University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI)

 - Class of 1921

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University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 242 of the 1921 volume:

Che Uubilee Quiuee Dolume KXD. 1897 1921 Published by Che Senior Class £tate DoFmal School Oshkosh, WisconsinCable of Contents DcDlcation oretoorD jFacultp Classes Semicentennial Organisations athletics rolics aonertisementsoffering this, tbe ttoentp fiftb volume of tbc Ouincr, uie banc enDeanorcD to transcribe to its pages tbe storp of tbc fiftieth pear of the £)sbkosb formal School. Cbe completion of fiftp pears of seroice is toortbp of note, anD the modern treno of ebucation is inDi cateD to pou tobo stuDp tbc response of stuOents as presenteb in tbesc pages. Q0ap this book prone enfopable to tbc classes tobose toork anD actio ities ujc bane sought to relate. Cbe Ouioer 15oarDZ )C Class of 1921 De tcates Zl)t Jjubtlee Eluibcr to jftr. €. (Srurnbagcn ti)bo tcacbcs Cbc jo? of tbc tuorfeman Cbrougb tbc master? of bis art.R. E. GRUENHAGENCommencement iDrogram SATURDAY. JUNE I Banquet of ttje Graduating; Class and alumni GUILD H LL OF TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH Toastmaster Mr. F. M. Karnes SUNDAY. JUNE 5- 3:00 P. M. Baccalaureate address NORMAL AUDITORIUM TUESDAY. JUNE 7 Class Dap Crercises CAMPUS AND AUDITORIUM Ivy Oration Fred Darling Junior Respotise Miss Kathleen Doyle Peace Pipe Oration Miss Ellen Due Junior Response Mr. Alfred Levistein Class History Miss Agnes Ellicson Class Prophecy Miss Grace Noirot Class Poet Miss Renetta Meyer Class Song Miss Beatrice Holland LIBRARY. 7:30 P. M. alumni association a9ertin Reception of Incoming Graduates Flection of Officers Informal Reception WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8 9:30 A. M. Commencement AUDITORIUM Representatives: Elementary Grades Miss Florence Bradway Grammar, State Graded and Rural Perry Writt High School Course— Miss Irene Brooks hulustrial Course Mr. Irvin Lathrop ADDRESS Mr. Carter Mexander, of the State Department of EducationjForetuorD THK school year now nearing its close possesses unusual significance to us all in that it marks the fiftieth milestone in the life of this institution. I’lie old school has stood the test ol time well: this to me constitutes a just and glowing tribute to those faithful souls who have given so unselfishly of their lives that the character and the traditions of the institution may he maintained. I am neither old enough in years, nor in service, to indulge in retrospection. hat the school has stood for in the past is registered many thousand times in the lives and work of its Alumni. As to the future, I feel that we can turn our faces toward it with confidence, and armed with the knowledge that to stand still is to go backward, strive valiantly for the continuation of such service as, in tin broader sense, the school has always stood for. A public institution which fails in the service for which it was created becomes at once a characterless pile of brick or stone, and can he likened to the rose that radiates no fragrance. And so it is the earnest wish and hope of us all that the ivy-covered walls of fifty years hence shall inspire that generation with the same love and respect that the institution has hitherto commanded. R. E. GRUENHAGEN.■ Here are the skies all burnished brightly; Here is the spent earth all reborn; Here are the tired limbs springing lightly To face the sun and to share with the morn In the chrism of deit and the cool of dawn.1 Here the air is soft ami hazy; it's a crime Not to linger and be lazy for a time. So, tchile summer skies are warming And the heart beats all in rhyme. Let us stop where life is charming, for a time.The woods wore made for hunters of dreams. The streams for fishers of son ft; To those who hunt thus, (to ftunless for (tame. The woods and the streams helon(t. An open hand, an easy shoe. And a hope to make the day fco through. These are the joys of the open road For him who travels without a load. like, as I say, in sicli scenes as these. The time when the green gits hack in the trees.The silver lifiht icith quivering glance Plays on the uater's still expanse.HHXVfV MV'IV nsitiii rniiw 1 H. A. BROWN 'resident A.B. Bales' College, 1903 A.B. University of Colorado, 1907 Graduate Student in Education University of Colorado and HarvardPedagogy, Literature, Psychology ROSE C. SWART l)can of Women English A.M. University of Wisconsin. 1895 MARGARET V. STAFFORD Director of Rural School Course English Rural School Management Rural Sociology State Normal School. Oshkosh. 1918 Cniversity of Chicago University of Wisconsin CAROLYN B. JACOBI Educational Psychology Oshkosh Normal School. 1910 Student in Education, Teachers College. Columbia University. 1912-1916-1917 University of Chicago. 1918 ELLEN F. PEAKE Literature University of New Brunswick. A.B. 1892 Graduate Work. Harvard Summer School. Columbia. Chicago A. A. FARLEY Director of High School Course Educational Psychology Educational Measurements A.B. Beloit College. 1895 A.M. University of Chicago. 1904. Ph.D. 1906 WALTER H. FLETCHER Mathematics Elementary Science A.B. 1900. Dartmouth A.M. 1908. Dartmouth 1921 Page sixteenn;ibe jubilee History, Mathematics FREDERICK R. CLOW MARGARET K. ROBERTS LYDON W. BRIGGS History. Economics, ami Sociology A.B. Carlcton College, 18S9 Harvard, 1891 A.M. Carlcton ami Harvard. 1892 Pit.IX Harvard. 1899 History State Normal School. Milwaukee, 1908 Wisconsin University. 1915 A.B. University of Minnesota 1914 Graduate University of Chicago. 19171018 School I.aw. Civics Normal University, Illinois. 1867 EMILY F. WEBSTER Arithmetic and English Graduated Oshkosh State Normal School. 1875 W. C. HEWITT Mathematics and Government Michigan State Normal School. IS82 Pd.B. Michigan State Normal School. 1 1 0; Pd.M. 1900 1921 Page seventeenScience JOSEPH O. FRANK Director of College Course Chemistry A.B. Indiana University, 1008; A.M. 101 •» E. A. CLEMANS Director State Graded Course Agriculture and Physics A.B. University of Michigan. 1901 H. W. TALBOT Biology B.S. Colgate University. 1908 Cornell University, loin University of Minnesota. 1919 LEAVELVA BRADBURY Geography and Nature Study Ph.B. University of Wisconsin. 1913 F. E. MITCHELL Geography Graduate State Normal School. Indiana A.B. Indiana University, 1897 1021 Page eighteenFine Arts, Languages LILA M. ROSE Music IVJ.M. MM?: A.B. Education. 1020; State Teachers CoIIckc, Grillcy. Colorado MALVINA C. CLAUSEN Librarian Library Methods, Wisconsin Library School. 1012 Student Wisconsin University, 1017 BEDA BJURMAN Art Massachusetts Normal Art School. Boston LILLIAN L. BRUCE Assistant Librarian Graduate Stephenson Training School. 1017 Student Oshkosh Normal School. 1020 1021 1021 LUCILLE C. FRANCHERE Romance I-anicuaKcs Iowa State University, B.A. 1018 University of Lcipsic University of Baris. 1010-1011 C. LOUISE ROEWEKAMP Assistant Librarian Page nineteenIndustrial Arts FRANK M. KARNES Professional Work Director Industrial Education Whitewater Normal. 1903 Oshkosh Normal 190“ Stout Institute 1920 R. E. GRUENHAGEN Mechanical Engineering University of Wisconsin. College of Engineering FRANK W. WALSH Instructor Engineering. Drawing, and Mathematics Western State Normal. 1910 Student University of Chicago, 1917 F. E. JUST Machine Shop Practice. Forging Stout Institute. 1920 HARRY H. WHITNEY Supervisor and Critic Industrial Education Life Certificate Kalamazoo Normal. 1909 It.S. Industrial Education. Carnegie Institute of Technology. 1917 Page twentyIndustrial Arts FORREST R. POLK Industrial Valparaiso University. It.S. 1909 Purdue University. H.S. in Civil Engineering, 1814 HERBERT T. SHRUM Auto Mechanic . Klectric Wiring. Forge Shop. Vocational Mathematics Graduate Purdue University Mechanical Engineer, I9IO RUTH S. MACE THERESA M. ST AT HELEN W. HENDERSON Physical Director for »irls l)e Arnold’s School of Physical Education. New Ilaven, Connecticut Assistant Physical I irector State Normal School, l-a Crosse. 1919 Home Economics Home Economics Department, Steven Point Normal. 1917 '1021 Page twentyoneTraining Department LAURA M.JOHNSTON Director Training Department School Organisation amt Management Grinncll College. 11 00 1908 University of Chicago. 1915-1916 Graduate Student in Kducation. Harvard JENNIE C. MARVIN Principal of Junior High School State Normal. Oshkosh, lsss FLORENCE B. WICKERSH AM Supervisor Junior High School State Normal School, l lattevillc. Wisconsin. 1909 University of Chicago. 1917-1918 CLARA A. TROTTER Rl BERTA N. SMITH Director of Intermediate Course Teachers College. Columbia University. 1911-1912 Diploma Oshkosh State Normal. 1919 University of Chicago. 1919-1920 Director of Primary Course State Normal School. Plymouth. N. H.. 191:: Student in Kducation. Teachers College. Columbia University. 1920 1921 Page twenty-twoTraining Department ALICE ADAMS Second Grade Critic I'li. it. University of Chicago, 1916 Graduate of Northern Illinois State Normal School. 1908 II ZEL A. BEHRENS Kindergarten Critic Milwaukee Normal School Diploma, lilt Graduate Work Milwaukee Normal School. 1918 f. SARA L. BOOM Critic of Fifth Grade State Normal School. DeKalb, Illinois. 1910 Student. University of Chicago, 19181919 LOUISE BOSWELL Fourth Grade Critic Northern Illinois State Normal School. 1913 Summer School. Chicago University MARY E. CROWLEY Supervisor English and History in Junior High School City Training School, Portsmouth. N. II.. 1915 State Normal School. Plymouth. N. 1L. 191S Harvard University. 1918 1921 - Page twenty-threeTraining Department ANNE DEN BLEYKER Sixth Grade Critic State Normal Life Diploma. 1009; B.S. 1919 Elementary Supervisor’s Diploma. Columbia University. 1919 Michigan Western Columbia University RUTH U. TALCOTT Critic Junior High School French ami English' B.A. Lake Forest College. Lake Forest. Illinois School of Conversational French, Chicago. Illinois BENNIE L. STONE Critic Teacher Junior High School I’h.B. University of Chicago. 1919 MARY WILLCOCKSON Critic Third Grade Eastern Illinois State Normal School, Charleston. 1910 University of Chicago. 1919-1920 EVA J. VAN SISTINE Critic First Grade Oshkosh State Normal. 1900 Student of Education. Teachers College. Columbia University, 1918 RUTH WILLCOCKSON Critic Teacher Fifth Grade Miilikin University, 1919-1911 University of Chicago Certificate Household Arts University of Chicago. Student. James, 191.VI9I7 Page twenty-fourSecretarial Force MABEL A. RIORDAN Registrar Oshkosh Normal School State Normal School, Oshkosh, 1902 RUTH S. SPARKES i'inancial Secretary MARIE I. MOORE Secretary to President Brown FRANCES H. RI PPLE Clerk and Stenographer ELEANORE HORN Clerk ami Stenographer. Industrial Building I’age twenty-lireOther Officers MRS. BLANCHE CRANDALL Matron of Gymnasium ALMA M.COURTNEY Matron of the Dormitory Page twenty-sixUbe jubilee The Senior Class Class Officers President Vice-President Secretary T reasurer . C. SHERMAN MARSH GLADYS KOESER MARY SCOTT ON I NTT GUERIN Page twenty-sevenEDWARD L. ALBRECHT State Graded Course Hartford, Wis.........................Hartford High Entered from Milwaukee State Normal V. M. C. A. '20. '21. "My wind is my kingdom." HUGO ALDER College Course Oshkosh. NVis.........................Oshkosh High "Small of measure, but of i uality excellent." WALTER AUGUSTINE Industrial Course Sturgeon Hay, Wis.................Sturgeon Hay High ".■I good type of good, active, earnest manhood." OSWALD R. BAUMGARTENER Industrial Course Wrightstown. Wis..............Wrightstown High I. A. S. 'll . 20; Lyceum 'io. "To be. no matter tchere, a man." ROMEO R. BEDKER Industrial Course Heaver Dam. Wis.......................Beaver Dam High Editor in-Chief Quiver '21; 1. A. S. 20. 21. Secretary '21; Advance Stall '21. "Earnestness, tcork. By these are his life inspired." Oshkosh. Wis. c CARRIE E. BEHREND College Course .....................Nccnah High , A. A. 21; Camera Club '21. 'She hath i studious mind." I'agc twenty-eight1 HELEN C. BOWE Intermediate Course Kdgar. Wis............................Edgar High Marquette ’2 . ’21. "Always in good humor," FLORENCE BRADWAY Intermediate Course Waupaca, Wi ......................Waupaca High Commencement Sj eakcr ’21. "Who deserves tcell needs no praise." IRENE BROOKS Hi(th School Course Oshkosh. Wis......................Oshkosh High Glee Club 'IP; Nautical Knot 'IP; Commencement S| eakcr '21. "AU things are easy to the willing mind." VIDA A. BROOKS High School Course Oshkosh. Wis......................Oshkosh High Glee Club '10. ‘What I say I stick by." FRANK A. BUTLER High School Course Jackson Port. Wis................Sturgeon Hay High President Senior Class 'Is; President Lyceum '18; Captain Junior Football '10; Captain Senior Football '17; Ivy Orator '17; Commencement Speaker 'Is; Interstate Debate '17; Inter-Normal Debate 'Is; School Orator '21. "In every look, word, deed and thought. Nothing but courteous and manly." JOHN C. CALDER Industrial Course Mcuasha. Wis.............................Mcnasha High I. A. S.. Critic '21. "The man worth while is the one who can smile when everything goes dead wrong." Page twenty-nine 1921JOSEPHINE CAM BIER High School Course Oshkosh. YVi .............................Oshkosh High Alcthean 20. ’21; Quiver '10. ’20; Assistant Kditor Advance '21; Junior Peace Pipe Oration '10: Vice-President Student Publishing Association '20. "And that sweet dignity, all who saw admired EARL T. CAREY High School Course Kurcka. Wis.................................Kurcka High Pliilakcan 21; Dramatic 21; Camera '21; Quiver Stall 21. "There's mischief in this man." MABEL CLARK Grammar Grade Course Oshkosh. Wis..........................Oshkosh High G. A. A. '20. '21: Current History 20, '21; Chorus ’2o; Camera ’21. "Like a bee she works all day." ZUA DANE College Course Oshkosh. Wis.............................Oshkosh High Alcthcan '2«. 21. Secretary '21. "Her charm is all her own." GRACE E. DANIELS Intermediate Course Babcock, Wis...............................Babcock High Marquette 21; Current History '21; Club Recorder '21. "She works with exfertness and efficiency." FRED S. DARLING Industrial Course Bangor, Wis.................................Bangor High I. A. S. '19. '20. '21; Marquette '19. '20. Treasurer '20; Lyceum '20; Class Basket Kail '19; Ivy Orator 21: Quiver Staff '21. "It is only the great-hearted who can he true friends." 1921 Page thirty t£lbe mlbilee CLAIRE E. DARTON High School Court Loyal. Wig................................Loyal I 1 rH Cl. A. A. ‘2». "21; Browning '21; Campfire 20, '21; Camera "21. Vice-President 21; Quiver Stall "21. “.I maiden who Merer will worry ami try little to hurry." OLIVE DAVENPORT High School Course Oshkosh. Wig............................Oshkosh lligli Phoenix 1 '20, 21; Marquette "It . 20. 21. President 20. Treasurer '21; G. A. A. 20, '21. Vice-President 20, 21; Quiver StalT 20. 21. "Il'e couldn't net along without the Irish." DELLA M. DAVIES High School Course Wild Rose. Wig......................Wild Rose High Advance StalT 19; G. A. A. 20. '21; Y. W. C. A. 20. 21. Treasurer 20, 21; Current History 19. 20. Secretary 19, Vice-President 20; Quiver StalT '21. "In her friendship there is nothing insincere." ROSE DEKEYSER Intermediate Course Xeenah, Wig...............................Xeenah High “Nothing is so strong os gentleness." JEAN DENIS High School Course f)e Pere, Wig...............................De Pcrc High Assistant Editor Quiver ’21; Browning 20. ’21, Secretary-Treasurer 21; ! ramatic 19. ’20; G. A. A. 20; Advance Staff '20. "A better pal ‘ticould be hard to find." JOHN B. DEQUAI.NE High School Course New Franken, Wig...................New Franken High Y. M. C. A., Treasurer 21. "As quiet and self-contained as an oyster." 1921 Page thirty-oneFRED DcYINNRY Imlu'trial Course Oshkosh, Wis...........................Oshkosh High Football '20-’21. "lYork! Where did I hear that word beforet” ELLEN DUE High Srhool Course Oshkosh, Wis..........................Oshkosh High Alethean '20. 21. Vice-President 21. President ’21; Advance Staff '20. Kditor-in-Chicf '21: Quiver Staff ’20. ’21; Dramatic '21; Peace Pipe Orator 21. "Her toil over books hath consumed the midnight oil." NATHAN EDELSON College Course Oshkosh, Wis........................Oshkosh High Business Manager Quiver 21; Advance Staff 21; Philakeau 21; Dramatic 21. Treasurer ’21. "You just can't keep a flood mart down." EDWARD E. EDICK College Course Amigo. Wis..................................Amigo High Football 20 ’21; Track 2". "Studies little, thinks much. You'll like him." AGNES M. ELIJCSON High Srhool Course Washburn. Wis.........................Washburn High V. W. C. A. 19. President ’20. 21; Dramatic 19; Delegate Student Volunteer Convention 19; O. A. A. 19. Secretary 19; (•lee Club 19; Quiver Staff 20. 21; Nautical Knot '19: Browning '21: Class History '21; Secretary Student Publication '21. "Xo cobwebs in this attic." ESTHER I. ERICKSON Stale Graded Course Denmark. Wis...........................Denmark High V. W. C. A. '20. 21; Dramatic '20. '21; Wicaka Campfire 20. '21. ' Thou hast wo sorrow in thy sor.fj. Xo winter in thy years." 1021 Page thirty-twoPRISCILLA EVANS Primary Cour.-e Wild Rose. Wig................... Wild Rose High V. W. c. A. ’19. 20; Dramatic 20. "Herr is to the girl with the heart anil the smile. Who makes the bubble of Hie worth while." MICHAEL J. FENISYN College Course Marinette. Wis......................Marinette High Football '20. ’21; Basketball '20. “Girls hereI How horrible!" WALTER T. FOX Industrial Course Sauk City. Wis............................Sauk City High Class Basketball and Football ’20. ’21: I. A. S. ’20. ‘21; Lyceum ‘20. ’21. ’’ have been recognized many a dark night by my red hair." ESTHER FRANSWAY Intermediate Course Oshkosh. Wis.................................Oshkosh High V. W. C. A. ’20. ’21; ir!s’ Chorus ’20. ".I lady and a true friend." ELLA I). GAUGER Intermediate Course Brandon. Wis.............................Brandon High "Be silent and safe: silence ne:er betrays you." LUCILE GEIGER Intermediate Course Oshkosh. Wis...................................Oshkosh High G. A. A. ’20. ’2!; V. W. C. A. ’20. ’21; College Baskct! al! ’20. "In her there is little to criticise.” Page thirty-threef£be Jubilee Quiver WARNER J. GEIGER College Course Oshkosh. Wis................................Oshkosh High Philakcan 20. 21. Vice-President 21; Dramatic 20. 21. Treasurer 20; Assistant Business Manager Advance 20; Advertising Manager Advance 20; President Student Publishing Association 20, 21. "(iood fortune is tire companion of courage.” ELLA GREIBE Primary Course Plymouth. Wis.............................Plymouth High V. V. C. A. 20. 21. “She has no faults ami I no faults can spy.” HARVEY ». G1LB0E College Course Mauawa, Wis..............................Manawa High Marquette 20. 21. "A man teith a heart touch.” 0VIATT J. GUERIN Industrial Course Manawa. Wis..............................Manawa High Philakcan 19. 21. President 21, Critic 21; Oratorical Association 10. 21. Secretary 10; Baseball 10; Dramatic 19. 21. Secretary 21; Ivy Orator 19; Y. M. C. A. 21; Camera 21; Class Basketball 10; Treasurer Senior Class 21; Assistant Business Manager Advance. "Worry and I hare never met.” VIVIAN HALL High School Course Columbus. Ohio.........................Columbus High Dramatic 19: President Browning 21: Wicaka Campfire "19. Secretary 20. Treasurer 21. "The hall of fame.” LILLIAN K. HALLADA Intermediate Course Seymour. Wis.............................Seymour High Marquette 2' . 21. Herself alone, none other she resembles.” 10211 Page thirty-four Ibe Subflee Quiver VIOLETTE HARTER Intermediate Course Menominee, Mich........................Menominee High Y. V. C. A. ’20. ‘21; Dramatic ‘21. "A hard worker who never stops at things done hy halves.” LEILA E. HARTFORD Intermediate Course Hancock. Win.............................Hancock High "What sweet delight a quiet life affords." MILDRED B. HEFFERNON Intermediate Course nerlin, Win..............................Merlin High Dramatic 20, ‘21: Camera ‘21. "One of those people who say little and accomplish much." RE SADA HERTZBERC High School Course Oshkosh. Wis...........................Omro High (i. A. A. '21: Dramatic Club ‘20, ‘21: Current History Club '20. ‘21; Y. W. C. A. ‘20. '21: D. Y. D. Basketball Team ‘21. "Graduation comes about very strangely." MARION HETHERINCTON Primary Course Oshkosh. Wis.........................Oshkosh High Alethcan ‘21: Primary Baskctl al! Team ’21. "A little lass, but O my!” GLADYS HELER College Course Kilielil. Wis..................................Fifiebl High H. A. A. ’20. ‘21: Y AY. C. A. ‘2 ». ‘21: College Basketball 20. "The noblest mind the best contentment has.' 1921 Page thirty-fiveBEATRICE HOLLAND High School Course Oshkosh. Wis............................St. Peter’s High Marquette '19. ’20. ’21. Vice-President 20; Alethcau '19. ’20. ’21. Treasurer ’20; G. A. A. ’19. ’20. ’21; Heat! of Basketball 21; All Star Team ’20; Woolly H. S. Team 21; Treasurer of Advance '20. ’21: Camera Club '21. "Thoughtfulness begets Wrinkles." HELEN k. HOREN High School Course Oshkosh. Wis.........................Oshkosh High Marquette ’20. '21. "I always laugh at jokes, and someone's always joking." NINA L. HOUGH Primary Course Winncconne. Wis......................Winneconnc High V. W. C. A. ’20. ’21. "Silence is more eloquent than words." MYRTLE HUGHES Intermediate Course Berlin. Wis.....................Berlin Training School Dramatic Club '21. '.‘l merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance." VIOLA JAMES High School Course Kland. Wis...................................Kland High Entered from Lawrence College Current History (dub '21: V. W. C. A. '21. "By virtue, not by craft." AMY E. JENSEN Intermediate Course Wausau. Wis................................Wausau High “Some are skillful with their head; Some are skillful toil It their hands; Hut I am skillful with my feet." 1021 Page thirty-sixf£ibe Subifee Quiver MARY F. JOHNSON Primary Course Oshkosh. Wis......................Oshkosh High "Life, 'tis tilth a serious matter." GLADYS JONES Intermediate Course Cambria, Wis.............................Cambria High Y. W. C. A. ’20. '21. "She always gives her best." ELSIE A. KIND Grammar Grade Course Menasha. Wis..........................Menasha High Y. W. C. A. 20. ’21. "I xcorb with patience which is almost power." ESTHER KLEINSCHMIDT Primary Course Oshkosh. Wis......................Oshkosh High Y. W. C. A. 20. '21. "Give me my own nook and shall be content." DWIGHT KM DSON Industrial Course Sturgeon Bay, Wis....................Sturgeon Bay High ".d worker always attending to his oxen business, and doing his level best." HELEN KOELLER Intermediate Course Oshkosh. Wis..............................Oshkosh High "It teould take a wiser head than mine to understand her." 1021 Page thirty-seven HHHHH■ ■ GLADYS KOESER High School Course f£be jubilee (St (Ishkosh. Wi .............................Oshkosh High Alethcan ’ll . '20. '21. Vice-President '20. Critic 20. President ’21: Dramatic Club ’10, '20. ’21. Vice-President ’21; Class Treasurer ’20. Vice-President ’21: Quiver StalY ’21. "II'caring all that learning lightly as a flower." EDNA KRATSCH High School Course Oshkosh. Win,........................Oshkosh High G. A. A. '20. ’21. Treasurer ’21; II. S. Basketball Team ’20: D. V. D. Basketball ’21; Camera Club ’21: Campfire ’21. "From her cradle she was a scholar, and a rife and good one." LUCY KRCHMA Grammar Grade Course Kewaunee. Wi .........................Kewaunee High Marquette ’21; Current History Club ’21; Girls’ Glee Club ’21. "Her ways are ways of fieasantness." WALDO F. KRUEGER High School Course Sawyer. Wis........................Sturgeon Bay High O. X. S. Band. ’I": Philakean ’1 . 20. ’21. Secretary ’10. Marshal ’2". Critic ’20; V. M. C. A. ’20. ’21. Vice-President ’20. ’21; Camera Club ’21. President ’21; Quiver Staff ‘21. "He has a head for figures and facts." GKRTRI DF. Kl’H UPT Intermediate Course Green Bay, Wis....................K. Green Bay High Phoenix ’20. ’21. Critic ’20. ’21. "I know a maiden fair to see—take care.” MARION KUTCHIN College Course Oshkosh. Wis.......................Oshkosh High Marquette 20. 21; Dramatic 21. "Be thine oten self always and thou art lovable." Page thirty-eight'She jubilee Quiver MARIE LABUDDE Primary Course Oshkosh. Wis........................Oshkosh High Girls’ Chorus ’21. "The only way to hare a friend is to be one." JANET LALLEY Intermediate Course Berlin, Wis.................Berlin Training School "She lives in peace u-ith all mankind." IRVIN J. LATHROP Industrial Course Beaver Dam, Wis................Beaver Dam High Industrial Arts Society. Secretary '20. Treasurer 21; Quiver Stall '21: Commencement Speaker 21. "A model lad tcho conscientiously masters his work." LESTER LE1TL Industrial Course Sturgeon Bay. Wis...............Sturgeon Bay High Football '2u. '21; Basketball '20. "One teho never turned his back, but marched breast forward." HOWARD LENTZ Industrial Course Oshkosh. Wis........................Oshkosh High dec Club '20. "A itreat responsibility of getting to his classes on lime." JOHN LESSELYONG College Course liortonvillc. Wis..................Hortonvillc High Lyceum '20. '21. Vice-President '20. '21. "When in the course of human events it becomes necessary to bluff, let us bluff.' 