University of San Francisco - USF Don Yearbook (San Francisco, CA)

 - Class of 1972

Page 1 of 338

 

University of San Francisco - USF Don Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1972 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 338 of the 1972 volume:

We had to decide what a yearbook is before we could make one. That meant we had to figure out what a university is. Which lead us to discover what went into education, and what came out. We ended up with three elements: innovation, insight, and involvement. Together they form what can be considered meaningful learning. Innovation is the password to the future of education. Newness, experimentation, change. We have sought not to praise the achievements of the past, and prepare USF for a happy burial, hut to describe the steps being taken to greet the future, to save higher education. We have tried to find what makes a university worth maintaining, what makes the struggle worth continuing. Come along. You be the judge. innovation dedication physics mathematics chemistry computer science biology communication arts language english philosophy theology educational alternatives prison reform study group myth, ritual, and reality new programs alan heinemanThe men on ihe right need littlr introduction to most Americans. In amazing time , they are men who are an inspiration to many, a nemesis to some. Why they deserve such an integral place in the dedication to the 1972 Don, along with six professors and a dean, is perhaps not clear to you. We see the effort to support life and the effort to end destruction as one and the same. A university exists to find the truth and spread it. The other men we have dedicated this book to have achieved this, in their roles as those who further education. But the education required for 1972 cannot be for college students only. And that is exactly where these three men have been of service—they have added to the education of an entire nation. Frs. Daniel and Phillip Berrigan. through their lives of writing, nonviolent direct action, and imprisonment, have told the American people what is happening to our society. Their efforts to affirm life in the face of history's most powerful agent of death is an affirmation of our basic rights, supported by natural law, civil constitutions, and the USF Credo—man’s right to self-determination, and the forming of a world built upon peace and justice. Daniel Ellsbcrg has been living testimony to the hardship one encounters trying to spread the truth. His exposition of the Pentagon Papers was the act of a man who finally came to terms with the lies America was spreading. And so he risks imprisonment for delivering the truth to the American people. The persons at USF to whom we dedicate this book are trying, albeit in different Styles and different fields, to deliver this same truth. They are planting and tending the life forces, the hope of the future, the replacement for the present forces of death. They are examples of the new men of the new society, about which Dan Berrigan wrote: "The consciousness of the radical man is integrated ... what he is finally looking for is not a solution. He is really looking for a creation: a new man in a new society." So, you see. they attempt the same tasks. It is inevitably the most noble task of education—right the wrongs. We acknowledge the efforts of all these persons to spread tlie truth, an effort we all must participate in. The times are bad. Redeem the times.4 1 3 1 :3 3 3 m 3 X, ear-20-0.00. -(rke ropee . ;anYl W Y Y W AN(oyd uckmann ralph miller ;anpat smith james haag ;an john collinsralph lane mike howe tom o'suilivan——3 m a a a si a §i 3 •3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 s 51 .AiXlkto:. S5SSSi)Sni$6-S ( R9P88S(C 5 CSS SE " -5S( J ■C . 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(VVVW 0)Z VVVV )" VVVVV (VVVV VV). v IV . (VG V G . • V GO . -•V GVG V .G. . VVVJGGV G .... .V -GVG G G Mm G v.. VVV 'Jg Mounv)IYC7Y It 9 9 9 m 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 i'1 ' 5 ’ x ft ' «, ' A « F ■It f.55 ‘J; ) ',8“ S6 55 8 8855 6 8886 55- -P (• ( V. Ji . » X « A £iU- SSS 5S) V ,XX rS- 8«o XX 8 ---XX 8 Vrfjf O I 9888 ( ( •»»u»t MHSX N X •—— x » , '5! ,5; XX X s@ iv » i? X 0 ■. VJ V »v K ( N ItXXX XXX xxxx xxxlx.i Xfc80C xxx xxxx XX . X 1-jxv ii- « X ...... XX vxxx ;xx vxxp r JXX VXXO S IrVVVVS ••A •nHKhfX ■■•A f.XXP 7 »X 1 8 XVXX U I—.) • '.XX A J «yv--.) XXA XXV ■-■ •• xx • ■•sxxxx ■V X6J ) NXXXX VV V V88 ( ------ •SXXXX ) yxyyxccf......... ms XXXO -■sxxx — NXX -■NXX What»» impressive about thr physics department is the high degree of student involvement in flic discoveries and research that are present. Dr. Eugene Benton and a small research group have developed high-energy-charged particle detectors that are sewn into the spacesuits of Apollo astronauts. After each apollo mission, these samples are flown back to USE. Besides this, they are also making inroads towards developing a material that can determine the effect of radon on uranium miners (coping with lung cancer) and developing the usage of radiation « an alternative to cobalt treatment of cancer. A course in Physics of the Atmosphere was recently offered, and students decided to built a dust inpactrr to measure, air pollution. Above and beyond classroom teaching, and a plentitudr of interesting research, the department ha arranged fur the National Science Foundation to sponsor undergraduate research participation at the physics department. Through this, they are able to employ professors and students to spend the summer in significant research projects they would not otherwise undertake. nvut01 p' $i:£Ilsfi nr.... sss$Sssssi»sb-» iiS ’t-Z i m J»S B8 7SSKI C = SJG0sS 08 I (R3P88S(CSSs (5$ t£ ’== -ssc »C ) S $( 6 J SSGSSJ • XX . ■ . 6 6 (' XX •“x xx ? ■ x XVI 5Xv I 'JF ■ x ■»888«( •»MX XX JaX JJ(»- XX 'nnN M?J xi ------- [ tiif, (66 •• 55i5 { 88 »885 se 8886 55- -P V v V XXXX XXXX XXXX XXX XXXX XXXAX WflW-6 6 P-« PX« 86 • '7r. IPVVVV8 c INMi(lX ••A •■•A ) NXXP 1 8 )— • . f.XXA I XX XX A • (XXX • sxxxx ‘.XXXX » XXXX) XX VXVVX XX VXXX xx vxxn NXXXO -••(XXX - 0 X i Philip Appleboum Karl Waidor Raymond Gnnoiio CAUTIO —UAU . J ------- •— oo»»» • v? 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U' VU Hi IIJ VU LU liu UJ UU UU IIV IU lii lii u .11 11 u H = S--S , CS 5 SSS$o- SS4 -.-24S " J»SSB8 ▼asm c «»isoois oS I (RSP80J C$S E "»■ t f‘} •( la » ( ( - (S S -SJt 1 • — ■c» «t . 6 h' A “x X1 x 5 5XV I f NN kN -----1( NiS (66 • • 55 5 ( 88 8856 'W f 69 (• ( » , JT I I SSSSSS) ) ) «»{§8U »XX ---XX Z z i 8 8 9b - 988B»( "MMUX .9 t 5 X « X » iv1 ftV xoBoc k N x{x xxxx c 0 xxxx XXX xxxx xxxxx ) XXXMP 9 Mathematic is one of ihc hardest subjects in which to measure innovation. The main innovative element is the faculty, with their attempts to combine a high quality of undergraduate teaching with a variety of research aspects. Aside from the school of nursing, this is the only department chaired by a woman. Millianne Granberg. This in itself shows a break with the past of male domination of higher education. The math department, being "traditional" and “graduate-school oriented.” applies innovation in ways like these: using a textbook authored by two of the department members, inviting student input into the subject through individual suggestion, and the involvement of their two academic council representatives in department matters.Fr. John Fischer Fr David Walsh George Sullivant! A! A A il A iXV ) x ,» SS$S5SSJ‘1ISB-J 4ii “.-ZSS " J SS93 Tssc(t C =,SJG0SJ G3 ( (H»P8aS(CSS = i| ‘0E ' 7b •C ) SSJS451 8»t IX) ■5888b I 2 ct( ■HMHX N i X. . , l a BB BpB ‘ , AST .%• XXX XXX xxxx XXXXX ) XXMP 9 Grant Frasor Millianne Granberg Edward Farrell Robert Wolf not pictured Allan Cruse Daniel Gallin Christine Dillon Michael Killen Michael McMurray Josito Dumo In Wha Lee Nadenc Ong Maria Fredinni Kathy Perez OUT ION CAUTION Ui — oo olulU U x so I —UAUX. •— -u- U.NN-- - - s • • oo»»» , o NO«S«,W» «o "“ »x— s •»- I » • •O » 5 3 i — ao !',?§3 o S v oo • a ® • • • 030 I • — — • I • I « I «A« 5 • v n. ______________________ n ON vviA b'iWis • « •».» « M M - v iAlAV« tAH -X » ) » x NXXN v « « • U« ass« I VWN UJ w I I U««A • • A • » sw u« ) av»s —a % v •or- N-ftiOiAS » • s rzxv . 5 fr OXS» • OKKKXS- • OXX 2j:?X «»»- ' .ix) ooxzxszx • «r .. a !•••'. ioo zzzz • • OCJ" XX .I XXKOOOOQ _ IOZZXZX • - XO XXXXXXXXXXXDOOOOIUOO— I • Z ZXXX XX 00® -» -xXXX XII XXXXXXXXXXXXXXZ.' 71' ?ZXXXX-.- ®««®« v- • —» «•• Tx z xxxxxxxxxxxzxjrjzzz ixxx- . 3SsaBs ............... r"" .w s x3«a x. 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J X$ ’" x £x xx si, wv.) 3. 3 3 3 3 -3 3 -3 3 3 35 8 Robrrt Seiwald. chairman of the department, explains well the situation of chemistry: “There is no denying that chemistry is relevant and interesting as we see it applied in our world today. The real challenge to the faculty is to make the process of acquiring the background necessary for its understanding and application interesting and to provide the motivation for the school to explore this sometimes very difficult science.” The chemistry department is most gifted in an important way: a grasp of areas a budding chemist could work with is offered in the Institute of Chemical Biology, ever active in cancer prevention, detection, and cure. The existence of such an institute, greatly responsible for the financing of Harncv Science Center, provides facilities for research in environment and cancer that is equal to Stanford and Cal Tech. With the guidance of Dr. Arthur Furst, Dr. G.F.. McCasland, Dr. Robert de Ropp, Dr. William Ho, George Ledin. and Fr. Andrew Dachauer, the department, aided by ICB. provides an ideal atmosphere for undergraduate study and scientific experience in topics like: study of the effect of tobacco on the body's processes, effects of artificial atmosphere, techniques of blood and organ preservation, brain bio-chemistry, as well as the above mentioned cancer research, And, to translate for those who do not understand chemistrv-ese, Drs. Seiwald, Jones, and Gruhn have put together a lab course designed exclusively for non-science majors.Fr Andrew Dachauer William Mdronoy '•7“| Sisgu- M$$SSSS5SSSB“S ' ' iBS ...... ...iii- t R»P88S(CSM ' JE '4St C =»i»6GiS 63 ----88SICSM — - -:t =CM , '‘llPsK-1' S5S SS) t Si SE -J.it Arthur Furst G.E McCasland Robert Soiwaid not pictured Thomas Gruhn Theodoro Jones OTUIGary C mozz TVrcsa Monger Joseph A. Alioto Robert V. Giusti Frederick Nchl Christopher Brown Barbara Kavanaugh Tayseer Nimry William MeShane Clifford Wong £ E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E '5 m 3 s s a 3 a $ 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 a .=5—S . CS S S»S0b- ‘S S$ $S!SS M1, f5$iS4S$«SSS8-S SSS »-ZiS " J.SS09 7JS C =»»JGGi» S9 ft»P88$ CSS« —C 5S SE ”= =C») -5i . lL V l x : xx -• 5 6 XX ) 'm -C5J§0 •xx . Y«- I ,« NN 59 N 5 NN 55 ----( r N55 66 ■• 55|5’ 88 8855 := 8886 55- -P •X xx Sl 5XV ) aw j 988$« •MMNXC N "J' 9 . X 51 X IX) xx x » ,JJ - XX 5! • 7 ?V. C 0 ) 1 9 ZV V V KN N A ZL • .AA-Xl .AJ X »A X IPVVVV8 "NNNf.PX iNxxe 1 8 I—. J z xx nwvv—.» -zz x i xxv U X l-lxv ZZ. -V AXfcf I VV V V88 ZX VXVVXCC6 XX VXXX A I XX VXXO 1XX VXXO X XVV 0 XXXVXVVD (XXXXXX o xxxx o XXD XXD -8888865 — " — B838.98F -.666.6-’! N »— ,£§80C XXX XXX xxxx XXXXX I XXXMP 9 XXP" -•• P"- PX 80 ■•A ■ ■•A 7)Jv8x • NXXA • NXXA • NXX »•NXXXX XXXX» •NXXXX) •NXXXO -■•.xxxp — nxxOl -■NXXOD V'NXXOD V»NXXD : xxo N«XXXP NNNND NNnSD ••NNO VHN _ . NN 666-V-N N - (I 8FFJ- 686.N -NNDOO 9886 S88FF 9XXXXXX"N0O2 98 8. 9. - ..XXXNNNNXO 98 -86 F Zi% (XXXXNNXX 8 66.) F XXXXNNXXO . _____________ . XXNNN :XX 8« - £ . IXXf.'NNX NNVX ( NN X Ue 388888888868-66 8 .e6 «8.8g8«8g8|6|)6-6fi ...______ X 8do88 X 88 86 ) . 8) 88 7G I 00« 88 88 8889 III 8 «! . vU (- 7 VV)»-V-V " 7 V 66WVV 1 VFI V ------- v . V. It) V EV ,-7’" oJf . -ioovz. o - ivvvztoo VVVV "“ (. (VVVVVI (0)Z VVVV I")VVVVV) ww vv . VC, I vG VG VV |GC,VrVVvVVSGG Etu vu m w if a if w u in vii ibj i iii a a Computer science is the most adolescent of the sciences. Roughly twenty-five years old. the subject allows the computer scientist to have the same influence on the theoretical underpinnings as Plato or Aristotle had on modern philosophy. The computer science department at USF, in its five years of existence, is not only the fastest growing department on campus, but the first in the country to offer a Bachelor of Science in computer science. (1969) Almost half of all USF students take CS 50a, the introductory course. The decisions of the department are made by consensus and equality of vote for all of the near 100 majors and 10 faculty members. Half of the teaching load is carried by student teaching assistants, including all the laboratories. The discipline is interdisciplinary in all respects. Psychology, sociology, mathematics, physics, biology, engineering, linguistics, all make great use of the facilities, and there arc even an art and music unique to computers. The faculty are the most diverse in the school: Rich Peddicord also leads a rock band. John Hoff directs a barbershop quartet, and Szilard Szabo teaches English (psycholinguistics) and ethnic dancing. Dr. Jim Haag, chairman, sees computer science deeply involved with the implications of technology, and the quality of life in a machine age. He fears the tendency for the machine to dominate its creator, as we see and read in science fiction and the daily newspaper. His hope, a definite undercurrent in this intriguing department, is "the extension of the capability of individuals to control their own lives and live as truly free human beings." Hi U. Ili Hi Hi Hi Hi Hi Hi Hi If Hj Ub L l L (A « 14, | V I I -X A 'S. K »JD«»N.VI ----------------- « AV»v»n — - V • • u»an i «• ( n i • ♦ i • IAS • CA V» sr»«w v» • r i K s • At HACA • •• » BO VIAIA t ITVV I • MA I I »NO I N«A I — • • c a v» % I f.MX-W -V’ Ilf Vi: yi All Richard Peddicord Szilard Szabo Jamas Haag not pictured George Ledin Ytha Yu muil Anthony Brown Arthur Chcau Cecilia Hung Charles Jackson Michael Leonardich William Magidson e Quock John Roster Betty Yucha m a a a a a a a a a a 5 = a a m u a a a a a a a mi. ml ft ft ft ft si (SS 5E -Ss "-C?7 -J 1 • Is • 1 • 0 1 8«6 L XX 8 •SS«S Ss£»«8., }S$$5SJ$‘S$5B-5 tSt ".-Zst " 7SSCK C = »S5G0S Gfl ( IHRP88S(CSJ= —( £ »=s =C» = I . S SC 6 » . ( “tiffl)-’ 3 SSSdSS) ’cstU: CO - ) 7 p l f •:C3, «5 IV . vvv C- LXV PXXX, i 86 xoxoy 66 "- a----------------- - (666-.- - "-8888866 Ff- ..... I--- V' 5!fiS - 6998886839V 68V "V . (V. (VVV 6VV v, 8 ‘3XX_ H»XXXP CNNNNO CNX.iNO • NND VMN IWM ___ 666—V—NNf.f — B888.98F -. 666 » 6-‘J f«N»— fiFFF (686.‘3 -NNODD 96H6 68PFF (9XXXXXX";.C'J2 9P 8. 9, - ..XXXNf(f iXD 98 -86 F 2 .CXXXXN XXD f 66.) F (XXf.NV'.XXy 6tS - E ..JXXfIHFX .88-6EEEE . NNFXI «89 £t . N .. B8o8? X. XC ,e. 89n83 X . v 83 86 . 8) 88 70 OCI33 38 88 (. { 88 88 3 . 89886R6( 8889 9 ( «! . “CC0V2. 0 - 3VVVZCOO 8 I? 98 V 8 £ £ -I -Sc 6 -6 { §8 e° . 8 8 3 888 '8 ' 3 • -388- - 388888886888-66 "0 88888888 f" 3-3VVVVV) CVVVV VV). CV IV . CVO V 0 k • 1 vvviwf S '2 v VG 8 - ( 7 ( 6-688817 . 1 37 V ) VV « w • { n »•- A !:•« 7 VV)"-V-VI V fSfiWVV - VV6VG I a!s5s i» $6 vvvj5 vfvvvvv5GoS | t ®‘» v»» IHI t»! til t! ,= . 1 In the past few years, the biology department has begun a new stage of growth. Increased enrollment, along with a demand f or greater variety of courses created new positions for additional faculty, giving the department opportunity to expand its areas of study, inevitably, an ecological approach was taken as the major emphasis, but not to the point of neglecting such things as pre-professional training. Ecology stresses interrelationship, structure and function, utilization of energy and synthesizing many facts and figures into a framework that may be studied carefully. The same approach can be applied to an orientation toward molecular biology or natural history. In the picture above, Dr. David Mullen arid a student enjoy a “ecology lunch" of kelp. The third floor of Harney Science Center is always in a flurry of activity. A strong point of the department is the close association between faculty and students. Relating with other areas within the university has also been a major focus, as the times dictate our need to be concerned with our physical environment. A course for fall 1972, for example, is offered in both theology and biology, discussing the biological and theological aspeers of today's environmental situation. During intersession, professor Peter-Flcssel conducted a course called "Social Implications of Modern Biology." Discussions entailed such topics as: brave world modern man vs. savage man, the definition of death, advances in reproductive biology, and the validity of heart transplants. UUUUUUUUUU i' u NOunvjFrancis Filice Lucy Trcagan Edward Kessel not pictured Peter Flessel David Mullen Joanne Baldocchi Lorenzo Casalcgno Richard Der Norris Evans Eileen Byrne Alex Castellanos Philip Derde van is Rick Fanciullo James Campisano Marina Chiapj cllone Thomas Ellcrhorst Robert Giuliani t h u K: fe £ £ fe: fc Is t? F K K £■2$ s S3 -SI 3 SI 3 3 3 3 3 ■5 -3 3 :3 3 ‘3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 i Eric Glassy Jack Hided John Lusardi Donna Ncujjebaucr Nounvs 3 Jeanette Piombo Ronald Reardon Ann Marie Silvestri John Wondollcck Gary Polizziani Kathy Re Stephanie Reed Anthony Rizzo Bart Sullivan JolinTarpey Dominic Wont; Louisa Yu JuneZoIczzi. ,i, • • -;veBivs'H ' i »J •» »' 'l r i ry ■». r| tm tji tm i i« .« 'll r» i; ’ 8i V "• r ill '5i “• iV -■» v r r n n ni Literature|L9 ijp«yi Gt »_____ Hi S .'l£, sts§ i t- «'x _ - n O 8 3' r- c 3 s? S? PT O 3" n o c r m tj 5, o- r-f —• 3 r Li 3 O O .3% J 3? 3 Q ♦ • r 8 c Li r— 3 ♦ « f € BS «I C S3.T3»r5 •0-0 Q s =j -rj O g' » P =? =; % a. ® sr l» 3 3 n» CL u - 3 ; ci n 3 - « 3 ♦ 3 — 'O ST" 5 o s' sal 'i 3 “ O ♦ Li 3 U 2T3 r, r OfcR§g'Ss„ s -'2 £k 5 “ £ 5 3B.g S' 5 I a S ov H £ n' tfggff | 3 3 jj g f S- 3 2 §,§•■§ ? 5 36 0 0 ♦ 3 W 3 Jr O 5 r4 ! Cl ° 8 5 3P St t a “O t Li p.'f 3 3 Li 5 nnimnnivii rnm ?r »vf-i -Tin-xiTywrttmtiv-Twy VUUIIIV "too young.”) have paved the way for the growth of creative writing. There is talk of a tutorial program for freshmen. Efforts have been great in English to break down the traditional classroom setting, and the traditional teacher-student relationship, and replace it with a fresher, more effective mode of learning. Alan Heineman's use of student journals, and the importance of student input, feeling, and design is an example. Szilard Szabo’s Psycholinguistics (or Aspects of Language) investigates the psychological, anthropological, and sociological aspects of language, examining the uniqueness of language to men.d| What can you say about Communication Arts except to list the innovations and let the d| roador marvel at them? The wide rango of topics include not only speech and theatre arts, but studies in general communication, mass media, performing and visual arts 9 — New courses for 1971 were these: Crisis ® and Confrontation in the 60's and 70’s. Exploration in tho Arts. Theory of Film. 9 Demagoguery. Communication in the Community. Explorations in Encounter 9 Process, and Political Campaigns 1972 icom arts 9 There is extensive team teaching in Com mumcation Arts, and also interdisciplinary work with physical education, fine arts. English, instructional media, and psychology. It has engendered links with the San Francisco community by bringing in community artists, and through sponsoring performances at local elementary, junior high, and high schools. 9 9 9 The communication workshop Myth. Ritual, and Reality, which oxplpred myth, ritual, literature, film, theatre and games in the areas of English, psychology, theology, and communication was also offered through Communication Arts And. tho experience of experiences, learning the background, and producing a performance such as Fiddler On the Roof, was readily available as a creative project. illisnumu vt cisrpancjnuc allcluiJA ccf. n'oncvmrj cotucoccdc. nicnb’mrrti :nmi. -£:cfa. octauiOtcic mdct£dio. in me manctcr rlma.iCdplc. Dncoiuimta in oc rcplcrt. sctfigumip urat £tuirc. ihi trimtms nine in no ini? :o:diafperaui: [ramrco:mcum iltiran mo:an quiboiu lurttubi. erts me m fine iijatne. Ofo cratinti fo:ri o.ppiausm « noitris. ct 1... i. Mill |jj V.II- 11 lA’V Cifi not Dilcrcn onmpcp:io:0i rfiliufiuippia.1 fit». fCbjninmi: io$:crnc octic rc. cuncniOYi ligam' uuiiccrcr' vcrcbaruaticuu - t. llIXXCOdlO in coiiuiicnVcr iioniaocipuftio mot? viduu'crcc iftiipr unfit ftlui Udl. JlllftitUOIl oni.iicfiit'CitfiliJ ncr.ctipc uicro. tiling ctcrcdim jbercv'itiiiohti il rciiiuiicTin Piiuiicr.cfDc'ui ifcctacbatrocci iciibabcjimuMii CUflllCCll-CillOo indO Tiino: no . fed pfut.i cb.iri :nmo:c.iiuoni.i .u'f-.Oin Jiircin n rrn. inrh lnrir.