University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI)

 - Class of 1937

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University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 164 of the 1937 volume:

C- i'VK ) v i (Z ‘ ,. o- A Cdxi sTA f i UNIVERSITY £ 5 ARCHIVES r? THEPublished by the Junior Cl ass for the Student Body of the Central State Teachers College STEVENS POINT WISCONSINo T° give you an illustrated chronicle of life at Central State Teachers College . . . that has been our purpose. May this 1937 yearbook be a worthy member of that dignified series of Irises that have preceded it. Humbly we present this Iris. We hope you like it.DEDICATION To one, who through conscientious endeavor has made Central State Teachers College a greater institution. To one, whose love of nature and interest in the great out-of-doors is unsurpassed. To one, whose kindly, helping hand has aided many in distress. To a real friend, Professor F. J. Schmeeckle, we, the Class of 1938, take great pleasure in dedicating our book.ONTLNTS BOOK ONE THE COLLEGE BOOK TWO COLLEGIATE BOOK THREE ATHLETICS BOOK FOUR FEATURESNelson Hall Entrance Page to- - ' • • • • ‘ • w • rv V Nelson Hall Fagt ijTraining School Page 14The Ad ministrationPRtSIDtNT MYtR As a parting word, permit me to express to you students who read these lines my sincere appreciation for the many fine things which you have said and done and for the exceptionally fine spirit which you have so continually manifested toward all of the better things of college life. Your Alma Mater has been particularly successful in all of its activities during the past year because you have so willingly and cheerfully done your part. If you enter into your professional life with the same fine attitude that has characterized your student life, success in marked measure should be yours. Personally, I shall always remember with joy the years spent with you, and my good wishes will go with you through life. Yours sincerely,REGENT MARTENS Herbert Spencer said that the function of education is to prepare one for complete living. The keynote of a full life is service to others. That entails not only forgetfulness of self, but also real self-sacrifice. Paradoxical as it may seem, happiness and contentment are attained to a fuller degree by a life consecrated to the service of others rather than by one dedicated solely, or even principally, to self. In training you young men and young women for your future careers, Central State Teachers College has that aphorism constantly in mind. Its faculty has emphatically demonstrated that it is imbued with the principle of doing for others unselfishly on many occasions, especially in giving its time freely and whole-heartedly to the work of the night school without expectations of any reward other than the satisfaction that doing for others gives. No class of individuals has so many opportunities for social service as have teachers of the young and adolescent. No class does more to regulate the habits and thus mold the characters of our future men and women. The school-room is a worthy adjunct of the home and of the church. It supplements and completes the work of each. This trinity—the home, the church, and the school —pre-eminently exemplifies the spirit of unselfish devotion for the good of others. Yours, young men and young women, is a high calling. If you carry with you through life the ideas and ideals mculcoted at Central State, your careers will be thoroughly happy and contented ones—ones devoted principally to the welfare of your fellow-man.DEAN STEINER Whether by accident or design, every institution from a popcorn stand to o mail order house is an advertiser. Central State Teachers College is no exception to this rule. A school's curricular and extra-curricular status is revealed partially through its student publications and its official bulletins. The athletic renaissance of the past few years, a new high in forensics, and the growth in number and quality of its musical organizations, all indicate the health and vigor of Central State. A study of the recent curricular changes and a comparison of the physical plont of a few years ago with that of the present would show many important improvements. The comparison would become a contrast which would make interesting copy in any prospectus. But the generous use of printer's ink alone does not constitute all of a successful advertising program; the influence of this college will manifest itself in the lives of its students. Their success or failure is the product by which the institution must be judged. Advertising of this kind is permanent and effective. I'agt iq INTERESTING FACULTY MAY ROACH Although Miss Roach is affiliated chiefly with the rural department of the school, everyone knows her. She is much in demand os a club speaker and always graciously obliges—has as much, if not far more, of the well-known “school spirit” as anyone faculty or student. She is the answer to a freshman's prayer, having that rare ability of being oble to make you her friend at first sight. She has a smile and a good word for everyone. The annual homocoming wouldn't be the same without her pep-talk. She throws her support whole-heartedly behind any constructive movement in school. EDDIE KOTAL The Builder of Champions—witnessed a championship in either football or basketball, or both, ever since he come in 1930— athletics was practically at a stand still when he came—played pro ball with the Green Bay Packers for four years—has the most complete line of after-dinner, before-breakfost, and anytime jokes of anyone wo know, and doesn't hesitate to entertain with theml—superstitious os they come where his team's concerned —insists on the bus’ driving out of town the same way on all athletic trips—honorary member of Kappa Chapter of Phi Sigma Epsilon. SUSAN COLMAN Our choice for THE popular teacher. Her office is the meeting place for a representative group of students from all departments of the school. A friend and confidant of all is she. Director of the primary department—is probably responsible in great part for the startling increase in enrollment there in the last few years—originally went to school and taught in Superior— imported from Whitewater, here—is working for her Ph.D. in education -studies and uses the latest teaching methods in her courses —secret ambition is to retire and relax in the Southland not for a long time, we hope1 Page 20 RAYMOND RIGHTSELL A mon who, besides doing a marvelous job in his physics classes, is interested in many hobbies. He has several patents on his inventions. He is a marvelous billiard player, a keen and appreciative sportsman. He reloxes in h»s cottage. It’s WAY up thar, in the deep forests of northern Wisconsin—enjoys astronomy, among other branches of physics—is meticulous end exact in all that he does -knows his subject and ccn put it across to anyone—is very well liked by all his students. He is on honorary member of Chi Delta Rho. PETER MICHELSEN Mr. Michelsen hos been with us for six years. During that time he has built from the bottom, a musicol department which ranks with the foremost in the state. He is a recognized authority in the musical world, having been a member of the American Bandmasters' Association since 1932 has studied under such masters as Grieg -played as flutist in the Notional Band and Orchestra of Norway—has judged state band tournaments in several surrounding states came to this country in 1909 -is a graduate of the Vonder-Cook School of Music in Chicago— is also a builder of champions musically possesses one of the keenest wits of the college—is well liked by all his students. BEATRICE RICHARDSON Come to this school lost year and has mode brilliant progress as head of Women's Athletics. Against the advice of many of her friends, she has acquired a Plymouth. She maintains that in spite of reports to the contrary, she likes it! —has been doing great work olong lines of interpretive and creative dancing both in the college and the training school works efficiently and untiringly, always having a definite goal and getting there in record time. A friend to all, the "woman coach" as she is affectionately called, has a great many friends. She is an honor-ary member of Tau Gamma Beta. INTERESTING FACULTY Page 2lAllen, Bessie May Iowa State Teachers College. Columbia U., B.S., M.A. Graduate study: U. of Chicago, Columbia U. Home Economics, Social Science. Aller. George C. U of Washington, B.A. School of Library Service, Columbia U., B.S., M.A. Library Science. Bauer, Betty Mae Western Illinois State Teachers College. Junior Collego Diploma, B.E. U. of Chicago, M.A. Training teacher, Second grade. Burroughs, Leland M. Wabash College, A.B. U. of Michigan, M.A, Graduote: King's College of Oratory. English Speech. Carlsten, Edna C. Art Institute, Chicogo B.A.E. Art. Church, Nancy Jane Columbia U., B.S. Clothing, Textiles, Costume design. Collins, Joseph V. U. of Wooster, Pn.B., Ph.D. Mathematics. Davis, Mildred U. of Iowa, B.A., M.A. Graduate work. Foreign Travel, Study. French, English Literature. FACULTY Page 12FACULTY Faust, Gilbert W. Finch, Josephine M. U. of Wisconsin, 8.S. House Mother, Nelson Hall. Chemistry. Diehl, Leah L. U. of Chicago, Ph.B., M.A. Training teacher. Fourth grade. Evans, Charles C. Ohio Wesleyan U-, B.Sc. Chicaqo U., M.S. Bacteriology, Biology, Physiology, Anatomy, Geology. Hanna, Mary E. Central State Teachers College, B.S. Graduate study: U. of Wisconsin. English, Geography. Hanson, Gertie L. U. of Wisconsin, Ph.B., Ph.M Troining teacher. Junior High School. Hart, Margaret U. of Wisconsin, Ph.B., Ph.M. Troining teacher, Sixth grade. Heilman, Garnet Secretary, Advanced Stand ing Committee. FACULTY Herrick, Alfred James U. of Wisconsin, Ph.B. Graduate work: U. of Wisconsin, U. of Minnesota, U. of Chicago. Training School Principal. Horton, Ethel Sue Beloit College, B.A., U. of Wisconsin, M.A., U. of Minnesota, Ph.O. Biology, Botany. Jayne, Clarence D. U. of Washington, A.B. Training Teacher, Intermediate Department. Leave of absence. Jenkins, Warren Gard Miami U., A.B., U. of Wisconsin, M A. American History, American Literature. Jones, Jessie E. U. or Wisconsin, Ph.B., U. of Chicago, M.A. Botany, Biology. Knutzen, Norman E. Lawrence College, A.B., A.M., U. of Chicago. English. La Vigne, Bessie U. of Minnesota, 8.S. Rural Demonstration School. Lyness, Arthur S. Kansas State Teachers College, B.S., U. of Iowa, M.S., Ph.D. Training Teacher, Junior High School. Page 24Mansur, Lulu M. Library School, Columbia U. Librarian. Mott, Joseph National University, M.A. English, Education. Mason, Syble Ethel Central State Teachers College, B.E. Librarian. Neale, Oscar Fremont College, B.S. Mathematics, Social Science, Picture Study. Matravers, Chester H. U. of Wisconsin, Ph.B., Ph.M. Teachers College, Columbio, Candidate for Ed.D. Philosophy, Psychology, Education. Neuberger, Mary K. St. Joseph's Hospital, Milwaukee, R.N. School Nurse. Meston, Helen Doane College, B.S. Columbia U., B.S., M.A. Home Economics, English. Pfeiffer, Lydia Marie U. of Wisconsin, Ph.B., Columbia U., M.A. Training Teachor, Fifth grade. FACULTY i'oir 2$ Pierce, Burton R. Ripon College, Ph.B. Junior High School Principol. Reppen, Nels O. U. of Wisconsin, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. History, Social Science. Rogers, Thomas A. Illinois Wesleyan U., B.S. Pennsylvania State College, M.i Chemistry. Rolfson, Carolyn G. Financial Secretary-Treasurer Schmeeckle, Fred J. State Teachers College, Kearney, Nebroska, A.8. U. of Minnesota, M.S. Agriculture, Chemistry, General Science. Smith, Ernest T. Bowdoin College, A.B., U. of Chicago, M.A. History, Social Science. Stein, George V. Chief Engineer. Steiner, H. R. U of Wisconsin, Ph.B., Ph.M. Graduate Study: Harvard. History, Social Science. FACULTY Pag 26FACULTY Swallow, Marie Training School Secretory. Van Arsdale, Gladys Iowa State Teachers College, B.A., Columbio U., M.A. Primary Techniques. Training Teacher, Third grade. Thompson, Victor E. Stout Institute U. of Wisconsin, Ph.B., Ph.M. Graduate work U. of Wisconsin, U. of Colorado. Industrial Arts, Mathematics. Van Deraa, Mary Jane Office Secretary. Tobias, Adda U. of Chicogo, Ph.B., Teachers College, Columbio U., M. A. Training Teacher, First grade. Watson, Charles F. U. of Chicago. B.S., M.S. Geography. Tolo, Harold Michael Luther College, Decorah, Iowa, B.A., U. of Minnesota, M.A., U. of Illinois, PhD. History. Wilson, Emily Kansas State Teachers College, B.S., U. of Chicago, Pn.B., Kansas State College, M.S. Home Economics. Page 27SIGNS OF LIFE Heovy date? Unit outline? Ready! Assistant editor -John. Literary minded. Overworked "This Year's Crop of Kisses" | Where's the soap box'? Pagf ClassesSENIORS Abondschein, William W. White Lake, Wisconsin Four Yeor H. S. Course,- Major: History,- Forum 2, 3, 4; Sigma Tau Delta 4. Anderson, Lorraine Elizabeth Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Yeor High School Course; Major: English; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Bond 1, 2, 3, 4. Bartz, Clarence R. Westfield, Wisconsin Three Year Intermediate Course; Round Table 1, 2, 3. Bossier, Ledo Marie Almond, Wisconsin Four Year Primary Course,- Primary Council 1, 2, 3, 4,- Omega Mu Chi 2, 3, 4: Orchestra 2; Band 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, Secretory-Treasurer 3, President 4; Tennis 1; Dramatics 1, 2, 3, 4. Berger, Lo Verne Edna Mattoon, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Rural Life Club 1, 2; Anderson, Dorothy Mae Waupaca, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Y. W. C. A. 2. Andrzejek, Christine Agnes Pulaski, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 1, 2. Bossier, Ellery Frost Almond, Wisconsin Four Year H. $. Course, Majors: Mathematics, History; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Sigma Zeta 3, 4; Chi Delta Rho 2, Secretary 3, President 4; Greek Council President 4; Pointer Circulation Manager 3, Business Manager 4,- Band 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2, 3. Baxter, Leta E. Stretford, Wisconsin Two Year Intermediate Course Major. Enalish; Round Table 1,2; Y. W.C A. 2; Glee Club 2. Bortz, Edna T. Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Major: Geography; Round Table 1, 2, 3; Rural Life Club 4. Paf-f joBurmoister, Verna Margaret Marshfield, Wisconsin Four Year Primary Course, Major: English; Primary Council 2, 3, 4; Rural Life Club 1, Y. W. C. A. 1, 3, 4. Cieslewicz, Annette Marie Rosholt, Wisconsin Two Year Rural State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 1, 2. Collins, Walter Alexander White Lake, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course,- Major: Biological Science; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Boxing. Carlson, Edith Ingram, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2,- Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. Coleman, Leone Butternut, Wisconsin Four Year Rural Supervision Course; Major: Geography; Rural Life Club 2, 3, 4, Y. W. C. A. 2, Glee Club 2, 3, 4. Dahlberg, Ebbo Merrill, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Major: History,- Rural Life Club 1 2. Doughty, Jenette Ogdensburg, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course, Rural Life Club 1, 2; Iris 2. Drobnick, Lewis H. Gleason, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course. Rural Life Club 1, 2; Football 1. Egaer, Mortho L. Marshfield, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Rural Life Club 1, 2. Eiicksen, Jeannette Marie Denmark, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-Stote Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2. SENIORS ? gf 3 Folkowski, Cecile Pulaski, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Major: History; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4; W. A. A. 3, 4. Gaffney, Marion Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course,- Major: History; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyolo 1, 2, 3; W. A. A. 2, 3, 4. Gohrke, Avis L. Wautoma, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Rural Life Club 1, 2. Glodoske, Nancy Amherst Junction, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course, Rural Life Club 1, 2, Loyola 1, 2. Fletcher, Eileen Marian Amherst, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Rural Life Club 1, 2. Gajewski, Virginia V. Pulaski, Wisconsin Four Year H. $. Course; Majors: English; History; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigmo Tou Delta 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4, Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4; W. A. A. 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Basketball; Tennis. Gigstad, Marie S. Bonduel, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Rural Life Club 1, 2; W. A. A. 1, 2. Goldberg, Ben Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course Major: English, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Tau Delta 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Bond 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4. SENIORS rage 32SENIORS Guth, Bernice E. Bancroft, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-Stato Graded Course,- Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 1, 2. Hayes, Lloyd Raymond Woodruff, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Major: History, Forum 1, 3, 4; 'S" Club 4,- Boxing 1, 3, 4. Hilber, Leo Francis Marathon, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 1, 2. Houle, Adele Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Major: Home Economics,- Homo Ec. Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4. Jaken, Emilic E. Mosmee, Wisconsin Four Year Intermediate Course; Major: English; Round Table 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4. Hamrick, Genevieve Elizabeth Curtiss, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rurol Life Club 1, 2. Hein, Paul Samuel Spencer, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Rural Life Club 1, President 2, Glee Club 1, 2. Hotvedt, Arnold Ralph Rosholt, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Major: General Science,- Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Zeto 3, 4, Bloc 3, President 4. Phi Sigma Epsilon 2, 3, President, Corrosponding-Secretary 4; Greek Council 4; Iris 3; Editor, Student Directory. Hovda, Fay© Clear Lake, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Rural Life Club 1, Secretary 2; Pep Club 2, Vice-President 2, Ins 2; Basketball 1. Johnson, Ellen M. Neillsville, Wisconsin Two Yeor Primary Course; Primary Council 1, 2. 1 al 33SENIORS Johnson, Evangeline Carrie Racine, Wisconsin Four Year Junior High School Course,- Mojor: English; Round Table 1, 2, 3, 4, Y. W. C. A. 1 Pointer 4; Glee Club 3. Johnson, Lois E. Edgar, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Rural Life Club 1, 2; Y. W. C. A. 1; W. A. A. 1. Jost, Margaret D. Stratford, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 2. Kissinger, Louise Kiel, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course,- Major: Home Economics, Home Ec. Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3. 4. Knutson, Thelmo lolo, Wisconsin Three Year Intermediate Course; Major: History; Round Table 1, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A.; Omega Mu Chi 3; Glee Club 1, Vice-President 2, 3. Koshollek, Gertrude Ann Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Major: English, History; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4; W. A. A. Kezeski, Ernest Andrew Custer, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2,-Loyolo 1, 2. Klug, Vivian Arlino Owen, Wisconsin Two Year Rural State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2. Konieczko, Bernice M. Mosinee, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 1, 2. Krepsky, Genevieve M. Colby, Wisconsin Four Year Primary Course; Primary Council 1, 2, 3, 4,- Lovola 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Page .14Kugel, Agnes J. Abbotsford, Wisconsin Two Yeor Rurol-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 1, 2. Ladwiq, Clara E. Lethenstrom, Ruth Antigo, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Majors: History, Geography; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Round Table 1, 2; Loyola 2, 3, 4. Kulwiec, Emclia Lublin, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-Stcte Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2. Leiser, Donald R. Pittsivlle, Wisconsin Four Year H. b. Course; Major: General Science; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Glee Club 3, 4. Likes, P. Kirkwood Randolph, Wisconsin Four Year Rural-State Graded Principal Course; Major: History; Rural Life Club 1, 2, Pres. 3, 4; Sigma Tau Delta 4; Bloc 4, Glee Club 2, 3, President 4, Chorus 2, 3. Lilkok, Montello Hazel Gordon, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2. McCulloch, Margery J. Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Majors: History, Mathematics; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Tau Delta 3, Secretary 4; Sigma Zeta 3, Recording-Trecsurer A, Y. W. C. A. 3; Iris 4. McHugh, Grace Haider, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, Vice-President 2, Loyola 1, 2; Iris 2; Pointer 1. McVey, Anita Withee, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Major: Home Economics; Home Ec. Club 1, 2, Vice-President 3, 4; Forum 2, 3, 4; Sigma Zeta 2, 3, 4, Y. W. C. A. 3, 4 W. A. A. 2, 3, President 4; Omego Mu Chi 2, 3, Treasurer 4. SENIORS P V 3SMcWilliams, Roberta Westfield, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course,- Major: English Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, Cabinet Member 4, W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 4; Pointer 4, Band 1, 2; Glee Club 3, 4. Maguire, Mark W, Mosinee, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Majors: English, History; Forum 3, 4. Malsheski, Mary Donald, Wisconsin Three Year Intermediate Course; Major: History; Round Table 1,2, 3,-Loyola 1,2, 3, W. A. A. 2, 3; Basketball 1, 3. Meath, Stella Cylon, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course,- Major: Home-Economics, Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4. Maguire, Eileen Kathleen Haider, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2, Loyola 1, 2. Maicr, John E. Medford, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Major: Mathematics; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Zeta 4; Chi Delto Rho 2, 3, Secretary 4; Pointer 4. Mannigel, Bernice A. Marshfield, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2. Meinke, Lila P. Westfield, Wisconsin Three Year Intermediate Course,-Major: English; Round Table 1, 2, 3. Menzel, Alfred Ted” Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course,- Major: General Science; Class President 3; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Bloc 2, 3, 4, "S" Club 1, 2, President 3, 4, Chi Delta Rho 2, 3, President 4; Greek Council 4; Football 1, 2, Captain 3, 4 Tennis 1, 2. Miner, Maxine Marion Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Major: Generol Science,- Class Secretary 4. Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Tau Delta 3, Historian 4, Sigma Zeta 3, Master Scientist 4; W. A. A. 2, President 3, 4; Omega Mu Chi 2, 3, Vice-President 4; Iris 3, Assistant Business Manager Pointer 2, 3, 4,- Glee Club 4. Page 36 SENIORSSENIORS £2 LL 12 22. Morency, Marion A. Three Lakes, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Majors: Chemistry, Biology,- Forum 2, 3, 4, Primary Council 1 ; Loyola 2, 3, 4; Band 1. Murgotroyd, Phyllis Dawn Vesper, Wisconsin Four Year Primary Course; Primary Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Nason, Maurine Dickson Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Major: Home Economics; Home Economics Club 3, 4; Forum 3, 4. Nelson, Jeannette A. Glen Flora, Wisconsin Two Year Rurol-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 2. Oik, Alice E. Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course,- Major: History; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Tau Gamma Beta 1, 2, 3, Vice-President 4. Olson, Leonard J. lola, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Major: English; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1. Osterhaus, George Robert Plainfield, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Rural Life Club 1, 2 Glee Club. Owen, Margaret Elizabeth Stevens Pointy Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Majors: Mathematics, General Science; Forum 1. 