. Kamke. L. Born, I. Kulidas, J. Raimuwn, J. Cowan, J. Moydem Row 2—G. Chapin. B. John on. D. Raddant, D. Luck. C. Wlrku . A. Wagner. L. Boe Row 1—A. Huntoon, E. Murgatroyd, L. Kulas, J. Larsen, C. Laumer. ). Stauber. W. Barto . Graduation, for many of the seniors, means that they must part from all the friends, classmates, and faculty that they have come to know so well. They like to have remembrances and keepsakes of their college days, for they, too. are only human. This human wish we of the "Iris" staff have tried, in our humble way, to fill. We do not claim to have preserved, as are the specimens on the shelves of the biological lab. all the scenes and events that have made this last year so memorable in the eyes of these seniors and the rest of the students. Rather, we have tried to catch, and preserve, some representative scenes that will, in years to come, stimulate the memory, and recall to mind that, after all is said and done, school was a grand place. In order to best attain the end to which the staff worked this year, the school was culled for the best in the English field, and the best in art, cartooning, photography, and all around knowledge. No one person has been more important than anyone else, all worked together to give their best. Even more important than the editor, the writers, or the lay-out staff, in the eyes of the world, is the "PHOTOGRAPHER”. Indeed, who ever heard of a student reading this tripe that we print, anyway? If any laurels are to be handed out for this "Iris", the best should go to Bob Aulik and his staff: Wallace (Shadow) Bartoz, Paul Pastemacki and all the other little photographers who contributed their snaps. If you wish to determine the relative importance of the photographer and the staff, just copy the copy of a page onto a blank paper and look at it. In this year's Iris we have attempted to present something that is different from any yearbook that has come to our attention. This "Iris" endeavors to tell a complete story, not divided up into sections or partitioned by division pages of any kind. We have taken the events as they have happened, and tried to make a running story out of them. The threads which bind this story together are the introductions to the various organizations, departments, and classes, together with our friend. Iris Ike. the creation of John Cowan. Ike is a friendly sort of a chap, so we hope that you will become well acquainted with him in the years that you will keep this book. — 80 —THE IRIS STAFF Editor-in-chief .......... Jack Ackerman Business Manager _________ Joyce Larsen Athletic Editor........... James Kulidas Religious Editor.......... Viola Gericke Assistant: ............ Cynthia Krohn Honorary Editor........... Evelyn Murgatroyd Organization Editor....... Bud Menzel Social Greek Editor......... Eileen Rose Departamental Editrr------Isla May Wood Music Editor..............Lillian Boe Credential Editor.........Carmelita Wirkus Faculty Editor ...........Glendy Chapin Assistant: ............Diana Kamke Copy Editor...............Wallace Bartosz Assistant: ............ Evelyn Hiller t Senior Class Editor...... Linda M. Born Layout Editor ........... Charlotte Reichel Assistants: ........... Alan Kingston Richard Sanborn Art Editor............... Henry Hryniewicki Cartoonist ..............John Cowan Typists ................. Roger Olson Dorothy Jane Raddant Proofreading ............ Alice Wagner John Zeihlke Index: ..................Betty Johnson Leona Kulas Fay Wendorf Faculty Advisor..........Mr. T. A. Rogers — 81 —y. w. c. a The "Y" girls started off the very first day of registration in the fall with a bang. There was a "lonely Tea" for all the freshman girls, and each one was assigned a "big sister" to help her meet people and get acquainted with this awfully big campus. After a few meetings at which the girls were enlightened about the functions of the "Y", they were ushered into the organization by a candlelight service. Throughout the year these were some of the activities of the "Y": decorating the dorm for homecoming; homecoming tea; interesting programs rounded up by "Glendy", at which such speakers were heard as Miss Mason, Miss Meston, Miss Coleman, and Mrs. Pfiffner; Christmas charity work, when boxes of clothes and food were distributed; and many more. The creed of the "Y” is: "We unite in the desire to realize full and creative life through a growing knowledge of God. We determine to have a part in making this life possible for all people. In this task we seek to understand Jesus, and to follow Him." This organization believes that it is succeeding in establishing Christian fellowship under such leaders as these who have taken the helm during the past year: The "Y” Girls: Pres. Viola Gericke; Vice Pres.: Linda Bom; Sec.: Betty Cress; Treas: Charlotte Reichel; Program Chairman. Glendy Chapin; Chaplain. Cynthia Krohn; Faculty advisor: Mrs. Josephine Finch. Sponsors: Mrs. Neal. Mrs. Nixon; Honorary Members: Miss Mansur, Miss Mason, Miss Meston; Valuable Leaders: Mrs. Pfiffner, Mrs. Hanson. -82-GAMMA DELTA 3rd Row—L. Born. D. Kamko. E. Jahnk . C. V««rs, E. Ru ch. C. Krohn 2nd Row—C. Rotchol, B. Grove. D. Avonill. E. Kobb», D. Bolongia 1st Row—E. Walcho , D. Bevor dori, D. Sixol, R. Buoo, H. Zcirn zow. E. Lang In 1940 a group of students on the campus affiliated with the Synodical conference and re-organized the Beta Chapter of the Gamma Delta Fraternity. The constitution was drawn up by Doris Abrahamson. Cynthia Krohn and Charlotte Reichell and was accepted by the organization. Gamma Delta is a fraternal organization that is based on the principle of Lutheran Christian Brotherhood and fellowship. Its membership consists of young people who find in its program the standards and Christian ideals that are to be desired of every Lutheran. The objectives of this organization are the encouragement and maintenance of lay leadership, and the dissemination of the Lutheran Scriptural world view in circles of higher education, and the increase of Lutheran consciousness on the campus. The meetings are given over to discussion of present day problems in the light of Christian understanding. Social fellowship and recreation are provided for the members in several functions, and several which were in conjunction with the L.S.A. Officers: President. Ruth Rathke; Secretary Leota Brandt; Treasurer. Edna Marotz; spiritual advisor, Rev. W. F. Ludwig. — 83 —PHOTO CLUB Skatrud . Albright, Wendorf. Arndt, Bartoz. B«ck«r. Schonk, Sprague Way back in 1935 a group of students interested in photography banded together to form the C.S.T.C. Photo Club. The only requirement for membership is a sincere interest in all the phases of photography, for the Photo Club aims to make its members proficient, not only in the clicking of the shutter, but also in the temperature of the developer. There is a practical part to the Photo Club, too, for the members contribute to the photography end of the Iris. The school provides developing solution, an enlarging machine, printer—indeed, everything except the camera and the thumb to click the shutter. Photo Club meetings are instructional, for at each meeting some phase or new development is discussed, under the direction of Mr. Faust and the club president. Wallace (Shadow) Bartosz, who can be heard screaming two blocks down the hall. Of course, the dark room is open to all members. At almost any time the room resembles wash day at a laundry, for there are long lines of film hanging up to dry. — 84 —HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 1st Row—Twill, M. Clark, W. Schaaitchmidt, K. Shaefwr. L Room. L. Bau«m! lnd. R. Lindoay, A. Murphy, L. Chmt 2nd Row—W. Andorson. A. Dauahhotoo, M John on, P. Brennan. H. Roger . A. Albright. E. Ru ch. Mis Allen 3rd Row—M. Robert . E. Marotz. M. La h. B. Padour. V. WarTon. D. Drew. K. Kelly. A. Campbell. BtUle Etchhom, Mi Moston Maybe some of you new students here at C.S.T.C. have been wondering about these white, starched uniforms around the corridors. You're right! They are the Home "Ecs". There is a home economic major given in our college, and they of the white uniforms are its members. They have organized into a club which meets once a month at Sims' cottage, socially as well as professionally. Miss Allen and Miss Meston are their Faculty Advisors. The club was very active this year, beginning its season with a fall picnic at Iverson Park. Janet Tiffany did an excellent job as chairman, the girls say. Later on in the year, Mrs. James Saunders spoke on "Home Economics in England”. At Christmas time the girls enjoyed a party in the "Rec” room of the Dorm. No presents were given, but dimes were collected and were given to some needy family in Stevens Point. Homecoming, Valentine's day. and the yearly picnic were other parties which were enjoyed. The members are now working hard to earn enough to buy a refrigerator for the cottage by sandwich sales, conservation stamps, etc. The officers are: Pres.: Louise Reese, who succeeded Marguerite Benn upon her graduation; Sec.-Treas.: Alva Daughhetee; Reporter; Mary Ann Gleeson. — 85 —LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION C. Torkelson, M. Barrett, L. Reese, R. TorkeUon, P. Anderson, N. Rasmussen, E. Johnson, D. Floistad, G. Halverson, L. Solverrud, J. Halverson, G. Torkelson, L. Torgerson The Lutheran Student Association has been very active in furthering the aims which it has set for itself, namely promoting a more Christian life on the campus, and the keeping of the students close to their church. Bible studies were conducted, and educational programs were held in which problems confronting the youth of today were discussed from the Christian viewpoint. L.S.A. deeply feels the loss of the Reverend Mars Dale, its spiritual advisor, who left the city, and Walter Jacobson, fellow student who was serving as president of the organization at the time of his passing. L.S.A. considers Walter to be an excellent example of the type of youth this organization purposes to build. Lorraine Torgerson served as president succeeding Walter Jacobson. The other officers of the organization are: Secretary, Eunice Lemke, and Treasurer, Elaine Johnson, L.S.A.’s Faculty Advisor is Mr. Gilbert Faust. Attending the L.S.A. Convention held at St. Olaf's College in Northfield, Minnesota, were Lorraine Wogsland, Mary Ann Hotvedt, and Robert Torkelson. Among the various social functions of L.S.A. this year were several in which both Lutheran groups of the campus were represented. The thought which is uppermost in the mind of each member of L.S.A. is the hope that the untiring efforts of the Lutheran Student Association be ever more fruitful as the years pass on. The Roll Call of L.S.A.: Phillip Anderson; Effie Eveland; Donna Bestul; Esther Erickson; Dorothy Floistad; Gilbert Halverson. Janet Halverson, Mary Ann Hotvedt; Walter Jacobson; Elaine Johnson; Ruth Johnson; Eunice Lemke; Gunvor Nelson; Selma Prell; Norma Rasmussen, Louise Reese; Clarence Solberg; Louise Solverud, Ethel Stoltenberg; Gerald, Carl, and Robert Torkelson; Ellen Vig; Lorraine Wogsland and Lorraine Torgerson. — 86 — So If® I ■ g,4 I i I December 1940 Cagers Win Opener, 43 to 42 1st Row: Friisch. Hclixoo, P. Terzynski, Van Dylte, Posluszny 2nd Row: Kulidas. Bagncll. Fi her. Warren. Oik, R. Terzynski. C. Czskey )rd Row: Johnson. Jusits. Lake. Pospyschala Ray Terzynski Scores in Last Four Seconds Stevens Point, Wis., Nov. 30. 1940 Before a capacity crowd Coach Eddie Kotai's Central State Teachers College quintet opened its 1940-'4l season by defeating Stout Institute, 43 to 42 in the P. J. Jacobs gymnasium. Ray Tcrzynski's basket, with four seconds to play, provided the margin of victory. The game was a nip and tuck affair with the lead changing seven times and the score being tied eight times. Stout led at the half 28 to 24. Trailing 42-38, with two minutes to play, the Purple and Gold Cagers cause seemed lost until Pete Terzynski dropped in a free throw and La Verne Van Dyke sank a long shot making the score 42-41. Then, with 10 seconds to play, Point gained possession of the ball and the clock showed four seconds remain- ing when "Ace” scored the winning basket with a one-handed shot from the side. Captain Pete Terzynski was high point man for the Kotalmen, scoring 10 points: two baskets and eight free throws. J. Hammond led Stout with nine points. Ray Warren, Ray Terzynski and Helixon, looked impressive while participating in their first college game. Out Of The Bag RAY TERZYNSKI: Freshman. .. . all conference guard.. .. home town is Rhinelander. ... Won the Stout game with a one-hander in the last 2 seconds.... ’’call me 'Ace’”.... fourth in conference scoring. . .. Swished in 24 points against Stout. .. POINT CRUSHES QUAKERS Whitewater, Wis., Jan. 13, 1941 Paced by Captain Pete Terzynski and Ray Warren, who scored 20 and 19 points respectively, the C.S.T.C. Pointers trounced the Whitewater Teachers College quintet 63 to 41 to capture their first conference victory. The first half was hotly contested. Whitewater jumped to a 2 0 lead on a long shot by Britelli, but two baskets in quick succession by Pete and Ray Terzynski extinguished this lead. This was the only lead held by the Agncw men during the game. They did, however, manage to tie the score at 16, 19, and 24. The score at the half was 27 to 26. The Kotalmen turned on the heat during the second half and simply coasted in. They jumped to a 42 to 30 lead during the first seven minutes and then breezed to victory. Out of 23 free throws tried, the Pointers made 19 for a .760 average. — 87 —CAGERS WIN TWO MORE ON TRIP TO MICHIGAN THE POINTER Warren Paces Attack BEAT MICH. TECH. AND MARQUETTE TEACHERS Houghton, Mich., Dec. 13, 1940— The C.S.T.C. quintet scored an easy 45 to 16 victory over Michigan Tech to secure its fourth successive victory of the season. Michigan Tech led only once and that was at the start of the game when Hawkins sunk a long shot to give the engineers a 2-1 lead. The Kotalmen then went into the lead 5-2 on Ray Warren's two sucker shots and led at the intermission 17-10. Central State controlled the ball most of the time in the second half and held the Huskies to five points. Point substitutes carried a major portion of the attack and performed very well offensively and extra well defensively. Ray Warren was high scorer with 12 points and La Verne Van Dyke was second high scorer with 17 points. Marquette. Mich., Dec. 14, 1940— The Pointers increased their winning streak to five, with a victory over a strong Northern State Teachers quintet by a score of 56-38. The Pointers, loking very much improved over the previous night’s battle, kept a substantial lead over the Northerners. Again Ray Warren led the C.S.T.C. attack, scoring 14 points. Ray scored 5 buckets and 4 free throws to lead the Pointers as high scorer for the second time in the same number of nights. The Point regulars scored 6 to 14 points apiece. Top: Jusits. Kulidat, Johnvon Bottom: Lake. Hclixon Posluwny, PROSPECTS FOR 1941 SEASON When Coach Eddie Kotal issues the call for basketball next fall, L; Verne Van Dyke and Bob Oik, the two stalwart guards, will be the onl players that will not answer the call. Only two members missing from ; quintet that won sixteen games, while only losing three, means just on-thing: they are again championship bound. Milwaukee shall, and will, fal from the throne which she usurped for two years. We are here and nov issuing a warning to all opponents: Beware of the Pointers! They arc oi the loose, and are ready to win. All conference Captain re-elect, Pete Terzynski will again be on hant to lead the Kotalmen in unconquered fields. Rangy ail conference center Ray Warren, will return to pour in baskets for the Purple and the Gold Ray Terzynski. another all conference man, will again return to the floor to continue his brilliant euard- t gui ing and scoring. Jim Bagnell, the de ndabie forward, will return to take position, and give his valuable E? aid to his teammates. Louis Posluszny and chunky Ted Fritsch, our two smooth, fast, passing guards and all-around floor men, will again prove their worth to the C.S.T.C. sauad. All in all, the prospect of the 1941-42 season is bright. Again, the only cloud on the horizon is the possibility of the loss of some of the players through the selective service, or through voluntary enlistment. Out Of The Bag RAY WARREN: All confercnc center.... freshman. . . . possessc the best fake in the state.... oppe nents tie themselves into knots tr) ing to follow him.... good rc-boun-artist.... his one-handed hook she is a honey.... a Rhinelander hig graduate.... DENNIS HELIXON: Attcnde Marshfield High.... freshman... full of fight. .. . plays a good bran of ball.... — 90 —THE POINTER POINT BEATS LUTHER IN THRILLER St. Mary’s Bows To Pointers Rally Late To Beat Iowans, Score 42-40 WARREN PACES SCORING IN POINTERS’ THIRD WIN Stevens Point, Wis., Dec. 10, 1940— Coach Kotai's C.S.T.C. caters defeated Luther College of Decorah, Iowa, 42-40 in a wild exciting game in the P. J. Jacobs High School game, before a screaming student body and townspeople. The Purple and Gold cagcrs took an early lead and held it until midway in the first half, at which time Coach Kotal substituted freely. The score at the time of the substitution was 17-9. and when the half ended the margin was cut to 19-18. The first five started the second half, but they found the Norsemen in a different mood. The Luther boys jumped into the lead and held it until the last four minutes of play. Out Of The Bag HENRY POSK1E: A hard work- ing player..,. Junior.... a valuable reserve man.... « CHET JOHNSON. Freshman.... From Alma Center... . will develop into a fine player.... CARL JUSITS: Starred for St. Mi- chael High School of Chicago.... Lives at Rib Lake___Will see more action next year___a freshman.... GARTH LAKE: Freshman...... From White Lake.... Worked out with squad, but did not play in the games. • JIM KUL1DAS: the "locker room port", well liked ... conscientious worker.... • CHET CASKEY: Assistant Stu. Mgr.... likable chap.... Speed-ball". They displayed a ver) good brand of basketball and looked very good on fast breaking plays. Ray Warren, led the Point attack by scoring 14 points, with four baskets and six free throws. Captain Pete Terzynski came through with four baskets. Engvold-stad was high point man for the Luthcrites, by scoring two buckets and six penalty shots. The Pointers won the game from the free throw line by scoring 18 to their opponents 10 penalty tosses. Luther outscored them from the field 15 to 12. POINTERS SHOW POWER IN BEATING KNIGHTS Stevens Point, Wis., Dec. 5, 1940— The Purple and Gold cagers defeated St. Norberts 48-38 for their second successive victory in the P. J. Jacobs