-Bdlc Bk om Richard Davis John Collins"too young.”) have paved the way for the growth of creative writing. There is talk of a tutorial program for freshmen. Efforts have been great in English to break down the traditional classroom setting, and the traditional teacher-student relationship, and replace it with a fresher, more effective mode of learning. Alan Hcincman’s use of student journals, and the importance of student input, feeling, and design is an example. Szilard Szabo’s Psycholinguistics (or Aspects of Language) investigates the psychological, anthropological, and sociological aspects of language, examining the uniqueness of language to men. Peter T wede Judy Menzics Domingo Magwili Patricia Logan Cathleen Ingraham Thomas Blankin wup % x. •- I r G o 5 SS § g a'N 5-9 r?0 pi’SHiafiairgSSSfrSi O _-f? uj t?.' Z. r» t- tA i? o c ST n • O i-r termination notices. lor lo. the department has become “too young.”) have paved the way for the growth of creative writing. There is talk of a tutorial program for freshmen. Efforts have been great in English to break down the traditional classroom setting, and the traditional teacher-student relationship, and replace it with a fresher, more effective mode of learning. Alan Heincman’s use of student journals, and the importance of student input, feeling, and design is an example. Szilard Szabo’s Psycholinguistics (or Aspects of Language) investigates the psychological, anthropological, and sociological aspects of language, examining the uniqueness of language to men.1 JJUUl IJJIII i'llj.' riwonlrxoim] j w u; w iij i;; y - g y Under the supervision of Dr. Szilard Srabo, the director of the Laboratory, a program entitled "The Language Exchange Program” lias been instituted at USE. A student volunteers his or her services in his or her native languagr, and in return receives free instruction in the foreign language of the person being tutored. For example, a Latin Amrriran student can teach Spanish to an American student in exchange for coaching in English. The advantages of this one-to-one educational experience are multiple. Thr language department also facilitated the offering of a Mandarin course, in thr year that China was finally admitted into thr United Nations. The course, taught by a Stanford graduate student, hopefully sparked enough interest to create a demand for further courses in the language spoken by more people than any other language. termination notices, for lo. the department has become "too young.’’) have paved the way for the growth of creative writing. There is talk of a tutorial program for freshmen. Efforts have been great in English to break down the traditional classroom setting, and the traditional teacher-student relationship, and replace it with a fresher, more effective mode of learning. Alan Heineman's use of student journals, and the importance of student input, feeling, and design is an example. Szilard Szabo’s Psycholinguistics (or Aspects of Language) investigates the psychological, anthropological, and sociological aspects of language, examining the uniqueness of language to men. . o o ■ w« •• ■ Mafia Marchosi Edward Muonk Fr P Carlo Rossj John Aguiarlaihabcjnuu'in icunllccitai'iios iiudo.2riino:iio . led pr'ca.i ch.irt rniiio.’c.iiuom.i Lht Ouuurciii n termination notices, for lo, tlwr department has become "too young.") have paved the way for the growth of creative writing. There is tallc of a tutorial program for freshmen. Efforts have been great in English to break down the traditional classroom setting, and the traditional teacher-student relationship, and replace it with a fresher, more effective mode of learning. Alan Heineman's use of student journals, and the importance of student input, feeling, and design is an example. Szilard Szabo’s Psycholinguistics (or Aspects of Language) investigates the psychological, anthropological, and sociological aspects of language, examining the uniqueness of language to men.Karl Schmidt Joaquin Valdoi Nancy Vo oloy Fr Arthur Swain not pictured William Clubb Fr Robert Hursttermination notices, for lo, the department has become "too young.”) have paved the way for the growth of creative writing. There is talk of a tutorial program for freshmen. Efforts have been great in English to break down the traditional classroom setting, and the traditional teacher-student relationship, and replace it with a fresher, more effective mode of learning. Alan Heineman's use of student journals, and the importance of student input, feeling, and design is an example. Szilard Szabo's Psycholinguistics (or Aspects of Language) investigates the psychological, anthropological, and sociological aspects of language, examining the uniqueness of language to men. Carla Lovi Linda Milne Paulette Pirio Kathleen Martin Maryannr Morris Gail Umphress Kathleen Meyer Joan O'Neill Virginia WongLi iU ;j ;j c l:; rj a u 3 u lit ty w a « uj ;i a a a a a a u a t jj in 'l l m i i Thrrc must be some truth to the theory that diversity breeds innovation. In a department where students and teachers are coming from so many angles, and into so many things, the developments in the interest of education have thrived. Merely the course listings reveal many corners and branches of study of English that are surviving—Creative Writing. Introduction to Journalism, Contemporary Black Literature, Design of Language, Modern American Poets. Introduction to Chinese Literature, the Jewish Novel, American Criticism, Psycholinguistics, and Elements of Film. Pat Smith was one of the leaders of the Myth, Ritual, and Reality course, exploring film, theology, literature, and theatre in modern reality. In the fall of 1972, a nine-unit course is coordinated by English and ethnic studies, consisting of Modern American Poets. (Pat Smith) Poetry Politics Jazz, (Alan Heineman) and Negritude and Soul (Liz Parker). Ralph Miller and Barry Smith (who received termination notices, for lo, the department has become "too young.”) have paved the way for the growth of creative writing. There is talk of a tutorial program for freshmen. Efforts have been great in English to break down the traditional classroom setting, and the traditional teacher-student relationship, and replace it with a fresher, more effective mode of learning. Alan Heineman’s use of student journals, and the importance of student input, feeling, and design is an example. Szilard Szabo’s Psycholinguistics (or Aspects of Language) investigates the psychological, anthropological, and sociological aspects of language, examining the uniqueness of language to men.poems from the quarterly artifacts by robert harmon As you wander, step carefully. The heritage of hate survives its authors; And the foreign art sleeps undor the soil Oblivious to armistice. Loyal to a state long since desd And history lives on. And may reach out of the past to claim you. Flinging your substance into the afternoon. Time will continue, and generations of historians Will wander the world, questing for evidence. There are ample signs of our own passing. And our work will survive us all. How will we be remembered? from EARTHQUAKE by Al Sakuda ... It was all agreed upon. So. with the help of Chris, the Old Man. and Montgomery, we filled up the Oakland Coliseum and Candlestick Park with all the packets of grspe Jello that were available. Wo had to fill up Kezar Stadium with strawberry Jello. but Chris said that it was all right. "Now what do we do?" I asked Chris anxiously. "Wait for raint" Chris exclaimed, with his index finger raised high in the air while he walked eastward over the Bay. "Our work is done.” Montgomery marched south to Santa Cruz, and the Old Man climbed into his sleigh which was parked in the stadium lot. He flew north, maybe to Sacramento. I drove westward to the Pacific where the whole 8ay Area was going to end up. My work had just began ... hatkus by Fleur Light fades in the west. Shadowing my emptiness. Where did the day go? An oarthenware vase. Lovely in its emptiness. Yet longs to be filled. from He Is by Matthew McKay he is practical he wears his father's watch because it runs-He Has Risen writing ths script he must hear to make it from one room to the noxt w It u BE B! Be Be B Bf e E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E I! t fc t fc I I IAnne 8eeler Lynn Benmon Fr. John Coleman Hugh Dawson David Derus Will IJWII- Nil 'W CifiiiOtfOilcrcn lonti me p:io:oi IrrTluIfitu.pptcu in . Chjnifiini: lOtvaiKV’Dcbc frc. cuncniovi lujjnruuiicc:c :j .'.cfchariUt'ciiK-h iliilxxcouno iiicoiiuncm'cr itiomioclpiTiTio rnopvidtm’ctte b nti pr unfit r'llui ilTdt.0lllfi.il’ COIl lOiit.iiciiii’CtTnlf mcr.cttpcmcro. iniii'’; cccrcdmr’ jbera:0 in nolm-il. rffr q nuncr m oiiuiicr.ctoc’m brcaad jrinpcvi icubjbcjimu'iii Tainllccihaiioi’ mldo-xTiiiio: no . led prccr.] ch.iri rnmo.’e.iitiom.i Per 0uuufemri .Tim inrh inrirr.Thomas Fitzpatrick Gerald Fournier John Gleason Charles Hartwell JAlan Heinemsn Irving Lowe Gene McCreary Ralph Miller Jean Put Uii» Cift nor Dilcrcn onuijxp:io:cu rftliufuu.ppicu fits iCbjninmi: IC CtllOtfDcbf rc.-kaincinovi uj jmdmucc: cr p.crcbjritJtKUk' It. ilitlxx COgllP m co maiicm'cr uomjc'clpiifiio mo ? vidim'crtc wipfmilirfilui udl.dllUlt'COIl mcr.cr ipcm cvo. iiuii”: cccrcduir’ Jbcrcr’mnolw ll rcjmjncr in o nuiier.ct pc’ m Kccfjcbjrirjt'cvi iajbjbcjimit'tn icurtllccil:ciiiot nudo.£tmo:iks . fed pfccM cb.irt rnukvc.iiuoni.i Per Cm jurcmri ,Tn.; nii'h innrr.Barry Smith Pat Smith Fr. Edward Stackpoolo Joan Wescott not pictured Julos Becker Jeanno Glennon Sura Johnson a s 9 3 5? 3 3 3 3 •3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 •3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 •3 3 3 3 ■ 3 Deborah Boyce C. Cinquini Mary Davidson Deborah Beck Michael Connolly Catherine Cannata Bernadette Blanchard Karen Carrillo Veronica Corvi Mary Cerutti Charles Coyne Sharon Eveland I 1111 ifi not Dilcrcn nmpcp:io:oi itliufiui.ppiaj to. iCbjnmmi: jtvctiioi'Dcbc C. CUI1C11J0VI csaMi’iiiutccrcv’ ctcbaritjociuo |iJfiilx»ccogno [mcoiiuncitVcr iiiomiocfpilfno riiOk? vidun'cr tc pmi pr unfit Alul fudi.auircitu'oii 10111.1 ICflltUltfiir mcr.cripc uicvo. 'tum :crcrcdim jberev0 in nobio 'll £tci HUMCt in OllUIICf.CtOc’llI pfeaacbarirjt’ivi kulutxjimum icurtllc cit:ci iioo undo. Ziiiio: no . fed pto dun rnmo:c.e|iioni.i LuT Out Jiircm ri , Tii.; itii'h inner.-1E0' James Forrer Vivienne Hung Michael King Maureen Gilmore Kathleen Hurley John KotlnnEcr L. Flournoy R. Gunther Joanne Johnson Cathrine Krciger Barbara Follain C. Holloway S. Kawasakiya Walter Lcnci V. to fc £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ R ftr=? 9 9 9 3 9 a 9 9 9 9 £ -9 9 9 9 9 Andrew Lustig Tricia Meade Marjorie Oxsen Richard Proaps Janet Mahoney John Mustanich Jean Petrini Diane Provaxi Ralph Notor Leonard Pilara Karen Regan Jerri O'Connell Ronald Plecas Daniel Riordan l. 'l 1 ijfi no t cilcrcn ionui|xp:to:cu irriliufiul.ppiaj i no. iCbaruiuni: lOorctnooDcbc TC.i CUIlC11 0Yl Itijarn’miuccrcv" ?.ct cbaritaocmo It. iJnlxxcoisiio tncoiiuiiciiVct tionijocipiiriio nioovidim’atc ?ni.ipr unfit ftlui ndi.Omftiocon lom.itcfuocilnir iiicr.ccipcm cvo. iiim ctcrcdim’ Jbcrcr'in nobic-it. rfjrci mjticT m oiiuucr.ctoc'm ?rcaad?anr.ioa:i iaJ babe amuo m iainllccitrciiioo mldo.£imo:iid . fed pfccra chart rnmd.Y.tiuoma hcrO-tiuurcmriEdward Russell William Short Brent Tilson Susan Welker Theresa Schallert Gary Sowards Donna Uhrig Pamela Weymouth Michael Moran Michael Tamblyn Jacob Van Ruiten Patricia Youkel E E E E E E E fc E E E E E E R t?It jpcruitfciis:erpluuillio nunna vt cderer: pane celt fcedir eisrpjne aiute lojumjducjuit homo alleluia. ar. H celclic rucquefuiir’Drievutrj ns ct p jcis.jpictus coiu cocc d e. quc mb obwnemmicnb’mrrti a ccocfigiunf. Tbcr otim. ibxii. t A Ouijpcrnianun.poa.iii.iOtClC r C )mnunduararncinda(CotO. f. bibit (anguine mcum.ui me injnet a c$o mco t irir tms alleluia. £oplC. £ F ac nos quefunfonc Diutmta tis rue fcmpfiu rruirioe rcplcru qui pctoli co:po:ts er figuims pcepno tpalis pftgur.it.0ut re. So Omc.i prru poll feihi trituratis tOnuneinnmnt; fericoidiafperaiii: rrulraui'rcoimeum mfalurari mo: can rabotmoquibona ibuttinibi. ‘Cdlqsquet'iie obliuilaTts me in line fq5qu0 auertio facte tu a .1 me. £ue m re Iperjimii fo:n m d 0: J d clto tp p ia us m uoandibusnortns. et in imiiuu i nuni ijvii nii i.vv. eft Uunu : no £jfi 1100 Dticrcn IllllOCtU.'fcd ijllOlll.i IpC pilOJOl lent noo.cr unlit filui litti jwieu none .p petio 11 no. iCbjnitimi: li lie Pc’Pilcntiioo:ctiioo oebe m’muiceotligcrc.keiiiieiiiovi cut viuf.Oi OtliiN anv' mince: cv" iiwuet in nobuver cbariuo emo in nobprccra eft. 3111 Ixxcogno faimiiuitionu in eo iiuncnYcr 1 pc in nobis?: qiionij oc Ipii liio a itt nobio. cr 1100 vieluii" cr tc rtiiiaimir: qiiom.i pf unfit rilui fu li I a 11u r0:e 111 lid 1.C1 it fp 0 c011 telfuo fuerit qitom.i tcliio eittiir cn.'cv’ 111 co iiuiier.ct tpe m cro. £t 1100 cognomm : ctcrcdun’ clxirtunpiu baberer’ m nobio kcXbanrao eft. etcj iiuncr 111 eba nr j term 0 co 1 tuner .cr Pc’ m 1 0.311 boc eft pfccta cbarir.10 cn 110 b ilal • vt lid lieu b a be j unit m Pictudiciipj fiair tile cft.ce 1100 liiiituo 111 bocimido. £11110:110 eft in cbanrarc. fed pfccr.i cb.m taofouo mtmr nmo:e. puom.i nmo: pen.i IxiPctOm .nirciii ri • .1 .........1.......Itwirirw IVf ♦ ♦ ♦ V' I mere c Inuwvfiirc Ijiginact p2cinu.pcba(hi commiino ♦ ♦ A ♦ ♦ A ..........A I ♦ £.1 £tcme Dam.£liu co?poj.iIi irin no vida fri ■ ♦ t ♦♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦- ♦ ♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦ a ; compniitii?:inciitc clcua virnifcm Lir in-j ct pzcmupcn If. .. foe feta crucefc ! Doiiiimliioftruni..' ;urcr Sterne 3 3 3 3 3 (♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ bununi sen cm in lisno crucis coftitm ft V ♦ ♦ )ciib.0m fain — 1 vtvndcmoM What can you say about a department whose mam purpose of existence is to teach twelve units of required courses? By maintaining this purpose, it denies innovation. Within the present framework, however, it tries to offer some alternatives to the student Within each of the four required areas, there 8re variations. While one may teach of problems in modern philosophy, another attempts at understanding cultural change. 8arbara Bacon expects students to define the approaches and subject matter most crucial to their study of ethics. Fr. Jeff Bridges encouragos a wide choico of media in student expression of Meaning, Value, and God. The non-required courses, though few. present divergent topics and viewpoints, such as Fr. Andrew Wozmcki's Existentialism, and Helmut Girndt's Idealist Philosophers, as well as American Philosophy. Philosophy, and Philosophical Theology.nitre c lcu Kv tutclargiridct pzamp ctmftii cottimu no ♦ ♦ l A ♦ ♦ ♦ Fr. Wilson Aldridge Barbara Bacon Fr. Geoffrey Bridges Edward Brusher cuG. 0 m fjlui vtvndcmoM 4- .."VlJ T . »TT i i« n i»»»ilili. ! 'nTi uu«n«i» u • •• Robert Cunningham David Everall Desmond Fittgcraki Jack Gordon Kerry Kollormere c lautG-vtiirclarsmoct p:cmia p cbziflil commit no ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦. f £tcmcOai£.0m co?pottIt ictu ho vida ten ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ i3crp:cmu.pcri Vincent Moran Fr. Daniel O'Sullivan Fr. Albert Smith Fr Andrew Woznicki Dens, 0ui Dim : vtvndcmoM —•—.ItUUUU’.tUU M ichael Donoghuc Gary Heil Andrew Dworak Mark Gladden Christine Fischer Harry Sttnger Patrick Meehan Kathleen O'Connor9 9 S3 9 m 9 mere c Iau0:vmtc!ar5inactp:cnii3»pcbnMcominuno 9 3 3 9 a a £a £tcmc Ocm0iu co:po:alt iduiuo vida ten ♦ ♦ ♦ 4 ♦♦ ♦ ♦ 1 ♦ ♦ coiiipzum mcittc dcua virtutcm largtrip cr p:cmiapcr ♦t a a Oefera truce f DomimliioHrmiKicnircr. etctvc )cu 0m falui ’!$♦♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ j ♦ ♦ a a •I I- •' 3 « btmum generis in (igno mi do cofh'cnt ft» vt vndc moK;,i?,......................± iiih'111 s s f ♦ 1 ♦ ♦ i -i 4 I mere c lauo-.vtiitelarsinoaprmiia cb ifhlcommuno ♦ ♦ ♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦ A discipline of great traditions adapting to contemporary demands. Theology in the 1970‘s. The gains of the Catholic progressives during the 1960'$ is evident in the increasingly contemporary concern of theology offerings: The Church and Society, Christian Anthropology, Marxism and the Theology of Hope, Theology and Literature, V'iolcnce and the Christian. Some theology faculty have branched into the community in such areas as draft counseling, and personal counseling in Hunter's Point. The Theology Students' Union is a very integral part of the department, and the most organized student voice in any USF department. New and popular courses involving new media in teaching debuted in the spring: Religious Search in the 70's, a multimedia course; Theology of the Film, an inter-disciplinary effort, was offered in conjunction with communication arts. Jack Klliott was also an organizer of the Myth, Ritual, and Reality course, which was offered through communication arts, English, and theology. mo vida ten ♦ ♦♦ :octp:cmu.pcri ocua 0m ftlui i on ♦ wy • ♦ ♦ I : vt vndc mow w --------i-Anthony B w"mere c Ictu vturclargiriactp:cimp cbrifhl comirnTno ♦ ♦ ♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦+,f imo vida ten Fr. James Mackoy Fr William Richardson Fr Theodore Taheny Fr William Wood Fr. Albert Zabala Fr Norbert Wildiers not pictured Fr. Frank Baur Fr C. Slade Crawford Charlene McCarthy (ocrpzcmu.pcn O m 0un folui (: vt vndc more Eugene Nevins Dolores Ortiz Ann Marie Zabalam wnni I clarc inoctpzctnia cbzifhloominu no ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦♦ £tcrttcDciis.0iri co?ponlt idnmo vida rcr ♦ ♦ ♦ 3 3 3 3 3 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦♦ ♦ comp:um$:mc!itc dcua tfrttittnt largtrto cr pzcmiapcr i It. ♦t frcfcra ouccfi ! Ooimminoftruni.icmter etcwc Dcufalu IP ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ I''• •! a ■ bunum acticrio i n ligno era do coftttnt (h: vt vndc hiohjChanges, changes, everywhere. Finally. The story of society. The story of education. Education: “The process of training and developing the knowledge, skill, mind, character, etc., especially by formal schooling." “By formal schooling" is being considered and questioned these days, for the formality has begun to impair the schooling. In the sense of a bureaucracy destroying the sense of purpose, we have created a veritable monster. In a world where the method of operation has changed radically in communications, employment, enjoyment and life styles, methods of education have remained virtually the same. A college education has evolved from once being being unrelated to normal living and employment to now providing vocational training in much the same way high school did in the past. But the subsequent changes that need accompany such major growth in society have been slow in arriving, at least at some campuses. Most of us students sit in a large classroom, for three one-hour periods a week, listening to an "expert” talk at us. and then we switch to another classroom, another expert, and so on. We become good followers, note-takers, and regurgitators of dispensed information. And most of the "experts” do not relish that title, and wait for our initiative to change our present rut. Most of them are still waiting. It has come to the attention of numerous educators, faculty, and students that we need some new structures, or non-structures, which make higher education a little more relative to the whole ball of wax. The few looks we have provided here are but a sample of what the future of education can. and should, hold in store. The Myth. Ritual, and Reality course brought together related elements, and melted the barriers of departments. Student design, with faculty facilitation, altered the traditional roles, and proved that education is indeed a two-way street. The Prison Reform Study Group applied theoretical models to the field of study, and the participants gained insight that lecturing would never have conveyed. Education thrives on firsthand experience. As it passes through other stages of retelling and interpretation, it should broaden, but often all it docs is dull. The closeness of this group’s study to reform was vital. We detail the programs which have been drawn up. to go into effect in the Spring of 1973. One-to-one interaction, and the ability for individual design will be a watershed for educational change at USE, and a crucial factor in university survival in the I970's. Finally. Alan Heincman responded with vigor to our request for a teacher's view of what all happens in a college classroom. With uncommon frankness, the article presents a level of communication not normally available in teacher-student relationships. We did not intend that his article be representative of all faculty, but we think it indicative of a majority sentiment. V V k i fe E E E E E E E E E E E E E E 61 E fe E E E E E fe - fc r fc E e i Changes, changes, everywhere. Finally society. The story of education. Educatior of training and developing the knowledi character, etc., especially by formal schooli "By formal schooling" is being c questioned these days, for the formality impair the schooling. In the sense of destroying the sense of purpose, we I veritable monster. In a world where I operation has changed radically in co employment, enjoyment and life style education have remained virtually the education has evolved from once being bei normal living and employment to n vocational training in much the same way in the past. But the subsequent changes that need a major growth in society have been slow least at some campuses. Most of us studen classroom, for three one-hour periods a we an “expert" talk at us, and then we swi classroom, another expert, and so on. W followers, note-takers, and regurgitator information. And most of the “experts” do title, and wait for our initiative to change Most of them are still waiting.tf » ) U AJ U AJ VU a iJ Ai 24 jj Ai v l A UU U U M X! JU l! X 'if 'if X' ’4 'Jj % IJj | ft u Prison reform study group Whit began » An intrrsesMon trip to Florid to study thr life conditions of migrant farmworker changed directions and look on the link of studying thr California it itc ptlMM system. m current problem and tile current »t«te ol proposals to deal with these problem . Under the direction ol sociology Mike Howe. group of nine undergraduate . with the supporting belpol fill) USF student and friends, conceived, developed, and implemented » sophisticated sociological study of prison reform, the result of which have been sought by the California State Legislature in tlieir Attempt to draft prison reform legislation. The study originated as a research project in Monterey and Contra Costa countir to study attitudes toward prison inmatr who arr on trial in ritlier county When thr students found tfirii pre-conception about the issue of bias to be (al»e, interest grrw in studying altitudes toward the prison system in thr whole »tate. and tlic range of study grew. The project was expanded to include surveys in Sacramento and Riverside counties, to augment and contrast the study already done in the other two counties. total of 1600 county citizen were iiurilioned on a wide number of issue including capital punishment, tear of escape, bias toward inmates on trial, and the credibility ol prison official . Also included in I he expanding rrw-arcli were intensive interviews with county officials, including police, sheriffs, district attorneys, public defenders, political figures, and reform group Tlu- study developed a tailc of documentation proposals and gauging tlic relative strength and commitment of the individuAls and groups interviewed. A the study group began interviewing the figure in thr state system, including legislator , Hate ptufcssronal groups. and the frtMin system i teU, thr ss-hole sy«tem became visible Raymond Socuniet, current director of the California Department of Correction aim became interested in thr study and authorized the research group to study all thr inslittitions under his management. The group conducted in ter views us Folsom, .So led ail. Vacaville, and our state prisons in Southern California. Recent incidents in the »tatr prison system as the So led ad killings, the George Jackson c e, ami the prison riots in Folsom. San Quentin, anil Soledad, liavc brought to light tlir glaring problem in thr system and the need for concrete prison reform. Unfortunately, when the i»sue of what i» to fie done arises, many different ptoposals are articuUlrd. ranging from tinsing down all prisons to sending evrry consicteil prisoner to death row . The task of the student was to point out which arras of reform mint groups agreed upon, and to study the relapse impact of each group's proposal in the w hole correction and criminal justice system. The student who paiticipatrd in the protect cattle out with concrete skill in sociological theory, rrscarch. and research tcchiinjurv They also came out of the study with a deeper understanding of the interrelationship of the various elements of the California justice system from the police to tlie governor, to concerned and unconcerned citizens. , Loo Leary Ed Dolores roKin olin joan robcrlTkufk divfdliniU TOM jUCiy JOfirt pkfiy SffvFicsrpn pameg paut painChanges, changes, everywhere. Finally society. The story of education. Fducati of training and developing the Icnowled character, etc., especially by formal schooli "By formal schooling” is being questioned these days, for the formalit impair the schooling. In the sense of destroying the sense of purpose, we veritable monster. In a world where operation has changed radically in co employment, enjoyment and life style education have remained virtually the education has evolved from once being bei normal living and employment to n vocational training in much the same way-in the past. But the subsequent changes that need a major growth in society have been slow least at some campuses. Most of us studen classroom, for three one-hour periods a we an “expert” talk at us, and then we swi classroom, another expert, and so on. W followers, note-takers, and regurgitator information. And most of the "experts" dc title, and wait for our initiative to change Most of them arc still waiting.: terry Steve michele chris margarrt anne scott mary trip cthel doyle lu gene debbie drborah myth,ritual .and reality john gary sue rich cllie brucc jeanette rob susan frank rami wendy E myth, ritual, and reality was our lives’ time shared —we were the pain of birth tearing away from the known but also the incredible ecstasy of taking that first breath in