University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI)

 - Class of 1936

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University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 176 of the 1936 volume:

F- re CO. S6 Post Office e s t 7 bl i sh ed " 1840 POST maSTC r G Q It up f-e-B y st. Late-b main st, In 1876 Webster Stanley and Chester Gallup lay claim to q II land between Mam Street and the lohe on the north Side of- the river loss held tv er ailouez %70WEBSTER STANLEY Webster Stanley, first white settler in what is now Oshkosh, came to this locality in the summer of 1836. He came from Neenah. where he had been employed by the government to transport supplies between Fort Howard, now Green Bay, and Fort Winnebago, now Portage, and built a cabin on the south side of the river above where the West Algoma bridge now stands. At this point he operated a ferry which he had purchased from a half-breed Indian, James Knaggs. Mr. Stanley was born in Connecticut in September. 1798. He came to Green Bay in 1834; the following year he was employed at Neenah and in 1836 came here. In the same year Governor Dodge, returning from the making of the Cedar Rapids Treaty, informed Mr. Stanley of the purchase, from the Menominees. of the land about the lower Fox River. Mr. Stanley was joined by Chester Gallup, each taking up land on the north side of the river. Stanley taking I 17 acres and Gallup 170. They erected a dwelling house on Mr. Stanley's claim, which they occupied in common until the following November, when Mr. Gallup's house was completed. Mr. Stanley operated the ferry at the site of his new home until 1847 when a bridge was built at this point. Pago ICOPYRIGHT Editor-in-Chief Harry Wolff Business Manager William EkvallTHE QUIVER For 1936 Published by the Student Body of the State Teachers College, Oshkosh, WisconsinDr. James F. Duncan DEDICATION To Dr. Duncan who has generously given the time to the betterment of the past Quivers, we sincerely dedicate the 1936 Quiver.Quite appropriately the theme of the Quiver this year is the commemoration of the one hundredth anniversary of the founding of Oshkosh which is being celebrated by the city this summer. ’ V tr-Lathrop Vosburg IN MEMORIAM To Lathrop Vosburg. who concluded forty-three years of engineer and building superin- Throughout the book, in keeping with the theme are pictures of the old Normal School as it was before the fire.ADMINISTRATIONPago 9PRESIDENT'S ANNUAL MESSAGE I should like to note briefly the salient accomplishments and changes of the past year and to report even more briefly the observable results of the past five years. The College, as well as the Normal School which preceded it. has had state-wide recognition because of competent, skilful, and devoted teaching: the emphasis may have changed from time to time but the objectives have ever been the same.—to train teachers as well as limitations of previous preparation and time would permit. That it has been reasonably successful is best attested by the mark made by its graduates in teaching, in business and the professions, as well as in graduate study in other institutions of higher learning. We have no need to be ashamed. This year has seen a fine participation of students in musical, dramatic, athletic, forensic, and social activities. These have not become the whole show but they have sought and found their honorable sphere concentric with intellectual accomplishments and teaching skills. That all of us can see impending change and reorganization, is taken for granted: in this school we have added facilities and strengthened our faculty in the sciences and social studies in preparation for the attempts which we shall make toward as much of unification and synthesis of courses as we deem wise and practicable. The Health program which has been initiated is a start, at least, toward the desirable program which must shortly be undertaken to keep in line with other colleges. The Library has made commendable additions to our reference books and through the assistance of N. Y. A. and W. P. A. workers we have been able to give adequate service for greatly increased, but much needed, hours. Mention must also be made of the work done in our extended day courses: these permit teachers in service, interested adults, and our own students to have a wider choice of subjects and at hours when these courses can be taken. Three much-loved teachers who have contributed fruitfully for years to the school have this year retired or announced intention of so doing: Mrs. Ruth S. Mace who handled so well the difficult position of Dean of Women, and Miss Ellen F. P. Peake who had been a teacher of Literature here since 1895. resigned at mid-year: Mr. Walter C. Hewitt, the Dean of our faculty and perhaps the best known teacher in the State Teacher. College system, will retire at the end of summer school. All of these teachers were loved and respected by faculty and students because each contributed definitely through personality and accomplishments to the upbuilding of the College. We still have needs.—many of them in buildings, recreation fields, library books, laboratory facilities, and in additions to the teaching staff, library, and clerical force. We have done well, we think, with our five-year plan of holding fast to that which is of worth and of adding to. where slender resources made it possible: we hope that our S ate Teachers Colleges may be accorded that measure of financial support which will enable them to take their proper place in the State's educational system: and this place, we conclude, ought to be in accordance with the value placed by the State on education. In the long run it will have to be so. Yours sincerely. m ■-- y Pago 10Page 11Ethel J. Behncke Came to Oshkosh 1925 A. M., 1925, University of Chicago Art Mabel G. Blake Came to Oshkosh 1922 Ph. M., 1935, University of Wisconsin Art May M. Beenken Came to Oshkosh 1928 Ph. D.. University of Chicago, 1928 Mathematics J. A. Breese Came to Oshkosh 1924 M. A. in Music Education Florence Case Came to Oshkosh 1930 Ph. D.. 1929. Indiana University Sociology Dean of Women Leavelva Bradbury Came to Oshkosh 1919 M. S.. 1926, University of Chicago Geography New York University Music Pago 12Malvina C. Clausen Came to Oshkosh 1918 M. S.. 1930, School of Library Science. Columbia University Head Librarian Hulda A. Dilling Came to Oshkosh 1930 A. M.. 1930. University of Chicago Director of Curriculum for Primary Grade Teachers Barbara Donner Came to Oshkosh 1926 Ph. D., 1933. University of Chicago History James F. Duncan Came to Oshkosh 1930 Ph. D., 1930. University of Michigan Physics E. A. Clemans Came to Oshkosh 1906 A. B., University of Michigan, 1901 Physics Vice President Dean of Men Helen W. Skemp Came to Oshkosh 1929 B. A., 1920. University of Dubuque Wisconsin Library School, 1929 Assistant Librarian Pago 13Janet Evans Came to Oshkosh 1934 B. S.. 1932, Stout Institute Domestic Science Maysel E. Evans Came to Oshkosh 1929 A. M., 1926. Northwestern University Speech A. A. Farley Came to Oshkosh 1907 Ph. D„ University of Chicago Psychology R. J. Grant Came to Oshkosh 1927 M. A., 1931. State University of Iowa Electricity and Metal Work W. H. Fletcher Came to Oshkosh 1918 Ed. M.. 1931, Boston University English and General Science J. O. Frank Came to Oshkosh 1912 A. M., 1912, Indiana University Chemistry Pago 14f Cozette Groves Came to Oshkosh 1931 A. M., 1929, University of Chicago Fifth Grade R. E. Gruenhagen Came to Oshkosh 1910 Ed. B.. 1930. State Teachers College. Oshkosh Drawing and Shop W. C. Hewitt Came to Oshkosh 1892 Ed. M.. 1900. Michigan State Normal College. Yipsilanti Economics and Government Marie A. Hirsch Came to Oshkosh 1929 M., 1924. University of Nebraska History N. S. James Came to Oshkosh 1923 A. M.. 1926. University of Wisconsin Enqlish and Speech Laura T. Johnson Came to Oshkosh 1924 Ph. M., 1932, University of Wisconsin Director of Curriculum for Intermediate Grade Teachers Pago 15R. M. Kolf Came to Oshkosh 1923 Ph. M.. 1931. University of Wisconsin Physical Education for Men Burton E. Karges Came to Oshkosh 1934 Ph. D.. 1934. University of Wisconsin Chemistry and Geology Corinne Kelso Came to Oshkosh 1924 A. M., 1927. University of Chicago Junior High School Mathematics N. P. Nelson Came to Oshkosh 1924 A. M., 1929. Teachers College. Columbia University Director of Division of Secondary Education Harriet R. Lockwood Came to Oshkosh 1924 R. J. McMahon Came to Oshkosh 1934 Ph. M., 1928. University of Wisconsin Registrar and Education A. M.. 1925. University of Chicago Junior High School English. English Methods Page 16Ellen F. Peake Came to Oshkosh 1895 A. M.. 1929. University of New Brunswick English Irene Price Came to Oshkosh 1929 Ph. D.. 1932, Indiana University Mathematics William F. Price Came to Oshkosh 1934 Ph. M., 1933. University of Wisconsin Rural Education Ruth Roper Came to Oshkosh 1934 B. M., 1932, Lawrence College Kindergarten Lila May Rose Came to Oshkosh 1921 B. S. in Music Education 1929 Teachers College. Columbia University Music Louise E. Scott Came to Oshkosh 1928 A. M., 1928. University of Iowa Junior High School History and Social Science Pago 17J. H. Smith Came to Oshkosh 1934 Ph. D., 1931. Columbia University Director of Training H. T. Shrum Came to Oshkosh 1921 Gladys H. Smith Came to Oshkosh 1925 Ph. M., 1932. University of Wisconsin Fourth Grade May L. Stewart Came to Oshkosh 1926 A. M.. 1923. University of Chicago Director of Division of Rural Education Lois E. Swallow Came to Oshkosh 1929 A. B., 1929, Iowa State Teachers College Third Grade Hilda Taylor Came to Oshkosh 1928 Ph. D.. 1926. University of Chicago English M. E.. 1910. Purdue University Metal WorkErnest Thedinga Came to Oshkosh 1936 Ph. D.. 1935. University of Wisconsin Political Science and History Eva J. VanSistine Came to Oshkosh 1919 Ph. B.. 1925. University of Chicago First Grade John T. Taylor Came to Oshkosh 1936 M. A.. 1927. University of Illinois English Florence Werner Came to Oshkosh 1928 M. S., 1928, Ohio State University Biology and Bacteriology H. H. Whitney Came to Oshkosh 1921 M. S.. 1924. Colorado Agricultural College Supervisor of Student Teaching in Manual Arts Ruth Willcockson Came to Oshkosh 1921 A. M.. 1928. University of Chicago English Pago 19Orpha Wollangk Came to Oshkosh 1928 M. A.. 1932. University of Wisconsin Sixth Grade Margaret M. Kelly Came to Oshkosh 1929 B. Ed. Oshkosh Wisconsin Library School 1932 Assistant Librarian Amy E. Wold Came to Oshkosh 1931 B. E.. 1925, National College of Education Second Grade Grace M. Shimek Assistant Clerk Stenographer Viola A. Stockfish Assistant to the Registrar Elizabeth MacDonald Secretary to the Director of the Training School Pago 20Other Members of the Faculty Lorin E. Dicklemann Come to Oshkosh 1936 B. $.. 1919, University of Wisconsin M. D., 1930. Marquette University College Physician and Health Education Elmo L. Jole Secretary to the President Jeanne A. Mercier Came to Oshkosh 1924 B. S., 1924, Whitman College French Gladys Perkerson Came to Oshkosh 1930 A. M., 1928. Peabody College Physical Education for Girls Hugh W. Talbot Came to Oshkosh 1919 M. S., 1925. University of Minnesota Biology Francis L. Zimmerman Financial Secretary Retiring Faculty Members Ellen Peake Walter Hewitt Ruth S. Mace Pago 21CLASSES Pago 23O Uh u. o w « m STUDENT BODY OFFICERS President, Robert Yaeger Vice-President, Russell Moseley Pogo 24Altman. Yvonno (Oshkosh) 4-yr. Primary Kappa Gamma I, 2. 3. 4; Soc. 3: Hist. 4: Play Follows I. 2, 3. 4; Collego Lutheran Society I, 2. 3: A Cappolla Choir I. 2. 3. 4; Bohemian Girl 4; Kappa Gamma Play Contest 3. 4; Prom Committoo 2: Social Life Committee 4. Badtko. Arthur (Ripon) 4-yr. Manual Arts Poriclean I, 2. 3. 4; Football 3: Intersociety Basketball 2. 3; Wrestling 3: Quiver Staff 3; Colloge Lutheran Society I, 2. 3. 4; Band I. 2. 3. 4. Barney. Harriet (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Pleyfollows 3, 4; Marquotto 3. 4: Pres. 4; Director Inter-Society Play 3: Forum 2. 3: Advance 2. 3: Wilton Club 3. 4. Blako. Milton (Omro) 4-yr. Manual Arts Bosketball I. 3. 4: Football I. 3. 4; Intersociety Kit-tonball I. 2. 3. 4; Intersociety Basketball 2. 3. 4; Pericloan I. 2. 3. 4; Student Council 4; Athletic Council 4; Intersociety Track I. 2. 3: Track I. 2. 3. Crane. Clarence (Oshkosh) 4-yr. Manual Arts lota Alpha Sigma I. 2, 3. 4; Archery Club 4. Anger. Enid (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Alothoan I. 2. 3. 4; Critic 2: Treas. 3: V. Pres. 4; Pres. 4; French Club I. 2: Press Club 2; Quivor Staff 2. 4; Intersociety Volleyball I: Homecoming Committee 2. 4; Wilton Club 4; Girl's Locker Room Committoo 4; Student Council 4; Secretary 4; Kappa Delta Pi 4: Kappa Gamma Play Contost 4; Vodvil 2. 3. Barlow. Bernice (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School LeCercle Francois I; G. A. A. I. 2. 3. 4; Marquette I; Alothoon I. 2. 3. 4; V. Pros. 3: Pros. 4: Baskotball I, 2. 3. 4; Athlotic Council 3: Wilton Club. 4; Advance Staff 4: Quiver Staff 4; Kappa Gamma Play Contost 3. 4: Vodvil 2. 3: Homecoming Committee 4; Playfellows 4. Board, Gaylord (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Phi Chi Mu I. 2. 3. 4: Treos. 3: V. Pros. 4; Advance 4: Track 2. 3. Bloch. Genevieve (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Atethean I. 2. 3. 4; Forum 3. 4; Wilton Club 3. 4: Orchestra I. 2. 3. 4: Marquette I. 2: Intersocioty Council 4. Crownor, Margaret (Oshkosh) 4-yr. Primary s E N I O R S Pago 25 s E N I R S Cuff. Margarot (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Delta Phi I. 2. 3. 4; Historian I. 2: Critic 3: V. Pros. 4: Wilton Club 2, 3. 4; Sec. 4; Basketball I; Lo Corcle Francois I: Playfollows 4: Kappa Dolta 4; Forum 3. Davies. Esther (Oshkosh) 4-yr. Intermediate Wilton Club 3. 4; Baskot-ball I. 2: Volleyball I. 2. Dobyns, Lyle (Fond du lac) 4-yr. High School Philakean 3. 4: Advance 2. 4; Executive Board 4: Phi Chi Mu 4: Forum 4; Chomistry Club 4. Dubester, Nathan (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Periclean I. 2. 3. 4: Wilton Club 2. 3. 4; Advance 2. 3. 4: Lit. Ed. 4; Inter-society Boskotball 2. 3. 4: Intersociety Kittonball 3. 4: Phi Chi Mu. 3. 4. Falk. Milton (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Dahlko. Thoodoro (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Poricloan I. 2. 3 4: Vice Pres. 4; Phi Chi Mu I, 3. 4; Pros. 4; Advance 3. 4-Assist. Sports Editor 3. 4: Studont Council 4; Intor-society Track I; Intorso-ciety Basketball 2, 3. 4. Derschoid. Vincent (Omro) 4-yr. High School Pericloan 2. 3. 4; Trees. 4: Sec. 4: Intersociety Council 3. 4: A Cappella Choir 1. 2. 3. 4: Band 4; Bo- homian Girl 3; Boxing I; Football 2. 3: Intorsociety Track I: Intorsocioty Basketball I. 2. 3. 4; Intor- society Kittonball 2. 3. 4; Advanco Staff 3. 4; Ass. Sports Ed. 4; Executive Boord 4; Quiver 4. Domko. Frank I Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Philakoan 2. 3. 4: V. Pros. 2: Pres. 3: Critic 4; Forum 2, 3. 4; Pres. 3. 4: Play- fellows I. 2. 3. 4- Advanco Staff 2. 3. 4; Ass. Ed. 3: Ed. 4: Studont Council 4: Pros. 4; Men's Organization 3. 4: Executive Committee 3: Pres. 4; Activ- ities Director 3: Vodvil 2. 3; Intersociety Play Contest 2: Track 3. 4; Inter-socioty Council 2: Class Day Spoakor 3: Kappa Dolta Pi 4. Fabrycki. Clement (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Football I. 2. 3. 4: Pori-clean I. 2. 3. 4. Forrest. Francos (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Dolta Phi I. 2. 3. 4: Mar-quotto I. 2. 3: French Club I; Orchostre I: Wilton Club 3. 4; Forum 4. Page 26Friday. Charlos (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Philakoan I. 2. 3. 4; Marshall 2: Corr. Soc. 3: Football 2. 3, 4; Capt. 4. Gorwitz, Harry (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Mgr. Athletics I. 2. 3; In-torsocioty Basketball I. 2. 3. 4; Intersociety Basoball I. 2. 3. 4: Poridcan I. 2, 3. 4; Forum 4; Phi Chi Mu 2. 3. 4; Studont Council 4; Advanco Staff I, 2. 3. 4: Sports Ed. 3. 4; Quivor Staff 3. 4: Sports Ed. 3. Grenhagen, Kathryn (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Alothean I, 2. 3. 4; Advanco I: Quivor 2; Intor society play contest 2. Helms. Stanley (Morion) 4-yr. High School loto Alpha Sigma 3. 4. Immol. Arthur (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Philakoan 2. 3. 4: Marshall 3: Intorsociety Baskotball 2. 3: Intersociety Baseball 2. 3: Baskotball 2. Gallun. Jano (Conovor) 4-yr. High School Alethean 4; Historian 4; Quiver Bus. Staff 4; Advanco Staff 4; Forum 4; Wilton Club 4; Gulig, Max (Fond du Lac) 4-yr. Manual Arts loto Alpha Sigma I. 2. 3. Hagono. Edgar (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Philokean I. 2. 3. 4: V. Pres. 2; Pros. 3: Critic 3: Historian 4: Baskotball I. 3. 4; Studont Council 2: Athletic Council 4; Inter-society Council 3. 4; V. Pros. 3: Pros. 4; Dobato 2: Advance Staff 2. 3. 4: Ass. Sports Ed. 3: Bus. Mgr. 4: Mon's Organization 4: V. Pros. 4; Inter-socioty Basoball 2. 3. 4; Intorsocioty Play Contest 3. 4; "Journey’s End" 4. Hoppo. Orvillo (Pickott) 4-yr. Manual Arts lota Alpha Sigma 2. 3. 4; Marshall 2: "Journoy's End" 4. Ives. Jano (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Dolta Phi I, 2. 3. 4; Sec. 2: V. Pros. 2: Custodian 3: Pros. 4; Playfellows 2. 3. 4; Soc. 4; A Coppolla Choir 2. 3. 4; Wilton Club 2. 3. 4; V. Pres. 4; Kappa Gamma Play Contest 3: Music Club 4: Christmas Chimos 2: Intorsociety Council I: Stebat Mater 4; Forum 3, 4. s E N I O R S Pago 27Jentz. Joo (Fond du Lac) 4-yr. High School Pericloan I, 2. 3. 4; Troas. 3: Pro . 4; Critic 4; Phi Chi Mu I, 2. 3. 4; Trea . 4; Marquette I, 2; Intor-society Council 2. 4; Social Life Committee 4; Homecoming Pub. Char. 4: Soph. Class Sec. 2. Kirloy. Holon (Doylestown) 3-yr. Intermediate Lambda Chi I. 2. 3. Kreese. Tennis (Neenah) 4-yr. Manual Arts lota Alpha Sigma I. 2. 3. 4; Critic 4: Pres. 4: Band I. 2. 3. 4; Exocutivo Committee 4; Archery Club 4. Mason. Maxino (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Advanco I. 2. 3. 4; Nows Ed. 2: Editor-in-Chiof 3: Quiver I, 2; Press Club I. 2. 3: A Ceppella Choir 2. 4: Phoonix I. 2. 3, 4: Hist. 2: Cust. 3: Pros. 4: Playfellows 2. 3. 4: Forum 3. 4; Wilton Club 4: Intor- socioty Beskotball 2: Girls Organization I, 2. 3, 4: Music Club 4; Kappa Delta Pi 3. 4: Intersociety Council 4: Intersociety Play Contest 2. 4; Commencement Spoakor 3. Norris. Helen (LaFarge) 4-yr. High School Lambda Chi I. 2. 3, 4-Hist. 2: V. Pres. 3: Pres. 4: Intersociety Council 3. 4; Pleyfollows 3. 4; G. A. A. I. 2: Intorsocioty Basketball I: Kappa Gamma Ploy Contost I. 3. Kendziorski. Edwin (Milwaukee) 4-yr. High School lota Alpha Sigma I. 2, 3. 4; Hist. 2; Treas. 2; V. Pres. 3: Intersocioty Council 4; Pleyfollows I. 2. 3. 4: Stage Mgr. 3. 4- Archery Club 3. 4; V. Pres. 3: Pres. 4- Marquotto I, 2: Sec. I: Quiver 3, 4; Photography Ed. 4. Kopitzko. Frederick (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Lyceum I 2. 3. 4: Press Club I. 2. 3. 4; Quivor Staff I. 2. 3. 4; Advanco Staff I, 2. 3 4: Ass. Bus. Mgr. 2; Bus. Mgr. 2. 3: Intersociety Track 2: Intersocioty Basketball 3: Intersocioty Kittonball 3: Koppo Gamma Play Contost I, 2. 3: Science Seminar 2. MacNichol, Carol (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School LeCercle Francois I: Press Club 2; Advance Staff 2. 3. 4; Organ. Ed. 4: Girls Organization Ex. Committee 4: Playfollows 3. 4: Wilton Club 4- Volleyball 2: Carnival Committee 4; Vodvil 3: Quivor Staff 2. 4: Alethean I. 2. 3. 4: V. Pres. 4. Mosoly. Russell (Omro) 4-yr. High School Football I. 3. 4: Intor-society Basketball I. 2. 4; Poricloan I, 2. 3, 4: Kappa Delta Pi 3. 4: V. Pros. 4; V. Pros. Student Body 4: Studont 8ody Pres. 4. Nowacki, Loonard (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Football I; Cheerleader 2. 3. 4; Marquotto 1,2. 3. 4; Playfollows I. 2. 3 4; Pres. 4: School Productions I. 2. 3. 4: Mens Exs. Committee 4; "Journoy's End' 4. Page 28Olp. George (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Periclean I. 2. 3. 4; Secretary 4: Pres. 4- A Cap-pella 2. 3. 4; Marquotte I. 2: Phi Chi Mu 2. 4: Chemistry 4. Ramseth. Jay (Groen Bay] 4-yr Manual Arts Band I: lota Alpha Sigma I. 2. 3. 4: Kappa Oolta Pi 3, 4: Archery Club 3: Quiver 3; Associate Editor 3. Roberts. Francis (Fond du Lac) 4-yr. High School Kappa Dolto Pi 3. 4; Historians 4; Wilton Club 2, 3: Pres. 2. 4: Vice Pros. 3: Winner Dolta Phi Contest I. 2. 3. Rooder. Ruby (Markosan) 4-yr. High School Schmidt. Leonard (Milwaukee) 4-yr. Manual Arts Archery Club 2. 3. 4. Patz, Vornon (Green Boy) 4-yr. Manual Arts lota Alpha Sigma. Rasmusson. Clifford (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Kappa Delta Pi 4: Forum 4; Marquotte I. 2: Quiver 2. 3: Assist. Bus. Manager 3: A Cappolla 2: Boxing 2. Roecfc. Waltor (Kiol) 4-yr. Manual Arts Kappa Dolta Pi 3. 4: Periclean I. 2. 3. 4; Pross Club 3: Pros. 3: Archery Club 3. 4; Track I. 2. 4: Football I, 2. 4; Intramural Basketball I. 2. 3. 4: Intramural Kittenball I. 2. 3. 4: Quiver Staff 2. 3: Assoc. Art Editor 2: Editor-in-chief 3: Intramural Track I. 2. 3. 4. Ryan. Bernard (Oshkosh) 4-yr. Manual Arts lota Alpha Sigmn I. 2. 3. 4; Archery 3. Schmidt, Milton (Milwaukee) 4-yr. Mon-ual Arts lota Alpha Sigma I. 2, 3. 4; Historian 3, 4: Intersociety Rep. 3: Pros. 4: Executive Council 4: Archery Club 2. 3. Pago 29s E N I O R S Schwabenlander. Anita (Fond du Lac) 4-yr. Intermediate Girls' Athletic Assoc. I, 2. 3, 4: Athletic Award (Sweater) 2: Athletic Award (Medal) 3: Marquette I, 2. 3. 4; Women’s Organization 4; $oc. 4: Treas. 4. Stowe. Gerald (West De Pere) 4-yr. Special Periclean I, 2. 3. 4: Playfellows 4: "Journey's End" 4; Intersocioty Play Con-tost 4. Thorson, Vernon (Noonah) 4-yr. High School Football 2. 3. 4; Basketball 3: Intersocioty Basketball I. 2, 3. 4; Intersocioty Kittonball 2. 3. 4; Inter-society Track 3: Band I. 2. 4; A Cappella I. 2. 4; Pori-clean 2. 3. 4; Critic 4. Vanderhoidon, Joan (Wrightstown) 4-yr High School Kappa Delta Pi 3. 4: Delta Phi I. 2. 3. 4: Soc. 2: Hist. 3: Wilton Club 2. 3. 4; Sec. 4; Forum 4: Playfellows 3. 4: Marquotto I. 2. 3. 4; A Cappella 2. 3. 4; Le Cercle Francais I. 2. Weisenberger. Arthur (Winneconne) 4-yr. High School Siobor, Margarot (Greenbush) 4-yr. Primary Playfellows 4. Swoot. Lucile (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Dolto Phi I. 2. 3. 4; Critic 2: Custodian 2: Vice-Pres. 3: Wilton Club 2. 3. 4: Kappa Gamma Play Con-tost 2. Topp. Jeanette (Clintonville) 4-yr. Primary Van Kouron. Ruth (Oshkosh) 4-yr High School Kappa Delta Pi 3. 4; Sec. 4; Delta Phi I. 2. 3. 4: Treas. 2: Pres. 3: Critic 4: Women's Organization 4; Pros. 4; Chairman of Women's Dinner 4: Intorsociety Council 3. 4: Sec. 4; Ploy-fellows 4; Phi Chi Mu 2. 3, 4; "Christmas Carol" 4. Weston. Jean (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Intersociety Basketball I. 2. 3. 4; A Cepoella I. 2. 3. 4; Delta Phi I. 2. 3. 4: Pres. 4; Girl's Sextet I. 2. 3; Intorsocioty Play 2. 3. 4: Director 3: Intorsociety Council 3. 4: Kappa Dolta Pi 4; "The Bohemian Girl” 3: Playfellows 4: "Christmas Carol" 4. Page 30Wotak, Hubort (Do Pore) 4-yr. High School Philokoan 2. 3. 4: Pros. 4; Soc.-Treos. 3: Critic 4; In-tersocioty Council 4: Vico-Pros. 4: Orchostra I, 2. 3. 4; Wilton Club 4; Phi Chi Mu 2. 3. 4: Prom King 4. Yaegor, Robert (Antigo) 4-yr High School Pros. Student Body 4: Student Council 3; Sec. 3: Football 3, 4; Major "O" 3. 4; Men's Association 2: Pres. 2: Co-Chairman All Mon's Dinnor 3. 4; Lycoum I. 2. 3. 4; Vico-Pres. 3: Orchostra 2. 3. 4: Band 4; Kappa Delta Pi 4; Pres. 4; Intorsocioty Plays I. 2; In-torsociety Baskotball 2. 3: "What Every W Oman Knows” 3. Pettors. Wilma (Antigo) 4-yr. Primary Phoenix I. 2. 3. 4; Pros. 2: Custodian 2; Student Council 3: Intersocioty Council 3: Intersocioty Basketball I. 2. 3. Wolfrath, Neal (Oshkosh) 4-yr. High School Yahr, Wanda (West Bond) 4-yr. High School Dolta Phi 3. 4; Pres. 4: Intorsocioty Council 4; Pres. 4; Playfellows 3. 4: Vice-Pros. 4; Director of Plays 3. 4; Homecoming Committoo 4: Wilton Club 3. 