High School Gymnasium. Ray Terzynski, freshman guard, led the Point attack with six baskets, four free throws, for a total of 16 points. Jim Bagnell scored ten points on three baskets and four free throws and Ray Warren poured five buckets and a free throw. Captain Pete Terzynski had difficulty in finding the hoop and only scored six points. The Kotalmen led throughout the game and didn't have much difficulty with the Green Knights. SIXTH STRAIGHT WIN FOR CENTRAL STATE Stevens Point, Wis., Dec. 17, 1940— Displaying a fast break and a fine brand of basketball with a deadly shooting eye, the C.S.T.C. cagers achieved their sixth straight victory by securing a decisive 45-33 victory over St. Mary's College of Winona, Minnesota. The Pointers jumped into the lead and were never headed. They led at the half 31-21. Coach Kotal started a lineup consisting of two regulars and three second stringers in the second half and this combination added to the total points, and held the Minnesotians to six points. The substitutes played the last five minutes. St. Mary's exhibited a very good style of ball but was not able to hit the hoop. Pete and Ray Terzynski led the Kotalmen in scoring by securing nine points each. Bob Oik scored seven points and Bagnell and Heli-xon came through with six each. The scoring honors for the evening went to Barrett of St. Marys, who accumulated a total of 10 points. — 91 —Captain Pete Terzynski scored 25 points as Central State trounce i he Winona Teachers. Above Pete is shown sending the ball through the hoop for another one of his points. The C.S.T.C. cagcrs chalked up their fourth conference win by defeating Plattcville 64 to 48. La Verne Van Dyke, Pete Terzynski (No. 88) and an unidentified player arc keeping Plattcville from scoring. Ray Warren (No. 86) is in the background. Central State showed great offensive power and defeated a strong Winona teachers quintet, 65 to 41. Winona reached the quarter-finals in the National Inter-Collegiate Tournament which was held at Kansas City, Missouri. A fraction of a second after this picture was taken, Ray Warren flipped in a basket to account for two of the eleven points which he scored. Warren out-jumping Rich of OshkoshYes, we entered school last fall as Juniors, and we leave as Seniors. We came, in the full glory of being Juniors, those super-beings that we looked up to during our first and second years. We were suave, smooth articles (we thought). We were sure that we would make the best teachers that C.S.T.C. ever produced. Then we hit the skids. We were inducted into the mysteries of Ed. 223, where we found that, above all else, teaching was no bed of roses. Then we entered our cadet training. We saw just what was expected of us when "on the floor" in the Training School. Now we leave this spring as Seniors. We are slightly chastened, and full of firm determination that we will do as well as the graduating class in proving that we are good teachers. Looking back over the year, we cannot help remembering the bright spot that the Junior Prom made. Headed by Bud Menzel and his Queen, Miss Enderlein. the "Night in the Jungle" had a remarkable turnout. Just about our whole class was there! Just look at our pictures, and you will remember— Prom Kinq: Bud Monsol Prom Quoon: Ingoborq Endorloin 93 —Juniors! Juniors! Juniors! Where do they all come from? Every organization you look into, or any class you visit you see Juniors. They infest the social, political, and economic structure of C.S.T.C. like so many termites in a piece of particularly tasty wood. But then, why shouldn't they? They may be Juniors this year, but next year they will be Seniors, and how better can they get to know the inside workings of the school than to get on the inside of its manifold parts? Just how badly is C.S.T.C. infested with these termites? Let's go on a tour of inspection. One of the most important activities on the campus is athletics. Examine its structure closely and you will see, dressed in full fleged football suits the '41 co-captains, Ted Fritsch and Ken Parr, while behind them swarm their cortege: Roy Otto. Greg Dorsha, Jim Hanig, Bob Reading, Bud Menzel, and Leon Kalkofen. In like manner basketball has its representatives: Captain Pete Terzynski, Jim Bagnell, Ted Fritsch (my how he gets around), and Hank Pospychala. In boxing we find two lonely, but formidable Juniors, namely Len Ropella and Joe Kalina. If we find termites, we must not forget the moths, either. Flitting gaily around the social flame, the males in somber black and white and the females in vericolored draperies, we see Kathryn Piehl, Lillian Boe, Linda Bom. Dianna Kamke, "Chiz" Reichel, Margaret Edwards, and Janet Poggemiller. The resplendent males are Bud Menzel, Bob Becker, Charles Dodge, Frank Pliner, Floyd Nixon. Jack Gear, Clarence Solberg, Jim Unger, Charles Miller, and Gerald Thusing. If this is to be an insect comedy, then we can't forget that most common of all insects found in institutions where books are kept; the book worm. The Junior class of '40-'41 is proud of its scholastic achievement and all deserves the title book worm, but as Doctor Reppen says no two persons are alike, some are larger book worms than others. For instance, Marie Peterson, Karl Mittelsteadt, and Dorothy Wirkus, qualify here. For more, just examine the rolls of the honoraries. GROUP 1 Row 1—R. Sanborn. T. Klein, F. MozuCh, C. Solbero Row 2—L. lakol. K. Piehl, J. Halvorson Row 3—R. Stelter. G. Halverson, J. Larson. GROUP J Row 1—A. Seidel. G. Holm. L. Zta. J. Ziehlke. Row 2—A. Walter. L. Sorenson, t. Erickson. Row 3—M. Murrlsh. G. Lowison. J. PoggetnllU-j — 94 —CROUP 3 Row I—B. Schrank. L. RopoSla, A. Schwartz, V . Sootobor. Row 2—A. Wagner, M. A. Peterson, M. Thompson. Row 3—R. Fuchsgruber, C. F. Miller, M. Martini. GROUP 4 Row 1—D. Wlrkus. £. De Canter. M. Lavers. H. Gauer. 2ow ?—M. Lundquist. L. Born. D. Kamko. Row 3—D. Bemdt, H. Rogers, L. Kolas. A peculiar type of insect are those who flourish best where there is no light. Here at C. S. T. C. we have a special incubator for them. Just go into that little room off from the chemistry lab and snap on the lights, then run. The "photographers" will be up in arms. Especially will Bob Aulik, Ray Skatrude, "Shadow" Bartoz, and Fay Wendorf be ready to throw the nearest enlarger at you. Did you ever walk along a marsh and hear all the crickets? We have this class of Artho-pida represented too. There's "Chiz" Reichel, Cynthia Krohn, Esther Erickson, Lorraine Jakel. Leone Kulas, Joyce Larson, Marilyn Lavers. Marcello Martini, and Janet Tiffany, and Aloha Walter along with Dorothy Wirkus. But beware you crickets, in this same marsh are lots of bull frogs, "Shadow" Bartoz, Jim Unger. Ted Frisch, Gilbert Halverson, Tony Klein, Fred Mozuch, Dick Sanborn, Warren Soeteber, and John Ziehlke. eager to snap up a tender morsel, boom out a resounding chorus. All foolin' aside, the Junior class is proud of the record it has made during the past three years. This year it has been especially progressive and aggressive and has fitted itself to take up the duties which are required of the Senior class. Let the Juniors speak for themselves: "As we are nearing the end of this year at C.S.T.C. we are being placed and set higher in the ranks of activities about school. Our members have proved themselves able leaders in the activities which they have undertaken. While working with other groups they have — 95 —CROUP 7 Row 1—J Ungor. M. Wunach. R. Skatnido, C. Dodqo. Row 2—C. Roschol. J. Ackormon, J. Tilfany. Row 3—p. Pitr.or, M. Edward . C. Krohn, W. Barter. shown the same ability as when working together. Evidence of their cooperation was brought out clearly in the Junior Prom, which was "A Night in the Jungle." Bud Menzel. King and Bob Becker. Prom chairman, did splendid work in the planning and the leading of the Prom, which is the main social function of the class. "At the conclusion of this year, the class as a whole is looking back over the things it has accomplished, the projects in which it has failed, and also at the opportunities which it has failed to accept. Out of this, the Juniors are deriving ideas and coming to conclusions as to their virtues and their aid to C.S.T.C. Out of the was. Senior, here we come." GROUP 5 Row 1—M. J. Bnsonor. D. Moll. E. S. Cx M. M. V. Christian-sen. Row 2—-A Albright. F. Wonder!. M. Zclmor. Row 3—M. La Brot, J. Hanlg, L. Noumon. GROUP 6 Row 1—S- Munion, C. Twist, B. Hutnko, E. Daughhotoo Row 2—E. Higgins. B. Moyor. M. Clark. B. Horn. Row 3—M. Rogors L. Wolhor, R. Burnott. — 96 —3fn iflemortam STUDENT WALTER JACOBSON mourn the loss of a friend, one whose exemplary character will remain to us a living memory—the memory of a youth whose high ideals and winning personality endeared him to those who knew him best. His death was a blow, but we know that his spirit and fellowship will live on. To those who were just slightly acquainted with him, may we say: you missed knowing one of the most likeable men in school. His ever present smile, cheery "Hello", and the traditional polka-dot bow tie, presented a picture never to be replaced. His duties in school were numerous, and unsung. He went about his work quietly, ac- complishing what he set out to do. asking neither praise nor recognition. The last verse of William Cullan Bryant's immortal "Thanatopsis" must have been his guide post, at least let it be a tribute to Walter Jacobson: "So live, that when thy summons comes to join The innumerable caravan, which moves To that mysterious realm, where each shall take His chamber in the silent halls of death. Go not thou like the quarry slave at night. Scourged to his dungeon, but, sustained and soothed By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave. Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch About him. and lies down to pleasant dreams." — 97 —Where are we going to teach? A rural school, a grade school, or a high school? It all depends upon the department of which you are a member. Rural Life club members can teach either in a rural or a state graded school. The girls of Primary Council, of course, will teach in the first, second or third grades. For the intermediate and Junior High School we have the Grammar Round Table members. The other department, which is the high school, has Forum for its professional club. This organization is made up of prospective high school teachers. May the Senior class of 1940-41 uphold the traditions and ideals of their Alma Mater as well as past graduates have so successfully done in the field. Good Luck, you seniors of '40 and '41! — 98 — Monday night is meetin' night. Want to go to a meetin'? Don your best bib and tucker and we'll amble down to the Primary Council and meet the primary teachers. One peek into the room tells us that we'd like to start school all over again. This department aims to provide skilled teachers for children, and to train teachers who bring high standards of personality into the classroom. Certainly this aim has a head start, for the Council is under the able direction of Miss Susan E. Colman, Director of Primary Education. Now down the hall to Mr. Watson's room where the Intermediate and Junior High School Departments meet at the Grammar Round Table. On the first Monday night of the month. Rita Novitski presides at these meetings, which offer information and entertainment to the students. Going into the hall we follow the lights up to the third floor of the building where we find the congenial students of the Rural Department holding the lively and worthwhile meetings of Rural Life. All the students take an active part in the gatherings, and friendship is the foundation upon which the organization is built. Now back to the auditorium where we peek in to find the High School Department meeting as the Forum. Forum has the largest enrollment of the professional organizations, and its function is to keep the records of the students in this department. For some reason it is the least active of the departmental organizations. — 99 —FORUM The Forum includes all students who are taking the four year high school course. This organization without question has the greatest number of members. This year it has an enrollment of over four hundred fifty. The course of study provides for liberal arts training in the Freshman and Sophomore years with specialized study in majors and minors during the Junior and Senior years. Many students who are preparing for a professional career, such as medicine, law. and engineering enroll in this division for their first two years of academic work. The Home Economics students are also enrolled in this division. Forum started out with great ambitions in their first meeting in the fall at which time they elected their officers for the ensuing year. The second meeting of the year was held approximately two months after the second semester started for the sole purpose of taking "Iris" pictures. This professional organization aims to produce future high school teachers of which C. S. T. C. can well be proud. The officers for the year of 1940 and 1941 are: President ----- Vice President Sec. Treas. .. Director ..... Jack Vincent Pete Terzynski Eileen Rose Mr. Rightsell — 100 —— 101 —GRAMMAR ROUND TABLE The Grammar Round Table, formed by the Intermediate and Junior High School divisions here at C.S.T.C. is composed of students who are desirous of becoming skillful teachers of these grades. At their head is Mr. Watson, who has unceasingly given valuable aid, information, and cooperation. Four years are required to complete this curriculum instead of the former two and three years. This is to insure adequate training in all phases of intermediate education. The Table was organized in 1918, with the purpose of promoting professional and social fellowship among its members. All students who are enrolled in the Grammar and Intermediate divisions are automatically members. It is the firm belief of the G.R.T.'s that superintendents and school boards employing teachers are interested not only in the purely academic achievements of the students, but also in the all around ability and personality. For this reason, members are urged to have active participation in the student organizations of the college. You can find them in almost every organization on the campus, and they have been especially active in athletics, dramatics, debate, and in Sigma Tau Delta. Meetings of this professional organization are held monthly throughout the school year and have been, in effect, a fellowship in learn- ed and intellectual growth as well as pure entertainment for the members. The first Monday of every month sees these convivial friends gathering together in Mr. Watson's room. The group never tires of lectures given by Mr. Watson, whose lectures are a decided aid in clarifying dubious points about the teaching profession and its requirements. Miss Hanson, another frequent lecturer to the group, gave the G.R.T.'s a treat one night in the radio studio of C.S.T.C. which they greatly enjoyed. Miss Hanson rendered help in painting a clear picture for the freshmen who were in the dark about the "years at C.S.T.C.", but they found through her efficient guidance that "all's well with the world". Then came the homecoming parade (without precipitation). The Round Table always has a big heap of fun preparing for the parade, with or without streamers, which depends upon the wind and thumbtacks. Many interesting lectures and displays prevailed throughout the school season, of which Miss Carlsten's exhibit of interesting Swedish antiques, pictures, etc., was not the least. The Training School critics. Miss Diehl and Miss Pfeiffer, carried out the Swedish custom of serving doughnuts and coffee (served out of a genuine Swedish coffee pot). Row 1—M. Geer, J. lossart, W. Soeteber, Miss Roach, A. Thompson, Mrs. Kelly, V. Gericke, M. Murrish. A. Zimmerman Row 2—N. Ramussen, N. Slay, M. Butter, M. LaBrot, P. Carver, F. Wendort, D. Kamko, G. Radomachor, B. Smith, D. Mott, E. Peterson Row 3—M. Lavers, R. McManners, B. Hoflman, C. Kegel, C. Solberg, L. Born, W. Jacobson, E. Zentner, B. Fitzko, R- Novitske, R. McArthur — 102 —Until 1934, this division offered a two and three year course. Now, however, a need has Joeen felt for well trained teachers in the ■graded schools as well as in any other division of our public school system. Enrollment in this department is to encourage because of the scarcity of teachers who annually join that field. The department is turning out a record of almost 100% placement. It is predicted that this year every grad- uate will obtain a position from this department. Congratulations to you graduates. The officers who led this organization to success are: President, Rita Novtski. a very competent leader; the Secretary and Treasurer was Warren Soeterber. He also has worked very hard to make the organization a success. For the coming year Leone Kulas will lead the organization to bigger and better heights. The office of vice president will be filled by Dianne Kamke. with Marilyn Lavers as Sec. and Treasurer. Good luck new officers. 103PRIMARY COUNCIL Row 1—R. Thompson. L. tan , J. Gilman, L. Brock. I. Ramskuqlor, E. Caltin, R. Chrousor Row 2—D. Bovoisdorl, D. Soderberq, I. Thompson, M. Wlpporfurth, D. Six !, E. Nerhor., I. Owon, S. Fonstad Row 3—B. Hold. H. Paik, J. Thorson. E. Owon. G. Ccnovor B. Mayor, B. Lowo, B. Cross Row I—1G. Ouinn, L. Goichy. D. Ouinn, D. Bolonqia, t Woihor. L. Winch, N. Ferguson Row 2—A.Kobs, D. Zonkor. M. Edwards. C. Krohn, C. Roichol, B. Hundco, R. BurnoM. S. Munson Row 3—C. Kostuch, N. Barber. D. Floistad. H. Gowor, E. Campbell. N. Jacobs. 