University of Santa Clara - Redwood Yearbook (Santa Clara, CA)

 - Class of 1912

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University of Santa Clara - Redwood Yearbook (Santa Clara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1912 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 554 of the 1912 volume:

p m ' THC RPDWOOD Library of Unmrsity of Santa C?af8 October, 1913 ' 0 J THE REDWOOD. : 3i SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA The University embraces the following departments: A. THE COLLEGE OF PHILOSOPHY AND LETTERS. A four years College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. B. THE COLLEGE OF GENERAL SCIENCE. A four years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. C. THE INSTITUTE OF LAW. A standard three years ' course of Law, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and pre-supposing for entrance the completion of two years of study beyond the High School. D. THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. (a) Civil Engineering — A four years ' course, lead- ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil En- gineering. (b) Mechanical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Me- chanical Engineering. (c) Electrical Engineering — A four years ' course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elec- trical Engineering. E. THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE. A four years ' course, leading to the degree of Bach- elor of Science in Architecture. F. THE PRE-MEDICAL COURSE. A two years ' course of studies in Chemistry, Bac- teriology, Biology and Anatomy, which is recom- mended to students contemplating entrance into medi- cal schools. Only students who have completed two years of study beyond the High School are eligible for this course. JAMES P. MORRISSEY, S. J., President K : THE REDWOOD. : { $50.00 Reward! TO ANY Santa Clara College Student Whose appearance can ' t be improved and who can ' t obtain an absolutely perfect fit in one of my famous " L SYSTEM " Clothes for College Fellows BILLY HOBSON BILLY HOBSON ' S CORNER 24 South First Street - - SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA Member San Francisco Builders Excliange DAVID ELMS GRAHAM BUILDING CONSTRUCTION WILLIAMS BUILDING 693 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO Telephone Douglas 1603 »K THE REDWOOD. FOSS HICKS CO. No. 35 West Santa Clara Street SAN JOSE Real Estate, Loans Investments A Select and Up-to-date List of Just Such Properties as the Home Seeker and Investor Wants INSURANCE Fire, Life and Accident in the Best Companies L. F. SWIFT, President LEROY HOUGH, Vice-President E. B. SHUGERT, Treasurer DIRECTORS— L. F. Swift, Leroy Hough, Henry J. Crocker, W. D. Dennett, Jesse W. Lilienthal Capital Paid In, $1,000,000 Western Meat Company PORK PACKERS AND SHIPPERS OF Dressed Beef, Mutton and Pork, Hides, Pelts, Tallow, Fertilizer, Bones, Hoofs, Horns, Etc. Monarch and Golden Gate Brands Canned Meats, Bacon, Hams and Lard General Office, Sixth and Townsend Streets - San Francisco, Cal. Cable Address STEDFAST, San Francisco. Codes, Al. A B C 4th Edition Packing House and Stock Yards, South San Francisco, San Mateo County, Cal. Distributing Houses, San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, Sacramento and Stockton « » THE REDWOOD. flilara Journal OUR JOB PRINTING PREEMINENTLY SUPERIOR Phone, S. C 14 Published Semi-weekly B. DOWNING, EDITOR FRANKLIN STREET SANTA CLARA, CAL. San Jose Engraving Company Photo Engraving Zinc Etchings Half Tones Do you want a half-tone for a program or pamphlet? None can make it better SAN JOSE ENGRAVING COMPANY 32 LIGHTSTON STREET SAN JOSE, CAL. : ji •Ji: THE REDWOOD. :a •• •• ' If Branch at Clark ' s 176-182 South First Street San Jose Order your pastry in advance Picnic Lunches GET A KRUSIUS if you want to get a good pen knife; guaranteed as it ought to be. If it should not prove to be that, we will be glad to exchange with you until you have one that is. Manicure tools, razors guaranteed the same way. If you wish to shave easily and in a hurry, get a Gillette Safety Razor. The greatest convenience for the man who shaves himself. The John Stock Sons Tinners, Roofers and Plumbers Phone San Jose 76 71-77 South First Street San Jose, Cal. Most business men like good office stationery REGAL TYPEWRITER PAPERS and MANUSCRIPT COVERS REPRESENT THE BEST AND MOST COMPLETE LINE IN THE UNITED STATES LOOK FOR THIS TRADE-MARK CATERS TO THE MOST FASTIDIOUS Pacific Manufacturing Co. DEALERS IN Doors, Windows and Glass General Mill Work Moulidngs Telephone North 40 Santa Clara, Cal. : : THE REDWOOD. :•$; Everybody is doing IT — Doing WHAT ? GETTING SHAVED at the University Shave Shop 983 Main Street near Postoffice Santa Clara T. MUSGRAVE p. GFELL T. Musgrave Co. Watchmakers Goldsmiths and Silversmiths 3272 21st Street San Francisco r iidrvljo. Perfect Satisfaction Guaranteed 867 Sherman Street I. RUTH, Agent - 1037 Franklin Street ALDERMAN ' S NEWS AGENCY Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. Cigars and Tobacco Baseball and Sporting Goods Fountain Pens of AH Kinds Next to Postoffice Santa Clara : Training Scliool for Nurses IN CONNECTION CONDUCTED BY SISTERS OF CHARITY Race and San Carlos Streets San Jose Men ' s Clothes Shop Gents ' Furnishings Hats and Shoes PAY LESS AND DRESS BETTER E. H. ALDEN Phone Santa Clara 74 R 1054 Franklin St. MANUEL ELLO fBOOTS and SHOES 904 Franklin Street Cor. Lafayette Billiard Parlor GEO. E. MITCHELL PROP. SANTA CLARA Pool 2V2 Cents per Cue : THE REDWOOD. T. F. Sourisseau JEWELER 143 SOUTH FIRST STREET, SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA A. G. COL CO. WHOLESALE Commission Merchants TELEPHONE, MAIN 309 84-90 N. Market St. San Jose, Cal. MEET ME AT Shorty ' s Place 68 N. First Street, San Jose, Cal. For FINE TAFFIES AND CANDIES True Fruit Syrups Served from our Twentieth Sanitary Soda Fountain ALSO ELECTRIC MILK SHAKES VICTORY CANDY SHOP » THE REDWOOD. Phones : Office S. C. 39 R Residence S. C. 1 Y DR. H. 0. F. MENTON Dentist Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 5 p, m. Rooms 3 to 8 Bank Bldg. Santa Clara Pratt-Low Preserving Company PACKERS OF Canned Fruits and Vegetables Fruits in Glass a Specialty SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA ROLL BROS. Real Estate and Insurance Call and See Us if You Want Anything in Our Line Franklin Street, next to Bank, Santa Clara Ravenna Paste Company Manufacturers of All Kinds of ITALIAN AND FRENCH Paste Phone San Jose 787 127-131 N. Market Street San Jose Phone San Jose 781 Pacific Shingle and Box Co. J. C. Mcpherson, Manager Dealers in Wood, Coal and Grain Richmond Coal, $11.00 Park Avenue San Jose, Cal. San Jose Transfer Co. MOVES EVERYTHING THAT IS LOOSE Phone San Jose 78 Office, 62 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose S. A. Elliott Son Plumbing Tinning Gas Fitting GUN AND LOCKSMITHING Telephone S. C. 70 J 902-910 Main Street Santa Clara, Cal. ■ THERE IS NOTHING BETTER THAN OUR Bouquet Teas at 50 cents per pound Even Though You Pay More Ceylon, English Breakfast and Basket Fired Japan FARMERS UNION San Jose THE REDWOOD. — p. Montmayeur E. LamoUe J, Origlia LamoUe Grill— - 36-38 North First Street, San Jose. Cal. Phone Main 403 MEALS AT ALL HOURS IF YOU ONLY KNEW WHAT= Mayerle ' s German Eyewater DOES TO YOUR EYES YOU WOULDN ' T BE WITHOUT IT A SINGLE DAY At Druggisu. 5 c or 65c by Gcorgc Maycrlc, German Expert Optician 960 Market Street, San Francisco Jacob Eberhard, Pres. and Manager John J. Eberhard, Vlce-Pres. and Ass ' t Manager EBERHARD TANNING CO. Tanners, Curriers and Wool Pullers Harness-Latigo and Lace Leather Sole and Upper Leather, Calf, K!p and Sheepskins Eberhard ' s Skirting Leather and Bark Woolskin Santa Clara - California Founded 18S1 Incorporated 18S8 Accredited by State University, 1900 College Notre Dame SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA SIXTIETH YEAR COURSES COLLEGIATE PREPARATORY COMMERCIAL Intermediate and Primary Classes for Younger Children Notre Dame Conservatory of Music Awards Diplomas Founded 1899 APPLY FOR TERMS TO SISTER ;SUPERIOR THE REDWOOD. Fall Styles IN Tailoring WHY NOT IN YOUR FALL AND WINTER SUIT BE Distinctive— IN fit C orrect — in style Comfortable— IN wearing ? TO DO THIS SEE ANGEVINE YOUR COLLEGE TAILOR 67-69 South Second St. San Jose, California : CONTENTS THE MYSTIC (Poem) IRISH HOME RULE NOCTURNE (Poem) RETRIBUTION " GREATER LOVE THAN THIS " JAMIE (Poem) WHEN THE TRAIN FAILED EDITORIAL COMMENT EXCHANGES UNIVERSITY NOTES ALUMNI NOTES - ATHLETICS - Courtenay ' Price ' 14 Victor Chargin ' 14 - Thomas E. Percy ' 15 H«roId R. McKinnon ' 14 - Rodney A. Yoell ' 14 Paul Perkins ' 16 F. Buckley McGurrin, 1st High 1 2 8 9 15 21 23 27 31 35 40 47 TA T5e tfOo £, Entered Dec. 18, 1902, at Santa Clara, Cal., as second-class matter, under Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 VO. XII SANTA CLARA, CAL., OCTOBER, 1912 No. 1 Kq JOTys io I HEARD Him in the dropping of tlie rain, I felt Him in tiie swelling of the sea, I knew His lips when harshness gave me pain, His love in all love, for love He was to me. And when the dawn rose ruddy or was gray, And when the sun set idly in the sea, I felt upon my weary cheek the spray; ' Twas all the freshness of His love for me. A hand in mine ? His hand in mine, no more ; A cheek ' gainst mine His cheek I said must be. And thus we wandered by the sounding shore, I listening while His wavelets spoke to me, Spoke of His wrath, spoke of His love. His fears, That though I kissed I still might Judas be, And if I kissed once more, while fell my tears. My tears were love and He my love to me. Down through the streets where hums the busy town We passed, I loving. He loved with me. A poor man begged, I answered with a frown; He left me there with my iniquity. — Courtenay Price. THE REDWOOD. THE IRISH HOME RULE MOVEMENT VICTOR A. CHARGIN From the first day of the 19th Cen- tury to the last, the statesmen of England have had one standing prob- lem to face. It might come up under various forms and disguises, and it might seem to demand various reme- dies, but in some shape or other the wroes of Ireland have alv ays furnished the test of practical statesmanship, and have often been the rock on which proud administrations have met with dire disaster. By nature Ireland would seem to be formed for peace and plenty. Happily located with the protecting bulwark of Great Britain between their emer- ald isle and foreign foes, blest with a mild and equable climate, and inhab- iting an island of marked fertility, the Irish race would seem to have been signaled out for fortune ' s favors. Yet such has been the misgovern- ment of the English that the Irish have seen their paternal acre turned into the hands of aliens, their religion made a brand of shame and outlawry, their parliament corrupted and finally done away with, their industries crip- pled and bound down, and they them- selves reduced to wretched poverty. At the outset of the century, Janu- ary 1st, 1801, to be exact, the legislative union went into effect, un- der the title of the " United Kingdom, " as it was a consolidation of the Eng- lish and Irish Parliaments. Ireland ' s Parliament, which had met in Dublin since 1782, went out of existence, and in the place of Home Rule, Ireland was represented in both houses of the Imperial Parliament at Westminster. But it is here that the first bone of contention was found. Irish Catho- lics according to the Act of Union, were unable to represent their native land. This indeed was a very serious mistake on England ' s side, and Pitt, seeing the discord it created in Ire- land, had promised the Irish Catholics that he would have the laws that made them ineligible to represent their country repealed. His plans, how- ever, were thwarted by the stubborn King George III, who believed that such a concession would do violence to the Protestantism of his coronation oath, and accordingly refused to sanc- tion Pitt ' s idea of Catholic emancipa- tion. This aroused the premier ' s dis- gust thoroughly and he resigned, thus leaving the movement without any in- fluential head. For some time it was dropped, as England had to give most of her time to Napoleon ' s European business. It was at this juncture that Ireland ' s greatest orator and probably the world ' s greatest agitator stepped to the front, and finally, by his elo- quence, wit and talent for agitation, combined with the efiforts of Welling- THE REDWOOD. ton and Peel, the Catholic Emanci- pation bill was carried. This measure by which Catholics were admitted to Parliament, the Eng- lish administration thought would quiet the Irish nation, but instead of removing the Irish question from poli- tics it paved the way for a more stren- uous presentation of it in a new guise. O ' Connell did not intend to let well enough alone, or to let affairs take their own course. In 1829 he was re- turned to Parliament at the head of some fifty Catholic members to agi- tate for Irish independence, and imme- diately he led a fresh movement for the repeal of the Act of Union, which had destroyed the Dublin Par- liament. All that monster meetings, soul-moving oratory, secret associa- tions, and printer ' s ink could do to in- fluence the government by Parlia- mentary manoeuver, demonstration of popular feeling, intimidation, and threats of insurrection, was done. O ' Connell ' s oratory which, in its power over vast multitudes of his emotional countrymen has never been surpassed, made him the idol of his party. To boisterous assemblies of tens of thousands he declaimed on Sax- on injustice to Celt, and he exerted a considerable political power, so long as parties were somewhat evenly divided. But when the Tories came back in 1841, his influence materially declined. He was arrested for trea- sonable utterances, but was eventual- ly vindicated after serving fourteen weeks in jail. This imprisonment brought on a serious malady resulting in an early death. But with his decease, great as his influence might be, the hopes Ireland entertained for Home Rule, were not to perish. A society called " Young Ireland " was formed about 1840, and it took up the agitation for Irish na- tionality, and carried it to greater lengths than O ' Connell dared, be- cause, being a most religious man, he stopped when it came to doing any- thing which his opponents might call unscrupulous. The fiery leaders of " Young Ireland, " Smith-O ' Brien, Meagher and Mitchell, preached sedi- tion from the platform and through the press, and in 1848 only by the vig- orous exertion of physical force, was open rebellion averted. The principal advocates of this agitation were seized and condemned to death, though they ultimately escaped with transportation to Australia, whence most of them eventually found their way to Amer- ica. It was in this country that the next alarm was sounded after two unquiet decades. During the famine year 1846, thousands of Ireland ' s suffering people had emigrated to the United States and a widely organized secret society, " The Fenian Brotherhood, " sprang up among these Irish exiles and emigrants. Their reign, if one may call it such, was similar to the " Reign of Terror " in the French Rev- olution, with the exception that they did not go quite as far as the frenzied mob of Paris. Fenian uprisings oc- THE REDWOOD. curred all over the country, but they accomplished little of practical value. One thing, how ever, they did do. " We know, " says McCarthy, " that while many public instructors lost themselves in vain shriekings over Fenianism, and the incurable perver- sity of the Irish people, one statesman was already convinced that the very shock of the Fenian agitation would arouse public attention to the recog- nition of substantial grievances, and to the admission that, the business of statesmanship was to seek out the remedy and provide redress. " The statesman to whom McCarthy alludes and who devoted the closing decades of a great career to a fruitless endeav- or to secure for Ireland the benefits of self-government was William Ewart Gladstone. Upon no name in the his- tory of the Irish Home Rule move- ment does greater lustre shine than on the name of that eminent states- man. Gladstone was a man of splendid intellectual power and sterling moral- ity, an adept at parliamentary man- agement, a shrewd financier and, in fact, possessed of all the talents which a man, who was to cham- pion the cause of Irish automony. a lost cause, so to speak, must needs have. Firmly convinced that the Irish were suffering an injustice, he resolv- ed to do all in his power to rectify their grievances ; accordingly, and with all the energy that marked his similar undertakings he threw himself into the work of making Home Rule a possibility. No sooner had Gladstone come into office in 1866 than he con- centrated his efforts upon this project. In April, in one of the greatest speech- es of his career, remarkable alike for its eloquent delivery and solidity of thought, Gladstone introduced into the House of Commons his first Home Rule Bill, " An act to make better pro- vision for the government of Ireland. " It proposed to establish at Dublin a parliament of Peers with a lord-lieu- tenant at the head, appointed by the crown, and an independent privy coun- cil. It was to have control of local finances except custom duties, and it was excluded from interference with army and navy, foreign or colonial af- fairs or with religious endowments. An essential provision was, that after the re-establishment of the Dublin Parliament, Ireland should no longer be represented in the Imperial Parlia- ment at Westminster. This bill created quite a furor and split the Liberal party, but notwith- standing, the bill narrowly missed passing a second reading. In July the Gladstonian administration abandoned the fight, but it was skillfully taken up by Parnell, with a view of forcing an issue. His plan was to embarrass legis- lation and obstruct the ordinary functions of government. Of this man, one of the most eminent Irishmen of the Nineteenth Century, a word of praise must be spoken. Born in Coun- ty Wicklow, he was educated at Cam- bridge. From his introduction to Par- liament in 1875 till his retirement, his THE REDWOOD. name was always before the public, advocating this measure and denounc- ing that, but whatever his principals were, his eloque nt voice was never heard supporting any movement which the most skeptical eye could consider unpatriotic. But to resume. During his third administration Gladstone pressed the Home Rule bill again, but with no bet- ter result than in 1890. In the grand old man ' s fourth term, he was now in his 84th year, he made a final endeavor to bring order into Ireland ' s political chaos, by enabling her to regulate her own affairs. The Home Rule bill of 1893 differed from its predecessor in respect to the Irish representation at Westminster. The old man ' s elo- quence, backed by an overwhelming majority, now carried the bill tri- umphantly through the lower house, only to meet defeat by a majority of ten to one in the House of Lords, the stronghold of conservatism, where every progressive measure has to en- counter resistance at the outset. After this humiliating defeat Glad- stone did not bring in the bill again. In March, 1894, he withdrew from po- litical life, and in his last interview with the leaders of the Irish party, he assured them of his belief in the ulti- mate triumph of their cause, a cause which he promised them would be al- ways mentioned in his prayers. Parnell preceded Gladstone to the tomb in 1891, and with the demise of these two eminent statesmen the Home Rule bill was left destitute of an able defender. In this deplorable condition it remained until 1902, when John E. Redmond assumed the respon- sibility of being its advocate. He de- livered several stirring orations in its support, both in and out of the House of Commons, but the time was not ripe for a re-introduction of the bill, the movement not meeting with the approval of many of the parliament- arians upon whom it would have to rely for support. Thus Redmond, too, in utter disgust, dropped the matter because of the failure of his colleagues to co-operate with him in the further- ance of his project. Mr. Redmond ' s futile effort was fol- lowed by another short era of decad- ence, though it can hardly be called decadence as rfome Rule has been a favorite theme of Irish orators, and in one form or other has always been before the eyes of the public. As far, however, as its agitation in Parlia- ment goes. Home Rule has been a dead letter there imtil very recently. On April the eleventh, 1912, As- quith, the present Prime Minister, presented to the House of Commons a new bill providing for Irish Autono- my. Though it differs from the Glad- stonian bill in detail, it is essentially the same. It calls for the establish- ment, or rather re-establishment, of an Irish Parliament in Dublin, to cor- respond with the Imperial Parliament in London. It might be well to men- tion here the main clauses of the fourth Home Rule bill. The Irish Parliament is to consist (1) of a Senate compris- THE REDWOOD. ing forty members, nominated by the Irish Executive, (2) a House com- posed of one hundred and sixty-four elected representatives. The Lord Lieutenant w ill preside over the execu- tive body. Pending the time when the present Irish deficit, estimated by Mr. Asquith at $7,500,000 annually, can be converted into a surplus, the taxes will be imposed and collected by England, and the British Ex- chequer will transfer to Ireland the amount necessary for present expen- diture. The Irish government will have complete control of the postal revenue and of the constabulary. A notable distinction between this bill and the one proposed by Gladstone is that Asquith ' s measure calls for an Irish representation at Westminster of forty-two members. This resume includes practically all of the import- ant clauses of the present bill. The principal advocates of " The Government of Ireland Bill, " are Mr. Churchill and the Prime Minister, and if the bill carries it will be largely due to their efforts. The Premier has thrown himself into the work untir- ingly, but, I may add, not unselfishly, for he realizes that if he is successful in putting this measure through it will, even as it aided in immortalizing Gladst( ne, be the means of handing his name down to posterity as a bril- liant statesman. But it will necessi- tate his making enemies, just as Glad- stone had to make them when he proposed his first bill for Irish Auton- omy twenty-six years ago. Though the Conservative party in England is against it on principle, this obstacle, the Irish statesmen feel, they will have no difficulty in overcoming. The real opposition to the measure comes from Ulster. This province is, prac- tically speaking, the only stumbling block to the advancement of the bill, and with them are the Orangemen, headed by Lord Londonderry. Carson and Craig are fighting heart and soul against what they consider an outrage. They are decidedly anti-Catholic, and their slogan is " Home Rule means Rome Rule, " intimating that Irish Autonomy would be the same as plac- ing the government of Ireland in the hands of the papal authorities. For any fair minded person this statement needs no refutation. Mr. Churchill virtually braved the lion in his den, when he spoke for Home Rule a short time ago in the cities of its foes. A riot was predicted and troops accord- ingly summoned, but fortunately no disturbance occurred. Mr. Churchill ' s most salient argu- ment for Irish Autonomy is his dec- laration of the deplorable condition existing there today, and which has existed since the Act of Union went into effect. No fewer than eighty- seven coercion bills in about as many years have been presented to Par- liament for the betterment and ad- vancement of the Emerald Isle. " But in spite of England ' s heroic efforts to improve Ireland " (sarcastically re- marks Churchill) " her population, in- stead of increasing is steadily and ma- THE REDWOOD. terially decreasing. " Mr. Churchill claims that the people of Ireland are paying taxes for the maintenance of a navy to protect her commerce, which, since Ireland has practically no commerce to protect, is to force them into paying unjust taxes. All the world is eagerly watching the outcome of the present demand for the repeal of the Act of Union of 1800. If the bill passes, and all indi- cations point to this favorable conclu- sion, England ' s act will be recognized and applauded by all just men anl all political leaders the world over. If she rejects the measure another era of political unrest will ensue in Ireland, to terminate either in a revolution or a conciliatory measure similar to the one we now have. As for the Irish, with the better- ment of their condition in view, they cherish the hope of " Home Rule " as a parent cherishes the successful career of a son, and in the same measure that one would desire to see a father ' s hope realized, let us hope for the happy issue of the Irish Home Rule Movement. THE REDWOOD. NOCTURNE walked beneath the olives when the sun Hung low in a reddening u-est. And every leaf was trembling, till the ivirid Called, and they answered with cries and clapping of hands. And beckoning they bade that I look. Ihere! There! What wast they saw, what saw? I looked again. The sinking sun had bathed them all in blood. Blood ' neath the olives ! I knew when I gazed I blushed as I looked to be man amongst men, Blushed with the leaves. And when the branches tvere bent Like One praying, His face to the earth, His lips in the dust, Prayed and shuddered and wept, Prayed and was dumb, Prayed, and the rivers of life Left their red courses and strayed, L bent down my face in the red dust and wept. And the crickets far off cried. Peace, Peace and Good Will. And the olive-branches cried. Peace, Peace. I walked beneath the olives rvhen the sun Hung low in a reddening ivest. Thomas E. Percy- THE REDWOOD. RETRIBUTION HAROLD R. McKINNON The eighteenth century was nearing its close with Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette on the throne. Affairs in France had come to such a pass that the entire nation felt the hour was at hand when either life or death had to be chosen by them, — the republic or a monarchy. It was the talk of the court, engrossed in all its luxury; it constituted the never ending prattle of the peasantry ; it was the daily theme of the lounger at the inn, and of the nobleman in the gay salons ; it was the hope of the oppressed, the terror of the royal officer. But interesting and important as it was to others, it was the one set pur- pose in the life of Monsieur Gabelle — Monsieur Gabelle in his dingy little tailor shop in one of the dingy little shacks of the village of St. Croix, out- side Paris, and it was the sole object, too, of the only other occupant of this stuffy unfrequnented chamber, for there was but one room. This per- son was none but Madame Gabelle herself — crafty, deceiving, and wicked, yet skillful and talented enough to be the more influential of the two. As for Monsieur Gabelle — he was short though heavily set and powerful of physique. His face, owing probab- ly to the treatment of his wife greatly resembled that of a scared wolf. He slunk around, — did not walk, and sel- dom seemed to notice anything. As a matter of fact, he didn ' t. He only thought. Except for the work which he performed for an occasional patron, this was his occupation. Even on the street (though seldom seen there), he was ever en- grossed with his own unpleasant thoughts. If one were asked to ex- plain the peculiar face of that Monsieur Gabelle, whose livelihood depended upon the patronage of a needy popu- lace, he would find it a difficult task. That ill-omened air of secrecy, how- ever, which the iron-jawed little man carried about him was in itself suf- ficient to ward off trifling company. That air of constant mqditation in- voluntarily refused interruption. As far as the village of St. Croix was con- cerned. Monsieur Gabelle could be briefly analyzed in the words of Du Bois, the gray haired old innkeeper who would explain him thus : " Gabelle minds his business. We mind ours. " For Monsieur ' s love of solitude there was, however, reason. In his earlier years he had been remarkable for skill with the sword, and in the dis " sipated brawls which marked his younger days, he had often resorted to it. With the life of more than one of his drunken opponents upon his 10 THE REDWOOD. conscience, he had in his more sober years, become dreadful even to him- self. Besides, Monsieur Gabelle had brooded for years over the loss of a favorite brother. Dropping mysteriously from the quaint home life of a lowly household, Leon Gabelle had never been heard of since. Like his younger brother he too had been a tailor, for it was the characteristic occupation of his family as far back as the old Bible on the shelf over the fireplace in Gabelle ' s shop chronicled the family ' s history. The failure of the elder brother to return from work on the evening of that perplexing day some years be- fore, and his subsequent absence in the first few days that followed, was as thoroughly argued and conjec- tured over as it was grieved over. Young, not yet twenty-five, thrifty, hard working, honest, — the joy and the hope of the humble circle had left them or had been taken away, leaving not the slightest hint as to his where- abouts or as to the cause of his sudden disappearance. The family waited and wondered. Surmises were many. Suicide, — that was out of the question. No young man could have been pos- sessed of a more buoyant disposition, none less throttled by serious cares. Accident? What could happen to an ordinary tailor? What grave dangers perturbed his safety? Then again, he had not prepared for nor had he, at any time, anticipated any journey. And thus the various presumptions eliminated themselves until, as a last probable reason, they thought of pos- sible abduction. Now the Law of Sus- pects was enforced and carried out with terrible partiality in that unset- tled age ; innocent men had been taken into custody in fearful mockery of jus- tice. Men, guiltless of any crime, were in prison in satisfaction of the mere whim of some fop favored by the court. " But who " , they asked them- selves, " could have borne such hatred against Leon? " Certainly none had been injured by their peaceful relative and hence would have found pleasure in doing him wrong. As a last stand, however, this idea gradually took pos- session of the minds of all save one, — and this one a , ' short, square-jawed little man, not over forty, with the suspicious air of a criminal about him, who muttered over his work or talked to his wife in the dingy little tailor shop of St. Croix. Moreover, even in his maturer years, Gabelle, it seemed, had made personal enemies, and, somehow or other, chiefly among the nobility. The taxes can be ascribed as the rea- son for hatred between him and the higher classes. The levies, at this time, were overbearing in the ex- treme and the collectors, no doubt, found Gabelle an obstinate fellow on their rounds. Yet the royal stat- statutes had to be fulfilled and Ga- belle, the tailor, was always forced to submit. Gabelle told his wife that he had been wronged. His wife told Ga- THE REDWOOD. 11 belle that she had been wronged ; and between two such vicious characters, — ah, what revenge would they have when the outbreak came. As the days gradually rolled by, events predicted the closer proximity of rebellion. The king began to ex- hibit signs of fear. The talk at the inns took on a more revolutionary tone. The ignorant and oppressed com- moners exulted at his weakness and determined to fight when the occasion presented itself. They were now more reluctant in complying with the hideous commands of the royal offi- cers. Taxes were collected less readi- ly. That obstinate tenor of the re- bellious conversation began to make itself manifest in their dealings with the court. There were very few pat- rons at the shop of Monsieur Gabelle these days, but he was not sorry. He could now prepare for the outbreak ; he could listen to the suggestions of his cruel wife. He made clear his plans to her, and with her prepared a campaign invaluable to the riotous revolutionists of France. For, with all his love of loneliness, Gabelle had an influence in the little village, and in the hope that he might figure prom- inently in the coming trouble he had instilled into the poorer and rougher classes of the little town his spirit of rebellion and bitter revenge. A memorable night for the rude in- habitants of the tranquil village was the eve of the thirteenth of July. There was little sleep for these other- wise unprofitable disciples of Gabelle, and behind the screen of concealing shutters, through which the miserable candle cast its gloomy rays, mutinous conversations were prolonged into the morning hours. The next day, as history also re- minds us, the outbreak came. Even the weather seemed to assume a thor- oughly becoming aspect. Hot, sultry, there was a certain uneasiness in the very air of France, ill-fated France, that day. Not the slightest breath of wind disturbed the sweltering atmos- phere, so that Nature left the revol- utionists without a single obstacle to perform their deadly work. Along the dusty highway towards the city swarmed the howling mob, with weapons clenched in their hard- ened fists and determination written upon their faces. On they rushed, bawling out their cries of " Vive la Republique " and " Abas la Bastille. " They were joined from time to time by other rioters whose presence added greatly to their volume and strength. The Bastille of Paris was one of the most antiquated and incommodious of all the prisons in France. It consisted of several low, flat structures covering so much space that it trenched ser- iously upon the dismal yard which lay behind the great high walls. These walls were brick, of a dull red color and formidable enough in their as- pect. They cut off from the view al- most the whole prison. There was but one exception ; — a talj tower, tapering from the bottom, rose de- fyingly out of the silent depths of 12 THE REDWOOD. the old Bastille. Narrow, railed plat- forms encircled this edifice a short distance from each other. The sep- arate floors of the tower were con- nected by an inner stair as well as the winding steps which pro- vided access to the top by means of the outside. There was yet another guard against outbreak or attack, and this was a deep wide moat which com- pletely surrounded the prison a few yards from its exterior walls. The on- ly means of entrance to the place, then, consisted of a rough draw-bridge which spanned the depths of the inter- vening moat. This was drawn high in the air at all times: it was lowered but seldom to afford means of cross- ing for incoming or departing prison- ers. Without its being dropped it was a feat next to impossible to enter the Bastille of Paris. The prison was reached by noon and hostilities began. All through the long sultry afternoon the conflict raged. Shot from the mob poured steadily into the tower and prison yard below. The guards, urged on by the commands of De Launey,the war- den, exposed themselves bravely in an effort to hold the prison but suffer- ed seriously from the unarmed men be- yond the moat. At five o ' clock, though, De Launey saw the futility of further resistance and raised the white flag of defeat. Truce signals were exchanged and the draw-bridge lowered. The mob surged madly across and crowded the little strip of ground between the prison wall and moat. Eager clamorings went up from the rioters who demanded entrance to the Bastille by their cries — and here De Launey saw his mistake. He now knew that their intent was " blood " , and feared to open the bolted gate. They clamored the more, — the war- den became the more firm. Thus stood the crisis of the thirteenth of July for several minutes — minut es of suspense and terror for the inmates of the pri- son, of consultation and planning for the crowd outside. The climax came abruptly. A great shout went up. A man, one of the revolutionists, was scaling the walls of the prison. And with the cry, " Gabelle, " " Avec Gabelle " , every re- publican who had a weapon pushed forward. The guards inside stood terrified, as they understood well the result of a hand-to-hand contest with the infuriated mass. They determined to stand, however, till the last man, and a new kind of battle began. But in spite of their grim determination and united efforts. Monsieur Gabelle, by means of his long thick sword, v as destroying them with terrible in- difference. There were now but two of them left. He would slay them in a moment. Just at this juncture, when the work of the mob was on the point of com- pletion, a prisoner clad in the convict garb of the Bastille, leaping down the stairs from one of the platforms of the tower , diverted their attention. In his right hand, he held a short rusty sword, a wicked-looking instrument. THE REDWOOD. 13 and for an instant, the great crowd, that unrelenting sea of wickedness, that seething mass of humanity with their hoarse cries of revenge and un- restrained cruelty, grew silent and fell back. From their distance they viewed for a few short moments the stranger thus inopportunely interupt- ing their day of success. The first impression was that in the newcomer, they, or at least, Gabelle had to en- counter a terrible antagonist. The guards that were left would infallibly fall before the sword of the skillful duellist, but what of the stranger? They were soon to know the answer. As he reached the bottom he waved the ugly weapon madly over his head and shouted some indistinct guttural sounds with all the unnaturalness of insanity. His eyes bulged noticeably from their sockets, and his long gray hair hung in a confused mass over his flushed red face. The crowd, which had been enjoying the interest- ing spectacle of Gabelle slaying the guards, now trembled at closer sight of the horrible maniac. Gabelle hesi- tated for a moment, then took his stand, and with his sword ready, wait- ed for his opponent. He had just ad- justed the shield when his antagonist rushed upon him. If strength were to decide the contest then the prisoner would certainly be the victor, for he was superhuman in his frightful con- dition. A well-aimed and skillful blow might end the battle. The pris- oner missed, and as he flew past, Ga- belle thrust at him but a second too late. Amidst the cries of the mob to keep his nerve Gabelle cooly waited a second attack. His opponent made a treacherous cat-like spring, thrusting as he jumped. Gabelle stepped quick- ly back, and as the prisoner fell heav- ily to the ground he pierced him through the side. With a hoarse cry of triumph the mob surged to the spot and lifted their their leader upon exultant backs. The guards that remained had taken ad- vantage of the momentary excitement to escape and the prison was now in the hands of the revolutionists. Hav- ing freed all the prisoners they pro- ceeded, more quietly, to plunder the old fortress. The stairways were soon crowded with them ; little parties, owing to the greater familiarity which some bore others, were thus informally or- ganized, and the work of minor pillage began. In each cell (for they were all inspect ed), was found some article or inscription of interest, and, in not a few, diaries which the prisoners had kept secreted in some obscure crevice of the walls or cell. In the course of their inspection, however, Gabelle ' s party reached one cell which was in an awful condition. The door hung widely open, the cot was overturned, and a large hole was in the mattress. A chair had been smashed to splinters, and a table whereon must have laid the scissors, needle, thread and prison cloth now scattered about the floor, had suffered a similar fate. 14 THE REDWOOD. Of course they were not slow in perceiving that this cell had been the home of the maniac. Gabelle, some- what curious to know something of his victim, searched the cell most thoroughly. Nothing beyond the or- dinary scant articles of the prison cell at first, revealed itself. But Monsieur Gabelle was not content. He exam- ined the walls, — not a crack or crevice in all four sides. Then looking care- fully around for several seconds, he suddenly started, — then stooped and picked up a small scrap of thin brown paper upon which there was the faint scribbling of a trembling hand. He lifted it up and read aloud : " It is my only chance. They have been fighting now for hours. If the mob wins, this twenty years of hell, then, Pompadour and all your fiendish slaves, shall be at an end. I am almost crazy now, and if the guards win I shall certainly lose . " Gabelle stopped ab- ruptly as the writing ended thus and slowly supplied the words, " my mind. " At this very juncture, the prisoner faithful to his diary, had gone insane. Instead of satisfying him this little note only whetted his curiosity. He continued his search for writing and after hunting assiduously for several minutes, the idea of the chimney sud- denly presented itself. Stepping across the cell, he examined it closely. In a moment he discovered that he could insert his hand through the narrow bars that enclosed the opening to the roof. He thrust his hand between them. His face, the evil face of Mon- sieur Gabelle, lighted up as he with- drew it and held out tightly a packet of papers bound by a string. He brought them to the light of the little square window, and drawing the diary close to his face began to read. But the voice of the cruel Gabelle choked on the very first word. His ruddy cheeks turned ashen white and the courageous rioter fell forward in a swoon. The event had been so strange that the other members of his party stood dazed. No one uttered a sound nor changed his position for a brief few seconds. Finally one of them ner- vously lifted the papers from the floor and read the cause of Monsieur ' s dis- may. But two words, carefully writ- ten on the outside of the diary, re- vealed the maniac: " Leon Gabelle. " THE REDWOOD. IS GREATER LOVE THAN THIS— " RODNEY A. YOELL It was cold, so cold that the police- man on the beat huddled himself up to the box-stove in Heggarty ' s, and in company with several maudlin indi- viduals, told stories that at best were left unmentioned. He dared not go further than the door, which he approached on several occasions and opened, only to be driven back by the drizzle and biting cold wind which shook the murky window panes and howled wierdly through the telegraph wires. Now and then a cab could be heard rattling over the cobblestones, and once in a great while some deep- throated whistle warned boats on the bay that this was the night of all nights for a collision. But the bloated reprejsentative of law and order cared neither for the rain, or wind, or boats on the bay, for with plenty of whisky and such genial companions his time of duty would pass rapidly, and therefore laughter waxed louder and jests coarser. The building in which Heggarty had his establishment was a story-and a-half affair, and from the dingy warped window of the room enclosed therein, a sign swung creakingly in the wind. Had there been light sufficient for the purpose, you could have read inscribed in faded gold let- tess the words Dr. P. B. Haverhill, Physician Surgeon. And while in the room below Offi- cer Swane laughed and joked uproar- iously, Dr. Haverhill vainly tried to concentrate his mind on a worn copy of Turndoffsho ' s Surgical Pathology. But the thin, cheap boards of the flooring ill prevented the sounds of revelry from below entering his room, and therefore tlie Doctor studied in vain. Finally, unable to withstand the bedlam any longer, he closed the book, and laying his head on his arms flung himself on a miserable pallet and mused on the brevity of life. The Doctor was a young man and out of college some two years. In those two years he had lived a life of constant deterioration. Futily endeav- oring to uphold the ethics of his pro- fession he had rejected those precar- ious cases of malpractice which are so frequently offered to young physi- cians, and in spite of all his pressing financial needs, he remained firm, and so sank lower and low er until we find him flung hopelessly on his pallet, a man open to temptation and blasted in hope even at the dawn of his career. While the Doctor was musing the babble below ceased suddenly ; a voice could be heard talking in tones of in- tense excitement, to be followed pres- ently by a rush of feet up the stairs 16 THE REDWOOD. to the office and a pounding " on the physician ' s door. " Doctor, O Doctor, for God ' s sake open quick. " Springing to his feet Dr. Haverhill rushed to his door, unbolted it, and admitted the officer, Heggarty, and a scared youth who continued his bawl- ing: " Come quickly — Mrs. Lathrop, she ' s dying, sir. Come quickly — 238 Weber street. " The Doctor having " flung on his frayed and shabby overcoat, seized his satchel and rushed down the stairs, followed by the group. Across Gar- field Square they fled, passed the granite sides of the Hall of Records, through two blocks of Chinatown, and at last up Weber street to 238, where a creaking flight of stairs led to a dark, gas-lighted hall, at the end of which clustered a scared group of women. The Doctor took in the situation at a glance, saw what he had expected and hastily inspecting the group of women, singled out the most capable looking, and ordered : " All the warm water and towe)ls you can bring me. You (indicating a second), come with me. They were fools to wait so long. " Plunging into the room he banged the door behind him and commenced the struggle which was to endure for hours. All that night he labored, and at last in the early quiet of the morn- ing a plaintive, pathetic little wail went up, and even as the rising sun streaked pink the eastern sky, a new life was added to the world. Per- chance that plaintive utterance was the first protest of the newly born. The Doctor left while still the street lamps burned, tired in body, tired in mind. Thus amid dingy, sordid sur- rovmdings was Margaret born. Let me now draw a veil before the reader ' s eyes. Two years will have elapsed ere it will be cast aside and in two years many things may have transpired. Lives may have been lived, deaths may have been died, and in the life-stream of one of our char- acters a change has taken place in which the handiwork of God is at its greatest. Ascend with me, dear reader, a flight of rickety, creaky stairs and en- ter a hall which does not seem unfa- miliar. It is gas-lit, dim and murky, and if you tap a bell hung for that purpose, a woman will appear who is the landlady, and about her clings an air of familiarity even as about the hallway. Upon close scrutiny and if you vv ere observant the first time, you will now recognize her as the woman whom Dr. Haverhill signaled out from the clustered group in the same hallway at the opening of our story. This is Mrs. Murdock, proprietress of the rooming-house conducted at 238 Weber Street. She is a large woman, tall and broad, rather dis- heveled and somewhat untidy. Her mouth is puckered in a perpetual smile, owing to a peculiar burn. Her eyes are large and heavily-lidded; THE REDWOOD. 17 they would have been good-looking had she been younger. Her voice is husky with asthma and her throat is extremely wrinkled. Yet in spite of this she is attractive, not from the view-point of physical charms, but from a subtle intangible spirit of camaraderie which emanates from her. Withal she is jovial, sensible, and pos- sesses a peculiar faculty not often found in her sex, that of minding her own business. Therefore it is not sur- prising that her lodging-house was frequented by those individuals who admire the above-named quality, and at the same time find it necessary in their business. Owing to this, more- over, the police kept vigilant eyes on her establishment and not unfrequent- ly was a lodger hastily transferred from there to prison. Among the lodgers whom we find now abiding at her domicile is a per- son of some interest, and he is con- versing with the landlady in the hall- way. He is tall, well-formed and more than ordinarily good looking. His hair is dark and curly, while a neatly trimmed moustache covers his upper lip. His eyes are black, with wonderfully long lashes, from be- neath which there beams forth a glance that is kindness itself. Yet there is nothing jovial or attractive about the man ; on the contrary he is repulsive, and, as if he realized this, he was unobtrusive. A third made up the little group, but this person was as unlike the other two as possible. Imagine a jewel in a miserable setting, a flower surrounded by weeds, a star endeav- oring to twinkle through dark and murky clouds. Such was the position of this being. She was not grown up ; on the contrary, she was a little child. About her head hung a mass of hair of a peculiar reddish tinge, not auburn, not blonde, but of the tint of gold in the melting pot. Her eyes were large, deep, and in the iris nature had placed a blue like unto the sea, the sky, or distant mountains in the haze of summer. The mouth had lips of perfect contour and flushing color, while about them lurked ineffable ten- derness. This was Margaret, the baby born at the opening of our story. Her mother, after a year of fruitless en- deavor, had given up the struggle of life with all its adversities, and had been carried down the stairs in a long wooden box, to where, at the side- walk, amidst a gaping curious throng, the public hearse awaited her. While this scene was being enacted little Margaret had taken her first few baby steps and toddled about the now vacant room, and below, over the cobblestones, rattled the hearse bear- ing her mother away — forever. Then came a charity worker, a prim stiff young lady in a clean starched shirt-waist with a volume of sanita- tion under her arm. She met Mrs. Murdock at the head of the stairs. Naturally repellant to each other the two women ' s conversation was brief, but in the end the settlement worker 18 THE REDWOOD. went her way, and Margaret escaped the cold mechanical charity of an or- phanage and remained in the tene- ment protected by the ample arms of Mrs. Murdock. Like a ray of sunlight was she to them all. Mrs. Murdock brushed up her clothes and she came to look most neat. Ellis, the tall, sinister boarder, ceased his swearing, while Shultz, a little German clockmaker, who room- ed there, forgot to get drunk and be- came quite industrious, making for her odd and comical mechanical toys. But above them all, these three boon companions, did Margaret love Ellis. Whenever he would come in, the patter of her tiny feet down the hall as she went to meet him, would be heard, while in laughing, gurgling, baby accents she would beg to " wide piggy back " — " wide piggy back, for little Marga. " No wonder that he loved her, this tiny strange little creature whom he held in vast awe. Oftentimes he would take her diminutive hand in his and match its size, softness and pink color with his long, dark, tapering palm. Then again, he would play horse, and she upon his back babbled commands which kept him on his hands and knees almost for hours. But Sunday was the day of all. O what a delight there was in the comic sheet ! The funny doings, the odd pranks — all had to be explained to her, while in the magazine supplement one could read such wonderful tales. Thus into the hearts of them all she crept and about the fibres of one she became linked, even as close as life itself. To Ellis she was as the breath to his lungs. Waking, sleep- ing — ever and always, was she con- stantly before him, yet he despised himself because his love for her was marred by the dual existence he lived. When the evening mists descended and the city slept from its day of toil, he would slink out into the streets and fight a battle against society towards which he acted as a preda- tory beast. Often in the early cool hours of the morning he would sulk wearily to his room before the sun was fully up, and there, with furtive glance about, and after locking his door, would deposit his booty in a hole concealed in the floor. There was a satchel that he was very jealous of and took extreme pains not to let fall into any other hands for fear that prying eyes should spy the long steel levers, drills, and bits. But one night, or rather morning, he did not return as usual ; and Mrs. Murdock knew without glancing at the paper that he was apprehended. Weeks passed and still he did not re- turn, until she had about given up hope and was on the point of renting his room. But at this juncture he re- appeared, and his first question was — Margaret? He looked — the expression in the eyes of Mrs. Murdock boded some- thing. THE REDWOOD. 19 " What — what is it? " he stammered. " Not gone? " " No, " she replied, " but sick, Jim — very sick. You couldn ' t have come at a better time. " " Where is she? I must see her now — at once. " Slowly they tiptoed down the hall- way together and entered a room, dark and fetid, — smelling of steam and laundry soap. On a couch placed in the corner a little figure lay. The breath was heavily drawn and wheezed ; the cheeks, deadly pale save for a hectic burning, the mouth was contracted with pain, while the lips were blue. A little hand stole querulously out from underneath the coverlet and flitted across the burning forehead. The nails that had been as pink as any coral were now darkened and the wrists were wasted to the bone. But Oh, the eyes — those deep and wondrous eyes ! Deeper in blue than ever, softer in light than that of summer sunset, of a purer white than any alabaster; the lids tremble over them, descend, shut them out, then slowly rise and show forth their beauty again. Around the bed three or four wom- en clustered ; at the foot knelt a priest. He had been called by a Mrs. Calla- han, and remained, struck by the beauty of the child. Ellis went to the bed, bent over her and pressed a kiss on the forehead. The eyes opened, recognized him and a smile hovered about the lips that had been drawn in pain. " How long has she been like this? " he asked, his voice tense and an ex- pression on his face such as Mrs. Murdock had never seen there before or ever dreamed possible, so tender was the glance. " Since morning, and — and the doc- tor says it ' s no use for him to come again, as it ' s a case for a specialist. He ain ' t one, and good Lord, Jim, we haven ' t a cent to get one. Have you? " Sadly he shook his head. " No, " he muttered, " I haven ' t a penny in God ' s world. " Tears fell from his eyes as he walked out and to his room. But there he stepped upon a board and the squeak it gave forth pierced his heart like a cry. " Take it out ; take it out. " The thought ran through his brain. But the weird surge of the wind around the chimney the roof and cornices made him shudder at a ter- ror that loomed black, gigantic, appall- ing before him. A tomb; dead, yet living; damned and in hell, yet pain-racked and sensi- tive to the life throb without the walls. A blackness, the cries of pain, groans, curses, imprecations, all, all these flooded his brain and the terror loom- ed greater, deadlier than before. But yet those eyes, that face, the look, as if God had exerted all His wondrous power to produce them, the touch of blue on the iris, bluer, clearer, purer than anything else in the world, — and yet they were clouded with pain. Aye, pain, — pain,— pain, a body only God could have made suffering, crying, enduring, because the sacrifice 20 THE REDWOOD. of a few years of life and such a life was dear and hard to make. Oh God who made this little world of ours, how we suffer, and grope without the pale ! But you have died for us and at the last we shall understand. Within his hands he held her life, but then those eyes, so fair, so pure, might some day damn a man and laugh at the damning. Beneath that board upon which his eyes were fixed lay plate and jewels. Their sale meant money. But just so surely as it meant money, just so surely did it mean living death. Weinstein, that scavenger of the under world, would buy them. And on having bought them the police would buy him. The price upon a dead man ' s head, murdered for these very jewels, would be enough to buy any Jew, yes let me say, dear reader, any Jew, even though he were not an Israelite, and there are many such. Thirty pieces of silver was the price of One — some ask even less, though they have not the hate nor the malice. If Ellis sold these jewels it meant the life of Margaret, the death of him. The sleuth-hounds of the law could trace him even by his handkerchief, had they possessed one. With the sold jewels and Weinstein, the rope was even now about his neck. But ah, that love, those eyes, to grat- ify a wish of them he would brave hell itself, and rising he tore up the board, removed his loot — and did. The specialist did come, but all his skill and knowle dge were useless in the attempt to save the life. He was a pompous man and well used to death, yet there was a tear upon his eyes and a quiver in his voice when he said with a sigh " You have waited too long. " Ah, yes, indeed, they had waited too long. The little life was fast ebb- ing away, the bubble of existence was frail ; it burst, shattered into a thou- sand irridescent bits, and went out. Great gray walls rising in the cold morning mist, until the heavy clouds which hung low seemed almost to touch them. At the corners of the walls were towers, and in them were gvms commanded by men who were not afraid to shoot. Within those walls were many buildings containing many men, some paying to society the debt they owed, and some were paying who owed not. The toil and moil, the suffering and pain were apparent on every face, but here and there was a face upon which it was not to linger long. An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, was the law, therefore a life for a life. With the rising of the sun that morn a man was taken from his cell, marched slowly past two rows of sullen fellow-prisoners, and led through a door out of which alive he was never to come. They placed a rope about his neck, a black cap upon his head ; a priest worked with nervous fingers and mur- mured soothing prayers. THE REDWOOD. 21 The trap was opened, closed again ; a doctor felt a twitching pulse, and sadly shook his head, and went away. They buried him in the prison ceme- tery, on a little hillside sloping in the sun. In the spring-time warm rains fall and flowers bloom over his head. And the wind comes and rustles the grasses, bowing and nodding the pop- pies ' heads, while a bird soaring in its freedom carols the song of nature to the whole wide world. And many miles to the south where a giant city sprawls and mars the land- scape, spreading like a great sore over the shores of a beautiful bay, — just on the outskirts lies a cemetery, and in one corner is the potter ' s field. Old and tumbled wooden crosses mark the graves of some; others can only be distinguished by rolling mounds and thicker weeds, yet the same sky spreads over all ; the same rain falls and lays a tear upon the graves, and the same bird-notes carol to their Maker. In two separated graves they lie united by a common bond of love, and when the last day comes and they stand before the Judge of all, who can doubt their fate, for written on the brow of one is " Innocence, " and to the other can the words be laid, " Greater love than this no man hath than that he should lay down his life for his friend " ? O happy grapes to pour your life for sin ! O happy wheat what glory thou dost win ! O happy chalice-cup Thus to be holden up And feel the beating of His Heart within. 22 THE REDWOOD. JAMIE Tlie green grass grows aboun thy grave, And thy dry hones lie below, Jamie Jamie, wilt thou nae come hame Where I sit and sew ? It is nae hut ane long week, Not ane hut only ticae, TJiat you kissed me on this very cheek, And then went away. Jamie mind you not haw Charley cries? And honny Nan is weeping too. If you ' ll not come to us Jamie Then we must come to you. The heather ' s gone the snaw is come, And the hiting ivinds do hlow, And there they sat them down to weep, Where the hiting winds do hlow. Ane, at his head, twae at his feet. And she his hody heside. And when the cold sun came again She was her Jamie ' s hride. Paul Perkins. THE REDWOOD. 23 WHEN THE TRAIN FAILED F. BUCKLEY McGURRiN An important financial institution of Salt Lake maintains a branch bank in Tooele, a small smelter town situ- ated at the southern extremity of Tooele valley, distant forty miles from the metropolis of Utah. The chief reason for the establish- ment of the branch bank was the pat- ronage extended by the Great Inter- national Smelter of Tooele, the month- ly payroll of which amounted to sixty thousand dollars. As the night shift, comprising five hundred of the smelter hands, was re- leased at 9 o ' clock on the morning of the last day of the month to receive their pay-checks, it had been the cus- tom of the Salt Lake bank to express the requisite amount of money to Tooele the previous night. On a certain eventful evening, — to be precise, the twenty-ninth of June — the money, through some error, re- mained unsent, and the morning of the thirtieth found it still in the vaults in Salt Lake. Soon after the opening of the vaults the error was discovered. The cash- ier, who was immediately notified, rushed to the president ' s private of- fice. One can easily imagine what might happen in circumstances such as these. The men live a wild life at best, and are accustomed to have their will in everything. Should they for a moment come to believe or suspect that they were being cheated out of their pay, violence of no uncertain kind would be their answer. There was besides the bank to consider. Plainly it would have to close its doors, and if that happened its credit would be lost forever. After a hurried consultation the cashier ' s son Harry was informed of the grave situation, and directed to prepare his fast semi-racer, a specially built E. M. F. and carry the money to Tooele. Obedient to orders, at nine o ' clock he drew up at the massive bronze gates of the bank, and a few moments later he was off down the main thor- oughfare with an armed bank mes- senger and sixty thousand dollars as cargo. Through heavy traffic to the foot of the street progress was discourag- ingly slow, but as the racy little E. M. F. skidded around the curve into the Redwood road Harry " gave her the gun, " and grinned at the startled mes- senger through a face generously smeared with grease, as were his hands, jersey, and trousers. Three minutes later, with the motor roaring like a gattling gun and ' hitting " like a clock, they met the Western Pacific tracks. As they rushed up the short incline 24 THE REDWOOD. leading to the crossing the messenger devoutly, but hurriedly, muttered a prayer for a clear track, and apparent- ly his prayer was heard. According to the bank messenger, when they struck the rails all four wheels left the ground; moreover, they failed to touch it again for at least twenty-five feet. But one must make allowance, as far as the mes- senger is concerned, as this was his first ride, — at least of this sort. Often, as a fleeting squawk told of another chicken that had left the home roost forever, or a roadside irrigating ditch made a most noble effort, on the occasion of one of their broad skids, to claim at least an axle, he cast an appealing glance toward the cashier ' s son. All glances of this sort, or, in fact, of any sort, were lost upon Harry, however; for, peering through his dusty goggles, his face drawn tense, his teeth set, he had eyes for nothing but the road, and ears only for the hum and the roar of the motor. Only once, when the messenger ' s hat sailed away into the cloud of dust that hung on their rear, his appeal for a short stop was answered by a look of blank amazement, and an order to " pump up some compression, bone- head. " As Granger, Lake Point, and Pleas- ant Green successively sprang into view and presented the usual village stores, with their groups of open- mouthed loungers, the messenger felt his fear gradually ebbing away; and almost before he was aware of the fact he had entered into the spirit of this race against time for the salva- tion of a bank. By the time the out- skirts of Garfield were entered, he v as pumping up gasoline, " shooting " oil into the crank case, and watching the gauges with the air of an experi- enced mechanician. At Garfield, twenty miles out of Salt Lake, they were obliged to slow down by a flock of sheep in the road ; and the grimy driver took advantage of the momentary respite to glance at his watch. It was twenty-eight min- utes after nine— showing that they had traveled the twenty miles at an average of forty-two miles an hour, very fair time for the roads of Salt Lake county. Meanwhile the night shift at the smelter stood in a long line at the window of the superintendent. As each man received his check he shoul- dered his lunch-box and tools and tramped down to the train which stood panting at the platform, ready for the twenty-minute run from the smelter to Tooele. At forty minutes past nine a strange, racy-looking car flashed through the little town of Arthur, seven miles west of Garfield. As the steady bark of its exhaust died away up the road, the said residents re- marked : " You can ' t tell nawthin ' ' bout what them artermobile fellers will be adoin ' next " — these sentiments being deliv- ered amid sage shakes of the head. THE REDWOOD. 25 At last the long line of men at the smelter had dwindled down to one lone Servian. As he grasped his check in one grimy hand the locomo- tive emitted a farewell blast of her whistle, and with a clanking of brakes the short train moved off down the grade to the town. At a point about three miles from Tooele, the railroad crosses the main highway, and then, turning south, runs straight into the town. As the engineer whistled for this crossing, his heart seemed to leave the place for which it had primarily been designed, and strive mightily to enter his mouth. The cause of this sudden commotion was a sudden, sharp, crackling bark; and as the locomotive rolled over the crossing it grazed the rear spring of a dust-covered racing car. After a c uickly indrawn breath, one of the occupants of the machine moist- ened his dry lips, and stole a glance at the youthful d river. Harry, on his part, was intently observing the progress of the train, and apparently computing the distance remaining to be covered. It is at this point that the grade which forms the southern slope of the valley becomes apparent, and Harry noticed with sinking heart the decreas- ing speed of the car. Although he used all the power available on both throttles, the train steadily gained on them. With still a mile and a half to go the locomotive was abreast, while at the " city " limits it held a lead of a hundred yards. Harry was fast giv- ing ' way under the strain and disap- pointment, and as the men on the platform of the last car waved a laughing farewell to him, the world seemed black indeed. By this time they were well inside the town, and as they turned into a street which runs close by the side of the railroad track they were caught in a tangle of horses, wagons, buggies and pedestrians. Harry ' s face was covered with perspiration. As he shifted from high to intermediate, he actually sobbed aloud. Pushing his way through the crowd with all possible speed, he ultimately reached its outskirts, and " stepping " on the foot throttle he set his teeth and changed rapidly back to high speed. The grade at this point is so slight as to be almost imperceptible, and Harry began to regain courage as the plucky little motor began to " pick up " again. As they gathered headway, he threw caution to the winds, and raced along the narrow road, between the railroad track and an irrigating ditch, at reckless speed. He perceived the lead of the train diminishing, and hope straggled back into his heart. He " opened her up " a few notches more. Around buggies on two wheels, skidding, almost, into thelegraph poles he went, and by the time the last turn was reached was again even with the first car. Here was a predicament. The road, which turned sharply at this point, 26 THE REDWOOD. was not more than eight feet wide ; and, as the raih-oad track turned also, the train formed a menacing, moving wall on the side on which the skidding would occur. On the other hand, a telegraph pole stood on the inner side of the curve, while immediately back of it lay the ditch. Toward the curve they rushed with unabated speed. The messenger, white as a ghost and thor- oughly frightened, cried : " For God ' s sake, boy, slow down! " The only answer he received was a savage snarl from the driver. They reached the curve. Timing the move to a nicety, Harry whirled the wheel over, missing the pole by a fraction of an inch. Then there was a sickening skid; a sullen, grinding jar; and as the rear springs struck the side of the rapidly moving train the car was turned almost completely around, and nearly upset. As if nothing had occurred, Harry again " shifted, " and reversing the " helm " went rocking off down the road on two wheels. They now gained rapidly on the train, and when three blocks from the bank they began to draw away from the locomotive. The messenger, peer- ing ahead, made out the form of the bank cashier, hatless and coatless, standing at the side of the road. At sight of the racer, the cashier emitted a joyful whoop, and indulged in antics that resembled an Indian war dance. Before the car had drawn up at the edge of the walk (Tooele being as yet curbless), the cashier rushed toward him, and seizing a bundle of currency in each hand disappeared into the bank. The messenger immediately fol- lowed his example. Once inside, the two men exchanged hurried congratu- lations, and began a count of the money as the engine ' s bell signaled the approach of the checks. Suddenly the messenger bethought himself of the youthful driver who had accomplished the thr illing feat. On issuing forth, he found that Harry had lifted one side of the hood and was delving into those mysterious regions the tyro knows only as " in- nards. " The messenger slapped the bent back and remarked in glowing terms on the boy ' s cleverness and dar- ing. " Why, Harry " , he cried enthusi- astically, " you ' ll be a hero, my boy! " A muffled voice issued from ' way down in the depths, and in tones of sarcasm, exclaimed: " Hero, nothin ' ! I pretty near bust- ed the magneto coupling! " THE REDWOOD. 27 PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA The object of The Redwood is to gather together what is best in the literary work of the students, to record University doings and to knit closely the hearts of the boys of the present and the past EDITORIAL STAFF EDITOR _ . - BUSINESS MANAGER ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER REVIEWS . - - ALUMNI - - - - UNIVERSITY NOTES - ATHLETICS ALUMNI CORRESPONDENTS STAFF ARTIST ASSOCIATE EDITORS THE EDITOR EXECUTIVE BOARD THE BUSINESS MANAGER ROY A. BRONSON, ' 12 ROBERT J. FLOOD, ' 13 HAROLD R. MCKINNON, ' 14 RODNEY A. YOELL, ' 14 LAWRENCE A. FERNSWORTH, Special EDWARD O ' CONNOR, ' 16 FRANK G. BOONE, ' 14 jCHAS. D. SOUTH, Litt. D., ' 01 JALEX. T. LEONARD, A. B., ' 10 GEORGE B. LYLE, ' 13 THE EDITOR OF REVIEWS Address all communications to THE REDWOOD, University of Santa Clara, California Terms of subscription. Si. 50 a year; single copies 25 cents EDITORIAL The cloak of night The New closed around the University - „ their sacred memories, and the initial year of the new university has dawned with all that vigor and enthu- siasm which has always characterized Santa Clara. Among the faculty are seen many new faces, and with the large increase in the pedagogical staff there has been also a simultaneous augmentation of the university ' s cur- riculum. A various selection of well chosen courses stands open to the stu- dent, and it has been the endeavor of those in charge to give an excellent drill in each subject rather than an immense selection of inferior courses. So the prospects for the year look exceedingly bright, and The Redwood 28 THE REDWOOD. predicts that the year shall be a ban- ner one in the annals of Santa Clara. It has been said that a good start sig- nifies a successful future, and we are sure that our new university will prove no exception to the rule. To Fr. Morrissey, our beloved President, and to the whole faculty, The Redwood extends her deep and heartfelt good wishes for the prosper- ity and triumph of the new Santa Clara. We are bound up in your suc- cess, heart and soul. May the achievements of the past be dimmed only by the attainments that are to come. A Word About Under the able di- ,, . rectorship of rr. C Our Magazine a 1 1 c t " A. Buckley, S. J., an entirely new staff will undertake the management and production of The Redwood for the ensuing year, and it is not without a deep feeling of re- sponsibility that those duties have been assumed. In the past The Red- wood has maintained an exceptionally high standard of literary worth, hav- ing been chosen for three consecutive years among the ten best college magazines in the country. This year we are striving to retain that stand- ard which was formerly enjoyed, and we earnestly solicit the hearty co-op- eration and united effort of the stu- dent body to assist us in our work. The Redwood is a college institu- tion just as much as track or football, and like them, it also depends upon the students for its life and vitality. We are looking forward to contribu- tions from everyone who ever " plied the quill, " or who ever had an inspira- tion so to do. Literary material is developed as the athlete, and often- times just as the " Jim Thorpe " or " Tim McGrath " is discovered, so also buried within the walls of our institu- tion the " mute inglorious Milton " may lie. So get the spirit; don ' t shirk, but put the energy behind your pen and contribute. Among the many Au Revoir changes in the fac- ulty this semester we deeply regret the loss of Fr. Morton, Fr. Rossetti, Mr. Lonergan and Mr. Budde. In them The Redwood and the Student Body have lost four staunch friends, who were ever working for their success and better- ment. Fr. Morton is doing his third year of probation at Poughkeepsie, Fr. Rossetti is now holding sway over the docile aspirants for the classic tongues at St. Ignatius University in San Francisco, while Mr. Lonergan and Mr. Budde have departed for Gonzaga College, Spokane, to delve into the depths of St. Thomas and Aristotle. To you all The Redwood tenders the expression of her regard, and wishes you success and keen enjoy- ment of your new duties. THE REDWOOD. 29 The Late Jas. R. Kelly The recent passing of James R. Kelly of San Francisco has brought from all parts of the country a flood of sympathetic messages to the relatives of the deceased and the highest tributes to the character of that prominent Catholic leader, whose life was an inspiration to all his fel- low citizens. Mr. Kelly was born in Ireland in 1827, and came to San Francisco in the year 1855. Although prepared for the bar, he never follow- ed his profession, and was occupied here from the beginning chiefly as a financier. In 1890 he gave up his mercantile enterprises to accept the presidency of the Hibernia Bank. He was also a pioneer member of the Chamber of Commerce. Says the Monitor, (S. F.) : " Deep religious devotion character- ized Mr. Kelly ' s whole life. Nor was there any grain of superficiality in his devotion. His tall, impressive figure might be seen at St. Ignatius at any hour, assisting at Mass, going to con- fession, kneeling at vespers, or even if one merely dropped in in passing. " Mr. Kelly was fitly characterized the " lay apostle. " He had been Pre- fect of The Gentlemen ' s Sodality of Saint Ignatius Church almost since its organization by Father Bouchard. His life was ever a high aspiration and ennobling influence to all with whom he came in contact. His happy death was a fit closing to a life so sin- cere and devotional. The Austra- lian Ruggers The University of Santa Clara was but lately the proud host of the pick of Australia ' s brawniest rugby men. The account of our wel- come to them and the game itself are recorded in other departments of this magazine, yet the gentlemanly, sportsmanlike demeanor of our brother rugbyites seems deserving of some special comment. Australia has long been famed for her athletes, not alone for their brawn and prowess, but also for that high standard of good, clean- cut games and sportsman-like fairness with which she treats all comers. The Waratahs proved no exception to the rule. Santa Clara found them in every respect true men and true athletes. Men of this calibre, who are genuine sportsmen in every sense of the word, are men after Santa Clara ' s own heart, and it is our sincere wish that the rugby of California will profit by those high-standard, technical, sports- manlike fighting games which will be accorded them by their brothers from the antipodes. The Late Rev. During the past Matthew forty years in which Russell, S. J. he edited the Irish Monthly (Dublin), Fr. Russell proved himself one of the big forces in pres- ent-day literature. From his pen came alike, the sweet song, the dispassion- ate criticism and the scholarly essay. Through the medium of his paper, it was he who introduced to the world 30 THE REDWOOD. such bright stars in the literary firma- ment as Sir Wm. Butler, Rosa Mul- hoUand, W. B. Yeates and many others. It was with almost prophetic fore- sight that the last volume from his pen, was styled " A Soggarth ' s Last Verses. " But probably the most mem- orable of all his lines are those which the immortal Gladstone uttered on his deathbed : " My dying hour how near art thou? Or near or far, my head I bow Before God ' s ordinance supreme: But Ah, how priceless then will seem Each moment rashly squandered now ! " In the loss of Fr. Russell The Red- wood feels a personal bereavement, for it was our extreme good fortune to have been his good friend, and several times the recipients of favorable com- ment from his pen. No later than the June number of this year he said : " We have sometimes spoken of The Redwood as in form the stateliest of all the college magazines that we are acquainted with. It cannot now be too stately in form, for it represents the Catholic University of the Wset. Santa Clara College has just become Santa Clara University . . and is sure to do splendid work in that beau- tiful portion of the great Republic. " Fr. Russell, born in 1834, was a brother of the late Lord Russell of Killowen, Lord Chief Justice of Eng- land, the first Catholic to hold that high seat of honor since the Reforma- tion. In the seventy-eight years in which he bridged this " span of life, " Fr. Rus- sell was an inspiration and encourage- ment to all who crossed his path. Though gone, his holy writings shall live. As for us, we shall always cher- ish his fond memory. We part with a tribute of love and sorrow. May he rest in peace. A PRIZE of ten dollars for the best essay, poem or short story contributed to The Redwood during the session 1912-1913, is offered by The Redwood. The purpose of this offer is plainly to encourage contributors to new ef- fort. The high standard set in the past, the repeated acknowledgments of other college journals that we have not failed to live up to the high stand- ard, the desire we have to leave The Redwood in un- diminished excellence to our suc- cessors, weigh more with us than any other motive. But now that the offer has been made we think that it adds a spur that will urge on contributors who might otherwise lag. It provides, besides, an honor that will be appre- ciated by all. To have done the best work in a year ' s issue is something when all the work is well done. To be chosen out as having done the best work is a reward that every one may envy. We look for an increased num- ber of contributors in consequence of this offer. THE REDWOOD. 31 Old friends are true friends, the say- ing goes, and indeed the proverb is amply verified w hen we sit down at our reading table and greet the friend- ly publications from other universi- ties and colleges. From the North, South, East and West they come, each bearing its por- tion of interest and jot of welcome, kindly criticism, and embodying the contemporaneous literary spirit of our American schools. Let him who thinks and idly bab- bles, that our student publications are becoming sadly decadent but cast his eyes upon the average exchange list, and he will rapidly change his views. The University Amongst the maga- of Virginia zines visiting us the Magazine University of Vir- ginia ' s takes high rank. Always con- taining good verse and interesting stories it is ever welcome, and the May-June issue is no exception to the rule. A Psychological Miracle is a clever story and well handled, but we think a longer and more rounded sen- tence would have added materially to the reading smoothness of the tale. The Irish dialect is not flagrant and runs naturally, for which the author is to be congratulated. In the way of verse " La Fontaine " is particularly dainty, and is worth reproducing We reprint it below. " Bacon ' s Prudential Philosophy " is a well written essay, but we are sorry that we cannot agree with the author ' s conclusions. " Notre Dame Scholastic " For a weekly, the " Notre Dame Schol- astic " is meaty and carries some good articles. In the Oct. 5th issue, " George Elliot as a Realist, " was well worth reading, and shows the author to be a keen and sincere critic of the novel. The verse of the publication is not, however, overly commendable. The Yale Lit The Yale Literary Magazine has always impressed us as being peculiarly well edited, yet in the May number we have a slight fault to find. It may be that we are over critical, 32 THE REDWOOD. nevertheless it see ' ms peculiar to have in one issue several short stories, the subjects of which are essentially for- eign. Yet " Thekla, " a short story with a Turgeniev atmosphere, holds one well to the end; the climax could have been more smoothly built up. The essay on " Arthur Symons " is exceptionally good and treats a diffi- cult and somewhat obscure subject in an analytical and keenly perceptive manner. A few more expositions like this, and the position of the deca- dents might be altogether untenable. The verse in the issue is good ; we think " The Homecoming of Sir Wal- ter Raleigh " the best, as it rings most true. From the North comes the Gonza- ga, and within its neat and dainty cover we find several good bits of verse and a well written essay. In- deed in this prosaic ag e, an article on the " Value of Poetry " is not only timely but sadly neded. The Taming of a Fresh- man was also good, but it smacked somewhat of the popular " College Hero " type of story that is now flooding the period- icals, and, to say the least, has become sadly trite and timeworn. In " How History is Written " we have an excellent expose or rather an excellent tearing to pieces of the wide- ly circulated Ridpath ' s History. The author has proven the work to be The Gonzaga faulty and untruthful in places where a very little research would have mended matters ; and in so doing he has done a good work for both stu- dents and Catholics. The verse is not up to the usual standard with the ex- ception of " Miserere " , a little four line description. The Chaparral The Stanford Chapar- ral comes to us, as full of wit and good sketches as the proverbial egg is of meat. How- ever, a little more serious literature would add balance to the paper. In Queenie the Queen, we have a sample of what a perverted sense of humor is. Such slangy and low phrases as " breezed into the form via four wheel- ers " , — " Her social rep was ace high " , — " When she left the sisters planted a farewell osculation on her phiz as she did the turkey-trot down the row in her hobble. " — Why continue? Suf- fice it to say our stock of slang is large enough. The Young Eagle From a college bear ' ing the same name as our university comes a sane, well edited sheet that is a pleasure to read. Very frequently it is the misfortune of the poor Re- viewer to be forced to read in maga- zines from young ladies ' schools, ar- ticles that at best are termed gushy. This is not the case, however, in the " Young Eagle " of Saint Clara ' s Col- THE REDWOOD. 33 lege in Wisconsin. " The Development of the Drama in America " is a read- able essay, and shows a familiarity with the subject that is not often found. We would suggest however to our sisters that their poetry should be more catholic or universal. It is not customary for the Red- wood to review high-school publica- tions, yet " Tocsin " of our local " Prep School " commends itself. The bo )k is well gotten up, and fairly edited. At last we have reached the end of our reviews, and we beg to mention those magazines that we only ex- cluded through lack of space. " The Xaverian " from Saint Xavier ' s College, Calcutta, " The Villa Maria " , " The Notre Dame Quarterly " , " The Xavier Athenaeum " " The Aive Maria " . " St Michael ' s Almanac " , and " The Dial. " Prisoners ' Years Dealing with, as maj- or theme, the great sacri- fice of a man for Con- science ' sake, and weaving a strong an interesting love-tale throughout the book, " Prisoners ' Years " , by I. Clarke is indeed a novel well worth reading. It is strongly written, and the char- acters each stand out in their own in- dividuality, leaving the impression that is only found in well written works. The conversation is natural and easy, not too much of it nor too little, but just the proper balance. By placing the later scenes in Italy and Egypt a newer note of interest is added, which is well backed up by clear and careful descriptions. In short, the book is well worth reading and we suggest for those who admire the semi-English type of novel, that they get the book and read it. It is neatly bound in red cloth and gold. Published by Benziger Bros. Price $1.35 net. „,, ,,. IS a pamphlet that Thy King- ... ■ u J r while common m charac- dom Come , . . , , ter IS uncommon in style. Many works are published with the in- tention of making converts, yet they frequently fall into a trite controver- sial style that offsets the end in- tended for them. This little pamphlet, however, avoids all these imperfections, and is admirably adapted to the winning over of new members to the fold. It has a good strong binding, and is printed in clear type on good paper. Published by the Ohio Apostolate, 6914 Woodland Ave., SE., Cleveland, Ohio. The Red Peril, by William Stephens- Kress. The Ohio Apostolate has issued a valuable contribution to contemporan- eous anti-socialistic literature. The pamphlet though small is full of sense 34 THE REDWOOD. and sound argument. Those who are interested in the subject, who is not? will find the work very useful. The price is 10c, address 6914 Wood land Ave. SE. Cleveland, Ohio. The Pastor and Socialism (America Press) could not be better. We are not pastors, but we can appreciate the argument made so cogently that with the fight in favor of Socialism so wide- ly waged, strong and persistent action on the part of our pastors becomes everyday more necessary. We en- joyed every page of this clearly writ- ten pamphlet. R. A. YOELL. LA FONTAINE From University of Virginia Magazine Through cool, grey rocks upspringing I bubbled from below, To where grey lichens clinging Were mirrored in my flow; Here sunbeams never go, But pallid wild-flowers grow Beside my pebbled reaches. With fern and moss encumbered I stole across the glade, And in a pool I slumbered Within the mottled shade, Where lithe, brown creepers strayed, — And slender grasses swayed Beneath the stately beeches. THE REDWOOD. 35 Imti rBtlg Notes The Passing Staff To Rev. A. J. Que- vedo, S. J., and to the members of the ' Red- wood ' staff under him, we tender these few sincere appreciative words as we assume those duties for which they have so zealously labored in the past, and so ably fulfilled. Some are no longer amongst us, — having entered the world — that stage on which we must play our passing parts ; — others are again occupying honored places on the staff. But tow- ard them all we feel a sense of grati- tude and wish them well wherever they be. In the successor to the director- ship, Rev. C. A. Buckley, S. J., we re- cognize the man of letters and the man of action too. Under his leader- ship we hope to continue the good work of our predecessors by starting off the new volume of the University ' s organ as they have closed the cover on the last historic page of old Santa Clara College, — brimful of spirit and enthusiasm ! Organiza tion The work of organiz- ing the various depart- ments, and of establish- ing the daily routine is entirely finished. On Oct. 1st. the President delivered his speech of welcome to the students. The atmosphere of the vast gathering was fraught with a presage of great events. The calm, clean-cut words of the speaker though dispassionately uttered were momentous indeed. It was as if he peered deep into the fu- ture and seeing great things held his peace and emotion. That his kind ex- hortation has been taken to heart is shown by the marked diligence and conduct of the classes as a whole. The New Lambs What a time old " Davy Jones " would have, if he had to ini- ate as many " landlubbers ' into the mys- teries of his royal domain as we have students newly-come to grace the old familiar places. But brothers, fear not. The terrors of hazing are not for you. ' Br ' er ' Kennedy is no longer here with his alpha-beta-gamma ' to terrorize you. ' Sinbad the Sailor ' — that strong-armed gentleman, well-known to his fellows, will harm you not. ' Juicy ' is not here to frighten you ' away, and ' Slick ' will nevermore soil your clothes. But joking aside, we are overjoyed at the happy way you take to dear old ' Santa ' . The Faculty with their tra- ditional perseverance has made her more ' homelike ' expressly for you. 36 THE REDWOOD. You are the beneficiaries of all their toils, and, therefore, the advantages your ' Alma Mater ' is able to give you now, are greater and better by far than those she could give to her erst- while sons. Then let us sow the seeds of en- deavor while the days are fertile that they may grow to life — mightly oaks of character. Rally In the good old yesterdays of the fore- fathers, when a man had to walk many a mile uphill and down dale weathering the roughest storms to attend a political campaign, he did so cheeringly, — for how his blood ran high at the strains of " Yankee Doodle " played round a bon- fire ! And he forgot his hardships in his hilarity when " Old Glory " unfurled " to the four winds of heaven, " gave impetus to the speechmakers. We had such a rally Sept. 28th as would do honor to any by-gone cam- paigner. We cared not for expense, feeding the hungry flames of a bon-fire that swept skyward and lighted up each nook of the campus, most elab- orate stage scenery. Every mother ' s son of us was enraptured by the mas- terful strains of the Agnews Band and the spirit of goodfellowship ran riot. We commend that band for the large part it played in making our first rally a genuine success. The speeches were delivered be- tween selections, the yells and ap- plause following each speaker echo- ing and re-echoing down the corridors of Senior Hall. We look forward with confidence to more rallying of this kind, — rally- ing round our ideals with the spirit of the present and the past. Entertain ment The visit of an English Rugby team is always of great magnitude in college circles of this state, and Santa Clara knows how to give such a team a reception never to be forgotten. This was conclusively proven on Sunday, Oct. 6th, by the hearty hos- pitality and entertainment tendered the " Waratahs " — those gridiron war- riors of Australia who have come to give us a taste of their mettle and of scientific Rugby. We have cement- ed an indissoluble friendship with our guests because they stand for fair- play and those higher qualities of manhood which scientific Rugby tends to develop as no other game can pos- sibly do. After the usual evening stu dy everybody filed into the theatre build- ing where an interesting programme awaited. The crowded theatre resembled a jolly hail-fellow-well-met party, and nothing so took our Australian friends as the informality of the affair and the friendly jests which were passed throughout the evening. To him who conceived and arranged this happy entertainment no less than THE REDWOOD. 37 to those who so generously took part in making it so uniquely itself, we would extend the appreciation of everybody present, for we feel that everybody enjoyed himself. The New Field Situated nearly as close to the university as to the rail-road station the new rugby-field is easily accessible to player and onlooker alike. Further improvements are un- der way so that in the near future we shall have as commodious a field as Stanford or Berkeley now boasts. Speaking of the field, we are re- minded of ' Doc ' Yoell and his " medi- cine men " , who have behaved like real trojans in administering first aid to the wounded. It is something to watch the limbs of that lithe gentleman carry him scurrying with all his pat- ent medicines to the side of a fallen hero. ' Doc ' Yoell has evolved a ' cure ' em air process : but it is said that he is rather gruff and strong of arm at times. " Ye faint-hearted keep your distance. " However, we know ' Doc ' would not knowingly harm a fly, if he knew it would hurt the feelings of the fly. The initial meeting Sodalities of the Senior Sodality was held on Sept. 15th, under the enthusiastic guidance of Director Fr. Boland, S. J. The fol- lowing officers were elected: R. M. Hardy, Prefect; J. L. Thomas, Asst. Prefect; H. W. McGowan, Asst. Pre- fect ; C. M. Castruccio, Treas. ; J. Noonan, Treas. ; H. R. McKinnon, Cen. ; E. W. Schween, Cen. ; L. P. Jennings, Cen.; J. P. Fitzpatrick, Cen.; J. F. Ahern, Cen., and N. J. Martin, Cen. The Junior Sodality held its first meeting on the same date, Mr. J. A. Vaughan presiding. The following members were elected to office : T. F. Kearns, Prefect ; M. A. Falvey, Asst. Pref. ; R. R. Crooks, Asst. Pref. ; L. J. Lucas, Sec. ; H. A. Wideman, Vestry Pref.; C. P. Dodge, Vestry Pref.; A. A. Falvey, Censor; N. Korte and J. E. Viosca, Consultors. It is a great honor to be a good Sodalist, and we therefore congratulate the newly-appointed as well as those who appointed them. They have but to follow the noble example set by their predecessors to continue the great work for which Santa Clara ' s Sodalities have ever stood. House and Senate A meeting of the House was held on Oct. 7th, Fr. Brain- ard, S. J., presiding, at which the fol- lowing were elected officers : E. W. Carlin, Rec. Sec. ; J. M. Concannon, Cor. Sec. ; F. G. Boone, Treas. ; R. A. Yoell, S. A. A meeting of the Senate was held on the same date ; new officers of that body follow : Marco S. Zarick, Rec. Sec; Michael Kiely, S. A.; W. J. Lyng, Sec. Fr. Buckley is President of the Senate. 38 THE REDWOOD. Visits We were favored Oct. 1st with a very interesting and en- thralling talk by Rev. P. Joseph Koesters, D. D., a man with a mighty message. Rev. Koesters is a Chinese missionary, but we venture to say that very few of us who enjoyed his talk can fully appreciate what the Christianizing of China means. To bring this great people into the fold of God, is the fond hope, the cher- ished achievement before the Catho- lic Church. Now is the time to support this movement of movements. We tender Rev. Koesters our heart- felt wish for the complete success of his noble work. The St. Berchman ' s Sanctuary Sanctuary Society met on Sept. 18th, and of- ficers for the ensuing year were duly elected. Mr. E. J. Ivancovich, S. J., is in charge this year. We trust that an early recovery from his present illness may enable him to resume control of the society. Mr. W. I. Lonergan, S. J., who was in charge last year has been called to duty elsewhere. Mr. Lonergan has endeared himself to the hearts of us who know and have felt the love that made him self-forgetful and ever at- tendant upon our welfare. His mem- ory shall be as an ever-present friend. The highest tribute we can pay him is to think of him when in trouble. _ ... , , Since the close of Institute of ,, , u 1 • _ the last scholastic year, many substan- tial donations have been made to the Law Library; many still continue to come in, showing that the friends and alumni of Santa Clara are determined that as far as they are concerned, this Department of the University shall be well equipped for its work. The following is a list of the dona- tions received : From Mrs. Elizabeth C. Belden, about 82 volumes. From Hon. James V. Coffey, Ph.D., 1901, five volumes, four pamphlets. From Curtis H. Lindley, LL.D., 1912, two volumes. From Hon. Secretary of State of California, two volumes. From Hon. Joseph Scott, Ph.D., 1907, 31 volumes. From Mr. T. L Bergin, A. B., 1857, A. M. , 1865, 103 volumes . From. Hon. Julius Kahn, M. C, six volumes. From Mr. John W. Ryland, B. S., 1877, LL.B., 1912, $1,000. From Hon. John G. Covert, B. S., 1891, $50. From Hon. Wm. Lawlor, $10. From Dr. Orestes J. Orena, B. S., 1877, $100. SUMMARY Books, 235. Money, $1,160. A number of alumni have generous- ly offered their services as special lec- turers. Mr. Curtis H. Lindley of San THE REDWOOD. 39 Francisco, will lecture upon the Law of Mines, and Mining Under the Fed- eral Laws, a subject in which he is the recognized authority. Special lec- tures will also be given from time to time by Hon. James V. Cofifey, Ph.D., 1901, Judge of the Superior Court of San Francisco, Department of Pro- bate, Hon. Bradley V. Sargent, M. S., 1885, Judge of the Superior Court of Monterey County, and Hon. William G. Lorigan, LL.D., 1912, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Cali- fornia. Twenty-three students are already registered in the Law School. THE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT The work of the Department of Engineering which was so auspicious- ly begun last year has this year re- ceived a new impetus. The Fresh- man Class numbers twenty-five and its members are serious students and well prepared for their work. The ad- dition of several new professors to the staff and the complete separation of the courses of the College of Arts and Letters and of General Science from those of the College of Engineer- ing and Architecture make for a dis- tinct advance in the efficiency of the engineering courses. Joseph L. Donovan, C. E., who has been added to the Civil Engineering Department, is an engineer of wide experience and first-rate ability. Pro- fessor Donovan is a West Point man and was for several years professor of engineering branches in the army. George L. Sullivan, M. E., a gradu- ate of the Engineering Department of the University of Nebraska, and re- cently a professor in the University of Colorado, is in charge of the Mechan- ical Engineering courses. Both he and Professor Donovan bring the spirit of enthusiasm to their work which is half the success of big enterprises. The need of an Engineering Build- ing for the College of Engineering is obvious. Santa Clara looks now for a benefactor who will do for her what the late Mr. Cudahy of Chicago did for Loyola University of that city in building the Cudahy Engineering Flail, and what John W. Mackay, Jr., did a few years ago for the University of Nevada. The President of the LTni- versity has signified his intention of making the Engineering Building the next subject of his solicitude, and we trust it will not be long before some generous patron of science will demon- strate his devotion to the University of Santa Clara and his realization of her great work by building the Engin- eering Building and endowing profes- sorships in the College of Engineering and Architecture. EDWARD O ' CONNOR. 40 THE REDWOOD. The most cherished period of a man ' s life is the days of his youth. Then, in his unproven fondness, he saw the vista of the future stretching before him with all its idealism. He was a boy, mayhap, hidden in the foliage of the apple tree, and look- on, while the stellar luminaries of the empyrean of sport played at baseball nearby. They were heroes to him. To him these men were the proud pets of the many, accorded homage and glory, and entrenched on the apex of happiness. He resolved to be one of them, but the day seemed tremend- ously far off. Still it came, and he took his place among the players, en- vied by other boys in the same apple tree. But his dream was changed. The many that accorded him acclaim were fickle and exacting, and their honors grew tiresome. The life be- came humdrum, the work a grind, and the situation at the best resolved itself into routine. And the boy of yester- time glanced up at a human speck in the old familiar apple tree, and he en- vied him. Or perhaps he was another boy whose fancies lead him to the less sci- entific, the more artistic pastime. He loved the play. The majestic stride of the actor, the glittering tinsel of the play-clothes, the rapturous bravos of the audience swelled his ambition. What castles he built that he should dwell in when his day should come? And how those castles tumbled about his ears in the day of his realization! How tawdry seemed the tinsel, how matter of fact and hard the life, how sparing the applause for him, and how surfeiting to those that had it. But he may have been that other boy that looked to the arena of the workaday life. He would write. He would gather the news ; he would fer- ret out crime ; he would wield a wea- pon of power. And how empty he found the task ! How unappreciative of his genius he found editors and readers ! How regardless of his im- portance he found those with whom he came in touch ! How humiliating to find himself curtailed in the use of that weapon of power he had cher- THE REDWOOD. 41 ished, or compelled to use it unfairly! In this, their day of disillusionment, they all looked back to the time when the things they now saw and found were thought to be otherwise. And then they knew that those were the true days of romance, of carefree fancy, of least alloyed idealities. It is a typical, everyday story. You alumni of the University of Santa Clara, you know how true it is. You are living another life from that of your college days and your fancy often flies back to those days and lingers fondly over every scene and detail of them, and then retraces itself to be sure that it has missed nothing. And your old associates, the old boys, where are they? what are they? It is the personal element that grips you most of all. The Alumni Department of The Red- wood has been established to serve that interest. Its mission is to keep alive among the old students the flame of those happier days and to breathe for those of the present time the spirit of olden years. It is to connect the man of today with the youth of yes- terday. Old students, much of this depart- ment ' s success depends on your inter- est. This you have realized and acted on in the past, but it is well to keep the thought alive with the reflection. Tell us about former students. Tell us about yourself. Commend the old college chronicle to former boys that may somewhat have drifted. And when in a reminiscent mood, turn to the alumni pages of The Redwood. The cut of the bat- ' 87 tery of ' 87, accom- panying these notes, and the following letter were received by President Morrissey from the Hon. J. F. Campbell, of Maxwell, Cal. Jack is one of the most prominent of the big men of the Sacramento Valley. His letter speaks for itself: " I have just returned from a long tour through the Sierra Nevadas and the state of Nevada. When I reached Virginia City I found my old friend, Jim Ennis, a superintendent of the Overman Mine. When you asked me of him, I told you he was dead, but, believe me, he is very much alive; a pleasant surprise to me. I immediate- ly thought of you and had our pictures taken as the battery of ' 87. Jim looks like a prize-fighter, and I look like I might be his trainer. Can you imag- ine the showing we would make now? " However, I trust this will interest you a wee bit. It takes me back to the old days when we fought our heads off for the old college and some of you younger ones would carry the bats and root for us. The future looks bright, but, don ' t you know, it is great to take a glance at the past. " O. D. Stoesser, A. ' 87 B,. ' 87, now a promi- nent Watsonville cap- italist, is President of the Annual Watsonville Apple Celebration, re- cently held. That this year ' s Annual 42 THE REDWOOD. was far and away the most successful in the history of the Pajaro Valley was to be expected with Stoesser at the helm. ' 91 It is always with a feeling of sadness that the duty of recording the death of an old student comes. The recent summer saw the passing away of Rev. Joseph J. Conway, A. B., ' 91, in San Francisco, where he had been stationed for some years as as- sistant pastor of St. Charles ' Church. Father Conway was an eloquent speaker and was universally beloved. While at Santa Clara he was the recipient of many college honors. Charles S. Laumeis- ' 93 ter, Jr., A. B., ' 93, has been put forth as a candidate for assemblyman, from the Twenty-eighth Assembly District. Mr. Laumeister was once Business Manager of The Redwood, and was prominent in athletic events, in which he received many honors. Mr. Lau- meister is now president of the Amer- ican Milling Company, with which he has been connected ever since finish- ing college. His candidacy has been endorsed by the Republican County Committee. This is Mr. Laumeister ' s first appearance in politics. Charles Byrne, Ex- ' 06, third base- man of the famous Varsity baseball team of ' 06 and now practicing law, is also a prominent Republican candidate for the assembly. Charlie ' s address is at the old familiar home in San Rafael. ' 94 John Regan, A. B., ' 94, is a candidate for state senator in Idaho. He is making a campaign that augurs well for his election. Ramos Arias Fer- ' 95 rand. Commercial ' 95, still remembers his old student days at Santa Clara amid his diplomatic duties. Last year he was Envoy Extraordinary and Minis- ter Plenipotentiary of Panama at the Coronation of King George V in London. Elmer E. Westlake, ' 98 A. B., ' 98, was an en- ergetic worker in ar- ranging the Alumni banquet at the Hotel St. Francis, San Francisco, last year, and its success is in a large meas- ure due to him. Mr. Westlake has his law office in the Humboldt Bank Building, San Francisco. Charles D. South, ' 01 A. M., ' 01, a member of the University fac- ulty, was accorded a signal honor by the Knights of Columbus, San Jose Council, when they elected him Grand Knight at their last annual meeting. THE REDWOOD. 43 John J. Ivancovich, ' 05 A. B., ' 05, is repeating the histrionic tri- umphs of his college days in Brook- lyn, N. Y., where he is playing with the Lytell Company. His career is being followed with interest by many that remember his Judas in the Pas- sion Play and his Diocletian in Light Eternal. His interpretation of the former role won for him the high praise of Ashton Stevens, the New York dramatic critic, and was consid- ered a masterpiece by the Lambs ' Club.. In 1903 Mr. Ivancovich was The Redwood ' s staff artist. ' 05 John H. Riordan, ' 05 A. B., ' 05, is now as- sistant to State At- torney-General Webb. He has his of- fice in San Francisco, in the Metro- politan Bank Building. In his college days Mr. Riordan won the Ryland de- bate medal, and was prefect for a time in the Junior study hall. M. Shields, is the Cal- ' 06 ' 06, whose father, A. H. A. Shields, ex ifornia manager for the Equitable Life Assurance Society, is himself engaged in insurance with offices in the Crock- er Building. Martin V. Merle, ' 06 A. B., ' 06, who, since his triumph, " The Light Eternal, " has written several stage successes, is now engaged on " The Mission Play of Santa Clara, " which is to have its premier in the liistoric Santa Clara theater next June. The play will depict the life of the early Santa Clara mission. Mr. Merle ' s " Light Eternal " is still play- ing to large houses in the East. ' 07 Joseph R. Brown, A. B., ' 07, of Napa, Cal., has for the past year been on the medical staff of Georgetown University as instructor, after having finished a brilliant course there. Anthony B. Diep- ' 08 enbrock, A. B., ' 08, of Sacramento, won laur- els for himself and his alma mater this year as a member of the graduat- ing class of the medical department of Harvard University. Despite illness during his course, Dr. Diepenbrock ranked third in his class. He is now in St. Mary ' s Hospital, San Francisco, as an interne, but he has been claimed by Mercy Hospital, New York, and will enter there shortly. Robert O ' Connor, ' 08 A. B., ' 08, was or- dained at the end of the summer at St. Patrick ' s Seminary, Menlo Park. He is now stationed at St. Francis Church, San Francisco. At College Father O ' Connor was dis- tinguished by his devotion to the sanctuary. He was president of the 44 THE REDWOOD. Sanctuary Society and sacristian in the college chapel for several years, and his zeal in this work won for him the name of " Deac. " ' 08 Dr. George Joyce Hall, A. B., ' 08, was married October 2, 1912, in San Francisco, to Miss Hazel Rita Webber. The couple are mak- ing their home at 1982 Eddy street. Dr. Hall graduated this year from Cooper Medical College. Maurice T. Dool- ' 09 . ing, A. B., ' 09, a for- mer Redwood edi- tor, who is studying law at Stanford University, was elected editor of the Chapparal at the beginning of the school year. Edmund Lowe, A. ' 11 M ., ' 11, is a student of more recent date that is winning honors on the stage. He is at present playing character roles at the Alcazar Theater in San Francisco. Mr. Lowe played leading roles in many late Santa Clara productions, notably those of Mathias in " The Bells, " a role immortalized by the late Sir Henry Irving, and of Shylock in the Merchant of Venice. Five lusty young- ' 12 sters that never saw a school and wouldn ' t know alpha from omega are the sub- ject of this note. They were left by Mister Stork in the last few weeks to as many proud papas that once studied such things at Santa Clara — but the papas are mere incidentals just now. Number one is Laurence D ' Arcy Quinn, August 15, ' 12. He arrived three and three-quarters pounds strong on that date at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hubert J. Quinn at Oakland, Cal., where the father is manager for the Pacific Manufacturing Co. Mr. Quinn was a Santa Clara student of the late ' 90s. Number two is William Valentine Regan, Jr., June 5, ' 12. William Val- entine Regan, Sr., A. B., ' 03, is the father. Mrs. Regan was Miss MoUie Merle, sister of Martin V. Merle. Mr. Regan was formerly on The Redwood staff as the editor of College Notes, and as Business Manager. The third ' 12 referred to is Joseph Frederick Sigwart, Jr., July 4, ' 12. The father avers that he showed his destination as a leader of the people by voicing strenuous objections to the sane Fourth of July movement the very first day of his arrival. The father, Fred Sigwart, is an A. B., ' 07. The mother was Miss Teresa Madden, well known in musical and society cir- cles of the bay city. The baby was baptized October 4th by Father R. H. Brainard of the University faculty. Dr. Sigwart is resident physician at St. Joseph ' s Hospital, San Francisco. Edward Sheehy, a prominent orch- ardist of Watsonville and a student of the middle ' 90s, is the fourth that THE REDWOOD. 