University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI)

 - Class of 1936

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University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 178 of the 1936 volume:

HELEN COHEN, Editor ELVERA DAUL, Associate Editor MARVELLA STUBBE, Assistant Editor HAROLD BAHLKE, Advertising Manager ROALD AGER, Circulation ManagerThe Periscope Annual Publication of the Eau Claire State Teachers' College. Vol. 20, 1936 TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY EAU CLAIRE STATE TEACHERS’ COLLEGE, 1916-1936EAU CLAIRE STATE TEACHERS’ COLLEGE ESTABLISHED BY ACT OF THF. WISCONSIN LEGISLATURE 1909 OPENED ITS DOORS TO STUDENTS IN SEPTEMBER 1916 TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 1916-1936Twentieth Anniversary 1916-1936 In 1909, partly through the efforts of Mr. Emmet Horan. Eau Claire’s representative on the State Board of Normal School Regents, the ninth Wisconsin Normal School was established at Eau Claire. The first session, a Summer School, was conducted during the summer of 1916, the old Senior High School, which is now the Junior High School, being used, as the present college building was not complete. The regular school term of Wisconsin’s ninth Normal School opened in September, 1916 in the building still occupied. Now, after twenty years, eight teachers of the original faculty of twenty-four are still here. A few changes have been made in their original teaching assignments, but for the most part each is teaching his original work. The eight are as follows: H. A. Schofield, President since the school was started; C. J. Brewer, Principal of the Training School and also Vice President the entire twenty years; Katherine Thomas, critic for the seventh and eighth grades at first, and now Junior High School critic; A. J. Fox, Manual Training instructor at first, and now of the Education Department; B. W. Bridgman, Physics and Chemistry at first, and of the Physics Department now; George L. Simpson, Athletics coach and Geography instructor at first, and now Geography and Physiography; Hilda Belle Oxby, instructor in German and Latin then, and now English and German instructor; Blanche James, Mathematics instructor both then and now. The Periscope staff has chosen as an appropriate theme for its book this year the commemoration of the twentieth anniversary of the school. In recognition of and appreciation for the unselfish work and sincere interest and co-operation shown by them, the staff therefore dedicates the 1936 Periscope to the eight members of the original faculty who are still here, and who have worked so earnestly for the best interests of this institution.HARVEY A. SCHOFIELD, PH. B. PRESIDENT APPOINTED HEAD EAU CLAIRE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 1916 HAS SERVED CONTINUOUSLY SINCE THEN AS PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 1916-1936The College 1916- 1936 The Eau Claire State Teachers’ College has passed through several stages in its development to its present position. The school was started in 1916 as the youngest of the nine Wisconsin Normal Schools. At first, in common with the other Wisconsin Normal Schools, our institution offered the one-year certificate and the two-year and three-year diploma courses. In 1926, by an act of the legislature, all of the Normal Schools in Wisconsin were made State Teachers’ Colleges with full collegiate rank and the authority to grant the degree of Bachelor of Education. Until 1934, the only four-year course offered, and, therefore, the only one leading to a degree, was the High School Teachers’ course. In that year the minimum training of rural school teachers was increased to two years, and of grammar and primary grades teachers to three years. Also, in 1934, four-year courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Education in Elementary Education were organized so that one may take either a three-year elementary course or a four-year course leading to the Bachelor of Education degree. These steps in the development of the present Eau Claire State Teachers’ College program have been common to all Wisconsin Teachers’ Colleges, each in keeping with educational progress throughout the country. This college is like the other Teachers’ Colleges of Wisconsin except that wc train teachers for only the regular school subjects, whereas some of the others specialize. When the leading Teachers’ Colleges of the United States decided, a few years ago, to form the American Association of Teachers’ Colleges and make the organization an accrediting agency, Eau Claire became a charter member. Since then, the ever higher standards of the association have consistently been met by this college.CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL MADISON History and Athletics 1904-1905 NEI.SON DEWEY HIGH SCHOOL SUPERIOR The Principal 1909-1910 Some Minnesota and Wisconsin High Schools in which President Schofield was a teacher or of which he was the Principal before coming to the Eau Claire State Teachers' College in 1916.CENTRAL. HIGH SCHOOL SUPERIOR The Principal 1910-1913 CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL ST. PAUL The Principal 1913-1916 Some Minnesota and Wisconsin High Schools in which President Schofield was a teacher or of which he was the Principal before coming to the Eau Claire State Teachers' College in 1916.Little Niagara Little Niagara, the falls shown in the foreground of the accompanying picture, is a favorite haunt of the students in the Spring and Summer. Many improvements have been made in this vicinity in the last few years, including a new bridge across the creek and a birdie path that leads up over the bluff, which is seen in the background. Little Niagara is the most notable, historically, of places on or near the campus. In the early years of the nineteenth century, the creek of which the falls are the terminus, was made a part of the boundary line between the Chippewa and Sioux hunting grounds; that is, a line following the creek and extending northwest from the falls was made the boundary. This line was fixed at a peace conference held at Fort Prairie du Chicn. The resulting treaty was signed by Sioux and Chippewa chieftains, and United States army officers then stationed at the fort. There is also a well-authenticated story to the effect that a certain Lieutenant Davis, then at Fort Prairie du Chien, came with a detachment of soldiers up the Mississippi and the Chippewa to Little Niagara Creek to cut timber, in what is now Putnam Park, for the fort. Lieutenant Davis, the young army officer, years later became President Jefferson C. Davis of the Confederate States of America. Driveway and Building This is an unusual view of the Garfield Avenue drive and east entrance to the building. In the background, the smoke-stack of the college heating plant may be seen. There is a most interesting tunnel connecting the furnace room with the building proper. Some of the trees in this picture were planted by graduating classes. Campus Lawn The campus was literally a blaze of glory when school opened last Fall. Beds of autumn blooming flowers lined the walks, reds and blues predominating. This view shows the front campus, which overlooks the entrance to beautiful Putnam Drive, and the Chippewa River. Some of the trees shown in the picture were planted by classes of bygone years. Campus ScenesMain Entrance Campus Scenes This picture shows the front entrance to the building and the walk leading to Garfield Avenue. When the mountain ash in front of the building is covered in Autumn with bright red berries, it is one of the prettiest sights on the campus. The position of the young lady at the center window is one very popular with some students. The beauty of the campus has been enhanced greatly during the past year by the work done on it. Little Niagara Creek has been straightened, rough spots have been graded, and the main building repaired and otherwise renovated. Football Field Last Summer, the football field was vastly improved at the expense of the Government. The flowers in the foreground arc also recent acquisitions. In the left center, the broadcasting tower may lx seen. Broadcasts of the games are no longer provided, however, because of the discontinuation of station WTAQ. In the background is the ridge behind Putnam Drive. The field has an excellent cinder track and is well sodded, in marked contrast to its condition when first laid out a few years ago. Putnam Drive Bridge This graceful little white bridge over the creek is situated in one of the loveliest spots near the college. On the right, a rustic path leading to Little Niagara follows the creek. Putnam Drive crosses the bridge and then turns to the left, to continue along below the Ridge. The bridge is not infrequently inspected in summer by students who are seeking surcease from the pains of too strenuous study.The Faculty Bearers of light, Guides of that vast potentiality Called Youth, Light well the path. Illumine nays Where halting footsteps pass— Uncertain, wavering, And afraid. Diffuse the light The mighty glow of which Was once only a flickering torch, Gripped in the teacher hand of him Who walked through tunneled walls, Amid the darkness, With momentary glimpses of the truth. Seeking a heritage For unborn man. TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 1916-1936CHARLES J. BREWER, B. ED. VICE PRESIDENT. PRINCIPAL OF TRAINING SCHOOL CHOSEN AS PRINCIPAL OF THE TRAINING SCHOOL 1916 BECAME VICE PRESIDENT EAU CLAIRE TEACHERS COLLEGE 1916 FACULTY State Teachers College Education The purpose of the Education Department is two-fold: to offer courses in Education and to provide supervised practice teaching in the Training School. The course of study therefore has been planned to begin with courses in the basic principles of Education in all its aspects, to lie followed by courses in the technique of teaching and special methods in the various subjects. Basic courses are History of Education, General Principles of Education and courses in Educational Psychology. Following this group of basic courses arc Technique of Teaching, Tests and Measurements, School Administration and Statistical Methods in Education. To round out this work, one year of practice teaching is required of all Seniors. Mr. Brewer, Mr. Fox, Mr. Donaldson, and the Training School critics are the instructors. English In addition to the basic two-semester English courses given by Muss Oxby, Miss Hansen, and Miss Macdonald and required of all students, the work of the English Department covers various fields: speech, dramatics, and a wide range of literature. Dr. Davenport has charge of dramatics and is a coworker with Mr. Donaldson in declamation, extempore speaking, reading, and oratory. Mr. Murray teaches literature and directs the publication of both the Periscope and the Spectator. He also conducts classes in English Methods. The Teacher-librarian course is given by Miss Buchholz, head librarian, and her assistants, Mrs. Thompson and Miss Miller. Sociology Sociology is designed to give the student orientation in the social sciences and a working system of thought about society. Social Problems, a more advanced course, is an intensive study of problems of American society. Rural Sociology, required of Rural Course students, is similar to the regular sociology course, but stress is placed upon rural dwellers and their problems. Dr. Schneider teaches Sociology and Social Problems, and Mr. Hornback, Rural Sociology- History The History Department has a double aim: to teach History for the students’ personal development, and to prepare students to teach History. New survey courses in History have been added this year to keep up with the modern trend and to give students, even those who are not majoring or minoring in History, a broader historical view. In order to achieve the above aim, courses in English History, United States History, Modern History, Wisconsin History, Greek Civilization, Roman Civilization, Medieval Civilization, Survey of Ancient and Medieval History, and History Methods arc offered. Miss Sutherland, Dr. Schneider, and Miss Vine Miller teach most of the History courses. Page FourteenState Teachers College Political Science, Economics The two foundation courses in Political Science arc Wisconsin Government, a study of the governmental units within the state, and American Government, a study of the foundation and principles of our national government and its relation to the states. More specialized subjects offered arc Comparative Government, American Foreign Policy, History of American Diplomatic Relations, which emphasizes policies developed. Recent International Relations, and the recently added course in Political Parties and Electoral Problems. The course in General Economics deals with general economic problems of the individual and the government. Dr. Wallin teaches most of the Political Science and Economics Courses. Geography Various courses in this field are offered to give students a knowledge of the political and economic geography of the major countries of the world— stressing physiographic influences—and to prepare them to teach Geography in the various grades and in the high school. The courses offered include the Geography courses for Primary Grades, Upper Grades, and Rural Schools, a general course in Economic Geography, and more specialized courses in the Economic Geography of North America, South America, and Europe, and courses in the Geography of Wisconsin and the Conservation of Natural Resources. Physiography also is taught. Mr. Simpson is in charge of the Geography Department. French In beginning French, the elementary principles of grammar and composition arc presented, with a study of the verb and translation carrying over into the second semester. The work of the second year includes the translation of well-known French classics: Dumas’ "Vingt Ans Apres,” Daudct’s "Chois dc Contes,” and Rostand’s 'I.es Romanesques", besides a certain amount of outside reading. The advanced class works primarily with idioms, a comprehensive review of previous work, and conversation. Mrs. Ayer, the instructor, uses the college French club, Le Troupelct Francais, as a medium for teaching students to converse in French. German After a lapse of several years, a two-year German course was re-introduced last year. The instructor, Miss Oxby, by using the direct method of teaching, endeavors to impart a practical living German that will eventually become an automatic vehicle of expression to the student. Accordingly, the sentence, rather than the single word, is the unit taught, in as much as one of the chief objectives of the course is to have the student converse in German as much as possible. Ample reading material is provided in the second semester for ultimate use as conversation, and, later, considerable work in composition is added. I'ttKc FifteenState Teachers College Mathematics The Mathematics courses seek, first, to acquaint the student with a wide range of material; second, to give an abundance of drill in the fundamental operations; and, third, to furnish a background for the understanding and teaching of high school mathematics. Courses in Algebra, Trigonometry, College Geometry, Analytic Geometry, Calculus, Theory of Equations, and Mathematics Methods are given to accomplish the above purposes. Miss James and Dr. Judd are the instructors in this department. Biology The Biology courses arc organized to begin with Biology Survey. This course is followed by General Biology, which includes laboratory work. More specialized Biology courses designed for students majoring or minoring in science include Heredity and Eugenics, Physiology, Plant and Animal Classification, and Biology Methods. Most of the Biology courses are under the direction of Mr. Slagg and Dr. Judd. Nature Study and Sanitation and Hygiene are offered for students planning to teach in the elementary grades. Chemistry The courses in Chemistry arc designed to begin with a Survey of Chemistry for those who have had no Chemistry in high school, and proceed to more advanced courses for those majoring or minoring in science, such as General Chemistry, which covers the principles of Chemistry and includes laboratory work. Mathematical Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Quantitative Analysis, and Inorganic Preparations and Problems in Chemistry. Dr. Dawson was the chemistry instructor here the first semester, during the leave of absence of Mr. Ackerman, the regular instructor, who was ill. Mr. Ackerman resumed his work the second semester. Physics The courses in Physics arc taught by Mr. Bridgman and Dr. Judd. The courses are designed to begin with a Survey of Physics, a course particularly well adapted to students who have not had Physics, in high school. This is followed by General Physics, a general course, which includes laboratory work done in one of the best equipped laboratories in the state, with $15,000 worth of equipment. The other courses offered arc designed particularly for students majoring or minoring in science. These courses are more specialized and include Electricity and Magnetism, Light, Modern Physics, Physics Problems, Heat, Alternating Currents, and Radio. l’agc SixteenState Teachers College Physical Education One year’s work in Physical Education is required of each student. Drills and games that may later he used in teaching form an important part of this work. If the student is particularly interested in athletics, the Men’s and Women’s Athletic Associations offer a varied program of sports. Miss Phelps is in charge of women’s physical education activities and Mr. Zorn is in charge of men’s. The football, basketball, and track teams arc coached by Mr. Zorn, and enter intercollegiate competition. Industrial Arts The Manual Training Department offers courses in Industrial Arts, Mechanical Drawing, Architectural Drawing, Elementary Bench Work, and Cabinet Making. The objective is to give engineering information as well as to train teachers of Manual Train-ing. The first objective in the courses in Home Economics at Eau Claire is to make the student better equipped to meet the problems of daily living. The Foods and Nutrition Course includes training in the preparation of low-cost and well-balanced meals. The Textiles and Clothing Course includes the study of textile fibres and fabrics and the acquisition of a working knowledge of the principles of clothing con- struction. Mrs. Flagler and Mr. Millircn teach Industrial Arts. Art The Art Department offers courses that acquaint the student with art principles and methods of teaching perspective, design, color harmony, and lettering. The fundamental Art courses offered include Rural Art, Drawing for the Primary Grades, Handwork for the Primary Grades, and Drawing for the Grammar Grades. Two new courses added this year. Applied Art and Art History and Appreciation, are intended to stimulate the student’s creative ability. The instructor is Miss Foster. Music In addition to the musical instruction available through the A Cappella Choir, the various quartets, the orchestra, and the band. Miss Ward offers Primary Grades Music, Grammar Grades Music, Rural School Music, and Music Directing. In the first two courses named the elements of music, rote singing, sight reading, and treatment of out-of-tunc singers, as encountered in the Primary and Grammar Grades, respectively, are taken up. The course in Rural School Music deals with music appreciation and the development of rhythm. Music Directing includes interpretation, conducting, directing glee clubs, the study of instruments, musical selection, and the classification of voices. Page SeventeenI’KESIDKN'T SCHOFIELD MR. BREWER H. A. SCHOFIELD, PH. B. President C. J. Brewer, B. Eo. Vice President Principal Training School Archie V. Hurst Eau Claire Regent Administration President Schofield H. A. Schofield, Ph. B., graduate of the University of Wisconsin, began his duties as President of the Eau Claire State Normal School in 1916. He is the school’s first and present president. He came here from St. Paul Central High School, where he was the principal. When the Eau Claire State Teachers’ College opened in 1916, Mr. Schofield started with a faculty numbering twenty-four. As the enrollment increased, so did the complexity of his work. His first year approximately one hundred seventy students enrolled, as compared with six hundred fifty this year. Under President Schofield’s administration, a great many changes have taken place. There has been a change in courses throughout the period of years. Many of the courses have been lengthened, and many others changed to comply with modem trends. Our school has grown from a State Normal School to a State Teachers’ College of recognized sanding. The faculty has been increased from twenty-four to forty-one. Vice President Brewer C. J. Brewer, B. Ed., holds a very important position in the college as Vice President and also Principal of the Training School. As supervisor of the practice teaching done in the Training School, he visits the various classes and conducts the teachers’ meetings, which are held every Tuesday morning. At these meetings the work of the Training School is planned. In addition to this work, Mr. Brewer teaches Principles of Education the first semester of each year. In this class thrre is much discussion of school management and the best methods of teaching. During the second semester of each year, Mr. Brewer goes about the state, particularly the northern part, visiting schools. He tries to arrange these visits so that he will visit every Eau Gaire graduate who is teaching for his first year. While making these visits, he also looks about for vacancies for which our students may be recommended, and then interviews superintendents in regard to students prepared to teach. Ri cent Hurst The Wisconsin Board of Normal School Regents consists of eleven members. For each of the nine Teachers’ Colleges in the state of Wisconsin, one person is chosen by the Governor to constitute the Board of Regents. Under its jurisdiction are placed matters concerning the hiring of the presidents of the Teachers Colleges, the settling of difficulties, the submitting of budgets to the state legislatures for approval, and the planning of new building projects. Consequently', the members of the board must be cognizant of existing educational problems as well as of general economic conditions. The Eau Gaire Regent is Archie V. Hurst, who was appointed by former Governor Schmcdeman in 1933 for a term of five years. Mr. Hurst was born at Augusta, Wisconsin, where he attended school. He is now a resident of Eau Claire. He is general agent for the National Guardian Life Insurance Company. Mr. Hurst holds a position of high esteem in the community, being among other things, a trustee of the First Congregational Church, a thirty-second degree Mason, and a Kiwanian. Page EighteenA. J. R. Wallin, Ph. D. Ri-K' trar Eugene McPhhe, A.M. Conference Athletic Committee Vine Miller, A.M. Dean of Women DR. WAI.I.IN .MR. MePHEE MISS MILLER Administration Registrar Wallin The office of Registrar is of comparatively recent establishment in universities and colleges. The Registrar is custodian of records of student grades and credits. He also, in co-operation with the President and the Faculty, is usually responsible for the preparation of the schedule of classes each semester, publication of catalogues, and development of curricula. The relation between Registrar and student is of particular importance. Reports of grades earned each semester are sent to all students enrolled. The Registrar has general supervision over registration, including advice in the selection of courses, directing choices in such manner that the student will complete the requirements of the work chosen. The Registrar’s office also checks the records and certifies names of the Seniors for graduation. It makes many transcripts of work done. Evaluation of credits of former students and those transferring from other schools likewise requires considerable attention. The Registrar must study and keep pace with the ever changing picture of the American college. This requires constant interpretation and readjustment. J. R. Wallin, Ph. D., who also teaches political science and economics, is Registrar here. Mr. McPhee During the past year Eugene McPhee, A. M., Principal of the Training School Junior High School, has becen the college’s representative on the board of the Wisconsin Teachers College Athletics Conference. Mr. McPhee, who is very much interested in athletics, was appointed to this board to succeed Mr. Fox, who had held that position for sixteen years. The object of this Conference is to supervise and control all athletic contests among the schools of the Conference in order that all athletic activities in the Conference schools may be maintained on a high ethical plane in keeping with the high purpose of education. Each school in the Conference is entitled to one representative, who must be a member of the faculty but may not be a member of the coaching staff of the school represented. The annual meeting of the Board is usually held in the Spring. At this meeting, schedules for the following season are arranged. Also, problems in athletics which have come up during the year are settled. Dean Miller Miss Vine Miller, A.M., has as her main objective as Dean of Women, to establish a guidance relation with the individual women students in order to help each to live a wiser, richer, and fuller life. In achieving this objective her duties are many and varied. As the college docs not have a dormitory, she must keep in close contact with the homes of those renting rooms to women students, in order to establish a better relationship between students and housemothers. This plan is intended to help students to live a more normal life in their temporary homes. Miss Miller also watches over the health of the women under her guidance, finds employment for those desiring to work for room and board, and helps standardize the amount of work done in these homes by the students. In addition to her duties as Dean of Women, Miss Miller, who teaches History and English, carries a full teaching load and co-operates in the promotion of the social program of the college. Pane NineteenRuth Auld, A. M. Junior High Critic University of Chicago F. W. Ackerman A.B., BS. Chemistry University of Michigan Elizabeth Ayer (Mrs.) B.S. French Upper Iowa University Frances L. Baker, A. M. Primary Education anil Supervision Columbia University Lillian O. Bahr B. Ed. Intermed, tirades Critic Illinois State Normal U. B. W. Bridgman A.M. Physics University of Wisconsin Julia Dahl, Ph. B. Primary Grades Critic University of Wisconsin Erna Buchholz A.B. S. R. Davenport Ph. D. Librarian Ripon College Dramatics Columbia University C. D. Donaldson, Ph. B. Psychology University of Chicago L. R. Dawson Ph. D. Lyla Flagler (Mrs.) M.S. Chemistry, Geography Home Economics University of Iowa University of Minnesota A. J. Fox, A.M. Education (.eland Stanford, Jr., University Ruth Foster A.M. Art Columbia University Charles Hornback A.M. Director Rural Dep't. University of Illinois Fannie Hunn A.M. Rural Critic University of Minnesota Minna Hansen A.M. English Columbia University Blanche James A.M. Mathematics University of Minnesota Roy J. Judd Ph. D. Science and Mathematics University of Wisconsin The Faculty Page TwentyEugene McPhee, A.M. Princi| ii1 Junior High University of Minnctota Elizabeth Macdonald A.M. Marion Miller A.B. English University » f Washington Assistant Librarian Carlcton College A. L. Murray, A.M. English University of Indiana Monroe B. Milliren Anna Nash BS. B. Ed. Manual Arts Third. Fourth Grades Critic Stout Institute DcKnlb Teachers' College Olive Phelps, A.M. Physical Education Columbia University Hilda Belle Oxby A.M. Hazel Ramharter (Mrs.) B. Ed. English, German Sixth Grade Critic Columbia University Kau Claire Stale Teachers’ College George L. Simpson, A.M. Geography University of Wisconsin J. S. Schneider Ph. D. Social Science University of Wisconsin W. E. Slagg Ph. M. Biology University «»f Wisconsin Laura Sutherland, A.M. History University of Wisconsin Inez D. Sparks A.M. Jane Temple A.M. Primary Grades Critic Junior High Critic University of Minnesota Columbia University Katherine Thomas A.M. Junior High Critic Columbia University Fern N. Thompson (Mrs.) A.B. First Assistant Librarian University of Omaha The Faculty Clara Mae Ward Music Diploma Northwestern School of Music Willis Zorn Ph. B. Physical Education, Coach University of Chicago Page Twenty-oneThe College This score of years, The hours gliding down Through shadowy Putnam Drive, Hare seen the college grow In strength, tradition, and sweet memories— Our Alma Mater. Spiritually, brjck by brick. Each placed with loving care In its true niche By hands who molded firmly Year by year And left each June, Our Alma Mater grew. Then here's to those Whose joy of life Has made each corridor resound With echoing hope. With immortal youth. TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 1916-1936BENJAMIN W. BRIDGMAN, A. M. PHYSICS DEPARTMENT FACULTY ADVISOR OF EACH GRADUATING CLASS SINCE 1918 SELECTED BY PRESIDENT SCHOFIELD AS MEMBER OF FIRST FACULTY 1916 COLLEGEOutstanding Students A committee composed of six representative members of the faculty chose those whose pictures appear on the pages that immediately follow as the five outstanding students of the college. The committee made its selections after considering character, scholarship, and leadership, as manifested by students of the college, whether Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, or Seniors. Students previously chosen for this honor and still in college, were not considered by the committee.LOUIS BERG PHILLIPS HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS DEGREE COURSE . 