1921 Page thirty-nineHOWARD LYONS College Course New London. Wis....................New London High "Men of few words arc the best men.” HAROLD MAAS Industrial Course Hartford. Wis...............................Hartford 11iicli “This is the period of ambition. Ah, blessed hourf’ DAVID MARSHALL Industrial Course Omro. Wis....................................Omro High I. A. S. '2 . ’21. "All goes well with him." EARL MARSHALL Industrial Course Omro. Wis...................................Omro High Lawrence College. "He can because he thinks he can.” SHERMAN MARSH College Course Pine River. Wis...............................Berlin High Philakean ’20. ’21. Vice-President '21; President Senior Class 21; Business Manager Advance ’21; Inter-state Delate '20; Y. M. C. A. Scholarship Committe ’20. "Difficulties get ant of the way of men who know where they are going.” NERVILLE A. MARTELLE High School Course Menominee. Mich.......................Menominee High Entered from Lawrence College. Philakcan ’19. '20. ’21. Secretary Treasurer '21; Marquette ’20. ’21; Quiver Staff ’21. " durst not smile upon the damsels, 'Twould break too many hearts.” 1921 Page fortyt£be Jubilee (Hufoet WILBUR MARTELLE High School Course Menominee, Mich.................Menominee High Kntertii from Lawrence College. Philakcan, Secrctnry-Trcasurer •20. Mnrsli.il 20, 21. President 21; Marquette. President 20, 21; Dramatic 20. President ’21: Inter-Normal Debate ’20. ’21. "Kttow ye not met" hazel McCarthy Intermediate Course Fond du Lac, Vi»................Fond tin Lac High C. A. A. ’21: Marquette ’21. "I have a heart with room for every joy." GERTRUDE MENERATTE Primary Course Wausaukcc. Wis......................Wausaukee High Marquette ’21; G. A. A. 21: Current History ’21; Primary Basketball Team 21. "MoJest and quiet and sweet, the very type of Priscilla." RENETTA MEYER High School Course Oshkosh. Wis................................Oshkosh High G. A. A. ’19. ’21, President ’20. ’21; V. V. C. A. ’20. 21; Browning Club ’21; Glee Club ’21. "Happiness is the product of work well done." KATHERINE MICHAELSON Intermediate Course Marinette. Wis......................Marinette High Browning Club ’21; Y. W. C. A. '20. ’2t. President ’20. "Free front deceit her face, and full as free her heart." MILDRED MILLAR Primary Course Fond du Lac. Wis......................Grafton Hail Advance Staff ’20; Junior Class. Secretary; Dramatic 20, ’21. Secretary '20, Vice-President ’21; Browning Club ’21. " nt sure care is an enemy of life." 1921 Page forty-oneMILDRED MORRISSEY Intermediate Course t£be Jubilee € Omro, Wis...................................Omro High Quiver Staff '21. ".•J merry heart doeth good like medicine." GORDON NEUENFELDT Industrial Course Oshkosh. Wis....................Kivcr Falls Normal Quiver Staff ’21: Advance Staff 21. "I would that there were more men like this one." DORIS NICHOLSON Grammar Grade Course Clintonville. Wis.................Clintonville High Phoenix '20. 21. Secretary '21; G. A. A. ’20. ’21. Treasurer ’21: Grammar Grade Basketball Team 2o; Y. W. C. A. ’20. ’21. Secretary 20; Glee Club '20; Quiver Staff 21. "They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts." RUTH NICKEL State Graded Course Oshkosh. Wis..................Winnceonne High "Whatever is worth doing at all is worth doing well." CALLIS NIQUETTE Industrial Course Oshkosh. Wis,...........................Mishicot High Marquette '20. '21. Secretary 20; Glee Club '20; Industrial Art '20. '21; Track '20; Class Basketball 20. "Quiet in appearance, with motive little knozen." GRACE NOIROT High School Course shkosh. Wis......................Oshkosh High Advance Staff '21: Quiver Staff '21; Ivy Orator '20; Class Prophecy 21. " dare not be as funny as I can." Page forty-twoLUC ILF. NOLTE High School Course Oshkosh. Wis.............................’ . Oshkosh High Alcthcan 20, ’21. Vice-President 21. "She strove with none, because none was worth her strife." EDNA NORF.M Intermediate Course Bryant. Wis.............Milwaukee Downer Seminary Phoenix 20. 21: G. A. A. '20. 2t. "Sever idle a moment, but thrifty and tlioughful of others." THERESA O’CONNOR Intermediate Course Berlin, Wis................................Berlin High Marquette 21. "Quiet and unassuming." GENEVA 01UM High School Course Oshkosh. Wis.........................Oshkosh High "The world's no better if you worry. Life’s no longer if you hurry." GENEVIEVE 01 UM High School Course Oshkosh. Wis......................Oshkosh High "A laugh is teorlh one thousand groans in any market." ORVEL OLSON College Course Amigo, Wis................................Amigo High Entered from Lawrence. Lyceum 20. 21. "Il'ould thou were half as constant as thy photograph." Page forty-three 1921JAMES OUR ADA Industrial Course ■Cbe jubilee ® Marinette. Wis..........................Marinette High Footlwll '20. '21; Marquette ’20. ’21; 1. A. S. 20. '21. Vice-President '20. Marshal '20; President '21; tllce Chib '20; Advance Stall '21. "To be without pretense or sham Exactly what men think t am." ARDESSA PALMER Intermediate Course KIcho. Wis..................................Elcho High "There's nothing so queenly as kindness.” PEARL PAWLICKI Intermediate Course Hurley, Wis..........................St. Ambrose High Marquette '20. '21; Dramatic '21. “There teas somethinj finer in her than anythinq she said." ALII) PF.RRIZO Intermediate Course Fond du Lac. Wis.....................Fond du Lac High Marquette ’2 . '21; Dramatic ’21. " dare not trust these eyes; They dance in mists." NORM PERRY High School Course Appleton, Wis................................. pplcion High Dramatic 10. '20, '21. President 20. '21; G. A. A. '20. '21; Quiver Staff ’10. '20. '21; Advance Staff '10. ’20: Kditor of Summer School Advance ’20; Assistant Business Manager ’20. Vice-President ’21; Browning Club '21; Camera Club ’21. "It is so because I say it’s so " LYDIA PFEIFFER Intermediate Course Plymouth. Wis...........................Plymouth High V. W. C. A. '20. '21. "The secret of her success teas her constancy to purpose." 1921 Page forty-fourLELA PLEOGER Primary Course Amigo High Klmhurst. Wis. Y. NY. C. A. '20. 21. "Diligence exemplified.’ JAMES POLOMIS High Seliool Course WaiuaDkce, Wis......................Wausaukce High "V't Mwj7 Lochinvar has come out of the It'est." CLARENCE PROFFIT Industrial Course Omro. Wi ............................Omro High “A quiet type of good, earnest manhood." KATHERINE RASH LEIGH Intermediate Course Houghton. Mich.............................Houghton High ;. A. A. ’2o; Primary Team; Hirin' dice Club. "Here she comes sparkling, Helter skelter, hurry scurry." CATHERINE HEANEY Primary Course Sojierton, NVi .......................Wattcno High Mariucttc Training School. Marquette ’21: Phoenix ’21. "Ireland forever." GLADYS REESE Primary Course Oshkosh. Wis.......................Oshkosh High “The measure of life is not length but honesty." Page forty-liveT£be Jubilee Quivet KI TH REILLY College Course Fond du Lac. Win. . . . St. Mary’s Springs Academy Manpiette ’20, '21. Treasurer 21; i. A. A. 2o. 21. Secretary 21: Browning 20; College Basketball 20, ’21. "Happy aw I. from tare I'm free. Why aren’t they all contented like mef” HERBERT RIEMER Industrial Course Oshkosh. Wis................................Oshkosh High ".I nood student, an excellent dehater, and a prime faster PEARL ROEMER Intermediate Course I’ioc River. Wis. . . Waushara County Training School "IIV fust don’t know it hat to say about her." LOIS SAWTELLE Intermediate Course Oshkosh. Wis.............................Oshkosh High "Such as she xtill be missed when they leave us." NEVA SCHRADER College Course Omro. Wis.............................Omro High (i. A. A. 21: Camera Club 21. Treasurer ’21. "In chemistry he excels'." ELEANORE SCHOEWE Grammar Course Waukesha, Wis.............St. Charles High. Minn. O. A. A. ’21. "She doth little kindnesses which most leave undone.” | 1921 Page forty-sixLEONA SCHUH Intermediate Course EtcJio, Win.........................................Elcho High "Smalt and quid, but a thinker and a doer." MARY SCOTT . High School Couree Oshkosh. Wia..............................Oshkosh High Prowning Cluh 19. ’20. ’21. Treasurer '20, President ’21; Editor of Advance ’20; Dramatic Club '21; Secretary Senior Class ’21. "A handjul of fun it better than a bushel of learning." LEAH SEYBOLI) Primary Course Forest Junction. Wis..................Brillion High V. W. C. A. ’19. ’20. ’21; Current History Club ’20. ’21: G. A. A. 20. 21; Primary Itaskctball Team '21. "A happy lot be thine." RUTH SEYMOUR Primary Course Oshkosh. Wis.........................Oshkosh High O. A. A. '21; Phoenix '20. ’21; Marquette '20; Quiver Staff ’21; Treasurer of Phoenix ’20. "Smiling expression is eharacleristie of her face." YVONNE SMITH State Graded Cour-e Green Pay. Wis...............E. Green Pay High "It is better to uear out than to rust out." ARLOW SOLBRAA In.Ill-trial Course Stoughton. Wis.............................Stoughton High Football ’20. 21; Basketball ‘20; Track '20. "Large of stature, he was strongly built and athletic." 1921 Page forty-seven■......................T----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - t£be Jubilee (Shrive ' FRANK STAt'BER Industrial Course Marinette, Wi ..........................Marinette High Industrial Arts Society 21: Footliall '20. 21. "Hit it up. Frank, the folks are watching." MAR I EL SWIFT Hi :li School Course Oshkosh. Wi ..................................Oshkosh High Ci. A. A. ’20. 21: Phoenix 'IP. 20. 21. Vice-President 20; Dramatic Club 10. 20; V. W. C. A. 20. 21. "Words foil us in this crisis” BELLE TAYLOR High School Course Oshkosh. Wis.......................Oshkosh High "The worid is tailing for you." MARY TEM.ME Intermediate Course Merlin. Wis....................................Merlin High (•recti I tke County Normal. Not much talk—a great, street silence." EDWARD J. TESOH Industrial Course Oshkosh. Wis................................ du1t Special 1. A. S. 20. 21. Critic 20. President 21. "Just in his judgment, true of liis word." WILFRED THIEL College Course Marshfield. Wis....................Marshfield High Kutercd from Lawrence. "His years are young, hut his experience old." I j i 1021 Page forty-eightMARIE L. TICE Intermediate Course Omro. Wi .................................Oshkosh IHkIi Y. V. C. A. '21; Girls' Glee Club '20. "So modest. to serene, so prate; To her the pods full many a blessing pave.” VERTIE TOLZMAN Intermediate Course Lomira. Wi ..............................Lomira V. V. C. A. '21; G. A. A. '21. "To her duty prompt at every ealt." GLADYS WALTER High School Course Oshkosh. Wis.......................Oshkosh High Glee Club '20. " detect more pood than evil in humanity.” SYLVIA M. WEINER Primary Course Oshkosh. Wis.............................Oshkosh High Marquette 20. '21. “Youth comes but once in a lifetime.” CAROLYN WEISSMILLER High Srhool Cour.-e Oshkosh. Wis.......................Oshkosh High maid tcho would find the way to knowledge." LEONARD A. WENZ College Course Watcrsmcct. Mich....................Watersmect High Lyceum Me. '17. Ms. '21. Treasurer 16. Secretary ’17. President '17; Glee Club '16. '17; Class Basketball M7. MS; Basketball MS: Men's Club MS; Track MS; Baseball M7, MS: Junior Football MO; Senior Football '17. "The name that dwells on every tongue no minstrel needs.” Page forty-nine 1921-■ ■■ EARL F. WILLIAMS Industrial Course t£be jubilee €t Oshkosh, Win.............................Oshkosh High " argue, argue, argue as I go." PERRY WR1TT State Graded Course Sturgeon Hay. Wi .....................Sturgeon Hay High Marquette '1! . ’20. ’21, Secretary ’20; Philakcan '20. 21; Dramatic Cluh ’2 . 21; Inter-Xormal Debate '20. 2t; Quiver Staff '21. "He does not need the artificial light that comes from other minds." ANITA YINDRA State Graded Course Antigo. Wis.......................... migo High Camera Club '21; Y. V. C. A. ’21. "Work first and then rest." GEORGE W. YOST Industrial Course Wimicconnc. Wis...................Winneconne High I. A. S. '20. '21: Marquette ’20. '21. Vice-President '21; Lyceum ’20. '21. 14None but hintsel is his parallel." Lena. Wis. "Love seldom ARTHUR ZEISMER College Course Baseball '20. haunts the breast where learning lies." ELIZABETH MARSH Pine River. Wis.............Berlin Training School Y. W. C. A. '21: Current History '21; Camera Club '21. "Slow but thoughtful are her actions." Page fiftyCommencement Speakers FLORENCE HEADWAY Intermediate Representative AGNES F.LL1CSOX Class History FRED DARLING Ivy Orator IRENE BROOKS High School Representative RENETTA MEYER Class I’oct KATHLEEN DOYLE Ivy Response IRVIN L ATH KOI' Industrial Representative GRACE NO I ROT Class Prophecy ELLEN DUE Peace Pipe Orator PERRY WR1TT State Graded Representative BEATRICE HOLLAND Class Song ALFRED LEVI STEIN Peace Pipe Kcsikhisc 1021 Page fifty-oneFile Junior Class (Mass Officers President........................................VOLNEY LEISTER Vice-President...................................HARRY McANDREWS Secretary........................................KATHRYN ROBERTS Treasurer........................................BERTHA CLOW 1921 Page fifty-twoCollege Course Walter Ahl Margaret Allen Ella Anger Alfred Bchnkc Kurt Blcck Robert Brehmer Norman Broderick Russel Broderick Burton Cardiff Howard Chambers Alvin Christenson Bertha Clow Lyman Conger Claire Cotanchc Kathleen Doyle Alvin Dupont Walter llaefs Lawrence Halverson Page fifty-three be jubilee Quiver College Course Francis Hart I.ilah Ileuer I)»rothy Jackson Catherine Josslyn Alfred Kreklow V'olney Leister AI f red Levistein Khlor Martin Harry McAndrcw James Mitchell Shcrbourne Morgan Leonard Nikcl John O’Keefe Elmer I’orath Jane Railford Kathryn Roberts Eunice Rogers Harold Thorpe Lorenz Zedler Luther Zellmcr 1921 Page fifty-fourSecond Year High School Course Klizabcth Allen Florence Christenson Geneva Conlin Florence Donnelly George Fenisyn Martha Heffernon Katlityn Ilubbell Laura J. Ihrig Gwendolyn Kihn Kva Morgan Thelma N'ccb Dorothy Xiquette William Price Anna Scybold Gordon Shipman Anita Wickert Gladys K. Williams Gwen Williams Marion Wolverton 1021 Page fifty-fiveFirst Year High School Course Bemadinc Brown Marguerite Fraederick Lucile Hoggins Lucilc Graves Ruth Guhl Emma Laars Nora Laars Helen Lee Ida 1’ctaja Doris Peterson Helen Pickett Merle Pickett Meric Rasmussen Avis Reid Ethel Rein hard Gwenald Ritter Mrs. Phyllis Ritter Rilla Rogers —1921 Page fifty-s xFirst Year High School Course Mabel Smallenhurg Anna Schmidt Rculah Solbraa Ksther Steudc Harold Vandervoort Naomi Willc Margaret Woltcr Marie Wolter Grammar Grade Course Dorothy Cartwright Marjorie Cord Mary Fitzgerald Marjorie Crecnwood Adelia lliltgcn Pearl Ka ten Julia Phillips Page tifty-seven 1921Industrial Course Dean Barber Emerson Kdgerton Earl Basklield Richard Esser Kenneth Counscll Russell Faulk Theodore Curtis John Fenner Theodore Doucette Mark Ferrando Walter Frederick Elmer Hedstrom Vincent Holman Arno King Vick Lang (or 1 Investor llanncman Albert Losey Frank Maulthetsch Theodore Meyer Edward Mueller 1921 Page fifty-eightIndustrial ("oursc Harvey Pugh Frank Schrank Paul Schmiedickc Francis Schulze Patrick Seymour Clarence Reuter (ieorge Stannard Archie Starkey •. A. Todd Reuben Witt Bernard Wulk Rural and State Graded Course Margaret Little Matgaiet Nies Marie Hansen Phoebe Lampert Myra McHonnugh Ksther Muscavitch Margaret Ohm Meta Rockwell Flavia Writt = 1921= Page fifty-nineIntermediate Course Dorothy Berner Blanche Bowen Virginia Carr Edna Cayac Esther (!hri ten on Mr . F. Christenson Ermine Crockett Eva Dodd Marjorie Finnegan Minnie Grimm Ruth Jewell Victoria Johanson Emily l-aursen Marie Mathiasen Ellen Neff Fern Nighthart Marjorie O’Brien 1921 Page sixtyIntermediate Course Helen Peterson Gladys Plummer Helen Pytlak Hilda Steuck Florence Ctnbrcit Irene Vieaux Lucy Whalen Nellie Woodard Primary Course J Marvel Burt Lillian Cartwright Melba Chapman Margaret Coyne Lyschcn Damerow Daisy Berber Marie Finnegan Alice Glaser Ruth Mahoney Loretta McFarland Page sixty-onet£ibe Jubilee Quiver Primary Course J Marian McVean Gladys Xucsbaum Margaret Parker Jeanne Parreue Ora Pfeiffer Florence Pierce Harriet Rexwinklc lone Roberts Irene Schartau Jean Swancy Evangeline Temple - 1921 Page sixty-twoSo safrguarb attb transmit to posterity, Sljr principals of justtrr, frrrbont atib brmorrarp; So ronsrrrate anb sanctify our comrabsliip 8y our bruotion to mutual Ijrlpfulttrss. —From the Constitution of th« American LegionFederal Board Rehabilitation Training at Oshkosh Normal Dl RING the year 1918-19 it became apparent that there would be a demand for special training of disabled soldiers under what was termed “The Rehabilitation Act. " Realizing this need the school offered its services to tin Federal Hoard for ocational Education. Representatives of the Board came and made us a visit, familiarizing themselves with the physical conditions, courses offered and the type of instruction available for taking care of special training which it was apparent would he demanded. In due time, the school was recognized as a training center to which place ment officers working under the auspices of the Federal Board might send young men qualified to receive special training under the Rehabilitation Act. During the spring of 1919 one man was assigned to training in the Industrial Department. It soon became apparent that a very large percentage assigned to this school would be assigned to courses in the Industrial Department. However, we have since enrolled six men who have been variously assigned to courses in Industrial Chemistry, college work, and regular teacher training courses. Each man is assigned by the placement officer with what is termed as a definite “job objective. Most of the men assigned to Oshkosh Normal have therefore been assigned to “Machine Shop. “Drafting." or “Pattern Making." as we are in position to specialize in that sort of work. lute-water Normal on the other hand has received a large percentage of men assigned to commercial courses, and River Falls has been assigned men pursuing courses in Agriculture. In tbe fall of 1919 we began to receive men more regularly and by mid-year bad enrolled ten or a dozen rehabilitation students and reached a maximum of 20 during that year. During the year of 1920-21 we have been assigned a total of 70 students in the various courses. During the time these men have been with us a number have seen fit to transfer over into regular industrial teacher training courses, or to take considerable academic and professional training to qualify to teach in vocational schools of the state. Many of them have had sufficient trade experience before coming to school to qualify under the Smith-Hughes Law. The provisions for Federal Board training are such that there will be continued demand for this work for several years. At present the Industrial Department is filled to its capacity and it is rather uncertain as to what arrangements can be made to continue the work. The field work which is being carried on for placements in training of deserving cases is such that there is a grow ing demand for instruction of the right type to prepare these men for definite positions. It is hoped that the necessary provisions will he made before another school year opens so that men in this district may be well placed either in this school or in some other school conveniently located. It is the desire of the Federal Board that every deserving man shall have the best opportunity which the Government can give him. It has been a pleasure for the Oshkosh Normal School to be able to offer opportunities for starting work of this kind in this locality. FRANK M. KARNES. Counsellor. fane sixty-three 10211Federal Board Officers President.......................................WILLIAM ABRAHAM Secretary.......................................ROGF.R FULLAM Treasurer.......................................WILLIAM STEGEMAN 1921 I’ajcc sixty-fourFederal Board William Abraham Walter Abraham Robert Adam Lovis Albert Thomas Babcock William Bahr Lawrence Hartenatcin Harvey Heglingcr Joseph Blech I Norman Houchctte John Dahl Leo Fletcher Roger Fullam Harry Hanger Chester Getchin John Gryskow Willi Fttmcllc Percy Holverson Page sixty-fiveFederal Board Arthur Jansen Joseph Rebartrhek Henry Kicckhaefer Henry Ries Edward Koeppen Emil Rostanke James Powell Charles Ruby Herman Sawall Carl Schmiedcl John Schwant Ray Smith William Stegeman August Steinert Otto Sues Abe Wilncr 1921 Page sixty-sixt£fee Jubilee Right must not live in idleness, Nor dv?ell in smug content; It must be strong, against the throng Of foes, on evil bent. Justice must not a weakling be But it must guard its oxtfn, And live each day, that none may sa Justice is overthrown. 1921 Page sixty-sevenizei THE MACHINE SHOPWbe talbtlee ®ufver The Normal School System of Wisconsin "The greatest glory of a state is the universal education of its people." This fact was recognized by the founders of this commonwealth. The Constitution of isconsin provides for the establishmcot of common schools, normal schools and a state university. Those who gave direction to our educational policy in the beginning realized that teachers must he specially trained and prepared for their important work. Therefore, shortly after Wisconsin became a state, the first normal school was founded and from time to time other normal schools were established, until the ninth school was dedicated in 1916. Today only two states, Pennsylvania and New York, maintain a larger number of normal schools than isconsin. The W isconsin Normal School System has always been considered one of the strong systems of the I nited States, ami the Oshkosh school has always been considered one of the strong schools of the system. The first president of the school and the faculty selected by him gave the school high rank at a very early date in its history. Through the ensuing years this high standard has heen maintained. Ruckle. in his comment on moral and intellectual progress, says: To he willing to perform our duty is the moral part; to know how to do it is the intellectual part.' This school has always endeavored to give to the public schools of W‘isconsin teachers willing and able to serve the state. E. J. DEMPSEY, Resident Regent. Page sixty-ninet£be Jubilee Quiver FIRST NORMAL 1921 Page seventy T £ r rr 7 I rrrr rrrr rr rr rrr rrr rr rr rrrr rrrr rrrr rr rr rrrr r r ■ r i i - _ 16 71 I9£l SLMI'CLNTLNNIAL $tme has flph. ffip uoutlj of to-hay look bark upon Hip limp utltpu first your toiuprs asrpttbpb; utr look, but btmlg bpp aub srarrp apjirpciatp tlip labor attb Ioup that to our hpritagp liaop blpnbpb.The Forward Look IN practically all phases of education, a process of evaluation, reorganization. and readjustment lias been going on for the last few years. This has resulted iu a rapid evolution of the public school system. A part of this movement has consisted of an effort to apply the principles of a valid scientific management to teaching and to school organization and administration. There has been an especially pronounced and vigorous effort to secure better results in school by devising ways of accurately measuring present achievements, establishing more valid aims, formulating more economical types of procedure iu teaching, and selecting better subject-matter for the content of the school curriculum. It is a familiar fact that activity along these lines has brought about great changes in both elementary and secondary schools. It is hut natural, as a result of these conditions, that equally great, and probably greater, readjustments need to be made in the agencies for training teachers, particularly in the case of state normal schools. If they are to he adequate to the needs of the day, these institutions must expect to make extensive modifications of their past practices. In fact, there is evidence that state normal schools arc now undergoing a marked change in fundamental particulars. comparison of the courses of study of such schools throughout the country with courses in existence ten years ago. or even five years ago. shows certain marked developments in the prevailing conception of the teacher-training process. The State Normal School at Oshkosh has always been a forward-looking school. It has always been a center for progressive ideas in education. Its leadership has been a positive force in education throughout the country, and especially in the Middle West. It is my earnest hope that during the decades which are ahead the school may continue to be a leader in progressive education. Looking forward into the next decade, I can see the greatest period of progress for state normal schools that they have ever experienced. These schools will rapidly develop into high-grade state teachers colleges everywhere, with standards and equipment equal to those of the best colleges and universities of the country. The people will demand no less of the institutions which are to train those who are to guide the education of the children of the nation. The wish nearest to my heart at this anniversary season is that the Oshkosh Normal School may play its part nobly in the days which lie ahead. PRESIDENT H. A. BROW N. 1021- Page eventy-oneThe Oshkosh Normal School Bits of History J 1868-1876 IN 1868 llir first movements were made toward the establishment of a Normal School at Oshkosh. During the next three years the building was erected ami on September 1, 1871, dedication exercise. were held and the Oshkosh Normal School enrolled the first class of prospective teachers. A Training School Department was also opened. It was to he used exrlu i ely for the purpose of demonstration. In 1872 the first annual Catalogue was published. The school calendar wa as follows: Fall term begins Tuesday, August 27; closes December 20, 1872. Winter term begins Tuesday. January 7; closes March 21, 1873. Spring term begins Tuesday, April 1; closes June 18. 1873. In the same year the Lyceum Literary Society was organized. Supervised teaching was also begun. In 1875 women members were admitted to Lyceum. The Protarean Society, composed of young men of the first and second year rla'ses, was established. It was in this year that the first class was graduated from the Oshkosh Normal. The graduates of the Advanced Course were: Miss Kmily F. Webster, Mr. John F. Burke. Miss Harriet E. Clark, Mr. Wm. M. Graham. Miss Margaret Hosford. Miss Mary J. knisely, Mr. Ed. McLaughlin, Miss Rachel L. Sulton. In 1876 the Ladies" Literary Society was organized. Miss Kmily F. Webster's name appeared on the faculty list as instructor of Latin ami Mathematics. Miss Rose C. Swart's name also appeared as instructor of Penmanship, Geography, and German. 