University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI)

 - Class of 1950

Page 1 of 168

 

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1950 Edition, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1950 Edition, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1950 Edition, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1950 Edition, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1950 Edition, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1950 Edition, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1950 Edition, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1950 Edition, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1950 Edition, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1950 Edition, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1950 Edition, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1950 Edition, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 168 of the 1950 volume:

CO-EDITORS Kathryn Angelich Barbara Peterson OAlnlcDAln aToTj foocImA colUqj. DAlnkoAln, wiacomaiih min MnFOREWORD Yearbooks have always been, and undoubtedly will continue to be, records of passing years, scrapbooks of memories, collections of important events, pictured treasures of friends — reminders of hours that will come no more. In this, the 1950 QUIVER, we hope to give you not only a yearbook as such, but also to show you that a college education is a synthesis. The administration, the faculty, the student body, the organizations, the societies, the various activities — each of these is an integral factor in forming the finished product — a college graduate.• ADMINISTRATION • UNDERGRADUATES • ORGANIZATIONS • SOCIETIES • SPORTS • GRADUATES • CAMPUS LIFE"Education in its widest sense includes everything that exerts a formative influence, and causes a young person to be, at a given point, what he is." Mark Hopkins President Forrest R. Polk To every senior President Forrest R. Polk is primarily the man who dispenses the diploma, that very necessary contribution made to the finished product of OSTC, the graduate. Actually, of course, Mr. Polk, president since 1931, fills a much more important and demanding position at OSTC than as the mere giver of diplomas. It is probably for this reason that most students, though familiar wih Mr. Polk's residence on campus as a well known landmark, see little of him except in transit to or from his office. The diversity of affairs that falls to the lot of a college president keeps him hard at work throughout the day. This does not mean, however, that the president is out of touch with school affairs. In many ways that often go unpublicized, he shows his appreciation of the efforts of students in behalf of the college. These may take the form of a personal letter, or a few sympathetic words in passing that show his profound interest in student affairs. Probably the President's favorite diversion is provided by the wide range of reading he covers during the year. Particularly informative and interesting to him are history and biography all of which tend to further point up the world situation, a subject of great concern to him. Mr. Polk feels that there is no one panacea for the terrific problems facing us all. yet he has a deeply rooted faith in education as a means of enlightenment in a positive effort to fit young people as responsible citizens. Page 7Responsible for the intricate task of working out the operation of class schedules is Dr. James F. Duncan. Dean of Instruction. Since 1934 Dr. James H. Smith, as Director of the Training School, has supervised the work of those students who practice teach. As Dean of Men, Dr. Ernest O. Thedinga has not only acted as counselor to the men of the college but also has won the admiration of the entire student body. In her first year at OSTC, Miss Harriet O. Leyson, Dean of Women, has carried out successfully all that the term "Dean of Women" connotes. Pago 8John Voight Donald Meyer STUDENT COUNCIL Since the Student Council is the governing body which represents all the students on campus, it has as its purpose the promotion of activities which benefit the student body and which advance the interest of the college. Acting as a mediator between the students and the administration, the student council helps to shape school policies, to decide questions of student government, and to discuss and act upon problems of all-school nature. Left to right: Officers Robert Thoreson, lames Haas, and Richard Schumacher Page 9OSTC CampusFACULTY RICHARD BAILEY Camo to OSTC in 1949 M.A.. University of Wisconsin Journalism. English ETHEL J. BEHNCKE Came to OSTC in 1925 A.M., Univorsity of Chicago Art RADFORD E. BOEING Came to OSTC in 1946 M.A., Univorsity of Wisconsin Mathematics LEAVELVA M. BRADBURY Came to OSTC in 1919 M.S.. University of Chicago Geography i JOHN A. BREESE Came to OSTC in 1923 M.S.. Now York Univorsity Music LEONARD BRISTOW Came to OSTC in 1949 Ph.D.. University of Illinois Mathematics FREDERICK L. CAUDLE Camo to OSTC in 1945 M.S.. Univorsity of Wisconsin Science. Mathematics MALVINA C. CLAUSEN Came to OSTC in 1918 M.S., Columbia University Head Librarian Page 12FACULTY HELEN A. COLBY Camo to OSTC In 1946 M.S., Northwestern University Women's Physical Education ORLEN C. DEAN Came to OSTC in 1946 M.S., State University of Iowa Chemistry HULDA A. DILLING Camo to OSTC in 1930 A.M., University of Chicago Director of Curriculum for Kindergarten-Primary Grade Teachers HERBERT C. DOHRMAN Came to OSTC in 1949 M.ED., Marquette University Biology: Audio-Visual Education BARBARA DONNER Came to OSTC in 1930 Ph.D., University of Chicago History. Political Science RUSSEL G. EHRENHARDT Came to OSTC In 1949 M.S., University of Wisconsin Economics MAYSEL E. EVANS Came to OSTC in 1929 A.M.. Northwestern University Speech WARNER I. GEIGER Came to OSTC in 1936 Ph.M., University of Wisconsin Geography: Social Studios Page 13FACULTY WARREN J. GOEHRS Cam© to OSTC in 1947 M.A., New York University Men's Physical Education JEAN GOGOLEWSKI Cam© to OSTC in 1946 M.S., University of Wisconsin Third Grade Critic ROBERT J. GRANT Cam© to OSTC in 1927 M.A., University of Iowa Mechanical Drawing; Shop Work COZETTE GROVES Cam© to OSTC in 1931 A.M., Univorsity of Chicago Fifth Grade Critic SHERMAN E. GUNDERSON Came to 06TC in 1946 M.A., Columbia University Economics MARIE A. HIRSCH Cam© to OSTC in 1929 A.M., University of Nebraska History EARL HUTCHINSON Came to OSTC in 1946 M.A., Lawrence College Principal of Junior High NEVIN S. JAMES Came to OSTC in 1923 A.M.. University of Wisconsin English; Spoech Page 14FACULTY JAMES K. JOHNSON Came to OSTC in 1949 M.A., Northwestern University Sixth Grad© Critic LAURA T. JOHNSON Came to OSTC in 1924 Ph.M., University of Wisconsin Director of Curriculum for Intermediate Grade Teachers BURTON E. KARGES Came to OSTC in 1934 Ph.D., Unlvorsity of Wisconsin Geology IRENE KOERWITZ Came to OSTC in 1947 B.S., Oshkosh Stato Toachers Ass't Librarian. Training School ROBERT M. KOLF Came to OSTC in 1923 Ph.M., University of Wisconsin Men's Physical Education DONALD R. McNEW Came to OSTC in 1949 B. Ed.. Southern Illinois Univ. M.Mus.Ed., Chicago Musical College Music: Safety Education Page 15 DOROTHY E. MARTIN Came to OSTC in 1946 M.A., Colorado State College of Education English; Latin ROLLA J. McMAHON Came to OSTC in 1934 Ph.M., University of Wisconsin Registrar; EducationFACULTY BERTHA C. MERKER Cam© to OSTC in 1939 A.M.. Teachers College Columbia University First Grade Critic JOSEPHINE R. MILLER Camo to OSTC in 1946 B.S.. University of Minnesota R.N., Evangelical Deacones Hospital of Milwaukee Student Hoalth Service IDA J. MUELLER MILDRED NASGOWITZ Came to OSTC in 1945 Camo to OSTC in 1948 B.S., Milwaukee State Teachers B.S.. Milwaukee State Teachers Kindergarten Critic Second Grade Critic N. PETER NELSON Came to OSTC in 1924 A.M., Columbia University Director of Division of Secondary Education RALPH A. NOREM Came to OSTC in 1939 Ph.D., University of Minnesota Political Science ETHAN B. PFEFFERKORN Camo to OSTC in 1935 M.D., Washington University Physician EVERETT G. PYLE Came to OSTC in 1946 M.A., State University of Iowa English Page 16WILLIAM SPRAGUE Came to OSTC in 1949 Ed.D.. University of Denver Psychology; Education HUGH W. TALBOT Came to OSTC in 1919 M.S., University of Minnesota Biology FACULTY RAYMOND RAMSDEN Came to OSTC in 1941 Ph.D.. Ohio State Univorsity Education; Philosophy Director of Proprofessional LOUISE E. SCOTT Came to OSTC in 1928 A.M.. University of Iowa History; Social Science GERALD G. REED Came to OSTC in 1946 M.S., Iowa State Collogo Biology GLADYS H. SMITH Came to OSTC in 192S Ph.M., Univorsity of Wisconsin Fourth Grade Critic MAY L. STEWART Came to OSTC in 1926 A.M., University of Chicago Director of Curriculum for Rural School Teacher JOHN T. TAYLOR Camo to OSTC in 1936 Ph.D.. Columbia University English Page 17FACULTY VIRGINIA WAGGENOR Cam© to OSTC In 1949 B.S., LaCrosse State Teachers Physical Education HELEN WAHOSKI Came to OSTC in 1946 B.S., University of Wisconsin Senior Library Assistant LLOYD C. WASSER Camo to OSTC in 1947 B.S., Oshkosh State Teachers Junior High Mathematics: Scienco RUTH WILLCOCKSON Came to OSTC in 1921 A.M.. University of Chicago English ROBERT I. WONDERS Came to OSTC in 1946 M.A., University of Michigan Mathematics ANTHONY J. WOMASKI Came to OSTC in 1946 B.S., Oshkosh Stato Teachers Physics BETTY JANE ZWICKY Came to OSTC in 1947 M.M.. University of Wisconsin Music Page 18MABEL G. BLAKE Cam© to OSTC in 1922 Ph.M., University of Wisconsin Art CORINNE HUBBARD Cam© to OSTC in 1949 B.S., University of Wisconsin Assistant Librarian ALFRED MARSH JEANNE A. MERCIER Came to OSTC in 1949 Came to OSTC in 1923 Ph.D., Indiana Univorslty A.M., University of Wisconsin Chemistry French Financial and Clerical Staff GERMAINE BRUEHMUELLER ..................... Stenographer LOIS D1TTER................................ Stenographer OLGA OSTERTAG...........Secrotary to Director of Training FLORENCE PALMER .......... Student Admissions Examiner lONE RADKE ................................ Stenographer GRACE SHIMEK ..................Secrotary to tho President PATRICIA SPAEDTKE ......................... Stenographer FRANCES ZIMMERMAN ............. Administrative Assistant Radko. Bruehmueller. Shimek. Ostertag Page 19 Palmer. Spaedtke, Zlmmorman. DitterFaculty members McNew, Johnson. Reed, and Breese give out with some old college cheer Dean Lyson receives a gift from Santa Johnson personally Longitude and latitude intrigue Mr. Geiger in and out of the classroom Page 20 Adams. Anunson, Anel, Anderson Row one: Bolling, Binder, Ballard Row two: Bender, S. Anderson, J. Andorson, Bauor, Belanger FRESHMEN Row one: Borsch. Bock, Bushman Row two: Bloom, Bochard, Beck, Blohm Burr, Bundy. A. Anderson. Bernard Row one: Burrows. Bronson. Borkovec. Butz Row two: Brault. Bradley, Brandt, Britton Page 21Row ono: Barbor, Domer, DeByle, Doctor, Dottke Cash, Campbell, Collien, Colson Row two: Ehrhardt, Dodge, Droger, Dorber FRESHMEN Row ono: Fritz, Fishor, Foil, Frioss Row two: Ferrell, Fahley. Frye. Ford Row one: Granross, Grover, Goyotto, Grossoo, Gibb Donovan, Daggett, Dichtl, Does Row two: Groth, Greely, Gilson, Garl Page 22Duex, Draeger. Dyckhoff .DeLap Row one: Hanson, Gorsuch, Gerlh, Howarth Row two: Holt, Gauorke, Green, Honsol FRESHMEN Hoaps, Hafenstein, Iserlot, Jones Row one: Krahnke, Kuebler, Kliss, Kracht Row two: Kutchln, Kolth, Kalbus, JUlson Page 23Row One: Meigaard, McCourt. Milius. Moior. Mielke, Messing Kempinger, Knutson. Kasten, Kiotzman Row Two: A. Marheine, McFarrin FRESHMEN Row One: La Plante. Lawless. Lange. Lubinski, Laude Row Two: Lind, Lee. Lemke, Lehmen, Luedomon Row One: Marquis. Mueller, A. Moyers Row Two: Notman. Norlandor, Marshall. Martzke, L. Meyers Row One: Pongrace Row Two: Prallot, Peterson, Percey Page 24Roland. Robinson, Rieckman. Robeck Row on©: Oohmko, Nolto, Nolson Row two: W. Otto, D. Otto, Neumann, Olfson FRESHMEN Rushkofske, P. Robertson, Rather, Reif Row ono: Poeschl. Pfeiffer, Peabody. Pioper Row two: Phelen, Paul. Pulvor. Pochat Pago 25Row on©: Stenens, Sanders, Stilp, Sorensen, Scott Row two: Schultz, Stoiniko. Steckor Shellman. Spaulding, Stark, Smith FRESHMEN Row one: Salon. Swanson, Stottbacher. Salford Row two: Schmitt, Stage, Stang. Steinhilber Row one: Thiel, Titzkowski Simonson, Stoiniko, Schuk, Schuotto Row two: Smith, Siewort, Trott. Sloan, Tomlin Page 26Row on©: Ustruck. Talbert Row two: P. Thiol, Tardlff, Uelmen Row ono: Wagoner, Wisnicky Row two: Wendt, F. Wendt, Wentzel, Wilson, Wood, Wobor FRESHMEN Row ono: Wrass», Weinzierl. Krentz. Woodhouse. Welch, Wallor Row two: Willard, Uhlmachor, Wagenhals Utlc, Vandorhoof. Valgrt, Townsend, Trickol Row one: Yankee, Zeller, J. Zernzach Row two: Zirbol, Zarnott, Zimpel. L. Zernzach Page 27Row on©: Buck. Allen. Broderick. Baxter, Blahnik. Bingen, Binkowski Row two: Baumgarter. Cook. Blair. Bunker, Bush. Albers, Beer. Birkholz SOPHOMORES Row one: Coumbe. D. Barber. Boyle, Bauer. Cain, Carollo, Boldt. Row two: Braun, Bossort, R. Barbor, Bidwoll, Cleaviand, Chamberlain, Carter, Christenson. Page 28Row one: Duggan. Ferrell. Davis. Dixon. Case, Emmel. Constance. Row two: Fralish, Dalton. Doll, Cotter. Damon. Dobberke, DeRusha, Draeger. SOPHOMORES Row one: Hunter. Fraodrick. Edingor. Flynn. Floming, Flanagan. Row two: Gould. Figel, Gongorck. Ermatinger, Goldsworthy, Firary, Greenquist, Gritt, Hertz. Grosshuesch. Page 29Row one: Harmes, Huettor. Haworth. Hammer, Haborkom. Hasloy, Herzog. Hanson. Row two: Horn, Hofman, Hostak, Hessel, Hebenstreit, Hartman. Hamann. SOPHOMORES Row one: King, Janssen, Jacobson. Kavolski, Jann. Kirk. Klottko. Row two: Hintze. Knoll. Jones. Johnson, Jacobs. Jorgensen. Killoran, Kasak. Pag© 30Row ono: Leo. Lampheer, Koeck. Listle, Kelley, Johnson, Koeppen. Row two: Luce, Landry, B. Kelly. Lem, Lelfin, Lind. Konpinqer. Landgraf. SOPHOMORES Row one: M. Moyer. Manross. Miracle. D. Marheine, Martin. D. Mitchell. Row two: Mynning, D. Marheine. Messerschmidt, McKinnon. B. Mitchell. J. Meyer. Marschall, Miller, Manis. Pag© 31Row one: Petersen. Peterson. Oetzel. Nickel. D. Nashold, Nelson. Nielsen. Row two: Nemetz. Onnink, Neveu, Privoznik. Pierce. Oudenhoven, Olbrlch, G. Nashold. SOPHOMORES Row one: Radtke. M. Redman. Steffen, Steeps. Schrimpf, Sallck. Row two: G. Rodman, Ra'ers, Rosera. Doemer. Ruch. Raisky. Schultz. Page 32Row one: Tracy. Trowbridge. Strode. Schraa. Schnabl. Row two: Retake. Shurbert, Sonnleitnor. Strachan, Schumachor, Schafer, Thomas. SOPHOMORES Row ono: Ruh, Unferth. Schwobke, Vanderhoof, Sprenger, Vlestenz. Row two: Smith. Stadtmueller, Thompson. Thlelmann, Utz. Schneider, Schulz, Tlddens. Pag© 33Row one: Vaughan, B. Williams, Washkoske, Winter. Row two: Walsdorf, Walsh, Weir, Wolfgram. SOPHOMORES Row one: Wislinsky. Webb, Wickmann. Rov two: Wall, Weilep, Warnocke, Wolfmeyer, Walters, Werner. Pag© 34JUNIORS A. Anderson J. Bagley N. Barber J. Bartman M. Becker E. Behnke J. Belanger J. Bettin P. Blow J. Brady J. Breymann J. Brown F. Carpentier A. Chase S. Chipman W. Clasen D. Corrigall G. Cudnohufsky R. Davis R. Day D. Dedering J. Desjarlais R. Doering M. Edler M. Evans T. Fadner B. Farmer D. Fenzl C. Fisher F. Flanagan Page 35JUNIORS B. Friedholdt S. Friedrich G. Gabriel E. Gagnon M. Geenen D. Gerth G. Gilray M. Grade G. Hamilton R. Harmon A. Heineman M. Henke W. HofJman J. Howman T. Janssen M. Johnson P. Johnson P. Johnston R. Junio C. King H. Kirchman T. Klemish N. Kohlbeck C. Kramer J. Krause S. Kroenke J. Laun B. Lawson R. I-ewis A. LoosenJUNIORS A. Marker J. Marks A. McBride E. Michels L. Miller J. Moody T. Moran I. Morrissey J. Murray E. Neuman J. Oaks T. Paul C. Pfeiffer D. Piette M. Pischke D. Popp W. Preston M. Quade E. Raabe J. Rasmussen J. Reed J. Reimers L. Reineman M. Richardson B. Riggle J. Schalinske W. Schein H. Schlueter E. Schoenick H. Skalizky Page 37JUNIORS K. Smith J. Sommerfeldt L. Spaulding D. Spillman L. Spink M. Spoehr P. Stevenson E. Stoch N. Tebo I. Thorp M. Timmel P. Trauba B. Uttke S. Wagner M. Waldron I. Wareham M. Weber A. Wielgas M. Williams R. Winkel A. Wolff J. Zeinert Page 38STUDENT COUNCIL First Row: B Kolly, A. Anunson, T. Scharpf. R. Wachholz. M. Lawless Second Row: T. Damon. 7.. Anunson. B. Beck. R. Nordhaus Representing and acting on behalf of the student body at OSTC is the Student Council. This organization is comprised of the council officers including the president, vice-president, and the secretary-treasurer, along with two representatives each from the secondary, preprofessional, primary, intermediate, and rural divisions. Executive officers are elected by the entire student body while the representatives are elected by their respective divisions. Members of the executive board are on the committee on the Distribution of Student Funds together with representatives of the administration. This committee allocates money for the various school activites and functions. The council is also responsible for the organization and functioning of the Social Life Committee. Appointments to this are made by the president but must be confirmed by the rest of the council. Activities of the Social Life Committee include the freshman mixer, homecoming, the Christmas dance, and the annual Spring Prom. Another function of the Student Council is to run all elections which are generally concerned with the entire student body. This year the Student Council took on an additional responsibility in connection with the cheerleaders. Henceforth the Student Council will set up the rules governing the cheerleaders, and will sponsor them in regard to the costs for uniforms and awards. Page 39WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION Unique among the organizations on campus because it is composed of all of the women students, the Women's Association is guided by an executive council made up of one representative from each society, two independents, and a locker-room chairman. The officers of the executive committee are elected in the fall by all of the women of the school. This organization promotes leadership and encourages a more active social life for the women of the campus. Through the Women's Association. OSTC is represented at the annual Women's Student Government Association Convention. Nine schools attend this convene tion to discuss school problems. At this year's convention at Stevens Point, OSTC was represented by Shirley Kroenke. Shirley Chipman, Madeline Hansen, Muriel Waldron, and Dean Harriet Leyson. The Women's Association sponsors an annual fall and spring tea for the coeds and faculty. In addition, a housemothers' tea was also given this year. With a large attendance attesting its popularity, the annual Christmas dinner was held at the Trinity Guild Hall. In the spring of the year the Women's Association gives a Locker room party to which all students are invited. An open house is held in the women's lounge and a locker decoration contest carried out. This year new furniture, drapes, hassocks, and carpets were bought by the Women's Association to add to the comfort and appearance of the lounge. The association also supplies the lounge v ith subsriptions to numerous magazines. Top: Shirley Chipman, Carol Brown. Muriel Waldron, Lorraine Spink. Midge Nansen. Advisor Dean Ley-son. Shirioy Kroenke, Virginia Winters, and Alice Wolff of the Women's Executive Council. Center: Between Class relaxation in the Women's lounge. Bottom: Speakers table at the annual Christmas Dinner sponsored by the Women's Association. Page 40MEN’S ASSOCIATION Although the Men's Association does not claim to have done anything in the past year that could be called particularly world shaking, it should, nevertheless, be given credit for performing those often unnoticed little tasks which go toward making improvements in the school and in the men's lounge in particular. Not to be outdone by the Women's Association who partially redecorated and refurnished the women's lounge, the men also took it upon themselves to make their lounge one of greater comfort and pleasure to the male students on campus. They accomplished this through the purchase of a new radio, reupholstering of the furniture and some general redecoration. As in the past, the Men's Association sponsored the intra-mural basketball and baseball tournaments. Trophies donated by the various men's societies were awarded to those teams which took top places. Headed by an executive board which is elected by all men of the student body, the organization has as its general purpose the bringing together of all the men on campus and the ultimate promotion of greater understanding and mutual friendship among them. Top: Officers and directors of the Mon's Association picturod aro Norm Tebo. Bob Doll. Dick Schumacher. Bill Manis. Carl Smedburg, and Jim Murray. Center: Chess addicts gather for the game of kings in the Men's Lounge. Bottom: Watch tho sign and behave yoursolvos. men! Page 41ADVANCE Editors: NORM BOYLE PATRICIA JOHNSON Although the Advance continued this year as a weeky publication, several notable changes were made. The first of the major transitions was the changing of the name from the Oshkosh Advance to the OSTC Advance. Transforming the old formality of make-up, the entire paper this year is characterized by a trend toward the more modem style. Many of the changes occurred through the work of make-up editor Larry Notman. Several minor innovations were also introduced. This is the first year in which the Advance has had a regular cartoonist. Although many of his cartoons were rejected, Tiddens usually managed to get one in each issue. A greater number of pictures was printed this year than in previous years. Much of the credit for this goes to photographer Tom Damon. The green St. Patrick's Day issue and the enjoyable April Fool's issue were also new ideas. Staff members: Janssen, Ustruck. Jillson, Stark. B. A. Williams, Nordhaus. Schoenick, Grenier. Nielson. Unferth, Gabriel Page 42Because the journalism classes did not do all the reporting for the Advance this year, the paper has been more or less on its own. The reporters were made up of a cross section of the student body with everyone having an opportunity to sign up. Exchange manager Shirley Wood sent papers to approximately 83 colleges and high schools. All in all about 950 to 1000 copies are placed in the hands of student each week. With the help of their new faculty advisor. Richard Bailey, the first semester staff undertook an additional job in publishing the OSTC Directory. The Directory contained a list of all OSTC students and faculty members with both city and home addresses given. Top: Business manager, Ellen Vanderhoof Bottom: Typists and business staff, Wintor, Goyette, Shell- man, C. Lee, Doctor, and Zirbel Editorial staff mombers Spillman, Johnson, and Boylo with Photographers Damon and Dichtl with make-up mombors Advisor, Mr. Bailoy. Notman. Vajgert. Kavolski. Buck and cartoonist Tiddens. Page 43QUIVER Co-Editors: BARBARA PETERSON KATHRYN ANGELICH This year's Quiver is the product of hard work, and conscientious thought on the part of the various members of the Quiver staff. It is not the easiest thing in the world for a group to get together and select a theme calculated both to appeal to the students for whom the book is intended, and at the same time to provide a unifying force that gives the publication coherency and meaning. After much thought, the editors, feeling that a book of this nature is first and foremost a record of student activities, decided that the annual could quite appropriately center its theme on the senior; that much desired status being the one to which all undergraduates most aspire. Realizing that many factors contribute toward the end product, the typical senior, it was felt that this process could best be expressed by the term "synthesis"; the senior representing a synthesis of the various forces with which he has come in contact during his school career. Page 44 Art Staff: Friedrich, and Bottin; Sport Staff: Gabriel. Schoonick, and Nolson Typing Staff: Stark. Washkoske, McCourt, Ustruck. and KrysiakIt is, of course, the editors who bear the brunt of responsibility, and on whose shoulders the final decisions rest. Nevertheless, it must be remembered that these decisions must be transformed into actualities, and this involves not only editors, but writers, photographers, and typists. Most students like to see plenty of pictures which must be taken, arranged, and identified; and, of course, there is always the unknown individual in the lower left hand corner that eludes identification. The members of the 1950 Quiver staff with the assistance of their advisor, Mr. Bailey, feel that they have done their best to produce a yearbook with emphasis on those things that most interest the student body, providing each individual with a permanent record of his or her activities during the past year. John Moody, Busin© Manager Businoss Staff Members: Evans, Flanagan. Davis, Paape, Steeps, and Broderick age Identification Staff Members: Meier. Gronier, Kroenke, Rossow. and Unforth Reporters and Proofreaders: Chipman, Hoffman, Reimors, Zimpel. Scharpf. Gerth, Janssen, and WolffDRAMATICS Shirloy Brusoe making a Russian out of Bill Mitcholl John Bagley, Jean Van Loan-en. and Fintan Flanagan choose a bill for the Gentleman from Athens to sponsor Backstage crew clearing tho stage for the "Gentleman from Athens." "Geraldine and the White Robe" prosontod by tho play production class Page 46Diroctor Evans checking last minute details with Ed Landgraf Bob Firary revives chivalry when John Bagloy introduces him to Joan Van Laanen Main dramatic event of the year at OSTC was the all-school play, "The Gentlemen from Athens" in three acts by Emmert Lavery. The play was presented on the evenings of March 22 and 23 under the direction of Miss Maysel Evans. Its presentation was in accordance with the observance of International Theatre Month —March 1950, in an attempt to focus the foot lights of America on the problems of peace and world understanding. An innovation which was introduced in the setting of "The Gentlemen from Athens" was the book-fold ceiling piece which replaced the older style of cropping with borders. On December 13, "Geraldine and the White Robe", a one act Christmas play by Jon Conde, was presented for the student body. The Christmas play is an annual project of the play production class. Rehearsal for "Gant oman from Athens" Page 47First Row: B. Friodholdt, t. Voight. D. Multhauf. W. Pynch. 1. Brault Second Row: A. Crissey, D. Meyer. E. Gagnon. J. Belanger Third Row: C. Brown. D. Schartner. I. Sell. L. Nickel CAMPUS FORUM Henry and A1 ponder the situation whilo John chuckles over it. Campus Forum is a discussion group open to any student at Oshkosh State Teachers College. The purpose of the club is to acquaint students with the various types of public speaking. to give its members an opportunity to participate in the different types of public oratory, and to engage in contests and round-table discussions with other speech clubs and institutions. During the past school year various members participated in tournaments at Eau Claire and at the University of Wisconsin. Those who participated in the Forensics contests were John Zeinert, John Voight, Barbara Friedholdt. Hugh J ones, Jean Van Laanen and James Brault. Mr. Nevin James, head of the OSTC English department, was in charge of the group. Outstanding problems discussed by the Campus Forum during the year were: "Shall the United States Adopt the Welfare State?", "What Shall Be the U. S. Foreign Policy in the Orient", and "Better Radio Listening." As usual, this years meetings were held in Room A103 on Tuesday evenings. It was here that anyone was welcome to come and take part in a heated discussion on some controversial issue. Page 48First Row: Drogor, Loosen, Forroll, Rodman, Messing Second Rov : Schmelter, Kalbus. Michels, Brault, Birkholz, Doltko Third Row: Williams. Riggle, Mr. Boeing, Mr. Bristow. Mr. Wonders. Raabe, Halle, Haworth PHI CHI MU One equals two! ! Proving that statement algebraically is just one of the many mathematical freaks and fallacies discussed at the monthly meetings of Phi Chi Mu, affectionately called "Math Club" by those who are members. In general, the purpose of the club is to promote and further an interest in mathematics through topics related to that field. One of the subjects presented to the group was a talk by Mr. Hurlbut entitled "The Basic Principles of Radio Transmission." Members of the club were also offorded the opportunity to see several movies entitled "The Gallop Poll", and "The Slide Rule". Of particular interest was a visit to Buckstaff Observatory where the group viewed star formations. Not all meetings are on the purely intellectual side, however, as the club provides some social life as well. One of the main social events of the year is the annual spring picnic, a time when the members get together for food and fun, and, incidentally, bring another school year with Phi Chi Mu to a close. Page 49 President Dan Haworth and Dr. Bristow— puzzling, isn't it?KAPPA DELTA PI A familiar scene of Kappa Delta Pi. takon at one of their supper meetings. What freshman has not stopped at the main hall bulletin board to ponder over the Greek letter "KAI1", only to discover from some upper classman that the notice refers to Kappa Dela Pi, the honorary society in the field of education. Coffee and doughnuts served in the PTA room comprised a Homecoming breakfast for the Alumni and headed the list of Kappa Delta Pi social events for the year. Initiation for twenty first semester pledges was held December 14 at the museum, while initiation for second semester pledges took place at the spring banquet. The society ended the year's activities with the usual spring picnic. Since the fundamental purpose of OSTC is to train future educators, and since the purpose of Kappa Delta Pi is to stress high standards of professional and scholastic work and to recognize noteworthy service in the fields of education, this organization is indeed an important element in the formation of the teachers college graduate. Page 50Seated: W. Pynch. B. Potorson. W. Hughes. E. Schloorb, J. Streckenbach, D. Radtke, F. Koll. J. Kuske, I. Seil, and L. Miller. Standing: E. Colder. D. Haworth, R. Jones, W. Jonks, Mrs. Behnke. Mr. Wasser. Mr. Boeing. D. Multhauf, R. Spaulding. K. Thiel, and L. Kalbus. PHI BETA SIGMA This year marks a year of anniversary for the Gamma chapter of Phi Beta Sigma. For a quarter of a century here at OSTC, the organization has been an integral part of the synthesis. Phi Beta Sigma is the faculty honors organization and has the distinction of having all faculty included in its membership. In the spring of each year about fifteen percent of the four year course graduating seniors who have high scholastic records are voted into the society. A dinner is given for the new members at which time the initiation ceremony is held and a certificate of membership is given to each candidate. Those who become members are entitled to wear the Phi Beta Sigma key. At this year's initiation dinner held at the Atheam Hotel on March 18. many alumni were present to help celebrate the anniversary of the organization. An Honor's Day assembly is sponsored by Phi Beta Sigma, its purpose being to promote interest in scholarship among the students of OSTC. Page 51Row I: Huetter. Lee. Farmer, Miller. King. Williams, Robertson. Rand. Sorenson, Spink, Oaks. Winters, Van Laanon, Slutzman, Strockonbach, Henke, Winkle, Belling. Row II: Schloorb. Doctor. Wobb. Burr. Nouman. Borndt, Schultz. Schlautonhaulon, Yankoe. Jonos. Rossow. Roberts, Grade, Coumbe. Swanson, Lanpheer, Tomlin. Row III: Haas, Doll, Roebeck, Brandt. Garl. lisa. Vanderhoof. Javenkowski, Darling, Immol. Anunson, Stout. Smith. Harmos, Stang, Kietzman. Behnke, Bearss. Row IV: Gertsch, Estlund, Lundin, Tallis. Wagenhals. Adams. Welsh, Mitchell. Dean, Studley, Reineman, Arnold, Gruenwald. Rathers, Martzke, Amel, Wachholz, Landgraf.CHOIR Under the direction of Mr. J. A. Breese, the college a cappella choir has again done an outstanding job of presenting fine concerts, not only for the student body, but also for this community and surrounding communities throughout the entire year. Those who attended their excellent Christmas concert will agree, for that performance was typical of the compact musical unity which has constantly been achieved. One of their two Christmas appearances in Oshkosh was the concert given on the evening of December 14 in the Little Theater. The Christmas story, told in song by the choir, featured the singing of "Adeste Fidelis" from outside the theater preceding the opening of the story by the narrator, Bruce Estlund. Mary Henke then sang "Behold, A Virgin Shall Conceive". "O Come. O Come, Emmanuel" was the processional which accompanied the entrance of the black-robed choir. The first part of the program consisted mostly of Christmas songs, while the latter part featured the "Messe Solennelle." A new feature of the concert was the use of an electric organ for this mass. In this mass the various solo parts were sung by Mary Burr, Jean Jones, Jacqueline Rand, Charmaine Lee, Mary Henke. Barbara Berndt, Pauline Robertson. Ella Mae Schloerb, James Studley, James Stout, and Bruce Estlund. The OSTC college choir has become well known throughout the state for its excellent concerts. The fine blend of approximately sixty voices and the attitude of the members cooperating as a group has caused many favorable comments. Page 53Soloist Mary Henke singing "Ave Maria" beforo the student assembly The Spring concerts given included the First Congregational Church, South Milwaukee High School, Trinity Presbyterian Church, Milwaukee, Manitowoc and Chilton. Horicon and Beaver Dam, and the teachers' convention at Green Bay. While at Green Bay the choir sang at a local radio station. The spring tour by the choir ended at the college where a concert was given for the college students on April 4. A concert was also given at the First Mehodist Church before the tour. Harmonious music bound to be heard wherever and whenever the choir assembles. After almost every meal while on tour and on the busses, too, the choir would warm up on some of the numbers just for the mere enjoyment of singing. Page 54ORCHESTRA OSTC Orchestra Rehearsal Although the orchestra is perhaps the smallest musical organization on campus, the members work hard and deserve much credit for their effort. This year the orchestra was comprised of twenty musicians under the direction of Mr. Donald McNew. In his first year at OSTC, Mr. McNew succeeded in doing a fine job of forming an orchestra from the small nucleus that was left from last year A lot of hard work went on at the weekly rehearsals that were held in the Science Building. As a reward for their efforts, the people in the organization derived benefits as well as receiving much enjoyment from playing together. Page 551 Members of the band pictured are Anunson, Arnold, Bergen, Belonger, Berndt, Brandt, Bronson, Bundy. Bunker, Cain, Carter, Christensen, Crain, Cowling. Coumbe. Darling. Davis. Daggert. Doan, Dedoring. Doll, Droger, Edlor. Ehrhardt. Flynn, Fritz. Hoaps. Goyotto, Keisnor, Krahnko, Kracht, Kroenke. Koszarek, Landgraf, C. Lee, R, Lee, Meier. A. Meyers, M. Miller, W. Otto, Percoy. Piopor, Ruh, Reineman, P. Schneider. Schmitt, L. Spaulding, G. Steineke, Steeps. Studley. Swanson, Titzkowski. Welch. Wielgas. Ouade. Schoenrock, Kasai, Tomlin. Gould. Stark, C. Stevens, Hoffman, and Fessenden.BAND No college can really be considered as complete without a school band. Oshkosh State Teachers is no exception to this rule. Alhough membership in the band is in no way compulsory, this year more than fifty students chose to meet each Monday and Wednesday to play with the group. Several new members were also admitted at the opening of the second semester. The first big event on the band's agenda for the 1949-50 school year was participation in the annual Homecoming Parade. After marching through town, they led the crowd back to school for the pep rally. They also took an active part in those proceedings. In addition, the band attended all football games. Besides cheering and playing between quarters and during the game, they gave demonstrations of marching skill between halves. They did much in the way of providing pep at the games. The drum majorettes who led the band at the between halves performances were Louise Christensen, Anita Tomlin, Betty Bunde and Emily Zachow. Page 57Halftime entertainment at football games furnishod by the marching band The band also provided music for two pep rallies held in the Little Theater before important games. During the basketball season they played for the assembly and game which concluded the basketball careers of Coach Kolf's 'Married Men". All the band members put much hard work into preparing for an assembly program at which many numbers were featured. Perhaps the outstanding event of the year was the spring tour taken by the band. This was the first trip of its kind for the OSTC band. All of the members went on the one day trip, May 9, during which performances were given at high schools in Oconto Falls and Peshtigo. Among the more popular numbers played for the trip were a symphonic band arrangement of "Three Blind Mice" and selections from "Student Prince". The band was under new direction this year, that of Mr. Donald McNew. His able direction and friendly personality did much to enable the band to be an essential organization at OSTC. Page 58College Lutheran Society Row 1: E. Vi«8tonz, M. McCourt. B. Emmel, C. Brown. P. Zimpel. A. Horst, S. Wood. Row 2: N. Piorce. E. Raabo, J. Kusko, R. Neumann, C. Olson, J. Zoinort. Row 3: E. Nashold, W. Hoffman, V. Stark, M. Moyer, R. W. Johnson, G. Mielko. E. Bryner, J. Kraus©. A. Kirk, A. Hoehno, R. Rosonborq. Prosldont John Zoinort consulting CLS advisor, tho Rov. Mr. Luedors. Lutheran students of OSTC are brought together by the College Lutheran Society, commonly known as CLS. The purpose of the organization is to bring together its members for spiritual, intellectual, and social benefits with the emphasis upon the spiritual. During the first semester the activities included a get-acquainted party, a hayride, mov ies, discussions, and guest speakers. At Christmas time the members of CLS joined voices to go caroling. One of the biggest events of the year for the College Lutheran Society was the Lutheran State Convention which was held at Oshkosh during the second semester. CLS members were kept busy sending invitations, planning meals, finding housing, and generally scheduling a program for the convention. To bring the activities of the organization to a close, a spring picnic was held for all the members. Page 59NEWMAN CLUB Row 1: C. McCarvlU , I. Frioss. L. Nickol. A. Krysiak. B. Nickol. A. Loosen, T. ScharpL Row 2: L. Prallat. L. Ustruck. G. Gabriel. S. Wagner. D. Haworlh, J. Washkosko. D. Schneider. H. Maichen. Row 4: C. Buck, G. Braun. P. Cain. B. Kelly. L. Rosera. B. Hammer. C. Goyette. D. Egan. D. Fonzl. N. Schomisch. Semester presidents Herb Lundin and Charles Buck with the Newman advisor. Fathor Riedy. Newman Club has as its purpose the bringing together of Catholic students on campus into closer intellectual and social relationships and the providing of opportunities whereby its members may gain advanced knowledge of important religious matters. The club meets every second and fourth Thursday at St. Peter's Recreation Hall. Miss Helen Wahoski acts as faculty advisor and the Rev. Harold Riedy as spiritual advisor. Contained in the list of social activities for the year were a fall and spring hayride, a Christmas party at Lawrence College, a box social, and a spring picnic at which time OSTC Newmanites played host to the Lawrence College Newmanites. General topic of discussion at several of the meetings was the anniversary of the Holy Year, which included slides in Rome, a panel discussion and a talk by Miss Helen Wahoski. Students from OSTC attended the province convention which was held at Appleton in April, and plans were made to send representatives to the National Newman Club Convention to be held at Cleveland. Page 60WESLEY FOUNDATION Row on©: Stoops, Wintor, Heaps. Lanpheer. Tomlin, Davis, Bock Row two: Wagoner, C. Loo. Mynning, Carter, Granross. Wobb, Streckenbach. President Virginia Winters with Wosloy advisor, tho Rev. Alvin Lindgren. To provide a home away from home, and a church away from church is the purpose of the Wesley Foundation, a religious organization comprised mainly of the Methodist students on campus. However, any student who is interested in the organization is invited to come to the meetings and to join the group in carrying on its program of fellowship, fun. worship, interesting studies, and numerous projects. Paine Hall of the Algoma Methodist Church was the meeting place of the group which met on the second, third, and fourth Thursdays of each month. A study of various other religions was made, including a visit to the Gospel Tabernacle. Six delegates attended the National Student Convention at Urbana, Illinois during Christmas vacation. The group was also represented at the Spring Conference held April 28-30 at Waukesha. Aside from its spiritual pursuits, the organization held a joint picnic and installation service in the fall, fall and spring banquets, several parties-, and a final spring picnic. Page 61Ouivor photographer, Tom Damon, at work In Ray Wachholz, Bill Mitchell, Bob Doll, and Lowis his dark room Reineman whooping it up for the Student Council Variety Show which didn't occur. Tho Advance staff creating an atmosphere for the April Fool's issue. Page 62First Row: Gabriel. Nielson. Schneider, Schrimpf, Kasai. Horst. Second Row: Manis. Dean Leyson. Dixon, Steffen, Hasley, Brusoe. Third Row: Multhauf. Mitchell, Boyle, Dean Thedinga. INTER-SOCIETY COUNCIL Acting as mediator among the social societies on campus is perhaps the main job of the Inter-Society Council, an organization made up of representatives of all the social societies on campus. Governing rules are made by the council. At the beginning of the first semester the council decided on a social calendar to avoid conflicting dates for scheduled campus activities. Informal rushings were scheduled for the same night in succeeding weeks. Those who rushed second semester had to rush in the second week of the semester on their previously assigned night. Plans were made whereby each society would take turns selling concessions at school dances and basketball games. A new project added to the list of Council activities was a Winter Carnival held at the beginning of the second semester. An entire day was set aside for an afternoon of skating events and an evening's Frost Bite Frolic. A snow decoration contest which was planned was cancelled because of unsuitable weather. It is hoped by the council that the Winter Carnival will become an annual affair at OSTC. Serving the council as officers were Bill Manis. president; Marion Dixon, vice-president; and Midge Hansen and Ethel Schrimpf as first and second semester secretaries. Page 63First Row: Ristow, Sommerfeldt. Duox, Petorson. Johnston Second Row: Borqman. Friodrich. Chamberlain, Chipman. Paapo. Blahnik, Skinner. Price. Kaerwer Third Row: Goldsworthy. Evans. Mador, Schluoter, Peabody. Elliott. Hamilton. Vanderhoof, Johnson. Anqelich ALETHEAN Mrs. Jean Gogolewski Advisors First Semester Officers Second Semester Barbara Peterson Kathryn Angelich Pat Johnston Ellen Vanderhoof Jane Ellen Blahnik Mildred Paape Shirley Friedrich Page 64Complete with checkered tablecloths, candlelight, and a French fashion show, the L'Alethean Cafe formed the background for the Alethean informal rushing party, the first event of the school year. Following this, the traditional Mardi Gras formed the setting for formal rushing. During the Homecoming weekend members, pledges, and alums met at the Saturday morning bruncheon. The Alethean float entry for the Homecoming Parade displayed the banner, "We're Gonna Wash Those Gulls Right Out of Our Hair." For the Play Contest, Aletheans chose Jane Ellen Blahnik to direct their entry, a comedy entitled, "The Lady's Slipper." Sports activities which the Aletheans participated in include volleyball and basketball. When the Philakeans revived the traditional spelling bee and challenged their sister society, the Aletheans were the victors with Pat Johnson taking individual honors. Just before Christmas the Aletheans made favors and decorated for the Christmas Dinner sponsored by the Women's Association. Each year at Christmas the Aletheans contribute to the Alpha Phi Omega Christmas Basket Drive and send gifts to the girls at the Oregon Home. The Alethean-Philakean formal was held at the Century Club on January 14. Soon after the formal the Aletheans sponsored the dance for the Ice Carnival. Brightly colored crepe paper carried out the hard times theme of the Frostbite Frolic. Second semester informal rushing took place at the home of Helene Schleuter while the formal rushing was held at the home of Betsey Barber. The Aletheans entered Songfest with "Cindy", directed by Sue Duex, and participated in the annual Vod-Vil contest. A cottage party completed the year's activities. Before appoorar.ee preparations for the Alethean formal by Betty McKinnes, Jane Blahnik. and Dlen Vandorhoof. Alethean Homecoming Bruncheon Page 65First Row: Williams, Zimpol, Bahlke, Salm Second Row: Fabbert, Thiel, Steubacher, Raggett, Anunson, Hansen, Prallat, Detaejo Third Row: Donovan, Williams. Breitricfc, Mlelke, Zirbol, Chady, Miss Stewart ALPHA CHI Advisor Miss Stewart First Semester Officers Second Semester Fayann Horton ..............................President..................................... Betty Bahlke John Stevens............................. Vice-President John Stevens Roman Borkovec............................. Secretary Pat Ann Zimpel Ruth Chady ................................ Treasurer Ruth Chady Lois Atkins................................ Custodian Beverly Salm .............................. Historian Beverly Salm Page 66Alpha Chi members, the rural students of OSTC, are active in many college events. This society is exclusive in that students entering the rural division automatically become members of it. Fall brought football and homecoming. With Fayann Horton as chairman, the Alpha Chis entered a float with the slogan, "We've Bagged Our Limit: 11 Green Gulls. The float consisted of two Titans holding a string of eleven gulls between them while a photographer took their picture. A homecoming tea was given to welcome back all alumni. "The Neighbors" written by Zona Gale was directed by Lorraine Ruh for the play contest. The theme of the play was the heart-felt joy and considerate help a group of sympathetic neighbors can bring when a poor widow finds that she must take an orphaned nephew into her humble home when she herself has so little to spare. The cast included Lorraine Ruh, Roman Borkovec, Marie Zirbel, Norman Daggett, Leona Prallat, John Stevens, Virginia Thiel, and Janice Detaeje. At Christmas time a party was given in honor of the sophomores who graduated this year. Alpha Chi helped plan and also acted as guides for the Campus Day program which was designed to encourage high school students to become teachers. "The Neighbors" was presented for them and the sophomores put on a skit entitled "A Day in the Life of a Teacher." Wih spring came Songfest and Vod-Vil in which Alpha Chi entered. Bob Magle directed and did the solo for the Songfest entry. June Amundson was chairman of the committee with Lorraine Ruh and Bob Magle as her assistants. The entry was the spiritual "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot." All members helped with Vod-Vil, which was directed by Lyle Stecker, and assisted by Janet Trowbridge and Fayann Horton. Alpha Chi s prosontation of "Tho Neighbors” in the Kappa Gamma Play Contest. "Swing Low. Sweet Chariot”, as sung by tho Alpha Chis. Page 67First Row: Schmelter, Barbor. Kempinger. R. Hanson. Schubert. D. Hanson Socond Row: Stoch. Marheine, Horn. Boldt. Stieben. Mr. Pyle. Belanqer. Mynnlng, Pierce ALPHA PHI OMEGA Advisor Mr. Everett G. Pyle First Semester Officers Second Semester John Belanger...............................President............................John Belanger Charles Otto............................. Vice-President ...................Fred Baumgartner Donald Marheine ........................... Secretary ......................Donald Marheine Robert Barber.............................. Treasurer ..........................Robert Barber Richard Schubert........................... Historian .......................... Francis Grott Page 68Unique in that it is the only fraternity on the campus that has service as its main purpose is Alpha Phi Omega, the national service fraternity. It is composed of men who were, or are, in the scouting movement and who wish to carry on their interest in scouting. The fraternity attempts to serve the school, the community, and the nation as a whole. Some of its projects during the past year included constructing a large wall map of the Twin Lakes Area for the Twin Lakes Scout Lodge, furnishing men to marshall the homecoming parade, and providing ushers for the Pro Arte Quartet and the International Forum Series. Alpha Phi also furnished ''police'' for the football games. Biggest project of the year for Alpha Phi Omega was the Christmas Basket Drive for needy families. A ''can" dance was held to collect food and money for distribution to the needy, and, in addition, all societies were contacted for contributions. With everyone's help, the drive was a big success. Alpha Phi is also represented in intra-mural sports. Teams competed in touch football, volleyball, basketball, and softball. The volleyball team had the distinction of being the only team to top the "Mighty" Midgets. By contributing canned goods this studont is admlttod to tho Alpha Phi Omega Christmas Benefit Dance. Four Alpha Phi Omegas give an Indian War Dance at the WSSF benefit box social and dance. Page 69First Row: Zernzach, Peterson. Yankee Second Row: Thiol, Brynor. Frioss, Coumbo. Miolko, Kopitzko, Broitrick. DoBylo, Chady Third Row: Schneider, Hasley, Steffen, Imig, Geenen, Belling. Titzkowski, Milins, Baus DELTA PHI Advisor Miss Helen Colby First Semester Officers Second Semester Marian Oleson .............................President.......................................Muriel Waldron Ruth Ann Chady.......................... Vice-President Ruth Ann Chady Doris Schartner .......................... Secretary Janet Breitrick Perry Lou Schneider....................... Treasurer Perry Lou Schneider Muriel Waldron............................ Historian Marjorie Williams Marjorie Williams......................... Custodian Ruth Hasley Page 70In the form of a scavenger hunt, the informal rushing party of Delta Phi was held at the home of a member, Gertrude Baker. The highlight of the evening was when the hunt unexpectedly, but pleasantly, brought forth the appearance of Mayor Siewert of Oshkosh. A formal rushing dinner was held a week later at the Hotel Raulf. The society erected a large ice cream cone for their Homecoming float. With members licking the cone, their appropriate slogan read "Watch Us Lick 'Em." The formal pledging party was held October 17 at the home of the society advisor. Miss Helen Colby. All the pledges received a yellow rose, the chosen flower of the society. Louise Coumbe was chosen to "govern" Delta Phi's volleyball team when they entered the fall tournament. On October 28. Delta Phi and their brother society, Iota Alpha Sigma, sponsored the annual Sadie Hawkins dance. As in previous years, the dance v as pronounced an enjoyable highlight of the year. Herbie Breitzman furnished the music. Dolores Ecker directed the Delta Phi entry tor play contest. The title of the play was "Magic on Maine Street". The cast included Velma Kasten, Carol Peterson, Joan DeByle, Marilyn Yankee, Suzanne Pfeiffer and Sue Youngwirth. On December 12, Delta Phi held their Christmas party in the Women's Lounge. Guests included Mrs. Thedinga, Miss Leyson and Miss Shimek. Admission to the party was by a gift which could consist of a toy, piece of clothing or canned goods. Three baskets of toys, food and clothing were then arranged and given to the Salvation Army for a needy family. A basketball team was organized second semester for entry in the W.R.A. basketball tournament. Louise Coumbe was chosen captain. Elaine Bryner was selected chairman for Songfest. The song chosen was the "Desert Song". Delta Phi also presented a short skit in the Vod-Vil contest. The annual and final formal of the year v as held by Delta Phi and Iota on May 6 at the Masonic Temple. In order to become better acquainted, both the mothers and the girls met at the annual Mother's Day Tea held on May 13. For the Delta Phi's, this event closed another chapter headed "Successful". Harvest Festival, depicted for us by the Delta Phi play cast. Delta Phi's interpretation of Desert Song in the Iota Songfest. Page 71First Row: Fraedrick, Bock. Kohlbeck. Motor Second Row: Anunson. Pischke, Knutson, Hansen, Ouade, Burr, Laun, O'Connnor. Race Third Row: Lem, Manross. Fralish. Herzog. Edlor, Lawless, Schrimpf, Domer, Campbell, Kavolski ,j_ GAMMA SIGMA Advisor Corinne Hubbard First Semoster Offlcors Second Semester Jean Streckenbach .........................President.......................... Midge Hansen Susie Manross .......................... Vice-President Jean Jones Midge Hansen.............................. Secretary Janice Kavolski Janet Reimers............................. Treasurer .........................Janet Reimers Betty Williams............................ Custodian Betty Williams Verla Stutzman ........................... Historian Betty Williams Page 72A gala reopening of the "Purple Parrot" night club set the pace for Gamma Sigma's participation in school events. Informal rushing was the occasion, and with Betty Ann Williams as roving mistress-of-ceremonies interviewing prospective pledges, everyone thoroughly enjoyed themselves, and felt that the society had received a promising send-off for the coming year. Formal rushing was held at the Town Grill. New blood in the society asserted itself almost immediately with the choice of the slogan "It's a Singe to Win" decorating the Homecoming float which consisted of a green gull being barbecued over a fire. Sparkplugged by the presence of Nancy "Sporting Blood" Race, volleyball enthusiasts gave their all participating in the intersociety sports contests, while the basketball team, led by Ethel Schrimpf, showed its pluck and sense of fair play. As has been their annual custom, Gamma Sigma again assumed the responsibility of purchasing and decorating a Christmas tree. Standing as it did in the second floor corridor of the Administration building, it made students and faculty alike conscious of the spirit of Christmas time. One of the important events of the year was the Periclean - Gamma Sigma formal, held at the Twentieth Century Club. After much deliberation, the theme decided upon was that of a "Winter Rhapsody." Tom Temple's orchestra provided the music. Songfest has always been of special interest to Gamma Sigs, so their entrance in the event was carefully selected and painstakingly rehearsed. With Jean Jones as their able director, the Gamma Sigs sang "I'll Be Seeing You." The last of the organized school events was Vod-Vil, another intersociety event; Gamma Sigma entered with high hopes for first place that was justified by their spirit and enthusiasm. Following participation in Vod-Vil the society members held their annual cottage party as a last get-together. Gamma Sigs gathor for thoir ring song. Annual Gamma Sig Homecoming Luncheon. Page 73First Row: Hoeft. Schumacher. Rhode, Haworth. Arzborger. Mlllor, Onnink. Firary Second Row: Rhoades, Johnson, Cudnohuisky. D. Nashold. E. Nashold. B. Kelly. Cain. Manis. W. Bush Third Row: R. Spaulding. L. Spaulding. Zoch. Gagnon, King. Lind. Spoohr, Fonzl, Does. Warnocko, Olbrich Fourth Row: Braun, Pieper, Schomisch. Kalbus, Binkowski, Bidwell, Tiddens, Boyle. Neveu, Popp. Kinziger IOTA ALPHA SIGMA Mr. Orlen Dean..................Advisors................ Dr. Ralph Norem First Semester Officers Second Semester Cliff Rhode ....................President..............................Milt Spoehr Don Meyer ................... Vice-President ...............Evan Gagnon Jim Spaulding ................. Secretary Gene Nashold Don Hoeft ..................... Treasurer John Arzberger Norm Schomisch................. Historian Don Meyer Page 74Iota Alpha Sigma began their year of activities with informal rushing at the predominately Iotan House of Meyer. A week later they held their formal rushing at Kile's Campus Cafe. As an added activity this year, Iota decorated the main corridor for Homecoming besides decorating their own float. "Milwaukee's Foaming and Losing It's Head" was the slogan which the Iotan's selected for their float. This consisted of a huge beer mug which was constantly losing its foam (soap suds—of course!) On Saturday evening, they held an Alumni banquet at the Athearn Hotel. Iota together with their sister society. Delta Phi. sponsored the Annual Sadie Hawkins dance on October 28. Again this year the dance was complete with many Lil' Abners' and Daisy Maes. The appropriate prize of a small jug was awarded to those best fitting the comic strip characters. Music for the occasion was provided by Herbie Breitzman. In November, the new pledges were hampered by "Quest Night.” This night the lowly pledges were compelled to obey the slightest wish of their society elders. Of the many things prescribed was the scrubbing of the two lions at the entrance of the Oshkosh Main Library and the recitation of Shakespeare on street corners. Iota entered play contest with a comedy entitled, "If Men Played Cards As Women Do”. The cast included Dick Schumacher, Charles King, Bob Firary, and Bill Manis and was directed by Freddie Cruckson. The society entered teams in intramural sports, including touch football, volleyball, basketball, and track. During "Hell Week”, the Iotans came up with a new idea. Each pledge was given a huge paddle on which was the name Iota and which the pledge had to carry for one entire week. By the end of the week, the pledge had to have the autograph of each society member. The autograph was received only after the member had given him a sound wack with the paddle. On April 14 Iota sponsored their annual songfest with Ray Wachholz as chairman. Later, under the direction of Freddie Cruckson. they entered Vod-Vil. As the final event of the year Iota and Delta Phi held their spring formal at the Masonic Temple on May 6. ILWAUKEES omiki ncikin HEIR If Men Played Cards As Women Do", prosontod by Iota Alpha Sigma at the Play Contest. Dick Schumacher. Pat Cain, Bill Manis. Bob Firary, and Chuck King made up the cast. Iota float entry for the Homocoming Parado. Page 75First Row: Case, Ring, Williams, Buchholz. Salm Second Row: Schlachtenhaufen, Thorp, V. Ferrell, Loosen. Henko. A. Ferrell. Davis. Lanpheer, Rossow, Kuske, Meier Third Row: Williams, Swanson, Johnson. Scharpf, Kasai, Wareham. Janssen. Johnson. Rodman, Flanagan. Broderick. Kroonko. Unferth KAPPA GAMMA Advisor Mrs. Irene Koerwitz First Semester Officers Second Semester Rita Meier..................................President...........................Therese Scharpf Lola Ring ............................... Vice-President Marian Johnson Ruth Winkel ............................... Secretary Beverly Salm Veola Ferrell ............................. Treasurer Veola Ferrell Jean Janssen............................... Custodian Anita Wislinsky Beverly Salm .............................. Historian Jean Janssen Page 76A "Behind the Swinging Doors" informal rushing party began the year's activities for Kappa Gamma Society. Formal rushing took place a week later with a dinner held at the Town Grill. With Mary Henke, a Kappa Gamma member. reigning as Queen, Homecoming was a special event for the society. A noon luncheon was held for the alums the day of the homecoming game. "Titan That Line" was the theme of Kappa Gamma's float entry the night before. Later in the fall the Alumnae group honored all the actives with an afternoon tea. A new loving cup was awarded at the annual Play Contest. Plans and details for this event were engineered by co-chairmen Shirley Kroenke and Jean Janssen. Alice Rossow acted as Mistress of Ceremonies and Mary Kasai scouted for between act entertainment. With Magdalen Redman as captain of the volleyball team, Kappa Gamma took first place honors in the tournament in the fall. Later in the year the society's undefeated basketball team captured first place honors and the basketball championship. Anita Wislinsky guided the team as captain. With Mary Henke as Songfest chairman, the society chose "Drink To Me Only With Thine Eyes" as their selection. Veola Ferrell and Audrey Johnson wrote and directed the society entry for Vod-Vil. As in past years, the girls planned for a summer cottage party to close another full school year. Kappa Gammas singtheir ring song for guosts at the formal. Homocoming luncheon given annually by the Kappa Gamma society. Page 77First Row; Grade. Dixon. Bersch, Krysiak Second Row: Donavan, Constance, Jacobson, Wood, V ashkoske, Bloom, Kramer, Schoenick, Oehmke. Gritt Third Row: Miss Waggonor, Neumann, Weber, Carollo, Webb, Grenier, Lee. M. Vander Schaaf, G. Vander Schaaf, Umland. Heineman, Sell, Breymann LAMBDA CHI Advisor Miss Waggenor First Semester Officers Second Semester Charmaine Lee ............................President......................... Shirley Grenier Alice Krysiak.......................... Vice-President Ida Carollo Virginia Winter ......................... Secretary ......................Elaine Constance Lois Umland.............................. Treasurer Lois Umland Marie Weber ............................. Historian ...................... Charmaine Lee Janet Dahm............................... Custodian ...................... Virginia Winter Page 78With a Nursery Rhyme theme as an opener. Lambda Chi began their school year of 1950. The informal rushing saw such assorted Mother Goose characters as Little Bo-Peep, Jill, Mother Goose, the 'ol woman of the shoe, Mother Hubbard and many more in the lounge of the Men's Gym. Amid the swirl of bright, gay formals one recognized the formal rushing party of the Lambda Chis at the Fly and Spider room of the Hotel Athearn. Everyone faithfully turned out to decorate the Homecoming float. As a slogan, "Let's Titan the Web" was chosen. A cast consisting of twenty-one girls was directed by Shirley Grenier and Mary Gritt as they presented "Old Maid's Conversion" as their selection for play contest. One of the society's most enjoyable events of the year was the annual formal held jointly with their brother society, Lambda Epsilon Beta, on Friday, November 11 at the Twentieth Century Club. The music was furnished by Reggie Barber and his orchestra. At Christmas time the members of Lambda Chi with the help of their brothers made the traditional lighted wreath which hung above the entrance of the Administration Building on Algoma Boulevard. Most enjoyable for many of the girls were the many sports activities. With Elaine Schoen-ick as basketball captain, Lambda Chi took second place, while in volleyball they placed third. The song "Star Lullabye" was their choice for Songfest. This was under the direction of Charmaine Lee. For the purpose of acquainting their friends with their mothers, the Lambda Chi's held a Mother and Daughter banquet at the Hotel Athearn on May 13. The final entry of the year was Vod-Vil, directed by Elaine Schoenick and Arlyce Heineman. The society ended their year of activities with an off-campus picnic and plans for a cottage party. The cast of Lambda Chi's play entry, "The Old Maid's Dilemna". "Star Lullabye" presented by Lambda Chi at Songfest. Page 79First Row: Carpentier, Jenks. Multhauf. Schmidt, Schoider, Green Second Row: Mr. Womaski. Portier, Cartwright. Morgan. Jillson, Miller, Cain. Hartman, Ermatinqor, Mr. Wonders Third Row: La Veillo, Spaulding. Wolimoyer. Bauer, Gould. Jirikovek LAMBDA EPSILON BETA Mr. Anthony Womaski........................Advisors...................... Mr. Robert Wonders First Semester Officers Second Somostor Ervin Behnke ..............................President............................ William Jenks Ray Fletcher............................ Vice-President John Jirokovec William Jenks............................. Secretary Robert Cain Claire Portier ........................... Treasurer Claire Portier Page 80Last year Lambda Epsilon Beta, under new organization and a new name, made an attempt to make the society a larger and possibly even better one. This year their hopes were somewhat accomplished through an increase in membership and an increased program of activity. In the fall of the year some of the first activities of the group were the informal and formal rushing paries which were held at Club Ohio. Next came the busy homecoming weekend when members cooperated to decorate a homecoming float using the slogan, “Ducks Today — Gulls Tomorrow” and carrying out a duck hunting theme. Their efforts were rewarded when they copped third place in the float contest. In November, the annual formal was held at the Twentieth Century Club. Lambda Epsilon Beta sponsored the formal along with their sisters of Lambda Chi. Reggie Barber furnished the music for the occasion. For the Kappa Gamma Play Contest Lambda Epsilon Beta presented "The Six Gods” under the direction of William Jenks. Using a unique style of presenting their play, the group came through to claim third place honors. Under the leadership of Erv Behnke, the society entered the Songfest contest singing "Little Brown Church in the Vale.” A short skit was also given for the Vod-Vil contest. In spring a young man's fancy turns to thoughts of — baseball and consequently to the softball contest sponsored by Lambda Epsilon Beta. A new trophy was awarded, since last year Periclean had won permanent pos-ession of the trophy. The cast of "The Six Gods" presented by Lambda Epsilon Beta in the Play Contest. "Ducks Today — Gulls Tomorrow", the theme of Lambda Epsilon Beta's Homecoming parade entry. Page 81First Row: Reinemann. Pulver, Adams, Smith, Greenquist, Reed, Schnabl, Leffen Second Row: Dr. Kargos, Mr. McNew, Bassert, Dreger, Mitchell, Hoffman, Moody Third Row: Tardiff. McFarrin. Martzke. Carter. Raabe Fourth Row: Landgraf, Williams, Brandt. Tallis, Wendt, Oudonhovon, Hamann, Walsh LYCEUM Dr. Burton Karges Advisors Mr. Donald McNew First Semester James Studley .. Lewis Reinemann Harold Hamann Wallace Hoffman Jack Reed........ Charles Bossert . Of floors .. President .. Vice-President . Secretary . . Treasurer . . Historian . . Custodian . Second Semester .....John Moody Lewis Reinemann ... Darrell Piette Wallace Hoffman ...... Jack Reed . Charles Bossert Page 82Lyceum opened a busy and successful year with an informal rushing party held October 1 at the Campus Cafe. A week later selected rushees were guests at a formal rushing held jointly with Lyceum's sister society at the Athearn Hotel. Pledges became members following a traditional Hell Week and Guest Night. In the Homecoming parade Lyceum featured a float of Indians, teepees, and war cries with the slogan "We'll Walkee Over Milwaukee." With the play "Minor Miracle", Lyceum captured first place in the Kappa Gamma Play Contest. The cast under the direction of Bill Mitchell included Grant Gilray, Edward Land-graf, Ralph Percey, and Warren Tardiff. At the first Winter Carnival held at OSTC Lyceum was the sponsor of the Ice Frolic Races. Under the direction of James Studley, Lyceum continued its activities with an entry in Songfest. This year's selection was "Meadow-lands". April 21 was the date of the annual Lyceum-Phoenix spring formal held at the Twentieth Century Club. Jimmy Kornder and his orchestra furnished the music. One of the highlights of the school's social calendar is Lyceum's tournament of laughter, the Vod-Vil, which was held May 4 and 5. Lewis Reinemann acted as chairman. Among the many functions that Lyceum participated in, the group had an entry in each of the intramural sport leagues. Lyceum climaxed the year with an annual group picnic. ! v Lycoum's prizo winning play. "Minor Miracle". "Meadowlands". as presented by Lyceum at the Iota Songfest. Page 83First Row: Draper, Kirchner, Jesse. Doll. Willard. Ritchie. Adams. Lautenschlaqer. Second Row: Schalinske. Vaughn. Meyer. Wagner, Zieman, Maichen. Melgaard, Robinson. Janssen. K. Schneider, Brady. Cotter. Listle. Third Row: Loppnow. Connor. Cousineau. Kelly. Hoehno. Nordhaus. Thell. D. Schneidor. Koeck. Nielsen. Ford. Stevenson. PERICLEAN Mr. Nevin James Advisors Mr. Earl Hutchinson First Somostor Officers Second Semester Kurt Thiel .................................President.......................... Douglas Ritchie Douglas Ritchie ......................... Vice-President Paul Stevenson Don Connor................................. Secretary Henry Rajsky Robert Nordhaus ........................... Treasurer Robert Nordhaus Robert Loppnow ............................ Historian ............................ Robert Doll Milton Lautenschlager ..................... Custodian ............................ Clete Listle Page 84With the first meeting of the year Periclean Society established a potential theme of added participation in all school events, and competitive competition. Pledging only eleven fellows in informal rushing the first semester and six the second, Periclean came up with full strength for all participation and events. Starting out strong with Homecoming weekend, the float committee, headed by Tom Janssen and Brad Nielson, turned out a dragon warship for the parade with the theme. "We'll A-Nile-Ate-'Em". This entry copped first place. On the weekend of the Winter Carnival a Periclean man was elected to reign over the event as Jack Frost. This representative v as Bob Nordhaus. In charge of decorations and advertisements at the Carnival were Don Schneider, Brad Nielson, and Bob Doll. The Gamma Sigma-Periclean Formal was held at the Twentieth Century Club on February 18. Music was provided by the orchestra of Tom Temple and members and guests danced to the theme of "Winter Rhapsody." In the touch-football season Periclean fielded a team composed of Paul Stevenson, Glenn Kirchner, Carroll Vaughn, Kurt Thiel, Bob Nordhaus, Jim Adams, Tom Cotter, Bob Dalton. Brad Nielson, Ken Robinson, Don Doucette, Bob Jesse, and Orlyn Zieman. This aggregation was humbled by only Iota and the independent Midgets who went on to win the football title. In basketball Periclean floored two teams, the Hoopsters and the Amboy Dukes, for a society representative in each basketball league. The Amboy Dukes, headed by Don Conner and Don Doucette, proved the better of the two teams, rating second in final competition. Members of this team were Clete Listle, Don Ford, Wes Cousineau, Bob Dahl, Brad Nielson, Paul Stevenson, Bob Loppnow, Rock Meyer. Jack Brady, Jim Kelly, and Frank Utz. In the post-season tournament play, this outfit was beaten in the opening round by an independent team. Periclean entered the Songfest content with the song entitled "Shut the Door They're Coming Through the Windows”. Following this event Pericleans entered the Vod-Vil contest. The "search”. Poricloan's grand finalo for the Lyceum Vod-Vil. Page 85First Row: Mynning, Privoznik, Corrigall. Piorco. Gerth, Chaso, Hortz. Second Row: Mr. Bailey, Dichtl, Neumann, Sonnloitner, Dodge, Wendt, Hebenstreit, Vajgrt, Peterson, Jacobs, Marschall, Damon. Third Row: Stoch, Brink, Beck, Miracle. Mitchell. Barbor, Gabriel, Egan. Tracy, Brasch. PHILAKEAN Mr. Gerald Reed ...........................Advisors.........................Mr. Richard Bailey First Semester Officers Second Somostor Donald Corrigall ..........................President............................ Donald Gerth Walter Tracy ........................... Vice-President ....................... lames Bettin Gordon Miracle ........................... Secretary .......................... Arthur Chase Thomas Damon Treasurer ........................Thomas Damon Page 86Philakean began the first semester of the school year with its usual formal and informal rushing parties, at which times a large number of pledges were invited and received into the society. The entire bulk of pledges, in the course of the year, proved themselves to be very worthy choices as prospective members of an active society. The entry in the Homecoming Parade had as its theme "We're the Victory Type", which was carried out by means of a huge typewriter with Philakean members and pledges punching up the keys to spell "victory". Although the float did not place among the top three, its ingenuity and make up showed a spirit of cooperation and ambition. Philakean, along with its sister society, Alethean, revived one of its old traditions of past years, a Spelling Bee. The finish found Alethean the winners. However. Philakean still has hopes of someday proving that men can spell as well as women. The annual Alethean-Philakean Formal Dance, held at the Twentieth Century Club, had an excellent turn-out, with all thoroughly enjoying dancing to the music of Howard Paul and his orchestra. The various intramural sporting contests found Philakean an eager and willing contender. While they did not finish on top. each member played hard and displayed an excellent quality of sportsmanship. At the beginning of the second semester, the members voted to have Mr. Richard Bailey, one of the newer English professors of the college, to act as their advisor with Mr. Reed. The second semester rushing party was held at the Campus Cafe with nine new pledges being taken into the society at this time. This party, like all Philakean parties, provided a good time for all those present. As in the past year, Philakean entered the Vod-Vil and Songfest contests. The school year was brought to a close by a joint picnic between Philakean and its sister society Alethean. Philakean throughout the year enters into every activity possible and by so doing makes the society a rich and interesting experience in which every member is proud to participate. r Philakoans proclaim, "We’re the Victory Type" in the homecoming parade. "Going Home". Philakean’s entry in the Iota Songfest. Page 87First Row: Wolff, Van Roy, Dos Jarlais. Socond Row: Fessenden, Grover, Mortenson, Rasmussen. Glaesman, Grosshuosch, Olsen, Spink. Third Row: B. Nickel. Horst. Zirbel, Stettbacher. Tomlin. Hammer. Radke, Bundy, Doctor. L. Nickel. PHOENIX Advisor Mrs. Bertha Merker First Semester Officers Second Semester Bernice Nickel .............................President...................................... Joyce Rasmussen Audrey Horst ............................ Vice-President Connie McCarville Lorraine Spink............................. Secretary Lillian Van Roy Barbara Sensiba............................ Treasurer Barbara Sensiba Connie McCarville ......................... Historian Lorraine Spink Charlotte Olsen ........................... Custodian Charlotte Olsen Page 88Pajamas, slips, housecoats, night gowns, and pin-curls made up the spectacles seen at the Congregational Church Hall, the scene of the Phoenix come as you are informal rushing party. More dignified was the formal rushing dinner which was held in the Fly and Spider Room of the Atheam Hotel. After the dinner, Phoenix and their Lyceum brothers held a dance in the Continental Room. Friday afternoon of Homecoming weekend found Phoenicians busy finishing their float "Flippty-Flop to the Barber Shop to Get a Titan Trim." When all the votes were tallied, the Phoenicians came in second. On Saturday, a homecoming luncheon was held at the Hotel Atheam for the Alumnae. In November Alice Wolff and Connie McCarville directed the play. "Sorority Sisters", for the play contest in which they placed second. The plot concerned the inside story of a freshman who needed affection and understanding. Phoenix and Lyceum members gathered at Christmas time to carol for the patients of Sunnyview. A story was read by Faith Koll and gifts were given to the children. Sports were an active part of the Phoenix agenda. Participating in both volleyball and basketball, Phoenix placed second in volleyball. At the beginning of the second semester, initiation of the first semester pledges was held at the home of Ella Mae Schloerb. Initiates were temporarily tortured and a locker was filled with food for the members. Phoenix, directed by Jackie Rand, entered Songfest and sang "All the Things You Are". On April 21. the Phoenix - Lyceum Spring formal was held at the Twentieth Century Club. Jimmy Roberts and his orchestra furnished the music. Another spring activity was the Mothers' Day Tea which was held at the Congregational Church Hall. The cast of the Phoenix play. “Sorority Sisters", included Joan Quist. Nancy Grovor. Loona Nickel. Ella Mae Schloerb, Jackie Rand. Elaino Glaosman. Mary Ellen Doctor and Joyce Des Jarlais. The year's activities were concluded by the Vod-Vil entry directed by Evelyn Draeger, the spring picnic, and a cottage party for the weekend following the close of school. At the Honors' Assembly, Phoenix awarded the scholarship trophy to the society having the highest grade point average. Phoenicians entertain Alumni at their Homecoming luncheon. Page 89Periclean society "A-Nile-Ate" their competition in the annual Homecoming1 parade to take first place honors. Alice Rossow presents the silver loving cup to William Mitchell. Director of Lyceum's play, "Minor Miracle", which was judged first in the annual Kappa Gamma Play Contest. Co-chairmen Shirley Kroenke and Rita Meier watch. Jean Jones, director of Gamma Sigma's first place "I'll Be Seeing You", receives the silver loving cup from Ray Wachholz, chairman of the Iota Songfest. Page 90First Row: Meyer. Hoohne. Koeck, Listle, Jesse. Smedberg. B. Bush. Fuchs. Luker. Schein. Socond Row: Coach Kolf. Goetsch, L. Bush, Niqhbor. Becker. Cousineau. Ford. Smith. Murray. Lautonschlager. Mqr. Harmon. Third Row: Mqr. Paffenroth. Waqner, Klovono, Schneider. Anderson. Willard. Zoch. Smith. Schwobkc. Mqr. Draper. FOOTBALL Except for La Crosse and Stevens Point, 1949 football co-champions, no team in the Wisconsin Teachers Conference can boast of exceptional success during the past season. OSTC, which placed tenth and last in the loop race, was just two games behind Platteville, the number five team. Four other teams were sandwiched between Platteville and Oshkosh and separated for the most part by half games. A comparison of points scored by their opponents substantiates the fact that none of the bottom eight schools produced an extraordinary football machine in 1949. Page 91 Coach Robert M. KolfCoach Robert M. Kolf's charges made their debut against a well-proportioned Platteville team and were beaten 6-0. The lone tally came shortly after halftime on a sneak pass. The Titan backs bulled their way to within ten yards of pay-dirt twice during the fracas, but both times their attack bogged down. K. Schneider C. Zoch The following week on the yellow-jacket gridiron at Superior, the Titans won their only game of the year by upsetting their favored host. 13-7. Early in the first quarter, the Oshkoshers staged a fine comeback to knot the score 7-all at the half. A sustained field length drive culminated in the second and winning Titan touchdown. Oshkosh played host to Milwaukee for their homecoming which was ruined by a last minute desperation pass of some 47 yards which gave the Green Gulls a 13-10 victory. A fourth quarter field goal had given OSTC a 10-1 edge, and, from all appearances, they were destined to keep it. Somehow a Gull end managed to get behind the Titan secondary and grab the L. Bush Page 92 W. Cousineau P. Wagner C. Smedborg R. KoeckT.D. pass which left the large crowd of alumni and students stunned for several minutes. Coach Kolf resorted to a modified platoon system in the Whitewater game, October 22, in order to limit the action of several regulars who were nursing injuries. Whitewater, however, playing before a capacity homecoming crowd, was highly geared for the Titan encounter and turned back the visitors, 19-2. A. Luker R. Nighbor November 5 marked the end of the 1949 grid season for the Oshkosh Titans who battled Stout and lost, 14-0. A number of OSTC thrusts deep into enemy territory were halted by a determined Stout forward wall. Nevertheless, the Titans were apt at selecting their slots and showed up well in the broken-field running department. Making their final appearance in a Titan football uniform v ere Carl "Swede'' Smedberg, Paul Wagner, Art Hoehne, Arden Luker. Ken Schneider and Milt Lautenschlager. A. Hoehne B. Bush F. Lautenschlager C. Listle R. Meyer Page 93Guard Ww Cousineau gives a giant grip to Captain Claudo Zoch. Bill Bush approves CONFERENCE STANDINGS W L T p O La Crosse 5 1 0 145 75 St. Point 5 1 0 124 64 Stout 4 2 0 96 63 Milwaukee 3 2 1 84 74 Platteville 3 3 0 66 72 Whitewater 2 3 1 79 61 Eau Claire 2 3 1 47 61 Superior 2 4 0 74 100 R. Falls 1 4 1 44 106 Oshkosh 1 5 0 38 100 October 1 Platteville 7 Oshkosh 0 October 7 Superior 7 Oshkosh 13 October 15 Milwaukee 13 Oshkosh 10 October 22 Whitewater 19 Oshkosh 2 October 29 Stevens Point 40 Oshkosh 13 November 5 Stout 14 Oshkosh 0 J. Murray B. Schein C. Kleveno B. Josso W. Fuchs Page 94Coach JColf. Lautenschlagor. Luker. Cotter. Zoch. R. Spaulding. L Spaulding, Ritchie, Adams. Willard, Schumacher. Dees, Kirchner, Popp. Pfioffor, Vaughn, Mgr. Harmon. BASKETBALL By winning eight of their twelve conference games, the OSTC Titans tied the Green Gulls of Milwaukee for the second place berth in the State Teachers College Conference. Furthermore, the Kolfmen copped three of their six extra-loop games. Viewed as a whole, the season was considerably more successful than the 1948-49 campaign. River Falls retained their conference crown with a perfect 12-0 record, and led the conference offensively with 932 points. OSTC was second in the league with 803 points for an average of slightly under 67. Coach Kolf's five "Married Men" have finished their cage careers at OSTC after having played over 70 games together. Doug Ritchie, the deadeye from Montello, left little to be desired as he set a new Titan record by racking up 369 points in 18 games for a phenomenal 20.5 average. In his four year tenure at Oshkosh the Titan captain scored 1,029 points, another school record. From statistics compiled by the National Inter-Collegiate Basketball Association of over 100 secondary schools, Ritchie ranks tenth in scoring. The dogged ballhawking and marksmanship of Arden Luker and Milt "Fritz" Lauten-schlager supplied the added punch which oftentimes meant the difference between victory and defeat. Dick Schumacher's steady, cool playing, coupled with the rebound power of Jim Adams, rounded out a team which could hold a candle to any former Titan quintet. However, not to be overlooked are the reserves who came through well in almost every tight spot. Lawrence Spaulding and Orson Willard proved to be very competent understudies of the towering Adams. Two Titan freshmen, Carroll Vaughn and Jim Dees, made especially promising displays of talent. Tom Cotter, Dave Popp, Carl Pfeiffer, Glenn Kirchner, Dick Spaulding, and Claude Zoch saw only limited action during the past season, but, with the exception of Kirchner, who is a senior, are slated for considerable action next season. Page 95Jim Adams Jim Spauldina Doug Ritchie Fritz Lautenschlager Glen Klrchner Dick Schumacher Arden Luker Orson Willard I Page 96Paced by Doug Ritchie's 31 point splurge, the Oshkosh Titans won their season's opener over Mission House, 69-40. The junior Kolfmen took over after halftime and fared very well. In their second non-conference game the Titans were defeated by a powerful St. Norbert team, 79-61. Doug Ritchie pumped in 22 markers while Knight Don Johnson scored 21. The Titans opened conference play by trimming Platteville, 75-61, on the local court. Milt Lautenschlager and Doug Ritchie were the defensive mainstays and also led the Titan offense with 16 points each. OSTC's yearlings, Carroll Vaughn and Jim Dees, made their debut and notched seven points apiece. Coach Kolf's Titans salvaged third place in the Lawrence Invitational Basketball Tournament, December 30 and 31. The first night the locals bowed to their hosts, 76-61. They came back the following night to clip Carroll College, 62-49. OSTC pinned back the ears of their perennial rivals, the Ripon Redmen, by a 69-60 score at the Merrill Gym. Kermit ''Doc'' Weiske tallied 23 points for the losers while Ritchie and Schumacher scored 18 and 16 respectively. Stevens Point exploded a tremendous scoring drive in the second half to defeat the visiting Oshkoshers 73-58 during Christmas vacation. OSTC led most of the first half; the score at halftime was 34-32, Stevens Point. Milwaukee's Green Gulls eked out a slim 65-61 win over Oshkosh on January 10. The count was knotted 15 times during the game, and it was only in the final two minutes that the Gulls pulled away. The Titans shackled Nate De Long, the River Falls giant, but were unable to stop his teammates as the Westerners romped over OSTC, 82-65. Doug Ritchie, the Montello Bomb-sight, dropped in 23 points while Newman Benson scored 20 for the winners. Bouncing back from their River Falls defeat, the Kolfmen ran up a 75-58 win over Eau Claire on the latter's court. Titan scoring was well balanced with Ritchie taking the lead with 17. Jim Adams and Billmeyer of Eau Claire scored 13 each. Doug Ritchie's 34 points set a blistering pace as the Kolfmen defeated Whitewater, 80-73, in what was perhaps the hardest fought game of the season. The following week the Oshkosh quint traveled to Platteville and handed the Pioneers another setback, 64-55. Doug Ritchie stole the show by netting 25 markers; Arden Luker added 13 more. The locals staved off a last minute rally by Stevens Point to even their score with the Point- Page 97CONFERENCE STANDINGS w L P O River Falls 12 0 932 713 Oshkosh 8 4 803 776 Milwaukee 8 4 711 655 Platteville 6 6 762 767 La Crosse 6 6 654 631 Superior 6 6 648 701 Eau Claire 5 7 779 834 Whitewater 4 8 712 773 Stevens Point 3 9 709 784 Stout 3 9 706 763 ers by a 68-66 count. Dick Schumacher flipped in the final bucket which gave OSTC the edge. The Titans annexed their fifth straight conference win by downing Stout, 64-56. The victory moved the locals into a third place tie with Superior. It was anybody's game until the last few minutes when OSTC began to edge away. La Crosse snapped the Titan winning streak in a 55-52 thriller at the Merrill Gym on February 13. The score was nip and tuck all the way with the midtime count being knotted at 25 all. Ritchie and Lautenschlager collected 13 and 10 respectively An underdog Titan team upset Milwaukee's highly favored Green Gulls 72-67, on the latter's home floor. This is the first season since 1935 that OSTC has humbled their big city rivals at Milwaukee. Reliable Doug Ritchie topped the Oshkosh scoring column with 21 points while Lemmer of Milwaukee gathered 23. For the fourth consecutive year the Ripon Redmen successfully defended their home sovereignty against OSTC, this time by a 76-65 score. The Riponites shot a sizzling 46 per cent in the opening half which more than offset the 26 point output by Doug Ritchie. Kermit Weiske wheeled in 24 for Ripon. In the season's finale, OSTC edged the Quakers of Whitewater. 69-65, to cop a share of the number two spot with Milwaukee. Fantastic Fritz Lautenschlager amazed the fans by lofting in three long shots and proved himself to be equally able on defense. Orson Willard poured in four timely buckets from the pivot while Ritchie rang up 15 from the corners. Page 988iGOLF Oshkosh and Whitewater, last year's defending co-champions of the State Teachers Conference, were dethroned as Milwaukee State won the 1949 golf crown with a team score of 611. La Crosse and Stout were knotted for second place honors with identical scores of 612. OSTC wound up sixth in a field of eight. Bob Klein of Whitewater won the medalist award with his score of 142 on eighteens of 70 and 72. The top Titan golfer was Marv Paffen-roth whose two 75's gave him 150 for 35 holes. Other Oshkosh scores posted were: Eddie Erban, 81-82—163; Dick Luft, 80-84—164; Ralph Draeger, 84-80—164; and Ralph Hartman, 83-81—164. Page 100TENNIS Annexing their third consecutive conference crown, the Oshkosh Titans completed their conference year at Milwaukee on Saturday. May 21, 1949 at Milwaukee. The Titan ace. Paul Keller, won the singles championship for the third straight year while the OSTC duo of Fintan Flanagan and Norm Thiel captured the doubles crown. Art Messerschmidt defeated Fisk of Stout. 6-3. 6-2, to place third in the singles race. Messerschmidt was beaten in the semi-finals by Bulmer of Eau Claire who then bowed to Keller. Keller drew a bye in the first round, and after trouncing Janish of Milwaukee, 6-0, 6-1, he went on to trim Fisk in the semi-finals, 6-0, 6-1. In the championship game Keller turned back Bulmer of Eau Claire, 6-3, 6-1, 4-6, and 6-2. The Flanagan-Thiel team won the first round from the Schulb9 brothers of Milwaukee. 