University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI)

 - Class of 1917

Page 1 of 234

 

University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1917 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1917 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1917 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1917 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1917 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1917 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1917 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1917 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1917 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1917 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1917 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1917 Edition, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 234 of the 1917 volume:

THE IRIS NINETEEN-HUNDRED SEVENTEEN VOLUME TWENTY-THREE PUBLISHED BY THE SENIOR CLASS STATE NORMAL SCHOOL STEVENS POINT,WIS. ------------ m_FOREWORD rrHE best that is found in this book is but a shadow of the ideal We have hoped to make true. The weakness is a challenge for those who follow to do better. If it awakens memories of happ;9 hours, of friends among faculty and students, of well-spent efforts to gain the best development, then will the Iris staff feel its labors have not been in vain. The Staff.Table of Contents Page Title Page................................................................ 1 Foreword................................................................. 2 Table of Contents......................................................... 3 Views..................................................................... 4 Dedication............................................................... 10 President Sims .......................................................... 2 President’s Address...................................................... 13 Regent Nelson ........................................................... 14 State Board of Regents................................................... 15 Cheer Song .............................................................. 16 Faculty ................................................................. 17 Seniors ................................................................ 27 Snapshots ............................................................... 68 Juniors ................................................................. 69 Sophomores .............................................................. 75 Freshmen ................................................................ 78 Rural Department......................................................... 81 Home Economics Department............................................... 102 Home Economics Club..................................................... 105 Boys’ Athletics........................................................ Ill Girls’ Athletics ....................................................... 128 Snapshots .............................................................. 131 Dramatic Club........................................................... 132 Y. W. C. A.............................................................. 135 Loyola.................................................................. 141 Forum Athenaeum ........................................................ 144 Arena .................................................................. 147 Oh iyesa ............................................................... 153 Oratorical ............................................................. 159 Primary Council ........................................................ 168 Practice................................................................ 171 Educational Measurement Club............................................ 175 Alumni ................................................................. 177 Honorable Mention ...................................................... 179 Treble Clef............................................................. 181 Glee Club .............................................................. 184 Orchestra .............................................................. 190 Manual Training......................................................... 192 Pointer Staff .......................................................... 195 Iris Staff ............................................................. 196 Jokes .................................................................. 199 Snapshots .............................................................. 207 Pictorial Review ....................................................... 208 Advertisements.......................................................... 220 Page ThreePage Four Normal SchoolPage Five Auditorium0 VM PUS IX Wintki: Campus Suf.xe Pagt SixPage Seven Nelson IIall Page Eight Mapi.k Bkacii " N ,6odDEDICATION Twelve years ago there came to this school a man, who, by his devotion to the school and by his constructive labor, has won the love and esteem of the student body. In recognition of this fact, do we lovingly dedicate this book to FRANK S. HYERPage Eleven1917 Iris 1917 President John F. Sims Page Twelve1917 a s Iris m ■ 1917 Forward The present moment in point of time is the dividing line between the past and the future. Each individual is at this moment the product f all of the influences of his past, heredity and environment, whether of home, church, school, hooks or companions. All of our yesterdays have shajied us to the mould of our present stature of manhood or womanhood. As we stand upon this dividing line and survey the future, and silently fashion our ideals, the vital question is. how shall those ideals l e realized. There is no standing still in this life of ours. It is either advancement or retrogression, forward movement or backward movement. We are given the divine privilege of choice through sovereign will power. Too often we say we can not, because we trill not. Let us arm ourselves for the struggle onward and upward. Ix»t us highly resolve now. and strain every nerve to achieve, that our journey henceforth will be advancement, progression, and movement forward. Seniors:— “Forward" is emblazoned on the seal of the Badger State. Take it to heart as your motto. Then with honesty as a foundation, absolute faithfulness to go with it, and loyalty to high ideals as your driving l wer, you will press steadily forward until you have reached the height of your ambition—the full stature of manhood and womanhood. John F. Sims. Page Thirteen1917 Iris 1917 Regent George Nelson Page Fourteen1917 Iris 1917 Board of Regents Charles P. Cary...... Edward J. Dempsey... Clough Gates......... H. 0. Hamilton...... Emmet Horan.......... Theodore Kronshage, Jr Duncan McGregor______ George B. Nelson..... P. W. Hamer......... Mrs. Clara T. Runge... William F. Wolfe .... State Superintendent ...............Oshkosh ..............Superior ............Whitewater ...........Eau Claire .............Milwaukee ...........Plattevillc .........Stevens Point ..........River Falls ...............Baraboo ...........La Crosse Deceased. OFFICERS Duncan McGregor................... H. 0. Hamilton.................... William Kittle...................... Henry Johnson..................... .....President Vice-President .....Secretary ,... .Treasurer Page Fifteen1917 a n Iris 1917 Cheer Song To Stevens Point, the school we love, Let’s sing a song of praise. Tell of her many victories won, And high her banners raise. We’ll glorify our Alma Mater, Work for her with zest. And show to all the world around Old Stevens Point is best. Chorus So let’s join in a cheer While we’re all gathered here. Cheer for old Stevens Point. We are ready to fight For the purple and gold Of dear old Stevens Point. For her honor and fame. And her glorious name, We will stand every loyal man, So let’s cheer, cheer, the gang’s all here. All out for Stevens Point. Page Sixteenusjiuj.ms 6v ! IT 61 ■ ■ sta i i 1611917 V Iris V i9i7 frank n. spindler. A.M. HARVARD I'XIVK.RSITY Psychology: Methods: History of Education: Lode; Theory. JAMES E. DELZELL. A.B. San XOKMAL, Pnu . In diaxa. Profession a I A r 11 hmet ic mul Grammar: Observa; tlon: Penmanship; Spelling. ERNEST T. SMITH. A.B. rXIVKRMTY OK WI8COX8IX. Kuro|H‘iin History: Economies: Pnhlle Speaking. MERLIN AMES. Ph.B. I’XIVKRSITY OK WlSCOXSIX. United States History: Civics. GARRY E. CULVER. A.M. CXIVERSITY OF WlSCOXSIX. Geology: Chemistry. ALFRED HERRICK. Ph.B. C.MVKRSITY OK WlSCOXSIX. Physics. Pa fit p. ighltfti1917 ■ ■ Iris 1917 THOMAS A. ROGERS. B.8. UNIVERSITY OK MlCIIIOAN. Chemistry. WALTER T. SMITH. B.8. I"niversity ok Wisconsin. Chemistry. CHARLES F. WATSON. Ii.S. l.’XIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. Geography. Ph.D. Johns Hopkins Univer sity. Mathematics. ARTHl’R F. POTT. R.S.A.. M.S. Ohio State I’nivekrity. Agriculture. I X nJ W 1 NANNIE It. (iRAV. Special Summer School, Middlebury. Vermont. German. Page Nineteen1917 Iris 1917 ELEA N K FLA N AO AN. 1'RATT IXSTITI TK. NEW York. Drawing: Iliimlwork. ETHEL F. COOPER. B.S. UNIVERSITY OK CHICAGO. Home Economics Physiology : Zoology: Botany. RAYMOND W. FAIR-CHILD. A.B. UNIVERSITY OK MICHIGAN. Biology: Bacteriology: Entomology: Sanitation. MARION JACKSON. Comm hi a University. Botany: Bacteriology: Physiology: Physics Ijil»or-atory. MARY L. JONES. COLl'MIll A UNIVERSITY. B o fa n y: Bacteriology: Physics I.:il orntory. DAVID A. SWARTZ. University ok Wisconsin. Physiology: Oeneral Science. Piigt Turnly1917 Iris 1917 BESSIE M. ALLEN. B.S. Columbia University. Advanced Cookery; Dietetics; Methods. ESTHER L. LOGREX. B.S. Lewis Institute. Ciiicaoo. L a undr y; Cookery ; CORNELIA LIVE. B.S. Columbia Cnivebsitv. Cookery. EDENA SCH ACM BERG I'katt Institute. New Yokk. Sewing: Dressmaking. I lousehold Management. KATHERINE TCI'PER. B.S. COI.VM BIA CHI VERS IT Y. Sewing. ALTA BEE ADAMS. Pli.B. Cniversity ok Chicago. Industrial Arts; Supervision of Household Arts in Grades. Page Twenty-one1917 Iris 1917 OSCAR W. NEALE. Denison UNIVERSE! y. Rural Economic and So-dology; School Mima cement: Arithmetic; Pri- mary Methods. LYDIA It. RADEMACHER. Illinois University. Assistant Rural Depart-ment. MAY ROACH. Stevens Point Normal. Model Rural Scliool Teacher. BERTHA HUSSEY. A.M. University ok Chicago Enelish Literature: Com-I osi t ion. EDNA EIMER. University ok Wisconsin. English Literature: Com-liosition. IDA M. BREWSTER. Ph.B. University ok Wisconsin. Juvenile Literature: American Literature: Composition Page Tixrnly-tixo1917 Iris 1917 GEORGE D. CORNEAL. University ok Pennsyl- VANIA. Physical Training. EDWARD J. WATERMAN. Bradley Polytechnic In- . STITITE. Manual Training: Mechanical Drawing. MARY BRONSON. Northwestern University. Physical Education: Expressive Reading. LEO A. CARVER. Central Institute, Cleveland. Manual Training; Mechanical Drawing. ROSE WALSH. Northwestern University. Physical Training. MABELLE M. Slf J TON. Columbia School ok Music. Chicago. Music. Page Twenty-three1917 ■ ■ Iris ■ ■ 1917 ELIZABETH M. SHORT. Librarian. BERTHA D. GOODYEAR. Columbia University. Critic Eighth Grade. LULU M. MANSUR. Columbia University. Assistant Librarian. WINIFRED R. NELSON. A.B. Carroll College. Critic Seventh Grade. FRANK S. HYER. A.B. Ripon College. Principal of Training School. NINA L. NICHOLS. Chicago University. Critic Sixth Grade Page Tiventy-four1917 Iris 1917 ELLEN I. BURK. A.B. Columbia University. Critic Fifth Grade. EDITH B. WHITNEY. Saint Cloud Normal School. Critic Third and Fourth Grades. PRUDENCE B. CUTRIGHT. Columbia Teach ers College. Critic First ami Second Grades. AGNES MORRISSEY. Steven8 Point State Normal. Critic First and Second tirades (Assistant). ETTA C. BOWSTEAD. Milwaukee State Normal. Critic Kindergarten. Mi ELBA A. SLATER. Chicago University. Music: Drawing. 3 Page Twenty-five1917 V Iris V 2 92 7 ELLA E. JENNINGS. Clerk. LOIS JENNKSS. Clerk. BERNICE SAUNDERS. Clerk. DOCTOR ALLISON. Normal Physician. Page Twenty-six1917 V is V 1917 w V 7 v SECIIORS 7 4 N Page T venty seven1917 Iris 1917 CLASS OFFICERS Page Twenty-eight1917 I r i s 1917 LUTHER ANDERSON Scandinavia “Andy" Scandinavia Academy, St. Olaf College. Two War English. Principalship. Activities: Football, ’16: Basketball, T7. Glee Club. Thesis: The School as a Social Center. "The world is waiting for you, Luther” VAX ASHMUX Stevens Point Waupaca High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Disraeli. Iris Staff. Thesis: Possibilities of Manual Training in Rural Schools. "He loves but one at a time and she’s at Ladysmith.” VILA BARAGKR—“Yi" Stevens Point Stevens Point High School. Two Year German, Grammar. Thesis: The Teacher’s Part in the Acquiring of Good Posture by Fifth and Sixth Grade Girls. "For she is wise, if I ran judge her: And fair she is. if that mine eyes be true: And true she is. as she hath proved herself.” CL A R A BA X TER—“ Ba be" Cl i fford Wilmot. S. I)., High School. Philips County Training School. Two Year English, Principalship. Activities: Arena. Y. W. C. A. Thesis: Relation of Speed to Comprehension in Reading. "She does what she will when she will.” ESTH ER BE LG I’M Mishicott “Smiles" Five Year English. Grammar. Activities: Y. W. C. A. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Teaching of Wisconsin in the Seventh Grade. "Just a little spice of wickedness.” Page Twenty-nine1917 Iris 1917 I WARREN BLODGETT Weyauwega ■' K K K X F. l"—" Blodgi e” Wevauwega High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Pointer Staff. Iris Staff. Thesis: The Teaching of American liistorv in the Eighth Grade. “Thinking makelh a satisfied man” GLADYS BLOOI) Stevens Point "Gook" Stevens Point High School. Two Year German. Grammar. Activities: Triangular Debate, 07: Arena. Loyola. Thesis: The Last Half Century of American History as Taught in the Eighth Grade. “Would that there were more like her.” GLADYS CHAPMAN Stevens Point "Chappie" Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Educational Measurement Hub. Y.W. C. A. Thesis: What a Pupil Ought to Know When He Finishes the Eighth Grade. '‘Small of stature hut mighty of mind” LYDIA (’LARK -"Lyd” Stevens Point Two Year English. Grammar. Activities: President Educational Measurement Club: Iris Staff: Pointer Arena, Y. W. C. A. Thesis: Measuring Hand Writing in the Grades. “To see her is to love her. and love her hut forever. For Mature made her what she is. and never made another.” MABEL CLEMENT Stevens Point "Clem" Stevens Point High School Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Tennis, 06; 07: Pointer Staff. 07. Ohivesa: Basket Ball. Thesis: Increasing the Percentage of Good Posture in the Grades Through the rse of the Triple Test. “rhat she has undertaken to do, she has done, but she has taken her time to do it.” Page Thirty1917 Iris 1917 DELL CURTIS—“Curt" Pardeevillc Pardeeville High School. Two Year English. Principalship. Activities: Loyola: Pointer Staff. '17. Forum Athenaeum; Glee Club. Thesis: Problems of Discipline in State Graded Schools. " come not, friends, to steal away your hearts; I am no orator as Unit us was; only speak• right on." MARY DROLL1NGER Marshfield “Dee" Marshfield High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Basket Ball; Tennis. Ohivesa. Thesis: Early Wisconsin History in the Grammar Grades. "Well, you know. Love is better than Fame.” ESTHER EICHSTEADT Port Edwards Grand Rapids High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Educational Measurement Club; Ohivesa. Y. W. C. A. Thesis: Supplementary Reading for the Grammar Grades. "Did she ever turn from the straight and narrow way f” WILLI A M GI ESC) X—G i lly" I asco Five Year English. Grammar. Activities: Forum Athenaeum: Triangular Debate; Alternate Junior Debate. 16; Second Alternate Orator. ’17: Iris Staff; Pointer Staff. ’14. ’16. Glee Club; Loyola; Dramatic Club; Educational Measurement Club. Thesis: A King without a Country. "He hath a silvery tongue that would move the heart of stone" Ll’CILE CZESKLEBA Waupaca “Lucy" Waupaca High School; Carroll College, ’10. Two Year English. Grammar. Activities: Y. W. C. A. Thesis: Signs of Defectiveness in Children. "Tall, stately, and serene. Every inch of her a yucca " Page Thirty-one1917 Iris 1917 GRACE I). HANSON—“Haws" Iola Iola High School. Two Year English, Grammar Activities: Ohivesa; Treble Clef. Y. Y. C. A. Cabinet. Thesis: Juvenile Courts. “Mold! Even I am I." MABELLE HEISIG He Forest Windsor High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Choral Club. treble Clef. Thesis: Teaching of Measurements in Seventh Grade Arithmetic. “She sure fulfills the regulations for a dignified Senior." ANITA HOLLM TELLER GrandRapids “Nrte" Grand Rapids High School. Two Year English. Grammar. Activities: Loyola; Treble Clef. Arena; Choral Club. Thesis: The Teaching of Reading in the Fifth Grade. “Of ever; noble work the silent part is best. Of all expression. that which cannot be expressed ALM A LA RSON—“Topsy" Norrie Shawano High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Y. V. C. A., Choral Club. Arena. Thesis: Habits to be Strengthened in the Sixth Grade. “He wisely worldly, he not worldly wise." HERMAN LK CAPTAIN Casco “Cappy" Five Year English. Grammar. Activities: Disraeli; Mikado; Foot- ball: Tennis; Track; Basket Ball. Forum Athenaeum; Loyola; Glee Club. “Eternal vigilance is the price of bachelorhoody Page Thirty-two1917 Iris 1917 LEONE LOHREY Algoma “Annie Laurie” Algoma High School: Door and Kewaunee County Training School. Two Year English. Grammar. Activities: Y. W. C. A. Ohiyesa. Thesis: The Development of Literary Appreciation through the Study of a Classic in Grammar Grades. “Give thy thoughts a tongue.” SAM LONG Westfield Westfield High School. Two Year English. Principalship. Activities: Educational Measurement Club. Forum Athenaeum. Thesis: Teaching of Agriculture in Elementary Schools. “No ordinary man was he.” HELEN LOOMIS—“Pit ” Gilmanton Gilmanton High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Ohiyesa. Thesis: Promotion by Efficiency in the Grammar Grades. “There’s a little bit of good in every bad little girl.” GORON LOVEJOY Stevens Point “Lovey” Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Football: Junior Class Play: Senior Class Play, T6. Forum Athenaeum: Dramatic Club. Thesis: Commercial Courses in High School. “He sees a duty to be done: a future goal that’s to be won.” FRANCES LOWE—“Fran” Prentice Prentice High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Ohiyesa. Y. W. C. A. Thesis: Consolidated Schools in Wisconsin. “Laughing eyes and raven tresses; a sweet way all her own.” Page Thirty-three1917 ■ ■ Iris 1917 BERENICE MALONEY—“Bra" Chippewa Falls Notre Dame High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Ohiyesa. Loyola. Thesis: The teaching of Spelling in the Grammar Grades. “She's beautiful: and therefore to be wooed; She is a woman: therefore to be won." HERBERT MARSH Stevens Point “11 ki;b” Colbv High School. Two Year English, Principalship. Activities: Forum Athenaeum. “Cheerful at morn, he wakes from short repose. Breathes the keen air. and carols as he goes." CLYDE MORLEY White Creek Friedship High School. Two Year English, Principalship. Activities: Glee Club; Football; Track. Educational Measurement Club; Forum Athenaeum. Thesis: The Practical in Civics for the Eighth Grade. “A little slip boy from the farm" RUTH NEMACHECK Eagle River “Rufus" Eagle River High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Ohiyesa. Y. W. C. A. Thesis: The Teaching of Poetry in the Intermediate Grades. “A merrier girl, within the limit of becoming mirth I never spent an hour’s talk withal" ADOLPH NEUAVALD Stevens Point “Ike” Stevens Point High School. Activities: Dramatic Club; Cheer Leader: Business Manager, Iris. Educational Measurement Club; Forum Athenaeum. Thesis: Continuation Schools. “For if he will, he will, and there's an end of it." Page Thirty-four1917 I r i s a ■ □ 1917 ELSIE PATITZ—“Pat” Stevens Point Abbotsford High School. Two Year German, Grammar. Thesis: Municipal Playgrounds in Community Center Work. “All days are nights until I see him ” BERNICE RILEY Stevens Point "Bin" Five Year English, Grammar. Activities: Basket Ball; Treble Clef. Ohiyesa; Loyola. Thesis: Teaching Grammar as a Thought Provoking Question. “.•1 glorious head and still more glorious hair.” GRACE NOHR Stevens Point “Gkayce'’ Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Basket Ball. Loyola. Thesis: Educational Tests—Spelling. "Much might be said if one could read her mind” LESTER PETERSON Iola Iola High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Football; Basket Ball. Glee Club. Thesis: Government Ownership of Railroads. “I have no other than a woman's reason. I think• him so because 1 think him so” IRMA PLAYMAN Stevens Point “Dusty” Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Thesis: Teaching of Argumentation in Grammar Grades. “Better late than never” Page Thirty-five1017 a ■ Iris 1017 HAROLD SCRIBNER Stevens Point “Scoop ' Stevens Point High School. Two Year English. Grammar. Activities: Debate; Mikado. Glee Club: School Reporter for Journal. Thesis: Teaching of Ethics through the “Great Stone Face.” “A little learning is a dangerous thing. Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.” DOROTHY VAN HECKE—“Dot" Stevens Point Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Activities: Iris Staff: Dramatics, 15; Choral Club. Loyola; Treble Clef. Thesis: The Necessity of Bringing Good Music Before the Pupils in the Grammar Grades. “I want to he a librarian.” MARGARET VAN HECKE—“Maro” Stevens Point Stevens Point High School. Two Year English. Grammar. Activities: Treble Clef; Pointer Staff. Loyola. Thesis: What the Teacher Can Introduce in the Way of Community Music. “Ay, every inch a queen.” RETA VERHUL8T Milladore Marshfield High School. Two Year English, Grammar. Thesis: The Value and Measurement of Ability to Read. “A friend through thick and thin.” OLGA WALLER—“Ole” Wittenberg Galesville High School. Two Year English, Gramma.r Activities: Ohiyesa. Thesis: What Games Shall Grammar Grade Girls Play? “That, though on pleasure she was bent, she had a frugal mind.” Page Thirty-six1917 Iris 1917 KATHERINE WALTHER Jefferson “Kay" Jefferson High School. Two Year English. Grammar. Activities: Y. W. C. A.: Basket Ball. Ohivesa: Choral Club. Thesis: Dynamic Civics in the Eighth Grade. "First, then, a woman will, or won't-depend on't." ALBERT JOHNSON Wausau “JOHNNIB" Wausau High School. One Year English, Grammar. Activities: Football. Glee Club. Thesis: The Psychology of War. “Wisdom, eloquence, and grace. But greater than these is 'Pep ALMA J EDAM US Wausau Wausau High School. Two Year English. Grammar. Activities: Y. W. C. A. Thesis: Home Study in the Grammar Grades. "Quite gentle and with a desire for study." MARGARET TOZIER Stevens Point “Muos" Northwestern University Five Year German, Grammar. Activities: Treble Clef. Thesis: Why we Should Have Physical Training in Public Schools. " ’Tis better to be too bold, than not bold enough ” Page Thirty-seven1917 I r i s 1917 BURTON AXBROSE Stevens Point “Boonsex" Five Year English, High School. Activities: Debating; Oratory; Basket Ball; Track. Loyola; Forum Athenaeum. Thesis: America Efficient. “Our future President of the t'nited States.” F LORI AN BA NX ACM Stevens Point “Joe" Stevens Point High School; Ripon. ’15-’16. Two Year High School. “I am a man. nothing that is human do I think■ unbecoming in me” HATTIE CONE Marshall Medina High School. Three Year English, High School. Activities: Ohiyesa President, M6; Junior Debate, M6; iris Staff. Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Choral Club. Thesis: The Development of the English Drama. “Her modesty is a candle to her merit.” MAX G IEDLINSKI—“Pep" Ripon Ripon College. Three Year English. High School. Activities: Basket Ball; Track; Ora- tory. Loyola; Forum Athenaeum. Thesis: What the Schoolmaster can Learn Through Soliciting. "You come most carefully upon your hour” XELLE GLEASON Stevens Point “Nell" Stevens Point High School. Three Year History and Literature. High School. Activities: Home Economics Club; Pointer Staff; Basket Ball. Loyola; Arena. Thesis: Dramatization in the High School. " ’Tis good to be merry and irise.” Page Thirty-eight1917 Iris 1917 A NTOIX ETTE H A M AC 11 EC' K “Nettie" Kewaunee P'ive Year English, High School. Activities: Y. Y. C. A. Arena. Thesis: Study Program in High School. “Knowleye is more than equivalent to force." MARGUERITE HARTL Marshfield “Peggy" Marshfield High School; Valparaiso University, Ho, H6. Three Year Mathematics and Science, High School. Activities: Loyola; Treble Clef. Arena. Thesis: The Methods of Class Instruction in Algebra. "Her words are theorms; her thoughts a problem. ARTHUR HELD Stevens Point Stevens Point High School. Three Year Mathematics and Science, High School. Activities: Football, H4, Ho; Track, Ho; Basket Ball, Ho, H6, H7; Forum Athenaeum; Iris Staff. President Senior Class; Glee Club; Choral Union; Mikado. Thesis: Teaching of Electricity in the High School. “When I beheld this I sighed and said within nu self—surely man is a Broomstick." VIOLET HILL Cumberland Cumberland High School. Three Year History and Literature, High School. Activities: Iris Staff; Y. W. C. A. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Economic Conditions in Mexico. "Her voice is low and even ; never a tremor disturbs the quiet serenity of her tone.” JAMES HULL—“Jimmy" Stevens Point High School. Three Year English, High School. Activities: Glee Club; Debate. Dramatic Club. Thesis: America — the Samaritan Among Nations. "lie oft hath burned the midnight oil, But never, I aver, in toil." Page Thirty-nine1917 Ir is 1917 GEORGE MOXON Stevens Point “Dr. Moccy" Stevens Point High School. Three Year Science, High School. Activities: Glee Club; Orchestra. Forum Athenaeum. Thesis: Alaska and Its Possibilities. “Upon what meat does this, our Georgie feed. That he hath grown so fatV JAMES MURPH Y—“Jim" Hayton Five Year English, High School. Activities: Football. “ 'Tis no siti for man to labor in his vacation." CHARLOTTE NACHTWEY “Whistler" Dorchester Abbotsford High School. Three Year Science, High School. Activities: Dramatic Club; Junior Debate, ’16; Triangular Debate, 16, ’17; Iris Staff; Pointer Staff. Treble Clef. M5; Loyola; Arena Pres-dent, '17. Thesis: America Back to the Sea. "A whistle, a flash, then Charlotte CARL NELSON—“Nels" Unity Unity High School. Three Year English, High School. Activities: Orchestra; Forum Athe- naeum. Glee Club. Thesis: The Place of Mathematics in a High School Course. “Give me a lever long enough, And a prop strong enough, And I can single handed move the world" AVADA OSTROM Hancock Hancock High School. Three Year English, High School. Activities: Y. W. C. A. Ohiyesa. Thesis: The Development of Self- Reliance in the High Schools Students. “She doesn’t believe in wasting superfluous en-ergg on laughter and speech " Page Forty1917 Iris 1917 JOSEPH POPE—“Swiftie" Wausau Wausau High School. Three Year Biological Science, High School. Activities: Football, 14, M5, '16; Basket Ball, ’15, '16, ’17; Track. Forum Athenaeum; Glee Club, ’15; Iris Staff; Pointer Staff, '15. Thesis: Theories of Leaf Coloration. “It is not rank, nor birth, nor state, It’s ‘Git up and get’ that makes men great.” MILDRED POTTER—“M” Stanley Stanley High School. Three Year English, High School. Activities: Iris Staff; Pointer Staff; Basket Ball. Ohiyesa; Loyola. Thesis: Pictures in the Teaching of Literature in High School. “The pencil wrought whatever her soul designed. and oft the happy draught surpassed the image in her mind.” HENRY SCHADEWALD—“Shad" Stevens Point Stevens Point High School. Three Year Science, High School. Activities: President, Junior Class; Treasurer. Senior Class. Football, '14, '15; Track, ’14, '15. Thesis: Can the Gary Plan be Adopted to the Schools of Stevens Point? “I awoke one morning and found myself famous.” HELEN SCIIROEDER Augusta Augusta High School. Three Year English, High School. Activities: Y. W. C. A. Ohiyesa. Thesis: The Teaching of Oral English. “She never leaves till tomorrow what she can do today.” EMORY PETERSON Scandinavia “Pete” Scandinavia Academy: St. Olaf College. Three Year Mathematics and Science, High School. Thesis: The Teaching of Electricity in the High School. “Brevity is the soul of wit.” Page Forty-one1917 Iris 1917 MICHAEL RYBICKE Stevens Point. “Mike" Stevens Point High School. Three Year High School. Activities: Dramatic Club. Thesis: The Arousing of Public In- terest in Civic Affairs. “The apparel oft proclaims the man ” Page Forty-two1917 Iris N ■ 1917 FLORENCE BLACK—“Flo" Kaukauna Kaukauna High School. Two Year Home Economies Course. Thesis: Ideal Country Homes. “As straw show the way the winds blow. So Florence points the way the fashions go." EDYTHE BLUME Monticello “Pbgoy" Monroe High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Secretary of Junior Class; Ohiyesa; Home Economics Club. Y. W. C. A.: Dramatic Club. Thesis: Development of Foreign Cheese Industry in Wisconsin. "Sweet, sensible and sincere, Is dairy worth a hemisphere." STELLA BROWN Beaver Dam Wavland Academy. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Y. W. C. A.; Home Economics Course. Arena. Thesis: The Farmhouse Cellar. "Ambition has no rest" CECELIA CAIN. Elkhart Lake Kiel High School. Two Year Home Economic Course. Activities: Lovola; Home Economics Club. Arena. Thesis: The Growth and Production of Cotton. "Herself alone, none other, she resembles." HAZEL CARLSON Necedah Necedah High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Y. W. C. A.; Basket Ball. Choral Club. Thesis: Correct Dress for Girls be- tween Ages of Sixteen and Twenty-five. "Labor is life." Page Forty-three1917 ■ ■ Iris 1917 BERNICE CORNELL—“Bun" Superior Superior High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Y. W. C. A.; Home Economics Club. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Household Insects and Methods of Control. ”A winning way. a pleasant smile.” JOSEPHINE COWLES Green Bay "Jo" East Green Bay High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Thesis: Correct Dress as a Business Qualification. "Blest with that charm, the certainty to phase.” BLANCHE CRAIG Oconomowoc Oconomowoc High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Y. W. C. A.; Home Economics Club. Arena. Thesis: The Farm Kitchen as a Workshop. "A smile for ail, both large and small.” MARGARET CUTLAND Wilton Wilton High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Y. W. C. A.; Home Economics Club. Arena. Thesis: The Influence of High School Domestic Arts on the Home. "Cheerfulness throws sunlight on all the paths of life.” NORMA DEARBORN Stoughton “Dutch" Stoughton High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. V. W. ('. A. Thesis: "Modesty seldom fails.” Page Forty-four1917 Iris 1917 BERXADETTE DONXELLY "Bin" Marinette Lourdes High School; Marinette County Training School. Three Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Loyola. Thesis: Development of Silverware. “A queen in the rosebud garden of girls." E U LA LI A DOUG IIERT Y Glenmore “Lou" Green Bay High School. Activities: Pointer Staff. ’17: Home Economics Club. Loyola. Thesis: Women’s Dress between Ages of Twenty-five and Fifty Years. "0 her to whom much is given, much will be required." LENA DRIVER Milton Junction ”Lkk" Milton Junction High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club; Basket Ball. Ohivesa: Y. Y. C. A. Thesis: The Modern Kitchen. “Pitii those who hove lived without loving.” HAZEL ELLIS Glenwood City “Shorty" Glenwood City High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Children’s Clothes from Ten to Sixteen Years of Age. “Keeping everlasting at it. brings suc-cess." EUNICE EVANS—“Eunie" Racine Racine High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Cakes and Cake Baking. “A little girl with a smiling face. Whose evert motion was full of grace." Page Forty-five1917 Ir is 1917 ALYA FITZGERALD Tomahawk “Abbib" Tomahawk High School. Two Year Home Economies Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Thesis: Oriental Hugs. "She drifts along on an ever constant stream of talk ." RUTH FONTAINE Grand Rapids Grand Rapids High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Thesis: The Housewife and Domestic Service. "The Gods gave you more than your rightful share. In making you brilliant as you are fair ” MAGDALEN GE1MER Manitowoc “Magda" Manitowoc County Training School. Five Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Thesis: Home Economics and the Rural School. "She was. but words would fail to tell thee what. Think what a woman should be, and she was that." KATHERINE GLYNN Glenbeulah “Glym's" Glenbeulah High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Loyola: Home Economics Club. Arena. Thesis: Children’s Clothes from the Age of One to Ten Years. "A little package of intelligence tied with green ribbon." ESTHER GROVER Two Rivers “T. R.” Two Rivers High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Y. W. C. A. Thesis: Development of Cooking Utensils. “Prosperity to the man who ventures to please her." Page Forty-six1917 Iris 1917 FLORENCE HAIRE Wcvauwega "Bunny" Weyauwcga High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: V. Y. C. A.; Home Economics Club. Choral Club. Thesis: Efficiency in the Home Every Day in the Week. “Genial in manner and original in speech" RUBY HAM ANN Unity Unity High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Y. W. C. A.; Home Economics Club. Ohivesa. “Still water runs deep:'' LAURETTA HARGRAVE North Lake “Ret" Holy Angels Academy. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Thesis: Treatment of the Servant in the Home. “Ambitious, but still not a hit of a grind.” ESTIIER 11A RLA ND Marshall "Essie" Medina High School. Three Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Y. W. C. A.: Home Economics Club. Arena. Thesis: The Fireless Cooker and Its Uses in the Home. “Though modest and gentle she rules her own heart.” IRENE HART—“Dutch" Glidden Glidden High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Loyola; Home Economics Club. Arena. Thesis: Evolution of the Home. “Life without laughing is a dreary blank" Page Forty-seven1917 ■ ■ Iris 1917 IDA HENDERSON Cresco. Iowa “Rusty" Five Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Y. V. A.; Home Econo- mics Club. Arena. Thesis: A Plea for a Larger Use of Cheese in the Diet. “Messed is the woman who has found her workr HELEN HUBBELL Beaver Dam. Wavland Academy. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Y. W. C. A.; Home Economics Club. Arena. Thesis: The Model Farm Living Room. “Bright, merry, and gay is this blithesome lass. With a sweet sunnt smile for all in the classr BLANCHE HUFF Independence Independence High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. Thesis: Principles of Correct Dress for School Children. “Tier charm is all her own." IRMA JENNEY—“Silas" Waupaca Waupaca High School: Waupaca Training School. Three Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Y. W. (’. A. Cabinet; Home Economics Club Treasurer. M5; President. M7. Ohiyesa. ✓ Thesis: Scientific Training for Home Making. “To business that we love we rise bclime and go to it with deligh t!’ EYYA JEPSON—“Jeppi” Bear Creek-New London High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Interior Decoration and Furnishing for a $2,000 Home. “Wisdom, eloquence, and grace. But greater than these is 'Pep Pag? Forty-eight1917 Iris 1917 MABEL JOHNSON Tomahawk Tomahawk High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Treble Clef: Home Economics Club. Arena. Thesis: The Preservation of Milk in the Household. “Hut her eyes! Such pranks they play.” ELEANOR KOPPA Wausau Wausau High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club: Basket Ball: Loyola. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Teaching Sanitation in the High School. “She lives in peace with all mankind.” KATHERINE LAM BERT Bavfield 'K” Bayfield High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club; Basket Ball. Ohiyesa; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. Thesis: Labor Saving Devices in the II ome. “She impresses till with abundant energy.” MINA LOOMIS Gilmanton Buffalo County Training School. Five Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Great Problem of Domestic Service. “A maid of valuable information is she.” MAUDE MATHE-—“Maudib” Almond Almond High School. Three Year Home Economic Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Vice-President, ’16: Ohiyesa-Arena Contest. ’16. Ohiyesa President, 16: Y. W. C. A. Vice-President, 16. Thesis: History and Development of Table Furnishings. “Her sweet smile and winning ways win the lore of all who know her.” Page Forty-nine1917 Iris 1917 ELIZABETH MATH IE—“Eli" Highland Park, HL Wausau High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Iris Staff; Home Econoi- mics Club; Mikado. Treble Clef; Choral Club. Thesis: The Efficiency of the Modern Home. ".I girl of honor, of noble,, and generous nature. MA RG ARET MINTON Waupaca “Marg" Waupaca High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Basket Ball: Home Economics Club. Arena. Thesis: How the Farm Home Dining Room May be Made Attractive. “She has more than wisdom, more than wealth, a merry heart that laughs with ait: MARION MOORE Green Bay “Bobby" Green Bay High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Iris Staff, ’17. Home Economics Club. Thesis: The Balanced Diet and Its Present Cost. “True beauty is sweetness, and sweetness is the spiritualizing of the earth” DELPHINE PENDLETON “Phene" Mount Hope Mount Hope High School Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Y. W. a A. Thesis: Modern Conveniences for the Farm Home. "Her modesty becomes her” LOUELLA PETERS Clinton Clinton High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Thesis: The Furnishing and Care of a Bedroom. “Prim and proper, so I be. Teachers think the world of me” Page Fifty1917 Iris 1917 LEONE POST Sauk City Sauk City High School-Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Lovola: Home Economics Club. Arena. Thesis: The Use of Electricity in the Home. “A kind and gentle heart she. has To comfort friends and foes.” JOSEPHINE POWERS Mukwonago “Jo" Elementary Course, Whitewater Normal. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club; Dramatic Club; Choral Club. Ohiyesa; Loyola. Thesis: The Use of Color in Interior Decoration. “The Josephine‘ part of her name Stands for wit and for fun. Hut the ‘Powers' will bring her fame. For it stands for work well done.” EVELYN RA1BLE—“Evie" Walworth Walworth High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Treble Cleef; Orchestra, ’15. Arena. Thesis: Project Work in Home Economics. “Little I ask. mg wants are few” MABEL RETON Stevens Point “Naughty" Stevens Point High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Thesis: The Fireless Cooker and Its Uses. ".Is merry as the dag is long.” ANNE ROACH—“Axxie" Eau Claire Eau Claire High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Loyola: Home Economics Club. Arena. Thesis: The Fireless Cooker and Its Uses. “Her smile is like a morn in dune” ♦ Page Fifty-one1917 ■ ■ I r is ■ ■ 1917 ETHEL STARK Stevens Point “Buddy” Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club; Choral Club. Ohiyesa; Y. W. C. A. Thesis: The Adulteration of Textiles. “So fair she almost lakes Hie breath of men auay.” VERA TEWKESBURY Osceola “Tooky" Osceola High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Y. W. C. A.; Home Economics Club. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Adulteration of Cloth. “An open-hearted maiden, fair and true” X ETTIE THOM PSON Wyocena “Tommy” Rio High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Choral Club; Home Economics Club. Arena; Dramatic Club. Thesis: The Servant Problem. “Oh tell me a way to gain knowledge without study” MARIE VAX ERMEX Green Bay “Van” Green Bay High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Choral Club; Home Economics Club. Ohiyesa: Loyola. Thesis: The Efficient Kitchen. “Good at a fight as well as at play” 11AZEL WICKERX—“Chick" Racine Racine High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Basket Ball: Iris Staff. Ohiyesa; Home Economics Club. Thesis: The Kitchen in the City Home. “My ambition far exceeds my size.” Page Fifty•tv.o1917 I r is 1917 ALICE WINTER Beaver Dam “Polly" Beaver Dam High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Thesis: The Paramount Knitting Mills. uWould that June were here." BEATRICE YOUNG—"Bea” Barron Barron High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economies Club: Pointer Staff, 17. Ohivesa; Y. W. C. A. Thesis: Teaching the High School Students their Responsibilities as Consumers. “Xeither rhyme nor reason ran express how much we love her." MARIE ZIMMERLE—“Zim" Monroe Monroe High School. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Vice - President Senior Class; Home Economics Club. Ohivesa Treasurer. Thesis: Individuality of Woman as Expressed bv Her Raiment “The best strength of a woman is shown in her daily deeds and character." LUCT LE LAW R ENCE Wausau Waterman Hall. Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Home Economics Club. Thesis: Twelve World Pictures. "Her heart like the moon is ever changing. And like the moon, there is always a man in it." TINA ROUTHEAUX—“Teen" Oconto Oconto High School Two Year Home Economics Course. Activities: Lovola: Home Economics Club. Ohivesa. Thesis: The Essentials of Good Housekeeping. "What better school for manners than the company of a brilliant woman?" Page Fifty-three1917 a n 3 Iris 1917 LOUISE ASHMUN Stevens Point Waupaca High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. Thesis: How to Tell a Story in the Primary Grades. “She's just the quiet kind, whose natures never vary.” MARY BOUND Plainfield Plainfield High School. Two Year English, Primary. Acti v i t ies: Oh iyesa. “The noblest mind the best contentment has” FLORENCE BOURN Stevens Point “Sis" Five Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council; Basket Bail. Y. V. C. A.; Arena. Thesis: Teaching of Phonics in the First Grade. “She's always jolly, bright and gay. With friends enough to throw away.” IDA BREYAI)—“Bee" Menomonie Dunn County Training School. Five Year English, Primary. Activities: Pointer Staff; Iris Staff; Basket Ball. Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Ohiyesa. Thesis: Wisconsin History Stories Revised for Primary Grades. “Strong reasons make strong actions.” Page Fifty-four1917 Iris a ■ 1917 ALICE BRADY Bancroft Five Year English, Primary. Activities: Debating. Loyola. Such a fresh, blooming, rosy, modest lit tie bud." PEARL BUNIN Stevens Point “Bunny” Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Arena. Thesis: The History Story in the Primary Grades. "If speech were golden, she's be a millionaire." ESTHER CARTERON—“Es" Belleville Belleville High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Y. W. 0. A. Thesis: Choosing an Elementary School Library. "The secret of success is constancy to purpose" RUTH CROWNS—“Ruthie” Nekoosa Grand Rapids High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Educational Measurement Club; Primary Council. Loyola; Ohiyesa. Thesis: Primary Reading Tests. "If silence is virtue then am a saint.” FLORENCE DAVIS—“Davie” Mercer Ironwood, Mich., High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Thesis: Songs Primary Children Should Know. " PTis the quiet people who do the work" Page Fifty-five1917 Iris 1917 VIOLA DOYLE—“Vi" Rhinelander Rhinelander High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Loyola. Thesis: Hygiene in the School Room. “Her merry laugh and jolly way Would make a school board raise her pay” J ESS IE FA R R—“Jks" Mondovi Mondovi High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Ohivesa. Thesis: Children’s Progress in First Grade Writing. “Happiness is a product obtained from work well done.” CLARA FELLAND Stoughton “Babe" Stoughton High School; St. Olaf, ’15. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Ohiyesa; Y. W. C. A. Primary Council. Thesis: Posture in the Child’s Health and Success. “The glass f fashion, and the mold of form. The observed of all observers.” FLORENCE FOOTE Stevens Point “Footir" Five Year English, Primary. Activities: Y. W. C. A. Ohiyesa. Thesis: How to Make History Inter- est ing to Primary Pupils. “None knew her but to love her; None named her but lo praise.” KATHERIXE GARY1X—“Kit" Rio Rio High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council; Iris Staff; Dramatic Club. Ohiyesa; Loyola. Thesis: Primary Games and Plays. “Good nature and good sense must ever join.” Page Fifty-six1917 Iris s ■ 1917 FLORENCE GETHING Stevens Point “Flossie" Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Choral Club; Primary Council. Arena; Loyola. Thesis: The Teaching of Muliplication in the Third Grade. “To those who know thee not. No words can paint tin charms.’' CHECHEN GILMORE Durand “Shorty" Durand High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Arena; Primary Council: Iris Staff. Y. W. C. A.: Educational Measurement Club. Thesis: The Relation of Art to Pri- mary Education. “Talking is second nature to me." ELSIE GRIFFIN—“Bob" Montello Montello High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Ohiyesa; Primary Council. Educational Measurement Club. Thesis: Teaching of Correct English in the Primary Grades Through Games. “All sorrows flee from her. we see. a smile is there so free from care. She spreads sunsh ine everywhere." GRACE H. HANSON Wautoma “Midge" Waushara County Training School. Five Year English. Primary. Activities: Primary Council; Treble Clef: Basket Ball. Y. W. C. A.; Ohiyesa. Thesis: Picture Study in the Primary Grades. “Our little ftowery maiden." SENA HANSON Greenwood “Dutchess" Greenwood High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Educational Measurement Club; Iris Staff. Y. W. C. A.; Ohiyesa; Primary Council. Thesis: A Study of Retardation in the Elementary Grades. “Thou sat 'st an undisputed thing, in such a solemn way." Page Fif.y-seven1917 Iris a ■ 1917 LENA HAUTZINGER Stevens Point “Lean" Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Loyola. Thesis: Story Telling in the Primary Grades. "Good humor only teaches charms to last, Still makes new conquest and maintains the past." MONA HENNESSEY Hayward “Hen nib" Hayward High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Treble Clef: Basket Ball; Iris Staff. Loyola; Ohiyesa. Thesis: Fold Dancing in the Primary Grades. "A teacher, an artist, a favorite of all, She's dark and quite pretty, though not very tall." EVELYN HOREL—“Eddie" Augusta Augusta High School. Two Year English. Primary. Activities: Educational Measurement Club; Primary Council. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Supplementary Reading in the Fourth Grade. "You are wisely silent of your own worth, And therefore it were a sin for others to he so." HARRIET JOHNSON Colby “Johnnie" Colby High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Ambition has no rest." CLARA KOSHNIK Stevens Point “Clair" Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Loyola. Thesis: Fairy Tales in the Second Grade. "The mild expression spoke a mind In duty firm, composed, resigned." P. ge Fifty-eight1917 Iris 1917 BERTHA LA BUDDE—“Betsy" Colby Colby High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Y. W. C. A.; Primary Council. Arena. Thesis: Eye Hygiene in the School. "Peaceful, studious, silent." VIRGINIA LALLY Rhinelander “Ginoie" Rhinelander High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Treble Clef; Primary Council. Loyola. Thesis: “The King of the Golden River”—A Story for the Primary Grades. "As merry as the day is long." SARAH LARSON Packwaukee Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Ohiyesa; Primary Council. Y. V. C. A. Thesis: Games and Plays in the First Four Grades. "Some say she is studious, some say she is not; Hut we ail know she is jolly, which amounts to a lot." FRANCES LIPKE—“Frank" Stratford Stratford High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council; Basket Ball. Y. W. C. A.; Ohiyesa. Thesis: Children’s Literature in Primary Grades. "Exceedingly wise, fair spoken, and persuading." LEILA LOOMIS—“Loi." Gilmanton Gilmanton High School. Two Year English. Primary. Activities: Primary Council; Educa- tional Measurement Club. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Nature Study in the Primary Grades. "ller quiet way and pleasant smile makes one think that life’s worth living." Page Fifty-nine1917 Iris 1917 GENEVIEVE LOVE Stevens Point “Irish" Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council; Arena. Loyola. Thesis: How to Teach Reading in the First Grade. “As merry as the day is long.” FLORENCE MALLERY ' Berlin Berlin High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Y. W. C. A.; Primary Council. Ohivesa. Thesis: A Practical Education in Relation to Civic Prosperity. “Teach me half the gladness that thy brain must know" JOSEPHINE McKEOWN Wabeno “Jo" Pittsville High School; Berlin County Training School. Two Year English. Primary. Activities: Ohivesa; Primary. Loyola. Thesis: Physical Training in Schools. “Soft peace she brings wherever she arrives." GERTRUDE MEAGHER Green Bay “Peg" East Green Bay High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Loyola Secretary; Primary Council. Arena. Thesis: How to Teach Writing in the First Grade. “She's Irish in manners, in name and in wit; She's true as gold, and as bright every bit," MILDRED MERRY Stevens Point Stevens Point High School. Two Year English. Primary. Activities: Basket Ball; Primary Council. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Primary Education in its Practical Relation to the Parent. “I am every merry when I hear sweet music" Page Sixty1917 Ir is 1917 HELEN MOHR Ishpeming, Mich. “Hellie" Ishpeming High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Mikado; Primarv Council. Treble Clef. Thesis: How to Secure Good Expers-sion in Primary Reading. “Alma Gluck the Second ' WANDA M ONI AN Wausau “By Gum" Wausau High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council; Mikado. Loyola. Thesis: The Value of Fairy Tales to Pupils in the First Grade. “lie there n will, and wisdom finds a way ' MAE MORRISSEY Stevens Point “Irish" Five Year English, Primarv. Activities: Loyola; Primary. Arena: Treble Clef. Thesis: Desirable Habits to be Cultivated in the First Grade. “They never fail who work in a yood cause." GKDA MYHRE—“Mibandy" Frederic Frederic High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Treble Clef; Primary Council. Y. W. C. A. President; Ohiyesa. Thesis: Nervousness in Children and Its Retardation upon Education. “Smile and the world smiles with you" ELSA NAGEL—“Puss" Waldo Waldo High School. Five Year English. Primary. Activities: Ohivosa. Thesis: Picture Study in Country Schools. “Of her to whom much is given, much will be required." Page Sixty-one1917 Iris 1917 RUTH OSTER Stevens Point “Tuffib" Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Iris Staff. Primary Council. Thesis: Lunches in the Grades. “Youth at the prow, and pleasure at the helmr DELMA PADGHAM Port Edwards “Del" Grand Rapids High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Treble Clef; Primary Council President, 17. Arena. Thesis: Beautifying the Classroom. “Wherever her conquering eagles fled. Arts, learning, and civility were spread." ELFRIEDA PAGED Stevens Point “Petie" Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council; Educa- tional Measurement Club. V. W. C. A. Thesis: Picture Study in the Primary Grades. “She is the sweetest thing that ever grew, And as true a friend as her eyes arc bluer MAGDALEN POLIVKA Coloma “Peggy" Friendship High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Loyola ; Primary Council. Ohivesa. Thesis: The Teaching of Writing in the Primary Grades. “A friendly heart with many friends." ELLEN RAETHER—“Rae" Humbird Humbird High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Ohivesa; Primary Council. Y. W. C. A. Thesis: Silent Reading. "When I have anything to do I go and do itr Pagt Sixty-t’v.o1917 Iris 1917 AGNES RASSMUSSEN Withee “Rassy” Withee High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Ohiyesa. Thesis: Games and Plays in the Second and Third Grades. "Happy (mi. I: from rare am free: 11 hy aren’t they all contented like mef” MADELINE REYER—“Maidy” Colby Bellingham High School. Activities: Primary Council; Iris Staff. Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Ohiyesa. Thesis: Mouth Hygiene in the School. "Of manners gentle, of affection mild; In wit a woman, simplicity a child.'’ FLORENCE ROBERTS Stevens Point “Boh” Five Year English, Primary. Activities: Ohiyesa; Primary Council. Loyola. Thesis: The Value of Nature Study in the Primary Grades. "Short and to the point.” IDA ROTHMAN —1Hi ” Stevens Point Five Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council; Basket Ball; Treble Clef. Arena; Y. W. C. A. Thesis: Sanitary Conditions in the Schoolroom. "Mirth, with thee I mean to live” VIOLET RUBY Stevens Point “Shorty” Five Year German. Primary. Activities: Basket Ball. Primary Council. Thesis: Some Interesting Games to Teach in the Primary Grades. "Up! Up! My friend, and quit your books. Or surely you’ll grow double.” Page Sixty-three1917 Iris 1917 AGNES RUDDY—“Ac" New London Little Wolf High School; New London County Training School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Loyola. Thesis: Teaching Reading in the First Grade. “0 easy temper and faithful to her word" LILLIAN SCHKOEDKR Stevens Point “Lil" Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council; Educa- tional Measurement Club. Y. W. C. A. Thesis: Kindergarten and its Relation to Primary Work. “She speak , behaves, and arts just as she ought.” PEARL SELLER!! Stevens Point Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Mikado. Primary Council. Thesis: The Influence of the School and Its Environment Upon the Formation of a Few Good Habits of the Primary Child. “A jolty face, a merry laugh, Your burden is lightened by one half.” ESTHER SITZER—“Es" Stevens Point Five Year English, Primary. Activities: Arena; Basket Ball. Primary Council. Thesis: Seat Work in the First and Second Grades. "The mildest manner, and the gentlest heart.” FAYE SPRAGUE—“Peooib" Oxford Oxford High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Y. W. C. A.; Primary Council. Ohivesa. Thesis: Rhythm in the First Grade. "A little fun along with work. Does not mean a girl's a shirk.” Page Sixty-four1917 ■ ■ Iris 1917 LILLIAN STEWART Stevens Point “Stew" Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Basket Ball. Thesis: Teaching Rhythm in the First Grade. “A noticeable girl with large brou n eyes.” KATHERINE TARRANT Durand “Cattie" Durand High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council. Thesis: Language in the Third Grade. "Is this that gallant, gay Katherine?” ELIZABETH THOMPSON Miles “Betty" Washburn High School. Two Year English. Primary. Activities: Y. W. C. A.; Primary Council. Arena. Thesis: The Importance of the Fain-Tale to the Child. ".