9 c Outstanding StudentALBERT MOLDENHAUER AUGUSTA HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS DEGREE COURSE I Outstanding StudentELIZABETH ALCOTT CORNELL HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS DEGREE COURSE Outstanding StudentOutstanding StudentROBERT MUSUM EAU CLAIRE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS DEGREE COURSE Outstanding StudentCLASS PRESIDENTS GRADUATING CLASS OFFICERS SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS Icy Tonuuhck Lokcn Skaiutcr Berg Miss Sutherland Berg Nelson Mr. Bridgman Skamfor J. Smith V. Smith Mr. Bridgma J. Smith Berthiaume Graduating, Senior Classes The Graduating Class is composed of all graduates, whether they he in the High School Teachers’, Elementary, Primary, or Rural Courses. This year the class numbered approximately one hundred thirty. Activities of the group are varied, including the Senior Class Play in May and the tree planting ceremonial in June. Commencement Week in June is, of course, one of great importance to graduates. It begins with the Baccalaureate Services on Sunday. President Schofield’s Annual Reception is held on the following evening. Class Day, held about the middle of the week, is a day on which graduates hear their CLASS PRESIDENTS Graduating Class—Louis Berg Senior Class—Robert Skamfer Junior Class—Byron Lokcn, Harold Speckien Sophomore Class—Robert Tomashek Freshman Class—James Riley futures foretold, have a party, and otherwise enjoy themselves. Commencement Day, naturally, is the grand finale. The Commencement Address is delivered, and the graduates receive their diplomas and degrees. The Graduating Class president appoints the committees who have charge of all the activities of the class. The Senior Class is composed of Seniors of the High School Teachers’ Course, and is, therefore, part of the Graduating Class, although it has its own class officers and class functions similar to those of the other classes. GRADUATING CLASS OFFICERS President—Louis Berg Vice President—Clarence Nelson Sccretary-Trcasurcr—Joyce Smith Sergeant-at-Arms—Charles Berthiaume Advisors—Miss Sutherland, Mr. Bridgman SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS President—Robert Skamfer Vice President—Joyce Smith Sccretary-Treasurer—Virginia Smith Advisor—Mr. Bridgman. Page ThirtyJUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS ohiifton By. Lokcn Mr. Millircn Stcinbring Mr. Slagg Tomashek R. Spcckion B. Johnson Harrington Riley Mr. SimpAon Wing Wciiencggc Junior, Sophomore, Freshman Activities of the Junior Gass are varied, the most outstanding social event being the Junior Prom held in May. The General Prom Committee is elected by the class, the Prom King by the entire student body after the class presents its candidates. Chairmen of the various committees have charge of all the details in connection with planning and giving the Prom. Sophomore Class elections arc held early in the Fall. It is not necessary for the class to meet often as most duties that arise are performed by the officers. A committee is usually appointed by the presi- JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS President—Byron Lokcn (first semester) Harold Speckien (second semester) Vice President—Lois Johnson Secretary-Treasurcr—David Stcinbring Advisor—Mr. Milliren dent to take charge of the various class activities; money for such activities is raised by means of candy sales. The principal duty of the class is having charge of the food at the annual college picnic held in the Spring. Freshman Class elections also are held early in the Fall. Tradition demands that the Freshmen gather material for the Homecoming bonfire. Each Freshman class strives to exceed its predecessor. The Freshmen share much of the work in connection with making the annual college picnic a success, as they have charge of providing the entertainment. SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS President—Robert Tomashek Vice President—Betty Johnson Secretary-Treasurer—Roy Speckien Advisor—Mr. Slagg FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS President—James Riley Vice President—Rosemary Harrington Secretary—Gordon Wing Treasurer—Betty Wcizcnegger Advisor—Mr. Simpson Page Thirty-oneFOM BEKCi SNYDER COHEN ORTH BUZZELL McCOY CESS NEK OAt’L VOIGT DAVENPORT Senior Scholastic Honors The number of selections for scholarship in the respective courses was made proportional to the number of graduates from these courses. Wilbur Voigt H. S. TEACHERS EAU CLAIRE Active in organization . forensic . athletic . clas leadership; Outstanding Student 35; head class in scholarship. Mrs. S. R. Davenport H. S. TEACHERS EAU CLAIRE Member oi the Amphictyon; racrolirr I.e Troupclct Fran-cai» and Strut and Fret. Dale Buzzell H. S. TEACHERS WINTER Member o( band and orchestra: editorial and feature writer on Spectator staff two year . Walter J. McCoy H. S. TEACHERS EAU CLAIRE Active in forensic , dramatic , organisations: college reporter Kau Claire Leader and Telegram. Robert Gessner H. S. TEACHERS EAU CLAIRE Active in Science Club and Radio Club; snapshot photographer for the 1936 Periscope. Elvi ra Daul H. S. TEACHERS EAU GALLE Active in dramatic , forensics, and organizations; Amphictyon; Spectator staff; Associate Editor Periscope .16. Irene Fomberg H. S. TEACHERS EAU CLAIRE Active in organizations; YAV.C.A. president; Amphictyon; New Editor Spectator J, Associate Editor 4. Frank Snyder H. S. TEACHERS EAU CLAIRE Member of the Spectator staff during Freshman year; active in the M.A.A. Helen Cohen H. S. TEACHERS EAU CLAIRE Active tn forensics, organizations; Amphictyon; Assistant Editor Periscope 35, Editor 36; Outstanding Student ‘35. Ona Orth H. S. TEACHERS EAU CLAIRE Member of Spectator taff for two years; member of the Amphictyon Society. Page Thirty-two MORTBNSON A. FEAR KIKSCHEK BERCEKSON Senior Scholastic Honors The number of selections for scholarship in the respective courses was proportional to the number of graduates from these courses. Douglas Mortenson H. S. TEACHERS EAU CLAIRE Adah Fear PRIMARY DIPLOMA EAU CLAIRE Member of Science Club. Crusaders; ('resilient Science Club; Physics Laboratory Assistant for two years. Member of the bam! for two years; active in Primary Club work. Helen Kirscher ELEMENTARY DEGREE EAU CLAIRE Jane Bergerson RURAL DIPLOMA STRUM Active in A Cappclla Choir, member for four years, accompanist for four years; Outstanding Student ”34 Active in Rural Life Club activities. Vice President. Secretary; member Y.W.C.A. Helen Hartung GRAMMAR DIPLOMA ARKANSAW Clifford Rayment RURAL DIPLOMA CURTISS Mciiibci of the Newman Club, the Grammar Club, and the Ainphictyou Society. Active in Rural Life Club activities. Vice President, Secretary; member Y.NV.C.A. Norma Boie GRAMMAR DIPLOMA EAU CLAIRE President of the Grammar Club; member of the Orchestra: member of the Amphiclyon Society. Jane Marie Steen RURAL DIPLOMA OSSEO Member of A (appella ( hjiir; Lutheran Students Association; Rural Life Club; Women”, Rest Room Committee. Adeua Ringger PRIMARY DIPLOMA ALMA Member of the Y.NV.C.A. Cabinet; Social Chairman W'.A.A.; member of the Amphiclyon Society. Elma Kruse RURAL DIPLOMA EAU CLAIRE Active in huthcran StudenU- Association; Rural Life Hub; I resident Rural IJfe Club. Page Thirty-threeAgcr Blanchard Alcott Baker Harnea Boberg Brandstedter Brown 1.. Berg Brrthiaumc Bruss Btuzcll Graduating Class High School Teachers Roald Ager Eau Claire MAJOR, HISTORY MINORS, SOCIAL SCIENCE, SCIENCF Crusaders 3-4; Periscope 4. Circulation Manager 4. Elizabeth Alcott Cornell MAJOR, ENGLISH MINOR, HISTORY Extempore Speaking 2; Y.W.C.A. 1-2-3-4, Cabinet 2-3 4, Vice President 2; Spectator 1-2; Periscope 3 4; Student Librarian 2-3-4; Publicity Committee 4. Amphictyon 4, President 4; Outstanding Student '36. Elizabeth Baker Eau Claire MAJOR, ENGLISH MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE A apprlla Choir I-2-J-4, Treasurer 3. President 4; Y.W. C. A. 1-2-3, Cabinet 2-3. James A. Barnes Eau Claire MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, SCIENCE M.A.A. 1-2 3 4; Football 2-3; Letter Club, 2-3 I; IM'hatil-Ion 3-4; Crusaders 2-3-4; Intramural Basketball 1-2-3 4. Louis F. Berg Phillips MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, HISrORY Forensic Honors Club I-2-3-4, President 3; lie Chatillon 2-3-4; Crusader 2-3-4, President 4; Debate 1-2 3-4, National Tournament 2. Northwestern Tournament 3-4; Oratory 3-4. State Contest 3; Spectator 2-3-4, Advertising Manager 2, ( irciilation Manager 3. Business Manager «: Graduating Class President 4; Outstanding Student '36. Charles W. Berthiaume Chippewa Falls MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, LANGUAGES Newman Club 1-2-3-4; Spectatoi 2; Sergeant-at Arm-, of (iraduating Class 4. George Blanchard Boscobfl MAJOR, SaENCF. MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Entered from Milwaukee State Teachers' College 1935. Letter Olib 2-3-4; M A.A. 2-3-4. Edwin J. Bohkrg Eau Claire MAJOR, SCIENCE MINORS, SOCIAL SCIENCE, HISTORY Spectator 4, Circulation Manager 4; Ph. L, University of Wisconsin, 1912. Bernard Brandstedter Fairchild MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE lie Chatillon J-4, Vice President 4; Newman Club 4; M. A. A. 3-4. Theodore J. Brown Altoona MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR. SOCIAL SCIENCE Le Troupclet Era neats 2-3-4; M.A.A. 1-2-3-4; Strut and Fret 3-4; Dr Chatillon 4. Donald Bruss Boyd MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE M.A.A. |.2-3-4; Prom Music Committee 3. Dale Buzzell Winter MAJOR, HISTORY MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Orchestra I-2-3-4-; Band 1-2-4; Spectator 1-2-3-4; Senior Scholastic Honors. Page Thirty-four tot Christensen Dickie Cohen Flatland Colby Daul Davenport Dcrouin Fombcrg (iessner Gilbertson Gillctt Graduating Class High School Teachers Camilla Christensen Chippewa Falls MAJOR, HISTORY MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Y.W.C.A. 1-2-3-4; Lc Trou| clct Francais 1-2. Helen Cohen Eau Claire MAJOR, ENGLISH MINORS, MATHEMATICS, SOCIAL SCIENCE Y.W.C.A. 1-2-3-4; Science Club 2-3-4; Literary Club 2; Forensic Honors Club 2-3-4; Outstanding Student 35; Amphic-I you 4; Publicity Committee 4; Periscope 1 2-3-4. Assistant Editor 3, Editor 4; Women's Debate Team 2-3-4, Northwestern Tournament 3-4; Senior Scholastic Honors; Extempore Reading. Gordon L. Colby Mondovi MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, ENGLISH Dclwte 3-4; Forensic Honors Club 3-4; M.A.A. 1-2-J-4; Science Club 3; l.c Troupclcl Francais 4; Spectator 3-4. Elvera Daul Eau Galle MAJOR, ENGLISH MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Strut anil Fret 2-3-4; Newman Club 1-2-3-4, Secretary 2. Council 3, President 4; Spectator 1-2; Periscope 3-4, Associate Editor 4; Declamation 2-3; Forensic Honors Club 2-3-4, Business Manager 2-3; Lc Troupelet Francais I-2-3-4, Secretary 2, Vice President 3; Amphictyon 4; Publicity Committee 4; Extempore and Interpretative Reading 4; Senior Scholastic Honors; Senior Class Play 4. Mrs. S. R. Davenport Eau Claire MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, ENGLISH Strut and Fret 1-2 3 4; Lc Trou| elet Francais 3-4; Y-W.C. A. 2-3; Amphictyon 4; Senior Scholastic Honors. Clyde Derouin Eau Claire MAJOR, HISTORY MINORS, SOCIAL SCIENCE, ENGLISH Newman ( lull 2-3-4; M.A.A. 2; Crusaders 2-3-4, Secretary 4. Philip Dickie Fairchild MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, MATHEMATICS Football 1-2-3-4; Track 1-2-3-4; Crusaders 3-4; I c Chatillon 2-3-4; Letter Club 2-3-4; Science Club 2-3-4; Second A Cappclla 2; M.A.A. 12-3-4. Ione Flatland Bloomer MAJOR, ENGLISH MINOR, HISTORY Y.W.C.A. 1-2-3-I, Secretary 2. Assistant President 3. Cabinet 2-3; Le Troupelet Francais 1-2-4, President 1; Lutheran Students' Association 3-4. Secretary 3; Central Prom Committee 3; Prom Publicity Committee 3; Publicity Committee 4; Amphictyon 4. Irene Fomberg Eau Claire MAJOR, ENGLISH MINOR, HISTORY Y.W.C.A. 1-2-3-4, Program Chairman 2. Cabinet 2-3, President 3; Strut and Fret 1-2-3-4, Treasurer 2; l.c Troupelet Francais 1-2-4; Spectator 1-2-3-4, News Editor 3; Chairman Prom Publicity Committee 3; Central Prom Committee 3; Class Secretary and Treasurer 2-3; Amphictyon 4; Publicity Committee 4; Senior Scholastic Honors; Associate Editor Spectator 4; Senior Class Play 4. Robert Gessner Eau Claire MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, MATHEMATICS Science Club 2-3-4; Radio Club J-4, President 4; Physics l aboratory Assistant 4; Periscope 4; Track 1-2; M.A.A. 1-2-3-4, Governing Board 3; Senior Scholastic Honors. Lester Gilbertson Chippewa Falls MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, HISTORY A Cappclla Choir 1-2 3-4, Librarian 3; Men’s Quartette 1-2-3 4; Oxford Club 1-2-3-4, President 2; M.A.A. 2; Periscope 2-3; Junior Class Play 3; Prom Invitation Committee Richard Gili.ett Eau Claire MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE M A.A. I-2-3-4, Governing Board I-2-3-4; Intramural Basketball I-2-3-4; Dc Chatillon 1-2-3 4; Tangle Kclc 2-3-4; Crusaders 3-4; A Cappclla Choir 1-2-3-4, Mixed Quartette 1-2-3, Men’s Quartette 4; Prom Decoration Committee 3. Page Thirty-liveGraduating Class Hjch School Teachers Arthur Hanstrom Eau Claire MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, ENGLISH l r ( hattlltm 1-2-3-4; Crusader 2-3-4; Cheer Leader 1-2; letter Club 1-2-3-4; Strut and Fret 2 3-4, Publicity Man-.liter 3; Spectator 2-3: Periscope Circulation .Manager 2; la: Troupelct Francais 2-3; M.A.A. 1-2-3: Homecoming Coinmittee 2; Pep Committee 1-2-3. Violet Hoover Eau Claire MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, HISTORY W.A.A. 1-2-J-4, Volleyball Manager 2, Deck Tennis Manager 4. Advisory Hoard 4; Strut ami Fret 3-4; Y.W.C.A. 4; Periscope 2-3; Chairman Women's Rest Room Commit tee 3; Advisor Junior High Dramatic Club 4; Advisor Junior High Home Economics Club 3. Stanley W. Hoy Land O’ Lakes MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, MATHEMATICS M.A.A. I-2-3-4; Science Club 2-3-4; Football Manager 2-3. William Johnson Colfax MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINORS, SCIENCE LANGUAGES l.e Trnujtclet Francais 2-4; De Chatillon 4; Hand and Orchestra Director 4. Irene Lbnz Altoona MAJOR, HISTORY MINOR, ENGLISH Strut and Fret 2-3-4; Spectator 2-3-4; Oxford Club 2; Y. W.C.A »; Publicity Committee 4; Amphictyon 4. Edna Mae Lobdell Durand MAJOR, ENGLISH MINOR, SCIENCE Filtered from Stout Institute 1933. Second A Cappclla Choir 2; V.W.C.A. 2 3 4; l.e Troupelct Francai 2-3; Oxford Club 2-3; Amphictyon 4. Burton D. Loken Eau Claire MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, HISTORY M.A.A. 1-2 3-4; Strut and Fret 2-3-4; Crusader 3-4; De Chatilloti 2-3 -4, VfCC President 3. President 4; (’la 111 President 3; Spectator 1-2; Periscope 2-3, Assistant Circulation Manager 2, Circulation Manager 3; Publicity Commit trr 3 4; Forensic Honor Club 3-4; Debate 3-4; Junior Class Play 3; Prom King 3; Chairman Prom Financial Committee 3; Central Prom Committee 3. Walter J. McCoy Eau Claire MAJOR. SCIENCE MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Debate 1-2-3-4; Oratory 1-2; Extempore Speaking 3-4; Forensic Honors Club 1-2-3-4, President 4; lx Troupelct Francois 1-2-3-4, Vice President 2; Science Club 1-2-3-4; Publicity Committee 3-4; llome«outing Committee 3; M.A.A. 1-2-3: Intramural Basketball 1-2; School Reporter Leader and Telegram 4; Chemistry Laboratory Assistant 4; Senior Scholastic Honors; Northwestern Debate Tournament 4; Senior t lass Play 4. Kathryn McDermid Eau Claire MAJOR, MATHEMATICS MINOR. SCIENCE Oxford Club 1 2-3 4; l.e Troupelct Francais 1-2-3; Science Club 2-3-4; W.A A. i-2-3-4. Secretary 2, Kittenball Manager 3, Ping Pong Manager 4. Advisory Board 3-4; Y.W.C A. 4; Amphictyon 4; Strut and Fret 3-4; Prom Publicity Committee 3; Chairman Prom Ticket Committee 3; Central Prom Committee 3; Periscope 2-3-4, Editor 3; Women's Rest Room Coinmittee 2; Senior Class Play 4. Joseph McKinnon Eau Ci.aire MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE .Newman (Tub 1-2-3-4; Science Club 2-3-4; M.A.A. 1 2-3-4; Lc Troupelct Francais 1; Intramural Rnskrthall 1-2-3-4. Lucile Miller Stanley MAJOR, HISTORY MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Entered from Lawrence College 1934. Y.W.C.A. 3-4. Albert Moldfnhauer Augusta MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, SCIENCE Football 1-2-3-4, Captain 4; letter Club 1-2-3 4. President 4; M.A.A. I-2-3-4; Intramural Basketball I-2-3-4; De ha-tilloti 2-3-4; Crusader 2-3-4, Vice President 4; Strut and Fret 2-3-4; Chairman Prom Invitation Committee 3; Central Prom Committee 3; Lutheran Students' Association 3 4; Outstanding Student ‘36. Page Thirty-sixXussbcrgcr Pfelferkorn Nelson Xadlcr Palmer Ncary Paquette Mutum Otis Mortcnson Orth Graduating Class High School Teachhrs Douglas Mortenson Eau Claire MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, MATHEMATICS la: Troupelet Francais 1-2-3-4; Science dub 2-3-4, President 3; Chemistry Laboratory Assistant 3-4; Crusaders 3-4; ben it r Scholastic Honor . Robert Musum Eau Claire MAJOR, HISTORY MINOR. SOCIAL SCIENCE Spectator D2-3-4, Sports Editor 2-3. Associate Editor 3, Editor 4; M.A.A. 1-2-3-4, (.overtime Hoard 3-4; Manager Intramural Basketball Tournament 3; Intramural Basket-ball I-2-3-4; Kittcnball 1; Intramural Tennis 3-4; Baseball 2-3-4; Central Prom Committee 3; Publicity Committee 4; OutstandiiiK Student .16. Arthur Nadler Altoona MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Strut and Fret 1-2-3-4; Do Chatillon 2-3-4. Membership ( ommittce 4; Track 1-2-3; Intramural Basketball 1-2-3 4; Prom Printing Committee 3; Spectator 2; M.A.A. 1-2-3-4. George Neary Eau Claire MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE M.A.A. 1 2-3-4; Intramural Basketball 1 -2-3-4; Football 1-2-4; la-ttrt Club 1 -2-3-4; Newman Club 1-2-3-4. Business Manager 4; Crusaders 4. Clarence Nelson Eau Claire MAJOR, ENGLISH MINOR, SCIENCE Spectator 1-2-3-4; M.A.A. 1-2-3-4. governing Board 1-2-3-4, President 3, Vice President 4; De Chatillon 2-3-4; Crusad- ers 2-3-4; Football 1-2-3. Captain 3; Letter Club 1-2-3-4; Lutheran Students Association 3-4; Second A Cappella Choir 2; Junior Class Play 3; Prom Finance Committee 3; Senior Class Play 4. Adeline Nussbergfr Durand MAJOR, ENGLISH MINOR, HISTORY Entered from St Theresa College 1934. Newman Club 3-4; D Troupelet Francai 3-4. Ona Orth Eau Claire MAJOR, HISTORY MINOR, ENGLISH Y.W.C.A. 2; Spectator 2-3; Amphictynn 4; Senior Scholastic Honors. Maxine Otis Mondovi MAJOR, HISTORY MINOR. ENGLISH Y.NV.C.A. 1-2-3-4; Strut and Fret 2 3-4; la- Troupelet Francai I-2-3-4, President 4; Amphictyon 4; Second A Cappella Choir 2; Publicity Committee 4; Senior Class Play 4. Virginia Palmer Eau Claire MAJOR, ENGLISH MINORS. SOCIAL SCIENCE, BIOLOGY, SPANISH Y.W.C.A. 1-2; Strut ami Fret 1-2-3 4. President 4; Debate 1; Extempore Speaking 3; Spectator 3-4; Senior Class Play 4. Helen Paquette Chippewa Falls MAJOR, ENGLISH MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE W.A.A. 2-3; Newman Club 1-23-4; Y.W.C.A. 3. Richard Pettis Augusta MAJOR. MATHEMATICS MINOR, SCIENCE M.A.A. 2-3-4; Science Club 3-4. Elsie Pfefferkorn Eau Claire MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, SCIENCE W. A. A. 2-3-4, Hiking Manager 3-4; Orchestra 2-3-4; Band 2-3; Y.W.C.A. 2. Page Thirty-sevenPinch V. Smith Skamfrr SjKtonrr Phillips K. Smith Scrruricr Snyder C. Smith Stark J. Smith Tracy Graduating Class High School Teachers Loren Phillips Chippewa Falls MAJOR, HISTORY MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE M.A.A. 12-3-4; Cru.aders 3-4; DcChatilfon 1-2-3-4; Publicity Committee 4. Harriet Pinch Chippewa Falls MAJOR, ENGLISH MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Y.W.C.A. 2-3-4, Cabinet 4; Newman Club I-2-3-4, Treasurer 3. Nice President 4; Periscope Literary Award 2; Amphict-yon 4; Publicity Committee 4. Arlene Serrurikr Eau Claire MAJOR, HISTORY MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE W.A.A. 1-2; Prom Invitation Committee 3. Robert Ska.vifer Eau Claire MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, HISTORY Crusaders 3 4; Central Prom Committee 3; Senior Class President 4; l)c (Tiatillon 4; M.A.A. 1-2-3: Science Club 3-4; Vice Prom King 3; Lutheran Club 3. Clark L. Smith Elmwood MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, SCIENCE Transferred from Stout 1932. Football 1-2; Basketball 1. Joyce Smith Fairchild MAJOR. ENGLISH MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Y.W.C.A. 1-2-3 4; Oxford Club 1-2-3 4; Graduating ( lass Secretary-Treasurer 4; Senior Class Vice President 4; Senior Class Play 4. Robert Smith Osseo MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE M.A.A. 1-3; l)c Chatillon 3-4; Crusaders 2-3-4; A Cappella Choir 1-2-3; Quartette 1-2-3; Band Director 2; Director of Training School Orchestra 3. Virginia Smith Eau Claire MAJOR, ENGLISH MINOR, LANGUAGES Y.W.C.A. 1-2-3, Membership Chairman 1, Social Service Chairman 2, Way and Means Chairman 3; Strut and Fret 3-4, Treasurer 4; Amphictyon 4. Business Manager 4; Spectator 1-2-3-4, News Editor 2, Managing Editor 3. Assistant Editor 4; Central Prom Committee 3; Prom Qneen 3; Class Secretary 3; Class Secretary-Treasurer 4. Frank Snyder Eau Claire MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, SCIENCE Spectator I; M.A.A. 2-3-4; Senior Scholastic Honors. Robert Spooner Elk Mound MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE M.A.A. I-2-3-4; Biology laboratory Assistant 3-4; Science Club 2-3-4; Lc Trou| elet Francois 1-2-3-4, Secretary 3; ' trut and Fret 2-3-4; Lutheran Students Association 3-4; Senior Class Play 4. Alta Stark Rice Lake MAJOR, HISTORY MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Entered from Stout 1931. A Cattpella Choir 2-3-4; Second Women's Quartette 2-3; First Women’s Quartette 4; Y.W. C.A. 2-3-4. Kenneth Tracy Altoona MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, HISTORY Newman Club 1-2-3-4; M.A.A. 4; Intramural Basketball 4; Central Prom Committee 3. Page Thirty-eight EmA J Williams Erickson Wrijtglesworlh Kirsclicr Babcock StUssy Bcnncti Buie Graduating Class High School—Elementary Wilbur R. Voigt Eau Claire MAJOR. SCIENCE MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Basketball 1-2-3: Track 1-2-3; l-ettcr Club 1-2-3-4, Vice President 2. President 3; M.A.A. 1-2-3-4, Governing Board 1- 2 3-4; Debate 3-4. Northwestern Tournament 3 4; Extempore Speaking 3-4; Forensics Honors Club 2-3-4, Vice President 2; lb- Cbatilion 1-2-3-4, Secretary 2, President 3; Crusaders 2-3-4, Vice President 3; Science Club 2-3-4; Pep Committee 2-3; Publicity Committee 4; Homecoming Committee 2- 3; Chairman Central Prom Committee 2-3; Class Nice President 2; Class President 2-3; Outstanding Student ‘35; Senior Scholastic Honors. Reuben Wick Eau Claire MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Football 1-2-3; Utter Hub 2-3-4; M.A.A. I 2-3-4; Intramural Basketball 1-2-3-4; A Cappella Choir 4, Male Quartette 4; Prom Publicity Committee 3; Class Treasurer I. John Williams Eau Claire MAJOR, SCIENCE MINOR, HISTORY De Cbatilion 3-4. William Wrigglesworth Eau Claire MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, MATHEMATICS Strut and Fret I-2-3-4: M.A.A. I-2-3-4; Intramural Basketball 1-2-3 4; Football 1-2; Newman Club 1-2 3 4, Treasurer 3, Vice President 4; Science Club 3-4; Spectator 1; Senior Class Play 4. ELEMENTARY DEGREE Gretta Bennett MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE Newman Club 1-2-3-4; Primary 1 2-3-4. Chippewa Falls MINOR, SCIENCE Hub 1-2-34; Y.W.CA. Doris Berg Eau Claire MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, ENGLISH Primary Club 1-2; Y.W.C.A. 1-2. Harvey Dahl Eau Claire MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, HISTORY Rural Club I; Grammar Club 2-3-4, President 3; Strut and Fret 3-4. Business Manager 4; Lutheran Students’ Association 3-4; Junior Class Play 3; Senior Class Play 4. Annabelle Erickson Eau Claire MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, MUSIC A Capprll.1 Choir 4 Quartette Accompanist 4; Orchestra 4; Primary Club 4; Y.W.C.A. 4; Lutheran Students' Association 4; Outstanding Student ’36. Helen Kirscher Eau Claire MAJOR, SOCIAL SCIENCE MINOR, MATHEMATICS A Cap|M-lla Choir 1-2-3-4. Custodian 3; Grammar Club 1-2; Y.W.C.A. 3-4; Accompanist Ladies Quartette 1; Accompanist Men's Quartette 2-3-4; Radio Club 3-4, Secretary 3-4; Lc Troupelet Franca IS 3; Senior Scholastic Honors; Outstanding Student ’34. Margaret E. Stussy Eau Claire MAJOR, HISTORY MINOR, ENGLISH Iris Babcock Eau Claire MAJOR, HISTORY MINORS, SOCIAL SCIENCE, ENGLISH Y.W.CA. 2-3 4; Primary Club 1-2-34. Norma Boie Eau Claire GRAMMAR GRADES DIPLOMA TWO-YEAR COURSE Grammar Club 1-2, President 2; Amnhictyon 2; Orchestra 2; Y.W.C.A. 2; Oxford Club 1-2; Senior Scholastic Honor . Page Thirty-nineCallahan Cooke putter Grunseth llaiffh H. Ilartunff I. Ilartunff Laatufka Counsell A. hear E. Fear Gardner Graduating Class Grammar—Primary Grades Anna Jane Callahan Mondovi GRAMMAR GRADES DIPLOMA THREE-YEAR COURSE Entered from Mondovi Teachers Trainitijr Institute 1934. YAV.C.A. 1-2; Gram mar Club 1-2; Newman Club 1-2; Am-jdiictyon 2. Jeanne Cooke Eau Claire GRAMMAR GRADES DIPLOMA THREE-YEAR COURSE Oxford Hub 1-2: Grammar Club 1-2-3; YAV.C.A. 1-2 3. Cabinet 3; Lc Troupdct Francai 4; Women’s Rest Room Committee 4. Chairman 4. Lola B. Dutter Eau Claire GRAMMAR GRADES DIPLOMA THREE-YEAR COURSE Grammar Hub 3. Frank Grunseth Ingram GRAMMAR GRADES DIPLOMA TWO-YEAR COURSE Transferred from Rural course 1935. Rural Club 1; Grammar Club 2; Oxford Club 2. Sadie Haigh Mondovi GRAMMAR GRADES DIPLOMA TWO-YEAR COURSE Helen Hartung Arkansaw GRAMMAR GRADES DIPLOMA THREE-YEAR COURSE Newman Hub 1-2-3; Senior Scholastic Honors; Ainphirtynn 3; Grammar Club 3. Irene Hartung Arkansaw GRAMMAR GRADES DIPLOMA THREE-YEAR COURSE Newman Club 1-2-3; Amphictyon 3; Grammar Club 3. Joseph Lastufka Rice Lake GRAMMAR GRADES DIPLOMA TWO-YEAR COURSE Entered from Barron County Normal 1935. Grammar Club 2; Newman Club 2; Senior Class IMay 2. Ila Counsell Neillsville PRIMARY GRADES DIPLOMA THREE-YEAR COURSE YAV.C.A. 2 3. Cabinet 3; Primary Club 3; Oxford Club 2. Adah Fear Eau Claire PRIMARY GRADES DIPLOMA THREE-YEAR COURSE Priittar) Club 1-3; Band I: YAV.tr.A. 2; Senior Scholastic Honors. Ellen Fear Eau Claire PRIMARY GRADES DIPLOMA THREE-YEAR COURSE Primary Club 1-3; Band 1; YAV.C.A. 2. Lucille Gardner Elmwood PRIMARY GRADES DIPLOMA THREE-YEAR COURSE Entered from Stout Institute 1935. Primary Club 2. Girnau ScRuin Israrhon W hi twain Kmulxon Andersen Larson Bcrijcrson Ranous Blanchard UingRcr lirc.iurr Graduating Class Primary Grades—Rural Ida L. Girnau Eau Claire PRIMARY GRADES DIPLOMA TWO-YEAR COURSE W.A.A. 1; Primary Club 1-2; Y.W.C.A. 1-2. Alice Israelson Winter PRIMARY GRADES DIPLOMA TWO-YEAR COURSE Primary Club 2-|t Y.W.C.A. 2-3: Second A Cappclla Choir 2; Lutheran Students Association 3. Wealthy Knudson Eau Claire PRIMARY GRADES DIPLOMA TWO-YEAR COURSE Y.W.C.A. 1: Second A Cappclla Choir 1: Primary Club 1-2; l.e Troupelct Francais 2, Jessie A. Larson Nelson PRIMARY GRADES DIPLOMA TWO-YEAR COURSE Entered from University of Wisconsin 1935. Primary Club 2; Y.W.C.A. 2; A Cappclla Choir 2: Lutheran Students' Association 2. Alice Ranous Eau Claire PRIMARY GRADES DIPLOMA TWO-YEAR COURSE l.c Troupelct Francais 2: Primary Club 1-2: Strut and Fret 2; YAV.C.A. 1-2; Senior Class Play 2. Adelia Ringger Alma PRIMARY GRADES DIPLOMA THREE-YEAR COURSE Entered from llulTalo County Normal 1934. W.A.A. 2-3. Social Chairman 3; Y.W.C.A. 2-3, Decoration Chairman 3; Primary Club 2-3; Amphictyon 3. Secretary 3; Senior Scholastic Honor . Eloise Seguin Eau Claire PRIMARY GRADES DIPLOMA THREE-YEAR COURSE Primary Club 1-2; Y.W.C.A. 1-2. Lucile Whitwam Altoona PRIMARY GRADES DIPLOMA TWO-YEAR COURSE Primary Huh 1-2; Y.W.C.A. 12; Oxford Club 1-2. Murcile Anderson Strum RURAL DIPLOMA Grammar (Tub 1: Y.W.C.A. 1; Rural Club 2. Jane Bergerson Strum RURAL DIPLOMA Rural Life Club 1-2; Senior Scholastic Honors. Eleanore Blanchard Cornell RURAL DIPLOMA Y.W.C.A. 1; Rural Life Club 1-2; Newman Chib 2. Beatrice Brenner Durand RURAL DIPLOMA Rural Life Club 1-2; Newman Hub 2. Page Forty-oneCasey Instifjord Hr tinner lleiiltkc Donne Kruse (•rtihlkr Matott Hanson Moen (iilhrrtson McCann Graduating Class Rural School Course Margaret Brunner Durand RURAL DIPLOMA Rural I-ife Club 1-2; Newman Club 2. Herbert Hfidtke RURAL DIPLOMA Rural Life Club 2. Bloomer Lottie Casey Eagle River rural diploma Newman Club 2; Rural Life Club 1-2; Y.W.C.A. Z Barbro Instifjoru Osseo RURAL DIPLOMA Lutheran Students’ Association 2; Rural Life Club 1-2. Gertrude Doane Menomonie RURAL DIPLOMA Elma Kruse Eau Claire RURAL DIPLOMA Rural Life Club 1-2. Rural Life Club 1-2, Treasurer 1, President 2; Lutheran Students Association 2; Senior Scholastic Honors. Dorothy I. Gilbertson RURAL DIPLOMA Hixton Nathanial H. McCann Chippewa Falls Rural Life (Tub 1-2; Lutheran Students' Association 1-2; Y.W.C.A. 12. RURAL DIPLOMA Entered from Chippewa Falls High School Training Class 1935; Rural Life (Tub 2. Eleanor Gruhlke RURAL DIPLOMA Fairchild Ethel Matott Cadott Y.W.C.A. 2; Rural Life Club 1-2; Lutheran Students’ Association 2. RURAL DIPLOMA Rural I.ife Club 1; Y.W.C.A. 1. Curtis H. Hanson Mondovi RURAL DIPLOMA Rural Life (Tub 1-2, Vice President 1; Lutheran Students’ Association 2. Evelyn M. Moen New Auburn RURAL DIPLOMA Rural Life Club 1-2. Page Forty-twoNorhcim Morn.ni Shaker Shermock Simpson Spindlcr Steen Walcuk Graduating Class Rural School Course Thelma Morgan Sheldon RURAL DIPLOMA Rural Ufe Club 2; YAV.C.A. 12. Margaret Simpson Durand RURAL DIPLOMA Rural l.ifr Club 1-2; Newman Club 1-2. Florence Norheim Strum RURAL DIPLOMA W'.A.A. 1-2, Advisory Koar ] 2; Rural l.ife Club 1-2; Lutheran Student ’ Association 2; Y.W.C.A. 2. Marian Spindlf.r Durand RURAL DIPLOMA Rural Life Club 1-2; Newman Club 2. Naomi Ray Minocqua RURAL DIPLOMA Primary Club I; Rural Life Club 2. Clifford Rayment Curtiss RURAL DIPLOMA Lutheran Student ' Association 2; Rural Life Club 1-2; Treasurer 2. Vice President 2; Senior Scholastic Honors. Norman Shaker Meridean RURAL DIPLOMA Rural life Club 1-2. President L Jane Marie Steen Osseo RURAL DIPLOMA A ajiprlU Choir 1; Rural Life Club 1-2, Vice President 2; Women' Rest Room Committee 2; Lutheran Students’ Association 2; Senior Scholastic Honors. Josephine Walczak Eagle River RURAL DIPLOMA Rural Life Oub 2; Newman Club 1; Y.W.C.A. 1-2. Lucille Shf.rmock Eau Claire RURAL DIPLOMA Fred Weggen Fall Creek rural diploma Class Secretary 1; Rural Life Club 1-2; Y.W.C.A. 1; Le Troupelet Frauacats 2; Oxford Club 2. Lutheran Students’ Association 2; Rural Life Club 1-2, Treasurer 1; Senior Claw Play 2. Page Forty-threer Groacu Ackerlund Jane Anderson Robert Baldwin Donai.d Barnes Larraynb Bing Vi ian Bragg Doris Carlson Clarice Chase Doris Davby Ione Drew Alice Ehnfrt Evelyn Erickson Helen Gabus Robert Ganther Noreen Gough Everett Graves Charlotte House Alice Hartwell Eugene Huntsinger Pat Held Owen Johnson Cecelia Kranzfelder Norma Kongsgaard Bowman Larson Norene Laundrie Jfss Laundrif Degree Juniors Page Forty-fourJoyce Loaschinc Rose Luhm Lucille Luhm Stanley McCombs Marian Mesang Ione Millard Sherwood Peterson Allan Randall Byron Loken Lempi Luoma Fayette McCormack George Matalas Tony Parkovich Einar Pedersen Gerald Richardson Ursula Schmidlin Gladys Stallman Betty Lou Schofield Marvella Stubbe Harold Speckien Margaret Sumstad Rufus Waters Arthur Tollefson Alice Watts John Walter Mary Wilson Degree Juniors Page Forty-fiveHigh School Teachers Sophomores Top Row—Bchn ffovcy A. Olson R. Johnson But lie Fossum I.. Smith J. Waller M. Schmicd lin Second Row H tiger Rarkin Frazier Vincent Gust nfson Nagle l.ind McAuley Bottom Row—i,M. Babcock T. Waiter Haag Haskell Allen Strrsc Schofield B. Johnson Blnment haler High School Teachers Sophomores Top Row — Oftcdahl Works Welhcr Broetzman Wcishnpple Henard Young Strauch Second Row Hochn Torrance Uavis Rctallick Amundson I). Smith R. Speckien Third Row -Skamser A. Kopp Wittwer Austen tiimmmg Svengaard Sorenson Bet Bottom Row—A. Carlson Izdcpski I). Nelson Snyd ct Klcusch J. Kopp C'ibsonHigh School Teachers Freshmen Top Kow-Kcr linttculioll Stride Feint I avi«! Iloowill Solbcr I.uth. Kopplin Kline Gentry llotvc.lt Second Row Hammond Homer John non bnen Hrmrnt Berdr Wine Donaklson Rockwell WrtKRlenwotth Skutley Ur Steven Third Row—Fuhrman Tweet Riley McCarthy Me-Gillivray Brier Gregerfcon I’ratt Kluth Ratmutirti Bottom Row —Kdineton Tangrn Dedrickson SUgg K. Anderson A er Gabu High School Teachers Freshmen Top Row Hr rick Ur Geliring Hundt McLeod Mcf'.ilvrav Pndrutt Moletid Kdc Second Row Klayhaufth Thorenon Boortx Lud vigton Murphy l.cn Jennings Molin Pitt Third Row Pinch Peterson Kodenhui Allen Kil- l.i lil Wciaciicgger William Larson Bottom Row llrunner Boclifer Muenchow Outer man Record Roach CarlisleHigh School Teachers Freshmen Tup Row A»k Dcdfickaon Kuchn C . OHcii Stephen »on Anderson J. Olson llociwr I’Ugnier Sandvig Second Ko» ilagcn Hoc!ter Kotnem iallaglur Cooke Omstcd Johnson Oram Hailey C. Brown l.uhach Bottom Row lx Due I Intuit Adler, l.cinenktigc! Shaker MattUon Watcrpool Scott Babing-lon High School Teachers Freshmen Top Row—Wollum B. C. Brown Water , Lofthu Collin Briicr Sprague Bamberg O'Connell Efctruntsc Zhc. Second Raw BiMxell Van Xatta Volt Rindy Man un Park Voahtnik II. Hessner Bay Lin-■Icnliauni Rtandon Third Bow Dougherty Strohcl Chawlrcrlin Tierney Urton Schroeder Goptil liovrlnnd Backu , Bottom Raw Krause B. Sherman Krutixfelder liar rittgton Bobb Krellr ► Grammar Grades Sophomores Freshmen Top Row B, Smith Frrmitail Fenner M. Anderson Korger Fonts Parker I-arson Hut tom Row Kyle P. Smith Rasmussen Schen-thall Garlic Klhott I). Anderson Primary Grades Sophomores Freshmen Top Row Colby Kjcntvct K. Pederson Dnsik Ter sel Johnson Jaeger lies Abrams Biilett Gilt son Olsen Noglc Second Row -I- Peterson Webert Beckwith Roy-crafl Pitts Pike I. Pederson Holland Jewett. Scohic Cook Brinkman Knudson lar-son Third Row—Litchfield La Marche My hers Thompson Lewi Mattison Dodge (». Peterson Van Camp i - Bottom Row — Kidd Antler son Whipple Gruber 1 Ranous Utley Cronk M. Sherman rRural Freshmen Top K'»w -Massey. Meier VVojcck Brown Sever-son Krause Christensen. Bottom Row—AfcFntil Johnson Roberts Clcaiby llickcy fclhnfer. Blakeley SkoKM.v! Thompson Zwic- TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 1916-1936 Page FiftyI Parents and friends of the graduates gathered at the college entrance last Commencement Day. Here we see them as they congratulate the Seniors. President Schofield is getting ready to return to his office. r Like father—like daughter! At least, both have degrees! The father. Dr. Judd, has had his for several years; his daughter, Evelyn, had just received hers when the picture at the right was taken. Boy or girl, man or woman—who wouldn’t be happy upon the completion of four years’ work for a Bachelor’s Degree? Here I-esscl Ramsay and Frances Demmlcr are rejoicing! Tve finished!” How many Seniors understand Robert Powell when he makes this pleasant statement? But Robert is happy; he has his B. Ed. degree! • Mabel Gutow, at the left in the picture, and | Annabel Brunner, have just received their Rural Certificates. Here they triumphantly clutch their precious documents! 