45 must be congratulated on the arrival of a son and heir. Mrs. Sheehy. nee Mary Kelly, is a sister of Edward J. Kelly, A. B., ' 97, a prominent attor- ney-at-law of Watsonville. James H. O ' Brien III came to the home of James H. O ' Brien, Jr., a stu- dent of five years ago, late last month, and was baptised by the Rev. Fr. Mor- issey. Mrs. O ' Brien is a sister to Julius, Albert and Louis Trescony, former Santa Clara students. Mr. O ' Brien is a contractor in San Fran- cisco. LAWRENCE A. FARNSWORTH. One of the main features of the temple being erected by the Native Sons, on Mason street, just back of the St. Francis Hotel, will be a Hall of Fame, in which the twenty Native Sons — " who have done most to en- hance the glory of the State " — will be immortalized in art-glass and classic sculpture. Among the names mentioned in this connection we find — Stephen M. White, B. S., ' 71, Clay M. Greene, ' 01, John J. Montgomery, Ph.D., ' 01, Charles W. Stoddard, Ph.D., ' 01, George W. James, Litt. D,. ' 07. George W. James, Litt.D, ' 07. With the death of Leo J. Marks on August 30th, the University mourns not only a loyal alumnus, but possibly the most famous track athlete that ever passed from her historic walls — his record in several events remaining unbroken. The funeral was largely attended by former Santa Clarans, several of whom acted as pall-bearers. Formal announcement has been made of the engagement of Lieuten- ant Ralph Crystal Harrison, A. B., ' 05, a former member of The Red- wood staff, and Miss Cali Phillips of Savannah, Ga., The wedding will be an event of October, and will be sol- emnized at Savannah, where the bride-elect — who is the daughter of Colonel and Mrs. Charles L. Phillips, is one of the most popular members of the younger set. After the " honeymoon " Lieutenant Harrison will be stationed at Fort Serwin. On June the first a romance of col- lege days found its culmination in the marriage of Lawrence V. Degnan, A. B., ' 03, and Miss Carmel Martinez — a member of the famous early California family of that name. The envied couple first met while the groom was attending the Civil En- gineering College of the University of California, and " apropos " — the wed- ding took place at St. Joseph ' s Church, Berkeley, with many class-mates of the groom in attendance. When Cooper Medical College, as such, brought its long and illustrious career to a close with the graduation of the class of 1912, it bestowed on George J. Hall, A. B., ' 08, the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Dr. Hall car- ried off the highest honors of his class, and since graduation has been attached to the faculty of the French Hospital in San Francisco. 46 THE REDWOOD. Not only has he carried off the hon- ors of his class, but likewise the heart and hand of Miss Nita Webber, the wedding to take place in San Fran- cisco, early in October. To the winsome bride and lucky groom, we extend our sincerest con- gratulations. ALEXANDER F. LEONARD, ' 10. The Alumni Association of the Uni- versity assembled in annual session in the Red Room of Hotel St. Francis, San Francisco, Monday evening, June 17th, 1912, and elected the following officers for the ensuing year: Presi- dent, Victor A. Scheller, of San Jose; Vice-President, John H. Riordan, of San Francisco; Secretary, Charles D. South, of Santa Clara; Treasurer, Charles M. Lorigan, of San Jose. By unanimous vote, it was resolved that the Executive Committee should consist of the Presidents of the Santa Clara University Clubs of the various cities of California. The following-named friends and benefactors of the University were elected to honorary membrship in the Alumni Association : Judge John H. Twohy, J. Edward Bean, John D. Gall, Sr., Richard E. Queen, Charles L. Barrington, Richard D. Doolan, James V. Smith, and Lawrence F. Walsh. The annual banquet of the Associ- ation was held on the same evening in the Colonial Hall of the St. Francis, under the auspices of the Santa Clara University Club of San Francisco, and was a delightful and memorable affair. As a re-union of the loyal sons of San- ta Clara, the gathering was remark- able for numbers and enthusiasm ; while the spirit manifested with re- gard to the noble past, the present ex- pansion and the splendid outlook for the future of the University was com- parable to the spirit that today char- acterizes the campus rally of the stu- dent host. The menu was in keeping with the standard of excellence maintained at the St. Francis, but the fact that the real features of the occasion were in- tellectual rather than gastronomical may be appreciated by reference to the following program of toasts : In- troductory remarks by the President of the University of Santa Clara Alumni Association, Hon. Thomas I. Bergin, ' 57; remarks by the Toast- master, V. S. Scheller, ' 86; " Our An- nual Banquet, " C. P. Rendon ; " Father Kenna, " Rev. Richard A. Gleason, S. J., President 1905-10; " Local Santa Clara University Alumni Clubs, " Jos. T. McDevitt, ' 86; " The Material De- velopment of the University, " Hon. B. V. Sargent, ' 84 ; " The Vista of the Fu- ture, " Rev. James P. Morrissey, S. J., President of the University of Santa Clara. CHAS. D. SOUTH, A. M., ' 01 THE REDWOOD. 47 The opening of the school year found many of the old members of last year ' s teams back to College, and ready to don their uniforms. Beside our having the old material, the ath- letic prospect is further relieved by an abundance of new material of the most promising kind. Athletics were ushered into active life at Santa Clara on the evening of September 28th, when a rally took place on the College campus. The rally commenced with a speech by President of the Student Body, Chaun- cey Tramutolo, who addressed the students in relation to their duty as members of the University, and par- ticularly the support expected of them along athletic lines. A spirit was soon kindled which surpassed anything of its kind ever seen on the College campus. Coach Higgins, who has the lot of the football team in his hands, deliv- ered a heart-to-heart talk to the aspirants for the team, and also its supporters. He commented particular- ly upon the strength of a team and the results produced by a team when working as a unit, and the student body supported it as such, laying aside completely all hero worship of individuals. The Agnews Band was secured for the occasion, and rendered several se- lections, which were much enjoyed by all. ST. IGNATIUS 0— S. C. U. 25. On September the 29th the rugby team of St. Ignatius University met the Varsity team on the Santa Clara rugby field. After an hour and twenty minutes of hard playing the Santa Clara team was successful in piling up a total of 25 points to the visitors ' nothing. Although the game was hard fought, — owing to the poor condition and lack of practice of both teams the 48 THE REDWOOD. rugby was not that which the teams were capable of playing. However, it could easily be seen that with the rounding into condition and the grad- ual improvement of team-work, Santa Clara was to have one of the fastest and most well-balanced teams that she has ever put on the field. CALIF. FRESH 0— S. C. U. 11. In the second game of the season Santa Clara lined up against the Cali- fornia Freshmen on the Berkeley field. Coach Schafer of Berkeley had his strongest team against us, — teams would be the proper word, as he put an entirely new team against Santa Clara in the second half of the game. The game centered to a great ex- tent around the forwards, in which division Santa Clara had the better men, and their superiority was to a great extent accountable for the well- earned 11 to victory. S. C. U. 8— AUSTRALIA 20. One of the greatest surprises to the followers of rugby was given them when Santa Clara held the Waratahs, the picked team from Australia, to a score of twenty points. The Santa Clarans had the Aus- tralians defending their goal posts al- most the entire first half. The playing of Captain Ybarrondo was one of the features of the game. He was recognized by the Australians themselves, as an equal to any man on the field. Santa Clara scored in the first half when Ybarrondo kicked the ball over the line and it was fallen upon by Best in back of the goal. Hogan then converted from a very difficult angle. At the end of the first half the score stood, Australia 11, Santa Clara 5. Santa Clara entered the field in the second half with the wind against them, but this did not seem to retard their playing in the least. Their fighting spirit, and excellent scrum work in this half were equal to that of the first. The Australian back field got in some good work in this half, and suc- ceeded in carrying the ball over the score line three times, in grand ex- hibitions of perfect passing. Toward the end of this half Santa Clara " scored her first try. A scrum was formed at the five-yard line; the ball was picked up by Curry and passed to Momson, who easily carried it over for a try. Hogan was forced to attempt the goal with a strong wind against him, and as a result the ball failed to come to rest behind the two posts. The final shot found both teams fighting for the ball in the middle of the field. Although the superior work of the Australians in passing was apparent, yet the Santa Clara team showed equal ability in the scrum, and the THE REDWOOD. 49 home boys were every bit as aggres- sive as their opponents. After the game the AustraHans were the guests of the University at a banquet given in their honor. In the evening they were entertained by a short performance in the College Theater. The next day the Waratahs left Santa Clara for Stanford to pre- pare for the game with the Stanford team on the following Saturday. STANFORD FRESHMEN 0— S. C. U. 3. Stanford field was the scene of the next game, in which Santa Clara had a part. It was played on Wednes- day, October the 9th. The boys did not show their usual form. They brought the ball time and again within the Stanford twenty-five yard line, but were able to carry it over but once. This was in the last half with about ten minutes of play remaining. Best secured the ball from the scrum, and went over the line for the only score. Tommy Ybarrondo did not favor the crowd by the kick- ing of the goal. Sometime before the game closed the sun had drawn himself under the cover of the surrounding mountains, yet the teams continued to play until the end, although hardly able to as- certain the course of the ball upon the field. Quill, the star Santa Clara ' hooker ' , had the ligaments of his shoulder torn loose, and it will be some time before he will again be seen in the respons- ible position which he has filled so well. COLLEGE OF PACI- FIC 0, S. C. U. 34 Nations rise and fall, but Santa Clara by her victory of October the 12th. is allowed to remain in the midst of her old glory. Never since the adoption of rugby by the two institutions, has Santa Clara ' s flag of victory been stained with the blood of defeat at the hands of her old rival, the College of the Pacific. The red and white by their fine work both in the scrum and backfield, overwhelmed their rivals. The Tigers, however, fought with much gameness and strength, and it was not until the second half that they gave way before the concerted skill and energy of Santa Clara. Toward the end of the first half Voight began the scoring. Pursued by the Tigers, he dribbled the ball from the twenty-five-yard line by de- grees toward the goal, and within a few feet of it he picked the ball up and carried it over. The half ended with Santa Clara having scored 8 points. In the first part of the second half there was no scoring. However, the boys were coming to themselves by degrees. Three pretty tries, the re- sult of excellent passing rushes were accomplished in the last five minutes of play. Tommy Ybarrando, as usual, 50 THE REDWOOD. did very effective work in kicking, and Hogan, Quill, Sargeant, Voight, Fitz- converted six out of a possible eight. patrick, Kieley, Melchoir and Noonan. Other members of the team Avho Ybarrando, Castruccio, Harkins, Stu- were constantly in the forefront of the art, Curry, Best, and Flood seem to battle v rere Curry, Momson, Voight , have the best chances for positions in Hogan and Ramage, Best and Flood. the back field. The boys who are showing up to ad- F, G, BOONE vantage this early in the season are: THE REDWOOD. : jh Our first duty to you and to ourselves is to give you shoes that will be satisfactory to you. The secret of the phenomenal Walk-Over success is due to the millions of satisfied Walk-Over wearers. $3.50 to $6.00 QUINN BRODER WALK-OVER BOOT SHOP 41 SOUTH FIRST STREET DON ' T WASTE YOUR TIME getting measured and waiting several weeks for a made-to-order suit or overcoat that may not suit you when it ' s done. Our Ready-for-service hand-tailored giRSH. ' iCKwmE (hs HAND TAILORED CLOTHES await your command for a try-on. The woolen in them are confined patterns and the workmanship unequalled by the majority of tailors — bettered by none of them. We ' ll put you into a good suit or overcoat for from SIS to S40, and you ' ll get your mondy ' s worth at any price. SEE THE S3 STRAND HAT when your in need of headwear. And if you don ' t like it, we ' ve a S3 hat that you will. Other good hats at SI. 50 to S5. POMEROY BROS. 51 South First St., San Jose EXCLUSIVE CLOTHES FOR WOMEN WHO KNOW AT POPULAR PRICES (ii i 683-685 Broadway tJew York 127-133 S.FIRST ST. SAN JOSEf. CW,. OearySt Sanfiancisco : - THE REDWOOD. THE BEST WAY EAST SAN FRANCISCO " OVERLAND LIMITED " Less than 3 days to Chicago An elegant, electric lighted train CHINA AND JAPAN FAST MA IL With through standard and tourist sleepers. Protected throughout by electric, automatic, safety block signals. Rail and steamship tickets sold to all points, including Europe, China, Japan, Honolulu and Alaska. Inquire of any Southern Pacific ticket agent OR 40 East Santa Clara Street 40 Southern Pacific THE REDWOOD WILL PRESERVE YOUR TEETH LANGLEY ' S PEROXIDE DENTAL CREAM A DELIGHTFULLY REFRESHING TOOTH CLEANSER 25 CENTS AT ALL DRUGGISTS LANGLEY MICHAELS CO., San Francisco J. EMMET HAYDEN JOS. V. COLLINS FERRY CAFE RESTAURANT " A FIRST CLASS PLACE ro DINE WHEN NEAR THE FERRY " 34-36 Market St. San Francisco, California ,,fA A. G. Spalding Bros. Sweaters ■ [ Get your sweater early before the assortment is broken _ . Tennis Rackets -;- • I All the Leading and Latest Models BOSCHKEN HARDWARE CO. SAN JOSE ' S LEADING SPORTING GOODS HOUSE Wm. J. McKagney, Secretary R. F. McMahon, President McMahon-McKagney Co., Inc. 52 West Santa Clara St. San Jose, CaL THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY Carpets, Draperies, Furniture, Linoleums and Window Shadss Telephone, San Jose 4192 Upholstering THE REDWOOD. GOING into the Game to win, means, getting ready beforehand. If yours is a grme thpt depends on good clothes, you ' d better do your getting ready in this store. HART, SCHAFFNER AND MARX clothes are the " READY " kind. They ' re the ready-to-wear; and when you wear them, ready for anything that comes, so far as clothes are concerned. SPRING ' S, Inc. SANTA CLARA AND MARKET, SAN JOSE YOU NEED SOMETHING! GET IT AT THE CO-OP STORE V. SALBERG 2 c per cue E. GADDI Umpire Pool Room Santa Clara, Cal. Mission Hair Tonic and Dandruff Remedy IT NEVER FAILS— 50 CENTS PER BOTTLE Madden ' s Pharmacy santa ciara, cai. Santa Clara Imperial Dry Cleaning Dye Works C. COLES and I. OLARTE, Proprietors Naptha Cleaning and Steaming of Ladies ' and Gents ' Garments Pressing and Repairing 1021 Franklin Street Telephone Santa Clara 131J Santa Clara, Cal. I. RUTH Dealer in Groceries and Delicacies Hams, Bacon, Sausages, Lard, Butter, Eggs, Etc. 1035-1037 Franklin Street Cigars and Tobacco THE REDWOOD. MEET ME AT THE SANTA CLARA CANDY FACTORY Wholesale and Retail Satisfaction Guaranteed WE HANDLE ALL KINDS OF ICE CREAM TELEPHONE, S. C. 36 R 1053 FRANKLIN ST., SANTA CLARA COMPLETE FALL LINES Suits, Overcoats, Hats and Furnishings Now Ready Winter is at your door— How about New Fall Clothes.? Do not Delay— Buy now while our stocks are fresh and complete — Cold weather will likely come on, no doubt without warning. Never in our entire store history, have we been able to afford you such a splendid array of choice fall wearables as is pre- sented now. The fabrics, and colorings, styles and models are beautiful in their seasonable harmony. All our makes and fits absolutely guaranteed. THAD W. HOBSON CO. 16 to 22 West Santa Clara Street :: San Jose : THE REDWOOD. IF YOU WANT A FINISHED FOTO HAVE BUSHSELL TAKE IT The Leader of San Jose Photographers 41 North First Street San Jose, Calif. SAN JOSE BAKING CO. w J. BREITWIESER, Manager The Cleanest and Most Sanitary Bakery in Santa Clara Valley We supply the most prominent Hotels Give Us a Trial Our Bread, Pies and Cakes are the Best Phone San Jose 609 433-435 Vine Street San Jose, Cal. Phone Temporary 140 A. PALADINl WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FISH DEALER Fresh, Salt, Smoked, Pickled, and Dried Fish 205 MERCHANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO ;?i - : " -:r:::: : L_ - : THE REDWOOD. ANNOUNCEMENT It gives us great pleasure to announce the consolidation of H. S. Crocker Co., San Francisco . Cunningham, Curtiss Welch, San Francisco H. S. Crocker Co., Sacramento Cunningham, Curtiss Welch, Los Angeles We extend our thanks to our many friends and patrons who have so gener- ously favored us in the past, and we ask for the new company the same kind consideration as we have heretofore enjoyed. Until further notice the various stores will remain under exactly the same management with all the old employes. Communications for individual stores should be addressed as formerly. Respectfully yours, CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS WELCH, H. S. CROCKER CO. HOTEL MONTGOMERY F. J. McHENRY, Manager Absolutely Fireproof European Plans Rates $1 and upwards THE ARCADE THE HOME OF ROUGH NECK SWEATERS CANELO BROS. STACKHOUSE CO. 83-91 South First St., San Jose Phone S. J. 11 GEORGE ' S SHAVE SHOP BEST SHAVE IN TOWN SANTA CLARA, CAL. H. E. WILCOX D. M. BURNETT ATTORNEYS AT LAW ROOMS 19 AND 20, SAFE DEPOSIT BUILDING SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA K. THE REDWOOD. Baseball and All Sporting Events Reported Telephone San Jose 3614 CIGAR STORE IN CONNECTION D. D. Dooley ' s BOWLING ALLEYS and POOL TABLES 62-64 NORTH FIRST STREET Opposite Victory Theatre SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA Wm. McCarthy Sons Coffee TEAS AND SPICES 246 West Santa Clara Street San Jose, California Irade with Us for Good Service and Good Prices Special Prices Given in Quantity Purchases Try Us and Be Convinced VARGAS BROS. Phone Santa Clara 120 SANTA CLARA Xo ' tV THE WORD CLARK ' S MEANS GOOD CANDIES DID YOU GET ME? :• THE REDWOOD. Young Men ' s Furnishings All the Latest Styles In Neckwear, Hosiery and Gloves Young Men ' s Suits and Hats O ' Brien ' s Santa Clara . — Angelus Phone, San Jose 3802 Annex Phone, San Jose 4688 Angelus and Annex G. T. NINMS E. PENNINGTON, Proprietors European plan. Newly furnished rooms, with hot and cold water; steam heat throughout. Suites with private bath. Angelus. 67 N. First St Annex, 52 W. St. John St. San Jose, California The Santa Clara Coffee Club Invites you to its rooms to read, rest, and enjoy a cup of excellent coffee Open from 6 a. m. to 10:30 p. m. The Mission Bank of Santa Clara (COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS) Solicits Your Patronage Telephones Office: Franklin 3501 Residence: Franklin 6029 Dr. Francis J. Colligan DENTIST Hours: 9 to S 1615 Polk Street Evenings: 7 to 8 Cor. Sacramento Sundays by appointment San Francisco When in San Jose, Visit CHARGINS ' Bestaurant, Grill and Oyster House 28-30 Fountain Street Bet. First and Second San Jose Oberdeener ' s Pliarmacy Sallows Rorke Ring us for a Iiurry-up Delivery :: :: :: Phone S. C. 13R . F Prescription Druggists Kodaks and Supplies Post Cards Franklin Street Santa Clara, Cal. THE REDWOOD. _ r SJ CZZr l Colgate ' s Shaving Soap, 5c ' SSm! ? I il ' J " s ' Shaving Soap, 2 for 15c ) D P P C 3TW I A ' l others in proportion 5 K ' l fe Y I UNIVERSITY DRUG CO. pT I Ij i - —; Cor. Santa Clara and S. Second St. San Jose For classy College Hair Cut, go to the Antiseptic Barber Shop SALT SEA BATHS Basement Garden City Bank Building JOHN P. AZEVEDO GROCERIES WINES. LIQUORS, CIGARS AND TOBACCOS FRANKLIN STREET, SANTA CLARA STUDENTS The Redwood depends upon its advertisers for its existence. It is up to you to support those v ho support you •K THP RCDWOOD November, 1912 THE REDWOOD. University of Santa Clara SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA The University embraces the following departments: A. THE COLLEGE OF PHILOSOPHY AND LETTERS. A four ' years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. B. THE COLLEGE OF GENERAL SCIENCE. A four years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. C. THE INSTITUTE OF LAW. A standard three years ' course of Law, leading to the degree of Bachelor of L,aws, and pre-supposing for entrance the completion of two years of study beyond the High School. D. THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. (a) Civil Engineering — A four years ' course, lead- ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. (b) Mechanical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Me- chanical Engineering. (c) Electrical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elec- trical Engineering. E. THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE. A four years ' course, leading to the degree of Bach- elor of Science in Architecture. F. THE PRE-MEDICAL COURSE. A two years ' course of studies in Chemistry, Bac- teriology, Biology and Anatomy, which is recom- mended to students contemplating entrance into medical schools. Only students who have com- pleted two years of study beyond the High School are eligible for this course. JAMES P. MORRISSEY, S. J., President : THE REDWOOD. l- -■- i $50.00 Reward! TO ANY Santa Clara College Student Whose appearance can ' t be improved and who can ' t obtain an absolutely perfect fit in one of my famous " L SYSTEM " Clothes for College Fellows BILLY HOBSON BILLY HOBSON ' S CORNER 24 South First Street - - SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA Member San Francisco Builders Exchange DAVID ELMS GRAHAM BUILDING CONSTRUCTION WILLIAMS BUILDING 693 MISSION STREET Telephone SAN FRANCISCO Douglas 1603 f • THE REDWOOD. 1 FOSS HICKS CO No. 35 West Santa Clara Street SAN JOSE Real Estate, Loans Investments A Select and Up-to-date List of Just Such Properties as the Home Seeker and Investor Wants INSURANCE Fire, Life and Accident in the Best Companies L. F. SWIFT, President LEROY HOUGH, Vice-President E. B. SHUGERT, Treasurer DIRECTORS— L. F. Swift, Leroy Hough, Henry J. Crocker, W. D. Dennett, Jesse W. Lilientlial Capital Paid In, $1,000,000 Western Meat Company PORK PACKERS AND SHIPPERS OF Dressed Beef, Mutton and Pork, Hides, Pelts, Tallow, Fertilizer, Bones, Hoofs, Horns, Etc. Monarch and Golden Gate Brands Canned Meats, Bacon, Hams and Lard General Office, Sixth and Townsend Streets - San Francisco, C il. Cable Address STEDFAST, San Francisco. Codes, Al. A B C 4th Edition Packing House and Stock Yards, South San Francisco, San Mateo County, Cal. Distributing Houses, San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, Sacramento and Stockton THE REDWOOD. : Ollara JIflttrttal OUR JOB PRINTING PREEMINENTLY SUPERIOR Phone, S. C. 14 Published Semi-weekly B. DOWNING, EDITOR FRANKLIN STREET SANTA CLARA, CAL. San Jose Engraving Company Photo Engraving Zinc Etchings Half Tones Do you want a half-tone for a program or pamphlet? None can make it better SAN JOSE ENGRAVING COMPANY 32 LIGHTSTON STREET SAN JOSE, CAL. : » : THE REDWOOD. : ..DOERR ' S.. Y Branch at Clark ' s 176-182 South First Street San Jose Order your pastry in advance Picnic Lunches GET A KRUSIUS if you want to get a good pen knife; guaranteed as it ought to be. If it should not prove to be that, we will be glad to exchange with you until you have one that is. Manicure tools, razors guaranteed the same way. if you wish to shave easily and in a hurry, get a Gillette Safety Razor. The greatest convenience for the man who shaves himself. The John Stock Sons Tinners, Roofers and Plumbers Phone San Jose 76 71-77 South Fhst Street San Jose, Cal. Most business men like good office stationery REGAL TYPEWRITER PAPERS and MANUSCRIPT COVERS REPRESENT THE BEST AND MOST COMPLETE UNE IN THE UNITED STATES LOOK FOR THIS TRADE-MARK (TRhOO S f Stg MARK I CATERS TO THE MOST FASTIDIOUS Pacific Manufacturing Co. DEALERS IN Doors, Windows and Glass General Mill Work Mouldings Telephone North 40 Santa Clara, Cal. THE REDWOOD. - ■ ■ 4- Everybody is doing IT — Doing WHAT ? GETTING SHAVED at the University Shave Shop 983 Main Street near Postoffice Santa Clara O ' Connor Sanitarinm ••• Training School for Nurses IN CONNECTION CONDUCTED BY SISTERS OF CHARITY Race and San Carlos Streets San Jose T. MUSGRAVE P. GFELL T. Musgrave Co. Watchmakers Goldsmiths and Silversmiths 3272 2lst Street San Francisco Men ' s Clothes Shop Gents ' Furnishings Hats and Shoes PAY LESS AND DRESS BETTER E. H. ALDEN Phone Santa Clara 74 R 1054 Franklin St. Enterprise LaiJrjCo. Perfect Satisfaction Guaranteed M Manuel Mello mf Sk. Dealer in all kinds of iS 904 Franklin Street laf SANTA CLARA, CAL. 867 Sherman Street I. RUTH, Agent - 1037 Franklin Street ALDERMAN ' S NEWS AGENCY Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. Cigars and Tobacco Baseball and Sportinf; ' Goods Fountain Pens of All Kinds Next to Postoffice Santa Clara F M. M. Billiard Parlor GEO. E. MITCHELL PROP. SANTA CLARA Pool 2 A Cents per Cue 1 THE REDWOOD. THE BEST WAY EAST SAN FRANCISCO " OVERLAND LIMITED " Less than 3 days to Chicago An elegant, electric lighted train CHINA AND JAPAN FAST MAIL With through standard and tourist sleepers. Protected throughout by electric, automatic, safety block signals. Rail and steamship tickets sold to all points, including Europe, China, Japan, Honolulu and Alaska. Inquire of any Southern Pacific ticket agent OR 40— East Santa Clara Street— 40 Southern Pacific » THE REDWOOD. f ,i4 Phones : Office S. C. 39 R Residence S. C. 1 Y DR. H. 0. F. MENTON Dentist Office Hours, 9 a. m. to S p m. Rooms 5 to 8 Bank Bldg. Santa Clara Pratt-Low Preserving Company PACKERS OF Canned Fruits and Vegetables Fruits in Glass a Specialty SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA ROLL BROS. Real Estate and Insurance Call and See Us if You Want Anything in Our Line Franklin Street, next to Bank, Santa Clara Ravenna Paste Company Manufacturers of All Kinds of ITALIAN AND FRENCH Paste Phone San Jose 787 127-131 N. Market Street San Jose Phone San Jose 781 Pacific Shingle and Box Co. J. C. Mcpherson, Manager Dealers in Wood, Coal and Grain Richmond Coal, $11.00 Park Avenue San Jose, Cal. San Jose Transfer Co. MOVES EVERYTHING THAT IS LOOSE Phone San Jose 78 Office, 62 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose S. A. Elliott Son Plumbing and Gas Fitting GUN AND LOCKSMITHING Telephone S. C. 70 J 902-910 Main Street Santa Clara, Cal. iu THERE IS NOTHING BETTER THAN OUR Bouquet Teas at 50 cents per pound Even Though You Pay More Ceylon, English Breakfast and Basket Fired Japan FARMERS UNION San Jose _ THE REDWOOD. p. Montniayeur E. LamoUe J. Origlia LamoUe Grill - 36-38 North First Street, San Jose. Cal. Phone Main 403 MEALS AT ALL HOURS IF YOU ONLY KNEW WHAT= Mayerle ' s German Eyewater DOES TO YOUR EYES YOU WOULDN ' T BE WITHOUT IT A SINGLE DAY At Druggisbj soc or 65c by Gcorgc Maycrlc, German Expert Optician 960 Mjirkct Street, San Francisco Jacob Eberhard, Pres. and Manager John J. Eberhard, Vice-Pres. and Ass ' t Manager EBERHARD TANNING CO. Tanners, Curriers and Wool Pullers Harness-Latigo and Lace Leather Sole and Upper Leather, Calf, Kip and Sheepskins Eberhard ' s Skirting Leather and Bark Woolskin Santa Clara - California Founded 1851 Incorporated 1858 Accredited by State University, 1900 College Notre Dame SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA SIXTIETH YEAR COURSES COLLEGIATE PREPARATORY COMMERCIAL Intermediate and Primary Classes for Younge ' Children Notre Dame Conservatory of Music Awards Diplomas Founded 1899 APPLY FOR TERMS TO SISTER SUPERIOR THE REDWOOD. : HE PLEASES ME WHY NOT LET HIM TAILOR YOU TOO? GET THE GOOD KIND YOUR COLLEGE TAILOR 67-69 South Second St. San Jose, California : : CONTENTS SEA IN THE MIST . _ _ Rodney A. Yoell 51 ANALYSIS OF SCIENTIFIC SOCIALISM Hardin Barry, A. M ' 12 52 WOMAN IN POLITICS - Thomas Riordan, A. M. ' 12 62 THE TIDE - - - - L. A. Fernsworth 68 THE ESSENCE OF A SHORT STORY - Rodney A. Yoell 71 " KELLEY OF THE MOUNTAIN DIVISION " Francis G. Matson 75 EDITORIAL -------78 EXCHANGES ------ gl UNIVERSITY NOTES - - - - - - 86 ALUMNI ------- 89 ATHLETICS _-- -...gj R J FLOOD L. A. FERNSWORTH F. G. BOONE REDWOOD STAFF ROY A. BRONSON E. O ' CONNOR H, R. MCKINNON R. A. YOELL G. B. LYLE ' €dttmidu Entered Dec. 18, 1902, at Santa Clara, Cal., as second-class matter, under Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 VO. XII SANTA CLARA, CAL., NOVEMBER, 1912 No. 2 Sea in the Mist EA in the mist and cloud, Waves rolling sullen, gray, Wind of the deep moaning tearfully, And the silver dawn turning to day. Birds of the sea that cry. Frenzied and hoarse in fear. Hearts of the sea-folk threshing the deep. Empty of hope and drear. Mine too was sorest pain — God, Thou hast shaped my way. When this world threw off its sadness, And the silver dawn turned to day. RODNEY A. YOELL 52 THE REDWOOD. ANALYSIS OF SCIENTIFIC SOCIALISM WITH Socialists the leading theme in the history of the human race is the struggle of the classes, the one, though small in number, possessing the wealth of the earth, the other a coumtless multi- tude, reduced to a bare subsistence wage; the rich often reveling in lux- ury, and the poor doomed to misery and oppression. With them society has always been divided into two hos- tile classes. Today there are the cate- gories of capital and labor struggling against each other with bitter animos- ity. It is the picture of the idle and luxuriant rich non-producers with ap- parently no right to live, who, like leeches and bloodsuckers, fasten them- selves upon the toilers of the world and bind them to poverty and misery more firmly than Prometheus was riv- eted to the rock by Vulcan, that is the source of the strength of socialism and the fruitful subject of the invective and vituperation of their agitators. It is not strange that the pages of history record many who have de- claimed against this unequal distribu- tion of wealth. Plato, in his Republic, exposed the evils of contemporary so ciety to the glaring light of publicity. Later the Gracchi in Rome clamored for a redistribution of wealth and lands. Thomas More, in medieval England, wrote his Utopia revealing a paradise to be attained by the workers under a different form of society. In France we recall the names of Saint- Simon and Fourier, men of penetrat- ing intellect, keenly critical, ingeni- ously suggestive and contagiously en- thusiastic, who played no unimportant part in making men realize that there was a social question to be solved. These dreamers of old times be- lieved in the benevolence of Nature ' s intentions and the preordained har- mony of the world and sought to dis- cover the ideal commonwealth intend- ed by the Creator to supplant the ex- isting state of things which had been instituted by the knavery or ignorance of the few. The movement was vigorous and enthusiastic, but lacked the intellectu- al element, the theories propounded were mystical and fantastic, the reme- dies unpractical and inefficient. This primitive socialist movement, there- fore, is termed Utopian in economics and sociology, and recorded as a sig- nal failure in history. Frederick Engels says of it : " The solution of the social problem, which as yet lay hidden in undeveloped eco- nomic conditions, the Utopians at- tempted to evolve out of the human brain. Society presented nothing but wrongs ; to remove these was the task of reason. It was necessary, then, to THE REDWOOD. 53 dicover a new and more perfect sys- tem of social order and to impose this on society from without by propagan- da, and, wherever it was possible, by the example of modern experiments. These new social systems were fore- doomed as Utopian ; the more com- pletely they were worked out in de- tail, the more they could not avoid drifting into pure phantasies. " In the propagation of no system has there been so much vagueness and ob- scurity as there has been in the de- velopment of this system of econom- ics, notwithstanding the fact that So- cialism stands in sore need of a well- defined terminology. Yet, in spite of all diversities and inconsistencies in theories, remedies and tactics, there seem to be four ele- ments that are necessary and requisite to make up the very essence of Social- ism. These elements are indictment, analysis, panacea and campaign. In the nightly tirades of soap-box orators, in ponderous treatises and fleeting pamphlet, the institutions of society are indicted and condemned root and branch. The prevailing industrial systems have been analyzed by the penetrating intellect and keen insight of the So- cialist agitators ; and, with the cheer- ful finality of a scientist they have dubbed the modern state the mother of the wealthy, the protector of the in- terests of the rulers instituted for the exploitation and degradation of the toilers ; they have described religion as an instrument of oppression to keep the laborers humble and svibmissive by diverting their minds to a future re- ward ; the present form of marriage to them is only legalized prostitution. Following this diagnosis of society is their prescription, consisting of the co-operative commonwealth where misery and poverty will be unknown and happiness and material well-being the common lot of all. Finally, socialism involves a cam- paign against capitalism. Here varia- tion is at the maximum. The tactics adopted have taken many forms ; the peaceful persuasion and parliamentar- ism of the revisionists, the armed re- volts of the revolutionaries, the prac- tical experiments which sought to teach by the power of example, and the waiting for capitalism to dig its own grave by the necessarian circumstan- tialists. These elements belong to socialism in general. Then, there is modern so- cialism which has all these elements and additional individuating notes. The panacea suggested by modern socialism for the evils of society has these essential traits : first, the aboli- tion of private property in the means of production ; second, the transfer of ownership in productive goods from the individual to society; third, the so- cial or collective control of production with the implication that all members of the community are obliged to con- tribute towards production by their labor; fourth, the social or collective distribution of the produce, because the ownership of the productive means 54 THE REDWOOD. and the control of production being socialized, society is also the owner of the goods produced, and hence has the right and duty to distribute them among its members who have pro- duced them by their united effort. In this definition two things need to be emphasized as characteristic of modern socialism — the collective own- ership of all capital and material la- bor, and also, the collective control of production and distribution of the produce by the entire people consti- stuted into a democratic common- wealth. This, according to them, com- pletely abolishes the waste and anarchy of production due to our competitive system. Socialism has outgrown its primi- tive imperfection. It proceeds no longer in the twilight of vague and phantastical theories, but in the full glare of a perfect science developed from the thought and researches of Karl Marx, Frederick Engels and others. These men reconstructed Socialism on an intellectual basis. It took the fertile brain of Marx to prove, by a new system of economics, the injus- tice of private property, the exploita- tion of the workers of the world by modern capitalistic methods, the com- position of capital by his theories of value and surplus value, the inevitable collapse of industrialism by his theo- ries of the increasing pauperization of the working classes, and the concen- tration of industries and the inevitable course of the future by his material- istic conception of history. It is the purpose of this article to examine this scientific basis of Social- ism as conceived by Karl Marx. It will be critical in so far as his theories will be analyzed and judged for what the writer thinks they are worth, with- out bias and without prejudice; and it will be negative in so far as the prac- ticability of the future co-operative commonwealth will be neglected. The scientific basis and the groundwork of the vaunted scientific Socialism will be examined, and if the socialistic superstructure is not resting upon a firm foundation it will inevitably crumble. Whenever a false theory is put into practice, nothing but evil can result from it. Hence, before we can es- pouse Socialism we must rest assured that its theory conforms with the ob- jective reality of things. ECONOMIC DETERMINISM OR THE MATERIALISTIC CON- CEPTION OF HISTORY. Marx and Engels have developed the fundamentals of scientific social- ism. Among the works of the orig- inal authors there are chiefly three that set forth the basis of socialist philosophy in clear and logical meth- od, and are, therefore, considered as classical text-books and authentic sources. These are " Capital, " by Marx; " Socialism, Scientific and Uto- pian " and " Feuerbach, the Roots of Socialist Philosophy, " by Engels. THE REDWOOD. 55 These books build up the socialist theory on the basis of modern science. From these authentic sources we learn the following facts. Marx and Engel at first belonged to the Hegel- ian school, the founder of which, G. W. F. Hegel (1770-183n, was one of the classical German idealists. Marx derived his method of scientific inves- tigation from Hegel, although he re- jected his system of idealism. Ac- cording to Hegel ' s method the abso- lute idea eternally evolves by be- coming the other of itself and by again returning from its otherness to itself, or, in other words, by first creating within itself an opposition and then re- solving this opposition into a higher unity. In the course of development there are three stages — thesis, anti- thesis, and synthesis. An example will serve to make clear what is ex- pressed in characteristic Hegelian ob- scurity. A grain of wheat is sown in favor- able soil. This wheat is the thesis or starting point of knowledge. It sprouts and the grain of wheat exists no long- er, but in its stead there is a plant. This is the antithesis or negation. The plant matures and yields a num- ber of grains of wheat. Here we have the synthesis or Hegelian negation of negation. A similar process is said to be ob- served in history. " Every civilized nation starts with public ownership of land. As soon as the nation has de- veloped beyond a certain stage, the development of agriculture causes this public ownership of property to be felt as shackling production. It is abolished, annulled, and after shorter or longer intermediate stages, it is changed into private ownership. But after private ownership in land has produced a higher stage of develop- ment, it becomes in its turn a sha-jkle, hampering production, as is the case at present not only on small but also on extensive estates. The necessity of abolishing it and changing back to public property has become impera- tive. But this necessity does not im- ply the restoration of public owner- ship as it existed originally; it means the establishment of a far higher and more perfect form of common owner- ship, which far from hindering pro- duction will give it free scope and al- loy it to utilize to the full the chemi- cal ciiscoveries and mechanical appli- ances of modern times. " This illustrates Hegel ' s dialectic method, which was applied by Marx and Engels. Notwithstanding that these socialist theorists adopted He- gel ' s method, they rejected his system of philosophy. Hegel was not a materialist, he was an idealist. Matter was not with him the demiurge of the universe, but the absolute idea, and life was only the gradual unfolding or evolving of the absolute idea, the objective world ex- isting only as phenomena of the sub- jective self. The absolute idea or the absolute being is God, who is con- ceived as the supreme and universal being; not for the reason that he is 56 THE REDWOOD. the self existent cause of all things, but because he is identical with all that has existence. For, eternally evolving by a thought process, he be- comes all things, and vice versa all things that come into being are in him and identical with him as stages of his evolution, and his thoughts and modes of consciousness. Thus He- gelian philosophy is a system of ideal- istic pantheism. Marx rejected this idealism of the German philosophy and became tinged with the materialism of the thinkers of the French enlightenment. He favored the materialism of the latter but rejected their metaphysical meth- od by which they recognized the eter- nal unchangeable character of know- ledge and truth. On the other hand, Marx saw in- herent contradictions in Hegel ' s ideal- ism. The dialectic of the idea with him became itself merely the con- scious reflex of the dialectical evolu- tion of the real world and therefore the dialectic of Hegel was turned up- side down, or rather it was placed on its feet instead of on its head, where it was standing before. In this way, Marx come to apply the dialectic evolution on a material- istic basis to human society, and the conclusion he arrived at was his phil- osophy of history, just as Charles Darwin had applied the same theory to biology. With him history was no longer an accidental succession of events, a wild whirl of senseless deeds of violence, but like all other reality, the gradual evolution caused by the economic factor proceeding by it? own inner necessity towards a self- recognized goal. In view of the importance and am- biguity of the materialistic conception of history it is advisable to quote the chief presentations : — The best known statement is that of Engels in the Communist Manifesto, the joint pro- duction of Marx and Engels. " The proposition is that in every historical epoch, the prevailing mode of economic production and exchange and the social organization necessari- ly following from it form the basis up- on which is built up and from which alone can be explained the political and intellectual history of that epoch; that, consequently, the whole history of mankind since the dissolution of primitive tribal society holding land in common-ownership has been a his- tory of class struggles, contests be- tween exploiting and exploited, ruling and oppressed classes; that the his- tory of these class struggles forms a series of evolution in which nowadays a stage has been reached in which the exploited and oppressed class — the proletariat — cannot obtain its emancipation from the sway of the exploiting and ruling class — the bour- geoisie — without at the same time, once an(j for all, emancipating society at large from all exploitation, oppression, class distinction, and class struggles. " More concisely he defines it as " the view of the course of history which seeks the ultimate course and the THE REDWOOD. 57 great moving power of all important historic events in the modes of pro- duction and exchange, in the conse- quent division of society into classes against one another. Again, " From this point of view we find the final cause of all social changes and political revolutions are to be sought not in men ' s brains, not in men ' s better insight into eternal truth and justice, but in changes in the modes of production and exchange. They are to be sought not in the phil- osophy but in the economics of each particular epoch. " Marx is not an out and out mater- ialist ; he lays great stress on the con- scious class struggle and this pre- cludes the position of the materialist that all the deeds of men are deter- mined by physical forces and uncon- sciously by blind necessity. The con- sistent materialist takes away all free- dom of the will, and all self-conscious struggles to elevate the human race would be absurd. Marx is a material- ist in so far as he believes that the material conditions of life in ultimate analysis cause the progress and growth of society. There, are two versions of this the- ory, — first, that economic conditions are the ultimate cause of all history — just as other historians have ascribed sole importance to geographical and climatic influences ; in the second, also, the economic factor directs the cur- rent of history, but its influence is ex- erted through the medium of a class struggle, that is, the law of evolution is found in the existence of two classes antagonistic to each other. The second version holds as its characteristic ele- ment the class struggle. It is distinct- ly Marxian since it is an application of Hegel ' s dialectic method of thesis, antithesis and synthesis to human so- ciety. In human society men enter into certain relations for the purpose of production and exchange. The sum total of these individual relations con- stitutes the form of society. From being conditions of growth and ad- vancement, these forms become shackles upon production, and in- herent contradiction develops, and with inevitable necessity a form of so- ciety will result to conform to the changed method of production and distribution. The germ of the new society develops in the womb of the old society. To illustrate : In the pres- ent state of human evolution which socialists designate as industrial cap- italism there is an inherent contradic- tion — production is co-operative and carried on by means of concerted la- bor, yet the method of distribution and appropriation of products is indi- vidualistic. Individual capitalists ap- propriate the commodities of social- ized labor whereas in the next stage of human evolution there will be a socialized distribution of products ihrough the instrumentality of a democ- ratic cooperative commonwealth. That is the socialistic state owning all the means of production will own all the products, and uf on the state will 58 THE REDWOOD. devolve the duty of distributing the products observing the greatest pos- sible equality. The folloviring are examples of ex- planations of events in history by " Economic Determinism " as it is sometimes called. In Engels " Socialism, Scientific and Utopian " we read, " Calvin ' s predes- tination doctrine was the religious ex- pression of the fact that in the com- mercial world of competition, success or failure does not depend upon a man ' s activity or cleverness, but upon circumstances uncontroll able by him. It is not of him that willeth or of him that runneth but of the mercy of un- known superior economic powers ; and this was especially true of a per- iod of economic revolutions when all old commercial routes were replaced by new ones, when India and America were opened to the world and when even the most sacred economic ar- ticles of faith — the value of gold and silver, began to totter and break down. " Aversion to earthly things taught by Christianity is explained by the material conditions of the old Roman Empire. Applying this to ethics Kautsky demonstrates the connection between a limited food supply and the categorical imperative to kill the old and feeble. Robert Rives La Monte in his latest work sets forth similar views. To quote his own words : " The ruling ideas of every age have been the ideas of its ruling class. " This applies to ideas of right and wrong — commonly known as morali- ty — as fully as to ideas of any other kind. " Conduct that has tended to perpetuate the power of the economic- ally dominant class — since the in- crease of wealth has divided society into classes — has ever been accounted moral conduct ; conduct that has tend- ed to weaken or subvert the power of the ruling class has always been branded as immoral. There you have the key of the varying codes of ethics the world has seen. " Morality is in its essence a class institution a set of rules of conduct forced or inculcated for the benefit of a class. " Socialism : Positive and Negative. " Concerning the changeableness of the moral code and its connection with the material conditions of life Bebel says : " As each social stage of human development has its own conditions of production so likewise has each its own code of morals which is but the reflection of the social condition. That is moral which is usage and that in turn is usage which corresponds with the innermost being, i. e. the needs of a given period. " James Oneal in The Worker, December 2, 1905 writes in the same strain : " The material in- terests of the ruling class of every ag are reflected in the moral code of their time, and this code will be changed, modified, and adapted to suit the changing character of production even though the change be so rapid as to reverse in a single year the code of the previous year. " Modern historians have rewritten THE REDWOOD. 59 all history on a materialistic basis and have found in ultimate analysis the cause of every war from the Trojan War of Greek mythology to the Rus- so-Japanese War of yesterday to be founded on economic conditions — the need of outlet for the support of grow- ing populations, the hunger for col- onies, territory, trade routes, markets, etc. There is much truth in Marx ' s con- tention and this emphasis on the econ- omic factor in history is a natural reaction against the unreal closet phil- osophy which read all life in terms of intellectual speculation and consid- ered it beneath the dignity of history to take any regard of the manner in which men earned their living. But Marx exaggerated this revolutionary idea to an indefensible degree. This is best seen in the efiforts of his dis- ciples and interpreters who are forced to hedge and qualify, which is tanta- mount to admitting that Marx made a mistake. These men have increased the tenability of Marx ' s theory, but at the cost of its consistency. Marx started by declaring that conditions of pro- duction determined the whole super- structure of society — the intellectual, political, and religious phases of hu- man life being merely the reflection of the material conditions of production. To this factor of production Engels adds the conditions of exchange or distribution, and in later years he rec- ognizes the influences of the ideolog- ical forces, that is, the creative power of the human mind in controlling en- vironment, which formerly were looked upon merely as the reflex and effect of material conditions. Race is again elevated to the posi- tion of a primary factor in controlling the course of human history. In short, the attempt to find one pass- key that will unlock all the secrets of the past is silently and reluctantly abandoned. In fact, it is impossible to bring the whole gamut of human existence un- der the all-embracing power of one single principle. Human society is too complicated, it is a system of re- lations and correlations and the lines of division are not clearly drawn. The thirst for fame and power, religious aspiration, racial prejudice, sex attrac- tion, scientific curiosity, the instinct of play are as real and primary forces as economic environment. These all act and interact on the course of his- tory, sometimes one predominates, sometimes another, but a method which selects an isolated instance where the economic factor is conspic- uous, neglectmg all other causes, and frames a doctrine of the overwhelm- ing importance of this factor can lay no claim to scientific finality or com- pleteness. For instance, socialists find the cause of the American Revolution in the economic discontent of a sadly exploited people, rather than the ab- surdity of a free people consenting to 60 THE REDWOOD. be ruled by a people no abler than themselves and three thousand miles away. Neither had the history of mankind been a history of class struggle. True, there was the war between patricians and plebians in ancient Rome, be- tween the landed aristocracy and the serfs in feudal society, and between bourgeoisie and proletariat today, or between capital and labor as it is com- monly known. There is an element of truth in Marx ' s contentions, but it gives such a distorted, perverted view of facts that his materialistic concep- tion of history must be qualified and conditioned into nothingness. So far as the economic factor has shaped history — and its importance is undeniable — it is impossible to show that this influence has always been ex- erted through the medium of a class struggle. Marx ' s emphasis on the class struggle, bailed by his followers as the most important contribution to the social theory made by scientific socialism, was in reality not a scientific deduction from facts but a survival of his a priori metaphysics. " His mind was so obsessed by Hegelian convictions of the dialectic character of mankind ' s development that he tried to fit the facts to the formula, and consequently for him the class struggle monopolized the whole econ- omic stage. " " Certainly two great classes corres- pond to the Hegelian negation of ne- gation but this negation does not cor- respond to reality. " The division into labor and capital is imperfect since one division in- cludes the other, as will be seen soon; but, assuming the truth of the division, it is untrue that each class is moved by and acts for its own economic in- terests. Witness the American workingmen supporting by their suffrage bosses and grafters. Kautsky, one of the greatest of So- cialists, angered at the failure of the English workingmen to play the rev- olutionary part staged for them by Marx bursts out : " Their highest ideal consists in aping their masters and in maintaining their hypocritical re- spectability, their admiration of wealth however it may be obtained, and their spiritless manner of killing their lei- sure time. The emancipation of their class appears to them a foolish dream. Consequently it is football, boxing, horse-racing, and opportunities of gambling which move them the deep- est and to which their entire leisure time is devoted. " In the complexity of modern in- dustrial life men ' s relations cannot be confined to a single group. The strata of modern society are many, the cross sections innumerable. Geographical division, occupational interejst, color and racial differences cut athwart the symmetrical lines of the class struggle theorist. Scabs fight union men. Small shop owners fight trusts and monopolies. By means of the joint stock companies the laborers become THE REDWOOD. 61 capitalists by investing their savings in commercial enterprises. Furthermore, it is only the optim- ism of Marx that can argue that clash of classes will lead not to chaos and relapse to low er levels, as happened before in the w orld ' s history, but to the triumph of the oppressed and the living happy ever after in classless Eden. Again we have the paradox, that class struggle and antagonism of interests is the only law of progress. But in the cooperative commonwealth there are no classes. Hence we are evolving toward a state of harmony plus stagnation. Again we have the queer contention that in all the preceding stages of society leading to the cooperative commonwealth, material environment controls the life of man with inev- itable necessity, but in the cooperative commonwealth the converse suddenly holds true, and the material forces be- come the servant of man. The mater- ialistic conception of history can lay no claim to being a science, since sci- ence investigates the eternal, immut- able natures and essences of things. It deals with necessary principles and seeks to know the truth which ever remains the same. Through the lapse of centuries the idea of circle, square, right triangle have ever remained the same. Neither will it avail Marx and Engels anything to concede that in the realm of mathematics alone there are necessary unchanging truths. All the sciences are intimately related and one forms the basis of another. What is true in mathematics is true in philosophy, which is the foundation of all sciences. HARDIN BARRY, A. M., ' 12. (To be continued.) 62 THE REDWOOD. WOMAN IN POLITICS JUST what will be the effect of woman in politics, is a question that is receiving a great amount of the attention of the public. That she will be mixed in political affairs shortly, no one, or very few, will deny. In fact, in our own State, they are al- ready involved. I have made so bold as to put on paper a few personal ideas on the subject. Now, the woman might either sim- ply cast her vote on those political questions which confront the people, or she might, and from actual experi- ence it seems to be the greater proba- bility, enter actively into the political game and fight shoulder to shoulder with man. In the first instance the nation will not derive any benefit, for she is vot- ing and that is all. She may vote this way or that. In the final reckoning the status of affairs will remain un- changed. Let it be granted that she can influence man in questions which concern the highest good. It is at least equally true that man can per- suade her to adopt his view, even if it should prove the wrong. Hence, it is my contention, if woman is to be mere- ly a mechanical device which punches this or that ticket at stated intervals, she will not put politics on a higher plane. It will only give the tally- clerks a larger number of ballots to count. This sort of politics the majority of women will deny. They intend to have as much say in the government as man. They claim the only way to do this properly is to get out and com- pete with man. It is held to be only fair that they should have as much right to adminis- ter the affairs of government as man. They are every bit as important a factor in its continuance. Probably more so. Ay! and here is where the rub comes — if they would not in so doing weaken rather than strengthen the country. We are treading on treacherous ground when we come to prove the fact, whether or not, women should keep out of politics. But when you realize they are apt to defeat that end for which society was formed, viz. the protection and preservation of the masses, then you are inclined to hold the former opinion. Have not the women as much right to be free as man? Are they to be man ' s slave? Must they always drudge and toil around dull domestic affairs? These and many, many more are the questions put by the bel- ligerent suffragette to her opponents. And indeed we should not laugh at or deride her queries, for it is a fact that some of them are most reasonable. How would the man relish the idea of managing the house-hold affairs, THE REDWOOD. 63 bringing up the children properly? This would necessitate remaining the best part of his time at home and his never meeting with the excitement of brushing up against the outside world. Ah ! ' tis well for you woman that so far you have not found it necessary to mingle in that of which you draw such a gay mental picture. Admitting it is a pleasing and exciting game for the man, would it prove equally fascinat- ing to the woman? Perhaps I have no right to answer the question. Never- theless, it appears to me, as I picture the present political fight for the pres- idential chair, if woman had to go through one-half the strain of such a campaign, she would be nigh unto death from physical and mental exer- tion. Are women as fit for political power and for the ruling of the State as men? One of the main essentials required in statecraft is rational discretion, i. e., the power of taking a cold abstract view of things. Man is much more capable of this than woman. Emotion will work upon her mind and cloud her road to strict justice. Nature has constituted her so, and nature acts with a purpose. If woman is anxious to cast aside such a quality, she is dis- owning a valuable attribute. The fact is, it is so innate in her that it does not seem probable or possible to sep- arate woman and this great emotional quality. The country depends for its exist- ence on naval and military power, di- plomacy, finance, mining, construc- tive, shipping and transport indus- tries, in none of which can women take part. Yet it is upon these matters and the vast interests involved in them, that the work, or better, the progress of the nation depends. What work is more noble and praiseworthy than that of the com- passionate worker for the down-trod- den unfortunate? Tell woman here is the chance for her if she wishes to get into public life. Will she jump at the chance? I think not. At one time it was the vogue for those females who were able, to perform many charitable works. They lessened the pains of the sick, refinanced the poor, and did all they could for the uplift of their fel- low creatures. This, to a great extent, is the fash- ion no more. That work is now left to burden the shoulders of the relig- ious orders. It is not fair to let the bulk of the weight rest on them, since they have also to teach the word of God, educate the young and do a multi- tude of other things. This makes it important for them to receive the help- ing hand of woman. How about the woman of today? What is her aim ? Is it for the best in- terest of the general welfare? That her intentions are good, I will not question. She looks upon the advent of woman in politics as an uplift for all, and principally for the rights of her down-trodden sisters. She is go- ing to become mannish so that she will be able to cope with man. Women now enter into all the 64 THE REDWOOD. sports. Their attire is made to imi- tate that of the males. They are com- peting with him in the various busi- ness lines. That she is able to vie with many in many of these latter is, indeed, most evident. This should not surprise anyone. He who thinks that woman is not cap- able of possessing the same intellect- ual powers as man, is imbued with a wrong opinion. That she is not actu- ally so possessed at present does not disprove the fact. The gentle sex have been handicapped by nature with an inequality of opportunity. Where in- equality of opportunity exists there is no chance for a fair comparison. Hence the statement that man pos- sesses an intellect superior to woman is without foundation. Man makes a great mistake when he takes it for granted that official su- periority implies personal superiority. Take for example the contract view of society and extend it to the marriage contract. Is there any more reason why, in this contractual relation of two, the wife should be the inferior, than in a voluntary partnership of two men of business for a common ad- vantage, one should preside over the other? As far as personal superiority has to do with their position man can claim no advantage. He is even in- ferior in many things. It comes, then, to this: Man has certain perfections which fit him for special undertakings, whilst woman is possessed of particular qualities which are the exact counterpart of man ' s. Thus he is, as a general rule, active and progressive. He is the defender of the weaker sex; he is ever discussing those affairs which relate to the dealings of man with his fellowman. The woman beholds her co-partner at work in these active affairs. She looks on from within. She is able to see, from this vantage point, where there is a lack of wisdom, order and judgment. Naturally she uses her in- fluence for the good. This has al- ways been our idea of the true woman. The two sexes are the complement one of the other. If the one objects to perform those duties for which it it naturally fitted, evil is bound to result. Hence, it is very necessary that each should be content to work within its special sphere. No one is going to deny that there should be as near as is possible a just division of the labor. Do the women hope to obtain a more just division by taking on their shoulders an extra and overwhelming weight? This cer- tainly would seem to be a most unwise remedy. They hope to effect a cure by using a remedy which is more deadly than the disease. Now as to this question of women entering politics. Do they all or the majority of them desire it? I am very positive they do not. The larger number advocating suffrage are those who might be termed faddists. A child desiring some relish is re- fused, because he already has all he can safely be allowed. So also is it THE REDWOOD. 65 with these faddists. They see man in a game which thus far they have been unable to play. Anxious to enter into it they immediately set up a clamor, claiming injustice, fraud, and unfair- ness. It might be well to note here that the majority of these women are as a general rule such as give little or no attention to those duties which their sex has been accustomed to per- form since the creation of the world. Because these duties appear disagree- able and burdemsome to some of them, should not be the cause for the jump- ing into a task which might wreak ruin on themselves and the nation. Why is it that man resents the entry of woman into politics? Are the men afraid they will be displaced by her? Are they afraid that she will control the government since she is in the majority? Does a man fear that after the ascendancy of woman he will be burdened with greater la- bors? Is it because it runs contrary to the custom of years? In looking these questions over not one of them seems to be a sufficient reason for his resentment. There are many more rhetorical questions of the same character, but these are no more valid than the above. Surely, then, there must be some weighty reason for his attitude. It is then my purpose to find out why his opinion is such. To do this I will first consider the moral uplift, which woman claims will be extended by her entry into politics, second, the intellectual up- lift which will be brought about by the broadening of her field of action. Let us first consider the moral up- lift. Our new-found politician is going to get out and run for office. Others will be out campaigning for their party favorites. Still others will be around talking over the various platforms, discussing which in their opinion should receive the support of the people. This they certainly must do if they would enter thoroughly into the political arena. Let us now see how much good the woman can produce by her debut into political afifairs. She assuredly could better the condition of working women by bringing about reforms for higher wages. Then, also, there would be certain official positions which she would be better fitted for than man. Those who were single would have a personal voice by cast- ing their ballot as to how great a tax should be levied on theiir property, etc., whereas, now they have no rep- resentative whatever. Then, also, those undertakings which lacked moral sanction ought to receive her negative vote. Thus it would certain- ly be death to such investments as race-tracks gambling, immoral places, gambling-dens and all their like. The number of affairs like the above which she could remedy is most nu- merous. That she would remedy them we cannot doubt, if her present nature is any criterion. But here is where the difficulty comes in. When 66 THE REDWOOD. once woman enters into this field of politics as an equal to man, then must her whole nature be changed. Then must those undesirable affairs which she now fights from within, look or appear in a different light. Those things which were fought tooth and nail she now lets pass unnoticed. This is but the natural outcome of woman ' s mixing in the struggles and strife of the ruffian world. Can woman so change her nature? Is she capable of shielding and mak- ing herself proof against the battery she must face? Granted that it is pos- sible. Would the good, which we have seen above, she could accom- plish, be worth this great change of her nature? Facts seem to show that it would not. Think how much, indeed, the home life must suffer with this con- templated change. The two ' things cannot be carried at the same time and tended to properly. Consequently either the woman must not be bur- dened with the bearing and rearing of the race, or she must be relieved of some of the work by giving the care and rearing of the children to others. In the first instance the lack of off- spring would be keenly felt by the coimtry. Soon the inevitable would come to pass, viz.; the nation would be a thing of the past. Regarding the second statement — the giving of the care of the children to others, while they busy themselves with political dealings — this will sure- ly bring about a queer state of affairs. What being beside the mother could have the interest or welfare of these children at heart? It is under the mother ' s care and guidance that the young are reared into good respectful grown-ups. With this motherly in- fluence lacking the growing child is certainly handicapped. On the other hand the more true the mother is to her natural task the greater the num- ber of good citizens there will be to look out for the interests of all. Think again of that high respect with which man holds the female sex. In the new body politic that reverence and esteem would soon be lost track of. She contesting with man and he opposing her, all thoughts of higher things disappear. The party best fit- ted to bear the struggle must be tri- umphant. This would seem to rank the man as ruler. For when the above quality comes into play we cannot deny that man is the superior. If man ' s respect for the gentle sex be- comes less there is great danger for that high moral standing for which she has always been noted. Surely, then, after one has looked thoroughly into the question, he can- not say this so-called emancipation of woman will bring about a great moral uplift. There is a preponderance of evidence, on the other hand, to prove that morality would decline. Now to the second consideration, viz: the intellectual uplift. The weaker sex have from the earliest periods of human exi stence been confined to no education what- THE REDWOOD. 67 ever, or to a very limited degree of it. Just w hose fault this is I will not at- tempt to explain. It may be the man ' s, it may be the woman ' s, or it may be the fault of both. Yet this much is evidently true : if the women wish to follow educational pur- suits to the fullest extent, they should not be prevented. They ought to have every opportunity that is given to man. Is man so small as to deny them this? If so, it might be well for him to know that he is opposing an important good, — a good, indeed, which will prove a serious setback to the nation, if it is wanting. For if on the one hand the women are unedu- cated, will not their lack of good judg- ment, of good reason and all the other qualities that go with a well-trained intellect, be felt by the husband and children? On the other hand, the educated woman will, by her wisdom, foresight, and understanding, bring about the results most desired. The number of women now pursuing the higher intellectual pursuits shows that the latter statement is fully realized in our present day. Also, is it not the mother that has the first and most lasting influence on the child? If these influences be not of a high standard, how is it possible for the influence to be such? Therefore, it is plain that it is for the best interest of the nation, that woman ' s intellect should be highly developed. Yet it is rather rash to come out with the declaration that their entry into politics will broaden her scope of action and consequently her intellectual capacity. Granted that it will broaden her scope of ac- tion, granted, even, that her intellect- ual capacity will be increased, I ask, will this training of the intellect which she receives tend principally toward a good effect? It would seem not. Her intellectual benefits by this pro- cess will be obtained at a high cost and accompanied with a goodly amount of evil. That she can be educated without be- ing in politics is evident. That she can put this education to greatest ad- vantage in politics, is absurd. For intellectual development is primarily for the perfection of human beings. Any undertaking which is a misuse of it, should be thoroughly shunned. That it would be a misuse of woman ' s education to have them use it in political affairs, I have not the slight- est doubt. That it is so, the above facts will show. Hence, from the moral and intel- lectual side of the question, it would not be profitable for woman to enter into politics. In conclusion, let me add : That the law of the country is capable of improvement with regard to wom- en ' s just rights, I do not deny; that their entry into politics is the best solvent of the difficulty, I do deny. THOMAS J. RIORDAN, A. M., ' 12. 68 THE REDWOOD. THE TIDE The fisherman sat in his fisherman ' s cot. In a fisherman s way he mused. Of a fisherman ' s life and a fisherman ' s lot, And a fisherman ' s words he used: ' An ' oV Zeke, now, he ' s gone the ivay, That many have gone before; Boat found driftin ' , so they say, An ' him a fioatin ' cor ' . " J. conquer in ' spirit that oV Zeke war, As ' ud weather the roughest blow; Through the lashing drink hed Bend his spar. Through the darkest night his bow. ' ' An the creek seemed sorto ' afavorin ' him, Noiv that I stop to reflect, It ' peared to admire his fearless vim, An wish to win his resjyect. ' ' I recollect ivell, when the run war low, An boats for months pulled light, Haui Zeke ' ud sail in on. the mornin bloio. With what hed caught at night, " An his tub ' ud almost ahvays float A haul right far from mean. An ' its ofteri times Tve seen the boat. Heaped high with Chinook sheen. " A good heart too, he had, had Zeke, A grumblin like, an rough; But a coat beat bare, an a face ' twarnt meek, Hid humaner, nobler stuff. THE REDWOOD. 69 ' ■ ' Right many a pal, as his luck unr bad, An ' his home a needin of things, OV Zehe ' ud give him the last he had, He ' d give him the sack an the strings. ' But a chap of 2)eculiar cast he war, Rather lone an dignified, With a distant-like an inscrutible air, With a smack of the deep-running tide. ' 0f the tide that sprays through the ice-shimmej ed gorge, That tricks through the timbered range. That burrows deep rock with an on-pressing forge, Till it gushes forth glad at the change; " That trips through the camjon an drips doicn the ridge, That roves from the lake an ' the spring, An ' ivith light lip-salute, ' neath a twig-twined bridge, Steals together aicay, awand ' ring; ' ' An ' threads through the contours of mountain an dell. An frolics through forest an field. An broadens an deepens, in on-surging swell, With the life current other streams yield; ' ' An ' dashes dotvn cascades, through boulders an ' crags. An ' recov ' ring itself, glides away, ' Then with graver an placider movement half lags. As if seni ing a soberer day; " An under, an wider, an ' wider an ' deep, ' Gins to grmo as it moves along. Past field an past town, till it meets at its seep, With the sea in a low love song. 70 THE REDWOOD. ' ' There hroad it broods, ahoixt the shores. This sullen, moody tide. From the brim o ' the brine, where the great green roars, To the half-walling mountain side. " An a secret deep in its breast it holds. The tale of its day ' s long course, When its life flushed quick in varied wolds; (Nought left but a tang of remorse.) ' ' An Zeke, of Zeke, he war much the same, A secret, too he had, Of better days seen ' fore Fate made its claim, An left him stripped an ' sad. ' ' So a sympathy-bond seemed to hold them near, Gruff Zeke an ' the gloomier tide. Each one alone an ' each with a sere. An each with a secret to hide. But a treacherous soul has the deep-runnin tide, As it learns from the treacherous sea: An a death war the goal of a smiling night ' s ride: An ' a dead man rots there in the ha. " An ' us as respond to its beckoning wiles, Or its sullener moods dare to brave, As it lures with soft song an with radiant smile — It bares us its soul, an ' the grave. " And the deep-running tide, in its heartless, cold way, With a menacing moan it mncked. The blackening tale of a perfidious day. When a fisherman ' s death was f rocked. L. A. FERNSWORTH. THE REDWOOD. 71 THE ESSENCE OF A SHORT STORY Murstott, aside from possessing a most peculiar name, possessed a most peculiar personality. One could scarce term him a cynic, yet he was sopped completely in culture and George Bernard Shaw. One could not denominate him a progressive or a radical, yet aside from rank animal laziness, he stood, or believed he stood, in the forefront of that movement which makes that of iconoclasm seem a mere hubub of confused ideas and voices. In short, he was not a conventional radical, if such a paradoxical expres- sion could be used, yet neither does the opposite hold, a progressive con- servative. If one were to set him down as a nonentity, one would per- chance convey some inkling of his per- sonality. But, since this is not going to be a character sketch, and neither is intended as a discursive treatise on human nature, we can safely dismiss Murstott from our thoughts as far as personality goes, and set him before ourselves only as an important figure in the telling of this tale. The ashes of our cigars began to grow long, and the conversation drift- ed gradually from politics to religion, and thence to literature. Drama came in for its share, and it was all owing to the discussion of Brieux ' s " Mater- nity, " that the question of climax came into the field. Parton claimed, and, being a critic, he knew whereof he spoke, that the placing of mental excitement, together with the climax, at the end of a drama, was bad con- struction. ' Faulty technique ' was what he styled it. Murstott then broke in and asked if that were not the essence of a short story. I well remember the look on his face when he put the query. " Well, — um — um, no, " answered Parton, " better say a finish after an anti-climax — take ' The Man Who Was, ' for example. The climax there, is, who is the man? and after the set- tling of that issue, the summary rela- tion of what became of Dirkovitch, is only a tearing down, a sort of an after- taste to a cloyed palate — say, a bit of literary polish. " Although that was Kipling, I can ' t agree. Not that I ' m egotistical — why, hang it — the French school, that ' s what I mean. " " Give us an example, " I chimed in. " Can ' t do it, " muttered Parton. Im- possible — save, perhaps, ' The Neck- lace ' , and we have Boule de Suif to off- set that. " " Here, I ' ll show you in the shortest possible fashion, namely by example, " 72 THE REDWOOD. We each took a fresh cigar, and Murstott began : " We ' ll say in a certain town of S , there lived a man that had a son. Nothing particularly extraordin- ary in the fact, but, anyhow, he had one. Now, this man was rich, quite rich — also nothing very extraordinary, and to complete the rather common- place detail, we ' ll say that the son had a " flame " which, to carry out the word, was rather lurid. " She was tall, exceedingly well formed, features somewhat oriental, dark hair, dark eyes, and possessed of a rather sensuous manner, that would attract any young man, even if he were not rich. Now this Lady Rebec- ca had several business connections, each of a rather dubious nature, so, to make all ends meet, she centralized the system, and the horses ran accord- ingly. " Amongst the many friends that this lady needed, and many are needed in that profession, was one that occu- pied an important position in the old man So-and-so ' s office. " Now, the boy was perfectly straight — that is, he was never arrested for speeding, never flunked in his studies, and, after procuring a diploma, he set- tled down rather quietly into an un- der-clerkship in ' Dad ' s ' office. But all the while, let us say, the flame kept burning. " But, for the sake of Parton, it is necessary to enter into the previous life of the old man, and to touch slight- ly on his character. His earlier life was spent in an effort to gain wealth, and, at that period, the sowing of wild oats, and later the reaping, were in vogue. Therefore, we will gloss over events, and say that every once in a while certain disreputable persons, would call on him, asking for money or this or that. Sometimes it was granted, but if stocks were up or down, the ' persona non grata ' was liable to put in his appearance and up- set the whole place, often crying and bewailing his fate, and the ingratitude of mankind. " Along in the Autumn of a certain financially depressed, or rather de- pleted year, there was one John Har- kins, an old-time co-sower in the field, turned up, and, after persistently ask- ing for succor, was given work, much against his will. " Now, at this time, you see, we have in our little sketch the following dramatis personae: An old, rich, and formerly rakish, father, a well-mean- ing but infatuated son (after the man- ner of a moth about a flame,) a former loose friend of the old man ' s, and a none too reasonable, responsible of- fice clerk. Thus five personalities given, and the crux of our plot is here to be unfolded. " About this time several cash short- ages were put in evidence at the of- fice, and they become so frequent and gradually amounted to so much, that the old man ' s attention was called to them. " Well, to say that he was disturbed, would be scarcely correct, but if one THE REDWOOD. 73 would say that he was filled with a passionate, chortling desire to catch the miscreant, that might approach more nearly his frame of mind. But there was a hitch in the old gentle- man ' s asking aid of the police, and it was this . The chief of police was his sworn political enemy, and pride was the greatest constituent in his psycho- logical makeup. Consequently he pon- dered for several weeks upon the mat- ter, all the while the pilfering going on ; and he was about to conquer his pride and ask the assistance of Major Bailey, the chief, when, on mentioning it to his attorney, that worthy repre- sentative of our legal system burst into a loud guffaw. " ' Nothing simpler; why the same thing ' s happened in a dozen offices — happened even in mine. I tell you how I landed them. It took no de- tectives, but plain common sense. I merely set a flask of good whiskey on my desk, and put into it a little knock- out stiffener. The next morning I came, and there was my man. The old fool of a janitor. Prosecute him? No. Just gave him some good advice and fired him. So you see nothing could be more simple. ' " ' Capital, ' thought the old gentle- man. ' I really can ' t see why the scheme did not suggest itself. Come to think about it also, my desk de- canter has been running rather low of late, much too low in proportion to my demands upon it. Furthermore, that clerk at the receiving desk has been rather blear-eyed of late. Um ! Natural causes always produce natur- al effects. ' " Here Murstott broke off. His cigar had gone out and he paused to relight it. After a few satisfying and succu- lent puffs, he continued : " The old chap did act on the sug- gestion. He even went so far as to buy the stiffening himself. And to be sure that no one but himself should have the credit of apprehending the culprit, he filled the decanter, set it on top of his desk, and, after remain- ing in the office longer than was his wont, finally left the building, and or- dered the chauffeur to drive to the club. " There, amidst the talk of several old youngsters like himself, mostly dilettantes in the financial set, and deeply engrossed in his favorite game of euchre, he forgot entirely the epi- sode until an attendant called his name out for the ' phone. " He excused himself, went int o the ' phone booth, and shortly after came out, all asmile. ' Well, gentlemen, ' he said, ' I ' ve got a surprise for you. Lit- tle you thought that I was a detective. Well, I am, I ' ll tell you. ' Here he proceeded to relate the entire incident. General interest was aroused over the recital, and nothing would do but that they must all jump into their ma- chines and ride down to the office, where the janitor had just ' phoned that the burglar was lying prone upon the floor. " They were soon there. The night boy took them up in the elevator, and 74 THE REDWOOD. the janitor, in company with an offi- cious-looking policeman, admitted them to the office. They started to- ward the inner office, and, as they did so, the old man with great familiarity, went ahead of them, and touched an electric button. Immediately the room was flooded with light, but, almost simultaneously, he uttered a piercing shriek, gazed fixedly for a moment at the easily discernible dead man, and collapsed. " One of his companions rushed for- ward to catch him as he fell, but he was too late. Naturally, he let his eyes rest on the contorted figure in the office and then turned hurriedly, and with amazement written glaring- ly on his face, he exclaimed pitifully to the wondering group, ' My God, what a mistake ! He has poisoned his ozvn son. ' " To say that we enjoyed the tale is not necessary, and to say that Murs- tott enjoyed it also, is furthermore unnecessary. In fact, he fairly radi- ated with joy, and exclaimed glibly. Come, now Parton, be truthful. Deny to me, if you can, that the es- sence of the short story is in the end climax. " RODNEY A. YOELL. THE REDWOOD. 75 " KELLEY OF THE MOUNTAIN DIVISION " THE " Mountain Division " was the roughest part of the system in those days and accordingly the most hardened men available were employed. The superintendent, Mi- chael McGinnis, was an Irishman, of course, and as most Irishmen was a good leader. But he lacked tact, and that is probably the link that bound him to little Jack Kelley, the " caller. " Nobody knew Jack ' s history, or even where he hailed from, but they all respected him, and he was the one person who could influence the men and still remain on their level. He had applied to McGinnis for work two years before and had been put in the shop as a helper. But the work was too heavy for him, and, being an all- round favorite, he had been made the first caller on the Division. This was in ' 92, and the floods of that date are as vivid to the veterans of the Division, as if they had hap- pened only yesterday, and there are few of the " old uns " who will not de- light in telling you how " little Jack " Kelley, the caller, saved No. 9. Jack is superintendent of the same Division today, and he is one that does ' nt for- get old friends. It was late in August, and the heat had been almost unbearable for some time past. It started to rain on the twenty-eighth, and it rained, and it continued to rain for six whole days. The small creeks were raging tor- rents, each canyon and gully had its own small rapid and the " cuts " were flooded to overflowing. It was noth- ing unusual to have a few bridges washed out every year, but this time it was not only the bridges but the roadbed of almost the entire Division. Men were rushed in from outside points, and in a comparatively short time had the track and bridges re- paired enough to withstand light traf- fic. But things just wouldn ' t go right. The track would no sooner be re- paired than a landslide would cover it with tons of dirt. McGinnis swore, the men swore, and Jack lost his smile, — which was an evil omen. However, the weather cleared up for a spell and things began to look bright again until that eventful night of September 12. Everybody was tired, and wherever it had been pos- sible a man was given a day off, on full pay, as a recompense for the hard work and fatigue he had endured dur- ing the floods. The operator and " little Jack " were the only ones that met No. 9 that night. She had pulled in at 10:33 with her usual five coaches, consisting of two mail cars, a combined baggage and express car, a day coach and an early model of the Pullman palace car. 76 THE REDWOOD. The locomotive was quickly changed and with time to spare, she pulled out at 10:40. The operator and Jack repaired to the station to enjoy one of their night- ly chats, and had just settled them- selve near the fire when a frantic call from Laramie pounded into the sound- er. The operator answered and the message was ticked off, H-O-L-D — N-I-N-E— C-O-B-B-L-E— C-R-E-E-K — B-R-I-D-GE— O-U-T. This stun- ning news nearly paralyzed both, for Jack had picked up the code in knock- ing about the station. Cobble Creek lay exactly between them and Rawlins. There was no chance for her to be flagged, for the track walkers had toth reported and were to be picked up in the " cut. " Every minute counted. Jack was the first to recover from the shock, and diving out of the station across the track he climbed to the cabin of 342, the immense engine that had just pulled in with No. 9. There were two Mexicans engaged in banking the fire for the night, and ordering them to " steam up " he took his position on the " hogger ' s " seat. His tone had compelled instant obedience, and the men shoveled for dear life. There was enough steam to get her out to the main line, and this he did. Waiting for one of the Mex- icans to close the switch, he opened the th ' ottle. Slowly they gained headway. The gauge registered 140 and was slowly creeping up. He let out notch after notch until he was making about forty miles. The gauge crept to one- fifty, then to one-fifty-five — and the speed increased accordingly. Cobble Creek was sixty miles away, and Nine had orders to make only twenty-five miles along the dangerous sections. This meant that he could not overtake her less than eight or ten miles from the Creek, considering the start she had, reckless of life as he might be. The gauge registered one-eighty and the valve " popped " . The weight was moved out a few notches at his direc- tion, and this meant about twenty pounds more of steam. The big black monster rocked and rolled. It was next to impossible for the two Mexicans to keep their feet in the gangway, but they did it somehow, strung tense by the claim of the hour. There was plenty of water, but the coal was running low, indeed too low for comfort. They were using eight or ten tons an hour, and there were less than six left. Jack wondered if those tail-lights would ever appear. He did not know where he was. He could distinguish nothing about him. He must at least have gone thirty miles, figuring from the coal and water used. He tried to plan, to think. How would he stop her? Would the " hog- ger " see them? But it was all useless. His brain was dazed by the rush, roar and reponsibility. He again strained his gaze to pierce the inky blackness before him. Did THE REDWOOD. 77 his eyes deceive him? Were not the green tail-lamps directly in front, peer- ing at him like the eyes of some great monster? He called one of the Mex- icans to his side. Yes ! There she was in front of them, if they were only in time ! He lit fusee after fusee and threw them from the cab window. He blew the whistle incessantly, but to no ef- fect. His own roaring iron steed was gaining fast — and would soon plough into the rear coach. It took Jack only a minute to de- cide. Releasing the throttle to one of the Mexicans, he climbed past the belching smokestack, and took his posi- tion above the cow-catcher, holding fast to the scorching crown-plate. The Mexican was to slow down as they approached, and was to ram them as easily as possible that Jack might effect a safe landing. A hundred yards still remained. Would they be in time? The distance was cut in half. They were going slower now, and it seemed as though ages came and went during those short seconds. Only a few feet re- mained. He made ready for the leap. His own life and the lives of the crew and passengers of No. 9 depended on it. The time had come. Crouching to his knees, he jumped. Would he make it? He barely touched the top of the platform gate. He felt himself slip- ping. But no — his hands firmly grip- ped the second bar, and realizing the fact he pulled himself up, stood on the platform at last, grasped the bell cord, gave two long pulls, and waited, what seemed days and days to him. He gave two more and felt the attack of the air brakes on the wheels. He had done his work. The crew ran back to demand an ex- planation from their pursuers. The Mexicans told as much as they knew and directed them to the rear plat- form where Jack was found in a dead faint from mental and physical ex- haustion. A little whiskey brought him around somewhat, and he explained matters and relapsed again into unconscious- ness, remaining between life and death for two weeks. But greater things than this were outlined for him and he pulled through safe and sound. The bridge was found to be com- pletely destroyed, and the train had been stopped just in time, for only a six mile straight-away stretch re- mained to be covered. There were no Carnegie medals in those days, for if there had been Jack would have had one, but he has the satisfaction of knowing that he is classed among the heroes of the Mountain Division in the early 90 ' s. FRANCIS G. MATSON. 78 THE REDWOOD. PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA The object of The Redwood is to gather together what is best in the literary work of the students, to record University doings and to knit closely the hearts of the boys of the present and the past EDITORIAL STAFF EDITOR . - - BUSINESS MANAGER ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER REVIEWS . _ - ALUMNI - - - - UNIVERSITY NOTES - ATHLETICS ALUMNI CORRESPONDENTS STAFF ARTIST ASSOCIATE EDITORS THE EDITOR EXECUTIVE BOARD THE BUSINESS MANAGER ROY A. BRONSON, ' 12 ROBERT J. FLOOD, ' 13 HAROLD R. MCKINNON, ' 14 RODNEY A. YOELL, ' 14 LAWRENCE A. FERNSWORTH, Special EDWARD O ' CONNOR, ' 16 FRANK G. BOONE, ' 14 JCHAS. D. SOUTH, Litt. D., ' 01 JALEX. T. LEONARD, A. B., ' 10 GEORGE B. LYLE, ' 13 THE EDITOR OF REVIEWS Address all communications to THE REDWOOD, University of Santa Clara, California Terms of subscription, SI. 50 a year; single copies 25 cents EDITORIAL Prison Reform in California The recent action of Lieutenant - Gover- nor A. J. Wallace in respect to the paroling of prisoners and the commutation of death sen- tences to life imprisonment, has pro- voked hearty disapproval, especially amongst the legal profession. Not more than a year ago an ex- convict, by the name of howry, wrote a continued article in the San Fran- cisco Bulletin, under the title of " My Life in Prison. " Low ry had just fin- ished his second term at San Quen- tin for burglary ia the first degree, yet his articles agitated the reading pub- lic to such an extent that the afore- mentioned paper saw a grand oppor- tunity to excite a popular movement for prison reform. Since that time the parole board, together with the acting governor, have pardoned any THE REDWOOD. 79 number of thieves, cut-throats and yegg-men, and are continuing so to do despite the sentiment of all the sane- minded citizens of California. A dozen or more have already broken their parole and are wandering over the country wheresoever they will, a menace and a detriment to society. Yet the lieutenant-governor goes on oblivious to all protests, and no one knows where he will stop. To show how far he has gone in this mat- ter, the case of Jack Ortega will suf- fice to convince the most skeptical Ortega, whose crime was so hideous that the details were forbidden publi- cation, was sentenced by Judge Lori- gan, in San Jose, to life imprison- ment, despite the fact that he boasted they would never get him there . Dur- ing his sojourn at the state peniten- tiary he figured as a ring leader in a dining-room riot, which was one of those " near break-aways. " After serv- ing but eleven years on a life sentence he was paroled by our acting gover- nor, and the very excellent reason given was, — good behavior ! Today he walks the street a free man, a dan- gerous burden upon our state. There is also a popular agitation on foot to abolish capital punishment, and to this end the lieutenant gover- nor has not only deferred all dates of execution, but has no later than a month ago, commuted the sentence of that infamous uxoricide, Figueroa. This kind of an action is an open and hearty invitation to crime. These men are moral perverts and deneger- ates who are criminals " bred in the bone. " They are a burden to society and owe it the debt of a life. Our honorable lieutenant- governor over- looks the truism that justice is es- sentially retributive and that the quicker we dispatch this kisd of men the better for society it will be. A law without a sanction is no law at all, and since the love of life is the greatest deterrent to murder and crime, what would be the state of af- fairs if this greatest of all sanctions were removed? Does Lieutenant-Governor Wallace know better than the judge and jury the evidence submitted in that case? Does not the law of California read that murder is punishable by death or life imprisonment? If the honorable judge and jury, knowing well every fact of that case, sentenced him to death, when they had another alterna- tive, whence comes this I-know- better-than-you from the governor? This is destructive of our system of rendering justice. It goes behind the jury and undermines that sense of responsibility which is essential to the careful sifting of evidence. Yet we suppose that with the present ten- dencies " we must slap the criminal on the wrist and send hi m to Sunday- school. " International The Turko - Italian Peace and the war was no sooner over Balkan War than Europe plunged herself anew into another sanguinary struggle, which, at best, bids fair to 80 THE REDWOOD. last for some time and to demand its awful toll of human lives. Yet lovers of peace do not look upon this bloody- sacrifice of innocent lives vi ith aban- doned hopes. All know that the roots of the present struggle have been growing for centuries, and they do not expect to accomplish their task of international peace in a day. They do not even aver that the present dis- pute could have been settled by ar- bitration, although, no doubt, the situa- tion would have taken a far less serious aspect had there existed a " concert of powers " for that purpose. But there is one thing certain. Tur key, with her ancient rule of tyranny and oppression, has forced upon the modern mind the necessity for greater steps in the movement for international peace. No man, in this enlightened age, can look upon this human slaughter, sending up its costly sacrifice of hundreds of lives, without a shudder of horror. The nation should reflect the char- acter of its individuals, and we are sure that the average citizen of any nation is none too willing to give up his life of domestic happiness to throw him- self into the face of death for a cause of which he knows practically noth- ing. But so long as tyrannous laws of conscription and greedy interests exaggerate the actual condition of af- fairs, the promoters of international peace have an almost insurmountable barrier to pass. THE REDWOOD. 81 As winter approaches, and the chil- ling winds of autumn are fast denud- ing the trees of their multicolored fol- iage, we followers of the path of learn- ing are forced to leave the campus and while away our vacant hours by read- ing and perusing books of various na- tures, which can not help but leave their impression on the current output of college journalism. Therefore it is not surprising that our Exchanges hold this month, more than usual interest. There is only one drawback, however, to our utter enjoyment of our contemporaries, and that is the paucity of good verse. There is no reason for this but, it is to be noted in passing that the defec- tion is general throughout " Exdom " and is probably due to a lack of ap- preciation of poetry when it does ap- pear. " The Haverfordian " Haverfordian presents itself to us, as an old and ever wel- come friend. In its dignified pages we have read some of the best undergrad- uate literature that we have come in contact with. The October number is no exception to the rule. We note in this issue a story entitled " The Soul of the Dragonfly " . There has been a tendency in college publications of late to turn to foreign themes as the subjects of short stories. Particular- ly is that of Japan, and the Japanese element handled. Frequently the re- sult of poor comprehension, shown in the lamentable unnaturalness of style, is the marring of an otherwise inter- esting and readable plot. Not so how- ever is the above mentioned story. The author, a Japanese, has given us the true concept of Japanese psychol- ogy, and better still has placed it in a clean pure semi-poetic English phraseology, that is charming to read, and a pleasure to review. If the au- thor still continues to write, we look forward with expectation to any pro- duct of his pen. " The Song of the Headland " is a poem that has the proper sweeping, lusty meter that is essential to such a subject but not often found. 82 THE REDWOOD. The diction is suggestive of the time of the theme and is on the whole rath- er choice. The Death of a Saint is also good, but runs a little too much into the studied. Good verse is never stiff, — rigid, firm, yes, but not iaflex- ible. The Editorials of the book are well written. However, we would suggest to the Editor more matter, as the table of Contents is rather short. Georgetown The Georgetown Col- College lege Journal offers us Journal in the October num- ber a wealth of good material, particu- larly in the field of the essay. For a brief concise refutation of the subject the article on Socialism is one of the best we have ever had the pleasure of reading. It combines brevity with cogency, a great point in its favour. " Francis Thompson " a short " sketch " on the poet shows a studied, keen in- sight into the author ' s work, but we like not an over abundance of praise, that almost touches the point of gush- iness. Another extremely enjoyable con- tribution was that which tells of the work done in oriental waters by the eminent and noble scientist Father Al- gue S. J. The photographs published helped materially in adding interest to the paper. The verse of the book is plentiful, but with the exception of " Mother Memories " , not overly com- mendable. Vassar Mis- ' ' ' ' ' - cellany ' " November still continues to add lustre to the university which it rep- resents. Having a long and judicious- ly selected contents, it has always ranked as one of our best and most favoured exchanges, and it is with pleasure we note that the abovemen- tioned number still continues to up- hold the high standard of the periodi- cal. The opening poem " To Andrew Lang " is a worthy need of encomium to that noted literary personage the fair and " Brindled Andy " . So nicely do the lines read that we think the " Redwood ' s friends will enjoy it. Therefore we print it below. For a literary appreciation that has warmth of expression and a careful judicious not overly enthusiastic tone to it we greatly admire " The Ameri- canism of Mark Twain ' s Humor " . The author has grasped the salient and interesting points of the subject matter and has used them to their ful- lest extent without being too exhaust- ive. In all it is clearly and nicely writ- ten. The story " The Hangman ' s Rope " is a bit amateurish, but has a well conceived plot that makes for its success. " The Mirth Power " , a poem is delicately written so far as diction goes, but is a little detracted from by the uneven metre. " Tipping the Balance, " a story, is also deserving of favorable notice, and it may therefore be said, that taken " in toto " the book is en- THE REDWOOD. 83 riched by several good poems, a good essay, and interesting stories. What more can a disgruntled reviewer de- sire. University of Again the University Virginia of Virginia magazine Magazine commends itself to our attention. It has betvv een the covers of the October number an unusually good quality of short stories and sev- eral good bits of poetry, besides prop- erly edited departments. The story " John Gaunt " , we find to be extremely interesting and on the whole well written, but we think that a more nat- ural and less studied diction would improve the tale to a great extent. " Sandy " is a little story, however, of a different nature. Cowboy stories are common enough, but in some way or another this one strikes a rather un- common note, we can ' t say just where, but anyhow it rings true. The hand- ling and technique of this story is artless, and free, two characteristics that young authors should strive after. But of all the stories that we have seen this year, we place at their head " The Sobbing Bell. " Well written, unexaggerated, and with just suffic- ient touches of local colour to make the " placing " stand clear, we can give nothing but praise to an author who has told an old legend in a new, ac- ceptable and unpedantic fashion. The poem " Summer Rain " is dainty but has a short meter that is rather inharmon- ious. We liked " Grief " as it has an element of real pathos in it. We also would say a word of praise in behalf of " For Pierrot the Dispirited " , but Tenthnedo, we can not appreciate. It may be that our taste is at fault, but even then cheap, forced, pessimism is obnoxious. linian " Again we turn the pages of an old fam- iliar friend, this time " The Carolinian " of the University of South Carolina. Needless to say we were not disappointed, for although the contents are somewhat meager yet on the whole they are rather choice. A pretty bit of verse, following an old French form, is cleverly handled, as is a small one act playlet. In the lat- ter, the only fault we have to find, is its length. There is too much matter crowded into too small a space. The essay " Paternalism in Govern- ment " is good and gives forth several sentiments that could be well taken by our legislators. It is written in a dignified smooth style that pleases the reader, hence its worth. But here we run up against a snag. " A Reminiscence " purporting to be a story is in reality a rather cheap imi- tation of indelicate writers. Not that the tale is most indelicate, yet it deals with a clandestine love affair of a monk, and a girl with the usual result. The end can be clearly seen by any discerning reader, and thus the only 84 THE REDWOOD. excuse to exist is taken away. Also, in the brief space allotted to him the author manages to demonstrate his complete ignorance of things monkish and, therefore, all that can be said of the thing is that it is inane and ridic- ulous. And here our reading ends. Not that there is any dearth of matter, yet space forbids. We should like to review the Tattler, from Randolph Macon Uni- versity as it contains many fine stories yet a limit must be set, and hence all we can do is mention the reception of the following: — " The Notre Dame Scholastic " , " The Ave Maria " , " The Chaparral " , " The Holy Cross Pur- ple " , " The Solanian " , " The Young Eagle " , " The Villa Marian " , " The Dial " . We have also received from The C. Wilderman Co. a copy of their new edition of the Catholic Bible. The type is new throughout and remark- ably clear, the paper is strong and a pleasure to the touch, while illustra- tions and colored maps add not a little to make reading most inviting. Be- sides, there is rather more comment- ary and notes than is usual, which will be welcomed by all readers. The price has been made to suit all buyers, from $1.00 in substantial cloth up to $6.50 on excellent Oxford India paper. C. Wilderman Co., Barclay St., N. Y. TO ANDREW LANG Now speeds the craft before the singing wind Light blown as thistledown, a breath of cloud, And purple sea mist is the only shroud Of him it carries, for the gods are kind Unto their bards, and lonesome death they give. Ajoyous journey o ' er a friendly sea To far lands where in immortality Bards of true romance untroubled live. Now speeds the craft and murmuring is the wind Of fair Greek gardens; iris bordered streams; Or of the Northland giants, and in the dreams And dross of legends to new gold refined. Of these he sang, of these whose souls he found. In silence, e ' re he gave them lasting sound. — The Vassar Miscellany, Nov., 1912. " The Black Brotherhood and Its Sis- ters, " by Rev. R. P. Garrold, is an ex- ceptionally enthralling boys ' story. In this story, perhaps, Fr. Garrold is at his best, for it is a reproduction of his long and varied experience with boys. The merit of this book is appareat from start to finish : from a literary standpoint, it is written in a plain, clean- cut, lucid style; its value is enhanced in great measure, too, by the success its author has, in speaking for his youthful heroes as they speak for themselves. In the second place the purpose or moral of the work is fully attained, and therefore, in this respect, we should do well to THE REDWOOD. 