University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI)

 - Class of 1918

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University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 132 of the 1918 volume:

VOLUME TWO EDITED BY STUDENTS OF THE EAU CLAIRE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 0 O 11 rAHON. EMMliT HORAN »(To JRr. Iimmet linrau, folio breamcb of the Normal 5 rl]ooI at Iimi (Claire anb folio sain his bream become a reality; ftiljo scrlieb it faithfully as a member of the Vnarb of Normal £ egents, folieu serfong meant Ijarb anb unremitting toil; foe brbicatr tljis iiolitme of the periscope. 54 3Periscope Board Kathryn Kku.f.tt, lid it nr in Chief. Harold Gkwald, Business Manager. O. J. Mf.miy. Assistant. Merritt Popk, Faculty Advisor. Harold Rounds. Assistant. Honor Frawley. Literary Censor. ORGANIZATIONS AND ATHLETICS— Lucia Fkar. HONORS AND EVENTS— Bernadette Walsh: SIDELIGHTS— I.YDIA SiNG1.ETON. Lawrence Fish. Thelma Mok. MOPE . SCHOOL— Wii.ua m Doudna. M arion O tkrbekg. LITERARY Gertrude Bartlett. ( .. I SSLS— M ARcaret Kai.k. Helen Wight. ART- - I UKRAINE Ahrens. Salisbury Bostwick. CALENDAR— Carol Willan. Cora Bartlbtt. Corcelia Turner.I ' 1 vS ® Si V 4. - I I PERISCOPE BOARDOfficers of Administration STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. Em win. I,. Fiiiuit C. I . Cary, Merlin Hull Mrs. Meta Berger. Clare B. Bird Howard J. Dempsey Herman Grotophorst Charles !.. Hill, I'rank P. Hixon Dr. C. H. Vilas Francis S. Lamb R. B. Buckingham - Governor Stale Superintendent of Schools Secretary of Slate Milwaukee - Wausau - Oshkosh liaraboo - Rosendale - - - La Crosse - Madison Secretary and Accountant Educational Statistician BOARD OF REGENTS OF NORMAL George B. Nelson President W. K. Coffin. Vice-President Duncan McGregor - IL (). Hamilton - C. P. Cary. Superintendent (Ex-Officio) Eiiwahii J. Dkmi-sky - D. C. Gates - F. D. Rogers - W. P. Ramkr - Ch as. Van Aukf.n - Mrs. E. August Runge - Wm. Kittle, Secretary - SCHOOLS. Stevens Point Eau Claire - Platteville IV hit neater - Madison Oshkosh Superior Milwaukee River Palls La Crosse liaraboo - MadisonFaculty II. A. St iiokim.Ii. 'resident. Sfcxcns Point Normal. I 'niversity of Wisconsin. ( |. Hkiavim. I'rim-ipal .» Training De- partment. River Kali Normal. Mainline University. W. . t i.AUK. Psychology ami Education. River I'alls Normal. Unix ersity ii’ Wisconsin. E, •. Douiina. English. Klattevillc Normal. University of Wisconsin. L. I). Go. it . History and Economics. University of Wisconsin. Hkttv T. A msm:t.t.. Expression and English. State Normal School. Valley City. N. D. University of Iowa. University of Wisconsin. School of Expression, Huston. E».xjamix W. Bridgman, Physics and Chemistry. Oshkosh Normal. University of Wisconsin. Bikxul M. DeWane, Stenographer.Florence C. Far.sham. Librarian. Oberlin College. Wisconsin Library School. A. J. Fox, Manual Training. Stevens Point Normal. Stout Institute. University of Wisconsin Summer School. University of Chicago Summer School. lloN'OMA FrAWLKY, English and Supervision. University of Wisconsin. Columbia Summer School. Grace Gail Gibkrsok. Music. Mount Pleasant Normal. Thomas Training School. Evelyn D. Hansen. Drawing. Iowa State Teacher's College. Leslie Hknshaw. Trench. Teachers' College. University of Cincinnati. Frames Jagoditsh, Clerk. Blanche James, Mathematics. University of Wisconsin. University of Chicago.ELLtN Mi IioniAM, Critic, hirst and Second (trades. Superior Normal. 7m.ma Monkiik, Ponii'stic Science. University of Michigan. Wellesley College. Illinois Wesleyan. 1111.da 15. Oxhv, Latin and German. University of Michigan. University ui Berlin. University of Freiberg. University of Marburg. Francks B. Pearson. Physical Director. Pritchett College. Columbia College of Kxpressiou. Chicago College of Physical lulu-cation. University of Wisconsin. Merritt N. Pope, Biology. North western University. Harvard University. North Dakota Agricultural lege. Col- K AT It F.RI xK Ryan . AYith metic. River Falls Normal. Columbia University. Dokotiiy Salter, Crilic, Fifth and Sixth Grades. Stevens Point Normal. Columbia University Summer School. Katherine Thomas. Critic. Seventh and Highlit Grades. River Falls Normal. University of Minnesota. Columbia University Summer School. ►Mkrritt N . Pope, Biology. Northwestern university. Harvard University. North Dakota Agricultural lege. Cot- Kathkrine Ryax. Arithmetic. River Kalis Normal. Columbia University. Dorothy Salter, Critic, Fifth and Sixth Crudes. Stevens Point Normal. Columbia University Summer School. Katherine Thomas, Critic. Seventh and Eighth Crudes. River Falls Normal. University of Minnesota. Columbia University Summer School.Senior Class Officers FIRST SKMESTER. Riknick l-frciiKS - President Rt by Suno - - • rii 9 President Doris Ei.semore - - Secretary-Treasurer SECOND Thelma Mok Bimiiink Buckley Frances Timbers Florence Johnson SEMESTER. I’re si tie n I I ’iee resident Treasurer Secretary COLORS—Red, White and Blue. MOTTO—“Out to Win.” FLOWER—Red Rose.ANDERSON. AGNES. liau Claire. Ceceliaus; Y. W. C. A.; Benis-ah-Nepay Campfire. BEEBE. MARJORIE. Clenwood City. BASS. JOSEPHINE. Neillsville. Alpha Rho; Y. W. C. A. BAR ACER, MILES. Owen. Teutonia; Glee Club; Periscope Board ’17; Class Play 17. BF.JIN, EVA. ( Ai ' •ellii l% alls. Alpha Rho. Pageant Committee. AUSMAN, MARY. : A Mound. Ceceliaus; Teutonia. BARTLETT. GERTRUDE. Han Claire. Alpha Rho; Ass’t Music Department ; Literary Editor. Periscope ’18. GOETHAL. JEANETTE K. Hau Claire.BERGFORD, BERGLIOT. Eau Claire. V. W. C. A. BUCKLEY. BIRDINE. .lima Center. BLUCHER. CELIA. Chippewa Falls. Bcnis-ali-Nepay Campfire. CONWAY, GERTRUDE. Eau Claire. BROWN. FRANCES. IF i thee. BROWN. HARRIET. Chippewa Falls. Alpha Rho. (APENER. EVA. Chetek. Alpha Rho. CONNELL, MARGARET. Chippewa Falls. Alpha Rho.FARNER, EDNA. (HIman ton. Y. W. C A. CURRY. ABIGAIL. Han Claire. Alpha Rho. FOSSUM. MYRTLE. liau Claire. Y. Y. C. A. DOUGHERTY. RUTH. liau Claire. Cccclians; Alpha Rho; Mandolin Club. ELSEMORE. DORIS. liau Claire. DAVIS. JEAN M. Grant on. Y. Y. C. A.; Pageant Committee. BERG. MABEL, liau Claire. Cccelians; Y. W. C. A. GKWALD, HAROLD. Richland Center. Men’s (ilcc Club, Pres.; Football ; Periclcan ; Choral Club; Class Play 1917; Basketball; Periscope Staff. 1917-18. iGUNDERSON. ESTHER. Gilinanton. JOHNSON, FLORENCE. lion Citin'. Cceclians; Y. V. C. A.; See. Senior Class. HUGHES, BERENICE. Chippewa Palls. I'res. Senior Class: Alpha Rho: State Treasurer Oratorical Association. " JOHNSON. MINIM L. Han Claire. Alpha Rho; Cceclians l’res.; V. . C. A.; Choral Club. HASSKMKR. MARY. C hippnva l alls. Alpha Rho; Campfire; Teutonia. ICKK. SARAH. . I mjnsta. 11ENNEMAN, DOROTHEA Woomer. Y. W. C. A. IIARRIGAN. HAZEL. liau Claire. Y. W. C. A.JOHNSON. EVELYN M. Rice Lake. Alpha Rho. Vice Pres.: Y. W. C. A.: See. Junior Class; Periscope 1917. KIRSCH. MARJORIE. Deer Dark. Social Committee Sr. Class; Kodowapa Campfire; Alpha Rho. LARSEN. BLANCHE M. Colfax. Cccclians See. and Treas.; Choral Chih; Alpha Rho; Y. VV. G A. KIRSCH. CLAIRE. Deer Dark. Kodowapa Camplirc; Alpha Rho. KALK. MARGARET B. ( hif'Pcwa Dalis. Cccclians: Alpha Rho; Y. Y. A. C. See.: Periscope Staff 1917-18. LOOBY, IRENE. Dan Claire. LARSEN. GLADYS. Haw Claire. Alpha Rho: Teutonia; Camp-lire; Y. Y. C. A. KELLETT. KATHRYN. Recti a It. Pres. Alpha Rho; Y. W. C. A.; Periscope Staff 1917-18.MATCHETT. RUTH. Ossco. Alpha Klio. MOL. THELMA. C randan. Campfire: Alpha Rho; V. W. C. A.; Pres. Senior Class; Periscope 1918. MUNICH. LILLIAN. FUoomer. Y. W. C. A. MOE, NORAIL Han Claire. Y. W. C. A.: Cecelians; Choral Cluh; Pcriclean. Me I. ROD. ELLA. :»i« Claire. . W. C. A.; Cecelians. McKAY, EVA. Cadott. MICHLER. MAYME Medford. Y. Y. C. A.; Alpha Rho. OLSETH. PEARL. .til oon a. Y. Y. C. A.; Cecelians.OTTESON. ELLI. • Eau Claire. Pres. V. W. C. A. REGLI. ADOLPH. Eau Claire. Basketball, Football. Teutonia. Glee Club, Pcricican, Periscope Board ’17. ROSETII. GERDA CHARLOTTE. Eau Claire. V. W. C. A.; Alpha Rho. PARKS. GOLDIE. Che Irk. Kodowapa Campfire Vice Pres. PORTER. MARGARET MAR V Cornell. Alpha Rho. RUST IN. RUTH P. Eau Claire. Y. W. C A. RIVARD. RHEA. Eau Claire. SCHOENGARTH. ANITA. Cranlon. Alpha Rho; Y. W. C. A.SEARS. MADELINE. Han Claire. SHERMAN. PH!LENA. Han Claire. SEGELHURST. OLIVE. . Illoana. SINGLETON, LYDIA. Hat Claire. Vice Pres. Junior Class: Cccc-lians: Pcriclcau. Periscope. 18. SHANE. VILLA. Han Claire. SIKPERT. CLARA K. Chippezva Halls. Pcriclcau; Alpha Rho: Y. W. C A. sen REFER. ER NEST IN E M. Halt Claire. Pcriclcan; Alpha Rho; Y. YV. C. A. SKOGSTAD. IZETTA. Eletm,» SUND, RUBY. Gilmanton. Cccclians; Choral Club. TURNER. CORCELIA. Boyd. Alpha Rho: Periscope Staff, •18. TIMBERS. FRANCES. Eau Claire. Treas. Senior Class. VAN GORDEN. ELVA. Alma Center. I HORNE. GRACE MARIE. lion Claire. STUSSY. LUCILE. Eau Claire. WILCOX. MABEL. Osseo. Y. W. C. A. WILCOX. MILDRED. Osseo. Y. W. C. A. « iWILL AN, CAROL. Eau Claire. lVriclean Sec.; Campfire; Alpha Rho; V. W. C. A.; Periscope Staff ’18. 7.EMPEL, MILDRED. Eau Claire. Periscope, ’17. KITZMAN, MYRTLE. Eau Claire. Y. W. C. A. ZIEMANN, ARTHUR Bloomer. Football. Basketball, Boys’ Glee Club. Tutonia Pres. LUBACH, ELSIE. Chippewa Falls. STEWART, JENNIE. Durand. Y. W. C. A.Junior Class Officers FIRST SEMESTER. O. J. MF.LBY Lucia Fear Harold Rounds Emmet Frye President Vice President Secretary-Treasurer II us in ess Manager SECOND SEMESTER. Harold Rounds Hugh Cartright Julia Anderson Lawrence Fish President I'ice President Secretary-Treasurer Business Manager Top Now: Helen Wight, Dorothy Horn. H. Pauline Reisbus, Owen Lyons. Harold Rounds. Kordahl Fristad. Middl,- Now: Letitia Guihrie, Etna Ruchholr. Arlic Foss. Laura Olson. Loretta Gagnon, Margaret Chiono, Della Sehuelke. Ruth Charlson. Theda Sehuelke, Faye Bennetlc. Bottom Now: DeIvina Merrier, Lillian Lintula. Marian Mathieu, Beatrice Mathieu. Blanche Langdcll, Lorraine Ahrens, Drusilla Walsh. Cora Bartlett, Irma Hatch.JVXIOK CK.iMM.4K Tcf Kovrz Edna Gnthlke. l-eona Johnson, Myrtle Coleman. Mary Hale. Bernice K« mo. Hazel Brewer. iena M «. Bottom Kou". Manrla Kosbach, Father Fehr, Lucia Fear, Rachael Peterson, Clara Grewr. Pearl Scguin, Alma Bubeck.JUNIOR PRIMARY Rack Row: Eunice Paul, Gladys Stecs. Ethel Jaquish. Muriel Leonard. Florence Nelson. True Miller. Maurea McGuire. Esther Gelein. Adelaide Rasmus. Lucia Oerterreicher. Ruth Champion. Front Ron: Frances Millircn. Thora Fletty. Gy da Fletty. Marion Parker. Julia Anderson. Ruth Dodmead. Ruth Nelson, Frances Thompson. Bethel Huntricker.JUNIOR KVR.iL Top Now: Emmet Peterson. Elfrieda Xiintr, Grace Wtbh, Annaticlle Cotton, Margaret Pinkerton. Edna Larson, Lena Johnson. Cora Hasten, Melvin Mors. bottom Rotv: Margaret Stuart. Evelyn Cutler, Selma Void. Minda Berg. Anna I .airy. Elda Happr, Nellie Monroe, Corinne Breed. Genevieve Louw. 1 1 4Jl’NIOH COLLEGE Raymond Rivard. Dorothy Timmons, (Scrtrude Schwahn, Cornelia Peterson. Doris Drummond. Roy Sugars.« t OWBNIZATI0N5 ( Choral Club SOTRAXO- Minda Johnson. True Miller. Pauline Reishus. Rubv Sund. ALTO— Julia Anderson. Cora Bartlett. Blanche Larson. Norah Moe. TENOR— Mr. Pope. Mr. Loop. Lawrence Fish. O. J. Melby. BASS— XoKDAHL FRISTAD. Harold Gewald. Melvin Mors. Harold Rounds. Director—Miss Grace Gail Giberson. Accompanist—Miss Gertrude Bartlett.Cecelian Club OFFICERS: President .... Mi.ska Johnson I icc President ... Dorothea HoBN S err clary and Trciuurcr - - Buxciik Larson Librarian .... Etv. Van Gorden Judies - Ji li Anderson, Lucia Fear. True Miujrr f « fCecelian Roll FIRST SOPRAXO— Mabel Berg. Ruth Dougherty. Ruth DodtnearL Lucia Fear. Gloria Fleming. Dorothea Horn. Minda Johnson. Muriel Leonard. True Miller. Grace Nelson. Pauline Rcishus. Lydia Singleton. Ruby Sund. Gladys Stees. Florence Le Tend re. FIRST ALTO— Cora Bartlett. Laura Olson. Florence Nelson. Della Schuclke. Theda Schuclke. S iCOXI) SOPRANO— Agues Anderson. Esther Gunnison. Clara Grewe. Mabel Hatch. Margaret Kalk. Ella McLeod. Pearl Olscth. Elva Van Gorden. SECOND ALTO— Julia Anderson. Mary Ausman. Clara Huebner. Florence Johnson. Blanche I-arscn. Norah Moe. Elizabeth McGough. Director—Miss Grace Gaii. Girkrson. Accompanist—Miss Gertrude Bartlett.The Alpha Rho Society OFFICERS: President - - - - Kathryn Kellett Pice President - - - Eyklvn Johnson Seeretarv and treasurer - Della Scb t'KLKF . idlist r Julia Andersen Lorraine AHr n« Eva Bcjin Josephine Ba«« Harriet Brnwn Cora Bartlett Ruth Champion Margaret Chiono Margaret Connell Ruth Charlson Ruth Dodmead Ruth Pouphertv K«ther C.elein Loretta Gagnon M EM l.etitia Guthrie Bernice IInches Mary Haaaemcr Clara lltiehner Erma Hatch Dorothy Horn Bethel Hnnlzicker Evelyn Johnson Minna Johnson Margaret Kalk Kathryn Kellel Claire Kitsch Blanche Langdell Marjorie Kirsch Miss ERS: Blanche Lanjjdcll Lillian Lintula Blanche l.arsen Gladys Larsen Muriel Leonard Item I.tHihv Mamie Miehlcr Tntr Miller Ruth Mmchctt Thelma Moe Florence Nelson Grace Nelson r-iii ntteson Laura Olson A M SHELL Eunice Paul Margate! Porter Gcrda Roseth Adelaide Rasmus Pauline Rasmus Clara Sicpcrt Theda Schuelke Della Schuelke Cornelia Turner Frances Thompson Carol Willan Bernadette Walsh Mias Amsdcll Miss Hansen There is not a school in America today that is not progressive or democratic enough !«• tlcsirc the organization of clubs anti societies for the purpose of giving to the students a hotter knowledge of the Arts and how they can use and enjoy them. The Alpha Rim was newly organized in the fall «»f ! JI7 for the prime purpose of studying the History of Art. The society has a roll of fifty-three members who chose for their motto “Artios”. a (ircck word meaning harmony, and took for the name the first two letters of the word. Each Tuesday evening the society meets in the Woman's Club Rooms at the Kan Claire Public l.ihrnn and spends a pleasant hour giving its program. The past few meetings have been a series of talks on Egyptian Art given by Miss Hansen. There is no doubt hut what the society will grow and do things tinder the willing efforts ami advice of the advisor. Miss Amsdcll.Y. W. C. A. Cabinet President - - - Elli Ottksdn Missionary Chairman - Clara Siepert Secretory - - Margarktk K.m.k Devotional Chairman - 'I iikrksa Nfi Treasurer - - Tmkda Schuelkk Social Chairman - Carol YVii.lan Hi hie Study Chairman - Gladys .Sti-ks 'acuity Advisors - Miss Prarson, Miss Monrol, Miss James in May 17, 1917 the girls of tl» Fan Claire Normal School met with Mi-Richardson, the Y. Y. C. A. Field Secretary. to plan for the organization of the local V. YY. C. A. Sixty-onc girls l ccamc charter mcmlKTS and elected for their president Geraldine Marshall. Class ’17. The organization of the "Y" was completed and the work started in the four weeks before the end of the year. The first social event was a good-bye party which the Junior Y. Y. C. A. girls gave for all of the Senior girls shortly before Commencement. Although the orgaui a lion was still weak and small, the girls decided to'send one delegate to Geneva to the College Y. C. A. Camp in order to get the spirit of the national organization. Elli Otteson represented Fan Claire ai this Conference. In spite of bring handicapped by the loss of some of the officers, the Y . C A. started in the new year ready for work. They were prepared to receive the new girls as they came into town. During the first week they gave a reception as a welcome party to all the girls of the institution. The one hundred and fifty girls succeeded in getting acquainted in the mixing stunts of the afternoon. The work has been carried on throughout the year with regular devotional meetings, occasional teas following special talks given hv outside speakers, and several successful parties. In March Miss Richardson again visited Fan Claire to give the "Y" girl help and encouragement. She helped especially the new officers who had just been elected for next year. April 12th a Circus was given to raise money for the Geneva fund. N"t only Y. C. A. girls took part hut every organization in school gladly aided in making a success of the Circus. The “pep” and vim with which every one participated was characteristic of the student body.1 eutonia Club OFFICERS: President -Pice President -Secretary and Treasurer liusiness Manager Chairman Social Committee .Idiisor - Theresa Non M ILFS Barac.lk Mary Hassemer Adolph Recli (ji.apys Larsen Miss Oxbi MEMBERS: I .aura Olson. Mary Ausniau. Margaret Chiono. alter Kopplin. Adolph Rcgli. Arthur Zicmanu. Miles Baragcr. iCIli Otteson. Theresa Ncin. Gladys Larsen. Mr. Clark. Mr. Pope Miss Oxby. Carol Willan. Mary Hassemer. Theda Schuclkc. Della Schuclkc. Erna Buchholz.Benis-a-nepay Camp Fire OFFICERS: President .... Lorraine Ahrens Secretary and Treasurer - - Mu.nv Van Gorden (Guardian - Miss Pearson—Ahuahndah ACTIVE MEMBER: » wendaunn—Helen W ight. ( ceca—Faye Bennett. Toheka—Lorraine Ahrens. Petaga—Cora Bartlett. Litahni—Celia Bluchcr. Daxa-danonda—Arlie Foss. Xyoda—Birdine Buckley. Weetomp—Julia Anderson. Mahkahivee—Iroa Kleiner. li'ehetonga—Elizabeth McGough. Wiyuskin—Thelma Moe. Waokiya—Drusilla Walsh. Anananiga—Esther Gunnison. Tinega—Elva Van Gorden. Piyaga—Milda Van Gorden. Sottoiua—Meta Dcmmlcr. HONORARY MEMBER—Miss Mcllquham.Kodowapa Camp Fire I resident I ice lJ resident Secretary 'treasurer (Guardian OFFICERS: Miss (ii.Auvs Larsen Goldie Larks Mary Hasskmkr Elli Otteson Monroe—Lotus ACTIVE MEMBERS: l.ida- (iladys Larsen. Truetia—Ruth Gilbert Kitzinan. .