University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI)

 - Class of 1949

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University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 188 of the 1949 volume:

The QUIVER ...1949 ? 4_ OSHKOSH STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE OSHKOSH. WISCONSIN EDITOR Robert E. Brismaster ASSOCIATE EDITOR Meriel J. Gralow FACULTY ADVISOR 4We dedicate this 1949 edition of the Quiver to three women of the faculty who have long maintained a keen interest in Oshkosh State Teachers College and its students. As pioneers of the present staff of educators, each has served over a quarter of a century as instructor and friend to thousands, reflecting in her tenure the same conquering spirit of those men and women who in 1849 were breaking new trails on the frontier of the West.Miss Ruth Willcockson Miss Malvina Clausen Miss I.eavelva BradburyFOREWORD In colleges and universities throughout the country there are hundreds of yearh(K ks rolling off the press. Many of these publications will be using the theme of the 49’er. Not all of them, however, can emphasize this theme as we here at Oshkosh State Teachers, for there is a definite parallel reflected between ourselves and the pioneers of a century ago. Unlike other professions whose paths of progress are clearly determined. the field of education is an ever-changing maze of obstacles and objectives. Just as the trails held unforeseen tribulations for the masses of men and women surging to the west 100 years ago, so do laymen entering the field today from this school and other teacher training institutions find themselves caught up in a frontier in which the individual is constantly pioneering, contributing his life toward shaping the destiny of the schools and, as a consequence, the future of the world. In presenting this book, the Quiver staff has striven to put forth that Oshkosh State Teachers College has been a place and a quality. The book will serve primarily as a stimulant to your memory and, as you page through it in years to come, we want you to remember both the serious and the gay, realizing the important role you played in a happy year and the more important part facing you on the frontier of education.CONTENTS BOOK BOOK BOOK BOOK BOOK BOOK BOOK BOOK I Administration................................. Page 7 II Faculty ....................................... Page 17 III Graduates ..................................... Page 27 IV Under-Graduates ............................... Page 39 V Organizations.................................. Page 59 VI Societies...................................... Page 87 VII Sports ........................................ Page 1 15 VIII Activities of the Year Page 139"Colleges . . . have their indispensable office — to teach elements. But they can only highly serve us when they aim not to drill but to create; when they gather from far every ray of various genius ro their hospitable halls, and by the concentrated fires set the hearts of their youth on flame.” 4 Ralph Waldo Emerson f W’.-y mm3% mmi mm Ad m i n i st ra t ion Bui Id i ng OSHKOSH STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE OSHKOSH, WISCONSINPresident FORREST R. POLK Came to OSTC in 1915 Page Eight(Elje j tate of Wisconsin TEACHERS COLLEGE OSHKOSH. WISCONSIN The President of the United States asked a Commission of nine prominent people, "What will make America strong?" They had six suggestions; the first was: "A strong, healthy, educated population"; the third was: "Scientific research and development," which depends upon the first. It cannot be maintained that we have a strong, healthy population when two out of every five young men called up for military service were rejected or later released. We neglect our youth, yes, for many counties have no physician and many others less than one to three thousand of population. We cannot argue that our people — this in a democracy where the government rests on the ethics, morality, and education of the people, — are educated when of all adults twenty-five years of age and over, ten million are functional illiterates; and furthermore, but one in twenty adults is a college graduate. We all know that literacy does not separate the wise from the fools, nor does a college education ensure reasoned political action and the possession of a social conscience. I would suggest that the curricula be overhauled, that teaching be improved, and that the learners accept responsibility. Responsibility cannot be taught alone from a textbook, in the laboratory, by precept, or by the finest library. It grows where it is wanted and watered by daily behavior. Samples of the problems, some big, some little, but all of which concern this College now are: The one Board Bill or Merger with the University of Wis- consin; the Biennial Budget which must recognize the degree of inflation we now have; whether we are to get started on a building program or not (the women's dormitory, and a men's gym now); the acquisition of the Thomas T. Reeve Memorial Building; the curriculum which is ever a case for study; the quality of teaching; the examination system; and student participation in their government and in policy making. There is evidence that the College has gained some in recognition and appreciation locally, at least. The Jay T. Putney reading room and the Fraker gift of the Reeve Memorial are two examples. The Alumni could be of greater direct assistance to the College, I think, if their Constitution were altered. It now provides for a life membership for ten dollars ! Alumni associations elsewhere are self-supporting and one here must be. Had it not been for gifts, the Association could scarcely have operated at all; but meagerly financed and supported not at all by its membership as a whole, it has nevertheless come to the rescue of ventures such as the procurement of the Pollock House Dormitory and the Memorial Athletic Field. This Class of 49ers is now eligible to form an association; will it? Since I love to read, and travel and exploration, historical novels and history are devoured incessantly, I have learned something of the adventure, danger, obstacles, and disappointments of the gold-seekers. The acquisition and holding of much of our western territory is attributable to the acquisitiveness of the pioneers of '49 and the "imperialism" of the government. DeVoto tells the story so well in "The Year of Decision"; his book is a "must," I think. Now here we are one hundred years later! Then they were excited over gold, the acquisition of land from Mexico and Great Britain; now we have become so accustomed to (or so jittery over) daily crises threatened or impending, that even the stupendous events of that time seem something less than world-shaking. The gravity of events is magnified by the speed and potency of the agencies of their accomplishment ; and surely reactions to action now are not only worldshaking; they may blow civilization apart. It is now trite to say it, but the race is still on. I hope you '49ers can find some gold, but it will be better if you can help wisely to guide the future.DIRECTOR OF TRAINING Heading an institution of training that had its origin over 77 years ago is Dr. James H. Smith, Director of the Training School since 1934. As father to the children of grammar grades and in his task of supervising the practice teaching of the college students. Dr. Smith has proven to be an administrator respected by all. DEAN OF INSTRUCTION Known to few but responsible to many. Dr. James V. Duncan has been on the faculty since 1930. As Dean of Instruction he is responsible for the operation of class schedules. In company with other members of the faculty, matters of polio regarding curriculum are decided. This, in addition to the teaching of physics, gives Dr. Duncan a full program of responsibility with little time for anything else. Pjjte TenDEAN OF WOMEN Conscientious and sincere, Or. Florence Case has served as Dean of Women since 1930. Upon her is thrust the greater responsibility of women student guidance and there are few girls with whom she is not well acquainted. Women’s teas, society formals, banquets, mixers, and the Spring Promenade keep her fully occupied, in addition to her sociology teaching duties. DEAN OF MEN Dean of Men and instructor of history. Dr. Ernest O. Tbedinga has been at OSTC since 1936. In observing him as the chairman of assembly programs, the student body has found him congenial, efficient, and the possessor of a sterling character which makes him popular as advisor of the Men’s Association and counselor to the men of the college. ■ Page ElevenScience Building ■■■■ Page TwelvePresident’s Home Page ThirteenPage FifteenPage Sixteen Administration Building '■£ rz lV i n«» • i'-»"i V'',' iVv'' i ETHEL J. BEHNCKE Came to OSTC in 1925 A.M., University of Chicago Art LEAVELVA M. BRADBURY Came to OSTC in 1919 M.S., University of Chicago Geography RADFORD E. BOEING Came to OSTC in 1946 M.A., University of Wisconsin Mathematics JOHN A. BREESE Came to OSTC in 1923 M.S., New York University Music FACULTY Mr. Breese—’’Think high . . . think on to ) of the notes.” FREDERICK L. CAUDLE Came to OSTC in 1945 M.S., University of Wisconsin Science; Mathematics MALVINA C. CLAUSEN Came to OSTC in 1918 M.S., Columbia University Head Librarian Page SeventeenHELEN A. COLBY Came to OSTC in 1946 M.S., Northwestern University Women’s Physical Education ORLEN C. DEAN Came to OSTC in 1946 M.S., State University of Iowa Chemistry Miss Evans—. . and stay in character!” FACULTY HULDA A. DILLING Came to OSTC in 1930 A.M., University of Chicago Director of Curriculum for Kdg. Primary Grade Teachers MAYSEL E. EVANS Came to OSTC in 1929 A.M., Northwestern University Speech BARBARA DONNER Came to OSTC in 1926 Ph.D., University of Chicago History; Political Science JOSEPH O. FRANK Came to OSTC in 1912 A.M., Indiana University Chemistry Page EighteenWARNER J. GEIGER Came to OSTC in 1936 Ph.M., University of Wisconsin Geography; Social Studies JEAN GOGOLEWSKI Came to OSTC in 1946 M.S., University of Wisconsin Third Grade Critic WARREN J. GOEHRS Came to OSTC in 1947 M.A., New York University Men's Physical Education ROBERT J. GRANT Came to OSTC in 1927 M.A., University of Iowa Mechanical Drawing; Shop Work FACULTY Mr. Gunderson—"Okay, look at it this way.” COZETTE GROVES Came to OSTC in 1931 A.M., University of Chicago Fifth Grade Critic SHERMAN E. GUNDERSON Came to OSTC in 1946 M.A., Columbia University Economics Page NineteenMARIE A. HIRSCH Came to OSTC in 1929 A.M., University of Nebraska H istory SARA M. HUGHES Came to OSTC in 1948 B.S., Oshkosh State Teachers Sixth Grade Critic Miss Hirsch—. . it’s a forgone conclusion FACULTY EARL HUTCHINSON Came to OSTC in 1946 M.A., Lawrence College Principal of Junior High LAURA T. JOHNSON Came to OSTC in 1924 Ph.M., University of Wisconsin Director of Curriculum for Intermediate Grade Teachers NEVIN S. JAMES Came to OSTC in 1923 A.M., University of Wisconsin English; Speech BURTON E. KARGES Came to OSTC in 1934 Ph.D., University of Wisconsin Geology Page TwentyIRENE KOERWITZ Came to OSTC in 1947 B.S., Oshkosh State Teachers Ass't. Librarian, Training School JUDY G. LANE Came to OSTC in 1948 B.S. LaCrosse State Teachers Women's Physical Education ROBERT M. KOLF Came to OSTC in 1923 Ph.M., University of Wisconsin Men's Physical Education WAYNE R. LOY Came to OSTC in 1947 M.S., Western Illinois State Chemistry FACULTY DOROTHY E. MARTIN Came to OSTC in 1946 M.A., Colorado State College of Education English; Latin Miss Lane—’’And above all else . . . always be graceful.'’ ROLLA J. McMAHON Came to OSTC in 1934 Ph.M., University of Wisconsin Registrar; Education Page I unity-oticBERTHA C. MERKER Came to OSTC in 1939 A.M., Teachers College Columbia University First Grade Critic JOSEPHINE R. MILLER Came to OSTC in 1946 B.S., University of Minnesota R.N., Evangelical Deaconess Hospital of Milwaukee Student Health Service Mr. Nelson—"Get it . . this. Can’t you see?” He, FACULTY IDA J. MUELLER Came to OSTC in 1945 B.S., Milwaukee State Teachers Kindergarten Critic N. PETER NELSON Came to OSTC in 1924 A.M., Columbia University Director of Division of Secondary Education MILDRED NASGOWITZ Came to OSTC in 1948 B.S., Milwaukee State Teachers Second Grade Critic RALPH A. NOREM Came to OSTC in 1939 Ph.D., University of Minnesota Political Science Page Tu enty lu‘oETHAN B. PFEFFERKORN Came to OSTC in 1935 M.D., Washington University Physician RAYMOND RAMSDEN Came to OSTC in 1941 Ph.D., Ohio State University Education; Philosophy Director of Preprofessional EVERETT G. PYLE Came to OSTC in 1946 M.A., State University of Iowa English GERALD G. REED Came to OSTC in 1946 M.S., Iowa State College Biology FACULTY Mr. Pyle— The test won’t be bard if yon studied GLADYS H. SMITH Came to OSTC in 1925 Ph.M., University of Wisconsin Fourth Grade Critic MAY L. STEWART Came to OSTC in 1926 A.M., University of Chicago Director of Curriculum for Rural School Teachers Page Twenty-threeHUGH W. TALBOT Came to OSTC in 1919 M.S., University of Minnesota Biology JOHN T. TAYLOR Came to OSTC in 1936 Ph.D., Columbia University English Dr. Taylor—"Take out a half sheet of paper." FACULTY RICHARD B. THIEL Came to OSTC in 1946 Ph.D., University of Wisconsin Psychology; Education HELEN WAHOSK1 Came to OSTC in 1946 B.S., University of Wisconsin Senior Library Assistant CECILE TIMMERMAN Came to OSTC in 1948 B.S., Oshkosh State Teachers Assistant Librarian LLOYD C. WASSER Came to OSTC in 1947 B.S., Oshkosh State Teachers Junior High Mathematics; Science Page Twenty-fourROBERT W. WHITE Came to OSTC in 1947 M.S., University of Wisconsin Physics ANTHONY J. WOMASKI Came to OSTC in 1946 B.S., Oshkosh State Teachers Physics RUTH WILLCOCKSON Came to OSTC in 1921 A.M., University of Chicago English ROBERT J. WONDERS Came to OSTC in 1946 M.A., University of Michigan Mathematics FACULTY Mr. Womaski—. . it's not at all hard . . . really very simple." VIRGINIA M. ZIERZOW Came to OSTC in 1946 M.A., University of Wisconsin English; Journalism BETTY JANE ZWICKEY Came to OSTC in 1947 B.M., University of Wisconsin Music Page Twenty-liveMABEL G. BLAKE Came co OSTC in 1922 Ph.M., University of Wisconsin Art JEANNE A. MERC1ER Came to OSTC in 1924 A.M., University of Wisconsin French LOUISE E. SCOTT Came to OSTC in 1928 A.M., University of Iowa History; Social Science Financial and Clerical Staff GERMAINE BRUEHMUELLER LOIS DITTER ......... OLGA OSTERTAG........ FLORENCE PALMER...... IONE RADKE .......... GRACE SHIMEK......... PATRICIA SPAEDTKE ... FRANCES ZIMMERMAN.... .................. Stenographer .................. Stenographer Secretary to Director of Training . . Student Admissions Examiner .................. Stenographer .....Secretary to the President .................. Stenographer ...... Administrative Assistant Palmer, Spaedtke, Zimmerman, Dittcr Radkc, Bruehmueller, Shimek, Ostertag Page Twenty-six ftf4: ' . ' ■ . • - V'- ’ . On June 11 another group of OSTC students will assemble in the Little Theatre to receive their diplomas in a ceremony which someone has appropriately titled "Commencement.” For some of these graduates, the road to completion has been long and difficult, interrupted with military service in all corners of the earth. For others, it has been four continuous happy and enlightened years, filled with experiences and learning that will assure a future of service to the nation. Still others have been with the school for only three or two years — yet all have found their training invaluable and beyond reproach. College years do not need lengthy explanations for those who have experienced them. There are perhaps variations to some degree of activities and schedules between various teacher training institutions of the country but basically, the general functions and the results are the same. And alike in all cases, these graduates will go forth into a field of education to experience the great self-satisfaction that comes with the profession — the heartfelt feeling of worthiness and accomplishment in seeing young men and women in their classes progress under their direction and guidance. And to many of them will come an even greater pride when, sometime in the future, they will see a former student rise to tremendous heights and will know within themselves that they were in part responsible for the success of this former student. To the graduates of 1949, as to the graduates of the past decades, go the sincere best wishes of the faculty and the student body, hoping that this group will reflect and cherish their education and their years here at Oshkosh State Teachers College. Page I'ucnty-svtinCLASS OF.... EDWARD C. ADAMS. North Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: Mathematics, Minors: Physics, Meteorology, June Graduate. Band I; Track I; Phi Chi Mu 3. JOANN ALLEN. Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Rural. January Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2. NORMA E. BECK, Theresa, Wisconsin. Intermediate, January Graduate. College Lutheran Society 4. BETTY JEAN BENDER. Colby, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English. Minors: Speech, History, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma lb-2-3-4. Secretary 3a. Vice-President 3b, Treasurer 4a; Band 1-2-3, Vice-President 3; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4, Secretary 4; Quiver 4; Student Council 4b, Vice-President 4b. MERLAND B. BERSCH. Winneconne, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Mathematics, Minors: Physics, Chemistry, S.S. Graduate. Periclean I-2-3-4. CLARENCE W. BITTNER. Chilton. Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: Physics, Mathematics, June Graduate. Band 1-2-4, Librarian I. Business Manager 2; Newman Club 1-2-3; I.R.C. 1-2; Campus Forum 1-2; Phi Chi Mu 2-3-4. Treasurer 3; Kappa Delta Pi 4; Orchestra 4. DORIS BROCK. Green Bay. Wisconsin. Elementary, June Graduate. Alethean 1-2-3, Custodian 2a. Critic 2b. BLAKE D. BURTON. JR., Williams Bay, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Minors: Geography, English. June Graduate. Lyceum I-2-3-4. Vice-President 3a. Secretary 4a. President 4b; Track 1; Cheerleader 1-2, Coach 3-4; Alpha Phi Omega 2-3. Secretary 3a; Inter-Society Council 2; Men's Executive Board 3-4a. President 4a; All School Play 4b; Quiver 4; Homecoming Committee Co-Chairman 4a. AUDREY BUTT, Larsen. Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: English, Minors: History. Latin. June Graduate. Alethean 1-2-3-4. Custodian 2a, Vice-President 2b, President 3a; Girls' Chorus I; W.R.A. 1-2; Inter-Society Council 2b-3a; Women's Executive Council 3- VERLA CHRISTIANSON, Winneconne. Wisconsin. Three-Year Primary, June Graduate. Advance 2; Women's Executive Council 2. Page Twenty-right....1949 DUANE CISMOSKI. Berlin, Wisconsin. Secondary. Majors: History, Biology, June Graduate. Pcriclean I-2-3 4, Secretary 4a; Kappa Delta Pi 3 4, Historian 4; Wesley 4. ALICE COLBURN. Marinette. Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: English, Minors: History. Biology, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma I-2 3 4, Critic 3a; Choir I-2-3-4; Women’s Executive Council 1-2; Quiver 2b; Social Life Committee Chairman 3a; All School Play 3b. KEITH E. COMEAUX. Colby. Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: History, Minors: English. Social Science. June Graduate. Choir 2-3- ROBERT J. DAMON. Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Geography. Minors: History. Geology, June Graduate. Newman Club lb-2-3. President 2a; Men's Executive Board 3-4a; Choir 2. MELVIN W. DISCHER. Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Biology, Minors: Chemistry, English. June Graduate. All School Play lb. DONNA DITTRICH, Weyauwega. Wisconsin. Three-Year Primary, June Graduate. Alethean 1-2-3-4, Treasurer 2; Band 2-3; Advance 2a. FRANK DOBYNS, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Chemistry. Minors: Physics, Mathematics, June Graduate. Lambda Epsilon Beta 3-4; Campus Forum 3-4; Kappa Delta Pi 4. WILLIAM H. DOUGHERTY, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Mathematics, Minors: Physics, Chemistry, June Graduate. Periclcan 2h 3; Phi Chi Mu 3-4. LLOYD M. DUSTMAN, Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: English, Minors: Latin, Geography, June Graduate. JOYCE EHR-HARDT, South Byron. Wisconsin. Rural. June Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2, Secretary 2a; Kappa Gamma 1-2; Wesley 1-2. I age Twenty-nineCLASS OF SHIRLEY L. EVERT, Oconomowoc. Wisconsin. Elementary, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma 3M. JEROME FITZGERALD, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Chemistry, Minors: Physics. Mathematics. June Graduate, lota Alpha Sigma 4; Phi Chi Mu 4; Newman Club 4. ROBERT FOWLER. Neenah. Wisconsin. Grammar Grades. June Graduate. Periclean 2; Alpha Chi 1, Vice-President lh; Tennis 2; Kappa Delta Pi 4. GERALDINE P. FRAL1SH, Berlin, Wisconsin. Three-Year Elementary, S.S. Graduate. Kappa Gamma 3; Newman Club 3. JOHN L. FREUND. Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Social Science. Minors: History. English. January Graduate. Periclean 1-2-3 4; Men's Executive Board 1-2; Newman Club 1-2-3; Campus Forum 1-2. ALBERT J. GOERLITZ, Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Grammar Grades. June Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2, President 2; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4; Social Life Committee Chairman 3; All School Play 4. JEAN C. GOODWIN. Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: English, Minors: History, French, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma I-2-3 4. Treasurer 2, President 4a; Choir l-2-3-4a; Campus Forum 1-2; Quiver 2; Kappa Delta Pi 3b-4, Vice-President 4; Inter-Society Council 4, Secretary 4b. MERIEL J. GRALOW, Menasha, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Mathematics, Minors: English, Physics, June Graduate. Phoenix I-2-3-4. President 3a; Phi Chi Mu I-2-3-4, Secretary 3 4; Quiver 1-2-4, Head of Proofreading 2, Copy Editor 4; Inter-Society Council 2, Vice-President 2a; Women's Executive Council 3; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4. Treasurer 4; All School Play 4b. JEAN M. HALLER. Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Rural. June Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2, Vice-President lb. Custodian 2b; Student Council 2a; College Lutheran Society 1-2. CLAUDIA HARRIS, Rush Lake, Wisconsin. Three-Year Intermediate. June Graduate. Kappa Gamma 1-2-3. Custodian lb. President 2a; Advance 2a; Wesley 1-2-3. Page Thirty1949 BETTY M. HARTIG, Green bush, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma )b-4; Choir 4. LAWRENCE J. HECKLE, Appleton, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: General Science, Biology, Minor: History, June Graduate. Lyceum 3 4; Golf I; Inter-Society Council 4a. ROBERT G. HEIDEMAN, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary. Majors: Biology, Natural Science, Minor: English, June Graduate. Kappa Delta Pi 4. LOIS J. HIELSBERG, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma I-2-3 4, Custodian 2a. Secretary 3a. President 3b. RUTH J. HIELSBERG, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Primary. June Graduate. Alethean 1-2-3 4, Treasurer 3a, President 4a; Girls’ Chorus 1; Social Life Committee 1 -4a; Choir 2-3 4. MARY L. HOFFMAN. Crandon, Wisconsin. Rural. June Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2; College Lutheran Society 2. JEAN C. HOHLER, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Elementary. June Graduate. Kappa Gamma 4; Choir 4; College Lutheran Society 4. HELEN E. JORGENS, Scandinavia, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma 1-2-3-4, Custodian 2b, President 3b. Historian 4a. Treasurer 4b; Choir 2-3 4; I.R.C. 2; Student Council 3a; Kappa Delta Pi 4. WILLIAM G. JUNGWIRTH, Butte des Morts, Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: Mathematics. Minors: Speech. Geology. S.S. Graduate. Periclean 1; Basketball 1-2-3; Tennis I. PAUL G. KELLER. Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: Mathematics, Biology, June Graduate. Tennis 1-2-3 4, Captain 2-3; Student Council 3-4, President 4a; Kappa Delta Pi 4. I’uge Thirty-oneCLASS OF.... JEANNE A. KETTLER, Fond du Lac. Wisconsin. Three-Year Primary. June Graduate. Phoenix 1-2-3, Historian 3a; W.R.A. I-2a; Advance 2; Choir 2-3. LORRAINE KLOPOTEK. Fall River. Wisconsin. Three-Year Intermediate, June Graduate. Lambda Chi 1-2-3. Treasurer 3b; W.R.A. 1-2-3; Wesley 1-2-3. President 2; Advance 2; Kappa Delta Pi 3. ROSEMARY R. KUBORN, Kimberly, Wisconsin. Elementary, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma I-2-3-4; Band 1-2, Reporter 2; Newman Club 1-2, Treasurer 2; Advance 2a. HELEN M. KUEHL. Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: History. Minors: Biology, English. S.S. Graduate. I.R.C. 2-3. DELORES KURTZBEIN, withdrew second semester. HELEN LATONDRESS, Menasha. Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English. Minors: History, Biology. June Graduate. Kappa Gamma 1-2-3, Custodian 2a; Girls' Chorus 1. FRANKLIN J. LIEBHABER. Seymour, Wisconsin. Grammar Grades. June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 4. BETTY M. LIESCH. Belgium. Wisconsin. Intermediate, June Graduate. Delta Phi 3-4. President 4a. Critic 4b; Quiver 4. JAMES LOBERGER. Oconto. Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: Mathc-mathics. Minors: Physics. Geography, June Graduate. Phi Chi Mu 3-4; Vice-President 4. LOUIS L. LOCK, Marinette, Wisconsin. Grammar Grades. June Graduate. Kappa Delta Pi 4. Page Thirty-tuo....1949 SHIRLEY B. LOCK, Marinette, Wisconsin. Intermediate. June Graduate. Kappa Delta Pi 4. AILEEN B. MADIGAN, Roscndale, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2; Newman Club I. DORIS T. MALCHESKI, Pulaski, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2; Kappa Gamma 1-2, President 2b; Newman Club 1-2; W.R.A. 1. MARY MATSCHE. Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: English. Minors: History, Biology. June Graduate. ROY E. MATZDORE, Mcnasha, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: Physics. Mathematics. June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 3-4, Treasurer 4; Phi Chi Mu 3. President 3; Campus Forum 3. RUTH ANN MORRISSEY. Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: Biology. Natural Science, Minor: Chemistry, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma 1-2-3-4, Critic 2a, Historian 2b, Custodian 3-4, President 4b; Campus Forum 1-2-3-4, Secretary-Treasurer 1-2, President 3; Newman Club 1-2, Critic 2b; Inter-Society Council 2. Vice-President 2b; Prom Committee Chairman 3; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4; Social Life Committee 4a. WILLIAM J. MORRISSEY, Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English. Minors: Mathematics, General Science. June Graduate. Periclean 2b-3-4. President 3b; Student Council 3, Vice-President 3; Kappa Delta Pi 4; Inter-Society Council 4a. President 4a. JOHN C. NELSON. Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary. Majors: Chemistry, Biology, Minor: French, June Graduate. Philakean 3-4. Vice-President 3b. President 4a; Choir 1-2-3-4; Men's Association President 2b; All School Play 1-2; Advance 1; Newman Club 1-2; Social Life Committee Chairman 4b; Homecoming Committee Co-Chairman 4a. JOHN NIEMUTH, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Minors: Speech. English, June Graduate. All School Play 3-4. VIONA R. OBERSTADT, New London, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Delta Phi 1-2, Historian 2a. Vice-President 2b; Alpha Chi 1-2, President 2a; Student Council lb-2b. l jge Thirty-threeCLASS OF.... JANE O. O'BRIEN. Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History. Minors: English, French, January Graduate. Gamma Sigma I-2-3a; Choir l-2-3a; Campus Forum lb. HELEN M. ORR. Bear Creek, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Delta Phi 1-2, Vice-President 2a; Alpha Chi 1-2, Secretary lb. President 2b, Inter-Society Council 2b; Newman Club Ib-2. HAROLD P. OSKAR. Neenah, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History. Social Science, Minor: English. June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 1-2-3-4; Advance 3a; Campus Forum 4. ELEANOR G. OSTF.R-BERG, Phelps. Wisconsin. Grammar Grades, June Graduate. Phoenix 2-3-4; Advance 2a; Campus Forum 3; Pilgrim Fellowship 3-4; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4. HUGH A. OTTEN. Barton, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: English, History, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 3-4; Choir 1. BETTY LOU PATCH, Kimberly. Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History. Minors: Speech, English, June Graduate. Gamma Sigma I-2-3-4, Vice-President 2b. President ,3a; All School Play lb-3b-4b; Quiver 2b-3b. Business Manager, 3b; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4. STEVAN J. PITTLF.R, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: Natural Science, Biology, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 1-2-3; Football I. LOIS B. PYNCH, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Three-Year Primary, S.S. Graduate. LOUISE M. RICHTER. Green Bay, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: Biology, Minors: Mathematics, English, June Graduate. Phoenix 1-2-3-4, Treasurer 2; College Lutheran Society I-2-3-4, Vice-President 2b, Treasurer 3; Phi Chi Mu 2; Quiver 2; Kappa Delta Pi 3b-4. ANNA M. ROBERTS. Bear Creek. Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2. Huge Thirty-four....1949 THELMA RODERICK. Eagle River, Wisconsin. Three-Year Primary, June Graduate. Phoenix 3; Band 1-2; Pilgrim Fellowship 3. VERNON RUECKERT, Nccnah, Wisconsin. Grammar Grades, S.S. Graduate, lota Alpha Sigma 2-3-4, Secretary, 3a; Student Council 4a. DORIS E. RUSH LOW, Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, S.S. Graduate. Gamma Sigma 3b-4; Newman Cluh 3-4. JAMES S. RYAN, Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Minors: Mathematics, English, January Graduate. Periclean 1-2-3-4, Treasurer 3. RAYMOND SACHARSKI, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Grammar Grades, S.S. Graduate. MICHAEL A. SANFELIPPO, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Grammar Grades, June Graduate. Alpha Phi Omega 4; Track 2; Newman Club 3-4; Men's Glee Club 3; Choir 4; Quiver 4. NORMAN J. SCHEIN, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Grammar Grades, S.S. Graduate. Periclean 2b-3-4; Football I-2-3-4; Track I; Inter-Society Council 3b. President 3b; Student Council 4a. GLORIA E. SCHNEIDER, Richfield. Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2; Delta Phi 1-2, Secretary 2a, Custodian 2b; Choir 1-2; College Lutheran Society 1-2. JOSEPH SCHRAGE. Fond du Lac. Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History, Social Science, June Graduate. ROBERT E. SHERBERT, Weyauwega. Wisconsin. Secondary. Major: History, Minors: Economics. Speech, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 1-2-3-4. Secretary 3b. President 4b; Campus Forum 1-2-3-4, Vice-President 4a; Track 1-2. Page Thirty-fiveCLASS OF.... CHARLES R. SMITH. Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Three-Year Intermediate, June Graduate. Football 1-2-3; Alpha Phi Omega 2, Vice-President 2; Kappa Delta Pi 3. SHIRLEY M. SORENSON. Waukau. Wisconsin. Primary, June Graduate. Delta Phi 1 -2-3 4. Custodian 3; Wesley I-2-3-4; Choir 3-4. NORMAN L. STANGBY. Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, Minors: Latin, History, June Graduate. Periclean 1-2-3-4; Football 1-2; Advance 1-2, Sports Editor 1-2; Phi Chi Mu 1. ARLENE STENNETT, Markesan, Wisconsin. Three-Year Intermediate, June Graduate. W.R.A. 1. Secretary-Treasurer 1; Wesley 2. WILLIAM STOWE, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History. Social Science, Minor: Economics, June Graduate. Kappa Delta Pi 4; Campus Forum 4, Program Chairman 4. JEROME N. STRUPP, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Minors: Economics, Mathematics, January Graduate. Men's Association President 2; Advance 3a; Kappa Delta Pi 4b; Veteran's Organization Vice-President 4a. AUDREY TAYLOR. Fall River, Wisconsin. Three-Year Elementary, June Graduate. Lambda Chi 1-2-3. President 2b. Vice-President 3a, Secretary 3b; Band 1-2; Choir 1-2-3; Wesley I; Inter-Society Council 2, Vice-President 2a; Kappa Delta Pi 3- NORMAN THIEL, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Minors: Mathematics. Social Science. June Graduate. Periclean 1-2-3-4. President 2b; Track 1-2-3: Tennis 1-4; Basketball 2. I.AVERNE TILKENS, Green Bay, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2, Treasurer 2. FERN TONN, Clintonville, Wisconsin. Rural, June Graduate. Alpha Chi 1-2, Historian 1; W.R.A. 1-2; College Lutheran Society 1-2. Page Thirty-six....1949 MILDRED TURNER. Omro, Wisconsin. Kindergarten-Primary, June Graduate. Alpha Chi I, Historian lb; Girls’ Chorus 1; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4; Wesley 3-4; Quiver 4. BERNARD VAN CAMP, Kewaunee, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: Chemistry, Geography, June Graduate. Iota Alpha Sigma 1-2, Vice-President 2a; Veteran’s Organization Vice-President 1; Football 1-2-3-4, Captain 1; Basketball 1. EUNICE W. VETTING, Manitowoc. Wisconsin. Intermediate, June Graduate. W.R.A. 1-4; Orchestra 1-4; Girls’ Chorus 1-2; All School Play 1-2; Advance 1-2. CLYDE WALLENFANG, Niagara, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: History, Minors: Social Science, Speech. Geology. June Graduate. Philakean 2-3-4. President 3b; Campus Forum 1-2-3-4; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4; All School Play 3b-4b. ROY WENTZEL, Oshkosh. Wisconsin. Secondary. Majors: Chemistry, Mathematics. Minor: History. June Graduate. Phi Chi Mu 2-3-4, Vice-President 3, President 4. VERA E. WENTZEL, Winne-conne, Wisconsin. Grammar Grades, S.S. Graduate. MILDRED C. ZWICKER. Eagle River, Wisconsin. Primary, June Graduate. Advance 2; Kappa Delta Pi 3-4. Page Thirty-sevenALTON O. BERNHARDT, Mishicot, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: Biology, History, January Graduate. Track 1. RICHARD E. BOELKE, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Secondary, Major: English, Minors: Social Science, History, S.S. Graduate. PHYLLIS C. LAHTI, Omro, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: English, Speech, Minor: History, January Graduate. All School Play 3b; Kappa Delta Pi 4. RICHARD LUFF, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Grammar Grades, June Graduate. Golf 1-2-3 4. CAROL J. MEYER, Winneconne, Wisconsin. Three-Year Primary, June Graduate. Kappa Gamma 1-2 3, Secretary 2b, Custodian 3a; Advance lb-2, Circulation Manager 2; Women's Executive Council 2, Secretary-Treasurer 2. ARTHUR MITTELSTADT, Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Grammar Grades, June Graduate. Golf 3; Kappa Delta Pi 4. LENORE SCHLOSSMANN, Appleton, Wisconsin. Elementary, S.S. Graduate. NORMAN SCHUMANN, Germantown, Wisconsin. Grammar Grades, June Graduate. JOHN G. SCHMIRLER, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Secondary, Majors: History, Geography, January Graduate. Periclean 2b-3 4, Treasurer 3b; Track 2-3 4, Captain 2-3; Football 1-2; Veteran's Organization President 1. ALICE SPOEHR, Antigo, Wisconsin. Primary, June Graduate. Who’s Who in American Universities and Colleges Left to right. Standing: William Hughes. Paul Keller. Mildred Zwicker, Clyde Wallen fang, Clarence Bittner; Seated: Meriel Gralow, Betty Jean Blender, Eleanor Osttrbcrg. Ruth Ann Morrissey, Jean Goodwin, Betty Lou Patch. Page Thirty-eightypsmSaf- . -..a ■whu Af; terns wpifMCLASS Albert Patricia Crissey Fitzgerald Earl Hcndricksen JANUARY, 1950 Donald William Faith Ardis Hoc ft Hughes Koll Manthcy Ann Margaret Marilyn Jeanne James Morgan Olson Pritchard Shafer Stout Byron William Weess York-Critchley j Page Thirty-nineJUNIORS James Kathryn Eugene Gertrude David Gerald John Adams Angelich Arnold Baker Batzer Behl Belanger Nelda Robert Caryl Shirley Franklin Edward Irvine Bilkey Brismaster Brown Brusoe Burr Caldcr Calvert Dan Donald Jean Ralph Charles Delores Leonard Cargill Connor Dahm Day Duchac Eckcr Feudner Winnie Fink Aileen Flanagan Raymond Fletcher James Frohman Lois Gabrilska Winfried Gerth Elaine Glaesman Page FortyJUNIORS Shirley Raymond James Grenier Gulhrand Haas Merlin Gail Halle Hamilton Walter Daniel Hartman Haworth Robert Willard Dolores Arthur Harry Joanne William Heinz Henkcn Hertcl Hoehne Horner Inlift Ison Raymond William John Marian M. Jean Jacquelyn Lee Javcnkoski Jenks Jirikovec Johnson Jones Jurkins Kalhus Glenn Kirchner Thomas Klemish Richard Koch Gerald Kocck June Milton Albert Kuske Lautenschlagcr Lehman Page Forty-oneJUNIORS Edward Robert Herbert Malcolm Carol William Marvin Lcveille Loppnow Lundin MacMenamic Mader Manser Marheine Corrinc Rita Donald Richard Reynold John Joyce McCarvillc Meier Meyer Meyer Miller Moody Mortensen Delmar Patricia James Joan Bernice Robert Kenneth Multhauf Murphy Murray Nabbefcld Nickel Nordhaus O'Connor Patricia Marian O'Connor Oleson Charlotte Charles Olsen Otto Mildred Paapc Yvonne Padlesak Barbara Peterson Page Forty-tuoJUNIORS Eugene Richard Gilbert Claire James Maxine Donald Peterson Pollack Pollnow Porticr Pynch Quade Rasmussen Joyce M. Ann Douglas Clifford Alice Robert Donald Rasmussen Richter Ritchie Rohde Rossow Russell Schaefer Robert Nyal Lucille Ella May Raymond Kenneth Donald Schenzel Scheuermann Schlachtenhaufen Schlocrb Schmelter Schneider Schneider Norman Robert Richard Lloyd Irene Audrey Marlyn Schomisch Schrader Schumacher Schwartzmiller Seil Sicwcrt Simonson Page Forty-threeJUNIORS Charlotte Carl James Russell Naomi Jean Verla Skinner Smedberg Smith Spaulding Stacrkel Streckenbach Stutzman Kurt Melvin Fern Lois Lillian Leon Carol a Thiel Timmcl Ucbele Umland Van Roy Vaudreuil Von Eisengrein Raymond Paul John Wachholz Wagner Wahlers Williams Zieman Pjge Forty-fourSOPHOMORES l ft to right, Standing: Milton Becker, Thomas Barbola; Seated: John Ar berger, Marian Barker, Harriet Allender, Agnes Anderson. Left to right, Standing: Harry Boll, James Bettin; Seated: Patricia Blow, Ervin Behnke, Betty Bergman, Dorothy Beyer. Left to right. Standing: Donald Bostwick, Robert Berth; Seated: Dorothy Butler, Lois Atkins, Arlene Buchholz, James Behnke. Page Forty-fiveSOPHOMORES Left to right. Standing: Ronald Davel, George Cudnohufsky; Seated: Arthur Chase, Shirley Chipman, Don Corrigall, Gloria Daugherty. Left to right. Standing: Anthony Eannelli, Corvin Degner; Seated: Maxine Caudle, Margaret Evans, R. Roberta Elliott, Mildred Edler. Left to right. Standing: Thomas Eadner, Fintan Flanagan; Seated: Donald Fenzl, Barbara Fried holdt, Marjorie Fenn, Beverly Farmer. Page Forty-sixSOPHOMORES Left to right, Standing: Godfrey Gabriel, Don Glaeser; Seated: Donald Girth, Shirley Friedrich, Evan Gagnon, Maxine Gilbertson. I a; ft to right, Standing: Earl Hintz, Robert Harmon; Seated: Donald Hanson, Mary Henke, Charlotte Gould, Margaret Grade. Left to right. Standing: Milton Hintze, Wallace Hoffman; Seated: Fay Ann Horton, Patricia Hoeffs, Audrey Horst, Thomas Janssen. Page Forty-sevenSOPHOMORES Left to right. Standing: Charles King, Harlo Hanneman; Seated: Robert Jesse, Patricia Johnston, Patricia Johnson, Raymond Kin-ziger. Left to right, Standing: Donald MacDonald, Robert Knaak; Seated: Barbara Kopitzke, Alice Krysiak, Shirley Kroenke, Ann Loosen. Left to right, Standing: Merlynn Lewis, Nick Klein; Seated: Nancy Lem, Ray Lipovac, Alcy McBride, John Kaspar. Page Forty-eightSOPHOMORES Le to right, Standing: Norman Marohn, Carroll Meyers; Seated: Alan Marker, Larry Miller, James Manley, Eugene Michels. Left to right. Standing: Ronald Olkowski, Raymond Pitz; Seated: Tom Paul, Donna Marheine, Elizabeth Ostro, Darrell Piette. Left to right, Standing: Harrison Nichols, Donald Millert; Seated: John Morrissey, Thomas Moran, Doris Nemitz, Jeanne Murray. Page Forty-nineSOPHOMORES Left to right, Standing: Milton Spoehr, Lawrence Smith; Seated: Jean Sommerfeldt, Barbara Sen-siba, Lthel Selchert, Ann Shrov-nal. Left to right. Standing: Donald Stoll; Seated: Lorraine Spink, Lawrence Spaulding, Dorothy Spillman, Curtis Stevens. Page Fifty Left to right, Standing: Paul Trauba, Jean Van Laanen; Seated: Betty Jane Uttke, Rosemary Unser, Joanne Thorp, Doris Schrocder.SOPHOMORES Left to right, Standing: John Rasmussen, Eugene Raabe; Seated: David Popp,Carl Pfeiffer, Marilyn Prahl, William Preston. Left to right, Standing: Burleigh Riggle; Seated: William Rule, Martin Richardson, Ellen Rueh-low, Lola Ring. I ft to right. Standing: Carl Schroeder, Richard Schluessel; Seated: Elaine Schoenick.Thercse Scharpf, Alene Schmidt, Perry Lou Schneider. Page Fifty-oneSOPHOMORES Left to right, Standing: David Willis, Francis Weber; Seated: Gordon Rhoades, Muriel Waldron, Janet Reimers, Jeanette Wareham. Left to right. Standing: Leslie Zacharias, Arthur Wielgus; Seated: Ruth Winkel, Marie Weber, Marjorie Williams, M. Edith Wilson. Page Fifty-two Left to right, Seated: Claude Zoch, John Zeinert, Norma Zarter. -€ to right. Front: Kathleen Broderick. Patrick Cain. Charles Buck, William Brink; Back: Beverly Case. Ida Carollo, Dan Carter, Gerald Calder. Left to right. Front: Dale Cleavland, William Clasen. Ruth Chady, Phyllis Collins; Back: Gwendolin Coumbe, Elaine Constance. I jt to right. Front: Rose Baus, Victoria Bcthkc, Robert Berndt, Robert Barber; Back: Wallace Berth, Frederick Behlendorf, Gerald Berger, Keith Beck. Left to right. Front: Delphine Allison, Beverly Biegick, LaVerne Abidon, Lois Allan; Back: Jane Blahnik, Reginald Bidwell, Shirley Atwell, Marvin Anderson. Left to right. Front: John Bettini, Janet Breit-rick, Gordon Braun, Charles Bossert; Back: Gerald Blechl, Leon Brasch, Norman Boyle, Harry Boldt. Page Fifty-threel ft to right. Front: Richard DeRusha, Jeannette Day, Jeanne Davis, James Damon; Buck: Robert Doll, Lyle Dobberke, Thomas Damon, Marian Dixon. l eft to right. Front: Enid Eichinger, Donald Drury, Donald Doucette, Carol Donovan; Back: Robert Evensen, Joyce Eulrich, Bruce Estlund, Betty Emmcl. Left to right, Front: Thomas Figel, Virginia Fessenden, Veola Ferrell, Arthur Faucett; Back: Patricia Flynn, Joan Flanagan, Barbara Fish, Robert Firary. Left to right. Front: Walton Frisch, Evelyn Fralish, Janice Fracdrick, Margery Follendorf; Back: Virginia Gould, Kenneth Gonganek, Marilyn Goldsworthy, Carlton Gcnz. Left to right. Front: Rose Grasshueseh, Mary Gritt, Lawrence Green, James Gowell; Back: Madeline Hansen, Bernardine Hammer, Virginia Hamilton, Harold Hamann. Page Fifty-fourLeft to right. Front: John Keinert, Janice Kavolski, Alice Kippenhan, Brian Kelly; Back: Keith Knoll, Kathryn Klettke, Arlene Kirk, Gilbert Kempinger. Left to right. Front: Robert Koeppen, Richard Koeck, Phyllis Knox, Donald Koch; Back: Donald Kunde. Kay Kruger, Donald Krause, Earl Kohlman. FRESHMEN Left to right, Front: Ruth Hasley, June Harten-berger, Douglas Harmes, Robert Hanson; Back: Lorraine Herzog, RoseMary Heimcrman, Thomas Hebenstrcit, David Haworth. Left to right. Front: Donald Hunter, Patricia Hugo, Arthur Howarth, Patsy Hotchkiss; Back: Agnes Jensen, Jean Janssen, Joyce Jacobson, Wayne Jacobs. Ijeft to right. Front: Leonard Jones, John Jones, Audrey Johnson, Robert Johnson; Back: Roger Kaufman, Mary Kasai, Robert Kannal, Wayne Jorgenson. Page Fifty-fiveLeft to right, front: Robert Magic, Bernard Madi-gan, Susan Manross, William Manis; Back: Lawrence Manderfield, Faith MacDonald, Howard Maichcn, Donald Marheine. Left to right, front: Robert Martin, Jacqueline Meyer, Marilyn Meyer, Mi Ida Mielke; Back: Charles Marschall, Jean McKinnon, Arthur Messerschmidt, Mary Miller. Left to right, front: David Mynning, Margaret Mueller, Edward Murray, Gordon Miracle; Back: William Mitchell, Donald Mitchell, Duane Nashold, Eugene Nashold. la:ft to right, Front: Richard Nelson, Leona Nickel, Bernice Neumeyer, Peter Nemetz, Back: Allen Onnink, Ronald Olbrich, Leon Octzel, Bradley Nielsen. FRESHMEN Left to right, front: Susan Lane, Charmaine Lee, Joyce Lanpheer, Edward Landgraf; Back: Elaine Luhm, Chester Luce, Cletus I.istle, Victor Lind. Page Fifty-sixFRESHMEN Left to right. Front: Donald Seybold, Carol Shilobrit, Elizabeth Streck, Lyle Schultz; Back: Charles Strachan, Beverly Steffen, Anna Marie Steeps, Richard Shurbert. Left to right. Front: Kenneth Sweet, Joan Strothers, Joyce Thiex, Clifford Schwebke; Back: Frederic Tiddens, Lawrence Thomas, Germaine Thiex, Richard Schwab. Left to right. Front: Edward Privaznik, Ardene Radtke, Ned Pierce, Rex Peterson; Back: Harry Rajsky, David Poulton, Kenneth Oudenhoven, David Otto. Left to right, Front: Lorraine Ruh, Lenora Rosera, Magdalen Redman, Carlton Ruch; Back: Glenn Redman, Norbert Rich, Herbert Reif, Robert Reinke. Left to right, Front: Doris Schartner, Carlton Sawall, Beverly Salm, Robert Sang; Back: Donald Schneider, Ethel Schrimpf, Jeanne Schraa, Frank Schnabl. Page Fifty-sevenFRESHMEN Left to right. Front: Harriet Westphalen, Dorothy Thompson, Walter Tracy; Back: Harry Weir. Melvin Thorp, Ellen Vanderhoof. Left to right. Front: Bette Ann Williams, Audrey Walters, Jean Washkoske, Ivan Werner; Back: Lo Ann Williams, Virginia Winter, Betty Ann Williams, Sanford Wolfmeyer. Left to right. Front: Fredrick Warnecke, Nancy Lee Weidemann, Ramona Webb, Joseph Walsh; Back: LuAnn Zuern, Bruce Zicbcll, Lucille Young, Jean Zellmer, David Zuern. Page Fifty-eightSTUDENT COUNCIL Acting on behalf of the student body of OSTC, the Student Council is directly responsible for all activities relating to the school. This group, organized in 1922 and made up of representatives from the various curricula, promotes activities which will benefit the student body and advance the interests of the college. Of its many functions, two are outstanding. The Student Council in conjunction with representatives of the administration meets each semester to apportion the fees collected from the students. This money is allotted to the various activities, such as sports, dramatics, publications, music, in accordance with their individual needs. It is the Student Council that is responsible for the organization and functioning of the Social Life Committee. This committee, under the chairmanship of Robert Nordhaus the first semester and John Nelson the second, activates the many social gatherings held on the campus. Freshmen and upperclassmen alike attended the first social function, the Fresh- man Mixer. Close upon the heels of this were the preparations for Homecoming. The Social Life Committee’s part here was the appointment of a capable Homecoming Committee to organize the activities of one of the most important weekends of the year and to see that they were executed efficiently. Following closely behind came the Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas dances. Pumpkins and cats, turkeys and corn, and Christmas trees took their turn at decorating the Women’s Gymnasium. Social society formals vied with the sch(K)l-sponsored dances for a place on the spring calendar. The Pre-Lenten dance and the Spring Promenade were held at the Women’s Gym and Eagles Club respectively. Buddy DiVito and the college royalty made the promenade the usual outstanding spring event. Future plans of the Student Council call for continued cooperation with the faculty’, increased voice in school affairs, and the promotion of greater school spirit. I’jge Fifty-nineOFFICERS Virst Semester Paul Keller .... Kurt Thiel...... Robert Nordhaus .. .. President .. .. . . Vice-President .. Secretary-t reasurer Second Semester Robert Nordhaus Betty Jean Bender ...... Kurt Thiei. MEMBERS Virst Semester Division Second Semester Clyde Wallenfang .... Dolores Hertel Donald Ziemer Gordon Rhoades Jean Haller Ruth Chady Rural fcan Jones Joan Pankratz Norman Schein Grammar Grade Vernon Rueckert Left to right: Degner, Ison, Wallenfang. Kdlcr, Thiel. Ostcrberg, Breitrick, Horst, Kuske, Obcrstadt, Nordhaus, Rueckert, Bender, Schein. Page SixtyCAMPUS FORUM l.eft to right: William Stowe, Robert Sherbert. N. S. Janies. Patricia Murphy, Donald Meyer. Membership in Campus Forum is open to any student interested in its activities, and opportunities to participate in programs are given to all. Campus Forum was organized in 1941 to provide an opportunity for students to practice and train for speech activities which were determined and prepared for by the group. Opportunities for speech activities with students from other schools as well as with students from OS'l'C were provided. This year's meetings for the Campus Forum were held on Tuesday evenings in room 103. Participants had an opportunity to participate in many forms of public speaking experiences including discussions, symposiums, debates, and campaign speeches. Important and significant public problems were studied by the group such as "Civil Rights”, "Juvenile Delinquency", "Present Political Campaigns”, and "Should the Federal Government Aid Education?” The activities of Campus Forum culminated in the debate and discussion groups at the University of Wisconsin on March 18 and 19. The question for debate at that time was "Resolved: That the Federal government should adopt a policy of equalizing education in tax-supported schools by means of annual grants.” The discussion question was on Civil Liberties. OFFICERS President.....................DONALD MEYER Vice-President ............. Robert Sherbert Secretary.....................Audrey Walker Program Chairman..............WILLIAM Stowe Corresponding Secretary .... Patricia Murphy Adviser.......................Nevin S. James Ruth Ann Morrissey leading a discussion with Donald Meyer and John Voigt waiting to offer rebuttal. Page Sixty-oneWOMEN’S ASSOCIATION l.eft to right, seated: Krysiak, Meier, Oleson, Gabrilska, Nickel. Standing: Peterson, Simonson. OFFICERS President..........Rita Meier, Kappa Gamma Vice-President.....JEAN JONES, Gamma Sigma Secretary-Treas. .. Barbara Peterson, Alcthean Adviser.....................Dr. Florence Case Hoard of Directors: Lois Gabriska—Independent, Alice Krysiak— Lambda Chi, Bernice Nickel—Phoenix, Marian Oleson—Delta Phi, Marlyn Simonson—Independent, Maxine Caudle—Locker Room Ch'n. Rita Meier and Adviser Dean Case making plans for the enjoyable locker room party. All women on the OSTC campus belong to the Women’s Association. One woman from each social sorority, two independent women, and a locker-room chairman make up the executive council which supervises the activities of this association. This year the council began and ended their activities by entertaining the faculty women, faculty dames, and student women at their annual Fall and Spring Teas. At Christmas time the women gathered at the Trinity Guild Hall for a festive Christmas Dinner. The after-dinner program of readings, vocal solos, and community singing sent everyone home in the Christmas spirit. On April 27 the Women’s Association presented a new angle to the campus activities. This was a Locker Room Party with the men invited to engage in the games and to see the gaily decorated locker alleys. The lounge, study and rest room, and locker room are suported by the Women’s Association. They offer comfortable furniture, quiet study corners, easy daybeds, and a smoking corner for the use of every woman. Page Sixty.I n oMEN’S ASSOCIATION Left to right: Flanagan. Popp. Lauccnschlager, Morrissey, Burton, Kirchner, Spoehr. Promotion of mutual friendship and understanding so that the men of OSTC are brought closer together is the purpose of the Men’s Association. The men are headed by an executive board which is elected by all men of the student body. The association has been kept busy this year redecorating one of the rooms of the men’s lounge. This room has been painted —the walls a light yellow, the ceiling white, and the partition between the two rooms has been attractively wallpapered. Newr draperies now hang at the windows and the furniture has been re-upholstered. The lounge was made even more cheerful by the purchase of a new rug. After a class or two, students find much relaxation listening to the radio or playing chess and checkers. Because of the cheerful atmosphere of the lounge, the men of Oshkosh State Teachers College find added enjoyment and relaxation. This year the Men’s Association sponsored the Intra-Mural basketball and baseball tournaments and awarded a trophy to each of the winning teams. OFFICERS hirst Semester President.......................... Blake BURTON, Jk. Vice-President...................... FlNTAN FLANAGAN Secretary-Treasurer...................GLENN KIRCHNER Second Semester President .......................... FlNTAN FLANAGAN Vice-President .............. MILTON LAUTENSCHLAGER Secretary-Treasurer.................. GLENN KIRCHNER Hoard of Directors: Robert Damon, LaVerne Ernst, John Morrissey, David Popp. James Adams. Milton Spoehr, William Utt. Adviser Dean Thedinga and Fintan Flanagan in conference. Page Sixty-three(fahkualt Ahuaurt MUV M U. V. »IIA»MUV M M)I »» tnn tiAOttii cuiua Dramo Group oOST(' KulOVS lt l01To lo Present Comedy Voil Ml . N« MMK. iimU‘ S|M‘i‘c Meet Two OS VC Students Win in Top Valent Tunc Hunt Mon's Association Office is Elected Student Bvttemwnt Committee Formed Variod Assembly Program Offered :T?T tw Presents Concert State Oratorical cumteo m 7 j rwT rJxri I wT ' r»— I hc ADVANCE this year reached another milestone of progress by printing on a smoother grade of newsprint. This allowed a fine-line reproduction of pictures and also assures the library of maintaining its files, this paper not being as susceptible to yellowing in age. I a ge S ixty-fou rADVANCE The Oshkosh ADVANCE continued this year as a weekly publication and the weekly trek of students to the Publications Office has proved again how much they value its nuggets of news. By its complete coverage of student activities it makes possible a ' know when, where, and how” of things. The ADVANCE Office is usually bustling with activity, a veritable bee-hive of reporters, columnists, journalism students, and photographers on Wednesday. Mrs. Zierzow, adviser, has learned to be patient with the hustle of a deadline. The purpose of the ADVANCE has remained unchanged. Events which constituted news were publicized while the editorials upheld their fine reputation for clear thinking and sincere opinions. The ADVANCE has combined its serious side with a good sense of humor. The excellent columnists have seen to this. The controversial subjects which have arisen throughout the year have received prompt and just publicity. One of the more important organizations, the Student Relations Committee, was given ample space to explain its purpose and aims. By this democratic medium the energetic programs of the school are brought before the student body. A complete sports page with good photographs keeps us from becoming too engrossed in school politics, keeps us more concerned about teamwork. The staff of the ADVANCE is composed of those students interested in editing and publishing a newspaper, and the students of the Journalism class who act as reporters. The publication of the Oshkosh ADVANCE at its constant high standard has called for concentration of the time and effort of editors and staff. They well deserve to share the honor which the ADVANCE has earned among the students of OSTC. Page Sixty-fiveFirst Semester STAFF Second Semester Barbara Peterson . . . . Editor Corinne McCarville .. . . Associate F.ditors .... J Barbara Peterson .... Corinne McCarville Pat Johnston Audrey Walker . . 1 . . I • ' Herb Lundin Bob Nordhaus Herb Lundin Herb Lundin Carroll Meyers .. Business Manat'er Carroll Meyers Hugh Jones . Exchange Manager Orlyn Zieman Columnists Robert Brismaster . .. . Thomas Damon Winfried Gerth •I :: i ■ ■ . . . Photographers j Robert Brismaster Mrs. V. M. Zierzow . . .... Mrs. V. M. Zierzow Reporters: Betty Ann Williams, Jane Blahnik, Norman Boyle, Arlene Buchholz, Marge Fenn, Shirley Kroenke, Alice Krysiak, Barbara Sensiba, Jean Sommerfeldt, Lorraine Spink, Joanne Thorp, Ruth Winkel. Left to right: Robert Nordhaus, Betty Ann Williams, Orlyn Zieman, Lower left, left to right: Carroll Meyers, John Voight, Herb Lundin. William Manis. Lower right, left to right: Corinnc McCarville, Jane Ellen Hlabnik, Pat Johnson. S- Page Sixty-sixQUIVER ROBERT BR ISM ASTER lid it or Each new yearbook involves new adventure in publication work, but the '49 QUIVER has turned up more adventure throughout its production year than any staff member could possibly have anticipated. The budget was the first scene of activity. In order to explore the possibilities in national advertising, the Editor and the business staff of the ’49er engaged in a thoroughgoing campaign designed to uncover gold in even previously unsuspected nooks. The results were both amusing and salutary. The theme selection involved a minimum of midnight oil, for the publication year naturally suggested that. But the art staff found the carrying out of that theme more difficult than the suggesting of it. No MERIEL GRALOW Associate Editor doubt the enlightening (?) debates concerning art expression versus the communication of ideas to mere mortals greatly complicated their efforts and tried their patience. Nevertheless, they responded beautifully. To the sports staff fell the task of making readable copy from an unspectacular year. The society and activity editors found it necessary to combine tact with drive in coordinating their sections. Picture identification, typing, and proofreading all provided those vitally necessary portions of yearbook-making that are in themselves so lacking in glamour that pure consecration to duty is required for their completion. All honor, therefore, is due those who performed those duties. Page Sixty-sevenUpper left, left to right: Society editors Lund in. Lee, and Hlahnik. Upper ri-.ht, left to right: Business staff Davis. Steeps. Nelson, and Angelich. I ou-er left, left to right: Photographers Gerth, Vaudreuil. Damon. Marohn. Both the photographic equipment and the staff using it were worked hard this year. Much of the experience gained was pleasurable in the gaining, but more of it added up to sheer drudgery. Copy and layout editors piled up hours of wearisome labor while experimenting with new forms and modifying established ones. High-lighted by adventure and pleasurable moments and experience, the production year of the ’49 QUIVER was nevertheless characterized by a dependency upon that all-important factor in the production of any publication — a dependable staff. It is always a joy to discover cleverness and talent among the members of a publication staff. But those two qualities alone never yet put out a school paper over an appreciable publication period or produced a coherent yearbook. Unsung, but absolutely fundamental, is the relatively rare quality of day-in-and-day-out dependability. With that firmly in mind, the selection of personnel for the higher staff positions was governed accordingly. No dead wood was tolerated on the ’49 QUIVER staff. Those filling the lesser positions with marked dependability will undoubtedly be the leaders of future QUIVER staffs. Whatever success the 49 QUIVER may have, it is the representation of the gold so faithfully dug for by dependable editors and co-workers. Page Sixty-eightt.eft. left to right: Art editors Friedrich, Johnson, and Padclsak. Rivht. left to right: Sports editors Nielsen. Gabriel, and Scharpf. QUIVER STAFF Editor........................................................R. E. Brismaster Associate Editor.....................................................M. J. Gralow Business Manager....................................................... C. Meyers Business Staff . . A. Steeps, J. Nelson, R. Sarafiny, J. Davis. K. Angelich, J. Moody Sports Editors..............................B. Nielsen, G. Gabriel, T. Scharpf Art Editors...................S. Friedrich, A. Johnson, K. Klettke, Y. Padlesak Society Editors...................................H. Lundin, C. Lee, J. Blahnik Photographers....................W. Gerth, L. Vaudrcuil, T. Damon. N. Marohn luty-Out Staff..........................................G. Redman, B. Liesch Special Projects........................................L. Rosera, E. Viestenz Reporters . . B. Bender, S. Chipman, J. Janssen, J. Washkoske, S. Lane, J. Reimers Typists..........................P. Johnson, A. Krysiak, C. Skinner, D. Nemitz Proofreaders..............................B. Burton, Jr., D. MacDonald, A. Wolff S. Grenier, L. Spink, M. Sanfelippo, J. Sommerfeldt, M. Turner, M. Paape Vacuity Adviser.......................................Mrs. Virginia M. Zierzow Picture Identification and Index l fl to right: Janssen, Skinner. MacDonald, Spink. Washkoske. Turner, Chipman, Grenier. Krysiak. I.ane. Paape, Wolff. Liesch, Burton. Redman. Sommerfeldt. Sanfelippo. Edge Sixty-nineDRAMATICS Left to right: Mcricl Gralow, Jane Blahnik, Edward Landgraf. Blake Burton, Jr., Gordon Miracle. "The Winslow Boy,” a four-act play by Terence Rattigan, was presented in the Little Theater, Thursday, March 31, and Friday, April 1, under the direction of Mayscl Evans. This play, which had a long and successful run in England, came to New York in the fall of 1947 where it had a successful run. It is based on one of the most famous trials of modern times — a celebrated English legal case which nearly caused a government to topple by a "father’s fight for his little boy’s honor." "Ronnie Winslow, skillfully played by Gordon Miracle, is the title character, a 14-year-old boy who was expelled from a British naval academy for allegedly stealing and cashing a postal order belonging to a fellow cadet. "Convinced of his son's innocence and indignant over the high-handed, arbitrary attitude of the naval academy officials, Arthur Winslow, the hoy's father — effectively played by Edward Landgraf — determines to fight the case through the courts at any cost. "The action, which takes place in the drawing room of a house in Kensington and covers a two-year period, depicts the repercussions felt in the British press and eventually in parliament as the controversy becomes a national issue. "Clyde Wallenfang, as Sir Robert Morton, is appropriately austere and dignified as the famed barrister whose courtroom skill finally resulted in the vindication of the youth. The loyal sister who stands by her father and young brother throughout the furore even at the risk of her own happiness is well played by Jane Ellen Blahnik. "Blake Burton, Jr„ as Dickie Winslow, brother of Ronnie, makes the most of his part as a cynical young man who is not entirely convinced that the legal battle is worthwhile. "Sterling characterizations are turned in by Betty I.ou Patch as Violet, the maid; Meriel Gralow as Mrs. Winslow; Norman Schomisch as John Wather-stone; Albert Goerlitz as Desmond Curry, another lawyer; Ann Resch as Miss Barnes, a gushing newspaper woman; and John Niemuth as a press photographer.” (Oshkosh Daily Northwestern) The stage crew of members of the play production class with Robert Brismaster as stage manager depicted the theme of the play in the setting. A typical sitting room of an English home, which required the painting of fiats, making of drapes, execution of off-stage noises, creation of lighting effects, and general portrayal of realism, was the stage setting. Everything about it reflected an upper-middle-class family such as the Winslows. This work and cooperation of the cast and production staff resulted in another successful play at Oshkosh State Teachers College with Miss Evans as director and overseer. Page SeventyCAST PRODUCTION STAFF Ronnie Winslow Violet Arthur Winslow lid ward lutndgraf Grace Winslow Dickie Winslow Catherine Winslow . . . . .... Jane Ellen Blabnik John Watherstone Desmond Curry Miss Barnes Fred Sir Robert Morton Clyde Wallen fang Stage Manager..................Robert Brismaster Assistant Directors..............Shirley Brusoe, Delores Ecker Assistants to Stage Manager . . Ella May Schloerb, Marvin Marheine, Yvonne Padlesak, Kathryn Angelich, Patricia Murphy, Eugene Peterson, William Jungwirth, Mildred Zwickcr, Eleanor Osterberg. Properties......................Margaret Evans, Alice Wolff, Alice Colburn Publicity Manager.............Betty Jean Bender business Manager................ Robert Shcrbert Assistants to Business Manager .. Jeanne Shafer, Franklin Liebhabcr, John Nelson, Dorothy Radtke. Upper Right: Clyde Wallcnfang, Albert Goerlitz, and Gordon Miracle. Lou-cr Left: Jane Hlahnik, Edward Landjtraf, and Norman Schomisch. Lower Right: John Niemuth. Ann Resch, Betty Lou Patch, Edward Landgraf, and Gordon Miracle. Rage Sii cuty-oncCAST Mildred Zwicker. Ann Resch, Betty Jean Bender, Betty Lou Patch, and Meriel Gralow. "Christmas on Erie Street” by Graydon Voss was the play which was presented for the Training School students Monday, December 13, and at an assembly for OSTC students on Tuesday, December 14. The stage of the Little Theatre became a street corner on Chicago’s West Side. The story of the play is centered around the activities of two Chicago newsboys, Tony and Terry, who displayed a spirit of giving different from that of most other people on Christmas Eve. This one-act drama presented by Miss Evans' play production class contrasted real charity with the efforts of the "do-gooders.” The setting and properties, as well as the production of the play itself, was the project of the play production class. Members of the class displayed their talents in creating a realistic background, as well as in their interpretation of character. A gaily trimmed store window, a street lamp, and an Erie Street sign constructed by the class were proof of Miss Evans’ statement that the play provided "practical experience in the painting and carpentering aspects of production for the group.” This project gave the class a chance to apply much other knowledge which the course offers. Terry ................................. Michael Grant Tony..............................................Darrel Johnson Dude ................•.................... Hugh Ollen Mrs. Beamcr.............................Shirley llrnsoe Distinguished-Looking Man .......Clyde Wallenfang Lorenzo ................................ Kicky Lentz Old Man.............................................John Niemulh Frankie........................................... Ralph Clematis Mabel ..................................... Ann Resch Clara ................................ Mildred ' .wicker Lady Bountiful.....................lilla May Schloerb Rodney ................................ Robert Sherhert Man from the Society ............ Robert lirismaster Ann ................................... Yvonne Padlesak Sally ................................. Audrey Walker Jo....................................Patricia Murphy Marie............................................Delores Ecker A Little Girl.......................................Judy Kesler Passers-By: Meriel Gralow, Kathryn Angelich, Betty Jean Bender, Anna Day, Betty Lou Patch, and William Jungwirth. Above: Ricky Lentz, Ralph Clemans. Shirley Brusoe. Below: Robert Sherhert (with camera). Robert Bris-master. Hugh Otten, Ella May Schloerb. Michael Grant. Page Seventy-twoPHI CHI MU -« to right, first row: Rigglc, Wentzel, Loberger, Gralow, Manthey. Left to right, second row: Haworth, Schaefer. Steckhauer. Wonders. I.eft to right, third row: Boeing. Halle. Kalbus. Schmelter. Fitzgerald. Bittner. Williams. Degner. One of the organizations on campus which provides intellectual as well as social benefits is Phi Chi Mu, the mathematics club of OSTC. Since it is a mathematics club, naturally enough, the purpose of Phi Chi Mu is to promote an interest in various phases of mathematics. Though meetings are held only once a month, they are put to good advantage and many topics of interest in the world of mathematics are discussed at these meetings, including such things as arithmetical freaks and fallacies. Movies of racing entitled "Spills and Thrills" were shown at one meeting by Mr. William Brennand of Oshkosh who was winner of the Miami Air Races. Mr. Brennand explained to the members of the club the system of timing and the records of the races. At another meeting Mr. Ted Irion gave an interesting talk on the subject of architecture. One of the highlights of the year is an annual picnic held in the spring. At this time the members and their w ives or dates and their advisers get together and play baseball and above all eat. As the requirements for eligibility to enter the club have been fairly high, it has been hoped that they could be changed to enable more students to join, thereby making Phi Chi Mu a larger and possibly even better organization. OFFICERS ..... Roy Wentzel ..... James Loberger ..... Meriei. Gralow .....Corvin Degner Mr. Radford Boeing, Mr. Roberi Wonders MEMBERS Clarence Bittner, Corvin Degner, Charles Duchac, Jerome Fitzgerald, Meriei Gralow. Merlin Halle, Dan Haworth. Earl Hendrickson, Lee Kalbus, James Loberger, Ardis Manthey, Burleigh Riggle, Don Schaefer, Ray Schmelter, Ted Steckhauer, Roy Wentzel, Robert Williams. President . ... Vice-President Secretary .... Treasurer Advisers....... Page Seventy-threeKAPPA The OSTC Beta Theta Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi has become one of the larger and more progressive organizations on the campus. The purpose of Kappa Delta Pi is two-fold: 1. To stress high standards of professional and scholastic work. 2. To recognize noteworthy service in the field of education. Again this year, as in the past, the active members held a Homecoming Breakfast for the Alumni. The get-together was held in the P.T.A. room of the Training School. In November, February and March supper meetings and programs were held at the Oshkosh Public Museum. The beginning of the new year, 1949, set the stage for initiation of thirty-five first-semester pledges. On March 23, the annual banquet was held in honor of the first- and second-semester initiates. This event, along with initiation of nine second-semester pledges, took place at the Athearn Hotel. On May 19, the Spring Picnic was held and the officers for the coming school year were installed. William Hughes. Betty Jean Bender, and Mr. Pyle engaged in an initiation ceremony of Kappa Delta Pi. DELTA PI The Kappa Delta Pi Banquet at the Hotel Athearn with Mr. Hutchinson introducing the guests. OFFICERS .. William Hughes ... Jean Goodwin Betty Jean Bender ... Meriel Gralow .. Duane Cismoski . Mr. Everett Pyle MEMBERS Gerald Behl, John Belanger, Betty Jean Bender. Clarence Bittner. Robert Brismastcr, Caryl M. Brown. Duane Cismoski. Hulda A. Dilling, Frank D. Dobyns. Robert F. Fowler, Lois L. Gabrilska. Albert Gocrlitz. Jean Goodwin, Meriel Gralow. Merlin D. Halle, Robert G. Heide-man, Ruth Hein, Lois Hielsberg. Daniel T. Haworth. William W. Jenks, William R. Hughes, Mrs. Wm. R. Hughes. Earl Hutchinson. M. Jean Jones, Helen Jorgens. Lee Kalhus, Paul Keller. Yvonne Kellerman, Lorraine F. Klopotck. Faith M. Koll, June D. Kuske, Louis Lock. Mrs. Louis Lock, Corinne A. McCarville, Dorothy Martin. Mrs. Bertha Mcrker. Leslie Miller, Arthur Mittclstacdt. Ruth Ann Morrissey, William J. Morrissey. Joan E. Nabbefeld. Charlotte M. Olsen, Eleanor Osterberg. Florence Palmer, Betty Lou Patch, Barbara Peterson. Everett Pyle, James W. Pynch, Dorothy Radtke, Raymond Ramsdcn. Louise Richter. Ella May Schlocrb. Norman Schomisch. Irene Seil, Marlyn J. Simonson. Charles R. Smith, William A. Stowe. Jean Strcckenbach, Verla M. Stutzman. Audrey O. Taylor. Kurt R. Thiel, Mildred Turner, Raymond C. Wachholz, Clyde Wallenfang. Anthony Womaski. Mildred Zwicker. President .... Vice-President Secretary .... Treasurer .... Historian . .. . Counselor ... , Page Seventy-fourPHI BETA SIGMA Gamma Chapter of Phi Beta Sigma received its charter on February 10, 1925. The Society was organi .ed for the purpose of honoring and promoting superior scholarship in our Teachers College. Since 1939 all of the faculty are members. They select the student members from approximately fifteen percent of each year’s graduating seniors who have the highest scholastic average. To promote interest in scholarship in a school engaged in developing good students into teachers. Phi Beta Sigma sponsors an Honor’s Day Assembly. At this time not only the new members are honored but also those students who have won other scholastic recognition. Several college societies as well as two civic groups are interested in offering awards. High grade-point averages, both in general scholarship and in specific areas of study, are recognized. Honors include the Ellen F. P. Peake St. George Scholarship, the Gamma Sigma Awards, Phoenix Trophy, Lyceum Scholarship, Oshkosh Council of Catholic Women’s Scholarship and the American Association of University’ Women’s Award. FACULTY OFFICERS President.................Ruth WlLLCOCKSON Vice-President..................Mabel Blakf. Secretary-Treasurer...........Radford Boeing MEMBERS Edward C. Adams Betty Jean Bender Clarence W. Bittner Meriel J. Gralow Jean C. Goodwin Margaret R. Hart Dolores K. Hunger Bernice L. Litner Roy Matzdorf Ruth Ann Morrissey Eleanor Osterbcrg Doris G. Phipps William A. Stowe Dolores S. Vander Velde Eunice W. Vetting Clyde G. Wallenfang Roy D. Wentzcl Mildred C. Zwickcr Seated, left to right: Eunice Vetting. Jean Goodwin. Betty Jean Bender, Ruth Ann Morrissey, Meriel Gralow, Eleanor Osterbcrg. Standing: Clyde Wallenfang, William Stowe, Clarence Bittner. Roy Wentzcl, Edward Adams. Roy Matzdorf. Page Seventy-fiveCH l.efi to right, first rote: Miller. Woodbury. Garrity, Sorenson. Kippenhan, Lee. Manross, Morgan, Hohlcr, Colburn. Spink. Oaks. Kectler. Scrcckcnbach, Scutzman, Radtkc. Van Laanen, Henke. Second row: Schlocrb. Stoll. Schneider. Ritchie. Webb. Ilartig. Jorgens. Schlachtenhaufen. Unscr. Jones. Rossow. Zcllmer. Barnard, Taylor. McCarvillc, Hiclsberg, Goodwin, Shafer. I’age Seventy-sixOIR Third row: Mr. Brecsc, Haas. Russell, Murray, Keinert, Javenkoski. Darling. Sanfelippo, Stout. Peterson, Harms, Behnke, Poulton, Rhoades, Olsen. Winkel. l ourlh Row: Drury, Green. Lundin, Barber, Nelson, Mielkc, Nashold. Mitchell, Reinemann, Arnold. Wall, Schenzel. Rasmussen. Wachholz, Landgraf. Page Seventy-sevenUpper left: Carrying in the risers ai Klcho. Upper right: Dinner at the hotel in Anfigo. Lower left: With everybody comfortable, on to the next stop. FIRST SOPRANO •Betty Morgan “Joan Garrity ’Betsy Manross “June Woodbury Shirley Sorenson Jean Hohler Alice Kippenhan Charmaine Lee Mary Miller ••Helen King ““Beverly Farmer SECOND SOPRANO ‘JoAnn Ritchie Lucille Schlachtenhaufen Ella May Schloerb Gloria Schneider Betty Hartig Carolyn Stoll Rosemary Unser Ramona Webb FIRST ALTO •Jane Barnard “Jean Goodwin Ruth Hielsberg M. Jean Jones Corinne McCarville Charlotte Olsen Alice Rossow Jeanne Shafer Audrey Taylor J. Marilyn Zellmer SECOND ALTO Alice Colburn Mary Henke Jeanne Kettler Lorraine Spink Jean Streckenbach Verla Stutzman Jacqueline Oaks Jean Van Laanen Dorthy Radtke Ruth Winkel FIRST TENOR 'Gordon Rhoades Ervin Behnkc Eugene Peterson James Stout Douglas Harms David Poulton Michael Sanfelippo SECOND TENOR “Ed Murray •John Keinert James Haas Robert Russell Ray Javenkoski Herbert Darling “James Studley ••Robert Doll Donald Apell BARITONE Richard Mielke John Nelson Don Drury Law’rence Green Herbert Lundin William Mitchell •Robert Barber ‘Eugene Nashold BASS Ed Rasmussen Eugene Arnold Lewis Reinemann Robert Schenzel Ray Wachholz Thomas Wall Ed Landgraf Thomas Red I in First semester only Second semester only Page Seventy-eightThe college choir is well known throughout the state for its excellent concerts. The fine blend of approximately sixty voices, and the attitude of the members cooperating as a group have caused many favorable comments about the choir. One of the clippings from a Pulaski newspaper put it quite nicely: "On Thursday, April 21, the well-known A Cappella Choir of the Oshkosh State Teachers College will visit Pulaski High School and present a one hour concert. "The famous singing group is composed of about sixty members, both male and female. "Mr. J. A. Breese, one of Wisconsin’s best musicians, is in charge of the State Teachers College group. Mr. Breese has produced a number of Wisconsin’s best musical organizations and has presented many well received concerts in many cities in the north central states. "Pulaski can expect a good musical treat next Thursday. . . .” A letter received from the Principal of Antigo High School held a great deal of praise for the group. "I wish to compliment Oshkosh Teachers College Choir on the very fine assembly program given by them to the Antigo High School student body on Friday, April 22. I have heard many fine compliments from both the students and the teachers. In fact, several of our teachers have remarked that this was the best college choir they have ever heard in our school." This year the choir gave its Christmas concert two nights instead of one because of the large attendance expected. It is interesting to note that even though the weather was very bad, the Little Theater was full both nights. The nineteenth annual choir tour was broken up into two sections. The choir was gone for two days in March, coming home for the night between. They again went on tour April 21 and 22. On the latter tour, the group stayed overnight in Merrill. They gave five concerts in two days which really kept them busy on the tour. One of the most noticeable things about the choir is the fact that wherever and whenever they assemble, harmonious music is bound to be heard. After almost every meal while on tour, and on the buses, too, the choir "warmed up" on a few numbers just for the mere enjoyment of singing. Singing a combination of sacred and secular music, the choir gave concerts at the Little Theater, the First Presbyterian Church of Oshkosh, at Antigo High School, Elcho High School, Fond du Lac-Newcomers Club, Horicon-Hi-Y Club, Kewaskum High School, Kimberly High School, Lomira High School, Merrill-St. Stephen Church, Port Washington High School, and Wau-pun High School. Under the able direction of J. A. Breese, the choir is one of the most active organizations on the campus. Above: A breather for some of the choir members between concerts. Below: Boh Doll putting one over on Director Breese to the amusement of everyone. P ge Seventy-nineORCHESTRA Under the direction of Miss Betty Zwickey, the orchestra is pictured here rehearsing for an assembly program. The students at Oshkosh State Teachers College were fortunate in having as fine a musical organization as the orchestra on campus this year. The orchestra entertained the student body at various school functions. Under the able leadership of Miss Betty Zwickey, the orchestra has proven to be composed of talented musicians. Miss Zwickey deserves much credit and recognition for her able work in re-organizing the orchestra. It is indeed a loss to the college in that it is her last year as director of the orchestra. On May 10 the OSTC orchestra presented an excellent and well-received assembly program. Selections on the program included: "Prelude” by Guilmant, "Russian Choral and Overture" by Issac, "Fan- tasia” by Mozart, "Andante Cantabile” by Tschaikowsky, "Spanish Dances" by Mous-kousky, "Malaguana" by Leucona, themes for the "Piano Concerto” by Tschaikowsky, and "Perpetual Motion” by Bohm. A trumpet solo, "Carnival of Venice” by Staigers, was played by Eugene Arnold, and a brass sextet of "Memories of Stephen Foster" was also presented. Another outstanding service of the orchestra was the furnishing of music for graduation. The orchestra of 1949 is one of which everyone should be proud, not only from the standpoint of entertainment, but from the standpoint of service to promote the welfare and the name of the college. This small nucleus group who worked tirelessly together deserve much credit for their effort. Pjge EightyPIANO Pat Blow VIOLINS Margaret M. Grade Eunice E. Vetting June Hartenberger Harold Keilburg Grace Lem Priscilla Duggan John Artzberger CELLO Mary Henke Jean McKinnon VIOLA Myra Kemmer BASS VIOL Herbert Darling FLUTE Betty Jean Bender CLARINET Carlton Sawall Ruth Winkel OBOE Rosemary Unser TRUMPET Clarence Bittner Robert Schenzel HORN John Jones Mary Miller TROMBONE Robert Doll BARITONE Tom Red 1 in PERCUSSION Edward Landgraf Gerald BergerBAND l.eft to right, inside circle: Studley. Sawall, Darling. Lewis, Bittner, Arnold. Second circle: Schneider, Hoffman, Thompson, Carter, Lee, Kopitzkc, Miller, Gritt, Dittrich, Morgan. Kastoff, Rcinemann, Schenzel. Third circle: Kroenke. Meier, Davis, Westphalen, Ruh, Schmelter, Atwell, Rcdlin, Blechl, Braun, Skinner, Kasai, Doll. fourth circle: Biegick, Landgraf, Cain, Steeps, Rasmussen, Blow, Mr. Breese, Unscr, Rossow, Behnke. President......... Vice-President . . Secretary......... Treasurer......... Hu si ness Manager Director......... OFFICERS ........................Eugene Arnold .........................James Studley .......................Carlton Sawall .....................Charlotte Skinner ........................Ray Schmelter ........................Mr. J. A. Breese ’fUitl.If you want to belong to an organization that really means a lot to the school, join the band. It is the vim, vigor, and vitality of OSTC. Every member of this organization has volunteered to be a member. There is no compulsion behind it. It is an organization that is freely entered into and thoroughly enjoyed by everyone in it. The members all contribute to the organization but it would never be what it is without the directorship of Mr. J. A. Breese. Mr. Breese has a real understanding for the problems of the students. He combines play with work, thus making him an interesting teacher. This year the band has attended all of the various athletic events, thus providing the crowds with the entertainment between halves and the pep during the games. One of the outstanding events was the trip the band took to Milwaukee when OSTC played Milwaukee State. The "homecoming” celebration also brought the band out with flying colors. They marched in the Homecoming Parade and then led the crowd back to school for the pep rally. All of the members of the band put in a lot of hard work this year in preparation for the assembly they put on for the student body. They featured many numbers, but a few of these that stood out were: variations on the theme "Pop Goes the Weasel" by Cailliet, "Barber of Seville” by Rossini, modern symphonic band arrangement on the theme "Three Blind Mice,” and "Scarlet Dragon” by Hanneman. Everyone agreed that it was one of the best programs presented all year long. On the same day they went to Omro High School where they presented another concert. They repeated the same concert for the patients of the Sunny-view Sanatorium soon after that. The band has had a very busy and profitable year. So "join the band” if you want to belong to a busy, but friendly organization. DRUMS Keith Beck Pat Cain Walton Frisch Edward I.andgraf Ed Rasmussen Anna Steeps CLARINETS Herbert Darling Jeanne Davis Wallace Hoffman Shirley Kroenke Rita Meier Lorraine Ruh Carlton Sawall Perry Lou Schneider lames Studley Dorothy Thompson Harriet Westphalen Donald Ziemer BASSES Gordon Braun Tom Redlin MEMBERS SAXAPHONES Shirley Atwell Harry Boll Dan Carter Charmaine Lee Ray Schmelter FRENCH HORNS Mary Gritt Barbara Kopitske Mary Miller TRUMPETS Eugene Arnold Clarence Bittner Sigrid Kastoff Lewis Reinemann Robert Schenzel BARITONES Donna Dittrich Betty Morgan TROMBONES Bob Doll Mary Kasai Charlotte Skinner BASS VIOL Pat Blow FLUTE Jeanne Lewis MARIMBA Beverly Biegick OBOE Rosemary Unser DRUM MAJORS Ervin Behnke Alice Rossow Rosemary Unser Page f.ighty-th ecWesley Foundation Left to right, first row: Oleson. Streckenbach. Atwell. Davis. Steeps, Eichinger. Turner. Thorp. Johnson. Second row: Klopotek. Johnson. Winter, Firary. Portier. Cisnioski. Count be, Webb. Constance. Lbird rote: I.anpheer. von Eiscngrein, Lee. Biikey. Ehrhardt. Klettke, Hansen. Meetings of Wesley Foundation were held the second, third, and fourth Thursdays of each month at Paine Hall of the Algoma Methodist Church. Discussions and fun sessions were interspersed. Lectures accompanied with colored slides on Europe and Cuba were given. Herbert Allsop, a student at the University of Wisconsin, from British Guinea, gave a talk on the geography, history, people and living conditions of his country. For entertainment there were several parties. Fall and Spring banquets, and a picnic. Jean Streckenbach was elected representative to the Conference at the University of Kansas. The purpose of this conference was the unifying of religion with daily life. All protestant faiths were represented. On October 29-31 the bi-annual State Student Conference of Wisconsin was held in Oshkosh. The theme for the conference was Methodist Student Movement and World Fellowship. On April 29-May 1 the Spring Conference was held in Platteville. Several Oshkosh students attended. The Wesley Foundation of OSTC decided to give financial support to the Navajo Methodist Mission School of Farmington, New Mexico. To do this a program of college talent was given. • OFFICERS President................JEAN STRECKENBACH Vice-President.............Barbara Peterson Secretary................ Lawrence Spaulding Treasurer.....................Donald Ziemer Publicity ................... Mildred Turner Membership, Refreshments. Lorraine Klopotek Student Council..................Marge Evans Workshop...............................Claire Portier Adviser..................................Rev. Lindgren Vacuity Adviser................ Dr. B. Karges MEMBERS LaVernc Abidon, Shirley Atwell, George Bard, Marian Barker, Betty Bergman, Nelda Biikey, Dan Carter, Beverly Christensen, Duane Cis-moski, Phyllis Collins, Elaine Constance, Louise Coumbe, Jean Davis, Enid Eichinger, Joyce Ehrhardt, Marge Evans, Robert Evensen, Art Faucett, Robert Firary, Barbara Friedholdt, Mary Jean Gritt, Madeline Hansen, Claudia Harris, Betty Hartig, Donald Hunter, Agnes Jensen, Audrey Johnson, Marian Johnson, Jean Jones, Lorraine Klopotek, Kathryn Klettke, Susan Lane, Joyce Lanpheer, Charmaine Lee, Mary Miller, Peter Nemetz, Marian Oleson, Barbara Peterson, Claire Portier, Geraldine Randall, Magdalen Redman, Gordon Rhoades, Robert Schenzel, Jim Spaulding, Anna Marie Steeps, Jean Streckenbach, Germaine Thiex, Joyce Thiex, Joanne Thorp, Mildred Turner, Carola von Eiscngrein, Ramona Webb, Harriet Westphalen, Bette Williams, LoAnn Williams, Virginia Winter, Donald Ziemer. Page Eighty-fourNewman Club L to right, first row: Manross, Hcimcrman, Carollo, Nickel, L., Nickel. B., Meier. Krysiak, Neumeyer, Rosera, Padlcsak, Fralish, Seil, Wahoski. Second rote: Malchcski, McCarville, Flanagan. Broderick, Scharpf. Loosen. Walters. Flanagan, A.. Weber, Goldsworthy. Third row: Rushlow. Washkoskc, Moody, Buck, Gagnon. Flanagan. F., Lipovac, Javcnkoski, Schomisch, Cain, Janssen, Grenier. Newman club is a society to bring Catholic students into closer intellectual and social relationship with one another and at the same time to give them the opportunity of informing themselves on important religious questions. It meets every second week at St. Peter s Recreation Hall under the direction of Miss Helen Wahoski, faculty adviser, and Father Harold Reidy, Assistant Pastor of St. Peter’s Catholic Church. It is a very active club composed of religious and social programs. Included in the social program for this year was a fall and spring hay ride, the Christmas party with the Lawrence College Newman Club as guests, and the spring picnic Lawrence gave for the Oshkosh Newman Club. An outstanding high light this year was the "Box Social” where attractive lunches were made by the girls and bid for by the boys, the highest bidder getting his lunch — and a girl to eat it with! At present plans are being made for some members to attend the Annual National Newman Club Convention at Chicago during September, 1949. OFFICERS President............ Raymond Javenkoski Fintan Flanagan Vice-President.............Evelyn JOHNSON Herbert Lundin Secretary..............Connie McCarville Susan Manross Treasurer...................Bernice Nickel Historian..............................Ann Shrovnal Norman Schomish Critic.....................Norman Schomish Raymond Javenkoski Adviser..............Miss Helen Wahoski MEMBERS Rosemary Baus, James Bingen, C. P. Bossert. Gordon Braun, Kathleen Broderick. Charles Buck. Ida Carollo. David Damon. James Damon. Robert Damon. Donald Fcnzl, Jerome Fitgerald. Ailecn Flanagan. Fintan Flana gan. Joan Flanagan. Evelyn Fralish. Geraldine Fralish. Evan Gagnon. Shirley Grenier. Donald Glaescr, Francis Grott. Daniel Haworth. RoseMary Heimerman. Patricia Hoeffs, Jean Janssen. Raymond Javenkoski, Evelyn Johnson, Patricia Johnson, Gilbert Kempinger, Gerald Kimber, Helen King, Phyllis Knox. Alice Krysiak. Edward Landgraf. Cletus Listle. Ann Loosen. Herbert Lundin. Carol Mader. Howard Maichen, Susan Manross, Doris Malcheski, Connie McCarville, Rita Meier, John Moody, Bernice Nickel, Leona Nickel, Patricia O'Connor. Helen Orr, Yvonne Padlesak, Raymond Pitz, Edward Privaznik, John Rasmussen, Anna Roberts. Lenora Rosera. Michael Sanfelippo. Donald Schaefer. John T. Schaefer. Jeanne Schraa. Therese Scharpf. Norman Schomisch. Ann Shrovnal. Irene Seil, LaVerne Tilkens, Rosemary Unser. Jean Van I.aanen. Jean Wash-koske, Audrey Walters. Marie Weber, Anita Wislinsky. Page Highly-fiveCollege Lutheran Left to right, first row: Wolff, Olson. Schlachn-nhaufcn, Tonn. Spink, Horst, Richter, Rossow, Kroenke, Radtke, Grosshuesch, Hohlcr. Rev. P. Lucdcrs. Second row: Schneider, Radtke. Gilbertson, Fuhs, Winkcl, Henke. Kuske, Olsen, Ruehlow, Schoenick. Schneider, Selchert. Third row: Mitchell. Calvert, Hoffman, Zcinert. Raahe, Rohde, Wacholz, Popp. Sherhert. Keinert. Manis. The College Lutheran Society, more commonly known as C.L.S., has been an active campus organization for many years. One of its most outstanding and popular activities is its bowling teams which battle against each other every week. High scorer and high team of the week gets fifty cents, while the lowest scorer gets a coke. This resulted in keen coke competition, and consequently, lower scores, but lots of fun! One of the first big social affairs in the fall is the annual hayride. This combines singing, eating, and lots of hay! Then Christmas rolls around, giving all of their A Cappela members a chance to shine, by caroling for the public; of course, the other members are present, t x . The last C.L.S. annual affair is the picnic just before the end of school. Combined with these social events are many business and religious meetings consisting of roundtable discussions, guest speakers, and movies. Meetings are held twice a month at the Bethlehem Lutheran Church, with the Reverend Mr. Lueders as adviser. OFFICERS President...................Ray WACHHOLZ Dorothy Radtke Vice-President ........... Charlotte Olsen Mary Henke Secretary................... Robert Sherbert Alice Wolff Treasurer............... Perry Lou Schneider Reporter....................Dorothy Radtke . David Popp MEMBERS Norma Beck, Bob Berth, Jane Blahnik, Irvine Calvert, Albert Crissey, Lyle Dobberke, Frank Dobyns, Ellen Du we, Tom Froehlke, Lorna Fuhs, Rose Grasshueseh, Winnie Gerth, Mary Henke, Mary Hoffman, Jean Hohler, Audrey Horst, John Keinert, Shirley Kroenke, June Kuske, Betty Metzig, Bill Mitchell, Charlotte Olsen, Margaret Olsen, David Popp, Eugene Raahe, Ardene Radtke, Dorothy Radtke, Louise Richter, Margaret Richter, Clifford Rohde, Alice Rossow, Carlton Ruch, Ellen Ruehlow, Lucille Schlachten-haufen, Gloria Schneider, Perry Lou Schneider, Ethel Selchert, Robert Sherbert, Lorraine Spink, Fern Tonn, Betty Uttke, Ellen Vanderhoff, Elaine Viestenz, Ray Wachholz, Ruth Winkel, Alice Wolff, Vivian Zehner, John Zcinert. Page Highly-six mC S g , . :r M Though their achievements arc not measured by diplomas or degrees, the societies undertake a very important part in the program of Oshkosh State Teachers College. If such a diploma could be advanced to these groups, it would be for their promotion of good sportmanship, friendship, service, and all the qualities of social betterment. The societies are the basis of social life and competitive events on the campus because they provide the necessary organization for these two functions. This is well displayed by the success of the various society sponsored events. Page Highty-sevcnUpper left Alcthcan float entry in the Home-coming parade. Upper right: Cast for the play contest including, left to right: Spannagle, Du we, Vanderhoof, Allender, Johnston, Lane. Left: Alethcan society participating in the Song-fest, singing "Faster Parade.” Social events for the 1948-49 school year began for Alethean with an informal rushing party at the home of Carolyn Stoll. Both Alethean and Philakean rushees were entertained at a joint formal rushing party at the home of Pat Johnston. Upholding the society tradition, a colorful Mardi Gras was given as the first semester pledging party. Held at the home of Ruth Hielsberg, Alethean presented a miniature of the famous festival and awarded prizes to those most appropriately costumed. Another annual custom, the pledges party for members, was held this year at the home of Mrs. Charles Nolan, an Alethean Alumnus. A new note was struck when each pledge was presented with a red and white beanie to be worn for the remainder of the semester. Homecoming was observed with an alumnae bruncheon at the Raulf Hotel. "We Can Can the Pointers” was chosen for the slogan of the float entered in the Homecoming parade. Sparking the cast of "Rehearsal,” the Alethean entry in the Kappa Gamma Play Contest, were Harriet Allender, Betty Spannagle, Ellen Duwe, Pat Johnston, Ellen Vanderhoof, and Marilyn Goldsworthy. The play was under the direction of Ann Morgan. According to Alethean tradition, a box of Christmas gifts, consisting this year of books and records, was sent to the Oregon girls. Opening the social season after the Christmas vacation, the annual Alethean-Philakean formal was given at the Twentieth Century Club. Music for the event was furnished by Searl Pickett. Informal rushing and initiation of first semester pledges was held at the home of Ann Morgan, while formal rushing was held at the college. Pledging ceremonies were performed at the R. E. Boeing residence. Using a decorative Easter Bonnet as a setting, the society sang "Easter Parade” for this year’s Songfest. Taking second place, Alethean was directed by Myra Kemmer. Concluding the year’s activities were the Vod-Vil entry, directed by Kathryn Ange-lich and centered around picturesque songs of the Gay Ninety Era; the annual mother’s luncheon at the Hotel Athearn; and the cottage party held at the Waupaca Chain of Lakes. Page Eighty-eightAlethean ADVISERS MISS JEAN GOGOLF.WSKI MISS JOSEPHINE MILLER OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Jeanne Shafer ................ President Ruth Hielsberg Betty Jean Morgan .......... Vice-President.........Charlotte Skinner Pat Fitzgerald ................Secretary.......................... Marge Evans Barbara Peterson ............. Treasurer............ Barbara Peterson Marge Evans................... Historian ...........Jean Sommerfeldt Betty Bergman..................Custodian..................Carolyn Stoll Harriet Allender Kathryn Angelich Betty Bergman Jane Ellen Blahnik Doris Brock Audrey Butt Shirley Chipman Donna Dittrich Ellen Du we Marge Evans Pat Fitzgtrald Shirley Friedrich Marilyn Goldsworthy MEMBERS Ruth Hielsberg Pat Johnson Pat Johnston Myra Kcmmer Sue Lane Carol Mader Mary Miller Ann Morgan Betty Jean Morgan Mildred Paape Barbara Peterson Verlyn Ristow Jeanne Shafer Charlotte Skinner Jean Sommerfeldt Carolyn Stoll Ellen Vanderhoof PLEDGES Roberta Elliott Gail Hamilton Ginger Hamilton Pat Hotchkiss Peggy Mueller Lee Ostro Betty Spannagle Left to right, first row: Friedrich, Paape. Goldsworthy, Peterson. Skinner. Johnston. Hielshcrg. Evans. Stoll, Du we. Second rote: Allender, Angelich. Ostro. Vanderhoof. Chipman. Blahnik. Dittrich. Madcr. Butt. Third row: Bergman. Fitzgerald. Mueller. Ristow. Miller. Hotchkiss, Johnson. Page Eighty-nineThe present Alpha Chi society was organized in 1926 under the title, Ruralite Society, which in 1930 was changed to Alpha Chi. The translation of the Greek name. Alpha Chi, is synonymous with the motto of the organization. The society is a mixed organization for rural students, as well as for others interested in its purposes. Alpha Chi’s colors are green and white, and the flower is the Shamrock. Alpha Chi was founded upon a five-fold platform of basic principles and has striven through the years to maintain and perpetuate these ideals. These purposes are: to form an educational and social union for students in the rural division, to establish a better understanding of rural conditions, to insure greater cooperation and coordination, to become better acquainted with Upper left: Alpha Chis burying Stevens Point in the Homecoming parade. Upper right: Ofticers of Alpha Chi including, left to right, seated: Tilkins, Williams, Breitrick; standing: Orr, Oherstadt, Haller. Left: Other members of Alpha Chi. left to right: Donovan. Williams, Horton, Magic. leaders in the rural field, and to promote and maintain educational welfare. This year Alpha Chi participated in many of the events of social life on the Campus. During Homecoming weekend the society entered a float in the parade on Friday evening and on Saturday the group entertained with their annual alumni tea, welcoming many of their former members. Alpha Chi also entered the annual Lyceum Vod-Vil, made a contribution to the Christmas basket fund for those in need, and held an all-club picnic. Members of Alpha Chi evidenced an interest also in women’s sports activities and while their entries did not place this year in the final contests, their basketball and volleyball teams participated whole-heartedly. Page NinetyAlpha Chi ADVISER MISS M. STEWART First Semester VlONA OBERSTADT .. Beverly Salm . Joyce Ehrhardt ... LaVerne Tilkins .. Bette Williams ... Mary Lou Hoffman OFFICERS Second Semester . President .................... HELEN ORR Vice-President............. Bette Williams .. Secretary................. Beverly Salm . Treasurer ...............LaVerne TlLKINS . Custodian............................Jean Haller . Historian .......... Harriet WESTPHALEN JoAnn Allen Lois Atkins Barbara Bart . Janet Breitrick Ruth Chady Carol Jean Donovan Joyce Ehrhardt Joyce Eulrich Jean Haller Madeline Hansen Arlene Hint MEMBERS Mary Lou Hoffman Fay-Ann Horton Aileen Madigan Robert Magle Doris Malcheski Alice Mortimer Viona Oberstadt Helen Orr Anna Roberts Lorraine Ruh Beverly Salm Doris Schartner Gloria Schneider LaVerne Tilkins Fern Tonn Harriet Westphalen Bette Williams LoAnn Williams Lucille Young LuAnn Zuern Left to right, first rote: Williams. Orr. Westphalen, Atkins. Malcheski. Ehrhardt. Oberstadt. Hansen. Horton, Salm. Roberts, Stewart. Second rote: Breitrick. Chady. Young, Hoffman. Tonn. Ziern. Ruh. Haller. Donovan. Williams. Schneider. Schartner, Tilkcns. Page Ninety-oneService is the purpose of Alpha Phi Omega national service fraternity and the members of Epsilon Upsilon chapter feel at the close of the year that they have served well their fellow students and the faculty of OSTC, the community in which they live, and the nation. One of the first service projects of the year brought almost every student in school into contact with A-Phi-O. The boys had charge of clipping the indentification photos to the student activity tickets. Later they were to be seen at the football games policing the field between halves to keep it clear. At Homecoming they helped the girls of Kappa Gamma decorate the lower hall of the Administration Building with crepe paper and the society banners. During the week preceding the Christmas holidays, they set up in the lower hall a candle to collect funds for Christmas baskets for needy families in Oshkosh. They also served as the collecting agency for the donations of the other societies who wished to provide a little cheer for some needy family. These donations were all given in the name of the individual societies to families recommended by the Oshkosh Chamber of Commerce. In April the brothers of A-Phi-O managed a concession stand for the local Boy Scout office at the Winnebago County Home Show'. Part of the proceeds are being used for a three week’s stay at Tw in Lakes Council Scout camp this summer for some Oshkosh boy who would otherwise be unable to attend. In May some of the brothers served as judges at district and city-wide Boy Scout Rallies. Of course not all of