4: Forum 3: Quivor 3: Girl's Exec. Committee 4. E N I O R S Page 31J u N I O R S Anders, Mario Oshkosh 3-yr. Rural Anderson. Winifred Menasha 3-yr. Grammar Grade Barlow, Botty Arcadia 4-yr. High School Phoenix Becker, Earl Appleton 4-yr. Manual Arts lota Alpha Sigma Bondor. Ruth Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Alethean Butkiowitz. Edward Omro 4-yr. High School Do Koysor. Pronase Norway, Michigan 3-yr. Primary Kappa Gamma Edwards. John Oshkosh 4-yr. Manual Arts lota Alpha Sigma Engel, Jane Fond du Lac 4-yr. Primary Dolto Phi Erdmann, Mildred Noonah 3- yr. Intormodiate Fitzgerald. Botty Oshkosh Special Phoenix Gardner. Gail Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Alothean Gebauer, Marie Oshkosh 4- yr. High School Phoenix Gifford. Donna Marie Oshkosh 4-yr. Primary Kappa Gamma Goohring. Evelyn Neenah 4-yr. High School Delta Phi Page 32 J Griffith. Goraldino Pickett 3-yr. Intermediate u Gruonhagon, Hamilton Oshkosh Spocial N Philakean Haveman. Lois Oshkosh 4-yr. High School I Alethean O Honko. Ewald Neshkoro 4-yr. Junior High R Hopo, Kathryn S Fond du Lac 4-yr. Primary Alethean Hunter, Marion Pickott 3-yr. Rural Ihrke. Harold Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Lyceum Johnson. Roso Oshkosh 3-yr. Primary Kahler, Harvey Apploton 4-yr. High School Keating. Grace Waupaca 3-yr. Grammar Grade Kildsig, John Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Lyceum Klabunde, Ruth Oshkosh 3-yr. Primary Klado, Myrtlo Wausau 3-yr. Grammar Grade Kruogor. Andreo Fond du Lac 4-yr. Spocial Philakean Krueger. Virginia Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Alethean Page 33Lindgren, Dorothy Washburn 4-yr. High School Lambda Chi Nichols. Bonita Mao Oconto 3-yr. Intermediate Lambda Chi Modison, Arlono Oshkosh 3-yr. Primary Kappa Gamma McCourt. Howard Fond du Lac 4-yr. Manual Arts lota Alpha Sigma McClono. Frank Boar Crook 4-yr. High School Millor, Joanotto Neonah 3-yr. Grammar Grade Phoenix O'Connell. John Fond du Lac 4-yr. High School Pogol. Eiloon Oshkosh 3-yr. Intermediate Pock. Madge Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Pitz. Mario Neenah 4-yr. High School Pomroning. Jane Clintonville 4-yr. High School Roiter, Ross Oshkosh 4-yr. Intermediate Gamma Sigma Ritger. Marie Apploton 3-yr. Intormodiato Gamma Sigma Roch, Francis Oshkosh 4-yr. Manual Arts lota Alpha Sigma Skowlund. Helen Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Lambda Chi Page 34Stockbauor. Eugene Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Lycoum Steinkollnor, Robert Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Poricloan Stoddart, Loona Fond du Lac 3-yr. Primary Thorn. Poarl New London 3-yr. Intermediate Dolta Phi Thompson. Orilla Oshkosh 3-yr. Intermediate Voland, Earl Kiel 4-yr. High School Poricloan Wolff. Harry Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Lycoum Womaski, Anthony Oshkosh 4-yr. High School I u N I O R S Page 35s o p H O M O R E S Allan. Furmon Allonvllle 4-yr. Special Armstrong. Floronce Noonah 2-yr. Rural Alpha Chi Bassott, Mao Antigo 4-yr. High School Lambda Chi Batterman, Marlon Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Poricloan Bonson. Patricia Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Gamma Sigma Blochl. Wilma Oshkosh 3-yr. Intermediate Delta Phi Brandt. Herman Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Lyceum Byso. Graco Oshkosh 3-yr. Primary Gamma Sigma Clark, Mary Ellon Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Phoonix Clondoning. Duane Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Conloo, William Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Lyceum Dahor, Howard Columbus 4-yr. Manual Arts Lyceum Davios. Vivian Noonah 4-yr. Special Phoonix Davis, Kathryn Crandon 4-yr. High School DoMaiffo. Phyllis Little Suamico 3-yr. Intermediate Lambdo Chi Pago 36Domming, Louise New London 4-yr. Primary Phoenix Dornbrook. Donald Menasha 4-yr. Special Poricloen Ehricke. Dennis Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Philakoan Farley. Floronco Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Alethean Fischer. Clifford Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Philakoan Flynn. Fahoy Fond du Lac 4-yr. Spocial Forrest. Jean Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Dolta Phi Frome. Morcodoes Colby 2-yr. Rural Fuller. Edith Winnoconno 3-yr. Grammar Grado Fuller. Margaret Fond du Lac 2-yr. Rural Alpha Chi Goggins. Kathryn Oshkosh 2-yr. Primary Delta Phi Gorr. Margaret Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Graff. Sylveria Fond du Lac 2-yr. Rural Alpha Chi Groonough. Emogeno Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Gamma Sigma Gruonstern. Elvore Marion 3-yr. Intormodiate Lambda Chi s o p H O M O R E S Pago 37Halo. Dorothy Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Hanson. Irving Waupaca 4-yr. High School Hanson. Mildred Larson 2-yr. Rural Alpha Chi Honltol. Jack Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Philakoan Honkol. Richard Winnoconno 4-yr. Special lota Alpha Sigma Himos. Joan Oshkosh 3-yr. Primary Phoenix Horn. Gilbort Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Houfok, Bon Appleton 4-yr. Special Hough, Lois Larson 3-yr. Grammar Grado Kappa Gamma Huobnor. Roland Milwaukee 4-yr. Manual Arts lota Alpha Sigma Humphroys. Holon Eldorado 2-yr. Rural Kappa Gamma Johnson. Boulah Shiocton 3- yr. Grammar Grado (Junior) Jonos. Evolyn Allonvillo 3-yr. Intermediate Kappa Gamma Justus. Charles Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Kaufman. Victor Tigorton 4- yr. Spocial Pago 38Killam. Norma Lake Geneva 4-yr. Primary Phoenix Kimball. Emily Washburn 4-yr. High School Phoenix Kossol. Alanson Wautoma 4-yr. Special Larson, Elaine Aurora 2-yr. Rural Dolta Phi Learnod. Harold Shawano 4-yr. Special Philakoan Lodvina. Edward Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Lyceum Lentz. William Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Lycoum Lorrigan, Alico Roedsville 2- yr. Rural Alpha Chi Maddon, Elixaboth Oshkosh 2-yr. Rural Martin. Dolores Oshkosh 2-yr. Rural Alpha Chi McCallan, Marjorie Oshkosh 3- yr. Primary Kappa Gamma McIntosh. Kathryn Fond du Lac 4-yr. Primary Alethean McVicar. Jeanne Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Phoenix Meritor, Bertha Wautoma 3-yr. Primary Michols. Grace Fond du Lac 4-yr. High School Kappa Gamma s o p H O M O R E S Page 39s o p H O M O R E S Miracle. James Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Lyceum Mortenson. Carl North Pond du Lac 4-yr. Special Myers. Kormit Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Lyceum Nichols. Verona Zachow 3-yr. Primary Gamma Sigma Orton. Mary Madison 2-yr. Rural Alpha Chi Palocek. Edna Rush Lake 2-yr. Rural Alpha Chi Pinkerton. Jeno Ann Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Phoenix Polk. Marian Oshkosh 4-yr. Intermediate Phoenix Pugh. Lorroine Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Gamma Sigma Pupoter, Albert Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Periclean Rasmussen. Carol Brandon 2- yr. Rural Kappa Gamma Rickaby, Mary Juno New London 3- yr. Primary Delta Phi Ritsch. Elizaboth Boaver Dam 4-yr. Primary Phoonix Robort. Lois Columbus 3- yr. Intormediato Roomer, Louise Appleton 4- yr. High School Page 40Rogers. Betty Oshkosh s o 4-yr. Special Lambda Chi p Roper. Maxine H Oshkosh 4-yr. Intormodiato Siebensohn, Marian O Omro 2-yr. Primary M Lambda Chi O Smith. Audroy R Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial E Alethean Springbi arn, Ervin S Monasha 4-yr. Special Periclean Stanz, Ruth Groon Lako 2-yr. Intermediate Stinson, Eleanor Oshkosh 4-yr. Primary Phoenix Stromme. Ethel Oshkosh 2-yr. Rural Alpha Chi Suren. John Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Periclean Talbot, Richard Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Philakoan Thews, Richard Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Lyceum Thorson, Gladys Wittenborg 2-yr. Rural Alpha Chi Treadway. Marybolle Armstrong Crook 2-yr. Rural Alpha Chi Van Slyko. Arthur Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Philakean Volkman. Robort Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Lyceum Page 41s o p H O M O R E S Wober. Jano Oshkosh 4-yr. Intermediate Gamma Sigma Webster, Jean Niagara 4-yr. High School Lambda Chi Wickert, Orrin Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Philekoan Williams. Stolle Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Phoenix Winkler, Garth Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Poriclean Witthuhn. Doris Pulaski 3-Yr. Primary Gamma Sigma Wollonburg. Lucilo Pickett 2-yr. Rural Alpha Chi Wood. Harry Berlin 4-yr. Special Yager. Kathryn Eden 2-yr. Rural Alpha Chi Zimpol. Carl Butternut 4-yr. Special lota Alpha Sigma Zoerb, Alice Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Lambda Chi Zuelhke. Esther Oshkosh 3-yr. Primary Page 42 Ackerman, William Fond du Lac 4-yr. Special Boano, Stanloy Berlin 4-yr. Special Beckor. Ralph Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Poriclean Bosso. Arthur Butternut 4-yr. Spocial Lyceum Bigford. Barbara Manawa 4-yr. Special Gamma Sigma Brodloy. William Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Philakean Bronnoke. Harriet Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Gamma Sigma Bryan, Robort Monasha 4-yr. Spocial Burger. Raymond N. Fond du Lac 4-yr. Special Clark. Gonovivo Larsen 4-yr. Spocial Collar. Roy Shiocton 4-yr. Special Philakoan Collins, Marie Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Delta Phi Cooko. Nolda Neenah 4-yr. High School Kappa Gamma Corr, Rose Mary Kenosha 4-yr. Spocial Alethean DeBaker, Adolphine Luxombcrg 4-yr. High School F R E S H M E N Page 43F R E S H M E N Dorr, Bernard Shawano 4-yr. High School Ekvall, Allan Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Periclean Evans. William Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Ewort. Margarot Fond du Lac 4-yr. Special Fintak. Gerald Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Philakoan Fitzgerald, Kothorine Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Alethean Fossum, Konneth Ashland 4-yr. Special Gurath. Howord Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Hannors. Albort Knowles 4-yr. Spocial Heisinger. Edward Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Horr, Joseph Brillion 4-yr. Special lota Alpha Sigma Hurd. Mary Agnes Marinette 4-yr. High School Lambda Chi Ihrko, Royal Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Lyceum La Chapelle. Joan Green Bay 4-yr. Special Larson, Alpheus Winnoconno 4-yr. Spocial Pago 44Lorenz, Virginia Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Mathwig, Robert Oshkosh 4-yr. Special Periclean Mayer. Dorothy Omro 2-yr. Rural Lambda Chi Nolte. Marjorio Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Alethoan Norton, Agatha De Pere 4-yr. Special Polton. Russel Waupaca 4-yr. Special Potorson, Joyco Washburn 4-yr. High School Phoenix Phillips. Jono Grand Rapids, Mich. 4-yr. Spocial Alethean Ramseth, Lillian Greon Bay 4-yr. Primary Robortson. Morlo Tomah 4-yr. Manual Arts lota Alpha Sigma Shorman. Orvillo Oshkosh 4-yr. Spocial Soronson. Stanley Kenosha 4-yr. Manual Arts Sparby. Marian Madison 4-yr. Primary Alothoan Tindall. Lowis Fond du Lac 4-yr. High School Lyceum Vanderheiden, Betty Wrightstown 4-yr. High School Delta Phi F R E S H M E N Pago 45F R E S H M E N Viott. Hamilton Fond du loc 4-yr. High School Wastol. Gilbort Shawano 4-yr. Junior High School Weller, Florence Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Wornor, Anotta Oshkosh 4-yr. High School Alethoan Wollenburg, Deloris Pickott 4-yr. Primary Wood, Robort Berlin 4-yr. High School Yankow, Henry Lomira 4-yr. High School . Pago 46OTHER STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE COLLEGE Vialor Dumdie William Ekvall Marjorie Beeman Mrs. Ida Bower Blanche Cady Karl Callies Dorothy Carpenter Leon Flanagan Glenn Conger Charles Garbrecht Harold Griffith Margaret Hendry W. M. Hurst Adolph Klatt Erma Austria Gilbert Barlow Raymond Beduhn Lucille Burt Armon Chapelle Sr. M. Bridgetine Conroy Roman Danielson Iris Dean D. Ted DeLeoleos Betty Dodds Esther Edwards Wesley Farr Lawrence Fischer Clair Flanagan Marian Flanagan Louise Fowley Alice Gunderson Elmer Halle Marie Hankey Franklin Haven Jeanette Hebblewhite Mildred Hefferman Leo Helmuth Irma Hildebrand Eunice Hohner Richard Holmes Celia Hoolihan John Ackerman Mrs. Eleanor Adams Sr. Rosina Allen Robert Arseneau Armin Baier George Becker Lucille Blahnik Katherine Bradford Helen Brown Thomas Calvy John Carroll Rhea Clark Rose Cohen POST GRADUATES Anita Leitzke J. Howard Van Doren SENIORS Alice Jansen Mabel Johnson Eleanor Jones Dorothy Laughlin Clement Liner Marian Marty Marian Maxwell Gertrude McCauley Lillian Pause Mary Pfeiffer Gladys Plummer JUNIORS Katherine House Robert Hubbard LeRoy Hughes Roy Jensen Amy Jorgensen Aaron Kimball Anthony Kolitsch Dora Kraft Stella Krueger Marie LaBudde George Lartz Rueben Lautenschlager Paul Lemke Julius Lipkind Lou Long Marie Luedike Margaret Lyans lone Maltby Robert March Inger Mathiasen Marie Mathiasen Durward Miller Mabel Miller Peter Moore John Oldfield Agnes O'Rouke SOPHOMORES Albert Hartman Laurel Heaney William Hett Ray Himes William Johnson Marian Kasten Caroline Kauth Betty Klucinske Marjorie Knoll Karl Koch Urban Krippene Alice Krueger Clara Lem Esther Weller Arthur Williams Irene Roeder Waldemar Roethig Norman Schubert Doris Schurbert Herbert Sherman Jacob Shilcrat Roger Sloan Earl Smith Dorothy Tangye James Williams Elmer Young Jennie Oxhelm Florence Palmer Phyllis Peterson Oliver Porter Gerald Rabideau Verena Reinhard Russell Retelle Marian Richter George Rose Helen Ryan Willard Saucerman Zona Mae Schwandt Harold Schwartz Eleanor Shea Norbert Sladky Kathryn Smith Jane Sorenson Bernice Steiner William Sullivan Edith Thornton Max Unzicker Verna Voss Richard Walsh Carl Williams Woodrow Williams Chester Wurl Neil Ostergaard Molly Ostwald Howard Penney William Pfrang Verna Pfund Norbert Polakowski Sr. Mary Margaret Prion John Rasmussen Kenneth Riese Elizabeth Rojahn Ruth Rosenthal Eleanor Ryan Raymond Salinger s T U D E N T SCleo DeLaura Ruth Diacon Robert Dolhof Knute Dornstreich Edwin Embertson Wayne Fero Edmund Fintak Henry Gardner Helen Goettmann Maxine Goold Melvin Grandman Ray Green Mary Gronouski Robert Gronowski Marvin Gutknecht Julia Hanley Stafford Anderson Oscar Arndt Jane Bakken Eric Becker George Behnke William Beyer Harold Bieber Charles Bray Florence Brennen Dorothy Briggs Ada Buckholz Jeanette Burt James Bushee Pauline Busse Charles Ceronsky James Ceronsky Thomas Chamberlain Boyd Clark Carroll Clark Donald Clark Monica Costello Lucille Cramer Veronica Cruice Paul Dahm Clarence Daniels Margaret Denis Marion Diehl Mary Louise Dollert Henry Duchac Rita Dushenski Ruth Dushenski Marian Eichinger Mary Elizabeth Erdlitz Harold Ewald Norman Ewald Lucy Fairbrother Roland Finke James Fitzgerald Robert Flanagan Margaret Fox Gilbert Frank John Fransway Mary Fritz SOPHOMORES Cont'd Merrill Lewis Robert Mabie Sr. Carol Marie Malley Florence Martell William Mathwig John McCoy Arthur Mittelstaedt Hugh Moore Mildred Moore Alice Morgan John Mortell Katherine Mortell Jack Nebel Norbert Nelson Sr. Clarence Nightingale Sr. Mary Beatrice Nolan FRESHMEN Margery Fuller Albert Garberg Allard Glaze John Gorham James Gormican Ruth Gould Melvin Grancorbitz Betty Grundy Audrey Guhl Donald Haessly Sr. M. Dolorita Hammes Willard Hanley William Hansen Harvey Hanson Richard Harris Carl Harrmann Marmion Harwood Charlotte Heckrodt Francis Hellert Neuman Himley June Hoffman Hildegarde Hoyer Ethel Huebner Lola Hull Elaine Huston Betty Ingham Joseph Janda Marjorie James Roger Jensen Magdaline Jerkish Jane Jolin Howard Judkins Eleanor Jurgens Bateman Keefe Burton Keefe Margaret Kelroy Norman Koerner John Konrad Alice Krings Edward Kriz Duane Krohn Orpha Krueger Patricia Lacy Miles Sendee John Seibel June Snyder Ralph Strassen Carl Swiston Lester Theile Norman Thoresen Elizabeth Valkoske Lambert Van Roy Anne Volk Lloyd Wasser Gertrude Weller Edward Wichmann Samuel Wilke Ruth Zimmerman Jean La Fontaine Aubrey Larsen Glenn Larsen Theodore Lartz Charles Lenz Clyde Leonard Dorothy Mannenbach Converse Marks James Martell Norman Martin Thomas Martin Harvy Martini John Marx Jean Mathwig Stanley Mauritz Marvin McCarthy Gertrude McCoy Helen McDonald William McGraw Olive McWilliams Jane Merrill Dan Mierswa Rudolph Miller Clark Moore Arline Morris Edward Mortell John Mosling Lawrence Muehrer Phyllis Mueller Garrett Mulva Marie Murphy Clarendon Nelezen Edgar Nell Margaret Newark Jane Nottleman Leonard O'Brien Roseann O’Brien Charles Olen Mariam Olmsted Sr. M. Venard Paulus John Penny Leila PfundFRESHMAN Contd. Hazel Pilling Kenneth Plate Walter Price Anne Pauline Prickett Betty Radtke Leona Radtke Burton Rasmussen Leslie Rasmussen Christina Rehm Sidney Richman Rosetta Riebe Thomas Roberts Warren Rodat Marcella Rodel Nile Roeder Richard Rohde June Ross Ralph Saczychinski Raymond Sandberg George Savinske Dolores Schaefer Helen Schindler Jack Schmidt Bruce Schneeberger Gordon Schneider Marcella Schneider Ada Agnes Schommer Lorna Schroeder Mildred Schulz Cathrine Schwalm Ralph Schwan Robert Schwandt Robin Scott Edward Seeger Jean Sell Jerry Siefert John Simonson Virginia Sipple Bernard Siviur Edward Smart Keith Smith Stance Smolen Sarah Sontag Irene Sorenson Evelyn Splittgerber Mabel Steiner Thelma Swisher David Tack Fayne Tegatz Margaret Tetich Ella Thedinga James Thornton Lucille Toll Gertrude Unzicker Lovita Van Beek Dale Van Doren Aletha Vedder Fred Vehlow Gertrude Volk Otmar Volkert Russell Walmer Dorothy Watters Russell Welch Lawrence Werch John Werner Gilbert Wieseckel Joe Winslow Betty Wolverton Charles Worby George Zabel Jeanette Zajac Annette Zielke Betty ZimmermanSNOIIYZINYOHOPago 51w2J0-H NM2 Qa)0 KAPPA DELTA PI The international fraternity of Kappa Delta Pi. for leaders of education in colleges and universities, is represented on the Oshkosh State Teachers College campus by the Beta Theta chapter. A high scholastic standard throughout their college course, and promise of educational and social leadership are the requirements for election, which is open only to seniors and juniors. Kappa Delta Pi numbers over 20.000 members in 90 chapters. The featured address of the year was presented by Miss Marie A. Hirsch of the college history department. Miss Hirsch. who studied with the Columbia University Seminar in Mexico during the summer of 1935. spoke of "Life and Customs in Mexico." At the annual national convention held in St. Louis, Missouri. Robert Yaeger, the president, represented Beta Theta chapter. The Oshkosh chapter was host to the two other Wisconsin chapters, those of LaCrosse and Milwaukee, on April 18 at the State convention. Dr. May M. Beenken was chairman of the committee in charge of the banquet and Dr. Hilda Taylor chairman of the lodging committee. Dr. Irene Price was in charge of the round-table conclave and Francis Roberts was in charge of publicity. KAPPA DELTA PI Top Row: Vandorhoidon Nichols. Ramseth. Olp Roeck. Domke. Ritger. Anger Center Row: Dr. Beenken. Engel. Rasmussen, Wotak, Dahlke. Thorson, Cuff. Dr. Price Lowor Row: Kraft. Gobauer. Van Keuron. Roborts. Mosoly. Miss Kolly. Weston. Miss M. Evans Page 52KAPPA DELTA PI President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Historian OFFICERS 1 Robert Yaeger O Russell Mosely N Ruth VanKeuren g Margaret Kelly Francis Roberts Councilor J. O. Frank MEMBERS IN FACULTY Dr. May M. Beenken J. O. Frank J. A. Breese Hulda Dilling Dr. Barbara Donner Dr. J. F. Duncan Maysel E. Evans Marie A. Hirsch Margaret Kelly Dr. Irene Price Louise Scott Dr. Hilda Taylor Pres. Forrest R. Polk Enid Anger Margaret Cuff Theodore Dahlke Betty Dodds Frank Domke Jane Engel Marie Gebauer Max Gulig Milton Heintz Dora Kraft Anita Leitzke Marion McCallan Russell Mosely Bonita Mae Nichols Grace Keating Dorothy Lindgren STUDENT MEMBERS George Olp Florence Palmer Jay Ramseth Clifford Rasmussen Marie Ritger Francis Roberts Walter Roeck Vernon Thorson Jean Vanderheiden Ruth VanKeuren Earl Voland Jean Weston Hubert Wetak Carl Williams Robert Yaeger PLEDGES Maxine Mason Wanda Yahr h nh2 0»0PHI BETA SIGMA The only organization on the campus of the Oshkosh State Teachers College which gives recognition to the graduating seniors solely for outstanding achievements in the field of scholastic endeavor is the national honorary scholarship fraternity, Phi Beta Sigma. In order to further scholarship in Teachers Colleges and other colleges of education. this organization was established in 1923 by Doctor Allworth Codings, Head of the Department of Education, of the University of Oklahoma. In an educational institution, election to this society is comparable to election to Phi Beta Kappa in liberal arts colleges and universities. The highest type of scholarship on the campus is represented by members of Phi Beta Sigma. In February. 1925, the Gamma chapter of Phi Beta Sigma was granted a charter. Fifteen per cent of the seniors graduating from the four-year courses may be elected to membership in this fraternity, but the entire quota is not always filled. The society sponsors an annual spring assembly program in honor of the newly elected members, in addition to giving public recognition to them on Class Day. In the latter part of the second semester the incoming members are initiated, and the officers are elected for the next year. At this convocation, an important feature is the presentation of an address on some vital question of scholarship and education.PHI BETA SIGMA OFFICERS I President o Vice-President N Secretary-Treasurer Florence Werner FACULTY MEMBERS S May Beenken Harriet Lockwood Ethel Behncke N. Peter Nelson Florence Case Ellen Peake Earl Clemans Forrest Polk Hilda Dilling Gladys Smith James Duncan May Stewart Allison Farley Hugh Talbot J. O. Frank Hilda Taylor Marie Hirsch Eva Van Sistine Nevin James Florence Werner Burton Karges Corinne Kelso Ruth Willcockson Pago 55 H Nm2J QW OWOMEN'S ORGANIZATION First Semester Ruth Von Keuren Helen Skowlund Morion McCallan OFFICERS President Vice-President Sec.-Treos. Second Semester Ruth Von Keuren Helen Skowlund Anito Schwobenlonder Upon enrolling in college, every girl becomes o member of the Women's Orgonizo-tion. which wos estoblished in 1928. The object of this orgonizotion is to uphold high stondords omong the students ond to promote o democrotic social life in the school. The Executive Committee consists of Donno Marie Gifford. Dora Kraft. Carol MacNichol. Jean McVicar, Anita Schwabenlander. Helen Skowlund. Ruth Van Keuren, and Wanda Yahr. This committee controls activities of all women and assists the Dean of Women with the guidance of women students. Each Executive Committee selects its successor, which includes only one representative from each women's society and two non-society women. The officers of the organization are elected from this committee by the women of the college. The Executive Committee appoints the Locker Room Committee, which supervises the care and upkeep of the women's room. Funds for financing the organization are raised by a semester fee of twenty-five cents. One mixer is held each semester and the remainder of the money is used to improve the girl's room. Each fall the Women's Organization sponsors a Big Sister movement to acquaint the entering girls with the school. To welcome these girls a card party is held in the Training School Gymnasium, at which a short program is presented and refreshments are served. In January of the current year a delightful farewell tea in honor of Mrs. Ruth Mace was held at the Museum. All girls and faculty women were invited and a parting gift was presented to the guest of honor. WOMEN'S EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Top Row; Kraft. McVicar. Yahr. Skowlund. Schwabonlandor Bottom Row: MacNichol. Dr. Cato. Van KeurenMEN'S ORGANIZATION The Men’s Association was organized in 1934 for the purpose of bringing the men of the college closer together in mutual friendship and understanding. This organization is composed of the entire enrollment of the men in college. Each year a president, vice-president, and secretary-treasurer are elected from the group and are held responsible for the yearly program. The president appoints an executive committee consisting of two representatives from each of the four men’s societies and two representatives from the Independent Group to aid in carrying out the program. In the gymnasium building a large lounge room awaits the men who congregate here to engage in various games, magazine-reading, listening to the radio, and friendly chats. During the past year much new equipment was added to the room in the form of comfortable chairs, tables, games, magazines, and a new radio. This year the executive committee devised an elaborate program of activities. Tournaments were held for those wishing to participate in athletics, card games, winter sports, and various forms of writing. The main events of the year consisted of an all-men’s smoker the first semester, an all-men’s dinner the second semester, and Field Day in the spring when an outdoor feast was held at a neighboring plot. The faculty men were included in each event and enjoyed the moments as much as the men students. The Men’s Association has accomplished the feat of converting the life of the men into a happier and more interesting one. For such a welcome transformation Mr. Walter H. Fletcher deserves a tribute of commendation, because it was through his untiring efforts, energy, and sacrifice, that the Men’s Association was organized and has met with such success. 