University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA)

 - Class of 1963

Page 1 of 308

 

University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1963 Edition, University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1963 Edition, University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1963 Edition, University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1963 Edition, University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1963 Edition, University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1963 Edition, University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1963 Edition, University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1963 Edition, University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1963 Edition, University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1963 Edition, University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1963 Edition, University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1963 Edition, University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 308 of the 1963 volume:

li Q 1 K N i W ll , . ' 7 . I fx , 1 , 1 X 1 1 - W ' , VN N I w 1 'IHS1 ' K 1 f 1 N , 1 X, W 1 1 ? , , K V E . 1 4 1 ' 12 ' f . azgx , W A -innv-rf-V , 1 -Y LY : - '- VW- ' 'Wi'-x "'l"l-IE IQ52 University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh 13, Pennsylvania Ioel B. Filner Editor Iames C. Hines Associate Editor William H. Schneider III Business Manager Lawrence M. Omasta Ass't Business Mgr. N w 'J M' 1 aj g-, Q'-' ui , ...---1...-. fra- "' 'I YU' T' 3' Y. , 'l K PHOTO EDITOR LAYOUT EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR TYPING STAFF LITERARY STAFF LAYOUT STAFF Stanley M. Knoll Edwin Ganek lean Kornfeld Deanna Proie, Diane Ruppen, Nancy Dixon, Mary Schutte, Ieannie Gilbo, Elaine Kalabokes, Ianet Poznik, Mrs. Iames C. Hines Susie Greenberg, Cookie Storch, Dave Coghe, Mary Ann O'Roark Vijay Kumar Iain, Martha Fry ' X. .1 .,' 4, , A' I . yyy rrr , rf' .iia ,jg 'S M1 Jizz, R I r r rri I PHOTO STAFF Edwin Ganek, Stanley Knoll, Ioel ADVERTISING MANAGER COMPTROLLER BUSINESS STAFF Filner, Vernon Colbert, Margie Nichols, Norman Keller, Robert Cunningham Mel Klein Irvin Leonard Sherman Canter, Bob Farrington, Linda Sadler, Lynn Haney, Iohn Vrana COVER STAMPING FROM A DESIGN AND STATUE BY BILL POWER x . ' J, ,jnugn 1 1, B, .J, ,.u X . S' n,!.v 'in-J A' f ., - .3 "' 'P ", -it , 1ejA6.r.5'4 V , , , 1 - E Ig :i bfnrll 'Ar' vxAX . flgb-v D A kk I .107 . V nz, I - ,ur A 1 , X' 5,-,HA 'f Z-'al' ".j.. ,K ,. 'Q f I 'J' ' " '. ' . ' P F' .' f .,,,, . 1 'fa rgg..'aTfs'oQa,Z 'g,x5'?' J -,-gig N- -2 4- 'z-4 W Q., I.. ,' -.'. . ,' -'- G E52 . -. . -A .1 fm . , Jw 'S 'l Q. :1Q:57"'fQi.5'?2v , 1 - - 4 Q ' , -:5 g,: . , , ' sg'f':f-f. J :B Q " , , '- ,J "4 'fy V A l 'Mig' , 1 ,ff-V' ."j' " 1, ' " "' "A, ' 4'3'?p 3, ff :gli nb' . ' '.., " . Q - - ,, . ,r , , . ,L :V ,F AJZQVQ ' , ' 4' 1 -' ' 5' -! ', 4 .f. ,XS-4..f" 1 ff x .f "X X . 4 1 ---,,. -sz ,I , . I . . . i -h. A V , ,,,f'KfJr 5- x . -'sq' I T-ch.,- F ., . - -1, l Nj Q - 1 -n-.' 3561, h J. 5. " , N-: A L.. F , , ' ll" ? 6 'T' 'lf' A '- 5. 2343!-V if 2 ir' - .. n -4 ws T , x s Q . 4 . Q13 . if rfw, THE YEAR THE VRANA PHOTOGRAPHY AWARD ACADEMICS ORGANIZATIONS ACTIVITIES HONORARIES FRATERNITIES SORORITIES ATHLETICS SENIORS HALL OF FAME SENIORS SENIOR INDEX ADVERTISING GENERAL INDEX ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 6 88 90 126 128 152 160 178 192 210 212 222 254 268 292 294 Copyright 1963 Owl and the University of Pittsburgh The Life In the southwestern corner of Pennsylvania, two rivers cut down through the mountains and meet to form a third. Four miles away from the point where these two rivers join, there is a university which has, as one of its major claims to fame, a forty-two story Gothic skyscraper called the Cathedral of Learning. This is the University of Pittsburgh. Around this building revolves the life of the University. A student's education' begins at registration in its Commons Room, and ends at Commencement on its lawn. Even though there are additional buildings scattered from the medical center on the hill to Schenley Park, this building is still the center and symbol of the University. And the number of additional buildings for the University is steadily growing. Langley Hall and Trees Hall are already centers of science and swimming classes, and the sound of bulldozers echoes across the campus as a fine arts building is constructed in Schenley Park and a new wing is added onto a medical center hospital. Plans have recently been disclosed for a National Aeronautics and Space Administration research center to be connected with the University. The most striking project of all is a new building which will span the formerly useless Panther Hollow. The major feature of this combi- nation bridge-building will be the computer housed in its basement, the use of which will be instantaneous communication with any spot in the universe. Also on the drawing boards is a method to transfer human speech directly onto magnetic computer tape. Once this process is perfected and the computer housed safely in its basement, every member of the University staff from the rank of assistant professor on up will go to his office at 4:45 each afternoon and there dictate into a tape recorder his thoughts of the day. Whether he has been thinking of Melville or molecules, his thoughts will be remembered by the giant brain in Panther Hollow and thus become available within thirty seconds for anyone who wishes to use them. The University will become one gigantic brain. University expansion and the burgeoning field of space research have brought with them greater emphasis on the sciences and graduate work in those sci- ences. A graduate with a bachelor's degree in chemistry or physics, unless he has definite plans to attend graduate school, often considers himself lucky to find a jtob as a laboratory assistant. A Ph.D. candidate in any field of science is considered a duffer if he does not have some sort of government research grant to cover his tuition and pay most of his living expenses, while graduate students in the humanities and social sciences are forced to work on their own and attend part-time classes. The result of University expansion and the academic' plums received by the scientific fields of research work has been another lost generation. Amid the clicking of computer relays, the rumble of bulldozers, and the quoting of con- struction costs in the million-dollar bracket, the undergraduate still exists. He is often confused, lonely, and lost, feeling alone in a world which is not of his making. He may not be neglected, but he often feels that way. His ninth- floor advisor ends his private conference as quickly as possible, and as the student leaves, he imagines he can hear the computer whirring on the floor below him. He finds himself in lecture courses with two hundred other stu- dents and referred to by a seat number instead of his name. He is thrown in with a group of strange people from all over the earth whom he does not know and who do not know him. His instructors, pressed for time, often find it convenient to brush off his questions with a suggestion that the student work on his own and find out the answer for himself. His classmates begin to form dormitory cliques, to join fraternities and sororities, and to become active in student organizations. He looks about himself for something that will provide an aim or goal to his life, for something that will give him a purpose. This something may be a booth in the Tuck Shop, a girl, or a desk on the publications floor, but, hopefully, he finds it. If he does not, he soon learns that Pitt is no place for anyone who has a trace of apron strings around his waist. Although the undergraduate is the lowest man on the academic totem pole, although he is often neglected, he is still the vital force which brings the University to life, and this is his book. This is his story, seen through his eyes, and told in his words. 4-an-Lal September brought its heat, its classes, its bonfires, and its football games. The first pep rally, held just before the game with Miami University, was nationally televised, and the students turned out in force. They brought ban- ners and pennants which exhorted the team to win its game and their mothers to send money. Coeds and cheerleaders swelled the throng, adding a touch of glamour to the boisterous crowd. At the first football game, the exuberant and optimistic students arrived early, in order to reserve a seat from which they could easily see the predicted slaughter. The students' enthusiasm re- mained With them throughout the band's performance and the pre-game ac- tivities, then turned into a dull despair as they saw the wrong team being slaughtered, and the disappointed faces began to dot the stands. fs. ' 4' as UPA .51 QL fur , ': V 5 ' 11 - .Q .cn ' I by, ..,, ,Q 4 - 8 1,1 L, 5 X -5, If . i gl 4 . .. ' 5 Q' 5 , J ' - fy ,g ' fx,- , EJ., ' ' M , lsixf b Ak ., H ,- 'Q ,A-vein '-'R'-1.5. -V.-'v H , , . -- . X. -1 .x - 5 -1 XI, - - uf., .n 5,3 ,. .v .. an .K .. -1"""d-Q3 .:?,9g': . .5 .. H H.. , 4 . -. .., n '- 15 . , .'.' ' N' Q. A f-f-. .Q-Q.:-fxf-I-fy-f-. gpzzpn, ' -.Q 2.11-.',. '.', :fr lf, -.fx '.v.'.lh",.Q,, , p N -.glw--.u f' Q' n A - 1- - . ' 9 ', .-- -:,:..4'-.2 ,..'4..- h. V 'f -zlgrrggg,-4 ..l- nn, --.1 . l ur Z':::?Pf7- '.4 5'-:.-, I .Q ' T Ii.. .v'... . 1 V, "iii fn W. , p ' 5. NK F , ia, A S ,Q .! -L The cold, chilling rain of early fall arrived, bringing with it a return to classes and a return to the rush and the scramble of the trimester system. It always began to rain just as the students had to make the long, unprotected dash from one end of the campus to the other. Everyone tried at first to get from Langley, across Fifth, and up to 224 CL in ten minutes, but they soon gave up as they discovered that the professor was always five minutes late. Despite the rush from class to class, from exam to exam, from paper to paper, a lucky few managed to find a few moments for themselves. Amid the organized chaos that could often be called an ulcer factory instead of a university, the lucky ones found an extra five minutes to view the art in the SU lobby or the museum photography exhibit. i ., y O ' Q ' l , - ' wg, 4 rj 1 A , 1 Ab Q9 Q, 9-s PP: ' 3n- gl -4 A J? A 4 u, .I , 'r I r .T 'H 3 nit' I J X 1 ff '11 it J ,Ji J A f The extracurricular activities of the student body were centered around the Student Union. It was a place to meet friends before or after dinner, to lounge for a few moments before crossing the street to the Cathedral and classes, and a place where the various activities of the Student Union Board's PM and Midday Series could be held. It was a place of activity. The ballroom was used for dances, addresses, and singers. Its upper floors were used as offices for various student organizations, the University publications, and the campus radio station. It was also used as a men's dormitory, and the elevators were in constant use during the night, as students went to and from nights on the town and study sessions. But it was also a place where a couple could find a corner and argue their differences. The University's students numbered in the thousands. They had come from all over the earth, and were of all types, ages, temperaments, and sizes. They jammed the Commons Room at Registration, forced classes to overflow into halls, and created gigantic traffic jams on Bigelow Boulevard as they crossed to the Union at the noon hour. They seemed to be everywhere, and there seemed to be no escaping them. But the moment always came when they seemed to disappear from the earth like lemmings. On these infrequent oc- casions, there was time to catch a few moments alone in the Flagstaff Hill sunshine. There was time for an elderly woman to read an article in the campus newspaper that related the mass activities scheduled for Homecoming, and there was time for a girl to take a lonely walk down a rain-soaked drive. ?alza.- , A ' wk Plug d J, . .ad Convocations were held once every tri- mester. Each begins with a stately pro- cession of faculty and trustees, fol- lowed by the Chan- cellor. The ceremo- nies were always conducted with much pomp and much circumstance, and a fair propor- tion of the students took advantage of the two-hour break from classes to at- tend these convoca- tions. On the stage, in front of the gigan- tic copy of Lincoln's Gettysburg address, the honors were con- ferred and the Uni- versity scholars named. Small gold ribbons were handed to the chosen few, and those who had not been chosen watched from their chairs with expres- sions of envy, deri- sion, and a touch of admiration. 17 - ,w : wg-x 1 V . A V The evenings on the University campus were as varied as the students them- selves. Those who could play bridge picked up a foursome and passed the evening discussing Gerber and Blackwood. Some dragged their troubles down to Gustine's, in the hope of forgetting their problems momentarily in the pleasant and convivial atmosphere. Others checked the University calendar of events, and twisting couples in the ballroom found themselves being eagerly watched by a small Indian boy tightly holding his mother's hand. For others, the pressure of classes and assignments weighed too heavily for them to waste an evening. These conscientious students spent their evenings with their books, trying to understand the method of balancing ionic equations and memorizing French verbs. For them, it was an enjoyable evening. f Q my X ,Lf '-.4 yu " , ' --. - , - A ' ' 4'-Q '. ,M X -ww "' '-" 2- -' , J '. 'A - 1 . . ' . , 06 A -:',-.wil ' , X w W 1' N' 1' 1 , 'W ' 5 ."'..,Q 4"-rf: ,fl 42542, . 1- .- - sf--,fn - .' --1 H- ' ' , 12,4 ' 'fn' Q"-ff: . ' -n haf' iv, " 'I 1-"4 1 4-1 ,N 41 -tiff -E1 5 . A -' ' 4 A -My 6: 1 4 waz r - . '- az.. . ' - ' . " 1, wf'1""AQ 'bw-f, f",,- w . ff A ,rim ,' ' :,"." -21" ' ' " .-WM ' -.A.,-. "1 .' 53 I X "R, "f 1 - Qef 1 V 1 my -fm .q.z5 ,. g !f. ? U - 'I :wb .0 ll -u. "N" ?1.l 955 I' . 47 ' P if -ses? ' ,v', "' ' J- J if V.. ,U ,J Egi , 'ff ' 'uf' ff ' ' , ' 's ' H1 P, ' I ' Illlhllyg . .1 -"9 .1 . ...z The snow descended on the campus with suddenness and silence, whitening cornices on the Cathedral and drifting down on abandoned motor scooters in the Student Union drive. For commuting students, the snow was only an an- noyance as it doubled their traveling time and rendered their automobiles use- less. For those on campus, snow meant that all activities, except snowball fights and snowman building, would now take place indoors. As students Went from class to class during the day, the snow made the walk from Langley Hall to the Cathedral a nuisance. The snow drifted down the collars of their jackets and dampened the paper in their notebooks, along with giving them wet feet and ilu that later proved to be an opportune excuse for class cutting. ,- H.,-' "x QQL "R -. v w n ,wif V V. 4 I 4 fa s 4 -,A. 1 " w , 1 The clank of the bulldozer was heard in the land as the University construc- ted its new circular dorms with the pie- shaped rooms. The dorms grew floor by floor, and the build- ings grew to be al- most as high as the wages of the hard- hatted men working on them. The build- ings inspired stu- dent self-expression. The more artistical- ly minded built their own circular dorms from scrap sheet metal and old beer cans, while those with tastes closer to the earth remained awake into the small hours of the morn- ing, thinking of names for the new dorms that would express the vision- ary ideals of the planners and the new spirit of the University. After countless student- hours of contempla- tion, a few names were discovered that suited these ideals to the highest degree and were nationally quoted: ' Ajax, Comet, and Bab-O. .Q ' "' f , ' ," '- ,la ' J ,' . ff-J ' ' . Y - -D' 1, , 1" : ' .4 14 .,,, , la 7 "' :rf 'WEB 45 ,f A I -, 151,-. :gg-1'Q.,,,,A W- ,TL- F W Y, -zu, ,, 'vw Nonetheless, the University's building program continued with even greater vigor. As the dormitories neared completion, plans were announced for ad- ditional buildings that would stretch from Panther Hollow to the Medical Center. These new buildings would bridge a formerly useless ravine and create one giant campus with the small engineering school located just on the other side of the valley. Everything from fine arts to one of the world's largest computers will be part of the massive project. A NASA research center was also included in the plan. But, after being subjected for years to the announcements of new building projects, none of the students were inspired enough to leap for joy when they discovered that Gustine's was to be demolished. 9 The student began at the bottom. In the monstrous school-city that is the University, he belonged to the low- est rank in the vast hierarchy. As he made the long, lonely march up the Fifth Avenue walk, he often felt like an ant squashed by the heel of the upper ad- ministration. He felt that he was on the last, lowest rung of the ladder that stretched to the 40th floor. But his plight did not go unno- ticed. There were those whose job it was to look down on him, care for him, and guide him as he wandered through the seemingly end- less maze of his edu- cation. Where the clouds drifted around the Cathe- dral windows and the View stretched for miles, these people met in secret con- ference and decided his fate. But they did not make him a pawn on a chess- board, only a num- ber in a gigantic IBM machine. A ,V . . . ig, .5012 X-, 75.5. , ,, , 0 -V YY vw Zn n H v ' "E,-L. . .., , " - 1 A 2- V .Cf -f :EE Fr Q I, 1 1, Q 'Q' SEQ, , ' wfmf- , , S.,-V P Q .:: ' , , pai' , rv . gi ,512 1. :ff . 5, A , Lv Lfiw '-rr-, -ik ' 51512. J, , QQ '13 M, 1--H we 'X wfapgf V Plffbs' ' ,N - .F '45 . ' 49? , .Ka M f, .. .5--,, R.. JL V., . F-r v 3, ' ' 5 , gs 43 -f-:wi 'iff' vi' ' k -Hs bw t a sn ,QL ,mga . vdlbv- 1-ugh-navy? The Tuck Shop was without a doubt the most crowded, the least air-condi- tioned, and the most over-priced eating place on the cam- pus. It was also the daylight gathering place for all Greeks. It was carefully segregated into booths, and every Greek made sure that he sat in his proper booth, un- less he wished to circulate among the sisters of the soror- ity across the aisle. It was the place to go to iind out the latest rumors on the tuition increase, the starting time of Sat- urday nightis party, and the location of this year's Greek Week Ball. It was a convenient place to waste an hour while the student was cutting a one o'clock class. But most of all, it was a place to eat lunch. The stu- dent could eat in the company of his chat- tering classmates, or eat his lunch alone. fm .wwf-. lg--Y I ',.,.'.v. .,A. ,+- A an Vw Ol N? , uv '-U4 4 1 . , .ls-44 ' ,. If' For many of the freshmen men, Freshman Camp was their first excursion into the big bad world of college. They spent Labor Day Weekend at Camp Kon-O- Kwee, and had an enjoyable time keeping each other awake and throwing their counselors in the lake. The counselors were upperclassmen who wished to do service to their University and also line up a few likely looking prospects for their fraternity. Besides instructing the freshmen in the ideals and tradi- tions of the University, the counselors also taught them songs, none of which are ever sung by any students. 34 If a student elected to live in the dorms, he signed away his privacy for the next eight months. Dorm living was one long round of shared showers, cafeteria lines, hot water that never stayed hot, and noisy evenings. In the winter, the eighteen-degree-below wind whipped around the upper floors of Schenley and Brackenridge, and in the summer trimester, the muggy weather made it im- possible to either sleep or study. Some students spent all their spare time in the dormitory rooms, while others seemed to go there only to sleep. The rooms were intended for studying and sleeping, but were used for everything from bull sessions and political discussions to eating pizza. Men students were continual complainers about their floor counselors, while women found the curfew hours and the orders from the Twelfth Floor too restricting. v -'ff-ua 'fix' -Q mae: i ' -hx : ' asf., . ,L The dormitories were ordinarily filled with laughing, lively students who were busily engaged in planning their weekend or joking about the day's happenings. On Friday and Saturday nights, the rooms and halls emptied as the students began their evenings on the town. They poured out the Quadrangle on motor scooters and in Iaguars, leaving the weighty problems of college life behind them for an evening. As more and more students left, the lights in the dorm- itory windows grew less and less numerous, and the halls seemed to grow longer, dimmer, and more lonely. The downstairs lobby emptied, and the Uni- versity policemen locked the Forbes Avenue door and turned off the lights in the lower lounge. But no matter how many students left, there was always one who was left behind. 35 37 1 , t mem, U, H ., l'N-.- We X 9 5' . l , The dormitories, besides being a place to stay away from, were also a place to work. Beds were better to study on if they were unmade, and four walls were easier to stare at if they were papered with copies of Miss September instead of assignment schedules for Mathematics 23. Some students preferred study sessions, but most quickly realized that the best way to accomplish their ends was to study alone. Thus the moment of truth arrived. When the mass lectures were over, the student's grades were decided by what he had ac- complished alone, over an open book. R 4059 The thought of the cafeteria caused an- xiety in any student unfortunate enough to have a meal ticket. He was faced at every meal with selecting one of the various overcooked bland repasts. His next problem was one of finding the proper type of knife with which to eat his soup. At times he faced his meal sans spoons, sans forks, sans glasses, sans all but knives. One distinct advantage was that he could usually obtain a second helping of material which was knifeable either in anger or in self-defense. His ability met the supreme test on Saturday night when faced with tough steak, tough lobster, or tough roast beef and tough to get seconds, knifeable or not. But, after meeting all the challenges he was reminded of past battles by Sunday night's Foods of the Week Review. F., M Y ., n -HV!-'pq "' W g.UlT-,fJq,5,"'gf4,-N .. ..,5.,-in . W . '4 ,Q H'f5:'. - , I Mtn., gig-1.1113 V, H I., , 1- A , 'BL 4 , 1 319 ' " 5 '- 7 For some students, college suddenly took on a new meaning as they dis- covered that certain Someone for whom they had long been waiting. And the campus, with its long, tree-shaded walks and circular benches, was the perfect place for this discovery. Here two students, usually one male and one female, could sit and discuss courses, life in general, and each other. They pledged their undying love and vowed to keep their promise when they were apart. But more often than not, the flower of their romance was ground under the heel of a Harvard man with pipe and Iaguar. ,,.-- N., O -1 'P n ' 3' H H1 6 r J 1 QK 1 .. 'I W ,lr 1. .I If A Wt, f A' ,.- -+I MV nw TUESDAY 7AM TU HAM APRILTU NIJV. INCLUSIVE PGH A138 UPS 2 J-f . ,1 1 1 .V . 1 2,1 T: .Lb '1 ." '1 I ll Q li. 4 J. -.. Commuting students came to the Univer- sity by means of every wheeled ve- hicle that was known to man- kind. They drove automobiles, rode the buses, came by bicycle and motor scooter, and rode the oldest means of commuting to the University-the too hot or too cold, nev- er-on-time Pitts- burgh Railways Streetcar. But no matter how the stu- dent commuted to the University, if he drove it, he couldn't park it. The No Parking signs seemed to grow like weeds along the curbs, and in the few places where there were none of these signs, there were parking meters. The city govern- ment, swallowed up in its greed for an even greater amount of revenue, had once again decided to fleece the student. Autos, autos every- where and not a place to park. Stu- dents soon learned that they would have to arrive at seven-fifteen in the morning in order to park within half a mile of the Univer- sity. Seven-twenty was too late. The vast cavalcades moving in on the University from every point of the compass soon filled every square inch of curb space. The hardier students brazenlly parked in front of Fire hy- drants, at cab stands, and in the endless posted zones. When it was announced that the last free parking lot in the area, Schenley Plaza, was to be pol- luted with the ever- present parking meters, the student body rose up in arms. Such a plan would never be tol- erated by the stu- dents of the mighty University. fkiq 4 1 -Hr.-.235 51 , if m. an .. ,I , , J,-H, 'T 4?-A M 13. .6,i..A,!-3 l M iv 1 U W, ' n. . ,-f-"f wir, f 2:11 '.m'l'1f" r f,"' 'Q -f W 1 .,.-xiii' f X i'I'fi..'-f. "XL . Bgivffw 4 551-. 4 E.'f.5.'gfw J'l. J. V , .1 5551351 ' 3 ff 'r 15' ,ggtvl N 5, 1 r: V ' 1.5! L51 'I:', 514, 4 , Q , 1, ' .-,1?x:-- 1 E2 ' ::ng::w'g3 LT: 'wp 1 -- - 1 15-Q f A"aH'A'.1:' 1 ': . r.-1. :gli 4' w I' U , a . W ' xx Q' rw ,w. flf 1625 14 '-df' ff. 1 ' xv A if . , 2'-., P1 :,:x L3-,'51I1f I . - Ne. f Y 'N 1, . '1 nf-q,, 2 , 5w?:,"L' .r --' onli :1r1"' p - 501' W G' idol wi M In -, 'P' . .. .. Q ,,, ff , 'T ,D , A2 1 Q- ... ,At T- lbw: 'If L Sig l. uf' ' :gn .I Hin a . F3"ff':'Si- X is So the students once more shouldered their ideals and signed their petitions, and rode off into the sunset to joust once more with the officials of the city. Led by Student Government, they were confident that their plea would be heard and that the days of liberty and free parking for all would return once again to the campus of the University. They signed the no-parking petition believing that it was meant to halt all parking meter installation on the campus. They suddenly discovered that they had signed a petition just extend- ing the time limit on the parking meters. The advantage of a city campus is that it is usually the center of the intel- lectual life of the city and all its cultural advantages. The campus of the Uni- versity is so situated, but it is also close to an entirely different side of city life. Not all the people who live in Oakland are young, bright-faced college students. Some are steelworkers and housewives. Some are old men who spend their fading days picking chewing gum off their shoes. W, ffm Iwi may 5 MEAT SAUCE 1 9 u MGH Em ' . MEAT mar? 6 i .M-gy . ,fl 1 mm 1 .,...,..-1 wi X .- .4 Yr Duquesne BEER 11 I 1 ' we! w x 4 ..- uma A ,,. 1 X H 522 v , , 1573 , Ln-N,,. " J Nik ev w fu H wx ' Wm w w. . N. 4 V ,Mk-Hi A f N . ,i,a..a- ,, ,. J? 6 " .H Aullj I, 1 pe.-Rf' ' " Lg f---wll ,Q w .quail Q as I-N" 1, I, 5',y,r- ,QE ' ,. ,. . --AK:-A-mf?-1 .tif 7' ff Lf. I 2 -- For commuters, life was one long ordeal. The day began and ended in a fourth-hand automobile or rickety streetcar that rattled over the Forbes Avenue potholes. The student often had to rise before dawn in order to make his eight o'clock class, and, if he had a reason to remain late at the University, had to carefully check the bus schedules to be sure that there was a run out of town after midnight. He discovered that public transportation schedules were meant for those who worked nine to five on five days of the week, not for college students with night classes and weird hours. , -"' -v - W - Y I, ,T 1 - -fl, ' - A - -,,. J -- 4 Q" Y -'iff ",,.5'4 V sv X , - , v F 1 A 1 A . 1- ' Y, ,. ' . l , - ' v l "' 'F-5 Many of the stu- dents were forced to commute by means of the many street- car lines that ran through the campus. In the Winter, the heavy snow kept the trolleys from meet- ing their schedule and kept the student freezing on the safety island. In the spring, these islands were no protection for the short-sighted student who had for- gotten his umbrella. And in the summer, the cars were jammed by masses of fat old ladies with huge shopping bags who trundled their way through the car, elbowing stu- dents and the motor- man alike while they declared squat- ter's rights on the last remaining seat. Students were forced to pay one of the highest fares in the country for their ride on the trolley, and they found themselves at their wit's end as the deadline neared for the annual Christ- mas strike. 'Ska 1""f i n . , V,-,. - , 1.4.1 The more provident students on campus took care to find a mode of transporta- tion that would be quick, cheap, and easy. For some, it was a motor scooter or a bicycle. Those of lower financial status resigned themselves to walk- ing for the rest of the trimester. But those students who lived more than a twenty-minute walk from the University had to either drive or find some means of public transport, and had to put up with all the incon- veniences and all the difficulties con- nected with com- muting to class. One of the inconven- iences was the time lost commuting, and the resulting short nights of sleep. Thus, when the com- muter's day was over, he found him- self alone on a poorly-lit street corner, Waiting for the one-fifteen streetcar. -'-wal ii. ggnuilllxxsa ui l Q U o a n 1 "asus" H- 1 lr I ,pant--Q I !!! 'un 3.2, H , 0 IW! JL E f 4 4 ' u lg -Lfx-:X 'Q . -OK +11 ,F , .1 ' X -, J if .-' 5. ' ,s I - . fi' f . 'ff 3?Y' iAx l . P- 'F . x - 4-if-ia' 'i 4 3' 4 s 'lv- fb K' . -.' - , - . ,F I, , -tif 1. 4 -, , eff 4 , 55'vQ1'1k . if In 'A xwgf: 1 Ahf I K -I Q, .1 ,QI 1. l. fig 1, ' ,fs"1.A',-fl r 4 .1 ., Wg r - f p ff , g fs .' ' fa ' ' ' ' ' -4. 'qu' b .3 '. 5 - r xv- f-v , , .fi Q ,W ' A ',' vu 'R A, ,., 1 y . , , 'Y ,Q -...V x -15,,N, 4 gf. .-. .I - ,h Q N, I N'f.f-J' . - 4 'K . N - 4 , X? gh . f '.f vf f A ,,: ,ft 11 QA: if 1 fx by - has . ,g ., if . 1 fre-- gf' r, I 1 , fa ., 'J '--, Mc I 1. ' B, J ,' 'gf . fe iq! '. f Q A, f -'v'1.+ 4 ' . 5. . ' I L ,151 r ,rv . . . , if ww vt I 'P' bbw' I tx W In . B5 ffl" P9175 x 3' vi, x , vu 'NV ' I A 1' , 4 ' .QA :ff f if-4vg'f'SN' r' "" ' N I 1. LJ1' V4-'NU Q 4 ' I if wifi. :X .el .1 .P , ,d::LQ 13 1 L Y ,gg ' E s . if . .. T . , N. 8 X' - I , v4 mi fi s H . -r' ' K " 9 o W.. . LV , M J 1' YE' -- tr ' I3 ' K - ,. 3' . 'L ' X L i ' in 'lx ..,f,i I J.: I . ,awry ,uw nf' , .. KA A -r ff. -. There were the masses, and there were the individuals. The masses flocked to all the sports events held at the University, and cheered or booed according to the fortunes of the team on the field. They made spectacles of themselves at any all-University function, while the individuals with something to say found a couch in the lower lounge of the Student Union and met with students over a cup of coffee. The individuals were quiet people, but their presence meant more to serious students than the presence of the Penn State football team. .1 ,-gal 2 There was the noise, and there was the quiet. The noise came as the team on the court scored another basket, and the quiet came as the seconds ticked away in the final quarter with Pitt be- hind by ten points. The noise came as thirty thousand people rose to their feet following one of the few completed Pitt passes, and the quiet came to the Homecoming Queen and her escort as she waited for the mo- ment when she would be crowned by the Chancellor. The noise came as students jammed the hallways of the Cathedral in the ten- minute break be- tween classes, and the quiet came as a student pored over his textbook on the night before finals. 63 W i f Y T -g Y- ,, 54 The fad of the year at the University was the campus riot. The award for the outstanding stu- dent riot of the year went to the resi- dents of Fifth Floor Schenley as they used the Cuban sit- uation to great ad- vantage. The pam- phlets and placards began to appear just before the noon hour, and a small picket line soon grew to a full-scale mob as sympathetic students painted their own placards with such legends as "God save St. Peter's and the South Side Syna- gogue." In the con- fusion, someone had the presence of mind to call the Uni- versity police to make sure the pick- ets did not get out of hand. Second place in the riot awards went to a group of enterpris- ing students who hung the sarcastic campus sportswriter in effigy. SJW N ..r M7532 43 'fg :I .svw5,.f -1 g, Q, ,I L 1- mais? Y The rush season for Greek organiza- tions began with the registration smoker in the Student Union Ballroom. The eager rushees quickly signed their names to the cards in anti- cipation of the soon- to-come free dates, parties, and lunches. The fraternity men met them with hand- shakes and the eter- nal smile of the Pitt Greek. The rushees were immediately subjected to all the propaganda that the Greeks could throw at them in the course of one night. The rush parties followed, featuring the Limbo, women, and, of course, punch that was guaranteed to be non-alcoholic. The rushees were intro- duced to brother after brother, and forgot names im- mediately. 58 Once again, Home- coming was a week of hurried float- building and house- front construction. The Greeks mixed papier-mache by the barrel and slapped it on the flimsy chicken-wire frames Fraternity men and sorority sisters co- operated in the final hours of the rush just before the struc- tures were judged by the committee. Long hours were spent on the moving parts of the dis- plays, and napkins by the thousands were stuffed into holes in chicken wire. The floats were hard to build, but were much eas- ier to tear down. The biggest problem lay in deciding what to do with the soggy masses of tissue, and tattered chicken Wire that remained after the floats were destroyed. YK ' in ,fm U , xLl4g'lo The Student Union PM and Midday Series provided University students with an added dimension to the normal routine of their life. Columbian folk singers brought their guitars and their coffee for an evening with the students. Inter- national folk dancing groups, who also provided food from their native coun- tries, gave the students an idea of the Czechoslovakian Twist. Foreign students attending the University were urged to come to these affairs dressed in their own native costumes. The coffee the Colombians brought with them was hailed as greatly superior to Saga's. Studying was a lone- ly process. It was a quiet spot in a dorm hall while everyone else was out for the evening. It was a mass of open books and note paper spread across a table in one of the libraries. .But no mat ter where it was, it was always done alone. The student had to cut himself off from the world and force himself to concentrate on the black-and-White squiggles on the page in front of him. For some, it came naturally. For others, it was like dying or having a tooth pulled. fn 5 1' ' ' J .fy , ir 5, -M wif: A. :gre t grffgl' 3' .Q 'CQ' X , i , 1 K 1 V is . Q I Once upon a time, there was a man who was hired to be the leader of a gigantic mob of students and teachers. This man was called the Chancellor, and the mob of students and teachers was called a University. Now, this man saw that his students wasted a lot of time doing things like registering, and he saw that his employees spent a lot of time writing these students letters and helping them register. So he decided to do his students a great favor and save his employees a lot of work. He bought a computor. But the computor could only understand numbers. It didn't know what to do with names. So the Chancellor decided to make all students numbers instead of people, and everyone lived electronically ever after. X tj, 75 "T':1.m--M 14 H ' Life?-l'f 2 :."'f'-NIS .1555 'J rin- ful? 'i gm.- - V J , f.. A ' ., 'hi ng I ' L n""r" ': .: 2 .f-rfwxzm-f' G fvffgzu L " ae . rl r 234 J :i J 6 J 'ff ,l'L.- -. ' lgae-ff 12-551 "' rv" gr xg :F-F '11 v EW ,-Cv mar? tp V,-T , E I ' -:VE-ff? ' --my . ,fi X ' 54, tif A w 1 1 V, 1 vfjix -A ffl As registration ended, the grind of classes began once again. The first days of classes brought assignment sheets and reading lists, as students tried to get the latest information on each instructor and his grading system. As usual, the last two rows of seats in classrooms were filled, and only a few dared to attract the attention of the instructor by sitting in the first row. No one seemed to crack a book during the first five weeks of the trimester, but after the first exams and papers were graded and returned, students began to panic. E 1 I It L 78 There were the good instructors, and there were the bad ones. The good ones spent their time trying to get their students to ask questions and become interested in the course, while the bad ones gave a dry, droning lecture three times a week. The good ones made sure the students knew their office hours and urged their classes to take advantage of office hours, while the bad ones only made their office hours available when students pressed them for an appointment. Fortunately for the students, there were more good instructors than there were bad ones. I Any learning that was done at the University began in the classrooms. There were classrooms that were equipped for three hundred students and sound movie projection, and there were classrooms with one small table and six chairs. The classrooms were never at a comfortable temperature, but always seemed to be either too cold or too warm. Students either shivered or dozed. While instructors were lecturing, students read the campus newspaper, drew cartoons, slept, or passed messages to their friends. Much to the surprise of the instructors, a few even took notes. 