1935 Commencement I'aKr Filly-oneAthletics Spirit of Victory, The magic breath That of all earthly things Is triumph over loss And life and dire defeat, With laurels non; Spirit of Victory That places strength Of purpose, north. And high idea! Above the glittering trophy Of awarded praise; Spirit of Victory, Immortal hope. And faith in self And all one's comrades, live— Live, grow, flourish Until blazes high With pride, achievement. And Tradition's fame. Our Alma Mater. TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 1916-1936GEORGE L. SIMPSON. A. M. GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT FOUNDFR AN1) FACULTY ADVISOR OF THE CRUSADERS, HONORS SOCIETY CHOSEN BY PRESIDENT SCHOFIELD AS MEMBER OF FIRST FACULTY 1916 ATHLETICSFOOTBALL SQUAD Back Row Lewis Gentry Setter Mitlnkix Weix llcnncin.'in Hoyev Kormoti Knnlrsl y I!.Itlamhanl Burkin Ilchn Front Row Walter To tn a slick J. Barnes Moliletthaucr Quick Stelile D. Barnes Davis Football Season The season of 1935 was one of ups and downs. The team was one that at times failed to win, but never failed to fight, always giving its best during the sixty minutes of every game. A stubborn defensive outfit stopped the running attack of every opposing team, but there was a weakness against pass defense that sometimes enabled opponents to gain ground after their other efforts had been completely frustrated. In conference competition the team won one, lost one, and tied two, gaining for itself third place, the highest position an Eau Claire grid machine has held for several years. In non-conference play the Blue and Gold did not enjoy its usual success. Of the three games played, the team won one. When Coach Zorn issued the call for practice on September 9, he was greeted by fifty-four candidates, the largest squad in Eau Claire history. Fifteen letter winners were back, and the prospects seemed bright for a successful season. There were several problems to be ironed out, however. A fullback was needed to replace Fairchild. New ends had to be found. George Neary was the only capable guard returning. The biggest problem of all was that the center position was wide open with not even a reserve center to fill the shoes of last year’s pivot man, "Ken" Kottke. Besides all of these problems. Coach Zorn was changing his backficld shift, and thus the offensive system was unfamiliar even to the veterans. With only a short time to prepare, the team went to Mankato, and still not settled in the system dropped a 19-0 decision. A week later the team redeemed itself by defeating Winona 13-0. The next game was our conference opener in which the Blue and Gold tied the Racquets of LaCrossc. The following week threw us against Luther of Decorah, and the team, still suffering from the bruising LaCrossc game, went down to a 30-6 defeat. Superior was the next opposition, and the Giants of the North handed us our only conference defeat by a 7-0 score, made on what appeared to be an official oversight. The traditional battle against the aggregation from River Falls followed. Unable to beat the "jinx.” the Tornadoes battled the Falcons to a 14-14 tie. The season ended with a rousing triumph over Stout by a 23-0 score and the possession of the Little Brown Jug for another year. The last two games of the season were a fine indication of what the team could do. A real offensive was functioning at the end of the season; it was the lack of offensive power which had checked the team in its early season games. Against both River Falls and Stout there was real speed, power, and deception. and the ability to get those precious yards near the goal line. Eau Claire Scores Sept. 28 Mankato 19 Eau Claire 0 Oct. 4 Winona 0 Eau Claire 13 Oct. 11 La Crosse 0 Eau Claire 0 Oct. 19 Luther of Iowa 30 Eau Claire 6 Oct. 26 Superior 7 Eau Claire 0 Nov. 2 River Falls 14 Eau Claire 14 Nov. 9 Stout 0 Eau Claire 23 Parc Fifty-fourFOOTBALL SQUAD Bark Row—Plctt . Itlanchuril ’ooj cr Kurlm Fcirn I Cor will Bulli Wollum Anderson Sj'rail Coach Zorn Asst, Coach II,light hronr Row—S| cckicn timtafxon Wcihcr WrtRRle .wortlt Omitted Nllascn Farkovich Ncary Schmicdlin (iall.iKhcr. Football Season It is unnecessary' to say that credit should be given this year to the entire first team for the spirit of willingness to work displayed by the men. A big share of credit is also due those members of the second and third teams who went out night after night and took the pounding of practice instead of the glory of the games. Many of these men, capable themselves, were kept from seeing much action due to exceptional men playing their positions. Due credit must also be given to Head Coach Zorn and Assistant Coach Haight for the fine, alert team that developed under their guidance. Individual heroes there were, too. Captain Al Moldenhaucr was handicapped all season by injuries and did not come into his own until the Stout game. Tomashek, smooth-running half, ranked with the best backs in the conference. Walter, Schmicdlin, and Wrigglesworth, made up in speed what they lacked in weight. Walter "Crash” Gentry, pile-driving fullback, was the outstanding defensive back of the conference, and "Budda” Behn, the crafty halfback, completed the backfield. The line, too, comes in for a full share of praise. A famous coach has said that the strength of a team depends upon its tackles; Eau Claire had two of the best in "Sheriff” Wcix and "Tony” Barnes, and a fine understudy in Hugh Horswill. The team enjoyed very capable ends in Feirn, Plctt, Korrison, Parkovich, and Davis. The center position was well taken care of by "Beaner” Hennc-man, the biggest man on the squad, and by Cooper, smaller but unconquerable. The guards were all small men, but led by "Orvic” Quick and "Beevo” Ncary with Omsted and Wollum, proved exceptionally capable. Mention should also be made of Stehle, one of the most capable backs on the squad, who was inactive all season due to the aggravation of an old leg injury. The feature of the work of the 1935 team was its defense. A large part of this defensive strength was made passible by the clean tackling of the entire team and the aggressive spirit displayed, which provided the drive to meet opponents across the scrimmage line. This may be called, and indeed was, a successful season. With only three men leaving this year’s team because of graduation, and with new Freshman material coming in, the prospects for next year look even better. Barring the possibility that some of the men may not return to school or that losses may be suffered by ineligibility, the team of 1936 should be able to change that third place of this season into the first championship to come to Eau Claire for more than a decade. Northern Division Standings W L T TP OP Pet. Superior 4 0 0 49 6 1.000 River Falls 2 1 1 47 27 .750 Eau Claire 1 I 2 37 21 .500 La Crosse 1 2 1 31 35 .333 Stout 0 4 0 0 75 .000 Paite Fifty-fiveMOI.DKXHAUKR BARNES WALTER BEHN COOPER DAVIS The Games HAU CLAIRE, 0—MANKATO, 19 September 28 There Twice in rhe first quarter, the Zornadocs advanced the hall to Mankato’s two and four-yard lines, respectively, hut were unahle to get it over before losing it on downs. Mankato opened the scoring in the second quarter with a line plunge by Gladhill, who gained another touchdown over the line in the last quarter, to bring the score 19-0 for the Minnesotans. Eau Claire, 7 first downs 0-0-0-0 0 Mankato, 11 first downs 0-6-7-6 19 EAU CLAIRE, 13—WINONA, 0 October 4 There Completely outplaying their opponents, the Zornmcn brought home their first victory by a 13-0 score over Winona. The first touchdown was made when Tomas he k tossed a pass to Behn. Tomashek went through the line for six points in the last period. Winona threatened by penetrating the five-yard line in the second quarter, but Behn intercepted a pass and returned it to midfield. Wrigglesworth ran forty-five yards on a quarter-kick sneak to Winona’s seven-yard line as the gun sounded to end the game. Eau Claire, 10 first downs 0-7-0-6 13 Winona, 4 first downs 0-0-04) 0 Individual Pictures Albert Moldenhaucr, Augusta, halfback—Captain of the 1935 squad, "Al” was handicapped by injuries most of the season, but gave a fine exhibition in the closing conference games. Donald Barnes, Eau Claire, tackle—Ranked by many observers as a tackle of Big Ten calibre, "Tony” was the work horse of a fine line. He has been elected co-captain of next years’ team, with "Johnny” Walter. John Walter, Eau Claire, quarterback—Playing his third year of college football, the fast and slippery "Johnny" will lead the next years’ team as cocaptain, with "Tony” Barnes. Holden Behn, Chippewa Falls, halfback — A coolheaded, crafty veteran and a clever running back, "Budda” was one of the mainstays of the 1935 team. Harold Cooper, Black River Falls, center—Another of the first-year men. Cooper was a light but formidable center. He held Adams of Superior on even terms, and played fine ball against River Falls. Marvin Davis. Batavia, 111., end—With abundance of end material, Davis failed to get a great deal of action, but played excellent ball against Stout in the final game. Page Fifty- ixMATA I. AS NEARV .NTI.SSKX OMSTED PARKOVICU PLETT The Games EAU CLAIRE, 0—SUPERIOR, 7 October 26 Here Refusing to give up, the Eau Claire team held the Giants of the North to a 7-0 score in a hard-fought game. The fine defensive work of Eau Claire broke up Superior’s scoring activity. Superior’s touchdown resulted from a pass from Butcher to Gentile, who raced twenty-five yards to score. Little offensive work was shown by the Blue and Gold during the first half, the ball being held mainly in Eau Claire’s territory. In the third quarter, Eau Claire advanced the ball sixty yards to the eleven-yard line, but lost it there on downs. Eau Claire, 7 first downs 0-0-0-0 0 Superior, 14 first downs 0-7-0-0 7 EAU CLAIRE, 14—RIVER FALLS, 14 November 2 Here With the fourtecn-ycar-old ’’jinx” rising up in the last tw’o minutes of play, the Eau Claire Peds tied the Falcons 14-14 in the annual Homecoming to save themselves from losing a hard game. Early in the third quarter Korrison recovered a fumble, and in the following plays Wrigglesworth went around left end to score. River Falls passed the ball down the field to tie the score in the last few minutes of play. Eau Claire, 6 first downs 0-0-7-7 14 River Falls, 10 first downs 0-0-0-14 14 Individual Pictures George Matalas, Merrillan, guard—"Sir George", who was looked upon by sports writers as one of the outstanding line candidates, was kept out of action by injuries during most of the season but should come into his own next year. George Neary, Eau Claire, guard—"Bccvo’s" last year of football also proved to be his best. The light but fighting red-head played excellent ball in every game in which lie took part. Harold Nilssen, Clear Lake, fullback—A hard tackling and speedy running back, "Casey” played his outstanding game of the season against LaCrosse. He has one more season of conference competition. Kenneth Omsted, Eau Claire, guard—Another first-year man to gain a position, Omsted was outstanding for his defensive play, and should prove even more valuable next season. Anthony Parkovich, Laona, end and fullback— A hard-fighting "talk-it-up" player, "Tony”, whether in the game or on the bench, was one of the team's spark plugs. Next year will be his final season. Grant Piett, Eau Claire, end—A stubborn and fighting defensive end who couldn’t be fooled, the rugged "Binno” was one of the pick of the first-year men. Pagr Fifly-cinhtFEIRN GENTRY I1KXXKMAN HORSVVII.L KURKISO.N Kl'EIIX The Games EAU CLAIRE, 0—LA CROSSE, 0 October 11 There A lighting Eau Claire team, that entered the game as underdogs, played LaCrossc to a scoreless tie in the first conference game of the season. Although the Zornmen played their best ball during the first half, when pitted later against the fresh reserves of the Racquets, they did not flinch. During the first half the ball was advanced to the LaCrosse fifteen-yard line, but was lost due to a penalty. In the third period, LaCrossc advanced the ball to the seven-yard line, but was unable to penetrate farther the defense of the Zornadoes. Eau Claire, 5 first downs 0-0-0-0 0 La Crosse, 6 first downs 0-0-0-0 0 EAU CLAIRE, 6—LUTHER OF IOWA, 30 October 19 Here "Taking it on the chin” to the tune of 30-6, Eau Claire bowed to a more powerful team in the first home game of the season. The Luther team made long advances due to the inability of the Zorn-inen to stop the running and passing attacks. Near the end of the first quarter, Bchn intercepted a pass and returned it thirty yards to the Luther twenty-yard line. Cur lone touchdown was made by a pass from Tomashck to Feirn, who caught tt in the end zone. Luther’s offense was centered mainly on pass attacks, with short line bucks when near the goal line. Eau Claire, 4 first downs I w' !! Luther, 12 first downs 6-12-6-6 30 Individual Pictures Harold Feirn, Neillsville, end—One of the outstanding first-year men of the conference, this tall Neillsville boy was a tower of strength on defense and scored Eau Claire’s lone touchdown against Luther. Walter Gentry, Geneva, III., fullback—The conference’s best defensive fullback, and a capable ball carrier, "Fat” played an outstanding game against both River Falls and Stout. Roy Hcnneman, Chippewa Falls, center—Shifted from guard to center, "Bcancr”, the largest man on the squad, proved to be valuable, although playing an unfamiliar position. Hugh Horswill, Neillsville, end — Hugh was kept from a regular position only because of Eau Claire's two tackles of all-conference caliber. He proved a fine player during ever)1 minute he was in the line-up. David Korrison, Lodi, end—Kept out of the line by injuries last season, "Dave” came into his own this year, and played good ball both defensively and offensively. Arnold Kuehn, Fall Creek, end—A big, rugged man without previous experience, "Arnic" saw little action, but should be a valuable man next season. Pajjr Fifty-wven 5M01.DENHAUER IIAK.NKS WALTER IJEIIX COOPER DAVIS The Games EAU CLAIRE, 0—MANKATO, 19 September 28 There Twice in the first quarter, the Zornadocs advanced the hill to Mankato’s two and four-yard lines, respectively, but were unable to get it over before losing it on downs. Mankato opened the scoring in the second quarter with a line plunge by Gladhill, who gained another touchdown over the line in the last quarter, to bring the score 19-0 for the Minnesotans. Eau Claire, 7 first downs 0-0-0-0 0 Mankato, 11 first downs 0-6-7-6 19 EAU CLAIRE, 13—WINONA, 0 October 4 There Completely outplaying their opponents, the Zornmen brought home their first victory by a 13-0 score over Winona. The first touchdown was made when Tomashek tossed a pass to Behn. Tomashek went through the line for six points in the last period. Winona threatened by penetrating the five-yard line in the second quarter, but Behn intercepted a pass and returned it to midfield. Wrigglesworth ran forty-five yards on a quarter-back sneak to Winona’s seven-yard line as the gun sounded to end the game. Eau Claire, 10 first downs 0-7-0-6 13 Winona, 4 first downs 0-0-0-0 0 Individual Pictures Albert Moldenhauer, Augusta, halfback—Captain of the 1935 squad, "A!” was handicapped by injuries most of the season, but gave a fine exhibition in the closing conference games. Donald Barnes. Eau Claire, tackle—Ranked by many observers as a tackle of Big Ten calibre, "Tony” was the work horse of a fine line. He has been elected co-captain of next years’ team, with "Johnny” Walter. John Walter, Eau Claire, quarterback—Playing his third year of college football, the fast and slippery "Johnny” will lead the next years’ team as cocaptain, with "Tony” Barnes. Holden Behn, Chippewa Falls, halfback — A coolheadcd, crafty veteran and a clever running back, "Budda” was one of the mainstays of the 1935 team. Harold Cooper, Black River Falls, center—Another of the first-year men, Cooper was a light but formidable center. He held Adams of Superior on even terms, and played fine ball against River Falls. Marvin Davis, Batavia, III., end—With abundance of end material. Davis failed to get a great deal of action, but played excellent ball against Stout in the final game. Page Fitty-alxFEIRX GENTRY HENNEMAN HORSYVILL KORRISON Kl'ElIX The Games EAU CLAIRE. 0—LA CROSSE, 0 October II • There A fighting Eau Claire team, that entered the game as underdogs, played LaCrossc to a scoreless tie in the first conference game of the season. Although the Zornmen played their best ball during the first half, when pitted later against the fresh reserves of the Racquets, they did not flinch. During the first half the ball was advanced to the LaCrosse fifteen-yard line, but was lost due to a penalty. In the third period, LaCrosse advanced the ball to the seven-yard line, but was unable to penetrate farther the defense of the Zornadoes. Eau Claire, 5 first downs 0-0-0-0 0 La Crosse, 6 first downs 0-0-0-0 0 EAU CLAIRE, 6—LUTHER OF IOWA, 30 October 19 Here "Taking it on the chin” to the tunc of 30-6, Eau Claire bowed to a more powerful team in the first home game of the season. The Luther team made long advances due to the inability of the Zornmen to stop the running and passing attacks. Near the end of the first quarter, Bchn intercepted a pass and returned it thirty yards to the Luther twenty-yard line. Cur lone touchdown was made by a pass from Tomashck to Feirn, who caught it in the end zone. Luther’s offense was centered mainly on pass attacks, with short line bucks when near the goal line. Eau Claire, 4 first downs 0-6-0-0 6 Luther, 12 first downs 6-12-6-6 30 Individual Pictures Harold Feirn, Ncillsvillc, end—One of the outstanding first-year men of the conference, this tall Ncillsvillc boy was a tower of strength on defense and scored Eau Claire’s lone touchdown against Luther. Walter Gentry, Geneva, III., fullback—The conference’s best defensive fullback, and a capable ball carrier, "Fat” played an outstanding game against both River Falls and Stout. Roy Henneman, Chippewa Falls, center—Shifted from guard to center, "Bcaner”, the largest man on the squad, proved to be valuable, although playing an unfamiliar position. Hugh Horswill, Ncillsvillc, end — Hugh was kept from a regular position only because of Eau Claire’s two tackles of all-conference caliber. He proved a fine player during every minute he was in the line-up. David Korrison, Lodi, end—Kept out of the line by injuries last season, "Dave” came into his own this year, and played good ball both defensively and offensively. Arnold Kuchn, Fall Creek, end—A big, rugged man without previous experience, "Arnie” saw little action, but should be a valuable man next season.MATALAS NEARY NILSSEN OMSTED PAKKOVICH PLETT The Games EAU CLAIRE, 0—SUPERIOR, 7 October 26 Here Refusing to give up, the Eau Claire team held the Giants of the North to a 7-0 score in a hard-fought game. The fine defensive work of Eau Claire broke up Superior’s scoring activity. Superior’s touchdown resulted from a pass from Butcher to Gentile, who raced twenty-five yards to score. Little offensive work was shown by the Blue and Gold during the first half, the ball being held mainly in Eau Claire’s territory. In the third quarter, Eau Claire advanced the ball sixty yards to the eleven-yard line, but lost it there on downs. Eau Claire, 7 first downs 0-0-0-0 0 Superior, 14 first downs 0-7-0-0 7 EAU CLAIRE, 14—RIVER FALLS, 14 November 2 Herb With the fourtecn-ycar-old "jinx” rising up in the last two minutes of play, the Eau Claire Peds tied the Falcons 14-14 ih the annual Homecoming to save themselves from losing a hard game. Early in the third quarter Korrison recovered a fumble, and in the following plays Wrigglesworth went around left end to score. River Falls passed the ball down the field to tic the score in the last few minutes of play. Eau Claire, 6 first downs 0-0-7-7 14 River Falls, 10 first downs 0-0-0-14 14 Individual Pictures George Matalas, Merrillan, guard—"Sir George", who was looked upon by sports writers as one of the outstanding line candidates, was kept out of action by injuries during most of the season but should come into his own next year. George Neary, Eau Claire, guard—"Beevo’s” last year of football also proved to be his best. The light but fighting red-head played excellent ball in every game in which he took part. Harold Nilssen, Clear Lake, fullback—A hard tackling and speedy running back, ’’Casey” played his outstanding game of the season against LaCrossc. He has one more season of conference competition. Kenneth Omsted, Eau Claire, guard—Another first-year man to gain a position, Omsted was outstanding for his defensive play, and should prove even more valuable next season. Anthony Parkovich, Laona. end and fullback— A hard-fighting "talk-it-up" player, "Tony”, whether in the game or on the bench, was one of the team’s spark plugs. Next year will be his final season. Grant Plett, Eau Claire, end—A stubborn and fighting defensive end who couldn’t be fooled, the rugged "Binno" was one of the pick of the first-year men. l aRc Fifty-eightQUICK SCHMIEDLIN TOMASHEK NVF.IX WOI.I.UM NVRIGGLESWORTII The Games EAU CLAIRE, 23—STOUT, 0 November 9 There Capturing the Little Brown Jug by virtue of their defeat of Stout, the Zornmen brought the 1935 season to a close. After Eau Claire had been held by Stout in the first quarter, Behn and Tomashck scored. Moldenhauer also scored in the third. Points after touchdowns were good, making the score 21-0. The final two points came as a result of a safety, when Eau Claire blocked a Stout punt on the latter’s ten-yard line. The last quarter was characterized by rough play in which both teams suffered severe penalties. One highlight of the game occurred when Schmiedlin carried the ball forty-five yards in a spectacular dash down the field. Eau Claire, 13 first downs 0-14-9-0 23 Stout, 7 first downs 0- 0-0-0 0 Individual Pictures Orville Quick, Eau Claire, guard—The cream of the Eau Claire guard crop, "Orvie”, light but exceedingly capable, was one of the outstanding men in a strong line and placed on the all-conference second team. Ray Schmiedlin, Lodi, halfback — The fastest man on the squad, Ray is noted for his ability to run the ends and return punts. He starred in the Stout game. Robert Tomashck, Eau Claire, halfback—"Tom-ma” shifted from end to halfback, proved to be the Blue and Gold’s outstanding ball carrier. He received a position on the all-conference second team. Frank Weix, Elmwood, tackle—Outstanding all season on both defensive and offensive playing, "Sheriff” received a well-earned all-conference berth. As one of the team’s two outstanding tacklers, he should prove invaluable next season. Frank Wrigglcsworth, Eau Claire, quarterback —"Wrig” enjoys the distinction of being the only first-year man to earn an all-conference position. He is remembered for his excellent punting and all-around play. William Wollum, Eau Claire, guard—"Bill”, a light but fighting guard, spent the early games on the sidelines, but his ability earned him a berth in the later games. Southern Division Standings W L T TP OP Pet. Oshkosh 4 0 0 53 13 1.000 Whitewater 3 I 0 49 37 .750 Milwaukee 2 2 0 34 40 .500 Platteville 1 3 0 21 59 .250 Stevens Point 0 4 0 0 8 .000 Pane Fifty-nineHere we have real action. Both teams become tense before the snapping of the pigskin as the Blue and Gold move goalward against the Falcons of River Falls. The crowd is almost holding its breath, waiting for the play. The game ended in a 14-14 tic, although Eau Claire led most of the game. Eau Claire suffered us only Conference defeat at the hands of Superior, but the Yellow-jackets found the going "plenty tough", as this p'c'.urc shows. The Northmen are being stopped in mdield on this particular play, a smash into the line. Time out! River Falls takes a rest and plots new ways to bring sorrow to Eau Claire fans in the 1935 Homecoming game. Nevertheless, Eau Claire held the Falls to a tie. The players in the foreground, from left to right, arc Simmclink, 33, guard, and Isaacson, 29, veteran center, of the Falcons. Eau Claire passes deep into Luther territory, and Thompson, left halfback, of the visitors intercepts, as the Eau Claire Zornadoes do down to defeat at the hands of Luther College, champions of Iowa, in the opening home game of the season. Here is part of the Eau Claire squad engaged in signal drill. In the backficld, from left to right, are Moldcnhaucr, Walter, Gentry, and Bchn. In the line, left to right, arc Fcirn, Weix, Matalas, Henncman, Quick, Barnes, and Korri-son. Football Action Page Sixty"You have to be a football hero to get along with the beautiful girls” is probably what Training School youngsters in the picture arc saying. If practice makes perfect, they ought to be good by the time they play on the Teachers’ College team. These young "huskies” are drawing their public already, judging from the way the crowd cheered when the youngsters played football between halves at the Eau Claire-Superior game. The determined appearance of the referee in the picture seems to indicate a penalty of fifteen yards—and what big steps he’s taking! With the goal line alarmingly near, this must have been one of the tense moments in football history. One, two, three, shift! But, where is the other team? However, this is just a practice, they tell us. And practice is what every team must have if it is to win games. With the rest of the team watching, Behn gets off a nice place kick. With Walter holding the ball, it should be an exceptional effort. "Bill” Zorn seems quite intent on the play, for many games have been won or lost by the extra point after a touchdown! Time between halves is absolutely necessary for the spectators as well as the team as is plainly evident here. There seems to be nothing like a "hot-dog” or pop-corn to bring "pep.” Football Action Page Sixty-oncSUBMIT TO EAU During Homecoming Week the Amphict-yons presented a skit to the assembly in which members of the Eau Claire team, represented by Amphictyonites in the picture, were interviewed by a reporter, Helen Cohen, from the "Nose-for-News” agency. Kathryn MeDermid, behind the bandages, represented River Falls. Each year it is the duty of the Freshman Class to gather boxes for the Homecoming Bonfire. Here one may see the work of this year’s class going up in flames! After the outdoor activities, a gigantic ’ pep” meeting was held in the college assembly. Here’s the float, prepared by the Newman Club, that took first prize in the Homecoming Parade, on November 2. The stately king, representing Eau Claire, is Lawrence King. His "subjects”, the other students in the picture, were concealed from the camera. "We have your number, River Falls; it’s 0000.” This immense telephone represented the French Club’s contribution to the Homecoming Parade. It received second award, a box of candy. Spectators were amused at the havoc wrought upon the telephone by the wind before the parade was over. The last car assembled for the Homecoming Parade included the loud speaker shown in the picture. Through the courtesy of the Wood Motor Co.. Eau Claire Chevrolet dealers, the car was placed at the disposal of the "Pep” Committee for the parade. Homecoming I’agc Sixty-twoWith an appropriate slogan decorating their truck. Training School pupils made a convincing football squad. The glow of anticipation on each face foreshadowed, it seems, a good Homecoming game; a foreshadowing that proved to be accurate. Dorothy Adler, as the Spirit of Victory, is extending the wreath of victory to the successful Eau Claire team. Donna Kidd is standing over the defeated River Falls team, represented by Kathryn Williams. Tom Merrill left the Strut and Fret float to show everyone how Paul Bunyan must have looked. Perhaps if Paul had played on our team he might have defeated River Falls single-handed; but, as it was, the team had to be contented with a tie. Attempting to prove the statement that you can’t keep a good man down, the Amphictyons have, in the picture at the right, put Norenc Laundrie, as Eau Claire, at the top of the ladder. Pearl Risberg, the defeated River Falls team, was forced to remain in disgrace at the foot of the ladder. Students, alumni, and other loyal supporters constituted one of the largest crowds that ever saw a Homecoming football game here. Most of the spectators were enthusiastic because of the 14-14 tie with River Falls after so many defeats at the hands of that college. Homecoming BAND Pli.ys ON I’ajfc Sixty-threeVARSITY BASKETBALL SQUAD Hack Row—Kudin Moore Hovey Feirn Morswill Cooper _ Parkovich Banger, Manager, ont Row Mr. Zorn, poach Bchn Ti ma hek SchmieUlin Held, Captain Anderson KorrUen Wrigglcsworth RctaRick, Trainer. Basketball Season Continuing the slow rise in Eau Claire basketball fortunes that started back in 1952, the Blue and Gold cagcrs of 1935-’36 turned in the best conference record an Eau Claire team has had since 1927, when the team won six and lost four games. This year with four wins and four losses, the Zomadoes tied with Superior for third place in conference standing. In the non-conference field, the record was not so impressive. The Zornadoes won only three, while finding themselves on the short end of the count in four contests. It was not a great team this year, but the makings of one—a team that would and did fight and played its best basketball in the second half of every game. It was its best on the home floor. Only River Falls, champions of the Northern Division, and Stevens Point, Southern Division champions, were able to hand the Eau Claire aggregation a defeat on its home court. The one factor that handicapped Coach Zorn’s men all season was a lack of height; this was especially noticeable against such teams as River Falls and Superior. The 1936 team was a team in every sense of the word. It had its stars, it is true, and yet. no one man dominated the play for the season. Captain Held displayed his usual eye for the basket, besides playing a good floor game. Behn, cool and smooth, aided in both offense and defense. Tomashek made up in fight what he lacked in height, and often provided the vital spark that set things going. Besides these men there was Feirn, one of the best Freshman centers to come up in years. Korrison played a season of fine ball, as did Hovey, who led the way to victory against LaCrossc. Anderson’s returning to school and Moore’s becoming eligible for conference games added strength to the team the second semester. At the close of the season the team displayed its greatest ability; it defeated a strong Superior team, fresh from victories over Stout and the championship team of River Falls, by a score of 33-30 as a fitting close to one of the best seasons in years. As 1937 will probably find most men of the squad returning for service, the fortunes of Eau Claire should continue to bt on the up grade. Eau Claire Opponents Eau Claire at Superior 24 47 La Crosse at Eau Claire 38 32 Eau Claire at Stout 40 36 River Falls at Eau Claire 37 53 Eau Claire at LaCrosse 32 36 Stout at Eau Claire 42 35 Eau Claire at River Falls 29 50 Superior at Eau Claire 33 30 Page Sixty-fourWith an appropriate slogan decorating their truck, Training School pupils made a convincing football squad. The glow of anticipation on each face foreshadowed, it seems, a good Homecoming game; a foreshadowing that proved to be accurate. Dorothy Adler, as the Spirit of Victory, is extending the wreath of victory to the successful Eau Claire team. Donna Kidd is standing over the defeated River Falls team, represented by Kathryn Williams. Tom Merrill left the Strut and Fret float to show everyone how Paul Bunyan must have looked. Perhaps if Paul had played on our team he might have defeated River Falls single-handed; but, as it was, the team had to be contented with a tie. Attempting to prove the statement that you can’t keep a good man down, the Amphictyons have, in the picture at the right, put Norene Faundric. as Eau Claire, at the top of the ladder. Pearl Risberg, the defeated River Falls team, was forced to remain in disgrace at the foot of the ladder. Students, alumni, and other loyal supporters constituted one of the largest crowds that ever saw a Homecoming football game here. Most of the spectators were enthusiastic because of the 14-14 tic with River Falls after so many defeats at the hands of that college. Homecoming Page Sixty-threer Hack Row—Kudin Moore Hovey •ont How Mr. Zorn, coach Helm Tomashek VARSITY BASKETBALL SylAI) Feirn Ilorxwilt t'oojwr Parkovlch Harager. Manager. Schmicdlin Held, Captain Anderson Korrisi.n Wrigglctnorth Rctalliek, Trainer. Basketball Season Continuing the slow rise in Eau Claire basketball fortunes that started back in 1932, the Blue and Gold cagcrs of l935-’36 turned in the best conference record an Eau Claire team has had since 1927, when the team won six and lost four games. This year with four wins and four losses, the Zornadoes tied with Superior for third place in conference standing. In the non-conference field, the record was not so impressive. The Zornadoes won only three, while finding themselves on the short end of the count in four contests. It was not a great team this year, but the makings of one—a team that would and did fight and played its best basketball in the second half of every game. It was its best on the home floor. Only River Falls, champions of the Northern Division, and Stevens Point, Southern Division champions, were able to hand the Eau Claire aggregation a defeat on its home courr. The one factor that handicapped Coach Zorn’s men all season was a lack of height; this was especially noticeable against such teams as River Falls and Superior. The 1936 team was a team in every sense of the word. It had its stars, it is true, and yet, no one man dominated the play for the season. Captain Held displayed his usual eye for the basket, besides playing a good floor game. Bchn, cool and smooth. aided in both offense and defense. Tomashek made up in fight what he lacked in height, and often provided the vital spark that set things going. Besides these men there was Feirn, one of the liest Freshman centers to come up in years. Korrison played a season of fine ball, as did Hovey, who led the way to victory against LaCrossc. Anderson’s returning to school and Moore’s becoming eligible for conference games added strength to the team the second semester. At the close of the season the team displayed its greatest ability; it defeated a strong Superior team, fresh from victories over Stout and the championship team of River Falls, by a score of 33-30 as a fitting close to one of the best seasons in years. As 1937 will probably find most men of the squad returning for service, the fortunes of Eau Claire should continue to bt. on the up grade. Eau Claire Opponents Eau Claire at Superior 24 47 I .a Crosse at Eau Claire 38 32 Eau Claire at Stout 40 36 River Falls at Eau Claire 37 53 Eau Claire at LaCrosse 32 36 Stout at Eau Claire 42 35 Eau Claire at River Falls 29 50 Superior at Eau Claire 33 30 Pane Sixty-fourBASKETBALL "B” SQUAD Back Row Vri haoplc Lam. Kopplin Carroll Conp-r Stephenson Front Row—Baragcr, Manager Barkin Luther Kopplin Welx Solherg Vande'try Height, Coach Ketallick, Trainer The “B” Team Under the tutelage of Assistant Coach Mark Haight, the "B” team of 1935-’36 had the most successful season, in every respect, that an Eau Claire "B” team has ever enjoyed. Although a six-game schedule was played, no opponent was able to defeat the team. The season opened with a 31-31 draw against Voigt’s Vipers, a team composed of former college and high school players. In this tilt, the ’’B’s” came from behind to tic up the count after a disastrous first half. This was the only game of the season in which Coach Haight’s men found themselves hard-pressed. In the remaining games, the Intramural All Stars were defeated 40-25; Token’s I.oopsters by a 37-26 count; the strong New Auburn High School quintet, 35-19; and a speedy amateur aggregation, the Silver Dome team from Neilsville, 43-9. The season closed with a 48-17 win over the Fairchild city team on its home floor, to give the "B’s” a record of five wins and no defeats for the season. During the season’s play the "BY’ rolled up a total of 234 points to 127 scored against them. One of the main objects of the ”B” team is to develop players for the varsity. In this Mark Haight was most successful. ’’Chick” Kolstad, an carly-scason player, was drafted for varsity use the second semester. He was an important factor in the defeat of Superior. Other players who should make a showing on the varsity next season were developed in the persons of ’’Mike” Carroll, former Durand High School player and ”Jim” Solberg, a guard from Elk Mound. A real value was also furnished to other members of the squad who, while they will not be available for the varsity next year, will find their experience worthwhile in the coaching field after graduation. With a large group of Freshmen to pick from next season and the group trained this year. Coach Haight should once more be able to build up a strong machine for the 1937 campaign. As a conclusion to the record of the "A” and the ”B” team seasons, mention should be made of Trainer James Baragcr and Stockroom Manager Harold Rctallick, whose earnest efforts and willing cooperation added much. Northern Division Won Lost Pet. 7 1 .875 5 3 .625 Superior 4 4 .500 4 4 .500 Southern Division Won Lost Pet. 8 0 1.000 6 2 .750 Platteville 3 5 .375 9 6 .250 Whitcwaterr ... 