2, 3, 4i Y. W. C. A. 3, 4; Photo Club 3, 4. Patterson, M. Marie Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year Rural-State Graded Principal Course; Primary Council 1, 2, Rurol Life Club 3, 4; Sigma Tou Delta 4. Paulson, Ruth Galloway, Wisconsin Four Year H. $. Course; Major: History; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4. 37SENIORS Pfiffner, Dorothy Kathryn Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. $. Course, Major: English; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4 Tau Gamma Beta 1, 2, 3, 4. Pingel, Ben J. Bonduel, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2. Pingel, John Henry Bonduel, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course, Rural Life Club 1, 2. Pophal, Gilbert E. Merrill, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Major: History; Senior Class Vice-President; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, "S" Club 3, 4, Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Delta Rho 4. Powloss, Lo Pearl C. West de Pere, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2. Prusow, Libby Marshfield, Wisconsin Four Year Intermediate; Major: History; Round Table 1, 2, 3. 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; W A. A. 1; Tennis 1. Reichert, Harold D. Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year High School Course, Major: Biology, Forum 1, 2,3,4; Loyola 1, 2, 3, 4, S” Club 2, 3, 4, Glee Club 1, 4; Dramatics 3,4, Football 2, Track 1, 2,4. Rice, Irma A. Plainfield, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Groded Course; Rural Life Club 1, Vice-President 2,- W. A. A. 1, 2, Pep Club 2. Rosenow, Laura Jane Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year Primory Course; Primary Council 1, 2, 3, President 4; Tau Gamma Beta 2, Vice-President 3, Secretary 4; Iris 2; Greek Council 4. Rosicky. Helen Junction City, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course, Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 1, 2. Schetter, Margaret Mattoon, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. Schleicher, Beulah E. Almond, Wisconsin Four Year Intermediate Course; Major: History; Round Table 1. 2, 3, Secretary-Trecsurer 4; Y. W. C. A. 3, 4; Tau Gamma Beta 4; Band 1, 2. Schoeneck, Adeline M. Enterprise, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course Rural Life Club 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2. Schroeder, Adeline Popp Shawano, Wisconsin Four Yecr H. S. Course; Major: History; Forum 3, 4, Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 3,- Basketball 1. Schwebke, Regina Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year Primory Course; Primary Council 1, 2, President 3, 4; Tau Gammo Beta 2, Secretary 3, President 4; Greek Council 4; Glee Club 3, Sindicic. Clementine Catherine Eagle River, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rurol Life Club 1, 2. Slotwinski, Bronislaus Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Mcjor: Chemistry; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Zeta 4, "S" Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Boxing 1, 2. Smith, Peter Gleason, Wisconsin Four Year H. 5. Course; Majors: History, General Science; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Chi Delta Rho 4. Soppa, Helen Arcadia, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course, Rural Life Club 1, 2, Loyolo 1, 2. Sporhawk Chorles H. Plover, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Major: History; Class Vice-President 3, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4.- "S” Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Track 1, 2, 3, 4, Boxing 1, 2, 3, 4.Staffon, George W. City Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Major: History, Forum 1, 2, 3, A, Basketball 1, 2 Baseball 1. Stiebs, Ardella Monawa, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2, Gamma Delta 1, 2; W. A. A. 1, 2. Stiehm, Floy Ellen Catawba, Wisconsin Two Year Rurol-Stote Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2. Swanson, La Verne R. Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Yeor H. S. Course, Major: Chemistry; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Sigma Zeta 4, Photo Club 2, 3, 4. Swenson, Carroll H. Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Major: English; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Tau Delta 4, Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Theilig, Adela Athens, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2. Theisen, William A. Loyal, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course,- Major: Mathematics; Closs President 2; Forum 1, 2, 3, President A, Sigma Zeta 2, 3, 4, Loyola 1, 2, President 3, 4; Chi Delta Rho 1, 2, Treasurer 3, 4; Pointer 2, 3, Editor 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, Vice-President 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, Librarian 2, 3, 4. Treptow, Valeria M. Tigerton, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2. Urbans, Ray M. Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course,- Mojor: Mathematics; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Loyola 1, 2, 3, A, "S” Club 1, 2, Secretary-Treasurer 3, 4, Chi Delta Rho 1, Secretary 2, 3, Manager 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3. Tubbs. Maxine J Plainfield, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course, Rurol Life Club 1, 2. SENIORS Pate joSENIORS Van Hoosen, George W. Mouston, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Iris 1, 2; Glee Club 2. Wachtl, Grace M. Holder, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 1, 2. Workois, Evelyne J. Rhinelander, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. (bourse; Mojor: Home Economics; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Forum 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 3, 4, W. A. A. 3, 4. Weed. Zeldo ■’Billie" Plainheld, Wisconsin Four Year Primary Course; Senior Class Treasurer; Primary Council 1, 2, 3, Vice-President 4; Omega Mu Chi 1, 2, Secretary 3, 4; Bond 1; Glee Club 1, Secretary 2, 3. Willecke, Gerhart K. Unitv, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Major: General Science; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Round Table 2; Iris 2; Oratory 2; Radio Announcer 4, Bloc 4. Vogc-des, Lucil.e E. Marathon, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 2. Wadxinski, Frank, Jr. Marathon, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 1, 2. Webster, Shirley Josephine Adams, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Mojor: English, Forum 1, 2, 3. 4; Sigma Tou Delta 4; Omega Mu Chi 2, 3, President 4 Greek Council 4; Pointer 1, 2; Debate 4; Glee Club 1, 2 4. Week, Lolita Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Major: History; Forum 1, 2, 4; W. A. A. 1, 2, 4, Omega Mu Chi 1, 2, 4; Pointer 4, Basketball 1, 2, 4, Tennis 1, 2, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 4; Volleyball 2. Werner, Mildred Arnetta Edgar, Wisconsin Three Year Junior High School Course; Major: English; Round Table 1, 2, 3; Sigma Tau Delta 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3. rage . SENIORS Williams, Ann M. Wild Rose, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, Secretory 2; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; Glee Club 2; Pep Club 2. Yarenowski, Charlotte V. Armstrong Creek, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 1, 2. Zick, Anna Wyocena, Wisconsin Two Year Rurol-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 2, Loyola 2. Williams, Elizabeth A. Redgranite, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 2; W. A. A. 2. Yerke, Fay 8 Mukwonogo, Wisconsin Four Year H. 5. Course; Major: Home Economics; Home Economics Club 1, 2, Secretary-Treasurer 3, 4; Forum 2, 3, 4; Y. W C. A. 1. 2, 3, President A, Basketball 1, 3. Zielanis, Stanley W. Thorpe, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course, Rural Life Club 2; Loyola 2. Zill, Viola Gillett, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Gomma Delta 1, 2. Domke, Edward T. Pittsville, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Major: General Science, Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball. Zylka, Michael E. Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course; Majors: English, History; Forum 2, 3, 4. Rural Life Club 1; Bloc 4, Phi Sigma Epsilon 2, Treasurer 3, A, Oratory 3, 4; Extemporaneous Speaking 2, 3; Debate 2, 3. Schwohn, Ruth I. Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Major: Home Economics,- Class Secretary-Treasurer 3; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, President 4; Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Zeto 4; W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Omega Mu Chi 1, Secretary 2, President 3, 4; Greek Council 3, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Iris 1. I’azt 41Cutler Nellie Jeon Waupaca, Wisconsin Four Year Primary Course; Primary Council 3, 4. Lindow, Thomas Sterling Mane wo, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Major: History; Forum 3, 4, ”S" Club 3, 4; Football 4, Basketball 3, 4. Peterson, Alto H. Hollondale, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Major: Home Economics; Home Economics Club 4, Y. W. C. A. Thompson, Orrilla Y. Ripon, Wisconsin Four Year Rural-State Graded Course; Major: English; Rural Life Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Tau Delta 4. SENIORS 4.iGRADUATES WITHOUT PICTURES Almo, Sister Mary Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year Intermediate Course; Major: Geography, Round Table 1, 2, 3, 4. Bcrord, Wilbur "Web" Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Major: History; Class President 4. Forum 1, 2, 3, 4; "S" Club 1, 2, 3, President 4; Chi Delta Rho 3, A, Football 3, 4f- Basketboll A, Track 1, 2, 3; Boxing 1, 2, 3, A, Boxing Coach 5. Blovat, Kathryn Mary Stevens Point, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course; Rural Life Club 1, 2; Loyola 1, 2. Gilson, Sam Green Bay. Wisconsin Four Yecr H. $. Course; Major: History Forum 2, 3, 4; Rural Life Club 1. Larsen, Mildred O. Stevens Point, Wisconsin Four Year H. S. Course, Major: History; Forum 1, 2, 3, A, W. A. A. 2, 3, Vice-President 4; Tennis 1, 2, 3. Reimer, Evelyn Gertrude Granton, Wisconsin Two Year Rural-State Graded Course,- Primary Council 1, Rural Life Club 2. Thompson, Elsie Chaseburg, Wisconsin Four Year Rural Suoerv sion Course; Major: Biological Science; Rural Life Club 1, 2 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, A 44JUNIORS CLASS OFFICERS Leonard Chartier ...... Alvin Bucholz ....... Dorothy Richards ..... William Larson ...... President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Third Row—G. Worzinik, S. Grove , G. Osterhous, W. Knox, M. Torkeljon. Second Row—E. McDonald, K. Duskey, D. Mullorkey, H. Preston, M. Werner, J. Joosten First Row—R. Kreilkomp, W. Rathke, R. Murphy, M. Graham, K. Becker, J. Verfiri. Third Row —I. Bowker, A. Goetsch, T. Baierl, M. StauHocher, I. Stauffacher, A. Veeder, L. Meinke, E. Kroilkamp. Second Row M. L. Tenley, G. Pagen-kotf, J. Redemann, G. Christenson, I. Floeter, J. Livingston, E. Koch, G. Harris. First Row—G. Morgan, R. Smith, E. Earl, A. Witkowski, C. Benke, V. Lee, M. Luedtke, E. Kushman, G. Doran. Enrolled in the personnel of the Junior Class are students of diversified talents. This group of 113 members is well represented in scholarship, forensics, music, athletics, and student publications. In these several fields, the splendid cooperation of the Juniors is especially noticeable. From the ranks of the Junior class, the King of the Marci Gras, Ben Loschkewitsch, was chosen os the most popular man. Further social ability of the class of 1938 can be seen in the planning and carrying out of the Junior Prom, which was a major event on this year’s social calendar. Leonard Chartier proved an able King, both in the preparation and leading of this social function. With a fine scholastic average, and a year of fine achievements, the Juniors appear entirely ready to launch forth into o successful Senior year at C. S. T. C. and produce a promising graduating class. Page 45SOPHOMORES Third Row—W. Judd, E. Bornum, H. Jackson, C. Delansky, L. Van oilder, L. Kruiza, P. Joaska. Second Row—J. O'Doherty, D. Colby, C. Andrzijek, I. Rice, C. King, J. Weiler, N. Jacobson, J. Hanson. First Row -G. Cowles, M. Tubbs, M. Egger, G. Hamrick, D. Schneck, E. Donermeyer, R. Behnke, F. Parfrey. ■ Third Row—C. Ladwig, L. Hilber, S. Zielams, A. Newhouse, D. Clark, N. Josperson, E. Sheorier, J. Nelson. Second Row— E. Lietz, E Kezeske, M. Warbleton, C. Varenowski, E. Lightbody, G. Church. First Row—A. lindrick, J. Dopp, E. Dopp, J. Doughty, A. Williams, A. Schoeneck, E. Michaels. Were the activities of this year's sophomore class to be screened, the results thereof would be o movie of which C. S. T. C. might well be proud. Surely, it would prove to be very intersting, for the interests of this group are varied, and its influence pervades and makes brighter the general atmosphere of the entire school. Each of the two hundred fifty-seven members of the class is an actor playing, in his own way, some role which helps to make up the unified performance which the rest of us see every day. A short review of this ploy reveals many intersting things. We see first the football team; there's Weingartner, Hitzke, Houck, Norton, Miller, and Nimz. Oh! There's a basketball gome with Nimz and Schneider in action. The next isn't quite clear. What con it be? To be sure, it's Michaels and Swanson boxing again. __________________________________________________ Ray Wemgartner CLASS OFFICERS President Betty Jacobs Vice-President Franklin Hitzke . . Secretary Ruth Nason Treasurer Third Row—J. Kiyshok, E. Brill, E. William , A. Cieslewicz, B. Guth, J Sprodo, T. Jaaska. Second Row—M. Krause, H. Rosicky, H. Jorgenson, M. Mayer, M. Krarz, L. G. Peden, J. Larjon. First Row—R. Bretzke, M. Sturm, L. Oleso c M. Wochtl, F. Quast, K. Storandt. Third Row -J. Vurkovich, I. Neisius, V. Dornbach, B. Scnwahn, B. Jacob , Z. Webster, A. Kugel, E. Belongio. Second Row M. Ropella, E. Thei en, E. Marx, B. Atkin , M. Reiman, J. Schronk, O. Pennington. First Row -Cigel, R. Ottem, E Vetter, D. Anderson, E. Johnson, B. Woke, R. Johnson, R. Stoeger. The scene shifts from the field of athletics to that of public speaking. We see Hyer and Murat at Eau Clair where they won the debate tournament. There s the Pointer staff in conference. We see among the group Hyer, Anderson, Murat, Nason, and Marx. The scene shifts to the Iris office across the hall. Some of the staff members are at work, the sophomores among them being Hovda, Doughty, McHugh, and Nason; in one corner Vennie and Schwmgel are displaying some pictures. Did you know that those two well known photographers are sophomores? Undoubtedly the sophomores are doing other things of which we have no knowledge, but surely we have proof enough of the value of this class to C. S. T. C. This is a group of real people working together for their school. Pogr 47FRESHMEN Third Row—J. Albrecht, L. Trowbridge, P. KendalL E. Twamley, L. Amundson, R. Gray, L. Smith. Second Row—E. Breeden, K. Thompson, F. Purcell, C. Sturm, R. Pfilfner, M. Bowers, M. Zaske. First Row -H. Henninger, L. Taylor, I. Forbes, M. Preville, V. Lueck, B. Klosinski, F. Keidrowski. Third Row—R. Joubert, H. Brown, M. Severns, R. Bishop, O. Peterson, R. LaHaye, C. Sandmire. Second Row—J. McDonald, E. Ruppel, R. Wiersig, G. Hintz, I. Schulist, V. Luthe, J. Thompson. First Row—B. Kordus, M. Sergeant, R. Nilson, D. Burrows, L. Holman, D. Peterson, D. Gunderson, R. Boger. The graduating class of 1940 has completed its first year at Central State Teachers College. The members have put forth a good scholastic record and have shown an outstanding interest in extra curricular activities. Two hundred and thirty-seven students registered in the Freshman Class in the fall of '36. Of this total, one hundred forty enrolled in the High School Division which is under the direction of Mr. Smith. Mr. Neale, who is at the head of the Rural Division, gives advice to forty students,- while Miss Colman’s Primary Division claims an enrollment of nineteen. The Elementary and Junior High School Division, made up of thirteen students, is under the direction of Mr. Watson. The remaining twenty-five are enrolled as special students. Thisyear her ia Deer orfned reshmar Advjsor Pa%t 48Keith Aulik Peggy Glennon Evelyn Schwingel CLASS OFFICERS Third Row -F. Wright, D. Young, E. Ruchtl, D. Lomas, M. Tostin, V Luchtorhand, A. McCormick, M. Kirschling. Second Row A Hintz, A. Syth, Q. Merrill, N. Mettloka, J. Felix, B. Johnson, E. Schwmgle, H. Wornke. First Row H. Scheel, E. Buchofz, C. Williams, H. Thornton, F Morency, M. Schmidt, R. Marggi. President Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer Third Row -C. Sorogue, E. Florence, H. Yach, L. Wanta, E. Glisczinski, J. Hagen, F. Szymanski, E. Jurczak, O. Schillinger. Second Row U. M. Knutson, S J. Schmiedlin, B. Richards, M. Martin, I. Behr, L. Gehrke, A. Mainlcnd, J. Fierek. First Row D. Oesterle, J. Van Notta, M. Cook, E. Lamg, R. Robison, R- Church, M. Davel, G. Okray, S. Palukas. closer contact with their teachers. Each Freshman, as he or she is enrolled, is assigned, to a group not to exceed fifteen. This group is in charge of a member of the faculty, who by means of group meetings and individual conferences, acts as a counselor-advisor to them. The Freshman class has more than contributed its share to the extra curricular activities. It has representatives on all of the athletic teams and also on the Iris and Pointer staffs. It has taken active part in forensics with members on the debate squads and in the dramatic club. The class is well represented in band, orchestra and directing, and in choral organizations. The Senior Ball Queen for 1936 was a Freshman girl. The Freshman class of 1936-37 is a fine group of students who carry the spirit of C. S. T. C. with them wherever they go and are bound to be an outstanding Freshman class of this college.SIGNS OF LIFE Sideline Snops "Chandu, the Janitor.” Me and Edison” Springtime was meant for love and lovers.” The Famous Slumber Scene. Won’t some men be lucky? Mexico or the farm”? Nature Study Class. raf. soDepartmentsPRIMARY DEPARTMENT Svhas E. COLMAN. Dirtttor OFFICERS 1936-37 Laura Jane Rosenow Zelda Weed Gladys Molinovsky Blanche Bader President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer THE PRIMARY DEPARTMENT The aim of the Primary Department of Central State College is to provide training for the students who are interested in small children and who wish to become efficient primary teachers. The four year curriculum, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Education is offered. In previous years, this division offered a two year course. Because it was felt that more training was needed for primary teachers, this course was abandoned and only a four year course is now offered. Miss Susan E. Colman is the director of this division. She is noted especially for her pleasing personality and her willingness to encourage and help students in any way possible. She welcomes all new students to this department readily as "one of my girls ’. Much credit is also due to the supervisors in the Training School, for their work in developing desirable and capable primary teachers. In the Primary Department, the pupil is considered as a little citizen. Emphasis is placed on present day living rather than preparation for life. Trained supervisors offer the students the fastest educational ideals and endeavor to develop a warm human interest in the child’s welfare and progress. The old code of obey and imitate is discorded for pupil activity and creativeness. Activities which are carried on result in child growth, emotionally, mentally, socially, and physically. These are the values which the students are trained to develop in the child. Academic courses are emphasized in the first two years of this curriculum. This enables the students to have an excellent background before starting professional duties. Students are given several opportunities for real practice in the handling of children even before they start practice teaching under the supervisors of the Training School. The children's literature provides practice in telling and dramatizing stories. Much experience is also provided in Education Techniques course. The students learn the fundamentals of primary reading, arithmetic, language, literature, writing, spelling and community life. This course also requires the student to do participation work. They assist, as well as observe, the practice teacher in her work. They come in close contact with children, and with the carrying out of the new ideas of education. Pagt 51PRIMARY DEPARTMENT Third Row—M. Zozke, A. Madsen, I. Stauffocher, E. Earl, E. Johnson, M.Bowers, R. Welk. Second Row -I. Behr, D. Gilbertson, H. Jorgenson, G. Krepsky, R. Wabers, P. Murgotroyd, B. Sch-wahn. First Row—V. Peterson, E. Koshman, D. Duecker, Miss Colmon, M. Davel, D. Butler, A. Jensen. Third Row R. Koske, V. Hume, R. Schwebke, L. J. Rosenow, B. Bader, Z. Weed, G. Malinovsky. Second Row—M. Sargeant, B. Richards, M. Warbleton, L. Peden, R. Firnstahl, L Bleck. First Row—S. Mainland, I. Dix, M. Wachtl. H. Beidlemon, L Bossier, J. Walker, E. Bestul. Formerly the students did practice teaching for a whole year. This year, however, they did all their practice teaching in one semester. In this way, the teacher sees more complete development of units, and is able to plan to teach a half day's program. Thus, her practice teaching will become more related to her professional teaching. Every girl enrolled in the Primary Department is automatically a member of the Primary Council. This is a social and professional organization which meets monthly. This organization is very prominent in all activities of the school. ! al' S3GRAMMAR DEPARTMENT OFFICERS 1936-37 Dorothy Cook ..... President Mildred Cram .... Vice-President Beulah Schleicher . . . Secretary-Treasurer Ch.mh.kr F. Wateok. Director Firrt Row —T. KsiTtox. E. Jorxwk. D. Cook. B. Schleicher. Mr. Wathox. L. Chows . B. Wake. M. Cham. E. Rcchti. Second Row—E. Jakes. D. Lomar. M. Werner. H. Phcrtox. E. Breeden. G. Ojckay. F. .Smith. S. Palvkar. S. Smith. Third Row—G. CinumxMW. I. Floetlr. E. Marx. J. Johxrox. M. McLaix. J. Htlaxd. M. Malmikaki. I.. Meinee. The Grammar Division is composed of students who are desirous of becoming skillful teachers in the intermediate, upper, or junior high school grades. Under the rules of the club’s constitution, all members of the Grammar Department are enrolled on the Grammar Club membership scroll. Monthly meetings, which were held throughout the school year, provided curricula discussion as well as entertainment. Until 1934, this division offered a two and three year course Now, however, a need has been felt for well trained teachers in the graded schools as well os in any other division of our public school system. Thus, the two and three year curricula have been abandoned and now only a four year course is offered. Students completing four years of satisfactory work are granted a Bachelor of Education degree. The director of this division of the college is Mr. Charles F. Watson. His advice, freely given, has been very valuable to this group, and his friendly cooperation with each member of this department has meant much not only to the individual, but also to the department as a whole. The Round Table, student organization of the Grammar Division, was organized in 1918 with the purpose of promoting professional and social fellowship among its members. Pag 54HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT OFFICERS 1936-37 William Theisen .... President Samuel Winch . . . Secretary-Treasurer P(r t Htw—I.. Schwinuei., D. Bonneck. E. Doxehmkvkr. R. Naaon. J. Rkdemanx. 