1876-1886 In 1877 a new wing was added, the first addition to the original buildings. Mr. Briggs became a member of the faculty a director of the model school. Miss Swart left to teach for a year in an academy in St. Paul, hut returned to the Normal in 1880. In the same year the elementary course was rhanged from two years to two and a half years. The graduating class of 1880 boasted six members. The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. were organized in 1882. In 1884. Miss Swart was tran-ferred from the teaching of Penmanship and Geography to the Art of Teaching and the supervision of practice teaching. Mr. Briggs began teaching bookkeeping and Civics in 1883. 1921 Page seventy two1886-1896 hive hundred eighty Mudenls were enrolled in the Normal department in 1886. An appeal for legislative aid was made in the report of the Oshkosh Normal School in 1886. An addition was made to the Normal School building in 1888. In this addition the present auditorium is now located. hnlranre examinations were required in 1889 of each student upon the following subjects: Arithmetic, Spelling, Penmanship, Geography, Grammar, and Heading. Five hundred eighty-five students were enrolled in 1891-1892. The first football team was organized in 1894. SIGNS OF GROWTH The Lyceum and Phoenix Literary Societies formed a league for the purpose of promoting the interests of debating. The Phoenix Society won the first contest, and as a trophy received a bust of Abraham Lincoln, offered by the faculty. The class of 1895 had the record of being the largest graduating class since the opening of the school, there being thirty-two graduates. M iss Emil) I . ehster was associate editor of the Advance. Mr. W. C. Hewitt was business manager. In 1896 the school football team won its first real football victory. The victim was Stevens Point Normal. 1896-1901 In 1896, alumni and friends of the school presented a sterling silver vase to President Albee in Commemoration of the Quarter-Centennial of the Oshkosh Normal School and of the Presidency of George Sumner Albee. Five hundred twenty-five students were enrolled in the school. ---------- 1021 Page seventy-three'Sbe jubilee Quiver Three oratorical contests were held during this year. One represented the school, one Lyceum, and one Phoenix. The Annual Excursion to Clifton was under the auspices of the Athletic Association. The Advance was made a monthly journal in 1897, edited by the students of the Oshkosh Normal. Previously the editor, assistant editor, and business manager were members of the faculty. Governor Schofield visited our Normal, September 29. He stated his thorough conviction of the immediate need of enlarging the capacity of the building. "Professor Fling and his class in Botany wheeled to Omro, Friday, October 15. where they gathered botanical specimens." The following were the new members of the faculty : Miss Moren, Professor Mitchell, Professor Fling. Professor Sherman, Miss Tower, and Miss Straight. THE CAMPUS "The Merchant of Venice," given in the Normal Auditorium, December 18. was the very-fine work of the Department of Elocution. Whitewater went down to defeat at the Inter-Normal Debate between Oshkosh and Whitewater. The death of President George S. Albee occurred September I, 1898. In the death of George Sumner lbee, president of the Normal School, the City of Oshkosh, State of Wisconsin. and educational interests throughout the northwest generally, suffered a great loss. He was at the head of the Oshkosh Normal School for twenty-five years. Many letters of sympathy were received by Mr. Briggs from alumni of the Normal and other friends of Professor Albee. Resolutions of respect were adopted by the University of Michigan Alumni Association. Professor R. H. Halsey was chosen by the Board of Regents as president of the Normal. Professor Halsey was formerly superintendent of the Oshkosh schools. Four football games were played during the season. Our team lost to Stevens Point. Whitewater, and Lawrence, but won the Ripon College game. Page seventy-four1921t£be Jubilee Quiver On September 4, 1899. Mi» Webster made the presentation address anil unveiled the bust of President Albee. the work of Helen Farnsworth Mears. The Philakean Society was organized by a group of young men who railed themselves “lovers of argument. In the fall of the same year the Alethean Society was established for literary pursuit. Within three months of its existence the limited membership was fillet! ami Alethean was lay ing claim to a place of merit among the school organizations. On May 4. 1900. the lnter State Oratorical Contest was held at the Crand Theatre. Delegations outside of Wisconsin were from Illinois. Iowa. Kansas, and Missouri. THE OLI) ASSEMBLY V very beneficial organization was added to the list of societies in the school in 1900 The Male Chorus. The inspiration to organize such a chorus bail been felt ever since the Inter-State Oratorical contest in May. The famous “Minnesingers of Iowa was the stimulus. After being in school a few days the students were invited to pay twenty-five cents and join the Athletic Association. FOOTBALL REPORT 1901 Oshkosh Normal................0 Stevens Point................0 Oshkosh Normal................5 Ripon....................... 6 Oshkosh Normal................0 Milwaukee Medical College . . 12 Oshkosh Normal...............20 Northwestern at Watertov.n . . 0 Oshkosh Normal................6 Lawrence.....................0 Oshkosh Normal................6 Stevens Point...............11 Oshkosh Normal................0 Whitewater..................11 1921 Page seveiily-aixA Bicycle Club was reorganized for the fall riding season, October 12. The club left the Normal at 4:30 1 . M. every school da when wheeling was good. 1901-1906 Memoral service in honor of the late President McKinley were held in the Normal Audi torium. President Halsey presided. A reception was given on the campus August 31. 1902. from 3:00 to 5:00 P. M„ for the new students. President Halsey and Dr. Abbott gave their mirth and cheer in short addresses of welcome. INDUSTRIAL BUILDING The lihran was rearranged; old partitions were taken out and the hook shelves placed differently. Many new hook were added to the reference library. A number of Normal girls organized a Hawthorne Club, which met every Saturday afternoon. While one member read selections from Hawthorne, the others with their needlework gathered around her. O. N. S. was represented in a debate with Normal University at Normal. Illinois. The debate was held May 16. and the decision of the judges was 2 to 1 in favor of Illinois. The new Manual Training building was opened. 1921 Page seventy-sevenizei THE DORMITORYFOOTBALL FOR 1902 Oshkosh Normal................6 Lawrence......................17 Oshkosh Normal...............23 Steven Point..................0 Oshkosh Normal................5 Ripon..........................0 Oshkosh Normal................0 Beloit........................17 Oshkosh Normal...............27 Whitewater.....................0 Oshkosh Normal................5 Ripon..........................3 Oshkosh Normal................5 Lawrence......................11 Oshkosh Normal...............27 Milwaukee Medical College . . 0 Considerable activity in the field of forensic was shown during this period of our history. On May 16, 1901, Oshkosh Normal School met Normal University in debate at Normal, Illinois. The decision of the judges was 2 to 1 in favor of Illinois. Oshkosh was more successful in oratory, capturing first place in the Inter-Normal Oratorical Contest. Robert C. Wendt represented the srliool. Xaidee I. Bovee was the school orator in the annual oratorical contest held at Stevens Point March 17, 1902. After losing to Stevens Point in the annual debate Oshkosh Normal School showed her merit by a triumph over Milwaukee ill the Inter-Normal debate in 1903. The contest caused much excitement. Milwaukee enjoyed yelling: “Two-t birds Irish, one-third Dutch, Gee. hut ain't ue awful much? Oshkosh might have responded with: “Two-thirds German, one-third Scotch, We'll make that mixture one hip hatch." The question of the debate was "Resolved, that the railroads of the I nited States should be owned, operated and controlled by the federal government, it being mutually conceded constitutionally.' 1. That the government is constitutionally and financially able to acquire the railroads. 2. That all the employees except those commonly termed unskilled laborers be appointed under the civil service system. nother victory for Oshkosh was the Junior debate with Stevens Point in 1906. Oshkosh won sixth place in the 1906 Inter-Normal Oratorical Contest held in the First Congregational Church. Out of the seven football games played in 1901, Oshkosh won four and in 1906 six games of eight were added to our credit. Stevens Point was the only Normal School on the schedule. Two were high school teams, two colleges, and two universities. Games with the universities were the ones which were lost. It was during this period that Dr. Maurice H. Small was added to the faculty as head of the department of psychology. Professor Karl A. Clematis took the place of Mr. Goddard as professor of Chemistry and Nature Study. Organizations were active and a desire for others was met by the organization of the Audubon Society for bird study, the Current Topics Club, the Philologian Society, and the Mandolin Club which was organized in 1905 by twelve girls. The club played at all school functions, at the public library reception, and at the Century Club. The Advance ended the first decade of its history in 1904. The new Manual Training building was opened and brought many men students to the school. As a memento, the class of 1906 presented to their Alma Mater two stained glass windows, which were inserted at the rear of the rostrum during the summer vacation. - — 1021 Page seventy-nine1906-1916 The decade from 1906 lo 1916 embraces a period in our M'hool history so rich in those events around which memory linger.- that il has been no light task lo decide which shall he included in our brief rhronology and which of them shall he discarded. In November of 1906 Mr. Keith assumed the presidency of the .Normal. Of more than usual interest in the life of a school is its record of past achievements, especially in the realm of athletics, and after carefully reviewing this record, we find much that is truly worth recognition and a place in our memory. The years 1905 and 1906 saw football teams that merit mention as both were strong championship contenders. The basketball team of 1906 was undisputed title-holder, having defeated the best college teams in the state outside THE KIRK of the University. The following three years tell of various successes and defeats, and it was not until 1910 that the Oshkosh Normal had another championship, this time ugain in basketball. The years from 1911 to 1913 were unusually successful; we had the football title in 1911 and in 1912 repeated the record of the preceding year. The championship team of 1912 was centered around a group which a few years later was known far and wide throughout the state, and in two cases this fame spread beyond the limits of Wisconsin. .Mucks, Eher Simpson, and Porliere composed this galaxy of stars: the first mentioned also participated in the Olympic Games and still holds the world's record of 155 feet 8 inches in the discus throw. Another championship did not fall to O. N. S. for several years and «o this close' the story of our prowess on gridiron and basketball floor for this decade. _______=1921- --------- Page eightyNexl in importance to the athletic activities of the school, hut possibly a little more ilrab to many of us if a record of the school's forensic activities. In gathering the material for this portion of our story we could not fail to notice the changes that have taken place in this sphere of school life during the decade. While perusing the old Annuals one is struck by the size of the school societies and organizations in former years and by the keen rivalry that existed between them. To have live or ten students competing for a place on a debating team or for the honor of representing the school in oratory was a frequent occurrence. Nevertheless, the succession of victories ami defeats came then in much the same way as they come at the present time. In 1906 Oshkosh won the state oratorical contest, Irvine A. Howlett representing us. and in 1913 it was won again, by John Ruehnel. With this last victory it would, perhaps, be appropriate to close, but there still remains a little to be aid concerning the year ANOTHER VIEW OF THE FIRE 1915. The cla ss of 1915 was the last to be graduated in the old Normal School, and the history of this period closes with the fire that destroyed the old ivv covered edifice, whose dark basement passages ami labyrinthian halls were the bane of the new students' first weeks of Normal School life. 1916-1917 The year following the destruction of the school plant the enrollment dropped from six hundred to four hundred students. Accommodations were rather limited and plans disrupted. Classes were held in the city high school during the afternoon. There must have been considerable enthusiasm in spite of handicaps, as a class of two hundred members was graduated in June. A military company was organized. About fifty young men, not forming a regular unit of the National Guard, drilled regularly, twice each week. Mr. Forrest R. Polk, of the Industrial faculty, having had the advantage of two years Cadet Corps training, was an efficient faculty advisor. The athletic season was not successful, for there were few experienced men playing on either football or basketball teams, and in contest with other schools, defeat more often came to the O. N. S. men than to their opponents. =1021= Page cighty-oneThe Senior were champions in the girls basketball tournament, having defeated the College-High team in playing off a tie. There were twenty active organizations. Harry Fuchs oration. “Americanism,"" was awarded fir»t place in the Normal contest. The Inter-State dehate had the subject, "Resolved, that the Philippines should he promised their independence now. to go into effect not later than 1925. The Juniors debated the aflirmative side of the i|ue tion. "Resolved, that the I'nited States should adopt a system of compulsory military training. LIBBEY HOUSE 1917-1918 In the fall of 1917, when the main building was hut partially completed, and the reconstruction of the school was still young. President H. A. Brown came to carry on the work of rebuilding the school plant. In his first year he succeeded in giving the students an understanding of the ever-broadening field of teaching and instilled in the hearts of all an admiration and love of the profession. The school enrollment numbered but few more than three hundred. Classes were held in the local high school and in the few completed rooms of the new building. A »la of one hundred seventy-five Seniors completed the course in June. The Three-Year High School Course, at that time not many years old, numbered more than thirty Juniors, and several graduating Seniors. The school had taken a great step toward the attainment of teachers college existence. Seventeen active clubs and societies, including literary, history, current topics and glee clubs, existed. Twenty-six students and faculty members were in military service, and before June, two of that number had been sacrificed to the great cause. Athletics did not cease during that period when many eligible players were fighting in France ami training in our military camps hut owing to our depleted enrollment, much experienced material was lacking. 1021 •’age eighlytwoize 1SV«I 3HI iO ONIHX V1918-1919 Al the beginning of the school year, the enrolliuent included one hundred young men of militury age, who made up the membership of the S. . T. C. For the first time -inre the lire, the school occupied it.' own plant. The administration ami library unit.' were completed in time for September classes. The present kindergarten ami auditorium building was remodeled from the grammar room of the Training Department. The football team had a highly successful season, winning all hut one game, and that one against the Milwaukee Normal School. Seven of the twelve basketball games played were victories for the Oshkosh team. A number of inter-class athletic events took place, affording fine examples of the splendid Oshkosh spirit. The June class of Seniors numbered one hundred forty-two. The complete enrollment neared the four hundred mark. 1919-1920 The second year in the new building marked another step in the perfection and success of the school. The O. V S. football team played within one victory of the southern sectional championship. The basketball season was marked with even greater succes . for it was not until the Oshkosh hoys met River Falls, the northern sectional champions, that they were defeated. The southern sectional championship belonged to us. June's class of Seniors numbered one hundred thirty ; the Junior class included more than two hundred. Many organizations had discontinued while the school was 'inall. hut with the new era came at least one new organization. A Girls' Athletic Association came into existence for the purpose of furthering interest in girls athletics. The Y. M. . reorganized after it' period of inactivity during the war. Although our debating teams won no title in the triangular contest, a unanimous victory was won over the La Crosse Normal team. 1920-1921 The present year has been one marked with success on every hand. The old numbers have been reached in enrollment, and activities are at their best. The state championship title in both football and basketball were won by our teams anil the state title in oratory was won by our orator. Frank Butler. As we approach the end of the school year, more and more thought is given to the coming Commencement season, when the fiftieth year of the school will close. Great step. , successes and developments in the school ' history are reviewed in our thoughts. The Seniors of the 1921 class reflect upon all that has been done to make their Alma Mater what she is: a school of the finest qualities high ideals, and great achievements. In the few years of the new era, successes have multiplied, and loyalty to the Alma Mater has not been diminished because of the external changes in equipment. The old-time spirit of Oshkosh is 'till with us. and belongs in all faith to the present generation. At the end of the first fifty-year epoch, let us cherish the certainty of a most successful beginning, and look forward to greater attainments than ever before. K e hail thee, dear formal! To thee lie raise our sotifc. Our pride, our allegiance. Our faith shall e'er be strong. May time serve thee kindly. The gracious years bring strength. Thy hopes find fulfillment. Thy days fruitful length. Send on, ever onward. Thy constant stream of life. To bear forth thy message In days of peace or strife. Though walls shake and crumble. Thy courage ne'er shall fail. Thy hopes spring eternal. Dear formal, all hail! 1921 Page eighty-fourTHK LI HR ARYTHE CORRIDOROnward What lo the year to come hold in More for the Oshkosh Normal? What sign of promise answer him who questions the future of this school? What will it he when men ami women yet unhorn shall celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the opening of these doors? The wisest of men have no way of judging of the future, hut by the past; and looking hack through the mists of the years, certain distinctive qualities appear which fill the heart with hope. The high ideals that have ever been manifested have achieved much and light the way for those who are to follow. The success of the past gives courage for the future. The reaping must ever depend upon the sowing. Seed sown by noble men and women who did not hesitate to give their lives for the cause they loved; sown by men and women who did not say, “How much can 1 get? but instead, “How much can I give?"; sown by those who were not paid with “mortal praise" but found their “amplest recompense in work done squarely and unwasted days;" such seed must yield a fruitage that will bring joy ami gladness to the harvesters whoever they may be and whenever they may reap. The truly great man is not content with the present, not satisfied with what he has already accomplished, but is ever seeking for other and greater achievements. So it is with a great institution. The traditions of the past urge it on to greater heights. Iteeause of the standard' of the past, because of the results already achieved, because of the vision of those who have gone before, it is confidently expected that the school will still be in the van, will still carry aloft the torch of progress. The success of the past fifty years is the outgrowth of the ideals not only of the men and women of the faculty but also of the ideals of the younger men and women of the student body. Added to these ideals there has ever been the will to do. the spirit of enduring determination. and unflagging perseverance. These same qualities in the leaders and the followers will give the school the same success in the future that it has had in the past. The matter is entirely in our own hands. Shall we “build more stately mansions as the swift seasons roll? Shall each new temple he nobler than the past?" The answer lies wholly and entirely with ourselves. EMILY F. WEBSTER I'agc eighty-sevenPage eighty-eight"Old Time and Old Friends” OSHKOSH NORMAL SCHOOL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Incorporated Officers ISABELLE STRONG ALLEN, 90. Serving since 1916 JAMES C. FITZGERALD. ML Serving since 1916 I .ETTA SABEAN HEWITT. '02. Serving since 1920 EMILY F. WEBSTER, '75. Serving since 1912 Loan Fund Directors EMILY F. WEBSTER. 75. Ex-Officio Chairman JENNIE G. MARVIN, '88. Serving rince 1917. Three years term expire 1923 ALBERT B. O’NEIL, 91. Serving since 1918. Three year term expire 1922 "Commencement' an Annual Ma azinettc Circulation: One thou ani! six humlreil uh criher . Term : Free lo all Alumni Associate Life Member . Issued each May. Content : Commencement Week Event . Farulty Change . The Junior Staff. The Advance Staff. Alumni Association New : Officer . Bu ine Meeting . Student ' Loan Fund Report, Marriages Death . School Champion . Sketche of the four pre ideut . Mr. Alhee, Mr. Hal ey, Mr. Keith. Mr. Brown. The Anniversary Celebration J The Faculty and Alumni Association are planning a Jubilee celebration to occur in the fall of the year 1921. You will he notified regarding the plan for thi golden week in our his-torv. Every effort will he made to prepare a memorable, enjoyable, ami beautiful wreck-end. It ha eemed mo t fitting to the alumni and farulty that the jubilee he held in the month of October, when all nature eem» to celebrate the clo e of a fruitful period. A the ea ou rejoice , let u rejoice over our Fifty Year Well Spent. What the Alumni Association Has Accomplished 1. Article of Incorporation were granted June 18, 1917, e tahli hing a Loan Fund for -indent in their Senior year. Mi Ethel Horn. 01. wa the prime advocate of the Loan Fund idea. 2. Twelve student have been enabled to lini-li the course, repaying the loan within the tated term. 3. Willi the de trurtion of meniber hip li t- in the fire of March 22. 1916, began the stupendous ta-k accomplished by Mi Webster in compiling an entirely new li t. She has secured Sixteen Hundred Life Members! Annual due were abolished and One Dollar became the total fee for Life Membership. President .................... Vice-President................ Secretary..................... Treasurer .................... 1921 Page eighty-ninet£be jubilee Quiver 4. A permanent standing committee on .Normal School interest co-operates with similar committees from other Wisconsin Normal Schools in forming an Inter-Normal Alumni A o-ciation ami in formulating school needs for legislative work. Miss Swart is chairman. 5. A permanent standing committee on school history and souvenirs of historical value is receiving from former students and faculty members much valuable material which it places ut the disposal of those desiring authentic data on school history. Miss Sarah James, '82, i. chairman. 6. The standing committee on Alumni Association copy for The Quiver and The Advance has prepared literary material und secured photographs for the 1919, 1920, and 1921 editions. This committee consists of the Athletic Association president, the Quiver and Advance editors, ami the president of the Normal School. It thus becomes a self-perpetuating committee. 7. On motion of William C. Reulher, '02, the 1920 annual meeting voted that re«|uest' he sent out for contributions of curios from former students traveling or located in all parts of the world, to he forwarded, charges prepaid, to the re-established fire-proof museum ami directed to "Curator of Museum." 1021 ninetyc_o ro a CTD CUD ODDContents m Orator? Debate Societies Publications 1021 Page ninety-oneForensics FRANK A. BUTLER Winner of the State Oratorical Content The Oratorical Contest IN tin oratorical content li l l at Platteville Normal, March 18. each state normal was represented by a contestant. Mr. Frank Butler rewarded the confidence placed in him by bringing to us the victory. His oration, “The Soul of America," was awarded first place. The second place was given to Superior's representative upon his oration, “America's Response." The third place went to Eau Claire and the oration, “Freedom's Charge." The opportunities for conquest will not he confined to our own state, for on May 6. at Warrensburg, Missouri, Mr. Butler will again deliver his oration, this time for inter-state honors. The speakers in this contest will represent tin states of Illinois. Iowa. Kansas, Missouri, and Wisconsin, and will decide tin oratorical supremacy of the normal schools of the Middle W est. I liree unusually unique features characterize this year's contest, for our records show that the first inter-state oratorical contest between the five states was held just twenty-five years ago. in the same city of W arrenshurg, Missouri, and that the Oshkosh orator representing W isconsin won first place. May history repeat itself! 