University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI)

 - Class of 1940

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University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 174 of the 1940 volume:

Copyright, 1940, CENTRAL STATE TEACHERS. V. Johnson, Editor P. Anderson, Business Manager T. A. Rogers, Faculty AdviserITS YOUR YEAR! AS SEASONS SPEED SO YOU SHOULD RIPEN—GET THE ANALOG PUBLISHED OF CENTRAL STEVENS P O I BY THE ST STATE TEACH NT, W I S C O N S U D E N T BODY E R S COLLEGE,entente | BOOK I AUTUMN...................................... 7 Administration.............................11 Faculty....................................13 Maintenance................................28 Freshmen ..................................30 Religious Organizations .... 33 Football...................................36 Flashes....................................42 ■ BOOK II WINTER............................................49 Sophomores.................................53 Departments................................56 Honoraries.................................62 Extracurricula.............................66 Basketball.................................72 Boxing.....................................78 Whims......................................80BOOK III SPRING...........................................87 Juniors...................................... 91 Music.........................................93 Publications.................................102 Greeks.......................................106 Women’s Athletics............................116 Fancies......................................118 BOOK iv Summer...........................................123 Into the Field...............................127 Degrees......................................128 Diplomas.....................................136 Out of the Field.............................143 Advertising..................................145 Credentials..................................156 Faculty Index................................160 Student Index................................161RETURN It is late. Voices, calmed from early evening hilarity, have become stillness and starlight. Against darkness I can see the building—the tower rises into haze and stars of the sky. I’ve come back to school. Vaguely I hope for others, as I gaze, some semblance of wishes fulfilled, of dreams of the future and friendships and learning and struggling that have been mine. More clearly, I wish that nothing will take this year away from me. If no one can attain the height of my feeling, selfishly I wish for myself that I can recapture the happiness of another year. BOOK I—we should have been very hum ble, but we weren't— -lor we had just become rs of a world denied to ople— mem- many—and like dll novitiates, we were very proud—AUTUMN -liLniuidtaticn a cult y y l la itilen ance zz reJiincn J elian'iiA raaniTatt n amj iet i a Moduli =Jull la.Jicminuittation PRESIDENT SMITH In 1909, Mr. E. T. Smith began teaching in the History Department of the Stevens Point Normal School. He has successfully completed thirty years in that field; he has seen the normal school as a comparatively small school grow and progress and broaden out into the college it is today—one of the leading teachers’ colleges in Wisconsin with an expansive scope of absorbing courses and a large activity program. In the spring of 1939 he became acting president at the withdrawal of President Philip A. Falk. The following fall term, which marks this school year, initiated him as president of our college, a place he well deserves for his meritorious activity in making this school what it is. The veteran faculty member up to his appointment, he is remembered and appreciated by his classes, his colleagues, and his superiors for his infinite wisdom, his philosophy, his kindness, understanding, and wit. A man whose tracks will be printed in the sands of Time. Pag« 11 FROSH BEAR DOWN ON US... THE USUAL GREEN VARIETYREGENT DELZELL Loyalty and co-operation among students and faculty members are priceless assets for any educational institution. They are the foundation of what we know as school spirit. They are the true measure of the virility of a school and a guaranty that its vital mission of making better citizens is being advanced. It has been my observation during my relatively short period of service as local regent that Central State Teachers College is unusually fortunate in its school spirit. This is especially noteworthy in view of handicaps with which it has been confronted due to reduced budgets for supplies and teachers' salaries and increased enrollment. These handicaps have been assumed in a spirit of cheerfulness and understanding by students and teachers alike, proving there are no 'quitters'' at Central State. That Central State is more interested in solving its problems by constructive action than in complaining about them, that it is committed to a policy of sound progress against all obstacles is an inspiring tribute to the institution. It is, by the same token, eloquent of the devoted and intelligent leadership accorded the school by its new president, E. T. Smith, who came up from the ranks" to climax many years of distinguished service as a teacher with administrative qualities destined to carry the institution to new heights of achievement. . UPPER CLASSMEN FEIGN POISE AND SOPHISTICATION . . . ALL IN THE GAME . . . Page 12JUNIOR H. S. Mr. Herrick, the congenial head of the Mary J. Bradford Training School, desires to extend the activities of the training school by sending teachers outside to other schools for part of their practice, and at present he is working for a more gradual introduction of the student to the training school. It is not surprising, then, to find that for forty years his hobby and life interest has been the helping of young people. He is also interested in all outdoor sports and spends much of his time at Long Lake. He isn't reluctant either to admit he once caught an eleven pound pike. He has traveled extensively throughout the West. Mr. Pierce, the jovial principal of the J.H.S. has made a hobby of summer schools. He’s now completed his eighteenth summer. He finds them an invigorating experience in that they enable him to meet and confer with prominent men of the country. He likes all outdoor sports, but calls himself a "fisher'' rather than a fisherman. He is striving for purposeful activity in the junior high school. Miss Loomer is a mistress-of-all-trades. She has been a switchboard operator, a faculty secretary, a waitress,- she has preached sermons, picked cherries, and done nursing during the World War. At the University of Wisconsin she started the record of the U. Gold Star Boys which now hangs in the Memorial Building. Her teaching has included Latin, English, French, dramatics, history, guidance, library, and music. Through her varied experiences she hopes to aid the student teachers with their problems. She plans to center her work in the social studies, and work out a course more beneficial to students. Mrs. Cutnaw is a new addition to the training school. She hails from Wisconsin originally but taught for ten years in North Dakota before going to Madison this last year. She has made two very thorough trips to Europe and hopes to go again with her two children. Her traveling is spontaneous—she gets that feeling and picks up and goes. She likes to cook, tell fortunes, and write children's stories. At present she is writing a workbook in English essentials. She has planned a program of remedial reading, whereby the voices of pupils will be recorded to analyze their speech and reading defects. We are indeed fortunate in having one who is so thoroughly interested in everyone and every- Miss Adda Tobias took leave of absence in 1930-1931 to get her master's degree at Columbia. She has been first grade critic since 1926. She is an exponent of nature study believing it should be a part of every schoolroom activity. She lives with her mother and enjoys cooking; each new recipe is used as an experiment on her friends. She still has many, many friends—so she must be a good cook. Miss Tobias has written and published several phonics and reading workbooks. Miss Gladys Van Arsdale is quite unusual in her ability to get creative work from her pupils. Perhaps her deep interest in poetry has helped her to gain this objective. She is an ardent collector of choice bits of thing—so amiable, optimistic, understanding, and truly modern. Page 13 WONDER HOW WE STEERED CLEAR OF MATRIMONY TO COMETRAINING SCHOOL verse and writing. She is eager to develop a new hobby in color photography. In 1933 Miss Van Arsdale received her master’s degree from Columbia. She came here as third grade critic in 1934. Another primary critic teacher of infinite experience is Miss Frances Dearborn who has at one time or another been affiliated with eight different universities. Her home is in southwestern Iowa and she received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees there. She delights in writing children's books—"How the Indians Lived ’ and "Daily Life Language Series" are two of them. Her spare time is devoted to revising these. "Sonny" is her pride and joy, as well as her prime source of worry. He’s fond of books, too (he worries them, as a puppy will!!). Miss Dearborn enjoys travel. She had spent four years in California before taking a position here in 1938. Although she has covered nearly all of the U.S. except the Northwest, she has never been abroad. She prefers travel by train to automobile. Miss Dearborn has quite an extensive collection of old glass. Her major activity is bowling. Dr. Jayne has extended what he has called his hobby, visual education, into a field of professional attainment. He used material obtained through recordings of teachers conducting classes as his thesis for his degree of doctor of philosophy. These sound records were analyzed and Dr. Jayne has published articles on his results in the Journal of Experimental Education. He highly advocates the use of films in teaching. He has prepared a series of radio broadcasts on the subject—"What of Our Movies?"—in which he discusses the effect of films upon children and makes a review of pictures that can be used. Dr. Jayne’s work has distinguished him and our school as well. His only recreation during the past few years has been travel. He can give exciting reports of the Puget Sound region. Last summer he traveled in Canada and Spokane, Washington where he was born and lived for many years. Miss Leah Diehl is also interested in visual education of a kind—color photography and candid camera. She has enjoyed travel in the East and West but has never been in the South or abroad. She spends most of her summers teaching. She was in Stevens Point last summer and enjoyed it. For four or five years now she has been a Girl Scout Counselor. She likes hiking. Another hobby is collecting old glass and china. Miss Lydia Pfeiffer, fifth grade critic in the training school, is well known and well liked by all her student teachers. Her pleasant nature and her understanding have endeared her to her pupils. She received her bachelor of philosophy degree at the University of Wisconsin and her Master of Arts from Columbia. She has made a record for herself and for the school in the field of intermediate education. The enrollment in this department is small, but placement is excellent. Page 14 BACK TO THE OLE INSTITEWTION . . . ENROLLMENT HITS 770 . . .RURAL Mr. Neale is the enthusiastic leader of the Rural Department. He is deeply interested in his students as individuals, thus having won their respect and confidence. They soon realize his word is law. The possessor of a fine sense of humor—like Miss Roach he is proud of his ancestry. His grandmother was an aunt of Phil Sheridan. Mr. Neale has a fine sense of taste in artistry and devotes a good deal of his time to art. He has published several books on this engrossing subject. Miss Roach is the answer to a freshman’s prayer, having that rare ability of being able to make you her friend in an instant. Although she is chiefly affiliated with rural education, she is easily accessible and known to everyone. Her greatest interest is talking to audiences. She has contacted as many as nineteen audiences in as little as three weeks. Her radiant personality and keen Irish wit distinguish her to any audience- P.T.A. or college assembly. She has more of the good old spirit than a goodly number of the other faculty and students combined. Outside college her joy is in her nieces and nephews. Almost like the training school, she says. Another interesting member of rural faculty is Miss Hanna. She is distinguished by her beautiful white hair and her tasteful grooming. Students of C.S.T.C. have acclaimed her the best dressed woman on the campus very dignified. She is a fine cook and delights in house-keeping. She’s devoted to her home community, Manawa. Miss La Vigne is little—but, oh my! She is a great worker—devotes her whole to her work at the Demonstration School where rural teachers are given the final touches to their preparation. She is the kind of teacher one reads about—doctor, lawyer, and spiritual director for her community. She comes from Wood County which she uses as her measuring stick for all other localities. She thinks the demonstration school children are the most ideal youngsters on earth. She has an unfailing faculty for losing things. As Chairman of the Advanced Standing Committee and Administrator of the Primary Department, Miss Susan E. Colman has advanced education a considerable notch or two, besides being another patron of the arts. She’s enthusiastically interested in concert music—(listens to the Philharmonic every Sunday afternoon), dabs with water colors, and sketches. Miss Colman has spent much of her time traveling in the U.S. She has fished and hunted for many years, and is a sportswoman par excellence. Her biggest catch was a 275 pound sturgeon, caught several summers ago. But it’s during the winter months that Miss Colman really "goes to town.” Versatile as she is on roller skates, she merits the spotlight on the ice rinks. Each year she ’’majors” in skating and tobogganing, and “minors” in skiing. She hurls a wicked snow- QUITE A BIT OVER LAST YEAR’S TOTALS . . . FROSH MIXER STAGED Past 15ADVANCED STANDING ball, too. By and large, she is probably the most active feminine member of our faculty. Miss Colman’s greatest pleasure comes from driving about in her car, “Suzabella III” (What happened to the other two7). Mr. Raymond M. Rightsell, Director of the High School Department, and faculty adviser to The Pointer, has been a professor of physics for more than a quarter of a century. He has taught in California, Arizona, Indiana, and Wisconsin. Mr. Rightsell has seen his long-cherished boyhood dream come true—he has his own miniature railroad, steam engine and all, for which he built the parts. He also has another hobby, that of photomicrography, and has a Leica camera and other wonderful equipment. The glass case in his office is full of the results of his work in this field. Mr. Rightsell delights in fooling his friends with photomicrographs of match-heads and pin-points. He has been active this year in creating a course in aeronautics and putting the forum on its feet. Dr. Arthur S. Lyness has confessed that this summer he hopes to continue his interests as a naturalist, to hike and collect plants. However, his duties as Director of the Summer Session are a serious threat. He has a beautiful collection of ferns. In his odd moments he works crossword puzzles. Dr. Lyness’ musical inclinations have drawn him into choral work. He sang for a number of years as a member of the University of Wisconsin’s Mixed Chorus. Dr. Lyness becomes so engrossed in his own lectures that he sometimes keeps his classes overtime. Mr. Thomas A. Rogers, like Dr. Lyness, has been teaching for 29 years, and recently applied his knowledge of Chemistry to an industrial use when he improved the taste and quality of Fox Valley Canning Company’s peas. At the same time he began his experiments with soy beans, which he helped develop into an edible vegetable food. Mr. Roger s classes are a model of industry and interest because he's a good listener as well as lecturer and has a twinkling sense of humor. In his spare time he putteis about in his beautiful Rower garden. He’s a philatelist and a coin-collector, too. As administrator of student activities and adviser to the Iris he contacts many non-chemistry students. AND VOTED S U C C E S S . . . P R A C T I C E TEACHERS HEADACHES BEGIN... Page 16SCIENCE CHARACTERS Mr. Evans, the expounder of know-thyself-physiologically, is known to the students of C.S.T.C. not only as an interesting instructor but as a cheerful friend. He has made himself a part of the tradition of the college by fostering the annual Homecoming Parade. Besides his teaching activities, Mr. Evans has collected a large number of unusual stamps and fills his spare hours painting in oils, pounding at amateur carpentry, hunting, fishing, and keeping abreast with the many developments in the field of medical science. A man of astonishing diversified interests and talents is Dr. Nestor Flodin, who came directly from Chicago University to test his abilities against the students of C.S.T.C. Chemistry is thrilling to him and he has proved himself a master in teaching it. He is also an authority in the fields of music, drama, and student psychology. As one of the youngest faculty members on the campus he has made himself popular by his considerate advice and help to students both in class work and personal problems. Miss Jesse Jones has devoted herself to the study of plant life, to the flora of Wisconsin, and to nature study. Her chief objective has been to train biology teachers for the high schools of the state and to work out a course to fit the interests and abilities of high school people. At the end of the first semester Miss Jones surrendered her plans and duties to other members of the biology staff in order to take leave of absence because of illness. At her home in the city she has found the radio and Chinese checkers enjoyable recreation between callers. Dr. Pierson of the Science Department has a mystifying reputation. His difficult tests have been known to cause many a headache; he has ruined many an appetite and yet he is one of the institution's most popular instructors and advisers. His exact and efficient manner, his sympathetic attitude toward the students and his willingness to give individual help to them, are outstanding factors which have made him a success as a teacher. His non-curricular interests are in minor sports, especially in ping-pong, badminton, and bowling and he usually comes out the Victor in any of these. FACULTY RECEPTION . . . ALL PARADE FOR THE INSPECTION OF ALL OTHERS Pase 17NEW DEAL Miss Hanson, returning from a leave of absence, brought many new ideas to Central State. As her chief interest lies in radio, it was to that field that she turned to bring improvements and in which to instruct the student body. In addition to her radio work and her duties as geography instructor Miss Hanson is in charge of a fifth grade geography program, "This Land of Ours," broadcast from Madison weekly. She is an enthusiastic antique and music-box collector, has found hiking a pleasant sport, and now plans to travel in the Western Hemisphere, especially through the Latin American countries. Mr. J. D. Colby, an alumnus of C.S.T.C., is doing much to make radio one of the most fascinating parts of this institution. It is his aim, by means of experimental production, to make radio an art within itself, not merely a substitute by which adapted stage plays and similar programs may be presented. He believes radio should appeal directly to the audio-sense of the listener, substituting voices for character, music and sound for lights and scenery. Music shouldn't be used merely to show lapse of time but through change of tempo, create mood and emotional attitudes corresponding to the varying movements of the program. Mr. Colby designed the radio studios within the college and took active part in laying plans for the rebuilding and lighting of our stage. Photography also absorbs some of his time. It is not an uncommon sight to see the "first-floor trio," Messrs. Watson, Steiner, and Schmeeckle, with their heads together in a pleasant, private conference. As members of the Athletic Board they have much in common. Mr. Schmeeckle is an instructor of various sciences among which his principal interest lies in conservation. He spends hours planning for forest conservation and the beautifying of the landscape; his own home is proof. The tree planting pilgrimages he takes his conservation classes on are further evidence of this. His night school and summer school conservation classes invariably fill the assembly. He and Mr. Watson alike join the great trek to the Northwoods for the deer season. However, Mr. Watson’s first love is in athletics. He played football and coached at Springfield, Missouri. Since coming to Stevens Point he has kept up his interest in all of the school’s athletic events. At C.S.T.C. he is head of the Intermediate and Junior High School Division. His position is one of dignity and service. Everyone was plenty glad to see him back last year after his absence. 64 REPORT FOR GRID P R A C T I C E . . . N E L S O N HALL NELLIES WELCOME Pas e 18Miss Gsrlsten, true to her profession, dotes on taking art tours, her most interesting being an art tour of Europe. She enjoys taking her students on art pilgrimages to the large cities. Last year they went to Chicago. Some of Miss Carlsten's own paintings have been exhibited in that city. Besides sketching and painting, she loves the out-of-doors (she swings a mean fish pole), she collects Swedish teapots, and is proud of her driving—note men, she’s never had an accident. At school she has some fine exhibits and her part in the decorations for the annual Christmas concert constructs a scene which is long cherished for its mood and beauty. Miss Davis is known not only to the many students of her French classes, but to others she has contacted through numerous worthwhile trips to plays, operas, and recitals at Milwaukee and Madison. Miss Davis is an enthusiastic supporter to all those ventures which tend to widen the cultural scope of thejstudents. She is interested, too, in speech correction, a field in which she worked previous to her employment here. Sketching is her hobby—might easily have been her profession from the evidence shown by the volumes of sketches and drawings she has made. They are truly professional. She collects Spode and Wedgewood china and loves to travel. She has been to Europe where she spent quite a bit of time in France. Since Mr. Michelsen arrived here nine years ago he has built from the bottom, a musical department which ranks with the foremost in the state. He is a recognized authority in the musical world, having been a member of the American Bandmasters’ Association since 1932—has studied under such masters as Grieg—played as flutist in the National Band and Orchestra of Norway—has judged state band tournaments in several surrounding states—came to this country in 1909—his anecdotes are unlimited—his accent charming—is a graduate of Vander-Cook School of Music in Chicago—the proud possessor of a lovely new home here—the Treble Clef House—one of most popular faculty on the campus— once judged best-dressed man on the campus. NEW GALS WITH INFORMAL GET-TOGETHER ... WE GET DOWN TO THE REAL PaSe 19LIBRARY Did you know that the latest accession number in the library is nearly 40,000? That means that with the possible discard of worn-out books over a number of years our library can boast a circulation of over 35,000 books, a circulation exceeding that of any other teacher’s college in the state. Mr. George Allez, on leave of absence to the University of Wisconsin, is largely responsible for the fine library facilities which we have at C.S.T.C. He originated the divided catalog as it is used here—subject reference in one and author and title in the other. It has been the meticulous work of our librarians for years which we are able to enjoy today. In Mr. Allez's absence, Miss Lulu Mansur is acting librarian, assisted by Miss Syble Mason and Mr. John Herling. They are people well worth knowing and certainly to be appreciated. Besides the 101 course in library science, there is a very interesting and worthwhile course in preparatory techniques for eligibility to hold a librarian’s license—the Teacher's Library Training Course. Miss Mansur has been unfailing in her attentions to bewildered students in the library. Her aid is offered with a smile and a twinkle. She is popular with students and faculty alike. The faculty loves to gather in the library office for a little chat or to gain permission to be first to take a new book that has arrived. There’s always a happy and a busy atmosphere around her. During Christmas vacation Miss Mansur and Miss Allen took a trip to sunny Florida. They were thrilled and have a wealth of stories to tell about it. Our librarian frequently refers to herself in the third person that is, as Miss Mansur. She has a lovely little home on Strongs Avenue and frequently knits for enjoyment. She sees the best movies, too. Miss Mason’s hobby is embroidering. She is in charge of the Training School Library as well as responsible for many duties at the college. Mr. Herling says he’d be a fisherman if he had time. We know, though, that he likes to philosophize and usually very philosophically -reads a great deal, thinks about all the problems of the world before he goes to sleep at night, easily a runner-upper for the dignified position of best-dressed man on the campus. In a school where education is the element of first consideration as prerequisite to teaching majors and minors, the faculty of the education department should be of primary interest. Each member is known to each student before he graduates. They deal in matters that are much too deep for most of us and seem to know our inner-most thoughts. They are a menace to those of us who never think,” but grand people when you really know them. Here’s the dope: Dr. Reppen, Chairman of the Education Department, on the Committee of Advanced Standing, Chairman of the N.Y. A. BIZNESS OF COLLEGE . . . DARN! . . . LOCAL LADDIES CLEAN UP ON STOUT Page! 20EDUCATION Committee, and President of the Association of Wisconsin Teachers’ Colleges, is one of the busiest men in school. In spite of his many professional duties he fines time for fishing, reading, and cabinetmaking. He taught manual training for five years, and is quite a handy man around the house. He does a vast amount of reading, mostly professional books and all periodicals. Once in a while he finds time to read a story. He likes traveling and driving, in fact, in his various trips, business and otherwise, he has covered over 200,000 miles. He has a joke on tap to illustrate any of his theories or ideas. Mr. Chester Matravers has hobbies and varied interests that we have never suspected. He does not only dabble, but actually accomplishes surprising things in gardening and landscaping. He raises all sorts of fruits and flowers and adds each year to the variety of his experiments. He enjoys swimming, golfing, and yachting on Lake Michigan. He didn’t mention his family in particular when we talked with him, but he has every reason to be proud of three such girls as his daughters. A more recent hobby includes oil painting. Mr. Joseph Mott of the black derby is a familiar figure to all the college students. His main interests are walking, archery, traveling and human beings. He has traveled through most of the U.S., Mexico, and Canada. He went fishing once, but all he caught was a catfish and a mudturtle so he gave it up. He feels that psychology helps one to understand and control behavior— To get folks to do what you want them to do. Humanist, zealous educationist, and humorist, Dr. Nixon imparts his knowledge of mathematics in such a subtly, capricious fashion as to precipitate howls of laughter among his classes. He has taught practically everywhere, is associated with the United States Department of Justice, and has been Director of Education of the Ohio State Prisons. He reads most of the new mathematics books. His one idiosyncrasy causes broad grins to spread over his students faces (ask them how he puts on his glasses). The girls "like him a lot," and the fellows think he’s a reg lar guy." TEACHERS CONVENTION AT WAUSAU SO NO SCHOOL . . . BORED U S s r 1 ? F P 9« 21MATH AND HOME EC Besides performing his duties as mathematics instructor at C.S.T.C., Mr. Thompson appreciates good music with all the ardentness of a born musician. No basketball fan is more faithful than Mr. Thompson—he never ever misses a game. He guides his students through the intricacies of quadratic equations and logarithms with a skillful hand. His philosophical and benevolent advice is always timely and well received. Few are those who haven’t heard his "Now, I may be wrong—.” The students respect his impartiality, fairness and kindness. He directs practice teachers in the Manual Arts and can get anyone to do his very best. Miss Allen, in charge of the Home Economics Department, is the senior woman of the faculty. She is interested in doing fancywork, (she is teaching Mr. Jenkins at present), playing solitaire, and seeing good shows. She loves to travel, and has covered Europe, the U.S., Alaska, and Canada. Incidentally, she was a Latin teacher before taking up Home Economics. There will be a minor offered in Home Economics, and those already enrolled as a major will finish up as such. At present there are about forty or fifty enrolled as either a major or minor. The graduates of this department are always well placed and make good. Miss Meston plays piano accompaniments for her real hobby. It might have been her profession if she hadn’t become interested in Home Economics. She likes to travel around in "Henrietta.’’ her Ford. She has visited the East and West, spending three full school years in New York. Miss Wilson likes to travel in out-of-the-way places. Some of her most interesting travels took her to Guatemala, the Honduras, Panama, Mexico, and, of course, throughout most of the U.S. and Canada. She enjoys air travel, her apartment, and outdoor sports. Coins and stamps fascinate her, and in her travels she has had an opportunity to start quite a collection. OF COURSE... TO BE ABLE TO SLEEP ■ . • RIVER FALLS TAKES Page 22THE STAGE Three men who represent a variety of unusual activities are Messrs. Knutzen, Jenkins, and Burroughs. Although their courses as faculty instructors are history and English each of them represents the stage in some phase. In 1936 when College Theater was initiated onto this campus, it was Mr. Warren G. Jenkins who encouraged and supported the venture. His kindness and good sense, his executive ability, and his understanding of theater and, most of all, young people were really the stamina of the organization. Many a human interest story is based upon the success of this venture. Mr. Jenkins is a great reader. He loves the out-of-doors, too. For several years he volunteered as coach for boxing and helped to organize the team into an organization of worthwhile activity. As a professor of history, he has become known as C.S.T.C.’s A1 absent-minded professor. But don’t let it kid you, he knows where he is. Mr. Leland M. Burroughs was invited into College Theater shortly after it began functioning, as director of speech. He has remained with Mr. Jenkins as a faculty adviser. His work in speech, literature, and the dramatic arts has been recognized far beyond C.S.T.C. His debate teams this year, one of which was almost undefeated and another of which entered the quarter-finals, he defined as the best he's had yet. Many fine plays have been produced under his direction. In 1939-40 the outstanding plays were "Mr. Pirn Passes By” and "Our Town, both beautiful productions of recognized quality. Mr. Burroughs has participated in and directed Shakespearean stage, on which he has had much experience. The Men’s Glee Club has flourished under Mr. Norman E. Knutzen. His heart and soul is in every selection his boys have ever sung. They have become a recognized group in the state and internationally by the advent of superior production. Tone and style are the things they strive for. Mr. Knutzen has a cottage up North which is one of his joys. He loves Nature and good literature and music, and in his work he has woven them into one beautiful pattern. THE LOCAL BOYS INTO CAMP . . . “AND SO TO BED” IN ASSEMBLY . . . Page 23IPSO FACTO Mr. Steiner, Dean of Men and Chairman of the History Department, finds his greatest enjoyment in fishing—Ask to see his fishing hat sometime! He is fond of all sports, fostering his interest as a Valley Conference official and as a member of the Athletic Board. He used to be an active participant in football. In addition, he is an inveterate reader, has traveled to both coasts and up north, and really loves great music. He has directed church choirs and sung here in school for many years. As yet he hasn t become reconciled to modern music. Incidentally, he and Mr. Evans used to put on some pretty good minstrel shows. Mr. Steiner feels that the aim of the history department is progress Dr. H. M. Tolo, an advocate of "ye goode life,” likes to design and remodel other peoples' homes. He’s interested in music, individual athletics, bowling, and blondes,- he’s a violent addict of golf, has traveled through the East, West, and Canada, and he dreams of taking a sabbatical year to study at the University of London with Mr. Burroughs, and of installing a handball court on the campus. He never fails to be optimistic and jolly toward everyone. He likes to take a jaunt with the football fellows or debaters and everyone enjoys his company. He gloats over his doubledoored office and pictures of all of his brothers. He and Mrs. Tolo are seen at theater first nights and dinner parties and dances. They both take an active interest in student activities and students themselves. Mr. Robert D. Morrison was chosen this year to replace Mr. Smith in the department of cultural and ancient history. He has proved to be a splendid choice. Being himself a man of vast experience, and having a wealth of information at his command, Mr. Morrison does not need to depend upon the reputation of his father, Dr. H. C. Morrison of Chicago University. He has traveled extensively. In 1931 he went to Turkey as a member of an archeological expedition from the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. He, with other members of the party, had tea with the prime minister in the old Sultan’s palace. In 1934 Mr. Morrison was supervisor of archeology in Morgan County, Alabama. He can tell you anything about snakes. He has spent many evenings intently watching Mr. Rightsell’s engine. Mr. Morrison reads much and has a keen sense of humor—two more assets to his courses that have become so popular. He often drops into the library to tease Miss Mansur or Miss Mason (and usually in time for a party!) or else he meets Mr. Jenkins in the inner office and between the two of them they plan fantastic organizations to do away with librarians and put the world aright. HOMECOMING . . . AND DID THEY EVER . . . MET A FINE GRADE OF ALUM . . . Page 24Miss Adele Davidoff came here last year and is now Director of Women's Athletics. Students know her by her "Hi!" It is a cheery indication of her youth and amiability. The intramural program and informal dancing she promotes foster health and fellowship. Believe us, her day is a full one and tough—but does it get her down? Never! And she can outplay the best of them in bridge. She flies to her home in New York City for vacations. Her father has had her sheepskins framed and shows them off. Who can blame him? Coach Eddie Kotal has been named The Builder of Champions. That s a title to live up to,-but he has been untiring in his purpose to develop real championship teams at C.S.T.C. Though he’s a strenuous competitor, a side-line agitator and a hard loser, he’s always a good sport. He's superstitious where his teams are concerned and a gambler at heart when he takes a long shot on a play—but his experience and knowledge qualify his chances as a sure thing. There's no chance in tiddly-winks, however—Tommy beats his dad at this big sport regularly. Coach played pro football with the Green Bay Packers for four years. He's a licensed boxing referee and has a lifetime pass to all games in the National Professional Football League. Besides, he’s no mean psychologist (just ask ‘im!)—he studied "psych" at the University of Southern California last summer! QUICKLY RECOVERED WHEN YOU DISCOVERED HE WENT STEADY WITH FRIEND Pase 25HEALTH Dr. Fred Marrs and Nurse Mary Neuberger, Dean of Women, are indispensable to our school. Their services in rendering first aid and advice are greatly appreciated. Di. Marrs is a fine physician and surgeon. Their crusade against tuberculosis and syphilis is a great cause and a worthy one. Have you been down to try the new cold machine? It’s a virtual vacuum cleaner— both faculty and students are for it. Careful reports of every "case are kept on file. Drop in at the library and see the bound volumes of these reports and you will know that the work of the Health Office is no small matter. In addition to her office duties, Miss Neu-berger checks rooms at the dorm weekly and finds time for movies and visits. After summer school she likes a trip— she s been West and is planning for another direction this summer. DORMITORY Mrs. Josephine Finch, house mother of Nelson Hall, is a spiritual leader as Coach is an athletic leader and the Doc and Nurse are health leaders. She has endeared herself to her girls by her generous understanding and consideration. Mrs. Finch's girls are her real hobby, and her grandchildren are her true love. She has a cottage at Waupaca where she takes them during vacations and enjoys the physical-mental cure of relaxation with Nature. She hasn’t much time for recreation, but she reads a great deal. She is a fascinating conversationalist. Her knitting and crocheting are beautiful. She goes for early morning walks very often and once in a while for a late evening one! MS CELEBRATE THEIR THIRTIETH ANNIVERSARY . . . CLASS ELECTIONS Page 26THE OFFICE STAFF Miss June Lindeman came here in 1938 as office secretary. She and Miss Van Derra have enjoyed many picnics and one unforgettable trip together. She likes photography and naturally, movies, which are an example of the best photography. Her favorite pastime is reading. The financial secretary-treasurer of the college board of administration, Miss Carolyn Rolfson, has a job to keep her really busy. However, in her spare time she has many interesting hobbies. She collects old glass and china, too but limits her choice to old blue glass. She likes to travel and has seen both the East and West. In 1935 Miss Rolfson and Miss Swallow went to Alaska together. It was a thrilling trip where Miss Rolfson undoubtedly had time to be active in her favorite sport, skiing. Miss Mary Jane Van Derra, Secretary to the Advanced Standing Committee. She was a freshman here in 1936 with the graduating class of 1940. Miss Van Derra is fond of classical music and blows her own horn, a cornet. She makes all the trips with the college bus and otherwise to hear the personalities in the worlds of music and dramatics. She enjoys reading—has started a library of her own. She likes the out-of-doors—rides horseback, tapdances. "Exploring Our State," a radio series, was a very interesting account of various localities in Wisconsin, written and broadcast during 1938-1939 by Miss Marie Swallow, Secretary to the Placement Committee. Wisconsin is Miss Swallow’s hobby. Her broadcasts were designed especially to acquaint the radio audience with our state, its natural resources and beauties, its people, human interest stories, and history. She is very much interested in present day affairs, economical, political, conservational, and personal, and is unusually well prepared to talk or write on any of them. She has traveled throughout the continent. Miss Swallow is a poetess of considerable talent, too. In "Exploring Our State she included many of her own poems which accurately distinguish her as one who really knows and loves her state. ...THE WINNAHS! O'DOHERTY, VANDYKE, SPLITEK AND OLSON . . . SENIOR Pase 27aintenancc Behind the scenes of an institution such as ours are the people who carry on activities that make things click and tick and mighty comfortable! They keep us clean they keep us warm—they keep us safe. When we stop to think, we appreciate it all; but we get to be pretty much matter-of-fact and take-it-for-granted about such things. Which all goes to say that we ought to stop and we ought to think and why not say "Thanks” while we re at it? Mr. Stein, the wizard of the heating staff, is responsible for making the wheels go round; and a better job was never done. He has spent spare time trying to compensate for everyone’s gripes about the weather for the last twenty years. The busiest man in school is Mr. Parks who is in charge of the maintenance staff. He has a solution for every difficulty and is especially handy with locks—not picking them; fixing them. COMMITTEES HARD AT WORK . . . THREE ONE-ACT PLAYS PRESENTED . . . Page 28UPKEEP-TO YOU! John, the Janitor, is the friend of every student and all the teachers. He has one of the jolliest personalities around school. Every returning student is assured of a warm welcome from John. To the children attending the Demonstration School, Frank is the most important man in the college. Why? Because he’s Santa Claus every Christmas. Besides that he’s the handy man and jack of all trades at the Demonstration School. Every Dormite will agree that life at Nelson Hall wouldn't run half so smoothly without Tessie. She always has a cheery word and a sunny smile no matter what the time of day, and she has never been known to refuse to do a favor for one of her girls. ’’Service with a smile” seems to fit Mr. Davis. He’s the practice teacher’s friend. You'll find him any time of the day somewhere in the training school, but you’ll have to look. He should patent his noiselessness. Besides her many duties at the college, Mrs. Jonas finds time for hobbies— baking birthday cakes for the Home Ec staff and raising flowers. It is her thoughtfulness of others that has given her a place in the hearts of all those associated with C.S.T.C. MEN'S GLEE CLUB DOING CONSIDERABLE TRIPPING ABOUT THE COUNTRY . . . Pase 29 men Freshmen, like autumn leaves, at first are green and new. Freshman girls wear new sweaters and new skirts and pass not unnoticed by Sophomore Casanovas; freshman boys wear slick suits or flashy sweaters, preferably of the letter variety, for erstwhile football heroes are at a premium in early autumn—but like the leaves these newcomers fade and mellow. Sweaters get that washed look; skirts become faded; letters disappear,- and new footballers develop. Some of the one time hopefuls find college competition more kaleidoscopic than the home town type. Net result: more bench warmers plus added volume and mass in the cheering section (though sometimes debatable). These things, together with the words of wisdom of sardonic Sophomores, soon obliterate the fresh part of our new men (and women) and they belong. TOP PICTURE: 1. G. Chapin, F. Sindicie. R. Rade, L. Grimm, E. Nitka, A. Lukatavitz, G- Pionke, J. Olton, R. Ahlet, M. Loberg. 2. K. Metcalf, 8. Fluke, G. Rondeau, J. Hlava, E France, A. Smith, B. Greve, D. Floistad. R. Williamson, L. Barber. 3. K. Gehrke, A. Wtchman, R. Berg, R. Bute, E. Fletcher, L. Neve, H. Preiton, C Veen, J. Meydam, L. Abrahamson, C. Catkey. 4. J. Kulidat, E. Campbell, C. Marshall, S. Gula, G. Nelson, E. Leake, M. Van Natta, R. Lundgren, M Waag. H. Kronenwetler. BOTTOM PICTURE: 1. R. Barwick, L. Sanden, J. Frane, R. Johnton, H. Hunkc, C. Schultz, R. Arndt, B. Belongia, H. Rector, H. Jawort, N. Reinckmg, E. Nowak. 2. D. Phaneuf, D. Warner, J. Jenten, M. Samplet, H. Park, G. Verke, J. Bray, M. Andenon, H. Kahler, T. Michal, J. Perry. 3. J. Bukolt, $. Omcrnik, K. Cody, R. Spencer, L- Swiontek, M. Thompton, R. Trader, M. Sorenson, M. Johnson, J. Cook, D. Crotsgrove. 4. L Koehl, K. Brenner, M. Thompson, A. Muttey, R. Dubinski, F. Wietzorek, D. Parkel, D. Brennan, E. Tettler, N. Bailey, M. Van Slett, D. Rouskey. PANHELLENIC DANCE CLIMAXES PLEDGING IN FITTING STYLE . . . GRID MEN Page 30AND HOW TOP PICTURE: 1. L. Solvcrud, J. Stohcnbcf J Trcdtr, A. Stoltenbc g. H. Kttchum.D. P«uclski, C. H«lvcnon. 2. I. SUnifUwvkl, L. Budibcrg, Z. Perry, D. F«lk, H. Guth, F. S «rti, G. Joo»tcn, I. Gclkowtki. 3. M. Sh«rfc«y, R. Shurlcy, D. R«dd«nt, H. Wickmon, E. Vig, V. Lundgren, E. Britelden, S. Borgen. 4. K. Foley, I. Simondj, I. Owen, £. Jehnke, T. Berber, M. Morrow, I. Wood, D. Kordu . BOnOM PICTURE: 1. R Aulik. N. H«IU, C. Stolten-berg, R. Tidtmun, J. Neuenfeldt, E. Fn»cn, G. Barden J. Hucke. 2. H. Bowker, V. Krueger, N, Goog.orowjki, W. Stoddard, F. Evans. T. Witblmski, E. Lange, C Oineen. 3. E. Jakel, C Anderson. M. Barrett, P. Markee. R Kaplun, C Eaton, M. Butter, P. Carver, G. Conover 4. E. Platte, M. Moskrwske, A. Cbtrowski, J. La Fleur, 0. Flood, M. Reitan, E. Johnson, R. Gooch. At any rate, little Harriet Coey added charm to pep at athletic events. This year's crop (we weren’t going to say that, but it does fit in with the leaf idea) of Freshmen have otherwise distinguished themselves in many of the college groups. In the musical organizations there was Gertrude Rondeau, with her lovely soprano voice. Jack Perry, Tommy Wishlinski, Bob Malecke, and Dorothy Jane Raddant of the Band are well prepared to fill the shoes of illustrious graduates. Norbert Gongiorowski proved himself a tricky drum major. The Frosh this year were more pugnacious than formerly for we find some outstanding boxers among Ken Brenner, Joe Negard, and Howard Stimm. In the Pigskin parade there were Norman Halla, Louis Posluszny, Joe Goodrich, Myron Sharkey, and Bill Carnahan—not to forget Doc Kulidas, the waterboy and manager. LOSE A FEW BUT MAKE PRETTY GOOD SHOWING IN SPITE OF IT ALL . . . Pase 31BOTTOM PICTURE: 1. L. Gregory, E. Kry»h«k, H. Nieraan, M. Booth H. Schmidt, L. Malchow. P. Stoitenberg, J. Gear. 2. J. Pajlco , C. Budnik, V. Brunner, R. Ciula, O. Wilkiru, G. Roberts, V. Gruenke, D. Abrahamson. 3. H Buchholz, J. Shier, T. Barber, E. Tushinski, J. Kyhl, L. Weller W. Anderson. H. Zuege. A. M. Lawrence, I. Ley, M. Nockerts, J. Pierce, A. Dean, F. Theisen E. Catlin, J. Wallace. THEY GREW! TOP PICTURE: 1. J. Turecek, J. Check, D. HoHeman, A Buchholz. S. Negard, G. Reedal, C. Nelson, E. Lyon! 2. E. Judd, v. Holubetz, R. Swenson, P. Brennan, K Gresens, R. Malecke, 8. Vonderlieth. 3. L. Wogsland. M. Garvue, S. Turner. O. Crawford, H Coey, R. Cieslewicz, G. Hintz. J. Halvorson. A. L. Thomsen, 8 Murty, V. Johnson, M Nelson, F. Hale P. Maguire, A, Brooks. Basketball showed Neal Druckrey and Bill Peterson to be good stuff. We might mention Florence Theisen as outstanding in girls’ sports. The young hopefuls of the theater, Isla Mae Wood, Jim Carew, Lucille Neuman, Paul Swenson and Myrtle Morrow really show promise. These Freshies were even represented in radio—WLBL, no less—Blair Belongia, announcer. Pat Cashin of the once Cashin-Berard duo, may have lost her partner but she's still a number one jitterbug and socialite. Nor would our list be complete without mentioning Neva Jane Burroughs who aspires to debate—which scores a hit for heredity. Some of the class even settled down to become scholars of notable worth. And so begins the class of 43. May they remember next year that Sophomores from little freshmen grow. Pase 32 28 TRAVEL TO WAUSAU TO ’'TOBACCO ROAD” . . . TED SHAWNy. w. c. a. "There goes the 7:30 gong! Come one, come all to the Y-Dub meeting in the rec room." Soon many girls are seen scurrying down the corridors of Nelson Hall to the bi-mcnthly Y.W.C. A. get-together. This national organization furthered its goal of friendliness and helpfulness the first week of school by assigning each freshman girl a campus sister, who took the new student under her wing. Membership in the Y.W.C.A. of C.S.T.C. is open to all girls in the college regardless of race or creed. Their purpose is to unite in the desire to realize a full and creative life through a growing knowledge of God. Some prolific mind conceived of the noble idea to rejuvenate the dorm rec room with new curtains and divan covers. Their nimble fingers "sewed the seed and soon the rec room blossomed forth in all its splendor. The group delivered baskets of food and clothing to two needy families at Christmas time. This charity work has its spiritual compensations and will remain long in their memories. All reports of the Valentine party proved that it was a "lovely" affair. Games such as matching lovers (you know -Bodan and ???) were played and cupid’s arrow hit the spot with a delicious lunch. With the spring tra la!—come lighter thoughts and lighter actions such as the Silver Spring Tea on the first day of spring and the Annual Spring Formal Banquet at Hotel Whiting. And did you do your cup cake shopping faithfully throughout the year? Two for a nickel sale begins every Wednesday at 9:00 and are they delicious! And many’s the time a little snack from the Y.W.C.A. store at Nelson Hall made that hollow feeling in the stomach of some midnight oil-burner disappear quite suddenly. What would the dormites do without that store7 Which reminds us that about this time two delegates began to look forward to the summer conference at Lake Geneva. Last year’s delegates, Viola Gericke and Doris Thousand, came back with interesting reports of their experiences at camp. Elouise Torkelson piloted the girls this year and was assisted by Viola Gericke as Vice-President, Virginia Johnson as Secretary, and Doris Thousand as Treasurer. STRUTS STUFF WITH TROUPE . . . TWO-DAY RECESS TO ALLOW FOR KILLING Pa3« 33LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION The Lutheran Student Association of America, like a planet attracted by a greater body, 9rew out of an international assemblance. Every Lutheran student on the campus of every institution of higher learning wears his path through contact with his respective church. It is with the purpose of promoting closer fellowship of Lutheran students that each particle clings to L.S.A. The activities throughout the year have been of such a nature as to encourage the use of the Bible and stimulate regular church attendance. As a result of the endeavors of this organization, the students are guided to live more healthy social lives and cultivate strong Christian friendships. Bible study has been guided by Reverend Marrs Dale, with Mrs. Harold Tolo as a faculty adviser. During the fall, representatives from C.S.T.C. attended the Land O Lakes District Convention held at Minneapolis. Among these were Charlotte Reichel, Ethel Hill, and Elouise, Elida, Harold and Gerald Torkelson of Central State. The educational values of L.S.A. are as much a part of its program. Present day problems and books are subjects for discussion. Creative thinking is stimulated—-ideas and plans. As a result of cooperation, many successful social gatherings and parties were enjoyed. For the year 1939-40 Herbert Upright was president and Elouise Torkelson was vice-president. Secretarial and treasury duties were performed by Elizabeth Hotvedt and Orval Moser respectively. Jesse Johnson was reporter for the year and Ethel Hill, missionary reporter. FATTED FOWL AND RECOVERING FROM SAME . . . MR. PIM PASSED BY... Page 34Away back in the dim dark past of 1916 when "join the army’ was the favorite slogan of many nations, C.S.T.C.’s Catholic students adopted "join the Loyola" as their slogan. It was then they decided it was about time they band together to strengthen their religious life, study along religious lines, and become better acquainted in a social way. Such was the Loyola Club until 1939 when the local group affiliated with a national organization and changed the name to Newman Club. Their big job this year was an intensive drive for new members accented during Newman Week, November 13th to 19th. Good Newmanites flashed red and black badges. The activities were culminated by an impressive initiation ceremony at which 65 people became members. Communion was received in a body at St. Stephens Church, followed by breakfast at the school. Surprisingly successful was their study club led by Edward Lightbody. The Pope s Encyclical on Social Justice was discussed. Meetings were held every other Thursday in the Rural Assembly. Their guest speakers included Father Kabat and Father McGinnley of St. Stephens Church, Father Krembs of Waupaca, Father Nebar, former member of this organization who spoke of his recent experiences in Poland, Dr. H. T. Harrington, resident doctor at River Pines Sanatorium, and Elizabeth Martell social worker for Portage County. Miss Roach is the faculty adviser for the Newman Club and Doctor Kabat acts as the spiritual adviser. Miss Hanna and Miss LaVigne also proved themselves valuable to this organization. Wallace Wheeler directed the Newman Club’s destinies for the first semester in the role of President. Grace Okray served as first Vice-President, Laurel LaValle as second, and Warren Lensmire as Treasurer, and Doris Soderberg as Secretary. The second semester James Bagnell took over and ruled the roost with the able assistance of Florian Sybeldon, Katherine Metcalf, Mona Reichert and Peter Terzynski. SENIOR BALL . . . VIVACIOUS EVELYN SCHWINGLE AND KING JERRY OFFICIATE Page 35BACK ROW: Ruppel, Slotwimki, Duecker, Warner. Svbeldon. T. Anderson, Goodrich, Bernstein THIRD ROW: Van Dyke, Dorsche, Parr, Seffern, Menzel, Smith, Kalkofcn SECOND ROW: Trankle, Halle, A. Anderson, LeFleur. Bishop, Schaidt, Michel, Hucke, Reading FRONT ROW: Henig, Fritsch, Posluzny, Bohan, Koehn, Carnahan, Sharkey I hold it true whate'er befall, I feel it when I sorrow most: Tis better to have played and lost, Than never to have played at all. With apologies to whoever wrote the real one. . . . ANNUAL YULE PROGRAM STAGED . . . MAGNIFICENT AS USUAL . . . Page 36PANORAMA This year's squad looked like a world-beater at the beginning of the season. The lads nosed out a tough Stout outfit to start the ball rolling. The second game proved discouraging when River Falls scored TO points in the last five minutes to hurt the locals TO-7. The Oshkosh-Point feud proved Point to be the tougher gang. Playing under a warm sun, Point kicked the Titans around to a 17-7 finish. Playing out of its class, Point traveled to Peoria, Illinois to get mauled around by an outfit that tied the U. of Illinois—final score 31-0. Temperature 85 degress F. Milwaukee came to Point, took advantage of every break and chased the local boys to the showers with a 27-6 case of exhaustion. Playing at the head of the lakes, Point nearly froze to death and took another on the chin 14-7. Whitewater, convinced Point wasn’t so tough, scored while Point didn’t 6-3. Piatteville ran Point ragged with lots of touchdowns. f t the half, Point was disillusioned, but more so when it was all over—26-0. basketball season gets well on its wav... three wins in tour sCANDID GREG and ROY A couple of co-captains for ’40. BOHAN He captained this year's outfit. SLOT Tough on opponents. READING He found his place—in the line SNOOKY A nice boy to have in a backfield. JIM He called ’em right. BERNSTEIN 240 pounds of fightin’ lineman. BUD He kicked us out of a lot of holes. 4 PARR All-conference center (no prize for making faces).CAMERA HANIG Shifty and tough. SLATS Likes the game. POLECAT All-conference half first year. RED A nice end. HANK Light but tough. TED He smashed lots of lines. HUCKE A future star. sy He wrote this stuff. BUD Tough and ready. HURRY KOEHN His kind are not always around.CLICKS JIM Okay in any back position. ERNIE Not enough like him. BISHOP A good lad. TONY Plays lots of end. AUCUTT Better known as Rochester." GOODRICH Fast and furious. BUCK WEAVER Assistant coach. RAY JIMMY MASE A swell bunch of managers.ACTION Koehn starts toward pay dirt. Hanig well on Vus way K°ehn «9ai„. °K! TK KurtjFall registration begins and ends with Miss Rolfson still smiling after an all-time high in enrollment. Social life gets under way at once. Y.W.C.A. leads by lending a big sister hand to new girls. It was a new experiment that was a success. (Even the members were surprised—it’s been rumored that they trekked to the store some three times for refills to take care of the two hundred who showed up). Omegs and Tau Gams welcome at teas. Fellows are so much more studious and get right into the real swing of school by loitering on the steps to study. Epicureans "give' with potent beverage that looks as if it's going to be coffee. Some clean up at cards and some clean up. Culture is brought to mind when the Russian Cossacks sing at the first assembly. And there is that cute blonde out in front to revive your memory if needs be. College Theatre comes into its own with a birthday cake et al (rather which all et)—nonetheless, Becher isn’t holding that knife for nothing. sotal gets the kiddies out to tighten up the flabby muscles— Bernstein doesn't show up. Burdened practice teachers on their way to the practice floor longingly wish that they were young again. Mixed social life gets under way, too—and is it prepared for! Organizations open their portals for new memberships and even the girls take to books. Rushing parties and initiations are mixed in. Then comes the day that the sun is right and the Iris thinks of pictures. Hatch checks the camera and the stampede is begun. It's every man for himself. We’ve heard that it always happens. There are those at this late date who are prone to dream and ignore grade points they probably just don’t know the rules yet. Fritsch must be winning what do you think? We think it's a shame. We think, too, that we should get a shot of someone really slaving. School looks like so darn much fun.J. preview of winter, but, if you remember, it didn’t last. Charlie Evans—the spirit that guides,- everyone buying a mum from W.A.A.; grads returning; the bonfire burning — spurning learning — anyhow! It's Homecoming! Pep rallies after the bonfire and snake dance and it's cider and doughnuts in the training school gym. Dawn arrives. Mr. Evans changes his role to guide the spirits, eh, Ramee? And last minute touches to floats and costumes are given. Organizations have planned and saved and worked for weeks. Others have kept their fingers crossed for sunshine and the right returns. The minute to float into action has arrived. What’s the matter, Gracie? Those aprons aren't headed for the kitchen, but even so, you know, too many cooks? Oh, yes, that’s a cardboard pointer. Paper you know. Or do you? he Parade starts. The usual luxury of the organization represented by the Ford is in evidence. Herr Hitler is camera shy, but propaganda wins again. Take time out and pity the pledges. Look at the man work. And it’s not limited to the strong sex. Note the active hand and watch for the little pledges. The band made up of alums was a riot. Even the staidest of the first year teachers regained his collegiate air for the day. And it was downright good to see those familiar faces back again. Let’s have another. The girls are pretty, too. Or hadn't you noticed? Wouldn’t you swear well, doesn’t it look as if—Scheel is taking a stitch in that hood? Giggling grads and guys and gals grinding and groping and gawking through the day and into the night and maybe on into the morning. They’re off and then the Phi Sigs pick up their signs and go home.game went on the air. The referees were kept busy. Doc watered 'em and Moser cheered ’em. What more does anyone want? But to continue, our little pledge shined 'em and the band wowed 'em. The Pointer did the covering. That night people dined and danced in style. Yawningly everyone began to wish it wasn't over. In the lower center we have the reason for it all. May be sentiment but there it is—C.S.T.C. And until it has C.S.T.C. (ceased to see) may Homecomings go on as pretentious and ostentatious. Now down in the right hand corner is an example of our humor or the effects of Homecoming on us. Humbly we apologize. It was meant to be a coed’s dream—to come in the fire escape -we faked it, of course. And now we have to explain it. Well, laugh!c"7 -ife goeson even on a bicycle. Happily, too. Organizations initiate new members in candle light and solemnity. Ted Shawn brings depression and a program aesthetically satisfying. Hell Week begins in earnest. President and Mrs. Smith are the toast of society—looks like a spread. Behind the scenes and behind the footlights actors and actresses are made up and come into their own. Every bit of it is done with the best of technique. Turn to pages 68 and 69 to see what really goes on stage. Here are our little pledges—liberated and honored, disillusioned or hopeful anyhow, they're scrubbed and smiling. They are allowed to eat and dance and to be themselves. Keep in touch with them. Turn to page 169 to see what kind of active Greeks they eventually turn out to be.SUBSEQUENT TRIFLES Chilliness waits for spring And in cold perspective Sees the green, And feels the warmth, And hears the song. Unaware that: The brittleness will break. The glassiness melt to Rivulets evaporating Into sultriness. Oblivious of: Apparent barren beauty Summer's growth will cover.1 I BOOK II—but we discovered no one else was impressed with our importance—WINTER ? )l CHIC T£A = £)eya t linen I a Aon c taxi a C xlta C ntticula ficviinj yiLtct m mu. c ovlt Htote TOP PICTURE: 1. G. Gordon. R. Fdlx, W. H«l«, L. Yokerc, H F«ulkt, M. Wunsch, D Fontud D. Rotom. 