-1II bin' o' smily round the mouth.” FRANCES VON NEUPERT “Fran" Stevens Point Stevens Point High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Mikado; Treble Clef. Lovola. Thesis: Story Telling in the First Grade. "Behold! She walbs like a goddess.” HATTIE WELTMAN Stevens Point “Hats" Five Year English, Primary. Activities: Primary Council; Basket Ball. Ohiyesa; Treble Clef. Thesis: Plays and Games in the Pri- mary Grades. "Ever charming; ever new.” Page Sixty-five1917 Iris 1917 PRUDENTIA H. WOODWARD “Prue" Wausau Wausau High School. Two Year English, Primary. Activities: Arena; Arena Contest, 16; Editor of Iris. Y. W. C. A. Treasurer; Educational Measurement Club; Primary Council. Thesis: The Best Method of Teaching the Nature and Effects of Alcohol and Narcotics in the Grades. “A heart to resolve, a head to contrive. and a hand to execute.” MILDA ZUEHLKE Weyauwega “Micky" Weyauwega High School. Two Year English. Primary. Activities: Ohiyesa; Primary Council. Educational Measurement Club; Y. W. C. A. Thesis: Pictures and Their Use in the Primary Grades. "She spoke no more than just the things she ought.” RUTH ROSS—“Rossib" Stevens Point Five Year English. Primary. Activities: Primary Council; Basket Ball; Treble Clef. Y. W. C. A.; Ohiyesa. Thesis: Home Co-operation with the School in Education. ” A nd still they gazed, and still the wonder grew, That one small head could carry all she knew.” Page Sixty six1917 Iris 1917 Senior Play GREEN STOCKINGS A Comedy in Three Acts BY A. E. W. MASON-CAST Admiral Grice (retired).........................................Charles Burns William Faraday..................................................Gordon Lovejoy Colonel Smith.....................................................Clyde Morley Robert Tarver................................................................M. Rybicki Henry Steele...............................................................Dell Curtis James Raleigh.......................................................Van Ashmun Martin .........................................................Raymond Rett Celia Faraday.............................................................Helen Mohr Madge (Mrs. Rockingham)..................................................Edythe Blum Evelyn (Lady Trenchard)..................................................Gladys Blood Phyllis........................................................Beatrice Young Mrs. Chisolm Faraday (Aunt Ida)...................................Ida Brevad Directed by Mr. E. T. Smith Page Sixty-seven1917 1917 Iris Page Sixty-eight1917 Iris 1917 Page Sixty-nine1917 ■ ■ Iris 1917 JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS President........................................... Vice-President...................................... Secretary .......................................... Treasurer ............................................ Editor.............................................. Sergeant-at-Arms ................................... . Martin Paulson ____Fern Willet .. Charles Burns Leslie Shellberg Agnes Eichinger .Alex Parkhurst Page Seventy1917 V Iris V 1917 Pictures of Junior Class Page Seventy-one1917 Iris 1917 Heard by an Iris Reporter Scene—The Normal Gymnasium. Occasion—The Junior Reception to the Seniors. (The Seniors, led by their honored and worthy president, Arthur Held, are bidding a last farewell to the Junior Class, drawn up in a long line near the west entrance.) Held (grasping the hand of Paulson, president of the Junior Class)—In behalf of the class, 1 wish to thank you for the pleasant occasion. We have spent a very delightful evening. (To the entire Junior Class.) We all appreciate your efforts. (To the Seniors.) And to you 1 can only say that I am proud to have been your president this year. (Aside to Paulson.) Paulson, if you ever wish to ascend to this lofty position, I advise you not to neglect the POLITICS. Paulson (in a stage whisper)—Leave it to me. Held (still aside)—It has taken me two years to build up this system, but it is worth the effort, Paulson, worth the effort. Well, success to you! Pope—Red, 1 suppose they’ve told you that I willed you a little of my surplus height? Red—Yes, and while 1 don’t wish to seem ungrateful, may I suggest that you will probably need it all next year. Really, the only part I could use would be your feet to get me to school on time. (Muffled applause.) Voice—Don’t need them either. Red. They’d only keep you away from classes, same as they do Pope. Murphy—Be it hereby understood by all present that 1 refuse to yield my option on the most delightful seat in the main room. Voice—If you will notify us whenever you intend to return to your Alma Mater, we will sec that the seat is vacated for your use, Jim. for if there’s one thing we hate it’s a fight. (Subdued murmurs and cries of "He careful, there, he's Irish.") Neale—Say, Parkhurst, did you know that Miss Kelley intends, in her search for knowledge, to gain such marks as will put even the worthy Miss Cone in the background ? Parkhurst—Yes, and she can do it, too. She has the advantage of having good old Irish blood in her veins, and nothing can stop the Irish, you know. Fern Willet—I must thank you, Miss Nachtwey, for bequeathing to me the highly desirable seat in the northeast corner of the assembly, together with your attractive whistle. Charlotte X.—You are very welcome to the seat. Fern. 1 was very sorry to have to part with my whistle, but 1 fear it would only be a hindrance to me. I wished some one to have it who would take care of it. and use it discreetly. Xot only that, but the seat is so secluded and quiet that you may need the whistle to amuse yourself. T. Moe—Thanks, Neuwald, for the gift of your enviable position as cheer leader. Xeuwald—You’re welcome! Luck to you, and may your newly acquired position win you trips to River Falls and—elsewhere. Voice—You yield your claims too easily, Neuwald. Xeuwald—Oh, I have many other interests, and I never liked River Falls, anyhow. Page Seventy-Vxa1917 Iris 1917 The Junior Class Paulson (to .Juniors)—You sec. friends, what a noble ideal we must hold before us during the coming year. Our task is not small, but the glory is great, and when June appears the 1017 Seniors will have been put to rout, and our heritage will be a reality. Just a few words in regard to the Junior class itself. It is one of the most versatile in the history of the school. We have athletes, orators, debaters, artists, and musicians. The class as a whole stands high in scholarship, and if you wish to see how we stand in regard to individual excellency, you have but to examine the Honor Roll. During the first semester a large percentage of Juniors received Honorable Mention, and the names of several appeared among those receiving excellent standing. We are all well represented in all four of the literary societies and in the Dramatic Club, and are taking active part in the work of these organizations. Several of the Pointer staff, including the editor-in-chief and the business manager, are Juniors, and you need but look at the Pointer if you wish to find a testimonial of their ability. Our class president is president of the Oratorical Association, the school orator for 1017. and the business manager of the Pointer. In the various musical organizations of the school the Junior class is well represented. In athletics, too, members of our class have won glory—glory for themselves and for the school. They have been loyal, faithful, and hard working, but their efforts have not gone unrewarded, for from their number have been chosen all of the team captains for next year. Just a word about that big annual event in which Juniors are the chief actors— the Junior Debate with Oshkosh Normal School. This subject will be more fully treated in another department of this book. Ix t it suffice to say here that we expected great things from the Junior Debating Team, and our expectations were realized in full. Page Sexen’.y-ihree1917 Iris 1917 Page Seventy-four1917 Iris 1917 The Sophomore Class of 1916-1917 shows a great increase in numbers over the class of last year. This is due to the popularity of the High School Course. The Sophomores met November 20, 1916, and elected the following class officers: President, William Metzer of Grand Rapids; Yice-President, Irene Colvin of Marshfield; Secretary, Bernard Christiansen. Stevens Point; Treasurer. George Strom of White Creek. Later Joe Ritger was elected Sergeant-at-Arms. Upon withdrawal of Irene Colvin from school at the end of the first semester, Marie Meehler of Marshfield was elected Vice-President. The Sophomores lead all the rest In work, in fun, in play and jest. They work to win the best of grades, Oh, may their glories never fade! In football eagerly they share, To win the games they work with care. In basket ball they work with zest To help the school they love the best. Of orators our class can boast. Of singers there is quite a host. With smiles and glances gay and bright The Sophomores work for the right. Page Seventy-five1917 Iris ■ ■ 1917 z i 5! Page Seventy-fix1917 V Iris V i 9i 7 Pictures of Sophomores Page Seventy-seven1917 Iris 1917 Once upon a time, to the Stevens Point Normal School came some sub-freshmen. Their manners were shy and retiring and they appeared like startled deer not knowing where to go. Everyone stared at them and said, “How pitifully young and childish they seem!” This frightened the poor sub-freshmen more and more. Pretty soon a tall, beautiful form named Courage passed by and taking them bv the hand, said to them, “You poor children! My heart aches for you, for I can see that you know not where to go, or what to do. Come with me and I will help you.” The sub-freshmen gladly obeyed him and soon Udieved themselves to be a part of the school. One day, one of the younger sub-freshmen, attended by her hand maidens. Health and Happiness, saw a tall foreboding spirit approaching her. At first she feared this spirit. Hard Work, very much, but after Health and Happiness had made her acquainted with him. she felt as if she had known him all her life. Before long all of the sub-freshmen came to know Hard Work and to love him. All year. Health, Happiness, and Hard Work clung to them, and soon Good Deeds came to join their number. The next year these timid sub-freshmen had grown into sturdy freshmen and feared no one. Hard Work was still a good friend and helped them through Geometry, European History, and Physics. Very soon School Spirit seemed to enjoy himself fully as much with them, as with any other class. Finally the year 1910-15)17 drew happily to a close. At this time, every one agreed that the chief basket ball stars were Katherine Gibbons, Isabel Polebitske, and Frances Herman. Two of the chief grinds were Alice Higgins and Marjorie Harmon. The champion skater and high school fan was Ruth Brady. The faculty’s friend was Janet Van Hecke, while the faculty’s chief care was Archie Hubbard. They even had among their number some who were witty and made it their business to amuse their re-spective classes. These were Anton Schreiner and Isabel Pavlowski. There were industrious students—Blanche Docka. Wanda Kerchewski, Mabel I »arv, Dorothy Somers, and Marcella Glennon. There was an all star mathematician. Mayme Cartmill; a class yell leader. Marion Pease: and a geometry shark. Margaret Burke. There were even |w ets. Tessie De Base and Frances Petatz. I»vers of social life were Anna Patzer and Loraine Morrissey; inseparables, Marie Eiehingcr and Grace Anderson. The worthy class officers were. President, Mabel Leary: Vice-President, Dorothy Somers; Treasurer, Helen Burns. Page Seventy-tightjutu-Xiuj.tJs - 6dj LI6T s tJJ LI 611917 V Iris V 2?i7 Eighty1917 V Iris V 1917 RURAL SCHOOL DEPARTMENT Eighty-one1917 Iris 1917 Rural Teackers Training Department The Rural Teachers Training Department is now the largest depertment in the Stevens Point Normal School. This department was organized in the fall of 1912, and has had the most rapid growth of any department in the school. The enrollment for 1916-1917 reached the grand total of one hundred and fifty-six students of whom ninety-two will graduate this June. The purpose of this department is to train for better teaching in the rural schools of the state of Wisconsin. The aim is to interest earnest, capable, energetic young men and women in the opportunity for service and professional progress which the rural schools now offer and to fit them for this service. That the purpose for which the department was organized is being fulfilled is adequately proved by the fact that our graduates are making good. Also various county superintendents have made requests for graduates of our department to fill vacancies in different localities. The demand for qualified teachers is far in excess of the supply. The courses now offered in this department are, a one-year course for high school graduates, a two-year course for students holding eighth grade diplomas, (this course will probably be made three years in the near future), and a two-year course for high school graduates. The last named course entitles graduates to a life certificate besides a bonus of ten dollars a month for the first year and fifteen dollars a month for each succeeding year. The record made this year by the members of this department in the various school activities has been an excellent one. Our members have acquitted themselves creditably in literary work and societies, in musical work and dramatic productions. in debating contests and also along the lines of athletic endeavor. We have representatives on the football and track team, and on three of the debating teams representing the Stevens Point Normal School. Students from our department entered the oratorical contest and made a good showing. The girls’ basket ball team was stronger than ever, and proved a worthy match for the other department teams in the tournament and won second place. Many of the girls are mem-Ikts of the Y. W. C. A.. Ohiyesa, Arena. Loyola, and Treble C’lef societies, and take an active part in affairs of these organizations. Practically all of the boys are members of the Forum Athenaeum Society, and take an active part in the orations, debates, programs and other things which this society conducts. The loyal, conscientious, co-operative spirit shown throughout the entire department has been one of the mast pleasant features of the school year, and the graduating class will take with them many pleasant memories of OLD STEVENS POINT NORMAL. Pagt Eighty-two1917 Iris 1917 ADAH M. ALLEN—“Babe” Waupaca Waupaca High School. One Year Professional. Ohiyesa; Y. W. C. A. “A sweet disposition goes a long way.” EDITH ALFORD Granite Heights “Ede" Wausau High School. One Year Professional. Arena; Iris Staff, ’17; Secretary Class. "There was a time when I was very small'' ELIZABETH ALPINE Stevens Point “Beth” Academic Course, S. P. N. One Year Professional. Treble Cleef. ‘‘A maid of musical worth with wisdom's aid.” SADIE ANDERSON Marshfield "Sad” Marshfield High School. One Year Professional. Y. W. C. A. “I like to fancy that a grateful spirit gives as good as it gets.” FRANCES BOUND Plainfield "Sunshine” Plainfield High School. One Year Professional. Arena. “For if she will, she will, you may depend on’t, and if she won't, she won't, and there's an end on'I.” SARAH V. DIXON Portage "Dixie” Portage High School One Year Professional. Y. W. 0. A.; Ohiyesa. "Harmless and gentle as a lamb.” Page Eig ity-lfiree1917 Iris ■ ■ 1917 EDITH FRITZ—“Fritz" Belleville Belleville High School. One Year Professional. Ohiyesa; Y. W. C. A. “Laugh and grow fat.” ERMA GAFFNEY Belleville “Ermif." Belleville High School. One Year Professional. Loyola; Basket Ball. “A good reputation is a fair estate.” MARGARET GRUBER Plainfield “Peg" Plainfield High School. One Year Professional. Arena. “Cheerfulness is what greases the axles of the world.” AXEL HOUGUM Auburndale “Norsk i" Marshfield High School. One Year Professional. ETHEL G. JONES Endeavor “Toddy" Montello High School. One Year Professional. Ohiyesa; Y. W. C. A.; Triangular Debate, Alternate. “A sense of duty pursues us ever.” MAYE H. JONES—“Peggy" Oxford Oxford High School. One Year Professional. Y. W. C. A.; Ohiyesa; Basket Ball. “What shall I do to be forever and make the age to come my own?” Page Eighty-four1917 I r i s 1917 LOUISE KLEUTSCH Westboro Westboro High School. One Year Professional. Loyola; Basket Ball. "A gracious, innocent soul” FRIEDA KOEHLER Black Creek “Dimples Shiocton High School. One Year Professional. Y. W. C. A.; Arena. "Talking is second nature to me” AGNES MALINOVSKY Friendship “Teddy" Friendship High School. One Year Professional. Arena; Loyola; Basket Ball. "The night is come; but not too soon” ELIZABETH MATEOFSKY “Matty" Abbotsford Abbotsford High School. One Year Professional. Loyola; Arena. "Everybody’s business is also mine” BESSIE MELGREEN Bancroft “Buck" Canton High School, Canton, 111. One Year Professional. "What she greatly thought, she nobly dared.” MARIE MELGREEN Bancroft “Mewee" One Year Professional. Arena. "I should worry ” RUKRC5 Page Eighty-five1917 Iris ■ ■ 1917 MICHAEL H. O’KEEFE Custer “Irish" Stevens Point High School. One Year Professional. Loyola; Glee Club; Football. Baseball; Track. “Worry and I have never met." LUCY ROZELL Plainfield Plainfield High School. One Year Professional. Arena. "Alt. why should life all labor be?" LOUELLA E. SCIINUR Kewaskum “Happy" Kewaskum High School. One Year Professional. Arena; Y. V. C. A. "She does what she. will when she will.” RUTH YATER—“Rutiiy” Withee Humbird High School. One Year Professional. Y. W. C. A. "She is wise but doth talk little." RUTH YATER—“Ruthy” Withee Withee High School. One Year Professional. Ohiyesa. "Silence seldom does harm.” VERA E. WASHBURN Shiocton Shiocton High School. One Year Professional. Arena; Y. W. C. A. "She speaks in a monstrous small voice." Page Eighty-six1917 Iris 1917 MAE E. WEBSTER Plainfield Plainfield High School. One Year Professional. Arena; Y. W. C. A. “Would there were more like her." ALICE WINEGARDEN Waupaca “Allis" Waupaca High School. One Year Professional. Arena; Class President; Triangular Debate. "Few things are impossible to diligence and skill." MERLE WILSON Amherst Amherst High School. One Year Professional. “A beautiful behavior is the finest of fine Arts." THEODORE E. WOZNIAK Athens Athens High School. One Year Professional. "He has enough who is content." T ?o Year Rural Department MARY BAILEY Stevens Point “Peooy" Two Year Rural. Y. W. C. A.; Choral Club. ".! light heart lives long." DORA BICKMORE—“Dodr” Policy Two Year Rural. Y. W. C. A.; Arena. "Sunshine though the day be dreary." Page Eighty-seven1917 V Iris V 7 97 7 ___________1_________________________ ALMA BERBERG Amherst “Bobby" Two Year Rural. Ohivesa; Basket Ball. H EN RY BEG LINGER Oshkosh “Beo" Oshkosh High School. Two Year Rural. Forum Athenaeum; Junior Debate; Department Flaw ’16; Pointer Staff, M7; Iris Staff, »17. “Doinq his duty all the whole year through." MADGE BENTLEY Linnwood “Niggib" Two Year Rural. Y. W. 0. A. “Strongest minds are often those of whom the world hears least." EMANUEL BENTSON Leeman “Shorty" Two Year Rural. Forum Athenaeum: Department Play, “Back to the Farm,” 16. "Silence is golden." FRANCES BRUSKK Stevens Point “Frankie" Two Year Rural. “A maiden meek and mild.” BEATRICE MAE CHEATLE “Bea" .. .. Grand Rapids Two Year Rural. “She is wise but doth talk little.” Page Eighty-eight1917 Iris 1917 VERONA BIESIK Stevens Point "Shorty" Two Year Rural. "Modest and unaspiring.” MARGARET BIRR Oconto Falls "Blonde" Two Year Rural. Arena ; Y. W. C. A. “She was. but words would fail to tell thee what. Think what a woman should be and she was that.” RACHAEL BLOM—"Ray" Rose Lawn One Year Rural. Y. W. C. A.; Basket Ball. “A lover of Athletics; loyal to her fel-lowmen.” HATTIE BOS Glenwood City Two Year Rural. Loyola; Arena. “She's not a flower, she is not a pearl, Hut she is a noble all around girl.” MARY FORMELLA Stevens Point "Sally" Two Year Rural. Basket Ball. “Studious as the day is long.” MARY FINNESY—"Peggy" Stockton Two Year Rural. “Blushes are the rainbow of modesty.” Page Eighty-nine1917 Iris 1917 IRENE COLBY—“Rene" Easton Two Year Rural. Ohiyesa. “Always thoughtful and hind and untroubled.” EDNA DENSCH—“Ed" Stevens Point Two Year Rural. “A friend of every one.” MABEL GRANGER—“Tootib" Ripon One Year Rural. V. W. C. A. "0 mildest manners and gentleness of heart.” OLGA HAYES—“Peggy" Hancock Two Year Rural. “It is true, politeness, gentleness, and love for humanity that constitute a lady.” HELEN ERICKSON Rose Lawn "Erick" One Year Rural. Basket Ball. “I am a woman; when I think I must speak.” MARGARET FRANK Stevens Point ‘‘Frankie" Two Year Rural. Loyola. “She is mischievous, but so innocent.” Page Ninety1917 ■ ■ Iris 1917 REG INA GLINSCZI N8K I Amherst “Dick" Two Year Rural. Loyola. "Tliink-s little hut says much." NUPFREY GOSH—“Ooc" Arnott Two Year Rural. Forum Athenaeum. "All things come to him who waits." NORA KRULL—"Ikf." Black Creek Two Year Rural. "Fair manners are more expressive than words." DOROTHY HUSNIAK Kewaunee “Doth" One Year Rural. "Sensitive, swift to resent, Hut as swift in atoning for error.” PAULINE HODIK Wayside “Bubbik" Two Year Rural. Arena; Loyola. "Modesty is the candle of thy merit." FLORENCE HOUGUM Auburndale “Flo" Two Year Rural. Y. W. C. A.; Arena. "Very, very guiet but studious." Page Sinrty-one 1917 V Iris V 1917 11ERBERT J EXSEN Scandinavia “Gus" Two Year Rural. Glee Club; Forum Athenaeum; Department Play, 16, 17. “In loyalty to the class no one can surpass him.” FLORENCE JOHNSON Amherst “Teddy" Two Year Rural. Play, “Back to the Farm,” '16. “A smile for all, both large and small ” ELLA MARTIN Stevens Point “Fritz" Two Year Rural. “Still waters run deep.” MARIE KASCH Linnwood Two Year Rural. “Beware lest thou fail to reach thy ideal” MARY KLOPOTEK—“May" Custer Two Year Rural. “A friendly heart with many friends.” BESSIE MAHANNA Amherst “Betty" Two Year Rural. Loyola. “Silence is for deep thinkers.” Page Ninety-tuo1917 Iris u ■ 1917 RUTH NELSON Conrath One Year Rural. Arena; Y. W. C. A. "Gentle and true, Simple and kind was she.” EUNICE MASE Stevens Point “Bridget" Two Year Rural. Sweetness is true beauty CLARA OLSON—“Ale" Rose Lawn One Year Rural. "Loving kindness for a great man't fame.” MARY LEMANCZIK Stevens Point “Jack" Two Year Rural. “Meanwhile she keeps on thinking.” MILDRED MEAD—“Jack" Almond Two Year Rural. “Wherever she goes happiness prevails.” ANTOINETTE MILLER Sharon “Tony" Two Year Rural. "A sweet and virtuous soul.” Paqe Kinety-three1917 Iris 1917 MARIE RUSSELL—“Billie" Bancroft Two Year Rural. Arena. "Studious is the maiden fair, and a smile joes with her everywhere." BESSIE NEWBY—“Betty" Bancroft Two Year Rural. Basket Ball. "What shall 1 do to be forever known, and make the age to come to my own?" AGNES SELINSKI Junction City “Aggie" Two Year Rural. “A friendly heart with many friends.0 EMMA OLSON—“Em" Stevens Point Two Year Rural. Secretary and Treasurer, Junior Cl ass 16. "A true friend to the true." CLARA PETERSON Milladore “Lal" Two Year Rural. "She can look the whole world in the face, For she bluffed not a single one." G ERTRUDE PI ON KE Almond “Billy" Two Year Rural. Pointer Staff. "I prefer to belong to the intellectual rather than the numerical majority." Page Sint.y-four1917 Iris 1917 RILLA PRECOURT—“Duke" Plover Two Year Rural. Loyola. “Life without smiles is a dreary blank.” CLARA PRODZINSKI Custer “Clay" Two Year Rural. “Trying leads to success." MYRTLE RANDALL Rosholt One Year Rural. “Rather be seen than heard.” JULIA SHARAPATA Coloma “Shirp" Two Year Rural. Loyola. “Ever disposed to quarrel with others." JERTRUDE SAMSON—“Eddie” Stevens Point Two Year Rural. Basket Ball; Y. W. C. A. “It is good nature only that wins the heart.” ELSIE SWANSON—“Eli" Denmark One Year Rural. Y. W. C. A. “Endurance is the crowning quality and patience all the passion of great hearts." RURRL} Page Ninety-five1917 Iris 1917 RUTH WOOD Stevens Point “Skixxey" Two Year Rural. “She I ires in pence llie whole year thru’, In friendship she is true." JULIA SHERF1XSKI —■“Jclb" Plover Two Year Rural. “Modest as a flower." EMMELINE SHULFER Arnott “Jane" Two Year Rural. “Greatness is in doinq, not in seeinq th ings." SIGURD SIGURDSON—“Sio" Detroit Harbor Two Year Rural. Forum Athenaeum; Glee Club; Football; Traek. “Independent people make fine teachers." VERONA SOMERS Amherst Two Year Rural. Arena. “A friend to many, a foe to none." FRIEDA WOHLLEBEN Butternut “Fkitz" One Year Rural. Y. W. C. A. “Hide me from the day's garish eye." Page Ninety-six1917 Iris 1917 NELLIE TAYLOR—“Nell" Plover Two Year Rural. Vice-President of the Junior Class, M6. “She’$ not a flower, she’s not a pearl. Hut she’s a noble all around girl.” H A R RIET W A R NER Amherst “Harry" Two Year Rural. Loyola. "Cheerfulness throws sunlight on all paths of life.” JENNIE WILLIA MS Amherst One Year Rural. “Her wags are wags of pleasantness.” RCiRRLS. Page Ninety-seven1917 Iris 1917 Senior Class First Semester Second Semester Alice Winegarten.....................President..................Alice Winegarten Madge Bendy.......................Vice-President......................Marie Russel Edith Alford................Secretary and Treasurer............Sigurd Sigurdson Sergeant......................Frieda Koehler Of all classes that have graduated from this department none have exceeded this one in numbers. There is not one of our class of ninety-three but that prides himself upon his persistency. This is manifested by the fact that one of our students had a higher average than any other Normal student, for the first semester of this year. Three of our members have gained fame by winning places on the debating team representing S. P. X. Mr. Xeale says: “This is the best looking class I have ever seen.” (Probably he says that to all of his classes.) We firmly believed this until we had our pictures taken. Upon asking the photographer why we had to wait so long for our pictures, he informed us that he had had to spend so much of his time repairing the broken plates that it was impossible to get the pictures out any sooner. When it comes to athletics we're right there. We have a girls’ basket ball team that is capable of holding its own with the other teams of the Normal. Even though they have met with some defeats they have put up a good fight and have shown their ability. The first part of the year we held a class meeting, choosing our class officers, colors, ami motto. Our colors are pearl gray and pink; the motto, B square. Junior Class First Semester Second Semester Lenora Ilelgeland....................President..................Lenora Helgoland Win. Bright.......................Vice-President................Eldore Bergstaken Rheda Sen .ig........................Secretary......................Rheda Senzig Palmer Simonsin......................Treasurer..................Palmer Simonson The .Junior Class of 1917 boasts of an enrollment larger than any previous class has registered, the number being sixty-five. Although large, the class is proud of the unity and spirit shown. The Juniors were represented on the Girls’ Basket Ball Team, which worked its way to the front, winning second place in the tournament. The enthusiasm displayed gave evidence of the spirit which the class as a body put forth in boasting for the department's team. Among the social events might lie mentioned “The Hour Parties,” especially the Bird Party, the Indoor Marshmallow Roast, the Word Party, and the March Hare Party. These social gatherings, under the supervision of Miss Rademacher, were held fortnightly, on Tuesday or Thursday evenings, between the hours of four and five. Aside from the enjoyment found, these meetings gave the Juniors who came as strangers to Stevens Point, opportunity to become acquainted with every member of the class at a very early date. The indications are that the class of 1918 will be a banner class. Watch them move “Forward.” Page Ninety-eight1917 V Iris V 7 9i7 Pictures of Juniors Pay? Sinfty-rune1917 V Iris V -7 92 7 ’« • On - hundred1917 V Iris V 1917 Page One hundred one1917 Iris 1917 Bannach, Tillie Bannister, Susan Burns, Elizabeth Cartmill, Genevieve Cleberg, Anna Cowles. Alice Cranston, Mabel Dixon, Ruth Du Franc, Maud Englebert, Evelyn Farrell, Marie Forsberg, Marie Glischinski, Verona Graff, Edna Graham, Hettie Fanan, Helen Ilanan, Lueile Henderson, Helen Ilill, Stella Holt, Mary Hubert, Beatrice Jones, Helen Keli, Elizabeth Kleist, Ruth Lahr. Gertrude LandgrafF, Eulalia Larson, Ella Mason. Amy Mills. Rhoda Morgan, Minnie Murphy, Cecelia Nelson, Amy Olson, Josephine Peck, Ruth Peterson, Irene Pittard, Catherine Procknow, Leona Reitan. Martina Rnnke, Ida Taylor, Jessie Walker. Margaret Wood, Gladys Wright. Thelma Page One hundred t-uo1917 V Iris ■ i7 Miss Bessie May Allen Director Home Economics Department Miss Allen Miss Adaius Miss Tupper Miss Schnumberg Miss Luce Miss Ix gren Page One hundred three1917 ■ Iris ■ i 0i 7 Kitchen Sewing Room Page Onr hundred fourIrma Jenny. Pres. Maude Mathe. V. P. Helen Henderson. Sec. Miss Allen Miss Schaumberg Page One Hundred five1917 Iris 1917 Name Black, Florence...... Blum, Edith.......... Brown, Stella........ Cain, Cecelia........ Carlson, Hazel....... Cornell, Bernice..... Cowles, Josephine... Craig, Blanche....... Cutland, Margaret... Dearborn, Norma______ Donnelly, Bernadette. Dougherty, Eulalie... Driver, Lena......... Ellis, Hazel......... Evans, Eunice........ Fitzgerald, Alva..... Gcimer, Magdalen... Grover, Esther....... Glynn, Kathy rn...... Hanan, Ruby.......... Hargraves, Lauretta.. Hart, Irene......... Ilaire, Florence..... Hubbel, Helen........ Huff, Blanche........ Harland, Esther...... Home Ec. Seniors Occupation By these words ye shall know them .Stewing................."Are you going to the dance?” . Kicking........................................."At home ” .Sputtering.................."I have so much to do.” . Listening........................................“Gracious sakes.” , Just working.................................“Well—Ye-es.” Keeping everybody happy..................“Uncle Jimmy says—” .Being sweet.........................................“That’s rare.” .Hurrying.................................“Well, I declare.” Critic...........“You have a right to your own opinion, of course.” , Dreaming...........“I like to hear the leaves Russell.” . Taking the joy out of life.............“Cottage life is—” Having a good time.. .“What word rhymes with ‘Dell’?” Attending movies...........................“I like the Gem.” Giggling......................................“Let's do it.” Being “Earle” (early). .“I can imagine you doing that.” Hollering...........................................“Sa-ay.” Walking.......................“Only Per serving.” Wit and humor...........“Have you some “Gim” paper?” Entertaining.............................“Isn’t this funny?” Writing her thesis......................................“Too busy.” Thinking................“What do you think about it?” Writing poetry.......“I wish something exciting would happen!” Extracting Information...........“I don’t understand.” Worrying.............“Oh, dear. I have so much to do!” Just moving...............“Oh say, girls, don’t worry.” Working overtime......................................“Well, now!” Page One hundred six1917 Iris 1917 Henderson, Ida...... Jenny, Inna......... Jepson. Eva........ Johnson, Mabel..... Koppa, Eleanor.... Lambert, Kathryn.. Laurence, Lucile... Loomis, Mina....... Mathie, Maude...... Mathie, Elizabeth... Minton, Margaret.. Moore, Marion...... Pendleton, Delphine Peters, Louella.... Post, Leone........ Powers. Josephine.. Raible, Evelyn..... Reton, Mabel....... Roach. Anne........ Routheaux, Tina... Stark, Ethel....... Tewksbury, Vera... Thompson, Nettie.. Van Ermen, Marie. Wichern, Hazel..... Winter, Alice...... Young, Beatrice.... Zimmerli. Marie----- Beaming....................................“Sure, Pll do it” School Spirit...................“Pll call a meeting.” Just sitting........................“You can never tell.” Interior Decoration (special—eggs)..“Home—James.” Getting excited.......“Sure, we’ll beat the Primary.” Playing basket ball................................“Get some pep!” Sitting in General Assembly.....“Where’s ‘Shelly’?” Planning a farm house................“On my farm—” Looking cheery............“0 slush, get your rubbers!” Cheering the Home Ecs......“Use Crisco, it’s the best.” Waiting................“Yes, I have my Phil (fill).” Journalism (elective course)....“Gosh, I don’t know.” Studying...........“Yes, my notebooks are complete.” Jack of all trades.................................“An-a-a.” Smiling..........................................“I’ll never tell.” Mothering......................................“That’t fine, dear.” Musician............................“Yes, I’ll help.” Bluffing.......................“I dont know—but—” Obliging...........................“That will never do.” .Seeing the sunny side.....................“By Jinks!” .Cooking.......................“I must go to church.” . Trying.........................................“Yes, yes.” . Teasing...............................“Well, listen!” . Boosting for her home town.........“At Green Bay—” . Neale(ing)..................................“I wish I were big.” .Taking life easy...................“Well, by Goll.” . Burning midnight oil.. .“How many letters did I get?” . Looking wise...............“You’ve got to show me.” Page One hundred seven1917 Iris 1917 Home Economics Club You may speak well of your Societies And your numbers too, if so inclined, But the Home Economics is the best and greatest. And it's growing all the time. A is for Allen, our director. And Adams, our critic, who just came to town; B is for Bannach, Bannister and Burns, Blum, Black, Ruth and Stella Brown. C is for Alice and Josephine Cowles, C'ain, Carlson and Cornell, And for Craig, Cutland and Cleberg, Cranston, and Genevieve Cartmill. D is for Dearborn, Dougherty and Driver, Dixon, Donnelly and Du Franc; E is for Englebert, Ellis and Evans, And F for Farrell and Fontaine. F is also for Fitzgerald, G for Glischinski, Geimer and Graff, For Grover, Graham and Glynn; H for Hargraves, Haman and Huff. H is also for Haire, Hubbell and Hart, For the Hanans and Hendersons too. And for Hill, Holt, and Hubert, (The latter are Juniors and therefore quite new.) Page One hundred eight1017 Iris 1017 I is for industrious, A word that applies to many, But with greatest force, perhaps, To Jones, Johnson, Jepson, and Jenny. K is for Koppa, Keli, and Kleist, L for Lambert, Loomis, and Lahr, And for Laurence, Landgraf and Larson; They have come from near and from far. M is for Mason and Mills, For Morgan, Minton, and Murphy, Nor do we forget Marion Moore, Maude and Elizabeth Mathie. N is only for Nelson; Olson comes under 0. P is for Powers, Pendleton, and Post, Peterson, Pittard, and Prochnow. II is for Reton, Reitan, and Routheaux, To this we add Roach and Raible, And S for Ethel Stark And we’ll add more when we’re able. T is for Thompson, Tewksbury, and Taylor; Y for Marie Van Ermen; Y for Wright, Walker, and Wood, And also for Winter and Wichern. Page One hundred nine1917 V Iris V 2 92 7 X is for Xerxes, To make this verse rhyme. V is for Young, Z for Zimmerli, Who came to our meetings on time. Now you know who we are: You may learn what we can do If you will think back a way, And combine a veil or two. We have vigor. We have vim: We can wash, and bake, and spin. Are we in it? Well. I guess! Home Ec! Home Ec! Yes. Yes. Yes! —I. H. Page One hundred ten1917 Iris 1917 CHARLES P. WATSON—“Watie" ‘Watie” sure is a big man and as our assistant coach he is of great importance to our coaching staff. "Watie” formerly played tackle on the University of Chicago team. 11 is methods of football have been taught to a great many of the players of old S. I X. RAYMOND FAIRCHILD—“Fairie" Mr. Fairchild is one of our assistant coaches and great credit is due him for the record of our team this year. He is an old football star himself, having played end for Wesleyan College of Illinois. To know of his ability along football lines one need only come to the field after school and watch him handle the pigskin like a plaything. GEORGE I). CORNEAL George I)., our head coach, is a man of exceedingly clever ability. In athletic circles he is spoken of as the big man of the middle West. Georgie is short but he doesn’t believe in short practice. He puts pep into his students and a better man with the boys is not to be found in Wisconsin. Page One hundred eleven1917 Iris 1917 Captains 6--iy LESLIE SCHALLBEHG—“Shallie" “Shallie,” commonly called the big Swede, is a handsome boy with sandy hair. During the past year as captain of our team, he led the team, as few captains have led their teams, to victory. He was always ready to take the chances of the game, lie has for two years proved his worthiness to the team. W ALT EH STEW A HT—“Stew” Here’s to our basket ball captain. Walter Stewart, who is a captain long to Ik remembered. He has always been ready to do what he could for the team. He played the position of guard for two years and there are few men in the state that can compete with him for this position. “Stew” has completed two years with the team and will be back again next year. SIDNEY EAGLEBURGER—“Sin" We can’t tell you much at this time about “Sid,” as our track captain, but we all feel safe in saying that Sid’s ability in track will help him to make an excellent captain. There is no man in the school today or has there been a man that is as fleet of foot as our little Sidney. When the conference meet is held, we know that this plucky little captain will lead our boys to victory. Page One hundred twelve1917 I ri s 1917 ELMER ELLIS—“Kllie" “Ellie” is from Illinois. For the past two years he has held down the positions of half back and end. “Ellie” was badly hurt during the last season but such things as broken ribs can be bound together. A little matter like this could not keep our sister state lad out of the game. Ellis will be with the team again next year and we know he will pick off pigskins from the aerial route. LESLIE HOUGAN—“Doc” “Doc” has been with the team for two years, filling the position of center as very few men have done before him. It is a pleasure to us all to know that Doc will till the position of captain, a position and honor which he has well earned. Best wishes. Doc. for a successful season this fall, 1917. JAMES MURPHY—“Jim” “Jim” is built upon the beef type—there is lots of him in a small space. For the past three years he has filled the position of guard and always gets the big men. At River Falls this year he put his 150 pounds of solid muscle against 260 pounds of fat that his opponent carried and never looked the worse for it. We all are sorry that Jim graduates this year. JOSEPH POPE—“Joe” “Joe” has completed three years of football with the school, two years as fullback and one year as left tackle. It will be a loss to the team to have Pope graduate. His services will long be remembered by the school and his team mates. “Joe” is an old veteran at the game and it will be hard to find a man as cool and steady in a game as he. Page One hundred thirteen1917 Iris 1917 SIDNEY EAGLEBURGER—“Sid" The little quarterback, who has completed two years will be with us again next year. It takes “.Sid” to keep the boys pepped up. Many a time we have seen him catching a punt and scurrying down the field to cross the goal for a touchdown. WALTER STEWART—"Stew" Our big guard who mows ’em down as the reaper does the grain. “Walt” was unable to play in all of the conference games because of injury to his back in one of the early games. “Stew” has played with the team for two years and will be back again next year. CHARLES BURNS—“Chas" Charlie has been with the team for two years and will be back again next year to fill the position of left end. There are very few men that go around Charlie and lie always can !x» seen with his arms around a man’s ankles. Wi NTHROPE REYNOLDS—“Red" “Red” is not tall or heavy but he sure is solid and when he hits an opponent it sounds like striking a solid piece of steel. This is Red’s first year with the team. It was his never dying spirit that keep the pep among the hoys. Scrap was written on his face through all the season. Page One hundred fourteen1917 Iris 1917 ERMIN SMITH—“Smittik” This is Smittie’s first year with the team. All his opponents will remember the big Dutchman, because “.Smittie” is a nice little boy and only cusses his opponents in German so as not to hurt their feelings. There is no man that “Smittie” has played against this year that cares to relate the game played against our right tackle. HENRY HERTZ—“Woodf.n Shoe" “Wooden Shoe Hertz” as he is commonly called, is not so wooden when playing football. He played end on our team this year and it was his first year of football. Hertz took to football as a duckling does to water water and next year we expect him to lw» a full grown drake. EDGAR CLEMENT—“Little Red" “Little Red” is the smallest man in school but a big man in football. Red sure did have River Falls guessing when it took six men to down him. This is Red’s first year and next year it will take the whole River Falls team to pull him to the ground. EARLE CHALK—“C11alk" ••Caruso” from Rock Island was with us for the first time and played the position of guard. Chalk will be with the team again next year and we expect him to play his opponents right off their feet. Page One hundred fifteen1917 It' is 1917 CHARLES HORN—“Charlbs” “Charlie” is long, slim, sleek, and slender with very little avoirdupois covering his many bones. When Charlie goes in at half hack position it is like facing pointed spears to the man that tries to stop him. Charlie will be with the team again next year and should be able to help win the championship. WILLIAM METZGER—“Metz” “Metz” is with us for the first time this year and will have two more years in which to battle for the purple ami gold. He played center and every game he played he showed that he did not have to take a back seat for any of his opponents. REX BEECKLER—“Beek" “Beck” never played previous to joining our squad. K He developed rapidly and next year he will prove a hard foe for any of the conference teams. ADOLPH NEUWALD—“Ike" “Ike” never played football but he deserves credit and mention for his work as our yell master. Football and basketball enthusiasm is only obtained when “Ike” is there to draw it from the student body. The Midnight ride of Paul Revere is nothing compared with “Ike’s” dash to mass meeting from Bancroft on the Portage branch, after we had won the game at La Crosse. (Ask Ike to explain.) Page One hundred sixteen1917 Iris 1917 Post Mortem The second day after school opened, football togs were handed out and that same night about 42 boys were out on the field ready for work. For two weeks we kept up this practice and on the following Saturday we met our next door neighbors, Grand Rapids, and defeated them to the tune of 42 to 0. Our next game was with Chippewa Falls who had lots of fight but were easily defeated by a score of 26 to 0. The following Saturday, however, brought sad events. Our team journeyed to West Depere on the Green Bay and Western, and a hard battle was fought against the St. Norbert’s team, but our boys finally lost by a score of 12 to 6. This game was one of the dirtiest games our men ever played. Pope and Ellis were both badly hurt and had to be left behind in the Green Bay hospital. Games now followed in rapid succession. Our team left for River Falls and were met at Hudson by a number of loyal students who had made the trip the night before in their side door Pullman limited. Arriving at River Falls, the team took a sweeping view of the metropolitan city from the eighty-fifth floor of the Gladstone hotel, a frame building forty-seven hands high. That afternoon the boys went out upon a field of mire and slush to play. It had snowed the day previous and a brisk wind was blowing when the boys entered this plot of ground. The game was a hard fought fight from start to finish and should have (as many true sportsmen would have said) ended in a tie 0 to 0. But luck handed them the game on a silver trav to the score of 7 to 0. Our next game was with La Crosse at La Crosse. The team on this trip was again accompanied by a couple of loyal rooters and at La Crosse were a number of old S. P. N. graduates who loyally rooted as of old. The game was nobody’s game until the last three minutes. La Crosse started by getting a safety giving them two points, and toward the end of the quarter Stevens Point scored a touchdown. Then the game was a see-saw, back and forth, till the last few minutes, when Stevens Point again made a touchdown by the aerial route, Shallie to Hertz. At Lawrence we were again beaten, it being our third hard game in succession. The score was 26 to 0 in favor of I awrence. Our last game played was at Stevens Point with Superior. The game ended Superior 0, S. P. X. 73. In this game Red Reynolds scored two drop kicks, and Pope kicked 10 goals out of 10 trails. The Oshkosh game was cancelled because of a snow storm a day before the game. Page One hundred seventeen1917 V Iris V 1917 S. P. N..............................42 S. P. N..............................26 S. P. N.............................. 6 S. P. N.............................. 0 S. P. N..............................14 S. P. N.............................. 0 S. P. N..............................73 Grand Rapids ..................... 0 Chippewa Falls.................... 0 St. Norbert’s College.............12 River Falls Normal................ 7 La Crosse Normal................. 2 Lawrence College ................26 Superior Normal................... 0 A Parkhurst becomes an efficient trainer. Red Reynolds carries an intercepted pass at Depere for forty yards. Pope has his neck broken at I awrence. (Some lively corpse—Joe.) Eagleberger made three touchdowns from punts. Hougen played against five different men at La Crosse. (Murder will out— Doc.) Shallberg makes an eightv-five yard run from the kick off, in the Superior game. Murphy receives a severe headache at La Crosse. (Peruna and pop.) Pope makes all goal kicks except one during entire season. Hertz and Smith were captured by La Crosse girls. (Harry gets the watch.) Ellis studies Entomology in the La Crosse hotel. (You’ll have to unload.) Metzger and Chalk find bed tied to the ceiling in La Crosse. (Sweet dreams, boys.) Page One hundred eighteen1917 Iris 1917 Page One hundred nineteen1917 Iris 3 OB □ 1917 JOSEPH POPE—“Joe" Joe is the oldest man on our team, this having been his third year at the pivot position. Joe graduates this year and it will be a great loss to the team not to have him back. There were no men that he played against this year or previous years that were able to outjump him and this was a great source of help to the team in winning their games. He is a very dangerous man on the floor and it takes the entire time of his opponent to cover him. HENRY HERTZ—“Wooden Shoe” “Wooden Shoe,” the long rangy southpaw forward, has filled his position well for two years. In many of the games when his man was watching his right. Hertz deceivingly let go with his left thereby scoring baskets. He plays the floor well and is always well up in scoring points for his team. W A LTER STEW A RT—“Stew" Walter Stewart, this year’s captain, is long to be remembered on account of the way he led his team to victory through the games of this season. “Stew” has played on the team for two years filling the position of guard, and there were very few baskets scored against him. LESLIE SHALLBURG—“Shallib” “Shallie” has completed two years of successful basket ball with the team, one year as guard and one year as forward. In both positions he has played a stellar game. There is not a better pair of guards to be found in the state that can play both the offensive and defensive game that “Shallie” and “Stew” Pa ye One hundred tvsenty1917 ■ ■ Iris 1917 MAXIMILIAN GIEDLINSKI—“Max" “Max” played with the team for the first time this year, having formerly played with Ripon College. Max played forward. He graduates this year and it will be a great loss to the team. He is short and light but nevertheless he was one of the trickiest men in the conference. N INTH HOPE REYNOLDS—“Red” “Red” hails from Carroll College, having played with them before coming here. Red was alternate man at guard and it is a sorrowful thing that more than five men arc not playing on a basket ball team because Red surely deserves a place on the team. This is his first year with the team. Next year he will be a hard proposition for any man in the state. CHARLES BURNS—1“Charlie" “Charlie” will be with the team again next year and his playing will be a big help. To show Charlie’s endurance we need only to look back to the Medford game. Charlie played on the second team winning the Medford game and then played on the first team against Stout. In both games he played a flashy and consistent game. ERMIN SMITH—“Smittie" “Smittie” hails from the Grand Rapids II. S. team and last year was chosen all-state center of high schools. Next year he will Ik? seen at the pivot position, a place which he will be able to fill and in which he will play a strong game. Page One hundred twenty-one1917 Iris 1917 Page One hundred twenty-two1917 Iris m ■ 1917 With the close of the football season all attention turned toward basket ball. With four men to start with from the team of the year before and a splendid amount of new material to pick from, the team was selected and the men were out for prac-tive every night developing team work which was shown in splendid form throughout the season. The first team met by our boys was the Lawrence College team. They were given a thorough trouncing by our boys on their own floor. This was a bitter defeat for Lawrence and it was the third defeat in two years. Later in the season we gave them their fourth defeat in two years. (Hard luck, I awrence.) Games followed in rapid succession and our boys were always victorious at the long end of the score. We won all of our games ami the town people were so enthusiastic over the team that they arranged a game with the strong St. John’s Military team who hadn’t lost a game. St. John’s apj eared upon the floor with five tall warriors and they were soon defeated two to one by our quintet. Later, the team journeyed to River Falls to play the team there. Three weeks previous, our boys easily defeated the River Falls team, but when they met on the River Falls floor it was a different story. Any one who has ever played there can tell you their attitude. It is win at any cost. We do not blame our boys for the defeats received from River Falls. The playing throughout the season was splendid and the team was one of the best, if not the best, team in the history of the school. The team was as one family of brothers and Coach Corneal was one of the boys on all the trips. Toward the close of the season our coach was assisted bv Mr. Leevis, a recent University of Wisconsin star. Page One hundred twenty-three1917 Iris 1917 Basketball Schedule S. P. N 32 Lawrence College ... 15 S. P. N 33 Oshkosh Normal ... . 9 S. P. N Lawrence College .... 18 S. P. N 34 Stout Institute 5 S. P. N 57 Kau Claire Normal... 18 S. P. N 35 River Falls Normal.. 17 8. P. N 36 Stout Institute 17 S. P. N 32 St. John’s Military... 15 S. P. N 34 Eau Claire Normal.. 10 S. P. N 14 River Falls Normal.. 24 S. P. N 19 River Falls Normal.. 22 S. P. N 2 Superior Normal . ... 0 S. P. N 2 Superior Normal . .. . 0 360 170 THE S. P. N. LINE-UP Giedlinski .. Right Forward Ilcrtz .. .Left Forward Pope Stewart Shallberg ... Right Guard SUBSTITUTES .Smith Burns Reynolds Page One hundred twenty-fourf •SAUK or n.Ava Charles Burns JoSvptl Pope 1 Walter Stewart ‘Leslie lloumu Hart Chalk Kruitii Smith Harry Hectx (Sidney Kajrtchurieer Wluthrop Heynuhls Kltncr Kills tlx-alle SIuiIIIhtx J nines Murphy Win. MetXRcr Itex Recckler Chn . Horne Kdxnr Clement Anselm Wyaovkl Slxurd SlKunlwHi Michael O’Keefe Ferdinand 111 ray l.utlior Anderson Lester Peterson l.ylaK KIuk Cordon Ixjvrjoy Ixrtll Sohroeder Albert Johnson IliiKh Ixonnrd Clyde Moriey My lea Thomnaon Ktban Peteraon Herman LeCaptaln Michael Tovey Krltx Moeller George Strom Burton Pierce Verne Vaughn Wm. flavin llernnrd Precourt Max filedllnskl •Captain elect. IIOMK TOWS Steven Point Wausau Antljco Grand Haplds Book Island. 