1921 P.ikc ninety-twoThe Soul of America NO nation liveth to itself. There is the brotherhood of man. hut there is also the brotherhood of peoples. The soul of America must stand for the brotherhood of peoples and for humanity. There is no parallel in all history to tin sacrifices America made in the great war. Not an acre of wrested territory did she take for herself, not an imposition of power for self-aggrandizement did sin make on any people, however humble. And in the words of her statesmen and by the blood of her sons, the American people proclaimed the message that America fought the battle for humanity. That message strengthened millions of sorrowing and despairing hearts, and now. in the reign of peace, the soul of America must continue sharing the responsibility that elevates mankind. For this, there is no price too high to pay. no sacrifice too great to make. Civilization is at the parting of the wav. one road leading to chaos and war, the other to order and peace. Since our power is great, our responsibility is great, and America must exercise the moral authority and strength that she possesses for procuring those fundamental rights that will contribute to the security of the civilized world. The words of the poet are the call to the soul of America: "To you, from failing hands, nr throw The torch be yours to bear it high! If ye break faith with us who die. if e shall not sleep, tlio' poppies blou In Flanders' Fields.” flic torch they throw is the spirit of brotherhood among men. and America must be the lirst to carry the light that will usher in the dawn of a new day. Perhaps no better recognition of what our country stands for was ever given than in the cry of the half-starved Armenian girl who. when pursued by brutal l urks, fell on her knees at the feet of a Red Cross nurse and cried, “America, America, save!" and from that cry. which is the cry of the whole world. America must not turn pitiless away. The soul of America must he a living soul. She inherits a noble past, and now she must guard, inspire, unite her sons and daughters, making more secure each year the victories of law, liberty, and social justice. Then she must take her accumulated wealth and bridge the oceans and level the mountains with her compassion. America must first be made clean and strong, and then, conscious of wider needs, she must turn the service of her wealth, her power, her glory, to the uplifting of a broken world. 'flic old prophets of Israel proclaimed the ideals that make for the immortality of a people—the ideals of justice and brotherhood. America must be the living exemplar of these ideals. The foundation must be justice, the superstructure. brotherhood, and though winds and floods may rage against them, this foundation and this superstructure shall stand firm above the storm and constitute the living soul of America. = 1921 Page ninety-threeT£lbe Jubilee Quiver Debate Affirmative Team Lyman Conger Sydney Knudson George Stannard Triangular Debate between the La Crosse, Stevens Point ami Oshkosh Normals. Question: Resolved, tlial the Esch Cuntntins Hill should he repealed. RESULTS AFFIRMATIVE AT OSHKOSH vs. STEVENS POINT Derision in favor of nflinnative. NEGATIVE AT LA CROSSE Decision in favor of affirmative. Negative Team Wilbur Martelle Gordon Shipman Perry Writ! 1021 Page ninety-fourDehate IN the annual Triangular Debates between La Crosse, Stevens Point, and Oshkosh Normals, our school emerged with one victory and one defeat. The proposed repeal of the Eseh-Cummins Bill not only proved to he an unusually debatable subject, hut provided such an excellent opportunity for a close study of the application and misapplication of our laws of economics and finance, that our negative team, who dropped its decision to La Crosse, felt its efforts more than compensated in the experience gained through the preparation and delivery of the debate. At home, the contest between our affirmative team and the Stevens Point negative proved to he one of the strongest forensic combats ever held before an Oshkosh audience. For the winning team, great credit is due Mr. Conger, whose attack upon the visitors' defense of the hill turned out to he one of the decisive factors in gaining for the home team the victory it coveted. The aggressive fight put up by Mr. Knudson also brought forth favorable comment from those present. Due to unforeseen obstacles, the annual dual debate between Osbkosh and Normal University of Illinois was cancelled to the mutual satisfaction of both schools. 102! Page ninety-fivet£lbe jubilee Quiver LYCEUM Date of Organization 1871 If e shape our own destiny With depleted ranks Lyceum faced a huge task at the opening of the present school year. The Class of Nineteen Twenty took with it three-fourths of the society's roster, but fortunately there remained a handful of earnest, devoted workers who succeeded in gradually building an organization filled with a spirit of loyalty and the will to do. This year Lyceum numbers among its members Frank A. Butler, winner of the State Oratorical Contest, who during the past year has been a guiding spirit for us and from whose rich fund of experience each and every one of us has benefited. W e may look upon our record of the year as one that is worthy of Lyceum's best traditions and worthy of a place in the history of this golden year of Nineteen Twenty-one. MEMBERSHIP f rank A. Butler Lyman C. Conger Emerson Edgerton Anton J. Erdmann Walter Fox Sidney KumLon John Leswdyor.g Jame Mitchell Clarence Reuter Paul H. Schmiedirke George II. Staunard A. I. Wilner Leonard Wenz George Yost 1921 Page ninety- ! Schmiedicke Reuter Mitchell Lcsaclyong Fox Butler Erdmann Stannard Conger Wilncr Yost NVen Kuudson Edgerton OFFICERS First Semester President ...................... Vice-President.................. Secretary....................... Treasurer ...................... Marshal ........................ Critic ......................... Second President....................... Vice-President.................. Secretary....................... Treasurer ...................... Marshal......................... Critic ......................... . . ANTON ERDMANN . . FR K BITLER . . ELMORE MILLER . . WALTER FOX . . GEORGE YOST . . GUSTAVE ZEISMER Semester . . SIDNEY KNUDSON . . JOHN LESSELYONG . . GEORGE STANNARD . . ABE WILNER . . ANTON ERDMANN . . FRANK BUTLER 1921 I'age ninety-sevenJubilee Culver PHOENIX SOCIETY Dale of Organisation 1872 " ore more than thou shotcest. Speak less than thou knouest." The Phoenix Society is about to celebrate its Golden Anniversary. During the past half century the purpose for which the society was organized has been fully realized by its hundreds of members. The strong fraternal spirit and the fostering of literary culture have existed ami grown to an extent fully satisfac tory to those who have worked to keep Phoenix at its best. The thoroughness and interest with which members carry on each society undertaking place Phoenix as one of the foremost societies of the school. This year the old Phoenix spirit has been shown in its programs, which consisted of a study of operas and modern writers, as well as in its social activities. Although the past fifty years have had a golden tint, the future promises to he even more glorious and golden through the consistent ideals of loyalty and service which characterize the society. I lie success of the society is largely due to the faithful co-operation and advice of our patroness. Miss Stafford, and our chaperons. Miss Henderson and Miss Van Sistine. MEMBERSHIP Faculty Miss Margaret Stafford Miss Helen Henderson Miss Eva Van Sistine Students Marian Banderoh Mae Radke Melba Chapman Kathryn Reavey Olive Davenport kathryn Roberts Marguerite Fraedrick Mela Rockwell Bernice Fredrick Killeen Scbmid Lucille Coggins Ruth Seymour Ruth Guhl Beulah Solbraa Gertrude Ruhaupt Margaret Smith Helen Lee Esther Steude Doris Nicholson Hilda Steuck Edna Norein Mariel Swift Alice Perrigo Anita Wickert Page ninety-eightLee Norem Solbraa Perrigo Seymour Fredrick Davenport Swift Rockwell Fraedrick Stcuck f oggin» Chapman Schmid Steude Smith Reavey Nicholson Kuhaupt Wickert Bandcrob Robert OFFICERS Fir.-t Semester President . . I 'ice-President Secretary . , Treasurer . , Critic . . . . Custtnlian . , ANITA WICKERT MARI EL SWIFT DORIS NICHOLSON RUTH SEYMOUR META ROCKWELL EDNA NOREM Second Semester President...................................ESTHER STEUDE Vice-President..............................BEULAH SOLBRAA Secretary...................................MARGARET SMITH Treasurer...................................MELBA CHAPMAN Critic......................................GERTRUDE KUHAUPT Custodian...................................HELEN LEE 1021 Page ninety-nineY. W. C. A Dale of Organization 1880 Ay: The Young omen's Christian Association of Oshkosh Normal i- in the Central Field District of the National Y. W. C. . Once a year, a student secretary comes to visit us from the Central Field office in Chicago. Miss Pierce ga e us some very helpful suggestions during her visit here. Many new members were welcomed into the society October 20. at the candlelight sendee. These girls have done much to help the Y. 'S. this year. The Y. V. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. gave a very successful party at Christmas time for faculty and students. This year the advisory hoard of the organization was reorganized. Miss Johnston is the chairman of this committee: the other members are Miss Webster. Miss ickersham. Miss Clausen. Miss Boswell, and Miss Henderson. The weekly meetings this year have been unusually interesting and full of inspiration. MEMBERSHIP Faculty Emily F. Webster Student Ruth Bennett Minnie Meyer Marvel Burt Renetta Meyer Marjorie Cordy katherine Michaelsen lora Curtis Thelma Neeb Della Davies Doris Nicholson Isabelle Douglas Jeanne Parrette Agnes Ellirson Lydia Pfeiffer Esther Erickson Merle Pickett Priscilla Evans Helen Pickett Daisy Ferher Florence Pierce Ella Griebe I.ela Ploeger Minnie Grimm Harriet Rexwinkel Violette Harter Phyllis Ritter Gladys Heuer Pearl Roemer Gladys Jones Anna Schmidt Esther kleinsrlunidt Leah Seybold Pearl ka-ten Lucille Tice Elsie kind Florence Umbreit Elizabeth Mar-li Gladys Webster Ryan Marion McVeati Anita Yindra Pag? one hundredPfeiffer Sclimidt l Seybold M. Pickett II. Pickett Grimm Marsh Pierce Yindra Parrette Tolzman McVcan Tice A. Seybold Jones Michaciscn Harter Temple Grcibc Corby N'eeb Rcxwinkel Erickson Hurt Umbreit Ritter Kind Swancy Nicholson OFFICERS First Semester President...................................KATHERINE MICHAELSON Vice-President..............................LELA PLOEGER Secretary...................................DORIS NICHOLSON Treasurer...................................DELLA DAVIES President . . I ice-President Secretary-Treasurer . Second Semester ...........PEARL KASTEN .........MARION McYEAN ...........DAISY FERBER ...........ANNA SEYBOLD 1921 Page one hundred oneBROWNING CLUB Dale of Organization 1897 The Browning Club is a literary circle that lias chosen as its poet ami ideal, Robert Browning, with his union of the intellectual and spiritual as its inspiration. "The Ring and the Book" is the masterpiece that is receiving careful study this year. The club has a limited membership of fifteen and meets the first and third Tuesdays of each month at the home of Miss Peake. MEMBERSHIP F acuity Miss Peake Students Margaret Luscher Kenetta Meyer Katherine Mirhaelson Nonna Perry Hallic Rice Rilla Rogers Mary Scott Margaret Allen Lillian Bruce Marvel Burt Claire Darton Jean Denis Agnes Ellicson Vivian Hall Florence Umbreit 1921 'aKe one hundred twoPeake Bruce Allen Luschcr Umbreit Michaclson Rogers Denis Perry Scott Hall Kllicson Burt Meyer OFFICERS First Semester President...................................MARY SCOTT Secretary and Treasurer.....................JEAN DENIS Second Semester President.......................................VIVIAN HALL Secretary and Treasurer.........................MARVEL BURT 1921 Page one hundred threePHILAKEAN 'Let memories keep forever bright The hallowed ties here formed. And past and present still unite Our band Thilukean." Dale of Organization 1899 Two am! twenty years, fruitful in their contribution to our Alina Mater, have come ami gone since the day when Philakean assumed its pluce in the ranks of the school’ literary societies. Semi-fraternal in organization, its spirit seventeen men. aspires to perpetuate the same ideal it has always upheld during its past career. Not always has the path been overbright, however, for when classes were resumed last September, only six men were available around which to form the year’s organization. Despite this handicap, the pledging, initiating, and assimilating of new men proceeded in such orderly fashion that before the major part of the school year had passed, Philakean was once more on its feet and up and doing as of yore. While the departing members cannot, and never will, forget the lasting friendships made, and the valuable lessons learned within the society, they can also rejoice at the brilliant prospects for the future. That these prospects will develop into realities is the hope and belief of those whose days of active membership are now at an end. of brotherhood and loyalty binds its members long after the days of active membership are over. By so uniting the present with the past, the new ideas with the inherited customs and traditions, the society, with its personnel of MEMBERSHIP Faculty Mr. E. A. Clemans Students Thoma Brindley Francis Hart Arthur Dorka Theodore Doucette Burton Cardiff Earl Carey Nathan F.debon Warner Geiger Oviatt Guerin Waldo Krueger Vick Langford Yolney Leister Sherman Marsh Wilhur Marlelle Nerville Marlelle William Price Perrv Writt page one hundred four f H I f f S | ? f J J Sit v ' v v % Writt Marsh Hart Krueger X. Martcllc Carey Price Cardiff Leister Langford Doucette Geiger W. Martcllc Brindley Docka Kdclson Guerin OFFICERS First Semester President...................................OVIATT GUERIN Vice-President..............................WARNER GEIGER Secretary-Treasurer.........................ARTHUR DOCKA Critic......................................WALDO KRUEGER Marshal ................................. . WILBUR MARTELLE Second Semester President...................................WILBUR MARTELLE I ic Presldent..............................SHERMAN M RSH Secretary-Treasurer.........................NERV ILLE MARTELLE f ritic.....................................OVIATT GUERIN Marshal ....................................PERRY WRITT Page one hundred fivet£be jubilee Culver ALETHEAN Dale of Organization—1900 TRUTH "If e tread the ath of perfect love. The perfect love of friendship." In tin twenty-one years of its life Aletliean lias been the means of creating between scores of girls bonds which will never he broken. Perhaps these bonds have never been drawn so closely as during the past year, in the course of which the A let beans have learned the fullest meaning of the word friendship. The spirit of kinship has evinced itself in the work of the society throughout both semesters of the year. The study programs based upon the short story and upon famous paintings have all rigidly conformed to the society's high standard of excellence. Nor has any spirit been lacking in the planning of good times, wherein also the members of Methean are proficient. Heady with a guiding hand in work and play have stood the Aletliean patroness. Miss Ellen F. Peake, and the Aletliean chaperons. Miss Roberta N. Smith and Mrs. R. S. Mace. The coming year will see Aletliean carried on by girls who have this year been strongly imbued with the hopes and ideals of the organization. With them will be the thoughts of those who are leaving. "Time keeps no measure when true friends are parted. No record day by day; The sands move not for those who, loyal hearted. Friendship's firm laws obey." MEMBERSHIP Faculty Mrs. Ruih S. Mace Miss Ellen F. Peake .Miss Ruberta N. Smith Students Elizabeth Allen Ella Anger Sarabel Beardmore Josephine Canibier Bertha Clow Zua Dane Kathleen Doyle Eden Due Marion Hetherington Beatrice Holland Gladys Williams Laura Ihrig Dorothy Jackson Gladys Koeser I.ucile Nolle Elaine Nusshaum Jane Radford Avis Reid Louise Roewekamp Eunice Rogers Viola Seymour 1021 Page one hundred sixJackson Ihrig Reid Holland Dane Allen Doyle Due Anger Rocwekamp Mace Beardmorc Radford Nolle Cambicr Kocscr Clow Nussbaum Williams Hctherington Rogers Seymour OFFICERS First Semester President . . Vice-President Secretary . . Treasurer . . Critic . . . Custo iian . . . . . . GLADYS KOESER ELLEN DUE LORRAINE MARTIN BEATRICE HOLLAND JOSEPHINE CAMBIER Second Semester President . . Vice-President Secretary . . Treasurer . . Critic . . . Custodian . . ELLEN DUE LUCILE NOLTE ZUA DANE DOROTHY JACKSON ELIZABETH ALLEN I VNE R VI WORD 1921 Page one luimlrcd sevenMARQUETTE CLUB Date of Organization 1907 Marquette Club, organized in 1907 by the Catholic students of the Normal School to facilitate the study of topics of interest to them and to provide a medium of social expression had until this year met in St. Peter's High School. Early in the year it was decided to change the place of meeting to the Normal School. That the move has been a good one has been evidenced by the increased enthusiasm on the part of the members. Interesting meetings have been held each week and an extensive social calendar has been enjoyed during the spring months. MEMBERSHIP Faculty Miss Margaret Stafford Miss Theresa State Miss Eliza lie tli Crowley Students Alfred Behnkc Wilbur Martelle Helen Bowe Hazel McCarthy Russell Broderick Loretta McFarland Bernadine Brown Gertrude Meneratte Grace Daniels Mddred Morrissey Olive Davenport Callis Niquette Florence Donnelly Dorothy Niquette Harvey Gilboe Theresa O'Connor Lucille Goggins John O'Keefe Francis Hart Pearl Pawlicki Martha Heffernen Alida Pcrrizo Adelia Hiltgen Doris Peterson Beatrice Holland Catherine Reavey Kcthrvn Huhbell Clarence Reuter Dorothy Jackson Ruth Riley George Kenney Viola Seymour Lucy Krchma Margaret Smith Marion Kutchin Lucy Whalen Ruth Mahoney Flavia Writ! Nerville Martelle Perry Writt George Yost 1921 Page one hundred eightt£be jubilee Quiver Jackson Whalen O'Connor I). Niquettc Wrilt Hiltgen N. Martellc Mnbl cU Pawlicki O’Keefe Keavcy K re lima Meneratte Mahoney Nies Reuter Davenport Yost Peterson Kenney C. Niqucttc Daniels Hart McCarthy Seymour Hrown Coggins Gilboe Ilcffernen Donnelly Holland Fitzgerald Smith OFFICERS First Semester President.....................................WILBUR MARTELLE Vice-President................................BEATRICE HOLLAND Secretary.....................................PERRY WRITT Treasurer.....................................HELEN BOWE Second Semester President.......................................MARTHA HEFFERNEN Vice-President..................................GEORGE YOST Secretary.......................................FRANCIS HART Treasurer.......................................GEORGE KENNEY 1921 Page one hundred nineCURRENT HISTORY CLUB Dale of Organization 1910 Current History Club is an organization whose main function is to interest adequate historical background for present-day problems. The programs held every Tuesday evening include oral reports in response to roll call, assigned topics, parliamentary drill, and addresses by outside speakers. Although this club, in the main, calls for industry, it has several social functions, among which are enjoyable semester dinner parties served at the Athearn Hotel. ith the resignation of Miss Roberts, the club lost a valuable leader, but it welcomes Miss Den Bleyker as the new critic. its members and the school in the big current topics of the day and to furnish MEMBERSHIP Mabel Clark Marjorie Cordy Grace Daniels ReSada Hertzberg Viola James Pearl Kasten Lucy Krcbma Elizabeth Mardi Gertrude Meneratte Dorothy Niquette Florence Umbreit Irene Yicaux Phillis Ritter Anna Schmidt Anna Seybold Leah Seybold Page one hundred tenT£be jubilee Quiver Schmidt Krchma Niqucttc James Roberts Bahr L. Seybold I'mbrcit Hasten Meneratte Vieasix Marsh A. Seybold Cordy Hertzbcrg Daniels OFFICERS First Semester President.....................................EMMA BRUNNER Vice-President................................DOROTHY NIQUETTE Secretary.....................................MINNIE MEYER Treasurer.....................................MINNIE MEYER Critic........................................MISS ROBERTS Second Semester President.....................................ANNA SEYBOLD V ice-President...............................DOROTHY NIQUETTE Secretary.....................................PEARL KASTEN Treasurer.....................................GERTRUDE MERERATTE Critic........................................MISS DEN BLEYKER 1921 Page one hundred elevenrmyv INDUSTRIAL ARTS SOCIETY Dale of Organization—1911 The Industrial Arts Society is coming more and more into it.- own as the years pass by. At the beginning of this year the society had only a handful of men but a world of hope. Beginning with a membership of twelve, the men showed their metal and today the society has thirty-five. It has always been the custom of the society to give two social events a year, one a dance, the other an excursion. The society also had two “Dutch Feeds" during the present year. It was at these informal "feeds" that the men in the society had a line opportunity to rub elbows with the Industrial instructors. All who took the time to go to a "feed" went away with the feeling that they had spent an evening long to he remembered. It is the purpose of the society to welcome all visitors who mat. he interested in its work. In the past few years, business men in the city have taken an interest in the men and have come to the meetings to tell the members the experiences that they have had. One can hardly think of I. A. S. without giving a thought to the industries of the country. 