University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma - Argus Yearbook (Chickasha, OK)

 - Class of 1979

Page 1 of 160

 

University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma - Argus Yearbook (Chickasha, OK) online yearbook collection, 1979 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 160 of the 1979 volume:

IN MEMORY OF CLARK T. BAILEY 1932-1978 ,Age 1 V "-1w?"w11.' Q-1 f- . ,. .'-., , - :A , 41 hi , ., Lgiggxy. , A. ,JA . , . , f M , ' ' 1 .w e, v 4 f -1. - 15, 1. ,, sw M J in V-'Aff-,W h 1-,Q-,153-f?1fg1g 1.4 , -Mx wk ' 1 ' , L1 ' ' X Y: U., 4,5 W .. JV ' ' ' ' 'f 1. 11 1 R ,M A ' ' 3 ga .Z 1 , .32 ' 'P 4 nf X YE A . , - ,1q,,,3: 149 ,ww 194. Q f ,. ,, x Q , r 1.1 'wail' as W 4 v. , 1 594 ,ts-'ul 'jfs fr'ff.2ig1f' x 1 , Qu 5 f ws-1, . " ,T Kqgk ih. 1 W 6? 1g45l,z., I 4 1 1 1 M1 . ' E5 2 751 K' 4, ,A I 1 ' 4+ A 4 A ,i N rf! 'Q 4 jp 43,1 1 ' .1 5 'P f 1 fi, 41, ff za P' V!! H. "'.5,ffW:"' 4" ' 4- S'Sw'ri1t.,., 11 ' if QP? Jgy,-,Nah 131 Tffj- 1 M Rf X H X 281.15 -3 I 5' ,195-fng,4ae,1:,J1.., 5' 7. '-.Wi . J',ffY,g,5f,Q3.riPil.. --,M +1 fx 1.'1f.f', 4' lhm' 'vk' 1" fi aa 1' , rj V 1 ., L l iw h' Kg, .L ',v.HQ'l . ,, ,Q X, " 3? ff w ma, 13 .1 V -1 .w wf " F M , ,J LW s H 5.1, 1 . 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Tell me, will you be here tomorrow? Will I? or, shall the world cease to be M , R l u S 1 in . 0 my - fu-qlwmw,4 if M -we Wg... E99 "' 2' P7 "QL f-0:1 .df 'Y Y ri.. iv. ,JJ M.: -1,,,.', J ' Everchanging . . . facets of momentumg the people and places of today and tomorrow. gpg' j""."s T j ,. " ,Q N ' mt 'gjesf-'1. L T . gi 2 tiff . I . 5-J, gl i gy ff -..Jw it 9' - 2' " ' -fa pw- .ff -f 1 f 'K ., "- 'F 'M ,-fra? ,, A' . . . ,A ,, J . ..- ,L .fx H. ' 4 V F A ,., J 5 ni. I '-S.: N X -' ., V ' , 4 , .li n - K ,.1., ff - , 9 .1 '.- e , - N ' ' - .ur 3 Q' " Q VK 1-.f ' ? 'luv 'SP-rl A Q fL,,f.2 if wig-4, K Y ff 2 ' f 2: ,J " fi ' , Y . Q Q 0 M 1. .ml 4' at 'i-4 I . 'A S, n - . E 'U A . I,Q1g"' "' ., emmg As the year began in earnest, so did the students etllorts to lind a diversion lroin the rigors ol' studying. Physical activities, endeavors in the lield ol music and cut-ups for passing photographers were just a few methods lor curing the inid-terin hlahs. To Lee Ann Ford, standing on her head was one way to cure "the class-rooin blues." Walt Wilson. on the other hand, discovered that composing songs helped in the treat- ment ol' this mysterious aihnent. The resi- dent P. R. whacl4o's. Roxanne Brantes. Lisa Beaudion and Diana Wight. released their pent up frustrations through a mock pie-in- the-faee lor the roving cainera-inan tStan Whitej. 4 K A k.gg yn -vt yn K . , t. H V Law , . 1- ,. L 'las N. fvi-.girl Q ..,. "' tt. if it x Q. g ,. - .Q j':Q"y A Q x ft . f , I 'f owl' ss it 'vs 'W ac . , - gr e 1, "-'fm As- ' V. -2 , '- Tgti- my t 'hd i'?1pQgl i L 9 t D3 nf . Y by Q Qs- f . xr , .5 Sy ',il,g1 s t , , While diversion was fine every once in a while, the more studious USAO students were found to be every vigilant in their, quest for knowledge. A prime example of this was Randy Lloyd, the TREND Editor, more affec- tionately called the "The Hunk" -the s'Hulk" that is, who could always be found hard at work studying his human physiology. Partying, another specialty of USAO, was the minor of Freshman Lisa Beaudion. Other students studied "the art of enjoying oneself" under the tutelage of Jon Ims. At the first event of the year, the SAB Howdy Picnic, the students of USAO were given the opportunity to enjoy good food and the company of friends among the beauties of nature. Later, the Mini-Olympics challenged the superiority of oneis stomach and body through tortourous activities. No, that's not a mad USAO student foaming at the mouth, that's Ani-Bee in the glorious aftermath of the Mini- Olympics twinkie-eating contest. This Addams Hall resident found that exercise was better, as he shows off his soccer prowess. John "Monty,, Montgomery shows that he, too, is talented as he blows a bubble. I wonder if he ever got it all off his mustache. J 'sa W my .K fm tg U " , X 5 e . L . .LL.1 5' 1LAL A1,-,A f - t S 'N 3 'V K' 1 XM' . M if . agus? Q " K .,'k , .wavrxg 'wwll-, M" ' 2 Talent runs rampant through the ranks of USAO students. It was apparent throughout the various activities in which they indulged. Jean Ann Stone shows her amazing talent of denying herself another hot dog, or is it accepting? Tisha Graham betrays her subtle stealing of food to Susan McGrew who is obviously flabbergasted. But the most uniquely gifted person had to be Patti Farmer who loved to dig below the surface of trash cans. Note, what could be bringing that insidous grin to Patti's face, certainly not trash? What did you find in there, Patti? F f .1 'W ,.. ,wx I i , , .4 Q' 1' 11 X, I x His World "Snips and Snails and puppy dog tails His world--a world of sports and studies. His room is filled with sports equipment, torn jerseys, ragged shoes, and a good pigskin football. Sometimes other things are present in the form of stereo equipment, TV, phone, and miles of albums and tapes. Often hobbies have a place in his world: backgammon, chess, and electronic foot- ball games are some. Terry McGrath and Norman Hall were chosen as examples of having a room that is typically "his.', l 1 f "Sugar and spice, and everything nice . . ." What is the World of ll girl like? lt is a world unique to expressing her personality in a way that nothing else can. Memories . . . the teddy bear that she hugged in the crib, her hrst doll. the Valentine from her first big crush and her first date and corsage. Then there are indications ofthe present- stero and albums. Z1 tv. a phone. posters of scenic beauty or the idol of the world ot' rock or Elm fame. And, of course. the ever-present college books that gather dust on the shelf. Roeki Brante's room was chosen because her room seems to typify the world of "Her." Z 5 2 is 52 Her World For first time freshmen, starting anew can sometimes be a problem. But students at USAO seem to have overcome it through various activities in which they engage. Stacy Davis arrived in Chickasha from California accompanied by a flair for the dramatic and an inclination to pose for photographers. Jon Hines decided that team- work was a way to meet people. so he played intramural football. Christi Curtis, a member of the infamous paint party, managed to help white-wash a few people along with the walls of Droveris Den. "NN ullllht rf' W y A If you had one thing you would not part with, no matter what the circumstances, what would it be? For students, that was an important decision because of the linnted space in the dorna roonas Tanya VVhheHehi brought her dog to protect her and keep her company on dark nights. Debbie Hodges' security blanket is her trusty Pentax which she never seems to be without. For Paul Fenwick, well, Paul has this attachment to his Christmas tree. You never can tell about Paul. CLOSET Qpinlon 65 fu. ., aw l"w? " - ., 1 fi 5 Question: Has USAO helped you recognize yourself as an individual? Yes, I feel USAO's contributed a lot to my sense of self-worth. When I first came to the university I didn't know who I was, why I was here, and what I wanted out of the future. Ever since then Iive been learning and growing. I was amazed to find that the people are friendly and are willing to help anyone. I especially give credit to members of the faculty for helping me see that I AM a worthy person. These particular people have helped me so much and I hope that eventually, Iwill be able to pay them back in return for everything they have done for me! Kit Andruss Question: Do you feel people accept you for what you are? Due to my experience as a USAO Student Senator H977-7811 believe people accept me for what I am, because I was the only foreign student serving in the Senate then. Personally speaking, I really enjoy working and mixing with people no matter where they come from as long as they take me for what I am. During the term of my office as a Senator, I was appointed as the chairperson of the Finance Committee, which I believe was due to my own little contribution towards the betterment of the school. I also believe that all of the other members of the Student Senate never looked down on me because I was a foreign student, which was a great surprise to me. What I heard before my appointment was just too different from what I personally experienced. We all worked together as one without any discrimination. We all took ourselves for what we were. It was this encouragement that made me run again for election. Although I lost the election, I don't feel too bad about it and I will definitely run again next year. I enjoyed being in the Senate. At the present, I am a member of the Residence Hall Council, and I feel accepted there too. Another experience of mine occurred during our Mini-Olympics which I took part in. At first I felt discouraged to get involved because there was no other foreign students there, but I made up my mind and invited some other foreign students like me to take part. Fortunately for us we won prizes! I won two