the world of New. —we were an arduous and crucial journey through superficiality to gut response to intimate insight with many a hand outstretched along the rocky way in need in comfort in joy —we were a death of sorts the passing into a different mode of Being with each other for each other —we touched held caressed the bodies as well as spirits of those around us —we knew love ... we felt love ... we were love may it continue Karen Carrillo rich jack linda john cathy peter michcline pat merit tom kathy john ricnew programs £ F There have to be some ways to save the student-teacher relationship. New methods of learning have to come to g-thc rescue of education. There is a proposal that is planned to go into effect in Spring 1973 that can do both. g- The concepts that prompted this move are these: how g-much can one learn while studying in classrooms only, virtually isolated from the rest of society? And how g complete is education served buffet style, with chili and p jello and ice cream served together (or medieval history, the black man in America and the New Testament). The Unis-ersity in Action is a program that allows student to contract with a few professors, and together design a program of study that is of interest to the student and of relevance to educational pursuits. Or, a group of students may pursue the same subject matter. g- For instance, students who want to study the politics of pollution would contract with a biologist, a sociologist, a government professor, or whatever field was needed to supply the theoretical background for his learning. He would then combine this with practical experience, working for Standard Oil, or with the Bay Area Air Pollution District, or the like, and report back to the contracting teachers periodically. He could also contract with people outside the university, in conjunction with someone at the university. E £ £ This program has many parallels at UC and other fei prominent universities across the nation. It was worked on at USK by Mike Howe. Gene McCreary, John Collins, fc? Gary Stevens, Larry Murphy. Paul Belcher. Charlene McCarthy, Gil Podolinsky, Jim Cheatle, Jim Hopkins, fcl and other students and faculty, along with faculty from Santa Clara. £Alan Heinoman Assistant Professor of English a s a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 TEACHER This seems almost beside the point. Most of you who are reading the Don have graduated, and may not be interested, therefore, in retrospection. To make matters even less relevant. I've come in contact with—what? maybe five percent of you? Yet, in what follows. I see no way of avoiding talking about you- which I really have no right to do—and about myself, a subject with which you might reasonably not be vitally concerned. Let me add just a bit of perspective. This was my second year of teaching at USF. The first year was spent primarily in trying to find out how college teaching worked, how USF worked, how I fit in, how you and I would respond to each other. This process continues, and. I hope, will continue to continue; if I ever stop learning. I hope I will have the good sense to stop teaching. But during the past year, feeling somewhat more comfortable. I’ve had the opportunity occasionally to step back a few paces and look at you with a degree of objectivity. For the most part. I haven't liked what I've seen. Which is not to say that 1 don’t like you. Indeed I do. I have found you open, earnest, hopeful, friendly, and cooperative with your fellows, and these qualities stand in sharp contrast to those prevalent in the majority of students at the schools I attended and hung around. But the very real virtues you possess arc accompanied by, arc perhaps even partly caused by, grave defects. Now, I firmly believe these defects are not personal, but rather systemic; that is, you are not bad people, but you have had some bad things done to you, and most of you have not yet overcome them. Let’s look at what you’ve been taught. I will generalize, and thus I apologize, now and throughout, because to some of you. and to some of the institutions you have been and will be emmeshed in, my remarks will be partly, perhaps wholly, inapplicable. But my limited experience indicated to me that 3sa rule, you have been taught:I. Sit down and shut up. Your instructor has the right to your undivided attention and unmitigated respect. Furthermore, education can only be conducted in an orderly atmosphere. Find an outlet for your exuberance, restlessness, orneriness, or simple, pleasurable distraction outside the classroom. (Take a Phys. Ed. class. It's good for you.) II. Education consists of learning the Correct Answers. One and one are two. The Civil War was fought from 1861 to 1865. A proper paragraph begins with a topic sentence. Crank it up a notch for college: The real cause of the Civil War was economics, not slavery. Kant invented the Catagorical Imperative. Hawthornes’s major theme is that the sins of the fathers are visited upon the children. Your instructors have access to these Correct Answers. So do your textbooks. You certainly don’t, and neither to your classmates, unless you’ve already memorized them. Consequently: III. Take careful notes on lectures and readings. Don’t bother to take notes on what your classmates say; it won’t be on the final. (Unless the instructor nods vigorously after a remark and says, “Very good." Then it might be on the final, because it is a Correct Answer, and you’d better try to remember it.) Also, don’t volunteer anything in class unless you’re pretty sure it’s a Correct Answer—especially if the instructor knows your name. There is nothing more sinful and degrading than being wrong, or foolish. If you don’t understand something that’s iust been said, it’s certainly your fault, since you're clearly stupider than the rest of your classmates and who are you to demand individual attention? Let it pass; look it up later. IV. Education also consists of a number of boxes labeled Philosophy, Chemistry, English, History, etc. Therefore, don’t get too excited by any one of these, since you’re taking four, five or six others which require an equal amount of time and energy. And for heaven’s sake don’t try to use what you’ve learned from History in English, or from Psychology in Philosophy, or from Biology in Theology. That messes up the boxes and will only confuse you on the final. (If the course is labeled "Theology in Literature.” then it's okay.) There are some "interdisciplinary" courses, but tliese arc experimental, and a luxury, and they don’t count as much as real courses. V. Your instructor will tell you what your goals for a particular class arc. Thus it’s a waste of time to try to define your own. If the instructor doesn't tell you your goals, figure out what he wants. Fast. Ask someone who took the course last year. The instructor wanted the same things then. VI. Your emotional life has no place in the classroom. The instructor may be interested in how well you may perform, but he is surely not interested in what you’re like. Remember that there is only one set of Correct Answers: European Intellectual History, the 18th Century British Novel, Introductory Physics, etc., are supposed to mean the same things to you whether you're male or female, black, brown, yellow or white, Catholic Protestant. Jew or atheist, rich or poor, whether you're a Sociology major or.in the Nursing School, whether you're excited or bored by the material, whether you're generally happy or generally not. (if you’re having serious problems, there are counseling services available.) V, V y fe fe £ £ £ £ £ F F £ F F F F £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £jfj !!•' r i-j r' !? =4 :q • i •i -i -a I5J Vi vi 71 Well. I could go on. but you set the drift, right? If you don't believe any of the above—and if you don’t ad as if you believed it— then I’m not talking to you. and I feel sorry for taking your time. But I didn’t get this stuff from reading studies on education, although such reading has helped me define, clarify, and attempt to discover alternatives to these conditions. 1 got it from observing you. Example: a very fine student who took two of my classes stopped by my office two weeks before the end of the second class. In the course of the conversation, she said she’d come up to the fifth floor of University Center a half dozen times or more, with various issues on her mind, but had never been able to work up the courage to actually enter my sanctum sanctorum. Example: when, in beginning to discuss a novel, I ask students how they felt about the novel, how they responded to it. they just look at the floor, the wall, their notes ... Those few who look at me do so as if I’d just said something in Swahili. As soon as I ask what the Major Theme is, of course, everyone breathes a deep sigh of depersonalized relief and goes on about his educational business. Example: in most of my classes I ask students to keep a journal rather titan writing formal papers or taking exams. The journal is supposed to contain thoughts and feelings about the course material and related issues. I try quite meticulously to communicate that the manner in which students proceed can be anything from frec-associational to academically formal, that they should deal only with subjects that interest them and ignore the rest, that they are responsible for defining their terms and criteria and that my evaluation of their work is based on how well, in my opinion, they have succeeded on their own terms. Yet, student after student, upon receiving a negative comment from me or being unable to make any progress at all in beginning a journal, has told me plaintively, "I just don’t know what you want!" Further instances are readily available, and I’m sure most of you could supply many of your own. The point is that you have been very good students indeed: you have learned what the system teaches—which, all the platitudes, credos, dicta, and dogma to the contrary not withstanding, it is simply that you as an individual are not worth a damn. It is not so surprising that the system teaches that. Any system depends for its survival on inculcating the belief that its composite structure is more important than its separate members. What is surprising, 3nd criminal, and tragic is first, that the educational system, whose explicit goals are directly opposite, thrives implacably on this premise. And secondly, more horrible still: you have come to believe it. Are you protesting it? Arc you indignant? Good. That means there’s at least a spark of self-esteem left. But think: did you ever think of your teachers as your employees, which we partly are, rather than as your hosses, which we in no sense are? Did you demand the attention due you as a result of your time, energy and monetary inputs? When a teacher scribbled "wrong” or "no" in the margin of a paper, did you find out why? Did you challenge him if you believed your position defensible? Conversely, when you arrived at an insight, even a fragmentary or half-formed one. did you share it with your peers, submit it to their scrutiny, test it in the arena? Did you listen when your classmates offered their discoveries? Because these are two sides of the same coin. If the teacher is everything, then you are nothing; if your classmates are nothing, then you are nothing. Do you believe you’re nothing? You act as if you did.Well, but most of you have graduated. You may never be in school again. What am I trying to do, make you feel bad about yourselves? Partly, ves. But in the first place, every situation one ever finds himself in is potentially an educational experience, so that I would hope that some of the principles I've enumerated might he useful for coping with the future as well as for assessing the past. In the second place, and more importantly, what I’m trying to make you feel bad about is the not-selves you have been encouraged, even compelled, to display in the academic theater, and perhaps elsewhere. To the extent that you have submitted to the pressures of the system, you have cheated yourself of your education. To the extent that you have internalized these pressures and helped to nurture them, you have cheated yourself of your humanity. Humility is a great virturc. It is well to be humble about how much one knows, and how little. It is well to be humble in putting one’s learning into the service of others. But I would suggest that in the process of learning itself, there is no room for humility. Until you realize—fully, egocentrically—that your education is yours,—and no one elsc's. you cannot learn much of consequence. Until you learn, you cannot teach. Until you take yourself seriously, you cannot take others seriously; until you think highly of yourself, you cannot genuinely think highly of others: and without this, charity, service, achievement are but hollow. And I tell you frankly that for me, the greatest reward of teaching is not in helping students acquire knowledge, pleasant as that is when it truly occurs. It is in participating in those miraculous moments when a student, having deeply inhaled freedom and found it exhilarating, begins deciding what sorts of wisdom he or she wants and needs, begins molding his own purposes, establishing his own standards. Perhaps the reward is so great because tin,- event is so rare. But you’re still young. We all arc. There is time. fir fr fe e k; i- !» F F F ? F F Einnro « » Involvement — to relate closely, to connect. A most abused word. In the sense of connecting, however, a vital stage of education. What is featured in this third book is the attempt to connect education with the USF community at large, and the San Francisco community at large. The events that have made their way through this Campus and the heads of these students in 1971-1972. We arc optimistic, for there is an attempt to break down these walls, or rise above the fog, and create a university that connects with the city. Drama does this; special speakers, concerts, bazaars, sports, community involvement, make us known to the city. Conferences, ethnic presentations, forums, town lulls, make the city known to us. To this relationship, we present this third book. May our friendship prosper. involvement our look at the year bill russcil gospel concerts black students’ union prisons ramscy dark shakespeare troupe coffee house college players international bazaar yvonne westbrooke mayoral race seiji ozawn soccer march on the city keep the clinic free week ethnic conference Paul chrlich carl stokes Herbert marcuse dismissed faculty basketball semana de la raza death of football jonsen resignation community involvement program graduation memorials religion war and peace governance campus life publications campus portfolio scanned gallery sports clubs cliff notes to 1971-2 conclusion staff CTcdits memTHE VEflR OUR LOOK AT THE YEAR A year passes-. So slow. Too fast. We mourn, shout, fall, triumph, and forget. We remember, and are silent. But memories blur, remembrance is selective; we forget though trying to hang on the pieces of 3 year past. The yearbook. It would betray its name if it only presented names and faces and ideas. Without a perspective of time, of 1972-ncss, these faces lack depth. A dimension has been removed if we do not provide the point of reference—the year. But what does one remember? What shouldn't we forget? Are our minds' memory banks filled with thrill and pains of dances and tests, or of national tremors? Do we notice all that happens, so tragically fast, in our society? We think a yearbook can portray, can repaint, can remember for us when we can't. But it can educate too. And so the frame is built for the picture, the life and death story of a year 3nd a people that loved it. If you find events in here you do not wish to remember, or think out of place, our apologies, good friends. We too lived through this year. We could not paint it in other hues, or different shades. Bill Russell Honored The man's picture over there needs little explanation. Bill Russell. t'SF’s cage superstar of the mid-fifties, who led USE to 60 straight victories, the NCAA record. Perhaps the finest player ever to compete in pro basketball. The first thing that comes into people’s minds when you mention USE. On November 19, the annual Hall of Fame Flynn Dinner honored the two NCAA championship teams of 1955 and 1956. Earlier that day, Russell attended the dedication of a trophy and meeting room named in his honor. The previous evening hr spoke eloquently to students on "Contemporary America,” in a lecture sponsored by the Special Events Committee.Relatively few knew Jack well eager, bright, and But Jack was a his counsel and on to others how were privileged to loyalty and right The world whatever he might boon pursued and blessed with from the tragically credit to his and his alma ourselvos to Had more of us care for Jack, his happier God Dempsey. SJ.3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Gospel Nights Two outstanding nights of inspiration and entertainment, benefitting two different causes were presented in 1971-1972. On September 30, Tommy Lindsey, chairman of the United Bay Area Crusade on Campus erncccd a program featuring gospel choirs, as a climax to a week of UBAC campaigning. The reception was so outstanding that a second night was presented on March 3, in tribute to the late Mahalia Jackson. Inspiring the audience were the Voices of Glory, Voices of Victory, SF Inspiration Choir, the Hosannahs, singers from the First Baptist and First Union Churches, the Chimes of Joy, Cynthia Harris and Nathaniel 'Ferry, i nephew of Miss Jackson. The second gospel nite benefited the Haight-Ashbury Free Clinic and the Western Addition Education Project for Delinquent Children. ii t p- o • ch ig Relatively few ly know Jack well n eager, bright, and But Jock was a his counsel and on to others how were privileged to loyalty and right. The world whatever he might been pursued and blessed with the tragically credit to his and his alma ourselves to Had more of us care for Jack, his happier God Dempsey. S J. fc. | meslBlack Students' Union The Black Students' Union again proved itself to be a catalyst for community-related activities. The annual BSU Halloween Carnival, which the young sister on the right is enjoying, attracted hundreds of community kids up to USF. The Thanksgiving food and clothing drive again provided needy San Francisco families with some support and cheer. And Black Culture Week brought together musicians, speakers, and discussions in April.tg Relatively few ly knew Jack well eager, bright, and But Jack was a his counsel and on to others how were privileged to ce loyalty and right The world whatever he might been pursued and blossed with from the tragically credit to his and his alma ourselves to Had more of us care for Jack, his happier. God Dempsey. S J.“somenmes I THINK.THE VHOLe WORLD is one big PRISanYARD... € E tr tl 3 5 $ 9 3 r? 5 a 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 =S a a a a a a a 1971 will be remembered as the year the prisons were finally portrayed as the institutions they are. A prisoners insurrection, at Attica State Prison in New York, directed the attention of all Americans to the inhumanity of prison conditions. The slaughter 0f guards and prisoners by police attested to the lack of concern for human life. It was a bloody lesson which finally reached the eyes and ears of the American Public. The uprising 3t Attica followed closely the killing at San Quentin of George Jackson. Jackson, who had been 3 major spokesman for prisoners and Blacks, and who wrote passionately of the political nature of law. imprisonment, and prosecution, was gunned down while supposedly escaping from San Quentin’s Adjustment Center. He was awaiting trial on a murder charge, for which his fellow defendants were later acquitted. The message he conveyed to prisoners and non-prisoners alike will have great influence on the 1970’s. ng Relatively few ily knew Jack well n eager, bright, and n. But Jack was a 'pt his counsel and t on to others how were privileged to fierce loyalty and as right. The world whatever ho might have boen pursued and blessed with from the tragically credit to his and his alma ourselves to Had more of us for Jack, his happier. God Dempsey. S J.“ some Times ITH1NKTHE VHOLe WORLD is one big PRlSOnYARD... ‘bob'DvuKM Ramsey Clark "The history of penology is perhaps the saddest chapter in the historv of man, because it shows the depth of his inhumanity, and that prisons, and segregation and the violence that is inflicted on all there • guards and prisoners alike - do not work." On November 21, former attorney general, Ramsey Clark spoke on the topic of Prison Reform in one of the fine lectures sponsored bv the Special Events Committee. Clark, then a lawyer in the Harrisburg Conspiracy case, is regarded as a leading spokesman in the nation for a rational and compassionate approach to crime, its causes, and its treatment. His message is this: crime reflects more than the character of the few who commit it, it reflects the character of the entire society.ng Relatively few tily know Jack well »n eager, bright, and But Jack was a ipt his counsel and t on to othors how wore privileged to fierce loyalty and OS right The world t whatever he might have been pursued and blossed with from the tragically ml an—a credit to his ' rch and his alma ' ensitize ourselves to jrs. Had more of us nd care for Jack, his much happier God ames Dempsey. S J.Shakespeare Can Be Fun For the second consecutive year, The New Shakespeare Company of San Francisco filled the lawns of USF for their exciting presentation of Shakespeare. This year's offering was As You Like It. a light and loose masterpiece. The company, which tours vearround. tries to bring a new experience in theatre to their audiences, maintaining a close identification with the audience, and a spontaneous approach to drama. We anxiously await their next Rototively few ily know Jack well n ouyor. bright, and In But Jock was a |pt his counsol and on to others how wore privileged to iorco loyolty and as right The world whatever ho might tve been pursued and blessed with from the tragicolly m—a credit to his rch and his alma jnsitizo ourselves to irs. Hod more of us id care for Jock, his much happier. God imes Dempsey. S J. venture. Medusa's A student idea, built by the students, and run by the students, was one of the great events of 1971-1972. Medusa’s, the coffeehouse in thr university Center, emerged as a landmark of entertainment and gathering at USF. Using money from ASUSF and ARA Slaters, the Coffee House Committee, led in large part by Roz James and Steve Morris, provided a stage for budding performers, and a nook of entertainment and relaxation for many. It was also utilized as a meeting place for discussions and films during the year. The stage was graced by the following among others: Rob Grant. Dave Blanchfield. Steve Boreman. Cindy Maugcini, Bob Williams, Dan Larsen, Larry Strick. Mike Olsen, John Metras, Tom and Valerie Spruce. Steven Fiske, Moon Smoke. Linda Allen, Nun's Canyon Road. I om and John Reed. Uncle Vinty, Bob Fabings, Li! Bean. Rose Redwood. Ned Lewis. Peter Spellman, Victoria and Scott Beach. rrL rr rr V rr il 53 53 51 51 51 3 a a a a a a 11 legc Players Srheir poster reads: "This season's repertory continues in the tradition of that dynamic heritage 3lh plays which focus particularly on questions of truth and responsibility with remarkable variety. J irm and wit.” This year, the College Players again lived up to Sit challenge. In a fine variety of productions—A "rat challenge, in a tine variety or productions—n Man For All Seasons, Murder In The Cathedral, “Sshomon, A Cry of Players, and Fiddler On The Roof, plus other smaller productions, they ■jjisented drama of professional quality from September through April. “jThe success of Fiddler paved the way for the Players to take the show on the road in California jjjring the summer. =5 3 g. Relatively few ily knew Jack woll | and 9S 8 pt his counsel and on to others how ) were privileged to fierce loyalty and right. The world whatever he might have been pursued and blessed with from the tragically credit to his and his alma ansitize ourselves to irs. Had more of us nd care for Jack, his much happier God tmes Dempsey. SJCollogo Playor Productions A Man For All Seasons directed by David Boyd starring Dennis Travins and John Bennett Murdor in Tho Cathedral directed by James Dempsey. SJ starring Larry Hecht You're A Good Man, Charlie Brown directed by Tom 8lank starring Scon Houghton and Lori Ferguson You Can't Take It With You directed by John Collins starring Al Magwili and Cynthia Splatt Rashomon directed by Larry Hecht. Carla Dotto. Thom Jackson, and John Collins starring Al Magwili A Cry of Players directed by Glenn Kovacevich starring Al Magwili and Deborah Wilson Hecht Fiddler on the Roof directed by John Collins starring Glenn Castello and Roseanna Hughes £ S F E f F e F F F F F F £ F fc fc £ fc fc fc fc fc fc fc te fc fcig Relatively few ily know Jack well n eager, bright, and n But Jack was a pt his counsel and on to others how wore privileged to rerce loyalty and as right. The world whatever ho might »ave been pursued and blessed with from the tragically in—a credit to his ch and his alma nsitize ourselves to rs Had more of us id care for Jack, his nuch happier God mes Dempsey. S J.77 ft 01 ft, fl ft, ft ft, ft, ft, ft. nr ft. rt n rr rr ft. ft a a a a a a 3 3 a ■ a s 3 International Bazaar Two student serve foreign delights at the International Bazaar. % mm ng Rolotivoly few .IV new Jack well in eager, bright, and in. But Jack was a •Pt is counsol and t on to others how were privileged to fierce loyalty and ras right The world whatever ho might have been pursued and blessed with from the tragically an-a edit to his rch nd his alma ensitize ourselves to irs Had more of us nd care for Jack, his much happier God imes Dempsey. S J.  