'I'lie members all realize this last statement and there is not a meeting that passes by without some phase or phases of a particular industry being discussed. MEMBERSHIP Faculty Frank M. Karnes Students William Abraham Irvin Lathrop Robert Adam- Albert Losey Oswald Baumgartener Frank Maulbetsch Romeo Bedker David Marshall Edward Bremer Charles McAfee John Calder Edward Mueller Fred Darling Theodore Meyer Luther Davis Callis INiquette Theodore Dourelte James Ourada Mark Ferrando Clarence Profli: Walter Fox Clarence Reuter Roger Fullam William Stegeman John Cryskow George Stannard Lester Hanneman Paul Schmiedicke George Kenney Frank Stauber Vick Langford Edward Tesch Bernard Wulk Page one hundred twelveTcscb Meyer McAfee Wulk Davis Ilanncman Loscy (.'aider Adams Stauber Darling Schmicdicke Ourada Stannard Kenney Bedker Langford Niquette Gctchius Mueller Fox Gryskow OFFICERS First Semester President . Vice-President Secretary . . Treasurer . . Critic . . . Marshal . . . JAMES OURADA OSBERT SHIPM ROMEO BEDKER IRVIN LATHROP EDWARD TESCH WALTER FOX Second Semester President....................................EDWARD TESCH Vice-President...............................THEODORE MEYER Secretary....................................GEORGE KENNEY Treasurer....................................MARK FEKRANDO Critic.......................................JOHN CALDER Marshal......................................CLARENCE REUTER 1921 I’age one hundred thirteent£be Jubilee Quiver Y. M. C. A. “He profits most who serves best." Dale of Organization—1915 The Young Men’s Christian Association was organized in October, 1915, and continued as one of the school’s most active organizations until the war, when meetings could not he held because the young men of the school were occupied by the military organizations. Last year some of the young men of the school, with the untiring efforts of the faculty, reorganized the “Y.” The association has been growing steadily ever since, and now ranks as one of the most active organizations of the school. By co-operating with the Y. W. C. A., the Association has been able to procure for the school this year two able and inspiring speakers. Those who heard the lectures of Dr. infield Scott Hall of Illinois and the Hon. Stitt Wilson of Berkeley, California, know that the time and money of the two associations, spent in securing addresses by men of this caliber, have greatly benefited the school. There have been two student conferences this year to which the school organization sent delegates. At one of these conferences, held at Milwaukee, Mr. Price and Mr. Dequaine represented our Association, ami at Carroll College, Mr. Gelling, Mr. Price, Mr. Krueger, and Mr. Shipman were the delegates. It is hoped that the Association will grow to become a greater factor in the lives of the young men of the Oshkosh Normal School than it has ever been before. Mr. F. M. Karnes Mr. W. C. Hewitt Hokerl Adams Edward Albrecht Kurt Blerk Robert Brehmcr Thomas Brindley John Dequaine Arthur Dorka Russel Faulks Robert Forward Warner Geiger That! Gelling Oviatt Guerin MEMBERSHIP Faculty- Students Mr. W. H. Fletcher Mr. F. W. Walsh Gilbert Hill Albert Kreklow Waldo Krueger James Mitchell {.eonard Nikel William Price Gwenald Ritter Gordon Shipman Osbert Shipman Edwin Taylor Abe. Wilner Lorenz Zedler ------1921 Page one hundred fourteenZcdler Hewitt Brehmer Forward Krueger Nike] Hill Mitchell Brindley Wilner Dcquainc Albrecht Bitter Celling Guerin Kreklow Faulk Blcck Fletcher Walsh Price Karnes Shijmian OFFICERS Firs! Semester President . . Vice-President Secretary . , Treasurer . . WILLIAM PRICE WALDO KRUEGER OSBERT SHIPMAN JOHN DEQUAINE Second Semester President . . Vice-President Secretary . . Treasurer . . WILLIAM PRICE WALDO KRUEGER GORDON SHIPMAN JOHN DEQUAINE Page one hundred fifteenDRAMATIC CLUB Dale of Organization 1918 Dramatic Club, organized in ID 18. exists for the purposes of studying tbe drama, of fostering interest in dramatic activities, and of giving its members training in amateur productions. A cast of more than twenty members presented “Macbeth a la Mode." a three-act parody of tbe original tragedy, in February of this year. Many short plays were presented or read as parts of the regular literary programs. Faculty members sometimes assisted the students by reporting on good productions recently seen, or by discussing favorite classics. The organization is not a society, hut a club which welcomes to its membership students who are interested in the drama and dramatics and are w illing to co-operate with the club's work. MEMBERSHIP F acuity Miv Lucille Franchere Students Ru — ell Broderick Earl Carey Jean Denis Ellen Due Nathan Edelson Esther Erickson Priscilla Evans Lucille Goggins Warner Geiger Oviatt Guerin Violette Harter Martha Heffernen Mildred HefTernon ReSada Hertzberg Kathryn ilubbeil Myrtle Hughe- Fla via Dorolln Jack-011 Marion Kutcbin Yolney Leister Wilbur Martelle Pearl Pawlicki Aiida Perrizo Nonna Perry William Price Hallie Rice Kathryn Roberts Meta Rockwell Mary Scott Beulah Solbraa Esther Shea Gordon Shipman Perry Writ! Writt 1021 Page 011c hundred sixteen.Shipman Carey leister Writ! Ilcrtzberg Coggins Broderick Erickson Pawlicki Harter Geiger Denis Heffernen Roberts Rockwell Due Jackson Evans Perrizo Kocscr Martelle Perry Cuerin Kdclson Hughes OFFICERS First Semester President.......................................NORMA PERRY V ice-President.................................MILDRED MILLAR Secretary.......................................OVIATT GUERIN Treasurer.......................................EARL CAREY Second Semester President.......................................WILBUR MARTELLE Vice-President..................................GLADYS KOESER Secretary.......................................OYIATT GUERIN Treasurer.......................................NATHAN EDELSON 1021 Page one hundred seventeenCAMERA CLUB NOTES Dale of Organization 1921 A few student met February 3 for tin purpose of organizing a Camera Club. The object of the club is to promote interest and provide further study in amateur photography. Membership is open to all students of the Oshkosh Normal School. The money which is earned is used to buy more material and equipment to he used by the club. With the aid and suggestions of Mr. Fletcher we expect to take better pictures. also to develop and print them more expertly. The study of light will he one of the main phases of work, while later the enlargement of pictures will be given consideration. Faculty Mr. Flelrher MEMBERSHIP Carrie Belireml Earl Carey Florence Christenson Mabel Clark Claire Darton George Fenisyn Oviatt Guerin Bealrire Holland Waldo Krueger Elizabeth Marsh Ruth Nickel. Dorothy N'i«|uette Norma Perry Louise Roewekamp Neva Schrader Anna Seybold Gwen Williams Anita Yindra 1921 Page one hundred eighteenFcnisyn Christenson Carey Krueger Fletcher Perry Williams Bchrends Schrader Darton Holland Xiquettc Seybold OFFICERS President.....................................WALDO KRUEGER Vice-President................................CLAIRE DARTON Secretary.....................................ANITA YINDRA Treasurer.....................................NEVA SCHRADER 1921 Page one hundred nineteenWICAKA CAMP FIRE l)atr of Organization 1921 Camp Fire is an organized effort to find romance, beauty, and adventure in every-day life. It seeks to make the homely task contribute to the joy of everyday living. Camp Fire presents many phases of occupation. To some it presents social life, and to others out-of-door life. Then there are those to whom the ritual and ceremony make the strongest appeal, and there are some who regard the organization as an opportunity for community service. The girls in Camp Fire learn to share and to work together. They find wholesome, interesting things to do together, and learn the spirit of teamwork ami fellowship. In obeying the law of the Camp Fire, a girl develops spiritually, mentally, and physically. The organization is made up of a group of girls who want to make life just as splendid as is possible. It is an army of girls who do things, who strive to follow the law of the Camp Fire, which says: “Seek Beauty, Give Service, Pursue Knowledge, Be Trustworthy, Hold on to Health. Glorify Work, and Be Happy." The members of Wieaka Camp Fire and their ranks are: Miss Theresa Slalz..........Ilitalo....... Mrs. R. M. Mare.............Soangahtaha... Edna Kratseh................U appa IVakan. Gladys Heuer................If ahuahtayssee Lilah Heuer.................Anacoanh...... Gwendolyn Kilm..............Ilan ah li en. Krnettu Meyer...............Anapao........ Yvonne Smith................Ouaissa........ Hallie Rice.................Ouaissa Agogo Esther Erickson.............Pahaukateua... Claire Darton...............Pocahontas.... Vivian Hall.................Minnehaha. ... Marion Wolverton............Nastcaukee.... Guardian .Honorary Member II ood Gatherer .If ood Gatherer II otxl Gatherer .11 ood Gatherer II otxl Gatherer. Fire Maker. Torch Hearer .11 ood Gatherer. Fire Maker, Torch Hearer II otxl Gatherer II otxl Gatherer II txxl Gotherer OFFICERS First Semester President.......................................RENETTA MEYER Vice-President..................................HALLIE RICE Secretary.......................................VIVIAN HALL Treasurer.......................................MARION WOLVERTON Second Semester President......................................MARION WOLVERTON Vice-President.................................GWENDOLYN KIHN Secretary......................................ESTHER ERICKSON Treasurer......................................VIVIAN HALL 1021 Page one hundred twentyxzex 3ltO-. lU- U |)3ipU(U{ 3il0 aan p£ aq t£be jubilee Quiver THE ADVANCE OHIOM. WU. n ll-v«t s. a bw m aai»a4 lw mix m |W M 0 n u IMMk » i tto Art to Man . in l«t • ww Can 0»i to T» THE ADVANCE VB SCHOOLS LOSSIHE f, r x c TVa. ar. to raal a "1 «Wa Ow «aa» EKIES II—VOL 2 AMIL «. INI 0« n to ito O. S ». halM OSHKOSH. W1S. NOVEMBER L H20_ xo X- ■ tor DSHKOSH 19—MILWAUKEE OLCII ” r» » ir n — mm- - •« —“ • f« kartaO . . lx. ka w » UT ...... P — Taaa’tP fcww ... K.lkU— CWp-v Utal Kama...............Cram SawaA Irt-aral lUaartat... IWaam blui W fra A. c IrM S, 9-0 Oshkosh Normal Defeats Ripon llrmpi, CaalaatM tail la |« 0 OlMMh Will lr to Milwliktl l» 0 (nta aM auto Itoatot to hli ltoa«at| Widk ifcr 4ao—» y urj « Lai Frvli,, OaMu placet at cac .................. I SIDE LIGHTS ON I J THE FACULTY : Aea! “ «•■...C a Mart O- ,f ito rntpaiam •!•••• Hn a.. 0 I. C K al «•( . rt_a • ««n- ... j— c Ortaat" .'■TrnjTTT “ Vtoto M to,— I. • t— Kilkartoa Mrrkaalaaa 1““ ” « at«M aM CMS................M ••a! P .'' » » 'HU -I- to Gr rm S«n A' “' ' w —’ mmu I. A. S. Dance laatMr Caa4 Ima Caaai TAal to»tt ta.( Organizations AM ' • w a fata «, Ian artk-M to. fa.anaWp tatorM WaAa. AM -a at. Nt a tC-a ... ktM laualar. Or- UCTNMN t ... MU I M«r . 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Mj Atopy Wl " «•» •OCtow' ▼Ma, «• to. laMrn, M m.. • aa a. »BOOST THE QUIVER!' Victory Dance I tot m. tor 1 Jutor I Tam Ora»ua. .p—frj. _ »U soaitti nmrstii TXtn “•to. W Ttoa lam. rtajm. MmmM to Ito. a. I»tonal Ttaa oip- la trn M to “ — "• '»-:»» fataMM mtoa-r: ,1 — •rtM lnm ito t J - ito toaalfv, , to-l rf .t.u aAtaa, — Ttopp ta Ito mam ail toa rm TV laataat to l a alaaf —1. tataa—m. tto Mp flat ' — .M ST-p „,,v IM rrtol I- Ut’lamf n atojMt. M- tori Ml , -iSSS.‘?nSS. | Wh IPIton U.vo v- - —— .Ml.a. aiaaaM Ttol Wto. fait at Vataap! ____ TACT iMUw Harrp VatAMt.. .at fot u. Panto .nSSSs- aM Baia. m urktoa. m Warn f«t y . .mrtm.'’ M Oa « j'V-S ,r to — am - tto- mto. I XOU'J. aM KaltotAa pm to., torn ... -a On pa—, Ttor'r. talf Ua Ototot. pm Mm • tom-art tto rrt.ta: to to (at tp Kn FtaaaMt. WMtoMat o‘ Faculty Has Fart - »Wl' It fuss™ AT CllUt MAL v .X— . „ , , Wto. pm Amt Ptltt NtaatL C -Mrr r-to f— to. OWM— .M Ito. I— Tm TZL t— A K • Mf |,I - .V. A o 4 M » Imo irmil M « M y N . . . ttoto -. to - ttoa ttmnt. to to. »« « 1 tv Ito ftp.to art mlp at tto RactUJ Of Marti—Mito r«»- rtart IWat ttttlralta Sill Oattlaak SUta i Krapaa, Two Titles For Oshkosh _____________ RwiUi of Maa Mtrtvmm -m. atom a CmM Oshkosh Win “ — rjrz rr r1:, oratorical cbnt ui 1!r. vmk «to lrt|tr tto f-Mtp[ -Ar. , _ to atol.1. TM —M k. —a ajiklrt at r rta I • pa' —I ,, rta Ml - Uto-vtoa, .«k -- .‘ l Z 7 “ -- Wara-to ito phh. f- all .to -am, I f’ 4 »«!.. f-I. O »t »k4 »n- 4 »« W« Un I »■ M«f, tlMra- k— to. btlll) “ — 1 ”8 ure formal , Unoa P-rtaaMra. ito S— Tto Otktol S—a-1 Matotton i art) af .vtp-t rt rt.aAM Korn TaOa lart « to — i.l Wtfratoar aatoap • C aM Aa'aalM ito.a ;a la • Ta— r»Mtoa. ItlM'T SOTKt TV Cat CA.V M. Maa Vtontal to Ito U -rtto «M taa aart, ftma ito |«M tot, .M rtart. totartf .trtf aM kaaftp lM-.pt ■ Ito. TM KaOrtOM. to a I Mark «aplap to 1921 FOOTBAIX PROSPECTS FINF com.vcr Mm ll-LA C 0 SE AT OiM X),S -H k Oiii tl PO i - ' _ OS HKOS 1 01 Victor ,)anc ‘ MflaWAk Kerc — o] mnm • 3 Part, i p rk - «l Y. M. C A. ikl ";’t ALUMNI IT—1 A Msec »"to A Into— ito N ZXa. a Y. W. C. A. Party .r, o-too- tt. pm. •« !"• »“• °7: 7am tmwrtto to a -r-r I'age one humlred twenty twoThe Advance Stall Literary Editor in-Chief . Associate Editor ELLEN Dl’E JOE CAM BIER Humor Reporters CRACK KOI ROT KATHLEEN DOYLE Athletics ROMEO RKDKKR GORDON XKIENFKLDT GRACE DANIELS OLIVE DAVENPORT MARTHA IIKFFKRXEN Circulation NAOMI WILLE FL )RKNCK DONN ELLY BERTHA CLOW Business Staff Business Manager Assistant Manager SHERMAN MARSH OVIATT GI ERIN Advertising Staff NATHAN KDELSON KATHERINE MICHAELSON AMES 017RADA IANE RADFORD lX)RO J A 3 VIC IOLA SEYMOl'R DTIIY JACKSON Page one hundred twenty-threeThe Quiver Board Romeo Bcdkcr Jean Denis Nathan Edelson P».rry Writt Editor-in-Chief............. Associate Editor . . . . Business Manager . . . . Assistant Business Manager Literary Adviser . . . . Business Adviser . . . . Scmi-Centcn nial ELLEN DUE NORMA PERRY CLAIRE DARTON MELBA CHAPMAN SIDNEY KNUDSON KATHLEEN DOYLE Faculty EDWARD TESCII EDNA NOREM Athletics HELEN LEE GORDON NEUENFELDT Forensics N ERVILLE MARTELLE Social Calendar GLADYS KOESER VIVIAN HALL LAURA IIIRIG Training Department DORIS NICHOLSON Typists IK)ROTIIY JACKSON CLARENCE REUTER ROMEO REDKER JEAN DENIS NATHAN EDELSON PERRY WRITT MISS BRADBURY MR. WALSH Classes DELLA DAVIES FRED DARLING OLIVE DAVENPORT Humor ELIZABETH ALLEN GRACE NOIROT FRANCIS HART NITA WICKERT BEATRICE HOLLAND Art IRVIN LATHROP WILLIAM ABRAHAM MILDRED MORRISSEY ROGER FULLAM Snapshots WALDO KRUEGER KATHRYN ROBERTS Organisations EARL CAREY RUTH SEYMOUR Business Staff RUSSELL BRODERICK AGNES ELLICSON VOLNEY LEISTER Page one hundred twenty-fourThe Quiver Stall Page one hundred twenty-five 1921The Training Department a Clinic THE Training Department has been making very definite efforts to meet certain needs of the superintendents and teachers in the field and is now organized as a laboratory or clinic to which they may come for the purpose of studying or observing various phases of education which are considered the best by the leading educators of the country. Much attention and effort has been given to developing and perfecting the conception and teaching technique of the project and problem method of instruction. The following are a few of the projects which have been worked out in the Primary Department: Pilgrim project: shelter project: dairy project; nature project; clothing project: Indian project: family project: preparation for winter: Main Street; Operetta for Armenian Relief, the operetta being “The Toy Shop.” Among the projects of the Intermediate Department some of the most interesting were the Pioneer project, Indian project. Transportation project, English project and newspaper; Greek project. The Junior High School has developed several successful projects such as the budget. The Seventh B Arithmetic Class is working out budgets, personal budgets, family budgets, and school budgets. Personal budgets are handed in at the end of each week and family budgets at the end of each month. 1 hey are now working out a Junior High School budget on things they want and need. They are also watching city budgets, church budgets, etc. 1 hese budgets are based on standardized schedules. Everybody has started a savings account. Other interesting projects were on colonial life in New England, in which they furnished an old-fashioned living room, the hoys making the furniture in the manual training department, and the girls dressing dolls in costumes of the period studied; Great Lakes to Ocean Deep Waterway project, Ocean commerce project, development of Africa project, British Colonial Empire. Current Investigations Recently the committee of superintendents on reading invited the Training Department to co-operate in working out an experiment in phonics in the Primary grades. Letters containing a questionnaire were sent to twenty-five or thirty of the leading educators on primary reading. The questionnaire dealt with all the phases of when and how one would teach phonics. The experiment is being conducted on the basis of the replies to the questionnaire, which was very successful in obtaining the desired information. The results will be given to the State Committee on reading as soon as they have sufficiently matured. The Primary and Intermediate grades arc interested in an experiment in connection with the teaching of arithmetic and a questionnaire has been sent out to a large number of the leading educators in arithmetic. Special Page one hundred twenty-fixemphasis is being given to a study of remedial work in reading in the intermediate grades. The Junior High School has been conducting an experiment in technical grammar which is proving most interesting and valuable. One of the problems on which the faculty of the Training Department is working during the spring term is the reorganization of content subjects in terms of project-problem method of instruction. The fourth grade history has been completed under three large units. The purpose of this is to deformalize the content of the subject matter taught in such a way as to make it adaptable to the project-problem method of instruction. The reorganization of subject matter has been very successful in connection with the drill subjects in terms of project and problem method of instruction, particularly so in arithmetic and Knglish. The superintendents and teachers of the state are appreciating the opportunity of using the Training Department as a clinic to the extent that during the current year the Waupaca County Teachers’ Association to the number of one hundred teachers or more were here for two days conference and observation, particularly on remedial work in reading, project-problem method of instruction, socialized recitation ami supervised study. Other groups of teachers who have spent a day in the Training Department at definite times are the teachers from Appleton, Green Bay, Necnah. Fond du Lac. Oshkosh, and many of the extension classes. Student Activities in the Training Department Many student activities throughout the Training Department arc a very vital part of the life of the school, such as the Junior High School basketball team; the Junior High School orchestra, consisting of four violins, xylophone, orchestra hells ami drums; a well-organized girls’ glee club; a school city, which has officers and convenes court every Friday, being presided over by the municipal judge: science club: hook clubs; current topics clubs: camera club: impromptu dramatization clubs. The Coming Pageant ?'The Spirit of Spring ' “The Spirit of Spring” is to he given about commencement time and will include large numbers of students from the Training Department. The pageant is being conducted on a large scale and not only includes Training School students hut Normal School students. It will he one of the most attractive events in the history of the school. The “Spirit of Spring’ opens with the coming of dawn, who finds the flowers asleep, unconscious of the approach of day. It is full of a variety of living flowers, birds, songs, dances, the winds, and fairies. In this play the entire talent of the school will find a most fitting culmination for the activities of the year. 1921 Page one hundred twenty-seven1021 i’agc one hundred twenty-eight1920 1 921The Spirit That Wins NINETEEN TWENTY-ONE lias been an unusual year in athletics at Oshkoxh Normal. Brilliant successes in football and basketball mark the jubilee occasion in glittering symbols which characterize champions. The honors in conference athletic competition were fought for and won with a noble spirit dominating our athletic activity. It was a spirit of self-sacrifice for the glory of the school, a spirit of co-operation and firmness of purpose, a splendid feeling of loyalty and confidence in leadership which permeated the school and crystallized into a championship. Such is the spirit that wins and holds the general interest of the school by bonds of friendship and success. The Coaches C. C. Dillon, athletic director and football mentor. Mr. Dillon was a splendid coach and a true sportsman. Mis knowledge of the game and his strength of character won innumerable friends for him. The championship team was the product of his ability as a coach. W hen Mr. Dillon was forced to take a leave of absence due to poor health we regretted his loss. Before the basketball season was well under way we were glad that Mr. II. 11. Whitney was available for coach. Mr. Whitney took over the coaching duties and gave us another championship team. The enviable record hung up by the Oshkosh Normal team in basketball is a credit to the school. Very few enthusiasts hoped for so splendid a team and too much cannot he said in appreciation of the part Coach W hitney played in bringing the championship honors to our sehool. Page one hundred twenty-nine 1021The 1920 Football Season OSHKOSH Normal enjoyed a very successful football season in 1920. winning the state championship after a hard, spirited campaign. Coach Dillon had a wealth of material from which to build bis team, and by consistent effort and splendid co-operation on the part of the men he was able, to organize an aggregation which was second to none in the Normal Conference. The season opened with a practice game at Green Bay, where our fellows easily trimmed the W est Side boys, and Coach Dillon gave every man a chance. On Saturday, October 8. Oshkosh established a remarkable precedent by defeating the strong Ripon College team 9-0. Line plays featured, as open plays were not perfected and forward passes failed. Effective punting kept the play in mid-field. Kolf registered a field goal and before the game ended, a touchdown was scored by Me Andrew. It was a splendid victory. Platteville held our championship contenders to a scoreless tic on a nimbly field which caused a listless, uninteresting game. W hitewater was defeated 21-0 at the southern city, although the fellows did not get started until the second half, when they began scoring to show the W hitewater enthusiasts the kind of football they knew. From W hitewater the team journeyed to St. John's and beat the soldiers 1 1-3. The first home game of the season was played with Milwaukee and the ancient rivals were beaten 19-0. In this game the Normal team gave evidence of true championship calibre and local followers became enthusiastic over the prospects of also winning the La Crosse battle which was to follow. La Crosse came to Oshkosh on November 12. inflated with confidence and touted as champs. Our warriors gave more than was expected of them and not only stopped the La Crosse men but outclassed them 26-0. ictory in this game made us champions of the southern division, and River Falls was played at the northern city to determine the state championship. It was a hard-fought struggle ami neither team scored during the first three quarters. W ith only seven minutes remaining and the championship still undecided. Dad Rraisher called for a long pass, and Kolf heaved the oval to Webster, who raced over tin Falls goal with the only score of the game. On Thanksgiving Day the season was closed with a game against the strong Milwaukee Engineers. The state championship safely lucked away and nothing to gain seemed to have affected the team, and they lost. 34-7. Several men of the team were named on the all-conference selections. Among those honored were Suess. Webster, Below, Me Andrew, and Smith. TOTAL SCORES OF FOOTBALL Ripon Oshkodi Platteville . . 0 Odikodi .... ft Whitewater . . 0 -hk it-li St. John's . . 3 Odikodi Milwaukee Oshkosh La Crosse . . ft Odikodi River Falls Odikodi Milwaukee Engineers . . . . 34 Odikodi .... 7 1921 Page one hundred thirtyuei WINNERS OF THE STATE CHAMPIONSHIP Smith Devine Whitney (Au't Coach) I-citl Tavlot Solbraa Newman McAndrew Below Suns Shrank Kdick Braishcr Webster Brindley Kolf (Captain) Fcnlsyn Dnjwnt OlsonThe 1920 Football Season The men who played on the second team were all finished players. To these men the first team owes a great deal of its achievements. They reported daily and gave their best efforts to hnild a machine which topped all conference elevens. In many eases competition for positions was so keen and so finely drawn that experience and the response under the strain of actual play determined the selection for a game. Fred De inney was an experienced and finished player of first team caliber ami would have played regularly hut for unfortunate injuries. Koutnik also suffered injuries which made playing a hardship for him. Thus it was that fortune smiled anad frowned, affecting the chances a man had to display his ability. However, the school feels deeply grateful to those men who stood ready to give their best, and Coach Dillon extended very honorable mention to the following: DeVinney F. Curtii Koutnick Fox T. Curtis Pugh Ouruila Mitchell Weber Thorpe Barber Mueller Zuege Stall her 1921 I“ Kc one hundred thirty-iwo be 5«lbslee Reiver CAPTAIN-ELECT HARRY “MAC” McANDREW Halfback Many a long gain ami favorable position to score were due to “Mae.” He was a natural halfback and made the most of bis native talents. CAPTAIN ROBERT "BOB” KOLF Halfback Hob carried the ball well whenever called, but bis specialty was passing and punting. He and McAndrew made a fine halfback combination. 1921 Page one hundred thirty-threet£be jubilee Quiver GERALD “DAD” BRAISHER—Quarterback An energetic little general who ran his team like a veteran. He carried the hall for long gains at psychological moments. MARTIN “MARTY BELOW—Tackle “Marty" was recognized as a peer among conference tackles. He never failed to open holes for the plays on his side of the line. EDWARD “ED EDICK—Guard He played a strong game as guard and was on hand when occasion demanded fighting service in the line. 1921 Page one hun lrc i thirty-fourUbe Jubilee (Stufoer LESTER "in TCH” LE1TL—Fullback lien we had to make the distance it was “Butch” who earned the hall, ami he seldom failed to make the required gain. As a line plunger lie had no equal and on defense he was a tower of strength. LEONARD “FAT” SMITH—Tacklv It was not what “Fat" said or appeared to he doing, it was what he did that won respect for him in the line. Plays never got far through him. ARLOVt “YVHITEY” SOLBRAA—End ” hitey" was a hard, sure tackier and many times broke up plays before they had started. His height enabled him to look things over, and he did to his team's advantage. t’sgc one hundred thirty-five ©be JwIMIee Quiver CLIFFORD “ V()lr TAYLOR—Guard "W op” was a big, powerful guard and played a strong game. Injuries handicapped him early in the season, but once recovered he was always in the game and opponents knew it. THOMAS “TOM” BRINDLEY—Center Tom was a splendid defensive man and never failed in accurate handling of the hall. He was quick to see an advantage and follow it. ROBERT “BOB” WEBSTER—End “Bob” was the undisputed star of the line. He had an uncanny way of out-guessing opponents, and when he tackled he brought them down. - 1921 Pane one hundred thirty-sixOLIN “O. B.” NEWMAN—End A sure tackier and especially proficient on offensive forward passes. Time after time he effected perfect interference for long gains. JOSEPH "JOEY " DEV INE—Halfback “Joey” played a hard, consistent game whenever he got into the fray. OTTO “CREME” SUESS—Guard “Creme” was a tower of strength and a guard who never played against a man who was his superior. Page one hundred thirty-sevenALVIN ‘ DUPE” DUPONT He, too. was a finished player, hut not regularly in tlie line-up. He proved one of the best of the reserves. MICHAEL -MIKE" FEMSYN When the occasion came "Mike assumed his position as if he had always played it. N e are glad to have him with us next year. WILLIAM “BILL” OLSON A fast, clever hackfield man who made the regulars go the limit to hold their positions. He showed his worth in every game he played. -1021 IMise one hundred ihirty-eiulitt£be jubilee Quiver FABIAN SCHBANK A linesman who filled tlie gap in effective style many times when playing was hard and serious. GYMNASIUM 1921 Pajje one hundred thirty-nine1921 Page one hundred fori;'How Our Team Played the Game H a £ .. « «»»« .»