9 I Born, E Hocvcdl, B. BfttuL F. Mozuch, G. Harrington, D. Mort, A Wagn«r, A Aibr.ght. 3. E Hanicn, A N.ggrnunn, C. Solbrrn, R Schrank. R. Spry. H. Faulkt. R Cutfer. 4 A. Snicgotki, V. $n«ll, F. Wandorf, L. Neuman, O M»j«r, J. Halvorson. A. Eggen M la Brot, 8. Guttin. BOTTOM PICTURE: 1. M Malick, R. Robertion, J. Manning, H. Torkelton, R. Sanborn, R. Oatrander, H, Sicvwright. 2 0 Hills, C. Tohm, M. lavert, F. Kelly, A. Moore, J. Zirlhke, R. Piekartki. 3 H. Nedreat. O. Shipla, B. Chylek, J. Tiffany, M. Topomg. M. Johnton. M. Fryk, A. Seidel, F. Splitek. 4. L. Rooella, E. Cornwell. H Randod. R. Fuchagruber. A Hamon. J. Jereak, M Thompton, J. Ackerman. President . Vice President Secretary . Treasurer OFFICERS ......................Frank Splitek Wallace Bartosz ......................James Cashin .......................Bob Berard If the students and teachers of C.S.T.C. thought the freshies of "38-'39 had something "on the ball," they haven’t met them as sophs. These kids really keep the ball a-rolling. The pigskin saw some action with Frank "Killer' Koehn, Jim Hanig, JimCashin, Bud Menzel, Ken Parr, and Ted Fritsch. Then, too, there are the boys who faithfully sank baskets durins the winter season—Pete Terzynski, Hank Pospychala, Ken Parr, Jim Bagnell, and Ted Fritsch. ‘ Hatch’ Berard and "Bud Menzel did their part in making the cheering section a success, assisted by Dorothy Ingham, Orval Moser, and Helen Faulks. Last but not least the sophomores claim the outstanding men of the bowling season—Bob Becker, Frankie Koehn, and Jim Cashin. Literally speaking that’s all the sophomores have on the ball," but figuratively they have a lot more. The new radio course in the college has interested a number of students in technical and mechanical work. These were Linda Born, Herbert Faulks, Tony Klein, Waldo Nelson, and Bill Winkler. Acting talent among the less-than-juniors showed promise. Wallace "Shadow" Bartosz practically bowled them over with his duo roles. Other active participants were Lillian Boe, Madge Lee, Jack Ackerman, Jim Bagnell, Janet Poggemiller, Mona Reichert, Cliff Powless, Bud Menzel, "Dink" Dana, and Lucille Miller. Quite a score! LEFT: 1. G. Helvorson, J Unger, R. Becker, P Honug, J. Bagnell, D. Lcton, C. Miller, W. Nelson 2. M. Stoehr, D. Kemke, 0. Lewis. R. Trowbridge, G. Wojciechowski, I. Enderlein, V. Freeman, J. Korolev. 3. E. Firkus. M Lundowst. A. Weller. N Weisser. M. Norstrant, M. Rohrbcck. 4. M. Rogers. B. Hein. L. Olson, M Murnsh, C. Norby, M. Bruener, I. Miller. RIGHT: 1. N. Werner. A. Klein. R. Lorbeech, W. Metzger, 8. McCormick, F. Furmenek. J. mIIm. 2. L. Lyons, L. Wted, M. Folk, I. Redltn, M. CUrk, C. Twist, M. Reichert. 3. H. Ingersoll, V. Dvorsek, L. Boe, M. Rust, M. Lee, J. Cattle. P. DeGolier. 4. R. Selves, W. Spencer, L Z.lle, b. In eo, A. Schefheuser, L. We.her. PARTIES AND MORE PARTIES... SPREADING CHEER OR GATHERING IT ??? . . . Pase 54' 1. M. Johrw«n, G. Binntbote, N. O'Brien, G. Brook , E. E »«x. J. Ho vedt, G. Sappenfield, E. Crumroey. 2 R D r»« B. Joo t«n, E. Fctcnon. W. Siebtrt, I. Gr«f»b»ch, R Ntwby, R. Abb, M. Mech. 3. M. Sh«lr«n»ki, M. Mtnmi, H. Mcnxel, A. Bcnnrii G. Lcwiton. J. B«rtkowi«k, R L«r on. 4. J PoggtmiHer, J. Urtcn, R Pjrrcttc. R. Ber«rd, T. FrltKh, M Mentd, L Kul« Possie also had the distinction of being one of the rare sophomore practice teachers, merited by her excellence in art. The class proudly "gave out" in the music department with outstanding talent— Charlotte Reichel, Tony Klein, Betty Gustin, Ingeborg Enderlein, Marvin Yost, Frank Pliner, and Chuck Dodge among the numbers. . With such talent and active interest displayed the honorary and social Greek organizations lost no time in acquiring sophomores among their ranks. Such a class of outstanding personalities is predicted to keep the ball a-rolling for better things. Speaking of unusual personalities—here are a few: Bud Menzel is a writer of ballads, a singer of songs. Harold Irish is quite an entertainer in song and dance. The dance is represented in other phases by Ingie and Hatch. Norm Werner and the Shadow are making records for themselves as camera addicts. Don Lewis is an example of first class scholasticism. And speaking of class, was there ever a boxer smoother than Jim "Chief" Hanig? There's plenty on the ball! AND SO TO OUR RESPECTIVE HOMES FOR A COUPLE OF WEEKS REST . . . Pose 55  t eyaxt m cn ts FORUM A new year and a fresh start was the motto of the High School Department of C.S.T.C. as it began this year under the leadership of a new director, Professor Raymond R. Rightsell. Of course the members hated to lose Mr. E. T. Smith as their leader, but they still claimed him as President of this college—and so began 1940 for the department with a new head and an enrollment of over four hundred and eighty. Ambitious? Of course they were. The first step was to reorganize the Forum on a professional basis to make the club more active than it has been in the past. For several years Forum has been hardly more than a name—this has been due to the large size of a group with varied interests and ambitions. Still, this year times have changed for there is an active club now. Under the charge of Florian Sybeldon, Virginia Johnson, and Ernie Ruppel, programs for the year and speakers have been arranged to entertain the group. Officers for the year are Joe Ophoven, President; Betty Smith, Secretary-Treasurer. Headed by this sroup, Forum is expected to become as active as the other organizations of C.S.T.C. Good luck, we know you’ll make it a success! You can find the names of members of Forum on the roll of almost any extracurricular activity—music, sports, dramatics, debate—the high school group produces leaders in other Reids besides scholastic achievement. Beginning in 1914, the High School Department has increased until it is the largest group of the college. Both degrees, B.S. or B E., are offered to the students today, although it wasn’t until 1926 that a degree curriculum was instituted. At present, the requirements are nearly equivalent to those of the University. PLENTY OF GOOD SKATING AROUND . . . MIGHTY COLD IN PARTS THOUGH . . . Page 56GRAMMAR ROUND TABLE The Intermediate and Junior High School Departments group together at the Grammar Round Table on Monday night each month—their King Arthur (Mr. C. F. Watson) is at the head of the knights and ladies to lead them in their quest for knowledge and pleasure. And do they enjoy themselves? The answer is a decided ''Yes.” Grammar Round Table boasts an increased enrollment—sixty belong to the department this year. Excellent programs and good entertainment are the results of the program committee why, even lectures have been entertaining and different as well as worthwhile. President Smith headed the list of guest speakers for 1940—but Mr. Watson is always welcomed. Miss Gertie L. Hanson received the group one night in the radio workshop of C.S.T.C. The trip there ended in a discussion of Radio Education in the Schools,” topped by a studio to studio broadcast of a Christmas play which was given by some of the members. And then there was a Bring-A-Friend night- and believe it or not, there was a capacity crowd. Giammar Round Table likes to do different things in its search remember the social side, especially the Scavenger Hunt? Trying to find a size eleven shoe, straw hats, cobwebs, and black toothbrushes seemed fun even though it did rain—especially when prizes and refreshments were found at the end of the trail. And then the music they had one night—members still can’t decide if it was a German, Jazz, or Swing Band—ask Rollie McManners, the President; it was his idea. The other officers, Grace Okray, Vice-President, and Gotelind Rademacher, Secretary-Treasurer, have done their best, too, to make this professional club one of the best liked on the campus. Placement records have been almost 100%—the prophecy for 1940 is that dll will get positions Congratulations! T G B S PUT ON SWELL FORMAL AS PER USUAL . . . NEW COUPLES NOTED . . . Pase 57HOME ECONOMICS White, starched uniforms and recipe books—you’re right, it’s the Home "Ecs again, members of the Home Economics Club of C.S.T.C. Once a month this group meets in Sims’ Cottage, socially as well as professionally, with Miss Allen and Miss Meston to guide them. Sometimes the girls leave the homey atmosphere to meet somewhere else, but all declare that the cottage is the best place of all. Interesting subjects and interesting people are part of the Home Economics Club s schedule alumni of C.S.T.C. have been featured twice this year. Miss Irene Skutley, now the Portage County Home Demonstration Agent, exhibited her display of linens from China,- Mrs. Jackson, another alumna who is now living in Chicago, discussed, “Dining With The Immortals’’—that night the girls were guests of the Stevens Point Women's Club. Movies, lectures, discussions, and displays provide the educational instruction for this professional Club which belongs to both state and national Home Economics Associations. But is that all the girls do at their meetings? Far from it—they too have recreation and fun. They remember as the best time of all the Christmas party held at Sims Cottage. Remember the games and Christmas carols that night in front of the fireplace? And then the fruit cake and hard-sauce afterward? Don't forget the gifts and money the Home Ec's ’ gave to Miss LaVigne to distribute among needy families—true Christmas spirit, girls! Even though the department is included in the High School Division, the group still sticks together. The officers for the year are Edith Einfeldt, President; Ann Mainland, Vice-President; Lucille Gehrke, Secretary and Treasurer,- Marguerite Benn, reporter. And so we have the Home Economics Club, active in every way we re always glad when one of them is in charge of refreshments—you can count on the results being good. WHY QH WHY DIDN'T WE KEEP UP AS WE WENT ALONG ??? ... WE MEAN Pa9e 58PRIMARY COUNCIL Who says a professional club can’t exist successfully with a membership of girls— just girls? C.S.T.C. has an organization —its Primary Council, directed by Miss Susan E. Colman, and everyone—{even the men) has to admit that it's one of the most effective departments in school. We all know the history of the Primaries—beginning their journeys to the Training School when sophomores—maybe that’s why such good teachers are produced. Popularity has increased with enrollment—this year over eighty girls answered to roll call the first Monday night of each month as the group assembled for their regular meetings -Primary Council is affiliated with the Association for Childhood Education this year several representatives were sent by the campus organization to the 47th annual Convention at Milwaukee April 29 to May 3—and all expenses are paid! Not all the group’s time is devoted to work and teaching—far from it. The year began with a picnic—remember the fun that Monday afternoon out at Iverson Park? And then don't forget the social times and programs after each business meeting—there was never a dull moment with Primaries around this school—they know how to keep things moving. Christmas—carols, Bingo, popcorn balls, candy canes all mixed together the result was a very successful party. Good deeds weren’t neglected as the group gave their annual Christmas fund to the district Red Cross. Grace Melchoir led the group as President; Betty Richards, Vice-President; LaRae Winch, Secretary; Anita Madsen, Treasurer,- Eileen Crummey, Press Representative. The members of the executive board for 1939-1940 were Margaret Edwards, Eileen DeHorn, and Marjorie Jacobs. We re expecting 100% placement from the Primary Department again this year— So off to your "wee ones," prospective teachers—C.S.T.C. wishes you success! . . . PROCRASTINATION, FOUL FRIEND . . . Page 59 —UST ™°SE CONFERFNCF NOTESRURAL LIFE "Well, how is Rural Life? Is it still as peppy as it was when we were there7 This has been asked by devoted alumni ever since 1915 when Rural Life Club was organized as the professional group for the Rural State Graded Department of C.S.T.C. —always the answer has been, "Yes, it’s still going strong." This year the reply is "Better’n ever"—and why not? Twenty-five counties are represented, and enrollment has increased over last year. Hopes are high to repeat last year's 100% placement record, for all the eighty-seven graduates of 1939 (seventeen of whom were Four Year Students) got jobs, many of them going to their home communities. But placement isn’t all—a host of happy memories of the club's activities is one of the highlights of College life for Rurals. Herbie Upright has led his aspiring musicians twice a month in the Mixed Chorus. Begun last year, it promises to be a permanent part of Rural Life. Third floor, west end, has been a lively place twice a month as the Rurals assembled for their regular meetings. Discussions were led by members of the group, and lectures by faculty members and other prominent people, ably took care of the educational side of the Club. But who can ever forget the parties? They certainly are not lacking in this active organization—take the Halloween Get Together for example—games, dancing, and refreshments rounded out that enjoyable evening. . . . WE WONDER WHY WE NEVER DID GO OUT FOR DEBATE . . . NOTE: THOSE Page 60Officers for the first semester were Wallace Wheeler, President; Alice Linehan, Vice-President; Laura Schreiber, Secretary; LaVern Jester, Treasurer. For the second half Frank Splitek, President; Warren Lensmire, Vice-President; Evelyn Putz, Secretary; U-Clair Brandt, Treasurer. Mr. Neale's the director. This May Rural Life was host to the Wisconsin Collesiate Rural Life Conference, a unit of the National Country Life Conference, of which this group has been an active member for many years. Over five hundred delegates attended, coming from teachers colleges, the university, and county normals. Good Luck, Rurals, we know you'll make it a success! OUT OF TO WN TOURNAMENTS ... TO SAY NOTHING OF THE DEBATERS Page 61 C.S.T.C. recognizes talent in dramatics, in literature, in music and in science by admitting the gifted into national honorary fraternities local chapters of which are active on the campus. Pledging and admission are based entirely on merit. Each group sponsors worthwhile activities during the year that further their aims and which lend prestige to the school. ALPHA PSI OMEGA Acting makeup—stage settings—directing—all are uppermost in the minds of our dramatic stars. The greatest reward to our talented, ambitious young dramatists is membership in Alpha Psi Omega, the only international honorary dramatic fraternity on the campus. It is also the largest honorary society of its kind. The primary function of the fraternity is to obtain reduced royalties on plays through the national headquarters for all theater organizations. Our chapter sponsors plays and parties for the student theatrical groups and is attempting to advertise in civic groups. Alpha Psi Omega annually edits a national magazine The Playbill." The officers of the first semester were: Director, Janette Van Natta,- Sub-Director, Lawrence Jozwiak; and Secretary-Treasurer, Earle Siebert. The second semesters officers include: Director, Maddie Davel; Sub-Director, Barbara Gerdes; Secretary-Treasurer, Earle Siebert; and Publicity Manager, Don Krider. The chief faculty supporters are Mr. Jenkins and Mr. Burroughs. Here’s to many more Clark Gables and Joan Crawfords BOWLING INAUGURATED AS FACULTY SPORT . . . AND REPORTS BOWL US OVER P«9e 62ALPHA KAPPA RHO Our three-year-old child of C.S.T.C. is proving itself to be quite a musical genius. With the encouragement of its faculty members and patronesses and especially its faculty advisor, it has learned to recognize musical talent in the school and stimulate general interest in music. This year our child has learned its first song. The music for this fraternity song, was written by Charles Dodge, and our talented patroness, Mrs. Michelsen, composed the words. AKP's baby book would not be complete without mention of its big parties. Twice the Belmont tables, decorated with streams of clinging vine interspersed with baby chrysanthemum buds, invited all to a formal dinner after the new membership initiation. And what entertainment was furnished! Mr. and Mrs. Steiner took advantage of the opportunity to talk to each other in public. Mr. and Mrs. Michelsen failed to follow suit, for, as we all know, Mrs. Michelsen "is a woman of very few words." The homecoming luncheon was given in honor of all band director alumni. AKP adopted President Smith into its ranks this year as an honorary member. Another accomplishment was the annual concert this spring which presented the Concert Orchestra and Mixed Chorus. The solo and ensemble numbers revealed much of the unusual musical talent in the school. First Semester Betty Johnson Ula Mae Knutson Leota Brandt Philip Dakin OFFICERS President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Second Semester Philip Dakin Gerald O’Doherty Leota Brandt Arthur Stapel BI-ANNUAL RUSHING PARTIES IN FULL SWING . . ■ GREEKS PICK 'EM OUT . . . Page 63SIGMA TAU DELTA What shall it be—prose—or poetry?" exclaim the members of Sigma Tau Delta as they begin, with pen in hand, to scribble on bits of paper. They all want to become great writers some day! Here is their chance. The third annual publication of "Flight," the local magazine, was edited by Betty Smith with the very able assisting business head" of John Yurkovich. Two of our most promising young authors even rated poetry recognition this year in "Rectangle," the national publication. This alone should be encouragement enough for any young Longfellow or Poe. In March of this year the members all stopped to pay homage to the late Margaret Ashmun, a Wisconsin poetess, who was the original patroness of the literary arts at C.S.T.C. Our chapter of Sigma Tau was originally called the Margaret Ashmun Society. All her life, Miss Ashmun maintained a steady, keen interest in this organization. The encouragement of worthwhile reading as well as writing is an objective of the group. This year our chapter sponsored a group of monthly contests of the character of written prose—narrative, descriptive, impressionistic, expository, script (stage and radio) and poetry. The contest material was being judged by other chapters of the organization, principally at Carroll and Whitewater. The winners of each contest were awarded books from the Book of the Month Club, to which the chapter subscribed. The awards were given at the annual banquet, which was held the latter part of May, and you can be sure that the following were on deck for a meal: Eleanor Ruchti, President; Janette Van Natta, Secretary; Ula Mae Knutson, Treasurer,- and Virginia Johnson, Historian. Good luck, contestants! . . . AND GREEKS GET PICKED OUT . . . NEW PLEDGING PLANS PROMOTED . . . PdS« 64SIGMA ZETA A scant fifteen years ago at Shurtleff College a group of industrious, scientific minded students formed a local honorary fraternity. It was only a hop—skip—and a jump before it became incorporated as a national fraternity with the sixth chapter, Zeta, located at our own Central State. The aims of our chapter of Sigma Zeta are to promote scholarship among students and to obtain information in the field of scientific knowledge. The brain trust” behind our organization is T. A. Rogers, who acts in the capacity of faculty adviser. He also serves in the capacity of Grand Recorder-Treasurer,- and he was ably assisted in the local chapter by Master Scientist, Ethel Hill; Vice Master Scientist, Rube Belongia,- and Recorder-Treasurer, Ray Wiersig. In addition to sponsoring numerous lectures and forum discussions, this year the Zeta chapter published "The Sigma Zetan,” the national magazine. The following delegates were elected to the conclave held at Muncie, Indiana, April nineteenth and twentieth: Florence Smith, Bob Burkman, Elida Torkelson, Harry Slabesheski, Rube Belongia, Ray Wiersig, and Ethel Hill. As usual, the crew went on its annual spring outing in May. Hope you had fun, gang! BIGGEST TURN-OUT OF BANDMEN FOR CLINIC WE'VE HAD YET... AND MORE Pase 65( - ctta (_ iitXLcula FORENSIC CLUB John Doe from Central, Wisconsin, came to C.S.T.C. last September. He soon made many friends, and often he and his new friends sat about engaged in philosophical discussions. Gossip, of course, never entered the mind of our noble John. Because of the high caliber of his opinions, and his ability to express them and explain them to others, his friends decided that John should interest himself in Forensics. John presented himself at the first Forensic society meeting. There he wrote his name on a yellow slip of paper, and met the Coach, Mr. Burroughs. Officers were elected; committees were selected to present to the group materials about debate technique. John figured he knew all about it, but being a good boy he listened part of the time anyway. Christmas vacation rolled around, but right after vacation Warren Lensmire, the Society's Secretary announced that ten Eau Claire teams were coming for a practice debate tournament a week from the following Saturday. Before the proposed meet, a series of two man elimination debates took place. John survived. The deciding Saturday found John in the pink. He sailed through his debates, took several firsts, ate a satisfying meal at the banquet, and the following Monday learned that he had made the team. Two weeks later the varsity squad of eight members accompanied by Mr. Burroughs and "Doc” Tolo went to Eau Claire for a tournament. John noticed that Virginia Johnson and Eleanor Ruchti were a pretty good team. More tournaments followed—Krider and Splitek, and Johnson and Ruchti went way out to Fargo for the Red River Valley Tournament where they did well. Ben Kordus then spent many hours worrying over the two day tournament he managed here. Again Johnson and Ruchti did well, tying for second place in the women’s division. Mr. Burroughs and "Doc Tolo then took four teams to St. Paul for the Northwest Debate Tournament where Margaret Becher and Evelyn Murgatroyd made the semi-finals. NOVEL CHEERING AT GAMES BY MENZEL . . . AND WE MARK DOWN FINISH Pd9e 66COLLEGE THEATER First Semester Joe Ophoven Earle Siebert Merville Meverden Barbara Gerdes Burroughs Jenkins OFFICERS President Executive Business Manager Secretary Publicity Manager Faculty Advisers Second Semester Joe Ophoven Earle Siebert Merville Meverden Lillian Boe Don Krider Burroughs Jenkins The College Theater had another very profitable and enjoyable season during the last year. Although one of the youngest organizations, founded in 1936, it is one of the most active on the campus. The Theater is unusual in its organization as it is entirely student run and directed. It is the policy of College Theater to "provide a means by which any student—having an interest and a certain amount of aptitude in the theater will be able to find active, educational, and whenever possible, creative work in theater production." Any student in school may participate in any of the phases of dramatics and play production in which he may be interested and it is from this active group that members are chosen to form the small working body that sponsors production. Workshop productions in the form of one-acts are presented each semester to find new talent and give experience to the aspirants. Besides these productions, one three-act is presented for a two-day run each semester. This year the three-acts successfully attempted were A.A. Milne's MR. PIM PASSES BY, and Thornton Wilder's OUR TOWN. In addition to its own work, Theater has staged and lighted other programs. Especially commendable was its work on the Men's Glee Club Spring Concert in the number "In Flander s Field" where a cross appeared on the background in the dim stage. TO FAIRLY SUCCESSFUL BASKETBALL SEASON . . . FOOTBALL FORGOTTEN . . . Page 67WITH YOUR REVIEWER LET’S HONEYMOON AGAIN, 3 clever, fast-moving comedy with quick wisecracks and a Hollywood-like plot, was directed by Earle Siebert. Roses for good acting go to Isla Mae Wood, the young wife,- Jim Carew, the husband, and D. J. Raddant, the convincing mother-in-law. Your reviewer says: A four bell production. Not suitable for children (especially training school tots).” INN OF RETURN was College Theater’s first attempt for a long while at a mystery drama. Directed by Merville Meverden, it concerned a jewel robbery, the return of five people and one ghost and a confession. Your reviewer says: “A one bell production. Crime does not pay. The League of Decency would have said, if you want to see it, see it.” ISLE completed the bill of the first three one acts and was done in the impressionistic manner with a space setting with a suggestion of a ship by a nautical wheel hung against a black background. Harlow Henniger was the Frank Capra this time. The story: Captain wants oil; crew does not want oil; wife does not want oil; wife wants home,- wife goes nuts. End of show on discordant chord. Your reviewer says: A three wheel production. Heavy roles well handled by Florian Sybeldon and Dorothy Brenner. If a one act did not have a crazy person in it, we would not have one acts. MR. PIM PASSES BY, a three act by A. A. Milne, was the Theater's second production directed by Mr. Burroughs and staged two nights. Actors and actresses were Jim Carew, Georye Quandt, La Rue Smith, Madelyn Lee, Barbara Gerdes, Evelyn Murgatroyd, and Lucille Neuman. The story concerns two young lovers who find it difficult to win the approval of the young lady’s guardian, a clever wife with a past which proves a help to the lovers, a disagreement about curtains, Mr. Pirn’s passing by, and talk about piss. Your reviewer says: A four bell production. College Theater has a weakness for English plays.” FOUR SENIORS . . . BELONGIA, WARNER, BOHAN, AND ANDERSON MAKE LAST Pas 68JOINT OWNERS IN SPAIN, a satirical comedy, done in a realistic manner was directed by La Rue Smith and Madelyn Lee. The scene: An old ladies’ home. The plot: Two trouble makers, one domineering and one querulous are forced to room together. After an argument and a chalk line, they agree to agree. The acting was good. ‘’Your reviewer says: It doesn’t take much to make a one act.” SUBMERGED: An impressionistic set with submarine effect created by lighting, combined with high caliber acting and Don Krider and Betty Smith’s directing helped put over this play. Story: Men are trapped; Captain offers to give his life so that they may escape; instead they draw lots; coward gets losing card; coward refuses to go,- brave man takes his place; other men leave coward for a safer place as water gurgles in; coward goes mad. Curtain. Your reviewer says: "Good play. Note comment under ISLE.” THREE’S A CROWD: A light comedy, concerning a high school lad who finds the girl of his dreams likes a car better than she likes him. She leaves him for his cousin, and he discovers her little sister. The mode of the set was stylization. It was done almost entirely in fabric to lend to the atmosphere of young love. Your reviewer says: ”Our choice for the best one act this year. Good acting combined with cute kids is sure-fire audience appeal. Bouquets to directors Bob Unger and Gerdes.” OUR TOWN, directed by Mr. Burroughs, was College Theater’s second major production this year. It was staged two nights, and followed the Constructive mode initiated by Orson Welles. No scenery, excellent acting, and recorded sound effects were outstanding characteristics of this play. Your reviewer says:” I'm speechless!” APPEARANCE IN OSHKOSH TILT . . . SOME FOLLOWING THEY HAD FOR PEP Page 69PHOTO CLUB By Laws Section II "Dues of ten cents per month shall be assessed of all members. Failure to pay the dues of two months will result in the honorable discharge of the member." How