0 R G A N 1 Z A T I O N S MEN S ORGANIZATION Top Row: Dornbrook. Fischer. Kresse. Becker. Thews Lower: Gruenhogen, Domke, Hagene. Dumdie Pago 57SOCIAL LIFE COMMITTEE MEMBERS FACULTY Dr. Florence Cose, Chairman Mrs. Ethel Behncke Miss Orpha E. Wollangk Mr. E. A. Clemans Mr. R. J. Grant STUDENTS Lois Havermon Marie Gebauer Joe Jentz Earl Becker The Social Life Committee supervises all social events given by the college during the year. The members include Dr. Case as chairman, five faculty members appointed by the president of the college, and five students chosen from the various societies. one representative being elected from each group. The committee has many responsibilities. It plans all the college social activities and approves all other social activities. It checks the list of eligible young men for the Prom chairmanship, and assists the one elected in whatever way he desires. Although the chairman is definitely responsible for the prom, he must submit all financial plans to the chairman of the Social Life Committee. The committee plans three evening dances for each semester, including an all-school mixer, and as many afternoon dances as the funds allotted from student activity fees will permit. An innovation this year was an All-Freshman Mixer Dance held in September. Each student member of the committee has a definite part of the work to do in preparation for each party. These duties include arrangements for the orchestra, decorations, refreshments, hostesses, and publicity. The committee is important in bringing together the educational and the social activities of college life. SOCIAL LIFE COMMITTEE Top Row: Jentz, E. Becker Lowor: Gobauor, Dr. Cate. HavomanINTER-SOCIETY COUNCIL Because of the important part that social organizations play in the life of the stadents and in the activities carried on by the college, the Inter-Society Council was organized to regulate those societies. In order to govern the societies in a general way. meetings are held to which each society sends two representatives each semester: one of them a senior, the other a junior. Any society which has been in existence for over a year may apply for membership in this council and may be admitted to membership upon a two-thirds vote of the council members. One of the duties of the Inter-Society Council is the regulation of all society functions, such as the spring formals, dances, and homecoming. The most important duty, one that has been a thorn in the flesh for the last few years, is to establish uniform rules for pledging. Until recently, the regulation was that first semester students could be rushed and pledged. Last year the rule went into effect that only second semester students would be allowed to join the societies. The Council has now gone back to the original system but has delayed the period of rushing until the completion of the first six weeks of school. Another accomplishment this semester was the prohibition of the sale of tickets by the different societies to their social events. I o N S INTER-SOCIETY COUNCIL Top Row: Conger. Thows, Jontz, Wetak, Hagene, Fischer Center Row: Kraft. Bender. Norris, Yahr. Jonos. Polk. Kendziorski Lowor Row: Hough. Ritger, Van Keuronj Dr. Case. Havoman. Davios Page 59 H Nm2 Q50OSTUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS President ........................................................Frank Domke Secretary......................................... Helen Scott - Enid Anger MEMBERS Enid Anger Milton Blake Theodore Dahlke Frank Domke Harry Gorwitz Hamilton Gruehagen Ray Himes Student Body President Robert Yaeger, Ex-Officio Kathryn Hope Rueben Lautenschlager Harold Learned June Schneider John Mortell Dorothy Tangye FACULTY MEMBERS Dean Florence Case Dr. Hilda Taylor E. A. Clemans Representatives from each of the six divisions of the college compose this democratic student organization, which constitutes the executive committee of the student body. It carries on an extensive program to promote broader student expression. good fellowship among students and faculty, good scholarship and worthwhile activity. It deals with student problems as they arise. In an effort to stimulate scholarship among the students the Student Council offers meritorious service awards and scholastic awards. During the year the Student Council has sponsored many varied activities, including a benefit dance for the championship football team. It has passed legislation clarifying the unwritten laws regarding the senior prom. STUDENT COUNCIL Top Row: 8lako. Dahlko. Lautenschlager, Gorwitz. Tangyo, Mortell Front Row: Gruonhagon. Angor, Dr. Case. Domke. LearnedPI KAPPA DELTA Pi Kappa Delta, national honorary forensic fraternity, is represented in Wisconsin by three chapters, one of which is located at Oshkosh State Teachers’ College. Membership in this organization is based upon the degree of experience and achievement which the college student has attained through his participation in oratory, extempore speaking, and debate. This organization is composed of over two hundred chapters located in thirty-seven states. The purpose of the organization is to promote the interests of intercollegiate forensics by encouraging a spirit of cooperation among participants, and by conferring upon deserving candidates a badge of distinction, proficiency, and honor, varied ancf graduated according to merit and achievement. There are four degrees of membership in Pi Kappa Delta, namely: fraternity, proficiency, honor, and special distinction. The Oshkosh Gamma Chapter has members in each degree but that of special distinction. The fraternity sponsors a provincial and a national tournament during alternate years. Oshkosh was represented by two men’s and two women’s teams at the Wisconsin-lllinois Province Tourney last year, but was unable to send representatives to the National Tourney at Houston. Texas this year. MEMBERSHIP DEGREES Fraternity Mary Gronouski Proficiency Marvin McCarthy. Ervin Springborn. Norbert Polakowski, Fayne Tegatz, Lucille Blahnik, Aaron Kimball Honor Fahey Flynn. Dora Kraft, and Donald Dornbrook PI KAPPA DELTA Top Row: Polakowski. Sprinqborn, Mr. James McCarthy Lower: Blahnik. Dornbrook. Flynn. Kraft Page 61 "PREPARED IN MIND AND BODY." Twenty-one years ago the society was organized .... industrial arts our specialty .... The main events of the year were homecoming and our nice big dirigible .... the banquet at the Colonial Inn ... . the "Wood Butcher's Ball'' later .... the rushing party still later at Kresse's .... and last, but not least, the annual Iota-Delta Phi formal. May 23. Pago 62IOTA ALPHA SIGMA OFFICERS 1st Semester 2nd Semester Milton Schmidt President Edwin Kendziorski Vice-President Earl Becker George Zabel and Bernard Ryan Secretary Francis Roch Xavier Kading . Treasurer .. Roy Jensen Norbert Nelson . Marshall Stanley Helms Tennis Kresse Critic Jay Ramseth Vernon Patz . . Historian Norbert Nelson Earl Becker MEMBERS Tennis Kresse Howard Christensen Howard McCourt Clarence Crane Norbert Nelson John Edwards Vernon Patz Max Gulig Jay Ramseth Stanley Helms Francis Roch Orville Hoppe Waldemar Roethig Roy Jensen Bernard Ryan Xavier Kading Milton Schmidt Edwin Kendziorski Chester Wurl Anthony Kolitsch Carl Zimpel James Ceronsky PLEDGES Charles Olsen Wilmer Dorschner Merle Robertson Francis Hellert Robin Scott Joseph Herr Norbert Sladky Roland Huebner Stanley Sorenson Glenn Larsen Faculty Adviser: Mr. H. H. Whitney IOTA ALPHA SIGMA Top Row; Dorichnor. Heubner. Sladky. Ceronsky. Hoppe. Edward . Herr Center Row: Duchac. Sorenson. Mr. Whitney. Schmidt. Ryen, Hillert Lower: Nelson. Roch, Becker. Kresse. Kondnorski. Jenson. Ramseth Pago 63 WZO H Nm2 Q5)0DELTA PHI 1st Semester Wanda Yahr . .. Jane Engel........ Kathryn Goggins. . . Elizabeth Jane Rojahn Margaret Cuff . . . Jane Ives ........... Ruth Van Keuren Wilma Blechl Margaret Cuff Iris Dean Betty Dodds Jane Engel Frances Forrest Jean Forrest Evelyn Goehring Kathryn Goggins Jane Ives Elaine Larson OFFICERS President .. Vice-President. . Secretary .. ..Treasurer .. Historian Custodian . ... Critic .. . MEMBERS 2nd Semester ............. .Jane Ives Margaret Cuff . . Wilma Blechl Elizabeth Jane Rojahn . . .. Elizabeth Valkoske . ........ Pearl Them ............Jean Forrest Eloise Lewis Mary June Richaby Elizabeth Jane Rojahn Lucille Sweet Pearl Them Elizabeth Valkoske Jean Vanderheiden Ruth Van Keuren Jean Weston Wanda Yahr PLEDGES Dorothy Briggs Marie Collins Lucille Cramer Elaine Huston Virginia Lorenz Faculty Adviser: Irene Sorenson Betty Vanderheiden Verna Voss Deloris Wollenburg Jeanette Zajac Miss Grace Shimek DELTA PHI Top Row: Zajac, Collins. Huston. Voss. B. Vandorheiden. Van Kouren. F. Forfeit. Wollonburg Center: Rickaby. Briggs. Doan. Cramer. Goggins. Loronz, Sorenson. Larsen. Yahr. Woston Front Row: Rojahn. Them. Blechl. Miss Shimek, Ives. J. Forrest. Valkosko. Engel. J. VanderheidenDELTA PHI “FRIENDSHIP. LOYALTY, SERVICE.’ The main events of the season for Delta Phi were .... the party honoring Miss Shimelc .... the Homecoming banquet at the Raulf. the big "Wood Butchers' Ball"......rushing at the Valley Tea Room .... the sleigh ride -----pledging at the Museum-------and finally the Iota-Delta Phi formal. ■ Pago 65 w20 n N-z 0a0 LYCEUM MWE SHAPE OUR OWN DESTINIES" Lyceum, organized in 1871. was again well represented in extra-curricular activities this year . . . Athletics, publications, drama, and honor societies all have Lyceum men in them . . . Memorial Vodvil Trophy again given this year . . . Main social events included the Masquerade, Homecoming, rushing parties, and finally the annual Lyceum-Phoenix formal, prelude to the finals.LYCEUM 1st Semester Aaron Kimball. John Oldfield...... Harry Wolff ....... Harold Ihrlce..... Ted De Leoleos Richard Thews ... Eugene Steclcbauer OFFICERS President Vice-President Secretary . Treasurer Critic . . Historian . Custodian 2nd Semester John Oldfield Eugene Steclcbauer Richard Thews William Lentz Herman Brandt William Conlee ..... Jack Nebel MEMBERS Robert Arseneau George Behnke Arthur Besse Herman Brandt William Conlee Ted De Leoleos Edwin Embertson Harold Ewald Norman Ewald William Hansen Royal Ihrke John Kildsig Aaron Kimball Frederick Kopitzke Edward Ledvina Paul Lemke William Lentz James Miracle Kermit Myers Lawrence Muehrer Jack Nebel John Oldfield Stance Smolen Eugene Steckbauer Carl Swiston Richard Thews Norman Thoresen Lewis Tindall Robert Volkman Carl Williams Harry Wolff Charles Worby Robert Yaeger PLEDGES Howard Daher, Albert Garberg, Melvin Grandman ADVISER J. O. Frank LYCEUM Top Row: Myers, 8osse. Arseneau. Smolen. N. Ewald. R. Ihrke. indall, H. Ewald. Kopitzke Center: Grandman. Ledvina. Kildsig. Embertson. Worby. Lorn . Volkman. Thoresen. Swiston Lower: Steckbauer. H. Ihrke. De Looleos. Conlee. Wblff. Old! !d, Lentz. Thews. Nobel fage 67 w20«h Nm2 q»oo R G PHOENIX A N OFFICERS T 1st Semester 2nd Semester 1 Maxine Mason President Vivian Davies Z Helen Scott Vice-President Elizabeth Fitzgerald A Vivian Davies Secretary ... Emily Kimball T Jeanne McVicar Treasurer . . . . ... Jeanne McVicar I Betty Klucinske . Custodian Jean Himes o Elizabeth Fitzgerald .. Reporter ... Jane Ann Pinkerton N Marian Polk . Historian Betty Klucinske s MEMBERS Elizabeth Barlow lone Maltby Mary Ellen Clark Maxine Mason Vivian Davies Jeanne McVicar Elizabeth Fitzgerald Jeannette Miller Marie Gebauer Alice Morgan Julia Hanley Wilma Petters Jean Himes Jane Ann Pinkerton Norma Killam Marian Polk Emily Kimball Elizabeth Ritsch Betty Klucinske Eleanor Stinson PLEDGES Louise Demming Leila Pfund Marion Eichinger Verna Pfund Marjorie James Bettye Zimmerman Joyce Peterson FACULTY ADVISERS Miss Amy Wold Miss Helen Skemp PHOENIX Top Row; Stinson. Killom, Damming. Jamos. Potters. Gebauer. Zimmerman. Miller. Hanley Center; Maltby. L. Pfund. Morgan. Ritsch. V. Pfund. Peterson, Clark. Eichingor. Barlow Lower: Polk. Klucinske. McVicar. Pinkerton. Himes. Davies. Kimball. Fitzgerald. Mason Paoo 68•’CULTURE NOT SHOW" Phoenix .... oldest society in the school .... founded 1875 .... members are proud of its traditions. Annually Phoenix presents scholarship trophy to a society .... presents Christmas program for Sunneyview patients .... holds homecoming dinner in the fall .... dinner-dance during winter .... Lyceum-Phoenix spring formal. Members are extremely active in extra-curricular activities .... participated in vod-vil .... basketball .... play contest . . . . publications claim many members .... several staff heads .... one member assistant editor of Quiver .... one member associate editor Advance .... members represented in Wilton Club .... Playfellows . . . . Marquette .... Forum .... Debate .... A Capella. Phoenix strives to uphold the ideals of loyalty and truth. Pogo 69 «ZO-H N-z oaowzo—! N-z n»o "VERSATILITY" 7:30 Thursday night . . . President Olp raps vainly for order . . . finally succeeding to a fair degree . . . soon a hot argument is waging between Bob Gronowski and Vialor Dumdie over the orchestra for the spring formal . . . Dumdie's success is shown when the group rises unanimously in support of Bob ... A motley bunch . . . forty odd strong . . . sitting in all positions depicting interest, indifference, boredom, and anxiety . . . but all regular fellows ... that’s Periclean. Pago 70PERICLEAN OFFICERS 1st Semester 2nd Semester I Joe Jentz President . . . George Olp z Theodore Dahlke Vice-President . Robert Gronowski H George Olp . . Secretary .Vincent Derscheid A T Vincent Derscheid . . . Treasurer George Lartz 1 Ray Himes Marshall Reuben Lautenschlager I Harry Gorwitz Historian Harry Gorwitz o Vernon Thorson Critic Joe Jentz N Faculty Advisers—Mr. N. S. James. Mr. J. MEMBERS T. Taylor S Armin Baier Harry Gorwitz George Olp Marlon Batterman Melvin Grancorbitz Norbert Polakowski Eric Becker Robert Gronowski Al Pupeter Harold Bieber Harvey Hanson Walter Roeck Milton Blake Albert Hartman Jerry Siefert Robert Bryan Franklin Haven Roger Sloan Glenn Conger Ray Himes Irvin Springborn Theodore Dahlke Joe Jentz Robert Steinkellner Vincent Derscheid Alanson Kossel Gerald Stowe Donald Dornbrook George Lartz John Suren Nathan Dubester Rueben Lautenschlager Lester Theile Vialor Dumdie Robert March Vernon Thorson Allan Ekvall Robert Mathwig Earl Voland William Ekvall William Mathwig Samuel Wilke Clement Fabrycki Clarendon Nelezen PLEDGES Garth Winckler Ralph Becker Theodore Lartz Ralph Schwan Clarence Daniels Edgar Nell Robert Schwandt PERICLEAN Top Row; Sloan. Stowo. Kossol. Voland. Springbok. Bryan. Ekvall, Thiole Third Row: Hartman. Thorton. Suren, Haven. Steinlollnor. Roeck. Wilke. Battorman Second Row: Mosely. Blake. Grancorbitz. Winkler. Himes. Oahlke. March. Hanton. E. Becker. Dornbrook First Row: Conger. Gronowski. Jentz. Lautenschlager. Derscheid. Olp. Oumdie. Polakowski 2 0»0h Nh2 q»o GAMMA SIGMA 1st Semester OFFICERS 2nd Semester Dora Kraft President Marie Ritger Marie Ritger .. . Vice-President Rose Reiter Emogene Greenough Secretary Irma Hildebrand Mary Gronouski . Treasurer .... Emogene Greenough Grace Byse Historian . . . Lorraine Pugh Rhea Jane Clark Custodian Doris Witthuhn Rose Reiter Critic Dora Kraft Patricia Benson MEMBERS Myrtle Klade Helen Brown Dora Kraft Grace Byse Verona Nichols Rhea Jane Clark Lorraine Pugh Emogene Greenough Rose Reiter Irma Hildebrand Marie Ritger Marian Kasten Doris Witthuhn Barbara Bigford PLEDGES Ann Prickett Harriet Brenneke Betty Radtke Ruth Dushenski Thelma Swisher Mary Fritz Jane Weber Audrey Guhl HONORARY MEMBER Eleanor Shea ADVISERS Miss Viola Stockfish Miss Janet Evans GAMMA SIGMA Top Row: Bigford. Klado, Clark. Kasten, Swisher. JJrown Confer Row: Dushonski, Bronnolio. Weber. Prickett. Benson. Nichols. Miss J. Evons Front Row: Groenough, Witthuhn. Pugh. Ritger, Roiter, Hildebrond. KraftGAMMA SIGMA •’FORWARD ’ Right off the bat ... we got the Scholarship Cup . . . rushing at "Pat's" . . . no money to spend . . . but the candy was good . . . Remember Homecoming in the Raulf Tudor Room ... we certainly cut loose ... The party at the Century with Periclean was a reality after the arguments were over . . . Stomach-aches . . . waffles . . . "Rit's" ... 16 gals in one room . .. then Greenough’s Christmas party . . . Did you get what you wanted? . . . Rushing party again . . . this time it was a cabaret in the Raulf Hotel . . . captured the Sportsmanship Trophy in basketball . . . Finally the formal. May 22 . . . and. of course, the assembly program. Page 73 "IN HOC SIGNO VINCES" Philakean organized in 1899 . . . oldest local fraternity . . . has high officers in Inter-society Council, Student Council, Men's Organization . . . Advance edited and managed by two of the members . . . football season gave a Philakean the captainship . . . annual Alethean-Philakean Brawl a howling success . . . rushing at Aunt Bess’ . . . spring brought Inter-Society Basketball Championship . . . "Journey’s End" added laurels to the Philakeans and other players in it . . . the Prom with a Philakean as king . . . last get-to-gether with sister society at spring formal. Pago 74PHILAKEAN OFFICERS 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hubert Wetak............. , . . President . . Hamilton Gruenhagen Hamilton Gruenhagen .... Vice-President.. Henry Gardner John Henkel ................ Secretary-Treasurer..........................John Henkel Myron Ellingson .......... Corresponding Secretary Urban Krippene Edgar Hagene Historian Clifford Fischer Frank Domke .................... . Critic .................. . Hubert Wetak Harold Learned ...................Marshall . . . . . Richard Talbot Custodian................ John Carroll MEMBERS John Carroll Charles Friday Urban Krippene Ralph Strassen Lyle Dobyns Henry Gardner Andree Krueger Richard Talbot Frank Domke Hamilton Gruenhagen Harold Learned Arthur Van Slyke Dennis Ehricke Marvin Gutknecht John Mortell Richard Walsh Edmund Fintak Edgar Hagene John Penny Hubert Wetak Clifford Fischer John Henkel Howard Penny Orrin Wickert PLEDGES George Becker Gilbert Frank Marvin McCarthy Ralph Saczychinski William Bradley John Gorham John McCoy Jack Schmidt Boyd Clark James Gormican Edward Mortell Bernard Siviur Carroll Clark Edward Heisinger John Mosling David Tack Donald Clark Ben Houfek Garrett Mulva Gilbert Wastel Roy Collar John Konrad Walter Price John Werner Bernard Derr James Martell Sidney Richman Gerald Fintak Norman Martin Nile Roeder HONORARY MEMBERS Gilbert Barlow Robert Hubbard FACULTY ADVISERS Mr. E. A. Clemans Mr. N. Peter Nelson f t f««t«t««? i ,t rrt t f PHILAKEAN Top Row: Domke. Dorr, Heisinger. Houfek. Siviur. Konrad. B. Clark Collar. Walsh. D. Clark. Waste! Third Row: Ehricka. Gutknecht. Bradley. Martell. Mosling. Friday. Dobyns. Wickert. Hagene. Strassen. Van Slyke Second Row: Bocker. Penny. Frank. Learned. Gorham. Martin. Roeder. E. Mortell. Fintak. McCarthy. Barlow First Row: Saczchinski. Carroll, Krippene. Wetock. Gruenhagen, Gardner. Fischer. Talbot0 R G A N 1 Z A T I O N S ALETHEAN 1st Semester OFFICERS 2nd Semester Bernice Barlow President Enid Anger Enid Anger Vice-President . Carol MacNichol Lois Haveman Secretary Rose Cohen Florence Farley Treasurer Dorothy Tangye Kathrine Mortell . Historian Jane Gallun Rose Cohen . . Custodian Annetta Werner Virginia Krueger Critic Florence Farley Enid Anger MEMBERS Virginia Krueger Bernice Barlow Carol MacNichol Ruth Bender Gertrude McCoy Helen McDonald Genevieve Bloch Rose Cohen Kathryn McIntosh Marion Deihl Jane Merrill Florence Farley Kathrine Mortell Kathrine Fitzgerald Marjorie Nolte Marion Flanagan Jane Phillips Jane Gallun June Ross Gail Gardner Audrey Smith Helen Goettmann Marian Sparby Kathryn Grenhagen Dorothy Tangye Lois Haveman Fayne Tegatz Kathryn Hope Annetta Werner Faculty Adviser: Mrs. F. Werner PLEDGES Rose Mary Corr Rita Dushenslci Honorary Adviser: Miss Orpha Wollangk ALETHEAN Top Row: Fitzgorald. Sporby, Dollar , Kruegor. Goold, McDonald. Phillips. Flanagan. Goettmann Contor Row: Mortoll, Smith. Diahl, Corr, Nolte. Tagatz, Gardnor. Marrill, Dushontli Lower Row: Bloch, Haveman. Barlow, Gallun, Tangye. Anger, MacNichol, Farley. Cohen, Werner Pago 76ALETHEAN ••TRUTH AND LOYALTY" Well girls, we went to town again . . . copped some first prizes . . . Homecoming float, Kappa Gamma play cup. and the basketball trophy . . . gave a "Brawl'' that went over big . . . rushing at the Century . . . our spring formal wound things up for us till the cottage party . . . 1936 was a successful year for Alethean. Pago 77 wZOwh nh2 Q»joc 20 h n !2 0W0 KAPPA GAMMA •’KNOW YOUR OPPORTUNITY” Highlights of the season . . . Homecoming, the float and the banquet at the Raulr . . . the informal dance in January held at the Raulf . . . the rushing party for prospects . . . the spring formal May 9th at the Athearn . . . Our play contest held November 19th to the 21st. Pago 78KAPPA GAMMA 1st Semester Donna Marie Gifford Carol Rasmussen Jeanette Hebblewhite Lois Hough ....... Arlene Madison Marjorie McCallan Grace Michels........ OFFICERS President Vice-President Secretary . . Treasurer Critic Custodian Reporter 2nd Semester Marjorie McCallan Grace Michels Carol Rasmussen .......Lois Hough Arlene Madison Helen Humphrey Donna Marie Gifford MEMBERS Yvonne Altman Pronase DeKeyser Donna Marie Gifford Jeanette Hebblewhite Lois Hough Helen Humphreys Evelyn Jones Marjorie McCallan MArian McCallan Arlene Madison Grace Michels Carol Rasmussen PLEDGES Lucile Blahnilc Nelda Cooke Grace Keating Jean La Fontaine Olive McWilliams Ethel Stromme Faculty Adviser: Miss Corinne Kelso I z A T I O N S KAPPA GAMMA Top Row; Cooke. Strome. Miss .Roper, La Fontoine. Blahnik Center Row: Mitt Kelso. Jonos. Do Koyser. Kooting. Me Williams Front Row: Humphries. Madison. Rasmussen. McCallan. Hough. Gifford. Michols Pago 79 o«o zLAMBDA CHI 1st Semester Helen Skowlund ......... Jean Webster ................. Clara Lem .................... Alice Zoerb................. Kathryn Davis............. Phyllis DeMaiffe...... Elvere Gruenstern...... Mae Bassett Kathryn Bradford Kathryn Davis Phyllis DeMaiffe Elvere Gruenstern Mary Agnes Hurd Helen Kirley Alice Krings Alice Krueger OFFICERS President Vice-President Secretary . Treasurer Historian Custodian Reporter MEMBERS PLEDGES Jeannette Burt 2nd Semester Helen Norris Bonita Nichols Jean Rogers Alice Zoerb Kathryn Davis Mae Bassett Helen Skowlund Clara Lem Dorothy Mayer Bonita Mae Nichols Helen Norris Jean Rogers Marian Siebensohn Helen Skowlund Alice Zoerb Jean Webster HONORARY MEMBERS Dorothy Lindgren FACULTY ADVISERS Dr. Irene Price Miss Margaret Kelly LAMBDA CHI Top Row: Hurd. Basset. Nichols. Zoerb. Davis Center Row: Krings. Kurly. Norris. Skowlund. Burt. Lindgren Front Row; Mayor. Krueger. Gruenstern, Siebensohn. Do Maiffe. Miss Price Pago 80LAMBDA CHI "FOR THE SAKE OF GAIN1 Another year gone . . . What did we do? . . . Rushing at Alice Zoerb’s . . . Charity Carnival with two booths . . . Homecoming with a second prize float, not forgetting the banquet . . . Rushing with a theater party and ice cream . . . The party for initiates ... "I Smell Smoke''—our's in the vodvil ... To top things off, the formal at the Athearn. Page 81 wZOwH nm2 OMOH N 2 0»0 ALPHA CHI In 1926 the class of the rural division recognized the need of an organization which would prepare the members as future leaders in their communities. To meet this situ-O ation. the Ruralite Society was formed. In 1930 its name was changed to Alpha Chi. N During the year, programs have included dramatizations, group singing, instrumental S selections, readings, speeches, and amateur hours. Alpha Chi held its Homecoming Banquet at the Valley Tea Room. Members of the society took part in the Kappa Gamma Play Contest and won favorable mention with their play "The Mayor and the Manicure." They also took part in the county-wide play contest, and gave as an assembly program March 5. two one-act plays and a musical number. They attended the Rural Life Convention held at Madison, and sponsored a second annual Parents' Day for the Rural Division, for which they presented a literary and musical program. They also gave an informal reception to their fathers and mothers who came to take them home at the time of their Easter Vacation. Student teaching in the Rural Division is carried on at the following schools: Snell. Evansville. Butte des Mortes. Slough Bridge, and Allenville. The practice teachers assigned to these different schools gain valuable experience by living in the rural communities in which they teach and by taking complete charge of some phases of the school. The members of Alpha Chi are now planning a trip to Madison in May to attend the annual state conference of the Country Life Clubs of America with which Alpha Chi is affiliated. In preparation for this conference they are receiving training as discussion leaders under the direction of Mr. N. S. James. They will be participants in a full day of activities—addresses, group discussions, and student-directed meetings.ALPHA CHI 1st Semester OFFICERS 2nd Semester Lucille Wollenburg President Elaine Larson Patricia Lacy Vice-President ... . Evelyn Splittgerber Gladys Thorson Gladys Thorson . Treasurer Margaret Fuller , Secretary .... . Marcella Schneider Marie Anders MEMBERS Elizabeth Madden Florence Armstrong Dorothy Mannenbach Florence Brennan Deloris Martin Pauline Busse Dorothy Mayer Monica Costello Roseann O'Brien Veronica Cruice Mary Orton Mercedees Frome Edna Palecek Margaret Fuller Hazel Pilling Margery Fuller Sylveria Graff Ruth Carol Rasmussen Marcella Schneider Mildred Hansen Virginia Sipple Ethel Huebner June Snyder Mylole Hull Irene Sorenson Helen Humphreys Evelyn Splittgerber Marion Hunter Ethel Stromme Margaret Kelroy Gladys Thorson Orpha Krueger Lucille Toll Patricia Lacy Marybelle Treadway Elaine Larson Lucille Wollenburg Alice Lorrigan Kathryn Yager Faculty Adviser: Miss May L. Stewart ALPHA CHI Top Row; Graff, Marjorie Fullor, Krueger. Bus o. Toll, Slrommo. Armstrong, Orton, Mayor, Kelroy Centor Row: Margaret Fuller, Cruico. Brennan, Mannonbach, O’Brien. Pilling, Soronson. Yager, Jurkish, Martin. Fromo Front Row: Costello. Sipplo, Lorrigan, Wollonborg, Schneider. Lorson. Thorson. Splittgorber. Polacokw'Z 0mh nh2 QM0 PHI CHI MU OFFICERS President............................ Theodore Dehike Vice-President .................... .. .Gaylord Beard Secretary .. Dorothy Lindgren Treasurer . . . .... Joe Jentz FACULTY ADVISERS Dr. May M. Beenken Dr. Irene Price Phi Chi Mu. college mathematics club, whose name signifies "Light by Reason of Mathematics ', was established in February. 1931. by Dr. May M. Beenken. The club has already made its place in the college and has developed a less formal attitude toward mathematics. The purpose of the club is to further interest in the cultural, recreational, and practical phases of mathematics and to give opportunity for social contacts among the students in the mathematics department. Associate membership is open to any student who has received at least a "B" grade in his first semester of freshman mathematics. Anyone enrolled in a mathematics class beyond that of freshman level is eligible to become an active member. During the year, club members presented mathematical papers at the regular monthly meetings. These were followed by discussions and by mathematical games and recreations. In February a mathematical party was held in the men's room to honor the new members. As a fitting climax to the years activities, an annual picnic was held in May to give the members one last social gathering before the close of the school year. PHI CHI MU Top Row.