1 7 .125 Page Sixly-fivcHELD ANDERSON BEHN Forward Guard Guard EEJRN HOVEY KOKKISON Center Guard Forward Non-Conference Games The non-conference season was opened against Concordia College of St. Paul. The Zornmen got an early lead and maintained it throughout the game. The game was a good test of our new players, as thirteen men saw action. The final score showed Eau Claire leading 45-31. Eau Claire’s second victory was in defeating Augshurg College 46-37. The Zornadoes led throughout the game, although they were threatened late in the second period when Augshurg came within four points of the Blue and Gold. The team was handed its first defeat of the season when the strong Stevens Point five, in a one-sided game, topped the locals 41-23. Although the Eau Claire players lagged in points, they continued aggressively until the final whistle. In the return game some weeks later, the "Pointers” led by a score of 45-28. Eau Claire did not fare very well on the two-day road trip that followed. At Dccorah, Iowa, the Zornadoes were edged out, 35-33, by Luther College in a close game after two over-times were played. The next dav Winona handed them a 45-36 defeat. In the return game, Eau Claire had revenge by defeating Winona 42-36. After trailing 22-18 at mid-period, Eau Claire gained the lead before the game ended. The contest was close and bitterly fought by both teams, as is evident from the fact that the lead changed eight times during the game. Individual Players Virgil Held, Augusta, forward—Captain of this year’s cagers, "Pat” has been a potent factor in both offense and defense. A cool player who drives at top speed for a full game. Clayton Anderson, Eau Claire, guard—"Andy,” a letter winner of last season, returned the second semester to add power to the Blue and Gold. He has a good eye for the basket and is a powerhouse on defense. Holden Bchn, Chippewa Falls, guard—For the second straight season "Budda” has been an outstanding defensive man of the team. Cool and crafty, he handles the ball well and is a dead shot from the free-throw circle. Harold Feirn, Ncillsvillc, center — The only Freshman to earn a regular berth, he has been one of the large factors in the team’s success. With three years more to play, Feirn should develop an outstanding record. Alfred Hovey, Tomah, guard—A tall man who is especially good on rebound work, Hovey played his outstanding game when the Zornmen defeated La Crosse, when his long shot tied up the count. David Korrison, Lodi, forward—A regular from last season who is the leading defensive player of the front line. "Dave” gets his share of buckets, and may be used cither at center or forward post. Page Sixty-nixKUEHN MOORE PARKOVICH SCHMIEDI.IN TOMASHEK WRIGGLES WORTH Guard Forward Guard Forward Guard Forward Conference Games The conference season opened at Superior on January 10. After keeping on nearly even terms the first half, the Zornmen lost when Superior got control of the tipoff and defeated Eau Claire 47-24. The following week, the team came through with a 38-32 victory over I.aCrosse. The Maroons rook the lead, hut Eau Claire broke through in a closing rally as Hovey evened up the score. To score her second conference win, Eau Claire again played an up-hill game to edge out Stout, 40-36. The undefeated Falcons of River Falls handed Eau Claire a defeat, January 30, 53-37, after a hitter contest. On February 7, LaCrossc defeated Eau Claire by pulling ahead in the closing minutes—revenge for the La Crosse defeat earlier in the season. In a return game, Eau Claire topped the Blue Devils, 42-35, in a game in which Eau Claire held the lead most of the way. The first half was played on nearly even terms, but Eau Claire led throughout the second period. Eau Claire suffered defeat when River Falls smothered the Zornmen 50-29. Eau Claire being unable to get a working combination during the early minutes of the game, River Falls piled up a comfortable margin. The second half was played on nearly even terms. Coming from behind in the last six minutes of play, the Zornmen closed the season’s play by defeating Superior 33-30. Individual Playkrs Arnold Kuehn, Fall Creek, guard—A big, rugged Freshman who shoots well and is strong defensively. "Amic” showed up well in early season games, but was kept out by illness most of the season. Donald Moore, Durand, forward—"Don”, who transferred from Ripon, was ineligible the first semester. The second-half of the schedule he shared scoring honors with Captain Held, and will be one of the sharp-shooters of next year’s team. Anthony Parkovich, Leona, guard—Despite the fact that injuries benched Parkovich in mid-season, his leadership and drive could be depended upon to encourage the team, spurring them on to greater achievements. Ray Schmicdlin, Lodi, forward—Playing his third season of varsity ball, Ray continued to be valuable on account of his exceptional speed. His best game of the season was the conference opener at Superior. Robert Tomashek, Eau Claire, guard—"Tom-ma” was shifted from forward to guard position, where his aggressive play soon earned him a regular position. Despite his comparatively small size, he outplayed most of his opponents. Frank Wrigglcsworth, Eau Claire, guard—Another of the squad’s Freshmen, "Wrig” saw little action this year, but will be available for duty next season. Page Sixty-sevenA boxing class was established the second semester as a part of the athletics program. Boxers shown in the picture arc, from left to right, Francis May, instructor; Peterson, Noglc, Judd, Strehlaw and Wilkie. A representative boxing team was selected for intercollegiate matches. The Vikings were among the leaders in the 1936 intramural basketball tournament. Left to right, in the picture the members arc, back row, Voshmik, Anderson, Olson, Hanson, and Stephenson; front row, Skutely, Amundson, captain, and Larson. H. Speckien, Bouthilet, McCombs, and Setter, back row; and Benish, E. Pederson, and R. Speckien, front row, made up the Siwash team. This was one of the four ranking teams in the play-off of the intramural basketball tournament. Some of the members of the old Whoops and Holler team were reorganized as the Pansies. The members of this team are, as shown in the picture, left to right, back row, Barkin, D. Barnes, and Matalas; and front row, Nilssen, Weix, and J. Barnes. Weix was the high scorer of the tournament. The strongest team in the tournament was the Alcrs. This team finished at the top in the tournament by defeating the Flying Dutchmen for the first time in years. The Alcrs team is shown, left to right in the picture, back row , Stcinbring, Pah!, Solbcrg, and Kopplin; and front row, Garber and Strauch. Intramural SportsThe "A” men were a bit dramatic in their basketball but failed to win a place. The members arc as shown, left to ri »ht in the picture, back row, Nchcr, Weiher and Skamfer; and front row, Hammond and Rick. Gillett, Wick, and Smith, back row, and McKinnon, Nadlcr, and Setter were the members of this year’s Dribblconian team. Most of them have been on this team for four years. For the past three years the Flying Dutchmen have been the winners of the intramural tournament. This year, however, they were overthrown. The team is shown here left to right, back row, Blanchard, Derge, and Kluth, and front row, Board, Moldenhauer, and Lewis. Another new team that made a fairly good record was the Titlers. The team is shown, from left to right in the picture, back row, Hokcn-strom, Hcnneman, and Jennings; and, front row, Rockwell, Lee, captain, and Donaldson. Martin, Melby, and Palmer, back row, and Waters and Brandstedtcr, front row in the picture, were the members of the 1936 Phillips’ 66. Although not as strong a team as in former years, the members played each game with fine spirit. Intramural Sports Page Sixly-tiineThe W.A.A. Advisory Board consists of all officers and sports managers for the year. The 19$5-’36 Board is, left to right in the picture, top row, Gough, Norheim, Roycraft, L. I.uhm, Miss Phelps. McDcrmid, Stallman, and R. Luhm; bottom row, Snyder, Patrick, Mesang, Ringger, I.undbcrg, and Kranzfcldcr. Gladys Stallman, left, and Harriet Babing-ton, right, arc shown here as they pause for a moments rest between games of the horseshoe tournament conducted by the W.A.A. during the Fall season. In this picture is shown one of the teams practicing for the touchball tournament. Elaine Hagen and Kate Williams, in the backfield, and Helen Gregerson, Joyce Loasching, and Peggy Krell, in the line, made up this team. Jean Johnson, left, and Elaine Hagen, right, were the winners of the Fall quarter individual sports tournaments, Jean winning the horseshoe singles tournament and Elaine the tennis singles by defeating all girls in their sections and the winners of the other sections. The "huddle” as employed in girls’ touch-ball is much the same as in football. Here, Marion Mesang, center, is planning a play with her team mates in hope of surprising the opponents and thus scoring. Girls’ Sports Page Seventyf The Bombers won first place in the W.A.A. basketball tournament by defeating all of the other teams entered. The members of the winning team are, as shown in the picture, left to right, back row, Jean Roycraft, Marie Kranz-felder, and Elaine Hagen; and, front row, Cecelia Kranzfelder, captain, and Arlene Serrurier. Second place in the basketball tournament was won by Pat’s Pirates. This team was defeated by only the Bombers. The members are, left to right, back row, Helen Gregcrson, Jean Johnson, Elaine Dutcher, and Rose l.uhm; and, front • row, Patricia Patrick, captain, Joyce Smith, and Dorothy Adler. Ping-pong singles was the second - quarter individual girls’ sports tournament. The winners of the two divisions, Elaine Hagen, left, and Marion Mesang played three games to determine the winner of the tournament. This year’s tournament was won by Elaine Hagen. The major tournament for the fourth quarter was kittenball. After a scries of practices, captains were elected and teams chosen. In the picture are Marion Mesang ready to bat the ball and Gladys Stallman in the catcher’s position, to catch the ball if "Mayo” is not successful in batting a home run. The young women who entered the deck tennis doubles tournament this year were, as shown left to right, back row, in the picture, Gcss-ncr, Nelson, McDcrmid, Sumstad, Pfefferkom, Johnson, Hoover, Gough, and Snyder; front row, Mesang, Waterpool, L. Gabus, H. Gabus, Gregcrson, Patrick, Kranzfelder, and Stallman. Girls’ Sports Page Sevcntjr-oncAlfred Hovey, left, and John Hopkins arc shown here as they were returning frem a game of horseshoe last Spring. The M. A. A. conducts a horseshoe tournament each Spring for its members. "Pat” Held was the winner of the 1935 tournament. A women's kittcnbal! team, composed of some of the best players developed during the W. A. A. kitten hall tournament, challenged a men’s team to a game at the annual all-school picnic last Spring In the picture the men are at bat. Here is another view of the kittenball game between the women’s and men’s teams. Harriet Hansen has just made a hit for the women. I.ouis Barkin is in the catcher’s position. One of the most amusing of the various "stunts” at the all-school picnic last Spring was the milk-drinking contest. The contestants were required to drink their milk from old-fashioned nursing bottles to see who could empty a bottle first. Tennis is Spring’s most popular sport. The college courts have been even more in demand since they have been equipped with backstops. The picture shows a men’s doubles game in progress. Spring Sports P»8« Seventy-threeActivities Challenges— Life scatters them like dust Right in the face of every mortal being, Blinding the weak, Wringing from them cries of anguish And of fear; Turning them back from the broad highways Into more sheltered lanes. Challenges— Seen in each twist of fate Which binds man’s wrists And blocks his struggling footsteps, Trying the strong With battles out of which Comes life’s reward for living. To those who see through dust, Shines as a beacon light Anticipation of the end Of being— Achievement. TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 1916-1936ARTHUR J. FOX, A. M. EDUCATION DEPARTMENT MEMBER TEACHERS’ COLLEGE CONFERENCE ATHLETICS BOARD SIXTEEN YEARS SELECTED BY PRESIDENT SCHOFIELD AS MEMBER OF FIRST FACULTY IN 1916 ACTIVITIES ROBERT MUSUM IRENE FOMBEKG VIRGINIA SMITH LOUIS BERG EDWIN BOBERG Editor Amw. Edit or Assist. Editor Adv. AUiutt r I ir. .Manager The Spectator Robert Muslim, Editor Irene Fomberg, Associate Editor Virginia Smith (First Semester) Asst. Editor Dale Buzzcll, James Riley, Editorials Irene Lcnz, Columnist Janice Bates, Frank Brown, Irene Lena, Albert Beck, Virginia Palmer, Gerald Richardson, Janet Peterson, James Riley, Ursula Schmid-lin, Clifford Westlund, lone Millard—Reporters Stanley McCombs, Sports Editor Einar Pederson, Paul Smith, Sports Reporters Jane Anderson, Alice Hartwell, Anna Tangcn. Gordon Colby, Margaret Lundberg, Clarence Nelson, Pauline Smith—Typists. Louis Berg, Advertising Manager Edwin Boberg, Circulation Manager Mr. Slagg, Treasurer Mr. Hornback, Circulation Advisor Mr. Murray, General Advisor Standing— Schmidlin Colby P. Smith F. Brown Richardson Westlund Burrell E. Pederson Riley Bates. Seated—C. Nelson l.en Tangcn Palmer Hartwell P. Smith J. Anderson McCombs.HELEN COHEN ELVERA DAl'L MARVELLA STUB BE HAROLD BAHLKE ROALD ACER Editor A it hoc. Editor AuiiU Editor Adv. Manager Cir. Manager The Periscope Helen Cohen, Editor Elvera Daul. Associate Editor Marvella Stubbe, Assistant Editor Kathryn McDermid, Copy Editor Clarice Chase, Literary Editor, Divisior Page Poems Florence Izdepski, Calendar Robert Gessner, Allen Randall, Photography Arnold Works, Athletics Elizabeth Alcott, Organizations Bowman Larson, Staff Artist lone Drew, Forensics Vivian Bragg, Music Edith Broctzman, General Activities Alice Hartwell, General Activities, Typist Pauline Smith, Typist Harold Bahlkc, Advertising Manager Roald Ager, Circulation Manager Clyde Dcrouin, Robert Martin, Asst. Circulation Managers Mr. Simpson, Circulation Advisor Mr. Murray, General Advisor Standing — Bragg Work Ixdri'iiki Chase. Seated Drew Smith Broclsman McDermid Alcott Hartwell.To|» row Mr. D»nal !»oti Mclojr Berg Voigt West-fund Bock Frazier Bottom row — Herrick Cohen Drew Svengaarti Cough Danner Minor Debate Tournaments The debaters of the college completed a very successful season this year. Debating the question, "Resolved that Congress should have the power to override by a two-thirds majority vote decisions of the Supreme Court declaring laws passed by Congress unconstitutional,” teams were entered in six tourna-ments during the year, and won first place in two and second place in two, besides participating in other debates. The following debaters came out for debating this year: Cleo Herrick, Dale Buzzcll, Clifford Westlund, Norene Laundrie, John Ritzinger, Albert Beck, John Danner, Noreen Gough, Helen Cohen, lone Drew, Lillian Svengaard, Louis Berg, Wilbur Voigt, Russell Frazier, and Junior McCoy. All these debaters, after participating in practice debates, were eligible to compete in the tournament in which nine colleges were represented and which was held at La Crosse on December 7. Eau Claire Teachers’ College debaters took first place in this tournament by winning ten out of a possible sixteen debates, despite the fact that frequent substitutions were made in order to give all debaters practice. Louis Berg and Wilbur Voigt won individual honors by winning four out of four debates. River Falls debaters engaged in four rounds of debate with Eau Claire at Eau Claire on January 18. These were non-decision debates. Eau Claire debaters also placed first in the tournament held at Eau Claire on February 1, at which they were hosts to teams from six colleges White-water, La Crosse, Stevens Point, and River Falls State Teachers’ Colleges, St. Mary’s College, and Northland College. Eau Claire teams won twelve out of sixteen debates. Individual honors for Eau Claire went to Albert Beck and John Danner in the "B” tournament, and to Russell Frazier and Junior McCoy in the "A” tournament. Both of these teams won four out of four decisions. In addition to the men’s first teams, consisting of the Louis Berg-Wilbur Voigt team and the Russell Frazier-Junior McCoy team, and the women’s first teams, consisting of the Noreen Gough-Helen Cohen team and the Lillian Svengaard-Ione Drew team, Cleo Herrick, John Danner, and Albert Beck also competed in this tournament. A banquet was given by the Forensic Honors Society for all debaters on this occasion. At the tournament held at Whitewater State Teachers’ College on February 21 and 22, Eau Claire tied for second place with the DeKalb, Illinois, Teachers’ College by winning eleven debates. Other schools represented were Stevens Point, LaCrosse, Platteville, and Whitewater State Teachers’ Colleges, and Carroll College. Helen Cohen and Noreen Gough took individual honors for Eau Claire by winning four out of five debates. The men’s and women’s first teams participated in this tournament, with John Danner and Albert Beck substituting for Louis Berg, who was unable to attend. On March 14 River Falls’ debaters were hosts to debates from six colleges in a post - tournament tournament to which all debaters who had not participated in the Northwest tournament were invited. In this tournament Eau Claire debaters won five debates, thus winning second place. Page Seventy-eightTop row — Mr. Donaldson McCoy Berg Voigt trailer. Bottom row-Cohen Drew Svettgaanl (lough. Major Debate Tournaments In addition to the three minor tournaments in which they participated, the men’s first teams of Hau Claire State Teachers’ College competed in two major tournaments this year, and the women in one. The men’s first teams, which consisted of Russell Frazier and Junior McCoy, who made up one team, and Louis Berg and Wilbur Voigt, who made up the other, competed in the Red River Valley Tournament, held at Moorehead, Minnesota, February 5-7, and the men’s division of the Northwest Debate Tournament, held at the College of St. Thomas, St. Paul, March 2-4. The women’s first teams competed in the second annual women’s division of the Northwest Tournament, held at the College of St. Catherine’s, St. Paul, March 2-4. At the Red River Valley Tournament, held at Moorehead. and at which twenty-two colleges were represented. Eau Claire men debaters won five debates. The team that consisted of Louis Berg and Wilbur Voigt won three debates, and the team that consisted of Russell Frazier and Junior McCoy won two. At the men’s division of the Northwest Debate Tournament, held at the College of St. Thomas, in which sixty-nine teams competed, the team consisting of Russell Frazier and Junior McCoy was eliminated in the sixth round, and that consisting of Wilbur Voigt and Louis Berg, in the seventh. The Frazier-McCoy team met Luther College, Concordia College, Iowa State Teachers’ College, University of South Dakota, Augustana College, and Gustavus Adolphus. The team defeated Iowa State Teachers’ College, the University of South Dakota, and Augustana College. The Berg-Voigt team met Northern Teachers’ College, Hastings College, Nebraska. Wcslvan. St. Olaf’s, St. Cloud Teachers’ College, and two teams from Macalrstcr College. The team defeated Nebraska Wesleyan, Hastings College, St. Olaf’s, and St. Cloud Teachers’ College. The tournament was won by the College of St. Thomas At the women’s division of the Northwest Tournament. held at the College of St. Catherine’s and in which fortv-cight teams were entered, the team consisting of Noreen Gough and Helen Cohen was eliminated in the fourth round, and that consisting of lone Drew and Lillian Svengaard. in the fifth. The Cchen-Gough team met Augustana College of Rock Isbnd. Illinois, Dakota Wesleyan. Eastern Teachers’ College, and Iowa State Teachers’ College. The team defeated Augustana College. The Drew-Svengaard team met Augustana College of Rock Island, W’heat-on College, and Moorehead State Teachers’ CoPege. The team defeated Augustana College of South Dakota and the College of St. Catherine’s. Hastings College won this tournament. After the fourth round of the Northwest Debate Tournament, one of the largest forensic contests in the country, Eau Claire was the only college entered that had three teams still in the tournament. Page Seventy-nineTop row 11.Trick Mr. Donahlftou Kringlr Hoy. Bottom row—Lnfttufkn Co lirn Berg Launtlrle Daul I‘a liner McCoy. Other Forensics Eau Claire this year was successful not only in debate but also in other forensic contests. At the state contest held at Stevens Point on March 21, representatives of Eau Claire took first place by winning two firsts and one second. Intracollegiate elimination contests were held at Eau Claire State Teachers’ College on March 11. Winners of first and second places in each of these contests were admitted to membership in the Forensics Honors Club. Only first place winners represented the college at the state contest at Stevens Point. In the preliminary oratorical declamation contest held here March 11, in which Cleo Herrick, Albert Beck, Joseph Lastufka, and Kenneth Kringle took part, Cleo Herrick won first place and Albert Beck second. In the preliminary extempore reading contest, in which Elvera Daul, Helen Cohen, Virginia Palmer, and Barbara Beckwith participated, Barbara Beckwith took first place and Virginia Palmer second. In serious declamation, on the same occasion, Mildred Berg won first place and Norenc Laundrie second. In the interpretative reading contest, Elvera Daul placed first and Barbara Beckwith second. Thomas Merrill entered the humorous declamation contest, Junior McCoy the extempore speaking, and Stanley Hoy the original oratorical. In the contest at Stevens Point, Eau Claire made the best record of any of the six colleges represented, contestants from Stevens Point, Whitewater, Plattc-ville, LaCrosse, and Eau Claire State Teachers’ Colleges, and Marquette University being entered. Eau Claire won two firsts and one second; LaCrosse, which placed second, two firsts and one fourth; and Page Stevens Point, which placed third, one first and two seconds. In the first contest at Stevens Point, that in oratorical declamation, Cleo Herrick of Eau Claire placed first with his selection, "Prisoner at the Bar.” In serious declamation, Mildred Berg of Eau Claire won first place with her selection, "Daddy Doc.” In extempore reading LaCrosse placed first and Marquette second. Elvera Daul of Eau Claire won fourth place. In extempore speaking, Stevens Point won first and Junior McCoy, of Eau Claire, fifth place. Barbara Beckwith was the winner of the local extempore reading contest; however, it was discovered, when the Eau Claire representatives arrived at the general meeting at Stevens Point, that there was only one reading contest, although Eau Claire had two representatives. As we did not have a representative entered in humorous declamation. Dr. Davenport, of the faculty, who accompanied the contestants, wrote an original declamation, and Barbara Beckwith learned it in time for the humorous declamation contest three hours later. She took second place in this contest and LaCrosse first. This was the second annual state forensics contest that has been held at Stevens Point. Formerly, district contests were held, the winners later representing the district at the state contest held at Madison. It is planned to perfect the organization, next year, of a group of students and members of the faculty who arc interested in forensics, to try to promote further participation in these activities and to train those participating. EightyOn this page are the pictures of five of the seven debate teams that debated at the tournament held at Eau Claire, February 1. In the picture at the left, the River Falls State Teachers’ College team is pictured. Its members are, as shown from left to right, back row, Baker, Vas-seoux, Sirianni, Glciter, Larson; front row, Bacon, Beard, Hawkins, Williams, and Ordal. The team at the left represented Stevens Point State Teachers’ College at the Eau Claire tournament. Its members were, back row, Shor-cy, Hyer, Burroughs, Zylka; front row, Beiher, Guerin, Watson, Rudal. At the left are pictured the members of the Whitewater team—Gerald Porter, Helen l-oncr-gan, Eunice Jerred, Vida Palloc and Lcand Hinkle. Later in the season, Eau Claire debaters took part in a two-day tournament held at White-water. This year, for the first time, Eau Claire debaters were hosts at a tournament to debaters from St. Mary’s College, Winona. In the picture arc shown Frank Csar, John Beckman, James Ricbe, and John Hogan, all of the Winona college. The expressions on the faces of the Eau Claire debaters, pictured at the right, seem to register satisfaction, for Eau Claire placed first in the tournament held here February 1. In the picture arc, back row, Mr. Donaldson, coach, Frazier, McCoy, Danner, Beck, and Herrick; front row, Svengaard, Drew, Gough, and Cohen. Berg and Voigt are not in the picture. Eau Claire Tournament Page EiKl ty-oncTHE TIME December 18 THE PEACE Coi.eecf. Auditorium THE OCCASION PRESENTATION "Outward Bound' Dramatics Strut and Fret revamped its organization this year. Under the new plan of organization, applicants for membership arc required to be in a one-act play in order to gain admittance to the club. All of these plays are presented at club meetings and at rural schools throughout this district. In "Poetry and Plaster,” one of these plays, directed by Florence Izdeoski, Julie Norris becomes t public menace through her recitation of bad poetry he husband has written. The cast consisted of Julie Norris, plaved by Borghild A«rr; lim Norris, bv Robert Tweet; Harry Tones, by Don Pratt; and Rlsa Tones, bv Mary lane Leinenku eL "Poetry and Plaster” was presented at the annual Christmas party in the college ovm. Other performances of this p!av were presented during the year. The cast of "Wedd:ng Clothes.” a on -act play directed by Charlotte House, consisted of Harvey Dahl, Gretra Bennett, and Donna K'dd. The plav shows the difficulties a farm couple has in obtaining enough money to buy the things they need for the return of their daughter from a large city. Robert Spooner directed the play The First Dress Suit.” There was a great "fuss” over the daughter’s marriage. The loss of the dress suit of the husband-to-be didn’t help matters any. The suit wasn’t found, but, then, the wedding was called off anyway. The cast consisted of David Stcinbring, Geneva Mucnchow, Mary Helen Kildahl, and Robert Spooner. "Evening Dress Indispensable,” directed by Virginia Allen, included in its cast Joyce Smith, Justice Riek, lone Drew, Frederick Von Schrocder, and Eloisc Seguin. It is a story in which a mother outwits her daughter. Other one-acts were "It’s a Fact”, directed bv Maxine Otis; "Social Balance,” by Leah Haskell, and "Pat’s Matrimonial Venture," by Tom Merrill. The major three-act play of the first semester was "Outward Bound" directed by Dr. Davenport, and presented to an appreciative audience in the college auditorium the evening of December 18. The action of the play takes place on board ship; the passengers, who arc at first unaware that they have died, are voyaging toward heaven and hell. An alarming situation results when the passengers realize their predicament, and each tries to solve the problem in a way which is in keeping with his character. The cast consisted of Anne and Henry, the "Halfways,” played by Marion Myhcrs and Harry Molin; Tom Pryor, young English toper, by Arthur Melbv; Mr. I.inglcy, a "big business man,” by Richard Kepler; Mrs. Cliveden Banks, a sophisticate, by Charlotte House; Mrs. Midget, a chore woman, by Bonnie June North; Rev. Wm. Duke, a minister, by Joseph Lastufka; Scrubby, another "Halfway,” by Ray Schmidlin; and the Examiner, by Kenneth Merrill. Page Eighty-twoTHE TIME March 7 THE PLACE College Auditorium THE OCCASION-PRESENTATION "Zero In Black" Dramatics After new members were admitted to Strut and Fret, the second semester, a number of one-acts, in which only members participated were produced. One of these was "Smoke Screen,” directed by Pearl Risbcrg. In it Ursula Schmidiin took the part of a gangster’s "moll,” David Stcinbring that of a detective, and Thomas Merrill that of a man falsely accused of murder. In search for the real murderer, the accused poses as a "dope fiend”, and through this strategy is able to prove that the real murderer is the "moll”. This play was well received. "The Brink of Silence” is a one-act directed and produced by members of the cast, Arthur Mclby, Thomas Merrill, Harry Molin, and Donald Board. In it, Arthur Mclby took the part of Darton, alias Cole, who attempts to cross the South Pole, but fails. From then on he lives in a small station, where the seal fleet brings supplies. Some years later another Darton makes the same attempt, and succeeds. The dream of the father has been fulfilled by the son, but the son never knows that Cole is his father. "Zero in Black”, a drama in three acts, was presented by Strut and Fret in the college auditorium the evening of March 7. Proceeds were given to the new Boxing Club. This play was written and produced with its first cast iast year by Dr. Davenport. This year’s cast included Lois Johnson as Miss Bledsoe; Arthur Mclby as Dr. Wentz, an old sweetheart of Miss Bledsoe; Barbara Roach, as Diana, a co-ed; Harry Molin, Joe Morstadt, a poor college student; Kenneth Merrill, Lane Talbot, a swaggering young college student; Bonnie June North, Mrs. Fisk; Leah Haskell, her daughter Eunice; Harvey Dahl, the butler, Borg; and Virginia Palmer, Jean. The contest play given at Madison, "Missus McGillicudy Misses” was written by Dr. Davenport, of the faculty. Its cast included Harry Molin as Maltby, the butler; Barbara Roach as Mrs. Hamp-don, one of the elite; and Elvcra Daul as "Missus” McGillicudy, Irish cook. Mrs- McGillicudy, Mrs. Hampden’s servant wins the Irish sweepstakes about the same time that Mrs. Hampden loses her money. Mrs. McGillicudy agrees to settle the latter’s debts on condition that their social positions be exchanged. That, naturally, brings trouble, as the cook tries to be a society queen, and the woman of leisure attempts to cook. The ending is happy. Mrs. McGillicudy realizes that it takes more than money to make a lady, and cheerfully makes the change back to her former position. Senior Class Play The last dramatic production of the year was the Senior Class play, "A Full House.” At the tryouts, held in March, Mr. Zorn, Miss Hansen, and Dr. Schneider chose the cast, which included Harvey Dahl, Elvcra Daul, Maxine Otis, Junior McCoy, Virginia Palmer, William Wrigglesworth, Alice Ran-ous, Robert Spooner, Fred Weggen, Irene Fomberg, Kathryn McDermid, Joyce Smith, Joseph Lastufka, and Clarence Nelson. Although this play was strictly a class project, members of Strut and Fret assisted in its production. Page Eighty-ThreePractice for "Poetry and Plaster," a one-act play presented by Strut and Fret at the all-school Christmas party, is pictured here. Shown from left to right are Robert Tweet. Florence Izdepski, director, Borghild Ager, Mary Jane Lcinenkugel, and Don Pratt. It’s a fact that mothers sometimes try to marry their daughters to men whom they themselves unknowingly love. This plot situation is employed in the play "It’s a Fact”, the cast of which is shown in the picture—from left to right. Barbara Roach, I.ois Johnson, Richard Kepler, and Maxine Otis, director. The daughter’s marriage created a commotion in obtaining a "First Dress Suit”, as was related in the one-act play directed by Robert Spooner. The cast included Mary Helen Kildahl, David Steinbring, Robert Spooner, and Geneva Muenchow, who are shown in the picture. "Social Balance”, a one-act comedy that involves the serious aspects of our present economic situation, was directed by Leah Haskell. The picture shows, from left to right, Clarice Chase, John David, Anita McGuine, Kenneth Merrill, and Leah Haskell, director. Charlotte House directed the one-act play, "Wedding Clothes,” in which the pecuniary difficulties of a farm couple are told. The cast, shown from left to right in the picture, was Donna Kidd. Gretta Bennett, Harvey Dahl, and Charlotte House, director. Dramatics Page Eighty-four "Ye O.’de Christmas Masque” was given by the the A Cappclla Choir as the annual Christmas program. The masque portrayed how a Christmas in