1C. Mosuch. C. Andotson The Primary Council, which is the professional and social organization of the Primary Division, offers a four-year curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Education degree to those students who are interested in small children and primary education. Miss Colman, head of this division, has a lot on her hands, for this year eighty girls filed programs in this division. The Primary Council takes itself seriously, and it has reason to. Modem theories of education believe that the adjustment of the child has its basic foundation during the first six years of its life. It is in the last part of this period that the primary teacher plays an important part. It is her task to make the child like school and to adjust himself to the social requirements of the classroom. In her hands is placed the responsibility of laying the foundation of good citizenship and upon the concreteness of this primary education the life of the child will be built. Of all the professional organizations on the campus, the Primary Council has probably the most specialized and individualized course. The first two years of the curriculum are spent in the study of purely academic courses. This provides the prospective teacher with the necessary cultural background. In the second year the Primaries are introduced to the Training School by observation combined with some handling of the children in the first three grades. This training continues, but with more intensity during the Junior year. Practice is given here in story-telling and the techniques of teaching the small child. In the fourth year the student teachers go "on the floor" in the Training School, and have full responsibility of their classes. One of the major aims of the Primary Council is to develop its members socially as well as pedagogically. This is accomplished throughout by different types of programs, activities, and just plain social get-togethers. This year, for instance, there was a picnic to welcome the freshmen, the annual Christmas party, and the spring homecoming luncheon. The turnout this year was excellent, there being forty alumnae present beside the active members of the council. In addition to the programs and the social meetings, many speakers were introduced who spoke on the various aspects of Primary teaching. One of the most interesting speakers of the year was the Rev. James Saunders, a student who arrived here from England only three years ago. Rev. Saunders spoke to the group on the English educational system in contrast to the American. Another interesting speaker was the third grade critic, Miss Van Arsdale, who shared her hobby with the group one evening. With her collection of colored photographic slides. — 104 —she gave the girls the various experiences in going to Florida with her. Then. too. her slides of the immediate locale showed familiar locations in new beauty. Several of the Primary girls presented an unusual studio program. Three original radio plays were given by the authors with the cast selected from the student body. Other radio work has also been carried on in the department. In connection with the radio the girls have had their voices recorded in order that they might overcome any defects in speech which might affect their teaching. The officers who so ably advanced Primary Council this year were: President. LaRae Winch; Vice-President, Eileen Coey; Treasurer, Carmelita Wirkus. The executive board members were Elaine Catlin and Lucille Neuman. Press representative for the year was Lucille Weiher. —105 —RURAL LIFE CLUB UPPER LEFT Row 1 L Stem, J. Wallacv, E. T«tzl«r. D. Flood, J. Tuiocek, A. Smith. |. Hockman, D. Crowgrove Row 2 N. Reinokir.a, L. Woasland, R. Williamson. A. Clula. I. Ow»n, V. Kruogor, R. Scipior, E. Johnson. B. Chylek Row 3 S. Clula. C. Halvorton, D. Falk, L. Budsbvrg. H. Humke. I. Stanlslowski. E. Fletcher, R. Lundgren, R. Rade, R. Gresens Row 4 A. Brooks, C. Veers, R. Eastman, E. Lemke. F. Hale, H. Preston. J. Stoltenberg, M. BarTett, 0 Parkel. B. Greve, H. Guth Row 5 H. Jawart. D. Anderson, D. Pavelski. L. Solvorud. J. Treder Row 1 Mr. O. W. LOWER RIGHT Neale, L. Holman, R. Wanserski. M. Mayer, R. Daniels, A. Knutson, E. Berg Row 2 M Francis. I. Ciula, S Berg. E. Williams, L. Chy'ek. A. Lelpseidt. E. Baslnski. E. Lutz Row 3 B. Ellman. M. Condon. M. Cole. A. Haines, T. Gunderson, I. Morgan, E. Pronz, M. Kjer LOWER LEFT Row 1 R. Berg, L- Barber. L. Sanders. M. Van Sleet. C. Marshall, A. Wlckman, I. Cook, A. Mussey Row 2 E. Eveland, E. Zell. M. Moslowski. I. Ley. L Swion-tek, N. Bailey, J. Anderson. M. Thompson Row 3 B. Grover. J. Ehlers, M. Van Natta. H. Kozlowski, E. Platta, G. Craft, A. Ostrowski, K. Metcalf, R. Buse, L. Neve Row 4 J. Kyhl, P. Stoltenberg, E. Tushinskl. S. Omemik. L. Token, E. Jahnke. J. Check UPPER RIGHT Row 1 M. Stevens, A. Somers, R. Scipior, C. Meinhardt, C. Mogal, I. Rich Row 2 M. Adams, J. Albertis, M. Dean, J. Welnmann. C. Winter. E. Hales, E. France, L. Anderson. M. Sparks Row 3 K Peterson. E. Mastey. M. Collins, I. Harder. A. Plon-kowski, E. Prcndzinskl, H. Swenson. E. Borgon, A. Moldenhauer, V. Rhode. A. Britten. M. Posky Row 4 H. Buranl. C. Wua. E. Gardner. J. Leary. M. McGin-ley, A. Prentice, H. Firkus, L. Justman, M. DeGoher, V. Johnson. C. Anderson. A. Andorson Have you ever been on third floor on Monday nights? If you haven't you are really missing something. That is one thing you should do before the close of the school term. "Blue Danube", "A Bicycle Built For Two", "Peggy O'Neil" and many other songs are sung and resung by the rural lifers. We. here in the "Iris" office were very well entertained for approximately a half hour on Monday nights. This is the most lively professional organization on the campus. This is perhaps because they have so many active members. Let us name some of them for you. "Kay" Metcalf with her jovial personality, is very outstanding. She is not only outstanding in Rural Life but on the whole campus for that matter. Everyone is after her to do something for them. Why, we even had her in the office one night identifying some pictures for us. She is certainly in- dispensible in this organization. Then there is Norman Fronek, president for one semester who is also prominent in debate. He brought back many laurels for the College. These persons and many others have kept the Rural Life Club just as active as it was when it was organized in 1915. It was organized as the professional group for the Rural State Graded Department of C.S.T.C. This year the Rural Life Club is better than ever. It gets larger and more active every year. The enrollment has increased over last year and they are striving for a 100% placement again as they have been able to boast for the past few years. But this isn't all these Rural Lifers think about. They have a host of happy memories of the club's activities. Their chorus, which was organized last year under the direction of Herbert Upright, was continued this year under the — 106 —most able direction of Miss Leota Brandt of the High School Department. When it was organized it promised to remain a permanent part of the Rural Life and after this year the promises are even stronger. The meetings which are held twice a month in the Rural Assembly Hall make a lively time of the student's curriculum. Discussions are led by members of the group, and lectures by faculty members and other prominent persons, ably took care of the educational side of the club. But who can ever forget the parties? They never have been lacking in this organization and never will be. Take the Christmas Party for example — Santa Claus and everything — games, dancing, and refreshments all went to make a good time for everyone. Perhaps you think that all the Rural Lifers do is have a good time. Well don't ever let them kid you. The rural program of visitation of schools is very complete. Mr. Neale, their director keeps in close contact with the field for two ultimate reasons: first to provide worthy promotion, and second, to strengthen the work in the department. The prospective teachers have the problems which confronted their predecessors set before them in a most effective manner and are advised on how to overcome them by Miss Roach, a friend and teacher to everyone. She is the sympathetic and understanding ''mother'' of the Rural Department. The Ruralites were very fortunate in obtaining Miss Glennon from the local high school. She is very capable and conscientious in everything that she attempts to do. The Rural Department is very proud of her. This organization furnishes an opportunity for fine training in club work. The Rural Life Club is a member of the County Life Conference, which is a National Organization. Every year many members attend the state conventions, and a few attend the National also. M. Eisenhammcr. P. Anderson. L. Torgerson. C. Cask y. I. McCallum, R. Leach, Miss Roach Row 2 G. Holm. D. Fukus, D. Berndt, T. Langton, M. Peterson, L. Vogedes. E. Beach Row 3 A. Ltnlhan. D. Hantsh. C. Tohm, M. Christianson. R. Johnson. B. Grindlo. J. Larson. E. DeCanter. D. Sorenson Row 4 K. Nelson. A. Paysa. N. Fronek. M. Booth. A. Schwartz, R. Hendnch, C. Papke 107 —GOLDEN GLOVES FIGHTS DAN YOUNG Dan Young is considered to be one of the finest boxers to ever enter the ring for C.S.T.C Competing in the arena for his Alma-Mater for four years. Dan has compiled record of 20 victories and 7 defeats. Of these, 8 were accomplished via the the knockout route. As a freshman, Young competed in the Golden Gloves Tournament at Wisconsin Rapids, where he won the championship, but was deprived of a trip to Chicago to participate in the Tournament of Champions". Since then his aim was to participate in that tourney. This year his ambition became a reality. He won four straight bouts to win the Central Wisconsin Championship, and the coveted trip to Chicago. Dan was defeated by Jack Burrel of Fort Worth. Texas, one of the favorites to cop the title. He received a jacket and a Golden Glove. Dan hails from Bancroft, where he was a star athlete. His star has risen steadily since, and was climaxed in his Senior year, when he was elected captain of the 1941 boxing squad. Don Young Konnoth Brcnnat KENNETH BRENNER Kenny Brenner hails from Thorp and is one of the most likeable chaps in school because of his pleasing personality. Having no experience in boxing previous to entering Central State, he went out for the boxing team as a freshman last year. He started slowly, but finished fast, to win two and lose two. This year he came back with added weight and more speed, developing into a clever fighter, and a consistent winner. He won seven bouts while losing two and drawing one. Ken won four successive matches to win the Golden Gloves Championship of Central Wisconsin. For this accomplishment he received a rever-sable jacket, and earned a trip to Chicago to join the "Tournament of Champions”. He was defeated in the tournament by a boy from Streator, Illinois, who went to the quarter finals. His favorite pastime is to talk about his girl friend in "Chi”, and Chi Delta Rho, his "frat”. C.S.T.C. Enters Tournament Of Champions By winning a total of thirteen fights throughout the tournament and capturing two individual titles, the Central State Teachers College boxing squad won the team trophy at the Central and Northern Wisconsin Golden Gloves Tournament, which was held in the Lincoln High School Fieldhousc at Wisconsin Rapids. Captain Dan Young and Kenny Brenner won the championship in the 175 and 126 pound class respectively. Kenny won the title by decision-ing Harvey Schar of Stratford. On his way to the title Brenner defeated Gil Layton, the defending champ; knocked out Bud Hammes, and routed Tony Gamache of Hurley. Danny won a decision over Chief Lonetree, a rugged Indian from Nekoosa in his first bout. In his second fight he K.O.'d Joe Krause of Curtis with a right cross to the chin. Lloyd Tebo. of Black River Falls, was his victim in the semi-finals, and Don Ellis was con quered in the crown match. Coach Ted Menzel entered eight men in the tourney and they immediately received the respect of their opponents and the support of the crowd. 112 lbs. Joe Kalina defeated Bud Wruck of Devils Lake in his first bout, drew a tie. and then lost a close decision to Sanchez in the semi-finals. 120 lbs. Orland Radke fought a clever fight but lost a close decision to Bob Soule, a golden glove veteran. Clarence Tohm knocked out Vesley of Devils Lake, in his first encounter, and drew a tie with Chief Browneagle. 135 lbs. Len Ropella won an easy victory over Gandeo of Devils Lake in his first bout and then knocked out Arnold Brown in his second match. Bob Kurtz won the title by defeating Len in the quarter-finals. 155 lbs. Howie Stimm lost a close decision to Bill Clark in his first fight, while 165 lbs. Jay Swctt was defeated by Butch Nelson in a very closely fought combat. — 109 —THE POINTER SQUAD HAS SUCCESSFUL SEASON 1 1 Row—Sharkey. Hallo, Brenner. Young. Swest 2nd Row—Slimm, Shrako. Tohm, Ropella, Hoboit BOXERS TAKE IT ON CHIN AT SUPERIOR The Centra! State Teachers College boxers opened its boxing season with a 7 to I defeat at the hands of Superior Teachers, at Superior. The card was much closer than the score indicates. Several close decisions went to Superior, although the Yellowjackets, as a team, looked more experienced and deserved to win. Results: 120 lb. class: Leonard Lally of Superior decisioned Orland Radke. Orland lost the first and second round and then rallied to win the third easily. The decision was given to the Superior boy because of the intercollegiate boxing rules which state that if a bout is stopped because of injury, the decision goes to the boxer who has the highest number of point at that time. This bout was stopped, as Orland flattened Lally's nose and eyes. 127 lb. class: Kenny Brenner, C.S.T.C., drew with Charles Woh-lend of Superior. Ken easily out fought Chuck, in a bout that had the crowd laughing at the Superior Boxer's efforts to hit him. Ken's peculiar southpaw style had his opponent baffled, but the judges sur- prised all by calling the bout a draw. 135 lb. class: Earl Larson, Su- perior, decisioned Ted Shrake. Ted iost the first round, won the second, and lost the third by a close margin to drop the decision. His opponent deserved to win the fight, as he had too much experience for Ted. 145 lb. class: George Bartano-li. knocked out Myron Sharkey in the second round. Myron easily won the first round, but tired in the second, and was the victim of a technical knockout. Bartanoli was a terrific puncher and, when Sharkey tired and quit fighting close, he lost his chance to win. 155 lb. class: Howie Stimm, C.S.T.C., and Chet Larson, Superior, drew. Howie Stimm carried the fight to Chet Larson, who placed fourth in the National intercolligiatc boxing tourney, and won every round, but the decision was announced as a draw. Larson was as good as pre-season notices, but he just could not cope with Stimm's speed. 165 lb. class: Don Olson, Su- perior, won on an T.K.O. from Jay Swett, in the third round. Jay took Continued on page 113, col. 1 Point Boxers Garner Second Glove Victory The Central State Teachers College boxing team defeated Whitewater Teachers 5 to 3 on Tuesday, April 29, at Whitewater, before a frenzied crowd to take the second intercollegiate victory. The record to date is two victories and one defeat. Two knockouts, 2 decisions, and a forfeit cave C.S.T.C. her 5 victories. Ted Shrake and Myron Sharkey chalked up the knockouts. Whitewater had to forfeit the 127 lb. match because they did not have a man available in that class. Continued on page 113, col. 2 Out Of The Bag NORMAN HALLA: Sophomore.. .. 2nd year man... . one of the best heavyweights in these parts--hails from Mosinee.. .. has a terrific right .... won three and lost one. JAY SWETT: Freshman... . Eagle River is his home town----will develop into a true champ---a hard fellow to knock out. ... 165 lbs. of dynamite.. .. won one and lost four. — 110 —THE POINTER Point Boxers Win Initial Victory The Central State Teachers Boxing Team easily defeated an overrated Duluth Teachers fistic aggregation before a capacity crowd in the Training School Gymnasium. I The margin of victory was 7-1, with the Pointers taking four decisions, two technical knockouts and a forfeit. Duluth came down with a good reputation and was favored to win as the result of their better performance against Superior. They lost by a margin of 5V2 to 2 2 while the Yeilow-jackets disposed of the Menzelmen 7 to 1. The Pointers apparently forgot to read the clippings of the boys from Minnesota and the result was a complete rout. Because of Duluth’s failure to provide opponents in the 120, 165 and 175 pound divisions, some last minute changes in the card were necessary. There were two 135-pound bouts and two in the 155 lb. division. Kenney Brenner opened the card with a victory over Monroe Braden. The Thorp boy held the advantage throughout. The bout started slowly but picked up momentum in the second and third rounds. Ted Shrake easily outpointed Tom Zujold. The New Lisbon Freshman displayed a good defense in addition to ability to hit with both hands. He had Bujold hanging on the ropes in the third round. His left hook is about the prettiest blow possessed by any Point boxer. Clarence Tohm showed much improvement from last year and he easily outclassed Kenneth Olson and scored a T.K.O. after one minute and 47 seconds in the second round. He roughed up Olson right from the start and landed a flock of stinging blows. The fight was stopped when it became apparent Olson would be unable to continue. Myron Sharkey lost a hairline decision to Bob Gurber, Duluth’s classiest boy. Myron was knocked down in the second round for a count of nine after winning the first. In the third round he had Gurber dazed but couldn’t knock him off his feet and lost the decision. The Continued on p«gc IIS, col. 3 Top—RadSco. Bronnor, Ropalla Bottom— Sharkey, Stimm, Swett PROSPECTS FOR 1942 SEASON Coach Menzel will send into the ring the strongest boxing team in the history of Central State for the 1942 season. That is, he will if none of his boys are drafted into the army, or decide to join the navy, marines, or air corps. Of the team this year, Captain Day Young will be the only fighter to be lost to the squad via the graduation route. Dan will be a distinct loss to the squad, as his record is an enviable one. But, though we regret it, his career is one of the annals, now, of C.S.T.C., and we must look ahead. For the future, these boys have a background that is tops in any team's history: they won two intercollegiate victories, and lost only one: won the Central Wisconsin Golden Gloves Championship trophy; and sent two men to the Tournament of Champions. To top this climax, they sent four men to the Northwest Tournament, held at Superior. Let all future contestants beware of our team, for with another year of pre-season training, they will be as strong, or stronger, than any other collegiate team in this section. BEWARE SUPERIOR! — Ill —THE POINTER Top—Young, Holla Bottom—Tohm, Stolnlo t Four Central Staters Reach Finals The Central State Teachers College boxing team made a great showing in the first annual northwest intercollegiate tournament which was held at Superior but failed to win a championship match. Seven out of the nine Point boxers survived the first round. Myron Sharkey, Ted Shrake, and Jay Swett were eliminated in the semi-finals. Captain Dan Young, Orland Radke, Howie Stimm. and Norman Halla were defeated in the finals. Superior Teachers copped five championships, Michigan Tech two and Bemidji Teachers of Minnesota one. Orland Radke decisioncd Solic, St. Olaf. Kenny Brenner lost to Christianson, Michigan Tech. (Fight stopped because of cut over Brenner s eye. Kenny was winning on points but bout was awarded to the Michigan Tech boy when it became apparent that Brenner wouldn't be al- lowed to fight again because of the cut.) Dan Young knocked out Lcich-man, Michigan Tech, third. Norman Halla decisioncd Keough, Eau Claire. Myron Sharkey decisioned Uvo-rich. Itasca Junior College. Howie Stimm won by a T.K.O. over Henderson, Duluth Len Ropella lost to Lanze, Michigan Tech, by decision. Ted Shrake and Jay Swett drew byes. Luther Bolstad of St. Olafs won by T.K.O. over Ted Shrake Bob Gerber. Duluth decisioned Myron Sharkey Howie Stimm decisioncd George Bakalyar, Duluth John Shock, Bemidji Teachers decisioned Jay Swett Norman Hall. Orland Radke and Dan Young drew byes. 120 lbs: Len Laily, Superior Continued on page 113, col. 3 POINT BOXERS IN INITIAL WIN Continued from page 111, col. 1 bout was a toc-to-toe affair from start to finish with Sharkey just missing the decision. Howard Stimm won a close decision from George Bakalyar in a fight that didn't have much action until the last round. Stimm didn’t look like the fighter we’ve seen before but he rallied to defeat a clever boy. Jay Swett won an easy victory over Bill Melby. Jay landed a left hook to Melby's button and the boy from Minnesota ended up on the canvas. The knockout was accomplished after a minute and 15 seconds of the second round. The Eagle-River freshman had Melby on the ropes a good share of the fight. Norman Halla won as he pleased from Jim Riley. Norman looked good and w-e think that he could have won on a T.K.O. if he wanted to. He floored the Duluth fighter for a nine count at the close of the second round. Out Of The Bag CAPTAIN DAN YOUNG: Golden Glove Champion.... a vicious boxer with a hard right____fourth year on the squad._____from Bancroft. ... Senior...._175 lbs. ... won 7, lost 3. ... w ill be missed next year. • HOWIE STIMM: Sophomore.... 