111. Crawl Haplds Weyauwem Stevens Point Marshdetd Moline. III. Moline, III. Heyton Grand Haplds tlrunton Stevens Polut Marinette Stevens Point Itetrolt Harbor Stevens Point Stevens Point Scandinavia lola Merrill Stevens Point tlrand Haplds Wausau Steven Point Friendship Scandinavia (Srnnton Casco Stevens Point loin Friendship Friendship Stevens Point Stevens Point Buena Vista Hlpon (Captain M.IIOOL ATTr.MirD nmow TO KNTKRIMO NORMAL xroatr IN WIIKII Til BY IIAVK l ARTlrirATKX AT . HTICVKNA rOIMT NORM Al. I’nrk Falla, II. S. Foot t ll. llaakvtball. Track Wiiumiu II. S. Football, Baaketball. Track Ai.lU-u II. S. Foot 1 11, Ha.Kctball Track lira ml Kai.l.la II. .S. Football Ilork Inland II. S. Football UfrihI Kaptda 11. S. Football nV)nu«rin II. s. Football. Ita kctt. ll SifTMw IVilnt II. S. Football. Itaaaka-tliall. Track Carroll I'ullftr Football. Mail Inc II s. Foot 1 11. Itaaaka-tliall. Track Molllia II. S. Football. Itaiakctball. Track Il t« t» II. s. Football lira ml ltii| M- II. S. Football Nolllavlllc II S. Football Stevena I'oll.t II. S. Football Marinette II. 8. Football Football. Itasketlmll. Track Football St even Point II 8. Football Football St. Ola.r. Collette Football loin II S. Football anal llnaakctball Merrill II S. Football Stevcil Point II. 8. Football tlrand Hapld ii s. Football WllUMU II. S. Football SI. Tli ani»ia Col Into Football Frlnidriilp II S. FOOt 1 11 anal Track Scandinavia II. S. Football (iranton II. S. Foot 1 11 Football ami Track Fax.tl.all lol II. 8. Football Football Fttetalriilp II S. Football Frlrnaluhlp II. S. Football anal Track Football Steven Point II. S. Football ami Track Itllaon Oolloita' Haricot ball t Haricot ball Captain FTraek Captain 1917 ■ Iris V 2 02 71917 Iris 1917 Intersckolastic Basketball Tournament The third annual Central Wisconsin High School Basket Ball Tournament was held at the Stevens Point State Normal School Gym on March eighth, ninth, and tenth. It was, without a doubt, a record breaker and the best held in the state for some time. Most of the high schools, having figured in previous tournaments here, were represented and in addition to these, four new teams: Ladysmith, Rib Lake, Medford and Merrill. The others teams were, Iola, Grand Rapids, New London, Wausau, Tomahawk, Stanley, Waupaca, Marshfield and Stevens Point, making a total of thirteen strong, fast, aggressive teams. Each team consisted of at least seven athletes and was supported by a large number of wide-awake rooters, so that Stevens Point had about two hundred and fifty visitors. On Thursday afternoon, March 8th, the tournament started and after a series of six games lola. New London, Tomahawk, and Rib I,ake were eliminated by Wausau, Ladysmith, Merrill, Grand Rapids, Stevens Point, and Stanley. Wausau played two games, winning the first from Iola, and losing the second to Stevens Point by a score of 12 to 16. On Friday, Ladysmith was defeated by Grand Rapids in a close and hard fought game. Ladysmith was a strong contender for the honors but Grand Rapids played a more finished game and won by a score of 29 to 15. Merrill was defeated by Marshfield in a fast and clean cut game, 23 to 15. This was Merrill’s first year at basket ball and they certainly made a good showing. Stevens Point lost to Stanley. On Saturday morning Grand Rapids lost to Waupaca and Stanley defeated Marshfield. The Grand Rapids team was picked as the winners, as they were the year before, but the Waupaca bunch got the jump on them and won 13 to 11. Stanley easily outclassed Marshfield. At night Stanley and Waupaca battled for first and second places. Grand Rapids and Marshfield playing for third place. The game between Waupaca and Stanley was what you would call a whirlwind ami ended 12 to 11 in favor of Waupaca. Grand Rapids easily defeated Marshfield, thereby securing third place. At the close of the tournament. President John F. Sims of the local Normal school, gave a short speech, after which he presented the winning teams with the trophies. Waupaca received a fine engraved shield, having won first place, and the individual members of the team were given gold watch fobs. Stanley won second place and each of the men was given a silver watch fob. Grand Rapids won third place and they were given bronze fobs. George Holman of the Stevens Point team was selected by the judges as the man who seemed to be of most value to his team. He received a handsome loving cup. The Ladysmith team received the cup for appearance and conduct. Professor Corneal, our coach, officiated at all of the games, and by his efforts the tournament was carried through with great success. Page One hundred twenty-six1917 Iris ■ ■ 1917 Track There are probably few who know really what a track team is like, but they will soon see. for we shall have about fourteen high school teams here competing for the large Pasternacki cup given to the team winning first place. When this event is 6taged the students will be able to understand and appreciate the work done by our boys. We have several stars with us this year—such as Eagleburger, Chalk, Ellis, Klug, Bacher, Kelsey, Horne, and Paulson. All these men are fast men and out of them, four will be chosen for the relay team which will enter the Pennsylvania meet. Sid is the captain of this year’s team, and together with the rest of the boys is working hard every night out of doors on the fair ground race track. Never before in the history of the school has the school been able to put forth a team as it will this year. Coach Corneal is an old weather beaten warrior of the track himself and is instilling into the team all his knowledge of the work. Our expectations for accomplishment this year are high, and we expect to see our team win the state championship of the Normal School Conference. While speaking of our athletes through these entire pages we have neglected and forgotten one other class of athletes who play and have played a big part in athletics of the past year. The loyal rooters belong to this class and the student body never was more loyal or enthusiastic than during the past year and may this school spirit be prevalent again next year when our athletes take the field of battle. It should be our motto to speak of our school spirit, and we ought to develop such school spirit that other schools will look to us in astonishment. This year a number of fellows and girls accompanied the team on trips and some of the fellows were so loyal that even though funds were low they managed to go with the team. The team is always glad to see the faces of at least three or four loyal rooters. Going back to the athletes themselves, we all know that even though Hiver Falls won both football and basket ball championships we still claim the better team. So we look forward with enthusiasm to our track team to save the year by winning the state championship. Go to it. track men. “We are all ‘witcha’,” so clean ’em up! Page One hundred twenty-seven1917 Iris 1917 Physical Training In offering physical training to our women students our aim is two-fold, namely, for the individual and for the teacher. For the individual we aim: 1. To correct common postural faults, without which work along other lines would be in part wasted. 2. To supply muscular exercise systematically. 3. To encourage proper habits regarding sleep, diet, ventilation, etc. 4. To develop as accurate a muscular control as may be possible in the available time. For the teacher we aim: 1. To make clear and to impress the relation between health and efficiency. 2. To make clear the hygienic demand for systematic exercise and supervised play in the elementary schools. 3. To supply as thorough an equipment of practical work for the teacher as time permits. This equipment for teaching consists principally of devices for posture training of school children, games, rhythm work and folk dancing. For the past two years a demonstration of the work done in the Normal classes has been held and the public invited. This year the demonstration was given on January 25th, two hundred and eighty girls representing the physical training department for the first semester participated. An attractive feature in the physical training department, and one to which everyone looks forward with pleasure each year is the spring play festival. Last year an outdoor dramatization of the “Pied Piper of Hamelin” was substituted for the regular festival and given under the auspices of the physical training department. The following teams competed this year: Home Economics, High School, Primary, Grammar, and Academic. This year we are planning to run a tennis tournament. The need of new courts can not be too strongly emphasizeed. The two which we have do not begin to accommodate the number of girls who wish systematic practice. We hope next fall for the first time to make hockey an interclass contest. This English game for women is comparatively new in American schools, though it is fast gaining a permanent place in athletics in many of our colleges. We need never worry in the Stevens Point Normal about girls coming out for athletics. All we need is space and equipment. The girls are enthusiastic. We had one hundred fifty-two girls out for basket ball. The limited number of practice hours due to constant use of the gymnasium for other things made it hard to give every one a chance to play and still to give the teams an opportunity to work together. We need a new gymnasium and we need some means of obtaining money for girls’ sports. Page One hundred twenty-eight1917 V Iris V 1917 Page One hundred twenty-nine1917 m a Iris 1917 flcfl beau: 6IRU5 g fcS'KET BALL T£fl(%5 Page One hundred thirty1917 V Iris ■ 7 97 7 Page One hundred thirty-one1917 Iris 1917 hffiffllY OSE CONSTITUTION OF THE DRAMATIC CLUB. I. Name. This society shall be known as the Dramatic Club of the Stevens Point Normal School. II. Membership. Only students and faculty of the Stevens Point Normal School shall be eligible to membership in this club. Faculty membership shall be conferred by vote of the Club. There shall be two grades of student membership as follows: A. Full membership, which shall Ik attained only by appearing in a speaking part in one of the public dramatic presentations given by the Dramatic Club, or in the Senior Class Play. B. Associate membership, which shall be open to every student in good standing in the Stevens Point Normal School by enrolling as the club shall direct. III. Voting, Office Holding. Only full members may hold office and vote. Faculty members may hold office but may not vote. IV. Officers. Officers shall consist of a president, a secretary, a treasurer, and an enrolling committee. A. The president, secretary and treasurer shall perform the services commonly expected of such officers in similar clubs. B. The enrolling committee shall make lists of names of full and of associate members, and shall publish the names of those attaining full membership in such manner as the club shall direct. V. Official Emblems. Dramatic club badges may be worn only by full members of the club. VI. Faculty Advisors. A. The Dramatic Club shall choose by ballot such faculty advisors as it may need. B. All public dramatics shall be staged under the direction of a faculty advisor. C. The faculty advisors shall use every endeavor to obtain for all associate members who desire it, places on the public dramatic casts. D. The decision of the faculty advisor in making up all casts of characters for public presentations must be final (except noted below in VII., B). E. Faculty advisors may resign at their discretion, and the club shall accept such resignations without demur. Page One hundred thirty-two1917 a b Iris 1917 Work of the Year The first work the Dramatic Club gave this year was the farce, “What Happened to Jones,” by (i. M. Broadhurst. It was a great success and showed that a great deal of work had been put on it. both on the part of the cast and the director. Professor E. T. Smith. “WHAT HAPPENED TO JONES” Cast Jones, who travels for a Hymn Book House..............................Mike Rybicke Ebenezer Goodly, a professor of anatomy.............................Adolph Neuwald Anthony Goodly, D.D., bishop of Ballarat............................Martin Paulson Richard Heatherly, engaged to Marjorie................................James Hull Henry Fuller, Supt. of the Sanatorium Thomas Holder, a policeman (...........................Gordon Lovejoy William Bigbce, an inmate of the Sanatorium........................William Gilson Mrs. Goodly, Ebenezer’s wife..........................................Mary Jones Cissy, Ebenezer’s ward.............................................Mildred Merry Minerva, Ebenezer’s daughter................................................Nettie Thompson Alvina Starlight, Mrs. Goodly’s sister.........................M. Kathryn Garvin Helma, Swedish servant-girl..............................................Charlotte Nachtway Page One hundred thirty-three1917 Iris 1917 Disraeli The play, ‘‘Disraeli (The Ditch in the Sand)” was given under the auspices of the Dramatic Club. February 9, 1917, for the purpose of selecting additional members for the Club. The success of the play showed that every member of the cast had worked faithfully, and carried his part with ease throughout the entire performance. Much credit should be given to Miss Edna Einier, under whose able direction the play was presented and proved such a great success. DISRAELI (THE DITCH IX THE SAND)” Cast The Duke of Glastonbury............................. The Duchess of Glastonbury.......................... Clarissa. Lady Pevensev............................. Charles, Viscount Deeford........................... Adolphus, Viscount Cudworth......................... Lady Cudworth....................................... I ord Brooks of Brookehill ) Bascot, Disraeli butler ........................... Lady Brooke......................................... The Right Honorable Benjamin Disraeli, M.P.......... Lady Bcaconsfield................................... Mrs. Noel Travers................................... Sir Michael Probert, Bart........................... Mr. Hugh Meyers..................................... Mr. Lumley Foljambe................................. Mr. Tcarle, butler at Glastonbury Towers............ Flooks, a rural postman ) Potter, Disraeli’s gardener ....................... Diplomats—English qnd foreign, naval and military. Officers—Lords and ladies, liveried servants. ......Van Ashmun .. .Josephine Powers ----Helene Hudson Herman Le Captain ... Burn is Carpenter ....Madeline Reyer .... Burton Ambrose . .Gretchen Gilmore .....Raymond Pett ......Ada Quinnell ____Edyth R. Blum .....William Gavin ......Clyde Morley ...Paul H. Paulson ---Anselm Wysocki .... Frank Diederick Alice Winter. Gertrude Ross, Bernice Cornell The following members of the cast were admitted to the Dramatic Club: Van Ashmun Raymond Pett Herman Le Captain William Gavin Clyde Morley Frank Diederick Josephine Powers Edyth Blum Helene Hudson Page One hundred thirty-four1917 V Iris V i?i7 Page One hundred thirty-five1917 Iris 1917 NEW CABINET Page One hundred thirty-six1917 Iris 1917 The Y. W. C. A. One Sunday afternoon in November, 1872, six young women sat in a student’s room for the purpose of prayer. Other prayer circles followed. These meetings increased in attendance and helpfulness until a permanent organization was thought advisable in order that other girls entering school in years to come might find a group whose influence would strengthen and encourage them in their Christian living. Thus originated the Y. W. C. A. and today we are a world organization scattered over the globe—not a few girls struggling on alone, but a society numbering over 500,000 strong. The work of the Stevens Point organization is carried on by committees, the chairmen of which with the president, the secretary, and the treasurer make up the cabinet under whose management especially good work has been done this year. The membership committee has worked so effectively that the enrollment has increased to one hundred eighty active student members and eleven honorary members from the faculty and the women of the city interested in the work. A number of devotional meetings have been led by the Missionary committee. This committee has also given the society much interesting information regarding the work of the various missions. The Social Service Committee has been more active this year than formerly and has accomplished much in helping young women not only in our school but also in our community. The Finance Committee has managed its part with signal success. It has conducted a sale of Japanese wares besides sandwich and cake sales which have created much enthusiasm among the students. Under the direction of this committee the Swiss Bell ltingers gave a delightful entertainment. The Program Committee in the performance of its important and responsible duties has by careful planning and knowledge of the ability of the various members provided interesting and helpful programs. Outside speakers were secured to address several of the meetings. The Social Committee has demonstrated its ability by making the girls acquainted in September and by encouraging a friendly spirit throughout the year. This was accomplished by spreads, mixers, hikes, and parties. Page One hundred thirty-seven1917 Iris m ■ 1917 Good Times During the year many social functions were given. The first affair was a mixer given in the gymnasium on the first Friday after the opening of school. The purpose of this was to get acquainted and to extend a word of cheer to those who were away from home for the first time. The membership campaign this year brought the greatest returns in the history of the school. The impressive candle initiation service held in the gymnasium in the fall was an indication of the work that was to follow. Other functions such as hikes, the Hallowe'en party, spreads, and informal receptions given by the faculty members have been enjoyed. Special mention should In made of the early morning hike to the Sanatorium where the Association was entertained by Mrs. Wallbridge. Other hostesses whose hospitality we have enjoyed are Mesdames Hyer, Collins, Culver, Delzcll and E. T. Smith. The Hallowe’en party was attended by nearly every member of the association and proved a very delightful occasion. The initiation of the new cabinet was an event of interest and was followed by a banquet for the entire association. This is to become an annual affair. The present membership is large. One even greater is anticipated for next year, a membership so interested and enthusiastic that the Association will be a greater help to the girls than ever before. Members Adah Allen Margaret Anderson I ouise Ashmun Viola Babbler Mary Bailey Celia Bartelt Clara Baxter Susie Beard more Esther Belgum Madge Bentley Cora Bickmore Rachel Blom Edythe Blum 4gnes Borbeck Florence Bourn Mildred Brooks Stella Brown Ruth Buswell Lois Butts Lydia Bauer Blanche Camp Amy Carley Margaret Carley Esther Carteron Luniel Carteron Gladys Chapman Grace Chillrud Annie Clehurg Emma Drvden Agnes Eichinger Hazel Eichler Esther Eichsteadt Sarah Dixon Marion Doty Leona Driver Alice Cowles Blanche Craig Mabel Cranston Evelyn Cummings Irene Colvin Hattie Cone Bernice Cornell Page One hundred thirty-eight1917 Iris i u 1917 Hazel Parks Helen Empey Clara Felland Elvira Felling Florence Foote Arvilla Forsythe Edith Fritz Zella Fuller Margaret Fulton Naomi Fulton Gretchen Gilmore Edna GralT Hattie Graham Mabel Granger Mary Grant Esther Grover Florence Haire Antoinette Hamacheck Helen ITanan Lucile ITanan Grace E. Hanson Grace H. Hanson Louella Hanson Sena V. Hanson Esther Harland Eleanor Hartleb Delphine Henderson Helen Henderson Mildred Herman Ella Messier Mary Holt Minnie Horn Blanche Huff Helene Hudson Margaret Hughes Alma Jcdamus Margaret Jeffers Irma Jenny Pearl X. Johnson Margaretha Joch Ethel J. Jones Helen Jones Maye Jones Esther Kelley Mabel Kittleson I eona Kleinschmidt Frieda Koehler Ruth Kleist Bertha La Budde Gertrude Lohr Katherine Lambert Alma Larson Sylvia Lien Frances Lipke Leone Lohry Frances Lowe Charlotte McCormick Florence Mallery Elizabeth Mathie Maude Mathe Sarah Martin Marie Metz Rhoda Mills Hilda Moberg Mary Moores Minnie Morgan Geda Mvhre Eunice Nease Amv Nelson Ruth Nelson Ruth Nemacheck Josephine Olson Julia Olson Bessie Onseim Avada Ostrum Ella Paap Elfrieda Pagel Clara Patzer Irene Peterson Martha Peterson Myrtle Piper Catherine Pittard Leone Proshnow Ada Quinnell Madeline Iteyer Ellen Raithcr Martina Reitan Lottie Root Ida Rothman Clara Russell Anna Russell Louella Schnurr Helen Schroeder Lillian Schroeder Helen Shampna Dorothy Smith Rachel Smith Fave Sprague Anne Sheldon Almira Stuvc Elsie Swanson Katherine Tarrant Jessie Taylor Helen Terrio Amy Tewksbury Vera Tewksbury Florence Tidd Margaret Walker Lillian Warner Vera Washburn Mae Webster Frieda Wohllcbcn Prudentia Woodward Bertha Ziebell Milda Zuehlke Honorary Members Maud Brewster Ella Jennings Ethel F. Cooper Lulu Mansur Mrs. James E. Delzell Bernice Saunders Bertha Hussey Mrs. Short Elba Slater Mrs. E. T. Smith Mrs. Wallbridge Page One hundred thirty-nine1917 V Iris V i07 7 Page One hundred forty1017 V Iris V 1917 Delegate to Konrito.v. Neb. The Loyola Club began (his school year with a membership of one hundred forty-live students and four members of the faculty, the Misses Flannagan. Shelton. Radcmacher, and Walsh. The officers for the first semester were elected at the first business meeting were: President......................William Gilson Vice-President.............Bernadotte Donelly Secretary....................Gertrude Meagher Treasurer.........................Dell Curtis N. ( s. A. of A. An executive Council was appointed by the president, which attends to the planning of social activities and other work of the club. The Club’s purpose is to promote a religious spirit among its members and to hold social gatherings where the young people may become acquainted. Business meetings are held every two weeks. At these meetings programs, both musical and literary are carried on. Father Bice, the spiritual advisor, talked at one meeting. Other talks have been given by Miss Flannagan, Miss Shelton, and Mr. Neale. The Loyola Club is affiliated with the Catholic Students’ Association of America and William Gilson was sent as a delegate to the Convention in November, at Kurnev, Nebraska. At this place is located a large State Normal School, where Mr. Delzell and Mr. Neale taught for some time. The convention was a very successful one. The principle speaker was Father Burke of Chicago, lie is chaplain of the C. S. A., and editor of the Catholic Student, a magazine in circulation among the members of the Loyola Club and of similar clubs throughout America. The social activities of the year have been successful as well as very entertaining. On October 13th, the nights of Columbus at the K. of C. hall gave the club a reception which was followed by dancing. This affair opened the club’s social season and was soon followed by a Hallowe’en dance. Games and Hallowe’en tricks were played and later dancing ended the program. On Saturday afternoon, January 14th, a matinee dance was given from 2:30 to fi:00. The Club also gave a fancy dress dancing party as a pre-Lenten social event on Februarv 2d. The members dressed in Pierette costumes and dancing was enjoyed by all. The Club is especially grateful to Miss Flannagan for her interested assistance and co-operation in making the work among students so successful. Page Onr hundred forty-one1917 Iris 1917 Page One hundred forty-tno Old Officers1917 Iris 1917 Page One hundred forty-three1917 V Iris V 1917 ra 1 1 1 rt7Raa ATflECIflECICI ' yrtrzp' President........ Vice-President... Secretary........ Treasurer........ Sergeant-at-Arms, OFFICERS First Quarter ...............Herman Le Captain ...................Frank Dejmek ..............Bernard Christenson ...................Clyde Morley ..................Martin Paulson Second Quarter President..............................Burton Ambrose Vice-President.............................George Card Secretary..............................Frank Diederick Treasurer..............................John Reiton, Jr. Sergeant-at-Arms.......................Sigurd Sigurdson President........ Vice-President... Secretary........ Treasurer........ Sergeant-at-Arms Third Quarter .Henry Beglinger .John Reiton, Jr. ... Hugh Leonard ......Tilden Moe Emanuel Bentson Fourth Quarter President........ Vice-President. .. Secretary........ Treasurer........ Sergeant-at-Arms. ___George Card ..John Ambrose ...Thomas King ... Clyde Morley Adolph Xeuwald FACULTY ADVISORS Prof. David A. Swartz Prof. Walter Smith Prof. James A. Delzell Page One hundred forty-four1917 V Iris V 1917 Page One hundred forty-five1917 ■ ■ Iris 1917 Forum-AtKenaeum Previous to the fall of 1911 there were two boys literary societies in the Stevens Point Normal school, namely, the Forum ami the Athenaeum. The membership of these two societies was so small that it was decided to unite them and form one strong organization, which was called the Forum-Athenaeum. The purpose of this society is to make its members more proficient along the lines of oratory, debate, and other literary work. That this purpose was carried out last year, under the leadership of Professor Delzell, is proven by the fact that all of the young men representing the Stevens Point Normal in oratory and debate, and those on the Iris and the Pointer staffs were members of this organization. The value of this training has again been demonstrated for the reason that all the young men who entered the preliminary contest in the Junior debate this year were members of the society. Two of the contestants succeeded in winning places on the team, namely, Tilden Moe and Henry Beglinger. Several of the members won places on the Triangular debating teams, and our school orator is also one of our number. School opened last fall with an increase in the membership of the Forum-Athenaeum. Professors Swartz, Delzell. and Walter Smith have kindly taken part in helping to make this society the best in the Normal. President Sims has consented to give a quarter’s credit in English to each member attending thirty meetings, and doing a certain amount of work. Weekly meetings are held on Tuesday evenings at 7:15 o’clock. Programs are given consisting of debates, orations, parliamentary practice, current event reports, readings, and musical numbers. One of the principal events of the second quarter was a banquet served by the girls of the Home Economics department. Plates were laid for forty-four guests. President John F. Sims was toastmaster of the evening. This is the first entertainment of the kind to lie given by the Forum-Athenaeum. The mock trial, which was given publicly on Tuesday evening, February 27, was well attended and enjoyed by all. We have Attorney Hanna to thank for his assistance in making it a success. With a membership double that of last year, and with the assistance of our three faculty advisors, we expect to accomplish things hitherto impossible. Members of this society in the years to come will have as a goal, the accomplishments of the members of the Forum-Athenaeum of nineteen hundred sixteen and seventeen. —C. A. M. LIST OF MEMBERS. Ambrose, Burton Ambrose, John Begllnger. Henry A. Bentson, Emanuel Bestule, James It. Bergstaken. Eldore Card, George Christenson. Bernard C. Dejmek. Frank W. IMederich. Frank C. Gilson. William J. Glisczlnski. Stanley Gosh. Xeufrey IIo|»| e. Robert C. King, Thomas. Jenson. Herbert M. I Hubert. Lester I-e Captain. Herman I onard. Hugh Long. John Long. Sam McClyman. Clifford McClyman. Harold Moe. Tilden Morley. Clyde A. Nelson. Carl I. Nelson, Charles Neuwald. Adolph Paulsen. Martin It. Paulsen, Paul II. Peterson. A. P. Pierec. Burton It. Preeourt. Bernard Iteitan, John Slgurdson. Sigurd Simonson, Paimer Somers. Raymond Strom. George A. Wiley. Harley Wltmer. John Wojak. Raphael Page One hundred forty-sixPage One hundred forty-seven1917 V Iris V 7 92 7 OUR PRE61 h E OiT cmn lotte cinctmjfiY A A MraL O ft 0 A "It; One hundred forty-eight1917 Iris 1917 What the Arena Society is Doing The fifty new members initiated into the Society last October learned what an enthusiastic-crowd of girls partake of Arena activities. The following officers were elected for the first semester and re-elected for the second half-year. President......Charlotte Nachtway Vice-President.......Pearl Heffron Secretary............Clara Wilhelm Treasurer................Ann Roach Programs are of an educational and an entertaining nature given at meetings held about even-two weeks. The “Night at the Gem” was very profitable, as the pictures of “Silas Marner” were a special attraction. During the high school tournament, the Arena girls had a “Day at the Pal.” There were several “Arena Specials” on the menu, and the society was greatly benefited financially. The Grecian type costumes, which the society lias adopted are of white material, fringed, and bear a large letter “A.” A triangular contest in short stories, declamations, and orations, was held this year between the Ohiyesa, Forum-Athenaeum and Arena Societies. m __ 'W r. J 1 r Page One hundred forty-nine1917 V Iris V 2 92 7 v 9 A fS e ; n Arena Song n Tune: Dixie Land ' We sing a song of a band of lassies, 0 In all the school there is none surpasses. Arena! Arena! Arena! Hip hoo-ray! Oil program day we have no shirker. Everyone is a faithful worker. Arena! Arena! Arena! Hip hoo-ray! Then we're proud of our Arena, X w Hoo-ray! Hoo-ray! O The Arena girls do ere excel, They do good work in all things. ' Hoo-ray! hoo-rav! hoo-ray! for our Arena! Hoo-ray! hoo-ray! hoo-ray! for our Arena. —B. L. G C ' G 0 0K e ■ a Is 9 a Pa? On hundred fifty1917 V Iris V i9i7 »? ■ Onf hundred fifty-onePage One hundred fifty-two1917 Iris 1917 C h J Presidents Hattie Conf. Maud Mathb Page One hundred fifty-three1917 Iris 1917 Page One hundred fifty-four1917 V