85 class it not only as a boys ' story, but also whatever its short-comings might be- as a work worth any body ' s reading. Lastly, we are glad to remark no ' dry spots ' throughout the work; and also the marked harmony and union of its texture. " The Black Brotherhood " — has fulfilled the one great dogma of all art : it reaches its ends, without making itself known. Net $1.35. Benziger Bros,. N. Y. 86 THE REDWOOD. A Successful Month October has come and gone, yet it leaves the memory of suc- cessful accomplishment behind, to buoy those of us who are apt to rest with " well enough " alone. If we pause and with one lingering look contem- plate what is past, we shall see that we are one furlong nearer the summit toward which all true, persevering en- terprise must needs lead. " Onward, onward, ever onward ! " is the cry nature utters everywhere ; with every season she changes the robe of her pet child ; last month we saw bleak autumn ' s hand, pluck off the green, fresh foliage of those gnarled sentinels in the campus, — that have held their ground stanchly these sixty or seventy years. Soon winler will lollow on the heels of autum.n, and finally sweet spring will usher in the warmth of summer. So why should we dally alone making no pro- gress? Nature rebels at the very thought and cries, " Onward, onward, ever onward ! " In all our undertakings last moiith, singular success has crowned effort. We could wish October to be the mod- el month on which to fashion the whole scholastic year. And then there is that joyful feeling coming from the knowledge of a thing well done, — a rest well earned. Regrets and doubts only accompany indifference and apathy, but meeting difficulties unflinchingly and trying once more where we fail is the true spirit which makes character, and the strife worth the fighting. The- ear- nest laborer that toils in the dusty heat of day, when noontime comes, devours his repast with a healthy, well-earned appetite and at night, in his cot, has long slumbrous sleep for his toil. Contentment, peace of mind, always follow the conscientious ac- complishment of every day ' s task. A Grand Victory The important event of the month was our grand foot-ball victory over Stanford ' s ' crack varsity ' on Oct. 23rd. Viewed from all sides, it will go down in. the history of the Univer- sity, as its greatest Rugby game. The details and main features of the game itself are treated elsewhere in this is- sue; we will confine ourselves to its broadest significance only. The fact that we have beaten Stan- ford ' s ' peerless fifteen ' , raises our ath- THE REDWOOD. 81 letic standing to the highest, and in truth, paves the way for the establish- ment of permanent relations with both California and Stanford. For years the cry has been put forth that Santa Clara could not enter into the field of athletics the material neces- sary to cope with either of these two Universities, and that, therefore, per- manent relations as to scheduled games, were out of the question. But now U. S. C. has settled this question once and for all time ; we have shown that we can compete and take our place with the best athletic aggregations in the state. As a mat- ter of fact, this season we have met most of them and the scores show that out of ten games we have lost but one, to the ' Waratahs ' , who were the only team to cross our line. All the rest scored through penalties. This is the envied record The UniiVersity of Santa Clara has made thus far this season, and if all indications do not prove false, it will be a greater record when the season closes. It is no more than fair sportsmanship that we be given the same consideration Stanford and California give each other. J. , His Eminence, John Cardinal „ ,. . . .- tt Farley ' s Visit f " " f ' Pf : S. C. an mformal visit on November 7th. Yes, we are among the fortunate who have been privileged indeed, to see, to hear, to admire His Eminence, and therefore to reverence in ,him the Church and God. How much better are we for this visit of His Eminence in mind and heart ! Like the sun that illumes the oppressive darkness, cheerily discloses with his warm rays the beauties of nature ; he has dawned in our lives, lighting up afresh the beauties of the soul, and the unconquerable majesty of His King- dom. Lord Cardinal, we know what your great work has been ; with what a zeal and what a love you have preached the Living Faith to hundreds, thousands, nay, millions of truth-hungry souls. Go on while there is Hfe; lead us with that firm voice that knows not defeat, and we shall answer with our hearts. Entertain- ment On Oct. 31st. the Young Men ' s Soladity of Santa Clara gave a very elaborate and entertaining musi- cal in the University Auditorium, for the benefit and furtherance of the So- dality. The singing and piano solos were of a high order, while the quartet and chorus of twenty voices were encored again and again. Mr. J. Bacigalupi opened the musical with an eloquent and appropriate address. The men who made Trip to ' Los ' the recent trip to Los Angeles with the foot- ball team returned with many obser- vations of the wonderful growth of that metropolis and the congenial re- ceptions tendered them by its people in general. 88 THE REDWOOD. Santa Clara owes much to Los An- geles, which has furnished her with men like " Tommy " Ybarrando, C. Castruccio and many others who put that vim and enthusiasm characterist- ic of the southern city, into all their undertakings. Surely, more trips will be made by our teams as the popular- ity of the University increases with our southern neighbours. Special thanks are tendered to Mr. D. Cunningham, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Murray, Mr. and Mrs. J. Ferrario and Mr. and Mrs. J. O ' Neill for thei r gen- ial hospitality. Home Industry The subject of our co-operative store is one on which too much cannot be said, since it is the financial source and support of our success in the field of athletics. To buy our sundry commodities here at this store, is to encourage real home industry and to further our own en- terprise, as all the profits revert to our athletic-fund. This should be borne in mind. It is real co-operation, and that is what we must have, if our whole college career means anything at all. Every little bit helps on the spirit of loyalty. And it is far from loyalty, if not intensely selfish, to look for a winning team and be proud of it and not to have done anything to support it financially. Every cent of profit is ours. The store is ours. It would be poor business for a merchant to pur- chase from another for his own use the very commodities he is trying to sell to others. Junior and The Junior and Mid- Midget get leagues have been Leagues working manfully. It affords us great pleasure to give them some encouragement in these pages, because it is from them that Santa Clara depends for her future ' ruggers ' . The fellows seem to realize this, if one can judge from the business-like way they lend themselves to the game. There is nothing to develop a stu- dent ' s whole intellectual and physical worth more than faithful ' work-outs ' in Rugby. It is this well-known re- sult of the sport, that has given it its rank and place in educational institu- tions throughout the United States. The leagues are managed by Thom- as H. Davis, who has divided the Junior league into three teams, cap- tained as follows : Joseph R. Aurre- coechea, first team ; Louis W Blinn, secofid team ; and Walter S. Jackson, third team. The Midget league comprises two teams captained by William J. Bush, and Demetrio Diaz. Eighteen men will be chosen from each league at the end of the season, the Juniors getting a letter and an outing, the Midgets making their ' M ' . THE REDWOOD. 89 A. P. Hill of San Jose, an ' 60 old student of the ' 60s, who is president of the Sempervir- ens Club of California, and was a col- laborator with the late Father Kenna S. J., his friend of college days at San- ta Clara, in securing the California Redwood Park has recently been ap- pointed by the club to conduct the campaign for the securing of an ap- propriation for the laying out and building of roads through the Park. Edward White, B. S. 72 of ' 72 Watsonville still takes his part in helping to mould the political events of the day, with all the vigor and enthusiasm of youth. In the campaign just closed he was the adviser and chief worker of James B. Holohan of Watsonvile, toward se- curing the election of Mr. Holohan to the Democratic side of the National House of Representatives. Mr. Holo- han proved a most formidable con- testant as the count showed and car- ried his section of the district, even though defeated. Mr. White is still, as he has been for years past, one of the foremost apple growers in that favored apple producing section, the Pajaro Valley. ' 85 Another position of high trust and honor has fallen to a Santa Clara student and the recipient is already making an excellent record. He is Thomas Mon- ahan. Ex ' 85, Mayor of San Jose, who took office last June. A newcomer ' s lack of information is the excuse for the failure to record it last month, as was due, especially since the occur- rence is so near to Alma Mater. May- or Monahan ' s clean-cut business pol- icy, and his far-sighted policy of de- velopment have already challenged the attention and the approval of his con- stituents. He is especially interested in the beautification of the Garden City, arid has inaugurated several steps in this direction. Most import- ant of these is his plan for creating an artificial summer lake in San Jose by 90 THE REDWOOD. draining the Guadalupe River and using its water. The most important development project San Jose has ever faced is also being prosecuted with vigor with Mayor Monahan as a lead- ing factor. This is the creation of Port San Jose, which has for its ob- ject the placing of San Jose on the basis of a harbor town, by improving the head of San Francisco Bay for navigation purposes, and connecting the harbor thus created with San Jose. Harry Francis Sullivan, Ex ' 03 ' 03, contemplates the mar- riage altar soon. Announce- ments are out telling of his forthcom- ing marriage to Miss Mary Elizabeth Smith at Saint Agnes church, San Francisco, Tuesday evening, Novem- ber 19. The future Mr. and Mrs. Sul- livan will be at home at 868 Shrader street after December 15. Mr. Sulli- van is now in the employ of the Southern Pacific Company. He is the son of ex-chief Sullivan of the San Francisco Fire Department. Francis X. Lejeal, A. B. ' 07, ' 07 is the father of a baby girl, his first born, who came to his home in San Francisco in the latter part of October. As " Frenchie " , Mr. Lejeal was a popular figure on the college campus during his college days. He is at present identified with the Braun-Knecht-Heinman Co., deal- ers in assay supplies and industrial chemicals, at 576 Mission street, San Francisco. Our chaplain. Rev. Father Boland, has been invited to christen the child, and will probably have done so ere the publication of this journal. Herman A. Budde, A. B. ' 07 ' 07, now holds a position in a general merchandise store in Tracy, California. Mr. Budde made an excellent record as a journal- ist after leaving college, and after hav- ing tasted most of the sweets the profession has in store for its devotees, has decided on a sedater life. Im- mediately after graduating he ac- cepted a position on the Oakland Tribune as a " cub " . From a full- fledged reporter he graduated to the copy desk, whence he stepped by way of the assistant sporting editorship to the throne of baseball editor. In his labor Mr. Budde was ever mindful of his Alma Mater and never lost an op- portunity to advance her interests with his pen. He must also be given the credit for being the first to give to the public the interesting and valuable discoveries of Father Ricard with re- gard to sunspots, which have since at- tracted international attention. After leaving the Tribune, Mr. Budde made a tour of Europe and, upon returning, assumed his position at Tracy. Mr. Budde is a brother to Mr. Charles Budde, S. J., who was for several years stationed at Santa Clara, and is now at Gonzaga University, in Spo- kane. ?■ » ' -, ■. ' %%., THE REDWOOD. 91 Ivo Bogan, A. B. ' 08 trav- 08 eled all the way from Tuc- son, Arizona, to Los Angeles some days ago, to witness the game between his Alma Mater and the Uni- versity of Southern California played there. The example of loyalty to the old school does honor to Mr. Bogan and gives inspiration alike to other alumni and to present students. Mr. Bogan is in the employ of the South- ern Pacific in Tucson. His father is county treasurer and one of the lead- ing men of the city, and owns a ranch near Tucson. As a student, Ivo Bo- gan was a member of Santa Clara ' s first Rugby team, in 1908. He played wing on the squad. He also wrote some excellent contributions, particu- larly tales with a Western color, for the Redwood. " Art " Shafer, Ex ' 08, a ' 08 ball player in the world ' s championship class, has re- turned to Los Angeles for the winter, after his third consecutive season with the New York Giants, with whom he plays regularly as short-stop. As a trophy of the recent championship series at New York and Boston, Mr. Shafer has a splendid 1913 Mercer automobile, which he bought from his share of the gate receipts. He proud- ly exhibited the machine to old stu- dents whom he met in the recent Southern game, where he was an en- thusiastic spectator in Santa Clara ' s rooting section. Mr. Schafer was a member of the history-making team that journeyed to Honolulu in 1908. He was a brother of the late Mervyn Shafer, captain of the team in that and the preceding year, whose death in the spring of 1909 w(as a source of heart-felt and universal mourning in the student body. Carl Herbring, Ex ' 09, is a ' 09 deputy in the office of Sher- iff Robert Stevens of Mult- nomah County, in Portland, Oregon. Besides being an officer of the law, he is also a lawyer. Mr. Herbring oc- cupies the position of confidential clerk to the sheriff, but occasionally girds himself with the shooting irons to join a posse of the regular thief- takers, in pursuit of some violator of the law. Mr. Herbring for some years attended the night law school of the University of Oregon, in connection with his work, and last Spring passed the Oregon bar examination with high honors. Edward Condon, Ex ' 09, ' 09 conducts one of the most finely appointed real estate offices of the city, in one of its choic- est locations, in Portland, Oregon. The office is located on a corner in the Multnomah Hotel, the leading hotel of the Beaver State metropolis. When the magnificent hostelry was opened last February, Mr. Condon immediate- ly engaged the corner as the future location of his business. His long- 92 THE REDWOOD. sighted business acumen will probab- ly prove a big asset, as the location is one of the most desirable in a district that is rapidly becoming the financial center of Portland. John W. Maltman, A. B. ' 09 ' 09, visited familiar (and un- familiar) scenes on the cam- pus late last month. " Jack " is now the head of a thriving law firm in San Francisco, with headquarters in the Nevada Bank Building. It may interest many of the ' 09 students of more recent years to learn of the success with which Robert D. Murphy, Ex ' 09 is meeting. Something of the role of private capitalist is that which Mr. Murphy essays. Mr. Murphy is the owner of several excellent par- cels of land in various parts of the state through judicious investment, and he is now a factor often reckoned with in the transfers of fine timber and ranch tracts. But, while " Murph " has made good as a business man, we cannot refrain from voicing a slight disappointment in ourself and others, who dreamed that in the scroll of the Fates, Mr. Murphy had been written down a poet. Mr. Murphy makes his home in San Jose. Devereaux Peters, A. M. ' 10, ' 10 expects to graduate from the law department of Stanford University this year, and meanwhile is coaching that University ' s baseball team. On the Santa Clara team Mr. Peters was a team mate to Arthur Shafer and his late brother, Mervyn. Throughout his service on the team he maintained a record for the highest batting average on the team. After leaving Santa Clara he entered pro- fessional baseball, but did not find it to his liking. ' 11 John Wilson, B. S. ' 11, was among the visitors at the rugby match of the University of San- ta Clara vs. the University of South- ern California November 2 at Los An- geles. Mr. Wilson is in his first year of law studies in the law department of the southern university. J. Morrin and Edward Mc- ' 11 Donnell, Ex ' 11, brothers, who were students at Santa Clara for several years, are now at their home in Portland, Oregon. J. Morrin McDonnell is attending the law department of the University of Oregon, there, with a view to entering an Eastern institution next year, prob- ably Ann Arbor. L. A. FERNSWORTH. THE REDWOOD. 93 With football in full sway at Santa Clara, much attention is being direct- ed toward the big game of the year. On November the 23rd Santa Clara and the University ;of Nevada will face each other in their first game of rugby, under the three years agree- ment between the two institutions. Judging from past records and per- formances, Santa Clara should emerge from the contest with the majority of points to her credit. However, these former games are not final tests, and the game itself will be the only means by which the respective merits of both teams can be judged. The game will be held on neutral territory, St. Ignatius grounds in San Francisco, having been agreed upon by both institutions as the proper field for battle. However, Santa Clara ' s rugby sea- son may not culminate with the play- ing of this game. The coast cham- pionship is still in doubt, and Santa Clara seems to be entitled to as much consideration as any of the other con- tenders. In past years the championship has been decided by the game between Stanford and California — the winner being awarded the championship. But Santa Clara has gained just recogni- tion by defeating the Stanford Var- sity, and also from the fact that her team has lost but one game this year — the Waratahs being responsible for the defeat. The rugby team has also a unique record — permitting no team in the ten games played, to cross her goal line, with the exception of the crack Waratahs, as mentioned above. Although there have been no steps taken in regard to this matter, yet Santa Clara hopes for the considera- tion due her, and in that event will, no doubt, give a very good account of herself. Should California be defeat- ed at the hands of Stanford it would entitle us to the championship, and on 94 THE REDWOOD. the other hand, if Stanford is defeated, we can demand a game from Califor- nia to settle the dispute. S. C. U. 5, STANFORD SECOND 3 Santa Clara on October the 19th, added one more game to her string of victories. The opposing team was the Stanford Second Varsity. The game from the start was an uphill battle for Santa Clara. When only five minutes of the initial half had passed Stanford made her first score, which was not overcome until the last ten minutes of play of the second half. In the first half the forward divi- sions of both teams showed up to ad- vantage, and the ball was continually going from one side of the field to the other. With play hardly begun, Stan- ford was awarded a free kick on ac- count of an illegal throw of the ball into the scrum. King was equal to the occasion, and with a well directed boot sent the ball over the uprights. This concluded the scoring in the first half. In the second half several changes were made in the Santa Clara team with satisfactory results, as this was the half in which defeat was turned into victory. With about ten minutes to play, Momson picked the ball from the ruck, and after a fifteen-yard run touched the ball behind Stanford ' s goal line. Captain Ybarrando was successful in converting the goal. Al- though Stanford then tried hard to overcome Santa Clara ' s lead, their ef- forts were of no avail. Conspicuous on the Santa Clara side was the work of Castruccio at the half back, and Flood and Curry on the wings. The good work of Melchoir, Ferrario and Sargent was also very noticeable at all times. S. C. U. 15, STANFORD VAR- SITY 10 On October the 23rd the Santa Clara rugby team, accompanied by about seventy-five ardent supporters, left for Stanford Field to engage in battle with the Varsity. The result was hardly expected by the Stanford fol- lowers, yet they were willing to rec- ognize the superior work of the Santa Clara team. Santa Clara had played the best game of rugby ever played by a team sent out from the institution. Fumbling was the most apparent fault of the Cardinal team, although the passing was below standard, and the backs were not able to break through the Santa Clara defense. Santa Clara ' s first score came when Flood picked up the ball on Stanford ' s fifteen-yard line and carried it over for a try. Ybarrando kicked an easy goal. After the kick-off another try was registered by Santa Clara. The for- wards packed around the ball, and after a fine exhibition of dribbling brought it to Stanford ' s twenty-yard line. On the line out the ball was quickly passed to Ybarrando, who ran THE REDWOOD. 95 fifteen yards to a try. Ybarrando was successful in converting his own score. At the end ot the first half the score stood Santa Clara 10, Stanford 0. The Stanford men, in the second half, went into the game determined to overcome their opponents ' lead. Al- though they scored ten points in this half, yet no Stanford man was able to cross Santa Clara ' s line. When Santa Clara was ' penalized for holding the ball on her ten-yard line, Brown scored three points by sending the ball between the goal posts from a place kick. Stanford soon scored again under the same cir- cumstances, Brown again being re- sponsible for the score. Santa Clara again broke into the scoring at this time, when the ball was forced to Stanford ' s fifteen-yard line. In a passing rush, started from a line- out, Best secured the ball and carried it over. Ybarrando converted. After the kick-off the play was in Santa Clara ' s territory long enough to give Louis Cass an opportunity to kick a beautiful field goal, which turned out to be the final score of the game. Stanford played a team consisting of nine of last year ' s veterans, and rec- ognized as a better team than the one which defeated the Waratahs the week before. No special credit can be given to any member of the team, as each and every man made himself conspicuous during the whole of the game- by his hard fighting and excellent playing. Captain Ybarrando played a great game from the start, and his accurate kicks to touch deserve special men- tion. SANTA CLARA 2ND 0, UNIVER- SITY OF CALIFORNIA 2ND 0. Some idea as to the respective abil- ities of the Santa Clara and California varsities can be gained from the fact that on October the 26th the Santa Clara second team held the California seconds to a scoreless tie. Although this is no authentic proof, yet it gives an idea of the respective rugby mate- rial of the two schools. Honors seemed to be about even. California played a very strong game in the first half, while superior work by Santa Clara prevailed in the second half. The goal lines of both teams were often in danger. Ferrario, in the first half, prevented California from scor- ing when he intercepted a pass and booted the ball into touch for a twen- ty-five-yard gain. In the second half the California goal was often hard-pressed by the Santa Clara warriors, but the excel- lent kicking of Bogardus at critical periods prevented the Santa Clara boys from carrying the ball over the line. Santa Clara ' s credit is due to the fact that this was the first and only game her second team ever played together, and the great fight they put up with 96 THE REDWOOD. California ' s experienced giants is de- serving of great praise. Hardy, Tramutolo, O ' Connor, and Ferrario were to a great extent re- sponsible for holding the Californians scoreless. S. C. U. 19, SOUTHERN CALIFOR- NIA 3. The Santa Clara rugby team made its initial appearance on a southern field November the 2nd, when it op- posed the crack team representing the University of Southern California. Although the Southern team put up a game fight, they were completely outclassed, as the nineteen to three score will indicate. The papers of the south had nothing but praise for the excellent showing made by the fight- ing Santa Clara team. In their ac- counts of the game they gave the red and white the credit of being the best rugby team that had ever played on a southern field. A detailed account of the game would be of little avail, as it was but a repetition of former Santa Clara rugby skill and knowledge again put into execution. The members of the scrum worked in perfect unison and the back-field once getting into stride, displayed superb passing ability. In the second half Santa Clara opened up the play more than in the first, and it was then that the southern people realized the scoring ability of the Santa Clara team. The members of the team report having an enjoyable stay in the south- ern city, and it is to be hoped the game between the two schools will be made an annual affair. THE REDWOOD. w Wx •• S H O E S •• To tell all that we know of the fitting qualities, the grace and " snap " of the new styles, the leathers and workmanship that goes into " Walk- Overs " requires time. We invite you to call and see for yourself- QUINN BRODER WALK-OVER BOOT SHOP 41 SOUTH FIRST STREET DON ' T WASTE YOUR TIME getting measured and waiting several weeks for a made-to-order suit or overcoat that may not suit you when it ' s done. Our Ready-for-service hand-tailored HAND TAILORED CLOTHES await your command for a try-on. The woolen in them are confined patterns and the workmanship unequalled by the majority of tailors — bettered by none of them. We ' ll put you into a good suit or overcoat for from S15 to 840, and you ' ll get your money ' s worth at any price. SEE THE S3 STRAND HAT when your are In need of headwear. And if you don ' t like it, we ' ve a $3 hat that you will. Other good hats at 81 .50 to 85. POMEROY BROS. 51 South First St., San Jose TRUNKS AND SUIT CASES FOR VACATION WALLETS, FOBS, TOILET SETS, ART LEATHER, UMBRELLAS, ETC., ETC. FRED M. STERN The ' leather Man " 77 NORTH FIRST ST., SAN JOSE, CAL. » THE REDWOOD. WM. HUNT, SR. WM. HUNT, JR. HUNT ' S BONDED WM. HUNT. 3rd and Townsend Streets H rranClSCO, Cal. HOTEL MONTGOMERY F. J. McHENRY, Manager Absolutely Fireproof European Plans Rates $1 and upwards THE ARCADE THE HOME OF ROUGH NECK SWEATERS CANELO BROS. STACKHOUSE CO. 83-91 South First St., San Jose Phone S. J. 11 •K THE REDWOOD. Z The New Cans beauties, and every real snappy one you see has our label in it. Buy one yourself and mingle with the well dressed college fellows. As large a shape as you may care for can be had. i prittga, 3inr. Santa Clara and Market San Jose, Cal. GEORGE ' S SHAVE SHOP BEST SHAVE IN TOWN SANTA CLARA, CAL. Wm. J. McKagney, Secretary R. F. McMahon, President McMahon-McKagney Co., Inc. 52 West Santa Clara St. San Jose, Cal. THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY Carpets, Draperies, Furniture, Linoleums and Window Shadss Telephone, San Jose 4192 Upholstering V. SALBERG 2 c per cue E. GADDI Umpire Pool Room Santa Clara, Cal. Mission Olive Oil i ki JM M iYllOOlWll V llVV V ll for Medicinal or Table Use MADDEN ' S PHARMACY, Agents FRANKLIN STREET SANTA CLARA, CAL. Santa Clara Imperial Dry Cleaning Dye Works C. COLES and I. OLARTE, Proprietors Naptha Cleaning and Steaming of Ladies ' and Gents ' Garments Pressing and Repairing 1021 Franklin Street Telephone Santa Clara 131J Santa Clara, Cal. I. RUTH Dealer in Groceries and Delicacies Hams, Bacon, Sausages, Lard, Butter, Eggs, Etc. 1035-1037 Franklin Street Cigars and Tobacco : THE REDWOOD. Wholesale and Retail Satisfaction Guaranteed WE HANDLE ALL KINDS OF ICE CREAM TELEPHONE, S. C. 36 R 1053 FRANKLIN ST., SANTA CLARA COMPLETE FALL LINES Suits, Overcoats, Hats and Furnishings Now Ready Winter is at your door— How about New Fall Clothes. ' Do not Delay— Buy now while our stocks are fresh and complete — Cold weather will likely come on, no doubt without warning. Never in our entire store history, have we been able to afford you such a splendid array of choice fall wearables as is pre- sented now. The fabrics, and colorings, styles and models are beautiful in their seasonable harmony. All our makes and fits absolutely guaranteed. THAD W. HOBSON CO. 16 to 22 West Santa Clara Street :: San Jose » THE REDWOOD. IF YOU WANT A FINISHED FOTO HAVE BUSHNELL TAKE IT The Leader of San Jose Photographers 41 North First Street San Jose, Calif. SAN JOSE BAKING CO. L. SCHWARTING, Manager The Cleanest and Most Sanitary Bakery In Santa Clara Valley We supply the most prominent Hotels Give Us a Trial Our Bread, Pies and Cakes are the Best Phone San Jose 609 433-435 Vine Street San Jose, Cal. Phone Temporary 140 A. PALADIN! WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FISH DEALER Fresh, Salt, Smoked, Pickled, and Dried Fish 205 MERCHANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 5C THE REDWOOD. CHRISTMAS PRESENTS I Leather Goods and Accessories Everything for the Comfort and Convenience of the Traveler Half a century of knowing how makes Crocker Quality famous now 565 MARKET ST. H. S. CROCKER CO. SAN FRANCISCO A. G. COL CO. WHOLESALE Commission Merchants TELEPHONE, MAIN 309 84-90 N. Market St. San Jose, CaL MEET ME AT por FINE TAFFIES AND CANDIES 1 i y 131 ' ' ' ™ " " ' Syrups Served from our Twentieth OJlOrty S JT 13,CC sanitary Soda Fountain ALSO ELECTRIC MILK SHAKES 68 N. First Street, San Jose, Cal. VICTORY CANDY SHOP For classy College Hair Cut, go to the Antiseptic Barber Shop SEA SALT BATHS Basement Garden City Bank Building H. E. WILCOX D. M. BURNETT ATTORNEYS AT LAW ROOMS 19 AND 20, SAFE DEPOSIT BUILDING SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA THE REDWOOD. z Baseball and All Sporting Events Reported Telephone San Jose 3614 CIGAR STORE IN CONNECTION D. D. Dooley ' s BOWLING ALLEYS and POOL TABLES 62-64 NORTH FIRST STREET Opposite Victory Theatre SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA Wm. McCarthy Sons Coffee TEAS AND SPICES 246 West Santa Clara Street San Jose, California Tfade with Us for Good Service and Good Prices Special Prices Given in Quantity Purchases Try Us and Be Convinced VARGAS BROS. COMPANY Phone Santa Clara 120 SANTA CLARA THE WORD CLARK ' S MEANS GOOD CANDIES DID YOU GET ME? THE REDWOOD. Young Men ' s Furnishings All the Latest Styles In Neckwear, Hosiery and Gloves Young Men ' s Suits and Hats O ' Brien ' s Santa Clara The Santa Clara Coffee Club Invites you to its rooms to read, rest, and enjoy a cup of excellent coffee Open from 6 a. m. to 10:30 p. m. Telephones Office: Franklin 3501 Residence: Frani Iin 6029 Dr. Francis J. Colligan DENTIST Hours: 9 to 5 1615 PolI Street Evenings: 7 to 8 Cor. Sacramento Sundays by appointment San Francisco Oberdeener ' s Pharmacy Prescription Druggists Kodaks and Supplies Post Cards Franklin Street Santa Clara, Cal. : Angelu Phone, San Joie 3802 Annex Phone, San Jose 4688 THE Angelus and Annex G. T. NINNIS E. PENNINGTON, Proprietors European plan. Newly furnished rooms, with hot and cold water; steam heat throughout. Suites with private bath. Angelus. 67 N. First St. Annex, 52 W. St. John St. San Jose, California The Mission Bank of Santa Clara (COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS) Solicits Your Patronage When In San Jose, Visit CHARGINS ' Mestaurantf Grill and Oyster Souse w 28-30 Fountain Street Bet. First and Second San Jose Sallows Rorke Ring us for a hurry-up Delivery :: :: :: Phone S. C. 13R THE REDWOOD. Colgate ' s Shaving Soap, 5c Williams ' Shaving Soap, 2 for 15c All others in proportion UNIVERSITY DRUG CO. Cor. Santa Clara and S. Second St. San Jose Telephone, San Jose 3946 T. F. S ourisseau Manufacturing Jeweler 143 S. First St. San Jose, Cal. JOHN P. AZEVEDO Groceries Wines, Liquors, Cigars, Tobaccos, FRANKLIN ST., SANTA CLARA BATH ROBES AT THE CO-OP STORE Rebuilt Typewriters WE SAVE YOU FROM 50 TO 75 PER CENT ON ANY MAKE OF TYPEWRITER MACHINES RENTED AND SOLD ON EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS Send for our Illustrated Price List RETAIL DEPARTMENT The Wholesale Typewriter Company 37 Montgomery Street San Francisco, Cal. : THC BCDWOOD December, 1912 c ' " u THE REDWOOD. University of Santa Clara SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA The University embraces the following departments: A. THE COLLEGE OF PHILOSOPHY AND LETTERS. A four ' years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. B. THE COLLEGE OF GENERAL SCIENCE. A four years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. C. THE INSTITUTE OF LAW. A standard three years ' course of Law, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and pre-supposing for entrance the completion of two years of study beyond the High School. D. THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. (a) Civil Engineering — A four years ' course, lead- ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. (b) Mechanical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Me- chanical Engineering. (c) Electrical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elec- trical Engineering. E. THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE . A four years ' course, leading to the degree of Bach- elor of Science in Architecture. F. THE PRE-MEDICAL COURSE. A two years ' course of studies in Chemistry, Bac- teriology, Biology and Anatomy, which is recom- mended to students contemplating entrance into medical schools. Only students who have com- pleted two years of study beyond the High School are eligible for this course. JAMES P. MORRISSEY, S. J., - - President THE REDWOOD. — A $50.00 Reward! TO ANY Santa Clara College Student Whose appearance can ' t be improved and who can ' t obtain an absolutely perfect fit in one of my famous " L SYSTEM " Clothes for College Fellows BILLY HOBSON BILLY HOBSON ' S CORNER 24 South First Street - - SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA Member San Francisco Builders Exchange DAVID ELMS GRAHAM BUILDING CONSTRUCTION WILLIAMS BUILDING 693 MISSION STREET Telephone SAN FRANCISCO Douglas 1603 1 1 THE REDWOOD. ; FOSS HICKS CO No. 35 West Santa Clara Street SAN JOSE Real Estate, Loans Investments A Select and Up-to-date List of Just Such Properties as the Home Seeker and Investor Wants INSURANCE Fire, Life and Accident in the Best Companies L. F. SWIFT, President LEROY HOUGH, Vice-President E. B. SHUGERT, Treasurer DIRECTORS— L. F. Swift, Leroy Hough, Henry J. Crocker, W. D. Dennett, Jesse W. Liiienthal Capital Paid In, $1,000,000 Western Meat Company PORK PACKERS AND SfflPPERS OF Dressed Beef, Mutton and Pori , Hides, Pelts, Tallow, Fertilizer. Bones, Hoofs, Horns, Etc. Monarch cuid Golden Gate Brands Canned Meats, Bacon, Hams and Lard General Office, Sixth and Townsend Streets - San Francisco, Cal. Cable Address STEDFAST, San Francisco. Codes, Al. A B C 4th Edition Packing House and Stock Yards, South San Francisco, San Mateo County, Cal. Distributing Houses, San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, Sacramento and Stockton : J THE REDWOOD. : Ollara 30urttal OUR JOB PRINTING PREEMINENTLY SUPERIOR Phone, S. C. 14 Published Semi-weekly B. DOWNING, EDITOR FRANKLIN STREET SANTA CLARA, CAL. San Jose Engraving Company Photo Engraving Zinc Etchings Half Tones Do you want a half-tone for a program or pamphlet? None can make it better SAN JOSE ENGRAVING COMPANY 32 LIGHTSTON STREET SAN JOSE, CAL. : JH THE REDWOOD. :ik .DOERR ' S. Y Branch at Clark ' s 176-182 South First Street San Jose Order your pastry in advance Picnic Lunches GET A KRUSIUS if you want to get a good pen knife; guaranteed as it ought to be. if it should not prove to be that, we will be glad to exchange with you until you have one that is. Manicure tools, razors guaranteed the same way. If you wish to shave easily and in a hurry, get a Gillette Safety Razor. The greatest convenience for the man who shaves himself. The John Stock Sons Tinners, Roofers and Plumbers Phone San Jose 76 71-77 South Fbrst Street San Jose, Cal. ost business men like good office stationery REGAL TYPEWRITER PAPERS and MANUSCRIPT COVERS REPRESENT THE BEST AND MOST COMPLETE LINE IN THE UNITED STATES LOOK FOR THIS TRADE-MARK CATERS TO THE MOST FASTIDIOUS Wm. McCarthy Sons Coffee TEAS AND SPICES 246 West Santa Clara Street San Jose, California •i : : THE REDWOOD. : Everybody is doing IT — Doing WHAT ? GETTING SHAVED at the University Shave Shop 983 Main Street near Postoffice Santa Clara T. MUSGRAVE P. GFELL T. Musgrave Co. Watchmakers Goldsmiths and Silversmiths 3272 2lst Street San Francisco 0. Perfect Satisfaction Guaranteed 867 Sherman Street I. RUTH, Agent - 1037 Franklin Street ALDERMAN ' S NEWS AGENCY Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. Cigars and Tobacco Baseball and Sporting Goods Fountain Pens of All Kinds Next to Postoffice Santa Clara Training School for Nurses IN CONNECTION CONDUCTED BY SISTERS OF CHARITY Race and San Carlos Streets San Jose K Men ' s Clothes Shop Gents ' Furnishings Hats and Shoes PAY LESS AND DRESS BETTER E. H. ALDEN Phone Santa Clara 74 R 1054 Franklin St. Manuel Mello Dealer in all kinds of Boots = AND = Shoes 904 Franklin Street Cor. Lafayette SANTA CLARA, CAL. M. M. Billiard Parlor GEO. E. MITCHELL PROP. SANTA CLARA Pool 2% Cents per Cue : THE REDWOOD. K See That Fit? Get your suit or overcoat madeat J.U. ' s. He shows the biggest range of fabrics in town. In other words let J. U. be your tailor. J. U. Winninger 113 SOUTH FIRST STREET, SAN JOSE , CAL. THE REDWOOD. u ■ ■■ Phones : OflBce S. C. 39 R Residence S. C. 1 Y DR. H. 0. F. MENTON Dentist Office Hours, 9 a. m. to S p. m. Rooms 5 to 8 Bank Bldg. Santa Clara Pratt-Low Preserving Company PACKERS OF Canned Fruits and Vegetables Fruits in Glass a Specialty SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA ROLL BROS. Real Estate and Insurance Call and See Us if You Want Anything in Our Line Franklin Street, next to Bank, Santa Clara Ravenna Paste Company Manufacturers of All Kinds of ITALIAN AND FRENCH Paste Phone San Jose 787 127-131 N. Market Street San Jose JOHN P. AZEVEDO Groceries Wines, Liquors, Cigars, Tobaccos, FRANKLIN ST., SANTA CLARA San Jose Transfer Co. MOVES EVERYTHING THAT IS LOOSE Phone San Jose 78 Office, 62 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose S. A. Elliott Son Plumbing and Gas Fitting GUN AND LOCKSMITHING Telephone S. C. 70 J 902-910 Main Street Santa Clara, Cal. 4. THERE IS NOTHING BETTER THAN OUR Bouquet Teas at 50 cents per pound Even Though You Pay More Ceylon, English Breakfast and Basket Fired Japan FARMERS UNION San Jose THE REDWOOD Those who know and insist on and Style Quality Wear ARE THE ONES WHO WEAR THE GOOD KIND $22.50 to $40.00 YOUR COLLEGE TAILOR 67-69 South Second St. San Jose. California : THE REDWOOD. . p. Montmayeur E. Lamolle J. Origlia LamoUe Grill_-— i. 36-38 North First Street, San Jose. Cal. Phone Main 403 MEALS AT ALL HOURS IF YOU ONLY KNEW WHAT Mayerle ' s German Eyewater DOES TO YOUR EYES YOU WOULDN ' T BE WITHOUT IT A SINGLE DAY At Druggisu. 5 c or 65c by Gcorgc Maycrle, German Expert Optician 960 Market Street, San Francisco Jacob Eberhard, Pres. and Manager John J. Eberhard, Vice-Pres. and Ass ' t Manager EBERHARD TANNING CO. Tanners, Curriers and Wool Pullers Harness-Latigo and Lace Leatlier Sole and Upper Leather, Calf, Kip and Sheepskins Eberhard ' s Skirting Leatlier and Bark Woolskin Santa Clara - California Founded 1851 Incorporated 1858 Accredited by State University, 1900 College Notre Dame SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA SIXTIETH YEAR COURSES COLLEGIATE PREPARATORY COMMERCIAL Intermediate and Primary Classes for Younger Children Notre Dame Conservatory of Music Awards Diplomas Founded 1899 APPLY FOR TERMS TO SISTER SUPERIOR . CONTENTS FRANCIS THOMPSON - _ - Edwin Coolidge 51 ANALYSIS OF SCIENTIFIC SOCIALISM Hardin Barry, A. M. ' 12 98 THE HOUND OF HEAVEN - Wm. Stewart Cannon 107 CHARITY SOUGHT ON CHRISMAS DAY Lawrence A. Fernsworth 112 THE CAPTAIN ' S CHRISTMAS PRESENT - Rodney A. Yoell lis CAPTAIN JOE _ - - J. Charles Murphy 119 EDITORIAL __---- 123 EXCHANGES _ _ . _ . 125 UNIVERSITY NOTES - - _ _ - 131 ATHLETICS - - _ _ - _ 138 Ul I- _l J m I- li. Ul I I- li. I ) tr UJ u IL Entered Dec. 18, 1902, at Santa Clara, Cai., as second-class matter, under Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 VOL. XII SANTA CLARA, CAL., DECEMBER, 1912 No. 3 Francis Thompson " 11 THAT voice is that, frail as the distant lark ' s From far-off fields across the valley shed? Fond chorister to Nature ' s hierarchs, Thy joy and song are one— the centuried Reverberation of abysmal bells Hangs not upon thy note: not so with him Who tranced in quiet Kensal ' s holy spells Pours out his songs — articulate cherubim. Strange father for such children: strange is Christ, Clothed in the flesh, to froward Galilee: Our bread and wine as then are sacrificed On alien altars still: and it may be Some hand had touched the lip that strangely calls With angel haunted voice without the walls. EDWIN COOLIDGE 98 THE REDWOOD. ANALYSIS OF SCIENTIFIC SOCIALISM (Concluded from November issue) MARX ' S THEORY OF VALUE AND SURPLUS-VALUE The general theory discussed in the preceding pages forms the foundation upon which Marx and Engels reared their socialistic edifice. Their theory of history was intended to show why and how the modern capitalist order of society must needs develop into so- cialism. At the outset of the argumen- tation we find the theory of value and surplus value exposing the evils of private property in the means of pro- duction, and the iniquity of modern capitalist exploitation. In capitalistic society, every kind of produce partakes of the character of merchandise. All economists both an- cient and modern from Aristotle to John Marshall have distinguished two kinds of values in commodities — use- value and exchange-value. All have agreed in defining use-value as the utility of an article in satisfying hu- man wants, and exchange-value as the value of an article in commerce or trade. But in regard to the common element found in all articles by which one is exchanged for another, there is great diversity of opinion. In com- mercial transactions we have two things equal to a third, with the neces- sary conclusion that these two things are equal to each other. The question is to find the third thing, this middle term, as it were, upon which all com- modities are compared to ascertain their value in exchange. Exchange-value accrues to mer- chandise only on account of the human labor expended upon it, and the meas- ure of labor embodied in the merchan- dise determines also its value in ex- change. Two kinds of merchandise embodying the same amount of neces- sary cooperative labor are also of the same exchange-value. This is Marx ' s famous law of value. SURPLUS-VALUE— T HE SECRET OF SURPLUS MAKING From this doctrine of value Marx de- duces his law of surplus value by ap- plying what has been said to labor capacity. In society today one class owns the means of production, another class pos- sesses labor capacity, but because they :Tave no tools of production they are forced to sell their labor to the owners of these tools. Labor capacity like all other articles of exchange has two values, use-value and exchange- value. The exchange-value is the cost of the laboring man ' s sustenance or what his labor is worth to himself, while the use-value is the total produce of that labor or what it is worth to the THE REDWOOD. 99 employer. The fact that a man pro- duces twice as much in a day as his la- bor amounts to, gives rise to the ex- ploitation of labor by capital. Thus capital is only an accumulation of sur- plus-value, of the unremunerated labor of others. The fundamental tenet of social- ism that all the evils in society today are due to private ow nership of the means of production is thus seen to rest upon this foundation, that labor produces all value and that the es- sence of exchange value consists of necessary cooperative labor required to produce any article, and is not based upon the utility or use-value of articles. Briefly, Marx ' s argumentation is this. Surplus-value is essentially based on exploitation, and by its very nature tends to an increase of exploi- tation by v rhich society will finally be divided into a mere handful of billion- aire capitalists and a countless herd of proletarians, and then the collapse will ensue. In reality this principle is untenable. To understand this we need but in- quire into the notion of value. Value is one of those simple concepts which are evident to every man and only be- come obscured when we attempt to define and divide them. An article is valuable if it is capable of being desired. It must be good in itself and it must have relative good- ness, i.e., it must appear to be conduc- ive in some way to our preservation and perfection. Devas in his Political Economy de- fines value as the capacity of anything to serve the needs and desires of man and therefore to be estimated as de- sirable. Immaterial goods are of more value than material goods. Virtue is a pearl of great price. In a similar m.anner life and health are more valuable than money and estates. But socialism is concerned little or nothing with these higher goods. Like all phases of ma- terialism it emphasizes too much the material side of life. Of economic value we speak in a more restricted sense. It is the busi- ness of economics to provide those material goods which are needed for the support, continuance or enjoyment of man ' s material and intellectual life on earth. In economic goods a two- fold value may be distinguished, value in use and value in exchange. Aristotle recognized these two uses in articles, but unlike Marx, he never conceived the element of labor re- quired to produce an article as the un- derlying basis of that article ' s value in exchange. As is his habit, Marx here gives us a sadly distorted and pervert- ed idea of truth. An example will illustrate this diffi- culty. A pair of shoes has a two-fold use: the first is peculiar to itself and exists in contradistinction to other arti- cles, and consists in this, that it can be used for the protection of the foot ; the second consists in this, that it may be exchanged for other goods, say a sack of flour. Why is a pair of shoes equal 100 THE REDWOOD. to a sack of flour? What is the com- mon term to which both are com- pared? The common term does not consist of labor alone, but is made up of several elements. The first element is its capability of satisfying human wants ; but this is not all, amd taken alone is too broad. There are many goods which have this element but have no exchange value, e. g., air, light, and water. The next element in the middle term is that the goods must not be available in unlimited supplies, that is, they must be difficult of at- tainment and capable of ownership. The third element, the factor over- stressed by Marx, is the labor ele- ment. It is true that great labor expended on an article gives it greater value, e. g., a well tailored suit of clothes, a work of art, etc. Thus we see that a complete, well-balanced view of exchange value includes sev- eral elements as its basis. Intimately connected with Marx ' s theories of value and exchange-value is that other fundamental tenet of so- cialism, that all wealth comes from labor, i. e., unskilled labor. This has been styled the " Right Arm of Social- ism. " An example will serve to illustrate better than scholastic arguments. Arkwright, a barber of moderate in- come, invented the spinning- jenny which was destined to revolutionize the weaving industry. The inventive genius of this man has been solidified into bolts and mortices. The child of his brain lies at his feet, yet it is pow- erless to produce a penny until an- other power steps in. Every new in- vention must be launched on the mar- ket and made a palpitating force in the industrial world. Men must be found with the moral courage and foresight to venture their money. These men are found, the undertaking proves a success, and with the addi- tion of another elemeiat, the muscle exertion of laborers, produces great wealth. There are three independent forces combining in that production. 1. The inventive genius of Ark- wright, an intellectual force. 2. The courageous enterprise of the capitalists who floated it, a moral force. 3. The muscle exertion of many la- borers, a physical force. It works with marvelous results. By its aid these ten men produce as much as a hundred working with their hands only. These men previously produced ten pounds weekly, now they produce a hundred. To whom does the surplus ninety belong? The socialist answers that since all wealth comes from labor, it belongs to the ten men working the machine. If Ark- wright the inventor, or the men who risked their money claim a penny, it is called robbery. Another example: a building con- tractor, a man quick to catch the drift of the times, calculates that the city will extend in a certain direction. He buys real estate, thereby exercising moral courage. He finds a place where THE REDWOOD. 101 materials are plentiful and cheap. By the genius of combination and by that subtle indescribable power of being able to handle men, he organizes a band of workers, by skillful manage- ment he secures marvelous results. One inspects the work, some men are dressing stones, some polishing mar- ble and some laying bricks, all en- gaged in separate employments. Yet the man with his hands in his pockets is the frame that holds together, com- bines and harmonizes individual ef- forts to one definite end. His brains are to their toil what cement is to the house : it combines and holds together the varied elements into one struc- ture. With foresight that enabled him to lay his finger on the pulse of the times, with moral courage to back his judgment, and finally with the abil- ity to handle men, he touches dead capital with the genius of enterprise, amd lo ! it is vitalized and becomes the source of wealth to scores. See what an army of force this man has con- tributed toward the production of this wealth. Time has justified his judg- ment, he nets thousands of dollars on sale of real estate. Every cent of it, the socialist says, should be divided among workmen, for their creed is, all wealth comes from labor — muscle- labor, of course. The varied forces he threw into the task are ignored. It is true these days that produc- tion is socialized to a great extent; there is a minute division of labor and assignment of tasks according to abil- ity. Men act in concert in the process of production so that innumerable workers contribute toward the manu- facture of every article. The method of production is attended with great advantages, and one of the most no- ticeable is that a group of laborers gain by association and co-operation ; that is, the sum total of their produc- tive capacities, when workingmen are in concert, is much greater than the sum total of their individual efforts, working independently. The same fact is illustrated in his- tory by the organization of the Mace- donian phalanx and the Roman legion, for it was found that 500 organized men were more than a match for four times that number of disorganized fighters. But socialists rashly con- clude from this phenomenon that the increased production is due solely to the laborers. They forget that the Macedonian phalanx must have an Alexander the Great, and that the Roman legion must have a Julius Caesar. PRIVATE PROPERTY This is one of the strongest pillars that support socialism. " All misery " , they cry, " comes from the possession of private property. All private pos- sessions in the means of production should become the common property of all, to be administered by the state or municipal bodies. " Municipal control of public utilities is undoubtedly attended with good re- sults, but there is a limit to every- thing, and there is a line beyond which 102 THE REDWOOD. no state must pass. The state must never thrust its hand into your pocket and claim the purse you have filled by the sweat of your brow. Sec- ondly, the state must never invade the sanctuary of your home to wrench from you the authority with which God and Nature invested you over your child and house. If you search deep down amongst the fibres of the human heart you will find the main-spring of most of our actions is labeled self. A man toils for fame. Whose fame? His own. A man wears out his life building a home and a fortune for his wife and child. Why? Because they are his bone and blood and bear his name — his other self. Now, before making the first step into the Socialistic Republic, you are called upon to take the forceps and tear from the inmost chamber of the heart its strongest fibre, self. Here you destroy the most powerful force that ever nerved men to deeds of daring. Will the author slave in the garret at midnight if he is assured when his work comes out it is not his own, but the result of his social environments, the products of the state. Will the business man rack and toil his brain if you destroy his hope of the sub- urban villa, where the autumn of his life may pass in ease and comfort with a family established in affluence? Will the farmer face the darkness and sleet of a winter morning or toil in all weathers if there is no plot he may call his own and upon which he may impress his individuality? Will he sow if he may not claim the yield of autumn, if he knows another will reap? Will men of exceptional abil- ity make great exertions except for exceptional rewards? We grant that the future state of socialism might be practical if human nature were changed; in short, if men were not men but angels and loved most of all things to see their neigh- bors prosper before themselves. Riches and the inequality in the dis- tribution of lands may be justified on economic grounds alone. Although without inequality there can be a certain amount of industrial organization and progress, the organi- zation can be but rudimentary and the progress slow. For with men as they are, the eagernes to make a fortune and live in ease and abundance is a needed spur to concentrated labor, elabo- rate production, improvements and in- ventions. And, though not in itself a high motive, it can only be elevated by the eagerness being for the ad- vancement and ease, not of one ' s self, but of one ' s kindred, — and, grasping am- bition may be transmitted into family affection. AN APOLOGIA FOR NON-PRO- DUCING CAPITALISTS Beaten out of their first position by the obvious fact that there are vari- ous orders of labor, some more useful to society than others, and consequently more valuable for time; and, that the quality of the labor must be consid- THE REDWOOD. 103 ered and not merely the time, So- cialists take up this second and stronger ground. " Should it be granted that some capitalists can rightly claim a reward as productive causes, e. g., a gentle- man farmer, or a managing partner in a factory, or the lessee of a coal pit and half a dozen others who are reveling in luxury with less knowledge of coal than a housemaid and with less brains than four-fifths of the miners? " It is true that these men are per- sonally unproductive, though their money is productive. It seems that they have no right to live, that they are so much dead weight — parasites that attach themselves to the labors and appropriate the products of labor. Yet they serve this useful purpose, that these sine- cures are a stimulus and a reward to the toilers of the world. They are the prize and the goal towards which every man is striving. Men toil in the hope of accumulating wealth ; the al- mighty dollar is, after all, the greatest stimulus to production. This may be an ignoble desire, nevertheless it is a potent moral cause of production and vital to progress in the industrial arts. The abuse lies in this, that the ig- norant and the thoughtless acquire riches without heeding the burden of responsibility that attends their ac- quisition. Great evil necessarily re- sults from the sudden acquisition of wealth by the uneducated and im- moral. Either they regard their money as a means of enjoyment and ostenta- tion, or as an end in itself. In either case they are selfish, a plague and embossed carbuncle in the flesh of so- ciety. These idle and luxuriant rich who deck their wives with diamonds, who find money to fling away in the extravagances of a London season, who yacht in the Mediterranean and fish in Norway and bitterly oppose any increased attention or expenditure on the poor as leading to bankruptcy, of themselves, are the sores of capital- istic society — the sores that the misery- focused lens of soap-box orators is turned upon. The intellects of the mob are fascinated, reason is dazzled, it must be true. Do not they read every day of the ludicrous doings of the smart set? Capitalists of this mind, sober, respectable men as they are, reputed to be rich but irrespon- sible, are to blame for the present and past misery of our laboring popula- tion. And if all capitalists are like these, selfish and heedless of the wel- fare of others, then there is truth in Karl Marx ' s statement that " Capital came into the world dropping blood from every pore. " It is waste of words to argue against Socialism and capital stands condemned. No one will deny that there is mis- ery and evil in the world, but few are willing to have the present edifice, reared on the wisdom and experience of centuries, razed to the ground, and rely on the future socialistic structure without an inquiry into the details, the plans and specifications of the new building. Socialism is a system of promises and can point to very little in the realm of achievement. It utter- 104 THE REDWOOD. ly fails to discover the true cause of misery and oppression. Tlie keen, practical intellect of Aristotle confronted the first advances of state socialism, which had much in common with modern Socialism, with this emphatic condemnation. " This state of legislation wears a good face and an air of philanthropy. No sooner is it heard than it is eagerly embraced under the expectation of a marvelous love to grow out from it between man and man, especially if the proposer goes on to inveigh against the evils of existing institutions, setting all down to the want of a community of goods. These evils are due, however, not to the want of a community of property, but to the depravity of human nature. For experience teaches that disputes are far more likely to occur among people who possess property in com- mon and live as partners than among those who hold their estates in sep- arate tenure. The life proposed ap- pears to be altogether impossible. " Man fell from Eden ; is it not rea- sonable to expect that he would fall from the classless Eden of Marx, Engels and others? Before inquiring into the objective fact that Socialism is making wonder- ful strides, it is necessary to inquire into the subjective factor of this suc- cess. By the subjective factor is meant the readiness of the people to harken to the gospel of discontent, their susceptibility to the nightly ti- rades and harangues occurring on the streets of large cities. Herbert Spen- cer once said: " The better conditions become the more is heard about their badness. " As example, we have the position of the modern woman com- pared to that of her sister in mediaeval times. Witness the campaign for suf- frage and equal rights for women and consider the degraded position of woman of former times when little or nothing was heard of her rights. Again take the virtue of temperance in re- gard to drink. In former times drunk- en revels were matters of every day, and the man who could not take his two or three bottles was considered a milk-sop, whereas, today the de- mands of industrial life require com- parative sobriety. Yet this is an age of prohibition movements and temper- ance leagues. Again, the workers of the middle ages lived in conditions of squalor and misery unknown to mod- ern civilization, while at the same time, little outcry was heard of their oppression or exploitation. The serfs of those days never thought of com- paring their lots with their masters. The laborers of today are told that they have shoes to cover their feet while their forefathers walked with bare feet. That matters little to them, but it does matter a great deal that they walk while the more fortunate in life ' s race pass by in their automobiles or cast upon them the shadow of their aeroplanes. The wants of man have advanced with greater strides than their ability to satis- fy those wants. In the daily newspapers the sins and waste- THE REDWOOD. 105 fulness of the rich are forever paraded before the eyes of the poor. Hence, the sociaHst agitators have found the soil prepared for the seed of discontent, and they have never lost an opportunity to fling the fire-brand of revolution into the inflamable mobs. Here is a fair sample of Socialist in- vective and vituperation where an agi- tator paints 20th century Chicago back of the yards. " From the general air of hoggish- ness that pervades everything from the general manager ' s office down to the pens beneath the buildings and up to the smoke that hangs over all, the whole thing is purely capitalistic. One ' s nostrils are assailed at every point by the horribly penetrating stench that pervades everything. Great volumes of smoke roll from the forest of chimneys at all hours of the day and drift down over the helpless neigh- borhood like a deep black curtain that fain would hide the misery and suf- fering it aggravates. The foul pack- ing-house sewage, too horribly rotten in its putrid offensiveness for further exploitation, even by the monopolistic greed, is spewed forth in a multitude of arteries of filth into a branch of the Chicago River in one corner of the yard, where it rises to the top and spreads out in a nameless, indescriba- ble cake of festering foulness and dis- ease-breeding stench. On a branch of this sluice-way of nastiness are several acres of bristles scraped from the backs of innumerable hogs and spread out to allow the still clinging animal matter to rot away before they are made into brushes Tom Carey, new alderman of this ward, owns long rows of some of the most unhealthy houses in this deadly neighborhood. These houses have no connection with the sewers, and under some of them the accumulation of years has gathered in a semi-liquid mass of from two to three feet. Shabbily built in the first place and then subjected to years of neglect, they are veritable death traps. A cast-iron pull with the Health Department renders them safe from any prosecution. " Here, indeed, the tally against cap- italism is marked in heavy lines by the socialist pen. The indictment against the modern industrial order is a seri- ous one. The socialist who focuses attention on the weak spots in the in- dustrial structure performs a valuable service. Candid recognition of the full extent of existing evils is the in- dispensible first step toward progress and reform. In short, the whole system of mod- ern socialism is an exaggerated, dis- torted, and sadly perverted represen- tation of the truth. It fails to carry conviction to the observer, it is too one-sided, the truth it contains is nul- lified by the truth it neglects. Marx ' s materialistic conception of history overstresses the economic factor ; his theory of value, of surplus-value, and of the composition of capital over- stresses the labor element in the idea of exchange-value. Socialist agitators concentrate their fire on the evils of 106 THE REDWOOD. modern society. They refuse to rec- ognize the strong points in our mod- ern competitive system, they absolute- ly ignore the three great sources of strength to the workingman,— namely, the growing sense of trusteeship of wealth and responsibility on the part of the employers, supervision and con- trol of the conditions of labor by the government, and trade unionism, or the organization of the laborers them- selves. Furthermore, socialists over- emphasize the material outcome of life in our competitive system. The present system encourages industry and thrift, insight and initiative. They forget that the stimulus of property and individual initiative are the driv- ing power of society, and they never mention that life ' s choicest gifts, love and honor and consecration to others ' service, are within the reach of man- sion and cottage alike. HARDIN BARRY, A, M., ' 12. THE REDWOOD. 107 THE HOUND OF HEAVEN FASTER and faster, nearer and nearer, comes the swift Hound. The terrified hare gathers its strength for another dash, spurred by its tenacity of life. This way and that dodges the little animal, seeking ever an avenue of escape. But to no avail. The hot, panting Hound is pressing closer and closer, until at length the hare ceases its flight and lies with heaving sides, and with fear- widened eyes roving restlessly. The Hound, coming up, sees in the crouch- ing hare no resemblance to the flying animal of a moment past, and gives up the chase. When Francis Thompson, in his " The Hound of Heaven, " pictures the soul as the hare and the Hound as God, he creates a striking metaphor. It is said by some that it is not proper to liken God ' s solicitude for the soul to the hound ' s desire for the chase. And, again, they say it is almost blas- phemy to liken God to a hound. Let it be said that both are right. But in this case, at least, the purpose justifies the means. In my case, when I saw the title for the first time, it seared itself upon my brain. That striking alliteration held my thought. When a reptile is seen crawling on the earth we are filled with an abhorrence for it ; yet, try as we will, we cannot remove our eyes from its hypnotic hold. " The Hound of Heaven " ; what two more diversi- fied titles could be offered? Yet as we read on we find how fitting they are, how concise, how beautifully forceful and clear. We take up the poem, not as a mas- terpiece in itself, but as an expression of a heart ' s humble and contrite out- pourings. There is no doubt in my mind that his work was written from Thompson ' s pitiful experience. True poetry rises like a spring, from the heart, pure, sweet, uncon- taminated. And Francis Thompson was a true poet. None other could voice those feelings, those tribula- tions, until his pen had traced them in lines o f sweetest pathos. The mechanical part of his work can only be commented on, and then left to admiring thought. By the me- chanical part I mean the manner in which the reader is made to feel the rhythmic motion of the flying feet. One can almost hear them beat faster on the slopes, and then slacken on the inclines, until, when all is over and the soul once more is God ' s, peace and quiet reigns. The wonderful meter alone secures it to immortality. The thought followed by the poet is so pathetic and so true, and it strikes the chord of sympathy in all our hearts. Few can really understand 108 THE REDWOOD. the depths of the poem ' s meaning un- less they have trodden the same path, fought the same fight, fled in the same chase. None save those that h ave been betrayed can know how he felt when all things betrayed him. One may think and imagine and conjure up pictures before his mind, and never know the bitter pangs felt, nor how the hapless soul sees a way to evade the tireless Lover, and. Oh, the shame ! follows the way with joy and is led on and on, only again to confront the di- vine Pursuer. They are few that know just how the harassed soul cowers at the Heavenly Hound ' s approach, and seeks to hide under childish arguments and futile reasonings, only to be driven on by the Eye that sees all, knows all. The poem is divided into five parts. The first three parts each end with the words spoken by the pursuing Voice. The fourth is a prayer, directed in in- quiry in the spirit that moved our Lord in the garden of Gethsemane, a spirit which asked, why must death be? W hy must we die to be saved? The last part speaks of the soul ' s surrender, its awe of the wonderful love and peace, of the forgiving gentleness of the " Hound of Heaven. " The exquisite metaphors that abound in the poem demand consider- ation by themselves, and the thoughts they give life to would fill many vol- umes. But before one could consider them he would have to consider the poem itself. The opening lines serve as an intro- duction and also bring one at once to the theme, the flight from God. As one reads he feels himself like an interested onlooker viewing the chase. He almost shouts as he sees them coursing in the chase of love. On ! On! On! Will the chase never end? Thou soul, thou stubborn soul that fieest thy God, the God of Infinite Love! Thou wouldst try in vain to lose him in thy maze of arguments, but they fade before Him like mist. He is again behind thee, and always will be. Thou soul, through thy miserable years, flee the God of eternity ! Thou soul, a fragile, selfish soul, flee the God of love, of might, thy God ! Through hope, through fear, through happiness and through dismay dost thou turn this way and that way ever from thy God. Thou hearest His voice. He says : " All things betray thee, who be- trayest Me. " And yet thou harkenest not to this warning, but away, on, on, thou rushest. Where dost thou now seek refuge, O soul? At the feet of Love? I shall watch thy success. Now thou hast laid thyself bare. Thou hast shown us thy true self. Thou sayest : " For though I knew His love Who fol- lowed, Yet was I sore adread Lest, having Him, I must have nought else beside. " There is the secret of thy flight, of the flight of countless others, from their God : that they may have other loves beside His love. THE REDWOOD. 109 Oh, human selfishness ! Oh, ingrate soul! Canst thou not be generous? Canst thou not even be grateful? Why dost thou risk eternal life that thou mayest enjoy these mundane joys? Love will oflFer no solace to thy harried soul, for thou wilt not love as thou oughtest. Thou hast failed again, for God is a jealous God, and will have none other before Him. Even is His love more intense than thy fear of His ruling hand. Driven from the realm of Love by the never-tiring Pursuer, the soul turns to the vaulted skies above. The great starry dome of blue has been the refuge of godless men of all time, and here rests the soul. But not long has the soul a haven here. It sees His hand everywhere and is uneasy. Eagerly it cries for Night ' s veil to cover it, then, aflfrighted, anxiously awaits the burst of dawn, only again to crave the dark- ness. Thus the ceaseless circles. On, unhappy, forlorn soul ! Thou callst vxpon God ' s work to prove that He is not. Oh, senseless soul ! Thou ask- est thy mind, thou askest the earth, thou askest the heavens and the inter- vening stars, but thou art foiled. In their constancy to their Maker they betray thee. Thou shouldest take a lesson irum these, but thy stubborn soul refuseth to learn. Thou wouldst flee Him with the speed of His winds, and hope to out- strip Him — Him, the Creator! Whether the winds drift lazily along or are hastened by Thunder ' s voice and Lightning ' s spur, thy haste can never exceed His. Thy fear is ever exceeded by the intensity of His Love. He is always nigh, and the soul hears Him speak in words pregnant with tender regard : " Naught shelters thee, who wilt not shelter Me. " Thwarted, the soul turns to seek the something in the eyes of little children that bespeaks an asylum at last, a way to foil the never-fatigued Pursuer. Here is something that has confidence in it, thinks the soul. It sees the wist- ful look of faith in the children ' s eyes, and comes near to them. At his ap- proach they are lead away by their guardian angel. The soul is like a man gazing after a mirage. Again frustrated, it turns, and with the grasp of a drowning man, seizes Nature. In Nature it still seeks the desire and answer to its foolish ques- tion. It wants to be without its God, its All. The soul delves into Nature ' s innermost depths. It reclines in her lap and catches her secrets as they fall in wondrous accents of sweetness. Her every emotion was its own. It frowned when she was angered. It smiled when she was pleased. When she sighed with the waning autumn, it grieved to hear her. When she lay like dead under the shroud of winter ' s snow, its heart was chilled with deep- est sorrow. When first her eyes opened with the coming of spring its heart thrilled anew with the joy of the lost, found, of the dead, quickened. But there was a hollowness about it all. The soul dared not probe deeper, 110 THE REDWOOD. nor stir in its temporary shelter for fear that the Hound, who lurked in every way, would pounce upon it. Its happiness was not true, was not real, and soon it tired and sought anew The Voice it hears again, saying: " Lo ; naught contents thee, who con- tent ' st not Me. " And on and on goes the chase. The soul is weakening, and its stub- bornness is fast ebbing to despair. The Hound ' s stamina of love is overpower- ing the hare ' s terror-born strength. The hare has ceased its flight and awaits the Hound. The soul can now be considered in its dying moment. It is a psychologi- cal fact that in the moment before death comes the mind reviews all its life minutely. So must the soul have been thinking of its life. It sees per- haps for the first time what a fool it has been. The soul sees broken to bits the ar- mor with which it had offset the mili- tant Love. The arguments that com- pose that armor now seem only to tor- ture his ,wound, and words taste like gall in the mouth that once so freely uttered them. He was strong, yes; but where has his strength flown now? He is at the mercy of Him whom he slighted. Thou hast spoken truly, oh soul. God ' s love is a weed that chokes out all other growth, and now it is taking thee as His own — this same weed that thou so feared. The troubles thou so easily cast aside in years past have suddenly grown heavy. They oppress thee and now thou attemptest to put them asida. And behold ; they hurl thee back. Thou wilt need aid, O soul, and that must come from Him. When thou soughtest Nature in thy headlong flight dost thou, O soul, re- member how the trees, the grass, the flowers, the earth, all Nature seemed to die and be no more? And thou know- est that when the warm spring sun shone again how everything bloomed anew, with greater beauty and abund- ance. So must thou, soul, die. And it will be hard to die on account of thy life unless thou feel God ' s love. And when thou hast felt His divine smile upon thee thou shalt rise and blossom in greater glory, even like to Nature in the warmth of His tender- ness. " Ah! must- Designer infinite ! — Ah, must Thou char the wood ' ere Thou canst limn with it? " The touching appeal in those words wells up the sympathy in our hearts for this helpless creature. It is hard for the soul to realize that after these long mortal years of trials and tribu- lations, the greatest suffering. Death, must be undergone. Death is terrible to man because of the uncertainty. Man fears only the unknown. Such is the soul ' s thought when it feels death drawing near; when it hears the sounding of the trumpet and the Voice speaking. Be thankful, soul for His love follows THE REDWOOD. Ill even yet. Pray that Death but wait till He come. The soul is speaking in a tearful frenzy. It is yet unable to receive His love. The soul asks : " Must Thy harvest fields Be dunged w ith rotten death? " As the soul is slowly leaving its mortal habitation, and now grows sadly penitent, the Voice is sounding louder and louder, until one hears it speaking in kind reproof. Thou, soul, listen thou to the words that are fall- ing to thy shame. Hear that tale of wondrous love, of compassionate re- gard. Hide not thy head, but raise it in thankful prayer, for He speaks with love, not anger. Harken, as He tells thee of thy pleasures that thou so mournest leav- ing. He has stored them where " thieves and rust cannot harm them. " He loves thee yet. Rejoice, for thou art saved ! Lo ! He is speaking. The voice is saying: ' Rise ! Clasp My hand and come. " Now go to thy peace, so unde- served. Go to His Love and His happiness. The Voice is speaking again as the soul leaves : " Ah, fondest, blindest, weakest, I am He Whom Thou seekest ! Thou dravest Love from thee, who dravest Me. " WM. STEWART CANNON. 112 THE REDWOOD. CHARITY SOUGHT ON CHRISTMAS DAY I set me forth the Christmas dawn, " Today, " methought, " was great Love born. " In thought my soul exultant cried, " All hearts beat Love, this holy morn ! And tremble, vibrate rapture. Earth ! Men love all men! Be banished. Pride! Today love naught but Charity. " " Ah blessed me ! Ah favored man ! This holy, red unprisoned flame, This spark of God, " exclaimed my thought, " Today is thine, thy sight ' s to claim. Now straightway hunt its visage out. " I thus resolved — made this my aim : " I ' ll go and seek out charity. " Unto a temple soon I came. Without, Christ ' s haggard, begging poor; Within, fine-clothed rich, low bowed. They rose, they passed without the door, The waiting poor a few endowed With shamed coins — no cheer — no more. I questioned " Is this Charity? " I hid me in a Fashion ' s hall ; This holy day kind Wealth had planned To give good gifts to waifs in want. Ashamed and sad its ways I scanned — A mere display, a vulgar cant, A show that but a vainness fanned. I, chol ' ric cried " Not Charity! " THE REDWOOD. 113 I found me in a cloister house. Now, Love, at last I ' ll greet thee here ! Here Pax makes way for sweet Amor. Hark! cowled monks do speak: I swear Of faults they talk, for faults a score This one and that smarts in their care — Faith waning here ! No Charity ! I went me to a hospital Where nuns of Charity, saint faced Served gnawing Pain ; and lo ! I saw Four hundred motley men where paced, By hunger sent here, and no law Did stay their need, and nuns ' smiles graced The weighted boards. Sweet Charity ! Into a workman ' s house I stepped, A hoveled room, a wasted form On barren bed ; some grieved ones near Were sore of Want, that cruel worm — But more! A neighborman brought Cheer, His half-loaf brought and self. Thy norm I now beheld. Great Charity! I passed me through the paupered streets. A child a cringing cur to save From sufifering, I saw ; and one With hidden sweets the streets did brave To give to friend that else had none. " God child, " I cried, " these guileless have Thine infant Love, Thy Charity! " I moved me to the prison place With drooping soul. My wish was now In meanest shape Uncharity 114 THE REDWOOD. To know, to see, to mark its brow. " For since, " methought, " Uncharity In such fair things that I must know In foul I ' ll seek Uncharity. " The braided captain stood his place, A Magdalene they brought to him. " And let her go this day, " he said. A sin-seared wretch ' s eyes grew dim, A coin he clasped, and went. I weighed The what I saw : what I had seen : And murmured, " Here is Charity. " LAWRENCE A. FERNSWORTH, THE REDWOOD. 115 THE CAPTAIN ' S CHRISTMAS PRESENT SHE lay to in the undulating water, with only the jib and foregailant sail to catch the wind. Once in awhile she would duck, and green water washed over her foc ' sle two feet deep, and came spurting out the hawseholes in a white mass of foam. It was the wind-up of the great gale, that gale of the early fifties which, originating on the bleak coast of Si- beria, roared down through the islands of the Orient sending hundreds of junks to the bottom, and spreading cold desolation inwards for twelve leagues or more. It was, as I say, the tail end of the gale, a last dying gasp, as it were, of the mighty force of the vast Pa- cific. Dawn was just breaking. A leaden light suffused itself over grey water, and melted gradually and al- most imperceptibly the heavy-lying mist which robbed the water of its blueness and filled the atmosphere with a powdery something that seemed to choke the very spirit of one, as well as his lungs. Small wonder that the crew was sullen. For four days they had fought the wind, when very wind and sea seemed leagued against them. No warm food had entered their mouths, no dry clothes had been put on their backs, no time for anything but fight — fight — fight. Pull here, haul there. Take in a slapping sail when the bel- lying gusts tore the reef-points out of their hands, and lashed their faces with stray ends of gaskets and flying spume. Again, I repeat, small wonder they were exhausted and tempers hung balanced on the knife-edge of a ner- vous tension, and on the fifth day when the last traces of the storm had blown from off the water, no one vi as sur- prised when Tom, the kanaka cook, and " Big Alec, " the Swede, rolled into the scuppers with flashing knives, and only separated when the kanaka came off with a six-inch cut across his breast a)7d the foremast hand ' s thumb be- tween his bloody teeth. By the time this pleasant episode was over, and the bully mate had kicked his toe sore on each, the deck was washed up and all scenes of the con- flict removed just as the master, Cap- tain Gallsworth, stepped out of the hatchway and took his position on the poop. Standing there by the binnacle with legs set far apart, blue cap pushed far back and to the right of his one good, glaring eye, he presented a typical pic- ture of what he was, a hard master of hard men. No kindly gleam came from that one eye, but, as if conscious of the absence of the other it shot with double malice and double coarse- ness, and it was the boast of the surly owner that with this one optic he could 116 THE REDWOOD. out-glare any man that had ever set his foot on a good streak deck. He was a tartar, and was proud of it, cruel, and glad of it, coarse, and jovial over it, but, worst of all, drunk at times and stupid over it. " Blast me, " he ' d say, thumping his fist on the rail. " See that knuckle? Well, I broke it on a man ' s jaw. See that finger? Well, I bent it in a man ' s eye. No sir; give me a man what as I can ' t handle an ' I give up my pa- pers, and walk to forard. " It is plain that it needs no further development to tell what kind of a ship The Prowler was, and so she hurried onward, with a sullen crew, a sullen skipper and a morose and sullen fate. When men ' s lives are spent at con- stant routine, at an occupation that is gruelling and triesome, it takes little or no event to break the monotony and act as a stimulus to arouse un- usual interest. Therefore when the lookout shout- ed, " Boat ahoy, sir, a few points ofif the starboard bow ! " everyone ran forward and lined the rail, only to be knocked back by the storming mate, and told, " No gass whacking allowed here. " The boat was a staunch one, a ship ' s longboat evidently, and when it hove to on the port side and the occupants climbed aboard by way of the Jacob ' s ladder, the mate gave orders " to trice it up onto the forcastle, " where it was battened down and provisioned as a valued addition to the ship ' s comple- ment. Two of the three occupants of the boat were plainly sailors, and were sent forward after a short but warm interview with the captain. This ad- dition to his crew- somewhat depleted by a death or two owing to wash- aways, proved to be most welcome, and put him in better humor to deal with the third passenger of the boat, apparently a person of some individu- ality and one worth looking after. He was a little man about five feet four with an unusually long body and queer stumpy round legs. His shoul- ders were stooped somewhat, and bore on them a round bullet-like head that had close-cropped greyish hair. His eyes had a peculiar squint as if always looking at some minute object, and his mouth turned upwards at the cor- ners into a shrewd though kindly smile. His voice was smooth, persuasive and pleasant, the grip of his tanned, stubby hand sincere, firm and assur- ing. The ruddiness of his cheeks be- tokened good health and the red veins around his nose looked well for his good-fellowship. So it was not surprising that he and his baggage, two large carpet bags, were stowed comfortably aft, and when he ate he dined in the cabin, and hobnobbed amicably with the captain. They had good weather until they were about in Long. 70, 19 " 14 " , and Lat. 30 18 ' 16 " , or some few hundred miles northwest of Wake island. Here they ripped into a lagging gale, and had the mizzenmast jerked clean out of her, owing to the tardiness of the THE REDWOOD. 117 second mate in taking in the spanker. The captain swore, and raved at the remaining bit of the wind, but prom- ised cheerfully that the ship would be hell afloat all the rest of the voyage. Then they ran into a calm, and floundered about helplessly on a smooth running sea, for three days, hot, so hot that the deck burned and copper bolts were too heated to touch. The captain, true to his promise, invented petty little jobs to keep them busy; made them haul down a per- fectly good block and oil the wheels ; .■■;ent them over the side to paint the rust streaks, and all the while nagged and swore and glared with his one tre- mendous eye until the crew, rebelling, had to be driven by the aid of marlin- spikes into their stronghold, the foc ' - sle. " By thunder, " shouted the captain, " I ' ll show you. Try to run me, will you? Come ambling along my deck with your dirty feet? Mate, trice up Prentice. If they don ' t give him up I ' ll proclaim mutiny and will fill that hold with dead even if I have to make Africa in the long boat. Come out. Prentice, you mangy dog, and show yourself as the man you orter be. You ' ll lead no more mutinies on my ship. " But Prentice refused to come out and the crew barricaded themselves in the forecastle, indulging in a long and fruitless sailors ' harangue, practically to end in a passive mutiny. Captain Gallsworth seeing that to patrol an empty deck was useless, re- treated to his cabin and indulged in liquid solace, until being almost inca- pacitated for work and duty he stum- bled into his bunk and snored bibu- lously. Meanwhile the strange little passen- ger had been most busy. He bundled himself off to the sullen sailors and by a calm persuasive talk pointed out to them the folly of mutiny, especially with three well-armed officers on board and no navigator amongst them- selves, and advised the sending of a committee to the quarter-deck and there stating their wrongs to endeavor to arrive at some amicable settlement of an altogether nasty business. He then hastened aft, and met the captain. Gradually bringing him around to his view of things, with the aid of an excellent bottle of Madeira, he leaned over the table and whis- pered a dread secret in Gallsworth ' s ear. Dread or momentous, I say, because the captain ' s face positively lit up in a something that almost resembled a cheerful smile. The one eye had a pucker in its corner that vainly tried to suggest good will. Rising, the captain put out his horny palm and grasping the chubby one of his little passenger, exclaimed : " By the Flying Dutchman, sir, I ' ll do it. You ' re the greatest man I ever see, and in my time I ' ve seen some good ones. " • • The next day the committee came aft. A fair breeze had blown across 118 THE REDWOOD. the waters, and sunlight ghstened cheerfully over the waves. " What was the date that there con- founded calm fell? " asked one man of another. " The nineteenth, by the log, " came the answer. Well, that was five days ago, rea- soned the questioner; that makes today the twenty-fourth, and tomor- row — " Christmas, added the other. Bloody lot a good it ' ll do us though, not even plum dufif. " And so they walked aft on their doubtful mission. They were met at the break of the poop by the mate, who upon hearing their errand went below and reported the fact to the captain. The mate a few minutes later reappeared with a look of blank amazement upon his face, and without heeding the com- mittee he strode rapidly to the rail and stared blankly out upon the heav- ing water. The three sailors shufifled uneasily first on one foot and then on another. They had not prepared for such a re- ception, and the strange behavior of the mate had completely unnerved them. They were nonplussed, had lost their bearings, and were completely out of their element. Presently they heard footsteps com- ing up the ladder, and then the cap- tain ' s bullet head appeared. His back was towards them and as soon as he turned around " Great guns, " shouted the men, " he ' s got two eyes. " Two eyes, grey, malevolent, only the new one drilled them through and through. It never left them, gazed angrily at their faces, and just looked and looked and looked, until, robbing them of their last ounce of manhood it froze the very core of their hearts, and they fled hastily pell-mell forward in a swirl of absolute fanatical terror. The mutiny was quelled, nipped in its incipiency, and no man forward dared ever mention it again, save one, and all he said was : " Scott, the devil sure gave the cap- tain a real live Christmas present. " They reached port in due time and got ready to land passengers. The only one they carried came to the deck and prepared to get into the boat. As he was going over the side he took his hand out of his greatcoat pocket to shake that of the captain in a parting salute. As he did so a little card fell from out his pocket and one of the men " standing by " stealthily put his foot on it. As soon as the passenger had gone over the side he picked it up, after glancing carefully around, and read it. Immediately a strange light broke out on his countenance and he passed the card to another who made out only after great difficulty the fol- lowing : THE AMERICAN OCULAR CO. Glass Eyes a Specialty. We Fit any Eye with any Color J. C. Carter, Agent. RODNEY A. YOELL. THE REDWOOD. 119 CAPTAIN JOE s r TRIKE three, ye ' re out, yelled the umpire, and Johnny ■Johnson, the little shortstop of the Clarendon Union High School nine threw down his bat in disgust. Then up to the plate stepped heavy- set, deep-chested " Cap ' Joe " Gilford. One glance at him overcomes every possible doubt as to his ball-playing ability. See how firmly he grasps his bat and note the flash of his dark-blue eyes as he faces the pitcher. It is true his face is rather grufif, but look ! He has hit the ball! Up, up it goes, far above the left fielder ' s head and over the fence — a home run ! Clarendon Union has won the game and ad- vanced another step toward the cham- pionship of the State High School League. " Joe Bush " Gilford, the grufifest man in school, awoke next morning to find himself the most pop- ular. Gilford had been unanimously elected captain of the Clarendon team at the beginning of the season, and he highly deserved the honor. He was the skilful diplomat who had per- suaded Benny Hout, the star pitcher, and Johnny Johnson, the best short- stop in the league, to come back to school. His was the artful pleading which had induced the school board to rent the corner lot for a diamond. He was the masterful coach who had de- veloped the nine picked men into a working unit, a well-oiled machine with every cog in its correct place. Each evening after practice as he walked to work in the factory where three weary hours must be spent in toilsome labor, he would mutter from between set teeth, " For the honor of Old Clarendon I ' ll stay with it. " Joe Gilford ' s fondest dream had now almost come true, for, if Claren- don should win the next game with Rockway only one more victory would be needed to obtain the coveted championship. Hard fought was the game from start to finish. Clarendon took an early lead, but Rockway " came back " and tied the score in the eighth inn- ing. Clarendon then started a rally, or to be more explicit, Joe Gilford started a rally. The captain ' s single brought across the initial tally. After this Rockway was smothered under an avalanche of runs. At the end of the ninth inning the score read Clar- endon Union, 10; Rockway, 3. Enthusiasm ran high at Clarendon Union High, for now only one game separated Old Clarendon from the staie championship. The one topic of conversation at s:hool was baseball. Dotting me halis the deeply inter- ested students were clustered about the players in animated conversation. 120 THE REDWOOD. On every side could be heard mur- murs of " state championship, " " three- bagger, " " sacrifice hit, " " batting aver- age " and such kindred expressions. On the evening preceding the game a rousing rally w as held. The flames of the huge bonfire mounting to the sky and the stirring music of the band helped to liven up the occasion. " Cap ' Joe " Gilford was called upon for a speech a nd the rousing cheers that greeted his appearance expressed the confidence felt in him by the entire student body. At his first words a deep silence fell upon them all. His remarks were few, but to the point. No sooner had the echo of his voice died away than the whole assembly burst forth into a mighty cheer. At last the great day arrived. The minutes seemed hours to the waiting players and the frenzied partisans. As the hands of the clock crept slow- ly towards two, vast throngs began to flock to the scene of battle. On one side of the grounds were arranged the Hildane rooters and opposite them sat the supporters of Old Clarendon. The rival sections were a surging sea of color. Suddenly, as if by magic, the yell- ing and cheering in the grands ' Pand ceased. The umpire was shouting through his megaphone : " Hildane batteries. Grand and Forbes. " The Hildane men in their dark green uni- forms trotted out on the diamond. Grand took his place in the pitcher ' s box and a man in a gray uniform picked out his bat and advanced to- wards the plate. " Batter up, play ball, " called the umpire. Grand " wound up " and delivered the ball. The batter was on the alert and he slashed the ball along the first base line. It bounded directly toward the first baseman, but just as he was about to grasp " the sphere " it struck a small rock and bounced to one side, and the runner was safe on first. He stole second and advanced to third on a balk by the pitcher. Then the man at bat knocked out a long drive and the Clarendon man crossed home- plate amid a tumult of cheers. Clar- endon has drawn first blood ! But now Grand is an enigma and retires his opponents. Benny Hout is air- tight in Clarendon ' s half in the field and Clarendon ' s rooters are jubilant. To say that Hildane went wild would be putting it mildly. Everyone in the Hildane rooting section shouted him- self hoarse. Now the watchword of the game is " Fight. " Every man on the field is on edge and ready. Benny Hout makes a good hit, a two-bagger at least, but the right fielder makes a brilliant run and " pulls down " the hard hit ball. Not a player scores again until the seventh inning, when Forbes of Hil- dane slides home on an error by Walker, and puts his team in the lead. Clarendon is helpless until the ninth. During this inning Walker, as if to re- trieve his error, hits a hard line drive to deep right, scoring the runner ahead of him. The gloom in the Clar- endon camp disappears. Joy and hope THE REDWOOD. 121 reign in every heart. The next man at bat strikes out and the game must go extra innings. In the first half of the tenth Hil- dane manages somehow to squeeze one man over the home plate, but one is all. Then Clarendon comes to bat. Come, Clarendon, now is the time to show your fighting spirit. A thous- and stout hearts are behind you and a thousand lusty voices are urging you on to victory. C. U. H. S. Rah! Rah! C. U. H. S. Rah! Rah! Hoorah ! Hoorah ! Clarendon! Rah! Rah! " Rah I Rah ! " shouts all Clarendon as if one voice. Hammond, the first to the plate, is an easy victim. Anxiously the rooters turn to Johnson. Cries of encouragement fill the air. But alas for their hopes! Nervously he grasps his bat and knocks out a little " pop- fly " right into the outstretched hands of the second baseman. Well do the Clarendon supporters know the man next to bat and the thought inspires fresh confidence into their drooping spirits. Sky-y-y-rocket, Whew-w-w-w-w. Boom ! Ah! " Cap ' Joe " bursts from the ardent rooters. Joe picks up his bat slowly and calmly faces the pitcher. His nerves are of steel and he is now the coolest man in the whole throng. An omi- nous silence prevails among the Hil- dane rooters as they look at him. Well they know that he is there to save the day. The pitcher delivers a swift ball straight over the plate and Joe ' s bat meets it squarely. Crack! It goes far above the head of the cen- ter fielder. Joe has reached second and is sprinting for third. The man on the coaching line yells " Home! Home! " and Joe dashes on madly. And then — the whole grandstand gives one great groan. Joe, in sharp- ly turning third, has tripped and fall- en. The ankle, weakened by last sea- son ' s rugby battles, has turned trait- or. For one interminable second he lies there prostrate. Then he rises. The look of agony on his face betrays the pain he is suffering. Game to the core he dashes bravely for home, but the instant ' s delay has been fatal. He hurls himself at the plate only to meet the outstretched hand of the catcher. The game — and the state championship — are lost. Unkind Fate has denied Joe Gilford the realization of his fondest hope. Next day in study hall " Cap ' Joe ' s " eyes wore a sad, far-away look. He was going ofif to the lumber camps of Oregon. Grim old warrior! His most cherished dream had been shat- tered, but there could be no doubting the sincerity of the " So long, Joe, good luck, " and the firm, hearty handshake given him by his school- mates as they bade him farewell. And, now, far ofif in the solitude of the great pine forests, as the wind 122 THE REDWOOD. moans through the trees, Joe Gilford labors. Now and anon, after the toil of the day is over, his thoughts revert to the fond memories of the past, and perchance the suspicion of a tear glis- tens in his dark blue eyes as he recalls poem once com- the last lines of a mitted to memory: " For of all sad words of tongue or pen, " The saddest are these : ' It might have been. ' " J. CHARLES MURPHY, 3rd High. Little Town of Bethlehem! Cold are thy streets, more cold am I When Mary mother passes by And I will raise no pitying eye. For every day she passes near, Knocking again, noiv there, now here. And still she smiles, and drops a tear ; little town of Bethlehem! GEO. B. LYLE. THE REDWOOD. 123 PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA The object of The Redwood is to gather together what is best in the literary work of the students, to record University doings and to knit closely the hearts of the boys of the present and the past EDITORIAL STAFF EDITOR . . - BUSINESS MANAGER ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER REVIEWS _ - - ALUMNI - - - - UNIVERSITY NOTES - ATHLETICS ALUMNI CORRESPONDENTS STAFF ARTIST ASSOCIATE EDITORS THE EDITOR EXECUTIVE BOARD THE BUSINESS MANAGER ROY A. BRONSON, ' 12 Robert j. flood, ' is HAROLD R. MCKINNON, ' 14 RODNEY A. YOELL, ' 14 LAWRENCE A. FERNSWORTH, Special EDWARD O ' CONNOR, ' 16 FRANK G. BOONE, ' 14 JCHAS. D. SOUTH, Litt. D., ' 01 (ALEX. T. LEONARD, A. B., ' 10 GEORGE B. LYLE, ' 13 THE EDITOR OF REVIEWS Address all communications to THE REDWOOD, University of Santa Clara, California Terms of subscription, $1.50 a year; single copies 25 cents EDITORIAL Six years ago in this I. W. W. country there came together a band of ex- laborers, socialists, tramps, hoboes and Others, w ho formed an Arrierican branch of an organization known as the " Independent Workers of the World. " What their exact mission was no one seemed to know and even they, themselves, when asked, ap- peared supremely ignorant of what they intended to accomplish. In the short span of six years, how- ever, from an insignificant local or- ganization they have grown so strong that their numbers total over 100,000 on the Pacific slope alone and their secret organizers are at work in every important town from New York to San Diego. Today, also, their pur- 124 THE REDWOOD. pose is quite clear and it is no small wonder that many see an impending evil in the movement that does not fall short of the disastrous. They are aiming at the union of all unions, or rather the union of all the laborers of all the world into one har- monious body so that they may ef- fectively crush out the capital system which now prevails. This they in- tend to do by refusing to work until all industry is taken over by the labor- ing classes. It is the capital system they seek to overthrow, and they are ready to use any means to accomplish their end. Capital is the source of all their woes, of poverty, oppression, starvation, no wages and long hours. Therefore, it must be smashed, crushed, annihilated and industry ap- propriated by labor. " Revolution " and " discontent " are their watch words and from the rostrum of the soap-box their fire-brands denounce all that is and advocate mutiny, force and even treason. Says one mani- festo : " Listen, men. The day is once more at hand when treason is the su- preme duty of every man and mutiny a soldier ' s highest obligation. In case of dispute remain at the post and turn out work in such shape as to be unfit for sale. The more skilled the workman is the greater his knowl- edge of how to spoil work without be- ing detected. The general strike of all labor is nothing less than the social revolution at which we aim. " But the most hopeless feature of the whole maniacal movement is that they have nothing to replace when their purpose of destruction is accom- plished. One I. W. W. leader was asked if he did not fear the conse- quences of overthrowing a civilization it has taken centuries to build. He replied : " Fear? What have we to fear? It ' s the middle class that has every- thing to fear. We have nothing to lose. Let the smash come! " And this is about the gist of the entire movement. They, indeed, have nothing to lose but everything in the world to gain, and their wild Utopian dreams of a land without work, (for three hours is what they advocate), has led them to a course of destruc- tion, force and treachery. Though originally they were comprised mostly of the rifif-raflf of repudiated socialists and union men it is now a well-known fact that they are gaining a firm foot- hold in the laboring classes all over the nation. It is a movement that cannot be mistaken for a local fray. It aims at a real war between the two great classes, and since they have de- nounced arbitration and compromise we cannot reasonably believe they will hesitate at bloodshed. Dispute over The California Rugby the Rugby Union has delayed this Championship year awarding the Cooper-Keith Trophy to the team, who (in the words of that agreement) THE REDWOOD. 125 are the Champions of California. The Rugby Union seems to be in a state of puzzling perplexity over the situa- tion and procrastinates, thinking that course will extricate them from their difficulty. We think not. A cool weighing of the facts will more effect- ively minister to their end and those facts, far from being complex, may be briefly stated in a few lines. The University of Santa Clara play- ed during the season eleven games, out of which she lost not one. And it might be mentioned en passant that her goal was crossed but once during the entire season. Among the many who went down to defeat under her was the team of the Leland Stanford Junior Univer- sity. The score was 15 to 10: Stan- ford ' s ten points representing two penalty kicks and one field goal. Later the University of California played Stanford a tie game, after which San- ta Clara issued a formal challenge to California to play for the Rugby championship of the State. California formally refused by let- ter. What claim then have either of the aforementioned teams to the cham- pionship? The answer is as clear as 2 plus 2 make 4. Why, then, we ask, in all seriousness, is the Rugby Union in such a quandary? Why all this dispute and delay? Is it because they regard us as upstarts? Because prior to this year we never figured in the claim and that, therefore, we never will? Are the intellects comprising this organization so feeble that they cannot have a surprise sprung on them without becoming flustered and confused? We strenuously recom- mend that the Rugby Union view our claim in the light of cold reason in- stead of refusing to be shown the truth because they cannot believe it. 126 THE REDWOOD. Our reading table for the past months has been unusually well sup- plied with a large number of high- class exchanges, representing the best thought in current college journalism. As it is impossible to give more than a cursory glance at them through the medium of our Review column We have placed a selected number on file in the college reading room. Having filled our pipe and placed our feet com- fortably though unceremoniously on the desk ' s edge, we have ruminated on our contemporaries in the follow- ing manner: The Mercerian Containing between its neat white cover, a well selected contents " The Mercerian " for November, from Mercer, University, Georgia, early attracted notice, and needless to say we were not disappointed. On opening the book we were greeted by a poem which for delicacy of treatment and keen appreciation we believe to be un- excelled. Descriptive poems are, as a rule, pretty and dainty, but they sel- dom rank, in college publications at least, above good verse. A poem that gives the atmosphere as well as the coloring is what we mean, and " Autumn Leaves " is such a one. As one of the purposes of this column is to give The Redwood readers the ben- efit of our contemporaries, we take pleasure in reprinting it below. A story that is true to type, but not overly well handled, is " A Diverted Tragedy. " It has the chief element of a short story, an episodic plot, but the treatment is not succinct enough for the theme. The diction is good, and a bit of description here and there throughout the piece rings true. On the whole we may dismiss it by say- ing that, although good, it has not the value its plot should warrant. " The Deacon ' s Trial " is also worthy of notice, as are " The Gist of the Matter, " and " The Murderer. " " The Sceptered Season, " a poem, is good, though it partakes somewhat of the typical autumnal poem. We miss in the publication a good essay, for while it is true that stories and poems should make up the body of the book, yet a sincere, steady and carefully written essay, lends dignity THE REDWOOD. 