like every other club, the Photo Club. It has a Constitution, dues, offices, and members. There are members and members and members and members, none of which come to meetings. Section VIII "All members who miss three consecutive meetings without an excuse from the president will be dropped from the Club." This motion was passed Oct. 30, 1935. If you can count you will notice that 1935 from 1940 equals 5 years and that is a long time, and since Photo Club is a progressive organization that part of the Constitution is obsolete. However, if you ever want to see Photo Club at work you may come down to the dark room (particularly if you are lovely—blondes preferred) anytime when it is dark and you will see Bartosz and Sprague working like mad. (Nice Work, if you can get it) Bartosz says, "I got it." Seriously, though, Photo Club does fulfill its purpose which is "to promote, encourage, and develop skill and general interest in photography among the students of C.S.T.C." Though the student body (and mind) of C.S.T.C. have been unaware of the Club's activities, the members of this club have been doing things (in the way of pitchin", I mean pitchers.) Not only did the Club take pictures, but it also brought an old time, silent movie to the college. In a social sense, too, the club was active, for two parties were given. In brief: Photo Club is a well founded, well organized, well rounded, and smooth working organization. AND OUR LADS AND COEDS LEARN WHAT WELL DRESSED DANCERS WEAR Page 70YOUNG PROGRESSIVE CLUB The Yeung Prosressive Club of C.S.T.C. is an organization which had its beginning in October, 1939. The club has about forty members who have their dues paid up to date. Don Kordus is the president. The club is active and has given its members a number of worthwhile programs. Outstanding Progressives as Gerald J. Boileau, of Wausau, and Orland Loomis, of Manawa, have spoken to them. On February thirteenth the club held a banquet at the Hotel Whiting at which Mr. Harold E. Stafford of Chippewa Falls was the main speaker. The attendance was large and the evening pleasant. April fifth saw the Young Progressives sponsoring a dance at the Armory at which Irv. Lutz and his orchestra provided the music. Preceding the dance, a number of Progressives and other political-minded adherents listened to a talk again given by H. E. Stafford. Everyone enjoyed himself although a record-breaking crowd did not attend. The Young Progressive Club is looking forward to a year of entertainment after the beginning of school this fall and hopes to have a large membership ready to start things off with a lively spirit. SOCIAL SCIENCE CLUB Away back in 1937 A.D. when most people were worried about the outcome of the Spanish Civil War, C.S.T.C.s newest and most exclusive discussion group rolled its own way into being. Taking a tip from Luckies this organization takes only the cream of the student Social Science crop. Membership is limited to twelve and to those who have a scholastic average of 2.1 and have a Social Science major or minor. The reason for restriction is stated by President Ben Kordus: “Any group numbering more than twelve ceases to be a discussion group. In order that all may participate actively we restrict membership." Resolving to carry on "better than ever" discussions, this club lost no time in getting started this year. Questions of a political and social nature such as Neutrality, U.S. Foreign Policy and the Cash and Carry Policy were discussed in King Arthur round table fashion. Initiation service for new members was held at Dr. Reppen's home at which the "victims” Don Aucutt, Phil Anderson, and Edward Wachholz, were given certain "tests." A social (science?) hour was enjoyed later in the evening. Joe Ophoven is vice-president of the Social Science Club and Bernard Johnson is the secretary. COLLEGE CENTER FOR DEBATE TOURNEY . . . FOOD TOO AND CUPS FOR PRIZES Page 71US lethal! From Row: Van Dyk«, Anderson, Bandow, Warner, Tcrzymki. Second Row: Bagnall, Tranlde, Ptltnon, SeWern. Ollc, Bohan. Third Row: Wierzig, Mgr., Peterson. Belongia, Saith, Pospychala. Codch Eddie Kotal LOTS OF WAYS GEORGE'S BIRTHDAY CAN BE PUT IN ... IF YOU GET IN . . . Page 72PANORAMA The basketball season was very successful compared with the football season. Playing nineteen games, Kotal's boys scored thirteen wins as against six losses. By losing two tough ones to Milwaukee, Point had to be satisfied with second place in the conference standings. Next year should prove to be a great year with many of this year s stars returning. Among them will be Terzinski, Bob Oik, Van Dyke, Bagnall, Trankle, Seffern, and Posky. All these men, plus a gang of freshmen, should give Point a great season next year. THE SEASON'S RECORD Point 26—Stout 25 Point 41—Oshkosh 29 Point 35—St. Norbert’s 47 Point 39—Marquette Teacher’s 42 Point 38—Stout 35 Point 39—Michigan Tech. 22 Point 48—Marquette Teacher’s 24 Point 47—Whitewater 38 Point 37—Winona Teacher s 47 Point 44—Milwaukee 58 Point 43—River Falls 36 Point 44—Concordia 28 Point 25—Whitewater 23 Point 39—St. Norbert's 47 Point 29 -Luther (Decorah) 31 Point 45—Platteville 33 Point 44—Platteville 42 Point 35—Oshkosh 39 Point 44- —Milwaukee 48 WOMEN? GET GOIN . . . EVERYDAY'S A SADIE HAWKINS DAY 'TIL NEW YEARS Page 73SLATS Tall and rangy SMITH A fighter TRANKLE Steady and cool BAGNALL Classy with left-handed hook shots. PETERSON Big and rugged POSKY A comer ...DON’T EVER SAY WE DIDN’T TELL YOU... AND TIME’S A-WASTIN ... Page 74BOHAN Clever floorman RUBE A fine man on rebounds LEWISON Didn’t play much but should be in there next year KLAKE He' s a comer, too VAN DYKE Another good floorman DRUCKERY He should play a lot from now on FORMAL HOME CONCERT BY GIRLS’ GLEE CLUB . . . AND ARE THEY LOVELY . . Page 75WARNER One of the best seen at Point for some years PETE High scorer- his record speaks for him OLK A fine guard with still another year EXAMPLE OF WHAT THEY HAVE BEEN TRUCKING AROUND TO NEARBY TOWNS Page 76This is one of the reasons that Pete was Point's highest scorer. Bob Oik goes right up there after those two points. Keep your eyes on that one, boys, because it looks a little too long. Now, that equals two points any way you look at it. Coach Drobnick Tohm Young Negard TEAM SUMMARY Point. . . 4 Keshena 4 Point. . . . ...3 La Crosse C I O . . 4 Point. . . . .. 4 La Crosse CI O.. .. ....5 Point - - - . .. .7 Whitewater ...3 INDIVIDUAL SUMMARY Wins Losses Weight Brenner 2.. . .2. ...130 Tohm 0. .3... .133 Ropella 1.... ...3... ...140 Negard 0. ...3... ...148 Stimm 3.... . 1. .151 Rades 1.... . 0. . .155 Drobnick 2. 2.. . 162 Hannig 1. .. .1. . .162 Young 2 . .1... .166 Lang 4 ...180 Halla 2.. . . 0... . .183 Stimm Halla Lang ?! f M Hannig PANORAMA Coach Louie Drobnick’s battlers turned in a pretty fair season record, winning eighteen bouts as against sixteen losses. The boys worked hard and their losses certainly cannot be credited to lack of training or spirit. We can say that most of Point's losses resulted from lack of ring experience. Of course, we do not wish to discredit the power of opposing teams for Point certainly did run into some lads who knew their way around under the floodlight. The only Point lad to win four bouts was Lang, rugged heavyweight. Lang is leaving Point this year to teach in a rural school. His place will be hard to fill when the bell sounds for the opening rounds next year. Coach Drobnick and Dan Young, both tough and bears for punishment, are graduating. Point s power lay mainly in the upper weights and with the above three leaving, next year's team will have to develop a few lads in the heavier classes. Point fought four matches: Keshena Indians, La Crosse C.I.O. twice, and Whitewater Teachers. Whitewater proved the easiest of the lot, Point winning seven while dropping but three.1 U;.ut lALu The Senior Ball ushered in the winter season. Norman Benson and his staff transported a bit of the World's Fair to the gym and the attendance made it truly gala. Nothing but cokes, too. And doesn't the royalty look right up in there? Christmas parties were crowded into the few weeks before vacation. The photographer caught the Dcrmites at their after hours get-together. No men ever allowed before! Later that night there was a caroling party. And then people began going home. Two long weeks way into January. Plenty of time for that New Year recovery and to get all the resolutions into good working shape. And then back again and fighting. Organizations got into full swing —note the interest exhibited in those expressions.A ere are the new radio studios —all bright and shining. There was ice cream and stuff when they officially opened. Miss Mansur beams and students get right to work at those broadcasts. Some people just carouse around with the checkerboard—it's a fright and so strenuous. Primaries are always busy. Lean to, fellows. They must be talking about the Men’s Glee Club—they should be. If you can’t polish that apple, eat it we always say. It’s certainly economical and healthful, too. This is why that storm shed was built later in the spring. (Like the man who couldn’t patch his roof when it rained). Mr. Rogers! It was heard told that the Sigma Zetans acquired a formula for taffy and it looks as if hearsay was right. Any way you look at it. Or then again, every way you look at it. Nice, aren't they? And we don’t mean the pictures they're looking at.CHEMtS cr eniors are still practice teaching—except those who observe or those who just drop in now and then for a nap. Junior high patrols keep us all safe and don’t say they aren’t serious about it. Don’t say you didn’t see the Tau Gam advertising either. The affair was reported gay. It was mighty concurrent with exams however—witness the vacant chairs— or is that the honor system? Or the intelligentsia finished early? The first thing you know it’s dishing out the dough again. Prof. Nixon looks happy enough to be getting a cut or else he's camera conscious. Pete and Hank are all done up. A peek into the President’s office symbolizes the whole chaotic week. And first thing you know you can get your grades. The Frosh just don't seem to mind. June looks over the situation, apprehensively— can't you tell? And the library calls all helpers to get your bookracks filled up again and eliminate that bare look your room's been having.a the boys must like cards— or are they faking these pictures? There's music in the air. And it’s Ruff! Slaves! Bobbie must have got a scoop. Some relax when they grind. Others don’t even pretend, do they, Adeline? The motto of the institution is quiet in the halls so the mob leaves the classrooms in order. The Blue Danube Singers sang. The piano player was excellent. Fronek, quit looking at pictures, can’t you read? Bowling has been right up in there all season and so have many of its addicts. If Charlie Evans doesn’t make a strike on that one it’s because he isn’t holding his tongue right. Debaters check up before the Fox River Valley Tournament (Held at C.S.-T.C.) They figured they had to have figures. And have you seen their jackets? Now, children. There’s something about the way a teacher looks.y I ever fear, spring will come and things will be different. Everyone will be laughing then. Out doing a little surveying, boys? The twins are just looking, thank you. Actors on the substage. But it sees some super action! ! The bell will ring so don’t lean there smirking. Expecting to hear from her, Krider? And so close by! John, what does Gates say about solitaire? People just seem to be barging around, laughing and having gobs of fun, tsk, tsk! Chew your nails and ponder. It s serious and requires deep thought. Of course, don't overdo. Students draw out reserve books to get their names on the cards never dreaming a teacher might ask them a question instead of looking at the book cards. 7he Eat Shop takes care of the hangouters, usually. Hands on the keyboard. (Who else thinks that the picture is in sideways?) To prove it’s winter. E. T. beams when his office finally gets to be. He should have open house. The Chi Delts entertain at bridge—and dessert we presume. Lab students get right into the test tubes, practically. Students swarm to assembly to see magic. No contracts to sign came out of that hat. What good are rabbits? There’s punch in more things than one, or are there more things than one in punch? Ingie? The younger and less sincere students just hang around and enjoy themselves but those with the real purpose drudge away and they’ll probably trudge away none the better. But if they’re happy -and those art students seem to be liking it. It's all a matter of opinion and we want you all to see how the other half lives.CRIPPLED SEASONS The world's been stripped of dll but white and grey and shadow. Breathless hope of green to grow and warmer winds to come Preludes the spring. But with a dawn the world is whiter: Branches hold up snow. You never know— Untimely, chilled precipitation Puts warmth at a handicap,-But never hope.BOOK—it seemed a gay and happy world, and we were anxious to be part of it——there were the promises of Spring in everything we saw or heard—Ill SPRING () • flUUOtA 1HMC ,10 HA (pullicate C ft eels Wo men A JikU 1C cJ'ancieAlllliots TOP PICTURE: 1. D. N l»on, E. Sicbcrt, R McM nncn, D. Scffcm, O. Holt, P. Andcrion, A. Carr, R- Rwucll. 2. E. M4fOU, R. Burlawr., M Sm.tK, D Knder. R Lanon. M. Kufcl, E Muf»«tr©yd. E. Daughhclcc. 3. V. Gcricke, M. Bcnn, A Huntoon, D. Luck, R. Bcilke, M Bcchcr. E Bathkc. BOnOM PICTURE: 1. E. Cocy, W. Dool.ttlc, R N.koo, R. Oik, D. Youog, A. Maochctkl, H. Hrymcwickt. 2. G. Wmarjki, H Dunn, H Johnson. R. Dishcr, G. Jorgcnt, R Baker, D. Aucutt 3. L. Church, L. Worzalla, K. Moruch, L Michaltkc, M. Jacobi. D. Lanon, C Ar»d«r»on, E Rote OFFICERS President........................ Vice-President..................... Secretary........................ Treasurer ......................... LaVern Van Dyke Gerald Torkelson Marjorie Jacobs Betty Smith Star-struck star gazers, star cavorters, stars in their own right. It all came out in the wash by a process of three years' saturation of college life and activities. The juniors are a peculiar specie—not quite confirmed to the books although many a junior primary has found herself trekking along to the T.S.— but quite thoroughly active around the campus. Starred at the Junior Prom amid the Mikado Gardens was the piquant queen, Nan Steiner, a member of the literati and one of the rare red-heads of the school, and her handsome king, LaVern Van Dyke, who starred during fall and winter athletic seasons. Stars of the spotlights were Bill Miller, Evelyn Murgatroyd, Eileen Rose, Barbara Gerdes, and Gerald Hierl, supported backstage by enthusiastic crews of technicians, . . . BOXERS FIGHT IT OUT TO A TIE WITH KESHENA INDIANS . . . Page 911. E. W«cholz, H. SUbcshrtki, K. Nclion, G. Torkclton, J. Vincent, K. Piehl, M. Meverden, E. Hiller . 2. 8. G«fdr», R. R«thke, A. Berber, B. Johnion, L. Reete, L. Brandt, M. Lockner, C. Wirkm, 8. Smith. 3. L. Vogedei, F. Kaplun, D. Sorenjon, 0. Soderberg. L Winch, N. Ferguton, E. Atkins, G. Rademecher, F. Larkee. star-making directors, and make-up artists—Bob Burkman, Liz Hannon, Maggie Becher, Merv Meverden and Earl Siebert; Florence Kaplun and Ev. Hillert wielding the greasepaint. The scribble stars were featured on the Iris and Pointer staffs. Betty Smith turned out a choice bit of editing on Flight. And Sigma Tau Delta developed some genuine talent. Song-birds Eyleene Atkins and Eileen Rose proved this with poetry and prose. Phil Anderson supported Our Book (as in Our Town, Our School, etc.), as business manager—no frozen assets! Star debaters were Becher and Murgatroyd, who proved their metal by reaching the semi-finals at St. Thomas. Becher may have cinched the debate, but Murgatroyd had the judge cinched. Jack Taylor is working up steam on the platform, too. Star reporter and announcer of radio was Bill Miller with Alton McCormick at the controls. Speaking of controls, many a junior lad enrolled in the aeronautics course found himself among the stars (for even though you cannot see them, they are always there and there's a chance you’ll see them in broad daylight, the lads say, if you don't know how to land!) There were musical stars in the Junior constellation, too. Besides those already mentioned, the feminine half was skillfully represented by Leota Brandt, accompanist, La Rae Winch, and Doris Soderberg. The men boast of Gerald Torkelson, bass soloist, Rollie McManners, a band personality, Earle Siebert, and Don Abrahamson. Among the star gazers were those enrolled in astronomy courses, the more conventional type. Then there were those of another type represented by George Cashin, man-about-town, and Bob Reading, would-bem-a-t, and no mean star at football. Gerald Hierl, too, who could be found at any time of day at the favorite jellyjoint, the Eat Shop. Then there were Doris Soderberg, voted as gal with most beautiful hair (red), and starry-eyed Marge Jacobs, one successful free-lancer. And did you know that Henry Hryniewicki is quite an artist? Ask the Shadow— he knows. BECHER AND MURGATROYD HOLD OUT UNTIL FINALS AT ST. PAUL DEBATES P«9e 92M LlSlC For the student who is interested in music C.S.T.C. is the place to come (and we re not getting paid for advertising either!) Oh, they let in those who lack that innate musical ability and put up with the ones who think they're gifted but really aren't, too. Get it risht now. One doesn't have to be interested in music to come—but if one should be there s no place better. Here we have the Glee Clubs for those who want to sing, and for those who like their company mixed and who can hit the right notes (at the right time) there’s the Mixed Chorus—for the lucky ones. Might as well mix humanity in with those abilities. All three organizations make frequent appearances at the college during the year and many visits to Wisconsin towns and cities to give the natives a bit of culture! Added to doing their bit to make the world a bit more aesthetic, incidentally, these singers usually get fed at the rate of one dinner to an evening s performance. Nice work, if you can get it and the men on page 98 seem to have it. We might take time out here to say that the men in the Glee Club went in for a real trip last summer when they boarded the bus for New York's World Fair. Now they really had themselves a time. They take a run up into the north woods for a vacation every once in a while and can they sing. But musical activity is far from limited to the vocal chords. There are the band and the orchestra. The nicest thing about all of the musical organizations, outside of their colossal ability to produce, is the cooperation evidenced between them. When two or more of them can get together and put on a program such as the Christmas Cantata or the Alpha Kappa Rho Spring Festival then that's really something. Another thing that’s heartening is to see the Alum band return at Homecoming and give out a bit of frisky melody—and they do! And to see Grads return at Band Festival time with little bands of their own and high school students that can sing or play with enthusiasm (and a certain degree of accuracy and feeling). The music department, by sponsoring tours to many high schools, clinics ancF festivals here at school and the fine broadcasts from the college studios, does much to advertise C.S.T.C. in the best possible manner. Turn the pages and look them over. They’re guaranteed. TALKED THEMSELVES INTO ROSES TO WEAR AND AN EXTRA DAY OF LEAVE . Past 93OFFICERS Elouise Torkelson . . . President Eileen Rose . . Vice-President Leota Brandt .... Secretary Doris Soderberg . . . Treasurer GIRLS' GLEE CLUB Hearts may have fluttered at the sisht of sixty girls attractive coeds attired in formals of every color, on the brightly lighted stage. But the girls could flirt with only one, their director, about whom all their interest was centered. Don't feel sorry for them; he winked back. Neither did the audience expect sympathy, for it was enjoying the home concert of the girls’ glee club. Eyleene Atkins upheld the reputation she made a few years ago as an outstanding soprano soloist in C.S.T.C. The girls’ trio, which also performed at that concert, has become popular this year at many request performances in the city. The trio is composed of the soloists, Gertrude Rondeau, soprano,- Ethel Hill, mezzo soprano; and Charlotte Reichel, contralto. When the trips started the bus driver also edged his way into the friendship of the girls. The out of town concerts were at Almond, Wausau, Wisconsin Rapids, Merrill, White Lake, Wittenberg, and Mosinee. Betty Johnson used her flute very successfully (not as a baseball bat), and Dorothy Jane Raddant played marimba solos. Marjorie Loberg and Jean Meydam tickled the ivory for the glee club, and Leota Brandt sat at the piano when soloists or the trio performed. COLLEGE BOWLING LEAGUE COMPLETES FIRST ROUND . . . PHI SIGS LEAD . . . P«9c 94VIOLIN. Mr AlbrccHt, Betty VonderlictK, Greet Win«rski. Ingrbo's End«rl«ln, Morn Rercfeit. M r$«ret Clerk. Mery Berrett, Gilbert Helvertow. VIOLA: Jeen Mry l m. CELLO: Olel Hctud. BASS VIOL: Jeck Geer, Mervln Yost. FLUTE: Betty JoKnton CLARINET: n Yotl . Frenk Plirver. Olive Crewford. BASS _ Melvin Wunteh BASSOON Eyleene Aik,m_____ Clerence Nelion, Meueicc TKoeioion. FRENCH HORN Phil Dekin. Don AbreKeetton. TROMBONE: RieKerd Perrette. DRUM: Evelyn Sdiwingel. Herold ScKecl. PIANO: Leote 8rendt CONCERT ORCHESTRA Ah, the counter is open. Wait a minute. I must get a candy bar for Mr. Michelsen." •'What?” ’ Yes, I m on my way to orchestra rehearsal and I fear I may be late. A candy bar is the best peace token we can give our director at such times. Let me see, what kind shall it be? It has to be something special because we re practicing for the Alpha Kappa Rho concert, and that Procession of the Sardar' has us working." What else will you play?” Well, we shall play several very fine classics, about a half hour concert. My favorite selection is Paderewski's ‘Minuet a I’Antique." . . . Oh, but I must hurry and pick some candy bar. No, not that kind; he doesn't like it. I'll never forget one time when Mr. Albrecht brought one like that. We had been practicing for the Christmas concert and Mr. Michelsen tried to induce him to play The Hallelujah Chorus alone when he finally did come in. It was all in fun, of course." "That Christmas concert was a beautiful program!" "Yes, we thought so ... But I must hurry! Give me any kind. If I don't get there soon, no candy bar will be good enough and I'll be rejected by everyone. And I certainly don’t want to miss our annual dinner party this year." THEATER ONE-ACTS HIT ENTERTAINMENT . . . NEVER ANY ADVERSE CRITICISM. Page 95GIRLS' GLEE CLUB PERSONNEL Eyleene Atkins Marjorie Houg Grace Okray Janette Van Natta Elouise Torkelson Clora Rabbitt Gertrude Rondeau Dorothy Jane Raddant Marilyn Lavers La Rae Winch Betty Gustin Madelyn Lee Evelyn Mur9atroyd Betty Johnson Dorothy Luck Leota Brandt Viola Gruenke Adeline Lueck Eileen Rose Mae Lundquist Jean Luxem Ethel Hill Marjorie Jacobs Anita Madsen Margaret Edwards Laura Schreiber Marcelle Martini Carmelita Wirkus Eileen DeHorn Charlotte Reichel Ruth Rathke Wilma Anderson Jean Byers Ingeborg Enderlein Eleanor Breeden Elida Torkelson Aloha Walters Mary Louise Butter Catherine Roder Lorraine Church Patricia Carver Kathleen Stone Elizabeth Hotvedt Elaine Catlin Lenore Sweeney Doris Soderberg Olive Crawford Janet Tiffany Joyce Larsen Jeanette Fierek Florence Theisen Dorothy Larson Viola Gericke Katherine Tyler Marjorie Loberg Katherine Mozuch Melba Waag Jean Meydam Dorothy Nelson Isla Wood Gladys Gilman Marjorie Mae Nelson Dorothy Flood Jeanette Halverson Lucille Neuman Selma Prell MEN AND WOMEN S INTRA-MURAL BASKETBALL THRIVING . . . TOURNAMENT Page 96SMOOTH MEN’S GLEE CLUB PERSONNEL Jack Ackerman Adrian LaBrot Ward Stoddard John Anderson Alex Mancheski Gerald Torkelson Joseph Bartkowiak Fred Mozuch Harold Torkelson Wallace Bartosz Waldo Nelson James Unger Norman Benson Clifford Powless Robert Unger Robert Bishop Alvin Price Jack Vincent James Bray George Quandt Edward Wachholz Bob Conant Norman Reineking Francis Walsh Herbert Faulks Dennis Roberts John Yurkovich Russell Frederick Fred Schwierske Gerald O’Doherty Erwin Frisch James Scribner Richard Parrette Gilbert Halverson Earle Siebert Duane Phaneuf Don Roger Hoffman Rayfield Skatrude Richard Larson George Humke Vernon Smith Alan Kingston Harold Humke Dearborn Spindler Herbert Upright Walter Jacobson Clifford Sprague James Carew Clyde Johnson Russell Spry Don Aucutt Anthony Klein Arthur Stapel Neal Brown Tom Langton Ula Mae Knutson Accompanist FASHION PREVIEWS STAGED AT OMEG CARD PARTY . . . LIVE MODELS Page 97EASTER OFFERS WELCOME RECESS . . . REPPEN HEADS MADISON CONVENTION Page 98MIXED CHORUS There is nothing like a cigarette to make one relax. One Monday everyone seemed to agree to that when we finished our fifteen minute mixed chorus broadcast. Perhaps we wouldn't have been so tense if there had been more of us. Why does everyone forget to come on the same day? It's good our other broadcasts weren’t like that. One other time we really had Art worried, though, or rather Ula Mae did. Arthur Stapel is our director, you know. Well, that time Ula Mae insisted on playing the wrong selection until the program started. Art welcomed a cigarette then, too, when it was all over (he had forgotten his pipe). I’ll have another cigarette, please . . . Our best presentation, of course, was at the Christmas concert. Russell Frederick sang the solo in Gesu Bambino. We have many other good soloists, too, including Gerald Torkelson, Gerald O Doherty, Charlotte Reichel, Ethel Hill, and Gertrude Rondeau. Talent like that can’t be kept down, not as long as either Ula Mae Knutson or Marjorie Loberg remain at the piano. P.S. I don’t smoke. MEN’S GLEE CLUB They travel on their stomachs and seem to enjoy it. The cars do serve to divide them into small groups so that they need not all be quarantined when the need arises. Their out of town concerts have included many towns of central and northern Wisconsin. The home concert was given on two consecutive nights. Several times they participated in concerts sponsored by the Twilight Music Club, and they also took an active part in the Christmas Concert. We understand that the rest of their story, such as impromptu concerts and even sleep talking, they do not publicize. As a parting gesture for the year the boys wish to give three cheers for Ula Mae, who can play anything; for their soloists, Gerald Torkelson, Russell Frederick, Duane Phaneuf, and Gerald O Doherty,- and for their assistant director, Arthur Stapel. To their director, all hats off! ALL FACULTY BACK HIM . . . THEY REALLY ATTEND THE MEETINGS TOO . . . Pa3c 99PERSONNEL FLUTE: 8 tty Johnton, Betty Guilin. OBOE: Je«n Meyd««, Evelyn Murg»lroyd BASSOON: Eylrene Atklnt, Nt«l Brown. CLARINET: Frank Plmer. Iirael Mann! . Loui Hamel, Olive Crawford, Marjorie Loberg, Don Abraham-ton, Kathryn Kohler, Virginia Strope. Gloria Jootten, Leona Kolat, Marjory Thompton, Emert Lange. BASS CLARINET: Melvin Wuntch, Angelyn Snicaotki. ALTO SAXOPHONE Tom Withl.ntki, Jamet Wemholt. TENOR SAXOPHONE Norbert Gontiorowtki, Miriam Grucnttern. BARITONE SAXOPHONE: William Metxaer. 8 ASS SAXOPHONE. Charlet Dodge. CELLO: Olaf Heitad. THE CONCERT BAND Tramp! Tramp! Tramp! Down and back and round asain. This year Norbert Gon-siorowski wore the big hat and gave the down beat as the band led the Homecoming Parade. Maybe the alumni band did steal the show with their Beer Barrel Polka, but everyone still rose in respect to the band (or the school) to the strains of ‘The Purple and the Gold” at the football field. A few weeks later we found the band in quite a different atmosphere. All was quiet in the eastern front of the college. Fifty-eight people with fifty-eight musical instruments and the jovial Norwegian had all quieted down to a motionless silence in their sound-proof room. Bill Miller awaited a signal from the adjoining room and then introduced the band. All fifty-nine were aroused into playing a lively march. The tenseness melted in the heat of the fast march; the band proceeded in another weekly half-hour broadcast. Mr. Michelsen began his work here in 1931 with a twenty piece band. With his band he has made himself known throughout Wisconsin, and is now acclaimed the critic and judge of high school bands of central Wisconsin. This fact has built up the importance of the annual band clinic at which the band plays numbers included on the state and national lists for high school band tournaments, at the request of and for the high school band directors attending. We wonder why they don't all use the same number. Dakin, who had a cold sore on his lip was especially curious about this after six hours of playing on February 16th. The big task of the year was the spring band festival with about fifty bands, orchestras, and glee clubs participating plus many soloists. April 19th meant vacation for CAST AND STAFF PICKED FOR OUR TOWN . . . SEARCH FOR PRESENTABLE STEP Page 100PERSONNEL BASS VIOL J ck Gc«r 8ARITONE Dorothy Ntltoo. John Fr«ne CORNET: Jack P«rry. Cl«r«nc« Nelson, Mguriot Thompson. Florence Thelien, Harold Kohler. Robert Abb, Ravnond Newby. John Kelley, Guy Robert . FRENCH HORN Ph.ltp Dgkln, Wllliem Miller, Don Abrahanton. Henry Hrynicwickt, Leota Brandt, Dorothy Ingham, Jerry LeFleur. TROMBONE Richard Parrette. May Tooomg Douglas Fonstad. Patricia Carver. Robert Malecki BASS Rollie McM nn«rs, Marvin Yost. Paul Horuik Anna Smith BASS DRUM John Anderson SNARE DRUMS Harold Schecl. Dorothy Jane Reddent TYM PANI Evelyn Schw.ngel. most of C.S.T.C. but it meant work for the band. Directing the activities of these high school visitors and encouraging them a little more in their musical talents is just another lesson for prospective music teachers to learn well. There is play, too, especially on the out of town concerts. The delicious meals (the solo cornetist is still looking for the recipe for that delicious salad), the flattering introductions brought forth a twinkling smile on our director s face (permanent until the first mistake in the concert), and the sleepy rides home in the dark bus all bring pleasant (?) memories. The features on these trips were marimba duets by the purple and gold clad Evelyn Schwmgel and Dorothy Jane Raddant, and the bassoon solos by Eyleene Atkins. OFFICERS Philip Dakin..........................................President Louis Hamel......................................Vice-President Leota Brandt..........................................Secretary Rollie McManners......................................Treasurer Betty Johnson...........................................Sponsor Evelyn Schwingel...........................Press Representative ITINERARY—Colby, Greenwood, Antigo, Shawano, Port Edwards, Almond, Green Lake, Berlin, Durand, Eau Claire, and La Crosse . FACULTY TAKES BOWLING LEAD . . . WEATHER KEEPS US GUESSING . • . Page 101HH iPullicaticns THE POINTER A THREE-ACT DRAMA OF COLLEGE NEWS ACT I. Time: Monday Evening Place: The lavish and sumptuously furnished offices of the C.S.T. C. s newshounds. The action follows in chronological order. 