0. Gheve. R. Smith. I.. J. I.ivinowton. M. Mohrnot. K. Coihy. Strand Hoic—E. Michael . E, Barxi'M. M. Rorei.ua. I. Smith. I.. Cheese. R Cmchc-h. M. I.OOTKE. F. Morkxcv. H. Moore. E. SoxNE.viu.ua. H. Sorbve. Thud Ho r—J. Ihxws.J. Sviii.HA. N. Jacobbon. C. M. Knotrov. H. Thornton. I. Van Gilder. J. Omiaykn. S. Grover. J. Vemrill. R. Bxloxoia. G. XViu.kcki. The Forum Club functions os a professional organization for all students who are enrolled in the Division of Secondary Education, more commonly known as the Four Year High School Division The High School Division had its foundation laid in the Department for Secondaiy Education-' founded in 1914. Two and three year courses were then offered in the field. There was also offered a two year course similar to that of a liberal arts college. The high school teachers department developed according to its special environment, that is,shaped its policies to meet the needs of the smaller high schools of Central Wisconsin. As the demand for more thoroughly trained teachers increased,two and three year courses were eliminated, and in 1926 the four year degree curriculum was instituted. The course of study now offered to those interested in secondary school education consists of four semesters of liberal arts training taken during the freshman and sophomore years, and two years of training in the field of education. Courses taken in the High School Division under the stipulations set forth in the catalogue are accepted by the State University and are set up to coincide with university courses. Throughout the past years, the Department of Secondary Education has set up under the directorship of l at' 55HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT Third Row -J. Kryshak, E. Shearier, M. Martin, E. Marcott, M. Owen, W. McDonald, D. Duckort, G. Church. Second Row —M. Krause, C. Molchow, E. Florence, D. Oesterle, J.Joosten, C. Benke, R. Bretzke, R. Bishop. First Row—D. Spindler, R. Gray, C. Cook, R. OttemJ. Ellingson, E. R Guerin, O Pennington, G. Harris. Third Row—L. Cigel, O. Peterson, L. Krut7a, H. Rezin, J. Dopp, D. Clark, P. Joosko, T. Jaoska. Second Row E. Lightbody, M Sturm, M. Schultz, L. Oleson, J. Schranki R. Johnson, J. Akins, A. Witkowski. First Row -B. LaHoye, E. Lietz, E. Dopp, L. Wanta, F. Ouost, R. Kreilkcmp, E. Kreilkamp. Professor E. T. Smith o standard not surpassed by any division within the college. The work of individual students is checked throughout the first two years of college life. Before he enrolls as a junior in the hiah school division he must have completed sixtv four hours of work and earned 1.3 honor points. Before enrollment as a senior, he must have ninety six hours and 1.5 honor points. For graduation the minimum number of honor points remains the same as for entrance with the senior class, but thirty two more hours of work must be completed. Mr. Smith and his associates, Mr. R. M. Rightsell and Mr. W. G. Jenkins, give their time and personal guidance to students in selecting majors and minors in the academic field. Because of the size of the division and the numerous other activities of its members, the Forum limits its activities to acquainting its members with the working of the department, and carrying out of the functions necessary to keep the organization alive. Page 56RURAL-STATE GRADED DEPARTMENT Williom Knox FIRST SEMESTER President Grace McHugh Vice-President Ann Williams Secretary Gordon Cowles Treasurer Paul Hein SECOND SEMESTER President Irma Rice Vice-President Faye Hovda Secretary Frank Symanski Treasurer O. V. N'kai.k, Dirttlor The Division of Rural Education has been growing and developing for the post twenty-two years under the direction and guidance of Mr. O. W. Neale. Before accepting his present position, Mr. Neale was at the head of the Department of Rural Education of the State Normal School in Kearney, Nebraska. Our former president, Mr. Sims, was attracted by Mr. Neale’s fine characteristics and qualifications and thought him to be the man to direct the department. Time has proved that Mr. Sims made a very wise choice. Mr. Neale’s kind, helpful, and sympathetic attitude has endeared him to the hearts of all his students. He has had a life-long interest in rural education and has been on influencial leader in promoting the welfare of this field. The rural program of visitation of schools is very complete. Mr. Neale keeps in close contact with the field for two ultimate reasons: first, to provide worthy promotion, and second, to strengthen the work in the department. The expectant teachers have the problems which confronted their predecessors set before them in a most effective manner and ore sagely advised as to how to meet and subdue these difficulties. This wisdom is expounded by none other than the beloved Miss Roach. She is the sympathetic and understanding "mother’’ of the Rural Department. Many a heavy hearted student in despondency has turned to her and found comfort in her wise counsel. The rural freshman are instructed in geography and English by Miss Hanna, a veteran teacher who has won the high esteem of all. She has the power to develop the desirable characteristics and eliminate the deficiencies and shortcomings in such a manner that the freshmen can never fully express their gratitude. Miss La Vigne is the guiding power which keeps the Orthman Demonstration School running smoothly and effectively. Practice teachers realize her efficiency and appreciate her helpful advise. The physical features of the Orthman Demonstration School were greatly improved this year, the entire building being redecorated. The four instructors mentioned are directly connected with the Rural-State Graded Division. Other members of the faculty conduct classes for this department. Their untiring efforts are greatly appreciated. 57RURAL.STATE GRADED DEPARTMENT Third Row—A Syth, E. Loing, E. Carlson, J. Nelson, D. Burrows, B. Pingol, F. Wadzmski. Second Row -E. Two-nley, M. Tubbs. G. Hamrick, L. V Berger, I. Rice, F. Hovda, M Mayer, F. Stiehm. First Row—G. Osterhous, G. Cowles, O. W. Neale, F. Checolinski, B. Stroik, J. Dzikoski, Third Row—A. Schoeneck, P. Hein, O. Schillinger, B. Christianson, M. Torkelson, O.Thompson, B. Mannigel, J. Ericksen. Second Row—E. Maauire, E. Bortz, R. Knutson, M. Marshall, H. Scholtz, E. Fletcher, E. Kulwiec, C. Sindicic. First Row—V. Treptow, A. Williams, K. Likes, J. Doughty, O. W. Neale. R. Hetzel, D. Anderson, R. Joling, M. Patterson. The Rural-State Graded Division trains teachers for the following fields of service: teachers for rural schools, principals and teachers for state graded and village schools, supervisors of rural schools, teachers in county normals, and county superintendents. All curricula are planned with the Bachelor Degree at the end of four years as the ultimate goal, although it is possible to secure a diploma at the end of two years. On the completion of the Four Year State Graded Principal's Course, as outlined in the catalogue, a student will receive North Central rating and be admitted to graduate work at the University without any deficiencies. The completion of the two-year curriculum entitles the student to the diploma of the school and a license to teach. After two years of successful teaching experience, an unlimited state certificate is issued. Page 5S RURAL-STATE GRADED DEPARTMENT Third Row—W. Clements, L. Hilber, W. Kox, J. Pingel, P. Thorson. Second Row -B. Guth, H. Hurd, A. Zick, B. LoVigne, M. Hanna. First Row —V. Klug, B. Konieczko, M. Roach, E. Tetzler, F. Szymanskr. Third Row—E. Kezewski, L. Powless, G. Von Hoossen, V. Luther, E. Belongia, S. Zielanis, W. Ratnke, D. Petersen, R. Nelson. Second Row—V. Zill, A. Theilig, A. Stiebs, M. Jost, E. Bucholz, R. Joubert, K. Stone, V.Luchterhand. First Row M. Egger, C. Yarenowski, L. Vogedes, L. Johnscn, L. Drob-nick, J. Felix, G. McHugh, G. Wachtl, E. Jurczak. Upon being enrolled in the Rural-State Graded Division one immediately becomes a member of the Rural Life Club. This organization furnishes an opportunity for fine training in club work. Instructive and entertaining programs are produced by the talent of the members with the assistance of an outside speaker. Unusually fine programs have been presented this year. These meetings are especially helpful in two ways,- first, they give valuable experience to the performers and second, they are suggestive of programs which one might use in his own school. The Rural Life Club is a member of the Country Life Conference, which is a National organization. Every year many of our members attend the state conventions and occasionally members attend the notional meeting. l He SOSIGNS OF LIFE This ought to increase the Home Ec. enrollment. Round and round! "Spirits of 76." This happens sometimes One use of the darkroom. Study on — ye mighty sophomores. Bulletin board rush. Men s locker rooms. Pa r 60Fir ft Four—K. Likes. E. R. Guerin. R. Mi-hpiiy. Mim Mason. M. Patterson. Mr. Allkz. Second Four—M. Werner. K. Bkcher. D. Gkokok. Mii. Knctzen. S. Wehsteh. O. Thompson. Third Fow C. .Swenson. M. StaCFTacher, M. Miner. J. Rkdkmann. Mr. Bvrrocohs. S I G Doris George Virginia Gojewski Jean Redemann Margaret Miller Maxine Miner . The Psi Beta Chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, National Honorary Fraternity for students excelling in English, was organized at Central State Teachers College on April 2, 1930. It is the forty-seventh of seventy similar chapters in the United States. To promote the mastery of written expression, to advance the study of the chief literary masterpieces, to encourage worthwhile reading, and to increase the feeling of comradeship among students specializing in English work are the major aims of this organization. Election to Sigma Tau Delta is based upon scholastic excellence, personal interest, and literary merit. Initiation ceremonies are both formal and informal and are held at the beginning of each semester. PERSONNEL A A TAU OFFICERS DELTA President Vice-President Secretory Treasurer . Historian Mr. Allez Mr. Burroughs Miss Dovis Kathryn Becher Alice Bentz Virginia Gojewski Doris George Ben Goldberg William Abendschein Kirkwood Likes FACULTY MEMBERS Miss Hanna Mr. Hyer Mr. Jenkins STUDENT ACTIVES Eva Rae Guerin Margery McCulloch Rita Murphy Marie Patterson Jean Redemann STUDENT ASSOCIATE Margaret Miller Mr. Knutzen Mr. Smith Miss Moson Carroll Swenson Orrilla Thompson Mary Ullman Shirley Webster Mildred Werner Maxine Miner Marianne Stauffacher ’ap 62PMV- MJ?- M. Mini . G. Facct. D. Richahcs. Mim» Horton. T1-' aT 7'H • Drecne. (,. Connor. R. Schwahn. Mia Mwton, A. McVey. H. Dent. Third Roir-C. Malchow. I.. Swanson. H. Blake. W. Theihen. J. Bekahd. SIGMA ZETA OFFICERS Master Scientist Vice Master-Scientist Secretary-Treasurer, 1st semester, Secretary-Treasurer, 2nd semester Maxine Miner . Alvin Bucholz Marjery McCulloch . Jesse Caskey Zeto Chapter of Sigma Zeta, National Honorary Science Fraternity, was organized at Central State Teachers College in 1930. The purpose of this society is twofold: first, the promotion of scholarship among students,-second, the mutual aid of its members in obtaining information in the field of scientific knowledge. Each year Sigma Zeta sponsors a Science Open House All the science departments of the college contribute in some way to this event. High Schools from all around are invited. Friday, April 16th, marked the cate of this year's Open House. This year the local chapter of Sigma Zeto sponsored the National Conclave. It was held cn April 17th and 18th, 1937. This was the national meeting of all chapters of Sigma Zeta. Most of the chapters had delegates present. FACULTY MEMBERS Miss Allen Mr. Evans Mr. Faust Miss Horton Miss Jones Miss Meston Mr. Pierce Mr. Rightsell Mr. Rogers Mr. Thompson Mr. Watson Miss Wilson ACTIVE MEMBERS Sylvia Anderson Robert Andre Carl Bachman ames Berard llery Bassler Helen Blake Alvin Bucholz Jesse Caskey Gene Connor Harold Dent Harld Dregne Charles Hartvig Arnold Hotvedt Bill Larson Clifford Malchow John Maier Margery McCulloch Maxine Miner Dorothy Richards Ruth Schwahn Bromslaus Slotwinski La Verne Swanson William Theisen ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Roland Cady George Church Clifton Fonstod Ruth Johnson Ted Ketterl Bill Miller Eileen Marx Thoburn Peterson Anthony Posloszny John Steiner Jeanette Winarski John HonsonFirtl Note— V. MiLLr.ii L. Ouhok. D. Cook. C. Sfxaoc . K. .Smith. G. Momoax. R. Cadt. Srrontt Nov -C. Sfakmawk. J. Schmank. H. Sokbti.. E. Stoltxxekho. E. Bakxcm. B. Peremox. R. Axokxoox. Tkirti Note—R Owex. H- Ouxov. E- Smearier. S. Zielaxir. C. Baomvaxx. T Mevkm. M. WaUWIXT PHOTO CLUB OFFICERS FIRST SEMESTER SFCOND SEMESTER Robert Vennie . Ted Meyer Dorothy Cook Rolph Anderson Mr. T. A. Rogers President Vice-President Secretory Treasurer William Miller Earl Sheoner Ethel Stoltenburg Rolph Anderson Faculty Advisor The Photo Club was organized in 1935. Since then it has become one of the most popular and outstanding organizations at C. S. T. C. The purpose of the club is to acquaint each member with the fundamental principles of photography In the past three years,many photographic necessities and facilities have been purchased which enables the club to be on the same status as commercial photographers. The success of the club since its inception connot be measured for it nas given invaluable service to the Iris staff as well as the student body. Anderson, Rolph Bachman, Carl Bornum, Edward Berens, Janice Cody Roland Cook, Dorothy Cook Marguerite Dent, Harold Groves, Sherman Jacobson, Norman ohnson, Ruth reilkamp, Edgor MEMBERS Kreilkamp, Robert Larson, William Meyer, Ted Miller, William Morgan, Grace Oleson, La Nore Owen, Margaret Olingy, Harrison Peterson, Betty Schrank, Joan Shearier, Earl Smith, Ruth Sorbve, Harold Sparhawk, Charles Sprogue, Clifford Stoltenberg, Ethel Swanson, La Verne Warner, Marjorie Wamsley, Mary Webster, Zilphia Westphal, Erwin Willeclce, Gerhard Vennie, Robert Zielanis, Stanley Page ( 4Fir,I Ron—P. IU'nkkl. I- Bamu . G. Connor. P. Giuixq. 1. Mgr EM. Second Ron—R. Timm. A. Bent . M. Komu. J. Van Nafta. E. Bcchol . K. Bechi . Third Ron—H. Jacemon. S. Zielasis. H. Reichert. C. Bachman. E. Rcchti. COLLEGE THEATRE OFFICERS 1936-37 BOARD OF DIRECTORS Phil Runkel ........ President Kathryn Becher...........................................Secretary Ben Laschkewitsch ..... Business Manager Mr. W. G. Jenkins ..... Faculty odvisor Departmental Heads Phil Runkel, Mr. Jenkins, J. D. Colby, Phyllis Gikling Directing I. D. Colby ... Lighting Robert Bretzke.............................................. Scenic Shirley Webster..........................................Auditorium The College Theater was organized in November, 1936. Its purpose is to provide a means by which any student of Central State Teachers College, having an interest and a certain amount of aptitude in the theater will be able to find active, educational, and, whenever possible, creative work in theater production. Two work shop plays were presented at morning assemblies. Among the major productions played to enthusiastic audiences during the course of the year were: Three Taps at Twelve' and Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Ernest.” Aulik, Keith Bachman, Carl Bassler, Leda Becher, Kathryn Bloom, Joe Bucholz, Ethel Bretzke, Robert Colby, J. Donald Connor, Gene Duskey, Kathryn PERSONNEL Gikling, Phyllis Jenkins, W. G. Koehl, Bill Laschkewitsch, Ben Meyer, Ted Parfrey, Fred Reichert, Harold Ruchti, Eleanor Ropello, Myron Runkel, Phil Schell, Joan Timm, Rosalie Van Natta, Jeanette Verrill, John Webster, Shirley Whittaker, Worde Yurkovich, John Zelianis, Stanley Pagr 65Fir»t Row—M. Bradt. E. Dorr. F. Qcmt. I. Olhox. Mu Merton. E. XVareeoi . S. Meath. R. Schwahx. F. Roihcieb Sffond Row—M. Xarox. M. Lcedter. J. Schraxk. H. Nicholas M. Graham. R. Johnson. I.. Olcson. A McVet. Third Row—G. Graver. R. Brhnke.V. Dennbacm. A. Vekder. M. Staittacmer. L. Kissinger. C. Woltert. T. Raierl. Fav Verke. HOME ECONOMICS CLUB OFFICERS 1936-37 Ruth Schwohn ..... Anito McVey ..... Alberto Veeder Miss Mes'.on Mourine Noson, Hazel Nicholes, Foy Yerke Marianne Stauffocher, Mildred Brody, Lenore Cleson Social Committee President Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer Faculty Advisor Finance Committee The Home Economics Club is maintained for majors ond minors in that field. It is affiliated with the State and Notional Associations. Meetings are held for both social ond business functions and programs are planned to pertain to some phase of home economics work. High lights of this year's accomplishments were the successful Rally Day given to promote interest in nigh school home economics clubs and our series of suppers served while night school was in session. Home economics majors are required to spend one semester in John Francis Sims Cottage, where they receive all possible practical training in household management. Allen. Edna Anderson, Sylvia Bated, Thelma Behnke, Ruth Bourcier, Frances Brody, Mildred Dernback, Voleria Dopp, Elizabeth Graham, Marion Greve, Gladys PERSONNEL ohnson, Ruth issinger, Louise Luedtke, Mildred McVey, Anita Meath, Stella Miller, Margaret Noson, Maurine Nicholas, Hozel Oleson, LoNore Peterson, Alta Quest, Florence Schmck, Vivian Schrank, Joan Schwohn, Ruth Stouffocher, Marianne Veeder, Alberta Walsh, Loretta Warekois, Evelyn Wohlfert, Celia Yerke, Fay B. Pate 66Ftr»i No —E. Soxxumo. R. Cam thill. B. KiCHakd . G. Melchior. T. Raienl. M. Davrl. R. Oma. A. Viun. SrtonH Root—I. Dix. R. Rohi ho R. Cm men. M. Warmuctox. E. 8 « trtxi«r.»io. I. Rict. A. Madmcm. I. Sr errA( «. M. Schulte. Third No —D. Ottmu. M. Star it a cm kh. F. Hovda. E. Tmkimcx. L. Psbkx. R Kxrwox, L. Waxta. M. Mamtix. PEP CLUB OFFICERS Betty Richards ...... President Faye Hovda Vice-President Lois Gene Peden ...... Secretary-Treasurer Marianne Stauffocher Club Reporter Eleanor Theisen, Evelyn Sonnenberg . . . . Cheer Leoders The Pep Club of Centrol State Teachers College is a new organization. In addition to instilling pep and enthusiasm in alT athletic activities, the club enthusiastically backs every activity sponsored by the college. The membership of the club is limited. Candidates for membership are accepted by the club mainly on the basis of dependability. The club has as its faculty advisors, two women who work wholeheartedly with the club. Thev are Miss Carlsten and Miss Ricnardson. The motto of the club is: We will willingly do our best for the purple and the gold." Boierl. Thelma Campbell, Ramona Dix, Irene Hovda, Faye CHARTER MEMBERS Melchoir, Grace Peden, Lois Gene Rice, Irma Richards, Be»y Schultz, Marcello Slouffacher, Marianne Vender, Alberta Wonta, Lorraine Warbleton, Marcelline Church, Rachel Dove I, Madeline Knutzen, Ruth Madsen, Anita Malesevich, Zorko OTHER MEMBERS Morgan, Grace Oesterle, Dorothy Ottem, Ruby Okray, Grace Pogenkoff, Geraldine Sonnenberg, Evelyn Smith, Ruth Stoltenberg, Ethel Theisen, Eleanor Torkelson, Margaret Pagf 6 F r$t Kov—E. Sold Kuo. M. Davel. C. Brunner. D. I.omas, M. Roach. C. arnowbki. L. McGinlkv. K. Bkciif.r. B. La Vione. Second Rotr—J. Sciiiiank. M. Ropella. K. Hoco. I-. Hilui.h. H. Tylk. E. Lioiitbody. S. Palukab. F. Church. Third Roir—G. Okhay. D. Stoeoer. F. Bourcier. J. Yurkovich. A. CiHUtwic . B. Kordub. J. Weiler. R. La Have, R. Campbell. LOYOLA CLUB OFFICERS John Krembs ....... President Eleanor Theisen ..... Secretary-Treasurer The Loyola Club, a religious organization for Catholic students of the college, was organized in 1916 in response to a suggestion by Mr. Neale, who had recently come from the State Teachers College at Kearny, Nebraska, where a similar organization was one of the influential clubs on the campus. The primary aim of Loyola is to provide an opportunity, for those who desire it, to get together to devote a regular period to the consideration of the spiritual and to furnish a time and place for the discussion of religious questions. PERSONNEL Anderson, John Andrzejek, Christine Becher, Kathryn Berard, Jomes Bourcier, Frances Brunner, Clyde Brunner, Dennis Campbell, Ramona Church, Forest Cieslewicz, Annette Davel, Madeline Glisczinski, Evelyn Hanna, Mary Hilber, Leo Houg, Katherine Joosten, Janet Kordus, Ben Krembs, John Kugel, Agnes La Haye, Bob La Vigne, Bessie Lethenstrom, Ruth Lightbody, Edward Lomas, Darloen Maguire, Eileen l agt 6$Fir»t Row—G. Wacute. G. McHuoh. M. Stvkm. J. Kkkmo . Rev. Koola. M. Hanna. E. Themes . M. Mohexcy. Second Row—W. Thxmen. E. Maovixs. I.. Wanta. M. Schultz. F. Mokkxcy. L. Vooedxr. M. Van Dekaa. D. Brunner. Third Row—J. Andkkoon. C. Andkzkjek. A. Kuoki.. E. Glmczinhki. S. ZiklaXih, J. Hkuakd. J. Joosten. R. I.kthexmthom. H. Reichert. LOYOLA CLUB FACULTY MEMBERS Mary E. Hanna Bessie LaVigne May M. Roach Secondly, Loyola’ offers a chance for social life among the group os well as various occasions for broadening the acquaintanceship of those in the club with young people outside through various projects sponsored by the Catholic Church in the city and surrounding neighborhoods. The constitution of the Loyola Club provides that the spiritual director shall be the pastor of St. Stephen's Church. Father W. J. Rice was the first spiritual advisor. This year Father J. J. Kools, who was assigned to St. Stephen's os assistant pastor last year, has been taking an active part in the club program. The Loyola meetings are held on the third Thursday of each month. McHugh, Grace Morency, Florence Morency£ Marian Okray, Grace Palukos, Sophie Reichert, Harold Roach, Mae Ropella, Myron PERSONNEL Schronk, Joan Schultz, Marcella Solberg, Esther Stoeger, Richard Sturm, Carlyle Theisen, Eleanor Theisen, William Tylk, Helen Von Deroo, Mary Vogedes, Lucille Wachtl, Marian Wanta, Lorraine Weiler, June Yarnowski, Charlotte Yurkovich, John Zielanis, Stanley Page 69Fir,t Rote—E. Don . A. Wiluamr. F. Qcast. E. M. Brivette. R. Smith. G. Moroan. K. Stone SttondRoir— I. Florrx R. G.Cmn i rt eX»is. B. Schleicher. M. Owen. I.. G. Peden. F. B. Yerxe. Third How—J. Dopp. M. I.. Ten-lev. J. Hagxn. E. Wahekois. M. Stal'peacher. E. Breeden. V. Lcece. Y. W. C. A. Fay B. Yerke OFFICERS 1936-37 President Esther Kushman . . Treasurer Dorothy Gilbertson Secretary Miss Jones Faculty Advisor The Y. W. C. A. of Central State Teachers College is a local group of the National Student Young Women's Christian Association. The aims and purposes of the Y. W. C. A. are to help people "grow religiously and to help provide a fellowship which every girl on the campus could participate in. Monthly meetings are held throughout the school year. These meetings are devotional services with frequent guest speakers and various entertainments. Any girl of the student body is cordially invited to join. New members are token in each semester. The churches of the city of Stevens Point have shown an interest in this organization by their constant cooperation. PERSONNEL Baxter, Leta Beppler, Lucille Breedan, Eleanor Carlson, Edith Christianson, Glennis De Horn, Eileen Dopp, Elizabeth Dopp, Jean Duecker, Doris Finch, Mrs. Floeter, Irene Gilbertson, Dorothy Greve, Gladys Hagen Jeanette Jones, Miss Kushman, Esther Kissinger, Louise Loing, Ethel Livingston, Jane Lueck, Verna Mayer, Marion McLain, Mabel Page 70Firtl Nov—D. CiLBSimoK. E. Kvrhmax. G. Grkvz. R. Me William . V. Scmnick. I. DkHorx. Srrond Nov—M. Mayir. M. McLain. E. I.akok. D. Dcicur. J. IjrtmnoN. C. William . Third Nov—I. Staityfachkr. H. Richard . T. Bairkl. A. V»on. G. Mklchoih. II. Rtnu. Y. W. C . A . COMMITTEES 1936-37 Doris Duecker ..... Thelmo Boierl ..... lane Livingston .... Roberta McWilliams .... Eva Rae Guerin ..... Vivian Schnick ..... Louise Kissinger ..... Program World Fellowship Social . . Music . Publicity Freshmen . . Geneva This local group olso belonas to the Northern Wisconsin-Mmnesota Area of the Geneva Region. A conference is held every year at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where a group of four hundred or more girls are brought together. The purpose of the conference is to give students an opportunity, sometime during their stay in college, to get into the classroom and is a result of extra curricular activities. Fay Yerke will represent the C. $. T. C. group at the conference this year. This conference draws each group into closer fellowship with the National Association of Y. W. C. A. PERSONNEL McVey, Anita McWilliams Roberta