127 and solidarity to the general makeup that is very desirable. The various departments of the book are excel- lent, and since, (though it lacks an es- say), nothing human is perfect we give the Mercerian a high place in our opin- ion. The " Ave Maria " , as " Ave Maria " usual, is not only meaty, but contains many articles that are a delight to read. The opening poem, " Mater Dei, " is tender and full of reverential and delicately worded sentiments. The essay, " An Old Time Irish Physician " , imparts a good deal of useful informa- tion in an entertaining manner. While these two qualities are supposed to constitute a good essay they are not often found combined. A story, " The Black Spine, " is well written and has sufficient local color in it to give the proper setting. The departments are excellently edited and are permeated throughout by a fervid spirit of Cath- olic faith. The magazine should find its place on the reading table of every Catholic family. The Williams In the " Williams Literary Monthly " for October Monthly we have had the good fortune to run across a modern-day story of sordid politics, told in a clear, refreshing and interesting manner. " The Man With an Idea " is the title and we enjoyed every line of it, espe- cially the natural and close-drawn character delineation. We notice, however, a lack of verse which detracts somewhat from the tout ensemble of the publication. What poems there are, however, are good, and we espe- cially commend a dialect verse, " The Garden. " It does not run to excess, and is pleasant to read, the critic not having to stop to decipher some syn- copated English word. The essay, " On College and the World, " is clear- ly written in a fine clear style. The author has something to say, and says it in a fashion that is as convincing as charming. It would be well, if some of our half-baked educational theory faddists would read the article in ques- tion. It might stop some of their use- less babble, and thus confer upon a long suflFering college public a great boon. Taking it long by large, the book is well put together, and if the edi- tors will only seek for a little more verse nothing but praise will fall to their lot on the really splendid show- ing of their paper. Harvard Monthly Our old friend and contemporary, " T h e Harvard Monthly, " presents itself before us. Always wel- come, the November number is no ex- ception to the rule, and on opening it we were met by a table of contents that is as entertaining as it is com- plete. The best thing in the book, and one that is written in a mature, 128 THE REDWOOD. keen style, is " The Black Heaven. " The title is suggestive of a story, but it is far from that, being an essay, dealing with the old metaphysical question of Satanism or devil-worship. While the subject matter could be im- proved and is not worthy of the style, yet nothing gross or unelevating will be found in it. Careful research is evident upon the reading, and the au- thor deserves a worthy meed of con- gratulations for a work well done. A poem, " The Invalid, " is well handled, and breathes an atmosphere of sympa- thy that is delicately suggestive. It is rather long, yet it does not deterio- rate towards the end. The meter is good and suits the theme. The article, it can hardly be termed an essay, " The New England Grand- mother " , is marked by a kindly warmth and grateful respect. For those who like facts regarding our early stock on the eastern coast, this article will prove most interesting. " Griggs " is a well written story, but it could have been worked up a little more suddenly at the climax, and this would have added materially to the structure. " Idyll " is also well handled, but at places it is strained. The diction is good and so is the theme, yet a more skillful reading before publication, would have undoubtedly improved it. We also suggest to the editors more verse. A book may be good, but never really complete without it. The Fleur De Lis " The Fleur De Lis " from St. Louis Univer- sity has always been known for its high standard. The No- vember issue sustains this reputation, not owing to any particular article, but more to an all-round judiciously selected contents that makes the pa- per seem what it is, mature, balanced and interesting. The essay, " The Catholic Church and Labor " , is studiously constructed, and shows a deep knowledge on the au- thor ' s part of our great industrial ques- tions. Such sane papers as these do a great deal of good and are therefore to be encouraged. " May the Best Man Win, " a story, is good and suitably told, as is " Uncle Silas Co. " The latter seems a bit amateurish in parts, but on the whole is worthy of comimendation. The verse of the book is equal to the other branches of literature. " A Vision of Erin " is prettily written and contains some lines of good poetic de- scription. " Autumn, " another poem, is also well done, as are the various de- partments of the book. And here we must close. We should like to go on and enumerate more of our exchanges, but space forbids. Un- der the circumstances all we could do is to acknowledge their reception, and promise in the next number to give them the attention that they justly de- serve. THE REDWOOD. 129 We acknowledge receipt of the fol- lowing : The Loyola University Mag- azine, The Sage Brush, of Univ. of Ne- vada ; The Whitworthian, The Univ. of North Carolina Magazine, The Holy Cross Purple, The Fordham Monthly, which was very fine, The Williams and Mary Literary Magazine, The Pacific Star, The Spectrum, Haverfordian, The Carolinian, The Chaparral, The Morning Star, The Exponent, The Col- legian, The Xaverian, The Dial, Mount Angel Magazine, The Laurel, The Ephebeum, The Academia , The Campion, Gonzaga, and Georgetown Journal. AUTUMN SCENES Now gentle winds sigh softly o ' er the fields. And dreamy sunlight languid glory yields The yellow corn its golden ears hangs low. The rosy-tinted forest dreams of snow. Look, how the crows, on treetops, cal- ling loud. With piping blackbirds form a noisy crowd. While, far above, in dim and distant sky. Faint lines of honking geese move southward by. And far below ' mong sparsely-shaded hills, ' Neath morning mist, sparkle the rip- pling rills. Where falling nuts the happy children greet. And grapevines stoop with purple clusters sweet. Still farther on, in glen and open glade. The asters and the golden-rod now fade ; But from the lingering, blue-eyed gen- tians fair, A fragrance loads the sweet autumnal air. Julian J. Sizemore, in the Mercerian. BOOK REVIEWS Faustula John Ayscough is an author of high standing and it is with pleasure that we read any new production from his pen. " Faustula " is the name of his new book, and it is written with all the charm of his Mezzogiorno and Hurd- cott. It is the tale of a little Roman maid, of such simplicity and charm that the reader ' s heart is won for her at the very outstart. Her pathetic story is well worth reading, and since " Quo Vadis " we know of no book that approaches it for delineation of the life of the early Christian Roman era. The descriptions are strong, vivid and well-drawn. The characters are natural and where necessary, striking. On the whole it is an interesting book, and one well worth attention. It is daintily bound in gold and green. Published by Benziger Bros. New York. Price, net, $L35. 130 THE REDWOOD. Sugar Camp and After teresting style about real boys, and Father Spalding, that famous juve- throughout the book imparts a good nile author, has published his new deal of useful information. book, " The Sugar Camp and After. " The book is published by Benziger It is written in his usual clear and in- Bros., New York. Price, net, 85 cts. THE REDWOOD. 131 f Imii rBttg ' Nutm The campus mail-man Who is He? is indeed, a popular creation. He is no uni- formed agent of " Uncle Sam ' s " postal retinue, but just an ordinary " cram- mer " like any one of us, empowered with the rare prerogative of shouting- out colloquial soubriquets and flinging with some ado scented epistles of variegated colors, down from the ven- erable band-stand to respondent voices and eager oustretched hands below. The campus mail-man is the final clearing-house, as it were, and his ex- changes are joys and glooms : — what may not a letter contain? Notwith- standing, he is a popular man, this precusor of joy or gloom, and he holds his audience as no orator can. And who is this grave personage, vested with such a weighty office? Don ' t you know? Why it ' s Michael Angelo " Bess " ! He is the right man in the right place, is our campus mail- man. Go wheresoever you will, it is doubtful if you will find his equal. Then, stand by for a skyrocket.. All set? Let ' er go: " S-s-s-k-k-y-y-r-o- c-k-e-t, t-h-z-z-z-z-z ; b-o-o-m ! a-a-h ! — Michael Angelo ' Bess ' " ! This new method of distributing the mail is very good, and its advantages over the old method are obvious, since the chief aim is to expedite the distribution and thereby save much of the unnecessary waste of time una- voidably incurred in the old method, when everyone receiving mail had to be sought out while at table. Still, there is room for more expedi- tion even in the new method. Now, when ' Bess ' shouts out some ab- sentee ' s name, he generally keeps that absentee ' s letter for a second reading, and very often for a third and a fourth reading; all of which is a useless loss of time and a source of needless work for our energetic campus mail-man. We would suggest a remedy which is entirely feasible. It is this: That when an absentee ' s name is called he should request anybody present to de- liver the letter. There are any num- ber of fellows who will gladly render one another thi s slight accommoda- tion. It makes for the general good spirit too. This is not new by any means, it is a scheme followed in many places where conditions are similar. 132 THE REDWOOD. Football Adieu " The team ! the team ! the team ! ' wow ' ! " — yes and a thousand times more will these words drum in our ears when the future shall bring us back in heart and mind to the Rug- by machine of nineteen hundred and twelve, and the scenes of Rugby bat- tle shall pass again before the mind ' s eye with all their reality, tense zest and rousing yells ! With the game on November 23rd, against the University of Nevada, our football season came to a victorious close. Every man who donned a foot- ball suit, whether making the " Squad " or not, in any of the teams, deserved the hearty congratulations of the stu- dent body, and this department of " The Redwood " will do its share of the shouting, now that we must bid adieu, for another year, to football. All hands please: " The teams! — bray! — bray- bray — the teams ! " Other staunch boosters and sup- porters, there are who should be re- membered, for their loyal share in mak- ing the season just closed the most successful in the annals of the Uni- versity. Here ' s cordial thanks and wishes for them too. May we meet them again in baseball. , On November 15th, the Students commodious library in Library g j j jj was thrown open to the use of the student members. The pick of the very best in English literature is available there, from light romance reading to the fiery oratory of Webster and O ' Connell. All ought to join and en- joy the treat, especially as the rains are soon due. Messrs. Joseph Ramon Aurrecochea, Joseph Raymond Par- ker, and William Stewart Cannon have been appointed censors. Football The football show and Show and rally held the night of " y November 22nd, were a fit prelude to the big event they pre- ceded, — the game against Nevada. We regret to remark that the spirit of the rally was not up to its usual pitch, though what caused this it is not easy to say. Perhaps the unusualness of the entertainment which followed was uppermost in most minds ; for such in- deed it proved to be. Or, perhaps, it was in great part due to that irresisti- ble wildness which gets hold of one when a German band, a biting night, and an old-fashioned bon- fire are the main attractions. But if there was no " pep " outside the Auditorium there was cer- tainly plenty of it displayed inside, when Coach Higgins announced the men who were to play in the game of the year. After each assignment by the coach the house fairly shook to its foundations, with perfect unison of vo- cal salvos. And the music that fin- ished the program can be best spoken of in the idiom of the singers them- selves, — " perfectly splendorious. " THE REDWOOD. 133 On the morning of No- A Visit vember 20th, Mr. Jos- eph Scott, the promi- nent Los Angeles attorney, paid Santa Clara an impromptu visit. Mr. Scott is also president of the Board of Ed- ucation and a member of the Chamber of Commerce of that growing city. As he is an alumnus of the old Mission University there was considerable in- terest shown .n his visit by the stu- dents and faculty. His address to the students on that day is considered one of the most cheerfully captivating and at the same time forceful extempore speeches ever delivered from the stage of the Auditorium — and that stage has supported many a silver-tongued orator, and many a masterful man. We would like to comment on the ad- dress itself, but space will not allow. Suffice it to say that " Joe " Scott has spoken and left with us certain indel- ible impressions of immense conse- quence. Thanks for the holiday, Mr. Scott ! 134 THE REDWOOD. Hon. Reginald Del Valle, ' 73, ' 89 B. S., 73, of Los Angeles, and Philip B. Lynch, Com- mercial, ' 89, of Vallejo, are two of California ' s thirteen presidential elec- tors who will cast their votes for Woodrow Wilson, our next President, when the electoral college meets. Both were named electors on the Democrat- ic ticket at the recent national elec- tions. Mr. Del Valle is mentioned as a very likely candidate for the posi- tion of United States minister to Mex- ico. The Rev. Joseph McQuaide, ' 88 A. B., ' 88, pastor of Sacred Heart Church, San Fran- cisco, visited Santa Clara recently in company with the Hon. Joseph Scott, Ph. D., of Los Angeles, an honorary alumnus of Santa Clara. A spirit of loyalty to his Alma Mater that does not wane with the years always makes Father McQuaide trace his steps to Santa Clara whenever in this vicin- ity. Father McQuaide is still the ar- dent and commanding worker in all that is for good in the civil life of the commonwealth that he came to be known as soon after taking up his work in the vineyard of the Lord. His name is known from one end of the State to the other, and beyond her confines. ' 90 Eugene O. McLaughlin, an old student of the early 90 ' s, and the son of E. McLaugh- lin, of San Jose, is president of the Union Hardware Company, of Los An- geles. Mr. McLaughlin was a fellow student of our Rev. Father President, and is the father of Edward McLaugh- lin, ' 06. John J. O ' Toole, B. S. ' 90, ' 90 is the newly installed Grand Knight of the Knights of Columbus, San Francisco Council. Mr. O ' Toole is a prominent attorney in San Francisco. THE REDWOOD. 135 Archibald Campbell, an at- ' 91 torney of San Luis Obispo, was among old Santa Clara students to win honors at the recent elections. He will represent his dis- trict at the next meeting of the Cali- fornia Assembly, as a senator. Mr. Campbell graduated from the commer- cial department in ' 91. ' 05 Charles Byrnes of San Ra- fael was elected to the state assembly at the general elections last month. Mr. Byrnes won athletic honors for himself and his fel- low students in 1905 as a member of the ' varsity baseball team. He is now practicing law in San Rafael. Gerald P. Beaumont, Ex ' 05, ' 05 is doing brilliant work as a writer on the Oakland Tribune in which, beside his regular journalistic contributions, excellent verse frequently appears under his name. After leaving college Mr. Beaumont was for a time city editor of the San Jose Mercury. More re- cently he was city editor of the Sacra- mento Union. At Santa Clara Mr. Beaumont was prominent in dramatic and literary work. He played import- ant roles in Light Eternal and in the Passion Play, and when, in 1909, the Constantine of Mr. South was pro- duced, he assisted in training the par- ticipants, forsaking his journalistic la- bors to do this service for his Alma Mater. He was also on the staff of The Redwood, and his work takes place among the best this magazine has printed. Albert M. Trescony, Ex. ' 07, ' 07 was up from the Trescony Ranch at San Lucas, the la- ter part of November, and called to see old friends on the campus. We understand that James ' 09 R. Daly, A. B. ' 09, is now registered in the law de- partment at Georgetown. For two years after leaving his Alma Mater, Mr. Daly was a teacher at Seattle Col- lege, Seattle, Wash. Mr. Daly was president of the Dramatic Society the year " Constantine " was produced. Besides assuming heavy managerial burdens, Mr. Daly played important roles in a number of the dramas at Santa Clara. Earl Leslie R. Askam holds ' 09 a responsible clerical posi- tion with the Southern Pacific Company, in connection with the shops at Sparks. Nevada. Mr. As- kam left Santa Clara in 1910, after a brilliant career in the class-room, and as a sprinter and a member of the bas- ket-ball squad ; Mr. Askam was a big point-getter for the college. Possessed of an excellent tenor voice, he enter- tained often at student functions in the theater. 136 THE REDWOOD. George J. Mayerle, Ex ' 09, ' 09 witnessed the second War- atah match at Santa Clara last month. Mr. Mayerle is now as- sociated with his father in the well known optical establishment that bears the Mayerle name, in San Francisco. While at college Mr. Mayerle was the most popular entertainer in the yard. He possessed high abilities as a com- edian, and his services were always in demand for student entertainments, which were quite frequent. Being a good singer, a good dancer and a good actor his offerings were wont to evoke rounds of applause and laughter. Mr. Meyerle was also gifted with excel- lent dramatic powers, and won suc- cess in heavy tragic parts in some of Santa Clara ' s notable theatrical pro- ductions. Among the roles he assumed were that of the Jester in " The Fool ' s Bauble, " Sestertius, the renegade Christian, in " Constantine, " and the mesmerist in " The Bells " . Mr. May- erle is still as popular a figure as ever on the college campus, when he vis- its it. ' 10 Seth T. Heney, Ex ' 10, vis- ited Santa Clara recently. For two years Mr. Heney was business manager of the Red- wood. He is now associated with his brother in Heney ' s Chateau Ricardo Cel lars_, an extensive wine establish- ment with headquarters at Cupertino, and is manager of the company. Matt Dromiack, of Reno, ' 11 Nevada, a popular student of two years ago, now as- sociated with the Ninon Bank at Reno, visited the University the latter part of last month. Mr. Dromiack is one of the most loyal of the old boys, and a visit to California without a trip to Santa Clara is something he cannot imagine. It will doubtless interest ' 12 students of more recent years, and of today, to hear a word about the class that most re- cently received their sheepskins from Santa Clara, the class of ' 12. With one exception we have been able to ob- tain information regarding every mem- ber of the several classes of graduates. We have heard no word of Fred O. Hoedt. We know he has not forgot- ten us, and we trust that some old stu- dent whose eyes may fall on this, will be able to put us in touch with each other. P. R. Leak, A. B., is assistant man- ager of the Woodland Democrat, at Woodland, Cal. He is associated with his father and with his brother, Ed- ward Leak, A. B., in the management of the paper. Chris Degnan, A. B., has a position in the Johnson Heney Law office in San Francisco, in connection with a law course at Hastings Law School. D. R. Holm, A. B., is associated as city sales manager with his father in THE REDWOOD. 137 the business of the Holm Millinery Co. He is also attending the morning sessions of the Hastings Law School. Herbert L. Ganahl, A. B., last year ' s Redwood manager, is studying law in the office of John W. Maltman, in the Nevada Bank Building, San Francisco. William P. Veuve, A. B., occupies a responsible position with the Pacific States Telephone and Telegraph Co., in San Jose, and is an occasional visit- or on the college campus. M. P. Detels, A. B., is a student in the Stanford University law depart- ment. John F. Curry, A. B., is in the office of the Southern Pacific Engineering Department, at Auburn, Cal. Harry Wildy, B. S., is in the engin- eering department of the new aque- duct under construction from Owens Lake in the San Joaquin Mountains to afford a new water supply for Los An- geles. Louis Canepa, B. S., is also in Los Angeles. He is attending the law de- partment at the University ot South- ern California there. Joseph J. Hartman, B. S., is attend- ing the medical department of the Uni- versity of California. Dominic DeFiore, B. S., is manag- ing a prune orchard near San Jose. Hardin Norman Barry, A. M., is back in Reno, in his father ' s law office, after a season in Eastern Canada in the ranks of professional base ball. Mr. Barry expects to take the law ex- amination this spring, for the Nevada bar, and after that he will go east to fill out his term with the Philadelphia North Americans. Six of the graduates still remain with us, and are registered in the law department of the University. They are Roy Bronson, A. B., who also teaches mathematics, Edward White, B. S., graduate manager of our foot- ball squad, Chauncey Tramutola, B. S., president of the student body, Rob- ert M. Hogan, B. S., and Marco S. Zarick, B. S. L. A. FERNSWORTH 138 THE REDWOOD. The following is a list of the games played by the Santa Clara Varsity: — St. Ignatius - U. S. C. 25 Waratahs 20 U. S. C. 8 California Freshmen U. S. C. 11 Stanford Freshmen U. S. C. 3 Stanford Second 3 U. S. C. 5 Stanford Varsity 10 U. S. C. 15 California Second 0---U. S. C. Second Southern California 3 U. S. C. 19 Waratahs 19 U. S. C. 8 Barbarians - U. S. C. 8 Nevada 3 U. S. C. 19 Santa Clara ' s rugby season was brought to a close by the final whistle of the Nevada — Santa Clara game. After three months of hard playing and faithful training, each and every member of the team has brought hon- or to himself and his University. A record has been made seldom equalled by any team, and never be- fore equalled by a Santa Clara team. With a total of 179 points against 19 the team ' s wonderful scoring ability has been demonstrated — to say noth- ing of its defensive playing, as the 19 points scored against it will show. Those present at the Santa Clara — Ne- vada game saw for the first time this season, an American team cross the Santa Clara goal line. Too great credit cannot be awarded Coach Higgins, who has given the skill and knowledge necessary for good rugby players, and at the same time instilled into them a fighting spir- it which was to a great extent the key- note of their success. Every student registered in the Uni- versity has nothing but praise and congratulations for Coach Higgins and his men, and with an abundance of material to work on in picking next year ' s team, the prospects point to a repetition of the fine work accom- plished this year. S. C. U. 8— WARATAHS 20 On Sunday, November the 10th, Santa Clara met the Waratahs for the second time this season. THE REDWOOD. 139 Although the score was practically the same as that of the former game, both teams displayed more rugby abil- ity than was in evidence at their form- er meeting. The game was hard fought ev ry inch of the way, with the same grim determination that has marked the work of the Santa Clara team all sea- son. In the earlier stages of the game Santa Clara was much more danger- ous than in the later periods. More than once they carried the ball al- most the full length of the field, and scoring was only prevented by poor passing near the Australian goal line. After the Australians had scored once in the first half and Captain Prentice had kicked a difficult goal, Santa Clara exerted every effort to score, but the Waratahs withstood their attacks in fine fashion. A try finally came, however, when Stewart and Ramage laid claim to the ball and brought it very near the Austral- ian goal line. The Waratahs followed up quickly, and after stopping a drib- bling rush, Ramage kicked the ball over the line, where it was fallen upon, first by Flood and next by Voight, the latter tapping it for SantaClara. Ybarrondo failed to kick the goal. This concluded the scoring done by both teams in this half. In the second half the Waratahs returned much the stronger, although Santa Clara put up a stubborn fight. The team work of the visitors was in evidence during this half, and their passing was ex- tremely brilliant. Santa Clara had numerous oppor- tunities to score in the last half, but errors at critical periods, permitted the Waratahs to hold the home play- ers from their goal line. Santa Clara ' s only score during the second half came when Ramage caught the ball behind the Australian goal line, after an Australian player had poorly executed a cross-kick. Ramage then kicked the goal. Some of the boys who showed themselves as dependable as ever were Curry, at fullback. Flood and Best on the wings, and Voight and Momson as breakaways. S. C. U. 8— BARBARIANS The annual Santa Clara — Barbarian game was played November 17th on Santa Clara field. The Santa Clarans succeeded in holding the San Fran- cisco team scoreless, while they were successful in gathering a total of eight points. The game continued rntil darkness almost prevented play. This was re- sponsible to a great extent for the offside plays during the last ten min- utes of the game. Although the game was closely con- tested the Barbs were unable to with- stand the onslaughts of the red and white, who brought the ball time and again to their opponents ' goal line. Santa Clara ' s first score came when Flood heeled the ball in front of the 140 THE REDWOOD. Barbarian goal-posts. On the free kick Ybarrondo was successful in sending the ball between the two posts for three points. These were the only- points scored in this half. In the second half the visitors put up a wonderful defensive game, and Santa Clara was able to cross their line but once, when Voight secured the ball on the 5-yard line and plunged over the line for a try. For Santa Clara Voight and Mom- son showed up well in the scrum, — Momson playing a wonderful game af- ter a hard work-out the day before, when he lined up as a member of the AU-American team, against the crack Waratahs. The Barbarians ' bulwark of defense was Captain Faulkner, Meyer, and Brown, while the forwards at all times showed up to advantage. U. S. C. 19— NEVADA 3 Santa Clara had little trouble in tak- ing the big game from Nevada on No- vember 23rd. Santa Clara expected to win but were very much disappointed when the blue and white crossed their goal line. It was the first time an op- posing team had succeeded in scoring a try on the Santa Clara team this season. The try was well earned ; after a fine dribbling rush the ball was passed to Curtin who had a clear field and easily carried the ball across the line. Santa Clara outplayed the Nevadans from the start, but the Nevadans played a defensive game most of the time, and in this way kept the Santa Clarans from scoring more often. Santa Clara started the game with a rush, and a free kick on the 30-yard line gave them a chance to score, but Ramage made a poor kick and the ball was carried into Santa Clara ter- ritory. The prettiest play of the day came when Harkins secured the ball from the throw-in and passed out to Mom- son. He in turn transferred to Best, who after some difficulty made a long pass to Ramage who followed close behind, and the latter ran across the field and scored. Ybarrondo failed to convert. Santa Clara then began an attacking game, but the Nevada men put up an excellent defense, their tackling being hard and sure. McPhail kicked the ball into Santa Clara territory, but Ho- gan came back with a 35-yard run and passed to Voight who dropped the ball after crossing the line. When the game was resumed Flood caught the ball off Delahide ' s foot and ran fifteen yards to a try. Ramage kicked the goal. At half-time the score was 11 to in favor of Santa Clara. The Nevada players started out strong at the beginning of the second half, Curtin opening it with a run of 35 yards, then passed to Fake, who carried the ball to the Santa Clara five- yard line. Curry kicked the ball from the danger point. Santa Clara ' s next try came as the result of a fine passing rush. Best THE REDWOOD. 141 started it with a clean pick-up on the 40-yard line. He passed to Momson, who passed to Ramage, the latter pas- sing to Flood, and the ball finally go- ing out to Voight, who scored. Ram- age failed to convert. Santa Clara had the best of the play during the remainder of the game. The Nevada defense was excellent, but Santa Clara showed up too strong for her lighter opponents. The final try came after a dribbling rush from the 25-yard line when Quill fell on the ball behind the Nevada goal posts. Ybarrondo kicked an easy goal. The Santa Clara team lined up as follows : Quill, Fitzpatrick, Noonan, Oilman, Melchior, Voight, Hogan and Kieley, forwards ; substitutes, Sargeant, Fitzpatrick. The back field consisted of Harkins, Ybarrando, Ramage, Momson, Best, Flood and Curry; substitutes, Stewart and Har- dy. We can hardly close without saying a word of goodbye to the team and the game. There was certainly a great deal of enthusiasm and jollity in the serpentine on Saint Ignatius field and in the streets of the town when we got home. But more than one of us confessed afterwards to just a bit of regret that it was all over. We shall have other teams again, who knows we may have better teams waiting in some future for their chance to do bat- tle for dear old Santa, but this team and this year are gone, gone. We loved you while you were with us, we cannot forget you easily. Goodbye. THE REDWOOD. : : K O V E R •SHOES. To tell all that we know of [the fitting qualities, the grace and " snap " of the new styles, the leathers and workmanship that goes into " Walk- Overs ' ' requires time. We invite you to call and see for yourself- QUINN BRODER WALK-OVER BOOT SHOP 41 SOUTH FIRST STREET THE PIANOS WE SELL Whether for $250 or $2000 Are Absolutely Dependable We carry all kinds oi pianos when measured by price — from S2S0 to S2000, but we sell only one kind of quality— DEPENDABLE QUALITY. We have had customers who needed only one piano in their life time, but the quality, the dependability has been such that the second and third generations of that family have also come to us for their pianos. " Some day you will want a STEINWAY Piano— the STANDARD of the world. We will sell you a less expensive piano now and agree ro take it back any time within three years, allowing you the full purchase price towards a new Steinway. Moderate terms on any Piano even the Steinway. Sherman, Pay Co. steinway and other Pianos Apollo and Cecelian Player Pianos VICTOR TALKING MACHINES 190-192 South First Street, San Jose : » THE REDWOOD. LOW ROUND TRIP RATE — — TO = — NEW ORLEANS $70.00 P " -- Rj ?d Trip $70.00 IF YOU RETURN VIA CHICAGO $72.50 FOR ROUND TRIP Tickets sold January 9, 10 and 11, 1913 Return Limit March 11, 1913 Account Western Fruit Jobbers Association Take this trip in connection with SPECIAL EXCURSION TO PANAldX CUBATjAMAICA From New Orleans Jan. 23 and Feb. 10, 1913 Round trip from New Orleans 125.00 and up Make Reservations early, A. A. HAPGOOD E. SHILLINGSBURG City Ticket Agent Dist. Passenger Agent 40 — East Santa Clara Street — 40 Southern Pacific THE REDWOOD. WM. HUNT, SR. WM. HUNT, JR. HUNT ' S BONDED WM. HUNT, 3rd and Townsend Streets San FranclSCO, Cal. HOTEL MONTGOMERY F. J. McHENRY, Manager Absolutely Fireproof European Plans Rates $1 and upwards THE ARCADE THE HOME OF ROUGH NECK SWEATERS CANELO BROS. STACKHOUSE CO. 83-91 South First St., San Jose Phone S. J. 11 THE REDWOOD. We have hit " ' season better than ever better than anybody else, in creating special smart styles for young men. We ' re eager to have you see the new things, some very beautiful fabrics in English models ready. Overeats 20 and up; Suits $20 and up. Santa Clara and Market S prtttgB, Sur. San Jose, Cal. " GEORGE ' S SHAVE SHOP BEST SHAVE IN TOW N SANTA CLARA, CAL. Wm. J. McKagney, Secretary R. F. McMahon, President McMahon-McKagney Co., Inc. 52 West Santa Clara St. San Jose, Cal. THE STOGIE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY Carpets, Draperies, Furniture, Linoleums and Window Shades Telephone, San Jose 4192 Upholstering v. SALBERG 2 c per cue E. GADDI Umpire Pool Room Santa Clara, Cal. Absolutely Pure Virgin Oil Z i iVilbblOIl WllVc J i for Medicinal or Table Use MADDEN ' S PHARMACY, Agents FRANKLIN STREET SANTA CLARA, CAL. Santa Clara Imperial Dry Cleaning Dye Works C. COLES and I. OLARTE. Proprietors Naptha Cleaning and Steaming of Ladies ' and Gents ' Garments Pressing and Repairing 1021 Franklin Street Telephone Santa Clara 131J Santa Clara, Cal. I. RUTH Dealer in Groceries and Delicacies Hams, Bacon, Sausages, Lard, Butter, Eggs, Etc. 1035-1037 Franklin Street Cigars and Tobacco — THE REDWOOD. Whole sale a nd Retail Satisfaction Guaranteed WE HANDLE ALL KINDS OF ICE CREAM TELEPHONE, S. C. 36 R 1053 FRANKLIN ST., SANTA CLARA TRUNKS AND SUIT CASES FOR VACATION WALLETS, FOBS, TOILET SETS, ART LEATHER. UMBRELLAS, ETC., ETC. FRED M. STERN The " leather Man 77 NORTH FIRST ST., SAN JOSE, CAL. CHRISTMAS PRESENTS I M Leather Goods and Accessories Everything for the Comfort and Convenience of the Traveler Half a century of knowing how makes Crocker Quality famous now 565 MARKET ST. H. S. CROCKER CO. SAN FRANCISCO Z THE REDWOOD. P Vl n 1 " O Q n ake appropriate F 1 lU LU O Christmas Remembrances Special Rates to Students BushnelTs 41 North First Street San Jose, Cal. SAN JOSE BAKING CO. L. SCHWARTING, Manager The Cleanest and Most Sanitary Bakery in Santa Clara Valley We supply the most prominent Hotels Give Us a Trial Our Bread, Pies and Cakes are the Best Phone San Jose 609 433-435 Vine Street San Jose, Cal. Phone Temporary 140 A. PALADINI WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FISH DEALER Fresh, Salt, Smoked, Pickled, and Dried Fish 205 MERCHANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO THE REDWOOD. Athletic Goods for Christmas Also a complete line of CUTLERY, SILVERWARE PURSES TOOLS, ALUMINUM WARE Boschken Hardware Co. hMrlSi olo i Si s E A. G. COL CO. WHOLESALE Commission Merchants TELEPHONE, MAIN 30Q 84-90 N. Market St. San Jose, Cal. Shorty ' s Place MEET ME AT For FINE TAFFIES AND CANDIES True Fruit Syrups Served from our Twentieth Sanitary Soda Fountain ALSO ELECTRIC MILK SHAKES 68 N. First Street, San Jose, CaL VICTORY CANDY SHOP For classy College Hair Cut, go to the Antiseptic Barber Shop SEA SALT BATHS Basement Garden City Bank Building H. E. WILCOX D. M. BURNETT ATTORNEYS AT LAW ROOMS 19 AND 20, SAFE DEPOSIT BUILDING SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA Jh THE REDWOOD. COMPLETE FALL LINES Suits, Overcoats, Hats and Furnishings Now Ready Winter is at your door— How about New Fall Clothes? Do not Delay — Buy now while our stocks are fresh and complete — Cold weather will likely come on, no doubt without warning. Never in our entire store history, have we been able to afford you such a splendid array of choice fall wearables as is pre- sented now. The fabrics, and colorings, styles and models are beautiful in their seasonable harmony. All our makes and fits absolutely guaranteed. THAD W. HOBSON CO. 16 to 22 West Santa Clara Street :: San Jose Trade with Us for Good Service and Good Prices Special Prices Given in Quantity Purchases Try Us and Be Convinced VARGAS BROS. COMPANY Phone Santa Clara 120 SANTA CLARA X V ' iV For Fancy Christmas Boxes and bandies that are made by people Baskets, Christmas Goods , . . • ' ' » ' of all kinds « " « h« . THE REDWOOD. +1 " Young Men ' s Furnishings Angelus Phone, San Jose 3802 Annex Phone. San Jose 4688 THE Angelus and Annex G. T. NINNIS E. PENNINGTON, Proprietors European plan . Newly furnished rooms, with hot and cold water; steam heat throughout. Suites with private bath. Angelus, 67 N. First St. Annex, 52 W. St. John St San Jose, California All the Latest Styles in Neckwear, Hosiery and Gloves Young Men ' s Suits and Hats O ' Brien ' s Santa Clara The Santa Clara Coffee Club Invites you to its rooms to read, rest, and enjoy a cup of excellent coffee Open from 6 a. m. to 10:30 p. m. The Mission Bank of Santa Clara (COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS) Solicits Your Patronage Telephones Office: Franklin 3501 Residence: Franklin 6029 Dr. Francis J. Colligan DENTIST Hours: 9 to S 161S Polk Street Evenings: 7 to 8 Cor. Sacramento Sundays by appointment San Francisco When In San Jose, Visit CHARGINS ' Mestaurant, Grill and Oyster Souse 28-30 Fountain Street Bet. First and Second San Jose Oberdeener ' s Pharmacy Sallows Rorke Ring us for a hurry-up Delivery :: :: :: Phone S. C. 13R Prescription Druggists Kodaks and Supplies Post Cards Franklin Street Santa Clara, Cal. +1 , , . ►H THE REDWOOD. Dr. Wong Him Residence 1268 O ' Farrell Street Between Gough and Octavia Phones : West 6870 Homes 3458 Sail Francisco, Cal, Rebuilt Typewriters WE SAVE YOU FROM 50 TO 75 PER CENT ON ANY MAKE OF TYPEWRITER MACHINES RENTED AND SOLD ON EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS Send for our Illustrated Price List RETAIL DEPARTMENT The Wholesale Typewriter Company 37 Montgomery Street San Francisco, Cal. THE REDWOOD. i Z Colgate ' s Shaving Soap, 5c Williams ' Shaving Soap, 2 for 15c All others in proportion UNIVERSITY DRUG CO. Cor. Santa Clara and S. Second St. San Jose Telephone. San Jose 3496 T. F. SOURISSEAU MANUFACTURING JEWELER 143 SOUTH FIRST STREET SAN JOSE, CAL. PINS CUFF LINKS At the CO-OP STORE WATCH FOBS Telephone, Oakland 2777 Hagen ' s MEN ' S TAILORING FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC WOOLENS 521 12th Street OAKLAND, CAL. Trinkler-Dohrmann Co. 163-169 South First Street, San Jose Crockery, Glassware, Art Goods, Lamps Silverware, Cutlery, Kitchen Utensils, Stoves •K THE REDWOOD. Appropriate Christmas Presents Can be bought on the Campus SUGGESTIONS: Fountain Pens Suit Cases S. C. Pillows Sweater Vests Bath Robes Tennis Rackets Pipes Ties Toilet Articles S. C. Jewelry Hosiery Stationery S. C. Pins Arrow Collars Delicacies, all kinds Pennants Cluett ' s Shirts SHOW SOME SPIRIT Get behind us and boost your own interests CO-OP STORE •i--— — - Ttie RCDWOOD February, 1913 J. THE REDWOOD. Z : University of Santa Clara SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA The University embraces the following departments: A. THE COLLEGE OF PHILOSOPHY AND LETTERS. A four ' years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. B. THE COLLEGE OF GENERAL SCIENCE. A four years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. C. THE INSTITUTE OF LAW. A standard three years ' course of Law, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and pre-supposing for entrance the completion of two years of study beyond the High School. D. THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. (a) Civil Engineering — A four years ' course, lead- ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. (b) Mechanical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Me- chanical Engineering. (c) Electrical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elec- trical Engineering. E. THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE. A four years ' course, leading to the degree of Bach- elor of Science in Architecture. F. THE PRE-MEDICAL COURSE. A two years ' course of studies in Chemistry, Bac- teriology, Biology and Anatomy, which is recom- mended to students contemplating entrance into medical schools. Only students who have com- pleted two years of study beyond the High School are eligible for this course. JAMES P. MORRISSEY, S. J., President » THE REDWOOD. : $50.00 Reward! TO ANY Santa Clara College Student Whose appearance can ' t be improved and who can ' t obtain an absolutely perfect fit in one of my famous ' L SYSTEM " Clothes for College Fellows BILLY HOBSON BILLY HOBSON ' S CORNER 24 South First Street - - SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA A hit: THE McDonald collett MADE-TO-ORDER CLOTHES " College Cut " full English and Semi-English Our Specialty POPULAR PRICES Corduroy Trousers to order, $6.50 SUITS TO ORDER $25.00 McDonald Collett 741 Market Street 2184-86 Mission Street Largest Tailors in San Francisco of Good Made-to-Order Clothes : THE REDWOOD. FOSS HICKS CO. No. 35 West Santa Clara Street SAN JOSE Real Estate, Loans Investments A Select and Up-to-date List of Just Such Properties as the Home Seeker and Investor Wants INSURANCE Fire, Life and Accident in the Best Companies L. F. SWIFT, President LEROY HOUGH, Vice-President E. B. SHUGERT, Treasurer DIRECTORS— L. F. Swift, Leroy Hough, Henry J. Crocker, W. D. Dennett, Jesse W. 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SCHLOSS-BALTIMORE CLOTHES are displayed by us in a wide variety of colors, patterns and models, and each garment has been so faultlessly drafted and tailored, that a wise selection can be quickly made, and we are glad to held you. THAD. W. HOBSON CO. 16 to 22 W. Santa Clara SAN JOSE, CAL. - A A 7E beg to announce our new season ' s line with most resplendent textile colorings and a complete assortment of exclusive and select designs YOUR COLLEGE TAILOR 67-69 South Second St. San Jose, California THE REDWOOD. — P. Montmayeur E. LamoUe J. Origlla LamoUe Grill -- 36-38 North First Street, San Jose. Cal. Phone Main 403 MEALS AT ALL HOURS IF YOU ONLY KNEW WHAT- Mayerle ' s German Eyewater DOES TO YOUR EYES YOU WOULDN ' T BE WITHOUT IT A SINGLE DAY At D eguu so-j -j esc by George Mayerle, German Expert Optician Market Street, San Francisco Jacob Eberhard, Pres. and Manager John J. Eberhard, Vice-Pres. and Ass ' t Manager EBERHARD TANNING CO. Tanners, Cun iers and Wool Pullers Harness-Latlgo and Lace Leather Sole and Upper Leather, Calf, Kip and Sheepskins Eberhard ' s Skirting Leather and Bark Woolskin Santa Clara - California Founded 18S1 Incorporated 18S8 Accredited by State University, 1900 College Notre Dame SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA SIXTIETH YEAR COURSES COLLEGIATE PREPARATORY COMMERCIAL Intermediate and Pr imary Classes for Younger Children Notre Dame Conservatory of Music Awards Diplomas Founded 1899 APPLY FOR TERMS TO SISTER jSUPERIOR CONTENTS FAME— (Poem) - - - - chas. D. South 143 THE UNIVERSE— IDEAL OK " ; REAL - Harold R. McKinnon 144 THOUGHT OF THE UNTHOUGHT— (a Sonnet) Harry B. Pierce ISO GENTS OF THE ROAD - - - Wm. S. Cannafli 151 THE PATRIOT- (a Sonnet) - - - chas. D. South 157 BY THE JAfL AT SAN METZFTO - - - R. Y. J. 158 The VACCfNES - - - john Paul Degnan 164 PE-HAS-KA . _ - . Frank Schilling 167 EDITORfALS - - - - - - -173 EXCHANGES .-_-_ 175 UNIVERSITY NOTES - - - - - -182 ALUMNI --.--___ 186 ATHLETICS -____-.- 190 MISSION STUDIO, PHOTO. VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM R. J. FLOOD T. CONCANNON GUY VOIGHT CHRIS. MOMSON, CAPTAIN J. AHEARN M. MELCHOIR Entered Dec. 18, 1902, at Santa Clara, Cal., as second-class matter, under Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 VOL. XII SANTA CLARA, CAL., FEBRUARY, 1913 NO. 4 FAME A bard, inspired with love for all mankind. Sang from his heart a song divinely sweet. Which calmed the passions, soothed the troubled mind;— A song in which the wounded soul might find A healing balm; a song with hope replete,— With rosy vistas for a race whose feet Had trodden thorn-paths. Long were mortals blind Toward him that sang them happiness, and when They fain would honor him with laurels meet, His soul had fled its frail, unworthy frame ; But o ' er the poet dead the tribes of men (Who, while he starved, had jested with his name,) Placed wreaths of immortelles, and hailed him then A friend of man, and gloried in his fame. CHAS. D. SOUTH A UNIVERSE— IDEAL OR REAL IN EXHAUSTIVE treat- ment, of the parity or analogy between two of the philosophical world ' s most avowed theories — to wit : Ideal- ism and Realism, and subsequently of their differ entiating notes, would resemble in great part the achievement of that great author, pictured by a modern writer ' ,! who bequeathed to the world his literary gem under the title of " Bon Jour Monsieur. " Imagining he was a genius, this fantastical being assumed the aforesaid words as a title, dreamed about them for a time, then supported them by a story; enlarged his story into a lengthy novel ; trans- formed his novel in turn into a vol- ume ; added volumes until his produc- tions in quantity (irrespective of qual- ity), rivalled those of Scott or Dick- ens. Now this grotesque artist dreamed again, and true to the wan- derings of his ingenious spirit, began the elimination process. He " pruned " his volumes and cast out the uninter- esting sections, changed his plot and language and as the years rolled on, gradually reduced his masterpiece to a story of inconsiderable length. At this stage we have it that death result- ing naturally from old age, possibly also from heavy work, was about to overtake him. He lay dying in bed. Impatiently, in his last effort he called for pencil and paper. As the mighty author wrote, he instructed his friends to destroy the story and then con- ferred upon the world his everlasting donation which consisted in three words scrawled just legibly: " Bon Jour Monsieur. " It is not the object of this article, then to expatiate upon every conceiv- able aspect of these two schools of reasoning, not so much in the fear of a fate similar to that of the author of " Bon Jour Monsieur, " but from a purely evident and common sense mo- tive. There are those, and whose au- thority, it might be remarked, de- mands respect, — who have proclaimed themselves expressly averse to a com- parison between these two theories in- asmuch as they do not fully represent a direct form of contradictory and as such, should not be argued, one against the other. With these again, we can- not exactly concur and we base our dissention on the severe contrast be- tween an all important issue as viewed, respectively from the idealistic and moderate realistic standpoint. The point in question partakes equally of a philosophical and psychological na- ture since it is, in brief, the theory of External Perception, or in other words, " Is there, apart from the Ego, an external, material world, and if so THE REDWOOD. 145 how do we perceive it? " For our au- thorities of the idealistic answer to this question we deem it equitable to look to such exponents of Idealism as Locke, Hume, Mill, Bain, Kant and Bishop Berkeley, practically its foun- der. At the outset we ask the reader to consider in turn Locke ' s reply to both the first and second part of this funda- mental interrogation, the one being es- sentially philosophical, the other psychological. Locke, it might be re- membered, assumed a parental posi- tion with respect to British scepticism and the unmitigated idealism of Em- manuel Kant. As to the question, now. Locke says: " Yes, there is an exter- nal, extra mental, material world. " This, however, is to be taken " cum grano salis " ; for as to how we per- ceive it, he says, " Knowledge consists merely in the perception of agreement or difference in our ideas. We cannot perceive immediately this extra mental reality, but we merely appre- hend directly our own mental states. Then, " — and hence his initial answer — " I postulate, assume that there is an external world as the cause of these mental phenomena which are the source of my knowledge. " Thus Locke, an Hypothetical Dualist, pos- tulates a cause which in itself is capa- ble of being and should in fact be proved. He arrives at a true conclu- sion but in a very incorrect and in- adequate manner. His theory (the at- tainment of a knowledge of an ex- ternal world only mediately as an in- ference from ideas) also bears well in support of our contention that it is very simple to show the divergence in the mode of reasoning in the two schools, that of Idealism on the one hand and of Realism on the other. To elucidate — The Realistic Theory of knowledge or perception is known as that of Im- mediate or Presentative Perception, fostered by great men, from the time of Aristotle to the present day. The theory of immediate perception, in brief, is this: That man, at least in some of his cognitive acts, immediately apprehends extended material reality. This theory can be maintained with an absolute, metaphysical certainty for the following terse reason — If my mind could not, at least in some of my cognitive acts perceive an immediate apprehension of extension (i. e., that property by which a body, whose parts are " extraposited in the whole, " oc- cupies co-relative parts of space and is thus capable of being measured) then it could never in any way attain to a knowledge of an extended mate- rial universe. For if we accept Locke ' s idea, that the mind knows only its own subjective modifications (workings), we are at a loss to know how to ex- plain our knowledge of the external extended world since no agglomera- tion or accumulation of mental states which are devoid, individually, of ex- tension (and Locke says they are thus devoid) could ever give birth to the slightest knowledge of extension. Locke ' s philosophy arose from or at 146 THE REDWOOD. least went one step further than the assumptive or postulative basis of the celebrated " Methodical Doubt " pro- pounded by Descartes, the grecit French mathematician and subse- quently philosopher, who professed that we had an immediate and infalli- ble knowledge of our own thoufrhls and nothing more. Since this theory is rather included in and by no means incongruous with the teachings of Locke, we merely submit the Realistic doctrine of Presentative Perception as a confutation of both. But we have now to arraign Idealism ' s most rigor- ous expositor, in the opinion of many, its father— the Anglican bishop, Berkeley. Berkeley secured distinction in the eighteenth century owing chiefly to his philosophical scheme known as the Theory of Vision. In a just considera- tion of this theory which proclaims it to be beyond the province of the eye to distinguish either distance or sur- face extension, and with all the defer- ence that a docile mind can entertain in respect to such an intellect, we must say that his tenets, by a " reductio ad absurdum " are so chimerical, in their essence, as to indicate an incredible " adieu " to common sense. To demonstrate — Berkeley, first of all, builds his work upon the ground- less hypothesis (pre-eminent in Locke) that we can know nothing but our own subjective mental states, hence, ideas. Now in any polemical treatise we deem it proper to hold to a man ' s word or statement in a purely unequivocal manner as doubtless the philosopher in question wished it to be taken — therefore the " absurdum " of Berke- ley ' s assumption if carried out to a philosophical conclusion. For if we know nothing but our own ideas we cannot logically profess the existence of an extra mental world There may or may not be one but we cannot as- sert ourselves affirmatively or negatively — in plain words, we don ' t know. The fallacy of such an irrational thesis as " esse est percipi, " for a thing to ex- ist it is essential that it be perceived, i-s so palpable as to scarce bear notice, Yet the advocates of Berkeley are powerless to resist such irrational con- clusions. ' " I ' ' n We do not wish to misconstrue the ingenuity of the Anglican, however, and we innocently question him thus : " If you perceive and know only what is in your mind, consequently ideas, and you do not affirm the existence of an external material world, there must be some cause for these mental phenomena, these sensations which you experience. He says, " Yes — there is cause. It is God. A Supreme Being, the Deity, is acting upon us, preserving orderliness in a supposed material world by— what? fantasms? — we do not know. Regardless of their objectivity, God is the cause, in some way or other, of my sensations. " To be perhaps more explicit, we hold up an orange before the gaze of the philosopher, and ask him if he ex- periences any sensation. He admits THE REDWOOD. 147 that he does, and that he entertains the idea of " orange. " We ask him to touch it, to taste it, to smell it — like- wise sensations of resistance, taste, and smell and the concomitant mental action, the idea of orange. Now we ask him the cause of these subjective phenomena, these sensations and ideas, and he answers, " God, in some un- known way, acting upon me. " He does not even postulate the existence of that material orange. According to his teaching, it may or may not exist but as to an express avowal or dis- avowal, he does not know. Let it, of course, be understood that the moderate Realist does not deny the capability " in potentia " of the Deity, to act thusly upon men ' s minds, but this much is certain — that the Berkeleyan Idealist can adduce no reason or accretion of reasons in sup- port of the contention that God is the Author of such a fraud. He has a divine attribute, veracity, which should be held in more rational esteem. And so for Berkeley and his Phenomenal- istic idealism. Does it not seem plaus- ible to contrast his doctrines with those of Realism? It seems, however, that amidst the geniuses of the eighteenth century, with which we have already had some experience, there existed those of a still more radical nature, but we must profess ourselves of a very sceptical state of mind as to the soundness, " radicis, " on which the genius leaned. We refer particularly to David Hume, to whom the followers of Idealism looked as a successor to Berkeley and in whom many were far from disappointed. The primitive ideas of Hume consisted mainly in the theory that all our knowledge is con- tained in mere impressions (sensa- tions) and that ideas, resultant from impressions, bore an extremely weak resemblance, both as a source of knowledge and " per se " to the afore- mentioned impressions. By the theory of the Association of Ideas (purely his own) he lays down the startling con- clusion that whatever our knowledge may be of an external material world, it is in the main an illusory specula- tion since we arrive at it through the incessant succession of innumerable and varying impressions. The terminus of these impressions (the objective world), he says, is a pure phantasm, a non entity. The illogical hypothesis, " esse est percipi, " and hence " if we have no impression of a thing, it does not exist, " that was propounded by Berkeley is likewise fostered by Hume. It is thus plainly discernible that the criterion of Hume ' s philosophy with respect to perception is a mere re- plica of the theories of his predecessors in the Idealist school coupled with tlie apparent distinction of thrusting it one measure more " ad absurdum. " Hume, on public announcement of this theory, opened the pathway to severe reprehensive measures on the part of the physical scientists of his epoch and on challenge by them (for which he is to be accredited at least with consistency in his views) candid- 148 THE REDWOOD. I3 ' confessed that according to his doc- trine there could be no such thing as physical science since he was wont to destroy the very groundwork of sci- ence itself. As to the Realistic answer to Hume ' s principles we simply reiterate the theory of immediate and presentative perception as has been heretofore ex- plained and proven to be in theory the most consistent with good reasoning and, in fact, the most compatible with the workings of physical science and the dictates of that standard of think- ing, common sense. John Stuart Mill (of induction fame) and Dr. Alexander Bain, contempo- raries, later expressed certain modi- fications, though slight, of the fore- going principles, but which are inex- cusable and m critical conflict with the Realistic theory of perception ow- ing to the fact that they, too, support the belief that an external world owes its existence " in toto " to the condi- tion that it be perceived. A tree, to illustrate, unperceived, is nothing— it absolutely does not exist except it is perceived. Hence we see the unfailing tendency of the exponents of idealism to destroy the underlying principle of all matter, its substratum, its sub- stance, indispensable to realistic rea- soning. Mill, it is true, realized the ab- surdity of Berkeley ' s theory that a thing ceases to exist when unper- ceived. That, for instance, when I am in a room, I perceive the chairs, tables, walls, etc. — as soon as I leave the room, these articles cease to exist and when I return they are re-created, wrought into a period of re-existence again when I look at them or feel them. FuUy realizing the ludicrous position this would place him in he modified it thus: He said that when an object was left temporarily unper- ceived, it remained " in potentia, " in a peculiar state of potency, of capability of being perceived again but an actual r.on-entity. This potentiality did away with the necessity of its being created again. By the same example: When I directly perceive the table, chairs, etc., in a room they actually exist — and on my departure from the room they remain in an i nert state of capa- bility of being perceived again when I return. The Realistic theory har- monizes with neither the one nor the other since it holds that apart from my direct perception, even when I am ab- sent from the room, those articles ac- tually exist in the same manner as when they fell under my immediate observation or detection. Finally we deem it inadvisable to terminate a contrast (in the restricted sense in which they have been treated) between Idealism and Realism without meting out his just due to Mr. Herbert Spencer, our most modern of — what shaU we call him? idealist or realist? Spencer, in his celebrated theory of ' ' Transfigured Realism, ' ' attempted seriously to combat the tenets of ideal- ism and enroll himself in a certain mitigated, essentially Spencerian rank of Realism. We fear, however, that THE REDWOOD. 149 Spencer has failed dismally, and for the following reason : The theory of Transfigured Realism contends that all we are conscious of as properties of matter are but subjective affections produced by an unknown and unknow- able objective agency, besides the ex- istence of which we can know nothiu.?: ' but our own states of consciousness. Accordingly we judge the epithet " transfigured " very well applied since in no way can this doctrine be made to agree with that of moderate Real- ism. If strictly construed, the world can easily be seen to disappear even from our own thoughts. Our own ma- terial being, our own bodies are dis- solved by it and yet to this theory has been applied a more than erroneous appellation. " Realism, Transfigured. " The contrast cannot be more vividly portrayed than to illustrate it as St. George Mivart once did by picturing a man inviting others (of an extremely liimgry mood) to a dinner, judging and talking at length of various dishes, their respective degrees of delectabil- ity, then ushering the guests into a room furnished with nothing but the chemical formulae of different kinds of food ! In truth, there are others, philoso- phers, also of note, aside from those we have noticed, that enjoy credit for extensive efforts in the realm of Idealism, the treatment of whose theo- ries, however, fairness and honesty will not permit, since a full discussion of their principles would involve no little extenuation of time and space, both of which are impossible here. Notable especially among these is Kant, a modern thinker, with his doctrine as to the innateness of ideas. For the above reason, then, it be- hooves us in conclusion to state one final argument as to the existence of an external material world, taken di- rectly from an admission on the part of the idealist. It is this. — The Idealist, I think, will admit the existence of other minds aside from his own. But then, he will be forced to admit he can only come to a knowl- edge of the existent reality of that other mind by an inference from the changes incurred in that material frame which he possesses ( his body). Hence, we can readily see, his admis- sion of other minds forces him to ad- mit as a corollary the existence of other bodies, external to his own Ego, to himself. Hence again, since he has admitted the existence of one extra-mental reality in the objective world, what reason can he adduce for rejecting all else? There are many other ways of com- paring and contrasting these schools of reasoning, but I hope, at least, to have established the fact that, in this most fundamental issue, there is a great yawning abyss that separates the two systems, against the contrast of which many have proclaimed them- selves — Idealism and Realism. HAROLD R. MCKINNON 150 THE REDWOOD. A THOUGHT OF THE UNTHOUGHT T ]]JPARTUD comrades! Had we but foreseen, When they were with us, that a day would faM, When gathered Wound their lowly beds of green Their dear familiar faces we recall, As once we knew them ere the sable pall Drooped o ' er their ashes, — might we not have been More tender, loving, helpful, kind, I ween, — More brotherly, sincere, unselfish, all ? ' ' Hoard not thy sweets till Night and Death appear, ' ' A still voice speahs. " Impart thy love today ! ' ' Fair was the rose Love laid upon the bier; " ■But better if the thought unbreathed that lay " Hid in the rose had blest the mortal ear, ' And made God ' s heaven from earth less far away! " HARRY B. PIERCE GENTS OF THE ROAD Being the touching story of two way-farers and a Christmas dinner T WAS early morn of the day before Christ- mas, in the year A. D. MCMXII. " Number nineteen, " had just pulled into the station at the little Western town of Arietta. Inci- dentally, " Hank " Jaga- long and " English " Woodskiill had just pulled into the same town. For the sake of accuracy, indeed, it might be well to remark that these two gen- tlemen and " Number nineteen " had arrived simultaneously. Just now the gentlemen referred to were seeking an unobserved exit from their traveling apartments, the same being the small, unoccupied portion of a refrigerator car laden with onions. Their precau- tion they deemed necessary in view of certain meddlesome gentlemen that were wont to disturb the equinamity of folk in their circumstances on such occasions. Having presently with much care, accomplished their object, they traced furtively their steps to the water tank nearby. " Well, " cogitated Hank, when the two found themselves securely stowed among the big tank ' s timbers, " won- der wot sort o ' dump this is, anyway. Looks to be a pretty good-sized burg for this neck o ' the woods. Got any tin, English? " English imparted the cheering in- formation that he hadn ' t a " bloomin ' red. " Hank grunted. " Hem. Well, I ' m a little luckier— I ' ve got a nickle. Say, scratch yer head, English, and set yer think box to work. It ' s Christmas tomorrow, and it ' s up to us to invite ourselves to a real Christmas dinner, with aU the trimmin ' s. Besides, we won ' t be eat- in ' at all at this rate. So sort out t]iat pi box o ' you ' rn, an ' pull proof on somethin ' readible. " The gentleman thus addressed scratched his matted dome vigorously. If that operation produced any results in the thought line, however, the said results were not apparent. " We might get a job, " he ventured. Hank stood aghast. Plainly he was disgusted. Since the time they had left New York together, this tendency of English to make courtship with vul- gar toil had been a thorn in his side. Often had he ehided him, but on occa- sions the tendency still manifested it self. Now he eyed his companion in mute astonishment. Then be blurted : " An ' I ' ll be dog-goned if I don ' t pretty near believe you ' d do it! ' Get 152 THE REDWOOD. a job huh. Say, ye ' r not over in Lun ' nun now. When ye ' r in this great an ' glorious land o ' the free ye ' r gotter use yer head, see? Wot ' s yer brains fer, anyhow? Good Gawd, think, man, think. " The speech was effective. The face of English flushed crimson guilt. He became ashamed of himself. But he made a desperate attempt to redeem his dignity. " Well, we ' ve gotter eat, " he blun- dered. " Of course we ' ve gotter eat, " an- swered Hank, in a more conciliatory tone, " and wot ' s more, we ' re gointer eat, too. But just you leave that to me, old timer, I see thinkin ' aiut in yer line. So leave it to me, an ' we ' ll be eatin ' an ' drinkin ' too, afore long. Here, help me look a bit respectable. Some minutes later the two way- farers found themselves directing their footsteps down the long " ave- nue " which led from the depot to the down-town district. Hank ' s wiry form, however, was quite different from when last seen. Instead of the very much too large and ragged pair of trousers, his long legs were encased in a pair of neat black ones, in truth, a trifle rumpled, but on the whole quite respectable. His shabby coat had been replaced by one more digni- fied, a clean collar and flashy tie had succeeded to the turkey red kerchief, a neatly brushed derby reposed jaunt- ily on his head, and his lately frizzled face bore tokens of a recent acquaint- anceship with a razor. The dullish grey of his shoes alone semed out of keeping with the harmony of his at- tire. This defect Hank resolved to remedy, however, at his earliest con- venience. Unlike his companion, Eng- lish, stocky of frame, roxind of face, restless of eye and tattered of clothes, had not changed his looks. In silence the two walked on, until at a certain corner where the little horse-car line, which began at the de- pot and ended wherever the last pas- senger happened to get off, made a swerve. Hank and English also turned, and shortly found themselves on the street that did duty as the business center of the city. In front of a pompous look- ing little red building which bore a legend informing the reader that here Anton Was- sertopf dispensed liquified bliss of such a rare quality as had caused all Mil- waukee to turn green with envy; and that, moreover, " Winnerwurst and Sauerkraut " should tickle the palates of all comers daily, between certain hours, the strangers stopped. It was not the building, however, nor the leg- end, nor even the seductive likeness of a brimming beaker which had arrested their attention, but the business estab- lishment of a smudge-faced boot-black. Hank climbed into the only chair with which said establishment was fortu- nate enough to be adorned, and the proprietor began to ply his tools with vigor. Suddenly Hank bawled out: THE REDWOOD. 153 " Say, kid, how much d ' ye chawge fer a shine, anyhow? " The lad informed him that the price was ten cents. Hank sat up with a jerk. " Ten cents! " he echoed, " why say, kid, I kin get my shoes shined lev a nickle in New Yawk. " " Well, " retorted the kid, " yu ' d better go to New York to get ' em shined, then. " " Here, " said Hank, as he fished a grimy five-cent piece from the inner recesses of his trousers and handed it to the kid, " never mind about the other one; " and with one shoe polished to a brilliant newness, the other worn to a faded antiquity, he rejoined his com- panion. Here it may be well to pause to cor- rect an erroneous impression which may have been gaining ground in the reader ' s mind. Hank and English were not members of that large and useless fraternity that wanders about the country year in and year out, cook- ing their meals in tin cans, dining be- hind wood piles, and dreaming their dreams in odd and unusual places, the members of which are commonly known to the public as " tramps " or " hoboes. " That they were not use- less was amply attested to by the card which each carried informing all that they were duly unionized printers, ef- ficient workers, and competent to dis- charge all duties incident to the trade ; nor could it be said that their wander- ing was aimless, inasmuch as the se- curing of employment was their avowed object, although, indeed, by a singular coincidence, it usually hap- pened that work was offered to them only at those times when they had al- ready landed a job in " the next town; " neither did they dine between woodpiles, or slumber in odd and un- usual places, or, if at all, only in rare instances, for their card and a tale of misfortune seldom failed to move the generous natures of their employed brethren of the craft, to whom they might appeal on their journey ' s way. Having thus removed all trace of tar- nish from our heroes, we may pro- ceed. Some thirty minutes after Hank ' s encounter with the boot-black, he ap- peared in the composing room of the Evening Sunshine, which occupied quarters over Catchem Skinnem ' s Capital Bank. His resources had evi- dently stood him in good stead, for if his pedal extremities had so lately been a study in black and white, they were now a model of inky brilliancy. It was not long until Hank had, " by trick or device, " as the law would put it, embroiled the editor in his confi- dence. " Ever been in Denver? " It was the editor who put the query. " Denver! Ya-a-as, " drawled Hank, after the manner of one who would have it known that he was treading on mighty familiar ground. " Sure, I ' ve been in Denver. Why, I lived there nearly two years. ' ' Now some more scrupulously in- clined gentleman might have blushed 154 THE REDWOOD. at perpetrating such a gross and igno- ble falsehood, but not Hank. He made the statement without " batting an eye. " The editor swallowed it. " Well, " he resumed, " you didn ' t know anyone out there by the name of West, did you? " Hank scratched his head. " West? " he muttered, questioning- ly; then seeming to recollect: " O yes, I remember — runs a drug store on Third Street. Sure, I know old Tom West; friend of yourn? " " No. I referred to Matthew West, the miner. You see, his brother ' s president of the bank down-stairs, and I understand he ' s made some big strikes on his copper mines recently. " " Oh, of course! Everybody ' s talk- in ' about Colonel West in Denver. You see, that ' s what they call him out there, colonel. Didn ' t think for a mo- ment that you had him in mind though. Never met West personally, but I ' ve seen him often enough. Why, just before I left he made another big strike on his property at — at a, at — let ' s see. Where is his property lo- cated now? I always forget that name. ' ' " The Black Blizzard mines, I be- lieve, are his. " " Why, certainly. Simple name, too, isn ' t it? Funny I can never remem- ber it. Yes, old West is getting to be one of the foremost mining men in the state. " " So I understand. His brother men- tioned something to me some time ago about his being up for alderman. " " Yes, he ' s up for alderman. But he ' s got a cinch. Everybody wants him, and he ' ll simply swoop down on the job in a whirlwind. Why, I ' ve no doubt he could be elected mayor if he had a mind to run. He didn ' t intend to meddle with polities at first " " Why, " interrupted the editor, taken somewhat aback, " I always un- derstood that he was one of the big guns in Denver when it came to poli- tics. " " Oh, yes, " quickly agreed Hank, " Colonel West always figured in pol- itics more or less, but what I mean is — that — a — well, you see, he ' d made up his mind not to dabble in polities any more, but to attend strictly to his min- ing affairs, when, as I was about to say, the people wouldn ' t hear of it, and it was only after their repeated demands that he consented to run. But really, now, I ' m taking up your time, and " " Why, my dear sir, not at all. Just remain seated. " Hank, however, excused himself on the grounds of an urgent engagement elsewhere. " Well, " said the editor, cordially, as he accompanied him to the door, " I ' m mighty glad I ' ve met you, any- how. Don ' t fail to drop in if ever you ' re around this way again. " When Hank left the office of the Sunshine it was twenty minutes after one o ' clock. At two P. M. he appeared at Catchem Skinnem ' s money em- THE REDWOOD. 155 porium, where he eommimieated to one of the clerks his desire of secur- ing audience with the worthy presi- dent of that institution. The bland young gentleman ad- dressed eyed him curiously. " Mr. West is engaged at present, " he announced, formally, " what did you wish to see him about? " " Ahem, well, you see, " answered Hank, " I ' m a friend of his brother in Denver, and I " But the clerk had cut him off. In an instant that worthy became trans- formed into all smiles and bows. A friend of the president ' s brother? Why, certainly, he had no doubt that under those circumstances Mr. West could manage to see him. And so it came about that Hank found himself admitted behind the counters laden with heaps of gold and silver, and ushered through a private entrance into a richly appointed room, fitted with green carpets and mahog- any furniture, and what not, where the sleek and benevolent bank presi- dent fortified himself against contact with that vulgar herd whose shekels lubricated the wheels of his money mill. As Hank entered Mr. West ad- vanced to meet him, grasping at the same time his hand in such warm and hearty embrace that Hank winced for pain. " And so you know my brother, Mat- thew, " effused the beaming Mr. West, drawing Hank to a chair. " Why, my dear sir, I can ' t tell you how glad I am to see you. Sit right down — here, have a cigar, and now tell me all about my brother. " And Hank did. He told Mr. West all he knew about his brother, and some things he didn ' t know. " And now, " said he, modestly, as he drained his glass for the fifth time, " I must beg you to excuse me. Real- ly, I ' ve been imposing on you by tak- ing up so much of your time. " " My dear fellow, not a bit of it, " protested the banker. " I fear it is I who am imposing on you. But if you really must go, I will not insist on de- taining you for the present. I want you as a personal favor, however, to take dinner with me tonight, or lunch- eon tomorrow, if you can at all ar- range it. " " Well, " drawled Hank, in suave and lingering accents, " you see it ' s this way. I ' m a printer by trade, and I ' ve secured a position up at Crooked Finger, where I ' m due the day after tomorrow. " " Oh, so you ' re going to Crooked Finger are you, well then we ' ll see more of each other. But really, there ' s no hurry if you ' re only due the day after tomorrow. " " Yes, I ' m going to Crooked Finger, and a — er — well you see it ' s this way. Coming way out here from Denver I happened to run a little short of money, and am somewhat embarrassed in a financial way just now, so I guess I ' ll have to ride Shank ' s mare until I reach my destination. Small matter 156 THE REDWOOD. though. I ' ll be alright as soon as I get there. " He brushed the thought aside with a short laugh, as being but a secondary- consideration. Mr. West was on his feet. " What! You walk to Crooked Fin- ger. Well, I should say not, nothing of the kind, not if I know it. " Hank protested humbly that it was no great account. Simply a little thing that would blow over in a day. But Mr. West would not hear him. The banker picked up a pen and began to figure: " Let ' s see, Crooked Finger, forty miles, hum, " he mused. Then he wrote something on a slip of paper and pressed a button. " Attend to this, " he said, handing the slip to the boy, who had respond- ed to his summons. A few moments, and the boy reap- peared bearing a small tray, which he placed on Mr. West ' s desk. " Here, " said the banker, as he picked the shiny twenty-dollar gold piece off the plate and thrust it into the bewildered Hank ' s palm, " I want you as a personal favor to take this, and to consider it as a present. What? Tut, tut, now, not another word. I ' m only doing for you what I would do for my own brother, and I ' m glad to have the chance to do it. " So, under such circumstances, the poor fellow had no recourse but to ac- cept the money, although in doing so he was obliged to stretch his principles a bit, and he did it, let the reader be assure d, most reluctantly. " And now, " continued the banker, as Hank prepared to leave, " don ' t fail to call on me at your earliest con- venience; and above all, don ' t forget about having luncheon with me. In that far I ' ll hold you under obligation to me. " Christmas noon saw Hank and Eng- lish seated in the eating department of the Hotel Paul Revere at Crooked Finger, which said eating department boasted of being the " swellest grill room in town, " and, indeed, not with- out some degree of justification, in view of the fact that it was the only place of that nature in the city that laid claim to so pretentious a name. Between generous mouthfuls of brown, juicy turkey immersed in cran- berry sauce, and garnished with ice- cream and pickles, English shj ' ly eyed his companion, his glances mingling awe with admiration. At length, after the last bone of turkey had been stripped bare, the last flake of ice- cream swallowed and the last pickle eaten, English gave vent to his thoughts. " H ' i soiy, old chawp, ' ow in the bloody bloomin ' blazes did yez do it? Blawstmisoul hif hit don ' t beat all. ' ' Hank accepted the compliment with complacent meekness. " English! " he said indulgently, " English, it ' s all in the knowin ' how. That ' s the difference ' tween you an ' me, I know how an ' you don ' t. An ' that ' s the difference ' tween failure an success. W. S. CANNON THE REDWOOD. 157 THE PATRIOT A PATRIOT in holy Freedom ' s right, Roused wp his country to the peril dire Of slavish yoke impressed by tyrant Might, — Into the balance then, with virtuous ire, His fortune flung, and when his sword flashed fire. The despot, sinking in the gory fight. Expiring saw, in sungilt splendor dight. The victor banner of the land ' s desire. But Mivy whispered, and the land grew cold Toward him who would have died that land to save, Tet when the patriot slept beneath the mold. They wrote his name among the honored brave, And then, while Truth at last his merits told. Reared a sublime memorial o ' er his grave, CHAS. D. SOUTH BY THE JAIL AT SAN METZITO |T WAS a quiet compla- cent sort of an evening with just the hint of a breeze coming off the desert, and a low hung, yellow flaming moon, that poured silver down the single hoof-scarred street of San Metzito, and shed a whitish veil over the adobe houses, with a more intensified pallour whenever it struck corrugated iron, or tin-pan roofs. A few hurdy-gurdies whined out pa- thetically, and once in a while raucous sounds came floating through the tepid air, showing that ' ' the boys " from the Cheney Interests Ranch were in town and enjoying themselves. Old man Dodd sat on the front porch of the " Piute Chief ' s Scalp " saloon and smoked a cobpipe with great satisfaction; he was " jedge, " he was, and calculated to be about the only man in those parts that could ever even get a man to trial, as he put it, " afore them stranglers unhitched their riatas. " But it didn ' t seem to do much good to bring a man before the bar any- how, because the jail was only adobe, and ' twas no great difficulty for the " committee " to smash in the door and jerk out the individual they were after. A ride on a mule, backwards, brought him to a scrub tree that grew near the stage office, and from thenet to eternity was one sheer drop, I trow. But to continue, old man Dodd was quietly sitting there, tilting his chair back and forth on its hind legs, gently puffing at his pipe as he did so. Along about eight in the evening a few men from Weaverscamp came jog- ging down the street, and there tied their horses at the hitching bar outside the dance hall and walked in. This left the street bare, and Dodd was about to shout out for some more liquor, when his peaceful revery was interrupted by two rapid shots, and a little knot of men threw themselves out of the " Hall of Paradise " in hot haste. A second or two later a single in- dividual darted out of the door, revol- ver in hand. Quickly he ran to the horses, jumped one and was off and away in a white cl oud of dust, only a second before the crowd poured forth, and took up the pursuit. " What ' sup, " yelled Dodd. " Whose killed, any one of importance? " Jack, the bartender for Sheeling, " came the answer. " Thunder, couldn ' t have been worse if he ' d a shot the whole town; that ' s bad, he shore could pour drinks. Who did it? Axely? So that wolf ' s roam- ing around again, eh! Well, sheriff, let ' s sceer up a posse. " THE REDWOOD. 159 It was the end of the day, hot, dusty and grueling. All that morning he had ridden, all that afternoon, and the full night before, his horse had now jogged and galloped, and alternately galloped and jogged. Far to the west the Pinta Agueras showed their pur- pled azure peaks against the blood background of the dying sun. The alkali dust rose heavily, and the cactus blocked his path, but his pony was a good one, as every one knew he had never stolen better, so by the following morning he expected to be in the mountains, and once there, all the posses in the west could not catch him. Ramon Prenturez, the Mexican, had been trapped in the pass, but pshaw, that man was a fool; any how he ' d got three of them before a bit of led spattered his intellect over the rocks. So thinking he rode on, and it was in remembering a water-hole and his horse, that he turned to the left, riding easily, and saving himself for the last grand spurt. The valley was V shaped. He was being pursued on one side by the posse from San Metzito, and down the other arm, some eighty miles long, an- other group would come, riding hard that they might trap him just before he rounded the twelve mile turn at the bottom and gained the pass through the cliffs to the mountains and safety. But he had the start of them, and though it promised to be a tight squeeze, he nevertheless continued his divergence, until after about an hour easy riding he breasted the brow of a little hill and expected to ride down into the water-hole, yet as he did so — ' ' thunderation. ' ' Quickly he wheeled his pony about on its hind legs and dashed down the hill. At the bottom he stopped. They couldn ' t have seen him, the dusk was too blurring. He tethered his horse to a clump of sage-brush and crawled forward, up the hill to the crest, and gazed cautiously over, to see — An immigrant wagon, much the worse for wear, stood desolately by the water-hole. Two oxen lay by the pole, but to his experienced eye they seemed dead , fagged, exhausted. A dog lifted his snout and whined pit- eously, only to be hushed into silence by a woman ' s soft girlish voice. Then suddenly a loud series of cri ' s and curses broke like delerium upon the air, and the voice cried, " Dad! oh! Dad, it ' s only I. It ' s May, Dad, with some water. " Again silence fell and he understood. This was no posse, just some fool immigrant who had lost his track and was stuck. Not for water, though? Food, perhaps? Anyhow I ' ll take a " looksee " and so, rising, he loosened his gun in its holster and strode for- ward. As he came near, the dog commenced barking, and kept it up until the girl, after vainly endeavoring to silence the animal, stepped out of the wagon and, lantern in hand, came forward. " Ohooo — " she cried in a fright, 160 THE REDWOOD. " what; what; who are you, what do you want? Oh, good God! " He stepped forward and came with- in the circle of light. " I ' m a stranger, miss; I — I, lost, that is, say what ' s wrong here? " She gazed at him. He was tall, about five feet eleven, not overly broad, but wiry, and sinewy. His face was long, square-jawed, and dark, his eyes set far apart, his nose sharp. Over his upper lip a slight line of hair was visible, it was no moustache, just stubble, yet he was not ugly nor re- pulsize, but very determined. Again he queried, " What ' s wrong. Lady? I ain ' t going to do any harm. " She seemed reassured. " My Dad, er — that is, my father ' s very sick, he ' s got a busted laig " ; the drawl was southern. " We ain ' t got over much to eat an ' no medicine. He cain ' t go ahead, an I ' m stuck, everythinsr ' s plumb cleared out, seep ' in water and meal, an taint over good food for a sick man. Oh, Lord, and there be goes again! " The delerium was on once more. She couldn ' t have been very old. about nineteen, with dark hair. Her eyes he could not distinguish, but that they were large, he felt sure. She was of medium height, and pretty, he could see that all right, and her chin had a nice roundness to it; " an oncommon girl, he thought. " She climbed into the wagon and quieted her father. In a few seconds she was out again ; he was still stand- ing where she left him. " Why don ' t you build a fire? " he asked. " I was a going to, " she said, " but some how I got skeered; taint nice be- ing here alone; Lord but I do wish I could do something for him. " " I ' 11 build a fire for you, ' ' he volun- teered, " and you can cook some, what d ' ye call it? Gruel, you say you got some meal. That will make him bet- ter, and say " — " What? " she asked. D ' ye mind, just getting things agoing, while I tend to this fire. " By gathering brush and twigs, he soon had a good fire going. She brought out an old skillet, and taking some meal, made some gruel, and gave it to her father. He seemed quieter now, and soon fell asleep. While she was hustling about the fire, cooking him some " pone, " as she termed it, he noticed her closely. Yes, indeed, she was pretty, excep- tionally so. " She caught the glance, and after a minute of painful silence asked cau- tiously, " What might your name be? " " Humyme, " he mused. " Well, I guess you can call me Ed — er Ed Vance. That ' ill do about as well as anything. ' ' " Say what ' s yourn? " " May Coulter, but how are we go- ing to get out of this? I ' m skeered, I tell you. " " Well, " he said, " let me see. " Af- ter several minutes of thought he sud- denly got up. " Listen, " he exclaimed, " there ' s a THE REDWOOD. 161 town about forty miles from here, San Metzito, it ' s called. I can ' t make it tonight, because my horse is worn out, but about fifteen miles from here there ' s a ranch house. I ' ll ride there, tell ' em to send to town, get a doctor, and come and fetch you and your dad. It will be a matter of several hours before they can get here, riding hard, but you wait. I ' 11 send ' em. ' ' He arose, looked at her intently for a moment, and stalked rapidly off. As he did so the thought came up in his mind, the posse, but he put it down and continued. " Anyhow, " he mused, " my life ain ' t worth for much, might as well take a chance now as not, so I ' ll do it. Shucks, she needs help bad. " Surprised as they were to encounter him, in this portion of the country. Sheriff Burton ' s posse was still more surprised to see him ride forward, hands in the air, and in one of them, the left, his gun, grasped by the muz- zle, but raised, a token of surrender. " Well, Tom " he said, with a queer smile, and a trace of suspicion in his voice, " guess we ' ve got you now, but say, what the thunder made you give yourself up? " Quickly Tom told him, and it was not long before a buck-board left the ranch-house near by, and hurried to the succour of the wayfarers. As for Tom Vance, he was riding steadily onward to San Metzito with his hands tied securely behind him, and the fate of hanging staring him in the face. When the relief party arrived at Coyote Springs, (where the fwagon was stranded) the man was dead. He had died during the night, the girl said, and that was all they could get out of her; for with a woman ' s pecu- liar attitude towards great grief, eith- er great calm or hysterics, she bore a stoic, unexpressive countenance, and save for a large tear which found its way out once in a while and stole quietly down her cheek, she was silent, and thus rode wearily in the buck- board, forty miles to town. The third day after her arrival, she began to take notice of the things going on about her, and it was then that she learned the true state of af- fairs. His name was not Vance, but Jor- don. He was a murderer, horsethief and general all round scoundrel, yet, he had literally run his own neck into the noose to save or try to save the life of one near and dear to her. Thus she mused on, and that even- ing at supper, she asked the doctor, at whose house she was staying, when the trial was to be held. " Trial, " he snorted, " there isn ' t go- ing to be any trial. He ' ll be strung up at noon tomorrow. The whole Cheney outfit will be there to see the ceremony. It ' ll certainly be a grand sight in their eyes. He ' s rustled off enough of their cattle, wonder the sheriff didn ' t shoot him on sight. Where is he now? Why he ' s so safely locked up down in the jail that with leg irons and all on him, it only takes 162 THE REDWOOD. one man to guard him. There ' s going to be a pow-wow up the " Scalp " to- night so as to celebrate his going off. About seven oclock the doctor left, and shortly after his housekeper, an old Mexican, went over the road to visit a friend. This left her alone. Very quietly she thought the situation over, and losing no time she ran into the doctor ' s little office to put her plan into execution. Quickly she found some whiskey, (it was not hard to find), it took a bit longer to secure the laudanum, but she did it. Without more ado, she mixed the two (she hadn ' t drugged a rev- enue officer in the Smoky Mountains for nothing), and after carefully clos- ing all doors behind her stepped out into the night. It was quite dark, not too black, however, for one to see a few yards in front of him, and so it was with no great difficulty that she found the jail, and heard the neigh of a horse in the corral next to it. The building was a low one, made of adobe, and had only a solitary win- dow and a door, the latter of heavy timber, with an old fashioned Spanish lock and chain on it. Leaning against this barrier she dis- cerned a figure, short, broad and dis- heveled. " Are you the guard? " she asked. " Is this the jail? " " Yep, this is it, miss. What kin I do fur you ? ' ' " Why nothing, only the Doctor sent me down to you with this bottle, say- ing that you might want to join in the celebration, and that some one else would be along bime by. Ain ' t no fun standing there, I reckon, is it? You all must be sorter lonesome. " " You bet 1 am, " he replied, " an ' this licker sure tastes good. Ef I had my say, we ' d a plugged him at first sight (he took a pull at the flask), an thet would have saved some trouble guardin the pest, I calculate. " Here another drink of the bottle. " Where did you come from, miss? You ' re the girl what as they picked up, ain ' t you? Another drink. Mighty lucky for you. It ' s a wonder that cuss inside helped you. Lord, this is mighty good licker, have some? No? A ' right. Say, I ' m going to sit down, you wait right here till I find a box, there ' s one in back. " Presently he returned rather un- steadily, to be sure, but still standing. " Lord, " she thought, " he ' s got a stumic like a horse. " " Here, now, you sit down. Come to think about it, I kin sit there, too, jes ' like two chickens on a roost, eh? Ha, ha, purty good, eh? Have a drink? A ' right, take one myself. Sis, say, that stuff makes me sleepy. I ' m gonna go to sleep. And so saying he stretched himself out and in a few moments, his breathing and snorting told her that the drug done its work. Quickly she searched his pockets. What if they hadn ' t given him the key? No, ain ' t in that pocket, " she said, half aloud to herself. " Ah, here it is. Most as big as a gun. " As she removed it from the man ' s THE REDWOOD. 163 pocket a smaller one came too, being attached to the first by a thong of raw- hide. " Guess that ' s for them big leg irons. " Quickly she secured them and then thumped guardedly on the door. " What do ye want? " a voice called. " Can ' t you let a man sleep that has to hang in the morning? " " It ' s me, May, " she answered. " I got the keys here. Wait a second. " She opened the door. On the inside it was so dark she could discern noth- ing. " Where are you? " she asked. He answered. They stumbled togeth- er. " Here ' s the key to the Oregon boot, " she said. He took it and in a moment was free. Without ' osing more time they dashed into the street and there he turned and said: " Ef I only had a horse. Say, how d ' ye do it? " " There ' s one in that corral there, you can just barely see it; see, it ' s white. " He vaulted over the fence. " It ' s saddled already, " he called soft- ly, and in a short space of time ap- peared beside her leading the animal. " Well, " she said, breathlessly, " you ' re a free man now, so don ' t lose any time, but ride. Every moment counts. They are liable to drop down here any time and then you ' d be caught. ' ' " And how about you? " he asked. " Well I can — can take care of my- self " she ceased speaking. He mounted the horse, as he did so it reared. " That ' s a strong animal, " he said to her, " and — well — say, miss, I think it would carry two. " He urged her, she did not struggle. " Will you come? " " Yes, " she replied softly, and as soon as she was back of him and her two little hands hugging him tigh: about the body, he gave the horse a cut, and the two figures melted quick- ly out of sight, into the night. R. Y. J. JESTERS ALL Now years have passed when boyish I Did contemplate with heaving breast A maiden ' s name — and had no rest, And aU day long did sit and sigh. But hng time has the fiame been stilled — She jested at my much-concern, And I, a fair one ' s way to learn. Did wither, and my heart was chilled. JAMES F. LAWRENCE THE VACCINES 17 = OR 400 years the Canal Zone was a plague-spot, its jungle and marshes were pest-ridden. To- day the deadly swamps cease to jeapordize life and the zone has be- come a more healthy lo- cality than many Amer- ican cities. Methods of scientific sanitation have accomplished this extraordinary re- sult. Keeping apace with the advances in preventive medicine, the methodical postponement of inevitable death has added many years to the average span of life, and this, notwithstanding the steady reaching into middle bfe o ' thu diseases of old age. Our vital organs are not as vigoronr-f as those possessed by our ancient fore- fathers, yet they have sufficient resist- ance if fortified against invading or- ganisms whenever epidemics occur. Among the external aids which serve as adjuvants to the resisting forces of every human body bacterial vaccines hold a prominent position. The prophetic belief of Pasteur, that all infectious disesaes will some day be eradicated by vaccinations, is continu- ally more and more realized. The word vaccine comes from the Latin, vaeca, a cow, for the first vac- cine used. Bovine Virus, was taken from a cow. It was administered to persons to render them immune to the dreaded smallpox. Farmers in widely separated localities of England and France had recognized the fact that accidental infection with cowpox con- ferred immunity against smallpox. Benjamin Jesty was probably the first European to vaccinate as a preventive measure. He successfully treated his wife and two sons with bovine virus in 1774, having himself secured immu- nity from variola through accidental vaccination. Today there is a con- stant increasing number of vaccines. These preparations are suspensions in a salt solution of dead germs taken from infected individuals. A weak preservative is usually added. They are of two types: The " stock " vac- cine and the " autogenous. " The former contains sterile organisms taken from many cultures of a particular germ, and which were obtained in dif- ferent individuals; the latter contains germs which were cultivated from an infection in the very person for whom the vaccine is being prepared. A scientific investigation of the first experiments with the virus of cowpox was not made until Jenner began his renowned studies. He performed nu- merous and accurate experiments. The first inocculation occurred in May 14, 1796, with virus taken from a vesicle of a milkmaid. The inoeeulated per- son was James Phipps. He developed THE REDWOOD. 165 a typical case of cowpox and a subse- quent attempt to inoculate him with smallpox proved negative. This was considered, and probably is, the first vaccination of a person with human- ized virus of the first generation. To Sacco, a physician of Milan, is due the credit of substituting animal or bovine virus, for the humanized variety. In the days of Jenner infectious dis- eases could not be thoroughly studied. Not until the monumental labors of Pasteur, Koch and others had intro- duced the new science, Bacteriology, could the fruitful methods of investi- gation, now universally employed, be adopted by inquiring pathologists. In reviewing discoveries of this sci- ence, we naturally inquire h as not na- ture provided us with some sort of defence against the microscopic organ- isms which produce disease? For we notice in individuals a difference in susceptibility to infection, and every individual differs at different times, offering a varying resistance to dis- ease. The question naturally arises: how does this happen? How is it that some men can resist disease, and some easily fall a prey to it? In recent years investigators have called attention to the role of the white blood cells in the defence of the body against bacterial invasion. The activity of these blood cells or, phagocytes, in carrying out their de- fensive warfare, appears to depend largely upon the presence in the blood serum of elements called opsonins. These opsonins seem to act upon low organisms in such a way as to render them an easy prey to the white cor- puscles. From this observation the in- ability of individuals to resist disease would seem to be a deficiency in opsonic power, in other words a fail- ure or partial failure of the blood se- rum to prepare the invading bacteria for destruction by the phagocytes. On the other hand by artifically in- creasing the opsonins in the blood stream more or less immunity should follow the treatment. Another ques- tion presents itself. How might these elements be increased? By experi- ment it has been found that a suspen- sion of dead bacteria aids the militant white corpuscles to destroy living bac- teria of the same kind. The defensive capacity of a person can be determined at any time by test- ing the opsonic index of his blood. A few drops of blood are drawn from the patient whose resistance to a dis- ease is being investigated. This blood furnishes a small amount of serum; a clear straw colored fluid that sepa- rates from a clot of blood. An equal amount, by measure, of a bacterial emulsion, is added to this serum and washed leucocytes. A short time must be given for the latter to attack and ingest the bac- teria. This being accomplished small drops of the fluid are mounted on slides as smears, stained suitably and are examined on the stage of the microscope, 100 leucocytes are selected for observation. Centering them over 166 THE REDWOOD. a grating if helpful, the number of bacteia in each is counted. If the num- ber of engulfed bacteria is less than the normal count the person from whom the serum was drawn is not able to resist the invasion of the bacteria tested, at least, as he might and really should if he hopes to escape infection. A vaccine made from this bacteria under examination will, however, sup- plement the natural resistance of the system, should some germs of this type gain accidental entrance. It must not be imagined that vac- cine therapy is unlimited in its effi- ciency, and that in time we shall be able to cope with any infection by skillfully selecting and then introduc- ing a potent vaccine into the blood stream. The sera likewise have their proper field of activity and are exceedingly effective. These furnish us with pro- tective substances which prevent fur- ther destruction of tissue by germs which have gained a footing in the sys- tem, or give immunity to threatening infection. Vaccines serve as stimuli which in- duce a protection of protective sub- stances. Such a production supposes a capacity in a patient to respond to the stimulation, and vaccination is useless when that capacity is lacking. Just as perpetual motion is an im- possibilty for the engineer so immor- tality is beyond the power of the phy- sician. Yet notwithstanding the in- creasing debility of the human race, modern methods of therapeutics and sanitation have accomplished the glo- rious achievement of reducing the gen- eral death rate in the Unted States al- most 25 pr cent in 30 years. JOHN PAUL DEGNAN ANYMAN A peacock struts along the wall, A death ' s head ' neath lies mouldering, A ruin old lifts a broken tower, 7h an inky sky all lowering. The ruin was a castle strong, The skull, alack! was a maiden fair, And the darksome sky a vault of blue. And pride was the peacock strutting there. R. A. Y. PE-HAS-KA WELL APPOINTED Bachelor ' s Club was one of the pleasurea ble though simple pastimes of Milwaukee, and was patronized by gentlemen of the higher order, who, bored after a hard day of exquisite mental torture, would seek such rest and comfort as was not to be found elsewhere throughout the entire East. A dark though respecta- ble old building, which had once been a palatial residence, was announced to be the " Bachelor ' s Club " by small, unobtrusive gold lettering on the huge door panels. One would not ex- pect to find here the wealth and com- fort subscribed to by well-to-do citi- zens, but, however, such was the case. On entering you are immediately re- lieved of your overcoat by one of four or five side-whiskered gentlemen in black uniforms, and propelled by an- other through a veritable tropical gar- den of palms artificial and otherwise, until you reach the drawing room. Even before you open the door, the aroma of perfect havanas pitches the senses for the luxurious sight which greets the eye. Within the room there is everything one could wish as a re- ceptacle for tired limbs or aching feet, and even now six or seven men in evening dress, are perched in the most comfortable though ridiculous places. All business formality and etiquette are dropped for the present, and the Hon. James F. so and so, of a few hours before is now plain " Jim, " while Dr. Geo. D. Medico, M. D., Ph. D., is called " George. " The conversation, which before was an argument upon stocks and bonds, now gradually drifts to football, which is the interesting branch of athletics upon this occasion, as the champions from two states, the Indiana and Illinois Universities are scheduled to play the following week in Milwaukee. Broker Johnston was speaking. " As my son is captain of the Illinois squad, " he said, " I am quite certain that his team shall win. " " Yes? " queried Banker Munson, argumentatively. ' My son, ' ' continued the proud parent, " is the soul of college spirit and enthusiasm, and as the captain of the other fifteen is merely a low, spir- itless, redskin, I am quite at rest as to the result. " " How dare you, sir, " broke in Munson; " if you do not take back the very tones in which those in- sults against my adopted son were ut- tered, I will be forced to denounce you as being ungentlemanly in the ex- treme. " An awkward pause followed the irate banker ' s outburst, when, finding his voice, even in the depths of 168 THE REDWOOD. his astonishment, Johnston coldly but courteously replied : " I beg your par- don, sir, or rather your son ' s, if I have offended, but my humility will carry me no lower; and it may be, sir, as he is not of your own blood and color, my assertions of a moment ago may in part be true. " Gentlemen, " the banker be- gan solemnly, " though the boy ' s gratitude to me is very great, the love of his Alma Mater is, I am certain, the only love above his love for me that permeates his noble being. Could you but hear him speak, you would see that love oozing out of the very pores on his handsome forehead. The day that our party rescued him from the jaws of an exterminating prairie fire, he saw his own father, the aged chieftain of the Nez Perces, charred and lifeless on the plain, and turning up his eyes to mine, he whis- pered: " You are good to me Pe-has- ka " (the long hair), and unable to say more, he sat crying noiselessly on my hunting jacket. In these last five years, he has learned that which would take the ordinary white youth fifteen years. He is now at the head of his class, both in sports and in the studies of the institution ; it is he who won the two Vanderbilt scholarships, and ' whose modesty was pricking your curi- osity, sirs, when you wondered at two scholarships being won by an ' Anony- mous. ' Furthermore, Mr. Johnston, I will write a letter to the boy in the following terms, and I will wager with you in the sum of $50,000 that his team not only wins but that he makes the majority of points. " While the as- tounded gentlemen-at-ease were reeov- ing their breath, the banker signaled one of those impassive machines known as butlers from without, and having procured pen and paper, wrote the following letter: My Beloved Son: — It is your foster-father who is writ- ing to you, my dear boy, and who asks you the one great boon of your life. My boy, if you do not lose that game to the Illinois team, I am ruined, both financially and otherwise, but even if you do not obey this, my first com- mand, remember that I am still your father. John Munson. " I take that bet, " said Johnston, huskily, choking down his temper, " and it were better that you leave a sworn statement to the effect that you will not in any manner permit your son to know of your real desire in the circumstances till after the game. " " My word is sufficient, sir, " snapped back Munson, whose face became red and white by turns, as he realized the position in which he had placed the boy he loved. Many were the misera- ble hours which Banker Munson was destined to spend in contemplation of his rash deed. The breezes of early autumn were wafting the delightful fragrances of the Indiana harvest over the campus of the University, and the little knots of students were gathered in the last beams of the setting sun, watching THE REDWOOD. 169 5 jg!?!eSt7? ' 35 " (? ' 53s: r? ' - t ' r with keen interest the brilliant prac- tice of the Varsity squad. But a blind man would have supposed from their conversation, that only one per- son was to be seen, namely. John Munson. Among the array of red jerseys, his dusky form, his keen alert glance, and the strong black hair was to be seen here, there and everywhere. His voice was to be heard now in ener- getic exhortation, again in praise of some worthy play by his fairer broth- ers. He stood for a moment silhouetted against the darkening twilight, as magnificent a specimen of true Ameri- can manhood as one could wish to see. Of about middle height, he stood clearly outlined, his muscles rippling delightfully under their velvet coating of purest bronze, every nerve screwed to the highest tension, his expressive dark eyes now blazing in determina- tion, and again melting in the extrem- ity of kindliness and encouragement. As some enthusiastic student from the sidelines called out a cheering word to him, he would nod smilingly, and re- turn the courtesy by some especially brilliant piece of work. He knew those boys loved him, that their hopes for the championship were centered in his prowess, and rather than betray their trust and affection, he would have consigned himself to the most ignominious punishment his honorable soul could imagine, — to be lashed to death by squaws of his own tribe. Slowly but surely one lone star began to shed its dim light from amidst the last golden reflection of the sun be- yond the hills, and Munson, in one great burst of brilliance, dribbles the ball for 50 yards, evading opponents with the utmost ease and security, and at last places the ball behind the goal- posts amid the shouts of the specta- tors. He thereupon signals the coach and the practice ends. The next morn- ing saw the students in a huge fit of funereal despondency. They were gath- ered in groups, and a deep stillness pervaded the stadium, where at any other time the air would have been a net-work of flying footballs. As the spectators in the arena at Pompeii felt the coming of the eruption of Vesu- vius, so also did the students feel the overhanging shadow. And the great foreboding was not without reason, as one of their number, who roomed un- der John Munson, said that the latter had walked up and down in his room above throughout the entire night. Munson himself was seen to leave his room in the morning, his face of an ashen hue, his eyes sunken, and as one of the boys expressed it, with the demeanor of Byron ' s Prisoner of Chil- lon. Another student clinched the matter by saying that he had heard the Coach and Moderator of Athletics in an altercation as to how Munson happened to be in such condition. Munson had hitherto enjoyed all the freedom of careless youth, and now in one moment was thrust upon him the crisis of his life, through the letter of Banker Munson. As for the latter, he had not only apologized to Johnston in the presence of the club, but had 170 THE REDWOOD. gone so far as to offer him money in order that his son might be freed from that odious trial, and Johnston had politely refused to ac- cept the money, but magnanimously consented to Munson ' s request. Two days before the game, therefore, saw a telegram in the hands of the coach, and the latter had decided that the message might contain something which would renew the " slump " from which Munson had been slowly recov- ering, and Munson did not get the let- ter, which contained these words: — My dear boy : Please excuse my letter of 15th inst., and play your best to win for my sake. John R. Munson. The day for the big game had broken with regal splendor, and its radiance illuminated the perfect grid- iron with its enormous bleachers, the pride of Milwaukee, which were soon to be the setting for a truly beautiful spectacle. The weather in the after- noon proved a confirmation of the morning ' s promise, and the enthusias- tic Alumni recounted adventures of the early 70 ' s, and sang their ancient college songs in groups about the en- closed arena. Even the dignified So- phomore condescends to bestow a wink or sly kick at a levity-loving Fresh- man, and meeting one another, the So- phomore and Senior will try to pre- serve a grave demeanor while holding converse on the Peace Conference in London, when they are in truth burst- ing with " dope " on the coming game. There was a convulsive shnddu ' among the phalanx of peanut wag .js, and the crowd is seen surging into Die bleachers. The two bands on - itl.er side of the field, blared forth in one grand never-ending discord. Har- mony was not to be considered now, and the sole idea was to make them- selves heard amidst the volumes of sound rolling down from the stands above. The Indiana stand was filled to its utmost capacity, and bedecked in all the sanguine hues that the in- genuity of the decorators could con- trive to place upon its lengthy front. The enormous sea of cardinal in the center of the stand, was a strange con- trast to the neutral tints of the disin- terested spectators on the edges. It resembled one enormous ruby, trimmed with a setting of gorgeous jewels dis- playing vari-colored fires, satellites to the ever present red. This blazing sea of color was not superior, however, to the other side of the bleachers, where the blue of Illinois was predom- inant as the color, and also blazed forth in a mild defiance toward its more vociferous brother, directly in front. In the dressing rooms to one side, the respective teams are getting their last " rub-down " before entering the field. The Indiana coach had pro- cured a certain preparation as a spirit- raiser for the team, a concoction of pineapple juice, iron, and other in- gredients entirely non-alcoholic, and each one of the team had to suffer a glassful before entering the field. A THE REDWOOD. 