6-4, 6-1 and then took the semi-finals from Stevens Point's Bart-Christenson team, 6-0, 6-1. Hansen and Davis of Eau Claire were defeated by Flanagan and Thiel in the finals, 6-1, 6-1, 6-0, to give Oshkosh the doubles championship. The total points scored by OSTC were 11 compared to 6 for Eau Claire and one for Stevens Point. Art Messerschmidt and Fintan Flanagan practicing tor the state tennis meet. P. Keller, F. Flanagan, N. Thiel, N. Tobo, A. Messorschmldt Page 101Milt Spoehr practicing the high jump. TRACK Culminating their 1949 varsity track season, the Oshkosh Titans placed fourth in the May 28 meet. Milwaukee State Teachers College retained their State Teachers Conference crown by copping eight of the 15 first place honors and amassing 94' points. The La Crosse thinlies finished second with 77l t, while White-water took third with 25. River Falls and Stevens Point were in the bottom berths. Jim DeMerit, La Crosse ace. was the individual star of the meet taking first place laurels in the shot put and the high hurdles. DeMerit set the only new meet record by putting the shot 44' 6" to smash the old mark set by Champ Siebold of Oshkosh in 1940 by one fourth of an inch. Four Titans scored 18 points for the white and gold. Claude Zoch, veteran fieldman, won Oshkosh's only first place by tossing the discus 12' 6". Evan Gagnon, another Titan hefty, took fifth in this event. He also scored a strong second in the shot while Zoch placed third. Tom Schumacher came in fifth in the two mile run which was won by Benson, a Milwaukee cinderman. Doug Ritchie rounded out the local scoring by winning second place honors in the javelin throw. A month earlier, in a dual meet with St. Norbert's College, Ritchie set a new record by pitching the javelin 180' A1 ". This toss bettered Siebold's mark of 180' set in 1940. First Row: W. Jorgenson, C. Zoch. I. Adams. C. King. A. Hoohno, D. Schneider. Second Row: Coach R. M. Kolf, E. Gagnon. B. Nielson. D. Schumacher. M. Spoehr, R. Wachholz. B. Bush, Manager, B. Harmon. Third Row: B. Manis, C. Schwobko. T. Schumacher, T. Morrissey. D. Soybold. L. Ernst. Page 102Intramurals Periclean's perennial touch football champs were dethroned by the Midgets, a newly formed independent team. Winning all seven of their encounters, the Cretans finished a length ahead of a surprisingly strong Iota eight which posted a 6-1 record. Alpha Phi Omega edged the House of A for the number four spot by a half game, while the Airosols took sixth on two wins and a tie. Victors in only one game, the Philakeans finished in seventh while hapless Lyceum went winless to take the bottom berth. Outdistancing eleven other teams in the race for the intra-mural volleyball crown, the giant-killing Midgets captured their second straight cup. A surprise upset by Alpha Phi Omega was the only setback for the Lilliputians who notched ten victories. Independent House of Lange and APO were knotted in a tie for the runner-up position while Iota was fourth with eight wins and a trio of losses. Phy. Ed. 10:35 grabbed fifth place honors with seven wins, and next came the Spikers of Periclean with six scalps. Seventh place Lyceum registered five victories. Philakean's Fairies and the Zephyrs were deadlocked for the number eight berth with four-seven records. In tenth position was the other Philakean team, while last year's champions, the Burps of Periclean, were 11th with only one win. Lambda Beta dropped out midway through the season. The seventeen intramural cage teams were divided into two divisions this year. The Amboy Dukes and the House of Mauritz shared the American League crown with 6-1 records. Following the top two came the Floorshines, Hot Shots, Hoopsters, Clowns, Philakeans, and Alpha Phi Omega in that order. The Commuters won eight straight to cop the National League championship. They were followed in line by the Midgets, Iota, Hornets, Fairies, House of Lange, French 74's, Lyceum, and Lumberheads. The feature of the season was the single elimination tournament which consisted of the four top teams from each league. The Floor-shines, Iota, Hornets, and Amboy Dukes were ousted in the first round. The Midgets and Commuters won their semi-final games from the Hot Shots and Mauritz respectively. The Midgets outlasted the Commuter five to take the toumey crov n. The Hot Shots laced Mauritz 47-23 for consolation honors. Page 103WOMEN’S SPORTS Promotion and direction of the various women's sport activities on campus is carried on through the Women's Recreation Association, otherwise known as WRA. Any coed interested in sports is invited to join the organization which was headed this year by presidents Veola Ferrell and Magdalen Redman; vice-presidents. Therese Scharpf and Anita Wislinsky; secretary-treasurer, Agnes Anderson; and executive board, Veola Ferrell and Therese Scharpf. The first activity of the fall season was the annual volleyball tournament in which seven teams participated. Kappa Gamma, led by ''Maggie'' Redman, won the right to have their name placed on the volleyball plaque as "Champs—49". Lambda Chi, Elaine Schoenick captain, took a close second with the final game between the two teams one of close rivalry. With the start of second semester began the annual basketball tournament which was played as a round-robin tourney with six teams entered. Once again Kappa Gamma was the victor as Anita Wislinsky led her team to undisputed possession of the basketball crown. Lambda Chi, led by Elaine Shoenick, took another second place in another final game of close rivalry.' Kappa Gamma also claimed the highest scoring player in the tournament. Veola Ferrell, who scored twenty-four points in a single game. In the spring of the year the individual sports, including badmintin and tennis tournaments, were sponsored. Last year in a double elimination tournament, Elaine Schoenick and Arlyce Heineman were crowned co-champs of the doubles badminton tourney after defeating Ida Carollo and Charmaine Lee in the finals. First place winners received gold medals and the runners-up received silver medals. A round-robin tournament ended the spring sports. For the third consecutive year, Elaine Schoenick took top honors and Connie McCar-ville placed second. Consolation honors went to Arlyce Heineman. Medals were awarded to the winners of this tournament also. WRA activities for the year were closed with a picnic and informal get together. Page 104WHO’S WHO Wachholz, Schloorb. Brismastor, Jones, and Halle. Thiol. Schomisch. McCarville, Haworth, and Streckenbach. Incorporating a large portion of the synthesis element is the recognition of graduating seniors in the publication. Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Each year since 1934 outstanding students in the various colleges throughout the country have been given recognition in this publication as a reward for notable achievements in their college careers. The student must first be officially recommended by the university or college he attends and then be accepted by the organization. Nominating committees are requested to consider the students’ scholarship, his leadership and cooperation in educational and extra-curricular activities, his general citizenship, and his promise of future usefulness. Page 105SENIORS JAMES I. ADAMS, North Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Minors: Physical Education, Biology, June Graduate. Periclean 3-4; Football 1; Basketball 1 -2-3-4; Track 1-2-3-4; Men's Association 3b, 4a, Secretary-Treasurer 4a. Kathryn C. ANGELICH, Oconto, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English. Minors: Speech, History; June Graduate. Alethean 2-3-4, Critic 3b. Vice President 4a, Inter-society Council 3a; Quiver 3-4; Co-Editor 4; Newman Club l-4a. LOIS ATKINS, Madison, Wisconsin. Rural, January Graduate. Alpha Chi l-2a. BARBARA BARTZ, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Alpha Chi la-2; C.L.S. la-2; W.R.A. la-2. BETTY BERGMAN. Rhinelander, Wisconsin. 3 yr. Primary, June Graduate. Alethean 1-2-3; Custodian 2; Historian 3b; Kappa Delta Pi 3b; Treblechor la-b. JANET BREITRICK, Appleton, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Delta Phi lb-2, Secretary 2b; Alpha Chi 1-2; StudenFCouncil lb. ROBERT BRISMASTER, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, Minors: Speech, Economics, June Graduate. Alpha Phi Omega 1; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4, Vice President 4a-b; Student Council 2; Men's Association 2, President 2; Campus Forum 1-2; Class Play, Stage Manager 1-2-3-4; Quiver 2-3, Associate Editor 2, Editor 3; Advance 1-2-3, Photographer 1-2-3. CARYL BROWN. Appleton, Wisconsin. 4 Year Primary, June Graduate. Kappa Delta Pi 3-4; Campus Forum 2-4; International Relations Club 1; Evangelical Students Union 1-2, Secret ary-Treasurer 2a; C.L.S. 4; Women's Executive Council, 4. SHIDLEY A. BRUSOE, Three Lakes, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, Minors: Speech, tfistory, June Graduate. Lambda Chi 2-3-4, President 3a, Custodian 3b; Women's Executive Council 2; Campus Forum 2-3; Quiver 1-4; Newman Club 2; School Play 3b-4b; Intersociety Council 4. ELAINE BRYNER, Markesan, Wisconsin. Intermediate. Summer School Graduate. Delta Phi 4; Alpha Chi 1-2; Band 1-2; Orchestra 1-2; Kappa Delta Pi 4; C.L.S. 3-4, Secretary 4b. ARLENE BUCHHOLZ, Kingston, Wisconsin. 3 yr. Intermediate. June Graduate. Kappa Gamma 1-2-3, Treasurer 2; Intersociety Council 3; Kappa Delta Pi 3; Advance 2. EDWARD A. CALDER, Menasha, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, History, June Graduate. RUTH CHADY, Appleton, Wisconsin. Rural. June Graduate. Delta Phi lb-2, Vice-President 2; Alpha Chi 1-2, Treasurer 2; Student Council la. ARLINE J. CHAPPLE, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Primary, Post Graduate. PATRICIA CLEARY, Marinette, Wisconsin. Intermediate. June Graduate. Kappa Delta Pi 4. DONALD J. CONNOR, Antigo. Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Social Science, June Graduate. Lambda Epsilon Beta 1; Periclean 3-4, Secretary 4a; Campus Forum 1. ETHEL COOKE, Racine. Wisconsin. Primary. ALBERT L. CRISSEY, Gaylord, Michigan. Secondary, Major: History, Social Studies, Minor: Economics, June Graduate, Iota Alpha Sigma 1-2; Campus Forum 1-2-3-4, Vice-President 1, President 4a; International Relations Club 1-2; C.L.S. 1-2-3-4, Secretary 2. CAROL J. DONOVAN, Van Dyne, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Lambda Chi 1-2; Newman Club 1-2. DOLORES D. ECKER, Chilton, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, Minor: History, Speech, June Graduate. Delta Phi 1-2-3-4, Vice President 2b, Critic 3a; Advance 3; All School Play 3b-4b. LURA E. ESTABROOKS, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Primary. January Graduate. Gamma Sigma 3b-4. AILEEN M. FLANAGAN, Rush Lake. Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, January Graduate. Kappa Gamma la-3-4; Newman Club 3. LEONARD FEUDNER, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary, June Graduate. WINNIE A. FINK, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Mathematics, Physics, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 3-4. RAYMOND L. FLETCHER, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Social Science, Minor: Economics, June Graduate. Lambda Epsilon Beta, Treasurer. Vice-President. Page 107SENIORS LOIS GABRiLSKA. Omro, Wisconsin. Primary, June Graduate. C.L.S. 4; Women's Executive Council 3; Kappa Delta Pi 3a-b. ELAINE GLAESMAN, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Primary, June Graduate. Phoenix 1-2-3-4, Custodian lb, Secretary 2a, President 3a; Intersociety Council 4a. LAWRENCE LEEMAN GRAVES, Waupun, Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: History, Minors: Biology, Physiscal Education, Summer School Graduate. Transferred from Mission House College Junior year 3a. SHIRLEY FAITH GRENIER. Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, Minors: French, Speech. June Graduate. Lambda Chi 1-2- 3-4, President 4b; Quiver 3-4; Advance 4, Society Editor 4a; Newman Club 3; All School Play, assistant to Business Manager 4b. FRANCIS GROTT, Cleveland, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Social Science, Minors: Political Science, Physical Education. June Graduate. Alpha Phi Omega, Historian 4b; Newman Club 3-4; Intramural Basketball 4b. RAYMOND LOUIS GULBRAND, Two Rivers, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Biology, Minors: Physical Education, English, Summer School Graduate. Periclean 2a; C.L.S. 3-4a; Basketball 1-2-3; JAMES ROBERT HAAS, Waupun, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Social Science, Minors: Economics, History, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 1-2-3-4, President 2b, Marshal 3a; College Choir 2-3-4; Student Council 4a, Secretary 4a; Men's Association la. MERLIN DONALD HALLE, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary. Majors: Mathematics, Physics, June Graduate. Kappa Delta Pi 3b-4, President 4; Phi Chi Mu 1-2-3-4; Who's Who In American Colleges 4. MADELINE HANSEN, Green Bay, Wisconsin. Rural. June Graduate. Gamma Sigma 1-2, President 2b, Intersociety Council lb-2a; Alpha Chi 1-2; Student Council Representative 2a; Wesley Foundation 1-2, Vice-President 2; Women's Executive Council 2, Secretary-Treasurer 2; Quiver 2. DANIEL THOMAS HAWORTH, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: Chemistry, Mathematics, Minor: Physics, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 3-4; Kappa Delta Phi 3-4; Newman Club 3-4; Phi Chi Mu 2b-3-4, President 4; Who's Who In American Colleges 4; Phi Beta Sigma 4. DONALD CHARLES HOEFT, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: Geography. Minors: History, Geology, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 2-3-4, Treasurer 4a; Intramural Sports 2-3-4. ARTHUR ROBERT HOEHNE, Winneconne, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Minors: Physical Education, Biology, June Graduate. Periclean 1-2-3-4, Secretary; C.L.S. 4b, Historian 4a, Football 1-2-3-4; Track 1-2-3; Intramural Sports 1-2-3-4. AUDREY MARGARET HORST, Kiel. Wisconsin. Three-year Primary, June Graduate. Phoenix 1-2-3, Secretary 2b, Vice-President 3a, Intersociety Representative 3b. Reporter 2a; Kappa Delta Pi 3; Advance lb-2a; C.L.S. 1-2-3, Treasurer 3; W.R.A. 1-2, Secretary 2a. Vice-President lb; Student Council 2b. FAYANN HORTON, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Rural. June Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2, President 2a; Student Relations Committee lb; Trampoline Club lb. WILLIAM ROBERT HUGHES, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History, Social Science. January Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 1-2-3-4, Treasurer lb, Vice-President 3b; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4, President 4; Pi Kappa Delta 4; Debate 3; Student Council 3, Secretary 3b. JOANNE IMIG. Waukesha. Wisconsin. Primary, June Graduate. Delta Phi 4. RAY JAVENKOWSKI, Three Lakes. Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Biology, Minors: Physical Education, History, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 2b-3-4; Newman Club 2-3-4, President 3a, Critic 3b; Choir 3-4. WILLIAM WAITE JENKS, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: History. Minors: English, Geology, June Graduate. Lambda Epsilon Beta 3-4, Secretary 4a, President 4b; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4; Phi Beta Sigma 4; Evangelical Youth Fellowship 1-2. JOHN JIRIKOVEC, Manitowoc, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History, Social Science, Minors: Physical Education, Economics, June Graduate. Lambda Beta Epsilin, Vice-President 4b, Kappa Delta Pi. HENRY FRANCIS JISA, Oconto Falls, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History, Social Science. June Graduate. Periclean 1-2; Band 1-2-3, President 3; Choir 4; Men's Choir 3; Campus Forum 1-4, Secretary-Treasurer 4. HUGH JONES, Redgranite, Wisconsin, Secondary, Major: Mathematics. Minors: History. Biology, June Graduate. Advance 2b-3a; College Pilgrims Fellowship 1-2-3; Oratory 1-4; Men's Glee Club 1. MARY JEAN JONES, Horicon, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma 2-3-4, Secretary 2b, Vice-President 3b-4b, Critic 4a; Choir 2-3-4; Student Council 2b-3a-3b; Women's Association, Vice-President 3; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4. MRS. MARY KAISER, Waupun, Wisconsin. Intermediate, June Graduate. Transfer Oswego Teachers College. Oswego. Nebraska. LEE KALBUS, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, June Graduate. MADALENE KIESNER, Chilton, Wisconsin. Intermediate, June Graduate. Band 4; Orchestra 4.SENIORS KIRCHNER, GLENN ALLEN, Appleton, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: English. Geography, June Graduate. Periclean 1-2-3-4, Vice-President 2b, President 3a; Social Life Committee 4a; Men's Association, Secretary-Treasurer 3; Football 1-2; Basketball 1-2-3-4. FAITH MARY KOLL, Oshkosh. Wisconsin, Kindergarten-Primary, January Graduate. Phoenix; Kappa Delti Pi 4. BARBARA KOPITZKE, New London. Wisconsin. 3 yr. Primary. June Graduate. Delta Phi 1-2-3, Treasurer 2; Alpha Chi 1; College Lutheran 2-3. MERLE EDNA KRAUS, Oshkosh, Wisconsin 3 year Primary, January Graduate. ALICE V. KRYSIAK, Pulaski. Wisconsin. 3 year Primary, June Graduate. Lambda Cni 1-2-3, Vice-President 3a; Women's Association Executive Council 2; Advance 2-3; Quiver 2-3; Newman Club 1-2-3; Student Council 3a-3b. JUNE KUSKE, Maryland, Kentucky, Intermediate, June Graduate. Kappa Gamma 1-2-3-4, Vice-President 2b; Intersociety Council 3; C.L.S. 1-2-3-4; Student Council 3b; Kappa Delta Pi 3b-4. MILTON ADAM LAUTENSCHLAGER, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Minors: Physical Education, Geography. June Graduate. Periclean 1-2-3-4, Treasurer 3a; Basketball i-2-3-4; Football 1-2-3-4. EDWARD JOSEPH LEVE1LLE, Peshtigo, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Social Science, Minors: History, Geography, June Graduate, Lambda Epsilon Beta. ROBERT ARTHUR LOPPNOW, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Geography. Minors: English, History, June Graduate. Periclean 1-2-3-4, Secretary 2a. Treasurer 2b, Intersociety Council 3a, Historian 4a; Veteran's Organization 2-3-4; Football la. MARIAN LEUBKE OLSON, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Primary, June Graduate. Delta Phi 1-2-3-4. HERBERT J. LUNDIN, Niagara, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: Geography, Social Science, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma, Historian 3b, Critic 4b; Newman Club, Vice-President 3b, President 4a, Critic 4b; Choir 3-4; Advance 2-3; Quiver 3; Social Life Committee 4a. ROBERT MAGLE, Marinette, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Alpha Chi lb-2, Program Comittee 2a. GUST MASTRICOLA, Redgranite. Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: History, Minors: Physical Education, Biology, June Graduate. CORINNE A. MCCARViLLE. Green Bay, Wisconsin. Primary, June Graduate. Phoenix 2-3-4, Reporter 3a. Historian 4a, Vice-President 4b; Choir 2-3; Advance 2-3, News Editor 2a, Editor 2b, Associate Editor 3; W.R.A. 1-2-3, Reporter 1, Vice-President 2a, Secretary-Treasurer 3a; Newman Club 1-2-3-4, Reporter 2b. Secretary 3a, Intersociety Council 3, Vice-President 3b; Kappa Deleta Pi 3-4. RITA MEIER, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Primary, June Graduate. Kappa Gamma 1-2-3-4, Secretary 2a, Treasurer 2b, Historian 3a, President 4a; Newman Club 1-2-3-4, Historian 3a, Secretary 2a; Band 1-2-3-4; Advance 3b; Quiver 4; Women's Executive Council, President 3. DONALD C. MEYER, Menasha, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: English, History, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma, Vice-President, Historian; Campus Forum 2-3-4, Vice-President 2, President 3; Debate 2-3; Pi Kappa Delta 3-4, President 4; Intersociety Council, Vice-President 3a; Social Life Chairman 4a; Student Council, President 4b. LESLIE MILLER, Oostburg, Wisconsin. Elementary, June Graduate. Men's Association 3-4; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4; Phi Beta Sigma 4. REYNOLD V. MILLER, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History, Social Science, June Graduate. Lambda Epsilon Beta 4; Intramural Golf Championship 3b. ALICE MOEHRING, Seymour, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, January Graduate. Alethean 2-3-4; Advance 2a; Student Council 3b; Intersociety Council; Women's Association la. OYCE MORTENSEN, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, June Graduate.DELMAR C. MULT-IAUF, Hartford, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History, Geography, Minors: Geology. June Graduate, -ambda Epsilon Beta, President, Vice-President, Historian, Intersociety Council; Phi Beta Sigma 4; Campus Forum 4. PATRICIA A. MURPHY, Chilton, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, Minors: Speech, History. Delta Phi 1-2-3; Play Director 2a-3a, Intersociety Council 2b-3a; Compus Forum 3, Secretary 2; Pi Kappa Delta. JOAN NABBEFELD, Appleton. Wisconsin. Intermediate, June Graduate. Kappa Delta Pi 3-4; Newman Ciub 1-3-4; Advance 2b. BERNICE L. NICKEL, Chilton, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, June Graduate. Phoenix 2-3-4, Vice-President 3b, President 4a, Reportor 4b; Newman Club 2-3-4, Treasurer 3; Women's Association Executive Council 3. Page 111SENIORS CHARLOTTE OLSEN, Theresa, Wisconsin. Primary, June Graduate. Phoenix 2 3 4, Vice-President 3a, President 3b, Custodian 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3b 4, Program Committee 4; Choir 2-3; C.L.S. 2-3-4, Vice-President 2b; Advance 2b; Quiver 2; W.R.A. 1-2, Secretary lb. President 2a, Reporter 2b, Treasurer la. MARGARET L. OLSON, Waupun, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, January Graduate. Lambda Chi 3b-4; C.L.S. 3b-4. MILDRED M. PAAPE, Saukville, Wisconsin. Intermediate. Summer School Graduate. Alethean 3-4, Custodian 4a; Quiver 3-4. MARVIN R. PAFFENROTH, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: Social Science, Geography, History, June Graduate. Periclean; Football. Basketball Manager; Golf. JOAN I. PANKRATZ, Appleton, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, January Graduate. Gamma Sigma 2b-3-4, Secretary 3b-4a; Newman Club 2b-3a; Band 3a; Student Council. BARBARA R. PETERSON, Marshalltown, Iowa. Secondary, Majors: English. History, June Graduate. Alethean, Treasurer 3, President 4a; Advance 2b-3, News Editor 2b, Editor 3a, Associate Editor 3b; Kappa Delta Pi 3b-4; Women's Executive Council 3, Secretary-Treasurer 3; Wesley Foundation 2-3, Secretary 2, Vice-President 3; Quiver 4, Co-editor 4; Phi Beta Sigma 4. EUGENE W. PETERSON, Leopolis, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, Minors: Speech, Biology. June Graduate. Choir 1-2-3; Christmas Play 4a; All School Play 3b-4b. GILBERT F. POLLNOW, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: Chemistry, Minors: Mathematics, Physics, June Graduate. CLAIRE E. PORTIER. Oconto Falls, Wisconsin. Intermediate, June Graduate. Lambda Epsilon Beta 3-4; Wesley Foundation. MARILYN L. PRITCHARD, Randolph, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, January Graduate. JAMES W. PYNCH, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary. Majors: History, Geography, Minor: Geology, June Graduate. Kappa Delta Pi 3-4; Phi Beta Sigma 4; Campus Forum 4, President 4. DONALD E. RASMUSSEN, Redgranite, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History, English, Minor: Mathematics. June Graduate. JOYCE RASMUSSEN, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Elementary. June Graduate. Phoenix 1-2-3-4, President 4b, Custodian 3b, Reporter 2a; Art Club 3. CLIFFORD K. RHODE, Coleman, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Mathematics, Minors: History, Physical Education, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 2-3-4, Treasurer 3b, President 4a. ANN RICHTER, Fond du Lac. Wisconsin. Primary, June Graduate. Cheerleader 1-2; W.R.A. lb-2-3, President 2b, Council Board 3a; All School Picnic Chairman 2b. EUGENE M. RIEDL, Hortonville, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: Social Science, Geography, Summer School Graduate. Intramural Sports, Basketball 1-3-4; Softball 1-3-4; Basketball Coach of the Training School 4. LOLA RING, Dalton, Wisconsin. 