Melchoir, Grace Morgan. Grace Owen, Margaret Peden, Lois Quest, Florence Rezm, Helen Richards, Betty Schleicher, 8euloh Stoltenberg, Ethel Smith, Ruth Slautfocher, Irene Stauffocher, Marianne Stone, Kathleen Thompson, Elsie Wanek, Doretto Warekois, Evelyn Williams, Ann Williams, Claire 7iFiftt Kau—$. Wkh-tih. E. BamM-M. C. To KN ox, R. S os. Strom! K»ir—B. I.aaohxlwittwji. I.. J. float.now. E. McDoxai-d. D. Rickaud . T. PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL FIRST SEMESTER Ellery Bossier Ruth Schwahn . OFFICERS 1936-37 SECOND SEMESTER President . . . Charles Torbensen Secretary . . . Ruth Nason All problems of inter-fraternity and sorority nature ore investigated and settled by a central governing unit, the Pan-Hellenic Council, which is composed of two members from each of the Greek social organizations. The president of each sorority and fraternity automatically becomes a member of the Pan-Hellenic Council and one other representative is elected by each group. The cardinal purpose of this governing council is to promote a sense of cooperation and unity of purpose among sororities and fraternities, and to act as a mediatory board for any difficulties which arise between the Greek groups. Several meetings are held during each semester at which dates ore set for rushing and pledging, and rules formulated to control fraternities and sororities. A formal dance for Greeks and their guests is sponsored each semester by the council. PERSONNEL FIRST SEMESTER Ellery Bossier, Chi Delta Rho Ted Menzel, Chi Delta Rho Shirley Webster, Omega Mu Chi Ruth Schwohn, Omega Mu Chi Arnold Hotvedt, Phi Sigma Epsilon Samuel Winch Phi Sigma Epsilon Ethel McDonold, Tau Gamma Beta Dorothy Richards, Tau Gamma Beta SECOND SEMESTER Ellery Bossier, Chi Delta Rho Ted Menzel, Chi Delta Rho Shirley Webster, Omego Mu Chi Ruth Nason Omega Mu Chi Ben Loschkewitsch, Phi Sigmo Epsilon Charles Torbenson, Phi Sigma Epsilon Laura Jane Rosenow, Tau Gamma Beta Dorothy Richards, Tau Gamma Beta Pav 73S o c i aPint Row— R. I'WMK . "• Miujw. tt . I.akeox. H. Dext. J. Caeeev. E. Dcooax. Srtond R nr—W. Theiaon. J. Krewe . R IfomiAX. X. E. KNmis P. 8xtt . M. Seixkbr. E. Bawuii. H. Oumov. Third Row—A. Bcoiom. J. Maier A. Menial. G. Hter. T. Kotael. D. Xoetox. J. Mr eat. J Steiner. R. Wkixgartxee G. LeGaCLT. R. Ascekeon ALPHA CHAPTER OF CHI DELTA RHO FIRST SEMESTER E. Frost Bossier Alvin Bucholz John Mater Roy Wemgortner Roy Urbans Alfred Menzel John Krembs OFFICERS President . Vice-President . Secretory Treasurer Sergeont-at-Arms Pan-Hellenic Representative Corresponding Secretary SECOND SEMESTER Alfred Menzel . John Maior John Steiner Ralph Anderson Franklin Hitzke E Frost Bossier George Hyer Alpho Chopter of Chi Delta Rho fraternity was organized at C. S. T. C. in 1931. Since that time it has been the most active group of men on the campus. Upholding its high standards of scholarship, good fellowship, and participation in college activities, the froternity closes one of its most successful years ot C. S. T. C. Chi Delta Rho has set an enviable record among the social organizations on the campus by taking the lead and participating in every extracurricular activity. During the past year the froternity has grown until at present there are three chapters of Chi Delta Rho in the state. The third chaoter was organized at Milton College. A new fraternity home morked another progressive step in the achievements of Chi Delta Rho during the past year. FRATRES IN FACULTATE 1939 Anderson, Ralph Mr. R. M. Rightsell Mr. G. C. Allez Hitzke, Franklin Hoffman, Robert Mr. N. E. Knutzen Hyer, George Jasperson, Newell Ketterl, Theodore FRATRES IN COLLEGIO Krembs, John Murat, James Norton, Don 1937 Oligney, Harrison PauTson, Carsten Bossier, Ellery Frost Bucholz, Alvin Skinner, Maynard Steiner, John Maier, John Menzel, Ted Smith, Peter Weingartner, Ray Theisen, Bill 1940 Urbans, Raymond Bohan, Felix Brunner, Clyde Duecker, James Walsh, James 1938 Lawrence, George Dent, Harold Lucas, Woodrow Larson, Bill Rusch, Paul Legault, Gordon Rinka, Lhet Spindler, Dearborn Weingartner, Francis Zimmer, Grandville It Slipped. Ouick! Deep Peace. Chance. K. P. Duty. We're muaical at time . State conclave. The center of home. The perfect life! A happy moment. Watch out below! 75 Pint How—G. Con son. E. Haxron. B. Sciiwahn. J. Rkdkmanx. Z. Wwrw, E. Burn. J. Walker. II. Schwann. $tton l Hoie— M. KraT . M. Miner. S. Weiinteh. R. MfKU.BR. I,. Baralkk. T. Knctrox. A. Horn. V. Hern-rack. I. Ou.es. Thinl Row—I„ Wile. P. Giki-ixo, A. Nkwhovbs. G. Malinovsky, Z. Weed. R. Nason. L. Blbck. K. Dusxey. FIRST SEMESTER Shirley Webster Jean Redemann tileen Hanson Anita McVey Ruth Schwohn Ruth Nason OMEGA MU CHI OFFICERS 1936-37 . President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Pon-Hellenic Representative Press Representative SECOND SEMESTER Ruth Nason Maxine Miner Jene Redemann Betty Jacobs Shirloy Webster Kathryn Duskey This year marks the tenth anniversary of the founding of the Omega Mu Chi Sorority at Central State Teachers College. The first social function sponsored by the organization this school year was the annual foil tea, held in September, to which oil college women, students and faculty, were invited. This was followed, in October, by a Homecomina banquet that was attended by many alumnae of the Sorority, including several charter members. At Christmas, the Omegas held a joint Christmas and birthday party for the actives, olumnae and patronesses. Rushing functions in the fall and spring gave the rushees a chance to become better acquainted with the members of the Sorority. These parties were followed by six-week pledge periods, and finally, formal initiations which made the pledges active members of the Sorority. The Omega Mu Chi Sorority also sponsored other social events throughout the year, outstanding of which were their Informal Dance and their Mid-Winter Formal. 1‘ate 7t SOROR IN FACULTATE Miss Edna Carlsten HONORARY MEMBERS Mrs. H. Tolo Mrs. E. A. Schwahn SORORES IN CCLLEGIO 1937 Bossier, Leda Knutson, Thelma Miner, Maxine McVey, Anita Schwahn, Ruth Webster. Shirley Weed, Zelda 1938 Gilding, Phyllis Connor, Gene Dusky, Kathryn Erdman, June Hanson, Eileen Horn, Artensia Malinovsky, Gladys Redemann, Jean Walker, Joanna Week, Lolita 1939 Bestul, Eleanor Bleck, Lucille Dernback, Valeria Jacobs, Betty Kratz, Maraoret Nason, Ruth Newhouse, Arietta Olson, Inez Quast, Florence Schwahn, Betty Webster, Zilphia 1940 Dernback, Dorothy Deucher, Lorraine Glennon, Peggy Hoppen, Mary Lutsey, Maryan Melchior, Grace Rogers, Marjorie Ruchti, Eleanor Schwingel, Evelyn Wolf, Betty Relaxation. Home's best. Birds eye view. Warm ins up. At the formal with Ted Gay. Were In a literary mood. Music appreciation you there? Worm eye view F r««de hour. Pag' 77Pifmi I CHWISORL O- OuOM 8. WlKCH ttoni WHirru. G. Cahtviix. W. Hochdox. C. Torrevaon H. Dreose. C. Foxrtad. K. Stokaxdt. B. I.amiikeu itrct. Third Rote_A. Hotvedt. J. Kreuha. C. Swaxaon. C. Malcmow K. Hodeix. R. BxrriKL. G. Raene. R. Kmeilkamp, V. Whittaeer. P H I FIRST SEMESTER Arnold Hotvedt Clifford Molchow Georoe Cartmill Robert Kreilkomp Ben Loschkewitsch LaVerno Schwingel Samuel Winch KAPPA CHAPTER OF SIGMA E P S I OFFICERS 1936-37 President Vice-President Corresponding Secretary Recording Secretory . Treasurer Guard Pan-Hellenic Representative LON SECOND SEMESTER Ben Loschkewitsch . Samuel Winch Arnold Hotvedt Edgar Kreilkomp Robert Kreilkomp Clifford Malchow Charles Torbenscn Koppa Chapter of Phi Sigma Epsilon is indeed proud of the high place it has hold In college this past year. It IS the only chapter on the campus which belongs to a national state teachers college fraternity. The purpose and aims of this froternity have been to promote and establish a brotherhood that shall hcve for its object the physical, intellectual, and socicl development of its members, and to participate and take a leading part in school activities. Kappa chapter has approximately thirty-five members who are chosen from the student body of C. S. T. C. Rushing parties and pledging are conducted each semester so that new mombers may be odmitted. Every two years the National Executive Council sponsors and finances a national conclave for the benefit of all chapters. The conclave this year will be held in Konsas City, M:ssouri. Page 78FRATRE IN FACULTATE Mr. F. J. Schmeeckle HONORARY MEMBERS Coach E. L. Kotal Dr. Wilbur Glover Mr. Price George FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 1937 Hotvedt, Arnold Skinner, Morris Zylka, Michael 1938 Cartmill, George Christensen, Bjorn Dregne, Harold Eyler, Gerald Kreilkamp, Edgar Kreilkamp, Robert Malchow, Clifford Torbenson Charles Whipple, Inman Winch, Samuel 1939 Bretzke, Robert Brill, Edward Fonstad, Clifton Hodell, Roy Hodsdon, Walter Kohls, Charles Krembs, Jerry Laschkewitsch, Ben Meyer, Ted Olson, Don Raese, George Schwingel, LaVerne Storondt, Kenneth Swanson, Carl Whittaker, Warde Yurkovich, John 1940 Bloom, Joe Durand, Edward Felix, John Hager, Rober Hubbard, George Joy, Park La Haye, Robert Olson, Marvin Pfiffner, Robert Stoeger, Richard Sturm, Carlyle Thorson, Phillip Recreation. Study. Concentration, and Relaxation. Date . and Orchestra, and more date . In a playful moor!. A mueinit chorua of "Oh. P.S.E' Contract »h rk». Revenge. Pat' 70fir How—B. Rader. B. Schleicher. D. Richards. K. Theiaes S Mainland SeeooHRow D. PnrrMER. I. Dix. E. McDonald. A. Oak R Sch ebke. I.. J. Roaenow. M. Miller. D. Mullarkey. J Mailer. TAU GAMMA BETA OFFICERS 1936-37 FIRST SEMESTER Dorothy Richards Alice Oik Margaret Miller Dorothy Mullarkey Blanche Bader Ethel McDonald . President Vice-President Treasurer Corresponding Secretary Recording Secretary Pan-Hellenic Representative SECOND SEMESTER Dorothy Richards Ethel McDonald Margaret Miller Dorothy Mullarkey . . Helen Blake . Laura Jane Rosenow This year marks the twenty eighth anniversary of Tau Gamma Beta Sorority, the oldest Greek organization on the campus. It was founded in 1909 and has continued through its many years to mointain high standards of scholarship, leadership, interest, and cooperation in all school activities. The social year of the sorority was opened with the annual tea for all college and faculty women. Rushing, pledging, and the customary aoy parties were followed by the mam social event of the fall season, the anniversary celebration which was a feature of homecoming weekend. During the winter months, the sorority gave many informal dances and parties. The second semester opened with the traditional gay rushing parties and pledging activities. The spring season of parties and dances was climaxed by the annual formal dinner and dance, one of the most successful dances of the year. Vaf.f SoSOROR IN FACULTATE 1939 Miss Jones HONORARY MEMBERS Miss Mildred Dovis Miss Beatrice Richardson Behnke, Ruh Dix, Irene Greve, Gladys Mainland, Sarah Mullarkey, Dorothy Theisen, Eleanore SORORES IN COLLEGIO 1937 Oik, Alice Pfiffner, Dorothy Rosenow, Laura Jane Schleicher, Beulah Schwebke, Regina 1938 Bader, Blanche Blake, Helen McDonald, Ethel Miller, Margaret Richards, Dorothy Richard, Dorothy Warzinik, Genevieve 1940 Benn, Marguerite Breeden, Eleanore Fierek, Jeannette Forbes, Iris Houg, Katherine lohnson, Jane Mainland, Ann Preville, Mavis Richards, Betty Williams, Clai re A little serious bridge. Horoeeomin . A literary group. Finishing "Gone With The Wind”. Correspondence. The group. A pensive mood. Somethin funny there? Fireside hour, Page SiSIGNS OF LIFE Privote worlds. Sign the egg, please? Future wives. Basketball sidelines Which is the more dense? Enthusiasm. Here it is Dr. Collins! 11 = 180°. Bill "Atlas” Larson. Try and find yourself! Brotherly love. Page $2ScholasticCLIFFORD MAICHOW Editor IRIS RUTH NASON ROBERT KREILKAMP Business Managers "To give you an illustrated chronicle of life at C. S. T. C. . . that has been our purpose.’ Ihese words appearing on the foreword page clearly state the aims of the staff in building this book "May this yearbook be a worthy member of that dignified series of Irises that have proceeded it This testifies as to the ideals and standards that we have tried to attain ond adhere to. "Humbly we present this Iris. We hope you like it it is our way of saying we hope that all innovations and features meet with your approval. If all these conditions are fulfilled, then our efforts have not been in vain. The ultra modern cover protecting the pages of the Iris was designed by the S. K. Smith Company of Chicago, Illinois. Page 84STAFF The beautiful spectrutint of Old Central Tower marks the first time a colored photo has ever appeared in any Iris. Choosing for a theme a subject that lends itself well to photography, we chose mythology. Everyone of the statues photographed occupies some pedestal in the main building of C. 5. T. C. These photograpns are the work of La Verne Schwmgel. The cover, the spectrutint, and the bleed style of layouts employed illustrate the staff’s endeavor to make a book which is cognizant of the modern trends in yearbooks. Not only has it been our desire to produce a modern book, but a practical and useful one also. It is for this reason we have added a complete faculty, student and advertisers index. Jahn Ollier was again chosen for the engraving work and the printing contract was awarded to the Rogers Printing Company, of Dixon, Illinois. The photography work was done entirely by the staff photographers, Robert Vennie, La Verne Schwingle, and Harold Sorbye. Firti fou—E. Sciiwinokl. J. Beckmann. C. Malchow. R. Xa ox. R. Kmeilkamp. M. L. Tesley. Mainland. Second Kmc—H. Bonin'l. E. McDonald. M. Stai-ffachek. L. Scswt.mi. F. Hovda. K. Beck eh. R. VtNNir. Clifford Malchow . Editor-in Chief Ted Meyer . . Assistant Editor Margery McCulloch Marianne Stauffacher Senior Editors Mildred Luedtke . Faculty Editor Ben laschlcewitsch Alvin Bucholz Men’s Athletic Editors Faye Hovda Women’s Sports Editor Helen Blake George Cartmill Alice Bentz eon Redmann lanche Bader Irene Stauffacher Ethel McDonald Gene Connor Sarah Mainland . . Music Editor Grace McHugh Jeannette Doughty Copy Editors Mary Louise Tenley Robert Vennie La Verne Schwingel Harold Sorbye Inman Whipple Josephine Oberst Kathryn Becher Evelyn Schwingel Katherine Houg Jim McGuire Ruth Nason } Robert KreilkampJ Mr. T. A. Rogers . Feature Editors Departmental Editor Organization Editor Index Editors Utility Editor Forensics Editor . Photographers Typists Business Manager Faculty Advisor Page 85 T. A. Roc.eki Faculty AdritorPOINTER No other organization in school has greater responsibility than the Pointer staff. Few students realize the amount of work and preparation that makes possible the distribution of the Pointer so regularly each Thursday morning. Members of this group must be active throughout the year. The staff devotes Monday and Tuesday evenings of each week to composing the paper, burning a good deal of ’’midnight oil in the process of turning out each issue The reporters and editors compile the "tips”. They have gathered into news items, editorials, and comments on school happenings and between jobs carry on weighty and witty discussions of intellectual and current problems. The Pointer holds a prominent place in the life of Central State Teachers College It acts as an organ of student opinion. It keeps students informed of school affairs by featuring articles about various departments and activities. It maintains an exchange system WILLIAM THEISEN Editor with other schools throughout the state, creating a wider knowledge of contemporary college affairs. The Pointer is one of the few teacher's college papers in the state which devotes an entire page to sports each week. It maintains a society column each week, several columns of school happenings, and student opinion columns in addition to straight news items, editorials, and sports comments. While the Pointer does not have a large staff, it ranks first in mechanical set-up and in quality of news content. Efficiency in the circulation department is maintained by distributing the copies before assembly on Thursday morning. The confidence of Stevens Point business men in the Pointer is shown by the large amount of advertising which they maintain in the paper. The editor-in-chief is chosen by the faculty advisor, and the editor in turn chooses the staff which assists him in his work. Page 86 ELLERY BASSLER Business ManagerSTAFF EDITORIAL STAFF William Theisen............... George N. Hyer ....... John Maier .................. Harold Dregne................. Maxine Miner Keith Aulik, Rolph Anderson, Ethel McDonald, Jim Murat Ruth Nason............... Marian Mayer, Eileen Marx Marianne Stouffacher, CliHord Talbot, Darleen Lomas BUSINESS STAFF Ellery Frost Bossier ...... Alvin Bucholz ........ Marian Graham, Roberta McWilliams, Doris Duecker Raymond M. Rights® 11 ..... Editor-in-Chief Assistant Editor . Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor W. A. A. Notes News Staff Society Editor Proof Readers . Typists Business Monoger Circulation Manager Circulation Assistants Faculty Adivsor It. M. RlOMTWKU. Family .Wri’JW It. Kahok. F. Banu-rn. V. TwKturx. It. AXPEMOX. H. Dmcoxk. D. I.oma» DrrxxKii R. .McWiixiam . M Graham. E. Ma«x. M. Mayer. C. Talbot. .STAcrrACHEK. M. Miner. A. Bivholx. J. Maikh, E. Mi-Donalo. Pagt SjCENTRAL STATE Our band this year celebrates its sixth anniversary. This is not astounding in itself, but coupled with the information that it has been developed in its entirety during that time, and that it has toured the state during three of its six years, the fact becomes significant and we are tempted to investigate. Let us go back, then, to the autumn of 1931, for it was in that year that Professor Peter J. Michelson formally organized the first band of this college, its avowed purpose being "to promote more pep" in school activities, this band consisted of twenty pieces In the autumn of 1932 a band of forty pieces made its appearance at many school functions. From that time to this, the band has made swift progress until it is today an impressive organization which is well-known throughout the state. It is ranked in comparison with the leading organizations of its type in Wisconsin and Central State can indeed be proud of the reputation the unit has earned. Its repertoire this year is one of the most ambitious that has been attempted here. It includes, rather than the usual noisome band music, beautiful arrangements of the most famous classics, including the works of such masters as Wagner, Tschaikowsky, and Grieg. PETER J. MICHELSEN Through the efforts of Piesident Hyer and Mr. Michelsen, Director the music department now possesses a very fine set of chimes and a xylophone-marimba. These add much to the appearance and balance the band. The band sponsored, this year, its fourth annual band clinic. About sixty-five directors from surrounding high schools attended Their requests were previously filed and tabulated and then played by the college oand. Comments after this were very favorable. The band festival this year was attended by 37 musical organizations within a radius of 100 miles from Stevens Point. This has become an established event each spring and the high schools plan on it much the same as a state-sponsored event of the same type. All in all, the band has completed a very successful season, and with only two men graduating, will probably do greater things next year. ITINEARY Adams-Friendship Wisconsin Dells Tomah Sparta Reedsburg Baraboo Portage Beaver Dcm Ripon Berlin C. Talbot Page 88 A. Jendric'x L. Oligny F. Parfreyteachers college band FLUTE Fred Parfrey LuCele Beppler Alice Bentz OBOE John Marshall BASSOON Lorraine Anderson Richard Colby CLARINET Ben Goldberg Kenneth Storandt Gerald Eyler Ralph Abrohamson LaVerne Schwmgel Israel Mannis Gilbert Faust Clifton Fonstad Philip Worsencroft Adeline Goetsch Sara Jane Schmiedlin Lucille Gehrke Lawrence McGinley John Dzikoski ALTO CLARINET Ceho Wohlfert BASS CLARINET Joseph Kryshak Art Roberts ALTO SAXAPHONE H. Neal Brown Bill Corley TENOR SAXAPHONE Mae Michaels Betty Gleason BAND PERSONNEL BARITONE SAXAPHONE Norman Hinkley Marvin Olson ORNET Arnold Jindnck Clifford Talbot LaVerne Olingy Victor Lee Delos Kobs Elsie Firkus Olive Gregory FRENCH HORN Philip Dakin Charles Mose James Berard Bill Larson Verna Lueck Robert LaHoye BARITONE Ben Schneider Doris Craham TROMBONE John Hanson Bernice Atkins Wamuel Winch LaRue Smith Louis Hamel BASS William Theisen George Cartmill Fred Palmer STRING BASS Ula Mae Knutson SNARE DRUM Harold Anderson MARIMBA-XYLOPHONE Evelyn Schwingel BASS DRUM Margaret Miller CYMBALS Robert Andre TYMPANI Dorothy RichardsMEN’S hnt How—A. IWlMNV. . LaMOX. K. IjEE . T. Meyer. N. Kmvtxxs. F. PaREREY. G. Cowlkw. J. Camcry. W. CLUIKm. .Won. Kotr—E. "wTnm,. W. Iheiren. G. Kvi.er. G. Cartmii.1.. J. Kmoiiak. J. Stein eh, C. KorELrEU.EH. H. Colhy. T. r Al'CETT. Thini How—D. Kou . II. I'AOENKori'. C. Hartvio. G. Doherty. S. Grove . R. Andre. D. I.eiaer, V. IIododon. I. Bowker, I.. Fetee on. OFFICERS 1936-’37 Kirkwood Likes ........ President Calvin Rockefeller ....... Librarian William Larson ...... Business Manager The Men s Glee Club, under the capable direction of Mr. Knutzen, enjoyed a very successful year. Overnite tours were taken in the fall and spring; the former taking in the territory southwest of Stevens Point, and the latter north, extending into the upper peninsula of Michigan. Many other trips consisting of one or two concerts were scattered throughout the year. This is the second year the club has been a charter member of the Associated Glee Clubs of America and is the only college organization of the group. The annual Music Festival was held this year at Oshkosh while last year it was held at Green Bay. The progress the club has mode in the last four years is remarkable as can be readily seen by the fact that it is becoming well known thioughout the state os a fine singing organization. Student directors featured at most of the concerts have proved themselves efficient. Among these ore George Cartmill, Kirkwood Likes, William Larson, and William Theisen The Home Concert presented March 31 is certainly wortny of mention. A record crowd of over six hundred people attended and all were very well pleased with the program as was readily demonstrated by their hearty applause. Awards are aiven to the men who have been in the Club more than one year. Bronze, silver, and gold keys are given for two, three, and four years work respectively. Although the first year men receive no initial reward they have had experience in one of the finest glee clubs of Wisconsin. Membership is open to all men who sing and show o genuine interest in the organization. Pa it QOCHORUS Pirtl Hoir—ll. AkdRmOX. R. Hor ru x. V. Rather. D. Oix»c. A. 8 tat l. D. S hli etkh. F. Palukk. H Bkowx. X. E. Knctxxx. Sreond Now ). RaEj e. J. Bloom. C. Bki-nnhk. J. Khcmmk. D. Susduh. O. Pkxninotox. 0. Owtuwac . II. Dm. H. Rlichekt. J. Mi’Hat. Williom Theisen Erwin Westfall ACCOMPANISTS Roberta Peterson Margaret Miller Gilbert Faust Third Now—E. Soixuur.H. M. Kopllla. R. Srotoit . K. Thommox, B. G. Pimtiwox. PERSONNEL FIRST TENOR FIRST BASS Joe Bloom Ralph Anderson Gordon Cowles Robert Andre Gerald Doherty Hugh Brady Sherman Groves George Cartmill Charles Hartvig William Clements Walter Hodsdon Clifton Fonstad Kirkwood Likes William Knox Granville Zimmer William Larson Donald Leiser SECOND TENOR Robert Bishop Howard Pagenkoff Anthony Posluszny Myron Ropella Ned Brown Dearborn Spindler Jess Caskey Richard Stoeger Richard Colby John Steiner Phil Dumbleton Ross Dumbleton Warde Whittaker Gerald Eyler Thomas Fawcett SECOND BASS Robert Hoffman Ira Bowker Charles Mase Clyde Brunner Ted Meyer Harold Dent James Murat Paul Hein Georae Osterhaus Delos Kobs Fred Parfrey Colvin Rockefeller Joseph Kryshak Thoburn Peterson Arthur Stapel Wilbur Rathke NORMAN E. KNUTZEN Conductor j c QlWOMEN'S ffmr-M. !.. Tkxlev. J. Dorr. I.. S. J. WtMm. Petek J. Miciiruucx. K. Dvkkkv. S. Mainland. D. Dikcxkr R. Wam.w. Srront! How- M. Mahtix. I). Oentemie. A. Mainland. T. Kni-tkes. I.. Rlece. I.. Amcndaox. E. DeHorx. I. Stadetacher A. Mature. Thin! H»rz c. Wohlekrt H. Hr. in. M. Tohk :i.