2nd year on squad. ... drew with Chet Larson of Superior, who finished fourth win the national tournament. ... a clever boxer and a hard puncher____155 lbs. of T.N.T...... won three, lost three, drew one MYRON SHARKEY: Thetoughest men were his lot all season. ... a tough battler who never gives up.... throws leather all the time.... So- f homore.. .. from Mosinee.... 145 bs.. .. w-on two, lost three. LEN ROPELLA: Stevens Point product. .. . Junior. ... 2nd year on team.... developed into a fine performer. .. . expect him to cop the Golden Gloves Championship next year ... 135 lbs...w on three, lost two. — 112 —THE POINTER BOXERS TAKE IT ON THE CHIN Continued from page 110, col. 2 an awful lot of punishment from the best boxer, and straighest puncher on the Superior team. 175 lb. class: Captain Wayne Shumate, Superior, decisioncd Captain Dan Young, C.S.T.C. Dan, after staggering his opponent three times, and failing to stop him, lost a decision to Shumate. Coach Menzel said, after the bout, that he thought Dannie had won the fight. Heavyweight Bout: Ray Lile, Superior, knocked out Norman Hal-la, Central State, in the first round. Norman took a terrific left hook and a right cross to the jaw which floored him in the first round. The referee stopped the bout, and awarded it to Ray Lile. Coach Menzel said that Lile was as good a heavyweight as any in the G. G. Tournament. Coaches Mencel, Kotal Coach Menzel one of the greatest performers on the gridiron for Central State returned to his Alma Mater as an instructor this year. He performed at tackle for Coach Kotal's gridders and was given all-conference recognition for three years. In 1936 he captained the team and led it to the conference title. Upon graduation he accepted a position as football and boxing coach at Marshfield High School. While at Marshfield his "eleven' was feared by all and his boxing team captured the state championship thrice. POINT BOXERS IN SECOND WIN Continued from page 110, col. 3 120 lb. class: Orland Radke ut the Pointers ahead at the start y taking the opening bout from Howie Winn. Radke outpointed Winn by a wide margin in the first and second round, then coasted through the third. 135 lb. class: Ted Shrake knocked out Harry Lynch in 1 minute 45 seconds, of the second round. He exhibited a good defense and his opponent hardly laid a glove on him. 135 lb. class: Myron Sharkey knocked out Al Martincic after one minute and 45 seconds in the first round. Gloves flew in every direction as the boys tore into each other. Though he lost, Martincic was awarded the "fightiest fighter" award during Whitewaters' Intramural tournament. 155 lb. class: Howie Stimm lost to Romie Baker in a very close decision. Baker, whose home is in Stevens Point, and a former C.S.T.C. student, held the upper hand most of the way. Stimm forged ahead several times, only to lose his advantage by fouling. 165 lb. class: Jay Swett lost the decision to Gene Barek. Swett won the first round, but Barek out-punched him to gain the victory. 175 lb. class: Captain Dan Young of C.S.T.C., defeated Al Shaw of Whitewater. Dan sent his opponent all over the ring, and did everything but knock him out. This was perhaps the easiest victory of the whole match. Heavyweight: Norman Halla lost to Carl Chcsnik, after the bout was stopped after 40 seconds in the first round. Joe Kalina, Kenny Brenner and Len Ropella fought exhibition matches, as their opponetns outweighed them from 11 to 19 pounds. Ken Brenner and Len Ropella won their bouts easily, while Joe Kalina drew with his opponent. All were swell fights. Out Of The Bag KENNETH BRENNER: Golden Glove Champion of the Central and Northern Wisconsin Division....... Sophomore.... from Thorp.... a south-paw... has a nice style ... 127 lbs.... Won six and lost three. ... drew one. • • ORLAND RADKE: Freshman.... at home in Montello.... a cunning boxer with a lot of speed. .. . never backs up... . hands are always moving.... 120 lbs....Won two, lost three. Four Central Staters Reach Finals Continued from pege 112, col. 2 decisioncd Orland Radke. 155 lbs: Ray Timer. Michigan Tech, decisioncd Howard Stimm 175 lbs: Wayne Shumate, Superior, won by a technical knockout over Dan Young Heavyweight: Norman Halla forfeited to Ray Lile, Superior. (Coach Menzel didn't allow Norman to fight because of the condition of his eye which he cut at Whitewater.) — 113 —The Year Around Women's Athletic Association Row 1—M. Nelson, A. Grub©, I. Wallace, P. Noble, Miss Davldoff. C. Piehl. B. Smith, M. La Biot. Row 2—K. Laumer, G. Pills, M. Geer, I. Wood, M. Butter, P. Carver, J. Kyhl. Row 3—A. Thompson. A. Huntoon, E. Johnson, V. Lundqren, V. Clark, K. Kelly, M. Hoffman, T. Parrot, M. Blissett. ORGANIZATION Under the able supervision of Miss Adele Davidoff, the Women's Athletic Association began a new year. Patricia Carver was elected president with Katheryn Piehl assisting her as Vice President. Mary Louise Butter was elected secretary with Madeline La Brot as treasurer. The meetings were held each second Wednesday of the month, where different activities were planned and different sports discussed. The W.A.A. was organized mainly to give the women of the I college an outlet for their athletic a-1 bilities. Through this medium many • of the girls have become better known to their fellow students and made a name for themselves where they would have otherwise remained anonymous. The W.A.A. has fulfilled its duty to the women of the college. As each year goes on we are sure to find this organization growing until it may some day vie with the athletic department of the men. ACTIVITIES Different departments of the organization have heads. The heads arc: Basketball—Mary Kay Geer; Badminton—Florence Theisen; Tennis—Jean Meydam; Archery—Mary Louise Butter; Volleyball—Jeanette Halverson; Hockey—Elaine Johnson; Tumbling — June Wallace; Ping-Pong—Majorie May Nelson. There are five big events given annually by W.A.A. In the fall a icnic for new students, in Novem-er a harvest party, in February a W.A.A. Dance, in May a Play Day and also a spring picnic. For Play Day three hundred high school girls from Central and Eastern Wisconsin gather to participate in a day of fun and play. At the spring picnic letters for the year are awarded and the new officers for the coming year are elected. The W.A.A. sponsors all intramural tournaments for women and also the informal dancing on Thursday Nights. STARS Heading our list of stars we have Millicent Blissett, Billie Eich-horn, and June Todd as new cheer leaders who helped cheer the teams on to victory. Pat Carver headed the list of Ping pong leaders until along came June Wallace who was the new topper for the Ping-Pong ladder. The basketball season wound up with a bang and Evelyn Turshinski and Mike Blissett were considered the outstanding forwards. Jeanette Halverson and Thelma Parrott came through as guards. In the badminton field we find Virginia Strope and Florence Theisen sharing the final honors in doubles. Consolation honors went to Mike Blissitt and Elaine Johnson. The tennis season started early as good weather permitted the girls to get on the courts. Alva Thompson shares the top rung in this ladder with Florence Theisen. Mary Kay Geer seems to be the outstanding star in basketball. — 114 —Out Of The Bag TEDSHRAKE: Has piston style of fighting.. .. started slow, but improved rapidly.... possesses the hardest right hand punch on the team---- from New Lisbon._______ freshman.... 135 lbs.... Won two, lost two • » CLARENCE TOHM: Junior........... comes from Manawa______the most improved man on the sauad.... third year of fighting__keep an eye on him next year, but don’t get it in his way.... 135 lbs. won two, lost 1. • • JOE KALINA: Junior....just a progressive and aggressive Point boy. ... a nice little fighter. .. . hard to match due to his weight.... 112 lbs.... won one, lost one, drew one. • • GORDON STEINFEST: from An- HISTORY Looking back over the annals of time wc find these interesting facts about the W.A.A. It was organized in 1929 after having been the Girl's Athletic Asociation since 1918. Its motto "Sport for all and all for Sports" seems to have been carried out since its organization. The association is affiliated with the A-merican Federation of College Worn en. Wc find that in 1939 various new ideas were introduced into the organization. For example, hockey was replaced by speed ball and mass basketball by intramural, four teams made up the leagues and medals were given. Badminton was proving to be a very popular sport. After each sport season a party was given for the participants. Also to be noted. Miss Davidoff appears as the new advisor and continues through until the present day. We arc sorry to say that Miss Davidoff will not be here next year and her presence will be missed. over two hundred and fifty girls from seventeen Central Wisconsin High Schools gathered in Point to participate in the annual play day. Comparing this year with last a decided increase is expected and all the girls in College and in the high schools are looking forward to another next year. tigo. .. . Freshman. ... a good boy... didn't get a chance to fight intra-collegiate matches this year. ... keep tabs of him. ... 145 lbs.... no runs, no hits, no errors. • • • LOUIS ERDMAN: Another An- tigo boy.... (fighters, aren't they). ... he. too did not get a chance to fight due to a conflict of weights... 145 lbs. Again reminiscing, we find that — 115 —Go to your corner! I'll count him out! Hit 'em high, Hit 'em low but HIT 'em! Young is about to be tackled. I 2—3- 1 -5 I(»! Brenner wins! Caramba! He is no fair! He beets weeth both ham “What are you wearing that black and red ribbon for?" "I'm pledging Sigma Tau Delta, you know, the national honorary English fraternity. Gosh, I didn't know that anything that I wrote was good enough to rate Sigma Tau. Did you know that we have three national honoraries and one international on the campus? Well we have. There is Alpha Kappa Rho, national music fraternity. Sigma Zeta. national science, and Sigma Tau Delta national English. Alpha Psi Omega is the international fraternity and interest and participation in dramatics is a prerequisite for membership. "You know, it's quite an honor to be invited to join one of these organizations. Their scholastic requirements are higher than any other organization on the campus, and membership in them really means outstanding work in the fields which they represent. "Well, I've got to go. There is a pledge meeting tonight, and I've got to write a poem as a pledge duty. You can write. Why don't you try to get in? Wait till I tell the folks about this!" — 117 —Our honorary music fraternity. Alpha Kappa Rho. is the only local honorary society on Central State’s campus. It was organized in 1937 with Margaret Miller as the first president. Other charter members were George Cartmill, Fred Parfrey, Dorothy Richards, and Kenneth Storandt. Mr. Peter J. Michelsen, director of the Band. Girl's Glee Club, and Orchestra, has been the faculty advisor since its founding. The primary purpose of Alpha Kappa Rho is to stimulate an interest in music and to develop leaders among students of the music department. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors are eligible for membership in the fraternity. Each person must have the following prerequisites: High scholastic average, two semesters of directing, and membership in one musical organization. Before admission to the fraternity, a pledge period of several weeks is required, and a test covering every phase of music must be successfully written. A formal initiation and banquet ends the pledging period. Alpha Kappa Rho has been one of the most active organizations, its members supervising and taking part in all musical functions. Each year a formal concert is given by the members of the fraternity. It has presented a large electric clock to the college this year. Membership: Betty Johnson, Dorothy Nelson, Leota Brandt, Eileen Rose, Gerald Torkelson, Edward Wacholz, La Rae Winch, Doris Soderberg, Melvin Wunsch, Leona Kulas, Charles Dodge, Olive Crawford. Harold Kahler, Tom Wishlinski, Jack Perry, Florence Theisen, Gloria Joosten, and Jean Meydam. OFFICERS OF ALPHA KAPPA RHO First Semester President .............. Charles Dodge Vice Pres....... Eyoleone Atkins Secretary ......... Leona Kulas Treasurer ......... Leota Brandt Second Semoster President ........ Leota Brandt Vice Pres....... Tom Wishlinski Secretary ......... Leona Kulas Treasurer ...... Dorothy Nelson hrL ittccia t Eta Delta cast of Alpha Psi Omega was organized at Central State Teachers College in 1938. "Alpha Psi", as it is best known, is the only Greek organization, social or honorary, which is an international fraternity. At present it is solely an honorary organization with no purpose other than the recognition of outstanding dramatic ability in the student body. It has. and will continue to act as an auxiliary to College Theater, and to insist that the student body get as fine plays, acting and sets as is possible. Although the functions of the fraternity are mainly social, there are many opportunities for future advancement of Alpha Psi Omega. Alpha Psi Omega is probably the smallest group on the campus, having at present a membership roll of only fourteen. This select group is: SENIORS: Don Krider, Bob Burkman, Barbara Gerdes, Merville Meverden, Earle Siebert, Gerald Hierl, Evelyn Murgatroyd, Lawrence Jozwiak. JUNIORS: Lillian Boe, James Unger. Janet Poggemiller, Clarence Solberg, Jack Ackerman. SOPHOMORES: Iris Precourt. Each semester new members are admitted to the fraternity. They must have shown their ability in one or more of the various fields of play production in order to become eligible. Before initiation a pledge period of from three to four weeks is required for the candidates, and a comprehensive examination is given to each pledge at the formal initiation ceremonies. OFFICERS OF ALPHA PSI OMEGA First Semester Grand Dir...... Robert Burkman Asst. Director...Donald Krider Sec.-Treas.... Janet Poggemiller Pub. Man..................Earle Siebert Second Semester Grand Dir................ Earle Siebert Asst. Director .... Robert Burkman Sec.-Treas.... Janet Poggemiller Pub. Man..... Lawrence Jozwiak — 118 —Si f nta au ltd In 1930 Psi Beta chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, national honorary English fraternity was organized at Central State Teachers College. The purpose of Sigma Tau Delta is the promotion of written expression, the encouragement of worthwhile reading and the fostering of a spirit of fellowship among teachers and students of English. From the first, one of the aims of the society has been to stimulate a desire on the part of its members to seek to express life in terms of truth and beauty and to make extensive contact with the chief literary masterpieces. Each semester new members are taken into Sigma Tau, being chosen for their ability and interest in English as well as their scholastic average. During the month's pledging, the pledges are required to exhibit literary contributions as a proof of their ability. Poetry, essays ,and short stories comprise the scope of the exhibit. The "Rectangle," annual national publication of Sigma Tau Delta, is sent triannually to each member of the fraternity. In 1937 our local chapter began its own publication, "Flight". All material in "Flight" is contributed by C.S.T.C. students; poetry, essays, and other forms of literary writings are included in it. Mary Ann Lochner is editor of this year's local magazine, being assisted by Charlotte Reichel, business manager. At the annual banquet which was held in May, winners from each monthly literary contest were awarded books from the Book of the Month Club, to which our chapter has subscribed. OFFICERS OF SIGMA TAU DELTA President ................ Leota Brandt Secretary ......Barbara Gerdes Treasurer ............ Xay Tyler Historian ........ Betty Johnson icwta 7 Sixteen years ago in 1925. at Shurtleff College, Alton, Illinois, a local honorary fraternity, Sigma Zeta came into existence. Four years later, in 1929, the Zeta Chapter of this honorary science fraternity was founded at Central State Teachers College. Zeta was the sixth chapter organized. The purpose of the association is two-fold: (1) To increase an interest in and a knowledge of scientific matters, (2) to encourage high scholarship among the students. With these two aims in mind, members are chosen who have a favorable academic class average and who are majoring in any of the fields of the natural sciences or mathematics. Sigma Zeta. besides its many other activities, is known for its annual alumni banquet which is held each year during the homecoming weekend. Alumni are kept in constant touch with the chapter throughout the year through the efforts of the committee on alumni records. Zeta Chapter does not confine its work to this college alone for it is well known at the yearly national conclave. Two of our members are grand officers in the national fraternity. Mr. Rogers is Grand Recorder-Treasurer and Mr. Faust is Grand Editor. The national magazine. "The Sigma Zetan", is published by one of Zeta's members. Mr. Floyd Nixon. The following delegates were elected to go to the conclave held at Otterbein College, Westerville, Ohio, April 17, 18 and 19: Helen Johnson, Grace Winarski, Marie Eisenhammer, Merville Meverden. Gerald Thusing, Roy Otto. Floyd Nixon, and Robert Burkman. OFFICERS OF SIGMA ZETA Master Scientist ............. ............. Robert Burkman Vico Mastor Scientist ........ .......... Morville Meverden Rocordor-Tteasurer ........... .............. Grace Winarski — 121 — (L ntct emo Yes. we are graduating. We are going to enter the special fields of study for which we have spent four years preparing ourselves. It is with regret that we look back, only to that, as a student, our life here at C.S.T.C. has ended. Only fond memories are left to us of all our little disappointments, happinesses, heartaches, and frustrations. All this is behind U8. DON AUCUTT: Better known as "Rochester"... has the role of a profesional cut- up... participating in "no note taking" in class... but still a very good student.. . gets a bang out of anything.. .even while teaching in the Training School. Ahead lies our future, unknown, uncharted—-a land that challenges us with its strangeness. We are pushing off from the known land, and crossing the border into the unknown. Though we look back with regret and sadness, we face the future with hope, expectation, and a little fear. BETTY SMITH: They call her "Smithy" . . . happy-go-lucky, cheerful, likes to go walking . . . but not alone . . . possesses charming personality . . . plus that twinkle in her eye . . . The waves of friendship rolled high over and about us when we descended to the briny depths at the Senior Ball. Father Neptune's absence was not noticed, as King Gerald Torkel-son and his Queen, Kay Tyler, presided over the elaborately decorated gym. "Under the Sea" was the theme, and was admirably carried out with those pictures of all the kinds of fish, known and unknown, on the walls, and the colored lights, and the copy of Davy Jones' Locker in one comer. As the spot lights played back and forth over the swaying couples, they picked out friends among whom were ... — 122 —T HE Senior Class of 1940 and '41 presented the College with a fund of twenty-five dol-lors to be used as a student loan fund. The President of the College shall determine the receiver of this fund each year. Of course, as the years pass by. the fund grows. It is the hope of the Senior class that this fund, the purpose of which is to aid some student in attending college, will be used to its best advantage.Cora Mao Andorson Marqarol Bockor Lorraino Church Russoll Frodricks Phillip Andorson Eyloor.o Atkins Donald Aucuti Elmor Bathko Marauorito Bonn Kathorino Boworsock Loot a Brandt Robort Burkman Eiloon Cooy Bomico Dawos Loulso Donnomoyor Kolon Dunn Norman Fronok Barbara Gordos Viola Co rick o Mary Anno Glooson Speak Senior—"At the last hall of the fourth year we resign with a feeling of accomplishment. As prospective teachers we admire the faculty of C.S.T.C. and wish to express our gratitude for the guidance we have received. The class of '41 strove to represent a typical product of the college. — 124 —Whatever—with fear or anxiety our schedule included five hours at ten o'clock or ten hours from one to three-thirty at Mary D. Bradford. Our efficiency rated another plus as we became more adjusted. Shop talk was bound to be heard continuously by those of you with whom we spoke. EILEEN ROSE: Industrious, intellectual, creative ... writes music, pens poetry, which inspires others ... seldom seen without a smile ... likes to teach Latin ... when left alone in a serious mood, means another poem ... Perhaps our most Interesting experience was the exposure to the actual situation. A teacher learns everyday—Check I Speaking of practice—we warn you the conference notebooks are no fun. As student teachers we surely did our job. Among the many exceptional might be mentioned Chet Kagel, Bernice Dawes, and Don Krider. DON KRIDER: Prominent in forensics ... knows what he wants and he gets it ... has a definite flare for verbal expression ... has a mania for knick-knacks for his wife ... happy-go-lucky—don't believe the picture on page 122 ... The prominent debaters—Murgatroyd, Krider and Becker—may set the standards for future efforts. Athletics are now. more than ever, playing an important part in college life. Let's cheer for such boys as Dan Young, Van Dyke, and Oik. The success of an organization such as College Theater depends wholly upon the ability of the actors and directors. Among those to be remembered were Bud Hierl, Betty Hannon. Florence Kaplun, and Barbara Gerdes. Edmund Grxogosowskl Elizabeth Hannon Coraid Hiorl Evolyn HUlorl Honry Hrynlowicko Arleno Huntoon Majors© Jacobs BoSty Johnson Holon Johnson Marqarot Johnson — 125 —Not only executively inclined, but also musically are La Rae Winch and Doris Soderberg, Leota Brandt, Russell Fredrick, and Betty Johnson. BETTY JOHNSON: First chair flutist—plays a mean solo for both of the glee clubs_____ literary, studious (best T.L.T.C. notebook in school)_socialite ... best Chi Delt on the campus ... as well as a Tau Gam ... Florence Kaplun Lionnel DoGauli Edna Marotz Keith Nelson Donald Kridor Myron Kufel Dorothy Larson James Larson Mary Anno Lochnor Viola Lonsdorl Dorothy Luck Joan Luxum Morvllle Movordon Kathorino Mosuch Evelyn Murqatroyd Dorothy Nelson Robert Nixon Robert Oik Selma Prell Goelind Rademacher — 126 —Ruth Rothko Louise Reese Marion Roberts Eileen Rose Rna Russell Earle Siebert Harry Slabosheski Betty Smith Doris Soderberq Dorothy Sorenson Murial Waid was the Men's Glee Club sweetheart (accompanist to you) during the past year. Earle Siebert is he to whom we accredit the editorship of the Pointer. Then came the gala event, the Senior Ball. GERALD TORKELSON: President of the Senior Class and the Men's Glee Club ... ability to lead as well as having a nose for news ... his recreation seems to be the riding of a bicycle ... basso profundo ... excellent student and a good teacher ... King Gerald Torkelson and Queen Kay Tyler reigned over the undersea gardens. For a lady—Helen Johnson takes first place as science shark. Merville Meverden spoke at Sigma Zeta's national conclave in Westerville. Ohio. DAN YOUNG: Star boxer, baseball and football player as well as a good student ... carries a smile just as constantly as one carries a hanky ... enjoys being Mr. Young (teacher) at the T. S. ... likes the name Anderson... Being capable in general, as are Margaret Johnson and Carmelita Wirkus is a compli ment to anyone. HARRY SLABOSHESKI: Conscientious, enthusiastic ... leadership prevails ... a good follower and a deep thinker ... a merry mixer .. . not exactly a book worm but likes to read them ... — 127 —Nancy Steinor Jack Vincent Glondall Gillman Helen Thornton Lucille Voqedee La Rae Winch Gerald Torkelson Edward Wacholz Carmellta Wlrkun Katherine Tyler Muriel Wald Dan Young LaVerno Van Dyke Grace Winareki Murray Severn DORIS SODERBERG: A pretty red-head on the campus ... a well known Primary ... artistically inclined ... appreciates life ... BARBARA GERDES: Assistant editor of the Pointer ... (unofficially) ... Commonly known as "Barb"_______well known play director ... settles disputes at the dorm ... well liked by the Mary D. Bradford pupils ... just a good girl ... This year's issue of flight was edited by Mary Anne Lockner, a member of Sigma Tau Delta. In signing off we want you to know that we've enjoyed being Seniors. LEOTA BRANDT: An excellent student and leader ... bubbling over with willingness and cooperation, romantically inclined but claims she is "Staple" ... collects vases and when not busy plays ... "Don't Get Mad"... — 128 —lomai Carol Anderson Mary Barrott John Chock Doris Crossgrov Dorothy Andorson Rosolla Borg Sophia Ciula Maynard DoGolior Iron Anderson Arvilla Brooks Boss Chylok Ruth Eastman Nola Bailoy Luolla Barbor Luola Budsborg Rhoda Bus loan Cook Gladys Cralt Joannott Ehlors Eyangolln Evoland The Rural State Graded division oilers a two and a four year curriculum, for the state graded, village schools, supervisory, and administrative positions in rural fields. Mr. O. W. Neale, director of the course, is a friend of every one's, not of just those in this division. — 129 —Dorothy Falk Bernice Grove Edith Fletcher Botty Grovor Dorothy Flood Hubort Guth Earlene Franco Ray Grosens Floronco Halo Courtnoy Halverson The aim of this division is not only to prepare its students to into community leaders when they enter the field. teach, but to make them — 130 —lono Harder lean Heckman Harold Humke Cleanora Jahnks Harold Jawarl Elaine Johnson Rulh Johnson Vivian Johnson Harriet Kozlowski Veloris Krueqer Eunice Lemke Irene Ley Ruby Lund ren Carol Marshall Maraaret Moslowskl Inez McCallum Chester Meqal Kathryn Metcall Alice Mussey Lucille Neve Some of the outstanding graduates of this department are: Kathryn Ann Metcalf, who demonstrated her efficiency in lines other than rural life activities; Rosella Berg, who was very active socially. Of course we can't forget Ruth Trader, who held an office in Rural Life, THE one organization which they all regret leaving because it is the life blood of the two year state graded division. Tony Schwartz, president of rural life the second semester, did a fine job of leading the group (especially at the convention in Madison). Ask any of the rural lifers whether Tony enjoyed every minute of the whole day or not. — 131 — Stanley Omernik Alice Ostrowski Isabelle Owen Donna Parkel Dorothy Pavelski Evelyn Platta Madelene Posky Helen Preston Ray Rade Norman Reinekinq — 132 —LylOMtU Lewis Sanders Irene Stanlslowskl Evelyn Totzler Evelyn Tushinski Anna Smith Leroy Sterts Mabel Thompson Marjori® Van Natta Louise Solverud James Stoltenborq Ruth Trader Marie Van Slett Adolph Somers Phillip Stoltonberg Joseph Treder Cathorine Veers Margaret Sorenson Lucille Swiontek Jack Turecek June Wallace The "mother" of Rural Lifers shouldn't be left out either. Do you know whom we mean? Of course, none other than Marie Eisenhammer, who so faithfully guarded the welfare of the students. Congratulations, Marie, on being a good sport, leadership abilities, and everything that goes toward making a good all-around student. Graduates! We salute you on your accomplishments during your two years at college, and wish you much luck and success in your next adventure—teaching.internal Allco Wickmon Rachel Williamson Lorraine Woqsland Evolyn Zell — 134 —ANDERSON, ANTON: Pulaski, Wis. Major: General Science, Minor: Geography, English. Chemistry; Chi Delta Rho; Forum; Football; Basketball; Intramural Boxing. ANDERSON. CORA MAE: Stevens Point. Wis., Major: Primary Education; Omega Mu Chi; Pres. 40. 1938-1941; Girls Glee Club, 1939-'40, Primary Council, 1937-41. ANDERSON. PHILLIP: Scandinavia, Wis. Major: History; Minors:Social Sciencel Men's Glee Club, Bloc; Forensics; Debate; Iris: Business Manager 1939-40; Social Science Club. Sec.-Treas. and Vice President; L. S. A. President; Forum; Rural Life; Intramural Basketball; Badminton; Nickname: Phil. ATKINS. EYLEENE: Almond, Wisconsin; Major: English, Minors: Music, Biological Science, History; Alpha Kappa Rho. Vice President, 1940, member since Sept. 1938; Sigma Tau Delta, member since Jan. 1940; Band. '37-41; Orchestra, '37-'41, Girl's Glee Club, '37-'41; Forum, '37-'40; Soprano vocalist with the band, Glee Club, and orchestra. Trio in the Glee Club '37-'38. Bassoon Soloist in the band, ’39-'40; Saxophone Soloist with the band '39-'40. Glee Club Librarian in '40-'41. AUCUTT. DONALD: Antigo, Wis. Major: History. Minors: Math, and Biology, Social Science; Phi Sigma Epsilon, '39-'41; Men's Glee Club; Social Science Club; Forum, Vice President for the Social Science Club; Football; Basketball; intramural 2, 3; Prom committee 3; Senior Ball 4; Mardis Gras. 2. Nickname: Uncle Mose—Rochester Aucutt. BATHKE. ELMER: Blenker, Wis. Major: English, Minors: French, Latin. General Science; Grammar Round Table, '37-'41; Intramural Basketball '40-'41. Nick Name: "El”. BECKER. MARGARET: Wausau, Wisconsin; Major: General Science, Minors: History, English; Sigma Tau Delta, Sigma Zeta; Forensics; Debate; College Theater; Iris; Neuman Club; Forum. BENN, MARGUERITE: Medford, Wisconsin. Major: Home Economics, Minors: Social Science; Tau Gamma Beta 1, 2, 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. 2, 3, 4; Home Ec Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Dorm Council 4, Pres. 4. Senior Ball Committee 4. BORCHARDT, BERNICE: Wisconsin Rapids. Wis. Special Student '40-'41; B.E. Degree, Intermediate Department. Nick Name: "Borchy”. BOWERSOCK. KATHERINE: Stevens Point, Wis.; Major: Home Economics; Minors: Biology, General Science; Tau Gamma Beta. '40-'41; Photo Club, '37-’40, Vice Pres. '38-'39; Home Ec Club, ’38-'41; Forum, '37-’4i. BRANDT, LEOTA: Dorchester, Wis. Major: English, Minors: Music. Math, History; Alpha Kappa Rho, '39-’41, Sec. '39-'40, Treasurer '40, Pres. '41; Sigma Tau Delta, '40-’41, Pres. '40-'41; Band. '37-'41, Sec. '39-'40, Publicity Manager. '40, '41; Orchestra. '38-'41; Girl's Glee Club, '37-'41, '38-‘39, Sec. '39-'40, Pres. '40-'41; Gamma Delta, '40-'41; Iris, Music Editor, '39-'4Q; Forum, '37-'4l; Director of Rural Life Chorus, '40-'41. BURKMAN, ROBERT EDWIN: Hawkins. Wis. Majors: General Science. Minors: Math and History; Chi Delta Rho, '39-'41, Sec. '40-'41; Alpha Psi Omega, Director '40-’41. Sub-Director ‘41, 39-'41; Sigma Zeta '39-'41, Grand Master Scientist '40-'41; College Theater. '38-'41; Forum '37-'41; Intramural Activities: Basketball. Volleyball. Kittenball, Ping-pong; Prom Committee ‘40; Senior Ball Committee, '41; Nick Name: "Bob". CHURCH. LORRAINE: Stevens Point, Wis. Primary Education; Girl's Glee Club. Y.W.C.A.; Primary Council. COEY, EILEEN: Bruce, Wisconsin; Primary Education; Y.W.C.A.; Primary Council, Vice President in '40-'41. DAWES. BERNICE: Strongs Prairie. Wis. Primary Education; Y.W.C.A.; Primary Council. Nickname: "Niece". DONERMEYER, LOUISE: Stevens Point, Wis. Major: History, Minors: English, and Science; Sigma Tau Delta, 1940, Forum. DUNN, HELEN E.: Prentice, Wis.; Primary Education; Primary Council, '38-'41; Attended U. of Wisconsin in 1937-'38. — 135 —FRONEK. NORMAN: Antigo, Wis. Major: History. Minors: Geography and Social Science; Debater Social Science Club, Pres. '38, Sec. and Treas. '39; President Rural Life, '40. GERDES, BARBARA: Loyal, Wis. Major: Math; Minors: General Science, English, History; Omega Mu Chi, since '39. treas. '40. Corresponding Sec., '41; Sigma Tau Delta, Sec. '40-'41; Alpha Psi Omega. Vice Pres. '40; Sigma Zeta; College Theater. Sec. '38 39; Forum, '37-'41; Prom Committee ‘40; Senior Ball Committee. '41; Forensics Training School 38'41. GERICKE, VIOLA: Florence, Wis. Major: English. Minor: Biology; Sigma Tau Delta. '40-'41; Girl's Glee Club, '37-'41; Y.W.C.A. '37-'41. Vice President '39-'40, Pres. '40-'41, Geneva Representative '39-'40; Pointer, '41; Iris, '40-'41; Grammar Round Table '38-'41; Nelson Hall Council, '39-'41, Pres. '40-'41; Nick-name: "Toby". GLEESON. MARY ANNE: Green Bay. Wis. Major: Home Economics. Minors: History; Tau Gamma Beta '38-'41; '38 Recording Sec., Vice Pres. '41. Neuman Club; Home Ec Club, reporter '39. member '37-'41; Forum ‘37-'41. HANNON. ELIZABETH: Stevens Point. Wis., Major: Math and History, Minors: French Social Science; Sigma Zeta '38-'4l; College Theater; Iris; Forum. Nick-name: Betty. HIERL. GERALD: Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. Majors: History. Minors: Geography and English; Alpha Psi Omega '41. College Theater; Forum; Photo Club. Nick-name: Jerry or Bud. HILLERT, EVELYN: Greenwood, Wis., Major: English, Minors: History and Biology; Omega Mu Chi, '38-'41; Sigma Tau Delta '39-'41; Y.W.C.A., College Theater; Iris; Forum; Prom Committee '40; Nelson Hall Council '39-'41; Transfer from Lawrence College. HRYNIEWICKI, HENRY: Thorp, Wis. Major: Chemistry, Minors: Biological Science, Music. History; Alpha Kappa Rho '39-'41; Band '37-'41; Orchestra '37-'41; Photo Club '37-'41; Iris '40-'41, Forum '37-'41; Nick-name: Heinie. HUNTOON ARLENE: Waupaca, Wis. Intermediate Department; W.A.A.; Y.W.C.A.; Photo Club Sec. and Treas. '39-’40; Iris, Grammar Round Table; Forum. Transferred from U. of Wisconsin. JACOBS. MARJORIE: Stevens Point. Wis. Primary Education; Omega Mu Chi, Treas. '39; Pan. Hell Council '40. Vice Pres. '40; Primary Council, Press representative, A.G.E.A., Senior Ball '40. JOHNSON, BETTY: Wisconsin Rapids. Wis. Major: English. Minors: Music, History, Social Science; Tau Gamma Beta '38 on; Alpha Kappa Rho. Pres. '38-'39; Sigma Tau Delta, Historian '40-'41; Band, sponsor '38-'41, Vice pres. ‘40-'41, Orchestra; Girl's Glee Club. Librarian '40-'41, Flute Soloist. "37-'41, Flute Soloist with Men's Glee Club '40-'41, Iris '40-'41; Forum '37-'41; Mixed Chorus, '37-'40. Nick-name: "Betts' . JOHNSON, HELEN: Endeavor, Wis.. Majors: Chemistry. Minors: Biology and General Science; Sigma Zeta; Neuman Club; Forum. JOHNSEN, MARGARET: Denmark. Wis. Major, History. Minors: Biological Science. Geography, and English; Tau Gamma Beta. Pres. '40-'41; Iris. KAPLUN, FLORENCE: Sheboygan, Wis. Major: Math, Minors: History, and Chemistry; College Theater; Forum. Nick-name: “Flo". KRIDER, DONALD: Antigo. Wis. Major: History, Minors: Social Science, Biology, and English; Alpha Psi Omega, official publicity manager. Director '40; Forensics; Debate; College Theater; Technical Director '40-'41; advertising manager '39-'41; College; Varsity debate; ‘38-'41; Prom Committee '40; Senior Ball Committee '41. KUFEL, MYRON: Stevens Point, Wis. Major: History, Minors: Geography and Chemistry; Neuman club '37-'41; Forum '37-'41 Intramural activities '37-'41; Prom Committee '40; Senior Ball Committee '41. Nick-name: Mike. LARSON, DOROTHY: Stevens Point, Wis.; Major. Math. Minors: General Science, Biology, English; Omega Mu Chi. Treas. '40-'41; Girls Glee Club; Forum; Prom Committee '40. LARSON. JAMES: Wautoma, Wis.; Major: History, Minors: Geography and Social Science; Men's Glee Club, Rural Life. Nick-name: Jim. LEGAULT. LIONEL H.: Owen. Wis., Majors: Science, Minors: English and Geography; Sigma Zeta '39-'41, Forum; intramural activities. LOCHNER, MARY ANNE: Arpin, Wis., Major: History, Minors: English, Biology, French; Sigma Tau Delta. Editor of “Flight" '41; Girls Glee Club '39; Iris '39-'41; Neuman Club '37-'41; Forum '37-'41. MORATZ. EDNA A.: Westfield, Wis.. Major: Home Economics. Minors: Biology and General Science; Home Ec Club; Gamma Delta. Treas. '40-'41; Forum '37-'41. MEVERDEN. MERVILLE L.: Eland. Wis., Majors: Math, and Science; Minors: History, Physics, Chemistry and Biology; Chi Delta Rho, Treas. 