-I ini no—Mary Hassemer. Xcache—Ruth Charlsoti. I da—Goldie Larks. .lllegogan—Myrtle Coleman. .Hyuyapi—Elli Otteson. Kauxi—Dorothy Timmonds. tiamalia—'Theresa Nein. Kokokicon—Hazel Brewer. Uialta—Marjorie Kirsch. li'ahkakndec—Margaret Chiono. A,’ ok ok oho—Claire Kirsch. Kilo—Carol Willan. MEMBERS IN SPIRIT. Il'akauda—Cerda Tiller. Uinta—Florence Olson. Ou.ai.McJ—Julia Starkey. lyeya— Inez Heidmann. lauassi I Men Durum. HONORARY MEMBERS. Spe Miss Duris Herrmann. Uececa—Miss Mabel Otteson.MANUAL TRAINING LIBRARY GYMNASIUMThe Football Season When ihc fust call for football practice was given lafst fall, fifteen of the nineteen hoys in school responded and donned their moleskins. They were determined to do their best regardless of the fact that most of them had not played the game before. While the season was not a “howling” success as far as scores were concerned, the men who took part gained a great deal of experience and benefit therefrom. j llarrv Tandberg was chosen captain at the beginning of the season. 'Two games were played. Stout winning the first by a sertre of 49 to o and Superior the second by the score of 19 to o. As Captain Tandberg suffered a broken nose in the first contest and a fractured jaw in the latter, the team was without the services of its captain during the greater part of both games. Even though both games were lost, the hoys who took part in them have the satisfaction of knowing that they have at least started the game at Eau Claire Normal. The prospects for next year look favorable with graduates from surrounding high schools planning to enter the Normal and take part in athletics. At the close of the season, Harold Rounds, the plucky left half-back, was chosen pilot for the next year’s eleven.« FOOTBALL Top Row: Mgr. Donnellait. Ft»b. Kcgli. Sugars. Rounds. Mclhy. icmann. Kopplitt, Bottom How: Pres. Schofield. Frye. Rivard. Fristad, Tandberg, (jewald, Davy. Coach Loop SCORES Eau Claire. 0; Stout 49. at Stout. Eau Claire. 0; Superior Normal 19. at K. :• C’aircBASKET!i. IU. TEAM. Captain Adolph “Auk" Rkci.i •'oru’ard Hugh “Carty" Cartright Center Haw i.d “Levi" (Jkwai.u R. Guard Arthur “Plrcy” Zieman R. Guard 1ki.vin “Beauty" Mors R. Guard Xoruaiu. “Kristy" I kistau L. Guard Laurence "Lidie" Fish R. ’award o. J. "Fat" Milb R. Guard Harold "Deacon" Rounds .. Guard Loop - - Coaeh THE SEASON'S SCORES. Eau Claire 16. Winona 22. at Winona. Eau Claire 17, Stout 36. at Eau Claire. Eau Claire 22, Winona 39. at Eau Claire. Eau Claire 6. Stevens Point 62. at Stevens Point. Kau Claire K. Stout 20. at Stout Eau Claire 3. Stevens Point 42. at Eau Claire. Eau Claire 16. Superior 27. at Eau Claire. Eau Claire 7. River Falls 62. at River Falls. Eau Claire 14. River Falls 45. at Eau Claire.The Basket Ball Season When stock was taken of the available men at the beginning of our basketball season, but one veteran from last year’s squad was on the list. Regli was consequently chosen captain and practically every man in school tried out for the team. At the close of the season. Clarence Williams was chosen captain for next year’s five. On March 7. 8 and 9 the Second Annual High School Tournament was conducted by the Athletic Association in the Eau Claire Normal School. Nine schools competed and a lively interest was shown. The results of the tournament gave Eau Claire High the right to represent our district in the State Tournament at Stevens Point. Chippewa Falls took second place and Spring Valley by plucky fighting edged the remaining competition out of third place. The following schools competed: Black River Fall, Fall Creek, (iilmanton, Chippewa Falls, Eau Claire, Spring Valley, Rice Lake, Mondovi and Barron. • School TournamentSI MMER SCHOOL 1917 i 4 I■m HONORS AND EVENTS COMMENCEMENT IVliKK 19!7. Sunday, June 3rd—Baccalaureate Address - Reverend Nelson Monday. June 4th—Senior Class Play - - Mrs. Compton's Manager Tuesday, June 5th—Senior Reception given at the home of President Schofield. W ednesday. June 6th—Class Day. Thursday, June 7th—Commencement Exercises. OUR FIRST GRADUATES. Stella Mae Amundson. I.unite Barrett. Eva C. P arlig. Mattel B. Bjorndahl. Esther Braun. Mary E. Brooks. Ella 1. Cummings. Caroline Dc Kclvcr. Margaret A. Dittmer. Alice Eystad. Helen E. Greenwood. Mildred Hailing. Inez L. Heidmann Minda Hovland. Amelia Johnson. Anna Johnson. C. Alvin Johnson. Cora L. Johnson. Esther F. Johnson. Freda A. Jones. Elva Josic. Ruth E. Knobloch. Adclia Larson. Lauretta Lcnnic. Jessie R. Levings. Ella Loohy. Hazel Lynch. Rose M. Malone. Geraldine Marshall. Helen McDonald. Merle C. Miles. Floyd J. Monk. Nellie M. Xelvirk. Rudella Neprude. Minnie A. Xesser. Marian T. Newell. Irma Otto. Bertha Rekstad. Geraldine Schofield Bertha Shaver. Nettie Stensland. Gladys Storseth. Viola Sturdevant. Margaret Truddle. Mabel Voss. Edna S. W’est. Hclcu Wirth.: Senior (Class )3lau 'MRS. COMPTON'S MANAGER." Cast of Characters. Miss Fr n ks B. Pkakson—Director. Mrs. Helen Compton, a widow - Kstiikr Johnson Leonard Marring, her nephew - Clifford Brupkn F.tlu-1 Durand, cousin to Mrs. Compton - Mary Brooks Klphron Vartray. a landscape gardener - Floyd Monk James Heaton, an architect Milton Townkr Frederick Lowell. Bishop of Hoboken - I Iarold Gkwami Margaret Roswell - - - Mildrkd Hai.i.ixg tack son. Sutler at "Fairthorn" - - Milks Baragkr Marie Demarque, actress - - Marion Nkwki.i. Mis. McCillion. housekeeper - Margarkt Tri i i:i.i.i: Tompkins, butler - Ralph Bing illiams, maid - Mi.rlk Mii.ks Watkins, farmhand ... Ralph Bing SYNOPSIS. ACT I. Scene I. At Fairthorn. Mrs. Compton's summer residence. An evening in April. Scene II. Same place. Midnight the same night. ACT H. Same place as Act I. A morning one week later. ACT III. Mrs. Compton’s town house. New York. An afternoon the following October. (Commencement program .Umir 7. 1017 Tiimftp!:aj;l March” from “Aida” ... JVn Orchestra. Imocaliott - - Reverend I ’. L. Roberts (a) An Indian Lullahv - - - Vmjl (! ) Carmcna - Lanc-Wilson Ceckliaxs. ADDRESS. Dean L. I). Corl max - ( nirersily of Minnesota Lridal Chorus fr« m "The Rose Maiden” - Cowen Cecelia xs. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES. President H. A. Schofield. “Polonaise Militaire” - Chopin Orchestra. CLASS DAY.PAGEANT VIEWS A GROUP PROM Tllli RAO HAST Historical Pageant Fob. 11 an historical pageant was given in the auditorium by the pupils of the model school trained by student teachers of the art department. Its theme was Democracy—“Liberty and Justice for All.” The pageant was written by Mr. Creutz, History Department: the music was directed by Miss fliberson. Music Department: the dances In Miss Pearson. Department of Physical F.duca-tion : and it was staged by Miss Hansen, Art Department. The scenery was set by Kva Bejin. Minda Johnson, Ruth Kusten, Sals-btirv Bostwick. John Meadcr, and 7.ama Sindell. The exposition of tlie pageant was read by Carol Willan. The scenes were as follows: Indian Scene. Puritan Scene. Colonial Scene. Southern Scene. Spirit of 76. Monroe Doctrine, l;reeing the Slaves, Cuba Libre, Appeal from Belgium. France and F.ngland. Somewhere in Franee, Do vour Part, and the Finale.Orators and Orations Ve Conquer But to Save” "The Public School Our Safeguard” "Awakening of America” "Autocracy Unmasked” "Americanism, a State of Mind" “Morality in World Politics" "The World’s Challenge to the Women of "The Crime of the tier man-American Press" "Our War" Lawrence Pish. Eau C In ire Frank Butler, Oshkosh Keith Peterson. La Crosse Charles Barkis, Platlctrille Tiios. R. King, Stevens I’oinr Alva n Gibson. Milwaukee America" Gladys Hokciiers. IT hit exenter Tiios. S. Tobin. Superior Russkli. Robinson, River l olls DECISION OF JUDGES. Whitewater—First. Superior—Second. Plattevillc—7 liird. Eau Claire—Fourth.The Oratorical Contest This has been a rather eventful year for the Kan Claire Normal in the )ratorical Contest. Although it is only the second year that we have been in the League, we were fortunate enough to have the state contest here. It is really the first year that we have taken part in the contest, as our contestant last year was snowbound at Hudson. and was unable to get to River 1'alls to deliver his oration. It was a great disappointment to us, as we were rather sure of a place. This year our orator. Lawrence Fish, secured fourth place 'The winner of this contest, Gladys Rorchers of Whitewater, will represent Wisconsin at the Interstate Contest which will be held at Macomb. Illinois. Another event that went with the Oratorical Contest was the Kxtempore Speaking Contest. This is first year that it has been tried in connection with the State Contest, blit it will probably continue to be a part of the Oratorical Contest in years to come. Arthur Roberts of Superior secured first place; Kstella Stone of Milwaukee, second: Henry Wegner of I'latteville, third; and Tilden Moc of Stevens Point, fourth, 'flu winner of this contest will go to Macomb. Illinois, where he will take part in the Interstate F.x-tempore Speaking Contest. All of the nine different Normals sent delegates and all of the orators except those from La ( rosso and ( shkosh delivered their orations. In addition to a large number of rooters. Superior sent an orchestra and the Girls’ Glee Club. La Crosse, an orchestra, and Milwaukee a twenty-one piece band. Thursday evening a party was given in the gymnasium for the delegates of the visiting schools who had already arrived. A general good time was had and much cheering and singing of school songs were in evidence. Friday morning we were entertained with musical selections by the Superior and La Crosse orchestras and the Milwaukee band : during tin afternoon the gym was the scene of dancing, the music being furnished by the musical organizations of the visiting schools.Kk.yest Dearth, 1st Sanitary Squad, j?nd Care Brkg, 121st Field Artillery, Mattery C, George Simpson, 1st Lieutenant, Infantry, Arthur Oj.son, 2nd Lieutenant, Infantry, A G. S. Krause, Great Lakes Xaval Training , Alvin Johnson, 2nd Lieutenant, Engineers. Harry Tanpijkrg, Engineer Corps. HOME GUARD. Mr. Clark. Corporal. Mr. Haiin, Artificer. Mr. Pope, High Private. Division, France. France. Camp C uster. f. E. F., France. Station.The Mixer Sept. J-| the V. . C. A. entertained the faculty and students of the scIi«m I at a “get acquainted party.” I he gvin was prettily decorated v ith aulnmn leaves gathered from the Drive. The most striking features of some of the students were made known, especially their weight and the length of their grins. As everyone knew everyone else before the party was over, the purpose of the party was accomplished. HALLOWEEN PARTY. A Halloween costume party was held in the gymnasium Oct. 31st. The gym was fittingly decorated with cornstalks, broomsticks and jack-o-lantcrns. There were costumes of every description ; sheeted ghosts, clowns, and witches. Every nation, every period of history, and every class of society were represented. Before anyone cotdd enter the gym lie was first conducted through Hades. f course the journey was only through the furnace room; Imt going through such a dark, mysterious place on such a dark mysterious night made one feel scary enough to be in the real Hades. Some marvelous feats were performed during the course of the evening: Lydia endeavored to show how a boat should he rowed. My rtle I;lattner ran a race with herself, and Lawrence Fish sang a song without words. JUNIOR PARTY. I lie Senior Class president informed the Junior Class president that it was "up” to the Juniors to do something to entertain the Seniors: so the Juniors gave a dancing party in the gym. As it was a cold night, some of the girls ate supper at school in order to he right there when the party commenced. After supper several of them made use of the music before the musicians came, and others made use of the cot in the rest room. Dancing commenced at half-past eight and continued till eleven. Everyone enjoyed himself as usual. THE POST-EXAM PARTY. Jan. 31st a post examination party was given to celebrate the fact that the mid-year finals were over. This party we hope to make an annual event. With the strenuous mental strains of the week over, everyone felt an immense burden ofi‘ his shoulders and just in the right mood to enjoy the party. Stevens Point played basketball in Eau Claire that evening, and after the game the team was invited to the party. The presence of a few extra men added very much to the general fun.mm . 