eld England was spent. Those in the picture are, left to right, George Storrs of the Sixth Grade, Reuben Wick, Fayette McCormack, Lester Gilbertson, Richard Gillctt, and De Alton Neher. The Wassailers in the Christmas masque were girls of the Sixth Grade, who, with Doris Litchfield, sang "The Wassail Song.” In the top row they are, left to right, Nancy Keeley, Florence Jaeger, Bonnie Jean Davis, Doris Litchfield, Ruth Flynn, Helen Hcrrman, and Helen Wood. Those seated are, left to right, Arlene Kling, Jeanne McPhec, Jeanne Hancock, and Lucia Hatch. The Mixed Quartet of the A Cappclla Choir appears at the right. They are, left to right, Herbert Juneau, tenor; Fayette McCormack, soprano; Dorothy Olsen, alto; and Richard Hammond, bass. The Men’s Quartet of the Choir has made several public appearances this year. Shown in the picture are, left to right, Helen Kirscher, accompanist; Lester Gilbertson, second tenor; Richard Gillctt, first tenor; De Alton Neher, second bass; and Reuben Wick, first bass. At the right is the First Women’s Quartet which consists of Annabelle Erickson, accompanist; Alta Stark, second soprano; Marion Doolittle, first soprano; Betty I.enhart, second alto; and Doris Litchfield, first alto. Music Page Eighty-fiveTop row — K. Ilammord Vofthmik. (hlhcrUon II. Ilammond Jo . Danner MrKachcrn Spn|iH Wick Backus. Second row — Thompson KjrntVCt lit Kirschrr Colhy Duichcr Morrison Sirese I .arson McCor- mack Jrsscl. Third row Xcher Kong -gaard Olsen Lenhart Collins Juneau Beck- with K. Baker GilWtt. Bottom row Stark Bing Rutland Johnson Erick- non Litchfield Anderson Svenjraard Doolittle. A Cappella Choir Elizabeth Baker (first semester) President Fayette McCormack (second semester) President Dorothy Olsen Secretary Betty Lenhart Treasurer DeAlton Nehf.r Business Manager Bernard Collins, Barbara Beckwith Librarians Herbert Juneau, Norma Kongsgaard Custodians Miss Ward Director Included in the A Cappella activities this year were a concert at the Wilson C.C.C. Camp; Thanksgiving and Christmas programs at Eau Claire churches; and a program at an Eastern Star installation service in Eau Claire. The annual Christmas program at the college was presented. This Spring, the choir attended music conventions in Chicago and Minneapolis. Soprano Alta Stark Lorrayne Bing Jerry Rolland Lois Johnson Annabel Erickson Vivian Anderson Lillian Svcngaard Marion Doolittle Norma Kongsgaard Elizabeth Baker Beatrice Jessel Fayette McCormack Dorothy Colby Helen Kirscher Rosalie Kjcntvct Judith Thompson Alto Doris Litchfield Dorothy Olsen Betty Lenhart Jessie Larson Thalisc Strcsc Jane Morrison Elaine Dutcher Olive Hess Tenor Herbert Juneau Richard Gillett Robert Voshmik Lester Gilbertson Bass Dc Alton Ncher Bernard Collins Richard Hammond Harold Hammond Joseph Danner William McEachem William Sprague Reuben Wick Norman Backus Parr Eighty-nix I Standing, left — Doolittle A. Erick ton Gorliring Culby l.mliAM Jcstcl K. Kjcntvct Dtttrhcr Storr». Standing, right—Juneau Back u» Flynn Green Wood Strr»e Beckwith lie $. Back row, »ratc«l — Holland Iting Hruer Collins Wick Stark Nrher J. I.arton McCormack Gilliertfton Ktrtch er Lillet D. Olaen Vothtnik V. Andcr«on L. Johnson I). !.itchticl l Kongsgaard Hatch A. Larson McEachern Baker. Front row, seated — K. Hanson Xovacak Hutchens Hancock Watts Fleming Sprague llornhack K. Hammond Davis Jaegar Kceley Mcl'hee Herman Kling Hahn. Christmas Concert Soloists: Lester Gilbertson, Fayette McCormack' Richard Hammond, DeAlton Ncher, Herbert Juneau, Reuben Wick, George Storrs, Richard Giilett Accompanist: Olive Hess Director: Miss Ward The annual Christmas concert, or musical play, given by the A Cappclla Choir was presented the morning of December 20. Produced in conjunction with the Training School Glee Club, the entertainment represented an old English Christmas. The scene of the play is old England at the dinner for the King and Queen on Christmas Eve. Mer- Characters King—Lester Gilbertson Queen—Fayette McCormack Jester—Richard Hammond Herald—Robert Voshmik Master of Ceremonies—De Alton Neher Astrologer—William McEachern Phoebe Meadowlark—Doris Litchfield Jocelyn Jilliffe—Alcron Larson Father Christmas—Herbert Juneau Good King Wencelas—Reuben Wick Page—George Storrs King's Champion—Norman Backus First Kitchen Bumpkin—William Sprague Second Kitchen Bumpkin—Merlin Gchring Holy Friar—Harold Hammond Robin O’ the Wood—Robert Hanson Maid Marion—Evelyn Lorenz rymaking characterized the feast as Christmas was ushered in. Numerous were the visitors who were royally welcomed to the King’s board, and who, in return, added to the zest of the occasion. The famous Boar’s Head, symbolic of English Christmas festivity, the Dance of the Scullery Maids, and the Dance of the Pillow Cases entertained the King and his retinue. Sheriff of Nottingham—Bernard Collins Little John—John Brucr Dancing Bear—Vivian Anderson Musical Numbers Deck the Halls—Welsh, Minuet Boar’s Head—Traditional, Carol The Wassail Song—Traditional Good King Wencelas—Traditional The Pillow Case—Traditional (Bluff King Hal) Yule Log Song—Traditional Scullery Maid’s Dance—Traditional Country Gardens The Holly and The Ivy—-Traditional Bear Dance—Traditional Come Now, Ye Shepherd—Traditional This is an old shepherd song. Page Kighty-tcvcnlop row llinirti W. Joint- Min Schrocilcr JokI Sctiti Haskell D. Ilusxcll . Itur rll Nr I uni Peterson. Second row — k a n 1 n 11 KotiKsnaard Lubach Se-bcnlh.nl Brinkman llonrtx lle»» Erickson Severson. Bottom row I’fefTerkorn Bt.ikk McAulcy Colby Skuteljr Beckwith Boic Korkrr Ackrrtund Stubbe. The Orchestra The orchestra, under the direction of Miss Ward, is larger this year than ever before. The orchestra has been practicing weekly, and has had a much busier time this semester. It has lost many of its last year’s members, but new and equally talented players have filled their places. Some of the members are directors of smaller orchestras, some are accomplished musicians, and some arc only novices. Miss Ward, Director First Violin Barbara Beckwith Rosemary Korger Ernest Severson Marvella Stubbe Second Violin George Ackerlund Norma Boic Dorothy Colby Phyllis Taylor Trumpet CIcII Buzzell William Johnson James Solberg First Trombone I.cah Haskell Wilmah Scott Second Trombone George Betz Joseph Waller Jane McAuley Elsie Pfcffcrrkom C-Melooy Saxaphone John Bruer E-Flat Saxaphone Donald Hotvedt Beatrice JesscI Patricia Patrick Sherwood Peterson First Clarinet Norma Kongsgaard Second Clarinet Arzella Brinkman Illenc Lubach Dorothy Scbenthal Jack Voll French Horn Cecil Anderson James Ray Drum Kale Skutley Cello Vivian Bragg P.irc Eiglity-ciRhi B-Flat Saxaphone Robert Hansen Baritone Dale Buzzell Oboe Nathan BoortzToj row Martin S. I’eleraon S ll crk Atnlcr«nn Tou-Unit ! . Buxxell Kautnlric N't her Torrence .Itmeau Voalimik Brandon Johnson. Second row Bu rcll Brink man Jcssol K. Hansen Van Attn llaskcll. Bottom row — Jones Itoorix ScWutlnl I.uhach Scott XcUon. The Band The band was reorganized this year under the directorship of William Johnson, a student. The greater part of its activity centered about Homecoming. It contributed spirit by playing at Homecoming "pep” assemblies, the "snake dance,” the bonfire, and the parade. It also played at other football games. Several members of the band arc also members of the orchestra. Some of the members are very good musicians. Trumpet De Alton Neher Dan Torrence James Solbcrg Clell Buzzell Robert Voshmik Trombone Herbert Juneau Leah Haskell Joseph Waller Stephen Toutant Frank Betz Wilmah Scott Clarinet Hartwick Brandon William Johnson, Director James Murphy Norma Kongsgaard Illcne Lubach Arzella Brinkman Jack Voll Dorothy Sebenthal Horn Cecil Anderson Clarence Nelson Bergctta Running Oboe Nathan Boortz Alto Samuel Jones Cecil Anderson Saxaphone Sherwood Peterson Beatrice Jessel Edward Palmer John Brucr Patricia Schroedcr Robert Hansen Baritone Dale Buzzell Bass Jess Laundrie Drums Robert Martin John Childs William Spratt Page Highly-nineTHE TIME June, 1935 THE PLACE Masonic Temple THE OCCASION Senior-Alumni Banquet Social Life Senior-Alumni Banquet Many graduates of former years met at the annual Senior-Alumni Banquet held last year during Commencement Week. The 1935 banquet was held at the Masonic Temple. "Get Acquainted" Party Social activities of this year were initiated by the girls’ annual "mixer” held in the gymnasium on September 11. The party was given by the Y. W. C.A. There were games, dancing, and light refreshments. All-School Party The faculty entertained the students September 20, at the annual faculty-student party. After "mixer" games were played, there was dancing the rest of the evening. Newman Club A large number of Catholic students attended the organization of this year’s Newman Club. At the meeting held on September 20, nominations for officers were made directly from the floor. A list of elected officers was posted, and the club began business and social plans for the year. A.mphictyon The Amphictyon, girls’ honorary society, started last year, was fully organized in October, with twenty-three members. These girls were invited to a tea in the Girls’ Rest Room at which time they were informed of their eligibility for membership. The purpose of the club, as carried on throughout the year, is to interest the girls in both the outside activities of the school and the academic work. The first purely social meeting of the club—when fully organized—was a steak fry held on October 7. WAA. "Night Club” The young women of the school attended a "night club” party given by the W.A.A. in the col-legc gymnasium October 16. Escorts for the evening were women dressed as men. Besides dancing and refreshments, a floor show was the "hit" of the evening. Decorations were declared excellent. Committee chairmen for the affair were Rosemary Harrington, Violet Hoover, Dorothy Adler, Patricia Patrick, and Lucille Luhm. Pago NinetyToji row Martin S. Pctcraon Sotbcrg l Anilrmott Tou-I tint I). Iltisxcll l.aiimlric Xthcr Torrence Juneau Voabtttik Hr.union Jolinxin. Second row 0. lin zcll Hrink-man Je cl K. Ilnnsen Van Atta Haskell. It it tom row Jones Itoort Selientlnl l.uliacli Scott XcImui. The Band The hand was reorganized this year under the directorship of William Johnson, a student. The greater part of its activity centered about Homecoming. It contributed spirit by playing at Homecoming "pep” assemblies, the "snake dance,” the bonfire, and the parade. It also played at other football games. Several members of the band are also members of the orchestra. Some of the members arc very good musicians. William Johnson, Director Trumpet De Alton Ncher Dan Torrence James Solbcrg Clcll Buzzell Robert Voshmik Trombone Herbert Juneau Leah Haskell Joseph Waller Stephen Toutant Frank Betz Wilmah Scott Clarinet Hartwick Brandon James Murphy Norma Kongsgaard Illcnc Lubach Arzella Brinkman Jack Voll Dorothy Scbcnthal Horn Cecil Anderson Clarence Nelson Bcrgctta Running Oboe Nathan Boortz Alto Samuel Jones Cecil Anderson Saxaphone Sherwood Peterson Beatrice Jcssel Edward Palmer John Bruer Patricia Schroeder Robert Hansen Baritone Dale Buzzed Bass Jess Laundrie Drums Robert Martin John Childs William SprattTHE TIME June, 1935 THE PLACE Masonic Temple THE OCCASION Senior Alumni Banquet Social Life Senior-Alumni Banquet Many graduates of former years met at the annua! Senior-Alumni Banquet held last year during Commencement Week. The 1935 banquet was held at the Masonic Temple. "Get Acquainted" Party Social activities of this year were initiated by the girls’ annual "mixer" held in the gymnasium on September 11. The party was given by the Y. W. C.A. There were games, dancing, and light refreshments. All-School Party The faculty entertained the students September 20, at the annual faculty-student party. After "mix er" games were played, there was dancing the rest of the evening. Newman Club A large number of Catholic students attended the organization of this year’s Newman Club. At the meeting held on September 20, nominations for officers were made directly from the floor. A list of elected officers was posted, and the club began business and social plans for the year. Amphictyon The Amphictyon, girls’ honorary society, started last year, was fully organized in October, with twenty-three members. These girls were invited to a tea in the Girls’ Rest Room at which time they were informed of their eligibility for membership. The purpose of the club, as carried on throughout the year, is to interest the girls in both the outside activities of the school and the academic work. The first purely social meeting of the club—when fully organized—was a steak fry held on October 7. W.A.A. "Night Club" The young women of the school attended a "night club” party given by the W.A.A. in the college gymnasium October 16. Escorts for the evening were women dressed as men. Besides dancing and refreshments, a floor show was the "hit” of the evening. Decorations were declared excellent. Committee chairmen for the affair were Rosemary Harrington, Violet Hoover, Dorothy Adler, Patricia Patrick, and Lucille I.uhm. Page NinetyTHE TIME October, 1935 THE PLACE College Gymnasium THE OCCASION Faculty-Student Party Social Life LeTroupelet Francais Party Mrs. Ayer, faculty advisor of LeTroupelet Francais, entertained the club at her home in Eau Claire at its first meeting of the year. This meeting was principally a "get-acquainted” party for students taking French. The club was entertained by its president, Maxine Otis, at her home in Mondovi, October 18. A third meeting was held at the home of one of the club members, Paul Smith, in Eau Claire. Plans were made at these meetings which resulted in one of the fullest years in the club’s history. Strut and Fret "Romper Romp" "Romper Romp” was the first social feature of the Strut and Fret year. At this meeting all members and prospective members were required to wear attire fitting for the occasion. Some of the games played were "Drop the Handkerchief” and "London Bridge Is Falling Down.” It was amusing to see the dignified college students become college "cap-erers.” Y.W.C.A. Events The Y.W.C.A. gave a card party in the Women’s Rest Room early in October. Mrs. F. W. Thomas of Eau Claire reviewed a number of new books at a supper and business meeting that the ”Y” held on October 21. Barbara Beckwith, accompanied at the piano by Annabel Erickson, played two violin selections. Old-Fashioned Party On October 22, the Lutheran Students’ Association’s regular meeting was held at the home of Irene Kopp, Eau Claire. John Kildc gave a talk on the English Bible. Lunch was served. An all-school old-fashioned party was sponsored by the Lutheran Students’ Association on October 24. The costumes at this party were unique. The gym was decorated with corn stalks and pumpkins. Popcorn balls and home-made candy were sold. Co-Educational "Stag” Linder the sponsorship of the De Chatillon and Amphictyon, a party without dancing was held on October 30. The first of its particular kind, the party helped arouse some of the pep shown throughout Homecoming week. Rural Life Club Party Dancing was the chief attraction of the allschool party given by the Rural Life Club on November 6. As an incentive to subscribe for the Spectator, subscribers were admitted to the dance free.THE TIME November, 1935 THE PLACE College Gymnasium THE OCCASION Homecoming Banquet Social Life Homecoming Various organizations presented "pep slcits” during Homecoming week, October 28 to November 2. These led up to a "mass meeting” and bonfire on November 1, which was followed by more "skits”. Louis Berg had charge of the parade, held on November 2. The winner of the float contest was the Newman Club. Le Troupelct Francais and the Crusaders were the second and third prize winners, respectively. After the game with River Falls a banquet was served in the college gymnasium. The Y.W.C.A. had charge of the menu and serving the food, the Primary Club of the decorations, and the De Cha-tillons and the Publicity Committee, of the program. A dance followed the banquet. Both were well-attended, many of the alumni returning to their alma mater for the occasion. Credit for much of the success of the Homecoming should be given to the Publicity Committee, a new organization this year, which included the presidents of all organizations. The committee was headed by Wilbur Voigt. Primary Club Activities November meetings of the Primary Club included a chili con came supper, held in the college cafeteria on November 6, and a meeting of the social committee and officers, held November 20. Plans were made to send Christmas baskets to needy families. W.A.A. Initiation A "bungdoodle” initiation party was given by the W.A.A. on November 21 in which each initiate was required to bring clothes to "dress up” one of the other initiates. On the following day the initiates, all dressed as nurses, entertained the assembly with a program of professional "advice.” Crusader "Raffle” The Crusaders accepted ten "neophytes” at an initiation and banquet held November 14 at the Eau Claire Cafe. The candidates were selected from among the young men students recommended by members of the faculty for outstanding scholarship or for achievement in athletics or other activities. The annual Thanksgiving all-school dance of the Crusaders was held on November 26. The "raffle” took place at ten o’clock. The winners of the poultry were Kenneth Kling, the turkey; Robert Musum, the goose; Rufus Waters, the duck; and Albert Moldenhauer, Dan Torrence, and "Ade” Thompson, chickens. Page Ninety-twoTHE TIME December, 1935 THE PLACE College Gymnasium THE OCCASION Christmas Party Social Life Hostess Tea The Y.W.C.A. had its annual hostess tea on November 5 in the college gymnasium, two hundred and fifty attending. Among the guests were paster; of the various churches of the city and prominent Rau Claire church women. All girls of the school and their mothers or house-mothers were invited. Miss Elsa Faucrback, state probation officer for women, spoke to a group of "Y” women at a supper meeting, November 18, in the college cafeteria. Also, at that time, Lois Johnson gave a report on the trip a few cabinet members made to River Falls on November 10. A review of the Winona conference on foreign affairs, held November 15-16, was made by Harriet Pinch. Mary Helen Kildahl and Anna-belle Erickson played piano ducts. Plans were made for the distribution of Thanksgiving baskets. Strut and Fret Semi-Formal Invitations, dance programs, and semi-formal attire characterized the Strut and Fret dance held on December 11. Committee chairmen were Dan Torrance, Charlotte House, and Kenneth Merrill. Newman Club Father Brady, of St. Patrick’s Church, Eau Claire, and 1935 chaplain of the Newman Club, assisted in a discussion concerning Mexico at the club’s monthly meeting, held on November 21 at St. Pat- rick’s School. Another topic discussed had to do with the status of movies since the Legion of Decency became active. Mary Ellen Kelley was chairman of the meeting. Christmas Parties The Primary Club’s Christmas banquet was held cn December 3 in the college cafeteria. Members contributed to a basket which was given to a needy family. The Newman Club banqueted on December 10. Clarice Chase spoke on "The Spirit of Christmas,” and a one-act play directed bv Maxine Otis was given. Father Deeny, St. Patrick’s Church, Eau Claire, spoke. The committee in charge of the meeting was Betty Weizcneggcr, Anita McGuire, and Rose I.uhm. A Grammar Club Christmas supper party was held on December 16. Members exchanged gifts. Strut and Fret and Amphictyon co-operated in organizing the annual all-school Christmas party held in the gvm on December 19. A one-act play was presented before the dance. Those in charge of the crmmittces were Kathryn McDcrmid, decorations; Noreen Laundrie, one-act play; Irene I.enz, music; and Virginia Smith, business management. The party was one of the year’s outstanding social successes; the decorations were exceptionally attractive. Parc Ninety-threeTHE TIME January 29, 1936 THE PLACE College Auditorium the OCCASION De Ciiatillon Tanglefetb Social Life All-School Carnival Bingo, fortune telling, and jitney dancing were the highlights of the all-school carnival held by the A Cappclla Choir in the college "gym” Wednesday evening, January 15. Money earned at the party was used for trips taken by the choir. Valentine Party A meeting of Le Troupelet Francais was held Monday, February 10, at the home of the Mademoiselles Gabus. The invitations, entertainment, and lunch were carried out in valentine fashion. Newman Slfighride A sleighride, much postponed because of the intensely cold weather that continued from the middle of January well into February, was finally held the latter part of February by the Newman Club. George Neary was chairman of the meeting. After the ride, a hot lunch was served in the college cafeteria. The Catholic Woman’s Club invited the Newman Club to its February meeting, at which President Schofield spoke. Y.W.C.A. Prom Patricia Patrick was elected Prom "King” to lead the grand march at the Y.W.C.A. annual Prom held in the gym February 12. She chose Helen Gregcrson to reign with her as Queen. Edith Broctz-man, chairman of the nomination committee, and her partner, were second in line. They were followed by Marion Doolittle, chairman of the music committee, and her escort. Fourth in line was Betty Johnson, who had charge of arrangements. Music was furnished by Ted Erickson’s orchestra. This year, as in the past, the Prom was one of the chief social events in the "Y” calendar. German Rathskeller Imitation of a German beer garden was the feature of the all-school party given bv the W.A.A. on February 10. "Beer” with pretzels and cheese and rye bread was served at tables. The big event of the evening was the floor show, which included tap-dancing, group singing, and music by a genuine German band. Mother - Daughter Banquet "Feather Boas in the Wind” was the theme of the eighth annual Y.W.C.A. Mother-Daughter Banquet held at the First Congregational Church, Eau Claire, on March 26. Lois Johnson was toastmistress. The speakers were Mrs. Schofield, Mrs. Kongsgaard, and Florence Izdepski. Committee chairmen were Page Ninety-fourCentral Prom Committee Top row Mr. Millirrn Voigt Marne Smith Nrhcr StrinhrinR Spcckiru. Bottom row Laundric John vm Ming McCormack Stabbe. Social Life program, Charlotte House; art, Adclia Ringgcr; arrangements, lone Flntland; menu, Mary Jane Lein-cnkugel. They were assisted by the Y.W. president, lone Millard. President Schofield’s Party The faculty observed President Schofield's birthday, March 28, with the customary dinner party at the Eau Claire Hotel. Mrs. Flagler, Mr. Simpson, and Miss Buchholz selected the place and had general charge of the dinner; Miss Sparks and Miss Baker supervised the baking of the cake; place cards were selected by Miss Vine Miller and Miss Chipman; and decorations and favors were arranged by Miss Foster, Mr. Fox, and Mrs. Wing; Mrs. Holbrook had charge of finances. To Miss Hansen, Dr. Wallin, Miss Bahr, and Mr. Murray may be attributed a great deal of the success of the party. They provided the entertainment, a humorous skit. President Schofield’s party is one of the outstanding social events on the faculty’s annual calendar, and was as successful this year as in the past. Junior Prom Al Setter, Prom King, and Barbara Roach, Prom Queen, led the grand march at the annual Junior Prom, held May 20, at the City Auditorium, Eau Claire. The three candidates for Prom King selected by the Junior Class to be voted on by the entire school, were Sherwood Peterson, Al Setter, and Tony Park-ovich. Harold Spcckien, Junior Class President, had general charge of the Prom. DcAlton Ncher had charge of selecting the orchestra; Brinkley’s orchestra was chosen. The Prom is the most important social event of the Junior year, and one of the most important of the entire school. Its success this year may be attributed to the work of the Central Prom Committee and Mr Milliren, Junior Class Advisor. Commencement Activities Louis Berg, President of the Graduating Class, will act as the student chairman of the committees for graduating activities this year. Mr. Bridgman and Miss Sutherland arc the faculty advisors of the Graduating Class. Besides the class play, "A Full House,” there will be the same general program as in other years. Baccalaureate services will be held on Sunday, May 31. President and Mrs. Schofield and the faculty will receive the graduates on June 1. Class Day exercises will be held the afternoon of June 3, after which the Senior-Alumni banquet will be held, with Otis I.inderman, alumni president, in charge. Commencement exercises will follow on June 4, at which time Mr. E. G. Doudna, Secretary of the Board of Regents of the Wisconsin Teachers’ Colleges, will be the speaker. Mr. Doudna was Head of the English Department here the first two years after the establishment of the college. Page Ninety-fiveOr trouble! Even college professors are not immune to it. After working over the machine for a while, Mr. Bridgman, shown at the left in the picture, and Mr. Milliren talk things over and attempt to solve the problem. Susie and Dick, pictured from left to right, arc found obviously enjoying the intellectual atmosphere of the campus. These geese, along with other wild fowl, frequently visit the grounds and add a touch of nature to the surroundings. The new women’s athletic instructor, Miss Phelps, was snapped on the playground. Miss Phelps, who holds a Master of Arts degree from Columbia University, has taken the place of Miss Drom, who is now teaching in Janesville, Wisconsin. Dr. L. R. Dawson filled, during most of the first semester, Mr. Ackerman’s place in the Chemistry Department. Dr. Dawson holds the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Iowa has taught in Illinois. Mr. Ackerman, for many years chemistry instructor here, was forced to take a leave of absence during the first semester on account of illness. Dr. Dawson also substituted for Mr. Simpson during the last weeks of the second semester. The Utica Jubilee Singers gave an excellent performance in the assembly on September 17. In the top row, pictured from left to right, are I.uther Hartley, Clarence Ratliife, and W. G. Culver. In the second row, are M. H. Coles and George Rayston. In front is Norma Lynch Coles. Calendar Page Ninety-sixHere arc a few of those who forgot for an evening that they were college students and returned to their childhood. They arc, left to right, back row, Kathryn MeDermid, Thomas Merrill, and Maxine Ctis; front row, Kenneth Merrill, Harvey Dahl, Eivera Daul, and Clarice Chase. All classes from Freshman to Senior were well represented at the Strut and Fret "Romper Romp.” It was difficult to distinguish dignified Seniors from the underclassmen, as all joined in games such as drop-the-handkerchicf, the farmer-in-the-dell, and other old favorites. At the right are two Training School students Wilma Thompson, left, and Iona Hilt. Our playground is well equipped for the enjoyment of the Training School pupils, who make excellent use of the equipment provided for them. The Women’s Rest Room Committee is shown in the picture—from left to right, back row, Miss Sutherland, Ursula Schmidlin, President Schofield, Jeanne Cooke, Beatrice Jesse!, and Helen Gregerson; front row, Jane Marie Steen, Betty Johnson, and Sylvia Subke. One of the outstanding musical entertainments of this year was presented by Albert Salvi and his instrumental quartet on October 1. Mr. Salvi is a well-known harpist. The program was very well received. Calendar Pane Ninety-sevenThe picture at the left was taken just before the team left for out of town. The team is, from left to right, top row—Nilsscn, Barkin, and J. Barnes; second row—Korrison and Schmiedlin; third row—Neary, Setter, Parkovich, Tomashck, Wollum, Henncman, D. Barnes Gentry, Davis, and Plett; and bottom row—Behn, Stehlc, F. Wriggles worth, Walter, Omstcd, Bailey, and Mat-alas." Members of the Y.W.C.A. Cabinet appear at the left. They arc, from left to right, back row, L. Johnson, Pinch, Alcott, Agcr, Haskell, Miss Oxby, Carlson, and D. Olson; front row Schofield, Hartwell, McAulcy, House, Millard, Kongsgaard, Ringgcr, and B. Johnson. Miss Florence Kaiser, soprano, and Mr. Siegfried Vollstedt, conductor-pianist, appeared in an assembly program, October 8, in a morning musical. In addition to the vocal selections of Miss Kaiser, two piano solos were played by Mr. Vollstedt. The program was very much enjoyed by the students. Miss Kaiser is a former resident of Eau Claire. On October 17 an illustrated lecture was delivered to the student body by Major James C. Sawders. "Ancient Civilization of the Americas” was the topic. Major Sawders discussed his topic very completely and illustrated his lecture with excellent slides he had made from photographs taken in Mexico and South America. As part of the program of improving the college grounds, considerable time was spent in rcsodding the side hill, and the lawn on both sides of the creek. This will make the grass softer and greener than ever for those students who seem prone to revert to nature in the Spring and early Summer. Calendar Page Ninety-eightOfficials may be jeered or acclaimed but at least they have a right to be Happy before the game. Here we have them as they went to the Luther game. In the picture they are, back row, right, Mr. Rosen, umpire, and Mr. Olson, head linesman; front row, left, Mr. Simpson, and Mr. Roe, referee. At the old-fashioned party given by the Lutheran Club these four young ladies relived, in costume at least, the times of their mothers or grandmothers. The)- are, from left to right, EIvcra Daul, Janet Whipple, Adclia Ringgcr, and Vivian Anderson. Members of the Publicity Committee for the current year are presented in this picture. Back row, left to right, they arc Gilbertson, Nadler, W. Voigt, Steinbring, Ganthcr, Spooner, Martin, McKinnon, D. Barnes, Berg, Byron Lokcn, L. Voigt, Gillett, Phillips; front row, left to right, W. Johnson, Fombcrg, Flatland1 Baker, V. Smith, Palmer, Burton Lokcn. President Schofield as shown here obeys two loyalties: one as evidenced in the picture, obeying the law by stopping for a stop signal, and the second, not so evident in the picture, being loyal to the school by watching our Homecoming parade from an advantageous position. November 5—and the first snowfall—yet our team could not be daunted. Here they are as they practice for the Stout game. The entire squad wanted to share the honor of having braved the snow. Calendar Pago Ninety-nineCandidates for the editorship of the Periscope and the Spectator at the annual election held last Fall arc shown, from left to right, Helen Cohen, Elvera Daul, and Marvclla Stubbe, Periscope candidates; and Irene Fomberg and Robert Musum, Spectator candidates. Helen Cohen was elected editor of the Periscope and Robert Musum editor of the Spectator. When the DeWillo Concert Company appeared at the assembly before Christmas, De Willo Semeran featured his concertina grand, the only instrument of its hind, he said, in the world. With Mr. Semeran appeared his wife, soprano and piano accompanist, and La Naomi Coffin, violinist. Mr. Semeran formerly lived at Chippewa Falls. A scientist of some note, Dr. Arthur De V. Carpenter, lectured before the assembly late in November. He spoke of astronomy and the kindred sciences, and included in his discussion the contributions of great astronomers. Henrik Ibsen’s play, "Ghosts,” was presented in the auditorium before a large audience the evening of November 25. Borgny Hammer, well-known Norwegian actress who has acted in many of Ibsen’s plays, had the leading role, that of Mrs. Alving. Arvid Paulson, shown in the picture with Madame Hammer, played the part of her son. The "nurses” shown in this picture were initiated into the W.A.A. the first semester. In the top row, left to right, arc L. Gabus, lx Due, Sumstad, Hagen, Wcizcneggcr, Johnson, Greger-son, and H. Gabus. In the bottom row, left to right, are Dedrickson, Roach, Williams, Harrington, Kidd, Adler, Anderson, Davey, and KrcII. CalendarAt least part of the credit for Eau Claire’s successful athletic season must be given to the cheer leaders. They were not only cut to lead cheers at all football and basketball games, but also led "pep” meetings. They arc, left to right in the pictures, Jones, Spooner, Mesang. Peterson, and Steinbring. "Big-hearted Herbert” was a three-act play, presented by the Pollard Players in the assembly, Tuesday, December 3. As the play was a rollicking comedy, the audience was kept amused during the entire performance. Dr. S. C. Eastvold, pastor of the First Norwegian Lutheran Church, of Eau Claire, delivered the Thanksgiving address at assembly Wednesday, November 27. Dr. Eastvold reminded the students of the meaning of Thanksgiving. Mr. Murray, faculty advisor of the Periscope, is shown in the picture informing Helen Cohen, at the right, editor, of some very technical and important points about planning the Periscope. Florence Izdepski, at the left, is giving a hint or two. The Osseo High School band gave a concert at assembly, Thursday, December 5. The band deserves credit for its musical accomplishments and for giving concerts at other schools. The program was very much enjoyed by the students. Calendar Page One Hundred OneOn December 16 our basketball team met the Stevens Point team in the gymnasium. The resulting score was 41 23, in favor of Stevens Point. Mr. E. G. Doudna, Secretary of the Board of Regents for Wisconsin Teachers’ Colleges, is an annual visitor here. He is pictured with President Schofield. Mr. Doudna was formerly an English instructor here. Max Gilstrap spoke on "Our Western Wonderland” in the assembly