the time has been spent in work. A cast of the A-Phi-O members under the direction of brother Cohan presented the play "Submerged” in the Kappa Gamma Play Contest. A number of the other brothers under the management of brothers Cohan and Thorpe have represented A-Phi-O in intramural touch football, basketball, volleyball, and baseball, placing second and third in volleyball and football respectively. For Homecoming they decorated their own float, using the slogan "Flatten the Point.” Page Ninety-twoAlpha Phi Omega ADVISERS MR. EVERETT PYLE MR. RADFORD BOEING OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Charles Otto ............. President Marvin Marheine Kenneth King.............. Vice-President........... Kenneth King Carroll Meyers.............Secretary.........................Donald Marheine Raymond Schmelter......... Treasurer.............Raymond Schmelter William Hinze............. Historian Carroll Meyers Robert Barber Fred Baumgartner Fred Behlendorf John Belanger William Cohan Ralph Draeger Jack Drey mi Her Tom Fadner Richard Hanisch Donald Hanson MEMBERS Robert Hanson David Haworth William Hinze Kenneth King James Manley Donald Marheine Marvin Marheine Carroll Meyers Richard Mielke Gordon Miracle David Mynning Charles Otto Kenneth Oudenhoven Net! Pierce David Poulton Donald Schaefer Nyal Scheuermann Raymond Schmelter Richard Shurbert Melvin Thorpe Left to right, first row: Manley, Otto, Hanson, Drcymiller, Schaefer, Hanson, King, Pyle. Second row: Schmelter, Marheine. Oudenhoven, Shurbert, Draeger, Scheuermann, Belanger. Third row: Marheine. Meyers. Miracle, Thorpe, Fadner. Mielke. Huge Ninety-threeUpper left: Delta Phi float in the Homecoming parade. Upper right: Homecoming luncheon at the Kaulf Hotel. Ixft: Members of Delta Phi in informal shot. Left to right. Baldwin. Oherstadt. Schneider. Staerkel. Kopif ke. Oleson. The Delta Phi year began with an informal party at Miss Colby’s home to welcome all former members back. Informal rushing consisted of a "prohibition party" at which both members and pledges entertained. The formal rushing party was a smorgasbord held at the Hotel Raulf. For homecoming, Delta Phi’s slogan, "We’ll Spread Them All Over,” caused a great deal of worry and work, but it was completed with success. It showed a Titan spreading jam over a sandwich of Stevens Point men. Getting third, it was the only women’s entry to place in the parade. Delta Phi won the permanent possession of the Kappa Gamma Play Contest cup this year, having won the contest for three consecutive years. "Gray Bread,” by Jean Lee Lotham, was the winning play. The cast included: Jean Matzdorf, Alison Nischik, Faith MacDonald, and Audrey Walker. Patricia Murphy was the director of this winning play. November 12 was the date that Delta Phi sponsored the traditional Sadie Hawkins Dance. The dance was held in the Women’s Gym. Costumes depicting Dog-patch characters were in evidence among students and faculty. "Kickapoo Joy Juice" and Salome-burgers,” in the form of coke and hot dogs, were served to the Dogpatch and Skunk Hollow- inhabitants. During the month of December activities centered around the Alpha Phi Omega Christmas Basket. Every girl donated money or food to aid the cause. The volleyball team was chosen and Barbara Kopitzke w'as selected as the captain. Delta Phi and Iota members were hostesses and hosts at a formal at the Masonic Temple, May 7. The young women were hostesses again at a Mother’s Day Tea on May 14. Soon after they participated in Vod-Vil and wound up the year with the annual Delta Phi cottage party. Page Ninety-four■■ Delta Phi First Semester Betty Liescii .... Helen Ork....... Gloria Schneider Barbara Kopitzke Shirley Sorenson Viona Oberstadt ADVISER MISS HELEN COLBY OFFICERS . President .. Vice-President .. Secretary ... . ‘Treasurer .. . Custodian .. . Historian ., Second Semester . Naomi Staerkel Viona Oberstadt Muriel Waldron Barbara Kopitzke Gloria Schneider .. Marian Olf.son Gertrude Baker Janet Breitrick Ruth Ann Chady Ann Day Enid Eichinger Delores Ecker Beverly Farmer Ruth Hasley Mariesther Howard Phyllis Knox MEMBERS Barbara Kopitzke Betty Liesch Faith MacDonald Patricia Murphy Alison Nischik Viona Oberstadt Marian Oleson Doris Schartner Laverne Schiels Perry Lou Schneider Audrey Siewert Shirley Sorenson Naomi Staerkel Beverly Steffen Muriel Waldron Marjorie Williams Audrey Walker Marilyn Zillmer Left to right, first row: Orr. Waldron. Staerkel, Nischik, Knox, Liesch, Oberstadt. Schneider, MacDonald, Colby. Second row: Williams, Oleson, Schneider, Hasley, Siewert, Schartner, Zillmer, Kopitzke, Steffen, Schiels. Page Ninety-fiveUpper left: Play content cast, left to right: Padlcsak, Hartig. Estahrooks. Jorgens, Kavolski. Upper right: Gamma Sigma's "Sailing to Victory" float. Left: Songfcst entry "I Told Every Little Star.” Gamma Sigma held its fall informal rushing at the Trinity Guild Hall. The theme was the Purple Parrot Night Club with the tables decorated with purple cloths and gold candles and a floor show of musical selections presented for the rushees by the members. A formal dinner at the Hotel Raulf was held for formal rushing. The president talked on the background and present activities of Gamma Sigma and Jo Schuster gave an account of the 1948 cottage party. A sailboat rode atop the Gamma Sigma float for Homecoming, but most of all the Gamma Sig’s were proud to say that the Homecoming Queen, Pat Gallaher, was a member of their society. For the third time in three years. Gamma Sigma placed second in the Kappa Gamma Play Contest. "Sisters Under the Skin” was the play directed by Jean Jones. The cast included: Betty Hartig, Helen Jorgens, Lura Estabrooks, Janice Kavolski, and Yvonne Padlesak. A Christmas party was held at the home of Susan Manross, as was second semester rushing. The society spread the spirit of Christmas further by decorating a tret-on the second floor of the Administration Building. Gamma Sigma and Periclean sponsored a formal at the Eagles Ballroom on February 18. Close upon the heels of this, Gamma Sigma, as many other societies, sang in the Iota Songfest. Their song, "I Told Every Little Star,” was directed by Jean Goodwin and accompanied by Janet Reimers. St. Peter’s Recreational Hall was the scene of the Gamma Sigma Alumnae-Activity party. May 16. The entertainment was in the form of the Vod-Vil entry which was presented two days later for the Lyceum Vod-Vil, May 18. The skit was a home-talent show of the early 1900’s. As a final event of the year a Mother-Daughter Tea was held in the P.T.A. Room of the Training School, May 21. Page Ninety-sixGamma Sigma ADVISER MISS MILDRED NASGOWITZ First Semester Jean Goodwin ...... Jean Streckenbach .. Joan Pankratz...... Betty Jean Bender .. Ruth Ann Morrissey Helen Jorgens ..... OFFICERS . President .. Vice-President .. Secretary ... . Treasurer .. . Custodian . . . Historian .. Second Semester Ruth Ann Morrissey ........Jean Jones ....Joan Pankratz ....Helen Jorgens Ruth Ann Morrissey ........Jo Schuster Betty Jean Bender Alice Colburn Lura Estabrooks Shirley Evert Pat Gallagher Jean Goodwin Midge Hansen Betty Hartig Ruth Hein Lois Hielsberg Helen Jorgens Jean Jones MEMBERS Janice Kavolski Rosemary Kuborn Nancy Lem Susan Manross Ruth Ann Morrissey Yvonne Padlesak Joan Pankratz Betty Lou Patch Janet Reimers Doris Rushlow Ethel Schrimpf Jo Schuster Jean Streckenbach Verla Stutzman PLEDGES Jo Ann Blair Janice Fraedrick Evelyn Fralish Kathryn Klettke Grace Lem Pat O’Connor Maxine Quade Betty Ann Williams ijeft to right, first row: Hielsberg, Fraedrick. Manross, Hartig, Schuster. Padlesak, Jones, Lem, G., Colburn, Blair, Lem, N. Second row: Quade, Stutzman, Goodwin, Kuborn, Patch, Streckenbach, Reimers. Kavolski. Schrimpf. Third row: Rushlow, Morrissey, Bender, O'Connor, Estabrooks, Fralish. Klettke. Hansen. Pankratz, Evert. Page S in tty-set en With a near capacity membership. Iota has been limited as to the number of pledges it could accept into the society. Informal and formal rushing parties were held, however, and the quota was filled. In addition to these social functions, numerous other informal parties were held by lota members throughout the year. Iota Alpha Sigma entered into the Homecoming festivities with a float having for its theme, ’'We’re Laying for the Point.’’ A large hen with Happing wings and eggs in the shape of footballs gained first place laurels for the society. First place honors were gained by Iota also on house decorations — the winning house being the House of Meyer which is one hundred percent Iota. The theme here will be remembered as "We’re pulling for Oshkosh and that’s no Bull!" An annual affair of Iota is the touch of Dogpatch which they bring to the campus when they sponsor the Sadie Hawkins Dance with their sister society, Delta Phi. To those students who best depict characters from the "Lil Abner” comic strip. Iota pre- sents "Little Brown Jug" awards. This year’s dance had the added attraction of refreshments in the form of "Salome-burgers” and "Kickapoo Joy Juice.” The annual Songfest contest is another activity which is sponsored by Iota Alpha Sigma and offers to the agenda of society functions another opportunity for good fellowship. This year Songfest was held on April 6 and proved to be the eighth successful presentation. Other activities of Iota included participation in the Kappa Gamma Play Contest, their entry being the one-act play, "The Byronic”; the V xl-Vil; and the intramural sporting activities to which they contributed a football team, a volleball team, a basketball team which won the championship, a softball team, and entries in the intersociety track meet. The highlight of the year’s social activities was the Spring Iota-Delta Phi formal dance held at the Twentieth Century Club for which Arch Adrian furnished the music. A spring picnic closed the s xial season of Iota Alpha Sigma. Page Nb ety-eigbfIota Alpha Sigma ADVISERS DR. R. NOR KM MR. O. DEAN OFFICERS Second Semester . President ...............Robert Sherbert Vice-President.............JAMES SPAULDING .. Secretary......................Ray Fir . . Treasurer.....................Cuff Rohde . Historian ....................Herb LUND1N First Semester Richard Schumacher William Hughes ... Ray Wachholz..... Roy Matzdorf..... Robert Sherbert__ John Artzberger Norman Boyle Wallace Berth James Behnke William Bush George Ciulnohufsky Corvin Degner Winnie Fink Robert Firary Jerry Fitzgerald Evan Gagnon James Haas Daniel Haworth Donald Hoeft William Hughes Ray Javenkoski Lee Kalbus Brian Kelly MEMBERS Charles King Frank Liebhaher Ray Lipovac Herb Lundin Bill Manis Roy Matzdorf Donald Meyer Wallace Morrick Harold Oskar Hugh Otten Ray Pitz David Popp Eugene Nashold Ronald Nashold Ronald Olbrich Cliff Rohde Gordon Rhoades Vernon Rueckert Norman Schomisch Richard Schumacher Lloyd Schwartzmiller Robert Sherbert James Spaulding Milton Spoehr James Stout Fred Tiddens Ray Wachholz Fred Warnecke Byron Weess Don Ziemer PLEDGES Duane Nashold Lawrence Neveu t.eft to right, first rote: Otten, Schomisch, Berth. Haas. Schumacher. Haworth, Schwartzmiller. Sherbert. Kalbus. Rhoades. Javenkoski, Dean. Second rote: Oskar, Matzdorf, Bush, Meyer. Ziemer, Liebhaber, Hoeft. Behnke, Spoehr, Olbrich. t hird rote: Gagnon, Wachholz. I.undin, Spaulding, Arzberger. Rueckert, Warnecke, Rohde, Tiddens, Popp, Lipovac. f ourth rote: Stout, Fitzgerald. Kelly. Manis. Degner. Nashold. King. Firary, Morrick, Pitz, Boyle. Pt ge Ninety-nine Upper left: Float entry "A Toast to Victory.” Upper right: Kappa Gamma girls in their Ring Song at their annual formal. Left: Songfcst entry. A busy year, full of sociability and fun, began with the first semester informal rushing party. Kappa Gamma entertained the rushees with an old fashioned Halloween party which included bobbing for apples, drinking cider, and dunking doughnuts. The formal rushing party was a dinner held at the Hotel Athearn. Homecoming was an especially busy season for Kappa Gamma’s. Besides holding their annual alumnae luncheon, they helped Alpha Phi Omega decorate the main hall of the Administration Building and found time to decorate a float for the homecoming parade. Since one of the objectives of the society is to further interest in dramatic production, it again sponsored the play contest. Alice Rossow and Carol Meyer were co-chairmen of the contest and under their competent direction it developed into an excellent display of talent, good sportsmanship and participation on the part of the societies on the campus. Because Delta Phi won the contest for the third successive year, they gained permanent possession of the loving cup awarded to the winning society. Christmas is always a busy season, and this year proved no exception to the rule. The social spirit was highlighted by the formal dance on December 11 at the Twentieth Century Club where a huge Christmas tree and Herbie Brietzman’s music provided the proper setting and background. In the Christmas spirit of true giving. Kappa Gamma again purchased a Christmas basket which was given to a needy family. The "backwards” party held for the second semester pledges was really an upside down affair. The members not only entered by the backdoor of the house and went on a backward scavenger hunt, but also ate their dessert first from plates turned bottom side up. The only thing not "backwards" was the hilarity about which no one was backward. The rest of the year saw "busyness" as the regular Kappa Gamma motto. In very tight competition. Kappa Gamma took third place in the Songfest with their entry, "1 11 See You In My Dreams." In both the basketball and volleyball tournaments Kappa Gamma also placed third. As the school year came to an end the Mother and Daughter Banquet was held in the French Room at the Hotel Athearn and plans were made for a cottage party to be held in June. Page One HundredKappa Gamma ADVISER MRS. IRENE KOERWITZ OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Helen Schaub Doris Malcheski Shirley Kroenke ... Lola Ring Arlene Buchholz .. Carol Meyer Joanne Thorp Rita Meier Alice Rossow MEMBERS Shirley Atwell Mary Kasai Lucille Schlachtenhaufen Marian Barker Shirley Kroenke Joanne Thorp Arlene Buchholz June Kuske Jeanette Wareham Gloria Dougherty Joyce Lanpheer Ruth Winkel Joyce Ehrhardt Ann Loosen Anita Wislinsky Veola Ferrell Doris Malchcski PLEDGES Geraldine Fralish Rita Meier Beverly Case Claudia Harris Carol Meyer Joan Flanagan Jean Carol Hohler Lola Ring Jean McKinnen Jean Janssen Alice Rossow Magdalen Redman Agnes Jensen Beverly Salm Carola Von Eisengrein Audrey Johnson Therese Scharpf Bette Ann Williams Marian Johnson Helen Schaub LoAnn Williams Left to right, first row: Meier. Ring. Schlachtenhaufen. Malchcski, Fralish, Kuskc, Winkel, Kroenke. Schaub. Ferrell. Huchholtz. Second row: Hohler. Salm, Janssen, Johnson. Barker. Harris, Ehrhardt. Kasai, Jensen. Thorp. Third row: Warcham. Loosen. Scharpf, Lanpheer, Johnson. Dougherty, Rossow, Atwell, Wislinsky. Page One Hundred OneUpper left: Homecoming parade entry of Lambda Chi. Upper right: Kappa Gamma Play Contest cast, left to right, seated: Sell, Schoenick. Lee, Dixon. Standing: Fish. Heimerman. Constance. Winter. Left: Songfcst entry "Come to the Fair." From first to last the members of Lambda Chi enjoyed their school year of ’49. They began it with a rushing party in partnership with their brother society, Lambda Epsilon Beta, at the St. Peter’s Recreational Hall. For this occasion they adapted motifs and activities of New York’s famed Stork Club. The French Room of the Hotel Athearn provided an enjoyable atmosphere for the Lambda Chi formal rushing party. Using the slogan "You Can’t Whip Our Cream,” a group of Lambda Chi’s decorated their float for the Homecoming parade in an afternoon of good fun, practical jokes, and some work. After choosing ”lnn of Return" for their entry and Shirley Brusoe for their director, they entered the play contest. Marian Dixon, Barbara Fish, Elaine Constance, Irene Seil, Elaine Schoenick, Arlyce Heineman, Virginia Winter, and Charmaine Lee made up the cast. Although they did not win, the Lambda Chi’s felt that they gave the winners a good run for their money and could count the preparation for the contest one of their pleasant memories. When the Christmas season rolled around the members of Lambda Chi embarked upon their annual project of decorating the Al-goma Boulevard entrance of the Administration Building with a huge wreath. Their one regret was that this year they had to forego the usual lights because of the electric power shortage. Next year they hope to be able to light the wreath as they have done in the past and contribute that much more to the joy of the season. Charmaine Lee directed the Lambda Chi entry in the Songfest. In spite of early morning risings, penalties for neglected studies, and that final blow of all, not winning, all the participants felt a glow' of satisfaction for having tried. The sports activities provided enjoyable activities for a great many of the girls. In basketball they had the pleasure of seeing the Lambda Chi team come through the season not only tournament champions but also the only undefeated team. They also t(x k part in the volleyball tournament. One of the most enjoyable social events of the year was the annual formal which was held jointly with the brother society. Lambda Epsilon Beta, on April 29, at the Twentieth Century Club. Music was furnished by Johnny Nugent and his orchestra. This was followed on May 7 by the Mother and Daughter Banquet at the Hotel Athearn. Lambda Chi’s entry in the annual Vod-Vil competition marked the closing of the year’s activities on the campus, but an off campus picnic was held later and plans were in progress for a cottage party. Page One Hundred TwoLambda Chi ADVISER MRS. JUDY LANE first Semester Shirley Brusoe Audrey Taylor Vivian Zehner Betty Metzig .. Maxine Caudle Margaret Grade OFFICERS .. President.. Vice-President .. Secretary .. . Treasurer .. .. Historian ... . Custodian .. Second Semester ... Margaret Grade ... Margaret Olson ___Audrey Taylor Lorraine Klopotek .........Irene Seil ___Shirley Brusoe Shirley Brusoe Ida Carolla Maxine Caudle Jean Dahm Marian Dixon Carol Jean Donovan Barbara Fish Barbara Friedholdt Margaret Grade Shirley Grenier Mary Gritt MEMBERS Delores Hertel Joyce Jacobsen Lorraine Klopotek Alice Krysiak Charmaine Lee Doris Nemitz Margaret Olson Elaine Schoenick Irene Seil Audrey Taylor Lois Umland Ramona Webb Marie Weber Virginia Winter PLEDGES Elaine Constance Arlyce Heineman Rosemary Unser Jean Washkoske Left to right, first row: Carolla, Caudle, Olson. Constance, Winter. Gritt, Dahm. Grade, Lee, Seil, Brusoe. Second row: Krysiak, Nemitz, Dixon, Donovan, Klopotek. Schoenick. Heineman. Weber, Wehh, Lane. Third row: Fish, Jacobson, Friedholdt, Grenier, Umland. Hertel, Taylor. Page One Hundred ThreeUpper left, left to right: B. Neumeycr, C. Porticr, Myra Kemmcr, G. Kimbcr. Upper right: Two members of LFB's preparing the refreshments for the evening. Left: Irvine Calvert, Audrey Walters, Shirley Evert, Delmar Multhauf sitting out a fast dance. Organized in 1946 by a large group of World War II veterans. Lambda Epsilon Beta until this Spring was known on the campus as the LEF society, a non-invita-tional organization for all men who were interested in bonding together for fellowship, pledging themselves to uphold the standards of Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity. With the general decline of incoming veterans, the LEF society, with ranks depleted, reorganized in January of this year to conform with the basic pattern of other organizations at OSTC. With the choice of Lambda Epsilon Beta for a name, the society is now an invitational organization and is represented on the Inter-Society Council. Although small in number, the group is striving to graduate from infancy and this year managed to participate in several events. The group held both formal and informal rushing, and with its sister society. Lambda Chi, a formal dance was held at the Twentieth Century Club. Students and guests danced to the music of Johnny Nugent and his orchestra and the event proved to be an occasion to be repeated again next year. Lambda Epsilon Beta made an effort also to be active in Vod-Vil as well as in intersociety sports. For the latter the group will continue its policy of awarding a trophy for the winning team of the softball contest. Lambda Epsilon Beta has every intention of gaining many new members during the next school year and with an increase in number will come a stepped-up program of activity. Page One Hundred LourLambda Epsilon Beta ADVISERS MR. ANTHONY WOMASKI MR. ROBERT WONDERS First Semester OFFICERS Second Semester WlNFRIEI) GeRTH Delmar Multhauf Dei.mak Multhauf .. Irvine Calvert Jerry Kimber Jerry Kimber Jerry Kimber Claire Portier Ervin Bchnkc MEMBERS John Kasper PLEDGES Irvine Calvert Jerry Kimber Leonard Fuedner Frank Do by ns Delmar Multhauf Douglas Harmes Ray Fletcher Peter Nemitz Williams Jenks Winfricd Gerth Claire Portier Sanford Wolfmeyer Ralph Hurlhut John Rasmussen l.eft to right, first row: Wonders, Rasmussen, Calvert, Fortier, Fletcher. Womaski. Second row: Kimbcr, Behnke. Jenks, Multhauf, Dohyns, Ncmctz. Page One Hundred ViveSocial events began early in October for Lyceum Society with an informal rushing party at the Campus Shop on Algoma Boulevard. The selected rushees were then the guests at the formal rushing party which was held jointly with Lyceum’s sister society at the Athearn Hotel. The next ordeal for the pledges was the well known "Hell Week" observances which terminated with "Quest Night.” Homecoming weekend found Lyceum participating in the float contest of the pre-game celebrations. The entry of the society consisted of a huge pencil sharpener and pencil with the motto "Let’s Get To The Point.” Lyceum was not fortunate enough to win top recognition in the float contest, but when the Kappa Gamma Play Contest was held Bob Russell directed the group to third place laurels. The "Navy Hymn” was the song sung by the group in Iota’s Songfest. James Stud ley directed them. On April 22, the annual Lyceum-Phoenix spring formal was held at the Twentieth Century Club with music provided by Jimmy Roberts and his orchestra. One of the highlights on the social calendar of the campus is Lyceum’s tournament of fun, the Vod-Vil, which was held on May 18. This year’s contest also sported a new gold loving cup in as much as Periclean claimed permanent possession of the old one by placing first for three successive years. Among the many functions that Lyceum participated in during the school term, the group had an entry in each of the intramural sport leagues — football, basketball, volleyball, and baseball. The last function of the year’s program was a group picnic and not to differ from the rest of the program, it proved to be a great success. Page One Hundred SixLyceum ADVISERS DR. BURTON KARGES MR. ROBERT WHITE OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Kenneth Smith ...................President...............Blake Burton, Jr. David Batzer.................. Vice-President.......................Robert Russell Blake Burton, Jr.................Secretary.............. Lewis Reinemann James Frohman .................. Treasurer...........................James Frohman Jack Reed........................Historian................Wallace Hoffman Lewis Reinemann .................Custodian............... Phillip Bossert David Batzer Harry Boll Charles Bossert Blake Burton, Jr. Dan Carter Robert Christoffersen James Connell Ronald Davel Walton Frisch James Frohman Ralph Greenquist Harry Hamann Larry Heckle Wally Hoffman MEMBERS Kenneth King Earl Kohlman Tom Kontos Donald Millert William Mitchell Kenneth Oudenhoven Darrell Piette Jack Reed Robert Russell Lewis Reinemann Ray Scharpf Robert Schenzel Frank Schnabl Kenneth Smith Larry Smith James Stud ley Robert Thoreson Joe Walsh Leslie Zacharias PLEDGES John Bettini Tony Eannelli Bruce Estlund Tom Hein William Preston Leroy Williams l.efl to right, first row: Burton. Mitchell. Hoffman. Reinemann. Hein. Greenquist. Schnabl. Reed. Davel. White. Second row: Millert. Bettini. Frohman, Studlcy. Smith, K.. Walsh. Preston, Hamann. Christoffcrscn. Third row: Zacharias, Oudenhoven. Eannelli, Frisch. Kohlman. Russell, Williams. Carter, Boll. Page One Hundred SevenPledging eleven men into their ranks, Periclean started the school year with its usual spurt of enthusiasm. Despite the fact that its members are almost wholly men of the varsity teams, the society gave evidence of its ability to organize good teams for the intramural sports activities from its non-varsity members. Periclean triumphed in both football and volleyball and took a very active part also in the softball and basketball tilts. Periclean met with great disappointment this year in its plans for their annual Periclean Speech Contest. Committees were appointed, judges were picked, rules and regulations were published — everything was planned and scheduled to run smoothly. The setback in plans came with the indication of a lack of interest on the part of the student body. With only two or three entries placed, Periclean was forced to cancel the event out of fairness to those who had already started to prepare. To the music of Reggie Barber and his orchestra, students and faculty members alike enjoyed the Periclean-Gamma Sigma formal held at the Eagles Ballroom. Dancing was from nine to twelve with many of the alumnae there for the occasion. Periclean entered into the Iota Songfest with the selection of "De Gospel Train” and although they did not place, the members participated one hundred percent and gave evidence of their desire for good sportsmanship and cooperation. The group enjoyed most their preparations and participation in the Homecoming parade. Using the theme "There Is No Point,” Periclean brought a spark of humor into the event by presenting on its float a live replica of Coach "Cough” giving the team a pep talk. With many members returning in the Fall, Periclean expects to share in the winning of competitive events and hopes to make an even greater showing in its activities as a whole. Page One Ilundred High!Penclean ADVISERS MR. N. JAMES MR. E. HUTCHINSON First Semester Glenn Kirchnbr Robert Nordhaus LaVerne Ernst .. Kurt Thiel..... Orlyn Zieman ... OFFICERS Second Semester .. President.................ORLYN ZlEMAN Vice-President................... Kurt Thiel ... Secretary...............Duane ClSMOSKl .. Treasurer..........Milton Lautenschlager ,.. Historian.................Orlyn Zieman Er. James Adams Milton Becker Merland Bersch Donald Bostwick Duane Cismoski Donald Connor Tom Cotter Robert Dalton Robert Doll Donald Doucette Ralph Draeger LaVerne Ernst Ward Fuchs Kenneth Gonganek Larry Green Arthur Hoehne Robert Jesse MEMBERS James Kelley Glenn Kirchner Richard Koeck Milton I.autenschlager Clems Listle Robert Loppnow Arden Luker Richard Meyer John Morrissey Tom Morrissey William Morrissey Bradley Nielsen Robert Nordhaus Kenneth O’Connor Marvin Paffenroth Douglas Ritchie Jerome Schalinske Norman Schein Donald Schneider Kenneth Schneider Robert Schroeder Carl Smedberg Paul Stevenson Norman Thiel Kurt Thiel Frank Utz William Utz Carroll Vaughan Haul Wagner Earl Wolff Orlyn Zieman Russell Zirbel .«• to right, first row: Schalinske, Koeck, Meyer, Nordhaus, Wolff, Stevenson, Cismoski, Loppnow. Second row: Ernst, Draeger, Green, Zieman, Thiel, K., Becker, Hoehne. Third row: Schneider. L)., Schneider, K., Ritchie, Thiel, N., Kirchner. Lautcnschlagcr. Page One Hundred SineUpper left: Philakean float entry. Upper right: Play contest cast, left to ri ht: Lehman, Nelson, D., Nelson. J„ Rule. Left: Hell-Week for pledges. Left to right: Lip-pold, Damon, Rasmussen. Organized on the campus in 1899, Phi-lakean Society this year is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary as a social organization for men. Although not the oldest society at OSTC, Philakean has through the years been a progressive and active group, evidencing in its functions a spirit of fraternity that leaves little to be desired. Opening the year with its customary informal and formal rushing parties, Philakean gathered into its ranks many new members. This group revealed great enthusiasm and strove hard to gain recognition in competition with the other societies. Among the large number of floats that passed the judging stand during the Homecoming parade was Philakean’s "Kicking the Extra Pointer” entry which, after the final judging points had been tallied, was revealed to be the second place float. Philakean was active also in the Kappa Gamma Play Contest, presenting the one-act play, "Rising of the Moon." The parts were played by John Nelson, Dick Nelson, Al Lehman, and Bill Rule. The play was directed by Clyde Wallen fang. Sporting competition also took a large measure of the Philakean scheduled events as the group took part in the intramural football, volleyball, basketball, and softball program. Philakean furnished the intramural basketball trophy and it was in this tournament that the "Nelson Numbskulls," the society’s entry, took the runner-up honors after a hotly contested tilt. One of the highlights of the social events of the season was their annual formal dance held in conjunction with Alethean, their sister society. This year’s formal was held on January 15, at the Twentieth Century Club. Other joint events of the societies included a spring picnic and several informal parties. Page One Hundred TenPhilakean ADVISERS MR. GERALD REED MR. WARNER GEIGER First Semester John Nelson...... Al Lehman........ Harrison Nichols Don Corrigali. ... Art Chase........ OFFICERS .. President .. Vice-President .. Secretary .. . Treasurer . . Custodian . Second Semester ___Al Lehman ....Bill Rule .. Bob Harmon John Schaefer .. Tom Damon James Bettin Russell Birkholz William Brink Art Chase Don Corrigali Jim Damon 'lorn Damon Godfrey Gabriel Bob Harmon Bob Harris Keith Knoll MEMBERS Wayne Jorgeson Al Lehman Norman Marohn Art Messerschmidt Dick Nelson John Nelson Harrison Nichols Bill Rule John Schaefer Walter Tracy Clyde Wallenfang PLEDGES Tom Hebenstreit Bill Gander Bill Manser Gordon Miracle Don Mitchell Ed Privaznik Herb Reif Charles Strachan Jim Thielmann Dick Wolfgram Left to right, first row: Nelson. D., Nelson. J., Birkholz. Lehman, Rule, Chase, Schafer, Corrigali, Gabriel. Second row: Tracy, Damon, T., Damon, J., Reif, Nichols, Messerschmidt, Manser, Marohn, Brink, Strachan. Page One Hundred PlevenUpper left: Phoenix parade entry. Upper right: Play contest cast, left to right, seated: Ritchie. Glaesman; standing: Kippenhan, Thompson, McCarville. Left: Songfest entry "With a Song in My Heart.” A "come-as-you-are” informal rushing party headed the list of the many activities for the Phoenix year. Rushees and members appeared at the Congregational Church wearing pajamas, slips, housecoats, and pin-curls. The Fly and Spider Room of the Athearn Hotel was the scene of the formal rushing dinner. After the dinner, Phoenix and their Lyceum brothers held a dance in the Continental Room. A formal pledging party was held in early October at the home of Ella May Schloerb. The pledges received their ribbons and pledge pins and were assigned big sisters at this time. Friday afternoon of Homecoming weekend found Phoenicians busy finishing their float, "Let’s Ram the Point.” The float in blue and white consisted of a boat with Phoenician oarsmen and a coxswain. On Saturday the active members held a luncheon at the Hotel Athearn for the alumnae. In November Audrey Horst and Ella May Schloerb directed the play ' Lady Rosa” for the Play Contest. Those in the cast were: Corrine McCarville, Dorothy Thompson, Alice Kippenhan, Elaine Glaesman, and JoAnn Ritchie. Phoenix and Lyceum members gathered at Christmas time to carol for the patients of Sunnyview Sanatorium. "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer" was read and gifts were given to the children. Beginning the second semester, initiation of the first semester pledges was held at the Fuhs home. Initiates were temporarily tortured and a locker was filled with food for the members. Sports were an active part of the Phoenix agenda. Both the volleyball and basketball teams took second place in the tournaments. Phoenix entered the Songfest and under the direction of June Hartenberger sang "With a Song in My Heart.” For the first time in the history of Songfest, Phoenix took a first. On April 22, the Phoenix-Lyceum Spring Formal was held at the Twentieth Century Club. Jimmy Roberts and his orchestra furnished the music. Soon after the Mother’s Day Tea was held at the Congregational Church Hall. With a take-off on the past, Phoenix entered Vod-Vil. Prior to a Vod-Vil rehearsal the Phoenicians had a picnic and planned a cottage party for the weekend following the close of school. Finally, Phoenix awarded the Scholarship Trophy at the Honor’s Assembly, June 2, to the society having the highest grade-point average. Page One Hundred TwelvePhoenix First Semester ADVISER MRS. B. MERKER OFFICERS Second Semester Elaine Glaesman Charlotte Olsen Charlotte Olsen Vice-President .. . Bernice Nickel Audrey Horst Alice Wolff I.orna Fuhs Lorna Fuhs Jeanne Kettler Mary Jo Zillmer Joyce Rasmussen Lillian Van Roy Lorna Fuhs MEMBERS Bernice Nickel Dorothy Thompson Maxine Gilbertson Leona Nickel Lillian Van Roy Elaine Glaesman Charlotte Olsen Alice Wolff Meriel Gralow Eleanor Osterberg Mary Jo Zillmer June Hartenberger Ardene Radtkc RoseMary Heimerman Dorothy Radtkc PLEDGES Audrey Horst Joyce Rasmussen Margery Fallendorf Jeanne Kettler Louise Richter Helen King Faith Koll Thelma Roderick Alice Kippenhan Corrine McCarville Ella Mae Schloerb Marilyn Prahl Barbara Sensiba Lorraine Spink l.eft to right, first row: Gralow. Hartcnbcrgcr, Prahl, Rasmussen, Radtkc. I)., Radtkc, A.. Gilbertson, Olsen, Kippenhan. Wolff, Heimerman. Second row: Nickel, B., Follendorf, Kettler, McCarville. Fuhs, Horst, Spink. Nickel. L.. Roderick. Third row: Glaesman, Schlocrh, Thompson. Zillmer, Koll, Sensiba, Osterbcrg. Van Roy. Page One Hundred ThirteenINTER-SOCIETY COUNCIL l.eft to right, first row: McCarville, Bchnkc, Hansen, Schocnick. Meyer. Second row: Dr. Case, Fletcher, Koll, Schneider. Schomisch. Third row: Kuske, Schlachtenhaufen, Green, Wolff. The Inter-Society Council, during the first semester of the 1948-49 school year, had the respective societies draw to decide which night of the week they would hold their informal rushings. The night chosen would also remain the same for formal rushing which would be held the week following. Hereafter, the societies will follow this rotation plan. The second semester’s rushing period was set for the second week with each society rushing on the same night of the week as they did the first semester. The Council was in charge of the drawing for hall decorations in the Administration Building at Homecoming. This year Kappa Gamma and Alpha Phi Omega decorated the hall. Next year the remaining societies will draw, and this will continue until each society has had a turn. Brother and sister societies will decorate the hall together. It was agreed by the Council that all societies should promote the idea of a student union. An amendment was proposed whereby the membership of the societies should be increased. The amendment was defeated after being voted on by all societies. This year the Council decided to allow the Training School to sell concessions at the football games, but the college societies may do so at basketball games. The various societies may still sell mums, flags and other concessions at various school events. OFFICERS First Semester President ................. Bill Morrissey Vice-President.............Donald Meyer Secretary..................Pat Gallagher Second Semester President.................. Norman Fuller Vice-President..........Corrine McCarville Secretary..................Jean Goodwin MEMBERS ALETHEAN Kathryn Angelich, Pat Johnson, Ann Morgan. DELTA PHI Helen Orr, Perry Lou Schneider. GAMMA SIGMA Jean Goodwin, Midge Hansen. IOTA ALPHA SIGMA Donald Meyer, Norman Schomisch, John Voight. KAPPA GAMMA Delores Kurtzbcin, June Kuske, Lucille Schlachtenhaufen. LAMBDA CHI Marian Dixon, Mary Miller, Elaine Schoenick. LAMBDA EPSILON BETA Ervin Bchnkc, Ray Fletcher, John Kasper. LYCEUM Ralph Greenquist, Larry Heckle, Kenneth Smith. PER1CLEAN Larry Green, Earl Wolff. PHILAKEAN John Nelson, Harrison Nichols. PHOENIX Faith Koll, Corrine McCarville. Pjge One Hundred FourteenFOOTBALL Although it cannot be said that the ’48 season for the Titans turned out an impressive record, it should be noticed that the season showed Coach Kolf several top prospects and the promise for a future team of first-rate rank in the State Teachers Colleges Conference. With that final record of one win, one tie, and four loses, one can't help but think that the season was a dismal flop. However, with consideration of a tough conference year all-round and several bad breaks, this feeling is modified. Further consideration shows that Coach Kolf has on hand much potential and feasible probability. In the loss of Eddie Erban through injury, a real blow hit the Titans, but with A1 Sweet and Jim Spaulding stepping in it was quenched. At the middle of the season when Arden Luker was also benched with an injury, a promising freshman, high-stepping Clete Listle, was discovered and shows real promise. Other good material developed in the form of tackles Rich Koeck, Paul Stevenson, and Bill Utz; back-field men in Claude Zoch, Dick Meyer, Arc Hoehne, and Carl Smedberg. Further potential power lies in linemen Milt Becker, Bob Jesse, Evan Gagnon, Frank Utz, and Jim Lunde. However the loss of regulars Bernie Van Camp, Don Bostwick, Rich Pollack, and Norm Schein will be felt ominously. l.tft to right, first row: Koeck, Kimball, Becker, Stevenson, Schneider, Schein, Pfeiffer. Meyer, Zoch. Second row: Utz, F„ Gagnon, Smith, Fuchs, Lunde, Listle, Jesse, Hoehne, Luker. Kolf. bird row: Salzeider, Schwehke, Utz, W., McCallum, Spaulding, Maichen, Lind. Van (amp, Erban. Fourth Row: Paffcnroth, Gongorek, Sweet, Czarneski, Poliak. Bostwick. Smedberg, Wagner, Schram. Page One Hundred FifteenAI Sweet End Howard Maichen Halfback Richard Meyer Halfback Richard Kimball Halfback Above: Richard Pollack Tackle Below: Norm Fuller Fullback OSHKOSH 13 .......... SUPERIOR 26 It was back in 1923 when the Yellowjackets of Superior last invaded Oshkosh, at that time the Titans had turned away the Yellowjackets to the tune of 8 to 0. Now in their 1948 season they were to face each other again in the game of revenge. It was a successful invasion for the Yellowjackets, as they turned the tide in defeating the Titans 26 to 13. After a scoreless first quarter, the Titans, on runs by Luker and Zoch, scored easily. The Yellowjackets took the kick-off and returned it 87 yards for the first tally. Minutes later on a costly fumble by fullback Zoch the Superior eleven scored again, conversion attempt was blocked by tackle Richard Koch to set .the score at 13-7, Superior. Neither team was able to make any headway until the short minutes before the half when Superior threw in their passing offense and scored again to make the tally 19 to 7 at the half. Coming back strong in the second half, the Titans ran the ball and then scored on a short pass Luker to Hoehne. Superior tallied late in the fourth quarter and the gun found Oshkosh just short of another tally.James Lunde End Frank Utz Center Carl Pfeiffer Halfback Evan Gagnon End OSHKOSH 13 ............ PLATTEV1LLE 6 The Titans showed up well their first game of the ’48 season with an important victory over the Platteville Pioneers. By beginning the season with this decisive victory, the Titan Eleven showed themselves and Coach Kolf that they had the needed touch of a fine team. Consistant runs, both around the ends and through the center of the line, combined with a few impressive passes when needed, showed the Titans to be an aggressive and well balanced ball-club. Oshkosh running mates Claude Zoch and Arden Luker, both contributed the needed yardage in setting up the first Oshkosh tally. Luker was the final factor in that first tally, running the ball around end to the touchdown. The attempt at conversion w-as wide by Evan Gagnon, Titan end. After holding each other for the most part of the first half, the Titans scored again late on an intercepted pass. Coming back late in the fourth quarter, the Pioneers managed to score on consistant runs and climaxed them with a touchdown run around left end. Final count Oshkosh 13, Platteville 6. Above: Ken Schneider End Below: Edward Erban EndBob Jesse Center Above: Bill Utz Tackle Below: Ward Fuchs Fullback Milton Becker Paul Wagner Arthur Hochnc End Fullback Quarterback OSHKOSH 0 .............. STEVENS POINT 21 Intermingled with decorative floats, parades, dormitory and house adornments, mass gatherings, and cheer meetings, it was only up to a victory in the football game to complete the gala Homecoming celebration. However, the word had gotten to the Stevens Point Eleven, and they showed it strongly in a smashing 21 to 0 defeat of the Oshkosh Titans. Impressive in the opening quarter, the Titans showed up much more the aggressor on the field, playing deep in Point territory while the Pointers made little infliction into Oshkosh zones. On a fumble deftly recovered by guard Charlie Smith, and a decisive setback by Bill Utz, the Titans found themselves deep in Point territory in the final minutes of the first quarter. Their drive to pay dirt was obverted in the last seconds when Hoehne’s pass was intercepted. Unable to make any impression upon the Pointer’s line, the Titans concentrated on wide sweeps during the second quarter and soon found themselves again deep in Point territory. Bottled up on the 24 yard line, the Titans called for place kicking specialist, Evan Gagnon, but his field goal attempt fell short.Victor Lind Ralph Draegcr Richard Kocck Quarterback End Tackle OSHKOSH 7 ......... MILWAUKEE 19 Driving hard and straight for the conference championship, the Flying Gulls of Milwaukee battered down the Titans of Oshkosh, 19 to 7 to remain undefeated in their drive for the title. It was the Titans third game of the ’48 season that they had as yet witnessed. Victims of the much favored Gulls, the Titans returned home from the bruising battle with several major players nursing severe injuries that were to take important toll on the future of the Titan’s success. Before the onslaught of Milwaukee’s Gulls the Titans fought determinedly through the game which took sad, tell-tale vengence on them. Behind new-type playing, the Oshkosh boys experienced a team so determined in their drive at the conference title that they had little consideration for easy play and set a viciousness far above any yet faced. Taking the kick-off and adding to it successive runs of 21, 33, and 41 yards, the Gulls scored easily on an intercepted pass and a nifty run by Wally Fricke, Milwaukee star back. Oshkosh rallied to their score in the third quarter on a pass, Luker to Schneider. Anthony Eannclli End Above: Carl Smedberg Halfback Below: Donald Bostwick TackleCliff Swcbke Halfback Norman Schcin End Charles Smith Center Claude Zoch Fullback Above: Bernard VanCamp Tackle Below: Arden Luker Fullback OSHKOSH 0.......... WHITEWATER 0 After a previous showing of excellent f x)tball in both offensive and defensive strategy the week before at Milwaukee, the Oshkosh Eleven could muster very little of that excellence to quell the Quakers of Whitewater. Amid runs wide, passes, and plunges, neither outfit could make any impression upon the other to score. Unable to muster up any of that winning spirit they displayed so well at Milwaukee in the first half, the Titans were forced, but summoned a portion of it early in the second half to score on a nifty end run by halfback Clete Listle. Heartbreaking was the toss of the handkerchief by the referee that signaled offsides on the Oshkosh line and nullified the touchdown. The final minutes of the last two quarters were spent in midfield with neither Oshkosh or Whitewater able to penetrate the final three strips of each others zones. Bringing back some of the powerful offensive they showed at Milw aukee, the Titans showed up in sharp contrast to their game of the first two quarters. However, their bid came too late to prevent the final scoreless tie. With but minutes to go. Coach Kolf substituted Norm Schein to drop-kick a field goal from the 40 yard line. Schein's attempt was true but the distance too far and it fell short, leaving the game in the inocuous tie.Clctus Listlc Ken Gongorck Paul Stevenson Halfback Halfback Tackle OSHKOSH 6.............. STOUT INSTITUTE 18 In their final game of the season, the Oshkosh Titans ran into another insurmountable aggregation, the Blue Devils of Stout, and wound up the season with an 18 to 6 defeat. Thus the closing of the season for the Titans shows a record of one victory, a 13 to 6 decision over Platteville, four losses and one tie to put them in a deadlock with Whitewater for eighth place in the conference standings. Scoring twice in the second quarter, Stout tallied their third touchdown in the third quarter on a disputed play. An intercepted Titan aerial on the 35 set up the play. After a plunge to the 31, an end run by Stout halfback Arnie Potthast, on which he was tackled into the end zone, was counted as their third tally. For the third time an aggressive Titan lineman batted dow n the attempt for the extra point. Unable to advance on the ground, the Oshkosh Eleven took to the air in the fourth quarter and clicked for their humble 6 points. On a 35 yard toss, Luker to Meyer, and another to end A1 Sweet, the climax came on a short pass, Luker to end Ken Schneider in the end zone for the count. The pass from center was fumbled and the conversion never got off. Content with their three tallies, the Blue Devils kept possession until the final whistle and the Titans trotted off the field to the lowr tune of the 18 to 6 decision. James Spaulding End Above: Marv Paffenroch Manager Below: Ralph Draper ManagerRichard Meyer, Norm Fuller and Paul Wagner out for a breather. STATE TEACHERS CONFERENCE FINAL STANDINGS Won Lost Tic Pts. Ops. Pet. Eau Claire . . . 5 1 0 72 33 .833 La Crosse . . . . 4 1 1 124 83 .750 Milwaukee . . . 4 I 1 72 39 .750 River Falls . . . 4 2 0 113 96 .667 Stevens Point . 3 3 0 77 65 .500 Superior .... • 3 3 0 114 106 .500 Stout . 3 3 0 85 90 .500 Whitewater .. . 1 4 1 76 109 .250 Oshkosh .... . 1 4 1 39 90 .250 Platteville ... . 0 6 0 69 130 .000 Page One Hundred Twenty.twoBASKETBALL Left to right: Kolf. I.autenschlager. Lukcr. Schumacher. GuUbrand, Wolff. Spaulding, Adams. F.rban. Ritchie, Cotter. Kirchncr. Popp. Pfeiffer, Manis. Paffenroth. After being unable to register a single victory in their first five starts, the OSTC Titans came into their own around the first of the year to win six of the remaining eleven games. Although the Kolf-men were relatively unsuccessful in conference play, they retained their Southern Division crown sharing the top berth with Platte-ville. Each had a five win, three loss record. Our inhospitable neighbors to the north, however, whipped us four times and OSTC wound up in a three-way tie for seventh place with Stevens Point and Milwaukee. Outside of loop play, the Titans dropped three of their four starts to round up a complete record of six wins and ten losses for the 1948-49 campaign. Dick Schumacher, veteran guard and winner of three cage letters, was elected captain of the squad by his teammates. The sharp eye of Doug Ritchie won for him a forward spot on the All-Conference team for the third consecutive year while his two running mates, Ed Erban and Dick Schumacher, were chosen for the second team. Not a member of this year’s quintet will be lost through graduation, therefore the squad will have even greater depth than it displayed this past season. Page One Hundred l u cnty-thrccI Miter begins another Titan Offensive play. OSHKOSH 47 ........ST. NORBERT’S 65 In their initial game of the 1948-49 cage season the Oshkosh Titans bowed to a speedy St. Norbert five, 65-47, on the latter’s home floor. Although the state-men had a definite advantage in height, the aggressive play by the Green Knights was more than enough to compensate for the deficit. Until midway in the second period the Kolf-men had matched the St. Norbert team nearly point for point; by half time the hosts had spurted to a nine point lead, 30-21. Fresh and revitalized, the two squads played speedy, heads-up ball in a hectic second half, but the Green Knights were indefatigable in their quest for victory and held a comfortable lead at the close of the semi-final stanza. It was with little effort on the part of the green and gold that they held a safe margin until the final horn sounded with the score 65-47 in their favor. High point man for the evening with 14 points was the former all-state forward from Lena, Wisconsin, Roman Kosnar. OSTC’s Dick Schumacher was runner-up with 12 points. OSHKOSH 54............ MILWAUKEE 58 Unable to shake off the spectre of bad luck, the Titans went down before the Green Gulls of Milwaukee State, 58-54, in an overtime contest. The color green seemed to place a hex on Kolf’s cagers as Milwaukee’s Gulls flew to an early lead, scoring ten markers before the Titans registered once. A furious sec-saw battle ensued; at halftime the birds held a scanty margin over their guests, 28-27. Things moved along swiftly in the third quarter, as the Titans found the hoop with relative ease; leading at the end of the third period, 39-34. In the last frame the Green Gulls slowly narrowed the visitors slim lead, and tied the score 51-51 just before the final horn. In the five minute overtime, Oshkosh chalked up the first three points, but Milwaukee came right back to score the final seven tallies and win the game, 58-54. Bolz of Milwaukee and Erban of OSTC led the scoring with 17 and 12 points respectively. Doug Ritchie Forward Jim Spaulding Center Page One Hundred Tu enty-fouiAdana gets the jump as a neu- game begins. OSHKOSH 46.......... DE KALB 62 OSTC's Titans crossed the border to invade the cage court of De Kalb, Illinois, only to suffer its third setback in as many starts, 62-46. De Kalb started things rolling with a quick bucket to take a lead which it never relinquished. The visitors displayed marked difficulty in finding the hoop as was shown by the half time score, 38-21, in favor of the classy De Kalb club. Scoring in the third and fourth frames was on a much more even keel as the Oshkoshers edged their adversaries 25 to 24, but fell far short of their goal as De Kalb won handily 62-46. The understudies of the De Kalb five took over as the clock ticked away the last minutes of the game. Riesser, smooth playing De Kalb forward, topped all offensive efforts with 15 points. OSTC scoring was bunched with Erban, Ritchie and Schumacher netting 13, 12, and 11, respectively. OSHKOSH 56.......WHITEWATER 58 Determined as they were to win in their fourth start of the season, the Titans dropped a heartbreakcr to Whitewater, 58-56, at Oshkosh. Paced by its towering centers, Oshkosh jumped to a quick lead which it maintained until the closing seconds of the game. Although closely pressed several times, the White and Gold held a five point advantage over Whitewater at half time, 29-24. In the second half the Quakers fully began to bridge the gap. With five minutes to go Oshkosh was ahead, 38-31; at this point the visitors found the range, and within two minutes they completely changed the complexion of things and led 43 to 42. The hosts trailed Whitewater, 58-54, with only one and a half minutes to play. A final Titan bucket ended the scoring as the Quakers stalled out the remaining time to win, 58-56. Jim Adams, Oshkosh prodigy at the pivot, led both teams by scoring 15 points. Close upon his heels was Molinario of the Quakers with 14 points. Eddie Erban Jim Adams Forward Center Page One Hundred Tu-enty-fiveIt looks like two more points for Oshkosh. OSHKOSH 62 ....... RIFON 66 One of the State's closest rivals, geographically and otherwise, is Ripon College of Ripon. The old feud flared up again at the rival's gym, and a hard-fought, nip and tuck fray followed with Ripon eking out a 66-62 decision over the jinx-ridden Titans. Although the count was knotted several times, the Redmen displayed an offensive kick that gave them the edge at half-time, 32-29. Ripon then began to burn the strings regularly with Duerst and Weiske carrying the load while the Titans, led by Schumacher and Erban, kept at the heels of the Redmen. However, it was not field goals that provided the margin of victory but rather, as is often the case, the charity tosses. Ripon’s 20 conversions from the penalty stripe spelled finis for the Titans. Doug Ritchie of Oshkosh and Duerst of Ripon headed the scoring column with 20 and 18 points respectively. OSHKOSH 73.......... PLATTEVILLE 66 Oshkosh began the new year right by knocking off the league leading Platteville Pioneers by a score of 73-66 at Platteville. Breaking fast, the underdogs grabbed a six point lead at the outset which was short lived as the hosts recovered and moved ahead; at half-time the quintets were deadlocked with 41 apiece. OSTC increased the tempo of things as it stepped off to an early second half lead which it managed .to maintain until the last two minutes when the southerners knotted the score at 66 all. With Adams, Ritchie, and Erban out on fouls, it looked like a new ball game, but the Titan’s seven point hitch-kick gave them the nod as the game ended, 73-66. Dick Schumacher and Doug Ritchie kept the club intact as they set the pace with 23 and 21 markers respectively. Two Pioneers turned in commendable offensive performances; Echerman dropped in 18 points and Murphy tallied 17. Milton Lautensehlajtcr Guard Dick Schumacher Guard — Captain Page One Hundred Twenty-sixOSHKOSH 59........ RIVER FALLS 62 Nace DcLong, the offensive genius from River Falls, was held to an anemic 12 points — his season’s low — by the Oshkosh Titans, but his teammates bore the brunt of the Falcon attack as they turned back the Kolf-men in a thriller, 62-59. Highly keyed, the Titans kept up to the visitors until just before halftime when the Falcons pulled out in front, 27-24. The Falls five let down somewhat in the third frame as Oshkosh surged ahead on 12 consecutive markers, 38-32. OSTC then blew its lead as River Falls rallied to go out in front, 52-50, midway in the final stanza. With just 52 seconds to go Benson, Falcon ace, flipped in a gift shot which changed the narrow 61-59 margin into a chasm too great to be bridged in the fleeting moments of the ball game. Benson sparkplugged the Fall's attack with 18 tallies topping Ritchie’s 16 point effort. OSHKOSH 42 ....... EAU CLAIRE 51 Using only five men, Eau Claire State Teachers College posted an easy victory over OSTC, 51-42, on the Titan court. Oshkosh drew first blood on a gift shot by Erban, but Eau Claire’s marksmanship began to pay off as they sailed ahead scoring 23 points, while the Titans registered 12; the half-time score stood 31-14, Eau Claire. What looked like a rout in the semi-final frame bogged down as the Titans temporarily came to life and cut the margin to 11, 35-24, but the clear water quintet countered with six to stretch their lead, 41-26. Continuing at this pace Eau Claire held a 16-point edge with less than five minutes to go, and then OSTC went on a scoring spree ringing the bell ten times while holding their opponents to a trio of tallies. But it was too late, time ran out and the game ended, 51-42, Eau Claire. Hoff, Eau Claire hub, coined 16 points, and Ritchie racked up 12. Carl Pfeiffer Arden Luker Guard Guard Pege One Hundred Twenty-sevenOSHKOSH 56.........STEVENS POINT 52 A last minute rally by the Stevens Point cag-ers fell short of its goal as the Oshkosh Titans went on to win its second conference game by a slim 56-52 count. Dick Schumacher was the main cog of the highly geared Titan attack as he dropped in 22 counters; Ritchie's 16 was next best. The Pointer’s scoring was spread; Curry, Flugaur, and Haidvogl gathered 9 each. Point grabbed an early lead on a fielder and a charity, but then OSTC came into its own with Schumacher hitting the bullseye six times in six at-temps. The locals were on the long end of a 33-24 score at midtime. With seven minutes remaining, OSTC still enjoyed a favorable 49-37 edge. Having cold-tracked throughout most of the game, the Pointers then picked up the Titan's trail but were unable to flush them up as the game ended, 56-52, Oshkosh. OSHKOSH 72 .......... WHITEWATER 57 After being edged 58-56 by Whitewater in their first encounter, the Oshkosh Titans trounced the Southerners 72-57 on their home floor. It was lanky Ed Erban of the Titan quintet who led the offensive drive with 19 points on seven buckets and five free throws. Meanwhile, Callums of the Quaker squad dumped in 15 markers to lead his team. In the initial quarter OSTC racked up 12 points before the hosts could add a single goal to their two successful gift conversions. Coach Kolf’s team continued to hammer the hoop effectively, and by half-time they had established an impressive 42-24 lead. Whitewater ended the evening's scoring with a string of seven charity tosses; however, the Northerners still sported a 15 point margin and left the floor avenged. Jim Adams of OSTC pumped in 13 points while Kimball gathered 11 for the Quakers. Tom Cotter Guard Bill Maim Guard Page One Hundred Tu enty-eightCamera catches offensive and defensive action. OSHKOSH 56.......... LA CROSSE 63 Despite a contribution of 23 points by Doug Ritchie, the Oshkosh Titans were unable to whip the La Crosse Indians and dropped the game by a score of 63-56. The Indians donned warpaint and spurted to a 12-1 lead within the initial three minutes, but the Titans steadily narrowed the margin, and the score was deadlocked at 29-29 at the half-time. The Warriors, battling on their own stamping ground, earnestly renewed their bid for the Titan scalp as they forged to a 43-32 lead midway in the semi-final round. The hosts faltered once as the OSTC aggregate drove to within three points, 53-50, but with a whoop the Braves dumped in several counters to win 63-56. Ritchie, Oshkosh forward, made the Indians dance as he poured in 23 markers to pace both squads. Olson and Schwanberg of La Crosse pegged 17 each to lead the Tribe. OSHKOSH 64 .......SUPERIOR 70 After a bad start at La Crosse, the locals invaded the Superior court and were handed a 70-64 trouncing by the Yellowjackets in a rough and fiery tiff. The Northerners led throughout the game, but not without strong OSTC opposition. Scoring was on an even keel during the first half, the end of which found OSTC leading 34-30. Tempers flared several times, and three of the Oshkosh cagers were tagged with technical fouls in the heat of the game. The margin waxed and waned alternately, but the Yellowjackets sting proved to be too much for the Titans as the game ended 70-64, Superior. Oshkosh outshone their opponents from the field, but the 26 charities tossed in by Superior more than made up for this deficit. Omernik, McGregor, and Moselle were the big guns of the Superior squad as they netted 18, 16, and 16 respectively. Erban’s 17 and Schumacher’s 12 paced the Titan attack. Glenn Kirchner Guard Dave Popp Guard Page One Hundred Twenty-nineOSHKOSH 67 ....... MILWAUKEE 57 Firing 102 shots at the mesh, the Oshkosh Titans avenged an earlier defeat by the Milwau-keans by downing them, 67-57, on the local court. Although they made fewer attempts, the Gulls hit with greater accuracy from the floor as well as from the free-throw line. OSTC rushed to a 13-6 lead in the first seven minutes of the game, and clung to it until just before the half, when the visitors overtook them. A quick bucket by the Birds gave them the edge at halftime, 30-28. Adams dumped in five markers in rapid succession to put the Titans out in front early in the third period. Milwaukee threatened several times, but the Oshkoshers managed to keep a jump or two ahead of them and won going away, 67-57. Big Jim Adams chalked up 20 points for the home team while Erban added 17 more. Milwaukee’s bespectacled Bob Bolz said nuts to OSTC as he flipped in 22 markers to top both teams in that department. OSHKOSH 51 ....... RIPON 47 Continuing their winning ways, the Oshkosh Titans toppled their perennial rivals, Ripon College, 51-47 at the Merrill School Gym. Overcoming a slight Ripon lead, OSTC maintained its margin throughout the game with the opposition threatening only once or twice. Although there were comparatively few fouls called, both teams were apt at the penalty stripe; Ripon caged 13 for 22 while OSTC netted 15 out of 21. Halftime found the Oshkoshers ahead 28-22. Swanson, sharp Redman guard, did much to narrow the Titan edge in the second half by coining timely buckets and upsetting several Oshkosh scoring attempts. The tempo of the game increased as Ripon moved to within 3 points of OS'I'C, 42-39, and it seemed as though they had at last hit their stride, but the Titans managed to quell the Red men's final bid and win 51-47. Doug Ritchie, Titan mainstay, flipped in 16 counters while Ripon’s Kermit Weiske led his teammates with 13. Earl Wolff Kay Gulhrand Forward Forward Page One Hundred ThirtyAwaiting the rebound after a Titan shot. DeLong faking Adana before taking a shot. OSHKOSH 54 .......STEVENS POINT 59 Despite a strong last quarter rally, the Oshkosh Titans were unable to overtake the Stevens Point five and dropped a 59 54 decision on the latter’s court. During the first 12 minutes OSTC netted only a pair of fielders and four free throws against 25 points by the opposition. The Point enjoyed a 28-21 advantage at half-time. Coming back fast in the third period, the hosts bolstered their lead to 14 points, 51-37. At this juncture, however, the Titans began a counter-attack cashing in 9 consecutive tallies, but the waning time loomed as an invisable foe. With but 50 seconds to go, OSTC trailed by a single basket, but the Pointers added a final trio to clinch the game 59-54. Ritchie’s 22 points led both clubs, and Wagner’s 21 for Stevens Point was next best. OSHKOSH 75 ........... PLATTEVILLF. 62 Coach Kolf’s Titans appropriately climaxed their 1948-49 cage season by humbling a highly-touted Platteville five, 75-62, on the home hardwood. The Oshkosh offensive machine bogged at the outset, but soon the Titans shifted into high gear and swished in 13 straight points to grab a lasting lead. Doug Ritchie, Montello’s contribution to OSTC, dropped in 10 of his 32 attempts plus a lone singleton to rack up 21 bingles. But even more apt at the art was Dick Schumacher, who netted 8 for 16 and added a charity toss to clinch the second place spot with 17. A determined Pioneer squad closed fast in the second frame and edged to within 3 points of OSTC as the first half ended, 32-29, Oshkosh. Hal McKean, unsung Platteville sub who entered the game about midtime, kept the Pioneers on the trail by cashing in on 7 of his 11 shots to pace his teammates with 14 markers. CONFERENCE STANDINGS WISCONSIN STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES w L PCT River Falls 10 2 .833 La Crosse 7 5 .583 Superior 7 5 .583 Platteville 6 6 .500 Eau Claire 6 6 .500 Stout 6 6 .500 Oshkosh 5 7 .417 Stevens Point 5 7 .417 Milwaukee 5 7 .417 Whitewater 3 9 .250 Page One Hundred Thirty-oneTRACK... 1948 Claude Zoch, Captain TRACK SUMMARIES IN WHICH OSHKOSH MEN PLACED MO yards: Leverom, Milwaukee; Brown, La Crosse; Murial, Milwaukee; Wolf, Oshkosh; Driscoll, Milwaukee. Time: 53.2. High hurdles: LaBorde, River Falls; Demerit, La Crosse; Moore, Oshkosh; J. Miller, La Crosse; Olsen, Milwaukee. Time: 15.7 (ties record set by Richlen, Oshkosh, 1940). 220 yards: Richmond, Milwaukee; Tarentino, Milwaukee; Pollack, Milwaukee; Schmirlcr, Oshkosh; Lomis, La Crosse. Time: 22.2. Low hurdles: Demerit, La Crosse; Moore, Oshkosh; Kimball, Whitewater; LaBorde, River Falls; J. Miller, LaCrosse. Time: 24.5 (new record; old mark 25.7 by Lcmmer, Milwaukee, 1947). Shot-put: Demerit, La Crosse; Zoch, Oshkosh; Carro, Milwaukee; Gagnon, Oshkosh; Leland, Milwaukee. Distance: 43'4". Javelin: Knapp, Milwaukee; Hoehne, Oshkosh; Pengle, La Crosse; Ritchie, Oshkosh. Distance: 149'. Discus: Zoch, Oshkosh; Lcvcrnick, River Falls; Marencil, La Crosse; Leighton, LaCrosse; Dennis. Platt eville. Distance: 133'8". High jump: Warner. Whitewater; tie between LaBorde, River Falls, Rhose, LaCrosse; tie among Olson and Weaver. Milwaukee, Hodgson. LaCrosse, and Paul. Oshkosh. Height: 5'10". Relay: Milwaukee; LaCrosse; River Falls; Oshkosh; Plattcvillc. Time: 1:34. Points: Milwaukee 83V ; LaCrosse 7114; Oshkosh 28 River Falls 22Vi Whitewater 15; Plattcvillc 4. A powerful Milwaukee Teachers track and field team, winning seven of fifteen events, annexed the championship of the State Teachers Conference Saturday, May 15, 1949, by shading LaCrosse, 83V to IWl- Oshkosh copped third with 28 4. Due to a high wind and soggy track, marks were not out of the ordinary in spite of the classy field with the exception of rare cases. Only one record was tumbled. Jim Demerit of La Crosse made nineteen points on three firsts and a second, skipped the low hurdles in 24.5 to chop 1.2 seconds off the mark established by Ken Lemmer of Milwaukee. Some credit for Demerit’s record-breaking performance must be handed to Oshkosh’s Tom Moore. The Titan ace pushed the La Crosse runner to the new time. In fact, Moore ran the distance in 24.6, or 1.1 better than the previous top. Claude Zoch, North Fondy husky, was the only Titan to spear a first place. Claude hurled the discus 133 8'' to take the blue ribbon. His toss was only a foot and a half below the record set by another Oshkosh boy. Champ Seibold. Zoch also rated a second in the shot. Other Oshkosh point winners were John Schmirler, who finished fourth in the 220 yard dash; John Wolf, who placed fourth in the quarter mile; Moore, who bagged a second in the low hurdles and a third in the highs; Evan Gagnon, fourth in the shot; Art Hoehne, third in the javelin; and Tom Paul, tie for third in the high jump. The half mile relay quartet took a fourth in this event. Coach Bob Kolf reported that the field was "fast and classy.” The finish of the 100 was a blanket heat with Schmirler apparently fifth, but overlooked. The track was heavy and slowed the Oshkosh ace, who likes a hard and fast track. Ritchie was a disappointment in the javelin. He was unable to get off one of his long pitches and finished fifth. The winning heave of 149 has been bettered by Doug in every one of the Titan's dual meets. Page One Hundred Thirty-tu oMAJOR: Abrahamson, James Adams, James Erban, Eddie Gagnon, Evan Hoehne, Art Lipovac, Ray Morrick, Wallace Paul, Tom Pfeiffer, Carl Ritchie, Doug Schein, William Schmirler, John Theil, Norm Wolf, John Zoch, Claude—Captain MINOR: Ernst, LaVerne Kentop, Bill Morrissey, John Schram, Chuck % aiAxto tktAxto tmm l ft to right, first row: N. Thiel, J. Adams, C. Zoch, C. Schram, T. Moore. Second row: Coach Kolf, A. Hoehne, J. Wolf, E. Gagnon, R. Lipovac, W. Morrick. Third row: J. Schmirler, C. Pfeiffer, E. Erban, D. Ritchie, J. Abrahamson. Page One Hundred Thirty-threeTENNIS... 