«on. II. Tvi k. K. Manx. A. Gorr»rf-ii. H. Phij tox. M. Mahmiai.l. R. Ext ties . Leco Bossier..............................................President Geraldine Pagenkoff ...... Secretory Jean Redeman ....... Treasurer The Women's Glee Club, with a membership of about fifty, began its fifth year this fall under the direction of Mr. Michelsen, director of the college music department. Greater care than ever was tcken this year in the proper placement of voices for the best chorai effects. Although the Glee Club has appeared in but one concert this season, its many fine appearances in the past have made it a well known organization. The annual Christmas concert, in which the Women’s Glee Club appeared with the Men's Glee Club and the college orchestra, was very well received by the college and townspeople. The club took oart, also, in the Mardi Gras by sponsoring a concession in true carnival spirit. It was planned some time ago to present awards in the form of pins to all members completing four years of Glee Club participation. If final plans are carried out the first presentation of cwards will be made at graduation in the spring of 1937. Pa eGLEE CLUB PERSONNEL FIRST SOPRANO SECOND SOPRANO Bernice Atkins Ledo Bossier Kothryn Duskey Thelma Knutson Jeannette Hagen Dorothy Oesterle Geraldine Pagenkoff La Pearl Powless Janette Van Natta Mary Louise Tenley Jeannette Winarski Lucille Bleck Ethel Bucholz Ethel Hill Roberta McWilliams Sara Mainland Maxine Miner Anita Madsen Helen Preston Florence Quast Helen Rezin ean Redemann hirley Webster Ruth Wabers FIRST ALTO Lorraine Anundson Alice Bentz Eileen De Horn Dorothy Dernbach Valeria Dernbach Jean Dopp Adeline Goelsch Mary Hoppen Esther Kushman Ann Mainland Irene Stauffacher Helen Tylk Ann Williams SECOND ALTO Marion Marshall Myrnel Martin Eileen Marx Ruth Knutson Grace Orkray Ruby Ottem Inez Olsen Mae Reiman Sara Jane Schmiedlin Eleancre Theisen Margaret Torkelson Celia Wohlfert Accompaniest LuCele Beppler PETER I. A ICHELSCN Conductor First S»r—E. Bocholz, A. Burn, E. Kfmuux. M. Reiman. B. Atkins. I. Ouix. K. McWilliams. I,. Powuh . Nov—J. Van Natta. 8. J. Scmmiedlin. D. Dernbach. M. Hoppe . V. Dernbach. J. Kkdemann. G. Pagenkopt. I.. Beppler. Third Nov—M. Miner. F. Qcart. E. Hill. J. Winarski. R. Ottem. E. Theisen. G. Okray, A. Williams. Pag 0 ?SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PERSONNEL Violins: Violo: Cellos: Bass Viol: Flute: Oboe: Bassoon: Clarinets: French Horns: Cornets: Trombone: Drums: Piano: Wenzel Albrecht, Marion Marshall, Ben Goldberg, Dorothy Richards, Alice Bentz, Phyllis Gilding, Ethel Bucholz, Myrnel Martin. LaVerne Schwingel Mr. Allez, Marie Hedquist Ula Mae Knutson Fred Parfrev John Steiner Dick Colby Kenneth Storandt, Gerald Eyler Philip Dakin, Charles Mase Arnold Jindrich, Victor Lee Louis Hamel Evelyn Schwingel Margaret Miller The College Symphony Orchestra is the oldest musical organization at Central State Teachers College. Under the direction of Professor Michelsen, the orchestra meets for rehearsal twice a week This year the Christmas concert was especially fine, including such well known numbers as Handel s Messioh, and De Schone Galthea. At this time the Glee Club appeared in concert with the orchestra, and the very excellent performance won the entire approval of the students and faculty. For the school year 1936-37, Mr. Michelsen has included in the repertoire of the orchestra such well known selections os Puccini s Madame Butterfly, With the Roumanian Gypsies by Ketelbey, Evolution of Dixie by M. L. Lake, Friml Favorites, and Victor Herbert’s Babes in Toyland. The progress of the College Orchestra is more evidence of the fine work Mr. Michelsen is doing with the music department.f'trti Nor—J. MoiUT. R. Hoi-tmas. G. lira, B. LaMiuwiwr, J. On m. Srtomd How—p. GiKLiN-a. S. WcHtm. K. Biernc . D. Geokoe. DEBATE Because Professor Leland M. Burroughs has coached winning debate teams for Central State Teachers College since he began his work here, this year's squad was well organized, hard working, and consistent in their 1937 debating career. Formal announcement of the opening of the forensic year was not made until October 15. A special invitation was made to all freshmen to attend the debate tourneys in order that new students would have the opportunity to try out for debate and acquire some skill in presentation of material before regular tryouts. Stevens Point has been active in the Midwest Debate Conference for the last ten years and on the opening of this school year Professor Burroughs announced that Stevens Point would participate in the Annual Mid-West Tournament at St. Thomas College in St. Paul again this year In preparation for this tournament, the local debaters entered into many state and invitational debates. On November 16, a debate tournament in which twelve local teams competed in three debates was held. At the end of the third round, seven teams were selected to continue debate work. In the men's division the following were chosen as members of the squad: George Hyer, Jim Murat, John Verrill, La Rue Smith, Tom Faucett, Dearborn Spindler, Bob Hoffman, and Ben Loschekwitch. In the girls group the following were chosen: Kathryn Becher, Shirley Webster, Doris George, Phyllis Gikling, Rosalie Timm, and Eva Rae Guerin. This squad began work immediately. Aiding the students in their research were: Doctor Reppen, Professor Steiner, Professor Tolo, and Professor Smith. They presided over scheduled round table discussions. Fair 9$Something up their (leave? That's sufficient proof. You tell 'em. Ben. A voluable fact. Jim? Kathryn set serious. A pause in the day's recitation. Shirley and Phil. This ought to cinch it. The Ecu Claire debate squad came here January 9th for the first intercollegiate debate. Seven teams from Eau Claire met seven local teams. Stevens Point debaters who participated in the Invitational Interstate Debate Tournament at Ecu Claire January 30th won first place. George Hyer and Jim Murat traveled to St. Paul and Northfield later in the season. They met the following five schools: University of Minnesota, St. Thomas, Carlton, St. Catherine’s and Macalester College. During this time the women’s team was not inactive. Shirley Webster and Phyllis Gilding were very successful at Fargo North Dakota where they went as far as the semi-finals in the Annual Red River Volley Debate Tournament. The squad which returned from St. Thomas after a tournament which was held March 1, 2, and 3 had completed another successful year of debating. In this annual Midwest Tournament none of the teams were eliminated until after the sixth round. The squad was composed of Phyllis Gikling and Shirley Webster, Doris George, and Kathryn Becher, Robeit Hoffman and Ben Laschkewitsch, and George Hyer and Jim Murat. Because their work was of such high quality these students scored one-hundred points in debate. The one-hundred points is equivalent to one grade point. Although debaters have never received scholastic credit before, it seems advisable that these students be given some material credit for their fine work. Page Q6F. J. Sc-iimkecxue R. M. Riokthell C. F. Watsox H. R. Stein ATHLETIC COMMITTEE A vote of thanks should be offered our illustrious athletic committee for their untiring efforts in producing a new deal for our college. The committee composed of R M. Rightsell, F. S. Schmeeckle, H. R. Steiner, and C. F. Watson control matters in relation to schedules, finances, elegibility problems, awards, and all controvercies dealing with athletics. The committee works in collaboration with the coach who expresses his desires and the needs of supporting an athletic system while the men on the board do their best to fulfill plans for a successful year. Professor F. J. Schmeeckle was elected president of the Wisconsin Teachers College Athletic Conference. Each athletic committee sends a representative to the conclave, ours being Mr. Schmeeckle. We may rest assured that Central State Teachers College will enjoy a successful 38-39 year. raseEddik Kotal "BUILDER OF CHAMPIONS" This is not an idle expression originated by the imaginative mind of some worshiper of Coach Kotal. A foundation has been built by our coach that fully merits its use. Perhaps it is an inherent temperment. The career of Eddie Kotal is indeed remarkable. His professional ball ploying with the Green Bay Packers which was exceedingly brilliant culminated in 1929 when they won the World Championship. Eddie spent several years both as assistant and head coach at Lawrence College with marked success. For the seven years that Kotal has been with us, he has turned out seven championship teams in football and basketball. This is the third consecutive year in which Central State has won the District Basketball Championship. This year at a meeting of the Teochers College Coaches Conference, Eddie Kotal was elected President of the group by a unanimous vote. Kotal is not only the dynamite that brings out the best in the men for the Purple and the Gold, but he is also interested in the individuals themselves and their problems. I try to be one of the boys—a buddy. The boys tell me their troubles and we sit down, talk them over ond see what con be done about them. Then we do it.” The complete harmony shown in the athletic department is one of the secrets of our success. We humbly submit this tribute because we owe it to you—"The Builder of Champions I'agr wCONFERENCE STANDINGS SOUTHERN DIVISION W. L. T. Pet. Stevens Point $ 1 1 667 Milwaukee 2 2 0 .500 Whitewater 2 2 0 .500 Oshkosh 1 1 2 500 Platteville 1 2 1 .333 NORTHERN DIVISION Superior. . 3 0 0 1.000 Eau Claire .2 1 1 .667 La Crosse 1 1 2 .500 River Falls 1 3 0 .250 Stout 0 2 1 .000 SCORES OF SEASON'S GAMES Jordan College . . 12 Stevens Point 18 Whitewater 2 Stevens Point 12 Platteville 7 Stevens Point 19 Oshkosh 7 Stevens Point 7 DeKalb 14 Stevens Point 12 St. Norbert's 19 Stevens Point 0 14 7 Total 75 Total 75 ALL CONFERENCE TEAM Athletic directors of the Wisconsin Stote Teachers College Conference met in Milwaukee November 19 to choose the all-star teams for the northern and southern division, to adopt the 1937 football schedule, and to decide to abide by the National Intercollegiate basketball rule retaining the center jump. Lautenschlager, Oshkosh ... . . . L.E Goers, Whitewater ................... L.T Sires, M. Milwaukee ......... .... L.G. Hanson, Oshkosh .......... .. . . C. Sparhawk, Stevens Point ........ R.G. Menzel, Stevens Point ............... R.T. Kafka, Platteville R.T. Berard, Stevens Point.............. R E. Farina, Whitewater ..................... Q Arseneau, Oshkosh ................... L.H. Rosenblum, Milwaukee L.H. McGuire, Stevens Point ....... .... R.H. Houck, Stevens Point .................. F. Pair 100 FwttRomr- Al Bl-cholx. Hhcno Sumnxui. Kkd Chartikk. Don Johnrton. Jim McGi-ihe. Wrbb Bxrard. Charlie Hoick. , Eddie Ouox, Frank Hitxke. Stnmd {„«—Hki» Hkhnxtmn. Hank Warner. Ed Slotwinhki. Hay Wkinoartnkr. Tkd Minim.. Don Hrkmmkr. Fk Bohan. Chock Squawk. TAirrf frov—CiM Formal Biu. Eokwbtkk. I.ylk Bhv'nkkr. Rid Miller. Fred N'im». Tom I.indow. Dox Norton. rouriM How Coacii Kutal, Jack Larrox. Harry Oliony. Al Middlertkadt. Swwant Coach Ferdinand Hirxy. SOUTHERN DIVISION CHAMPIONS Gold Jerseys Mick McGuire .. Franklin Hiizke .. Leonard Chqrtier Al Bucholz Edd e Olson Chuck Sparhawk fo Bohan Tom Lindow ... Don Bremmer Gib Pophal Don Jonnston .. Chas. Houck Webb Berard . Br. Slotwinski__ Hank Warner . Don Norton Ray Wemgartner Bill loewecke . . Gib Miller. . Ed Slotwinski. Lyle Brunner . Year on Pos. High School Squad B Grants Pass, Ore. 2 B Merrill 2 B Merrill 3 B Merrill 2 E Elcho 3 G Plover 4 E Chicago Hts., III. 1 B Manawa .. 2 B Stevens Point 1 G Merrill 3 B Appleton 3 B Stevens Point 2 Wisconsin Rapids 3 G Stevens Point . .. 4 G Stevens Point 1 T Wisconsin Rapids 2 C Gladstone Mich.. 3 G Merrill 2 T Mazomome 2 T Stevens Point .... 1 C Abbotsford . 1 E Wausau 2 Ycor on Gold Jerseys Pos. High School Squad Ted Menzol .... T Stevens Point . .. 4 Red Bernstein .. B Brodhead .. 1 Black Jerseys Jack Lorson .. .. B Stevens Point . .. 1 Forest Church . E Iron Mt. Mich .. 1 Harrison Olingy E Stevens Point . .. 1 Ernie Ruppel B Appleton ... .. 1 Dan Young T Bancroft . . 1 Jerry Jones G Oconto Falls . .. 1 HeroStanelle . B Forest Junction .. 1 Bill Middlesteadt B Abbottsford ... 1 Chas. Khols B Stevens Point . .. 1 Ed McAllen . .. Wabeno .. 1 Paul Rusch E Merrill . ... 1 John Hutsell ... T Laona . ... 1 Purple ond Gold Jerseys Rube Belongia .. E Mountain .. . .. 1 Chet Rmka B Stevens Point .. 2 Louis Drobnick . E Gleason 1 Chos Burch . .. G Unity . 2 Jim Duecker. .. B Kiel .. 1 Page lorFOOTBALL POINTERS 18—JORDAN 12 Cocch Kotal’s 1936 gridders opened a successful season by defeating Jordan College. After the opening kickoff, the hopes for a point victory were dampened when brilliant pass offense gave Jordan a touchdown and a lead of 6 to 0. The second quarter featured brilliant playing by the Point team. Chartier swept around the end to tie the score and a few minutes later a beautiful run by Bucholz aided by wonderful blocking, gave Point the edge 12 to 6. Marvelous defensive play marked the third quarter and os a result neither team scored. The fourth quarter featured a long pass from McGuire to Chartier to put the ball on the three yard strips. McGuire churned the line for a touchdown. After the kickoff, a revived Jordan team swept down the field via pass plays to bring them within a touchdown of a victory. The game ended shortly after the next kickoff with the score 12 to 18. Kotal’s 1936 grid machine was on its way to another championship. POINT 12-WHITEWATER 2 A fighting eleven marched away with the conference opener by defeating Whitewater. At no period in the game did Whitewater moke any serious threat to score. Farina, of Whitewater, took the kickoff back to his own 28 yard line and that was as neai to their own goal as Point’s defense would allow. A Whitewater fumble, recovered by Point, Backs—Al Bucholz, Jim McGuire, D. Johnsion, C Houck. Lino -Webb Berard, R. E. Ted Menzel, R. T. Gil Pophal, R. G; Ray Weingartner, Cj Bruno Slotwmski, L Gi Ed Slotwinski, L.Ti Eddie Olson, L. EBocks—Fronklin Hitzke, Tom Lin-dow. Red Bernstein, Red Char-tier. Line—Fred Nimz.R.E., Don Norton, R T. Bill Loewecke, R. G.j Lyle Brunner, C.j C.Sparnowk, L.G.;Gib Miller, L. T.1 Fe Bohan, L. E. sent McGuire across in the first quarter to give Point the lead. An exchange of punts during the remainder of the quarter left the ball on Whitewater s 20 yard line. Large gains by McGuire and Chartier were featured in the second quarter, but attempts to score were checked. Working the ball down to the three yard line via McGuire s passes put the ball on the Point three yard line. Chartier carried the ball around end to score Spectacular pass plays and brilliant work on the part of both teams left the score 12 to 0 at the opening of the fourth quarter. A blocked punt by Goers of Whitewater and recovered by Menzel in the end zone gave Whitewater the two points. Only six Pointers were substituted for in the entire game. POINT 19—PLATTEVILLE 7 Central State's powerful eleven continued its drive toward another championship by scorina a decisive victory over Platteville. Small gains were made in the opening quarter by both teams. In the second quarter, after Eddie Olson blocked a Platteville punt, recovered by Point, the local team marched for a touchdown. The finest plunge was made by Chartier. The Kotal men started another march that ended on the ten yard line. Platteville's punt was blocked by Bruno Slotwinski and recovered by Ed Slotwmski in the end zone for a touchdown Platteville's determined rally ended on Point's thirty two yard line. The kick was bad A strong wind aided the Purple and Gold to push the ball for a touchdown m two plays by Menzel and McGuire. Chartier converted. In the lost quarter, the invaders tallied a score with the extra point to end the game nineteen to seven. Olsen, Slotwinski, Menzel, and Nimz played limelight ball. FOOTBALL Page 103FOOTBALL OSHKOSH 7-POINT 7 Point s enviable record was marred by a tie game featured by a spectacular run over the Qoal line by Micky McGuire in the lost minute oT ploy only to have it recalled by an offside. Oshkosh seemed unable to hold Point during the opening minutes. The Kotal men made o gain of sixty two during this period. The Kolf men kicked into safe territory and. when they got the ball, made the score 7-0 by a series of trick ploys. Aerial attacks by both teams featured the second quarter with large gams bv both teams but no tallies. Early in the third quarter, McGuire scored a touchdown with Chartier converting. During the last quarter, the game was ployed between the thirty yard lines. The local boys made a last desperate attempt, but McGuire's featured run was frustrated. Olsen, Johnston, and Houck were outstanding. POINT 12—DEKALB 14 Homecoming spirits were dampened by a flashy colored quarterback from DeKalb who ployed with plenty of speed to bring Point their first defeat. Point made a brilliant start with McGuire playing Big Ten brand of football, but DeKalb took the oval and after exchange of punts and good passing scored, lundeen converted to make it 7-0. In the second quarter, Bohan performed well and Point was on the twenty-five at the final whistle. The second half featured good playing on both sides. Playing even football throughout the third quarter, the Pointers came back with a touchdown in the early minutes of the final period on a pass from McGuire to Chartier, making the score 12-7. Point failed to convert The flashy Hold that line1 Looks good to me. Atto boy! Donnie. End run. Reverse. Tough luck Davis. Shifty hips No good "Big Ten" form. Intercepted.Bill Loewecke Red "Touchdown" Chortier. Chuck Sporhowk Coach. We'll miss you next year Red "Bruno." Lyle Brunner. Davis of DeKalb could not be stopped and in the last minute of play, he went over for the final touchdown and boosted their score to 13. DeKalb converted the extra point and the game ended 14-12 with DeKalb out in front. POINT C-ST. NORBERTS 19 Being completely outplayed in this annual gridiron battle, the Pointers dropped a onesided game to the St. Norbert Green Knights. Reserves of the Point squad played during most of the game which was played on a muddy Reid Finke, the Saint’s 2C0 pound full back, scored two of the three touchdowns, smashing through the Point line Point at no time seriously threatened the defense of the hard driving machine that gave them a disheartening defeat. POINT 7—MILWAUKEE 14 Playing a hard-driving Milwaukee aggregation, the Pointers failed to find many effective combinations to pile up scores. The Green Gulls, on the other hand, clicked marvelously on everything that they attempted. Eckenrod and Kleinman scored for Milwaukee. In the final quarter, Nimz passed to McGuire who smashed to the four yard line. Then on two more plays, Micky skirted left end for the talley. The extra point was scored on a pass from McGuire to Bremmer. Although losing the game, the Pointers still won the championship by virtue of Whitewater s defeat by Plattevifle, the only team threatening Points lead in the conference standing. Page ios FOOTBALLCHAMPIONS OF SOUTHERN DIVISION We Salute You! RESUME OF 1936-37 SEASON DECEMBER 7 Pointers open cage season with victory. Warner and Nimz high scorers as local Peds win sixteenth straight Neither team displayed better form than that characteristic of a beginning season. The gome was closely fought during the first three quarters, but the Pointers managed to cash in on some beautiful shots during the last several minutes to win by 41-31. (Non-Conference) DECEMBER 18 Concordia is second pointer victim of season Brings total wins to an unbroken 1 7 Central State managed to eke out a 36-28 victory over the strong Milwaukee five for the second win of the season. The gome displayed better style than the one a week earlier. I he local cagers overcame an early lead to set the pace at 26-17. (Non-Conference) Chet Rinka, one of last years ace stars JANUARY 3 Teachers college noses out alumni five 36-35 Warner leads winners with four baskets Krumm high scorer as grads nearly upset Peds as grads nearly upset reds played his first game of the season for the peds. ill handling and frequent changes of the lead. • • » • ' w" w v ' 7 v v v 1 | I he game was fast, featured by clever ball handling and frequent changt This game was the 18th consecutive victory for the College Quintet. (Non-Conference) Kw-FiBoiun, Dave Pabim. Tom I.i.vdow. Fkkd Nimz. Chet Rucx a. Dos Jomxetox. Geokob Sciinkidkk. Sffun.l AW Coach E. Kotal, Roe Rimiop, Hank Waknkh. Rube Relonoia. Ltuc Rncxnen. Tom Jaamca. Tonv Andkkaox. Jim Dukcxeh. Paf t lo6Dove Pornsh Tommy Lindow Freddie Nimz Don Johnston Chet Rmka JANUARY 5 Peds drop overtime game to Marshfield 47-46 Contest tied 42-42 at end of 40 minutes Pointers take 45-42 lead in extra period then err to lose This see-saw game was os exciting, thrilling, and full of action as any game one would want to watch. The Marshfield Athletics were allowed to stay in the game after four personal fouls due to lock of reserves. (Non-Conference Game) JANUARY 8 Point trims Milwaukee 39-26 in league opener Nimz, Johnston, Rinka star for Kotals cagers Teacher's center scores 1 7 points In their first game in defense of their title Friday Night, the Kotal men acquitted themselves admirable. Many fouls slowed up the game. Neither team ployed above mid-season form. C S.T. C. controlled the boll most of the game, but Coach Penwell s team showed remarkable floor play. (Conference Game JANUARY 10 Teachers drop first college game in 19 starts Concordia Five gives Kotalmen 30-21 setback Concordia's Cagers proved too much for the tired Point Quintet. It was a hard fought game with the C. S T. C. ball handlers not up to true form. The lead changed six times during the first half. (Non-Conference Game) BASKETBALL Page 107 George Schneider Fe Bohon Rube Belongio Tony Anderson Hanlc Warner JANUARY 1 5—Teachers score 52-35 victory over Platteville—Nimz.’Lindow, Johnston share scoring honors—Peds take 2nd straight conference win with Warner and Rinko on sidelines The conference champions of last year were not greatly extended in defeating Coach Leiti’s five, even with Rinko and Warner incapacitated. Thirty-two fouls were called, indicating a rather rough game. JANUARY 22—C.S. T. C. Cagers lose to Whitewater 37-35—Pointers suffer 2nd conference defeat in three years Whitewater showed plenty of style on their own floor while Point played ragged boll. Forty-four fouls were called. Nimz, the Purple and Gold reliable center, had an off night, contributing only three points and held without a field goal JANUARY 30—Purple and Gold defeat Stout 46-23—Reserves ploy half the game for Kotalmen—Rinko and Johnston score 11 points each Stepping to an 18-2 lead during the first ten minutes, the Pointers were never threatened. Occasional bursts of style were witnessed. The gome became rather rough toward the end. JANUARY 31—Eau Claire sets bock Pointers 41-39—Nimz, Lindow and Held shore honors A great deal of traveling did not agree too well with the Point Cagers. They appeared to tire toward the middle of the 2nd half and played without the necessary zip. Point led by a margin of ten with but six minutes left to play but failed to hold the lead. BASKETBALL Patt ioSBASKETBALL FEBRUARY 1 Pointers win at Rhinelander 28 20 Victory gives Kotalmen two wins and one loss over weekend Again, outplaying a fresher team by clever defense and accurate shooting, the Pointers were able to retain their early lead to win the game. The contest started fast but the local ccgers seemed to tire, making a slow finish FEBRUARY 4 Teachers overwhelm Whitewater 61-28 Regain league lead in record scoring spree—Don Johnston leads attack with 16 points Lindow, Nimz score 13 each Forecast as an avenger for a defeat two weeks ago, this game proved to be all that and more. Whitewater was completely outclassed after the first few minutes A burst of scoring speed at the start of the 2nd half netted twenty-two points for the local caaers while the Agnewmen were held to two boskets. FEBRUARY 14 Teachers improve first place position Trim Oshkosh quintet with ease 45-25—Johnston, Nimz, lead for Point Lautenschlager