2L'j ,v.. AUDITORIUM STAGE BIOLOGY LABORATORY DRAWING ROOM PHYSICS LABORATORY 4 HANSOCRACY UNMASKED long tlu turbulent tide of the times came the invasion of Costume Design. Heralded by a blare of criticisms, a flash of color, a veritable army of Lines, Spaces, Color, Harmony Contrast. Tones, Unity, Balance and Rhythm, and Miss Hansen, it beseiged our stronghold of Habit and Style. Taking the initiative. Captain Hansen tore down our love of large bright areas, light shoes with dark dresses, weak pinks and blues, superfluous jewelry, white shirtwaists and dark skirts, middies, and conspicuous undergarments. She left behind her immense areas of devastation, lost and blasted hopes, and, in nut a few cases, resentment, 'The Students of the Kan Claire Normal (hitherto vain, deluded creatures) taking the defensive, struggled along with such ammunition a vain excuses and pitiful justifications. For instance, in response to the campaign of criticism waged against light waists, we said. “But they arc so easily laundered and make for variety." The counter-attack came in this wise. "Well, if you want to break yourselves in two, do it!" After her first ruthless campaigns, Capt. Hansen set about to reestablish and rebuild broken ideals. We, the members of the Student Division, were forced to acknowledge that desirable and even enviable conditions existed where there was a proper regard for laws of Harmony and Dress Designs; that "the smaller the space, the brighter the color, the larger the space the duller the color" is both truthful and pleasing. How long shall we submit? When making or buying our clothes must we ask ourselves these Questions: If I am stout, shall I get a dress that has a slanting belt, a small pointed collar, and a V-shaped neck to feign slenderness? Or, if I am small and slender shall I wear round or square collars, round necks, and round belts as camouflage."Must we endeavor lo delude the public and make ourselves look like "what we’aint'?" Must we. with egotistical complacency, put personality and individuality above the demand of the masses? If we follow not in the chosen path of Style, Class, and Fashion, what will people say 1 Captain Hansen found us unprepared, hut in the exultation of internal peace and satisfaction. Today, we are not prostrate before this apostle of Harmony, but steeled to resistance. Let us avenge ourselves Oh Xonualites! and hope the day will soon come when we mav again worship at the Shrine of the (ioddcss of Fashion. C. 13. SHE CAME. SHE SAW. SHE CONQUERED. "'I he lady o! the house, 1 presume? I am the traveling agent for Pratt's famous new edition of the Child’s Encyclopedia and Books of Knowledge. I will just step in, and we’ll glance over the hooks together before I take your order." As good as her word, the formidable speaker of these words opened the screen door, walked briskly in. and seating herself in the nearest chair, proceeded to Open her sample case. "The encyclopedia, as you see, will help your children greatly in their school work, and this book of Questions of Childhood Answered contains answers to those startling and incessant questions that children ask daily. Here, for example, is a perfectly satisfactory answer to the irrelevant question How far can a cow jump? and here is one on hat does Cod eat?' N on can----’’ "lint," timidh interrupted the anxious “lady of the house", “We have no-------” "Of course." interposed the other, “you have had no trouble as yet with the questions of your children, hut you know that as their minds develop they must be fed the knowledge they demand, and this set of books was especially compiled to meet that demand. This is a chance no mother can afford to lose. It is an absolute necessity for the busy parent, and certainly a great bargain for only $24.4 ) the set and six months to pay. Just see-----" "There are only two-------", stammered Mrs. John Deering, bride of three weeks, twisting her hands nervously in her apron, and glancing toward the clock. “Only two. but two children ask as many questions in a day as ten, and they will find such company with these hooks. I hev will have so many interests in common, and though it will be mere play to them, the results----” “My husband------’’. cut in Mrs. Deering desperately."Of course lie won't object", continued the persistent one, "but as I’m afraid I'm taking too much of your time. I’ll just write down your order and receipt. Oh. never mind spelling the name. I got that and the address from the directory before I started out." Closing her sample ease she continued, "I'm so glad you are so sensible and decided to take a set. You'll never regret it, I'm sure, when you see the children’s delight. The books will be. expressed to you direct, with the bill, in the next three weeks. A lovely day, isn’t it? (iood morning!" She closed the door firmly, descended the steps, and strode swiftlv flown the walk. 9 l or a moment the little bride stood stupefied. Then she walked over to the table, picked up the receipt, deliberately crushed it into a hard little ball, and opening the door. threw the hall with all her might at the swiftlv disappearing figure. Then she buried her face in her apron, and groaned aloud, "and I couldn't get a word in edgewise. Oh, what will John say?" L. A. An im|M rtant question of the day is the necessary preparation for the momentous change that will follow the great conflict in which all the world is, in some way. engaged. Each country is using a great ileal of thought and work in preparing for a, new and better society, a wiser and a happier people, and a guarantee of peace and freedom bought for the future by the sacrifice of this generation. Though it is certain that great changes will he effected as a result of this war. it is yet a matter of speculation, a dangerous field faf prophecy, whether these changes will take place for the Certainly the familiar form of Europe is being dissolved in the great heat of this war. to crystallize and cool again in new forms. It is during the cooling process, before the chastening effects of the war are lost, that the character of the new forms will he determined, depending largely upon the will of the controlling hand. Without doubt, this hand will he that of the people. Kings, presidents, statesmen may yet exert influence, but it is becoming more and more evident that the main hope for a better Europe lies in the hands of the people. Theirs will he the task of discarding the worn out ideas which have resulted in the present conditions in ? of these ideas is nationalism, the nineteenth century product. which brought about the present map of independent states. However, the spirit of nationalism must not be considered wholly A BETTER AND A WISER EUROPE.an evil, for it was? a great step upward in the development of government. a step from the disorder of too many small states to larger well organized nations, and as natural as the uniting of families into tribes and tribes into small states. Hut it is the nationalism that had evolved at the beginning of the twentieth century that is to be condemned,—the "nationalitis" of which Germany has had the most acute attack. hen this selfish nationalism gives wa to tlu next stage in the development of government—internationalism, that is. when each man will think of himself as primarily a citizen of the world, and secondarily as a citizen of Italy or of England or «if Germany, one great step will be made in the direction of a guarantee for tlu future peace of Europe. 'Khe main hope for a better Europe, however, lies in the increase of democratic control over foreign affairs and the abolishment of the secret diplomacy of tlu- past. Hut it depends on what kind of democracy is to do the controlling. History, both past and present, furnishes precedents for the statement that a democracy is not made overnight. A true democracy is. as yet. an ideal, and the nearer tlu world approaches this ideal, the le s war It will have. Hut in the meantime, while the ideal of democracy is being approached, the future place of Europe and of the world will be maintained if two of tlu vital principles of nglo-Saxon civilization are upheld—that "there must be everywhere a wider extension «»f liberty to those diversities in thought and action which spring from race and tradition and there must accompany it a general strengthening of the mutual regard for public law and equit among nations." In brief the Teuton ideal of "might gives right" must be stamped out. and the small states must he insured freedom. The futility in the long run of the dominion-by-might idea is shown in the history of all the small states under the grasp of Germany and Austria-1 lungary. 'The history of lsacc-l.orraine, of Schleswig-Holstein, and of South-eastern Europe is one long tale of writhing discontent. It is impossible that such a state of affairs can have brought any re.nl pleasure to either Germany or ustria-l lungary. Noth may profitably look to the despised England for a lesson in the successful management of dependencies. But that there may be fewer dependencies of the Great Powers is another ideal which, if realized, would produce a better Europe. The importance of the small state and the heroism of Belgium can never he forgotten. Tt is safe to sav that a world of Serbias and Belgimus would be a much better place in which to live than a world of Germanvs or even of England . The last and most important evil to be blotted out is autocracy, the effect of which is now so well recognized that it is not necessaryto niter into a discussion of it. Let it suffice to say that in this, the fourth year of the war. it is more clearly than ever recognized that the real issue at stake is the ideal of democracy. In short, the giant task of tomorrow, which will fall to all of us who survive the enormous tasks of today is the move forward from secret diplomacy to democratic control over foreign affairs; from disregard for the rights of small nations to a full recognition and protection of their rights: and what is most important, from autocracy to democracy. These must he the results of the war in order that it may not have been fought in vain. To establish these results firmly and permanently w ill call for all the capacities and activities of which we are capable. Rut there is great hope, for may not the world, fighting itself free from the shackles of the past, he compared with Milton’s vision of a great commonwealth? —"Methinks I see in my mind a noble and puissant nation, rousing herself like a strong man after sleep, and shaking her invisible locks. Methinks I see her as an eagle mewing her mighty youth and kindling her undaz .led eye at the full midday beam, purging and unsealing her long-abused eyesight at the fountain itself of heavenly radiance." C. 14. P. OVERALLS— REWRITTEN. Ibis is to he a rewritten theme because the original bad too much of facts and too little of fancy. In this effort the facts and fancies will be left to race it out between themselves, and mat tin-devil take the hindmost. In giving the facts about a factory it would probably be best to start at the top of the ladder and work down. At the top of this particular ladder were perched a short, thin, nervous Jew who smoked cigarettes, and a shorter, fat. contented Jew who smoked a pipe. The first was the President; he worked in the factory. The President had freer use »»i bis hands and so did most of the talking. The third high man was a short, erect, little worker who had been everything from lumberjack to photographer, and w ho. through his widespread knowledge, was the handiest man about the place. His title would probably be Expert Repairer. The fourth and last high man in the factory enjoyed the title of Shipping Clerk but be did, or was supposed to do everything that any of the other three could think up. Needless to say, I was the Shipping Clerk. There were also two office girls who were engaged mostly in trying to appear hard at work. The rest of our force consisted of about sixty girls under the guidance of a foreladv. They were far from being thedowntrodden working girls of whom so much has been written. When they came to work in the morning, they romped up the stairs with all the freshness and vivacity of school girls, and if one or two appeared tired on going home at night, it was probabh because of too much talking rather than too much work. Their attitude toward the forelady was. indeed, of much the same hostile respect and secret defiance that school girls show their teachers. And to get a "bawling out from the old man" was quite equivalent to “being sent to the office" at school. These girls were superstitious and rather ignorant in many things, hut they had the ability of knowing how to speak confidently and fluently on any subject which might arise. In other respects they were merely school girls at work. It might be well to say at this time that we occupied two floors of a factory building and that we were engaged in making overalls. s there were so few of us we all knew each other, and could argue and quarrel and otherwise enjoy ourselves, and still turn put overalls without much loss of am thing except breath. The blame was easy to shift and it was passed along from one to another as gingerly as a hot coal. If the President swooped in upon me to And why a certain order had not been shipped I would toss the hot coal in the direction of the stock girls who hadn’t put up the order in time. They, of course, could claim that they had had to wait for the Stitching Department to finish enough overalls: and that department had not received the cloth from the Cutting Department; and the Cutting Department had hail to wait for the cloth to come from the manufacturers. In this way the coal was constantly being passed around and it seldom stopped in one place, though all of us had our lingers scorched. The Vice-President and his girl assistant, who constituted the Cutting Department, started the overalls on their way to completion by spreading about twelve dozen double layers of overall cloth, one upon the other, for the entire length of a long table. The top layer was marked with chalk traced over patterns, and the different divisions of the overalls were carved out over these lines by an electric machine which cut the entire lot at one time. Tin different parts were removed to the Stitching Department, where they were sevVcd together b different machines. The buttons and suspenders were then attached, and the finished product inspected, folded, and placed in stock on the racks. The stock girls, when not too occupied in nlaving hide and seek or discussing last night’s dance, filled out order slios from the office and prepared the overalls for shipment bv tying them in bundles of a dozen. The completed order was packed, by pounding, jumping, or pleading, in a wooden caselined with paper. The dray men were then called to haul it to the railroad. I hese men usually arrived at the last minute before train time, and with the self confidence inspired on!) by the ability to back up their statements with a wide splotch of tobacco juice, succeeded in placing the blame on either the office, the factory, the elevator. «»r the overalls as they saw tit. With departure of the drav men comes the end of the Theme, had and Fancy have run their race and stand, panting aim steaming, ready to hear the result. Hut in the stand sits a solitary figure who also pants and steams. He is the Promoter of the race. Hut one question worries him as he watches for the decision of the judge. He is not concerned with the outcome of the race. Me bothers not at all with the condition of the runners. He merely asks in a voice hoarse with emotion. "Will the race have to he run again ?” The judge smiles grindv and prepares to give the verdict. II. R. THE CRUSADERS OF PEACE. CHARACTERS: The Honorable Solomon Distiller: Apostle «»f Bagiev and Chair- man of Peace Campaign Committee. Mr. Rufus Yarnspin: Professor of Literature and fiood Cheer. Prof. D'Angcll: Professor of Psychology and Pedology. Mr. Mutch Nccduv Reformer Student of European History ami Chronicler of the Expedition. Mr. Pcrcival Birdlore: Professor of Biology and Animal Surgery. Miss Emtee Grateful: Professor of Expression and Impression. Miss Trcbelle Cleffe: Professor of Music and Mesmerism. Plot: Representatives of Eau Claire Normal School Faculty on peace expedition to Berlin. Scene I. fhe upper deck of the good ship Normalian nearing the submarine zone. I he Hon. Solomon Distiller. Rufus Yarnspin. Pcrcival Hirdlprc. and Miss Trcbelle Cleffe all occupying steamer chairs lined up beside the railing. Distiller always seen with a eop of Bagley’s Classroom Management under his arm, Rufus Yarnspin carrying a sack of lemons. Pcrcival Birdlore a camera. Distiller (decidedly): Now folks, we’ve got to get down to work—Come, come now, get busy------.Yarnspin : You’re right, old boy, but don’t be in such a bloomin’ hurry------------------------we haven’t reached the “auld sod” yet. By Jolly! we may have to take a swim before we get there. Birdlorc (anxiously scanning the water): Say. fellows, don’t you think it's