1948 Paul Keller. Captain SUMMARIES Singles—First round: Keller, Oshkosh, bye, Scheel, La Crosse, defeated Ellison, Superior, 6-4, 6-1; Niles, Whitewater, defeated Baldwin, Eau Claire, 8-6, 6-0; Bandszak, Milwaukee, bye; Buerger, Oshkosh, defeated Belfanz, River Falls, 6-1, 6-1; Bart, Stevens Point, defeated Brenk, Milwaukee, 6-1, 5-7, 6-3? De Long, Eau Claire, defeated Potts, Milwaukee, 6-0, 6-0; and Lubbers, La Crosse, bye. Second round: Keller defeated Scheel, 6-2, 6-1; Bandszak defeated Niles, 6-0, 6-0; Buerger defeated Bart, 6-0, 6-0; De Long defeated Lubbers, 6-2, 6-4. Semi-finals: Keller defeated Bandszak, 6-1, 11-9 Buerger defeated DeLong, 6-3, 6-2. Finals: Keller defeated Buerger, 6-1, 6-2, 6-0; Bandszak defeated De Long, 6-2, 6-2 (third place). Two more crowns emblematic of the best in the State Teachers Conference were placed in the trophy case at Oshkosh State Teachers College. In the state meets at Milwaukee on Saturday, May 22, 1948, the Titans retained their state tennis crown as Paul Keller, defending singles champion, defeated a teammate, ’’Red” Buerger, for the solo crown, and the golfers tied Whitewater, defending champions, for the golf bunting. Keller and Buerger, rated No. 1 and 2, respectively, at the college, duplicated their fete of 1947 when they waded through all opposition in the singles to clash in the championships. Keller won in straight sets, 6-1, 6-2, 6-0. La Crosse won the doubles with a team of Bud Graham and Bob Novak; they annexed the duo play with a 6-1, 6-2, 6-2 verdict over Whitewater in the finals. Oshkosh’s tandem of Fintan Flanagan and Don Negendank was eliminated in the opening round when they bowed to Whitewater, 6-3, 6-8, 6-3. Based on a scoring of 5-3-1 for the first three places in both singles and doubles, the finish was like this: Oshkosh 8, La Crosse 5, Whitewater 3, Milwaukee I, Stevens Point 1. Keller advanced into the finals by defeating Jim Scheel of La Crosse in the second round, 6-4, 6-1, after drawing a bye in the first round. Dick Bandszak of Milwaukee went down before Keller in the semi-finals, 6-1,9-7. Bandszak took third by whipping Jim De Long of Eau Claire, 6-3, 6-2. Buerger moved into the championship round by downing Bob Belfanz of River Falls, 6-1, 6-1; Bart of Stevens Point, 6-0, 6-0; De Long, 6-3, 6-2. Page One Hundred Thirty-fontMAJOR: MINOR: Keller, Paul Glaeser, Don Buerger, Carlton Flanagan, Fintan Negendank, Don Kannal, James Dahl, Robert Left to right: Paul Keller, Don Glaeser, D. Negendank. Robert Dahl, Fintan Flanagan. Carlton Buerger. Page One Hundred Thirty-fiveGOLF Raymond Hartman, Captain SUMMARIES Whitewater: 623 (Connors, 74-77—151; Klien, 74-79—153; Kinsella, 80-81—161; Koepen, 80-80—160; Pressentin, 78-81—159.) Oshkosh: 623 (Hartman, 74-73—147; Paffcnroth, 74.81—155; Luft, 78-82—160; Erban, 80-81— 161; Erickson, 84-87—171.) Milwaukee: 629 (Dietrich, 79-74—153; Kindsig, 78-78—156; Vosswinkel, 80-78—158; Baran-waki, 82-80—162; Groth, 81-82—163.) La Crosse: 657 (Klein, 79-81—160; Hayes, 82-80— 162; Mears, 83-83—166; Nichols, 86-83—169; Westere, 79-91—170.) V.au Claire: 660 (Anderson, 81-81—162; Robertson, 82-81—163; Backus, 82-82—164; Goers, 83-85—168; Lehman, 86-82—168.) River Falls: 680 (Dick, 75-81—156; Gibbs, 89-76—165; Thompson, 92-87—179; Giere, 90-90—180.) Stevens Point: 720 (Menzel, 83-87—170; Duerd, 83-90—173; Mayek, 96-90—186; Tillis, 97-94—191; Grover, 96-98—194.) ... 1948 In the state golf meet at Milwaukee, the results were not determined until the final putt was holed late in the afternoon. White-water and Oshkosh finished with identical scores of 623 w ith Stout, despite a beautiful 133 turned in by its No. 1 player, Roger Winberg, taking second, two strokes behind. Winberg’s card of 133 for the 36 holes broke the old medalist’s record of 141, established by Albert Hartman of Oshkosh in 1938. He turned the first 18 in 64 and wound up the second with 69. Ray Hartman of Oshkosh took runner-up laurels with cards of 74 and 73 for 147. Teams were permitted to enter five golfers, but scores of only four were counted. Other Oshkosh scores were: Marv Paffenroth, 74-81—155; Dick Luft, 78-82— 160; Eddie Erban, 80-81 —161; and Nyle Neumann, 81-81 — 162. Page One Hundred Thirty-sixMAJOR: MINOR: Hartman, Ray Buetow, Melvin Paffenroth, Marv Neumann, Nyle Luft, Richard Viett, Harold Erban, Eddie Page One Hundred Thirty-sevenCHEERLEADERS Blake Burton. Jr.. Captain Behind every basketball game, every football encounter here at Oshkosh State, the on-looker will find a second team—that of our Titan Cheerleaders. Under the direction of Blake Burton, Jr., this year’s trio of yell-leaders was: Virginia Fessenden, Marilyn Goldsworthy, and Arlyce Heineman. These girls were chosen at the beginning of the college year after extensive try-outs and exhibitions. All have had former experience in high schools. Before coming to Oshkosh State, Miss Heineman was a cheerleader at Oshkosh High, Miss Goldsworthy at Columbus High, and Miss Fessenden at Sheboygan North. Miss Heineman is the only second-year veteran on the team. Much credit is due these girls and their leader, Blake Burton, Jr., for the work which they do; not only in making up the yells and leading the student body in these cheers, but also in their efforts to maintain the school spirit in backing our athletic squads. , Left to right Arlyce Heineman. Virginia Fessenden. Marilyn Goldsworthy. Page One Hundred Thirty-eight g$tss tfx b K VO '- !'. .' S y=v« x «; £ - -7“ f u 7l WAYi r»r. rv r yi'«7 • ,% yVr 95?r ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR NOTE: Allowing greater freedom. chi» "Activities of the Year" section. which it a new addition to OSTC. enables the QUIVER to record on it pages a comprehensive and objective coverage of school functions and other matters closely related to the school year. In addition, this break from the traditional style gives credit to those who deserve such for their hard work and clears a path for setting into print activities considered too minor for a page spread. — Ed. REGISTRATION Confusion Queues threaded in a tangle of confusion. Once again the marble corridors resounded to the excited voices of green freshmen and to the hushed rt served murmuring of upper class-men. Registration for the school year had begun and in the opinion of those who had been thtough the mill before, it was the same old tale. Many agreed that no matter how often one went through the processing, he would never know from year to year what was to be done first. Some sections had improved their methods; others had slipped back to previous status. The biggest bottleneck was found in the central office where veterans stood in line for tiresome hours at the end of which they received a curt notice they should have proceeded directly on. bypassing this station. At the next stop they found one lone typist beaded in sweat in a desperate attempt to get the men through without delay. A directional sign could have improved relations. There was efficiency in evidence. Proof of this was an added feature, a barricade of tables on the second floor staffed with men of the faculty who know what they were doin«. On the same floor the Men’s and Women’s Associations have moved to fresher air in the corridor outside of the office and found their collection task made easier by the new increase in fees—there was no change to make except for the more fortunate who snorted the folding Lincoln's and Hamilton's. Despite the numerous forms of all descriptions that were to be filled out, the three days were sufficient for the task—even counting the many breakdowns in the photo deoartment where lights were continuously burning out and the plaster of paris numbers were being smashed with increasing rapidity. The majority of the "police blotter" pixes came out with the usual harsh features. The addition of numbers this year completed the cycle. Students of OSTC now know one of the routines when entering San Quentin. FRESHMEN MIXER "Restricted Area—Keep Out7 Smoke issuing from the cigarettes of dozens of well-scrubbed male freshmen hung low in the hallway outside the Women's Gymnasium. Coke at a dime a bottle was selling fast and salesman John Nelson quickly discovered that it did not require his rapid double-talk to dispense it. On the floor inside the college dance band began to wonder if it had been hired for a concert instead of a get-acquainted mixer. Along the east wall of the gym. an inviting array of attractive young women sat tapping their feet to the music. Along the south wall stood the freshmen men—apparently enjoying each other's company and looking much like a bunch of fraternity brothers who were attending their 25th year reunion. Occasionally a group of two or three of these men would terminate their conversation long enough to steal a glance at the "date-bait" and then would return to their huddle as if they had suddenly sighted a "Restricted Area—Keep Out" sign posted at right angles to them. Toward the middle of the evening, upper classmen made their appearance and gradually the floor began to fill with these couples who were too busy renewing acquaintances to notice the bashfulness on the part of the freshmen. Through all this, the girls were left sitting. Eventually, after much passing of the buck, a fan-fare from the band was heard and Johnny Nelson took over. "All the boys form a ring.” he ordered," and the girls in a ring around them. Move in opposite directions and when the music stops, that's it. Doc!" The Geigers, Kargcs’, and Thedingas, chaperones for the evening, blocked the door and forced everyone in the fracas. The music started, stopped, and everyone danced. For the surplus of girls, bottle caps were issued and it was their privilege to cut and "pass the cap." From that moment on, the even- ing was a success. When twelve o'clock rolled around, more than one guy who was seen coming in a stag walked out with a big grin on his face and a starry-eyed coed on his arm. With the exception of a few grumbles about the traditional lack of fast music, everyone seemed well pleased and many agreed that it was a successful event. Even Philakean Society was happy—they sold a cooler of coke with an aggregation of profit that was certain to please someone! FRESHMEN MIXER " . . . the girls were left sitting QUIVER, 194 9 139ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR SOCIAL LIFE COMMITTEE Schoenick, Gabriel, Nordbaus, Shafer, Brock, Kircbner, Skinner. SOCIAL LIFE No one appreciated Taking it on the chin and known to only those who are interested in registering complaints, the members of the Social Life Committee under the faculty supervision of the Dean of Women, Dr. Case, deserves plenty of credit for all of the work which they have accomplished during this school year. With the exception of the formal dances sponsored by the societies, and the Sadie Hawkins Dance given annually by Iota Alpha Sigma, the Social Life Committee is responsible for all of the efforts put forth to make the many school dances of the year a big success. Hanging thousands of feet of crepe paper, trimming Christmas trees and carving out pumpkins, this group labors hours on end in preparation for social affairs, with little reward except for a few compliments and smiles from a few of the students who are aware of those who arc doing the work. Four dances were sponsored during the first semester with Charlotte Skinner, Doris Brock, Marge Evans. Myra Kemmcr, and Dorothy Thompson working under the leadership of committee chairman Robert Nord-haus. In the second semester of this 48-49 school year, the committee was under the chairmanship of John Nelson, assisted by Jeanne Shafer, Glenn Kirchncr, Elaine Schoenick. and Godfrey Gabriel. Their big job was the preparation of the Spring Promenade. Coordinating the committee’s activities for both semesters was Dean Case who has evidenced this year as never before her sincere interest in student affairs. Surely the social season's successes demand laurels of praise for those responsible, the Social Life Committee. COLLEGE AVENUE Mother Nature Won Out "For your assignment over the weekend," sparked Dr. Donncr to her new class in U. S. History, "you may read pages 23 to...”. Brrrrrt! Brrrrrt! Bang! Brrrrrt! Once again classes at OSTC were under way with a familiar note of disturbance. In September of 1947 air hammers were being used for completing the steam connections to the newly erected chemistry laboratory. Classes in the Science Building and Administration Building cowered and struggled with the progress. September, 1948, sounded the same mark of progress on the campus. Compression hammers were on the final phase of work on College Avenue, the eastern boundry of OSTC. For years. College Avenue (more affectionately known as "College Alley") had withstood the traffic of thousands and thousands of vehicles as they wended their way through snow and ice, blistering heat and drenching rain to discharge their passengers into the portals of the Administration Building. For years these vehicles had been left on both sides of College Avenue by their owners, leaving so narrow an aisle through the center that it was strictly a oneway lane. No one ever objected strongly enough to circulate a petition. It was accepted as a matter of course and everybody liked it for the conveniences it had to offer. There were roads in the city far worse than this. Nevertheless, one day early in the summer the road was blocked off. "What’s coming off here? Whose brainstorm was this?” These and many other comments were heard as irate summer session students lost their parking facilities. The "alley" was to get a face lifting. The state had money to spend and so...! A few trees fell before the axe and the work progressed. Slowly but with decided surencss the road took form. When the students returned for the’ Fall term, they found there was still work to be done, but what had been completed thus far was undoubtedly worth the money that was spent. College Avenue was no longer a tarred narrow lane crowded with a hodgepodge of cars. It had been transformed into a gleaming new autobann"—a boulevard that looked and was truer to its name of College Avenue. And to the surprise of everyone, for once, the hard-hearted engineers had not cleared the. and. Mother Nature won out—the beautiful old trees of the campus had been spared and the traffic lane passed on either side. COLLEGE AVENUE . . . gleaming new autobahn. ' 140 QUIVER, 1949ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR HOMECOMING MUD BATTLE He lost bis trousers. LITTLE THEATRE Physical and aesthetic comfort Although it may not have shown on the seating chart, some changes were made in the assembly procedure during the 1948 49 session. The solid comfort of new seats and aesthetic comfort of fresh paint made the Little Theatre a much more pleasant place to spend the 9:40 assembly hour. Installation of the new seats began in October, delaying assembly programs for the first semester. Seating capacity was reduced to 548, while the aisles were widened in compliance with safety regulations, and space reserved near the stage for an orchestra pit. The actual cost of the redecoration was S10.027.28. The new seats are different from the old in that those in the middle section are staggered so that no one's view of the stage is blocked. This is accomplished by making some seats wider than others which is a patented feature of the installing company. Reconditioning of the old seats have made them available for use in Lecture rooms and in the second floor hallway of the Administration Building. The next improvement slated for the Little Theatre is the purchase of new curtains and window drapes; plans for a balcony have also been mentioned. LITTLE THEATRE No one objected! HOMECOMING Where were the hunters? Late last fall, September, the the month to be exact, Kurt Thiel appointed Budd Burton and Johnny iNclson as co-chairmen of Homecoming for 1948. With the cooperation of the faculty homecoming committee, the alumni committee and the engineering department, these three students tick-tocked the works of the festive week to the tune of Swiss watch. On Tuesday evening of the big week a regiment of "beamed" coeds and college ''joes” so elegantly decorated the corridors that one pictured a Mardi-Gras approaching in miniature. The crepe hangers were the members of Alpha Phi Omega and Kappa Gamma societies. To add to the luster of the great event gold and white beanies suddenly became the rage of the campus. Chuck Schramm and a group of football players were to be thanked for this noble deed, although everyone is convinced there was no loss of money for them. Something new was added in the realm of social progress on the campus this year when the committee decided upon the election of a Homecoming Queen. Any coed who was not wed was allowed to be nominated. Counting the ballots was a two-hour job but in spite of the details the students were glad to see Pat Gallagher come out on top. Her runner-ups were Carolyn Stoll and Audrey Taylor. Pat was a second semester freshman from Fond du Lac. Her gleaming smile and ebony hair made her the envy of many. The honor court consisted of Carolyn Stoll of Oshkosh and Audrey Taylor of Fall River. All the beauties met with whole hearted "eye” appeal. By Wednesday evening one could see a myriad of colored crepe paper and ancient gridiron suits hanging or perching at varied angles from numerous houses occupied by students. All houses vied for cash prizes donated by the Alumni Association. The House of Meyer ran off with first place laurels in an individual way. Their slogan "We're Pulling For the Titans and That's No Bull" was authentically pictured well enough to make the 4H Clubs bow their heads in shame. Second place was awarded to the House of Strupp. Third place went to the Pollock House. By 6:30 on Friday evening after preparations on the part of Alpha Phi Omega and the committee, the parade was ready to wend its glorious way down Main Street and announce to all that old grad week was in full swing. The final product was termed by many an onlooker as the most beautiful parade in the history of the QUIVER, 1949 141ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR HOMECOMING COMMITTEE They started in September. college, lota Alpha Sigma's stubborn hen won the float contest. A wink of an eye, a flap of the wings, a vicious quack and the emergence of pigskin eggs told the tale of how the Titans Laycd for Point. Philak-ean’s "Kicking the Extra Pointer” in the form of a human football going over a crossbar won second place. Delta Phi’s culinary artists won third place with a neat sandwich backed up by "We'll Spread 'em All Over.” In readiness for the pep assembly a number of men from the lounge were gathered to aid the committee in moving the three hardwood platforms. The platforms and the public address system were placed at the rear of the power house so that the band, football team and the cheerleaders could face the crowd aft of tne Training School. With the fine music of the band and the excellent contortions of the cheerleaders, the assemblage was kept in the spirit of the occasion. Immediately following the mass meeting a dance was held in the Women's Gym. The "Queen's Ball", as it was named, was in honor of the Homecoming Queen. At this function Kurt Thiel arrived with the results of the float and house decoration contests. Tradition reigns supreme at this time of the year and so it was that the annual freshman-sophomore mud battle and football game were scheduled for Saturday morning. At 6:30 on Friday evening the committee rolled out the hose and let the field of play get politely dampened until 9:00 on Saturday morning. This resulted in near knee-deep mud for the contenders with the large patch of mud strategically placed in the middle of the playing field. The frosh team boasting only one freshic and several upperclassmen won the mudspattered game. Orlyn Zieman and Doug Ritchie refereed the game only to wind up playing the second half while Burton and Nelson took over their duties. A short rest period came after which the battle of the tire through the mud was commenced. No one knows who won. The removal of Dick Mielke's trousers put the lid on the Saturday morning festivities. As usual the numerous societies held their respective events on Saturday morning for the benefit of their QUEEN AND COURT In a brand new Mercury. alums. The annual Kappa Delta Pi breakfast was held in the P.T.A. Room of the Training School. The other societies held their brunches and lunches at downtown establishments. The alums of the respective societies were more than pleased with the functions. The main event took place on Saturday afternoon when the Titans took on the Pointers for the football game. The weather man had smiled down all week and it looked as though he was going to frown after all. But the rain held off until after the game. Point won 21 to 0 but the spirit was there if only slightly quenched. The Homecoming Queen and her honor court and their dates sat in the front row of the stadium and during the half, the last of the festivities before the dance took place. There was ample proof in viewing the crowd that there were some faculty members and prominent students who thought it more important to help open the pheasant season than to witness the gaiety of the week. During the half, the band under the direction of Mr. Breese marched onto the field and did an outstanding job of the Alma Mater. Then Pat Gallagher made the awards to the winners of the house decoration contest, the float contest, and the freshman-sophomore football game. The house presidents and the society representatives accepted the float cup and the cash awards. Abbie McTrusty accepted the little brown jug for the freshman team. Then the committee presented to Pat a sterling silver cup as her personal possession for her glorious reign as Queen. It was overheard that one of the faculty enjoyed dancing to the music of Tommy Temple more than any other band. Therefore, the alumni board went all out to engage his orchestra. Tommy Temple was better than he had been in years and the band did their best to close festivities of the old grad week with a rousing hop. Everyone was there including some of the hunters! One could see alums who had not shown up for a celebration like this in many a year. A mile-wide grin on the faces of the faculty members made their students feel as though it was imperative to have an enjoyable time. HOMECOMING AWARDS Even a little brown jug. 142 QUIVER, 1949ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR HOMECOMING DANCE AT THE EAGLES Even some pheasant hunters tv ere there. HALLOWEEN DANCE Cats, Goblins, and Girls Despite the fact that the walls of the Women's Gymnasium were pasted up with black cats, goblins. and leering pumpkins, the girls of OSTC were bright and cheerful as they danced to the music of Larry Green's orchestra at the Halloween Dance. Many commented that they had never seen so many pretty girls around the campus. Could it have been the contrast to the decorations arranged by Marge Evans and Charlotte Skinner? Questions and cause aside, the evenings dance was thoroughly enjoyed by everyone in attendance. The orchestra provided a very danceable background for the lovers of jitterbug as well as for those who like the more dreamy music and the easy informality of the occasion was compatible with the likes of all. INTRAMURAL TOUCH FOOTBALL Soon after the fall term began, Warren Goehrs, intramural director, initiates! his sports program by organizing an intramural touch-football league. Comprising the league were the following teams: Lyceum, Iota; Periclean (Burps); Alpha Phi Omega (Mustangs) and two independent teams—the Graniteers and Goal Posta. Scheduling was so arranged that each team played every other team once. Eight men consituted a team, three in the hackfield and five on the line. Games were held on the first four days of the week at 4:00 P.M. Action commenced on October 4 with the Graniteers romping over Iota, 45-0. Tuesday, the Mustangs squeezed by the Burps, 7-6, and the same situation occured on Wednesday when the Goal Posts edged Lyceum, 13-12. In the final game of the week, the Graniteers defeated the Mustangs. 12-8. Periclean’s Burps began in earnest during the second week of play by trimming the Graniteers, 26-9. Iota and the Goal Posts battled to a 6-6 deadlock on Tuesday; and on Wednesday Lyceum was shaded by the Mustangs. 13 12. Again on Thursday Iota fought its way to 6-6 tie, this time with Lyceum. On Monday, October 18, the Goal Posts bowed to the Burps, 25-0 while Iota dropped a 6-0 decision to the Mustangs on the following day. Lyceum was handed its second setback by the highly-geared Burps. 19-0. The Goal Posts forfeited to the Graniteers on Thursday. Monday, lota dropped a close one to the powerful Burps, 6-0. Again the Goal Posts forfeited, this time to the Mustangs. On Wednesday the final game was played with the Graniteers whipping Lyceum. 18-6. Periclean’s Burps and the Graniteers finished the season with similar 4-1 records necessitating a championship playoff. In this decisive tilt the Burps downed the Graniteers by a 21-7 count. A traveling trophy donated by Periclean society and now on display in the library, was awarded to the winning team. Further, each member of the championship team was given a gold medal. Members of the Burp squad were: Norm Thiel. Kurt Thiel, Jim Adams. Bob Schroeder, Bob Loppnow. Bob Nord-haus, Glen Kirchner, Orlin Zieman, Tom Morrissey, Bill Kentop. and Fritz Lautenschlager. The runner-up team consisted of: Carol Vaughn, Abbic McTrusty, Tom Cotter. Francis Grott, Tom Hornby, Dave Poulton, Ken O'Conner, Milt Muller, Al Lehman. In third place with a three-win, two-loss record were the Mustangs a result of their single win and four of Alpha Phi Omega. A tie for fourth place honors existed between Lyceum and the Goal Posts who each had a I x 2- 3Zi record. Iota placed sixth as defeats. Despite the fact that the Graniteers played only four games (they gained 1 point when the Goal Posts forfeited), they still outscored the Burps for the season. 85-72. After the playoffs the total points scored stood at 93 for the Burps and 92 for the Graniteers. Doug Ritchie and Mr. Goehrs did nearly all of the refereeing. FOOTBALL AWARD Small hut expensive. QUIVER. 1949 143ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR THE MILES CO., INC. FLORISTS "Say it with ¥ LOWERS" Weddings and Floral Designs FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION Greenhouse 76 Frankfort Street Stanley 126 Store 8 Washington Boulevard Stanley 2311 ”R. E. Patnplin — H. Cornell” CARAMEL CRISP SHOP Wisconsin's Finest Popcorn Store Wholesale and Retail Phone Stanley 4415 OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN SADIE HAWKINS Kickapoo Juice "I’ll take the check" was the unusual offer of many OSTC women on November 12, 1948. The occasion was the annual Sadie Hawkins Dance sponsored by the members of Iota Alpha Sigma and their sister society Delta Phi. Audrey Walker and Don Meyer were the co-chairmen of this successful social gathering. The Women’s Gym was decorated in true Dogpatch style. The ceiling was decorated with black, gold, and blue crepe paper which were to signify the two societies’ colors. Marilyn Zellmcr drew and painted the posters that were seen on the walls. These portraits depicted such comic paper characters as Daisy Mae, LiT Abner, Mammy Yokum, and Salome, the favorite pig of Dogpatch. In- the center of the floor was a large shock of corn stalks. Many a queer-looking sight w'as seen walking the street that Friday night as each "Daisy Mac” called for her "Lil' Abner", presented him with a vegetable corsage, and took charge of his wraps at the dance. When the "stomping” to Will Jones’ music became too strenuous, the female escort could offer her date a Salome-burger or a jug of Kickapoo Joy Juice which Perry Lou Schneider and her refreshment committee had prepared for the party. Later in the evening all the Dog patch characters formed a promenade line for the Grand March. The King and Queen of Dogpatch for the evening were Frank Litz and Betty Licsch, respectively. During the Grand March, while everyone was having a good time, the judges were busy selecting those people who most vividly depicted "Daisy Mae" and "Lil" Abner”. Sigrid Kastof was judged the best "Daisy" and Evan Gagnon took the honors as "Lil’ Abner". INTRAMURAL VOLLEYBALL To utilize those few odd weeks between the end of the touch football season and the beginning of the basketball season, Mr. Goehrs organized a volleyball league consisting of six teams. Those who participated were Pcriclean (Burps), Alpha Phi Omega (Mustangs), Iota, Philakean, Lyceum, and one independent entry —the Natural Set-Ups. As in touch football, each team had to encounter every other team once. A set consisted of three games; the team that won at least two of these games was the winner of the set. Mr. Goehrs acted as judge for all the matches. Monday and Wednesday evenings were occupied by volleyball with two games being played simultaneously; the first pair beginning at 6:30 and the other matches beginning after the first ones finished. Thirty games of volleyball were played during the following weeks, and after the last game had been VOLLEYBALL CHAMPS Usually for girls. played the Burps and the Mustangs found themselves in a first place tie with four wins and one loss apiece. A playoff for the championship was arranged in which the Pcriclean squad trimmed the Mustangs to cop the 1949 intramural volleyball crown. Iota finished a strong third with a trio of victories against a pair of defeats. A fourth place tie existed between the Natural Set-Ups and the Philakean team; each team had won two while dropping the other three. Lyceum, who went through the five game season without a victory, wound up in last place. Iota Alpha Sigma donated a trophy which was awarded to the Pericleans and is now on display in the library and the intramural department presented each of the victors with a gold metal. Periclean’s roster consisted of manager Orlin 144 QUI VE R, 1949ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR Zieman, Art Hoehne, Boh Schrader, Norm Fuller. Boh Loppnow, Norm Thiel, Ken Schneider. Kurt Thiel, Glen Kirchner, Duane Cismoski, and Boh Nordhaus. Members of the number two team were manager Bob Cohan, Mel Thorp, Hick Hanisch, Ray Schmelter, Ken King, Don Hanson. Jerry Jirikovec, Bob Hanson, Jack Dreymiller, and Dick Schubert. Director of all intramural sports at Oshkosh State Teachers College is Warren Goehrs of the Athletic Department. This year he organized touch-football, volleyball, basketball, and softball leagues to which the societies and independents responded splendidly. Although he spent many hours in the gym and on the field. Mr. Goehrs main activity was instructing twenty physical education classes each week. He taught touch-football, volleyball. bassketball, softball, tennis, boxing, wrestling, and trampolining. The last mentioned became quite a favorite with the students, so much in fact that Mr. Goehrs collaborated with Miss Colby and Mrs. Lane, directors of women’s athletics, in organizing a trampoline club. Mr. Goehrs also organized a series of tournaments in tennis singles and doubles, golf and horseshoe. That intramural sports receive ample notice in the "Daily Northwestern” is due chiefly to Mr. Goehrs who sends in daily results to the sports editor. WARREN GOEHRS 25 hours a day. BRIDGE TOURNAMENT Students vs. Faculty Echoing with bids of three hearts, four spades, and demand bids of five no trump, the college cafeteria was the scene of a new event on the campus—a bridge tournament. Devoid of decorations, the room was filled with cheerful and well-mannered students, all vieing for top honors and doing their best to outplay those members of the faculty and their wives who were also present for the event. Under the direction of Dan Carter and Bob Thoreson, the event was very enjoyable. Requirements for entry were simple—it required a two- BRIDGE TOURNAMENT ". . . two hearts. ” some and a working knowledge of the game. To make a break from the usual trend, partners remained opposite each other for the entire evening. The evenings of play took place on Friday and Saturday. December •i and 5. Although the nearness to the Christmas activities kept many away who would have enjoyed taking part, the thirty-odd students and faculty members present had a splendid time. Eliminations were made on Friday evening; on Saturday the championship and consolation awards were decided. Student champions were Betty Jean Bender and Barbara Sen-siba; faculty winners were Dr. and Mrs. E. O. Thedinga. Consolation honors went to the R. E. Boeings. T H E CAMPUS CAFE "Good food at moderate prices" Jim Kile, Proprietor EVANS BROS BURRS, INC. "Finest in Quality Foods" 555 Algoma Boulevard 230 Merritt Street QUIVER. 