prizes which was an accomplishment to me. Frankly speaking, I am welcome wherever I go on campus. All of the instructors I have had so far accept me for what I am which helps encourage my progress. I think the best way to know what other people think about you is to become closer to them, not by assuming what they think, which is just classic. Ani-Bee Question: Has USAO helped you recognize yourself as an individual? Definitely, USAO has helped me in recog- nizing myself as an individual in relation to other members of society through the various courses of instruction I have taken this first trimester. I am a business major and have found that the business courses I have taken as well as IDS courses offer exposure to the specific requirements I will need in the business pro- fession as well as insight into my own personal worth. By the same token, USAO has aided in Hawakeningi' me to the importance of be- coming more confident in many areas. I might also add that USAO has enlightened my interest in many other areas besides business. It has created some questions in my mind as tc additional career areas because USAO instruc- tors have made other areas of learning ir different fields equally important. Virginia Warner iestionz Do you feel people accept you for tat you are? I believe before one can accept me, they ust accept themselves. I also think the idents at USAO all seek knowledge of not ily what they see but also of what is lyond the limits of their senses. We can't j be 4.0 studentsg but we can be our own tique individual and give something more an grades, "Friendship," David Saner Question: Do you feel people accept you for what you are? Forum human is unique in his own way. If one generates a feeling ofwarmth and sincerity it truly will be perceived by others. Mind, as it has now been determined, is a series of electrical impulses. but with one vital factor of FEELING added. If it were not for feeling, man himselfwould perform like a robot. I accept myself. and I feel others accept me also, Each and every individual Being a hometown girl, I have observed a complete metamorphosis, and I have had the opportunity to be involved in that change of growthg from OCW, a refined college for women, into OCLA. a coeducational establishment of high expectations, and finally into a fine university. A university of which I am proud to be a part! Because I am a seeker of truth and a student of human behavior, USAO has helped me recognize my potential, by providing me with a challenge. A unique challenge which has helped me to answer two of the most important questions ofa lifetime . . .Who am I? Who do I want to he? Man is set apart as 'funique' from all other animals, through his mysterious faculty of self-awareness. and his capacity to evaluate his experience. USAO has provided me with the learning experience that is necessary to embark upon the journey of life. Because of my capacity to evaluate my life experiences, my journey will indeed be lighter. Sunny Parker Question: Do you feel people accept you for A what you are? It seems that my high school was really htmg up on stereotypes. Since I am and I - always have been a singer, everyone seemed to be concerned as to whether I was straight or not. It seems that no one wanted to admit that someone had a talent that he or she did not have. College, therefore, is really a breath of fresh air, USAO is a very liberal minded school. The . people here for the majority are very mature in the way that they think about people as R .. individuals. I really feel that I am accepted here. I am proud to be a new part of this campus community, and I am looking for- ward to my next three years here at USAO. I think it will be a very rewarding exper- ience. I hope that everyone else will have the same feeling I have. Paul R. Fenwick X s 3' JMU 'gPairs," "couples," "two of a kind," or three as the case might be. all seein to be descriptive of the students at USAO. Take Spanky and "his Gang" Cpleasellj, three Canning Hall residents, a typical sight on most any day. Then, there is the "Dynamic Duo" Cindy Hooper and Katherine Madden, and "The Odd Couple" Pam Bryant and her "friend" p ,iw1wfff f-bf Wqfggwf 1 3, I r Q , iii Wm hz 'QW 'Y 3' I gsm 'Couples II'-a sequal to page 20. But seriously folks, here's more info on that plague-couple-itis. It strides fast, unseen, and is always fatal to loners. Christie and Jeff Cochran au naturale- their everyday run-of-the-mill appearance. Vickie, you're going to have to stop dropping the door tag on John's head. He actually believes that he's a star and Reynold's Wrap just doesnlt go with the door. Well, not everyone is part of a twosome just ask Tracy De Laughter. Maybe it has something to do with his wardrobe? ,,:y ,W ifx pw xi M E' 'ffm' 1,34-,M ig JV wr A A ' 1 e w ,? fa, Other student pastimes range from photography to girl-watching to eating to music to sleeping. The cafeteria seems to be the favorite topic of conversation. You can always hear someone commenting on the excellence of the food. Well, one down and two to go-the cafeteria food is on the rampage again. "Plop, plop, fizz, fizz. Oh, what a relief it is!" the Alka Seltzer song presented to you by Julia Dyck and Lori Lucero. No, that's not a fatality, is it? Thatls Mike Daubenspeck after his stomach had a run in with the cafeteria food-and it was one of the better days. Z c st . .-'e . M t QM. 'ir 24 The USAO student body is regulated by a student association patterned after the governing bodies ofthe United States. The Student Association controls the alloca- tion of funds to the student organizations for their projects. Executive Brunch: Wayne Wickham President Larry Simmons VieeAPresident Jolm Montgomery- -Attorney General Marty Aclkinson-'Seeretary Legislative Branch: Susan Vietzke, Christi Curtis, Stacy Davis, Debbie Hodges, Connie Allen, Diana Wight, Pete Cochran, Brad Ableson, Rick McCormick, Randy Lloyd, Ric Baser, Jeff Cochran, Twilla Carr fx '-J' RQPWPQFW V-If 'Y '?N!?K?N'8 V ' fi fri' :S f QSTUDE T co T. s'What's up Doc?" could be queried of Senate advisor Jerry Holt's expression. Senator Jeff Cochran ponders a motion presently on the floor. Dave Cochran, Student Activity Commission Chairman, plays D.J. at a party. Randy Lloyd senator, obviously finds senate meetings entertaining. MU N. The Model United Nations is an organization which conducts an annual mock United Nations session for high school students. Students who are involved in MUN play the roles of various United Nations officials. The High School students who attend this seminar act as representatives of different countries. Gina Benzel is the Secretary-General of MUN and Dr. Dexter Marble is the faculty advisor. Members of MUN hold regular meetings and work hard to prepare for the upcoming session Members shown Shannon Damron Y.. John Gatliff i'i' x"'-PM Patti Farmer if w,,,,.-,,.,, ,,s,, ,,,m.,-,,,-N X A---, M' "eee f"e "'e'i" N ' H WII f ' """""' N e s U M ,, , ,,,, if pggy mam V Brad Ableson ixlxjimi in rr. ' XXX WND Q3ClENCE C LUIS The Mind Science Club promotes an interest in the study of psychology. The club only formed this year, but has been active in various events. Among the campus activities that the Mind Science Club participated in are the campus carnival and the end-of-the-trimester film festival. Members shown: Pamela Koehn, Jorga Gregg, Lonnie Walthall, Dave Cochran, Luke Williams, Pete Cochran, Marty Niens, Robin Kickingbird, Shirley Heilman, Dr. Egan- Club Advisor Officers: Jorga Gregg, Shirley Heilman, Pam Koehn Z DC UQ? The ARGUS staff consists of students who contribute a great deal of their time to producing a quality yearbook. This year the staff has worked even harder to publish a book which is representative of all of the student body. Members shown: Stan White, Gigi Neniputour. Kent Foster, Paul Fenwick, Lisa Beaudoin. Gayla Barring- ton. Diana Wight, Cindy Hooper. Dana Clark, Debbie Hodges 'Q- 'WSP 'CLS' -KZ' hu- TQE D The TREND is the University Community newspaper. The staff tries to inform students, faculty and administra- tion of the many different campus activities which occur during the year. They have been working very diligently to provide a paper which is both informative and entertaining. Steve Harvey stepped in during the Spring Trimester to become acting Editor. Members shown: John Crump-Director of Student Pub- lications, Christi Curtis, Lori Lucereo, Larry Simmons, Steve Harvey-Editor, John Montgomery mf Y T r 'Qs -1 V L CCDMM. CL li The communication club has been estab- lished in order to further an understanding of human communication and human relations. The members of the club have attended several seminars in order to gain more knowledge in the field of communication. Members shown Mike Daubenspeck, Loyce England, Susan Vietzke, Barbara Able, Larry NelsonwClub Advisor, Leroy Lee, Charlie Drew, Jerry Smith fr 5 HQME EC. CL B The home economics club offers fellowship to the many students who are interested in home economics as a career. The home economics club sponsored two parties during the fall trimester. These activities were a tasting party and a Christmas party. Members shown: Gwen Craig, Lisa Sears, Karen Richard- son, Joan Pellan, Connie Fulton, Patty Farmer, Teresa Lingle, Pam Rucker, Glenda Owen Officers: Mary Alice Morris-Club Advisor, Connie Fulton, Gwen Craig, Joyce Gran, Lisa Sears, Joan Pellan lgueic e t. Uri? Throughout the year the Music Depart- ment has offered various types of entertainment for the campus community. Fantasia: Janet Mackey, Paula Morton, Brenda Streber, Rocki Bran tes Faculty Music Group: Barbara Geary. Mark Eichner, Tony Gon- zalez, Elaine Maxwell, Horace English Julia Dyck one of the members of Pure Gold captivates the audience with her singing ability. -su 9 il WX' 'Nt Maestrosingers: Stacy Davis, Gina Haygood, Fran Allen, Tanya Whitefield. Diana Wight, Paula Morton, Nita Stewart, Rhonda Willeford, Marilyn Muse, Ophelia Moore, Brenda Porton, Julia Dyck, Janet Mackey, Paul Fen- wick, Mike Dauhenspeck, Mark York, Marty Adkinson, Jerry Smith, Tracy De Laughter, Kirk Ramsey Richard Carmen and Derwood Stephen- son are shown playing at one ol' the jazz band concerts. Pure Gold: Paul Fenwick, Kirk Ramsey, Marilyn Muse, Lori Lucero, Marla Morris. Mike Dauben- speck, Bill Bullock, Max Ridgeway, Richard Austin, Jaroine Adams H 3. 