- Conger. Battorman. Olp, Oldfield, Womaski. Sloan Cantor: Dr. Boenlien. Engol. Dornitroich. Collar. Wetak. Dobynt. Skowlund. Dr. Price Lower: Polakowski, Prickett. Board. Jont , Dahlko. lindgron, Grandman Page 84MARQUETTE OFFICERS 1st Semester Mary Gronouski President 2nd Semester Harriet Barney Edward Heisinger Emogene Greenough . . . Vice-President Jean Forrest Treasurer Jean Forrest Kathryn Goggins Secretary Marshall Jeannette Zajac Norbert Nelson Religious Adviser: Reverend Father Kleiber Faculty Adviser: Dr. May M. Beencken Marquette Society was organized in 1908 by the Catholic students for the purpose of discussing religious problems pertaining to their faith and fostering social activities among its members. The society has always been active in all intersociety activities. Each year a dancing party open to the student body is sponsored by the society. Columbus Day. October 12. was the day chosen for the Marquette assembly program. At the bi-weekly meetings the members present talks, musical numbers and dramatic selections, after f hich a social hour is enjoyed. Much of the success of the Marquette Society during the past year is due to the faculty adviser. Dr. May M. Beencken, and the religious adviser. Reverend Father Kleiber. MARQUETTE Top Row; Cruico. Kelroy, C. Caronsly. Sladky. Simonson. J. Coronsly. Bosso. Nolson Second Row: Beenlen. Busso. LaFontaine, Jorgens. R. O'Brien. Pricltott. Pitr. Yager. Steclbnuer Firsl Row: Costello. Mannonbach. G'eenough, Zajac. Barney. Hoisingor. Forrest. Graff. Fullor2 0»0 COLLEGE LUTHERAN SOCIETY i z A T I O N S 1st Semester OFFICERS 2nd Semester Knute Dornstreich .. President . . Esther Zuehlke Esther Zuehlke Vice-President Elizabeth Valkoske Secretary Lucille Cramer Harvey Kahler ... Treasurer Harvey Kahler Faculty Adviser: Dr. Burton Karges The College Lutheran Society is an organization whose main purposes are to acquaint the Lutheran students attending Oshkosh State with their fellow Lutherans, and to keep them within the influence of their church. Regular meetings are held bi-weekly, the place of assembling alternating between the Jackson Drive Church and the Oakland Avenue Church. Reverend Harold Kleinhans and Reverend Paul W. Lueders. pastors of these churches, alternate in supervision of the meetings. A short devotional service precedes the business meeting, which is followed by a program. Several purely social gatherings with eats n everything" are held during the year. COLLEGE LUTHERAN SOCIETY Top Row: Rooder, Kruogor. Kahler Lowor: Cromer. Zuehlke, Erdmann. Waller Pago 86WILTON CLUB OFFICERS 1st Semester 2nd Semester Eloise Lewis......................... President....................Francis Roberts Francis Roberts ............... . . Vice-President ...................... Jane Ives Jean Vanderheiden ...............Secretary-Treasurer Margaret Cuff Faculty Adviser: Dr. Hilda Taylor The Wilton Club was organized in the spring of 1932 for the purpose of fostering interest in literature and promoting creative writing. The club was named after a famous English estate which during the Shakespearean period was the center of literary activities. Membership in Wilton Club is open to any students who have completed one year of college work and who are interested in this type of activity. Once each month Wilton Club holds a meeting with programs furnished almost entirely by the members, consisting of studies and open discussion of all types of literature. Members are encouraged to do original writing, some of which is presented as part of the programs. The club was organized under the leadership of Dr. Hilda Taylor, who has continued as faculty adviser. M20«h Nm2 Qwo FORUM OFFICERS President.................................. Frank Domke Secretary ................................. Marian Pollc The period of economic, social, and political transition through which the nations of the world are passing offers to the student of political and social science a great opportunity for analysis of modem trends. The stress of these current problems and the student interest in them was one of the main reasons for the inauguration in 1933 of the Forum society, a society open to all students who are interested in present social problems. The society frequently at its meetings has competent local speakers who present talks before this group of college students and their friends. The various topics discussed throughout the past year include nationalism, nazism, and communism, the conditions in Germany and the condition of present-day Mexico. Among the speakers were Miss Marie Hirsch of the history department, who spoke on her recent travel through Mexico: Dr. E. O. Thedinga. a new history instructor, who spoke on his travels and research studies in Germany a few years ago: Mr. T. E. Furman, who described his travels through Russia last year; and a member of the newly organized Council for the Promotion of Americanism, who described the reasons for the inauguration of his organization as well as the program its members wish to carry out. Mr. N. S. James, debate coach and instructor in the English department is the adviser of the group. Pago 88SOCIETY AWARDS That the different phases of school life may receive their proper stimulation and emphasis, four societies. Phoenix. Kappa Gamma. Delta Phi Alumnae Association, and Lyceum, present trophies to the persons of highest excellence in each of four fields. Phoenix gives a silver loving cup to the society having the highest average grade-point. The records of all societies are carefully compiled and checked, and the three highest are announced in assembly at the same time the cup is awarded sometime in the first semester. Delta Phi gained the trophy in 1932. Lyceum in 1933, Delta Phi in 1934, and this year Gamma Sigma obtained the coveted cup. Later in the first semester the Kappa Gamma Play Contest is staged. Usually, three or four plays are given each of three nights, all of the social societies participating. Amid all the running around, the props having to be held up. and the streaks of grease-paint, the Aletheans emerged the victors for the third successive year. "As the Tumbrils Pass' was their presentation; Periclean won second place with "First-Degree Murder"; and Lyceum gained third place with "Message from Garcia". Because the Aletheans have obtained the Kappa Gamma Cup for three years, it now has the right to keep it, and next year Kappa Gamma will inaugurate a new trophy. About the middle of the second semester, the Delta Phi Alumnae Association sponsors its annual Prose Writing Contest. Short stories, expository essays, and descriptive material are eligible for entrance. Within the last three years. Francis Roberts won the award twice, in 1933 and 1934, and he tied with Clark Byse in 1935. This year's winner is as yet undetermined. Lyceum’s Vodvil Contest usually comes in April, climaxing most of the inter-society competitions. Short skits of fifteen or twenty minutes are given by each group on the program, with audience and actors alike enjoying themselves greatly. In 1935. the first year that Lyceum had sponsored the Vodvil and had given a cup. Alethean won with their humorous take-off on school politics; "The Good Ship Lollypop ". given by Phoenix, was second; and Periclean's "No, No, A Thousand Times No!" came in third. WZ0wH Nm2 Q»0ACTIVITIESPoge 91WOMEN'S DEBATE This season the women's debate team, composed of Dora Kraft, Fayne Tegatz. Mary Gronouslci, Lucille Blahnik, Agatha Norton, and Eleanor Stinson, established one of the finest records in the history of women's debate. They debated the official Pi Kappa Delta question, "Resolved: That Congress be given the power to over-ride by a two-thirds majority vote, decisions of the Supreme Court declaring acts of Congress unconstitutional." and the Mid-West Conference question. "Resolved: That the United States support the League of Nations in the application of economic sanctions." Lucille Blahnik and Eleanor Stinson opened the season on February 16 when they upheld the affirmative of the latter question against the Lawrence College negative. These same two teams met again on February 19 when they debated before the Kaukauna Rotary Club at Kaukauna. On March 2. 3. and 4. two women's teams journeyed to St. Paul, Minnesota to participate in the Northwest Debate Tournament. Here Dora Kraft, Lucille Blahnik, Fayne Tegatz. and Mary Gronouski. established the commendable record of placing among the top six teams of a tournament which embraced 48 teams representing seven states. The number two team consisting of Mary Gronouski and Lucille Blahnik was eliminated in round four, and the number one team composed of Dora Kraft and Fayne Tegatz finished with six wins and three losses. Lucille Blahnik alternated with Fayne Tegatz on the number one team after the first day's debating had been completed. John T. Taylor assisted N. S. James in coaching the women's team. WOMEN S DE8ATE Top Row: Kraft. Tegatz. Norton lowor; Blahnik. GronouskiMEN'S DEBATE The year 1935 proved to be a very active and successful one for the men’s debate squad composed of Fahey Flynn, Donald Dornbrook. Norbert Polakowski. Ervin Spring-born. Marvin McCarthy, and Norman Thoresen, who debated the official Pi Kappa Delta question, "Resolved: that Congress be empowered to over-ride, by a two-thirds majority vote, decisions of the Supreme Court declaring acts of Congress unconstitutional." The affirmative team of Dornbrook and Flynn and the negative team of McCarthy and Springborn, who alternated with Polakowski, represented Oshkosh in a series of non-decision debates with the colleges of St. Olaf and St. Thomas of Minnesota and River Falls Teachers College of Wisconsin, while the team of Thoresen and Polakowski engaged in two pre-season debates with Marquette University. Dornbrook and Flynn also took part in a debate with Lawrence College on February I 3 before the Menasha high school student body and on February 19 before the Appleton Kiwanis club. The season’s tournament debating got under way on February 22 and 23 when two teams representing Oshkosh finished in first-place, on the percentage basis, in a tourney held at Whitewater. Dornbrook and Flynn upheld the negative and won four and lost one. The affirmative team, composed of McCarthy and Springborn. won three and lost two. The season's climax was effected when Oshkosh sent two teams to the Northwest Debate Tournament at St. Paul. Minnesota on March 3, 4. and 5. Team number one, composed of Dornbrook and Flynn, survived until the seventh round, and team number two. composed of McCarthy and Polakowski. was eliminated in round six. MEN S DEBATE Top Row: Flynn. Mr. James, Springborn, Dornbroolc lower; McCerlhy. Thoresen. PololowskiHO PLAYFELLOWS i V Every campus has a group of students who are interested in dramatics and play j production. At Oshkosh State Teachers College this group is the Playfellows. It has » for its aim the stimulation of interest in the art and presentation of opportunities whereby the student may express himself. Membership is qained only after a period of apprenticeship by students who have done 20 hours work in the dramatic efforts of E college production, either as one of the characters or as a member of the producing S staff. Under the direction of Miss Maysel E. Evans an annual production is staged with the cooperation of the entire college. At meetings held monthly in the Little Theatre, the organization's workshop, several one-act plays are presented under student direction. The present officers are: Leonard Nowacki, President, and Jane Ives. Secretary. The Faculty Adviser is Miss Maysel E. Evans. I PLAYFELLOWS Top Row: Barney, Vanderhciden. Webster, Huobnor. Witthuhn. Brandt, Van Kouron Confer: MacNichol. Zaiac. Stowo. Havon. Krippone. Sladky. Cuff. Gardner Lowor: Nowacki. Yahr. Miss Evans. Ivos. Kendziorski. Bender, Sweet Pago 94JOURNEY'S END Journey's End ", under the direction of Miss Maysel E. Evans, was the all-college play given April first and second. 1936. It is a tragedy of the World War by R. C. Sherrift. When first produced in London it scored a sensational success and later duplicated this success when it was produced by Gilbert Miller (by arrangement with Maurice Browne) at the Henry Miller Theater, New York. March twenty-second, 1929. It is said to have done much to revive a faith in the drama which was slowly but surely expiring." "Journey s End" scored another success this year when it was given at Oshkosh State Teacher's College under the auspices of Playfellows Society. Miss Evans was the director with Ruth Bender and Carol MacNichol as assistant directors. The production was particularly benefited by the splendid stage settings which were made by Donald Mees from Milwaukee, professional scene designer. Edwin Kendziorski was stage manager. and Leonard Nowacki was business manager. Ruth Van Keuren and Margaret Sieber composed the make-up committee. The cast consisted entirely of men. who were chosen from the school at large. The members were: Captain Hardy............................Leonard Nowacki Lieutenant Osborne .........................John Henkel Second Lieutenant Raleigh ............. . Gerald Stowe Private Mason ............................. Herman Brandt Captain Stanhope ......................... Urban Krippene Second Lieutenant Hibbert ... Richard Talbot Company Sergeant Major.................... Edgar Hagene The Colonel .............................. Henry Gardner Second Lieutenant Trotter Miles Sendee German Soldier........................................Max Unzicker German Soldier . . Tom Green P«go 9S C 2F1 — H —AS THE TUMBRILS PASS A C T I V I T I E S The play which won the cup in the Kappa Gamma Play Contest was presented by members of the Alethean Society. The cast is as follows: Gervaise ............................ ... Ruth Bender Manon................................... Kathryn Hope Gobemoche....................... ... • Kathryn McIntosh Vicomtess . Gail Gardner La Tripiere ....................... Virginia Krueger La depart............................. Annetta Werner Jurevant................................ Bernice Barlow The play was directed by Enid Anger. Gervaise. a Breton peasant is reared by an aristocratic Vicomtess in luxury and culture. When the French Revolution breaks out. all people affiliated in any way with the aristocrats are enemies of the Republic. Gervaise. however, innocent as she is and the same time in love with Jean Coulard who is the extreme patriot of the Republic, fears conviction and perhaps death in the hands of the bloodthirsty revolutionists. Although Coulard and his grandmother Manon hate the aristocrats, they so love Gervaise that Jean manages to hide them and Gervaise's guardian, the Vicomtess. in the garret of the bakery shop of citizeness Jurevant. Gobemoche. a half crazed waif is in the same garret with the fugitives. He has a mania for calling Vicomtess as aristocrat thus arousing the suspicion of La Tripiere and La Clepart. two women enjoying the gore and torture of the aristos. Meanwhile the fearful trio await word from Jean who has not been heard from for three days. They pray that he will place the tri-color cockade on the door of the bakery thus removing any suspicion of its inhabitants and refusing entrance to the searchers. Tumbrils pass one after another and the play ends when Jean Coulard places the tri-color cockado on tho bakory door and passes on with the crying, howling mob. Gervaise kneels in prayer as the curtain slowly falls.k FIRST DEGREE MURDER This very interesting play was presented by an excellent cast and had a very effective setting. The cast is as follows: Irvin Springborn . Bull O'Malley Gerald Stowe................. .. . .. .Lefty Donald Dornbrook . . ... .. ....Rabbit Earl Voland Tarpy the Jailer Franklin Haven . The Kid Director Robert Gronowski When the play opens, a depressed group of gangsters is seen sighing and impatiently awaiting news from their lawyer. They have been put in prison on a killing charge and several robbery attempts. The jailer brings them the message that all must stand trial. Bull O'Malley, the leader of the gang, decides it is best to flip a com to see who should be charged with the murder, thus preventing the deaths of perhaps all three. Lefty, the youngest of the quartet, loses on the first flip of he coin. Again they try. and Lefty is again the loser. This time he becomes hysterically frightened and instigates a verbal quarrel with Bull. Amid curses and condemnations from both the criminals. Bull, in a fit of temper and disgust, strangles Lefty, leaving the remaining three with the death penalty shadowing their lives. A C T I V I T I E S A MESSAGE FROM KHUFU Third place in the contest went to the Lyceum Society in that tragic one-act play "A Message from Khufu. " The cast included the following: Professor Hardy John Oldfield Herman........... ... . .......Herman Brandt Ben .... . . James Miracle Butch ........................... Aaron Kimball The play was under the direction of William Lentz. Professor Hardy has employed some human derelicts from the foreign legion for his expedition to the tomb of Khufu. There is a noticed cowardice in the character of Ben as he draws back in fear upon entering the age old tomb that is said to have a curse upon it. The others, along with the professor in their eagerness to gain wealth greedily invade the tomb. They discover the old coffin of Khufu and after reading the Egyptian signs of warning, continue the procedure of opening the heavy casket. Sneaking around from side to side of the uncovered coffin they gaze in wonder at the huge emerald which is in the mummified hand of Khufu. Immediately Butch and the Professor began arguing as to who will have the possession of the stone. The professor threatens Butch and the others that he will send them back to where they came from which is as bad as death to them. Butch struggles with the professor and kills him. In a proud fashion he goes to the coffin and removes the emerald from the hand. As he does this the door of the cavern slowly closes and they are trapped. Ben who has been keeping in the background because of his pitiful fear, cries and claws frantically at the door. Butch returns to the casket and shakes the mummy which gives up a poisonous fume. He falls back dead upon the cold stone floor and Herman fearfully and curiously runs to the casket to meet the same fate. In the meantime Ben. still praying for life takes the stone out of Butch's cold hand and places it in the hand of its original owner. When this deed is done the door of the dim cave slowly opens and Ben dashes out weeping. Pago 98THE BAND OFFICERS 1st Semester 2nd Semester Ervin Springborn . . President . . . ...Tennis Kresse Franklin Haven ..................Vice-President .......... Vernon Thorson Donald Dornbrook Secretary-Treasurer . . Vincent Derscheid Orville Sherman, Stanley Sorenson Russel Hollub ... ... . Librarians ...............Sidney Richman In spite of the fact that graduation of the members and the lack of new material made a large gap in the band, this organization was able, through the unfaltering cooperation and the musical ability of its director. Mr. Breese. to carry on a successful program for the past year. Each semester officers are selected from the group with the usual responsibilities. Because of lack of financial resources the band made but one out-of-town trip, that to Milwaukee. It gave one concert before the student body, and also met with the student body frequently at pep" meetings. The band, in its gay uniforms, performed its usual important function of providing fast march tempos to bolster our college spirit at the football games and especially during homecoming. It appeared at all the home football and basketball games and supported the football team at Milwaukee, where a steady drizzle of rain failed to quell its efforts. At the conclusion of each year those band members who have given faithful service to the organization are awarded a beautiful gold letter "O ' with a black monogram lyre as a recognition of such service. Prospects for next year are brighter, and with the drive for new members completed, a better organization is assured, providing the important positions can be filled. A C T I V I T I E S Pago 99 A CAPELLA Among the noteworthy organizations of Oshkosh State Teachers college, not the least deservina of praise, is the A Capella Choir, which has just concluded its sixth successful season of concerts, tours, and thorough enjoyment. The choir was organized in 1930 and has gained in repute and quality. Mr. J. A. Breese, genial music instructor of the college, directs the choir. Concerts at the First Evangelical Church of Oshkosh and the First Methodist Church of Neenah started the activities of the season. Soon after occurred a tour of southern Wisconsin, the highlight of which was a radio broadcast over WTMJ. Milwaukee, the first that the choir has ever made. Also included in this itinerary were Whitewater, Kewaskum, West Bend, Waukesha. Lake Mills. Burlington. Jefferson. Menominee Falls. Elkhorn. and Lake Geneva. This was the most extensive tour ever undertaken by the choir. The next tour included Kaukauna. Oconto, West De Pere, and Marinette. Several local concerts, and additional short trips to Fond du Lac. Kiel, and other nearby places rounded out the year's work. The program was of excellent caliber and the choir's rendition of it admirable. Soloists featured were Jean Weston. Norma Killam. George Behnke. and Hugh Moore. Under the direction of Mr. Breese. also, a chorus, composed of many from the choir, assisted by a group of students not in the choir, and several singers not in college, presented Rossini s Stabat Mater, an extremely difficult oratorio. Soloists were Miss Blanche Olsen. Mrs. Fred Jebe. Mr. Wesley Hoad, and Hugh Moore. The presentation was a decided success. All in all. those participating in the choir's work for the year reaped benefits more than compensating for the time and effort expended.ORPHEUS CLUB OFFICERS President James Miracle Vice-President Orville Sherman Secretary-Treasurer . . . Ervin Springborn Chairman of Instruction . Jean Webster Advance Reporter .. . Alpheus Larsen Faculty Adviser. . J. A. Breese MEMBERS Eleanor Adams Virginia Lorenz Winifred Anderson Bertha Merlcer George Behnke James Miracle Barbara Bigford Hugh Moore Vincent Derscheid Verona Nichols Phyllis De Maiffe Sidney Richman Mildred Erdmann Rosetta Riebe Lucy Fairbrother Orville Sherman Betty Fitzgerald Ervin Springborn Katherine Fitzgerald Jean Vanderheiden Leon Flanagan Robert Volkman Jean Forrest Earl Volund Marie Hanlcey Jean Webster Edward Heisinger Edward Wickmann Ethel Huebner Doris Witthuhn Mylola Hull Agatha Norton Mary Hurd Jean La Chapelle Jane Ives Zona Schwandt Marjorie James Ruby Roeder Alpheus Larsen Enlarging upon the activities of the college music department, a group of students interested in its further promotion and the study of operas and their composers formed the Orpheus Club this spring. This group, which is open to all, will sponsor benefit entertainments to raise funds for the different musical organizations of the college. J. A. Breese. head of the music department, has aided the development of the organization. Pago 101 THE ADVANCE Executive Editor Executive Board News Editor .. Assistant News Editor Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor Literary Editor ... . Copy Editor ... Feature Editor ... ................ .. ........... .... Frank Domke Jane Ann Pinkerton. Lyle Dobyns. Vincent Derscheid Clara Lem ... ... William Lentz ............ Marlon Batterman . . ... Theodore Dahlke ........... ... . . ... . Nathan Dubester ........................................ Roy Collar Virginia Krueger Reporters—Gaylord Beard. Vivian Davies. Rita Dushenski. Allan Ekvall, Mary Erdlitz, Mary Agnes Hurd. Al. Larsen. Virginia Lorenz. Elizabeth Rojan. Orville Sherman. Jacob Shilcrat. Gertrude Volk. Evelyn Goehring. Business Manager ..................... .. .......................... Edgar Hagene Assistant Business Manager . . Urban Krippene Typists ... . . . Jane Gallun, Marie Gebauer Frank Domko Executive Editor Edgar Hagona Business ManagerTHE ADVANCE Under new editorship beginning in September 1935. the Advance took on a new typographical appearance. The staff editors cut the size of the paper down in order to bring it to standard college tabloid size. The staff organization was somewhat revised, the editor. Frank Domke. instituting an executive board of three members that aided in the editorial work of the paper. During the year, the Advance took an active lead in carrying to a conclusion an editorial program. One of the first things of campus importance that the paper attacked was the deferred rushing plan and after several months of campaigning in the form of "Student Spout" letters and actual participation in the Intersociety council meetings enough dissension was aroused to substitute the present plan. In cooperation with the Student Council the Advance recently began a drive against reckless driving on the college parking area. The editorial policy of the paper in regard to political questions has been decidedly liberal. The paper has attacked conservative reactionism in the state and the nation. Several interesting articles were submitted by students in regard to modern political questions. The paper also took an active lead in opposition to a college petition demanding the ousting of a newspaper from the library files. Its success in this matter can be exemplified by the fact that the executive editor received a complimentary letter from Edgar G. Doudna of the board of normal school regents commending the paper's stand on the particular question. In the fall of 1935. the paper sponsored a political and campus questionnaire to which some 400 students responded. The indications of this poll were published in the paper and aroused much interest in the college. One of the features of the year was the literary supplement published with the Easter edition of the newspaper. This insert, compiled and edited by Maxine Mason. Nathan Dubester. and Virginia Krueger, contained many interesting stories and prose writings by students and faculty of the college. Likewise the paper gave push" to the outstanding campus social activities making an attempt to interpret campus problems in order to bring attitudes before the student body for discussion. ADVANCE STAFF Top Row: MacNichol. Clark. Lam. Krueger. Dornbrook. Pugh. Webster. Cooke Canter: Dubester, Gallun. Batterman. Pinkerton. Lorenz. Larsen. Kopitzki, Davies Lower: Gobauer. Collar. Dahlke. Derschied. Dobyns. Hagene. Brenneke. Rojahn Page 103  A C T I V I T I E S THE QUIVER Graduation always means parting for many seniors. They like to have remembrances and keepsakes of their classmates with whom they have spent many happy hours. The Quiver attempts to give to such students a book where-in is given a complete record of the past school year. Therefore, to those students who are leaving, the Quiver should be a means of keeping alive the scenes of their college life. To produce a successful yearbook, the first consideration is always a willing and talented staff. This year the editor was indeed fortunate in having a group ready to work, and able to follow any instructions given. Next in order of importance is the availability of material. Again the Quiver was fortunate in being able to draw upon both new and historical data. New photographs are used throughout the entire book. Representative faculty pictures are an innovation this year. Characteristic pictures of the teachers were taken at their desks, in their laboratories, at the board, and in various other places which show them at their work. The reader will find them especially interesting. New snaps, writeups. and society pictures are all included. The Oshkosh Public Museum was most generous in allowing the staff the use of their historical material. The pictures were rephotographed with excellent results in every case. Thus a section of historical pictures was made possible. These depict scenes in the life of Oshkosh which celebrates its founding one hundred years ago. Of course, in any undertaking, the financial backing is always to be considered. The Quiver, a self-supporting non-profitmaking organization, depends entirely upon student support. It receives an allotment from the Student Activity fee as well as an amount from the sale of the book. A slight revenue is received from advertising in the Student Directory, a pamphlet published by the Quiver staff at the opening of the school year. From these sources, a large handsomely bound annual can be produced each year. May the value of this book grow greater as the years pass by. QUIVER STAFF Top Row: Lindgren. Maltby. Dornbroolt. A. Ekvall. Rojahn, Dumdia. Anger. MacNichol Center: Skowlund 8arlow. Gallon. Havoman, Volkman. Oldfield. Lorenz, Pinkerton, Kopitzke. Phillips Lower: Davios. Springborn. Lorn. Zoorb, Wolff. Polk. W. Ekvail. Gobauer. Keating Pago 104QUIVER STAFF EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief...................................................... Horry