Yvonne Westbrooke The beautiful young woman on the. right is Yvonne Westbrooke. a freshman at USF. Unlike other'freshman students, she did not spend all her time reading books and sipping Cokes. Yvonne dazzled the voters of San Francisco by collecting over 47.000 votes in the November race for supervisor. Unfortunately, she did not win. This time. With her fingers on the pulse of The City, and enormous support of the 18 21 year old vote. Yvonne forged a campaign that won, the votes of voters from all age groups, and made her a person to deal with in the future of City politics. All of this without even the endorsement of The Foghorn. They won't ignore her next time.71 71 ng Relatively few lily knew Jack well an eager, bright, and m. But Jack was a rt his counsel and on to others how o were privileged to fierce loyalty and ivos right. The world t whatever he might have been pursued and blossed with from the tragically »n—a credit to his irch and his alma ensitire ourselves to Had more of us nd care for Jack, his much happier God ames Dempsey. SJ. i!U li; ll) L Ij lh L IL 'A 'U 'JJ 'JJ Jj A Vi M Mayoral Candidates November of 1971 was election month for the city of San Francisco. Also, 1971 was the first time that 18-21 year olds were part of the electorate. So the candidates carne. Over a three day period, candidates for sheriff, supervisor and mayor came to USF for Town Halls. They were sponsored by the I'hilhistorians Speech Society, the Alumni Association, and the Sociology Department. Mayor Alioto could not attend and was reelected anyway. The big surprise of the November election was the election of Richard Hongisto, a progressive criminologist, as sheriff of San Francisco. Hongisto, who did address the gathered students, has gone on to achieve success in revamping the penal policies and actions in San Francisco. Seiji Ozawa In May of 1971. USF gave Seiji Ozawa, conductor of the San Francisco Symphony, an honorary degree. He repaid the honor in December of 1971, by returning for an hour of coffee and conversation. On that day, Ozawa spoke briefly to the students and then answered questions about the symphony, himself, and his views on the “state of the art" in music. The colloquium was arranged by the students activities council and student members of the Symphony Forum. "In him meet East and West in an ever-harmonizing world and in him converge poetry and passion in this ever expanding cosmos of spirit..." Honorary degree. USF Commencement, 1971 rji Ti rr. rr. rr, m rr. rr nr. 7i T t» T, nr, ti t. t, t t t ,t, nln ,t t t t t i?Relatively few knew Jack well eager, bright, and But Jack was a his counsel and on to others how were privileged to loyalty and right The world whatevor ho might been pursued and blessed with the tragically credit to his and his alma ourselves to Had more of us care for Jack, his happier God SJ.ig Relatively few lily knew Jock well eager bright, and But Jack was a ipt his counsel and on to othors how wer8 privileged to fierce loyalty and as right The world whatever ho might lave been pursued and blessed with from the tragically an—a credit to his rch and his alma iitize ourselves to Had more of us nd care for Jack, his much happier. God ames Dempsey. SJ. Running off a string of eight consecutive shutouts in the middle of the season, the soccer Dons finished the season with a 13-3 record, the last defeat coming at the hands of St. Louis University in the national semifinals.c f The lime is past when good men may he silent wlirn obedience can segregate men from public risk when the poor can die without defense How many indeed must die before our voices are heard how many must !w tortured dislocated starved maddened? How long must the world's resources lie raped in the service of legalized murder? Wlirn at what point will you say no to this war? We have chosen to say with the gift of liberty if necessary our lives; the violence stops hrre tlie death stops here the suprcMion of the truth stops here tlie war stops here. Daniel Kerrigan, l%8 march against the war novctnlxr 6. I‘ 71 until our shies wear out. until the war stops whichever comes firstI Relatively few knew Jack well bright, and But Jack was a his counsel and t on to others how ) were privileged to fierce loyalty and right The world i whatever he might ave been pursued and blessed with from the tragically credit to his and his alma ourselves to Had more of us care for Jack, his much happier God Dompsey. S J.I I I I Keep the Clinic Free Week The Haight Free Clinic, a source of great sen-ice to the nearby community, has donated time and effort to maintaining the health of the people of that area. As in the past, 1971 was a rocky year for funds. The students at USF responded, with the direction of J.L. Broderick and the Office of Campus Ministry, by sponsoring "Keep the Clinic Free Week" in mid-October. One afternoon, famed puppeteer Tommv Roberts presented a social satire, followed by a discussion of the clinic with a clinical psychologist and the administrator of the clinic, 'I'he major event of the week was the San Francisco Mime Troupe’s presentation of "The Dragon Lady’s Revenge,” a controversial social commentary on drugs and the United States’ friends in Southeast Asia. The Mime Troupe had been performing the play all over San Francisco that fall. ng. Relatively few ily knew Jack well meager, bright, and in But Jack was a ipt his counsel and t on to others how were privileged to fierce loyalty and vas right. The world t whatever he might have been pursued . and blessed with from tho tragically an—a credit to his rch and his alma ensitize ourselves to ers. Had moro of us nd Cflro for Jack, his much happier God ames Dempsey. S J.  Ethnic Conference For some viewers, the University of San Francisco conjures up images of a feudal castle, separated from the very city whose name it bears. The Ethnic Studies Program, among others, is trying to alter that image. Under the leadership of Lenneal Henderson, director of Ethnic Studies, the program presented an all-day conference entitled "Community? Higher Education? A Two Way Street?" Dealing with such topics as the politics of health and welfare, effective community involvement programs, politics and the future of third world communities, the conference assembled scholars, educators, editors, organizers, attorneys, students, politicians, and interested parties from the black, chicano, asian, and white communities.ng Relatively few lily knew Jack well in eager, bright, and m But Jack was o ipt his counsel ond t on to others how ) were privileged to fierce loyalty and |vas right The world t whatever he might have been pursued . and blessed with from the tragically an—a credit to his irch and his alma tonsitize ourselves to ers. Had more of us ind care for Jack, his much happior God lames Dempsey. S J.Paul Ehrlich The Over-population Environment Where do wo go from here? February 20. 1972 Phelan Hall Dining Room Special Events Committee M w Paul Ehrlich If the present trend of population increase continues, the earth will he depleted of mineral resources and the food supply will be inadequate to feed the population of the world. Thus spoke Dr. Ehrlich. Concluding from statistical data on population growth that the world has three to seven times more people that it can ably support, Ehrlich predicted increased pollution of the land and oceans which would in turn endanger the life-supporting systems of the world. His solutions, to solve the explosion of the population is threefold: 1) Encourage couple to have only two children. 2) Encourage Women’s Liberation platforms to be adopted. 3) Encourage the government to persuade people to have small families. ig Relatively few ily knew Jock woll n eager, bright, and n But Jack was a pi his counsel and t on to others how were privileged to fierce loyalty and as right The world whatever ho might lave been pursued and blossed with from the tragically an—a credit to his rch and his alma ©nsitize ourselves to 9fs. Had more of us nd care for Jack, his much happior God ames Dempsey. SJ iH  Paul Ehrlich Tho Over-population Environment Crisis: Where do we go from here? February 20. 1972 Phelan Hall Dining Room Special Events Committee Carl Stokes Carl Stokes, former mayor of Cleveland, was another of the SEC speakers presented in 1971-1972. He spoke from experience on “The Decline and Fall of the American City." Mr. Stokes is a member of the executive committee of the National League of Cities, a member of the advisory board of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, and of the policy committee of the Democratic Party. He was introduced by the Rev. A. Cecil Williams of Glide Memorial Church.ng Relatively low lily knew Jock well m eager, bright, and in But Jack was a pt his counsel and t on to others how were privileged to fierce loyalty and ras right Tho world t whatever he might have been pursued and blessed with from tho tragically an—a credit to his rch and his alma ensifoe ourselves to ers Had more of us care for Jack, his much happier. God ames Dempsey. SJ. Herbert Marcuse Moving above the mediocrity that often dominates USF functions, the Special Events Committee ended its lecture series with one of the great spokesmen for the New Left and Marxist theory, renowned professor, Herbert Marcuse. Speaking during the escalation of the air war over Viet Nam, Marcuse spoke of the availability of radical social change in America, in his talk "Youth in A One Dimensional Society." The former mentor of Angela Davis mentioned her case and others in describing the modern development of American society. He drew parallels to his native Germany, and added that we might be the first nation to vote fascism by democracy. The major means he sees to really change our society is education, and suggests "do not destroy but radically reconstruct the university."Faculty Termination I It may not be good, but it is inevitable I that a few will have to die for the cause. The teachers on the right are going or I gone, but their terminations have sparked a flame of interest about hiring and firing policies and procedures, and the use of tenure in a university. A heated issue during the course of the year, it signals the beginning of a long fight by students to gain some control of policy and procedure, a fight | not unlike the Black Liberation and Women's Liberation movements. The means of hiring and firing is both overt and covert, representative and laden with group interests, manipulated and generally uncoordinated at USF. Academic freedom is often overlooked as personal affronts and coup dr rtats are fmjucnt. Few guidelines are used to determine termination; tire representation of non-tenured faculty is minimal, the input and power of the students nil. The student voice is beginning to be heard. We are far from any sort of justice. In a time coming when students and all faculty will have a voice, most of these teachers would be retained. For now, they are signs and martyrs of a system due for destruction.o mary buckley ralph miller katherine canelides barry smith helmut eirndt tom o'sullivan and on and on. In a school where champion cage teams arc a tradition, 1971 was a traditional year. Taking their eighth WCAC championship since 1953, they finished with a 13-1 conference record, and advanced to the Western Regional playoffs of the NCAA. Relatively lew knew Jack well and is a his counsel and on to othors how were privileged to fierce loyalty and right The world whatever he might have been pursued and blessed with the tragically credit to his and his alma ourselves to Had more of us for Jack, his much happier. God Dempsey. S.J.  La Scmana dr la Raza During the first week of May, the La Raza organization on campus presented its annual Semana dr la Raza. As in the past, it was an opportunity for peoples of two distinct cultures to gather on common ground, and for members of the Latino community of San Francisco to have some input into the University. The events and presentations of the week, culminating in the Cinco dc Mayo, included the films Chic an o and Am Joaquin, art exhibits, local rock bands, a multi-media art presentation, the poetry of Roberto Vargas, a performance by a mariachi band, and by the Ballet Folklorico of San Jose, as well as discussions concerning higher education and Raza people, ethnic art. the Mission Model Cities program, and La Raza at USF. ng Relatively few ly know Jack well eager, bright, and But Jack was a t his counsel and on to others how wero privileged to fiorco loyalty and right The world whatever he might have boon pursued and blessod with from the tragically credit to his and his alma ourselves to Had more of us for Jack, his much happier. GodFootball Dropped On February 7. President Jonsen announced the termination of USF's intercollegiate football. This announcement came after seven years of trying to recapture the winning days of past USF grid teams. Football was the victim of economic pressures, be declared, noting that the trustees bad based their decision on the findings of a task force of alumni, facultv and administrators who had studied the whole picture of USF Athletics over a five-month period. He added that there were two determining factors - the cost of football and the conviction that basketball and soccer are where the emphasis belongs. Basketball, soccer and baseball remain major sports at USF. The intramural program is being expanded to provide all students with an opportunity to develop athletic skills.a president resigns llarch 16 H.C Son Front tuo F.xaminrr report hat Jonsen i» "in line tor appointment Oil» ’ to head Berkeley' mostly ’totestant Graduate Theological Jnion. klarclt 17 I'he Son Front iteo Chronicle report hat Mr . A. Crawford Greene, the re»ident of the GTU board of rustees. had announced on March 16 ■ather Jonsen’s appointment as acting 'resident of the GTU, by a 9 to 3 vote if the trustee ' executive committee. Student and president of the eminarie of GTU protest Jon en’» ippointment, due to the method of hi election. Jonten reject the acting re idency. saying he wishes to stand a i candidate for the permanent ippointment. March 10 President Jomen ubmit hi resignation orally to the trustees, effective June 30, 1972. March IJ In a letter to the University community, Jonsen announce the trustee ' acceptance of his resignation, citing hi reluctance to stay away any longer from hi professional field of theology and theological education. March IS Jonsen read the above letter to a noon meeting of tile University community, adding that he wa» under consideration for another position. Relatively few knew Jack well and js a his counsel and on to others how were privileged to fierce loyalty and vas right The world ! whatever he might have boon pursued and blessed with from tho tragically credit to his Urch and his aima sensitize ourselves to ters Had more of us end care for Jack, his much happier God James Dempsey. S J March 18 The I 'SF hoard of truster request Junsrn to continue a president of the university until a successor is appointed. On his agreement to do so. tbr trustee unanimously pas a resolution expressing their thanks and confidence in his continued leadership. April 29 The Presidential Search Committee— John Gutierrez. Robert Rossi. Paul Belcher SJ. Dr. Louis Batmalr, Janet Saalfirld. Dr. Anthony Seidl. Andrew Boss SJ. Charles Clifford, Dr. Desmond Fitzgerald, and Herman Gallegos—begins the search for a new president.Community Involvement Program The Community Involvement Program, or CIP, presently runs as Sociology 140 and Psychology 140, and has been one major effort in extending USF into the community. An extension and application of classroom education, projects include work at Laguna Honda Home for geriatric patients, arts and crafts at Helper’s Home for retarded children, physical education at nearby grammar schools, daycare centers, Upward Bound, and tutoring. One especially popular area is the Advocate Program, where students work one-to-one with "pre-delinquent” children of pre-junior high age. A long range goal is to expand the CIP classes to the'point where "140" classes will be offered in all departments, offering an in-thc-strcet application of all disciplines. Relatively low knew Jack woll »n eager. bright, and in But Jack was a ipi his counsel and t on to others how were privileged to fierce loyalty and right The world svhatever he might have been pursued efcnrl KlorenH tuifh from the tragically an—a credit to his and his alma ourselves to ors Had moro of us caro for Jack, his much happier. God Dempsey. S.J.  On May 28. USF celebrated its 113th annual commencement, giving out diplomas to I 100 graduates. Some .5000 people attended tire happy ceremonies in Civic Auditorium. Honorary degrees were awarded to Fr. Alfred Boeddelcer, OFM. Honorable Raymond L. Sullivan. Sister Mary Brata Bauman, S.M., and Reverend William J. Dunne. S.J. Doctor Xavier Barrios was awarded the St. Thomas More Award for his work as founder of the Mission Neighborhood Health Center. Ms. Frances Monet Carter and Fr. John McGloin. S.J. were awarded the Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award.ng Relatively few uly knew Jack well an eager, bright, and sn. But Jack was a .pt his counsel and t on to others how o were privileged to fierce loyalty and right The world . ...latever ho might have boon pursued and blessed with from the tragically n—a credit to his his alma to Had more of us for Jack, his much happier God Oempsey. S J.I I i i f I I I 1 Valedictory Domingo Albert Magwih Education — What's it lor? Thar are manv ) answers to this question Lot me offer you mino Education is for Survival basically and fundamentally , survrva Alvn Toffior s book Future Shock, identifies ' a very real jnd present danger -a culture that changes faster than a man can adopt I tn order to survive we must turn to ocn educational system Education must now more than over teoch • Students to think to onab.'e them to cope with this vast proliferation of material If education is to teach the skills of thinking, then ! what. pray, is the purpose of Catholic eduration I submit to you that it must, among other things I give us a sense of purpose, a sense of what we can ’ do All that 16 years of Catholic education has taught me is what I sliculd not ought not. better not do And ! whoro were the teacher who would tell me what I could do Catholic education must become positive education For our country bears the wounds of injustice racism and a war we have yet to see end . This generation of American people along with the • generations that will follow must realize its capacity to heal To heal to rebuild to cream and to } strengthen Graduation must not merely be a moment in which . wn mark time It should celebrate the liberty wo have won through our educational process It should be a moment in which we celebrate the liberation of our ! hearts and minds away from the past and toward the conquest of the future It should—the traqedy is that I t doesn't the hope is that d can' I Relatively few knew Jack well eager, bright, and But Jack was a his counsel and on to others how were privileged to fierce loyalty and The world whatever he might hove been pursued and blessod with from the tragically credit to his and his alma ourselves to Had more of us Jack, his much happier. God Dempsey. SJ.Student Awards Awarded at Graduation The Father Flynn Award The Father Cody Award The Father Flohorty Award The Father Lonetgan Award The A A Bam Award Studnnt Achievement Award The M.P KilQtxe Award Dolta Sigma Pi Scholarship Award The Master of 8ouness Administration Award The Education Akimm Award The Phi Beta Chi Fraternity Achievement Award Or Ehvood Molsoed Award The Sister Mary Phit-ppa Fayno Award The Motlicr M. 8aot"St Russell Award The School ol Nursing Faculty Award The Evening College Faculty Award The James J Qitt Award Tho Alumni Award The Charles I Harney Award The Edward McOuade Award The Don s Club Loyalty Award The Professor of Military Science Award The Department of the Army Superior Senior Cadet Daughter of the American Revolution Modal American leg on Medal for ExcoUonco (Military) American Leg»on Medal for Excellence (Scholastic! Military Order of tho World Wars Award Michael Freeing Clark Leslie Christopher Brandi Paul Gaspan Wiiiiom Sable Bernard Lustig Robert Harrow James McConnell Anthony Todd Robert Harrow Bethany Adams Lawrence O'Shea Judith Jacinto Michael Freiling Kenneth Christoph Anne Boucy Stephanie Woodfo Nancy Barrett Helen Rotxllord Mary DoVay Carl SchmdSer Thomas Blank Carla Dotto Thomas Jackson Kathleen Byrne Stephen Heeg Philip Wittman Michael Connolly Everett Keating Evotott Keating Michael Mooney Joseph Schmiedi Michael Mooney John Kotlangerng Relatively few lily knew Jack woll an eager, bright, and m But Jack was a pt his counsel and t on to others how 3 W8re privileged to fierce loyalty and vas right The world t whatever he might have been pursued and blessed with from the tragically an—a credit to his irch and his alma tensitize ourselves to Had more of us nd care for Jack. hi$ much happier God ames Dempsey. S.J.Jack Burda Tony Goratdi Tony, o Minlc government rnaior at USF .in aclivii and respected momboi of