time we get the life preservers on? The fact of the matter is. we re almost in the submarine zone. I don’t know how you folks feel about it, but 1-- Dist: Well, I’ll tell you right now, honest, this is a serious business. ur president wouldn't have found it possible to dispense with our services at the Normal had it not been absolutely necessary for the welfare of humanity that we make this trip. I don’t believe in this dilly-dallying any longer. I may be old-fashioned, but I believe in tackling a job at once, and getting it done. Besides. we may run across a submarine any minute. We must make plans for our peace campaign and make them in a hum. My friend Bagiev here—(taps hook under his arm)------ Yarnspin (interrupting): W as peace, do you think, ever made in a day? Tin Lizzie’s creator met with no rapid results, you’ll remember. Miss ClefTe (decidedly): It makes no difference. We abso- lute must get this peace proposition under wav and definitely settled in short order. I have a special rehearsal of the Wailing Warblers set for Friday, the 13th. to practice for Commencement and !'vc got to be back. Birdlorc (excitedly scanning horizon with telescope): What’s that 1 sec? A gull! gull! A sea-gull! Wonder if I can’t get a picture of it? (Hastily adjusting camera ) Dist: (impatiently): Come now. everybody, we’ve got to get busy. Bagiev says-----(tapping book cruder arm) (Kilter Miss Kmtcc Grateful) Miss Grateful: Allay your fears, friend Birdlore, I have just had a conference with the captain about the Advisability of putting on our life preservers. Yarnspin: Oh yes. I suppose vou’vc been kidding the captain. Miss Grateful: You’re unkind. Mr. Yarnspin. I mean business, and it's a good thing I do. Your intentions are all right, hut von have left tlie business end of the expedition to the women. Miss ClefTe: I agree with you. Miss Grateful. Men arc mere pieces of furniture. They are all right to stick around like other ornaments. W’hat you know about business would occupy a very small space. Yarnspin: Some score on us fellows, believe »m ’ There's nothing like getting used to it though. W’c’re all hardened benedicts. so we should worry.Dist: Mow now! Stop all this foolishness! We must have our conference, and lay our peace plans now. Come, conic, ladies and gentlemen. I’ve found a place of privacy. (AM gather around a table at one side.) What decision shall v:e come to? Eriend Yarnspin. suppose you and 1 have a little personal contlab with the Kaiser. My friend Raglcy (tapping book under his arm) shall render valuable assistance and show Wilhelm the error of his ways. Yarnspin: Yes. and if that doesn’t take effect, I’l go up to Mill and ask him if lie hasn't heard of the terrible condition in Russia. and that the hoy stood on the burning deck in 1492. Believe me. I’ll kid the old hoy. Bird lore (anxiously scanning water): Bv go?! Ihat's mighty much like a periscope out there right non . My kingdom for a life preserver! Dist: And what about you. Miss v'leite? Arc you going to trv your “charm" experiment on the Huns? Miss ClclTe (very decidedly): Why. of course. Music bath charms to soothe the savage Bochc. In the spirit of tlie dove of peace, I will stand before the armies of the savage Hun in the front line trenches. The licjuid cadence of m voice "ill melt their l ard hearts, bring tears to their eyes and remorse to their souls. Miss Grateful: Hear! Hear! Birdlore: But pray. Miss Cleffc, with what miraculous melodies do you aspire to this achievement? Miss Cleffc: My first number will be “I Love You Truly”, and if encored, I shall sing “Let Me Call You Sweetheart Yarnspin: n with the song, let joy he unconfined. Birdlore (ironically): My George. he would he a hard hearted soldier, indeed, and several kinds of fools, who would not, at such a touching appeal, lay down his arms and make use of the ones nature gave him! Miss Cleffc: Sir! Dist: By the way. folks, where is Prof. Mutch N’eeduv Re- forme? He can’t he writing all this time, can lie? If lie expects to keep accurate account of the historic events of this expedition, he should he here taking notes, and Prof. D’Angell. where is he? Sav Yarnspiiii hunt them up and send them over. (Exit Yarnspin.) Miss Grateful: Now, gentlemen: take a few suggestions from me. One of the essentials of expression is breath control. When you appear before the Kaiser, you must practice centralized breathing and absolute relaxation. It will give von moral support and mental poise. Should an argument arise, you must squelch him with a well-prepared recitation of Esau Wood sawed wood. EsauWood would saw wood. Willi llir.se suggestions in mind. I know you will be able to convert tlu enemy. Dist. (impatiently): All very well, if we don't get that breath knocked out of us before we get away from him (Looks at watch). I inic dies. (Sees trio aprpoaehiug) h. here they come at last, t Kilter Prof. ( ) ngel1 and Prof. keforme leaning heavily on Yarn-spin.) Yarnspin is not such a had truant officer after all. I’.y George! hat can Ik the matter? I hey look fairly bilious. Miss (iratcful: Pritbee. why so pale, foml lovers, prithee, wbv so pale? Dist: Where have von fellows been lingering at the ru- cial moment? By George! N on look like the reck of the Hesperus ! Yariispin: I found them leaning against the railing in a con- dition too sad to mention. Keforme (weekly ): Where we were making our contributions to the Atlantic. D'Angcll (feebly): I have given to Neptune my last full measure of devotion. I )ist : Well gentlemen, we have gathered here to map out our peace campaign. Now Mr. Keforme. what may we expect of von ? Keforme: Well, as I said before, our President appointed me the official recorder of tlu events of this expedition for the benefit nf future generations, who. I feel confident, will he living in a ‘world made better bv the socialistic ideals which I have helped to advance. s a chronicler of events and a modern historian. I shall faithfully perform my duty------when not otherwise engaged. D'Angcll: And my commission is to make a psychological study of the nations at war and establish standardization of table manners in the armies. Neurones differ, you know, and their habits, too. 1 must study.-----that is. (putting hands shakely to head) when 1 have once more recovered my equilibrium. You see. my friends, the law of habit is the focalization of consciousness upon the process to he automized. plus attentive repetition of the process, permitting no exception, until automatism------- P.irdlore (interrupting): B Jove! A brilliant thought iust struck me. My ambition is. henceforth, to dissect a German and get a permanent peace. a TV Angel I: A piece? A piece of what? P.irdlore: Peace, you numskull! Peace, the object of this ex- pedition ! Yarnspin : But that would be a German peace, and bow would von preserve a German peace?Dist: Oh ho! Here come the sold salts with the life preservers. hat a good motto is Safety First! Birdlorc (happily): The life-preservers at last! The fact of the matter is, I feel braver already. ( Filter sailors with life-pre-servers. deposit them on the deck, and withdraw. . 11 awkwardly begin to strap on life-preservers.) -Miss Clcffc (gingerly handling preservers): Aren’t they the dirtiest things? Miss Grateful (sweetly): Ves, and smelly! Yarnspin: By hooke ! The suspender on this one is gone! D’Angcll (awkwardly fumbling): Reminds me of one time when I tried to dress up in my wife’s clothes, flow do you Operate this thing anyhow? I can’t seem to tret this down over my shoulders. Miss Grateful (sweetly): Never mind, Mr. D’Angell, your head will keep you afloat. (Prof. Reforme suddenly dashes madly through the crowd, jolting those with whom he comes in contact, and upsetting the feeble D’Angcll in his transit. All gaze curiously on his retreating form with the life-preserver hanging limply). Miss Grateful: Our friend. Rcfornic. must have a pressing engagement. Miss Cleffc: Evidently. Prof. D’Angcll (sitting tip, dazed, hands to head, hair awry): f believe he knocked me sensible. (Dist. lias meanwhile been struggling with his preserver, and has finally succeeded in fastening it around his neck). Dist. (contentedly): P»v George! I’ve got mine on at last. W hat a time I had with this contraption! Yarnspin: Why, good gracious, man alive, don’t you know where that thing belongs? Here, let a man help you. (Proceeds to fix the preserver hurriedly, hut is hindered hv the copy of Bagley in Distiller’s pocket. Business with hook). Yarnspin (irritably): Great guns! Wouldn’t it he a rare sit- uation to sec you and Bagiev divorced for a few minutes? (More business with hook. Finally in disgust. Yarnspin throws hook over-hoard). Distiller (immediately running toward railing, shrieking frantically as he jumps overboard). My Bagley! Mv life! My life! My Bagley! (Confusion reigns). —Curtain— Scene II (On board ship returning to America. Sound of loud voices, protesting and quarreling. Distiller still carries a copy of School Management, water-soaked and much dilapidated.Distiller (excitedly): Xo. no, Yarnspin, you needn't try to explain it at all. 1 know where the fault lies. You were wrong, all wrong when------ Yarnspin: Well, well, old hoy, don’t get so excited. Xo use crying over spilt milk. I did my host in my own way and I would have succeeded if------ Dist: How under the canopy of heaven did you expect to convince the Kaiser of his mistake with your Mother Goose rhymes? Yarnspin: Rut what in the name of reason were you trying to do with that soppy spcciman of literature in your hand? Dist: Hold on! Hold on! Xo insults! I had my discourse on habits ami ideals, page 227. all prepared, and was in the midst of feeding it to the Kaiser, whose eyes. I could plainly see. were already filling with tears. I was just congratulating myself on the success of my mission when in you bounced with your absurd, nonsensical story of Esau Wood sawed wood. Esau W ood would saw wood. Miss Grateful: I am so disgusted with you both. You acted like irresponsible schoolboys. When 1 pecked out from behind the door in the Kaiser’s audience chamber, and admonished you to enunciate clearly and. by all means, to lengthen your inflections, yon took no more heed of my suggestions than if I were speaking to the empty air. You didn't pitch vour voices, you didn’t pause, and von didn’t breathe once during the entire speech. Distiller: Enunciation! Inflection! 1 presume your exalted ideas of your abilities flatter you into thinking that if you had been sent as envoy to the Kaiser, you would have led him around like a lamb tied to a ribbon. Yarnspin (sarcastically): Eating in submission from your hand, no doubt. Prof. D'Angcll: 1 see where the whole trouble lies! You did not make a psychological study of your opponent. If only------- Dist: What right have you to pass your opinion I'd like to know. You-------- Yarnspin: Yes. you and Prof. Reforme were in Liverpool five weeks recovering from the effects of your voyage over; so infants like you shall he seen and not heard the remainder of our voyage. (Enter Miss Trchcllc Clcffc and Prof. Rirdlorc. excitedly arguing) MissCleffe (angrily): Indeed. I did not. What a silly idea to think that T had stage fright singing before those savages. Prof. Rirdlorc: nd prav then, what made you flat so woe- fully on high C? I imagine how the Huns must have winced at the discord.Miss ClcfTc: 1 don’t care. It is easier to be natural than it is to stay on high C. Yarnspin (aside): She's on high sea now and doesn’t know it. Miss ClelTc: At least you have nothing to say. Prof. Birdlorc. (Turning to others) A man who dissects a pet gorilla, mistaking it for a (ierman. is a pretty big failure at peace-making. Dist. (angrily): What! What fool talk is this? What did you say about gorillas? Did he dissect a gorilla? lias his brain ceased to work? Miss ClcfTc: 1 saw it with my own eyes. Prof. liirdlorc (nervously): Aw. give a fellow a chance to explain. I got my gas mask on so crooked, 1 could see only out of the half of one eye. and I just naturally dissected the first thing I stumbled against. Prof. D'Angell: Some biologist! Now if you had made a psychological test--- Prof. Reforme (irritably): Oh, shut up! Maud me another lemon. Yarnspin. Yarnspin: Here, you need one. too. P’Angcll. to keep your tongue from wagging and to save that one brain path of yours from wearing through. Prof. D’Angell (flushing hotly) : 1 refuse to bear such insults! lake back every------ Dist. (rushing up. grabbing D'Angell by coat collar) Enough! Yonder sits your friend. Rcforme. contentedly sucking a lemon. Go thou and do likewise. (Exit D'Angell) Miss Grateful (sympathetically): The poor fellow isn’t himself. Neither is Prof. Reforme. This trip has been bard on them, but they’ll feel better when they get home. Oh, by the way. Yarn-spin. I am curious to know what that story was you told the Kaiser at that fatal moment when you and Distiller met your Waterloo. Do tell us. won’t you? Yarnspin: Why. I just asked him if he had heard of the ter- rible condition in Russia. He said no. he hadn’t heard any further developments lately, and then I told him that there were 500.000 subjects walking around without any predicates. Oh. boy! wasn’t he mad. though? Distiller and I stopped not to reason why. ours but to turn and fly. vowing no more to pry into bis business. Miss ClcflFc (swcotlv) : So you’ll admit that you, too. were failures. (To Miss Grateful) Did your coaching fall short of the mark ? Miss Grateful (angrily): Indeed, and what else could you ex- pect? They didn’t heed one thing 1 said. They were as deaf as stones----senseless things.Miss ClcfTc: 1 don’t care. It is easier to be natural than it is to stay on high C. Yarnspin (aside): She's on high sea now and doesn’t know it. Miss ClelTc: At least you have nothing to say. Prof. Birdlorc. (Turning to others) A man who dissects a pet gorilla, mistaking it for a (ierman. is a pretty big failure at peace-making. Dist. (angrily): What! What fool talk is this? What did you say about gorillas? Did he dissect a gorilla? lias his brain ceased to work? Miss ClcfTc: 1 saw it with my own eyes. Prof. liirdlorc (nervously): Aw. give a fellow a chance to explain. I got my gas mask on so crooked, 1 could see only out of the half of one eye. and I just naturally dissected the first thing I stumbled against. Prof. D'Angell: Some biologist! Now if you had made a psychological test--- Prof. Reforme (irritably): Oh, shut up! Maud me another lemon. Yarnspin. Yarnspin: Here, you need one. too. P’Angcll. to keep your tongue from wagging and to save that one brain path of yours from wearing through. Prof. D’Angell (flushing hotly) : 1 refuse to bear such insults! lake back every------ Dist. (rushing up. grabbing D'Angell by coat collar) Enough! Yonder sits your friend. Rcforme. contentedly sucking a lemon. Go thou and do likewise. (Exit D'Angell) Miss Grateful (sympathetically): The poor fellow isn’t himself. Neither is Prof. Reforme. This trip has been bard on them, but they’ll feel better when they get home. Oh, by the way. Yarn-spin. I am curious to know what that story was you told the Kaiser at that fatal moment when you and Distiller met your Waterloo. Do tell us. won’t you? Yarnspin: Why. I just asked him if he had heard of the ter- rible condition in Russia. He said no. he hadn’t heard any further developments lately, and then I told him that there were 500.000 subjects walking around without any predicates. Oh. boy! wasn’t he mad. though? Distiller and I stopped not to reason why. ours but to turn and fly. vowing no more to pry into bis business. Miss ClcflFc (swcotlv) : So you’ll admit that you, too. were failures. (To Miss Grateful) Did your coaching fall short of the mark ? Miss Grateful (angrily): Indeed, and what else could you ex- pect? They didn’t heed one thing 1 said. They were as deaf as stones----senseless things.Prof. Rirdlore (rousing himself from meditation): Hie dis- grace is more than 1 can bear. The thought of von Hindenlmrg's pet gorilla massacred is driving me to distraction. Remorse overwhelms my being! Henceforth. 