171 certain feverish energy was noticeable in Munson, and the coach in order to make the Indian ' s condition better, if possible, forced him to drink two glasses of the medicine. An unnatural flush was upon his brows, that depict- ed mental fatigue, which lent to his eyes a brilliance that was dazzling, while every muscle of his body could be seen to be quivering slightly. He heard the directions of the coach in a listless manner, and as the gong rang and the impatient players pranced on the gridiron after the manner of young colts, his was not the elastic tread of the John Munson of old. Banker Mun- son saw from the stands and won- dered, while the f aithful admirers of the red immediately came to their feet with a roar. Munson, Munson, Munson, boomed over the field again and again, the resonant echoes vying with one other to spread the petition. The painful flush deepened, but Munson answered with a grave smile. The coin flashed brightly in air, and the combatants having found their positions, the play commenced. The game from begin- ning was a great, soul-stirring battle of the forwards and seldom did the ball reach Munson or his fellows in the back field. The game was played so evenly that the vast crowd roared at the least little dash or gain. Cleverness matched brilliance, wit matched its more awkward opponent, strength, in such a manner as to elicit a continual cheer from the bleachers. But suddenly the play changes. One or two scrums and Bergez of Illinois starts on a splendid run down the field with the ball, which has been passed to him by the halfback. He easily passes the forwards, and finds directly in his path the deadly Munson, crouched like a tiger about to spring, ready to inter- cept any manoeuver of the on-coming Bergez. Munson suddenly darts for- ward like an eagle and subperbly tack- ling his antagonist, throws him clean- ly over his head, and procuring the ball dashes down the field in an ut- terly bewildering manner. Nothing is seen of him for seconds at a time as he dashes, darts, and swerves always forward and has at last passed through the mob behind. He now has a clear field save for the fullback Johnston. Not a sound is heard in the living oceans of enthusiasts on either side, and all gaze with startling eyes at such a spectacle as had never before been seen on the old ball field. There was Munson tearing down the field at a speed which could have never been equaled in five olympiads, his blazing eyes to be clearly seen by all an object of terror at once to his opponents, and of astounded satisfaction to his sup- porters. Johnston moves quickly for- ward, and being in excellent position to tackle, suddenly launches himself forward at the on-coming figure. The anxiety in the stands was at bursting point, for all knew as well as the play- ers themselves that if Johnston stopped Munson, one of the two would be seri- ously injured. But a mighty gasp re- 173 THE REDWOOD. lieves the tension for at the psycholog- ical moment Munson rises beautifully into the air and leaps at least two feet over Johnston ' s bending form, and then rushes onward toward the try of the game and victory. It is the end of the game and pandemonium reigns su- preme. As the red sea encompassed the Egyptians under Pharoah, so also did this great living mass sweep down upon the victorious team, and, strange- ly enough, none escaped save Munson, who appeared trembling before the coach. The latter too full for words, handed Munson the telegram, and waited silently for the effect. Munson said not a word, but the anguish and despair depicted on his countenance would have melted the hardest of hearts. The dressing room door sud- denly opened, and Banker Munson entered. The smile of congratulation was struck from his face as he saw the ghostly pallor of his son. The latter, however, leaped forward and said in tones piteously pentinent : " My father, I knew you would not ask it of me , but you see I got it too late. Goodbye. At any minute now I may die. I have taken a poison which 1 found in my medicine-bag, and which was handed down by my ancestors from generation to generation. " The father stood transfixed with horror. The stoicism and feverish despair of the lad was so great that it held him paralyzed, as the eye of the deadly cobra holds the flut- tering little bird in midair in order that he may not lack his breakfast. The coach, who, up to this, had stood penitently by, now rushed frantically for a doctor. He luckily found one on the grounds, and returned with all haste to the dressing rooms. Munson lay in his father ' s arms, cold and still, a purplish tinge mingling with the pal- lor on his cheeks. The father was cry- ing like a child as the doctor walked up and felt Munson ' s pulse. " Why, he burst out, this young fellow is very much alive, he is only in a cataleptic f it ! " After administering restora- tives, he made a stomach test and said : " This young man has taken a poison made from certain roots, and to which iron is a direct antidote. I see that he has also taken a medicine contain- ing iron, and this coma is the result. At this moment, however, Munson ' s lips began to twitch, a shudder passed through his body, his eyes slowly opened, and realizing that he was not dead he said: " Both God and you have been good to me, Pe-has-ka. " FRANK W. SCHILLING, 2d year High PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA The object of The Redwood is to gather together what is best in the literary work of the students, to record University doings and to l nit closely the hearts of the boys of the present and the past EDITORIAL STAFF EDITOR . - - BUSINESS MANAGER ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER REVIEWS _ - - ALUMNI - - - - UNIVERSITY NOTES - ATHLETICS ALUMNI CORRESPONDENTS STAFF ARTIST ASSOCIATE EDITORS THE EDITOR EXECUTIVE BOARD THE BUSINESS MANAGER ROY A. BRONSON, ' 12 ROBERT J. FLOOD, ' 13 HAROLD R. MCKINNON, ' 14 RODNEY A. YOELL, ' 14 WM. STEWART CANNON ' 16 EDWARD O ' CONNOR, ' 16 FRANK G. BOONE, ' 14 JCHAS. D. SOUTH, Litt. D., ' 01 I ALEX. T. LEONARD, A. B., ' 10 GEORGE B. LYLE, ' 13 THE EDITOR OF REVIEWS Address all communications to THE REDWOOD, University of Santa Clara, California Terms of subscription, SI. 50 a year; single copies 25 cents EDITORIAL COMMENTS College Editorial The territory allotted to the college editorial was recently called into question by a certain university magazine. Somewhere between its two covers a sarcasm was attempted on the editorials of different college magazines alluding to them as totally " foreign to student atmosphere. " Those articles to which it referred were for the most part, present day topics and comment on current events. Doubtless the commentator would restrict the field of college editorials to such antiques as, moral sermons on " The College Snob, " " Football Spirit, " " Our Team " and other arti- cles equally trite and worm-eaten. But we are forced to admit that we 174 THE REDWOOD. differ radically from this opinion and, we think, not without reason. Since an editorial is an official ex- pression of opinion, --ind a college mag- azine is a literary journal differing from others only in that its articles are written by a class which is limited, what incongruity, we ask, arises when an editorial is written which deals with topics of the day and is not neces- sarily enveloped in the stuffy cloak of this restricted " student atmos- phere? " But as far as student atmosphere goes, it would seem to the ordinary ob- server that a student should take a vital, if not an active, interest in cur- rent events as intimately connected with his welfare as a member of so- ciety, and that in this sense an article of this type would be in a student sphere, just as much as an article on " Government Ownership of Rail- ways " is to the reader of the North American Review. Any person, then, who would banish all such items from his magazine (and everyone else ' s) does so arbitrarily, fixing his own standards of college editorials and limiting himself o a field so time-worn and hackneyed that he does well to dress his articles anew. Return to the Classics We note with much satisfaction that an- other voice joins in the chorous against electivism in a recent issue of The Dial (Chicago). The pro- tests against President Eliot ' s little pet have increased marvelously during the past two years, till one wonders some of our more advanced institu- tions of learning still cling tenaciously to the method of early " specializal- tion, " " practical training " and " ma- chine made " educations. The writer sees a grievous fault in the modern educational system from the great depravity of literary taste in the undergraduate. He finds the col- lege litterateur, (the type of student most intellectually alert), a slave to the modern demagogues of literature with a total disregard of all the old standard poets, authors and dramat- ists. Says he : " I have known students who " spe- cialized " in the drama, without even enjoying a nodding acquaintance (such as one gets in translations) with Sophocles or Euripides, Moliere or Racine, without so much as an ability to read the Elizabe han English of Shakespeare — one of them, indeed, ad- mitted to " hating " Shakespeare with particular fervor. The new gods are Wells and Shaw, Meredith and Chesterton, Ibsen (already a lit- tle old fashioned) , Strindberg, the Irish school, indeed any writers who put genuine " red blood " into their work who have broken violently with tradi- tion and who have a " deep love for the primitive. " The writer styles this " regrettably frivolous, " and we feel inclined to add that it is not only frivolous and regret- tably so, but also the offspring of an THE REDWOOD. 175 immature superficiality which results from an unguided mind. The type re- ferred to is one whose ambition it is to excel in the " high-brow " parlor talk of a sham literary society. We recognize the type as one from the in- stitution where from freshman the youth is able to elect his studies as he sees fit with no one to guide his tastes nor curb his youthful ideas. The classical education, where one took his studies as prescribed and completed his general education ere he became the specialist, whatever else it did or failed to do, it produced men whose tastes were less vulgar than are those of to-day. So after all it seems as if the practical education is less prac- tical than the impractical one (for such the old classic school is styled). " Fortunately we are just beginning to grasp this truth, " says the writer referred to, " which is manifested by a reaction from the excesses of the elective system — -or rather a return to the old point of view by the attempts to revive the classics at Amherst, the requirements at Oberlin and Rutgers and by the tendency at Harvard, Yale and Princeton toward a general rather than a special education. " To us, this recent tendency to- wards a return to the classics, is ex- ceedingly gratifying, to say the least, for we count ourselves one among the very few schools in the United States who have adhered closely to the tradi- tional course. The modern system of specialization and " quick returns " , by a silent consent, seems to have been a failure. The return seems to vindicate the old regime. A modern educational idol topples from its pedes- tal of clay. Well, the holidays are over, and once more we find ourselves in the " sanctum " perusing our contempo- raries from " Exdom " and deriving therefrom much benefit. But we feel a little belligerent, and the cause is this, that too many of our leading College Journals have dropped their " Exchange Column, " and sub- stituted nothing nearly so valuable nor interesting in its place. An Exchange Column should play an important part in the general " get- up " of the book, and certainly it is the most productive of results, as it is un- doubtedly the widest read portion of the periodical by outsiders. We all need advice, and kindly criticism, for as the dictum runs " There ' s so much good in the worst of us and so much bad in the best of us, that it shouldn ' t behoove any of us " to uphold ourselves and ignore the rest of contemporary college journalism. To develope critical powers, is one of the prime objects of all instructive lit- erature ; why, therefore, should a jour- nal whose absolutely ultimate basis of existence is devoted to literary bene- fit, neglect this very important depart- ment. But enough of this, why continue, we are sure that our point is well taken, therefore, let us scan the wel- come pages of our " fellows " and for- get our surliness. California Occident It ' s a neat book, " The ' Occident " is, and the University of Califor- nia has no cause to blush at the bearer of her literary honors. We were well repaid, on glancing between the covers, and in verse we found several morsels which just suited our taste. " Night Songs " we thought the best, " The Bards " is also good, but a little smoothing over the lines and a bit of attention paid to " images " would im- prove this contribution materially. " The Passionate Desert, " a story, strikes one, not only by its title, which is good, but by its telling, which is better. A western atmosphere well sustained and a plot strong, but not melodramatic, holds the attention, and one feels repaid for the time spent in reading it. THE REDWOOD. 177 " Why Is History, " an essay, ans- wers a frequently asked question, as regards the value of tlio erudite study, and does so in an entertaining fashion, that convinces one, but in justice to the author, we beg to state that all educated men recognize its value, and it were better, if he would turn his talents to a subject more fruitful. Another essay, " The Ideal of Gen- tlehood, " is timely and should be pub- lished as a brochure, in these sadly decadent days of Suffragettes and Labor Leaders. The story " My Lord ' s Venison, " is well conceived and par- takes somewhat of the French style, but is not thoroughly worked out, and hence becomes amateurish. The rest of the publication balances well, but why not an exchange column? ,„ .„ The D ' Youville Maga- D Youyille . jyiagazine substantial publication, and since it is a quarterly, a well-filled table of contents is assured. There is one point, however, that should be noted at the outset, and it is uncut pages. The double leaf adds nothing to the beauty of the book, but affords only a trivial, though annoying, hin- derance in reading it, cut them ladies it saves time ! An observer can not help noticing the qualities of the es- says published, and if it were not for a certain " schoolish " style they would be all that is desirable in this species of composition. " The Roman Wom- an, " and " After Reading the Tem- pest " struck us as being the best, but " Horace At Home " is also commend- able. The stories are not quite up to the standard established by the essays, nevertheless they are far from being poor. " Out of the Fog " has a Dick- ensesque setting and tone through- out, but why confine the plot to two pages and a quarter? A London night, and Lon- don town is too large a theme to occu- py such cramped quarters. " The Feud Child " strikes one as being human, and the handling of the story is com- mensurate with the " motif. " Good, is the word that describes it. As regards poetry, we miss it. There is quite a paucity of verse considering the size of the periodical. " Two Son- nets On Faith " were good, each breaths a spirit of sincerity and they, or it, is handled well. Considering the book, altogether, it is good, biit there is still room for im- provement, particularly in the depart- ments. ¥T • rivT L The University ot Univ. of North ,, , ,. ,, ,. ,, North Carolina Maga- CarolinaMag. . -., . , zme, although rather small in contents for November, con- tains several good contributions that are a pleasure to read and review. " Dinner With Dr. Johnson " is a clev- erly written sketch and one a bit un- usual. It is handled well, but could be improved as regards to length. The verse " The Way of the Winds, " is a nicely worded poem, and is placed in ' a smooth musical meter. The figures 178 THE REDWOOD. are good and the theme pleasant. It should have been placed in a more prominent portion of the book ; there it would have been more effective. " The Vacuum, " a story, has an un- usual plot, and shows talent on the part of the author. It is well con- ceived, but is not handled in a manni-r that would give its fall value. Tlie ending is cramped and seemingly hur- ried. A little attention paid also tn periodic construction would not be wasted. The article entitled " Hun- dred Days in Fort Alexis, " is nicely written, but is a mere recital of the brutalities of a Russian prison. The matter is not interesting and not worth the telling. The end might just as well have been the beginning, and the middle could fit any place. Unless some great lesson is to be drawn from such a theme, it were far better if it were left unrecorded. The departments of the book are well written, but since so much talent is shown in so little matter, we would ask the Editors to increase at all costs the size of their publication. St.Mary ' s Collegian Our old friend, " The Collegian, ' ' from ' St. Mary ' s College, Calif., came into the office, dressed in a neat holiday attire, and bearing some good matter on the inside. The opening poem is good, but could have been cut down with better results. The playlet, " The Governor ' s Gift, " is well writ- ten and comes up to a skillful and un- expected climax. The essay on " Hor- ace Howard Furness " is timely and nicely written, but should have been a bit longer. Several stories, notably " The Welch ina- of To n Carroll, " ar)- pealed to us, and taking everything in- to consideration the issue at hand is a representative one. Indeed you have com- The Tattleij menced the new year very well. First issues are generally expressive of talent, but usually along the principle that good things come in small packages. The January issue of " The Tattler, " from Randolph Macon College, is, however, an exception to this rule. In poetry the book is very fortunate, and several pieces are among the best that we have seen this year. " Night " is daintily written and has an expressive meter and rhyme-scheme, but the last line in the second stanza almost rings amateurish. " A Fragment " is also good, but is in- clined rather to pessimism, with a tinge of Omar ' s. " What without knowing whither hurried whence, " etc., thrown in. " Mercy " we liked best, and in it we found the true poetic spirit, well expressed and voicing a worthy theme. We reprint it below. " The Friendship of Saylin, " a story of modern day polities, is not only un- usual in treatment, but also in plot. There is a sane style throughout, with but very little exaggeration in con- versation. It ends smoothly and with- THE REDWOOD. 179 out any straining or evincing of a hur- ried desire to close. The author is to be congratulated. " The Magic Kiss " is also good, but is a bit flamboyant in parts, a general toning down and smoothing would benefit the article. The essay, " Char- acteristics of the Poetry of Coleridge " shows careful preparation on the part of the authors, and is valuable in shed- ding a little new light on that peculiar and high-flown poet. The story " A Boy There Was " is also deserving of notice, as are the departments. If the periodical keeps up the standard set by this issue it will soon gain an extreme- ly high place. The Fordham Monthly The Fordham Month ly for December is a good number and con- tains several stoiies that are co;n!acn,I- able. " The Spirit of the Wood, " at- tracted our attention, as did " Feaj May Save. " The latter, however, is carelessly written and not well con- ceived. In several of the poems the opening verse is novel, particularly in its mechanical structure. The book loses, however, by not having an essay. Also too much space is taken up by the depart- ments. The magazine is more newsy than literary. We also acknowledge the receipt of the following, space forbids extended review: Chapparal, Schoolman, Sola- man, Mercerian, Ephebeum, Witwo? - thian, Gonzaga, Loyola, Springhillan, Ava Maria, Harvard Monthly Vic- toria, Georgetown, The Laiirel, Acad- emia, Marquette, Vassar, Mount An- gel Cath. Univ. Bulletin, also Wil- liams ' Monthly, vevy neat in format. MERCY In yonder west the sun ' s bright ban- ners pale, The crimson fire grows slowly faint and dim, The silent stars all luminous unveil — And what is man that Thou shouldst visit him? Obedient to Thy mighty laws they go ; The spheres around the sun in sol- emn swing; Ten thousand worlds, unending, row on row. All safe beneath the shadow of Thy wing. Thou comest in the tempest and the storm ; Thou ridest on the thundercloud ' s black rim; Thou raisest mighty whirlwinds with Thine arm — And what is man that Thou shouldst visit him? A puny weakling, whom to know ' s to spurn ; Yet shall this weakling triumph at his death. For though from dust to dust he must return. E ' en Thou, O Lord, hast breathed in him Thy breath. — From The Tattler, Randolph Macon College, Va., 1913. 180 THE REDWOOD. BOOK REVIEWS Saints and Places There are many travelers, and many books on travel, but none of them can set down more entertainingly the scenes which they have witnessed than John Ayseough. author of Faustiila. He writes in a keen, refreshing style of the places that he has visited and the saints that they are associated with. His pictures are vivid, and the manner of description brilliant. There is also an appropriate vein of wit run- ning through the volume, and the de- scriptions are aided by many splendid photos done in sepia. The volume is tastily boimd in blue, and is published for $1.50 net, by Ben- ziger Bros., New York and Cincinnati. MODERN SOCIALISM A New Brochure by Rev. H. J. Maeckel, S. J. An able brochure has just been pub- lished by the Central Bureau of the Central Verein, entitled " Modern Socialism. " Rev. Herman J. Maeckel, S. J., is the author of this treatise, which shows how Socialism has changed its policies for opportunistic reasons, adhering however to its fun- damental principles. After defining modern Socialism the author explains its principles, its teachings with re- gard to private property, to Christian marriage and to religion. One can readily see from this brief resume that the author emphasizes the important phases of his subject and presents those features to his readers which call for the closest attention on the part of Catholics, and anyone interested in this all-important and vital question. This brochure can be procured from the Central Bureau of the Central Verein, 307 Temple Bldg., St. Louis, Mo., at 5 cents per copy; 12 copies, 50 cents ; 100 for $4.00. The Holy Hour By Right Rev. Benjamin J. Keilly, D. D., Bishop of Savannah. The author in his foreword says : " I do not think it necessary to say a word of the great spiritual benefit to be de- rived from this devotion of the Holy Hour ; one has but to make it to realize what hidden treasures of piety and love are found in it. There are many ways of making the Holy Hour and it would of course be highly presumptu- ous to claim that the way suggested by me is the best. I can only say that it has been in use with us for quite a while and is enjoyed by the people, and I believe has been the means of much good. On this account I have determined to publish these (Sugges- tions. " Price 10c. Intercollegiate Debates. (Vol. II. Edited by Egbert R. Nichols) Intercollegiate Debates, Volume II, is a long-expected sequel to the first volume bearing that title, edited by Paul M. Pearson. The new volume, however, contains many new features THE REDWOOD. 181 and aids to the general reader and college debator alike. The work consists of the most receat college debates in the leading educa- tional institutions of the United States on the most live and up-to-date topics. A copious appendix containing stat- istics on debating among American colleges and universities for the year of 1910-11, with partial records of pre- vious years and also a list of general references on debating, adds material- ly to the value of the book. It should enjoy a great success and prove a val- uable aid to the college debater. Hinds, Noble and Eldridge, N. Y., $1.50. Intorsitg Note It was with reluctance Return that we broke away from the fireside to return to old Santa Clara and resume studies. But, once returned, the pangs of homesickness are drowned in the mirth and shouts of the campus. After exchanging our good wishes for the year and relating the good times en- joyed during our holiday recess, we must turn our thoughts to the study of this half-year and with sturdy deter- mination, backed by good resolutions, we take to our books again. On the evening of De- Show cember 19th an enter- tainment was given in the University Auditorium for the benefit of athletics. It was an unusual show. Vaudeville shows are not, in themselves, unknown, but seldom have we witnessed such perfectly balanced vaudeville. Every act was good and it would, indeed, be difficult to pick the headliner. The Harmony Four, of San Jose, rendered some exceedingly good har- mony, both vocal and instrumental. " Swede " Nelson, accompanied by Ed O ' Neil of San Francisco, sang some new and catchy songs in a man- ner all his own. A vocal solo by Miss Clarisse Smith of San Jose scored a tremendous hit, and we hope to hear Miss Smith fre- quently in the future. Messrs. McKenzie, Gaxiolo, Wal- fish and Scherzer were an entire show in themselves. Their act, lasting a full half hour, was replete with good songs, dialogues and even grand opera. The University Quartette, consist- ing of Messrs. Haskamp, Askam, Zar- ich and Best, was very good, and though the skyline of the group was ragged, the harmony was perfection. Recitations by Mr. P. O ' Connor were well given, especially his imper- sonation of George Cohan. Space will not permit us to continue the details, suffice it to say that the whole affair was good, even to the " movies. " Too much praise cannot be given Messrs. Bronson and Flood for the manner in which the affair was managed. New Staff Member We read with pleasure of the appointment of William Stewart Can- non to the Redwood staff. W. S. is a popular figure on the campus, a mem- ber of the class of ' 16 and House of Philhistorians and secretary of the former body. Congratulations, Bill! THE REDWOOD. 183 With the arrival of Joseph Leo (Patsy) O ' Rourke on the scene, base- ball will soon be in full swing. " Patsy " in not new at the coaching garne, having had charge of the Priu(julon squaJ in lOiiner ; eais. lie is well-known in baseball circles as a heady and aggressive player. He is now with the Senators and formerly of St. Louis Nationals. He takes charge of the squad immediately. Lecture On December 17th Freshman were enter- tained by an interest- ing and instructive stereopticon lec- ture delivered by Mr. J. G. Hubbard. Mr. Hubbard is an old Santa Clara student (ex ' 04) and a graduate of U. C. Department of Engineering. Since he received his diploma he has been connected with the Oriental Consoli- dated Mining Co., the largest corpora- tion of its kind in the Orient. He act- ed in the capacity of manager of one of their largest properties in Korea, and therefore had many interesting things to tell the class regarding min- ing, engineering and chemistry. He also told of the people of the Far East and their customs. Sanctuary Banquet The St. John Berch- mans Sanctuary Soci- ciety held their annual banquet on the evening of December 15. The banquet hall was well deco- rated and the menu was all that could be desired. Bert Hardy, the prefect, acted as toast-master, and the speakers for the evening were Messrs. Aurrecaechea, T. Kearns, R. Flood, J. Noonan, J. Fitzpatriek and H. McGowan. Messrs. Ivancovich and Vaughan director and director pro tern respectively, and Fathers Boland and Burke spoke a few words to the members. The musical programme was well arranged. The quartette, composed of Messrs. Hardy, Haskamp, E. Flood and R. Flood, rendered some original songs and made a der-ided hit with the audience. Solos by Messrs. Haskamp, J. Christy and J. Lyons and a duet by Messrs. Flood and Haskamp, complet- ed the evening ' s programme. The solos by Messrs. Lyons and Christy deserve special mention. They were encored again and again and the mem- bers were still applauding when the director informed the gathering of the lateness of the hour. The boys passed a very enjoyable evening. Freshman Class The Freshman class held their first regular meeting on December 16th, the business being the election of officers, the drawing up of a constitu- tion and the discussion of plans for the ensuing term. The officers elected were: Mr. E. J. Ryan, S. J., Moder- ator; Joseph R. Parker, President; Jos. A. Noonan, Vice-President; Wm. Stewart Cannon, Secretary; Ray Em- merson, Treasurer; Harry Whelaln, Sergeant-at-Arms ; Geo. A. Nicholson, 184 THE REDWOOD. Athletic Manager. The captains for the various teams were : Donald Davies, Baseball; J. Ahern, Basket- ball, and M. J. Leonard, Track. The class of ' 16 promises many surprises for the student body, and the captains of the various teams are out for inter- class honors in every branch. We learn with regret of the unfor- tunate accident that befell Hial Cleg- horn, a popular member of the Soph, class. On Christmas Eve, while at- tempting to board a train at Ross Val- ley, Hial lost his footing and was thrown to the ground, breaking his right leg and suffering lacerations about his face and head. He is now on the way to recovery and hopes to be among us soon. Mr. Ivancovich We were pleasantly surprised to see Mr. Ivancovich among us again after his illness. He is looking well again and will be able to resume his duties this term. TheCo-Opera- tive Store This institution, as yet in its infancy, has ac- complished marvelous things in the small space of two years. Under the able management of Mr. Jos. L. Thomas, the store has grown from a mere hole in the wall to its now spacious quarters, and the trade has grown in proportion. Time was when we called it the " pie stand, " and the mention of it meant pie, ice-cream, jelly beans. Soon new lines were add- ed until at the present day we may purchase anything from a tack to a diamond without going a hundred feet out of our way. But did you see the latest lines? We now have a shoe de- partment where we can buy almost anything in footwear from dancing pumps to gum boots. Soon we ' ll have dress suits for sale, and even it is ru- mored that " Joe " is dickering for several automobile agencies. The en- tire student body owe thanks to Mr. Thomas and his assistants for the able way in which they have conducted this business and we hope they shall con- tinue in the good work in the future. r J.U jr Miss Catherine Mc- Ueatn of „ . , . Miss McCann f;, " " ' f ° , J 4th m San Jose, hav- ing reached her eightieth year. Miss McCann was the donor of the McCann Medal, given each year for the best short story in honor of her nephew, Daniel McCann. She has been an exemplary Catholic and a charter member of the Ladies ' Sodality of Saint Claire ' s Church. May she rest in peace. University Notes The Department of Mechanical Engineer- ing received a set of blue prints showing the exact size of every part of a 26 " by 48 Rolling Mill Type Corliss engine and a set of celluloid tracings for lay- ing out power plants. These were do- nated by the Murray Iron Works Co. THE REDWOOD. 185 of Burlington, Iowa. The CometMotor Works Co. of Chicago donated a set of prints showing details of a %-horse- power gasoline engine and of a 3-horse- power motorcycle engine and the De La Vergne Machine Co. of New York donated a large framed photograph of a 600-ton refrigerating machine. Junior Debat ing Society The J. D. S. was re- organized for the year under the direction of Mr. Ivancovich. The officers elected were Thos. H. Davis, Vice-President ; Joseph R. Aurrecoechea, Secretary ; Thos. R. O ' Connor, Treasurer; Claude B. Sweezy, Sergeant-at-Arms. he Faculty of Law held a banquet during the holidays with Dean J. H. Campbell acting as toastmaster. The work accomplished during the last Law Faculty Banquet semester was reviewed and the plans for the ensuing year discussed. Those present were President Father Mor- rissey, S. J. ; Father C. A. Buckley, S. J. ; Father John J. Laherty, S. J. ; Prof. Clarence C. Coolidge, Prof. Nicholas Bowden, Prof. James P. Sex, Prof. Edwin Coolidge, Prof. L. E. O ' Keefe, S. J. It is of great interest Father Cichi to the " old boys " to know that Fr. An- thony Cichi is to celebrate the Golden Jubilee of his last vows as a Jesuit on February 2nd. The date also marks the seventieth anniversary of his en- trance into the Society of Jesus. Fr. Cichi was actively engaged in teaching chemistry at Santa Clara for thirty-five years. He is now Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. Fr. Cichi en- tered his ninetieth year on January 17th. Alumni Club The University of San- of San Fran- ta Clara Alumni Club Cisco held an informal ban- quet at the St. Germain on December 12th. The committee of arrangements, which ably saw to the details, were Mr. J. F. McDevitt, President; Mr. Elmer Westlake, Mr. George Wool- rich, Rev. Fr. Laherty, S. J., and Mr. John Riordan. The banquet was well attended and proved to be a very successful affair. Among the speakers were : Presi- dent Father Morrisey, S. J., B. S., ' 91 ; Hon. B. V. Sargent, B. S., ' 84, M. S., ' 85 ; Mr. T. C. Van Ness, Lewis Bying- ton, Mr. Richard Queen, Mr. John J. O ' Toolo, U. S., ' i O; AitSSiS. J-iUiULLL, B. S., ' 57, Van Ness, Menton Hon, ' 01, gave reminiscences of Santa Clara in Lhe early filLics. One aiiecduLe was particularly interesting. It seems that when Fr. Nobili was in search of stu- dents for the school he was to begin he favored the father of Mr. Burnett by calling and asking that " Mr. Burnett send his two boys to his school when it started. " What a difference time makes. It will be remembered that Mr. Burnett ' s father, Peter Burnett, was the first governor of California. Rev. Fr. Sesnon, ' 04, charmed all by his singing and playing. The evening was brouerht to a close by a few more musical nuiiibcrs, iu vvliieli Mcssi ' s. r.Io- Kenzie, Sherzer, Hefferan and others participated. ' 87 We were pleased to note in the San Francisco Examiner that Father McQuaide, B. S., ' 87, A. B., ' 88, lunched with the na- tion ' s Chief Executive on January 6th. Father McQuaide renewed his old friendship with President Taft when he went to Washington, D. C, as a member of the San Francisco delega- tion to secure the Exposition of 1915. Father McQuaide is the pastor of the Church of The Sacred Heart, San Francisco. THE REDWOOD. 187 Charles M. Cassin, A. B., ' 88 ' 88, one of the most promi- nent and able attoi-neys-at- law in this portion of the State an-l until recently having offices at Santa Cruz, has removed his law offices to the Bank of San Jose Building, San Jose. Mr. Casson is the father of a fine family, and all the ' ' old boys " know that Santa Clara Valley ' s cli- mate is unsurpassed for the health of growing youth, which is probably the reason for the change. went to the Boston Americans, the present champions. Stanley Hitchborn, Ex- ' 90, ' 90 visited the College lately while staying with relatives in town. Mr. Hitchborn has been quite a fig- ure in contracting circles, having done nearly all the Santa Fe Railroad ' s work for the past few years. The new stations on the way to Kansas City are his work ; also the Harvey Houses, which take the place of " diners " on that road. Mr. Hitchborn is now at Richmond constructing the Santa Fe ' s terminal. Chas. Graham, A. B., ' 98, ' 98 paid us a visit in the early part of January. " Charley " has been part owner and manager of the Sacramento Ball team in the Pa- cific Coast League, but has withdrawn from baseball. He intends to devote his time to a large automobile business which he has built up in Sacramento. Mr. Graham was a star in the national game while here, and upon graduating ' 02 Robert O ' Keefe of Folsom, Cal., has been married for the last three months. The bride is a Cincinnati girl. " Bobby " was another of those great ball players Santa Clara is famed for. He has been pitching for the Cin- cinnati " Reds, " but next season is ex- pected to go to the Eastern League. J. G. Hubbard, Ex.- ' 04, is ' 04 now living in Santa Clara with his wife. He was the representative of the University of Santa Clara in the Chem- ists ' Convention last summer. Mr. Hubbard has become quite well- known in connection with the Oriental Consolidated Mining Co. of Korea. Fie was chief chemist and manager for sev- eral years. He is now corresponding superintendent of the mines, which are the largest of their kind in Asia. Martin V. Merle, A. B., ' 06, 06 has taken up his residence at the University and will im- mediately begin getting together the cast of his latest drama, " The Mis- sion Play of Santa Clara. " With the finishing touches applied, Mr. Merle is confident that his work will be attended by great feuccess, even to rival Clay M. Greene ' s passion play, " Nazareth, " and Mr. Merle ' s own famous works. 188 THE REDWOOD. ' 08 The class of 1908 have form- ed a permanent organization. It would be well for other classes to unite in a like manner, if for no other reason than to keep the class spirit alive. But such a body is capable of greater things, as is shown by the men of ' 08. They came together in the offices of Beach Heffernan in the Hewes Bldg., San Francisco, and with Mr. Heffernan as temporary chairman they proceeded to the election of per- manent officers. The following offi- cers were chosen : Mr. Harry A. McKenzie, Class Pres- ident. Mr. Francis M. Heffernan, Treas- urer. Dr. Anthony B. Diepenbroek, Secre- tary. Father Robert J. O ' Connor, Chap- lain. The business of the evening consist- ed of planning a present to the Uni- versity, the nature of which the class wishes to keep a secret for reasons of their own. They also discussed plans for a ' ' quinquennial ' ' celebration. It was decided that the Class of 1908 hold an informal smoker, to which the Class of 1913 be invited. The date will be set later, most prob- ably in June. A committee composed of Mr. Frank Heffernan and Mr. Harry A. McKen- zie was appointed to prepare a pro- gram. At the annual banquet of the Alumni Association the class will attend in a body and render their class song. A few of the Class of 1908 have been visitors to their Alma Mater. Father O ' Connor, who is chaplain of the class, said mass in the Boy ' s Chapel, where he used to pray as a student. He is curate of St. Francis ' Church in San Francisco. Dr. Anthony Diepenbroek was down for a last visit before going east. Dr. Diepenbroek was an interne at St. Mary ' s in San Francisco, and is now returning to St. Vincent ' s, New York. The position as interne at St. Vin- cent ' s is a coveted one, and gained solely by merit. Dr. Diepenbroek graduated fourth in his class at Har- vard, though just recovering from ill- ness. Harry McKenzie, who has been a prominent factor in making the several entertainments given lately by the College the success they were, ran down for a day. Harry has been ap- pointed chief clerk to District Attor- ney Fickert of San Francisco. Con- gra tulations ! Leo J. Pope, Ex.- ' 09, was a ' 09 visitor at the initial basket- ball game of this semester. Mr. Pope expressed his approval of the further improving of Santa Clara and was delighted to see the good work progressing so rapidly. Mr. Pope is living in Oakland at the present, but intends to go East to the larger uni- versities this fall. THE REDWOOD. 189 ' 11 Edward MacDonnell, Ex.- ' 11, has joined the Domini- cans at Benicia, where he now wears the white robe. " Eddie " was a most popular boy in the " yard, " and we all wish happiness in his career. The students and faculty of ' 12 the University of Santa Clara have a " good angel " in James B. Smith. Mr. Smith ' s latest favor is in the interest of athletics. A much-needed car of cinders has been placed on the siding and is being quickly unloaded for rebuilding our track, which has been sadly in need of repair. Our benefactor is the head of the Western Coal and Fuel Co., and on account of his generous interest in our University was made an Honorary Alumnus at the Annual Alumni Ban- quet in 1912. ' 12 Found! Fred O. Hoedt, A. B., ' 12, has at last been heard from. We were be- ginning to feel sorely neglected when a welcome note arrived bringing the news that Fred is a dental student at the University of California. Fred is living in San Francisco. Robert E. Jeffress, ' 12, is on ' 12 a leave of absence from the University of California. " Bob " has been extremely ill during the past few years, after leaving this institution. He is living at home in Piedmont, Oakland, and hopes to take up his college work soon again. With the football season a thing of the past except for the pleasing recol- lections, and never to be forgotten vic- tories, attention has been called to the numerous other lines of sport. The athletics of the year were started with an illustrious record made by the foot- ball team, and there is no reason under the present conditions, why the high standard already set should not be continued. Most of the members of last year ' s basketball, baseball and track teams have returned, and will be on hand to do their part when called on. Graduate Manager White has al- ready arranged a fine schedule for both the basketball and baseball teams, and will no doubt arrange sufficient meets to give the track men plenty to do. BASKETBALL. Captain Momson of the basketball team has a large squad out for the team, and positions are being held at a premium. Three of the members of last year ' s victorious team, namely: Voight, Momson and Melchoir, are on deck and working out daily on the gymnasium court. The loss of Jack and Chester Palmtag, the remaining members of last year ' s quintet, will be keenly felt. Flood, Ahern, Gilmore, and Heinninger, seem to have the best prospects of obtaining regular posi- tions on the team, as regards the two vacancies. So far the team has taken part in Ihree games. The first was with tlie Peninsula team of San Mateo, which was won in an easy fashion by Santa Clara, the final score being Santa Clara 60, Peninsula team 0. All the members of the team played important parts in the scoring, every player be- ing accountable for a large number of goals. The Bon Durre team of San Fran- cisco was the next team to line up against the basketballers. Both teams fought hard through the whole game, THE REDWOOD. 191 but Sant Clara managed to emerge from the affair nine points to the good. the result being 39 points for Santa Clara; Bon Durres 30. On Saturday, Jan. 18th, the basket- ball team left in automobiles for I,iv- ermore to play a game scheduled with the team of that town. The game re- sulted in a victory for the Livermoro team. The end of the first half found the score 13 to 9 against the college boys. In the second half our boys started off with a rush and for a while it looked as if they would overcome the lead which Livermore had already gained in the first half. However, poor goal throwing proved a great handicap, and many time goals apparently cer- tain were misjudged or .carelessly thrown, and Santa Clara was finally obliged to be content with the score standing 38 to 31 with Livermore on the long end. The team has yet a fine schedule ahead with trips to Santa Cruz, Wat- sonville, San Francisco and Oakland. BASEBALL. Patsy O ' Rourke, captain and man- ager of the Sacramento Coast League team of 1912, has arrived at the in- stitution and is ready for work. O ' Rourke is a man very familiar with the game, and his former experiences as captain should be a great asset to him as a coach, having given him much ability in handling players, and ob- taining the best results from them. He will be seriously handicapped, however, in one department of the game ; that is in respect to pitchers. So far there are only two men who can be looked forwar d to with any encour- agement. These players are Voight and Nino. Voight has had some ex- perience as a member of last year ' s second team, and has also played in amateur baseball to some extent. Nino is quite young and inexperi- enced, but has a good curve and an enormous amount of speed, with fair control. O ' Rourke has a good man to work on in Nino, and he will, no doubt, be seen in action in a number of the scheduled games. The other positions will all be taken care of, for the most part, by former varsity men. Davis is back at his old stand as catcher. Ramage will hold down the first sack, Tommy Ybar- rando will be at second, Zarick at short and Tramutolo at third. Hogan, Best, B. Fitzpatrick, Milburn, Besselo and several other promising young players are seeking positions in the outfield. On the whole Captain Zarick and Coach O ' Rourke are looking forward to a very successful year, and after the first two or three games will know where the material for the varsity team lies, and can then begin the sea- soning of their players and the en- grafting of team work. There has been some rumor of Santa Clara again meeting St. ' Mary ' s in baseball, but so far there has been nothing done, and in all probability the affair will not be taken seriously. 192 THE REDWOOD. although the game would create much interest, and would be a success from a financial standpoint. TRACK. During the past two or three years track athletics have been gaining more and more recognition at Santa Clara, the track is now looked upon as one of the major sports. Owing to this in- terest a dirth of material is out and the team which will represent Santa Clara this year will be far superior to any team yet turned out. With the cream of last year ' s team to pick from there is also much new material of the most promising nature. Heretofore the weight events have been Santa Clara ' s weak points, but this year they will be well taken care of by Kieley of I.es Ang ' les, wiio car- ' ies with him the distinction of being the second best developed man in the state. This honor was awarded him by the judges of the physical develop- ment contest, held under the auspices of the Los Angeles Athletic Club. In the sprints we still have with us Best, Hardy, Bronson and Haskamp; all point winners of last year ' s team. The quarter-mile will be well taken care of by Crane and Momson, who have both covered the distance in very fast time. Benneson, who has heretofore borne the laurels in the distances, is still suf- fering from injuries received in an automobile accident, and it is uncer- tain whether he will be seen in action this year or not. If he is able to get into any shape whatever, there is no doubt but what he will be a valuable asset. Captain Hardy has called his men out for early training, and the lack of condition experienced in former years, when the team trotted out for the first meet of the year, will be ab- sent. THE REDWOOD. : : W L K O V E R •• S H O E S •• We are showing advanced SPRING STYLES in English and High Toe models. Look us over before buying your next pair QUINN BRODER WALK-OVER BOOT SHOP 41 SOUTH FIRST STREET The home for the up-to-date college student to purchase his ready-to-wear clothing. We manufacture all our clothing, and it has that " so different look. " The snappy college style. Our tuxedo and full dress suits are up to the minute in style and finish. - THE REDWOOD. Pratt-Low Preserving Company PACKERS OF CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FRUITS IN GLASS A SPECIALTY SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA PROMPT SERVICE DEPENDABLE GOODS AT THE University Drug Co. Cor. Santa Clara Second St. SAN JOSE, CAL. Phone Temporary 140 A. PALADINI WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FISH DEALER Fresh, Salt, Smoked, Pickled, and Dried Fish 205 MERCHANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO Trade ivith Us for Good Service and Good Prices Special Prices Given in Quantity Purchases Try Us and Be Convinced VARGAS BROS. COMPANY Phone Santa Clara 120 SANTA CLARA Telephone, Oakland 2777 Hagens MEN ' S TAILORING FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC WOOLENS 521 12th Street OAKLAND, CAL. THE REDWOOD. The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society Hibernia Bank INCORPORATED 1864 Corner of Market, McAllister and Jones Streets SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. Members of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco ASSETS $58,059,830.40 Open Daily from 10:00 a. m. to 3:00 p. m. Saturdays from 10:00 a. m. to 12; 00 m. OPEN SATURDAY EVENINGS FROM 6 TO 8 O ' CLOCK FOR DEPOSITS ONLY THE REDWOOD. Telephones: Douglas 1570 ; Home J 1570 Palace Hardware Company Hardware, Tools and Cutlery Agents for P. and F, Corbin Building Hardware 581 Market Street San Francisco, Cal. When buying Drawing Instruments insist on Primo, " " Corona, " " Excelsior " or " University " Brands Sold exclusively by The Frederick Post Company 537 Market St. San Francisco Use Post ' s Drawing Inks Our Trade Mark Your Guarantee School Supplies our Specialty V. SALBERG 2 c per cue E. GADDI Umpire Pool Room Santa Clara, Cal. Mission Olive Oil m M i iM m lYllOOlWll V- 11VV V_yil for Medicinal or Table Use MADDEN ' S PHARMACY, Agents FRANKLIN STREET SANTA CLARA, CAL. Santa Clara Imperial Dry Cleaning Dye Works I. OLARTE, Proprietor Naptha Cleaning and Steaming of Ladies ' and Gents ' Garments Pressing and Repairing 1021 Franklin Street Telephone Santa Clara 131J Santa Clara, Cal. Wm. J. McKagney, Secretary R. F. McMahon, Presiden McMahon-McKagney Co., Inc. 52 West Santa Clara St. San Jose, Cal. THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY Carpets, Draperies, Furniture, Linoleums and Window Shades Telephone, San Jose 4192 Upholstering THE REDWOOD. Have you ever experienced the convenience RATES TO STUDENTS of a ground floor gallery? Bushnell Fotografer Branch Studios: 4J YlYSt Street SAN FRANCISCO c t i OAKLAND oan Jose, Cal. SAN JOSE BAKING CO. L. SCHWARTING, Manager The Cleanest and Most Sanitary Bakery in Santa Clara Valley We supply the most prominent Hotels Give Us a Trial Our Bread, Pies and Cakes are the Best Phone San Jose 609 433-435 Vine Street San Jose, CaJ. Ickelheimer Bros. Co. Gas and Electric Fixtures Lamps, Andirons, Fire-sets 439 Sutter Street San Francisco, Cal. THE REDWOOD. Veronica Water A Home Product that Challenges the World to Produce its Equal on the Human System After 17 Years ' Success on the Eastern Market and from the results and experi- ence we have had and produced for the suffering, we are prepared to put a case in your home for a ten days ' trial FREE and if it does not give you better results for Headaches, Constipation, Bilious- ness, Gastritis, Rheumatism, Sys- tetis, Dyspepsia, Malaria, etc.. ,:: iife: ' 4 SI " 9 than any remedy you ever used, return the three empty bottles and the nine full ones, and there will be no charge for the water used. If you find it as represented for your trouble pay your druggist 5.50 From the Superior Father of the Old Mission For the benefit of suffering humanity I wish to testify to the fact that " Veronica " Water is really obtained from the Veronica Medical Springs near Santa Barbara, California, and that the water has been used with very beneficial effects at the Old Mission. I have recommended the " Veronica " Water to friends and strangers, and all have only words of praise and gratitude in respect to its salu- tary influence. REV. PETER WALLISCHECK, Order of Franciscan Monl s, Santa Barbara, Cal. Distributed throughout the East by THE F. H. KIMBALL WATER CO. 402 S. Commercial Street, J. H. THOMAS, Prea. St. Louis, Mo. The Veronica Medical Springs Water Co. p. H. KIMBALL, President 2125 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. SOLD BY ALL DEALERS : : THE REDWOOD. I Evening and Fancy Dresses Made to Order Wigs, Play Books, Make-up, Etc. ESTABLISHED 1870 GOLDSTEIN CO. Theatrical and Masquerade Costumers 883 Mar ket Street, Lincoln Building, Phone, Douglas 4851 Opposite Powell Street Official Costumers for SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. Santa Clara Mission Play A. G. COL CO. WHOLESALE Commission Merchants TELEPHONE, MAIN 309 84-90 N. Market St. San Jose, Cal. S h Q V i n 2f O " " ' ' " e of SHAVING Articles is complete. ======== Safety and Common Razors of ail l inds ACC6SS0ri6S Gillett ' s Razors 5.00 SliavingBrusli. 25cup ■ Keen Kutter " 3.50 Strops 50c up Ever Ready " 1.00 Strop Dressing 10c Enders " 100 Shaving Soap 25c THE — Sharp Shave " .50 Extra Blades, all kinds JOHN STOCK SONS „, „„ . „, c o , Every Razor Guaranteed 71-77 South First St., San Jose For classy College Hair Cut, go to the Antiseptic Barber Shop SEA SALT BATHS Basement Garden City Bank Building THE REDWOOD. ►». Young Men ' s Furnishings Angeluf Phone, San Jo»e 3802 Annex Phone, San Jo«e 4688 THE Angelus and Annex G.T.NINNIS Proprietor European plan . Newly furnished rooms, with hot and cold water; steam heat throughout. Suites with private bath. Anselus, 67 N. First St Annex. 52 W. St. John St San Jose, California All the Latest Styles In Neckwear, Hosiery and Gloves Young Men ' s Suits and Hats O ' Brien ' s Santa Clara The Santa Clara Coffee Club Invites you to its rooms to read, rest, and enjoy a cup of excellent coffee Open from 6 a. m. to 10:30 p. m. The Mission Bank of Santa Clara (COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS) Solicits Your Patronage Telephones Office: Franklin 3501 Residence: Franklin 6029 Dr. Francis J. Colligan DENTIST Hours: 9 to 5 161S Polk Street Evenings: 7 to 8 Cor. Sacramento Sundays by appointment San Francisco When in San Jose, Visit CHARGINS ' Restaurant, Grill and Oyster Souse 28-30 Fountain Street Bet. First and Second San Jose Oberdeener ' s Pharmacy Sallows Rorke Ring us for a hurry-up Delivery :: :: :: Phone S. C. 13R Prescription Druggists Kodaks and Supplies Post Cards Franklin Street Santa Clara, Cal. f- THE REDWOOD. Dr. Wong Him Residence 1268 O ' Farrell Street Between Gough and Octavia Phones : West 6870 Homes 3458 San Francisco, Cal, Rebuilt Typewriters WE SAVE YOU FROM 50 TO 75 PER CENT ON ANY MAKE OF TYPEWRITER MACHINES RENTED AND SOLD ON EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS Send for our Illustrated Price List RETAIL DEPARTMENT The Wholesale Typewriter Company 37 Montgomery Street San Francisco, Cal. 1 " — THE REDWOOD. A Delightful Route East ! sm TO AVO ID THE COLD DURING THE WINTER MONTHS THE SUNSET ROUTE BY RAIL AND OCEAN OR aTlT rail TAKE THE SUNSET LIMITED A Train de luxe With the latest and best equipment, stenographer barber shop, bath, ladies ' maid, leaving San Jose each Thursday evening. 10.00 extra fare : OR : take the Sunset Express, with through standard and personally conducted tourist sleepers, and the palatial Southern Pacific Steamers or all rail from New Orleans Rail and steamship tickets sold to all points, in- cluding Europe, the Orient, Honolulu, Panama A. A. HAPGOOD E. SHILLINGSBURG City Ticket Agent Dist. Pass. Agent 40 — EAST SANTA CLARA STREET — 40 Southern Pacific yb THE REDWOOD. ' A Drama (LEGENDARY) Curtain: Scene I. Opens in tPie filled store. On Left: Clerk alone on the floor OI Business dull, discouraged sat he there, pies, jewelry, candy, bats, track goods, base- balls, unsold everywhere. Scene II. A young lady from Frisco Trips in (idea Joe ' s) with sample Nabisco. Off I Scene III. On the job: she sells and sells and wreckage and Riot for place, demolishing, pushing to buy; more broken wreckage. Envoi; The Prefect. EVERYTHING FOR EVERY STUDENT WANT The Co-Op. Store : THE REDWOOD. TRUNKS AND SUIT CASES FOR VACATION WALLETS, FOBS, TOILET SETS, ART LEATHER, UMBRELLAS, ETC., ETC. FRED M. STERN The " Leather Man " 77 NORTH FIRST ST., SAN JOSE, CAL. Our Line of Caps are full of Snap and is complete in every detail. Large shape, one piece with plaited back, and in the Norfolk style, new patterns, large stock to select from. Prices 1.00 to $3.00 The home of HART, SCHAFFNER and MARX CLOTHES Santa Clara and Market Sts. IJftttltS Kttr San Jose, Cal T X ♦ All kinds of hot drinks for the season Puffed rice crisps, this this month ' s specialty 1012 Franklin Street Santa Clara, Cal. Telephone, S. C. 36 R 4 « THE REDWOOD. STUDENTS The Redwood depends upon its advertisers for its existence. It is up to you to support those who support you ji THP RPDWOOD March, 1913 f K, J . ■ ■ - , THE REDWOOD. " — University of Santa Clara SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA The University embraces the following departments: A. THE COLLEGE OF PHILOSOPHY AND LETTERS. A four ' years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. B. THE COLLEGE OF GENERAL SCIENCE. A four years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. C. THE INSTITUTE OF LAW. A standard three years ' course of Law, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and pre-supposing for entrance the completion of two years of study beyond the High School. D. THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. (a) Civil Engineering — A four years ' course, lead- ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. (b) Mechanical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Me- chanical Engineering. (c) Electrical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elec- trical Engineering. E. THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE. A four years ' course, leading to the degree of Bach- elor of Science in Architecture. F. THE PRE-MEDICAL COURSE. A two years ' course of studies in Chemistry, Bac- teriology, Biology and Anatomy, which is recom- mended to students contemplating entrance into medical schools. Only students who have com- pleted two years of study beyond the High School are eligible for this course. JAMES P. MORRISSEY, S. J., - - President THE REDWOOD. $50.00 Reward! TO ANY Santa Clara College Student Whose appearance can ' t be improved and who can ' t obtain an absolutely perfect fit in one of my famous " L SYSTEM " Clothes for College Fellows BILLY HOBSON BILLY HOBSON ' S CORNER 24 South First Street - - SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA Varsity Crisp this month ' s specialty Ice Cream — all kinds of excellent Candies Hot drinks during the cold months 1012 Franklin Street Telephone, s. c. 36 R Santa Clara, Cal. : THE REDWOOD, K. : FOSS HICKS CO No. 35 West Santa Clara Street SAN JOSE Real Estate, Loans Investments A Select and Up-to-date List of Just Such Properties as the Home Seeker and Investor Wants INSURANCE Fire, Life and Accident in the Best Companies L. F. SWIFT, President LEROY HOUGH, Vice-President E. B. SHUGERT, Treasurer DIRECTORS— L. F. Swift, Leroy Hough, Henry J. Crocker, W. D. Dennett, Jesse W. Lilienthal Capital Paid In, $1,000,000 Western Meat Company PORK PACKERS AND SHIPPERS OF Dressed Beef, Mutton and Pork, Hides, Pelts, Tallow, Fertilizer. Bones, Hoofs, Horns, Etc. Monarch and Golden Gate Brands Canned Meats, Bacon, Hams and Lard General Oflfice, Sixth and Townsend Streets - San Francisco, Cal. Cable Address STEDFAST, San Francisco. Codes, Al. A B C 4th Edition Packing House and Stock Yards, South San Francisco, San Mateo County, Cal. Distributing Houses, San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, Sacramento and Stockton : :! THE REDWOOD. Santa Clara Journa PUBLISHED SEMI-WEEKLY B. DOWNING, EDITOR OUR JOB PRINTING PREEMINENTLY SUPERIOR FRANKLIN STREET Phone, S. C. 14 SANTA CLARA San Jose Engraving Company Photo Engraving Zinc Etchings Half Tones Do you want a half-tone for a program or pamphlet? None can make it better SAN JOSE ENGRAVING COMPANY 32 LIGHTSTON STREET SAN JOSE, CAL THE REDWOOD. : .DOERR ' S.. Y Branch at Clark ' s 176-182 South First Street San Jose Order your pastry in advance Picnic Lunches HOTEL MONTGOMERY F. J. McHENRY, Manager Absolutely Fireproof European Plan Rates $1 and upwards Most business men like good office stationery REGAL TYPEWRITER PAPERS and MANUSCRIPT COVERS REPRESENT THE BEST AND MOST COMPLETE LINE IN THE UNITED STATES LOOK FOR THIS (TRKOL If S MARK TRADE-MARK -- - mlMtl CATERS TO THE MOST FASTIDIOUS THE ARCADE THE HOME OF ROUGH NECK SWEATERS CANELO BROS. STACKHOUSE CO. 83-91 South First St., San Jose Phone S. J. 11 : :« THE REDWOOD. i Everybody is doing IT — Doing WHAT? GETTING SHAVED at the University Shave Shop 983 Main Street near Postoffice Santa Clara 4 O ' Connor SanitariM Training School for Nurses IN CONNECTION CONDUCTED BY SISTERS OF CHARITY Race and San Carlos Streets San Jose Telephone, San Jose 3496 I ' .F.Sourisseau Manufacturing JEWELER 143 S. First St. SAN JOSE Men ' s Clothes Shop Gents ' Furnishings Hats and Shoes PAY LESS AND DRESS BETTER E. H. ALDEN Phone Santa Clara 74 R 10S4 Franklin St. EntoprisoLaonilrjCo. Perfect Satisfaction Guaranteed A Manuel Mello J m__ Dealer in all kinds of | ;i Shoes m jScM 904 Franklin Street ° ' ' Lafayette m SANTA CLARA, CAL. 867 Sherman Street I. RUTH, Agent - 1037 Franklin Street ALDERMAN ' S NEWS AGENCY Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. Cigars and Tobacco Baseball and Sporting Goods Fountain Pens of All Kinds Next to Postoffice Santa Clara M. M. Billiard Parlor GEO. E.MITCHELL PROP. SANTA CLARA Pool 2% Cents per Cue . THE REDWOOD. _ — p. Montmayeur E. LamoUe J. Origlia LamoUe Grille-— a. 36-38 North First Street, San Jose. Cal. Phone Main 403 MEALS AT ALL HOURS IF YOU ONLY KNEW WHAT- Mayerle ' s German Eyewater DOES TO YOUR EYES YOU WOULDN ' T BE WITHOUT IT A SINGLE DAY At Druggiste soc or 65c by Gcorgc Maycrlc, German Expert Optician 960 Market Street, San Francisco Jacob Eberhard, Pres. and Manager John J. Eberhard, Vice-Pres. and Ass ' t Manager EBERHARD TANNING CO. Tanners, Curriers and Wool Pullers Harness-Latigo and Lace Leather Sole and Upper Leather, Calf, Kip and Sheepskins Eberhard ' s Skirting Leather and Bark Woolskin Santa Clara - California Founded 1851 Incorporated 1858 Accredited by State University, 1900 College Notre Dame SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA SIXTIETH YEAR COURSES COLLEGIATE PREPARATORY COMMERCIAL Intermediate and Primary Classes for Younger Children Notre Dame Conservatory of Music Awards Diplomas Founded 1899 APPLY FOR TERMS TO SISTER SUPERIOR : THE REDWOOD. : Ji Shaving Accessories :THE JOHN STOCK SONS 71-77 South First St., San Jose Our line of SHAVING Articles is complete. Safety and Common Razors of all kinds Gillett ' s Razors ; 5.00 Shaving Brush. 25c up Keen Kutter " 3.50 Strops 50c up Ever Ready " 1.00 Strop Dressing 10c Enders " 100 Shaving Soap . 25c Sharp Shave " .50 Extra Blades, all kinds Every Razor Guaranteed ROLL BROS. Real Estate and Insurance Call and See Us if You Want Anything in Our Line Ravenna Paste Company Manufacturers of AH Kinds of ITALIAN AND FRENCH Paste Phone San Jose 787 Franklin Street, next to Bank, Santa Clara Phones : Office S. C. 39 R Residence S. C. 1 Y DR. H. O. F. MEINTON Dentist Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 5 p, m. Rooms 3 to 8 Bank Bldg. Santa Clara S. A. Elliott Son Plumbing and Gas Fitting GUN AND LOCKSMITHING Telephone S. C. 70 J n02-910 Main Street Santa Clara, Cal. San Jose Transfer Co. MOVES EVERYTHING THAT IS LOOSE Phone San Jose 78 Oflficc, 62 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose THERE IS NOTHING BETTER THAN OUR Bouquet Teas at 50 cents per pound Even Though You Pay More Ceylon, English Breakfast and Basket Fired Japan FARMERS UNION San Jose : THE REDWOOD. Evening and Fancy Dresses Made to Order Wigs, Play Books, Make-up, Etc. ESTABLISHED 1870 GOLDSTEIN CO. Theatrical and Masquerade Costumers 883 Market Street, Lincoln Building, Phone, Douglas 4851 Opposite Powell Street Official Costumers for SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. Santa Clara Mission Play A. G. COL CO. WHOLESALE Commission Merchants TELEPHONE, MAIN 30Q 84-90 N. Market St. San Jose, Cal. SAN JOSE BAKING CO. L. SCHWARTING, Manager The Cleanest and Most Sanitary Bakery In Santa Clara Valley We supply the most prominent Hotels Give Us a Trial Our Bread, Pies and Cakes are the Best Phone San Jose 609 433-435 Vine Street San Jose, Cal. » " THE REDWOOD. A Delightful Route East TO AVOID THE COLD DURING THE WINTER MONTHS THE SUNSET ROUTE BY RAIL AND OCEAN OR ALL RAIL TAKE THE SUNSET LIMITED A TRAIN DE LUXE With the latest and best equipment, stenographer, barber shop, bath, ladies ' maid, leaving San Jose each Thursday evening :: :: ; 10. extra fare = OR — take the Sunset Express, with through standard and personally conducted tourist sleepers, and the palatial Southern Pacific Steamers or all rail from New Orleans Rail and steamship tickets sold to all points, in- cluding Europe, the Orient, Honolulu and Panama A. A. HATGOOD E. SHILLINGSBURG City Ticket Agent Dist. Pass. Agent 40 — EAST SANTA CLARA STREET — 40 SOUTHERN PACIFIC CONTENTS SWEET DEATH, WHY ? NEO-VITALISM THE PRODIGY - L. A. F. 193 James J. Conlon, S.J. 194 George A. Ragan 200 TO BISHOP EDWARD J. HANNA, D. D. - Charles D. South 20S WEATHER FORECASTING - Jerome S. Ricard, S. J. 207 MONTANA JUSTICE - - - F. Buckley McGurrin 217 BROWNING AND I - - - Frank McCabe 223 JIM GRIMSBY OF THE VALENTINE TOUCH Francis W. Schilling 227 EDITORIALS ------ 232 EXCHANGES ------ 235 UNIVERSITY NOTES ----- 241 ALUMNI ------- 246 ATHLETICS - - - - - - ' - 249 OFFICERS OF THE SENIOR DRAMATIC CLUB MARTIN V. MERLE, A. M., ' 06 ALPHONSE J. QUEVEDO. S. J. C. F. TRAMUTOLO. A. B.. 12 AUTHOR OF THE MISSION PLAY PRESIDENT BUSINESS MANAGER STAGE DIRECTOR edia Entered Dec. 18, 1902, at Santa Clara, Cal., as second-class matter, under Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 VOL. XII SANTA CLARA, CAL., MARCH, 1913 No. 5 S oot X) ath, Ay ? Sweet Death ! So Hng ' ring, why ? And dost thou lead me oft to sigh, Compose myself, and think .that now Thou ' rt close: And dost thou then flee mockingly That I my burden may the heavier feel? And wilt thou one day all unwished take me In my black sins? Sweet Death, curst but in this: That jailor of my career flesh Thou stand ' st outside my shackled frame, That weights me down ; There pointest me the starry space, The beauties of the sky, the peace beyond, And I would soar, would speed this place Where life is living death. And when I pleading smite these bars Thou stay ' st mockingly. And sweet Death, Why? L. A. F. NEO-VITALISM OR centuries the face of nature has been surveyed by inquir- ing eyes search ing for the secret of her genial powers, which manifested in the nourishing of a rootlet or the unfolding of a flower, quicken matter until the air and the ocean and the earth feel the pulse of life. Failing to wrest from nature her secret by methods of observation, other unwearied investigators have searched the depths of every unsound- ed void the human intellect can pene- trate, for an answer to the baffling riddle of life, and yet the enigma con- tinues to be one of the most difficult problems known to metaphysician or biologist. From time to time we read of some- body having made inert matter live, but when the entire story is told and the whole truth is published, life re- mains just as much of a mystery as it ever was. It is important to remember that the expression " artificial life, " is fre- quently used in different senses. It may refer to vivifying lifeless mate- rial or to fertilizing living eggs artifi- cially. In a limited way the latter proced- ure is possible. Though wonderful, the existence of the " fatherless frog " does not invalidate the dictum of bio- logists that all living plants and ani- mals have originated from others of the same kind essentially. The multiplicity of notions regard- ing life had accumulated, even in the days of Claude Bernard, into such baffling mass of more or less dis- cordant ideas that with all his in- genuity he could not invent a new definition of life to be added to the long list of definitions previous inves- tigators had left on record. Still, with all our study and real ad- vancement the descriptive definition of life given by St. Thomas of Aquin, bears criticism much better than the definitions formulated by more mod- ern thinkers. According to him a liv- ing thing (vivens) " est id quod potest scipsum movere secundum aliquam actionem " (is that which is able to be- stir itself into some form of activity.) " Motus " is used in a wide sense so as to include intellectual operations. The peculiarity of the activity of life is that the operator is also the re- cipient of the act he produces. To live is an " immanent act. " A pro- jectile travels rapidly but its motion has been communicated. Vital activity manifests itself in an Abstract of a lecture delivered under the auspices of the Knights of Columbus, during the Lenten Course of 1913, by James J. Conlon, S. J., Director of the Department of Biology. 194 THE REDWOOD. 195 ascending scale in plants, in animals and in intelligent beings. Growth and reproduction charac- terize its presence in vegetable organ- isms, these distinguising traits are supplemented by sensation in the ani- mal, and human beings possess these three characteristics with the reason- ing faculty, and all that accompanies it, as a superadded qualification. Looking backward along the dark avenue of time our eyes count as so many milestones the shattered monu- ments once proudly reared to com- memorate the discovery of something, at least, of that inner reality from which vital activity issues. But the discoveries were more pop- ular than real, and in time went the way everything must go that is not true and therefore immortal. In the Greek period Aristotle is alone worthy of notice. His treat- ment of this subject, life, was scien- tific. In the Middle Ages the ideas of a sound vitalism were developed as far as the methods of metaphysical re- search can investigate such a matter. The modern period may be said to be- gin with Descartes, for the current theories rejecting a vitalizing princi- ple are founded on his philosophy. All changes in living bodies were to him but mechanical operations. Plants and animals were ingenious machines differing from one another in complexity only. This notion phrased in the ter- minology of our day is called the me- chanistic theory. It obtained wide- spread popularity in the nineteenth century, through the ready accepta- tion of Darwinism and the advances of Organic Chemistry. Men like Helmholtz, Huxley, Haeckel and oth- ers warmly defended this theory. Fundamentally the mechanistic the- ory is a biological expression of the materialistic conception of life. It postulates that organisms are compli- cated chemical aggregates, or perhaps compounds, but nothing more. The forces known to physicists and chem- ists alone are needed for Ihe opera- tions of life. We live and breathe and move because our chemical structure is such that it must exhil it such phe- nomena. In a word a human being differs from an Ingersoll watch in de- gree, not in kind ; we are more com- plex. If this presentation of the the- ory appears biased listen to Le Dantec, (The Nature and Origin of Life). " Between life and death the differ- ence is of the same order as that which exists between a phenol and a sul- phate, or between an electrified body and a neutral body. In other words, all phenomena which we study objec- tively in living beings can be analyzed by the methods of physics and chem- istry. " Blichner, Verworm, Haeckel and a multitude of smaller luminaries of the materialistic type express their feel- ings similarly. But they must have some evidence in support of such extraordinary 196 THE REDWOOD. views. Here is a summary of the ex- periments thought to prove the me- chanistic theory: To begin with " artificial proto- plasm. " This is made by treating olive oil with potassium carbonate un- til saponification commences. On the stage of the microscope a speck of this material has some movements which resemble those of the protozoa. Everybody knows that the activity of the soap is due to escaping gas, yet this experiment is sometimes cited as an overwhelming proof that the amoeba and Castile soap are cousins ! In 1865 Traube made artificial growths which resembled seaweeds from chemical solutions. Though mystifying in appearance these growths could be explained by the laws of physics. Leduc, professor of physics in the University of Nantes, improved on the experiments of Traube and was able to present to the French Acad- emy of Sciences some plants he had grown from " artificial seeds " . Not content with what he had done, he claimed recognition from the Acad- emy as the discoverer of the secrets of life. His imitations of living struc- tures were exact as to details, but as capillarity, osmosis and similar phe- nomena explained the growth of his " seeds, " Leduc finally saw the futility of posing before the scientific world as a creator of life. In fact, he denied after a time that he confused the ac- tivity of his osmotic growths with life processes. In this he, like many of his confreres, was dishonest for there is a record on the proceedings of the Academy of his ambitious and un- scientific claims. Probably the best discussion of these experiments is to be found in the publications of the physiological laboratory of the University of Lille — an institution of high standard, un- der Catholic auspices. The director of that laboratory not only determined the true scientific value of Leduc ' s ex- periments, but also suggested valua- ble improvements for enlarging and beautifying an " artificial garden. " In 1905 a thrilling announcement came from Cambridge University that Mr. John Butler Burke of the Caven- dish laboratory had made bacteria by treating culture media with radium chloride. Soon, however, the patholo- gist of the university, Dr. V oodhead, found that the " radiobes " — (Burke ' s bacteria) were bubbles of gas. Then the potency of radium was found to be shared by barium, strontium and lead. The nuclei of the " radiobes " consisted of an insoluble sulphate of one of these metals and the new " bac- teria " were but shadows of the real- ity. If Burke had not living germs he had a seeming discovery and pro- posed to make the best of it. With an ingenuity born of a bold and impu- dent defiance of propriety he now pro- posed a new definition of life so that his bubbles of gas might fit into some category of living things ! This grasping at a straw is the THE REDWOOD. 197 wonderful achievement held up be- fore wondering eyes as the triumph of chemistry and the advent of a new era, dominated by a very elastic ethi- cal code. Yet all legitimate biologists protest that they have yet to see even one cell that was produced from inert ma- terial by physical and chemical forces only. We find this admitted, though re- luctantly, in the address of Dr. Schae- fer delivered last September before the British Association for the Ad- vancement of Science. The telegraph- ic report of the address stated that the Edinburgh professor vouched for the fact that life can be produced artifi- cially. The correspondent probably confused the prophetic forecasts Dr. Schaefer made with results which, he stated, had been accomplished. If anybody is desirous of studying the defence of the mechanistic theory let him examine Schaefer ' s proofs. Leaving aside the dogmatism, the President of the Association displays throughout his paper, all his evidence is but a summary repetition of experi- ments, for the most part not new, and a most hopeful expectation that if so much has been accomplished since 1828, some day the gap yet separating brute matter from the vegetable king- dom will be gloriously spanned. Realizing that a jarring word might prevent his fallacious argumentation from crystallizing firmly, he adroitly avoids a clash by ignoring the oppos- ing views of great biologists, the world over, who directly contradict him. But to return to the historical de- velopment of this subject. No discord- ant note was heard in the chorus of zoologists who supported the Carte- sian philosophy of life until the last quarter of the nineteenth century. That was a time when discontent openly displayed its grim visage and seemed to spread discord by some sort of contagion. The biologists were not immune; and when " infected " invaria- bly expressed a certain anxiety about the deficiencies of the physico-chemi- cal theory of life. The leaders of that school of biologists who defended this theory were alarmed, but met the dif- ficulty by a skillful expectant treat- ment. Various soothing syrups, suit- ably flavored to please the tastes of the " infected, " were able to control the desire to ask questions and to clamor. In the meantime excellent work was being done in many laboratories to de- termine something of the nature of internal secretion in cellular struc- tures and to investigate the process of repair in wounds. The data thus ob- tained were adding complexities to ac- knowledged difficulties for the me- chanistic school. Finally the discontent with accept- ed explanations for all these newer phenomena could not be controlled, Haeckel was at that time the " buddha " of the monist cult, and gives some interesting observations taken from the top of his pedestal : " Very recently this ancient phantom 198 THE REDWOOD. of a mystic vital force which seemed to be effectually banished, has again appeared ; a number of distinguished biologists have attempted to reintro- duce it under another name. " What follows explains why these gentlemen thought it necessary to re- introduce an old theory under a new form. Experimental morphology is a new line of biological research, and has opened before experimentalists new fields of labor and provides effi- cient means for producing very won- derful results. It has increased the importance of the cell in the biological world, and Prof. Wilson of Columbia but voices the conviction of all when he writes that ; " the cell is the key to all ulti- mate biological problems. " Embryologists have been searching cells for something that would explain certain facts of heredity, and as they searched it became more evident that each little cell possesses some kind of autonomy. If that is true then Harvey and oth- ers who held the theory of " epi- genesis " were not mistaken. Up to recent times " preformation " or " pre- delineation " were preferred to the old- er notion, which explained the devel- opment of an embryo as a real con- struction of new parts. Hertwig and Driesch are the most distinguished advocates of the old the- ory among the modern investigators. Reinke certainly favors it, even if he disagrees with Hertwig in some mat- ters. The theory of localized areas held by Conklin and Wilson openly favors neo-vitalism by supposing a determin- ing formative power in a developing organism. As Hans Driesch of Heidelberg is the most ardent defender of the neo- vitalists ' contentions and one of the most distinguished living biologists, the arguments in favor of the new school are summarized from his works, but not all are enumerated here. According to this school plants and animals must pos- sess some form of autonomy since they adjust themselves to various con- ditions of environment. Organisms grow naturally when surroundings in- terfere considerably with develop- ment. A mechanism cannot adjust it- self to a multiplicity of variations. According to Weismann, — who may be taken as the most consistent de- fender of mechanistic notions, — every organ is predetermined in the primary cell before development takes place. Thousands of determinants may be re- quired, but he believes that they must be in existence. Each of them de- velops some part of an organism. Now it is possible to separate one cell of a sea-urchin ' s egg from the three sister cells when development of that egg is at the four-cell stage. What will the single cell produce and what will the three cells become? After repairing the mechanical in- jury due to division each unit may be brought to term and the resulting or- THE REDWOOD. 199 ganisms are normally formed, except that they are of dwarfish proportions. If the organs seen at maturity were predetermined how could the single cell, — a quarter of the original egg, — have determinants for a complete urchin? If it had not been separated from its sister cells it could have pro- duced but a portion of the entire body. Chemical and physical forces act blindly, here there seems to be evi- dence of design. Divide the works of a watch into four parts, if we suppose each quarter can reproduce itself it cannot do more; it cannot reproduce wheels and screws in an adjoining quarter not possessed by itself. Weis- mann thinks that nobody would find difficulty in conceding something like this, other people, however, find an in- explicable difficulty. The repair of lost or injured parts has become a matter of great diffi- culty for the " machine-theory. " It is true that its defenders quickly present the " accessory germ-plasm " explana- tion to inquirers. This usually de- prives the inquisitive of their breath, but if one knows how to carve a newt ' s tail and how to argue from the scientific hacking of that member, the " accessory plasm " will not shock the respiratory center as otherwise it might. Then there is an immense number of facts regarding the regulating of functions when environment is not suited to an organism, which mechan- istic explanations cannot touch. Guy ' s Hospital Gazette has published, in synoptic form, the opinion of many European physiologists regarding this difficulty. But what of it? Has not an unfer- tilized egg been artificially brought to develop into an animal, even to sexual maturity? This indeed appears to be something new as well as marvelous, but very little search in the literature of the past reveals the fact that the absolute possibility of parthenogenesis was rec- ognized hundreds of years ago. In our day the possibility has become a reality, even of a practical kind, with a limited number of animals. How- ever, this is not producing life, it is simply fitting an ovum to develop. If we could make that egg from inert matter and then fertilize it, the case would be very different inded. Those who are most acquainted with these experiments do not claim to have produced life, some have said that they have hopes of doing so. Optimism has its own advantages but it does not alter facts. (To be Continued.) JAMES J. CONLON, S. J. THE PRODIGY T WAS the opening day of school and the campus was crowded with lusty young m a n h o o d. Lowly Freshmen asked questions of lofty upper class men, and after a brief but biting in- struction to lift their caps and say " sir, " the poor Freshies were conde- scendingly answered. It was early September and the trees that shaded the campus from the glare of the sum- mer ' s sun were already shedding their leaves. Vesta had made a rec- ord in athletics the previous year, and the Sophomores and Upper Classmen were already gathered in little groups discussing this year ' s prospects and looking over the crowds of Freshmen for possible athletic material. Bert Clark and Frank Willson, the two star athletes, around whom an admiring " and attentive group had gathered, turned to see a huge Fresh- man pass. He was at least six feet three, built in proportion to his height, and next to him Willson, who ly the whole group was convulsed with laughter, for hanging to the back of the giant ' s coat was a small, thin fellow of pygmy size. He was being jerked through the crowd under the goodly shelter of the Freshman ' s back. He was little and sickly look- ing, and had an abnormally large head out of all proportion to his di- minutive body. Soon the ill-matched couple were lost to sight, and in the excitement of the opening day were soon forgotten. II. A FIND. " Say, Clark! If you are ever going to put your clothes away you ' d better begin now. for the bunch will be over here pretty qufck and we want the place to look half way decent, " said Willson. " You don ' t have to sit there and dream all night. " " I won ' t, Frank, " Clark answered, " but I was just wondering who is going to be stroke oar this year. You know no one worth while has turned up yet, and as I feel responsible I was that year ' s football captain and can ' t help worrying a little. " considered a big man, looked diminu- tive. He was now pushing his way through a crowd and the way the press broke ahead of him caused a laugh among the onlookers. Sudden- Fred Clark was captain of the crew while his room-mate and closest friend, Willson, was football captain. They had both occupied berths in the crew and on the football squad for 200 THE REDWOOD. 201 the last two years. " Don ' t you go worrying, Fred, or you will — " At this point he was interrupted by a soft knocking on the door, and in an- swer to his " Come in, " the door was slowly opened and into the room stepped the little fellow who had caused all the mirth on the opening day of school. Without waiting he burst into the following in a little weak voice : " I trust, sirs, that you will pardon my seemingly rude inter- ruption, but I assure you it is a mat- ter of grave importance that has brought me here to see you this even- ing. " Clark turned suddenly the other way, and seizing a pillow from the lounge stuffed as much as possi- ble of it into his mouth, while he rocked back and forth in silent laugh- ter. Willson strove to keep a straight face and succeeded in asking his visi- tor to continue. " You have, it is possible, noticed me as a spectator watching the crew ' s practice, and I see you are sadly in need of a stroke oar. " At this point Clark suddenly stopped laughing and looked in amazement at Willson, for it was supposed that no one but the coaches and the crew knew of this shortcoming. " Well, " he resumed, " I have just the man you need, and if you will come with me, and do a lit- tle persuading I am sure this defect in the crew can be remedied. " The room-mates gazed for a moment at one another and then simultaneously they seized their hats and followed at the heels of their informer. It was into nicely furnished rooms that their guide, whose name they by this time had found to be Reginald Rogers, led them. In one corner of the study the huge Freshman that they had seen the first day was bend- ing diligently over a pile of books. He was soon given to understand that his appearance the next day at prac- tice would be expected, and after a chat of a few minutes Willson and Clark made their farewell. The next day, acting on the orders of Clark, Joe Davis, followed by Reg- inald, appeared at the boat-house and Joe was given his try-out. " Whew ! " said Clark, in an aside to Willson, " look at the chest and arm muscle.; on Davis. If he can use those we needn ' t worry any more about a stroke oar. " And his surmise proved correct, for during practice Davis showed himself the superb athlete that he was, and even Clark admitted that he had never seen a better ex- hibition of oarsmanship. Every day the practice continued till the crew was like some fine piece of machinery with perfect unison and harmony ex- isting between each part. It was only now and then that the coxswain, a nervous chap, became the hitch in the crew ' s work. Every day with his large eyes shining with joy at seeing Davis in the crew, and his immense head making him look grotesque, lit- 202 THE REDWOOD. tie Reginald would sit on the bank and watch the crew ' s practice. III. ANOTHER FIND. It was about half past three in the afternoon, but the crew were still lounging about the boat house, for Smithson, the coxswain, had not yet appeared, and Clark on inquiry found that it would be several weeks before their pilot could again guide the shell. The river stretched for a full mile before being lost to sight, and was as smooth as glass. With the glow of the afternoon sun making it appear like some flowing mass of molten sil- ver, and the pleasant contrast of the green trees leaning out from the bank, it was indeed a beautiful sight. Clark was standing worried and perplexed, looking moodily into the waters, for it was no small calamity to miss a week ' s practice this late in the sea- son, when, " Pardon, me Clark, " piped Reginald ' s voice, " if you have no cox- swain for today I can handle the shell. Anyhow, " as he saw Clark be- gin to smile, " it could do no harm, for I ' ve been a coxswain before, and at least I won ' t tip the shell. " Clark hesitated a moment, and then, proba- bly remembering Reginald ' s former service in the matter of a stroke oar, said, " Very well, get ready ! " And as he saw Reginald start for the boat- house he thought, " Gee, if he was any good, with his weight he ' d be a peach. He can ' t weigh more than one hundred and ten, I ' ll bet. " Soon they were all seated in the shell and heading down the river. The way Reginald handled the boat caused a hope to spring up in Clark ' s mind. " Time us for a mile, Reginald, " said Clark. In a moment, under Reg- inald ' s guidance, the shell went fly- ing down the river. With an uncanny knowledge of just what the crew could stand Reginald kept increasing the pace till the mile was finished. Not once was there a slip. When the time was called at the finish Clark was astounded. It was two minutes better than they had done so far. " Here, " thought Clark, " is the man for little me. " So it was that Reg- inald won his position as coxswain. IV. THE PRODIGY. There had been a faculty meeting, and now that the regular business of that august body was finished they were discussing different happenings of the month. Professor Smith, of The Department of Mathematics, sur- rounded by an attentive group, all list- ening with interest to what he was saying. " The fellow is without a doubt a prodigy, " he was saying. " Why, he answered every question I could put to him, and in fact showed me the solution to two problems that are being sent to all the colleges to be solved. Then, after astounding me that way, he turns about and asks me questions I could not answer, and after I had worked for a good three hours, he calmly shows me the mis- THE REDWOOD. 203 takes I ' d made and works the prob- lems for my benefit. " " It ' s just the same thing in the Sci- ence department, " said Professor King. " He has absolutely astounded all of us. And in fact he gave me a hint that may lead to a great discov- ery. " Many other similar remarks v rere made by the other professors, and one and all hailed Reginald Rog- ers, (for it was he) as a wonder and unanimously he was called a prodigy. Profe ssors Smith and King having left, the rest were on their way home discussing Reginald, when King sud- denly cried, " Look! It can ' t be — It isn ' t!— Why, Smith, it ' s Rogers. " By that time the man who had caused this outburst, a man of some fifty years, hurriedly approached with smiling face and outstretched hand. " Smith! King! " he gasped. " Well! Well! " " And you, " spoke up Smith. " What are you doing here? " " Just stopped off to see my boy and watch Vesta win the race this afternoon. " " Do you know my son? " asked Rog- ers. Smith and King could only look at one another, could it be that Reg- inald Rogers, the diminutive prodigy, could be the son of the giant tackle of years gone by? " Surely not, " thought they, and dismissed the mat- ter from their minds. They discussed old times, old friends and in fact everything that had happened since graduation parted them many years ago. That afternoon the three of them. Smith, King and Rogers were guests on the finish-judge ' s launch. Long before the race started the river was a floating mass of gaily bedecked craft of every sort from the rowboat to some old graduate ' s steam yacht. Gay voices sounded over the waters, and now and then blood-stirrins " o cheers were hurled defiantly to the breezes by the opposing contingents. A flush slowly mounted in Rogers ' cheeks. Once again he was Rogers of by-gone days with all the excite- ment of the race shining from his eyes. He shut out the scene before him, and again he could imagine him- self the old athlete out on the field waiting for the game to begin. His eyes for a moment were misty, but he was recalled to the present by the cry, " Here they come, " and he looked up the river to see the boats neck and neck, rounding the turn. " Was Glad- stone forging ahead? " " No! It couldn ' t be, " and before he knew it the old man was going through the motions of the oarsmen, pulling, pull- ing, as he had pulled for Vesta in by- gone days. The boats were near now, when suddenly from the crowd of boats that had been lined along the shore to clear a lane for the shells, a big launch disentangled itself and drifted into the course of the racing crews. Now it was in Gladstone ' s course, and then, slowly but surely, drifted into Vesta ' s. On and on came the shells, leaving an open course for Gladstone and blocking Vesta. If Vesta was forced to turn aside many precious lengths would be lost that 204 THE REDWOOD. could not be regained at this stage of the race. " What was that fool cox- swain doing, was he going to hit the launch dead on? " thought Rogers. " Would he lose his nerve? " With- out a moment ' s hesitation the cox- swain for Vesta was cutting in be- tween the bank and the drifting boat. " Would he make it? No! " The shell would be jammed in between the shore and the launch. Straight as an arrow, without decreasing the pace, the coxswain headed for the opening. A fighting chance and that was all. Now the prow of the shell was through and now, ah! a long drawn sigh of relief went up from the shores and a yell from the spectators rose booming over the waters for " Vesta ' s Coxswain. " Slowly did Gladstone drop behind. Then came the final spurt from Gladstone, but up went Vesta ' s stroke and they held the lead, shooting over the line winners by half a length. V. A SURPRISE. A cry from Rogers as the shell drew near the judges ' launch caused Smith and King nearly to collapse. " My boy, " shouted Rogers, as Reg- inald stepped aboard. Over the water came rolling six loud cheers for Reg- inald Rogers. All the father could do was to swallow once or twice and to brush quickly from his face the large tears of joy that filled his eyes. As soon as Reginald had gone below he turned to Smith and said, " Why didn ' t you tell me, Smith? " But Smith, with a ready smile, answered, " Why we kept it as a surprise for you, Rogers, " giving King at the same time a vigorous kick in the shins. Long did Rogers lay awake that night and dream with joy over the events of the day. Many were the praises of his son that he had over- heard. His son had been the cause of Vesta ' s victory. The son, whom he had often wished, could have been the athlete that he once was. The following day Clark, Willson, Davis and Reginald went down to the station to see Mr. Rogers off. When the train was leaving Rogers looked down from the observation car to see his diminutive son flanked on each side by splendid athletes, but as the train pulled out the pride of a father glistened in his eyes. GEORGE A. RAGAN. TO RIGHT REV. EDWARD J. HANNA, D. D., AUXILIARY BISHOP OF SAN FRANCISCO Prince of the church, St. Edward ' s son! From triumphs in the land afar. Triumphs that have nor blight nor scar. Triumphs of Christian duty done, Triumphs of faith and love divine — To triumphs in the newer land Along Balboa ' s storied strand. Fulfilling here the Lord ' s design, — We bid thee welcome, o ' er and o ' er, A welcome from our heart of hearts, Deeper than spoken word imparts. To Portola ' s gold-broidered shore ! Where Serra ' s cross defying Time, Reflecting heaven ' s effulgent beams, In silent benediction gleams. Or mutely preaches truth sublime, — Where Padre Santo spread the light The groping heathen tribes among. Till praise to God the Indian sung And faith set free the slaves of Night, — 205 206 THE REDWOOD. Where chiming hells, from dome-shaped towers — Bells sweet with mother-tales of Spain, Awoke the cloister ' s matin-strain O ' er sunbaked walls half -screened with flowers; — Where Paradise once bloomed anew, Till avarice of godless men Seized flock, and herd, and land, and then Strew ashes where the roses grew; — Wliere Nobili, the black-robed sage, Like Nehemiah, o ' er a scene Of ruin grown with mosses g reen, Built broadly for the later age, — Both Santa Clara, grateful heir Of Santo Serra, Nobili, Breathe, in their spirit unto thee, St. Edward ' s son, a welcome fair! We know thy gifts, ive prize thy fame, We know the tablets thou hast wroiight. Thy potent voice, thy master-thought, The virtues that enwreathe thy naine. The word we breathe but ill imparts The spirit in which thee we hold! Receive a welcome all of gold From Santa Clara ' s heart of hearts. CHAS. D. SOUTH. LATEST ADVANCES IN WEATHER FORECASTING HE sunspot is not yet fully understood, nor m e t e o r o logy, nor planetary i n f luence, nor elect romagnet- ism. However, much we may imagine we know about these subjects, no well-trained mind can deny that much more remains to be learned. Hence we do not feel dis- posed to agree with those who say these fields have been investigated and found wanting, so much so that our knowledge of the causes of phenom- ena remains in the statu quo of the old ignorance. Much more is now known of the stmspot than say, ten years ago, thanks to Dr. Hale of Mt. Wilson and his devoted and learned staff, not to mention others in and out of the United States. Meteorology, too, has advanced to a knowledge of causes undreamt of before, and our wireless systems of telegraphy have opened new avenues of indefinite progress. Planetary influence on both sun and earth has been subjected to rigid tests and marvellous results have been ob- tained. Hence it were but little surprise if at no distant date, there were a com- plete turning of tables. The very men who had been, as it were, rele- gated to an obscure corner and belit- tled as aspirants to scientific treasures beyond reach, will be the very ones that a grateful posterity will hail as benefactors of the race. We have spe- cial reference to such painstaking stu- dents of nature as have spent from ten to fifty years of their useful lives in tracing the complicated phaenom- ena of astronomy, meteorology, seis- mology and biology to their proxi- mate and ultimate causes, and yet have been so modest as to avoid self- assertion and even publicity during the experimental period of their pro- ceedings. Not only is the sunspot now better known in itself, but also in its rela- tion to aero-physics, the jealous de- partment where every man is wiser than his neighbor, and in which the total of individual wisdoms, if only photographed, might be exhibited as the picture of general unknowable- ness. The modest quota contributed by the Santa Clara University Obser- vatory may be described as follows : — As long as the period of maximum frequency of sunspots lasted, a desire for simplicity of view and result dic- tated that we should confine ourselves to a study of the western limb which had at first attracted our attention 207 208 THE REDWOOD. as the scene of coincidences between disturbances on the sun and distur- bances on the earth. As a result of a simple but very direct investigation, which we have kept uninterrupted since the year 1900, when an 8-inch equatorial was installed, the three-day law concerning the western limb was found to hold generally and in conse- quence we published it. Of this arti- cle in Popular Astronomy, April, 1911, thousands of copies have been distributed in America by men of note interested in astronomy and meteor o- logy, and a translation into French was made by Jean Mascart, then of the Observatory of Paris, and now Di- rector of the Observatory of Lyons. At that epoch of our pioneering, it sounded passing strange that the western limb should thus appear to be in direct communication with the western coast of the United States in preference to any other coast that we had knowledge of. And it was only natural that certain reflecting minds should put in a demurrer to what they called a theory, and we called a fact of observation, which we could not explain and did not care to ex- plain so long as the fact stood. Mean- while time went on and, to our great discomfort, the period of minimum frequency set in. We had been using the three-day law, and had tested it in every kind of way by issuing forecasts which, all in all, held for semi-month- ly periods. But during this time of minimum frequency there were, except on very rare occasions, no visible spots that we could, with any degree of cer- tainty, locate as having to be at some future time, within, say, three days ' distance from the western limb. Sometimes there were no spots at all ; at other times, they were mere van- ishing apparitions and so, on the whole, the solar surface was complete- ly denuded. And, yet, we sorely wanted some sort of sun trouble in order to forecast disturbances on the earth. Past observation came to our rescue ; we had often noticed that faculae could be fairly well descried on the eastern limb, which on the way across, became lost in the efful- gence of central light and finally re- covered visibility, say within 45 or 50° from the western limb. We had noticed, too, as had other observers often before, that the so-called dark spots underwent every kind of change in the midst of facular fields. They would, as it were, leap into view sud- denly ; become drowned the next day, and then float again the following day. Witness the little spot in the faculae of October 20, 1912. We, therefore, arrived at the con- clusion that a solar disturbance, once started, would continue until it was supplanted by a new one, or until it got a new lease of life from a new cause that came into play, thus mak- ing the old focus of disturbance the seat of the new one. Nodon of the astronomical society of Bordeaux had noticed the same thing. However, it would cost nothing to experiment, THE REDWOOD. 209 and note the results and observe what help they might bring to the forecas- ter. The experiment has so far proved a great success, the reality having al- ways corresponded to anticipation, and this not only with regard to the western limb, but the eastern limb also and the central meridian, both in front and in back. By this new dis- covery the task of forecasting earth ' s weather by the sun ' s weather, if the expression be allowed, becomes mere child ' s play, and the weatherman can plunge as deeply into the future as prudence may dictate. There will, of course, always be difficulties from new disturbances on the sun which might occur so far out of place as to upset the previous calculations. Hith- erto our limit of forecasting has been one month, during which, and espe- cially at the end of which, failure or success is carefully ascertained from the weather map. If any slips have occurred, an investigation immediate- ly follows, and it shows constantly that one solar disturbance had been overlooked or another had set in out of harmony with the one or the ones that had been used as bases of calcula- tion. But what is worthy of note in this conection, is that a recalculation, by the three-day law applied univer- sally, based on the omitted spot or the new one, brings a result that is en- tirely in harmony with the dates of the real meteorological events of the past month. To put the whole process in a nut- shell. Observe the sun. If you see a spot or a facula, find its heliographic latitude and longitude, taking the central meridian as the o-line. Roughly speaking, a spot takes 12 1-2 days to go from limb to limb in front and a little over 14 days from limb to limb in back (synodic period). Or, to state the fact more pointedly, it takes 6 1-4 days from the eastern limb to the central meridian on thij side, 6 1-4 more days from the central meridian on this side to the western limb, and 7 days from the western limb to the central meridian on the other side, and, finally, 7 more days from there back to the eastern limb, traveling at the rate of 14.4 degrees a day. The spot ' s longitude converted into days and combined with its rate of motion, will tell at once on what day of the month the spot will be 3 days ' distant from the central meri- dian on this side or that, and from both limbs. The dates thus obtained may be set down for the appearance of new areas of low pressure or storms on the western-most part of the Pacific Slope, Washington, Oregon, Califor- nia, Arizona. Further investigation of the most delicate kind, promises to show how the observed latitude of the spot may be utilized for telling approximately where the storm will strike. A few examples, not imaginary, but of actual observation, will make the calculation of stormy periods clear. 210 THE REDWOOD. Example 1. On Oct. 17, 1912, a facula stood 1 day in. Hence it stood 1 r ■ on Central front ■ Oct 22% Western limb Oct 28 2 Central back Nov 4 2 Eastern limb Nov. II 2 Central front Nov 17% Western limb Nov 24 Central back Dec 1 Eastern limb Dec 8 Subtracting 3 from each one ot these dates, we get the followmg stormy periods for this coast. Example 11. On October 20, another facula was V 2 days in. We have ' ' Central front Oct. 243 Western limb Oct. 31 Central back Nov. 7 Eastern limb Nov. 14 Central front Nov. 20% Western limb Nov. 26% Central back Dec. 3% Eastern limb -Dec. 10% Proceeding as in Ex. I, we get :— October 21% to 24% October 28 to 31 November 4 to 7 November -H to 14 November 17% to 20% November 23% to 26% November 30% to Dec. 3% December 7% to 10% Example III. Also on Oct. 17,the facula of Oct. 14 stood 1% days from western limb. Hence : — Western limb Oct. 18% Central back Oct. 25% Eastern limb - Nov. 1% Central front Nov. 7% Western limb - Nov. 14 Central back Nov. 21 Eastern limb - Nov. 28 Central front Dec. 4% Western limb Dec. 11% Operating as above, we have : — Stormy periods : October 22%— 25% October 29%— Nov. 1% November 4% — 7% November - 11 — 14 November 18 —21 November 25 — 28 December — 1% — 4% December 8 — 11% In examples II and III, the faculae stand in such favorable positions that the results sensibly agree. Example I stands for separate storms. Accord- ingly, in our forecast for November, published on Oct. 30, prominence is given to the periods based on faculae of Oct. 14 and 20, while attention is also called to Nov. 1, 8, 14, 21, 28, Dec. 5, for either the augmenting of already extant warm waves or the ap- proach of new ones, as per Example I. A magnificent verification is just now going on, this being Nov. 5, 1912. If there was only one facula or spot do- ing service for 27 days, there would be only 4 storms during that time. But if there were several, either they wo uld happen in critical positions or not; in the first case, the storms would coincide and intensify each other both in depth and area; in the THE REDWOOD. 