1 2 lf5.c3.U. Although the Baptist Student Union is sponsored and funded by the Southern Baptist Churches, it welcomes all students. The activities sponsored by the BSU consist of unoondayf' a time for sharing and fellowship, Bible study, and "encounter," which deals with students feelings about the current topics of the day. This year the BSU had a Howdy Party for all new students at USAO, a hayride and weinie roast, and a Valentine party. Members Shown: Larry Bates, Ken Shiplet-Director, Darrell Hutson, Gary Kennedy, Mike Daubenspeck, Bill Sizemore, Tommy Hay, Brenda Scheller, Fran Allen, Mildred Dewberry, Pam Bryant, Karen Lusby, Tanya Whitefield, Kathy Peters, Susan Vietzke, Debbie Green , WMV X if V ,Madam-V Web., CL + The pemm club is an organization that promotes fellowship among students who are interested in careers in health, physical education, and recreation. One of the events sponsored by the pemm club this year was a campout for their members. The pemm club is open to all physical education majors and minors. Members shown: Cindy Hooper, Barbara Roberts, Kathy Kinsey, Tammy Smith. Christi Rainey, Bonnie Conder. Katherine Madden, Connie Kaus, Gayla Barrington. Teresa Persinger, Judy Brooks. Charlene Kell, Angel Craw- ford, Joyce Laflin --Club Advisor. Nancy OsbornfClub Advisor, Eddie Callahan, Ed Marshall, Keith Shaw, Tim Persinger, Nor- man Hall, Rick McCormick, Tom Sandersf Club Advisor Officers: Joyce Latlin, Barbara Roberts, Judy Brooks, Kathy Kinsey, Tammy Srnith. Christi Rainey, Nancy Osborn 5'-Ui H1 l3CDLl. SCI. DDE-LAW CL B Throughout the academic year the political sciencefpre-law club promoted an interest in political awareness among the student body. The club sponsored a Hlm festival in October and also held several social meetings, The club also held a mock trial in the Spring trimester. Members shown: Dr. KimfClub Advisor, Conni Allen, Lisa Beaudoin, Wayne Wickham, James Merritt, Stacey West, Diana Wight, Larry Simmons, Ric Baser. John Montgomery, Jane Tram- mell, Delano Stephens st liQ.ll.C. The Residence Hall Council, composed of representatives of all of the USAO resident halls made recommendations to improve on-campus living facilities. The club met regularly in order to discuss solutions to the problems that on-campus students might face. Members shown: Jerry Hale-Willard Hall Director, Sarah Blalock, Jean Stone, Cecil Sellers, David Saner, Jarome Adams, Pete Cochran, Cathy Brown, Lori Myers, Debbie Brotherton, Bruce Carter, Frank Ross, Mark Peterson-Club Advisor BIBLE CH llf2 The Bible Chair is an organization supported through the Church of Christ. Students are invited to come to the Bible Chair and use their recreation room. Members of the Bible Chair often go on field trips to points of interest. The Bible Chair holds weekly devotionals for all students. This year the Bible Chair sponsored a Christmas party. Members shown: Jay Smith, Gary Higgins, Robert McClanahan, Bruce Utley, Mary Rice, Betty Scott, Sharen Utley, Kenny Talbert, Lavissa Tillis, Elizabeth Talbert, Allan Peterson, Janet Foust, Anita Stewart, Susan Roberti rag thc'STl2EET DL rm The seventeenth street players, a club which promotes an interest in Drama, has become more active this year. Members of the club often star in USAO's Drama productions as well as help with the advertising of the performances. The seventeenth street players also sponsor a concession stand at the plays in order to earn money to help cover the cost of each production. Members shown: Jim Merritt, Stacy Davis, Barry Brown, Mike Daubenspeck, Linda Hodges, Lori Lucero, Tamara McDonald, John Stover, Vicki Samara Officers: Linda Hodges, John Stover, Barry Brown .,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,s , SPEECH Q5 MDI C CLUB The speech and hearing club promotes a better understanding of speech path- ology and deaf education. The club also provides the services of the John A. Morris Speech and Hearing Clinic. The members of the club raised funds by sponsoring a cake walk at the Campus Carnival and by selling stationery. Members shown: Barbara Grogan, Shirley Buchanan, Kathy Baker, Darlene Williams, Nancy Sleeper, Nedra Sanders, Jeff Meadows, Mark Branson, Bruce Carter, Twila Carr, Debbie Brotherton, Brenda Streber, Nancy Shaw, Peggy Eise, Jean Stone, Lori Myer, Teresa Carter, Trina Meadows, Richard Manning Officers: Larry Hawkins-Club Advisor, Lori Myer, Richard Manning, Jean Stone, Twila Carr, Kathy Baker, Nedra Sanders SA. . The main function of the Student Activities Board is to provide social activities which appeal to the majority of USAO students. SAB has sponsored or co-sponsored several on-campus events. Among these events are the Howdy Picnic and Dance, Halloween Dance, the Tinsel Ball and the end-of-the-tri film festival. Although the membership of SAB is small, the organization does a good job in providing social activities for students. Members Shown: Lugene Livingston, Sophie Laurenzana, Dr. Magrath-Club Advisor, Patti Farmer, Loyce England, Barbara Able. , V,,... I QS .Eh The Student National Education As- sociation is a professional organization for students who are interested in teaching careers. Members of SNEA meet per- iodically to discuss new developments and ideas in the field of education. SNEA officers: Mary Braly, Robina Harmon, Sherry Woolwine, Martie Brooks QT CL B The art club tries to cultivate a greater interest in art. The club does this by spon- soring art shows. The members of the club also hold several bake sales to earn money. The club helps art majors to become better acquainted with each other. and develop a stronger feeling for their field ot' study. Members shown: James Dudding---Club Advisor. Billy Cable, Jeannie Cavel. Sunny Carrigan, Kent Lamar -Club Advisor. Billy Mirth. Tony Hazelrig, Elizabeth Talbert. Barbara Adkins. Shelly Manning. Doug Roundtree. James Eakins, Gayla Mitchell. Tamara Paige. Barbie McCloskey. Rocki Brantes Officers: Barbie McCloskey. Glen Thomas. Sunny Carrigan. Kent Lamar. Barbara Adkins, James Dudding, Sally Anderson Members of Who's Who Among Students ln American Colleges And Universities: Gwen Aylor, Ric Baser, Christie Cochran, Pete Cochran, Adeyemi Cole, Janet Baxter, Larry Crump, Connie Fulton, Robina Har- mon, Terri Henderson, Anita Howeth, Karen Lusby, Susan McGrew, Kathy Paige, Shirley McKinney, Joan Pelland, Gary Rogers, Janet Rice, Abdol Simrooni, Nancy Smith, Jean Stone, Michael Thiriot, Theresa Tiger, Clara Traywick, Wayne Wickham, Mary Braly. Members of Pi Gamma Mu: Nancy Smith, Dr. Warren Kim, Glen Brown, Barbara Scott, Art Scott, Brad Ableson, Charlotte Hinson, Abdol Simrooni, Dave Cochran, Dr. Sam Evans, Robina Harmon, Doug Sikes, Bill Rice, John Anderson, Dr. Dexter Marble Members of Alpha Lambda Delta: Teresa Glass, Kimberly Pearson, Susan Vietzke, Linda Hart, Sarah Elder, Anita Howeth, Sharon Beller, Pam Cobb, Mitzi Cook, Dr. Floyd Coppedge, Kathy Paige, Charlotte Hinson, Ademyei Cole, Sue Baxter, Scott Davis, Sam Boodle, Dr. Elsie Null Qrgani ations Members of Sigma Alpha Iota: Gwen Aylor, Janet Rice, Karen Lusby, Kathy Tate Members of Phi Beta Lambda: Debbie Lavin, Nancy Price, Connie Allen Linda Hart, Sue Baxter, Anita Howeth, Kathy Paige, Mary Ann Goin-Club Advisor Richard Marshall, Ani-Bee, Aaron Price, Jon Hines Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges is a nationwide honor society honoring outstanding Juniors and Seniors. Pi Gamma Mu is a national social society. Alpha Lambda Delta is a national honor society for freshmen. Sigma Alpha Iota is a national honorary pro- fessional music society. Phi Beta Lambda is a professional organi- zation for students interested in business careers. 