Iris V 2 02 7 7jK hundred fifty-five1917 Iris 1917 Work of tke Tear The Ohiyesa Society was organized in 1905 by Lottie Deyoe. Since that time the membership has increased steadily until now it has reached one hundred twenty-five, making this the largest literary society in the school. The initiation for the first semester was held in the gymnasium at the beginning of tin? year. This ceremony is very impressive: the girls promise to be loyal to their school, friends, teachers, homes and the society. The initiation for the second semester was held at Plover Hills, May 12th. Our “Day at the Pal” this year was on May 19, at the time of the High School Track meet. Indian decorations were used and Indian dishes were served. A series of three contests were held with the Arena and Forum-Athenaeum; first, a short story; second, a declamatory; and third, an oratorical contest. This contest was conducted by the Pointer Staff. The winning society was rewarded by having its picture in the Pointer. Another successful event of the school year was the Ohiyesa night at the Gem theater. Indian maidens ushered the people to seats; Indian girls danced and a men’s cpiartette sang. The theater was crowded and everyone enjoyed the time spent there. A week before the close of school a meeting was held, and with a most impressive ceremony five of the Senior members appointed a like number of Junior Ohiyesa girls to carry on the membership work the following fall. This ceremony will be held each year and will be one of the most impressive as well as the most important events of the school year. We urge the future members to keep our society up to the high standard it has attained, that of the strongest and best in S. I . X. —Maud Matiie. Page One hundred fifty-six1917 V Iris V i 9i 7 Ohiyesa Ohiyesa. child of Nature. Welcome gives, to all those maidens Who will hold her honor sacred; Those who ever will be faithful To rhe vows of the great order. Those strong bonds with which you bind us Founded are, on motives worthy, Those of service for each other. Those of thinking, high and noble. Those of loyalty to others. To our friends, our school, our teachers. With the passing of the seasons. When no longer we shall gather Hound the embers of our camp-fire, Still the name of Ohiyesa With its mystic charm, will bind us In a union, strong, enduring, Founded on undying friendship And of love for our great order. Psigt One hundred fifty-seven1917 V Iris ' V 1917 Ohiyesa Tells Ohiyesa—Ish-ka-uga! Ohiyesa—Ish-ka-uga! Ohiyesa—Ish-ka-uga! Ugh! Chunk kena, chunk kena! Chunk chunk, kena kena! Negasachi, Yokalacke, Hoi-pi-doi-to, Hoi-yah, Hoi-yah! Page One hundred fifty-eightOratory One of the standards by which the normal schools of the state are judged, is the attitude which they take towards public speaking. The Stevens Point Normal school can feel justly proud of the records it has made in this activity the last two years. As the time for the local oratorical contest drew near, much interest was aroused and on the evening of January, the eleventh, ten orators contested for the honor of representing their Alma Mater at the state oratorical contest. The decision of the judges gave third place to William Gilson, second place to James Hull, and first place to Martin Paulson. This was the second time that Mr. Paulson had been chosen as school orator. The school, as a whole, felt satisfied that we were so ably represented at the state contest which was held at River Falls on the sixteenth of March. Fifteen members of the student body and faculty accompanied our orator over snowbanks, in stalled railway trains to the seat of the contest and testified to our sister normals that we were proud of our city, our school, and our speaker. The result of the contest at River Falls gave Superior first place, Stevens Point second, La Crosse third, and Platteville fourth. Although we did not win first place we feel that Mr. Paulson has brought honor to his school and placed her in the front rank among her sister normals in oratorical work. Mr. Paulson will also act as delegate and alternate to the business meeting at the interstate oratorical contest to be held at Emporia. Kansas. May .'ith. Page One hundred fifty-nineOratorical Association Officers Martin Paulson Otto Backer Charlotte President Vice-President Nachtwey Secretary David Swartz T rcasurer Page One hundred sixty1917 Iris 1917 Emancipation for Two Million Americans One of the fundamental principles of the American government is equality. From 1861 to 1865 the nation wrestled in the throes of rebellion and decided that the negro need no longer be the white man’s slave. Today we are confronted with a problem of human conservation far greater in importance than the negro problem of ’61, one that should not be lost sight of amid the intense excitement and emotion incident to the present war; for the final solution of this paramount problem is certain to determine the destiny of America. It demands the support of every liberty-loving citizen. While we claim that here no class distinctions prevail, we must admit it is but an idle boast. Everyone who has given the matter serious consideration knows that, even for little children, there are two distinct classes; the one has all that makes life worth living; the other, deprived through economic conditions, of the training of school and home, knows only suffering and privation. To such children as those, the name “America” does not symbolize freedom, liberty and happiness, but rather an eternal round of misery and woe. It is for these unfortunate toilers who are responsible for neither their birth nor their condition of existence that 1 beg to he heard today. I do not speak to you as a Republican, a Democrat, or a Socialist: but as a law-abiding citizen of a beneficent democracy whose fundamental aim is justice, I plead in behalf of those thousands of unhappy American children who have l een deprived of their God-given rights. Page One hundred sixty-one1917 Iris 1917 We proudly boast of America as the land of promise. We proclaim it the land of equality. We sing of it as the land of the free and the home of the brave. In our complacence, we look with horror upon oppression in foreign land and ignore the actual state of affairs existing in our own industrial world. To our shame be it said that in this boasted land of equality there are bonded baby slaves; that in this great American Republic, dedicated to freedom and justice, there are children who are denied the common right of breathing pure air. At the present time, forty of our forty-eight states have child labor laws. But our national child labor committee reports that there is not one state whose endeavors to enforce these laws have been even approximately successful. This committee, however, commends Wisconsin by saying that she has enforced her laws the most efficiently. The majority of the states have merely placed the laws upon their statute books and have made no provision for their enforcement. This alone should prove the need for national regulation. But as soon as we ask to protect further the suffering children of this nation by federal law, many people object upon the ground that such a remedy would be attacking the “doctrine of state rights.” In answer to this objection, I wish to ask how the hog cholera that appeared in the Middle West was checked. Did the advocates of state rights object to having congress attempt to suppress the disease? No! they turned toward Washington ami begged Uncle Sam to come to the rescue with all the knowledge and devices he could muster to fight the plague. Without one opposing voice, every one of these states immediately demanded national intervention to stamp out the cholera. Upon the demand, our obliging congress hurried to pass, and our president hastened to sign a bill appropriating five hundred thousand dollars to suppress the contagion, and no one questioned whether it was wholly within the province of the United States to give such protection. Since such protection is afforded by our Federal Government to the thirty million swine, is it any less reasonable that protection should be afforded to the thirty million children of this nation, the children who have not the foresight to realize that their future is being blighted forever? Then, too, our Government has already spent more than two million dollars in fighting the hoof and mouth disease of cattle. It has never spent so much in its entire history in fighting the child labor evils, yet every year factories, mines, mills, and quarries sap the very life from more than a hundred thousand children. But we say this cannot be stopped because it would be at variance with that precious doctrine of “state rights.” It is true that our last congress placed a law upon our nation’s statute books, for the purpose of protecting American children who have begun the struggle for a livelihood. But many people who have been laboring for the betterment of helpless little children have said that the present child labor law is one in name only. Judge Lindsay, a man well capable of making comment upon the present law, says: “If the United States is to continue her leadership among the nations of the world, it is imperative that she protect her own children, and she can do this in but one way, by passing and enforcing a real child labor law, or constitutional amendment.” Judge Lindsay further asserts that our present child labor law is but an empty form, for it does not. and it will not prohibit the evil. It merely prohibits products derived from child labor from interstate commerce for a period of thirty days after manufacture. This thirty-day clause has revealed itself as a joker to all who have given the present law earnest consideration. The law has been re-named the “Warehouse Act,” for, instead of prohibiting child labor, it merely requires that Page One hundred sixty-two1917 Iris ■ ■ 1917 goods produced by the children shall be stored for thirty days before they are placed on the interstate market. The ease by which the present law can be evaded makes it obvious that until Congress shall pass a child labor law which shall contain no loop-holes open to the corporations who put gain above the rights of youth, the crime of child slavery will be permitted to continue; Pennsylvania breaker boys will be left sitting over the coal chutes, picking slate from the coal ns it rushes down the great troughs in a steady stream; our Wisconsin furnaces will continue to burn the coal stained by the bleeding fingers of the breaker boys. Imagine, if you can, a boy sitting in a coal mine, imprisoned within the depths of the earth, without a single ray of sunlight, inhaling the air laden with coal dust, anticipating no bright future, and feeling no joy, but experiencing the same grind from day to day. Could you expect him under such circumstances to sing with inspiration and joy, “My Country Tis of Thee, Sweet Land of Liberty?” We speak of the horrors of war; God knows they are real. But we are unaware of the horrors in our American coal mines. Only a few weeks ago one of the Pennsylvania breaker boys fell into the coal chute, over which he was working, and was carried away with the coal. Upon reaching the breakers he was crushed before the eyes of his fellow-workers. There was merely a cry of terror and agony. The great machine went on. This is not an exceptional case. In the annual report of our national child labor committee, I find that there were two hundred boys killed in the coal mines of this country in the year nineteen hundred and fifteen. Of what value are our exports and dividends if they come from these treasons against God? From the time the doors are closed behind the children of the cotton mills in the morning, those little ones are denied all music, color, fragrance and beauty of flowers, or harmony of landscape. Instead there is the unceasing vibration of the great machinery and the din of its operation. Those children literally sense nothing but vibration. They forget speech and in the roar of the operation can only beckon dumbly one to another like mutes. “This new slavery of the mills is worse than the old slavery of the cotton fields, for the negro of the old days was well fed and sheltered; he did his work under the open skies singing as he toiled, and finding time to weave out of his mystic brain a wild balladry and a poetic folklore. But the mill slavery of the white children of today sucks life dry of all vigor and joy.” By a peculiar change of circumstances it is now the white babies who must weave into usable form the cotton which the Civil War declared must not l e picked by the black as a slave. It is now the child of our own blood that is in bondage, while the little darkey is out in the cotton fields under the open sky. It is a recognized fact that child labor is likewise a curse to the adult. The child underbids the man. The father competes with his own child. Thus justice to the children will mean justice to the adult wage-earners. Here, within our own state, whose motto is “Forward,” in our cities, little children are permitted to work for a low wage and from ten to fourteen hours per day. This very evening, while we are comfortably seated here in this room, there are thousands of children who are wandering the streets of our cities, suffering from hunger and cold. There are pale-faced little boys, scantily clad, standing on the streets calling, “Papers! Papers!” There are little night messengers becoming acquainted, in the performance of their duties, with the evil sights of the dramshop and the brothel. There are thousands of children who have no other shelter than the dark damp basements in which they must eat, sleep and work. For a moment let us consider the curse of the sweatshop which prevails in many of our tenement settlements. Page One hundred sixty-three1917 Iris 1917 Will America, richest of all nations, ignore suffering childhood? Will America, known as the world’s treasure-house, say, “We are unable to protect our children,” and then immediately turn to her Congress and ask it to appropriate five hundred thousand dollars to dredge some remote creek? The condition of little children in the mines of Pennsylvania, in the canning factories of the Middle West, in the cotton mills of the South, and in the sweatshops and streets of all cities, mutely protests against such appropriations. Let us urge Congress to strive to realize the true significance of our country’s ideal of political and industrial equality: to take measures to develop a sturdy race of Americans comparable to our forefathers. Let us urge our Senators ami Kepro-sentatives to break at once the shackles of this new slavery and to emancipate our two million child slaves. Only thus shall we grant to the thousands of unhappy American children their inherent rights, only thus shall we be able to uphold our standards of democracy; only thus shall we obey the divine decree for mercy and justice. FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION. With the increasing Interest which is manifested from year to year in forensic lance. These activities, representing as they do the entire school, should of course be financed by the entire school. Up to the present year membership In the association has been purely voluntary, with the result that the association was always hampered by lack of funds. This school year the plan was Inaugurated of financing the association by a fee of fifty cents collected from each student at the time of enrollment at the beginning of each semester. This has worked very well. It has not only enabled the association to take care of its financial obligations as they have arisen, but it lias made it possible for students to enjoy various entertainments either free or for a nominal sum. Under this plan students have enjoyed free the following entertainments during the year: "The Mawson motion pictures, and accompanying lectures, dealing with the Antarctic regions: the plays "What Happened to Jones" and "Disraeli." In addition the following entertainments were given to which a special admittance price was made to students holding the oratorical association tickets. Professor Dennis In popular readings: the Theobaldl Concert Company: Caul's "Holy City”: and others. Following Is a statement of the financial transactions for the year to date: Fees from students ...............................................................$60JMJ5 Prof. Ames, refund from Mawson Pictures............................................ 22.59 Money paid to Helen Hudson from the Theobaldl fund.................................. 2.00 Ileposlted in First National Hank................................................. 4.25 Total Amt. of Receipts.......................................................$638.49 Expenditures: By check No. 1 to First Nat. Bank in payment of Joint note given by Ames.......... Delzell. and Watson .......................................................$118.07 To Lee Keediek, payment for Mawson Pictures....................................... 100.00 To Gazette in payment of printing bill............................................. 12.50 To E. T. Smith to cover expense of "What Happened to Jones......................... 33.00 Alex Krembs Drug Co. for secretary books...............................................20 Helen Hudson for service account for Theobaldl...................................... 2.00 Stevens Point Journal for printing................................................. 13.00 Festival account deficit on Prof. Dennis Reading................................... 19.00 Joseph B. Taylor, Treas. Wis. Oratorical Association dues.......................... 30.00 French. Campbell for account book......................................................75 Postage and insurance on pennants sent to River Falls..................................09 Prudentia Woodward In payment of 9 paces In Iris for Oratorical Association.... 50.00 K. T. Smith, balance of appropriation of $40.00 made him account of plays......... 7.00 Otto Hacher ami .1. W. Hull. exi ensex to River Falls.............................. 24.00 Total expenditures ..........................................................$409.00 Total receipts .............................................................. 638.79 Balance .....................................................................$229.18 Page One hundred sixty-four1917 ■ Iris V 7 07 7 .Martin Paulson Otto Baches Charlotte President Vice President Nachtwey Secretary David Swartz Treasurer The Debates The four debates in which Stevens Point contested this year with Superior, River Falls, Oshkosh and Eau Claire were of exceptional interest. They were enjoyable not only because of the success of our school, but also because each of our compulsory military training should be established in the I'nited States.” The first preliminary contest was held in the auditorium December 10. 1916, to select a team from the Junior class to debate the Junior team of the Oshkosh Normal School. Twelve capable young men and women participated in this debate. They were: Lucile Hanan, Ethel Jones, Frank Dicdrich, Alice Wcingarten, Anna Russell. Angie Sheldon, Charles Nelson, Clara Wilhelm. Jennie Anderson, Tilden Moe. Ida Brevad, and Henry Beglinger. Every speaker presented a strong, forceful argument. The judges’ decision named Henry Beglinger, Ida Brevad, Tilden Moe. and Jennie Anderson as representatives of our school. The Junior debate occurred at Oshkosh March 30, 1917. A delegation of about twenty loyal boosters accompanied the team. The decision resulted as we all hoped and expected it would—a unanimous decision in favor of Stevens Point. This makes three successive years that we have received a unanimous decision in the Junior Debate with Oshkosh. On the evening of February 19th, the Misses Nachtwey. Jones, Weingarten. Gleason, Geimer, and Blood, and the Messrs. King, Paulson. Bacher, Whitmer, Nelson, Peterson, Rybicke, Gilson, and Ambrose appeared in a contest for places on the Eau Claire and the Triangular Teams. Thomas King, Charlotte Nachtwey. Gladys Blood, and John Ambrose (alternate) were selected as members of one of the triangular teams to meet the River Falls team. Otto Bacher, Charlie Nelson, William Gilson and A. P. Peterson (alternate) were chosen to make up the other triangular team to debate Superior. Paul Paulson, Alice Weingarten, Magdaline Geimer, and Ethel Jones (alternate) were chosen as the team to contest with the Eau Claire team. Our able coaches were Messrs. Ames. Smith, Watson and Swartz. Page Ont hundred sixty-five1917 Iris 1917 Eau Claihe Team Junior Team Page One hundred sixty-six1917 Iris m ■ 1917 Triangular Team—Superior Triangular Team—River Falls Pa e One hundred sixty-seven1917 Iris 1917 Primary Officers Dei.ma Padoiiam President Evelyn Horf.i. Sec. and Treas. Madeline Reyes Vice-President Page One hundred sixty-eight 1917 I r is 1917 Page One hundred sixty-nine1917 Iris 1917 Primary Juniors Abli, Kathryn Anderson, Frances Babler, Viola Bacon, Mildred Bart let, Celia Brooks, Mildred Cummings. Evelyn Car ley, Amy Crossman, Elsie Duscnberry, Grace Eichler, Hazel Felling, Elvira Frogner, Hulda Fulton, Margaret Gillet, Nola Goder, Frances Grant, Mary Hanson, Grace Hanson, Luella Huntley, Lillieth Herman, Mildred Hirzy, Regina Hudson, Helen Ziebell, Johnson, Pearl Ki(linger, Beulah Lien, Sylvia La Haie, Vivian Lombard, Ruth Moberg, Hulda Misner, Emma Meyer. Hattie Martin, Sarah Martin, Bernice Means, Zelda McCallum, Lillian Paap. Ella Rogers, Flora Belle Stewart, Audrey Shampnor, Helen Smith, Lola Skelly, Mary Slocum, Kathleen Sorenson, Esther Williard, Bernice Willette, Fern Willey, Addie Florence Page One hundred seventyFrank S. FIyer Principal of the Training School Page One hundred seventy-one1917 Iris 1917 Tke Training School Twenty-six years ago, when the Stevens Point Normal School first came into existence, the training school consisted of three departments. The grammar department was composed of the seventh and eighth grades, the intermediate department of the fourth, fifth and sixth grades, and the primary department, of the first, second and third grades. Mrs. Marv I). Bradford, present City Superintendent of Racine, Wisconsin, was supervisor of practice, and she had three critic teachers to assist her in the training department. The total enrollment of children at that time, was one hundred sixty-five, and there were fifteen student teachers who made up the first group in practice. To-day the training school, under the supervision of Mr. Frank S. liver, is composed of three departments; the grammar department, the primary department, and the kindergarten. The grammar and primary departments each consist of four grades. Mr. Hyer is at present assisted by seven critic teachers, a supervisor of music and drawing who gives her whole time to the work of the training school, and a kindergartner who has charge of the kindergarten which is located in the Garfield school within two blocks of the Normal School. The training school faculty consists of: Miss Bertha I). Goodyear Miss Winifred Nelson... Miss Nina Nichols....... Miss Ellen Burk......... Miss Edith Whitney...... Miss Prudence Outright.. Miss Agnes Morrissy..... Miss Elba Slater........ Miss Etta Bowstead...... ..........8th grade ..........7th grade ..........6th grade ..........5th grade _____3rd-4th grades .....lst-2nd grades .....lst-2nd grades Music and Drawing ......Kindergarten There are two hundred ninety-five children enrolled in the training school at the present writing, and during this, the third quarter, there are over two hundred practice teachers. It is of interest to note that no city school superintendent in Wisconsin, outside of the city of Milwaukee, has the supervision of as many teachers as Mr. Hyer. Mr. Hyer came to the training school eight years ago after serving five years as a teacher of professional subjects in our Normal School. He came to the Normal School with a number of years’ successful experience in training school, and city school work. During the past eight years, he has made many improvements in the training school, and has made a record not only for the department, but for himself which is far more than state wide, as is made evident by the number of rails that come to him for institute work, and addresses before state teachers asso-ciations, both from within Wisconsin and from many places in other states. Our primary department is noted for the work in phonics and in reading, the development of which has had the interest and active support of the supervisor. The observation room which has become a factor in the training of teachers, is unique. It affords the students of the Normal School an opportunity for observation of class work done by both the supervisor, ami the critic teachers. Mr. Hyer attempts, in his own work as a teacher, to exemplify the high ideals which he endeavors to inspire in us as students, and those of us who have seen his work have been inspired to carry into our school his oft repeated injunction. “Lead your children to think.” Page One hundred seventy-tno1917 V Iris V 2 7 Practice Teachers Grammar Grade Teachers Primary Teachers Page One hundred seventy-three1917 V Iris V 1917 Gpammak Grade Children PrIM ARY CHILDREX Page One hundred seventy-four1917 Iri. 1917 eMCflTIOCIflL oeflsaReneciT Frvnk S. Hyrk Instructor Baxter, Clara Beglinger. Henry A. Chapman, Gladys Clark, Lydia Crowns, Ruth Diederich, Frank C. Eichsteadt, Esther CLASS ROLL Gil more. Gretchen Griffin, Elsie Hanson, Sena V. Morel, Evelyn Loomis, Leila Long, Sam Marsh, Herbert Morley, Clyde Morrissey. Mae Xeuwald. Adolph Pagel, Elfrieda Ross, Ruth Schroeder, Lillian Woodward, Prudentia IT. Zuehlke. Milda Page One hundred seventy-five1917 ■ Iris nD" 1917 Sena Hanson Soo. Lydia Clark Pres. Sam I-ono Tress. TKe Educational Measurement Club When word reached our school that State Superintendent Cary had added to his force an expert in school measurements in the person of Mr. Theisen, Ph.I)., we found our interest in the development of this new field for research greatly stimulated. Profs. Hyer and Spindler spent a week in Madison where they met with representatives from the other normal schools of the state for the purpose of discussing the problem of standardizing measurements. Later Mr. Hyer extended an invitation to interested students to meet him for an informal discussion of educational measurements. Out of this informal meeting there came into existence on organization known as the Educational Measurement Club composed of twenty-two members who have met on Thursday at 3:15 and have devoted their time to the work without any thought of credit. These members have considered not only the theoretical side of this work but they have also worked out actual tests. Some of the members were invited to help make a survey of the city schools in company with Supt. Snyder, Dr. Theisen and Mr. Hyer; others have gone out into neighboring schools and given tests. Material written by teachers in institutes conducted by Mr. Hyer and specimens in writing collected from graded schools from this locality under the direction of Prof. Spindler at the request of Dr. Theisen has given opportunity for work in tests of a varied nature. The Club likewise has familiarized itself with practically all the material used in conducting tests by the foremost investigations in this interesting field. Some members have made a study of special tests and have reported for the benefit of the Club; some have written their final theses on the subject of ed uca t