Wolff Associote Editor....................................................... Morion Polk Literory Stoff ....................................................... Cloro Lem Horriet Brenneke. Vivion Dovies, Morgoret Dennis. Donold Dornbrook, Allon Ekvoll. Mory Agnes Hurd. Dorothy Lindgren. Virginio Lorenz. John Oldfield. Jone Phillips. Jone Ann Pinkerton, Helen Skowlund. Jeon Webster. Photogrophy Stoff.................................................. Edwin Kendziorski Robert Volkmon. Frederick Kopitzke. Jeonette Zojoc. Elizobeth Rojohn, Betty Klucinski. lone Moltby. Olive McWillioms. Robert Becker. Art Stoff Alice Zoerb Athletic Stoff—(Boys) Morion Bettermon. Williom Mothwig Athletic Stoff—(Girls) Evelyn Goehrinq. Groce Keoting Secretories to the Stoff . .............. John Oldfield. Jone Gollun BUSINESS STAFF Monoger . . . . ... . . .............................Williom Ekvoll Assistont Monoger ............................................. Morie Gebouer Helen Skowlund, Dorothy Lindgren. Don Mierswo, Jone Gollun. Betty Fitzgerold, Lois Hovemon, Enid Anger. Bernice Borlow. Horry Wolff Edifor-in-Chiof Williom Ekvoll Business Monogor COLLEGE KING The College Promenade which marks the climax of annual festivities was held at the Eagle's Ballroom on May I. To the strains of Al Kemper's collegiate music, faculty, students, and guests alike enjoyed the formal dance. Queen Lois Haveman and King Hubert Wetak led a glamorous march which was followed by several hundred couples. Pago 106PROMENADE QUEEN When the Grand March gave place to the mellow waltz tunes, here and there happy couples could be seen whirling and swaying in the colored reflections of the crystal ball. As the orchestra swung into its theme song at 12 o'clock, couples found their way out. happy and satisfied with the success of the dance. Pago 107 ATHLETICSPago 109wo — HWr!UH ATHLETIC COUNCIL The Athletic Council of the Oshkosh State Teachers college is the ruling body for all business involving athletics. The council is composed of eleven members, five faculty representatives and six student members. The faculty members are appointed by President Polk for a term of two years. The student members are elected by the student body, in the fall, for the duration of the school year. The faculty members appointed by President Polk are: Miss Gladys Perkerson. Mr. R. M. Kolf. Mr. R. J. Grant. Mr. H. H. Whitney, and Mr. E. A. Clemans. The student members elected by the student body at the beginning of the fall term are: Dora Kraft. Rhea Jane Clark. Marie Ritger, Reuben Lautenschlager, Edgar Hagene. and Milton Blake. Mr. Whitney, the chairman of the Council, represents the school in all conference athletic business. The Council’s main duties are: the approving of the schedule for all inter-collegiate sports: the approving of Coach R. M. Kolf's recommendations for all awards to athletes, such as letters, sweaters, and trophies, designating the winning of a championship: and the checking of finances relative to trips, guarantees to visiting teams, fees for officials, and equipment. The council this year has approved the buying of a large bus for transportation of athletes in the future. This purchase will eventually save the school a large sum of money which will be available for improvement of facilities and equipment in the coming years. ATHLETIC COUNCIL Top Row: Blake. Lautenschlager Lowor: Ritger. Kraft. ClarkATHLETICS Intercollegiate athletics will always form one of the most important phases of college life. For this reason it is the aim of the department that its high standard of success and sportsmanship shall be maintained. No other phase of college life has so great an influence on the development of college loyalty and spirit. Because of this influence of athletics on the life of our college, and because our college is to a certain extent judged by the sportsmanship and success of the teams that represent it. we cannot afford to have, in this new era of athletics that is opening before us. anything but the best. We look for teams that will bring us victories—victories founded on clean, fair play. It is this goal for which the athletic department of Oshkosh State Teachers College has striven with great success. WOHHMrSH Top Row: Stoegbauor, Swiston. Groncorbitz. Blole. Dorr Second Row: Kolf, Thorson, Strasson. Lautontchlagor. Rioso. Captain Friday Third Row: Schwan. Yaegor, Hanson. MortollTop Ro : P©f:er»«o Artor.aao iOo'ca Moore Becker Sccons Re -: DarJoij Fao-ycki, Do e' Rooc Becerra1 Thi'O Ro«: Motley Z:ebeii Math-rig Beibe'HI o6ed wohhm kh IBM (IS III Ml Friday Haesoe Granccrbitz Kloiber tautonschlager Mathwig Moore  Per:ontka Rioie Roock Mortell Mosely Schwan Stoogbauor Pago 116 — WO«HtirSH WO HWt-'SH FOOTBALL SEASON OF 1935 The 1935 football season of the Oshkosh State Teachers was the most successful season a team has enjoyed in this school since 1923. The entire team was the most faithful and best conditioned team that Coach Kolf has ever handled. In training as well as in playing, they responded readily to the coach's advice, and the ultimate was an undefeated championship team. The first practice of the season was attended by sixty-five capable prospects. The squad was not as heavy as many of the past teams, but possessed a lot of speed and reserve power. This speed and power were combined slowly, but surely, in the next ten practices, by hard conditioning work and the perfecting of Coach Kolfs system of attack. At the end of the last preliminary practice, the team had taken form as a complete unit. The Gold and White was ready for combat, and on September 21 the team traveled to De Pere to battle the Green Wave of St. Norbert's College. OSHKOSH 12 — ST. NORBERT’S 12 Statistically Oshkosh far outplayed the "Saints", but untimely fumbles and inexperience at the vital moments proved damaging to Oshkosh. The Gold and White scoring was done by Carl Swiston. who plunged twice for touchdowns behind beautiful line play and hard-charging interference. The game proved Oshkosh to be a strong team, with lack of experience in the scoring zone as the only glaring weakness. OSHKOSH 7 — JORDAN 0 Oshkosh kept the ball in Jordan territory throughout most of the game with a hard-charging offense and rugged defense. The only score of the game came after Lauten-schlager and Beiber had brought the ball within a few yards of the goal, from which point Carl Swiston rammed his way over for six points. "Chuck'' Friday converted the extra point. OSHKOSH 20 — NORTHERN STATE 0 Playing on a field covered with three inches of snow, the Oshkosh gridders ran wild over the Purple clan of Northern State of Marquette. Michigan. Despite the elements of snow, slush, mud. and high winds, the Oshkosh team displayed a fine running attack featured by lateral passes, off-tackle plays, and end runs. The first score came on a 30-yard jaunt by Milt Blake around end. The second touchdown resulted from a plunge by Swiston from the three yard line. The last score came on a reverse around end for 65 yards by Grancorbitz, who literally ran the opponents into the ground. The extra points were made by Grancorbitz on a lateral pass, and Beiber on a plunge into the line. OSHKOSH 31 — WHITEWATER 6 Unleashing a powerful and devastating attack in the early part of the game, the Golden Wave ran rough-shod over Whitewater by a score of 31-6, avenging a beating at the hands of the Purple last season. Grancorbitz scored the first touchdown of the game on a plunge from the three yard line. Shortly a ter this score. Swiston threw a pass to Rube Lautenschlager for the second touchdown of the game. In the third quarter "Rube" again scored by intercepting a pass and running twenty yards to the goal. Frank Kloiber was next to cross the coveted line on a run of six yards through tackle. The final score was put over by Milt Blake from the ten yard line. Friday converted the extra point. The game was featured by an almost perfect performance by the Oshkosh line on both offense and defense. Pago 118STEVENS POINT FORFEITS TO OSHKOSH Due to o violation of conference rules, the Stevens Point Teachers eliminated themselves from competition in 1935. It was a disappointment to the Oshlcosh team, who had been looking forward to this game in order to gain revenge for last year's defeat. It undoubtedly would have been one of the best games of the season, for the Pointers have been Osnkosh’s most bitter foe in the last few years. OSHKOSH 14 — PLATTEVILLE 7 The Golden Gladiators of Oshkosh, appearing for the first time in new gold silk pants, ruined Platteville s homecoming by administering a 14 to 7 defeat. The game was featured by the passing combination of Swiston to Lautenschlager. who collaborated to score both Oshkosh scores. Friday converted for both extra points. The play of the Oshkosh line was again outstanding, with the Oshkosh T.N.T. supplied largely by Riese. Thorson, Friday, Roeck, and Fabrycki. In the backfield, the Washburn duo. Swiston and Arseneau. played hard, aggressive ball behind beautiful interference. OSHKOSH 6 — MILWAUKEE 0 Playing on a field made a sea of mud by a twenty-four hour rain. Oshkosh plowed its way to a 6 to 0 victory over Milwaukee, the last hurdle in the way to an undisputed championship. The first half of the game was played mainly in Oshkosh territory, but the hard charging, invincible defense of the Oshkosh line kept the Green Gulls from scoring. Finally in the third quarter. Carl Swiston threw a pass to "Rube", who caught the ball, while guarded by three opponents, spun away from the grasp of the enemy, and scored the only touchdown of the game. Oshkosh might have scored later in the game, but the slippery field and ball caused fumbles and breaks which the players could not overcome. Credit for the victory must be given to every fellow who played, for team work was the deciding factor in the game. The glorious victory at Milwaukee ended the playing days of seven Oshkosh seniors. Milton Blake. Vernon Thorson. Captain Charles Friday. Clement Fabrycki. Walter Roeck, Robert Yaeger, and Russell Mosely. These fellows have worked hard for three years and were finally rewarded by bringing their Alma Mater a championship for the first time in seven years. Five Oshkosh gridders were honored by being selocted to the all-conference team at the end of the season. The players chosen on the all-star team were Reuben Lautenschlager at end, Kenneth Riese at tackle. Charles Friday at center. Milton Bloke at halfback. Carl Swiston at fullback: and Vernon Thorson was given honorable mention at guard. FOOTBALL STANDING Oshkosh 4-0 1000 Whitewater 3-1 750 Milwaukee 2-2 500 Platteville 1-3 250 Stevens Point 0-4 000  OSHKOSH SONGS AND YELLS ALMA MATER Dear Alma Mater, Mother of Ours. We raise our song to thee; Thy children stand a loyal band, Though far they scattered be. Dear Alma Mater. Mother of Ours. We raise our hearts to thee: And hold thee close by night or day. In reverent memory. Dear Alma Mater. Mother of Ours. What e'er the years unfold. Keep true our hearts in duty done. Beneath the White and Gold. White for they light, so pure, so bright; The Gold for they garnered grain. U-RAH-RAH GOLD AND WHITE U—Rah—Rah Gold U—Rah—Rah White U—Rah—Rah Team Fight! Fight! Fight! OSHKOSH STATE Oshkosh State, we're on to battle For the cause we know is right; Oshkosh State, we re on to battle For the good old Gold and White. Oshkosh State, we re ever loyal. We will conquer every foe: For we have the fighting spirit. On to vict'ry we will go. Yeah-h-h. Gold and White! Yeah-h-h. Gold and White! Yes. we will fight!—fight! Fight for Gold and White—Rah! LOCOMOTIVE U_Rah!—Rah! Oshkosh College! U—Rah!—Rah! Oshkosh College! U_Rah!—Rah! Oshkosh College! Yeah!—Yeah!—Yeah! NINE RAHS Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Team! Team! Team! Who? Team! Who? Team! Who? Team! Team! Team!BASKETBALL SEASON 1935-1936 The 1935-1936 basketball season started immediately after the last football game of the year. The prospects were not overly bright with only two regulars from the team of last year. The new freshmen were all players of high caliber, but they lacked experi-ence in conference competition, and smoothness of play, which is developed only after a great deal of practice and playing together. Even with these handicaps. Coach Kolf worked diligently with the men and at the end of the season he had a team well versed in the intricacies of basketball. Although the team did not have as successful a season as some of the past teams, it did show flashes during the season of potential power. If all the members of the team return next year, the team will undoubtedly wipe away the defeats which they suffered this year. BASKETBALL 8ack Row: Coach Kolt. E. Boeder. Himes. Hagene. Nell. 8etterman Front Row: Konrad. Nelozen, Rieso. Lautenschlager, Daniels. W. Mathwig. Derr  Page 122Paqe 123 MQHHWr3JH BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 1935-1936 Score Dec. 6— Ponds’’ Appleton 30-22 10—Green Boy Bent's Sports 35-23 1 3—River Foils 36-28 19— Illinois Wesleyon 20— Wheoton College 24-32 19-42 21—Illinois Normal 24-22 Jon. 4—Illinois Normal 23-27 10—Stevens Point 25-35 1 1—Marquette University 31-32 17—Plotteville 40-30 24—Milwaukee 23-30 Feb. 8—Stevens Point 25-31 14—Whitewoter 37-42 17—St. Norberts 37-27 21—Milwoukee 37-42 28—Whitewoter 42-29 29—Plotteville 26-30 STATE A.A.U. Totals 676-657 TOURNEY Oshkosh All Stors 46-18 Milwoukee Horvesters 26-24 Rocine Douglos Flowers 30-24 Goodyeor's Tires. Milwaukee 33-40 Hoffmons. Milwaukee 35-28 CONFERENCE STANDING Stevens Point 8-0 1000 Milwaukee 6-2 .750 Plotteville 3-5 .375 Oshkosh 2-6 .250 Whitewoter 1-7 .125LETTER WINNERS 1935-1936 FOOTBALL MAJOR LETTERS Robert Arseneau Milton Blake Howard Daher Clarence Daniels Bernard Derr Clement Fabrycki Charles Friday Melvin Grancorbitz Harvey Hanson Frank Kloiber Reuben Lautenschlager Russell Mosely Kenneth Riese Walter Roeck Ralph Schwan Harold Stoegbauer Ralph Strassen Carl Swiston Vernon Thorson Robert Yaeger Albert Ziebell Harold Bieber William Mathwig Hugh Moore MINOR LETTERS Jack Mortell Joseph Perzentka Chester Wurl BASKETBALL Eric Becker Clarence Daniels Bernard Derr Edgar Hagene Ray Himes John Konrad MAJOR LETTERS Reuben Lautenschlagi William Mathwig Clarendon Nelezen Edward Nell Kenneth Riese Milton Blake TRACK William Ainsworth Howard Daher Marvin Gutknecht Clarence Miller Leslie Nell MAJOR LETTERS Howard Penney Kenneth Riese Carl Swiston Richard Talbot Homer Wittig Harold Learned MINOR LETTERS John Oldfield Marlon Batterman MANAGERS Eric Becker  VARSITY TRACK 1935 With the opening day of spring. Coach Kolf issued the first call for track candidates. About thirty men answered the call and immediately began to condition themselves indoors on the wood-track in the gym. At the start of the outdoor practice a few weeks later, about twenty additional men reported. The squad was comprised of few veterans, but had a wealth of good freshman candidates. Homer Wittig. William Ainsworth. Clarence Miller. James Montague. Leslie Nell, and Wesley Farr were the lettermen back from previous years. With the opening of the season, bad luck overtook the squad. Jim Montague's knee went bad. and he had to retire for the year. Homer Wittig s injured knee failed to respond to treatment, and his performances were not up to his standard. The weather was so bad that the squad did not have time to get into proper condition. In spite of these bad breaks, the team continued to train faithfully, and although they won no meets, they gave every team a run for the title. Pago 126HIGHLIGHTS OF THE SEASON The first competition of the season was the Inter-society Meet . . . Dick Talbot and Howard Penney tied for first place in the mile, breaking the old record by fourteen seconds . . . Dick also broke the two mile record . . . Ken Riese heaved the shot for a new school record . . . Homer Wittig was high point man of the meet . . . The second meet was a quadrangular meet at Whitewater . . . Wittig jumped six feet, three inches in the high jump . . . Jim Montague s knee went bad and he had to retire for the year , . . Milwaukee won the meet with Oshkosh third . . . The next meet was at Milwaukee against Carroll. Whitewater, and Milwaukee . . . Carl Swiston sprung a surprise by winning the javelin . . . Wittig won the high hurdles and high jump . . . Clarence Miller threw the hammer for the winning distance . . . Oshkosh finished fourth . . . The final meet was the state meet at Marquette Stadium in Milwaukee . . . Homer Wittig was leading the high hurdlers when he stepped in a hole in the track and stumbled . . . five points lost . . . Wittig tied for high jump at six feet . . . Les Nell came through and won the javelin . . . Bill Ainsworth led all the runners in the half mile for the first half of the race but tired badly and finished sixth . . . Ken Riese won the shot put . . . Marv Gut-knecht finished third in the 440. after leading most of the way . . . Wittig won the low-hurdles. displacing last year's champ . . . Oshkosh finished third in the conference . . . Bill Ainsworth was chosen honorary captain of the team by the letter winners to end the season. TRACK Top Row: Coach Kolf Gutknecht Daher. Rieia Millar, Wittirj Bottom Row; Nell. Swiiton. Ainiworth. Penney. TalbotSPORTS A T H L E T I C S The curriculum in sports may be on educational force or may be an instrument of evil. If administered properly, it makes a number of unique and important contributions to living. It contributes to the wholesome utilization of leisure time, the development of health, and the development of character. Such a curriculum must offer instruction in a varied program of sports activity, must coincide with community activity, current interests and needs of the group. There is always a tendency to promote a sports program, but unless thought is given to the selection of games: unless each game contains elements that are developmental: unless each game leads up to a major sport; and unless opportunity is given to all individuals to learn the fundamental skills underlying satisfactory playing, a sports program has failed to fulfill its highest aim. Every physically fit person should be given the opportunity to participate in a seasonal sport and the opportunity to select an activity that will carry over into adult life. Good playing and achievement should be the aim stressed rather than winning. Good sportsmanship should be a constant condition in winning. Sports and games should be kept free from commercialized performances. Therefore, all equipment and instruction should be provided by the institution or organization. Maximum activity tor maximum members should be our aim. Pago 128INTRODUCTION Despite the fact that for the past three years the Girls' Athletic Association has not existed under the name G.A.A. the girls athletic activities have progressed rapidly. Many improvements have been made in the Women's Physical Education Department, which is under the direction of Miss Gladys Perkerson. The department has promoted a fine individual sports program. It is possible for a girl interested in earning a sweater and letter to participate in practically any individual sport which she desires. The program includes tennis, golf, ping pong, and archery, and any other individual sport in which equipment is obtainable. Some of the sports, such as golf and tennis, are limited to fall and spring. However, as far as it is possible a student may participate in an individual sport during the entire year. During the current year tournaments in two of the four major sports were held. The field hockey and soccer tournaments were held shortly after the Thanksgiving recess and the Inter-Society Basketball Tournament was held March 4-12. Trophies were presented to the winners in the basketball tournament. Awards, sweaters, letters, and medals were presented to those girls excelling in the four major sports, field hockey, basketball, volleyball, and baseball. m O-« h m t-a h wo HMr3JH BASKETBALL The hockey spirit and enthusiasm was hardly over before the basketball season opened. Basketball is the major event in the athletic activities of the Women’s Physical Education Department. Practices were held four nights a week beginning December 4. The season was brought to a climax March 5 to 12, by the annual Inter-Society Tournament, a consolation-elimination event. The teams participating were: Lambda Chi. Gamma Sigma, Phoenix, Alethean, Independents. Kappa Gamma, and Delta Phi. The championship trophy was won by the Alethean society which defeated Delta Phi 29-25 in the finals. Delta Phi was defending the cup which it won in the 35 tournament. Gamma Sigma was awarded the sportsmanship trophy by vote of the various captains of the teams. Consolation honors went to the Independent team. An all-star team, chosen by the captains of the society teams participating in the tournament, consisted of the following players: Patricia Benson. Mary Louise Dollert. Anita Schwabenlander, Dorothy Briggs. Jane Engel. Kathryn Goggins, Bernice Barlow, and Florence Farley.HELD HOCKEY The women's sports season was formally opened on September 23 with the first field hockey practice. Practices continued until after the week of December 2. Besides the Frosh teams there were many upper class-men who played regularly. Parallel with field hockey, soccer games were played by the freshmen women. The season ended December 2 after a tournament in both field hockey and soccer. All the games were played on the hockey field at the rear of the Training School. VOLLEYBALL Volleyball practices were begun late in March and were held twice a week in the Women s Gym of the Training School. A large number of women participated. Several teams were formed, and exciting games were played during practice hours, but no volleyball tournament was scheduled. BASEBALL Baseball, the final major sport of the year, followed volleyball in the late spring and concluded the women's sports activities. Practices were held on the Training School diamond. During this season many of the students, not caring for baseball, participated in archery, tennis, track, and golf.  BASKETBALL TEAMS Page 132KITTENBALL 1935 Completing the intra-mural sport calendar for the year, Lyceum Society kept a balance of power in the school by winning the Inter-Society kittenball championship. The tournament was held during the last weeks of school with five teams fighting it out for the title. The five squads were Philakeans, Lyceum, Periclean. lota, and the Independents. After the regular schedule of games. Periclean and Lyceum won the right to compete in a three game series for the championship. Led by the Washburn boys. Bob Arseneau and Carl Swiston, the Lyceum forces won two straight games to cop the Inter-Society bunting. The first game Lyceum won by a margin of 8-3. The second game was a close battle, with Lyceum squeezing out an 8-7 victory. Swiston's pitching and Arseneau's and Daher's hitting were the high-lights of the Lyceum victory. By virtue of the victory the Lyceum Society received the trophy donated by Mr. R. J. Grant of the faculty. Pag© 133  hKHJUhMOw TRACK 1935 With the return of warm weather, intra-mural sports of the men turned to track for its competition. This competition, called the Inter-society track meet, was held the last part of April. It was the first taste of competition of the year for the track candidates. All men in the college were eligible to compete in this meet. If a man was a member of a society, he competed for his society in the meet. If he was not a member of a society, his points were contributed to the Independent group of the school. The meet was held in two separate days, one day for tunning events, the second day for field events. At the end of the first day Philakean Society was the leader, due to the efforts of Gutknecht. Talbot, and Penney. Penney and Talbot tied for first place in the mile run. breaking the record for the distance. Talbot also broke the two mile record by fourteen seconds. The second day. Pericleans won most of the field events and swept out the Philakean lead to win the title. Kenneth Riese broke the school shot-put record to help the cause of Pericleans. Homer Wittig of Periclean was the s ar of the meet, winning three events. The final standings of the meet gave Pericleans 55 points. Lyceum 39 points, and Philakeans 30 points. Pago I 34BASKETBALL 1936 Inaugurating a new season of intra-mural sports, the Philakean Society upset the long reign of the Periclean Society and copped the Inter-society basketball title. The tournament was one of the most hotly fought and cleanly played tournaments ever held. The teams were evenly balanced and all tasted defeat before the final game. Eleven teams competed in the tournament. Six teams were entered in the major league and five representatives were entered in the minor league. At the end of the regular schedule. Philakean. Lyceum, and Periclean Societies in the major league and Philakean B ‘ team in the minor league won he right to play in the elimination playoff for the championship. In the play-off games. Philakean Society emerged the champion. They easily defeated last year's champions. Pericleans, and then whipped the Lyceum team in the final game. The Philakean team was light and fast, with quick breaks and tight defense, the factors which won them the title. Bud Barlow, former varsity star in basketball, was the coach pf the victorious five. wo hiti u;h HISTORICAL OSHKOSH% TnnHISTORY OF OSHKOSH AT A GLANCE The settlement of Oshkosh was started in the summer of 1836 by Webster Stanley and Chester Gallup. They were immediately followed by others and in 1839 the community was named. This name was selected by ballot from the suggested names of Athens. Fairview. Oceola. Oshkosh and Standford. After the selection of the name the people commenced to clamor for better mail facilities. Up to that time the mail had been supplied by courier from Green Bay and Fond du Lac, but this service was very unsatisfactory and in 1840 the citizens secured a post office. Morris Forman had the distinction of being the first person to engage in industrial enterprise. In 1847, Mr. Forman erected a sawmill on the north side of the river at its mouth. This was followed by other mills until finally the city became known as the "Sawdust City." The first steamboat, "Manchester," built in 1844, plied the waters of the lake and the Fox River for five years. This was followed by the "Peytona." which made daily trips between Menasha. Oshkosh and Fond du Lac. For 79 years, from 1844 to 1923, when the last of the larger freight and passenger steamers burned at its dock. Oshkosh was the center of a fleet of steamboats equal to the best on any inland waters. In 1853. the people drew up a charter and became a city. The first mayor was Edward Eastman. The first act of the city government was the passage of an ordinance pledging the credit of the city for the sum of $50,000 to the Milwaukee. Fond du Lac and Green Bay Railroad Company. The first passenger train arrived in Oshkosh. October 13, 1859. Citizens walked to Van Dyne to meet the Iron Horse as it was then called. This railroad was followed by others until now Oshkosh has three large railroads running the city. The telegraph came with the railroad and 1871 marked the appearance of the telephone. In the last half of the century the dream of peace and prosperity met disaster in the nightmare of fires. Oshkosh has been the ill-fated victim of five disastrous fires. The first occurred in 1856. Again, in 1859. flames swept everything along Ferry (Main) Street from Ceape to Washington and Algoma before them. In 1866 another fire commenced on the west side of Main Street and swept away the whole block from High to Algoma Street. Then again, everything was peaceful and it appeared that Oshkosh was destined to have an uninterrupted growth, but in 1874 and ’75. destruction again poured its fury onto the little city. These two fires were the greatest of all: nothing was spared. It is said that "the whole burned district was burning at the same time—the city was a mass of writhing, twisting flames." The loss in both of these fires amounted to over three million dollars. The last fire was the turning point in the history of Oshkosh,—for a new city, of brick and fire proof buildings, was erected. The first fire company was organized in 1856 and was known as the Niagara Co. No. I. This was followed by other volunteer companies until the city fire department was organized in 1882. The first school classes were held in a room of Webster Stanley s home with Emmeline Cook as the first teacher. A few years later the first school house was built near the site now known as Riverside Park. From this time on the growth of the system of graded schools of the city has been rapid. About 1867 the high school was erected at a cost of $40,000. This building was destroyed by fire and a much finer and better building was erected. Another school which gives the city added educational facilities is the State Teachers College. This was dedicated and opened to students in September 1871 and was then known as the Third State Normal School. George S. Albee was its first president. The building was destroyed by fire in March. 