211 second, they would be separate and one follow on the heels of the other at distances of 1, 2, 3 days. The forecasts of Ex. I, II, III were from 30 to 40 days in advance. They were a strange novelty to us, requir- ing careful combination and segrega- tion. The opportunity was thereby offered of making a rare test and the result has been watched with anxious care. At the present date, Jan. 22, 1913, in compliance with a request from Popular Astronomy, we append, in parallel columns, first, a list of the real storms, as found in the official Weather Chart of the United States, which occurred from Oct. 19 to Dec. 5, 1912, and, second, a list of dates forecasted and announced from mere solar observation, covering the same period. The agreement between real- ity and prognostication appears to be so exact that the error, if any, is either negligeable or explicable. It all seems a great triumph for sunspots [and likewise for planetary meteoro- logy, since the planets are successful- ly used in getting the same dates quite independently and also in forecasting solar disturbances.] THE WEATHER MAP. October 19—23 October 24 — 26 October 29—30 November 1 — 3 November 5 — 7 November 8 — 9 November 1 1 — 15 November - 18 — 20 November - 20 — 21 November 25 — 27 November 27 — 28 November 27 — 28 November 29— Dec. 3 December 5 — 8 Examples I, II, III, combined and ordered : BY SUNSPOTS. October 19 22 Oc tober 25 28 October 28 — 31 November 1 4 November 4 7 November 8 11 November 1 1 14 November 18 21 November 21 24 November 25 28 November 28— Dec. 1 November 30 — Dec. 3 December 5 8 The above cannot be mere coinci- dence, far less guesswork. The result of the new experience, briefly, amounts to this : There are in all 4 critical positions ; 3 days before the solar disturbance reaches the western limb ; 3 days be- fore it reaches the central meridian in back ; 3 days before it reaches eastern limb; 3 days before it reaches the cen- tral meridian in front. We mean to say that when a solar disturbance reaches any one of these four posi- tions, a new storm arrives on the Pa- cific Coast, either rising from the ocean directly or descending from Alaska, or ascending from the mouth of the Colorado in Baja, California. The anomaly of the western limb 212 THE REDWOOD. being alone responsible for storms on this coast, and, thence, over the whole or part of the United States, is thus removed and we have instead one har- monious whole governed by the 3- day law. This great fact is the solid foundation on which rests the claim made by a respectable number of seri- ous scientists that the connecting link — the causa intermedia— between the sun and the planets is electro-magnet- ism, which, while knowing no distinc- tion between front and back, has its own peculiar laws of action that set at naught the views of the uninitiated. With a view to remove a number of well-meant difficulties, we beg leave to offer the following remarks: — The idea that a sunspot is a cosmic cause, the effect of which, if any, must be equally distributed throughout the whole earth, is adhered to by many with the greatest tenacity. It is the postulate on which certain otherwise very estimable writers rely with full- est confidence when recording their judgments on the theory we have ad- vanced. Otherwise stated, their prin- ciple is this : — The sunspot is a uni- versal cause; therefore its effect, if any, must be universal. Hence, if it causes magnetic storms, earthquakes, aurorae boreales, atmospheric upheav- als, these have to cover the whole earth. But as they never do so, the inevitable conclusion follows that it has nothing to do with them. How this idea got to be so wide- spread and deep-rooted is hard to un- derstand. Possibly it may have arisen as certain other popular errors, now condemned by science, have arisen; viz., we generally believe the reports of our senses even in regard to objects which transcend their capacity, and we do not pause long enough to apply to them the ordinary criteria by which the reason tests the data of experi- ence. We see, for instance, how the sun sheds its light wherever no ob- stacle, intervenes; we see, too, how the sunspot looks down on the whole earth, and then the unwarranted con- clusion comes that, as the light pene- trates everywhere, so the sunspot, if at all efficient, must have its effect manifest everywhere. Unfortunately, this hurried conclusion belongs to the sensible order, and deals with an ob- ject with regard to which the senses may deceive. It should, therefore, be distrusted until the reason, after due examination, approves of their deci- sion. There are, of course, popular errors among scientists as there are among the common folk. It is to be feared that otherwise very respectable scientists have in the present instance neglected to see if their inference agrees with the findings of scientific observation. They have, in a word, accepted it too hastily as an axiom on which to base their discussion of the possibility or impossibility of foretell- ing, not only the weather but also earthquakes, from the presence of sun spots in general or in certain posi- tions. While, personally, we take no spe- cial interest in that so-called axiom, THE REDWOOD. 213 seeing that our method of forecasting prescinds from it and depends entire- ly on the physical basis of observation and has nothing to do with the metaphysics of the case ; yet, as we have time and again noticed that cer- tain writers and speakers, whose turn of mind brings them to pay attention to the attempts we have made in fore- casting, show an inclination to go much more by that axiom than by the encouraging results so far achieved, we have thought it worth while to dwell somewhat upon this matter and offer some helpful reflections that may pave the way to a better under- standing. First of all, we could direct atten- tion to another and less doubtful axiom, that of the Schoolmen : " What- ever is received follows the manner of being of the recipient. " In modern style, the mathematician would say, " An effect is a function of several variables. Its calculation in- volves partial deriviatives and multi- ple integration. In more intelligible language, we might put it thus, " The effect of a given activity on the object on which it is exerted depends very much, sometimes entirely, on the form, nature, situation and disposition of that object. " In the light of this axiom, even on the admission of the universality of solar causation, sunspots included, it would not follow that the effect must be everywhere and equally distributed on the whole earth, because the re- ceiving subject might unfavorably be disposed to receive that effect, or very differently disposed in different local- ities. Those who attribute every weather change to purely local influ- ences under the general agency of the sun, fully understand the pertinence and value of this remark : magnetic and electrical conditions, topography, altitude, air distribution, moisture, present temperature, geological con- ditions, are all different. The axiom is well recognized in Physics in the law of cosines for radiant heat and the intensity of light. One has only to glance at formula 1 = to see how potently the reception of solar radia- tion of both heat and light is affected by the distance and the angle of the receiving surface. In the above equation : I = Intensity of the effect. Q=Amount received, say, per sq. in. D=Distance of the cause. H= Angle between impingent activ- ity and the normal to the receiv- ing surface. (cf. Ganot ' s Physics, 15th Ed., Art. 421 ; Young ' s Gen. Ast. Revised Ed., page 136.) Class-room formulae, however, might be questioned when transferred to the immensely greater laboratory of nature. For instance, in December the sun is nearly 3,000,000 miles near- er to us than in July. If, therefore, a thermometer could be properly in- stalled anywhere in our latitudes so that the receiving surface was normal to the incident ray, it would be warm- er in December than in July. Of 214 THE REDWOOD. course, the experiment has not been tried; but if it were, we feel rather skeptical about the result. At any rate, physical science admits the axiom quoted, and this is sufficient for our purpose. Another idea that should claim at- tention is the fact that if, as is gen- erally done, we suppress altog ' ether any external influence except the gen- eral effect of the sun upon the earth, and therefore fall back entirely upon mere local agencies for the formation and advance of storms, one is at a loss to see how particular agencies of a mere local character can account for the trans-continental and even trans- oceanic character of many of our ter- restrial storms. For instance, how will you explain that a big storm in the Northwest, say, west of Alaska, will descend upon the States of Wash ington, Oregon, California and even Arizona, then cross over the Rocky Mountains, the prairie, the eastern states, plunge into the Atlantic Ocean and finally invade western Europe, unless we suppose similar agencies al- ways of a local character are to be found all along the track of the storm- center? But an alignment of such purely local causes conspiring togeth- er to give us a storm of the above- mentioned sort, is not only not likely, but is actually disproved by the daily meteorological observations of the Weather Bureau, taken simulaneous- ly right along the track of all the storms that pass over the United States. The obvious inference is that every storm, far from being originated by local influences or conditions, does itself originate its own conditions and carries them along with it. The next inference would seem to be that a cosmic cause, one altogether foreign or external to the earth, is the parent of our atmospheric disturbances and that, general in character though it may be, there is some other force in the recipient other than a mere local affair which defines, particularizes, and localizes the cosmic force, in spite of any universal character that one may be pleased to endow it with. Hence one who reasons is inclined to wonder somewhat at the hastiness of those who jump at conclusions re- garding matters so complex and so recondite that they have baffled the many efforts of honest and laborious scientists of the present and past cen- turies. But the wonderment waxes immensely when we see such repre- sentatives of science as Profs. La- grange of Belgium, Gockel of Ger- many and Nordmann of Paris, either openly or covetly, declare that sun- spots being a general, universal, cos- mic cause, it is futile to appeal to them with a view to account for certain terrestrial phenomena, such as weath- er and earthquakes, which are always more or less local. Relying on the apparently solid basis that a universal cause must " (Vid — Bulletin de la Societe Beige d ' Astronomic No. 3, 1910. Scientific American Supplement, Aug. 17, 1912, Le Matin, Paris, Sept. 8, 1912.) THE REDWOOD. 215 needs have a like effect, they gravely tell us that if, by sunspots or what amounts to the same, critical plane- tary positions, it rains in Portland, Oregon, it should also rain in Santa Clara, Calif. Or, if a hurricane rages at Acapulco it must also rage in Cuba and Porto Rico. The conclusion is forced beyond due limit, exaggerated, illogical to a degre, so much so as to constitute a case of non sequitur. We are not aware that any trained me- teorologist or habitual observer of the sun in its various aspects, has ever dared go so great a length. In the third place, it might be urged that a 12-year experience at this ob- servatory has traced an invariable connection between sunspots, dark or brilliant white, with the advent of new storms on the Pacific Coast, and that as these storms are very partic- ular and definite as to depth, area and track, it follows that in virtue of the invariable connection just mentioned, either the spots themselves are partic- ular definite causes, or if they are general causes, their influence is de- fined and particularized by some ter- restrial force which is not merely local ; or, if it be urged that other storms are simultaneously started in other parts of the world, which a wider experience will no doubt prove to be true, yet each of them is still certainly definite and particular in depth, area and track and does not cover the whole earth as it is claimed it should, if our conclusions are true. The above is equally cogent if applied to the planets in certain definite posi- tions which are claimed by nearly all philosophical meteorologists to be the simultaneous causes of spots as dis- turbances on the sun, and of storms on earth as disturbances in our atmos- phere. Fourthly, the sunspots are great centers of magnetic force, as shown by the most exact and delicate ex- periments at Pasadena, Calif., and by an entirely different method at this observatory. But the field of a mag- net is very different as you pass around from one pole to the other. As the earth revolves and rotates in that field, every different part of it must be differently affected. Add to this the magnetism of the earth itself with its poles and equator and the various agonic and isogonic, aclinic and isoclinic lines which will empha- size the difference. Thus, then, the earth and the sun with its spots are two huge magnets and the effects of neither of them single or combined are exactly the same everywhere; rather, they exhibit such great and complex differences as to demand an extension of our present knowledge of mathematics. Now it is well known that the movement of certain metallic substances in a various and varying magnetic field, generates a various and varying electric current, and con- versely. It is electro-magnetism, to which, in all likelihood, the variations of our weather and seismic phenom- ena are mostly due, a theory support- ed by eminent meteorologists of the 216 THE REDWOOD. most modern type and to which we feel greatly inclined as the only one that stands examination and which, it is to be hoped, every succeeding ex- periment will corroborate. Thus, then, the reader can see for himself that the axiom under discus- sion, that a universal cause has a like effect, in the sense in which certain writers take it when they naively tell us that if, by sun spots it rains in Athens, it must also rain in Constan- tinople ; or, if there is an earthquake in Patagonia, the whole earth must shake, runs amuck with physical sci- ence and ignores the facts of electro- magnetism as demonstrated by Far- aday, Clerk Maxwell and Ampere, not to mention other names of undisputed authority. Once more, people seem to forget that the sunspot, dark or brilliant white, has a sidereal period of a little over 25 days and a synodic period of a little over 27 days, and that its ef- fectiveness is as great on the other side of the sun as on this side. This fact repeated experiment at this ob- servatory has abundantly proved, especially during the present period of least frequency. Once on the field, the activity of a solar disturbance lasts very long, very likely until it is replaced by another or becomes re- vivified by the activity of some new heliocentric conjunction or opposition with or without a simultaneous quad- rature about the line from Jupiter to Saturn. Further observation will soon furnish a solution of this last mooted point. On the other hand, it should care- fully be borne in mind that a large number of real storms, especially dur- ing the summer, in a given locality or country, will pass through altogether unnoticed. Invisibly they are mighty oscillations of the barometric curve, and sensibly only a hot wave. There are no clouds, very little wind, no rain, no electric displays and yet the very substance of a storm is passing over people ' s heads. We would place the essence of a storm in a barometric change above and below the semi- diurnal oscillation. And it may be af- firmed without fear of contradiction that there is no place on earth exempt from the stormy barometric change. Barometrically speaking, there is no difference or very little difference be- tween winter and summer; but there is always a seasonal difference in solar force, moisture, and tempera- ture. JEROME S. RICARD, S. J., (Vid. Nodon, Bulletin de la Societe Beige d ' Astronomic, Feb. No., 1912.) MONTANA JUSTICE ILLIAM P. WAT- SON, known to e ' ery one within a hundred miles of Lodge City as " Big Bill, " found himself at the some- what mature age of forty-five. Simul- taneously the uncertain ties of the hunter ' s existence began to impress themselves upon his mind, and it was natural that he should cast about for some other means of livelihood. As the office of sheriff would shortly be vacant, he bent his energies toward that goal. The things that bluff, hon- est Bill Watson desired usually fell to his lot, and the coveted political job proved to be no exception to the rule. The first of February found Wat- son duly installed, and executing the demands of justice with laudable im- partiality. Barring a few drunken brawls and one miserable escape from the penitentiary, little occurred to test his professional ability. The sheriff spent the greater number of his leis- ure moments enthroned by the office stove, where he divided his attention between various more or less anti- quated sporting periodicals and the weather; the last being unusually se- vere, even for northern Montana. On a certain Friday morning Wat- son " puttered around " his office until noon. Then in accordance with the established custom, he hied himself down town to eat dinner at the " Pal- ace Cafe, " and later to greet the week- ly stage from Fairchild ' s. When the stage, after a gruelling experience with huge drifts, finally drew up in front of the postoffice. Big Bill observed among the alighting pas- sengers a tall, angular person, who ap- peared somewhat agitated, and cast a scrutinizing glance over the assem- bly of loungers, until, spying Watson, he rushed toward him and asked hur- riedly: " Be you Bill Watson, the sheriff? " " That ' s me, " replied Big Bill, some- what proudly. " Well, Pm John H. Hiener, from Fairchild ' s, an ' I want you to capture a criminal for me ! " " Sure thing — no trouble at all. But let ' s walk up to my office and talk it over first. " The estimable Hiener had by this time become slightly more calm, and suffered himself to be led toward the sheriff ' s office, a small log structure adjoining the jail. Upon arriving, Hiener paced up and down nervously. Being requested by the sheriff to relate the details of the crime, he seated himself upon a crack- er-box near the window, and after coughing apologetically said : 217 218 THE REDWOOD. " Say, by the way, sheriff, you ain ' t got about forty drops of the devil ' s best friend, that ain ' t being used, have you? I guess I ' m some het up about this here affair. " The requested solace having been consumed, he continued : " You see, sheriff, me and my broth- er, that ' s Pete, owns a general store up to Fairchild ' s. Well, last night, long about closin ' time, it begun to snow considerable, so me and Pete turned in early. " I always sleep like a log, but Pete ' s an awful light sleeper. ' Long about midnight, I guess it was, he nudges me and says somebody ' s in the store. Now me and Pete has been keepin ' stores around these parts for years, and ain ' t never been robbed before. So I tells Pete to roll over and shut up, and then I goes to sleep again. " Well, a minute later, I hears Pete hollerin ' for help, so I grabs my old forty-five and turns out. I seen Pete an ' some other feller fightin ' in the middle of the store. Just as I come in this feller hits Pete a wallop on the dome with his gun butt, and then beats it out the door. I took a shot at him — guess I must o ' winged him, too. I found this here gun right out- side the door. " Here Hiener produced a weapon, which he handed to the sheriff. Then he resumed : " Poor Pete was knocked cold. We sent for the doctor over to Indian Grass. This may be the last of old Pete, for he sure did get an awful belting. " " That sure is too bad, " sympathized Watson, " but maybe the doc will pull him through. How about the robber? Do you know anything about who he was? " " You bet I do. When he turned around just before he jumped through th ' door, I seen his face, and I ' ll swear that it was the devil ' s face of Jim Redding! " " Jim Redding! " exclaimed the sher- iff, " you don ' t mean the fellow that works a claim up on Snake Creek? " " That ' s the chap. " " Well I ' ll be ; why, that fel- ler always semed to mind his own business pretty well. Say, do you mean Jim Redding that run off with Sam Burns ' s daughter? " " Yes, he ' s the one, all right, " re- plied the other, somewhat nettled. " I tell you I seen him. " " Well, that skunk ' ud do anything after that. I guess we ' d better get busy. You roll up them blankets while I gather some things together. " After a few moments the two men left the office, and proceeded toward the store. Here Big Bill purchased some beans, bacon and coffee, taking care not to omit a plenteous supply of " plug cut. " Hiener was not a little gratified by the stir their appearance created, and during the better part of an hour which elapsed before the stage started on its return journey, he ambled gen- THE REDWOOD. 219 ially about, addressing Watson as " Friend Bill, " and frequently recount- ing his fearful struggle with the des- perado. " Did Redding get away with any- thing? " asked Watson, when they had taken their places on top of the stage. " Well I should say so, " replied Hiener. " I come in before he had got very far, but there ' s a can of tomatoes and a side of bacon missin ' . " " Is that what you call a lot? " " Well, that there stuff was worth three dollars, if it was worth a cent! " Then a moment later, " Say, ain ' t this fierce weather? " " You bet it is, " affirmed Big Bill, from the depths of his sheepskin col- lar. As no more conversation seemed forthcoming he lapsed into thought, considering the best way to bring Redding to justice. Big Bill ' s reasoning was simple. From Redding ' s shack to Fairchild ' s was about twenty miles, and about the same distance from Lodge City. It appeared to Big Bill that Redding, after having failed in his attempt, would look to his obscure cabin for sanctuary, trusting that during his struggle with Hiener ' s brother he had not been recognized. At a point midway between the two towns the stage line passes within fif- teen miles of Snake Creek. Here Big Bill dismounted, strapped on his snow shoes, waved a farewell to Hiener, and plunged into the hills. Before night Watson had covered five miles of heavy going. With the coming of darki ' ess the weather abat- ed considerably, and after finding a sheltered nook he built a small fire, partook of a frugal meal, and turned in. According to his previous reckon- ing, he was now some ten miles from Redding ' s shack, and it was in this neighborhood that he hoped to dis- cover the fugitive ' s tracks. Several hours after resummg his quest next morning, his expectations were real- ized. The snow-shoe tracks were headed due east, in the direction of Snake Creek. Somewhat elated at having thus far succeeded in his mission, he paused to regale himself with a fresh " quid. " " Looks pretty soft for my first job, " he muttered, " when it comes to track- in ' desprite criminals to their lair I ' m the boy. " Having delivered himself of these sentiments of self-approbation, he swung off along the trail. Watson felt a thrill of mild excite- ment as with the passing hours the tracks appeared more and more re- cent. Across broad, wind-swept meadows, over low, rolling hills, through groves of spruce and scrub- oak lay the dim, unending ribbon, in some places deep enough to show the impression of the toe-strap, in others almost obliterated. Now Watson was beginning to strain his eyes for a glimpse of his quarry. The cheerless gray of afternoon was shifting rapidly into dusk when the sheriff, topping a slight rise, found 220 THE REDWOOD. himself on the edge of the diminutive valley near the source of Snake Creek. On the opposite side was a low, squat structure which Watson judged to be Redding ' s shack. And that dim form, staggering towards it — surely that was the fugitive himself ! Big Bill quickened his pace. It was with some difficulty that he overtook the man, but when he at last arrived within earshot he called : " Better stop now, Jim. " The fugitive, turning, observed his pursuer, apparently for the first time. With a quick, anxious glance he meas- ured the intervening distance and in- creased his speed toward the cabin. Despite the heavy gloom Watson securely established the man ' s iden- tity in this backward glance. Jim Redding ' s small eyes, protruding un- deriip and flat, almost shapeless nose were unmistakeable. Watson repeated his command, this time more imperiously. Receiving no reply, he drew his gun and sped a warning bullet past Redding ' s head. Without turning the fugitive gained the cabin, stepped quickly inside and slipped the bolt just as Watson hurled his two hundred pounds of bone and muscle against the door. A second lunge served to loosen the hinges. Hurled on by the lust of the man hunt he threw every bit of his weight and energy into his task. The rough, pine barrier proved no match for his fierce onslaught; the door crashed in, and Watson found himself face to face with the robber. The cheerless aspect of the shack ' s interior immediately impressed itself upon the sheriff ' s mind. Beyond a clumsy table, two heavy home-made stools and a barren cupboard, the room was devoid of furniture. On the table reposed a side of bacon — un- doubtedly the one of which Hiener had spoken. Redding, with a tattered shawl — strangely incongruous amid the surroundings — wrapped hastily about his injured arm, stood before a low doorway, evidenly the entrance to a sort of lean-to at the rear. Seen in the gloom of semi-darkness, he pre- sented a menancing appearance as he half crouched, his haggard face con- vulsed with hatred ; his small, evil- looking eyes flashing wickedly ; and a knife glinting dully in his hand. The sheriff paused a moment. " This sure looks business-like, " he muttered. Then addressing himself to Redding he said, earnestly: " Listen here, Jim ; you might as well quit — you ' re about all in, and it ' s a cinch I can get you. Come back to Fairchild ' s with me and I ' ll promise to do all I can to get you off easily. " Thinking his words were taking ef- fect he moved a step nearer and con- tinued. " Come on now, Jim — use your head. Why, you ' re not in as bad as you think. Everybody knows that it has been a mighty hard season, and game sure is scarce. Now don ' t make a fuss — it won ' t do you any good, and it ' ll probably do a whole lot o ' harm. " THE REDWOOD. 221 He then moved toward the meat on the table, and prepared to place it in his pack. Leaping across the room like an in- furiated panther Redding was upon him, and with incredible quickness wrenched his gun away. Watson, stung into action by the shock of con- tact and the realization of his danger, freed himself from the other ' s grip long enough to secure his knife. The fugitive snarled savagely and again rushed. Big Bill seized him in a clinch. Round the cabin they rocked, overturning the table with a crash. A stool splintered into frag- ments beneath their combined weight. Both men struggled fiercely, silently ; each fighting for an opening. Save for their labored breathing and the thudding of their bodies against the floor and the remnants of furniture, the twilight stillness was unbroken. It seemed as though the great, dark wilderness watched with bated breath these two creatures, each fighting madly for the other ' s blood. Redding ' s strength semed inspired by the reckless fury of a madman. The sheriff put forth his most stren- uous efforts, knowing that the crim- mal, crazed by starvation and suffer- ing, had at least momentarily lost his reason, and was intent upon his life. The fearful exertion was telling on the men. Watson ' s superior vitality ultimately asserted itself, however, and he felt the struggles of his adver- sary gradually weakening. Slowly the sheriff forced Redding to the wall, and began to bend his knife arm back. Unable to resist the excruciat- ing torture, the criminal sobbed bro- kenly, and the knife clattered to the floor. He dropped to his knees, and crouched coweringly in the corner, ap- parently in a state of complete ex- haustion. Leaning against the wall, Big Bill paused to recover his wind. " Well, Redding, " he remarked, " you certainly can make me travel some. I sure would hate to buck up against you when you ' re in fightin ' trim. " He stooped to gather the scattered contents of his pack, which he dis- cerned with difficulty in the deepen- ing gloom. At this juncture a subtle something warned him of impending peril. He half turned just as Redding struck him heavily. Seeing his enemy borne to the floor by the unexpected blow, Redding threw himself upon him, and tore viciously with his bare hands. The tables were turned, and Watson found himself battling desperately for his life. But Redding ' s momentary strength rapidly dissipated. With a herculean effort Big Bill threw his antagonist off, and pinned him to the floor. Watson, the embodiment of frank- ness and honesty, abhorred treachery, and Redding ' s vicious attack aroused him to deadly wrath. He looked into the fugitive ' s eyes, and saw there an expression of malevolence, brute- hatred, and sullen defiance, indefina- 222 THE REDWOOD. ble in its intensity. Redding ' s froth- ing mouth began to pour forth a stream of curses and revilements. Roused to a pitch of reckless ferocity, the sheriff seized the knife which had so nearly terminated his existence. It flashed through the air, and — stopped, hovering within an inch of Redding ' s throat. " What ' s that? " demanded Watson, tensely. ' ! ' There broke upon the wan, gray stillness a low moan — the utterance of a woman in agony — and a faint, high- pitched wail — the wail of an infant — issued from the rear room. As Wat- son, startled, glanced quickly at Red- ding, he observed the look of fierce loathing replaced by an expression remarkably tender. Then a great light broke for the sheriff. His grip slowly relaxed, and the fugitive stood upright before him. In a low tone, husky with emotion, the guardian of the law exclaimed : " Say, Jim, I didn ' t know. Why the devil didn ' t you tell me? Shake. " F. BUCKLEY McGURRIN. MICHAEL ANGELO ' S DAVID 8tay! But a moment and the pendant arm Will rise, the eyes flash fire ! But no! and still Goliath works his harm. Still foul his taunts as mire. wmld some other David come again With stone and sling and ire. A. STONE. BROWNING AND I O O K S ARE great friends. They never desert us, no matter what turn our for- tune may take. They are the truest friends of the rich and poor, the feeble and strong, the great and small, the business man and the scholar. The man of the world finds pleasure and recreation in books, and the student gets his learning and education from the same source. The child, just learning to read, passes many a happy hour with its books; and the oldest man, when in his last fleeting years of life, passes his time with pleasure by reading books of philosophy. What is more pleasant to a student than to sit, on a winter ' s eve, and develop his mind by ponder- ing over the oftentimes difficult pas- sages of Robert Browning ' s poems? These poems are overflowing with beautiful thoughts and profound truths ; but it requires a deal of grind- ing study and deep thought to glean the so profusely scattered pearls of wisdom from the dark and well nigh subterranean passages of the poems of Browning. Obscurity is what keeps Browning out of the rank of popular poets. In this so-called intellectual age the ten- dency of most people is to skim light- ly over a narrative, or poem, and pick the story, or moral, at a glance. It is for this reason that light, tripping poetry is the popular poetry of the hour. In Browning we have an au- thor who wrote very little of this sort of poetry; for, as he himself said, he " never pretended to offer such liter- ature as should be a substitute for a cigar, or a game of dominoes, to an idle man. " He was extraordinarily well educated in all arts and sciences end that he wrote for a class of people as well versed as himself is easily de- duced from the many omissions of ex- planatory words and phrases found in his poems. These omissions make the poems more difficult than obscure. Many readers say that Browning ' s lack of grammatical frills and descrip- tive verses makes him obscure, where- as if they were only his peers in knowl- edge his so-called obscure verses would be easily understood. Of course in many of his poems there are many really obscure verses ; but most of them are the result of omitting parts of speech; for Browning ' s verses very often resemble lines of notes taken down on a subject which the writer has already heard explained. Notice the crowded notebook style of this passage : — r " To be by him themselves made act. Not watch Sordello acting each of them. ' ' 223 224 THE REDWOOD. This verse from " Sordello " is, at first glance, not only obscure, but also absolutely devoid of any m eaning. After a little study and changing of the collocation of the Avords we dis- cern that Browning probably meant to give this idea : — " To be themselves made by him to act, Not each of them watch Sordello acting. " There is now a coherent thought in the lines, though they had to be changed almost entirely before the sense was made clear. The main fault of the author seems to be the suppres- sion of the relative, both nominative and accusative, and until the reader becomes familiar with this characteris- tic he will find the study of Brown- ing ' s poems both hard and unsatisfy- ing. A few examples are given be- low: " Checking the song of praise in me, had else Swelled to full for God ' s will done on earth. " " The Ring and the Book. " Which is omitted before " had else swelled. " " See in such A star shall climb apace and culmi- nate. " " The Other Half of Rome. " " See in such A star that shall climb, " etc., is the way the line should have been written in order to have made the sense per- fectly clear. There is no need to cite further examples for many may be found in " Saul " and other poems. In conclusion to these few words concerning the obscurity of Browning it might be said that, though he is un- doubtedly obscure, his obscurity is very often due to the lack of intellec- tuality of his readers. They hope to glean his profound and learned ideas of life and religion without proper study and thought. As a religious writer of poetry Browning undoubtedly ranks first among modern authors. He was an ardent Christian and his religious writings are imbued with the fire and zeal of his Christian faith. At times he seems sceptical in belief in God, as, in " An Epistle containing the Strange Medical Experience of Karshish, the Arab Physician, " he speaks of Christ and His great power of healing, in comparison with Arab medicine-men, and their ' snake-stones and healing spiders. In the first part of this poem Browning seems to be trying to ridi- cule the Christian faith, but in the lat- ter part he seems to realize his error, for in the last lines of the poem he gives God ' and Christ unqualified praise. Though rather biased against the Catholic faith, he was broad-mind- ed enough to see that the faith was in- tellectually well founded; but as he thought in his poem, " Christmas Eve, " it was more difficult to under- stand than Protestant doctrine; so he preferred the latter. In " Christmas Eve " and " Easter Day " we are con- veyed, by the poet, to the shrines of THE REDWOOD. 225 all denominations, and he picks their beliefs and creeds apart for us. None are rejected wholly, for there are to him good points in all. Browning did not write in favor of any church, but the whole foundation of his belief was in the immortality of the soul, a Su- preme Being, and a reward, in Heaven, to the just and righteous. His idea was to believe some things all the time, rather than all things part of the time, and though our creeds do not chime harmoniously with his, neverthe- less his religious teachings are, for the most part, uplifting and good for the soul. Much that he has written about the Catholic church we could well wish away, as he was hopelessly out of feeling, and thus incapable of understanding it. He believed what he chose, not what God would have him believe. In regard to originality it may truthfully be said that he was one of the foremost of all English poets in that quality. What other poet ever strove to force his readers to ponder by the hour over his verses in order to get their hidden meaning, when he could more easily have filled his poet- ical lines with quickly discerned and outstanding truths? His poems were written, not with the purpose in view of soothing, or delighting his readers; but to disturb them, rouse their minds out of the rut of thought into which they had fallen, and transfer the slum- bering intellects to a realm of deep, and brain-enlivening study. He wrote not to obtain the popularity of the frivolous and light-hearted many, but to gain the respect of the deep-think- ing and intellectual few. There is little to be said in regard to the study of Browning by high school students. A deep thinker and highly educated man often has trouble understanding lines such as these from " Saul " :— " God made all the creatures and gave them our love and our fear, To give sign, we and they are his children, one family here. " Or as these : — " But when ' Twas time expostulate, attempt withdraw Taurello from his child, " (From " Sordello. " ) How, therefore, can young men and women, just starting out on the road of learning, be expected to vmderstand the poet ' s difficult verses, to compre- hend the poet ' s broad views, profound ideas and brilliant inspirations? How can a high school student devote the time required to glean the hidden gems of thought which Browning so cleverly covers up in his obscure lines? Here is an author whose study should be reserved for the last years of the university course, when the student is intellectually fit to receive the beauti- ful ideas which may be drawn from the study of his poems. But for all that Browning, I think, has helped me. Looking at him not as a religious teacher, for such he is not even to one who might go to him 226 THE REDWOOD. to be taught — his uncertainty and ob- scurity and changefulness prevent that, — but as a poet, there is in many of his poems an outlook upon life that is new and stimulating There is an interest in the problems of life and their solution that appeals to one that hopes to solve them one day for him- self. The solution is not all that I de- sire or always approve, but I try to learn from what seem to me to be pal- pable mistakes. I think I made a friend of Browning and so I have cal led this essay Browning and I. FRANK McCABE, 4th High. AND THOU BESIDE ME IN THE WILDERNESS (Ruhaiyat) The jug, the look, with thee beneath the bough. And Life and Death naught but the winds that bhrv ? Sans God, sans Soul, sans Love, sans everything. This world were wilderness enow. Myself when young did wait the dawn of Spring, And flung aside old Winter and the ring I pledged her, but Life, but Death, tlie fearful whence and why. They set my wilderness abhssoming. PAUL BOOK. JIM GRIMSBY OF THE VALENTINE TOUCH lE 1 OB SCANLON, after giving his order care- lessly in The Oxford Club, picked up the morning paper and glanced at the head lines. Instantly a transformation took place on his good-humored counte- nance. Two or three spasmodic twitches of the face, and in order the shadows of doubt, perplexity, anger, and deep sorrow fell darkly upon his emotional countenance. The London Daily was held so tightly in his hand, that the clean white finger nails ex- tended sharply into the pale flesh of the palm. " Great God, " his voice broke with pitiful wail upon the cock- ney waiter. " John cannot be dead, and a criminal, " he added, bitterly. " Oh, the curs, " he cried, " that would brand him thus. " " Hi s ' y sir " — " Enough, " came from Bob, " Get my coat and hat. " " But the ' am and heggs, " began the servant, confused- ly. " Let ' em wait, " yelled back Bob, as he rushed out seizing his coat and hat from the rack, and passing swiftly through the door. The once pleasant mouth now wore a worried look. Five minutes later saw him at the station. Here he hastily purchased four differ- ent newspapers, but the troublesome account did not differ save in details. The story read as follows : A body found drifting in the Thames yester- day was identified by the Babing Pri- vate Detective Agency through clothes and documents found thereon, as belonging to John Scanlon, one of a nefarious band of safe crackers, jimmy-men, etc., and said to have been killed by colleagues, for what was known as " squealing to the bulls. " A badge bearing the inscrip- tion, " Royal Order of Safe Workers, " as the criminal society was known, was upon his person when found. All who wish to identify body further must apply to J. H. Babing, head of detective agency, 450 Soho Square. Hence we find Bob in London, and as he drew near an old brown stone building which was distinguished from its brethren by virtue of an out- rageously insistent ' mansard, he was made aware that he had reached his destination through a gilded sign ex- tending overhead for one-half of the sidewalk. As he approached Bob murmured to himself: " And to think that he did it to put me through college ! No, I cannot believe it, I will not. " But his sorrowful blue eyes turned to a steely grey under the fire of determination, as he muttered gritting his teeth : " If I ever meet his murderers ! " He walked into the ante-room and a sour, expressionless individual accepted his 227 228 THE REDWOOD. card and disappeared through the in- ner door. The clerk ' s erstwhile mask of ap?thy dropped like a veil as he stood before a corpulent, sleek-appear- ing individual, with a fat face and nar- row eyes. He crouched forward, eager- ly, menacingly, reminding one of the tiger about to spring. " I thought you said you croaked him, " he snarled. " Croaked who? " the man asked, in a perfectly imperturbable manner. " Why, Scanlon, of course, " shrieked the other, fuming at his companion ' s pretended indifference. The fat gen- tleman, whose name was Babing, calmly took down a small memoran- dum with the word croaked written across the top in a horrifyingly prom- inent manner, when the transformed office boy broke out in a pleading tone: " For goodness sake cut it out. Either he or his ghost is out in the next room or I am going crazy. " At this Babing whirled around in his seat, all the color gone from his face whose sickly palor was further em- phasized by a deep dyed mustache, " Wha-a-at, " he faltered nervously; and then spying the card in his con- federate ' s hand he snatched it up. A ludicrous sigh, or rather gasp, of relief went up from some where down in his double chin, but the other who also saw the inscription on the card but did not express himself as forcibly, broke in saying: " It must be his brother; what shall we tell him? " " Slip the safe worker ' s stall over on him, " returned Babing, now com- posed ; " it would never do for John Scanlon to be found alive, so we will have to put his brother on a false lead. " " What, " cried the other, " do you mean to say that you haven ' t killed Scanlon? " The fat man saw that he was caught, and said sheepish- ly : " Well, I put him in the steel vault underneath this building, and have in- stalled the latest combination safe lock on the door. " The other looked with supreme contempt upon the head of the dishonest agency, and said with disgust in his tones : " Don ' t you know that, as he has the papers that will hang us both hidden somewhere, it will be good night if he ever escapes? " Here the fat man ' s patience became exhausted, and the air immediately be- came sulphurous. And what he end- ed up with, if coherently expressed, would sound something like this : " Do whatever you like with him, but for heaven ' s sake don ' t garble it. I will attend to the kid. Now show him in, " he said imperatively. The assistant immediately, though reluctantly, resumed his former role, and returning from the sanctum said, complainingly, to the now very impa- tient Bob : " The chief is busy, but he says he will see you if " Wherewith Bob, unwilling to hear more, opened the door of the office and walked in upon Babing, who ordered him, gruffly, without looking up, to sit down. He then began to appear very busy, un- doubtedly for Bob ' s benefit, and after THE REDWOOD. 229 about five minutes looked up with an oily and ingratiating smile. Bob im- mediately conceived a strong dislike for Babing, and this may be account- ed for -in part by his long wait during the foregoing stormy interview ; but the fawning affability of the man struck upon Bob ' s better nature as being incongrous with both the circum- stances of his case, and Babing ' s be- fore affected preoccupation. The shifty little blue eyes before him -spoke a certain nervousness which was inexplicable, but Bob gave up the puzzle and listened to the paper story over again, and then after many as- surances on the part of Babing that the murderers were being hunted down, he left the office in a sort of daze. He was proceeding in a rambling way along the street when he sudden- ly heard a subdued " Say! " directly at his side. Turning, he found a gentle- man staring at him in a manner which bordered almost on abstraction. Then, seeming to realize that he was causing Bob some embarrassment, he called a cab and saying a few words to the driver in ' a low tone, he turned again to Bob. " Will you get in with me? ' he asked. " I would like to speak to you, if it is to your convenience, " he added hastily. Seeing Bob ' s re- luctance, and divining the cause, he smilingly said : " Do not fear for your purse; " and as he said this he unbot- toned his coat and exposed to view a star of the " private detective " sort, and to Bob ' s surprise he could read the words, " Babing Detective Agency, " engraved on the metal. Bob thinking he might learn something of his brother, obeyed with alacrity. The ride which followed was passed in a dead silence. Bob, seeing that the other was eyeing him in deep thought, would not speak until his host opened the conversation, which at length the latter did. " Your name? " he queried. " Robert Scanlon, sir, " said Bob, look- ing up. " Brother of John Scanlon, I presume? " he asked. " Yes, sir, " re- plied Bob, with illconcealed eager- ness in his tone. The detective now said : " Did you ever hear about Jim Grimsby of the Valentine touch? " " Why, " answered Bob, " he was the greatest criminal in England. It was said that he could open the finest time locks in this country by the mere touch of his hand ; but he has been dead this last twelve-month, so how could he have anything to do with my brother ' s death? " " He didn ' t, " an- swered the gentleman. " I am James Grimsby. " " Will you listen to what I have to say or leave the carriage at once? " Bob was so astounded that he just gazed upon the man with com- mingled feelings of awe and doubt, and after a pause, and remembering his brother, answered slowly. " I will listen. " The stranger then hurriedly began as follows : " When they gave me up for dead I was pretty near gone. I was just able to cling to a spar in the English channel. I clung to the battered hulk for two days in the throes of a delirium, and when I 230 THE REDWOOD. awoke a month later I found my hair to be as white as you see it now. I was lying very weak in the small farm house of an Irish peasant, who, thank God, had shelterd me for five long weeks. In admiring the simple faith that characterized their lives, I thought of my life and repented. I determined to do all in my power to stamp out criminality. After recover- ing from both the physical and mental fatigue which I had undergone, I ob- tained the position of detective from that fat spider whom you saw a min- ute ago, and I did not suspect at the time his deep rascality and duplicity of purpose. A little while later I made the acquaintance of a young police re- porter on the London Times who was about to publish one of Babing ' s ras- cally deeds, and also the news of a shameful murder indirectly done by Babing. Babing had unlawfully im- prisoned your brother, for the news- paper reporter was your brother, and gathering false evidence against him, branded him as a criminal. That very night he took the body of his former victim, placed upon it your brother ' s garments and threw it into the Thames. Your brother is now a pris- oner in a time-locked steel vault under Babing ' s house, and I was about to go for the police (as I learned of the outrage just before lunch), when I saw you coming from the office. As it is now nearing nightfall and as your brother may be in peril, I think it best to go for the police immediately. " Bob ' s face was ghastly as he huskily asked, " Is there any ventilation in the vault? " " I think so, but it is very slight. And by the way, you may call me Corcoran, as none know my true identity. " Nine o ' clock that evening saw Bob, the reformed criminal, and five police officers within the old brown-stone building in Soho Square. When the house was stealthily searched, neither Babing nor his chief assistant were to be found. Grimsby thereupon lead the way to the vault and after a short space the ventilator was found. Bob, in his eagerness, called through it, and received in answer only a slight moan. He thereupon fainted, whether from relief or anxiety, or both, and Grims- by, whose face was haggard, and who seemed to be in deep thought, awoke with a start and caught him as he fell. When Bob awoke he found that he was on the outside of an awe-stricken group of police officers, who stood around Grimsby. He arose and his eyes started from their sockets at what he saw. Grimsby, totally obliv- ious of all around him, was kneeling on the stone floor, directly against the big door of armor-plate. The veins of his forehead were standing out in heavy purple lines, and his flashing eyes might well be compared with twin diamonds in a setting of ebony as they moved like bits of lighted charcoal in their dark caverns. His long tapering fingers were ma- nipulating the combination so slowly that it could scarce be seen to move, while his ears strained to catch the THE REDWOOD. 231 dropping of the tumblers. Rembrandt alone could have done justice to such a picture. " Sandpaper, " he finally muttered, never even changing his at- titude. A strip of it was handed to him by a perspiring Irish officer, who looked as if he had seen a ghost and had heard it speak. This Grimsby rubbed delicately to his finger tips, never even turning his eyes to it. When he had finished he let it float gently to the floor and his fingers again found the combination. The next that Bob remembered seeing was that Grimsby suddenly stopped, leapt to his feet and gave the handle of the door a tug. It opened to him, and as it did so, there was heard the whir of a buzzer faintly above an d the scram- bling of feet in the corridor, and Bab- ing, with his assistant, their faces livid, burst in upon the safe-openers. Both were armed with revolvers, and Babing, seeing Grimsby, in his rage shot the latter through the heart ; while the assistant recognizing Bob, fired point blank at him, cursing at the same time after the most ap- proved manner of a pirate. Bob had no sooner heard the sickening chug of the bullet and the fall of Grimsby, then he himself experienced a sting- ing, numbing sensation in the flesh of his forearm and fell senseless to the floor. Bob gradually came to his senses in a darkened room, the air of which was heavy with the odor of drugs and the perfume of flowers. He heard the kindly voice of his brother, and felt his hand in a warm loving clasp, and murmured, " John. " Then with a hap- py smile illuminating his features he fell into a deep sleep, the product of a recently administered opiate. F. W. SCHILLING. PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA The object of The Redwood is to gather together what is best in the literary work of the students, to record University doings and to knit closely the hearts of the boys of the present and the past EDITORIAL STAFF EDITOR - - - BUSINESS MANAGER ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER REVIEWS _ _ - ALUMNI - - - - UNIVERSITY NOTES - ATHLETICS ALUMNI CORRESPONDENTS STAFF ARTIST ASSOCIATE EDITORS THE EDITOR EXECUTIVE BOARD THE BUSINESS MANAGER ROY A. BRONSON, ' 12 ROBERT J. FLOOD, ' 13 HAROLD7R. MCKINNON, ' 14 RODNEY A. YOELL, ' 14 WM. STEWART CANNON ' 16 EDWARD O ' CONNOR, ' 16 FRANK G. BOONE, ' 14 JCHAS. D. SOUTH, Litt. D., ' 01 I ALEX. T. LEONARD, A. B., ' 10 GEORGE B. LYLE, ' 13 THE EDITOR OF REVIEWS Address all communications to THE REDWOOD, University of Santa Clara, Santa Clara, California Terms of subscription, Si. SO a year; single copies 25 cents EDITORIAL COMMENTS A Step Towards a Money Trust Before the legislature of this State several bills have recently been introduced, ostensibly to prevent fraud on the part of the investment companies. These bills are modelled after the so-called Blue Sky laws of Kansas, and provide for a one-man commission, who is given full author- ity over all corporations, co-partner- 232 ships and companies which offer for sale stocks, bonds or other securities. It is to be the duty of the commission- er to examine the books and docu- ments of these companies (at their ex- pense), and if in his judgment they will not yield a fair return on the stock or bonds it will be unlawful for these companies to transact business. If on the contrary, in the personal THE REDWOOD. 233 opinion of this dictator, the stock or bonds will receive a fair return, then the company may continue to exist. But the statement authorizing it to do so must recite in bold-faced type that the commissioner in no way rec- ommends the securities ! The result of the passage of such a bill may readily be imagined. Banks would be the sole recipients of the capital of the people, and the creation of a money trust and the furtherance of its plans would logically follow. The effective development of the national reserves of a country de- mands the use of large amounts of mone y. Such capital must be ob- tained through the combination of the assets of large numbers of per- sons. There are two methods by which this may be done: First, the indirect method, by which individuals deposit money with bankers who themselves invest ; and second, by in- vesting directly. The so-called money trust of the United States is founded upon the in- direct method, and its disadvantages are manifest. If the enterprises in which the funds of depositors are in- vested fail, the indirect depositors lose their money; if, on the other hand, they should prove a great success, the indirect investors do not receive their share of the profits, but by an unjust financial system their money is lent at a nominal rate to capitalists who re- ceive the real profits therefrom with- out any corresponding risk of loss. A class is being formed in this coun- try consisting of the stockholders of banks and insurance companies; they constitute a financial monopoly and it is claimed that a select few number- ing not over thirty-six individuals, is rapidly gaining control over enough banks to dominate practically the de- veloprpent of the natural resources of our country and all forms of invest- ment. It is the purpose of these trusts to have all enterprises capitalized in New York, and all money sent there for investment. The schemes to accom- plish their purpose are infinite, and are always under the guise of a bene- fit to the people. The present bill forms no exception to the rule. It is ostensibly designed for the protection of the State ' s countless investors, but in reality its object is the fostering of a money trust within our State and the furtherance of the aims of the money lenders who are seking to con- trol the entire wealth of the nation. Resumption Some few words of of Athletic ours in another de- Relations partment, in which we spoke of the possible resumption of athletic relations with a certain col- lege on this Coast as being not thought of seriously, have, by some one, we know not whom, been inter- preted to mean that there was a desire in Santa Clara to see those relations resumed. We said the whole affair was not to be taken seriously. We say it again. There is no wish or ten- 234 THE REDWOOD. dency, desire or thought of resuming such athletic relations. The newspa- per in which we read the comment on our words, spoke of the bat-boy and the manager being at one in this de- sire. We have seen the bat-boy and we know the manager, and we speak out for the ir sakes. Since the dropping of athletic rela- tions with this college at least one event has occurred which can but strengthen us in our determination, and we may as well say, once for all, that a newspaper campaign such as was resorted to some years ago, and of which the article to which we have referred above, seemed to be the in- ception, would be the last thing in the world to secure the effect which those who would engage in it seem to de- sire. Well, we have rolled up our sleeves, and having an unusually long ex- change list before us this month, we have started to work. As an average the books are better than in the pre- vious semester. Perchance, it is ow- ing to the fact that we are now in the middle of the college year, and hence have struck our proper stride and have become settled in the neces- sary routine that is essential to good, serious work. This is only advanced as a theory, however, and is conse- quently to be regarded as such. Bowdoin Quill The first m a g i z i n e to be reviewed this month is an old and extremely welcome friend of ours. Unfortunately we have not seen it in some two years, yet the issue at hand, (though in itself rather ancient as magazines go), still maintains the standard which gave the " Quill " its high rank amongst college journals. An article which called for our atten- tion immediately is " A New Aristoc- racy. " Essays on Socialism, both pro and con, have become quite common, in point of number as well as in quality, yet it is with a distinctly new note that the subject is handled in this essay, and hence its interest. Instead of giv- ing a cut and dried prosaic argument, the author pleads for a new aristoc- racy, which he believes, in an altrustic sense, will change society for the bet- ter. " The Winning of My Wife, " is a clever and well worded story, the cli- max is approached nicely and the en- tire piece is well balanced. The book loses much, however, in not having a good representative poem. The de- partments are well written. We hope to see the " Quill " again during the coming month. Holy Cross Purple In the Holy Cross Purple for January, we find promise for a first class magazine, if they keep up the standard set by this issue. " Prator ' s, " a sketch of some city types, is cleverly written, as is the story, " Five Min- utes. " The latter has some good con- versation in it, and reads smoothly. " The Wand of Midas " is an article that 235 236 THE REDWOOD. can neither be called an essay nor a story. However that may be, there is no hesitation on the part of the re- viewer to call it poor, and that is all that is necessary. The piece has no connection, fails in its attempt at wit, and is silly and ambiguous through- out. We sincerely hope that the edi- tor will examine such contributions more closely, before admitting them to print. " Drum Chapel Raw " is a Scotch dialect poem, well done, and finished. Another bit of verse, " A Fragment, " is sincere in tone throughout and po- etic in expression ; we suggest that a less prosaic title would sound better. However, that is only a minor detail; what one desires in verse is quality, and if that be present he can over- look such small considerations. Purple and Gray There came into the Sanctum the other day a stranger of dig- nified and genteel appearance, who presented himself as No. I, Vol. 1, of the " St. Thomas Purple and Gray. " The book is of fair size and gives promise of keeping up the good stand- ard required of all first class college journals. An essay on " Robert W. Service, " the Canadian and Alaskan poet, is timely and well written. Service has been attracting considera- ble attention the last few years, and a keen, thorough, analysis of his work, such as this article is, should find ready appreciation. The verse, " Last Days of Autumn, " is sweet in tone and smooth of diction, as is the first open- ing poem. The latter, however, suf- fers somewhat from an inharmonious meter; a bit of attention here could have easily improved matters. The story, " Jack ' s Dilemma, " is prosaic in plot, and not surprising in climax, yet the theme is well handled and saves what would otherwise be a rather tiresome story. Another bit of fiction is " A Mysterious Escape. " This has a good plot, but lacks facil- ity in workmanship. It is well con- ceived but should have been elabo- rated slightly. In way of departments the magazine is well stocked and they all seem to be well edited. If the book keeps up the work so well be- gun, we look for a good exchange in the future. Greetings from the " Red- wood, " " Purple and Gray, " in your undertaking. The Haverfor dian Haverfordian began the year well, as is evinced by the January number, now before us. This book has always been a welcome pleasure at our exchange desk, and the present issue is no exception to the rule. We were rather staggered on turning to the front page by an essay of statistics that closely resem- bled those of a patent medicine al- manac. However, the article, " Les- sons in College Statistics, " is not so formidable as it appears, and for one seeking information regarding the THE REDWOOD. 237 number and attendance of our colleges the article should prove interesting. The story, " El Doctor, " is well writ- ten, and deals with types known to us of the West. It runs nicely to a climax and ends well. The other bit of fiction in the book, " The Retribu- tion, " is an attempt at the style of Charles Dickens. We can not say that it is a failure, for it rings true and partakes somewhat of the grand style of that great author, yet al- though the piece is splendidly con- ceived, it is somewhat overdrawn in the matter of realism and strikes an almost repulsive note in the end. We have noticed the author ' s work before, and although he writes well, greater pains should be taken by him to gain a deeper insight into our English classics, since he is a foreigner. Con- sidering everything the story is ex- ceptionally good in conception and workmanship ; a more thorough re- writing, however, would have im- proved the contribution. " Eyes, " is a pretty piece of verse and has a running meter that is pleas- ant to read ; the thought is good and well expressed in diction and form. The various departments of the book are carefully edited, but we sug- gest a more detailed review of your exchanges. worth ' s famous " Ode on Immortal- ity, " is a studious and careful piece of work that should reflect great credit on the author. It is not written in the ultra intellectual style so frequent- ly assumed by college essayists, but conveys its thought in a readable and pleasant manner. The story, " An Awful Experience, " is well worded, but a bit amateurish in the working out of the plot. A more facile style of ex- position necessary to bring out the motif can be acquired by careful study of some French short storyist, such as Prospere Merimee or Coppee. The magazine loses considerable in its ensemble by lack of good verse; this should be attended to as it rounds out a volume, better than anything else. One good poem can atone fre- quently for too faulty contributions. Viatorian The Viatorian, - though a small maga- zine, is neatly and well edited. The essay on Word- " Golf and We are not in the Outdoor habit of r e v i e w i ng Sports profess ional maga- zines, yet on receiving the above named publication we decided to do so, since it fills a long felt want. " Golf, " though restricted in title, gives monthly an interesting account of all sports of the better class, and besides this in its editorial we can read some pretty sane criticisms of the world ' s current events. It has a table of contents that ranges all the way from Polo to Bullfights (a fairly good arti- cle, by the way, but the cuts were not of the bull ring in Mexico City), and dramatic criticisms. 238 THE REDWOOD. This bit of reading matter is varied enough for everyone, yet we would like to see a department devoted en- tirely to college athletics, as many of the Eastern sporting sheets contain. The periodical is not filled with objec- tionable adds, but is fresh, clean and breezy throughout. Williams ' Monthly We have noted the excellency of the " Williams ' Monthly " before, but the quality of the January number again commends itself to our attention. Particularly does its verse strike us, and the fiction is also good ; A playlet, " In the Library, " is good in plot, but a bit too short. The main trouble with college play writers is that their work is too crowded. " Bravado " is a poem that read so nicely we reprint it below for the benefit of our readers. Space forbids a more extended list of reviews, but we gratefully ac- knowledge the following : " Vassar Miscellany, " " Columbia, " " Athenaeumom, " " Springhillian, " " Holy Cross Purple, " " Mercerian, " " University of Virginia Magazine, " " Indian Sentinel, " " Fordham Month- ly, " " Xaverian. " BRAVADO. She comes comes down the gilded, mirrored room Through the crowded tables ' revelry, With an indolent languorous smile on her face, And the grace of a wind-swept fleur de lys. Her lips are as red as poppies are In a poppy field where the sunlight lies. Her skin is as white as the moon on the mist, There ' s a careless passion adream in her eyes. It is New Year ' s eve, there is holly, wine, Crimson poinsettas, amber cham- pagne ; Confetti and serpentine flung through the air. Drift down in a little gossamer rain. She passes by with her studied laugh, So debonair and so cavalier. With the ghost of a dread hid deep in her heart For the spectre she ' s feting — another year. — Charles William Brackett. The Road Beyond the Town, Mich- ael Earls, S. J. It is a pleasure to meet with the music and hope of Father Earls ' s verse. There are no blind hands stretched gropingly, for there are no darkness and no distrust. The ele- ment of pellucidity, one wishes to say more than the element of clear- ness, is everywhere, shot through with the light of joy and faith and perfect calm. It would be hard to match the elan of " The Bonnie Prince of Spring, " just as one seems THE REDWOOD. 239 to feel freshly the lilt of the Sapphic measure in " The Appian Way. " " The Road Beyond the Town " is caught up well by the envoi " The Wide World of My Town, " and one can be sure that the sealed hands of such transparent, hap- py verse will rain rich blessings when they are raised to bless. Benziger Bros., $1.25. Poems, Rev. Hugh F. Blunt. Father Blunt has already the fame of a maker of verse. One could hard- ly read " The Last Communion Day " and not f eel that he was looking through a real poet ' s eyes, one of the sort that sees beyond earthly beauty unto the soul. And the impression lasts all through one ' s reading, for there is never lacking the happy thought to carry one on. Father Blunt is always clear, direct and mu- sical. Were we ungraciously to find a flaw it would be that the music is nearly always of the soft, soothing kind, rarely of the robust and stirring sort that we feel lies waiting in his lyre. — The Rumford Pres, Concord, N. H. " UP IN ARDMUIRLAND. " " Up in Ardmuirland " is a delightful book, written by the twin brother of a priest. It describes in a simple, inter- esting style the different events that take place in a Scottish Catholic vil- lage. The book is really made up of a series of delightfully entertaining character sketches of these simple-liv- ing Scottish folk. The characters of Archie, Penny, Val, Christian and oth- ers are very pleasing and excellently done. Each chapter of the book, we may say, contains within it a complete tale, especially the one entitled " The Smugglers. " In it is related the in- tensely interesting incident of an offi- cer whose duty it is to ferret out all the distilleries in the vicinity. While making his way to one of these places, situated on a high hill, he is caught in a heavy snowstorm. He struggles along; faint and weak. Finally he reaches the house overcome by the cold. The poor agent is taken in the house of Davie Forbes, the notorious " moonshiner, " and every help is given him. The Forbes treat him so hos- pitably that he thinks they do not know who he is. All the time, how- ever, they are aware of his identity. Donar, the agent, hesitates about ac- cepting the good family ' s generosity. Gratitude and appreciation for the Forbes ' kind treatment which really saved his life, dissuade Donar from " piping " on this family. He readily forgives them and abandons the un- pleasant avocation that requires him to bring Davie Forbes to justice to some one more able to resist his generosity. In the chapter entitled Phenomena, a real ghost is introduced. Admirers of Poe will find this chapter very en- thralling. Throughout the whole book there 240 THE REDWOOD. is a great deal of pathos and refresh- ing good humor. Inded the book is so overflowing with sunshine that we are really cast down and withered by the chill shade of the sad story of Fa- ther Fleming ' s old housekeper, Pluny. The story, as a whole, is very satis- factory and wholesome, giving a true insig ht into the happenings that oc- curred in the life of a parish priest, " Up in Ardmuirand. " Benziger Bros., N. Y. Price, $1.25 Initi rBttg NotFB Exams. Soon after the re- and a good wholesome spirit was turn from the Xmas maintained throughout the three days, vacation, it became plainly noticeable that a new spirit had crept into the school. " More study and less play, " seemed to be the motto of every one. Some at- tributed this spirit to brand new res- Visit of Bishop Hanna On January 30th the University was hon- ored with a visit of the Rt. Rev. E. J. Hanna, D. D., auxil- olutions, but to the wise majority it Jary Bishop of San Francisco. On was evident that the Exams were fast that evening he was tendered a re- approaching. Here and there about ception by the students. Alumni and the campus an isolated figure would Eriends of the University. 1 ' he be seen, diligently plying a Virgil, speakers of the evening were Chaun- Horace or Homer, or a lofty carefree y Tramutolo, Harry McGowan, senior, frowning over a ponderous j o delivered an ode of address, volume of economics. And thus it written by Mr. Chas. D. South, Mr. was that when the dreaded week had j p_ Sex, J. D., and Rev. Er. Mor- come and gone, few were caught un- isey, all bidding welcome to the bish- prepared. As a whole, the faculty re- p Santa Clara. The Bishop then ports are highly satisfactory. addressed the gathering, thanking all for the hearty welcome he had re- ceived, and then spoke to the students When these trying as to how they might here prepare Retreat days had been fin- themselves to aid him in future years, ished we entered upon The bishop is a man of genteel ap- the annual three days ' retreat. The pearance, amiable in disposition, but exercises were given by Rev. Er. D. his most striking characteristics are J. Kavanagh, S. J., consisting of his firmness of purpose and his deter- twenty Meditations. They were in- mination. He is indeed the man for teresting and instructive and offered his position, and fully able to cope excellent subjects for thought. The with any problem that may arise be- retreat was begun with enthusiasm fore him in his great work. The stu- 241 242 THE REDWOOD. dents extend their thanks to his Lord- ship for the hohday which he granted them. Engineering Lecture On February 17th, the first of a series of lectures to be given under the auspices of the Engineering Society was delivered by Prof. Jos. L. Sullivan, Instructor in Descriptive Geometry in the College of Engineer- ing. The subject was " Motive Pow- er. " He spoke on electricity, steam and gasoline, illustrating the facts ex- pounded with slides. These lectures promise to be very interesting and the society has invited several of the best known engineers of the West to speak, after the present series is con- cluded. Pres. Taft ' s Picture This U n i V e r s ity is the recipient of a large autograp hed portrait of President Taft. It is a very good likeness of the president, and bears the following inscription : White House — For the University of Santa Clara. With best wishes. Jan. 13, 1913. Wm. H. Taft. Ad plurimos annos. The second of the Show three vaudeville shows to be given by the As- sociated Students was held on the evening of Feb. 20th. This was by far the best entertainment held this year in the auditorium. The bill was replete with good numbers, ranging from comedy to drama. The quartette headed the bill with some new songs and ditties and made a big hit as usual. Best, " Blondie, " " Murke " and Askam are hard to beat, and they are ever welcome with their " barber shop harmony. " Next in order came a skit entitled, " The Reformation, " written by Harry McGowan and Percy O ' Connor, and acted by themselves. The idea, as in- dicated by the title, is that a burglar is led to a better life by a girl, but is tempted to revert to his old ways by a former pal, who informed him that his fiancee had given him up. All this was but a lie. He learns the truth and gives up his plan to rob the church. Harry McGowan plays the part of the tempting crook, Percy O ' Connor, the reformed crook at col- lege, and Harry Butler the landlady ' s son. It is a very good skit well acted. Miss Olga Slavitch, San Jose ' s most popular vocalist, treated the audience to some delightful classical solos, accompanied by Miss Helen Sims. Miss Sims rendered a violin solo, unequaled in the University ' s theatrical history. She was accom- panied by Miss Ethel Twohy of San Jose. The only and original Billy Hynes was there. He had the crowd in hys- terics with his favorite songs and new sayings, sung and told as only Billy Hynes can. He was accompanied on the piano by his son, Stewart Hynes. THE REDWOOD. 243 The Harmony four of San Jose de- lighted the audience with their new numbers. This quartette are un- equaled on the coast when it comes to bringing harmony forth from stringed instruments. The thriller of the evening came in the last number, Rodney A. Yoell ' s production of Uncle Tom ' s Cabin. There was the villain, Topsy, Eliza and even Little Eva. The beauty chorus led by J. Winston and Artison Ramage danced the old " Minuette " by request, and sang the chorus to Little Eva Mamsen ' s pathetic lyric, " She Loved Him Once, But He Moved Away, " with gestures. The play was completed, Eliza having crossed the ice and Eva having as- cended into Heaven by means of a pulley, without much damage to the company. Ralph Sherzer and Gaxiola were there with their newest syncopated melodies and rag-time numbers. This pair are always welcome. They have become real favorites hereabouts, as was proved by the reception they re- ceived. The show was excellent and the big crowd left satisfied. Orchestra The University Augmented Orchestra. That is the way it reads on the programme. This or- chestra of twenty pieces, under the di- rection of Prof. Orion and Mr. Cun- ningham, S. J., was recently organ- ized and is providing fine music on all occasions. The orchestra has been a weakness in college theatricals in late years, but we have found one, at last, and a very good one, at that. The Mission Play of Santa Clara Rehersals are now on in full swing for the forthcoming pro- duction of the Mission Play of Santa Clara, under the personal direction of the author, Martin V. Merle, A. M., ' 06. The cast, with one or two minr.r exceptions, has been chosen and the preparatory work is forging ahead on the stage of the historical theatre at the University. Under the auspices of the re-organized Senior Dramatic Club, one of the oldes: organizations of the University, the first public per- formance on any stage will be had in the University Theatre on Thursday evening. May 15th, to be followed by a second performance on Saturday evening. May 17th. For those two performances arrangements are being made for special trains from various points to Santa Clara at reduced rates. Mr. Merle has been at the University for the past month super- vising the preliminary work connected with the undertaking, and a brilliant success is already assured. The play, dealing as it does with the American invasion in Caliornia in 1846, and de- picting the harrowing crisis the old Santa Clara Mission passed through during those exciting times, has m.ore than ordinary interest attached to it. 244 THE REDWOOD. It will be produced in a magnificent way in the institution that is the outgrowth of one of Cal- ifornia ' s most distinguished land- marks, and the whole undertak- ing, which is for the benefit of the building fund of the New University, is entirely a labor of love on the part of all concerned, from the author to the stage hands. Three prominent members of the alumni, Dion Holm, ' 12, August Aguirre, ' 07, and George Mayerle, ' 11, will appear in leading parts, and from the student body of the University the following talent has been chosen : Robert Flood, Harry McGowan, Percy O ' Connor, Frank Boone, Errol Quill, Daniel Ryan, Nicholas Martin, Edward Ford, John Sheehy, Miles Fitzgerald, Edward Ferrario, George Nicholson and James Lyons. To these names will be added others as soon as the tryouts close. The Senior Dramatic Club has made several notable productions in the past, among others being, The Pas- sion Play, by Clay M. Greene, Henry Garnett, by Rev. Dennis J. Kavanagh, S. J. Constantine, by Charles D. South, and The Light Eternal, by Martin V. Merle. direction of the author, Martin V. Merle, A. M., ' 06, a former stage di- rector of the club. The reorganized club is now under the direction of Mr. Alphonse J. Quevedo, S. J., and he will be assisted by the following competent staff : Stage Director, Mar- tin V. Merle, A. M., ' 06; Business Manager, Chauncy Trumutolo ; As- sistant Business Manager, Marco Zar- ick ; Press Representative, Clarence C. C. Coolidge, L. L. B., and Assist- ants ; Stage Manager, John Ahern ; Assistant Stage Manager, William S. Cannon ; Director of Orchestra, Ed- ward J. Cunningham, S. J., Leader of Orchestra, Prof. Orion ; Electrician, Edmund Kearns ; Assistant, George Stearns ; Master of Properties, Ken- neth Daly; Assistants, Thomas Davis and Claude J. Sweezy; Head Flyman, Guy Voight ; Assistant, Donald V. Traynham ; Staff Artists, George B. Lyle and Bert Hardy. The produc- tion is to be the most elaborate one ever undertaken by the club, and no expense will be spared to arrange the necessary scenic, costumes, music and electrical features. These latter are all in preparation. The Senior Dramatic Club This hist oric organ- ization has been thor- oughly r e o r g a nized for the forthcoming production of The Mission Play of Santa Clara which is now being rehearsed nightly in the University Theatre under the personal . The Senior Sodality regular meeting of this semester, the director, Fr. Bo- land, S. J., presiding. Less important matters having been attended to, they proceeded to the election of officers with the following results : Prefect, THE REDWOOD. 245 Jos. L. Thomas ; First Assistant, Bert Hardy; Second Assistant, Harry Mc- Gowan ; Secretary, Ernest Schween ; Treasurer, Philip Martin ; Secretary, James Lyons. Junior Sodality On Jan. 15, the Jun- ior Sodality held their first meeting after the holidays for the purpose of electing officers, Mr. J. Vaughan, S. J., the Director, acting as chairman. The following are the officers for this term : Prefect, Thomas Kearns ; First Assistant, Mark Falvey; Second As- sistant, Ralph Crooks ; Secretary, Di- metrio Diaz ; Censor, William Bush ; Vestry Prefects, Richard Eisert and Frank Conneally; Consultors, Fran- cis Shilling, Leo Lucas, Thomas Con- neally and Raymond Mayle. F. Cichi Father Anthony Cichi, Emeritus Pro- fessor of Chemistry, celebrated the Golden Jubile of his final vows as a Jesuit on February 2nd. Many of his old friends and scholars were present to congratulate him. The class of ' 81 sent a beautiful floral piece to their old professor. He is still as quick and bright as he was twenty years ago, and chemistry is yet the queen of all the sciences to him. He is fond of going back to what he calls the beginnings of chem- istry, forty years ago. JOSEPH F. PARKER. A Passing Thought In greeting the Alumni on their wel- come visits to their Alma Mater and of lauding their ef- forts in the world of strife, I fear we do not fully appreciate their worth. Santa Clara College was great. The University of Santa Clara is greater. The future holds more in store. To whose efforts are we responsible for these attainments? We point with pride to every alumnus, to the alumni, makers of old Santa Clara ' s fame. By the death of Arthur ' 74 Bandini, Ex. 74, of Pasadena, at St. Mary ' s Hospital, San Francisco, Santa Clara has lost one of her most devoted sons. It is consol- ing to know that in his last illness the Jesuits of St. Ignatius University were with Mr. Bandini, and that the sadness of his death was tempered by the fact that it came while he was among the friends of his boyhood. To his afflicted family Santa Clara ex- tends her heartfelt sympathy. Mr. Bandini was the manager of the es- tate of Mrs. Baker of Pasadena. He was the brother of John T. Gaffey of San Pedro, an uncle of Tracy Gaffey, who continues the traditions of the Bandini and Gaffey families among the students of the University of San- ta Clara. ' 88 Ex. ' 88 of visited the month. The P. A. Bernal, Edendale, Cal., University last Chemistry students are extremely grateful to him for many samples of minerals for analysis, obtained from his large ranch. We are pleased to hear from ' 04 Jas. V. Comerford, ex. ' 04, of Virginia City, Nevada. He is the Principal of the High School at that place. Santa Clara can well be proud of this son of hers, as he is much estemed in Nevada ' s educational 246 THE REDWOOD. 247 circles, but above this, his sterhng character and exemplary habits raise him still further in the eyes of his as- sociates and reflect more glory on his Alma Mater. On the 22nd of January, in ' 04 the Church of St. Thomas in Los Angeles, Miss Nita Ber- tha Guiol was married to Caesar Rob- ert Castruccio, Ex. ' 04. The wedding was a quiet one, there being but the members of the respective families and a few most intimate friends pres- ent. The bride was given away by her mother, Mrs. Narcisse Sentous. Constantine Castruccio, a brother of the groom, attending the University, journeyed to Los Angeles to act as best man. The happy couple will re- side at the Albion Apartments, 2674 West Ninth street, Los Angeles. Mr. Castruccio was a most popular figure on the campus in his time, and all his friends join in wishing him and his bride a long and prosperous life. Dr. Chas. C. Strub, ' 04, re- ' 04 newed his old acquaintances while on a visit to San Jose. Dr. Strub is the proprietor of the well- known chain of Aveolar Dental Par- lors in this State. It was with the in- tention of establishing a branch in San Jose that he made the trip down the Valley. The Doctor, in his college days, was a splendid ball player. He " made " the first varsity ball team while still in the second division. On February 13th, the eve ' 07 of his departure for the East, Harry Wolters, Ex. ' 07, was tendered a banquet in San Jose. He goes to rejoin the New York Ameri- cans, having completely recovered from a broken ankle, injured during the early part of 1912-13 season, which he had so brilliantly begun. Harry coached the varsity team last year be- fore going East. Robert Twohy, A. B., ' 08, of ' 08 Portland, Ore., was a visitor on the campus last month. Mr. Twohy, while being shown through the new buildings, was taken into the Engineer ' s Library. Mr. Twohy, being interested in that sci- ence, donated fifty dollars to help the library. Mr. Twohy was recently the successful bidder on a two million dol- lar contract for the Canadian Pacific Railway. Mr. John W. Maltman, A. B., ' 08 was married on February 16th to Miss Matilda Rose Schalitz. The " REDWOOD " extends sincere congratulations, as Jack was business manager several years ago. He is now practicing law in San Fran- cisco. Maltman comes from a Los Angeles family and registered at San- ta Clara from that city. Addison Cecil Posey, A. B., ' 11 ' 11, whose rapid rise in the service of the Southern Pa- 248 THE REDWOOD. cific after his entrance a few months ago, has been a source of great inter- est in the railroad world, dropped in lately. His appointment to the posi- tion of Lease Clerk for the S. P. was heard with great pleasure by his friends. It is not surprising, however, for Posey has all the gifts for success in his chosen field — talent, energy, thoroughness, perseverance and that ability for sustained hard work, which is more than half of genius. Joseph Lindley, Ex. ' 11, of ' ll Ontario, Cal., was recently ad- mitted to the Bar in Los An- geles, where he has begun the prac- tice of law. He has offices in the Higgins ' Building, with J. Wiseman McDonald. John Wilson, also of the class of ' 11, is engaged in the study of Law in Los Angeles. All old Santa Clarans will ' 12 rejoice to hear that Judge Cur- tis H. Lindley, L. L. D., ' 12, is convalescent and rapidly growing stronger. The Judge has been quite ill at Saint Mary ' s Hospital, San Fran- cisco. Judge Lindley is the author of many standard works on Mining Laws and Water Rights, and is regarded as the highest authority in the West on those subjects. He was a pillar of strength in this capacity to Mayor Rolph of San Francisco, concerning that city ' s negotiations with the Spring Valley Water Company. Lindley is to give a series of lectures in his special branch during the pres- ent semester at this University. Dion Holm, A. B., ' 12, made ' 12 the trip from San Francisco to be present at the initial reading of Martin V. Merle ' s latest work, " The Mission Play of Santa Clara. " Dion is in Samuel Short- ridge ' s office and is studying law at Hastings. August Auguirre, A. B., ' 07, also came down from the city for the occa- sion. Aug. is the proprietor of the Colombo Seed Company, having bought out his partner. George Mayerle, Ex. ' 11, who is with his father, the Optician, in San Francisco, was also present. Hardin Barry, A. B., ' 12, of ' 12 Reno, Nev., and Charles Mur- phy, Ex. ' 11, of San Jose, have bought a ranch near Susanville, Cal. The ranch is some seven hundred acres in extent, and not far from Honey Lake. They expect to make alfalfa their principal crop. Hardin and " Bob " were popular students and prominent athletes while here. Hardin ' s connection with the baseball world is known to all, while " Bob " distinguished himself in bas- ket ball. Their old friends wish them great succes in this venture. The continuing excellent weather has permited the various athletic teams of Santa Clara to do some good work, and also to take part in a num- ber of games. At present the base- ball, basketball, and track teams are in a condition above the average, tak- ing into consideration the youth of the season. However, there are still some defects to be remedied, and with the progression of the year we hope to see the gradual improvement, which will no doubt accompany the present hard work. The writer has had his attention called to accounts in the various news- papers, regarding the favorable pros- pects of Santa Clara and St. Mary ' s again meeting in baseball. But the newspapers did not give sufficient stress to the statement " that the mat- ter would not be taken seriously. " As a matter of fact the rumor originated among outsiders, and no member of the Student Body has any cause for believing that such an agreement will ever be considered. In fact the affair is looked upon by the entire student body of Santa Clara in such a light that there will be no wish or intent to resume again relations in any way whatever. BASEBALL. The following is a list of the scores of games played to date: U. S. C. 1— Stanford 1. U. S. C. 3— San Jose All Stars L U. S. C. 1— Marines 2. U. S. C. 11— San Jose All Stars 1. U. S. C. 5— Wielands 6. U. S. C. 15— Agnews 3. U. S. C. 10— Olympic Club 2. U. S. C. 7— Agnews 1. U. S. C. 1 — Ireland ' s Independ ents 5. The baseball team, although feeling the effect of the absence of last year ' s varsity men, has nevertheless with- stood the drain, and the new and younger material is gradually work- ing its way to the condition where 249 250 THE REDWOOD. they may be depended upon as fin- ished players. The pitchers are having fairly good success, and are receiving reasonably good support from the remainder of the team. However, the hitting standard of former Santa Clara teams is not being lived up to, which may be accounted for by the fact that a number of the new players have not yet got their footing. Although they have a good eye and latent ability, yet the results have not appeared in their initial ap- pearances in " fast company. " Milburn, the new recruit, has been playing a good game, both in the field and at bat, and is aided by his natural quickness which he is able to use to advantage. Captain Zarick is playing in his usual form, and the fact that he holds the position of captain does not seem to effect his playing in the least. Ramage is out of the game indefi- nitely, and his absence will certainly be felt, when it comes to totalling up the team ' s batting average. Whalen and Noonan, two other new men, are making a good showing, and their work is being watched with in- terest by all the fans. Davis, Ybarrando, Tramutolo and Fitzpatrick, veterans on the team, are all playing excellent ball and living up to their former reputations. The fans have already been treated to a good brand of baseball, and have had the opportunity of seeing some well known players in action. The Wieland team of San Francisco had on their lineup such well known players as Egan, Swain of the Sacra- mento Coast League team, Justin Fitzgerald of Portland, formerly a member of the Santa Clara team, and now recognized as the cleverest base- runner in the Coast League. In the game with Ireland ' s Independents, such players as Duffy, Lewis, McAr- dle, Tennant and Spencer were seen in action. The team has yet a large schedule to play, and Coach O ' Rourke being very satisfied with past performances, predicts a gradual improvement which will put his team on an equal basis with any which can be gathered to- gether in this part of the State. BASKETBALL. The basketball team, headed by Captain Momson, is giving a good account of itself. The team has made a creditable showing in all the games in which it has participated, and if the present work continues we can ex- pect no better. One of the best games ever wit- nessed on the Santa Clara court took place when the home team lined up against the Exposition Five of San Francisco. Although we were on the short end of a 25 to Z7 score, we real- ized the superior ability of our oppo- nents, especially as regarded their team work, which was in evidence at all times. Voight, Momson and Melchoir have been showing up well, but the THE REDWOOD. 251 team on the whole sems to be rather deficient when it comes to placing the ball in the baskets , and efficiency in this line would mean a great deal for the success of the team. Ahern and Concannon, the remaining players, are doing creditable work, considering the length of time they have been in the game. The Freshman team has a schedule arranged and has already played sev- eral games. Among their opponents were the San Jose and Santa Clara High School fives, which they had lit- tle trouble in defeating by good mar- gins. TRACK. Captain Hardy has a large squad working out daily on the track, and expects to have an excellent team in the field for the coming meets. Seven track men were sent to San Francisco to take part in the indoor meet held under the auspices of ihe Pastime Club, and an excellent show- ing was the result of their good work. In the seventy-five yard dash Has- kamp won second place, but lost only from the fact that Gales of the Pas- time Club jumped the gun by at least two or three feet. Haskamp was also successful in taking third place in the three jump event. Kiely captured sec- ond place in the fifty-six pound weight event, and his performance in this event predicts for him a very bright future. In the seventy-five yard event Hardy followed close behind Haskamp and crossed the tape third. The half-mile relay was an easy vic- tory for the Santa Clara quartet, com- posed of Bronson, Best, Hardy and Haskamp. On Friday, the twenty-first, the same athletes will take part in the Olympic indoor meet, and past per- formances predict a reasonable share of the points for the Santa Clara ath- letes. The new men are showing up well, particularly Cuschina, in the hammer throw. Laine, in the broad-jump, and Schino, in the distances, are the most encouraging new material. Within a week or two Dad Moul- ton is expected to take charge of the track team, and then active prepara- tions will be under way for the im- portant meet with Nevada. With such material on hand at present, there should be no cause for alarm whenever track prospects are to be considered. NEVADA 36, SANTA CLARA 20. We lost the basketball honors to the University of Nevada in a fast game, on the 1st of March, the score of which was 36-20. The team we sent up was composed of the follow- ing: Momson (forward), Voight (cen- ter), Concannon (guard), Melchoir (forward), Ahern (forward). Substi- tutes: Twohy, Haskamp, Gilmore: Nevada ' s boys were; Sheehy, Pennel, Henningsen, Charles Smythe, Nehl, Settlemeyer. The game was well fought. The odds were against us in the court, in 252 THE RE DWOOD. the altitude, and in the necessity of such a journey. We can, therefore, be proud of the exhibition our team put up. Revenge will be ours next year. At the end of the first half the score was 17-8. They made a spurt in the second half, and left the final score 36-20. The boys were given a fine recep- tion by the Sagebrush students. On their arrival at 8:50 A. M. Saturday, they were met by several old students and a delegation from the university, headed by the graduate manager, G. J. Ross. Among the old boys who were there to greet them were: Harry Gal- lagher, Thomas Mac Courrich, Matt Dronnalk and Jack Lewis. Tom Mac Courrich is the proud father of a bouncing boy. Congratulations, Tom. The whole team, with the exception of Momson, was banqueted by James J. Burke, an uncle of Tom Concannon, who plays guard on the Varsity. Momson, however, was the guest of honor at another banquet. It was ten- dered by the Reno High School Chap- ter of the H. O. Q. Fraternity, of which Momson was a member at the Fresno High School. The players were given a dance by the student body after the game, which only broke up when the boys left for the depot. Their car was side- tracked so they at once boarded and retired for the night. The members of the team and the student body take this opportunity to express their thanks for the hospitality of the Uni- versity of Nevada and Reno, ter of a Fraternity of which Momson was a member at the Fresno High School. THE REDWOOD. : W A L K O V E R — •• S H O E S •• We are showing advanced SPRING STYLES in English and High Toe models. Look us over before buying your next pair QUINN BRODER WALK-OVER BOOT SHOP 41 SOUTH FIRST STREET STYLISH TAILORING FOR MEN WHO CARE A well dressed man attracts favor- able attention at all times. You can be well dressed in one of my suits made to your measure from $25.00 and up. JOHN J. O ' CONNOR FASHIONABLE TAILOR " Dress Swell, you may as well " 1043 Market Street Bet. 6th and 7th San Francisco California . THE REDWOOD. : Pratt-Low Preserving Company PACKERS OF CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FRUITS IN GLASS A SPECIALTY SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA All the Standard Brands received fresh weekly, and at lowest prevailing rates AT THE University Drug Co. Cor. Santa Clara Second St. SAN JOSE, CAL. Phone Temporary 140 A. PALADINI WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FISH DEALER Fresh, Salt, Smoked, Pickled, and Dried Fish 205 MERCHANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO Trade ivith Us for Good Service and Good Prices Special Prices Given in Quantity Purchases Try Us and Be Convinced VARGAS BROS. COMPANY Phone Santa Clara 120 SANTA CLARA Telephone, Oakland 2777 Hasans MEN ' S TAILORING FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC WOOLENS 521 12th Street OAKLAND, CAL. THE REDWOOD. - It ' s unnecessary to concentrate all one ' s attention on the matter of clothes, in order to be well dressed — yet the man who doesn ' t occasionally give some thought to the subject these days, is making a real mistake. By all means give serious and sufficient attention to the selection of a style, pattern and color best suited to your individual needs. You can safely leave the rest of it to us, most of the well-dressed men in town do. SCHLOSS-BALTIMORE CLOTHES are displayed by us in a wide variety of colors, patterns and models, and each garment has been so faultlessly drafted and tailored, that a wise se- lection can be quickly made, and we are glad to help you. THAD. W. HOBSON CO. 16 to 22 W. Santa Clara SAN JOSE, CAL. h ' ASTER is on the calender early this year —March 23rd. It leaves only a few weeks for clothes making : : : Come in and let us discuss prices and woolens and styles. We can suit your taste and purse, and take pride in serving you with hand tailoring that will give you appearance, wear, comfort and economy. " " " V ' n V ' JhAj ■ V • i HrT iM H H N -- jiSHBciVy AH fajhriMdUadll YOUR COLLEGE TAILOR 67-69 South Second Street San Jose, California THE REDWOOD. Have you ever experienced the convenience RATES TO STUDENTS of a ground floor gallery? Bushnell Fotografer Branch Studios: 4| i FifSt Street SAN FRANCISCO t. , , OAKLAND an Jose, Ual. For classy College Hair Cut, go to the Antiseptic Barber Shop SEA SALT BATHS Basement Garden City Bank Building V. SALBERG 2 c per cue E. GADDI Umpire Pool Room Santa Clara, Cal. MiQQinn OliVP Oil Absolutely Pure Virgin Oil lOOlUll V_yllVC V_yll for Medicinal or Table Use MADDEN ' S PHARMACY, Agents FRANKLIN STREET SANTA CLARA, CAL. Santa Clara Imperial Dry Cleaning Dye Works I. OLARTE, Proprietor Naptha Cleaning and Steaming of Ladies ' and Gents ' Garments Pressing and Repairing 1021 Franklin Street Telephone Santa Clara 131J Santa Clara, Cal. V m. J. McKagney, Secretary R. F. McMahon, President McMahon-McKagney Co., Inc. 52 West Santa Clara St. San Jose, Cal. THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY Carpets, Draperies, Furniture, Linoleums and Window Shades Telephone, San Jose 4192 Upholstering THE REDWOOD. jh See that Fit The first glimpse of Spring is nature ' s first hint that it is time for all the livers to put on New and Better Dress. Are you taking steps to change yours? Be a J. U. tailored man this season. It means the pinnacle of clothes satisfac- tion Yours very truly, J. U. WINNINGER ll South First Street San Jose, California u THE REDWOOD. •K » NOT ADVERTISED CO-OP. STORE 35 Oh I Q Baseball Goods Indian Blankets S. C. Pennant Table Covers Diaries for 1913 Crane ' s Linen Lawn Correspondence Paper Waterman ' s Fountain Pens Complete Line of Colgate ' s Dental Cream 20c Soap 5c to 95c a Cake Shaving Sticks, Etc. I 0} H K. » THE REDWOOD u Young Men ' s Furnishings All the Latest Styles in Neckwear, Hosiery and Gloves Young Men ' s Suits and Hats O ' Brien ' s Santa Clara Phone, San Jose 3802 Angelus Hotel G. T. NINNIS Proprietor European plan. Newly furnished rooms, with hot and cold water; steam heat throughout. Suites with private bath. Open all night 67 NORTH FIRST STREET San Jose, California The Santa Clara Coffee Club Invites you to its rooms to read, rest, and enjoy a cup of excellent coffee Open from 6 a. m. to 10:30 p. m. The Mission Bank of Santa Clara (COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS) Solicits Your Patronage Telephones Office: Franklin 3S01 Residence: Franklin 6029 Dr. Francis J. Colligan DENTIST Hours: 9 to 5 1615 Polk Street Evenings: 7 to 8 Cor. Sacramento Sundays by appointment San Francisco When in San Jose, Visit CHARGINS ' Mestatirant, Grill and Oyster Souse 28-30 Fountain Street Bet. First and Second San Jose Oberdeener ' s Pliarmacy Sallows Rorke Ring us for a hurry-up Delivery :: :: :: Phone S. C. 13R Prescription Druggists Kodaks and Supplies Post Cards Franklin Street Santa Clara, Cal. THE REDWOOD. YOUR money is as safe in this store as it is in your own pocket — every day values, every hour, and every minute of every day — there you have one idea of our relations ivith you. Our Caps you know are the finest Home of HART, SCHAFFNER in town for class and price and MARX FINE CLOTHES Santa Clara and Market Sts. San Jose, Cal. i prittgjg, 3(nr. QUALITY CANDIES AND ICE CREAM Spend your money with Clark and put it in circulation Dr. Wons Him Phones : West 6870 Home S 3458 Residence 1268 OTarrell Street Between Gough and Octavia San Francisco, Cal. » THE REDWOOD. Order your Easter Suit now Hernandez OUR COLLEGE TAILOR i: NORTH SECOND STREET SAN JOSE PORTER BUILDING CALIFORNIA STUDENTS The Redwood depends upon its advertisers for its existence. It is up to you to support tliose who support you THP RCDWGOD APRIL, 1913 ■ THE REDWOOD. University of Santa Clara SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA The University embraces the following departments: A. THE COLLEGE OF PHILOSOPHY AND LETTERS. A four ' years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. B. THE COLLEGE OF GENERAL SCIENCE. A four years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. C. THE INSTITUTE OF LAW. A standard three years ' course of Law, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and pre-supposing for entrance the completion of two years of study beyond the High School. D. THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. (a) Civil Engineering — A four years ' course, lead- ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. (b) Mechanical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Me- chanical Engineering. (c) Electrical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elec- trical Engineering. E. THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE. A four years ' course, leading to the degree of Bach- elor of Science in Architecture. F. THE PRE-MEDICAL COURSE. A two years ' course of studies in Chemistry, Bac- teriology, Biology and Anatomy, which is recom- mended to students contemplating entrance into medical schools. Only students who have com- pleted two years of study beyond the High School are eligible for this course. JAMES P. MORRISSEY, S. J., - - President » : THE REDWOOD. $50.00 Reward! TO ANY Santa Clara College Student Whose appearance can ' t be improved and who can ' t obtain an absolutely perfect fit in one of my famous " L SYSTEM " Clothes for College Fellows BILLY HOBSON BILLY HOBSON ' S CORNER 24 South First Street - - SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA ICE CREAM— all flavors Ice Cream Bricks are our specialty during the Summer months Orders taken for Lodges, Banquets, etc. 1012 Franklin Street Telephone, s. c. 36 R Santa Clara, Cal. THE REDWOOD. ..DQERR ' S.. Branch at Clark ' s 176-182 South First Street San Jose Order your pastry in advance Picnic Lunches HOTEL MONTGOMERY F. J. McHENRY, Manager Absolutely Fireproof European Plan Rates $1 and upwards Most business men like good office stationery REGAL TYPEWRITER PAPERS and MANUSCRIPT COVERS REPRESENT THE BEST AND MOST COMPLETE LINE IN THE UNITED STATES LOOK FOR .-vOL CATERS TO THE ™ (W Wj MOST TRADE-MARK -— - — FASTIDIOUS THE ARCADE THE HOME OF ROUGH NECK SWEATERS CANELO BROS. STACKHOUSE CO. 83-91 South First St., San Jose Phone S. J. 11 4 THE REDWOOD. : : Everybody is doing IT — Doing WHAT ? GETTING SHAVED at ttie University Shave Shop Main Street Opposite PostofFice Santa Clara Telephone, San Jose 3496 T.F.Sourisseau Manufacturing JEWELER 143 S. First St. SAN JOSE r iKirvijo. Perfect Satisfaction Guaranteed 867 Sherman Street I. RUTH, Agent - 1037 Franklin Street ALDERMAN ' S NEWS AGENCY Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. Cigars and Tobacco Baseball and Sporting Goods Fountain Pens of All Kinds Next to Postoffice Santa Clara Training School for Nurses IN CONNECTION CONDUCTED BY SISTERS OF CHARITY Race and San Carlos Streets San Jose : Men ' s Clothes Shop Gents ' Furnishings Hats and Shoes PAY LESS AND DRESS BETTER E. H. ALDEN Phone Santa Clara 74 R 1054 Franklin St. Young Men ' s Furnishings All the Latest Styles In Neckwear, Hosiery and Gloves Young Men ' s Suits and Hats O ' Brien ' s SantaClara M. M. Billiard Parlor GEO. E.MITCHELL PROP. SANTA CLARA Pool ly-i Cents per Cue : THE REDWOOD. _ _ p. Montmayeur E. Lamolle J. Origlia LamoUe Grill —i 36-38 North First Street, San Jose, Cal. Phone Main 403 MEALS AT ALL HOURS IF YOU ONLY KNEW WHAT- Mayerle ' s German Eyewater DOES TO YOUR EYES YOU WOULDN ' T BE WITHOUT IT A SINGLE DAY At Druggistej s c. or 65c by Gcorge Maycrlc, German Expert Optician 960 Market Street, San Francisco Jacob Eberhard, Pres. and Manager John J. Eberhard, Vice-Pres. and Ass ' t Manager EBERHARD TANNING CO. Tanners, Curriers and Wool Pullers Harness-Latigo and Lace Leather Sole and Upper Leather, Calf, Kip and Sheepskins Eberhard ' s Skirting Leather and Bark Woolskin Santa Clara - California Founded 1851 Incorporated 1858 Accredited by State University, 1900 College Notre Dam e SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA SIXTIETH YEAR COURSES COLLEGIATE PREPARATORY COMMERCIAL Intermediate and Primary Classes for Younger Children Notre Dame Conservatory of Music Awards Diplomas Founded 1899 APPLY FOR TERMS TO SISTER SUPERIOR THE REDWOOD. Z : S h 3. V i n 2f ' ' " ° SHAVING Articles is complete. Safety and Common Razors of all kinds ACCGSSOriGS Gilletfs Razors $5.00 ShavingBrush. 25cup = Keen Kutter " 3.50 Strops 50c up Ever Ready " 1.00 Strop Dressing 10c Enders " 100 Shaving Soap 25c == Siiarp Shave " .50 Extra Blades, all kinds THE JOHN STOCK SONS 71-77 South First St., San Jose Every Razor Guaranteed ROLL BROS. Real Estate and Insurance Call and See Us if You Want Anything in Our Line 1129 Franklin St. Santa Clara Phones : Office S. C. 39 R Residence S. C. 1 Y DR. H. O. F. MENTON Dentist Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 959 Main Street Santa Clara S. A. Elliott Son Plumbing and Gas Fitting AND LOCKSMITHING Telepiione S. C. 70 J 902-910 Main Street Santa Clara, Cal. Ravenna Paste Company Manufacturers of All Kinds of ITALIAN AND FRENCH Paste Phone San Jose 787 127-131 N. Market Street San Jose San Jose Transfer Co. MOVES EVERYTHING THAT IS LOOSE Phone San Jose 78 Office, 62 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose THERE IS NOTHING BETTER THAN OUR Bouquet Teas at 50 cents per pound Even Though You Pay More Ceylon, English Breakfast and Basket Fired Japan FARMERS UNION San Jose z THE REDWOOD. ANNOUNCEMENT THE SENIOR DRAMATIC CLUB OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA THE PRODUCTION OF " THE MISSION PLAY OF SANTA CLARA " BY MARTIN V. MERLE, A. M. ' 06 IN THE University Theatre, Santa Clara ON THE FOLLOWIND DATES : Wednesday Eve., May 14, Thursday Eve., May 15, Saturday Evening, May 17, AND — Sunday Afternoon, May 18, 1913 FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE BUILDING FUND OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA Reserved Seats $1.50, $1.00, 75 and 50 Cents Special Railroad Excursions at Greatly Reduced Rates See Local Agents For further particulars address CHAUNCEY F. TRAMUTOLO, Business Manager Senior Dramatic Club : THE REDWOOD. Evening and Fancy Dresses Made to Order Wigs, Play Bool s, Make-up, Etc. ESTABLISHED 1870 GOLDSTEIN CO. Theatrical and Masquerade Costumers 883 Market Street, Lincoln Building, Phone, Douglas 4851 Opposite Powell Street Official Costumers for SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. Santa Clara Mission Play A. G. COL CO. WHOLESALE Commission Merchants TELEPHONE, MAIN 309 84-90 N. Market St. San Jose, Cat SAN JOSE BAKING CO. L. SCHWARTING, Manager The Cleanest and Most Sanitary Bakery in Santa Clara Valley We supply the most prominent Hotels Give Us a Trial Our Bread, Pies and Cakes are the Best Phone San Jose 609 433-435 Vine Street San Jose, Cal. CONTENTS THE DAWN - _ _ Charles D. South 252 SOME NOTES ON THE IDEA OF TRAGEDY - R. A. Yoell 255 THE MAN WHO WORSHIPPED - H. R. McKinnon 258 EL PROLOGO . . _ Martin V. Merle 264 NEO-VITALISM - - - James J. Colon, S. J. 266 MATER DOLOROSA - - - Frances Odevek 270 HOPES AND THE SPRING - - J. Charles Murphy 271 THE WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR George A. Nicholson 278 EDITORIAL - _ - - _ _ 284 EXCHANGES ------ 287 UNIVERSITY NOTES ... . - 291 ALUMNI .....