tops losers The Purple and Gold entrenched themselves more firmly jn first position by trimming the Oshkosh five. The Kotalmen were in top form but lacked the class usually shown with Lindow, regular guard in the hospital. Teachers defeat Platteville, 47-29, near title—Rinka scores 13 points for local peds Despite the missing of Lindow and Schneider in the lineup, the Pointers showed up well. A rough game witnessed by only a few, short moments of class and style proved only another stepping stone toward the Pointer’s race for the conference title. Lyle Brunner Bob Bishop Tom Joaska Jim DueckerFEBRUARY 28 BASKETBALL Peds win third straight title Don Johnston Goes to Town with 23 points Victory over Milwaukee gives Kotalmen championship A score of 49-35 copped an undisputed title for the Purple and Gold, making it the third straight in the Southern Conference. All players exhibited a fine game with beautiful teamwork. Johnston was "on‘ but was supported by his team mates in a grand manner. MARCH 1 St. Norberts fails to get revenge—Pointers win easily The local cogers were led in their attack on St. Norberts by Chet Rinka with fifteen points and Fred Nimz with thirteen points. Both teams relied, for the most part, on long shots and both played a steady brand of ball. MARCH 5 Teachers lose last conference tilt at Oshkosh 31-21 Title already won. Pointers have letdown Lautenschlaqer paces Kolfmen with 1 3 points A fiahting Oshkosh quintet, with nothing to gain but the satisfaction of having beaten the conference champions, took advantage of the Point Five who lacked spirit, and outplaying and outscoring them. MARCH 7 Stout bows to champs 62-35—Johnston and Nimz High Scorers as season ends After showing inferior ball playing at Oshkosh, the Purple and Gold had a reversal of form and ended the seoson witn fine style and splendid scoring record. The reserves played a major part of the game. We took Eau Claire And Concordia And Whitewater And Oshkosh Two points —but not for us. Funny Up Freddie!How to put the shot put in two easy lessons. Puff, Puff, Puff. The finish. Christy in the home stretch. Track at Central State Teachers College, although it did not play a major part in the year's athletics, was whole heartedly supported by the men interested in this sport. The cross country running featured Christenson, Bull, and Grandkoski. Lloyd Krutza and Chuck Sparhawk were the best men in weights. The fact that these men conscientiously trained and have kept physically fit should give them a good chance In the state meet this year. Although Milwaukee has won the state track championship for the last eight years, they will be up ogainst some stiff competition when they encounter Stevens Point. This year marked the more enthusiastic revival of minor sports as was seen by the increased popularity of boxing. Track is taking its place too and should become a great interest for future years. TRACK AND CROSS COUNTRY Pa-e BOXING Central State boxers were determined to win laurels of champions. Despite the fact that several of the boys were the best of friends, they displayed marvelous ability in marring the other fellow's features Those boxers making the trip to the state tournament at Superior were: Loyd Hayes and Earl Michaels, 119 lbs; Ben Laschkewitsch, 125 lbs; Charles Torbenson, 135 lbs, Inman Whipple and Calvin Cook, 145 lbs; Bill Corley, 155 lbs; Winston Judd, 165 lbs,- Fred Nimz, heavyweight. The champions of the school for 1937 ore: 119 lbs.........Earl Michaels 125 lbs......Charles Torbenson 135 lbs ...George Hubbord 145 lbs ...........Calvin Cook 155 lbs Inman Whipple 165 lbs ..................Bill Carley 175 lbs......Charles Sparhawk Heavyweight ........Fred Nimz Fir,I Row—I). Hlotwinbki. I. Whipple. J. Iliranx. V. Ratuke. A. Fob- LVMNY, P. Am, Strottd Row—F. Slut, F. 8chekl. C. Cook. D. Yovno. K. Michaels. G. Hakkib. Third Roy—W. Cahi.cy. H. Warner. L. Dnorkick. J. Felix. L. Brunner. Tired? Fe’n Honk. Hot or Cold7 He does look tough. Chuck "Darleen” Torbenson. Who‘s hiding behind those gloves? Waiting for the bell. Oh! Oh!MrATUDIrSScene 1' Importance of Being 'Earnest" . Identity solved. The Darson becomes entangled in romance. "The Martins and the Coys. Thev were reckless mountain boys." Who’ll ploy detective this time? Cast "Three Taps at Twelve.” DRAMATICS CALENDAR 1936-'37 December 3—"The Adding Machine. December 10—"Three Taps at Twelve.' March 17-18—"The Importance of Being Earnest. April 8— "Sintram of Skaggerak. April 15—"Submerged." The College ploy year was initiated with the presentation of Elmer Rice s The Adding Machine" by the speech classes under the direction of Mr. Leland M. Burroughs. The need for o student organization for those interested in dramatics has long been felt by the College. To meet this need, the College Theater was organized in November 1936 Its purpose, os stated in the constitution of the organization, is to provide a means by which any student of the Central State Teachers College having an interest and a certain amount of aptitude in the theater will be able to find active, educational, and creative work in theater production. Page n 4BEHIND THE SCENES The College Theater presented two major productions to enthusiastic audiences during the course of the year. The first, "Three Taps at Twelve", was, as the title implies, a mystery olay typical of the best entertaining modern drama. The second was Oscar Wildes The Importance of being Earnest.’ First nighters who attended the latter production were favored with checkroom service and were extended the hospitality of a lobby fitted with comfortable chairs, lamp, end radio. After the ploy, an informal theater party was held at the Gingham Teo Room for members and their guests. Submerged" and "Sintram of Skoggerok were workshop productions. Designed primorilv for the purpose of giving members practical experience in experimental production, workshop plays provide entertainment to the audience as well. They were presented at morning assemblys. A unique feature of the organization has been its classes in theater art conducted by Phil Runkel. Other activities included sponsorship of the high school one act play contests and assistance in stage setting and lighting for ploys presented by other organizations during the year. Gloom. Phil looks worried. Light technician. Make-up artists.RADIO BROADCAST Central State Teachers College is very fortunate in being given the opportunity to make use of the facilities of WL6L to release radio programs to a vast audience in the state of Wisconsin Previous to 1935, several programs were produced by the college and broadcast from the main studios of the station. In 1935 the contributions of alumni and other interested persons made it possible to erect a telephone line from the station to the college, making it feasible to broadcast programs directly from the school. A regular weekly program schedule was arranged. Jack Burroughs directed the radio activities during the 1935-36 school year, with able assistance by Don Colby and others. In the Fall of 1936, because of the graduation of Burroughs, the directorship passed to Gary Willecke, a senior student in High School department. Don Colby again handled the technical side of the broadcasts. Because of the limitations of the technical equipment, musical programs were generally avoided. An active campaign was started to secure high quality equipment. Several makes were tried out during the year. At the beginning of the second semester, the time was thought to be ripe to definitely organize the radio staff so that the work could be carried on during the ensuing years. Trials were held for announcers, technicians, and script writers. A publicity bureau was organized and musical programs were broadcast during the latter part of the school year It is the plan of the staff to become as active and as efficiently organized as the school publications. The pioneering work is of course slow and difficult, for it takes tremendous time and effort to put on a radio program that will be a credit to the institution. The success of the radio Standing—E. Shearier, R.Venme, E. Belongio, W. Knox, S. Zielani , G. Willecke, Dr. Tolo. Seated—D. Colby, K. Becher F. Parfrey. R. VENNIE Technical Assistant G. WILLECKE announcer D. COLBY Technical DirectorThe Rovina Reporter. Graham McNamee. Dr. Collins on the spot. And now deor Lois—will you kindly tell the radio audience. activities is due to a large extent to the efforts of President Hyer who made the money for the equipment available, and to the staff members listed below: Faculty Advisor: Dr. Harold M. Tolo Student Director: Gerhard Willecke Technical Director: Donald Colby Production assistants: Barbara Wake Ruth Nason Gene Belongia Kathryn Becher Carroll Swenson Rosalie Timm William Knox Phil Runkel Fred Parfrey Technical Assistants: Bob Vennie Stonley Zelonis Earl Sheorier Pngf 117 Publicity: Bob HoffmanKing Leonard Chartier and Queen Esther Yach JUNIOR PROMENADE King—Leonard Chartier Queen—Esther Yach General Chairman—Bjorn Christenson Orchestra- Harold Menmng Chaperones Pres, and Mrs. F. S. Hyer( Dean and Mrs. H. R. Steiner, Regent and Mrs. Martens, Mr. and Mrs. C-. Evans, Miss S. E. Colman, and Mr, L. Burroughs.SENIOR BALL King Wilbur Berard Queen Sarah Jane Schmiedlin General Chairman Ted Menzel Orchestra—Tommy Temple Chaperones- Pres, and Mrs. F. S. Hyer and Dean and Mrs. H. R Steiner. K ng Wilbur Berard and Queen Ssrah Jane SchmiedlinJust cover the spot folks. Who's who'onywoy. Queen Betty. King Benjamin. And a good time was had by all. M A R D I GRAS The Mordi Gras Carnival held Friday, February 5, and the masquerade dance the following Tuesday proved to be a decided success botn financially and socially. The mam show featured a well balanced variety of fun and frolic with the Muscle Bound Follies providing a big lough. The Martins and the Coys’ with their hilarious display of mountain enthusiosm did much to moke the show a hit. Several other vaudeville numbers topped off the evening. The concessions, too, were of many varieties, talcing in all the tricks of the trade. The masquerade ball revealed an array of color and splendor worthy of any occasion. The recedina ceiling of varied colored serpentines and the streamers furnished a gay background for the merry evening. The ever present balloon busters" were in their glory as they punctuied hundreds of balloons at the height of the evening s hilarity. Bob Kreilkamp deserves much credit for his fine management of the occasion. Prizes were awarded the best and cleverest costumes. Of these, Marianne Stauffacher, escorted by Frederick Bolender, won the prize for the best dressed couple and the group prize was awarded to the Omega Mu Chi sorority. King Laschkewitsch and Queen Betty Schwahn were fitting blueblcods.DGWTtGWrtt CAMlb Everybody was out to see the game. Phi Sigma Epsilon's float. Heinz's vegetables. Who needs support? Traveling ambush. Tau Gams Coming Home. Omega Mu Chi's winning float. Omega Mu Chi's Royalty. The kick off. Incidently, Roosevelt won. Home Ec. belles. HOME COMING The weekend of October 24th with its gala activities brought to C. S. T. C. one of the greatest homecominas in the history of the college. The bon fire on Friday evening ushered in the celebration. Pep talks were followed by cheering and ended with a snake dance. The Phi Sigma Epsilon Fraternity welcomed the alumni to a semi-formal pre-hcmeccming dance at FHotel Whiting Friday evening. The homecoming porade was held on Saturday morning. Omega Mu Chi Sorority was awarded first prize for its float representing the Greek meaning of the sorority with the caption Conquei DeKalb”. Sigma Zeta won second place with its chemical interpretation of C. S. T. C. Disintegrating DeKalb.’’ The Primary Department, with its novel stunt of using vegetable puns forecasting the results of the game was awarded third place. In the afternoon, the Kota I men met DeKalo on Schmeeckle Field. Stevens Point suffered its first defeat, DeKalb coming through with a well deserved 14 to 12 victory. In spite of the disappointment caused by the upset in the homecoming tilt, the large crowd which aather-ed at the gymnasium for the annual homecoming dance Saturday evening was proof that the gala spirit of the day had not been lowered.INTERESTING SENIORS LAURA JANE ROSENOW— Possesses the most infectious chuckle in school—is never without it little -dork—constantly threatens to diet, but doesn’t need it—has artistic ability and should do something about it—studies, but doesn’t think it os much fun os lots of other things -tap dances occasionally and panics people when an entertaining mood hits her -gave up "steady things" lost year and has lost her heart several times since (and recovered it ogam)— sparkles with pep -generally known as "Rosie" and hates the nome— has an answer for everything (even if the answer is several minutes later)—intends to teach, at least for o while! GERHARDE WILLECKI- The Graham McNamee of C. S. T. C—has handled with a professional touch Central State's "time on the air" for the past year -announces, directs, and organizes -possessed of eloauent powers of speech—great procastinator, but comes through in the end—likes bosketball and swimming—goes steady -usually to be found at "her" house -wants to be an electrical engineer and should be aood at it -has been a C. S. T. C. institution for several years, off and on, and will be much missed. REGINA SCHWE8KE - Socially inclined, particularly during vacations plays the piano ("swing''band classical) like a professional—can always collect a crowd when she’s in the mood to play—plays bridge a lot and loves it—not particularly athlotic dances beautifully—holds the school record for a long affair and was rewarded by "something sparkly"—conscientious about work when she has to be—moody—takes it out in bursts of work and then is "set to go” again -has a comeback that is one better every time -will be hard to get along without her. Page 122MAXINE MINER A fine student and a good worker- devotes herself whole-heartedly to her many activities—a leader in most everything -very athletically inclined -favorite hobby is sports—particularly walking with Frank—runner up for the title of "Most Permanent in Love Affairs '— very quiet—probably thinking most of the time—looks good in sports clothes -wears them most of the time— scientifically minded -friendly when you get to know her—will undoubtedly be a success IF she chooses a career. LEONARD OLSON- One of those people whom everyone likes—just natural—good natured -wears a perpetual grin—not too ambitious but definitely reliable—another freelancer who is usually “there"'—harbors a slight yen for Eleanor Powell’s twinkling feet -likes to ploy Baseball—and ping-pona "at the house"—has noble ambitions of a string of degrees and the teaching profession-likes English—gets positively profound on the deeper aspects of literature—will leave a place which is hard to fill when he graduates this spring. SHIRLEY WEBSTER— Blond and studious—works hard in school and extra-curricular activities ond the result usually indicates the effort applied -her argumentative powers are shown by her successful seosons in debate loquacious—entertains frequently with her rendition of "The Crooked Mouth Family”—her "Outside Time" is all taken up and he’s out of town now—absent minded and rather vague about it all—not particularly athletic— should succeed in anything she undertakes—a good scout. Page 12$ INTERESTING SENIORS» KIRKWOOD LIKES— A studious person—con carry on lengthy discussions on life's weightier problems, both intellectual and practical—is married and settled for life—very musical— possesses a beautiful tenor which has made him the pride and joy of the men's glee club—says that ping-pong is one of his most strenuous activities—definitely enjoys the teaching profession, and intends to moke a success of it after graduation—likes Frederick March ond Ginger Rogers—but disapproves definitely of "swing" music—will undoubtedly be a success in his chosen field. FAY YERKE- Red headed- good egg -likes athletics—skating and basketball best—adores noture—picking wild raspberries, and reoding poetry on banks of streams, for instance. Doesn't go for swing music—light opera and waltzes have more appeal—has o yen for Victor Herbert's music, Norma Shearer, and Nelson Eddy—the gypsy in her makes her daydream a lot about travel in foreign climes—dreams a lot—but her feet hit the ground when there’s something to be done—wants to be an authority on dietetics, and will reach her goal if past achievements are any criteria. CHARLES SPARHAWK— The local "bone-crusher"—specializes in wrestling ond the more serious side of the "Manly art of self-defense"—is brainy and a good student in cddition— favorite hobby is any form of athletics—in the outdoor world, likes hunting and fishing best—can be seen any fall with o gun over his shoulder—believes in "steady" things—is with her most of the time —has a beautiful power of bluff which he uses in and out of the classroom—wants to be a coach and will be a good one. Page 124 INTERESTING SENIORSINTERESTING SENIORS JOHN MAIER— The Chi Delta "dark horse"—toll, dark, and handsome, but doesn't do much about it—could probably break a few feminine hearts if he tried—blushes easily -authority on athletics—as sports editor of the "Poin»r”{ has kept the paper full of up to the minute "dope" on the sporting world—has a headful of sporting statistics—one of the school's "brain trusts”—not too over loquacious, but when he soys something its worth while—can be clover—usually at someone else's expense—we think he'll "go places". ARNOLD HOTVEDT- Blond man-obout town type—is usually "in there" in school activities—successfully filled the post of president of Phi Sigma Epsilon and Bloc honorary society —not o "steady" man, but gets around plenty -possessed of remorkoble powers of argumentation which he uses frequently -soys his favorite outdoor sport is golf-favorite indoor sport is tolking, we think—has a twinkle in his eyes and a reody wit—proud of his various business careers—but we wonder when he’ll settle down to one. He will be a much missed campus institution. FROST BASSIER- Another strong silent man—quiet, but well-liked and popular—dependable—a good student—his fine head for business is shown by his career os business manager of the "Pointer”. Favorite outdoor sport (and profession) is baseball—during the summer he burns up most of the diamonds in Central Wisconsin— good dancer but not much of a socialite—has been a leoder in school activities—a good conversationalist when you get to know him. Page !2$Reading, writing and rahmetic. On the playground. At the Halloween partv. The library. Transportation and Communication project, Fourth Grade. Librory, First Grade. Historical Pageant, Sixth Grade. TRAINING SCHOOL The Training School is one of the outstanding units of our college. The work that the pupils have done with the guidance and assistance of the practise teachers and training instructors is astounding. All grades have carried out projects which reveal a remarkable ability. Following is a brief sketch of their activities: The first grode made a study of animals which culminated in a circus. In connection with the study of milk, grills were brought into the room and each child participated in making cottage cheese and junket. Then they gave a tea for their mothers. The first grade pupils also built a library which is cared for entirely by them and operates just like a college library. Last fall the second grade visited the Oak Grove Dairy farm ond then built a farm like it in their own room. They studied onimals and even churned butter. They also studied the community, visited many of the important buildings in the city, ond then made miniature duplicates of them. The third arade pupils' study of animals culminated in a puppet show which they arranged and operated themselves. At Christmas time they displayed great talent by giving a ploy The Jugaler of Notre Dame ". Another interesting unit was the valentine store and post office. They carried on a definite business and postal system. The fourth grade made use of a transportation and communication project os the basis for their work in social studies, geography, and art. With the knowledge gained, the class made a large map of Eurasia, snowing the occupations and the products raised in various parts of the countries. The fifth grade pupils carried on interesting experiments such as making wax candles and paper. The paper was used for making Christmas cords. In relation to their study of theTRAINING SCHOOL industries devoted to the making of clothing, the class actually spent some time in spinning and wecving. A semester of the study of geography culminated :n a European Fair sponsored by the sixth grace. This was a very colorful affair. The children’s abundance of information revealed that they had made a very extensive study. On Aonl second, the sixth grade gave a historical pageant. The children were dressed to represent the various peoples in the different periods and excelled in giving the history of them. The Junior High School division of the Training School has many interesting extracurricular, as well as curnculor, activities. The Junior Council is an administrative body which is chosen from within the group. It conducts a citizenship contest. This department can boast of membership in such commendable organizations os the Junior Red Cross Society, the Junior Audubon Society, a Stamp Club, a Photo Club, and it has charge of the issuance of the Junior Pointer. Mid-year elections for members of the Junior Council ond officers of the Junior Pointer staff were conducted by the ninth grade Civics class. The Junior Assembly became the M. D. B. voting precinct. The candidates filed nomination papers and a regular election was held. The seventh grade brought honors to the school by winning the city championship in the basketball contest. Social activities take an important stand among the members of this group. The big event of the year was the Hallowe'en party. A treasure chest hunt terminated in a great deal of fun and festivity. The latter is of special interest for the treasure chest is actually buried. Last year after a thrilling series of searches, the chest was found buried in the sand in the sub-basement of the Training School. First Grade recitation. Basketball team, Seventh Grade. Home Ec. students. Junior Hioh bosketteers. Fourth Grade transportation protect. Study. Home room.SIGNS OF LIFE Ain't we got fun? It was under this Christmas tree that Ted M. hung his stocking. O. K.l Ninethirty? Hoove ho! Shiny nose?GIRL’S ATHLETICS Fir it Ho —M. I.t'KDTXK. H. McWiluama. A. McVst. Mini Kkhmumis. B. Petxhaon. B. Jacobs. Z. Wunn. B. Schwahn. Second Row I. Floeteh. G Chrirtenrem. M. Tcbba. I. Rjce. G. Doran. E. Vakikoi . L. Peoix. Third Row—D. Dvetker E. I.amo. A. Serin. 