1 shall remain in solitary seclusion in my stateroom. Repentance is my only salvation. Miss Cleffe: Will you go back to Pan Claire? Prof. Birdlorc (sadly): .Mi. no! 1 shall never darken its doors again. I am preparing to return to North Dakota where I shall found a society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Dumb Animals. Farewell, friends of my better days, farewell. (F.xit Birdlorc sadly). Miss Grateful: Come, Miss Civile, we arc only a couple of hours from New York, and wc had better begin getting our duds packed. (Exeunt Miss Grateful and Miss Cleffe. (Distiller and Yarnspin in constrained silence.) Yarnspin: What have you got on vour mind. Distiller? (Silence) By the way, what arc you going to tell the folks at home? Dist. (angrily): You keep your mouth shut! Yarnspin (worried): But what will they think of us? Distiller: Good gracious man! Arc you just waking up? Is it at this stage of the game you begin wondering what the home folks will think? It was more than evident when you fooled with the Kaiser that you forgot all about the day of reckoning at home. Yarnspin: Aw! let up a little. The whole bloomin' thing was a fool’s errand, and I’ll confess right now, my friend, your Bagiev was what knocked me silly and started me going until I couldn't stop. Distiller (solemnly) : I care not what course others mav take, hut as for me. give me Bagley. or give me death. Yarnspin : Hey what's that? Somebody’s singing down at the other end of the deck. Distiller (listening attentively): Their song sounds familiar. Listen ! (Strains of “Keep the Home Fires Burning"). Yarnspin: Yes, let's hope they are still burning, but if they are. it will not. alas! be due to our efforts in this expedition. Suppose. Distiller, that we go home via Detroit and shake hands with Ford. We're in the same boat now! —Curtain— L. A. O. H. P. R.FIRST AND SECOND GRADES Miss McIlquiiam, Ttachtr. Top Ron — Henrietta Neher. Naomi l-enmark, lx is Childs, Raymond Brown, Arlic Burgess, Dorothy Wing. Mildred Brady, Remelaer Mcadcr. Amy Osterberg. Bucklin Moon, John Proctor, John Welch, Laura Kimball, Seth Pope. Lucille Jarvis, Clifford Burgess, Roger Hunt. Loren Pope, Gwendolyn Bruden, Charles Kepler. Gloria Bruden. Louise Tolies. Bottom Row— Albert Peirce, Donald Keith. Frank La Brcck, Richard Brady, William Welch. Albert Smith. Lawrence Hamilton. Margaret Stuck. David Luebkeman, Adelheit Kahn, Florence Hanson, Fred Haskins. James Creut .1 THIRD .ISO FOURTH GR.ADLS Mi s Saits . Tea her. Tof Rots—Betty Brady, Edith Schlegelmilch. Alice Brown. Clair Courtney. Apwi l'circc. Vera Trimbell, Birgit Mathiesen. France l.uehkeman, Mary Proctor, Georgina Keith. Emma Burge . Bernice Jarvi . Middle Row—Vincent Adam . Wesley Ferguson. Milton Laroon. Kenneth Anderson. Leroy ImislumL Robert Standen. John Brown. Francis Wilcox, Oti Lindermann. R. C. Woos-ler. France Cither. Edward White. William Surens. BoIIohi Roti —Je ie Glen nan. Louise Bagiev. Uinnifred Braden. Magda line Barron. Josephine Culver. Mary Cook. Inpkorg Midelfart. Dorothy Derge. Elsie Midelfart. Marion Lindermann, Phyllis Briggs. Laura Dean Moon.FIFTH AND SIXTH GRADES Miss MacDonald, Teacher. T a? Row—Leah Jarvis, Katharine Steinberg. Lowell Wilde. Delores Christopher son. Marjorie Moon, Alice Hanson. Alfred Berg. Erling Mathiesen. Winifred Smith. Catharine Schlegclmilch. Harold Erlandson, Eugene Languid, Dorothy Christophcrson, William Proctor. Norman Stock. Middle Rote— Kenneth Langr, Edward Rounds. William Lockwood, Cecil Hahn, Owen Rust. Thekle von Schrader. Verna Neprnde, Jack Keith. Voight Lenmark, Harold Burgess. Phil Allan, Kenneth Osterl»erg. William Allan. Bottom Rou — Hardean Peterson, Eilert Meader, Ruth Bachmann, Cretchen von Schrader, Edna Hanson. Tryphine Nelson. Wendell Towner. John Creutz, Sam Wekh, Frederick Midelfart, Ned Fleming, Aaron Lenmark. George Lurbkcman.SEVENTH AND BIGUTH GRADES Miss Thomas, Teacher. Merrill Farr, (iordon Glennan. Herman Sunden. Anna Mat hie sen. Eileen Davie, Brisics Luebkeman, Mabel Kent. Marguerite Jarvis. Louisa Wilcox. Virginia Carpenter. Marjorie Bonnell, Adrian Hobbs. Frederick Brady. William Branham. Middle Row— Raymond Berg. Gordon Steiner, Robert Evans, Thusnclda Hahn. Florence Francis. Alta Camcross, Alma Evanson. Phyllis Churchill. Mary Lucia Fish. Anna I-ang-seth. Emily Weinfeld. Keith Glennan, I-ester Warner. Bottom Row— Phyllis Bust wick. Marion Osterberg. Margaret Charles. Wilhclmina Lange, Esther Jacobson. Daniel Francis. Peter Midclfart. Jori Hack, Kenneth Wing.NINTH GRADE Miu Lsvake. Teacher. Top Row— Florence Rounds, Geneva Shaeffer, Harriet Wilke, Geraldine Demmler, Joseph Walsh, Henry InKram. John Meadcr. Victor Ijndley, Dorothy Lucia, Genevieve Dickson, Marion Farr. Haxel Clemens, Grace McCombs. Middle Row'— Doris Brigics. Jeanne Shoemaker, Barbara Willan, I .cola Bruden, Gertrude Olson, Lester Clemons. Donald Farr. Den net h Nelson. Elvira Williams. Hottom Row—Sarah Neprude, Annabclle Dark. Dogny Midelfart. William Doudna. Salisbury Rost wick. Gordon Keith. Zama Smdell. Hazel la Breck. Louise Mason.ONE ON YOU. “Although l»e lias much wit. He's very shy of using it.”—M. Rounds. ‘He doesn’t cut any ice.”—Sam Davcy. "Giddy, gabble, giggle, goo.”—A. Anderson. "The scholar may war the master.”—II. Gewald. WE NEVER SLEEP! So long as there is an opportunity of looking after other people’s affairs. Our watchword is. “Everybody’s business cheerfully looked after.” W e can furnish information on anyone’s personal affairs Corcelia Turner—Accumulator. Margaret Porter—Spreader. Grace Nelson—Exaggerator. Teresa Nien—Treasurer of Facts. True Miller—Corroborator. HOW IT LOOKS TO A VISITOR ON THE CAMPUS. President of Eau Claire Normal - Halm Financial Manager ------ De Mars Superintendent of Building and Grounds - Mr. Loop Dean of Faculty ------ Mr. Creutz Professor of History - - Fish Professor of Mathematics ----- Lyons Librarian - -- -- -- - BaragerOnce upon a morning dreary, As we entered, wan and weary, The spacious halls of Eau Claire Normal Seeking friends of the year before ; We were shocked and deeply wounded, When to us the news was sounded That Dorothy, a girl of the Eau Claire Normal Should not be there, anymore. Cupid worked hard during vacation Giving Dick a stimulation To marry Dorothy—a fair young maiden, Such he had never known before. They were married Christmas evening. And on the train when they were leaving Dorothy, with a sigh was breathing. “Work I’ll do forevermore." Joy and luck to them we’re sending Health and wealth and luck contending, To Dorothy with her household duties And Dick, his work in the wholesale store. For we trust that in their gladness. They will gladly share it with 11s, We. the students of Eau Claire Normal. Now, and always evermore. —L. F. S. SONNET TO MISS MONROE. Though with us in mind. We missed you dear. And we all are glad You are back with us here, Here, where the minds of young are uplifted.Once upon a morning dreary, As we entered, wan and weary, The spacious halls of Eau Claire Normal Seeking friends of the year before ; We were shocked and deeply wounded, When to us the news was sounded That Dorothy, a girl of the Eau Claire Normal Should not be there, anymore. Cupid worked hard during vacation Giving Dick a stimulation To marry Dorothy—a fair young maiden, Such he had never known before. They were married Christmas evening. And on the train when they were leaving Dorothy, with a sigh was breathing. “Work I’ll do forevermore." Joy and luck to them we’re sending Health and wealth and luck contending, To Dorothy with her household duties And Dick, his work in the wholesale store. For we trust that in their gladness. They will gladly share it with 11s, We. the students of Eau Claire Normal. Now, and always evermore. —L. F. S. SONNET TO MISS MONROE. Though with us in mind. We missed you dear. And we all are glad You are back with us here, Here, where the minds of young are uplifted.1 0 wear 5o different varieties of frat pins—Cora Bartlett. l o be the most popular girl in school— i. Louw. l o learn how to sing—Pauline Reishus. I'o be president of Normal School—H. Gewald. To have a chart for roll call—Mr. Schofield. FAVORITE MOVIE ACTORS AND ACTRESSES. Mary Pickford—Radical Peterson. Marguerite Clark—Celia Blucher. Theda Bara—Rhea Rivard. Clara Kimball Young—Claire Kirsch. Elsie Ferguson—Marjorie Beebe. Earl Williams—Walter Kopplin. Douglas Fairbanks—Miles Barager. Harold Lockwood—Adolph Regii. Charlie Chaplin—Mr. Fristad. Sidney Drew—Art Ziemann. William Farnum—Mr. Clark. A KNOCK OR TWO. "Much Ado About Nothing"—Junior Meetings. "A quiet little boy from down the country"—Koplin. "Noble by birth—noble by deeds"—Alpha Rho. "My mania sent me’ —M. Pinkerton. "No reason, no hope"—E. Gunderson. “Nuf sed"—E. Gunnison. "Now for a little recreation"—Halm and DeMars. "One vast substantial smile"—J. Gocthel. "For Pm nothing if not critical"—D. Henneman. "I believe I can make a good speech, if I get my notes"—Judge Blum. "'Tis true that she is much inclined. 'I'o chin and talk with all mankind"—Elva Happe. "Greater women than I have lived—but I doubt it."—E. Cutler.Mr. Loop's checked suit. Miss Pearson's new gvin suit. Miss McDonald's new ring. Rapidity of the seventh period D. S. class. The Library is meant for study. Mr. Pope’s easy quizzes. That Miss Giberson excels Galli Curci. That Mr. Doudna forgets a joke. 'Hie halls arc to be quiet. That Fristad walks like his favorite horse. That R. Dodmcad comes from the country. M. Beebe's hair. O. Evcnson hasn't a fellow yet. WE JUST HEARD THESE. “I am a man—every inch of me"—Ray Rivard. “Good! hirst Rate!"—Mr. Brewer. “Solemn as an owl but not necessarily as wise"—G. Conway. “I'm but a stranger here—Heaven's my home"—M. Pinkerton “If I could only spell"—A. Curry. “A Dewdrop from Heaven"—Anna Dairy "You can easily get your excuse"—Mr. Schofield. “ Yc got the Marshfield job"—LydNettcMil. SOME THINGS WORTH LOOKING INTO. How Hugh Cartwright happens to be such an anient lover. How “ hoodies" is mistaken for “Poodles ' How Sam is a married man. How Jeanette makes a bedshirt. Why Ray Rivard studies Latin. Miles Baragcr’s new glide.“Howdy Cv"—M. Zcmplc. “My Little Grey Home in The W est"—Miss Ryan. “Chinatown"—Miss Farnhatn. “After The Kail W as Over"—Miss Mcllquham. “America, Here’s My lloy"—Ruth Gilbert Kitzman. “School Days"—Students of Kau Claire Normal. DON’T FORGET— To be on time for classes. I hc cafeteria opens at 11 145. To cross private lots. We didn’t win a game. To boost the Periscope. 'fhe alumni and faculty. The happy days at Fan Claire Normal. That Davcy is our cheer leader. The hash on Fridays. To take the same girl to every party to avoid complications. To read your text—it may help in examinations. To graduate. THE HONOR ROLL. A frequent occurrence though common is droll. Why! Didn’t you hear. ’ They are taking the roll! 9:45—and I rush for our goal. 10:15—they’re taking the roll. I expect a speech that will stir my soul. But all I hear is. “We ll take the roll!”i Special Attention Given. Headquarters at Kau Claire Normal. Apply for: Harold Gewald. M. Matland, M. Johnson, A. Reirli A. Ziemann, P. Sherman, E. Lender. MAGAZINES FOR SALE— Current Opinion—P. Sherman. Cosmopolitan—M r. Schofield. Woman’s World—Fat. Melby. System—L. Fish. Vogue—Miss Giberson. Ladies’ Home Journal—Mr. Loop. Good Housekeeping—De Mars and Hahn. XZ r I irO'M at wit Mjvivt r INOT'Cfc-, uiht omi MODEST MOLLY CLUB OF MEN HATERS. President—Ruby Sund. CERTAIN— C. Bartlett B. Hart M. Parker DOUBTFUL— E. Johnson G. Nelson T. Miller PROBABLE— E. Gelein M. Ray R. Nelson SUSPECTED— (L Segelhurst M. Sears M. (iooder FEARFUL EXAMPLE. Jean Davis f Toodlcs McGuire MASCOTS. R. DoughertyDist: Oh ho! Here come tlie sold salts with the life preserv- ers. What a good motto is Safety First! Birdlorc (happily): The life-preservers at last! The fact of the matter is. I feel braver already. (Enter sailors with life-preservers. deposit them oil the deck, and withdraw. All awkwardly begin to strap on life-preservers.) .Miss Clcflfe (gingerly handling preservers): Aren’t they the dirtiest things? Miss Grateful (sweetly): Yes, and smelly! arospin: By hookey! The suspender on this one is gone! D’Angell (awkwardly fumbling): Reminds me of one time when I tried to dress up in my wife's clothes. How do you operate this thing anyhow? I can’t seem to get this down over my shoulders. Miss Grateful (sweetly): Never mind. Mr. D’Angell, your head will keep you afloat. (Prof. Reforme suddenly dashes madly through the crowd, jolting those with whom he comes in contact, and upsetting the feeble D’Angell in bis transit. All gaze curiously on his retreating form with the life-preserver hanging limply). Miss Grateful: Our friend. Reforme, must have a pressing engagement. Miss Clcffc: Evidently. Prof. D’Angell (sitting up. dazed, hands to head, hair awry): I believe he knocked me sensible. (Dist. has meanwhile been struggling with his preserver, and has finally succeeded in fastening it around his neck). Dist. (contentedly): By George! I’ve got mine on at last. What a time I had with this contraption! Yarnspin: Why. good gracious, man alive, don’t you know where that thing belongs? Here, let a man belt) you. (Proceeds to fix the preserver hurriedly, but is hindered bv the copy of Bagley in Distiller’s pocket. Business with book). Yarnspin (irritably): Great guns! Wouldn’t it be a rare sit- uation to see you and Bagley divorced for a few minutes? (More business with book. Finally in disgust. Yarnspin throws book overboard). Distiller (immediately running toward railing, shrieking frantically as he ilimps overboard). My Bagley! My life! Mv life! My Bagley! (Confusion reigns). —Curtain— Scene II (On board ship returning to America. Sound of loud voices, protesting and quarreling. Distiller still carries a copy of School Management, water-soaked and much dilapidated.Distiller (excitedly): No. no. Yarnspin, you needn’t try to explain it at all. I know where the fault lies. You were wrong, all wrong when------ Yarnspin: Well, well, old boy, don't get so excited. No use crying over spilt milk. I did my best in my own way and I would have succeeded if----- Dist: How under the canopy of heaven did you expect to convince the Kaiser of his mistake with your Mother Goose rhymes? Yarnspin: Hut what in the name of reason were you trying to do with that soppy speciman of literature in your hand? Dist: Hold on! Hold on! No insults! I had my discourse on habits and ideals, page 227. all prepared, and was in the midst of feeding it to the Kaiser, whose eyes. I could plainly see. were already filling with tears. I was just congratulating myself on the success of my mission when in von bounced with your absurd, nonsensical story of Esau Wood sawed wood. Esau Wood would saw wood. Miss Grateful: I am so disgusted with you both. You acted like irresponsible schoolboys. When I peeked out from behind the door in the Kaiser's audience chamber, and admonished you to enunciate clearly and. bv all means, to lengthen your inflections, you took no more heed of my suggestions than if I were speaking to the empty air. You didn't pitch your voices, you didn’t pause, and you didn’t breathe once during the entire speech. Distiller: Enunciation! Inflection! I presume your exalted ideas of your abilities flatter you into thinking that if you had been sent as envoy to the Kaiser, you would have led him around like a lamb tied to a ribbon. Yarnspin (sarcastically): Eating in submission from your hand, no doubt. Prof. D’Angell: 1 sec where the whole trouble lies! You did not make a psychological study of vour opponent. If only------ Dist: What right have you to pass your opinion I'd like to know. You-------- Yarnspin: Yes, you and Prof. Reforme were in Liverpool five weeks recovering from the effects of your voyage over: so infants like you shall be seen and not heard the remainder of our voyage. (Enter Miss Trebelle Cleffe and Prof. Pdrdlore. excitedly arguing) MissClcffe (angrily): Indeed. 