1940, Vice Pres. '41; Alpha Psi Omega, Sigma Zeta, 1938, Vice-Master Scientist '40-'41; College Theater, Business Manager, Forum '37-41; Prom Committee '40; the only C.S.T.C. Student taking Machine Shop Defense Work; Nick-name: "Mev". — 136 —MOZUCH, KATHERINE: Stevens Point. Wis.; Omega Mu Chi; Girls Glee Club; W.A.A.. Primary Council; Senior Ball Committee '41. MURGATROYD, EVELYN: Wisconsin Rapids, Wis., Majors; English. Minors: History, Spanish; Sigma Tau Delta 40-'41; Alpha Psi Omega '41; Girls Glee Club; Y.W.C.A., College Theater, Pointer; Iris; Grammar Round Table; Nick-name: "Murgie"; Transferred from U. of Wisconsin at beginning of Junior Year. NELSON, DOROTHY M.: Abbotsford, Wis., Major: English, Minors: Music. Geography, Biology, History; Sigma Tau Delta, Alpha Kappa Rho, Treas. '40-'41; Girls Glee Club; Y.W.C.A.; Forum; Nick-name: ''Dot '. NELSON, KEITH: Wausau. Wis., Major; General Science, Minors: History. Geography; Pointer, business manager '40-'41 Rural Life; Friendly 21, Pres. '40-'41. OLK, ROBERT: Stevens Point, Wis., Major: Chemistry. Minors: Math and History; Phi Sigma Epsilon. Vice Pres. '40, Pan Hell. Rep. '41; Basketball '37-’40, Prom Committee '40; Senior Ball Committee '41. PLATTA. EVELYN: Amherst Junction, Wis., Neuman Club; Rural Life. PRELL, SELMA: Stevens Point, Wis., Primary Education; L.S.A.; Primary Council; Nick-name: "Seim". RADEMACHER, GOTILAND: Westboro, Wis., Major: Biology and Elementary Education, minors: History and English; Omega Mu Chi, ’38-’41; Sigma Tau Delta; Sigma Zeta; Y.W.C.A.; Iris; Grammar Round Table. Physical Education department in all women’s sports. RATHKE, RUTH: Auburndale, Wis., Major: English; Minors: History. French, and Biology; Omega Mu Chi, Sec. ’40; Sigma Tau Delta, '39-'41; Girl's Glee Club '37-'40; Gamma Delta '40-'41; Iris; Forum '37-'41. ROSE, EILEEN: Stevens Point, Wis., Majors: English, Minors, History and Biological Science; Tau Gamma Beta, Press Repre. 2, Corresponding Sec. 3, Recording Sec. 4; Alpha Kappa Rho; Sigma Tau Delta; Girl's Glee Club; Vice Pres. 3; Forensics; Debate; Pointer; Iris; Forum; Prom Committee '40; Mixed Chorus 1,2,3; "Flight" 1,3. RUSSELL, RITA: Port Edwards. Wisconsin; Majors: Math and History, Minors: English; Tau Gamma Beta Pres. 4; Pan Hell Council 4, Pres. 4; Forum; Dorm Council; Senior Ball Committee '40. RUTTNER. MRS LAURETTA: Kewaunee. Wis., Major: Geography. Minor: English; Neuman Club; Grammar Round Table, Pres. 1936; Dorm Council, Friendly "21". SIEBERT, EARLE: Bimamwood, Wis. Major: History, Minor: Social Science, Biology. English; Chi Delta Rho. alum Sec. 1939, Coires. Sec. 1940, National Deputy Grand Master 1940-'41; Alpha Psi Omega. Sec.-Treas. 1940, Pres. '41; Men's Glee Club; College Theater. Production Manager '38-'40, Pres. '40-'41; Pointer Reporter '39-'40. Editor '40-'41; Iris Dep't. Editor '39, Social Science Sec. Treas. '38-'40; Prom Committee '40; Senior Ball Committee '41. Mardi Gras. SLABOSHESKI, HARRY: Princeton. Wis., Major: General Science, Minors: Geography. English, History; Chi Delta Rho. Sec. to Alum. '40, Pres. '40; Sigma Zeta; Men's Glee Club; Forum; Intramural Activities. SMITH, BETTY: Gillett, Wis., Intermediate and Jr. High School; Omega Mu Chi. Vice Pres. '41; Sigma Tau Delta, Editor of "Flight"; W.A.A., College Theater; Pointer; Iris; Grammar Round Table; Forum; Senior Ball Committee '41. Nick-name: "Smithie". SODERBERG, DORIS: Thorp, Wis., Primary; Tau Gamma Beta, Vice Pres. 40; Alpha Kappa Rho, Girls Glee Club; Pointer '39-'40; Neuman Club. Sec. 1939; Primary Council, ’37-'41; Senior Ball Committee. '40; Nelson Hall Council, '38. SORENSEN. DOROTHY M: Rhinelander, Wis., Major. Education; Y.W.C.A.; Rural Life; Friendly "21"; Nickname: "Dot". STEINER. NANCY: Stevens Point. Wis., Major: English, Minor: Biological Science; Omega Mu Chi Pan Hellenic Representative. 1939; Sigma Tau Delta, ’38-'41; W.A.A., '37- 41; College Theater, '37-'40; Iris, '37-'39; Grammar Round Table, "37-41; Basketball, '37-‘40; Intramural activities, Archery; Prom Committee. '40. THORNTON. HELEN: Shiocton. Wis., Major, Home Ec.; Minor, Biological Science, General Science; Photo Club; Home Ec. Club; Forum. TORKELSON. GERALD: Merrill, Wis.; Major, American History; Minor, Social Science, English; Chi Delta Rho, Corresponding Secretary. '39-'40, Alum. Sec., '40-'41; Alpha Kappa Rho; Men's Glee Club, Publicity Chairman '39-'40, President '40-'41; Pointer Staff. '40-'41; Social Science Club; L.S.A., president, '38-'39; Vice President of Junior Class. President of Senior Class; College quartette '38-'40; Mixed Chorus '38-'40. TYLER, KATHARINE: Stevens Point, Wis., Major, English; Minors. History, Biology; Omega Mu Chi. Chaplain, '39-'40; Sigma Tau Delta, Treasurer, '40-'41; Girls Glee Club '39-'40; Iris '38-'39; Forum '38-'41; Junior Prom Committee '40; Senior Ball Committee '41; Nickname: "Kay". — 137 —VAN DYKE, LA VERNE: Little Chute, Wis., Major, History; Minors, Biology. English, Geography; Chi Delta Rho; Forum; "S" club; Football; Basketball; Intramural; Prom Committee; Nickname, "Snooky". VINCENT. JACK: Stevens Point, Wis., Major, General Science, Minors, History, French; Chi Delta Rho, Corresponding Sec. '39; Rushing Chairman, '39-'40 '41, Corresponding Sec. '41; Sec. of Alum. '41; Pledge Chairman '40; Men's Glee Club; Pointer; Iris; Forum Pres. '40-'41 Intramurals, Senior Ball Committee, '40; Nickname: "Vine". VOGEDES. LUCILLE: Marathon, Wis., Major: Math, Minors: Science and English; W.A.A., Neuman Club; Rural Life. WACHOLZ. EDWARD: Spencer, Wis., Major: American History, Minor: Social Science, and Math; Alpha Kappa Rho: Men's Glee Club, Cores, Sec. '40-'4l; Gamma Delta Pres. '40-'41; College Theater; Forum; Intramural; Nickname: Eddie Proff, Detective. Edwardo. WAID, MURIEL: Waupaca, Wis., Major History, Minors: English, Social Science; Rural Life, Friendly Twenty-one; Men's Glee Club accompanist. WINARSKI, GRACE: Stevens Point. Wis., Majors: Math and General Science; Sigma Zeta, Sec. and Treas. '40-'41; Orchestra; Forum. WINCH. LA RAE: Marshfield, Wis. Primary education; Tau Gamma Beta. Pres. 41; Alpha Kappa Rho; Girl's Glee Gub; Primary Council, Sec. '39-'40, Pres. '40-'41; Senior Ball Committee, '40; Mixed Chorus '38-'40. WIRKUS. CARMELITA: Edgar, Wis. Primary Education; Tau Gamma Beta, Alum Repre. ‘40, Pan Hell. Repre. '41; Girl's Glee Club; Pointer; Iris; Primary Council; Prom Committee; Senior Ball Committee; Nickname, ''Carmel". YOUNG. DAN: Bancroft. Wis.. Major: General Science; Minors: History and Geography; Phi Sigma Epsilon; "S" club; Football; Nick-name: "Killer". ANDERSON, CAROL: Aubumdale. Wis. 2 year state graded; Gamma Delta, Primary Council; Rural Life; Nickname. "Kelly". BAILEY. NOLA C.: Athens. Wis.; Y.W.C.A.; Rural Life. BUDSBERG, LUELLA: Rosholt. Wis.; Rural Life. BUSE, RHODA: Spencer, Wis.; Gamma Delta; L.S.A.; Rural Life; Nickname, "Buse". CHECK. JOHN: Rosholt, Wis.; Neuman Club; Rural Life; Nickname, "Johnie". CIULA, SOPHIA M.: Knowlton, Wis.; W.A.A.; Neuman Club; Rural Life; Nickname. "Rene". COOK. JEAN: Unity. Wis.; Rural Life. CRAFT. GLADYS: Marshfield, Wis.; Y.W.C.A.; Rural Life. CROSSGROVE, DORIS M.: Unity. Wis.; Rural Life; Basketball '40-'41. EASTMAN, RUTH J.: Waupaca, Wis., Rural Life; Rural Life Chorus for Two Years; Nickname. "Ruthie". EHLERS. JEANETTE: Neilsville. Wis., 2 year Rural State Graded; Rural Life; Nickname, Nette". FLETCHER, EDITH: Plover. Wis.; 2 year State Graded; Rural Life. GRESENS, RAYMOND: Edgar, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded; L.S.A.; Rural Life; Ping Pong, Checkers; "Kay". GREVE, BERNICE: Brillion, Wis., 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life; Tau Gamma Beta; Y.W.C.A.; Gamma Delta; Iris '40-'41. GUTH, HERBERT E.: Bancroft, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life Club; Table Tennis 41. HALVERSON, COURTNEY: Amherst. Wis.; 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life; Men's Glee Club; Intramural; Nickname. "Court" or "Flash". HECKMAN. JEAN: Unity, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded course; Neuman Club; Rural Life; Nickname, "Heckie". — 138 —HUMKE. HAROLD: Greenwood, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded Course, Rural Life; Men's Glee Club; Intramural Activities; Nickname, "Butch”. JAHNKE, ELEANORA: Mattoon, Wis.. 2 Year State Graded; Girl's Glee Club; Gamma Delta; L.S.A.; Rural Life. JAWART. HAROLD ROBERT: Manawa, Wis.; L.S.A.; Rural Life; Checkers. JOHNSON, ELAINE: Iola, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded Course; W.A.A.; L.S.A.; Rural Life; Nickname, ''Johnny". JOHNSON, RUTH E.: Rhinelander, Wis.; 2 Years State Graded; Rural Life; L.S.A.; Friendly Twenty-one. JOHNSON, VIVIAN: Tigerton, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded Course; Girl's Glee Club; Y.W.C.A.; Rural Life. KRUEGER, VELORIS: Curtiss, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life; Rural Life Chorus; Nickname: "Larry". LEACH. RILEY: Waupaca, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded Course; Rural Life; Treasurer Rural Life Club '40. LEMKE, EUNICE: Medford, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded Course; L.S.A.; Rural Life; Rural Life Chorus. LEY, IRENE: Spencer, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded Course; Rural Life. MASLOWSKE. MARGARET: Mosinee, Wis., 2 Year State Graded Course; Neuman Club; Rural Life. McCALLUM, INEZ: Elroy, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded; Y.W.C.A.; Rural Life; Friendly Twenty-one. METCALF, KATHRYN ANN: Montello, Wis., 2 Year State Graded Course; Tau Gamma Beta; Neuman Club; Rural Life; Nickname, "Kay". MUSSEY. ALICE: Westfield. Wis., 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life; Y.W.C.A. NEVE. LUCILLE L.: Lyndon Station, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life. OMERNIK, STANLEY, Polonia, Wis., 2 Year State Graded Course; Rural Life. OWEN. ISABELLE: Mattoon, Wis., 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life; Nickname. "Issy". POSKY, MADELINE: Stevens Point, Wis., 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life; Photo Club; Y.W.C.A.; Basketball; Nickname, "Ginger". PRESTON, HELEN L.: Wonewoc, Wis., 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life. RADE, RAYMOND: Eagle River, Wis., 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life; Intramural Activities. REINEKING, NORMAN: Greenwood, Wis., 2 Year State Graded; Treasurer of Rural Life; Rural Life. SANDERS, LEWIS: Wittenberg, Wis., 2 Year State Graded Course; Rural Life. SMITH, ANNA I.: Endeavor, Wis., 2 Year State Graded, Band; Rural Life. SOLVERUD. LOUISE M.: Nelsonville, Wis.; L.S.A.; Rural Life; Nickname, "Weezy”. SORENSON. MARGARET: Almond, Wisconsin; 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life; Nickname, "Margie". STANISLOWSK. IRENE: Rosholt. Wis.; 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life. STERTZ. LEROY: Junction City; 2 Year State Graded Course; Rural Life; Ping Pong; Baseball; Nickname. "Storty". STOLTENBERG, JAMES: Rosholt. Wis. 2 Year State Graded Course; L.S.A.; Rural Life; Intramural; Nickname, "Jim". STOLTENBERG. PHILLIP: Rosholt, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded Course; L.S.A.; Rural Life; Sec. '40; Intramural Activities; Nickname, "Phil". TETZLER, EVELYN: Conover. Wis.; 2 Year State Graded Course; Y.W.C.A.; Rural Life; Rural Life Chorus. THOMPSON. MABEL: New London. Wis.. 2 Year State Graded; Y.W.C.A.; Rural Life; Nickname. "Tommy". TRADER. RUTH MARIE: Iola, Wis., 2 Year State Graded Course; Rural Life, Sec. 41; Nickname. "Ruthie". TREDER, JOSEPH T.: Stevens Point. Wis.. 2 Year State Graded Course; Neuman Club; Rural Life. TURECEK. JACK: Wittenberg, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life; Intramural Activities; Nickname, "lack". TUSHINSKI, EVELYN: Marathon, Wis., 2 Year State Graded; Rural Life; Neuman Club; Basketball. VAN NATTA, MARJORIE: Arpin, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded Course; Rural Life; Girl’s Glee Club; Y.W.C.A.; Nickname, "Marge". VEERS, CATHERINE: Stratford, Wis.; 2 Year State Graded Course; Rural Life; Gamma Delta; Y.W.C.A.; Rural Life Chorus. WALLACE, JUNE: Stevens Point, Wis., 2 Year State Graded Course; Rural Life; Y.W.C.A.; W.A.A.; Rural Life Chorus; Intramural Activities. WOPLAND, LORRAINE: Galloway. Wis. 2 Year State Graded Course; Rural Life; W.A.A.; L.S.A.; Nickname, "Rainie". ZELL, EVELYN: Stevens Point, Wis., 2 Year State Graded Course; Rural Life; Nickname: "Blackie". — 139 —WHERE OUR « MONEY WENT: f 1. Marching men " WJM of song.... 2. Lets have more o! of this! 4 3. W.C.T.U. Representative 4. In memoriam to President Smith S. Chalk Talks 6. Austrians. Hungarians, or what have you? 7. Something new. Mr. Evans? 8. From the "Land Down Under"— Australia 9. Mexicali Rose (and her name l WAS Rose) 10. Bird songs at—Eventide?This year our advertisers received us kindly, and whether or not they read our advance publicity, they greeted us cordially. We appreciate the grand support given us, the courteous responses made to our requests, and may we continue to exchange benefits in the future. . .We need our businessmen, and they have proven their need of us by advertising in this section. Support our advertisers! Joyce Larsen Business Manager — 141 —J chnabel 5 mzx' siop WHITIH HOHl — TAYLOR'S DRUG STORES • BETTER CLOTHING • DRUGS STATIONERY GREETING CARDS GIFTS TOILETRIES • Stevens Point Wisconsin Rapids DOWNTOWN SOUTH SIDE 111 Strongs 752 Church TACKLE and GUNS ALL ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT MOLL-GLENNON COMPANY JANTZEN BATHING SUITS "Because You Love Nice Things" THE • SPORT SHOP • LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR ACCESSORIES and POINT SPORTING GOODS CO. LADIES' CHILDREN'S FOOTWEARCentral State Teachers College STEVENS POINT, WIS. Member AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS COLLEGES Degrees in all fields of Public School Service Special Attention To RURAL EDUCATION RADIO EDUCATION VISUAL EDUCATION Excellent Summer Sessions "Let us turn again, and fondly, To thy best traditions true— Central—Queen of all Wisconsin Alma Mater—here's to you! " "THE COLLEGE THAT TRAINS FOR SERVICE"J. A. WALTER FLORIST Plant and Cut Flowers Arrangements of Distinction Tel. 1629 110 N. Michigan Stevens Point, Wis. KREMBS' HARDWARE COMPANY Compliments of • The CONTINENTAL Phone 21 YOUNG MEN'S CLOTHES Stevens Point, Wis. • PERMANIZED BONDS, LEDGER AND THIN PAPERS —KEEBORD TYPEWRITER PAPERS — ARE MANUFACTURED EXCLUSIVELY BY THE WHITING-PLOVER PAPER CO. Stevens Point Wisconsin — 144 —BOSTON FURNITURE Compliments of and UNDERTAKING CO. The HANNON-BACH PHARMACY Quality Furniture and Rugs at Reasonable Prices • Established 1888 430 Main St. The Best in Drugs-Stationery-Gifts Lunches-Sodas THE HOTEL WHITING • Headquarters for PARTIES and DANCES — 145 —Compliments of CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK Ready-to-Wear Jack and Jill Shop Headquarters For Savings Home Furnishings "I SHALL PASS THROUGH THIS WORLD BUT ONCE. ANY GOOD THEREFORE THAT I CAN DO, OR ANY KINDNESS THAT I CAN SHOW TO ANY HUMAN BEING, LET ME DO IT NOW. LET ME NOT DEFER OR NEGLECT IT, FOR I SHALL NOT PASS THIS WAY AGAIN." — 146 — The ARK STUDIONORMINGTON'S DRY CLEANING LAUNDRY Phone 380 Compliments of E. J. PFIFFNER LUMBER CO. Compliments of NIGBOR FUR COAT COMPANY Wisconsin's Largest Furriers Milwaukee Berlin Wausau Green Bay Stevens Point — 147 —JAHM OLLIER AGAIN ‘ This crest of service and quality is the hallmark of America’s largest Yearbook designing and photoengraving organization. J HI i OLLIER ENGRAVING CO. Makers of Fine Printing Plates for Black and Color Artists and Photographers 817 W. WASHINGTON BLVD. CHICAGO. ILL. — 148 —Most Popular In Central Wisconsin Compliments of the SERVICE PRINTING COMPANY FISHER CASHIN and REINHOLT It's An American Tradition The crisis of war. of business depression. tho challenge of modem Invention and of public preference have never found American industry idle and unconcerned. The utility Industry, despite eight years of constant attack and censure, is pouring hundreds of millions of tax money into public coffers. without asking for preferred treatment. It is depended upon, today, for over ninety percent of all electricity generated In the country, and is spending new millions for necessary production expansion so that the power demands of the present war emergency may be unhesitantly met. It is an American tradition for private enterprise to step into the breach in time of crisis.... this company and the Industry it represents is proud of the contribution it is able to make. Wisconsin PUBLIC SERVICE CorporationCompliments of FISHER'S DAIRY Compliments of SCRIBNER'S DAIRY Protected Milk Phone 1367 114 Wyatt Compliments of BOOTH AUTO KRAUS MOTOR SALES SALES CARL MOTOR KARNER AUTO SALES COMPANY G. A. GULLIKSON SMITH MOTOR COMPANY COMPANY BUICK SALES STEVENS POINT MOTOR AND SERVICE COMPANY TRICKEY'S AUTO NORTH MOTOR SALES SALES VETTER Manufacturing Co. Phone 87 For BETTER LUMBER and MILLWORK — 150 —Compliments of the BELMONT HOTEL COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE Compliments of JOURNAL PRINTING COMPANY Everything in Student Supplies You'll just love every drop of 'Xup i-JfaViyC' DEER WOOD COFFEE WGtflN the world's choicest green coffee scientifically blended and roasted under our controlled process guarantees the finest flavor. That's why you'll prefer Deerwood "Super flavor" coffee. 