ASUSF circles. d «d after a short illness in January An ASUSF senator for tho second time at the time of hit death Tony had been an unsuccessful candidate for the ASUSF presidency in 1971 He was also involved in San Francisco and California politic , and was to be a deiogato to the Repub can National Convention Death comes unexpectedly, striking down the young as well as the old We can define it wo can bring it about, but wo tail at understanding It. We ore thankful for the years that Tony Gnraidi did scent on this earth tho inspiration he gave and the rospoct he oornod at USF We hope that the Anthony Gerakh Memorial Fund will enable future USF students to contribute to the university the same dedication Tony Gnrakfi tlKl Jack Burda died far too young Relatively few members of the Univorsity family knew Jack well but those who did knew him os an eager, bright, and independent thinking young man But Jack was a very lonely young man who kept his counsel and secrets to himself and never let on to others how lonely ho was Those of us who were privileged to know him well admirod his fierce loyalty and dedication to whatever he felt was right The world is poorer because we know that wh8tovor he might have attempted In life would have been pursued with eagerness, determination, and blessed with success If anything is to be "learned'’ from the tragically short life of this fine young man—a credit to his parents, his family, his church and his alma mater—it is that all of us must sensitize ourselves to the hurts and loneliness of others Had more of us expressed and shown our love and care for Jack, his short life would have been so much happier God grant him eternal rest Fr James Dempsey. S J. fetor Poielio 1928 1971 The University of San Francisco has lost o most valuable friond and respected mombor of if community Pole Peietia's death ha lot! o void that can never be replaced Tho records and standards he initiated as the wlnnmoest basketball coach at USF aro monumont to his excellence As Athletic Director his foresight and enthusiasm was ithvays a boost to all who came m contoct with him Most of all, his personality will be missed Pete had a definite charisma" that attracted people to him and his personal touch was always warm and gracious Bob GaiiiordROIGIOn The University of San Francisco is a Catholic University. That has something to do with religion. Religion includes myriad groups pursuing patterns of belief and practice, which makes discussion of religion a work without boundaries. Concepts of religion and religiosity read like a lengthy multiple-choice: people praying in a church ancient priest teaching theology modern annual pilgrimages radical sacred times conservative celebration other-worldly pontifical decrees prayerful clergy on picket lines rational Christianity likewise evokes many descriptions, some at odds with others. Action taken in the name of the message of one Jesus Christ has ranged from holy war to the burning of draft files. Hermits, paupers, martyrs, organizers, writers, warriors, worker-priests, have all added a distinct perspective and ring to religion, to Christianity. Our own Campus Ministry (page 63) led by Frs. Bill Wood, Alden Stevenson, and Joe Diebcls, along with E.J. Coyle and an assortment of students, provides a source of coordination for religious-oriented activities on campus. Movies, liturgies, counseling, draft help, discussions, colloquiums, and benefits were sponsored by the ministry. Bill Wood, who doubles as Ombudsman, serves as a sounding board for throngs of students, and a catalyst for grievances and actions throughout the year. Their doors are always open. And always busy. Flic Theology Students' Union (page 64) has increased input into the theology department, and offers colloquiums on issues of the day. Bringing togrther both undergraduate and graduate students in theology, it has made that particular department more informal, and is one of the most organized student voices in any department. The picture on page 65 is exactly what it looks like: about three hundred people in The Ark. a world’s record for that usually sedate meeting place. And. on Saturday nights, it is hot an uncommon sight. The Charismatic Renewal, or Catholic Pentecost.ils. arc part of a national turning to religion and gospel, mainly by youth. Starting from a small group initiated two years ago by Kerry Koller and Bill Spohn of the philosophy department, attendance has soared to around three hundred for the weekly prayer meetings, which roar with a praise uncommon to the Catholic experience. Fr. Alden Stevenson caught a very expressive angle of St. Mary’s Cathedral on page 66. The thousand words that would take its place could talk about the Catholic Peace Fellowship. Ecumenical Ministry of the Haight, Catholic Worker. Archdiocesan Social Justice Commission, and clergy and laymen of all faiths involved in action for peace and justice. For now, let the picture sink in.REIIGIOnREUGIOIl 1I Are the moral implications of ROTC contrary to those of a Catholic university? 2) Docs ROTC servo its intended purpose of teaching the pupil to be a pood soldier? rote What i the role of ROTC in 3 university? In a Catholic university? This tom has been thrown around for some time, and will probably not bo solved as lonp as universities roly upon contributions from benefactors who espouse our war efforts Beyond ihot. there aro theoretical issues, which are passed from generation to Generation The puostion of academic credit for ROTC is hotly debated, as it was one April afternoon in the annual Father Flaherty Oobote of the Philhistorians The team of Clark Leslie and Chns Brandmeir roisod the points that will be discussed timo and again:A giant apparatus of destruction is today firmly installed in and around Indochina. Kilty thousand American airmen and 500 strike aircraft ranging from thr huge B-52 to the killer gunship, located at a dozen mammoth airbases and aircraft carriers are waging fullscale aerial warfare. The Nixon administration remains committed to a 20-year-old goal of American leaders: keeping U.S.-supported regimes in power in Indochina. The people of Indochina have suffered at the hands of oppressors for twenty-five years. The French colonial war. the Kennedy-Johnson commitment of American air troops, and now the electric battlefield and the automated war. All of North and South Vietnam, two-thirds of Laos, three-quarters of Cambodia are basically free-fire zones, subject to American bombing any time of the day or night. But this new war is different than the past. Ground troops play a secondary role to the air troops. This new war is automated, waged by machine. It is total, making no distinction between military and civilian targets, destroying everything below. It is secret. carried out without the knowledge of tlie American people. The mines, guava bombs, propane gas bombs, flechete bomblets, gravel mines, und dragontooth mines that are being dropped in the current air war are basically anti-personnel weapons, intended to kill and maim anyone within reach, presumably including a few Viet Cong. The bombs do not significantly affect supplies, roads, and machinery. The air war violates international law in several respects. Among the most extensively documented violations is the continued bombing of unprotected villages and hospitals, augmented by our illegal failure to aid civilian bombing victims. And there is no question about the Geneva accords we have broken through the bombing, and the transfers of civilians against their will. Besides killing and maiming the people, or making them refugees, the bombing has deprived hundreds of thousands of their livelihoods by destroying crops and forests. How do wc respond to this as Americans or as Christians or as educated people? the war has been brought home by the threat of nuclear war and the testimony of veterans to .American atrocities. We realize that we are paying the majority of our taxes for bombs and mines, not for housing or jobs or health care or conservation or bread. The war finally gets in our way. Peace marches, letters to congressmen, boycotts, resisting induction, arrest, imprisonment, peace candidates, initiatives, have all attempted resistance of this destruction. The USF Credo reads. “We believe that man can fulfill their dignity only in human communities where peace and justice prevail.” And, later, one of the educational aims is “to instil into youth the neglected doctrine that morality must govern economics and politics." History will acknowledge the struggle and resistance of the Vietnamese people to gain self-determination. How will we Americans be remembered?In an upstairs room in Blackpool By the side of a northern sea The Army had my father And my mother was having me Military madnoss was killing my country Solitary sadness comes over me Aftor the school was over snd I moved To the other side I found a different country but I never lost my pride Military madness was killing the country Solitary sadness creeps over me In 1971. the 3 4 million tons of bombs dropped on Indochina represented: the explosive equivalent of 38 Hiroshimas 80% of the ordance expended during the entire Korean War five times the tonnage dropped on Japan during World War II The total of 6.3 million tons of bombs dropped on Indochina from 1965-1971 represents 250 pounds for every man. woman, and child In Indochina 22 tons for every square milo of territory in Indochina more than twice the 3.1 million tons dropped during World War II and the Korean War combined Tho cost of the heli- copters lost in the 1971 Laos invasion equals tho cost of 17 U.S. local health centors. each treating 40.000 patients annually • Tho fuel for one jet for one hour equals two and a half months of food for a family of four ' One aircraft carrier costs the same amount as public housing for 270.000 pooplo And after the wars are over And the body count is finally filed I hope The Man discovers What's dnving the people wild Military Madness is killing our country So much sadness between you and me. War. war. war. war. war. war "Military Madness" by Graham Nashthe student senate A minimally powerful body, which controls 1.6% of the tuition fees, and is given authority to allocate this fund to the various student organizations and publications. the university senate This is the prime faculty representative body. Currently in a state of proposed transition. Basically an academic committee, and with a history of powerlessness. The committee on Governance of the University Senate recommended that the Senate he moved from the periphery of the university decision-making process to its center, and be involved in budget formation. Yet to be seen. the trustees 18 men and one woman, 12 Jesuits included. They possess the full legal jurisdiction in all that pertains to the university. Generally speaking, the highest power source. the students the university president the regents The lumpen proletariat, with a few minor uprisings. The people who pay the majority of the fees that support the rest of the bodies. Powerless, unless they channel their energy into the above, legitimate bodies. Good boys and girls. 1. responsible for the general direction of all the educational affairs of the university 2. appoints all administrative officers and faculty of the university 3. prepares the annual budget, with the assistance of the Finance Committee 4. prepares a long-range plan of development covering several years Basically an advisory group of businessmen and former businessmen who aid in development and fund raising For fun. move these around, and make combinations of your own. Balance them. Dream up different distributions of power. '1 radc with your friends.Fr Albert R. Jonson. S J. State of the University Address May 9. 1972 Today, before faculty and students strike out on the rigors of examination trail, and before we all head for the more pleasant trails of summer vacation. I want to present my views on the future of the University of San Francisco Some might consider it presumptuous for the retiring president to express his views, after all. he's had his chance. Better he fold his tent and silently steal away I beg to disagree Being, as one of our faculty elegantly put it. a president in resignation, is a rare opportunity. First, it confers upon me a power which I've never had before: I can now speak more frankly than the complexities of university politics generally allow Socondly. it renders my opinions more than mere opinion: They may not yet be Truth, to uso Plato's terminology, but they have transcended opinion, since I have emerged from the cave and have seen, to some extent, the view of the whole Finally one of my principal duties will be to inform my successor about the current stste of the University which he must govern But, it seems appropriate to tell you what I will tell him. for he can govern only if he and you. faculty and students, have some common understanding and appreciation of where we are today and where we must go tomorrow I hope my experience can aid in creating that common understanding I have, since the beginning of my presidency, spoken of the need for renewal and reform in our educational program, our administrative systems, in our governance and in our policies regarding student life While some heard these statements as threats to the established order, many responded with enthusiasm. But only the beginnings have been accomplished: much remains to be done My words were not merely my private prejudices imposed upon our local community. They were echoes of the words many wiser and older educators have spoken to the entire world of higher education in the United States They are being spoken even more strongly today The most respectod Jesuit educator. Father Paul Reinert. President of St Louis University, states them forcibly in his important new book. To Turn The Tide. While these are the worst of times for private and public higher education, they could bo the best of times for reforms, renewal, and rededication Necessity is the mother of invention whore our schools are concerned, too. and the changes being mado are significant rays of light coming at our darkest hours First and foremost, our colleges and universities have had to become receptive to change and bettor ways of fulfilling their task Thore is no place for blind loyalism to the status quo. Also put to rest must be the traditional institutional protectiveness or tendency toward self-perpetuation In its stead we must have open examination and honest evaluation of the job being done We at the Umvorsity of San Francisco must heed these words 8ul we. like most institutions of higher learning in the United States, consider the call to innovation moro a condemnation of our past and present than a challenge to create a new future. John Gardiner has said of American higher education, "even excellent institutions run by excellent human beings are inherently sluggish, not hungry for innovation, not quick to respond to human neod. not eager to reshape themselves to meet the challenge of our times." We at University of San Francisco are not distinguished from our brethren across the country in this respect Wo have our excellences, but we are too satisfied with them: we are not excited enough about creating new excellences We need, I believe, some sort of contract relationship where a student can be freed of the regular course procedure and work with a faculty member alone over a period of time. We need some experimentation with the evaluation of success and failure for students. A number of things that we have made possible by a relaxation of former requirements now have to be made real by the use of imagination. There should be, I believe, in the University an instrumentality for experimentation and innovation in educational procedures. Wc have allowed a great deal but we have not encouraged. We have not made experimentation easy. We have been. I think, oftentimes afraid of it because unfortunately we have not recognized that many things which we think of as innovative have had some history in other institutions. We must liberate imagination to devise more effective, and. in many instances, more humane patterns. When I speak of the quality of imagination. I do not refer to the ephemeral fantasy which has excited some so-called reforms in higher education. I rather mean the ability to imagine alternate futures—to use the modern term—-alternate ways in which the vision of possibilities has real relationship to an awareness of our limiting realities—personal, political, financial. The University of San Francisco desperately needs quality of imagination, in saying this, I refer to the life of the University as a whole because there has been exhibited considerable imagination on the part of some faculty and students in devising educational programs. At present, however, the general tone of university life, I believe, needs quality of imagination.I nmnis PORTFOLIO UFE no one has been reading 'e been that the staff was bution of the magazine ibly the change in format nishing audience. The td to worse with its literary magazine into a nto the most diverse and miliar foreign languages the magazine's rebirth, ry magazine circa 1965-Donahoe and her small, kuda, George Klein, and to the magazine format, changes made, and just : attracted over twenty ic, art. and ideas. 1 best describes them, in fit on this page. We did, • Klein in a rather poetic the Bismarckian ine with an iron the editor’s desk, o observe bricks ic-at-large, is a per whose stern agmatic pessimist that ranges from arterlymom THE PRESIDEm Fr Albert R Jonsen. SJ. Stato of the University Address May 9. 1972 Today, before faculty and students strike out on the rigors of examination trail, and before we all head for the more pleasant trails of summer vacation. I want to present my views on the future of the University of San Francisco Some might consider it presumptuous for the rotinng president to express his views, after all. he's had his chance Better he fold his tent and silontly steal away. I beg to disagree Being, as one of our faculty elegantly put it. a president in resignation, is a rare opportunity First, it confers upon me a power which I've never had before I can now speak more frankly than the complexities of university politics generally allow Secondly, it renders my opinions more than mere opinion They may not yet bo Truth, to use Plato's terminology, but they hove transcended opinion, since I have emerr and havo seen, to some extent, the Finally one of my principal duties wil successor about the current stato of he must govorn But. it seems appropna; will toll him. for he can govorn only if and students, have some common appreciation of whore wo are today and | tomorrow I hope my experience can common understanding Wr need. I bclirve, some sort of contract relationship where a student can be freed of the regular course procedure and work with a faculty member alone over a period of time. Wr need some experimentation with rheevaluation of success and failure for students. A number of things that we have made possible by a relaxation of former requirements now have to be madr real by the use of imagination. There should lie, I believe, in the University an instrumentality for experimentation and innovation in educational procedures. We have allowed a great deal hut we have not encouraged. We have not madr experimentation easy. We have been. 1 think, oftentimes afraid of It because unfortunately we have nor recognized that many things which we think of as innovative have I have since the beginning of my presidency, spoken of the need for renewal and reform In our educational program, our administrative systems, in our governance and m our policies regarding student life While some heard these statements as threats to the established order, many responded with enthusiasm But only the beginning have been accomplished, much romams to be done My words were not merely my private prejudices imposed upon our local community. They wore echoes of the words many wiser and older educators havo spoken to the entire world of higher education m the United States They are being spoken ovon more strongly today The most respected Josuit educator. Father Paul Reinert. President of St Louis University, states them forcibly in his important new book. To Turn The Tide. While these are tho worst of times for private and public higher education, theyam ik no one lias been reading 't been that the staff was bution of the magazine tbly the change in format nishing audience. Tht id to worse with its literary magazine into a nto the most diverse and miliar foreign languages the magazine's rebirth, ry magazine circa 1965-Donahoe and her small, kuda, George Klein, and to the magazine format, changes made, and just attracted over twenty ic, art. and ideas. best describes them, in fit on this page. We did, Klein in a rather poetic the Bismarckian fine with an iron ic-ar-largf. is j Jopcr whose sltrnHHNIl THE PRESIDENT Fr. Albert R Jonsen. S.J State of the University Address May 9. 1972 Today, before faculty and rigors of examination trail, and before more pleasant trails of summer my views on the future of the Somo might consider it president to express his views chance 8etter he fold his tent to disagree 8eing. as ono president in resignation, confers upon me a power which I've can now speak more frankly then university politics generally allow, opinions more than mere opinion: Truth, to uso Plato's termino transcended opinion since I have and havo seen, to some oxtont. the Finally one of my principal duties successor about the curront state of tf he must govern, But. it seems will tell him. for he can govern only if and students. hBVo somo common i appreciation of where we are today and tomorrow I hope my experience can common understanding Wr need, I believe, some son of contract relationship where a student can be freed of the regular course procedure and work with a faculty member alone over a period no one lias been reading e been that the staff was bution of the magazine bly the change in format nishing audience. The id to worse with its literary magazine into a ito the most diverse and niliar foreign languages the magazine’s rebirth, ry magazine circa 1965 Donahoc and her small, uda, George Klein, and to the magazine format, t changes made, and just i attracted over twenty lie. art. and ideas. • best describes them, in fit on this page. We did. e Klein in a rather poetic the Bismarckian ine with an iron the editor's desk, o observe bricks :ic-at-large. is a oper whose stern natic pessimist it ranges from irterlymom the Fr Albert R. Jonsen. S J State of the University Address May 9. 1972 Today, before faculty and students rigors of examination trail, and before i more ploasant trails of summer my views on the future of the Umversit Some might considor it presumptuoi president to express his views, after chance. Better he fold his tent and to disagree. Being, as one of our president in resignation, is a rare confers upon me a power which I've can now speak moro frankly than university politics generally allow opinions more than mere opinion Truth, to use Plato's te transcended opinion, since I have and hovo seen, to some extent, tho Finally one ol my principal duties successor about tho current state of ho must govern. But. it seems will tell him. for ho cun govern only if and students, hove some common appreciation of where we aro today and tomorrow I hope my experience can common understanding. PRESIDEITT We need, I believe, some sort of contract relationship where a student can be freed of the regular ------------i..