i on a 1 measu remen ts. Pagt One hundred seventy-six1917 Iris 1917 Stevens Point Normal Banquet On November 2, 1916, the Stevens Point Normal banquet was held at the Republican House in Milwaukee. Among the alumni who attended were: P. A. Carlson.... Winnie Delzell___ Prudence Outright. Frances Bannach.. Marion Bannach... Mary Hanna....... Maud E. Brewster. Alfred Herrick.... J. H. Ames....... Mary Carroll..... E. R. Moxon..... J. W. Wheeler.... G. L. Whittingham J. M. Jaastad.... Paul Schanen..... G. M. Glennon____ Lillian McDermid. Winnifred Nelson., Duncan H. Reid... Edith Hartwell--- Alma Warnecke____ ... Manitowoc Stevens Point .Stevens Point .Stevens Point .. .Gays Mills ......Manawa Stevens Point .Stevens Point ... River Falls .Grand Rapids ........Elroy .....Medford ,.... C'ogocena —Eau Claire .....Amherst ___Milwaukee Grand Rapids Stevens Point .....Montello .. .Milwaukee .....Madison Page One hundred seventy-seven1917 ■ E Iris ■ 1917 Visits of the Alumni Earl Moxon visited the Normal, Monday, December 18, 1916. Isabelle Boyles, a graduate of 1916, visited the Normal, January 4, 1916. Georgia Stock ley, ’16. visited the Normal during the early part of the term. She is a teacher in one of the Wausau Schools. Lorraine Oster, April Ellis. ’16. Daisy Dill, ’16. Esther Kriskey, ’16. and Jean Houseman, ’ 16, visited during the first part of the year. Miss Hazel Menier, a member of the class of 1916, is teaching the Montessori method under Miss Helen Parkhurst in New York City. Donald Hay, class of M3, is attending the University of Wisconsin this year. Arthur Murphy, class of M4, is teaching in the Marshfield High School. Miss Bernice Blunt, class of ’16. was awarded first prize in the essay contest, conducted by the W. C. T. U. of Wisconsin. Miss Sarah Mooers, class of M3, and Mr. Arthur Pott, a member of the Stevens Point Normal faculty, were married, December 23, 1916. Mr. Pott is instructor in agriculture at the Normal. Friends of Miss Mona Boot, class of 1915, were shocked to hear of her death, December 17, 1916. Mrs. Cassandra Thrasher, class of ’01. is a member of the faculty of the Wausau nigh School. She is an instructor in the commercial department. Miss Prudence Outright conducted a primary teachers’ institute at Marion. Wisconsin, December 1, 1916. Page Otic hundred seventy-eight1917 Iris 1917 Honor Roll 1st Semester 1916-191 The following students received 90% or above in all subjects during this semester (Gymnasium excepted), and are therefore entitled to mention as “EX- CELLENT.” HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS' DEPT. Bauer, Lydia... Boston, Marjorie Cone, Hattie----- HefTron, Pearl.. .....Wevauwoga . .Stevens Point .......Marshall . .Stevens Point Wilhelm, Clara. Nine women. Hill, Blanche... Hill, Violet.... Jacobs, Louise.. Ostrum, Avada. ......Marshfield .. Weyauwega . .Cumberland Stevens Point ....Hancock GRAMMAR GRADE TEACHERS' DEPT. Clark, Lydia...........Stevens Point Jacobsen, Karen----- Gates, Blanche...........Neillsville Kurkowska, Sophelia Gross. Faith...........Stevens Point Rice, Mrs. Jennie... Horn. Minnie..................Barron Wiley. Harley B----- Seven women—one man. ......Withee .....Amherst Stevens Point .....Hancock PRIMARY TEACHERS' DEPT. Hanson. Luella...............Iola Paap. Ella.............Weyauwega Hudson. Helen.......Stevens Point Wiley, Ada...............Hancock Four women. RURAL SCHOOL TEACHERS' DEPT. Colby, Dorothy..............Adams Liepert, Clara.............Unity Gordon, Gladys......Stevens Point Rozell, Lucy..........Plainfield Four women. ACADEMIC COURSE Bialoznyska. Helen..Stevens Point Peterson. Martha..........Milladore Baughman. Theresa....Stevens Point Three women. SPECIAL Ilartleb, Eleanor......,....................................Milwaukee Page One hundred seventy-nine1917 Iris m ■ 1917 Honorable Mention The following students attained an average of 90% or above in all subjects for the first semester, 1916-1? (Gym excepted), and are entitled to Honorable Mention for this semester: High School Teachers' Dept. Hums. Charles....................Stevens Point Buswell, Ituth......................Iola Card. Geo.................Stevens Point Eichinger, Amies..........Stevens Point Empey, Helen..............Stevens Point Puller, Zella.............Grand Rapids Hamaeheek, Antoinette ........Kewaunee Hartl, Marguerite ............Auburndale Luminal. Bernice .............Marshfield Kelley. Esther..................Marshall Meeckler, Marie ..............Marshfield Russell, Anna ....................Almond Schoonover. Blanche ..........Lone Rock Sehadewald. Henry................Stevens Point 8chroeder, Helen ................Augusta Sheldon. Angie ...................Almond Chlllrud, (irace ............Scandinavia 14 women—3 men Grammar Grade Teachers' Dept. Anderson, Jennie.................Conover Anderson. Luther ............Scandinavia Blodgett. Warren ..............Weyauwega Blood, Gladys ............Stevens Point Elehsteadt, Esther .......Port Edwards Hanson, Grace B.....................iola Ijirson, Alma ....................Norrie I .oh rev. Leona .................Algoma Morley. Clyde......................White Creek Nagle. Eel a ......................Waldo Pafitz. Elsie .............Stevens Point Qulnnell, Ada ..................Columbia 10 women—2 men Primary Teachers' Dept. Bartelt, Celia .................Kenosha Brevad. Ida ..................Menomonie Klchler. Hazel ............Independence Vtregner, Hulda .............Park Falls Hanson, Sena .................Greenwood Herman. Mildred ..............Sheboygan Huntley. Lllleth ...............Mosinee La Budda. Bertha ........Stevens Point Lindahl. Elizabeth ......Grand Rapids Ross. Ruth ..............Stevens Point Slocum. Kathleen .................Warren Zuehlke, Mllda.................Weyauwega 12 women Home Economics Dept. Blum, Edith ..................Monticello ( arisen. Hazel .................Xecedah Donnelley, Bernadette .........Marinette Evans, Eunice ....................Racine Fontaine. Ituth ..........Grand Rapids Harland, Esther ................Marshall Hart. Irene .....................Glldden Hills, Stella .................Weyauwega Hubboll, Helen G............Beaver Dam Jenney. Irene ...................Waupaca Klelst, Ruth ............... West Allis Mat he, Maude ....................Almond Routheau, Tina ...................Oconto Post. Leona ........................Sauk City Young. Beatrice ..................Barron Zlinmerli. Marie .................Monroe 16 women Rural School Teachers' Dept. Birr. Margaret ... Bound. Frances . Colby, Irene....... Dixon. Sarah ------ Fritz, Edith ...... Gruber, Margaret Helgoland. Lenora Koehler, Frieda .. Mase. Eunice .... Nowak. Clara ... Simonsen. Palmer Straka. Theresa . Struve. Almira ... Vitcak, Bernice ... Winegarten. Alice 15 women ..........Oconto .......Plainfield . .........Adams .........Portage .......Belleville ......Plainfield Harmony, Minn. .... Black Creek ...Stevens Point ...Stevens Point .........Bonduel ...........Anlwa .........Humbird ... Stevens Point ...Stevens Point Academic Teachers Dept. Cartmill, Mayme ................Ste ens Point Gibbons. Catherine..............Stevens Point Gerzeskowlak. Ladislaus ........Wayside Harmon. Marjorie ...............Mondovi 4 women Page One hundred eighty7 97 7 V Irit V 7 97 7 President.............Elizabeth K. Mathie Vice-President...............Helen Mohr Secretary.............Dorothy Van Ilecke Treasurer.................Grace E. Hanson Director........Miss Mabelle M. Shelton Page One hundred eighty-one1917 V Iris V i9i7 First Soprano Etta Claire Bowstead Marjorie F. Boston Lillian McC'allum Elizabeth K. Mathie Helen Mohr Frances Von Neupert Helen Hudson Delma Padghom Ruth Ross Margaret Van Hecke Hattie Weltman Second Soprano Elizabeth A. Alpine Grace E. Hanson Helen E. Hanan Elsie Hill Ruth Lombard Harriet Pinkerton Jessie Tavlor Page One hundred eighty-t%vo1917 V Iris V 7 92 7 Firs .4 Mo Blanche Gates Helen Henderson Esther Logren Esther A. Kelly Dorothy Van Ilecke .Jannette Van Ilecke Mabel Johnson Elizabeth Thompson Second Alto F. Susan Bannister Mildred Brooks Marguerite V. Hartl Mae Belle ITeisig Frances Coder Page One hundred eighty-three1917 V Irit V 2 92 7 GILL CLUB 0»r hundred eighty-four1917 Iris 1917 C. Nelson Pros. E. J. Waterman Director I.. Shali.bf.ko Student Leader M. Rybycki Page One hundred eighty-five1917 %B Iris V 2 92 7 Glue Club Page One hundred eighty-six1917 Iris m m 1917 First Annual Minstrel Skow GrOen by the Normal Glee Club April, 16th, iqi7 Directed by E. J. Waterman FIRST ACT Court Room of the African Nation. SECOND ACT Scence 1:—Plantation and home of a southern gentleman. Time: Noon. Scene 2:—Same as scene 1: Barbecue and celebration. Time: Night. CAST IN FIRST ACT King .......................................................................T. King Court Poet .................................................................Moleski Princes: I.. Shallberg. G. Strom. M. R.vbycki. A. Held. H. Leonard. C. Carver. L. Oat rum. E. Clements. Orchestra ..................................................................C. Nelson Army ........................................................S. Sigurdaon, II. Jensen Courtiers: O'Keefe. Precourt. Mollitt. Pierce. Tovey. Lambert. Vaughn. Wysoeki. Morley, J. Hull. CAST IN THE SECOND ACT Southern Gentleman.....................................................T. King Son..........................................................................L. Shallberg Butler ...............................................................L. Ostrum Mammy ........................................................................? W. Wilson....................................................................E. Clements Cotton Pickers: O'Keefe. Preoourt. Pierce. Tovey. Vaughn. Wysoeki. Morley. L. Carver. J. Hull College Glee Club: M. MotHtt. E. Waterman. M. Ilybycki. A. Held. C. Nelson. G. Strom. MUSIC IN' FIRST ACT Opening by the entire club Pray for the Lights to Go Out..............................................1 . Shallberg Here They Come......................................................................Club How’s Everything in Stevens Point?.........................................M. Rybyckl Give Me Back My Letters....................................................M. Rybyckl Mammy’s Little Coal Black Rose.............................................E. Clements Ijiugbing Song...............................................................L. Carver Mn Pickaninny Babe.........................................................L. Ostrum Negro Melodies.................................................................Quartette M. Rybyckl. M. Moffltt. L. Shallberg. A. Held Now Our First Part's Ended..........................................................Club MUSIC IN SECOND ACT Scene I Old Kentucky Home............................. The Lord Am a Coming in a Big Chariot......... Drinking Song................................. Scene II Carry Me Back to Old Virginy Solo ....................... The Preacher and the Bear... Dawning..................... Echoes of the Woodland...... Ending Chorus............... .............Cotton Pickers ............Cotton Pickers E. Waterman and Glee Club .....................Glee Club ..................L. Shallberg E. Clements and Cotton Pickers ................E. J. Waterman .....................Quartette ...............Entire Assembly Page One hundred eighty-seven1917 Iris ■ ■ 1917 Members of the Glee Club President........ Vice-President... Manager.......... Librarian........ Faculty Manager Student Leader.. .. .C. Nelson . .M. Rybicke .. .. G. Strom .. L. Ostrum L. A. Carver .L. Shallberg » o Director........................ Pianists........................ First Tenor M. Rybicke J. Hull V. Vaughn Bari tones L. Shallberg M. Tovey B. Precourt II. Jensen S. Sigurdson E. Waterman .................E. J. Waterman ... .Miss Elba Slater, Carl Nelson Second Tenor L. Ostrum M. Moffet L. A. Carver C. Lc Clair F. Moleskie B. Pierce Basses G. Strom A. Held M. O’Keefe A. Wvsocki H. Leonard T. King Quartet—Messrs. Rybicke, Moffat, Shallberg. Held. Double Quartet—Messrs. Rybicke, Moffet, Carver, Ostrum, Shallberg, Waterman, Held, Strom. The Glee Club The school year of nineteen sixteen saw an added improvement in the Stevens Point Normal Male Glee Club. The Glee Club has had a very successful year and has very good material for the coming year. During the year the club sang at several churches, at General Assembly, and gave a minstrel show, which was written by the members. It is planned to make the show an annual affair, instead of the usual Glee Club concert. The club this year has been directed by E. J. Waterman of the Norami School faculty. Leslie Shalbcrg was elected student leader of the Glee Club, and Miss Elba Slater of the faculty was pianist. Page One hundred eighty-eight1917 Iris 1917 Summer Sckool Concert PART 1 1 “Winter Song”.................................................F. Bullard Glee Club 2 “Sprinkle Me With Kisses”.......................................E. Ball Messrs. Miller, Waterman, Macnish, Hofsoos 3 “On Alpine Heights”.............................................I) Andre Violins, Arthur Bcijcr, Miss Pauline Furmingcr Piano, Miss Annabel Dunlap 4 “A Son of the Desert Am I”......................................Phillips E. J. Waterman 5 Reading.............................“The Mind Cure of Brother Peter Paul Wilson Delzell 6 “Stevens Point Cheer Song”.........................................4 non Glee Club 7 “Song of the Evening Bell’..................................A'. Linders Messrs. Miller, Miller, Vaughn, Waterman, Cove, Macnish, Noble, Beijer 8 “Medley of American National Airs”..........................C. F. Furry Glee Club PART II 1 (a) “Can't Yo' Heah Me Canin'”..................................Trinkaus Glee Club (b) “I)oan Ye Cry Ma Honey”................................F. J. Smith Messrs. Miller, Miller, Van Hecke, Waterman, Cove. Macnish. Noble, Beijer (c) “Little Cotton Dolly”........................................Geibel Glee Club 2 “Ix) e Is Waiting”................................................Squire Mr. A. J. Miller 3 (a) “Mv lady of the Telephone”..................................Gilbert Mr. R. Miller and Club (b) “Keep the Home Fires Burning”...............................Novello A. J. Miller and Club 4 Reading....................................................."Ole Mistis” N. L. Gross 5 Cornet Solo—“Kochanka”.......................................F. E. Noble F. E. Noble G “Auf Wiedersehn”.................................................Romberg Messrs. Miller. Van Hecke, Waterman, Hofsoos 7 (a) “Medley of College Sons”...................................Robinson (b) “The Star-Spangled Banner”...................................Arnold Glee Club Page One hundred eighty-nine1917 V Iris V 1917 Tke Orchestra Page One hundred ninety1917 ■ ■ Iris 1917 The Orchestra Professor Potts T. Hoe........ G. Moxon..... F. Hirzy..... C. Horn...... Nelson..... ......Director .....President Vice-President .....Secretary ----Treasurer .....Librarian The 1916-1917 orchestra of the Stevens Point. Normal School, under the able leadership of Professor Potts, is an unusual success. The matinee dance introduced bv this organization proved very popular with the student body. The music furnished for the dances of the various school organizations has always been appreciated. A like success has been scored in concert music and in accompaniment. The members of the orchestra and the students and faculty as a whole appreciate the efforts of Professor Potts in making the orchestra the success it is. Page One hundred ninety-one1917 Iris 1917 Manual Arts One Hundred ninety-two1917 V Iris V 7 97 7 Page One hundred ninety-three1917 Iris M ■ 1917 Page One hundred ninety-fourC. Burns Edltor-in-Chlef Martin Paulson Business Mgr. POItl TEMfM Page One hundred ninety-five1917 V Iris V 1917 IRI5”5Tflff The 1916 Iris Editor-in-chief.............................. Business Manager............................ Assistant Editor............................. Second Assistant Editor...................... Assistant Business Manager.................. Sales Manager............................... Assistant Sales Manager..................... EDITORS Prudentia II. Woodward .......Adolph Neuwald ............Ida Brevad ............Violet Hill ...........Joseph Pope ..........Arthur Held .........William Gilson Faculty......... Senior.......... Alumni.......... Music........... Rural........... Home Economics. Calendar........ .. Madeline Reyer .....Lydia Clark ____Edith Alford Elizabeth Mathie .Henry Beglinger ... Marion Moore ) Warren Blodgett j Esther Kelley Artist........... Art Staff Cartoonist............Mildred Potter Photographer.....................Ruth Oster Athletics......................Joseph Pope Girls’ Athletics......Hazel Wichern Practice................Frances Lowe Manual Training.........Van Ashmun Jokes............) Charlotte Nachtwey (Hattie Cone ...Mona Hennessey Bertha La Budde Ruth Oster Susan Bannister Gladys Blood Vila Barager Sophelia Kokowski Gretchen Gilmore REPORTERS Arena..............Delma Padgham Forum-Athenaeum......Clyde Morley Ohivesa..............Maude Mathe Y. W. C. A...........Seena Hanson Loyola..........Dorothy Van Hecke Primary Council... .Gretchen Gilmore Dramatic Club......Kathryn Gamin Oratoricals.........Martin Paulson Juniors.............Agnes Eichinger Sophomores.......Blanche Schoonover Freshmen............Margaret Burke Glee Club..........Herman Le Captain Home Economics Club. Nettie Thompson FACULTY ADVISORS Miss Eimer Mr. Ames Mr. Culver Mr. Waterman Page One hundred ninety-sixTflFF PiflC jckTs 1917 V Iris V 2 92 7 Page One hundred ninety-seven1917 V Iris V i7 Page One hundred ninety-eight1917 V Iri V 2 92 7 Page One hundred ninety-nine1917 ■ ■ Iris 1917 SLAMS ?!, -.0 Vc ■ ?% dr C M V rs 1. tt M' °y — 7= PLEASE ro n Qivt me Two aV V £ 77i £ 0 macc To Do I T AGAIN ThE SLA ntr? Page T%so hundred1917 V Iris V i?i7 Page T uo hundred one•JW t»vj NORMAL SCREW DRIVER Vo). Entered a Orst-clas mailer under protest. PUBLI8IIED UNI KH IIIUII PHESSIHE Jly Mull Jeff. CANNED TDK (" .AH AND TDK BARD IN KM Intent New from tbe Kront War GREAT SCANDAL! ! How Awful! Oh! How Awful! Mr. CoHIm: You are a funny girl. Mnrgarllc Haiti: Honest. Mr. Collin . I'm uo half as funny aa I look. EXTRA! HIGHWAY ROBItERY. November Morn. The IiIIIk lie naked III the breeze. The Arid unfrocked. Hare are the limb of nil Hie trees. No wonder llie com was shocked. HOARDING HOUSE ROMANCE! ! ! WELL KNOWN RESIDENT OP THE STEVENS POINT SCHOOL STRANGELY AFFECTED BY WEIRD SIGHT. Ike Neuwalil saw u face on the screen In 1 illKtit A he al III the movie how: Ami It held him fnxt In the hurUxI past, A girl that he u ed to know. He «aw the light In her shilling eyes A she noted with | ep and da h: Shea a movie star where the bright lights are: When he knew her she Juggled the hash. (River Falls. Adolph). GREAT DATES OF HISTORY. Famous lie House Raid ‘17. Scene: Stewart's home. Luther Anderson discovered elaborately feeding his face. I .ester Peterson: Luther! haven't you any bringing up? Luther: Nolle. I cot an appetite. HOBO MALARIA. Myles Thompson: Doctor. I wonder wluits wrong with me? I oetor: Well, what’s the matter with you? M. T.: Tlial's what I want to know. Doctor: Do you eat well? M. T.: Yea. I eat well, sleep well, and foot well, hut I have mi nintdtlon to work. Dodor: Hobo Malaria. Sixty mlnute« of Calculus each morning tiefon- break-fast will lake away that appetite. Scene: Ph »iology Cla ». Mias Cooper: (calling roll) Min Doty. Miss Doty: (who has been cramming Chemistry) Hello! The Theft Solved At Lost. Day after day we hare weu merry, light-lira rtixl students wandering along the way leading from the assembly door to the musk- room. They were happy, smiling nml Jingling money. Time and time again we have noticed them return with down troilden expressions upon their faces, carrying is-rhap a small bunch of I«i|s-r or a new 3 Inch |s-ni-ll and Jingling no money. The faeulty have eyed tills mystery with suspicion. At Inst by a donation from the ‘•Pointer” two Scotland Yard Ik-tectlvcs were hired from Junction City. These plaid clothes men were noticed day after day leaning against the bannister hut to no avail: they could iwit lind cause for the dlxap-(s-arance of the Jingling money. On March 27 Tewle Debacc laid down SO cents for a 3 inch is-ncll. Turning away from the counter she yelled. "Gee Wbls! this darn counter Is a highway robber.” Mystery sol veil at last. 1917 V Iris V 1917Pact TV hunjtrj tkrtt Nov. 7 Senior Clam begin pork barrel |K IUiC . Friday. Krt, 2. Johnaoo come to rlua Clam dbaabwd. Marx li 0. Spring bouse cirailing. Nral and Airs miming. Mart'll Itl. Ikry And a girl twit------In Itlvrr Falla Man'll 30. Harold Scribner try to get drunk on four root beer . Mnr.li 3340. Maxlr attrndn civic’ . (Ilchold ’(««» the laid work of the quarter). March ‘M. lecture on the wild life In thr assembly room. April 2. Midge' ITlc rnll ta In thr cavalry. WHY PRACTICE TEACHERS HAVE OKAY IIAIK. Some Heat from Thrlr Patient. —Ttir difference between the Savagery nnd ImrberUm are a Savager I one who let bl hair grow wild. (Mike Ityblcke) a barbarian I one who aliave hi dome all except one tiu h no bl enemy can lift III roof." “A protognr la a ort of confusion of the play." COMPOSITION "Tlte akin I a layer of meet with hole In for perapu ration and hair which tirautIDe tlie complexion the body should have a certain amount of clotlui a feller skin should be washed dally or else dirt will get Into the pours of his meet." ADVICE TO THE 1A VKIA KN. Ih-wr Mlm llel|iafelloW :— 1 have a young man friend who la devoted to me. but he laefca pep. How can I wake him up? I.unlet. Take a strong pin. with the aid of a vis , bend It to a right angle. Place It In hi favorite chair. When he arrive , put a good distance betwevu him aud yourself and watch the awakening. Dear Mlm llel|«fellow: My heart I broken. A girl I thot was true to me winked at Stanley tlllcziiiskl. Wliat can I do to regain Hie love of thl tiewitiiilng dame. Frank IHetrkli. Aiqdy to the II. B. IMS. If they cannot help you iswlbly the Manuel Training Dept, may lend you some glue to mend It. iN-nr Ml llelimfellow:— My gentleman friend who wa very ■hair to me ha dlNOonllnucd hi Ntudle In thr Steven Point Normal School. Ilr ha taken away all the love which I had. lie I now working In the | i| er mill nnd I do mil ee him n often a I used to. My dear Ml llel|iafellow Isn't there any way In which I could induce him not to work there any more no Hint lie could lie with me? Hoping you will try aud mend my broken heart. I remain. Hazel W. Choo-w a dark moonlm night. Find out the route be take . Hire Mr. WatMon ■ ml Mr. Fairchild and the Arcade Ford lo assist you and then lie In wait for him In a dark place. When he cornea along, nnd hag him. (the sandbag having tieeti previously prc|iarvd In the II. K. Dept.) put him In n «lark room for the night, with Mr. Fairchild and Mr. Wat. Mai to guard him. (Jo home and In the morning we guarantee that he will be a meek a a day-old Walrua and you can ►•ad him back lo arhool easily. Hear Mlm IlcIpafelUnr }— I am In ileei (rouble. Please advise •ue. I am dee|dy In love with two young men. They have sensitive nature and since (he announcement conccrtillng "Wild life In the general assembly." they refuse to iqieml more than rt free |ierlods In (here with me. Ob what shall I do???? Mary I have lain awake Iwo night |Kinder lug over jxair problem, a It Interested me greatly. The only adv! e I can offer la fur you to retire to the assembly room, carefully pin a blanket over each win-■low. You will thu make yourself happy ami be rendering oilier a service. I tru t von will have no further trouble. Hear Ml Helpafrllow:— lbxnu c of the prevailing style of millinery. which cover up the moat of a girl's face. I aiu continually worried for fear I shall make a dale with Ihe wrong girl. Advl c me. Max. Ilefore making a date, make a harp quick nol e. She may Jump enough to knock Hie lial off: llien you will he able to recognize her. 1917 V Iris V 19171917 Iris 1917 Heard Here and There A Junior ran into the office. Mr. Spindler was there. "I want to go to Madison the worst way,” lie fumed. "Go by the Portage branch then,” growled Spin; "that’s the worst way i know of.” Miss Hussey in English Lit.: "Sir Walter Raleigh wrote the history of the world, while in prison before he was beheaded.” Prudentia: A motion to adjourn is in order. Charlotte: Second the motion. Sid to Mary: Would you like a pet monkey? Mary: Oh! This is so sudden. John Martini: Well, I guess I’m the flower of the family. R —© —: Is that what your brother meant when he called you a bloomimr idiot.? h Lillian McCallum: Do you know you are the first Ripon fellow I’ve met? don’t believe I know a Single Ripon fellow. Max: I’m single. Miss Jennings at Mr. Spindler’s door: “Is Howard Abrahamson there?” Spin.: “Haven’t seen him for weeks” (After door doses) “Is he here?” (sr oc ) L QH1 OCCopaT ions Shallv Tozier Anderson (Luther) Neuwald Dietrich Bacher Young Shad Flanagan Lallv Ukie Neale King Ellis Rybicke Spin (sometimes) Sid Tilden Allan Ron t beaux Stew I Page T uo hundred four1917 Iris 1917 Cabbage, is vrt ABt frtovD or nun G HEADS Highest Developed Organizations in S. P. hJ. ASPIRING YOUNG LAWYERS CLUB First requisite: Every member must have a “case.” Motive: Holding court without a jury. Motto: Just look devoted: never pass a sentence. Office: Any place from old assembly room up to the Pal. High Chief Courter: Janies Murphy. Assistant Chief Courter: Sidney Eagleburger. Secretary: Henry Shadcwald. Treasurer: Fuzzy Martini. Sergeant-at-Arms: Billy Gilson. Live IFire Members Martin Paulsen Ethan Peterson John Martini Lester Peterson Earle Chalk Maxic Giedlinski Russel Skinner James Hull Black Balled Members Stanley Gliezinski David Hirtz Henry Beglinger Carl Nelson Faculty Members E. J. Waterman Ia»o Carver Walter Smith Disciples of Old Prince Albert Motto: Smoke, Smoke, Smoke, but no firm alarm. Office: Movable. Either in the boiler room, or up on the fourth floor in the room where the storm windows are stored. Sometimes at Atkins’ store. Password : Got a match ? Organizer: Lowie Schroeder. Active Members Harr}- Hertz Leslie Hougen Gordon Love joy Art Held Joe Pope “If tee could stand it" “If she would let me" Members Members Bernard Christenson Leslie Shallberg Clyde Morlev James Murphy Paul Paulsen Del Curtis Sam Long Waterman John Ambrose Scribner Faculty Advisor Mr. Watson Page Two hundred five1917 Iris 1917 To Touck the Hearts of our Poets Two boys set out for S. P. N. All on a September day. One was thick and one was thin— All on a September day. On the Portage Branch they climbed in glee All on a September day. They were fresh and green, as you plainly see, All on a September day. They came (o pity them!) up the walk, All on a September day. With lumps in their throats so they scarcely could talk. All on a September day. In the office, the gruff, bluff voice of Spin. All on a September day. Made the thin one shrink and thick one grow thin. All on a September day. Well, they weathered the siege and are living today. And their faces are glad and their hearts are gay. They wouldn't go home, 0 no, not they! For they fell dead in love with the Normal that day. And all the king’s horses couldn’t pull them away. II. B. C , ’17. Critique Some students fail to realize And not to loaf and hang around. And not to loaf and hang around Or to hold back and shirk. You can see them in the corridor. You can see them on the stair. Neither studying nor talking. Just simply standing there. You can see them in the assembly Many and many a pair. Neither studying, nor talking. .1 ust simply-sitting-t here. Get into the game my friends: Play it all the while. Put your shoulder to the wheel. Then all the world will smile. —Mike, 17. Page Two hundred six1917 Iris 1917 Inseparables Viola and Pete. Bannister and seven or eight men. Mr. Ames and Jeff. Neuwald and “Have you subscribed for the Iris?” Mike and his flower. Miss Eimer and “exquisitely, elaborately grand.” Shally and his smile. Spin and his Psy. Violet and her giggle. Michael and his “Sure” and “Begorra.” Miss Hussey and her motherly look. Miss Jones and her agar-agar. Horn and his elevated eyebrows. Sid and Mary. Mildred M. and her temper. Some time ago a charming Xormalite was given charge of the confectionery stall at a church bazaar. Eventually a middle-aged man was led that way. “They tell me 1 must buy some chocolates,” smiled the victim, picking up a box from the stall. “How much is this?” “Five dollars,” answered Lillian, and never flinched. “Uni,” thoughtfully returned the victim, glancing from the chocolates to the girl, “aren’t you a little dear?” “Well,” coyly enjoined Lillian, shaking her curls, “that’s what all the boys say.” Normalite (writing home): The checks you give me are getting smaller each time. Why is that? .