1916, and the present buildings were erected the following year. Thus, during the century from 1836 to 1936. Oshkosh has passed through the typically American and highly dramatic transformation from a wilderness to a modern industrialized city. Page 145FEATURES8 9 IO 1 1 12 3 16 17 18 IP 20 22 23 24 2F 29 30 iREAT NORTHERN A travel ' f "»•« Tv r ro TmU r-u A» I 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 II 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 28 29 -m 3 I I m is % .4 25 W 31 Pago 147CALENDAR F E A T U R E S SEPTEMBER 7-9. Registration Daze. Everyone is in one—Ask Mr. Nelson. 10. Ho-hum. we're off. Gosh, can't we get our minds on the work confronting us? 14. Frosh frolic in the men's gym. Innovation of Frosh Mixer. 21. How do. How do. Scene. All-School Mixer. Men's Gym. 22. Lid pried off football season. Battle St. Norberts to 12-12 tie. 26. Training School gym. Coach Kolf speaks to men at All-Men's Smoker. Lots of seegars and cigs—Eh? 29. Football team comes through again, whips Jordon by 7-0 count. OCTOBER 8. O-S-H-K-O-S-H. Yeah!! Pep session in assembly. 10. One of highlights of assembly programs. Mr. Sam Campbell’s illustrated lecture on north woods. Member the chipmunks—Cute. Huh? 11. Big week-end starts. Homecoming parade, starts on time.—What? Big pep ses- sion in gym. Lotsa noise. 12. Battle rages on campus. Sophs whip Frosh. Gold and White again victorious. smother Whitewater under avalanche of touch's by 31-6. Society dinners. Successful day topped by dance at Eagles to tantalizing tunes tendered to tickle the toes by Don Mack. 22. We learn about the cause of the downfall of Adam and Eve—meaning SNAKES. not pink elephants, ya mug. Johnson brothers told us. 26. Football team continues drive for championship by downing Platteville 14-7. 31. My gosh, could you recognize the place? Barkers telling of their wares. Where? Why the Charity Carnival, dope. NOVEMBER 9. Whoopee. Hooray!!! O.S.T.C. wins championship of Southern Division by sinking Milwaukee in a sea of muck. 6-0. Great work fellows. We re proud of you. I 2. Very interesting assembly program. Dixie Jubilee Singers. I 3. We show our spirit and appreciation for the bacon that the football brought home. Big pep session and sun hop. 19-21. Heart-throbs, suspense, comedy, etc. Kappa Gamma's Annual Play Contest. The Winnahs? Alethean (naturally). Periclean and Lyceum. 21. Many spent this evening in a slaughterhouse. This was the annual Alethean-Philakean brawl. Member the Knights of the Bath? DECEMBER 5. Women copy men's idea. All-Women's dinner. Mrs. Mace, retiring dean, renders farewell address. 6. Open basketball campaign by downing Pond's of Appleton 28-23. Nice work. fellows. 12. Tweet-Tweet—Where’s the bird? That's no bird, it's Max Gilstrap The Whistling Forest Ranger." Schoen's. Jawoll! 13. River Falls falls before local Peds 36-28. Candy canes—on the floor—sticky hands —Annual Christmas party. Peds prance pompously to High Hatter's rhythms. 16. Athletic council presents gold footballs to champs. 18. It's here at last. Christmas vacation, of course. JANUARY 4. Overtime period to most exciting game of season. Illinois Normal noses out our boys by 32-28 count. 6. We re back again. Big question—What did you do during vacation? 9. Delta Phi entertains in assembly. The Minuet." 10. Dr. Florence Case succeeds Mrs. Mace as Dean of Women. Miss Peake submits resignation effective at end of semester. Stevens Point downs Gold and White 35-25. 14. Shades of Major Bowes. Colonel Arrow's Amateur Hour sponsored by Phoenix society. 16. Soft lights and sweet music by the Independent's orchestra and also puns by their master of ceremonies. 18. Peds again show their spirit for football champs by attending dance given to raise the necessary dough to purchase sweaters. Pago 148CALENDAR JANUARY 23. What's your name?" and other questions. Why the questions? Well, kid, it was the Periclean "Man on the Street" assembly program. 25. Clowns. Colonial damsels, and what have you. Lyceum-Phoenix New Semester s Eve Masquerade. More fun. FEBRUARY 2. Headache week. In other words, don't you wish you would have studied before? Why? This is semester finals week, sweetheart. 5. What did he give you? I was robbed. Oh dear! The grades are posted. Tch! Tch! 6. Pollard Players supposed to be here today. Ha! Ha! Ha! Was Dr. Case's face red. They appeared the 7th and it was worth waiting a day. They rendered the play Big Hearted Herbert." 20. Three pianos playing simultaneously. Wahoo.’ The men’s turn to be carefree and happy. The reason, the All-Men's Dinner. 21. Tough luck, team. Yep. Milwaukee won 42-37. MARCH 3. What a band! The Stevens Point band entertained today. Plenty neat. 5. This is the rural's day to go to town. Alpha Chi puts on assembly program. 12. Wetak is elected Prom King. Wins by one vote. In assembly we get the dope on the Eskimo. S. Montague "Under Northern Lights.' Boy. could he crack 'em— whips! 26. Lois Haveman announced Prom Queen by Wetak. lota presents their Minstrel Show. Good jokes, woodbutchers. APRIL 2-3. Playfellow's presentation of the heart rending war play. "Journey's End." Exceptionally well done. 7. Choir and city musicians render Rossini's "Stabat Mater." Nice work. 8. Easter vacation. Longer vacation because of Teacher's convention. 14. Here we are again. Ho-hum. mid-semester grades to be posted. 15. Musicians from school play for sun hop which is benefit for Prom. Don't forget the neckties boys. 18. Kappa Delta Pi state convention this week end. 21. Annual Lyceum Vod-Vil contest. Offer Demming-Polakowski memorial trophy. Ver' nice contest. MAY I. Prom — Biggest social event of year. Eagle’s Ballroom beautifully decorated and we glide to the smooth rhythms of Al Kemp—er's (Ha! Ha! Fooled ya) band. 9. Kappa Gamma's gather at the Athearn for their spring formal. Good time, gels? 14. Honor's Day. Our leaders are recognized. I 5. Formals every week-end from now to close of school. Alethean-Philakean formal ' at Eagle's Ballroom. 16. Lambda Chi's formal at the Athearn. 22. Gamma Sig-Periclean's formal this week end at the Yacht Club. 23. Woodbutcher s and sisters, in other words. Iota-Delta Phi's formal at Yacht Club. 28. Music, puns.—jokes. Lyceum presents assembly program. 29. Lyceum-Phoenix sway to Ripon Varsity Band at their annual formal at the Yacht Club. JUNE I -5 The more you study the more you know, the more you know the more you forget, the more you forget the less you know—so why study? I didn't and now I wish I had. Hope I'm home when the grades are sent out so I get them first and not the pater. 6. Seniors. Years of hard labor have gained for you your sheepskin. Don't forget to be there to get it and don't let your students mitt-wring you. This finishes the year and I hope it didn't hurt you as much as it hurt me. Adieu. Ma' Fran's. Pogo 149 WM50c:H t1Kd CHARITY CARNIVAL The second annual College Carnival was held October 31, 1935 in the halls of the school amid gaily colored booths. It was continuous from four o'clock in the afternoon until ten-thirty at night. Miss Marie Hirsch and Miss Louise Scott were the faculty chairmen and Helen Scott was the student chairman. Each student organization had two representatives on the committee. All manner of entertainment and various kinds of refreshments could be found at the different booths. The faculty served a tempting dinner. A school dance orchestra furnished the music for the dancers in the Gamma Sigma dance hall. Boxing and wrestling matches of Philakean proved a groat drawing card. From the Powder Puff, the Phoenix beauty shop, many of the erstwhile strong-men-about-school. as well as those of the weaker sex. emerged with a sculptured wave and garnishly tinted nails. The Kappa Gamma auction sale was almost too crowded to get near. The Aletheans did a rushing business in the gymnasium, for of course everyone wanted to roller skate, regardless of a few minor casualties. Many startling revelations were made by the comic mirrors in the lota Fun House. And speculations resulted from Alpha Chi’s fortune telling booth. What carnival could be complete without many candy and pop stands? The Training School booth offered all kinds of homemade candies which brought the crowd back again and again. Delta Phi had the proverbial "popcorn, crackerjack. and peanuts" and candy besides. The rootbeer gardens of Lambda Chi had as a sideline a table of Halloween favors, and everywhere people were seen standing around munching hamburgers from the Periclean booth and sipping Coca-Cola from Lyceum. The affair was declared a success in every way. and the gentle reek of hamburgers in the halls recalled the happy time for some days.1935 HOMECOMING Seven O'clock. "Are they ready? What's the matter? Who's holding up this thing?" Shouts, loud laughter. Frenzied pounding and nervous adjusting on floats. Bright paper everywhere. The impatient boom-boom of a drum at intervals. At last, we move.—colored floats, sombre floats, clowns, cars, bicycles—down Algoma, up Main through rows of commenting spectators. Now slowly, a little tattered but still hilarious, we crawl through residential districts, back to the campus and pep meeting. Old grad, new grad, sonior, frosh—O.S.T.C. packed on to all bleachers and benches available—standing on the space that's left. The team, proud, bestowing embarrassed grins, sits on a raised platform. The gym rings and echoes with the noise. But of a sudden, everyone holds his breath. Awards! Third place to Phoenix with its silver sailed canoe, second to Lambda Chi with King Alumnus' royal court, and Alethean's "Swan Song of Whitewater" wins! To the girls at Marsh's and the boys at Swaney's go the house prizes. Impromptu "words" from team and from well-known alumni ensue, punctuated by cheers and clapping. The band beats out a tune at intervals, stirring the crowd to greater heights of enthusiasm. Finally, the last word is spoken, the last cheer is cheered, and the creaking gym is emptied of its noisy burden. Sophomore men. victorious as freshmen, rally in the murky morning to defend their title. Both sides wallow in the mud in the tug-of-war. Both suffer torn shirts, scratches, bruises. But despite the valor of their foe. the winning freshman team of '34 is the winning sophomore team of '35. "U—rah—rah—O-S-H-K-O-S-H—". Bleachers again crowded with collegians, excited, waiting. Blobs of yellow and white stand out on a field of dark coats, megaphones dangle from coat lapels. The sun smiles kindly, and the traditional army blankets and the thermos bottles are not needed. The kick-off—the team goes to wort. Whitewater's victory of last year haunts the promises for awhile. But this year we ll fool ’em with a 31 -6 score. Not bad? Not bad? At Oshkosh hotels and tea rooms, societies gather round their respective banquet tables to welcome back their alumnae members. Friendships are renewed to the tune of toasts, more noise, more speeches. With a ten foot football dangling overhead we trip about (wearily?—nay. not wearily) under the melodious of Don Mack's orchestra in the Eagle's Ballroom. The victory of the afternoon incites us to greater gayety—so from nine until twelve o'clock we ore gay.  Pago 152Pag© 153  Pago 154 vmm. Page 155  Pago 156  ASSEMBLIES Assembling twice a week, the entire student body and faculty, more than seven hundred people, gather to hear programs designed to stimulate thought on contemporary conditions and ideas and also to present entertainment. The assemblies have included a variety of interests, ranging from political problems to pep sessions. During the year's programs on current world affairs were W. C. Fischer of White-water speaking on "Austria. Hub of Future Troubles in Europe", and Russia : Reverend K. A. Stimpson of Milwaukee on "Personal Close-Ups of Italians and Ethiopians". Dr. E. A. Ross appeared under the auspices of the Association of American University Women to analyze present conditions from a sociologist's standpoint. Travel talks included S. A. Campbell. "Philosophy of the Forests", showing films of northern Wisconsin, the Johnson brothers with their snakes, George H. Landgraf of the staTe department of public instruction on Australia and New Zealand and S. Montague. "Under Northern Lights". Of interest to scientists were the films of Dr. George Roemmert and his Microvivarium: Dr. R. O. Ebert, oculist, on eye defects: a drug firm's presentation of the making of serums: Psychologist Harold Hulbert of Chicago: and Dr. G. E. Seaman of the State Hospital for Insane at Winnebago. Programs ot a less scholarly nature were the appearances of the Dixie Jubilee Singers, the Pollard Players, Max Gilstrap. whistling forest ranger. James B. Pond of New York on "Eccentricities of Genius", and Sylvia Lubi. Chicago soprano. Outstanding among programs presented by various departments of the college were Playfellow's. "A Christmas Carol" by Dickens and Stabat Mater' by the A Capella Choir, and various society-sponsored programs.IN APPRECIATION With the distribution of the 1936 Quivers, a new chapter in the record of the school life for the past year has been brought to a close. It is with a sigh of relief that we close the annals for another year. A debt of gratitude is owed, to the entire Quiver staff who gave so generously of their time and talents, to Mr. and Mrs. Nile J. Behencko, and to Dr. Hilda Taylor who have helped to solve the many problems that have confronted us. to the faculty for their co-operation and patience with us. to the Oshkosh Public Museum which supplied an unlimited source of historical material, and to the janitor staff for their patience and consideration when their help was needed. May we extend our personal thanks to each and every one who have in any way contributed to the success of this Quiver. Harry Wolff. Editor-in-Chief William Ekvall, Business Manager WWWCjH tTl T3 LIST OF SPONSORS American Legion Club Anger-Blechinger Co. Carver Ice Cream Co. The Constance Salon de Beaute James A. Coe. Druggist The Continental First National Bank Eagle's Club Ballroom Globe Printing Co. Groth Company, Cleaners O. A. Haase Henderson-Hoyt Co. Lampert-Ryder Shoe Co. Lyman Studio Martha s Beauty Studio Mathieu Studio Newman's Jahn Ollier J. C. Penney Co. Spoo and Son Strauss Shoe Co. Wadhams Oil Co. Wis. Public Service Corp. Dr. M. C. ZentnerALUMNI 1935 Ainswoith. William—No oxporionco Barrett. Frod—U. of Wisconsin Blank. Joe—Koogo Harbor. Mich.. Teaching Burden. Fao—No experionco Byso.Clark—U. o| Wisconsin Calhoon. Russoll—Toaching Sheboygan Falls H. S. Christenson, Howard—No oxporionco Cottor. Perry—W P A. Office. Chemist (Commercial) Crissoy. LaVorno — Poabody College (attending and teaching) Dischor. Clarence—U. of Wisconsin Dumdio, Vialor—Post Graduato, O.S T.C. Ekvall, V illiam—Post Graduato. O.S.T.C. Ewert. Helen Farm, Margarot—St, Graded School. Abrams. Wis. Fitzgerald. Margarot—Beta Sigma Phi. Field Representative. Kansas City. Miss. Froohlich. Margaret—No experience Frognor, Gorala—Working Omro Gonsch, Alma — Junior High School, Edgarton. Wis., Toachmg Goff. Howard—No experience Gorgos. Claronce—Working. Now London Griswold, Julia—No oxpenonco Gronenich, Gilbort—Toaching at Birnamwood Hunnors, Eleanor—Teaching at H. S., Mishicot, Wis. Hoilsborg. Johnny—Oshkosn, Wis. Hointz. Milton—Attending O.S.T.C. Hintz. Elva—Teaching. Niagara, Wis. amon. Mary—Toaching Birnamwood. Wis. enkins. Harry—Teaching Oshkosh, Wis. ohnson. Carol—Toaching Evanston. Ill onos. Catherine—N. Fond du Lac. Teaching Camp. Dolila—No oxporionco. marriod Mr. Rowland Nock Katkosky. Gordon—Toaching Mattoon. Wis. H. S. Katzka. Josephine — U. of Redlands, Redlands. Calif, (attending) Koehler, Jamos—U. of Michigan (rocoivod scholarship) Korb. Ramona—Marriod Kosmichi, Harry—No oxporience Kulibert, Harry—No experience Loitzke. Anita—Poet Graduato. O.S.T C Lundstod. Lostor -South sido J. H S., Sheboygan, Wis., Teaching Lutzo, Cordelia—Toaching Rudolph. Wis H. S. McCormick, John—Attending U. of Wisconsin Moriz. Dorothy—Teaching Oshkosh H. S Miller. Claronce—Principal Stato Graded School, Ogdens-burg. Wis. Montague. James—No experience Niland, Rosemary—No oxpeiionce Owens. Stanley—No experience Polk. Francis—Evanston. 111. Toaching Poulotto. Morgan—Teaching H. S. Antigo. Wis. Pung. Albort—Subs, toaching. Milwaukee. Wis. Romillard. Virginia— Married Roato. James—No experience Rondou. Mane—Field Roprosentativo Beta Sigma Phi, Kansan City. Miss. Seefeld, Bornelaa—Lowell. Wis. Sell. Willard—No oxporionco Smith. Gormaino—No experionco Spaulding. Oscar—Attending O S T C Steiner. Oscar—Morgan's Lumber Company Swaney. Wilbur—Half time teaching, Oshkosh Toss. Eugono—No experience Thoilo. Dorothy—Sheboygan. Wis. Toaching Vilhmore. Fred—Rockford. Ill J. H. S. Teaching Voight, Raymond—No experionco Wandry. Myron—Chetok. Wis. Teaching Wollor. Esther—Post Graduate O S.T.C. Windhausor. Thelma—H S. Fish Crook Wittig. Homor Teaching Shawano. Win. Zimmorman. Victor—Toaching H. S. Pulaski C l CO COCO CQ »— ALUMNI 1934 Abraham. Verna—Cut-Out School. Waupaca Achtman. Clinton—No experience Allen. Gordon—No experience Anunson. Morton—No experience, working Clintonville Arnold. Winifred—No experience Atwell. Clyde—Teaching Roosovelt J H S . Fond du Lae. Wis. Augustine. Walter—Teaching Green Bay. Wis. Averill. Norma—No experience Backhaus. Yvonne—Teaching Eldorado. Wis Barnard. Allan—Teaching Monroe, Wis Barrett, Fred—Teaching Brookfield. Penn. Bartleson. Mae—Teaching Sheboygan. Wis. Bartz. Bernard—At home Oshkosh Birkholz. Ervin—Teaching Two Rivers. Wis Bloomquist. Roy—Teaching Monoa. Wis. Bohman. Walter—Teaching Amhorst. Wis. Bohnsack Wilbert—Teaching J H S.. Milwaukee, Wis Braatz. Percy—Teaching Shiocton. Wit Brennand. Mary—Teaching Gillett. Wis Brey Sr Mary G —Manitowoc. Wis. Bnghtman. Dorothy—Teaching Red School. Winnebago County Brooks. Frances—Teaching Acorn Rural School. Waupaca Camoron. Harry—Teaching Vocational School. Appleton. W is Chase. Madge—Teaching Fremont. Wis. Christensen Carlyle—Wautoma. Wis. Christman. Henry—Teaching Kewaunee. Wis Chryst. Richard—Teaching Sauk City. Wis Daul, Norbert—Teaching, Kaukauna Wis Davies. Sarah—Pickett Wis. De Groot. Clarence—Teaching Wausaukoe H S. Dolo. Agnes—Teaching Rural School. Brown County DerLcr. Lorna—Secretarial Work. Oshkosh. Wis Dobberstein. Elmer—Oshkosh Wis Dulfy. Helen—Columbus. Wis Ely. Helen—Teaching Oshkosh. Wis. Ewald. Ruth—Teaching Sheboygan. Wis. Flynn. Lyman—Principal H S Hastisford. Wis. Fowler Robert—Rural School. Winnebago County Frei. George—Teaching Milwaukee. Wis Garvoy. Catherine—Teaching Kaukauna. Wis Geiger Warner I—Attending U of Wis. Glissondorf. Helen—Fond du Lac. Wts Gorr, fean—Teaching Boscobel. Wis Gorwitz Simon—Oshkosh Wis. Working Gravos. Norma—Teaching Rural School Shawano County Grittner, Louise—Westboro, Wis. Grots. Eiloen—Teaching Fond du Lac. Wit. Grosskopf. Ervin—Teaching Milwaukee Haefs. Ruth—Oshkosh Hamilton, Charlotte—Teaching Pickott. Wis Hanley Mary Teaching Merrill funior High Oshkosh Harper. Earle—Redgranite Wis. Harris. Ruth—Teaching Appleton. Wis Haslam, Ruth—Oshkosh. Wis Heinrich, Harry—New London. Wis Heraly. Zita—Teaching. New Frankcn Wis. Hetue Leona—Teaching Marinette. Wis Hill, Richard- Working Walk-Over Shoe Store Oshkosh Hoff. Edwin- Teaching Green Bay. Wis Hogan. Mary—Teaching Neenah. Wis. Hostottler. Laurette—Teaching Hilbert. Wis lohanek. Frances—Teaching Two Rivers. Wis. Kaiser. Dorothy—Teaching Pickott. Wis Kirchhofer Edward—Home Frodonia Wis Knutson. Herbert—Teaching Antigo. Wis Kohl Dorothy—Larson. Wis Married Kolitsch. Dorothy Home. Apploton. Wis Kramer. Edith—teaching Hilbert. Wis Krueger. Marjorie—Touching Argonne Wis H S Kuscne, Howard- Working Wisconsin Axle Co . Oshkosh Kushman. Gertrude—Teaching Niagara. Wis. Laney. Bernard—Teaching Sheboygan. Wis. Lange. Charles—Studying for ministry Lehmgk. fanet—Teaching in Monoa. Wis Lloyd. Ins—Home Oshkosh Loczhart. Madge—Teaching Redgranite, Wis Loper, Eldon—Home Omro. Wis Ludeman. Karl—Home Waukesha. Wis Lyon. Louis—Teaching Oshkosh. Wis Marty. Marion—Teaching Neenah Maxwell. Marion—Teaching Mattison School. Winn McEacthron. Raymond—Working Shoe Factory. Waupun. Wis. Meier. Alma—Home Neenah Wis Meyer. Ruth—Teaching Oshkosh Michaelis. Geneva—Home Marinette. Wis Miller. Esther—Teaching. home Oshkosh. Wis Miller. Lawrence—Teaching, home Weyauwega. Wis. Miiler. Violet—Teachina Fond du Lac. Wis Miller. Wilamine—Teaching Lublin. Wis Morris. Ray—Working Chicago. 111. Muckian. Annabel—Homo. Green Bay. Wis. Murphy. Willard—Working in Shoe Factory. Mayville. Osterby, Aunie—Mrs Hultquist. Oshkosh. Wis Otto. George—Teaching De Pere. Wis Parish. Russell—Teaching Saginaw. Mich Patterson. Donald—Teachina Michtcot. Wis Pavey. Beatrice—Teaching Kewaunee. Wis Philpott. Eileen—Teaching, home Omro. Wis. Pinkerton. Marion—Teaching Oshkosh Pitz. Herbert—At home Neenah Poulotte. Ellis—Teaching Wautoma H S. Radde. Frank—Eureka Radke. Edward—Working Appleton. Wis. Ratsch. Juanita—Teaching, home Shiocton. Wis Redford. Gertrude—Married Harold Herrington Rohde. Carl—Teaching Milwaukee. Wis Ruaotska. Curtis—Home Wautoma. Wis Runland. Armella—Teaching Randolph. Wis. Salchert. Alma—Home Fona du Lac. Wis Shannon. Sr Marie—Home Stnsiniwa. Wis. Shaw. Veryl—Business College. Oshkosh. Wis Skinner. Bernice—Teaching, home Redgranite Wis Smith. Walter—Teaching Bear Creek. Wis Sohrweide Orlando—Teaching Elroy. Wis H S Sonn. Lester—Teaching Brussels. Wis Springate. Virginia—At home Oshkosh. Wis. Stacker. Eunice—Teaching; home Neenah. Wis. Stembach. Irene—Teaching Marion. Wis Stelznor Margaret—Teaching home Oshkosh Stiller Lucille—Teaching home Omro Strassburg. Alvera—Teaching, home Randolph. Wts Sutherlands. Dorothy—Teaching Fond du Lac. Wis Tilly. Leo—Toaching Aurora, 111 Timm. Irene—Teaching Oshkosh. Wis Hall time Tonquay. Estelle—Deceased Topp, Joanette—Oshkosh, Wis Veleke. Josephine—Teaching home Waupun. Wis Villemure, Fred—Teaching f H S . Rockford III Vogt. Eugone—At home Oshkosh. Wis. Vonderlon. Lorna—Teaching rural School. Winnebago county Webster. Arleen—Teaching Florence. Wis Wentzol Gordon—Teaching, home Winneconne. Wis Wertsch. Gabriel—Teaching S High School. Rockford. Ill Wetzel. Harvey—At home Gillett. Wis. Wied. Eleanor—At home. Bear Creek. Wis. Wiese. Jeanette—Teaching Neenah. Wis Witthuhn, Violet—Teaching. Black Crook. Wis. Wolf. Dorothy—Teaching West Bend. Wis. Zantow. Beniamin—Teaching, Manawa. Wis Ziegort. Beatrico Teaching Eldorado Wis.ALUMNI 1933 Adam , John—Working at Dundeo. Illinois Andorson. John—Teaching at R 2. Noenah Wis Andtaska. Bornard—Teaching at Gilman Wis Arnold. Winifred—Teaching at Tigerton. Wis. Arvey. Joseph—Teaching at New franken. Wis Augustine Walter—Teaching at Franklin J H. S Green Bay. Wis. Bangert. Mane—At home Oshkosh. Wis Bell. Dorothy—Teaching at Cambria. Wis. Below. Dorothy—At home Oshkosh. Wis. Berger. George—At home Two Rivers. Wis Birknolz. Erwin—Teaching at Vocational School. Two RlversN Wis. Blaney. Kathleen—Teaching at Bay View School R 2. Green Bay. Wis Bloomquist Roy—Teaching at Manawa. Wis. Bottomley. Thomas—Rural School Racine county Brawn. Stewart—At home Oshkosh. Wis Brey. Sr M George—Teaching at Holy Family Convent. Manitowoc. Wis Bunkelman. Lois—At home Fond du Lac, Wis Burdett. Zeralla—Teaching at Omro. Wis. Burger. Galen—Teaching Fond du Lac. Wis. Cameron. Harry—Teaching Appleton. Wis Carley. Clayton—Principal State Graded School. Land O Lakes. Wis Cavanaugh. Hilda—Super. Teaching Sauk County. Bara-boo. Wis Chamberlain. Mary—At home Oshkosh. Wis Charette, Amrose—Teaching at Milwaukee. Wis. Chryst. Richard—Teaching Sauk City. Wis Conger. Wayne—At homo Greenbusn. Wis Cravillion. Ira C—Teaching State Graded School. Theresa. Wis. De Keyser. Pronase—At home Tigerton. Wis. Dinsmore, Priscilla—Teaching Lincoln School. Oshkosh. Duf|y. Helen—At home Columbus Wis Dunham. Elizabeth—Mrs Comstock. Cincinnati. Ohio Evans. Jermon—Teaching at Ripon. Wis Faehlina. Sophie—At home. Big Falls. Wis Farris. Marian—Teaching in McKinley School, Manitowoc, Wis. Floyd Mary—Teaching in High School. Tomahawk, Wis Fowler. Louise—Teaching in Grammar Grades. Camp-bellsport, Wis Fredrick. Mona—Teaching in Washington School. Sheboygan. Wis. Friday. Marshall—Teaching in J H S. Wauwatosa. Wis Gaber, Theresa—At home. Niagara Wis. Gadbaw. Coleman—Teaching in Omro. Wis. Grittner. Louise—Teaching in Wostboro. Wis. Grosskopf. Ervin—Teaching in Boys' Tech. High School. Milwaukee. Wis Gruhle. Bernice—Teaching State Graded School R. 2. Fredoma. Wis Gulig. Lila—Teachina in Rural School. Oshkosh. Wis. Gunderson. Belma—At home Ogdensburg. Wis. Gunderson. Elizabeth—Teaching in Ware School. Waupaca. Wis. Gunderson. Esther—At home, Wittenberg. Wis. Haack. George—Teaching in Kaukauna Wis. Harrison. Ivy—Teaching Kewaunee. Wis. Hartenberaor. Dora—At home. Sheboygan Wis Heime.