— 3n j work with athe quarterly campus PORTFOLIO In the past few years, almost no one has been reading The S.F. Quarterly. It could have been that the staff was unfriendly, or maybe the distribution of the magazine was kept secret, but it was probably the change in format that scattered the already vanishing audience. The Quarterly had slid from bad to worse with its transformation of an interesting literary magazine into a newsprint manifesto and later, into the most diverse and unorganized collection of unfamiliar foreign languages ever assembled. The Spring 1972 issue was the magazine's rebirth. A revival of the good ol literary magazine circa 1965-1967 was organized by Brandy Donahoe and her small, but concentrated staff of Al Sakuda, George Klein, and Terence Donahoe. By returning to the magazine format, designing a logo to advertise the changes made, and just plain running around, the staff attracted over twenty contributors in poetry, prose, music, art. and ideas. The staff’s epitaphs, probably best describes them, in lieu of the photos we could not fit on this page. We did, however, manage, to find George Klein in a rather poetic place and position. BRANDY DONAHOE. in the Bismarckian tradition, has edited this magazine with an iron hand in a velvet glove AL SAKUDA is heir apparent to the editor’s desk. He plans a brief midwest return to observe bricks GEORGE KLEIN, our critic-at-large, is a graduate student and ex-paratrooper whose stern visage belies a heart of gold TFRENCE DONAHOE is a pragmatic pessimist with a Swiftian sense of humor that ranges from the ridiculous to the sublimemom the Wc need. 1 believe, some .sort of contract relationship where a student can be freed of the regular course procedure and work with a faculty member alone over a period the foghorn This will be noted, somewhere, by someone, that this was the year when the Foghorn came of age. anil surfaced weekly as actual journalism. Under the dires-tion of Phil Wittmnn and I .mi Leary for most of the year, they got their fingers and staffwriter into faculty terminations, student power in university politics, ethnic studies, the computer, grading. ROTC, the Institute of Chemical Biology, Community Involvement Program, the Church, the president's resignation, hiring and firing, the air war, student life. And a masterful piece on bureaucracy. City sections, tinder the influence of J.L. Broderick and Joan Lubamersky, scanned street music, pornography, religion, the peace movement, professional sports, tlie Chinese community, abortion, and prostitution, Excellent screen, stage, and music reviews, a resident cartoonist, spans coverage, and efficient news coverage rounded out a commendable staff effort t fining In Hit the year.PORTFOLIO1SH N CHIP’’THE SCnnnELL gdllervI ) fl aIWELCOME TO THE CAMPUS Vbiting student arc always welcome at USE. Guided tours of th - campus arc conducted daily at II a m. and 2 pan. Question alK.ut the Umverwly. U F»J grams, ami admission, procedure, w.ll Sadly Ik answered. Just let us know ... advance that you arc coming, "rile or call: Office of Admission University of San Francisco Sail Francisco, CA 94117 (415) 752 1000 (Cop . of tl c General Unnersily (a.1 Lur are available fro... the AdmttMOO SPORT Sports has had a strange history in our nation. It has become a mega-business, a financial goldmine. There’s more money in being 3 star basketball player than in being the head of ITT. In the 1930‘s, while our country floundered, sports flourished. Now, in the midst of turmoil at home and abroad, more honor and devotion is bestowed upon a football quarterback than on the president of the United States. For so long a school has been measured by the number of champion teams it has produced. And while a handful of people were lucky enough to participate, the rest were turned into spectators. The decision by USF to drop football and expand the intramural program was a step in the direction of preserving sport for everyone. As more people participate, we move closer to the original intention of sports. Abner Doubledav did not envision a huge, money-making corporate entity, but rather the chance for everyone to enjoy sport, and treat their bodies to a good time. So, while we acknowledge the performances of our teams, we add photos of other sports. They arc just as vital to the health and enjoyment of a people, and necessary if we arc not going to turn into a nation of professional observers. Take a hike.basketballSPORT I 5i basketballbasketball footballSPORT soccer The soccer Dons again sparkled in 1971 with a 13-3 record, reaching the semifinals in Miami before falling to the St. Louis Billikens, 3-2. Steve Nogeosco's team averaged almost four goals per contest, while their netkeepers allowed an average of less than one goal a game, while shutting out opponents eight straight times. Players Bill Rapp USF 3 Westmont Steve Carvajal USF 9 SF State Mike Gailigan USF 0 British Columbia Pancho Ruiz USF 4 Pacific LenchoCumplido USF 13 St. Mary's Al Werner USF 3 U.C. Davis Fdgar Sagastumc USF 3 San Jose State John Miklewright USF 3 Stanford Hans Fricssen USF 1 UCLA Alex Robustoff USF 2 Cal State Fullerton Leon Heitman USF 4 California Chuy Bracamontes USF 2 Santa Clara Les Deleon USF 2 Chico State Urbano Boucsieguez USF 3 San Jose State Bill Mejia USF 6 UCLA Kelly Hagan Kevin Dincen USF 2 St. Louis University Luis Lefaure Ray Silva Final Record 13-3-0 U»K)tv4.00000000basketballbasketball In a school where champion cage teams arc a tradition. 1971 was a traditional year. Taking their eighth WCAC championship since 1933, they finished with a 13-1 conference record, and won 17 of their last 19 games. The s |uad. composed of three seniors, six juniors, and four sophomores, lead the WCAC in both team defense and team rebounding. Each of the starting team—Johnny Burks. Phil Smith. Mike Quick. Snake Jones, and Kevin Restani—scored in double figures during league play, and were aided by a strong bench. Senior Burks, playing spectacular defense along with his able scoring and rebounding, combined with the play-making and scoring punch of guards Quick and Smith, and the rebounding strength and scoring of Restani and Jones (who was the fifteenth leading reboundcr in the nation). Although daunted by the tough Long Beach State in the Western Regional . the young team can look back proudly on a year in which their teamwork devastated opponent after opponent, and look forward to more of the same in the next season. Johnny Burks Honorable mention—All-WCAC Honorable mention—All-Northern Calif. Byron "Snake” Jones First team—All-WCAC Second team—All-No. Cal. Kevin Restani Co-soph of the year—WCAC Second team—All-No. Cal. Honorable mention- All-WCAC Phil Smith Second team -All-WCAC Second team—All-No. Cal. Mike Quick First team NCAA Western Regional Tournament Team USF 76 Stanford 67 USF 82 USC 102 USF 63 California 64 USF 70 Santa Clara 60 USF 77 Memphis State 82 USF 87 Loyola Chicago 74 USF 84 New MexicoState 91 USF 70 Arizona U. 62 USF 75 Oklahoma City U. 77 USF 97 U. Nevada Reno 60 USF 78 U. Nevada Las Vegas 69 USF 100 Georgetown 76 USF 86 Seattle U. 62 USF 92 St. Mary’s 75 USF 65 San Jose State 69 USF 102 San Francisco State 79 USF 97 Pepperdine 81 USF 79 Loyola Los Angeles 66 USF 68 Santa Clara 73 USF 82 Pepperdine 75 USF 66 Loyola Los Angeles 65 USF 106 St. Mary’s 72 USF 74 Seattle 0. 65 USF 113 U. Nevada Reno 65 USF 90 U. Nevada Las Vegas 83 USF 63 Santa Clara 56 USF 55 Long Beach State 75 USF 74 Weber State 64 Final Record 21-7 Bob Gaillard WCAC Coach of the Year No. Cal. Coach of the Yearbaseballbaseball USF Not a pennant-winning year for the diamond Dom, but they could probably take on the Giants this year and fare well. Dante Bcnedctti's team placed third in the WCAC with a 9-9 record, and some fine individual performances. League Statistics Zan .r .441 Zimmerman 3-0 3.58 Benedetti .412 Ramaciotti 0-0 4.00 Curran .381 Nolan 3-3 4.18 Downing .339 Bologna 3-0 4.58 Tassone .315 Saunders 0-0 6.06 Marion .300 Spediaci 0-2 7.14 Senn .278 Zanzc 0-1 9.09 Smith .278 Jackson 0-0 9.09 Cosmos .250 C ssincili 0-0 0.00 Jones .250 Turner 0-0 0.00 O'Leary .208 Jackson .188 Tsukamoto .125 The following arc ASUSF chartered clubs. They were approached twice during the fall of 1971 regarding photos for the Don. For whatever reasons, only a few provided us with pictures, or requested photos be taken. Groups such as Delta Sigma Pi. The Theology Students’ Union, La Raza, the BSU, and the Foreign Students are represented elsewhere by activities they sponsored during the year, or with a department they are a part of. The Embers The USF Film Club National Society of Scabbard and Blade The Knights of Columbus Gamma Gamma Gamma Society United Asians Philippine-American Students Naturalist Club Italia Nostra Bridge Club Student Nurses Association USF Historical Society Irish Club USF Rally Club Phi Beta Chi Chinese Students Dancers Co-op Students International Meditation Society Theology Students’ Union Omicron Theta Chi Hui O’ Hawaii St. Ives Law Society The Peers Ecology Action The Emcraudcs Sigma Theta Tau Gamma Pi Epsilon Organization of Arab Students The Executives Club Society of Physic Students USF Young Republicans Student Mobilization Committee SCTA La Raza Strategic (James Judo Club USF Young Democrats BSU Foreign Students IUIBS Naturalist Club ... we find Nature to be the circumstance which dwarfs every other circumstance, and judges like a god all men that come to her. We have crept out of our close and crowded houses into the night and morning ... Here no history, or church, or state, is interpolated on the divine sky and the immortal year. How easily we might walk onward into the open landscape, absorbed by new pictures and by thoughts fast succeeding each other, until by-degrees ... we were led in triumph by nature. emerson The International Fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi Professional Commerce and Business Administration Fraternity- Delta Sigma Pi was founded at New York University. S- hool of Commerce, Accounts and Finance, on November 7, 1907. Delta Sigma Pi is a professional fraternity organized to foster the study of business in universities: to encourage scholarship, social activity and the association of students for their mutual advancement by research and practice; to promote closer affiliation between the commercial world and students of commerce, and to further a higher standard of commercial ethics and culture, and the civic and commercial welfare of the community. The Emeraudes I he purpose of the Emeraudes is to promote unity among the coeds of the University, to promote spirit, to support student activities so as to increase student attendance, and to participate in activities of social welfare. The membership is open to all women undergraduates who are full-time students in good standing with the school, and who will contribute their enthusiasm for the principles of the sorority. 1 op Row: Debbie Low. Joann Blum. Barbara Levine. DcDee Aherne. Jean Schwcifler. Kathy Gee, Claire McCaffep- Bottom Row: Merit Dowling. Michele Phair, Jean Carainatti. Kathy Miller. Rosemarie Maring, Ann Marie Dilvestri, Lynn McDermott The following arc They were approached of 1971 regarding whatever reasons, only with pictures, or requested Groups such as Delta Theology Students' Union, BSU, and the Foreign represented elsewhere hy a sponsored during the yea department they arc a part of The Embers The USF Film Club National Society of Scabbard The Knights of Columbus Gamma Gamma Gamma Soc United Asians Philippine-American Student Naturalist Club Italia Nostra Bridge Club Student Nurses Association USF Historical Society Irish Club USF Rally Club Phi Beta Chi Chinese Students Dancers Co-op Students International Medit Theology Students Union Omicron Theta Chi Hui O’ Hawaii St. Ives Law Society The Peers Ecology Action The Lmeraudcs Sigma Theta Tau Gamma Pi Epsilon Organization of Arab Studen The Executives Club Society of Physics Students USF Young Republicans Student Mobilization Comm SCTA La Raza Strategic (James Judo Club USF Young Democrats BSU Foreign Students r I] A few landmarks by which to remember 1971-1972 Willie Mays was traded to the New York Mcts after two decades as a Giant. Marlon Brando makes a comeback in the highly successful movie The Godfather. The French Connection and A Clockwork Orange arc also biggies. The IVhole Earth Catalogue thrives and dies. Angela Davis is tried and acquitted of murder conspiracy charges in San Jose. George Harrison, Bob Dylan, Leon Russell, Eric Clapton and others raise much money for the people of the war-torn country of Bangla Dcsh. which won a war of independence from West Pakistan. President Nixon travels to China and to Russia. George McGovern, rising from virtual obscurity, seemed assured of a first ballot victory for the Democratic presidential nomination and a crack at unseating Richard Nixon.The following arc ASUSF cl They were approached twice of 1971 regarding photo for whatever reasons, only a fc' with pictures, or requested pi Groups such as Delta Si| Theology Students' Union. HSU. and the Foreign i represented elsewhere by a sponsored during the yea department they are a part of. The Embers The USF Film Club National Society of Scabbard The Knights of Columbus Gamma Gamma Gamma Sue United Asian Philippine-American Student Naturalist Club Italia Nostra Bridge Club Student Nurses Association USF Historical Society Irish Club USF Rally Club Phi Beta Chi Chinese Student Dancers Co-op Students International Medit Theology Students' Union Omicron Theta Chi Hui O' Hawaii St. Ives Law Society The Peers Ecology Action The Emeraudes Sigma Theta Tau Gamma Pi Epsilon Organization of Arab Studen The Executives Club Society of Physics Studrnts USF Young Republicans Student Mobilization Comm SCTA La Raza Strategic (James Judo Club USF Young Democrats BSU Foreign Studcnt So that's all folks. If you have read this far, our congratulations. Conclusions arc necessary usually if the words before may be vague. So we’ll just have a little conclusion, for maybe we’ve been a bit purposefully vague. Only this: we looked at the idea of a yearbook, examined it. and changed it to fit the times. Whether it is successful is mainly up to you. We have our opinions. So, if you desire, clip off the box below and send us some remarks. You probably won’t have the good bad fortune to change something like a yearbook. But there are plenty things more important you come in contact witli that could use some changes. Maybe we can keep up with future shock after all. To The Don Phelan Hall University of San Francisco San Francisco, C A. 94117 Remarks:The following arc ASUSF cl They were approached twice oi 1971 regarding photos for whatever reasons, only a fc’ with pictures, or requested pi Groups such as Delta Si| Theology Students’ Union. HSU, and the Foreign f represented elsewhere by a sponsored during the yea department they are a part of, The Embers The USF Film Club National Society of Scabbard The Knights of Columbus Gamma Gamma Gamma Soc United Asians Philippine-American Student Naturalist Club Italia Nostra Bridge Club Student Nurses Association USF Historical Society Irish Club USF Rally Club Phi Beta Chi Chinese Students Dancers Co-op Students International Medit Theology Students' Union Omicron Theta Chi Hui O' Hawaii St. Ives Law Society The Peers Ecology Action The Emeraudrs Sigma Theta Tail Gamma Pi Epsilon ()rgani .ation of Arab Studcn The Executives Club Society of Physics Students USF Young Republicans Student Mobilization Comm SOT A Ua Raza Strategic C James Judo Club USF Young Democrats BSU Foreign Students Graphics Dsn Scannell Bill Colo Joo Leon Photography Gorman Velasco Tom Bressan Bob Mow Marlene Voosto Randy Royce Phil McEvoy Alden Stovenson. SJ Mr. Jim Kelly Mr. Jim Hamilton Mr. Bud Bosolli Wade Murphy Copy. Consultation. Typing, and Sundries Audio-Visual Department J.L Broderick Karon Carrillo John Collins Fr. Andrew Dachauer Fr. James Dempsey Ed Dolores Kathy Gee Ms. Joyce Habert Alan Heineman Michael Howe Fr. Albert Jonsen Loo Leary Al Magwili Jim McConnell Bob Mow Mr. William Regan Mr. John Riley Al Sakuda Dan Scannell The Foghorn The Alumnus The Quarterly With anything so complex 88 the creation of a yearbook, many sources have to bo tapped, and many talents realized The yearbook owes its being to many pepole, but especially a handful who have seen it through a yeor of struggle 8nd growth: Photographers Tom Brossan and German Velasco, our moderator Dennis Alvernaz. S J„ Mr. Bud Bosolli of Macy’s Portrait Studio, and Mr Don Freeman of Pischel Yearbooks. Thanks to their suggestions and critiques, and far-fetched ideas, the yoerbook appears the way it does. And to the many who m8do it happen, our thanks. John Dombrink Editor Mr Flori8n Shasky. Special Collections. Richard A Glecson Library, permitted our photography of the Missale Salisburgense. Nurnberg, 1498. from the Timken-Zinkann Collection of Incunabula And a very special thanks to Mr Jim Kelly and all the people of the Office of Public Information, for their valuable services in photography, ideas, and information,Photography Graphics Tom Bressan Book 1-80 Bill Cole Book l-insrde cover Book III- 11.12.15.16,27.31.39. Book ll-mside cover 63.64.65.70.73.111 Book lll-in de cover Joe Leon Book 1-3 German Velasco Book 1-10.43.44.72 Book 111-8 Book 11-2.20.30.60.62.89-100 8ook 111-28.32.36.40.44.52.55. Dan Scanned Book 111-89-92 56.59.75-78.79.81-88. 93-98,101-104.107-110. 112-114.123 Faculty Pictures Bob Mow Book 1-52.87 Marlene Voeste Book 111-47.74 Tom Bressan 8ob Mow Marlene Voeste 8ook 1-4.18.30.46 Phil McEvoy Book 11-56 John Dombnnk John Oombnnk Book 1-8.88 Book 11-72.74 Background for Jim Kolly PlO Book 1-12.24.36 Book 111-3.4,7.20.24.48 Faculty Pictures German Velasco Randy Royce Book 11-8-13 Jim Hamilton Book 111-19 Senior Pictures Akten Stevenson Book 111-66 Mr Bud Boselli. Macy Portrait Studio Bud Boselli Book 1-11 (17.23.29.35)45151.59.71) 73(70.85) Book 11-3 (7.19) 21 (29.37) 38.39.40, 59.61 71.83)I  insight economics business history government nursing physical education military science Work without a purpose is wasted. Effort without direction is useless. Innovation without insight is nullified. One of the pleasures afforded those who are involved in higher education is the opportunity to take long hard looks at crucial issues. We highlight here topics such as war and peace, religion, governance, the role of sport, and educational alternatives, because they are indeed crucial. We take a long look at the educational process because it is our bread and butter. These are the kinds of interests we feel a university must come to grips with if it is to survive. Insight without involvement, directed toward affecting those crucial issues, is abused. Insight without the ability to innovate, and relate to the times, resigns itself to dusty library shelves and endless discussion. We have tried to point out areas and issues a university should grapple with. 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JerCPpf9.JA XIO 114 114 114 + 4 JerCPpf8.i2 xio I021 102 102 — ' JarCPLt pu 1200 SO 51 6 +2 Jewel Coi.66 SI 4 • 46'. 46' + % Jim wair.52 Jim U4%M «Ai 192 30 2V44 •291 — '-% Of all the fields of human endeavor, enterprise, Especially business enterprise, exerts the most thoroughly -Pervading influence on society. What you eat for Ercakfast, how you work on the job, how you are -entertained in the evening and even what you sleep on 3t 3ight begin as joint decisions of the producer and the -jnarket. All these things, the goods and services with Ehich society functions, owe their existence to the -creative decision-making of managers. 3 _ Enterprise today, more than ever requires professionals 3-ho are awake to the complexity of their world and fully aware of their role in that world. Considering this fact. LlS Sc USF College of Business Administration seeks to .educate professional managers, academically well-funded. trained in those skills useful in enterprise, and . imbued with a strong sense of responsibility for the iSccisions they must make as professionals. Jim McConnell The stereotype of the narrow-minded business student is not valid at USF. As an organization three things characterize the College: professionalism, social responsibility, and interpersonal involvement. This is the case because these three qualities also characterize the faculty and students of COBA. In the COBA, unlike other institutions, the prevailing student attitude is one of serious professionalism. A managerial career is seen not so much as a nine-to-five job but as a life endeavor. With the establishment by COBA students of an academic major in Business Ethics, two important ideals were realized: student participation in the shaping of their curriculum and affirmative leadership in what we consider to be a moral imperative. Spirit runs high; teamwork is the byword. Had it been thought of. the 1972 Commencement exercises would have been graced by a COBA spell it yell. The cheer that did go up indicates the enthusiasm and personal involvement prevalent in the college- In the preceding four years we have watched the COBA grow and come more and more alive, largely because the faculty and students have done so together. NashuaCp.48 NatAirlina Nat Avla.92a Nat Can.4! NatCashft.40 Nat Cham.31 NatCltyL.90 flat Fueil.74 Nat Oanl.20 Nat Gypl.05 N Horn . 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Omarklnd V II 11 11 — % OneidaLt.70 11 17% 17 17 — % Chelsea.24 Chemetrn.40 ChemNY2.88 Ches O?.S0e Chesbghl.08 ChlEast III ChIMilwCp ChiMilwpf 5 ChlPncuT2 ChRIP clUP Ch RICf NW ChocFull.lOr ChrisCraM ChrisCflcvpf Chromall.60 Chromlpt S Chrysleri Chryslerwt Cl Mtg2.19e CinnBelll.X Clnn GE1.56 CinGpf9.X CinGpf7.44 Ciiw.5iaei.40 CIT Pint? _ 9 16 1S% 117 26' 24' 160 SO’ 49 73 49 47% 196 79 78 5 10 10 22 9% 9 I 20 20 38 47 46' 10 19% 18% IS 19 18 24 8’ 7% 12 6% 6% 4 14 14 X2S 19 19 Xl 88''4 88'.it 206 31 30% 22 15 14 74 22 22 8 20 20 85 23% 23 180 115 115% 190 100% 100 12 37 36% 69 47 47 —-------rT 25% + 49 48V - V» 79 +1 10% + 9% — 20 47V +1 19% +1 19V +1 7% — 6% 14 + 19 + 88% + % 30 — 15 — % 22% — 20 23% _ % 115 100 37 + % -.47 + FedNMfg.30 FedPapfidi P Pappfl.70 FedSlgnS.60 Fcderalslnc FcdDSIrl.04 FederatDev Ferro Cp.'O Flbrebrd.70 FldMtg3.l8e FidUnBn2.20 FieldctMl.40 Filtroll.40 FinFedl.04t FlrejtCHie.83 xl07 FsIChrtl .42» 409 FilChiC1.56 111 F»l76tg2.24a 173 FitNalBoi.3 63 F tNCityl.32 334 939 17 26 4 22 57 6 29 13 16 1 31 16 42 FstNStBnc2 FslNStr.2$p FstPennl.16 F IPaM2.06e FstUnRE.92 20 26 19 13 4 49% 8 38 22% 27 39 30% 30'4 22 72 28 49 22% 68 60 32 24 49% 23 12 19% 25% 19 13’ 3 49’i 8 38 22’ 26% 39 30% 29 72% 21’ 27% 48% 22% 68 60 32% 24 49% 23 12 19% - % 26 + 19 13 — 3 — 49% - Vi 8 4- 38 + 22 26%— 39' + V4 30% + % 29’ - 72% + 1% + 27’ + 48% — % 22% — 68% + 60 — 32 + 74 49 — 23% + % 12 + David Scalise Delta Sigma Pi Mac Johnson interpactl intpD Gp.40e lntsBrand.96 mieriP wi.28 intersfSirs interjtunii lowBectl .481 Iowa Ell.30 lowallGsl.38 lowaPowl.60 lowaPSvl .44 IpCOHOip IfE i m p.60 ItexCorp jam.ie.j Jantxtn.60 japanFo.5S JpnFdtn.58 jellnPilot.92 JerCPpf9.J6 JerCPptB.12 JerCPLt pU Jewel Col.66 32 47% 46 Jim wall.52 192 30 79% lim M»l( lULtiW__LAW 7 23 23 73 X 3J . 32 32 . — ?’• 4 16 16 16 — 3 18 18 18 661 V 6% •% + n 8 1% 8% - V'. 33 30 JU 30 — 12 17 17% 17% + 34 19 18% 18 IV 22% 22 22 + V. 27 70% 20% X". — 18 11% 11 11 - V. 43 3VH 3V .94. — 143 64 63 63% 15 35 J54. 