(Extract from letter from father): What can you expect with paper the price it is? Xormalite (also writing home) to room-mate: How do you spell financially? Room-mate: F-i-n-a-n-c-i-a-l-l-y, and embarrassed is spelled with two Ps. ’Twas Ever Thus Page Two hundred seven1917 Iris 1917 Just a Bit o’ Motherly Advice to Class of 1918 Do not drop miscellaneous article down upon the rostrum from elevated heights. Remember the faculty are daily becoming more bald headed. If you have a goat in the school do not ride him to death. Remember that the goat can balk. Likewise, a steady ride becomes tiresome. (Mike was ours.) Do not go into public speaking just for the gaining of a letter. Remember the counter may sell them. Consult the faculty, board of regents, city council, governor of the state, and president of the United States before you choose n motto, and by all means before you elect officers. Practice assembly singing during summer vacation, and for goodness sakes improve over us! Do not mention fussing in any annual or weekly publication. It is at present worn fringy from constant use. What’s in a Name J. F. Sims. Just Fine. Sometimes. F. X. Spindler. Freezes Normal Sports. M. M. Ames. Much Manipulation Alleged. B. M. Allen. Belittles Most Attempts. J. E. Delzell. Just Every Day. Alfred J. Herrick. A Judicious Helper. F. S. Hver. Forever Struggling Hyer (Higher). O. W. Neale. Our Wandering (K)nut. M. Brewster. Many Brains. Mary Bronson. Merry Butterfly. J. V. Collins. Just, Very Calculating. G. I). Corneal. Gol Darned Coach. E. J. Waterman. Everything Just Wonderful. X. R. Gray. Never Rambunctious, Gracious! R. W. Fairchild. Rarely Working Fairy. E. Flannagan. Easy Flunker. Garry E. Culver. Genuine, Engenders Confidence. Bertha Hussey. Beautifully Homelike. Cornelia Luce. Cooking, a Lark. Lulu M. Mansur. Little. Mildmannered. T. A. Rogers. Tinv ami Roguish. E. M. Short. Endeared to Many Students. Primper’s Union Password: Where’s the mirror? Office: Girls’ cloak room. ONLY requirements: Five hundred hair pins and a powder puff. Members: Every girl in school except Burnis Carpenter and Mable Clements. Faculty Advisor: Lost, strayed, or stolen. Page T co hundred eight1917 m m Iris 1917 Why They Come to S. P. N. 1. Ma sent me.—Stanley Gliczinski. 2. My wife made me.—Bellinger. 3. Mr. Sims came after me.—Otto Baeher. 4. Debates, more debates.—Win. Gilson. 5. Well, what would I do?—Lovejoy. 6. Guess!—Virginia Lally. 7. To have more time to sleep.—llougen. 8. 1 am just beginning to find out.—Shadewald. f). For variety.—Hazel Parks. 10. Gee, I dunno.—.Max Giedlinski. 11. Seacli me.—Albert Johnson. Laugh if You Can Charlotte (reporting at Iris meeting): “I have appointed some one in each department to watch for jokes and Pve been watching myself.” (Shout from Iris staff; blank look from Charlotte.) Hugh Leonard: “When rain once falls, does it ever get up again?” Fairy: “Yes. in ‘dew’ time.” Woman is a creature of mood, generally the imperative mood.—Ex. Mr. Smith (in European Historv): “When was Rome built. Mr. Neale?” Glen: “At night.” Mr. Smith: “Where did you get that idea?’” Glen: “I have often heard my father say that Rome was not built in a day.” Mr. Delzell (meeting Mr. Fairchild wheeling a baby cab): “You have your son out airing. I sec.” Mr. Fairchild: “No, 1 have my heir out sunning.” A loud noise was heard in the back of the room during geometry class. Mr. Collins: “Smith, what are you doing?” Ermine Smith: “Oh nothing. Mr .Collins. I simply dropped a perpendicular.” Mr. Sims calling at the cottages found Hazel Wickern playing the victrola. Seating himself he said. “Hawaiian?” “Fine, thank you,” answered Hazel. Spin : “Men are apples.” Ethelyn Wood : “Gosh ! 1 like apples.” Page Two hundred nine1917 Iris m m c 1917 YthBN A FELlOw rt £Ds fffie tD The girls of this normal school Are having their tournament. The boys do not like our rule, For they can’t see the event. When Van was asked to report On basket ball news last week. I thought he could storm a fort. ’Why,” he said, "I can’t even peep.” But such excuses won't go Where you find a studious class. It was up to Van to know. So he had to go and ask. —L. M. K. Itemized Expenditures of Iris Printing.............................................$ .98 Engraving ................................................ 1.28 Cigars for business manager............................ 20(5.00 Binding ................................................... .49 Chewing gum for editor-in-chief.......................... 75.00 Ten trips on Portage branch by business manager... 6.40 Trip to River Falls by editor-in-chief................... 86.23 Armour for joke editors................................. 500.00 Heating for Iris room................................... 622.68 Shoestrings for athletic editor............................ .25 New shoes for bus. mgr................................... 11.49 5 gal. white lead paint for art editor................... 20.00 5 midnight lunches for staff............................... .10 25 games of pool for business manager.................... 25.00 5 packages dates for calendar editor...................... 3.00 Movies for editor-in-chief............................... 30.00 Bribe to keep Stanley Gliczinski from monopolizing Iris................................................ 100.00 $67,889.89 (.03 for gum) (2Vfc pair) (Armenian style) (She had company and had to entertain them somehow) Side money for business manager not accounted for. Page Two hundred ten1917 V Iris V 1917 SEPTEMBER Sept. 18—Act I. Scene 1. The curtain rises on the old time picture; a slow stream of student filing through the office; a crowded corridor; jolly greetings among old students; silent awe and admiration on the part of new ones; with Spin growling viciously over mistakes on enrollment blanks. Sept. 19—Stragglers from the Portage branch and Velvet Special appear for enrollment. No rush. Sept. 20—Welcome to our classrooms and corridors. New students face the faculty line-up for the first time. Sept. 21—Work starts in earnest. The agonized faces of newlies indicate the depth of the impression made by first assignments. Sept. 22—Concert in the Auditorium by courtesy of Prof. Weber. Faculty reception afterward. IIotTsoos, 16, found time to run down from Rosholt for the occasion. No necessity for any fellow dancing a straight program with one girl4. Sept. 25—Blue Monday No. 1. One or two make the mistake of preparing lessons. Sept. 29—Football squad introduced in Assembly. All there but Stewart. Modesty is a noble virtue—Stew, but you’ll get yours yet. Sept. 30—Victory No. 1. S. P. N. 44, Grand Rapids 0. OCTOBER Oct. 4—Officers of the Oratorical Association chosen. President, Martin Paulson; Vice-President, Otto Bacher; Secretary, Alice Brady. The faculty thought it best to appoint Prof. Swartz Treasurer. Oct. 6—Denominational receptions held at the various churches. Oct. 7—St. Norbert’s put one over us in return for their last year’s defeat. Damages— Pope, concussion of the brain; Ellis, broken rib; Murphy, a few scars. Oct. 14—Played Chippewa High mostly for practice and incidentally to get back courage to face River Falls. Oct. 18—Miss Elsie Baker, famous Victrola Contralto, accompanied by the Kalten-born quartet, gave a delightful concert as the opening number of the entertainment course. Oct. 19—Suspicious symptoms of school spirit become manifest. Football squad leaves for River Falls, accompanied to Soo dejiot by the student body. Oct. 20—We met the enemy and we are theirs; but we didn’t give ourselves away. River Falls plus four inches of snow, 1; S. P. N. minus a few more minutes of time, 0. Oct. 27—The “Pep” symptoms of Oct 20 developed into the real thing and the goddess of school spirit finds a home in the heart of S. P. N. Team leaves for La Crosse. Oct. 28—“We have met the enemy and they are ours.” S. P. N. 14, La Crosse 2. Oct. 30—Celebration of La Crosse victory. Adolph makes record cross country run from Plover to “be on the job.” Page Two hundred eleven1917 Iris 1917 NOVEMBER Nov. 3—Faculty privileged to see themselves as we see them. Nov. 4—Lawrence 26, S. P. N. 0. The school was well represented. Nov. 8—Hughes loses presidency. Mike loses bet. Doomed to go without a hair cut until St. Patrick’s Day in the Mamin’. Nov. 11—S. P. N. 73, Superior 0. Superior had a good time out of it. if they did get the worst of it. Nov. It—(ilee Club rendered two selections, i. e.. “We will repeat the Irish Folk Song,” and “Today is letter Day.” Nov. 15—Otto Bacher dedicates the Eau Claire Normal with thrilling eloquence. Nov. 18—Iris staff entertained by Miss Hussey; Mr. Waterman might have found room on the davenport even if there were live girls already there. Nov. 20—Football squad enjoys feed by courtesy of the girls of the school. Nov. 23—Mr. Sims visits the “Pie House” (see illustration). Culprits escape through rear exit. Boys assigned to front seats in assembly. Nov. 24—Initiation of Jersey Day. Home Economics girls give matinee dance in the gym. That’s all right, its leap year. Nov. 28—Mrs. Oberwinder gives rec ital. Mis Bannister favors audience with two solos. Treble Clef assists also. Nov. 29—Leslie Hougen appeared at a ?:30 class. School closed at noon for Thanksgiving recess. DECEMBER Dee. 8—Dramatic Club presents, “What happened to Jones.” Dec. 9—We disc-over that we own a basket ball team. So does Lawrence. Score, Stevens Point 32. Lawrence 15. Dec. 11—Preliminary Junior Debate. Ida Brevad. Henry Beglinger. Tilden Moo and Jennie Anderson chosen. Dec. 12—First issue of the Pointer appears. Some book. Dec. 14—Miss Shelton, assisted by Weber’s Band, introduces community singing. And Sid sat right where Mary had to look at his back. Dec. 17—Glee Club Sacred Concert—postponed indefinitely. (Never heard of since.) Dec. 18—Bazaar. Postponed indefinitely also. Dec. 20—Oratorio. Gaul’s “Holy City.” postponed until after Christmas. What’s the idea? Well, you see we all went home Monday night before the Scarlet Fever epidemic got a chance at us. Page Two hundred twelve1917 Iris 1917 JANUARY Jan. 3—Tlu trains pull out ami the trains pull in. Vacation goes and the grind begins. Jan. 4—The factulty makes a New Year’s resolution to enforce current events rules. Jan. 6—Saturday classes looked better to us last December. However, our motto is “Play up and play the game.” We had our fun and we will pay for our whistle. Oshkosh 9, S. P. X. 33. Jan. 8—A new chance to boost S. I . X. appears. Buy a Xormal sticker and boost your school. Jan. 11—Oratorical contest. Best ever held in S. P. X. Martin is right there with the oratory. Jan. 12—Lawrence comes up for a practice game. Practice a little too stiff for them. Tried to turn the game to a “Boxer rebellion.” They couldn’t spoil your smile, though, could they Shallie ? Jan. 19—Stout 5, Stevens Point 34. How do you like being snowbound Stew? Murmurs of championship heard. Jan. 25—Girls’ gymnasium demonstration. Jan. 26—S. P. X. 57, Eau Claire 16. Jan. 27—Semester exams end. Jan. 29—Enrollment. Fairchild and Rogers sworn in as constables. Jan. 30—We see a glimpse of a little bit of sunshine through Fairy’s smile. FEBRUARY Feb. 1—The wind doth blow. Just look at the snow! But what shall we do without school? Feb. 2—High School Operetta, "Sylvia,” in Xormal auditorium. Feb. 1—Our friends, the enemy receive a slight jolt. River Falls 17. S. I . X. 35. Feb. 7—Basket Ball rally. Capt. Stewart makes first appearance l eforc the public. What’s the matter with Smith? What Smith? Don’t all move at once. Feb. 8— Theobald i detained in a snowdrift near Marshfield. Concert postponed. Feb. 9—"Disraeli,” presented under the direction of Miss Eimer. Congratulations, Miss Eimer! Xcw dramatic star discovered. A second John Drew, alias Raymond Pett. Feb. 10—Stout 17. S. P. X. 36. Feb. 12—Prof. Ralph Dennis of Northwestern University gives a pleasant evening’s entertainment. Page T io hundred thirteen1917 Iris 1917 Feb. 13—Students agree to forego the use of athletic tickets in order to give the team a chance to play a real competitor. Feb. 14—Valentine’s Day. If you love me like I love you, Xo knife can cut our love in two. Feb. 15—We play a real game. St. John’s 15, S. P. X. 32. Feb. 19—Preliminary Triangular Debate. Feb. 20—Theobald really gets here and gives a concert with Ole Bull’s violin. Feb. 21—Weatherwax Quartet presented a delightful program. Ahem! Feb. 22—Otto Bacher and Violet Hill dramatize an episode in the private life of George and Mrs. Washington. Also a legal holiday? Feb. 23—Fan Claire 10, S. P. X. 34. Team rather badly damaged. Feb. 26—Prof. E. T. Smith gives an interesting talk on our navy. Feb. 27—Mock Trial. Parkhurst and Cone scandal comes to light. Feb. 28—Literary program in Assembly. Headings by Misses Bronson and Walsh. Solo by Melvin Moffat. MARCH March 1—Cathedral Choir gives concert. River Falls succeeds in getting revenge. River Falls 24, S. P. X. 14. March 5, 6, 7—Girls’ Basket Ball Tournament. Exclusion act works? Final game postponed. March 8 and 9—Third Annual Central Wisconsin Interscholastic Basket Ball Tournament. March 10—Arena Girls run the Pal. You can have your job. George. Waupaca wins tournament. March 12—River Falls 22, S. P. X. 19. They got us that time; but we’ve got the best team and we know it. March 13—8:25 P. M. Where’s Ames? Digging Miss MacLaren out of a snowbank near Plover. 9:25, Ames arrives and Miss MacLaren (dressed in a shirtwaist bv request of Mr. Ames) entertains us with “Bought and Paid For.” (Was that ticket bought and paid for, Mr. Ames?) March 14—Delegates chosen to represent S. P. X. at Oratorical Contest in River Falls. Some town ! Some fellows! Page Two hundred fourteen1917 Iris 1917 March 17—Paulsen pulls down second place in the contest. Good work, old man! At home. Treble Clef and Male Quartet gives Irish program. Where did they get the hose? (Red takes part in Irish program.) March 19—M iss Winnifred Lamb gives piano recital. Very classical. Joe Pope dreams of------------------ March 20—Delegation relates River Falls experiences. Nobody mentioned the elopement, however. Sleighride $1.50 per victim. March 22—Training school gives Physical Demonstration. March 23—Johnson visits History of Education. Shock too much. Class dismissed. March 24—Prof. Con of Madison gives a lecture on ‘‘Wild Life in the Normal Auditorium.” Birdhouse contest. March 26—G. M. at Delzell’s front door. "Is Miss er—the little girl with the white sweater in ?” and thus began the jitney romance. March 29—Miss Lillian Hanan entertains us with a whistling solo. March 31—Junior Debate at Oshkosh. Unanimous decision in favor of S. P. X. Why so sleepy, Bacher? APRIL April 1—Fourth quarter begins. April 2—Junior Debate Demonstration. Moe thinks it would be a good plan to take Bacher on almost any kind of a trip. (Honeymoon not excluded.) Final 'girls basket ball tournament game. Primaries win cup. V rah rah Primaries! April 5—Classes begin at 7 :00 A. M. so that we can close at noon for Easter recess. April 7—Adolph actually left the Iris long enough to spend the day at Bancroft. Can you blame him? Nice kitty, isn t it? April 10—King returns from a patriotic celebration at Appleton. (Ask Thomas.) News!! Van Ashmun discovered at the movies with a girl. Page Two hundred fifteen1917 Iris 1917 April 11—Waterman returns from Green Bay. Why the smile. Waterman? Miss Shelton conducts music in assembly. General good time enjoyed by all. "Xow we will sing ‘Love’s Old Sweet Song!’” Dr. Steiner gives lecture on “Nationalizing America.” The cow in the box comes to life again. Pett met the Colbv train all right, but the taxi driver beat him to it. Too bad, Raymond! April 12—Iris Staff on the job. Last hours under high pressure. April 13—Patriotic celebration. General Charles King rouses the city. April 16—Glee Club Minstrel Show. Some voice. Red! April 20—Faculty night program. You’d he surprised to know how much talent we have tied up in that faculty. April 24—Debate—River Falls vs. S. P. X.. at Stevens Point. April 25—Cantata "Windmills of Holland,” given by the training department under the direction of Miss Slater. April 27—Debate, S. P. X vs. S. X. S. at Superior. Senior Mardi Gras. MAY May '1—Debate, Eau Claire vs. S. P. X. at Stevens Point. May 5—Track meet. Lawrence vs. S. P. X. at Stevens Point. Play, “The Passing of the Third Floor Back.” May 6—George, why don’t you quit? Editor-in-Chief’s birthday. Never mind how old. May 12—President’s Reception to Seniors and Faculty. Ike ami A lie lost their nerve when they came to celebrate. May 19—Fifth Annual Interscholastic Track Meet and banquet. May 18—Senior Class Play, "Green Stockings.” May 25—Mike pays up his Iris debts. Watch for his photo. He didn’t intend it to be there. May 26—The Iris is being greatly enjoyed (?) bv all loyal students. Staff takes an enforced and hasty trip out of town. Inter-Normal track meet at White-water. May 30—Senior Class plants Ivy. (Xo, this is no Agricultural school.) JUNE June 3—Baccalaureate address by Rev. Perry Miller at the Xormal auditorium. June 5—Faculty reception to Alumni, students and friends in the gymnasium. June 6—Annual Reunion and banquet of the Alumni Association, gymnasium. June 7—Commencement. Address by A. K. Winship, of Boston. Page Two hundred sixteenHE YE! HE YE! bCtfrbEPEfibwi THE TOUCt-tm. mmisE in THE IRIS. Page Two hundred seventeen Cook says “Its Satisfactory Work and Kind Treatment That Made The Cook Studio IN STEVENS POINT ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR STUDIOS IN WISCONSIN Page Ttvo hundred eighteen“-just life new! llow often we hare heard such an exclamation from our customers when they see the result of the Dry Cleaning and Pressing we give their garments! You will say it, too, when you see the work you ask us to do for you. We remove the dirt—every spot—and restore to your garments their original freshness. Then we press them. Our equipment is the l csr that we can buy. It produces perfect work. You have a suit we can make like new. When shall we call f NORMINGTON BROTHERS LAUNDERERS AND DRY CLEANERS STEVENS POINT WIS. The Bank That SERVICE Built” The Citizens National Bank Stevens Point, Wis. OFFICERS: E. J. PFIFFNER, President JOHN A. MURAT, Vice-President t C. S. ORTH MAN. Cashier I JOHN G. GLINSKI, Ass’t Cashier ' DIRECTORS: { GEO. B. NELSON, Regent local Normal School VV. T. WHITING. Paper Manufacturer E. F. PFIFFER, Lumberman JOHN MURAT, County Judge C. A. HAMACKER. Merchant B. B. PARK, Circuit Judge D. E. FROST, Capitalist LOUIS BRILL. Capitalist N. A. WEEK. Lumberman The only bank in the city that keeps open continuously from 9 A.M. until 3 P.M. — ........................ Page Tvso hundred nineteenVan Ryn De Gelleke ARCHITECTS 7U Caswell Block MII.WAVKEE, WIS. Pieckert’s Sanitary Meat Markets The Markets SERVICE Built 451 Main St. 322 N. Second St. The Arcade Billiard Hall The place to spend your spare time. The finest equipped establishment of its kind in this part of the state. Conducted in an orderly manner. LOUIS G. ROUSKEY, Prop. 440 Main Street WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE A CROWIXC ISSTITl TlOX THE Wisconsin State Bank OF STEVENS POINT, WISCONSIN Page Two hundred twentyNELSON HANNA LA WYKRS Citizens National Bank Building The Stevens Point Journal E. McGlachlin, Prop. Daily am! Weekly Job Printing HOTTER THAN SUNSHINE Copps Coal PHONE 22 and 23 144 MAIN ST. K ----------------- • — — .............. 4----------------------—- ■ hen you are liuiign or thirst j r'rirtC'O p t a r'ADO stop at the ! GROSS JACOBS ♦ CO ARCADE RESTAURANT j Ijhtodatc and the Finest in the j HARDWARE and OMy j COAL LOUIS ROUSKEY, Prop. 405-407 Main Street „ . Tel. 92 415-417 Main Street Stevens Point, Wisconsin -—»—» — - ■•—»—»—»—»-—•«—4 . ■■■!. — «.-—»♦—•—1 Page Two hundred twenty-one ........ I GROSS JACOBS CO. f HARDWARE and COAL Tel. 92 415-417 Main Street+ Are You Watching Us Grow? Enrollment Gain Gain percent 19141915 481 78 19% 1915-1916 621 140 29% 1916-1917 661 40 6.4% Since 1911-12 our enrollment has increased 100% IN WHAT ARE YOU INTERESTED? WE CAN OFFER YOU THESE COURSES Three Year Courses for High School Teachers: Course A—History and Literature “ B—Language, History and Literature “ C—Physical Science, Mathematics and Geography “ D—Biological Science and Agriculture “ E—For training of County Training School Assist- ants and High School Training Course Teachers. Grammar Grade Teachers’ Course—Two Years State Graded School Principals’ Course—Two Years. Primary Grade Teachers’ Course—Two Years Rural School Teachers Courses: Two Year Course for Eighth Grade Graduates Two Year Course for High School Graduates One Year Course for High School Graduates Home Economics Courses: Three Year Home Economics Course for High School Graduates Two Year Home Economics Course for High School Graduates Three Year Home Economics and General Course for High School Graduates. Athletics—of all kinds for both men and women New Classes organized live times a year. A fine new fire-proof dormitory accommodating 102 girls offers an attractive home life outside of school hours. If you believe in Preparedness, there arc opportunities to increase your efficiency at the STATE NORMAL SCHOOL JOHN F. SIMS, Pres. Stevens Point, Wis. Summer Term Opens June 18 Fall Term Opens Sept. IT Page Tito hundred twenty-twoCity Fruit Exchange The place for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables. Large assortment of Candies and Canned Goods. A. L. SHAFTON, Prop. Tel. 51 457 Main St. This Space Paid For By ¥ © PBIXTERS - PUBLISHERS Stevens Point, Wis.Remember that homely old saying, "The Mostest for the LvastesV That describes exactly The C. G. Macnish Shoe Co’s Position MACS SHOES HAVE THE MOST STYLE AT THE LEAST COST , -.........- ...........—»—— Established 1863 Incorporated 1912 Athletic Goods,—Cutlery—Cooking Ctensils and everything in hardware. KREMBS HARDWARE CO. “The Pioneer Hardware Merchants" ...... ........................ .... ---—------------------------.---------—------1 SOUTH SIDE HEADQUARTERS FOR SCHOOL SUPPLIES Stationery, Hooks, Periodicals, Musical and Spurting Goods PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES | SCHUWIELER’S NOVELTY SHOP 1019 Division Street Phone Black 538 1 »-------------------------------------------—........ $18.00 NO MORE—NO LESS $18.00 When you want a nifty, well wearing suit made to your measure, come and see me. ENGLISH WOOLEN MILLS 119 S. 3rd Street H. NEUWALD, Manager. Page Two hundred twenty-fourWe carry a complete assortment of BOOKS, 8TAT10XERY, SCHOOL SUPPLIES, KODAKS and PHOTOQRAPH 1C SUPPLIES H. D. McCULLOCH CO. DRUGGIST AND GROCERIES PLUMBING Pipe Valves and Fittings, Pneumatic Water Systems, Steam and Hot Water Heating, Tungsten Lamps, Gas and Electric Fixtures. J. B. SULLIVAN CO. 210 Strongs Avenue Telephone lllack 297 THE NEW DRUG STORE Hannon-Bach Pharmacy Page Two hundred twenty-fiveELECTRICITY THE SILENT SERVANT WILL MAKE YOUR HOME BRIGHT Call at our display room and we will be pleased to demonstrate our electric appliances to you. Wisconsin Valley Electric Co. 505 Main Street Tel No. 10 The Senior Class at the Stevens Point Normal are always glad to receive their pins and rings from the I). L. Auld Co. because they know the workmanship on these rings and pins are A No. 1. That is the reason we, for the past several years have gotten their trade. THE D. L. AULD COMPANY COIJ’MBUS, OHIO E. A. ARENBERG THE LEADING JEWELER Fine Watch Repairing a Specialty Normal School Rings and Pins Official Watch Inspector for Soo Line 447 Main Street Page Two hundred twenty-fixOfficial Caterers to the Student Body It’s to your advantage to make a speedy acquaintance with our establishment, and “get in on” the accommodations of our Students’ up-town headquarters. The Store of CLOTHING FURNISHINGS and LUGGAGE SPECIALTIES Up-to-date Tailoring Institution Home of the Hart, Schaffner d Marx COLLEGIA V ('LOTHEX Between the Two National Banks 1 THE CONTINENTAL CLOTHING STORE Page Two hundred twenty-sevenAthletic Goods Used by the State Normal School—came all the from Kansas City, U. S. A. There is a mighty good reason which we would like to explain to others KANSAS CITY, MO. JAMES A. VanROY CO. The Shop of Clever Clothes TAILORS, DRY CLEANERS MEN'S FURNISHERS Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing done expertly on short notice. Cashin’s Grocery The Store of Quality and Service Telephone 71 your favorite color in FOUNTAIN PENS IS THE NEWEST CREATION Kremb’s Drug Store Page Two hundred twenty-eight“Shivering Jimmy.” “The Mills College girls like Jell-O. With fruit inside and whipped cream outside, it is one of their favorite dishes and is affectionately known as ‘Shivering Jimmy.’ ” Mills College, near San Francisco, is the only woman’s college on the Pacific coast, and the student body is drawn from a field of great extent. It was a Mills College girl who told us about “Shivering Jimmy.” As a change from fudge and other common things, nobody can be more appreciative of Jell-0 than the girls who must provide their own dainties and do it without devoting much time and effort to it. There are seven pure fruit flavors of Jell-O: Strawberry, Raspberry, Lemon, Orange, Cherry, Peach, Chocolate. Each 10 cents at any grocer’s. Little folders in Jell-O packages contain all the instructions anyone needs in making the “made-iu-a-minute” Jell-O dainties. THE GENESEE PURE FOOD COMPANY. L Roy. N. Y. Page Two hundred twenty-nineWill You Write Your Name?


Suggestions in the University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) collection:

University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection, 1914 Edition, Page 1

1914

University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection, 1915 Edition, Page 1

1915

University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection, 1916 Edition, Page 1

1916

University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

1918

University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

1919

University of Wisconsin Stevens Point - Horizon / Iris Yearbook (Stevens Point, WI) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

1920

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.