81 The trimester drew near its end, and the pressure mounted. Some stu- dents Were informed that they would have to get a hun- dred and twenty points on the final out of a possible one hundred if they were to pass the course. All-night study sessions be- came a matter of habit as papers fell due, and the clicking of typewriters could be heard at any hour of the day or night. The exam schedule Was made up by a computor which had been programmed to schedule the exam- inations on a system of maximum incon- venience. ,- lm., Q 'M ,JWL-,,',L, , ,,. For anyone with enough credits and the proper distribution requirements, the last, final day was Commencement Day. It was a dark, drizzly morning, and everyone's mortar board seemed just a little wilted by the light rain and the humidity. After sitting through a speech of dubious merit that was given by a government official, the degrees were granted. For an hour and a half, the Chancellor conferred on the graduating class the rights and responsibilities appertaining to the degrees. Then it was finished, and the graduates hurried to the Bookstore for their ten dollars. P .D . 'vii 'l V, 1 ' , "4-"9 . '1'f'f1' Y ' " , . V K '-4.-Paw-, , 1 7 H 'M-ii .svuv - ' if- - ' -V ' ' ' arm- . Q1- i. . i 1 . ' Q. r' Y' r ' 2 .hal .39 l .55 .. - if , '-s I 5. ' . vs '.w M, f'! L"'.,' , - . Lg, .M 1 . Y, nv, Margie Nichols The Thomas C. Vrana Photography Award is given each year to a student who has produced outstanding work in the field of photog- raphy. Photography lies on the border- line between the sci- ences and the arts. An exact knowledge of chemical pro- cesses is needed in the developing of the film, while the photographer must use his artistic abilities in printing and composition. The photography on these pages was the work of Margie Nichols, winner of this year's Vrana Award. Thomas C. Vrana Photography Award 1 . 'ff 'T - ' H ' ,- snfg, " ' ' '-v.'-Ag' 'I' ,G-'Ci' I'?Q ' 3"tf vs""9' " 9 F' xg'-"5""4.-,i :E -Lk VF F' ' '- 3949: 'Y Y1"'4?-'ia' ' A-sffsf'-7 -x- 34-.1 s . .. f-"fr -:J 'if -' ,f- K . r I - ov" 4 V X 4' .yi 1 CNJ , fi., 2 v . I . ' -1 - 'iukt I "J 5 ' ' 5.1! . I " .h A , .JZFYI t"'l'5 .511 .--' '75 qv .1 ' ,',':, '. .,,,j"' ' ',S...,w--4 ,:'r,: ' 54,1 A f , - , gf of ' .f ,::3og-xl"-5 f: H' , ' 'f , ' k ' ,IRQ . . , 4' - ffl' gil! V- ' A.. '-'hs . . EF' A sn, ww- w , , ',-4.:-- ' ., an - .gig 1 , .r--,, -W,z.ius.f. v .J ... - ,jp -, . 1- lb. ,f-4:.,.,,,,. 4 V .- Q - - - ,ff 7,13 'Ng--,ff , sjvgyh, of V - -' , ' rg!! ,qv fffu-E? V-.AU ', f 1- ' r H., V 4 +' 'T4'5"f,-., - -- ,.,'j,5'f- -'l ' .-.,Hi.,,- :'gg,2,L.,.i... 111.41-, ' W DEIVIICZS Board of Trustees Gwilym A. Price, Chairman Chancellor Edward H. Litchfield, Ex Officio Leon Falk, Ir., First Vice Chairman George D. Lockhart William H. Rea, Second Vice Chairman George H. Love Stanton C. Crawford, Secretary Norman MacLeod Alan C. Rankin, Assistant Secretary Frank L. Magee C. S. Rupp, Treasurer The Honorable William D. McClelland I. T. Hudson, Ir., Assistant Treasurer Richard K. Mellon Patterson, Crawford, Arensberg, and Dunn, Solicitors Emil E. Narick Roger S. Ahlbrandt I. Henry O'Neill The Honorable Ioseph M. Barr, Ex Officio William E. Rea William W. Booth A. W. Robertson, Trustee Emeritus Arthur E. Braun, Trustee Emeritus Walter I. Rome William W. Collin, Trustee Emeritus The Reverend Howard C. Scharfe Leland W. Cook William P. Snyder, Ir., Trustee Emeritus Frank R. Denton The Honorable Sara M. Soffel, Trustee Emeritus Earl A. Dimmick William A. Steele Leon Falk, Ir. james M. Stymes Rufus H. Fitzgerald, Ex Officio Edward A. Weeks Marcus A. Follansbee Edward R. Weidlein, Trustee Emeritus Robert R. Gaw William K. Whiteford Charles W. Herald Leslie B. Worthington Harry B. Higgins, Trustee Emeritus Dr. lessie Wright Henry L. Hillman Robert A. Young The Honorable David L. Lawrence The Chancellor is an image of many forms. He is the welcomer of the anxious freshmen. He is the man ac- claimed in national newspapers and magazines, yet the man who may unexpectedly appear in the unorganized frenzy of a quadrangle pep rally to shout friendly en- couragement. He is the gold-robed man at the very end of the convocation procession for whom students watch with sophisticated awe, yet he is the man in the press box above the football field who causes the students to rise and turn with rowdy delight and somewhat frantic sa- The Chancellor lutes. He is the man who can speak authoritatively to a board of directors or talk cordially with a student and his parents during Parents' Week-End. He is the man who extends innumerable and carefully worded greetings and challenges in university publications, yet the man who may leave the notes of a prepared speech to speak with frank and concerned enthusiasm about his hopes for the University. At last, in Iune, he is the man who stands before the graduating seniors, presenting the problems that await the graduating class. rf 1 ' t S .gjinlfl N Z5 X J" ra?" i if - i iz it When a student at the University is perplexed by a dilemma, he often stares in disbelief at the seeming chaos around him and wonders if there is someone, somewhere, who has some sort of control over the sur- rounding confusion. If he looks long enough and hard enough, he discovers that that someone does exist. Dr. Rankin's office, on the first floor, is the only room in the first five stories of the Cathedral that is equipped with Venetian blinds, and any student entering his office is impressed by the provincial furniture and the psychiatrist's couch. Dr. Crafts' office is located on the eighth floor, directly across from the University computor, and his modern office is carefully shielded by its glass doors, which swing open on aluminum hinges. His office is also the headquarters of the fraternity advisor. Any women with problems are invited to discuss them in the pleasant Victorian atmosphere of Miss Rush's office. Dr. Alan C. Rankin Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Dr. William B. Crafts Dean of Men Helen Pool Rush Dean of Students The Professors A professor should be more than just a man who stands at the front of a classroom and lectures for fifty minutes three times a week. He should be a combination taskmaster, advisor, confidante, and friend. In his classes, he should be able to present his material in such a way that it is grasped by the student with a minimum of difficulty. His lectures should not be droning discourses from pages of notes that are five years out of dateg they should be laced with current material to make the student straighten in his chair and think about the subject that is being presented. A professor should be willing to answer student questions, and he should answer them in such a way that the student is encouraged to do additional work on his own. He should not brush off student questions as irrelevant, and neither should he use them as an excuse to fly off on a half-hour digression from the subject of his lecture. A professor should be willing to have his students come to his office for private conferences. He should listen to problems with an attentive ear and not make the student feel as though he is wasting the professor's time. He should also, to the best of his ability, attempt to help the student solve his problems, be they academic or personal. A professor should not forget what it is like to be a student. He should remember that the student, on the first day of class, may not be even vaguely inter- ested in what the professor has to say, and the pro- fessor should attempt to make the student take an interest in the course, be it through inspired lectures, weekly papers, or fantastically difficult examinations. A professor should be all these things, and the mem- bers of the University faculty on the following pages are those professors who have attained these standards. 4 . .I P-:YT f , if-nw wat-f' '11 H V 3 Q -- e-it 'f' MH- A V. DR. CHARLES S. BEROES: ENGINEERING "Greater stress should be placed on the student getting the material for himself . . . at the first meeting, sell the students on the value of the subject and keep him sold . . . keep courses as interesting as possible." DR. ROBERT G. COLODNY: HISTORY "I do not believe in pouring facts into students' heads . . . make them think creatively . . . let them sample the excitement of the intellectual adventure that is available to everyone in the University com- munity . . . this can be done only by demonstration and personal example . . . there is no shortcut or formula." DR. HARRY FOWLER: PSYCHOLOGY "Two important aspects of teaching are motivation of the student by What- ever method available and the use of the question and answer method to force the student to consider the material more deeply and to see if he under- stands it and can generalize it to other fields." DR. MALCOLM T. IOLLIE: BIOLOGY "Make the kids work hard . . . students can only break through the educational barrier by careful, thorough, meticulous Work there can be no shortcuts to learning trying to educate students is not all ice cream and cake." A-M W, f, -. '.',..'-ri 'pin-si-l:'ffd2""V,v 'na MR. LAWRENCE LEE: ENGLISH "Literature is a most useful revelation of man's nature-its pleasures and dangers: it is a non-sec- tarian insight into man's greatest beliefs. This joy of being as reflected in literature communicates itself to students when I do my job correctly." w il mtv - DR. EZRA T. NEWMAN: PHYSICS "My style is one of informality . . . a teach- er's own personality comes out when he teaches . . . try to relax the tension." MR. REX PEERY: EDUCATION . . do the best job with the tools at hand . . . try to l-mow my boys and develop them along their best skills . . . encourage hard work." DR. WILLIAM C. PANETTA: CLASSICS "Homo sum: humani nil a me alienum puto-I am a mang I deem, therefore, that nothing which affects man does not ah'ect me." I I DR. CARL A. PETERSON: EDUCATION "Get to know the students well . . . it is our mission to teach the students first and not the subject matter . . . the important thing is the student . . . each student is individual and unique and should stand out at his own level." DR. ELIOT B. SPEISS: BIOLOGY "Get the kids interested in the subjects . . . arouse their curiosity . . . make them work all the time-not just before exams . . . I always encourage them to come into my oh'ice and bother me." DR. COLIN C. STERN: MUSIC "Try to elicit from the student an excite- ment in a field that I am interested in . . . to in- still an excitement in Western culture and I stimulate continued interest and the develop- ty ment of a critical sense." I I DR. RICHARD C. TOBIAS: ENGLISH "I would like students to be themselves . . . make them think . . . many times I try to take a different point of View to make them think and do some hard Work." DR. ARTHUR TUDEN: ANTHROPOLOGY "Encourage the exploitation of all fields of cultural development . . . the wider the variations, the better the student will understand the prob- lems of culture." The School of the Liberal Arts Although many students use the School of Liberal Arts as a stepping-stone to a graduate or a profes- sional school, there are a great number of students who remain in the school for their entire collegiate education. It provides the broadest education of any school in the University, and a student may major in anything from anthropology to zoology. Entering freshmen find themselves scheduled for a language, a laboratory science, English 1, and usu- ally two other courses from the iield of social sci- ence. By the time they have finished their sophomore year, they must have chosen a major and completed all their distribution requirements in the natural sci- ences, social sciences, and humanities. The freshman must quickly learn to concentrate. A theme a week for his English course improves his typing skill and, hopefully, his composition. He be- comes bi-lingual through his memorization of the Russian alphabet or his discovery that French verbs are all irregular. Research papers teach him how to use the basic elements of laboratory methods. He learns not to look into a bubbling test tube, and dis- covers the correct method of mixing acid and water. One of the major hazards the Liberal Arts student must face is the fact that Pitt has an engineering school. He must learn to defend himself in bull ses- sions with the "ingunears." He has to be able to jus- tify his field of study and prove that it is just as dif- ficult and important as Petroleum Refinery 121. If he is a non-science major, he is often a man alone, caught between what he believes in and a world that is growing more and more technological. He is taught to think, while others are taught to do what they are assigned and not to ponder why they are doing it. He comes to feel that people are rapidly be- coming holes punched in IBM cards and that he is a superfluous man in American society. If he is to survive, he must realize that the world needs him more than any engineer or nuclear physi- cist. He is the man who, in a world balanced on the knife edge of destruction, must keep his head among those who are screaming for arms, men on the moon, and bigger and better nuclear weapons. 103 I Albert B. Martin Dean I 1 1 Xu The university is composed of scholars, non-scholars, those who don't know the difference, and those who don't care. Take a cross-section of these. They come in all sizes and shapes, some appealing, and some fantastic. Remove engineers, professional graduates, and those of general stud- ies. Tire of differentiating, combine what is left-those who know what they want, those who don't and those who never will. Result: the School of Everything Else. Give this school a setting. Spread it from Schenley Park to the Hill, for the man must be kept in shape through long hikes to classes. Then exercise his alertness in a vertical maze. Let him ponder over elevators of limited stops, and staircases of questionable origin and termination. Give him a central structure to revolve around. Call it a Cathedral of Learning. Lest he forget that it is a cathedral, sound chimes twice every hour. Pamper him, direct him for about a week. At this time chew up his class cards in the IBM machine, change his schedule, and declare him on probation. Then send him on a treasure hunt from 1817 CL to Alumni Hall to unravel the red tape. This trek will insure that the student will know his university inside and out, and will be able to assist the Information Office in directing curiosity seekers. Liberate him from the narrow. Mix biologists and sculp- turers in French III. Present the English major with the di- lemmas of rates of chemical reaction. Challenge too the mathematician with the prospects of American democracy. Blend well the scientist and non-scientistg the realist and abstractist. And the purpose in such contradiction is simply this: to present building materials of all types to insure that the organism will survive the most rigid of disciplines-life. r XX .. x. The Schools of Engineering and There is a world apart from the University. Its build- ings sit on the Hill, above the campus, and during one week of the year its students participate in an organized madness called Engineers' Week. It is a world small in some ways, but very large in others. At some time during their freshman year, the engi- neering students develop a pride and affection for their Hill, and they begin to conceive of it as their home, rarely leaving it to associate with the students on the main cam- pus and in the "college" Their years of education are years of slide rules, briefcases, and laboratories. They complain about instructors, high tuition, and compulsory attendance at seminars, and deride the Liberal Arts stu- Mines dents as Ioe Colleges who take nothing but snap courses. Since their education is almost entirely technical, their appreciation of the non-scientific students on the campus is necessarily limited, and they come to feel that the Uni- versity is one large solar system that revolves around the sun of the engineering school. But in their classrooms, this limited viewpoint is for- gotten, and their world becomes one of entropy, enthalpy, mass transfer, unit operations, and "What happens when . . . " The engineering students are just beginning to think that they have all the answers, when they suddenly dis- cover that there is a great deal about which they do not even know how to ask the questions. I' 'Q' TS' ,, pf r , r - ' -as ml, 2, - r . , . 1 tj Lf-'.t: '::, I 1 ,J f . 4, f 1- Y A -.....L..'.,.L -,Amr . - . iii . --i 2 7 J 1 -L.. V ' 3 " s I in , . 2 J 1 5 S 7 E g 14, - 15 10 Jn . L.. -- -. " " ' w 5" ,, . W ,..- : H. ns .tu -3 ,ZS ,I Us I - F P "I ' V05 ' U11 1-nn '..., 1-2" -- H ' J'- sh lt . . 9 0 , In ' - , T 9- , ' ' I Q-E iiglnir V ' W' QQ W at fs, , A 4 , 47 f , . QV.-,J . .. 1 . -F ' ,vw ' A.. 1 c iw wr ff- 1 I E '-2. f-Ss w -P q qwu-x., ff ., ., win.-,, Z, i' +5 Walter R. Turkes, Dean .X 1 , V 4 R Nm,- Aifz ' wb: V. 7 N43 HA wp A-,V- , '4 , Q: nigh! ' .WF X' School of l N Education y . When a student in the School of Education has it reached the senior year and has a minimum of Q.P.A. of 2.5, he or she is at last able to put his psychology pre- i requisites to work in Student Teaching. For many, the idea of student teaching is a strange but fascinating idea, for not too long ago they were sitting in class l rooms glaring at fumbling, frightened college students testing their modern book techniques in an actual class- 5 room. The outcome is usually different than the book f predicts, but the teaching experience and humorous i l incidents of actual group Contact is a discovery Worth Sfaa il the waiting. However, student teachers are not so old that they cannot remember the tricks they played on l the unsuspecting student teacherg now it is with hesi- ig tancy that they assume the same role of that poor f teacher. During this period two subjects are taught and 3 a participation in co-curricular activities of the cooperat- ing school is expected. A student teacher may find him- self participating in a school club program or engaging in a homeroom conspiracy as the go-between to find out what the teacher would like for a Christmas present. Dr. Paul Masoner Dean I C241 Q 1 A l.. If -'f "'r, "Double, double, toil and trouble, fire burn and cauldron bubble" might well be used as the slogan of the pharmacy student as he ponders over his serums, ointments, and solu- tions. His lab coat pockets are perpetually stuffed with bottles or mysterious mixtures prepared in lab. Not all of the preparations, however, are medicineg one sometimes comes across a vodka-orange juice combination, designed to cure the common cold and whatever else ails you. Pitt's Pharmacy School is relatively small and, therefore, the students attending are a closely knit group, for the most part. For this reason, the pharmacy student spends much of his time out of class with his fellow students also. Three fraternities-Phi Delta Chi, Kappa Si, and AZO-and one so- rority-Lambda Kappa Sigma-have been organized. Non- academic functions become an important part of the phar- macy student's life. These organizations hold parties and dances at various intervals throughout the year. Modern labs and equipment are some of the benefits shared by the pharmacy students. The pleasant atmosphere is believed to have a strong positive effect on the student's work. A concoction brewed in a large modern lab usually turns out to be a good concoction. When filling a prescrip- tion, the young pharmacists are serious-minded and alert, for they know the importance of putting in the correct in- gredients in the right proportions. Some monkey business occurs, however, in the pharmacy lab as well as in the other labs. This accounts for the holes and stains on the student's white coat. These little outbursts are overlooked, though, for it is usually recognized that we all have to let off steam once in a while. The School of Pharmacy Ioseph A. Bianculli, Dean F- The School of Dentistry Edwa The year 1962-63 saw some important changes introduced into the Dental School by its Dean, Dr. Forrest. Among these changes is the replacement of a white lab coat for the former beige one, enabling the dental student to look and feel more like the professional man he is than a mechanic. New classes have been added in the sophomore year in order to further broaden the minds of our future dentists. Time spent in the clinic has been lengthened to give the student more prac- tical experience. And a new grading system has been estab- lished, substituting letter grades for the percent plan. Upon entering Dental School, the student finds himself in a new world. He must arise before daybreak and present himself at the Health Professions Building cleanly shaven and neatly attired in a suit, white shirt, and tie. Dirty, bitten fingernails spoil the whole effect of the professional picture. The dental student learns a different language which, when spoken to the layman, sounds very impressive. He gains a sense of maturity and a professional air, commanding re- spect from his friends and colleagues. A date with a dental student is an exciting experience for any girl. He likes to have fun-to laugh and joke and make love-just like everyone else. And at the end of the evening, when he holds his favorite young lady in a passionate em- brace, he tells her what a beautiful gum ridge she has and that her overbite will never make any difference in their re- lationship. .. ' .f, 1-if ' Em H .. this W' "se ',,,,.--4 Q. ,.t, .4-Q., , . L ii VI J A , :ami f 9 5 H35 I Q ! ig.. W 34- r, nl- .Ll :JU The School of Nursing Virginia G. Braley, Dean The girl in the blue uniform with the large white buttons is a nursing student. Instead of spending her days as most other students do, she passes her time half in class and half in a hospital. The classroom work provides the theoretical knowledge for mixing formulas, administering injections, and proper care for a craniotomy patient. But no matter how much the student nurse learns in the classroom, she discovers, when she begins to work in the hospital wards, that there is no substitute for experience. How to placate a cranky old woman whose dinner did not please her is a subject that is not covered in the textbooks. And neither is there a set formula for curing a little girl's broken heart when the little boy in the room down the hall goes home. While the prospective nurse is still a student, she does not live in the University dormitories, but in the Nurses' Resi- dence in the medical center. She has a room of her own, but must keep up a running battle with the students from Pres- byterian-University Hospital. She quickly learns that two buzzes mean a visitor, one buzz means a phone call. She also learns in a hurry that nursing is not what it is made out to be by the writers of many popular television programs. She discovers that not everyone in the hospital is an actress, mil- lionaire, gangster, or sex fiend, and that she is just one notch above the orderlies in the hospital social order. She is not treated as an angel of mercy with healing in her wings, but as someone who is to empty bedpans, change sheets, and feed babies. And her ego is crushed as she learns that prom- ising young doctors on their way up do not readily fall in love with mere student nurses. T i ZA, . ,31- 118 The School of Medicine The symbols of the medical student are his little black bag and the stethoscope which invariably protrudes out of his lab coat pocket. His all-white attire stands for the ideals and purposes sanctioned by the medical profession. The pure white does not stay that way long, however, for it soon be- comes stained with blood and chemicals. The medical stu- dent too, you see, is still a human being. Contrary to the opinion of some, the cadaver is not the medical student's best friend. The student of medicine is, often by nature, a very social being. Throughout the school year various activities are planned by the students to satisfy their social tendencies. Fraternity life is often a welcome thing, for it allows the med student to break away from his books and classroom tedium. It gives him the opportunity to get together with his classmates on a different, more friendly, basis than the lecture room and the lab provide. The med student can sometimes be found in the snack bar of the coffee shop, conversing with his peers over cigarettes and inevitably drawn back to medicine. When the med stu- dents join one another at mealtime, napkins and tablecloths are covered with doodles of the central nervous system and other areas of the body recently discussed in class. Patients, also, are a common topic of discussion and argument among these students. The medical student, in his junior year, begins a series of hospital assignments which enables him to learn the prac- tical application of medicine. Then, after four years of med- ical school, he is ready for internship. Not too many years ago, a pre-med student needed either money or connections in high places in order to be admitted to medical school. Such is not the case today. Many young men who would be qualified to enter the field of medicine are turning away from it and entering professions in which the financial returns come much sooner. Nine years plus resi- dency is longer than most young people wish to remain in school. As a result, medical-school enrollment is lower now than in past years. Social and financial backgrounds are no longer taken into consideration when a pre-med student applies to medical school, and grade averages are not so important as they once were. i Francis S. Cheever, Dean Thomas M. Cooley II, Dean The School of Law A crowded elevator ride to the fourteenth floor, a briefcase that is ready to split along one seam, and a jacket and tie every day of the week quickly become an integral part of the law student's life. He learns to divide his assignments with others in order to meet instructors' demands. He finds the quietest spots to study and the best persons with whom to study. The lounge on the floor below becomes the place to meet his friends, discuss courses and assignments, and sip hot coffee. The time between his classes is used for last-minute prep- aration trying to discover examination questions, or discus- sing the merits andfor drawbacks of the several secretaries employed on the law floor. His days become one long round of coffee, classes, bull sessions, more coffee, more classes, and finally the ride down to the ground floor in the late afternoon, in an, elevator filled with instructors, University employees, and a few lone un- dergraduates. His three years of schooling are in preparation for one great event-his bar examination. He may approach it with fear or confidence, but the one thing he can be sure of is that he has received one of the finest backgrounds in law that this country has to offer. The percentage of University law students who fail their bar examinations is extremely smallg there is only one other law school in the United States which has a lower percentage of failure. But law school is not all toil, sweat, and tears. There are a few lighter moments, usually employed in trying to con- vince outsiders that Blackstone Tort is not a student in the University of Pittsburgh Law School. Contrary to popular opinion, a Bachelor of Laws degree is by no means an immediate key to a Cadillac and a ten-room house in the suburbs. If the lawyer wishes to go into private practice, he must spend years building up his practice and increasing the number of his clients, with no guarantee that he will be successful. He may find a position in a private law firm, but it is probable that, unless he is exceptional, his salary and advancement opportunities will be limited. Like any other field, a successful career in law requires work. 121 Donald C. Stone, Dean ,-:fr-v' 'Ita :fd 1 5 .1 'fiffmi ww- ' r 3, 3,-gfxzeqs. ::zQ3w,':g:s -.v M X 5 yvy-.'fw.w::cw -uf if - - V . 19:-.111 .:f' Y ' 1 iff LL 1:4 " 1 , QQ- T.. '15 ,f,j.5Q' P4219- 'u.. 5!f",2'5': .1'1"'7' ":w,'11,S4LtL6 " '1f74"'?' bn,-:uf - - . a . ,..,..,,,,,s,,! --4 A l-n , , sn--faq,-K I ' gr, . I , . - K , 4 ,. ' S K. 4'- -3' A M, ihf, Y, 1 . ,gum-mnvvf ww.-1 :ge -.um .4 A ,.,.. Q, -4 .1159 Q.- 4'q,...-0 all i v ' -nasal? , 1,1 Qi., "-'lm The Graduate School of Public and International Affairs A student in the Graduate School of Public and Interna- tional Affairs becomes more than a registered graduate stu- dentg he becomes a member of the close-knit family of stu- dents studying the bases of critical issues of modern times. Language barriers and discrimination are forgotten as the students gather in the Bruce Hall lounge to discuss the Cuban crisis, last night's Pirate loss, or plans for Saturday's re- ception for campus visitors. Smiles of "bella" are the re- actions of a Nicaraguan woman to a New Iersey native's description of the annual Saint Patrick's Day parade and hearty laughs result from a foreigner's experiences with television commercials. By this combination of working and relaxing together, these students are gaining valuable under- standing for their futures in government work. The GSPIA forum is one activity which provides a cul- tural aspect for the student as he hears an expert speak on the Common Market. A delegate from the United Nations is guest at the Fall Assembly. And for first-hand experience the student can visit Mexico for two weeks with E.S.D., or spend four days in Chicago examining public agencies. In- ternational law and the origin of foreign policies of different countries become topics at bi-weekly luncheons in Interna- tional Affairs. In GSPIA the student becomes aware of the individuality of each of his fellow students, yet each of his experiences with the group of other students becomes preparation for public and international leadership. 2 l ' pw..- A E ,. fig.. The Graduate School o Library Science The Graduate School of Library Science, now celebrating its first year as an independent professional school at the University, has been influential in creating a new concept of the librarian. The number of married librarians and the increased enrollment of men in the school have eliminated the standard image of a cranky old maid spending her entire life checking books in and out and collecting penny fines from forgetful youngsters. The librarian is now a college graduate who is educated in the sciences, social studies, and humanities. Coming from all fields, the engineer, the human- ist, and the biologist all enter this school, finding opportuni- ties to satisfy their interests. The library student attends the Colloquium each Tuesday, hearing a review of Websters Third New International Dic- tionary of the English Language or a moving rendition of Christmas stories. He checks the placement center and A-V Laboratory for the latest on jobs and equipment. He learns the Dewey Decimal System by checking and classifying the numbers on license plates. For an assignment in Children's Literature he reads Winnie-the-Pooh, and in a course in cata- loging he is concerned with documentary control. The Stu- dent Organization provides him with the social activities of a faculty-student luncheon or a swimming party at Trees Hall. Whether he is scanning LiRiP for ideas on research or following a map in the Bookmark by climbing seventy-two steps, he is appreciating and enjoying his valuable training. Because of his wide educational background and genuine interest in people, he receives satisfaction from the personal contacts he makes and the aid he gives. As he learns the classification of rare books, studies the art of storytelling for an hour, he realizes his importance in helping others find new ideas, in helping minds grow, and in communicating his love for books. 1. S51-m ,f Harold Lancour, Dean HV .v,.,,! W, Vg.- V., I 1 I 19x11 4 ' W - CJFQGAIQII S ATICDNS The Activity The entire waking hours of a University student are not consumed by classes. If he is foolhardy enough to want something to do in the sup- posedly huge a m o u nt of spare time that he has, he joins an organization. No matter what the student's interests, there is an organization for him. Whether he is interested in publications, music, poli- tics, or student government, he will be able to find an or- ganization where he Will be accepted and admitted into the fold-especially if he is willing to work. Often, the student joins an organization not to improve himself or the organization, but to have an activity to put under his name on his Univer- sity record. He does not real- ize that, behind the Pitt News issue, the Pitt Players production, or the PM presen- tation, there is an astronomi- cal amount of hard, time-con- suming work. Air Force ROTC Angel Flight Coeds and Arnold Air Society Cadets represent the Pitt AFROTC Detachment at national and regional conclaves and play an important role in all detachment activities. Senior Cadets destined for Pilot Training receive 36W hours of flight training and obtain private licenses through the AFROTC Flight Instruction Program at a nearby airport. ,Q i. an 'Af' -, ' Wi. ' "ii: r- ,FQ-: H rar- t , .Q , TE, 'QE 174 H4 ' Cadets are briefed on current Air Force weapon systems during visits to operational Air Force bases. Each month, an outstanding cadet is given a jet ride by an Air Force fighter pilot. ". . . and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter . . ." In taking the Oath of Office, graduating cadets become Second Lieutenants in the Air Force and assume duties in a career area of preference consistent with USAF needs. a 1:2005 cu Orientation flights in Air Force planes familiarize cadets with air- crew procedures and responsibili- ties. Alumni Board In recent years, Pitt alumni have been badly treated. But since the advent of the Alumni Association, the sit- uation has been changed. The Alumni Association is, like the rest of the University, dynamic and growing, working with alumni, the Admissions Office, and students pres- cntly on campus. The major aim of the Alumni Association is to educate Pitt alumni so that they will be able to assume a role of liaison between the University and the friends and neigh- bors of the alumni themselves. The alumnus should be a sort of public relations man for the University, providing personal contact between Pitt and those who are unin- formed about University activities. The Alumni Association works in close cooperation with the Admissions Office by releasing names of po- tential freshmen to alumni. There are 260 alumni repre- sentatives in Allegheny County alone, and others, 172 of them, scattered over the country in 35 cities in 15 states. There are actually twelve separate alumni associations, including all the professional and liberal arts graduates. Each one of these separate Alumni Associations sends three representatives to meetings of the general Alumni Association, which are held five times each year. The Alumni Association holds annual dinners for all graduating seniors, at which undergraduates get a chance to meet alumni from their own school. Annual smorgas- bords and dances are held at Commencement and Home- coming, and the Association also publishes PITT, a mag- azine for all alumni. One of the areas in which the Alumni Association is trying to strengthen itself is in its relationship with stu- dents presently on campus. The Association is attempting to get the campus undergraduates to understand exactly what the Alumni Association is, what it does, and what it can do for the student once he graduates. 'Ti fu J all , '44, V11 ,JU-' f fi .ff I Eb iff 5 M f. aff, .gf Army ROTC "Hup-hoop-hreep-horp! Hup-hoop-hreep-horp!" The sergeant's cadences echoed across the Cathedral lawn and bounced off Heinz Chapel every Thursday afternoon as the Corps practiced its marching. But besides the drills, there were also the hours in the classroom. The cadets learned how to read maps, how to defend a hill with seven men and a machine gun, and studied in detail the battles of the Civil War. They also learned who to salute and how to salute, how to polish brass, how to clean an M-1 with the least amount of elbow grease, and how to keep the shine on their shoes until Inspection. 