35 + 7 19 19% 19% 73 12 11% 12 3 10 10% 10% 38 53 52 52 — % 10 114 114 114 + % 80 102 102 102 —1 200 56 5 56 +2 Jerry Shea Business Secretaries Dore Schwabis distinguished die quality ol its rvicjvs mid the com|M‘-iiee. imagination, and 'ofits people. no have 5-»u  5M.' - » 4k — Vk l) '4 M — V% «« Ml 3 »A b S'® ' 4 4 + k :■ « - a » Chelsea.24 Chemclrn.40 ChemNY2.88 ChkS O?.50« Chesbghl.08 ChiEast III ChiMilwCo ChiMlIwpl 5 ChiPncMT? ChRIP clUP Ch Rlct NW ChocFull.lOr ChrisCraft ChrisCffc rpf Chrom ll.60 Chromlpf S Chryslerl Chryslerwt Cl Mtg?.19e CinnBelll.30 Cinn GE1.S6 CinGpf9.30 CinGpf7.44 ClnMSIacl.40 -CLT Finl2 9 16 117 76% 140 50% 73 495% 194 79% 5 10% 22 9% 1 70 38 47% 10 19% 15 19'% 24 8'% 12 6 4 4 14% 25 19% xl 88'A 206 315% 22 15'% 74 22% 8 85 T. 180 1155% 90 1COH 12 37 69 4 % 1S% 24% 49% 474 78'k I OH 9% 20 44'A 18'4 18% 7% 4% 1 % WVfc 8844 30 4 14Vk 224k 20’.% 23 115’A 100 364 47 Itti - 254 + Ifc 49% 48 Va — % 79% +1 10% + 4k 9% — 'V. 20 47% + 1% 19% +VVk 19% +1V» 7V, — H 6% 14% + 4k 195k + Ml 88'A + % 30% — Mi 15 — ’A 22'A — 'A 201% 23'4 — 'A 115'.% 100% 37 + V4 47% + H ,Ma.3( pBdl FedPa. 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A) 30 — 5k lowa Ell.30 12 175. 1744 17% + 5k lowallGsl.3S 34 19 18% 11% towaPowl.60 19 226k 22% 22% + Vfc lowaPSvl .44 22 20% 20'A 20'4 — % IPCOHOip 18 1154 11 11% - % 11E lmp.60 4J J?% 39% J?% — 5k ItekCorp 143 44% J— 43% 43% JamaiP.32 15 J544 364k 35% + % Janlien.60 2 19% 1954 1954 Japjnt-d.VSa 23 12 114 12 JpnFdln.ss 3 10% 10% 10% JettnPiior.V2 53 525k 52% — % JcrCPpt9.J6 no 114 114 114 + % JerCPpf8.l2 180 102% 102 102 —1% JerCPLI pf4 1200 56 55% 56 +2 Jewel Col.66 32 4 ' 44% 46'% + 5k Jun wail.52 192 30 2V% 29% — % Jim wall ptl rlOO 13% 13% im — k NashoaCp.4 38 53% 52% 525k — % NatAlrline 134 43’. 435k 43% — % Nat Avia.92a 16 24 23% 23% - 5. Nat Can.45 37 13'A 13 13 NalCashR.40 84 32% 31% 31% — % Nat Chem.31 15 765k 76% 765k NatCllyL.90 3 20% 7G% 20% Nat Distil.90 149 18'A 17% 17% — 4k N Dlst pf4.25 10 70 70 70 + % flat Fuell.74 9 24% 24% 24% — 4k Nat Genl.20 51 23 72% 224 — 4 Nat Gy pi.05 77 17% 17% 17% — Vk N Mom .15a 143 16 1554 15% — 4k Nallndust 33 64. 4% 6% Natlndpll.25 10 14 14 14 - 4k N Prestl.lOa 1 31 31 31 - % NatSvdn.68 28 29% 79% 29% - 4k Nal Stand.75 9 45 44% 4444 N Starch.64b 92 47% 4 5 47% _ 5k Nat Staal2.S0 34 42% 425% 42% + Vk Nat Taa.80 9 1254 12 124. - 4. Natomas.25 258 55'A 54 54V. + 'A Neptune.40 33 175k l '.k 17% + 'A NavPowl.30 6 34% 3454 34% Newbrry.l7p 15 275k 27 224k — 4k N EngEll.62 26 23'A 73 23'A + 44 NE TT2.36 30 3?'k 31 % 325k Nawhall.30 8 18 1744 174 - 4k Nawmntl.04 106 28% 28% 2854 — % N wmtp(4.50 5 1055k 104 104 —a NYHanR.20 50 16' . 1654 164 + % NYS EG2.08 30 28% 28% 28% + % NYSEIpM.80 30 110% 110% 1104k Nlag MPl.lO 72 155k 1554 15% — Vi Nia M pfk. 10 1140 54 54 54 — V Nla M pf3.60 210 4 TV, 47 74 — 44 Nia M p!3.40 100 46% 46'. 46 . + 4k Nlag Shi.10 111 16 1S% 15% - % NL Indl 163 13% 1354 13% NUT Cp.S4a 71 4154 40 vk 41 —4k Norfolk W5 ftl 7254 70% 7154 —1% NorlinCp.60 39 27% 264 26% Norrislnl.04 35 56% 5654 56'. — Vi NoA M 12.32 63 3154 30% 31'A V % No Am Phlll 68 3554 34 . 344. + Vk NoAmRkl.60 58 315. 31 31 NoARkpf4.75 17 83’4 83'A 83'A NoACo l.60 11 1ft 174. 174. — % NOA M 12.32 63 31 ’A 50% 3144 + V No Am Phlll 68 3554 34% 34% + % NoAmRkl.60 58 31% 31 31 NoARkpf4.75 17 3'A 83'A 83’A NoARkpfl.35 1 2754 27 4 274 _ A Noeatl UI.98 118 1454 145k 14% +4k NorCanOi.60 2 13 13 13 Nor CentRy 50 10% 105 104k + 4k NolllOasl .82 28 26% 26 2644 + A NollOspll.90 2 285. 28% 28% No In PS1.32 41 734k 235k 2344 NoNGat2.60 35 42% 425k 42% + 4k NoSUPwl.77 23 25% 75% 2554 NS PwplS.80 1100 110% H0% 110% + ’A NS Pwpf7.84 201 1035% 1025% 103% —1 NS Pwpf3.60 100 50 49'A 50 +1 Northgala 20 5% 5% S4i — 5% Northropl 9 27% 22% 22% + 'A NWSI Airl.45 1M 45% 445% 445. —1% NwtBanct.40 30 455% 44% 455% +1% Nwstlnd 50 84 32 31% 315% Nrwst lodwl 45 185% 18% 18'% + 5A NwtlndpfAS 7 99 98'A 98% —1 NwtlndptC5 3 99% 99 99 —1% Nwstlnpf4.20 5 825% 81% 82'A NwIMofUO 70 225% 22% 22% + 'A Norton 1.50 15 33% 3254 32% — 5% NorSImn.COft 145 33% 3344 33% Nort Spfl.40 » 70% 705% 70% Oak Ind.14 12 U'A 14 14'A — % Oaklla Pd.80 I 14% 14% 14% + % OcddP.12p 335 10% 10% 105% — 5% OcctdPatpf 4 4 47'A 47% 47% OccldPpf3.40 18 43% 43% 43’ 4 — % OeeldPp»7.14 2 24% 24 24 — % Ogdan Cp.40 34 14% U% 14% — % Ogd nptl.87 3 30 295% 30 + % OhioEdlsl .54 34 21 20'% 20’. + % Oh Ed pf4.S4 (100 44 44 44 OhPowpf8.04 tlOO 103'A 103 103 —2 OhPowp»7.40 x50 99 99 99 _1 Okla GE 1.28 740 225 . 225% 22'% - 4k OklaOEpf.80 xl20 12% 12'% 125% + 5% OklaNOsl.24 29 1 7% 17% 17% Olio Corp.88 70 1 4 1 5’% 15% - % Omarklnd 37 11% II 11 'A OnaMaLt.70 11 17% 17% 17% — %Timothy Barry Richard Braun V. ChoiiKphadduni lf James Barry Charles Boerio Gerald Abreu T. 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NatAlrline 134 43 43 43 — Nat Avia.92e 16 24 23 73 — Nat Can.4S 37 13 13 13 NatCashR.40 84 32 31 31 mm Nat Chem.3l 15 76 76 76 NatCityL.90 3 20 v» 70s 30 Nat Distil.90 149 18 17 17 — N Dlst pf4.25 XlO 70 70 70 + flat Fuell.74 9 2464 24 26 — Vi Nat Genl.20 51 73 72 77 — V, Nat Gypl.05 77 17 17 17 — N Homa.lSe 143 16 IS 15 — Natlndust 33 6 6 6 Natlndpll.25 10 14 14 14 — N Prestl.lOa 1 31 31 31 — Vi NatSvcln.68 28 29’, 29 79 — Nat Stand.75 9 45 44 44 N Starch.64b 92 47 47 47 — V, Nat Sta l2.S0 34 47 42 V', 42V, + Nat Taa.80 9 17 12 12 Vs Natomas.25 2S8 55 54 5414 + Naptuna.40 33 17 17 17 + NavPowl.30 6 34 34 34 Nawbrry.l2p 15 22 27 22 mm Vi N EngEll .62 26 23 73 23 + % NE TT2.36 M 32V. 31 37V. Nawhall.30 a 18 17 17 — Nawmntl.04 106 28 Vi 28 28 — Vi Nawmtp(4.50 5 105 104 104 —! 2 N YHanR.20a VO 167. 16 16 4 + NYS EG2.08 30 28 78 28 4 + Vi • •j NY5Elpf8.80 i30 110 110 110 Nlae MP1.10 73 IS 15 IS — Nia M pM.10 1140 54 54 54 — v» . 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Northropl Nwsl Alrl.45 NwlBancl.40 Nwstlnd SO Nrwst Indwt NwtlndpfAS NwtlndpfC5 Nwstlnpf4.20 NwIMutl .80e 5% - 2»i + 44 —1 45 Va +1 31 18 + 98 —1 .1 + Nortonl.50 15 33 32 32 - Nor$lmn.06h 165 33 33 33 Non $pf).60 30 70 70 —0— 70 Vi Oak lnd.16 12 14 14 14 — V, Oakita Pd.80 1 16 16 16 + Vi OccloP.12p 335 10 10 10 — OccidPatpf 4 4 47 47 Vi 4 7 Vi OceldPpl3.60 II 43 43 Vs 43 — Vi OccldPpf?.16 2 76 76 26 - Vi Ogdtn Cp.60 34 14 14 14 - Vi Ogdanpll.87 3 30 29 30 •f Vi OhioEdisl.54 36 21 20 70 + Oh Ed pf4.S6 xlOO 64 64 64 OhPowpn.04 XlOO 103 103 103 —7 OhPowptX.AO Okla GE1.78 ISO 99 99 99 —1 740 77 22 22 — OklaGEpf.80 xl20 12 12V, 12 + Vi OklaNGsl.24 29 17 17 Olln Corp.88 70 16 15V. 15 — Va Omarklnd 37 11 11 -■ OnaidaLt.70 11 17 17 17 — Glenn Hunter pj S. Laokwansayitaya Michael Mooney |H David Hoffman Gordon King Robert Herrold Everett Keating Edward Gome . 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I -' i +1 IJ. ++I I I l+l l+ ll+ +L+I+L+ + ++ +1 ++I +,-i II I+M I ++I I I +1 ++I+I III llll+l I II ge S;ff Ssi. fffs t Zf ' S' f ',a a s - u €Q a | S «N s§ o aii o aa h al 3 TO o jp u s v to Si riling status—uicun 1 Single 2 □ Married filing jointly (even if only one had income) 3 Married filing separately and spouse is also filing. Give spouse's social security number in space above and enter first name here ► c. ciii}juuiid rtcguiar oo or over Dima ntor 7 Yourself . ... □ ' Q ""Jw 8 Spouse (2Por 6 s chocked) □ □ □ chocho 9 First names of your dependent children who lived with vou 4 Unmarried Head of Household 5 Q Surviving widow(er) with dependent child 6 n Married filing separately ar.d spouse is not filing Enter 10 Number of other dependents (from line 33) . . . ► 11 Total nvpmntinnc rlaimorl .... a . 12 Wages, salaries, tips, etc. (Attach Forms W-2 to back. If unavailable, attach explanation) . — 13a Dividends(a£ „ ,£) $.................. 13b Less exclusion $......... ... (It gross dividends and other distributions are over $100, list In Part I of Sche lo 14 Interest. Ilf $100 or less, enter total without listing in Bl Ilf over $100. enter total and list in Part II of 15 Income other than wages, dividends, and interest (fro 16 Total (add lines 12,13c, 14 and 15) 13c 17 Adjustments to income (such as "sick pay, 18 Adjusted gross income (subtract li g e See page 3 of instructions for rules under which © If you do not itemize deductions and line lm is u £9 If you itemize deductions or line 28 is4UMOOO o' 19 Tax (Check if from: □ Tax Tables 1- a 3 9 a ■r 32 JB 3- u TO 3 d s’ ■o J o » •O Of O T3 C 0 "c a s= » CL X ro h- o £ w, 3 = J C Q = o a • - o m $ 20 Total credits (fy n lin 21 Income tax (subtractline 22 Other taxes (from line 60)............................................................... 23 Total (add lines 21 and 22)................................... 24 Total Federal income tax withheld (attach Forms W-2 or W-2P to back) . 25 1971 Estimated tax payments (include 1970 overpayment allowed as a credit) 26 Other payments (from line 64)................................. 27 Total (add lines 24. 25, and 26). . . ....................... 24 I 25 26 28 If line 23 is larger than line 27, enter BALANCE DUE ZJS iS tSSS 29 If line 27 is larger than line 23. enter OVERPAYMENT 30 Line 29 to be: (a) REFUNDED "fiTA'SJS? (b) Credited on 1972 estimated tax _Z • Z3 '3 |ijg 31 Did you, at any time during the taxable year, have any interest m or signature or other author- c 5 5 ity over a bank, securities, or other financial account in a foreign country (except in a U.S. military banking facility operated by a U.S. financial institution)? If "Yes," attach Form 4683. (For definitions, see Form 4683.) ..................... 13 © 6 3=! o S o O w □ Yes No Under penalties of perjury, I declare that I have examined this return, including accompanying schedules and statements, and to the best of my knowledge and belief It is true, correct, and comoletc.___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ , _ or The innovation in a history department comes not from the style of teaching necessarily, but a broadening of the areas of offering. USF’s history department prides itself on the diversity of its offerings, particularly in national histories such as Irish, English. German. Spanish. Russian, Chinese, and Japanese. New courses in the spring encompassed Ancient Civilizations. European Revolutions, Independent Africa, and The History of the Film. A course that attracted attention also was Dr. George Lcrski's History of the Jews in Europe, tracing the history from the settlement of the Jews in the Roman Empire to the Nazi extermination and the exodus to the United States and Palestine. Dr. Lerski also proved to be of service to the College Players, in aiding their background education for their performance of Fiddler On the Roof.o ait o 3a 3! Mlllg OlcUU-i urn; V7IIV.. 1 Single 2 □ Married filing jointly (even if only one had income) 3 Married filing separately and spouse is also filing. Givo spouse' social security number in-sp ce above and enter first namo here ► 4 Unmarried Head of Household 5 Q Surviving widow(er) with dependent child 6 n Marriedfilingseparatelyandspouseisnotfiling nxunijniuiis 7 Yourself KCguiar oa or over oimu Entor ■ a □' □ r£. a spouse □ □ ‘"•“•v 9 First names of your dependent children who lived with you_____________________________________________ Enter ------------------------------------------number ► 10 Number of other dependents (from line 33) 11 Total exemotions claimed 9 12 Wages, salaries, tips, etc. (Attach Forms W-2 to back. If unavailable, attach explanation) . 13a Dividends(3nt uuLu.) $.................. 13b Less exclusion $......Balance • ► (It gross dividends and other distributions aro over $100. list in Part I of Schedule B.) y 14 Interest. Ilf $100 or less, enter total without listing in B1 [if over $100, enter total and list in Part II of 15 Income other than wages, dividends, and interest (from m flO) Frank Beach Fr Joseph Brushes Donald Campboll Msgr. John Tracy Ellis Elisabeth Gleason% m Ti 7 7. 7, 7. 1 7. 7 7, 7, T, T. fT, fT IT IT fT .T ft ft fTgase attach Copy B of Form _p to back Income o u a m a '3 3 3 3 3 =a •3 3 13 •3 3 3 3 3 rs L3 .'3 3 3 3 3 3 3 ruing oidiua—v-iiuv-in um; 1 £2 Single 2 fj Married filing jointly (even if only one had income) 3 r-j Married filing separately and spouse is also filing. Civo spouse's social security number in space above and enter first name here ►_______________ ] Unmarried Head of Household □ Surviving widow(er) with dependent child PI Married filing separately and spouse is not filing (.ACIIItJlIUMd 7 Yourself Enter number of boxes checked □ nuguiiif oj ui uvui ... 0 □' s spouse □ 9 First names of your dependent children who lived with you_______________________________________________ Enter ___________________________________________number ► J- 10 Number of other dependents (from line 33) 11 Total exemptions claimed............. 12 Wages, salaries, tips, etc. (Attach Forms W-2 to back. If unavailable, attach explanation) . ■ — — - 22 13a Dividends (anSj ufwutr.) 5........... 13b Less exclusion $................ lance . ► (It gross dividends and other distributions are over $100. list in Part I of ScheSiles!) £ 14 Interest, [if $100 or less, enter total without listing in Scj Hfe B]. . . . . llf over $100, enter total and list in Part II of 15 Income other than wages, dividends, and interest (from iO) .......................... _______________________________________________________ - I SZ. 4 1 4 Joan Burric Philip Devine Ruth Borman Vincent Callan Paul Pissing Linda Bruzz.one Ronald Cenicrwnll James Dunne Marilyn Buckley Timothy Christen Joseph Costello George Farrell Mary Fcehant Cynthia Ferry John Harless Kenneth Lajoy Michael Flynn Stephen HaaR Linda Hay A.J. Lindemann Thomas Hally Anthony Hubner Joan Lutumersky Hattie Knox Bradford Lyle Gregory Kuver Brian Lynch?ase attach Copy B of Form 9 a 4 jc ■ o S-° o a riling OiaXU5 UIIC in um; wiic. 1 g}. Single 2 0 Married filing jointly (oven if only one had income) 3 Q Married filing separately and spouse is also filing. Give spouse's social security number in space above and enter first name here ► cxuiii|juuiis Heguiiir w or over diiiiu Entor 7 Yourself . . . . . □' □ 8 Spouse (•»«!» SSJO □ □ ch ek V 9 First names of your dependent children who lived with you 4 0 Unmarried Head of Household Enter 5 0 Surviving widow(er) with dependent child 6 n Married filing separately and spouse is not filing 10 Number of other dependents (from line 33) . . . ► 1 1 Total avsmnliniic rlaimoH w 12 Wages, salaries, tips, etc. (Attach Forms W-2 to back. If unavailable, attach explanation) 13a Dividends (uur.iu.) 5...................... 13b Less exclusion $......... (If gross dividends and other distributions are over $100, list in Part I of Sch 14 Interest. I If $100 or less, enter total without listing in B Ilf over $100, enter total and list in Part II of 15 Income other than wages, dividends, and interest (fro Balance r _12_ 13c 14 15 JZ. r MiryMlgn John Magnano Anne Maloney Rosemarie Mating Sally McKenna Kathy Mendelsohn Susan Mugnolo Reynaldo Ortiz Robert Pizzuto Jeanne Pttdoff Nelly Pun con RadomilePhilip Rapoport James Realini Sharon Schaffer Janet Scheunnan Van Dcr Meulin. Carol Wallace Larry Richardson Robert Sciaroni Mary Ellen Wiss There Kodello Kathleen Shea James Tyrrell Daniel Zigal Adolph Zimmer E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E IE (E. no. on Check or Money Order. Attach here H_ • O • j_Please attach Copy B of Form 3 3 3 3 filing status cnee umy vane. 1 g. Single 2 Q Married filing jointly (even if only one had income) 3 □ Married filing separately and spouse is also filing. Givo spouse's social security number in-space above and enter first namo here ► cAcmpwuiib Kccmar oa or over unno En|ef 7 Yourself . ... 0 0 number 8 Spouse j 9 First names of your dependent children who lived with you 4 0 Unmarried Head of Household 5 0 Surviving widow(er) with dependent child 6 n Married filing seoaratelv and sDouse is not filing Enter 10 Number of other dependents (from line 33) . . . ► 1 1 Ta aI aIaImaU _ |- -- 12 Wages, salaries, tips, etc. (Attach Forms W-2 to back. If unavailable, attach explanation) Balance See page 3 of instructions for rules under which If you do not itemize deductions and line lAis u It you itemize deductions or line 18 is MOOO o' 19 Tax (Check if from: □ Tax Tablesl- o o o c VI c O £ % nj Q. x ra f— §1 Q 3 . « CO ir 20 Total credits (trjpn 21 Income tax (subtract:line 20 from line 19) 13a Dividends(ans iiouniu.) 5.................. 13b Less exclusion $. (If gross dividends and other distributions are over 5200. list in Part I of Sche 14 interest. [ If $100 or less, enter total without listing in S Llf over $100, enter total and list in Part II of 15 Income other than wages, dividends, and interest (fro 16 Total (add lines 12.13c, 14 and 15) . . 17 Adjustments to income (such as "sick pay, 18 Adjusted gross income (subtract li 22 Other taxes (from line 60) 23 Total (add lines 21 and 22)................................. 24 Total Federal income tax withheld (attach Forms W-2 or W-2P to back) . 25 1971 Estimated tax payments (include 1970 overpayment allowed as a credit) 26 Other payments (from line 64)............................... 27 Total (add lines 24,25, and 26). .__. . . . . . . . 24 J? ) 4 2 25 26 28 If line 23 is larger than line 27. enter BALANCE DUE “V" 29 If line 27 is larger than line 23. enter OVERPAYMENT 30 Line 29 to be: (a) REFUNDED (b) Credited on 1972 estimated tax ► 12 13c 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 A3 c 42 31 Did you, at any time during the taxable year, have any interest in or signature or other author- 's § | ity over a bank, securities, or other financial account in a foreign country (except in a U.S. 5 S military banking facility operated by a U.S. financial institution)? . ; If "Yes," attach Form 4683. (For definitions, see Form 4683.) ...................... Under penalties of perjury, I cecJare that I have examined thia return, including accompanying schedule and statements, and to the best of my knowledge and belief 1 it is true, correct, and complete. n □ Yes gj NoSi 'SI Si ft WTJTffi ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft' UMWVf U VI rmiijj ouuub-—u T tAcmpoor ncguidi 03 or over ounu £n,cr 3 3 S -5 z 1 Single 2 Q Married filing jointly (even if only one had income) 3 ] Married filing separately and spouse is also filing. Civs jjwujc'j social security number in s?ace abovt and enter first name bere ► ______________ 4 P] Unmarried Head of Household 5 £j Surviving widow(cr) with dependent child 6 Q Married filing separately and spouse is not filing 7 Yourself 8 Spouse (rS»|»’ iS)D □ □ ch”ek”d 9 First names of your dependent children who lived with you Entor _____ number ► 10 Number of other dependents (from line 33) . . . ► 11 Total exemptions claimed .... . • . . ► In Government today, the four main areas of study are political theory and public law. international relations, government and politics, and public administration. A few attempts were made this year to strengthen involvement. "The City." an interdisciplinary course combining anthropology, economics, history, sociology, psychology, government, and biology, was offered in the fall. "Your Constitutional Rights." a one-unit course taught by USF law students, acquainted students with their constitutional rights if arrested, taken into custody, questioned by the police, or searched. "American Judicial Process," and a municipal internship program in San Francisco helped pull together elements of theory with practice and observation in the area of government.Donald Brandon Andy Johnson Richard Kozicki Robert MacKenzie Scott McEhvain Alexander Smetanay'ffl'minapmswsi vrism vrwvnu irvrvr... a a .. rilll Ig IdlUS—1H,IICCA UIIIJ urn.. 1 Single 2 Pj Married filing jointly (even if only one had income) 3 Q Married filing separately and spouse is also filing. Give spouse's social security number in-spaco abovo and enter first namo here ► 7 Yourself □' □ 8 Spouse only if itcm pn |—| f“| chockod 2 or 6 is checked 1—1 LJ ► 9 First names of your dependent children who lived with you 4 P] Unmarried He3d of Household 5 Pj Surviving widow(er) with dependent child 6 Q Married filing separately and spouse is not filing Enter number ► 10 Number of other dependents (from line 33) . . . ► 11 Total exemptions claimed ► Pamela Alioto Mark Baranowski Mary Cunningham Margaret Anderson Roger Carmody Guy Dastc Kenneth Antonich John Cechini Frank Drago Mary Barbcris Allen Cowley Dorothy Ehrlich aAlfonso Fernandez James Hagarty Gary Martinelli Walter Franco Kennedy Kilcy Michael McCready Christine Greefkens Barbara Levine Kevin McGrath C. Gudamuz Albert Lujan Michael McKenna3 3 K 7 3 ? rmng «••■ ww. -------------- 1 g Single 2 Q Married filing jointly (even if only one had income) 3 □ Married filing separately and spouse is also filing. Give spouse's social security number in- spaco above and enter lust name her ► ___________ □ Unmarried Head of Household 5 lj Surviving widow(er) with dependent child 6 □ Married filing separately and spouse is not filing Brian McLaughlin Luke Morley James O'Hare I Thomas McLaughlin Susan Nicolai Pierre Ozendo -ACIlipUUIIO nuguidl OJ 01 UVU UIIIIU £ntor 7 Yourself • ... (EL □' □ ™"bx°crs | 8 Spouse (rt'l’iftJISffla □ □ Ch Ch0V 9 First names of your dependent children who lived with you Enter ___ number ► I 10 Number of other dependents (from line 33) . . . ► 11 Total exemptions claimed..................... Sophie Miranda Gerald Norman Severo Pasol Robert Mohr James O'Donnell Bruno PcgueseEdward Pike Shawn Regan Stephen Riehl Harvey Sullivan William Topf Kenneth Wayland Michael Williams John Spataforc Philip Wittmancc. no. on Check or Money Order. Attach here |_O OO j_Please attach Copy B of Form W-2 to back rmng otatus—Lnct,r um 1 3 Single 2 □ Married filing jointly (even if only one had income) 3 Q Married filing separately and spouse is also filing. Give spouse's social security number in-spaco above and enter first name here ► cxempiiuiii Kcgui.tr tt or over Dima Ent0f 7 Yourself . . . . SI FI FI nJ,mbof — - L_J l—l of boxes 8 Spouse (onl» i,wn) FI FI FI ehechod 2 or 6 is checked 1—J LJ LJ 9 First names of your dependent children who lived with you 4 Q Unmarried Head of Household 5 [j Surviving widow(er) with dependent child 6 Q Married filing separately and spouse is not filing i J I! 10 Number of other dependents (from line 33) . . . ► 11 Total exemptions claimed ► 12 Wages, salaries, tips, etc. (Attach Forms W-2 to back. If unavailable, attach explanation) 13a Dividends5............... 13b Less exclusion $. (It gross dividends and other distributions are over $100, list in Part I of Sche lo Balance 14 Interest . I If $1C0 or less, enter total without listing in S Llf over $100, enter total and list in Pbrt II of S' 15 Income other than wages, dividends, and interest (fro 16 Total (add lines 12, 13c, 14 and 15) . .. . 17 Adjustments to income (such as "sick pay," 18 Adjusted gross income (subtract li See page 3 of instructions for rules under wh cfn line lm is uM S wirl figure yoMfJta If you do not itemize deductions and line llis uiWr $10,000, find ta If you itemize deductions or line 18 iS4 j|000 omnore, g c Mne 4 19 Tax (Check if from: □ Tax Tablesl- lj fax Rate Sch □ •o o O ra z o CL o H Q 3 . o CO ables and enter on line 19. figure tax. . D, □ Sch. G or □ Form 4726) 20 Total credits (f»0n lin 21 Income tax (subtract line 20 from line 19) 22 Other taxes (from line 60) 23 Total (add lines 21 and 22)............................ 24 Total Federal income tax withheld (attach Forms W-2 or W-2P to back) . 25 1971 Estimated tax payments (include 1970 overpayment allowed as a credit) 26 Other payments (from line 64)................................. 