3 year Intermediate, June Graduate. Kappa Gamma 1-2-3, Secretary 2a, Vice-President 3a. DOUGLAS S. RITCHIE, Montello, Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: History, Minors: Biology, Physical Education, June Graduate. Periclean 1-2-3-4, Vice-President 4a, President 4b; Football 1; Track 2-3-4; Basketball 1-2-3-4, Captain 1-2-4, All Conference 1-2-3. JANET HORN. Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. 3 year Primary, January Graduate. ALICE ROSSOW, Princeton, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, June Graduate. Kappa Gamma 2-3-4, Historian 2b. Sargeant at Arms 3b, Chairman of Play Contest 2a; Choir 1-2-3-4; Band 1-2-3; C.L.S. l-2-3a; Advance 3b; Quiver 4. BEVERLY SALM, Neenah, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Kappa Gamma 1-2, Historian 2a, Secretary 2b, Homecoming Chairman 2a; Alpha Chi 1-2, Vice-President la, Secretary lb. Historian 2a; Student Relations Committee lb; Quiver 2b. DORIS SCHARTNER, Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Delta Phi 1-2, Secretary 2a; Alpha Chi 1-2, Program Chairman; Newman Club 2b. LUCILLE D. SCHLACHTENHAUFEN, Ripon, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, June Graduate. Kappa Gamma 2-3-4, Intersociety Council; Choir 2-3-4. ELLA MAY SCHLOERB, Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, Minors: Speech, History, June Graduate. Phoenix 1-2-3-4, Intersociety Council, Secretary 2a, Custodian; Choir 1-2-3-4; Kappa Delta Pi 3b-4, Secretary 4; Phi Beta Sigma 4; Who's Who in American Colleges 4. RAYMOND C. SCHMELTER, Brillion, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Mathematics, Minors: Physics, English, June Graduate. Alpha Phi Omega 2-3-4, Treasurer 3; Phi Chi Mu 3-4. Page 113SENIORS ALENE SCHMIDT, Green Bay, Wisconsin. 3 year Primary, June Graduate. Choir la. ALVIN W. SCHNEIDER, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History, English, Minor: Geology, June Graduate. PERRY LOU SCHNEIDER, Neenah, Wisconsin. 3 year Primary, June Graduate. Delta Phi 1-2-3, Treasurer 3, Intersociety Council 2; Alpha Chi la; Band 2-3; C.L.S. 1-2-3, Treasurer 2; Student Council la; Girl's Glee Club 2a. NORMAN SCHOMISCH, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History. Social Science, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 1-2-3-4, Intersociety Council 3b, Historian 4a; Kappa Delta Pi 3b-4; Advance lb-2-4b. Editor 2a; News Editor lb, Associate Editor 2b-4a; School Play lb-2b-3b-4b; Newman Club 1-2-3-4, Critic 3a, Historian 3b, Vice-President 4a. LYLE M. SCHULTZ, Wautoma, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Natural Science, Minors: Physical Education, Mathematics, June Graduate. DORIS SCHUMACHER, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. 3 year Primary, Junuary Graduate. Lambda Ci 3. RICHARD F. SCHUMACHER, Janesville, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Natural Science. Minor: Biology. Physical Education, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma, President 3a, Marshall 3b, Intersociety Council 2b; Basketball 1-2-3-4, Captain 3, All-Conference 3; Track 1-3; Social Life Committee 4a; Student Council 4b, Vice-President 4b; Men's Association 4a-b, President 4b; All School Play Stage Committee 2b. IRENE M. SEIL, Adell, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Minors: English, Geography, June Graduate. Lambda Chi 2a-4b, Secretary 2b; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4; Phi Beta Sigma 4; International Relations Club; Campus Forum 4; Newman Club 2-3. ETHEL SELCHERT, Juneau. Wisconsin. 3 year Primary. June Graduate. Lambda Chi 3; C.L.S. 1-2-3; Girl's Glee Club 2; W.R.A. 2. BARBARA SENSIBA, Green Bay, Wisconsin. 3 year Primary. June Graduate. Phoenix 1-2-3, Treasurer 3a-b; Advance 2; Student Council 3a. ANN SHROVNAL, Kewaunee, Wisconsin. 3 year Primary, June Graduate. Newman Club 2, Historian-Reporter la. MARLYN J. SIMONSON, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, Minors: Latin, History, June Graduate. Kappa Delta Pi 3b-4, Historian 4; Social Life Committee 4a; Women's Executive Council 3; Quiver 4. CHARLOTTE P. SKINNER, Stoughton, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English. Minors: History, Biology, June Graduate. Alethean 1-2-3-4, Critic 2b, Vice-President 3b, President 4b; Band 1-2-3, Treasurer 2-3; W.R.A. 1; Christmas Play 4a; Quiver 3; Social Life Committee 3a. JIM M. SMITH, Ciintonville. Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, June Graduate. RUSSELL A. SPAULDING. Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Minors: Biology, Geography. June Graduate. Lambda Epsilon Beta; Phi Beta Sigma 4. JEAN A. STRECKENBACH, Green Bay, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Mathematics, Minors: Physics, Chemistry, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma 1-2-3-4, Vice-President 3a, President 4a, Intersociety Council 4b; Wesley Foundation 2-3-4, President 3, State Council Representative 4; Choir 1-2-3-4; Kappa Delta Pi 3b-4. VERLA M. STUTZMAN, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Mathematics. Minors: English, History, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma 1-2-3-4. Historian, Custodian; Kappa Delta Pi 3b-4; Choir 1-3-4. KURT R. THEIL, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History, English, Minor: Mathematics, June Graduate. Periclean 1-2-3-4, Treasurer 2b-3a, Vice-President 3b, President 4a; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4, Treasurer 4; Phi Beta Sigma 4; Student Council 3. Vice-President 3a, Secretary 3b; Homecoming Chairman 3a. Who's Who in American Collegs 4. FERN UEBELLE, Hartford, Wisconsin. Primary, Summer School Graduate. LOIS L. UMLAND, Bimamwood, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, Minor: Physical Education, June Graduate. Lambda Chi. GWENDOLYN VANDER SCHAFF, Juneau. Wisconsin. 3 year Intermediate, June Graduate. Lambda Chi 3. MARILYN VANDER SCHAFF, Juneau, Wisconsin. 3 year Intermediate, June Graduate. Lambda Chi 3. LILLIAN VAN ROY, Kaukauna, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, June Graduate. Phoenix 2-3-4, Secretary lb, Custodian 3a, Intersociety Council 4a; Newman Club 1-2-3-4. RAYMOND WACHHOLZ, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Grammar Grades, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 1-2-3-4, Secretary 3b; Choir 1-2-3-4; Track 1-2-3-4; Quiver 1; Student Council Council lb-2-4; C.L.S. 1-2-3-4, Secretary 2a, President 3a. JOHN H. WAHLERS, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History. June Graduate. Page 1157 BETTE ANN WILLIAMS. Eldorado. Wisconsin. Rural. June Graduate. Kappa Gamma lb 2; Alpha Chi 1-2, Vice-President la. Custodian lb, Historian 2b; Wesley 1. LO ANN WILLIAMS, Van Dyne, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Kappa Gamma lb-2, AlphaChi 1-2. ROBERT DELBERT WILLIAMS, Brandon, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Physics. Minors: Mathematics, Chemistry. Phi Chi Mu 3-4. LUCILLE YOUNG. New London, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2; Newman Club 1. JAMES JOSEPH YOUNGWORTH, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, Minors: Physics, Mathematics, Summer School Graduate. NORMA ZARTER, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 3 year Intermediate, June Graduate. Kappa Gamma 1. ORLYN ZIEMAN, Rlandolph, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: English, History, Minor: Biology. June Graduate. Periclean, Historian 3a, Intersociety Council 3a, President 3b; Advance 3a. SENIORS NOT PICTURED BETTY BAHLKE, Princeton, Wisconsin. Rural. June Graduate. Alpha Chi 2, President 2b; C.L.S. 2. JEAN E. DAHM, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Elementary, January Graduate. Lambda Chi, Custodian. BEVERLY JANE EICK, Dale, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, Summer School Graduate. WILLIAM JOHN FENELON. Brandon. Wisconsin. Elementary, January Graduate. WALTER KENNETH HARTMAN. Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History, Social Science, June Graduate. Lambda Epsilon Beta 4. Intersociety Council. RUTH LORRAINE HElN, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: English, Minors: Latin, French, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma 1-4; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4. YVONNE M. KELLERMAN, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Elementary, January Graduate. Kappa Delta Pi 3-4. EVELYN HARTMAN KERR, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Primary, January Graduate. HELEN MARIE KUEHL, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Minors: English, Biology. June Graduate. I.R.C. 1; Campus Forum 1-2-3-4. ARDEN L. LUKER, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Geography. Minors: Physical Education. Science, Summer School Graduate. Periclean 1-2-3-4, Secretary 3b; Football 1-2-3-4; Basketball 1 -2-3-4; Track 1-2. CAROL MADER, Gresham, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, June Graduate. Alethean 3-4; Newman Club 3-4; Transfer Milwaukee State. CARL EUGENE SMEDBERG. Fond du Lac. Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History, Social Science, June Graduate. Periclean 3-4; Men's Association 3-4, Vice-President 3b-4a; Football 1 -2-3-4. Captain 3a. JAMES H. STOUT. Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Geography. Minors: Music. Geology, January Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 1-2-3-4, Vice-President 3; Choir 1-2-3-4; Band 4a. PAUL JACOB WAGNER, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Social Science, Minors: Biology, Physical Education, Summer School Graduate. Periclean 1-2-3-4; Football 1-2-3-4, Captain 2. WILLIAM SIDNEY YORKCRITCHLEY. Fond du Lac. Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History. Social Science. January Graduate. LU ANN ZUERN, Hartford, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Alpha Chi lb-2; W.R.A. 1-2, Vice-President 2a; Newman Club 1-2. I Page 116 CAMPUS Prof Pinned Page 117HOMECOMING 1950 Homecoming Chairman, Don Meyer OSTC STUDENTS RALLY TO MAKE SUCCESSFUL EVENT Busiest weekend in the fall of the year was the much anticipated Homecoming weekend! The returning of the alumni, the election of Mary Henke as homecoming queen, the parade with the Phoenician's first place float, the House of Schneider with their prize winning decorations, the annual touch football game and mud battle, the big game with the Milwaukee Green Gulls, and, finally, the Homecoming dance, made this weekend one to be long remembered by the OSTC coeds and college Joes. Custodian Ronnie Campbell radiates "Let's Clip Their Wings", slogan of the some of his spirit to students at pep first place winning House of Schneider, assembly. Students gather on the campus for the Mud-weary warriors clean up after post-parade pep rally. annual frosh-soph mud battle. Page 118QUEEN MARY HENKE Court attendants Carol Jean Donovan OSTC students and alumni wind up and Jean Streckenbach sit on either the weekend's activities at the annual side of Queen Mary Henke as they homecoming dance, reign at the homecoming game. Page 119OSTC students stop at the college store before they join sport fans to watch the to get a between class snack racqueteers on the conveniently located tennis courts. LIFE Class studies are made more practical as OSTC students carry their knowledge into the field and the laboratory. Page 120Other aspects of College life at OSTC and Doctor Ramsden of the Pre-Profess-are typified by Carol Mader as she ional Department counseling a future applies her education courses while business administrator, teaching in the kindergarten AT OSTC OSTC facilities include a Training and locker room facilities for such School cafeteria open to all students activities as bridge, lounging and reading. Page 121Student librarians help to keep OSTC OSTC coeds help keep up male morale, library functioning while LIFE AT OSTC Evening entertainment such as this is sponsored for the students of OSTC by societies, the Student Council, and other organizations. Page 122SENIORS IN THE NEWS Robert Brismaster Jean Streckenbach Lee Kalbus Daniel Haworth Robert Brismaster of OSTC was chosen to represent Wisconsin at the 54th annual congress of American Industry. The National Association of Manufacturers Convention was held December 7-10, 1950 at the Waldorf-Astoria, New York City. Representing the Methodist Student Movement of Wisconsin at the National Conference of Methodist Youth held August 27 - September 4, 1950, at Williamsport, Pennsylvania, was Jean Streckenbach of OSTC. Jean is very active in Methodist Student work having been a member of the local organization for the past three years and having served as its president in 1948. Lee Kalbus, a chemistry major, has accepted a teaching assistantship in the analytical division at the University of Wisconsin, while Daniel Haworth, also a chemistry major, has accepted an assistantship at Marquette University. Page 123POLLY’S" BABY SISTER Viiim‘l»n« »l«n rK liroat Sron HOPE TO HOUSE 82 WOMEN IN NEW DORM At long last, the badly needed new women's dormitory is more than just a dream, for President Polk has announced tentative construction plans to make it a reality. The Pollock House, which at present is the only dorm for OSTC women, cannot begin to take care of all the coeds who would like to gain the experience of dorm life. The new dormitory will be one of seven to be built at La Crosse, River Falls, Superior, Platteville, White-water, Stevens Point and Oshkosh State Teachers Colleges. All of the dorms will be similar but not identical. First plans for the new dorm called for its adjoining the Pollock House, but it was found that a separate building is needed. Thus, the new site will be the Radford property facing Algoma Blvd. The building will have forty-one double student rooms accomodating eighty-two students. It will have two stories, and a full sized basement. On the first floor will be eighteen rooms for students, a lobby, guest room, office, mail room, kitchenette, and lounge. In the basement will be a large lounge, storage space, six date rooms, lobby, powder room, smoker, and kitchenette. Page 124DRIVER TRAINING COURSE LOCAL AUTOMOTIVE DEALER PRESENTS CAR TO COLLEGE Seen about the town in the spring of the year was a four door, gray Pontiac sedan with big black letters on the door saying, "State Teachers College Driver Training Car." The car is used by those OSTC students who are enrolled in the driver education class. The course is designed to equip future teachers to handle similar classes in high schools. In most cases, the beginner drivers, also students at OSTC, have proved very adept guinea pigs. Keys to the car were given to President Polk by W. D. Traver, manager of the Fisher Motor Company of Oshkosh in a presenting ceremony (shown above). Up to date the car has not suffered too much indignity and it has been out of commission only once. Trainees learn mechanical aspects of driving. Pag© 125WINTER CARNIVAL Mr. Jack Frost, Bob Nordhaus, and his queen, Janice Unferth, reigned over the weekend festivities Between skating races and figure skating exhibitions, students tried their skill on the ice. Dressed in jeans and plaid shirts, students attended the Frostbite Frolic and danced the polka, flying dutchman and old time waltzes to the music of Jack Wentzlaff. Page 126THE MILES CO., INC. Florists "Say It With Flowers" Weddings and Floral Designs FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION Greenhouse 76 Frankfort Street Stanley 126 Store 8 Waugoo Street Stanley 2311 R. E. Pamplin H. Cornell HOTEL ATHEARN "Famous for Fine Foods" NORMANDY COCKTAIL LOUNGE Rooms for Students Manager Lester McCormick RECORD HEADQUARTERS WILSON MUSIC CO. 178 Main Street FRESHMAN MIXER One of the first social events on the 1949 calendar was the annual Freshman Mixer. Sponsored by the Social Life Committee, it was held early in the fall. The dance was turned into a true mixer by having a "match-the-shoe" dance. All girls formed a circle and kicked one shoe into the center. The men were required to grab a shoe, find the girl to whom it belonged, and dance the first dance with her. The large crowd spent the remainder of the evening enjoying refreshments and dancing to the music of Searl Pickett and his Orchestra. V 69 Main Street Stanley 1566 151 Main Street Stanley 980 j. F. KRUMRICH Registered Jeweler American Gem Society Established 1905 143 Main Street Stanley 2386 Page 127NORTHWESTERN ENGRAVING COMPANY MENASHA, WISCONSIN THE HOUSE OF n O £ m cn m TO n New Plant at Midway Page 128Shouts of "Get him, Lulubelle, he's a rearin'!" resounded over the campus. The night for the coeds of OSTC to howl, to pay for all the bills, and to furnish their dates with vegetable corsages had finally arriver, for it was October 28 and the date of the Sadie Hawkins dance sponsored by Iota and Delta Phi. The Women’s Gym was decorated to provide the needed atmosphere for the many couples who danced to Herbie Breitz-man's orchestra, drank Kickapoo joy juice, and formed a promenade line for the Grand March to determine the best dressed couple, a Daisy Mae and a Li'l Abner. The winners of these titles were Bob Barber and Betty Williams, Beverly Eick, and Freddie Cruckson respectively (shown above). Page 129 The CAMPUS CAFE "Good Food at Moderate Prices" Jim Kile, Prop. 9 LRow One: Dean Leyson, Duex, Swanson, Dixon, Meyer Simonson Row Two: Carter, Flanagan, Lundin, Schumacher, Kirchner SOCIAL LIFE COMMITTEE CITY CAB COMPANY Phone Stanley 97 24 Hour Service Located at Greyhound Bus Depot 60 Main Street An active but unpublicized organization on campus is the Social Life Committee. Each semester the sstudent council selects a chairman or co-chairmen to head this committee and they in turn select their own committees. This year's chairman for first semester was Don Meyer, while Dan Carter and Marion Dixon were co-chairmen for the second semester. During the first semester the committee arranged for the homecoming dance for which Tony Winters and his orchestra furnished the music. They also made plans for the Christmas dance of the yuletide season. Pago 130The QUIVER Cover Santa at OSTC made by Second semester social events centered around the prom and the all school picnic. The prom was held May 19 with Louis Panico furnishing the music. The committee converted the ballroom into a southern plantation for the night and formally crowned the king and queen. The picnic grounds were the Pollock House and Radford House yards this year. To help make the picnic a success, school was dismissed at noon on Thursday, May 25. No complaints were heard. CRAFTO YEARBOOK COVERS Division of SHELBY CRAFTO CORP.NEWMANS SMART FASHIONS for the Discriminating Woman and Miss THROUGH COURTESY OF OSHKOSH BAKERS Bakery Goods That Are Different BAIER'S BAKERY 136 Scott Street Phone St. 935 DIXIE CREAM DONUT SHOP 495 Main Street Phone Blk. 4632 DUTCH OVEN BAKERY 234 Otter Street FRESH BAKED GOODS NIGL'S BAKERY • 808 Ohio Street Phone Blk. 4594 BOESE HOME BAKERY 1524 Oregon Street Open Daily 6 A. M. to 9 P. M. Sundays Holidays 3 P. M. to 7 P. M. For orders call St. 517 EVERYBODY'S FIRST CHOICE HEISS BAKERY BREAD 716 S. Main Street Page 132Reading Room Dedication J. T. PUTNEY DONATES FUNDS FOR LIBRARY ADDITION A new addition to college facilities is the Jay T. Putney reading room, located in the room formerly used as a textbook library. Furnished with comfortable, upholstered chairs, a table and a davenport, the room offers excellent opportunities for leisurely reading from the classics that have been placed in the bookshelves. Formal dedication of the Jay T. Putney reading room was held on November 2, 1950, at which time President Polk spoke to students present at the ceremony, (shown above). Mr. and Mrs. Putney with President Polk. Page 133MIDGETS Row One: Gagnon, L. Bush, Fletcher, Stevenson, Koeck. Row Two: Loppnow, Rhodes, B. Bush Basketball season witnessed the debut of the team of OSTC midgets. Averaging well over 200 pounds per man, the team traveled about the surrounding territory and furnished entertainment for sport fans. Towns in which the heavyweights played carried write-ups of the games advertising the Midgets as the OSTC beef trust. FRIENDLY SERVICE ALWAYS THE BANKS OF OSHKOSH WOOD'S FLOWERS We Specialize Bouquets Corsages Cut Flowers Funeral Work Flowers by Wire Anywhere — Anytime Service Guaranteed Call Stanley 465 WOOD'S GREENHOUSE 1015 Algoma Blvd. SP00 SON CLOTHING THE NORTHWESTERN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY M. A. Carroll, Agent UNION CIGAR STORE STEUDE FUR COMPANY 1 85 Main Street Oshkosh, Wisconsin 141 Main Street Stanley 1609 11 2 Main Street Stanley 541 Page 134ECONOMY MART INC. SPORTING GOODS 166 Main Street Oshkosh, Wisconsin FOX INSURANCE COMPANY AGRELL BRUESKE 57 Main Street Oshkosh, Wisconsin MARRIED FIVE A unique feature of this year's OSTC basketball team was the fact that the first five men on the team were married. The wives became true sport enthusiasts during the basketball season and backed the team at every game. Shown above are left to right: Fritz and Pat Lautenschlager, Doug and Pat Ritchie, Jim and Florence Adams, Dick and Doris Schumacher, and Arden and Shirley Luker. THE COMPLIMENTS OF MANGEL'S FEMININE MAIN SURPLUS STORE J. J. NEWBERRY APPAREL Main at Otter 99 Main Street Oshkosh, Wisconsin 115 Main Street Phone Stanley 533 Oshkosh, Wisconsin Phone Stanley 502 Page 135Cheerleaders Marilyn Goldsworthy, Roman Borkovec, Virginia Fessenden, and Norman Tebo. CHEERLEADERS W. T. GRANT CO. 85 Main Street "The Friendliest Store in Town" With the opening of of the football season begins the work of a small but nevertheless important organization — the cheerleaders. Headed by Norman. Tebo, Captain, and with Miss Waggenor as their advisor, Virginia Fessenden, Marilyn Goldsworthy, and Roman Borkovec led