9Tie COPPf COMPANY STEVENS POINT —— MARSHFIELD MEDFORD- MERRILL — 151 —ZENOFF'S Super Food Market South Side Stevens Point's Most Complete ONE STOP FOOD MARKET We Specialize in Fancy Meats, Groceries Fresh Fruits Vegetables Free Delivery Service 1000 So. Division Phone 1880 MENTION THE IRIS Compliments of DELZELL OIL COMPANY — 152 —Member Federal Reserve and F.D.I. Corporation EVERY BUSINESS BOOM ENDS WITH A BOOMERANG Boom! Business activity in this country is now at an all time high. It is an unhappy fact that England's desperate need for war materials is producing such a high state of business activity that the dangers of a boom constantly increase. Booms mean high wages, more jobs, silk shirts, diamond rings, autos for a short time... Then comes the collapse. After every boom comes the boomerang—throwing business into reverse and men out of jobs. The 1940-41 boom will end no differently than the 1937 boom, the 1929, or any other boom that America has experienced. For every peak in business there is a valley of depression. So what. Just this: make the most of present opportunities. Save more. Put it in a strong bank and let it stay there till the day of reckoning you know is coming, comes. This BIG BANK offers you security, convenience and fair interest on your savings. Your deposits will be handled with courtesy and consideration. FIRST NATIONAL BANK Capital 6c Surplus $271,000. Largest in Portage County DRUG STORE Lunches Gifts Drugs Stationery Greeting Cards Soda Fountain Toiletries Kodaks Films 459 Main (27 steps from Post Office) WELSBY'S Best Wishes from CLEANING IRENE and MERV — 153 —FINE CRAFTSMANSHIP in our well equipped plant assures you of a well printed publication. which to us is ON-THE-SPOT service at all times during the planning and production of your books reduces your usual yearbook worries to a minimum. built up from many years of collaboration and our thorough knowledge of your publication problems makes working together a very pleasant experience. Add to these things the fact that to many of us Central State is Alma Mater and you can appreciate why we try to give an extra measure of service and quality to our college publications. WORZALLA PUBLISHING CO. cr N common with many other colleges and high schools throughout the Middle West, Central State finds right here in Stevens Point at the National Bookbinding Company complete facilities for fine yearbook covers and binding. Many colleges with limited budgets too, have improved their yearbooks with our colorful, flat-opening PLASTIC BINDING. We invite your inquiries on all your yearbook cover or binding problems. EFFICIENT SERVICE PLEASANT RELATIONS Stevens Point, Wisconsin. Stevens Point, Wisconsin Book binding • Plastic Binding Yearbook coversLINES OF INSURANCE: Two Strong Mutual Companies operating Automobile on the age-old mutual principles of econo- Garage Liability Plate Glass my in management, equitable claims settle- Burglary ments, and the return of dividends to poli- Workmen s Comp. General Liability cyholders. These Companies have no capi- pire tal stock and no stockholders, all assets are Windstorm Extended Coverage held for the benefit of the policyholders. Rent and Rental Value Inland Marine Business Income (U O) HARDWARE DEALERS MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY AND HARDWARE MUTUAL CASUALTY COMPANY Home Offices: Stevens Point, Wisconsin Licensed in Every State Offices Coast to Coast —155 —Dndex, to AdoeAtiieAA ADVERTISER PAGE Bake-Rite Baking Co...............................................................149 Belmont Hotel.....................................................................151 Boston Furniture and Undertaking..................................................145 Campbell Company..................................................................146 Citizens National Bank............................................................146 Central State Teachers College....................................................143 College Counter...................................................................151 College Eat Shop..................................................................153 Continental Clothing Store........................................................144 Delzell Oil Co....................................................................152 E. J. Pfiffner Lumber Co..........................................................147 First National Bank...............................................................153 Fisher. Cashin and Reinholdt......................................................149 Fisher's Dairy....................................................................150 Hannon-Bach Pharmacy..............................................................145 Hardware Mutual Insurance.........................................................155 Hotel Whiting.....................................................................145 John and Ollier Engraving Co......................................................148 Journal Printing Co...............................................................151 Krembs Hardware Co................................................................144 Moll-Glennon Co...................................................................142 National Bookbinding Company......................................................154 Nigbor Fur Co.....................................................................147 Noah's Ark Studio.................................................................146 Normington's Dry Cleaning.........................................................147 Service Printing Co...............................................................149 Scribner's Dairy..................................................................150 Schnabel's Clothing Store.........................................................142 Sport Shop........................................................................142 Stevens Point Auto Dealers Association............................................150 Taylor's Drug Stores..............................................................142 The Copps Co......................................................................151 Vetter's Lumber Co................................................................150 Walter Florist....................................................................144 Welsby's Dry Cleaning.............................................................153 Westenberger Drug Store...........................................................153 Whiting-Plover Paper Co...........................................................144 Wis. Pub. Service Corp............................................................149 Worzalla Publishing Co............................................................154 Zenofi's Food Market..............................................................152 — 156 — itAeut Abb, Robert....................................49 Abrahamson, Doris.........................60, 64 Abrahamson, Lennert............................60 Ackerman. Jack....... 47. 49, 68. 76, 77. 81. 96, 108, 118, 121 Adams, Marie............................. 14, 106 Ahles, Ralph...................................7, 60 Albertie, Jean........................... 14, 106 Albright, Annette.........................84. 96 Ameigh, Wilma..................................66 Anderson, Anton................................37 Andersen, Arles.......................... 14. 106 Anderson Carol.......................... 106, 129 Anderson, Cora Mae----- 46. 47, 50. 56, 104, 124 Anderson, Dorothy.........................129 Anderson, Irene......................... 106, 129 Anderson, Lyla...................... 14, 66, 106 Anderson, Maurice.........................46. 53 Anderson. Phillip....... 68. 70. 107, 108. 124 Anderson, Wilma...............................60, 82 Andre, Lois......................... 60, 64, 66 Arndt, Roy.......................... 60. 72, 84 Artz, Eileen................................. 14, 64 Atkins. Eyleene......................64, 118, 124 Aucutt, Donald.................. 53. 68, 123, 124 Aulik, Robert............... 57. 59, 74. 81, 108 Averill, Dorothy.............................. 14 Baebenroth, Robert............................47, 53 Bagnell, James................................87, 88 Bailey. Nola.........................106, 129 Bandeiin, Carl...................... 10, 49, 77 Barber, Anita.................................58, 82 Barber, Luella....................... 106, 129 Barber, Theodora...............................60 Bamum, La Vem..................................14 Barrett. Mary.................................129 Bartosz, Wallace........ 68. 77, 80. 84, 96. 108 Basinski, Evelyn.....................14. 106 Bathke, Elmer..............................8, 124 Bauemfeind, Lois.............................. 14 Beach, Ella................. 60. 66. 75. 82. 107 Beadle, Ardith ............................... 14 Becker. Donald ...................... 14, 68 Becher, Margaret..........................16, 72, 124 Becher, Robert...................... 47, 53, 84 Belongia. Doris............................... 14 Benn, Marguerite......................... 54, 124 Bentle, Gordon................................ 14 Berens, Alexander............................. 14 Berg, El wood ............................... 106 Berg, Rozella........................... 45, 106, 129 Berg, Sidney ................................ 106 Berger. Marguerite...............14. 16, 64, 66 Berndt, Dorothy ..........................95 Bestul, Donna................................ 14, 66 Beversdorf, Dorothy................. 14. 66, 104 Blissett, Millicent......... 14, 64. 66, 82, 112 Bocher, Arnold.................................49 Boe. Lillian................ 47. 50, 76. 78. 79, 80 Booth, Melvin.................................59, 107 Borchardt, Clifford.......................... 14, 42 Borden, Gene.......................................59 Borgen, Eleanor.............................. 14, 106 Bom, Linda.............. 16. 80. 82. 95. 102, 103 Bower sock, Jean ........................... 14 Bowersock, Katherine............................. 124 Brandt, Leota .... 64, 66. 117, 118, 121, 123, 124 Bray. Jim......................................... 58 Brennan, Patricia..................................58 Brenner. Kenneth...... 16, 49. 60. 109, 110, 111 Brill, Gene....................................7. 60 Britten, Alice............................... 14, 106 Brock, Lois.............................14, 66 Brooks, Arvilla.................................. 129 Brown, James...................................... 14 Brown. Reva....................................... 14 Bruener, Mary Jane.................................96 Brunner, Vincent...................................59 Brylski, Eleanor ........................... 14 Budsberg, Luella..................................129 Burant, Harriet.............................. 14, 106 Burkman, Robert .. 47. 49. 76. 117, 118, 121, 124 Burnett, Ruth.......................................% Burroughs, Neva Jane..........................58, 66 Buse, Rhoda............................. 58, 106, 129 Butter, Mary Louise......... 58, 66, 82, 102, 112 Cammack, Vernon....................................14 Campbell, Anita....................................14 Campbell, Elizabeth...........................58, 82 Carnahan, William....... 16, 37, 42. 53, 58, 108 Carver, Patricia........ 58, 64, 66, 82, 102, 103 Cashin, Patricia...................................58 Caskey, Chester..................... 43, 58, 87, 107 Catlin, Elaine...................... 58, 76. 77. 104 Chapin, Glendy............... 7, 64. 78, 79, 80, 82 Check, John..................................106, 129 Chenoweth, Ruth................................7, 58 Christ, Luella.................................... 14 Christianson, Mildred.........................74, 96 Chrouser, Ruth.................. 14, 64. 66, 74, 104 Church, Lorraine........................ 66. 82, 124 Chylek, Bess..................................58, 129 Chylek, Lillian.............................. 14, 106 Cuila, Ida........................................106 Cuila, Sophia.................................... 129 Clark, Edna ...................................... 14 Clark, Margaret....................................96 Clark, Virginia................................... 14 Clark, Bernard.................................... 14 Coates. Betty................................ 14, 66 Cody. Kathleen.....................................58 Coey. Eileen................................ 105. 124 Cole. Marian .......................... 14, 106 Collins. Marie.......................... 14, 74, 106 Conant, Robert.....................................59 Condon, Mary............................ 14, 74, 106Conover, Gladys 58, 64, 104. 105 Cook, Jean 58. 106, 129 Cooper, Roman 6. 14. 16 Cornwell, Betty 14 Cowan, John 14. 68, 80 Craft, Gladys 129 Craig. Ronald 14. 68 Crawford. Olive 58. 64. 66, 118 Cress, Elizabeth .. 9, 78. 79. 96. 104, 105 Crossgrove. Doris .... 58, 129 Crummey, Marguerite 14 Dana. Richard 7 Daniels. Robert 14. 106 Daughhetee, Elva .... 82. 96 Dawes, Bemiece 105. 124 Dean, Mildred 14, 106 De Canter. Echo 75. 95. 107 De Guere, Elizabeth .. 58 Dietrich, Bob 7. 60. 64 Dineen, Catherine 58 Dobbs, Joyce 14, 104. 105 Dodge, Charles .... 7, 45. 53. 64. 96. 110 Donermeyer, Louise .. 124 Dorsha, Gregory 37. 40 Drew, Dorothy 14 Dunn, Helen 105, 124 Durkee. Daniel 13, 14, 45, 68. 108 Eastman. Ruth 129 Eckels, Phyllis 14 Edwards, John 14, 16 Edwards. Margaret ... 50, 66. 96. 104 Ehlers, Jeanette 58. 106, 129 Eichhorn. Billie 14. 16 Eisenhammer. Marie . 74. 75. 107, 121 Ellman, Betty 14. 106 Erdman. Harvard 14. 64 Erdman, Louis 68 Ericksen, Esther 9. 66. 73. 82. 94, 102, 103 Eveland, Evangeline . 106. 129 Fahmer. Arthur 14 Falk, Dorothy 82. 130 Ferguson. Norma 104 Fink, Frederick 42. 43 Firkus, Helen 14. 106 Fisher. Robert 7. 10, 50. 87. 88 Fitzke, Betty 102, 103 Fleischmann, Bregetta 14, 66. 74 Fletcher, Edith 130 Floistad, Dorothy 58 Flood, Dorothy 82. 130 Fonstad, Shirley 9. 14. 16. 66. 104 Fox, Lydia 14 France. Earlene 58, 106, 130 Francis, Marcella 14, 106 Fredick, Russell 68, 124 Friday, Frank 14. 68 Frisch, Ervin 68. 69 Fritsch, Ted 36, 37. 42. 44, 49, 87, 88 Fronek. Norman 70. 72. 75, 107, 124 Frost, Betty 15. 64 Fryer, William 15 Fuchsgruber, Ruth ... 95 Gardner, Everett 14. 106 Gauer, Helen 95 Gear, Jack 49. 58 Geer, Mary K.................... 59, 102, 103, 112 Gehrke, Keith...................................... 58 Gerdes, Barbara............. 50. 76, 77, 117, 118, 121, 123, 124 Gericke, Viola........... 9. 66, 78. 79, 82. 102, 103, 121. 124 Gierszewski, Norbert.............................. 108 Gilman. Jeanne............................... 15. 66 Gilman, Glendell.................................. 128 Gleeson, Mary........................... 47, 54, 124 Glisczinski, Bernice............................... 15 Gonsiorowski. Norbert.........................58, 64 Goodrich. Joe........................... 37, 43, 49 Gotchy. Loretta..................... 15. 64. 66, 104 Grzegozewski, Edmund......................... 15, 104 Green, Gordon........................15. 64. 68, 69 Gresens, Raymond......................... 130 Greunke, Viola................................58. 66 Greve, Bernice................................54, 130 Grimm, Lyle ....................................... 60 Grindle, Bette..................................... 15 Grover, Betty................................106, 130 Gruhe, Alice....................................... 14 Gruenstem, Miriam....................... 50. 58. 64 Gullikson. Jean.................................... 15 Gullikson, Kathryn .......................... 15, 74 Gunderson, Thelma.............................15, 106 Guth. Hubert............................. 130 Hafner, Jerry.......................................59 Haines. Anna................................. 15, 106 Hale. Florence .......................... 130 Halla, Norman................ 9, 45. 53. 110, 112 Hales, Evelyn.................................14. 106 Halverson, Courtney ......................... 13, 130 Halverson. Gilbert............................68. 94 Halverson, Jeanette...........................66, 94 Handrich, Roy ..................................... 75 Hanig. Jim.................. 37. 43. 49. 78. 79. 96 Hanosh, Dorothy......................... 58, 74. 75 Hannon. Elizabeth........................ 125 Hansen. Dick ...................................... 14 Hanson, Bob.........................................60 Hanson, Gareth .................................... 15 Harder. lone................................ 106. 131 Harvey, Gardener........................ 14, 68, 69 Handeyside, Robert..................................77 Hebert, Glenn............................ 110 Heckman. Jean............................ 131 Held, Betty...................................15, 104 Helixon, Dennis......................... 15, 87, 90 Hein. Betty...................... 9. 78. 79. 96, 121 Henke, Mae ........................................ 15 Herrick, Gwendolyn............................15, 82 Henrichs, Roy.................................75. 107 Henrichs, Joyce.....................................15 Hestad. Olaf..................................53. 59 Hickey, Mary....................................... 14 Hierl, Gerald............................75, 118, 125 Higgins. Eileen...............................96, 107 Hillert, Evelyn..... 13, 45. 50. 76. 77. 121, 125 Hlava. Janet............................ 54, 58. 74 Holm. Gerhardt................................94. 107 Hoffman. Mae........................ 15, 66, 82, 112 Hoffman, Robert ......................... 102 Holman, Lucy.............................15, 82, 106 — 158 —Holt, Olney........................................70 Hoppensted, Beverly .............................. 15 Hotvedt, Mary......................................15 Hovie, Lois ....................................... 9 Hryniewicke. Henry................................64, 125 Humke. Bemelda.....................................96 Humke, Harold....................... 69, 106, 131 Huntoon, Arlene................. 7. 80. 112 125, Jacobs. Marjorie.......................105, 125 Jacobson, Velma................................... 15 Jacobson, Walter........... 68, 69, 97, 102, 103 jahnke, Eleanora.................... 66, 106, 131 Jakel, Elaine..................................... 60 Jakel, Lorraine...............................9, 94 Jawart, Harold .................................. 131 Jedamus, Paul .......................... 15. 68, 69 Jenks, Merle................13, 15. 68, 69. 108 Johnson, Betty........ 54, 64. 66, 80, 117, 118, 121, 123, 125 Johnson, Chester.............................87. 90 Johnson, Elaine......................9, 112, 131 Johnson, Helen............................. 121, 125 Johnson, Isabel................................... 15 Johnson, Marcia .................................. 59 Johnsen, Margaret....................... 54, 56, 125 Johnson. Robert....................................53 Johnson, Ruth................................82, 131 Johnson, Vivian..................... 66, 106, 131 Joosten, Gloria............ 54, 59, 64, 74, 118 Jossart, Jeanne............................. 14. 108 Joyce, Violet .................................... 15 Jozwiak. Lawrence............................76, 118 Judd, Eldred ..................................... 57 Jusits, Charles..................8. 15, 16, 87, 90 Justmann, Louise............................ 15, 106 Kagel, Chester...............................75, 102 Kahler, Harold.......................... 53, 58. 118 Kalina, Joe...................................... 113 Kalkofen. Fred..........................42. 58 Kalkofen, Leon..........................43. 58 Kamke, Dianna .. 16, 46, 54, 80, 82. 94, 102, 121 Kaplun, Florence ................... 