on January 7. During his lecture he whistled "Trees,” incorporating various bird calls. He was accompanied on the piano by Helen Kirschcr, a student here. In the picture arc shown the members of the committee chosen by President Schofield to take charge of the Men’s Rest Room. They arc, left to right, Byron Lokcn, Earl Nelson, Don Barnes, James Riley, and Robert Musum. President and Mrs. Schofield were hosts at a dinner party for the married men of the faculty and their wives on January 13. The dinner was served at Baum’s. A bean-bag throwing contest was the climax of the evening. Calendar Page One Hundred TwoHere we have the faculty men smiling over their victory in the Senior-Faculty game. They are, standing, left to right in the picture. Dr. Schneider and Mr. Hornback; seated, Mark Haight, Dr. Dawson, Mr. MePhee, Dr. Davenport, Dr. Judd, Mr. Zorn, and Mr. Milliren. Note Dr. Davenport’s famous grin. The office force, snapped as they arc hard at work, are from left to right in the picture, Mrs. Wing. Miss Howard, Mrs. Holbrook, and Miss Chipman. All of these, except Miss Howard, work in President Schofield’s office. Miss Howard is secretary to Mr. Brewer. These girls and their ''gentlemen’’ escorts are some of those who enjoyed themselves at the Y.W.A.C. Girls’ Prom. They are, back row, Norma Boic, Kathryn MeDermid, Ethel Matott, Elizabeth Alcott, Irene Fomberg, lone Flatland, Vivian Badman, and Florence Izdepski; front row, Henrietta Lass, Lucille Luhm, Virginia Haag, Edith Broetzman, Helen Gregerson, the Queen, Patricia Patrick, the King, Larrayne Bing, and Fayette McCormack. The Strut and Fret "stunt” was one of the best during the Periscope circulation drive. Students pictured here impersonated members of the faculty who were supposed to be trying to get into Hell. They are, from left to right, Leah Haskell, Kenneth Merrill, Arthur Melby, Barbara Roach. Harvey Dahl, Virginia Palmer, and Bennie June North. Harry Molin, representing Satan, is sitting on his throne, and Dave Stcinbring is seated in front. The W.A.A. "stunt” for the Periscope drive had as its theme song, "Here we come, a ridin’ ”. Those who took part are shown in the picture from left to right. Rase Luhm, Kathryn MeDermid, Lucille Luhm, Marion Mesang, and Lois Gabus. They were assisted by a group of Fifth Grade students. Calendar I’.irc One Hundred ThreeThese Rural students, some of them back from practice teaching at various rural schools, appear well-pleased. From left to right, in the back row, arc Herbert Heidtke, Arley Harslip, Jane Marie Steen, Lena Helmueller, and Norman Shaker; in the front row, Nathaniel McCann, Clifford Raymcnt, Sheridan Burce, David Gifford, and Fred Wcggcn. The picture at the left is mute testimony to the result of an announcement made in assembly for several successive days, requesting all students who entered college here the second semester for the first time this year, to appear in the fan room to have their pictures taken. The two representatives who appeared arc Donald Skamfer and Henrietta Lass. Strut and Fred initiations arc always amusing to the students if not to the initiates themselves. However. Don Pratt, left, and Robert Tweet, seem to be enjoying themselves in their unusual costumes. Perhaps they are intended to represent the spirit of drama. The busy debaters paused for a moment to have their pictures snapped before leaving for the Whitewater tournament, at which Eau Claire won second place. From left to right arc Albert Beck, John Danner, Wilbur Voigt, Russell Frazier, Dr. Judd, Junior McCoy, Mr. Donaldson, Noreen Gough, Lillian Svcngaard, Helen Cohen, and lone Drew. The Crusader Ministrcl is one of the important annual events of the school year. "Bob” Smith, in natural color, acted as interlocutor. The dusky players arc, standing, Robert Martin and David Steinbring, and, seated, Louis Berg, Richard Gillett, and James Barnes. Calendar Page One IIun lrc ) fourLate in March, Mr. Simpson left to attend an army officers’ school at Fort Leavenworth. Kansas. Dr. Dawson, who took Mr. Ackerman’s classes during the first semester, taught Mr. Simpson’s classes the rest of the year. Don Barnes, left in the picture, and John Walter were elected co-captains of the 1936 football team at the anual football banquet. They were chosen for their leadership and sportsmanship. Both will be playing their last year of football next Fall. One of the annual all-school elections is that of Prom King, held every Spring. This year the Juniors presented Anthony Parkovich, Alfred Setter, and Sherwood Peterson as candidates for this honor. At the all-school election, Alfred Setter was elected, and therefore led the 1936 Prom. During the second semester of this year a new commitcc was chosen to regulate activities in the men’s rest room. The members were, from left to right in the picture, back row, Speckien, Dale, W. Voigt. President Schofield. Solberg, McCombs, and Mr. Fox; front row, Parkovich, Neary, and Gallagher. The Graduating Class selected "A Full House,” a comedy, as the annual class play. The play was presented May 7. The members of the cast, as shown in the picture, from left to right, were, back row, Lastufka, Weggen, McCoy, Dr. Davenport, director, Spooner, Nelson and Daul; second row, Fomberg, McDermid; front row, Daul, Ranous, and Palmer. Joyce Smith and William Wrigglesworth were also members of the cast. Calendar Pajrc One Hundred FiveOrganizations Oh happy hours, The silken threads, Entwined in coarser weave, That shine in memory's chest Long after fabrics fine and strong Have faded— You endure! The casual friends With whom we meet In work and play And share the many happenings of the day. And tlyose more dear, Whose being makes Life sweeter and more full— These friendships. Silken threads That gently sway Through fleeting years. Will endure as long as We can cherish memories. TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 1916-1936BLANCHE JAMES, A. M. MATHEMATICS FACULTY ADVISOR KODOWAPA, CAMPFIRE GIRLS, FROM 1918 TO 1928 FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF EAU CLAIRE STATE TEACHERS’ COLLEGE, A MEMBER OF THE FACULTY ORGANIZATIONSToji row Ui»InTK M. Kratu-(elder .'1. Andemon R. Cooke Scott Schofield Alcott .Mcfiuitie B. Smith Mel hr in id Ih-ivcr Scohic C. Brown Second row Mi Oxby I. hdcll Hc-rgrrxon lloune .McAuley Callahan l ell P.-rkrr K;i»mu«sen I . Smith I'laghr llamlt Third row - Cohen .Millard K. I.arton Adler Kun Stuhbc K. I.uhm Dodge Watt Cha»r Bottom row — Waterjiunl CouuxcO Shaker King fer _ Whipple (Iruber ledrickaon A. Brunner l.ouachiiiK Y. W. C. A. Ione Millard Betty Johnson Alberta Carlson Jane McAuley Miss Oxby President Vice President Treasurer Secretary Advisor Organized in 1916 This Year’s Activities: Girls’ ’'mixer"; several card parties for members; supper meetings; discussion meetings at which music, hooks, and international questions were topics. MEMBERS Beatrice Abrams Dorothy Adler Borghild Ager Elizabeth Alcott Dolores Anderson Eleanor Anderson Mabel Anderson Miss Auld Mrs. Ayer Harriet Babbington Iris Babcock Mildred Babcock Miss Bahr Miss Baker Barbara Beckwith Elgic Becdc Irene Beier Mildred Berg Jane Bergerson Florence Blakely Destc Boehrer Norma Boie Edith Broetzman Cathryn Brown Annabel Brunner Florence Brunner Miss Buchholz Anna Jane Callahan Alberta Carlson Lottie Casey Emily Chaput Clarice Chase Miss Chipman Helen Cohen Betty Comings Jeanne Cooke Ruth Cooke Ila Counsel Miss Dahl Marjorie Dedrickson Dorothy Dodge Marion Doolittle lone Drew Irene Dusik Elaine Dutchcr Alice Ehnert Annabel Erickson Almeda Farrington Mrs. Flagler lone Flatland Irene Fomberg Miss Foster Dolores Fox Beatrice Fremstad Margaret Gibson Dorothy Gilbertson Helen Gilchrist Helen Green Gayle Gruber Eleanor Gruhlke Elaine Hagen Miss Hansen Alice Hartwell Leah Haskell Jeanette Hilger Mrs. Holbrook Mildred Handt Violet Hoover Charlotte House Geraldine Hoveland Miss Howard Miss Hunn Florence Izdepski Miss James Beatrice Jessel Dorothy Jewett Betty Johnson Jean Johnson Page One Hundred KirIii9 Top row MorRatt Leinen-k HRrl SlaRR llrit-r Kil-it hi I.ciir. Broct man !!: k " Morr i oti Dusik .Icwcii Norheim I). Ol non Doolittle Second row McCarthy llih •on Meliillivrav Hrede iI.Ik r Hartwell J. I.ar iwm Iteekwith Sirce-w L .Miller l ombcrg J. John » ItahitiRton KrcO llovlunil Th'nl row Kjentvet J. Cooke M. Balicock Gnu-ii'K Krici.fon C»rlwi II JohnNon Krcm«lad Khnerl Patrick .My her Rot tom . row Ajcr Kopp l.itehiirM Ixnhart Mr-h.-uir I- Balicock KiiM Wilson (’. Kraiuleliter K. Anderson Y. W. C. A. Cabinet Chairmen: Borghild Acer, Elizabeth Ai.cott, Leah Haskell, Charlotte House, Norma Kongsgaard, Dorothy Olson, Harriet Pinch, Betty Lou Schofield, Lois Johnson, Alice Hartwell Organized in 1916 This Year’s Activities: Hostess tea for the mothers and friends of the girls; girls prom; mother-daughter banquet and the June breakfast. MEMBERS Juel Johnson Lois Johnson Dona Kidd Mary Kildahl Rosalie Kjentvet Norma Kongsgaard Irene Kopp Cecelia Kranzfcldcr Marie Kranzfcldcr Peggy Krell Bernice Kunz Mary Kyle Jessie Larson Ruth l.arson Norccn Laundric Marie Jane Leinenkugcl Irene Lcnz Edna Mae Lobdcll Rose Luhm Miss Macdonald Ethel Matott Jane McAulcy Mary McCarthy Kathryn McDcrmid Margaret McGillivray Anita McGuinc Marianne McRae Marion Mcsang lone Millard Lucille Miller Miss Vine Miller Thelma Morgan Jane Morrison Geneva Muenchow Marion Myhcrs Miss Nash Dorothy Olson Maxine Otis Miss Ox by Ruth Parker Patricia Patrick Loraine Peterson Miss Phelps Harriet Pinch Ina Pitts Alice Ranous Mrs. Ramhartcr Elsie Rasmussen Adelia Ringger Pearl Risberg Betty Scobie Beulah Sehcel Ursula Schmidlm Betty Lou Schofield Wilmah Scott Maxine Shaker Althea Slagg Bernice Smith Pauline Smith Miss Sparks Thalise Strese Marvclla Stubbc Miss Sutherland Miss Temple Mrs. Thompson Dorothy Utley Evelyn Van Hosen Josephine Walczak Miss Ward Jean Waterpoolc Alice Watts Mac Westlund Janet Whipple Lucille Whitwam Mary Wilson June Worth Claudia Swicfclhofcr P.irc One Hundred NineToj« row !-«• • J. Banif' Bo. berg Bali! (Jnniher I). Rarnc P. Smith Weiher Tomnshck L. Voigt Ciillctt Second row Byron l.okcn (’. Nelson Hanson Moltkn hauer Near. Martin I). Smith Richardson Nchcr I)ickie Third row—Skamfer E. Peter •on Setter Stcinbring Wol lum K. Nelson Natller Oin sled Kopplin Bottom row - (larbcr Xilssrn Custafson W. Johnson Riley St ranch R. Speekicn Burt I.okcn Walter M. A. A. Byron Loken (first semester) President Clarence Nelson (second semester) President Clarence Nelson Vice President Earl Nelson Secretary-Treasurer Mr. Zorn Advisor Organized in 1930 This Year’s Activities: Intramural basketball tournament; volleyball tournament; frcc-throw contest; tennis singles, mixed doubles with the W.A.A. horseshoe tournament; track. MEMBERS John Anderson Eldon Amundson Donald Barnes James Barnes Richard Benish Byron Blanchard Jerome Bouthilct Frank J. Brown Frank N. Brown Donald Bruss Marshall Burger Robert Buttenho Charles Coss Richard Derge George Donaldson Elmer Garber Robert Ganther Robert Gessner Richard Gillctt Erland Gustafson Richard Hammond Ben Hancock Roy Henneman Val Hocser Stanley Hoy Robert Johnson Russell Johnson Howard Kolstad I-averne Kopplin Luther Kopplin Alcron Larson Robert Lee Burton Loken Byron Loken Robert Martin Arthur Melby Page One Hundred Tenf Top row—I. all ml He Schtntcd-hn Stcinhring Xilsscn l-opplin Water Davis Brown Second row — Stephenson Peterson Solberg Amundson Work Rctallick B.iragcr Matalas Third row Hojr W. Voigt Parkovich lomashek J. Barnes II. Speckien ). Walter Bottom row—Jones Setter F. Wrigglesworth Dm-lied Skuteljr Voll M. A. A. Governing Board: Harold Bahi.ke, Donald Barnes, Holden Behn, Donald Dedrickson, Richard Gillett, Robert Lee, Byron Loken, Robert Musum, Clarence Nelson, Earl Nelson, Justus Riek, James Riley, Donald Smith, Wilbur Voigt. Organized in 1930 The Governing Board controls matters pertaining to tournament schedules, eligibility of players, recording the results of activities, and other administrative problems that may arise. John Menard Joseph McKinnon Paul Mochlc Albert Moidenhauer Robert Musum Arthur Nadlcr DeAlton Ncher Clarence Nelson Earl Nelson Harold Nilssen Werner Ncibuhr Conrad Olsen Leon Olsen MEMBERS Albert Pahl Einar Pederson Sherwood Peterson Orville Quick Harold Retallick Justus Rick James Riley John Ritzinger Malcolm Rockwell Cyril Schaffner Alfred Setter Kale Skutely Don Smith Delos Walker James Solberg Robert Spooner Harold Speckien Roy Speckien Andrew Stephenson David Steinbring Francis Strauch [.ester Voigt Jack Voll Robert Voshmik Robert Weiher Frank Weix Reuben WickToo ruw V. NelMHi l !rlt llriim-inan Weix Kcirn llor» ill I). Ilnnirt UcrRf Korrikon Mr. Zorn (ialktghcr Dickie Second row S| eckieti OjB r eJ Voigt Parkoviclt II y I aundric llaiistroin lllanrhnrd I. B.irnr» Nil » n Wnllntn Walker Kot t !in Fcn»kc. Bottom row — Moldenhauer Toma hr k Schmidlm F. W'riggknvntth Davit N'eary Setter tlentrr Walter Letter Club Albert Moldenhauer President John Walter Vice President Mr. Zorn Faculty Advisor Organized in 1920 This Year’s Activities: Banquets for election of football and basketball captains; banquet for seniors from high schools in this section of the state. Clayton Anderson Donald Barnes James Barnes Holden Bchn George Blanchard Harold Cooper Marvin Davis Richard Derge Philip Dickie Harold Feirn Robert Fenskc Clyde Gallagher Walter Gentry Arthur Hanstrom MEMBERS Virgil Held Roy Henneman Hugh Horswill Stanley Hoy Lambert Kopplin David Korrison Jess Laundric Albert Moldenhauer George Ncary Clarence Nelson Harold Nilssen Kenneth Omsted Anthony Parkovich Grant Plctt Orville Quick Ray Schmicdlin Alfred Setter Roy Speck icn Robert Tomashek Adolph Vogler Wilbur Voigt Delos Walker John Walter Francis Wcix Robert Weihcr Reuben Wick William Wollum Frank Wrigglesworth Page One Hundred TwelveI Toj» raw — |. Kranzfelder Snyder Nelson Koycraft Willis in McDeiTiiiil Stall [ l»n K. I.tihtn ircRcr«on Davey Second row- I.undlwrg |«c-l ttc I., Cahus (lough Hagen Norhcitn Krell II. (iabus Third row—Dcdrickson Mi Hhelp Svengaard Morrison Johimnn Adler Kidd Kiugger Bahitigton Hot tom row—Whipple Memoir I’fcfferhorn Hoover l;. I.iihin Hat rick C. Kranxfelder Harrington W. A. A. Marion Mesang Patricia Patrick Nori-fn Gough Adelia Ringger Miss Phelps President Vice President-Treasurer Secretary Social Chairman Advisor Organized in 1926 This Year’s Activities: Sports tournaments; "Top Hat” night club; Rathskcllar; all-sports banquet; play day for high school girls; Homecoming activities. Dorothy Adler Dolores Anderson Lorraine Baskin Avis Davey Marjorie Dedrickson Helen Gabus Lois Gabus Norecn Gough Helen Gregerson Elaine Hagen Rosemary Harrington Violet Hoover Jean Johnson MEMBERS Dona Kidd Cecelia Kranzfelder Marie Kranzfelder Peggy Krcll Edna Lc Due Joyce Loasching Lucille Luhm Rose Luhm Margaret Lundberg Kathryn McDermid Marion Mcsang Jane Morrison Dorothy Nelson Florence Norhcim Elsie Pfefferkom Adelia Ringger Patricia Patrick Barbara Roach Jean Roycraft Bcrgetta Running Dorothy Snyder Glady Stallman Margaret Sumstad Lillian Svengaard Janet Whipple Betty Weizcnegger Kathryn Williams One Hundred ThirteenToj row—Callahan Korjjcr Lastufka Grttiucth Dahl Fenner McGuinc Second row—Foul Fretn-• tad V. I-arson Parker M. Anderson Kyle B. Smith Mitt Bahr Bottom row — Dntter D. Anderson (iehrkinK M-Davcy II. Ifartung liar-lie 1. Hartung Scbcn-thall Grammar Club Norma Boib Mary Kyle Jeanne Cooke Helen Hartung Miss Bahr President Vice President Sccrctary-T rea surer Social President Advisor Organized in 1931 This Year’s Activities: Homecoming float; Christmas party; club meetings; spring ban quets; tea for dub members; farewell party to graduating members. Dolores Anderson Mabel Anderson Norma Boie Anna Jane Callahan Jeanne Cooke Harvey Dahl Mildred Davey Lola Dutter Elaine Elliot Hazel Fenner MEMBERS Lucilc Fouts Beatrice Frcmstad Eileen Garlic Mable Gehrking Frank Grunscth Helen Hartung Irene Hartung Rosemary Korgcr Cecelia Kranzfelder Mary Kyle Velma Larson Joseph Lastufka Anita McGuinc Ruth Parker Dorothy Sebenthall Bernice Smith Pauline Smith Margaret Stussy Sylvia Subke Page One Hundred FourteenIon row- Kniid on Xogtc h. Pederson Dusik Beck-with Jcsscl (lillson Pike Robinson Scobie L. Pet-erson Second row — (I. Peterson Brinkman Ringgrr Jewett Roy era ft fiattison J. I.arson J. Johnson Olson Webert Brunner Third row—Erickson (liman Meyers Utley I. Peterson Pitts Van Camp Sherman Dodge Wright Bottom row—Anderson limber Ration Holland Cronk Worth Babcock Whipple. Primary Club Dorothy Olsen Betty Scobie Ila Counsell Miss Baker President Vice President Secret ary-T reasurer Adrisor Organized in 1926 This Years Activities: "Mixer”; tea for faculty members; chili supper; Christmas baskets; Christmas party; "cootie” party; Spring banquet; monthly meetings. MEMBERS Beatrice Abrams Barbara Beckwith Winifred Billett Arzclla Brinkman Elizabeth Bruchert Annabelle Brunner Kathryn Campbell Dorothy Colby Blanche Cronk Ila Counscll Dorothy Dodge Irene Dusik Annabelle Erickson Adah Fear Ellen Fear Lucille Gardner Helen Gilchrist Evelyn Gillson Ida Girnau Helen Mary Green Gayle Gruber Alice Israclson Beatrice Jesscl Dora Jewett Rosalie Kjentvct Wealthy Knudson Jessie I.arson Esther Longberg Beulah Mattison Marion Myhers Margaret Noglc Dorothy Olsen Elva Pederson Irma Pederson Geneva Peterson Lorraine Peterson Roberta Pike Ina Pitts Alice Ranous Adelia Ringger Gerry Rolland Jean Roycraft Betty Scobie Eloise Seguin Margaret Sherman Beatrice Sturgeon Dorothy Utley Virginia Webert Janet Whipple Lucille Whitman June Worth Mary Wright Page One Hundred Fifteen IToj n w — MoCil Morgan (.illicit von 11.in von Casty Krown Invlefjnrd Slier- mock Wt.jcck Matotl Second ro w— Miss llunn Krune Meier Simpson Walczak Severson Htircc Amler son Kay Christianson Thiril row Spindler Ilrun-ner Berger son Blakeley assey i.rulilke Mrs. Doane McFaul Roberts Bottom row J. Johnson Cleashy Thompson Blanchard Skogvtail Swcilcl-hofer Brenner Hickey Rural Life Club Elma Kruse President Jane Marie Steen (first semester) Vice President Clifford Rayment (second semester) Vice President Jane Bergerson Secretary Clifford Rayment (first semester) Treasurer Ernest Severson (second semester) Treasurer Miss Hunn, Mr. Hoknback Faculty Advisors Organized in 1927 This Year’s Activities: All-school party; Christmas party; complete evening programs at rural schools; Spring banquets; delegates to state convention. Murcile Anderson Jane Bergerson Florence Blakeley Elcanorc Blanchard Beatrice Brenner Frank Brown Margaret Brunner Doris Burce Lottie Casey Bcrdella Christianson Ruth Cleasby Gertrude Doanc (Mrs.) David Gifford Dorothy Gilbertson Elcanorc Gruhlke MEMBERS Curtis Hanson Herbert Heidtke Lena Helmueller Emcline Hickey Barbro Instefjord Jucl Johnson Francis Krause Elma Kruse Nathaniel McCann Gladys McFaul Adeline Massey Ethel Matott Naunda Meier Evelyn Moen Thelma Morgan Florence Norheim Naomi Ray Clifford Rayment Dorothy Roberts Ernest Severson Norman Shaker Lucille Shermock Margaret Simpson Irene Skogstad Marian Spindler Jane Marie Steen Leona Thompson Josephine Walczak Fred Wcggcn Cecelia Wojcek Claudia Zwicfclhofer One Hundred SixteenTop row -Schtnicdlin Setter Stcinliring N'iUsen Dor-ouin .Martin Walker Kopplin E. Xrlv.n K. Smith Walter Second row — Berg Xeary C. X el ton Voigt Agcr Speckieti J. Barnes Mor-tenson l.okcn Third row t'.illett Seller Dick ie I'arkovicli Totna-«hrk I’hillip llanstrom Crusaders Louis Berg Albert Moloenhauer Clyde Derouin Mr. Simpson, Mr. McPhee, Dr. Davenport President Vice President T reasurer Faculty Advisors Organized in 1922 Activities This Year: Initiation of new members; Thanksgiving raffle party; Homecoming activities; "stunt” for Periscope circulation drive; annual minstrel show. Roald Ager Louis Barkin Louis Berg Donald Barnes James Barnes Holden Behn Clyde Derouin Philip Dickie Richard Gillctt Arthur Hanstrom Virgil Held MEMBERS Lavcrne Kopplin Burton Loken Robert Martin Albert Moldcnhauer Douglas Mortcnson George Ncary De Alton Nehcr Clarence Nelson Earl Nelson Harold Nilssen Anthony Parkovich Loren Phillips Alfred Setter Ray Schmicdlin Robert Smith Harold Speckien David Steinbring Robert Tomashck Wilbur Voigt Delos Walker John Walter Frank Weix One Hundred SeventeenTop row -J. Barnes Schmid lin lleli! Seller Skam-(er Helm Nelson Mr. Millircn Second row—Mr. Bridgman I), ltarnes Marlin Uickic Korrison I». Smith K. Smith Garber Bottom row — Parkovicli Middcnhauer Walter lohnson Hansirom Nad-ler By. I. »ken Hurl Lok-en Dc Chatillon Burton Lokfn President Bernard Brandstedter Vice President Byron Lokpn Secretary-Treasurer Mr. Bridgman, Mr. Milliren Advisors Organized in 1928 This Year’s Activities: Monthly meetings; semester "stags”; annual production of "Tangle- fete"; Homecoming and Periscope stunts; Homecoming float. Harold Bahike Donald Barnes James Barnes Holden Bchn Louis Berg Bernard Brandstedter Theodore Brown Donald Christianson Philip Dickie Ted Erickson Elmer Garber Richard Gillett MEMBERS Arthur Hanstrom Roy Henneman William Johnson Frank Jordan Laverne Kopplin David Korrison Burton Loken Byron Loken Robert Martin Arthur Nadler Dc Alton Neher Clarence Nelson Anthony Parkovich Loren Phillips Alfred Setter Ray Schmicdlin Robert Skamfcr Donald Smith Robert Smith David Steinbring Wilbur Voigt John Walter John Williams Page One Hundred Kightecnrow-Davenport l.cn dell Schmidlin Alcott Me-Oermid Schofield Callahan Srconil row Mis Sutherland Carlton V. Smith l tul K. I.uhni KomberR Otis Bottom row—Millard Kingiirr Pinch Finland Cohen HragR Orth l.aundric Stuhbe Amphictyon Society Elizabeth Alcott President Pearl Risberg Vice President Adflia Ringger Secretary-Treasurer Virginia Smith (first semester) Business Manager Ione Millard (second semester) Business Manager Miss Sutherland Faculty Advisor Organized in 19)5 This Year’s Activities: All-school party; Homecoming activities; annual Christmas party for ail students; April Fool’s party for all girls of school. Elizabeth Alcott Jane Anderson Norma Boie Vivian Bragg Anna Jane Callahan Alberta Carlson Clarice Chase Helen Cohen Elvera Daul Blanche Davenport (Mrs.) MEMBERS lone Flatland Irene Fombcrg Norcen Gough Irene Hartung Helen Hartung Norcen Laundrie Irene Lenz Edna Mae Lobdell Rose Luhm Margaret Lundbcrg Kathcryn McDermid Ione Millard Ono Orth Maxine Otis Harriet Pinch Adciia Ringger Pearl Risberg Virginia Smith Ursula Schmidlin Betty Lou Schofield Marvella Stubbc P.irc One Hundred NineteenTop row Steinbring S| oon-cr Mclby W. Wriggle , worth l»r. Davenport Mu-lin Nadir r Dahl Second row Twrct Pratt K. Merrill Torrance Stim ♦tad Chase llrtg Me-Drrniid Painter Mr . Davenport House. Bottom row Allen Haskell Kleusch Drew Haul Fotnlterg Hoover Ixdcp-•ki Roar It Strut and Fret Virginia Palmer David Steinbring Virginia Smith Harvey Dahl Dr. Davenport President Vice President Sccrctary-T reasurer Business Manager Advisor Organized in 1929 This Year’s Activities: "Romper Romp”; weiner roast; banquet; supper meetings; semi-final dance; "Outward Bound” and "Zero in Black.” Mildred Berg Waldo Cooke Harvey Dahl Elvera Daul Mrs. S. Davenport lone Drew Evelyn Erickson Irene Fombcrg Arthur Hanstrom Leah Haskell Douglas Hoehn Violet Hoover Florence Izdepski MEMBERS Jane Jaeger Irene Lenz Junior McCoy Kathryn McDermid Arthur Mclby Kenneth Merrill Thomas Merrill Harry Molin Arthur Nadlcr Maxine Otis Virginia Palmer Donald Pratt Alice Ranous Pearl Risberg Barbara Roach Malcolm Rockwell Ursula Schmidlin Maxine Shaker Kale Skutely Virginia Smith Robert Spooner David Steinbring Robert Tweet Carlton Van Atta William Wrigglesworth One Hundred TwentyHack row—l(oy Voigt Mr. Dona Muon Berg West-Iiiml Hu xell Danner Me-toy Frazier Front row—Laumlric Sven gaaril Drew Berg Danl Herrick Ix ir|mki Cough Cohen Forensic Honors Club Junior McCoy Russell Frazier Noreen Gough Dale Buzzell Mr. Donaloson President Vice President Secretary Treasurer Advisor Organized in 1925 This Year’s Activities: Supper in the Fall for those interested in forensics; banquet to debat- ers at tournament here; banquet for graduating members. Albert Beck Barbara Beckwith Louis Berg Mildred Berg Dale Buzzell Helen Cohen Gordon Colby John Danner MEMBERS EIvcra Daul lone Drew Russell Frazier Noreen Gough Clco Herrick Stanley Hoy Florence Izdepski Burton Loken Noreen Laundrie Junior McCoy Thomas Merrill Virginia Palmer John Ritzingcr Lillian Svcngaard Clifford Westlund Wilbur Voigt One Hundred Twenty-oneTop row — Pratt Knudson McCoy Frazier Spooler Smith K lc Schofirli! ( liamlicrlin Coleman Second row—Bobh U. Luhtn Hragg Stallman I.. Ltlhtn Lundherg Mr . Ayer An-dcruon Xussherger Me-Atilcjr Hilger Ranoti . Hottom row—Slagg I., Gabus I.eDuc Fomherg Litchfield Jonrjt Otis Chase II. Gabus Le Troupelet Francais Maxine Otis David Taylor Doris Litchfield Betty Lou Schofield Jane McAuley Mrs. Ayer President Vice President Secretary Treasurer Business Manager Advisor Organized in 1933 This Year’s Activities: Weiner roast; Hallowe’en party at Mondovi; meetings at homes of members; Christmas party for Orthopedic School children. Jane Anderson Eleanor Anderson Mildred Babcock Irene Bobb Vivian Bragg Clarice Chase Grace Chamberlin Gordon Colby Arthur Coleman Helen Comings John Danner Elvera Daul Mrs. Davenport Dr. Davenport MEMBERS Marian Doolittle Paul Edc Irene Fombcrg Russell Frazier Helen Gabus Lois Gabus Virginia Haag Jeanette Hilger William Johnson Samuel Jones Wealthy Knudson Edna LcDue Doris Litchfield Lucille I.uhm Rose Luhm Margaret Lundberg Jane McAuley Junior McCoy DeAlton Nchcr Adeline Nussbergcr Patrick O’Connell Maxine Otis Donald Pratt Alice Ranous Betty Lou Schofield Lucille Shcrmock Althea Slagg Paul Smith Gladys Stallman Page One Hundred Twenty-two First row—W. Johnwin G. Blanchard Dickie Stroll Inu V. Voigt Retallick Kichardftnn Menard Tom akhrk McCoy Second row- W. Ocasner Dr. todd Wittwrr Baldwin I. Pedersen Parkovich Ackcrhmd tioolsbcy Her this time Third row -Pettis Sorenson l.ndvickson Brandon Sol-berg K. Wrimdca worth Setter Amundson Bottom row L Calms (lough McDerinid Sum-• tad Kirschcr II. (iahus Cohen Science Club Harold Retallick Richard Pettis Robert Baldwin Dr. Judd President Vice President Sccretary-T reasurer Advisor Organized in 1931 This Year’s Activities: Monthly meetings at which scientific matters of interest to club members were discussed; one dance was given this year. George Ackcrlund Elden Amundson Robert Baldwin Charles Berthiaumc George Blanchard Hartwick Brandon Helen Cohen Phillip Dickie Helen Gabus Lois Gabus MEMBERS Robert Gcssner Ronald Goolsbey Noreen Gough William Johnson Helen Kirschcr Arthur Ludvickson Junior McCoy Kathryn McDermid John Menard Anthony Parkovich Einar Pedersen Richard Pettis Harold Retallick Gerald Richardson Alfred Setter Lawrence Sorenson Donald Strehlau Margaret Sumstad Robert Tomashck Wilbur Voigt Page One Hundred Twenty-threeT«»|i row Gallagher Coleman Tracy Fuhrman Toma hch llavlil Bulli Held Beck Kit ringer Wnlhim J. Smith l,a t-u(ka Second row - Gough Val» cxnk Harrington I., huh in Met untie (•. Bennett I. Bennett Baquettc Mc-Auley Klcuftch' Rivard M i 111)1111011 Near? Third row—II. Hartung If. Spindler Brenner Brunner Callahan Xu -herger I. Hartung M. Kranxfelder R. Luhm Haul Sini| »ou But torn row—Ca ey L. Gab-u» Wrixencggrr Adler Roach McGiliivray McCarthy Ch.mc Blanchard tKmnxft-liier fxdc| ki. Newman Club Elvera Daul Harriet Pinch Lucille Luhm Miss Thomas President Vice President Secretary-Treasurer Faculty Advisor Organized in 1916 This Year’s Activities: Christmas party; co-opcration with Eau Claire Women’s Club in establishing Catholic book shelf at Library; Homecoming float. Albert Beck Irene Bcicr Charles Berthiaume Eleanor Blanchard Jerome Bouthilet Margaret Brunner Anna Jane Callahan Lottie Casey Clarice Chase Elvera Daul John Davis Robert Fuhrmann Helen Gabus Lois Gabus Clyde Gallagher MEMBERS Moreen Gough Helen Hartung Irene Hartung Virgil Held Lorenz Hundt Florence Izdepski Mary Ellen Kelly Joseph Lastufka Lucille Luhm Rose Luhm Robert Martin Jane McAuley Margaret McGillivray Anita McGuinc George Neary Arthur Padrutt Helen Paquette John Ritzingcr Barbara Roach Francis Rooney Margaret Simpson Don Smith Marion Sprindler James Thompson Robert Tomashck Kenneth Tracy Josephine Walczak Francis Weix Bettic Weizenegger William Wollum One Hundred Twenty-fourTot. row McCombs Amundson M.ddcnhaucr Spooner Stephenson Skutley S. Peterson C. Hanson Ackcrluml Dahl Second row - Miss Hansen Wccgrn Haymcnl T. Merrill Kruse A. Carl v n M. Anderson C. Nclfc.n Severson Bruss Third row Fenner Kunt Hcrttcrwin Steen Waller Svrnftuul Mrs. Kam-hnrtcr Instefjord J. lar-son Bottom row Kopp I). Davey Taiifteit larlie Stiihhe It. Cliristianson Frrmstad A. Erickson Lutheran Students’ Association Lillian Svengaard Irene Kopp Doris Davey George Ackeri.und Miss Hansen, Mrs. Ramharter President Vice President Secretary Treasurcr Faculty Adrisors Organized in 1934 This Year’s Activities: Social and discussion meetings; "old-fashioned” school party; repre- sentatives sent convention college Lutheran clubs, Stevens Point. George Ackerlund Dorghild Ager Elden Amundson Elizabeth Baker Donald Bruss Alberta Carlson Helen Comings Haney Dahl Doris Davey Annabelle Erickson Hazel Fenner Beatrice Frcmstad MEMBERS Eileen Garlic Dorothy Gilbertson Eleanore Gruhlkc Olive Hess Charlotte House Barbro Instefjord Jane Jaeger Irene Kopp Jessie Larson Esther Mattison Stanley McCombs Thomas Merrill Albert Moldenhaucr Clarence Nelson Clifford Rayment Bcrgetta Running Robert Spooner Jane Marie Steen Marvella Stubbc Margaret Sumstad Lillian Svengaard Anna Tangen Joseph Waller Theola Waller One Hundred Twenty-liveIn the picture are shown the W.P.A. workers on strike last Summer, at the college, where men were at work on the campus. Pickets patrolled the streets outside the grounds for a week or two; but, at last, they gave up, and appeared no more. Last Autumn, and continuing throughout the Winter inside the building, the otherwise unemployed did all sorts of repair work and renovating of the physical plant of the school. The picture shows several men spreading soil near the parking area. The two toilers pictured here arc pausing, possibly to recuperate after their rigorous exercise. They are engaged in loosening the top soil that is to be hauled to a hill on the campus that needs attention. Several places on the college grounds were thus greatly improved. W. P. A. workers shown here arc "manicuring” the grounds. The building in the picture is located near the Athletic Field and is used for storing campus equipment. The entire campus was "dressed up” during the Autumn. Here two of the workers arc loosening the soil west of the college. This soil was used, in part, to level the slope east of the college. Liter, the sod was again replaced. All of this work helped greatly to improve the beauty of the grounds. Workers and Others Pago One Huiulrcil Twenty-sixf Workers and Others Much improvement has been made this year on the college campus by P.W.A. workers. Here we see men working near the bridge over Little Niagara Creek, changing the direction of the stream. Near it and elsewhere on the campus, flower beds were planted. Work of all kinds was done on the grounds, making Eau Claire State Teachers’ College a more attractive place. In the picture are shown men cleaning up the grounds with the aid of a truck to hold the debris. Much to the discomfiture of teachers and students alike, during the early Fall days the sound of this machine constantly disturbed the quiet of the college. It seemed to be everywhere, aiding the men in beautifying the grounds. With pick-axes and shovels endlessly picking and shoveling, the channel of Little Niagara was changed. The work last Autumn wrought many changes in the appearance of the college grounds. Even on the coldest days these men would be out with their picks and shovels, working. Slowly they leveled many irregularities in the surface of the campus. Page One Hundred Twenty-sevenTraining School Oh child wind. Imaginative as song. Your scope cannot be bound And held within Four-nailed materialism. Your compass is the wind, Your anchor silvery star Or coral reef; You live in cloud, In sea, on woody knoll, In murmuring beauty Of undying hope. Your little world Is peopled with the dreams of ages: Fairy folk, Knights, princes— All are there, Within that province Of infinite faith, Which children share. TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 1916-1936 rKATHERINE THOMAS, A.M. JUNIOR HIGH CRITIC FACULTY ADVISOR OF THE NEWMAN CLUB SINCE 1930 CHOSEN BY PRESIDENT SCHOFIELD AS A MEMBER OF THE ORIGINAL FACULTY IN 1916 TRAINING SCHOOLGRADES 1, 2, and 3 Top row Burgess Garnock Haag Thompson A. King Cooper Horn hack Second row- Boberg Ohm . Ayres Newman lloytnc Zicllie King O'Brien Third row- Kings Dranke Lein Nagle Ophcim McPhec WcinMock Kildnhl Bottom row Linton J. Wicklund L. Mundinger M. Hutchinson J. Thoralcy O’Brien M. Buri Sager GRADES 4 and 5 Top row Peeso Storrs Hatch Regan O. Mun-dinger Ayes Murphy Wahl Weidlich Second row F. Kings K. Thomlcy Hilt Thompson Lenmark Kaast Kling Weinstock Lasker torn wall Third row — Levin Herrmann Haxen Karntx Arnold King Jnastad B. Millircn Kuchl Calkins Bottom row—J. McPhee L. Wicklund Baragcr Ifoag Hagstroin Anderson I). O'Brien Buri GRADE 6 Top row—Edgar Davis Flynn Kycs Jaeger Webster Second row—Iaiwrencc Fleming B. Davis Hahn Hutchens Storrs Bottom row Xovacck Green Dcbney Hancock Wood Watts Training School Page One Hundred ThirtyGRADE 7 Top row Hoag Henderson Burgess Ziclie Knight Mundingcr Hutchens Nrasselt Second row Hoar Ayers Slagg Jaasted Hutch in son Mayer Huntington Third row - MeGruer Sampson Debney Wahl Warden Thompson McDermid Landmark Bottom row—Block Cornwall Wcnbcrg Ham barter Wallin Warden Douhty Cillctt Calkin GRADE 8 Top row—Crawford Bucy