1. $TAtrrrACHKR. E. Peterson. M. Cham. Fint Row—M. Gaetnev. D. Okrterle. B. Ricnamdh. K. Trkuzk, R. Ottem. R. Smith. G. Morgan. Second Row— M. Warbleton. M. Davel. G. Okhat. !!. Bi.akk. M. Miner. R. Schwahn. M. Waimut. Third Rote—0. Mkloioir. R. Mihphy. M. Graham. E. Earl. M. Schcltx, E. DkHorn. I.. Dewar. WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION The W. A. A. of Central State Teachers College was organized in 1929 after having been the Girl's Athletic Association since 1918. This organization has developed a keen interest in sports among the women of this college. With "Sports For All and All For Sports’ as its motto, the W. A. A enjoyed an unusually successful year under the leadership of Anita McVey, President; Mildred Larson, Vice-President; Virginia Gajewski, Secretary; and Roberta McWilliams, Treasurer. Miss Beatrice Richardson, the Women’s Physical Education instructor, was the advisor for the Women’s Athletic Association. Miss Richardson did a fine piece of work in forming the skeleton of this year’s activities. The various activities were conducted under the guidance of sportsheads. The sports-heads were elected by the members of the W. A. A. for the entire year. This year's sports-heads were as follows: Hockey, Eleanor Theisen,- Tennis, Ruth Nason,- Archery, Marian Graham,- Basketball, Betty Schwann; Baseball, Ruth Smith; Volleyball, Irma Rice,- Creative Dancing Rita Murphy, Minor Sports, Lolita Weeks and Cecelia Falkowski; and Scrap Book, Marie (jigstad and Ardella Stieba. Pagf 119Reol action in this game os it's played by the girls. Don't shoot! A battle royal. Play day. The meetings of this organization were held the fourth Wednesday of each month. Initiations were held at the beginning of each semester. Women were not eligible for membership until they had been in school one semester. Three initiates were taken in the first semester, while twenty-four were admitted this spring. The W. A. A. was prominent in its social functions for the women of the college. A clever "White Elephant" Christmas party was held. The girls are still trying to unearth Eleanor Theisen’s formula for the eating of stick candy. Another high spot in the social life of the organization was the party Miss Richardson gave at Nelson HaTl for all the sportsheads. The year 1936-37 was ushered in by the annual W. A. A. Picnic which was held at Iverson Park. The school bus provided transportation for the sportswomen. Organized sports and stunts kept everyone ousy and happy. Those who attended reported plenty of fun" and seventy-five guests and members couldn t have been wrong. Choosing a huge football as its means of conveyance, the Women s Athletic Association displayed a clever float for the Homecoming Parade with the then popular "Knock, knock" theme. Paf,e 130For this year’s activities the girls were divided into squocs. There were five squads and each squad had its own leader. Some members of each squad participated in every activity. All of this yeor's activities were conducted on the tournament basis. After several weeks of practice the gomes were played off in a tournament. In the basketball tournament, squad three under the leadership of Evelyn Sonnenberg won the championship. The championship of the ping-pong tournament went over to squad five under the leadership of Eleanor Theisen. Volleyball honors went to squad one under Evelyn Warekois's direction A shuffle board and second semester volleyball tournament were also played. Squad two was under the leadership of Helen Blake, while Rita Murphy conducted squad four. Because it had the most points, squad five carried off the honors of the year. The creative dancing class, although an all school activity for women, was backed by the W. A. A. Members of this class together with Miss Richardson attended a creative dance recital which was held in Madison in the early spring. W. A. A. picnic. Swimming class, Summer School. Medicine boll. Ploy day.Fir it Ro --I . Schwab . R. Schwab . M. Eibekoex. J. Dorr. E. Petexaox. M. Gioatad. A. Mainland. Mim Richakdaos. G. Chri tiaX ox. I. Ploktkr. M. Sarobaxt. V. I.cbtk. C. William . V. Bi-rmeikter. Srcond Roip—R. Mi-ni»mt. I.. Were. M. Sohiltz. M. Gah-set. R. Smith. G. Moroax. D. Ri rkoux D. Peteumon. R. Jouxc. R. Nziaon. I.. Johxrox. J. Elmnoaon. E. Soxxesbbbo. R. Koaxe. M. Dayel. J. Hexes . M. I.vedtke. M. Toms, L. HolmaX. TkirJ Rtnr— M Gbaham. E. Earl. A. McVet. I Stacttacmex. L. Pedes. I. Die. D. Waxee. I.. Geiixxe. I. Rice. R. McWil-liam . II. Beidlemax. E. Seeich. G. Okxay. J. N'xlsox. F. Steehm. A. Stieb . M. Marshall. Fourth Ro»r—B. Richard . E. Martex . E. LaXO. L. Dewar. D. Schxece. R. Ottem. E. Tmm ox. H. Blare. Mix Xewblrtxr. M. I-iRiwx, E. Warkkoi . R. Lethexatrom. A. Hixtz. I.. Amcxdbox. A. Goetach. M. Zaaee. V. Gajewaei. E. Stoltes-bkro. M. Martix. 8. MaIXLAXD. Ploy Day! That day when girls from Central Wisconsin High Schools visit our college as guests of the W. A. A. and Play for Play's Sake." Play Day enjoyed the distinction of celebrating its sixth anniversary. It was insittuted in May, 1931 ov Miss Eva Seen, the director of W. A. A. at that time, and has since become an annual affair. This year s Play Day was held May fifteenth. Lois Peden and Anita McVey were co-general chairmans. There was close competition between the teams which competed in horsehoe, tennis and archery. A one o'clock luncheon was served in Nelson Hall. At this time the winning color teams and individual winners were announced. In the summers session of the Women's Athletic Association, the women found swimming an entirely welcomed activity. And was it fun to watch Miss Richardson pilot the school bus to Robertson Park! Even losing their competent president, Anita McVey, does not discourage the W A A. members from seeing another successful year full of good times approaching. Page t}2AdvertisingCENTRAL STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE Stevexs Poixt, Wisconsin Member AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS COLLEGES " Shrino of Alma Mater” Degrees in all fields of Public School Service • Also three and two year courses in rural, elementary, and junior high school fields. • Special Attention to RURAL EDUCATION HOME ECONOMICS • Excellent Summer Sessions “ Let us turn again, and fondly, To thy best traditions true— Central—Queen of all Wisconsin, Alma Mater—here’s to you!” “THE COLLEGE THAT TRAINS FOR SERVICE’' P V 34COMPLIMENTS OF MOLL-GLENNON JOURNAL PRINTING COMPANY COMPANY We carry a complete line of Dry Goods PUBLISHERS and Ladies Ready-to-Wear Stevens Point Daily Journal We Want Your Trade JOB PRINTERS Come To Us Quality Promptness Dependability Our Motto RINGNESS SHOE COMPANY THE MAIN STREET MARKET Bill and Ben. 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Trucks CARL MOTOR SALES Studebaker Cars and Trucks DOMACK MOTOR SALES Dodge and Plymouth Cars and Dodge Trucks G. A. GULLIKSON CO. Chevrolet Cars and Trucks, Oldsmobiles KRAUS SERVICE STATION Pontiac Sales and Service KARNER AUTO CO. Nash and Lafayette Cars, International Trucks SMITH MOTOR SALES DeSota and Plymouth Cars, Diamond Trucks STEVENS POINT MOTOR CO. Ford V-8 Cars and Trucks, Lincoln Zephyrs Page 140 COMPLIMENTS OF FISHER’S SPECIALTY COMPLIMENTS OF SHOP WILSON FLORAL • COMPANY HOTEL WHITING BLOCK COLLEGE • SUPPLY STORE COMPLIMENTS OF • WELSBY’S DRY CLEANING Everything in • Student Supplies Pag 141• KREMB’S HARDWARE COMPANY COMPLIMENTS OF For Hard-Wear THE HOTEL WHITING Established 1863 • Phono 21 Stevens Point, Wis. MOST POPULAR IX CENTRAL WISCONSIN Page 142Scene—Fromm’s Fox Farm. COMPLIMENTS OF FROMM’S FOX FARM Pa%e 43EARLY TO BED and oarlv to rise makes most men healthy, wealthy and wise— maybe. 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TIT THE MODERN TOGGERY THE STORE FOR EVERY MAN Quality Clothing Haberdashery Shoes WISCONSIN PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATION The Home of Hart-Schaffner-Marx Clothes If you enjoy REAL GOOD COFFEE you’ll like these Big 4 Brands-—all the finest—each an exceptional value in its price class. Roasted fresh daily and delivered direct to your grocer. Try them. They are excellent. COPPS COFFEE COMPANY DEERWOOD DELICIOUS FOODS 4$WHITING-PLOVER PAPER COMPANY The Golden Plover, familiar to everyone who has lived in Stevens Point or its vicinity, is the trademark symbol of Whiting-Plover Paper Company—manufacturers of high quality bond, writing and ledger papers. In future years, choose a paper bearing this symbol—your guarantee of honest value, long life, and perfect writing and printing qualities. VETTER T. A. FREIBERG MANUFACTURING Plumbing and Heating COMPANY Contractor ■ GENERAL ELECTRIC OIL BURNING FURNACE Phone 88 DAY AND NIGHT For SERVICE Manual Training 110 Strongs Avenue Better Lumber Phone 383 Pa%e 146CITY FRUIT EXCHANGE COMPLIMENTS OF FISHERS DAIRY QUALITY FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Meyer Prescription Drug Company 305 Main Street — Telephone 148 “On the Square” Comer 304 Main Street Telephone 1573 “On the Square” SODA FOUNTAIN SERVICE Telephone 51 457 Main St. LUNCH CANDY MAGAZINES TOBACCO • Drugs • Gifts • Toiletries • Stationery • Greeting Cards “Our Fountains are Famous for Chocolate” DRUG STORES Page 147 Down Town 111 StrongsAve. South Side 752 Church St.TACKLE AND GUNS ALL ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT COMPLIMENTS OF JANTZEN BATHING SUITS A. L. SHAFTON COMPANY THE SPORT SHOP POINT SPORTING GOODS CO. Stevens Point, Win. A Store Matching the Usual With the Unusual and Concentrating on Quality, Intelligent Service and Value. Fancy Groceries Stationery Sherwin Williams Paints — Wall Paper Office Supplies — Murphy’s Varnish THE UPTOWN INCORPORATED Telephone 994 426 Main St. Pate 148WITH COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND J. A. WALTER, Florist Telephone 1629 110 N. Michigan Ave. Compliments of OSHKOSH OFFICE SUPPLY COMPANY SCRIBNER’S DAIRY OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN MILK MAKES ATHLETES MIMEOGRAPH DISTRIBUTORS Pagt 149GRASSELLI REAGENTS CONSTANT UNIFORMITY STRICTLY CHEMICALLY PURE ALWAYS DEPENDABLE E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS CO.,. INC. GRASSELLI CHEMICALS DEPARTMENT lUjfflt) Wilmington, Delaware ATTENTION READERS! The cover of this book is made of DuPont Fabrikoid and is washable. To wash, wipe with a damp cloth containing fine soap. Do not use a strong or coarse soap. Do not get the pages nor binding of the book wet. Follow these instructions carefully. ISOON MAINTAINING LEADERSHIP--- • To win and consistently hold a place as the recognized leader of school annual printing, has been the record of Rogers Printing Company since its beginning in 1908. • That we have, during a period of 29 years, successfully produced hundreds of annuals for schools throughout the country, attests our ability to satisfy completely the most discriminating Year Book Staff. • New ideas, coupled with the knowledge and experience gained through a quarter of a century’s service, insure the school that chooses a Rogers’ printed book of ideal pages From Start to Finish." • We are proud that the staff of T H E IRIS entrusted its printing to our organization and we herewith present it as an example of our work. ROGERS PRINTING COMPANY 307-309 First Street DIXON, ILLINOIS 228 N. LaSalle Street CHICAGO. ILLINOIS Page 151• Artists and Makers of Fine Printing Plates for Black or Color The Largest College Annual Designers and Engravers in America . . . Ff JanMOIlier Engraving Co. 8 7 U . U a 4 ti i n y t on 4U. I ica.jo%'Hllinoi k e x e i 5 no iulititute j) ° Quality PagtFACULTY INDEX Allen, Bessie May A Ilex, George C. 22, 63 22. 62. 76. 94 Bauer, Bet tv May Burroughs, Leland M 22 22.62, 118 Carlsten, Edna . .. Churrh, Nancy J Collins, Joseph V ... 22. 77 22 22 Colman, Susan E .22, 52. 53. 118 Davis, Mildred Greta . Diehl, Leah L. 22. 62. 81 23 Evans, Charles. 23,63, 118 Faust, Gilbert W Finch, Mrs. Josephine 23, 63. 89,91 23,70 Hanna, Marv Ellen Hanson. Gertie L 23. 59. 62, 68 . 23 Hart. Margaret Heilman, Garnet . . ... 23 .23 Herrick, Alfred J liver. President Frank S. 24 16. 17. 62, 118. 119 Jayne, Clarence D Jenkins. Warren G Jones, Jesse E 24 24.62.65 ... 24. 63. 70. SI Knutxen. Xortnan E Kotal, Edward L .. 24. 62. 74. 75. 90 . 20. 79. 99. 106 Yigne. Bessie Lyness, ArthurS. 24 . 59. 68 .24 Mansur, Lulu Martens. George ... Mason, Syble ... Mat ravens. C. H. . . . , Meston, Helen Mirhclsen, Peter. Mott. Joseph 25 IS . 25,62 25 25, 63. 66 . 21, 88. 92. 93 25 Neale, O. W Neubcrger, Marv 25. 57. 58 25. 132 Pfeiffer, Lydia . . Pierce, Burton R. ...25 26, 63 Reppon, Nels O Richardson. Beatrice.... Rightsell, R. W Roach. Mav N Rogers, T. A Rolfson, Carolvn 26 21, 81, 129. 132 21.63. 75,87,98 20, 59. 69 26.63,85 26 Schmeeckle. F. J Smith. E. T Stein, George V. Steiner. H R Swallow, Marie 6, 7, 26. 79, 98 26, 55, 62 26 19. 26, 98. 118, 119 27 Thom peon. V. E . . Tobias. Adda . Tolo, H 27.63 27 27, 116, 117 Van Arsdale. Glad vs .. Van Deraa. Mary Jane 27 27,68.69 Watson, Charles F Wilson, F.unly W 27. 54. 62, 98 27. 63 p V 1S3STUDENT DIRECTORY AND INDEX Abenderhein, William W.; While Lake;4............30, 62 Anraliamson, Ralph William; .Sparta; 3................69 Adomaitis, Vincent; Keenan; 1 .................... Akev, James P.; Port Edwards: 1................... Akins, Jayne; Mannwa; 1............................ 50 Albrecht, Joseph; Phelfts; 1....... .......48 Albrecht, Wenzel; Phelps; Special ..................94 Aleut t, feugene.................................. Allen, Edna; Waupaca; 2.............................66 Amundson, Lorraine M.; Wia. Rapids: 1 4S. 92,93, 132 Anderson, Sylvia Marie; Rosholt; 3............. 63. 66 Anderson, Dorothy Mae; Waupaca; 2 .......30. 47. 58 Anderson, Ellen ....................... ........ Anderson, John P.; City: 1.......... .......68, 89 Anderson, Lorraine E.; City; 4....... ............30. 89 Anderson, Ralph; City; 2 ........... 64, 74, 75. 87, 91 Anderson, Anton L.; Pulaski; I... . . .. 106, 107 Andre, Robert Elliotte; Cornell; 3 ..62, 90, 91 Andrzejek, Christine; Pulaski; 2... .........30, 46, 68 Arvold, Frans; City; 3............................ Asn, Ailie Paul; Wausau; 4....................... 112 AtKins. Bernice G.; Almond; 2 ...............47. 89, 93 Aulik, Keith J.; Antigo; 1...................49. 65. 87 Biirhmann, Carl; Brantwood; 3.........63. 64. 65 Bader, Blanche Agnes; City; 3........... 52. 53, 81, S5 Bader, Clement J.; Kcnnan; 1....................... 80 Baiert. Thelma Bea; Nekoosa; 45, 66. 67, 71 Baker, Ro! crt G.; New Lisbon; 1.................. Barnuin, Edward 8.; Barnum; 2................46. 55, 64 Bartz, Clarence Raymond; Westfield; 3.............. 30 Bossier, Ellcrv Frost; Almond; 4...........30, 63, 72, 74, 75. 77, 86, 87, 125 Baxter, Lets E.; Stratford; 3...................30, 70 Becher, Kathryn; Wausau; 3. ............45, 62. 65. 68, 85, 95. 116, 117 Beggs. Norma L.; Plainfield; 3.................. Beh.ike, Ruth Elsie; Belleville; 2 ..... . __46. 66. 81 Benr, lone; City; 1 49, 53 Beidleman, Helen M.: City; 1...................53. 132 Bel ngia, Eugene A.; Mountain; 2 . 47. 55. 106. 116, 117 lkdongia, Reui en R.; Mountain; 1......55, 59, 101, 107 Ben. e, Clarence; City; 3................... 45. 56 Benn, Marguerite M.: I..............................81 Bentz, Alice Emily; Nekoosa; 3 . .62. 65. 85, 89, 93. 94 Bepplcr, Lucele C.; Nekoosa; 1 ......70, 89, 93 Berard, James E.; Wis. Rapids; 3.. ___63. 68. 89 Berard, Wilbur; Wis. Rapids; I . ,44, 100, 101. 119 Berens. Janice; City; (Special), .. ...........64. 132 Berg, Arlein J.; Mosinee; 1..................... Berger. LaY’erne E.: Matoon; 2..................30. 58 Bernstein. Rodger L: Brodhcad; 1............ 101, 103 Bestul, Eleanor M.; .Scandinavia; 2.........53. 76, 77 Bulwell, Lee C.; City; 1 ...... . . ......... Bishop, Robert 0.: Antigo; I---- 48. 56. 91. 106, 109 Blake. Helen; Mellen; 3 .... .63, 80. 81. 85, 129 Blnvnt, Kathrvn; City; 2 44 Bleck, Lucille V.; New Dmdon; 2 53, 76, 77. 92, 93 Bloom, Joseph E.; Rhinelander: 2 .... 65. 79, 91 Roger. Rol ert A.; Port Edwards; 1 ..48 Bohan. Felix F.; Chi. Hts., 111.; 1 75. 101, 103, 106, 108 Bortz, Edna T.; Citv; 4 30 Bourcier. Francis; Marshfield; 2................66. 68 Bowers. Mildred M.; Park Falls; 1 ............. 48, 53 Bowker, Ira Harry; Bancroft; 3......... 45. 90. 91 Brady. Hugh; Bancroft; 3........................... 91 Bradv. Mildred; .Seymour; 3 ....................... 66 Breeden, Eleanore J.; Column; 1 48, 54. 70, 81 Bremtner. Don E.; City; I. 101 Bretzke, Robert; City; 2............47, 56. 65. 78, 79 Brill. Edward; City; 2...................... 47, 79 Brooks. Clarence.................................. Brown, Harvey N.; Almond; 1.................48, 89. 91 Brunner, Ciydc J.; Leopolts; 1..............68, 75, 91 Brunner, Dennis; Custer; 2..........................68 Brunner, Lyle C.; Abbotsford; 1. 101, 103. 106, 109, 112 Bruyctte, feather; Mannwa; 2..................... Bucnolx, Ethel M.; Mannwa; 1.........49. 59, 65, 93. 94 Bucholz. Alvin; Merrill; 4 15. 74. 75. S5. 87, 101, 102 Bull, Edwurd; Hartford; 1........................ Burch. Charles; City; 3.......................... 101 Bur.m-istcr, Verna M.: Marshfield; 3 31. 132 Burnett, r.lnor E.; Mosinee; I..... . ........... Burrows. Dorothy M.: Plainfield; 1 .... 48, 58, 132 Butler. Dorothy L.; City; 3. ..... 53 Buzzo, Arthur M.; Dancy; 2....................... Cady, R jlaud; Birnamwood; 2....................63, 04 Campbell, Roinona M.; City; I. .................67. 68 Campocll. '» ln L.; Crumlon; I ............... . ’.iriey, William O.; Plover; 1 s9. 112 Carlson, Edith L.; Ingram; 2.............. ..31, 58. 70 Carlson, Mable Carney, John; Phillips; I Carswell, Gid.; City; 4...... ................... Cirt.nill, George E.: Plover; 3 .78. 79, 85, 89, 93, 91 Caskev, Je«e M.: Phelps; 3 ............. 63, 74, 93. 91 Cuartier, Leonard K.; Nlerrill; 3 ........45, 101, US Cue.'olinski Fred; City; 1 ..........................5S Chojnacki, Victor J.; City; 1..................... Caown, L ; 1 54 Christensen, Bjorn; Nelsonville; 3 ........ 58, 79, 118 Christensen, Dorothy E.; Nelsonville; 2........... Cnristensen, Be-wie; Arpin; 1....................... 58 Christensen. Glen is; Westfield; 3... ............ Church, F. G.; Iron Mountain, Mich.; I. .56, 63. 68. 101 Church, G. W.; Iron Mountain. Mich.; 2..........46, 50 Church, Rachel J; City; 1...................49. 55, 67 C.eslewiez, Annette M.; Rosholt; 2.... .....31. 47. 6S Cigel. Louis; City; 2...........................47, 56 Ciseskv. Djrothv M.; Plover; 1.......................56 Ciark. Durothv; Wausaw; 2.......................46, 56 Clements, William EL; Vesper; 2.............59, 90, 91 Colby, J. Richard; Loyal; 2..........55. 89. 9.3. 91. 94 Coleman. Leone B.; Ashland; 4 ... ..................31 Collins. Walter A.: White Imkc; 4...................31 Conner, Gene; Auhumdale; 3 63. 65, 76. 77, 85 Cook. Calvin; I 'nity; 3 56. 112 Cook, Dorothy J.; Waupaca; 3.................. 54, 64 Cook. Marguerite E.; Waupaca; 1................ 49, 64 Cooper, Earic; Citv; 2..... ...................... Cowles. Gordon if.; Wittenl erg; 2 . 46. 57, 58. 9ft, 91 Cram. Mildred M.; City; 3......................54. 129 Cress, Samuel; Wausau; 2.......................... ('mine. Lucille A ; Viroqua; 1 Cutler, Nellie J.; Wis. Veterans Home; 3.......... 43 Dagneau. Bill R.j City; (Special)................ Dahif»erg. Ebba L.; .Nlerrill; 2................... 34 Dakin. Philip E.; Antigo; 1.................... 39, 91 Daly. Charlotte.................................. Davidson, Verne...... .......................... Davel, Madeline A.; l«ovnl; 1 . 49. 53, 67, 68, 129. 132 DeHorn. Eileen; White Lake; 1...... 70. 71, 92. 93. 129 Dent. Harold R : Almond; 3.......... 63. 64. 74. 75. 91 Dernbach, Dorothy L.; New London; 1.............77. 93 Dembach, Valeria E.; New London; 2. .47, 66, 76. 77. 93 Dewar, Lois A.; Westfield; 1... ..............129. 132 Dix. Irene J.; Colby; 2 ......... .53. 67. 80. 81. 132 Dihertv, Gerald A.; Mosinee; 2................46. 90. 91 D lan kv, Cecelia M.; Engle River; 2............... 46 Domke, Edward T.; Pittaville; (.Special) .......... 42 Donermever, Eva G.; City; 2 ................... 46, 55 Dopp. Elizabeth G.; Wild Rose; 2 .........56. 66. 70, 146 Pogr IS4Dopp, Jean; Wild Rose: 2........46, 56, 70, 92, 93, 132 Doran. Genevieve E.; Shawano; 2 . • ------- • Doughty. Jeanette H.; Ogdensburg; '--------------------2 Dregne, Harold h.; Marchfield: 3. ----• 63In! ini no Drormick. Lewis H.; Gleason; 1...... -31» 59« 101, ‘Ir Duekart, Donald S.; Wis. Rapids; 1 ■■ — • • • _ • • • ■ Dueeker, Doris M ; Kiel; 3......59, '-VVm Ofl lii? Duecker, James F.; Kiel; 1...........'5- 101» 1(H » UJL Duescher, Loraine P.; Bimamwood; 1................. i. ‘ Duggan, Ed.; City; (Special) .................... Dumoleton, Philip J.; City; 2.................... Dumhleton, Ross W.; City; ............................91 Dumphy, tierald; City; 2.... ............. ...... Dunn, jerrv; City: 1 Durand, Ed. D.; City, 1 . • •-J5 Duskey. Kathryn E.; Wausaw; 2 45, 6o, 6, . 9-, 93 DxikosKi, John J.; City; I...........i£ m ’i io8,iS? Karl, Edna; Owen; 3 ................ 45, 53, 129, 13- Egger, Martha L.; Marshfield; 2...........31, 46, 59 Emergen, Marie J.; Grnnton; 2....................... 132 Kisenock, Walter.................................. Ellingson. Joyce H.; Hawkins; 1 ........... ...56, 132 Erdinan. June R.; Augusta; 3..................... V Y ro Ericksen, Jeannette M.; Denmark; 2............. 31, 5S Eylcr, Gezald A.; Sparta; 3..........79, 89, 90, 91, 94 Falkowski. Cecilia; Pulaski; 4... ........................ 32 Fandrv, Esther A.: Edgar; 3 . ................. Faucett. Thomas L.; City; 2 ......................... 90, 91 Felix. John J.; Edgar; 1....... ............. 49. 59, 79, 112 Fierek, Jeanette ().; City; 1.........................49. 81 Firgens, Oscar Charles; Suring; 3................. Firfcut, Elsie........................................... 89 Firnstall. Ramona; Marshfield; 1 ......................... 53 Fisher, Hazel A.; Spencer; 2...................... Fletcher, Eileen M.; Amherst; 2.......................32. 58 Fleeter, Irene C.; Westfield; 3. . ..45. 54. 70, 129. 138 Florence. Elroy N.; Pittsvillc; 1 ................... 49, 56 Fonstud, Clifton G.; New London; 2. 63, 78. 79. 89, 91 Ford, Marian E.; Wittenburg; 2.................... Forties, Iris D.; Port Edwards; 1 ....................48, SI Gaffney, Marion; Wis. Rapids; 4.. . . . 32, 129, 132 Gajewski. Virginia; Pulaski; 4 ................. 32. 62. 129 Gorden, Laurin................... ................ Gehrkc, Avis L.: Wautoma; 2.............................. 32 Gehrke. Jucille M.; Manawa; 1 ... 49, 55, 89. 132 George. Doris F.; Wis. Rapids; 3 ... 62, 95 Gigstad, Marie S.; Pulaski; 2 ........................32, 132 Gilding. Ph. G.; Tupper Lake, N. V.; 3.64, 76. 77. 94. 95 GUliertson, Dorothy M.; Rhinelander; 2............53, 70, 71 Gillman, Berko B.; City; 2 .................... Gilson, Sam; Green Bay; 4................................. 44 Gleason. Betty Jane; Wis. Rapids...........................89 Glennon, Peggy; City; 1.............................. 49. 77 Glisczinski, Evelyn R.; City; 1 49, 68 Glodoski, Nancy B.; Amherst Jet.; 2 .................... 32 Goetsch, Adeline E.; Colby; 3 45. 89. 92. 93. 132 Goldlierg, Ben; City: 4..................... 32. 62. 89. 94 Graham, Doris G ; Owen; 1................................ .89 Graham, Marion; Gillett; 3 ..... 45. 66. 87. 129, 132 Grandkowski, Ray; Wis. Rapids; 3.................. Gray, Raymond; Amherst; 1.......................... .48, 56 Gregor, Jean A.; City; 1 ...................... Gregory, Olive S.; City; 4 ......................... 32. 89 Grave, Gladys C. A.; Brill ion; 2...... 55. 66. 70. 71. 81 Groves. Sherman R.; Prentice; 3 45. 55. 64. 90. 91 Gueb, B.; 2.... ...........................................47 Guerin, Eva Rae C.; lolu; 4 . .. 32. 56. 62. 71 Gunderson, Dorothy; lola; 1.............................. 48 Guth, Bernice; Bancroft: 2............................33, 59 Guzman, Raymond F.; City; 1 ...................... Hafner. Geraldine H.: City; 2........ ......... Hagen, Jeanette; Sechlerville; 1................. 49, 70. 93 Hager, Robert; City; 1................................79 Hamel. Louis; Arpin; 1......................... 89, 94 Hamrick, Genevieve E.; Curtiss; 2...........33, 46. 58 Hanson, Eileen A.; City; 3................... 76, 77 Hanson John A.; Abbotsford; 2. ........ 46. 55. 63, 89 Hardy. Verlin; Wis. Rapids; 1.................... Harris. Glen C.; Plainfield; 3............. 45, 56. 112 Harter. Betty M.; Norway; 3.......... ........... Hartvig, Charles: Iola; 3."................ 63, 90, 91 Hascltine, Jane L.; Wittenburg; 1....... ........ Hayes. Lloyd R.; Minocqua; 4 . ..................... 33 Hcdquist, .Marie R.; City; 1... ......................94 Hein. Paul S.; Sjiencer; 2 ... 33. 57, 58. 91 Henderson, Oiner C.; Phelps; 2............... . . Hennick, John, City; 1............ .... ..... Henninger, Harlow; 1............................. 48 Hetzcl, Willis R.; City; 4............................58 Hetzel. Ruth Ann; Almond; 1 . .. .58 Hickey, Anita; 1................................. llillier, Leo F.; Marathon; 2 ..... . 33. 46. 59, 68 Hill, Ethel; Washburn; 1............ .... 93 Hinklev, Nor. P.; Port Edwards;(S] caal)..............89 Hintz, Adeline; Westfield; 1 .................. 49. 132 Hmtz, Genevieve: City; 1 48 Ilitske, Franklin L.; Merrill; 2 ... 47, 74. 75, 101, 103 Hodell. Raymond W.; City; 2.....................78, 79 Hodson. Walter L.; Mellen; 2. ......... 78, 79. 90. 