-_ 294 ATHLETICS - - ----- 297 UJ Ll UJ III O Q UJ H _l -I m CD UJ I I- li. ( ) q: UJ u u. u. Entered Dec. 18, 1902, at Santa Clara, Cal., as second-class matter, under Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 VOL. XII SANTA CLARA, CAL., APRIL, 1913 NO. 6 The Dawn I. The evil Spirit of the Night upraised her flag of gloom, And swift her sable legions rose with pennon and with plume, — With plumage of the raven s wing and pennons black as hate, From hidden caves of subtile crime, they swarmed through Ueber ' s gate. The murky banner shut from sight the beams of glon s sun, While cruel darkness whelmed the Gaels, divided, spent, undone; And long the struggle, long the looe, since Discord ' s blade was drawn, Till night grows pale when Gael joins Gael to hail the bursting Dawn. II. 7 he Boyne, which laves the fields of Meath, by Navan and by Trim, — The Boyne, which bore a hated name in bitter years grown dim, — The Boyne, through Castle-jordon sings, through Clonard to the sea, — It sings the coming Sunburst on St. Patrick ' s people free! It sings the pride of ancient days; it sings dissension dead; It sings an Irish brotherhood to Irish union wed; It sings old Urin s joylit face, no longer moist and wan, — It sings the olden land grown young at breaking of the dawn! 254 THE REDWOOD. III. • From Malin Head to Mizen Head, the land is Erins land; And Ulster, in the patriot light , takes Munster by the hand. The chiefs and clans united stand on Irish soil once more, Strong as the race that bridged the sea by Antrim ' s pillared shore! The blood that flowed for William and the blood that flowed for James Hath mingled in the Nation s heart to quench disunion! s flames. The feuds are dead, the hates are fled, the Norman robbers gone, — The Gaelic State is marching up behind the spears of Dawn ! IV. Old Hrin smiles a welcome where the ways of Progress meet. Where sovereign Trade shall woo her for the riches at her feet. The Future ' s golden argosies shall gleam on Shannon s tide; — On Liffey ' s stream Prosperity s white harbingers shall ride; And Peace shall reap new fields of wealth in Irish hill arid vale. And harps shall ring and ministrels sing the glory of the Gael! The tragic night is flying, with its robbers and their Spawn, While Freedom ' s glittering phalanx are the lances of the Dawn ! St. Patrick ' s faith, through Erin ' s night, hath conquered fell Despair, Unscathed aloft her tower of might, she keeps her Beacon there, — The grand old Faith whose banner Christ Himself to time unfurled, Against whose Rock the futile seas of living death have swirled, — The Irish Faith, in spite of sword and gallows-tree and chains. Of famine-stroke and tyrant-yoke, triumphant still remains, — Triumphant, in the cause divine, the old Faith marches on, While glows St. Patrick ' s cross sublime, the glory of the Daun! CHARLES D. SOUTH SOME NOTES ON THE IDEA OF TRAGEDY GREAT grim woman standing in the drizzling rain, with deep- set glowing eyes and form half bent, neath its load of human misery. The thwarted hopes, the blasted joys, the tumbled aspirations of a thousand human mates who struggle futily against the storms of life in this world of great and dire opponents, all encompassed within that too brief space of time termed living. Grim lips, sardonic in expression, breasts of the milk of human agony, cheeks high up, and jaw hard, firm, implacable to all commiseration. A voice as of some deep-toned cath- edral bell mellow with the rust of ages in its note, and the ebb and flow of a dying sea resonant throughout its peal. Hands, bloody, strong, and formed to crush; talons fit to rend and tear the fabrics of our earthly joys, and fling them ravelled in our faces. Tears of scalding salt upon those cheeks, and ears all deaf to cries of pain. A figure standing thus alone with isolation self-imposed, and with the mad man ' s leer awaiting the com- ing of another day. This is Tragedy, queen of all dra- matic art. Light featured comedy may deal in quips and pranks and by diverse jests show wherein life is gay, but for truth, for those elemental passions which lay bare the human heart and expose life as it frequently is, a strug- gle, whose ending is as the bursting of a mere iridescent bubble, let me behold a tragedy. Tragedy is noble, for that which is noble is pure, and alone in a play of tragic " motif " may one see life in all its madness and gaze upon its funda- mental constituents. Hence no psychological manifesta- tion may pose as tragedy unless it comes unalloyed from the heart, and hence it is here that Tragedy gains its purity and nobility stripped as it ne- cessarily is of all sham, foibles and guises. Frequently a sex " motif " may be used to draw a throng to see con- structed upon a faulty framework a play posing as a Tragedy. But how easy to detect such a fraud. Pangs of the heart may be exposed and wails of women fill the air, but yet there is inwardly missing that one telling note which is so inseparable, without which a play however sad fails to be- come tragedy. Love may be the plot, and every 255 256 THE REDWOOD. turn which that capricious passion takes may be dealt with; yet if there is not contained in the formation that strong undercurrent of basic reality, its veil of gauze is torn asunder, and it stands exposed, as it really is, a play (mayhap a good one) yet not — Trag- edy. Since all time when man has given expression to his muses by uttered words, there has been this basic, fun- damental constituent. Variously ex- pressed it may be broadly stated to consist of strife, conflict, and opposi- tion. Some critics have expressed their views that tragedy must contain a re- volt either against fate or some conven- tional dictum of the day. While this may be true in a certain large sense, yet also the submissive acquiescence of a strong noble nature to a force im- placable, yet capable of being opposed, has to my thinking an element of nature that strikes nearer the heart of real tragedy. Witness Lear. There a revolt would have been opportune, nay is even expected by some, yet the aged monarch wandering alone, for- saken, yet humble to his fate, is un- doubtedly one of the greatest concep- tions in a tragic way of any dramatist. Force and dynamic situations un- doubtedly increase in some circum- stances the power of the play, and to the average follower of the drama the more terrible they are in a physical sense, the more satisfactory from a purely subjective viewpoint they be- come. But to limit the sphere of Tragedy to physical action, no matter how in- tense, is absurd, and hence many other- v ise intelligent observers of the drama lose in a great measure the really en- joyable factor in the production. Rather it would be better to say that physical action constitutes the essence of melo-drama, and leave as undeter- mined, or at least undisputed, the pre- cise prime requisite of tragedy, for it is useless to seek to sound the deepest part of a sea when its very confines are unknown. That the appeal of tragedy is primi- tive and unusual is attested by the ancient lineage of this species of dramatic art and the absolute perfec- tion it attained at an early stage. Indeed, if one is not in an argu- mentative frame of mind the words of Aristotle still may be applied with apt propriety to this species of dramatic expression. " Tragedy, " he says, " is an imitation of an action that is seri- ous, complete and of a certain magni- tude, in language embellished with every kind of artistic ornament — not narrative, but through pity and awe effecting the proper katharsis of these emotions. " Now in a certain free sense the Greek Katharsis meant any purga- tive that purified, hence any thing which cleanses and purifies the mind and soul is given this term, and it is this precise effect which he attributes to tragedy. One may, in the modern method of criticism, carp at this remark, and THE REDWOOD. 257 throw it aside as applicable only to the Athenian drama, and entailing the rythmic chorus. We will concede that Strindberg has written tragedy, but we ask if it is not on the strength of his deep and tremendous pessimism, almost mani- acal in its tone, that he is chiefly known and read. It is with a feeling of awe that one reads his works, and the cleansing psychological value of this spirit was only too well known to the ancients, hence the applicability of Aristotle ' s remarks, to t he drama of Strindberg. On the other hand, in Synge one finds the ideal purity sought for in tragedy. " Riders to the Sea " is brief, very brief, yet it has, without any strain or effort, acquired those tre- mendous tones of pathos and great surges of grief which are inseparable from the great moments of life, and leave the reader in a state of awe, sadness and sincere commiseration. As one able critic has splendidly observed: " The pity and the terror of it all have brought a great peace, the peace that passeth understanding, and! it is because the play holds this timeless peace after the storm which has bowed down every character that " Riders to the Sea " may rightly take its place as the greatest modern trag- edy in the English tongue. " That is the essence of the whole play, and it is in my mind the real essence of all true tragedy. Sadness must be present, awe may fill us, ter- ror may by sheer force overcome our spirits, yet it is from the calm, noble tenor of sadness that the mind on be- holding great events derives its pleas- ure. Some claim, with an element of justice in their favor, that as life grows more complex and civilization alters the relation of man to nature, those fundamental passions and emotions which form the basis of tragedy will cease to be and hence great perfection in this branch of literature will grad- ually deteriorate, and finally drop out of existence. How this can come to pass I can- not conceive. For as long as man is human, and pain can be inflicted on a human soul, the essentials of tragedy will be found at hand and thus only await the coming of the master that is to fashion them. Hence the future is bright, and as man advances he more ardently seeks for what is natural and is far readier to drop the artificial. His longings must be appeased, and it is in answer to this desire that sincere, natural and pure tragedy will come into its own. R. A. YOELL. THE MAN WHO WORSHIPPED " All that glistens is not gold ; Often have you heard that told : Many a man his life hath sold But my outside to behold, Gilded tombs do worms infold. " D E VO N I S K was a landlord. But what was more, and here- in lies the trait was a miser, covetously and niggardly hoarding up his cursed rubles to the extreme grat- ification of his desires and the posi- tive distress of all who were so un- fortunate as to become his debtors. Whether it resulted from his igno- rance of the plight that befel his pre- cusor, Midas, or not, makes no differ- ence — Devonisk was as sordid as the most sordid, and Russia under Paul I can be justly conceded sordid. But to know him better. M. Devonisk arose early on certain mornings, and this was one of them. Though not primarily in accordance with his feelings as a human, he de- fied the cold of a chill spring morning in Western Russia for the sake of his better self, which can be acclaimed as Devonisk, the miser. Money " first, last, and always, " as the saying has it. and we deem it, in this case, not whol- ly groundless to add " comfort result- ing therefrom, never. " Our landlord, as we have said, arose early and after a few minutes ' atten- by which we are tion to a dyspeptic stomach, began his to know him, he beloved rounds. Rents were due to- day and Devonisk ' s spirits waxed high. The larger and more substan- tial establishments received his first attention, owing to the obvious fact that his avarice tended more especial- ly to large sums than to small ones. With these we have no concern. But with the later day parties to his re- ceipt book, the less gold-ridden of the inhabitants of Bielostock, let our at- tention now rest. M. Devonisk passed unscrupulously from door to door through that dis- trict wherein he was known as mas- ter, the district of the poor. He passed, list in hand, from one dilapi- dated abode to another, now harangu- ing, now frowning, now with a forced smile, according as his call had gotten him no money, delinciuent money, or prompt requital. The poor received him with despair, but their pleading 258 THE REDWOOD. 259 seldom moved the heart of their igno- ble " master. ' He inwardly exulted at his predominance, and possessed of such a character, our Midan friend knew not what compassion was. With but a few of his creditors left to be consulted, our greedy Devonisk stopped abruptly in front of a build- ing midway between two of the worse kept streets into which his business had directed him. The dwelling was tall, uncommon, perhaps, for such an ill built district, and crowded with families, as might be seen from the groups of dirty children htiddled to- gether here and there upon the nar- row stairway or street below. Land- lord Devonisk stopped abruptly, I say, in front of this abode and smiled craft- ily as he glanced at the narrow win- dow on the upper floor. " Be a man, Devonisk, " he muttered, inaudibly to himself, " don ' t let him persuade you again today. If he had the supremacy you know what he would do. " M. Devonisk, Russian po- tentate, did not know how nearly he spoke the truth. He assumed what self possession he could (for Devonisk half feared this one tenant), and ascended the stairs to the upper floor, reached an ill-smell- ing corridor and knocked sharply on a door that was unfailingly locked. Professor Baritz had come to Bielo- stock some two years before, whence nobody knew. The first person to whom he had extended his apparently agreeable acquaintance was our miser- ly landlord, whose character we have already introduced. Upon agreement as to the amount of rent and the commodities offered by the cheerless apartments, the scientist took vip a room in the tall dirty house on the Rue Pietrosky. Scientist, I say, but not with a surety. The only evi dence that his neighbors had to ascertain the quest of Baritz, consisted in the title which he claimed (and which he took pride in pasting on the upper panel of his door, and strange, queer lights that sometimes cast dismal flashes out from the cramped little window facing on the street. He evi- dently worked at night, for strange sounds resembling that of a hammer accompanied by these multi-colored flashes, awoke many a curious co- tenant. Professor Baritz never wasted idle moments in walking the streets nor in seking whatever scant amusement the city offered. He seldom ever emerged from his unhealthy habita- tions ; when he did it was only for the purpose of purchasing flimsy articles for the wants of his body. Certainly he was not employed in any project outside of his room, nor did he seem to be engaged in any active produc- tion within. This would necessitate his carrying the results of his labors from the house and such, apparently, was never the case. But it is certain that the professor was wrapped up in some mysterious work, and that 260 THE REDWOOD. sums up what we are here to know of him. M. Devonisk knocked twice and three times and grew impatient at the delay. Someone finally crossed the floor inside and the door half opened. The landlord authoritatively threw it wide and glowered (for he was a big man) upon his " victim. " The victim, none other than Baritz, measured only to his shoulders, and besides was thin. His thick Russian hair fell in an entangled mass over a low, retreat- ing forehead that was pallid and sug- gestive of ill health. Eyes, deep set and black, spoke of suppressed anger and shrewdness far beyond that of the average Russian. Shriveled lips contra!cted beneath an ill-kept beard, while his hands nervously clutched and fumbled with the lower part of a coat the worse for wear. These thin hands were suggestive of manual labor in that the long trenched wrink- les were black and greasy. Besides they were worn and in several places bore scars, as of powder burns. But if, beyond what we have said in de- scribing this weird little man, there is one feature which stands out pre- eminently it was the shape of his skull — a retreating forehead, like that of a negro, but it protruded far beyond the neck and gave his head an oval shape which was, at first sight, laughable. It certainly was a malformation to be noted, this ill-formed skull, and had some unscrupulous " post mortem " fiend seen it we should fear for the un- known character that stood, apparent- ly unawed, in front of M. Devonisk, miser. " Well? " asked Devonisk, queru- lously. " I — really — have not the sum today, sir, " answered the other, in as apolo- getic a manner as he could assume, " but if you will wait " " Not another week. " " But just two days, sir. " " Not another day, " added Devonisk, emphatically. " Either you will give me the money now or leave. What say you, fool, have you not even ten rubles to give me? " " Not even five, " answered Baritz, humiliated, " but if you give me two days more, I will pay you all — the twenty rubles are at my disposal, but simply give me time. " " Ah, " growled Devonisk, drawing closer to him, " do you take me for as big a fool as you? Listen. I came two weeks ago and found you like a whimpering cur, begging time, time — time — it ' s always time. Do you think that I can live on time? Money! Money is what I need, and money I will get. " He fairly shoved his puny tenant against a door that concealed the inner shelves of a closet. The closet must have been built for clothes, but no clothes were there. For as the door gave way to the impact, De- vonisk saw a long row of small red boxes arranged, in orderly fashion, along the upper shelf. On the lower was a mass of tools and pieces of curved steel or iron. THE REDWOOD. 261 Were it not for the excitement of the land owner and the fact that the peculiar little man immediately re- gained himself and closed the door, Devonisk would have given these things his further attention, and he would have acted wisely. But his successful violence only spurred him on. He began to argue again. " Do you think I rent my house for idiots who beg for time? Is their beg- ging to be my compensation? Do you think I would even speak to you if you didn ' t owe me money? Insig- nificant dog, " he shouted, " pay me now or get out of my house. " The while he had grasped the tenant by his thin shoulders and was half crush- ing him against the wall. Baritz struggled a few moments and at last broke free. One shoulder hung limp and his angry features were contorted in pain. He slowly ap- proached M. Devonisk and blurted tremblingly, " I will — go. " On Upper Toynbee street in Lon- don a well-known Research Society, noted for its liberality in cases where the object presents a sufficient abnor- mality, is installed in one of the best offices that the street boasts. They are affiliated with other organizations of the same aims and, financially, never worry. Constantly on the alert for unheard of physical deformities they often give money to the one af- flicted before he dies for the body post mortem. On a certain winter afternoon — it was in November — the door of the of- fice of the president of this well- known society opened to admit a small, little man whose thick beard and low hat almost completely con- cealed his face. Stooping noticeably, and with haggard features wherever they could be seen, the visitor gave every evidence of a wound or of fatal lung disease. He paid no heed to the little grate which otherwise would have been welcome on a day such as this, but spoke immediately to the man at the desk. " I need some money, " he said, with a marked Russian accent, " and I want to know if you can advance me some. I ' ve not long to live. " " I don ' t know whether I can or not, " was the curt reply. The Russian, surmising the insinu- ation, took off his hat and turned his back, exposing the mal-formed skull. With a hundred and fifty pounds and a pledge that his body should be- long to the society when he died, the visitor pushed his way through the comfortable offices to the street. M. Devonisk sat before a dismal hearth in the better section of Bielos- tock. His face was flushed — not from the slight warmth that emanated from the dying flames but from a re- cently computed account of his cursed savings. The eve of the anniversary of Christ ' s nativity held out no cheer for him. He even now was contem- 262 THE REDWOOD. plating the removal from his premises of a family that deserved well of char- ity. A bell rings. The single servant en- ters and tells his master he is wanted. Devonisk arose from his plotting reverie and went to the door. A mes- senger, poorly clad and very excited, spoke between breaths. " Come quick — sir — someone wants — to see — you. Money. " Thoroughly aroused by the last word De " onisk, hatless, followed his unknown leader through street and alley. Silently they hurried. The messenger showed signs of fatigue — the landlord of agitation. Curiosity, even in its highest degree, did not prompt him to propose questions, for were not they answered already? Money was the end. What cared he for means. Through the business district, — past the shops, through dark streets and lighted ones, past houses that were his own, and finally into that quarter of which no city is destitute, into that squalid terrestrial hell, the " circle " of the triple plague — poverty, misery and ' crime. M. Devonisk hesitated, owing to the lateness of the hour, and, for the first time, went near the lad. " Who is this person that wants to see me, boy? " " I don ' t know the name, sir, but it ' s urgent. Come, " and he made as if to start. " How much further is it? " " But a little way, " responded the boy, and they entered the narrow street. Through this gutter of in- human humanity they passed, Devon- isk yet curious but with all hesitation quelled by the words of the boy. Strange weird faces they met, none the less discomforting, till they paused before a dwelling of extraordinary mien, closely cramped between the adjoining walls of buildings far the worse for age. " Here, " the messenger remarked, in answer to the inquiring look of the landlord, and both started up the stairs. Two flights, or three — Devon- isk was not sure. At all events, the boy finally stopped for a moment in front of a door, then opened without knocking and bade his companion en- ter. Devonisk promptly complied — he found himself in a familiar chamber which bore as close a resemblance to the " old curiosity shop " as Russian custom would permit. In addition to this resemblance, a low bed with blankets greatly distvirbed, as by a restless occupant, stood in the far corner. By its side, there was a top- pling three-leg ' ged table covered with bottles of various medicines. Aside from the door by which they entered, there was but one more, and that on the side adjacent to the bed. While our character was observing these things, the boy stood still as if in thought. Suddenly, as if recalling himself, he motioned Devonisk to- wards this door. The latter fol- lowed. THE REDWOOD. 263 Half opening it, the lad said, " Go in. " Devonisk entered — the door was shut behind him. He was alone in a mere closet, windowless, furnitureless also, except for a small table and a dim lamp under which rested a single piece of paper, neatly folded. He un- folded it and read: " At last, my benevolent Devonisk, I can repay. The twenty rubles are in a drawer of this table. Take them — they are yours. Worship them. My life and yours shall be the sacrifice. You shall never, my compassionate sir, leave this room. Four walls of steel protect you and your beloved rubles. Your cries cannot be heard. The door is already riveted forever. Think of me in your wretched death, for I shall have gone before you. May my hate be the bitter fruit of your dying thoughts. Prof. Karl Baritz. H. R. McKINNON. EL PROLOGO! ' Salud, mis amigos ! You will come with me back to the golden days Of laughter and dancing and song, — yes? To the days of the Missions and Padres and Dons ; — To the light-hearted earless and free-swung days, When all California was young and gay. And we laughed in the sun, with never a care, Except for, may-be, a tomorrow, — eh? Let us walk in the footsteps of Serra ' s sons Under the cool Alameda ' s shade. And tarry awhile in the Mission town Where the drowsy old-world peace and calm Lingers still in the echoes of yesterday. We will gaze once more on the turned-back page In history ' s book of stirring deeds, When the Gringos come and, with ruthless hand, Would have plucked the Mission of Catala And rolled it deep in the dust ! (The Mission bell is heard in the distance.) Oiga! ' tis the call of the Mission bell. The deep-toned bell from sunny Spain ; — A voice from the deep, forgotten past, Breaking soft and sweet on the peaceful air. And striking the embers of other days That time has unheeded and left to die Alone, forgotten — decayed. (Mandolins, guitars and singing are heard in the distance.) The following lines are spoken in front of the curtain by a character known as " El Prologo " , in " The Mission Play of Santa Clara " , by Martin V. Merle, A. M. ' 06. 264 THE REDWOOD. 265 Oiga ! The dance ! Let us step it light to the rippling notes Of mandolin and gay guitar ! — Fandangos, contradanzas, too ; And many a kiss behind the fan Or a rose tossed down from the casement high, In the softness of the night ! So, come, mis amigos, come with me. Before the sweetness dies away. Step back from the present bustling life And dream in the past, for an hour or two; — Of the peace and rest that this world knows not, Of the days and deeds of a reign that is gone, Of the splendid, sparkling, idle days When God kissed California ' s cheek ! Come, mis amigos, come! NEO-VITALISM L T H O U G H the biological as- pects of life are very important it would be un- s c i e n t i fi c to overrate their value by assum- ing that they embrace all that we know of the life cycle. Biology is an experimental science, and conclusions deduced from experiments should al- ways be compared with data derived from other sources, not that extrane- ous ideas may be read into the ex- periments, but simply to uncover dis- crepancies due to faulty observation or inaccurate instrumentation. If en- gineers find it not only useful, biit also necessary, to plot the strains and stresses of a projected structure graphically, after calculating the strain-sheet by formulas, manifestly the biologist cannot afford to be too sure about everything he thinks he has seen through the microscope. Hence it is necessary to glance at the philosophical aspects of life in order to have an adequate discussion of the theories of biology. Philosoph- ically considered the life cycle is in- explicable if living beings are but complex mechanisms or resultants of varied chemical and physical deter- minations. Pure reason demands something more than these hypotheses offer. Where there is a unification of a multiplicity of operations there must be a dominating principle that unifies. It is not necessary that the biolo- gist should know its exact nature, it suffices for him to recognize its ex- istence and not to formulate theories which ignore such a fact. That there is a unifying principle in living organisms is evident from these facts. Every living thing main- tains itself as a unit in the varied creation and some internal regulative power directs the functioning of parts excedingly complex and chem- ically unstable. The formation of an embryo is but a continuous display of some guiding influence controlling a multiplicity of processes so that a determined structure is formed after a notable lapse of time. Notwithstanding the physical pos- sibility of variance, species are kept distinct and monstrosities are prized as rare curiosities. All that has been said regarding the physiological behavior of organisms might be repeated here; it will suffice to recall it. As every effect must have an ade- quate cause, and as chemical and phys- Continued from March Number. 266 THE REDWOOD. 267 ical forces are intrinsically too limited to produce such results, we are forced to conclude that there must be pres- ent a unifying principle which vital- izes. That forces, as we know them, are incapable of producing such re- sults is a matter of observation. They are always determined, act blindly and uniformly. They never display what might be called a utilitarian elasticity, a readiness to accommodate their operations to circumstances so that a uniform result may be secured by the whole organism even under most unfavorable and opposing condi- tions. To cherish a hope that some day we may discover forces, now unknown, which will satisfy these conditions is to indulge a dream. Vitality displays the presence of something that has a simplicity of structure superior in de- gree to matter and force, and this something is the vital principle. To enter into more details and offer a number of cogent proofs would be trespassing on the domain of the suc- ceeding lecture, — " Is the Human Soul a Chemical Phenomenon " ? The vitalist does not attempt to determine the nature of the life-giv- ing principle, nor is he obliged to do so. The physicist may declare that he finds a current of electricity pass- ing through a wire without being forced to describe what is electricity. Investigations into the nature of supra-material substances is not the subject-matter of biology, and the rec- ognition of the presence of a vegeta- tive or sentie nt vitalizing principle is sufficient to guard a scientist from er- rors. In the vegetable kingdom and in the world of irritational animals the vital spark is perishable, because it ceases to exist with the destruction of the subject. The human soul is something superior, it is a spiritual substance. This reason deduces from the nature of its operations and the evidence we have of its intrinsic capacity. It must have occurred to many in the audience that it is very strange that the adherents of the mechanistic theory do not answer these arguments or abandon their theory. Such a procedure supposes that logic dominates the minds of those gentlemen, but the supposition is fal- lacious. Adepts in physical science are very often nothing more than skilled technicians. Deftness in man- ipulation and a knowledge of a varied assortment of facts do not necessarily imply productive mental capacity. Specialists in biological science sel- dom possess that soundness of char- acter and enlightened sympathy with the complex details of life which the degree of " doctor " once connoted. The biographies of naturalists usu- ally impress the reader that there is some incompatibility between an ar- dent study of biological science and the acquirement of literary culture. Many, if not most, naturalists have lost a taste for poety before passing middle life and become permanently warped and querulous men, com- 268 THE REDWOOD. pletely out of sympathy with the real- ities of life. The literature of these sciences — especially the medical — teem with examples of faulty reason- ing, inaccurate diction and even glar- ing grammatical blunders. Zoologists and botanists seldom have a knowl- edge of metaphysics. If they have read some philosophy systematically, the course did not extend beyond a few semesters, and the authors studied were Kant and Hegel, perhaps Nietz- sche, or some of that ilk. When the blind lead the blind we know where to find master and pupil. Then it must never be forgotten that most men are eager to improve themselves financially. The " bump " of business — if there is such a pro- tuberance — is as well developed in the biologist as in his thrifty brother of the arts or crafts. It is a matter of experience that to say something out of the ordinaiy is very often an excellent means of at- tracting attention and of gaining pres- tige with the public. Very few among us have heard of Wilson of Columbia, of Mall of Johns Hopkins, or of Dwight of Harvard, but we do hear much of Loeb and other ingenious experimentalists who are obsessed with the fad of becoming creators ! For the sake of completeness some- thing must be said of the theological aspects of the mechanistic theory. This is not the occasion to explain what they are; it will suffice to relate what the church actually has done re- garding this vexed question. During the last half century Ton- giorgi, Secchi and Palmieri, professors at one time on the staff of the Gre- gorian University in Rome, held me- chanistic views in regard to the life of lower vegetable growths, and yet no ecclesiastical censure was pronounced against them. The official silence was not an approbation of the views of these men, but the incident shows how false is the common assertion that every vagary of a biologist is formally condemned by ecclesiastical authority. It might be of interest to know that every theologian of prominence in the Middle Ages, firmly believed in the spontaneous generation of animal- culae. They were in error on this point ; but, at least, they were several centuries in the lead of those " ad- vanced thinkers " who, a half century ago, proclaimed a more extended form of spontaneous generation as the great principle that would solve the riddle of the universe. Truly, " there is noth- ing new under the sun. " Theology deals with facts which are true and therefore immutable ; and as truth cannot be at variance with it- self, nothing in biology nor in any other science that is really a fact, and not a supposition, can conflict with theology. For this reason the theo- logian may safely retain his position and peacefuly observe the upheavals The discussion of Dr. Loeb ' s metaphysics and NewjEthics is omitted here. THE REDWOOD. 269 which almost revolutionize a science. But the latter cannot tolerate the effects of gratuitous assumptions and the projecting of unfounded hy- potheses. Every step in a wrong di- rection must be retraced and the use- less, if not harmful labor, squanders forces which are, at best, very meagre. It is pitiful that there is so much misspent energy, considering the amount of investigation that must yet be done. This is a matter for the con- sideration of psycholgist. Almost every natural science has some great question which, though settled to the satisfaction of normal minds, is ever open to discussion by a few. With an ill-directed zeal they per- petually attempt to solve the old prob- lem that baffles them. While time lasts some genius will discover period- ically how to square a circle ; and a perpetual-motion machine will be in- vented at intervals ; and the legitimate biologist will ever and anon be startled by the defiant cry of an enthusiast that a rival of the Creator has been developed in the laboratory. JAMES J. CONLON, S. J. MATER DOLOROSA By the banks of the Cedron in sorrow, The Virgin walked slowly and wept, As she thought of the days of her gladness. When converse with Jesus she kept. Long, long and sadly she pondered. Till her sorrow deep unrestrained, Gave vent to her feeling and echoed The thoughts her sad bosom contained. " Look down on Thy desolate mother, O Savior of men and my love, Long have I sighed for my coming To rest in Thy mansion above. All alone and weary I wander, Without Thee my Jesus, my Son, And O how I ' m yearning to see Thee, When life ' s stormy battle is done. O sad is m} ' life and how rueful, Do I live in this valley of woes, For Thou my beloved, art absent, Slain by iniquitous foes. Thou art gone — and O how I miss Thee, All the day long do I sigh. Till leaving her dark desolation, My soul to Thee Jesus shall fly. " So wept our dear Mother Mary, And sighed to be with her Son, But Comfort and sweet resignation Whispered, " Father, let Thy will be done. " FRANCES ODEVEK. 270 HOPES AND THE SPRING HE Jackson Grammar School was to have a picnic. All was in a flurry of excitement over the coming event. The pu- pils were all looking forward to the great day with eager anticipation. One evening after class, a little girl tripped out the school gate singing. Flung over her shoulder was a strap at the end of which dangled a book. Her luxuriant soft brown hair was blown back by the breeze, which had just sprung up. On her open, winning face dwelt a look of gladness. Her dark eyes sparkled with joy as she thought of the picnic in the country. So she danced lightly along, never stopping until she had reached a small, mean, two-room shack three blocks away. Quietly the child opened the door and tip-toed into the darkened room. In the far corner, on a small cot, a worn looking woman was lying, and in the center was a steaming tub of clothes. The girl took all in at a glance and in a flash she was by her mother ' s bedside. " Oh, mother, are you sick? " she cried, excitedly. " No dear, only a little tired, " re- sponded a weary voice. Now the girl moved about with lightning-like rapidity and before long, some hot broth was made, and she was giving it to her mother. Then she donned an apron and commenced a struggle with the large tub of clothes. Her mother remonstrated with her, but it was of no use. She could wash those clothes. The task was not too great for her. So the mother and daughter fell to discussing the affairs of the day. " How is everything at school, Girlie? " questioned the mother. " Fine, " she replied. " We are going to have a picnic next Saturday. Before they had had much time for conversation the tub of clothes was washed, and only the easy work of wringing them out remained to be done. Then the mother grew sleepy. " Sing something. Girlie, " she said. And Girlie did. A soft little melody, one that she had learned at school, she sang. Her mother ' s eyes closed. The voice grew softer and softer and finally ceased. The woman was asleep. There was a look of refinement on the mother ' s face that told of culture and training. Those gracefully mould- ed hands were not fashioned for a life of toil. No, indeed. Mary Anson had not always been a washerwoman. She had once been the idol of an ex- clusive social set. A sweet, vivacious, 271 272 THE REDWOOD. laughing maiden, what wonder that everyone loved her But she had com- mitted the unpardonable sin. She loved and married Jack McCorman, a man below her, a workingman. Ex- clusive society placed the ban on her then and there. What cared she? Her heart was light and happy. Could one ask more? For a while life went on merrily. Then one day there was a strike at the factory where Jack McCorman worked. Nothing remained but to quit his position. For three weary weeks he had searched for work. None was to be had. The wolf of hunger was pawing at the door. But soon another wolf, deadlier and more ravenous, the wolf of sickness entered. McCorman had always had a tendency toward con- sumption, and now when his vital forces were at their lowest ebb and he was on the verge of despair, the dread disease had claimed him victim. His girl wife did her best to nurse into a flame the spark of life which re- mained, but human effort was useless. The Angel of Death visited the hum- ble cottage, and Mary McCorman was left a widow at the age of twenty-five. A few months after her husband ' s death her child had been born. The remembrance of his death hovereld over her like a dark cloud, but the lively little tot became the silver lin- ing to the cloud. She had christened the child Vida, but in some way, no one knew exactly how, every one came to call her Girlie. The stout butcher on the corner, the good-natured mailman, the dignified bank president, all knew the washer- woman ' s little girl. She had early shown an aptitude for singing. Penniless, God himself had bestowed on her a dowry in the shape of an exquisite voice. The m other loved to hear her daughter sing. Many a time, when the future loomed up black and ominous, the sweet strains of a simple song, like a ray of sunlight would pierce the gloom, and dissipate the low hanging clouds. For four years she had struggled along, striving to keep body and soul together, her daughter ' s happiness the guiding light to illumine her path. The day of the picnic had come at last. Girlie set out for school. " I ' ll be home early, mamma, " she prom- ised, as she disappeared around the corner. But as the mother watched her going off, her thoughts reverted to the long ago. That very morning she had noticed certain signs, slight yes, but they were there nevertheless. The signs were the first indication of con- sumption. Her daughter might have tuberculosis ! Overwhelmed by the thought she turned ,and with a heavy heart entered the dingy hut. ' In the meantime Girlie had joined the group of laughing children. They were awaiting the arrival of the im- mense hay wagon which was to con- vey them to the large country estate of Samuel Blythe. The latter was a jolly, portly gentleman. He was an uncle of one of the teachers. A lover THE REDWOOD. 273 of children, he was childless and con- sequently he had been only too glad to allow the school children to picnic on his farm. His wife, too, loved the sight of happy childrens ' faces and she insisted upon preparing and spreading the lunch herself. So stately old Manor House Farm, with its groves of oaks, its winding driveways and vast fields was transformed for a day. The unaccustomed ring of childrens ' shouts was heard. Their laughing echoed through the groves of gnarled old oaks which had withstood the storms of four score years. The brook seemed to ripple along more musically when accompanied by the sound of children ' s voices. Girlie was in her element. She was the happiest of the merry crowd. The day semed to her but a swift passing hour. After lunch had been eaten four o ' clock came all too quickly. The joyous youngsters were summoned to the spacious courtyard. An im- promptu musicale was to be held to repay Mr. and Mrs. Blythe. The children squatted on the ground in a large circle. In a conspicuous position, on two great oak chairs, Mr. an d Mrs. Blythe sat, beaming on the happy scene. First there were some songs in chorus by the school led by the teach- er. Next on the programme were sev- eral violin solos, for one had brought her violin. As the modest recital was nearing its close, the teacher thought of Girlie. Walking up to the host and hostess she asked if they would like to hear a little girl sing. " Why yes, " they responded, " yes, by all means. " So the teacher spoke to Girlie. " Yes I will sing, " the little maiden re- plied. Self-possession was a natural trait with her; so she advanced to the cen- ter of the large group, and unaccom- panied, save by the rustling breeze, and by the birds chirping and twitting in the branches overhead, and by the faint murmuring of the stream, she sang, pouring forth her whole being in melodious harmony. A simple lit- tle song she sang, but it touched the heart of bluff, hearty Samuel Blythe. " You sing well, little girl, " was all he could say, but his great heart was too full for utterance. The time had come to go home. The children were putting on their wraps, and gathering together the va- rious souvenirs collected during the day. Samviel Blythe called his niece aside. Before he finished talking with her, he knew the history of Girlie, of her poverty, and of her tired, overworked mother. In the twinkle of an eye he had arranged for a long sojourn to be taken at his great farm by Girlie and her mother. When Girlie was told of the scheme her young heart was filled to overflowing. " Oh, how mamma will like it here, " she cried out ex- citedly. The wagon drew up and the chil- dren scrambled aboard. " Giddap, " shouted the driver, and a wagon load 274 THE REDWOOD. of thoroughly exhausted but happy children were on their way homeward. The schoolhouse was reached and everyone got off. Soon in groups the children were trudging home to tell of the wonderful day they had spent. But Miss Blythe went home with Girlie. The teacher and her pupil soon reached the small shanty, known to the latter as home. Between them they told the widowed washerwoman of the events of the day and of the good for- tune which had befallen her. The mother was greatly surprised at the turn affairs had taken. Should she go to the country? Her natural keenness enabled the poor mother to see through the disguised charity. Yes, for the sake of her darling child she would humble her pride and accept the generous offer. She could help Mrs. Blyt he with the housework. Poo ' r woman ! She little knew how her strength had been sapped by the ex- treme demands which it had suffered. The very next week a large touring car chugged up to the door of Mary McCorman ' s miserable shack. A short, pudgy man hopped out and helped down a matronly looking woman. Together they ascended the few steps of the humble abode. Girlie, in her own artless way soon had in- troduced her mother to Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Blythe. Mrs. McCorman was soon on friendly terms with the moth- erly Mrs. Blythe. Their few belong- ings were stowed away in a corner of the large baggage rack, and off they started. Girlie was bubbling over with joy. The happiness of the moment and the kindness almost overwhelmed the poor mother. In a short time Manor House Farm was reached. Spring was in full blossom. Everything was bursting into new life. The grass was green on the hillsides. Flowers were shooting up from the ground here, there, and everywhere. The bright colored blooms on the trees gave promise of a bountiful crop. And when Girlie could steal away a moment in which to be alone, she wandered away into the heart of the oak-grove and there, surrounded by Nature ' s most wonderful creations, she threw out her thin graceful arms and sang, sang. Mr. Blythe was not long in finding out that the girl really possessed an excellent voice, needing only the care- ful guidance of skilled teachers to be brought to a wonderful maturity. Hence he determined to surround her with all the advantages which money could obtain. And when Samuel Blythe determined to do a thing he never rested until it had been accom- plished. Mrs. McCorman was consulted about sending her daughter to a school, where the girl might take les- sons in voice culture along with her other studies, she was overjoyed and consented gladly. In a remote corner of her heart had always been hidden THE REDWOOD. 275 a faint hope, that some day her daugh- ter might be a famous singer. After a few months Girlie was found in the new school. She liked it well enough as long as she had time to Avander amongst fields picking flow- ers, and time to wade in the brook which ran through the oak grove. Lessons were fairly easy. Daily sing- ing lessons were for her hours of re- laxation and enjoyment. The days rolled by, as days have a fashion of doing. Then one bright spring day Vida McCorman was given her diploma. " Develop her voice by all means, Mr. Blythe, " her teacher said. " She will be a prima donna some day. " Mr. Blythe, however, needed no urging. Already he had made prep- arations for sending her to a Chicago conservatory of music. Consequently, one September morn- ing a short, portly gentleman, a fair, middle-aged woman and a laughing young girl boarded a train for Chi- cago. Arrived there no time was lost until she had been safely lodged in school. Then Mr. Blythe and Mrs. McCorman left for home after promising to return for a visit the following week. Every Saturday the two, sometimes accompanied by Mrs. Bly the, -made the trip to Chicago. Girlie was happy, that is as happy as it was possible to be amid the hurry and bustle of the great city. Her voice was developing wonderfully. A few years of study and the road to success lay open to her, was the unanimous opinion of her instructors. Mr. Blythe ' s aspirations tended higher. Should all go well and should she feel so inclined Vida could go to Paris, to study under the masters of voice culture. The few years passed like a fleeting shadow. Girlie remained undecided whether or not to go abroad. Now that the time had come the mother did not like to see her daughter leave. The young woman ' s teachers all were anxious to see Vida make the venture. " To leave her thus would be to leave a gold mine undeveloped, " they said. So Mrs. McCorman consented and Mr. Blythe and his protege packed their trunks in preparation for the European trip. The two women would remain at home and patiently await their return. Then came the day of sailing from America, two women, smiling through their tears, waved till the girlish face faded from their view. After five days the tall spires of Liv- erpool were sighted. Samuel Blythe had crossed the ocean before, but to Girlie everything was new. She had enjoyed the invigorating breeze and the vast expanse of tossing waves. At last Paris, their final destination, was reached. The masters were sur- prised at the wonderful voice of the American girl. She was rarely gifted, was the consensus of opinion. Then Vida studied long and ardu- ously. She enjoyed the new life and Samuel Blythe delighted in what he 276 THE REDWOOD. had done. With her present to sing for him he could never grow weary. But both, happy though they were, rejoiced when the day of home coming arrived. Their thoughts dwelt con- stantly with the two women across the ocean awaiting their home com- ing. When they could discern, as the boat entered the harbor, the towering buildings of New York, at least two loyal hearts beat faster at the welcome sight of their native land. The very next morning, the papers came out with glaring headlines, for her fame had preceded her. " Noted Singer Arrives. " Silver-voiced maiden sings here next week. " Such was the case. After many ur- gent requests she had promised to sing in New York. Chicago was passed and before the lapse of many hours, Vida McCorman, still a simple artless girl, beautiful and acomplished, was in her mother ' s arms. But the four needs must hurry back to the metropolis to fulfill the engagement. The evening of the debut came. Mrs. McComan and the Blythes were there, in a box near the stage. The mother ' s heart was light. She was happy with a mother ' s joy. But soon all was hushed, and Vida McComan appeared. She was beau- tiful beyond the shadow of a doubt as she stood there. She was dressed simply and her cheeks were slightly flushed with the splendor and excite- ment of the scene. Raising her dark brown eyes, full of tenderness and love, toward the box where her mother sat, her lips parted in song. Like the song of the nightingale it sounded, only more perfect, less me- chanical ; like the trill of the meadow lark it rang out, but more musical, more joyous ; like the call of the dove it echoed, yet more loving, more ten- der. She sang, and the vast multitude wondered. Enthralled the audience sat spellbound even after the singer broke the enchantment. The applause was deafening. Bouquets rained on the stage. And from a box above a solitary woman looker down on the enthusiastic assemblage and offered a silent prayer to God, a prayer of thanksgiving welling up from the in- most recesses of a happy mother ' s heart. The demonstration did not cease until Vida McCorman appeared again. Then all again became as still as death. Again the wonderful voice burst out, but fainter now. The entranced mul- titude awaited breathlessly for what was to follow. Then of a sudden the sweet soimds faltered and broke. For an instant she stood there motionless, then reeled and fell prostrate to the floor. Attendants rushed in and willing hands carried her tenderly behind the scenes. Upon the hushed stillness of the place, a piercing shriek rang out, and all the audience turned as one per- son to behold a black garbed woman THE REDWOOD. 277 shaken with sobs leaning vipon the box raihng, and the whisper went round, softly at first, then of increas- ing volume, " She is her mother. " Before the week had passed, mother and daughter were surrounded by lov- ing care and were again at Manor House Farm. The days flew by to Girlie, days of happy, carefree enjoyment such as she had never known before. Her spirit grew young again. She looked at the gnarled old oaks, and the fresh flowers and the sweetly singing birds. She loved to wander far away in search of new wonders. She loved to hear the small streamlet as it rush- ed over the rocks. She could vie with the lark in melody. She could imitate the quail to perfection. A child of Nature, she had at last come into her own. Never was a happier family group assembled at the Manor. Girlie filled a long felt want in all hearts, but to her benefactor especially was she dear. Like father and daughter the two would sometimes sit in the shade to- gether, telling stories. He told her the names of the birds, and when the cherries would be ripe. He told her where the best poppies grew. Soon they had bcome inseparable compan- ions. But one morning the swallows and humming birds twittered in vain for the graceful hand which was wont to feed them. Girlie was confined to bed. The mother ' s worst fears had come true. The " white plague " had strick- en her daughter. When the doctor came he shook his head. " Too late " he murmered sadly. So the birds twittered in vain, and the green fields felt no longer the tread of little feet. Girlie lay on her cot, helpless. Only a strange unearthly sweetness which hovered about her features told that death was near. Mr. Blythe brought her flowers often. She thanked him gratefully. The window was open all day long. She could inhale the fresh air joyously. Vast fields of yellow, nodding poppies stretched away be- fore her eyes. She could hear far ofif the tinkling of the little brook, as it rippled along in the sunlight. She ' could hear the birds singing, calling to her. Then, even as she lay there on her sick bed, she sometimes feebly sang. A high fever had come over her now. The end was drawing near. At last the glorious day of Resur- rection was at hand. The bright Eas- ter sun rose above the hilltops, and gazed on a scene of rejoicing. But Girlie rejoiced and sang with the an- gels in Paradise. J. CHARLES MURPHY, 3d High THE WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR LD SIMEON WHITE was rich. He was also blest, or ctirsed as the case may be, with a nephew. This nephew, besides being his only sister ' s only child, was also by far his nearest rela- tive, which facts account for the pre- dicament in which old White found himself as his nephew ' s keeper. " Billy " Hartley, as the young man was called by friend and acquaintance alike, was by no means a bad fellow. To be sure " , he could ' shuffle the deck ' and ' set ' em up ' as long and as often as the next one, but he was neither drunkard nor gambler at heart, and kept away from such things as much as possible, for as he expressed it, " the unc was an old horse and wouldn ' t stand hard driving. " With these sentiments in his heart and a good record in Eligh School to his credit, the young man entered college. For a year things went well. He ' made a frat, ' was chosen on the Freshman football team, and enjoyed the friendship of many estimable young men and women. Continuing in these creditable pursuits as a Sophomore, he won a place on the ' varsity squad ' and a medal in the art of declaiming, his closest rival in both contests being a young man of wealthy parentage, Pascoe Sher- bourne. As for Sherbourne, estimable as his ambitions may have been, he was not a person whom one at first sight would pronounce a good fellow. His were the features, close-set and hard, which mark the self-centered man. And in his everyday life, his actions were wont to fulfill the criter- ion which his face foretold. Laudable as young William ' s reso- lutions were concerning the various time-passing methods of young man- kind, he now came to find them grow- ing irksome. As a High School stu- dent he had regarded card-playing and drinking as foolishness — as a popular fraternity man at college he found them inevitable. His spirit be- ing no stronger and his flesh no less susceptible to pleasure than the aver- age human being ' s, he succumbed. To the scrutiny of books in a wholesome atmosphere, the scrutiny of faces suc- ceeded as he slouched behind his ' row of fives ' and through the haze of a smoke-filled room watched ' his month- ly allowance dwindle and disappear. Nor was this the worst. When this had failed, he watched the borrowable part of the monthly allowance of other fellows disappear in a like manner. 278 THE REDWOOD. 279 The boy who formerly had never thought of too much borrowing- now became deeply in debt. Yet mixed with it all was a view of pathos. " Thou canst not serve two masters " is written for us. Neverthe- less a prey to Cupid, Billie besides wooing the goddess of Fortune, sought, slaved for, and worshiped a Goddess who meant more to him than all his ambitions, all his popularity, — yea, even exceeded in preciousness the amount of his ever increasing gambling debts. She did not know he gambled, she did not know he drank — and his fondest, closest, thought was that some bright day when he was clear of all this beastly mess he might obtain her as the Goddess of his hearth. And, strange to say, in this as in many lesser contests, Pascoe Sherbourne was his closest competi- tor. Struggling to free himself from the gambling debts in which he was ever sinking deeper and deeper, and with the resolution of forsaking the paths of iniquity, the boy wrote his uncle for help — confessing all and promis- ing much. But, as is usually the case with such occurrences, some portion of the makeup fails, and our good in- tentions come tumbling down around us. Thus it was that when William received the quick and final answer of his uncle, which informed him that since he had needed no help in get- ting into the mire, he might try the same means of freeing himself, further, that unless all such practices were eliminated immediately disin- heritance would ' follow, he plunged once more into the abyss of hopeless- ness and the battle of chance — with the same result. Life became to him one continual cloud mingled with joy or light — a veritable hell on earth. His only moments of happiness were those spent in the companionship of her for whom his better portion lived. Even these, however, were embittered by the ever-present realization within him that his time would come — that sooner or later she must know, and then — oblivion. The end of the year was drawing nearer and nearer. With its close came sleepless nights caused hy the persistent, relentless demands of his creditors for payments, demands he was as powerless to satisfy as he was of computing the annual gas bill of the people in the next frat house. At last the night before the final day of grace came, the day upon which he was to be disgraced, for his creditors had finally threatened that unless on that day he paid in full the case would be publicly laid before the col- lege authorities. Then he would be expelled and branded before the pub- lic as a bankrupt. But above all this came the realiza- tion that she would know. His cause, with her at least, had prospered. He no longer considered his uncle, but to think of losing her, of being scorned by the only one whose judgment he esteemed!, wholse sweet affection he 280 THE REDWOOD. coveted — was more than he could bear. In desperation he went out with his remaining few dollars — to drown his sorrows in the sparkling- cup, to brighten his cloud of despair by the white lights of the underworld. With a few companions he left the house. They drank — they caroused. No hell was too deep, nor dive too dangerous for their patronage. They became gloriously drunk — or drugged. Per- haps some low-browed bartender could tell. Billy awoke the following morning to discover himself reclining upon a pile of sacks on a wharf. How he came there he knew not. A peculiar taste in his mouth and a nauseous in- clination of his stomach served to re- mind him of his previous night ' s ex- perience. With a heart heavier than the heaviest lead, he lay there consid- ering his position. Today was his day of judgment — of doom. As he looked out upon the blue, white-cap- ped, waters, and watched the rip- ples on the vast expanse, a tempta- tion greater than any he had ever be- fore experience seized upon him. There was a heaven in the deep, a coward ' s refuge. But, with a cour- age worthy of a better life, he re- sisted it, and turned his face once more toward the land — trembling in weakness, sick in body and at heart. As he regained the busier sections of the city, a newsboy brushed past him with the cry of " Extra ! Extra ! " Throwing the lad a dime he opened the paper. With an involuntary ex- clamation of surprise and remorse, he leaned weakly against a friendly lamp- post, his eyes staring fixed on the sheet before him. There, in scai ' e- head type, was " Simon White Mur- dered in Cold Blood. " Beneath was given an account of one of the most carefully planned and baffling murder cases known in the history of the city. His first feeling of surprise and re- gret having passed, a sudden, insane, sensation of joy took its place as the boy realized that all the old man had possessed was now his own. Enough there was and many times over, to pay the debts which had so nearly ruined him. Again turning to the account and reading further, he found, first to his amazement and scorn — then to his terror, that in the opinion of the police the only possible in- centive for the deed was the posses- sion of the old man ' s money. Then came a fanciful story from the pen of some imaginative reporter of how the nephew, leading a wild life at college — crazed by impending gambling debts and threats of prosecution, had at last taken a terrible means of satisfying his creditors. The account ended with the report that inquiry at the young man ' s address revealed the fact that he had ' left the night before and had not returned, but that the police were foUiwing close upon him and his early arrest was assured. Surprised as the boy was at the death of his uncle and the suspicion cast upon him, still more was he as- THE REDWOOD. 281 tounded at the knowledge the paper seemed to have of his affairs. While he did not doubt that his creditors, true to their threats, would prosecute and expose him, he was puzzled as to how the facts had been learned early enough for the morning edition. With a determination and fearless- ness born of innocence assailed, he immediately turned his steps toward the police station, resolved to seek and avenge himself upon the man who had branded him as the most despicable and ungrateful of proteges. As he walked, his mind turned to- wards the old man, now lying stilled forever, and he felt in his heart a sor- row, deep and sincere. Reflecting, he recalled the times when they had lived together, the closest of com- panions, and the old gentleman had thought nothing too good for his " Billy Boy " — and an ever-increasing wave of grief filled his heart, carry- ing him to remorse as he realized the sadness and pain he must have caused his good old friend by his way- wardness. He was received at the police sta- tion with open arms, gruff speech and obvious suspicion. His identity being established, his protestations of inno- cence were laughed to scorn. He was locked up, — while all the city rejoiced that the perpetrator of such a deed was safe in the toils of the law. The day of the trial came. The courtroom was packed by a morbid mob, craning their necks for a glimpse of the " Human Jackal, " as the young man was journalistically termed. On a platform elevated above the level of the floor, sat the grey- headed, rugged-faced judge — cool, impassive, seemingly unconscious of his surroundings, patiently waiting for the entrance of the prisoner. At last a side door opened. There was a creaking of furniture in all the court- room as the spectators strained to see. There, guarded on either side by a bailiff, stood the prisoner. Thin and haggard he was, but on his features was a look of ineffaceable joy, which the spectators, had they known of a little note accompanied by a small bouquet of flowers which had found its way into Billy ' s cell, would have found much less puzzling. She believed in him ! She knew he was innocent; she was waiting for the day when he would be free, — and what mattered the rest? The first two days of the trial were spent in the selection of the jury. On the third the two sides were lined up — prepared for battle. At the table on the State ' s side sat the District Attorney — shrewd, inscrutable, sar- castic of speech — at whose very voice the hapless criminal was wont to tremble. Supporting him as special prosecutor, was another, equally as shrewd, whose reputation was state- wide. Across the room at the other table sat the prisoner. On his left a war- den, and on his right was a gentleman 282 THE REDWOOD. in the declining years of life, grey of hair, strong of feature and sharp of mindl: an old man, respected by all the Bar for his sagacity, and admired for his eloquence. He had been a life- long friend of William ' s uncle, and in his heart the boy himself held no small place. So the trial began. With the introduction of evidence by the prosecution, the prisoner ' s case grew blacker and blacker — his chances, fewer and fewer. The prosecuting attorney with his usual skill showed how the young man, overcome by his gambling debts, hounded by his creditors, had writ- ten to his uncle for help ; how the old man had refused that help, and had threatened disinheritance ; how he had sunk deeper and deeper into the mire, becoming more and more reck- less. Finally, how on the night prior to the day when he would be forced to settle or go to jail, he and a few companions had set out from his lodgings. He then brought to the stand the others who had been with him and testified to having left the young man in an intoxicated condition about two o ' clock in the morning. At the conclusion of this evidence the lawyer pointed out how the prisoner was unable to make any explanation of his actions during the ensuing hours, beyond claiming the loss of his senses through intoxication, and that since the murder must have been committed somewhere around four o ' clock a. m., the boy would have had ample time to reach the home of his uncle and commit the foul deed. In the defense, the old man on whose shoulders rested the fate of the boy sought to show by the blame- lessness of his previous character, the impossibility of his having committed the deed. He brought forward wit- nesses to speak of the friendly rela- tions of the boy and his uncle. He pointed to the prisoner ' s record as a boy, as an undergraduate in college, but with all his efforts, the defense seemed but immaterial and weak in comparison to the damning evidence brought strongly home by the prose- cution. In his last speech on the final day of the trial, the old lawyer admitted this and in his concluding remarks, he said, " But with it all, our evidence, our defence would be incomplete, our efforts useless, were it not for one thing. There is one witness remain- ing whom we have not yet produced, one who is in the position of the young prisoner before you — one who has given away his honor in the hope of satisfying a worldly desire. He has committed a deed so base and with an object so terrible, that his bare Chris- tian training, his very humanity, if such it can be called, has forced him to confess. Bailiff call Pascoe Sher- bourne ! " Once more all eyes were turnd to- ward the door towards which the bailiff went. With no less surprise did the prisoner himself look into the now bright and eager eyes of his counsel. The door opened. Once THE REDWOOD. 283 again there stood a young man worn and haggard, but whose face held no light of hope or joy. Advancing with weak steps into the witness chair, in a trembling voice he began his story. A story it was of love, disappointment, weakness and revenge — a story mor- bid in its passion, intense in its pathos, and horrible in its detail. He began with his entrance into college, and with the story of the struggles in which Hartley was al- ways the victor, of the hatred in his heart ; and at last of the final struggle — the result of which meant to him either sunshine or hell during life — and still his rival seemed to win. Then he told of the hatred brewing in his heart, how his mind commenced clamoring for revenge and would not let him rest. He told of his being in his room one evening ransacking his brain for some means of vengeance, when he chanced to hear a conversa- tion between the prisoner and his room-mate, who slept next door. Lis- tening carefully, he heard the whole story of the debts, of the young fel- low ' s writing to his uncle and the blasting of his last hope. Then its was, that the seed was sown which developed into such a horror. How he hesitated, battling with his worthier self — of the soul-tearing war between his better and baser inclinations, — and of the victory of the latter — all this he told. And lastly, the deed being commit- ted, he explained how he had with a free and willing tongue given out to the police the details and facts which had fastened suspicion upon an inno- cent man. And so at the end of that day in court, the two principals went their respective ways — the one to a happi- ness which perhaps he did not de- serve, — the other to atonement for his sin. GEORGE A. NICHOLSON. PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA The object of The Redwood is to gather together what is best in the literary work of the students, to record University doings and to Icnit closely the hearts of the boys of the present and the past EDITORIAL STAFF EDITOR _ - - BUSINESS MANAGER ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER REVIEWS _ - - ALUMNI _ - - - UNIVERSITY NOTES - ATHLETICS ALUMNI CORRESPONDENTS STAFF ARTIST ASSOCIATE EDITORS THE EDITOR EXECUTIVE BOARD THE BUSINESS MANAGER ROY A. BRONSON, ' 12 ROBERT J. FLOOD, ' 13 HAROLD R. MCKINNON, ' 14 RODNEY A. YOELL, ' 14 WM. STEWART CANNON ' 16 EDWARD O ' CONNOR, ' 16 FRANK G. BOONE, ' 14 JCHAS. D. SOUTH, Litt. D., ' 01 ALEX. T. LEONARD, A. B., ' 10 GEORGE B. LYLE, ' 13 THE EDITOR OF REVIEWS Address all communications to THE REDWOOD, University of Santa Clara, Santa Clara, California Terms of subscription, 81. SO a year; single copies 25 cents EDITORIAL COMMENTS The Futility Before the present of Some state legislature over Legislation four thousand bills of various types have been submitted. The entirety must be dispensed with during the session follovifing the re- cess. To read and understand these bills alone would take an ordinary man a week. To read the arguments pro and con would take a month, and to intelligently discuss and argue the respective merits, to deliberate and vote upon them, we cannot even con- jecture how long it would take. We have no reason to believe, espe- cially from the character of the bills submitted, that the present regime of statute framers are intellectual gen- iuses of a higher order and thus able to go through the above four thou- 284 THE REDWOOD. 285 sand in less time than it would take an average citizen. The entire legis- lature then must continue session un- til the high moral duty of serving the interests of the people is accom- plished. The tax-ridden citizen must bear the expenses of the elect three hundred, while from their lofty seats they seriously discuss the merits of creating some new office in Hayseed County or the advisability of increased traveling expenses for themselves. It is about time that the people of this state were realizing the futility of the present system of legislation. Futile, because those who represent and are unfamiliar in matters of gov- ernment humanly tend to break into the lime-light with some revolution- ary measure which their imagination conjures them into believing will bring them immediate political fame. Or if not that, they feel they must sat- isfy those who elected them by sub- mitting at least ten or twenty bills that are usually as of much interest to the welfare of the general public as the tariff on peanuts. Several of the more sober members of that august body have expressed themselves as thoroughly disgusted with the conditions existent. One man in temporary alleviation has sub- mitted a constitutional amendment which provides for the convening of the legislature every two years with a shorter session between for the ur- gent and necessary business. Fur- thermore, it provides that assembly- men are to be elected for a term of four years in place of two, and sena- tors for six in place of four. We are of the opinion that this bill, although not without its faults, would work a great amelioration over the present system. The legislator being elected for a longer period would not be so wont to burden that body with his petty, nonsensical bills. He would no longer be a child with a new toy. Perhaps by the fourth year the nov- elty of law-making would be some- what tarnished and we really might hope to obtain a little true business which, after all, is more than we now can even hope to be able to desire. " Environ- Samuel Gompers, that ment " run riot § " di ' oq " ent siren of the American Federa- tion of Labor, is as yet unreconciled to the justice of the sentence pro- nounced upon the guilty dynamiters now sojourning at Leavenworth, Kan- sas. His plea for their justification is based upon the idea that those men were the victims of environment and that this mitigating circumstance should excuse them in the eyes of the world. He claims their justification " because those who do the worldj ' s work pay the price of our civilization with their blood and bodies! " This is, indeed, a marvelous statement from one who represents the labor element of our country. This fomenter of dis- content would have us pardon those who go about the country destroying our industries and blowing into eter- 286 THE REDWOOD. nity the very men whom they are sup- posed to represent, upon the plea that they are " victims of environment! " Yet we might reasonably expect such a statement from one accustomed to deliver his Fourth of July orations standing on the American flag. Unhappily for the laborer these loud-mouthed agitators have had al- together too much say in the running of his affairs. Disturbances such as this recent one, however, must be bringing him to reflect whether or not these men, whose living depends upon his hard earned dollars, are really safe guides in matters which affect him vitally. The press should intelligently aid his understanding by fearless exposi- tion of the purpose and principles of these lawless leaders, and should not be restrained by any such motive as that of catering to the union element. In this way as in no other the light will soon dawn upon him and with it will disappear the menacing clouds of McNamaras, Hockins, Tveitmoes and Gomperses. It is usual to expect in this period of the year the fruitage of all class es- says and stories which various profes- sors have looked over and deem wor- thy of publication in the College Litt. For example one magazine has, let us say, three Shakespearian essays and two stories founded on the same plot. It is easy, therefore, to trace the equa- tion existing between the rquired class " comps " and the ensuing edition of the school publication. But while this was true to a certain extent throughout exdom, at the pres- ent writing it does not show so bad as formerly, hence let us be thankful. Tennessee Magazine The first exchange to attract attention this month, was " The Ten- nessee Magazine, " a slight but neatly garbed periodical, that upholds well the honor of the institution it rep- resents. The opening poem, " Silent Sisters of the Poor, " is well conceived, but the transition from the second to the third stanza is short, almost to the point of abruptness. An essay on the " Country High School Curriculum " is well written in a clear, orderly man- ner, and contains a few thoughts on intermediate education which should be well considered by faddists on that subject. " In the Garden of Gallinas " is a story weak in plot but saved by good diction and careful handling. Some of the paragraphs might almost be teemed prose-poems, but unfortu- nately such qualities do not constitute the essentials of a short story. " Plato ' s Republic " is a treatise on that work from a careful and appre- ciative viewpoint. The language is well chosen and the article as a whole bears a commendable spirit of solidar- ity that makes for pleasure in reading it. There are one or two other stories in the book but save for a more care- ful attempt at " finish " they do not rise above the level of mediocrity. Considered as a whole, though, the book is a good one, and except for the lack of proper verse, it can, without difficulty, hold up its head in an assem- blage of any of the contemporary col- lege journals. Needless to say we hope to see you again " Tennessee. " 287 288 THE REDWOOD. The Stanford Chapar- Chaparral ral sent us its baseball number, and there were no errors committed in the issue, from cover to cover. The various " hits " are humorous, and bring in the desired results. The editorials are good, but maybe we are a bit preju- diced in that regard, as the editor was formerly the " Chief of Staff " of The Redwood. The story. Dilettante, is cleverly written, but cramped at the end. Your joke, " Chappie, " on " Get- ting Into Shop, " is both clever, and as you yourself say, " quite versatile. " One thing further we noticed, and that is you reproduced a page from a certain large daily newspaper in San Francisco. If those jests were taken, as you state they have been, from va- rious college journals, and no ac- knowledgment made, you certainly have had a rank injustice done you, and should do your best to correct such dirty business, although indirect- ly tactics like that are a compliment to your publication. " The Pacific Star, " Pacific Star from Mt. Angel, Ore- gon, is an old friend of ours, and an exchange that always holds at least some article of interest for the outside reader. In the March num- ber we find several good stories, but a woeful lack of verse. The bit of fi c- tion termed " Bravery ' s Rewards, or The Hero of the Cross-roads, " is seri- ously detracted from by such a long, non-essential, and clumsy title. The tale itself, however, is fairly well told along humorous lines, and the des- cription is good. " A Strange Adven- ture " has a well developed plot, but the handling of the denouement is not as finished as it might be. The essay, " Why the Canal Should be Fortified, " is well and sanely writ- ten. The position that the United States occupies, in international af- fairs owing to her possession of the canal, is clearly set forth, and the ne- cessity for adequate protection of our interests is vigorously maintained. The only thing which detracts from the contribution is its length ; it is by far too short. The other essays of the book are not well done, and the departments could stand a thorovigh scrutinizing from the editorials down. Get more verse " Star " at all costs. " The Columbia " From far away Switz- erland comes a digni- fied publication called " The Columbia. " Its contents are both meaty and solid. They bear the stamp of maturity, and show careful preparation. The article, " Is Heredity Fatal? " demonstrates the author ' s fa- miliarity with his subject, and gives some clear exposition of a rather knot- ty question. Thoroughness is the dominant note of the contribution. The other essay, " Evolution and the Soul of Man, " is well handled, but the THE REDWOOD. 289 subject matter is quite trite. The poem, " Temptation, " strikes a true chord and has the meter best fitted for a subject of its nature. The diction is good and the figures natural and not strained. In the departments the " Book Re- views " is easily the best. We enjoyed reading it, but taking the publication as a whole, it loses much by having no fiction, unless it be that in the judgement of the editors fiction would be out of place in such a journal. Another of our con- The Mercerian temporaries which holds high place amongst college journals is " The Mer- cerian. " The March number has some good fiction and a particularly good essay, but seems a little weak in poetry. The essay on Stephen Philips, though short, is an appreciation of that poet dramatist, from the careful viewpoint of an admirer, who holds in strong approval the beauty of that au- thor without disregarding his faults. Careful study is evident, on reading the piece, and the only suggestion that we can make is that no place is given to " Nero, " one of the most mature and poetic of Philips ' productions. However, that is only a matter of taste. The article is good and worth the reading. The story, " Faith from the Yellow Leaves, " is extremely well told, and has good direction and description throughout, but the climax is some- what late in its action being antici- pated before its actual coming. " Fi- delity " has a better plot, but is not so well told. The sketch on the " Pass- ing of the Old Schoolmaster " is keen in its appreciation of what was pic- turesque in the old days of early edu- cation, and is well written. " English in the Transplanting " has a good idea, but the workmanship is strained and faulty. We like the departments, particu- larly " Books and Authors. " The Mer- cer has a good number for March, but needs more poetry to have a well rounded look. Notre Dame Quarterly In the " Notre Dame Quarterly " we find many pieces of poetry of exceeding merit, nearly all of them being inspired by the death of that great-hearted woman. Sister Superior Mary Bernardine. To criticize all of them would be an impossible task, but to show the general poetic spirit and quality of the group we reprint a few stanzas from " In Memoriam. " We would like to print the entire piece but space forbids. The contribution on " The Sisters of Notre Dame on the Pacific Coast, " is clearly and interest- ingly written, and gives some good matter for the history lover of early days in our valley. The departments are newsy, but we miss greatly some good fiction, which should have its place in a publication of such stand- 290 THE REDWOOD. ing as " The Quarterly. " Doubtless it was thought well to exclude it from this number. And here we must cease our r ead- ing. Many good exchanges have been omitted, but in our next number we will give them the notice that is their due. We gratefully acknowledge the re- ception of the following magazines: " Campion, " " Carolinian, " " Notre Dame Scholastic, " " Marquette Jour- nal, " " Georgetown Journal, " " Gon- zaga, " " The Tattler, " " Harvard Monthly, " " Schoolman, " " Irish Monthly, " " The Occident, " " Xaverian, " " Holy Cross Purple, " " Fordham Monthly, " " Vassar Miscellany, " " The Collegian, " " The Academia " and " The Laurel. " Several others came in too late for notice except in our next is- sue. The book is well bound and is pub- lished by Benziger Bros., Cincinnati. Price, $1.00. BOOK REVIEW. " Their Choice, " by Henrietta Skin- ner, is a novel containing a love plot developed in an original manner. The story is written in a somewhat too careful vein, but has the quality of presenting its characters in a strong and vivid manner. IN MEMORIAM. Sister Superior Mary Bemardine. While life ' s fair morn was radiant with the beauty And gladness of the cloudless hours of youth, She heard the Master summoning her to duty Amid His chosen, in the field of Truth. She heard the Master ' s call, and hearing, heeded, Despite the arduous toil for heart and hand, Vainly, home love and earthly pleasures pleaded, Humbly she answered, " Lord, at Thy command, I follow where Thou leadest, all unfearing, Safe in the shelter of Thy holy Cross, Thy tender love my every moment cheer- ing, With Thee for Guide I dread no toil, no loss. " Thrice happy choice! Love ' s ever blessed mission Was her ' s whose life made bright earth ' s weary way. The sunshine of her being a sweet vision Of true submission to celestial sway. — From Notre Dame Quarterly. f Initi rsttg Notes Attention ! From our den we have kept a faithful lookout upon student body ac- tivities in general. And we think we express the aggregate opinion of that body in asserting that there has been, lately, a marked change, foreign to our usual student spirit. There is a sinister indifference on the part of a few disgruntled classmen which is contagious and against which we should be warned. There is no ground for this grumbling indifference. If these dissatisfied students have any real grievances, or a jot of considera- tion for their Alma Mater and for their fellow students, they should be men enough to ventilate them fully at the regular monthly meeting of the student body. The student body of any University, any association for wholesome purposes, are all primarily organized for the protection of the greater number of their respective constituent parts. They cannot long exist where a minority spread discon- tent and sedition. If a citizen ' s, or a subject ' s rights, as such, are infringed upon it is his privilege to obtain re- dress by due process of law. And so it is that the few among us who are so actively vociferating their criticisms and railings, aimed as it seems at an imaginary monster of abuse, must stop short! They are gradually un- dermining Santa Clara ' s most import- ant asset: — the spirit of loyalty and glory for the name. This is a warn- ing to them. Let them be sincere. Let them forget their selfishness and that peevish vanity which is repulsive to their associates. Let them search up the records of those who have been here before, and who are now valuable members of society. They will find that they were not backward in coun- cil, and as equally aggressive on the g ridiron as in the study halls. Come. What are we coming to? Let ' s play the game square, as it should be played. Excelsior We wonder how many of us really appreciate our environment in this historic vale? We wonder just how many realize the treasure they can gain here day by day. Here in this beautiful clime, where nature has been so lavish, Santa Clara carries on her great intellectual work of faith and love. She inspires the poet and gives him immortal ideals. Her phil- 291 292 THE REDWOOD. osophy points the way of truth. Sci- ence, literature, art — all are here at our behest. God indeed has been kind to us. You leaders of a coming day, lay something to your hearts while the acceptable hour is here. There is little place for rest in this life. We know not of the word rest till we have reached our goal ; — the crowning glory of this life. House of Philhistorians The House of Philhis- torians held their reg- ular meeting on Thurs- day, March 13th. The subject for de- bate was : Resolved, That the election of United States Senators by direct vote of the people, is to the best inter- ests of the Nation. Both sides of the question were ably handled. For the affirmative the debaters were : Repre- sentatives Draper, Chargin and N. Martin. The negatives were : Repre- sentatives Carlin, P. Martin and J. Parker. The decison of the House was rendered in favor of the negative side. The House is to be commended by all who appreciate the need of rep- resentative government in a represen- tative democracy, for its stand on this important question. St. Patrick ' s Day We recall with fond- ness the impressions left upon us by the spirit and traditions connected with St. Patrick ' s day. That celebration has a meaning which touches the in- most chords of the human heart. What virtue is there that appeals more readily to the deepest feelings of the soul, or more quickly excites our admiration than the faithfulness of the Irish people to a cause? There is nothing as beautiful as faith and noth- ing so heart-rending as unfaithful- ness. The faithfulness of the Irish people is an illustration of the truth that it is by persecution that souls are tem- pered and men become inflexible in one common cause. This should be an inspiration to us, when we reflect upon the moral courage of Ireland. And each year St. Patrick ' s day should find us stronger in our loyalty to God and His true church. _,, ,,. . We look forward ex- The Mission . ., . T» r .■ - T p. pectantly to Martm V. Merle ' s r em i n i s cent drama of the early days of the " squat- ters " in California, when ruthless men seized upon the mission property. " Where paradise once bloomed anew, Till avarice of Godless men Seized flock, and herd and land, and then Strew ashes where the roses grew. " There are no pains being spared to produce this drama on an elaborate and artistic scale. We venture the prediction that it will be as appealing and as full of exquisite feeling as " Constantine " or " The Passion Play. " The author, Mr. Merle, is himself di- THE REDWOOD. 293 reeling the rehearsals and infusing his whole spirit into the parts. The play will be staged next May under the auspices of the Senior Dramatic Club. Meeting of Student Body A regular meeting of the Student Body was called on Thursday, ' March 13th. Important matters were discussed, President Tramuto ' lo speaking on the appointment of a committee on rules. The by-laws of the body have so frequently been amended that it is almost impossible to transact important business. Many members have but a vague idea of these by-laws, owing to the fact that it is very hard to find printed copies of them. We are glad to see a com- mittee to look into this important mat- ter. As " Chauncey " Tramutolo will be remembered by future Santa Clar- ans as the first President of the Uni- versity ' s Student Body, we hope to see his incumbency become a prece- dent for them to follow. We are pleased to see Law Library that the Law Library is steadily increasing. Just recently it received the first in- stallment of a new set of reports from Mr. James P. Sex, Professor of Crim- inal Law in the University. " The Misson The Senior Dramatic Play of club of the University Santa Clara " of Santa Clara is now prepared to make public for the first time the complete cast for their forth- coming production of " The Mission Play of Santa Clara, " by Martin V. Merle, A. M., ' 06. Weeks have been devoted to the tryouts for the various roles, and after careful deliberation Mr. Merle, who is himself directing the production, has finally chosen the following cast : Padre Jose Maria del Real, Dion Holm, ' 12; Don Fernande Castanares, August M. Aguirre, ' 07 ' , Don Antonio Alvarado, George J. Mayerle, Jr., ' 11; Captain Harry Mal- ison, U. S. Army, Robert J. Flood, ' 13; Don Luis Castarnares, Percy O ' Con- nor, ' 13; Soquel, Harry McGowan, ' 13; Jack Moseley, Adolph Canelo, ' 15; Risdon, Frank Boone, ' 13; Andrews, George Nicholson, ' 15; Pablo, William Geha, Special ; Don Ramon Hernan- dez, John Sheehy, ' 15; Don Alfredo, Myles Fitzgerald, ' 16; Sergeant Briggs, U. S. Army, Errol Ouill, ' 17; Padre Felipe, Robert Ryan, ' 15; Son- ora, Edward Ford, ' 15 ; Joaquin Mar- tinez, Edward J. Ferrario, ' 17, and Fra Miguel, James Lyons, ' 17. These are the principals only and over 100 additional students will be used in various roles of Dons Cabal- leros, Padres, Indians, Mexicans, va- queros, musicians, dancers, peons, neophytes and soldiers of the U. S. Army. An augmented orchestra un- der the direction of James Cunning- ham, S. J., and under the leadership of Prof. Orion, will play all of the entire act and incidental mu- sic. This music is to be made a feature of the production, and has 294 THE REDWOOD. been chosen with that object in view. Besides the various numbers arranged for the orchestra, five slections have been written especially for the occa- sion by a well known young Califor- nia composer, Alfred Arriola. These special numbers consist of four Mexi- can dances, arranged for the mandolin and guitar and a dance for orchestra entitled " La Jota. " Michael O ' Sulli- van, the artist, who painted the entire production of the Santa Clara Passion Play, has been engaged to paint the scenes for " The Mission Play of Santa Clara, " and he will have a rare oppor- tunity to do some very beautiful and picturesque work, as all of the scenes are laid in and around the famous old Santa Clara Mission. The first act shows the plaza, in front of the mission, with the mission cross in the foreground and the church in the background. The second act takes the audience into the fragrant garden of the Mission, with the old adobe fountain and the tiled walks and the vine-covered trellises. The last act is laid in the vineyard, where even today may be seen the olive grove planted by the padres in 1774. The lighting of these scenes will be gor- geous, the University Theater being equipped with one of the finest switch- boards in the state. One of the big situations in the play is the reproduction of the tremendous storm that followed the famous drought of 1846, and, in order to get this stupendous effect, a special device is being constructed on the stage. The management of the Senior Dra- matic Club have made special arrange- ments with the Southern Pacific rail- road to bring people from all parts of the state to witness the production of " The Mission Play, " and special ex- cursions are now being formed. With this fact in view, an unprecedented de- mand for seat reservations in the Uni- versity Theater has already been made for the two performances originally scheduled, and the management, in or- der to meet the demand has decided to give two additional performances. The correct schedule for performances is now given out as follows : Wednes- day evening, May 14, Thursday even- ing. May 15, Saturday evening, May 17, and Sunday afternoon, May 18. The curtain will rise at 8 o ' clock sharp on all of the evening perform- ances and at 2 o ' clock sharp at the per- formance to be given on the afternoon of May 18. The special trains will run to arrive just before all of the per- formances. Arrangements for these and for the special rates will be an- nounced later. Inasmuch as the en- tire proceeds of the production are to go to the building fund of the Univer- sity of Santa Clara, the leading people in both civic and social life throughout the state are manifesting an extraordi- nary interest in the undertaking, and many of them will act as patrons and patronesses of the affair. Prominent among these are His Grace, Archbish- op Riordan of San Francisco, and Mrs. Eleanor Martin. The full list of pat- rons and patronesses will be published later. Rev. Fr. Jos. MacQuaide, ' 86 A. B., W, Pastor of Sacred Heart Church, San Fran- cisco, has gone to New Mexico at the request of the Panama-Pacific Exposi- tion Directors to secure an appropria- tion for the New Mexico State Exhibit in 1915. Mr. WilHam Mansfield, Ex. ' 01 ' 01, is on a tour of the state in the employ of a moving- picture company. While stopping in San Jose lately, he paid a visit to his Alma Mater and entertained the stu- dents of the University with a series of very interesting rolls. ' 05 sugar ier of Cuba. Angelo Quevedo, A. B., ' 05, of Jovellanos, Cuba, who has been engaged in the business, is now chief cash- the American Sugar Co. in Mr. Quevedo ' s business career on the Island has been characterized by rapid promotion to offices of in- creasing responsibility. ' 05 John Leibert, Ex. ' 05, has been heard from in Vancovi- ver, B. C. It is a far cry from bellringer to building contractor, but John has taken the leap gracefully. Many of the old boys will recall the joy with which they greeted the ring- ing of the old yard bell, as handled by him, when called from class-room or to refectory. We are not so sure about the six A. M. bell. Mr. Clephane Fortune, Ex. ' 06 ' 06, and Mr. Marcel Lohse, Ex. ' 08, dropped in on their way to Santa Cruz. As Clephane is about to seek the oil fields of Texas as a speculator, we wish him all suc- cess. Mr. Lohse is at present work- ing for an Electrical Company of San Francisco, but is thinking seriously of giving up his position as an excellent 295 296 THE REDWOOD. opportunity is offered him of greater success. ' 07 Fred J. Sigwart, ' 07, who has added an M. D. to his name, a wife to his house- hold and a young son to his family, is about to hang out his shingle in Sac- ramento. The good wishes of the Redwood go with him. ' 10 Charley Freine, A. B., ' 10, the star first baseman of the 1905 and 1906 Baseball Var- sity team, has developed into a the- atrical magnate of the first water. Latest advices from him inform us that he is now the manager of the Or- pheum Theatre in Nampa, Idaho. Charley has developed unsuspected talents. Edmond S. Lowe, A. B., ' 11 ' 11, is also rising rapidly in the theatrical world. Since his graduation he has been a valued member of the Stock Company at the Alcazar Theatre in San Francisco, and his rise has been extraordinarily rapid. During the present season he has appeared in a number of promi- nent roles and is more than fulfilling all that was predicted for him. Bradley Dougherty, Ex. ' 11, ' 11 of San Jose, returned home from Europe on the 16th of last month. He brings news of Fa- ther Geo. Golden Fox, S. J., who is studying in Posillipo, Naples, Italy. Fr. Fox sends his best wishes and as- sures us that he is terribly homesick. He is to be ordained in July of this year, and then we will see him again. Brad, did not stay away very long, having left here in the middle of De- cember. Working in conjunction with the committee for the Senior Ball was an auxilliary committee composed of several members of the alumni. This committee was on hand to steer around the old boys who were for- tunate enough to receive a bid to the initial dance. It comprised Martin V. Merle, A. M., ' 06, as chairman, and Elmer Westlake, Roy Bronson, A. B. ' 12; Dion Holm, ' 12; Frank Hef- fernan, A. B., ' 08, and Joesph McDev- itt. The expression " success " and " San- ta Clara " have always been very close- ly connected in days gone by. Along intellectual lines Alma Mater seems to have had an unlimited amount of success, and on the field of sports she has been equally fortunate. This year has proven to be no exception. However, turning to the sports where brain, skill, heart and intellect are essential, and where interest is centered at this particular time, we find success still pursuing the numer- ous teams. The baseball team, al- though getting a somewhat indiffer- ent start, is fast rounding into condi- tion. It has scored some well earned victories of late, and from present in- dications the wonderful reputation that Santa Clara has achieved in the baseball world will be amply upheld by the 1913 " flingers. " Casting attention toward the cinder path, we find a team that would do honor to any University. Surely it is the equal and perhaps the superior of any that has ever represented the Mis- sion town in this sport. It is a matter of some difficulty to say exactly what the team is capable of doing as a whole, for up to the present time there have been very few meets of much import. In the numerous indoor meets held in San Francisco, Santa Clara has been ably represented. The individual stars have certainly shown their worth by being returned victors over men who are not only known in this vicinity for their athletic ability, but whose reputations are national. Observing closely the material that is daily working out on the track we seem to be justified in saying that Santa Clara will have a team that will be able to cope favorably with the in- stitutions of the same grade in the State. BASEBALL. There has been an awakening of spirit on the Mission campus from the fact that a great improvement has 297 298 THE REDWOOD. taken place in regard to the work of the baseball team. The one great trouble to date seems to be the incon- sistency shown in many of their games. As an instance we may recall to mind the two games played be- tween Santa Clara and the Sac ' ra- mento Coast League team. In the first game Santa Clara played excel- lent ball, and hit in a creditable fash- ion, while in the second game they seemed to " fall down " in almost every department of the game. What the team needs and has needed most is some hard and sincere practice to per- fect their team work, and also among the players themselves a little more of the harmony which is necessary for a successful team. The game played in Sacramento on March 9th, ended with the score stand- ing 2 to 1, with Santa Clara on the long end. Santa Clara won in the ninth frame when Bessolo got on first after hitting safely to left, and crossed the home plate after Ramage had lined out a three-bagger to deep center. The feature of the game was the pitching of Snook, the former Sac- ramento High School twirler, whose curves had the leaguers guessing at all periods of the game, and were, to a great extent, responsible for Santa Clara ' s victory. In the game on Sunday, the 10th, there was a complete reversal of the Saturday order, Sacramento wiping out their defeat of the day before, by switching the score to 13 to 1 in their favor. Nino, the Santa Clara pitcher, had plenty of speed, but this seemed to be no obstacle to Sacramento ' s hitting ability, as they hit the ball almost at will, and also used their batting eyes to the extent of obtain ing eight walks. On Wednesday last the team jour- neyed to Livermore to clash with the Oakland Club of the Coast League. Voight started the game for the Mis- sion team, but " got off bad " and be- fore the third man was retired in the first inning Oakland had succeeded in gathering seven runs. Santa Clara then settled down and after this in- ning played superb ball, but were not able to overcon ' .e the lead gained in the first inning ' , although during the game the hon e team was successful in obtaining lane scores, and finished only two run » behind their opponents, who piled up a total of 11 runs. Ramage, Whalen, Zarick, Tram- utolo and Ybarrando all played a good game, and were well up in the hitting column. Manager White has secured another game for the 19th of March, and the boys will be given a chance to turn the tables on the more experienced leaguers. On Sunday last the home team took an easy game from the Columbia team of San Francisco. Nino took the box from the start and pitched a good brand of ball, ably backed by the re- mainder of the team. In this game the boys showed more team work than heretofore, the value of which showed to advantage often during the game. THE REDWOOD. 299 Ramage, Whalen and Captain Zar- ick, all hit the ball hard and were re- sponsible for a number of Santa Clara ' s runs. Noonan made the longest hit of the season, a long fly over the left fielder ' s head, and sent Whalen over the home plate, himself covering the circuit on the same drive. Ramage and Milburn also did some fine base running each having a cou- ple of stolen bases to his credit. TRACK. Captain Bert F. Hardy of the Track Team has had a large squad at work for the last three or four weeks, and hopes to have the work of elimination completed before the arrival of Dad Moulton, who will take charge of the team in the near future. Best, Bronson, Momson, Fitzpat- rick, MacCauley, Milburn, Caspers and Haskamp are some of last year ' s men who are again out for the team. Captain Hardy has announced the schedule for the coming season as fol- lows : April 5th, Olympic Club, at Santa Clara ; April 13th, Pastime Club at Santa Clara ; April 26th, Nevada University at Reno. A number of meets have also been arranged for which no dates have been set. Among them are meets with the California Farm, Stanford and College of Pacific. The Santa Clara hurdlers and mid- dle-distance men, especially, are show- ing good form. Benneson is again in a suit and will take good care of the mile and half-mile races. Much is also expected of Schino, his running mate, who has been making good time. Noonan and Fitzpatrick are both working out well in the high barriers, and Fitzpatrick has covered the 100 yards in 12 2-5 seconds. BASKETBALL. The basketball season has practical- ly come to a close and little remains to be said of this line of sport. The quintet went through a hard schedule of games, and the results will show that they performed with credit to themselves and the University in each and every contest. THE REDWOOD. Walk-Over, the Shoe THAT ALL MEN SHOULD WEAR ecause They fit better, they have more style, and they wear better than all other makes _ Try a pair— Critic model English Style QUINN BRODER WALK-OVER BOOT SHOP 41 SOUTH FIRST STREET SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA Have you ever experienced the convenience RATES TO STUDENTS of a ground floor gallery? Bushnell Fotografer Branch Studios: 4| Qyl pjj-gt Street SAN FRANCISCO t , OAKLAND Jose, uaL For classy College Hair Cut, go to the Antiseptic Barber Shop SEA SALT BATHS Basement Garden City Bank Building THE REDWOOD. K. SEE THAT F 1 T Since it costs no more to be cor- rect, why do otherwise? Nothing helps a man more than well-tail- ored, fine fitting, attractive looking clothes If you want the best money can buy, then get acquainted with J. U. 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It ' s unnecessary to concentrate all one ' s attention on the matter of clothes, in order to be well dressed — yet the man who doesn ' t occasionally give some thought to the subject these days, is making a real mistake. By all means give serious and sufificient attention to the selection of a style, pattern and color best suited to your individual needs. You can safely leave the rest of it to us, most of the well-dressed men in town do. SCHLOSS-BALTIMORE CLOTHES are displayed by us in a wide variety of colors, patterns and models, and each garment has been so faultlessly drafted and tailored, that a wise se- lection can be quickly made, and we are glad to help you. THAD. W. HOBSON CO. 16 to 22 W. Santa Clara SAN JOSE, CAL. Dr. Wong Him Phones : West 6870 Home S 3458 Residence 1268 OTarrell Street Between Gough and Octavia San Francisco, Cal, hZ Z ¥ THE REDWOOD. MANUEL MELLO Dealer in Boots and Shoes 904 Franklin Street Santa Clara The Santa Clara Coffee Club Invites you to its rooms to read, rest, and enjoy a cup of excellent coffee Open from 6 a. m. to 10:30 p. m. Telephones Office: Franklin 3501 Residence: Franklin 6029 Dr. Francis J. Colligan DENTIST Hours: 9 to S 1615 Polk Street Evenings: 7 to 8 Cor. Sacramento Sundays by appointment San Francisco Oberdeener ' s Pharmacy Prescription Druggists Kodaks and Supplies Post Cards Franklin Street Santa Clara, Cal. Phone, San Jose 3802 Angelus Hotel G. T. NINNIS Proprietor European plan. Newly furnished rooms, with hot and cold water; steam heat throughout. Suites with private bath. Open all night 67 NORTH FIRST STREET San Jose, Cailfornia The Mission Bank of Santa Clara (COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS Solicits Your Patronage When in San Jose, Visit CHARGINS ' Restaurant, Grill and Oyster Mouse w 28-30 Fountain Street Bet. First and Second San Jose Sallows Rorke Ring us for a hurry-up Delivery :: :: :: Phone S. C. 13R -Jb THE REDWOOD. ; These Low Rat es Will Aid Your Friends in the East to Find a Home in Calif In Effect March 15 to April 15, 1913, inclusive VIA SOUTHERN PACIFIC LINES SOME OF THE RATES: FROM FROM Sioux City $31 95 New Orleans $3,1 00 Omaiia 30 00 Oklahoma City 30 00 Kansas City 30 00 Memphis 37 00 Denver 30 00 St. Paul 37 85 Houston 32 50 Chicago 38 00 St. Louis 37 00 New York 55 00 NOTE — Deposit your money with the nearest Agent and he will arrange by telegraph for delivery of ticket and cash if required, to your relative or friend in the East Rail and Steamship Tickets Sold to All Points A. A. HAPGOOD E. SHILLINGSBURG City Ticket Agent Dist. Pass. Agent 40 -EAST SANTA CLARA STREET -40 Southern Pacific THE REDWOOD. : i-i- STYLISH TAILORING FOR iVlEN WHO CARE A well dressed man attracts favor- able attention at all times. You can be well dressed in one of my suits made to your measure from 25.00 and up. JOHN J. O ' CONNOR FASHIONABLE TAILOR " Dress Swell, you may as well ' 1043 Market Street Bet. 6th and 7th San Francisco California QUALITY CANDIES AND ICE CREAM Spend your money with Clark and put it in circulation STUDENTS The Redwood depends upon its advertisers for its existence, it is up to you to support tliose who support you : : THE REDWOOD. Things They Didn ' t Do ooo Now Caesar may have conquered Gaul and drove these hordes far north From " Sunny It ' " and beauteous Rome whenever he marched him forth; And Cicero may have thrown the bull to Roman crowds galore, And thru the Forum raised his voice a full score times or more; And Horace may have written odes that Emperors, Consuls, Kings Rejoiced to hear reread again " ' tis the Muse that in them sings " ; Tho o ' er in Greece those Orators who stirred the patriot ' s soul Awaked courage that once made King Phillip hunt his hole; Tho all these famous men of old, whose names we read about. Compel us now to thumb their works and seek their meaning out, One thing must yet appease us, and fill our hearts with hope — THEY had no handy place to buy all necessary dope. Now just suppose for argument, that Caesar wants some gum, Or Horace needs a " Waterman " from which the ink will run, That old Demosthenes has grown full grumpy at this world And needs a " rough-neck " sweater that will keep him from the cold. Or that Cicero has strained his voice denouncing Cataline — ' Tis " Jujubes " that will fix his throat far better than all quinine. Just think how handy all would be for these old fogies, lad, If they were near the CO-OP STORE where all things may be had. Their gum would come in packages, their pens and " rough-necks " red. And rugs and pennants, pillow tops, track shoes, bats and balls With shoe strings, bath robes, soap and hop, and " Navajoes " for their bed. With chaping dishes, coffeepots, for the feeds in Senior Hall. All these they had not at their call — no handy place to buy All articles from " Pall Mall " pills, to shaving sticks or pie. So envy not the ancients for their vast and classic lore. We have it on them just a mile— THEY had no CO-OP STORE Z h THE REDWOOD. Pratt-Low Preserving Company PACKERS OF CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FRUITS IN GLASS A SPECIALTY SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA Our line is dependable and our prices are right ; I We solicit your orders at the I University Drug Co. ' - ' I Cor. Santa Clara Second St. SAN JOSE, CAL. Phone Temporary 140 A. PALADINI WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FISH DEALER Fresh, Salt, Smoked, Pickled, and Dried Fish 205 MERCHANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO Trade with Us for Good Service and Good Prices Special Prices Given in Quantity Purchases Try Us and Be Convinced VARGAS BROS. COMPANY Phone Santa Clara 120 SANTA CLARA Telephone, Oakland 2777 Hasans MEN ' S TAILORING FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC WOOLENS 521 12th Street OAKLAND, CAL. Tne RCDWOOD MAY, 1913 MISSION PLAY NUMBER J J THE REDWOOD. University of Santa Clara SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA The University embraces the following departments: A. THE COLLEGE OF PHILOSOPHY AND LETTERS. A four ' years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. B. THE COLLEGE OF GENERAL SCIENCE. A four years ' College course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. C. THE INSTITUTE OF LAW. A standard three years ' course of Law, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and pre-supposing for entrance the completion of two years of study beyond the High School. D. THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. (a) Civil Engineering — A four years ' course, lead- ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. (b) Mechanical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Me- chanical Engineering. (c) Electrical Engineering — A four years ' course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elec- trical Engineering. E. THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE. A four years ' course, leading to the degree of Bach- elor of Science in Architecture. F. THE PRE-MEDICAL COURSE. A two years ' course of studies in Chemistry, Bac- teriology, Biology and Anatomy, which is recom- mended to students contemplating entrance into medical schools. Only students who have com- pleted two years of study beyond the High School are eligible for this course. JAMES P. MORRISSEY, S. J., - - President — THE REDWOOD. — — — — - — $50.00 Reward! TO ANY Santa Clara College Student Whose appearance can ' t be improved and who can ' t obtain an absolutely perfect fit in one of my famous " L SYSTEM " Clothes for College Fellows BILLY HOBSON BILLY HOBSON ' S CORNER 24 South First Street - - SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA The ' ' Clean-up " Hitter Is a bigger man than the Governor — for the moment - if he " delivers. " Anyway, he has at least the chance of an even break if the Cork Center is being used, because it has just that much more ' ' go " to it than the old style rubber core ball. The Cork Center has solved the problem of how to help the batter, because, while it is livelier than the old style rubber core ball, it is not too much so. The Spalding Official National League Cork Center ball, price SI. 25, is ttie official ball of ttie world series, and will be for twenty years A. G. SPALDING BROS. 158 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. THE REDWOOD. 