1949 145.y.v illll Northwestern Engraving Company Menasha, Wisconsin 146 QUIVER, 194 9ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR WOMEN'S CHRISTMAS DINNER What did the sight of Dean Case scrambling from room to room with a piece of chalk mean? It was nothing to he alarmed about, only a part of her personal publicity campaign for the Women's Annual Christmas Dinner. (This is one of the very few social activities that the women on the Campus really get together and promote better relations and understanding among the women of the school). In ever)- OSTC classroom, the blackboard spelled out an invitation for all women to attend the annual affair on December 8, at the Trinity Guild Hall. The hall was decorated under the able direction of Jean Jones and the labor of Gamma Sigma Society. A huge Christmas tree with all the trimmings was placed in the center of the dining room. At each place setting there was a small candle with candle holders of red and green gum-drops with life-saver handles. The chairmen for the different committees were Alice Krysiak and Lois Gabrilska—food, Jean Jones— decorations, Marlyn Simonson—hostess, Bernice Nickel—tickets, Maxine Caudle and Shirley Kroenke—invitations, and Marian Oleson and Rita Meier—publicity. Dr. Florence Case was active in aiding all of these various committees. Among the distinguished guests were Mr. F. W. Radford, a member of the Board of Regents, his wife, and Mrs. Forrest R. Polk. After every one was through eating a delicious turkey dinner, Rita Meier, President of the Women's Association, welcomed the girls with this snappy speech. "To be seen, one-must stand. To be heard, one must speak distinctly. But to be appreciated, one must sit down." Adding to the pleasure of the evening was the program arranged by Barbara Peterson. First on the list of talented coeds was Joan Garrity, who presented the vocal selection, "O Holy Night", a reading of "The Littlest Angel” was presented by Jane Ellen Blahnik; Alene Schmidt followed with a piano selection which was composed of various Christmas Carols; next on the list was a reading "The Sale of Christmas Cards" presented by Veola Ferrell; and a comic version of "The Night Before Christmas” was dramatized by Alice Krysiak. Community singing led by Jeanne Shafer brought the evening to a very pleasant end. CHRISTMAS DANCE Even Santa was There Backboard's in the Women's Gymnassium were suddenly transformed into snowy, rural, winter scenes as Doris Brock and Sharon Jann applied their artisctic ability. The ceiling was lowered by green and red bands of crepe paper, and a Christmas tree that greeted dancers as they entered the gym topped off the decorations. The music furnished by a local orchestra provided a pleasing background for the students, their friends, and several faculty members who were there for the last get-together before the seventeen-day vacation. There was only one difficulty during the evening—the Christmas tree lights would not stay on. After several students tested the bulbs, checked the connections, and plugged the cords in different outlets, a janitor was called in to aid. Upon exploring the Training School a faulty fuse was located and the difficulty was overcome. All that was left then was the arrival of Santa Claus, and at intermission he appeared in the traditional regalia but very short of words to sooth and please the college kiddies. THOMAS T. REEVE MEMORIAL Coming as a complete surprise to all but a few select individuals, students and faculty alike heard the amazing news that the college had been willed an addition to the campus. Miss Mary (May) R. Fraker. long a friend of many OSTC occupants, had bequeathed her property to the school. Located conveniently close to the Administration Building, the Fraker residence is a two story structure dating back to the late 19th century. It is of sturdy brick construction but like so many other homes of that CHRISTMAS DANCE . . short on words" QUIVER, 1949 147ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR THOMAS T. REEVE MEMORIAL "with a Victorian love-seat.” You Will Find Here at all Times QUALITY CLOTHES To Meet the Requirements of YOUNG MEN at Low Prices period, it is a confusion of small rooms and high ceilings, difficult and expensive to heat. The first floor has five rooms, all approximately 13' x 17' with a small bathroom; the second floor has approximately the same. Miss Fraker, in her generosity, was not as accomodating as the school might have liked. Apparently dubious as to what the administration might do with the property if left to the school outright. Miss Fraker placed several restraints in her bequest which caused long hours of anxiety on the part of the administrative heads. According to the terms of the will, the building is to be used by the school only for social activities and is to be known as the Thomas T. Reeve Memorial in honor of Miss Frakcr’s grandfather, a pioneer of Oshkosh who once served as president of the old Commercial National Bank in the early 1870's. If the school should refuse the gift, or if at any time it abandons the property, the residence will immediately revert to the ownership of the Trinity Episcopal Church of Oshkosh. If this should happen, the church is free to make disposition of the estate as they see fit. Miss Fraker’s total estate was valued in excess of $90,000. Her generosity was shown toward other friends as well for besides bequests to her relatives she left $9,000 to her nurse and housekeeper, $5,000 to thy Trinity Episcopal Church for the purchase of a new altar, and several thousand to the Home on North Main, a residence for aged ladies. In commenting on Miss Fraker’s benevolence. President Forrest R. Polk said: "The Teachers College, up to this time, has never had separate social and recreational facilities. The Thomas T. Reeve Memorial has now happily made possible the establishment of a student union. "The college." Mr. Polk said, "has been greatly heartened by this gift because it indicates that Miss Fraker, a descendent of one of the most respected pioneer families, has seen fit to express her good will and confidence in the work which the college is attempting to do.” Questions that are involved over the acquisition of the memorial were discussed in a joint meeting of students and faculty. Mrs. E. Behncke, having been appointed by Mr. Polk to make a survey of the estate, reported to the group on the condition of the inheritance as she found it. The house contains many pieces of antique furniture which the college will take possession of, the more outstanding including several marble top tables, a Victorian love-seat with 148 QUIVER, 1949ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR (wo matching chairs, a large dining room table with twelve leather seated chairs and a buffet. The bathrooms, one on each floor, are all very outmoded and will require, in Mrs. Behnckc's opinion, complete renovation. The hot air heating system may also require attention, for the Industrial Commission of Wisconsin requires a fire wall to completely encircle the furnace in a public building of this sort. The Industrial Commission will probably require further revisions in regard to the staircase leading to the second floor, for here again the state requirements are not satisfied for a public building where large groups will congregate. Expenses were estimated by President Polk to run upwards of $5,000 annually, this figure including the costs of hiring a matron, a janitor, and to replace and repair furniture and other expendable items that will deteriorate through hard usage. With less than a thousand students enrolled, the students would find their activity fee increased considerably for these purposes. Despite the hardships that remain to be overcome, the students in attendance at the joint meeting expressed eagnerness to tackle the problems for they fully realize the importance of a student union on the campus. Not only would it be a convenient and enjoyable place for the students to mix in fellowship, but it would relieve the problem of where to hold society rushing parties and other social functions that at the present time require the engagement of a downtown hotel. Fall and Spring months would permit the use of the large garden which covers almost a full acre and which, although slightly in need of a good weeding, is landscaped with numerous flowering bushes and borders of phlox, tulips, and other colorful bloom. MARGARET FRAKER RESIDENCE Another mark of progress in the expansion of the campus developed late this year with the purchase by the school of the Margaret Fraker home. Located on Algoma Boulevard directly next door to the recently acquired Albee house, the Margaret Fraker home in recent years has been a place of residence for students and several faculty members. Purchased for the sum of $12,500, the property is to be held as a future building site for additions to the campus. Plans at present call for (he home to be used temporarily by faculty members and perhaps a few students for a place of residence. The property was purchased from the George Fraker family, Mr. Fraker having been an occupant of the home until the turn of the century when he left Oshkosh to attend Yale Flowerphone Blackhawk 7870 HRNAK'S Flower Shop 28 Washington Boulevard Oshkosh, Wisconsin GREENHOUSE 1603 Ninth Street Phone Stanley 2743-W Flowers by Telegraph "Everything for ♦he Sportsman" VETTE SPORT SHOP "The trading post of Wisconsin" 1 Main Street 149 MARGARET FRAKER RESIDENCE Future building site. QUIVER, 1949 OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN Stanley 468HOTEL ATHEARN “Famous for Fine Food” Normandy Cocktail Lounge Mn Store MILWAUKEE OSHKOSH MANITOWOC Before You Go to College While You're Attending OSTC And After You Graduate . . . Make the BOSTON STORE Your Shopping Center Winnebago land's Great Store ISO QUIVI-R, 1949ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR University. Changing his plans for a higher education shortly after leaving. Mr. Fraker engaged in managerial positions and early in his career became president and general manager of the Carolina Cotton and Woolen Mills Company which was owned by Marshall Field and Company of Chicago. At the time of his death in 1919. Mr. Fraker, a graduate of Oshkosh High School, had become vice-president of the National City Bank of New York, a large established hanking firm of international renown. The residence had been occoupied until recently by Miss Margaret Fraker. a cousin of Miss Mary Fraker who this year bequeathed her home to the school. J. T. PUTNEY READING ROOM "Consider what you have in the smallest chosen library. A company of the wiset and wittiest men that could he picked ou of all civil countries. in a thousand years, have set in best order the results of their learning and wisdom.” —Emerson This year Oshkosh State Teachers College was very fortunate to receive from Mr. Jay T. Putney, head of the Oshkosh City Lines Inc., a substantial monetary gift, thus making possible the reconversion of the second floor textbook library into a reading room which will contain books of particular value in various fields of study. Mr. Putney has always been a great lover of books and from time to time he has given to the library copies of the current best sellers. Now, through his generous gift this new reading room is being made available to the students of Oshkosh State Teachers College. The initial cost of the remodeling of the room itself was taken out of state funds so that the gift money could be used to buy special furnishings and also many of the books for the reading room. The interior decoration of the room was done under the guidance of Mrs. E. Behnckc, an art instructor at OSTC. The color scheme for the reading room is based on colors of red-orange and green with the walls finished in neutral green, drapes of a modern leaf design and a floor of square tile blocks of alternating colors. Along the sides of the room are adjustable book shelves made of bleached quarter-sawed oak. All the facilities necessary for a comfortable reading room will be provided. There will be lounge chairs upholstered in the general color scheme of the room; there will be chairs and tables of bleached quarter sawed oak to accommodate twelve students; there will be floor lamps provided, as well as fluorescent lighting from the ceiling. The room will also contain a water color painting to complete the decoration. It will he done in colors carrying out the orange-red and green scheme. The purpose of the reading room is to give the students a place where they can become acquainted with good books in a pleasant atmosphere and with a minimum amount of supervision. On the book shelves will be found those books which each instructor feels are really the best books in that particular field. The students will be free to look around and take from the shelves those books which he finds of interest and help to him. Talking in moderately low tones will be allowed as long as consideration is taken of the other students who are in the room to study, and as long as the privilege is not abused. There is in the new reading room a stone plaque containing the follow-ing inscription: Jay T. Putney Reading Room "Reading-Maketh-A-Full-Man" J. T. PUTNEY READING ROOM (Before and After) " Read i tig-Make! b-A-V nil-Man." QUIVER, 1949 151ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR PORTRAITS O F DISTINCTION Not just a good resemblance . . . but portraits that actually reflect your personality. That makes the big difference ... a difference you'll appreciate in a portrait by . . MIN. E. KUEHL STUDIO 169 2 Main Street Phone Stanley 1624 OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN Friendly Service Always . . . . The BANKS OF OSHKOSH OSHKOSH OFFICE SUPPLY COMPANY 146 Main Street Phone Stanley 2358 TALENTED STUDENTS OF OSTC Three students from OSTC." displayed remarkable talent and won laurels for their efforts in the past semester. Bruce Estlund and Patricia Blow placed in a talent show at the Fox-Oshkosh Theatre and Carol Jean Donovan won state-wide recognition for her successes in a pie baking contest. Competing in state-wide competition for a screening and trip to Hollywood, Estlund traveled to Milwaukee to appear at the Wisconsin Theatre as the winner from this district. His vocal entry in Milwaukee followed his winning of first place and a prize of $50 in a series of six contests in Oshkosh. Miss Blow appeared in Oshkosh on the same evening as Estlund and captured the second place honors for her vocal and piano presentations, winning a prize of $25. Miss Donovan entered a district pie bajiing contest in Fond du Lac and took top honors over five others who had entered. Representing the district at Milwaukee, she competed against five other district winners but failed to win in the state meet. Donovan was pictured in the rotogravure section of the Milwaukee Journal newspaper. CAROL JEAN DONOVAN Almost but not quite. INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL Nine teams entered the race for the 1948-49 intramural basketball crown. Listed among the society teams were Alpha Phi Omega (Mustangs); Periclean (Burps); Philakean 152 QUIVER, 1949ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL CHAMPS Philakean was showered in tears. (Num' Skulls); Iota; and Lyceum (Blitzcrs and Eager Beavers). A trio of independent entries, the Natural Lay-ups. Alhee's Comets, and the French 74’s, rounded out the league. The season was divided into halves, and the winners of each half played off for the title at the end of the season. lota remained undefeated in eight games to win the first round of play. Trailing by one game were the Num Skulls, and following them were the Burps and the Comets with five wins and three losses each. The Natural Lay-ups with a 4-4 record took fifth place while the Hager Beavers placed sixth on a three-win. five-loss record. Winning two out of eight, the French 74's ran seventh; the Blitzers and the Mustangs were at the bottom of the pile with seven defeats against a lone victory apiece. With only a week intermission, the second half began on Monday, January 31. Since Iota was thus far unbeaten, it was expected in many quarters that they would do a repeat performance in the second round, but the Comets stopped them in their third game. 27-16. Philakean, also a strong contender, was upset by the Blitzers midway in through tee second half, 21-17. With indcntical 6-1 records. Iota and Philakean met March 9. and the Num’ Skulls emerged victorious by a 23-22 count to cop the second half crown. If Iota had been the winner. there would have been no playoff for championship. AI bee’s Comets shared a part of the second place berth with Iota by virtue of their six wins and two losses. The Mustangs wound up fourth, winning five and dropping three; with a .500 record, the Blitzers edged into fifth spot. The French 74's and the Eager Beavers were deadlocked for sixth place each with three victories and five defeats. With a pair of wins and six losses, the Burps ended in seventh place while the Lay-Ups dropped all eight ot wind up in number nine position. March 14 was scheduled to be the first day of the playoff in which the champion would have to win two of the three games. Led by Jorgenson’s ten points, Philakean posted a 29-19 win over Iota to take an early edge in the playoffs. Iota reciprocated the following day by trimming the Num’ Skulls. 29-23. with Jim Behnke carrying the lotan load with 11 points. Both tcann were highly keyed for the third and deciding ball game. Iota led 14-11 at half-time, and managed to maintain its three-point margin to down the Phils, 25-22, and annex the intramural basketball title. King of Iota dumped in 13 markers to lead both squads; Gabriel of Philakean was runner-up with 12. Philakean society donated a traveling trophy which was awarded to Iota. As in the other sports, each member of the winning team received a gold medal. When you think of music . . . remember MacDONALD MUSIC 87 Monument Square HILDA'S Women's Apparel Phone Blackhawk 8995 158 Main Street Oshkosh, Wisconsin QUIVER, 1949 153ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR The "A Corner on Men's Fashions 7 Algoma Boulevard B-Z FURNITURE CO. First in Furniture 49 Main Street OSHKOSH "The Value Saving Address' RECORD HEADQUARTERS WILSON MUSIC CO. 178 Main Street DICKSON'S for Something Different in FASHIONABLE SUITS and DISTINCTIVE BLOUSES Leading Dress Lints FORENSICS Debaters were active this year participating in seventeen debates. Two debates each were held with River Falls and Lawrence here and two and three debates were held with Ripon and Whitewater, respectively. OSTC students entered the annual forensic tourney of Delta Sigma Rho at the University of Wisconsin on March IS and 19 w-ith entrants from nine Midwest states in attedance. Our speakers engaged in eight debates. JEAN VAN LAANEN 3 firsts and 3 sixths winning from Wisconsin. Purdue, North Dakota and Milwaukee State Teachers. They lost to Wayne, Wisconsin, Mundelein and Whitewater. The debate question was on "Federal Aids to Education." The four people participating in debates at this contest were Donald Meyer, Patricia Murphy, Jean Van Laancn. and Robert Thoreson. Others participating in debate this year were Mary Kasai, Marian Dixon and Marvin Marhcinc. In the discussion group at Madison were Harrison Nichols, Ruth Ann Morrissey. John Voight and Barbara Friedholdt. Seventy-five people participated in the discussion groups from nine Midwestern states. The topic for discussion was "Civil Liberties.” On March 17 the Oratorical Contest was held at Oshkosh. There were five contestants competing from Ripon. Oshkosh, and Eau Claire. Jean Van Laanen and Allan Sampson participated for Oshkosh and Miss Van Laanen was winner in the women’s division. Her speech was entitled 154 QUIVER, 1949ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR "We're All Americans, But". On April 25 and 26 she participated in the Oratorical Contest at Northwestern University. Two OSTC freshmen. Marion Dixon of Milwaukee and Bob Kannal of Fond du I.ac, were college representatives speaking in a panel discussion on "Dating Etiquette." This discussion, which was held in the main ballroom of the Twentieth Century Club on May 7, was part of the program of the annual Horizon Club Convention. WOMEN'S LOCKER ROOM PARTY The girls locker room was open for an afternoon to both sexes and how the hoys did enjoy it. Each of the four aisles of lockers competed for the top award for decorations and judges Milton Lautenschlager, Robert Brismaster, and Dr. E. O. Thedinga gave first place to Davey Jones Locker. Second place went to April Showers and close behind followed Big Top and Nightmare Alley. The girls had a sucker for every one that entered and provided music to pep up the atmosphere. Guessing on a jar of jelly beans kept everyone entertained as did the comfort of the lounge in the rear. The event was managed by the president of the Women's Association. Rita Meier and the locker room chairman. Maxine Caudle. LOCKER ROOM PARTY Davy Jones was there too. j. F. KRUMRICH Registered Jeweler American Gem Society Established 1905 143 Main Street CITY CAB COMPANY Phone Stanley 97 24 Hour Service Located at Greyhound Bus Depot 60 Main Street BAUER LUGGAGE Since 1898 Your headquarters for LUGGAGE AND FINE LEATHER GOODS 24 Washington Boulevard Oshkosh, Wisconsin QUIVER, 1949 155Castle"Pierce Printing Co. Oshkosh, Wisconsin 156 QUIVER, 1949ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR M. C. VAN WEELE’S HOME No windows, no roof tiles. SAVE THE CHILDREN'S FEDERATION Bruinissee, a town of 2400 inhabitants located on an island in the Lccland province of Holland, today has a warm spot in its heart for the students of OSTC, for it was in the Fall of 1947 that a meeting of the Student Council decided to join the ranks of the Save the Childrens Federation and adopt a school in Europe. The qualifications necessary for OSTC to join the crusade of brotherhood was in itself a huge undertaking; regulations required the school to raise a sum of five hundred dollars as the first step. Under the leadership of William Hughes, the Student Council and Alpha Phi Omega put on an extensive campaign to raise the money. Toward the close of the school year the necessary sum of money was together and the school made application for membership. Papers came back and the students voted on the country in which they wished to sponsor a school. On the ballot were the countries of France, Belgium, Holland. Denmark and when the tally was counted, Holland had won. The information was forwarded to the national headquarters and word was received last June that our school was located in Bruinissc with a Mr. M. C. Van Weele as the principal. With the beginning of this term all interest seemed to be lost and the only word received from the Dutch school had been a cablegram stating that a package of clothing had been received. The QUIVER, interested in establishing a contact, sent through a letter to Mr. Van Weele and several weeks later received a reply. Although written in poor English, the letter proved to be extremely interesting and revealed to the school the conditions as they existed in Bruin-issce. The schoolmaster reported that the village had undergone severe damage during the war. having been in the front lines. The island had to be evacuated by the inhabitants, having been flooded by the Germans, hit by Canadian artillery, and bomb- M. C. VAN WEELE AND CHILDREN Thanks for the clothing. ed by the R.A.F. and the Eighth Army Air Force. Describing the destruction of the village, Mr. Van Weele wrote that "in my house, there were no windows, no ceilings, no tiles on the roof, and several holes. The floors were covered with mud. the furniture had been broken or spoiled by exposure, and the streets were filled with rubble and broken glass. Materials for rebuilding are scarce," wrote Mr. VanWecle, "and newspapers, cardboard and glass from greenhouses were used to patch the ruined houses." Reporting on the school. Van Weele reported that classes were being held in an old German ammunition hut while the village was making an attempt to build a new school despite the shortages. Heading a staff of three teachers and one woman who teaches needlework, Mr. Van Weele has an enrollment of 104 children. When he returned to the island in 1946 after the evacuation, he alone taught 91 children without books, maps or other school supplies. In letters received during this year by the QUIVER. Mr. Van Weele enclosed pictures of Bruinissee, some of which were published in the "Advance”. He also reported that there existed a shortage of pencils, rulers, paper. To care for this need, a committee of two from the QUIVER staff made an effort to collect supplies from the students. This group, Elaine Viestenz and Lenora Rosera, gathered in several large boxes of school supplies, and to pay for the postage over thirty dollars was collected at an assembly. Heartfelt thanks have been received from Bruinissee for the aid the students of OSTC have given to the group. In his last letter. Mr. Van Weele reported that their new school is now completed and on opening day, every student appeared colorfully dressed in their Sunday best, the clothing received from the Save the Childrens Federation and the students of Oshkosh State Teachers College. SCHOOL BELL AMIDST RUINS First thing reconstructed. QUIVER. 1949 157 SMART FASHIONS FOR THE DISCRIMINATING WOMAN AND MISS THE BEST OF EVERYTHING TO YOU .... INCLUDING LUGGAGE PietmreJ sbott: OSHKOSH "CHIEF’ ENSEMBLE 158 QUIVER, 1949ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR SPRIiNG PROMENADE And the Dean of Women had broken her ankle! SPRING PROMENADE $1000 for a Night! The social season closed in a galaxy of beautiful dresses and white coats. The senior prom held at the Eagles Ballroom on Friday, May 20, concluded a more than enjoyable-school year. All the functions adde-d together never seem to equal the prom in anticipation, entertainment, and attendance. Buddy Di Vito and his band made everyone feel like-dancing. The evening was a bit cool but old man weather was good in not ruining the night with rain. James Lobergcr and Dorothy Kadtke reigned as the regal couple. John Nelson and Jeanne Shafer composed the honor couple. The honor court, at the choice of the King and Queen, was as follows: Blake Burton. Jr., and Meriel Gralow, Herbert Lundin and Jean Van Laancn. George Cudnuhofsky and Jean Janssen. William Manis and Peggy Hugo, and Robert Sherbert and Ruth Wellnitz. The preparations began with the reservation of the Eagles Ballroom way back in November. The Social Life Committee did this early to assure a dance floor large enough to accommodate the huge crowd expected. In February, after a long period of correspondence and numerous telephone calls to the windy city, John Nelson signed a contract with the number seven band in the nation. Buddy Di Vito. The cost was consid- erable but it was felt that rather than have a mediocre local band, a real drawing card could be made of the music. What interested the women on the campus most of all was an age old question—Who would be elected prom king? In a closed session the Student Council met and revamped the 1956 regulations governing the elections of the highest social office on the campus. Boiled down, these regulations amounted to this: "any unmarried, unengaged, senior man graduating in June who has the desire to run can become a candidate. The KING LOBERGHR AND QUEEN RADIK! prom queen by choice of the king can be any single woman registered as an OSTC student." Under these new laws the field of candidates was narrowed down to the following individuals: Blake Burton, Jr., Frank Licbhabcr, James Loberger, John Nelson, Harold Oskar, Hugh Otten. Michael Sanfelippo, and Robert Sherbert. On April 28 and 29 the student body in a general election chose James Loberger and John Nelson to comprise the slate for the final election. On May 2 and 3 in another general election the student body registered their choice of James Loberger as King. The runner-up and his date were to be the honor couple. Many furrowed brows, brows of •hose inquisitive females, were to be ,een in anticipation of Jim Lobcrger's choice of Queen. Jim slyly kept us all in eagerness when on the 18th of May, the "Advance" gave its full front page to the prom and pictures of the King and his Queen Dorothy Radtke. By this time the festivities were well under way and everyone endured the next two days of classes in rare fashion. This was one event where even the chaperones had a good time. The students were more than delighted to have Dr. and Mrs. John T. Taylor. Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. White, and Mr. and Mrs. Richard Loy in attendance. QU1VE R. 194 9 159ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR The 1949 QUIVER is bound in a DURAND COVER Produced by the Durand Manufacturing Company 939 West 35th Street CHICAGO 9, ILLINOIS WOMEN'S SPORTS The aim of the Women’s Recreational Association is to promote sports activities on the campus and to act as a directing and guiding force in the field of women’s sports. Membership is open to all college women interested in sports. W. R. A. sponsors two major tournaments for group participation, volleyball and basketball. Any society or independent group may enter these tournaments. This year a pair of matching plaques was purchased, one for the volleyball award and one for basketball. The names of the winning teams will be placed upon the plaques which will hang in the women’s lounge. The first name to appear on the new plaques will be Tigers, winners of the volleyball tournament and Lambda Chi, winners of the basketball tournament. Among the individual sports tournaments held each year are badminton and tennis. Last year, for the second consecutive year, Elaine Schoe-nick won the tennis tournament. Peggy Castle and Eleanor Fcnn won the badminton tournament. Co-recreation, a meeting of both college men and women for participation in sports, proved to be a successful activity begun by W.R.A. this year. Last year W.R.A. tried out corecreation as an experiment with the understanding that it would be continued only if the students took enough interest to warrant its continuation. Co-recreation has risen steadily in popularity among the students. Meetings are held on Wednesday evenings from seven to nine in the women's gym. Students may participate in any sports activity for which equipment is available. Volleyball and basketball proved to be tnc favorites along with badminton and tabletennis. In March a group of 27 sport enthusiasts had the opportunity to travel to La Crosse to attend the La Crosse State Teachers College Play Day. The arrangements were made through W.R.A. and all women students on the campus interested in sports were invited to take the trip. This is the second year that OSTC has participated. Serving as officers for W.R.A. were the following: As president's. Agnes Anderson and Ann Richter; vice-president, Terry Scharpf and Lu Ann Zucrn; Secretary-Treasurer, Connie Me Carville and Bernice Neu-meyer; Council members. Connie Me Carville, Agnes Anderson. Ann Richter and Lorraine Ruh. Active members included: Agnes Anderson. Beverly Case. Louise Coumbe, Betty Emil, Veola Ferrell, Audrey Horst, Milda Mielke, Connie Me Carville, Bernice Neumeycr, Magdalen Redman. Ann Richter, Lorraine Ruh. Ethel Selchert, Terry Scharpf. Fern Uebele, Rosemary Unscr, Eunice Vetting, Lu Ann Zuern. BASKETBALL CHAM PS Varsity n ext year! ALL-SCHOOL PICNIC In spite of a rainy morning, the college all-school picnic was one of the most successful social events of the year. Classes were dismissed at eleven-thirty and almost six hundred students and faculty members joined in the fun. Light showers forced the group to eat in the college cafetreria where about twenty students and cooks helped to serve. The lunch consisted of potatoe salad, baked beans, barbecues, pickle chips, ice cream cake-roll, coke, and coffee. Music was provided from records and by pianists Bob Doll and Larry Green. J. A. Breese also led the group in some community singing while the food queue snaked around the gym in a manner that reminded many vets of bygone days. 160 QUIVE R, 1949ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR After the lunch, when clearing skies promised better weather ahead, the picnickers adjourned to Menominee Park for the volleyball, softball, tennis, and other athletic contests. First and funniest of the scheduled events for the day was the traditional pie-eating contest won by Richard Meyer with Bernard Killoran as runner-up. Rasberries covered the faces of the participants among whom was even a faculty member, Mr. Wonders! Other contest winners included Blake Burton, Jr. and Meriel Gralow, wheelbarrow race; Howard Maichen and Susan Manross. three-legged race; Corvin Dcgner. crab-walk; Charles Strachen. potatoe race; Blake Burton, Jr. and William Manis, men's fifty-yard dash; Ida Carollo, women's fifty-yard dash; Pat Cain, Donald Doucette. and Melvin Thorp, chariot race; James Loberger, hand-walking; Marian Dixon, girl's "duck-waddle”; Larry Smith, boy’s "duck-waddle”; and James Loberger and Joseph Walsh, two-man roll. Winners of the various contests and races were awarded "T" shirts and sweat shirts bearing the OSTC title and emblem. Tickets were drawn for attendance prizes and the winners had to be present. The men's prize, a Ronson lighter, went to Paul Stevenson, and the women's prize, a gold bracelet, went to Patricia Hugo. Pat's was the sixth name pulled out of the box, the first five not being present. Pat thought it was really worthwhile to trek to the park that day. Ann Richter served as general chairman of the outing, while Fintan Flanagan was in charge of the entertainment. Ticket sellers and the various departments they headed were: Bernice Nickel, Kindergarten; Connie Me Carville, Primary; Audrey Taylor, Intermediate; Dick Schumacher, Secondary; Don Corrigall, Preprofessional; and Audrey Horst, Faculty. Comments heard afterwards from both the students and the faculty were, in general, very commendable. Richard Meyer, winner of the pieeating contest, was heard to comment that the committee could have chosen a different flavor of pie—the rasberries did not seen to set very lightly in his stomach. WALGREEN COMPANY 131 Main Street The New Showboat Restaurant 188 Main Street THE WISCONSIN PUBLIC SERVICE CORP. 34 Washington Boulevard KLINE'S IRA PARKER SONS 250 Main Street HIRSCHBERG'S Department Store 808 Oregon Street "RUSTY” LARSON S CLUB 375 for Chicken and Steaks Lobster Fish Sandwiches 375 Main Street Oshkosh, Wisconsin For top entertainment and the best movies OSHKOSH THEATRE 157 Main Street A FOX THEATRE "The Place to Go” QU1VH R, 1949 161STUDENT PICTURE INDEX Abidon. La Verne M....................... 53 Adam , Edward C..................... 28, 75 Adams. Junto I.......... 40. 