7:00—Floss is seen sitting at her desk with a worried expression on her face. "When is the news coming in?" Looking at the small stack of copy, she wonders whether there will really be a paper this week. GRACIE BLOWS BALLOON IN THIRD WHEN W.A .A. TAKES PART IN COLLEGE Page 1027:10—Unger enters and speaks, "What’s new? What are we going to use for an editorial?" 7:15 —Mase and Jab enter—hoist feet upon the sports desk. 7:30—Angeline, the Faithful, begins pounding out the checked copy. 7:40—In walks Jim—begins to interpret, punctuate, and censor typed copy. 8:00—Stoney rushes in—grabs the phone—swings into snappy repartee—supposedly getting the "dope" for the weekly headline. 8:02—Smithie is at it again Woe unto those who have strayed from the straight and narrow. Bitzagoz sees all; tells all. Society comes to life with Madge. 8:05—Schwing "Schwings" in and flounces behind a typewriter—The Music Parade is on! 8:10—Gracie comes in and grabs typewriter No. 3. Sports in Shorts are on the way. Sy arrives and begins to "mooditate" -awaits the Muse—before Shootin’ from the Lip. 8:25—A gust of wind—Bloom is here, screaming for cuts in expenses. 8:30—Mase and Jab finally have something "On the Ball" -They exit. Marcella and Elizabeth enter and quietly begin to write their weekly stories. 9:00—"Downwind" Siebert breezes in with his sundry, completed articles. 9:01—Siebert, Bloom, Stoney and Schwingle head for the Eat Shop. 9:02- Soderberg arrives—Sy and Soderberg exit. 10:15—Tony arrives. 10:28—A feminine rush for the dorm. Quiet reigns—following the evening s storm of news. Exit Bagnell. 10:40 Bob and Tony get busy—headlines are flying. 12:00—Everything is all set for the printers . . . Lights out. ACT II. Time: Tuesday. Scene I. Street scene. 7:00 A.M.—Tony peddles furiously down Main St., delivers the news to the printers—One minute later, he peddles back—jumps back into bed. 3:30 P.M.—Alice and Fay walk empty-handed toward town. 3:40—Fay and Alice hurry back to school, arms full of copy. Upon arriving, they begin to check on printers and staff alike—The "proof" is in the reading. Scene II. Pointer Office. 7:00—Floss and Bob are back at work. 9:15—Tony, too. 9:20 Sonnenberg enters with her weekly contribution to art and the newspaper world. 10:28—Floss runs for the dorm. 12:00—The layout is complete—lights out. ACT III. Wednesday. Scene I. Street scene. 7:00 A.M. Tony peddling up and down again—once more he jumps back into bed. Scene II. Pointer Office. 3:00 P.M.—Gus is busy writing address slips. 3:10—Starting now, Waldo is seen at the door at five minute intervals until the paper arrives. 3:15—Pogge, Doris and Carmelita arrive and quietly (?) await Pointer delivery. 3:30—Pointer arrives. 3:31—Waldo rushes papers to the second floor. 4:00—Doris, Carmelita and Pogge are hard at work folding and preparing the copies to be mailed out. 4:05—Student critics begin to murmur. 5:00—The office is locked for the week. Between acts the various members of the staff may be seen at concerts, dances, sports events, etc.,- gathering items of interest. Bloom may be seen rushing about town "high pressuring" the local merchants for ads. CURTAIN SPORTS DAY IN MADISON . . . PIERSON DONATES THAT NEW CAR . . . STYLE!! . Page 103IRIS Because we are honest and want you to know where your money goes, we present this account to you, our public: Postage .............................................$ 46.73 Office equipment.......................(on installment plan) New blade for paper cutter ........................... 16.28 Debate jackets for staff.............................. 50.00 Erasers............................................... 10.75 Editor—Trip to Appleton............................... 25.00 Staff—Steaks at "Archies''............................ 84.00 Business Manager—Haircut at 2 for $.25 -IS1 ? Athletic Editor—"Date Money”............................ .10 Curtains for office.................................. 100.00 Editor—Trip to Appleton............................... 25.00 Gift to Faculty Adviser................................. .98 The Shadow's "Mad Money”........................... .04Vfc Van's bills.......................................... 240.00 Editor's Salary...................................... 650.75 Engravings............................................. 5.20 Salary to Bloom....................................... 12.80 Printing............................................ 36.00 Delinquent Assessments....... ....................... 920.00 Covers................................................. 1.18 Editor—Trip to Chetek................................. 35.00 Oil for the Midnight Light.............................. .07 Retakes on Senior pictures........... .... 62.00 Transportation of office furniture ................... 93.62 Farewell party for staff.............................. 87.36 Miscellaneous........................................... .03 Total.....................................$2213.02 It has been a job. A hard one. Fun? Yes and no. Let's take time out and pass out credit where credit is due. To people like Vennie who struggled on the photography and came through every time on time; and his able staff especially the Shadow who had to take the brunt of the cracks, distemper and off days. To Dale and Bob the layouters who struggled with stiff brushes and curly pictures and rubber cement and asked for more. Angie who typed for hours and only broke the typewriter once—that we know of. Van the personnel head who managed her crew and ran around the office in her stocking feet. Fierek, faculty interviewer par excellence. Becher who not only assisted on the whole works but also took care of the organizations. (With a grain of satire now and then.) There was Stoney who ordered and took orders and people like Lars and Lilyan and Margaret who did the odd jobs that take patience and perseverance. Index editors Ruth and Mary Ann. The artists Grade and Dee and Gilman who shone with wit and Bob Unger who drew for the cover. Then Phil to whom we owe our financial well being. Mr. Rogers who probably worried more than anyone else (because the rest of us were much too unaware to). Mr. Olson and Mr. Boettcher who dropped in often enough to see that we eventually got a book. And the countless numbers, unknown and poorly thanked who did things like mailing letters, listening to gripes, moving the office, clearing out of the way when we came dashing through, excusing us for cuts and fpr being just a little tardy (right, Miss Davis7) and bearing with us in general. All in all, it was fine. Thanks and love, Virg. CHI DELTS LEAD OFF SPRING SOCIETY WITH TENTH ANNUAL DINNER DANCE Page 104STAFF ORGANIZATIONS: Departmental -Evelyn Murgatroyd Religious—Leone Kulas Honorary -Katherine Piehl Social—Dick Larson Musical—Leota Brandt Academic—Betty Hannon, Dorothy Luck PERSONNEL: Faculty—Jeanette Ficrck Seniors Eleanor Ruchti, Linda Born Senior Horoscopes—Eileen Rose, Evelyn Hillert FEATURES: Zodiac Designs—Grace Melchior, Eileen De Horn Cartoons—Glendell Gilman Copy Betty Smith, Betty Gustin, Lawrence Jozwiak Cover Drawing—Bob Unger TECHNICAL MAKE UP: Layout- Dale Hills, Bob Ostrander, Kathleen Stone Typing—Angelyn Sniegoski, Joyce Larsen Proofreading—Lilyan Thomsen, Margaret Johnsen, Celia Jordan Index—Ruth Rathke, Mary Ann Lochner Editor..................... Assistant Editor .... Personnel Editor .... Athletic Editor Photographer......................... Assisted by: Wallace Bartosz, Warner. Business Manager Assistant .... Advertising Circulation .... . Virginia Johnson . Margaret Becher . Janette Van Natta Florian Sybeldon Robert Vennie Bob Aulilc, Marjorie Warner, Don . - . . Phil Anderson Gotelind Rademacher Frank Splitek Melvin Mech . . . THEY PREVIOUSLY GAVE UP THEIR PROPOSED LENTEN ACTIVITIES . . . Page 105How could they be overlooked? The four Greek organizations on the campus occupy an important place in the social make-up of C.S.T.C. They, as well as other groups on the campus, sponsor many social functions for the benefit of the student body. Each fraternity and each sorority gives a formal dance annually. The student body is always welcome. The sororities take their turns at ushering at plays and concerts. The Greeks have two Panhellenic Formals a year to climax their fall and spring pledging seasons. At these affairs friendship and cooperation among the Greeks are at their height. Members of each organization are active in school activities that require that politics and social affiliations be at a minimum. When organizations such as these can function without being obnoxious to the greater organization—the school—and, instead, uphold the standards of the institution of which they are a part, then they are worthwhile. CAN ALWAYS DEPEND ON THEM TO WEAR SHOES AND BE CONVENTIONAL Page 106PANHELLENIC COUNCIL "Nobody knows the trouble we’ve seen"—except perhaps other Panhellenic Council members!—It is the job of the council to investigate and solve the inter-fraternity and sorority problems which arise during the course of the year.—The president of each sorority and fraternity automatically becomes a member of the council, and one other representative is elected from each group. The council meets several times during the year, to decide upon the dates for rushing and pledging, and to set the dates for the Greek formals. (Which was no small matter this year, what with basketball games, Lent, and other school activities conflicting with chosen dates.) This year witnessed the formation of a new set of principles regarding pledging, making it somewhat more ethical—we understand! Besides the formal dance for all Greeks, which is sponsored at the end of pledging each semester by the Panhellenic Council, a new type of Homecoming Dance has been inaugurated. This Inter-Greek Dance is not exclusively for Greeks, but is being sponsored by all four social Greek organizations from this time forth.—Originally this dance was sponsored by one Greek organization. The work of the Council this year has been rather extensive, but well done. We salute the pacemakers’ of the Greeks! NEW STORM SHED ON EAST ENTRANCE FINISHED ... BE PREPARED, page 107OMEGA MU CHI SENIORS Eileen DeHorn Lorraine Johnson Virginia Johnson Anita Madsen Grace Melchoir Eleanor Ruchti Evelyn Schwingel Florence Smith Madelyn Davel JUNIORS Cora Mae Anderson Evelyn Hillert Marjorie Jacobs Dorothy Larson Katherine Mozuch Kathryn Piehl Betty Smith Barbara Gerdes Katherine Tyler Nancy Steiner Gotelind Rademacher Ruth Rathke SOPHOMORES Eileen Crummey Bette Lou Dent Margaret Edwards Betty Gustin Joyce Larsen Madelyn Lee Lucille Miller Margaret Murrish Virginia O’Connor Virgene Freeman Leone Kulas Lillian Boe Ruth Stelter FRESHMEN Neva Jane Burroughs Miriam Gruenstern Jean Byers Patty Markee Anna Mae Dean Beverly Murty Patricia Cashin Rita Novitski Janette Rogers PATRONESSES Mrs. H. M. Tolo Mrs. Palmer Taylor Mrs. E. A. Schwan Mrs. C. H. Cashin HONORARY MEMBERS Miss Adele Davidoff Miss Zclma Loomer One of the outstanding Greek organizations on the campus is Omega Mu Chi sorority. Though founded in 1926, and still a comparatively young organization, this sorority has taken an active part in extra-curricular activities in school and takes pride in maintaining high standards of scholarship. The social functions of the Omegas are many and varied. The first event of the year, sponsored by the sorority was the annual Fall Tea, to which all faculty and college women were invited. In October there followed the Homecoming Alumni Banquet, which was attended by many alums and actives. Christmas found the group preparing baskets for needy families. Besides these traditional functions, there were also the fall and spring rushing activities, which were climaxed at the end of six weeks by formal initiation. And the climaxing event of the year, both for the Omegas and the rest of the school the Spring formal. Omega Mu Chi was well represented in school activities this year, especially in the fields of forensics, dramatics, and literary productions. Graduation will take many outstanding girls but aims and objects of the sorority will be carried on to the fullest extent of their ability by the remaining and new girls. OFFICERS First Semester Grace Melchoir Anita Madsen Florence Smith Nancy Steiner President Vice-Pres. Secretary Treasurer Cora Mae Anderson Press Rep. Marjorie Jacobs Panhel. Rep. Second Semester Margaret Edwards Marjorie Jacobs Betty Gustin Barbara Gerdes Madelyn Lee Eleanor Ruchti VAN AND NAN REIGN AT JUNIOR PROMENADE . . . AND ROYALLY TOO . . . Page 108THE MUSIC LOVERS—Crummey, Gustin, F. Smith, Steiner, Anderson. THE CAMERA LOVERS—Beilke, Miller, Lee, D. Larson L. Johnson. READ US A GOOD ONE! Freeman, Gerdes, Madsen, Kulas, Piehl, V. Johnson. IT'S “SWING” AGAIN—Schwinsle, B. Smith, De Horn, J. Larsen, Hillert. WHAT'S HIS NUMBER?—Ruchti, Michalske, Edwards, Murrish, Mozuch, Jacobs, Melchoir. PACKING IT AWAY—O’Connor, De Horn, Dent, Miss Carlsten, B. Smith, Beilke, profile—Ruchti.TAU GAMMA BETA SENIORS Marguerite Benn Eleanor Breeden Germaine Byrne Jeannette Fierek Iris Forbes Katherine Houg Jane Johnson Ula Mae Knutson Ann Mainland Grace Okray Betty Richards Claire Williams Marjorie Warner JUNIORS Mary Anne Gleason Eileen Rose Doris Soderberg LaRae Winch Carmelita Wirkus Betty Johnson Rita Russell Loretta Worzalla SOPHOMORES Ingeborg Enderlein Elizabeth Hotvedt Dorothy Ingham Madeline LaBrot Lucille Weiher Fay Wendorf Margaret Johnsen Alice Wagner Aloha Walter Diana Kamke Lucille Newman FRESHMEN Marion Lee Katherine Kohler Gloria Joosten Dolores Nolan Alice Worzalla Myrtle Morrow Ellen Vig Jane Shier Marjorie Reitan Marie Ocvrik Bernice Greve Janet Hlava Gertrude Rondeau Florence Theisen Virginia Lundgren Maxine McGuire Mrs. Spindler PATRONESSES Mrs. Smith HONORARY MEMBERS Miss Davis Mrs. Morrison Heading the list of "old” organizations on the campus is Tau Gamma Beta Sorority. But old only in respect to the fact that this group had its beginnings in 1909, and celebrated its thirtieth anniversary, in connection with Homecoming week-end last fall. It has the distinction of being the oldest Greek organization on the campus. Tau Gamma Beta stands for sisterhood among its members, democracy on the campus, and promotes a lively interest in all school activities. Although primarily a social organization, it aims to pledge girls of good scholastic standing. The social year of the sorority was highlighted by the annual Fall Tea for college and faculty women. Rushing parties, and the Homecoming Anniversary Dinner, which incidentally was attended by alumnae representing classes from 1914 through 1939! The climax to the first semester social season was the Tau Gam Formal which was held on January 20, and was one of the season's most successful dances. The spring season of rushing and pledging, and other gay parties, made the year a very complete one. This spring finds thirteen seniors leaving, but into their places will step a large group of fine girls who have been pledged this year. First Semester OFFICERS Second Semester Ann Mainland President Rita Russell Iris Forbes Vice-Pres. Iris Forbes Claire Williams Rec. Sec. Mary Anne Gleason Eileen Rose Cor. Sec. Eileen Rose Eleanor Breeden Treasurer Aloha Walter Germaine Byrne Press Rep. Jane Johnson Jane Johnson Panhel. Rep. Ann Mainland BIGGER, BETTER MUSIC FESTIVAL DRAWS BANDS . . . SCHOOL OUT AT NINE Pa9e 110CONTEMPLATION—J. Johnson, Williams, Mrs. Spmdler, Forbes, Breeden. LET'S LOOK AT THIS ONE—Russell, Hotvedt, Kamke, Okray, Weiher. DON’T KID US—Wirkus, La Brot, Walter, Rose, Fierik. GO AHEAD, LAUGH!—M. Johnsen, Richards, Ingham, Winch, Soderberg. MUSIC S EVERYWHERE!—Enderlein, Houg, B. Johnson, Byrne, Knutson. A QUARTET, HAVING FUN—Mainland, Wendorf, Wagner, Gleason.CHI DELTA RHO SENIORS Tony Anderson Fe Bohan Neal Brown Lewis Drobnick William McDonald Dearborn Spindler Arthur Stapel Henry Warner Francis Weingartner Ray Wiersig Elroy Florence JUNIORS Robert Burkman Arthur Carr George Cashin Merville Meverden Robert Larson Earle Siebert Jack Taylor Gerald Torkelson LaVern Van Dyke Jack Vincent Allan Kingston Harry Slabesheski Earle Raab SOPHOMORES Paul Borham James Cashin Ted Fritsch James Hanig Gene Harrington Elmer Hoffman Floyd Nixon Richard Sandborn James Unger Jordan Korotev Dennis Roberts FRESHMEN Delbert Anderson Ralph Ahles Arnold Bocher Melvin Mech Wayne Peterson Jack Reitan Dick Robertson Rolland Rades FACULTY ADVISERS George Allez R. Rightsell N. E. Knutzen H. M. Tolo Chi Delta Rho Fraternity is the "youngest” social Greek organization on the campus. The Alpha Chapter was organized in 1931, and has grown rapidly and become a very influential factor in campus life. The fraternity stands for good fellowship and high standards of scholarship, and maintains, today, the high standards, both educationally and athletically, that the charter members had and showed. Chi Delta Rho has shown continuously a high excellence in scholarship. An unusual and interesting party was the "sweat shirt and plaid skirt” party, given before Christmas. The Chi Dell Alumni Banquet, held this year in Milwaukee, was another outstanding event. There are now three chapters of Chi Delta Rho in Wisconsin, and it is hoped that there will be more. The Chi Delt Formal took place in March, and attracted much attention. Parties and bull sessions were conspicuous parts of the program for the year. Educational talks by townspeople, after the regular meetings were inaugurated this year. Being successful, they now promise to become a tradition. Pledging this year has brought in many fine students and clearly points to continued prominence of Chi Delta Rho on the campus of C.S.T.C. OFFICERS First Semester Dearborn Spindler Jim Duecker Arthur Stapel Jerry Torkelson Second Semester Hank Warner Jim Duecker Earle Siebert Harry Slabesheski President Vice-Pres. Rec. Sec. Cor. Sec. Frenchy Weingartner Treas. Frenchy Weingartner Earle Siebert Alumni Sec. Jerry Torkelson Lewis Drobnick Panhel Rep. Ted Fritsch Sgt.-at-Arms Ray Wiersig Lewis Drobnick PRIMARY ALUMS FLOCK TO HOMECOMING . . . SCRIMP FOR GONE WITH WIND Page 112LOAFING AT THE HOUSE Siebert, Vincent, Larson, Taylor. DIGNITARIES -Knutzen, Rightsell, Tolo. TALKING AT THE HOUSE—Meverden, Warner, Otto, Korotev, Brown, Abb. SMOKING AT THE HOUSE Slabesheski, Carr, Spindler, Hanig. MUSIC AT THE HOUSE—Van Dyke, Wiersig, Duecker, Weingartner, Unger. CHEER AT THE HOUSE—Stapel, Bohan, Roberts, Torkelson, F. Nixon.PHI SIGMA EPSILON Mason Atwood Roman Baker Robert Bishop Joe Bloom Robert Bretzke Edward Durand SENIORS John Felix Ray Hodell Pat Kennedy Joe Ophoven La Rue Smith Phillip Thorson Phillip Dakin JUNIORS Donald Abrahamson William Miller Ray Disher Douglas Fonstad William Mailer Quenton Merrill Bob Oik Frank Schneider Robert Nixon Frank Pliner Don Aucutt Bob Becker Charles Dodge Charles Jensen Harold Menzel SOPHOMORES William Oik Florian Sybeldon Donald Stein James Carew Arthur Seidel FRESHMEN Maurice Anderson Bill Carnahan Jack Davis Bob Fisher Dave Hennick Leonard Koehl Adrian La Brot Donald Larson Ralph Mischnick Loy Mullarkey Robert Redfield Bob Shorey Howard Stimm Tom Wishlinski Jack Ziehlke FACULTY ADVISER F. J. Schmeeckle HONORARY MEMBERS Coach E. L. Kotal Mr. Price George Dr. Wilbur Glover Mr. L. M. Burroughs Mr. Leonard Olson Way back in 1919, a small group of fellows organized themselves into the Phi Lambda Phi fraternity. That name didn't last, however, for in June, 1931, the original order of Phi Lambda Phi became the Kappa chapter of Phi Sigma Epsilon, the oldest national Teachers' College Fraternity. It still holds the distinction of being the only national social order affiliated with C.S.T.C. This group has proven itself worthy of the standards set up by the charter members, those of establishing a brotherhood that shall promote physical, intellectual and social development of its members and to participate and take a leading part in school activities. The Alumni Banquet held during Homecoming week-end, rushing parties, pledging and other informal parties made the year an interesting one. The Phi Sig Formal, held in spring, was well received. The graduation of many noteworthy seniors is recompensed for only by the large number of new members taken in this year. First Semester Phil Thorson Edward Durand Joe Ophoven Joe Bloom Mason Atwood Florian Sybeldon Bill Mailer OFFICERS President Vice-Pres. Cor. Sec. Recording Sec. Treasurer Panhel. Rep-Guard Second Semester Edward Durand Pat Kennedy Phil Thorson La Rue Smith Robert Bishop Joe Ophoven Robert Baker OMEGS DINE AND DANCE TO MUSIC OF WALLY BEAU . . . WERE YOU THERE? Page 114LOOK AT THE BIRDIE!—Sybeldon, Atwood, Ophoven, Bloom, Mailer, Durand, Thorson. SHELL OUT, BOYS—Vig, Atwood, B. Oik, Mailer Kennedy. THE BIG SHOTS—Smith, Durand, Baker, Thorson, Olson (Alumnus). JOKES—AGAIN: Dakin, Ophoven, Dodge, Sybeldon, Aucutt, Yurkovitch. A RETAKE Bloom, Dakin, Ophoven, Dodge, Sybeldon, Yurkovitch, Schneider, Aucutt, Becker. THE SEVEN BOBS- Baker, B. Nixon, Bishop, Becker, Baebenroth, Bretzke, B. Oik.yi V be emeu A W.A.A. The W.A.A., with a large enrollment, is a very active organization. Besides their athletics, they are up in front socially. This year big times were had at the Harvest Party, Fall Picnic, and Dance. This year Play Day, an annual affair, was again a big event under the general chairmanship of President, Grace Okray. Over two hundred and fifty girls from seventeen Central Wisconsin high schools gathered in Point to participate in tennis, horseshoe pitching, softball, volleyball, cageball, dodgeball, kickball, and line soccer. Tumbling and group dancing was also on the program. A tour of the broadcasting studios where voice recordings were made completed the afternoon. The luncheon banquet was served at Nelson Hall. W.A.A. put on mixed badminton demonstrations between hjl cs of varsity basketball games. Ihey also sponsored intramural tournaments in tennis, archery, badminton, basketball, and ping-pong for women only. President Grace Okray attended the convention of the Athletic Federation of College Women at Bloomington, Illinois, where she was one of the program speakers. At the Spring picnic, new officers were installed and new members initiated. OFFICERS President—Grace Okray Vice-Pres.—Eloise Torkelson Secretary-Zorka Malesevich Treasurer Betty Richards SPORT Basketball—Betty Gustin Badminton—Laurel La Valle Tennis—Myrna Rogers Archery—Carolyn Pronz HEADS Volleyball—LaVerne Lonsdorl Hockey—Elaine Johnson Tumbling -Grace Melchoir Speedball—Marguerite Sargeant W.A.A. RADIO RALLY ATTRACTS HIGH SCHOOLS . . . CROWDED DAY PACKED Page 116SPORTS IN SHORTS Look at the girls go to it! Tennis, tumbling, archery (and it's not Cupid!), ping-pong, basketball whatever it is, leave it to the girls. They can do it. PHI SIGS GET AROUND TO THEIR FORMAL AND IT IS FINE . . . INTO THE NITE Pa3e 1172 ancies Spring gives us a bad turn and snow flurries. But does it bother the Chi Delts? They just go ahead and have a spring formal. Hank and Jane are just a sample of how good looking the people all were. Boxes from home that have been coming consistently all year are so much better when the weather s warm. Adagio dancers, too. Classes, it is rumored, are still being held. People are even known to show up. But, lest we get to speaking disparagingly, look for yourself. And revive your own memories of how you controlled the wanderlust impulse and didn't cut. Seniors, of course, just aren't the cutting type. There’s that job to get. Now's the time of year that the training school blackboard is carefully watched. And at times Mr. Herrick has considerable "board and room duty keeping hopeful seniors informed. A few lucky ones get all signed up early. When people start hanging around outside, I always say they aren’t studying. Maybe they should be but it’s spring.yv usic' s everywhere. And the mixed chorus right along with it. What’s this, Drobnick? Didn’t you get out of the way fast enough? Chief is sitting by with beefsteak, no doubt. Boxers sure have to take it! And can they ever. Alpha Psi meets and keeps dramatics constitutional. The Eat Shop newspaper takes a beating. England gets on the map. Pop dons apparel fitting for building scenery and builds. Out in front, the ground's too cold yet, O’Brien helps Robertson with a little trig. Unger goes over Pop’s work with a fine tooth. Tooth to tooth! Miss Tobias demonstrates and first grade teachers take heed. The bell hasn’t rung yet. "and a rumble seat for two. And let me Wahoo!' Where’s the date? Yes, we can see why. The girls’ Glee Club trills and silver tinkles in. We are all proud of the music our school s vocal organizations render and here we have our girls really independent The concert’s their own. Congratulations!J HE men's sins is well attended. It's the reputation that Glee Club has built up lor itself. Isn’t that right, Jarvis? And one day the ground turns out to be warm enough and they all go right to it. Sprawling around, never once thinking what the passerbys might think. The Junior Promenade touches off the social season. The High School gym gets all dressed up and so do most of the people we know. There’s the royalty against a bit of the Oriental background. The regent squares himself with the cashier. Our Town, sans scenery and costume, leaves the trick of n all to good acting. Hearsay tells us it was the best play ever and what's good enough for hearsay is good enough for us. Cottage parties get under way early. And there comes a day when students do their bit for posterity and plant a tree or two. Do they go back and water them, though? That’s the question. Tradition (and precaution against fire) keeps the boys lighting up right outside the door.J- HE line forms at the right and dt dawn, boys. The He-Men of the school. Are you chilly, Russ? A little fresh dir doesn't seem to be hurting the hair on the other fellows’ chests. The Eat Shop bench opens for official business. And before the really hot weather sets in, someone disengages the storm doors on the East entrance. Then the Omegs dine and dance at one of the noisiest parties of the year. Stoney makes a few minor adjustments. Hodell won’t let a mere Glee Club man get ahead of him. Kickland and Peterson revert to the prehistoric method of time telling. (They don’t know the hands are broken off.) Our own Hink leads his band. People take to bicycle riding and strolling and licking ice cream cones even Assistant Editor, Becher. Nursie stays to nurse spring fevers. Play Day comes and is a well broadcasted network of fun. People go on laughing and having a good time and we have to quit taking pictures because here it is getting late in the day, darn late.PHILISTINISM—1940 Oh Commencement Day, Commencement Day! What e’er you say— Be what it may— Well, anyway! This is the day That seniors stay So eventually They will have pay— (Except the stooges with Ulterior motives Who have inherited from Wealthy relatives And probably couldn’t get A job anyway.)BOOK IVI I I I I —the world was there before us, and there was no turning back■ - i‘ ■ —we weren't as confident as we had been, for it seemed much too busy to pay any attention to us— rI I i —v e ja a lot of questions out there, and we worked feverishly trying to find the ansv ers in the time there was left— —until one day, feeling woefully unprepared, we went out to cultivate our gardens during the long summer— Cartoons and Legends Conceived and Written by Glendell Gilman Drawn by Arnie MossierIV SUMMERHOE! HOE! Comes June and summer and commencement and contracts. Graduates of the two and four year courses get diplomas or degrees. Commencement week flaunts the members of the graduating class. Traditions aplenty—Parents and friends are proud— Some start to pack and find that two or four years allowed ample time to accumulate a significant assortment of useful odds and ends -We propose a senior auction —There are bills to pay, too. And who wants to be beckoned out of line? All of a sudden, with a lump in the throat, seniors realize that the end is upon them. What they’d have done differently, had they known, supplies many a bull session; and conclusively and unanimously and anonymously they decide that not a minute of it would they have changed and school days are the best and on and on— But let’s not get sentimental at this stage of the game. Say goodby and dash off a note to Santa Claus if you haven’t signed on that dotted line yet.CO JOSEPH ALBRECHT JOHN ANDERSON FRA Nfe AKV OLD MASON ATWOOD REUBEN BELONGIA NORMAN BENSON ROBERT BISHOP NEAL BROWN FE BOHAN ELEANOR BREEDEN MABEL BRIERE An organizer . . . born under the guiding star of Saturn . . . personality plus . . . hard worker . . . cheerful .. . we often wonder how Jane keeps that sparkle in her eyes . . . likes to trip the light fantastic . . . watches tensely at basketball games . . . you can guess the reason . . . one of the best teachers in the T.S. ... has proved an excellent student, too . . . straight and immaculate . definitely well-liked . . Joe, the most serious practice teacher,-John, the psychologist; Franz who quit and went to work; Mase who manages to act; Rube, a Mountain Rube; Norm, stager of the Senior Ball, Bob, waits at Whiting; Joe, blooms with Pointer ads (adviser to Iris); Neal, up in the air over the Mainland; Fe, everybody picks on a Bohan; Eleanor, affable artist; Mabel, ask her about her dogs. DISCOVER DEBONNAIRE AND DEMURITY DONE FOR . . SUITS AND HEELS Page 128 CO RAYMOND BURGER GERMAINE BYRNE SAMUEL CRESS PHILIP DAKIN MADELYN DAVEL EILEEN DEHORN LEWIS DROBNICK JAMES DUf DUECKER EDWARD DURAND EDITH ElNFELDT JEANNETTE FIEREK Q Ray, his Social Science major distinguishes him Jerry, the way to a man's heart; Sam, baseball expert; Phil, slings hash and swings it; Maddie, chief maker-upper; Dee, Sonny Boy; Slugger Drobnick, teaches them how with the fists,- Jab, landed the first four year job (position, we mean); Ed, Esquire-well dressed, well liked, well heard, Edie, efficient cottager; Jeannette, knows the Romance language Born by the sign of Libra ... has powerful sense of justice . . . executive ability . . . quite a guy . • • has a definite flair for verbal expressions T amour"—“my veils, my veils"—"my plumes and lace curtains" . . . member of a collegiate vocal quartet . . . breezes through the library ... has a weakness for pie ... especially sour cream and raisin ... steady customer at Sims' Cottage . reliable and efficient teacher in the T.