1 did not. What a silly idea to think that 1 had stage fright singing before those savages. Prof. Rirdlore: And prav then, what made you flat so woe- fully on high C? 1 imagine how the Huns must have winced at the discord.Miss ClefTc: I don’t care. It is easier to be natural than it is to stay on high C. Yarnspin (aside): She’s on high sea now and doesn’t know it. Miss CIcfTc: At least you have nothing to say. Prof. Birdlorc. (Turning to others) A man who dissects a pet gorilla, mistaking it for a German, is a pretty big failure at peace-making. Dist. (angrily): What! What fool talk is this? What did you say about gorillas? Did he dissect a gorilla? lias his brain ceased to work? Miss ClefTe: I saw it with my own eyes. Prof. Birdlorc (nervously): Aw, give a fellow a chance to explain. I got my gas mask on so crooked. I could see only out of the half of one eye, and I just naturally dissected the first thing I stumbled against. Prof. D’Angell: Some biologist! Now if you had made a psychological test--- Prof. Reforme (irritably): Oh. shut tip! Hand me another lemon. Yarnspin. Yarnspin: Here, you need one. too. D’Angell, to keep your tongue from wagging and to save that one brain path of yours from wearing through. Prof. D’Angcll (flushing hotly): I refuse to hear such insults! 'l ake back every---- Dist. (rushing up. grabbing D’Angell by coat collar) Enough! Yonder sits your friend. Rcforme. contentedly sucking a lemon. Go thou and do likewise. (Exit D’Angell) Miss Grateful (sympathetically): The poor fellow isn’t himself. Neither is Prof. Reforme. 'Phis trip has been hard on them, but they’ll feel better when they get home. Oh, by the way. Yarn-spin. 1 am curious to know what that story was you told the Kaiser at that fatal moment when you and Distiller met your Waterloo. Do tell us. won’t you? Yarnspin: Why. I just asked him if he had heard of the ter- rible condition in Russia. He said no. he hadn’t heard any further developments lately, and then I told him that there were 500,000 subjects walking around without any predicates. Oh. boy! wasn’t he mad. though? Distiller and I stopped not to reason why. ours but to turn and fly. vowing no more to pry into his business. Miss (’IcfTe (sweetlv): So you’ll admit that you, too. were failures. (To Miss Grateful) Did vour coaching fall short of the mark ? Mi s Grateful (angrily) : Indeed, and what else could you ex- pect? They didn’t heed one thing I said. They were as deaf as stones----senseless things.Prof. Birdlore (rousing himself from meditation): The dis- grace is more than 1 can hear. The thought of von Hindenburg‘s pet gorilla massacred is driving me to distraction. Remorse overwhelms my being! Henceforth, I shall remain in solitary seclusion in my stateroom. Repentance is my only salvation. Miss Clcffc: Will you go back to Fan Claire? Prof. Birdlore (sadly): Ah, no! I shall never darken its doors again. I am preparing to return to North Dakota where I shall found a society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Dumb Animals. Farewell, friends of my better days, farewell. (Exit Birdlore sadly). Miss Grateful: Conic. Miss ClefTe. we are only a couple of hours from New York, and we had better begin getting our duds packed. (Exeunt Miss Grateful and Miss ClefTe. (Distiller and Yarnspin in constrained silence.) Yarnspin: What have you got on your mind. Distiller? (Silence) By the way, what are you going to tell the folks at home? Dist. (angrily): You keep your mouth shut! Yarnspin (worried): But what will they think of us? Distiller: Good gracious man! Arc you just waking up? Is it at this stage of the game you begin wondering what the home folks will think? It was more than evident when you fooled with the Kaiser that you forgot all about the day of reckoning at home. Yarnspin: Aw! let up a little. The whole bloomin' thing was a fool’s errand, and I’ll confess right now, my friend, your Bagiev was what knocked me silly and started me going until I couldn’t stop. Distiller (solemnly): 1 care not what course others may take, but as for me. give me Bagiev, or give me death. Yarnspin : Hey what's that? Somebody's singing down at the other end of the deck. Distiller (listening attentively): Their song sounds familiar. Listen! (Strains of “Keep the Home Fires Burning ”). Yarnspin: Yes, let’s hope they are still burning, but if they arc. it will not. alas! he due to our efforts in this expedition. Suppose. Distiller, that we go home via Detroit and shake hands with Ford. We’re in the same boat now! —Curtain— L. A. O. H. P. R.“If you want to get a-hcad pet a-head of red.” Pauline Rieshus M. Ausman B. Larsen Miss Giberson M. Dearth Miss Lcvakc. Miss Oxby—"The doctor said the reason my hyoid bone is out of place, is that I don't talk enough.” I AM PROUD OF— My onesteps—Fristad. My Pompadour—Lyons. My machine puns—D. Elsemore. My Sister Pin—G. Schwahn. My vocabulary—Zicmann. Mr. Pope: (Talking of the circulation of the blood)—“Why is it, if the circulation is right, that our hands get cold?” F. Timbers—"Oh, that is a matter of convenience.” The first bird of spring Essayed for to sing; But ere he had uttered a note. He fell from the limb, A dead bird was him, The music had friz in his throat.—(Selected.)Song:—“My Honolulu Maiden' Dialogue—“Fish, Frye, Lyons' Reading—“Conservation of Fat" “ .. Instrumental Duct—“Moonlight Sonata Quartette—“Two Pairs of Twins" 7 Reading—“The Trials of Trying to My in Miss Pearson Emmet, Owen Miss Monroe Newell, F. Nelson Kirsch and Hagen High Society" Doris Drummond Lawrence, - R. NOT WORTH ROASTING. A. H. Zicmann. Mahala Rav. Margaret Connell. Doris Drummond. Irma Hatch. Ruth Champion. LATE PUBLICATIONS. “The Greatest Unknown" - Gorden “The Periscope" - lc Stall “Health and Beauty Problems" - - Departing Seniors “How to Grow a Melon Patch" - - Jcanctte-Marjorie “The Silent Voice" ----- Betty McGough Doudna: "Lyons, can you sec a better form for writing this sentence? ‘Richard can ride the mule if lie wants to.' " Lyons: “Richard can ride the mule if the mule wants him to." Irma Kleiner: (coming from Composition Class.)—“Say kids! Do you know Miss Monroe can honestly really teach composition?" Mr. Loop: “Can you tell me how iron was discovered?" C. Bartlett: “Yes. Someone said thev smelt it." G. Bartlett: So far I have derived no benefit from the socie- ty of man." Prof. Kimmcl: "Normal sounds arc heard in abnormal places.’’The Normal: “A sheltered hollow, scooped out of the windy bluffs of the drive.” The Faculty: “They need no eulogy: they speak for themselves.” The Seniors: “May the present have no burdens for them, and the future no terrors.” The Juniors: “May the hinges of friendship never grow rusty.” The Boys of the Service Flag: "Our friends, whether absent on land or on sea.” Our Army: "May it ever he small in peace, but grow to mighty dimensions and mightier achievements in war.” A COMEDY'OF 0PAIR-ER3 PRUUtfLO e Y Tin. LAOt VEN-t i PU YCR3 — DPAinAATi3-PlR50WAL — ACT I. SCENE I. Setting: E. C. N. S. Halls filled with Dukes and Duchesses, Lords and Ladies, Etc. DRAMATIS PERSONAE. King Schofield Premier Brewer Princesses Princes I-ords and Indies Dukes and Duchess Karls and Countesses Knaves Barbarians The Same Also the Same Various Faculty Women Various Faculty Men Sedate Seniors Jolly Juniors Kascal Kura Is Model School yone Outside of Normal Work, Quiet. Marks, Etc., Personified.September— 17—The nobles of the realm do assemble lor the first time in the royal palace to pay ye royal fee. 19—King Schofield addresses the realm as to ye olden customs of the kingdom. Work enters. 22—Ye Ladies of the Y. YV. C. A. do labor in making gay the in-door jousting field. They discover to their sorrow that the beautiful red leaves are poison ivy. 24—All the noble ladies of the realm meet at ye V. Y. C. A. mixer. King Schofield enters but is frowned upon by all assembled. (This is a strictly feminine affair.) r jK— Ye Princes and Princesses entertain the realm at a royal afternoon hall. W e tread on each others feet. Princess (iiberson beseeches us to "Keep the home fires burning". We are to hear more of this later. October— j—Lady Hughes is elected (irand Lady of the Sedate Seniors. .Vine rahs for Keren ice. Duke Melby wears the laurels among the Dukes and Duchesses. 4 The Lords and Ladies begin the instruction of the Knaves. Sir Lesson Plan becomes popular. (?)11—Many barbarians and nobles assemble at the royal palace to listen to the Noble Dr. Fitch. The only disappointing thing about the lecture was that the Doctor did not appear. 17—Lady Jeanette Goethel, Lady Evelyn Johnson, and Duchess Julia Anderson hold court in the locker room, the attraction being Hawaiian music. Evelyn plays her piece. Come again girls! 19—The Teachers of the surrounding country assemble for ye convention. W ork stalks manfully from the stage. 20 Duchess Champion admires Duke Fish more each day. 24— Spring and Holmes, barbarians, do entertain 11s with a music feast. 25—Civil war in the Realm! Was it good or wasn't it? 30- Trince Doudna leaves Ladies Kellett, Hughes, and Bergford in charge of classes. Work disappears. We like conventions.31—The Knaves of the eighth and ninth grades make merry in fantastic costume. Several lucky Ladies are invited. November— 2—We meet in the evening for a Hallowe’en festivity—Evelyn Cutler proposes to Mr. Pope—Naughty Evelyn! ()—'I'lie barbarians of Superior succeed in inflicting defeat on our nobles on the foot-ball field. We admire Rounds. Ladies’ snake dance between halves. The victors give the ladies a treat in the eve. 10—Princess Mcllquham opens her Pine Lodge palace to Primary Ladies. Pretty swell for them. 14—Alpha Rho is organized.—We resolve to cultivate our minds in Art. 16—Princess Hansen informs the Ladies and Duchesses of the art of costume design. Fare-well, waist and skirt! Thou art banished. 29—Ye rare company do divert themselves in solving the mysteries of the Turkey. I r ACT I. SCENE IT. December— 3—King Schofield preaches a sermon on the subject of the erring members of the realm who have not yet returned to the royal palace. Funny he always pawns off these little talks on the ones who are back! “W hen you get out teaching you’ll find---” 5—Ye royal Periscope Staff is chosen from among all the Knights and Ladies assembled. Who'd a thunk they’d of got on ! Some book ! ii—Duchess Hess Hart does ye royal promenade to the front of assembly at Princess Giberson’s request. She wanted to sit with the boys anyway. 13—King Schofield announces that the fuel shortage makes it necessary for us to have an extra week of vacation. Tears and sobs from the nobles. 14—We have a final merry-making before our departure. Work enters in the matter of decorations. i»;—Sir Mouse and Lady Spider take charge of the royal palace. January— 2—The nobles of the court assemble once more. A barbarian force. Matrimony. seems to have claimed some of our members. Thou too, Ziemann! Later we find out that Ziemann has been kidding us. Still, you can never tell. It might be true.5—Sir Work holds us in his grasp even though it is Saturday. X—Princess Monroe happens to remember that school may have started; so she ambles in. a little matter of a week late. The D. S. girls have worried. Kach teacher thinks that the others are letting up and piles on a little hit more. 11—Ladies Singleton and W alsh and others (guess who) bring their suppers in order to be on time for the Junior Party. Why not sleep there and he on time in the morning, Ber-nadettc? 14—Duchess Toodlcs is indignant at the los of her lunch (with the breast of a chicken!) She brings her grievance to court. King Schofield smiles behind his hand. We saw him! |X—()ur noble warriors battle on the foreign field at Winona. The boys stepped out. so they say. .M ( on f css ions from the faculty. Premier P.rower admits that he made the arithmetic course, and Prince Kimmcl acknowledges that he knows nothing of the subject of Honesty. 27—The assembled nobles vote to adopt an orphan in a far distant land. Lady Hughes, Duchess Bartlett. and several others distinguish themselves as orators. • ' «■%- )—Princess Monroe lias been seized by a terrible monster. Appendicitis, who holds her in captivity. We write her many letters. 3 —Feb. i—A death-like silence in the royal halls! A host of giant examinations crush us. We tremble for we hear that the villain, Sir Marks, is to enter shortly. ACT M. SCENE T. Vebruary— 4—Can we wheedle Princess Jagoditch into charging our fees? The Lords and Ladies obtain new divisions of knaves for instruction. This doesn't bother Lord Gewald. X— contest in basket-ball in the indoor jousting field. A new noble, Duke Cartwright, makes his appearance in our 1 i-ts. All the noble ladies succumb to his charms. 1 list! They say lie is timid! M— noble lady doctor visits our realm to give yc annual physical examinations. She finds several hearts entirely missing. I"—The nobles, mostly feminine, assemble during noon-hour to trip lightly around for a few minutes. The Kel-lett Jazz plays. iX—Lady Minda Johnson becomes the center of interest on account of somethin' ’ verv attractive about her left hand. "Isn't it too lovely for words?" ‘'Somewhere in France.--------"19—The noble Doctor Lincoln makes yc magnificent address—All the nobles make ye royal resolutions concerning wheat, meat, sugar—etc. 21—Princess Hansen presents ye historical pageant. The knaves are in the lime-light. Duke Dube is cheered when he enters our lists in the contest with Superior. Did you see Frenchy fall down in that circle two-step? 22—George Washington, a lord of long ago, obliged us by giving us a holiday. 25—Duke Melby brings tears to our eyes in a pathetic little talk. We adopt Raymonde. But, Fat, you didn’t need to harrow our feelings like that. 28—Lord Barager cabarets on the library tables. He is proud of his nice letter to our French orphan. March— 4—The Princes come near blows over a ! nest ion of politics. Premier Brewer’s Conference class gets the benefit of the discussion. 7-8-9—Barbarians from the surrounding country assemble to battle in a tournament—Many Ladies and Duchesses. and even the Countesses, wear smiles and are suspiciously absent from classes. !5-lf —Many kinsman nobles from foreign lands visit the palace in order to unite the nobility of all lands. Is E. C. X. S. there when it comes to pep? Well I guess. Lady Porter, where were you Friday night? Aren’t you ’shamed? Superior and Whitewater win ve supreme medals. We sob “farewell”. 19—Duchess Drummond'receives mysterious mail from Milwaukee males. Letters don’t excite her, however. She gets plenty of ’em. Yep. A correspondence course. 21—Everyone present at fifth period French class. Princess Henshaw swoons. 