University of Texas School of Law - Peregrinus Yearbook (Austin, TX)

 - Class of 1956

Page 7 of 168

 

University of Texas School of Law - Peregrinus Yearbook (Austin, TX) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 7 of 168
Page 7 of 168



University of Texas School of Law - Peregrinus Yearbook (Austin, TX) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 6
Previous Page

University of Texas School of Law - Peregrinus Yearbook (Austin, TX) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 8
Next Page

Search for Classmates, Friends, and Family in one
of the Largest Collections of Online Yearbooks!



Your membership with E-Yearbook.com provides these benefits:
  • Instant Access to Millions of Yearbook Pictures
  • High-Resolution, Full Color Images Available Online
  • Search, Browse, Read, and Print Yearbook Pages
  • View College, High School, and Military Yearbooks
  • Browse our digital annual library spanning centuries
  • Support the Schools in our Program by Subscribing

Page 7 text:

A B., LL.B., 1931, University of Texas; S.J I).. 1936. Il.irvaid University. Professor of Law sincr 1939 Assistant Dean, University of Texas. 1940-42. Ori leave 1942-45 as Chief Counsel and Price Kxeentise of Petroleum Branch of O.P.A. and as Assistant Chief Counsel of Petroleum Administration for War. Washington. DC. Detn. University of Dkla-School, 1940-49. Dr .in. University of Texas I-aw School since IMft Member. Texas. American. Oklahoma Bar Associations, ami Judicial Council of OklalwNiia Co-editor erf Seasry. Keeton, and Thurston, tarsej on Torts; editor. Cases on Fraud and Mistake Puhlislied articles in several law reviews. Subject; Torts UNIVERSITY Ol I The School of Law Austin 12, Texas Ofitt of th D«an May. 19 6 Letter to the Law Student a: A great law school require aa a minimum a hard-working st .dent body and a capable, energetic faculty working together In a cooperative manner, with such mutual trust, confidence and reaped aa to create a stimulating intellectual atmosphere for both faculty and students •l‘ke a substantial percentage of the atudenta in any law achool are habitually unprepared, are abaent from classes frequently without good reason, and in general are seeking to do only what is absolutely necessary in order to graduate, then the label of greatness can never be properly applied to that school. Likewise, If a substantial percentage of the faculty become satisfied with past accomplishments, show a lack of interest in and concern about the students and their intellectual development, and conduct themselves in such an unfair manner as to lose the respect and confidence of right-thinking students, mediocrity is inevitable. The increasing demand for admission to this Law School makes it imperative that everything reasonably possible be done to limit the privileges of legal training here to those who are conscientious and intellectually curious. Moreover, the increasing financial support, not yet sufficient, makes it more nearly possible to assure a high level performance from the faculty. I have every reason to believe, therefore, that those of you who graduate hereafter will be justified in feeling a sente of pride and accomplishment and that the caliber of legal service in this state will be materially improved. Sincerely, Page Keeton

Page 6 text:

DR. HUBERT WINSTON SMITH Dr. Smith has achieved an education which few men can equal. After graduation from the University of Texas in 1927 with an A B degree he proceeded to Harvard Law School from which he received an LL.B in 1930. After six years of law practice, first as an associate of the law firm of Thompson. Knight. Baker, and Harris in Dallas, and later as a member of his own firm, he carried out an aspiration conceived in Law School of some day studying medicine with the plan of working on possible integrations of law and science. He studied for two years at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and finished his medical education at Harvard in 1941. Subsequently he was appointed as a Research Fellow of Rockefeller Foundation and accepted an appointment as an Associate in Legal-Medical Research on the faculties of Harv ard Law School and Harvard Medical School. On leave of absence from Harvard in late 1943, Dr. Smith served in the Medical Corps of the USNR and was assigned to duty in the Legal Medicine Branch of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery in Washington. D.C. After the war he served on the faculties of the University of Illinois and Tulane University until his acceptance of a professorship in 1952 at the University of Texas School of law as Professor of Law and largal Medicine and Director of the newly created Law Science Institute. He is also a member of the Faculty at the Medical Branch in Galveston. In addition to teaching courses in I.cgal Medicine and Evidence, he conducts a seminar in the Law-Science area. Dr. Smith has written many articles which have been published on various aspects of thie Science of Proof and of I.egal Medicine. He is Associate Editor of the Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology. and has been Editor and Contributing Author in several National Symposia devoted to Law-Scicncc Problems. The Legal Medicine Short Courses on "Legal Medicine and Elements of Medicolegal Litigation" involve the use of a distinguished teaching staff made up of as many as fifty to seventy-five medical specialists and trial lawyers. It is estimated that today eighty percent of civil actions involve personal injuries and trial lawyers have l ecome increasingly concerned with obtaining instruction in the related fundamentals of medical science and medicolegal trial technique. Lawyers from every State in the Union have attended tlx- Short Course which involves from seventy to eighty-five hours of intensive instruction and constant experimentation with new post-graduate teaching techniques. Dr. Smith has said that “only science can explain human Ix-havior and only law can regulate it and therein lies the basis of a necessary and enduring partnership.'- Today law schools throughout the country are endeavoring to launch' Law-Scicncc programs similar to that now functioning at the University of Texas Law School. Dr. Smith lias received various honors and recognitions; among these has been his recent election as a Fellow of the International Academy of Trial Lawyers in recognition of his contributions to the field of Scientific Proof. In view of his tireless devotion to Law-Science ideals, and his energy in bringing its contributions to akl of the judicial process, to trial lawyers, and to undergraduate students, it is with deep pride that the staff of the 1956 Pcrcgrinus dedicates this yearbook to him.



Page 8 text:

THOMAS J. GIBSON, III Assistant Dean—Spring Semester B.A. 1939, LL.B. 1948. University of Texas. Assistant Professor ami Associate Librarian, University of Texas School of Law 1954-56. Admitted to practice, Texas 1948. Texas State Librarian. 1952-54. Instructor, University of Texas Law School, 1950-51. Member, Texas Bar Association. U. S. Navy, 1941-46. Subjects: Legal Bibliography. JACK PROCTOR Assistant Dean—Fall Semester B.A. 1948, LL.B. 1949, University of Texas. Admitted to practice in Texas, 19-49. Practiced with Paul Bandy firm. 1949-50. in Wichita Falls. Appointed Administrative Assistant to Dean, University of Texas Law School, 1950; Executive Assistant to the Dean, 1952. Member of Texas State Bar. EDWARD WELDON BAILEY Professor of Law B.A. 1920, LL.B. 1928, University of Texas. S.J.D. 1942. Harvard University. Admitted to practice, Texas, 1928. Practiced with Callaway 6c Reed, Dallas, Texas. 1928-30. Associate Professor of Law, University of Texas, 1930-36; Professor of Law since 1936. Subjects: Private Corporations, Trusts, Future Interests, Wills. LEO C. BLACKSTOCK Professor of Law B.A. 1923, M.B.A. 1925, LL.B. 1933. University of Texas. Admitted to practice, Texas, 1933. U. S. Supreme Court. 1952; U. S. Court of Military Appeals, 1955. Chief Examiner, Cas Utilities Division, Railroad Commission of Texas, 1937-38. Head, Business Administration Department, Trinity University, 1924-25, and Sam Houston State Teachers College, 1925-27; ProfcsiOr of Business Law, University of Texas since 1927; Visiting Professor of Military Law, University of Texas School of Law since 1953. Member, Travis County Bar Association. Col. JAGC, 1940-46. Subjects: Military Law, Legal Accounting. 4

Suggestions in the University of Texas School of Law - Peregrinus Yearbook (Austin, TX) collection:

University of Texas School of Law - Peregrinus Yearbook (Austin, TX) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

University of Texas School of Law - Peregrinus Yearbook (Austin, TX) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

University of Texas School of Law - Peregrinus Yearbook (Austin, TX) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

1955

University of Texas School of Law - Peregrinus Yearbook (Austin, TX) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

1957

University of Texas School of Law - Peregrinus Yearbook (Austin, TX) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

1958

University of Texas School of Law - Peregrinus Yearbook (Austin, TX) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.