1 w Cr anlzations have Fun! The students and faculty members at USAO found out just how much fun belonging to an organization could be. Lisa Beaudoin and Mike Daubenspeck, members of the TREND staff took time out to pose for this picture! What are you holding over Lisais head, Mike? The club carnival proved to be a fun and exciting event, just ask Dr. Marble! George McAtee and Roger Drummond, advisors of the 17th Street Players, could always be found in the costume room playing dress up! ., . ,- tsi s 11532 "'i 'E X if ,fn 'ttt r" 1-' - '- was I m 4 8 W l 5 5 , . 3 2 1 YS es- Clubs often sponsored events through- out the year. Many students learned how fun and exciting it could be to belong to a club. Dave Cochran, member of the Mind Science club, runs the projector at a film festival sponsored by the club. Members of the Biology Pre-Health club wait anxiously for food at a picnic held by them in the fall. The Indian Club sponsored a booth at the club carnival and Janelle Paddlety volunteered to work at it. E KDE CLASS Kevin Baharlou Phillip Barnes Ric Baser Mary Braly Mark Branson Bobby Bridges Judy Brooks Martha Brooks Ric Baser became known for his talent in mime at the schools he attended before USAO. Things didn't change when he came here for he was asked to perform at a variety of functions and places. Here we see him doing his act called the Tic Toc Man. :Univ-. ffl Shirley Buchanan Michael Cameron Peter Cochran Robert Cochran i - Many times students can be seen with Pen in hand for some reason or another. Micheal Cameron has his pen in hand answering some questions for one of his classes. Pete Cochran was seen with pen and clipboard in hand writing down the statistics at the watermelon- seed spitting contest. Adeyemi Cole Larry Crump Patty Farmer Connie Fulton Robana Harmon Tony Hazelrigg Daniel James Sharlene Kell Lonnie Landrum Vicki Marquis 4 'ZQDQ2 md' W I Barbara McCloskey Rhonda McCurley Pike Festus Mgbeme Gayla Mitchell John Montgomery Laura Montgomery Mehdi Movahedi Oreta Pelley Barbara Pendleton Mohammad NematPour Nina Powers Aaron Price The name USAO can be seen almost anywhere and at anytime. Here we see that Gayla Mitchell wears a USAO T-shirt while displaying her art work, and Mohammad NematPour, his wife Gigi, and Dr. English wear the USAO badge at a function they were attending. ,as ' 352 ,. ' f J ' K n! X35 V v Tana Ryan Vicki Samara Nedra Sanders ,Q , Laverne Schickedanz 1'-.np , ... ,. for 6 "PIE ABE 'nn-: FEA' wnrunrzn wAn'r H55 ,nxt 9 if dk , ig ., , - .f . - 'IW ,X I.- Expressions! Boy can they vary. Cecil Sellars displays an unusual expression here as he is placed in a straight-jacket at the USAO carnival. Vicki Samara displays a happy Cfunnyj expression as she reads something amusing in the paper. Y Andy Scurlock Cecil Sellers Larry Simmons Jean Ann Stone Elizabeth Talbert Portia Whiteshield Nita Williams Wayne Wickham LCDWEIQ CLASSES Conni Allen Fran Allen Bi Jan Davani Kit Andruss Sandy Avery Mildred Bates Lisa Beaudoin Sharon Beller Gina Benzel Reginald Bidding Bi Jan Davani participated in the Halloween festivities this year because he wanted to prove that ghosts could drink. Ani-Bee Abiodun Brad Ableson Larry Absher Ibe Alexander I V7 Cynthia Bivins Twanna Bivins Roxane Brantes Debbie Brotherton ,,f,,.W ,,-,V gk Gayla Barrington Marty Barton Phyllis Brown Darrell Bruer Pam Bryant Cheryl Buchanan Bill Bullock Karen Carrigan Sunni Carrigan Twila Carr ,faith Bruce Carter The Sophomore talents at USAO are displayed in many forms. Bill Bullock is seen revealing his talent for composing, while Bruce Carter displays one of the more popular and natural talents of taking a break. , 74 . James Clark Pam Cobb Christie Cochran Jeff Cochran Susan Collins Rose Crose Christi Curtis Mike Daubenspeck Stacy Davis Sally Deevers Happiness . . . It can be found in many different ways. Christi Curtis seems to always be happy about having her picture taken. Happiness for Mike Daubenspeck and Marla Morris seems to be performing with Pure Gold at different places in Oklahoma. George Carty Jeannie Cavel Otis Cheadle Dana Clark .hp f--www Tracy Delaughter Julia Dyck James Eakins Sarah Elder Cecille Beverly Elwood Charles Elwood Ruby Evans Paul Fenwick John Gatliff Farag Gibali Jorja Gregg Sherry Hart Melvin Hartley Tommy Hay Haynes Play productions helped to keep student actors and actresses active. Bill Bullock and Julia Dyck, stars of "Little Mary Sunshine," try to decide on a publicity picture to be used in the local paper, and Paul Fenwick finally gets to sing a solo in "Little Mary Sunshine." Cindy Hooper Marcus Hughes Collins Ikwagwu Ali Jooybari Connie Kaus Kathy Kinsey Pam Koehn Hossien Dywanfard James Heacock Mike Herron .Ion Hines Deborah Hodges Wanda Lagaly Students seem to be everywhere on campus. Cindy Hooper and Katherine Madden appear to be enjoying UD a meal in the cafeteria, while Jon Hines anticipates the enjoyment of rappelling off the roof of Davis Hall. Debbie Lavin Lynn Lee David Leonard Randy Lloyd QL Lori Lucero Janet Mackey Katherine Madden Shelly Manning Richard Marshall Cindy Massey James McClure Terri McClure , ,5 g, L . B1 V,'f"?-s.,,.'Nk1 ,Lj.:i,,f .r,,r gf, t Xl, ' -,321 ' "'ff"a,4' Hi' Nm ' 'EY' I R' f," . ' x A 'Han' A , ' ffl. 1 X vs- W 'ra W 'wa V vii 'J' Ms,-x ' ' .. N 3? a 5 ' ' ' Q- .,,, . - ff! - 5, ..,,- QQ ' I 4, a Q I I - Karel McDaniel Tamara McDonald Terry McGrath Concentration can be observed on the faces of Richard Marshall and Randy Lloyd. Richard concentrates on his pool game, and Randy takes a break long enough to study the TREND. Donna Miller Jon Minton Muftah Mohamed Linda Moore Sylvia Moore Marla Morris Paula Morton Georgette NematPour Anifowoshe Olasubomi Craig Patterson Students often take time out to relax. Marla Morris finds relaxation in singing, while Paula Morton prefers the comfort of lying under a blanket. Susan McKenna Shirley McKinney Jeff Meadows James Merritt III Micheal Palmer Larry Pearson Kathy Peters Graylen Pierce A -A-at . . Dennis Polk Nancy Price Kirk Ramsey Gina Rice X Darrell Richardson Susan Roberti Frank Ross Doug Rowntree David Saner Brenda Scheller Betty Scott Although studying plays a big part in student life Brenda Scheller is seen taking time out from studying to participate in the club carnival, while Dave Saner is seen taking a break to read a letter. Roberta Smith Tammy Smith Brenda Sproul Anita Stewart Brenda Streber Brenda Stringfellow John Stover Ademola Tairu-Balogun Barilynn Taylor Brenda Taylor Students seem to be constantly on the go for one reason or another. John Stover dis- plays this as he flies down the stairs to his next class and Barilynn Taylor provides some refreshments for some friends at an intramural game. Mike Sinesio Desi Sites Bill Sizemore Brenda Smith 3 .twin ' Shirley Taylor Cindy Tedder Erin Thomas Jane Trammell Lois Ukoago Roger Van Laningham Susan Vietzke Kristy West Stacey West Diana Wight Ronald Willhoite Lenworth Williams Tony Wilkerson Joylene Wright Rebecca Wright USAO students seem to always have a class, a meeting, or a banquet of some type to attend. Here Diana Wight, a Sophomore Student Senator, tries to appear incognito at one of the regular Monday night Senate meetings, while Lois Ukoaga lights up the Y- Q Qi. room with her bright smile at the Foreign Students Reception banquet. ME ' TENN The USAO Drovers Tennis Team members are Phillip Barnes, Marcus Hughes, Eddie Callahan, Dennis Wallis and Coach Larry Scroggins. At the beginning of the Spring Trimester Dr. Tom Sanders took over the position of tennis coach. Marcus Hughes received the Most Valuable Player Award at the All Sports Banquet and Billy Brown received the Most Improved Player Award. X, , WCDlVlEN'c3 TENN Q3 illliliig The members of the USAO Women's Tennis Team include Terri Henderson, Kerry VanEss, Judy Brooks, Coach Joyce Laflin, Susan McGrew, Kelly Hart and Mary Davis. With Joyce Laflin resigning her position, Dr. Sanders assumed the position of Tennis coach during the Spring Trimester. Taking awards at the All Sports Banquet were Judy Brooks-Most Valu- able Player and Kathy Kinsey-Most Improved Player. Terri Henderson received the Academic Award. , H., ,, .. W, Mya,-.w4, H, M--4 Av. P" ,,,-Mg, A -uh ,gh 'nf . KW. ,,, My , aw 'Y ,,.,E4,.,.m: Q, new . L g, 4 4, .W if, 'fr ,, W , . ,a W-.R ,,,. V: I . ,L arf-4. m,.4,.. V ,,,.,,, ,.,, av win wa 4' My-wwf li ,, ,,, M ,,,,,,1,w 444: "Bi- ,Way - . mf. ,wi-,'u,f--W ,.,,,,,,ng. 7 ,W .sk , .. ,,., ,,,. :,L ,.,,,,.,,.U9, 4 4,1 -,,. Jw AN: , I QL: 9 ,W ,,,, W 1 4455 f MW if my F ,tv way mnzff' fb 1 f 'um 'PF' .dum-,K wus-N,.M ,,,......-we 'mf' . . 'M x 'A 4 my 'N' wh 1 3-rf ,M ff" ,lf .....-1. ,,..Y..,..... Ulf? 'ww ' Y i5,.,...,.m f 3 , . - . ...- . ,V ., . M.. ,WN 'W wlgwig 2MZf,1'1"'bf?Q1'f4:f , ' 1+ N"'-- .--"'Nf+,-,,...WW-.,.1,-.,..,,. ,,,..-, . ' ' ff-'fn' +..4s wr-,f+...Ws.4.s.-, , . . , Q . + v ' L,,N,,?,,,f,,...,W, ,,.7,.4,,f, ,701 -Ng f ,,..w',.N4 A, t ' M f I I . Q ,V , ., 1 in i 4.f",,. I , 1. Vw -v 5 . .V M., , ,, , , -,V -'Q--.uw N'-..,...-.-,......,,, .W -,.,,, . Y . . X , , , , J gs A., f -4-1 .... ,WM' ,el , ,-.o-4 M BASKETB LL t Q.