Tinker York II. Hanson G. Simpson Skrivseth Second row—Parker Hoeppner Nicolet Stein Lange tiorton Third row—Taylor Bcdnarek Lien Olson Regan Itolier g Marten Bottom row—Brandt Arnold Romberg Billet Abramson Kuehl l tsker Kisohl GRADES 9 and 10 Top row— Kimpton Rude Connell Ryder Kycs Second row Lee Thomley Mallum Amend Clark Bottom row—Newman Deiglman Butler Till Martinson Training School Page Otic Hundred Thirty-oneThe Manual Training Club of the Training School consists of, back row, from left to right in picture, Knight, Connell, Hanson, Ranger, Mai-Ium, Ryder, Zcillic, W. Slagg; front row, Dcigl-man, J. Slagg, Henderson, Calkins, Newman, Huntington. The members of the Junior High School Economics Club arc, back row, Lee, Bucy, Tinker, Kyes, Stien, Thomley, Nicolet, Crawford, Rude; second row, Dressel, Till, Eisold, Marten, Kuehl, Thompson, Brandt, Amend, Bednarek; front row, Martinson, Wallum, MeDermid, Sampson, Doubtey, Wenberg. Ayers, Taylor. The Dramatics Club consisted of, as shown in the picture, back row, Lemberg, Lange, Boberg, Lien, Regan, Olsen, Parker, Hoeppner, Krassclt, Hutchins, Mayer; second row, Debney, Rosholt, Warden. Billet, Arnold, Wahl, Jaastad, Hutchinson, Warden; bottom row, R. Lasker, Gillett, Cornwall, Block, S. Hoag, M. Hoag, MeGruer, Ramhartcr, landmark. The Winter Sports Club was made up of, as shown left to right in the picture, Boberg, Hahn, Fomberg, Hutchinson, Kuehl, D. Mun-dinger, Ted Wahl, Novacek, Tom Wahl, Lawrence, Lange, Edgar, Robert Musum (advisor), landmark, Taylor, Fleming, Abramson, D. Galkins, Watts, Davis. Not in picture—G. Simpson. G. Storrs, J. Storrs, Webster. The Training School Orchestra, under the direction of Alta Stark and Helen Kirscher of the college, is shown at the left: Kuntz, Martin, Hoag, Hoeppner, Kuehl, R. Olson, Hanson, Bo-berg. The members of the first semester Domestic Science Class think that it’s a good idea for boys to know how to cook. Those in the picture are, back row, Thomley, Camilla Christianson (student teacher), Ranger, Ryder, Connell; front row, Butler, Deiglman, Newman. Training School Page One Humlrctl Thirty-twoThis is a common playground scene, showing some of the Training School pupils making use of the playground equipment before school hours. This activity is under the supervision of college student teachers. Pictured at the right arc Sixth Graders in Hallowe’en costumes. The "Ghost” (Roger Hahn), shown near the left, won the prize for having the best costume. Janice Bates was one of those in charge of the party, at which games were played and refreshments served. More Hallowe’en attire! This time it is the Fifth grade, which has Miss Bahr for critic teacher. The pupils paraded the halls and the library to show their costumes, and then played games and had refreshments. The Junior High School basketball team has made a name for itself this year. Of the seven games played the team won five. George Blanchard, a college Senior, coached the team. Pictured from left to right, they arc, back row. Coach Blanchard, Davis, Boberg, Connell, Ranger, Hutchinson, Martinson; front row, Taylor, Butler, Wahl, Jaastad, and Fomberg. Pictured at the right are the Third and Fourth Grades pupils engaged in classroom work. Their student teacher, Jessie Larson, is helping them to do their knitting right. Mrs. Flagler, critic teacher, is experimenting on Homemak-ing activities in the primary grades. Here is the Ski team that represented the Winter Sports Club of the Training School at the Junior Meet at Whitehall, Wis., Sunday, Jan. 19. The team was coached by Robert Musum, a college Senior. Stanley Hoy also accompanied the boys to Whitehall. Pictured from left to right arc Davis, Wahl (Cap’t), Fleming, and Watts. Training School I'nge One Hundred Thirty-threeLiterature Great works, ’Though wrought by the immortal few, Belong not to the genius mind alone, But to each one of that vast throng, The million souls who dream and live and die— Nonentities. Each fine ideal. Awakening in song So fragile that it seems to fade away Into oblivion With the brief life span of its creator, Lives As memory in the undercurrent of life. Each fine ideal, Each tale of chivalry, And noble love Sung countless ages At the hearths of men. Enriches the vast wealth of living lore From which the mighty few. Inspired, Select, interpret, and impart. TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 1916-1936HILDA B. OXBY, A.M. ENGLISH, GERMAN LEADER IN LITERARY AND OTHER STUDENT ACTIVITIES OF THE COLLEGE MEMBER OF THE EAU CLAIRE FACULTY SINCE THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SCHOOL IN 1916 LITERATURELoveliness I want all that is lovely To knock at my door; A soft, low melody, A kind adjutor. And the stars as they tremble In a desert sky; The opal-tinted wings Of a butterfly, The soft, silver sails On a moon-fed sea, And the breeze as it blows Through the poplar tree. Oh, Lord, it is so grand to be A part of your great majesty. Charlotte House Night Thoughts It is late. I stretch beneath my quilt. I open my eyes wide and look at the gothic pattern made on the wall by the street light coming in through the tiny leaded window. The shadow is sharp. I look at it, fascinated. In itself it is an entity. It is perfection. Through the open window, cool puffs of air, very soft, trip and tumble over my face. The sensation is exquisite. The smell in the air and the ’'plop-plush” of the icicles melting off the roof is the essence of all the Springs I have ever known. I know that the snow is lying in clumps on the roof, like the dirty waste men use to clean machinery in factories. I know that water is running in dark, gleaming trickles in the gutters. I do not want to sleep. This aloneness is good. An hour ago I was crying because I was afraid of loneliness; then the click of a door shutting. There is nothing as final as that. After a door closes, there is only quietness. The gate is closed. The barrier is raised. From then on the distance between two people is unbridgeable. One can’t fiercely tug open the door and rush out. Lying here, I am conscious of a loveliness. Every sensation, sound, smell I have ever known is here. The springs, when I lay in my crib, digging down deep because I was afraid of the swaggly shadows from the bare oak tree outside the window, were like this. It’s like walking into a room where the sun is shining, and suddenly smelling an Easter lily. You feel happy. The scent is connected with something you knew. It is something you knew. Last Tuesday I had some veal for dinner. I put a piece into my mouth and then it seemed Saturday. It made me feel like steamy windows, cloudy days, and myself on the floor in black stockings, playing with a toy. It is easy to lie here and see pictures: a piece of wet seaweed held in hand, every spear of it glistening with water. It is fullbodied and bristling. The hand is mine, a long time ago. I was lying on the wet sand, letting the sun beat down on my back. I could feel it penetrate into me. Driftwood was scattered about the beach. It was bleached silver. Once I knew an old, old lady. All her children had grown up and gone away. I often used to go over to see her. She had a long, cool backyard. I called her Christine. She always smiled when I said it. One Spring, she died. After I’d gone to her funeral, I went dancing. Lack of respect? How could it be? In the Summer, she is little puffs of dandelion floss blowing about. In the Winter, she is a snowflake landing on my sleeve. I can let my eyes fall almost shut, and then the street light shoots rays in all directions. I have known so much loveliness ... It is pleasant to be falling asleep. Anon. I Cross the Barrier Slowly, slowly dying! Cannot my lonely voice be heard? Alone, I must be all alone. My arms reach out to cling to something, and find nothing but empty space. Gropingly they reach from side to side, then weakly and faintingly drop back. I am alone. Why do they let me die here all alone, without one ward of comfort? I see my mother’s hand, so dimly, right before me. She seems to beckon me; reaching, I find her vanished. Then far above and clouded with a mist, my mother’s smiling face is out- rage One Hundred Thirty-fixlined. I smile at her, and call her mother; she does not answer, yet smiles, and disappears. Where are all my dear ones? They must have gone before me that they leave me all alone. Will not someone take this heavy cover from my head? It smothers me and bruises all the flesh on my scarred bones; my arms arc so weak; I cannot lift the weight. No one answers this one plea. I forget that I am all alone. Cruelly and slowly this heavy cover will smother me; would it could bear down so heavily right now that life would pass in one short second. Struggling to regain the life that is so painful, yet must I ever struggle. Each time I would slip over the bank into the dark abyss below, one small slight hold seems to bring me back again. Why leave me in this utter darkness? My head throbs so painfully and my limbs seem to be torn loose from my flesh! Maybe if I should sing, the burden would be lighter. My lips arc parched, my tongue is swollen; I cannot sing. My heart is growing heavier; my arms no longer dear ones can enfold; my soul is slowly breaking from this body; I cross the barrier. L. SvENGAARD “East of the Sun-” "East of the Sun and West of the Moon”—the never, never land of the old fairy tale, was a living reality then, in the credulous days of my childhood. The unattainable was to be found there, and that I should one day find it, I never doubted. But in a few years this had passed out of my life—with Santa Claus and other myths. Yet, somehow, so firmly rooted was my faith, that for several years, the vision remained. Older, I walked through another world that I had learned to love. Late on a hazy mid-August afternoon, when it was neither dusk nor day, I entered a country lane in which the gray-green of mullein leaves carpeted the land like twilight. Suddenly, facing the East, I stopped, conscious that the silence had become articulate. At first I saw only the familiar lane and the early-rising moon, hanging like a wan, golden globe against the lavender sky. Without knowing why, I wheeled, and looked full at the blazing sun, balanced on the opposite horizon. Dazed by realization, I stood—"East of the Sun and West of the Moon”! Since then I have stood "East of the Sun and West of the Moon” many times. Many times I have stopped, hearing the silence in the lanes of life, and have found myself surrounded by half-forgotten ideals and ghosts of ambitions. Through each revelation I have learned again the old lesson that nothing conceived is lost, and all that has its birth in thought must have its life in being. Anon. SUMMER Third Prize Summer— High-noon. A drowsy cloak of numbness slips over the quiescent earth; Cows softly low in the dark, cool shade of elms, Chewing their cuds in humdrum, tiresome fashion; A dog sleepily lifts himself from his bed to chase a sparrow, Thinks again, drops back, and shuts his eyes. Drearily shaking his head at the buzzing bothersome flies. The trees sigh with quiet happiness; A fleecy cloud skims over the floor of heaven; The bird on wing ceases his flight in mid-air. Lazily coasting to earth and inactivity; Peace reigns—harmony over all. It is Summer— High-noon. L. SvENGAARD Tagc One Hundred Thirty-acvenQuicksilver I found a moonlight dollar; It was lying on the floor. But when I bent to pick it up, It leaped outside my door. It lost itself amid the shade Of such a silent tree, Which would not tell a single soul Where that coin could be. I searched an hour, more or less. And still I had not found it— Until I spied it overhead Where a spider web had bound it. I set it free—it was not meant For even a spider’s hoard, And somewhere it has joined the heap Where moonlight money’s stored. H. P. Regret Cancer-like, regret gnaws Into my inner consciousness, Paralyzing reason. Leaving me sightless, speechless, numbed— Alive only to the bleak Aching despair of "It might have been." Irene Lenz The Library The library of Eau Claire State Teachers’ College is a likely place to study human character. The room itself is interesting. The books, the unceasing file of students going in and out, the various teachers seated about finding material to keep their victims from spending idle days and nights, the librarians endeavoring to fulfill their duties of keeping order and answering to the many wants of the students— ail serve as subjects of study- Here embryo geniuses may be found. How unfortunate it is that some of our famous writers had not this as a background for their works! We can merely speculate as to what they would have said about the library. Had Washington Irving been from Eau Claire instead of New York we probably would find something like this among his writings: "As I gaze about in this spacious room of the college, I have a feeling of the delightful companionship of those engaged therein. On the faces of some of these students is a certain social joyousness, ob- literated occasionally by a studious look when the face of one of their pedagogues is turned their way. Mingled with the throng is a strong, heartfelt sympathy and understanding of one another’s troubles. Upon the stern command of the librarian for some erring student to get to work, the group assembled breaks forth in very subdued merriment, and at this the hitherto stern countenance of the mistress in charge expands into a friendly smile, and she beams in kind and benevolent sympathy. Here is some fair lass embellishing her complexion, and here is a youth completely absorbed in something in his particular corner.” The somber Edgar Allan Poe might see an altogether different aspect of the room: "During the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the late Autumn of the year, when clouds hung oppressively low, I approached the college library and found myself, as the day waned, within the melancholy room. I know not how it was, but with the first glimpse of the library, a sense of insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit. I say insufferable, Parc One Kumlrcil Thirty-eightfor the feeling was unrelieved by any of that half-plcasurcable, because poetic, sentiment with which the mind usually receives even the sternest natural image of the desolate or terrible. I looked upon the scene before me—upon the room and the features of the students there—with utter depression of soul, which I can compare to no earthly sensation more properly than to the after-dream of the opium reveler.” James Fenimore Cooper would probably add a touch of tense expectancy, if he were to describe the scene: "I entered the library and saw one group of observant students sitting bolt upright in their seats, tense, expectant, and yet seeming patiently to await the moment when the bell would ring for the next class. By far the greater number sat leaning, in lazy lounging attitudes. The teachers’ and the librarians’ backs were turned, and I profited by that to read the countenances of the student body. One student, near the card catalogues, scarcely cast a glance at the librarian, keeping his eye on the open book before him with an air that might have been intended for respect but which was quite easy to construe as watchfulness. Others were less reserved. I detected their searching but stolen looks, which in truth scanned their teachers’ forms and attires inch by inch, leaving no emotion of the countenance, no gesture, nor even the fashion of a garment, unheeded.” William Cullen Bryant would be likely to break out into verse about the library: "Not in solitude May the student learn his task, or see On a card only The A’s and B’s in History, Or hear the voice Of a teacher speak of a time to rejoice. In the Library, I do behold Thy steps, Student Body, here amidst the crowd. Through the assembly rolls With everlasting murmur, deep, ’Mongst the proud files, the Work of student minds. Florence Izdepski Silhouette A spruce tree, Inky black against the blueness of night, As if groping for stars. A Prayer Life is so precious, God, I want To live every second wisely— Will You guide me? And if I follow You—and I will Try—when Death comes Will You guide me? Jeanne The Painter Ah, you beautiful painter in the west, Tinting the clouds with a purple haze, Dabbing with soft colors hill and mountain side, Touching the rugged pine of the forest, Shading the crystal blue of the sky. Alas, have you lost your magical power? + Sinking slowly below the horizon, Slipping, the brush falls. L. SvENGAARD Pane One Hundred Thirty-nineLittle Things I am content with little things: The way the sunlight falls Aslant that trellised wall, The sound of wind in tall pine trees. The rustling of autumnal leaves. E.C.B. Dusk Shadows came to pluck my heart strings. And gentle was their melody; A song of beauty, lost past sharing— I named it "Loveliness in a Minor Key.” Charlotte House Essay on Cats There were eight—Archibald, Cleothilda, Faust, Puffball, Dummy, and three nameless ones. Archie wandered in one day when life was gloomy. Archie was gray—and I was blue. We got along. Mother protested, but Archie hid under the davenport. And then, one day, a heap of gray fur was found on the highway. Archie might have best stayed home. Cleothilda strayed in too. She was so homely that I pitied her. She was a dainty eater. Archie had gobbled, but she nibbled. I never had to catch more than one fish at a time for her. She preferred savory sun fish, one inch in diameter—fortunate, too, for that’s the size I usually caught. Many’s the time I had to throw back a six-incher because I knew Cleothilda didn’t care for such a Hotel Lowry diet, and besides, who likes to bury half-eaten fish? The family hated Cleothilda. She was too catty. So by villainous means they trapped me into loving Faust. He came wrapped in a gunny sack, "on account of" a syncopated car ride had led to boisterous activity. On release, his little white paws acted as stilts. Cleothilda ran for the front porch. She stayed there three months, and when I wanted to see her, I had to whisk the broom around the place to trick her into thinking I was playing. The front porch was quite clean that quarter-year! But to go back to my "stilted” friend. One glance at his little black body, white chin, paws, and whiskers, and I saw the reincarnation of a "little black devil.” So Faust he was named for evermore. It almost wasn’t really "evermore,” however, for the next day brought disaster, which almost sent Faust back to his "happy hunting grounds." Some celebrating Fourth-of-JuIyer backed his car into my pet, and there he lay until, after a frantic search, I found him. I can’t say that mother liked having her clothes basket changed into a cat infirmary, but it worked. Faust recovered, and eventually made up with Clco-thilda. The two of them would calmly bask in the sunshine, and while I combed one, the other would become jealous. (That reminds me—whatever happened to that tooth brush?) And then one day there were five kittens! Cleothilda guarded her quintuplets day and night. She couldn’t fool me though; I found them there in my brother’s book-box in the garage. There were three "tigers" and two "reds”—well, yellow, if you insist. A friend of mine said, "why not compromise and call them orange?” Each night, hadn’t I to cover them with a peach crate so the neighbor’s dog wouldn’t find them? But the old peach crate fell in on one of the "reds” and hurt him in the neck. You see, there was a nail in the crate. The sore might have healed if the four little imps hadn’t discovered that that wound tasted much like the tiny pieces of beefsteak that we had introduced in their diet. As a last resort, I found some horse salve, which when coated over my sick friend gave him such a noisome odor that even Cleothilda wouldn't enter the box. You’ve heard of cases where even a mother couldn’t love her offspring. Kitty survived, but his inactivity caused him to develop into a widc- I'ajcr One ilunitrcil Fortyaround-thc-middle pet. He never lived down the name of "Puffball’'. When school started, I had to leave the gang. A week later, mother informed me that one had fallen into the cistern. Oh well, he was rescued; but five minutes too late. And then Puffball and two nameless ones wandered off. Mom said if I wanted the last one I'd better put in my order soon. A special delivery brought Dummy here in a hurry. He wouldn’t sit still on the back of the car, nor would he be tied in a sack. Nothing less than rhythmic stroking under the chin would keep him quiet. Mother was a martyr to the cause, but she claimed getting rid of the pest was worth it. So now Dummy lives in Eau Claire. He was twelve ounces heavy and nine inches long five months ago; which is not saying what he is now. At least he’s the only one left, as, last week, a letter from home told me how one of the "strayed revelers" had come back with distemper. Faust and Cleothilda, never to be outdone, caught it too, and the three of them were "popped off” with a "twenty-two”. Cats—I like them; furry ones, mind you. Maybe, eventually, I’ll forget Faust’s white whiskers and Cleothilda’s torn car. Maybe I’ll even forget Dummy’s flying trapeze skits around the ironing board. It may even be possible that some day I’ll say, "Cats? —oh I had one, once.” "Elviry” Gram Ann, the only child of a Scandinavian couple, was born in a small Minnesota town. Her parents were middle-aged when Ann, a child of just three pounds, was born. That feeble beginning serves as an excellent paradox—for at sixty, Gram (or Ann) can dance a full evening of square dances and leave the youngsters of the crowd in the background. Ann’s face is a study that no artist—however gifted—could ever translate into a portrait. This face has the saintly tone that defies any poet, photographer, or artist. Gram tells me that she had thick black hair when she was first married. The black hair has been changed, by suffering and sacrifice, into a gray that serves to emphasize the bluish-black eyes. Gram’s mouth is just as small as a mouth could be; but beneath that mouth lies one of the stubbornest chins I have ever noticed. Ann’s life was spent in helping her father in the fields, barn, or any place where she might be needed. She went through the public school of the little community. Little pleasure found its way into her life except an occasional prize for school work, or a new dress for graduation or confirmation. At twenty-one, Ann was married to a Norwegian immigrant. From then on, her work kept getting more burdensome, with the children, sickness and health, births and deaths and the additional care of her parents, who were already on the down-slope of life. Her sons were not old enough to go to war in 1918, but during that year Ann last her husband. Therefore, Ann found herself with seven children of varying ages—a mother whose heart kept going in spite of her shell-like body—and little money with which to bring up the family. Somehow, Ann kept her head above financial waters during the next years. At last, her family grew up; and together they planned ways and means of improving their environment and giving their mother a home of her own. As the family became more interested in other people and other things, they felt free to bring their friends home. Gram’s friendliness and maternal loveliness made friends of all the young people who shared her home. After one visit, the young people gave her this shorter title of Gram, for grandmother. This title has remained, until friends of the last four years have forgotten her real name, Ann. Christmas of last year brought Ann a card addressed to "Mrs. Gram J--------------- and Family.” When I caught the beaming look on her face, I saw the expression that must have made my Dad propose. E. M. Johnson My Work If I should die today, Could I say I’ve finished, Or would my work Be left Undone? Charlotte House l aRc One Hundred Forty-oneDreams Dreams of Heaven, Pass gently over me; Dreams of God, Descend upon me. All dreams of what Is yet to be, I feel, I see— A veil is lifted; I die. L. SvFNGAARD Every Night Except Monday SECOND PRIZE I light a cigarette, take a couple of drags, and finish my after-supper coffee. There’s nothing like a good cup of coffee and a cigarette after you finish eatin’. That’s what I always say, anyway. It’s five or ten minutes yet ’till Zimmie’s due to come after me, so I get up and case my collar away from my neck where it’s sticking to me from the sweat, and stroll up front with the check. When I get up by the cash register, Sophie starts fooling with the radio. She knows that I’m going to razz her a little about her brother. A long time ago I tried to get her to let me walk home with her, but she said her brother’s calling for her and she can’t. Of course I know that’s just a gag, so I razz her a little about it every time I get the chance. I pay the check after she gets some E-flat outfit playing "Home on the Range”, on the radio, and razz her some more. She gets a little sore, so I grab a toothpick and ease up to the front window where I can watch for Zimmie. Tony comes over and starts making cracks about the weather, but as I don’t like him and he knows it, pretty soon he goes back into the kitchen to eat his supper. The E-flat band fades out of their time on the air with their theme song, which I learn is "Over the Waves, and one of the boys from the Green Bay studios reads a spot about "Summer Lubrication” and makes the station break, throwing the program to Oshkosh. That means it s eight-thirty. The place is pretty cool ’cause they make a pretense at air conditioning, but by the door it s just like standing in front of a furnace. When a car goes past, the tires make a noise like somebody stepping on a ripe tomato. I’ve got a linen suit on, and feel like a Thanksgiving turkey. I don t want to think about how hot it’s going to be out in that joint. Zimmie slides up in front, and I pick up my trumpet from behind the bar, and go out. My feet stick in the soft asphalt, and the door handle on the car is hot. Frank sticks his idiotic pan out of the front window and wants to know if it’s hot enough for me. That’s a good measuring stick of his mentality. His hair is in his eyes, as usual, and his stutter is even more pronounced, as if the heat had acted on his voice as it does on the paving. Zimmie says he expects a good night tonight. I suppose so. There’s a lot of fools that’ll go out on a night like this and get canned to the eyes just to forget that they’re hot. Swell kind of weather to wake up with a hangover. Zimmie nearly rams a truck, waving at a girl that probably don’t want to be waved at anyway. I curse him good, and try a new position on the rear scat. We turn from College Avenue into Memorial Drive, and sail right past Tommie’s street I want to know if Zimmic’s lost his mind, and he tells me that Tom’s going to Chicago to get some music and stuff for the band he’s organizing. Monty is going to sing tenor tonight. That’s a break anyway. We spend ten minutes in front of Monty’s, cooking to a nice, golden brown. Zimmie improves the situation by honking his horn to the rhythm of "In a Little Gypsy Tea Room.” Monty finally comes out and dumps his tenor on my shins, starting the evening out right. The first thing he says is, whether he gets three or thrce-and-a-half. Zimmie says three-and-a-half. He doesn’t care; it all comes out of Tommie’s dough for the week anyway. I half expect Monty to start right in with psychology, or what’s the matter with any of the other three of us, but it is too hot for him. We get out of the car as soon as Zimmie stops in front of the joint. He always takes about a half hour to park. It’s a big crate, but you’d think it I’ajrr One Hundred Forty-twowas the Normandie the way he goes about parking it. I could turn a truck around in the space it takes him to wheel that Buick. I go in and pass the time of day with Mike. Mike is a nice guy and slips me something when Charlie, the boss, goes out for an order. The waiters aren’t here yet. Betty, Charlie’s five-year-old daughter, is running around with her hands in her mouth, as usual. She comes over and starts asking me for pennies. I give her the only two I’ve got, and she starts for the dance floor, where the other boys arc warming up, to ask them too. She may be only five, but she’s mature in a lot of ways, and systematic. One night, when the place was packed, she sang a song. Somebody started throwing pennies, and then the drunks got going. She picked up better than five bucks off the floor; almost twice what we make. Monty’s a good rhythm man. We starts riding "Old Oaken Bucket” in a nice, swingy stomp rhythm. He’s plenty good enough to dance to all by himself. A couple of parties come in, and Zimmie comes back from the bar, carrying two beers. He gives one to Monty. Even Zimmie is smart enough to do that. If he didn’t, Monty’d borrow a dime from him, and he wouldn’t get it back anyway. Frank is almost asleep back of his drum outfit. After about the second tune, he’ll go to sleep with his eyes open, and stay that way all night. That is unless somebody offers to buy him a drink. We always gag about Frank’s getting mad about being waked-up in the middle of a job. Monty and I tunc again; and Zimmie picks out “What’s the Reason,” “Isle of Capri.” and “Ida,” for the first group. We get music and our horns up and wait for Zimmie to tap off. In front of the outfit is a big, silver and black sign all covered with stuff that sparkles from the lights of the floods on it. It says "Larry and His Artists.” Self-Expression To be able to express one’s self is a wonderful thing. Whether it be in the turn of a phrase, an inflexion of the voice, a movement of the hand, in a glorious opera, on a canvas, or in a finely modeled bust, complete self-expression is gratifying to the soul. In writing, how often a desired word eludes our grasp—tantalizes us by its very nearness, dances just outside the reach of our pen. But when that word is captured and is fitted into its proper place, is there anything more satisfying than to read the word, to revel in its completeness? Then, too, the pleasure of knowing that one has expressed himself as he wishes, not as anyone may desire to interpret, comes, as a great director expostulated when he was so vociferously applauded by his musician’s after directing Beethoven’s "Ninth Symphony,” “Please—please—don’t do this to me. You sec, gentlemen, it isn’t I; it’s Beethoven.” E. B. NOSTALGIA FIRST PRIZE Forsooth! I wish I were a babe again, A smiling, toothless babe, with apple rosy cheeks. Methought becoming maiden would be fun. But life is just another hot-cross bun. Ah! if ’twere as simple as that. But I fear ’tis not. The welkin rang from the voice of a lusty wight, The “Good” Sinclair Lewis. A noble knight? Alas, no. He shattered an illusion; made it go. Simpleton, as I was, I dreamed of perfect romance: Poor life—so difficult and boring in his books. The "Goodman” Dreiser uprooted another golden fancy: All men arc bad; good only under a tansy. There is no future ever can be pleasant. Dear Dr. Frucd, I might even fall in love with a pheasant. (Peasant would have been more logical, but it seemed to lack tone color). I scan the horizon for my knight in shining armor; Biologically speaking, Sire Hemingway, what hast thou done with him? Alack-a-day, ha’ penny, roses in bloom, will my ears never be soothed by— "Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let down your hair; I would climb to the top of thy tower.” Woe is me! Down the vista of years there is only despair— A parade of "goodly” husbands tiring of wives and finding new lady loves. I would shut my eyes. I would know half-oblivion. Gadzooks! I wish I were a babe again. Anon. Woodland Stream Clear, cold, crystal water Trickling over mossy stones; Mirrored in its deep blue ripples, Overhanging leafy ferns; E.C.B. l Agr One Hundred Forty-threeMy Generation There is nothing new under the sun. It’s like going down a river. Before one is a bend. Around the bend is an island. One doesn’t see the island until he rounds the bend. But the island was always there. My generation are "war babies.” Flappers were in vogue when they were little children. Their first impressions were of legs. Ladies’ legs in black silk stockings, with arrows up the back: thin legs, bow legs, legs like tree trunks. As the children grew, radios and cars speeded life up and made it noisier. Cider brothers and sisters carried flasks and parked in motor cars. "Frank” books, magazines, movies, took away illusions even before they were acquired. I think my generation is splendid. They are so sober. They know that clothes and food come only from work. Their eyes are steady when they look toward the future. One could tell the boy was very young. He looked so frail and tired, hanging on the bus strap. In his free hand he was holding an empty dinner bucket. It jingled as they jogged along. His face was grimy from working all day in the factory. But believe me, he was going home. He would go home and clean up, and then go over to the hospital to see Mildred and the baby. Some boy that! The girl was walking across the hard-packed field. The new grass was green in patches where feet had not crushed it. She looked down at her feet. "Funny, I’m not conscious of wanting to go forward. Yet, my feet go on. Perhaps they arc glad for this clean wind’s blowing. This lovely day! Early June morning! High sky with the few white clouds going along paths. I am that cloud up there, or that bird flying. I can feel the warm wind ruffling the feathers on my breast as I swoop down and up —and up again.” The girl reached a fence at the edge of the field. She knelt down, and put her hands on the cool leaves of fresh grass. "I don’t want to go over the fence," she thought; "I want to feel this loveliness of grass and earth with my hands, and dig into it. This sense of perfect happiness: it might be eternity. Or perhaps, this is reality, and all the rest—pettiness and hurt—is unreality.” L------is a gloomy young man. He has been out of work for four months. He sleeps late in the morning; then he gets up, and puts on a dirty sweat shirt and a pair of work pants. He pads about the house in bed room slippers. In the afternoon, he listens to hockey games on the radio. He’s not going to look for a job; someone will have to get him one. "I tell you,” he says, "the whole system of society is wrong. "What’s the matter with the government if a man can’t earn a living?” Two boys and two girls were sitting at a table in the small club room. A four-piece orchestra was playing in the corner. Some couples were dancing. Upstairs a dance was in full suing. "One more drink and I will be a satyr dancing in a wood,” ventured the girl in blue. They had their drink, and then left for upstairs. The tall boy guided his partner up the steps. "I’m not afraid any more; I feel secure; I know that you belong to me utterly,” he said. The girl pressed his arm; "I love you more than anything in the world.” She stumbled on the top step. The music was fast and hot in the ball room. Couples clutched one another, and writhed and whirled about. The boy and the girl danced. "How lovely it is to dance,” thought the girl. "I can not feel my legs at all; we arc floating. I wonder if he thinks of love as I do. Why is the future so frightening? Little apartments, frustrated ambitions, sordidness, feeling hurt—1 get breathless when I think.” The music stopped. The orchestra played again, and the boy and the girl danced. The music was wilder than before. The pudgy orchestra leader jerked his whole body, leading the rhythm. "That’s right,” thought the girl, "play loud, play fast until ear drums explode. Squeeze your partner, bald-headed man; your wife won’t know. And if she did, what of it? "Nothing’s fun Just a hodge-podge of hot pavements in Summer at noon; nausea making spots before eyes; pitiful human beings. That’s all there is.” The orchestra changed its rhythm to a slower measure. "You know what I am thinking of now?” murmured the tall boy. "Last Sunday, when we took that ride in the late afternoon, it was so lovely to be with you. You told me you were so contented. I was happy; I couldn’t talk. You said the sun shining on the clouds as it set made them mauve. I like that word.” Anon. I'agr One llumlrrd Forty-fourAdvertising Section TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 1916-1936Index To Advertisers Aancs Studio 164 154 146 Balderston Apparel 164 Balfour, L. G., Co. 152 146 Berg Taylor ...... 