't. Q .xfrfw ., ' First Row: W. I. Kaiser, G. Finger, R. Sestili, D. L. Kinsey, L. Benitend, M. Sfanos. Second Row: I. DiFrancesco, R. Wertz, G. McDonald, L. Kubus, T. Olofson, B. Duse. Third Row: L. Mas- sung, W. Reed, D. Malki, H. Kaplus, E, Bergen, T. Peters. Fourth Row: H. Beisel, C. Scheriff, H. Trout, R. Polick, P. Byerly, R. Maddock, D. Iones. .5 E ,V V Y: 532- L , . .,C..u, 1-. - . . K X .. The beginning of the year for the Heinz Chapel Choir was marked by the annual Choir camp, at which the singers tried to get back into form both mu- sically and socially. A banquet for all the members of the Choir was held at Stouffer's late in the second trimester, and as soon as classes were over the Choir went on its an- nual tour. One of the highlights of the ten-day tour was the stopover in New York, which was the only place where the singers had more than a few hours free time to themselves. With the return to classes next fall, the Choir hopes to recruit new members, along with instituting a program of concerts at several area high schools. First Rowg: I. Zweig, R. Burton, S. Evans, G. Grimshaw, S. Synder Second Row: G. Reynolds, C. Robson, R. Clar, B. Payne. Third Bow: I. Morn, T. Bailey, H. Bray, B. Stewart. Fourth Row: D. Colton, I. Craw- ford, I. Shumaker, F. Mahany. Heinz Chapel Choir First Row: I. Krausche, I. Heart, I. Fix, I. Marx. Second Row: L. Richardson, L. Grant, S. Somach, M. Urling, I. Knorr, H. Lee. Third Row: C. Stone, I. Trenkle, R. Mitchell. Fourth Row: A. Booffard, T. Graybill, I. Berry. Left to Right: B. Gruber, M. Meyers, C. C. Bronder, C. Ciccone, D. Urbaitus, P. Wassel, B. Welsh, M. Nowda, B. Zythowisy, C. Lira, R. Mizak. f W Q Newman Club The trademark of the Newman Club has become the "Peanuts" cartoons on the bulletin boards. Be- sides advertising the social affairs that are held weekly in Newman Hall, the signs inform club mem- bers and all others who may be interested of the cur- rent projects and activities of the organization. This year, the Newman Club hosted the olub's an- nual convention and received the Bell Award for Special Religious Programming on Network Radio. Left to Right: M. A. Kassoida, M. Binder, S. McDermott, C. Grabow- ski, R. Tuskan, D. Ioli. First Row: V. Modej, I. Azara, D. Noe, N. Fuchs, B. Bine, C. Bronder, D. Gnarra. Second Row: W. Kennedy, R. Mizak, B. Buckley, P. Wen- dell, D. Gardner. Third Row: H. Holzen, R. Zolno, A. Fricioni, I. Hollash. Fourth Row: T. Lynn, A. Murray, R. Hutto, L. Petak, B. Zythowisy, B. McGovern. The Student Government Men's Dorm Council The transition from high school to college life is often difficult, which is the reason for the existence of Men's Dormitory Council. Composed of student representatives from various floors in the men's dor- mitories, the council attempts to aid residence hall students by presenting them with cultural, social, and athletic activities. This year, the council held open houses and dorm- Wide dances, along with intramural sports programs and planning the use of recreational facilities in the new circular residence halls. - Student Government Student Government, the voice of the student body, func- tioned to strengthen communication among students, fac- ulty, and administration. Kiski Day, early in the year, gave the freshman a chance, through a program consisting of swimming, boating, baseball, skits, and cheering around a blazing campfire, to mingle and enjoy a last iling before classes began. Shortly after, the satisfied expressions on parents' faces were signs of the success of Parents' Weekend. As the year progressed, Student Government promoted several other ac- tivities, such as Homecoming, the Pitt Chest, and the Student Book Exchange. Perhaps the greatest accomplishment, in the eyes of the students, was the publication of a Student Directory con- taining the names, addresses, and phone numbers of all un- dergraduates, thus enabling anyone to find the phone num- ber of the cute girl he met at Gustine's last Friday night. 1 First How: B. Guttenberg, T. Olofson, S. Gershman, B. Weaver, I. Seiger, B. Cardin, C. Montgomery, I. Diethorn, N. Roland. Second Row: B. Baumgart, L. Besana. Third Row: M. Fountain, B. Meier, B. Reifman, I. Slotkin, A. Iohnson, M. Landy, A. Schlosser, R. Maguire D. Menzer, G. Carlson. Fourth Row: I. Wertheimer, R. Minker. T P a H. is 11 v -1 A w w 4 I 1 f A ' Y I 1 , N - 51 1' 1. A . f u X - X Av ' xl , L. 1 ,,,, W 5 V H ly Q . I A f 5 1, 1 I. This year Associated Women Students, the women's gov- erning organization, was a valuable aid in helping freshmen and transfer students to adjust to University life. Even though the freshmen women might have complained as they tried to recite the second verse of the Alma Mater for the ninth time that evening, the moving ceremony of Lantern Night impresses upon every woman her duty and impor- tance upon becoming a student at Pitt. Presented with a lan- tern which was inscribed with her name, and a burning candle inside, she followed her mentor in a procession, hear- ing about the glorious tradition of the University of Pitts- burgh. Sponsoring the Freshmen Council dinner or a tea for honor students, Associated Women Students promoted school spirit and encouraged loyalty to Pitt among all women students. Associated Women Students Left to Right: B. Hodgkinson, I. Fishman, G. Michaliszyn, M. P. Thomas, A. Walesky, T. Wiehn, E. Lambi R Maquire The Engineering and Mines Cabinet is the governing body of the Pitt engineers. Composed of representatives from every department in the School of Engineering and Mines, the Cabinet is perhaps the most important organization on the Hill. The Cabinet members have a hand in almost every en- gineering activity. They help to organize Engineers' Week, from the first decision as to what the theme of the year will be to the final scheduling of the arrival of Saint Patrick. The Cabinet helps to publish the weekly newsletter, the ESM Bulletin, in which important notices and occasional ' ' editorials are printed. The Fall Ball and the Shamrock Ball are only two of the social activities which the Cabinet spon- sors. ' Unlike the rest of the governing organizations on the Pitt campus, the Engineering and Mines Cabinet has a strong voice among the engineering student body, from setting final - athletic schedules to-:publishing the student opinion of the trimester plan or the new probation system. Left to Right: L. Tavlarides, N. Polick, W. Advison, B. Mason, G. Demi- Left to Right: H. Krier, B. Mason, D. Halpun ter. First Row: I. Rafferty, R. Polick, W. Mason, M. White, W. E, Covturo, L. Taularides. Second Row: M. Wiess, G. Vareman, F. Poellnitx, I. Donalies, R. Crawford, A. I. Anderson, B. Quinlaw, A. Hautman, G. Demeter. Third Row: R. Arnnot, R. Mannig, H. Krier, D. Halpern. Publications There is no activity at the University more demanding and more rewarding than student publications. For any- one who becomes engrossed in the work, it quickly be- comes a way of life for him. The publications office be- comes not only a place to work, but a place to live. A member of any publications staff studies at his office desk, sleeps on the couch, and finds the office a con- venient place to start a bridge game. The publications life is one of panic sessions and dead- lines, crayon-marked proof sheets and reams of typed pages. There is the weekly crisis, concerning anything from how to fill up a column to where to get a picture of a senior that now makes his residence in Skagway, Alaska. There are the deadline nights, with arguments, empty pizza boxes, and overflowing ashtrays. The hi-fi's fill the hall with everything from Rachmaninoff to the sound track from The Alamo to Iewish folk songs by Theodore Bikel. No publications office is neat. Even with the nightly maid service, keeping the offices from looking like the aftermath of a tornado is an impossible task. Copy sheets, photographs, and proof sheets litter desks and fill waste- baskets, along with empty Coke bottles and pipe tobacco tins. Every University publication has a definite purpose. The OWL is the book you are now reading. The Pitt News is the campus information agency, The Pitt Capsule is a magazine for pharmacy students, and The Skyscraper Engineer publishes technical articles that will interest en- gineering students. Ideas and Figures is the magazine of the liberal arts, and the Polaris is a handbook that is use- ful for both freshmen and upperclassmen. Working in conjunction with all these publications is WPGH, the campus radio station. 4 ,-xx 4 QQ: -- x F H" F 1 , fx ,A -g M5 M ,T -! For the OWL staff, it was another year and another book. Back again was Dorothy Zass . . . Ioel's an ogre . . . Schmendrick Would you like to see the OWL office? The Phantom But I've been here every day It's like this, old man Cha-Cha My next joke is a little risque . . . Bridge, anyone? . . . Ioel's jag . . . Stanley's signs A Grecian Waterfall Cunningham's spawn- ing grounds . . . Stan's couch . . . Where'd that couch come from? Iim's trips to Buffalo O. R. Ganek Re- served for Yellow Cab Vern Zolbert, senior 2750 sheets of paper Get a lot of sports shots Ganek Russel's fiasco . . . OWL Weeks . . . Larry's staph . . . Iohn and Anthro . . . Hines, where's your pipe? . . . Reserved for Linda Sadler . .. Reshoot The Muskingum Moose Tommy in Wonderland Detroit Tap Day Mr. Pittl? Where's the Institute speaker? Who's going down for food? . .. The Village Pizza Donna and her twins . . . two with mustard and onions . . . Did you go to Russian today? XK-120 When're you getting mar- ried, Hinesy? But I'm only sixteen What trip to Europe? A hundred and forty pages and no.pictures? Take the pictures, Knoll frammis and blannistan Who's entering the Vrana contest? here comes George . . . The 1961 Tiger . . . OWL Week prizes . . . Iune Wilkinson . .. just go 'way . . . Marilyn, Marcly, and Iack Yum-Yum tenting in the editorial office Swe- tomnick . . . Sam-Reny's . . . Havah . . . Lincoln, Nebraska Feit's Formula D-76 and milk OWL 14, Pitt News O Doorknobs, typewriters, and Ethel race riot Roberstein the Coke machine wrestling matches, baseball, and football in the hall . . . golf in the office there's a party in 1013 overt activities Knock, dammit Fire! Fire! . .. Who's got a key to the cupboard? . . . the darkrooms . . . Darkhorse Nichols leads . . . Sunday night and corned beef sandwiches . . . parking meters . . . what hit today, Mel? . . . Vrana's campaign for damsel protection . . . Ask Miss Martin . . . Mrs. Sam . . . Bill, your mother called and said to call your father Study in the library, neck in the Oval, but stay out of this office! ,F 1 this room has the whole house in it. the privilege of something downstairs to prowl in. allowed silently to any love still come so feebly here you can't think where to let it else be tolerated. this room has no door nor floor concept. the welcome. set like walls at one time. are too much understood and that was to become love. and love: the toad that was to come turning the stone facade to warts with the antique-ing kiss time has. this room of watching company as constant in place as expectation packed at each turn i turn from if filthy with things other than me. here i could never please to be naked with habits to cover me. once. i would like the perspirant shine of pride in myself to be all i'd wear. independent of the world. before the possibility of myself. Ed Roberson Atlantic Monthly Grand Prize Poet The numerous activities and facilities of the Student Union were made available to the University Community through the concentrated efforts of the Student Union Board. Friday night dances were only part of the pro- gram. The PM series presented Columbian singers and Columbian cofee, and Midday speakers tried to answer . student questions. Instructors who participated in the Last Lecture Series presented issues that were vital to the preservation of mankind. The Film Series kept stu- dents from becoming bored. B First Row? D. Helsel. I. lilenyak, T. Mellers, S. Rotharmel. F. Cross, M. Rex, I. Snoke. Second Row: L. Heller, Mrs. McKnight, M. Holstein, S. Goldmeier, M. Eiges, I. Wertheimer, D. Meyer, B. Safier. William Pitt Debate Union In the fall of 1958, the William Pitt Debating Union was formed by means of the consolidation of the Pitt Men's Debate and the Pitt Wornen's Debate. Since then, the organi- zation has sponsored annual cross-examination debates, de- bate clinics for high school students in the Pittsburgh, West Virginia, and Ohio areas, and has published its own year- book, Adventures in Argument. More recent- projects of the William Pitt Debating Union include an intercollegiate debating program with over five hundred debates, twenty-five major trips, and regular en- gagements in the West Indies and Canada. A high school program takes visiting speakers from six major universities to sixty school assemblies appearing each year before some forty-five thousand people. Aside from formal activities, the debate union is com- prised of a close-knit group of debaters who conduct occa- sional parties for holidays and victory celebrations. First Row: D. Poscick, A. I. Anderson. Second Row: I. Defife, B. Shieker, I. Grison, M. Glier, C. jordan, L. Mallone, L. Connelly, R. Contestible, R. Davis, I. Matsco. Third Row: M. Volen, I. Adams, P. Patricks, B. Zigtkowicy, R. Roland, M. Nix. Fourth Row: B. Bucely, R. Lamb, W. Kelleer, W. Mason, I. Davidson, R. Cof field, D. Zell, D. Hahn, M. Wieser, M. Beck, W. Kennedy, H. Keiser. This year, the American Institute of Electrical Engineers combined with the local chapter of the Institute of Radio En- gineers to form the present organization, the Institute of Electrical Engineers. The Institute is made up of students in good standing with the University who are majoring in elec- trical engineering. After winning the first place for display in Engineers' Week, many of the junior and senior members of IEE were tapped to the engineering honorary fraternities, Sigma Tau and Eta Kappa Nu. I. A. S. A technical society for students in the field of aerospace engineering, the Institute of Aero- space Science this year held several trips to local aerospace industries and held two parties during the course of the fall and Winter trimesters. The I.A.S. also parti- cipated in the Shamrock Ball, th e intramural sports program, and En- gineers' Week. Institute of Electrical Engineers PI SVILLE DAM LIGHT AND POWER yu ,, x A-,f H First Row: H. Choma, T. Cook, E. Chuta. Second Bow: R. Krupa, Kubiak, B. Brandestein, I. Howard, I. Macko, B. Hift, R. Glaser, I. Kopriva, C. Bailey, G. Grimshaw, E. Hurtack, E. Sheridan, E. I. Grill, P. Olympia, T. Twigg, V. Vance. Men's Glee Club Begun in 1890 as the Pitt "Mandolin and Banjo Club," the Glee Club is now one of the oldest extracurricular activities on campus. The club sings for the Chancellor's Reception and during the spring. This year, the men also sponsored the Intercollegiate Music Festival and toured to Elmira, Beaver, and Goucher Colleges. Half the fun in being a member of the Glee Club is being able to go on these trips, since the aim and purpose of the Clee Club is to sing well and and above all to have fun doing it. Standing: Emanuel Rubin, Director, at piano, Bernard Walters. First Row: C. Waite, R. Sands, K. Sachs, P. Havens, D. Snyder, E. Williamson, R. Warren, D. Klein, C. Saladino. Second Row: H. Hatters, D. Reese, S. Levine, I. Sayre, R. Drosnes, I. Katz, R. Davis, R. Davis, R. Meckler. Third Row: L. Meta, C. Ebitz, D. Savage, I. Bukes, T. Harris, R. Bur- roughs, I. Rossen, K. Renchler, I. Seiger. Fourth How: E. Atkins, R. Ienkins, S. Canter, W. Silverman, I. Romito, W. Hale, A. Rich, I. Dunny, R. Nared. First RoW:'Sgt. T. B. Kelley, Company NCO Advisor, R. Sestili, Public Information Offi- cer, D. Kinsey, Operations Officer, I. Sollinger, Company Commander, R. Shontz, Sup- ply Officer, T. Fairfull, Executive Officer, D. Rudiak, Administrations Officer, T. Symons Second How: M. Sfanos, E. Filip, I. Szurek, S. Cooper, I. Pelch, D. Weatherhead, R. Tonsetic, M. Roberts. Third How: I. Panksepp, D. Lazar, C. Gruggel, C. Ebitz, F. Calanen, I. DiFrancisco, M. Glatt, M. Skrotski. Pershing Rifles The U.S. Army's version of a fra- ternity, the Pershing Rifles, was this year named the outstanding military organization on campus. Besides per- formance for the student body at the UCLA football game, PR was the honor company of the First Battalion, Fifth Regiment. Social affairs of the year included an annual dinner dance and a Christ- mas dance, along with a Hell Week- end, at which pledges were intro- duced to military customs. Quo Vadis No one on campus knows more about the variety and detail of the Nationality Rooms on the first floor of the Cathedral than the members of Quo Vadis. These student hostes- ses are trained to lead visitors and tourists around the circle of Nation- ality Rooms and keep up a running commentary and lecture as they go. To many outsiders, these hostesses are their only contact with the Uni- versity, which is the reason for the examination each girl must take be- fore she becomes a member of Quo Vadis. Left to Right: P. Nemeth, R. Tuskan, I. Dickerson, L. Oklin, I. Manion, G. Peterson, H. Fatur, G. Cartledge, W. Novogradac, P. Martin, K. Tatko. Left to Right: K. Shanley, C. Robinson, G. Scherm, A. Leivinnik, M. Rex, B. Litus, I. Myers, B. Edison E. Solon. Women's Choral Three times a week, the members of Women's Choral gather for rehearsal in a small room on the ninth floor of the Cathe- dral. For several hours, their singing is di- rected by Mr. Donald Colton, whose teaching ability is evident in every line the Choral sings. , ... -5 Y..-,....,.,prfff-,1,2-,.-atai-.-?1.,! --X-vszy..., ' in . , I' Left to Right: I. Franz, S. Wehmer, C. Bayless, R. Pett- ler, C. Cramer, P. Harris, I. Herald, I. Franz. The white blazer with the University seal on the pocket is the trademark of the Cho- ral. The group is made up of women from all classes, freshman to senior. In addition to their concerts, Women's Choral also attends a singing camp each fall. At this camp, the singers are given the chance to acquaint themselves with new friends and new music. 1 if AZN? Q F B.. -.., 1 L '-N., Fl- - , - ' rjci .gf 1 N wr" . ae" K . N. Wiand, M. Capous, S. Crafton, I. Diethorn, I. Cidemiller, I. Edwards, M. Flanagan, L. Goldberg, P. Measler, M. Montgomery, I. Morris, R. Obensader, S. O'Connell, I. Fishman, G. Schenle, R. Selbeiman, I. Snake, S. Switzer, L. Whitney, I. Wiehn, W. Wolford. fx ....-.?-- Y of Mortar Board Mortar Board is an honorary for senior women. The privilege of wearing the gold and black pin, shaped like a small mortar board, indicates the wearer's outstanding achievement on the campus and high intellectual ability. At the regularly scheduled meetings of Mortar Board, reading lists were handed out, and the read- ing topics were discussed in later meetings. Sopho- more and junior women were also invited to join the discussions, in the hope that they would be stim- ulated to pursue extra reading on their own. Often, the senior members of Mortar Board were surprised at the intellectual abilities of these younger women, and developed a new respect for them Twice each year, the big wooden key appeared on the Cathedral lawn, bearing the names of the men who had been selected for this senior men's honorary. They were men who had demonstrated that they were able to keep a suc- cessful balance between activities and the classroom. - Omicron Delta Kappa annually administers its Senior Award to the University student who most exemplifies the ideal product of the University. This year, the award went to Tom Olofson, President of Student Government. D Besides administering this award, the honorary also do- nates money for the "S" award, which enables a University student to travel, work, and study abroad. Luncheons were held in the Student Union every other Tuesday, at which important business was discussed and decisions made. Left to Right: A. Revay, L. Tavlarides, I. O'Brien, E. I. Rothman, A. Roses, L. Omasta, I. Bianculli, R. Tim- Drexler, D. Grimm, W. Crafts, W. Schneider, F. Robie, IHOIIS. l P r Left to Right: I. Friend, W. Mason, R. Ziegler, G. Mos- Olafson, W. Whited, R. Heath. toller, I. Karas, I. Harrison, I. Sollinger, P. Bijur, T. Whatever. the purpose of any Quax meeting, complaints and discussions about chemistry lab or experimental psy- chology exams seem to become part of the business meet- ing. Quax's activities of the year concentrate on defining women's role in the field of science and in each Quax mem- ber's particular science. Visits to cyclotron labs and dinner meetings with guest speakers are means of fulfilling the dual role of the woman in the scientific world. Left to Right: W. Wolford, I. Markman, G. Henkin, H. Iones, Mrs. R. Wachter, N. Ward, C. Lundberg, I. Manion, C. Solomon, D. Colgan, E Prussin, R. Abrahms, G. Peterson, P. Nemeth, Miss I. Teats ladvisorj, I. Peters. First Row: A. Roses, R. Carroll, D. Colgan, K. Schmitt, S. Makphanij- vadna. Second Row: L. Omasta, M. Orringer, I. Goldberg. Third Row R. Rabinowitz, R. Barardi, E. Williamson. Fourth Row: T. Kearnen, R Boron. Alpha Epsilon Delta, Alpha Epsilon Delta once again functioned with great efficiency and expediency. Everyone knew about scheduled meetings at least twelve hours ahead of time. Times and places of meetings were deter- mined by a system of maximum inconvenience. Ac- tivities of the year included asking which officer would like to be in charge of publicity for one of the planned seminars, desperately hoping to find at least one pre-med registered with the ninth floor, trying to explain to Mr. Bodin why his seminar hall was so empty, and depending on the officers to give the im- pression of adroitness during the initiation ceremo- nies. Cwens Cwens, the national sophomore honorary society for women, derives its name from the Anglo-Saxon word for "lady" or "queen." The Cwens on Pitt's campus are the young ladies who have demonstrated outstanding qualities in leadership, scholarship, and service to the University. The members of Cwens work during Freshmen Orientation, usher at Fall Convo- cation and other University functions, and are hostesses at Heinz Chapel services. Be- sides these duties, the Cwens this year spon- sored Cwen evening and attended the Cwen National Convention at Allegheny Col- lege. Cwen's aims are to foster leadership, schol- arship, and service, to promote fellowship among sophomore womeng to encourage leadership among freshmen women: and to serve and promote the interests of the Uni- First Bow: M. Leaf, I. Perry, I. Wolbert, M. Kalogeras. Second Row: I. Evan- versity of Pittsburgh. Members of CWBIIS cho, E. Swartz, N. Heckler, I. Grossman, R. Farkas. Third Row: R. Lieber- must have 3 3.0 quality point averaggy and man, R. Fedorchak, C. Durant, A. Bilewicz, R. Brown, K. Woolf. are chosen with respect to qualities of lead- ership evidenced during their freshman year. In this respect, Cwens is the women's coun- terpart of Druids, the men's sophomore hon- orary. 34 First How: R. Gorham, C. Hosick, A. Seijas, B. Cardin, A. Falk, I. Kory. Second Row: R. Heath, I. Catalano, T. Gay, B. Generalovich, L. Henry, M. Slutsky, W. Cohen. Third Row: I. O'Brien, I. Mas- trian, L. Sherman, N. Harrison, I. Newell, I. Vrana, S. Houser. Fourth Row: S. Knoll, R. Pease, N. Firestone, R. Warren, E. Pinneo, I. Wertheimer. Fifth Row: I. Ball, R. Cottham, I. Critchfield, I. Kleinberg, F. Slossinger. Sixth How: W. Schneider, M. Swetonic, P. Bijur, I. Rothman, C. Gular- son, I. Seiger. Eta Kappa Nu selects for its members only those electrical engineering students who have demonstrated both character and scholastic ability. Among the functions of this honorary organization are the administration of the electrical engineer- ing departrnent's Outstanding Senior Award, the awarding of a prize to the sophomore electrical engineering student with the highest grade average, and an annual initiation ban- quet. Eta Kappa Nu also attempts to promote and reward excellent scholarship, while co-operating with other campus honorary organizations. Eta Druids Druids is the men's counter- part of Cwens. The fraternity is made up of sophomore and junior men who have ex- celled in leadership and activi- ties. The Pitt chapter of Druids this year named Dr. Ionas Salk an honorary member, among several other out- standing faculty members. Among the outstanding mem- bers of Druids on the Pitt campus are Chancellor Ed- ward H. Litchfield and Irving N. Rothman, member of the University faculty and Direc- tor of Student Publications. Kappa. Nu Seated: Professor R. C. Gorham, C. Laughinghouse. Standing: E. Kubiak, R. Nored, D. Iurenko, D. Fisher, C. Hosick, G. Mos- toller, I. Frink, T. Rozmarich, R. Claser, L. Henry, E. Chuta, D. Kimmel. Phi Eta. Sigma. Phi Eta Sigma is one of the few honoraries which con- siders freshmen. It is, in fact, a fraternity for freshmen men who have achieved a 3.5 qual- ity point average during their first trimester, or who have earned a 3.5 cumulative qual- ity point average during their first year at Pitt. I. Bensy, M. Broder, M. Brumberg, R. Capriotti, I. Centifanti, W. Coax, W. Deforest, I. Driesch, I. Duffy, M. Ehrman, R. Frank, I. Harper, R. Hor- owitz, G. Iacobson, R. Iohnston, R. Keifer, R. McCurry, A. Odermott, P. Phillips, I. Rixner, W. Rohrer, M. Schorn, R. Shweder, M. Stein, C. Sullivan, I. Swetnam, I. VerEleeren, R. Weppelman, I. Zekan, M. Zel- kowitz. First Row: D. Musser, W. George, W. Mason, R. Lamb, L. Tavlarides, H. Beisel. Second Row: R. Smith, E. Petrisko, I. Watt, N. Williams, C. Hosick, R. Davis, R. Davis, D. Po- such. Third Row: I. Meyer, T. Edisen, G. Ulassin, H. Krier, T. Cain. Fourth Row: V. Bhat, R. Stana, I. Bruno, W. Cieski, L. Geary, I. Wilson. Fifth Row: W. Tilton, H. Iones, R. McCaffrey, E. Goscenski. Sixth Row: I. Tobias, B. Harland, D. Ritzcloff, I. Myers, I. Karas, T. Rozmarich, G. Mostoller. Sigma. Tau At this University, there are leader- ship honoraries, science honoraries, business honoraries, and journalism honoraries. Sigma Tau is the hon- orary fraternity for engineers. Twice each year, the names of Sig- ma Tau tappees are announced inthe weekly seminar. If the tappee wishes to join the honorary, he is required to pay an entrance fee, study a pam- phlet containing information about the honorary, and go through his in- itiation. His initiation is the most unusual one on campus. He is required to wear a railway engineer's denim cap with "Sigma Tau" printed across the bill, and railroader's gloves with "Sigma Tau" written on the cuffs. Until he becomes a full-fledged mem- ber of the honorary, he is required to follow the orders of the older mem- bers. The fields of business and industry are badly in need of qualified accountants, and it is the purpose of Beta Alpha Psi to serve as a liaison between accounting students and their future employers. The study of accounting is not only learning the principles of debits and credits: the accounting major must also be acquainted with a wide range of business subjects such as economics, industrial psychology, and busi- ness administration. Men who have proven their ability in these related fields are candidates for Beta Alpha Psi, which encourages cordial relationships b'etween its members and those of the account- ing profession. Alpha, Kappa. Psi Alpha Kappa Psi is a fra- ternity for men in the field of Business Administration. In order to recruit new mem- bers, rush smokers are held each trimester. A program of pledging follows, after which the new initiaties are wel- comed into the fraternity. Through membership in Alpha Kappa Psi, it is possible for a Business Administration student to make important contacts which may later help him when he seeks a job. First Row: N. Goodlin, H. Kane, L Soltz, B. Weiner, B. Tarlo, warden Second Row: G. Luther, pres., E Seager, treas., G. Felser, S. Kneze- vich, I. Greif, B. McGovern, R. Bol- linger, A. Goodman, master of rit- ual, L. Facchini, chaplain. Beta. Alpha. Psi Left to Right: T. Carson, S. Katz, L. Komatz, R. Finn, S. Charapp, treas., H. Krason, sec., E. Drexler, R. Kantrowitz, v. pres., I. Gailys, C Steiner, Professor S. I. Iablonski, W. Meier, H. Fahnestock, pres. A professional sorority for women in the field of phar- macy, Lambda Kappa Sigma is this year celebrating its fif- tieth anniversary. Its prospective members must have a quality point average of at least 2.0 on a four-point system, have personality and character, and have the endorsement of ninety percent of the active members of the chapter. Lambda Kappa Sigma is also active in the publishing field. Its publications are the Blue and Gold Triangle and Lambdcfs Tales. These publications are aimed at accomplishing the purpose of the sorority, which is the advancement of women in the field of pharmacy spiritually, socially, and profes- sionally. Lambda. Kappa. Sigma. 5, Q First Row: M. Allen, P. Watters. Second Row: M. McLane, V. Osborne, Goodling, G. Schenle, I. Rosenzwiecz, M. Koyder, D. Dantow. The Eta chapter of Sigma Theta Tau provides a partial scholarship yearly to a qualified student in the basic profes- sional program, and, on a national level, Sigma Theta Tau maintains a Research Fund which provides grants for re- search on the doctoral level. With such qualities as leadership and an overall 3.0 quality point average, the ability and intelligence of these aspiring nurses cannot be denied. Although professional rather than social in purpose, teas and banquets are also held by the Eta chapter, and distinguished speakers address the mem- bers at program meetings. G. Storc, I. Hilinski, G. Holroyd, G. Ballerini, N. Sigma. Theta. Tau Left to Right: C. Scofield, M. Green, D. Davis, G. Haughton, B. Evans, Dr. L. Austin, S. Gross, M. Avery, G. Pischke, E. Mar- ker, N. Sherlock, M. Hood, M. Iohns, B. Lindstrom, S. Switzer, I. Sanders, L. Whitney, O. Iurnet, T. Wiehn, N. Lloyd, D. Galiardi, R. Sheffey, S. Bigger, F. Knitengale, C. Spicher, N. Wiand. l Greeks 150 Greek organizations on the Pitt campus lie in a no-man's land between the University and the Luna. They are offi- cially under the jurisdiction of the University and controlled by the office of the Dean of Men, but their houses are all off-campus, and so is much of their social life. Their pledg- ing and initiation process is carefully controlled by the Ad- ministration, but their social functions are often open to the entire University com- munity. The Greeks have also had a token sort of control imposed on their social af- fairs, in the form of a no- liquor regulation. While on campus, most of the Greeks obey this ruling, but many parties are held off-campus, with a resulting relaxation in the observance of the Univer- sity no-alcohol ruling. To avoid the added expense of holding social affairs off the campus, the Greeks have often attempted to have the University alcohol law re- pealed. The latest attempt only imposed an even stricter rul- ing. But, even though the Greeks are an often-maligned group of Pitt organizations, they do serve a definite pur- pose. In a large University, a student often feels lost in the masses that crowd the halls. It is the purpose of the Greeks to provide a group With which the student can find his place in a giant school-city. Interfraternity Council Serving as the governing body of the fraternity sys- tem, Interfraternity Council works to create an atmos- phere of cooperation among its members. Meeting in the Student Union on Wednesday nights, the men dis- cuss ways of increasing unity and promoting the gener- al welfare of the fraternity members, as well as the University itself. Two of the big issues this year were rush and the alcohol question. The Council was very active athlet- ically as well as socially. Ranging from track meets at the Field House to ping-pong matches, Interfraternity Council helped to spark the good-natured violence among the fraternities. Social aspects of the Council's program included a successful Interfraternity Ball at Baldoc Country Club, and, in conjunction with Pan- hellenic Council, the greatest Greek Week ever. 163 Left to Bight: R. Poust, R. Kyser, I. DiFrancisco. Left to Right: H. Trout, I. Stanchak. 154 Delta. Iota. Delta. It was a good year for Delta Iota Delta. September brought the new house and furniture. The physical education pro- gram for the exceptional children at Saint Anthony's School got under way once again, and the fall pledge class of a dozen men helped to strengthen the chapter. Beaver! . . . Rocky . . . Minnesota Fats . . . Dennis the Menace . . . Bugs . . . Two Beers . . The Animal . . . lap- Fink . . . Duke . . . Mickey Mouse . . . LGI . . . Trenk . . . Fuzzy Fish . . . Iaggy George's Folly . . . twenty-three is a meld bid, stupid . . . The Ballad of Dirty Ed's . . . Saint Anthony's . . . Brutus . . . pinochle . . . five Big Irons . . . wanted-one bar stool . . .The Verona Iail . . . Raid! Raid! . . . Charlie Brown . . . new furniture . . . Phi Delts . . . Parents' Day . . . the parties . . . Valentine's Day, Hal- loween, Christmas . . . The Vampire . . . Kennedy . . . Castro . . . ABCD and Peggy . . . A little nickel-dime? . . . the last-day-of-school blast . . . Marsha . . . Beaver! Beaver! . . . the basketball team . . . the football team . . . Shep's . . . Nan . . . I want to be a Bill Kelly . . . Stanchak in the lake . . . dates . nurses . . . sweetheart . . . tea dances . . . Beaver! For Delta Iota Delta, the year was more than parties and classes. It was keeping the chapter solvent, deciding who would make the best president next year, and checking on the grades of both brothers and pledges. And by April, the sweat and struggle paid off. The chapter was in the black, grade averages were up, and the new president and his ex- ecutive committee had the house and chapter running smoothly. Left to Right: I. Vaushan, B. Niederst, R. Miller, I. Spehar, I. Thompson. Left to Right: T. Wossel, I. C-fittings, L. Rowley. Left to Right: D. Adamson, R. Purdy, R. Viltrakis, G. Dernas, 1. Deid- erich. 1"' T" r 3 "' 'J 7 r,,,. in .. 4.1-.B ' l... .4l' Y LC' A7 " --V' 0' 'LL' . :Tgow -SL -,", .- 1' 1 1 ' Left to Right: R. Behrandt, M. Hunt, R. Kassouf, I. Picone. Left to Right: E. M. Hecklinger, R. Fadorcheck, R. Franklin, T. Linsemeyer, A. Alex, R. Coppy, L. Henrey, B. McKnight, T. Pignetti, R. Martin, B. Gaffney, I. Newall. Left to Right: W. Rodgers, R. Williams, I. Troese, R. Pingatore, H. Baumberger, I. Geordano. Left to Right: F. Cross, R. Dodson, R. Petterson, P. Abaray, S. Zacarias. Left to Right: S. Martin, D. Kankel, I. Moffet, F. Petrich, W. Hole, R. Nies, T Sopkovitch, M. Lebo, D. Helsel, N. Ceramela, I. Phelps. Delta. Sigma. Phi Delta Sigma Phi was one of the big Winners in this year's interfraternity sports program. The Delta Sig's took first place in wrestling, basketball, ping-pong, and golf, while Winning second places in bowling, track, and football. The IFC all- sports trophy was lost by only three points. Social affairs of the year included the Sailor's Ball, and the annual Sphinx Ball for the sweetheart, plus weekly meetings at the Luna, Chief's, Fat Daddy's, and Fox's. Both living rooms of the house were completely refurn- ished, and during Hell Week, the pledges painted the entire inside of the house. Kathy English Sweetheart of Delta Sigma Phi 1 First Row: I. Coll, R. Havalak, I. Borcovick, C. Riley, F. Charles. Second Row: C. Loch, I. Hollingsworth, T. Ransick, G. Gary, D. Swenney. First Row: C. Riley, I. Borko- vick, R. Cobun, T. Ransick, C. Loch, R. Loch. Second Row: I. Pisula, D. Sweeney, F. Charles. Left to Right: D. Pflug, R. Marshall, R. Kibochick, I. Mastrian, M. Ferson, R. Iohnson, G. Denis First Row: T. Ransick, R. Haulak, I. Hollingsworth, A. Bracilrelly, C. Riley. Second Row: P. Busany, D. Garwood, E. Migaluchi, D. Sweeney. Pi Kappa, Alpha, The express aim of the Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity is to promote brotherhood and have a good time do- ing it. The year's social events contributed to this end. The Dreamgirl Formal was held at the Univer- sity Club on December eighth, and the Spring Week- end was held at Seven Springs on April fifth. The PiKA's placed men in Phi Eta Sigma, Druids, Student Government, and the Interfraternity Council Executive Committee. The Chapter also took second place in Homecoming and won trophies in several in- terfraternity sports. The basement of the house was remodeled with materials donated by the Mother's Club and work donated by the brothers and dream- girl. The national organization of Pi Kappa Alpha Fra- ternity was founded on March 3, 1868, which makes it one of the oldest Greek-letter fraternities. The Pitt Chapter was founded on March 1, 1934. For several years, the fraternity's quarters were lo- cated in the Bellefield Apartments. Two years ago, a house on the corner of Bayard and Bellefield Streets was purchased. Since that time, the house has been improved and remodeled, with most of the work be- ing done by the brothers themselves. This year's president and vice president, Bob Bryan and Dave Garwood, continued the tradition in getting the broth- ers to remodel the basement. Nancy Goodling Sweetheart of Pi Kappa Alpha me Pi Lambda. Phi The Rex now is a Mozart disciple . . . Larry Sherman was tapped into 17 honorary groups . . . Boss Tweed edged out Tamany Hall from OUR third floor . . . Wally had some bad breaks but he'll be okay . . . Smitty became our own Mort Sahl . . . Lot's gave away that ole' pin to some wonder- ful damsels . . . Ming had some hard working room- mates . . . The boys tore up N.Y.C. for New Years . . . Trips to Boston, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Wheeling . . . "Charlie the Rat" . . . Unbe- lievable . . . The Myth . . . "Don't knock the Rock" . . . The Chi's . . . Skiing . . . Roth needs a lift to and from . . . "The turtle loves me, guys" . . . Two accidents-boy we'll be on TV . . . Iohn H. Brooks of Brooks Brothers . . . "Who ever heard of a Pontiac with- out a radio, Iohn?" . . . Or should we say I.A.H.M.D .... Barry you're his friend. Tell him to have the spaghetti . . . Raskin tell Chicky that he made national TV. Left to Right: K. Herman, L. Sherman, I. Fingerett, B. Car- don, M. Marineo. ? Left to Right: N. Cohn, W. Leight, I. Apetoth, L. Wolkov, D. Fleishman. Left to Right: S. Stillman, G. Shapiro, D. Rankin, M. Abes, A. Malassky, A. Segan, R. Minker. First Row: H. Frucker, A. Clien, A. Brossman, I. Muchwick. Second Row: I. Zemil, E. Brum- berger, M. Oringer, K. Ioseph. 