the students in cheering on the team. Their teamwork was backed by hours of practice. There were new yells this year in addition to the old one, but a game would not have been complete without at least one Fight Team Fight. GDC • Pasteurized • Homogenized • Vitamin D DAIRY PRODUCTS Guernsey DOiRy compnny 0 a t£u?Li$cd iSjUufu 'tcxxt-.. SmTEOTTER • OSHKOSH. WIS. TRY THEM GDC Page 136COEDS OPEN HEARTS AND LOCKER ROOM SERVE DIXIES TO MEN AND FACULTY A Rogue's Gallery of truly hardened criminals, a Fun House filled with all sorts of weird things, Gay Parie, and a Palm Beach complete with hot dog stand greeted those who attended the combination open house and locker room Palm Beach attracted the fancy of Grace Lem party given by the Women's Association on May 3, 1950 for all the male students and all the faculty of OSTC. After signing up for the door prize, attempting to guess the number of jelly beans in the fish bowl, and viewing the locker decorations, the guests were served dixie cups and were invited to test out the new furniture in the Women's Lounge. Prizes awarded for best locker decorations were first place to the Rogue's Gallery group and second place to the Fun House aisle. Elaine Viestenz guessed the a-mount of jelly beans in the fish bowl and Joanne Thorp won the door prize. Wheels whirling and math recalled, these fellows are ready to make their computations. Page 137QUEEN ALENE SCHMIDT AND KING JIM SMITH Page 138Preceding the election for prom king, the social life committee made use of the bulletin boards for publicity for the candidates. Any unmarried senior man was eligible for the coveted honor of prom king. VON CONN CPISSEY AY FLETCHER Walt hartman VAN HAWORTH VON HOEFT HENRY JISA LEE KALBUS E V LEV El LIE BOB LOPPNOW 07 Hc 8 i Y% 1950 PROM Royalty reigned May 19, 1950, at the Eagle's ballroom, which was converted into a Southern Plantation for the big night. Starry-eyed couples danced to the music of Louis Panico's Orchestra. Page 139CASTLE'PIERCE • FOUNDED IN 1888 RINTERS OF CHOOL ANNUALS OSHKOSHMiss Miller, of the OSTC health department, examining a troublesome eye. STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE Whether he has a headache, the signs of a common cold, or bumps and bruises as a result of participation in athletics, the OSTC health service is on the job to handle all the ailments of the student. Statistics have it that the college Joes frequent the health office more than the coeds do. With Miss Josephine Miller as school nurse and Dr. E. B. Pfefferkorn as school doctor, health service for OSTC students is carried on with the greatest efficiency possible. B Z FURNITURE CO. FIRST IN FURNITURE "The Value Sat ing Address” Compliments of S. S. KRESGE CO. 5 10 CENTS STORE 49 Main Street Oshkosh, Wisconsin Page 141 105 Main StreetThe Oshkosh Public Library is one of the many community facilities available to students of Oshkosh State Teachers College. Among its approximately 95,000 books are historical scientific and biographical material to which students can turn for background for the research papers required during their four years of college. SAWYER HARRIS PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMUNITY FACILITIES The Oshkosh Public Museum is another community facility which aids students of OSTC in acquiring a well-rounded education. Here, students may study art, history, science, as well as other fields, by observing materials used in centuries past. Because it is an objective of the museum to give a popular interpretation of the collections for the schools and public of the surrounding area, students find it easy to see the relation between antique and modern collections. SAYWER FOUNDATION PUBLIC MUSEUM Page 142HONOR RETIRING REGENT FRANK W. RADFORD In praising Mr. Frank W. Radford, retiring state teachers college regent, for his even temper, broad and flexible mind, and consideration of the faculty. President Forrest R. Polk was expressing the sentiment of all who attended the banquet in honor of the Radfords. Well known on the Oshkosh campus prior to as well as during his service as regent, Mr. Radford is the former owner of the property on which the new women's dormitory will be constructed. During his four years as regent, Mr. Radford, among other things, was influential in raising salaries for faculty members of the teachers colleges. Expressing regret at the necessity of resigning, Mr. Radford told the assembled faculty members, "I have enjoyed my association with President Polk, the faculty, and the board of regents." Page 143STUDENT INDEX EVANS BROS. BURR, INC. "FINEST IN QUALITY FOODS" 555 Algoma Boulevard 230 Merritt Street "EVERYTHING FOR THE SPORTSMAN" VETTE SPORT SHOP "The Trading Post of Wisconsin" 1 Main Street Oshkosh, Wisconsin Stanley 468 A Abidon. La Verne M...................... 00 Adams, Edward C......................... 00 Adams. James 1. 84. VS. 96. 102. 106. 13S Adams. Ronald ................ 21. 52. 82 Agnew. F.velyn A........................ 00 Agnew. Lorraine M....................... 00 Albers. Ciene H......................... 28 Algiers. Norberr E...................... 00 Allan. Lois G........................... 28 A me!. Glen W...................... 21. 52 Andersen. Annabelle E................... 21 Andersen. James G....................... 21 Anderson. Agnes R....................... 35 Anderson. Elmer S....................... 21 Anderson. Howard W................. 21. 91 Angelich. Kathryn G. ......... 44. 64. 106 Anunson. Zenella J. 21. 39. 52. 56. 66. 72 Arnold. Eugene C................... 52. 56 Arzberger. John W....................... 74 Atkins. Lois J......................... 106 Ausloos. Leonard J...................... 00 B Babler. Mars in R........................ 00 Bagley. John W................. 35. 46. 47 Bahlkc. Betty A.......................... 66 Baker. Gertrude D........................ 00 Ballard. Carol 1......................... 21 Barber. Betsey E......................... 22 Barber. Donna T.......................... 28 Barber. Nancy D.......................... 35 Barber. Robert D............... 28. 68. 86 Bartmann. John W......................... 35 Bartz. Barbara A........................ 106 Bauer. Clarence A........................ 28 Bauer. Ronald J..................... 21. 80 Bauernfeind. Roger C..................... 00 Baumgartner, Frederick VC'............... 28 Baumgartner. Julie A..................... 00 Baus. Rose M............................. 70 Baxter, Bertram S........................ 28 Baxter. Merritt H........................ 00 Bearss. Edgar 1.......................... 52 Bechard. James J......................... 21 Beck. Benny L.................. 21. 39. 86 Becker, Milton A.................... 35. 91 Beer. Leon N............................. 28 Behlendorf. Frederick C. ................ 00 Behnke. Ervin F..................... 35, 52 Belanger. John J............... 35. 48, 68 Belling. Marilyn J............. 21. 52, 70 Belonger, John H.................... 21, 56 Bender. Kent S........................... 21 Benner. Milton C......................... 00 Bergen. William II....................... 56 Bergman. Betty R.................... 64. 106 Bernard. Lois M.......................... 21 Berndt. Barbara R................... 52. 56 Berndt. Robert F......................... 00 Bersch. Gwendolyn E............. 21. 78 Berth. Robert H.......................... 00 Bethke. Victoria J.......................'00 Benin. James P...................... 35. 44 Bettini. John A.......................... 00 Beyer. Dorothy J......................... 00 Beyer. Dorothy J. ....................... 00 Bidwcll. Reginald D................. 28. 74 Billman. Joseph P........................ 00 Binder. Virginia M....................... 21 Bingen. James M.......................... 28 Binkowski. Donald 1............. 28. 74 Birkholx. Russell J................. 28. 49 Blahnik. Jane E................ 28. 64. 65 Blair. JoAnn B........................... 28 Blank. Urban J........................... 00 Blissctt. David Thomas .................. 00 B'ohm. Patrick J......................... 21 B'oom. Valeria M.................... 21. 78 Blow. Patricia M......................... 35 Bock. Jean C. ................. 21. 61. 72 Boldt. Harry H...................... 28. 68 Bombrrg. Marilyn D....................... 00 Borkovcc. Roman F................... 21. 136 Bosscrt. Charles P.................. 28. 82 Boyle. Norman W......... 28. 42. 43. 63. 74 Bradley. Raymond F....................... 21 Brady. John E....................... 35. 84 Brandt. Daniel A........... 21. 52. 56. 82 Brasch. I-con E.......................... 86 Brault. James W................ 21. 48. 49 Braun, (iordon J............... 28. 60. 74 Braun. Paul S............................ 00 Brcitrick. Janet E............. 66, 0. 106 Bremer. Barbara A........................ 00 Brrymann. Janet A................... 35. 78 Brink. William D......................... 86 Brismastcr. Robert E........ 105. 106. 123 Britton. Bruce M......................... 21 CITY CAB COMPANY 24 HOUR SERVICE Located at Greyhound Bus Depot 60 Main Street Phone Stanley 97 OSHKOSH CLEANERS DYERS "Dependable Service Always" 424 Main Street Phone Stanley 2368 Page 144STUDENT INDEX Broderick. Kathleen M.......... 28. 45, 76 Bronson. James E.................. 21. 56 Brown. Caryl M............ 40. 18. 59. 106 Brown, John F.......................... 35 Brusoc. Shirley A............ 46. 63. 106 Bryner. Elaine E.............. 59. 70. 106 Buboltz. Belly A....................... 00 Buchho'z, Arlene P............... 76. 106 Buck. Charles W................ 28. 41. 60 Bundy. Betty M................. 21. 56. 88 Bunker. Donald .................... 28. 60 Burr. Franklin W....................... 00 Burr. Mary B.................... 21. 52. 72 Burrows. Richard W..................... 21 Bush. Lee A................... 91. 92. 13 Bush. Wm. C. 28. 74. 91. 93. 94. 102. 1 34 Bushman. Beverly J..................... 21 Butler. Dorothy M...................... 00 Bntz. Paul J........................... 21 C Cain. Patrick E....... Cain. Robert S........ Catabbcsa. James V. . Odder. Edward A........ ('alder, Gerald E...... Calvert. Irvine D. ... Camnbell. Barbara I- Carollo. Ida A......... Camenticr. Frank J...... Carter. Dan 1.......... Cartwright. Billie L. .. Oise. Beverly E......... Cash. Herbert J......... Caudle. Maxine M........ Olicbowski. John F. . Chadv. Ruth A........... Challooer. George W. , Chamberlin. Mars’ P. .. Chappie. Arlinc J....... Chase. Arthur R......... Chinman. Shirlcv E...... Christensen. Robert H. Christen on. I.ouise M. Clark. Philits J........ Oaten. William E........ Oearv. Patricia A....... C’eivland. Dale S....... Col'ien. Robert A....... Co’son Donald I........ Connell. I.co I......... Connor. Donald J........ Constanre. Elaine E. ... Cook. Dexter F.......... Cooke. E'hel Mue ....... Corisnll. Robert J...... Corrieal' Don T......... Cotter Thomas P........ Coumhe. GwentWin I.. Courtoos’. Mont E...... Cmis'oenu Wrjlcv D. . C owl in e Shirlcv M. ... Covne. Wavne W.......... Cr«io. R-'loh .......... Crivs-v. A'hcr» T....... Cru’-k«on Freddie A. .. Cudnohufsky. George . 28. 56. 60. 71. 75 ................. 80 ................ 00 ........... 51. 106 ................ 00 ................ 00 ............ 22. 72 ............ 28. 78 ............ 35. 80 28. 56. 61. 82. HO ................ 80 ............ 29. 76 ................ 22 ................ 00 ................ 00 ....... 66. 70. 106 ................ 00 ............ 28. 64 ............... 106 ............ 35. 86 .... 35. 40. 45. 64 .............. 28 ............... 00 ................ 00 .................. 35 ............... 106 ................ 28 ................ 22 ................ 22 ................ 00 ........... 84. 106 ............ 29. 7g ................ 00 ............... 106 ................ 00 ............ 35. 86 ........ - 0. 84. 03 ... 28. 52. 56. -n ................ 00 .... 84. 91. 92. °4 ................ 00 ................ 00 .................. 36 ........... 48. 106 ............... .. 00 ............ 35. 74 O Daggett. Norma V 22. 56. 66 Dahl. George F Dahl. Robert J 52. 84 Dahm. Jean E Dalton. Robert E 29 Damon. Thomas I) 29. 39. 43. 62. 86 l ankc. Charles 11 Darling. Herbert E 52. 56 Davis, Jeanne E 29. 45. 56. 61. 76 Davis. Rosemary Unxcr 35 Dawson. Robert S Day. Ralph W 35 Dean. Dale R 52. 56 De Bylc, Joan R 22. 70 Dedering, Diane F 35. 56 Dees. James W 22. 74. 95 Delap. Janet V Delap. Kenneth D. 23 Derber. Gaylord E 22 De Rusha, Richarrd L. Des Jarlais. Joyce I 35. 88.89 Dctacje. Panice F Dichtl, Donald F 22. 43. 86 Dixon. Marian J ... 29. 63. "8. 130 Dobberke. Lyle F 29 Docter. Mary E .22. 43. 52. 88.89 Dodge. Alice A 22. 86 Doering. Ray L 35. 1(8) Doll. Robert E...............29. 41. 56. 62 Domer, Norinc J.................. 22. 72 Donos-an. Arline V....................... 22 Donovan. Carol Jean .... 66. 78, 106. 119 Doolittle. Audrey J...................... 00 Doolittle. Majorie J..................... 00 Dorst, Norman G.......................... 00 Dottke. James F.................. 22. 49 Doucette. Donald A....................... 00 Doule. Donald A.......................... 00 Dracger. Evelyn M........................ 23 Dracgcr. Ralph A................... 29. 100 Draper. Ralph N.................. 84. 91 Drcgcr. Lloyd H............. 22. 49. 56, 82 DriessclI. Artur F....................... 00 Duchac. Charles D........................ 00 Duex. Suzanne ................. 23. 64, 130 Duggan. Priscilla A...................... 29 Dukct. Patricia A........................ 00 Dupuis. Adele W.......................... 00 Dyckoff. William C. ..................... 23 Dykstra. Marlene J....................... 00 E F.bersberger. Charles J. .. 00 Eck. Marguerite J 00 Ecker. Deloris D Edinger. Marilyn J 35. 56. 72 Egan, David. F 60. 86 Ehrhardr. Orville W 22. 56 Eick. Beverly J Elliott. R. Roberta 64 Emmcl. Betty M 29. 59 Erban. Edward J Ermatinger. James P. .. Ernst. LaVcrnc R 102 Estabrooks. I.ura E 106 Estlund. Bruce K. 52 Evans. Margaret H 35. 45. 64 F Fadner, Thomas A 35 Fahley. Monica M 22 Farmer, Beverly J 35. 52 22 Fenelon. William J Fenzl. Donald J 35. 60. 74 Ferrell. Ann 22. 76 Ferrell. Veola 29. 49. 76 Fessenden. Virginia A. ... 56. 88. 136 Fcudncr. Leonard J Figel. Thomas L 29 Fink. Winnie 106 Firary. Robert J 29. 47. 74. 75 Fischer. Clinton R. 35 Fisher. Gene R 22 Fisher. Wylie L 00 Flanagan. Ailecn M 76. 106 Flanagan. Fintan M . 35. 46. 101. 130 Flanagan. Joan P 29. 45 Fleming. Kathleen M. ... 29 Fletcher. Raymond I 106. 134 Flynn. Patricia A 29. 56 Ford. Donald T 22. 84.. 91 Fraedrick. Janice A. ... 29. 72 Frakcr. David F 00 Fralish. Evelyn J 29. 72 Friedholdt. Barbara A. .. 36. 48 Friedrich, Shirley M 36. 44. 64 Friess. Jean M 22. 60. 70 Fritz. Vivian 1 22. 56 22 Fuchs. Ward I 91. 94 G Gabriel. Godfrey G. Gabrilska. Lois I..... Gagnon. Es-an A...... Gallagher. Marilyn J. Garl. I.ouis W........ Gauerke. Eugene A. Geenen. Mars- ........ Gehrke. Joan L........ Gehrke. Peter J....... Gehrke. Walter E. .. Gcisthardt. Gerald E. Gerth. Donald L....... Gertsch. Robert C. .. Gibb. Suzanne M. .. Gicbel. Aryln J....... Gicbcl. Gordon E. .. Gietzen. Donald II. .. Gillespie. Patricia C. 36. 42. 44. 60. 63. 86 ................ 108 36. 48. 74. 102. 1.34 , ................ 00 .............. 22. 52 .................. 23 ............. 36. 70 ................. 00 ................. 00 ................. 00 ................ 00 ......... 36. 45. 86 ................... 52 .................. 22 ................. 00 ................. 00 ................. 00 ................ 00 DRUG N BOOK School Supplies DRUG N BOOK Stationary DRUG N BOOK Gifts DRUG N BOOK Greeting Cards DRUG N BOOK Books DRUG N BOOK Fountain Pens DRUG N BOOK Drugs DRUG N BOOK Prescriptions DRUG N BOOK Toiletries DRUG N BOOK 270 Main Street Phone Stanley 4900 THE WARDROBE "A Corner on Men's Fashions" 7 Algoma Boulevard Page 145PORTRAITS STUDENT INDEX OF DISTINCTION Not just a good resemblance . . . but potraits that actually reflect your personality. That makes the big difference you'll appreciate in a portrait by . . . MIN. E. KUEHL STUDIO 169’ 2 Main Street Phone Stanley 1624 Oshkosh, Wisconsin THE HUB DEPENDABLE MEN'S CLOTHES 1 70 Main Street Gil ray. Grant N....................... 36 Gilray. Robert C ...................... 00 Gilson. Stephen W...................... 22 Ginke. Robert C........................ 00 Glae»er. Donald F...................... OO Glucsmun. Elaine L........... 88, 89, 108 Glandcr. William F..................... 00 Goctsch. William C..................... 91 Goldsmith. Robert A.................... 00 Goldsworthy. Marilynn G....... 2. 64, 136 Goltz. Donald V........................ 00 Gongorck. Kenneth J.................... 29 Gorsuch. Marilyn M..................... 23 Gould. Joseph D........................ 80 Gould. Virginia M...................... 29 Gowcll. James H........................ 00 Govettc. Cecelia A........ 22. 43. 56. 60 Grade. Margaret H.............. 36. 52. "8 Granross. Audrey F................. 22. 61 Grasee, Nancy J...................... 22 Graves. Lawrence L.................... 108 Greeley. Sewell F...................... 22 Green. Charles H....................... 00 Green. Ross R..................... 23. 80 Grcenquist. Ralph W............... 29. 82 Grenier. Shirley F....... 42. 45. 78. 108 Gritt. Mary J..................... 29. '8 Groessl. William D..................... 00 Grosshhucsch. Rose M............... 29. 88 Groth. Gerald K........................ 22 Grott. Francis R...................... 108 Grover. Nancy L............... 22. 88. 89 Gruencwald. Arlin A.................... 00 Gruenwald. Myron ...................... $2 Gulbrand. Raymond L................... 108 Gunderson. Richard 0................... 00 Guth. Eileen M......................... 00 A pL.AAENTS o m p C.-V VS , tix H Haas. James R................ 9. 52. 108 Haase. Edward J....................... 00 Haase. Marjorie Gibson ............... 00 Haberkorn. Richard B............... JO Hafcnstcin. Marry K................... 23 Haigh. Frederick C ................... 00 Halle. Merlin D............. 49. 105. 108 Hallin, Stelle B...................... 00 Hamann. Harold E................. JO. 32 Hamilton. Gail C................. 36. 46 Hamilton. Virginia 1.................. 00 Hammer. Bernardine A..........30. 60. 88 Handcysidc. Joseph B............... 00 Hansen. Madeline E...... 40. 66. 72. 108 Hanson. Carolyn 1..................... 23 Hanson. Donald L...................... 68 Hanson. Donnah G...................... 23 Hanson. Robert G................. JO. 68 Harmcs. Douglas 1................ JO. 52 Harmon. Robert L........ 36, 91. 95. 102 Hartman. Anita M...................... 00 Hartman. Raloh G................ JO. 100 Hartman. Walter K..................... 80 Hartzhcim. Leo J...................... 00 Hasley. Ruth A............... JO. 63. ”0 Hatcher. Marcia E..................... 00 Haworth. Daniel T. 49, 51. 60. 74. 105. 108. 123 Haworth. David A...................... JO Heaps. Marjorie M............. 3. 56. 61 Hcbenstrcit. Thomas D............... jo Heimerman. Rosemary .................. 00 Hein. Ruth L. ...................... 00 Hein. Thomas J........................ 00 Heineman, Arlycc J............... 36. 78 Hclstrom. Gordon R.................. 00 Hendrickson. Earl E.................. 00 Henke. Mary L....... 36. 52. 54. 76. 119 Henken. Willard J..................... 00 Henning. Mary 1.................... 00 Hcnsche . Lyle A.....................00 Hensel. Gcdald E...................... 23 Hcnscl. loan D........................ 06 Hertz. D m M..................... 29. 86 Herzog. Lorraine ................ JO. 72 Hesscl. Donald J...................... 30 Hintz, Arlene J....................... 00 Hint . Eirl F......................... 00 Hintze. Milton W...................... 30 Hocft. Donald C.................. 74. 108 Hochne. Arthur R. 59. 84. 91. 93. 102. 1C)8 Hoffman. Wallace E.... J6. 45. 56. 59. 82 Hofman. Richard E..................... JO Holt. William R........................23 Hopper. John S......................"" 00 Horn. Mer'in E.................... 30. 68 Horner. Harry C....................... 00 Hornkc. William 0..................... 00 OSHKOSH OFFICE SUPPLY COMPANY 146 Main Street Phone Stanley 2358 Page 146THROUGH COURTESY OF OSHKOSH BEAUTY PARLORS BOYD PERMANENT WAVE SHOP 104 Main Street Call Stanley 674 CONSTANCE SALON Tip To Toe Figure Contour 116 Church Street Call Stanley 383 ELMWOOD BEAUTY SHOP Everything in Beauty Culture 527 Main Street Call Stanley 2611 MARTHA MANNING HAIRDRESSING 17 Mount Vernon Street Call Stanley 977 VOGUE BEAUTY SHOP 10 Merritt Street Call Stanley 1178 Verna Reinhardt Lydia Hartman WILCO BEAUTY SHOP “Loveliness Without Extravagance" 1 1 1 V2 Main Street Call Stanley 493 llont. Audrey M......... Horton. Fayann M........ Ilostak, Kenneth F...... Horwitz, Ruth I......... Iloworth. Arlene N...... I lawman. L. James ..... Hudzenske. Michael J. Huettcr. France I...... Hughes. William R....... Hunt. Joseph M.......... Hunter. Donald H........ Hurlhut. Ralph J........ Husman, Bruce N......... 59. 63. 88. 108 ........... 108 .............. 30 ............ 00 ............. 23 ............. 36 ............ 00 ........ 30. 52 ....... 51. 108 ............ 00 ............. 29 ............ 00 ............ 00 I Imijr. Joanne L...................... 70. 108 Immel. Gladys L............................ 52 Iscrloth. Kenneth W..................... 23 Iton, William C............................ 00 ) Jacob . Wayne J.......... Jacobson. Joyce F........ Jann. Sharon R........... Jansen. Paul L........... Jan cn. Yvonne G......... Janssen. Jean C. ........ Janssen. Thomas R........ Javcnkowski. Ray S....... Jcnks. William W......... Jensen. Aitne M......... Jcrabek. Frank 1......... Jerue. Willard J......... Jesse. Robert W.......... Jillson. Jack A.......... Jirikovec. John K. ... Jisa, Henry F............ Johnson. Audrey L. ...... Johnson, Clemens A. ... Johnson. Delores J....... Johnson. Don G........... Johnson. Marian R........ Johnson. Nfieil A........ Johnson. Patricia A. ... Johnson. Robert Harold Johnson. Robert Hcuer . ........... 30. 86 .......... 30. 78 ............... 30 ............... 00 ............... 00 30. 42. 45. 76. 81 ............... 36 ......... 52. 108 ........... 51. 80 ............... 00 ............... 23 ............... 00 ,. 84. 91. 94 23. 42. 80 ....80. 108 84. 52. 108 31. 44. 76 ........... 23 .......... 23 ..... 23. 74 ..... 36. 76 ......... 00 36. 42. 43.64 ............ 30 ....... 23. 59 STUDENT INDEX Johnson. Robert W. .. Johnston. Kenneth W. .. Johnston. Patricia J..... Jolin. Dean ............. Jones. Carolyn .......... Jones. Hugh ............. Jones, laronard ......... Jones. Mary Jean ........ Jones. William C......... Jorgensen. Wayne ........ Jost. James G............ Joubert. Richard K. .. JunKwirth. Suzanne H. Junto. Raymond .......... ............. 23 .............. 23 .......... 36. 64 ............. 00 ............. 00 ........ 51. 108 ............. 30 52. 90. 105. 108 .............. 23 ....... 30. 102 ............. 00 .............. 23 ............. 00 ............. 36 K Kuerwer. Elizabeth L Kaiser. Mary D Kalbus. Gene E Kalbut. Lee H 49. Kannal. Robert D Kasai. Mary J Kastcn. Velma 1 Kaufman. Roger E 51. 74. 108. 123 . 30. 56. 63. 76 24 30. 4 3. 72 Keith. William H Kellerman. Yvonne M. Kelley. James E Kelly. Brian V .... 31. 39. 60. 74 31 Kempingcr. John F Kenyon. Russell A. Kerr. Evelyn H Kevill. Jay K Kicsncr. Madalcnc A Kiet man. Loren R. 24. 52 Killoran. Bernard O. 30 King. Charles G ... 36. 4. '5. 102 King. Helen K 30. 52 Kinziger. Kay B. 74 Kirchman. Harold I Klettkc. Kathryn J Kleveno. Charles D Kliss. Edith M. Knohlock. Julaine J. Knoll. Keith F. Knutson. Joan ................. 24, ”2 Koch. Donald A......................... 00 Koch. Richard 1........................ 00 Kocck. Richarl J...... 31. 84. 91. 92. 134 Kocppcn. Robert C...................... 31 Kohlbeck. Nancy A................. 36. 72 Kohlman, Earl F........................ 00 Koll. Faith M..................... 51. 110 Roller. Wilbert L ..................... 00 Kopitzkc. Barbara M............... 70. 110 Kopp. Bernita A........................ 00 Koszarck. Maxine M..................... 56 Krachr. Shirley A................ 23. 56 Krahnke. Carol A............... 23. 56 Kramer. Carol A................ 36. 78 Kraus. Merle E. ..................... 110 Krause. John T........................ 00 Krause. June B.................... 36. 59 Krentz. Clayton R...................... 27 Kroenke. Shirley A. 36. 40. 45. 56. 76. 90 Kruger. Kay L. ........................ 00 Krysiak. Alice V......... 14. 60. 78. 110 Kuebler. Patsy J....................... 23 Kuehl, Helen ........................ 00 Kunde. Donald J...................... 00 Kundc. Kenneth L......................00 Kuske. June D............ 51. 59. 76. 110 Kutchin. Charles R..................... 23 L I .a Luzerne. La Verne A................. 0° I.amoert. Florian T...................... 00 Landftraf. El ward S... 31. 4'. 52. 56. 82 Landry. Clarence J....................... 31 lange. Linda M........................... 24 Langrnhorst. La were nee J............... 00 Lampheer. Joyce C. ........ 31. 52. 61, 76 la Plante. Donna M....................... 24 Larson. Carol M.......................... 00 Laude. Donald D.......................... 24 laun. Jean H........................ 36, 72 Lautcnschlager. Milton A...... 84. 91. 93. 95. 110. 135 lawless. Mary J................ 24. 39. 72 Lawson. Betty L.......................... 36 Lee. Charmaine C 31. 43. 52. 56. 61, "8 Page 147STUDENT INDEX Lee. Robert E 24, 56 1 .offin. Walter W 31. 82 Lehman. Junior G 24 Lem. Grace Y 31. 72. 13“ I.emke. Armond E 24 Lenz. Dale F 00 Leu t hold, Eugene L. 00 Lcvcille. Edward J Lewis. Robert H 36 Lincoln. Elaine B land. Victor I 31. 74 Lindstrum. Walton 1 l.istle, Clems E 31. 84. 91. 93 Loosen. Ann E 36. 49. 60. 76 Loppnow, Robert A .... 84. 110. 134 Lubinski, Lu Ann M Luce. Chester F ] io Luesleman. Donald K I nker, Arden 1 91, 93. 95. 96. 135 Lund. Paul A Lund. Wilton F I.undm, Herbert 52. 110. 130 Xashold, R. Duane ............... 32, 74 Xaslund. Arvid J...................... 00 Xclson, Career C...................... 00 Nelson, Phyllis M..................... 25 Xclson. Richard A.................... 32 Nemeez, Peter J....................... 32 Nesbitt, Jean A....................... 00 Neuman, Eunice G............. 3 . 52, "8 Neumann, Dale E....................... 00 Neumann. Rollin G............ 25, 59, 86 Xevcu, Lawrence R................ 32. 74 Nickel, Bernice 1............ 60. 88. 110 Nickel, Leona M.......... 32. »8. 88. 89 Nielsen, Bradley R. . 32.42. 44.63.84. 102 Nighbor, Richard J............... 91. 93 Xischik. Alice E...................... 00 Nolle, Donna M........................ 25 Nordhaus. Robert VC'..... 39, 42. 84, 126 Norlandcr, Robert E................... 24 Norvah, Betty J....................... 00 Notman, Lawrence J............... 24. 43 O M MacDonald, Donald G..................... 00 Mac Farlane, Bea J...................... 00 Mader, Carol M................... 64, 121 Magic, Robert L. ...................... 110 Maichen, Howard L. ................ 60, 84 Malak, Geraldine M...................... 00 Mams, William P. . 31. 41. 63. 74. 75. 102 Manross, Susan R................... 31. 72 Manthcy, Ardis E........................ 00 Marhcine. Allen H....................... 24 Marhcine, Donald H.............. 31, 68 Marhcine. Donna R....................... 31 Marker. Alan M.......................... 37 Marks. James S.......................... 37 Marquis, Betty D........................ 00 Marschall, Charles W.............. 31, 86 Marshall, Frank B.................... 24 Martin, Dale W.......................... 00 Martin, Harvey N........................ 00 Martin, Robert R........................ 31 Martzkc, Vernon V.............. 39. 52. 82 Mastricola. Gust H................... 110 McBride. Alcy L......................... 37 McCarville, Connie A........ 60. 105, 110 McCourt. Marian M.............. 24, 44, 59 McFarrcn, Gerald 1..................24, 82 McKinnes. Elizabeth M................... 65 McKinnon, Jean M........................ 31 Meier, Monica A................ 24, 56, 72 Meier. Rita T............. 45. 76, 90. 110 Mel|caard, John T.................. 24, 84 Mvsscrschmidt, Arthur R............ 31. 101 Messing. Aubrey F.................. 24, 49 Meyer. Donald C .... 9. 48. 110, 118, 130 Meyer. Jacqueline A..................... 31 Meyer, Marilyn R................... 31. 59 Meyer. Richard E............... 84. 91. 93 Meyers. Adeline N....................... 56 Meyers. Lcncil S........................ 00 Michels, Eugene E.................. 37, 49 Miclkc. Gloria J........... 24. 59, 66. 70 Milius. Beverly M.................. 24, 70 Miller. Larry H.................... 37. 74 Miller. Leslie W................... 51. 110 Miller. Mary J................. 31. 52. 56 Miller. Rey nold V................. 80. 110 Miracle, Gordon E.................. 31, 86 Mirguet. Eugene H....................... 00 Mitchell. Donald F............. 31. 63. 86 Mitchell. William A. . 31.46. 52. 62. 82. 90 Moehring. Alice M..................... 110 Moldenhaucr. Mary A..................... 55 Moody. John T.................. 37, 45. 82 Moran. Thomas M......................... 37 Morgan. Ann C...................... 110 Morgan. Joan C....................... 00 Morgan, John T....................... 80 Morrissey. John T....................... 37 Morrissey. Thomas M.................... 102 Mortcnscn. Joyce E................. 88. 110 Mueller. Jennie M....................... 00 Multhauf. Del mar C. .. 48. 51. 63. 80. 110 Murphy. Patricia A.................... 110 Murphy. Thomas E........................ 00 Murray. James E................ 41. 91. 94 Murray. Jeanne R........................ 37 Myers. Everett L. ...................... 00 Mynning. David G........... 31. 61, 68, 86 N Nabbcfcld. Joan E.................... 110 Nashold. Eugene A............. 32, 59, 74 Oaks, Jacqueline 1 37. 52 O Brien, 1 homas C oo O Connor, Michael J oo O'Connor. Patricia E 72 Oetzcl. Leon 1 32 Olbrich. Ronald A 32. 74 Oleson. Howard A 00 Olfson. John W 25 Olm. Wilma 00 Olsen, Charlotte M .... 59. 88. 112 112 Onnink, Allen G 32. 74 Otto. Charles O 25. 56 Otto. David W 25 Otto. Wayne R 25 Oudcnhoven. Kenneth 1 32. 44. 82 P Paape, Mildred M Paftenroth, Marvin R. .. Panetti. Philip E Pankrau. Joan I Parker, Barbara J Paul. Robert J Paul. Tom L. 45, 64, 112 91. 100. 112 00 112 00 25 37 00 Peabody, Janet R 25. 64 Pcrccy. Ralph A Peterson, Allen O 32. 86 Peterson. Barbara R ... 14. 51. 64. 112 32. 70 24 Peterson. Eugene W 112 Petesch, James E 00 Pfeiffer. Carl H 37, 95 Pfeiffer. Suzanne C 2.5 Phelan. Robert J 25 Picpcr. John W 25. 56, 74 Pierce. Ned D .... 32. 59. 68. 86 Picttc. Darrell A 37 Pischke, Mary E 37. 72 Pockui. Donald C 25 25 Pollnow. Gilbert F 112 Pongrace. Marion E Ponto. Arthur W OO Pope. Howard S Popke. Ornu M Popp. David R 37. 74. 95 Portier. Claire E HO. 112 Possin. Marian H 00 Prallat. Leona M 24. 60. 66 Preston. William E 37 Price. Nancy 1 Pritchard. Marilyn L. 112 Privoznik. Edward J. ... 32. 86 Pulvcr. Donald W 25. 82 Pvnch. J. William 48. 51. 112 Q Quade. Maxine A................ 37. 56.72 Quist. Joan D.......................... 89 R Raabe. Eugene E............ 37. 49. 59. 82 Race. Nancy A........................... 25 Radtke, Ardcnc M................... 32. 88 Ratsky. Harry C......................... 32 Ramirez, Thomas P....................... 00 Rand. Jacqueline H............ 25, 52, 89 Rasmussen, Donald E................... 112 Rasmussen. Edward I)................... 00 Rasmussen, John F...................... 37 Rasmussen. Joyce M............ 88. 112 Rather, Frank R................... 25, 52 Rau, Stuart R.......................... 00 Ray, Donald K.......................... 00 Redman, Earl D......................... 25 Redman. Glenn F........................ 32 Redman. Magdalen M............ 32, 49. 76 Reed, Jack A...................... 37, 82 Reese. Betty D......................... 25 Rcif. Donald J......................... 25 Rcimcrs. Janet E.................. 37, 45 Rcincmann, Lewis R. .. 3". 52, 56, 62. 82 Rcinke. Kenneth H...................... 25 Reinke. Robert G....................... 33 Renner. Paul E......................... OO Rhoades. Gordon G............ 74. 134 Rich, Norbert L. ...................... 00 Richurdson, Martin G................... 37 Richter. M. Ann ...................... 112 Rickman. Robert J...................... 25 Ricdl. Eugene M....................... 112 Ricvcs. Norman G....................... 00 Riggle. Burleigh I)............... 37, 49 Ring. Lola L...................... 76. 112 Rissman. Lorraine J.................... 00 Ristow. Vcrlvn D....................... 64 Ritchie. Douglas S. .. 84, 95. 96. 112. 135 Robcck. William E................. 25. 52 Roberts. Carole M................. 25. 52 Robertson. Pauline M............ 25. 52 Robinson. Kenneth B............ 25. 8t Roedcr. Donald K....................... 00 Roels. Harriet E....................... 25 Rocmcr. Caroline R..................... 32 Rogers. Charles H...................... 32 Rohn. Janet R......................... 112 Rohde. Clifford K................. 74. 112 Roland. Robert M....................... 25 Root. Charles E........................ 00 Rosenberg. Robert W............... 25. 59 Roscra. Lcnora E.................. 32. 60 Rossow. Alice J...... 45. 52. 76. 90. 112 Rozcllc. Harry E....................... 00 Ruch. Carlton E........................ 32 Ruh. Lorraine 1................... 33. 56 Rushkofskc. Betty J.................... 25 S Safford. Dona Rac ........................ 26 St. Amour. Ralph R........................ 00 Salick, Susan K........................... 32 Salm. Beverly M...................... 66, 112 Salm, Rosalind A..................... 26, 76 Salutz, Veronica M........................ 00 Sampson. Allen E.......................... 00 Sanders, Helen C.......................... 26 Sang. Robert E............................ 00 Schafer. David ........................... 33 Schalinskc. Jerome A................. 37, 84 Schaller. Mary M.......................... 00 Scharpf, Thcrese C......... 39. 45. 60. 76 Schartncr. Doris A................... 48. 112 Schcin. William F............... 37. 91. 94 Schcllin. Fa Donna M...................... 00 Schilcker, Alvin N........................ 00 Schlachtenhaufen, Lucille D. .. 52, 76, 112 Schloerb. Ella May .... 51. 52. 89. 105. 112 Schlueter. Helene ................... 37. 64 Schmcltcr. Raymond C............ 49. 68. 112 Schmidt. Alene 1................... 114. 138 Schmidt. George H......................... 80 Schmicdcl. Robert C. ..................... 00 Schmitt, Bernard A................... 26. 56 Schnablc. Frank J.................... 33. 82 Schneider, Alvin W...................... 114 Schneider, Donald M.................. 60. 80 Schneider. Donald W....... 33. 63. 84. 102 Schneider. Kenneth J............ 84. 91. 92 Schneider. Perry Lou ........... 56, 70, 111 Schoenick. Elaine M........ 37. 42. 44. 78 Schocnrock, Dale M........................ 56 Schocning. Duane L........................ 00 Schomisch, Jerome C....................... 00 Schomisch. Norman ......... 60. 74. 105, 114 Schrar. Jeanne E.......................... 33 Schrader, Robert ......................... 00 Schrader, Robert F........................ 00 Schriber. Suzanne T....................... 00 Schrimpf, Ethel M............... 32. 63, 72 Schroeder, Carl E......................... 00 Schroeder, Doris E........................ 00 Schubert. Richard ........................ 68 Schuette. Fred J.......................... 26 Schuh, Dclmar A........................... 26 Schultz, Charlene E....................... 52 Page 148STUDENT INDEX Schultz, Charlo M......................... 32 Schultz. Lyle M.......................... 114 Schultz, Miriam N......................... 00 Schultz, Richard H........................ 26 Schultz, Lc Roy il....................... 33 Schumacher, Doris M..................... Ill Schumacher, Richard F........ 9, 41, 74, 75, 95, 96. 102. 114. 130. 135 Schumacher, Thomas VC'.............. 33, 102 Schwcbke, Clifford R............ 33, 91, 102 Scott, Arlene 1........................... 00 Scott, Dan B.............................. 26 Scarf . Russell K........................ (K) Scil. Irene M.............. 48. 51. 78. 114 Sclchcrt, Ethel J....................... 114 Sensiba, Barbara A...................... 114 Shcllman, Frederick D................ 26. 43 Shilobrit. Carol T........................ 00 Shrovnal. Ann J......................... 114 Shurbert, Richard E...................... 33 Siewert. Audrey B......................... 00 Siewert, William R........................ 26 Simonson, Clifford I™ .................... 26 Simonson. Marlyn J................. 114. 130 Skalitzky, Henry B....................... 37 Skinner. Charlotte P................ 64, 114 Sloan. Ned J.............................. 26 Smedberg. Carl E................. 41, 91, 92 Smith, Donald L........................... 26 Smith. James M................. 52. 114. 138 Smith, James R............................ 33 Smith. Kenneth ...................... 38. 82 Smith, Lawrence E........................ 91 Smith, Stanley R..................... 26. 91 Smith. William A.......................... 00 Sommerfcldt. Jean M.................. 38, 64 Sonnlcitncr, Eugene T................ 33. 86 Sorensen, Jacquelin M................ 26. 52 Spanhaurr. Robert C....................... 00 Spaulding. Lawrence IX . 38. 56, 74. 95. 96 Spaulding. Richard R............. 26. 74. 95 Spaulding, Russell A............ 51, 80. 114 Spillman. Dorothy J.................. 38, 43 Spink, Lorraine E........... 38. 40. 52, 88 Spochr. Milton E................ 38. 74. 102 Sprengcr, Richard J....................... 33 Stadler, Gerald J......................... 00 Stadtmucllcr. Albert A.................... 33 Stacrkel. Naomi E........................ 00 Stage, Joseph H........................... 26 Stang. David C ...................... 26, 52 Stangby. Norman L. ....................... 00 Stark. Verna A.......... 26. 42. 44. 56. 59 Stearns. Carl J........................... 00 Steckcr. Lyle G........................... 26 Steeps. Anna Marie L......... 32. 45, 56. 61 Steffen. Beverly J............... 32, 63, 70 Steineke. Geraldine A................ 26, 56 Steinhilber, Jack D....................... 26 Stcinhilbcr. Kenneth R.................... 00 Stcinikc. Charles L....................... 26 Stepp. Charles F.......................... 00 Stettbacher. Ilene A................. 66. 88 Stevens. Curtis R......................... 00 Stevens. John R...................... 26. 56 Stevenson. Paul W............... 38. 84. 134 Sticbcn. Edwin H.......................... 68 Stilp. Caroline F......................... 26 Stoch. Ervin G................... 38. 68. 86 Stoegbauer. Robert 0...................... 00 Stout. James H........................... 52 Strachen. Charles E...................... 33 Streck. Elizabeth R...................... 33 Strcckcnbach. Jean A........... 51. 52. 105, 114. 119. 123 Studley, James E..................... 52. 56 Stutzman. Verla M................... 52. 114 Swanson. Nancy C....... 26. 52. 56. 76. 130 Sweet. Alfred C........................... 00 Sweet. Kenneth P.......................... 00 T Tabbert. Mary Ann I. . Tallis. Craig A......... Tardiff. Warren A....... Tebo. Norman C.......... Tcmbelio. James ........ Terrace. Ralph J........ Them, Richard C......... Thiedc. Joan C.......... Thiel. Kurt R........... Thiel, Peter L.......... Thiel. Virginia M....... Thiclkc, Thomas E....... Thielmann, James J...... Thisdcll. Rodger I...... Thomas. Lawrence M. .. Thompson. Kenneth R. Thorcson. Robert C...... Thorp. Joanne E......... Tiddcns, Frederic R..... Timmcl. Melvin A........ Titzkowski. Marlene E. Tomlin. Anita M........ Townsend. Neal ......... Tracy. Walter M......... Trauba. Paul R.......... Trichel. William B...... Trott. Kenneth J........ Trowbridge. Janet M. .. ............ 27, 66 ............ 52. 82 ............ 27, 82 ... 38. 41. 101. 136 ............... 00 ............... 00 ............... 00 ............... 00 .. 51. 84, 105. 114 ................ 27 ........ 26. 66. 70 ............... 00 ................ 33 ............... 00 ................ 33 ............... 33 ................. 9 ........... 38. 76 ........ 33. 43. 74 ................ 38 ....... 26. 56. 70 26. 52. 56. 61. 88 ................ 27 ........... 33. 86 ................ 38 ................ 27 ............... 26 U L'cbelc. Fern P...................... 114 I'cl man. Douglas J.................... 27 Uhrmacher. Gavin A...................... 27 L'mland, Lois 1.................. 78. 1 14 Unfcrth. Janice A.... 33. 42. 45. 76. 126 L'pham. Robert S........................ 00 Ustruck, Lorraine A....... 27. 42. 44. 60 Utic. Bernard A........................ 27 Uttkc. Betty J.......................... 38 Lirz. Franklin J........................ 33 Utx. William G........................ 00 V Vajgrt. Donald J........... Vanderhoof. Dwain E........ Vanderhoof. Ellen R........ Vandcr Schaaf. Gwendolyn Vandcr Schaaf. Marilyn J. . Van Laancn. Jean C......... Van Roy. Lillian E.......... Vaughn. Carroll J.......... Vcith. Robert J............. Vicstcnx, Elaine R.......... Voight, John ............... Voruda. Jack D.............. .... 27. 43. 86 ......... 27. 52 33. 43. 64. 65 J...... 78. 114 ....... 78. 114 .... 46. 47. 52 ....... 88. 114 .... 34. 84. 95 ............. 00 ......... 33. 59 .......... 9. 48 ............. 00 W Wachholz. Raymond C. .. 102. 105. 114 .. 39. 52. 62. 90. Wagcncr. Virginia 27. 61 Wagenhal . Robert A. 27. 52 Wagner. Paul J. Wagner. Shirley M Wahlers. John H 38. 60 Waldron. Muriel F. . 38 Wall. Raymond E 34 Wall. Thomas M Walsdorf. James A. 34 Walsh. Joseph A. 34. 82 Walters. John on Walters. Audrey A 34 Wandrcy, Howard H. .. Ware. Charles H........ Warcham. Jeanette M. . Wargula. Janice M...... Warnecke. Frederick A. Washkoskc. Jean K...... Weaver. Donald R....... Webb. Ramona J.......... Weber. Marie T......... Weber, Robert E........ Weilcr. Catherine A.... Wcese, Byron G......... Wegcr. Joseph G........ Weilep. Catherine A. .. Weingartin. Harold D. Weinzierl, Edward J. .. Weir. Harry B.......... Welch. Richard W....... Wendt. Forrest D........ Wendt. Philip J......... Wcntzcl. Bruce E....... Werner. Ivan A......... Werner. Marilyn J...... Wcsscnberg. Benny ..... Wickmann. Corine F. .. Wictus, Arthur C....... Wilde. Karlyn A........ Willard. Orson S...... Williams. Bette A...... Williams, Betty A...... Williams, Leroy F...... Williams. Ia» Ann E..... Williams. Marjorie E. . Williams. Robert D..... Wilson, Raymond E...... Winkcl, Ruth M.......... Winter. Virginia A.... Wislinsky, Anita M..... Wisnicky. Virginia A. .. Wisnicky. Walter R..... Witzke. Gilbert F...... Wolfe. Donald L. ...... Wolff. Alice R......... Woifgram. Richard C. Wolfmeyer. Sanford E. . Wollcr. James D........ Womaske. Vivian Miller Wood. Shirley A........ Wood house, John H. .. Wrasse. Gertrude J..... Wyman. Thomas R........ ............... 00 ............... 00 ........... 38. 76 ............... 00 ........... 34. 74 ... 34. 44. 60. 78 ............... 00 ... 34. 52. 61. 78 ............ 38. 78 ................ 27 ............... 00 ............... 00 ............... 00 ................ 34 ............... 00 ................ 27 ................ 34 ....... 27. 52. 56 ............ 27. 82 ............ 27. 86 ................ 27 ................ 34 ............... 00 ............... 00 ................ 34 ........... 38. 56 ............... 00 27. 84. 91. 95. 96 .... 42. 66. 76. 114 ................ 34 ............... 82 ...... 66. 76. 114 ........... 38. 52 .......... 49. 114 ................ 27 ........... 38. 52 34. 40. 43. 52. 61 27 .................00 .................00 .................00 ... 38. 40. 45. 88 .................34 ........... 34. 80 ................ 27 .............. 00 ....... 27. 59. 78 ................ 27 ................ 27 ............... 00 Y Yankee. Marilyn A.............. 27. 52. 70 York-Critchley. William S.............. 00 Young. Lucille R....................... 114 Youngworth. James J................... 114 Z Zachow, Emily A.......................... 00 Zarnott. Lawrence F...................... 27 Zarter. Norma L........................ 114 Zeinert. John A...................... 38. 59 Zeller, Patricia A....................... 2“ Zernzach. Julia F........................ 27 Zcrnzach, Lois J..................... 27. 70 Zieman. Orlyn A......................... 114 Zimpel. Patricia A.............. 2“, 45, 59. 66 Zirbel. Marie E................. 2". 43. 66. 88 Zobel. Robert 0.......................... 00 Zoch. Claude C...... 74. 91. 92. 94. 95. 102 Zubcrbuehler. Willis E................... 00 Zuern. David L. .......................... 00 Zucrn, Lu Ann ............................ 00 Pag© 149


Suggestions in the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) collection:

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

1947

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1948 Edition, Page 1

1948

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Page 1

1949

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

1951

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

1952

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.