155 Blucdorn Florist 167 162 Brandstad Drug 156 Bundy, Beach and Holland 146 162 152 156 162 Charlson Mfg. Co. ......... 158 153 Conrad Fur Co. 148 E. C. Book and Stationery 149 E. C. Cafe 166 E. C. Hotel 151 E. C. State Teachers’ College 168 Fleming Bros. Jeweler 158 Gillette Rubber Co. 163 156 Gundcr Thompson Apparel 166 Bundy, Beach Holland ATTORNEYS-AT-1. AW S. A. F. BUILDING EAU CLAIRE, WIS. Balcom’s Printery 906 GRAHAM AVENUE DIAL 4836 Hansen Clothing 147 Hansen Furniture .. 148 Huebsch Laundry 165 150 154 157 162 166 154 160 161 151 151 155 152 158 150 160 165 156 167 159 147 160 161 . 146 Wood Motor Co. 151 WILCOX - WILCOX —AND— SULLIVAN Attorneys - at Law Suite 500 UNION NATIONAL BANK BLDG. Tel. 6312 Eau Claire, Wis. Compliments of The Band-Box C. A. Christensen 211 SOUTH BAKSTOW Eau Claire, Wisconsin Page One Hundred Forty-»ixHANSEN CLOTHING CO. FASHIONS FOR MEN AND BOYS "WHERE YOU LOWER THE COST OF DRESSING WELL” 206 S. BARSTOW STREET EAU CLAIRE, WIS. THE PROFESSIONAL PHARMACY (URHEIM DRUG CO.) PRESCRIPTIONS ONLY 314 E. GRAND AVE. WE DELIVER Eau Claire, Wisconsin Classified Louis Berg—You’re a lowdown cheat! Wilbur Voigt—You’re an unmitigated liar! Chairman (rapping)—Now that the opponents have identified each other, we shall proceed with the debate. Idiot George—I suppose you think I’m a perfect idiot. Grace—Oh, none of us is perfect. a decent funeral. This may look more like an accident. You won’t need a note then; so tear it up. In the end you’ll probably decide that it is easier to stay a while and die a natural death than to take all this trouble and die early. Frances Hoeppner, 8B Date Bureau Burt Loken (dashing into the office to get a date for a DeChatillon party)—Say, Jerry, you couldn’t fix us up a couple of dates, could you? Milwaukee Jim B.—Why is Milwaukee sometimes called the "Athens of Wisconsin”—because so many Germans settled there? Mr. Fox—Why, I never heard of such a thing. Jim B.—I believed it was mentioned in the text, Mr. Fox. How to Commit Suicide First you have to get disgusted with life, and reason with yourself until you are quite sure that you want to leave this life. Write a sad goodbye note giving the reason for your departure, and then buy a gun, strong acid, poison, or a knife. Poison costs too much, and a knife is torture; so what is the easiest? Jumping off a bridge and forgetting to come up for air is easy, but then you can not have The Classics Conversation between two Training School pupils: First Pupil—I’ll be the Fair Lady, and you be Sir Walkathon. Second Pupil (disgustedly)—It wasn’t Walkathon; it was Lochinvar. Room for All Mr. Fox (changing seating arrangements) — Now the first group will move down one scat to accommodate Mr. Barnes. The second group will have to move down two scats, because we’ll have to get Mr. Fcnskc in, too. The next group will move over three, and Miss Johnson will sit next to Miss Hartwell. And now—the next group will please move over four seats to admit Mr. Jordan. Page One Hundred Forty-sevenFURS REMODELED - REPAIRED - STORED ALWAYS A COMPLETE STOCK OF FURS FOR YOUR SELECTION "BUY FURS FROM A FURRIER” CONRAD FUR COMPANY Manufacturing Furriers EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN AUGUST HANSEN FURNITURE STORE Homemakers, especially beginners, find us Plead-quarters for the Best Furniture, Rugs, Carpets, and all House Furnishings. EAU Cl.AIRE, WISCONSIN "Buy a Periscope” Two decades, five months, and two hours ago our alumni brought forth on this campus a new yearbook, conceived in completeness and dedicated to the proposition that everyone would buy one yearly- Now we arc engaged in a great campaign testing whether that book, or any book so compiled, can actually be sold. We arc now met on the twentieth anniversary of that book. We have come to subscribe in that campaign as a final act for ourselves that the memories of college days may live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But in a larger sense, we cannot sell this book, we alone cannot make this campaign a success, we cannot edit this book. The cooperation of the loyal students, awake or asleep, who are struggling here, can put this drive over far above our poor power to sell. The college will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget the picture announcements by Helen Cohen. It is for us, the students, to subscribe here for the Periscope so that the accomplishments of the staff thus far so nobly advanced will not be in vain. It is for us to be interested in the great opportunity before us—that for this annual we give increased enthusiasm so that the book which shows our diversified college activities shall have the last full measure of support—that we here highly resolve that this Periscope shall not be published in vain—that this institution under Harvey A. Schofield shall have forever-and-a-day a yearbook of the students, by the students, for the students, and shall be supported by the students by subscribing in their third and fourth period classes this week. Junior McCoy Teutonic Sneeze In English Literature a very loud sneeze was heard from the back of the room: Mr. Murray—A-hem—that must have been Beowulf greeting the dawn. Why? Clarice Chase (making an assembly announcement)—Boys may come to the semi-formal dance in their business suits, but remember, boys, no suspenders! Nutting Mr. Murray (in Romantic Movement class) — Write a synopsis of the poem "Nutting”—and that’s not the antonym of "something,” cither. What’s This.' He (confidently)—I think Parkovich is Russian. She (all in a flutter) — Well, forever more! Who’s he rushin’? Page One Hundred Forty-eightGRADUATION DAY is a step forward in your progress toward an elected goal. You are a step closer to an end that you are ultimately going to attain. In the business of serving teachers we find the same is also true. Service and satisfaction to our customers is our main objective. We have served the teachers of Wisconsin for fifty-one years, and it is our constant aim to fulfill your future desires efficiently and completely. Warehouses are maintained at 3102 Cherry St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin; 312-314 North Grand Avenue, Lansing, Michigan; and 320 South Bar-stow St., Eau Claire, Wisconsin. If you are located in one of these sections, write to the establishment nearest you for catalogs and information as soon as you begin teaching. Eau Claire Book Stationery Co. Eau Claire Wisconsin I'lige One Itumlral Forty-nineWILLIAM SAMUELSON DRY GOODS CO. Eau Claire, Wisconsin Wc Carry one of the Largest Stock of— QUALITY DRY GOODS, READY-TO-WEAR, MILLINERY. SHOES. AND HOUSE FURNISHINGS IN NORTHWESTERN WISCONSIN Jensen Drug Stores Service in Drugs Old Razor Blades P. G. Wodehouse puts the modern writer’s conception of modern man rather neatly. He says, 'They arc well-tubed, long-legged, and clean-shaven.” Let the first two characteristics amount to what they may, I bemoan the latter, and I’ll tell you why. Do you realize that, according to Gillette Razor Blade Corporation, there are sixty-five million shaves going on in the United States each day? Do you realize that this amounts to about four hundred fifty-five million a week? Supposing you can conceive this, do you as yet sec the terrible importance of it? I doubt it. Let me show you something. Figuring the average blade to be one and one-fourth inches long, one week's supply would form, lying end-to-end, a line nine and one-half million miles long! One year’s supply would form a path eighteen inches wide and long enough to reach to the moon and back! A year’s supply could rebuild the French navy! Staggering, isn’t it? And this amount is increasing! This razor blade problem is our heritage, and what a problem it is! Various and sundry solutions arc pending, of course, but none arc satisfactory. Some people say we could ship old razor blades to Scotland where the inhabitants use old blades until they disintegrate, but shipping rates are prohibitive. Others say that they disposed of theirs by putting them between pages of dry old books. This method could not possibly answer a national problem, though it would provide local relief. Shavers could drop them between the cracks in the floor, for a while. Probably there is only one solution and that is to stop shaving. Why not? All men, with few exceptions, who have made history have had their faces adorned by a grand array of whiskers. Wc look more masculine that way. And besides saving the cost of razor blades, the soap bill would be lowered. Whatever is done must be done soon, for the rate of increase of the supply of old razor blades is tremendous. Spring must find us in possession of a solution, or accumulated blades will be lying on the ground in piles, as lay the snows of winter. Justus Rifk Your Absence Your absence Leaves a lonely place— A chest of tender memories Whose key I often turn To go within, and bide among my thoughts And then depart when duty calls me. Could you but know my dearest heart’s desire— That some day you might turn the selfsame key And enter in that treasure chest with me! L. S. I'agr One lltitulrcil FiftyHOTEL EAU CLAIRE Special Attention Given Banquets and Dinner Parties COFFEE SHOP CAFE COLONIAL GRILL Eau Claire, Wis. CHEVROLET - BUICK FINE PRODUCTS OF GENERAL MOTORS We Handle the complete Buick and Chevrolet line, Auto Radios and Used Cars. WOOD MOTOR CO. 5 1 3 So. Barstow St. OPPOSITE POST OFFICE “EAT" MOONEY’S CANDIES Opera Cream Royalc 5c Nut Goodie 5c Pineapple Whipp 5c Cherry Float 5c Double Mint Pats 5c Paradise Bar 5c French Bittersweet 5c Walnut Royal 5c OWNERS OF JENNY LIND CANDY SHOP Fancy Package and Bulk Candies Mooney Brothers Co. Eau Claire, Wisconsin Why Cook for Hours When Minutes Will Do Endorsed by World s Foremost Authorities on Cooking and Recommended by U. S. Department of Agriculture as well as all State Agricultural Departments as being the only safe method for canning vegetables, meats, fowl and fish. Canning done better and in one-third the time. National Pressure Cooker Company Eau Claire, Wisconsin Tagc One Hundred Fifty-oneLooking Back In 1917, forty-seven seniors emerged from the portals of this institution. Keeping in mind the present graduating class, a comparison of the two is enlightening. Of the forty-seven graduates, the female contingent proved superior in numbers, being forty-five women to two men. Then as now the student body was drawn from Eau Claire and surrounding towns, the greatest number being from Eau Claire and Chippewa Falls— twenty-four and eight, respectively. Chctck, Augusta, Eleva, New Richmond, Durand, Ncillsvillc, Menomonie, Spencer, Shell Lake, and Sheldon also had sent their sons and daughters to be educated. A rather interesting sidelight is the fact that of the eight from Chippewa Falls, three, at some time or other, have since taught in the public schools there. Needless to say, the majority of the class has fallen victim to the arrows of Dan Cupid. The first page of the 1917 Periscope reveals the reason for the name of the annual. Running horizontally across the page is a drawing of a periscope; also on the page is the caption "A suggestion for a name for the school annual is 'The Periscope’, a reflector of school activities.” Anon. Thou book immense, Thou spacious book. Though started long ago Thy print is ever A changing type that changes As men grow. B. F. Fraternity, College and Class Jewelry Commencement Announcements, Invitations, Diplomas Jeweler to the Senior Class of Eau Claire State Teachers’ College L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY Manufacturing Jewelers and Stationers Attleboro, Mass. QUALITY FRESHNESS BURI’S JPJ L01 S UM At Your Grocer’s COMPLIMENTS OF NORTHWEST CONFECTION CO. FORMERLY BARAGERAVEBSTER JOBBING CO. 414 Eau Claire St. Eau Claire, Wisconsin Page One Hundred Fifty-twoThe Chippewa Printery PRINTING • PUBLISHING - ADVERTISING Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin Page One lliin lrc«l Fifty-threeJOHNSON HULEATT Headquarters For HART SCHAFFNER 8 MARX CLOTHIERS FURNISHERS SHOE FITTERS TWO STORES 416 Water St. EAU CLAIRE, WIS. 501 Bellinger St. ADAMS DRUG STORE Students’ Headquarters 502 Water Street Eau Claire, Wisconsin BERG TAILOR CLEANING, PRESSING AND SUITS AT POPULAR PRICES—REPAIRING. 436 Water Street EAU CLAIRE WISCONSIN Commuters Twice a day, Five days a week, Four weeks a month, Nine months a year: Back and forth, To and fro— Just to get an education Over bumps, Up the hills, Around curves, Never stopping: Keep on going, Endlessly— Just to get an education. It is smart to wear Real Flowers Have Your Corsage Styled by Louise at Lauritzen Floral Co. 311 So. Barstow St. Eau Claire Wisconsin In rain or shine, In fog and mist. Windy days. Grey, dark days. Bright, warm days. Slippery days— Just to get an education. Same old road, Yet always new, Every day we see it; Seasons pass, Landscapes change, Time goes by— Just to get an education. E. B. Memorable Utterances Dr. Davenport—He cut off his nose in spite of his face. Maxine Otis (making an assembly announcement)—There’s a semi-formal coming off Wednesday night. Strut and Fret is putting it on. Gentleman (escorting Elizabeth Alcott hurriedly to class)—Well, as Sir Walter Raleigh said when he laid down his cloak, "I guess you’ll have to step on it, Lizzie.” Page (hie Hunilrol Fifty-fourNORTHERN STATES POWER COMPANY EVERY city or town has some particular advantage that makes its community life attractive. Some cities and towns have such spectacular natural advantages of location or climate that they become world famous. But every community must have the one vital if not spectacular advantage of good electric service if it is to succeed or even continue. Communities have grown and become prosperous by the influence good electric service exerts in attracting new industries. This is only possible where the utility builds today to have adequate reserve capacity for the business it attempts to attract to the community tomorrow. The public in self-interest owes its utilities the opportunity to extend its service in this manner by permitting it to earn a fair return which alone makes expansion possible. Page One Hundred Fifty fveARCHIE V. HURST General Agent Eau Claire MADISON. WISCONSIN LIFE INSURANCE - ANNUITIES ANNUAL DIVIDENDS ON ALL POLICIES ASSETS INCREASED 45% FROM 1929 TO 1936 R. H. STOKES E. WALACE STOKES VERNON C. STOKES R. H. Stokes U Sons Co. FUNERAL SERVICE AMBULANCE SERVICE 105 Grand Avenue E. TEL. 3322-3455 Eau Claire Wisconsin Not a Joke Mr. Hahn, engineer, and Mrs. Ray, manager of the cafeteria, have not been given division pages in the Periscope, this year, for the display of their pictures, but they have, nevertheless, been here since the establishment of the college, and have played their parts in the development of the school. Mrs. Ray has seen many classes come and go, and has provided good food at very reasonable prices. Mr. Hahn has kept the building warm, and had his part in the improvement of the campus. Snappy Talk Mr. Fox—That’s all right; you write your own ticket. Miss Sutherland—Tomorrow I shall carry the burden of the discussion. Dr. Wallin (when confronted with an argument)—Well, we can’t go into that any further now. Dr. Wallin (in reply to R. Gillett, who was trying to sell him a ticket for a "turkey trot” raffle) — I’m sorry but I’m like the Czar of Russia, Nicholas. Romeo, O Romeo! Pearl Risberg (reading aloud from a screen magazine)—Romeo and Juliet, Antony and Cleopatra, Tristram and Isolde, Dante and Beatrice, He-loise and Abelard! Lovers all—out of the scores upon scores of lovers who down through the ages have stimulated the creative artistry of poets and minstrels— Lizzie (bored to tears)—Another Lifebuoy ad! Card and Party Shop GREETING CARDS AND GIFTS “Exclusive But Not Expensive" 311 So. Barstow St., Eau Claire, Wis. Meet Me At- BRANSTAD'S Cor. Barstow and Grand Ave. Eau Claire, Wisconsin Page One Hundred Fifty-sixJohnson Studio Photographers - Engravers Lithographic Printers Eau Claire, Wisconsin Page One Hundred Fifty-sevenKenneth Kling’s and Mr. Boberg’s diminutive moustaches. Vivian Bragg’s bored air. Dr. Davenport's mannerism of rubbing his finger along his nose. President Schofield’s clearing of his throat. Louis Berg’s booming voice. Miss V. Miller’s hearty laugh. Good Idea While living in a tenth-story apartment in Chicago, our family, and especially my mother, always worried about our ice problem. You sec, there were no elevators, and by the time the iceman had carried fifty pounds of ice up the ten flights of stairs, there would be only about thirty-eight pounds left. We paid almost one dollar and sixty-eight cents a month for the waste, as the ice was weighed at the wagon. The family budget couldn’t stand that inefficiency, so we cast about for a solution of the problem. Mother suggested an electric refrigerator, but as one would cost too much, the idea was shelved. We tried pulling the ice up the side of the building with ropes, but the tenants below acquired the habit of chipping off pieces as the ice went by their window; so the cost of the waste mounted instead of declining. Finally we decided that the best solution of our problem was to have the iceman carry our ice box down stairs to the wagon, fill it up, and carry it back up again. Justus Riek Rogness Battery Electric Service Automotive Electrical, Carburetor and Auto Radio Service Telephone 3711 615 S. Barstow St. EAU CLAIRE. WISCONSIN COMPLIMENTS CHARLSON MANUFACTURING COMPANY EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN Lumber Millwork Reformed Too Late Announcement in assembly, Thursday, April 2, after Mr. Zorn failed to get his 200 the previous banknight—"Any one wishing to see me, do so before 7 o’clock this evening. After that time I will be at the State Theatre.” "Signed: "Zorn” Lest We Forget Wilbur Voigt’s propensity for vocal utterance. Helen Cohen’s speed of speech. Dave Korrison’s good looks. Elvera Daul’s "Grade Allen” talk. Theola Kelly’s "Zazu Pitts” voice. Fleming Brothers RELIABLE JEWELERS Eau Claire, Wisconsin Page One llumlre I Fifty-eight“Pure as The Lily” LILY BRAND ICE CREAM Distributors of Perfectly Clarified and Pasteurized Milk and Cream ALSO Uecke’s Vitex - Vitamin “D” Milk Approved by the American Medical Association CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR OR DENTIST Uecke Dairy Co. PHONE 4104 EAU CLAIRE, WIS. Page One Hundred Fifty-nineSchwahn's “DE LUXE" QUALITY LUNCHEON MEATS Always Uniformly Good EAU CLAIRE WISCONSIN USE CLASSIFIED ADS----------- IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR WfORK, A BOARDING PLACE. A ROOM. OR HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL USE A CLASSIFIED AD. The Eau Claire Leader and The Daily Telegram Eau Claire, Wisconsin Research Imagine our surprise at seeing a member of the Periscope staff looking for her humor assignment in the Fifth Grade newspaper. Didn’t Say It The gym was crowded. A tense expectancy pervaded the atmosphere. The student body had turned out five-hundred strong. Staunch alumni supporters filled the bleachers. The winning or losing of the game between our varsity and the visiting team meant a great deal to Eau Claire. Then, Geneva Muenchow entered the crowded gym, glanced about, and inquired, "Who’s playing, tonight?” This year I have the nicest selection I have ever had in beautiful combination sets, of clips, bracelets, and rings. My watches are the kind that will tell you the correct time when you look at them. Elgin — Gruen — Hamilton H. F. VANDERBIE Eau Claire, Wis. False Gayety I go to teas and parties And dance and laugh a lot, I try to have a jolly time, But, oh, my dear, I’m not! I keep the gayest company, My days filled to the brink; No one knows the reason is So that I cannot think Of when I walked with love a way And Spring lived in my heart— Dear, can’t we stop this nonsense? Don’t let us drift apart! Jeanne Marginal Productivity Dr. Wallin (in Economics Class)—Now, if a farmer hired four men who produced nine hundred bushels of potatoes, and then added a fifth man who made it possible to produce one hundred more bushels, the marginal productivity at this point would be one hundred bushels. Mr. Smith, will you define marginal productivity? Mr. Smith—Sure, it’s one hundred bushels of potatoes. Congressmen Remark heard at a debate one night — "Our Congressmen are as good as money can buy!” P«KC One Hundred SixtyMOBIL GAS AND MOBIL OIL Alemite System of Greasing and Grease Goodrich Tires, Tubes and Repairing Willard Batteries and Battery Charging Car Washing-Brake Testing and Lining Headlight Testing and Accessories A REAL SUPER-SERVICE STATION OWNED BY EAU CLAIRE PEOPLE — THAT’S US White Bros. Oil Company Frank Heebink, Manager 718 So. Barstow St. Eau Claire. Wisconsin 24-Hour Service Phone 5512 LOOBY’S LEO L. LOOBY P. J. LOOBY QUALITY MEATS and GROCERIES Eau Claire, Wisconsin Altoona, Wisconsin Candid Miss Buchholz (in Library Methods class) — Miss Luoma, what is the distinction between the use of the words "lady” and "woman"? Lempi Luoma—The word "lady" stresses social position and refinement. Nine-tenths of the time "woman” is really the word needed. He "sassed” Mr. Donaldson; He slept in Miss Oxby’s German class; He attempted to match Miss Sutherland’s wit; He told Mr. Murray the Periscope was a "flop”— He was expelled from school after the first month. A Fool There Was He was late for Mr. Fox’s class five days in succession; He talked aloud in the library to see whether Miss Buchholz would care; He tried to argue Miss Macdonald into passing all the basketball boys; She Didn’t Jane Anderson—Why are you lame, Evelyn? Evelyn Erickson—Do you see that step over there? Jane—Yes. Evelyn—Well, I didn’t. I’aKc One Hundred Sixty-oneH. H. KLEINER COMPANY Building Contractors Dealers in Lumber and Building Supplies PHONE 8411 EAU CLAIRE. WIS. 1128 FIRST AVE. Infants Free Coach Zorn (making an assembly announcement)—The price of admission to this boxing show is fifteen cents for college students and twenty-five cents for adults. Barbara Roach Barbara Roach entered school here for the first time this year. She was supposed to be enjoying it, but one week-end she walked into the room where her father was and remarked, "I'm tired of going to school, Pop.” "Why?” asked her father. "Oh,” answered Barbara, "it breaks up the day TO MEN IN ALL STAGES OF PUBLIC OR PRIVATE LIFE,BILLIARDS OFFER THE IDEAL RELAXATION IN THEIR DAILY TASKS— T! 1ESE MEN ARE REALIZING THE SURE ROAD TO MENTAL AND PHYSICAL WELL BEING. TRY IT AT W. C. BUNDE EAU CLAIRE. WISCONSIN Compliments of Central Service Paper Co. EAU CLAIRE. WISCONSIN BLUM’S Clothing, Furnishings and Shoes for Young Men OPEN EVENINGS 507 Bellinger St. Eau Claire, Wis. Was She? Imagine Elvera Daul getting kicked out of the library with five Freshmen boys! Sissies In English grammar, gender is frequently cither masculine or feminine. The Readers’ Digest this year defined school teachers as the third gender. However, Mr. Brewer still wins in the discussion. He claims that the third gender is composed of They Did Mrs. Thompson (in the library during the first week of school)—Will all you upperclassmen in here who haven’t anything to do, please stop talking! 1’atcc One Ilumlrcfl Sixty-twoPage One Humlml Sixty-threeShorter Now Notice in Training School newspaper: "Lost, a green pencil. It was five inches long when lost.” Good Idea John Ask (in German class)—Shall I tell how much of it I understand, or how much I don’t? Miss Oxby—You’d better tell how much you understand. We have just one period, you know. Speed Freshman—When are you going to read your Spectator? Senior—In Periscope meeting while I’m doing my Slat. Methods. Changed? lone (reminiscing)—That was when I was a poor, dumb little Freshman; I’ve changed since then. Norma—Yes, you’re a Senior now. Somebody’s Education President Schofield (reading announcements in assembly)—Lost, a small black notebook; contents very valuable to owner. Lempi (sotto voce)—There goes somebody's education. So? Mr. Slagg—What plants flourish in excessive heat? B. Dale—Ice plants. The Soul Beautiful as a starlit sky After rain; Tender as the soft caress Of a vagrant snowflake; Wonderful as the merciful Nearness of God— So is your soul. L. SvENGAARD Sprig Tis sprig, ’tis sprig; The birdies sig; The little buds will sood udfode; But whad care I Dough sprig be digh— I have a code. Candy Evelyn Erickson----The candy in that window makes my mouth water. Joe Waller—Well, here’s a blotter. AANES STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHS LIVE FOREVER Phone 9731 Appointments Day or Night One Block South and One Block East of Post Office 708 So. Farwell St. Eau Claire, Wis. JOS. E. BALDERSTON 17-19 So. Barstow Street LADIES’ CORRECT WEARING APPAREL FOR THOSE WHO KNOW Eau Claire, Wisconsin page Out ilmiilrrd Sixty'fourGet It Back by Parcel Post Have It Master Cleaned - It Costs No More iffliiQbschj) Launderers Dry Cleaners ESTABLISHED 1891 EAU CLAIRE CHIPPEWA FALLS, WIS. 5 Family Services—5 Prices TRUCK SERVICE IN Over 50 TOWNS Sterling Paper Pulp Co. EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN Manufacturers of School Papers, Tissue Papers, Fruit Wraps, Paper Towels, Figures and Manilas, and all Specialty Papers made from Sulphite and Groundwood. Page « ne Hundred Sixty-fiveDiamonds Watches LASKER JEWELERS EAU CLAIRE HOTEL BLDG.—EAU CLAIRE. WISCONSIN Telephone 5914 Cash or Credit Gunder Thompson Co. Opposite Eau Claire Hotel EXCLUSIVE LADIES and MISSES READY - TO - WEAR We Specialize in DANCE. GRADUATION, AND PARTY FROCKS Eau Claire, Wisconsin Eber Simpson Mr. Simpson was visited by Mr. Donaldson one day. During the evening he noticed that the son, Eber, was staring at Mr. Donaldson’s bald pate. Fearing the boy would make some outspoken remark, Mr. Simpson gave him a disapproving glance. "That’s all right, dad," came the reassuring response, "I’m not going to say anything; I’m just looking at it." Test "Stoney” McCombs—Do you know how to tell a professor from a student? Kenneth Kling—No, how? S. M.—Ask him what "it” is, and if he says a pronoun he’s a professor. Not News Mr. Murray (while reading the Eau Claire Leader)—This isn’t real news. Irene Fomberg—Why not? Mr. Murray—The head is "Woman talks steadily for three hours." That isn’t news. Did She Miss Oxby (in German class)—Does no one know the word? Timid Freshman—Yes, "damit.” Miss Oxby—Of course; and I could say it with a vengeance! The Home of Quality and Service EAU CLAIRE CAFE Eau Claire Wisconsin Training School Definitions Access—What the earth revolves on. Accrue—What’s needed to run a boat. Origin—A fruit from which is squeezed the popular "origin juice." Speeding—Expectorating. Abuse—A muse with a cold. Sigh—What the wind is doing through the pines. Noose—What one reads in the paper. Incubus—What the Dionne quints were brought up in. Mercury—The quality of which Shakespeare wrote about. Methodist—One who does things methodically. I'aiif One Hundred Sixty-sixGood Old Joke Practice Teacher—Frank, what lesson do we learn from the bee? Student—Not to get stung. Good Old, Old Joke Practice Teacher—How many make a million? Student (answering quickly)—Not many. Memorable Utterances Dr. Davenport (in Political Science class) — There are six hundred odd people in this class; (afterthought) six hundred fifty counting the faculty. Address, Please Miss Buchholz (in Library Methods class, shortly after Rudyard Kipling’s death)—Did you find Mr. Kipling's address in ’’Who’s Who,” Mr. Boberg? Mr. Boberg—Well, there was no forwarding address, but— Louis Berg Louis Berg is capable of more than talking. He proved in a Co-operative Marketing class that he was fully as capable in the field of snoring. Bob Musuni Irene Fombcrg (admiringly)—I suppose your news articles just flow from your pen. ’’Bob” Musum (looking ruefully at fountain pen)—Sometimes the whole article comes out at once. Wise Guy President Schofield—Why don’t you put a "Wet Paint" sign up? W.P.A. Worker — Not on your life; do you want finger marks all over the walls? Elizabeth Ai.cott Imagine dignified Seniors like Elizabeth Alcott flipping pennies! The underclassmen were mystified until an astute one discovered that it was an experimental tossing for Stat. Methods, to illustrate the law of probability. Absent-Minded Professor An absent-minded professor drove home, got out of his car, opened the garage doors, noticed that the garage was empty, jumped into the car again, drove to the police station, and reported his car had been stolen. Sensible Mr. Slagg—I heard Grant Plett was kicked off the football team. Mr. Bridgman—How did that happen? Mr. Slagg—He was told to tackle the ’’dummy,” and he tackled the referee. Freshie First Freshie—Why didn’t you stay for the whole show? Second Freshie—The program said, "Act 3, same as Act. I.” Cut Flowers Plants Floral Designs PHONE 4535 EAU CLAIRE, WIS. 416 DODGE ST. More Milk Content Gives TENDER KRUST BREAD DELICIOUS FLAVOR — BETTER TOASTING QUALITY Better Keeping Quality AT ALL INDEPENDENT GROCERS TENDER KRUST BAKING CO. EAU CLAIRE, WIS. I’aitc One Hundred $ixty- cvcnState Teachers' College EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN The Eau Claire State Teachers’ College offers exceptional advantages for students. The physical plant is unexcelled. It is thoroughly equipped with the best educational apparatus that money can buy. The fees at the Eau Claire State Teachers’ College arc moderate, and the same as any other State Teachers’ College in Wisconsin. This college no longer offers two-year courses except in the field of rural teaching. The old one-year course for rural teaching has been discontinued. The minimum course for those talcing Primary work or work for Upper Grade teaching is now three years in length. Four-year courses are also offered in the field of Elementary Education and in the field of Secondary Education. These courses lead to the degree of Bachelor of State Teachers’ College Education. The standard courses offered at the Eau Claire State Teachers’ College and their length are as follows: Two-year course for Rural school teaching. Three-year course for Primary Grade teaching. Three-year course for Upper Grade teaching. Four-year course for Elementary Grade with degree. Four-year course for Secondary school teaching with degree. The courses for High School teachers are highly elective, provision being made for the student to specialize along lines for which he is best adapted. Summer School begins June 15, 1936 and closes July 24, 1936. The regular school year opens September 14, 1936. Write for a circular or, better still, ask definite questions about any part of the school work and get an immediate personal reply. President H. A. Schofield EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN I’agc One Hundred Sixty-eight t


Suggestions in the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) collection:

University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) online yearbook collection, 1934 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

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