$. . . . we'll miss Herby next year . . . ARE THE THING . . . FEWER H AIRBQWS FLASHY SWEATERS . . . ALL DRESSED UP Page 129ELROY FLORENCE IRIS FORBES LUCILLE GEHRKE LOUIS HAMEL HARLOW HENNINGER ALICE HERMAN ANITA HICKEY ETHEL HILL RAYMOND HODELL KATHERINE HOUG BERNARD JOHNSON JANE JOHNSON Butch, active Chi Delt; Iris, perpetually smiling personality; Lucy, the ideal room-mate,- Louie, plays with Benny Graham, Harlow, with him it's a gamble; Alice, interested in being a teacher,- Nita, Ber-nard Johnsons coop,- Ethel, mezzo-soprano, sweet, scientific, Raymee, has seen all his pet theories disrupted; Katie, historical hobby; Berme, refer to picture 3, row 2, p. 130, Jane, friendly to everyone. Born by the symbol of Aquarius, the fruits of her labor are many . . . Flossie is altruistic . . . proverbially "calm, cool, and collected . . . always busy . . . feminine editor of the Pointer . . . works besides and studies . . . a no. 1 scholar... enjoyed practice teaching .. . fine business sense . . . never procrastinates . . . little or no time for the male specie . . . admired by all for her abilities . . . AND A PRACTICE CLASS TO GO TO . . . GREY H A I R S - F R O W N S - C I R C L E D EYES . . Page 130LORRAINE JOHNSON VIRGINIA JOHNSON LAWRENCE JOZWIAK PAT KENNEDY FRANK KUDROWSKI ULA MAE K.NUTSON BEN KORDUS STANLEY LEPAK DOROTHY LLOYD VERNA LUECK ANITA MADSEN Fish is brain food, so they say . . . birth symbolized by Piscis ... Spin, all by himself, has his professional career planned . . . knows exactly what he wants , . . excellent student . . . exultant appreciation of life ... not only advances but preaches his philosophy . . . . . likes to experiment on his friends, wonders about intelligence tests . . . . people devour his wit with relish . . . loves the out-of-doors.. . Johnny, Dink's side-kick; Virg, the editor (of what?); Larry, C.S.T C.'s playwright; Pat, double for Hitler; Frank, still water runs deep; Ula Mae, nicest laugh in school; Ben, fanatic politician; Laurel, coed with prettiest name; Stan, seen about in a lab jacket. Dot Sue, assistant Girl Scout leader, Verna, primary dormite,- Nita, pretty as a picture. DISTINGUISH DISCIPLINARIANS . . . LESSON PLANS BECOME VERNACULAR . . . Page 131CO ALTON McCORMICK ANN MAINLAND ZORKA MAI.ESEVICH GRACE MELCHOIR GERTRUDE MOHME HELEN MOORE FLORENCE MORENCY JAMES MURAT GERALD O DOHERTY GRACE OKRAY JOE OPHOVEN SOPHIE PALUKAS We don’t know if Van is refusing a date or cinching one- does both—and often ... her sign is Virgo . . . creative ability ... has written and published poems and stories ... an actress of worth . . sings Chloe lovelier than anyone . . . temperamental but can afford to be independent . . has never been known to hand an assignment in on time . . sophisticated and blonde .. . beauty is its own excuse for being . . . Alton, radio studio handy man; Ann, demure, but well taken care of; Zorka, ping-pong champ four consecutive years; Grade, voted best dressed coed with most pleasing personality; Gertrude, poised and well groomed; Helen, a sweet smile,- Flo, Gently laugh and the world laughs with you; Mr. Murat, cleared out first semester; Jerry, senior class prexy and a king,- Grace, W.A.A. president, Joe, whatta ya' know7 Nuttin! Lectricl; Sophie, third floor hairdresser. VELOCITY OF OUTPUT INCREASES . . . COEDS ARE ESP. CONSCIENTIOUS . - . Page 132CO GEORGE OUANDT BETTY RICHARDS RUTH ROBISON ELEANOR RUCHTI ERNEST RUPPEL CORRINE SANDMIRE MARGUERITE SARGEANT DOROTHY SCHNECK rny SCHI HAROLD SCHEEL EVELYN SCHWINGEL EDWIN SLOTWINSKI FLORENCE SMITH Quandt, and they lived happily ever after; Betty, rooms alone and likes it; Ruth, conscientious to the core Rook, Eleanor May and then again, Eleanor May not— you never know from where you sit; Ernie, Good morning glory; Corrme, serious about her humor; Peggy, from way down in Iowa; Stub, drummed his way through; Schwing, musical esp. gifted at the marimba, Slot, get in there and pitch; Floss, leaves town every week end. Executive ability, as merited by his birthright by the sign of Libra . . . "Snuffy" Smith has an edge on things ... a finger in every pie, so to speak . . . vies with the best of 'em before the footlights . . . has a flair for making speeches . . . likes recognition and knows how to get it . . . absolutely "henny" about food . . . dotes on milk with ice cubes . . . quite, quite a social aspirant . .. PRIMARIES PRACTICE PRACTICALLY —HALF DAY AT A TIME... ONE D O E S N1L Pag 133CO LA RUE SMITH VIRGINIA SMITH EVELY NENBERG DEARBORN SPINDLER CLIFFORD SPRAGUE ARTHUR STAPEL ETHEL STOLTENBERG KATHLEEN STONE ri-tLEEN S PHILIP THORSON ELOUISE TORKELSON ELIDA TORKELSON LESLIE TROWBRIDGE Snuffy, counter boy; Virginia, transfer, interested in radio; Evelyn, flair for fashion design, novel hair styles; Spin, is he going to feel bad when he sees this book!; Cliff, rides a bike and takes pictures—not at once; Art, directs mixed chorus, likes an accompanist; Ethel, everything a teacher should be; Stoney, Miss Colman's NYA; Sy, should have been but didn't know; C., has so many offers for jobs he can just consider the wires and specials; El and Leda, only senior twins, Les, highest 1.0 in class. Derives her power from Taurus, the bull . . . guiding star Venus . . . Rook, men s choice for the best all-around girl . . . girls’ choice for an ideal sister . . . gifted with an unintentional wit . . . impulsive . . catchy way of talking to you but looking out of the corner of her eye at something else claims she's looking down the hall for something better ... she talked her way into a first rate debater this year . . walks and talks and looks as if she's glad to be alive—it’s an infectious vitality . . . tJT ONE'S PRACTICE CLASS ONE LEARNS... TRAINING SCHOOL PARTIES. . . Pa9« 134ROBERT UNGER HERBERT UPRIGHT JANETTE VAN NATTA HENRY WARNER MARJORIE WARNER FRANCIS WEINGARTNER WALLACE WHEELER RAY WIERSIG CLAIRE WILLIAMS WILLIAM WINSOR BERNARD YULGA JOHN YURKOVISH .. _ Born by the U4J ... account' and agility ir Born by the star, Mercury accounts for his speed in athletics . . . Fe is a real Irish fighter . , . a riot on the basketball floor but there's nothing funny about the way he plays football . . . cute turned-up nose and a twinkle in his eye . . . has planned to transfer to Miami U. every semester for some time, but he sticks around . . . spends his summers in Waupaca—chris-craft riding with the younger set.. . likes women who talk . . . and cherry pies . . . women who weep get his goat . . . can't make up his mind about practice teaching . . . Bobbie, thinks he could write a book on women's clothes; Herbie, student librarian and comedian; Van, has a definite opinion on everything; Hank, basketball captain and star,- Marjorie, has hopes of graduating, Frenchy, hold those eyes, Wally, the right sort, Ray, a car of his own, but bashful, Pee Wee, China blue eyes. Bill, devotes his time to chemistry, Red, his hair causes many a sigh; Johnny, brought the Senior class through with no frozen assets or poor investments; Nice bunch, aren't they7 TEACHERS REFUSE NO INVITATIONS... FOOD... EVERYONE HAS FINE TIME Page 135ALICE BENNETT GEORGE BERG BERNICE BESTUL U-CLAIR BRANDT JANET CATTLE BETHEL CHRISTIE MARY KATHRYN COPPER ERMA CORNWELL PHYLLIS DEGOLIER VERNA DVORSAK ANNETTE EGGEN MARIE EISENHAMMER Patronized at birth by old father Neptune, god of the sea . . . keeps steady company with a Steinway . . . she's famous for her collection of pins and brooches ... we all think she's a good egg ... her secret ambition is to be a professional accompa-ist . . . but we think she’s doing "all right" with the men ... has a contagious giggle ... a catchy way of waving her hands and saying incredulously "no-oo . .. we wonder if any girl is more generous than Ula Mae (accent on Ula) . . . Alice, never home evenings—we wonder why; George, I live for those who love me; Bernice, you can’t get the best of her because she holds on to the best in herself; U-Clair, has ability to climb ladder of success; Janet, a heart unspotted is not easily daunted,- Bethel, the 3 S girl "studies," "shows," "Sundaes”; Mary Kathryn, shy, sweet with plenty of intelligence; Erma, she doesn't waste what she has—she’ll go far; Phil, the wit of Nelson Hall; Verna, has time to talk to you anytime, anywhere,- Annette, a brilliant girl— a good hearted egg, ( en) we mean it; Marie, she measures the distance to her goal and she won’t fall short. STUDENT TEACHERS TAKE ON JANITOR WORK . . . BOARD AND ROOM DUTY . . . Page 136CO MAXINE FALK EVELYN F1RKUS VIRGENE FREEMAN MALCOLM FRYK FLORIAN FURMANEK MARIE HALES ANNA MARIE HANSON EVA HANSEN HILDA HAUGEN FLORENCE HINTZ OPAL HOLTS HELEN INGERSOLL Maxine, do not turn back when you're lust at the goal; Evelyn, a romantic belle, she's a ding dong actress—ask George; Virgene, the happy blonde who boasts a fullback—you know who; Malcolm, always needs a little more time to catch up with back work; Florian, a good thinker and likeable chap; Marie, keep the best foot forward; Anna Marie, seen but not often heard; Eva, she's little, but can she pitch ball; Hilda, takes things as they come with a smile; Florence, she's busy now, she'll talk to Aggie another day,- Opal, as bright and firm as an opal; Helen, she's no clock, but when she's wound up! Intelligence, executive ability symbolized by the sign of Virgo . . . Joe . . . ask him what he likes . . . answer: "Food'' . . . gets more specific and outlines whole kernel com, French fries, rare steak, tomato and cucumber salad (what, no beverage?) Gourmand or Epicurean? ... he takes analyzing people and his practice pedagogy seriously . . . real task getting out of bed in the morning .. . earned his way through college working at the Tea Room and NYA on the stage, which is his first love ... esp. lighting and setting—(or is it •'sitting?'') ... a forceful debater . . . SHADES RAISED WITH CRITIC S EYEBROWS . . . ALL TO COMPENSATE FOR CUT • Page 137JEANNETTE JERZAK LAVERN JESTER JESSE JOHNSON MARJORIE JOHNSON CELIA JORDAN LOUISE KORTH LOUIE LANG TOM LANGTON EL6DA LARSON WARREN LENSMIRE RAYMOND LEPAK LAVERNE LONSDORF Jeannette, small, but, O my!,- LaVern, come on, LaVern, give the girls a break; Jesse, when I can't talk sense, I talk nonsense, Marjorie, a friend worth having,-Celia, I chatter, chatter, as I go and I go on forever; Louise, made a good pick-up at CSTC; Louie, he's as good as his punch ask Lola; Tom, The smilingest lad in the rural department; Eleda, providence gave her talent—art; Warren, he does not make the common error of confusing education with intelligence; Raymond, talk is cheap, why not make use of it; Laverne, La excels in sports. Perhaps her birth by the star Uranus explains Grade's aquatic skill . . . this year's champ in Women's Badminton . . . she's a champ in other ways too—ask her kid brother, Pete ... he and his gang have taken her in as honorary member of their club . . . meticulous in everything . . . adept in art . . . teaches handicraft at summer camps . . . organizes her class notes for the past year and files them . . . keeps an account of expenditures and saves blank checks her Dad sends her . . . THE DAWN COMES . . . COURAGEOUSLY SENIORS CONNIVE FOR CONSERVATION Page 138 HELEN LOTZ ROMAN LORBIECKI GEORGE LUTZ EUGENIA MANSAVAGE ESTHER NINMAN ELEANORE NELSON AGATHA NIGGEMANN DOROTHY MOTT CAROL NORBY MARY NORSTRANT ADELINE LUECK AGNES LUKASAVITZ Intellectual, industrious, cooperative . . . symbolized by Aquarius, the water bearer ... a true gentleman . . . enjoys classical music . . . George likes sports—tennis, hockey, badminton . . . also chocolate drop cookies from the Point Bakery ... is in love with his wife ... is a conscientious student . . detests extreme jazz music . . . helps to hold up the tenor section in the Men's Glee Club . . will be a fine teacher . . . Helen, she's lots of fun and nice to know; Roman, a perfect gentleman at heart, George, why can't we skate the year 'round? Eugenia, new ideas are my specialty, Esther, be silent and safe; Eleanore, she's at Nelson Hall, but week ends her time is taken up some where else; Agatha, keep the sunny side up; Dorothy, tall, vivacious, and graceful, too; Carol, she doesn't catch on fast, but when she does!; Mary, would like to diet but just can't leave those potatoes alone; Adeline, dignified, knows whereof she speaks; Agnes, when does she study7 She's never home evenings. CREDENTIALS LOOM IN IMPORTANCE . . . ALL POINTS TO LARGE PLACEMENT Page 139LOLA PETERSON AUDREY PICKETT RONALD PIEKARSKI JOHN POBIECKE ALVIN PRICE CAROLYN PRONZ EVELYN PUTZ CLORA RABBITT HELEN RANDORF IONE REDLIN LUCILE RITCHIE CATHERINE RODER The patroness of their birth is the goddess, Venus . . . ”E" and "El'' . . . typical Norwegians . . . like lute- fisk and lefsa . . . winter picnics . sports . . . two entirely different personalities . . . like symphonic music-"El" likes Grieg . . . musicans in their own right . . . mainstays in the alto section of the Girls’ Glee Club "E" is an excellent cook—even her brothers will admit that . . . they’re going to be teachers—and we know they’ll be good ones . . . Lola, likes big, strong men; Audrey, lead me not Into temptation, but show me where it is; Ronald, handsome is the word for him; John, a smile and kind word for everyone; Alvin, he taught art successfully; Carolyn, has an eye for a certain business manager,- Evelyn, a quiet; studious maid who never finds time to waste, Bunny, Bunny is a foxy rabbitt, when she bears down; Helen, if you're in doubt go to Hel-en find out; lone, doesn't like a doubting Thomas so Thomas doesn’t doubt her; Lucille, velly Ritchie in personality and charm; Catherine, jah—she can read German. PREVIOUS PLACEMENTS SCRUTINIZED APPREHENSIVELY . . . APPLICATIONS Page 140MARGARET ROHRBECK ELVIRA SAXE LAURA SCHRIEBER RUBV SELVES OTTO SHIPLA ELAINE SHORT VERNICE SNELL SOFIE GLEN MARIAN SOPPA THELMA SPENCER PRANK SPLITEK LORNA STEWART Margaret, now who can I pester next? Elvira, studies come first; Laura, I am right, don't argue,- Ruby, quiet, but can she giggle! Otto, Otto the Great—Shipla's ship sails surely; Elaine, short, but has a tall personality; Vernice, she can't find the janitor; Sofie, I think I can do it; Marion, I don't understand you; Thelma, quiet, but she really knows her stuff; Lorna, wise as the day is long; Frank, the happy philosopher from Adams-Friendship-knows what he wants and gets it. Frankie, born under the sign of Virgo . . . eccentricity of preferring stairs to elevators ... a gullible traveler . . . day dreams about the Golden Maid has reserved table at Tea Room . . often treats himself to two strawberry sundaes for dessert. . . talks himself in and out of anything (but slowly!) . . . speaks, walks, thinks, and acts with gusto . . . inveterate statistician . . authority mongrel . prefers Friendship to Adams . . FINGERS CROSSED . . . PERSONAL INTERVIEWS . . . ALL NERVOUS AND HOPEFUL Page 141IRENE SWANSON MYRA STOEHR DORIS THOUSAND GERTRUDE VRANESH MARGARETH WEILER LOIS WIED JUANITA ZADDACK LOUELLA ZILLE Irene, Swanie is a ducky gal with a drake in every lake; Doris, she's a thousand but worth a million; Gertrude, quiet, Gertrude, it's teacher's turn to talk now; Margie, has time for everything; Lois, she's a weed but not obnoxious, Juanita, dreaming is so effortless, Luella, men are such zillie things. Born by the symbol Gemini, (j3 0 the twins . . . everybody knows "Stoney ' — and "Stoney" knows everybody ... has a huge giggle . . . an ardent supporter of school spirit gives pep talks to our athletic heroes . . calls her friends "Butch" ... is always hungry . . . nothing gives her a bigger thrill than a free meal ... is a cooperative and willing worker. Stoney' is somebody worth knowing . . . SOME SIGNED . . . BACCALAUREATE . . . CLASS DAY . . RECEPTION . . . Page 142 Before you send that letter to Santa look at what you’re asking for. Look and contemplate. Oh, now's your last chance-even if you’ve never contemplated before. The future is threatening. It holds absent mindedness and knitting over your heads. Now the absent mindedness may be inevitable and we re not condemning knitting if there’s a soldier and we re not advocating war. But it’ll be your own fault. Of course if the reindeer are hibernating and Santa can’t make it and elections turn out all right, you may not have to starve even though you cast aside the pedagogy and knitting. We see below that we will always have the intelligentsia among us. Cutting up as usual. U And there are those sentimental ones who, having played the field, I I SENIOR BREAKFAST . . . COMMENCEMENT . . . CONGRATULATIONS . . . ETC. ETC. P J9e 143ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We are indebted to Mr. Rogers for his advice and helpfulness in getting the 1940 IRIS ready for you. Grace Melchior and Eileen De Horn’s designs for the division pages featuring the Zodiac signs were adapted from the Zodiac Bowl by Waugh shown in Life Magazine, September 18, 1939. The cartoons in the division sections were conceived by Glendell Gilman and drawn under his direction by Arnie Mossier. Pictures for the frontispiece and several division pages were taken by Eldrea Olson, representative for Jahn and Ollier Engraving Company. The drawing of the school for the cover was done by Bob Unger. Photography by Vennie Engravings by Jahn and Ollier Printing by Badger Printing Co. Covers by Kingsport Press Binding by Worzalla Publishers Page 144: Advertising To the business men of this community I wish to express my sincere appreciation for the splendid way they have subscribed to this section, and also for their attitude of courtesy and consideration which they extend to college students in general. Phillip Anderson, Business Manager ! 1Central State Teachers College STEVENS POINT, WIS. Member AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS COLLEGES "Shrine of Alma Mater' Degrees in all fields of Public School Service • Special Attention To RURAL EDUCATION RADIO EDUCATION VISUAL EDUCATION Excellent Summer Sessions “Let us turn again, and fondly, To thy best traditions true Central- Queen of all Wisconsin Alma Mater—here’s to you!” u. a Page 146 ’’THE COLLEGE THAT TRAINS FOR SERVICE’ VETTER Manufacturing Co. TACKLE and GUNS ALL ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT JANTZEN BATHING SUITS Phone 87 For BETTER LUMBER and MILLWORK T H E SPORT SHOP POINT SPORTING GOODS CO. Most Populai In Central Wisco nsin Page 147 NORMINGTON'S DRY CLEANING LAUNDRY Phone 380 COLLEGE MOLL-GLENNON SUPPLY COMPANY STORE “Because You Love Nice Things” • • LADIES READY-TO-WEAR EVERYTHING ACCESSORIES IN and STUDENT SUPPLIES DRY GOODS r. «9 3e 148Two Strong Mutual Companies operating on the age-old mutual principles of economy in management, equitable claims, settlements, and the return of profits to policy holders. These companies have no capital stock and no stockholders, all assets are held for the benefit of the policy holders LINES OF INSURANCE: Automobile Garage Liability Plate Glass Burglary Workmen’s Comp. General Liability Fire Windstorm Extended Coverage Rent and Rental Value Inland Marine Net Earnings (U O) HARDWARE DEALERS MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY AND HARDWARE MUTUAL CASUALTY COMPANY u. a Pase 149 HOME OFFICE: STEVENS POINT, WISCONSIN LICENSED IN EVERY STATE OFFICES COAST TO COASTCompliments of TAYLOR'S DRUG STORES V THE CONTINENTAL YOUNG MEN'S CLOTHES Compliments of JOURNAL PRINTING COMPANY DRUGS STATIONERY GREETING CARDS GIFTS TOILETRIES DOWNTOWN SOUTH SIDE 111 Strongs 752 Church Compliments of CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK KREMB'S HARDWARE COMPANY A Page 150 HEADQUARTERS FOR SAVINGS Phone 21 STEVENS POINT, WIS.WHITING-PLOVER PAPER COMPANY The Golden Plover, familiar to everyone who has lived in Stevens Point or its vicinity, is the trademark symbol of Whiting-Plover Paper Company—manufacturers of high quality bond, writing and ledger papers. In future years, choose a paper bearing this symbol—your guarantee of honest value, long life, and perfect writing and printing qualities. T H E HOTEL WHITING Headquarters for Parties and Dances THERE'S ONLY ONE WAY A mere handful of stubborn leaders MADE America ... a hundred million and more of their followers have a hand in KEEPING America. This is the democratic spirit that has created great things in this country, educational institutions, successful industries, great inventions, efficient utility services. Your present education is but a step in this well tried plan of citizen participation in the functions of government. A good goal to face is that of keeping the task of governing in the hands of those who are being governed. Wisconsin PUBLIC SERVICE Corporation Page 151Flowers Gifts Compliments of News Wilson Floral DELZELL Company OIL FOX THEATRE BUILDING • COMPANY OPEN DAILY 7:30 A.M. to 10 P.M. Phone 235 • Member Federal Reserve and F. D. 1. Corporation DRIFTING AND DREAMING It’s easy to drift through life, dreaming of the day when your ship will come in. But a more sensible plan for living is to put both feet squarely on the ground, adopt a plan of making regular bank deposits, and stick to it, come what may. Here is the place to start your account. • FIRST NATIONAL BANK STEVENS POINT, WIS. Capital and Surplus 268,500.00, Largest in Portage County Page 152The Compliments of College Eat Shop FISHER’S DAIRY • Best Wishes from J. A. WALTER FLORIST “Plant and Cut Flower IRENE and MERV Arrangements of Distinction” Tel. 1629 110 N. Michigan Stevens Point, Wis. ZENOFF’S Super Food Market SOUTH SIDE Compliments of SCRIBNER’S DAIRY PROTECTED MILK Stevens Point s Most Complete ONE STOP FOOD MARKET Phone 1367 114 Wyatt We Specialize in FANCY MEATS, GROCERIES FRESH FRUITS VEGETABLES FISHER C ASHIN Free Delivery Service and 1000 So. Division Phone 1880 REINHOLDT PageCompliments of Booth-Cartwright Kraus Service Auto Sales Station Carl Motor Karner Auto Sales Company G. A. Gullikson Smith Motor Company Sales Gateway Motor Stevens Point Sales Motor Company You II just love every drop of '£upeA,-$cukyti' DEERWOOD COFFEE The world’s choicest green coffee scientifically blended and roasted under our controlled process guarantees the finest flavor. That’s why you'll prefer Deerwood "Super flavor” coffee. i Li »-------------------------—----------------_----------------------------------------i Page 154 Compliments of WELSBY 'S The D R y HANNON-BACH CLEANING DRUG CO. • Compliments of the The Best in DRUGS—STATIONERY—GIFTS SERVICE PRINTING LUNCHES -SODAS COMPANY MENTION T H E IRIS and C. S. T. C. «a Pase 155JAHN AND OLLIER AGAIN’ j- «... A Repeated acceptance by discriminating Year Book Boards has inspired and sustained the John Ollier slogan that gathers increas ing significance with each succeeding year. 817 West Washington Blvd., Chicago, III. - Telephone MONroe 7080 Commercial Artists, Photographers and Makers of Fine Printing Plates for Black and Color Page 156CREDENTIALS JOSEPH AL8RECHT, Phelps,- General Science,- Sigma Zeta 3, 4; Volleyball; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Manager. JOHN ANDERSON, Stevens Point; History; Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3; Forensic 3; Debate 3; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Boys' Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Mixed Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom Committee 3; Senior Ball Committee 4; Young Progressive Club 4. FRANZ ARVOLD, Stevens Point; History; Pointer 1, 4; Lutheran Group 1,2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Pep Club 1; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Harlequin 1, 2; Student Manager 3. MASON ATWOOD, Marshfield; Mathematics; Phi Sigma Epsilon 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4; S Club 3, 4; Photo Club 1; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4,-Band 1; Student Manager 2, 3, 4. REUBEN BELONGIA, Mountain; General Science,- Sigma Zeta 3, 4, Vice Master Scientist,- Intramural Sports 1, 2,- S Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. NORMAN BENSON, Rosholt; General Science; College Theater 3, 4; Forum 2, 3, 4; Boys’ Glee Club 3, 4. ROBERT BISHOP, Antigo,- Mathematics; Phi Sigma Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3; Football 2, 3, 4,- Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4,- Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Boys' Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- Junior Prom Committee 3; Senior Ball Committee 4,- S. Club 1, 2, 3, 4. JOE BLOOM, Rhinelander; English; Phi Sigma Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Iris 2; Pointer 3, 4, Business Manager 4,-Intramural Sports 2, 3; Forensic Club 3; Debate 3; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4,- Boys’ Glee Club 1, 2, 3. FE BOHAN, Waupaca; History,- Chi Delta Rho 1, 2, 3, 4; S. Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Boxing 1; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. ELEANOR BREEDEN, Coloma,- Biological Science,-Tau Gamma Beta 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; YWCA 1; Grammar Round Table 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls’ Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2; Iris 3; Pointer 3. MABEL BRIERE, Wisconsin Rapids,-Geography; Sigma Tau Delta 4,- YWCA 2; Grammar Round Table 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls’ Glee Club 2. NEAL BROWN, Almond; Mathematics,- Chi Delta Rho 2, 3, 4; Alpha Kappa Rho 3, 4; Iris 3,- Intramural Sports 2, 3; Photo Club 2, 3; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Boys' Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mixed Chorus 2, 3,- Band 1, 2, 3, 4. RAYMOND BURGER, Park Ridge,-Social Science,- Transferred from Oshkosh Teachers’ College. GERMAINE BYRNE, Antigo,- Home Economics; Tau Gamma Beta 3, 4; Press Representative 4; Loyola 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Forum 2, 3, 4. SAMUEL CRESS, Wausau; Biological Science,- Intramural Sports 2, 3; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Young Progressives 1, 2, 3, 4. PHILIP DAKIN, Antigo,- Mathematics,- Phi Sigma Epsilon 3, 4; Sigma Zeta 3, 4; Alpha Kappa Rho 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1,2, 3, 4, President 4, Treasurer 3. MADELYN DAVEL, Loyal; Primary; Loyola 1, 2, 3; WAA 2, 3, 4; Pep Club 1, 2; College Theater 3, 4; Primary Council 1, 2, 3, 4,- Alpha Psi Omega 4. EILEEN DE HORN, White Lake; Primary,- Omega Mu Chi 3, 4; Iris 4,- WAA 1, 2, 3, 4; Primary Council 2, 3, 4; Girls’ Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- Nelson Hall Council 3, 4. LEWIS DROBNICK, Gleason,- General Science,- Chi Delta Rho 3, 4; Panhellenic Council 4; S Club 3, 4; Boxing 1, 2, 3, 4; Coach 4; Track 3, 4; Rural Life 1, 2, 3, 4. JAMES DUECKER, Kiel,- History,- Chi Delta Rho 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Treasurer 3, House Manager 4, Vice-President 4; Panhellenic Council 3, 4; Pointer 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3,- Football 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2; Track 3; Golf 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; S Club 2, 3, 4, President 4. EDWARD DURAND, Stevens Point,- Chemistry,- Phi Sigma Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Vice-President 4, President 4; Iris 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. JEANNETTE FIEREK, Stevens Point; English; Tau Gamma Beta 1, 2, 3, 4; Photo Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls’ Glee Club 4; Iris 4. EDITH EINFELDT, Greenwood; Home Economics; Sigma Zeta 3, 4; Lutheran Group 3, 4; YWCA 2, 3, 4,- Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3, President 4; Forum 2, 3, 4. ELROY FLORENCE, Phillips; General Science,- Chi Delta Rho 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4,- Photo Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Social Science Club 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Boys’ Glee Club 2, 3. IRIS FORBES, Port Edwards; Home Economics,- Tau Gamma 8eta 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3, Vice-President 4; Pointer 3; Home Economics Club 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. LUCILLE GEHRKE, Manawa,- Home Economics; YWCA 2, 3, 4; Photo Club 3, 4,- Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1. LOUIS HAMEL, Arpin,- General Science,- Alpha Kappa Rho 3, 4; Art Club 3, 4, President 3; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2; Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4. HARLOW HENNINGER, Pittsville; History; Intramural Sports 2, 3; College Theater 3, 4, - Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. ALICE HERMAN, Harshaw,- Geography,-YWCA 4,- Rural Life Club 3, 4. ANITA HICKEY, Neenah; Home Economics,- Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4,- WAA 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. ETHEL HILL, Washburn,- Home Economics,- Sigma Zeta 3, 4, Master Scientist 4; Lutheran Group 1, 2, 3, 4; YWCA 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls' Glee Club 1,2, 3, 4,- Mixed Chorus 3, 4; Girls’ Trio 4. RAYMOND HODELL, Stevens Point; Chemistry,- General Science,- Phi Sigma Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Zeta 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Fox Theater 1, 2, 3, 4. (By request, but not the management’s!) KATHERINE HOUG, Exeland; History,- Tau Gamma Beta 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola 1, 2,- Forum 1, 2, 3, 4,- Senior Ball Committee 4; Debate 1; Iris 1. BERNARD JOHNSON, Stevens Point; History; Iris 3, Business Manager 3; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3,- Social Science Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Forensic Club 1, 3, 4, Forum I,- Grammar Round Table 2, 3, 4; Bloc 2, 3, 4. JANE JOHNSON, Endeavor; English; General Science; Tau Gamma Beta 2, 3, 4, President 3; Panhellenic Council 4, Secretary 4,- Vice-President—Junior Class 3; Debate 3,- Grammar Round Table 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls' Glee Club 2; Sigma Tau Delta 3, 4; Pointer 3. LORRAINE JOHNSON, Rhinelander,- Geography; Omega Mu Chi 3, 4; Sigma Tau Delta 3, 4; WAA 2, 3, 4; Pep Club 2; Grammar Round Table 2, 3, 4. VIRGINIA JOHNSON, Abbotsford; English; Omega Mu Chi 3, 4; Sigma Tau Delta 3, 4, Historian 4; Iris Editor 4; Flight 3, 4; YWCA 3, 4, Secretary 4; Forensic Club 4; Debate 4; Art Club 3; Forum 3, 4; Nelson Hall Council 3, 4, President 4. LAWRENCE JOZWIAK, Wisconsin Rapids,- English,- Sigma Tau Delta 3, 4; Alpha Psi Omega 3, 4, Sub-Director 4; Iris 4,-College Theater 3, 4; Forum 2, 3, 4. PAT KENNEDY, Stevens Point; History,- Phi Sigma Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Pointer 3,- Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4; Debate 2; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. FRANK KIEDROWSKI, Custer,- Chemistry,- Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. ULA MAE KNUTSON, Stevens Point; English; Biology,- Tau Gamma Beta 2, 3, 4, Page 157Vice-President 3; Sigma Tau Delta 3, 4, Treasurer 4,- Alpha Kappa Rho 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls' Glee Club (accompanist) 1, 2, 3; Boys' Glee Club (accompanist) 4; Mixed Chorus (accompanist) 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Band 1, 2, 3; Junior Prom Committee 3; Senior Ball Committee 4. BEN KORDUS, Mosinee; History; Sigma Tau Delta 3, 4; Flight 3, 4; Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4, President 2; Boxing 1, 2; Social Science Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; Forensic Club 3, 4, Business Manager 4, Secretary 3; Debate 1, 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Bloc Club 2, 3, 4. LAUREL LaVALLE, Hurley, Primary, Loyola 2, 3, A, Vice-President 2; WAA 3; Forensic Club 3, 4; Debate 3, Primary Council 3, 4, Transferred from Ironwood Junior College. STANLEY LEPAK, Custer; History, Loyola 1; Rural Life Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Rural Life Chorus. DOROTHY LLOYD, Stevens Point; Home Economics, Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Pep Club 1, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. VERNA LUECK, Marshfield, Primary, YWCA 1, 2, 3, A, Primary Council 1, 2, 3, 4, Band 1, 2, 3. ANITA MADSEN, Phelps, Primary, Omega Mu Chi 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4, Vice-President 4; WAA 2, 3, 4, Pep Club 2, Vice-President; Primary Council 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Girls' Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Nelson Hall Council 3. ALTON McCORMICK, Plover, General Science,- Sigma Zeta 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. ANN MAINLAND, Stevens Point, Home Economics, Tau Gamma Beta 1, 2, 3, 4, Recording Secretary 3, President 4, Panhellenic Council 4, Vice-President—Sophomore Class, Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Girls' Glee Club 1, 2, 3. ZORKA MALESEVICH, Mayville, History, Sigma Tau Delta 3, 4, WAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4, Pep Club 1, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. GRACE MELCHIOR, Apple-ton, Omega Mu Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 4, Panhellenic Council 4, President 4, YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4, WAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Primary Council 2, 3, 4, President 4, Forum 1, Girls’ Glee Club 3, Nelson Hall Council 3, Orchesis 2, 3. GERTRUDE MOHME, Sheboygan, Geography, Rural Life Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Rural Life Chorus. HELEN MOORE, Shullsburg, Home Economics, YWCA 2, 3, 4, Photo Club 3, 4, Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. FLORENCE MORENCY, Three Lakes, Home Economics, Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4, Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. JAMES MURAT, Stevens Point, History, Chi Delta Rho 1, 2, 3, 4, Sigma Tau Delta 4, Iris 3, Pointer 2, Lutheran Group 3, 4, Forensic Club 3, 4, Debate 2, 3, 4, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Boys’ Glee Club 1, 2, Bloc Club 1, 2, 3, 4. GERALD O'DOHERTY, Mosinee, Mathematics, Alpha Kappa Rho 4, President- Senior Class, Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Boys' Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4, Mixed Chorus 3, 4. GRACE OKRAY, Stevens Point, English, Tau Gamma Beta 4, Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, 4, WAA 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 4, Pep Club 2, President 2, Grammar Round Table 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4, Girls' Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Mixed Chorus 4, Iris 3, Pointer 4. JOE OPHOVEN, Antigo, History, Phi Sigma Epsilon 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4, Panhellenic Council 4, Alpha Psi Omega 3, 4, Iris 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Social Science Club 3, 4, Vice-President 4, Forensic Club 3, 4, Vice-President 3, President 4, College Theater 2, 3, 4, President 4, Debate 1, 2, 3, 4, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4, Boys’ Glee Club 2, 4. SOPHIE PALUKAS, Goodman, History, Geography, Loyola 1, YWCA 3, Photo Club 3, 4, Grammar Round Table 1, 2, 3, 4. GEORGE QUANDT, Wausau, General Science, Sigma Zeta 3, 4, Treasurer—Senior Class, Pointer 3, Tennis 3, 4, Forensic Club 3, Debate 3, Forum 2, 3, 4, Men’s Glee Club 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 4, Mixed Chorus 4, Bloc 3, 4, College Theater 2, 4. BETTY RICHARDS, Portage, Primary, Tau Gamma Beta 1, 2, 3, 4, Iris 2, 3, YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4, WAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4, Intramural Sports 1, Pep Club 1, Primary Council 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4, Pointer 3, 4. RUTH ROBISON, Nashville, Primary, YWCA 3, 4, Pep Club 1, 2, Primary Council 1, 2, 3, 4. ELEANOR RUCHTI, Lodi, English, Omega Mu Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2, President 3, Panhellenic Council 3, 4, Alpha Psi Omega 3, 4, Iris 2, 3, 4, Flight 3, YWCA 4, Pep Club 1, Forensic Club 4, College Theater 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Debate 4, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Nelson Hall Council 2, 3, President 3, Sigma Tau Delta 3, 4, President 4. ERNEST RUPPEL, Appleton, History, Vice-President—Senior Class, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, S Club 2, 3, 4, Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Track 2, Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3, Badminton 3, 4, Loyola Club 4. CORINNE SANDMIRE, Richland Center-Home Economics, YWCA 3, 4, Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3,4, Pep Club 1, Forum 1,2,3,4. MARGUERITE S ARGE ANT, Lime Springs, Iowa, Primary, WAA 3, 4, Basketball 2, 3, 4, Primary Council 1, 2, 3, 4. DOROTHY SCHNECK, Stevens Point, English, Loyola 3, 4, WAA 3, 4, Pep Club 2, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Orchesis 3. HAROLD SCHEEL, Spencer, General Science, Alpha Kappa Rho 3, 4, Iris 3, Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4, Boxing 1, 2, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4, Band 1, 2, 3, 4. EVELYN SCHWINGEL, Richland Center, Biology, Omega Mu Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Alpha Kappa Rho 3, 4, Home Economics Club 2, Class Offices 1, 2, Iris 1, 2, Pointer 3, 4, Forum 1, 2, 4, Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4, Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Tumbling 3, 4. EDWIN SLOTWINSKI, Stevens Point, General Science, Chi Delta Rho 3, 4, Loyola 4, Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. FLORENCE SMITH, Tomahawk-Geography, Omega Mu Chi 3, 4, Secretary 4, Sigma Zeta 3, 4, Iris 3, Assistant Business Manager, Pointer 4, Editor, Pep Club 1, 2, Grammar Round Table 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, President 4, Girls’ Glee Club 2, 3. LaRUE SMITH, Shawano, Mathematics, English, Phi Sigma Epsilon 3, 4, Sigma Tau Delta 3, 4, Sigma Zeta 3, 4, Alpha Psi Omega 3, 4, Iris 2, Pointer 3, Flight 3, 4, College Theater 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 3, Debate 1, 2, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Band 1, 2. VIRGINIA SMITH, Friendship, History, Loyola 4, Forensic Club 4, Debate 4, Forum 4, Transferred from Eau Claire. EVELYN SONNEN8ERG, Stevens Point, Mathematics, Iris 3, Pointer 4, Pep Club 1, College Theater 3, 4, Art Club 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. DEARBORN SPINDLER, Stevens Point, History, Chi Delta Rho 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4, Corresponding Secretary 3, Panhellenic Council 4, Secretary—Junior Class, Iris 3, Editor 3, Pointer 2, Assistant Editor 2, Intramural Sports 3, 4, Debate 1; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Boys’ Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Bloc 2, 3, 4. CLIFFORD SPRAGUE, Stevens Point, Mathematics, Chemistry, Iris 1, 2, 3, Head Photographer 3, Photo Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, President 4, College Theater 2, 3, 4, Photographer 4, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Boys' Glee Club 3, 4. ARTHUR STAPEL, Spencer, General Science, Chi Delta Rho 3, 4, Secretary 4, Lutheran Group 1, 2, 3, 4, Intramural Sports 1, 2, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Boys' Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4, Mixed Chorus 1, 3, 4, Director 4, Bloc 4, Alpha Kappa Rho 4, College Theater 3. ETHEL STOLTENBERG, Stevens Point, General Science, Lutheran Group 1, 2, 3, 4, YWCA 1, 2, Photo Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Iris 2, 3. KATHLEEN Page 158STONE, Wittenberg; Geography; Sigma Tau Delta 3, 4; Secretary -Senior Class; Iris 3, 4; Pointer 3, 4; YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4; Grammar Round Table 3, 4; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Girls’ Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom Committee. PHILIP THOR-SON, Ogema,- Mathematics; Phi Sigma Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Panhellenic Cojncil 4; Iris 2; Pointer 3; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Directory 2, 3, 4. ELOUISE TORKELSON, Merrill; Primary; Lutheran Group 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; YWCA 2, 3, 4, President 4; WAA 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Primary Council 2, 3, 4; Girls' Glee Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; Nelson Hall Council 4. ELIDA TORKELSON, Merrill; Home Economics,- Sigma Zeta 3, 4,- Lutheran Group 2, 3, 4; YWCA 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3,- Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Forum 2, 3, 4; Girls’ Glee Club 2, 3, 4,- Mixed Chorus 4. LESLIE TROWBRIDGE, Milladore; .Mathematics; General Science,- Sigma Zeta 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. ROBERT UNGER, Neillsville,- Mathematics,- Pointer 4, Assistant Editor; College Theater 4; Art Club 4; Forum 4; Boys’ Glee Club 4,-Transferred from Carroll College, Waukesha. HERBERT UPRIGHT, Kenosha; History; Lutheran Group 3, 4, President 4; Rural Life Club 3, 4; Boys' Glee Club 3, 4; Mixed Chorus 3, 4; College Quartette 3, 4; Rural Life Chorus 4; Director 4. JANETTE VAN NATTA, Osseo; English; Sigma Tau Delta 3, 4, Secretary 4; Alpha Psi Omega 2, 3, 4; Advertising Manager 2, Sub-Director 3, Director 4; Iris 2, 3, 4; Flight 3, 4; College Theater 1, 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls’ Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Announcer 3, 4; Mixed Chorus 2; Radio 3. HENRY WARNER, Stevens Point; Mathematics; Chi Delta Rho 2, 3, 4, President 3; S. Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3; Boxing 1; Track 1; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. MARJORIE WARNER, Stevens Point,-Geography; Iris 4; Photo Club 3; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. FRANCIS WEINGARTNER, Lake Delton,- Mathematics; General Science,-Chi Delta Rho 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Zeta 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3,-Photo Club 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. WALLACE WHEELER, Union Grove,- History; Loyola 3, 4, President 4; Rural Life Club 3, 4, President 4; Radio Announcer, Radio Newscaster. RAY WIERSIG, Colby,- Mathematics; General Science; Chi Delta Rho 2, 3, 4,- Sigma Zeta 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; S. Club 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. CLAIRE WILLIAMS, Pewaukee; Home Economics,- Tau Gamma Beta 1, 2, 3, 4, Recording Secretary 4; Loyola 1, 2, 3,- Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls’ Glee Club 2. WILLIAM WINSOR, Mauston,- Chemistry; Mathematics; Sigma Zeta 4; Tennis 3; Photo Club 4; Forum 3, 4. BERNARD YULGA, Stevens Point; Chemistry,-Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4; Photo Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. JOHN YURKOVICH, Loretta,-General Science; Phi Sigma Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Sigma Tau Delta 3, 4; Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4,- College Theater 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4,- Boys' Glee Club 3, 4; Bloc 3, 4. ALICE ALICE MAE BENNETT, Stevens Point; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; YWCA 2; WAA 2,- Intramural Sports 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Rural Life Chorus 1, 2. GEORGE BERG, Bonduel; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- Newman Club 2,- Rural Life Club 2. BERNICE BESTUL, Rosholt; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded, Lutheran Group 1, 2,- Basketball 1, 2,- Rural Life Club 1, 2,- Rural Life Chorus 2; Girls’ Glee Club 1. U-CLAIR BRANDT, Park Falls; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 2; Intramural Sports 1; Rural Life Club 1, 2,- Rural Life Chorus 2; Progressive Club 2. JANET CATTLE, Mauston; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 2. BETHEL CHRISTIE, Greenwood,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- Basketball 1,- Rural Life Club 1, 2. MARY KATHRYN COPPER, Withee,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; YWCA 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Rural Life Chorus 1, 2; Rural Life German Band 1. ERMA CORNWELL, Plainfield; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,-Rural Life Club 1, 2. PHYLLIS DEGOLIER, Pine River; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; YWCA 1, 2,- WAA 2,- Rural Life Club 1, 2; Girls’ Glee Club 1, 2; Rural Life Chorus 2. VERNA DVORSAK, Knowlton,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Rural Life Chorus 1, 2. ANNETTE EGGEN, Pittsville; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,-Rural Life Club 2. MARIE EISENHAMMER, Nekoosa,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 2; Rural Life Club 2. MAXINE FALK, Pittsville; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- YWCA 2; Rural Life Club 2. EVELYN FIRKUS, Knowlton,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Baseball 1; Rural Life Club 1, 2. VIR-GENE FREEMAN, Spencer; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Omega Mu Chi 2,- WAA 1,- Intramural Sports 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2,- Rural Life Club 1, 2. MALCOLM FRYK, lola,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Intramural Sports 1,- Rural Life Club 1, 2; Boys’ Glee Club 1. FLORIAN FURMANEK, Amherst; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- Rural Life Club 1, 2. SOFIE GLEN, Knowlton; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- Newman Club 2; Rural Life Club 2. MARIE HALES, Granton,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 2. ANNA MARIE HANSON, Abbotsford; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Band 1. EVA HANSON, Amherst; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,-Lutheran Group 2,- YWCA 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. HILDA HAUGEN, Stanley,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 2. FLORENCE HINTZ, Amherst Junction; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 1, 2. OPAL HOLTS, Waupaca, 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; YWCA 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2,- Rural Life Chorus 1, 2; Young Progressives 2. HELEN INGERSOLL, Abbotsford; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Rural Life Chorus 2. JEANNETTE JERZAK, Stevens Point; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. LA VERN JESTER, Wausau,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 2. JESSE W. JOHNSON, lola,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Pointer 2; Lutheran Group 1, 2; Boxing 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. MARJORIE JOHNSON, Plainfield; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; YWCA 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2,- Nelson Hall Council 2. CELIA JORDAN, Unity,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Iris 2; Newman Club 1, 2; WAA 2; Basketball 1, 2; Forensic Club 1, 2,-Debate 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Band 1, 2. LOUISE KORTH, Granton,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; YWCA 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. LOUIE LANG, Marathon,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- Newman Club 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1; S Club 2; Football 2; Boxing 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2,-Rural Life Chorus 2. TOM LANGTON, Stevens Point,-2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- Rural Life Club 1, 2; Boys' Glee Club 1, 2,- Young Progressive 2; Rural Life Chorus 1. ELEDA LARSON, lola; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- Rural Life Club 1, 2. WARREN LENSMIRE, Marathon,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 1, 2, Treasurer 2,- Intramural Sports 1; Chef Club 1; Debate 1, 2, Treasurer and Secretary 2,-Rural Life Club 1, 2; Rural Life Chorus 2. RAYMOND LEPAK, Edgar; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1; Rural Life Club 1, 2. LAVERNE LONSDORF, Athens,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2,- Rural Life Club 1, 2. HELEN LOTZ, Waupaca,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- Rural Life Club Page 1591, 2; Rural Life Chorus 2. ROMAN LORBIECHI, Wittenberg; 2 Vr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 1, 2. ADELINE LUECK, Hamburg; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,-Rural Life Club 1, 2; Band 1,- Rural Life Chorus 2. AGNES LUKASAVITZ, Custer; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. GEORGE LUTZ, Stevens Point; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Panhellenic Council 1, 2. EUGENIA MANSAVAGE, Parkridge,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. DOROTHY MOTT, Neillsville,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 2. ELEANOR NELSON, Waupaca; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; WAA 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Rural Life Chorus 2. AGATHA NIGGEMANN, Westooro; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 1, 2; Intramural Sports 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Rural Life Chorus 1,2. ESTHER NINMAN, Shawano; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,-Rural Life Club 2; Rural Life Chorus 1. CAROL NORBY, 1 o I a; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 1, 2. MARY NORSTRANT, Berlin; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; YWCA 2,-Rural Life Club 2. LOLA PETERSON, lola; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded, Lutheran Group 2; YWCA 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. AUDREY PICKETT, Spencer; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; WAA 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. RONALD PIEKARSKI, Junction City,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 2. JOHN POBIECKE, Knowlton; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Boxing 1, 2; Forum 1; Rural Life Club 2. ALVIN PRICE, Stevens Point; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 1, 2, - Boys' Glee Club 1, 2; Young Progressives 2; Rural Life Chorus 1. CAROLYN PRONZ, Stevens Point; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 1, 2; WAA 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Rural Life Chorus 1; Dancing 1; Archery Sport Head 2. EVELYN PUTZ, Almond; Newman Club 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. CLORA RABBITT, Montello; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; YWCA 1; WAA 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Girls Glee Club 1, 2. HELEN RANDORF, Plainfield,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; YWCA 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. IONE REDLIN, Pulaski; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; YWCA 1, 2; WAA 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Girls' Glee Club 1. LUCILE RITCHIE, New London,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded, Rural Life Club 2. CATHERINE RODER, Rib Lake,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; YWCA 2, Rural Life Club 1, 2; Rural Life Chorus 1, 2. MARGARET ROHRBECK, Mauston,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; YWCA 2; Rural Life Club 2. ELVIRA SAXE, Curtiss,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- YWCA 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2,- Rural Life Chorus 1. LAURA SCHREIBER, Suring; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 1, 2, Secretary 2,- Girls' Glee Club 1, 2; Rural Life Chorus Accompanist 1, 2. RUBY SELVES, Neillsville,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded, YWCA 1; Rural Life Club 1, 2. OTTO SHIPLA, Friendship; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; College Theater 1; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Young Progressives Club 2. ELAINE SHORT, Granton; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 2. VERNICE SNELL, Seymour,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 1, 2. MARIAN SOPPA, Arcadia,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Newman Club 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2, - Orchestra 1; Band 1; Accompanist for Creative Dancing. THELMA SPENCER, Stevens Point,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,-Intramural Sports 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2,- Rural Life Chorus 2. FRANK SPLITEK, Friendship,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; President of the Sophomore Class 2; Forensic Club 1, 2, Vice-President 2; Debate 2,- Rural Life Club 2, Treasurer 2. LORNA STEWART, Ladysmith; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 2. MYRA STOEHR, Gresham,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- Newman Club 2; Intramural Sports 1; Rural Life Club 1, 2. IRENE SWANSON, Junction City; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 1, 2. DORIS THOUSAND, Blue Mounds,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- Lutheran Group 2; YWCA 1, 2, Treasurer 2; Primary Council 1; Rural Life Club 2; Delegate Lake Geneva Conference 1. GERTRUDE VRANESH, Eagle River; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; WAA 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. MARGARETH WEILER, Auburndale; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- Newman Club 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. LOIS WIED, Almond; 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,- WAA 1, 2; Rural Life Club 1, 2. GERALDINE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Athens,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,-Newman Club 1, 2; WAA 1; Intramural Sports 1; Rural Life Club 1, 2. JUANITA ZADDACK, Shawano,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded; Rural Life Club 1, 2,- Rural Life Chorus 1. LOUELLA ZILLE, Neillsville,- 2 Yr. Rural State Graded,-YWCA 2; Rural Life Club 2. Page 160FACULTY INDEX Allen, Bessie May Burroughs, Leland M... Carlsten, Edna Colby, J. Donald Colman, Susan E Cutnaw, Mrs. Edith Davidoff, Adele Davis, Mildred G Dearborn, Frances R Delzell, W. D 22 23, 114 19, 109 18 15,16 13 25,108 19, 110 14 ... .12 Diehl, Leah L 14 Evans, Charles C . .. . 17 Finch, Mrs. Josephine 26 . .. .17 Hanna, Mary E 15 Hanson, Gertie L.. . 18 Herling, John P 20 Herrick, Alfred J 13 Jayne, C. D 14 Jenkins, Warren G 23 Jones, Jesse E 17 Knutzen, Norman E 23, 113 Kotai, Edward L 25, 114 La Vigne, Bessie... 15 Lindeman, June 27 Loomer, Zella 13, 108 Lyness, Arthur S 16 Mansur, Lulu M ....20 Marrs, Dr. Fred W... 26 Mason, Syole E 20 Matravers, Chester H 21 Meston, Helen 22 Michelsen, Peter J 19 Morrison, Robert 24 Mott, Joseph 21 Neal, Oscar W 15 Neuberger, Mary 26 Nixon, O. F 21, 22 Pfeiffer, Lydia 14 Pierce, Burton R 13 Pierson, Edgar 17 Reppen, Nels O 21 Rightsell, R. M 16, 113 Roach, May N 15 Rogers, T. A 16 Rolf son, Carolyn G 27 Schmeeckle, F. J 18, 114 Smith, E. T 11 Steiner, H. R 18, 24 Swallow, Marie D 27 Thompson, Victor E 21, 22 Tobias, Adda 13, 14 Tolo, Harold M 24, 113 Van Arsdale, Gladys 13, 14 Van Deraa, Mary Jane... . .. . 27 Watson, Charles F 18 Wilson, Emily W 22 Page 161Abb, Robert......... Abrahamson, Donald. Abrahamson, Doris... Abrahamson, Lennert. Ackerman, Jack...... Ahles, Ralph........ Albrecht, Joe....... Albright, Annette... Anderson, Anton----- Anderson, Carol..... Anderson, Cora Mae Anderson, Delbert... Anderson, Irene..... Anderson, John...... Anderson, Maurice.. Anderson, Phillip.... Anderson, Tony...... Anderson, Wilma----- Arndt, Roy......... Arvold, Franz....... Atkins, Eyleene..... Atwood, H. Mason. Aucutt, Donald...... Aulik, Robert....... Badten, William.... Baebenroth, Robert.. Bagnell, James...... Bailey, Nola........ Baird, James....... Baker, Robert....... Bandow, Art......... Barber, Agatha..... Barber, Luella..... Barber, Theodora---- Barden, Grace...... Barrett, Mary....... Bartkowiak, Joseph.. Bartosz, Wallace. ... Barwick, Richard--- Bathke, Elmer...... Becher, Margaret---- Becker, Robert...... Beilke, Ruth........ Bellile, Vernon.... Belongia, Blair.... Belongia, Reuben---- Bender, Susan...... Benke, Clarence.... Benke, Ray......... Benke, Virginia.... Benn, Marguerite---- Bennett, Alice..... Benson, Norman...... Berard, Robert..... Berg, George....... Berg, Rozella...... Bernstein, Rodger— Bestul, Bernice.... Binnebose, Gus..... STUDENT INDEX 55, 101, 113 95,101, 114 ....32, 101 .........30 .....53,97 ....30,112 95,128, 156 .........53 .....36, 40 .........31 ....91, 109 ....36,112 .....97, 101, 128, 156 ..............30, 114 ..............91, 105 ..............72, 112 ................32,96 ...................30 .............128, 156 .......92, 95, 96,101 40, 103, 115, 128, 156 .......40, 91, 97, 115 ..............31, 105 ...........115 54, 72, 74, 103 ............30 .91, 114 .....72 .....92 .....30 ..31, 32 .....31 ..31,95 ..55, 97 .97, 105 .....30 .....91 .91,105 .54, 115 .91, 109 .............30 72, 74, 128, 156 .........56 .........56 .........59 .....91, 110 55, 136,158 97, 128, 156 .........55 ....136, 158 .........30 ......36, 38 53, 136, 158 ..........55 Bird, Jewele............................................. Bishop, Robert...................36, 40, 97, 115, 128, 156 Bloom, Joe..............................103, 115, 128, 156 Bocher, Arnold...........................................112 Boe, Lillian.......................................54,108 Bohan, Fe...............36, 38, 72, 74, 113, 128, 135, 156 Booth, Melvin.............................................32 Borgen, Sidney...........................................31 Borham, Paul............................................112 Born, Linda..............................................53, 105 Borsk, Vernon............................................ Bowersock, Katherine......................................58 Bowker, Harriet..........................................31 Boyack, Louise............................................52 Brandt, Leota.........................92, 95, 96, 101,105 Brandt, U-Clair........................................136, 158 Bray, Joseph.........................................30, 97 Breeden, Eleanor.........................96, 111, 128, 156 Breitenstein, Charles.....................................56 Brientenstein, Peggy......................................56 Brennan, Dorothy..........................................30 Brennan, Patricia........................................32 Brenner, Kenneth........................................30, 78 Bretzke, Robert..........................................115 Briere, Mabel...........................................128, 156 Brill, Eugene.............................................56 Briselden, Ellajean......................................35 Brooks, Arvilla..........................................31 Brooks, George............................................52 Brown, Neal.........................97, 101, 112, 128, 156 Bruener, Mary Jane.......................................54 Brunner, Vincent..........................................32 Buchholz, Arnold..........................................32 Buchholz, Harold..........................................32 Budnik, Clara.............................................32 Budsberg, Luella.........................................31 Bukolt, John..............................................30 Burger, Raymond.........................................129, 156 Burkman, Robert..........................................91, 112 Burnett, Ruth.............................................59 Burroughs, Neva Jane.....................................108 Buse, Rhoda...............................................30 Butter, Mary Louise......................................31, 96 Byers, Jean..............................................96, 108 Byrne, Germaine....................................Ill, 129, 156 Calvert, Ralph........................................... Campbell, Elizabeth.......................................30 Cantlon, Loryn........................................... Carew, James.............................................97, 114 Carnahan, William........................................36, 114 Carr, Arthur.............................................91, 113 Cartmill, Phyllis.........................................56 Carver, Patricia................................31, 96, 101 Cashin, George...........................................112 Cashin, Jim..............................................38, 112 Cashin, Patricia.........................................108 Caskey, Chester...........................................30 Catlin, Elaine...........................................32, 96 Cattle, Janet.......................................54, 136, 158 Page 162Chapin, Glendy....... Check, John.......... Christie, Bethel..... Church, Lorraine...... Chylek, Bess......... Cieslewicz, Rosalie... Ciula, Raymond....... Ciula, Sophie........ Clark, Margaret...... Cody, Kathleen....... Coey, Eileen......... Coey, Harriet........ Colburn, William..... Conant, Robert....... Connor, Roger........ Conover, Gladys...... Cook, Jean........... Copper, Mary Kathryn Cornwell, Erma....... Cossette, Rolan...... Cottrill, James...... Craft, Gladys........ Cram, Laura.......... Crawford, Olive...... Cress, Elizabeth..... Cress, Samuel........ Crossgrove, Doris---- Crowley, Mary Jane.. Crummey, Eileen...... Curt, Loretta........ Cutler, Ruth......... Czajkowski, Julius.... Dakin, Philip....... Dakins, Frank........ Dana, Robert......... Daughhetee, Elva..... Davel, Madelyn....... Davidson, Verna...... Davies, Harold....... Davis, Jack......... Dawes, Berniece...... Dean, Anna Mae....... DeGolier, Phyllis.... DeHorn, Eileen...... Dent, Bette Lou..... Dietrich, Robert..... Dille, Theresa....... Dineen, Catherine---- Disher, Raymond...... Doan, Burton......... Dodge, Charles....... Doolittle, Wayne..... Dorsha, Gregory...... Drobnick, Lewis...... Druckrey, Neil....... Dubinski, Rosalyn.... Duecker, James....... Dunn, Helen.......... Durand, Edward...... Dvorsak, Verna....... Eastman, Ruth........ Eaton, Charlotte..... .....30 ......32 136, 158 ...91,96 .....53 .....32 .....32 .....30 ...54, 95 .....30 .....91 .....32 .........97 .........56 .........31 .........30 ....136,158 53, 136, 158 56 .......32, 95, 96, 101 ....................59 ..............129, 156 ....................30 ..............55, 109 ....................53 95, 101, 115, 129, 156 ....................55 ....................91 ....108, 109, 129, 156 ...................114 .....................59 ...............32, 108 ..........54, 136, 158 96, 105, 108, 129, 156 109 .....31 91, 114 .............101, 115 ...................91 ...............36, 38 ...78, 112, 129, 156 ...................75 ...................30 36, 39, 103, 129, 156 ...................91 .......115, 129, 156 .........54, 136, 158 31 Edwards, Margaret...... Eggen, Annette......... Ehlers, Jeanette...... Einfeldt, Edith........ Eisenhammer, Marie.... Enderlein, Ingeborg---- England, Ira........... Essex, Edgar........... Estey, Harvey.......... Eswein, Bruce.......... Evans, Fred............ Eveland, Evangeline---- Falk, Dorothy.......... Falk, Maxine........... Faulks, Helen.......... Faulks, Herbert........ Felix, John............ Felix, Robert......... Ferguson, Norma....... Fierek, Jeannette...... Fritzsinger, Jean...... Firkus, Evelyn......... Fisher, Robert......... Fitzke, Betty.......... Fletcher, Edith........ Floistad, Dorothy...... Flood, Dorothy......... Florence, Elroy........ Foley, Kenneth......... Folk, Rose............. Fonstad, Douglas....... Forbes, Iris........... France, Earlene........ Frane, John............ Frederick, Russell..... Freeman, Virgene....... Frisch, Ervin......... Fritsch, Ted.......... Fronek, Ervin......... Fronek, Norman......... Fryk, Malcolm.......... Fuchsgruber, Ruth..... Furnanek, Florian...... Garvue, Maxine........ Gear, Jack............ Gehrke, Keith......... Gehrke, Lucille........ Gerdes, Barbara........ Gericke, Viola......... Gertsch, Eugene........ Getkowski, Irene...... Giese, Richard........ Gilman, Gladys........ Gilman, Glendell....... Gleason, Betty Jane... Gleeson, Mary Anne.. Glen, Sofie............ Glennon, Ben.......... Golka, Orville......... Gonsiorowski, Norbert Gooch, Rosemary....... Goodman, Harold.... .....96, 109 53, 136, 158 .............129, 156 .............136, 158 .......54, 95, 96, 110 ...................56 ...................56 ...................56 ..................56 ..................31 .................. 60 ..................31 .........54, 137, 158 ..................53 ................53,97 .................114 ..................53 ..................92 96, 105, 111, 129, 156 .54, 137, 158 ........114 .........30 .........30 .........30 ......31,96 112, 130, 156 ..........31 .....53,101, 114 ....111, 130, 156 ...............30 .........30, 101 ...............97 54, 109, 137, 158 .......31, 55, 97 ......36, 39,112 ..............66 ..............66 .....53, 137, 158 ...............53 .....54, 137, 158 ...............32 ......32, 95, 101 ...............30 ........130, 156 .........92, 109 ...........91, 96 .31 .56 .96 105 .......Ill ..141, 159 ........56 31, 101 .....31 .....56 Page 163Goodrich, Joe.......... Gordon, Gwen.......... Grambsch, Lyle........ Gregory, L............ Gresens, Raymond...... Greve, Bernice....... Grimm, Lyle........... Grover, Betty......... Gruenke, Viola......... Gruenstern, Miriam.. . Gustin, Betty......... Guth, Herbert......... Grzegozewski, Edmund Hafner, Jerry......... Hager, Raymond........ Hager, Wayne.......... Hale, Florence........ Hale, Wayne........... Hales, Marie.......... Halla, Norman......... Halverson, Courtney... Halvorson, Gilbert.... Halvorson, Jeanette... Hamel, Louis.......... Hanig, James.......... Hannon, Elizabeth.... Hannon, Joseph....... Hansen, Eva........... Hanson, Anna Marie.. Hanson, Bob........... Hardy, Elaine......... Hardy, Lorraine....... Harrington, Gene....... Haugen, Hilda----- Hawkins, Ralph.... Heckman, Jean....... Hein, Betty......... Hennick, David...... Henninger, Harlow. Herman, Alice....... Hestad, Olaf....... Hickey, Anita....... Hierl, Gerald....... Higgins, Eileen..... Hill, Ethel......... Hill, Inez.......... Hillert, Evelyn..... Hills, Dale........ Hintz, Florence..... Hintz, Grace........ Hlava, Janet....... Hodell, Raymond... Hoffeman, Donald G Hoffman, Donald R... Hoffman, Elmer...... Holt, Olney......... Holts, Opal......... Holubetz, Victor. .. Honzig, Paul........ Houg, Katherine---- Houg, Marjorie...... Hotvedt, Elizabeth.. ..............36, 40 ..................53 ..................55 ..................32 ..................32 .............30,110 ..................30 -..........32,96 ............101, 108 53, 101, 103, 105, 109 ..................31 .............60 .............60 ..............32 ....53, 137, 158 ......31, 36, 78 ..............31 ......54, 95, 97 .......32, 53, 96 ...130,156, 101 ...36, 39, 78, 112 ..............105 ......53, 137, 158 ......53, 137, 158 ........56 ........56 ....53, 112 ..137, 158 ......54 .....114 130, 156 130, 156 .95, 101 130, 156 .....56 96, 130, 156 .......92, 105, 109 ............53, 105 ...........137, 158 ................32 ............30, 110 ......114, 130,156 ................32 ................97 ...............112 ................91 ...........137,158 ................32 ............54, 101 ......Ill, 130, 156 ................96 53, 55, 96, 103, 111 Hotvedt, John......... Hryniewicki, Henry.... Hucke, James........ Humke, Bernelds... . Humke, George...... Humke, Harold...... . Huntoon, Arlene. . . Ingersoll, Helen..... Ingham, Dorothy. . . Irish, Harold........ Jacobs, Marjorie... . Jacobson, Walter... Jahnke, Eleanora... . Jakel, Elaine....... Jarvis, Donald........ Jawart, Harold........ Jeneman, Harold....... Jensen, Anita......... Jensen, Charles....... Jensen, Joseph........ Jerzak, Jeannette..... Jester, La Vern....... Johnsen, Margaret. ... Johnson, Alberta...... Johnson, Bernard...... Johnson, Betty........ Johnson, Elaine....... Johnson, Evelyn....... Johnson, Helen....... Johnson, Jane........ Johnson, Jesse........ Johnson, Lorraine..... Johnson, Marcia....... Johnson, Marjorie..... Johnson, Robert....... Johnson, Virginia----- Johnson, Vivian....... Joosten, Beryl...... Joosten, Gloria....... Jordan, Celia......... Jorgens, Gaylord...... Jozwiak, Lawrence Judd, Eldred.......... Kahler, Harold........ Kalina, Joseph....... Kalkofen, Fred....... Kamke, Diana.......... Kaplun, Florence..... Kaplun, Rachael....... Karner, Elaine....... Karner, Margaret..... Kelley, John......... Kelly, Francis........ Kennedy, Pat.......... Ketchum, Howard....... Kingston, Alan........ Kingston, Dorothy..... Klake, Robert........ Klein, Anthony........ Knutson, Ula Mae...... Koehl, Leonard........ Koehn, Frank.......... .......91, 101 ....31, 36, 39 .............30 ............97 . ...97 .............91 . ..54, 137, 158 -.54, 101, 111 . ...91, 96, 109 ............97 ...........31 ............31 .............56 .............30 .....59, 116 .........114 ..........30 53, 138, 158 ...138, 158 .53, 55, 111 .............130, 156 ...92, 95, 96, 101, 111 ....................31 ....................59 ....................91 .........Ill, 130, 156 .............138, 158 .........108, 109, 156 ....................30 .............138, 158 ....................30 ....105, 108, 131, 156 ....................32 ....................55 ..........31, 101,110 .............138, 158 ....................91 ... . )5, 131, 156 ...................32 ....................30 ...................54 ....................36 ..............54, 111 ..................67 ..............31, 92 ....................59 ....................59 ..................101 ....................53 .........114, 131, 156 ....................31 ..............97,112 ....................59 ....................74 ...............54, 97 97, 111, 131, 136, 156 ..............30, 114 ...............36, 39 Page 164Kohler, Harold....... Kohler, Kathryn..... Koitun, Frank....... Kordus, Benjamin.... Kordus, Donald...... Korolev, Jordan..... Korth, Louise....... Koziowski, Harriet. . Kresh, Joe.......... Krider, Don......... Kroner.wetter, Henry Krueser, Veloris.... Kryshak, Edward. .. . Kudrowski, Frank---- Kufel, Myron........ Kulas, Leona........ Kulidas, James...... Kyhl, Janet......... La Brot, Adrian..... La Brot, Madeline... La Fleur, Jerry..... Lang, Louie......... Lange, Emert........ Langton, Tom........ Larkee, Florence---- Larsen, Joyce....... Larsen, Margaret---- Larson, Donald...... Larson, Dorothy..... Larson, Eleda....... Larson, Richard..... Larson, Robert...... La Valle, Laurel.... Lavers, Marilyn..... Lawrence, Mary.... Leach, Riley........ Lee, Madelyn........ Lee, Marion......... Le Gault, Lionel---- Lehman, Lester...... Lemke, Eunice....... Lensmire, Warren---- Lepak, Raymond...... Lepak, Stanley...... Lepinski, Theodore.. Leton, Don.......... Lewis, Donald....... Lewison, Gordon — Ley, Irene.......... Lind, Orville....... Line, Jack.......... Linehan, Alice...... Lloyd, Dorothy...... Loberg, Marjorie. . . Lochr.er, Mary Anne Lodzinski, Gregory.. Lonsdorf, Laverne. .. Lonsdorf, Viola..... Lorbiecki, Roman... Lotz, Helen......... Luck, Dorothy....... Lueck, Adeline...... .....101 101, 110 131, 157 ......31 .54, 113 138, 158 ...............56 ...............91 ...............30 ...............31 ...............32 .........130, 156 ...............91 55, 101, 105, 109 ...........30, 40 ...............32 .........97, 114 .........53, 111 ......31, 36, 101 .....78, 138, 158 .........31, 101 .....97, 138, 158 ...............92 .55,96, 105, 109 ........114 91, 96, 109 .. .138, 158 .....55, 97 ....91, 112 ...131, 157 .....53, 96 .........32 54, 96, 103, 109 ...........110 .............56 ......30 138, 158 131, 138, 157 ....54 ....54 55, 74 .... 32 ........60 ..131, 157 30, 96, 101 ....92, 105 .....138, 158 ............60 ....54, 139, 159 .......139, 158 .....91, 96, 105 ....96, 139, 159 Lueck, Verna........ Lukasavitz, Agnes... Lukasavitz, Arnold Lundgren, Ruby....... Lundgren, Virginia . . . Lundquist, Mae...... Lutz, George........ Luxem, Jean.......... Lyons, Emerald...... Lyons, Lorraine..... Maddy, Evelyn....... Madsen, Anita...... Maguire, Patricia-- Mailer, William..... Mainland, Ann..... Malchow, Leland... Malecke, Robert---- Malesveich, Zorka... Malick, Maurice..... Mancheski, Alex..... Manning, James...... Mannis, Israel....... Mansavage, Eugenia. . Markee, Patty....... Marotz, Edna........ Marshall, Carol..... Martini, Marceile.... McCormick, Alton____ McCormick, Bruce---- McDonald, William... McDiarmid, Donald... McGuire, Maxine----- McManners, Rollie. . . Mech, Melvin........ Megal, Chester...... Melchoir, Grace..... Menzel, Harold...... Menzel, Hortense — Menzel, Margie...... Merrill, Quenton---- Metcalf, Kathryn.... Metzger, William.... Meverden, Merville.. Meydam, Jean........ Michal, Terrence.... Michalske, Leone.... Miller, Charles..... Miller, Lucille..... Miller, William..... Mischnick, Ralph... Mittelsteadt, Karl.. Mohme, Gertrude... . Mollen, Raymond. . . . Moore, Arnold....... Moore, Helen........ Morency, Florence... Morrow, Myrtle... Moser, Orval........ Moslowske, Margaret Moss, Lavern........ Mott, Dorothy....... Moyer, Betty........ ....131, 157 ....139,159 .........30 .........30 . ...31,110 ......54, 96 ....139, 159 ..........96 ..........32 ..........54 ...96, 108, 109, 131, 157 .......................32 ......................115 ............Ill, 132, 157 .......................32 ................32, 101 .................132, 157 .......................53 ...................91, 97 .......................53 .....................101 .................139, 159 ..................31, 108 .......................91 .......................30 ..............55, 96, 103 .................132, 157 112 ........110 .....91, 101 55, 105, 112 59, 105, 108, 109, 132, 138, 157 .....................36, 39, 114 .............................55 ..............................55 .............................114 .............................30 ........................54, 101 ........................92,113 .................30, 95, 96, 101 .........................30, 36 ........................91, 109 ..............................54 ........................54, 109 .......................101, 114 ............................114 ..............................56 ....................132, 157 ..........53 ......132, 157 .....132, 157 ........31,110 .............53 .............31 53, 139, 159 ..........59 Page 165Mozuch, Fred....... Mozuch, Katherine. Mullarkey, Loy---- Munson, Shirley. .. Murat, James....... Mursatroyd, Evelyn. Murrish, Margaret.. Murty, Beverly..... Mussey, Alice..... Nedrest, H........ Nesard, Shirlee--- Nelson, Clarence.. Nelson, Dorothy... Nelson, Eleanore... Nelson, Gunvor. . . Nelson, Keith..... Nelson, Marjorie... Nelson, Ruth...... Nelson, Waldo.... Neuman, Kenneth.. Neuman, Lucille.... Neuenfeldt, James. Neve, Laura....... Newby, Raymond... Nieman, H......... Niggemann, Agatha Nikolai, Bill..... Ninman, Esther.... Nitka, Ed......... Nixon, Floyd...... Nixon, Robert...... Nockerts, Mary---- Noble, Ruth....... Nolan, Dolores---- Norby, Carol....... Norstant, Mary---- Norton, George. .. Nowak, Edward... Novitski, Rita.... Ocvirk, Marie...... O'Brien, Neal..... O'Connor, Virginia O'Doherty, Gerald. Okray, Grace....... Oik, Robert........ Oik, William...... Olsen, Elizabeth... Olson, James....... Olson, Lorraine---- Omernik, Stanley— Ophoven, Joseph.. O'Reilly, Basil... Ostrander, Robert. . Ostrowski, Alice. . . Otto, Roy.......... Owen, Isabell..... Pajkos, Julia...... Palukas, Sophie.... Park, Helen........ Parkel, Donna...... Parr, Kenneth...... Parrette, Richard-- ..........53,97 ....91, 96,109 ............114 .............59 ......132, 157 91, 96, 101,105 .......54, 109 .......32,108 .............30 .............53 ........32, 78 ....32, 95, 101 ....91, 96, 101 ......139, 159 .............30 .............92 .........32,96 54, 97, 103 .........53 ....96, 110 .........31 .....55, 101 ..........32 53, 139, 159 139, 159 ......30 .....112 .91, 115 ......32 ........110 54, 139, 159 54, 139, 159 ..................30 ................108 ................110 ..................55 .................109 ........97, 132, 157 96,103,111,132,157 ......72, 74, 91, 115 .................114 ...............30 ...............64 ...............30 115, 132, 137, 157 .......53, 105 .............31 .............38 .............31 .............32 ......132, 157 .............30 .............30 ........36, 38 55, 95, 97, 101 Pauelski, Dorothy.... Perry, Jack.......... Perry, Zona........... Peterson, Don......... Peterson, Earle....... Peterson, Howen Peterson, Lola....... Peterson, Norman Peterson, Wayne....... Pfiffner, Thomas...... Phaneuf, Duane........ Pickett, Audrey....... Piehl, Katheryn....... Piekarski, Ronald..... Pierce, Jane.......... Pionke, G............. Platta, Evelyn........ Pliner, Frank......... Pobiecke, John......... Poggemiller, Janet... Posluszny, Louis...... Pospychala, Henry. . . Precourt, Iris........ Prell, Selma.......... Preston, Helen........ Price, Alvin.......... Pronke, Gerald......... Pronz, Carolyn......... Purdy, Ruth........... Putz, Evelyn........... Quandt, George......... Raab, Earle........... Rabbitt, Clora........ Raddant, Dorothy. . . . Rade, Ray............. Rademacher, Gotelind Rades, Rolland........ Rajski, Roman......... Randorf, Helen........ Rathke, Ruth........... Reading, Robert....... Rector, Howard........ Redfield, Otis......... Redfield, Robert...... Redlin, lone.......... Reedal, George........ Reese, Louise......... Reichel, Charlotte____ Reichert, Mona........ Reineking, Norman— Reitan, Jack.......... Reitan, Marjorie....... Rezin, Jane............ Richards, Betty....... Riley, Donald.......... Rinehart, Mary Louise. Ritchie, Lucile........ Roberts, Guy........... Roberts, Denis........ Roberts, Marian....... Robertson, Richard----- Robison, Ruth.......... .....31 30, 101 .....31 55 140,159 ........112 ..........56 ......30,97 ....140, 159 92, 105, 109 53, 140, 159 ..........32 ..........30 ..........31 95, 101, 114 ....140, 159 .....55,105 ......36, 74 ..........72 ..........56 ..........96 .........30 97, 140, 159 .........140, 159 ...............59 ........140, 159 97, 133, 139, 157 ..............112 .....96, 140, 159 ......31, 96, 101 ...........30, 78 .....92, 105, 108 ..............112 ....53, 140, 159 92, 96, 105, 108 ..........36, 38 ...............30 ........114 59, 140, 159 .........32 .........92 .........96 ......54, 95 ......30,97 ........112 ....31,110 111, 133, 157 .........59 ... 140, 159 ....32, 101 53, 97, 113 .53,112 133, 157 Page 166Roder, Catherine...............................96, 140, 159 Rogers, Janette...........................................108 Rogers, Myrna..............................................54 Rohrbeck, Margaret.............................54, 141, 159 Rondeau, Gertrude................................30, 96, 110 Ropella, Leonard.......................................53, 78 Rose, Eileen...............................91, 96, 105, 111 Rouskey, Dorothy............................................30 Ruchti, Eleanor................105, 108, 109, 133, 134, 157 Ruka, Lloyd................................................ Ruppcl, Ernest..............................36, 40, 133, 157 Rusch, Edna................................................ Russell, Rita.............................................91, 111 Rust, Margaret.............................................54 Samples, Myra..............................................30 Sanborn, Richard..........................................53, 112 Sanders, Lewis.............................................30 Sandmire, Corinne........................................133, 157 Sappenfield, George........................................55 Sargeant, Marguerite.................................133, 157 Saxe, Elvira.........................................141, 159 Schafhauser, Adeline..............................;........54 Scheel, Harold.............................95, 101, 133, 157 Schelsnes, Ole............................................ Schmidt, Harold...........................................32, 36 Schneck, Dorothy....................................133, 157 Schneider, Frank..........................................115 Scheinert, Helen...........................................59 Schrank, Robert............................................53 Schrieber, Laura................................96, 141, 159 Schultz, Carl.............................................30 Schwartz, Anthony......................................... Schwierske, Frederick.....................................97 Schwingel, Evelyn.........95, 101, 103, 108, 109, 133, 157 Scribner, James...........................................97 Seffern, Duncan............................36, 39, 72, 74, 91 Seidel, Arthur......................................53r 114 Selves, Ruby.....................................54, 141, 159 Severns, Glenn............................................56 Severns, Murray...........................................56 Shafranski, Mary..........................................55 Sharkey, Myron.........................................31, 36 Shatrude, Rayfield........................................ Shier, Jane..........................................32, 110 Shipla, Otto....................................53, 141, 159 Shorey, Robert............................................114 Short, Elaine......................................141, 159 Shurley, Ruby..............................................31 Siebert, Earle..............................91, 97, 103, 113 Siebert, William.......................................... Sievwright, Harry..........................................53 Simonds, Inez..............................................31 Sindicie, Francis..........................................30 Sister Mary Henrica........................................ Sister Mary Perpetua...................................... Slabesheski, Harry..................................92, 113 Slotwinski, Edwin...........................36, 38, 133, 157 Smith, Anna.........................................30, 101 Smith, Betty...............................92, 103, 105, 109 Smith, Florence................103, 108, 109, 130, 133, 157 Smith, Gladys.............................................. Smith, LaRue....... Smith, Maurice----- Smith, Virginia---- Snell, Vernice..... Sniegoski, Angeiyn Soderberg, Doris.. Soeteber, Warren.. Solberg, Clarence.. Solie, Ronald....... Solverud, Louise... Sonnenberg, Evelyn Soppa, Marian------ Sorenson, Dorothy.. Sorenson, Margaret. Spencer, Ruth....... Spencer, Thelma... Spindler, Dearborn. Splitek, Frank...... Sprague, Clifford. .. Spry, Russell....... Stanislawski, Irene. . Stapel, Arthur...... Stedman, Adelyn... Stefl, Tyrus......... Steiner, Nancy....... Stelter, Ruth........ Stenz, Gene.......... Stertz, Francis...... Stewart, Lorna....... Stien, Donald........ Stimm, Howard........ Stoddard, Ward....... Stoehr, Myra......... Stoltenberg, Allan. . Stoltenberg, Charles. Stoltenberg, Ethel---- Stoltenberg, James. . Stoltenberg, Phillip.. Stoltenberg, Vivian.. Stone, Kathleen...... Strachota, Lucile. . .. Strajny, Frank....... Stromberg, Maynard. Strope, Virginia...... Suits, John........... Sullivan, James....... Swanson, Irene........ Sweeney, Millicent. . Swenson, Paul......... Swenson, Roy.......... Swiontek, Lucille.... Sybeldon, Florian.... Syms, James........... Taylor, Jack........... Terzynski, Pete........ Tetzler, Evelyn....... Theisen, Florence...... Thielke, Glen......... Thompson, John......... Thompson, Mabel........ Thompson, Margery... Thompson, Maurice— 115, 133, 134, 157 .36, 39, 72, 74, 91 ..........134, 157 ......53, 141, 159 .53, 101, 103, 105 ..92, 96, 103, 111 53 ....................31 .........103, 134, 157 ..............141, 159 .....................92 .....................30 ....................30 ...........54, 141, 159 97, 113, 131, 134, 157 .....53, 105, 141, 159 ..........97, 134, 157 ...............53, 97 ..................31 ....97, 112, 134, 157 .......................109 .......................109 ........................56 .......................31 .................141,159 .......................114 ..................78,114 ...................31, 97 .............54, 142, 159 .......................32 .......................31 .................134, 157 .......................31 .......................32 96, 103, 105, 134, 142, 158 .................101 ..................56 ..................56 ............142, 159 ..................96 ..................32 ..................30 36, 39, 103, 105, 115 .................113 ..............72, 74 .................30 .....32, 96, 101, 110 .................56 .................30 .............53, 101 ..........30,95,101 Page 167Thomsen, Lilyan..... Thorson, Philip.... Thousand, Doris..... Thusing, Gerald.... Tiderman, Robert.... Tiffany, Janet...... Tohm, Clarence...... Topping, May........ Torkelson, Elida.... Torkelson, Elouise. .. Torkelson, Gerald . .. Torkelson, Harold. . Trader, Ruth........ Trankle, Herbert--- Treder, Joseph...... Trowbridge, Leslie.. Trowbridge, Robert. Turecek, Jack....... Turner, Shirley..... Tuszka, Dorothy..... Tushinski, Evelyn. . . . Twist, Crystal...... Tyler, Katharine.... Unger, James........ Unger, Robert....... Upright, Herbert.... Urbanowski, Ralph. . Van Dyke, La Vern. Van Natta, Janette.. Van Natta, Marjorie Van Slett, Marie---- Veers, Catherine . . . Vig, Ellen......... Vig, Leonard........ Vincent, Jack...... Vogedes, Lucille. . . Vonerlieth, 8etty.. . Vranesh, Gertrude. . Waag, Melba........ Wachholz, Edward. Wagner, Alice....... Wallace, June....... Walsh, Francis...... Walter, Aloha....... Warner, Donald.. .. Warner, Henry....... ..........32, 105 ....115, 134, 158 ......142,159 ...............56 ...............31 ..........96, 153 ..........53, 78 ..........53, 101 96, 134, 140, 158 96, 134, 140, 158 ..........97, 113 ..........53, 97 ...............30 ....36, 38, 72, 74 ...............31 .........134, 158 ...............54 ...............32 ...............32 ...............32 ...............54 ..........96, 108 .......54, 97, 113 97, 103, 105, 135 97, 129, 135, 158 .........36,38, 72,74,113 ......96, 105, 132, 135, 158 .........................30 .........................30 .........................30 ....................31, 110 .........................56 ....................97, 113 .........................92 ......................32,95 ...................142, 159 ....................30, 96 ....................92, 97 ...............53, 103, 111 .........................32 .........................97 ...............54, 96, 111 ....................30, 105 36, 39, 72, 74, 113, 135, 158 Warner, Marjorie...... Weiher, Lucille....... Weiler, Margareth..... Weingartner, Francis.. Weinholt, James...... Weisser, Natalie...... Weller, Lois.......... Wendorf, Fay.......... Werner, Norman........ Wheeler, Wallace...... Wickman, Alice........ Wickman, Helen........ Wied, Lois........... Wiersig, Raymond...... Wieszorek, Florence... . Wilkins, Orville Williams, Claire Williamson, Rachel... Winarski, Grace Winch, LaRae. . Winkler, William.... Winsor, William--- Wirkus, Carmelita . . . Wishlinski, Thomas Wogsland, Lorraine.... Wojciechowski, Geraldine Wood, Isla Worzalla, Alice...... Worzalla, Loretta.... Wright, Clayton. Wunsch, Melvin Yerke, Grace Yokers, Lloyd Yost, Marvin Young, Dan Yulga, Bernard Yurkovish, John Zabrowski, August Zabrowski, Ernest Zaddack, Juanita Zelmer, Mary Zetsche, Robert Zielhke, John Zill, Evelyn... Zille, Louella. Zuege, Harold . ...105, 110, 135, 158 ...............54, 111 ................142, 159 ...........113, 135, 158 .................101 ...............54 ....................32 ......53, 103, 110 .................54, 103 ................135, 158 ......................30 ......................31 ............54, 142, 159 ...40, 72, 113, 135, 158 ..........30 ..........32 111, 135, 158 ..........30 ........91,95 ..92,96, 111 .........135, 158 .92, 96, 103, 111 ....31, 101,114 .............32 ..............54 .........31, 96 ..............110 ........91, 110 ....53, 101 .........30 .........53 ....95, 101 ......78, 91 ....135,158 97, 135, 158 142,159 .....59 .....60 .53, 114 142, 154, 159 ...........32 Page 168


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