76, 77, 126 Karau, Norbert ................................... 15 Karloski, Manette ..................... 15, 82 Kaufman, Hannah................................... 14 Kelly, Francis ....................................49 Kelly, Kathryn ............................. 15, 112 Kjer, Mildred................................15, 106 Kingston, Allen..............................49. 121 Klein, Anthony.......................... 53, 68, 94 Kluck, Ernestine.................................. 15 Knitter, Alice.................................... 15 Knutson, Ada................................ 15, 106 Kobs, Eileen.................................13. 60 Koch, Gloria................................ 15, 82 Koehn, Frank.............................41, 44, 49 Koehl, Leonard.....................................53 Kohler, Kathryn.........................54. 64 Kordus, Donald.......................... 58, 72, 74 Kostuch, Constance................................ 15 Kowalski, Edmund.................................. 15 Kozlowski, Harriet......................... 106, 131 Krause, Michael .................... 15, 74, 108 Krider, Donald............. 72, 76, 118, 123, 126 Krohn. Cynthia.................. 66, 80, 96, 104 Krueger, Melva ............................... 14 Krieger, Robert............................... 14 Krueger, Veloris............................. 131 ICryshak, Edward.................. 57, 59, 72 Kufel, Myron............................ 117, 126 Kulas, Leona.......... 47. 66, 80, 93, 117, 118 Kulidas, James .. 16. 43. 47, 49. 60. 78. 79. 81. 90 Kurth, Jeanne..................... 15, 64, 116 Kurtzweil, Terrence........................... 14 Kyhl, Janet...............................60, 106 LaBrot, Adrian.........................7, 53, 68 La Bort, Madeline......... 47. 54. 96. 102, 112 La Fleur, Jerry.......................41, 51, 74 Lake. Garth...........................15. 87. 90 Lane. Lorraine.................................15 Lange, Emert..............................59, 121 Langton, Tom..............................68. 107 Larsen, Charles .............................. 15 Larson. James................. 68, 69, 107, 126 Larsen, Joyce .. 11. 35, 47. 58, 66. 80. 81. 94. 121 Larson. Dorothy................... 47, 50, 126 Laumer, Kathleen.......... 15, 66, 74, 80. 112 Lavers, Marilyn........... 66, 82, 95, 102, 103 Lawrence, Ethel .............................. 15 Lea, Keith.....................................15 Leary, Jeanette.......................... 15, 106 LeGault, Lionnel..............................126 Lemke, Eunice.............................131 Lemke, Lois.............................. 151 Lewison, Gordon..................... 13, 53. 94 Ley, Irene .................................. 131 Leykom, Winnifred.......... 9. 11, 35, 45, 108 Liebzeit, Arvin...........................15. 82 Lindsay. Ruth................. 15, 66, 82, 142 Livingston, Olive.........................66, 82 Loberg, Marjorie.............. 60, 64. 66. 108 Lochner, Mary Anne.................74, 121, 126 Lonsdorf, Ferdinand .......................... 15 Lonsdorf, Viola...........................126 Lodzinski, Gregory........................59, 74 Lowe, Betty................... 15, 64, 66, 104 Loyd. Arlene............................. 14, 66 Luck. Dorothy.......................7, 9. 80. 126 Lueck, John................... 15, 64. 68. 108 Lundgren, Ruby........................... 131 Lundgren, Virginia................ 54. 58, 112 Lundquist, Mae.................................95 Lutz, Evelyn............................. 15, 106 Luxem, Jean...............................66, 126 Lyons. Emerald ............................... 59 Maddy, Evelyn..................................60 Madsen. Orion................................. 15 Maguire, Patricia............. 60. 74, 78. 79 Malchow, Leland................................59 Malecki, Robert........... 53, 58, 68. 78, 79 Malek, Irene.................................. 15 Mancheski, Alex...............................68, 108 Markee, Patty.............................50. 60 Marotz, Edna ............................ 126 Marshall, Carol................... 82. 106, 131 Martini, Marcella......... 66, 78. 79, 95, 121 Maslowske, Margaret............................74 Mastey, Evelyn............................15. 74, 106 Mayer, Marit............................. 106 McAarthur, Rosemary........... 11, 15. 102, 103 — 159 —McCollum, Inez............................9, 82, 131 McCawley, Jack.................................... 15 McGinley, Mary................................15. 106 McGuire. Maxine.......................9, 54, 58 Mcllhattan, Russel................................ 15 McManners, Rollie.............................64, 102 Megal, Chester.......................106, 131 Meinhardt, Clarence.......................... 15, 106 Menzel, Harold............. 37. 43, 45, 47. 56, 93 Menzel, Robert............................... 15, 68 Meronek. Apoline...................................15 Metcalf. Kathryn........... 54. 74, 106, 123, 131 Meverden, Merville............. 47, 49, 117, 126 Meydam, lean................... 60, 64, 80, 108 Michal, Terrence.................................. 43 Michelsen, Ruth.................15. 64, 66, 108 Miller, Charles................ 36. 70, 95, 121 Menton, Lloyd........................... 15, 68. 69 Minton, Ray........................................15 Mischnick, Ralph ................................. 53 Mittelsteadt, Karl............................76, 77 Moe, Mildred............................ 15, 64, 66 Mohr. Robert...................................... 15 Moldenhauer, Alice................... 15. 106 Moreau. Esther................................45. 77 Morgan, lone ........................... 15. 82, 106 Moslowski, Margaret.............................. 131 Mott, Dorothy........................... 66, 75, 96 Moyer, Betty.......................................96 Mozuch, Fred..................................68. 94 Mozuch, Katherine.............. 50. 104, 105, 126 Mueller, Verna......................................9 Mullarky Loy............................ 47, 53, 60 Munson, Shirley .................................. 96 Murgatroyd, Evelyn...... 66, 72, 76, 77. 78. 79, 80. 82, 118, 121, 126 Murphy, Anita..................................... 15 Murrish, Margaret....... 50. 78. 79, 94, 102, 121 Murty, Beverly.......................... 47, 59. 60 Mussey, Alice........................106. 131 Negard, Shirlee..................... 46. 53. 57, 60 Nelson, Betty.................................15, 66 Nelson, Clarence..............................60. 64 Nelson. Dorothy......... 9. 64, 66, 117, 118, 126 Nelson, Gunvor................................60, 66 Nelson, Keith.............. 75. 78, 79, 107, 126 Nelson, Majorie........ 36, 60, 66, 77, 82. 112 Nerlien. Effie.....................................60 Neuenfeldt. James.............................49. 60 Neuman, Lucille..................... 54, 76, 96, 104 Neve. Lucille........................ 106, 131 Nieman, Henry......................................59 Nikolar, William ................................. 74 Nixon. Floyd............................ 47. 49. 121 Nixon, Robert.................. 47, 53, 56, 126 Noble. Pauline............................... 15, 112 Novitske, Rita............. 47, 50. 74, 102, 103 Nueske. Allan..................................... 15 Ocvirk, Marie.........................7, 16, 54, 74 Olingy, Albert.....................................15 Oik, Robert.................... 53. 87. 88. 126 Olson. Roger..........................7. 61, 68, 69 Omemik, Stanley......................106, 132 Oronozinski, Eleanor.............................. 15 Ostrander, Robert................................. 13 Ostrowski, Alice............................ 132 Otto. Roy.......................... 37. 40, 121 Owen. Eileen....................9, 15, 66, 104 Owen. Etta............................. 15, 104 Owen. Isabell............................... 132 Padour, Blanche.............................. 15 Palmer, Joseph...................... 15. 64, 69 Papke. Charles.............................. 107 Park, Helen..............................60, 104 Parkel, Donna .............................. 132 Parr, Kenneth................................ 42 Parrott. Thelma.................14. 66. 82, 112 Pasternacki, Paul............................ 15 Pcrvelski, Dorothy...........................132 Paysa, Arthur............................15, 107 Perry. Jack........... 7. 47. 53. 57, 58, 64. 108 Peters. Mary............................ 14, 74 Peterson. Kathryn............................106 Peterson. Oscar......................... 15, 41 Peterson, Thelma........................ 15, 126 Peterson, Wayne...............................60 Peterson, William...................37, 41, 60 Phaneui, Duane...........................60, 68 Piehl. Kathryn ... 11. 45, 47, 50. 80. 94, 112, 121 Pils, Gladys........................15. 64. 112 Pionkowski, Agnes........................... 106 Platta. Evelyn......................... 106, 132 Pliner, Frank................... 16, 53, 64, 96 Pdhala, Dorothy.............................. 15 Poggemiller, Jane........ 79, 94, 105, 117, 118 Posky, Madeline........................106. 132 Posluszny, Louis............. 37, 41, 47, 87, 90 Pospychala, Henry................... 87, 88, 121 Powell, Olive.................................15 Precourt. Iris................ 60, 76, 77, 118 Precourt, Patricia................. 15, 72, 82 Prenevost, Bill.............................. 15 Prentice, Arlene........................ 14, 106 Preston. Helen ............................. 132 Prey, Majorie........................... 15, 64 Prondzinski, Eleanor........................ 106 Pronz, Evelyn........................... 15, 106 Quade, Ruth.................................. 15 Quinn, Dorothy .............................. 15 Quinn, Gertrude.............................. 15 Quinn, James................................. 60 Raddant, Dorothy Jane......... 61, 64, 66. 80, 82 Rade, Jay................................... 132 Rades, Rolland.......................... 13. 42 Rademacher, Gotelind ... 50. 102, 103, 121, 126 Radke, Orland............................... Ill Ramskugler, Irene............................ 15 Rasmussen, Calvin ........................... 15 Rasmussen, Jack..........................64, 80 Rasmussen. Helen.............................. Rasmussen. Norma........................ 15, 82 Rathke, Ruth.................... 46. 50, 66. 127 Reading, Robert..........................37, 41 Reese, Louise............................... 127 Reichel, Charlotte..... 66, 82, 96, 104, 121, 142 Reineking, Majorie.............. 54, 60, 79, 105 Reul, Julienne............................7, 82 Rezin, Jane...................................61 Rich, Jeanette.......................... 15, 106 Rinehart, Mary................................79 — 160Roberts. Dennis...........................46. 49 Roberts. Guy..............................59. 64 Roberts. Marian.............................. 127 Roe, Lloyd.................................... 15 Rogers, Helen..................................93 Rogers, Jeanette.................... 47. 50, 56 Rogers, Nyma ...............................96 Rogers. Shirley............................... 15 Rohde, Velma..............................15, 106 Rondeau, Gertrude............ 16, 47, 54. 58, 66, 74, 105, 142 Ropella, Len........... 49. 74. 95, 110, 111, 116 Rose. Eileen....... 16, 47, 54, 66, 121, 123, 127 Rothumel, Marilyn..............................82 Rouman, Daphne.......................10, 11, 13, 15 Rusch, Edna....................................59 Russell, Rita................... 47, 54, 56, 127 Ruttner, Lauretta,..................16, 75, 103 Salay, James..............................15, 68 Salvin, John ................................. 15 Sanborn, Richard.................... 6, 47, 68, 94 Sanders, Lewis......................... 106, 133 Saunders, James...........................60, 108 Schaarschmidt, Waltraut........................60 Schaefer, Kathleen ........................... 15 Schenk, Karl............................. 15. 84 Schmidt, Harold............................8, 61 Schmidt, Shirley...............................14 Schrank, Robert.............. 11, 13, 49, 74, 95 Scholtz, Virginia............... 14, 64 66. 108 Schrank. Virginia.........................15, 74 Schult, Mildred.......................... 15. 74 Schunk, Robert......................14. 43. 68 Schwartz, Anthony............... 74, 75. 95. 107 Schwierske, Fredrick............ 59, 68. 69. 108 Schwingel, Evelyn ............................ 64 Scipior, Raymond..............................106 Seidel, Arthur...................... 53. 68, 94 Severns, Murray ............................. 128 Shafton, Ralph..................................4 Sharkey. Myron.......................60. 110, 111 Shier. Jane................. 9. 11. 54. 60. 78. 79 Shorey, Bob......................... 45, 53, 59 Schrake, Ted............................ 113, 118 Siebert, Earle......... 47. 49. 56, 68, 69. 76. 78, 79, 117, 118, 127 Sixel, Dorothy.................................60 Skatrude, Rayfield.................. 68, 84, 91 Slabosheski, Harry......... 47, 49. 56. 123, 127 Smith, Anna...............................64, 133 Smith. Betty .. 47, 50. 76. 102, 103, 112, 123, 127 Smith. Carol ................................. 15 Smith, Genevieve ........................... 82 Smith, Vernon..................................68 Soderberg, Doris ... 10. 45. 54. 66. 104, 123, 127 Soeteber. Warren......... 9. 68. 75, 93, 102, 103 Solberg. Clarence.............. 49, 94. 102, 118 Solie, Ronald..................................59 Solverud, Louise ............................ 133 Somers, Adolph.......................... 106, 133 Sorenson, Dorothy..............................82 Sorenson, Lucille............................ 128 Sorensen, Margaret.................. 75, 94, 133 Sparks. Majorie.......................... 15, 106 Spindler, Dearborn ......................... 49 Stanislawski. Irene....................... 133 Stauber, Jacqueline....................14. 80. 108 Stay, Neosha................... 15, 64, 66. 102 Steckel, Frank..............................15, 68 Steinberg, Mildred.............................. 11 Steiner. Nancy..............................50, 128 Steinfest, Gordon..................... 68, 69, 112 Stelter, Ruth................ 47. 50. 72. 94, 121 Sterts, Francis...................106, 133 Stevens, Majorie ............................... 15 Stimm. Howard............ 16, 42. 53, 60, 110, 11 Stock, Hilton .................................. 15 Stoltenberg. James............................. 133 Stoltenberg, Phillip.............. 106, 133 Strope. Virginia................................ 58 Sullivan, Jim...............................42, 60 Stevens. Marjorie ............................. 106 Swenson, Roy.....................................60 Swett. Jay............................ 14. 110, 111 Sword. Sherman............................. 47, 49. 70 Swiontek, Lucille................. 106, 133 Szymonski, Edwin................................ 15 Terzynski, Pete....................... 87, 88, 92 Terzynski, Ray........................ 87, 88, 92 Tetzler, Evelyn................... 106, 133 Theisen, Florence........ 45, 47, 58, 64. 66, 74, 78. 79. 118 Thompson, Janet................... 15, 104 Thompson, Alva ... 60, 66, 77, 82, 102, 103, 112 Thompson, Mabel................... 106, 133 Thompson. Margery................................93 Thompson, Ruth.........................15, 66, 104 Thornton, Helen................................ 128 Thorson, Joyce.................................. 15 Thusing, Gerald...................................8 Tiffany, Janet........................ 66. 82, 96 Todd. June...................................... 15 Tohm, Clarence............................ 107, 112 Torgerson. Lorraine.........................15, 68 Torkelson. Carl.................... 7. 60. 68, 69 Torkelson, Gerald .. 45. 47, 68. 70. 118, 123, 128 Torkelson. Robert......................15, 68, 69 Trader. Ruth................................... 133 Treder, Joseph..............................74, 133 Turecek, Jack.............................. 13, 133 Tushinski, Evelyn ........................ 106, 133 Twist. Crystal...................................96 Tylerm Katharine.......................50. 121, 128 Umlaft, Phyllis................................. 15 Unger, James_____ 47. 49, 68. 69. 76, 96. 118, 121 Untidet, Marion............................ 15, 82 Van Dyke. LaVeme........ 42. 49. 87, 88, 92, 128 Van Natta, Majorie........................ 106, 133 Van Sleet, Marie.......................... 106, 133 Veirs, Catherine............................... 133 Vig. Ellen..................................54. 60 Vig, Leonard.......................... 47, 53, 94 Vincent. Jack................ 46. 49. 68. 108, 128 Vogedes, Lucille...................... 107, 128 Vonderlieth, Betty.................... 60, 82, 108 Waag, Melba......................................60 Wacholz, Edward.................. 68, 70, 118, 128 Waid, Mildred .................................. 15 Wagner. Alice......................... 54, 80. 95 Waid. Muriel.............. 9. 68. 69. 75. 108, 128 — 161 —Wallace, June 82, 133 Walsh, Francis 16, 68. 69 Walter, Aloha 54, 66, 94 Wanserski, Richard ... 15, 106 Wanta, Norman 15 Warren, Raymond 87, 88, 92 Warren, Virginia 15 Wedderkop, Herman .. 14 Weiher, Lucille 45. 54. 79, 96, 104, 105 Weinmann, Carla 15, 106 Weisser, Natalie 11 Wells, Edward 15, 16 Wendorf, Fay .... 54, 78. 84, 96. 102 Wichman, Alice 106, 134 Wiese, Charlotte 66 Wilkins, Orville 60 Williams, Ethel 15, 106 Williamson, Rachel 134 Winarski, Grace 117, 121, 128 Winch, La Rae 47.66, 104, 128 Winter, Carol 15 Wipperfuth, Marie...................... 15, 74, 104 Wirkus, Carmelita....... 47, 54, 66, 78, 79, 80, 105, 128 Wirkus, Dorothy................... 66, 93, 107 Wishlinski, Thomas.......... 7, 53, 59, 64, 118 Wiza, Cecilia ............................. 106 Worden. Robert.............................. 15 Wogsland, Lorraine ........................ 134 Wood, Isla................. 60, 66, 76, 77, 112 Wright, Donald ............................ 14 Wunsch, Melvin............ 57, 64, 96, 108, 118 Yoder, Crystal...............................14 Yokers, Lloyd.............................. 106 Yost, Marvin.................................64 Young, Dan........ 11,41, 109, 110, 112, 123, 128 Zell, Evelyn.......................... 106, 134 Zelmer, Mary ................................94 Zenker, Dorothy ........................... 15 Zentner, Elaine............................. 15 Ziehlke, John.............. 16, 50, 68, 94, 103 Zimmerman, Am..........................60, 74 — 162— 164 —


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