««' Pr-ti.rr ■ 1021 Page one hundred forty-one'She Subflee Quiver Page one hundred foriy-iwoizei WINNERS OF THE STATE CHAMPIONSHIP Kolf Whitney (Coach) Webster Doucette Below (Captain Newman Pugh Curtis Hraisher DevineBasketball COACH WHITNEY VI hen the basketball season opened over forty men reported for practice. Coach Whitney took two weeks to select men for more intensive training. Several practice games were played and the team defeated quintets representing Paine Lumber Co., The Diamond Match Co., and the Inter-Lake Paper Co. of Appleton. On January 21st the first conference game was played with Milwaukee. Oshkosh gave evidence of good team work in the making by-flashes of brilliant passing and clever floor work, 'flic Cream City quintet was trounced 39 to 11. The following week Stevens Point came down to even up the football squabble hut was soundly trimmed 32 to 8. In the first quarter Stevens Point appeared to have an edge and lead in score 3 to 0. hut once Oshkosh was able to penetrate the Point defense, matters took a different turn and our fellows began consistent scoring. The Whitewater game followed and this team was easily defeated in a ragged game 46 to 11. Oshkosh was developing a defense that could not he penetrated. Marquette University took the first victory from us by a 17 to 13 score in an exciting, hard fought battle in which the outcome was uncertain until the final whistle. Our team was commended by the Marquette aggregation for its superb defensive play. From Stevens Point our boys brought hack the bacon 13 to 12 in a game marred by fighting in which spectators participated. Pugh, on account of an injured shoulder, missed the Stevens Point game, which probably accounts for the elose score of 13 to 12. It was an achievement to win on the Point floor because of the small gym and adverse attitude of the crowd. Pane one hundred forty-four 1921St. Joint's was defeated on the local floor 31 to 15 and the following week the team journeyed to Whitewater ami Milwaukee where they decisively trimmed both Normal quintets 18 to 6 and 43 to 10, respectively. At this time Oshkosh was going strong and playing in championship form. March 8. River Falls was taken into camp 20 to 8 in a thrilling game. Every man on the team was keyed to a high pitch in anticipation of the struggle with the strong Falls aggregation and every man responded brilliantly. Both offensively and defensively Oshkosh played a splendid team game and outclassed River Falls decisively. A return game at the Northern city was played on March 16 ami the team clinched another championship banner to the school flag staff by a 18 to 13 score. BASKETBALL SCORES Milwaukee . . . 11 O-hkodi .... 39 Stevens Point .... ... 8 O-hko-h .... 32 Whitewater .... O-hko-h . ... . Marquette University . ... 17 Odikosh 13 Stevens Point .... ... 12 O-hko-h . . . . 13 St. John'f ... 15 O-hko-h .... 31 Whitewater .... ... 6 O-hko-h . . . . , Milwaukee ... 10 St. John ... 16 Odikosh .... River Fall ... 8 Oshkosh . . . . 127 287 Pugh and Braisher scored more points than the total piled up against them. Pugh made 81 anad Braisher 74. Notice: 13 points arc the most points any Normal school was able to pile up against Oshkosh in one game. Oshkosh Opponent: 98 . Field Coal- .... 33 52 18 . Technical Foul- . . . Page one hundred forty-fiveUlbe mlbilee ®wlvec CAPTAIN MARTIN “MARTY” BELOW—Center “Marty usually outjumped his man. He was a reliable man, the huh of the team's offensive. Forward CAPTAIN-ELECT GERALD “DAD” BRAISHER “Dad" was unquestionably one of the fastest and cleanest men in the conference. Boy, he could travel! ROBERT “BOB” KOLF—Guard “Bob" broke up more opponents plays than any other man. He was a strong guard ami with Webster proved the best of conference guards. Page one hundred forty-sixROBERT "BOB” WEBSTER—Guard lien it came to clever heady team play we usually found ‘‘Bob in it. Mis experience was a valuable asset to the team. HARVEY “HARVE” PUGH—Forward Unassuming and likable, “Harve” played a fast game and was a good shot. His speed and aggressiveness, coupled with Braisher's, netted many baskets. THEODORE “TED” CURTIS—Forward A last, shifty player, who could guard or forward equally well. He was a valuable utility asset. 1921 I’.'ikc one hundred forty-sevent£ibe Jubilee Quiver JOSEPH "JOKY" DEVINE—Forward “Joey" got into several games and displayed line qualities as a finished player. THEODORE "TED" DOUCETTE—Center Whenever “Ted" went into a game he grabbed a basket or two and kept team spirit high. OLIN “O. B " NEW MAN—Center A versatile, rangy center who could handle the ball as cleverly as a juggler. Page one hundred forty-eight 1921t£be jubilee ®uivet The Girl’s Athletic Association I lie G. A. A. is an Oshkosh Normal Seliool organization that promotes girl's athletics of the school. Its officers ami members belong to the student body and are members while they attend school. All girls who play basketball must he members of the G. A. A. and must conform with the regulations made by the association. The organization is under the supervision of Mrs. Mace and Miss Statz. Meetings are held the first Monday of every month. The purposes of the organization are: 1. To promote an interest in athletics among the girls of the school. 2. To promote good fellowship and good sportmanship and establish lasting friendship. 3. To improve the student body physically, thereby providing health as an asset to the establishment of high scholastic standards. The constitution provides for the giving of points to encourage the various sports engaged in during their seasons. Hockey, basketball, baseball, tennis and hiking have been well carried on because of the enthusiasm aroused last year. The following girls were given their ) ' and their pins this year: ffO”8 Linda Hauer Myrtle Williams Olive Davenport Cecil Young Florence Donnelly Marion Wolverton Linda Haslow Kdna Kratsch Martha Heffernen Heatrice Holland Gladys Heuer Edna Norem Dorotlix Mathews .Nellie Marie Duel Lucille Reilly Bessie Fcnhouse Margaret Reilly Helen Lee Ruth Reilly Esther Storking Mariel Swift Victoria Werner Pins Linda Hauer Heatrice Holland Olive Davenport Kdna Norem Florence Donnelly Nellie Marie Duel Linda Haslow Bessie Fenhouse Martha Heffernen Helen Lee Gladys Heuer Esther Stocking Dorothy Mathews Victoria Werner Lucille Reilly Jean Denis Margaret Reilly Agnes Ellirson Ruth Reilly Margaret Golden Mariel Swift Josephine Gores Myrtle Williams Renetta Meyer Cecil Young Doris Nicholson Marion Wolverton Signa Carlson Kdna kratsch 1921 I'atjc one tunxlrcd forty-nineGirls Basketball Basketball lacked the usual pep tliis year because of the lack of players to represent the different courses. The College team found it difficult to obtain the required six players and was forced to borrow from the Primary team Jeanne Parrette, Irene Schartau. and Marion Hetherington. who showed their good spirit by playing on the College as well as their own team. The four teams participating in the tournament were the Primary, the College, the ooly Highs, and the I). Y. I). Highs. The Wooly Highs came out on top in the tournament, winning all their games. The following are the resulting scores: I). Y. I). Highs.................23 Wooly (li|tlh....................33 College..........................19 Wooly High.......................34 I). Y. I). Highs.................25 Wooly High.......................49 The line-ups were as follows: PRIMARY TEAM Jeanne Parrette (Captain), Guard Marvel Burt, Guard Loretta McFarland, Guard Irene Srliartau. Forward Leah Seybold, Forward Daisy Ferber, Jumping Center Marion Hetherington, Side Center WOOLY HIGHS Merle Pickett (Captain), Forward Lucille Goggins, Forward Marion Wolverton. Jumping Center Marion Banderoh. Guard Ruth Guhl, Guard Beatrice Holland. Guard Kenetta Meyer, Side Center College.........................7 College........................10 Primary........................17 Primary........................17 Primary........................23 I). Y. D. High.................11 COLLEGE Ruth Reilly (Captain), Jumping Center Eunice Roger., Side Center Kathryn Robert., Forward Sarahel Beardmore. Forward Bertha Clow. Guard I). Y. I). HIGHS Marguerite Fraedrick (Captain) Guard Re.ada Herl .herg, Guard Helen Pickett, Guard Helen Lee, Forward Marie Ganzer. Forward Edna Krat'di. Jumping Center Mariel Swift. Side Center Lucille Graves, Side Center 1921 Page one liuiuiretl fiftyi LiiptJ WOOLY HIGHS Coggins Holland Wolvcrton lleffcrncn Guhl Banderol) Pickett Meyer I). Y. D. Hcrtxhcrg Pickett Graves I.cc Giitter Fraedrick Swift Page one hundred fifty-onePrimary Burt Scyhold Schartau Mencratte Fcrbcr Parettc McFarland Hcthcrington 1921 Page one hundred lifty-two1921 Page one hundred fifty-three WINNERS OF THE STATE CHAMPIONSHIP Siclm.ii! Hagen I.aunlilin Courtney Roach Johnson Zussman Jacobson Hreisc Vincent (Coach) Bloomer Dunn (Captain)T£be jubilee Quiver High School T ournanient THK Ninth Annual .Sectional Basketball Tournament held at this school on March 10, 11. and 12 was beyond u doubt the most successful from the standpoint of enthusiasm and attendance of any tournament held under Normal Athletic Association auspice . The teams entered were the best of our district. Those qualifying for entrance were Appleton, Neenah, Fond du Lac, Oshkosh, Niagara, Shawano, Mayville, Ripon, and Menasha. From the opening whistle of the first preliminary game there was never a moment of play without excitement. The first game between Menasha ami Fond du Lac ended in a 20 to 10 victory for the latter. Despite the large difference in the score the game was fast and hard-fought. The second game of the day had for its participants Niagara and Shawano. This game went in favor of Niagara by two points, 18 to 16. The evening games, while not so fast and close-fought as those of the afternoon, were worth watching. Neenah defeated Mayville. 21 to 16, and Oshkosh took Ripon's measure, 36 to 9. Appleton, who drew the bye for the first round, drew Niagara for the Friday morning game. Friday morning's contest brought an unexpected crowd and game. Niagara very nearly spilled the Appleton team but was defeated in the last two minutes of play, the final score being 20 to 17. In the afternoon Mayville eliminated Ripon by defeating her. 23 to 17. and Menasha fell before Shawano by a score of 34 to I. In the evening games Oshkosh lost to Neenah. 22 to II. In the second game, which ran five minutes over time, Appleton took a turn at Fond du Lac, leaving the latter at the short end of a 15 to 13 score. In this game Appleton showed the result of her hard contest in the morning as did the Niagara men in the next game when Shawano left them at the small end of a 24 to 20 score. This was the second time Niagara had met Shawano and each had won a game. Saturday morning in the semi-finals, Mayville met Shawano and the latter took the game by a score of 21 to 9. giving Shawano a chance to pla for third place in the evening. The second morning game between Oshkosh and Fond du Lac was won hy the latter. 18 to 17. The evening game for third place between Shawano and Fond du Lac was fast ami was won by the better judgment of Fond du Lac, giving this team third place. In the championship game. Appleton showed her real caliber b defeating Neenah. 25 to 8. and taking the title. Appleton also won the state championship at Madison, giving our section another title. The general concensus of opinion among the visiting teams was that the officiating of Filers, DeVinney, ami Kolf was excellent and there was nothing hut praise for these men. Since the tournament. letters have been received from most of the coaches, expressing their gratification at the quality of the tournament. Two all-tournament teams were picked. The first was composed of the following players: Jacobson, Appleton, right forward; Madson. Neenah. left forward; Collins, Fond du Lac, right guard; Nussbaum, Oshkosh, left guard; and Reed, Shawano, center. The second all-tournament team men were: Dillett. Shawano, right forward; Senn, Oshkosh, left forward; llreise, Appleton, right guard; Thornton, Neenah, left guard; and Dunn, Appleton, center. ATHLETIC COMMITTEE Faculty Representatives: Mr. Clematis Chairman; President Brown. Fix-Officio; Mr. Whitney; Mr. Karnes, Treasurer. Student Representatives: Mr. Cardiff, President of the Student thletic ssociation; Mr. Smith, F'irst Semester Representative; Mr. McAmlrew. Second Semester Representative; Mist Allen, Secretary. Pane one hundred fifty-five1 Zbe jubilee Quiver Page one hundred fifty-sixFaculty Reception The students of the Normal School were the guests of the faculty. September 24, at the annual reception given to the new students. During the evening a delightful program was presented by faculty members. Dancing was in order from 8 to II o'clock. The affair is always anticipated with great pleasure by both tlx incoming Juniors, and the Seniors, as an excellent opportunity to get acquainted with each other. Hallowe'en Dance Members of the Alethean and Philakean Societies entertained the school at a Hallowe'en dancing party, October 29. A five-piece orchestra played for dancing from 8 to II o’clock. During intermission an attractive program was presented. Shortly after, all of the lights save one or two were extinguished, and while the orchestra played “I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles." the dancers were showered with balloons. A grand march preceded the home waltz and during the processions, serpentine was thrown. The decorations were typical of Hallowe'en. Yellow and black streamers were suspended from the balcony, and witches, cats, corn stalks, autumn leaves, and pumpkins were used in various parts of the room. The party proved to be one of the most enjoyable and attractive of the school year. 'Fhe Industrial Arts Society Dance On November 12. the Industrial Arts Society held its annual dance. The “gym" was decorated to commemorate Armistice Day. Guns were placed at one end of the gymansiuin and a flag at the other. The orchestra took its place in the center. After an interpretative dance given by Miss Statz and Aletha Fuller, dancing furnished the enjoyment for the rest of the evening. 'Fhe Victory Dance To celebrate our football championship this year, the Quiver Staff gave a Victorv Dance, November 19. The gvmnasium was artistically decorated w ith the school colors, gold and white. A football hung from the center of the gymnasium to symbolize our championship. Although dancing was the main feature of the evening, a short musical program was given by members of the student body. Mr. Dillon gave his farewell address to the school and was presented with a gift in appreciation of his efforts and success as football coach, fter the program, dancing continued for the remainder of the evening. Page one hundred fitly-seven1021 Page one hundred fifly-eigb'Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A Partv One of tlie most enjoyable parties of'the year, the last social affair of the year 1920. was given December 16. Dancing was the main feature of the evening, but between “sessions" many enjoyable things occurred. The first was the “get-acquainted" stunt in which handshakes and smiles played a large part, 'flic next interval was the program proper. Mr. Karnes sang, accompanied by Miss Millar at the piano, and a cornet duet was rendered by Miss Ferbcr and Mr. Krueger. Immediately following was a stunt with Mr. Fenisyn. Mr. Dupont. Mr. Gelling, and Mr. Wilner as contestants. Dancing was then resumed until the “eats" arrived. Santa Claus appeared upon the scene and amused all with his droll laughter ami witty remarks. After that more dancing, and then—eleven o’clock and the end of social events for 1920! Christmas Romp A very delightful Christmas party was given December 18, in the gymnasium of the Normal School. I bis was the annual Christmas romp at which the members of the Alethean Society entertained youngsters from the public schools of the city. About 125 of them were conveyed from their schools by automobiles provided hv the members of the society and faculty members. The gymnasium was attractively decorated in the Christmas colors. In the early part of the afternoon girls of the society entertained the children and directed them in the playing of games. Following the games, a Christmas story was told the children, and immediately after. Santa arrived with stockings filled with goodies, apples, and hags of popcorn. After the excitement luul somewhat subsided, the automobiles returned the children to their respective homes. Corridor Dances Numerous corridor dances, or “sun-hops,” as they have been termed, have been given during the year by the members of the Girls Athletic Association. These entertainments for the school have been, perhaps, the most enjoyable of any of the informal social events. The Star Orchestra has officiated so often at these affairs that it has become almost an institution of the school. An occasional dancing frolic has also been given in the gymnasium during assembly period. Needless to say, these little parties have done much to make school life more pleasant: in fact, each individual who attended the “sun-hops” must carry away happy memories of the many good times. 1921 Page one humlrc l fifty-nine®be Jubilee Culver: 1921 Page one hundred ix« Macbeth a la Mode The Dramatic Club presented a play, “Macbeth a la Mode,” in the auditorium, February 24. The play was in the nature of a take-off on the students and the faculty of the Normal School. It included the following cast of characters: Willie Marbeth...............................................................Karl Carey King Duncan.................................................... olney Leister Hob Buii |iio..............................................................Gordon Shipman .Mike McDuff................................................................Perry Writt Arthur I,ennox..................................................W ilbur Martclle Donald Bluiii ...............................................Hu»ell Broderick Flea Aula........................................................Oviatt Guerin Lady Macbeth ...................................................Kathryn Robert? Hecate ...................................................... Katherine Huhhell Frivolou Fannie...............................................Beulah Solhraa Mainly Malcolm.................................................Meta Rockwell Witches...................I.ucile Goggin.-, Myrtle Hughes Mildred Hcffernon Other Students..............Thad. (Celling. Esther Erickson, Martha HefTernen. Dorothy Jackson. Jean Denis Members of the Faculty..............William Price, Warner Geiger, Norma Perry This play was the first real venture for some time, and was very much appreciated. Miss l orraiuc Martin. Miss Marion Hetherington, Miss Genevieve Oium. and Mr. Karnes provided music for the program. Miss Franchere’s Recital Miss Lucille Franchere delightfully entertained a large audience with a violin recital on March 16. Miss Franchere is an artist of note, for she studied in Lcipsig, and has played before the King of Fngland. She was assisted in presenting her concert by Mr. George Nixon. Mr. J. (). Frank, and Mrs. heeler, an able accompanist, flic concert was given under the auspices of the Quiver. Girls Fancy Dress Party For one evening, April 8. the girls of the school reigned supreme. The affair was the annual girls' fancy dress party, given by the members of the Girls' Athletic Association. Gypsies, fairies, gay young “lounge lizards." witches, foreigners of all types, Broadway dancers, and numerous other characters danced away the hours from 8 until 11 o'clock. The girls of the school always look forward to this event with much enthusiasm, as it provides such an excellent opportunity for a care-free, happy, all-girl time. 1921 Page one hundred sixty-onet£ibe jubilee Quiver Page one hundred sixty-twoFaculty Slav Party 1'ln faculty held it annual party January 13, at tin Guild Hall. The members of the faculty were as much mystified as any, concerning the character of a Grand Slav party until the night arrived. There, it is said, several of our dignified faculty renewed their acquaintance with King Prank. The first event of the evening was a three-course dinner, which was not disturbed by weighty speeches from the faculty. Gay-colored fools caps, presented to each one. caused much merriment. fter dinner. Mr. Fletcher, who was the Grand Slav, presented each with an envelope containing the name of some great personage whom he was to represent. In this contest Miss Rupple shone forth very cleverly, representing Henry Ford. Piano duets by Mis- Jacobi and Miss Behrens were the next features of the program. One of the main events of the evening was the minstrel show, in which Mr. Walsh. Miss Franchere, Mr. Just. Miss Statz, Miss Talcott. Miss Crowley. Miss Clausen, Mr. Clematis, and Mr. Talbot took part. Miss Johnston was then asked to judge the case of F. R. Clou against E. W ebster. for stealing from the aforesaid F. R. Clou ix prize chickens. Mr. Just was named constable, but Miss W ebster succeeded in escaping from him. and the case was dis% missed. The remainder of the evening was spent in dancing. Faculty Teas In order that the members of the faculty and faculty dames might become better acquainted with one another, an informal tea has been field every two weeks at the I.ihbev House. Four hostesses were appointed for each gathering, two from the ladies of the faculty, and two faculty dames. These teas, offering an opportunity for our busy faculty to get together and enjoy one another's society, have proven very successful. April Fool's Dance The Plioenix-Lyccum Societies gave a dancing party for the school on April 1. 1921. The music was furnished by the Royal Garden Jazz Orchestra. Refreshments were served late in the evening. Pile party was voted, by all who attended, a splendid success, and one of the most attractive of the year 1921. 1921 I’aite one hundred sixty-threet£ibe wbflee Salver 1921 Page one hundred sixty fourDo You Remember? Remember when you came lo school. Away hack Iasi September. How hie you thought your hank roll. Remember! Do you remember? First it was your regular fees Hut you had expected that. Your athletic fee was one buck more. It almost knocked you Hat. Then came a movie benefit. For the Quiver, so they said. Two weeks more they gave a play. Once more your roll was hied. Then they asked you to help Pa) a debt, from away last year. And it took almost every cent You could beg, borrow or spear. So, if you come hack next year. There is only one thing to do: Get a hank roll like a hale of hay. And on each hill put a bottle of glue. Hob Webster: You'll miss me when I'm gone. Kate Kashleigh: Yes, I guess I would now. if I had anything to throw. Pressed close to his heart ah. how his blood ran like fire through his veins. He had been miserable the past few days but now. now everything would be all right. Already with that pressure upon his breast he began to feel soothed ami comforted. If only that mustard plaster would cure his cold! Resolutions For The Coming Year RESOLVED: That I will not fail in more than six classes a day. That I will never hand my work in on time. That I will not borrow any paper: and that if I do I shall return it. if sued in court. That I will attend class meetings. That I will pay my debts, and not contract more than twice as many new ones as I have paid. That I will be friendly with the treasurers of all organizations, etc. That I will not borrow other students work. That I will not worry about the opposite sex. That I will not litter the floor with paper, unless I have some I want to get rid of. That I will cheerfully lend my possessions, even my pocket-hook, because if I don't they'll take 'em anyway. That I will anticipate the teachers' wishes in every conceivable way and not cause disturbance, if I expect to get caugbl at it. That I will mimic George W ashington by never telling a lie (unless it should be occasionally!, follow in Abraham Lincoln's footsteps hy doing all I can to emancipate the oppressed (especially students who have no inclination to work); and prove myself a true disciple of Bolshevism by adhering to the rule of shorter hours, less work, more parties, and a wage scale for all students who work overtime. -192 = :,Kc one hundred sixty-fivet£foe jubilee Quiver Wooden Scliuhs at Our Door It has been Writtten) to us that a Newman at Normal ha just come from Holland In a Swift Car. He said tlie ale Rice and Weiners that cost him Little Coyne, although the I’rice lh.it the Baumgartcner Rashleigh asked yielded him Proflit. He Roewfed to)kamp on the Tyrivcr to see his friend the DeYine Sargent. He also got a Peake at DeKeyser Schuhling) Parreltes in the Barn y : rd. He asked a Weismiller to show him the Temple on the Hill. When he rang Zicbcll. a Grimm Dane chased him into the Greenwood, Below the Marsh, and onto the Lee, where he saw Ruby and her Howe sitting on a Davenport by the Brooks, where he, the Barber with a had kolf, had Just given his Darling a Jewel from which Stone the Sparkes flew. Being Wise, he wanted to Seymour, hut he knew that the Grimm Dane had no Hart and was too Swift for him, and that he Wood he in one of the Graves in the Greenwood if he did not arrive at the Dock ta' where he was Due to go by Raliel to reach the Mainland. THIS IS SHORT SKETCH OF TOM BRINDLEY’S LIFE Little Tommy hail a hobby At the age of four; And his hobby was a horsie Which he rode upon the floor. Tommy later came to Normal, Still his hobby was a horse. This he used to great advantage Trotting through his language course. THE H. C. L. Dear Ma: I lake my pen To let you know I need a ten: If you are short, a five will do. I really hate to bother you. If lacking five, then send me none. Must go to school. Your loving son. Shop Clerk: “Now, see here little boy, I can't spend the whole day showing you penny- toys. Do you want the earth with a little red fence around it?" Rii'sell Broderick: “Let me see it." Grace Daniels: No. I didn’t have time to study my American History le «on. When I study, I want to make a full meal of it. Dorothy Niquette: Don’t forget to begin on the “Fish" cour e. I WOULD LIKE TO SEE Matron: “Only relatives arc allowed to see him. Are you a member of his family?" “Why. yes Pm his sister.” Matron: “Oh, really. I’m so glad to meet you. I’m his mother." Never confide your secrets to a girl. Though you call her your own Sweet dove, she may turn Out to be a carrier pigeon. —Francis Hart. 1021 Page one hundred sixty-si Pane one hundred sixty-sevent£be 3wlbilee ® wiper 1921 Page one hundred .'ixiy-cight"5 be jubilee Quiver Agony Column Bc»‘ AB Aroun.l Boy ....................................... Earl Carey BeM All Around Girl ..........................................Merle Rasmussen Handsomest Boy ............................................ Obie Newman Prettiest Girl ............................................ Lucile Graves Best Boy Athlete .......................................... Burton Cardiff Best Girl Athlete ...........................................Sarabel Beardmore Best Girl Dancer ............................................Marion Hetherington Best Boy Dancer ........................................... Abe Wilner ..................................................Edna Kratseh HunfcneM ..................................................."Speed Swift Best Vamp (be) ............................................Me Andrew Best Vamp (she ......................................... Vivian Hall Biggest Borrower ............................................Marge Coyne Most Conceited ............................................ Vandervoort Best Girl Blusher........................................"Ollie Davenport Best Boy Blusher .........................................."Tom Brindley Silliest ..................................................Katy Josslyn Most Talented Boy .. .................................... Bill |»rjce Most Talented Girl ............................................ Ra |fon| Most Talked About Faculty Member ..........................Mr. Clow Laziest ................................................... Mary Scott Cutest Girl ...............................................Cert. Kuhaupt Cutest Boy ..................................................Ceorge Fenisyn (.lass Pels ...............................................Martelle Twins Most Popular Girl .........................................Irene Brooks Most Popular Boy ............................................ Sherman Marsh Peppiest ................................................... Lucille Goggins Best Dressed ................................................ George Kenney Biggest Crab ................................................ Gladys Koeser Most Unpopular "Prof. ................................... Mr. Hewitt Most Pro-German in Looks, etc.............................. Florence Donnelly Frances (dark: "In some parts of Africa, a man doesn’t know his wife until he is married to her.” Boh Kolf: “Why pick on Africa? The worn out old stove crouched wanly on the rubbish pile and, pointing to the ash-heap, remarked to the garbage can: “Ah, me! There's all that’s left of an old (lame of mine!" Boarders taken by the meal. day. or week, and those who don’t pay by the neck. Mr. Hewitt: Which problem didn't you have right? McAndrew: The one I had wrong. Mrs. Finnegan: I want a pair of shoes for my girl. Clerk: French kid. Ma’am? Mrs. F.: No, sir, Irish. Far be it from me to put quinine in anyone’s lip-rouge, but the bird I’d like to mourn for is the vegetarian who won’t allow his children to eat animal crackers. --1921 I’ajcc one hun lrc t sixty-nineThe End of the Road for a Normal Graduate Fifty years have now passed by And I stand here alone; From O. N. S. my weary feet Have trod a path of stone. I'm absent minded and juite weak; They say I'm getting senile; They look at me as inurh to say. Your place is on the junk pile. Tis well to have much knowledge. I've piled it cord on cord: But if I'd been a janitor I’d be running 'round in a Ford. Co-ed Hater: “Don't you know that woman is man's worst enemy? Frosli: “Yes, but the Good Book tells u- to love our enemies.” Gossip takes an inch of truth and stretches it into a yard of story. HOW ABOUT IT OBIE? “How was the Southern army distinguished from the Union army?" “Why the Southern army wore southern suits and the Union army wore union suits.” Pane one hundred seventyParc one hundred seventy-oneT£be jubilee Quiver Page one hundred seventy-two te.uTheir Favorite Indoor Sports Helen Horen............. Combing her hair al noon. Ilea, liollaml.......... Healing every one else in telling the latent story. Dorothy Jackson......... Watching for the next car from Fond du I.ae. Kenctla Meyer........... Having Marie Moore teach her the latest on the Uke. Resada Hertzberg........ Making history outlines for -? Helen Peterson.......... Looking for Marge O'Brien. Esther Steude........... Trying to evade her frivolous friends who won't let her study. Miss Clausen............ Doing sentinel duty. Warner Ceiger........... Fixing the dictaphones in Miss Clausen's room on the third floor: by means of which criminals may he apprehended who think no one is looking. Jean Denis.............. Going with “What cha call it." Myrtle Hughes........... Making plans. Lucille Nolle........... Blessing Omro and the means of transit thereto. Helen Pickett........... Denying she had a date the night before. Bulb Seymour............ Doing up her hair. Agnes Kllicson and Ed. Teseli........ Reading hooks together. Mary Scott.............. Waiting for mail from Illinois. Ellen Due............... Chasing up delinquent writers for the Advance. “Ollie" Davenport....... Visiting new religious gatherings. Doc. Guerin............. Wondering if Northern Wisconsin will he as heavenly as Wis- consin Avenue. Tlieo. Meyer............ Attending to his own work. “Alia!" lie cried, as he picked up an egg from the piano -tool, “the lay of the last minstrel." He: “l)i«l you see John walk out of the class in the middle of Prof. Clow's lecture?" She: "Yes, what was the matter?" He: “Why, lie walks in his sleep." He: “What would you do if I should kiss you on the forehead?” She: “I’d call you down." "LEARN ONE THING DAY" The Wooden Horse of Troy is an animal in Greek Mythology, said to have belonged to Belorn. “Gel down off your high horse," probably is traceable to it, likewi-e the student slang of “my pony will get me through." HOW MANY APPLES DID ADAM AND EYE EAT? Some say Eve 8 and Adam 2. a total of 10. Some say Adam 8 and Eve 8 also, a total of 16. But if Eve 8 and Adam 8 2, the total would he 90. Now, if Eve 8 I and Adam 8 I 2. the total would he 893. Or, again. Eve 8 1 I Adam, and Adam 8 112 oblige Eve. total 82,056. Though we admit Eve 8 I I Adam, if he 8 1 8 1 12 keep Eve company, total 818,056. All wrong! Eve, when she 8 18 12 many, and probably felt sorry for it, and Adam, in order to relieve her grief 8 12: therefore Adam, if he 8 1 8 1 1 2 40-fy Eve's depressed spirits, hence both 8 1,896,861 apples. 1921 Page one hundred seventy-threeSC tfffC M !s G I?£■ £'£■ CPuPS. Esther Steudc: “We’ve got a fine ear, hut no name for it." Jolm Le.«-elyong: “Name it United State.-.” E. S.: “.Not much, it might go dry.” V mother secs her daughter Jazzin' round in life' mad whirl. And says “They never did such things When your ma was a girl." And yet. when her ma was a girl. And stepped a mean Virginia reel. Poor grandma probably threw a fit And handed her the same old spiel. Marg. Parker: “Sheep are -tupid animals, aren't they, Joe?” Joe Devine: “Yes my lamb.” “My brother take- up Spanish. French. Italian, Hebrew. German, and Scotch.” “Goodness where does lie study?” “Stud ? He doesn't study. He runs an elevator" = = =1921- Page one hundred seventy-four Page otic hundred seventy-fiveI’age one hundred tevenlysixThe Alphabet—If in Doubt, Consult the Dictionary We hope that everybody ha digested A, B, C, I). E, and F from Iasi year's Quiver and is ready lo go on--- G GOLOSHES Heavy rubber and wool footgear alTerted b flapper usually worn unbuckled. GOULOSH Frequent dish on hoarding-house tables sometimes made from above with buckles removed. GOOD -Symbol G-mark. almost never seen in Miss Swart’s classes. GOZ The usual line. GUFF—What we bear in assembly. II HEART—Organ of the bod) formerly supposed to be the seal of Love late discoveries have proved this supposition to be false. The seat of Love is now known to be in the automobile. HEAVEN -Any place but a practice class. HARD- -Condition common to instructors. H —Prudish way of writing Hell, a word commonly u ed in place of the longer word. Practice-teaching. HANDKERCHIEF A spare carried by most everyone against the possibility of a blow-out. 1 I—First person, singular most used (and abused) won! in language favorite of professor . IDEAS—Something which we have everything else but. IMPORTANCE—Needs no explanation personified in 99 }? of student body. INDIGO Prevailing color in Exam. week. (Puzzle: Which of the 36 are exam, week in O. N. S.? Three dozen? Your’re right be seated.) J JOHN Name applied to any unclaimed young men in Normal. JAZZ Conglomeration of sounds made on pianos, saxapbones, cow bell , etc. Ha produced a wonderful revivifying effect on hitherto dormant muscles of most young people-especially between the ages of 15 and 83. JAZZ BO Trick necktie affected by some young men. Resembles nothing in particular usually worn with a dotted, striped, or pale green soft collar. JAKE- Word used by English instructors to denote excellence in written work. KALE- G. Gelt—Fr. Argent U. S. Movies, Chili, Cigarettes------Everything. KEEN —Adjective used in describing a new tie, girl, oxford or smile means chic, bright, classy, etc. KIBOSH What O. N. S. put on River Fall’s hopes for a championship. (To be continued in our next JUNE 1922) Once we saw a little dandy. Dressed up all so spick and spandy. And we wondered who on earth this hoy could be. Then he gave his girl some candy. And we thought of Min and Andy, And we knew that he was Yandy, Yandy Y. : 1921- Page one hundred seventy-seven= t£be mbilee ——== Why? Why does a fellow always go to assembly on the days that roll isn't taken? W hy do some students park their fsimi under the rhairs in the class-rooms? Why is it that no matter how recently you have had your teeth repaired another dentist ran find a flock of cavities? Why do girls wear goloshes on dry. sun-shiny days? W hy do anarchists and other paranoiacs insi t on making: footnotes in public library hooks and school hooks? Why do girls always ay. “Now this photo is terrible, hut as soon as I get some new ones taken. I'll send you one.” Why does teacher become »o suddenly sweet when mother visits school? Training school student. W hy does the mdn behind me at the theater always carry my hair-net out on his watch-chain? W hy docs Dr. Clow ask the hardest questions the last five minutes of class? W hy do girls no longer wear muffs? Why is the student who sits behind me in class permitted to kick my chair, jarring my whole spinal system? Why has Washington a birthday if he i» dead? Especially since we cannot celebrate it in this state any more with a school holiday . Why is it when you are in a special hurry almost late for school • the gates of the Soo I.ine always go down and a long freight passes? Why docs the fellow next to me at the movie in ist on introducing the characters in the cast? Why the signs, “Shoes Shined inside?” Why will a woman get on the scales, take off her coat and hat. and throw them across her arm? Why do the students sitting in the aisle seats in assembly always get there before you do when your seat is in the middle? “SHOPLIFTING.” In an engineering works a great ileal of pilfering had been done among the men. The proprietor spoke to the foreman, an Irishman, about the matter, telling him that if he had any suspicions he was to search the men before they left. One evening Pat had occasion to do this and while in the act of telling his men to take off their coats the proprietor appeared. “Well, Pat. what is missing now?” he asked. “A wheelbarrow, sir.” was his reply. THE AUTO-MECHANIC COURSE I’agc one hundred seventy eightBuilding a Nation or Why Postum is the National Joy Drink Meandering along. a il were, with m trusty Bonami of an evening, (the night being still young) our path was eirruitous; and our ohjeet even more uncertain than circuitous. Thus it came about in the dim workings of Fate, and the course of inhuman events, our circuitous course led us up a familiar byway, namely the old Algoma Indian Iruil (for fear I will reminisce I must hasten on.) But little do we know tan honest confession) whether an invisible beacon light held aloft hy Fate, or one of her henchman, was guiding us toward that Hall of Fame d‘Mortals. or whether the actual light it-elf was present in our mind's eye, leading us on; for as we slowly revolved into the sight of the school of sub-normals here shone a light. Tiny? Yes. hut oh so piercing, coming forth from four of the west-wing lower floor windows. We looked at each other, so distingui'hahlc in the darkness, and asked ourselves, “At night, a light?” But yes, twas night so, 'landing there in pensive mood, we evolved a plan. The light must he explained. »o hand in hand we lo!e our steps acros the campus, and together looked in one of the windows and shades of Diana, was it an explanation or an hallucination? For, gentle reader , over a laboratory desk, Bill Smith wa 'till at his daily labors. WRITTEN TO JANE RADFORD DURING HER SOJOURN IN THE HOSPITAL I'm in a 10 der mood today I feel poetic, 2 •I fun I'll just write down a --- And send it off 2 U. I'm sorry you've been 6 so long. Don't he disconsol 8 But hear your ills with 10 2 dc And they won't seem 2 gr 8. George 'ays my beauty intoxicate' him. I heard him say you were enough to drive a man to drink. Most things that are bought go to the buyer. Yes, all except coal; that goes to the cellar. A woman's first kiss may be attributed to childish curiosity; her second to misplaced confidence; the others are just downright carelessness. Jack: tat a formal): “Gee. I just discovered a patch in these trousers.” Jim: “Cheer up, just think how you'd feel if there were no patch there." IS PICKING UP! Page one hundred seventy-nine 1021-itft- Page one hundred eight)TDbe tslbilee ®wiver 1921 Page one hundred cighly-oncThat LaCrosse Goat It was a dark night in November. A group of girls were silently wending their way along Washington Street toward the depot. How strange, how peculiar indeed, that these girls usually so full of pep. were now so quiet and enshrouded in mystery. Sufficient to say that something of extraordinary moment was afoot. Think of it! Gan you imagine it! Until they reached the depot ami boarded the north-hound train, not a word was spoken! Then huddled together in a corner of the chair car. even amid the roar and shrieks of the locomotive, they communicated in whispers. “Sh!" whispered blue eyes, “here comes the porter; he looks dark and suspicious." “Porter nothing, what can that frican guess about us; let me finish my speech. Here's what we must do. Marly Below told me that I .a Crosse had a goat this year as well as last year. He said there was no necessity for its remaining at that institution any longer. So he asked me to get several of the G. A. A. girls together and go to La Crosse before the game, and bring it home with us. The goat is in their gymnasium. We must he very careful and take it unawares. We won't he stealing because it's hound to he ours in a few days anyway. We'll just he sort of an advance guard of old Oshkosh ami tie down the bacon beforehand. That's the purpose of our trip, girls." “Gee," said brown eyes, "glad it aren't me. I'm glad they gave this job to the G. . A. We ran do it all right." "You bet we can." said gray eyes. “Hurrah for Oshkosh. we want the goat!" “Hush." said the leader, “let’s settle down and he more quiet until our mission is accomplished.” Oh, yes, readers, “the cat is out of the hag!" The secret i« now told and this story joins the columns of history. The rest you can guess. The girls did not fail. The goat was kidnapped. lied, and transported to Oshkosh. You surely remember it in the assembly upon the rostrum! Enough has been said, so I'll end with this: Dedicated to Our Pet Goal Once there was a goat, ft resided in La Crosse. One day it came to Oshkosh The poor old thing got lost. Once there was a super school. It had a super team. But when it came to Oshkosh. The score was mighty lean. So listen to this woeful tale. But please do not forget That O. N. S. is some old school. And it’s keeping up its rep. 1921 Page one hundred eighty-twoLucile: Did you know that they are writing all jokes on tissue paper now? Kllen: No, why? Lucile: So Joe Cambier can see through them. AND THEY DO When we want something done. So that we ran have some fun. And we don’t know who on earth is going to do it We just sweep around the room. With our eyes no a broom. And we say “Oh, Ellen Due it. And she does. We were walking o’er the lea. When we eame upon a tree Right across our path—now who to get to move it? When we saw a tallish man And to him we swiftly ran. And we said, “Oh, Mr.—Hewitt!’ And he did. The difference between a knife losing it- temper and a woman losing her temper, is that the knife becomes dull and the woman more rutting. Ti . A.: How did tbc cavemen keep warm? Sarabel B.: I don’t know, how did they? Tiz: Don't you know? They used the mountain ranges of course. Vainly : Where have I seen your face before? Francis Hart: Right where you see it now. A SOFT ANSWER Whitey: “What would you do if you were in my shoes?” “Red” Fox: “I’d buy a pair about two sizes smaller." WORKING AN OLD CLAIM Dentist: “When did your teeth first «tart bothering you?” Flossie: “When I was cutting them.” I NEVER THOUGHT OF THAT Mr. Clow : “Can anyone tell me where the Declaration of Independence was signed?" M. Fickett: “At the bottom. ' THE RETORT COURTEOUS Irate Passenger: “Why don’t you put your foot where it belongs?" Tough (iuy : “If I did. you wouldn't sit down for a week.” HARD TO SAY Passenger: “What makes the train run so slow?" Irate Conductor: "If you don’t like it. you can get off and walk." Passenger: "I would, only I’m not expected until train time." = 1921= Page one hundred eighty-three1921 Page one hundred eighty-fourWe Nominate to the Hall of Fame “Fat Smith 11 » Because of the never-to-be-equalled line he hands out. 2 Because of his command of the English language. 13» Because of his ability to wear how-ties. Sarahel Beardmore l 1 i Because she learned to play the piano through a correspondence course in ninet days. 2 • Because she got out for basketball. l3» Because she wears a Sig. Alph. pin in a l si U. town. 14» Because she wore a new fur coat in school and got away with it. Josephine Camhier « 11 Because she accomplished the impossible for a teacher. 2 • Because she wrote lesson plans that Miss Stone did not murder. »3» Because she successfully survived the rides in the Omro ’bus. (4• Because of her ability to carry red roses around for a day without their willing. George Fenisyn 1 For his willingness to answer all questions. 12 • For his pugilistic tendencies. • 3» For his popularity with the girls. “Vandy • 1) Because of his wavy tresses. 2» Because of his successful correspondence with a girl who has never seen him. 3 Because he can kid more than one woman at a time. 4) Because his credit never fails. • 5) Because of his abstaining from danc- ing during Lent. Bea. Washburn 11t Because of her sense of humor. 2 Because of her corner on tains. • 4) Because of her championing the down-trodden sex. 1921 Page one hundred eighty-fivePage one hundred cighty-si-Their Favorite Songs Janie Skinner ................“I’ll lie There."' Dorothy Jackson ...............“Meet Me at the Station.” “Ollie” Davenport “0 Death Where is Thy Sting.” • after headache ........... Fat Smith ....................."The Wild. Wild Women." Dad Braishcr .................."Marjie. Hob Kolf.......................“O! Frenrhy, Frenchy.” Phoebe Lamport ................“Just Awearyin for You.” Jean Denis.....................“Kisses." Harold Maas ...................“Longing." Abe Wilncr .....................“Lonesome, That's AIL” Hob Webster....................“Bring Hack the Day .” Sidney Knutson ................“Ain't It Fierce to he so Brainy.” Laura Ihrig ...................“When Johnny Comes Marching Home." Helen Pickett .................“Waltz Me Around Again Willie." Obie Newman ...................“Carry Me Hack to 01" Virginity.” Waldo Krueger .................“Take Me to That Land of Jazz.” Mariel Swift ..................“I'm Old hut I'm Awfully Tough." Geneva Oium .....................“How'd You Like to Meet Me in the Land of Bliss?” Kathleen Doyle ................“Love Nest. Norma Perry ...................“Till the Sands of the Desert Grow Cold.” Grace Noirot ..................“Taxi.” Sapo Reid .....................“Reuben, Reuben." Esther Steude .................“O! Johnny, O! Johnny, O! ” Marguerite Fraedrick .............amp." Heacie Holland ................“I'm in Heaven When I'm in ?????". Katy Josslyn ..................“I’m a Jazz Baby." Mart Below ....................“O'Brien I'm Tryin' to Learn to Talk Hawaiian." Gladys Koeser .................“There are Blues.” Harold Thorpe .................“Slow and Easy. Ellen Due .....................“Watch. Wait and HOPE." Merle Rasmussen ...............“The Go Wild, Simp! Wild Over Me." Wilbur Martelle ...............“I Know I'll Get More Than My Share." “Wliitey” Solbraa ............."For Me and My Gal." Mary Scott ....................“All the Boys Love Mary." Earl Carey ....................“O! Mother I’m Getting Simply Wild.” Wally Fraedrick ...............“O! Marion!” Ray M rick ....................“In the Spring a Young Man's Fancy.” Fran. Clark ...................“Whispering.” Gilbert Hill ..................“For I’m a Member of the Cavalree.” “Enough of this foolishness, shouted the professor. “We shall now discuss some of the lower forms of life, beginning with Mr. Peterson.” “Are you trying to make a fool of me?” mildl inquired Mr. Peterson. “No." said the now humorous professor, “I never interfere with nature." Ex. The biology professor, who slipped, is now at Leavenworth studying cell structure. Even Rome toddled before its fall. “My dear. I’m so sorry I couldn’t see you when you called hut I was ju t ha ing my hair washed." “Yes, and the laundries arc so slow about returning things too." Page one hundred eighty-seven1921 Page one hundred eighty-eight1921 Page one hundred eighty-nineD . Q A TCJ Osrt foSH - 'STCv’trtfj Tj,n T yyA'rz o with hu oyr A. th nE QAT VYA3 AGtur TO STA fT -r mmiiiiiim '.'ii M .r ftm MUM '■' rr, 7 „„. Mr. Hewitt: "If they a«k your authority in this debate what are you going to say?” Hill Price: “I’ll -ay the authorise. for that statement are such prominent people as Pres- ident Wilson, Governor Lowden, and myself.” With all the dehates going on we feel it our duty to recommend this subject: Resolved, "That wood alcohol made the blind pip.” Abundance of material is to he had on both -ides. I had a light with her last night. She pot the best of me. She had me fipuriif how the deuce— She's right; hut she must be. She sure has got my number— Her answer’s always right; I’ll ne’er forget my tussel With algebra last night. A woman’s mind is like a little "Flivver" car; it will run up hill and down again: scurry around the corner of a subject, without upsetting her: dodge skilfully through a mass of masculine arguments: ami keep right on going interminably, on the weeniest hit of fuel. Ex. History Teacher: "Can you tell us something about the Iron Age?" Bright Student: “I'm a bit rusty on that subject." An unusual thing happened the other day. A man who lives in an apartment house was accused of being "crazy with the heat.” IT TOOK PLACE IN RUSSIA. K. Roberts: "Did you hear about the wooden wedding?” "Nope, who got married?” "Two Poles.” Prof: Gentlemen. I am dismissing you ten minutes early today. Please go out quietly so as not to wake the other classes. 1921 P ge one hundred ninctjUlbe jubilee Quiver THINGS WE NEVER SEE Margaret Fraedrick without her gum. Florence Donnelly without her grin. Frances Clark without her hat anil coat. Obie without his “Hi there!" Surahel without Bob. I.urillc .Nolle without a high collar. Louise Roewekanip without a fancy apron. Joe Camhier without her trunk. Kill Smith without his smock. Russell without Dorothy. 