6 ' One of the largest national fraternities, Sigma Alpha Ep- silon this year participated fully in inter-fraternity and inter- sorority activities. Q 1 h The SAE's built their homecoming float with Kappa Kappa p al Gamma, and held an inter-fraternity party with Sigma Al- pha Mu and Delta Sigma Phi, which was heralded as one . of the biggest Greek social events of the year on Pitt's cam- pus. In the annual Greek Sing held during Greek Week, Sig- ma Alpha Epsilon chose as its song "Standing on the Corner, Watching All the Girls Go By." A Christmas Party was held after the completion of the fall trimester. One of the freshman men, Ioseph Bensey, was named to Phi Eta Sigma, the freshman honorary. Left to Right: A. Hussy. E. Laine. F. Nichols. I- Varner, E- Carey- Left to Right: D. Aleva, E. L. Atkins, A. Markus, R. Collins, C. Lair. K. Stavisky, M. Korb, R. Enyhart, L. Catalano. Seated: Left to Right: D. Miller, A. Ienkins, W. Martello, I. Edwards, I. Har- I. Porter, C. Taylor. PGI'- rg! Left to Right: R. Cimino, D. Lasker, N. Himes, R. Leeson fpianol, I. Linhart, A. Wakelin, A. Sunseri. .ff Z" ff!! Left to Right: D. Picciano, R. Lucidi, R. Popvichak, I. Linhart. Vw . 1 Left to Right: I. Roberts, C. Zarganis, I. Whiteford, I. Crawford, Left to Right: I. Beechler, T. Betras, I. Bircher, T. Ribarchak, R. Vulin. H. Kolbert, B. Shanahan. Left to Right: I. Hughes, D. Woll, I. Toth, I. Hartman, B. Meier, G. Kaltenbach, I. Friend. Sigma Chi Traditionally, each year the men of Sigma Chi gather on the shores of Conneaut Lake for the purpose of electing a sweetheart for the following year. This yearis meeting at the Oakland Shores Hotel was made more festive due to the chapter's sweetheart, Beverly Hodgkinson, who was nom- inated by Sigma Chi's national organization to compete for the title of National Sigma Chi Sweetheart. Also traditional are the Greek Week Exchange Dinners, the White Rose Dance, which is the final rush party, and the regular weekend parties. Participation in Homecoming is also an annual activity. This year's float carried a giant paper-mache facsimile of a roll of Delsey tissue, with the slogan "Wipe 'em up, Pitt!" Traditional, too, are the Luna, Fox's, Mambo Leucidi, and Butterball Sinceri. The entire downstairs of the house was remodeled and paneled, and through some miracle the grass was cut in the back yard. In sports, men of Sigma Chi captained the football team, the basketball team, and the track team. In student govern- ment, Tom Olofson was president of the student body. In social activities, twenty-five of the brothers were either pinned or engaged. Beverly Hodgkinson Sweetheart In its first full year as ZBT on the Pitt campus, the chapter moved forth with vigor in all areas of fraternity, campus, academic and social activities. B Fall rush obtained the largest pledge class on cam- pus. Matching skills with SDT created a beautiful float for the Homecoming Parade. The brothers ranked second among fraternities in academic standing. In the winter, the initiation of 15 new brothers and the election of a new "V" brought a burst of new energy. In the area of social service, the chap- ter held a party for crippled children with the pledges of AEPhi and won a plaque for outstand- ing support in the UMOC Contest. The year's so- cial calendar was full, but the crowning events were the First Anniversary Dinner-Dance and the Spring Weekend at Mont Chateau. l l First Row: I. Sandler, S. Levine, I. Oliver, M..Kornblatt, T. Booke, L. Stiffman. Second Row: D. Snyder, I. Swartz, B. Siskin, E. Faber, G. Berkman, H. Pollack, S. Levey. Third Row: A. Sabsevitz, A. Roses, L. Schwartz, H. Kaplus, B. Mannheimer, R. Reisner, M. Baumritter. Fourth Row: A. Cazen, R. Richterp R. Sternberg, R. Weinstein, A. Finkelstein, M. Stiglitz, M. Kraus, I. Marron, R. Parlow, S. Bernste1n..F1fth Row: P. Ash, A. Sabsevitz, M. Sobsey, O. Smith, I. Iaffe, P. Balagur, I. Bockneck, I. Frause, I. Epstein, P. Krugman. ff 5. A 'nf n,,,-' ' X 7 '- f' . T' ., 1- B ' . -, ', . V I E , W . L7 ' 5 'A N, gh. ,fy . J v Q A 1 1 3 'EM I - ' ms V - , wh-Q ,G . , A .. not , I S---5 AJ5'-'li' Y,-Am' sg, 4- I A ML' 4- "'f 451. . ' ' ,'5 ff 3' " 'X " WL in f X-L fx ' -if: . 73, 1 ,la-ik- .46 7 ,,.1 V t ,V I 14. . T.. ff S .' R4 kj I 3 'W if L 1. JN. rx- gi- A 'I ' ' I 1 R -, 'I l i 3,7 f - - - ,RY , X ji L "Y ,N J 'xl 1 vv I .,, ' ' .. 1 , ' N "1'f- :Q u '- .f- - 4 A ' ' :W .. , ur., V ' . 'k in 'N Q . .ig , Q1 ,Q Q M A am, I, lu-. -SX R. n ,V Q' Ney X Fl 4 l' A 5 is c , H! gpg! T Q F IQIJKA1 K ll Y, I , I if E1 ' The 1962-63 year at the Sammy House had many diverse events. Some of which will be remembered are: Corning to a Pep rally in a black and orange car, the top cut off, and a palm tree imported from Florida sticking out . . . the dirty mind and similar food of Rosie . . . Gil Miller's heroics in killing a bat inroom 8 . . . the completion of bathrooms and the unique stall . . . firecrackers at three in the morning . . . ul daily bridge games and weekly lessons . . . sudden AWOL of limbo . . . Barry Hirshfield's dissertations on "How to get a girl" . . . Dave Tyson's sophisticated dates . . . the way Tyson and Al Paulanoff let each other use their Corvettes . . . 150 dollar phone bill in room 8 each month, thanks mainly to the daily calls to McKeesport . . . Iack Herman's friendliness in taking hints on "How to run a kitchen" . . . daily pilgrimage to Web Hall and all the friendly waitresses . . . Tippecanoe and Kessman too . . . the 'petite' appetite of Howie Haber- man . . . the beautiful renditions on the piano from the "gross scene from Great Neck." First Row: M. Louick, R. Ellsweig, L. Ronick, A. Weinstein, G. Miller, D. Ginsburg, E. Finder, A. Fleischner. Sec- ond Row: H. Altman, I. Ingwer, R. Plotkin, I. B. T. Golding, H. Soltanoff, B. Waldman, I. Herman. Third Row: S Mestleman, M. Weiss, I. Iacobson, H. Gould, L. Harris, I. Clay. Fourth Row: S. Shobin, B. Salth, E. Leeds, I. Hais- Held, B. Hershfield, M. Bernes. Fifth How: D. Lewis, L. Walkon, R. Zatman, R. Pressman, I. Meyerson, R. Ehrlich Sixth Row: H. Haberman, M. Peller, N. Eisman, S. Kessman, S. Randell, R. Leder, P. Novak, H. Schwartz, S. Gersh- man, R. Lopez, I. Penn. is ,ff2+c9'lf +4 Greek organizations on the Pitt campus are in a perilous position. Every year finds another fraternity or sorority going off campus, or another Greek organization in serious finan- cial trouble. Each fall, the number of freshman rushees decreases, and so do the number of new pledges. Fraterni- ties are plagued by perennial rushees who pretend to be in- terested in a particular fraternity so that they can attend the rush parties. Grades of freshmen are notoriously low, and the grades of freshmen who pledge fraternities are notori- ously lower. Problems of public relations also enter into the picture. Noisy parties cause trouble with private families who live near fraternity houses, and a brotherly quartet on its way home from a Monday-night meeting at the Luna does not add to the peace and quiet of North Dithridge Street. Frater- nity men are derided by anyone who does not spend his spare moments in the Tuck Shop. They are often looked upon as playboys or docile sheep who merely find a group, adjust to it, and quickly fall into a typed pattern. Greek organizations are also accused of wanting nothing to do with the University. Supposedly, the fraternity men and sorority women would rather spend their extra time in their house or suite than enter into the larger social and in- tellectual world of the University. But there is another side to the story. In the last two years, Greek organizations have taken a searching look at them- selves, determined their shortcomings, and set out to cor- rect them. Tutoring systems have been set up, more and more Greeks are becoming active in University affairs, and noisy parties are now either not so noisy or are held off campus. Hopefully, the Greeks are on their way up. Panhellenic Council Providing an opportunity for the sororities to "air out their problems," Panhellenic Council again demonstrated its importance as the unifying force between and within sororities. On questions concerning policies for rush, open houses, or ideas for philanthropic activities, sug- gestions were heard from each sorority, and through the help of individual chapters, it was possible to make wise decisions. As the delegates return to their sororities en- thusiastically talking about the great, idea for a Greek Week theme, planning the pledge reception in Ianuary, or deciding the important questions of what to wear and whom to ask to the Pan-Hel Ball, they clearly show the aim of Panhellenic Council-fostering of a cooperative spirit among the sororities and their members. D. Grant, I. Tyler, I. Goldfin- ger, S. Goldboro, A. Mason, S. Gibson, D. Schwarzback, I. Cutuly, M. A. Polyak, I. Die- thorn, I. Iuber, I. Descalzi, L. Berdex, I. Ruey, C. Zambaro, L. Gray, S. Cartei, C. Magules, C. Rosenberb, D. Lobough, M. Leof, P. Marunczak, H. Car- penter, G. Storic, B. Hall, M. I. Yankosy, M. Bernath. i Alpha, Delta Pi First Row: C. Fyock, M. F. Chiccino, S, Girton. Sec- ond How: K. Grant, A. McDowell, P. Watters, M. Zbicowski. Third Row: L. Whitney, E. Snyder, K. Dixon, S. McDermott, C. Zord. The aims of the Alpha Delta Pi Sorority are to foster sisterhood, to encourage high scholarship, and to add to college life the social and philanthropic aspects of an educated woman's existence. The Pitt Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi was founded at the University in Ianuary of 1919. Since that time, the sorority has grown in both size and renown. The honors that the individual members of the sorority received are evidence of this fact. Four of the sorority sisters were named to Mortar Board, three were members of Cwens, four were senior mentors, and one sister was elected to Pi Delta Epsilon. Linda Whitney won the Pan-Hel- lenic Scholarship for the Pittsburgh area. Left to Right: M. F. Chiccino, C. Cicone, I. Traynor, A. Bilewicz, P. Whitman, M. Nauda, C. Collins. 1 , I l i -L u Left to High-t: H. Toncier, L. Turkes, L. Delich, D. Turkes, K. Browning, C. Fox, A. Materna, I. Krausche, C. Schissel, M. A. Kearney, F. Kasubik, M. Nauda, I. Vannucci. Alpha Epsilon Phi It took a prim, pure, old-fashioned girl to resist the chal- lenge of this year's Alpha Epsilon Phi pledge skit: "Nibble, Nibble me skin. Stop nibbling at my Cicenf' . . . The sisters look alike, they talk alike, they even wear their hair alike . . . The winter affair at Seven Springs and party following the Pan-Hel Ball did more for the pledges than the sisters . . . Sisters wonder why they can never find Iaokie from Friday to Sunday. Perhaps it's a West Virginia law . . . the ubiquitous Bob Proctorwitz . . . Possibly Mr. C. has trouble distinguishing his own AEPhi? . . . Oh, pledges, when're ya gonna fix us up? . . . How about at the next "bring your own sheg" party? . . . Even though the AEPhi's didn't win Greek Sing, they learned a lot from it. iii ' ill- 1 Left to Right: S. Golboro, I. Goldfinger, F. Kravitz, M. Albert, K. Bendheim, B. Guttenberg, E. Zatkowsky, M. Landau. EEF Left to Right: S. Melriick, P. Kessler, I. Grossman, A. Kozart, D. Rovner, I- Slotkin, I. Kasindorf, B.Atkin, L. Eisenstadt, S. Nathanson. . i Left to Right: B. Lichter, N. Kaney, S. Radbil, D. Singer, F. Chagrin, L. Berger, E. Stine, D. Brand. Left to Right: C. Friedman, M. Swerdloff, L. Melnick, S. Spalter, S. Brill, N. Snellenberg. l . ix.. i t '7 G l Left to Right: P. Greenberger, R. Kaufman, M. Gordon, P Green. Beta. Sigma. Omicron Left to Right: D. Schwartzbach, M. Otterman, M. Wright, D. Fleming, I. Manion. The members of Beta Sigma Omi- cron piled up another year of memo- ries. Dee's wine ceremony was one of the highlights of the year. Square dances and quick Monday night din- ners added to the confusion. Dottie forgot to get off of the elevators 'and rode to the eighth floor of the Student Union. Iosie played the flute in the Cathedral elevators and the whole chapter carried signs to football games and pep rallies. Picnics in the rain and pajama parties provided a social atmosphere. The National Con- vention was held at the Elms. Every- one ran to catch buses, and coaxed Betsy to run. The year wound up with Inez and Dee graduating, and Inez won cum laude honors. Besides fostering Sisterhood within their own sorority, the members of Beta Sigma Omicron also partici- pated in Pan-Hellenic and all-Greek activities. T7 .p r- ,.4" av-' ff? V .AWN .AN ge Left to Right: M. Wright, D. Fleming, M. Otterman. Left to Right: I. Manion, D. Schwartzbach. 181 Chi Omega. The Chi O's will remember both the big and little things of this year. Among the big things was winning the scholarship trophy for the second year. Among the little things . . . Did you hear? Faith is a queen again . . . Ioanie is off to the salt mines in Utah . . . Maryanne changed her major again . . . the big weekends at W and I . . . Barbie, here are the 350 pennies for pizza . . . Mrs. B. locked the door and Karen broke it down . . . Bob, the boy of the golden horseshoe . . . Man, this lodge is rustic . . . Homecoming- Karen's box, Elliot's orange curtains, and Oh! remember that spaghetti . . . Marie is getting her pin soon . . . SAE Little Sisters meeting tonight . . . I Enjoy Being A Girl . . . Colorado, here we come . . . Oh! those late movies . . . Brown, the favorite man in a palm tree . . . Let's go TGIF-ing today . . . Her name is really Nancy Fuchs . . . The big and little sister overnight . . . Don't for- get your sleeping bag . . . Did you get your brandy-snifter? . . . the night the bed fell in . . . and lane behind the counter. Left to Right: S. Bachtell, F. Rothenstein, L. Bowers, N. Fuchs, B. Beam, D. Scalise, M. McIntyre, S. Drake. . I 1 Left to Right: L. Tor, S. Love, B. Brownfield, A. Saveikas, N. Delaney, A. Walesky, M. Yankocy. 1 . Left to Right: I. Greedan, E. White, M. Walko, K. Swartz, M. Robertson, F. Leitzel. Left to Right: B. Shumaker, I. Cutuly, L. Pidutti, I. Meyers, M. Fay, M. Pe trosky, L. Besaha. Delta, Delta, Delta, The "wee" ones at 901 Amos proved to be "Rugged, but Right" . . . Pinky stuck Ron with her trident, but she wears the white cross now . . . A funny thing happened to Sandy and Ioe over a pizza pie-What a true "Sweetheart, Ioe is! . . . What Fink put M.A.'s mattress on the elevator? . . . Bren loved the social parties . . . The Delta Sigs and the Delts craved the "tea dances" . . . The Sigs still cannot conceive that the baby was so big! . . . Where have all the workers gone? . . . It sure was a "hairy" and "lude" situation . . . Ian go to classes-ridiculous! . . . H.I., the great white healer . . . Rossie lost her mittens, the naughty Tri Delta! . . . Ash trays-Yes, where are the ash trays? . . . A silver cup and sec- ond place in Greek Sing . . . Did M.A. play "hooky" or did she really have a toothache? . . . Lee still does not "understand" . . . What is a pinning cere- mony like? Left to Right: K. Perna, I. McKeever, L. Gilmore, R. Pomarico, Boatman, I. Volkin, L. Finlay, S. Whitehouse. Poff, I. Wolbert, I. Hutchison, B. McKeever, C. Lyons. to Right: N. Roland, M. Buckbee, Mrs. H. Stewart, M. Polyak, Left to Bight: K. Frawley, I. Fox, L. Helfrick, I. Miller, K. Krasneski, N. Provost. Left to Right: B. Henderson, I. Davies, H.,Iones, C. Wilson, I. Diet horn, N. Gavalier. Left to Right: R. Haupt, S. Turlik, M. Clemens, A. Butera, N. Matt- son, T. Garber, M. McGannon. B. Cooper, L. Lewis. f I The year was a busy one for the Omicron Chapter of Delta Zeta. At the Pitt-West Virginia football game, the sorority sponsored the Menzie milk wagon. Christmas caroling at Western Psychiatric Hospital and building the Homecoming Queen's float were included among the many activities. Serenading at fraternity houses on Fall ribboning night . . . open houses for Parents' Weekend and Home- coming . . . the tea for the pledges' mothers . . . the pledge party . . . the Founders' Day Dinner with the alum- nae . . . the Christmas Party . . . the Spring Formal . . . the Alumnae Fashion Show. The DZ's are also active in com- munity service work. The chapter supports an active scholarship pro- gram, makes Easter favors for the patients at Western Psychiatric, and contributes to Children's Hospital, the American Hearing Aid Society, Gallaudet College for the deaf, Car- ville Hospital, the only hospital in the United States where victims of Han- sen's disease are treated, and the Nav- ajo Indians. Delta, Zeta, 1? First Row: L. Barr, M. Mikulla, I. Ruebush, A. Plishta. Second Row: S. Fletcher, C Szolis, R. Davis, L. Madducks, I. Schofield, C. Mdister, H. Rose, L. Wildeman. V7 First How: N. Neiberg, L. Richardson. Second Row: P. Rowand, G. Grimshaw, I. Hanahan, F. Molesky, I. Rosengwieg, I. Iuber. First Row: B. Moore, K. Tatko. Second Row: G. Idzkowsky, A. Plishta, M. Bernath, C. White, I. Peters, K. McClure, C. Meister. Pitt's chapter of Kappa Alpha Theta holds an annual orphan's party each year at Christ- mas, along with contributing to Western Pennsylvania School for the Blind and the Institute of Hagopedics at Wichita, Kansas. Social activities included a Christmas Formal, a Spring Formal, active alumnae parties with alumnae from both Pitt and Carnegie Tech, tea dances with campus fraternities, and par- ties with other sororities. Among the outstanding members of Kappa Alpha Theta this year was Beverly Hodg- kinson, who was named University Scholar, Greek Week Queen, and was nominated for national Sweetheart of Sigma Chi. The The- tas also placed third in this year's annual Greek Sing. Left to Right: K. English, I. Mund, C. Dolfi, R. Fedarchak, S. Coen, S. Kitson, R. Zaremba, I. Chenowith. Kappa Alpha Theta Left to Right: S. Burton, calzi, M. Montgomery, B. K. Kitson, G. Michalyzyn, L. Waters, I. Ruey, I. Des- Hodgekinson, L. Bendix, I. McCabe, R. Maguire. Left to Right: K. Poppe, B. Hodgekinson, S. Burton, I. Descalzi, I. Ruey, M. Montgomery. Left to Right: L. Bendix, G. Michalyzyn, L. Waters, I. McCabe, K. Kitson, G. Kissel, E. Proudfoot, G. inton, N. Heckler, L. Smi Reynolds, M. Kayner, M. Brenlove, R. Maguire, C. Ben- th. Left to Bight: A. Harper, M. Donnelson, L. Love, L. Vaira, Y. Hefferle, S. Martin, B. Murphy, C. Warbeneth, M. Faso, C. Hefferle, P. Iablon- ski. Kappa. Kappa, , Gamma. Left to Right: I. Hively, T. McCloskey, C. Durant, N. Moore, I. Blackwood, R. Brown, A. Iohnsen, M. P. Thomas, C. Notopoulos. Left to Right: E. Lambie, T. Arrow, M. Magnani, L. Morton, S. Spanos, C. Smith, I. Evancho, E. Stuckeman. It was another swinging year for the Kappa's. You can spot the "tweed', from a distance by her madras skirt, madras headband, blue blouse, red flats, and a Delt. Where ELSE but at the Luna? Moderation is "the word" as we approach the Yacht Club . . . Homecoming was spent at the S.A.E. House manu- facturing Campbell Kids . . . Mmmm mmm good! Un styrofoam that is!! Accomplishments included a Homecoming finalist, two Sweethearts, second in scholarship, our own "Honey Bun" at Greek Week, and the highest percentage of monotones. Tony's pinned! . . . to whom? . . . How do you like my touch-up job on the wallpaper? . . . by the way, which one has the Marty??? Remember those endless hours Don spent waiting for Dilly . . . and those Sunday evening sessions preparing the Ensign for wearing civilian garb! Who said we were the Nursing Honorary? Candlelight atmosphere set in as the Pledges hid the lightbulbs . . . Nightly bridge in Mom's room and remember her Saturday Special-SAM SAND- WICHES! Yes, that's what we're having for din, Nanc, so quit inspect'in the refrig . . . and thus ends another great year with a K. and an A. and a P.P.A.! 1- li. X -1 Left to Right: A. SiIIlU1'1, B- Iacob. 5- SWHZCF. M. I. Fran- Left to Right: I. Brown, F. Fiore, S. Marshall, B. Ross, Mrs. Berg, K. Shanley dozzi, C. Zambano, L. Gray, I. Stockberger. K. Sura, P. Thompson, B. Keller, A. Iones, S. Smith. fir Iliff' ' 'W Mig, Phi Sigma. Sigma. . CIoordinated confusion vvas the phrase of the year for the , Phi Sigs. What happens when a dentist and a computer get together? . . . Hey! Which one of you is dating Dooley? . . . 'X What is Duff Gordon doing in the suite? . . . Answer those phones . . . What's chirping in the bathtub? . . . It's Margie again, collect . . . Watch out for wild Indians with water guns . . . Who took my door knob? . . . How about red and black on Monday? . . . Who's sleeping in the chapter room? . . . VVateris a great diet. .. VVhat else is there in hfe besides coffee ice cream? . . . Where's my hammer? . . . Our pledge mother is genuine . . . Who's sleeping in the chapter room? . . . Shut off those phones . . . Do you always Wear your clothes in the bathtub? . . . Do appendicitis attacks always wait until finals are Over? Left to Right: B. Leiberman, I. Perry, I. Secher. S8932 nfiff Left to Right: F. Perlstein, W. Schoenfield, A. Liebling, S. Price, M. Schwartz, S. Brownrot, L. Chase, F. Pitt, H. Secher, B. Rosenbloom. ,. ,,,,. Left to Bight: I. Englehart, R. Kessler, K. Hepps, B. Guggenheimer, F. Left to Right: R. Feldman, S. Steigman, E. Prussen, E Stein, I. Sices, G. Shapiro, L. Freedman, S. Fleisher, R. Freidman, S. Margulies, H. Hersch, M. Siegel. Cantor, A. Sanza, D. Hoffman. Sigma, Delta, Tau It was a lively year in the Sigma Delta Tau suite. There was the float with Zeta Beta Tau, the tea dance with Beta Sigma Rho, the Alumni Party, the dinner dance, the speak- ers, and the Founders' Day card party. There was more. Little B.B. and a big fur coat . . . everyone loves chop suey . . . cah- aret and cherry soda . . . Pin the tail on the DONKEY? . . . frans, frans, frans, we will always be . . . good idea . . . next year you're chairman . . . eight in the morning and we're eating pancakes . . . See you next year-keep the torch light burning. One of the newer sororities on the Pitt campus, Sigma Delta Tau came to the Uni- versity in 1950. The aims of the sorority are to promote leadership, friendship, and char- ity: to promote scholarshipg and to foster the spirit of service to the University, while keep- ing in mind the social development of the women of Sigma Delta Tau. T T i Left to Right: M. Bergstein, L. Schwartz, Mrs. Estep S Saul Left to Right F Weiss I Gordon A Hersh A Lefko S Iacobowitz I. Saul. Left to Right: I. McCormick, S. Ioseph, S. Price, M. Melnik, H. Borsay, D. Linhart. Row: I. Lewis, D. Shutte, M. Leaf. First Row: S. Sullivan. Second Row: E. Kalabokes, E. Sentipal. wig pq. vii' . ,ix 5. .I- Third Sigma. Sigma. Sigma. "Let me entertain you," the Tri-Sigs begged at Greek sing. "Let me do a few tricks, some old and then some new tricks," and then demonstrated their skill by smashing a flower-decked train into the wall of Pitt Stadium. Singing "Fm very versa- tile," the sisters roamed Pittsburgh in formal attire searching for their own dance. The question of the year was: Why didn't the Tri-Sigs share their toys with the orphans? . . . The girls are having problems recognizing their own front door since the Phi Kaps found a safer place to display the sisters' door plaque . . . Atten- tion, Turnpike Authority: Winnie's Lemon refuses to peel down your road . . . Does falling in love at tea dances always result in piles of luscious cookies? . . . Oh, no, not again! . . . Off to Gustine's, girls! Left to Right: E. Darryl, B. LaRosa, B. Dell. Left to Right: A. Punzak, W. Pizzano, D. Loubaugh, I. Krenicky, B. Ulaky, R. Healy. L rw Theta Phi Alpha, 1 I 1 l l l 1 Highlights of the year for Theta Phi Alpha in- cluded Reggie's being selected for Mortar Board, Helen's making Delta Phi Alpha, and Gerri's being elected president of Quax. The Stripper . . . Great Saint Fink . . . Gustine's . . . Cicero's . . . Overnights . . . hearts . . . the doll party . . . the alumni tea . . . Mimi the bunny . . . Ioan and Ioe . . . Rat-Fink . . . Birthday parties . . . the student teachers-Mimi, Peggy, and Willie . . . Fran and Fiji Bob . . . tea dances with Delta Iota Delta and Phi Gamma Delta . . . Emily studying in front of the television set. Left to Right: H. Carpenter, G. Peterson, M. A. Wildow, P. Marunczak, M. Houk. Left to Right: F. Healy, M. Hrinya, I. Ferrari, R. Tuskarx. Left to Right: M. Kerlavage, D. Link, E. Kovak, N. Semler. Zeta. Tau Alpha The requirements for membership in Zeta Tau Alpha are the completion of twelve credits at the University and a quality point average of 2.0. The first chapter of Zeta Tau Alpha was founded on October 15, 1898, at Longwood Col- lege in Farmville, Virginia. The sorority achieved national status in 1929 when a chapter was established at the Univer- sity of Manitoba. The women of Zeta Tau Alpha built a Homecoming float in conjunction with Phi Kappa Theta Fraternity. They also held several tea dances during the year. The highlights of the social schedule included a Christmas party and an Orphan's party. Gloria Store was president for the year, Linda Kleiner served as vice-president, and Marsha Colling and Elizabeth Hall were secretary and treasurer. Like most of the other sororities on Pitt's campus, the women of Zeta Tau Alpha live in their sorority suite, located in 801 Amos Hall. The sorority colors are gray and blue, and the slogan is "The Call of Zeta." "Ll" 7" ' Left to Right: G. Store L Schmidt M Callm C Sopher S Kish. Left to Right: B. Hall, M. Bale, S. Massimino, S. Barris, M. Noble, M. Reynolds, S. Reday, I. H1l1nsk1 I Brazauskas. 1 '-2:44 . , Left to Right: B. Titus, I. Brazauskas, M. Wiltman, C. Whitehouse, I. Niznansky. ?iI AT LETICS 4.1 .K .A - 4. .'a.,,,,w. .x 1.--rf c .,,..-r Q , .V g...,.---.- N vm. ., Y. , ..-.,....,,. , , 1. f HWY ' P- Q' " 1 1. ' ,I . -..W .. .... rg... ?.-- :sf . . , , v. -nh .M 1 . i , ..,,,,.4 . ' . ' .wx ' -v. ,, Q.. . ,, ..L.4.,.4 .- -,-mb-, ., -L 1- -'T .w .a..v- 1. -AA. , .J,.- -- . -.1 ., . , . ,WM ..,. - , ' 1 .... .-.uv - l l I .-.-..Y,.n f - . ...Q me -,-. -M .. U. .4 VJ.- - --l...... -.A M. ..,--1 M ,. W.. . , .4g,-,.... l H ... .,. . - -. .... ...g 1 l Q w .1 -,ua Iv' R . ,,.........., .... .. '1 -. 1... a..vv-an-lv--'P"v ..-.um-L,- 1 1 W 1 1. , 1 -' ' -... .. ww. I ,g.,:. .. W..- , . -'30 ' ,,.,4.......- .- .- .... 4: .-. . . Q YM? ' -"QV-n-1n,,'A-4.4-34,1-.1 ., -. .n -'dh-f ' 1 Ji., A Q4-..:,,....... .E In ,M ' ,-'l'f".1T"- J' 5 ..,,,. - 5 f , iff :if f-'eff' -.E 'TT3' . 2 -pu Wi. -- - . . . "-ffv " 'T'- ' Jw.. ' L, 6 U , "' .vel , ' V. V' in 'lr .xl . Q " 3 '. ...ww 'flaf ' F' W' Q 'WFX' ' Q- 9... ' x :wr 7 ,p-nv . vi? - . - . 4 -- J ' . . , .. . 1 U 1 .,,..-...H .--. W N K , ' - , L,-.. .. .-.W 3 4515? f " -H., ... , ... 5 ' . av., -Q """' """". T '. ." ' lf - ' . - u - -'ww ' f "". .' ' -, , . ., , I , . .. I , .4.....,..Vv. 5 ,, ,, ,.,v.f 5. -.X-,X .yi K.: n 1 H1 ,+L ,,.. ... . w..?my.1. .. , I VX' I' --Y I 'wlfdy Y. -4 ' ,, . 1 ' " 4' . argl . f .,f.,0:.g,.,. Q ..J-W -i .rf H, 1 ,- I: --v' .4x,-.- rx: .5 .. 'yiylu A 1 -5, 1. , ' 'fb '-'- -w -' Q- . '- 4 gf.. . .r - A ji ,.. ,. M- X ...I . . K . ,K ,M A 'sn' l r ,y,f.n, 4, - .i A Vegigf? ' 'W W, 551' 4. 3: .-1 I -H' , 11 -. A " :..i. ' .5 4- - 1.5 a--1 .M "au fb-. , yr i , 'Q-Y. ig . -.Q ,. 5, , '. ' V N wi- 't..f.,. M,-3 9 5' -1 'V '0,2."7'f'.. 'J , ' F , ' iff- ,E'1.g.I'-' -I F "Q" - ' ' " 'T If X..- .-. P. 1,-.. 8-.F .-Y . . Q4 6' .-so wax. V !Q'Z'.4,. ' . 'Jr---Q 'f' ' fx- ,tif rn T.-,iv '51 - . k 1 4"-1-ftfzzalf'-1 .- .. Q, - .-'-. . -r. -7- . , , -1 -- 1. M' "N ' ' -' 6.5-'ff 31, -'ar'fff.. 'E T. --N' " Q'-"7 'Q' .f ' -I..' ' " ve -- 1. . - 94- . : r H +ff+'J'.-' 1-"il--1 '- 5 -'vt " 'vb-.?-?"'7"5' '.. ...f 7.f.,z.:.. 1 . Q -lg, ...hfgwl X : QV .ggi 51 -. 4,3 AH. -Jw? lf -egg .- 3 "WK -- 1 '- . -14 ' '..-Elf"2+'f....5SmW Q.. -. . A, g, f ."41Q1Yf-.ip . A- .. fm , 2.5. ':. - h .. - 4. -vm-. A .,,,,'-w. TY-.L 1--'fa A , H , .. A N -1. -, ,ft fs., ,, ' Z1 , 4, wzgij-. . -V 'vi ,fi "--M., ,j -q..-1 c .ff " . nr Jw ' ' ' ...Z 1' 0 'QQZTT .'f'h'+h?b"?"'41'wf1bqfVg!5f:,?'- ' , ff -1' -' in ,-,?n?r::355':,. , 4... 55. , A F' Q V, A2 iii: , , Vx -jx . mn ,- in --1.w-5'-wa' wiki?-.,.' 1 91. .. ', ,..- ,aff ""- ,Z-1 5,231 v , -. . A I - . I , , .. A ,Q .. ... A. 1-f.. H ' ' ' YW--55" . , f Q?'+iw2-if-si.. .1 ,.-. FG.-s1.:.f-- N ,4 .V .,.. 4 U. ., A Ms. , ,. . , Le'-F.. 1"3f-qY,w5Q.- wi-'-rgQ,gj5'5.i.v'-H F 13. "-w.:?"'- 41' -1, H ' 1 4 -. - '.-4 -. -1 4, ,..,. H... fi. 4- I ' , 'A A -.l -v '-II.. " . ff' H. 1 'HF'-' -1 'if " ..- "-"1 w'li.J--2""-'4q"'2'- - vu' - , . 1 . .V A , L, f-.uf f- ' ' 1 " QR- . -' .',-M V' 'fight .u.gj"'..' 'QM .1 Q.-. w. 'iss' -...Q -+"H ,5.:N's,.' I ,N "" -,uv ,X ..+g-.e.-v...- if '. '.:,,.-" .. --we -+4 - . ,W H ML- 'J A 5 ,, "-' V I. . N' 9, 1 .1 -I: - ". 'A A' ' . ' '-I, : E ff. ' if 415, It . Yugi, 'rfM'.. Y' A, 'V , P3-2-a-Q? -Baan.: 2 1 - .-..J ,- ,gsm " ir.. .W ., -amy? -u., -- -m , -Y "'- ,. .-.-nw mf- fwv, - --.4-' .4--. -2-f ...xg ffm... gg, -15 .' "i -'5 . " '. '-' Q. f- 1 if- '3 .' . . f,,.'-1 'Q . "-T," ,, "1 "5 I' ' .' 1' ff -:ge j , .P .5 , f ' , - . ' ' ' fn- 1 -3 '4J"Qi- ' ' 1.-A Q ' X " f-igvfk,wEQ'5'5'f.""--5w1+"y'ff,.fq.- N dh.. v, Ag g. .f-'31 u,L.s..-.,, ,,. ,.f . H , T... - ...ff 1 M w- 'w - A ' . . v f 1. ' 5 .. . "- , ' . H ., 'J ., ' - '.. . sv" A , .. - ' " H ' ., . .. Y .. " .'1.'. n.. ,-,., ... H., ' " I, It t . .eq I V -. ' .4 5. klwiilaw N .K A 1.3.4. 4 . I .'...-nz.. .r. 1 J ,-...Lu :t4g,.e,,,W JM, ,i.L,u,cf: . Q . 1 . .'.. ,,, -. A ,I . Q. J' 4: nz N L P ,QV V.. K, . ii, , .., Q. . ,1,.J',k2 . 4. ,Q . .. my , v" ' -'H vr'!f.f gi . 1 V . . . .- 1... ., . - fff- 1" , , ' ' ,L '. 'f .4 'I -. - . 1 -'4 ,.- .fn-ASF W Ji 1? :',: W ' '- x A '3 ""'f' '.-nrt' 'N' .1 - ' fa ' ' '+ ' - -+"'- ' 'Z ww- A Y'-1-'..... .,.,,, ."4 Q u-- ,qi . . ' , ' in . " .. -.- ' :JV-."2L'L'-' - -. "'-" " X"'-ifuf 'MR' "ff f"'--"1" .,l-5 , "' . "' 45.9, fwjp' 1" 1"'r.f!F-AL "V " ' ' ' " " " ' " .H ' , .W .1-We. 'fu - gi. NJ. "": ,vim 1-..--N-.fxfqvgx mi-.1 W ,,' 1 ,, JS,-1,1-,JV , -1 .L ,' , Bffre.--'Aww - EAJQG1- . -. QM.-.. ei- L 1- .M ' . V, ' ' ,J ,- ,U x -.,.-. df., Jug , .. '. ,... :-f.," ---uf gg,-.L V, W 4 N 1 , , Q, V' ,,i,p5,, .."' "Q 1-1 , . -'-. ' .. - " ,E vb-' ' '15 ' W ' 51 'Mr 'M 3' -." .' ..-3' -Am i""- '. Q..-, V we-f"f"'f':4-j, Y fm, 50 .-I, . A.. .- . 211-am. ,. :Mr T' n- ' 3 -'-1. ..g.,,.,.,. , --,,.5-E4 .,, --:--1 4 E-. v Am. 1 . Q,1," Y 5' . -4,3-uk. we-wg, e .wa ,-5 -. 5- .-,uf -":a.m.,,.-Magzx' vw., --QW f-w-.dk QF - V- 4. ,"' '14 1, 'W P 4 .- ,' 1 - .-1 .. .. .,. "- ,gi .-4. .1 "gr v . . 7 li," ".!- QL f,'-, , " 1 ,-'A .,' 5, 4- WI' ZQWLW 'ff l 4f' I ' '-1. 5' . "' -."'l'.w '4lW1?l'M.Q"f'T"f .M--fT+!"W . ' 14-1. gf ' . " - --ff ' ze -' " 'W :' sign -. - tr -ff ' 1' A --.:f:5-' mf' 1 N- "L ,H-. . C., - 4 . " -' - - , ,--' ,L ,gf-M .f w, 1'rvfa"'?., .H-.H ' ,' 'Q-1. .,x , ', 4 ' .11 - .L -, 1 ' 4' - ', ' -A .,--3.12 2 0 - - .Q -. '.- . ' -' --' "-- ' " ' 4 -1- Q, f 1 4: M 1-R.. .. 4 -1-1 . f - ' ' u 4 - ' -'V ' , ' 1' " . mf . . . ' -J g-- ' -7' - 'A 'E L . -'.' ', ' ,V - . N: Q . Q... 4,1 If .A,. H -r Q. ww- J X. X 1 3, A , Y I .1 lt., I . H. 75.1, ,.. V4 gf9v!5.Y1q6"A, ' f' .-' ." ' sri ' --jk-m'3'f"A F' 'I HA 15'-' U ., .,, .V .-.12 Q.-,-.-. 35, .3-.4 gf ,, , . . .. ., . ..,..,,, , .fwLwg,g.zvw. . , ,. . ,.., R . 1- Jr.. , .,. Aw---"-L ,-..-.-.151 " ' gm. -wff'-xi 'lf--!',,,. ul.. ' -f -5- W... ' 1415, if - ' - , , F iff'-71 ' ' 5""' '- ' , . 'L 'M "" A " 1' lg". f"1?'. ' ' '-4 ' . ' iv . . 1.1, .' ," ."'7 'V' .. ',' '- U" K "' -L, ,L 4 Q' ' 3 ' , 'L 7. '., , I A ' "L' 'T' ' ' ...Q ' 1 557116, 5 L Hwxz, l 'xiffl' .fv?'.P?, ':F1w.s.'.' . L, 'QLEEQ7' 'f-vg,':iQ:"'f .m.:-.Lv .5 " .J ,W .. --Q-4 -MWf."'-f't"W'?j1scf-- uv' . 4. A 'W .: 'YA ' .-X 11 -. F' " . -' .Q ,, .. ug, .- f ' '-"...' --- ,,. ".'. X5 , ' ' '- -. A '- 'V-.:. H1 ,f ..,i.J.: . ' 'Ns . , " W'-I .:. M- w"'- '43 . 'Q-"lm "" .."---rfziimfii . Z." '1 '!f1fR...aJ.' ,v-1.2 - . - ' '-'HN ...ff-inf-+f. uhefnm .,.- 1. 4.4,J5m..JW-2'ef'?f 7 52- ' -413: L. , - . ","'.., -' 'y .'r-in ' Q .,-.gd .. .., -:w.,':' M - ---0-', '-W". ,A ' . -wa The Action It was a big year for mediocrity. There were times to cheer, and times to jeer. There were athletes who did their best, and those who just didn't care. The student body seemed to turn its enthusiasm on and off like a faucet. There were football games at which they were on their feet for minutes at a time, and there were games at which they just sat and watched either the Chancellor or the sign-trailing airplane overhead. The coaches were carried off the field one week and maligned by sportswriters the next. Final records followed the same pattern. One or two teams managed to do better than average, most broke even, and a few fared miserably. The famous quote of Pitt coaches, "We've got some good boys coming up next year," seemed to have been forgotten. Grades took their toll. Certain professors were seen by coaches as sadists evilly chuckling into their dissertations as they gleefully scribbled failing grades onto athletes' class cards. Other athletes who had been highly praised as fresh- men or sophomores found, when the day of the important match, game, or meet arrived, that they simply did not have the ability to play regularly in big-time college sports. But for every athlete who did not produce, there was one who managed to come through with the right play at the right moment, to make the winning basket, or score the important points. Many of these were men who had ridden the bench in their earlier years or who had been overlooked by both coaches and sportswriters. Since Pittsburgh is a sports-conscious town, the outsider is often a major source of headaches to the University stu- dent. He arrives on Saturday morning to find his parking spot stolen by a boozy baseball fan on his way across Forbes Avenue to the field where the stumbling Pittsburgh Pirates once had their fleeting moment of glory. On football week- ends, the outsiders poured into the Stadium, paying five dollars a head. The student, for his six hundred dollars a trimester and seventy-two dollar University Fee, was en- titled to a six-inch strip of bench on the ten-yard line, while the outsiders took reserved seats on the fifty. The student who walked up to the Stadium for the logical reason of watching a sports event often turned away in dis- gust. He arrived an hour before game time only to find fra- ternity pledges roping off blocks of fifty seats for a fraternity with twenty-five men. If he stayed to watch the game, he either had straight gin spilled down the back of his neck or was hit in the back of the head with a Greek-letter sign. Gung-ho cheerleaders exhorted him to dash down onto the field and form a tunnel for the players as they ran out of the locker room. When he returned, he found his seat stolen by someone who had formerly been sitting in the stone aisle between the benches. He too often felt that Pitt sports were not meant for him but for the faceless guy shouting ob- scenities in the back row. ' ? i -I ... I ua! I M, , pf. 4 'j' J 127 , 1 H 51.i'L'i' r' A ,, . i v. . 4 '55 Q 'ff sq " - + f H D gt' - 2 Wk r xfl-i. x f X A U ' V 5 M l J 6 ,f 3.590 . - U 4 '4 . I , li 1 flag. 1 A ' r ' -Q . A I t , f E4 .r - 5 x Q. A Q X W . . 4 A ,, Wi ' 3 T, 5 Qily' I4 .. f 'ill-1 ,r , 7 V ' ' 7. ,f ., , L. 'R . .'-uh l I I il - .. A :1 11 . "' mt - H ff 1 ' 711- 'f ,, -4 V -,lx 1. , Q - ' ,nf , .eo - ,V ,, 1 7 , -11. U Q, -'N .4 , .1 sl 1 .. N C I .f Q C f f , ,- ,L , , RA , , 5 jg 3 M 2 1 ,- :lx ,- f . ' " ' - -fl -'--'-'-f-w..:....., .,, -- . Af" .