91 Hotlman, Grace; City; 2 Hoffman, Ixro.................................... Hodman, Rol ert J.; Almond; 2. _____74. 75, 91, 95, 117 Holman, Ix»is M.; Waupaca; 1................... 48, 132 Hnppcn, Mary C.; City; 1. .................... .77, 93 Horn, Artensia..................................76, 77 Horn. Frances; City; 2........................... Hotvedt, Arnold R.; Rosholt; 4 33. 63. 72, 78, 79. 125 Houck, Charles A.; City; 2.............100, 101, 102 Houg. Katherine S.; Exeland; 1 68, 81, 85 Houle, Adele C.j Sturgeon Bay; 4 .....................33 Hovda. Faye; Clear l ake; 2.........33, 57. 58, 67, 85 Hubbard, George; City; 1..............................79 Hughes. Donald; City; 1.............. ........... llumc, Vera L.; Endeavor; 2...........................53 Hurd, Hazel; Almond; 1................................59 Hutscll, John R.; Duma; 2 .....................101, 112 Hyer, George N.; City; 2................74, 75, 87, 95 Hyland, Jane F.; Rhinelander; 3 ................ . ..54 Jaaka. Paul E.J Phelps; 2..........................46. 56 Juaska, Thomas R.; Pheljw; 2...........47, 56, 106. 109 Jackson. Helene M.J Eagle River; 1 ............. .46. 65 Jackson. Lucie; Wis. Rapids; 1 ............ Jacobs, Betty; City; 2.................. 47, 76, 77, 129 Jacobson, Norman; Nelsonville; 2 ..... 46, 55. 64 Jaken, Emilie E.j Mosinee; 4.......................33. 54 Jas| erson, Newell; Port Edwards; 2............... 46. 75 Jauliert, Ramona; Tigerton; 1......................48, 59 Jensen, Anita; City; 1.......................... ..53 Jindrick. Arnold W ; Hil!sf oro; 2 .. ____46. 88. 89. 94 Johnson, Bernard; Wis. Raimis; 1........................49 Johnson, Eldred; Amherst Jet.; 1......... ......... Johnson, Ellen M.; Ncillsville; 2 33, 47. 53 Johnson, Evangeline; Racine; 4 .............. . 34, 54 Johnson. James; City; 1. Johnson. Jane; Endeavor; 2.. 54, 81 Johnson, Lois E.: Edgar; 2.................. 34, 59, 132 Johnson, Ruth; Wausau; 2..............47, 56, 63, 64, 66 Johnson, Wayne L.; Endeavor; 2..................... Johnston, Don E.; Appleton;3...........101, 102, 106, 107 Joling, Ruby; Vesper; 1............................58, 132 Jones, Elva; Oregon; 1............................. Jones, W'illiam J.; Oconto Falls; 1 ...................101 Joosten, Janet M.; Rudolph; 3;.............. .45, 56. 68 Jorgenson, Harriet; Scandinavia; 2................ 47, 53 Page 155Jost, Margaret D.; Stratford; 2..................34. 59 Joy, Park M.; City; 1..................................79 Judd, Winston D.;'Bancroft; 2..... ....................46 Jurezak, Edward A.; Knowlton; 1 ................ 49, 59 Kalke, Charles W.; City; (Special)................ Kaminski, Barney; Rosholt; 1...................... Kendael Paul; Crandon; 1...............................48 Ketterl, Theodore J.; Butternut; 2...........63. 74, 75 Kezewske, Ernest A.; Custer; 2. ....... . .34. 46. 59 Kedrowski. Frank; Custer; 1 .48 Kisak. Adeline; Edgar; 1.............. .... King. Bernard; Hawkins; 1......................... King, Cornelia; Edgar; 2........................... 46 King. Marcella V.; Kdgar; 2....... Kirschling, Melvin; Custer; 1 ....................49 Kissinger, Louise; Kiel; 4................... 34.66.70 Ivlosinski, Bernice; Custer; 1...................... 48 Klug, Vivian; Owen; 2.......................... 34, 5S Knox, William B; Mansion; 3_______45.57, 59.91, 116. 117 Knutson, Ruth; .Manitowoc; 1 . 58,67,92 Knutson, Ula Mae; City; 1............. .49, 55, S9, 94 Knutson, Thelma; lola; 3... 34, 54, 76, 77. 92, 93 Kobs, Delos A; Colby; 2............. ........S9,90,91 Koch. Klsie M.;Sheridan:3.......................... .45 Kochi, William J.; City; 2.............................65 Koehn, Paul; City; 1.............................. Kohls, Charles; Oitv; 2.. .......................79. 101 Konicczko, Bernice M.; Mosince; 2 .. ......... 34. 59 Kordus. Bcnkainin; Mosince; 1....................48. SS Koshollek, Gertrude A.; City; 4........................34 Koske, Ruth K.j Hawkins; 1............. ........53,132 Kratz, Don; Clintonvillc; .. ..................... Kratz, Margaret; Clintonville; 2.............47. 76, 77 Krause, Martin F.; Almond; 2.....................47. 56 Kreilkainp, Kdgar; Mosince; 3 ...... 45. 56. 64. 78. 79 Kreilkamp, Rol ert; Mosince; (S|»ecial). ......2. 45, 56. 64. 78, 79. 84. 85 Kremlw, Catherine................................. Kreml s. Jerry A.; City: 2 ......................78, 79 Krembs, John G.; Merrill; 2..................68, 74. 75 Krepsky, Genevieve; Colby; 4 ......... ... 34, 53 Krutze, Lloyd J.; Amherst; 2 45,56 Kryshak, Joseph; City; 2. .............47. 56, 89. 90. 91 Kubisiak, Helen; City; I......................... . Kubisiak, Carl; City: 4........... ............... Kugcl, Agnes J.; Anbovsford; 2............ 35. 47, 68 Kujawa. Genevieve; Rudolph; 3............. ....... Kulwiec, Kmelia; Lubiin; 2.................... .35. 58 Kushman, Esther; Pelican taiko; 3. .. 45, 53. 70. 71. 93 Ladwig, Clara E.; Colby: 2 ..................... 35. 46 La Have, Robert; City; 1 .. 48. 56. 68. 79. 89 Inning, Ethel L.; Moniello; 1 49, 58, 70, 71, 129, 132 Larheiki, Ronton...................................... l arson, Mildred; City; 4 44. 129. 132 Larson, Jack; City:2.............................47. 100 Larson. William. City; 3 ... 45. 63. 64. 74. 75, 89. 90. 91 Laachkewitsch, B. B.; Goodrich. N. D.; 3.. .45. 65. 72, 78. 79. 85. 95 Laszewski, Dan D.; City; 3........ ............... Lawrence, George H.; Oitv; 1.......................... 75 Lee, Earle; City; 2..... ............................. 94 Lee, Victor, M.; Richland Center; 3 ... 45. 89 Ix'gault, Gordon; Owen; 3.. .................... 74, 75 Legault. Lionel; Owen; 1.......................... Ix iser, Donald: Pittsville; 4 ....... ...... 35, 90, 91 Lejienski, Allen R.; Junction City; 2.. .......... I Roux. Warren A.;............................... l ethcnstrom, Ruth E.; Antigo; 4 ............35, 68. 132 Lietz, Edwin; Mosince;2........................ 56. 46 Lightbodv, Edward R.; City; 2.............. . .46. 56. 68 Likes, Kirkwood; Pittsville; 4... 35. 58. 62. 90. 91. 124 Lilkok, Montello M.; Gordon; 2. .. .. 35 Lindow. Thomas; Manawa; 4... ......43, 54. 55. 70, 71 Lloyd, Dorothy; City; 1 ........... Looerg, Louis A.; Amherst; 3............. ...... Locwecke, William; Merrill; 2................101. 103 Lomas. Darlcon E.; West Allis; 1... ..49. 54, 68, 87 Lucas, Woodrow M.jCity; 1 75 Luchterhand. Vera; Greenwood; 1.............. 49. 59 Lucck, Verna; Marshfield; 1 ..........48. 70, 89. 132 Luedtke. Mildred fc..; Horicon; 3.. 45. 55. 66. 85. 129. 132 Luther, Viola; Waupaca; 1................ .. 48, 59 Lutsav. Maryan; Pulaski; 1.................... 77 Lynn,Robert 8.; Rhinelander; 1. . .............. Lvthc. Dean;Ogdensburg; 1....................... Madsen, Anita M.; Phelps; 1.. ...... 53. 67, 92, 95 Maguire, Eileen; Dancy; 2..................36.58.68 Maguire, Mark.; Mosince: 4 . ------ ----- ... .36,68 Maier, John; Medford: 4........... . 36. 74. 75. 87. 125 Mainland, Ann; Cite: 1 ............49. 81. 92. 93. 132 Mainland. Sara L.; Oitv; 2. 53. 80, SI. So. 92. 93. 132 Mnlchow. Clifford P.; City; 3 ... 2. 56. 6-3. 78. 79. 84. 85 Malinovsky, Gladys B.; Portage; 2.....52, 53. 76. 77 Malesevich, Zorka; M a wide; 1................... 67 Malsheski. Mary; Donald; 3................... 36, 54 Malsnler, Leonard; ...................... ...... Mannigei. Bernice A.; Marshfield;2............. 36,58 Maimis, Israel; City; 3............................89 Marcott, E.; 1................................... 56 Marggi. R.; 1......................................49 Marshall, Marion; Omro; 3..........89, 92. 93. 94. 132 Marshall, Marjorie J.; Thorpe; 1..............56. 5S Martin, Myroel, J.: City; 1 ....49. 56, 92. 93. 94. 132 Marx, Eileen, R.; City; 2.......47, 54. 63. 87. 92, 93 Mase, Charles; City; 1 ....................89. 91, 94 Mastey, Florence; Pulaski; 1.................... Mayer. Marian L.; Junction City; 2. .47. 56. 58, 70, 71, 87 McAllen. Ed; Wal eno; 3.....!.....................101 Ml■ onnick, Alton, K.; Plover; 1 ............. . 49 McCulloch, Margerv; Wis. Rapids; 4. . . . 35. 62. 63. 85 McDonald. Ethel; City; 3 ....45. 72. SO. 81. 85. 87 McDonald, Jack ; Soperton: 1.................. 48 McDonald, William; Wis. Rapids; 1................. 56 McGinlev, Lawrence; Almond; 1 69. 89 McGuire, James G.; City; 3 ........ S5. 100. 101, 102 McHugh. Grace R.; Mosinee; 2 . 35, 57, 59. 68. 69. 85 McLain, Mablc: Wheeler; 3....................... 54.71 McVev, Anita; Withee; 4_____35. 66. 71. 76. 77. 129, 132 McWilliams, Roberta; Westfield; 4 36, 71, 87, 93. 129, 132 Meath, Stella; Cvlon; 4.................. ... .36. 66 Meinkc, Lila P.; Westfield; 3... ..........35. 45. 54 Melchoir, Grace M.; New London; 1. ___67. 71. 77. 129 Menzel, Alfred, E.; Citv; I 36. 72, 74. 75. 100. 101, 102, 119 Merril, Quentin A.; City; 1 49 Metcalf, Frank; Amherst; 1................... Mettelka. Norbert J.; Marshfield; 1 49 Middlesteadt, Alfred K.; Abbotsford; 1 101 Meyer. Ted; City; 2 . 64,65.79,85,90.91 Michaels. Earl F.; Citv; 2. ............. 40. 55. 112 Michenls. Mae; Cit v; 3 89 Miller, Gilbert S.: Mazomanie; 2........... 101, 102 Miller. Margaret L.; City; 3____ 62. (Ml. 80. 81. 91. 94 Miller. William W.; Plover; 2. .... 63, 64. 74 Miner. Maxine M.; Citv; 4 ............ 36. 62. 63. 76. 77. 87. 93. 123. 129 Minston. Marion M.; Mellen; (Sjieeial) . ... Molland. Margaret; Viroqua; 1 . . . ... ..... Moore, Helen M.; Shullsburg; 1 ................ 55 Morcncy, Marian A.; Three Lakes; 4.......37. 55. 68, 69 Morency, Florence A.; Three I akes; 1 49. 55. 68, 69 Morgan. Grace B.; Bancroft; 3 45. 64. 67. 71. 129. 132 Morris. Robert C.; Antigo; 1............ Mueller. Ruth; City; 2.............................76 Mullarkey, Dorothy I.; Bear Creek; 2..... . 45. 80, 81 Murat, James; City; 2., . ...74. 75. 87. 91. 95 Page i$6Murgatrovd, Phillis D.; Vesper; 4 ..............37. 53 Murphy, Rita i.; Chilton; 3...... 45. 62. 63. 129, 132 Nason, Maurine D.; Wis. Rapids; 4...............37. 66 Nason. Ruth M.; Citv; 2.................. 47. 55, 72. 75. 77. 84, 85, 87. 117 Neisius, Joe; Wabeno; 2...............................47 Ncison. Jeanette A.; Glen Flora; 2.....37, 58. 46, 132 Nelson, Ruth J.; Sawyer; I.. 48, 59. 132 Newhouse, Arietta; Marathon; 2 ............46. 76. 77 Nimz, Fred O.; Wausaw; 2.. 101. 102, 106. 107, 112 Nicholas. Hazel; Bara boo; 3..................... . ..66 Norton, Donald P.; Wis. Rapids: 2. 74, 75. 101, 102 Nott, Lorton L.;.Schofield; 1.................... OlK?r»t,Josephine D.; Neeah:3 ..... . So Oestenc, Dorothy J.; Citv; 1 .49. 56. 67. 92, 93, 129 Okrav, Grace T.j'Cily; 1.'.....49. 54. 67,69. 93, 129.132 Oleson, IjiNore; Mosinee; 2.. 47. 56. 64. 66 Olingv, Harrison; City; 2.......................... 88, 89 Oik, Alice; City; 4....................... 37, 80, 81 Olsen, Edward R.. Wleho; 3 ..........1«»1. 102 Olsen, Gundella; City; 2..................... ..... Olsen, Inez; Elcho; 2.................... 66, 76, 77. 93 Olson, Donald A.; City; 2........................... 78. 79 Olson. Leonard J.; lola; 4...........................37. 125 Olson, Marvin H.; Suring; 2 78, 89 Ophaven. Joseph A.; Antigo; 1........ .............. 55. 95 Osterhaus, George R.; Plainfield; 3........ 37, 45, 58, 91 Ottem, Ruby O.; City; 2............ 47, 56.67. 93. 129.132 Owen. Margaret E.; Citv; 4............. .37. 56, 64. 71 PagcnkofT, Geraldine E.; City; 3.................45, 67, 92. 93 Pazenkotl, Howard K.; City; 3....................... 90. 91 Palmer, Fred; Sparta; 1...................................89 Palukas, Gohie G.; Goodman; 1................ 49. 54, 69 Parfrev, Fred A.; Richland Center; 2 ........ 46, 65, 88. 89. 90, 91, 94, 116 Parish, David S.; City; 2...........................106. 107 Patterson, Marie M.; Dogerville; 4........... 37, 58, 62 Paulson, Carsten; Plainfield; 2...........................75 Paulson, Ruth; Galloway; 4............................... 37 Peck, Fred F.;City; 1.............................. Pedan. Lois G.; Colhv; 2.......... 47. 53. 67, 70. 129. 132 Pederson. Lvnndred E.; Monico; 2 .................... Penington, Otis K.; Birnaimvood; 2 .. ............. 47, 56 Peterson, Alta; Hollandale; 4..................... 43. 66 Peterson, Bet tv J.: Amherst; 2. . .......64. 129 Peterson. Delilah F.; Plainfield; 1 ............... 48, 132 Peterson. Emily; Phillips;3 129. 132 Peterson. Gilbert N.-.City; I Peterson, Oswald A.; Mosinee; 1..................... 48, 56 Peterson, Roberta V.; City; 2........................... 91 Peterson, Thoburn F.; Citv; 2...........63, 90. 91 Peterson. Verla G.; Citv; i...................... 53. 59 PfifTner, Dorothy K.; City; 4...... .. 38, 80, 81 Pfiffner, Rol ert F.; City; 1..................... 48, 79 Pingel. I Jen J.; Bonduel;2.... 38, 58 Pingel, John M.; Bonduel; 2........................ 38, 59 Pionkoski, Thaddeus J.; Rosholt; 1...... .......... Polehitski, Stanlcv; Citv; 1 Pophal, (filbert £.; Merrill; 4.... 38. 101. 102 Poskv. Madeline P.; City; 1. Poslusxny, Anthony; City; 2........ . 03, 90, 91, 112 Powless, La Pearl; West De Pere; 2 . .. 38. 59. 92. 93 Preston. Helen M.; Neilsville; 3..........45. 54. 92. 93 Preville, MavisC.;City; 1..........................48,81 Prusaw, Libby; Marshfield; 4......................... .38 Purcell, Franris W.; Wis. Rapids; 1...................... 48 Dunst. Florence W.; Saukville; 2... 47. 56. 66. 71, 77, 93 Raese. Geroge R.; Wausaw;2......................78. 79 Rathke, Wilbur G.; Merrill; 3. . 45. 55. 62, 76. 77. 85. 93 Reichert, Harold D.; City; 4................38. 65. 68. 69 Reiman, Mae 1 .; Iron River Mich.;2...................47, 93 Renner, Evelyn G.; Granton; 2............................. 44 Kerin, ilelen E.; Wis. Rapids; 2 .......... 56. 71. 92. 93 Rue. Irma A.; Plainfield; 2 38, 57, 58, 67, 46, 129. 132 kirtuirds, Betty L.; Portage; 1 49, 53, 66, 71, SI, 129, 132 Richards. Dorothy: City; 3..........45. 63. 72, 80, 81. 94 Rinsa. Chester; City; 3................ 76. 101, 106, 107 Risoh, Margaret; City; 1..... .................... Roberts, Art; City; 4............... . 89 Rismon. Junior.................................... Robinson. Ruth; Nashville; 1. 49, 67 Rocketener. Calvin; City; 2.................... 90. 91 Rogers. Margaret A.; City; 1.......................... .77 Ropcila. Myron, t.; City; 2. .......... 47. 55. 65. 69, 91 Rosenow, Laura J.; City; 4.. . 38. 52. 53. 72, 80, 81, 122 Rosickv, He.en; Junction City; 2 -------- .. 38, 47 Ruchti, rJeanor M.; Lodi; 1............. .. .49, 54, 65. 77 Runkcl, Philip J.; Wausau; 2 .... 65. 117 Ruppel, Ernst. H.: Appleton; 1....................... 48. 101 Rust'll, Paul F.; Merrill; 1 ....................... .75, 101 Saehtjin, Robert W.; Mazomanie; 2.................. Sand.niro, Corinne I.; Richland Center; 1............ 48 Sergeant. Marguerite L.; Lime Spring; 1.... 48, 53. 132 School, Harold R.; Spencer; 1 .... 49. 89 Schell, Joan; Neenan; 2 . 65 Schetter, Margaret N.; Mattoon; 2 39 Schiliinger, Otto E.: Edgar; 1.... . 49.58 Schmidt, Mildred; lola; 1.......................... 49 Schinicdlin, Sara Jane; Ixxli; 1.. ......49, S9, 93. 119 Schneider, Benedict C.; Independence; 1............ 89 Schneider. Eugene; Wausaw; 2....................... Schneider, George; Green Bay; 2.................106. 108 Schleicher, Beulah E.; Almond; 4......39. 54. 71. 80. 81 Schlucter. Delos D.; Wausau; 2..................... Schnick, Vivian; Hixton; 3.......................66. 71 Schocneck. Adeline M.; Pelican take; 2.. .32, 39. 46, 58 Scholtz, Helen K.; Plover; 1..........................58 Scliulist, Irene D.; Junction City; ! ................58 Schrank, Joan K.; City; 2................ 47, 56, 64. 66. 69 Schroeder. Adeline P.; Schawano; 4....................39 Schultz, Marcella L.; Marshfield; 2 56. 67. 68, 69. 129. 132 Schwahn. Bcttv E.; City; 2.. 47. 53. 76. 77. 1 9. 132 Srhwahn. Ruth I.; Citv; 4... .42. 63, 66, 72. 76. 77. 129 Schwcbke. Regina R.; Citv; 4.........39. 53. SO. 81. 122 Sohwingel. Evelyn D.; Richland Ctr.; 1..49, 77, 85, 94 Schwingel, La Verne L.; Richland Ctr.; 2. .55. 78, 79. 85. 89, 94 Seffern, Duncon;................................... Scverns, Murray, J.; Plainfield; 1................... .48 Sharkey, Fay L.; Mosinee; 1.. ............ Shcarier. Earl L.; Wis. kupids: 2.... 46, 56, 64. 116, 117 Scidmeier. Edward;... . Simonde, Luella......................... M Sindicic, Clementine C.; Eagle River; 2. Sister. Alice M.; City; 1.............. Sister, Alma M.; City; 4............... Sister. Huinilia. M.; Citv; 2........ Sister, Wenceslaus. M.; City; 3 ....... Skibba. Eugene. R.; City; 2.......... Skinner. George B.; City; 3............ .Skinner. Mnvnard F.; City; 2........ Slotwinski. Edwin; Citv: 1............. Slotwinski, Bronislaus; City; 4...... Smith. Calvin W.; City; 1 ............. Smith, Florence M.; Tomahawk; 1.......................54 Smith, l-a Rue W.; Shawnaw; 1 .............. 48, 55. 89 Smith, Peter; Gleason' 4................... 39. 74. 75 Smith, Ruth E.; Plainfield; 3 . 45. 55, 64. 67, 71. 129, 132 Smith, Shirley S.; Tomahawk; I....... ............... 54 Solberg, Esther M.; Mauston; 1...................... 67 Sonnenlx-rg, Evelyn L.; City; 1..............55. 67, 132 Soppa. Helen M.; Arcadia; 2...........................39 39, 58 ”..44 ......74. 75. 79 ...101. 102. 112 39, 63. 101, 102 57Sorbye, Harold; Nclsonville; Sp. Student Grad....... 55, 64. S5 Spar hawk, Charles I!.; Plover; 4. .39,64.100,101,102, 124 Spreda, James F.; City; 2........................47.55 Speich, Father R.; Monroe; 1...................... 132 Spindler, A. Dearborn; City; 1................56, 75, 91 Sprague, Clifford R.; City; 1.................... 49, 64 Staffon, George W.; City; 4..........................40 Stanelle. Herbert C.: Forest Jet.; 1................101 Stauffacher, Irene C.; Monroe; 3........45, 53, 67, 71, 85, 92, 93. 129, 132 Stauffacher, Marianne; Monroe; 3......... . 62. 66. 67, 71, 85. 87. 45 Stapel, Art hue H.; Spencer; 2..................... 91 Sterner, John H.; City; 2..... 63, 74, 75, 89. 90. 91. 94 Stiel s, Ardella L.; Manawa; 2..............40, 59, 132 Stichin, Hoy, E.; Catawaha; 2.............. 40. 58. 132 Stoeger, Richard: City; 2............. 47, 69, 79, 91 Stone, Kathleen H.; Wittenberg; 1................59.71 Stoltenl erg, Ethel E.; City; 1. --- . . .64, 67. 71. 132 Storandt. Kenneth F.; West Salem; 2. .47, 78, 79. 89. 94 St rock, Bernard; Custer; 1...... ... 58 Strvkowski, Edsvin C.: Junction City; 1........... Sturm, Carlyle. F.; City; 1 .. .............48. 69, 78 Sturm, Mary C.; Knowlton; 2................. 47. 56, 68 Swanson, Carl G.; City; 2............... 48, 63. 78, 79 Swanson, La Verne; City; 4.......................40, 64 Swenson. Carrol; City; 4...................40. 62, 117 S.vth, Alberta L.; Greenwood: I.... ....... 49. 5S, 129 Szymanski, Frank E.; Marathon; 1.............49, 57. 59 Talbot, Clifford F.; Merrill; 2 ............ 87, 88, S9 Taylor, Elizabeth;................................ Taylor, Lawrence A.; City; 1.........................48 Tenley, Mary Ltuise; Wabeno; 3........45, 85. 92, 93 Teaten, Mareurite E.; Waupaca; 1................49, 132 Tetzler, Emil A.; Conover; 1.........................59 Theilig, Adcla; Athens; 2....... ................40, 59 Theiaen, Eleanore R.; Loval; 2.............. 47, 67, 68, 69, 80. 81. 93, 129 Theisen, William A.; Loval; 4...............40, 55. 63. '68. 69, 74. 75, 86, 87. 89, 90. 91 Thompson, Elsie; Chaselmr;g 4................... 44, 71 Thoin| son, John R.; Mosinee; 1 ...................... 48 Thompson, Kenneth D.; City: 1.. 48 Thoin| son. O. V. Mrs.; Fond du I ac; 4.......43. 58. 62 Thornton, Helen M.; Shiocton; I................ 49. 55 Thoreon, Philip; Omega; 1.......... .............59.79 Timm, Rosalie C ; Manawa; 2.............. ......65. 117 Toftum, Raymond; Amherst 1. . ...... ---- Torlienson, Charles: City; 2................ 72. 78. 79 Torkelson, Margaret C.; Merrill; 3... 45, 58. 67. 92. 93 Totxke, Albert; Edgar; 3...... ................... Trebataski, Walter. ......................... .... Trcptow, Valeria; Tigerton; 2....................40,58 Triggs, Eulah J.: Wis. Rapids; 1.................. Trowbridge. Leslie W.: Milladore; 1................. 48 Tublw, Maxine; Plainfield; 2. . 40, 46. 58. 129 Twamley, Elva T.; Citv: 1........................48, 58 Tvlk, Helen J.; Mosinee; 3................... 69. 92. 93 Vaughn, Donald A.; Wis. Rapids; 4................. Vedder, Frank S.; Marshfield; 1... .. . ......... Veeder, All»erta G.; Friendship; 3.......45, 66, 67, 71 Vennie, Rol»ert James; City; 2........64, 85, 116, 117 Verrill, John; City; 3...'................. 45. 55. 65 Vogedcs, Lucille; Marathon; 2 ... 41, 59. 68. 69 Voith, Clifford V.; Jet. City; 1.................. Wabers, R.;............................... 53, 92, 93 Waohtl, Grace M.; Edgar; 2... ..................41, 68 Wachtl, Marian A.; Mosinee; 2............ 47, 53. 69 Wadzinski, Frank Jr.; Marathon; 2 41. 58 Wake, Barbara X.; Galesburg, ill.; 1...... 47, 54. 117 Walker, Joanna J.: Wautoma; 3... ........53, 59, 76, 77 Walmsley, Mary Jane; Ashland; 2................64, 129 Walsh, James; Slanawa; 4 . ......................... 75 Wulsli, Loretta P.; City; 3.......................... 66 Wunck, Doretta G.; Sechlemlle; 1.. ...........71,132 Wanta, Lorraine; City; 1............ 49, 56. 67, 68, 69 Warbelton, Marcelline; City; 1 .........46, 53. 67, 129 Warnarski, Lirry.............. ...... Warekois. Evelvne J.; Rhinelander; 4..41, 66. 71. 129, 132 Warner, Henry L.; City; 1.. 101, 106, 108. 112 Warner, Marjorie; City; 3....................... 62, 64 Wamke. Hazel H.; Westfield; 1........................ 40 Warz.inik, Gene ievo; Merrill; 3............... 45. 81 Webster, Shirley; Adams; 4 41, 62. 65, 72, 76. 77, 92 Webster. Zilphia A.; Amherst; 2 47, 64. 76, 77, 123, 129 Weed. Zeldn; Plainfield; 4 .. 41, 52, 53. 76. 77 Week, Lolita; City; 3--------------- .41, 76. 77. 132 Weik, Ruth G.; Wausau: 1 ... . .. 53 Weiler, June E.; Aubumdale; 2...................46.69 Weingartner, Francis J.; Like Delton; 1.............. 75 Weingartner, Rav L.; Like Delton; 2 47. 74, 75, 101, 102 Werner, Mildred A.; Edgar; 3........... ... .41, 45. 54 Westfahl, Ervin; Eland; 3................. 64. 90, 91 Whipple, Inman; City; 3. ......... ... 78, 79. 85. 112 Whittaker, Warde; Rhinelander; 2 . .05, 78, 79. 91, 117 Wiersig, Raymond C.; Colbv; 1........................48 Willeeke, Gerhard; Unity; 4'. ... 41, 55. 64. 116. 122 Williams, Ann M.l W ild Ro e; 2 42. 46. 57, 58. 71, 93 Williams, Claire L.; Pcwaukee; 1 ... 49, 71. 81, 132 W'iiliums, Elizal eth A.; Redgranite; 2......... 42. 47 Winanki, Jeannette; city; 2 .......63.93 Wiltraut. Bet tv Jane; Wis. Rapids;. ............ Winch, Samuel, R.; Waupaca; 3....... 55. 72, 78. 79. 89 Witkowski, Alhin; City; 2....................... 45. 56 Wohlfert. Celia A.; Oxford; 2............66. 89. 92. 93 Wolf, Bet tv F.; City; 1........................ 77 WotaanerafL Philip T.; Thorp; 8 88 Wright, Fred J.; Grant on; 1.........................49 Yach, Harry J.; City; 1...............................49 Varenow8ki, Chas.; Armstrong Creek; 2 42,46.59.69 Ycrke, Fay B.; Mukwanago; 4 .42. 66. 70. 124 Tetter, Ellen L.; City; 2 47 Young, Dan A.; Bancroft; 1 49, 101, 112 Yulga, Bernard; City; 1..... Yurkovich, John V'.; Loretta; 2......... 47. 65. 67, 79 Ullman, Mary; Necedah; 3...................... 62 Urbans, Raymond M.; City; 4.............. 40, 74. 75 Van Gilder. I.edah L.; Wittenberg; 2.... ..... .46. 55 Van Hoosen, George W ; Mauston; 2..... .........41.59 Van Xatta, Janette; Osseo; 1........... ... 49, 65, 93 Zaske. Margaret L.; Westfield; 1.............48. 53. 132 Zick. Anna M ; Myouna; 2 42. 56 Zielanis. Stanley; Thorp; 2 42. 46. 59. 64, 65. 68. 69 Zill, Viola; Gilktt; 2............................ 42.59 Zimmer. Granville E.; City; 1. ........... .75. 91 Zurawski, Chester R.; City; 2.... ................. Zvlka, Michael; City; 4 .................. 42, 79 Page t$8AFTERWORD "Close to the Heart of Wisconsin In Service os well as Location . . . C. S. T. C. Wisconsin Magazine, Nov., 1928. May this annual serve as a memory book providing a complete record of the 1936- 37 school year in a durable and accessible form. May it always be reminiscent of the happy days spent at Centrol State Teachers College. And, as the days turn into years, may it be treasured more highly. Then we shall have achieved our purpose. ‘59AUTOGRAPHS


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