22—Ye royal Venus dons spring-like costume. Duchess Ahrens is the court costumer. They say she feared a lack of appreciation at one time. 25—A treacherous villain called measles claims great numbers of Knaves and Nobles as his victims. Lumps behind your ears? 27—King Schofield cruelly drags ye honorable Periscope Staff to the stage— We plead for contributions. One joke handed in. 28—Countess Genevieve Louw wishes she hadn’t asked King Schofield if she might go. Every one else is leaving —Faster Vacation!ACT II. SCENE 2. April— 2—April Fool, King Schofield ! We arc all hack from Easter vacation, except measles victims. 4—Each la all the noble ladies beautify themselves for Periscope pictures. 8—Duke Fristad is not in third hour grammar class. Princess Henshaw weeps tears for her erring one man. 12—Ye glorious Y. V. C. A. Circus takes place. The honorable Princess Pussy-Foot makes her debut. 26—The Nobles display wonderful talent for the sake of the banner of the Red Cross. June 13—Commencement—one last final merry making.—Jov mingled with tears. Curtain. S  • • • • T Y I Now Is The Time To Save a Dime Pap Ninety-five xk x-v x x x- -x x x xk %-x x x x x x x x x X‘ x x x ®o (Cljc iV iicrtiscrs In appreciation of the kindness you have shown us in the publishing of this, our second edition, the Periscope Board deem it necessary to devote this page to thank you for your.hearty co-operation. We hope that our work will meet with your approval and that you will be proud to say that this is the annual of our Normal School. Jlnbcx to Abfccritscntcnis PAN Allen-Johnson Co.------------------115 Anderson. Ivcr----------------------98 Anderson, Dr. W. R. ---------------116 Aanes Studio __-------------------101 Badger Supply Co. -----------------11 Baragcr Webster ------------------99 Bergman. C. H.---------------------105 Betz Market -----------------------11 Black. William --------------------105 Blum, George ...-------------------117 Branstad Drug Co. — ---------------103 Bootcry, The ---------------------119 Bowers, F. J. ---------------------108 Bundy Wilcox --------------------116 City News Depot -------------------107 Claus Studio -----------------------97 Commercial Hotel -----------------111 Continental, The ------------------100 Culver, H. L. ................... 100 Conley, T. F. ---------------------115 Downs, W. W. ----------------------116 Dudgeon, Tom -------------------- 112 Kau Claire Book Stat. Co.-------111 Fau Claire China Company ----------103 Fau Claire Creamery Company —113 Fau Claire Decorating Company -- 99 Fau Claire Grocer Company ---------105 Fau Claire National Bank ---------93 Fau Claire Normal -----------109 Fau Claire Press Company ----------107 Fau Claire Savings Bank --------119 Fan Claire Theatre Company---------108 Fleetric Shoe Hospital ------------112 Electric Studio ------------------119 FIfvinK. A. J. ....................105 Fleming Bros. --------------------101 French, E. C, Dr. --------------- 116 Galloway Hotel --------------------119 Gilbertson. J. C. -----------------116 Gillette Rubber Company ____________98 Gocthcl Bros. Market ______________113 Hanson. August -------------------118 Hollcn. A. H..................... 118 Holt, John _______________________112 •X X X-X X-X X X XMX"X X X X" Page Ninety-six r AO Howe Shoe Company ------------120 Hucbsch laundry ---------------- 120 Hurst, Archie V. -----------------99 Jaeger. Dr. P. B. ----------------117 Johnson, Carl G. -----------------97 Johnson Hulcatt ----------------106 Kelley Construction Company------97 Kepler Company, The --------------102 Lauritzen, A. F. T. ------------117 Lewis. A. E. ------------------- 107 Lind Company ------------------103 Lindcrman, G. O. ----------------117 Mcadcr. R. L. -------------------110 Murphy Bicycle Company ----------103 Murphy, Dr. E. C. --------------116 Naum an. P. G. -----------------115 Neher Drug Store --------------119 Nichols, W. L. .................105 Northwestern Egg Poultry Co.--110 Palace of Sweets ----------------117 Remington, Dr. C. L. ------------116 Rounds, E. D. -------------------110 Samuelson. Wm ---------------- --102 Schaefer Shoe Store -------------106 Schroeder Nielsen -------------104 Sherman. Olaf _______,____________99 Smith, Dor ______________________112 Stacy Fruit Company -------------112 Starkey. L. H., Company ---------112 Thompson, Guilder ___________ 101 Thompson, Dr. I. F. _____________116 Ucckc Dairy Company -------------105 Union Mortgage Loan Company. 106 Union National Bank (Inside back cover) Union Savings Bank --------------104 Urheim Drug Store ---------------101 Vandcrbie, H. F. ________________104 Wide-Awake Shoe Repair Co._______113 Weinfeld, Emil __________________106 Williams Furniture Company _______98 Wisconsin - Minnesota Light Power Co. ____________________114 X X X X X X X X"X X X X X X K XKKK X X X X XX,XK XKKKK XKK X X XKK X X X X X X X X  HAPPY MEMORIES Arc recalled by pictured faces in the old album. SWEETEN OLD AGE BY OUR PORTRAITS OF YOURSELF AND FRIENDS Claus Studio “Pictures of Merit.” I I Y t :k-x xk- x-xk-x-x-xk-xK“X-x -:-xk-x-x-x-x- x-x-x-X‘ x x » x :4 y Mr. Crcutz: "How many days in the year?' y Moe: “Three Hundred twenty-five." $ Mr. Crcutz: “How’s that?" Nora: “Forty days of lent.” Nothing is better than a good lesson. A poor lesson is better than nothing. Therefore a poor lesson is better than n good lesson. Mr. Loon: “In Holland they go skating on skates." Mr. Kimtncl: “My face was so long. I had to pay 30c for a shave.” x-x«x-x-x-xkkk-x-:-x-xk-x-:-x-:-:k-:-x-x-x-x-x-x-:-xk-x :-:- S ELECTRICAL I Y I CARL G. JOHNSON CO. Portraits Commercial Motion Pictures, Photographing Developing, Printing. Copying and Enlarging for Amateurs Process Engraving Half Tones and Zinc Etchings Clue Printing. ! ! i •vvw-w-vv SUPPLIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION KELLEY CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 314 SO BARSTOW PHONE 127 RUY WAR SAVING STAMPS I I Y i I Y I. x-x-:mw x-x-x-x-x-x-x -:-x-:« -x-x "X-x :-x-x «:-xk-x-x x-x-x Page Ninety-seven GILLETTE A TIRE THAT IS PRACTICALLY WEAR-PROOF The Gillette “Chilled Rubber Process." developed and perfected by our chemists, is a method of treating crude rubber. It toughens and “tempers” the rubber in a manner similar to the heat treating of the higher grades of steel. It docs not HARDEN the rubber in the sense of making it brittle. On the contrary, it actually adds to the resilience and tensile strength of tires and tubes. “ONE GILLETTE SELLS A SET” GILLETTE RUBBER COMPANY Factory—Eau Claire, Wis. x-X"X x x x-x xk-x-x x-x x x x x x x x x x-x x x x x x X" ! ANDERSON I BOOT SHOP | “Always in the Lead.” X WE SELL The Store For REALLY DISTINCTIVE STYLE CREATIONS IN I FINE | FOOTWEAR A Y X To wear an A ndersort X Shoe is to give charac- ter to your foot dress. ? :j: Ivar Anderson | Shoe Co. v r K X XKKKK"X X XK‘ K-X X-X XKK X X X X XK- KKK X X X X X X X CADILLAC DESK TABLES Especially Useful to students during study hours. Williams Furniture Company South Barstow Street. Page Ninety-right Oluf Sherman JEWELER Eau Claire, — Wisconsin f | I i Decorating “It’s Our Profession.’ EAU CLAIRE DECORATING CO. •; v xk x x x x x - k xk«x xkk x x xk- -X"X x x x x- k xk x x : ; Xieman is again in love, and the effect is very serious. Yesterday he lost his glasses while they were peacefully perched on the bridge of his nose. (Alas women! W hat hast thou wrought! ') Pal had been in the "land of the free many years and he was proud «if his worldly possessions. W hen he was showing them to Mike, he produced a gold watch. "How's that. Mike?" Alike regarding the watch with a look of disgust said: “If I had been over here as long as you Pat. I would be carrying an alarm clock in my pocket." • -x-x-x -:-:--x x x -x-x x- -x-x- x-:7X-x--:--x- -x-:--x -x--xk--x- -x -x--x--X': i Archie V. Hurst District Manager. 'ASK THE MAN WHO HAS A POLICY” (uardiarvlife VJInsuranceCompan L— The Only Purely Wisconsin Company. ! i ! ! Webster’s Famous UDGE Barager - Webster Company Makers of FINE CANDY EAU CLAIRE WISCONSIN • x xk-xkk-xk-x xkk-xkk-x-x--x-x-x -x x-: -x- :-X'-x -x -x x-x x- Page Ninety-ninexkk x x xk % xk x x-x x xx-xkk x x xk x- kkk x x : x x x« s I i i The Continental Headquarters for Normal Teachers and Students. Silk, Angora, Shetland and Wool Knitted Coats and Slip-overs. Ladies’ Tailored Hats, Phoenix Hose, Etc. Surtrtn T3ratt (Ulnlltefi The Only Styleplus Store ¥ V i I Y I V I V T j_________________________________________________________ ¥ I X -h x-xxx:-xxx-xxxxxxxx-xxxx xx-xxx xxx:-xxxxxxxxx-xx-:-xxx-x: ;i; ? $ i The Only urifttj-Srani Store ! 1 For a Perfect Fit or Pumps—Try CULVER’S Summer Styles Now Ready. in Shoes, Oxfords i The Old Corner Shoe Store J v X X Cor. Barstow and Grand Ave. j % ? .x x x : x x x xx : x xx x x x x xxxx-x"xx-x x xx xx x x"x"x» i i fc Otic Hundred Aanes Studio Maker of “QUALITY” PHOTOGRAPHS Opera House Block. “GO WHERE THE SENIORS HAD THEIR’S TAKEN” Phone Black 421 Eau Claire, Wisconsin. I V ¥ I .Mr. Doudna: (In Am. Lit.) ”1 died ami on my -way to heaven I had to go up a long flight of stairs. Before going lip an angel at the foot of the stairs gave me a piece of chalk and told me that on my way up I would find all of my sins written on the wall and I should cross them off. 1 was half way up when I met Gewald coming down. I asked him where he was going and he said he was going after more chalk." Miles I'aragcr: “How is liquor business this year'" Hahn: “Intoxicating." I . Hughs: (Translating French} “Two of his sons are boys." FLEMING BROTHERS SELL GOOD WATCHES All purely American, and the World’s Most Reliable Timepieces. Established 33 Years : : x f , x xk x xkk x x X"X xkx x x xkk x x xk x x x-x x-: : % X We cordially invite you to •{• inspect our beautiful line of •}• novelty dresses and party gowns, suits, coats, millinery X and furs. Everything always up-to-date and by far the largest assortment to choose from. GUNDER THOMPSON ! V I pncscRmoH pharmacist DRUGS, CHEMICALS AND TOILET ARTICLES. 120 South Barstow Street ; V Page One Hundred Onex-xk x x x- x xk x x x x x xx kk xk x x k xk xk x-x x X' 1 ¥ ? Wm. Samuelson Dry Goods Co. % £ A STORE FOR YOU All your interests are well taken care of here. What you buy here is new and gootL JThe prices are the lowest. ♦X-X X-X X-X-I X X-X-I X-X-I-X-X X-X-X-XK X X-X- X-X-X-X Mr Schofield in announcing a blackboard drill for the football srjitnd—M Yo want all the boys in room 22 ) this evening without their suits." Mr. Doudna: (InAmerican Lit.)—"What are some other things which made Franklin famous, Miss Dearth." Miss Dearth—“lie invented the spark." Mr. Doudna—"Oh no. Miss Dearth, the spark was invented before that." In Assembly—Miss Amsdell reads a story that ends, "So she married the Major, pants and all." Mr. Clark (repeating the story in methods class)—"So she got married, pants and all." ;x x».: x xx k xx xk xkk .x x x -x x x x x x x x x x x x x x X‘ THE KEPLER CO. “The Shopping Center of Eau Claire" X {• The goods we sell and the values we offer are Ij! guaranteed by nearly half a century of f successful Merchandising ? X Prompt service, courteous and fair treatment are £ Assured you. DEPARTMENTS. Rendy-to-Wear. Millinery, Rugs anil Draperies. 2nd Eloor. Press Goods, Trimmings. Wash Goods. Fancy Goods, Art Ribbons, Linens, Notions. Hosiery, Patterns and Domestics, ij Eloor. Mndins, Corsets. Gloves, Underwear, Infants' Wear. Hurston .-Imiim. Douse Furnishings, China, Crockery, Leather Goods, Toys. Hasnnrnl. ;i x x xx-xkkkxk xxx x-x-x-xx-x-xk :-x- x- x- x -x-xx-xx Faye One Hundred Two x-x -:-x-x-x x : x-x :«f THE POPULAR SPOT 1 i I I i MEET ME THERE X ♦ $ •X X-X-X X» X ,X - »X-X X-X X I X-X X «X I»% X-X X-:, X X, XmX‘ X-X X«Y ¥ ? X SJ3ran side) I Always Fresh. Deliciously, Sweel BETSY ROSS CANDY —For Sale— Eau Claire China Co MURPHY’S BICYCLE SHOP ! I ! ,! kkk x-x xk xk xk x- x x x x x x x xk x xk x x x : I % X Wc Have the Exclusive Sale i of the Famous RICHELIEU COFFEE 2.5c to 40c Special Richelieu Brand 3 Pounds for $1.00 Phone 345-346 I 95 Grand Ave. West X-X X X-| C. H. BERGMAN FLOUR FEED GRAIN COAL HARD AND SOFT COAL l ! 4 i x 1 ‘GILT EDGE” FLOUR Grand Avenue West. :-x-x-:-x-x-x-x-x- x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x- -x- x- -x-:-x-: I’ayc One Hundred Three. x x x xkkk x x x x x-x xk-x x x x x xkk x-x x x x x-x : i ! X We Cordially Invite Your Account and Will Take Good Care Of It. UNION SAVINGS BANK i • » » .}.,x xk-x-x-:-x-x-:-:-x-x 'X-x-x-x x-x-x-: -x- x-x-x-x x-:-x-x x« Miss Monroe: “You can be thin without being an old maid.’ ! Rhea: “Yes. you can be an old maid without being thin.” Miss Pearson: “There are a good many “hat eggs" (heart aches) in this world. Rhea." Rhea: “Yes. Miss Pearson, and a good many soup sand- wiches too." Miss Mclllquham: “Try to make Arlic’s voice soft, just as hard as you can." Mr. Loop: "What kind of tin do we use to measure rain. Miss 'Timbers?" P. 'Timbers: “ )ne that doesn’t leak." kkk %xk-xkkk-xk-«x-x-x x-x-x-xx x-x-x-x-x-x-x -: BY ALL MEANS Give a watch if you can for the young man in these beautiful thin models or for the young lady in the latest designs of wristlets. ALL MY WATCHES HAVE A MONEY BACK GUARANTEE WITH THEM H. F. VANDERBIE 207 South Barstow Street. I Schroeder-Nielsen Hardware Company HARDWARE • • • • • Stoves and Ranges Paints, Oils and Glass Guns and Ammunition. Builders Hardware Fine Cutlery and Sporting Goods XK XK XK X XK X X KKK X X X X XK -XKK X K XK X XK X XX X l agc Otic Hundred i'our•xk xkk xk xkkkk xk x xk xk x kkkkkkk xkk xkk xk xk x-x x x I i ; When In Need of Milk PHONE 1729. UECKE DAIRY COMPANY PERFECTLY CLARIFIED AND PASTEURIZED MILK CREAM The Cleanest Place in Town 522-24 Water Street. I T •i ? y i V v •XKK-X XX X XK-X X-XK-X-X-X-XX-X-X-X-X-X-X-XX-XX-X-X- ••• A I COLON BRAND FOOD PRODUCTS WILL STAND THE TEST ASK THE GROCER I t J •J XmX -X X -X XmX X» X“ X X X XmX XmXmX X X X X-X X X X‘ X X X« ! x • • i ! NYAL FACE CREAM Helps make the skin soft, smooth and attractive 25c and 50c. Grcascless and Delightfully Perfumed. £ Take a small jar home. If not $ ! satisfied you may return it £ : W. L. NICHOLS. Druggist $ | 117 Grand Avenue West ' • ’ ‘X-X X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X'-X-X-X- { Protect Your Income Against Loss of Time With NATIONAL CASUALTY COMPANY A. J. ELFVING ----TAILOR---- Imported and Domestic Woolens for Inspection 309 Grand Avenue East WILLIAM C. BLACK, AGENT. Truax Bldg. Eau Claire, Wis. Phone R. 919. kk xk xkxk x x xk xk4 xkkk x x x-x xkk-x x x x xkk I‘aye Ouc Hundred Five.X X X XKK X X XK X X XK XK : X X XK X X X : X X XXK X X X X X I y For Safe Investments Buy First Farm Mortgages .£ F rom A UNION MORTGAGE i LOAN COMPANY We Guarantee Collections of Principal and Interest 304 Eau Claire St. Eau Claire, Wis. Deny Yourself a Little Now, To Have Enough For The Rainy Days When They Come to You By Insuring With WEINFELD Tn the North Western Mutual Life Insurance Co. Ingram Block. •X XX X XK X X X X XK XKKK X X XK-X : X X X X X X X X X X X BRIGHT SAYINGS IN EAU CLAIRE NORMAL Mr. Doudna: “W hat is an epistle? ' P . W alsh : “The wife of an apostle.” Lyons: “Do von know wlmt the last drink is?" Miles B.: “XoP Lyons: “The funeral bier." E. Johnson: (In Sanitation:) “This would alTect the elementary track.” Mr. Pope (Speaking of the car and pointing to himself:) “Now class, just look at the beauty of this human mechanism.” ;x-x-x-X“X“X x-x-x- :-x-x :-:-x-X'X-: : : :-:x :-:“: : x- : :-: -:-x x-:‘ j ohnson Huleatt I i Clothiers Furnishers Shoe Fitters We can save you money. TRY US X 416 Water St. Open Evenings Dor Smith’s Kandy Kitchen Home of Dor’s Famous Ice Cream. Home Made Candies Deliveries of Cream Orders Are Given Prompt Attention Tel. 1026 Eau Claire, Wis. :xk-:-x x- x-x-:-:-x :--x -x-x TO SAVE MONEY BUY YOUR SHOES OF i i s CHAEFER HOE TORE 502 Water Street. .