123, 125. 133 Albers, Gone H........................... 00 Allan. Lois G............................ 53 Allen. Joan ............................. 28 Allcndcr. Harriet j. .......... 45. 88. 89 Allison. Delphine E...................... 53 Anderson. Agnes R........................ 45 Anderson. Marvin H....................... 53 Angelieh. Kathryn C............ 40. 68. 89 Apcll. Donald S.......................... 00 Arnold. Eugene C............... 40. 77. 82 Arzberger. John W................... 45. 99 Atkins. Lois J...................... 45. 91 Atwell, Shirley Ann ..... 53. 82. 84, 101 U Baker. Gertrude D.................. 40. 101 Bally. Ralph R............................ 00 Barber, Robert D..................... 53. 76 Barbola. Thomas D......................... 45 Bard. George W............................ 00 Barker, Marian L.......................... 45 Bartmann, John W.......................... 00 Banter. David (NMI) ...................... 40 Baxter. Bertram S......................... 00 Baus. Rose M.............................. 53 Beck. Keith G ............................ 53 Beck. Norma E............................. 28 Becker. Milton A....... 45. 109. 115. 118 Behl. Gerald H............................ 40 Behlcndorf, Frederick C................... 53 Bchnkc. Ervin F..... 45, 77, 82. 105, 114 Behnke. James F...................... 45, 99 Belanger. John J..................... 40. 93 Bender. Betty J.............. 28. 38. 60. 72 74. 75. 97 Berger. Gerald J.......................... 53 Bergntan. Betty R.................... 45. 89 Berndt. Robert F.......................... 53 Bersch. Merland B......................... 28 Berth. Robert H........................... 45 Berth. Wallace E................. 53. 98. 99 Bethke. Victoria J........................ 53 Bettin. James P........................... 45 Bcttini, John A...................... 53. 107 Bcversdorf, Robert J...................... 00 Beyer, Dorothy J.......................... 45 Bidwcll, Reginald D....................... 53 Bicgick. Beverly A................... 53. 82 Bilkcy, N'elda J..................... 40. 84 Bingen. James M........................... 00 Binkowski. Donald 1....................... 00 Birkholz. Russell J..................... 111 Bittner. Clarence w.... 28. 38. 73. 73. 82 Blahnik. Jane E. .. 53. 66. 68. "0. 71. 89 Blair. Jo Ann B........................... 97 Blechl. Gerald P..................... 53. 82 Blow, Patricia M..................... 45. 82 Boelke, Richard E......................... 00 Boldt. Harry H............................ 53 Boll. Harry E........................ 45. 107 Bossert. Charles P........................ 53 Bostwick. Donald R........... 45. 115. 119 Boyle. Norman W. .................... 53. 99 Brasch. Leon E............................ 53 Braun. Gordon J...................... 53. 82 Brcitrick. Janet E........... 53. 60. 90. 91 Brink. William D..................... 53. 111 Brismastcr. Robert E............. 40. 67. 72 Brock. Doris E............................ 28 Broderick. Kathleen M................ 53. 5 Brown. Caryl M............................ 40 Brusoc. Shirley A................ 40. 72. 103 Buboltz. Betty A.......................... 00 Buchholz. Arlene P............... 45. 101 Buck. Charles W...................... 53. 85 Burr. Franklin W.......................... 40 Burton. Blake D..... 28. 69. 70. 107. 138 Bush. William C........................... 99 Butler. Dorothy M......................... 45 Butt. Audrey M....................... 28. 89 Calabresa. James V. Calder. Edward A. . Cargill. Dan C. Case. Beverly E..... Caudle. Maxine M. Chady. Ruth A...................... 53. 91 Chamberlin. Mary P....................... 00 Chase. Arthur R.......................... 46 Chipman. Shirley E............. 46. 69. 89 Christensen. Robert H.................... 00 Christianson. Verla M.................... 28 ChristoHerson. Robert W.................. 10 Cismoski. Duane L.............. 29. 84. 109 Clasen. Henry F.......................... 00 Clasen. William E........................ 53 Cleavland. Dale S........................ 53 Colburn. Alice M............... 29. 77. 9 Collin . Phyllis L....................... 53 Comeaux. Keith E......................... 29 Connell. Leo J........................... 00 Connor. Donald J......................... 40 Constance. Elaine E...... 53. 84. 102. 103 Cook. Dexter E........................... 00 Cornell. Robert J........................ 00 Corrigall. Don J......................... 46 Cotter. Thomas P.................... 123-128 Cottrell. Howard W....................... 00 Coumbe. Gwendolin L. .............. 53. 84 Crissey. Albert L........................ 39 Cudnohufsky. George (NMI) ............... 46 D Dahm. Jean E....................... 40. 103 Dalton. Robert E........................ 00 Damon. James E................ 54. 110. Ill Damon. Robert J......................... 28 Damon, Thomas D............... 54, 68. 111 Darling. Herbert E............ 76. 81. 82 Daugherty. Gloria S..................... 46 Davel. Ronald L.................... 46. 107 Davis. Jeanne E........... 54. 68. 82. 84 Day, Jeannette E........................ 54 Day. Ralph W............................ 40 Degner. Corvin E.......... 46. 60, 73. 99 DeRusha. Richard 1...................... 54 Dion. Gars J............................ 00 Ditcher. Melvin W....................... 29 Dittrich. Donna M............. 29, 82. 89 Dixon. Marian J............... 54. 102. 103 Dobberkc. Lyle F........................ 54 Dobyns. Frank D.................... 29. 105 Docring. Ray L. ........................ 00 Doll. Robert E................ 54. 79. 82 Donovan. Carol Jean ...... 54. 90. 91. 103 Doucette. Donald C...................... 54 Dougherty. Gloria ..................... 101 Dougherty. William (1................... 29 Draeger. Ralph A.............. 93. 109.119 Draper. Ralph N........................ 121 Drexler. Robert G....................... 00 Drcymillcr. Jack H...................... 93 Drury. Donald W.................... 54. 76 Duchac. Charles D....................... 40 Duggan. Priscilla A..................... 00 Dustman. Lloyd M........................ 29 Du we. Ellen A..................... 88. 89 Dyckhoff. William C..................... 00 E Eannelli. Anthony P.............. 46. 107, 119 Eckcr. Delores D........................... 40 Edler. Mildred M........................... 46 Ehrhardt. Joyce E............ 29. 84. 91. 101 Eichinger. Enid A..................... 54. 84 Elliott. Roberta R......................... 46 F.mmcl. Betty M............................ 54 F.rban. Edward J. 1 15. 1 17. 123. 125. 133 Ermatinger. James P........................ 00 Ernst. La Verne R......................... 109 Flserhut, Betty J.......................... 00 Estabrooks. Lura E................ 96. 97 Estlund. Bruce K........................... 54 Eulrich, Joyce E. ......................... 54 Evans. Margaret H................ 46. 89 Eventcn. Robert N.......................... 54 Evert. Shirley L...................... 30. 97 . 85 .. 00 F 46. 93 Farmer. Beverly J Faucett. Arthur E 46 54 46 . 40 Frnzl. Donald J 46 53 Ferrell. Veola (NMI) ... 54. 101 105 Fessenden. Virginia A. 54. 138 . 40 40 103 Figcl. Thomas L. 54 107 Fink. George J (HI .. 53 40 103 Firary. Robert J ... 54. 84. 98. 99 Fish, Barbara A Fitzgerald. Jerome D Fitzgerald. Patricia A. .. Flanagan. Aileen M Flanagan. Fintan M Flanagan. Joan P Fletcher. Raymond L. ... 54. 102, 103 30. 73. 99 39. 89 40. 85 . 46. 63. 85. 135 54. 85 40. 105. 114 54 Follendorf. Margery A. 54. 113 l owlcr. Frank R 30 Fracdrick. Janice A 54. 97 Frakcr. David F Fralish. Evelyn J 54. 85. 97 Fralish, Geraldine P. Frank. Joseph II CHI Freund. John I 30 FriedFoldt, Barbara A. 46. 103 Friedrich. Shirley M 47. 69. 80 Frisch. Walton G 54. 107 Frochlkc, Thomas E 00 Frohmun, Janies R 40. 107 Fuchs. Ward I 115. 118 Fuhs. Lorna M Fuller. Norman 116. 122 G Gabriel. Godfrey G................ 47. 69 Gabrilska. I.ois l_ .............. 40. 62 Gagnoon, Evan A.......... 47, 85. 99, 115 117. 133 Gchrkc. Peter J........................ 00 Gchrkc. Walter E....................... 00 Gcnz. Carlton A........................ 54 Gerth. Donald L........................ 47 Gerth, Winfried E................. 40. 68 Gilbertson. Maxine L......... 47, 86. 113 Glactcr. Don F.................... 47. 135 Glaesman. Elaine 1........... 40, 112. 113 Glander. William F.................... (HI Goerlitz. Albert J................ 30. 71 Goldsworthy. Marilynn G. 54. 85. 89. 138 Gonganck. Kenneth J.......... 54. 115. 121 GoOdwin. Jean C........ 30. 38. 75. 77. 97 Gould, Charlotte J..................... 47 Gould. Virginia N...................... 54 Gowell. James H........................ 54 Grade. Margaret H............ 47. 81. 103 Gralow. Meriel J. 30. 38. 67. 70. 73. 113 Grave . Ijwrcncc L .................... 00 Green. Lawrence J...... 54, 76, 109. 114 Greenquist. Ralph W................... 107 Grenier. Shirley F....... 41. 69. 85. 103 Gritt. Mary J................ 54. 82. 103 Grasshueseh. Rose M............... 54. 86 Grotc. Harold J........................ 00 Grott. Francis R....................... 00 Gulbrand. Raymond L......... 41. 123. 130 H Haas. James R 41. 76 Haase. Edward J 99 Habcrkorn. Richard B. (HI Haigh. Fred C. (Ml Halle. Merlin I) 41. 73 Haller. Jean M 30. 8). 91 Hamann. Harold E 54. 107 Hammer. Bernardine A. 54 Hamilton. Gail C. 41 Hamilton. Virginia I 54 Hanncman. Harlo M. 48 Hansen. Madeline E. 54. 84. 91. 114 Hanson. Donald 1 47. 93 Hanson. Robert G 55. 93 Harden. Barbara J (Ml Harmes. Douglas L 47 Harris. Claudia E 30. 101 Harris. Robert L. , (Ml Hartcnbergcr. June M 55. 113 Hartig. Betty M. 31. 76. 96. 97 Hartman. Ralph G. (Ml 41 55. 95 Haworth. Daniel T 41. 73. 99 Haworth. David A 55 Hebenstrcit. Thomas D. 55 31 Hcidcman. Robert B. 31 Hcimcrman. Rose.Mary L. 55. ms. H3 (Ml Hein. Thomas J 107 Hcincman. Arlycc J 102, 103. 138 Heinz, Robert E (Ml (Ml Helstrom. Gordon R 00 Hcndricksen. Earl E 39 Henke. Mary 1 47. 77. 86 Henken. Willard J 00 162 QUIVER. 19 4 9STUDENT PICTURE INDEX Hcrtel. Dolores M........................ 103 Hen . Dan M............................... 00 Herzog. Lorraine (NMI) ...............- ” Hielsberg, Lois J.................... 31 • 97 Hielsberg. Ruth J.............. 31. 77. 89 Hill. Kenneth 1........................... 00 Hinez. Arlene J........................... 00 Hints, Furl P............................. 4' Hintze. Milton W.......................... 47 llinze. William J......................... 00 lloeffi. Patricia M....................... 3 Hoeft. Donald C...................... 39 99 llochne. Arthur R..... 109. 115. 118. 133 Hoffman. Mary L..................... 31. 91 Hoffman. Wallace E....... 47. 82. 86. 107 llofman. Richard E........................ 00 Hohlcr. Jean Carol ........ 31. 76. 86,101 Horn. Merlin E............................ 00 Horner. Harry C........................... 00 Hornkc. William 0......................... 00 Horn. Audrey M............. 47, 60. 86. 113 Horton. Fay-Ann M. E........... 47, 90. 91 Hostak. Kenneth F......................... 00 Hotchkiss. Patsy L.................. 55. 89 Howarth. Arthur (NMI) ................... 55 Howman. lames L........................... 00 Hughe . William R.............. 58. 39. 74 Hugo. Patricia M.......................... 55 Hunter, Donald H.......................... 55 llurlhut. Ralph J......................... 00 llusman. Bruce N.......................... 00 Imig, Joanne I.. . Ison. William C. ... 00 ... 60 J Jacobs. Wayne J........................... 55 Jacobson. Joyce E. .................. 55. 103 Junscn. Paul L. .......................... 00 Janssen. Jean C............ 55. 69. 85. 101 Janssen. Thomas R......................... 47 Javenkoski. Ray S.......... 41. 76. 85. 99 Jenks. William W..................... 41. 105 Jensen. Agnes M...................... 55. 101 Jesse. Robert W................. 48. 115. 118 Jirikovec. John K......................... 41 Johnson. Audrey L......... 55. 69. 84. 101 Johnson. Marian R............... 41. 84. 101 Johnson. Patricia A............. 48. 66. 89 lohnson. Robert 11........................ 55 Johnston. Patricia J............ 48. 88. 89 Jones. Hugh B............................. 00 Jones. John E............................. 55 Jones. Ixonard C ......................... 55 Jones. Jean M................... 41. 77, 97 Jorgens. Helen E................ 31. 76. 97 Jorgenson. Wayne H........................ 55 lungwirth. William G...................... 31 Jurkins. Jacquelin J...................... 41 Kalbus. Ixc II................. 41. 73. 99 Kamps. Richard J........................ 00 Kannal. Robert D........................ 55 Kasai. Mary J.................. 55. 82. 101 Kaspar. John L. ........................ 48 Kaufman. Roger E........................ 55 Kavolski. Janice A............. 55. 96. 97 Keilbcrg. Harold F...................... 00 Keinert. John W................ 55. 76. 86 Kel'er. Paul G. .. 31. 38. 59. 60. 134. 135 KeMerman. Yvonne M...................... 00 Kelley. James E......................... 00 Kelly. Brian V..................... 55. 9 ) Kemmcr. Myra E.......................... 00 Kempinger. Gilbert H.................... 55 Kenyon. Russell A....................... 00 Kettler, Jeanne A.............. 32. 77, 11 3 Kevill. Jay K........................... 00 Killoran. Bernard 0..................... 00 Kimbal. Richard .................. 115. 116 Kimber. Gerald T....................... 105 King. Charles G.................... 48. 99 King. Helen R........................... 00 King. Kenneth 0......................... 93 Kinzinger, Raymond E.................... 48 Kinnenhan. Alice M....... 55. 76. 112, 113 Kirchner. Glenn A. 41. 63. 109. 123. 129 Kirk. Arlene 1.......................... 55 Kitz. Richard J......................... 00 K'ein. Nick W........................... 48 Klemish, Thomas D....................... 41 K'ettke. Kathryn J............. 55. 84. 97 Klopotck. Lorraine E........... 32. 84. 103 Knaak. Robert W.......... Knight. William D........ Knoll. Keith E........... Knox. Phyllis H.......... Koch. Donald A........... Koch, Richard L.......... Koeck. Gerald T.......... Kocck, Richard J......... Koeppen, Robert C........ Kocpscll. Daniel W....... Kohlman, Earl F............. Ko!l. Faith M............ Kontos. Thomas J......... Kopitzkc. Barbara M...... Kraus. Merle E........... Krause. Donald J............ Kroenke. Shirley A....... Kruger. Kay I............ Krysiak, Alice V...... 48 Kuborn. Rosemary R....... Kuehl. Helen M........... Kuenzl. Lorenz J......... Kunde. Donald J.......... Kuske. June D....... 41. .................. 48 .............. 00 .................. 55 .................. 55 ............... 55 ......... 41. 109 .................. 41 ... 55. 115. 119 ............... 55 .............. 00 ......... 55. 107 ... 39. 113. 114 .............. 00 ... 48. 82. 94. 95 .............. 00 ...................... 53 48. 82. 86. 101 ............... 55 , 62. 69. 85. 103 .......... 32. 97 ............... 32 .............. 00 ............... 55 60. 86. 101. 114 Lumpcrt. Florian T....................... 00 Landaal. Mary L. ........................ 00 landgraf, Edward S........ 56. 70. 71. 77 81. 82 Lane. Susan B................. 56. 69. 88 lanphecr. Joyce C............. 56, 84, 101 l-atondrcss. Helen B..................... 32 Lautcnschlagcr. Milton A...... 41. 63. 109 123. 126 Laux. Donald J........................... 00 Ixe. Charmaine C..... 56. 68. 76. 82. 84 102. 103 Ixhman, Albert W.............. 41. 110. Ill Lem. Grace Y............................. 97 lxm. Nancy E........................ 48. 97 Ixvcillc. Edward J................... 42 Lewlt, Merit nil 1.................. 48. 82 Licbhabcr. Franklin J............... 32, 99 Licsch. Betty M............... 32. 69. 95 Lind. Victor 1................ 56. 115. 119 Lipovac. Ray M....... 48. 85. 98. 99.133 Little. Cletus F.............. 56. 115. 121 Lobcrgcr. James C. ................. 32. 73 Lock. Louis L. .......................... 32 Lock. Shirley B.......................... 33 loosen. Ann E................. 48. 85. 101 Loppnow. Robert A................... 42. 109 Luce. Chester F.......................... 56 Laft. Richard H......................... 137 Luhm. Elaine F........................... 56 Luker. Arden L. ..... 1 15. 120. 123. 127 Lunde. James .................... 115. 117 Lundin. Herbert J.... 42. 66. 68. 76. 99 M MacDonald. I onald G............... 48. 69 MacDonald. Earl F......................... 00 MacDonald. Faith E................... 56. 95 MacMcnamic. Malcolm H................. 42 Madcr. Carol M....................... 42, 89 Madigan. Ailcen M......................... 33 Madigan. Bernard J........................ 56 Magic. Robert L...................... 56. 90 Maichen. Howard L. ......... 56, 115, 116 Malcheski. Doris T...... 33. 85. 91, 101 Manderhe'd. Lawrence R.................... 56 Manis. William J............ 56. 66. 86. 99 123. 127 Manley. James M...................... 49. 93 Manross. Betsy ........................... 76 Manross. Susan R................ 56. 85. 97 Manser. William D.................... 42. Ill Manthey. Ardis E..................... 39. 73 Marheine. Donald H................... 56, 93 Marhcinc. Donna R......................... 49 Marheine. Marvin E................... 42. 93 Marker. Alan M....................... 49, 65 Marks. James S............................ 00 Marohn, Norman W................ i . 68. I I I Marschall. Charles W...................... 56 Martin. Robert R.......................... 56 Mastricola. Gust H........................ 00 Matschc. Mary J........................... 33 Matzdorf. Roy E................. 33. 75. 99 McBride. Alcy L. ......................... 48 McCarville. Corinnc A... 42. 66. 77. 85 112. 113. 114 McKinnon. Jean M.......................... 56 Meier. Rita T....... 42. 62 82. 85. 101 Messerschmidt. Arthur R.............. 56. 111 Meyer. Carol J............................ 00 Meyer. Donald C ........... 42. 61. 99. 114 Meyer. Jacqueline A...................... 56 Meyer. Marilyn R......................... 56 Meyer. Richard E...... 42. 109.11 5.116.122 Meyers. Carroll L.............. 49. 66. 93 Michels. Eugene E........................ 49 Mielke, Hilda M.......................... 56 Mileke. Richard F................... 76. 93 Miller. Larry H.......................... 49 Miller. Leslie W......................... 00 Miller. Mary J............. 56. 76. 82. 89 Miller. Reynold. V....................... 42 Millcrt. Donald R................... 49. 107 Miracle. Gordon E.......... 56. 70. 71. 93 Mitchell. Donald F....................... 56 Mitchell. William A............ 56. 76. 86 Mittelstaedt. Arthur R................... 00 Moody. John T....................... 42, 85 Moran. Thomas M.......................... 49 Morgan. Ann C. L......................... 39 Morrick. Wallace E.................. 99. 133 Morrissey, John T................... 49, 63 Morrissey. Ruth A..... 33. 38. 61. 75. 97 Morrissey. Thomas M.................. 00 Morrissey. William J.................. 33 Mortcnten. Joyce E....................... 42 Mortimer, Alice A........................ 00 Mueller. Margaret Y................. 56, 89 Mueller. Milton W........................ 00 Multhauf. Delmar C. ................ 42, 105 Murphy. Patricia A.................. 42. 61 Murray, Edward J.................... 56. 76 Murray, James E.......................... 42 Murray. Jeanne R......................... 49 Mynning. David G......................... 56 N Nabbcfcld. Joan E. .. Nashold. Eugene A. . Nashold. R. Duane .. Nelson. John C. ..... Nelson. Richard A. .. N'emctz. Peter J..... Ncmitz. Doris M...... Nesbitt. Jean A...... Ncumcyer. Bernice H. Ncvcu. Lawrence R. .. Nichols. Harrison W. Nickel. Bernice L ... Nickel. Leona M...... Nielsen. Bradley R. ... Niemuth, John R...... Ntschik. Alice E..... Nordhau . Robert W. Nusser. Arthur G...... ................... 42 ............... 56. 76 .................... 56 33. 68. 76. 110. Ill ....... 56. 110. Ill .............. 56. 105 .............. 49. 103 ................... 00 .............. 56. 85 ................... 00 ............. 49. Ill .... 42. 62. 85. 113 ......... 56. 85. 113 ............... 56. 69 ............... 33. 71 42. 60. 59. 66 ............ 00 O Oaks. Jacqueline L. .................... 77 Oberstadt. Viona R......... 33. 60. 90. 91 94. 95 O'Brien. Jane 0......................... 34 O'Connor. Patricia E............... 42. 97 O'Connor. Kenneth G..................... 42 Oetzel. Leon 1.......................... 56 Olbrich. Ronald A.................. 56. 99 Oleson. Marian E..... 42. 62. 84. 94. 95 Olkowski. Ronald G...................... 9 Olsen. Charlotte M........ 42. 77. 86. 113 Olson. Margaret L. ............ 39. 86. 103 O'Mara. James D......................... 00 Onnink. Allen G......................... 56 Orr. Helen M.................... 34 . 90. 91 Oskar. Harold P.................... 34. 99 Osterberg. Eleanor G. 34. 38. 60. 75. 113 Ostro. Elizabeth l_ ............... 49. 89 Otten. Hugh A. ................ 34. 72. 99 Otto. Charles 0.................... 42. 93 Otto. David W........................... 57 Oudenhovcn. Kenneth L. ........ 57. 93. 107 P Paape. Mildred M.................. 42. 69. 89 Padlesak. Yvonne M. .. 42. 69. 85. 96. 97 Paffcnroth. Marvin R. 115. 121. 123. 137 Pankratz. Joan 1......................... 97 Patch, Betty Lou ........ 34. 38. 71. 72. 97 Paul. Tom L. .............................. 49 Petersen. Allen 0........................ 00 Peterson. Barbara R......... 42. 62. 65. 89 Peterson. Eugene W.................... 43. 77 Peterson. Rex R.......................... 57 Pfeiffer. Carl H......... 51. 115. 117. 123 127. 133 Pierce. Ned D............................ 57 Piette. Darrell A........................ 49 Pittler. Stevan J........................ 34 Pitz. Raymond G....................... 49. 99 Polk. Robert R........................... 00 QU1VE R , 1949 163r STUDENT PICTURE INDEX Poliak. Richard F............. 43. 115. 116 Pollnow. Gilbert F...................... 43 Popp. David R. 51. 63. 86. 99. 123. 129 Porticr. Claire E. ........... 43. 84. 105 Poulcon. David E................... 57. 77 Prahl. Marilyn J................... 51. 113 Proton. William E.................. 51. 107 Pritchard. Marilyn L. .................. 39 Privaznik, Edward J..................... 57 Promcr. Donald J........................ 00 Pynch. James W.......................... 43 Pynch. Lois B........................... 34 Q Quadc. Maxine A.................... 43. 97 R Raabc. Eugene C....... Radke. Clarice J...... Radtke. Ardene M...... Radtke. Dorothy R..... Rajsky. Harry C....... Rasmussen. Donald E. Rasmussen, Edward D. K.mmiwn, John F....... Rasmussen. Joyce M. ... Redlin. Thomas A...... Redman. Glenn F....... Redman, Magdalen M. Reed. Jack A.......... Rcil. Herbert L....... Reimcrs. Janet F...... Reinemann. Lewis R. .. Reinholr. Harvey H. .. Keinke. Robert G...... Renner. Paul E........ Resch. Ann H.......... Rcttler, Fred H....... Rhoades. Gordon G. .. Rich. Norbert L. ........ Richardson. Martin G. Richter. Louise M..... Richter, Marjorie A... Richter. Rudodph R. .. Ricdl, Eugene M....... Ricvcs. Norman G...... Rigglc. Burleigh D. ... King. Lola I.......... Rippl. William W...... Ristow. Vcrlyn D...... Ritchie. Douglas S. 43. Roberts. Anna M....... Roderick. Thelma W. . Rogers. Charles H..... Rohde. Clifford K..... Rohn. Janet R......... Rostra. Lcnora E...... R os sow. Alice J..... Ruch. Carlton E....... Rueckert. Vernon D. .. Ruehlow. Ellen L...... Ruh. Lorraine L. ..... Ruhl. William J....... Rushlow. Doris F...... Russell. Robert F..... Ryan. James S......... .............. 51. 86 .................. 00 ........ 57. 86. 113 ........ 77. 86. 113 .................. 57 .................. 43 ............. 77. 82 ............ 51. 105 ............ 43. 113 .................. 82 .............. 57. 69 .................. 57 ................. 107 ............ 57. Ill .............. 52. 97 ........ 77. 82. 107 .................. 00 .................. 57 .................. 00 .............. 71. 72 .................. 00 ......... 52. 77. 99 .................. 57 .................. 51 .............. 34. 86 .................. 43 .................. 00 .................. 00 .................. 00 .............. 51. 73 ............ 51. 101 .................. 00 .................. 00 109. 123. 124. 133 ......... 34. 90. 91 ............ 35. 113 .................. 00 ......... 43. 86. 99 .................. 00 .............. 57. 85 43. 77. 82. 86. 101 .................. 57 ......... 35. 60. 99 .............. 51. 86 ......... 57. 82. 91 ...... 51. 110. Ill ......... 35. 85. 97 .... 43. 76. 106. 107 .................. 35 S Sacharski. Raymond J..................... 35 Salick. Susan K.......................... 00 Salm. Bcserly M................ 57. 91. 101 Sampson. Alien E......................... 00 Sanfeliopo. Michael A.......... 35. 69. 76 Sang. Robert E........................... 57 Sawall, Carlton F........................ 57 Schaefer. Donald L............. 43. 73. 93 Schaefer. John T....................... 111 Schafer. David (NMI) .................... 00 Schalinske. Jerome A.................... 109 Scharpf. Raymond G....................... 00 Scharpf. Theresc C......... 51. 69. 85. 101 Schartner. Doris A............. 57. 91, 95 Schaub. Helen N......................... 101 Schcin. Norman J. ......... 35. 60. 115. 120 Schcnzel. Robert P......... 43. 77. 81. 82 Scheuermann. Nyal M................. 43. 93 Schiels. Lavernc M....................... 95 Schilchcr. Alvin N....................... 00 Schlachtenhaufen. Lucille D..... 43. 76. 86 101. 114 Schlocrb. Ella May ........ 43. 72. 76. 113 Schlossmann. Ixnora E.................... 00 Schlucssel. Richard J.................... 51 Schmelter. Raymond C....... 43. 73. 82. 93 Schmidt. Alene L......................... 5j Schmicdcl. Robert C...................... 00 Schnabl. Frank J.................... 57, 107 Schneider. Alvin W....................... 00 Schneider. Donald N................... 57. 109 Schneider. Donald W........................ 43 Schneider. Gloria E........... 35. 76. 86. 91 94. 95 Schneider, Kenneth J. .. 43. 109. 115. 11 Schneider. Perry Lou 51. 82. 86. 95. 114 Schocnick. Elaine M............ 51. 86. 10. 103. 114 Schocning. Duane L........................ 00 Schontisch. Norman Jr............. 43. "1. 85 99. 114 Schraa, Jeanne E........................... 57 Schrader. Robert (NMD .................. Schragc. Joseph C......................... 55 Schrimpf. Ethel M..................... 57, 97 Schroedcr. Carl ........................... 51 Schroeder. Doris E......................... 50 Schultz. Charles M......................... 92 Schultz. Lyle M....................••••••• 57 Schumacher, Richard F. .. 43, 99, 123. 1-6 Schumacher. Thomas W....................... 00 Schumann. Norman C......................... 00 Schuster. Jo (NMI) ..................... Schwab. Richard H.....................•••• 5 Scrwartzmillcr. Lloyd V............... 43. 99 Schwebkc. Clifford R.......... 57. 115. 1.0 Scott, Donald R..........................•■••• 00 Scil, Irene M............. 43. 85. 102. 103 Seichert. Ethel J...................., Sensiba. Barbara A.................... 50. 113 Seybold. Donald 1........................••••• 57 Shafer. Jeanne M...................... 39. ; Sherhcrt. Robert E..... 35. 61, 72. 86. 99 Shilobrit. Carol T...................... 5 Shrovnal. Ann J............................ 50 Shurbert. Richard E................... 5". 9J- Sievert. Audcry B..................... 3. 95 Simonson. Marlyn J.................... 43. 62 Skinner. Charlotte P....... 44. 69. 82. 89 Smedberg. Carl E.............. 44. 115. 119 Smith .Charles R.............. 36. 115. 120 Smith. James M............................. 44 Smith. Kenneth (NMI) .............. 106. 107 Smith. Lawrence E. ........................ 50 Sommerfeldt. Jean M................... 50. 69 Sonnleitner. Eugene T...................... 00 Sorenson. Shirley M................... 36. 76 Spanbauer, Robert C........................ 00 Spaulding. Lawrence D.......... 50. 99. 115 121. 123124 Spaulding. Russell A....................... 44 Spillman. Dorothy J........................ 50 Spink. I.orrainc E..... 50, 69. 77. 86.113 Spochr. Alice T............................ 00 Spoehr. Milton E.................. 50. 63. 99 Stachle. Joan E............................ 00 Stacrkel. Naomi F................. 44. 94. 95 Stangby. Norman 1.......................... 36 Stcckbaucr. Theodore C..................... 73 Steesp. Anna Marie L. ........ 5”. 68. 82. 84 Steffen. Beverly J.................... 57. 95 Stcizner. Harry D.......................... 0O Stcnnett. Arlene D......................... 36 Stepp. James F............................. 00 Stevens. Curtis R.......................... 50 Stevenson. Paul W............ 109, 115. 121 Stoegbauer. Robert 0....................... 00 Stoll. Carolyn C ..................... 76. 89 Stoll. Donald G............................ 50 Stout. James II................... 39. 77. 99 Stowe. William A.................. 36. 61, 75 Strachan. Charles E................... 57. Ill Strcck. Elizabeth R..................... 5 Streckcnbach. Jean A....... 44, 77. 84. 9" Strupp. Jerome N........................... 36 Struthers. Joan R.......................... 57 Studley. James E........................... 82 Stutzman. Verla M................. 44. 77. 97 Sweet. Alfred C ..................... 115. 116 Sweet. David E............................. 00 Sweet. Kenneth P........................... 57 T Tavlor. Audrey O Teno. Norman C Them. Richard C Thiede. Joan C. Thiel. Kurt R Thiel. Norman C 36 109. 133 Thiclmann, James J Thiex. Germaine G. ... 5' Thiex. Joyce J 57 57 Thomson. Dorothy A. .. 58. 82. 112. 113 Thorcson. Robert C Thorp. Joanne E 50. Hi. 101 Thorp. Melvin I Tiddcns. Frederic R 57. 99 Tilkcns. LaVerne E 36. 90. 91 Timmcl. Melvin A 44 Tonn, Fern F................ 36. 86, 91 Tracy. Walter M................. 58. Ill Trauba. Paul R....................... 50 Turner. Mildred E........... 37. 69. 84 U Ccbelc. Fern P......................... 44 Umland. Lois L. .................. 44, 103 Unscr. Rosemary 1............ 50, 777. 82 Uttkc. Betty Jane 1.................... 50 Utz. Franklin J.................. 115, 117 Utz. William G................... 115. 118 V Van Berkcl. Edward I) Van Camp. Bernard Vandcrhoof. Ellen R 00 37. 115. 120 58. 88. 89 Van Roy, Lillian E 44. 113 Vaudrcuil. Icon P 44. 68 Vaughan. Carroll J 00 Vetting. Eunice W 37. 75 Viestenz. Elaine R (Ml Voight. John M Von Eisengrein. Carola J. 44. 84 W Wachholz. Raymond C 44. 77. 86. 99 Wagenh.ils. Robert A (M) Wagner. Paul J , 115. 118. 122 Wahlcrs. John H W akeman. William S 00 Waldron. Muriel F 52. 95 Wall. Thomas M. 77 Wallen fang. Clyde G. .. 37. 38. 60. 71. '5 W alsh. Joseph A 58. 107 Walters. Audrey Ann M. 58. 85 Wambold. Robert J 00 Wandrey. Howard H 00 W'are. Charles H (M) 52. 101 W'arneckc. Frederick A. ..... 58. 99 W ashkoske. Jean K 58. 69. 85 Webb. Ramona J . 58. 76. 103 W eber. Das id T W'eber. Francis G 52. 84 Weber. Marie T .... 52. 85. 103 Wccss. Byron G 39. 99 W'cidemann. Nancy Lee 58 (Ml Weir. Harry B 58 Wcntzcl, Roy I) 37. 73. 75 Wentzcl, Vera E 37 Werner. Ivan A 58 Mestphalcn. Harriet E 58. 91 Wielgus. Arthur 52 Wilde. Karlyn A (Ml Williams. Bette A 58. 90. 91 W'illiams. Betty A 58. 66 Williams. Ixroy F 107 Williams. LoAnn E 58. 90. 91 Williams. Marjorie E 52. 95 W'illiams. Robert I) 44. 73 W illis. David C 52 W’ilson. M. Edith 52 Winkel. Ruth M........ 52. 77. 82. 86. 101 W inter. Virginia A...... 58. 84. 102. 103 Wislinsky. Anita M..................... 101 W'olff. Alice R............... 69. 86. 113 Wolff. Earl 0............... 109. 123. 130 Wolfgram. Richard C .................... 00 W'olfmeycr. Sanford F................... 58 W'omaski. Vivian M...................... 00 Y York-Critchley. William S............... 39 Young. Lucille R................... 58. 91 Youngworth. James J..................... 00 Z Zacharias. Leslie R............ 52. 106, 107 Zarter. Norma L.......................... 52 Zeinert. John A..................... 52. 86 Zellmer. Jean M..................... 58. 77 Zicbell, Bruce M......................... 58 Zicman. Orlyn A................ 44. 66. 109 Zicmer. Donald N......................... 99 Zillmcr. Mary J..................... 95. 113 Zirbcl. Russell 0........................ 00 Zobcl. Roger J........................... 00 Zoch. Claude C. .. 52. 1 15. 120. 132. 133 Zuern. David L. ......................... 58 Zucrn. I-uAnn (NMI) ................ 58. 91 Zwicker. Mildred C. ........... 37. 38. 72 164 QUIVER, 19 4 9AUTOGRAPHS SHd vnoinv  AUTOGRAPHS AUTOGRAPHS L


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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.