-I. Harold—Teaching in Oakjiela. Wis Henning. Robert—Iowa State. Ames. Iowa Hickey Florence—Teaching in Hustisford. Wis. Hogan. Mary—Dental Hygienist Neenah. Wis. Holding. Mary—Teaching in Washington School. Sheboygan. Wis. Hough. Emerson—Teaching in Larsen. Wis Hultquist. Donald—Sears-Roebuck. Oshkosh. Wis Hutchison. Harry—At home. Sugarbush. Wis. Jacobs. Bornice—At home. Oshkosh. Wis. johanok. Frances—Teaching Two Rivers. Wis Kachur, Nina—Public Library. Oshkosh. Wis Karnes, Barbara—Attending Columbia U and Julliard School of Music. New York City Kelley. Isabel—Teaching (Sub ) in Milwaukee Wis. Kelley. Janice—Teaching in Pulaski. Wis Kester. Gordon—Teaching Mishicot, Wis. Keyser. Ruth—At home. Fond du Lac. Wis. Kildsig. Josephine—Teaching Shiocton. Wis Kirchhofer. Edward—At home. Fredonia Wts. Kolitsch. Dorothy—At homo. Apploton. Wis Kramer. Elizabeth (Mrs.)—Teaching in Jefferson School. Manitowoc. Wis. Kramer. Sr M Mathias—Holy Family Convent, Manitowoc. Wis. Kuppor. Robert—Teaching in Washington J H. S . Manitowoc. Wis. Kussow. Marion—At home. W Do Pore. Wis. Lanoy. Bernard—At home. Alma Center. Wis. Leith, Marion—R. R 1. Van Dyne. Wis Lewis. Dolores—Teaching New Holstein. Wis. Look. Mabel—At home. Kaukauna. Wis Ludomann. Karl—Teaching H. S . Waukesha. Wis Lyon. Louis—Teaching in Roosevelt School. Oshkosh. Wis. Marten. Mildred—At home. Neenah. Wis. Mathwig, Margaret—Teaching in Roosevelt School. Oshkosh. Wis. Maxwell, Marion—Mathison School. Winnebago County McCulley, Kathryn—Teaching State Graded School, Reeasville. Wis. McLees. Marjorie—Teaching Franklin School. Oshkosh. Wis. McWright, Ruth—Teaching in Sheboygan. Wis. Mierswa, Kathryn—Teaching H. S.. Hudson. Wis Miorswa. Richard—Teaching Sheboygan. Wis Miller. Georgia—At home. Oshkosh. Wis. Miller. Lawrence—Teaching at Weyauwega. Wis Miller. Violet—Teaching at Fond du Lac. Wis Fourth St School Mortson. Dorothy—Teaching in Evansville. Wis Muckian. Annabel (Mrs )—Green Bay. Wis. Neubauer, Linda—At home. Fremont. Wis. Nichols. Sr M Louis—St. Francis Convent. Green Bay. Wis Nock. Rolland—Teaching at Apploton. Wis. Olsen. Orvel—Director Vocational School. Antigo. Wis. Owens. Ardin—At home. Oshkosh. Wis. Pamplin. Jessie—At home. Oshkosh Parish. Russell—Teaching in J H S . Saginaw. Michigan Patterson. Donald—At home. Crivitz. Wis Perkins. Otis—Teaching in Woodrow Wilson J. H. S.. Manitowoc. Wis Pfaffenbach. William—At home. Watertown. Wis Pilling. Caryl—Teaching in G. G Meade School. New Holstein. Wis Pinion. Stella—At home. Marshfield. Wis Pospiechala. Anton—At home. Rhinelander. Wis Pugh, Walter—At home. Oshkosh. Wis Oualley. LeRoy—Teaching in Omro. Wis Radtke. Violet—Teaching in Marinette, Wis Random. Lois—Oshkosh. Wis OSTC. Rasmussen. Mabel—Teaching at Redgranite. Wis Reed. Alice—Union Grove State School Reeves. Edith—At home Lena. Wis Reichardt, Hattie—Teaching in Rural School. Forest Junction. Wis. Reis. Geraldine—At home. Green Bay. Wis. Ridings. Leone—Teaching at Leona. Wis Robertson. Robert—Teaching at Waupaca J H. S Waupaca. Wis Roe. Beatrice—Rural School. Brown County Roeder. Irene—Longfellow School. Oshkosh. Wis Ruhland. Armolla—Teaching at Randolph. Wis. Rydzewski. Adolph—Teaching in Armstrong Creek. Wis. Schlegel. Rose—Private Secretary. Advertising Concern. Milwaukee. Wis. Schneider. Josephine—H S . Oshkosh. Wis. Schroeffer. Evelyn—Teaching in Stato Graded School. Deerbrook. Wis. Schweger. Gretchen—At home. Eland. Wis Shannon. Sr. Mane—St Clara Convent. Sinsinawa. Wis Simpson. Frank—At home. Oshkosh. Wis Smith. Frank—At home. Oshkosh. Wis. Spaulding. Jane B (Mrs )—Oshkosh. Wis. Stauber. Frank—At home. Marinette. Wis. Stone. Leonard—At homo. Omro. Wis. Tamblingson. Roy—Teaching in Vocational School. Sheboygan. Wis Timm, Oscar—At home. Oshkosh. Wis Valkosko Rose—At home. Fond du Lac. Wis. Walter. Mildred—Teaching in School District No 6. Campbollsport. Wis. Wandreir Arden—Teaching in Noshkoro. Wis Woller. Gortrude—At home. Oshkosh. Wis. OSTC Williams. Gwen—Teaching in Bonduol. Wis. Wilson, Warren—Sturgeon Bay. Wis Winkler. George—Teaching in Garfield School. Milwaukee. Wis. Woller. Eleanor—Teaching in Kenosha. Wis Woodzicka, Bernard—At home. Royalton. Wis. Wright. Mildred—At home. Racine. Wis Zarling. Earnie—At home. Horicon, Wis Zaun. Harvey—Teaching in Hammond. Indiana Ziebell. Alice—At home, Oshkosh. Wis CO CO CO —ALUMNI 1932 A L U M N 1 1 9 3 2 Allendor. Floyd—Teaching at Rivor Viow School. Florence County. Wis. Arvey, Anna— At home. Now Franken. Wis Attoe. Edith—Teaching at Slough Bndgo School. Oshkosh. Wis. Badtke. Laura—-At home. Ripon. Wis. Barry. Goldio—At home, Appleton. Wis. Bartz. Melvin—Teaching at Phillips, Wis. Bedkor, Romeo—Teaching at Wauwatosa Jr-Sr. High School Berson. Adell—Teaching at Oshkosh. Wis. Bloedel—Teaching at Beaver Dam. Wis. Bradley. Helen—Teaching at Read School. Oshkosh. Wis. Brossard. Esther—Teaching at Redgranite. Wis. Brossard. Zana—Teaching at Rio, Wis. Buck, Marion—At home. Tigerton. Wis Carlson, Glenace—Teaching at Roosevelt School. Neo-nah. Wis. Chase. Howard—Teaching at Hustis|ord. Wis Clark. Charlotte—At home. Fond du Lac. Wis. Clark. Marie—At home. Mountain. Wis Collar Arthur—At home. Hortonville, Wis Cone, Betty—At home. Fond du Lac. Wis Cowling, Beatrice—At home. Neonah. Wis. Crosby. Caroline—At home. National City. Cali|. Cunningham. Cecils—Teaching at Kiel. Wis Davroux. Eunice—Teaching at State Graded School, W Do Pore. Wis. Dotgolf. Eleanora—Mrs. Ray Donohuo. Neenah. Wis. Domarais. Maurice—Teaching Mt Iron, Minn. Densin. Gladys—At home. Marinette. Wis De Voldor. Beatrice—Teaching at Green Bay. Wis Dokken. N'elda—Teaching at Winnebago Indian Mission School. Neillsvtlle. Wis Dorcey, Mane—At home. Do Pere. Wis. Dornbush, Ruth—Teaching at State Graded School. Haven, Wis. Drossos. Christiana—At home. Oshkosh. Wis. Duenkler Ruth—At home. Oshkosh. Wis. Earle. Marian—Teaching in High School. Stockbridgo. Wis Eicher. Dorothy—Teaching in Ella Court School. Marinette Wis. Elmer. Foanette—At home. Oshkosh, Wis Engle. Lois—At home. Hecla. South Dakota Englobright, Mary—Teaching at Hortonville. Wis. Fenzl. Leone—Teaching at Dale School. Oshkosh Wis Flanagan. Carroll—Teaching at Stato Graded School. Wausau. Wis. Fryk. Louis Mrs.—Teaching at Westboro. Wis Fuller. William—Teaching in H. S.. Oshkosh. Wis Funk. Ruth—At home. Fond du Lac. Wis Gardipee. Louis—At home. Green Bay. Wis. Gilhg, Mane—Teaching in Neenah Wis Goiz. Loretta—Teaching in Longfellow School, Oshkosh Wis. Goodrich. Margaret—Teaching in Withee, Wis Goss. Harvey—Teaching in Vocational School, fanesville, Wis Granberg, G Gordon—Teaching in G A Davis Vocational and Technical High School, Grand Rapids. Mich. Furlong. Harry—Teaching at Kewaskum Wis. Furr. I Sherman—At home. Harrison. Ohio Haase. Lucille—Not listed Hart. Mary—Teaching at Waupaca. Wis. Hofforman. Marguerite—Teaching in High School. Green Bay. Wis Heljorman. Rosemary—Teaching in Jr. H S Antigo. Wis Heller. Leone—At home. Evansville. Ind Herman. Delphine—At home. Manitowoc. Wis Hujgins Harold—At home. New Richmond. Wis Hill. Mary—Teaching in Htles. Wis, Hoaalin. Emily—Teaching in Milwaukee State Teachers College Huobner. Anita—Teaching in lefferson School. Appleton Wis Huffman. Emma—At home. Amberg. Wis Huntley. Alfred—Teaching in Mosa, Arizona fanda. Emmett—Working farstad, Ethel—At home. Green Bay. Wis Iohnson. Elvera—Teaching in Hancock. Wis !a|er. Winifred—Teaching in Park School. Marinette Wis Kvipo Irene At home. Green Lake. Wis Kellogg. Clayton—At home. New London. Wis. Knadfe Frank—Principal of State Gradod School Koenders. Morton—At home. Whitefish Bay. Wis. Koeser. Myrna—Teaching at Two Rivers. Wis Konrad. Mane—Married, living in Evanston. 111. Kotkosky. Dorothy—Assistant. Public Library. Oshkosh. Wis. Krause Evelyr.—Teaching at Mount Horeb. Wis. Leaman. Harvoy R —Teaching at Neenah. Wis Ledwell. Ruth V.—Teaching at Humbird. Wis Levinson Charles—Teaching in Vocational School South Milwaukee Wis Licber Frank -Teaching in Ladysmith. Wis. Long. Harlow—At home. Wild Rose. Wis. Lora. Geraldine—At home. Rhinelander. Wis. Lutze. Gertrude—Teaching at Auburndale. Wis. Lyngaas. Bertram—At home. Winneconne. Wis Mac Casham. Gertrude—At home. Niagara. Wis. Mace. Howard—At home. New London. Wis. Marks. Beryl—At home. Rhinelander. Wis Maschka. Bernice—At home. Kenosha, Wis Meilahn. Lorotta—Teaching in Oak Grove School. Pickett, Wis. Michaolis. Geneva—At home. Marinette. Wis. Moos. Frederick—At home. Do Pere. Wis. Moore. Mary—Teaching at Marinette. Wis Morgan. Donald—Assistant Co. Supt.. Appleton. Wis. Morris, Jacquohne—Teaching at Oconto Falls. Wis Moslmg. Lucile—Teaching at Oshkosh. Wis. Motley. Sr. Marione—Teaching at St. Clara Convent. Sinsinawa. Wis Mueller. Herbert—At home. Gillott. Wis. Muttart. Virginia—Teaching at Merrill School, Oshkosh. Wis. McKinloy. Edna—At home. Neenah. Wis. Neumann. Delia—Teaching at Poshtigo. Wis Nickel. Francos—Teaching at Park School. Marinette. Wis Nicotaison. Dorothy—Teaching at Ogdensburg, Wis Nolan. Sr M. Charitas—At home. Green Bay. Wis. O’Connell. Francis — Principal Stato Graded School. Royalton. Wis. Parks. Helen—Mrs. fohn O Frank. Oshkosh. Wis Patri, Marvin—At home. Oshkosh. Wis. Paulson. Marshall—At home. Mount Horeb. Wis. Pearson. Arthur—At home. Redaranito, Wis. Peterson. Annies—At home. Amnorst, Wis. Pfeil. George—At home. Oshkosh. Wis. Posorko Mrs. Verena—At home. Berlin. Wis. Powell. Dorothy—At home. Tomahawk. Wis. Powers. Florence—At home. Columbus. Wis Radkey, Hugo—Teaching at Merrill Jr High School. Oshkosh. Wis. Randall. Evelyn—At home. Berlin. Wis. Randall. Reginald—Teaching at Clintonville. Wis. Rector, Rachel—At home. Brandon. Wis. Reimer, Ruth—Mrs Clarence Bredendick. Neenah. Wis. Rtstau. Vallee—At home. N. Fond du Lac. Wis. Robinson. Robert E.—Walk-Over Shoe Store. Milwaukee, Wis. Roesko. Lucille—At homo. Eldorado. Wis Rucks. Louise—At home. Fond du Lac. Wis. Sailor, Carol M—Teaching at R R. I. Kewaskum. Wis. Sandberg, Lola—At home. Birnamwood. Wis. Sandberg. Vera—At home. Birnamwood. Wis. Sawyer. Lorraine—Librarian. Public Library. Green Bay, Schmidt. Charlotte—Teaching at Marinette. Wis Schmidt. Edith V.—At home. Fremont. Wis. Schmidt. Melita—Teaching at Rural Normal School. Sheboygan. Wis. Schneider. lane—Married. Mrs. Bob Foster Schroeder. Betty—Teaching at Gilman. Wis. Schuler. Gordon—Teaching at Oconto Falls. Wis. Seefeld. Kermit—Teaching at Roosevelt J. H S . Milwaukee. Wis Seiboidt. Arthur—At home. Oshkosh. Wis. Sickinger. Agnes—At home. Antigo. Wis. Skinner. Mildred—At home. Redgranite. Wis Snelling. Ronald—Teaching at Rewey. Wis Sobush. Margaret—At home. Green Bay. Wis. Sorenson. Exna—At home. Green Bay. Wis. Stallman. Evelyn—At home. Appleton. Wis. Stollfuss. Mary—At home. Ripon. Wis. Stout. Elizabeth—Teaching at Merrill School. Oshkosh. Wis Struts. Olive—At home, Fond du Lac. Wis Thelen. Kathryn—Teaching in Oshkosh. Wis Thorp. Kathryn—At home. Shiocton. Wis. Timm. Georae—At home. Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. Tracy. Charlotte—At home. Appleton. Wis. Trapp, Adeline—At home. Fisk. Wis. Tremblay, Anna—Principal at Athelstane. Wis. True. Gregory—Teaching at Waterloo. Wis Villwock. Karl—Teaching at Galesburg. Illinois Waterstreet. Edwin—Teaching at Green Bay. Wis. Wenban. Dorothy—Teaching at Garfield School. Marinette. Wis. Wheelor. Helen—Substituting and Tutoring at Lake Wales. Wis. Wiese. Eleanor—At home. Neenah. Wis Williams. Hugh—Teaching at Oshkosh Wis. Williams. Kathryn—Nurse's Training. Chicago. 111. Wothe, Bernice—Teaching at Chilton. Wis. Wrage. John—Teachma at Abrams. Wis. Wright. Warren—Teaching at Wheaton. Ill Wurzbach. Clara—At home. Weyauwega. Wis. Zelinske. Florence—Teaching at Redgramto. Wis Zielsdorf. Margaret—Teaching at Wausau. Wis Zimmer Lloyd—At home Racine WisINDEX A Capella Choir................................100 Ackerman. John ................................ 47 Ackerman. William ............................ 4: Adams. Mrs. Klranor........................47, 101 Advance ..................................102, 103 Alethean...................................76, 77, 96 Allen. Kurinan ................................ 36 Allen. Hr. Ko»ina ............................. 47 Alpha Chi..................................82. M3 Allman, Yvonne.............................25. 79 Anders. Marie .............................32, M3 Anderson. Stafford ............................ 4m Anderson. Winifred.........................32. lot Anger, Knid.................25. 52. 53. 60, 76. HU Armstrong. Florence .......................36. M3 Arndt, Oscar .................................. 4M Arsen.au. Kohcrt............47. 67. 113, 114. 125 Assemblies .....................................15m Athletic Council ..............................lit) Austria, Krma ................................. 47 liadtke, Arthur................................ 25 Itaier. Arinin ............................47. 71 Itakken, Jane.................................. 4m Hand .......................................... 99 Harlow, He mice.......................25. 76, 104 Harlow. Hetty .............................32. 6M Harlow. F. Gilbert ........................47. 75 Harney, Harriet............................25. 85. 94 Hnskethall. tiirl's ............................130 Haskethall, I liter-society ....................135 Hassell. Mae ..............................36. M0 Hatterinan. Marlon. 36. 71. M4. 11)3. 113. 117, 121. 123. 125 Hrane. Stanley..................................... 43 Heard. Caylord................................25. M4 linker. Kric------4M. 71. 113. 117, 121. 122. 125 Herker. Karl.........................32. 57. 5 63 Hecker. George................................47. 7', Hecker, Knlph ................................43, 71 Heduhn, Kaymnnd ..................................... 47 Herman. Marioro- .................................... 47 Hrenkcn. May M. ............ 12. 52. 53. 55. M4. M5 Hehncke, Kthel J..........................12. 55, 5M Hchnke, George...................................4M. 67. 101 Hendrr. Kuth ........................32. 59. 76. 94 Henson. Patricia .............................36. 72 Hesse. Arthur ............................43. 67. M5 Beyer. William....................................... 4X Hictier. Harold........................4M, 71. 113. 114. 125 Kigford. Barbara .........................43. 72. H l lllahnik. Lucille ...................47. 61. 79. 92 Blake. Mabel G....................................... 12 Wake. Milton.........25. 60, 71. 110. 112. 122. 125 Hlechl. Wilma ..............................36. 64 Hloch. Genevieve...............................25, 76 Bower, Mrs. Ida................................ 47 Hradhurv, l avelva................................... 12 Bradford. Kathryn..............................47. Mo Bradley. William .............................43. 75 Bray. Charles........................................ 4M Brandt. Herman........................ . .36. 67. 94 Hreese. J. A................................. 12. 53 Brennan. Florence..............................4M. M3 Hrrnnrke, Harriet................................43. 72. 103 Briggs. Dorothy................................4M. 64 Brown. Helen...................................47. 72 Bryan. Hotter! ...............................43. 71 Burkholr. Ada ................................. 4M Burger. Kaymnnd ................................ 43 Burt. Jeanette ................................. 4M Burt. Lucille .................................. 47 Bushee. James........................................ 4M Busse. Pauline........................... 4M. M3. M5 Kutkiewitx. Kdward................................... 32 Byse. Grace ..................................36. 72 Calendar.....................................14M. 149 Cady. Blanche ............................... ... 47 Calvy. TIi..inns ............................... 47 Carpenter, Dorothy .......................... . . . 47 Carroll. John ................................47. 75 Ceronslcy, Charles ...................... ... 4H. m5 (Vronsky, James..................................4M. 63. m5 Chamberlain. Thomas.................................. 4m Cha|telle. Arm..11................................... 47 Charity Carnival .................................. 15o Christensen. Howard ............................ 63 Clark. Boyd ..................................4M, 75 Clark. Carroll............................... .4M, 75 Clark. Donnld ................................4M, 75 ('lark, Genevieve .............................. 43 Clark. Mary Kllen............................ 36. 6m Clark. Hhea......................47. 72. 103. Uu Clausen. Malvina C........................ . 13 Clematis. K. A....... ... ... 13. 55. 5m. 6o 75 Oendening. Duane .............................. 3 . Cohen. Hose............................ ».... 47 76 Collar. Hoy .........................43. 75. M4. 103 Collins, Marie............................... 43. 64 Conger. Glenn....................... 47. 59, 71. 4 Conlee. William ...............................36. 67 Conroy. 8r. M. Hridgctinc...................... 47 Cooke. Xelda ..........................43. 79. 103 Corr. How Mary.................................43. 76 Costello, Monica ......................4M. M3. M5 Cramer, Lucille........................4M. 64. 86 Crane. Clarence................................25. 63 Crowner. Margaret ............................. 25 Cruice. Veronica..................... 4m. M3. 8 Cuff. Margaret...............26. 52. 53. 64. M7. 94 Daher. Howard...........36. 67. 113. 114. 125. 127 Dnhlke. Theodore.......26. 52. 53, 60. 71. M4. 103 Dahin. Paul ................................. 4M Daniels. Clarence . 4m. 71. 113. 114. 121. 122. 125 Danielson. Homan ............ 47 Davies. Ksther............................... 26 Davies. Vivian...............36. 59. 0M, 103. | 4 Davis, Kathryn ................................36. MU Dean. Iris.....................................47. 64 Dc Baker. Adolphine............................ 43 De Keyser. Pronase . ......................... 32. 79 DeLaura, Clro ................................. 47 Delta Phi..................................64. 65. 89 DcLeolcos. D. Ted..............................47. 67 DeMaiffe. Phyllis..........................36. M0. !••! Demining. Iciuim ....................... 37. 68 Jlenis, Margaret............................. 4M Derr. Bernard_______44. 75. 112. 111. 121. 122. 125 Dcrncheid. Vincent....... .26. 71. 99. |Ol, H)3 Itiacon. Huth ................................. 47 Dickelmann. L. F.................. .............21 Diehl. Marion................................ 4m. 76 Dilling, Hulda, A..........................13, 53. 55 Dobyns. Lyle......................20. 75. Ml. 103 Dodds. Betty...............................47. 53. 64 Dolhof. Hubert ................................ 47 Dollert, Mary Louise ....................... 4M, 70 Domke. Frank . . . .26. 52. 53. 57. 60. 75, MM. 102 Donner. Barbara................................13. 53 Dnrnhrook. Donald. 37. 57. 61. 71. 93. 99. 103. HU Dorustreirh. Knute ............................47, H4 Dorschner, Wilnier............................. 63 Dubestcr. Xnthan...............26. 71. 103 Ducbac. Henry.....................»s ....... 4M Dumdie, Viator....................47. 57. 71. 1"4 Duncan, J. F...........................4. 13. 53. 55 Dushenski, Hita .............................. 4M. 76 Dushenski, Hutli ..............................4M, 72 Kdwards. Ksther ............................ 47 Kdwards. John ............................... 32. 63 Khricke, Dennis........................ . . .37. 75 Kichinger. Marian..............................4m, 6m Kkvall. Allan.....................44. 71. 103. 104 Kkvall. William ..................47. 71. I 4. 105 Knibertson. Kdwin............................ 47. 67 Kngel, Jane.......................32. 52. 53. 64. m-| Krillit , Mary Kli .alretli.................... 4M Krdmann, Mildred...................... 32. 86. 1 •»I Kvans Janet ................................. 14. 72 Kvans Maysel K....................14. 52. 53. 94 Kvans. William................................. 44 Kwald. Harold .................................4m. 67 Kwald. Norman..................................4m. 67 Kwert. Margaret ... ........................... 44 Fabrycki. Clement............26. 71. 113. 114. 125 Fuirbrother. Lucy .........................4m, in I Falk. Milt..................................... 26 Farley. A. A................................. 14. 55 Farley. Florence ..............................37, 76 Farr. M. Wesley................................ 47 Kem. Wayne..................................... 47 Finke. Koland ................................ 4" Fintak, Kdmund.................................47, 75 Fintak. (Jerald ...............................44. 75 Fischer. Clifford.................37, 57, 59. 75 Fischer. Lawrence ............................. 4” Fitzgerald. Betty.....................32. 68. In I Fitzgerald. James.............................. 4m Fitzgerald. Katherine......................44, 76. Dll Flanagan. Clair ............................. 47 Flanagan, ................................... lot Flanagan. Marion........................... 47. 76 Flanagan. Hubert .......................... • . 4M Fletcher. W. H........................ . 14 Flynn. Fahev...........................37. 61. 93 Forrest. Frances...........................26. 14 Forrest. Jean . ..................37, 64. m5, DU Forum ...................................... mm Fossum. Kenneth ............................... 44 Fox. Margaret . ... 4m Fowley. I iuise................................ 47 Frank. Gilbert .......... ................. 4m. "5 Frank. J. O........... ...........14. Vi. -7 Fra ns way. John ...... -Im Friday. Charles ........27 75. III. 112. 115. 125 Frit . Mary.......... . . 4m. 72 Froine. Mercedee ........ .................37. M3 Fuller. Kdith................................. 37 Fuller. Margaret............. . . . ,37. m3. 85 I I N D E X Fuller. Margery..................................46. 63 (•alluii, Jane...................27. 76. lull. HU (•amnia Sigma ...................................72. 72 tinrlwrg. Albert ................................46. 67 (•arlirerht. Cliurle ........................... 47. Gardner. Hail ...................................22, 76 (•ardnrr. Henry.........................47. 75. '. 4 (irhiurr, Marie..............22. 52. 52. 56. 66. 104 Lifford. Donna Marie.............................22. 75 (•laze. Allard .................................. 46 (•oehring. Evelyn................................22. 64 (•oettmunn. Helen ...............................47. 76 (•uggin . Kathryn............................... 27. 64 tioutd, Maxine ..............................47. 76 Lorhnm. John.....................................46, 75 Hnrmiran. .lanir............................... 46. 75 i»rr. Margaret.................................. 27 Lurwitx. Harry..........................27. 60. 71 (•••uld. Ruth ................................... 46 (•raff. Sylveria ................................27. 65 Lrandman. Melvin ....................... 47. 67. 64 (■rancorhiiz. Melvin.........46. 71, 112. 115. 125 (Irani. R. J.....................................14. 56 Hreen. Kay....................................... 47 Lreeuough. Einogenr.....................27. 72. 65 (•renhagen. Kathryn..............................27. 76 (irilhth. (ieraldine ............................ 22 (•rilKth, Harold................................. 47 Oronouaki. Mary.........................47. 61. 02 Oronowxki. Robert................................47. 71 (•rove . Cozette................................. 15 Lruenhagen. Hamilton..................32, 57, 60, 75 (iruenhagen. K. K................................ 15 Oruenatern. Elvere...............................37. 60 (irundy, Hetty .................................. 46 Hu hi. Audrey....................................46. 72 (iulig. Max ............................27. 53. 63 Hunderxon. Alice ............................. 47 (•urath. Howard.................................. 44 (iiitknerht. Marvin..............47. 75. 125, 127 Hae |y. Donald ................................. 46 Hugenr. Edgar. 27. 57. 55 . 75. 102. 103. 121. 122. 125 Hale. Dorothy.................................... 36 Halle, Klmer .................................... 47 lla in me . Sr. M. Dolorita...................... 46 liankey. Marie...............................47. 101 Hanley, Julia ...................................47. 66 Hanley. Willard ................................. 46 Hutiner . Albert................................. 44 Haitaen. Irvine.................................. 36 llaiiKcii. Mildred......................... 36, 63 llan en. William ................................46. 67 Han»on. Harvey...............46. 71, 112. 115. 125 Harri . Richard ................................. 46 Harrinann. Carl ................................. 46 Hartman. Albert .............................47. 71 Hnrwood. Murtnion ............................... 46 Haveman. l.oi ...........33. 56. 59. 76. 104. 107 Jlaven. Franklin......................47. 71. 94. 99 Heaney. I.aurcl ................................. 47 Hehlilewhite, Jeanette...........................47. 79 Hrckrodt, Charlotte.............................. 46 llefferman. Mildred ............................. 47 Heintit. Milton ................................. 53 Heixinger. Edward.....................44. 75. 65, 10! Hcllrrt. Frnnci .................................46. 63 Helm . Stanley...................................27. 63 llrlmulh. Ian.................................... 47 Hendry. Margaret ................................ 47 Henke. Kwahi .................................... 33 Henkel. John ................................36. 75 Henkel. Richard.................................. 