•«x xk x x xkk x x x xk x x-xk : x x x : x x x x x x x x x x S I'agc One Hundred Sixx x xkkkkkkk xk x x xk x x -xkkkkkk xkk xkk xkkkkk-X"X x-x I : ■ i ♦ ♦ | i Eau Claire Press Company —Publishers of— EAU CLAIRE LEADER (Morning) THE DAILY TELEGRAM (Evening) Manufacturing Printers i f i !CX"X-X X X X X XmXK X"X"X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X-X «!» ; City News Depot Phone Red 1672 iG South Barstow Street TYPEWRITERS Rented and Repaired. New and second hand machines for sale. The Central Life WRITES BOTH Participating and Non-participating Insurance Pays Double in Case of Accidental Death. Pays Yearly Pension to Policy Holders in Case of Total Disability Pays full face of policy to policy holder at age of 65 Ask to see the new policies i Headquarters For PENNANTS. Novelties, SOUVENIRS. ETC. L A. E. LEWIS General Agent. Ingram Bldg., Phone 24. I I I | I i X-X X XK X X XK X«X XKK X X X X X"X«X XK X X X-X X X"X X PaOC One Hundred .SVrv i x i 1 I I I I k-x-xk x x xkkk xkkkkkkk xk x x : x x : x xkk x x x x x x X EAU CLAIRE THEATRE CO. ALWAYS HIGH CLASS -PROGRAMS- Programs that have won their place in the best theatres throughout the world. If you enjoy high class entertainments, visit our theatres and make them your place of amusement. ,»X-X X X“!"X-X X X X X X X X X-X X-X X X X-X«X X X X X-X X X Hetty—“Do you use slang?' Cora—“Naw! My mother said she'd biff me in the beak if I’d ever make a stab at any such dope as that.” M. Beebe—“How can you tell a bad egg?" Jeanette S.—“If I had anything to tell a bad egg. I d break it gently. ’ Kcgli: (Cafeteria line)—“Don't jam! Preserve order!" Pope—“Where do bugs go in winter?" Mclby: (Scratching his head)—“Search me!" :x x xk x x xk x x x x xk x x xk x xkk xk x x x x x x When you are in need of Lawn Tennis Goods, Baseball Goods Bicycles, or any kind of repairing, remember V 1 F. J. BOWERS CO. Under Gunder Thompson’s. X X X X X X X XK-X X X-X X X X X X"X f x x x x x $ t'ngc One Hundred Eight:!: State Normal School Eau Claire, Wia. This new Normal School offers exceptional advantages for students. The physical plant is unexcelled. The equipment is the latest and best that money can buy. Tuition is free to all intending to teach. ! I 1 V Y ¥ ¥ I V ? V ? X f i Y ! ! Y Y Y i COURSES TWO-YEAR COURSE for PRIMARY TEACHERS. This course is designed to train people for positions in the first four grades. TWO-YEAR COURSE for GRAMMAR GRADE TEACHERS. This course prepares for the upper four grades. A TWO-YEAR COURSE FOR PRINCIPALS OF STATE GRADED SCHOOLS. A TWO-YEAR COURSE FOR SUPERVISORS. This course is designed to meet the needs of those preparing for positions as supervising teachers and training school assistants. A ONE-YEAR RURAL COURSE. This course fits high school graduates for rural school teaching, and meets the minimum requirements of the State. A THREE-YEAR HIGH SCHOOL COURSE for the training of high school teachers. This course is freely elective, and provision is made for the persons taking it to specialize in those lines for which they seem best adapted. A THREE-YEAR COURSE FOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPALS. TWO YEARS OF COLLEGE WORK is also offered. The work given is in accordance with the statement given in the U. W. catalogue. CALENDAR THE SUMMER SCHOOL SESSION begins June 17th. 1918 and closes July 26th, 1918. THE REGULAR SCHOOL YEAR opens September 16th, 1918. Write (or circular, or better still ask definite questions about any part of (he school work and tret an immediate peraonul reply. Address President H. A. Schofield Eau Claire, Wisconsin J»X-»X I-X X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-!-X-X-X-X-X-X-X «X-X-X-X-X« X I-. Page One Hundredi ROUNDS NEW YORK LIFE. y I I 1 •!• X X"X X X X X X XMX X : : x-x •!• r v SPRING. ± y Y Spring conies second— £ In the seasons of the year. And everyone’s glad When Spring draws near. For the snow melts away. And the birds come hack. And of laughing and cheer There never is lack. I he robins will chirp In notes clear and keen. The boys play ball As the hills become green. And all of this gladness Conies with Spring. With April comes showers. 'That flowers will bring. • • • • « Robert Standcn. Fourth Grade. X» "X X-X-X"X :-T i t Y Northwestern EttU Poultry Co.. Rulr.Uur 'f Y 20V So. River St. — Eau Claire. Wisconsin Y CANDY IS NOW RECOGN IZED NOT ONLY AS A CONFECTION BUT ALSO AS A FOOD GOOD CANDY IS A VERY NUTRITIOUS FOOD WE MAKETHE GOOD KIND R. L. MEADER CO. I aye One Hundred Tenv A .!• A I ¥ I ? I •! ? i Your Test Grades Tell The Tale. ¥ ■ 11 -cmrwnh Fthe pen you use writes with an case and a smoothness, day in and day out, it shows up in your test grades. Therefore, whether it's theme writing, taking notes in class, home work, or what-not. use the efficient I I i ¥ ¥ I ¥ P - ■ J - _L. 5=aL=wa rw-- THE COMMERCIAL HOTEL Eau Claire, Wis. Strictly Modern. All Outside Rooms. Local and Long Distance Telephones. Hot and Cold Running Water in Every Room. RATES: From $1.00 to $1.50 European. Your Patronage Solicited. X I ¥ I Y ¥ ¥ Y | Y ? Y Sell-Filling Fountain Pen NON-LEAKABLE Let us fit your particular style of hand writing with a CONKLIN that w»U help y .u in your work for years to coma. -- - - •{♦ The Cuisine and Service of !j! A this Hotel is beyond doubt the V X best that can be obtained in the I EAU CLAIRE | ",y- | BOOK | — I STATIONERY : I COMPANY % : Page One Hundred PlevenWATCHES •{• for boys and girls, bracelet | watches, fountain pens, gradual ation presents. | at JOHN HOLT’S !£ Jeweler. BILLIARDS | 1 There is a time for work and a • time for play. When you play, y I ! play at DUDGEON’S ? ? x v v yx XK-x x xx x x X"X x x x x x x x x XK"X x x x :-x x XvX STACY FRUIT COMPANY WHOLESALE FRUIT AND PRODUCE COMPANY, EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN. Gold and Red Stripe Lemons; Black Diamond Grape Fruit; Oak Grove Oleomargarine; Cream of Nut Margarine. ALL THE BEST. HANDLED BY ALL RETAIL GROCERS. ! V W ! 1 5 x I f -:-xx-x-x-x x-xx-x-x-x x-x-x x-xxxx-x-x-x-x-:« x-x« x«:«-x-x «x-: ':' v X X............................ _ ❖ A 1|1 Have You Any Sick Shoes? $ We Are Expert Shoe Doctors. X Wo ran make your old shoes £ V like ueu by our modern metli- A X «k!s in Shoo lle|mii iitK. GREETINGS I ELECTRIC SHOE hospital. 20» S. Bars low St. X Itcir of Ivor Anderson Shoe V Store. 1 TBit. It. NI H. 1 s To the Graduation Class of ’i8. •{• £ May you get out and hustle for a BANNER CROP to help $ feed the starving world. X ? L. H. Starkey Co. ? £ X“XK“X-x-x-x X“X“X“X- -x-X“X“ X“X-X“XkkK“X-x-X“X- -x X"X-x-j: •!» I EVERYTHING IN MUSIC. VICTROLAS. EDISON DISCS AND RECORDS. Wm. E. Steinberg Piano Co. 217 South Barstow Street. Eau Claire, Wisconsin. MANUFACTURERS’ REPRESENTATIVE FOR THE BEST IN MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. .xxxk xkxk : x»«x x: x -x »x» X"X «x» xx «x : xx x x x x x -x xxx «x - -: %» Pane One Hundred TwelveI EAT— I ROBIN BRAND ICE CREAM THE CREAM OF ALL ICE CREAM. Manufactured by EAU CLAIRE CREAMERY COMPANY Wisconsin. I ! ! Y I ! Y i Miss Hansen was trying to teach a drawing class hv means of a song. When she finished singing, the following was heard: .Marion Parker—"Miss Ilanscn what is the tunc to that song?" Miss Amsdell—“The horses in the middle century had such heavy burdens to carry I should think they would die." II. Hughes—• They did." E. Johnson: (buying a ticket)—“Is my face good?" Miss Jagoditsh—"No. it has two holes in it." (Dimples.) ! Goethel Brothers Dealers in FRESH AND SALT MEATS. POULTRY. ETC. At Lowest Cash Prices. Telephone Red 605 119 Grand Ave. W. I ! | •I i YOU WILL FIND Quality and Service go together with moderate prices, when you try us Wide Awake Shoe Repair Co. O. O. Gjernes, Prop. 206 Gibson Street. Phone Black 1183. 1 I Paije One Hundred Thirteen huJctuAj 0 tJOu • • c} rKJUlC$rns utiki kr WISCONSIN - MINNESOTA LIGHT and POWER COMPANY PHONE ISO W. B. VOTH. Manager I age One Hundred Fourteen T. F. CONLEY STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. Telephone 827. 438 Broadway. I I ! I ? ¥ v V 1 GIVING. $ For thrift stamps, and baby bonds. £ We give an amount sn small. For we only give the soldiers a part, W hile the soldiers give us their all. Our soldiers fight across the sea. But their road to civtorv Is the road of stamps and baby bonds. X That's paved by you and me. X ROBERT STAND EX, 4th Grade. •}.xk x x x x x x x x x xk xk X"X xxkK"Xk»x x k x x x x x : ‘ COMFORT STYLE GOOD WEAR The Allen- Johnson Co. THE PLACE TO BUY SHOES POPULAR PRICES ---------------- o SHOE STORE i 1 SHOES FOR EVERY OCCASION Would like to show you their new line of Pianos, Pianolas, •}• Victor Victrolas, the Edison Disc and Musical Instruments of all kinds. Grand Ave. E. Eau Claire, - - Wisconsin. I ♦i ' MK, MXHWHW“XwX"X "X M ‘X" X“X, XHWM 4XMI ‘X MX XHMMX,‘J WHXMX4 Page One Hundred FifteenPROFESSIONAL X"XKKkk X"Xkkk xk x xkk x x xk xkk x xkkkk x xk x x : x x x-: DR. C. L. REMINGTON !j! Uses oxygen gas for painless filling and extracting teeth. ? Phone 314. Fourth Floor, Truax Bldg. A I y A. W. THOMPSON. Dentist. 31854 S. Barstow Street. Phone B. 61. i I I ? X Eau Claire, - - Wisconsin. Y .•x-x-x-:-xx x x-:-x-x:x-x x-xxx-x- - x-x-x-x-x- xx-:-x-:-x-x« x- I W. R. ANDERSON. Dentist. Rooms 1-2-3-4 McGrath Bldg. Phone B. 274. Eau Claire. - - Wisconsin. ! J. C. GILBERTSON. Lawyer. McGrath Building. Eau Claire. - - Wisconsin. i i -x«x- v vx.;..x XKX"XxxKX XKKx x x XK xx-x XK"X x x x x x x--j t i 5; Abstract of Land Titles a J Specialty. E. C. FRENCH. Dentist. 43 Ingram Block. Telephone B. 313. i 1 W. W. DOWNS. Attorney at Law Room 6, Wilson Bldg. Bell Tel. No. 231. Eau Claire, Wisconsin. !x XKK XK-XK X XXK X XK-X X X X X X X K-X X X‘ X X X X- X X-;t; DR. E. C. MURPHY Osteopathic Physician. Telephone No. 424. 27-28 Ingram Block. t BUNDY WILCOX. Attorneys at Law. X Union Savings Bank Bldg. Eau Claire Wisconsin. $ Eau Claire, I Wisconsin, v 1 y •x- -x--x xk-xxxk-xxx-x- x -- x -x-xx"C -x-x--x- xx-x-x- xx -x-x-x-;-x:" JJaye One Hundred Sixteenx x x x x xxx x x x x xk x x k x xkkk x x-x x x-x x xx x l ! GEORGE L. BLUM. .{• Attorney and Counselor at X Law. Y DR. P. B. JAEGER, Dentist. Eau Claire, - Wisconsin. 2oi{ £ S. Barstow St. Eau Claire, - - Wisconsin. ¥ Xx x-x x xk x x x-x x-x x x x x-x-x x x-x x-x x-x-x-'X ; Abigail I telling about a joke)—"Gosh! I bit so hard, I cracked a tooth.” Corcclia Turner—"I should think ‘out' should be the direct object of turn.” Miss Henshaw—'Wo cow is the direct object.” Corcclia—"But we can’t turn a cow.” n inmate of the Normal «|uitc ri h Heard funny noises at which She took off her hat And found that her rat. Had fallen asleep at the switch. I 1 i GET YOUR CANDIES and I • • • • ♦ • ■ ICE CREAM AT PALACE. £ Always Fresh. Palace of Sweets I i i Y Y Y X i The Sweet Shop. G. O. LINDERMAN. Attorney at Law. Frawlcy Building. Eau Claire. - - Wisconsin. :j:x«x-:-x-xK- x-XK-:-x-:-x-x- x-: -j i i B- 439- X CAV CLjUB£. nf. I X X XK-X-X"X X X -X X X X X- X X X X X-X x-x-x-x-x-x-x-xx-: T«v Our Hundred Seventeen i ! Great Variety in Styles for Young Men Young Men’s Close-fit. Clean-cut, Smart, Ultra Models; suits that are acknowledged to be the standard of style; perfect in designing, in finish, in tailoring. This store is full of good styles for young men; new and unusual features in military models; new weaves in a great variety of colorings and patterns—Olives. Greys, Greens. Copper and Heather shades. Browns, $15 to $35. A. H. H O L L E N Good Clothes Since 1876. ’! X X-X -X X-X X X X-X X-X X-X X X-X X X X"X X X» X X X"X"! OUR THRIFT STAMP MONEY. I have :» little pocket bonk I lint i'mcn every where with me, AimI it’» full of Thrift tttamp money, For Sammic across the tea. I’ve Ih.ukIiI a hnhy liberty bond, Nine Thrift slumps, more or Ic .. Ami wi»lt nil America’s Thrift tump money Wr’ll get 1 hr Germans yet. J(»SK I’ll INK Ct l.YKK 4th Grade. THE THRIFT STAMPS. I Imd one little thrift ulattip A ImicJy a could lie; S" I knight another thrift stamp ‘fo kc -n linn company. Th n more 11 ml more I l«nn:ht Till I had tivd in nil. And linn I thought I'd dour my pnrl To answer l.ilw-rty Call. INC.KHORC. MIDF.I,PART. 4th Grade i I V V I 1 • • V X j. V X Wc Are the Only EXPERT UPHOLSTERERS In the City. Wc Solicit Your Patronage. Aug. Hansen X X X X-X X X X-X X X X X"X' Betz Market I. C. Erity, Prop. CHOICE FRESH AND CURED MEATS. Poultry, Fish, Oysters and Game in Season. Telephone 181. 412 South Barstow Street. -X-X «X-X- X- «X-X-X-X% BADGER SUPPLY COMPANY Household Furnishers. A. Montgomery, Prop. Telephone Red 1204. 12? South Barstow Street. During house-cleaning time don’t forget we arc in a position to help you out with your furnishings. I ? I Y i t Y I ! I X X X KK X XKK X XmXK XK -X X -X X XKKK X X X X-X XK X X. I'tttjc One Hundred Eighteen•x xkkk xk x x x x x-xk x-x-x xkk- x x x x x-x x x xk x-: | v i KEEPING YOUR DOLLARS AT WORK Do you make your dollars work for you? Or do you let them play around where they wish? Considering the effort it cost you to secure them, doesn’t it seem fair that they “do their bit” in helping you reach the goal you have set for yourself? Dollars in the bank are dollars at work. Here they are kept at work twenty-four hours a day, without a thought or worry on your part. And their wages go to you, to do with as you choose. Moreover working dollars do not get away from you and disappear. You can always put your hand on them when vou want them. • The first opportunity you have, round up some of those playful dollars of yours and put them to work in a savings account. EAU CLAIRE SAVINGS BANK EAU CLAIRE. WISCONSIN NORTH SIDE xkkkk-x xk xk x x xk x x x xkk xk xx x xk xk x x-x x x I NEHER’S DRUG STORE 225 N. Barstow St. Corner Wisconsin St. i Eau Claire, Wisconsin. THE BOOTERY Larson Christianson, Dealers in GOOD SHOES. 216 North Barstow St. Eau Claire. - - Wisconsin sin. £ ?. X X-XX"X X X X-X X X X X X X X X X-X“X X X-X"XK X X X-X v I THE GALLOWAY 'Teachers’ Sunday Dinner.’ 1 1 Electric Studio POSTALS PANELS FOTTETS KODAKERY I i 1 •k % $ •X X-X X-XK X X-X X-X X X X X X X X X-X X"X X X-X X X"X X": Page One Hundred Nineteen ? I Y S X X i! :: WE KNOW What you can expect of the Howe Shoe Co. shoes. They are of superior quality that will give you the utmost satisfaction—your first pair will convince you that it pays to buy at the Howe Shoe Co. HOWE SHOE COMPANY Eau Claire. .... Wisconsin. •jx X X“X XK XK» X X»X X X X XK XK XKKK X X X X X X X-X X X !« Y I I ! ! ? 5 I ! i % .X-X X X"XK XK X X-X"XKK :"XKK XK X"X X X X"XKKKK"X X X Pane One Hundred Twenty t t LAUNDERERS AND DRY CLEANERS F.au Claire. Wi». PHONE 118 We Mould Your Collars this method insure Tie-Space and Smooth Edges Our Dry Cleaning Dept. takes the Drudgery out of Spring House Cleaning Costs More Phone Us For InformationI V i ®fye |Jntmt Jfetkmil Skttfe Eatt (Claire, JBUtBcmtsm Bank Where Your Business Is Appreciated Whether you open a small or large account with us, we will welcome your business and render you service that shows our appreciation. Come in and get acquainted with the facilities of “The Bank for Service with Safety.” Capital and Surplus $250,000.00. United States Depository. Member Federal Reserve Bank. s 2 t 1 v ? I I l I I V V I $ 1 1 I t 1 OFFICERS: George B. Wheeler, President S. G. Moon, Vice President. L. S. Bowne, Assistant Cashier. 4 M. B. Syverson, Vice President J. W. Selbach, Assistant Cashier. !j! Knute Anderson, Cashier. B. G. Weizeneggcr, Assistant Cashier. £ •XX XK X X«X XK X"XK XKK X X,X XK X"X"X X"XK X"X X «X X X »X 


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University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin Eau Claire - Periscope Yearbook (Eau Claire, WI) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

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