-la :s,,,.,gp llvffp gave 38 -W., Q- .,,4 'D' ' Throughout the past year the USAO Drovers Basketball team worked diligently to make this one to be proud of. They finished with 16 wins and 19 losses. Receiving awards for outstanding performance on the basketball court were Kenny McCaster-Most Valuable Player, Daniel Stokley-Best All Around, Nor- man Hall-Best Free Throw Shooter. Jeffrey Jenkins received the Academic Award and Kenney McCaster also won the President's Award. GROUP PICTURE: First row: Reggie Forbes, Alton Kizer, Glenn Preston, Kenny McCaster, Tony Wilkerson, Norman Hall Second row: Rick McCormick, Terry McGrath, James Clark, Reggie Brown, James Perkins, Daniel Stokley, Coach Gene Davis Third row: Jeffrey Johnson, Craig Patterson, Lewis Hill, Dolan Leveen, Graylen Pierce, Stuart Owings XRBVE 4 2 W, 'WX J' N inn. iw- USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO Langmon Panhandle Aggies Northeastern Southwestern Cameron Aggies Southeastern Howard Payne Langmon Wayland Pioneers Southeastern Savages Pan American University Lamar University Texas A8Ll University St. Mary's Henddx Arkansas Tech Forthays State Fort Hays State Arkansas State Southwestern Bulldogs OBU Bison Phillips Haymakers Cameron OCC Eagles Bethany Nazarene Panhandle BNC Redskins Okla. Baptist University Phillips Haymakers Wayland Pioneers Okla. Christian Phillips University Bethany Nazarene Okla. Christian Southwestern 1 V35 KL is ,px X.-f -'Ku' D' X 54- Nz fl as . I With a deadly eye Glenn Preston looks toward the basket for a free throw. Daniel Stokley muscles his Way over 21 defender to tie a much needed jump ball in the Drovers direction. Glen Preston drives through a crowd under the basket to make a lay up, Terry McGrath drives around a defender looking for an open man. Mews. Q .ii , ::':"s', use s itat.. 'Qu is VN xo 5 3 A i . X . If g i i i :N E 'i ' ? 4: at 5 5 l i ke K , X K will k'-r f ff 5 l ls 51 ,X Q'- , gs .ak :Asst se 5 if . at xv? QS' With his eyes looking toward the goal Daniel Stokley drives around a Cameron defender. Alton Kizer dunks two points for the Drovers. Kenny McCaster leaps into the air to pull down a rebound. Norman Hall passes the ball in basketball action against Langston. if . . .,. .I 5 0. is- .,., . . ... e e i N -,xg lf vi at in Q5 ' 48 5. ,N r 'Q XXZQMENTS BAQSKETB LL Through much hard Work and determin- ation the Droverettes made themselves known throughout the state. The Drover- ettes placed fourth in the Regionals before coming home. Receiving awards at the Sports Banquet were Ruby EvansfMost Valuable Player, Dee Wylie-Best All Around, and Gayla Barrington and Phyllis BrownfMost lm- proved. Janet Pitts-Most Rebounds. GROUP PICTURE: First row: Cindy Hooper, Kathy Kinsey,DeeWylie, Tammy Smith Second row: Connie Kaus, Katherine Madden, Shirley Temple, Joan Christian, Janet Pitts, Phyllis Brown, Gayla Barrington, Angel Crawford, Teresa Persinger, Ruby Evans USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO USAO 62 NORTHWESTERN 67 SOUTHWESTERN 57 SOUTHEASTERN 69 CAMERON 74 EL RENO JC 53 MIDWESTERN, TX 49 SOUTHEASTERN 54 NEOSU 43 EL RENO JC 68 PANHANDLE 64 NORTHWESTERN 45 LANGSTON 63 OCC 45 CAMERON 65 CENTRAL STATE 71 OBU 67 SOUTHWESTERN 56 OCC 54 BNC 52 MIDWESTERN, TX 63 BNC 71 OBU 57 PANHANDLE 67 PHILLIPS 55 LANGSTON 70 CENTRAL STATE STATE TOURN. 52 PANHANDLE 73 LANGSTON 60 SOUTHEASTERN 53 NORTHWESTERN REGIONAL TOURN. 40 ARKANSAW TECH 60 ANGELO STATE ..,1uowwww..t...,.m,.m 33 Awww . f""--MV T,1Q4 . Phyllis Brown leaps high to grab a rebound. Pausing for a quick time out, Coach Willie Hamilton gives his team some last minute instructions. All eyes look to the basket as Phyllis Brown lets go for a jump shot. Cindy Hooper and Ruby Evans race up the court. Connie Kaus' eyes follow the ball as Katherine Madden slioots a free tlirow. Janet Pitts lets tlie ball tly tlirougli the air for a possible two points. Cindy Hooper lobs tlie ball over the head of a defender. Dee Wylie looks for an open teammate. Kathy Kinsey and Gayla Barrington look anxiously toward the court forthe next play. xl ,, VVVV ww- ! Y 'Pi . - n . ,Q1,,,1, x fflf Q ww va W , EL Q Q fi 'V vw A5 , Y fi ,wifi -3 JE, 4 f . ff fi? f , AX, 1 W , W 'E -.fif K K 'Qu-. f 1. 1 ,3l N 4 13 In order to have a good team, time must be set aside for practice. The members of the Drovers and Droverettes basketball teams knew this to be true. Practice is essential in making a game run smoothly. The Droverettes, Ruby Evans, skies for the tip. The Drovers always came out of the dressing room ready to win. Cindy Hooper eyes a possible rebound. A quick run around the field sets the scene for a day of practice. James Perkins and Kenny McCaster kid around in the dorm before a game. Dee Wylie dribbles up the floor during one of many practice sessions. is ii .ff 30" ..., ,MQ N ,,g f ir hmm Qifiwfw 1 , 5 2f'gH ,V :F 'fb' 'iv' ff 14 igiray , Q25 Q M M I-ff,Wx.,f ! . ev . . -ff lx Y A 1 'Z V fu 4 :9 . ,, , 6 V gf . ' -H J E A' ' 'Q 'Mmwf - Wwhxfkyiwy Q 4' ' 7 ' ffe 2 fwwigvumwwwww 6 f- ' . gf! 'X J' , -1 I f H-,f 'b', ,, , A f L 'J , + Intramural Football and Basketball proved to be interesting sports last fall. Everyone who participated had a fairly good time and everyone always got to play. The defense is ready for the next play as Stan White hikes the ball. Wayne Wickman and Jon Hines tackle Pete Cochran as he catches the ball. Richard Marshall outsmarts defenders and heads for the bucket. Jeff Cochran passes the ball and an unknown defender jumps up to deflect the pass. P. T. Barnes shoots high over the hands of Jeff Cochran for two points. Controversy was an apparent factor in the intramural basketball and football games. Members of the Force try to figure out the FFFB's next play. HF' r 3 .,.. t -LJ , , .lQ. ,,,, I H ,, , 5954 ,.. A ,M 'QS 52' 4 my if f 4 +1 W P W 49 4' 4 fn 4 J: -f X, i , f V' 1 fi' F Z' "N ' 3 , AB" f 5 'A f' k " 'H , W Wm , ' W f 4 f- 'f M Intramural volleyball was played earlier this spring. Bill Sizemore and Richard Marshall struggle to hit the volleyball. Sharlene Kell smiles as Janet Pitts taps the ball over the net. Marcus Hughes shows great athletic form as he leaps to hit the ball. Janet Pitts and Sharlene Kell look on as Gilbert Jones smashes the ball over the net. Bill Sizemore jumps high to tip the ball over. Dave Saner stretches and hits the ball up and over the net. Tim Persinger leaps up to spike the ball. 1. ,A-351 swdiw. Intramural Softball had the largest turnout of the four intramural sports. Softball was held in the late spring. Many students and faculty members participated. Softball was the only Coed intramural sport and women were often an asset during the games. Herb Alberd strikes and misses. Mark Eichner makes a base hit. Gale Thorsen watches the pitcher warily. Hal Weisbein looks over home plate. Christi Curtis runs around the gym in a brisk workout. The HPER Students often gave swimming lessons to local children as a class assignment. The Tennis Team was the overall Champions of the Intramural Sports. They won the Softball, Basketball, and Volleyball titles. The FFFB won the football title but there was no picture available. etee mx i -in J' ,kNN""i..,.,,,,..,. ...-s.. . K' feii- ww V' an 1 ,g553.,j'.-Wg, E. he ,I - gf 1. . , are f e f' 4 Z H Q... WW, K ff.. " 4 f.,v ,,,1fw, , Y, , ,, f it si ziff if w J wa 4. .1 f 4 F v fa, , 1. W. E ,i- 1 f .ww 5 ggi aww... , I Q Mi my ,t'a i i ' , 4. it -1 Q I ,ggi M f .., , JA an-"" 2... .4-.,.v..-- svn.. w il J x as K .m.Mv.-me-m..4, .AW 4 all 5 Qif ' My M ' 1 V, ,M W j In . -,Q ,Xf"' . ,AE A , Jmgm 5 u 2 ,, 2 N Q M X u MS, MM .,.,...Wx- K 6 i ' RQ. il Q 1 Q g I WN ww M Q- QS., Q 'Sli .-fe NM Several recreation classes were offered during the Spring Trimester with an active enrollment in all. The tennis class offered excitement for some people and disgust for others. Fencing, however, proved to be a very competitive and rewarding sport. These classes not only taught the rules of these sports, but also the spirit of competitiveness which was stressed along with the regulations of the game. R ,F 55. Www'-.-?l....,,,,,,, R M -an 2, gs 4 1 2 A3 H .5 3 4 . ,. ' , Q was if ,Q 4 fs 1- 'E - f 5' .' Wi1,f1f4 A Q s.. U F' -kann Cheerleaders and Twirlers were elected this year as Drover supporters. Pictured on the right are: l. Conni Hinkle, Diane Le Comte, Betty Scott, Karel McDaniel 2. Nancy Clarke, Bruce Carter, Jerry Smith, Donnie Sheppard, not shown, Tracy Delaughter Connie Allan and Nancy Price added a little spice to halftime with their twirling routines. They were accompanied hy the USAO Pep Band. Karel McDaniel and Jerry Smith pose for a picture during cheerleading practice. 