1 — _ FOSS HICKS CO No. 35 West Santa Clara Street SAN JOSE Real Estate, Loans Investments A Select and Up-to-date List of Just Such Properties as the Home Seeker and Investor Wants INSURANCE Fire, Life and Accident in tlie Best Companies L. F. SWIFT, President LEROY HOUGH, Vice-President E. B. SHUGERT, Treasurer DIRECTORS— L. F. Swift, Leroy Hough, Henry J. Crocker, W. D. Dennett, Jesse W. Lilientlnal Capital Paid In, $1,000,000 Western Meat Company PORK PACKERS AND SHIPPERS OF Dressed Beef, Mutto n and Pork, Hides, Pelts, Tallow, Fertilizer, Bones, Hoofs, Horns, Etc. Monarch and Golden Gate Brands Canned Meats, Bacon, Hams and Lard General Office, Sixth and Townsend Streets - San Francisco, Cal. Cable Address STEDFAST, San Francisco. Codes, Al. A B C 4th Edition Packing House and Stock Yards, South San Francisco, San Mateo County, Cal. Distributing Houses, San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, Sacramento and Stockton THE REDWOOD. Santa Clara Journal PUBLISHED SEIWI-WEEKLY B. DOWNING, EDITOR OUR JOB PRINTING PREEMINENTLY SUPERIOR FRANKLIN STREET Phone, S. C. 14 SANTA CLARA San Jose Engraving Company Photo Engraving Zinc Etchings Half Tones Do you want a half-tone for a program or pamphlet? None can make it better SAN JOSE ENGRAVING COMPANY 32 LIGHTSTON STREET SAN JOSE, CAL THE REDWOOD. ..DQERR ' S.. T Branch at Clark ' s 176-182 South First Street San Jose Order your pastry in advance Picnic Lunches HOTEL MONTGOMERY F. J. McHENRY, Manager Absolutely Fireproof European Plan Rates $1 and upwards Most business men like good office stationery REGAL TYPEWRITER PAPERS and MANUSCRIPT COVERS REPRESENT THE BEST AND MOST COMPLETE LINE IN THE UNITED STATES LOOK FOR CATERS TO THE THIS ( m OST TRADE-MARK =— - — - FASTIDIOUS THE ARCADE THE HOME OF ROUGH NECK SWEATERS CANELO BROS. STACKHOUSE CO. 83-91 South First St., San Jose Phone S. J. 11 THE REDWOOD MANUEL MELLO 1 Dealer in [ " ' o Boots and J X Shoes 904 Franklin Street Santa Clara O ' Connor Sanitariuni ••• Training School for Nurses IN CONNECTION CONDUCTED BY SISTERS OF CHARITY Race and San Carlos Streets San Jose Telephone, San Jose 3496 I ' .F.Sourisseau Manufacturing JEWELER 143 S. First St. SAN JOSE Men ' s Clothes Shop Gents ' Furnishings Hats and Shoes PAY LESS AND DRESS BETTER E. H. ALDEN Phone Santa Clara 74 R 1054 Franklin St. Enterprise LaunJr J Co. Perfect Satisfaction Guaranteed Young Men ' s Furnishings All the Latest Styles in Neckwear, Hosiery and Gloves Young Men ' s Suits and Hats O ' Brien ' s SantaClara 867 Sherman Street I. RUTH, Agent - 1037 Franklin Street ALDERMAN ' S NEWS AGENCY Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. Cigars and Tobacco Baseball and Sporting Goods Fountain Pens of All Kinds Next to Postoffice Santa Clara — - M. M. Billiard Parlor GEO. E. MITCHELL PROP. SANTA CLARA Pool 2 4 Cents per Cue t THE REDWOOD. p. Montmayeur E. Lamolie J. Origlia LamoUe Grill - 36-38 North First Street, San Jose. Cal. Phone Main 403 MEALS AT ALL HOURS IF YOU ONLY KNEW WHAT- Mayerle ' s German Eyewater DOES TO YOUR EYES YOU WOULDN ' T BE WITHOUT IT A SINGLE DAY At Druggisb. sector 65c by Gcorgc Maycrlc, German Expert Optician 960 Market Street, San Francisco Jacob Eberhard, Pres. and Manager John J. Eberhard, Vice-Pres. and Ass ' t Manager EBERHARD TANNING CO. Tanners, Curriers and Wool Pullers Harness-Latigo and Lace Leather Sole and Upper Leather, Calf, Kip and Sheepskins Eberhard ' s Skirting Leather and Bark Woolskin Santa Clara - California Founded 1851 Incorporated 1858 Accredited by State University, 1900 College Notre Dame SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA SIXTIETH YEAR COURSES COLLEGIATE PREPARATORY COMMERCIAL Intermediate and Primary Classes for Younger Children Notre Dame Conservatory of Music Awards Diplomas Founded 1899 APPLY FOR TERMS TO SISTER SUPERIOR jH THE REDWOOD. K Shaving Accessories :THE JOHN STOCK SONS 71-77 South First St., San Jose Our line of SHAVING Articles is complete. Safety and Common Razors of ail l inds Gillett ' s Razors $5.00 Shaving Brusli. 25c up Keen Kutter " 3.50 Strops 50c up Ever Ready " 1.00 Strop Dressing 10c Enders " 1 00 Slnaving Soap 25c Sharp Shave " .50 Extra Blades, all kinds Every Razor Guaranteed ROLL BROS. Real Estate and Insurance Call and See Us if You Want Anything in Our Line 1129 Franklin St. Santa Clara Phones : Office S. C. 39 R Residence S. C. 1 Y DR. H. O. F. MENTON Dentist Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 5 p, m. 959 Main Street Santa Clara S. A. Elliott Son Plumbing and Gas Fitting GUN AND LOCKSMITHING Telephone S. C. 70 J 902-910 Main Street Santa Clara, Cal. Ravenna Paste Company Manufacturers of All Kinds of ITALIAN AND FRENCH Paste Phone San Jose 787 127-131 N. Market Street San Jose San Jose Transfer Co. MOVES EVERYTHING THAT IS LOOSE Phone San Jose 78 Office, 62 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose THERE IS NOTHING BETTER THAN OUR Bouquet Teas at 50 cents per pound Even Though You Pay More Ceylon, English Breakfast and Basket Fired Japan FARMERS UNION San Jose : . CONTENTS SILHOUETTES _ _ - - Charles D. South 301 LA MISSION SANTA CLARA - - Martin V. Merle 302 THE MISSION PLAY OF SANTA CLARA _ _ _ 306 THE SKYLARK AND THE POETS - Edward O ' Connor 310 COME Rack ! come rope ! - Wm. Stewart Cannon 314 THE MISSION BELL _ - - Charles D. South 317 JUST LUCK - _ - _ Rodney A. Yoell 320 THE DESERT WAY - - - - F. Schilling 324 EDITORIAL __----- 328 EXCHANGES _ - - - - - 331 UNIVERSITY NOTES _ _ - _ - 334 ALUMNI _ - . - - 337 ATHLETICS _-__--- 341 MARTIN V. MERLE. A. M., ' 06 AUTHOR OF " THE MISSION PLAY OF SANTA CLARA " PHOTO BY GEO, FRASER, s F. Entered Dec. 18, 1902, at Santa Clara, Cal., as second-class matter, under Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 VOL. XII SANTA CLARA, CAL., MAY, 1913 No. 7 Silhouettes. In the old mission tower of Saint Clare I lingered as the sunset ' s parting ray Suffused the West with crimson. Far away, Along the ridges, silhouetted there Against the reflex glory, rose in air The forms of the Sequoian Kings who sway Forever where Hesperian elfins play Amid the tangle o ' er the grizzly ' s lair. The crimson purpled into blue, and then, O ' er all Eve ' s veil, with jewels sparkling, fell. And lo! the darkled silhouettes are men In robe and cowl; the padres live again! While to the Night, of halcyon Day to tell And glories past, leans Serra ' s sad-voiced bell. CHAS. D. SOUTH. LA MISSION SANTA CLARA 1 1 lf ite N THE 12th day of January, 1777, two Franciscan Padres, de la Pena and Mar- guia, followers of the venerable J u n i p ero Seri a, paused on the bank of the Guadalupe, a beautiful stream of water that flowed its serpentine way through fields of golden poppies, under the shade of countless willows and oaks, and found its outlet in the headwaters of San Francisco Bay. There they planted a rude cross of wood, and blessing it they called the site Santa Clara in honor of the Abbess Saint Clare. With the aid of a band of faith- ful Indians, who made the site their rendezvous because of the excellent salmon fishing in the stream, they erected a few primitive buildings of adobe and willow boughs, and for two years flourished and prospered both in teaching the Faith to the natives and raising crops and cattle in abundance. But they were not to be free from the many discouragements and set- backs that followed in the trail of the holy Franciscans, for, in 1779, the waters of the Guadalupe rose to a de- structive height and washed out all of their material work. Undaunted, how- ever, and with a zeal and determina- tion that won for them many future triumphs, the two holy men set about and selected a second site for the Mis- sion, this time on higher ground and over half a mile from the original site. On November 9th, 1781, they laid the foundation for a large Mission Church and Mission Buildings, and three years later the new church was dedicated by the venerable Padre Serra, then Padre Presidente of all the Missions of Cali- fornia. It was the most beautiful and elaborate church erected up to that time in California. But success was not yet to be theirs, for two earthquakes, the first in 1812 and the second in 1818, all but demolished the buildings and forced the Padres to vacate them and look for a third site. The new site selected was situated about one hundred and fifty yards from the second ' one, due west, on a spot called by the Indians, " Gerguen- sen " — the Valley of Oaks. The Mis- sion church and buildings were begun in 1818 and finally dedicated in 1822. On August 11th, of that year. Padre Serra performed the ceremony and started the Mission on a flourishing career that bore out its promises until 1837, when it was affected by the sec- ularization edict of Ramon Estrada, who was Governor of California at the time. In agricultural advantages Santa Clara was deemed second only to San Gabriel, and crops and cattle were 302 THE REDWOOD. 303 both good, thus early foreshadowing the heavy harvests and rich pastures for which the whole Santa Clara Valley is now known throughout the world. The Indian population was very large in the flourishing years of Santa Clara. The converts and catechumens Vv ' ere employed in the fields among the livestock, and at various kinds of me- chanical labor. In one part of the Mis- sion buildings were rooms set aside for spinning wool, weaving cloth, making shoes, clothes, candles and soap. In other parts carpenters, blacksmiths, saddlers, tanners and oth- ers plied their trades. Three different Indian languages were spoken at Mission Santa Clara. Two of these were similar, but the third was altogether different. As there was very little in- clination on the part of the natives to learn reading and writing, both arts were taught only to those who showed desire and capacity for them. The virtues especially noticeable among the Indians were love for their rela- tives, submissiveness, and modesty in dress among the women. Their vices consisted principally of lying, stealing, gambling, immoralities of all descrip- tion and race-suicide. They were all of a very superstitious nature and at times fell to demon worship and sor- cery. In 1843, by a decree of Micheltor- ena, twelve of the Missions were re- turned to the management of the Franciscan Padres and among the number was Santa Clara. Much of the Mission land and two-thirds of the cattle and sheep had disappeared dur- ing the time of secularization, and these were never returned to the Mis- sion. Many holy men were connected with Mission Santa Clara from the time of Padres de la Pena and Marguia to the last of the Franciscan superiors. Padre Jose Maria del Real. But no figure in the entire history of the California Missions stands out in such bold relief as the Holy Magin Catala. This ven- erable man came to Santa Clara prob- ably in 1794, though the exact date of his arrival is not known. The Mission records show that he baptized an in- fant boy in the Mission church on Sep- tember 1st, of that year, bringing the then total of baptisms in Santa Clara to 2510. From the day of his arrival Fr. Magin Catala remained at Santa Clara until his death, which did not occur until November 22nd, 1830. Durine those thirty-six years he la- bored zealously and faithfully at Santa Clara and never absented himself from the Mission except on the occasion of the founding of Mission San Juan Bautista on June 24th, 1797. He as- sisted the Padres at Mission San Jose in administering baptism to the multi- tude of converts that applied for ad- mission, but as the lands of Mission San Jose joined those of Mission San- ta Clara, he was not beyond the lim- its of his own beloved Mission. Cat- ala was famed for his sanctity and, when he died, the universal cry of his sorrowing people was " The Saint has 304 THE REDWOOD. left us. " Miracles are attributed to him and descendants of those who wit- nessed many of them are still alive. The most famous miracle he per- formed was the miracle of the rain, which occurred in 1824, the first year on record that the Santa Clara Valley suffered from a drought. It had not rained during the entire preceding Winter, nor in the Spring that suc- ceded it. Cattle perished, crops failed, and the people were in depair. They appealed to Fr. Magin and in answer to his prayers God sent a storm that lasted for eight days, and the water in the streams rose so high that many people could not return to their distant homes for some time. Steps have been taken to investigate the life and works of the holy man with a view of eventually having him canonized by Holy Church. This investigation was begun by His Grace, the Most Rev. Joseph Sadoc Alemany, D. D., Archbishop of San Francisco, on No- vember 24th, 1882. After Catala ' s death, evil times fell on the Mission Santa Clara, and, in 1846, at the time of the American in- vasion, it saw exciting and trouble- some times. Land agents, immigrants and land jumpers gave the Padre Su- perior considerable trouble by endeav- oring to take possesion of the Mission property and buildings. An unscrupu- lous land agent, sent from Washing- ton to inspect the Spanish land grants, with an eye to his own piratical ends, was seized with a desire to possess the Mission for himself, realizing the ad- vantages of its wonderful cultivation and the broad area of its lands. With a band of followers he set up camps in the old orchard and vineyard, refusing to leave on an order from the Padre Superior. The Mission was legally protected by its landgrant issued by Viceroy Bucarelli, in 1776. The land agent, alive to the fact that the grant stood between him and his purpose, bribed a renegade Indian to steal the grant, which was secreted with other valuables under the main altar in the church. This is a noticeable instance of the ingratitude of some of the In- dians toward their priestly instructors. With the grant in his possession, the land agent, after attempting to file in his own name in Monterey, raided the Mission, but was driven off by a young officer in the United States army who, with a troop of cavalry, came from Monterey to the rescue of the Mission. Unfortunately, no two authors seem to agree on dates, events and general matter concerning the Missions of California. Many of them, no doubt, have not had access to the old records that were kept by the Padres them- selves, many of which are in an excel- lent state of preservation. It is fairly well authenticated that Padre Jose Maria del Real was the last of the Franciscans to rule Mission Santa Clara. After his death, what remained of the Mission buildings and lands was turned over to the Rev. John No- bili, of the Society of Jesus, by Rt. Rev. Joseph Sadoc Alemany, the Bish- op of the Diocese of San Francisco. THE REDWOOD. 305 On March 19th, 1851, with one hun- dred and fifty dollars and a brave heart, Rev. Father Nobili laid the foundation of the present University of Santa Clara. One or two of the old Mission buildings still remain, but they have been so transformed as to retain little of their old architecture. This has been forced in order to meet present demands. The Mission Church is practically a different structure, as the original was damaged from time to time by earthquakes. The walls have been rebuilt and a new ceiling put in, the latter being a reproduction of the original. Relics, such as altar decorations, statues, pictures, vest- ments, candelabra, missals, etc., are still intact, and the original Mis- sion bells, the gift of the King of Spain, still ring out their sweet chimes in the church tower. The Mission cross, encased in an outer covering of wood, in order to preserve it against the elements, stands in the plaza in front of the church. On December 23rd, 1909, what was known as the Fathers ' building and containing on the lower floor the old living quarters of the Mission, was completely de- stroyed by fire. On the site of Mission Santa Clara the new buildings of the greater Uni- versity of Santa Clara are rising, tes- timonials to Jesuit devotion and educa- tion. In a few years all trace of the old Mission will be removed. Such is the demand of the progress of time. No progress, however, can destroy memories that are rooted fast in the hearts of men, and long after the winds of time have blown the dust that will cover up even the footprints of the Franciscan Padres, who labored and suffered and died at Santa Clara, these memories will linger, holy and sweet, to be passed down, God willing, from generation to generation, until the end of time. MARTIN V. MERLE, ' 06. THE MISSION PLAY OF SANTA CLARA 1 HE Senior Dramatic Club of tlie Universi- ty of Santa Clara has the honor to announce the first production of " The Mission Play of Santa Clara " , written by Martin V. Merle, A. M., ' 06, the author of " The Light Eternal " , one of the Club ' s worthiest and most complete suc- cesses. Under the direction of Mr. Al- phonse J. Quevedo, S. J., the Club has been thoroughly reorganized and the production of The Mission Play will eclipse all former efforts in College dramatics. The production will take the form of a gigantic benefit for the Building Fund of the University of Santa Clara, for which generous friends are not lacking, though for the want of deeper thought on the matter of Christian Educational work, few realize its importance and the im- mense sacrifice it entails, and the mer- it there is in co-operating and sharing with Christian educators in their work for God and Country and the welfare of the young men of our generation who are to become the leaders of the generation of tomorrow. The faculty of the University has given its life- services freely and gladly to do the work. Those who would share with them in this great enterprise can do so most effectively by rendering ma- terial aid for the continuance and de- velopment of the work. Such an op- portunity is afforded by the production of " The Mission Play of Santa Clara " , to which notable interest attaches in as much as the play will be produced on the site of the old Mission by stu- dents and members of the alumni of the pioneer institution of learning on the Pacific Coast, and the fact that the University was founded within the old adobe walls of the Mission itself. Four performances of this elaborate production will be given in the historic University Theatre on the following dates : Wednesday evening. May 14th ; Thursday evening, May 15th; Satur- day evening, May 17th and Sunday af- ternoon, May 18th. Arrangements have been made with the Railroad Companies whereby spe- cial excursions will be run to all per- formances, at greatly reduced rates. The rates are to be effective from May 13th to 19th inclusive. Information regarding them can be had from local agents. The Santa Clara Mission, founded in 1777 by Padres de la Pena and Mar- guia, passed through a great crisis at the time of the American invasion in 1846. That is the period the author has chosen for " The Mission Play of Santa Clara, " and he 306 H I m 0) U) z TJ r ■ ■n ( ) z O r 30 THE REDWOOD. 307 has set forth with fidelity and color, the struggles and privations, the suf- ferings and sacrifices and the too often forgotten heroism of the days of the Padres and the Dons. The Santa Clara Mission furnishes much of the early history of the State of California, being not many miles away from Monterey, where Commodore Sloat raised the first American flag on the 7th of July, 1846. Padre Jose Maria del Real was the superior of the Mis- sion at the time, and how he held out against the efforts of an unscrupulous land agent from Washington, who at- tacked the Mission and attempted to take it by force, is graphically told in the play, the author ingeniously bringing forth the account of the sav- ing of the historic landmark. The plaza in front of the old Mission church, the beautiful old Mission gar- den where the holy Magin Catala was wont to walk, soft-footed, along the shaded, tiled walks, and the arch-sur- rounded vineyard, long since de- stroyed, are all faithfully reproduced as detailed settings for the stirring story of poetry and romance. There are twenty speaking parts in the play, and over one hundred students and members of the alumni will partici- pate in the production. " The Mission Play of Santa Clara " will be produced on the most elaborate scale ever undertaken in any similar effort. The play is in three acts and an epilogue, and the magnificent stage settings will be faithful reproductions of scenes in and around the old Santa Clara Mission. Michael O ' Sullivan, the well known scenic artist, whose work in the Passion Play is a testimo- nial to his genius, has prepared three wonderful sets of scenery for this production ; and Goldstein Com- pany, the San Francisco costumers, have brought the entire equipment of costumes from the City of Mexico. The light effects to be used in the Mis- sion Play will be the most effective result of months of experimenting, and the music, which is to be a special feature, under the direction of Mr. Ed- ward J. Cunningham, S. J., and the leadership of Prof. Orion, will be played by an augmented orchestra, besides a string quartette under the direction of Mr. Bert Hardy. Four Mexican dances and an entre act num- ber, " La Jota " , have been especially written for the production by Alfred Arriola, the well-known California composer. The entire production will be staged personally by the author, Mr. Martin V. Merle, A. M., ' 06. A great many months have been given over to the careful preparation for this production and no expense or pains have been spared to make it the biggest dramatic event in the West. The complete cast for The Mission Play is as follows : — Padre Jose Maria del Real Dion Holm, ' 12. Don Fernando Castanares August M. Aguirre, ' 07. Don Antonio Alvarado George Mayerle, Jr. 308 THE REDWOOD. Don lyuis Castanares Roy Emerson, ' 16 Captain Harry Mallison, U. S. A.-- Robert J. Flood, ' 13. Soquel Harry W. McGowan, ' 13. Jack Moseley Adolph Canelo, ' 15. Risdon Frank G. Boone, ' 14. Don Ramon Hernandez John Sheehy, ' 15. Don Alfredo de la Pena Myies Fitzgerald, ' 16. Sergeant Briggs, U. S. A. i rrol Quill, Fourth High. Andrews George Nicholson, ' 16. bonora Fdward Ford, ' 15. Pablo William Geha, First High. Ji adre Felipe Fugene Simas, Third High. Fra Miguel James Lyons, Third High. Arquez Joseph Herlihy, ' 16. Chico Donald Traynham, Third High. Lieutenant Howland, U. S. A. Thomas Davis, Third High. A Beggar Rodney A. Yoell, ' 14. Pedro Demitrio Diaz, Second High. Sunol William Doran, First High. Mateo Claude Dodge, Second High. Diego (A Peddler) Joseph Vejar, Second High. Ysidro Harold Kelly, Fourth High. Caballeros : — Donald Davies, Harry Casey, Andrew J. Ginnocchio, Norbert Korte, Raymond Cal- lahan, Ignatius O ' Neil, Edward Nicholson, Richard Noonan. Gam- blers : — Joseph Aurrecoechea, Tracy Gaffey, Angelo Bessolo, Frank Cam- arillo, Brackenridge Clemens. Va- queros : — Benjamin Pacheco, Walter Jackson, Robert Ludwig, Lloyd Car- sen, George Sternes, Victor Leininger, Idlers : — Elisha Dana, Harry Jackson, Joseph Parker, Louis Bergez. Indi- ans : — Joseph Christy, Victor Parra, Manuel Parra, Rudolph Geoghegan, Harry Butler, Frank Conneally, Ralph Crooks. Acolytes : — William Bush, William Detels, American Soldiers : — John Ahern, Claude Sweezy, Thom- as Concannon, Edward Kearns. Mu- sicians: — Bert Hardy, Marshal Rosen- thal, Louis Jennings. Singers: — Jose Zavalza, Mark Falvey, Edward O ' Connor, Joseph Ferrario. The Prologue will be spoken by Jos- eph Aurrecoechea ' 16. The state-wide interest that is being manifested in the production of the Mission Play can be readily gleaned from a glance at the names of the fol- lowing prominent men and women who will act as patrons and patron- esses of the undertaking: Most Rev. Archbishop Patrick W. Riordan, D. D. of San Francisco, Right Rev. Ed- ward J. Hanna, D.D., of San Francisco Right Rev. Thomas J. Conaty, D. D., of Los Angeles, Right Rev. Thomas Grace, D. D., of Sacramento, Rev. Joseph P. McQuade, Mr. andl Mrs. John Auzerais, Mrs. Mary Barron, Mr. T. I. Bergan, Mr. and Mrs. John F. Brooke, Mr. and Mrs. John J. Barrett, Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Clark, Hon. James V. Cofifey, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Coryell, Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. Dunne, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Driscoll, Mr. Frank G. Drum, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Desmond, " " Miss Louise Enright, Mr. THE REDWOOD. 309 and Mrs. Tiry L. Ford, Mr. and Mrs. J. Athern Folger, Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Fay, Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Grif- fin, Mr. and Mrs. J. Downie Harvey, Mrs. Robert Y. Hayne, Mr. William F. Herrin, Mrs. Catherine Ivancovich, Mr. and Mrs. C. Frederick Kohl, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Kearns, Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Lorigan, Hon. and Mrs. W. G. Lorigan, Mr. B. T. Lacy, Hon. and Mrs. Curtis J. Lindley, Mr. and Mrs. Gus Lion, Mr. and Mrs. Eu- gene Lent, Mr. and Mrs. William J. Leet, Mrs. A. M. Loughborough, Mrs. Eleanor Martin, The Misses Morrison, Mr. and Mrs. Leopold V. Merle, Mr. Mr. and Mrs. Charles K. McClatchy, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore P. Murphy, Mr. and Mrs. Garrett P. McEnery, Mr. and Mrs. Edward O. McCormick, Mr. Edward McLaughlin, Mr. and Mrs. Bartley P. Oliver, Mrs. R. A. Sweeny Pescia, Miss Mary Louise Phelan, Mr. James D. Phelan, Mr. and Mrs. Rich- ard E. Queen, Hon. and Mrs. James Rolph, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Puck- er, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Ryland:, Hon. and Mrs. Joseph Scott, Mrs. Mary White Staples, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Sloss, Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Spellacy, Mr. and Mrs. William Sproule, Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Sweeney, Mr. Matt I. Sullivan, Mrs. Mary A. Tobin, Mr. and Mrs. Emory Winship, Mrs. Bertha M. Welch. THE SKYLARK AND THE POETS M ERIC AN S are not generally acquainted with the skylark and its cheerful song. It is in the northwest- ern portions of the old world that this songster is seen and heard, and it is there that poets, among others, have been attracted to it and charmed by its happy, jubilant notes. To them it has been an inspira- tion, an emblem of happiness, the peerless singer of the feathered-folk and many other wonderful things as we shall see. The nightingale, it must be owned, has also moved the poets, but they seem to have invariably sung sweeter of the lark. The ways of the lark are very strange. It is not satisfied with stay- ing on earth in some secluded grove, and like the nightingale sing his songs divine, but must soar far into the skies at break of day or into the set- ting sun, and then gladden all the earth and air with its " shrill delight. " These care-free pranks have puzzled the verse-makers in no small degree : " Why does it soar so high? " " Why does it scorn the ground? " " What manner of joys seem to surfeit its little heart that it must herald in the sun or hover round its departing glory? " are questions which ma.ny of them have raised and poeti- cally solved. Nothing, therefore, can hardly be more interesting than to hear what the poets have to say of the peculiar ways of their respective birds. And this is the reason why we have selected The Skylark and the Poets as our subject. But there are other, deeper things of life, suggested by the various view- points of those who, in English, have written on the skylark. We will not cover much of this alluring ground, as we freely admit that we have made no exhaustive investigation. Our pur- pose is to give what we have. Judge of that which we give, by the universally accepted principle of all art, — truth and a proper appreciation of the artistic; and in this way, we hope to develop and whet a taste for those passages of lyrical poetry which are veritable mirrors of the human heart. In The Taming of The Shrew, Pe- truchio, after driving away the tailors and their wares, consoles Katherine by reminding her of the " precious plainness " of the lark: — For ' tis the mind that makes the body rich; And, as the sun breaks thro ' the dark- est clouds, So honor peereth in the meanest habit. What ! is the jay more precious than the lark, 310 THE REDWOOD. 311 Because his feathers are more beauti- ful; Or is the adder better than the eel, Because his painted skin contents the eye? Oh, no, good Kate ! Neither art thou the worse For this poor furniture and mean ar- ray. The lark, it must be remarked, is a bird of very plain feathers, yet Shake- speare holds him in high esteem. He regards the lark as the great awakener of life, dispelling sorrow from the earth and bringing to the weary soul new hopes. This idea is very happily con- veyed in the twenty-ninth sonnet : — When in disgrace with fortune and men ' s eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state. And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries. And look upon myself, and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope. Featured like him, like him with friends possessed. Desiring this man ' s art, and that man ' s scope, With what I most enjoy contented least ; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Happily I think on thee, — and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day aris- ing From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven ' s gate ; For thy sweet love remember ' d such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. That is, the remembrance of the ab- sent beloved gives new courage to the weary and then like the lark singing hymns at heaven ' s gate, his state is exalted. Wonderful indeed must be the cheery roulades of this delicate- throated prima donna that can move the heavy laden mind to such thoughts ; their harmony seems to af- fect its delicate texture even more readily than the charms of the human voice or of instrumental music. All music and all poetry alike, must, to be good poetry or good music, have pow- er to stimulate our minds and elevate our thoughts. And upon this broad principle can we rest all the fine arts. To the cultured, or naturally artis- tic, that is the best work of art, which has power to move them to similar thoughts and feelings. For a proof of this, if we turn to poetry we find these thoughts and feelings in all lyri- cal verses inspired by the lark ' s song. Hence we see that the lark ' s song is the source of a gladness and of a cheerfulness peculiarly its own, and far more appealing than that gladness or sense of pleasure the source of which is instrumental or vocal sound. Shelley ' s greatest lyric, " To a Sky- lark, " is the most perfect lyric poem of its kind in the language. It is to him that we must turn for an interpreta- tion of the lark, — and, in fact, for all the wild, roving things of nature, with which his spirit had such a won- derful and pathetic kinship. We quote only in part : — 312 THE REDWOOD. Hail to thee, blithe Spirit ! Bird thou never wert, That from heaven or near it, Pourest thy full heart In profuse strain of unpremeditated art. Teach us, sprite or bird. What sweet thoughts are thine : I have never heard Praise of love or wine That panted forth a flood of rapture so divine. With thy clear keen joyance Langour cannot be: Shadow of annoyance Never came near thee : Thou lovest, but ne ' er knew love ' s sad satiety. We look before and after And price for what is not ; Our sincerest laughter With some pain is fraught ; Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought. Waking or asleep ; Thou of death must deem Things more true and deep Than we mortals dream — Or how could thy notes flow in such a crystal stream? Teach me half the gladness That thy brain must know, Such harmonious madness From my lips would flow, The world should listen then, as I am listening now ! Shelley was a Utopian dreamer keen- ly affected by the sufferings of man- kind, and though he has nowhere sung hymns more acceptable to Heaven than when he wrote his famous lyric, he screamed defiance at God in his Defense of Atheism. His was a tragic life, indeed. He perished in the Gulf of Spezia at the very early age of thirty. Had he lived to a maturer age, there is little doubt that he would have left the very highest type of lit- erary work, both in design and execu- tion. But if Shelley was the lark ' s in- terpreter, Wordsworth was its phil- osopher. He answers the question incessantly inferred in Shelly ' s lark, " What is the secret of that super- abundant bliss? " Here is his address to the lark : — " Ethereal minstrel ! pilgrim of the sky! Dost thou despise the earth where cares abound? Or, while the wings aspire, are heart and eye Both with thy nest upon the dewy ground ? Thy nest which thou can ' st drop into at will. Those quivering wings composed, that music still ! Leave to the nightingale her shady wood; A privacy of glorious light is thine ; Whence thou dost pour upon the world a flood Of harmony, with instinct more di- vine ; Type of the wise who soar, but never roam ; True to the kindred points of Heaven and Home! Wordsworth has ably and subtly answered the question which puz- zled poor Shelley. It is because the lark is " true to the kindred points of Heaven and Home " that his little heart flows forth upon the earth in THE REDWOOD. 313 such sublime ecstacies. But one may- well ask what constitutes these kin- dred points of heaven and home. The wise man ' s vision, the philanthropist ' s joy, or the poet ' s ideal, — call it what you will — that something which moves a man ' s heart to noble acts and a noble life, is a visitant from God, and a mere boon of Nature ' s. Surely, those feelings, those thoughts, that love for mankind, are akin and related to Christ ' s own divinity — gifts from the Giver of all good gifts. And as a symbol of these kindred points of heaven and home, the lark is a beau- tiful conception. It is like the image of that spirit that descended of old upon the twelve Apostles, pouring forth radiant rays of light. As to that other lark problem that has kept the poets busy, " Why is it that one never tires of the lark ' s song? " We have found no better an- swer than that of the late Father Matthew Russell, written in his youth : — " We were strolling round the gar- den and the singing of the lark overhead seemed a part of the August sunshine. And my gentle cousin, Annie, said: ' How strange one never tires of the lark. ' " Yes, although it is so monotonous, on and on, almost the same always. A mere thrill of joy, a mere gush of love and gratitude, a mere trickle of the simplest melody. No triumphant burst, no riotous gurgle, no pathetic murmur, no agonising spasm, no sub- tle gradation, no mellow fall from treble down to bass, no splendid leap from bass up to treble. On and on, a few artless unvarying notes. And yet it never tires us ; it is always musical and fresh, a meekly-joyous image of the one unceasing song of the Blessed, image of the rapturous mo- notony of heaven. " " Is there not pain in a restless mul- tiplicity of pleasure? Amidst the whirl of changes is not the heart haunted by a vague dread that the next change may be sadly for the worse? It is a symptom of disease in the soul to stand in need of vicissitudes. Only com- monplace souls, earthly souls, souls without depth or compass, souls with paltry resources of their own, and slavishly dependent upon outward things — none but these desire, none but these can endure, perpetual va- riety, excitement, travel, change of scene, change of society, change of employment, change of amusement, change of change. The higher natures are stable, equable, self-contained, self-sustaining, placid, domestic ; con- centrated in their large memories and their large thoughts and hopes ; seek- ing and finding pleasure in a stable loyalty to duty at home with themselves, at home with their conscience and their God, at home in their own homes, at home with a stainless and a happy monotony. " Father Russell ' s answer is fraught with tenderness. It is a passage re- vealing a nature and a disposition which, we are tempted to say, were happily mated in a soul as happy as a lark ' s. EDWARD O ' CONNOR. " COME RACK! COME ROPE! " T WAS with great ex- pectations that I opened " Come rack! Come rope ! " by Mon- signor Robert Hugh Benson. This book, the author-priest ' s latest work, was heralded as surpassing all his former writings, as a historical novel par ex- cellence; in a word his masterpiece. I may say I was disappointed. It may have been an inability to enter into the spirit of piety which pervades the work. This I am not to judge. Or it may have been that the work was spoken of in such laudatory terms as to raise my hopes to an impossible de- gree. I believe the latter case to be more probable. What should one ex- pect from the pen that put forth " By What Authority? " and " The King ' s Achievement. " To my sorrow " Come rack! Come rope! " surpasses them but little. The historical novel is the monsignor ' s forte, and he should do more of that style of work. I think he appreciates the fact but in doing so comes near spoiling the good by writ- ing much too hurriedly. Yet beyond a doubt Mgr. Benson is one of the leading lights of literature of the present day. It is his writing that will silence those who howl and lament the degradation of the litera- ture of the time. If there were more of Mgr. Benson ' s kind a great reaction for the uplifting of letters would follow. Mgr. Benson can never achieve a wide popularity as an author. The major- ity of the people who speak and read the English language are mostly Prot- estant. It is then Mgr. Benson ' s standpoint from which he writes and his station in life which sever him from all chance of such popularity if he so much as desires it. But to the Catholic intellect he is paramount amr)ng all contemporary writers. " Come rack ! Come rope ! " is a his- torical novel, a historical novel whose chief characters are drawn from a pe- riod of long ago and are centered about events that really happened. In this work the actors are taken bodily from history and made to do the identical things that history tells of. But being a novel the principal characters are fictitious yet act in a manner wholly possible with conditions at that time. Mary Queen of Scots is presented to the reader in her captivity and at her death. The reason why she is brought into the story is not clear, but can be excused on account of her being one of the principal characters of the time. It is not clear, however, why her death is introduced, and why it is made to cover so much space. Her presence was not needed in the first place, and this second occurence seems to be ap- 314 THE REDWOOD. 315 parently to excite sympathy for the be- loved and add another laurel to her al- ready much bedecked brow. The book is queerly constituted as regards the hero. It is hard to tell whether the tale is of a hero or of a time. Much more attention is given the condition than is given the man who is supposedly the hero, Robin Audrey. The trend of the story has to do with the tribulations of the faith- ful and the fortitude of the priests. It is in this persecution of priests that Robin finds his part in the story. Though the book opens up with Robin going to his fiance and though it ends with Robin absolving his father from the scaffold, it is an open question as to its true nature, story of a hero or a time. The conclusion of the book is one of the most stirring passages in the book. The father of the priest had turned away from the church after a series of fines and imprisonments for adhering to the old faith. After he had gone and heard her majesty ' s minister de- liver his sermon (an act that gave great joy to the persecutors, for he was a squire and a man highly thought of in Devonshire), he was made a magistrate. He knew his son was gone to be a priest and ' great was his dread lest his strong sense of duty would lead him to capture, and thus to kill his own son. This fell to his lot. After driving to the house of his son ' s sweetheart (the same that sent his son to be a priest and had given up her life to aid of her persecuted re- ligion) spurred on by the searchers anxious for the blood-money, he de- manded that the priest that was in his house be brought forth or that way be made that he might search. The mag- istrate was taken aside by the girl that might have been his daughter-in-law. What she told proved that the thought that weighed upon his heart like lead was too true. He would have to take his son, his only son, to a death most terrible. And the thought sickened him. He fell into a fit and was car- ried to his home. During the weeks that Robin lay in prison now tortured on the rack, now doubly tortured by the insidious Topcliffe, he was firm. At last they led him forth to his death. He rode upon a hurdle which rested upon a jolting cart. His joints were all swol- len from the rack. His whole body was in pain, pain that overwhelmed him and choked him even as a swim- mer whose strength is spent in a surg- ing tide. He wished that he might have the ability to answer the crowd that shrieked its taunts at the suffering man. He wished — and then he sighed as he realized that he was not so to be blessed. The cart had stopped before he was aware that the journey had been accomplished. He saw the platform, the seething caldron, raised his eyes higher and saw the rope be- ing made ready, lowered his eyes and saw the chopping block ; and the sight cooled and strengthened him. He was now allowed to address his last ser- 316 THE REDWOOD. mon to the crowd. He began, con- fessing his priesthood, his faith, and then exhorted the vast concourse as- sembled to witness his last extremity, to return to the CathoHc religion which they had forsaken ; to pray for the Church throughout the world, for the conversion of England and her children, and for her grace the Queen. He then begged all Catholics present to join him in prayer. " From the whole packed space the prayer rose up, in great and heavy waves of sound. There were cries of mockery, but each was suddenly silenced — the waves of sound rolled round and ceased and the silence was profound. " He began to prepare for the last within himself and looked over the sight which lay before him. By chance he dropped his glance. A figure stood grasping the rungs of the ladder. It was strangely clad in a loose gown with a silken night cap. He did not recognize it for a moment, and then the truth flashed across his pain-sod- den mind. It was his father, penitent from a sick-bed, come to be forgiven through the son he had sent to be killed. One look was enough. His son spoke the words of absolution. The consciousness once again re- turned while he was being butchered, and murmuring the words, " O Christ " — he died. With a heavy sigh I laid down the book. I thanked Heaven those days had passed. I thanked Heaven there were men like Robin. I was glad I read the book and I am fired with a sense of pride in those brave charac- ters portrayed. The book has served its purpose. WM. STEWART CANNON. HARRY McGOWAN, ' 13 PERCY C. O ' CONNOR, ' 13 DON LUIS CASTANARES EDWARD FORD. 15 FRANK BOONE, ' 14 RISDON " THE MISSION PLAY OF SANTA CLARA ' PHOTOS BY GEO. FRASER. S. F. THE MISISON BELL Old Mission hell, I long to hear thy story! Faith, poesy, romance, are on thy tongue. Thy voice rang out the first sweet notes of glory Ihat echoed California ' s hills among. Along Gahrillos shore in saint-days olden. Inspired by thee was many a holy dream. Thy music, in the distant dawn-light golden. Was prelude of a State ' s majestic theme. And now, with noon ablaze, amid the splendor Of garish fabrics crowned with domes and towers Still to thy quaint abode ive turn to render Some tribute from these gratefid hearts of ours, Turn to the arched facade of alabaster. Its columns white, and thy deep, shadowy cell — Turn to this spirit- d celling of the Master; And dream that still thou callest, ancient bell. l hy peal, as Dawn aside with rosy fingers Morns curtain drew of mingled pearl and gold, Awoke the matin-hymn, whose echo lingers In this gray shrine, thrice-blest by saints of old. Then, like God ' s candles in the heavens burning About his throne, the altar fires ilhime Thy mystic rite, while monks, with holy yearning, Praise Him who burst the bondage of tJte tomb . 317 318 THE REDWOOD. Ihee hearing, the dusk maid, her treasures stringing Of shells that gemmed the necklace of the sea, Aside her task of hright-hued ivampum flinging, Cried, " The Great Spirit calleth unto me! " Sis bowstring slacked, the tawny forest-ranger Turned from his prey, enchanted by thy spell; The deer forgot his terror and his danger And paused to list thy music ' s vibrant swell. Forth at thy signal strong-limbed Labor wended To cleave the rich loam of the fertile vale, And read from Nature ' s open book extended Of mans immortal destiny the tale: Into the gaping glebe the corn to shower, And mark the miracle of buried seed, Its death and resurrection, and the flower, As from the grave, on emerald pinions freed. Musing, I ask how much of joy and sorrow Thy voice hath told o ' er all these hundred years. Now swelling with the bliss that mortals borrow From angels: knelling now the tale of tears; Now thrilling with delight thy voice rings o ' er us, A melody of prayer now singing low; — Thy wedding peal, how golden, sweet, sonorous! Thy funeral note, Jiow palling in its woe! Thy task complete, to be forgotten never — Thy day is ended, but secure thy fame, In poet-song thy voice rings on forever; To hyal hearts thou speakest still the same. THE REDWOOD. 319 The dark- shinned bellman is a dim tradition; 7 ' hy sheen is buried ' neath consuming rust; A name, a bit of clay — this was the Mission; 2 he neophytes are gone; the monks are dust. Old bell, more precious are the memories clinging To thee than je vels on the royal brow, Listen! A Sabbath symphony is ringing! Of all these a-oyidrous bells, the Mother thou! Faith, Hope and Love, — the tidings of salvation — The creed of the Redemption, these they ring! Their mighty voices roll across the Nation 2 he summons of the Universal King! Yet, while around thee, from a hundred steeples, 2%e bells ring out their sacred jubilee, Proclaiming to the regnant paleface peoples 21ie saving Word, — old. hell, I turn to thee — Thee — dearer far than all the bell-choirs singing, — Silent thou art, and heard shalt be no more ; Though plaintive winds, aronnd thy ruin icinging. Whisper thy fame to the responsive shore. CHAS. D. SOUTH. JUST LUCK groomed men. HE foyer of the ho- tel was comfortably crowded, and well- dressed women passed back and forth es- corted by well- A page ran to and fro crying out in a rather raucous tone for some guest wanted in the phone room, and the soft strains of a con- cealed orchestra wafted airily through the marble-pillared corridors into the palm court and out into the night. The gentle splash of a light colored fountain fell refreshingly on the ear, and excellent service bringing the necessary " wherewith " to be served, supplied all the demands of my com- panion and myself. He was an old westerner of the fast vanishing type, and as we sat out the evening together in the palatial hos- telry he told me many tales of that same spot, when the very ground on which we were sitting was but an empty sand-dune bleaching by the sea. " Yes, " he was saying in answer to my question, " fate, or as I term it luck, is a mighty queer thing. " " I ' ve seen men who never did a day ' s honest work in their whole worthless lives, pick up a lot of quartz to shy at their mules and found thet the quartz was purty near pure gold. " " Then again, I ' ve known men so cussed onlucky thet they could set on top of a gold mine and never have any idea or any luck enough to uncover the dinero. ' " But the worst luck thet I ever heard of a man having pulled off on him was way back in the seventies, over in the L,oma Prieta coun try. " Here the narrator took a glass that was handed him, and after drinking from it with a satisfying smack he returned it to the tray and continued. " You know those were pretty wild days then, and bad men were sure aplentiful, and their story is about one of the baddest of the bad. " Lone Jack some knew him by, and others vowed that he was a Mexican named Orledando, who was oncom- mon bleached out like, but however that may be, he sure was a traitor. " I saw him up against a faro bank in Tucson once, and he shore was an eyeful of a man. " He wan ' t over tall, mebe about five feet ten, but lithe and wiry like, sorter alway ready to spring; he never raised much disturbance anywhere, where there was a crowd, but notwithstand- ing thet fact, he had a reputation and a handle to his name thet was some unsavory. " We folks in Tucson never minded him much just so long as he tended to his own affairs, but one night down in 320 THE REDWOOD. 321 Dan Rainey ' s Empire saloon he got to talking rather large and free wise, and then we knew he was from Flagstaff, and had got out of there rather hur- riedly by way of Globe, San Carlos and then to Tucson. " Just the nature of his crime, I never could diagnose, but it alway seemed to me like as if a story about his ashootin ' of a Pache over in Tomb- stone had some foundation. " Well, as I was a sayin ' , we folks in Tucson never minded him much as long as he tended to his own herd. But one night, the night I was refer- ring to heretofore, he got pretty ram- bunctious, and afore we knew what was up an ' doing, shooting irons got free, and lead jest about buzzed around thet bar-room, as thick as bees a hiv- ing. " When the smoke cleared away and we all crawled out from behind the bar an old inoffensive chap that every- one liked, called Smoot, was a lyin ' on the floor all chewed up and Orledandc had scampered out the door, jumped his horse and was off and away. " Nacherally we all composing the law and order element of the com- munity was some anxious to lay a holt of the scalawag, so we just hiked to our bronchos ' muy pronto ' and took after him as fast as legs could take us. " About sun-up we fetched Sagepike springs, and there we found ample evi- dence of his recent occupancy there. " We rested awhile and pretty soon took after up a long mesa that stretch- ed quite a number of miles to the east. " The Pintos Alagarze boundered the plain to the west and we could dimly see their blue jagged like top against the purple sky. " You ' ve never seen a sun rise on a desert have you, son? Why I tell you there ' s nothing like it. It ' s all bluey like and deep at first; then comes pink, next grey and pretty soon old sol him- self comes a smiling out and the whole sky turns red and metal like, the same as a copper kettle. " Well, the sun was up quite a piece when we left the springs, and we fig- ured it that if Orledando could get to Mesa Gap in the mountains by four o ' clock, he ' d be safe, for then he could just as easy drop out of the territory anywheres and might a turned up in New York. " So accordin ' Jim Racey, who was leading our posse sent two men out ahead to get that pass before the greaser did, as he would nacherally take a round-about way to avoid trou- ble. The man had a good start on us all right, but if these two chaps near killed their ponies they ' d make it ahead of him. " They lit out accordin ' an ' the last that we saw of one of ' em alive was cantering away at a great clip in a cloud of dust. " Along about five o ' clock we fetched up the pass, and Tom Courtrelle, he being one of the men who went out ahead of us, came riding back, and told us that they beat the pongo to it all right, but he plugged Sterrit on 322 THE REDWOOD. sight and was wounded by Courtrelle just as he made his get-away. " He couldn ' t have gone far, how- ever, Tom told us, because his nag had been hit a couple of times and was in a bad way owing to hard riding. " Nothing was left to do, however, but to curry-comb thet sage brush plain for miles, because we reckoned that he was hiding somewhere and seeking a chance to give his horse a rest. " That was partly the case, too, for several of the boys rounded him up about three miles from the mouth of the path, in a little arroyo, hiding be- hind a cotton-wood scrub. " He dropped one of ' em, and came charging out right in front of the other two, and here ' s where my ob- servation on the cussedness of luck comes in. Those two men were both on ' em, what you would term expert shots, an ' they both onlimbered some with them guns, but nary a bullet touched him. " He made his clean break, and the only thing to do was to join the rest of the bunch and hunt him down fur ther way out on the desert next day, for we grabbed the pass and he couldn ' t scoot that way. " We were a sore bunch when we pulled together again, having lost two of us, and we all started riding out to the pass again to camp there all night and follow him away on the next day. " Some of the boys were still out ascouting, however, so they might not know jest where we planned to lay up for the night. " Therefore, Jim Racey, he being cur leader, said that when we got to a clump of mesquite bush which we could dimly see in the dusk about a half mile off, he ' d fire a few shots to scare up any stragglers who were still out hunting the cuss. " Well, we fetched that clump in no time, and according old Jim rises up in his stirrup and cuts loose bang, bang. And by jimminy, thet second shot no sooner starts forth when we hears a shriek which almost tears us out of our saddles. We all knows where it came from. We see a little bush shake plenty hard, and so dis- mounting we runs there ,and sure enough it was Orledando all right, dead as a door-nail. " You see, he ' d figured on beating us back to the pass by cutting across our trail like a bow string, we having taken the curve there to gather up the posse. " So far so good; but he didn ' t figure on running onto any one sudden like, and when he sees us coming he leaves his horse dead by cutting its throat and crawls into a bush. " Then we come along as free and easy as boarding-house soup, and thinking of nothing Old Jim Racey stand up in his stirrups and throws his gun anywhere carelesslike jest to fire two waste shots. " Well, one of ' em got him, and that was sure queer, for he ' d killed two of THE REDWOOD. 323 our men, ran the gauntlet of several others and never got touched. Yet when the first loose shooting comes about he gets plugged. " That luck was hard luck, and you can ' t get away from it. " " No, sir, " he continued reminiscent- ly, " that ' s the demdest case I ever heard of. " Come on, let ' s have another drink. " RODNEY A. YOELL. THE DESERT WAY HE sweltering rays of mother earth received him on her un- the noon-day sun friendly bosom. " Tex and me is the peered in and out only ones that holds the chips in this among the craggy lay out, " continued Pete scornfully, depths of Black " What do you think I have been in Creek Canyon, as this business over in Dakota these last out from the bushes strode a wiry five years for? To divide my first man of medium height, accompanied haul in this part of the country with by a dirty individual of low type, greasers Not on your . " Pete whose very presence seemed to was about to continue when he be- emanate filth. " Well, greaser, I guess came aware of the fact that the Mex- we ' re about due to make a haul! " The ican was peering over his shoulder in face of the white man corrugated into an abstracted manner, the now pale a mass of leathery wrinkles as he emit- and drawn face yielding a cold per- ted a dry chuckle. The greaser spiration. Pete turned on his heel, laughed or rather cackled congenially, and then started back as though he his snaky eyes seemingly hidden in had seen an apparition. Recovering his the fat of his cheeks, while the bluish poise, however, he laughed uncertain- smoke of his vile-smelling, though ly. " You illiterate dog " , he said, " what perfectly rolled cigarette, broke at the are you gaping for, it ' s nothing but a point of his chin into two separate mirage in which Tex is enlarged by hazes, on either side of his unnaturally the heat waves ; I ' m glad he ' s coming, low brow, now reeking with an oily howsumever, because he ' ll bring us sweat. " Si, senor Pedro Negro, news of the stage. It ' s about due. " mucho dinero es muy bueno, si. " The Mexican had by this time arisen Black Pete turned contemptously to- to his feet, but had not wholly recov- ward h is companion. " Don ' t look at ered from the recent shock, which was me that way, you miserable son of in truth a startling one. In some man- Popocatapetel ; you don ' t figure on a ner, Tex, a pal of the aforespoken share in the swag, you are getting precious duet, while returning from your grub, which you don ' t deserve, if Cow Hollow with news of the stage we win or lose. " His attitude was so containing passengers and a well filled menacing that the Mexican fell back Wells-Fargo box, had passed between involuntarily, and tripping over a rock, two contrary waves of heat; the result let fly a startled " caramba " , just as being that himself and his pony were 324 O O (n s 2 r i r 1 1 U) z H S m THE REDWOOD. 325 magically produced upon the sky-line in massive proportions. The grotesque portrayal lasted but a few seconds, however, and soon a small, antlike fig- ure was to be seen down the gorge. It enlarged as it grew nearer, and at last a sinister-looking, rawboned, lanky and scar-faced individual in chaps and sombrero is to be seen, his spurs hid- den in the flanks of a fatigued cow pony. Without pity for the animal he bestrode, the man rode furiously up to where the two men were standing by the side of the trail and drew the pony up brutally on its haunches, the animal only saving itself from top- pling over backwards by a squirming demivolt. Before his mount had reached the ground, Tex was on his feet, shifting his belt and unburdening himself of a well-chewed, voluminous quid of tobacco. He watched the sand greedily absorb the moisture, and then turned to his friends with a gesture of disgust. " I ' ll be hanged if I ever did like this God-forsaken des- ert, enyhow. Say, Pete, were ' bout due for the biggest lump ever extract- ed this side o ' the rockies. " " Watcher know, " queried Pete, laconically. " Ther stage with that $15,000 Wells- Fargo pulls over this very spot in one hour. " " The deuce, " incredulously retorted Pete. " Madre de Dios, " im- piously came from the excited Mexi- can. " But the funny part of it is, " con- tinued Tex, not noticing the interrup- tion, " that one of these new-fangled detectors is coming from the east to inspect that little bank job me and ther Mex pulled off in Eldorado be- fore you came over the line. Some of the men in Cow Hollow were tellin ' me about it. He ' s coming on this stage, and his name is Jim Conners; James W. Conners. " Tex made the correction sarcastically. " What " , roared Pete, and then he added with more emphasis than grammar: " That bein ' the case, we don ' t rob no stage today. " " Say, " interposed Tex, mild- ly, as he rolled a cigarette, " Mebbe we ' ve made a mistake. " " Are you sure? " he asked, with a hint of irony in his voice, " that you are the dare- devil Black Pete from Dakota? " " You hit it the first shot, you square-head, " returned Pete. " Wa-a-11, I never thought that the likes of you would run from a measly fly-cop " . " Well, you know it now, don ' t you? And if you v ant something to think of, I ' ll go so far as to let you know that your measly fly-cop is my brother. " With these words he went into the bushes, and, returning therefrom with his horse, rode off down the canyon, leav- ing two disagreeably astonished ras- cals behind him. About 6 p. m. that evening Black Pete rode into Eldorado. His weary mount bravely covered the last few yards of the alkali road, and stood stock still in front of the " Poor Man ' s Friend. " This establishment boasted of the best whiskey that could be found in Eldorado, and obeying this significant hint on the part of his horse, Pete leaped gingerly off, and made his way into the domicile of 3 26 THE REDWOOD. liquified glory. There were quite a few men in the saloon, and as Pete made his way to the bar, five or six of the men representing the anti-work league of Eldorado, stepped expect- antly forward and tried hard to scrape acquaintance sufficient to procure a drink. Pete obligingly ordered a round, and enquired of his seedy looking friends the burden of the day ' s news, which the latter were more than an- xious to give, hoping thereby that an- other round might be obtained. Al- most the very first words of the news- volunteer had the desired effect. " Say, d ' ye know, stranger, ther old stage comin ' throo Black Crik Can- yon was lifted by Texas and his greaser pard, and o ' course they got thet Wells-Fargo stuff just as e-e-asy. And thet young detective feller tried to be brave, but they emptied their 45s in him an ' he ' s up at the undertaker ' s. What ' s the matter pard, are yuh sick? Pete, his face an ashen hue, reeled against the counter, and recovering himself, he said brokenly : " No, Pm alright, I have to be going, " He flipped down a half dollar piece on the bar, swal- lowed his drink in silence and stum- bled outside. " Oh, Jim, Jim, " he moaned, " what evil spirit prompted you to come out here. But Pll get those hounds, " he muttered, " and Pll shoot their fingers off before I kill them. They will make for the old hold-out up Bison creek, and Pll fol- low them and send them where — where Jim went, " he added grimly. He gathered in the reins and vaulted into the saddle, and a few seconds later he was on the edge of the desert, the still mountains re-echoing with the horse ' s clatter. The misty halo of the cold and dreary moon slowly but surely gave place to the first roseate streakings of the eastern horizon, as slumbering na- ture threw aside the silvery shadows of night, to emerge in her morning robe of gleam- ing gold. Black Pete saw and exulted, not in the beauty and grand- eur of it all, but in the fact that this welcome light would enable him to accomplish his vengeance. A rocky ledge came into sight around the bend of the river, and Pete dismounted, leaving his horse standing beside the trail. Then he moved forward through the underbrush until he arrived about a hundred yards from his destination. " They ' re up there alright, " he mut- tered, " and mighty careless. I can smell that bacon even from here. " He again moved forward carefully, till he was within a few feet of the ledge. Should he advance boldly, or creep up on them. He did not relish the idea of shooting them down in cold blood, yet he must take the latter alternative. There was Texas, keeping watch with his rifle across his knees, while the Greaser was chuckling to himself over the sizzling bacon. Gritting his teeth Pete crept stealthily forward. A twig snapped beneath his foot, and Texas jumping up with an oath, sent a whin- ing messenger over Pete ' s head. Al- THE REDWOOD. 327 most simultaneously Pete ' s revolver spoke, and the hard blue muzzle belched forth the death crack of Texas. Before the Mexican could reach his gun, he found himself cowering before the proximity of the cleverly fashioned little piece of smoking steel. Turning his eyes to the body of Texas, Pete re- marked : " You were a mighty poor friend Tex. but " While Pete was thus soliloquizing, the Mexican ' s nimble fingers had drawn a pistol from its holster by his side, and just as Pete turned instinctively toward him, his eyes gleaming with hatred, the Mex- ican fired. Pete experienced the sen- sation of a searing hot iron piercing his scalp, and as he reeled and fell, he fired two bullets into the heart of the Mexican. The multitudinous reflections of the scarlet and gold canopy above, conjured forth by the last rays of the setting sun, spread themselves over the picturesque village of Eldorado. They sought entrance into the old adobe hotel, and successful in this at- tempt, dyed the frayed curtains in the splendor of the afternoon. Some of the strongest went farther and laid themselves across the sleeping form of a man in the sickroom of the hotel. His head was encased in a caplike ban- dage, and the face on the pillow was that of Black Pete. The camp doctor and a spotlessly attired nurse bustled around, noiselessly performing their offices for the com- fort of the patient. The doc- tor looked at his watch. " It ' s about time he was coming to, " he re- marked in a whisper to the nurse. " Yes, there he is now " , returned the nurse. Pete moved restlessly, opened his eyes, and gazed around, and his eyes lighting on the doctor he en- quired: " Wats the matter? Oh, yes, I remember " , and he buried his face in the pillow. " Do you feel strong enough to see your brother, " enquired the doctor. " My brother " , almost shrieked Pete. " Yes, your brother Peter " , came a kindly voice full of gladness from the door, and in walked Jim Connors, the detective. " Jim, " whispered Pete in an awed tone, " you don ' t mean to tell me that you weren ' t killed " . The doctor and the nurse having discreetly left the room, the de- tective came forward and took his brother by the hand. " You mustn ' t talk now, Pete. I heard all about your going after those fellows -who thought that they had killed me " : I couldn ' t come on that stage, so I got my as- sistant to come ahead and get the lay of the land " . You have $10,CX)0 re- ward coming to you for capturing those two fiends, and you are coming back east with me, and begin all over again. " Tradition says that Peter went back. F. SCHILLING. PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA The object of The Redwood is to gather together what is best in the literary work of the students, to record University doings and to knit closely the hearts of the boys of the present and the past EDITORIAL STAFF EDITOR . _ . BUSINESS MANAGER ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER REVIEWS _ - _ ALUMNI - - - - UNIVERSITY NOTES - ATHLETICS ALUMNI CORRESPONDENTS STAFF ARTIST ASSOCIATE EDITORS THE EDITOR EXECUTIVE BOARD THE BUSINESS MANAGER ROY A. BRONSON, ' 12 ROBERT J. FLOOD, ' 13 HAROLD R. MCKINNON, ' 14 RODNEY A. YOELL, ' 14 WM. STEWART CANNON ' 16 EDWARD O ' CONNOR, ' 16 FRANK G. BOONE, ' 14 JCHAS. D. SOUTH, Litt. D., ' 01 (ALEX. T. LEONARD, A. B., ' 10 GEORGE B. LYLE, ' 13 THE EDITOR OF REVIEWS Address all communications to THE REDWOOD, University of Santa Clara, Santa Clara, California Terms of subscription, Si. 50 a year; single copies 2S cents EDITORIAL COMMENTS Modernism and Christianity The Harvard Monthly for April is given over to a review and crit- icism of Professor Santayana ' s Winds of Doctrine as a tribute to his genius. We have read much of Santayana, and liked him sometimes. He now and then, seemed to us to have found a way to bring the beauty of the true church home to outsiders ; exception, however, made where we were forced to disagree. But were we to pay a tribute to his genius we would have found another tribute. To tell your ge nius he is at one with all the ultras and the fanatics is perhaps a tribute of a sort. Our own daimon would not relish it. But would not, at least, the gentle art of tribute-giving have been better served had the tribute 328 THE REDWOOD. 329 been given by some one at least half conversant writh his subject and half capable of seeing another ' s point of vievir? We ask in all meekness. There is a piteous appeal to young men in the college to study Catholicism and " the source of the intuitive sense which every Catholic boy and girl has of being an indispensable part of the same great w hole, " and there is the ig- norant question as to whether Pius X can with any ultimate justice be con- sidered to represent the Catholic standpoint. There is an indictment of modernism as a gay evasiveness, a dissolute juggling with ideas and a total defiance of reason, an attempt at development in dogma independent of revealed truth, and then Prof. Santay- ana is blamed, at least constructively, for thinking that such people are act- ing a lie in remaining in the Catholic Church which we were told was cold truth and unchanging Rome. If the gentleman who is paying his share of homage to the Professor would only know that one may not be an infidel nor an apostate and still not be a Cath- olic he would not have had the hardi- hood to blame the Professor for refus- ing to count as Catholics all who be- lieve only that Our Lord Jesus Christ came down from heaven and estab- lished a Church and Sacraments. It may be inconvenient for the Professor to be so praised. Still the whole ex- planation of the incoherent incom- patible jumble of this article may be that " it is written in a university where there is not so much hostility to Catholicism as ignorance of its past and blindness to its beauty. " A few words after, we read " there is not one conscientious non-Catholic who knows it well. " That is very true, as might be shown by an example. Indolent Reviewers We are just laying down our pen in the sanctum. We are doing it with some ceremony as wisdom has flowed so often from it during the year that we had begun to revere it. Wisdom told and untold. The wis- dom untold, the soft communings, the whispered secrets, have almost charmed us more, for the songs un- sung are sweeter. We are unwise, we are even rash, but let us say one thing more. What a jolly lot of temporiz- ers the reviewers in College Magas are. There it is out. We have sat un- der the owl, we have a live owl to keep us company, and night after night as they come in have we wasted and watched and sighed and longed for the man to come, — the reviewer, the exchange editor, — who would set the pace of ruthlessness and go wan- dering on from victory to victory as with trenchancy and light, instead of the usual sweetness and glimmering he laid about him among the College Magazines. Such an amount of piffle, such a farrago of mediocrity, such a line of gusty grinding quills. Were they only windmills they would have had their Don Quixote before now, 330 THE REDWOOD. but being only College Magazines, like the poor relations, one does for- get them. O gentle reader, were we only younger, had we only been more to the matter and the manner born we should have essayed the role our- selves. But the candles of the night are out. Some other Helen or Paris must fire this Troy. Bear with us, for next month ' s numbers are still to come in and be waded through. We noticed last month a gentle Randolph- Maconian pleading skillfully, and with what amorousness and pain, for a paid critic, at least, who would do the work we should do for ourselves ! We think that is the most unkindest of all the cuts. Except perhaps the ridiculous aloofness of the few who do not review, that is the most unkindest cut of all. Many periodicals covered our Ex- change table for April, and from the length of their table of " Contents " we find abundant evidence of literary in- dustry in other colleges and univer- sities. We had considerable difficulty in deciding just where to begin our reading, but as a start had to be made somewhere we decided to commence with our old friend and contemporary, " The Carolinian. " The Carolinian This periodical used to be known for the ex- cellence of its verse, but in the March number we find that this department of literature is the book ' s weak member. Save for the poem, " Oh Mighty Wind, " which is in itself only passably fair, the verse in the magazine is poor, even at times inane and ridiculous. As regards essays the publication is not much better off, but an apprecia- tion of " Robert E. Lee, " is splendidly written and bears a welcome aspect of deep sincerity. There was one story in the book that we liked well, " The Broken Promise. " It is divided into several portions, (one can hardly term them chapters), and yet the unity of the piece is retained nicely throughout. The character of the doctor is well drawn, and on the whole this con- tribution plus the departments, saves the book from falling into sheer mediocrity. It is with no little Gonzaga pleasure that we pe- ruse the pages of the " Gonzaga " . Its poems sparkling with poetic effusion, its essays rich in thought and diction, make her the honored guest of our sanctum. The several poems on Easter are very good, especially the one entitled, " O Death, I Will Be Thy Death, " which contains pretty pictures, pretty thoughts, and neat and polished verses. The simple beauty of " To a Linnet, " and " Kind Words, " pleased us immensely, forced as we are some- times to wade through a pile of mud- dled " trash " . The paper on the single tax shows the writer has a real, philo- sophical bent of mind and a clear, 331 332 THE REDWOOD. nervous style. We did not like " Glagston ' s Revenge, " as it seemed to us the ending smacked too much of the dime novel. " The Dying Fireside " deserves more than passing mention for its pass- ages of fiery eloquence and for its beauty of diction. The other arti- cles of this number are good ; and on the whole we may say that we enjoyed immensely the Easter issue of the " Gonzaga. " Occident The only article that we really enjoyed in the whole of the April issue of the " Occident " was that en- titled " The Child Under the Candles. " This is a short essay, full of pen pic- tures and written in a clear, racy style. From the start it gives us a new view of De Quincey. He is no longer the morose opium-fiend that our imagination always painted for us, but one who with all his faults wins our sympathy if not our affection. We started the story " Speaking of Ber- nita, " but soon passed on. The verse on the whole affords pleasant reading; the " Judgment " , though, strikes us as the effort of a dilletante in the direc- tion of a weakly adulterated pagan- ism. The Easter number of The Ignatian The Ignatian from The University of Saint Ignatius, San Francisco, is well up to its standard. Still the number next before this was better for variety, of subjects and literary appeal. The Panama Canal offers little as a sub- ject for literary effort. " Explosives " is too much in the style of a merely class exercise. " A Welcome " in verse is somewhat prosaic. But " A Fun- damental Fallacy " is very good, and the verse at times is more than mere verse. There is a distinction about The Ignatian, a sort of dignity, that one sees too rarely in exchanges. The articles are never banal, the verse never poor. More of matter that has inspiration in it should set The Igna- tian high on the list of the best stu- dent monthlies. THE MIGHTY FRIEND. As an epic of business and social conditions, " The Mighty Friend " is a gripping tale of love and war, of plot and counterplot — a big story told in a big way. The author has very cleverly suc- ceeded in presenting a threatening condition of modern economics through the medium of a fascinating and splendid story, and while his tale is at no time given over to dry discus- sions of the problem presented, the very spirit and essence of the book is concerned with a phase of the conflict which is even now going on. " The Mighty Friend " is, of course, the Land, the country, the real back- bone and substance of the nation. When the Harmmsters, therefore, THE REDWOOD. 333 who are manufacturers from Paris, invade the Vale of Api with a com- mercialism whose immediate effects are baneful in the extreme, Jacques opposes the erection of their factories, as he is far-seeing enough to under- stand the inevitable result of such an invasion. The various characters are deftly handled, that of Alberta, the stormy Jewess, being especially well drawn, and the author is at his best in his de- scription of country life, the simple joys and sorrows of a people as yet untouched by the muddy contagion of the town. " The Mighty Friend " is a strong, purposeful drama, relieved by lighter touches of humor. The cover, which is in four colors, and the illustrations of which there are sixteen, add greatly to the value of the book. Price, net, $1.50. Postage, 15 cents extra. Benziger Brothers, New York, Cin- cinnati, Chicago. MANUAL OF SELF-KNOWL- EDGE AND CHRISTIAN PERFECTION. By Rev. John Henry, C. SS. R. This work analyzes the various character temperament and gives ad- vice and methods for each in achiev- ing spiritual perfection. An invalu- able manual for Religious as well as for parents and all entrusted with the care and education of the young. The chapter on mental prayer is one that struck us as being very practical. A mere outsider, such as the reviewer is, hears so many things of the ways of the mystics and sees such frequent references to the ways in which they entertain themselves with God that it is refreshing to find in such a short space a very exact account of what the first step to mysticism really is. Benziger Brothers, New York, Cin- cinnati, Chicago. Imtt rsitg N0to There was much dis- The Elite cussion in Hterary and Repertoire Co. philosophical ranks last month, over the latest travesty by The Elite Repertoire Co., " Julius Caesar " . It was staged on a far grander scale than has heretofore been customary. The peerless Rodney, as Caesar, and his trained cast of barn-stormers, showed rare talent in the last word on Shakespearean anomaly hits. It has generally been agreed that the company is a fun-loving crowd of modern Roman clowns with a one act fiasco full of impossible incongruities, and that herein lies the secret of their marked success in what appears to be a new form of dramatics with an ex- traordinary end, — the portrayal of hu- man nature as it should not be. The critics further agree that the ' Yoellian school ' has found the highest expres- sion of the new art in its " Julius Cae- sar " , — although its " Uncle Tom ' s Cab- in, " considered in this light also, was no less a success. The play was enthusiastically pre- sented to an appreciative audience, on April 4th, and though they did not en- tirely misunderstand the great pur- pose of the play, some have taken it quite seriously. At all events, the ' Yoellian interpretation ' of life as it should not be has started something, and we do not hesitate to give ' our Rodney ' his due praise for what we cannot help regarding as his boldest invention, — whether for good or for bad. He has succeed in puzzling many campus thespians and is gaining over serious-minded admirers, among whom number prominent literati and campus philosophers of note. A Notable Visitor His Lordship Rt. Rev. Edward J. Hanua, Auxiliary Bishop of San Francisco, paid Santa Clara a mem- orable visit on the 13th of April. We say memorable, since on that day his Lordship confirmed many. Those who were present within the Mission Church may not soon forget the words he uttered on that happy and impres- sive occasion among so many bright young souls newly dedicated to God. For they rang with the joy that must have been in his heart, and yet with the sadness of the thought that those souls, now so pure, so innocent before the sight of God, have yet to undergo the snares and trials that lie beyond the bliss of opening manhood. 334 THE REDWOOD. 335 „, , .• T w His Lordship was pre- St. Josephs Day , , , . , o . y , sent also at the shrine at Santa Clara . o. t i .u of St. Joseph, the pa- tron of the University, and felt hon- ored and privileged at being able to participate with the Faculty and stu- dents, in their yearly homage to the great Saint. His Lordship ' s address was brief and full of the life and en- ergy which we have learned to expect when he speaks and which we trust our western crispness and life in the open will not tarnish. President Tramutola of the student body made a brief address. H. Mc- Gowan read an ode specially written for the event. The college band ren- dered three very well chosen selec- tions. We trust that his Lordship re- tains the feeling that Santa Clara is ever anxious to welcome his presence among her sons. Ryland Debate One of the important events of the scholas- tic year at Santa Clara is the Ryland debate between The House of Philhistorians and the Phil- alethic Senate — two ' organizations es- tablished for the purpose of promoting and developing in every way possible skill in debate. They are the replica of our National Congress and i,con- ducted on the same bi-cameral basis. The debate for this year has been announced for May 6th. The ques- tion, though seemingly trite, is at present agitating many states and in particular our own. The Senators and Representatives are already deep- ly engrossed in statistics, congression- al records and other data bearing on the issue, preparing their argumental legions and phalanges of defense. As yet the teams have not been given out, but we promise a hot oratorical me- lee to those who are to be present next May 6th, in the Theatre. The ques- tion to be debated on that date reads: Resolved : that capital punishment is for the best interests of California. r, - 1 o most of the campus Keference j ,, , ., dwellers, the an- Library nouncement that the reference library in the Administra- tion building has been thrown open for the use of the students, comes as the fulfilment of an intellectual need that had been felt by them for a very long time. There is now no excuse for those idle groups of students with " nothing to do but to sit around " , as they can now turn those sedentary habits into profitable sedentary la- bours. The library is open every day from 3 :30 to 4:30 p. m., except on Sat- urdays and Sundays, and on Wednes- days from 9 o ' clock to 12 a. m. and from 1 :30 to 4 p. m. Senior Ball A few words of con- gratulation from this department of The Redwood to the Seniors on what is conceded to be the biggest thing of its kind ever attempted and successfully 336 THE REDWOOD. carried out by any class, though rather late, will, we trust, be accept- able to them as a small, but well-mer- ited tribute. Ever since the ball took place on March 26th, in the Colonial ball-room of the St. Francis, it has been a topic much talked of, not only in our local gatherings, but also otherwheres. When we consider that the number of prominent guests, patronesses, well-known Alumni and the members of ' 13 was 400, we begin to appreciate the mag- nitude of the event. We should like very much to give a complete list of all who were present, but space will not permit. However, it was a true revival of the true Santa Clara spirit, much talked about but rarely mani- festing itself in all its meaning as it did on March 26. The newspapers of San Francisco have given the affair no small attention, so that it is hardly necessary to describe it in detail here. We wish, though, to center the atten- tion of the Student Body upon the members of the class of ' 13, and to lay stress upon the fact that they have, with the exception of three new members, hung together since the rugged days of Freshman year, with remarkable compactness and as one true body; for to this fact, we attribute their continu- ous success in all they have under- taken. Senate Bill 392 The bill is old his- tory at the time of writing and the un- lucky class of ' 13 are not done yet with answering their congratulating friends. It was only meagre justice, however, this Senate Bill 392, which entitles all members graduating in The Institute of Law of this University to practice in Cali- fornia without the usual Supreme Court examination. Yet meagre jus- tice is so often a stranger and the bill for a while was so little heard of that we shall, if we may, congratulate un- lucky ' 13 again. Attention Alumni The call of Alma Mater should meet with a warm response on the part of the old boys during the forth- coming production of " The Mission Play of Santa Clara. " This produc- tion is to be made in the historic old Auditorium, on the campus, in the shadow of the old Mission cross itself, and four performances in all will be given, thus affording all an ample op- portunity of witnessing Santa Clara ' s grandest undertaking. The Mission Play bids fair to eclipse all previous efforts attempted by the Sen- ior Dramatic Club, and no one of the students can afford to miss it. The play itself is the work of one of the old boys, Martin V. Merle, A. M., ' 06, and three of the alumni appear in principal roles, namely Dion Holm, ' 12, August M. Aguirre, ' 07, and George Mayerle, Jr., Ex- ' 13. Already many applications for seats are reach- ing the management from the old boy ' s fellows who have not forgotten the sweet ago in Santa Clara, and the Mission Play is going to prove a medium for many happy and joyous reunions. ' 01 Dr. A. P. O ' Brien, A. M., ' 01, who is chief surgeon at Mary ' s Help Hospital, San Francisco, has recovered from a fear- ful accident which he sustained while motoring last summer. The Doctor has resumed his practice again. Will J. Maher, Ex, ' 05, who ' 05 was recently married, is now at the head of the firm of Maher Co., leading dry goods mer- chants of Grass Valley, Nevada Co., Cal. Hon. T. A. Norton, Ex. ' 05, ' 05 was elected Mayor of San Luis Obispo by a large ma- jority. Mr. Norton was city attorney long of San Luis Obispo for six years, and 337 338 THE REDWOOD. prominently known in the professional and political life of the town. Mr. Norton was an energetic member of the Senior Dramatic Club when at col- lege, and aided in the initial produc- tion of the famous Passion play of Santa Clara, " Nazareth. " ' 05 Lieut. Ralph C. Harrison, Ex. ' 05, is at the Presidio in San Francisco. ' 08 State cured, efforts Dr. O. D. Hamlin, M. S., ' 08, of Oakland, who is the President of the California Medic al Society, has se- mainly by his personal the Forty-third annual conven- tion of that society of which he is the head, for Oakland, his home city. Dr. Hanjlin is at the top of his profes=;ion in vDakland, and one of the most widely known physicians in the state. The Doctor and his wife will give a recep- tion at their home on Lennox Ave., to the ladies visiting the convention. Frank Palomeres, Ex. ' 90, ' 09 and L. C. Ross, Ex. ' 09, of Los Angeles have moved their Real Estate offices from the Trust and Savings Building to the Los Angeles Investment Build- ing. The change of offices speaks v eH for their prosperity, as tlie Los Angeles Invesment Building is the fin- est in that city and one of the best on the Pacific Coast. Mr. Palomares and Mr. Ross were most popular on the campiis and are now ranked among the most loyal of the old Santa Clar- ans of the South. ' 09 Leo J. Pope, Ex. ' 09, made a visit to the campus on the seventeenth of April, for the purpose of examining several trees which are falling to decay. Mr. Pope is field superintendent for The French Tree Surgery Co. of San Mateo, Cal. He will return to the campus in a week or so to " doctor our ailing trees. " ' inn THE Class of 1910 recently T-, , held their semi-annual ban- Banquet , , 1 . r „ quet and election oi otiicers at the Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, where, amid decorations of red and white carnations, entwined with ferns, symbolic of the class colors, twelve of the fifteen members participated in one of those dinners which have brought this hotel its world-wide rep- utation. Telgrams of regret were read from James K. Jarrett of Honolulu and Ralph Goetter — at present doing med- ical work at St. Louis University, aft- er which, in the words of the " Poet of Alaska " — Standing, we drank to the absent ones, And we pledged in bumpers of wine, THE REDWOOD. 339 The health of our friends so far away And the days of Auld Lang Syne. The speakers of the evening includ- ed President Raymond W. Kearney, who spoke on the " Class of 1910 " , George A. Morgan, the benedict of the class, responded amid great applause to the toast, " The Married Man " , while Edmond S. Lowe conversed in his usual eloquent style on " The Col- lege Made Man and the Drama. " " Our New University, " brought forth from Eugene Morris a burst of oratorical ability. P. Arthur McHenry, first president of the class, discussed " The College of the Past, " and W. B. E. Hirst, who journeyed from Los Ange- les, concluded the speaking and caused much mirth by reciting an original poem, entitled " The City of Angels. " In the line of business several im- portant matters were discussed, among which it was decided to con- tinue the monthly informal suppers, which have been held at the Univer- sity Club and proven such a success. The next formal meeting of the class was called for two nights before the annual University of Santa Clara- Nevada football contest and a com- mittee appointed to arrange for a ball at the Fairmont Hotel, the evening preceding this event. The election of officers resulted in Raymond W. Kearney being again chosen President, while Eugene Mor- ris fills the position of Vice-President. W. B. E. Hirst and A. T. Leonard, Jr., were unanimously chosen Treasurer and Secretary. Santa Clarans at Stanford Quite a number of for- mer Santa Clarans are registered at Stanford this semester, and as was to be expected, have been the recipients of unusual honors. Martin P. Detels, A. B., ' 12, has just been elected to Phi Alpha Delta, the premier honorary fraternity and the highest honor to which a law student may aspire. J. Devereaux Peters, M. A., ' 09, is also a member of this so- ciety, while Maurice T. Dooling, A. B., ' 09, and Charles W. Dooling, A. B., ' 10, have been honored with member- ship in the Phi Delta Phi honor soci- ety. Maurice Dooling has not only been distinguishing himself in the Law Department, but in general stu- dent body affairs as well, having been placed on the Advisory Board of the University Conference and chosen Editor in Chief of The Chaparral. The two die Lorimer brothers, Arthur J. and George S., were also registered in law at the beginning of the semester. Only one remains at present. Charles P. McLaughlin, Ex. ' 12, is also working for his Juris Doctor de- gree. In dramatics Santa Clara is ablv represented by Paine Bennett, Ex. ' 11, who has been taking the leading roles in the productions of " The Ram ' s Head " Society. Godfrey C. Buehrer, Mus. D., ' 07, is one of the most popu- lar members of the Faculty, being held in the same high regard by the Stu- dent Body here as in former days at Santa Clara. 340 THE REDWOOD. Daniel O ' Connell In a little hollow of the Marin hills near Greenbrae, in just such spot as a poet would hunt out, when the urge of inspiration sent him from mankind to the breast of Mother Earth, the Bohemian Club has erected a bronze tablet, designed by Charles RoUo Peters, to the memory of the late Daniel O ' Connell, the " Poet of Bohemia, " at one time a member of the Faculty of Santa Clara College. This tablet, the second memorial to this gifted poet, has simply these words: " In loving memory of Daniel O ' Connell, poet, philosopher, friend. " D. M. Delmas, A. M., ' 63, in refer- ence to the appropriateness of com- memorating the poet of the hills and among the trees, wrote: " He was a lover of nature, his genius expanded and poured forth its garnered treasures the closer it nestled upon the breast of the great parent of the universe. " Charles Rollo Peters, our Califor- nian artist, described the poet thus : " O ' Connell had a charming personal- ity. He was very magnetic, a great story teller and quick at repartee. But there was no evil in his mind, no malice in his wit. " Clay M. Greene, Hon. ' 01, declares that after his graduation from Trinity College, and while on the Santa Clara Faculty, " O ' Connell was the hand- somest man I knew — a perfect Irish gentleman. " W M W w ' With the baseball season drawing So far Santa Clara has very little in- to a close and the track men rounding formation concerning the strength of into condition for the final meet with their opponents, more than that their Nevada University, the athletic year rivals have high hopes of emerging from the game victors. However, we feel that Santa Clara will have col- lected her share of honors after the supremacy in the two remaining con- tests is decided and the curtain is BASEBALL. of 1912-1913 will soon be no more. Only two events remain on the sched- ule, — the track meet, as metioned above, and the baseball game to be played on May 5th. which will decide the championship with Nevada Uni- drawn to close the athletic year, versity. There is more or less interest being taken in the track meet, as both uni- versities man for man are very evenly matched. The meet will be held in Reno, and the reports from members of the Nevada institution say the meet is attracting much attention, especial ly, since Reno is the center of the ath- letic activities of the State. The baseball game is to be played on the Santa Clara diamond. The late date is due to the inclement weather of Nevada, which will not allow the team to get in a sufficient amount of practice. The baseball team, although prob- ably not of the same high order as teams representing the institution in the past, has met with fair success. The new material, of which this year ' s team is to a great extent composed, has done very good work. Whelan, Noonan, Bessolo, Milburn, and Vejar, all members of the team, donned a college uniform this year for the first time. They will all be on hand again next year, and with the start obtained in this season ' s games should play a 341 342 THE REDWOOD. greatly improved brand of ball. About the only missing members next year will be Zarick and Tramutolo, the loss of whom will be greatly regretted both by the team and the fans. Zarick and Tramutolo have played in a Santa Clara uniform for the last five years, and have gained a large number of friends and admirers among the many followers of the Santa Clara team through their fine work at second and short respectively. Both men have re- ceived some good offers, an d like many other Santa Clara player l ey have the opportunity and ability to rise to a high position in the baseball world. Nevertheless, Marco and Chauncey have decided to cast their lot with the more elevated legal pro- fession. The Nevad ' a game which still re- mains to be decided will in all prob- ability find the team lined up as fol- lows : Ramage c, Whelan 1st., Noo- nan 2nd., Zarick 3rd., Tramutolo s. s., Voight and Nino pitchers, and Mil- burn, Bessolo, Vejar, and Fitzpatrick fielders. TRACK. The track team leaves Friday the 25th. for Nevada to take part in the final meet of the year. The team is not altogether lacking in individual stars, but its true strength seems to come from the fact that it is evenly balanced. On April 5th. the first real meet of the year was had. The affair resulted in a v ictory for the Santa Clara men over the Olympic Club of San Fran- cisco, by the score of 77 to 54. Fairly good showings were made in all events, considering the fact that the Santa Clara track is a 220 yard oval, which necessarily hinders fast time. Kiely, the Santa Clara weight man, bettered the world ' s junior record with the 56 pound weight. The height was 14 feet 9 inches, two and one half inches better than the previous record of 14 feet 6 1 2 inches held by Cable of Harvard. In the mile run, Schino won from Burke and Donavan of the Olympics by a good margin in the time of 4 min- utes 52 1 5 seconds. Nelson of the Olympic Club led Best and Haskamp all the way in the hun- dred and covered the distance in a fast 10.1. He also won the 220 yd. dash in 24.4. In the half mile Schino was forced to take second place behind Hobey, Olympic, who finished in 2:12. The shot-put found Rose, the world ' s champion, heaving the ball 47 feet, 5 inches, which shows that the big fel- low still has championship material in his frame. The three places in the high hurdles went to Santa Clara men, Haskamp, Fitzpatrick, and Ramage finshing in the order named. The high jump went to Haskamp of Santa Clara with a jump of 5 feet 11-2 inches. " Blondie " has since done 6 ft. 1 and 1 1-2 inches. THE REDWOOD. 343 SANTA CLARA vs. STANFORD FRESHMEN. The Stanford Freshmen took a vic- tory from the Santa Clara team on the Stanford oval. The showing made by Santa Clara was not as good as was expected, but considering the fact that the Stanford team is composed to a great extent of Freshmen who are the equal of the members of the varsity, an allowance can rightfully be made. Kiely lived up to his record by win- ning the shot put with a heave of 41 feet 6 in. Hardy took first place in the broad Jump. Schino took second in the mile, which was won by Wilson, who has lately hung up a new Stan- ford-California record of 4 minutes 26 2 5 seconds. The pole vault was Santa Clara ' s weak point, all three places going to the Stanford men. Haskamp of S. C. and Needham of Stanford ran a dead heat in the 100 yard dash, covering the distance in 10:1. The relay also went to Santa Clara ; Best, Hardy, Haskamp, and Momson composed the team. The Freshmen have beaten Palo Alto High 3 — 0, the Ideals of San Jose in three games, Anderson ' s Academy 11—5, San Jose State Normal 12—5, being beaten only by the crack Sacra- mento High in a ten inning game by the close score 5 — 3. Leonard and Whelan have all that a pitcher needs and a superfluity besides. Ahearn has been catching excellently and batting in grand form. All in all this class team has the vigor and unity that makes for success. Why is there not more of the same fighting spirit in the upper class-men? The Juniors under Captain Aurre- coechea have been covering them- selves with glory. They have won and lost to Agnews, beaten Normal 4 — 2, the Evergreens of San Jose in a one sided game. With the completion of their schedule more victories may be looked for. Traynham and Ira O ' Neill seem to have Varsity material in their heaves and curves. The Tennis Tournament has been holding on its way with Winder Scott as guide. The Midget League champions are captained by Demetrio Diaz. They are looking forward with great anti- cipation to the banquet to which Mr. O ' Brien will invite them shortly. The new league is already formed and from the excitement seen daily on this end of the campus great things are going on. THE REDWOOD. Walk-Over, the Shoe THAT ALL MEN SHOULD WEAR ecause They fit better, they have more style, and they wear better than all other makes Try a pair— Critic model English Style QUINN BRODER WALK-OVER BOOT SHOP 41 SOUTH FIRST STREET SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA THE " L " SYSTEM CLOTHES CLOTHES FOR THE YOUNG GENTLEMAN Lend a " touch of class. " They are full of " pep " ' and " ginger. ' ' Clever designs and rare styles give these clothes the individu- ality which they enjoy. " L " System Clothes, designated particu- larly for the young gentleman, are tailored from the word " go. " The coat fits beauti- fully around the neck. The trousers fit at the waist and hang without a hitch. STYLE. WEAR AND PRICE ARE COMBINED IN THE " L " SYSTEM CLOTHES ROOS BROS. Market and Stockton Streets San Francisco, Cal. THE REDWOOD. z :: COOL THINGS FOR SUMMER: If you need a few extra pairs of outing trousers for tennis, golf, or any lively sports, we can supply you with the right things. Shirts for summer wear, also underwear that ' s cool, neckwear fresh and new every week from the eastern style centers, and all other good things you want. Ask the fellows where they get their " keen ideas about dress. " Home of HART, SCHAFFNER and MARX FINE CLOTHES Santa Clara and Market Sts. San Jose, Cal. pringH, 3lnr. Trade with Us for Good Service and Good Prices Special Prices Given in Quantity Purchases Try Us and Be Convinced VARGAS BROS. COMPANY Phone Santa Clara 120 SANTA CLARA U SEE THAT FIT 99 Let J. U. be your Tailor J. U. WINNINGER 11J4 S. First Street, San Jose THE REDWOOD. V. SALBERG 2 c per cue E. GADDI Umpire Pool Room Santa Clara, Cal. Oil Use Mission Olive Oil r::ir xr MADDEN ' S PHARMACY, Agents FRANKLIN STREET SANTA CLARA, CAL. Phone, Kearny 944 A. PALADINI WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FISH DEALER Fresh, Salt, Smoked, Pickled, and Dried Fish 540 CLAY STREET SAN FRANCISCO TRUNKS AND SUIT CASES FOR VACATION WALLETS, FOBS, TOILET SETS, ART LEATHER, UMBRELLAS, ETC., ETC. FRED M. STERN ' The Leather Man " 77 NORTH FIRST ST., SAN JOSE T hp ; nt r l r invites you to its rooms lllC oailLCl K lCXia to read, rest and enjoy a -x i-j |- T-i T- T T TQ cup of excellent coffee FFCC v dJO Qpen { g a 10.30 p Pratt-Low Preserving Company PACKERS OF CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FRUITS IN GLASS A SPECIALTY SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA THE REDWOOD. : LOW ROUND TRIP SUMMER EXCURSIONS Sold on certain days in May, June, July, August and September Limit 15 days going; Return limit three months from date of sale but not later than October 31, 1913 SOME OF THE RATES Salt Lake City $40 00 Montreal Omaha, Kansas City 60 00 Minneapolis, St. Denver. Colorado Springs 55 00 New Orleans Dallas, Fort Worth 62 00 New York Boston 110 00 Philadelphia Baltimore 107 50 Portland, Me. Chicago 72 50 Quebec Duluth 83 50 Toronto Memphis 70 00 Washington, D. Paul $108 50 75 70 70 00 108 50 108 50 113 50 116 50 95 70 107 50 Gettysburg, Pa., $103 80, sold June 25, 26. 27 Atlanta, Ga., $93 50, sold May 6, 7, 8, 9 Winona Lake, Ind., $73 10; sold May 22, 23, 24 Rochester. N. Y., $96 40, sold July 1, 2, 3 Cincinnati, 0., $84 50, sold July 22, 23, 24 Steamship Tickets Sold to All Points in the World A. A. HAPGOOD City Ticket Agt. SHILLINGSBURG Dist. Pass. Agt. 40 — EAST SANTA CLARA STREET— 40 Southern Pacific : THE REDWOOD. = : It ' s unnecessary to concentrate all one ' s attention on the matter of clothes, in order to be well dressed — yet the man who doesn ' t occasionally give some thought to the subject these days, is making a real mistake. By all means give serious and sufficient attention to the selection of a style, pattern and color best suited to your individual needs. You can safely leave the rest of it to us, most of the well-dressed men in town do. SCHLOSS-BALTIMORE CLOTHES are displayed by us in a wide variety of colors, patterns and models, and each garment has been so faultlessly drafted and tailored, that a wise se- lection can be quickly made, and we are glad to help you. THAD. W. HOBSON CO. 16 to 22 W. Santa Clara SAN JOSE, CAL. Dr. Wong Him Phones : West 6870 Home S 3458 Residence 1268 O ' Farrell Street Between Gough and Octavia San Francisco, Cal. THE REDWOOD. f ( QUALITY CANDIES AND ICE CREAM Spend your money with Clark and put it in circulation Phone, San Jose 3802 Angelas Hotel The Mission Bank G. T. NINNIS Proprietor European plan . Newly furnished rooms , with of Santa Clara hot and cold water; steam heat throughout. (COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS Suites with private bath. Open all night 67 NORTH FIRST STREET San Jose, California Solicits Your Patronage Telephones When in an Jose, Visit Office: Franklin 3501 Residence: Franklin 6029 CHARGINS ' Dr. Francis J. CoUigan DENTIST Restciurant, Grill and Oyster House Hours: 9 to 5 1615 Polk Street Evenings: 7 to 8 Cor. Sacramento 28-30 Fountain Street Sundays by appointment San Francisco Bet. First and Second San Jose Oberdeener ' s Pharmacy Sallows Rorke Prescription Druggists Ring us for a hurry-up Kodaks and Supplies Delivery :: :: :: Post Cards Phone S. C. 13R Franklin Street Santa Clara, Cal. ■ u THE REDWOOD. : ' STYLISH TAILORING FOR MEN WHO CARE A well dressed man attracts favor- able attention at all time s. You can be well dressed in one of my suits made to your measure from $25.00 and up. JOHN J. O ' CONNOR FASHIONABLE TAILOR ' Dress Swell, you may as well " 1043 Market Street Bet. 6th and 7th San Francisco California Telephone, Oakland 2777 ens MEN ' S TAILORING FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC WOOLENS 521 12th Street OAKLAND, CAL. STUDENTS The Redwood depends upon its advertisers for its existence. It is up to you to support tliose who support you . if THE REDWOOD. 4: And It Happened Thus — " To buy or not to buy? that is the question. " Said Gaffey in a fit of hesitation. And hied him from the treasurer ' s office room To where the CO-OP store in grandeur loomed. " Here are two nictcels-bright new Buffalo ones Good Heavens! could I change them into bones! Two nickels for an appetite like mine When I could eat a melon, — seeds and rind! " So stood he there before the CO-OP store Resolved to spend one nickel, nothing more. " Let ' s see those gum drops, naw! — let ' s see the top. Shall I buy toilet powder, soap or hop? How much for that new lid right over there? " " Two plunks. " Poor Gaffey tears his hair. " Do you keep candy! Foster and Orear ' s? " The question brings poor Gaffey into tears. " No! don ' t want it! — throw down the tube Just hand me out an Armour ' s Bullion cube. 1 think that I should keep my teeth more clean I ' ll take a sample of that Dental Cream. Well no — I ' ve changed — some old Prince Albert please, Or cancel that and give me Banquet cheese. And now I ' ll take my change, come hand it quick Don ' t think the CO-OP guys are awfully slick! " Poor Ernie blushed, then fainted, called for time " He ' s down and out! " the crowd around did chime. Then Joe appeared, sedate and full of cares His mind all taken up with vending wares. Facing about with accents swelling loud He burst him forth and thus addressed that crowd: — " O ye who gather round about this lad Arouse your interest and appear not sad. Why fainted yon fair headed lad so strange? Because a rough-neck asked for five cents ' change. Now who, I ask YOU keeps the teams in suits? The CO-OP store as well as he who roots. Who gives the cash for bats and catcher ' s mitt? The CO-OP ' guys ' — there lies one in a fit. Who paved the tennis courts by yonder hall? Who built tlie bleachers where they play in fall? Who backed the track team to Nevada, where The sage-brush were hoisted by the hair? Who did these things? Who did a full score more? Believe me lads, it was the CO-OP store. Reprove me not, nor shed the briny tear, Don ' t go be cheated elsewhere, — COME IN HERE! " : THE REDWOOD. - - Evening and Fancy Dresses Made to Order Wigs, Play Books, Make-up, Etc- ESTABLISHED 1870 GOLDSTEIN CO. Theatrical and Masquerade Costumers 883 Market Street, Lincoln Building, Phone, Douglas 4851 Opposite Powell Street S° traaTa " M " sion " piay SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. Every known variety At Lowest Selling Prices ity Drug Co. Cor. Santa Clara Second St. SAN JOSE, CAL. PATR0N1ZE= University Barbers Main Street Opposite Postoffice Santa Clara - - Good Clothes are half the battle The well dressed man has a tremendous advantage over the other fellow, that ' s one reason why you should be particular who does your tailoring Let us make your full dress suit Our twenty-five years ' experience in the tailoring business enables us to give you the best there is YOUR COLLEGE TAILOR 67-69 South Second Street San Jose, California THE REDWOOD. : Geo. G. Fraser PORTRAIT STUDIO SUCCESSOR TO TABER-STANFORD VAUGHAN KEITH VAUGHAN FRASER Studios Old Pictures Copied and Enlargements a Specialty Telephone Sutter 2180 1 1 6 Geary Street San Francisco, Cal. " " -iiiiiiai OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE MISSION PLAY OF SANTA CLARA -. ii THE REDWOOD. : ANNOUNCEMENT THE SENIOR DRAMATIC CLUB OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA THE PRODUCTION OF " THE MISSION PLAY y OF SANTA CLARA BY MARTIN V. MERLE, A. M. ' 06 IN THE University Theatre, Santa Clara ON THE FOLLOWING DATES : Wednesday Eve., May 14, Thursday Eve., Alay 15, Saturday Evening, May 17, AND - = Sunday Afternoon, May 18, 1913 FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE BUILDING FUND OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA Reserved Seats $1.50, $1.00, 75 and 50 Cents Special Railroad Excursions at Greatly Reduced Rates See Local Agents For further particulars address CHAUNCEY F. TRAMUTOLA, Business Manager Senior Dramatic Club : i


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University of Santa Clara - Redwood Yearbook (Santa Clara, CA) online yearbook collection, 1909 Edition, Page 1

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