1st Finnegan with the other Finnegan. Prof. Hewitt without a story. Geneva without words of F.ilgar s. Jane Radford without a picture of “Inky." M iss Clausen without her eagle eye. McAndrew without a girl. Fat Smith without his line. Lower hall without laboratory zephyrs. Hallie Rice without her history. I’rof. Clow without his portfolio. Assembly with everyone there. Mrs. Mace with high heels. Miss Franchere with a grouch, liuhhcll with straight hair. Koh Kolf with a white shirt. Anyone anxious to go to school. Bea. Washburn taking a joke. Zua Dane walking home. Marl Below not reading a newspaper. Junior Co-Ed: “Why doesn’t Jack take you to the theater any more?" Frosh Co-Ed: “Well, you see, one night it rained and we couldn't go so we sat in the parlor. But anyway. I think theaters are an awful bore, don't you?" WHAT SAY!! “Oh. don't trouble to sec me to the door." “No trouble at all. It’s a pleasure." Agent: “I'd like to sell you a combination carpet sweeper, letter opener, cash receiver, and talking machine." Prospect: “Not a chance in the world. I'm married already." ENGLISH AS SHE IS SPOKE They were wending their way to Wood’s, the sweet young thing who was majoring in English and the Industrialite. “I think originality is one of the finest qualities a girl can pos-css. don't you?" he asked. “I'll tell the world I do!" she replied with emphasis. “It’s such a relief to find a girl who has ideas of her own and can express them." he went on. “You tell ’em," she acquiesed with conviction. "This is splendid music, isn't it?" he asked as they stepped off in the first fox-trot. “Pretty slick." she murmured as she turned her check to his and deposited several layers of powder on his tie. “Well, you can dance!” he added as the music stopped. "Now, don't kid the gold fish!" was her reply and it wasn't until the next morning that she wondered why he emphasized the word “dance." Just a little bluffing Lots of air quite hot. Makes a recitation. Seems like what it’s not. B: "Isn’t that man queer looking: lie has Pullman teeth." V: "What do you mean by Pullman teeth?" I): “One up|»er and one lower." Prof: “Is your mother wearing a fur coat?" Boy: “Yes." Prof: “Ami do you know what kind of an animal had to suffer so that your mother could wear that coal?" Boy : “Yes, my father." I’age one hundred ninety-one A.A SNttFS 1921 Petite one hundred ninety-twoPage one huntlri'd ninety-threePage one hundred nincty-fon SCANDAL SHEET Independence Day JUNE 8, 1921 Price One Man o’NVar VOL. 3. ONLY THIRD SPECIMEN IN CAPTIVITY. RAPIDLY BECOMING BESTINGUISHED. NO. 3. THE STAFF Editor-in-necd—FAX X Y FIX IT Editor-in-necd—DORIS BLAKE Artless ELLEN DO-LESS Hart-throbs FRANCIS HART PUBLISHED BY Thr Society for Prevention of Stale Joke . EDITORIAL The Uncs of thr Wunn . Normally speaking. have you ever stopped lo consider the importance of the present isness. The want ess of the past is always with us. thus the isness of the wasness comes to l»e an imiwrtant factor in our daily lives. There arc times, however, when the wasness of the isness is impressed upon our vacuumed heads, t ne of these times is when you have coaxed yourself into believing, all during the year, that you were going to graduate at the end of summer school, and then, you find that someone has taken some inky-raser and marked out about twenty of your credits. Then it's cither yours for the tall timbers or else another year to gather up your lost credits. ’ It is at a time like this that the isness of the wasness is converted into the wasness of isness. It all resolves itself into a brain storm which resembles the inside of an electric washing machine. In closing I can but say: I used to think I knew I knew. Hut now I must confess The more I know I know I know I know I know the less. Daily Sorthwettern: Two Oshkosh young ladies, who gave their names as II. Holland and Ellen Due. were arrested last night. They were charged with carrying STL XX INC handkerchiefs, equal to the rocks in any stone pile back of world-famed work houses. NORMAL DAILY PROGRAM Oh I How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning—Everybody. Reading Better Late than Xevcr Miss Emily Webster. Instrumental Selection. Wedding Hells -William Stcgeman. Male LJuartctte — We Won’t be Home l.'ntil Morning— Sherburne Morgan. John I cquainc. Clifford Harnard. Liwrcncc Halverson. Lecture—Docs Butterfly?— Dr. Hob Harmon. Interpretive Dance -Storm Kings Prof. Joseph Rcbartzhck Prof. John Gryskow Sob Story My Brow is Getting Nobler Every Day -Monsieur Warner J. Geiger Spencer Weekly Clarion: The Misses Helen and Merle Pickett. Lucille Graves. Marion Me-Yean. Jean I’arcttc are still attending O. X. S. Contrary to all of our expectations, none of them have been expelled yet. Omro bulletin: Beg Your Pardon. The announcement in last week's i»| cr concerning the engagements of Miss Merle Rasmussen wav a misprint. Mr. James Polomis sang a solo magnificent, entitled "When My Shoes Wear Out I’ll lie on My Feet Again.” at the annual banquet of the Fox River Valley Shoemakers. Eureka Chronicle: Our fellow townsman. Karl ('. Carey, sang "She May Linger, but I'll Xail Her in the End,' at the annual meeting of Wisconsin Associations of Undertakers. Chicago Daily Tribune: Oshkosh, a city famous for its ability to rhyme with H’Gosli. is coming to the fore. Our sjiorting editor. Doris Blake, tell us that they have the state championship in basketball and footlall. O. S. Advance: The O. X. S. Advance take great pleasure in announcing the approaching funeral of Miss Josephine Cambier and Mr. George Kollos-son. The | all-bcarcrs have not been named a yet. Mcddc! some's funeral march will be chanted timing the ceremonies. Menasha bugle: The Menasha Prom is over. Among the noted gue ts this year was Miss Carolyn Wcismiller of Oshkosh. Miss 'Wcismiller was the geest of Mr. Al. Grove. She was attired in a jade gown with pink ict I cads anti irredeseent shoulder straps. The Prom was a decided success this year. Fond da Lac Reporter: Fondy’s representative citizens, who are attending the O. X. S., are accrediting themselves with honor. Contrary to the fear of the local high school. .Marge Coyne avoided the rocky shoal of Chemistry. The Finnegan girls cxjiect to return. Their record is much better than was exacted. I'au Dyne Newt: At the election last week, our fellow townsman. Bob Kolf. received the highest number of votes for Mayor. This S nicc Rrscrvci for Downey's Picture Hut li e Inti Xo Kti! Ink. Docks is gaming experience in girls, while at Normal. He is. in-Seed, a Normal Rummyco. How about it. Helen? Laura? Marion? etc., etc., etc.? Page one hundred ninety-fiveSoon 4 HV pivriCUB fir THe. Pootuhoose T |£5, i'll B£ W UL-F aP' E-p£l 0, , -THAT CASH- Turtt- ,l oU WluLSoow' K. pAifje " C.T?4sHI-ei6rf - W Ca THE'f f=AU- 'TrHEM?" I’ajfc one hundred ninety-sixI’src one hundred ninety-sevenPage one hundred ninety-eight®lr Cjwnfe |)ou ©ur asbrrtuins tobo baue maOe tbis 'Jubilee (Eutbcr possible bp pour co-operationJUBILEE QUIVER 5amtt Photos Win by Comparison The Popular Studio for Norma lites Garrett Studio 1HO MAIN STREET TELEPHONE 1624 Oshkosh, WisconsinJUBILEE QUIVER The Rex Built up to a Standard Not Down to a Price Better Photoplays Attractive Short Subjects ami Comedies BEST CONCERT ORCHESTRA IN THE MIDDLE WEST Dorm’s Demon Doers SEPTEMBER 13. School start? Mr. Briggs makes first cut on our hank accounts. 14. Much green in evidence. 15. Everyone goes to classes, hut no one works. 16. Normal Couplets formed. 17. Many callers at Dormitory—including Erl. Tesch. 20. History assignments get down to old standard 50 pages. Success Comes in Cans; Failure in Caul'sJUBILEE QUIVER Always at Your Service Good Clothes are an asset and investment that always satisfy the wearer SINCERITY AND FIT-FORM are good through and through FURNISHINGS, HATS AND CAPS 114 MAIN STRBBT 21. Danre coming— be Her fintl a girl. 21. Faculty Reception everybody meet everybody. 27. Football squad begins to work. 28. Rumors of revival of school spirit. 29. Societies begin •‘rushing." Also individuals. 30. Fun at Normal Juniors forget to be homesick. OCTOBER I. Instructors decide to give lectures on “How to Study." 4. Advance in full swing. 8. Pep meeting—everybody’s going to Ripon. 9. Big football victory, Oshkosh 9, Ripon 0. Green raps missing. II. Football team is planning to get State Championship. 15. Platteville (same 0-0. (7. A. A. Dancing Party. 18. Football men come back on crutches. 19. Finnegan Twins take post in lower corridor. 20. Finnegans on duty with reinforcements. 21. Marquette Reception. Who washed the plates? 22. Whitewater swamped. 21-0. 26. Get your Jack o Lantern for Hallowe'en Dance. 27. Aletbean-Pbilakean Dance. 28. Milwaukee tomorrow everybody out. 29. Oshkosh 19. Milwaukee 0. Hallowe'en Danre. It never rains but it pours. THE HOTEL ATHEARN BARBER SHOP The Largest and Most Modern Equipped Shop in the City SIX CHAIR SHOP Try Morse Scalp Cream for Dandruff and Falling Hair BONCILLA FACIAL TREATMENT The Best Shoe Shiner in the City. Al, the Shine ArtistJUBILEE QUIVER THE BUCKSTAFF COMPANY Oshkosh, Wisconsin THE QUALITY KIND Chairs, Rockers, and Caskets And when your school days are past, and your thoughts turn to “home”—The “dream of youth”—“Come Over to Our House” and select Leath Beauty Furniture. A. LEATH COMPANY MAX-ROYAL QUALITY THE R. McMillen Co. Manufacturers of Hardwood Veneered Doors OSHKOSH. WISCONSIN For Tricks, Puzzles, Jokes and anything in the Amusement Line, Try Oaks Magical Co. 269 Main Street Send 10 cents, coin or stamps, for large illustrated catalogue For Your New Suit or Overcoat See Carl F. Fischer TAILOR Corner Ninth and Oregon Streets F. E. ELSER Millinery 209 Main Street Phone 2084 Exclusive Patterns Popular Prices II. E. SCHUELKE CUSTOM TAILOR Phone IM6 Othko.h, Wis. 12 W«u(oo Sr. Did it ever strike you that one mouth and two ears were ffiven you with a purpose?JUBILEE QUIVER THE HENDERSON-HOYT CO. “Betty Wales” Dresses Are Girlish— Stylish— Beautifully made—and most appropriate for all Normal School festivities as well as good servicable wear. They are here only, in Oshkosh — Apparel 2nd lloor THE MOTOR THAT WILL INCREASE THE PLEASURES OF YOUR BOATING Uuiveritnl MotorN nre nurd in kontN up (o BO fpet SEND FOR BULLETIN NO. » UNIVERSAL MOTOR COMPANY Oahkoeh. Wiaron.in FRANKLIN COLE DODGE BROS. MOTOR GARS Bloch Hebblewhite GROCERS I'or Quality Service and Vegetables in season '"•HENDERSON-HOYT"' Oshkosh, Wisconsin 17 AI go ms StreetJUBILEE QUIVER Ruby’s Rippling Rillers Perhaps Rodin’s “Thinker ” Had it A ll Thought Out —lhal il was just a well to go without rlothes a to wear poor ones. Fine thought even now for if we do say it ourselve with a seemingly ulterior motive this season' market is flooded with auits that you wouldn't wear if you could see them after tuo weeks’ wear. Honest. You want good material ami workmanship ami that kind ran not he bought and will not he sold this season at $20 and $22. We My pay $35 because at this figure and up we are showing enormous values in the kind of garments that make real friends. ON DISPLAY Hart Sehaffner Marx Suits—$40, $45, $50 Chat. K. Manaptr CONTINENTAL Special Suits $35, $10. $45JUBILEE QU1VE R NOVEMBER 1. Engineer go to Xcenah to build paper mill. 2. Second string men lose {tame, etc., at St. Norbert's, 6-0. 3. You're fired!- Engineer- return from Necnah. 4. Kuniee has her hair bohhed she will he aide to make a 7:55 now. 5. Teacher ' convention May they meet again! jewman’s STYLE = CLOTHES for SummerJUBILEE QUIVER Better Pictures «OTTO’S NEW STUDIO 67H MAIN STREET Phone 982 MORGAN COMPANY OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN The majority of the manual training schools of the state are using Morgan Kiln Dried Lumber for their Manual training work. ARCADE BILLIARD ROOM The Most Popular Place in Oshkosh RETURNS OF ALL SPORTING RECEIVED BY WIRE Malted Milk and Ice Cream a Specialty “Students’ Headquarters” SAM KINGSLEY HUB RYAN. PROPRIETORSJUBILEE QUIVER We Serve You Better We Charge You Less J. C. PENNEY CO., Inc. A CHAIN OF 312 DEPARTMENT STORES Carrying a Complete line of Dry Goods, Ladies’ Ready-to-Wear, Shoes and Men’s Clothing. 8. Hack again. Exams just around the corner. 9. Worried expressions in evidence. 10. The zero hour no one in sight. 11. We came out from under. Did you gel hy? 12. La Crosse goal added lo our Menagerie. I. A. S. Dance. 15. Second quarter. Most of us start with a handicap. 16. Marks are posted in the office—be sure you look at your own only. 17. Queer smells emanate from Client. I.ah. 18. Queer expressions on people who emanate from Pres. Brown's office. Line forms on right. 19. Seniors begin to worry about Quiver Officers. 23. President Brown re-dreams about the future Normal. 21. Many were the sad farewells. 25. Vacation- Big Turkey Dinners. 29. The coon on Milwaukee's Team proved too much. 30. Everybody back, and full of pep. DECEMBER 1. Francis Hart quits school 10:10 a. m.—returns to school 4:00 p. m, 3. Victory Dance in honor of Football men. 6. Faina Scott and Jimmie Powell seen walking down Ylgoma Street. 8, Coach Dillon leaves. 10. Balcony counting up profits to sec whether they can afford big ad for Quiver. 13. Schroeder does likewise. 14. Quiver Staff chosen. 15. Basketball outlook good. 16. Y. W. Y. M. C. A. Xmas Party. 17. School closes for Christmas vacation.JUBILEE QUIVER Start a Bank Account A bank account is an important factor in your commercial education. Start one today with this strong progressive bank. The advice and counsel of its trained officers are always at your disposal. The Old-Commercial National Hank THE BANK NEXT TO THE POST OFFICE CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $800,000.00 O.kU.h, Wi.ron.in Bouck, Hilton, Kluwin Dempsey ATTORNEYS HART W. HEISS Maniticrr Department of Collection American Bank Building Oshkosh, Wisconsin “Economy is wealth” we are told, but most of us prefer to get rich some other wayJUBILEE QUIVER Guns, Ammunition, Fishing Tackle, Base Ball and Foot Ball Supplies, Golf and Tennis Goods. Thermos and Ferrostat Bottles, Pocket Cutlery, Playing Cards, and General Sporting Goods DUNHAM-FULTON GUN COMPANY 37 Main Street JANUARY 3. Joe C. conies hack to school with a diamond ring everybody envious. 5. Many more Xma.' gifts appear. 6. Claire Darton gained three pounds during vacation. 7. Miss Milne's wedding on Christmas is a surprise. 10. Oshkosh wins over Appleton Paper Mills in basketball. 36 16. 12. Special Assembly to create interest in debate. Mr. Hewitt issues annual call. 14. Current History Club holds luncheon. 18. Mr. Karnes sings “Lucky Jim in assembly. 19. Ed. Fdick wears his new green checkered shirt. Santa brought it. 20. Romeo begins work on Quiver. 21. Miss Johnston visits Omro teachers. 24. Grace Noirot turns in 17 pages of jokes for Advance. 23. Quiver staff worrying about the high cost of QUIVERING. 26. "Play the game if it is only croquet apologies to the Advance. 27. Cram! EXAMS! I flunk! 28. Semester ends. Miss Roberts leaves for work in Indianapolis. 31. Second semester- heavy casualties. FEBRUARY 1. Quiver staff again selling tickets. 2. "The Thief" Quiver Movie Benefit. 3. Everybody excused to attend matinee except those who went before. 4. 0. N. S. beats up the Point, 32-8. W. S. PATTERSON COMPANY Heating Engineers and Contractors 28 Waujtoo Street Phone 254JUBILEE O UI V ER Friendship’s Perfect Gift YOUR PHOTOGRAPH MATHIEU STUDIO 36 High Street Phone 359 Model Troy Laundry 335 Main Street Phone 392 Down Town Office, If) Waugoo Street Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repair Work CAMPBELL LABORATORIES X-RAY ELECTRICAL CHEMICAL Orpheum Theatre Kid . Phone 46S9-W OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN A fully equipped X-Ray and Electro-Therapeutical Laboratory. If your physician advises X-Ray diagnosis. P3lcctro or X-Ray Therapy, it is the work of this laboratory to co-opcratc with him. Chemical analyses and Microscopical examinations. Donald B. Campbell. Roentgenologist Individual Family Washing and Damp Washing THE MILES COMPANY Patronize 20 Washington Street QUIVER MASTER FLORISTS Advertiser Everything in Flowers Member of the F'lorist’s Telegraph Delivery IIAU RV J. AAV K WHOLESALE QUALITY CANDIES 806-808 South Mein Street Featuring Bunte Diana Confections MYTY GOODS MAN O’WAR If It's Quality, Have ItJUBILEE QUIVER Thews Thirsty Thirty Many people gel plenty of exercise from patting themselves on the backJUBILEE Q U I V E R Real Estate We consider it a privilege to give advice and assistance to anyone contemplating purchase of property in Oshkosh. This service is absolutely free. It is certain to save you some money, and may save you from serious mistake. We act as agents and general trustees in the purchase, sale, care and management of all classes of property for residents, non-residents, corporations and estates. Crane Chase EDWARD M. CRANE, Licensed Real Estate Broker and Insurance Agent. 135 Main Street Over Baumans' Drug Store REMEMBER When YOU’VE finished school and taken on thut Job, that “OSHKOSH” has a real OFFICE SUPPLY HOUSE and arc always Rind to serve you. OSHKOSH OFFICE SUPPLY CO. 156 Main Si red STRONGE WARNER CO. 76-7N Main Sired NEW SUMMER MILLINERY A large variety of Quaint Styles — Pretty Colors at Low Prices BE SURE TO SEE OUR I.INF. BEFORE BUYING YOUR NEXT HAT Tailorgram You may know about woolens to judRe our fabrics, or'ubout tuilorinR to judRe our workmanship, and yet, the fact that we are tailors to the best dressers in Oshkosh, is worth some of your attention. McCullough - fisher co. TAILORS AND SHIRT MAKERS 158 Main Street HFNRY SCHROTTKY THE CYCLE MAN ■- Dealer In BICYCLES, MOTORCYCLES, GAS SUPPLIES AND SUNDRIES RcpairinR Motorcycles. Bicycles, TnlkinR Machines, Locks and Keys Cast Iron Welding a Specialty 12 Merrill Sired Telephone 2051 OSHKOSH. WISCONSIN Seal of Minnesota Flour POWERS PATTERSON Dinlribulora 24 Wautoo Sired Oshkosh, Wisconsin A true pessimist is one who wishes Adam had died a bachelor.JUBILEE QUIVER Students: you are getting an education to fit you for the duties of life. BUT are you learning that most important of all things, without which, regardless of all else you may learn, you will be a failure? ARK YOU LEARNING TO SAVE? If not, enroll with us, for you cannot be a success without it. THE NEW AMERICAN BANK OSHKOSH WISCONSIN A HANK FOR ALL THE PEOPLE 7. Lucille. Mary, ami W aldo lake place of Gladys Joe, ami Jimmie at Omro. 8. Jean seen with a dark romplexioned young man. 9. John I.. ha a date with Esther S. 10. Quiver begin agitating for glo prints hair dressers make lots of money. 11. Member of Biryrle Brigard “shine up their machines. 15. President Brown gives us great hope for a longer Kaster vacation. It’s nice to have something coming. 16. A la Mode begins tearing their hair. 21. Jimmie Mitchell gets zero in French Cheer up. Jimmie, you'll get used to them soon. 22. Washington's Birthday—No school Cast for pla still at it. 23. Lucille almost misses Omro car- Morning after the night before. 24. Macbeth a la Mode Everyone makes a hit. 25. Whitewater wiped off the map. 26. Marquette cancels game. Why??? MARCH 1. Commencement speakers announced in assembly Congratulations. 2. Everybody works—even the faculty! 3. Debate won at O. N. S. 7. Girls Basketball Tournament begins. 8. Buskethall in the air No studying. 10. High School Tournament begin Whitney dusts off his big megaphone. 11. Classes cut Everybody goes to the tournament. 12. BIG GAME! Score cards sell like hotrakes. 11. Voices lost—marks, too. 15. Quiver staff sell tickets for recital. 16. Miss Franchere gives a violin recital for the Quiver benefit. 17. Extension course students visit training school Wearing of the green.J U BIL L E QUIVER N. C. WERBKE Prescription Druggist Corner 8th und Oregon Streets Phone 123 Your Patronage is Appreciated FOR FUEL SEE South Side Wood Coal Co. Phone 21 821 Sixth Street Oshkosh, Wis. Oaks’ Confections and Ice Cream We invite you all to our new lee Cream Parlor ami assure you the best of quality ami service romhincil. OAKS CANDY COMPANY Opposite PostolTiee. THE OSHKOSH SHOE HOSPITAL K LEI ST ACKERMAN 5 Ugoma Street Next to George’s Hat Shop WE CALL AND DELIVER Phone 1216 The College Pump Here's a high quality line huilt especially for the College student to give the longest wear, the utmost style and solid comfort. Ask to see this and the many other number . O. A. HAASE 63 Main Street Oshkosh, Wis. Wisconsin's Largest Shoe Store Drink Ruby Rill IT FILLS THE BILL ON TOP, AT Carver’s Ice Cream BRICK OR BULK Schroeder’s Pharmacy The A. D. S. Store V Insist on Carver’s at Your DealersJUBILEE QUI V E HJUBILEE QUIVER 18. Butler wins Inter-Normal contest at Plalleville Good work. 21. Sniffle—Spring lias come—Sniffle. 22. Whitney ami Ilutler tell us how they did it—Both of them pass the buck. 23. Sleeping sickness hit O. V S. Prognosis doubtful. 24. Full attendance required No more pre-vacation cuts. 25-28. Vacation colored egg colored hat it was a great parade. 29. Days are getting longer funds, etc., getting shorter. 31. Webb-Hernard concert in auditorium— It's more blessed to give than to receive.—Karnes. I. April Fool Got fooled?? Phocnix-Lyceum Dance. I. Third down Nine weeks to go. Track-men out. 5. Karnes' “Gas Hater" takes Shrum's Grease Gups to the I Wheel Drive Plant. 6. Qualitative analysis class scores new song hit—"When you get what you got, you ain’t got it.” 7. Dr. Clow lets up on assignments Only 500 pages for Friday. 8. Fancy-dress Parl "Where’d you get them shoes?” II. Joe Devine begins eating at home. Baseball men out. 12. Decorum in assembly is called for We must preserve order. THE OSHKOSH TRUNK COMPANY APRIL Before you're fired, yet fired with enthusiasmJUBILEE QUIVER GEO. J. SMITH CO. Fine Furniture V These Popular Watches $12.50 to $250.00 55 AND 57 MAIN STREET ANGER’S 13. Kenny ha picked all of last year's hairpins off the tennis courts. Code of behavior for Normal Social events published by our Social Life Committee in the Advance. 14. Holy Roller become an attraction Harve Pugh has a date. 15. Sun Hop Some have a touch of sun: the rest are full of hop. 18. O. Davenport reports for practice-teaching. 19. I)onnell Hart combination substituted for some time-worn combinations. 21. Wisconsin Glee Club sings this evening. 22. Trackmen just one jump ahead of Camels. 25. Fair and warmer. 27. O. B. Newman has a birthday. 28. More rain Mr. Hewitt animadversifies Big protest parade. 29. Bertha Weber dances at the sun hop -Student Council formed. MAY 2. Mitchell forgot to spring a joke in rlass. 3. Y’olez—vous promenade, Madamoiselle? 4. Bright spots appear on the campus dandelions and Normalitc . 5. Embryo chemists depart for Iron Range. 6. Art Docka claims tennis championship in singles. Leister contests claim. 9. Kind hearted teachers hold classes on campus there were no classes outside. Compliments to the NORMAL SCHOOL Percey Fur House If the price of paper goes any higher, they arc going to make shoes out of leather againJUBILEE QUIVER Paine Lumber Company, Ltd. OSHKOSH. WISCONSIN Established 1853 MANUFACTURING WOODWORKERS Saw Mill—Sash and Door Factory Veneer Mill -Box Factory DOHERTY RICE LEADING LADY HATTERS AND DISTRIBUTORS OF SMART MILLINERY Our Trimmed Hats are noted for their original designs, and we Specialize in Trimmed Hats PRICES: $5.00 to $25.00 LADIES' HATTERS Telephone 625 119 Main St. State Exchange Bank The Friendly Bank STRONG PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE Large enough to accommodate you Not too large to appreciate you. We welcome your account. Halrmig Jr? (Errant Parlor Corner Jackson and Irving St. THE HOME OF THE STUDENTS We have remodeled our place and are now prepared to give you the best service as fast as you come—SO come on. FOR BETTER RESULTS PLANT OSHKOSH SEED COMPANY’S GARDEN. FIELD AND FLOWER SEEDS OSHKOSH. WISCONSIN THE PLYMOUTH PRESS GOOD PRINTING As you want it—When you want it 189 Franklin Ave. Oshkosh, Wis. G. L. LUSCHER Insurance and Loans Fire, Tornado and Accident Insurance written -Money loaned on Real Estate. Security at current rates of interest with pre-payment privileges. 74 Main Street Over Penney Store When an anarchist yets into trouble, he immediately appeals to the lawJ U BIL L E QUIVER 1K5 Main Street vmieu_, Maker of FINE FURS Oshkosh. Wisconsin Marsh’s Meat Masticators 10. Helen Horen has special topic for Assembly “My Recent Trip to Manitowoc." 11. Florence Donnell) roller katc! to school. Hart pick her up when .'he falls. 12. I.atlirop feverishly preparing his speech. INCORPORATED TELEPHONE 1956 47 MAIN STREET THE HOME OE GOOD SHOES Oshkosh, WisconsinJUBILEE QUIVER £fl5tte !erce printing Company 25-27 High Street .... Oshkosh, Wisconsin FUNDAMENTALLY type was made to invite and make reading an easy and pleasant task, and I do not think that enough attention is paid to this idea. Simplicity, which makes reading easy, is what we should strive for in advertising, or in the printed word for whatever purpose it is issued. Tell the truth about your article in an entertaining manner, and print it so it is sufficiently attractive in its clearness and simple beauty, and you will have your message read. e e bartlett Ask for Specimens of Our WorkJUBILEE QUIVER It’s We-For-9-Won 13. Marquette Party—Normalite are learning to waltz under guidance of Social Life. 17. Mr. Frank springs an exam. 18. Industrial Boat Ride—Big Time. 19. I. A. S. recovering. 20. Quiver distributed. Got Your’s Autographed? 23. Two more week to go. 24. Cram-------Bang!! 25. Chemistry lab work overtime. Imperially Schrader-Behrend Co. 26. Parking begins. 27. President Brown trims bis goatee in anticipation of commencement exercises. Remember Our ( Advertisers GIANT GRIP MANUFACTURING CO. Formerly CHALLONER COMPANY Established 1863 Manufacture™ of Giant Grip Traction F.quipmcnt For Motor Trucks Giant Grip Products H. B. OSGOOD, Manager OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN Giant Grip Original Drive Calks and Horse ShoesJUBILEE QUIVER We Think the makers of the Co-Ed Dresses have come nearest to truly interpreting the style demand of the American College girl and the vast multitude of her small-figured sisters who want simplicity blended with an original daring dash that up to the present writing Parisian designers have failed to understand. • We have been appointed as Co-Ed representative for this locality. iFrank $c (En. HI Uluru's tOrar 137 139 141 Iflain fctrrrl Ulahkunlt. lUiBfoimin 28. Junior hoatride. 30. Memorial Day— All student in mourning. 31. Exam . All is lost. JUNE I. Campus day. 8. Graduation. 9. Home. Janie . LOOK, MEN! New Summer Shirts New Summer Caps The New Low Collars New Summer Hosiery Will be found here A. A. EHRMANN 133 Main Street Oshkosh Optical House Geo. W. Johnson REGISTERED OPTOMETRIST Eye Examined Glasses Fitted Broken .eases Duplicated The Florist says, “Say it With Flowers.” We say, “Say it With Glasses.” 16 Washington St. Opposite Postoffice I’honc 1916—Oshkosh, Wi .Autographs


Suggestions in the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) collection:

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Oshkosh - Quiver Yearbook (Oshkosh, WI) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

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