4 I ! i a 93 w - c r P i STATE E. T. Dunlap Chancellor of Oklahoma State .V System of Higher Education DECE TCS Bob F. Allee Vice-Chairman Joe F. Gary Ruby M. Hall Chairman Bert H. Mackie James L, Mills Assistant Secretary Scott E. Orbison Secretary John H. Patten Eugene L. Swearingen Russell D. Vaught XA Kathryn Empic Chairman of USAO Board Of Regents Oklahoma City UQ? BCD QD CDF IQECE T Gary Bryant Oklahoma City John Hudson Chickasha John Jarboe Tulsa Mary Ellen Jennings Secretary Bartlesville Scott Ousley Marlow Jack P. Wallace Vice Chairman Tulsa DIQESIDE T Dr. Roy Troutt has served as President at USAO for the past four years. The President is the chief officer of the university faculty and administrative staff. He presides at faculty meetings and recommends to the Board of Regents promotions and dismissals. Furnishing information to the Board of Regentsg maintaining general oversight and control of the public information program of the universityg and defining and interpreting certain principles, objectives and philoso- phies concerning the campus, are a few of Dr. Troutt's responsibilities. IQ VICE DDE IDE Tc? The Vice Presidents of USAO work many hard hours improving and maintaining the academic standards of the university. They also supervise the curriculum that is taught at USAO. This includes constant evaluation of the curriculum in terms of the stated philosophy and aims of the university. These men assist in the selection, orientation and evaluation of staff. They also recommend instructional staff for retention, dismissal or assignment. The Vice Presidents coordinate the work of several departments. They maintain general supervision over the library, academic services, school relations, and student services. Floyd Coppedge Vice President for Academic Affairs Bill Smith Vice President for the University Community Clyde Spruell Vice President for Fiscal Affairs I , 'fk x, O0 fXDMlNlcSTL2 TWE STAFF Jack Hudson Director of Admissions Mark Peterson Director of Student Development The Administrative Staff at USAO aids the students in their financial needs and in the enrollment process. They represent USAO in the areas of Public Relations, Student Development, and Records and Admissions. Their primary duty is to answer students questions concerning University procedures. .lohn Crump Director of Public Relations Gale Thorsen Director of Financial Aids his--1 T Virginia Embree Alumni Director DIQQF EQSQSICDNA STAFF Lonnie Emhoolah Indian Counselor Diane Gantt University Nurse Ron Kemper Director of Printing Services Thomas Montgomery Director of Fiscal Affairs Hal Pike Director of Data Processing Pam Williams-Emmons Student Counselor The Professional Staff is valuable to the entire University Community. Through the various services they offer, the students soon find the answer to their needs. Their services vary from counseling first year students to advising the graduating Senior. 10 O2 CE E12 L STAFF Nancy Bawden Secretary of University Community Esther Brown Head Cook Marian Coulter Accountant Joyce English Secretary of Central Steno Joan Gallups Secretary of Admissions Donald Hill Security The general staff is one of the most important staffs on campus. It is the responsibility of these people to see that everything on campus runs smoothly. Among the general staff are the secretar- ies, cooks, accountants, security officers, and the PBX Operator. Josey Ketcher Secretary of Financial Aids Marjorie Moore PBX Operator Suzanne Palmer Secretary of Student Development Paula Peterson Secretary of Admissions 10 O Betty Rubcrts licmkkcupcr lfisuul .M'i':iirs Malrgzurul Sncll Cashier Ifiscul Affairs Priscilla Splawn Payroll Clerk Nadine Wright Secretary of Fiscal Affairs A -.:,i l Debbie Ricks Secretary of Public Relations LNG Qian , " 3 y LIBQAQ STAFF Mildred Dehart William Martin- Director Katherine Montgomery Betty Jean Pruitt Martha Woltz 10 O Zark 622163 H1315 f. 7611616611 7771111 if 1 J J ' Z Z , 1 15sf111i112:f,, .gffbgrzgj 11ZCg11z'cjy6111Z11.?? '66 1274116 ex 5111 05, , gif 6? 216011.51111 e171A1116s, 822 461.-Sf, QQSE ?C252? 6611 1f6:111f5. 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Z z6u6f01' 856222 0.260 11111512 30 011, 10 056 7065 611-6 16 111 0116 0 0116 Z 1 1' fs ' 1 1 f0r6u61'510116, ffC7ZZI' wife, ZIOI r 50 1. our 61r6z1'fSg 51027 13 jClCSCZZQ4 11612655 6050 40511 ZgZ2zJ1lS'Z 6155155-25:6 6311175 0-5!7O X055 556 ZYZHIZ- Jje 121-66111 217556111155 Q35 11011163 7119 jQ1Z211'55 155101106 1 be Zif6'JZfO'II?22H5g 50u1"1L1.'5.S,M 31715 1101721111 106 Z?I'?MQ6g5O , can 11111 6 15215 5Z'gZl61" CQJZZCG pa.-55, 01 fear sgozzr 5,0655 jronr Q36 511-61 U6. 516 11, Z9611.11.Z11JjffLc66156. 1 6 71211922 56 AFJUQ 01111 5f7?1'Z 11165 111 10 321 you gave, K7 'ukfv I 61, 1 7 JWF ,ff .fi..f'f 'ff i p46 tr Vx xi G v QQ ,,.. fr6,,i,"ifi rl Z' iliillfif S aff? sg. fi pf. ,.Q1g?, ,riffs 4-Pffn 4 .fri figgi Clark T. Bailey C1932-19781 School began on a tragic note when Clark Bailey was fatally injured in a hunting accident. Mr. Bailey was an internationally acclaimed artist and head of art department at USAO forthe past three years. One of Bailey's sculptures 1'Reflections, Images of America," was selected for an eighteen month tour. The exhibition included showings in Copenhagen, 5 vt til' 4 M 4 4' "iw 5.1 ir W' i . 791 t,lt,l . C K III f , ,M Stockholm, Lisbon and Paris. Works by Bailey were accepted for showing in the 37th, 38th, 39th, 40th, 42nd, and 44th annual exhibition by the National Sculpture Society in New York City. Mr. Bailey won various awards throughout his career. In 1967 he was awarded the S500 Mahonri Young Memorial Prize for traditional sculp- ture. ln 1973 he received the Elizabeth N. Watrous gold medal and cash award for his "Two Generations QGiraffesj.,' Mr. Bailey had works entered in art shows throughout Oklahoma and Texas. He had one man shows in Yukon, Oklahoma City, Tulsa, and Fort Smith, Ark. His sculpture "Crowned Cranef' was accepted for a Bicentennial exhibition in New York City. 107 108 FAC LTY Homer Arms is the Associate Pro- fessor of Chemistry. He has been at USAO since l958. He received his B.A. from Texas Western Collegeg his M.A. from Texas College of Arts and Industries. He did his advanced study at Oklahoma State Univer- sity and the University of Okla- homa. ef Judy Brawner is an instructor in Speech and Hearing Therapy. She received her B.S. from East Central State University and her M.Ed. from the University of Oklahoma. She began her teach- ing career at USAO in 1978. Charles T. DeShong is the Associate Professor of English and has been at USAO since 1977. He received his B.A. from the University of Tulsag his M.A. from the University of Oklahomag and his Ph.D. from the University of Tulsa. Roger B. Drummond is an Instructor in Drama. He received his A.B. from Marshall Universi- ty and his M.F.A. from Ohio University. He began his teaching career at USAO in 1978. S--.. X James F. Dudding is an Instructor in Art and has been at USAO since 1976, He received his B.A. from the University of New Mexico and he also received his M.A. from the University of New Mexico. Samuel W. Evans is a Professor of History and has been at USAO since 1947. He received his B.A. from Southwestern State Collegeg his M.A. from Oklahoma State Universityg and his Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma. He did his advanced study at the University of Nebraska. O Q t . K ,K Q I Q ' Z .f X I O 3. g . A . . 5 . Q I O s Larry J. Hawkins is an Assistant Instructor in Speech and Hearing Therapy. He received his B.A. from East Central State College and his M.S. from the University of Oklahoma. He began his teaching career at USAO in 1978. Jerry G. Holt is an Assistant Professor of English and has been at USAO since 1968. He received his B.S. from Oklahoma State Universityg his M.S. from the University of Oklahoma. He did his advanced study at the Univer- sity of Oklahoma. A. Kent Lamar is an Instructor in Art Education and has been at USAO since 1976. He received his B.A. at the Oklahoma College of Liberal Artsg his M.F.A. at Instituto Allende, University of Ganajuato. Lawrence K. Magrath is an Assist- ant Professor of Biology and has been at USAO since 1972. He received his B.S.E. and his M.S. from Kansas State Teachers College and his Ph.D. from the University ofKansas. J. Dex Marble is an Associate Professor of History and has been at U.S.A.O. since 1972. He received his B.A. at Stanford Universityg and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Texas Christian University. ,,,, pg r tiff: J. Sue Markham is an Instructor in Education and has been at USAO since 1974. She received her B.M. at the Oklahoma College for Womeng and her M.Ed. from the University of Oklahoma. She did her advanced study at the Univer- sity of Oklahoma. 12 Charles M. Mather is an Assis- tant Professor of Biology fZoologyJ and has been at USAO since 1976. He received his B.S. and M.S. from Stephen F. Austin State Universityg and his Ph.D. at Texas A8cM University. George F. McAtee is an Assistant Professor in Drama. He received his B.S. from Northern Arizona University and his M.A. from the University of Denver. He started his teaching career at USAO in 1978. Sally McBeth is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and Indian Studies. She received her B.A. from Michigan State University and her M.A. from Washington State University. She also did advanced study at Washington State University. Ms. McBeth has been teaching at USAO since 1977. Stuart Meltzer is the Associate Professor of French and has been at USAO since 1968. He received his B.A. from Hunter College and his M.A. at the University of North Carolina. He did his advanced study at the University of North Carolina. Kenneth D. Moore is the Assis- tant Proefessor of Education and has been at USAO since 1977. He received his B.A. and M.S.E. from Wichita State University, and his Ed.D. from the University of Houston. Lawrence D. Nelson is an Instructor in Communication and has been at USAO since 1975. He received his B.A. and his M.A. from the California State Univer- sity at Long Beach. He did his advanced study at the University of Oklahoma. lngrid H. Shafer is the Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion and has been teaching at USAO since 1968. She received her B.A. at Abitur Bundes- realgymnasium fuer Maedchen, Innsbruck, Austriag and her M.A. at the University of Oklahoma. She did her advanced study at the University of Oklahoma. 