36 Herr. Joxeph ...........................44. 63. 120 Jlett. William .................................. 47 Hewitt. W. C.....................................15. 21 Hildebrand. Irina ...........................47, 72 iliine . Jean....................................36. 66 I lime . Ray.............47. 60. 71. 121. 122. 125 llimley, Newman ................................. 46 Himch. Marie A..........................15. 53. 55 Hoffman. June.................................... 46 Jlohner, Kuniee ................................. 47 Houlihan. Celia ................................. 47 Hullub. Ru cll.................................. 99 Holme . Richard.................................. 47 Homecoming.......................................151 Ho|n Kathryi...........................33. 60. 76 llo|i|ie. Orville................................27, 63 Horn. (iill»Tt .................................. 36 Hnufek. I.. Hen .................................36. 75 Hough. l.oi ............................36. 59. 79 Ilouxe, Katherine................................ 47 llo.Ver. Hildrgnrde.............................. 46 Hubbard. Roln-rt ................................47. 75 lluehncr. Ethel ........................46. 63. lol Huebiier. Roland........................36. 63. 94 Hughe . 1-cRoy................................... 47 Hull. Mylola............................46. 63. DM Humphrey . Helen..........................36. 79. 63 Hunter. Marion ...................................33. 63 Hurd. Mary................................44. 60. lol llu ton. Klaine ..............................46, 64 Jhrke. Harold.................................33. 67 Jhrke. Royal..................................44. 67 Jmmel. Arthur..................................... 27 Ingham. Hetty .................................... 46 iota Alpha Sigma..................................62. 63 ive . Jane.....................27. 64. 67. 94. lol Jaine . Marjorie..........................46. 66. DM Jamex. X. S...........................15. 55. 71. 93 Junda. Joxeph ................................... 46 Janxeti. Alice ................................... 47 Jenxen. Roy .................................... 47 Jenxen. Roger..................................... 46 Jentz. Joe.......................26. 56. 59. 71. 64 Jerkixh. Magdalene ............................... 46 Johnxon. Heulah................................... 36 John on, Laura T.................................. 15 John on. Mabel ................................... 47 Johnxon. Rom .................................... 33 Johnxon. William ................................. 47 Jole. Klina I............................. ... 21 Jolin, Jane ..................................... 46 Joiipk. Eleanor ................................. 47 June . Evelyn ............................36. 59, 79 Jnrgen»en Amy ................................... 47 Journey' End ................................... 95 Judkinv Howard.................................... 46 Juergen . Eleanor ............................46. 65 Ju tus, Charles................................... 36 Kading. Xavier.................................... 63 Karge . Hurton K..........................16. 55. 66 Kahlrr. Harvey ...............................33. 66 Kappa Delta Pi................................52. 53 Kappa (ianuna.............................76. 7V. 69 Ka ten. Marian ...............................47. 72 Kaufman. Victor ................................. 36 Kauth. Caroline ................................. 47 Keating. (Jrare.......................33. 53. 79. 104 Keefe. Hateman ................................... 46 Keefe. Hurton .................................... 46 Kelly. Margaret M.....................16. 52. 53. 60 Kelroy. Margaret..........................46. 63. 65 Kelxo. Corinne M..........................16. 55. 79 Kendziorxki. Edwin....................26. 59. 63. 94 Kildnig, John............................... 33, 67 Killam. Norma ................................39. 66 Kimball. Aaron ...........................47. 61, 07 Kimball. Emily................................39. 66 Kirley. Helen.................................26. 00 Kittenball, Interaociety .........................133 Klabunde. Ruth.................................... 33 Klade. Myrtle.................................33. 72 Klatt. Adolph .................................... 47 Klurin ke. Hetty..........................47. 66. 104 Knoll, Marjorie................................ 47 Koch. Karl ...................................... 47 Koerner. Norman .................................. 46 Kolf. R. M..................16. 112. 121. 123. 127 Kolitftch. Anthony............................47. 63 Konrad. John ...............46. 75. 121. 122. 125 Kopitxke. Frederick..............26, 67. 103. 104 Ko el. Alanuon ..............................39. 71 Kraft. Dora______47. 52. 53. 56. 59. 61. 72. 92. 110 Krexxe. Tenni .......................26. 57. 63. 99 Kring . Alice ................................46, 80 Krippcnc, I'rhan..........................47. 75. 94 Krix. Edward ..................................... 46 Krohn. Duane ..................................... 46 Krueger. Alice............................47. 60. 66 Krueger. P. Andree............................33. 75 Krueger. Drpha ...............................48. 83 Krueger. Virginia.........................33. 76. 103 Krueger. Stella................................... 47 J.a Hudde. Marie.................................. 47 La Chapellr, Joan.............................44. DM Lacv. Patricia ...............................46. 63 La Fontaine. Joan..........................46. 79. 65 Lambda Chi....................................80. 81 l.ar en, Aubrey .................................. 48 Larxen. filenn ...............................48. 63 ].ar on, Alpheu ......................44. 101. 103 Laraon. Elaine............................39. 64. 83 Lartx. Leorge.................................47. 71 J.artx. Theodore..............................48. 71 Lauglilin. Dorothy ............................... 47 I iutenachlager, Reuben. 47. 60. 71. 110, M2. 115. 121. 123. 125 Learned. Harold.......................39. 60. 75. 125 Ledvina. Edward...............................39. 67 l.eitxke. Anita ..............................47. 53 J.em. Clara......................47. 80. 103. 104 I -mke. Paul..............................47. 67. 120 l.enlz. William...............................39. 67 J.onz. Charle .................................... 48 I. eon rd. Clyde................................. 46 J. ewi . Eloixe..............................64. 87Lewis Merrill........................................ 47 Liudicreu, Dorothy................24. f 2. mu. hi. i•• i Liner. Clement ..................................... 47 I.i| ktti l. Julius.................................. 47 lau-kwnod, I In r riel It...................... I 55 I .ulllC, Lou........................................ 47 lairrii , Virjciniu............45. « 1. |»I. 102, 104 I airmen n. Allrv . :tl», H2 land ike. .Marie.................................... 17 L alls Mur Karel ................................... 47 I .Veen in ........................ ..lifl. 07. MU. UK M.iltie. Roller!..................................... 47 Marc, Kttlli S. . ................................... 21 MacDonald, Kli ali.tli ............................ 2 » MncXichol, Carol.............2M. .50. 70. 04. loll. till Madden. Kli alx'iii ............................:tu, H2 Madison. Arlene ...............................114. 70 Malloy, SiMer Carol Marie............................ 17 Malthy, lone .............................47. OK. |i 4 Maniienlineli. Dorothy.................... 4K, Mil. H5 Manli. Kohert ...................................... 71 Marks Converge ..................................... 4S .Mur«|llelle ...................................... K.'i Mnrtell, Florence .... ............................. 17 Mnrlell, James...................................4h. 7.5 Marlin. I Moris ...............................:»». h:i Marlin. Norman ................................4h. 75 Marlin. Thomas .................................... 4h Martini. Ilarvev.................................... 4M Marly. Marion ....................................... 47 Marx, John.......................................... 4H Mason. Maxine .............................2M. 52, 0M Mnlhiasen. I nicer .................................. 47 Mathinson. Marie..................................... 17 Mallmiic. Jean....................................... |H Mathwix. Kohert................................ 45. 71 MnlhwiK. William. 17. 71. I 111. lift, 121. 12.1. 125 •IK .................................. 47 ........................ 45. hii, h:i ..............................V!. 70 .............................:tu. 7u ....................4M. r.i, 75. o:i 70 4K no, 7n 10 .M.iuritx, Stanley . Maxwell. Marion . . Mayer. Onrothy . . . MeCnllnn. Marian . MeColliin. Marjorie MeCartliv. Marvin . Mi-Can ley. iertrnde MrCInlie. Frank ................................... 24 MeCourt. Howard .............................114. ;:( McCoy. Cert rude............................ 4M. 70 MeCoy. John...................................47. MrDonald, Helen...............................4H. MrCraw. William ............................... Mel iiln-li. Kathryn ....................... McMahon, It. .1............................. McVicar. .leanne .......................:tu. 50 OH McWilliams Olive........................ ... ,4H, 70 Men’ Oehwte .................................. Oil Merrier. Jeanne A............................... 21 Merkcr. Herlhn ...................................:io. |o| Merrill. Jane ............................... 4H. 70 ■Miehels Crace ....................... . . . . :to. 70 Mlrrswa. Dai................................... 4H Miller, Ourwnrd...................... . 47 Miller. Jennnelte........................... :t4. liH Miller. M«M.................................... 4 7 Miller. Itudnlidi ............................ . . 4H Miracle. Janies...........................4n, 07. Ini MittelMnedt. Arthur................................ ih Mi Hire, Clark ................................ 4 Moore. Hutch ...............4 . IOI, 1 1 It. 115, 125 Min.re. Mililred ........................... .JH Moore. Peter...................................... 47 Moreau. Alice ................................ih. tin Morris Arlene ..................................... |H Mnrtell. Kdw.ird .............................4H. 75 Mnrtell. John...............4H. Oh. 75. 112. 110. 125 Mnrtell. Katherine......................... 4K, 70 Morien-en. Carl ................................... In Mn elv. Russell.......24. 20. 52. 52. 112. 110. 125 Mft'linjr. Join....................................4 . 75 Muehrer, Lawrence.......... 4H. 07 Mueller. Phyllis .................................. 4H Mulva. Cnrrell ...............................4K. 75 Miir| hy. Marie.................................. 4 Myers Kerntlt ................................40. 07 N'ehi'l. Jack......................................4H. 07 Xehaeh. Clarendon....................4 . 71. 121, 122, 125 Nell. Kdear . .. ------4s. 71. 121. 122. 125 Nelson. Xnrliert........................4h. 02. H. NVImhi. X. I ..... .....................17. 55. 75 Newark. Margaret .............................. 4s Xlehols Bonita........................24. 52. 351 fMi Nichols Verona..........................10. 72. i"t Nightingale. Sr. Clarence ......................... JH Nolan. Sr. Mary Beatrice........................... JH Nolle. Marjorie ..............................45. 70 Norris Helen .............. ............2 . 511. ho Norton. Atcatlm.........................45. 02. I"! Noli lent a n. Jane................................ IH Nowaiki. la-onard ............................2d. 04 O'Brien. Leonard .............................. -JH .47. 07, HI, 104. .................IH, ..........IH, h:s. h5 24 25 02 ................. IH 20. 52. 52. 71. HI ..................17 ................I"l 40. H2 O'Brien. Rommnn ..... O'Connell. John .......... Oldlield. John............ den. Chnrle'.............. Olniated. Miriam ......... d|». Henrico.............. O Rouke, Agues............ trillions .............. Orton. Mary............... Osterguard. Neil ......... Oatwahl. Molly ........... O.xhelm. Jennie .......... Pagel. Kileeli ........... Patecek, Kdna ............ i’almer. Floremv.......... Pair, Vernoi.............. Paulus Sr. M. Vcnnrtl Panne. Lillian............ Peake. Kllen F. P......... Peek. M a dice............ Pel ton, Russell.......... Penny. Howard ............ Penny, Joltn ............. Perieienn .................................7o. 71 J'erket'hon. Clailya I.. . . Peterson, Jovee........... Peier «oi. Phylli« ....... Pollers. Wilma ........... Pfeiffer. Mary ...................................... 47 Pfranic, William .................................... 4H Pfuiid. I aula .................................|H. OH Pfillid. Verna................................. 4H. OH Phi Chi Mu . ................................... n t Pliilakenn .....................................74, 7.-, Phi Beta Sigma.......................................51. 55 Phillips Jane..............................45. 70. Hi I Phoenix ...................................OH. 00. ho Pi Kn|i| a Helln .................................. 01 Pdlinic. Ila el............................. .|;». h:j Pinkerton. Jane Ann............... In. OH. |o2. |n| Pit . Marie ....................................24. h5 Playfellow' ........................................ ;tl Plate. Kenneth...................................... |u Plummer. Uladys ..................................... 17 J'olakoW'ki, Nnrliert ............ 4s. 0|. 71. h4. 02 Polk. Forrest R.........................||. 52. 55 Polk. Marian..................III. 50. OH. H7. |u4 Pmil rolling. Jane .................................. 24 Porter. Oliver ...................................... 47 IH •IH 17 2 1 .in. h:: 17. 52 .20. 02 4 H 47 .21. • M 21 45 125. i:»,7 .24. 12H 45. OH 17 .21. OH 17 Price, Irene 7. 52. 52. ho, h.| Priee. V. F......................................... 17 ......................40. 75 ..............40. 72. h4. Hft ......... 4H . . lot). |o7 40. 72. 102 ---- 4o. 71 ..In I. 105 ......... 17 .40. 72 Price. Wall Prirkett. Ann Paulin Prion. Sr. Mary Mnrtcari-I Promenade ................ Pinch, lairrainc.......... PiljN'ter. Alhel't ....... (Quiver .................. Kil.td.au. Herald ........ Radlke. Betty ... ........ Itadtke. I....nil .................................. 40 Rantwth. Jay ...........................20, 52. .52. 02 Kiiin.'cth. Lillian ............................... 1.5 J{a uiU"Cii. Burton............................... |!i R:i mii".'li. Clifford .....................20, 52. 52 Ru noi" 'U, John .................................... 4H ltu'mii"cn. Leslie ................................. to Rasmussen, Ruth Carol.......................40, 70. h:; Relim. Christina.......... ........................ 40 Kcinluird, Verona .................................. 47 Reiter. Ito-e........................................24. 72 It elel h . ItU'snll................................. 17 Riehman, Sidney.........................40. 7 5. 00. |u| ltirhler, Marian .................................... 47 Kirkahy. Mary June. ........... .... 40. 04 Rielmt. .....tin .............................. 40. I n | Rieve. ....... 4H. nil. 112. 110. 121. 122. 125. 127 RitlCCP. Millie.....................24. 52. 52. 50. 72 Ititsrli. Kli al.-th ................................40, iJn Roherts. Francis..........................20. 52. h7 Knherls 1-ois-....................................... 40 Kohert'. Thonia' .................................... 40 • 20, 52. 52. 71. 112. Knliertsoii, Merl Knell. Francis . . . Kodat. Warren . . . It neck, Walter .... Boeder, Irene ... Rm-der. Nile .... Boeder, Ruhy. . . . RiN-lller. Lull l-e .. Roeihiic. Wahleiuar ....................... Roicer . Betty......................... Rohde. Richard ......................... Rojallll. Kli .uheth .............. 4H. 111. Ro|»er. Ruth ............................... Ko|mt. Maxine .............................. R..... Lila May ............... . . Kn-entlinl, Ruth ........................... Ro". June............................ 15. 24. 02 02 . . . 10 10. 125 .......... 47 . . . 40. 7.5 20. s0. In| .......... 4n . . .47. 02 41. HII .......... 40 I "4 17 II 102. I 40. I XMD2 1 I Ryan. Bernard ...............................29, 63 Ryan. Kleanor .................................. ■} Kvan. Helen................................. • ; Sarzychinski. Ralph.........................■ ' • «J SiliiiXiT, KijrmoM ............................ •,f4 SiimllM'rK. Raymond.............................. d® Sandes . Mile ................................. ■ Sautrrnian. Willard............................. ■ ” Savinske. George ............................... - 9 Hrkarfrr, Dolor - .............................. Schindler. Helen................................ Schmidt, Jack................................- 9. "5 Schmidt, Leonard................................. 29 Schmidt, Milton ..............................29. 63 Sehneeberger. Bruce ............................. ® Schneider. (Jordon ............................. - 9 Schneider, Marcella .........................- 9. 3 Schommer. Ada Agnes............................. - 9 Schroeder. laima ................................ (J Schubert, Norman ............................... ■ “ Schulz. Mildred ................................ ■ » S«'hurl»ert. Dnria .............................. ( S hwalM-nlander. Anita.......................30. 50 Sch« aim. Catherine.............................. ® Sell wan. Ralph...................-19. 71. 112. 116 Schnandt, Robert.............................■•9. "1 Schwandt. Zona Mae.........................■ ". 101 Schwartz. Harold................................. (" Scott, Helen .................................... 00 Scott. Ie ui e K..............................10. 50 Scott. Robin.................................. 9. 63 Seegcr. Kdward .................................. 49 Seibel. John .................................... 4S Sell. Jean ...................................... 49 Shea. Klcanor.................................47. 72 Sherman. Herbert ................................ 47 Sherman. Orville........................45. 99. 101 Shilcrat. ..................................47. 103 Shi nick, (trace M............................20, 64 Shrum. II. T..................................... 16 Siol en ohn, Marian...........................41. 60 Sielier, Margaret ............................... 30 Sieferl. Jerry................................49. 71 Simonson. John................................49, 85 Sipple, Virginia..............................49. 83 Siviur. Bernard...............................49. 75 Skemp. Helen W................................13. 68 skowlund. Helen.................34. 56. 80. 84. 104 Slndkv. Norbert...........................47. 03. 85 Sloan. Roger..............................47. 71. 84 Smart. Kdward.................................... 49 Smith. Audrey.............................. 41, 76 Smith. Karl...................................... 47 Smith, Gladys H...............................18. 55 Smith. J. II..................................... 18 Smith, Kathryn .................................. 47 Smith, Keith .................................... 49 Smolcii. Stance .............................49. 67 Snyder. June..............................48, 60, 83 Soiitag. Sarah .................................. 49 Sorenmn. Irene............................49, 64. 83 SoreiiMtn, Jane.................................. 47 SoreiiM.n. Stanley........................45. 63. 99 Spnrhy. Mnrian ..............................45. 76 Splitlgerher. Kvclyn..........................49. 83 S|M.iiM r» ......................................160 Springlairn. Irvin ...41. 61. 71. 93. 99. |OI. 104 Stan . Ruth ..................................... 41 Steckbaner. Kugenr........................35. 67. 85 Steiner. Bernice................................. 47 Steiner. Mahel .................................. 49 Steinkellner. Robert..........................35, 71 Stewart. May I,...........................18. 55. 83 Slin»on, Kleanor..............................41. 68 Stockfish. Viola A............................20. 72 Stnddart. le-onn ................................ 35 Stowe. Gerald ...........................30, 71. 94 Stra cn. Ralph..............48. 75. 112. 117. 125 Strotnme. Kthel ........................41. 79. 83 Sullivan. William ................................ 47 Suren. John...................................41. 71 Swallow, laiis K.................................. IS Sweet. Lucille............................30. 64. 94 Swisher. Thelma...............................49. 72 Swislon. Cart............48. 67. 112. 117. 125. 127 Tack. David ..................................49. 75 Talbot. II. W.................................21. 55 Talbot. Richard ...................41. 75. 125. 127 Tang ye. Dnrothv .........................47. 60. 76 Taylor. Hilda ....................19. 53. 55. 60. 87 Taylor. J. T..................................19. 71 Tegat . Payne........................49. 61. 76. 92 Tetich. Margaret ................................ 49 Thedinga. Kiln .................................. 49 Thrdingii. Krncst ................................ 19 Them, Peart......................... • ■ • • ■ -3$. 64 Thewa. Richard ...........................41, o7, 59. 67 Thcile. I...................................48. 71 Thompson. Mrs. Orrilla................... • • • • .» Thorescn. Norman........................48. 67, 93 Thornton. Kdltl................................ 4« Thornton. James ........................... • 49 Thorson. Gladys.......................... ThorMin, Vernon, 30, 52, 53, 71, 99, 112, 117. 125 Tindall. Lewia..............................45. 67 Toll. Lucille...............................49. 83 Topp. Jeanette ................................. Track. Inter-society ...........................••» 49 48. 64 49 Vanderheidcn. Jean ...30. 52. 53. 64, 87. 94. 101 Van Doren. Dale................................ 49 Van Doren. J. Howard .......................... 47 Van Keuren. Ruth........30. 52. 53. 56. 59. 64. 94 Van Rov. (.ambert ............................. 48 Van Sistine. Kva J.........................1®. 55 Van Slyke. Arthur .........................41. 75 Vedder, Aletha ................................ 49 Vchlow, Fred .................................. 49 Viet . Hamilton ............................... 46 Vo!and, Karl......................35. 53. 71. 101 Volk, Anne................................... 48 Volk. Gertrude................................. 49 Volkcrt. Otmar ................................ 49 Volkman. Robert.................41, 67, 101. 104 Vos . Verna ................................47. 64 Walmer. Russell................................ 49 Walsh. Richard .............................47. 75 Wasser, Lloyd ................................. 48 Waatri. Gilbert ............................46. 75 Watters. Dorothy .............................. 49 Wcher, Jane.................................42. 72 Webster, Jean ...............42. 80. 94. 101. 103 Weisenhurger. Arthur .......................... 30 Welch. Russell ................................ 49 Weller, Florence............................46, 86 Weller. Gertrude .............................. 48 Weller. Ksther ................................ 47 Werch. Lawrence................................ 49 Werner. Annettn ............................46. 76 Werner. Florence B...................19. 55. 76 Werner. John ..............................49. 75 Weston. Jean........................30. 52. 53. 64 Wetak. Hubert..............31. 52. 59. 75. 84. 106 Whitney. If. 11.............................19. 63 Wichmann. Kdward...........................48. 101 Wickert. Orrln.............................42. 75 Wieserkel. Gilbert............................. 49 Wilke. Samuel .............................48. 71 Willcnekaon, Ruth .........................20. 55 Williams. Arthur .............................. 47 Williams. Carl..........................47. 53. 67 Wdlianis. James................................ 47 Williams. Stella ............................. 42 Williams. Wo drow ............................ 47 Wilton ........................................ 87 Winrkler. Garth ..........................42. 71 Winslow. Joe .................................. 49 Wilthuhn. Doris...... ............42. 72. 94. 101 Wold. Amy K................................20. 68 Wolff. Harry....................35. 67. 104. 105 Wolfrath. Neal ............................... 31 Wollnngk. Orpha K....................20. 58. 76 Wollenburg, Deloris........................46. 64 Wollenhu rg. I.ucilc .....................42. 83 Wolverton. Betty .............................. 49 Womaski. Anthony ..........................35. 84 Wood. Hnrry ................................... 42 Wish!, Roltert ................................ 46 Worhy. Charles.............................49. 67 Wurl. Chester .............................47. 63. 125 Yaeger. Robert. 24. 31. 53. 00. 67. 112. 117. 125 Yager. Kathryn..........................42. 83. 85 Yahr. Wanda.................31. 53. 56. 59. 64. 94 Yankow. Henry ................................. 46 Young. Klmer................................... 47 Zahel. George ................................. 49 Znjac. Jeanette....................49. 64. 85. 94 Zielke. Annette................................ 49 Zimmerman. Bettye..........................49. 68 Zimmerman. France ............................ 21 Zimmerman. Ruth ............................... 48 .impel. Carl..............................42. 63 Zoerb. Aliee...............................42. 80. 104 Zuehlke. Ksther............................42. 86 Pago 168ALGOMA - NOW WErST ALGOMA OtylG'INALLy CALLED AT H fr NS Zq mpkcll1 S C rcel —fi. .ru -i C ompbeJI So wnoil) fJL ftl OOK L N - NOW South oshhOSh i B «.«. ! Mill 1st s c h s J ► use iSi'g + Train ______5 o i ffc 5 To Oshkosh e. p o-f" i ■ »» »»» - » Ml ■■ 19+ n J yt 184ST CC IsT Ho+e.1 f1846 " ■ LAise WINNEBAGO Frii. yj 1 8 -f r 2 r volumt __b s t € r Stanley b u i If | b e r t a ct monThs . ."p, _ y , r . , 1ST Lib r or} f gptic n butldtny 'near bno998 F e rr ... 1ST .own c !e cT 10 h he. I d here. 18 F- re CO. S6 Post Office e s t 7 bl i sh ed " 1840 POST maSTC r G Q It up f-e-B y st. Late-b main st, In 1876 Webster Stanley and Chester Gallup lay claim to q II land between Mam Street and the lohe on the north Side of- the river loss held tv er ailouez %70


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