27 Total (add lines 24, 25. and 26)..............................._ 24 £JL 25 I 26 28 If line 23 is larger than line 27, enter BALANCE DUE 29 If line 27 is larger than line 23. enter OVERPAYMENT 30 Line 29 to be: (a) REFUNDED ______ (b) Credited on 1972 estimated tax S 12 3 13c 14 7 15 16 A3 17 18 19 0 - — ■ 20 21 ■— 0 - 22 23 0 ' .' ■j , 1 m m 27 S'! 28 29 ) t= -22 31 Did you, at any time during the taxable year, have any interest in or signature or other author-•ff 5 ity over a bank, securities, or other financial account in a foreign country (except in a U.S. - military banking facility operated by a U.S. financial institution)? If "Yes." attach Form 4683. (For definitions, see Form 4683.) □ Yes No Under penalties of perjury, I Cedars that I have examinee this return, including accompanying schedules and statements, and to the best of my knowledge ana belief it is true, correct, and complete.____________________________________________________________________ P ____________________________________________rr T d nr TTEfnJT) nr ff nSm iflOOJS 3N U Li IV IV IV IV IL li UJ lii ILi IL Lii uJ w u iu IL .J ui ui iiJ iiJ ii; XL L IL ll U tl ij 1j Igj lEMPbRATURt ORAL O - - RECT.37 2 _ 59 NORMAL 36-6 03 Lois Dunlap Sr. Mary Zita Folciano M8ry Fortin JoanGreon NE STOOL N » i S » u TEMPbRATURtSheila Pechoco Marilyn Ray Sr Judith Rothstein Ann Scheiding Sarah SpidellTEMPERATURE ONE STOOL 37-7 £ 37-2 99 “ NORMAL • 36-6 93 uJ 39.4 o 38 8 38-3 Joan Sullivan Sr Madeline Turnbull Wendy Tyler Jane Vincent not pictured Dorothy Daigle Sr Mery Fabian Josephine Gallas Sr Mary Martha Lona Schiagock Marion Vierra lexie WoodruffSusan Basil Joan Bowen C. Almadova loanne Bellcw Vvonne Budesa Nancy Barrett Cathryn Blake Cynthia Butte Anne Boucy T.M. Carney37-2_____99 NORMAL, 36-6 03 Mary Delaney Alma Ellsworth Jean Halligan Linda Cliff Connie Doherty Margaret Epidendio Anne Daze Sandra Dut'ficld Barbara Galvin Diana Colombini Paulette Duca Marilyn Travel ONE STOOLLinda Ishcim Kathy Cann Lane Nanette Magr.it I) Barbara Henry Marcia Kirices Mary Leonard Janet Holt?. Marianne King Jackie Lippitt Kathleen Hardin Caro! Kamalski Mary K. Lenzumm a a Judith Malijgie Diane McCarthy Annamarte Miller Heather M anion Patricia McLean Kathleen Morton Susan Marocvich Maureen MeSwiggan Mary K. Muller Laurie Martin Karen Meyer Mary Muller IhONE STOOLCatherine M urphy Maureen O’Hara Mary K. Ramirez. Colleen Murray R. Pate Rhoda Rlira Darlene Noussc Sandra Pinelli Helen Robillord Sr. M. Melanie O'Brien Renee Ralls Janet Rodrigue 37-2_____ NORMAL 36-6 Renee Saraccno Marie Thibodeaux Laurie Vaughan Susan Smith Kathy Trail Stephanie Wood fork Patty Seybold Rosemary Toschi M. Weisner Jeanne Swanson Kathleen Tupa Barbara Wright ONE STOOL Physical Education and Health Education have a small but important corner in the university complex. Though there are no majors in these areas, the faculty offer a wide variety of experience for the student. "Special Health Problems in the Ghetto,” with Florence Stroud, is co-offered in Ethnic Studies, and offers discussion of a pressing concern. "Personal and Community Health" discusses social, medical, and economic aspects of sickness, disability, and death, as well as nutrition, community diseases, narcotics, and mental health. In Physical Education, the faculty is active in the area of exercise physiology; modern dance is very popular, and the department provides expertise in individual and team sports.- Dr. George McGlynn wrote a piece for the I‘ 71 Don that deserves to be reprinted here in part: The purpose of the Phys»cal Education Department m to develop end impart to rhe student a scientific understanding of man as on individual, engaging In the motor performance of hla daily Mn and in other motor performance yielding aesthetic values 01 serving aa an oxptowion of hi physical and competitive nature Our program m Physical Education is concerned With contributing to man's undomtnnding of nature nnd hrmselt It is concerned with the development ol aesthetic appreciation These objective are achieved land indoed can only txi achieved) by the devotion of those who teach our courses to the concept that those objectives arn of primary vdiuot Unless thoso using the curriculum have soma pari in determining it not only will it be meaningless but. subsequently. It Will meet increased resistance from those umg it The student therofor . is obwously central to the educational process. If the student is not allowed full participation, wo produce individuals who have been implanted with a set of perceptor to view things und a vocabulary for describing them, and who will end up defending compromise and accommodation . V t fe fe fe fe fe t t t fe £ £ b h b b fc fc b £ £TEMPERATURE • ORav o • - rectI-a: S3 S QL ra uJ Of 39-4 103 o 38-8 102 38-3 101 37-7 100 —J 37-2 99 « NORMAL 36-6 98 o 36-1 97 Bob Turner "If we continue with the old way of on eye for an eye. we will all end up blind.' Martin Luther King Jr. Kay Hermann With all that we take with us. we feave something behind. Jeanette McDonald 8ettor by far I should forget for a while than remember and be sad. AJ. 8lock "Fondling precious time we follow the footsteps and echoes of children, with bloodshot eyes, tear driod choeks and tongues wondering with memories we leave to growl" Bob Giuliani Knowledge knows the printed toxt of books upon the shelf. But he alone is truly wise Who understands himself Michael Pieracci "While going along one of the streets. I noticed a poor beggar: he was.l believe, already drunk, as he was joking and feeling high I gave 8 groan and spoke to my frionds who were with me of the many sorrows arising from our own madness." St. Augustine Philip Dordovanis "I want what I want when I want it .. . You'll get what you get when you get it " Goorge Thanash 1907 Rino Bertini To Romulus and Remus Who made it all possible Shawn Regan If knowledge small Isa dangerousfl8w. Then a dangerous man Is what I am 5BII0R QUOTES •ONE STOOLMarcia Aveling Zenaida Dumo J.Jonos Pat O’Bnen L Pavlovich P. Lane Michael Galligan Raymond Selma Richard Dennis Nore Charles VelascoKEY FOR DFFfCATION E-ENEMA O-NO STOOL I—ONE STOOL: • GROUP j o GROUP : ■GROUP :9 I n ID 3" 1 2; • GROUP 1 5 oGROUP 2 5 ■GROUP 3 9 I n DPillD A Lul March over 200 Psychology majors gathered in University Center to discuss their futures. Would they go to graduate school? Get a job? Go into education? Many were uncertain. The result was a frank discussion and an exchange of ideas with seniors who could give possible career suggestions. Thr idea for this unique meering came from Fred Minmgcrodc'ssenior Psychology seminars. It was led by Psychology's academic representative, Chris San Miguel. It marked the first time in my four years at USF that I saw so many people interested in psychology in one room. It should be a clue to those that teach and study in the department that there is interest in innovation and more communication. This past year also saw great interest in Psychology 140 and 150. Here. Lee Bender initiated a long needed program -practical field experience in psychology inside San Francisco. It opens up endless possibilities in experimentation, and possibly more specialized work. Grants are also available to urban areas for research and practice alike. Maybe the next person hired by the department should have experience in this area. Community psychology, also, is beginning to define itself and grow. What better place for it to experiment and grow than in San Francisco?It it common knowledge that the Psychology Department here is experimentally oriented. It dor' an excellent job in this area. But with more psychology graduates applying in the clinical area it seems rather necessary for courses addressing such a variety of topic as Behavior Mortification to Jungian Analysis. We 'till, for example, discuss the "abnormal personality" in one huge course. Most universities are beginning to move away from this concept to more specialized arras. The coursr tends, many believe, to be too traditional and too general, even though those that teach it have done a fine job This whole area seems ripe for creative change. There also lias been talk about more interdisciplinary courses, with biology, sociology, philosophy, etc. Some have also discussed more contact between the counseling center and the department. Obviously, new faculty and personnel would be needed. Also, there would have to l e 4 new commitment and trust on both sides. Could thU idea be the road to graduate work in psychology at USF? Who knows? A mixture of experimental and clinical work inside the university and inside San Francisco Could truly give the undergraduate a first rate psychology background It would also make the department more appealing to possible applicants. Therefore it becomes obvious that the Psychology Department is just beginning to tap all of its possible resources. Because of its location our department has the opportunity of attracting new faculty, students, and. more importantly, ideas to San Francisco. It can be a mirror of the changing face of psychology. The department has a long way to go. But because of the extra work of Lee Bender. Fred Minnigerode. and sonic Psychology majors, the department, during this past year, seems to be moving on the right track. £ £ £ £ J.L. Broderick: • GROUP 1 5 o GROUP 2 : ■GROUP 3 9 ; n rzDrv id aColin Sitverthorne Harold Bevan• GROUP 1 o GROUP 2 ■ GROUP 3 n DAIID A Joan Affleck Gordon Chclunc Margarita Aranas Emily Chen William Ayoub Carla Cimino Karen Brrntsen William Coats Paulita Brrnuy Cynthia Colby J.L. Broderick Hunt Collins Mark Carbone Susan CorominasCeleste Coxxoli Kay Hermann Roberta Cusamayon Susan Jacobs Carole Dang G. Deis Mary Kelley Jocelyn Dumo Nancy Etswirrh Roxann Rigori fc t t- e- Linda Jones William Kenney Linda Knox Luix. A. Kossobudzfci3 =3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 • GROUP 1 o GROUP 2 ■ GROUP 3 n I DrM ID A Peter Kowalski Carmel Navarro Carolyn Lucido Nancy Nevis Laverne Mau Sharon Osborne John Mdnernry Margaret Overend Richard Mendribil Anne Murphy John Murphy Donna Parton Carol Quinn Thomas Rciil:::::::: Gloria T ravmo Louise Spiritosanto Jams Stagnaro Ann Mine Stewart tt Vareas Tom White Steve Williams Bradford Sihith Joseph Trolji Wayne Wright: • GROUP 1 5 oGROUP 2 i ■ GROUP 3 n rzor I ID A 3a 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 51 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 • GROUP 1 o GROUP 2 ■ GROUP 3 n GROl LP A o "Sociology at USF define education as a blend of academic challenges and student participation in the activities that comprise his or her intellectual interests. Programs and resources available through the department can he utilized by the student and faculty to stimulate the student's educational growth and competence." What all that means is that there’s a lot of action. Students can initiate this process of education, and it is enhanced by u high degree of student-faculty interaction. Since the department is only undergraduate, all of the faculty are involved directly with all the students, and their specific academic or research interests. There are three similar yet disparate areas of concentration—sociology. rthnir studies. and anthropology. The anthropology area is rapidls expanding, giving students introduction to physical and cultural anthropology. Opportunities to do field research have been maintained in the Bay Area, as well as in summer trips to Mexico. In the summer of 1972, an archaeological dig will be conducted in Nevada. In tlir fall of 1972, archaeology will he part of the departmental offerings. Ethnic studies provides courses in the history, culture, and social institutions of Blacks. La Raza. Asian, and Native American people. Community ties are valuable here, and there is a wealth of chances to be involved with community action groups, and workshops sponsored at USF and elsewhere. Sociology itself offers three mam areas for students’ interests—a variety of survey courses and specific theoretical courses, a program of applird sociology-research in the area of social work, evaluations, and impact studies, and a broad introduction to the naturr of social structures. Studrnt input, with faculty support and development, ha developed many of the innovations in sociology. Presently being studied are immigration patterns in South San Francisco, new and radical forms of religious expression in America, and the movement for prison reform in California. Trips to complement study and research work in the classroom are available during summer and intrrsessions. In the past few years, groups have studied cultural conflict in the N'avajo reservations of Arizona and New Mexico, agri-business and farmworker organizing in Central California, and study groups have gone to Mexico. Planned for 1972 are field trips to the Peoples' Republic of China to study the social and political factors affecting the social revolution there. Anothet study group rhis summer will tour the Soviet Union to investigate the existing social system and patterns of system maintenance. Field placements have let the sociology students loose on San Francisco through such programs at CIP. community studies, and specific areas of field research, aided by faculty connections. All in all, there is a lot of action, student input, faculty interest; innovation runs rampant.GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 Stanloy Goldman Helmut Girndt Fr Paul Belcherft -glGROUP GROUP GROUP Mary McCormick Jack Curtis Fr Peter McConville 1 2 3Elizabeth Parker Patricia Htll Lenneal Henderson not pictured Shirley Cartwright Babs Thomas Calvin Wolch Carl Reiterman• GROUP o GROUP ■ GROUP □ GROU P Christine Abbott Roosevelt Alexander Nora Bevel Dolorinr Biggs Tom Brcssan Johnny Burks 1 2 3 4 William Barulich Verna Blra Richard Burns Roberto Bemnati A.J. Block Kathleen Byrne Gary Bertelsen Rebecca Botkin Susan CanakJoseph Colombo Susan Earl Joseph Fern ekes Mary Crowe Timothy F.sscr J ames Ford Bernice Daniels John Everett Bernard Fusion Kelly Dicker Gary Fadda John Gutierrez Cathrinc Earcckson Paula Farley Zelma Henderick • GROUP 1 oGROUP 2 ■ GROUP 3 Joseph Lazio Jamie McKinnon Kathy Peterson Ernestine Lemons Kevin McNamara Michael Pieracci Ellen Luster Jerome Mitchell Stephen Sans Katie Johnson Pamela Lyau Robert Mow Christine Keane Jeanette McDonald Louise Peters _______________________ _____ £ «N | IK fl. m a Gwendolyn Smith Richard Valentine Jeanette Wiseman Shari Stevens Patricia White Kenneth Yeung John Storm Chester Williams Camille Ziomek t• GROUP 1 oGROUP 2 ■ GROUP 3 dGROUP 4Donald J. Russell, Chairman I . Kevin Mallen, Secretary Harry M. Bardt Vincent I. Compagno Richard P. Cooley Christian DcGuigne III Hon. Preston Devine Mortimer Fleishhacker. Jr. Marco F. Heilman Jack H. HowReed O. Hunt George C. Montgomery A.E. Ponting Leslie B. Worthington Roger D. Lapham. Jr. Edmund W. Littlefield Ernest J. Loebbccke Marshall P. Madison N. Loyall McLaren Thomas J. Mellon iuniversity administrators Edmond J Smyth. SJ Vice-president Academic Affairs Tho most powerful of the vice-presidents. Fr Smyth is also a history professor He served as dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences from 1965-1967 One of Smyth s ma|©r tasks os academic vice-prosidont has been his four-year effort of completely revamping the core curriculum requirements Richard C Hill Vice-president Business and Finance A native of Los Angeles, a graduote of Pomona College. Stanford and Claremont Graduate School. Mr. Hill succeeded Fr Corbett in April of 1971 Mr Hill served as Controller of the Claremont Colleges from 1963-1971 Albort R. Jonsen. S J Unrvorsity President The youngest president In USF's history. Fr Jonsen becamo president in Juno 1969 Ho was the first priest to receive a PhD in religious Studios at Yale. His years as president have been trying ones, the result of constant attempts at significant action m the university. Restructuring the board of trustees, pulling USF out of financial crisis, inspiring students to participate in their education, reorganising student affairs, developing a full development staff, and turning USF into a university of excellence and creativity were somo of his goals Some have been achieved, some will be revealed in time Unlike many of his predecessors, it can bo said of him: ho dared try John F Marshall Vice-president Student Affairs The Vice presidont for Studont Affairs, who has been reorganising that area of USF since his appointment in August of 1971. Or Marshall previously was dean of students ond dean of men at Slippery Rock State College, in Pennsylvania A graduate of Colgate. Columbia and SUNY Fredoma. ho has workod in studont affairs at Fredonio and Penn State While at Slippery Rock, he was also an assistant professor of education, psychology, and guidance. John K Riley Vice-president University Relations A most competent and experienced worker in fund raising and development. Mr Riley joined USF in the fall of 1971 after four years at senior Vice-president and Vice-chairman of the board of G A Brakeloy and Co. of Now York Ho worked there with clientele such as the Umvorsity of Kentucky. Xavier University, and Wayne State College, in areas of fund raising feasibility studies, campaigns, and consultation Riley was previously Vicc-ptosidont for devolopmont at Loyola Los Angelos, where ho dirocted support planning and fund raising, the same tusks he is responsible for at USFTRUSTEES John J. LoSchiavo, S.J., Chairman Cornelius M. Buckley, S.J. Michael J. Buckley, S.J. John W. Clark. S.J. Alfred J. Cleary James M. Corbett, S.J. Herman E. Gallegos James J. Gill. S.J. John J. Goodwin, Jr. Francis J. Harrington, S.J. Albert R. Jonscn. S.J. Karl Klein ., S.J. John H. Martin. S.J. Timothy L. McDonnell, S.J. Richard B. Morris Richard F. Mulcahy. S.J. John 'I'. Noonan, Jr. James W. Trent Maryannc Werner t 1 f i E E E E E fe I I I I C i I tAVA7 a IflMV A! J A Jl i i tfi IJ; y “TtmiimP MUMIIII ||, » komiiiiim lijiillJiifc lllllimiL''".. I •’• Mt! «•■ W-wwi sspbb .. V"John J. LoSchiavo, S.J., Chairma Cornelius M. Buckley. S.J. Michael J. Buckley. S.J. John W. Clark. S.J. Alfred J. Cleary James M. Corbett, S.J. Herman E. Gallegos James J. Gill. S.J. John J. Goodwin. Jr. Francis J. Harrington, S.J. Albert R. Jonsen. S.J. Karl Klein ., S.J. John H. Martin, S.J. Timothy L. McDonnell, S.J. Richard B. Morris Richard E.Mulcahy. S.J. John T. Noonan, Jr. James W. Trent Maryannc WernerCornelius M. Buckley. S.J. Michael J. Buckley, S.J. John W. Clark. S.J. Alfred J. Cleary James M. Corbett, S.J. Herman E. Gallegos James J. Gill. S.J. John J. Goodwin, Jr. Francis J. Harrington. S.J. Albert R. Jonsen, S.J. Karl Kleinz. S.J. John H. Martin. S.J. Timothy L. McDonnell, S.J. Richard B. Morris Richard E. Mulcahy. S.J. John T. Noonan, Jr. James W. Trent Maryanne WernerJohn J. LoSchiavo, S.J., Cornelius M. Buckley, S.J. Michael J. Buckley, S.J. John W. Clark. S.J. Alfred J. Cleary James M. Corbett. S.J. Herman E. Gallegos James J. Gill, S.J. John J. Goodwin. Jr. Francis J. Harrington, S.J. Albert R. Jonsen. S.J. Karl Kleinz, S.J. John H. Martin, S.J. Timothy L. McDonnell, S.J. Richard B. Morris Richard E. Mulcahy, S.J. John T. Noonan, Jr. James W. Trent Maryanne WernerCornelius M. Buckley, S.J. Michael J. Buckley, S.J. John W. Clark, S.J. Alfred J. Cleary James M. Corbett, S.J. Herman E. Gallegos James J. Gill. S.J. John J. Goodwin, Jr. Francis J. Harrington, S.J. Albert R. Jonsen, S.J. Karl Klein ., S.J. John H. Martin. S.J. Timothy L. McDonnell. S.J. Richard B. Morris Richard F.. Mulcahy. S.J. John T. Noonan, Jr. J ames W. Trent Maryannc WernerJohn J. LoScliiavo, S.J., Chairma Cornelius M. Buckley. S.J. Michael J. Buckley, S.J. John W. Clark, S.J. Alfred J. Cleary James M. Corbett, S.J. Herman E. Gallegos James J. Gill. S.J. J ohn J. Goodwin, J r. Francis J. Harrington, S.J. Albert R. Jonsen, S.J. Karl Klein ., S.J. John H. Martin, S.J. Timothy L. McDonnell. S.J. Richard B. Morris Richard E. Mulcahy. S.J. John T. Noonan. Jr. James W. Trent Maryanne WernerJohn J. LoSchiavo, S.J., Ch.iirm Cornelius M. Buckley, S.J. Michael J. Buckley, S.J. John W. Clark. S.J. Alfred J. Cleary Janies M. Corbett. S.J. Herman E. Gallegos James J. Gill, S.J. John J. Goodwin, Jr. Francis J. Harrington, S.J. Albert R. Jonsen, S.J. Karl Kleinz, S.J. John H. Martin. S.J. Timothy L. McDonnell. S.J. Richard B. Morris Richard F.. Mulcahy. S.J. John T. Noonan, Jr. James W. Trent Maryannc WernerGolden (iatc - Hyde Branch 101 Hyde Street 6224741 Serving USF [mr, n % line IfofSL'PPCR! REYNOLDS AND SEILER TOYOTA 3800 Geary Blvd at Second Avenue _________ San Francisco_______ Congratulations from Burns Electronic Security Services, Inc. 105 Market Street San Francisco BUY OR LEASE FROM THE BAY AREA'S FINEST SELECTION CADILLAC Save on lowor prices, better trade-in allowances, and better mothods of financing. Every sale.......every lease is backod by the finest service to make sure your standard of excellence is satisfied every mile you drive. GEORGE OLSEN SAN SAANClSCO I ?«•John J. LoSchiavo, S.J.. Chairm; Cornelius M. Buckley, S.J. Michael J. Buckley, S.J. John W. Clark. S.J. Alfred J. Cleary James M. Corbett, S.J. Merman E. Gallegos James J. (Jill. S.J. John J. Goodwin, Jr. Francis J. Harrington, S.J. Albert R. Jonsen. S.J. Karl Klcinz, S.J. John H. Martin, S.J. Timothy L. McDonnell, S.J. Richard B. Morris Richard E. Mulcahy, S.J. John T. Noonan, Jr. James VV. Trent Maryanne Werner CONG R ATU LATIONS If you want your thesis library bound — please bear us in mind Foster Futernick Co. Inc. 444 Bryant Street fc San Francisco, California 94107 398-3757 E f E E E E E E E E fc fc fc fc E fc fcToday USF, Tomorrow the World! USF alumni live in 47 states and more than 35 countries. No matter where you travel, you’ll find a friend not far away. The Alumni Association P S. If we can help today, contact us • 4th floor Cowell Hall. Compliments of Empire Travel Services 995 Market Street San Francisco 9 9 9 9 9 3 a a ____ Congratulations Compliments of Richmond Glass Co. 1001 Clement May you have a fruitful and delicious future. Congratulations from ARA Slater, the University Food Services.John J. LoSchiavo, S.J.. Chairm; Cornelius M. Buckley, S.J. Michael J. Buckley, S.J. John W. Clark. S.J. Alfred J. Cleary James M. Corbett. S.J. Herman E. Gallegos James J. Gill. S.J. John J. Goodwin. Jr. Francis J. Harrington. S.J. Albert R. Jonsen, S.J. I Karl Klein . S.J. John H. Martin, S.J. Timothy L. McDonnell. S.J. Richard B. Morris Richard E. Mulcahy, S.J. John T. Noonan. Jr. I James W. Trent patrons Mr and Mrs. David Olson Galt. California Mr. and Mrs Joseph Giusti Citrus Hoights. California Mr. Fred Campisano Phoomx. Arizona Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Ellsworth Sacramento. California Mr. J.P Mclenn Scranton. Pennsylvania Mr. George Collins Louisville. Kentucky Mr. and Mrs. Rinaldo Sciaroni. Jr. Kentfield. California Mr. and Mrs. Henry Trainor Kentfield. California Mr. and Mrs Alexander Ballart San Francisco. California Mr, and Mrs. Henry Dombnnk Oakland. California Wanda Schaffer Downey. California Mr. and Mrs. John Ahl Atherton. California Mrs. Amelia Bernard San Francisco. California Mr. and Mrs. John Kotlangor San Francisco. California Mayor and Mrs George Sullivan Anchorage. Alaska Mr. and Mrs. Norman Cowley San Francisco. California Mr and Mrs. Frank Yee San Francisco. California Mr. and Mrs. William Nehl Marysville. California Mr and Mrs. Joseph Galligan Burlingame. California Mr. and Mrs. Richard Piombo San Francisco. California Maryannc Werner


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University of San Francisco - USF Don Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

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