4:1 Charles B. Scott is the Assistant Professor of Education and has been teaching at The University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma since 1975. He received his B.A. and his M.T. from Southeastern State College. He received his Ed.D. from the University of Oklahoma James D. Skaggs is an Associate Professor of English and has been teaching at the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma since 1974. He received his A.B. from Western Kentucky State University and his M.A. and his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt Universi- ty. He did his advanced study at George Peabody College and the Oxford University. .X in X ' X- i j Douglas W. Sikes is an lnstructor in Philosophy and has been teaching at USAO since 1973. l-le received his B.A. at Abilene Christian Collegcg and his M.A. at Oklahoma State University. llc did his advanced study at Oklahoma State University. l f il Wayne H. Tyler is an Instructor in Economics. He received his A.A. from Hutchinson Junior College, his B.S. from Kansas State University, his M.S. from Oklahoma State University and his Ed.D. from Oklahoma State University. He began his teaching career at USAO in 1977. N-af Alan D. Todd is the Assistant Professor of Education and has been teaching at the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma since 1976. He received his B.S. from Oklahoma State University and his M.Ed. and Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma. Mary Gwen Woods is an Instruc- tor in Speech and Hearing Therapy and has been teaching at the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma since 1977. She received her B.A. from Oklahoma State University and her M.S. from Oklahoma University. fi' - gy . g Nz 1 Nw' 3. Edna M. Wilcox is the Assistant Professor of Speech and Hearing Therapy and has been teaching at USAO since 1971. She received her B.A. at Oklahoma College for Women and her M.S. at the University of Pittsburg. She did her advanced study at Northwes- tern University and also Pennsylvania State University. Administration and Faculty members play many other roles besides their working one. They do however. spend many long hours trying to serve the student and the university in the best way that they can. Dr. Marble prepares to lecture to his Contemporary Man class. Ron Kemper, Director of Duplicating, tries to prepare the printing machine. Kathryn Empie. Chairman of the Board of Regents, presents Dr. Kenneth Moore, Edna Wilcox, and Jerry Holt with the Regents Award for Superior Teaching. George McAtee looks up in the stage rafter to see if there are any lights before holding play rehearsal. John Crump takes time out of his busy day to enjoy an ice cream cone. Barbara Geary poses for a picture after one of many successful recitals. Dr. Kenneth Moore props his feet up to relax and prepare for his next class. Nurse Diane Gantt tests Susan Palmer's blood pressure. W-WMM! x ,Y v W 7 8 fs., 'N 1 5 '97 Q: 1.4- , J A Ln, . ,fr , f u' ' ' firm W ' 'gl' .k m L nefulkf' w . , W, 'l:g5'- 'I' V 1. av" 1, "WfZ4"' fm ., .Q W-mx. ' K vw., -.f W, , M, ,f - 4 'mg 20 Howdy Week was held the first week of the Fall Trimester. Two of the events were a Picnic and a Watermelon Seed Spitting Contest. The main purpose of Howdy Week was for new students to get acquainted with each other. Vicki Samara gets ready to spit her seed in the Watermelon Seed Spitting Contest. The Howdy Picnic was held behind Nash Library. There was lots of fun, food and drinks for everyone. Richard Marshall enjoys the Water- melon Seed Spitting Contest. Jean Ann Stone and Kathy Baker relax at the picnic. Several members of the Administration and Faculty took part in the events of Howdy week. Gale Thorsen, Director of Financial Aids and Dr. Tom Sanders tried to out do each other in the Seed Spitting Contest. S 1-1 . E . ..,,.. fi nf . ..... . , K X "hugh "' sf y my 'ig , I , 1 2 1 2 W W V X V A. my ,ti . ' . gy, lhz i, " ' f " , . W h, V V1 A ,I L :VV ' P I .. Nr? .ur Da All x ,,f ' f , 1 V I " " 1' , ,..., ' Q 1 , ,I 3 295. I w yz , ," Ji,,f, V ' 1 , I kQ..,,W was 94 , ' , A 'W f I fl W' f A -" A . ' . ,,,. KM" Q Jeffi, A ,, V 4 'Q 1, -+G, ',-, 1 'im f , , 4? fl? Q, Q -WG' 2 22 Freshman Orientation was held the first week of the Fall Trimester. It was held in order to inform Freshman students about the policies and procedures of the University. Later in the Fall Trimester Dr. and Mrs. Troutt held a reception for Freshman students in their home. The reception helped students to become better acquainted with the faculty and administration. Bl all ls ll' lf , i lt 91 T H up "fa ., fr MW mi W f ,f , H 4 a my "f.. -,..', "Q, , . .,,. 124 Dances and Coffeehouse concerts were an important part of student life. Mike Daubenspeck and Lee Ann Ford practiced several disco steps before attending the Howdy Dance. Jon lins performed at the first coffeehouse concert of the year. The coffeehouse concerts had good student turnouts. which helped to give the performers a positive attitude about USAO. Many per- formers left vowing that they would be back. The FFFB turned out in full force for the Halloween Dance . . .in Togasl Ric Baser and Lee Ann Ford get down to the nrusic. John Montgomery and Debbie llodges attended several of the monthly dances. George and Carolyn McAtee, John Stover and Vicki Samara visit together before a concert. Paul Fenwick displays his own style of dancing and no one could tell what Ric Baser was doinv Charlie and Craig Patterson styled out for the annual Tinsel Ball held just before Christmas Break "V1 .., Af' 1 f Q :VI 4, gffjfv fp-1: fx fu ff F Q A 4' ,at w X ,Q 4. 2 2 Throughout the year the Music Department had several recitals and concerts. Karen Lusby performed beautifully at her Senior recital. Andy Scurlock plays guitar with the USAO jazz ensemble, Tony Gonzales directs the orchestra during the Spring Concert. Max Ridgeway belts out background music for Pure Gold. Cecille Haynes and Ricky Brown prepare for a Jazz Ensemble Concert. Fantasia singers, Janet Mackey, Brenda Streber, Paula Morton and Rocki Brantes pose before an upcoming concert. Julia Dyck, Pure Gold member puts her heart into her music, Kirk Ramsey and Paul Fenwick rehearse for a Pure Gold Concert. Stacy Davis, Diana Wight, Rocki Brantes, and Rhonda Willcford discuss the days events before choir practice begins. The USAO Choir and Choral gave an outstanding performance at the annual Spring Concert. 6 W 'S FW lg' ru. 127 L'The Riniers of Eldritchv was presented in February. The Drama centered around the events that occurred in the town ot'Eldritch. The play was symbolic in that the town nor the people of the town changed. Jon Minton, Jean Dobry. Stacy Davis, Lori Lucero, and Bill Bullock had the leading roles in this production. Jerry Holt, assistant professor of English directed the production of 'Waiting for Godotfl 'iWaiting for Godot" dealt with two men waiting for their image of God to appear which was represented in Godot. Members ofthe cast included Bill Bullock, Randy Bence, David DeShong. Jarome Adams, Jon Minton, .V 4 1 " ,N WNW .,. . I ,..-wwe l x, Q -R NAS ww 9. 9 '51 Q 'Mia 4 p J :ME 'k ,sv Q . :,,.,,..,g H-if .rf ,X os O o oo 12 150 "See How They Run," was the first drama production of the year. The setting was in a vicarage in a small town in England. The story revolves around the Vicar's wife, played by Stacy Davis, and an old soldier friend of hers, played by John Stover. Starring in this production were Paul Fenwick as the Vicar, Stacy Davis as the Vicar's wife, John Stover as Clive, and Jon Minton as the Bishop. "Little Mary Sunshine" was a delight- ful musical which revolved around Mary's plight to save the Colorado Inn which was built on Indian territory. The Captain of the Mounties, was romantically interested in Mary. Romance, danger and humor carried this play from beginning to end. Starring in the production were Julia Dyck, as Little Mary Sunshine, and Bill Bullock, as the Captain of the Mounties. 2 Students often looked forward to ban- quets and receptions for good food and entertainment. The foreign student's reception proved to be quite interesting. The students dressed in their native clothing to attend the recep- tion. The All-Sports banquet was highlighted by guest speaker Steve Owens. former OU football player and Heisman Trophy winner. Another highlight ofthe evening was the presentation of awards to the outstanding athletes of the year. '--u.....W,wmW' l? 12 . '33 , , N VK Lk' ,sf s , X Q N Z1 M Nw. , r - T -, 4 The Eleventh Session ofthe USAO Model United Nations was held April 26 through April 28. Model lsnited Nations is designed for High School Students to learn the working of the United Nations, Senior Day was held on the USAO campus in April. There were many activities planned for the day including an art show and the rising of a hot air balloon. Desi Sites motions for the MUN delegates to be quiet, while Debbie Hodges waits for the meeting to be ealled to order. l.isa Beaudoin and Shannon Damron register MUN delegates during the recent session. An anxious crowd gathered on the oval to witness the rising ol' the hot air balloon on Senior Day. Larry Simmons waits patiently for his committee to reach a decision during the MUN conference. On Senior Day the Indian Club set up a booth to display their recent publication. Bruce Carter registers guests and offers them a free coke on Senior Day. Richard Marshall took time out of his day to help with the rising of the hot air balloon. Mark Peterson and Elaine Maxwell discuss the performance that Pure Gold gave on Senior Day. . . 4, - . r .M sxgc'ni':'i,xinli ., ..... . wt- '1 I N' 'X t R '55 2 X me Q E, x PV , ' .ff ., Q " ' , QI Q i ii. . A i iig krisi Q U: A PEHXQ K A X k-hVk I an k f :fi , , -f f X Mwmwq W an W 'L' Hi X 1 L 'K L NW ,lil- is , ,Km M fx 1 na- y, ,, d 'Niki 'W29 . 3. in , Lk Q.s .....f U L53 '-'r' X, Y , 1 ,325 .I , A - v " 44", uf' XY ' , W g 714 37 'I - ' ff 1 ' 2- - gf . my 3552- Wgziifz. . R . X A 1 5 .. K X... fi 'X ' -I Q 1 1 . ' t' A w , Snow, Snow and more Snow! During January and February the USAO campus was covered with a blanket of snow. Residents in Addams Hall took time out of their day to build a snow castle. Different parts of the campus provided pictorial scenes for roving photographers. The trees in front of Davis Hall seemed to have caught Argus photographer, Stan White's, eye. Making her way through the snow, Brenda Scheller paused long enough for an Argus photographer to snap a picture. Kathy Peters finally made her way up the cleared steps ofthe Administration building. Ethereal silence surrounds the Chapel green following an afternoon snow. Although the snowfall was appreciated by some. Doug Roundtree found that it was just extra work. On his way to class Dr. Kim found time to stop and take a picture with his nfriendf' the snowman. ef' 1 , a - v diff H Wir Q M. pr' M' O .5 JF A X "fi " I 5 .QW T? 1 9' . " A s fs .W I, X C iw The Spring months, March and April, set the scene for various fairs held on campus. The Medieval Fair was held by the Medieval and Renaissance class. Students were asked to do different projects depicting life in Medieval times. Lynn Lee fopposite pagej was so into Medieval history that he rented his costume. The Bridal Fair was sponsored by the Home Economics Club. The Wedding Chapel in Moore provided all Bridal wear. The Business Fair was sponsored by the Business Department for high school students. The department gave tests and awarded scholarships. 1 KVM 'H QQ V v NQAQQ S . ,,,y kj li- k .ff , - ,,, L,,. ,J www E .. . 6,17 A! in 2 , ,,,, my ' PQ vs V: 1- I 1 S1 "" " ' A' ' , , 3 K ' ff M:Qf,Qf1 22 c If '5 5 ' 1 if We Mifm elf? 5 . iff, I ga. Eff' ' 1 140 Parties were the scene for strange, new happenings. Until this goblin spoke no one knew who he was. There seems to be something funny going on between these two Romans and their lady friends. The "Godot,, gang parties again. The punch bowl phantom strikes again with his bottle of Canada Dry or whatever it is. ,.- Q, TE " lr ' W 2 " ' bf A QF' M Am F ill N QQ Eddie Callahan and Bill Sizemore look over the items at a booth in the Club Car- nival. Stacy Davis Wonders what someone has put in her drink ata cast party. The Mini Olympics proved to be enjoy- able for everyone. Diane LeComte looks at the crowd While sitting at the cheerleaders booth at the Club Carnival. 2 Elections. club meetings and contests are another facet of college life. Much hard work is put in by a small group of people to make these things come about. Paul Fenwick posts results in the Dis- trict vocal contest. Debbie Hodges, Larry Simmons and Gina Benzel relax after a hectic day during the MUN conference. Cecil Sellers waits anxiously while students vote during a Student Govern- ment Election. lr ri .1 sit'-6 sw 49" Paula Morton munches on potato chips at a picnic. John Stover and Mike Daubenspeck invent a new dance at a cast party they attended. Jerry Smith, Lujean Livingston, and Kelly Allred wait for their order at the Pizza Inn. Berry Brown listens attentively during a REFLECTIONS meeting. 44 Christinas was perhaps the host titne of the year on the USAO eainpns. Parties were ever present tlttring the month OT1DCCCINbCI'. President and Mrs, Trout decorate their Christmas tree with a variety ot' interesting ornaments given tn thein hy friends. They entertained niany petiple during the Christ- nias season inehiding the annual reception for Senitirs graduating in Deeeinber. Students enjoyed an iinproinpttt Christ- mas party at the Bihle Chair. Elizabeth Talhert has fun deeorating the Bible Chains Christmas tree. f. Holidays along with birthdays were always celebrated. Ms. Virgina Embree's surprise party was quite a success. Desi Sites looks for something to do while Pat Smith visits with someone around the corner. Karel McDaniel had a surprise birthday party in the Financial Aids office. Tammy Smith was the official Easter bunny at the BSU Easter egg hunt. sg. . Yin kg ,- N if 'i..sf I ig .4 5 y .gygvyy y are -"-as be 4 - K 4 Around USAO students can often be found taking it easy. Whether it is before a class, at a picnic or while working, students will always pause long enough to relax and smile. Andy Scurlock takes a break while checking in residents at Canning Hall. Tracy Delaughter relaxes before a Pure Gold Concert. Pam Thompson and Norman Hall try to find a quiet place to talk but are interrupted by a roving photographer. Janet Mackey and Brenda Porton have a quick chat before choir class. Tamara McDonald and John Stover smile at the camera before play practice. Barbara Scott enjoys a campus picnic. Doug Rowntree spends many long hours working on his hobby. MW 4 ilwwp., WW 1? K 14 48 Once and awhile it becomes necessary for students to study and work, Some students become serious about their studies while others do not. Many times studying is put oft' to the last minute. therefore. students would study ahnost anywhere. Ruth Morgan studies at work, while Tony Hazelrigg tries to learn all he can at a jewelry makingdemonstration. Cindy Bivans studies Nl in the print shop and an unidentined student studies in the Library fill. Will wonders never cease? fm , W X ,,r ,, A W 3, r f W H wemvwmwf f f f Q M, "Q 150 FQCLCS FACES J lx fm , f L , W M , H, .1 Q , 152 This book deals with a relatively small number of people. There was no way every- one could have been included. But as you thumb through the pages and look past the faces you should see yourself. The pictures, and the stories built around them, represent memories of what a USAO student is all about. A lot of work and a variety of talents went into the production of this book. It seems that only a small number of people will stick to doing something until the end, and it is this group of people I would like to thank. Desi Sites, at first was only respon- sible for layouts, but at midterm she took over the position of copywriter. I would like to thank her for being able to cope with my criticism and produce copy that represented the year in action. During the middle ofthe Spring Trimester, David Saner joined the photography staff. David was always willing to help when all else failed. Before he knew it, and not asking for it, David soon became the primary yearbook photographer. He accepted this responsibility and never let me down. The last BIG thanks goes to Diana Wight for her role in producing the book. I nor Diana could really describe what her role was, but she always came through with results. Diana started out as a yearbook secretary, but soon became a 'fgeneral do everything" person. tThat is what usually happens to secretaries right'?lJ l To the people who contributed something special, Ingrid Shafer and Tammy Smithf Thanks. I have only one thing to say to John Crump-Thanks for giving me the freedom to do what I want and the advice to make it better. Being Editor for the last two years has been a great challenge for me. I can look back now and say it was great!! Once and awhile for some silly reason I would like to do it all over again. Heaven Forbid. This book is all about you the USAO student. Enjoy it. Dana Clark 1978 ARGUS Editor oe .Jimi A fs I is .. "' E ..,. i 5 Qieaiinfi


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University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma - Argus Yearbook (Chickasha, OK) online yearbook collection, 1943 Edition, Page 1

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