-v, A - 'V' .V ' 5 """""""f" .vu lmgann-mana-.4q,. . V ' f ' " " ' ' Q, X I - " A ' A-1 J Q ,-4-H , -'94-N-Qq,.g.ssg3,k , F W 1 V -L awfwk -w Q f'ww1g,"fN--In ,,,.Qi4"'-'- V. ' 1 - r The year began with the annual flurry of optimism and enthusiasm. The football team was playing its usual hara-kari schedule, but Iohn Micheloson was said to have some of the finest material in the coun- try and an exciting new style of play. Early in the season, hopes were high. After an opening game loss to Miami and George Mira, in which Pitt's pass defense had "more holes in it than the Maginot Line," the Panthers won two games in a row against Baylor and California, and students were forced to call it a streak. But then the downfall slide began. Pitt was out- played by West Virginia, trounced by Notre Dame, where football had been de-emphasized, and shut out by Penn State. At the home games, rooters were treated to the same old style of Pitt football. Off guard, off tackle, pass, punt. Off guard, off tackle, pass, punt-the back- field ran like a record with its needle stuck. Students in the grandstand made themselves as comfortable as they could on the splintery wooden benches and passed the afternoons away by trying to guess the plays before they were run, a fairly simple task. On occasion, however, there were real surprises. About once or twice each quarter, Pitt would run its famous double reverse that usually backfired. It had worked well in the days of lock Sutherland and the "dream backfieldf' but it was now just about thirty years out of date. Opposing linemen had worked out a solution. All they had to do was tackle both half- backs, and Pitt was second and fifteen instead of first and ten. Passing was just as poor. A Pitt end or halfback would be behind his defender, with nothing but grass between him and the goal line, while the quarterback was either throwing out of bounds or being buried by a wall of opposing linemen. On the rare occasions when the pass was to the right man at the right spot, the receivers seemed to have their hands greased. The result was that Pitt rooters cheered at any completed pass, even if it went for a loss. Watching the way the team was coached was like watching a re-run of an old movie on television. If Pitt had the ball within the opponent's thirty, every play was sent in from the bench. They were usually dives through the center of the line-exactly what the opposition was expecting. I ' x s 'in' A.-.' ' 1 TW ..- In other instances, a second-string quarterback would drive the Pitt squad eighty yards to the opponent's ten- yard line. The combination in the backfield would be working perfectly, every man seeming to know where he was going and what to do when he got there. Then the coach would exercise his superior knowledge and send in the first-string quarterback equipped with a series of four plays to be run in a given order. Four charges into the line, four pile-ups of twenty-two men, and Pitt would be forced to surrender the ball if no one had fumbled in the meantime. The superiority of Pitt coaching could easily be seen by watching the plays that were ordered in critical situations. Pitt has the ball on the opponent's twenty-seven, fourth and half a yard to go. One student in the stands says to another, "What would you do?" There are a variety of answers. "I'd go for it." "I'd try a field goal." "I'd pass. They wouldn't be expecting it." But only the coach comes up with the play that will dazzle the opposition and catch them unaware. He orders a punt. Not a punt that is angled toward the sidelines to drive the opposing team back to their own goal, but a punt that is boomed into the end zone and that the opposition watches as it sails per- fectly over the goal posts, over the goal line, over the end line, and rolls to a stop on the warming track, giving the opposition a touchback and the ball, first and ten, on their own twenty. There are no boos from the crowd, only a muted groan. 1. " Yi l 1 After the last bit of confetti had been swept from the Stadium seats, the last empty Seagram's bottle dropped into the groundskeeper's wastebasket, and the last pom-pom ground into the dirt of Stadium Drive, the football team's record was five wins and five losses. It was a mediocre season, but it was the best record of any Pitt football squad in the last four years. While the football team was losing half its games, the soccer squad was quietly sweating out its meets. The soccer team did not lose a game during the regular season. The only blots on its record were two ties, one with Ohio University and one with West Chester. Both tied games went into overtime, and Pitt won every other game by a margin of at least two goals. Robert "Corky" Cuthbert was high scorer again, kicking in fifteen goals during the course of the season, two higher than his record of the previous year. Close behind him were George Shimpeno and David Reichenbach, with eight and six goals, respec- tively. Pitt had seventy-six corner kicks against thirty-seven for the opponents, and two hundred and fifty shots against their opponents' goals, while Pitt's adversaries managed only ninety-four shots against Pitt's goal. Soccer and football games often ran concurrently, and, when the public-address announcer at the Sta- dium would notify the crowd that "Pitt's soccer team has just beaten . . .," the cheers were often louder for thedsoccer squad than for the football team on the fiel . The soccer team remained undefeated until the Na- tional Collegiate Athletic Association playoffs, when they lost to Maryland University in the playoff match and to Penn State in the consolation match. While things were going well for the soccer team, the case was not the same on Flagstaff Hill, where the cross-country squad was frantically trying to look good during a season that had become a sham- bles. In their first meet, they managed to squeeze by lowly Slippery Rock State Teachers, but in their second, they lost to Ohio University by thirty points. After that, it was all over. Although the cross-coun- try squad had won its first meet against a small teachers' college, whenever it came up against a bigger school, something was missing. 5 .,, .. 7- 94. ",H1.1: f 09 f I 1 .+ sa' ' Y if ' x fi 7 w ' - Xgwivdf '5 5.-4 fx, aw 'dll . ' ',m -tor' 2 1 6 . Q . 38-1 " f ' "8 ,1- -.4 A " xt. . , . - ,, N A U11 19.0 ,..-..i.ns. -V ws, w -A ur-4--'vu-,rg ' V A A ,:'J' Qu -1- f- "x 'Sz 5535 1-maria 4 fam, X .15 .q'!.'L.1 Q- . , A ' '90 Q1 The missing quality was either talent or hustle. Against Penn State, Navy, and West Virginia, Pitt could not manage to get under forty points, while these three opponents never scored over eighteen points. Last year's cross-country squad was made up mainly of sophomores and juniors, who were sup- posedly 'tgaining valuable experience." Five losses out of six meets during this year's season proved that experience was not so valuable after all. While the soccer and cross-country meets were usually poorly attended, the crowds at the Field House for basketball games were somewhat bigger. No one really expected much of the basketball squad, since the previous year they had won only twelve of twenty-three games. But when this year's season began in earnest, they surprised everyone by winning eleven of their first thirteen games, losing only to Northwestern and Miami of Florida. Students began to take interest in the team, and soon tickets to home games became hard to find. By season's end, Pitt had won nineteen of its twenty-four regularly scheduled games, and had re- ceived a bid to the National Invitation Tournament. Shortly after, a bid was received for the National Collegiate Athletic Association Tournament. The NIT bid was declined, and the NCAA bid accepted. Pitt went off to its first game of the tournament with high hopes and dreams of glory, and returned soundly beaten by New York University and Penn State. Pitt was outshot, outrebounded, outdribbled, and generally outclassed by its competition in the NCAA tournament. 0 r 3 T! w ' x "'N.gA.1 X I ?F,afY V -X ' X Q: - N R .: 5' .W 4.-X' . 5-.,' TOLD C H1 ,4 -'X - - --. :Q ily' 1, ., ' ga? ' u ' x v . X f jill , i, 5 5-f. X I 1, x I. A X X X .X lg" ' , , ,ETX - - --. , . .- , S " , '32 'S-Lila. ,Xu ",. . ,3 XX .,.,,! -YI - . ..N-V ,-1-'YT ' F A' ' f.. X A - X X, .- J, D' Gi. 3141? ' ,sf ll' .4 1' I Y' I T' twin '. I n --1 -L XX 15 A X X . X . I X . - A ,- X, " 1 , .-.rfX.-'9P"': ' -' . ' - Q-wi., .. . X M , ,. ,.,3Xff.4X A X , . , 7 , X W i1X-.X .,,,,,, ,,.X 1 X,X1XX-X,.X.1--,,'..:X"',X',v.' ,a',' ,Xu1,, .fX .' .,.- ' .,- .. . - . .X 1. sew . ' Xp' , :X .f51. '- , J. -w '- , .HL-1 M- 11".....:sX,.. J '-'J -r : r-G' :.gQ5r3'fpa 'Xr',jlX-,X-X 'I'X1.j.3X-'61,-gg:V'-Y 15-'MQLXLWQ-:t"XX' 1:31, ' U if ' H5 -.-vi--X11-1 X- XXX rr ff- iam-1-1-4-' L: ' ' ' -X Huff L, NHL- - X X .X .x X . 2154. X. . ..X.X... We X. . . X.X,X,. XXX , , iw, x X' XX 14-X,-..X - v'y,, X,- . XXH XX X49y':. -Q, Mn si g, , 3X-W lXJ,LXT1,3 X,, ,X-gp., ,, -. X 3.1?S 7.'.'RS-62,6 BTQJQLEZXQQ ' " ' XX " N1 11 ' ,, 4.54-g2':.11XfXf1-X I. XXX.:-'Vf.e , A -' . F15 N-'Z'-' , Xv 74 ,:XXX.Xi,L A 51-'niXCX.. X ,, , -fyn ', '- - .. J ,,'r W ' 1 Q' X 5:--'ff'-' 5.10, " Ly 'bi X. -.'f XX:".,1y4' ' 1.37 ' A ' 'r ' H -' X 1,2 X:,g,:-IVA, J 'D .- -, '.,'. j1X ,gg ,. f ,- Lf , -. 5- X' -XM , 'XT-,f - ' X1 X 'J X-f:p:XX,1-2? ff-1-X 2 X Lv. 3.5 , :..Ij..' X" .':3-X,A'.:J',,. .W ,. Q: A H --X' 5 . Kg- .X - 'X , . . " X .'t1-- , ,'X.',,-'-4. 'jl::, '5-I -N I -,, 1 X . - , . ' - ' .glzygf Mt.-5-,f,,,1 V , . , . ., .. . ,- . . X, ' , If X ,g,,,,Y , A Although accepting the bid to the NIT instead of the NCAA Tournament might have resulted in a greater amount of prestige and a higher national ranking for the basketball squad, the performance of the individual team members was admirable. Dave Roman, a newcomer to the squad, was high scorer, averaging fifteen points a game and scoring three hundred and forty-three points during the course of the season. Paul Kreiger, one of the stars of last year's squad, was high rebounder with two hundred and fifty-nine re- bounds. Brian Generalovich also played to the best of his ability in every game. As the basketball team ended its season, the gymnas- tics squad began to work out in the Catacombs of the Field House. The result of all the practice, all the sweat, all the workouts, was a perfect record. The team lost every meet. Last year, the gymnastics squad had managed to come up with a split season. It had not been termed failure, be- cause, in the eternal words of coaches, there had been some inexperienced men who were up-and-comers and who would be the mainstay of this year's team. What happened? No matter what the excuse, the gymnasts still looked sloppy in the meets and, thanks to the NCAA Tournament that was held this year in the Field House, looked sloppy to coaches from all over the country. The year dragged on into a dull, dismal winter, and the gloom of the season was reflected in the faces of stu- dent sports fans as they began to take a don't-care attitude about the course of Pitt athletics. The routine was the same as every other year, with Pitt winding up in the loss column in the greatest number of cases. Except for the swimming team. Trees Hall Pool opened early in the fall, and the new, well-lighted pool with its clear tile markings provided an added incentive for a team that usually turns in winning records. The swimming team opened its season at Trees Hall against Princeton. The Panthers were underdogs to the Ivy Leaguers, and a spectacular squeeze win by Pitt pro- vided the basis for another winning season. The swim- mers lost to Maryland later in the year, but that loss was the only one on their record. Unfortunately, students have little interest in the swimming team. They follow more closely the fortunes of the wrestlers. vu, Y x il: .' I 4 . 1 . ,, p ..- f nw- ,.,.- ..- 41 ....-- ...- 1 4 . .M,w'v I X 2-f - ff --- - . . f- . nw- - 4,134 1, -4. -' ' - , V 'w-- ' ' '2"'v'.fwr- 4.-.an fi qw Q, 1 ful! I- 11,5 W- ' - f':,.9f"'.1" "gf 'N Q, ,- , .- .- + , v -gg , 4. " ' f ,Tri ' L - 'gn 4 9-Q ' 1 .u - . mf af f 'Q ' ' ' 4, .1 U .153 l jvc., f , Q , ' .,'sxfM,.,x se :- , .. C eff ggi fm- I , w an Ma 3. w nf - 1 X ' w asf ' Q A fa ,LA 'E sxS .av ,law ev as--f' ff? Q , ,,.K. -gi IV' Q- 'J gv! We ,,,.-f J glitmfl' 1 "knife . .Rye - ' ' .Q ,, -L.. -qt' 1" :sw 'Wu iz' V' ." 4:-. '.. mc .". .wr A +V, - ,MU '44 , - g - . -.t . 1 . 2334i J Q' ff '.w -1 l -Au, . A, . N. . .h For years, Pitt had been one of the big powers in Eastern college wrestling. Rex Peery had trained the squad Well in past seasons, and, through his ability as one of the country's outstanding coaches in any sport, had always managed feven with the worst ma- terialj to make a team that would win. He had pro- duced regional and national individual champions and teams that had consistently ranked in the top ten squads throughout the country. But this year, such was not the case. The wrestling squad flubbed their season. Rex Peery had one of his worst seasons as a Pitt wrestling coach, and for no good reason. Matches were lost to schools that should have been easy marks, and scores of meets were closer than they should have been. Pitt just scraped by teams that they should have ground into the mats. The material for Pitt's wrestling team was first class and the coaching was the finest in the country. Why should a team with this potential fall flat on its face? It is impossible to place the blame on Rex Peery. The teams in the minor sports fared just as poorly. An outstanding example was the tennis team, for whom thirteen was the unlucky number. They were faced with thirteen matches in the course of the sea- son, and scored exactly seven points in the thirteen matches. They were shut out four times, scored one point five times, and scored a smashing two points in their last four matches. And this poor showing fol- lowed on the heels of a winning record the previous year. The rifle team improved tremendously. After a dismal, winless season the previous year, the rifle team proved that this year it was on the comeback trail. The team won one match. The squash, golf, and track teams also decided to follow the trend. They all produced losing seasons. it ha- . t . X. t Ai 'ffftitg -Q 4. Q-.I The course of Pitt sports seemed to be downhill all the way until the baseball team played its first few games. The team opened its season with a strong team that stayed strong for the entire schedule. In the course of the season, the squad won twenty games. The only incident that marred the Winning record was the fact that the Panthers were not invited to go to the National Collegiate Athletic Association Dis- trict Two Playoffs. The teams replacing them were Penn State, Rider, Temple, and St. Iohn's, with Penn State sweeping the tournament. A popular campus rumor had it that the tarpaulins which were usually carefully spread over the Penn State field by the groundkeepers were removed on the rainy night be- fore the double-header so as not to endanger Penn State's chances of going to the NCAA Tournament. There was also a rumor concerning the integrity of the board that had selected the teams for the playoffs. Be that as it may, the passing up of the baseball squad by the NCAA selection board had a deadening effect on the team, producing apathy and sloppy playing, and a feeling that, for Pitt, the baseball season was over. Such was the year in Pitt athletics. It was not good, and neither was it bad. It was only mediocre, and for no single reason. Poor coaching, student apathy, lack of desire by the players-it might have been all, none, or any one of these. I SEIXIICJFQS ODK Man of the Year Thomas William Olofson was selected as Omicron Delta Kappa Man of the Year. In his senior year, he served as president of Student Government, and was also a member of Sigma Chi social fraternity and Omicron Delta Kappa, the senior men's leadership honorary. Mr. Olofson was chosen after much careful deliberation of the part of the Omicron Delta Kappa selection committee. To be eligible for this award, a man must be a senior, in the upper third of his class, and must have displayed out- standing leadership qualities in the areas of athletics, publi- cations, government, or the arts. Tom Olofson 214 Sheila Rinne Joel B. Filner Mr. and Miss Pitt Ioel Filner and Sheila Rinne were chosen as this year's Mr. and Miss Pitt by a committee composed of prominent juniors in the various schools of the University. Mr. Filner was editor of the 1963 OWL and president of the Pitt Foto Club. He also served, in earlier years, as as- sociate and photo editor of the OWL, production editor of The Pitt News, and as Tri Delt Man of the year. He was on the SU Film Series Committee, the Ideas and Figures literary magazine staff, and the Skyscraper Engineer staff. He was a member of Pi Delta Epsilon honorary journalism fraternity and was a charter member of AU. Miss Rinne was student director of the Student Union Board, president of her dormitory, and a representative to the Associated Women Students Housing Board. She also served on the AWS scholarship committee and was a mem- ber of Mortar Board. OW1 Hall of Fame Margie Nichols, Pitt News XE ,tb Lawrence M. Omasta, Owl l:1. -' V.: Q :gg .,:fwst 22,1 iii .tr In fl X "NF" :! ah- -with ,, A .1 . ,Mgt . A it . 1 :Fifi T 1.11 ..- .ei ,T . new ,,. .-1 - -.rw After the Omicron Delta Kappa Senior Award has been given and Mister and Miss Pitt have been named, there are still some people left over who have been active in University organizations. These are the people who are selected for the OWL Hall of Fame. They are also people who have taken the un- glamourous jobs, who have done the dog work, who often have had to sit by while others take the credit for their achievements. They are the assistant editors who keep their organization moving while the editor is out impressing the students and the members of the University Administration. They are vice-presi- dents and secretaries who have spent long hours mimeographing minutes and organizing programs. They are athletes who have ridden the bench for four years, watching others take the varsity position, but still try out for the team, year after year. They are minor editors who manage to complete assign- ments despite the press of classes. They are the SG Senators who do their best to represent their classes. These are the people who have helped the ODK Man of the Year, Mister Pitt, and Miss Pitt win their awards. Without people like these who have been selected for this year's OWL Hall of Fame, no or- ganization could remain active for long. 11' 3 l 3 .I l. if :U lat Eliot Drexler, Pitt News 1 -ff I , 5 l Matt Nesvisky, Pitt News X lim Hines, Owl Mary Alice Polyak, AWS Allen D. Roses, University Scholar I am" w 'T 5, .-'H-. . N 7754. , Tom Olofson, Student Government Penina Kessler, Mortar Board Qi-N, Iacques Wertheimer, Student Union Bill Mason, Skyscraper Engineer Bill Schneider, Owl ii Fl 9,5 w if 6 1 3' 'in 5,1 'H I 'Lai lane Batchelder, AWS Sally Golboro, Panhellenic Council . Kathy Flanagan, Debate Ierry Sollinger, Swimming Linda Whitney, AWS Iudy Deithorn, Student Government Carol Montgomery, AWS Iack Whiteford, Truck Mary Pat Thomas, AWS The Senior ABERCROMBIE, C.1 ABRAHAM, N. K. ABRAMS, 1. ABRAMS, R. B. ADELSHEIMER, s. 1. ALBERT, M. E. ALLIS, P. T. ALSZERSKI, W. ALTMAN, M. M. AMBRISCO, D. P. AMMBRMAN, T. 1. AMYGDALOS. A. G. ANDERSON, D. 1. ANDERSON, L. 1. ANDQLINO, N. R. ANDRUS, w. S. ANGELICI, D. R. ANISH, S. S. ANTAL, vv. L. ANTONINI, 1. 1. ANTONUGGIO, N. I. APONICK, B. A. ARMONAT, R. G. ARMSTRONG, R. K. ARONSON, E. B. ASHKENAS, M. A. ATKINS II, E. L. AUGUSTINE, H. A. BAGGUS, R. BAKKER, I. M. B. BALAGUR, P. BALKMAN, S. BALLERINI, G. M. BALMER IR., W. R. BALOH, R. W. BALSERAK, R. I. BALTA, A. S. BANKOWSK, R. S. BARMOY, R. M. BARNA, R. L. BAROZZINI, R. D BARRAGE, R. H BARRIS, S BASSETT, W. I BATCHELDER, I. L BAUER, B. A. BAUMRITTER, M. R. BAYER, F. X. BEACH, R. O. BEACHLER, C. L. BEATTY, M. C. BEDELL, T. W. BENINTEND, L. BENVENUTO, D. M. BENYAK, 1. M. BERARDELLI, F. M. BERARDI, R. S. BERGEN, E. D. BERGER, C. F. BERKOV, L. G. BERND, A. M. BERNSTEIN, P. D. BERNSTEIN, S. M. BIANCO, F. L. BIGGER, S. A. BILLSTONE, I. L. BISHOP, G. T. BISHOP, 1. M. BITNER, s.1. BLACK, w. G. BLACKBURN, A. M. BLANKENSHIP, M. L. BLOCK, C. 1. BLOUCH, K. G. BLUSTEIN, R. BODNAR, R. L. BOGDAN, V. L. BOGUS, E. R. BOLLINCER, A. BOLLINGER, R. D. BONAVITA IR., E. 1 BOND, G. L. BONELLO 111, A. L. BORK, F. S. BORKOVIC, E. I. BORSAY, L. L. BOTULA, I. C. BOWSER, O. G. BRACKEN, I. V. BRANDENSTEIN, R. E BRAUN, E. S. BRECK, L. D. BREEZE, B. A. BRENCKLE, W. P. BRINER, D. E. BRITTON, G. C. BRODIE, D. Q. BROKERING, M. 1. BROWN, D. L. BROWN, E. E. BROWN, 1. BROWNING, H. D. BROZELL, 1. 1. BRUMERT, P. BRUNNER, R. G. BRYAN, R. 1. BRYANT 11, T. H. BRZOZOWSKI, S. P. BUBY, T. 1. BUCKLEY, P. BUKSBAUM, N. H BURDMAN, 1.1 BURGER, 1. 1 BURHENN, R. E BURKE, R. C BURNS, L. 1 BURROUGHS, R. C BURROWS. R. T. BURTON, S. E BUTERA, A BUTLER, R. F BUYERS, R. L BYERLY, P. I BYRNES, 1. P. CAIN, L. 1. CAMACHO, G. CAMARDA, T. C. CAMPBELL, G. A. CAMPOLIO, C. R. CAPOUS, M. M. cAPAzzoL1, 1. 1 CARBONE, N. 1 CAREY, P. R CARLA, R. CARLISLE, 1. L CARLSON, G. M. CARPE, M. A. CARPENTER, H. A. CARR, D. R. CARROLL, L CARROLL, M. A CARROLL, P. I CARSON, T. I ff-I Rs QE' 3 K' .0 u' CARUSO, A. 1. CARVELLI, A. 1. CASPERO, E. I. CATALANO, L. W. CAZEN, A. L. CERRGNI, A. P. CHANDRABHA, V CHANZUE, S. A. CHAPPLE, P. L, CI-IARAPP, S. I. CHARLSON, H. N. CHASS, R. S. CHODOCK, 1. CHQMA 1R., 1. CHRIST, A. H. CHUHTA, E. S. CICCHIINO, M. F. CICEN, 1. R. CIMBERG, I, M. CLARK, W. G. CLAWSON, R. N. CLAY, G. S. CLEARY, E. H. CIOFFIIR., 1.1. ..-aff" COBRA, M. 1 OOFRIN, D. O. O'- OOOHE. D. w OOHEN, M. 1 COLELLA, S. D COLGAN, D. COLLER, L. COLLER, L. COLLINS, C. COLLINS, G. R L S CONIELKO, M OONNER, D. K OONNOR, 1. R COOK, T. O OOOLEY, R. A COOPER, G. 1. CORNELL, 1. O. CORTEAL, 1. P. OOUOH, F. O. COYNE, R. M. 15' COYTE, W. F. CRAMER, B. M. CRAWFORD, G. CRONIN, T. I. CROSS, F. C. CROUCH, G. B. CROUCH, S. A. CUNNINGHAM IR., R. I CURRIER, I, H. CUSICK, M. P. CUTHBERT, R. W. CYGNAROWICZ, T. A. DALIN, D. s. DANAHEY, E. 1. DANTOW, D. O. DASHER, B. L. DAUGHERTY, T. L. DAVIES, R. E. DAVIS, D. E. DAVIS, 1. H. DAVIS, R. 1. DAVISON, 1. W. DEGENHARDT, D. H. DE KLEVA, 1. A. DE LANOEY, G. B. DE MAO, N. R. DE MORE, L. A. DE POLO, O. 1. DE SANTIS, L. A. DE SANTIS, P. I. DESCALZI, I. H. DEUTSCH, E. C. DIERS, E. L. DIETHORN, I. A. DIETZ, T. A. DI FRANCESCO, I. V. DIKEMAN, R. M. DINARDO, R. D. DI SALVO, V. I. DIXON, K. A. DIXON, N. C. DOBKIN, D. M. DOLAN, P. D. DONALDSON, N. 1. DOSGHEK, G. A DOTTS, 1. L DOZZEL, E. A DRAGAN IR., G. A DRELICH, 1. M DREW 1R., R. 1. DREXLER, E. M. DUDZIAK, 1. s. DUELL, E. W. DULSKI, T. R. DUNLEVY, B. I DUNN, R. L. DUNNY, I. A DURALIA, P. R. DUSE IR., B. G DZIUBEK, L. C. ECKEL, W. K. ECKENRODE, I. A. ECKMAN, S. L. EDWARDS, D. R. EDWARDS, K. E. EGMORE, E. E. EISEN, G. 1. ELMES, H. B. ELSDON, S. L. ELSTON, 1. G. EMERIGK, E. L ERCOLANI, E. 1 ERNST, 1. D ESPY, G. E ESPY, R. G EVANS, D. 1. EVANS, W. M FACCHINI, L. sf FAGADAW, M. G EAIK, W. D. FAINT, I. R FAIRGLOUGH, 1. E. FALGE, R. 1. FALK, 1. FALSETTI, E. V. EANDozz1, M. 1. FASANO, R. F. FAY, M. A. Q J - .FL T V 'F "F FEDERBUSCH, M. D FEINSTEIN, B. D. FEIT, R. A. FETSKO, 1.1. FETSKO, M. 1. FILNER, 1. B. FINGERET, I. L. FINK, D. B. FINU, R. G. FISCHMAN, S. FISHER, P. D. FISHER, P. A. FLANAGAN, K. A. FLANSBAUM, M. C FOLINO, 1. F. FORD, G. M. FORMAN, c. 1. FOSTER, K. E. FRAGOMERI, F. A. FRANK, E. A. FRANK, S. A. FRANKEL, I. L. FRANZINI, L. R. FRARY, F. L. FREEMAN, S. FRIED, L. 1. FRIELELL, S. FROHLIGH, S. 1. FULGHUM, P. A. FULLERTON, M. L. FULTON, R. W FUNK, G. 1 FYLOCK, C. K. GAILYS, 1 GALANTER, L. P. GALIARDI, D. G GAMBLE, 1. G. GANDIS, G. 1. GEBHARDT, H. F. GEDID, 1. L GEORGE, R. G GEORGE, R. s GEORGESGU, R. G GEPPERT, 1. K GERRETY, R. T. GERSTACKER, R. L. GERTZ, E. W. GILLILAND, R. F. GILMORE IR., S. G. GINDLESPERGER, I. L GIRTON, S. E. GITTELSOHN, M. O. GLASER, R. B. GLASS, C. H. GLICK, H. R. GLICK, M. M. GOLDBORO, s. F. GOLDBERG, L. 1. GOLDFINGER, 1. C. GOLDSMITH, F. E. GOLDSTEIN, M. E. GONSOWSKI, C. I. GOODE, W. W. GOORIN, S. S. GOSCENSKI, E. I. GOSS, R. A. GOTTDIENER, S. F. GRAFFT, M. L. GRANDY, R. E. GRANT, K. F. GRAZIANI, F. GREEN, R. E. GREENHOUSE, B. H. GRESS, G. H. GRESSLER, D. GRIBSCHAW, R. GRIFFITH, M. L. GRILAK, A. 1. GRIMM, D. W. GROSS, B. M. GRUBER, G. A. HADLY, R. 1. HAFENBRACK, M. D. HAISFIELD, 1. HALOVANIC, 1. C. HANAK, R. M. HANEY, L. M. HANLIN, M. 1. HARLESS, O. S HARRINGTON, H. 1 HARRISON, 1. O HARTFORD, A. A HARTLAND, 1. B HARTMAN, 1. 1 HARVEY, 1. A HASELSTEINER, R. E HASTINGS, O. A HAUSMAN, 1. 1 HAVEKOTTE, A. vv HAVLAK, G. R. HAWK, M. HAWK, V. D. HAYDEN, L. L. HAYS, C. A. HECKLINGER, E. M. HECKMAN, R. E. HEIBEL, 1. L HEISELMAN, W. O HELBLING, 1. 1 HELSEL, D. F HELSLEY, W. O HENDERSON, D. P M AR 331' HENRY, W. L. HENTZ, R. D. HERMAN, 1. HERRINO, 1. A. HERRON, R. B. HERSH, D. M. HERSH, 1. A. HERSH, 1. HESS, G. A. HESS, R. 1. HILAIRE, O. E. HILINSKI, 1. M. HINGE, F. R. HINES, 1. C. HINKES, O. HIRSCH, 1. L. HIVELY, 1. H. HODGKINSON, B. A HOERNER, H. C. HOFFMAN, F. L. HOFFMAN, G. W. HOFFMAN, M. T. HOFFMAN, R. G. HOLLINGER, I. W. HOLLINGSWORTH HOLT, R. 1. HOLTZ, P. K. HORN, 1. F. HOUSERMAN, H. E. HOWARD, 1. W. HOWARD, R. E. HUGHES, 1. W. HUNT, M. 1. HUNTING, M. W. HURBANEK, I. G. HUTTLER, R. R. IDZKOWSKY, M. G. ILCISIN, S. A. ILLUMINATI, R. A. ISETT, 1. M. IACKMAN, L. B. IACKSON, 1. A. IACKSON, M. A. IACOB, B. 1. KALTENBACH, C. L. KANTROWITZ, R. B IAEGER, S. R. IAMES, F. R. IAMES, 1. IAMISON, B. IASPER, C. P. IEFFREYS, F. B. IEGLINSKI, R. S. IENKINS, K. M. IENKINS, K. W. IIMICK, D. L. IINKS, B. S. IOHNSON, A. M. IOHNSON, D. 1. IOHNSON, 1. D. IOHNSTON, B. D. IONAS, P. IONES, H. M. IONES. M. 1. IORDAN, C. L. IOSEPH, M. R. IOSEPH, S. L. IOYCE, W. H. IUDGE, W. E. IUPINA, M. T KAISER, W. 1 KALINSKY, 1. M KAPLUS, H. L KARR, 1. P. KASELER, H. M. KATZ, C. A. KATZ, C. M. KATZ, R. KATZ, R. F. KAVIC., A. 1 KAZEBEE, N. 1 KEARNEY, 1. B KEIFER, L. M. KEIL, S. L KEMERER, M. E KEMPINSKI, C. I KERLIN, I KERR, R. M R B5 KESSLER, P. H. KETTERLE, N. I. KHALIL, C. G. KIERNAN, T. W. KINAST, W. E. KING, D. M. KING, R. P. KINSEY, D. KISH, S. L. KLAHR, M. A. KLEE, R. A. KLEMENCIC, I. F KLEINER, L. L. KLEVANS, I. A. KNIGHT, P. H. KNORR, I. B. KRASS, B. G. KOBASA, D. KOLB, W. A. KONESKI, L. M. KONIGSBURG, N. A KOPEC, D. N KOSTISHACK, D KOTOVSKY, A. B KOURAKOS, S. 1 KOVALIK, 1. G KRASGN, H. 1 KRAVETZ, N. L KRAVITZ, P. E KREMIN IR., M KRIEGER, R. S KRUCHKEVICH, E. N KUBIAK, E. T KUECHLER, D. s KUHN, R. 1 KUKICH. G, KUMER, 1. B KUNKEN, F. R KWESKIN, D. M KYPER, P. T LABOVITZ, M. W LACOVIC, R. F LAICHAK, H. I LAMB, R. H LA RUSS, s. L. LAUGHINGHOUS LAVELLA, 1. P. LAVER, M. LAVERY, M. 1. LAWSON, R. L. LEBOVITZ, C. N. LEE, E. E. LEE, H. LEEDS, E. A. LEFKOWITZ, D. LEGO, S. M. LEHNER, I. W. LELEWSKI, C. I. LEMMERT, M. L. LEVENSON, S. D. LEVINE, D. I. LEVINE, H. E. LEVINE, S. R. LEWIS, D. LEWIS, R. E. LEWIS, R. A. LIEBTAG, B. G. LIGHT, W. M. LIGHTELL, W. G. LINCOFF, G. H. LINDSAY, C. A. LIPPMANN, S. H. LIPTON, s. H. LISTEK, T. 1. LLOYD, N. LOBAUGH, D. 1. LOGAN, A. E. LOHRENTZ, B. R. LoTz, M. C. LOVELACE, R. o. LUCAS, C. R. LUGAR, 1. R. LUNDBERG, 1. C. LUNDY, T. LUTHER, G. D. LUZANSKI, G. T. LYDIC, L. A. MCALISTER, M. E MCCAHAN, L. S. MCCLAIN, T. P. MCCLOSKEY, C. 1. MCCORMICK, 1. E. MCCOY II, M. M. MCCOY, R. L. MCDERMOTT, S. M. MCDONALD, G. MCFARLAND, K. T. MCGILL, E. F. MCGOVERN, T. L. MCGOVER, W. L. MCKEEVER, L. D. MCLAIN, P. L. MCLANE, M. A. MCMANUS, 1. C. MCQUAID, E. R. MCVICRER, C. E. MACDONALD, D. A. MACKEY, C. B. MACKO, 1. E. MRCKRELL, I. C. MADDOCK, R. A. MAILKI, D. B. MAICHER, R. B. MAKPHANIIVADHANA, S. MALARKY, 1. T. MALCOLM, C. E. MALIN, 1. R. MALINCHAK, R. M. MANDEL, R. s. MANION, I. M. MARLER, M. R. MARKOWSKI, P. MARRCN, 1. D MARSHALL, R. w MARSICCVETRRE, R. C MARSILII, A. L MARSZALEK, S. 1 MARTIN, 1. s MARTIN, M. 1 MARTIN, S. R MARTIN, W. E MARUNCZAK, M. M Q l I A --,i MASON, W. T. MASSIMINO, S. I. MASSUNG, L. I. MASSOUD, A. G. MASTRO, D. A. MATEY, 1. G. MATUSZ, 1. M. MAURER, 1. A. MAUS, R. M. MAUST, 1. R. MAXWELL, 1. F. MAYERS, T. A. MECKLEY, R. C. MAHNERT II, A. E MEIER, W. C. MELNICK, S. L. MERENDINO, M. C MERGEN, P. N. META, L. D. MEYER, D. MEYER, 1. L. MEYER, R. D. MEYERS, G. R. MEYERE 1R., G. E MEYERS, 1. A. MIGHALEK, F. 1. MIGHALOWIOZ, L. W MILLER, A. L MILLER, 1. S MINNICK, A. E MISTIGK, 1. A MITCHELL, G. 1 MITCHELL, I. C. MIZLA, W. A. MIZNER, R. C. MOHR, K. L. MOKAL, M. E. MONRO, N. U. MONTEQUIN, 1. 1 MONTGOMERY, G. E MONTGOMERY, M. L MONTGOMERY, W. v MOORE, E. A MOORE, E. A MORETSKY, H. MORPHY, 1. O. MORRIS, R. L. MOSTOLLER O. R MOSTOLLER: O. A' MRDIENOVICH, R. MUEOK, A. 1. MUNTER, S. O. MURRAY, D. L. MURRAY, R. 1. MYERS, 1. 1. NEIL, N. L. NEIMAN, 1. NELSON, R. H. NEMETH, P. G. NESVISKY, M. D. NEWFELD, R. NEWELL, 1. H. NICHOLS, M. L. NICHOLS, T. W. NIEDERST, w. O. NOOK, T. 1. NODVIOK, R. 1. NOLAN, 1. F. NOLAN, M. B. NORED, R. NORWOOD, E. 1. NYOUM, P. S. O'BARA, 1. T. OBENRADER, R. M OHRINGER, L. OLOFSON, T. W. O'LOUGHLIN, D. L. OMASTA, L. M. ONDESKO, 1. 1. OPSATNIK, R. M. ORNER, G. ORRINOER, M. B. ORRIS, D. M. ORRIS, R. OTTO, R. E. OWENS, P. K. PALAIKA, T. PALETTA, F. X. PALEY, 1. P. PANKO, 1. W. PARKER, G. W. PARRECO, 1. A. PASQUARELLI, A. P. PATRICK, E. P. PATRINOS, T. 1. PAULENOPP, A. R. PAVLOSKY, A. M. PEARL, 1. D. PEARL, K. PEDULLA. 1. PEKINS, W. PERU, O. E. PESSOLANO, 1. L PETAK, L. P PETERMAN, 1. P PETERS, I. E PETERS, I. A PETERS, T. G PETERSON, G. R PHILLIPS, N. D PIDUTTI, L. M PIERCE IR., C. W PINGATORE, R. P PITTLER, B. R PIZZANO, W. A PLATT, G. E PLUCIENNIK, E. D POKRZYWINSKI, E. 1. POKRZYWINSKI, R. A. POLYAK, M. A. POMERANTZ, M. H. POMPER, W. 1. POPP, 1. POPPE, K PORPER, R. P PORRITT, T. H PORT, A. S PORTER, G. S. PORTER, 1. O. PORTNOY, 1. M. POTTER, T. E. POWER, 1. C. X Ji. fb. POWERS, D. R. PRIMOZIC. W. PROCTOR, W. R. PULLEKINES, 1. 1. PUNZAK, A. M. PURICH, E. D. PURVIS, C. A. QUEL, R. C. RADAK, L. 1. RADCLIEEE, R. E. RADOV, P. R. RANKIN IR., W. G RANSICK, T. F. RAPIER, R. M. RASKIN, D. RATAN, S. S. REDLICH, M. E. REDMOND, G. W. REED IR., W. A. REEDER, D. B. 1. :Ag-Eliisih . 4, .Q ' J . nm.. ' - V 'vm-rrp f, f. REESE, T. REILLY, R. R. REISENWEAVER, E. R. REISHER, R. L. REITER, H. S. REITH, R. A. RENKIN, 1. O. REX, M. B. REYNOLDS, 1. S. REYNOLDS, R. F. RIOARDELLI, M. A. RICHTER, D. M. RINI, M. 1. RINNE, S. B. RITLEY, R. D. ROBERSON, C. E. ROBERTS, B. C. ROBERTS, L. P. ROCCASANO, C. A. ROCKWELL, I. A. RODDIS, E. G. ROLAND, N. A. ROLLE IR., M. S. ROMIG, R. R. ROMITO, L. E. ROSEN, R. ROSENBACH, L. I. ROSENBAUM, B. I. RO SENBERG, C. R. ROSENBERG, K. L. ROSENTHAL, M. 1. ROSENZWEIG, R. L. ROSES, A. D. ROSS, M. M. ROTHARMEL, S. A. ROYDES, R. L. ROZMARICH, T. A. ROZYCKI. K. RUBEN, P. H RUBIN, 1. E RUDOLPH, R. L RUEY, M. 1 RUSH, R. E RUSKEWICZ, P. A W RUSKIN, s. N. RUTLEDGE, R. E. sABsEv1Tz, A. D. SADLER, M. C. SADLER, W. 1. SAFKO, L. s. SANDLER, I. M. SARKIN, F. S. SAUL, S. A. SAVEIKIS, T. L. ' SCHAFER IR., E. A SCHENLE, G. L. SCHESTACK, D. M SCHIRF, M. G. SCHMITT, 1. F. SCHMITT, K. W. SCHNEIDER 111, vv SCHNITMAN, P. A SCHOLLEY, 1. F. SCHOTT, R. 1.. SCHROTT, R. C. SCHULMAN, B. s. SCHURICHT, R. W. SCHWARTZ, L. K. SCHWARTZ, S. C. SCHWARZBACH, D. E SCHWARZBACH, R. H SCHWEINSBERG, A. R SCISLY, 1 SCOTT, M. L SEAGER, E. E SECOLI, D. P SEGAL, A. C SEIPLE, B. H SENIOR, B. I. SESTILLI, R. I SEVHONKIAN, S. T. SFANOS, M. H. SHAFFER IR., C. F. SHANNON, P. A. SHAPIRA, G. T. SHARP, D. L. SHAUGHNESSY, W. T. SHEININ, A. 4-Nff ' iia'faT ..-if If-. 5, . R11 ,Ss flu 1" I AAW I W 17 .H 1 ' sf! ez fv- -...dl Rs TI SHERIDAN, D. P. SHERIFF, C. A. SHERLOCK, N. A. SHERMAN, C. P. SHERMAN, L. I. SHERMAN, S. 1. SHEROKE, R. M. SHORTHOUSE, 1. N SHORTREED, W. 1. SHRUM, K. L. SHUKER, W. A. SHUMA, W. 1. SIBENIK, L. H. SIEPFERT, R. 1. SIEGEL, W. SILBERMAN, R. E. SKRGIO, P. 1. SKY, M. B. SLATER, R. SLONE, 1. A. SMALL, B. L. SMAY, O. G. SMITH, D. E. SMITH, M. I. SMITH, M. 1. SMITH, M. 1. SMITH, P. 1. SNYDER, E. SNYDER, R. W. SOFA, L. T. SOLLINGER, 1. M. SOLOMON, 1. E. SOLOMON, M. SOMMER, 1. SORBO, R. A. SOROCZAK, N. SOSTER, A. 1. SPEHAR, 1. A. SPENOE, v. M. SPERLINGS, R. SPIEGEL, E. P. SPIEGEL, R. N. SPINGYS, R. SPITZER, D. M. SPOKANE, M. SPROAT, A. D. STANA, R. R. STARMAN, S. STARRETT, D. G. STATLER, H. K. STAUFF, 1. R. STEES, M. S. STEFANIK, R. A. STEINBERO, A. L STEINER, O. M. STELLABOTTE, O. 1, STERN, S. STEUERNAOEL, E. M. STEWART, R. O. STIGER, K. R. STILLEY, L. L. STIMEL, 1. E. STITT, R. K. STOCKBERGER, I. I. STOFFEL, A. R. STORC, G. I. STORCH, P. K. STRASSER, M. D. SUMMERFIELD, D. K. SUSKO, O. 1. SUTTON, K. D. SWITOHEN, A. M. SWITZER, S. L. TABAOK, M. H. TANZER, 1. L. TATALA, 1. R. TATKO, K. G. TAVLARIDES, L. TAXIS, 1. TEITELBAUM, E. M. THOKAS, R. C. THOMAS, M. P. THOMAS, S. I. THOMPSON, D. E. THOMPSON, D. A THOMPSON, 1. M THROPP, R. 1 TIBBOTT 1R., R. H TILTON, w. R TOBIAS, 1. B. TORBIN, H. 1. TORRIS, 1. M. TOSATTO, 1. 0. TOTH, 1. L. TOWLE, G. w. TRIPPE, 1. R. TROMBETTA, C. TRUMPETER, 1. N. TRUSCELLO, 1. v. TURLIK, S. M. ULAKY, B. M. ULASSIN, G. L. UNTI, K. A. VAUGHAN, P. G. VEHEC, R. F. VENGLIK, R. G. VISNICH, S. VITORI, R. A. WACHTER, R. M. WAGNER, C. R. WALESKY, A. B. WALLHAUSSER, F R WALLO, 1. E. WALSH, M. E. WALTERS, I. S. WAMPLER, I. K. WARRICK, L. H. WARRICK III, W. M WASCONICK, R. D WATKINS, M WATSON, D. E WATSON IR., P. R WATSON, R. G WATTERS, P. I WATTMAN, C. A WAYNE, W. K WEIERS, R. M WEIL, H. A WEINBERGER, B WEINER, 1. T WEINOARTEN, R WEINSTEIN, A. I. WELCH, R. L WELSH, 1. A WELSH, R. A WEMPA, 1.1 WENTY, M. R WERTZ, R. F WHELAND, 1. O WHITE, L. E WHITERORD, 1. K WHITNEY, L. B WHITTAKER, 1. H WIAND, N. C WIOKMAN, S WIEGEL, R. R WIEHN, T. 1. WILDOW, M. A. WILLIAMS, F. E. WILLIAMS, 1. 1. WILLIAMS, L. E. WILLIAMS, T. O. WILSON, C. A. WILSON, 1. H. WILSON, P. E. WINEOARDNER, B. A. WISHNEV, R. M. WITT, D. A. WOLFORD, W. A. WOLL, IJ. A. WOODY, M. 1. WOODS, M. S. WOODS T. B WOODWARD: R. Lf WOOSTER, R. A. WULFE, R. E. WUSLICH, S. R. WYMAN, F. E. YANKELEVITZ, G. YATES, C. H. YEAGER, R. C. YEE, C. F. YELENIC, 1. 1. YOKAITY, E. G. YOSPIN, G. H. YOUNG, P. R. YOUNG, R. W. ZAMBANO, C. I. ZAMEGNIK, E. A. ZBIKOWSKI, M. F. ZDINAK 1R., 1. 1. ZELIK, 1. A. ZELMANOVITZ, D ZIANCE, R. E. ZIMMERMAN, S. L ZINDREN, T. P. ZOLBERT, V. ZUCGO, D. B. ZWIBEL, B. C. Senior Index ABERCROMBIE, Charles I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi, A.Ph.A. ABRAHAM, Nancy K. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Chi Omega ABRAMS, Ioyce Newport, R. I. B.A. Education P.S.E.A., A.W.S. ISocial Chair- manI, Hillel ABRAMS, Rochelle B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Quax, Orchesis ADELSHEIMER, Stanley I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Phi Epsilon Pi ALBERT, Marilyn E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Phi ITreasurerI, Alpha Phi Omega, A.W.S. Schol- arship and Social Committees, Freshman Picnic Committee, Pitt Players ALLEN, Lawrence H. Duquesne, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Westminster Foundation ITreas- urerj ALLIS, Parker T. Bath, N. Y. D.D.S. Dentistry ALTMAN, Mel M. Flushing, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Phi Omega AMBRISCO, Donald P. Ebensburg, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Engineers' Society IPresidentI, A.S.M.E., P.S.P.E. AMMERMAN, Thomas I. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry AMYGDALOS, Anastasia G. New Brighton, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Delta Pi IRush Chairmanj, WPGH, Student Council of Reli- gious Organizations ISecretaryI, Eastern Orthodox Fellowship, Student Union Board ANDERSON, David I. Riverside, Conn. B.S. Engineering and Mines Engineers' Week Committee ANDERSON, Laird New Florence, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Rho Chi ANDOLINO, Nicholas R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Theta Chi ANDRUS, William S. Ambridge, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Dentones, A.D.A. IG e n e r al Chairmanj ANGELICI, Dino R. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry President of Dental School Class, Student Research Fellow ANISH, Stuart S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Epsilon Pi ANTAL, William L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts ANTONINI, I. Iames Iohnstown, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts PANTHER IEditorI, Newman Club ANTONUCCIO, Nicholas I. Indiana, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Delta Tau Delta IVice-Presidentj, STEADY STATER IEditorI, A.- I.Ch.E., A.C.S. APONICK, Barbara A. Williamsport, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A., Wom- en's Choral, NURSING NOTES, A.W.S. Transfer Committee ARMONAT, Raymond G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines E. and M. Cabinet ISecretaryI, A.I.P.E. ARMSTRONG, Ripley K. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Theta Chi, Heinz Chapel Choir ARONSON, Eileen B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Pi Lambda Theta, A.W.S. Trans- fer Committee ASHKENAS, Marilyn A. Middletown, N. Y. B.A. Education P.S.E.A., PITT NEWS, I.R.C. ATKINS II, E. L. Arlington, Texas B.S. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Heinz Chapel Choir, Men's Glee Club AUGUSTINE, Hilda A. Natrona, Pa. B.S. Nursing Newman Club BAGGUS, Richard Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. BAKKEK, Iohannes M.B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Owens Fellow BALAGUR, Perry Hewlett, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau, PITT NEWS, l.F.C. BALKMAN, Susan Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Pitt Players, P.S.E.A. BALLERINI, Gabriella M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Lambda Kappa Sigma, OWL BALMER Ir., William R. New Kensington, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Delta Tau Delta BALOH, Robert W. Yukon, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Gamma Delta IPresidentI, Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Newman Club, Freshman Camp Counselor, Pitt Singers, l.F.C. BALSERAK, Robert I. Wexford, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Dentones, A.D.A. BALTA, Andrew S. Duquesne, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Phi Epsilon, Varsity Marching Band IManagerI BANKOWSK, Richard S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E., Newman Club BARMOY, Ronald M. Meyersdale, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega BARNA, Roger L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Alpha Phi Omega IVice-Presi- dentI, ENGINEERING A N D MINES BULLETIN, A.I.E.E. BAROZZINI, Robert D. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts BARRAGE, Robert H. Natrona Heights, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega BARRIS, SUSAN Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Zeta Tau Alpha, Canterbury As- sociation BASSETT, Warren I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts BATCHELDER, Iane L. New Orleans, La. B.A. Liberal Arts Kappa Kappa Gamma, Cwens. Iunior Worthy, S o p h o m o r e Class C 0 u n c il IPresidentI, A.W.S., Freshman Council, Men- tor, Senior Assistant, Student Union Board, University Theater BAUER, Barbara A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Women's Choral, B.S.N.A. BAUMRITTER, Michael R. Freeport, N. Y. B.B.A. Business Administration Zeta Beta Tau BAYER, Frank X. McKees Rocks, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.M.E. ' ICorresponding Secre- taryI, P.S.P.E. BEACH, Robert O. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Dentones, A.D.A. BEACHLER, Charles L. Allison Park, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts BEATTY, Marvin C. Irwin, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry BEDELL, Thomas W. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts BENINTEND, Lawrence Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pershing Rifles ICommanding Officerj, A.S.C.E., Scabbard and Blade IPresidentI BENVENUTO, Donna M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Chi Omega, Quo Vadis, Pitt Players, A.W.S. Lantern Night Committee BENYAK, Ianet M. Greensburg, Pa. B.S. Education Delta Delta Delta, Student Union Board, A.W.S., Pitt Players BERARDELLI, Francis M. Irwin, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. BERARDI, Ronald S. Aliquippa, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta BERGEN, Eugene D. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Iohn Marshall Society BERGER, Charlotte F. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Phi Sigma Sigma, A.W.S. Trans- fer Committee, P.S.E.A. BERKOV, Linda G. Lebanon, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Hillel, Iazz Club, I.R.C. BERND, Amelia M. New Castle, Pa. B.S. Nursing BERNSTEIN, Paula D. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Pi Lambda Theta BERNSTEIN, Stuart M. Union, N. I. B.A. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau ISecretaryI, PITT NEWS, I.F. MESSENGER BIANCO, Francis L. Walston, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi IRegent, Vice-Regentj, PITT CAPSULE, Gymnastics, Class Treasurer BIGGER, Sally A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta fSocial Chair- manj, B.S.N.A. BILLSTONE, Ianet L. Iohnstown, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts BISHOP, G. Thomas Munhall, Pa. A.Ph.A., A.C.P.A. BISHOP, Ioan M. Munhall, Pa. BITNER, Susan I. Iohnstown, Pa. Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A., S.N.- A.P. BLACK, William G. St. Louis, Mo. B.A. Liberal Arts Men's Dorm Council fSecretary- Treasurerl BLACKBURN, Allen M. Danville, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry A.D.A. fSecretaryj, Psi Omega fSecretaryj, Dentones BLANKENSHIP, Mary Louise Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing BLEAKLEY, William E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E., Engineers' Week Com- mittee BLOCK, Carole I. Iohnstown, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha E p silo n Phi, A.W.S., fScholarship Committeej, Presi- dent of Brackenridge Dorm BLOUGH, Kathryn G. Davidsville, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A., P.S.- N.A., Student Nurses' Associa- tion of Pennsylvania BLUSTEIN, Richard Iacksonville, Florida D.D.S. Dentistry BODNAR, Raymond L. Kearny, New Iersey B.B.A. Business Administration Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Arnold Air Society, Phi Alpha Theta, Phi Eta Sigma, Newman Club BOGDAN, Vera L. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Education Pi Lambda Theta, P.S.E.A. BOGUS, Edward R. St. Benedict, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts BOLLINGER, Ann Riverton, New Iersey B.A. Liberal Arts Delta Delta Delta BOLLINGER, Randall D. Iohnstown, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi BoNAv1TA, Emil 1. Jr. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pershing Rifles, Rifle Team BOND, George L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi, Soccer, Squash BONELLO, Alfred L., III Leechburg, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts B.S. Pharmacy B.S. Nursing B.S. Nursing BORK, Francis S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.M.E., S.A.E., P.S.P.E., New- man Club BORKOVIC, Embrie I. Beaver Falls, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Kappa Alpha BORSAY, Leslie L. Springdale, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Circle K, United Campus Fellow- ship BOTULA, Ion o. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Delta Tau Delta, Football BOWSER, O. Gaylard Ford City, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega, Varsity Marching Band, Concert Band, Westmin- ster Fellowship, Pitt Y.M.C.A. BRACKEN, Iames V. Natrona Heights, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi, A.Ph.A., A.C.P.A., P.P.A. BRANDENSTEIN, Robert E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Varsity Marching Band fSection Leaderj, Concert Band, P.S.E.A., A.I.E.E. BRAUN, Edward S. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry BRECK, Lawrence D. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Gamma Delta fSocial Chair- man, Treasurerj, I.F.C. judicial Council BREEZE, Beth A. East Liverpool, Ohio B.S. Education Senior Assistant, Dorm Council fSecretary, Treasurerl BRENCKLE, Wayne P. Coraopolis, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.Ch.E. BRINER, Dale E. Loysville, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega, A.D.A. BRITTON, Gail C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education BRODIE, Donald Q. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts S.A.M. BROKERING, Marilyn, I. New Milford, N. I. B.S. Nursing Chi Beta Phi, Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A., Nurses' Christian Fel- lowship BROWN, David L. Butler, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Delta Sigma Phi, Pi Tau Sigma, Sigma Tau, Pershing Rifles, B a s e b all, P.S.P.E., American Rocket Society, Institute of Aerospace Sciences BROWN, Edward E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma BROWN, Ioseph I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Squash, Tennis BROWNING, Herbert L. New York, N. Y. B.B.A. Business Administration Phi Epsilon Pi, I.V. Soccer lCap- tainj BROZELL, Ierome I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Delta Sigma Rho fVice Presi- dentj, William Pitt Debating Un- ion fPublicity Manager, Vice Presidentl, Lutheran Student As- sociation, Iohn Marshall Society, l.R.C. BRUNNER, Richard G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E., Engineers Week Com- mittee BRYAN, Robert I. Las Cruces, New Mexico B.S. Liberal Arts Pi Kappa Alpha fPresidentJ, Phi Eta Sigma, Fifth Man I.F.C., Squash, Pitt Preview Committee, Druids fVice Presidentj BRYANT, Thomas H. II Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Delta Epsilon, PITT NEWS fFeature Editor, Production Edi- tor, Assistant News Editorj BRZOZOWSKI, Stanley F. Coraopolis, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.Ch.E., Newman Club BUBY, Thomas I. East Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.M.E., Sigma Beta Sigma BUCKLEY, Fred Akron, N. Y. B.S. Engineering and Mines BUKSBAUM, Norman H. Woodmere, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi BUMMERT, Patricia L. South Fork, Pa. B.S. Nursing BURDMAN, Ioel I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Pi Delta Epsilon, PITT CAP- SULE lEditorj, PITT NEWS, A.Ph.A., Kappa Psi BURGER, Iohn I. Buena Vista, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Kappa Sigma fTreasurerj, A.S.- C.E., A.R.B.A. BURHENN, Ray E. Erie, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi BURKE, Robert C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Delta Sigma BURNS, Laura I. Richmond, Ohio B.S. Nursing BURROUGHS, Richard C. Ardsley, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts BURROWS, Robert T. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E., S.A.E. Bigger-Carpe BURTON, Suzanne E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Kappa Alpha Theta, Heinz Chapel Choir BUTERA, Arlene Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Delta Delta Delta, P.S.E.A., W. R.A. BUTLER, Richard F. Duquesne, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi BUYERS, Roberta L. Shelocta, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration P.T.K., S.A.M., "The Mikado," Johnstown: Glee Club-Student Director BYERLY, Paul 1. Monroeville, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Theta Chi, Pershing Rifles, Heinz Chapel Choir, A.I.E.E. BYRNES, Iohn P. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Delta Tau Delta CAIN, Louis 1. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts E. and M. Cabinet, Young Repub- licans Club CAMACHO, German Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines S.A.E., P.S.P.E., CAMARDA, Thomas C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts CAMPBELL, George A. Washington, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines CAMPOLIO, Gerald R. Richwood, W. Va. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega, A.D.A. CAPOUS, Majorie M. Akron, Ohio B.A. Liberal Arts Cwens, Mortar Board, Student Union Board, Midday Series, Housing Board, William Pitt De- bating Union CAPOZZOLI, Ieanne I. Burgettstown, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts CARBONE, Natale I. Latrobe, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Rifle Team CAREY, Paul R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts CARLA, Richard L. Natrona Heights, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines CARLISLE, Iohn L. Ebensburg, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Baseball CARLSON, Gerald M. Dover, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi, Rho Chi, Student Government, Varsity Marching Band CARPE, Marjorie A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education A.W.S., Student Union Board Carpenter-Davis CARPENTER, Helen A. Lancaster, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Theta Phi Alpha ISecretaryI, N e W m a n Club, Panhellenic Council CARR, Donald R. Munhall, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. CARROLL, Lewis Orange, N. I. D.D.S. Dentistry CARROLL, Michael A. Charleroi, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines N.S.P.E., P.S.P.E., A.I.E.E., l.R.E. CARROLL, Patrick I. Charleroi, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines S.A.E., N.S.P.E., P.S.P.E. CARSON, Terrence I. Bethel Park, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi CARUSO, Albert I. Sharon, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta, A.D.A. IPresi- dentj CARVELLI, Albert 1. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts CASPERO, Edward I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Phi Kappa Theta ISocial Chair- man, Pledge Masterj CATALANO, Louis W. Ieannette, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Druids, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Student Government fTreasurerI, Inter- iraternity Council CAZEN, Alan L. Brownsville, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau, I.R.C., Delta Sigma Rho lPresidentI, Society for Conservative Studies, Wil- liam Pitt Debating Union fPresi- dentj CERRONI, Anthony P. Sharpsville, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry CHANDRABHA, Vunvilai Bangkok, Thailand B.S. Nursing CHANZUE, Said A. Maragoli, Kenya B.A. Liberal Arts Y.M.C.A. CHAPPLE, Phyllis L. McDonald, Pa. B.A. Education Zeta Tau Alpha CHARAPP, Sheldon I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Phi Eta Sigma, Beta Alpha Psi lTreasurerI, S.A.M. CHARLSON, Howard N. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Rho Chi, Phi Eta Sigma CHASS, Robin S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS cHoDocK, Iay McKeesport, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts CHOMA, Iohn Ir. Ambridge, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Eta Kappa Nu, Phi Eta Sigma, Sigma Tau, SKYSCRAPER EN- GINEER, A.I.E.E. IChairn'1anI, Engineers' Week Committee, I.R.E., E.E. Student Council, P.S.P.E., N.S.P.E. CHRIST, Albert H. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E. CHUHTA, Edward S. Windber, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines CICCHIINO, Mary F. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Delta Pi IChaplainI CICEN, I. Randolph Sharon, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts CIMBERG, Ianice M. Malverne, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts University Theatre, Pitt Players, Foreign Policy Association CLARK, William G. Monroeville, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines CLAWSON, Ronald N. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts CLAY, Gerald S. Cleveland, Ohio B.B.A. Business Administration Sigma Alpha Mu, Men's Council ISecretaryI CLEARY, Eileen H. Mars, Pa. B.S. Nursing ciorri yr., Iohn 1. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Pi Kappa Alpha, S.A.M., Base- ball Team ICO-Captainj COBEA, Madeline I. Blairsville, Pa. B.S. Education Physical Education Club, Wom- en's Recreation Association COFFIN, Dwight C. Rock Island, Ill. B.A. Liberal Arts COGHE, David W. Gibsonia, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Iohnstown: Lambda Sigma Rho ITreasurerI, Phi Theta Kappa, Phi Eta Sigma, PANTHER SEN- TINAL IEditorI, Newman Club COHEN, Miles 1. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts COLELLA, Samual D. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Gamma Beta, Panther Club COLGAN, Diane L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta lSecretaryI, Quax, Fencing Club fManagerI, WRA fPresidentI COLLER, Lester S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi, Pitt Capsule lCopy Editorj, A.Ph.A. COLLER, Linda B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education COLLINS, Charles E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts COLLINS, Gary R. Hastings, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Newman Club CONIELKO, Mike Windber, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Student Council, Club CONNER, David K. Bridgeville, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts CONNOR, Iames R. Iohnstown, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Iohnstown: Business Adminis- tration Club COOK, Thomas G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Phi Kappa Theta, Institute of Radio Engineers, SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER, Emitt Committee C h a i r m a n, Engineers' Week Committee COOLEY, Richard A. Clairton, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Chi, Kappa Kappa Psi, IPresidentI, SKYSCRAPER EN- GINEER, Varsity M a r c h i n g Band, P.S.E.A. COOPER, Graven I. Iohnstown, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi lTreasurerI CORIALE, Samual D. Natrona Heights, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E., Engineers' Week Com- mittee CORNELL, I. Clark Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Army R.O.T.C. Photographer, Foto Club CORTEAL, Iames P. Wilmerding, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Engineers' Week Committee COUCH, Francis O. Manor, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Alpha Phi Omega, Concert Band, Varsity Marching Band, I.E.E.E., Engineers' Week Committee COYNE, Robert M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Kappa Alpha, Student Gov- ernment Financial Committee COYTE, Wallace F. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts CRAMER, Bernard M. Monessen, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Zeta Beta Tau, PITT NEWS, I.F.C. Handbook fBusiness Man- agerj CRAWFORD, Guy Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi, Pharmacy Class Pres- ident CRONIN, Thomas I. Munhall, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.C.E., A.R.B.A., SURVEYOR, Engineers' Week Committee Psychology CROSS, Forrest C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Delta Sigma Phi, Student Union Board IPresidentI, Student Gov- ernment, 175th Anniversary Committee, 1962 Tap Day ICO- chairmanj, Freshman Orienta- tion Committee, Parents Week- end Committee CROUCH, Gordon B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts CROUCH, Stephen A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Institute of Radio Engineers CUNNINGHAM, Robert Ir. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Delta Sigma Phi, Arnold Air Society, Institute of Radio En- gineers, A.I.E.E., OWL CURRIER, Iames H. Sharon, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Psi Ome- ga, Dentones CUSICK, Michael P. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E., Engineers' Week Com- mittee CUTHBERT, Robert W. Colmar, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Soccer, Basketball CYGNAROWICZ, Thomas A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pi Tau Sigma, S.A.E., P.S.P.E., Institute of Aerospace Science DALIN, Dennis S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta, William Pitt Debating Union, Men's Glee Club, Student Union Board Midday Series ICO-Chairmanj, Pitt Players, University Theatre DANAHEY, Erla Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Student Union Board, Women's Choral DANTOW, Diane C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Lambda Kappa Sigma DASHER, Bonnie L. New York, N. Y. B.S. Liberal Arts DAUGHERTY, Thomas L. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pi Tau Sigma, A.S.M.E., P.S.P.E. DAVIES, Ronald E. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Education P.S.P.E., N.E.A., Varsity Basket- ball, Upperclass Counselor, Stu- dent Congress DAVIS, Dianne E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing DAVIS, Iames H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines DAVIS, Robert I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Special Fellow- ship Program, Upperclass Coun- selor, IDEAS AND FIGURES DAVISON, Iames W. Coraopolis, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega DEGENHARDT, Davis H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy DeKLEVA, Joseph A. Cheswick, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry DeLANCEY, George B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau, Omega Chi Epsilon, A.I.Ch.E. DeMAO, Nicholas R. Arnold, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Kappa Theta, Baseball DEMCHAK, Michael I. Philipsburg, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pitt Players DeMORE, Louis A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E., Eta Kappa Nu, Sigma Tau DBPOLO, Charles I. Windber, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines DeSANTIS, Lydia A. Monongahela, Pa. B.S. Nursing DesANT1s, Paul 1. Baldwin Borough D.D.S. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta DESCALZI, Ian H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Kappa Alpha Theta fPresidentJ, A.W.S. Traditions and Social Committees, Senior Mentor, Panhellenic Council DEUTSCH, Elizabeth C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Graduate School of Public Health Phi Theta Phi DIERS, Eleanor L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts IETHORN, Iudith A. Ieannette, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts elta Delta Delta, Mortar Board, tudent Government fVice-Pres- dentj, Panhellenic League fSec- etaryl IETZ, Thomas A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines .S.C.E., A.R.B.A. I FRANCESCO, Iames V. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts elta Iota Delta fSocial Chair- anl, Pershing Rifles, Newman lub, IDEAS AND FIGURES, ssociation of U.S. Army, .M.C.A., Student Union Dance hairman, Chess Club, Military all Committee, NEWSLETTER hairmanl, Fencing Club IKEMAN, Richard M. Iessup, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry elta Sigma Delta fTreasurerJ INARDO, Rudolph D. Canonsburg, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts DI SALVO, Vincent I. Williamsport, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta DIXON, Kathy A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Alpha Delta Pi, Orchesis fVice- Presidentl DIXON, Nancy C. Du Bois, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Quax, Senior Mentor, A.W.S. Public Relations, Student Union Board Hospitality Committee DOBKIN, Donald M. Wheeling, W. Va. B.B.A. Business Administration DOLAN, P. David Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Kappa Psi, Pharmacy Class Pres- ident DONALDSON, Norma I. Warren, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts DOSCHEK, George A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Chess fCaptainj DOTTS, Iack L. Iohnstown, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. lVice-Presidentj, Circle "K" fDirectorj DOZZEL, Ernest A. Verona, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts A.R.B.A., A.S.C.E. DRAGAN, George A. Ir. McKeesport, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Epsilon DRELICH, Ioan M. Wycoff, N. I. B.A. Liberal Arts Newman Club, I.R.C. DREW, Robert I. Ir. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E., P.S.P.E. DREXLER, Elliot M. Greensburg, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi, Pi Delta Epsilon, PITT NEWS fBusiness Managerl, Omicron Delta Kappa, Upper- class Counselor, Parents' Week- end Committee DUDZIAK, Iudith s. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts DUELL, Bruce W. Warren, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry DULSKI, Thomas R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts DUNLEVY, Bernard I. Steubenville, Ohio B.S. Pharmacy DUNN, Richard L. Masontown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines ENGINEERING AND MINES BULLETIN, A.S.M.E., S.A.E., P.S.P.E. DUNNY, Iames A. Trafford, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Glee Club DURALIA, Paul R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.C.E., A.R.B.A., P.S.P.E., A.S.- C.E. fPresidentj DUSE, Bernard C. Ir. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Omega Psi Phi fSecretaryj, Scab- bard and Blade, A.I.I.E. lVice- Presidentl, Pershing Rifles DZIUBEK, Lawrence C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Kappa Alpha, Student Union Board fDance Chairmanj, Swim- ming, I.R.C. ECKEL, William K. Iohnstown, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Alpha Theta, Phi Theta Kappa, Newman Club ECKENRODE, Iames A. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau Psi, N.S.P.E., P.S.P.E., A.I.Ch.E., Canterbury Society, Omega Chi Epsilon, Circle K fTreasurer1 ECKMAN, Susanne L. Hanoverton, Ohio B.S. Liberal Arts Pi Delta Epsilon, PITT NEWS fFeature Editor, Production Edi- torl, Pitt Players EDWARDS, David R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Math Club EDWARDS, Katherine E. Johnstown, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS EGMORE, Susan E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration EISEN, Carol I. Martinsville, Va. B.S. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Phi, American Chemical Society, Hillel, I.R.C. ELMES, H. Bisuen Beaver Falls, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta, STUDENT DENTAL IOURNAL ELSDON, Suzanne L. Grove City, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts ELSTON, Iohn C. Bloomfield, N. I. B.S. Engineering and Mines Delta Tau Delta, S.A.M., Varsity Football EMERICK, Ernest L. Shanksville, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.Ch.E., P.S.P.E., N.S.P.E., S.- A.M. ERCOLANI, Edward 1. Plainsville, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta ERNST, I. 'Darryl New Cumberland, Md. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi, Rho Chi, Pitt Band ESPY, George E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Kappa Kappa Psi, Scabbard and Blade, Varsity Marching Band, Concert Band ESPY, Richard C. Apollo, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Davison-Feit EVANS, Daniel 1. New Brighton, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts EVANS, William M. West Mifflin, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E., A.S.M. FACCHINI, Lucio S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, S.A.M. FAGADAW, Marta G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Psi Omega, Pitt Play- ers lSecretaryj, QUOTES AND COMMENTS Committee, Scho- lastic Honors Committee FAIK, William D. McKeesport, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Delta Sigma Pi FAINT, Iames R. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Eta Kappa Nu, Psi Sigma Tau, P.S.P.E., S.A.M. FAIRCLOUGH, Iohn E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Lambda Chi Alpha FALCE, Reynold I. McKeesport, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy PITT CAPSULE, A.C.P.A. FALK, Iudith Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Phi Sigma Sigma, Fencing Club FALSETTI, Eugene V. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts FANDOZZI, Mary I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Kappa Kappa Gamma fTreas- urerj, P.S.E.A. FASANO, Robert F. Long Branch, N. I. B.S. Liberal Arts FEDERBUSCH, Melvin D. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Alpha Omega fVice-Presidentj, American Society of Dentistry for Children, DENTAL IOUR- NAL fEditorj, A.D.A. fPublicity Chairmanj, School of Dentistry Public Relations Representative FAY, Martha A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Chi Omega, Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A. lCommittee Chairmanj, Nurses' Christian Fellowship, A.W.S. fTransfer Committeej, Women's Choral FEINSTEIN, Bernard D. Iohnstown, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Psychology Club, Dramatics Club FEIT, Richard A. Iamaica, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Iohn Marshall Society, PITT NEWS, OWL, Swimming, Golf, Engineering and Mines Cabinet, Dorm Council, Men's Council, Society for Conservative Stud- ies, S.A.M., I.R.C., Ski Club, Foto Club, Hillel Fetsko-Graziani FETSKO, Ioseph I. Iohnstown, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. FETSKO, Michael I. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Glee Club FILNER, Ioel B. Sharon, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Delta Epsilon, PITT NEWS fProduction Editorj, OWL lEdi- torj, Foto Club fPresidentJ, IDEAS AND FIGURES, Publi- cations Board, A.U., SKY- SCRAPER ENGINEER FINGERET, Iay L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi lPresidentj, Druids, Student Government fVice-Presidentj, Omicron Delta Kappa fChairmanj, Book Ex- change, Alpha Epsilon Delta FINK, Daniel B. Youngstown, Ohio B.A. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS, Iudo Club, Dorm President, Dorm Social Chair- man, Varsity Marching Band FINU, Robert G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi FISCHMAN, Susan Philadelphia, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Dolphin Club FISHER, Peter D. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Etta Kappa Nu, Sigma Tau, SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER FISHER, Phoebe A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts FLANAGAN, Kathleen A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Mortar Board fPresidentj, Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Sigma Rho fSecretaryj, William Pitt Debate Union fPublic Debate Managerj, I.R.C., W.P.G.H. Special Fellow- ship Program FLANSBAUM, Marilyn C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A., S.N.- A.P. FOLINO, Iohn F. Verona, Pa. B.S. Education O.D.K., Soccer, Physical Educa- tion Club fPresidentJ FORD, Gladys M. Philipsburg, Pa. B.S. Nursing FOREMAN, Paul S. Clairton, Pa. LL.B Law PITT LAW REVIEW FORMAN, Carol Chicago, Ill. B.S. Education FOSTER, Keith E. Toledo, Ohio D.D.S. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta, A.D.A., Den- tones fSecretary-Treasurerj FRAGOMERI, Frank A. Munhall, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines FRANK, Elsa A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Phi FRANK, Steven A. Brooklyn, N. Y. B.B.A. Business Administration Sigma Alpha Mu, S q u a s h, S.A.M.. QUOTES AND COM- MENTS, Greek Week Commit- tee lChairman of Athleticsl FRANKEL, Ierome L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Zeta Beta Tau, A.I.Ch.E. FRANZINI, Louis R. New Brighton, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Varsity Marching Band, New- man Club FRARY, Francis L. Monroeville, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Delta Tau Delta, Soccer . FREEMAN, Samuel Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau, IDEAS AND FIGURES FRIED, Leslie I. Elkins Park, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts FRIELELL, Sandra Murraysville, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta FROHLICH, Stanley I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E., A.S.M. FULGHUM, Penelope A. Sewickley, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Kappa Kappa Gamma, A.W.S. FULLERTON, Martin L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration FULTON, Robert W. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Gamma Delta fRecording Secretaryj, Druids, Iunior Wor- thy, Phi Eta Sigma, Student Government, I.F.C., Druid Soph- omore Man-of-the Year FUNK, George I. Ambridge, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts FYLOCK, Claudine K. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Education Alpha Delta Pi, Dolphin Club, Newman Club, A.W.S., P.S.E.A. GAILYS, Iohn Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi, S.A.M. GALANTER, Lawrence P. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Photo Club, Chess Club, PITT NEWS GALIARDI, Diane G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Sigma Sigma Sigma, Alpha Tau Delta, Sigma Theta Tau GAMBHE, Iames C. Bolivar, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines GANDIS, Clifford 1. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.Ch.E., Engineers' Week, East- ern Orthodox Fellowship GEBHARDT, Helen F. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Women's Choral GEDID, Iohn L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Theta Chi, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Eta Sigma, Sigma Kappa Phi, Druids, PITT CALENDAR lEdi- torj, Student Government fSena- torj GEORGE, Robert C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.Ch.E. GEORGE, Robert S. Connellsville, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi GEORGESCU, Ronald C. Flushing, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Psi Omega, Pitt Players GEPPERT, John K. Oakmont, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Wrestling GERRETY, Robert T. Erie, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega, A.D.A. GERSTACKER, Ronald L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Delta Sigma Phi GERTZ, Edward W. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Phi Theta Kappa, PANTHER fPhotography Edi- torl, Circle K GILLILAND, Robert F. Sharon, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega GILMORE Ir., Samuel G. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.Ch.E. GINDLESPERGER, Iames L. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines PANTHER, STEADY STATER, SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER, A.I.- Ch.E., P.S.P.E., N.S.P.E. GIRTON, Sandra E. Bloomsburg, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A. fSecretaryl GITTELSOHN, Michael O. Bayside, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Iohn Marshall Society, Squash, Young Democrats Club GLASER, Roger B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Etta Kappa Nu, Sigma Tau, Squash, Tennis, P.S.P.E., I.R.E., A.I.E.E. GLASS, Charles H. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.C.E., P.S.P.E. GLICK, Henry R. Hanover, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Kappa Kappa Psi, Varsity Marching Band, Concert Band GLICK, Morton M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pi Tau Sigma, ENGINEERING AND MINES BULLETIN, Engi- neers' Week Committee fChair- man Aero Dept.j, P.S.P.E., I.A.S. GOLBORO, Sally F. Pikesville, Md. B.S. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Phi fVice-Presi- dentj, Sophomore Class Coun- cil fPublicity Chairmanj, Pan- hellenic C o u n c il lPresidentj, Cwens GOLDBERG, Linda Uniontown, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Mortar Board, IDEAS AND FIG- URES GOLDFINGER, Ioni C. Larchmont, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Phi fPresidentj, Panhellenic Representative GOLDSMITH, Frank E. Iohnstown, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration GOLDSTEIN, Morton E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Assistant to Curator-Stephen Fostor Memorial GONSOWSKI, Chester I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Ritle Team, S.A.E., P.S.P.E. GOODE, William W. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi GOORIN, Stanley s. Beaver Falls, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Alpha Epsilon Pi, William Pitt Debate Union fExecutive Com- mittee, Publicity Directorj, WP- GH GOSCENSKI, Edward I. Carnegie, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pi Tau Sigma, Sigma Tau, P.S.P.E., S.A.E., American So- ciety of Mechanical Engineers lSecretary, Vice-Chairmanj GOSS, Rachel A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS GOTTDIENER, Sandra F. McKeesport, Pa. B.S. Education GRAFFT, Michael L. Elmhurst, Ill. D.D.S. Dentistry GRANDY, Richard E. Gibsonia, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Eta Sigma, Midday Series, Philoso- phy Club GRANT, Kathryn F. Grant City, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Delta Pi lPresidentj, WPGH fNeWs Editorj, PITT NEWS, W.R.A., Women's Hous- ing Board, Dorm Council, Sen- ior Mentor GRAZIANI, Finalba Bridgeville, Pa. B.S. Education GREEN, Ross E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Alpha Phi Alpha, P.s.P.E. GREENHOUSE, Burton H. New Haven, Conn. B.A. Liberal Arts Varsity Marching Band GRESS, George H. Meyersdale, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts GRIBSCHAW, Raymond Glassport, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Scabbard and Blade fTreasurer, Presidentj. SKYSCRAPER EN- GINEER, American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical Engineer- ing, P.S.P.E., A.S.M., American Rocket Society fSecretaryj, Per- shing Rifles IPublic information Officerj GRIFFITH, Meredith L. Bentleyville, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Delta Sigma Phi, Men's Glee Club, Dentones GRILAK, Albert j. Perryopolis, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Kappa Kappa Psi, P.S.P.E., Var- sity Marching Band, judo Club GRIMM, Donald W. West Newton, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi lTreasurerj, Rho Chi, Phi Eta Sigma, Pi Delta Epsilon, PITT CAPSULE lBusi- ness Managerj GROSS, Barry M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Delta Epsilon fSecretaryj, PITT NEWS fAssociate Editorj GRUBER, Gilbert A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts GWILLIM, Eimyra McKeesport, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts United C a m p u s Fellowship lVice-Presidentj, Women's Cho- ral IAccompanistj, Pitt Players HADLY, Roland j. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration HAFENBRACK. M. Daniel Homestead, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts HAISFIELD, jeffrey Merton, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Mu fScholarship Chairmanj HALOVANIC, joseph C. Cheswick, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Chess Club HANAK, Robert M. Sharon, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Delta Tau Delta fTreasurerj, Football, Pitt Players HANEY, Lynn M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Psi Omega, Pitt Players, OWL fCirculation Managerj, Freshman Council HANLIN, Margaret j. johnstown, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi fSecretaryj HARLESS, Carole S. johnstown, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A. S.N.A.P. HARRINGTON, Herman j. South Fork, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts HARRISON, james C. Norfolk, Va. B.S. Engineering and Mines Druids, Wrestling, Lettermen's Club lSecretaryj, I.R.E. HARTFORD, Ardith A. Beaver Falls, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts HARTLAND, j. Barry West Mifflin, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau, A.I.M.E. fPresidentj, A.S.M., P.S.P.E. HARTMAN, lack 1. johnstown, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Sigma Chi lTreasurerj, Student Government, N e w m a n Club fTreasurerj HARVEY, james A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi HASELSTEINER, Renate E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education HASTINGS, Gilbert A. New Kensington, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines HAUSMAN, Joel 1. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Phi Epsilon Pi HAVEKOTTE, Alan W. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration HAVLAK, George R. Gibsonia, Pa. B.A. Education Pi Kappa Alpha HAWK, Vernon D. Hawthorne, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Sigma Chi HAYDEN, Lee L. Evans City, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts HAYS, Carolyn A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, Lutheran Stu- dent Association HECKLINGER, E. Martin Bethel Park, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Delta Sigma Phi fSocial Chair- manj, OWL, FRATERNITIES AT PITT fEditorj, IF MESSENGER fAssociate Editorj HECKMAN, Robert E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines HEIBEL, john L. Erie, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry HEISELMAN, William C. East Patchoque, N. Y. B.S. Liberal Arts I-IELBLING, john Allison Park, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Alpha Phi Omega, Newman C l u b , ENGINEERING AND MINES BULLETIN, S.A.M. lChairmanj, P.S.P.E., Engineers' Week Committee HELSEL, David F. Knox, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Delta Sigma Phi, Student Union Board, Freshmen Orientation Committee HELSLEY, William C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines HENDERSON, Dawn P. Bolivar, Pa. B.S. Nursing B.S.N.A. HENRY, W. Leroy Cumberland, Md. B.S. Engineering and Mines Delta Sigma Phi fVice-Presi- dentj, Druids, Eta Kappa Nu, Phi Eta Sigma, ENGINEERING AND MINES BULLETIN, Fresh- man Camp fChairmanj, Greek Week iChairmanj, I.F.C. Secre- tary, Homecoming fPublicity Chairmanj HENTZ, Ronald D. Sidman, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau, Phi Tau Kappa, P.S.P.E. HERMAN, jack Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Mu, Phi Eta Sigma, Kappa Kappa Psi, Varsity Marching Band, Concert Band HERRING, John A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Homecom- ing Committee HERRON, Robert B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts HERSH, Donald M. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Alpha Omega, Phi Sigma, Sigma Xi HERSH, jacquelyn A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Alpha Epsilon Phi, Student Government fChaplainj, Greek Week lCo-Chairmanj, Homecom- ing Committee, Freshman Ori- entation Committee HERSH, joel Miami Beach, Fla. D.D.S. Dentistry HESS, Guy A. Pittsburgh, Pa. ' B.S. Liberal Arts Sigma Phi Epsilon, Mathematics Club HESS, Raymond j. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts HILAIRE, Catherine E. Bethlehem, Pa. B.S. Nursing HILINSKI, Irene M. B.S. Pharmacy Monessen, Pa. Zeta Tau Alpha, Lambda Kappa Sigma, Newman Club Green-Howard HINCE, Frank R. New Kensington, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Gamma Delta, Newman Club HINES, james C. Carnegie, Pa. g B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Delta Theta fTreasurerj, OWL fAssociate Editorj, I.F.C. HINKES, Charles Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta HIRSCH, jeffrey L. Lawrence, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Pitt Players, I.R.C., Student Sane HIVELY, joan H. Williamsport, Pa. B.S. Nursing Kappa Kappa Gamma, Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A. HODGKINSON, Beverly A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Kappa Alpha Theta, Cwens, Sigma Kappa Phi, A.W.S. Tradi- tions Chairman, Senior Assist- ant, Senior Mentor, Sweetheart of Sigma Chi HOERNER, Howard C. McKeesport, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E. HOFFMAN, Frank L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts A.F.R.O.T.C. Rifle Team, A.C.S. HOFFMAN, George W. Sipesville, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Varsity Marching Band HOFFMAN, Mary T. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts HOFFMAN, Robert G. Mercer, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Dormitory Counselor HOLLINGER, john W. Lebanon, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts HOLLINGSWORTH, john M. Girard, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Kappa Alpha HOLT, Robert j. Sharon, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi, Fencing Club fPresi- dentj, Varsity Marching Band HOLTZ, Patrick K. Hastings, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M., Alpha Kappa Psi HORN, john F. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Football HOUK, Miriam S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Theta Phi Alpha, Lutheran Stu- dents' Association HOUSERMAN, Howard E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Kappa Psi lVice-Presidentj, Varsity Marching Band fSection Leaderj, Concert Band HOWARD, james W. johnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E. Howard-Kinsey HOWARD, Ronald F. Grove City, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi HUGHES, Iohn W. Elkins Park, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi, I.F.C., Central Rush Committee, Freshman Orienta- tion Committee HUNT, Martin I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Delta Iota Delta lPresidentj, Young Democrats, Iudo Club, Far East Club HUNTING, Maurice W. Pitcairn, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry A.D.A. HURBANEK, Iames G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Head Football Manager HUTTLER, Raymond R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.C.E., P.S.P.E., A.R.B.A. IDZKOWSKY, M. Gretchen Iohnstown, Pa. B.A. Education Deltz Zeta ILCISIN, Sylvia A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy A.Ph.A. ILLUMINATI, Ruth A. Torrington, Conn. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, Christian Fel- lowship, B.S.N.A., Fencing Club ISETT, Iames M. Iames Creek, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega, A.D.A. IACKMAN, Lowell B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Alpha Phi Omega lVice-Presi- dentj, Soccer, A.S.C.E., Wesley Fellowship, Student Council of Religious Organizations lTreas- urerj IACKSON, Iulie A, Winston-Salem, N. C. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, Residence Council fPresidentj, B.S.N.A. IACKSON, Martha A. Sewickley, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A., S.N.- A.P. IACOB, Barbara I. Easton, Pa. B.A. Education Kappa Kappa Gamma, Lutheran Student Association IAEGER, Stephen R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration IAIN, Vijay K. Bombay, India B.A. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS fProduction Assist- ant, Feature Editorl IAMES, Frank R. Ieannette, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts William Pitt Debating Union IAMES, Jerome Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.M.E. IAMISON, Brenda Green Lane, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Delta Delta Delta IASPER, Charles P. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi, A.Ph.A. IEFFREYS, Frank B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Circle K IEGLINSKI, Ronald S. Carnegie, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Fellowship Program, P.S.P.E., Institute of the Aero-Space Sci- ences, American Rocket Society IENKINS, Kenneth W. Duquesne, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Sigma Phi Epsilon IENKINS, Kenneth M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines I.R.E. IIMICK, David L. Homestead, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Eta Kappa Nu IINKS, Benjamin S. Long Island, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Phi Alpha fTreasurerj, Men's Council, Varsity Basket- ball iCaptainj, Varsity Basket- ball Award IOHNSON, Allen M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Alpha Phi Alpha fSecretary1, PITT NEWS, Heinz Chapel Choir, I.F.C. iScholarship Chair- manj, Engineers' Week lPubli- city Chairmanj, Student Govern- ment, A.I.E.E. fRecording Secre- taryi, P.s.P.E. IOHNSON, David I. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega IOHNSON, Iames D. Erie, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi O m e g a lVice-Presidentj, A.D.A. fVice-Presidentj, Den- tones JOHNSON, Martha A. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Delta Sigma Theta, Newman Club, A.W.S. Scholastic Inter- ests Committee IOHNSTON, Bruce D. Emporium, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi, A.Ph.A. IONAS, Paul Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Alpha Omega IONES, Helen M. New Kensington, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Delta Delta Delta, Quax, Men- tor IONES, Mary I. Oakdale, Pa. B.A. Education Westminster Foundation, P.S.- E.A. IORDAN, Charles L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines ENGINEERING AND MINES BULLETIN IL a y o ut Editorj, Gymnastics Team fManagerl, I.A.S., P.S.P.E. IOSEPH, Devorah L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts A.W.S. Transfer Committee IOSEPH, Myriam R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education P.S.E.A. IOSEPH, Sandra L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Sigma Sigma IOYCE, William H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts IUDGE, William E. Monroeville, Pa. B.A. Education Delta Iota Delta, P.S.E.A. fVice- Presidentj IUPINA, Michael T. Ieannette, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega, Track, Cross-Coun- try IURENKO, Donald I. Duquesne, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau, Phi Eta Sigma, Eta Kappa Nu, A.I.E.E., I.R.E. fChair- manj KAISER, William Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pershing Riiles, Scabbard and Blade, E. and M. Cabinet KALINSKY, Iay M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. KALTENBACH, Gary L. Clairton, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi, Football fCo-Cap- tainj, Wrestling KANTROWITZ, Richard B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi fVice-Presidentj, Pi Delta Epsilon, PITT NEWS fAssistant Business Managerj, S.A.M. KAPLUS, Howard L. Clifton, N. I. B.B.A. Business Administration Zeta Beta Tau fPresidentJ KARR, Iohn P. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Education Newman Club KASELER, Harold M. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Education KATZ, Carl A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Zeta Beta Tau KATZ, Charles M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Epsilon Pi KATZ, Richard Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, S.A.M., Young Republicans KATZ, Rhoda F. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Sweetheart of Pi Lambda Phi, Homecoming Committee, P.S.- E.A. KAVIC, Alexander I. Aliquippa, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Amateur Radio Club KAZEBEE, Norma I. Seneca, Pa. B.S. Nursing Heinz Chapel Choir KEARNEY, Iohn B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts KEIFER, Lorraine M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education KEIL, Sally L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Mentor, Senior Assistant KEMERER, Marcia E. Ieannette, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta fTreasurerJ, B.S.N.A., S.N.A.P., Nurses Resi- dence-Social Chairman KEMPINSKI, Carl New Kensington, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy KERLIN, Iames Aliquippa, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Arnold Air Society, Chess Club, Newman Club, Dorm Council, Upperclass Counselor KERR, Richard M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts KESSLER, Penina H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Phi lCorrespond- ing Secretaryj, Phi Beta Kappa, Cwens, Mortar Board, Sigma Kappa Phi fSecretaryj, Iunior W o r t h y, A.W.S. lSecretary, Chairman Scholarship Commit- teej, Midday Series Committee, Special Fellowships Program KETTERLE, Norma I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Quo Vadis, A.W.S. Publications Committee, Mentor, Pitt Pre- view KHALIL, Carl G. Reynoldsville, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta KIERNAN, Thomas W. Nutley, N. I. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Special Fellowship Pro- gram, CARDINAL, N e w m a n Club fPresidentj KINAST, William E. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry KING, David M. Mercer, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi KING, Russel, P. Iohnstown, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Theta Kappa KINSEY, David Bethel Park, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Scabbard and Blade, S.A.M., Pershing Rifles KISH, Sandra L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Zeta Tau Alpha KLAHR, Melvin A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Alpha Mu, S.A.M., A.I.E.E., I.R.E. KLEE, Renee A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Midday Series, A.W.S., Scholas- tic Interests Committee KLEMENCIC, Iohn F. McDonald, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. KLEINER, Linda L. Florin, Pa. B.S. Nursing Zeta Tau Alpha, Alpha Tau Delta, W.R.A., B.S.N.A. KLEVANS, Judith A. Altoona, Pa. B.S Education Alpha Epsilon Phi, A.W.S. KNIGHT, Patricia H. Mt. Vernon, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Cwens lPresidentj, Midday Se- ries KNORR, Iill B. New Cumberland, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Cwens fTreasurer1, Canterbury Association, Heinz Chapel Choir, Alpha Tau Delta KRASS, Barrett G. New Haven, Conn. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Student Union Board KOBASA, Daniel Turtle Creek, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines KOLB, William A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines KONESKI, Louis M. New Kensington, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Great Linguist KONIGSBURG, Dale A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E., A.I.Ch.E. KOPEC, David N. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pi Tau Sigma, S.A.E., P.S.P.E., Chess Club, Student Govern- ment KOSTISHACK, Douglas Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. KOTOVSKY, Avis B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education KOURAKOS, Stella I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing KOVALIK, Iames G. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts KRASON, Henry I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi KRAVETZ, Nancy L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. KRAVITZ, Phyllis E. Grand Rapids, Michigan B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Phi KREMIN, Ir. Michael Homestead, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E. KRIEGER, Ruth S. Carnegie, Pa. B.S. Nursing KRISTAKIS, Iohn Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.l.I.E. KRUCHKEVICH, Eric N. McKees Rocks, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts KUBIAK, Edward T. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Eta Kappa Nu, A.I.E.E. KUECHLER, Donald S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts KUHN, Richard I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines KUKICH, George Export, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts KUMER, Iohn B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Sigma Pi, Track KUNKEN, Frederic R. Rockville Centre, N. Y. B.S. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau, President Inter- dormitory Council, President Men's Dormitory Council, ludi- cial Committee KWESKIN, David M. Stanford, Conn. B.S. Liberal Arts Varsity Marching Band, Hillel, Ski Club KYPER, Peter T. W. Brownsville, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Druids, Delta Sigma Rho, William Pitt Debating Union, Student Gov- ernment LABOVITZ, Melvin W. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. LACOVIC, Raymond F. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Phi Eta Sigma, Newman Club LAICHAK, Henry Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy A.Ph.A. LAMB, Robert H. McDonald, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pi Tau Sigma fPresidentj, Sigma Tau fTreasurerj, Institute Aero- space Sciences fVice-Presidentl, E AND M BULLETIN fEditorj, P.S.P.E. LA RUSS, Sandra L. Natrona Heights, Pa. B.S. Education P.S.E.A. LAUGHINGHOUSE, Charles L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Eta Kappa Nu lPresidentj, Phi Eta Sigma, Sigma Tau, Omicron Delta Kappa, I.R.E., A.I.E.E., P.S.I.E., E. and M. Cabinet, Eta Kappa Nu "Outstanding Electri- cal Engineering Senior" LAVELLA, James P. Herminie, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau, Newman Club fNewspaper Co-Editorj, P.S.P.E., fTreasurerj, A.S.M., A.S.T.M. LAVER, Marian Glassport, Pa. B.A. Education Quo Vadis fPresidentj, New- man Club, Senior Mentor LAVERY, Michael I. Franklin, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Lambda Chi Alpha, Varsity Marching Band, Students for Democratic Action, Pitt Politi- cal Forum LAWSON, Robert L. Latrobe, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration LEBOVITZ, Charles N. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Omicron Delta Kappa, Druids, Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Senior Worthy, Men's Council lVice- Presidentj, University Orienta- tion Committee, William Pitt Debating Union, Tap Day Com- mittee fChairmanJ, "Big Brother" Orientation Program fChairmanJ LEE, Elaine E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Kappa Alpha, Quo Vadis, Alpha Tau Delta LEE, Helen Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Quax, Heinz Chapel Choir lVice- Presidentj LEEDS, Edward A. Brooklyn, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Mu, William Pitt Debating Union, Varsity March- ing Band fManagerj, Dormitory President LEFKOWITZ, David Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Hillel, United Iewish Federation LEGO, Suzanne M. Coraopolis, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta LEHMANN, Ioseph H. III Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Delta Tau Delta lPresidentj, Soc- cer, WPGH, I.F.C. LEHNER, Iohn W. Venetia, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Gymnastics, I.R.E. LELEWSKI, Constance I. Baden, Pa. B.A. Education LEMMERT, Marion L. Frostburg, Md. B.A. Liberal Arts I.R.C., Lutheran Students Asso- ciation Kish--Logan LEVENSON, Stan D. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Epsilon Pi LEVINE, David I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Epsilon Pi, Swimming LEVINE, Helen E. Altoona, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta LEVINE, Sheldon R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Soccer, WPGH LEWIS, David New Rochelle, N. Y. B.B.A. Business Administration Sigma Alpha Mu LEWIS, Richard E. Philadelphia, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Newman Club LEWIS, Robert A. Philadelphia, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Newman Club LIEBTAG, Benford G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Alpha Phi Omega, A.I.E.E. LIGHT, Warren M. Rockville Centre, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi lTreasurerJ LIGHTELL, Wilbur G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration LINCOFF Gary H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts I.R.C., Philosophy Society, Ski Club, Pitt Political Forum lSteer- ing Committeej, Students for Democratic Action lVice-Chair- manj, Young Democrats LINDSAY, Carol A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A., S.N.A.P., Heinz Chapel Choir LIPPMANN, Susan H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Orchesis, Tennis Club LIPTON, Stephen N. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Homecoming Committee LISTEK, Theodore I. New Kensington, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER, A.S.- M.E., P.S.P.E. LLOYD, Nancy Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing B.S.N.A. lPresidentJ, Alpha Tau Delta fRecording Secretaryl LOBAUGH, Diane I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Sigma Sigma, Newman Club, Angel Flight LOGAN, Ann E. Milton, Pa. B.S. Nursing Zeta Tau Alpha, Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A., S.N.A.P., A.W.S. Transfer Committee Lohrentz-Melnick LOHRENTZ, Beverly R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS, Special Fellowship Group, Society for Conservative Studies fSecretaryj, Senate, Pitt Political Forum LOTZ, Mona C. McKeesport, Pa. B.S. Nursing LOVELACE, Robert O. West Mifflin, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Alpha Phi Alpha fTreasurerJ, P.S.P.E., A.S.l.E., N.A.A.C.P., In- stitute of Aeronautical Sciences LUCA, Charles R. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E., Newman Club LUGAR, Iames R. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.M.E., P.S.P.E. LUNDBERG, Iulia C. McKeesport, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Quax, Lutheran Students, PITT NEWS LUNDY, Theodore Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry B.S. Engineering and Mines Alpha Omega, American Society for the Advancement of Den- tistry for Children, A.D.A. LUTHER, Gary D. Ligonier, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, S.A.M. LUZANSKI, G. Thomas Belle Vernon, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E., A.S.M., A.I.M.E. LYDIC, Lauren A. Davidsville, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration MCALLISTER, Mary Elizabeth Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts POLARIS MCCAHAN, Larry Steele Saxton, Pa. A B.S. Pharmacy Rho Chi lPresidentj, Kappa Psi lVice Regentj, A.P.H.A., Class President MCCLAIN, Thomas Patrick Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Pi Kappa Alpha, Student Gov- ernment MCCLOSKEY, Carol Ioan Cleveland, Ohio B.A. Liberal Arts Kappa Kappa Gamma MCCORMICK, Iudith Emert Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Sigma Sigma Sigma, Pitt Players MCCOY, Morgan Michael II Trafford, Penna. B.S. Liberal Arts MCCOY, Robert L. Export, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration MCDERMOTT, Suzanne Marie Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Alpha Delta Pi lStandards Chair- rnanj, Newman Club, Quo Vadis MCDONALD, Gilbert B.A. Liberal Arts Pittsburgh, Pa. Pitt News Sports Staff, Soccer, Military Ball Committee, United Campus Fellowship lPresidentj MCFARLAND, Kenneth T. H. Coraopolis, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Theta Chi, Panther Club, Per- shing Rifles, Scabbard 8: Blade, Soccer, Ritle, Westminster Foundation, Chapel Board MCGILL, Edna Frances Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts MCGOVERN, Thomas L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS MCGOVERN, William Lloyd Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Lambda Sigma Rho, Alpha Kap- pa Psi lPresidentj, Alpha Psi Omega, Student Congress, Psy- chology Club, Newman Club fVice-Presidentj, S.A.M., Per- shing Rifles MCKEEVER, Leland Dennis Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma fTreasurerJ, Phi Lambda Upsilon MCLAIN, Paul Larimer Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Phi Beta Kappa MCLANE, Mary Anne Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Lambda Kappa Sigma, A.Ph.A. MCMANUS, Iames Clark Oakdale, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.M., A.I.M.E. MCQUAID, Edwin Roger Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E. MCVICKER, Gail Elaine Boswell, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts MACDONALD, Douglas A. Irwin, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts MACKEY, Colin B. Ieannette, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Eta Kappa Nu, Sigma Tau MACKO, Ioseph Edward Homestead, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines I.R.E., Engineers Week Commit- tee MacKRELL, joseph Charles Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration MADDOCK, Robert Anthony Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts MAILKI, Donald Burton Natrona Heights, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau, Pershing Rifles MAICHER, Ronald B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. MAKPHANIIVADHANA, S. Thailand B.S. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta lVice-Presi- dentl, Photo Club, Ski Club MALARKY, Iohn Taylor Bridgeville, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.M.E., I.A.S., P.S.P.E. MALCOLM, Catherine Eileen McKees Rocks, Pa. B.A. Education Angel Flight, P.S.E.A. MALIN, Ierald Robert Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Alpha Phi Omega fTreasurerJ, Chess Club, A.I.E.E., WPGH fChief Engineerl MALINCHAK, Raymond M. Dravosburg, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau, P.S.P.E., S.H.E. MANDEL, Esther Susan Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Alpha Psi Omega, Pitt Players MANION, Inez Marie Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Beta Sigma Omicron, Quax, Quo Vadis, Angel Flight Newsletter fEditorj MARKER, Marie Ruth Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing MARKOWSKI, Peter Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry MARRON, jay David Teaneck, N. I. B.A. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau MARSHALL, Richard W. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Eta Sigma tPresi- dentj, IDEAS AND FIGURES, Math Session Program lChair- manj, Upperclass Counselor Program fChairmanJ, M e n ' s Council Orientation Committee MARSICOVETERE, Elona G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts WRA, Dolphin Club, American Chemical Society, Inquiry Club, Newman Club MARSILII, Albert Louis Wilmington, Del. D.D.S. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta MAPSZALEK, Stanley Ioseph Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Beta Gamma Sigma, Phi Eta Sigma, S.A.M. MARTIN, Iohn Sperling Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Delta Sigma Phi MARTIN, Margaret lane Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Quo Vadis, A.W.S. Traditions Committee fChairmanj, Mentor MARTIN, Susan R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education PITT NEWS, Homecoming Com- mittee, Hillel, Dorm Standards Committee, P.S.E,A. MARTIN, William Edward Kittanning, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Dental School Class lTreasurerj, Student Council MARUNCZAK, Margaret Mary Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Tneta Phi Alpha fPresidentj, Panhellenic Council, Newman Club MASON, William Thomas Oakmont, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pi Sigma lVice-Presidentj, Sigma Tau fPresidentj, SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER fCirculation Man- agerj MASSIMINO, Sandra lean Tarentum, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Zeta Tau Alpha, Angel Flight MASSUNG, Lawrence Iohn Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines S.A.E., P.S.P.E. MASSOUD, Anthony George Aliquippa, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Scabbard 8: Blade, Newman Club, A.I.M.E. MASTRO, David Anthony Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Delta Iota Delta, Varsity Foot- ball, Varsity Basketball, New- man Club MATEY, Iohn George Van Voorhis, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts MATUSZ, Iohn Michael Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E., I.A.S., A.S.M.E. MAURER, Iohn Albert Greensburg, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi, R.O.T.C. MAUS, Rose Marie Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Quo Vadis, SKYSCRAPER EN- GINEER, A.W.S. Social Commit- tee, Parents' Weekend Commit- tee MAUST, Iay Robert Somerset, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega, A.D.A., DENTAL SCHOOL NEWSLETTER, Class Treasurer, Class President, Den- tal School Student Council fPresidentj, Dentones MAXWELL, Iames F. Oil City, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega lTreasurerj MAYERS, Thomas Allen Trafford, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Eta Kappa Nu MECKLEY, Richard Clark Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E., I.A.S. MEHNERT, Allen Edward II Sewickley, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Arnold Air Society, Chess Club, Chess Team MELNICK, Susan Lee Bradford, Pa. B.S. Education Alpha Epsilon Phi fRush Chair- manl, Breckenridge House lPres- identj, Mentor, Senior Assistant MEIER, William Carl Rochester, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Sigma Chi lPresidentj, Beta Alpha Psi MERENDINO, Mary Clare Clarksburg, W. Va. B.S. Education Quax, Newman Club, P.S.E.A., Mentor MERGEN, Paul N. Trafford, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts META, Louis D. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Men's Glee Club, Varsity Quar- tet, Newman Club MEYER, Debra Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Cwens lSecretaryj, W.R.A., Stu- dent Government, A.W.S. IAC- tivities Committeej, Business Administration Cabinet Wice- Presidentj, Student Union Dance Chairman, Weekend Programs Chairman, Iazz Committee, Kis- ki Day Committee MEYER, james L. Seward, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Omega Chi Epsilon, Sigma Tau, A.I.Ch.E., Phi Theta Kappa MEYER, Richard D. Zionsville, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts MEYERS, Charles Richard Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines MEYERS, Gerald Frederick Ir. Carnegie, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Phi Kappa Theta, Sigma Tau, P.S.P.E. MEYERS, Iacqueline Ann Warrendale, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Chi Omega, Dolphin Club, Ski Club MICHALEK, Frank Iohn Tarentum, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts MICHALOWICZ, Leon William Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines E.M. Cabinet MILLER, A. Lana Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education P.S.E.A., S.A.M., Student Union Board MILLER, Iames s. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration ITT NEWS, S.A.M. ILLER, Iohn D. New Kensington, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts INNICK, Audrey E. Nemacolin, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts ISTICK, Iames A. Turtle Creek, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines igma Tau, A.R.B.A., fSecretary- reasurerj A.S.C.E. ITCHELL, George I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines hi Kappa Theta, A.I.E.E., I.R.E. MITCHELL, Iames C. North Braddock, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry MIZLA, William A. North Braddock, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Engineering and Mines Cabinet, P.S.P.E. MIZNER, Ronald C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. lTreasurerj MOHR, Kathleen L. Bethel Park, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Westminster Foundation MOKAL, Marie E. Mahanoy City, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Chi Omega fVice-Presidentj, S.A.M. fCorresponding Secre- taryj, Student Union Iazz Com- mittee, A.W.S. Social Commit- tee, Mentor, Homecoming Com- mittee MONRO, Nancy U. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, Dolphin Club MONTEQUIN, Iames I. Langeloth, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts MONTGOMERY, Carol E. Washington, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration D o r m i t o r y Oflicer, Housing Board, Student Government, Mentor, A.I.E.S.E.C. fSecretary1 MONTGOMERY, Martha L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Kappa Alpha Theta, fSecretaryj Mortar Board tSecretaryJ, Par- ents' W e e k e n d Committee, A.W.S. Traditions Committee MONTGOMERY, William V. East Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Lutheran Student Association MOORE, Beverly A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Delta Zeta, Social Chairman of United Campus Fellowship, A.W.S. Public Relations Com- mittee MOORE, Elinor A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing MORETSKY, Howard Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts MORPHY, Iohn C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta MORRIS, Robert L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi.Eta Sigma, Special Fellow- ship Program, Chess Club fPres- identj MOSTOLLER, Charles R. Boswell, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines MOSTOLLER, George A. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau, Eta Kappa Nu lVice- Presidentj, P.S.P.E., fSecond Vice-Presidentj MRDIENOVICH, Robert Turtle Creek, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines MUECK, Antoinette I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Newman Club, Rifle Team MUNTER, Stephen O. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Phi Epsilon Pi, Track MURRAY, David L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma MURRAY, Robert 1. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines I.R.E., Engineers Week Commit- tee MYERS, Iames I. Sidman, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines NEIL, Nancy L. Belle Vernon, Pa. B.S. Nursing B.S.N.A., S.N.A.P. NEIMAN, Ioseph Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy A.Ph.A. NEMETH, Pearl G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Quax, W.R.A. Executive Board, A.W.S. Social Committee, Emer- son Club, Quo Vadis NELSON, Robert H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts NESVISKY, Matthew D. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Delta Epsilon fPresidentj, PITT NEWS fEditorj, IDEAS AND FIGURES, Student Union Board Film Series fChairmanJ, Student Affairs Committee NEWFELD, Raymond Mamatuneck, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Epsilon Pi, I.F. Council NEWELL, Iohn H. Stahlstown, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Delta Sigma Phi fPresidentJ, Phi Eta Sigma, Druids fPresi- dentj, Homecoming Chairman, Interfraternity Iudicial Commis- sion NICHOLS, Marjorie L. Pittsburgh, Pa, B.A. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS iPhoto Editorj, IDEAS AND FIGURES, OWL, Foto Club fTreasurerj NICHOLS, Thomas W. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts NIEDERST, William C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Phi Delta Theta, SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER, Steady Stater, PITT NEWS, OWL Artist NOCK, Thomas I. Greensburg, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines NODVICK, Richard 1. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Eta Kappa Nu Meier-Orris NOLAN, John F. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines NOLAN, Mark B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Theta Chi, PITT CALENDAR, P.S.P.E., I.A.S. lSecretaryJ NORED, Roland Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Eta Kappa Nu, Men's Glee Club fSecretaryJ NORWOOD, Edward I. Canonsburg, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Evening Students Association NYCUM, Peter S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Delta Tau Delta lSecretary1, Tennis, Squash O'BARA, Ioseph T. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.Ch.E. OBENRADER, Rose M. Fryburg, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Cwens, Mortar Board, I.R.C., Newman Club, Russian Culture Club OHRINGER, Lee Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Founder of Pitt Math Society, Chess Club fPresident1 OLOFSON, Tom W. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Sigma Chi, S.A.M., Basketball, Student Government lPresident1 O'LOUGHLIN, David L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Delta Tau Delta, Soccer, Squash, Tennis OLSZEWSKI, Walter A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pershing Rifles, Rifle Team ONDESKO, john J. Dunlo, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts OMASTA, Lawrence M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta fTreasurerj, Pi Delta Epsilon, Omicron Delta Kappa, OWL lComptroller and Assistant Business Managerj, Upper Class Counselor OPSATN IK, Richard M. Aliquippa, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega, A.D.A. ORNER, Gerald Philadelphia, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Alpha Omega, A.D.A. ORRINGER, Mark B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, Special Fellowship Program, Interfrater- nity Scholarship Committee ORRIS, David M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Kappa Theta fVice-Presi- dentj Orris-Reith ORRIS, Raymond Port Vue Borough, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines OTTO, Robert E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts OWENS, Paul K. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry PALAIKA, Thomas Arnold, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts PALETTA, Francis X. New Kensington, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts PALEY, Iana P. Pleasantville, N. Y. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A., Freshmen Council PANKO, joseph W. Butler, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts PARKER, George W. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines I.R.E., Engineers' Week Com- mittee PARRECO, Iames A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts PASQUARELLI, Anthony P. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Theta Chi PATRICK, Edward P. Munhall, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines S.A.E., P.S.P.E., ENGINEERING AND MINES BULLETIN PATRINOS, Theodore I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration S.A.M. PAULENOFF, Alan R. East Hills, N. Y. B.B.A. Business Administration Sigma Alpha Mu, Alpha Kappa Psi PAVLOSKY, Annamae M. Iohnstown, Pa. B.A. Education IDEAS AND FIGURES, Phi Theta Kappa PEARL, Iudith D. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Alpha Epsilon Phi fTreasurer, Secretaryl, Cwens, M o r t a r Board, Sigma Kappa Phi, Men- tor, A.W.S. fVice-Presidentj, Student Government PEARL, Kenneth Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts PEDULLA, Ioseph Sharon, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Kappa Kappa Psi PEKINS, William Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines PERU, Charles B. Coraopolis, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega, A.D.A. PESSOLANO, Iohn L. New Kensington, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi fPresidentj, A.Ph.A., Rho Chi PETAK, Lawrence P. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.R.B.A., A.S.C.E., N e w m a n Club PETERMAN, Iohn P. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry PETERS, Iesse E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Omega Psi Phi, Psychology Club, S.A.N.E. PETERS, Ioan A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Delta Zeta fVice-Presidentl, Quax lVice-Presidentj, Special Fellowship Program, Gamma Delta, Heinz Chapel Choir, A.C.S. fPresidentJ PETERS, Theodore G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines S.A.E. PETERSON, Geraldine R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Theta Phi Alpha lVice-Presi- dentj, Quax lPresidentj, Quo Vadis, Newman Club, Mentor, A.W.S. Traditions Committee PHILLIPS, Nymphe D. Beaver, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Senior Assistant, Mentor PIDUTTI, Linda M. Greensburg, Pa. B.A. Education Chi Omega, Newman Club, A.W.S. Public Relations, Hous- ing Board PIERCE Ir., Clarence W, Harwick, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts PINGATORE, Robert P. Beaver Falls, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Delta Sigma Phi, Gymnastic Team PITTLER, Barbara R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Pitt Players, P.S.E.A., Inquiry Club PIZZANO, Winifred A. Harrisburg, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Sigma Sigma fTreasurerj, POLARIS, Homecoming Dance IChairmanj, A.W.S. Transfer Committee PLATT, Gail E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Kappa Alpha Theta, Delta Iota Delta Sweetheart, PITT NEWS, A.W.S. NEWSLETTER, Mentor, A.W.S. Public Relations Chair- man, Panhellenic Council PLUCIENNIK, E. Douglas Vandergrift, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.Ch.E., P.S.P.E., STEADY STATER lSports Editorj POKRZYWINSKI, Edward North Braddock, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Theta Chi, POLARIS, Freshman Camp Athletic Chairman POKRZYWINSKI, Richard A. North Braddock, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Engineers' Week ICO-Chairmanj, A.I.I.E. fSecretaryj POLICK, Raymond L. Elrama, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Theta Chi, Scabbard and Blade lVice-Presidentj, Engi- neering and Mines Cabinet fTreasurerj, E AND! M BULLE- TIN, S.A.E. lTreasurerj, Engi- neers' Week fCo-Chairmanj POLYAK, Mary A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Delta Delta Delta fPresidentj, Druid Man of the Month, Senior Worthy, Student Government fSecretaryJ, Panhellenic Coun- cil, Freshman Orientation, Kiski Day Chairman POMERANTZ, Marc H. White Plains, N. Y. B.S. Liberal Arts Hillel, William Pitt Debate Un- ion POMPER, William I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.l.E.E. POPP, Iohn Ligonier, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E. POPPE, Katrina Gibsonia, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Kappa Alpha Theta, Quo Vadis, A.W.S. Public Relations Com- mittee, Homecoming Committee, Mentor PORPER, Robert P. Mt. Vernon, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Dorm President PORRITT, Thomas H. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry A.D.A. PORT, Arlene S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Alpha Epsilon Phi, A.W.S. Schol- arship Committee, Student Un- ion Forum Committee PORTER, Gerald S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts PORTER, Iames o. Ingomar, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts PORTNOY, Irving M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts POTTER, Thomas E. Barberton, O. B.S. Liberal Arts POWER, Joseph C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma POWERS, David R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts PRIMOZIC, William Export, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma PROCTOR, William R. Mercer, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Squash PULLEKINES, Ioseph I. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry PUNZAK, Alinde M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Sigma Sigma PURICH, Edward D. Farrell, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Rho Chi, PITT CAPSULE, Phar- macy Class lVice-Presidentj, Kappa Psi PURVIS, Clarence A. Ambridge, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration QUEL, Robert c. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy A.Ph.A. RADAK, Les I. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.M.E., P.S.P.E. RADCLIFFE, Richard E. Duquesne, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines RADOV, Patricia R. Erie, Pa. B.A. Education PITT NEWS, Hillel, P.S.E.A. RANKIN, Ir., William G. Bethel Park, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts RANSICK, Thomas F. McKeesport, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Pi Kappa Alpha RAPIER, Robert M. Butler, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy A.Ph.A. RASKIN, David Carnegie, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Pi Lambda Phi RATAN, Santosh S. Bombay, India B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.I.E., India Student Associa- tion, Soccer, I.R.C. REDLICH, Max E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau REDMOND, Gerald W. Brownsville, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts REED, Ir., William A. Oakmont, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts REEDER, David B. Reading, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega, Baseball, Dental Class Nice-Presidentj, A.D.A. REILLY, Robert R. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry REISENWEAVER, Earl R. Conyngham, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega REISHER, Richard L. Bradford, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau REITER, Harvey S. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Gymnastic Team REITH, Robert A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts American Chemical Society RENKIN, Iean-Claude Liege, Belgium B.S. Engineering and Mines Ski Club lPresidentJ REX, Marilyn B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Student Union Board, Women's Choral fVice-Presidentj, Mentor REYNOLDS, Ieanette S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Orchesis, Mentor REYNOLDS, Richard F. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts RICARDELLI, Mario A. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry RICHARDS, H. Lawrence Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry A.D.A. RICHTER, David M. Albany, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Business Administration Cabi- net, Iohn Marshall Society, Stu- dent Union Hospitality Com- mittee, Hillel RINI, Mario I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Phi Kappa Theta, Druids, Lib- eral Arts Cabinet, Men's Council RINNE, Sheila B. Library, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Mortar Board, Dorm President, Housing Board, Student Union Board fStudent Directorj, A.W.S. Scholarship Committee RITLEY, Roger D. Shaker Heights, Ohio B.B.A. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi lVice-Presi- dentl, I.A.S.E.C. fPresidentJ, Business Administration Cabi- net, Society for Conservative Studies, University Panel on In- tercultural Relations ROBERSON, Charles E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Phi Alpha, Pi Delta Epsi- lon, IDEAS AND FIGURES fsdifory, PITT NEWS, soccer, Mountaineering Club ROBERT, Benjamin C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts ROBERTS, Lf-:Roy P. St. Michael, Pa. B.A. Education ROCCASANO, Carol A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education A.W.S. Housing Board, Dorm President ROCKWELL, Iudith A. Carmichaels, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Delta Pi, W.R.A. Execu- tive Board, Social Chairman of Dorm RODDIS, Eugenia G. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Education Phi Theta Kappa, SENTINEL, P.S.E.A., Glee Club, Student Congress lSecretaryj ROLAND, Nancy A. Erie, Pa. B.A. Education Delta Delta Delta, Student Gov- ernment, P.S.E.A. ROLLE, Milton E. yr. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts ROMIG, Richard R. New Kensington, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts ROMITO, Louis E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Varsity Cheerleader lCaptainj, Freshmen Orientation ROSEN, Ritanna Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education William Pitt Debating Team, Pitt Players ROSENBACH, Linda Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education P.S.E.A. ROSENBAUM, Bernard Stoystown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pershing Rifles, A.I.Ch.E., P.S.- P.E. ROSENBERG, Carole R. Long Island, N. Y. B.S. Liberal Arts Sigma Delta Tau lPresidentj ROSENBERG, Karen L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Cheerleader ROSENTHAL, Mark Iericho, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Pitt Players, Student Union Dance Committee ROSENZWEIG, Richard L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Druids, Special Fellowship Program ROSES, Allen D. Paterson, N. I. B.S. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau lTreasurerj, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Eta Sigma, Al- pha Epsilon Delta lPresidentl, University Scholar, I.F.C. Iudi- cial Committee, Senior justice ROSS, Mary M. West Newton, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta ROTHARMEL, Sue A. Brooklyn, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Cwens, Sophomore Class Coun- cil lSocial Chairmanl, Midday Series Committee fCo-Chair- manj, Philosophy Club, A.W.S. Traditions Committee ROYDES, Rona L. Oil City, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Quax ROZMARICH, Thomas A. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau, Eta Kappa Nu, Phi Theta Kappa, I.R.E. lTreasurerj, Amateur Radio Society ROZYCKI, Kenneth Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER, New- man Club RUBEN, Philip H. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Alpha Omega RUBIN, Ierry E. West Orange, N. I. D.D.S. Dentistry Zeta Beta Tau RUDOLPH, Ronald L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts S.A.M. RUEY, Mary I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Kappa Alpha Theta fVice-Presi- dentj, A.W.S. Public Relations, Dormitory Council, Freshmen Council, Mentor, Panhellenic Council fVice-Presidentj, Stu- dent Government RUSH, Richard E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Swimming, Iohn Marshall So- ciety RUSKEWICZ, Patricia A. Oakmont, Pa. B.S. Nursing RUSKIN, Susan N. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education P.S.E.A. RUTLEDGE, Raymond E. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering PANTHER, Newman Club, A.I.- E.E. SABSEVITZ, Alan D. Iersey City, N. I. B.S. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau fVice-Presidentj, WPGH, WQED SADLER, Margaret C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education Mentor SADLER, William I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts SAFKO, Louis S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS SANDLER, Ioel M. Franklin Square, N. Y. B.S. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau, Alpha Epsilon Delta SARKIN, Fred S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Epsilon Pi, Student Govern- ment SAUL, Susan A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Delta Tau, Community Relations Committee, Student Union Board fQuotes and Com- ments Committeej SAVEIKIS, Toni L. Oakdale, Pa. B.A. Education Chi Omega lSocial Chairmanj, Homecoming Queen's Court, Military Ball Queen's Court, P.S.E.A. SCHAFER, Edward A. Ir. Windber, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E., P.S.P.E., Varsity March- ing Band, Concert Band Renkin-Scisly SCHENLE, Gretchen L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Mortar Board, Rho Chi lSecre- taryl. Lambda Kappa Sigma fPresidentj SCHESTACK, David M. East Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education SCHIRF, Marlene G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing SCHMITT, Iacob F. Carnegie, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Phi Beta Kappa SCHMITT, Karl W. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta, Phi Eta Sigma SCHNEIDER, William H. III Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Druids, Pi Delta Epsilon, OWL fEditor and Business Managerj, Omicron Delta Kappa lPresi- dentl, Iunior Worthies, A.I.Ch.E. fVice-Presidentj, P.S.P.E., Pitt Foto Club, 1962 Emitt Award, 1962 Thomas C. Vrana Awardee SCHNITMAN, Paul A. Woodbridge, Conn. B.S. Liberal Arts Iazz Club, Varsity Marching Band SCHAEFFER, Charles F. Ir. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Wrestling, Student Government, International Relations C l u b lPresidentl, I.R.C. fPresident1 SCHOLLEY, Iames F. Cleveland Heights, Ohio B.S. Liberal Arts Men's Council SCHOTT, Ronald I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines S.A.E. fChairmanJ, P.S.P.E. ISD- cial Chairmanj SCHROTT, Robert C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Basketball SCHULMAN, Barbara S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Alpha Epsilon Phi, Student Book Exchange SCHURICHT, Richard W. New Kensington, Pa. B.A. Education SCHWARTZ, Lyndell K. Pottstown, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Alpha Omega SCHWARTZ, Susan C. Linden, N. I. B.S. Education SCHWARZBACH, Dorothy E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Beta Sigma Omicron fPresidentj SCHWARZBACH, Robert H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts SCHWEINSBERG, Allen R. Ellwood City, Pa. B.S. Education Rifle Team SCISLY, Ioseph Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Scott-Stellabotte SCOTT, Mary L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education P.S.P.E., A.W.S. Scholarship Committee SEAGER, Edward E. Bedford, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi lTreasurerj, S.A.M. SECOLI, Dorothy P. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing SEGAL, Arlyne C. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education P.S.E.A. SEIPLE, Barbara H. Lancaster, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta SENIOR, Barry I. Windber, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts SESTILI, Robert I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Psi Omega, Newman Club, Pershing Rifles, Pitt Play- ers, Scabbard and Blade, WPGH, Military Ball Co-Chairman SEVHONKIAN, Shahan T. San lose, Calif. D.D.S. Dentistry SFANOS, Michael H. Turtle Creek, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Scabbard and Blade, Baseball, Eastern Orthodox Campus Fed- eration, Pershing Rifles SHANNON, Paul A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Phi Kappa Theta, P.S.P.E., S.A.E., A.S.C.E., A.R.B.A., N e W m a n Club, jazz Club, Young Demo- crats SHAPIRA, Gail T. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Sigma Sigma, A.W.S. Scho- lastic Committee, Freshman Council, P.S.E.A., Greek Week Queen Finalist, Greek Week Committee, Homecoming Com- mittee SHARP, David L. Mt. Pleasant, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma Alpha Epsilon Delta, OWL, PITT NEWS, Wes- ley Foundation, Glee Club SHAUGHNESSY, William T. Volant, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi lSecretaryJ, PITT CAPSULE, A.Ph.A. fPresident1 SHEININ, Allan Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts SHERIDAN, Daniel P. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration SHERIFF, Christophor A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts SHERLOCK, Nancy A. Windber, Pa. B.S. Nursing SHERMAN, Charles P. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Delta Sigma Rho, William Pitt Debating Union lPublicity Man- agerl, Society for Conservative Studies SHERMAN, Lawrence I. Carnegie, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi fVice-Presidentj, Druids, Delta Sigma Rho, Greek Week IB u s i n e s s Managerj, Homecoming Chairman, Chief Iustice of I.F.C. Iudicial Council, Pitt Debate, Men's Council, Stu- dent Government fSenatorj, Co- Chairman of I.F.C. Ball SHERMAN, Stephen I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Phi Epsilon Pi SHEROKE, Robert M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.C.E. fSecretaryj SHORTHOUSE, Iohn N. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Phi, Druids, Golf Team fCaptainj SHORTREED, William Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Engineer's Week Central Plan- ning Committee lChairmanJ, Omega Chi Epsilon fPresidentj, Sigma Tau tSecretaryj SHRUM, Karen L. Houston, Texas B.A. Liberal Arts Mentor, A.W.S, Transfer Com- mittee, United Campus Ministry lPitt Chairmanj SHUKER, William A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pi Tau Sigma, P.S.P.E., I.A.S. SHUMA, William I. Belle Vernon, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration SIBENIK, Lois H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts SIEFFERT, Raymond I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.C.E., A.R.B.A. SIEGEL, William Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Epsilon Pi, Hillel, Student Union Music Committee, I.F.C. SILBERMAN, Raisha E. Harrisburg, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Mortar Board, Cwens, Alpha Psi Omega, Pitt Players, PITT NEWS SIMPSON, Samuel A. Butler, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E., P.S.P.E., I.R.E. fVice- Chairmanj, Pitt Amateur Radio Club, WPGH, Engineers' Week fDepartment Co-Chairmanj SKRGIC, Peter 1. Ieannette, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines S.A.E. tProgram chairmanj SKY, Marcia B. Altoona, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Epsilon Phi, Dolphin Club, A.W.S. Transfer Commit- tee, Nurse's Dance Committee SLATER, Robert Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau, Phi Eta Sigma SLONE, Ieffrey A. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Student Film Committee, Stu- dent Library Committee SMALL, Byron L. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E. SMAY, Clare G. Vandergrift, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.l.E.E. SMITH, Donald E. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega SMITH, Margaret I. Bellefonte, Pa. B.S. Nursing SMITH, Mai-an 1. White Plains, N. Y. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi SMITH, Mary I. New Baltimore, Pa. B.S. Nursing SMITH, Peter I. Mt. Lebanon, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Soccer SNYDER, Elizabeth Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Delta Pi SNYDER, Robert W. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.I.E. SOFA, Louis T. West Mifflin, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration SOLLINGER, jerry M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pershing Rifles, Scabbard and Blade, Panther Club, Swimming Team fCo-Captainj SOLOMON, lack E. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts SOLOMON, Michael Munhall, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Delta Sigma Pi, Beta Gamma Sigma, Delta Mu Delta SOMMER, Iames Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines E. and M. Cabinet SORBO, Roger A. Trafford, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Phi Lambda Up- silon SOROCZAK, Nicholas Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts SOSTER, Abel 1. Snow Shoe, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega SPEHAR, Iohn A. Ambridge, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Delta Iota Delta SPENCE, Violet M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts SPERLINS, Rauls Pittsburgh. Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines SPIEGEL, Edward P. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega SPIEGEL, Ronald N. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts sP1NGYs, Ryte Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Quo V a d i s lVice-Presidentj, PITT NEWS, Lithuanian Room Committee SPITZER, David M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Zeta Beta Tau, POLARIS lBusi- ness Managerj, PITT NEWS SPOKANE, Melvin Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Business Administration Phi Epsilon Pi SPROAT, Alan D. Verona, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.l.Ch.E. STANA, Regis R. Greensburg, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau, Omega Chi Epsilon lTreasurerj, SKYSCRAPER EN- GINEER, President of Chemical Engineering Seminar, A.I.Ch.E., P.S.P.E., Emitt Award, Emitt Award Committee, Engineer De- bates STARMAN, Sidney Rochester, N. Y. D.D.S. Dentistry Alpha Omega STARRETT, Dennis G. Duquesne, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Kappa Theta, Arnold Air Society fCommanding Officerj STATLER, H. Kenneth Salisbury, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Pi Tau Sigma, P.S.P.E. STAUFF, Ioseph R. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry STEES, Mae S. Harrisburg, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Alpha Delta Pi, Art Show, Stu- dent Union Dance Committee STEFANIK, Ruth A. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Education STEINBERG, Arthur Il Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Alpha Omega, Dentones fDirec- torj, Dental Careers Team, DEN- TAL IOURNAL, Dental Student C o u n c i l , Clinician-Student A.D.A. Day, Periodontal Award STEINER, Charles M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi, S.A.M., Pitt Players STELLABOTTE, Charles I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines STERN, Shraga Ramat-Gan, Israel B.A. Liberal Arts I.R.C. STEUERNAGEL, Elmer M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts STEWART, Robert C. Brookville, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma STIGER, Kenneth R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Canterbury Club fTreasurerj, Pershing Rifles STILLEY, Lee L. Ellwood, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi STIMEL, John E. New Kensington, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts STITT, Robert K. Natrona Heights, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Sigma Chi fSocial Chairmanj, I.F.C. MESSENGER lEdit0ral Boardj STOCKBERGER, Iudith I. Greensburg, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Kappa Kappa Gamma, Student Union Film Series Committee fChairmanj, A.W.S. Social Com- mittee STOFFEL, Albert R. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.C.E., A.R.B.A., P.S.P.E. STORC, Gloria I. Youngstown, Ohio B.S. Pharmacy Zeta Tau Alpha, Rho Chi, Lambda Kappa Sigma STORCH, Priscilla K. New Castle, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts OWL, University Film Series STRASSER, Mona D. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education P.S.E.A., National Council of Teachers of English SUMMERFIELD, Donald K. Beaver, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts A.D.A. SUSKO, Charles I. Bethel Park, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines SUTTON, Kenneth D. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering SWITCHEN, Anna M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Theta Phi SWITZER, Susan L. Houston, Texas B.S. Nursing Kappa Kappa Gamma, Mortar Board, Cwens, Sigma Theta Tau, B.S.N.A., Student Government, A.W.S. Traditions Committee ICO-Chairmanj TABACK, Mitchell H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts TANZER, Judith L. Wilmington, Del. B.A. Liberal Arts TATALA, Ioseph R. McKees Rocks, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Jazz Club TATKO, Kathryn G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education Delta Zeta lTreasurerj, Quo Vadis fSecretaryj, OWL, A.W.S. Traditions Committee, Greek Week Committee, Senior Mentor TAVLARIDES, Lawrence Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau fVice-Presidentj, Omega Chi Epsilon fRecording Secretaryj, O mic r o n Delta Kappa, E. and M. Cabinet lPresi- dentj TAXIS, Iohn Lamsdowne, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy A.Ph.A. TEITELBAUM, Edward M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau THOKAS, Robert C. Murrysville, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines THOMAS, Iames H. Beaver, Pa. L.L.D. Law THOMAS, Mary P. Oakmont, Pa. B.S. Education Kappa Kappa Gamma, Cwens, A.W.S. lPresidentj, Public Re- lations Committee Chairman Traditions Committee, Dolphin Swimming Club, Mentor, New- man Club, Senior Assistant, University Theatre THOMAS, Sarah, I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi, Beta Gamma Sigma, S.A.M. THOMPSON, David E. New Wilmington, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi, Pitt Players THOMPSON, Dorothy A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts THOMPSON, Iohn M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Delta Iota Delta THROPP, Robert I. Finleyville, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry TIBBOTT, Rowland H. Ir. Ebensburg, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi TILTON, William R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Varsity Marching Band TOBIAS, Ioseph B. Homestead, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Tau, Engineering and Mines Cabinets TORBIN, Herbert I. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Gymnastic Teams fVarsity Man- agerj, Student Government, En- gineering and Mines Cabinet TORRIS, Iohn M. Latrobe, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi, A.Ph.A. TOSATTO, Iohn O. Freeport, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Newman Club, A.I.E.E., I.R.E. TOTH, Iames L. Lawrence, Pa. B.S. Education Sigma Chi TOWLE, George W. Ieannette, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts TRIPPE, John R. Erie, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry TROMBETTA, Christine Canonsburg, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts TRUMPETER, John N. Beaver, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts TRUSCELLO, Iohn V. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines P.S.P.E. TURLIK, Sandra M. West Mifflin, Pa. B.S. Education Delta Delta Delta, A.W.S., Com- mittee Member ULAKY, Bernadine M. McKeesp0rt, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Sigma Sigma Sigma, A.W.S. Publications Committee, New- man Club ULASSIN, George L. West Mifflin, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Delta Sigma Phi, Sigma Tau, Wrestling UNTI, Kathryn A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts VAN RIPER, Iames K. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration VAUGHAN, Paul G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Delta Iota Delta, Varsity March- ing Band VEHEC, Robert F. Duquesne, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts VENGLIK, Richard G. New Kensington, Pa. B.A. Engineering and Mines A.S.C.E., A.R.B.A., Soccer Team fCo-Captainj, Civil Engineers fTreasurerj VISNICH, Steve Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration VITORI, Robert A. Clairton, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Wrestling, Secretary of Dental School Class WACHTER, Roberta M. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts WAGNER, Charles R. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Baseball WALESKY, Ann B. Frackville, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Chi Omega, Cwens, A.W.S. Housing Board Chairman, Men- tor, Student Government, Par- ents' Weekend Committee, Sen- ior Assistant Stern-Weil WALLHAUSSER, Frederick R. Allison Park, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts WALLO, Iohn E. Braddock, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines WALSH, Mary F. Gibsonia, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Kappa Kappa Gamma Nice- Presidentl, Greek Week Dance Chairman, Homecoming Com- mittee lExecutive Secretaryj, Homecoming Queen Court, Par- ents' Weekend Committee WALTERS, Arthur L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Delta Sigma Phi WALTERS, Ion S. Uniontown, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Kappa Psi WAMPLER, Ioseph K. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry WARRICK, Louise H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, B.S.N.A., S.N.A.P. WARRICK, William W. III Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi WASCONICK, Robert D. New York, N. Y. B.S. Engineering and Mines WATKINS, Marianne McKees Rocks, Pa. B.S. Education Sigma Sigma Sigma WATSON, Donald E. Ardara, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts WATSON, Paul R. jr. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi, Swimming Team, Glee Club WATSON, Robert G. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts WATTERS, Patricia I. Barnesboro, Pa. B.S. Pharmacy Alpha Delta Pi lVice-Presidentj, Lambda Kappa Sigma lTreas- urerj, Secretary Pharmacy Class WATTMAN, Constance A. Easton, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Kappa Kappa Gamma WAYNE, Walter K. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.S. Business Administration WEAVER, Bonnie L. Chambersburg, Pa. B.S. Nursing Kappa Alpha Theta, Alpha Tau Delta, Student Government WEIERS, Ronald M. Mammoth, Pa. B.S Engineering and Mines Delta Tau Delta, Alpha Pi Mu, Sigma Tau, Track Team WEIL, Herbert A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Zeta Beta Tau, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Tennis Team Weinberger-Zwibel WEINBERGER, Benjamin Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Alpha Omega lPresidentj, Den- tal Iournal fBusiness Managerj WEINER, Iudith T. Uniontown, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Dolphin Club WEINGARTEN, Rachel Evanston, Ill. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Psi Omega, Pitt Players WEINSTEIN, Arthur I. Lawrence, L.I., N. Y. B.S Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Mu, Phi Eta Sigma WELCH, Robert L. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.Ch.E., P.S.P.E. WELSH, Ioy A. McKees Rocks, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, S.N.A.P., B.S.- N.A. WELSH, Regis A. Coraopolis, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry WEMPA, james I. Cheswick, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry WENTY, Margaret R. Somerset, Pa. B.S. Nursing WERTZ, Robert F. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration Theta Chi fTreasurerJ WHELAND, Ioy c. Glenshaw, Pa. B.S. Nursing B.S.N.A., Nurses Christian Fel- lowship WHITE, Lewis B. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Pi Theta WHITEFORD, Iohn K. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Sigma Chi, Druids, Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Eta Sigma, Track, Freshman Camp Staff, Big Brother Program WHITNEY, Linda B. Camp Hill, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Tau Delta, Sigma Theta Tau, Cwens, Mortar Board, Fencing Club, Women's Choral, WPGH, B.S.- N.A., Nurses' Christian Fellow- ship, Student Government, Pit- kin Club, Intervarsity Christian Fellowship WHITTAKER, Iohn H. Williamsport, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega WIAND, Nancy C. New Castle, Pa. B.S. Nursing Mortar Board fCorresponding Secretaryl, B.S.N.A., Pi Theta, Christian Fellowship fExecutive Cornmitteej, Westminister Foun- dation, Women's Choral WICKMAN, Susan Stanford, Conn. B.S. Nursing B.S.N.A., Freshmen Council WIEGEL, Robin R. Franklin, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta WIEHN, Tekla 1. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, Mortar Board lVice-Presidentj, B.S.N.A. lVice- Presidentj, A.W.S. T r a n s f e r Committee Chairman WILDOW, Mary A. Verona, Pa. B.S. Nursing Theta Phi Alpha fTreasurerj, Dolphin Club, Mentor, A.W.S. Public Relations Committee WILLIAMS, Fay E. Schellsburg, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts A.W.S., Phi Theta Kappa WILLIAMS, Iames I. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Psi Omega WILLIAMS, Lawrence F. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Lambda Sigma Rho, Phi Theta Kappa, PANTHER, Newman Club WILLIAMS, Thomas C. Dravosburg, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Kappa Kappa Psi, Varsity Marching Band WILSON, Carole A. Iohnstown, Pa. B.A. Education P.S.E.A., A.W.S., Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student Fellowship WILSON, Iames H. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines Amateur Radio Club, Ritle Team, I.R.E. WILSON, Paul E. Middletown, Ohio B.S. Engineering and Mines A.S.C.E., A.R.B.A., P.S.P.E., Fel- lowship of Christian Athletes, Wrestling WINEGARDNER, Barbara A. Schellsburg, Pa. B.S. Education P.S.E.A. WISHNEV, Robert M. Butler, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration WITT, Donald A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts American Institute of Physics, Amateur Radio Association WOLFORD, Wardella A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Mortar Board, Quax WOLL, David A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts S i g m a Chi lVice-Presidentj, Druids, E. and M. Cabinet, I.F.C. lPresidentj wooov, Mary 1. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Education P.S.E.A. WOODS, Mary S. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, United Chris- tian Ministry WOODS, Thomas B. North East, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts WOODWARD, Ronald L. Sewickley, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts WOOSTER, Rebecca A. Warren, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts WULFE, Rita E. Iohnstown, Pa. B.A. Education A.W.S.Newspaper Staff, P.S.E.A. WUSLICH, Samuel R. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Alpha Sigma Phi WYMAN, Frank E. Monroeville, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts YANKELEVITZ, Gerald A. Cumberland, Md. D.D.S. Dentistry YATES, Cecil H. New Kensington, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts YEAGER, Robert C. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Engineering and Mines A.I.E.E. YEE, Charlotte F. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts YELENIC, Iohn Blairsville, Pa. B.B.A. Business Administration YOKAITY, Edward G. Baden, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta, Dentones YOSPIN, Gerald H. Elizabeth, N. I. B.B.A. Business Administration Phi Epsilon Pi, Soccer YOUNG, Paul R. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Phi Gamma Delta, Swimming Team, Glee Club YOUNG, Robert W. Murrysville, Pa. B.S. Education ZAMBANO, Cordelia Greensburg, Pa. B.S. Nursing Kappa Kappa Gamma lPresi- dentj, Parents' Weekend Chair- man, Nursing Triple Trio, B.S.N.A. ZAMECNIK, Edward A. Binghamton, New York B.S. Engineering and Mines Delta Sigma Phi, Gymnastics ZBIKOWSKI, Maxine F. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. Liberal Arts Alpha Delta Pi ZDINAK, Iohn 1. Jr. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts ZELIK, Ioseph A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Liberal Arts Newman Club, American In- stitute of Physics lSecretary, Treasurerj ZELMANOVITZ, Doris A. Pittsburgh, Pa. B.S. Education P.S.E.A., A.W.S., Hillel ZIANCE, Robert E. Barnesboro, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Psi Omega, Dental School Class, Student Council iSecretaryJ ZIMMERMAN, Sandra L. Camp Hill, Pa. B.S. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta ZINDREN, Theodore P. Monaca, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry ZUCCO, Donato B. Iohnstown, Pa. B.S. Education Lambda Sigma Rho, Phi Theta Kappa, Newman Club, Psychol- ogy Club lPresidentJ ZWIBEL, Burton C. Pittsburgh, Pa. D.D.S. Dentistry Alpha Omega, Zeta Beta Tau, A.D.A. " 'PT' Q 1 , . , ,' ffw M L . .Y-, 3 i , ..f. V 4.- .fr " , . 1 ni .I .'.'i. ,E Sf Q V .1 -'V ' ' 4 ", XZ fi. . .ff if ri ,, 'lu r-Xl., a..,.P'x , 3: X 1. . Q ' u ff . , ,. -.F 'wi ,. ",.4-."-',,,r - 1, bf ax. -:ww 1 .r 1' 1 .-.. A. ,V in riff!-..- , , F , ., 'JQJ I . , .J A .ca , f ..,,, r ,vm ,I :ff x f L., AIDVEr - , ,-p '- 1 vt r -A ' ' . -' .S ' TISIIXIG NATIONAL AERONAUTI D SPACE ADMINISTRATION - lq Chas. M. Henry Printing Company 5 ., Pittsburgh Office: 212 Carlton House LES! M 'ew A Telephone - 261-1134 COMPLETE Graphic Arts SERVICE MAIN OFFICE AND PLANT: GREENSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA MAPLE AVENUE AT TUNNEL STREET 0 TELEPHONE: TEmple 4-7600 UNJICS ,, KJLJEUFR 'r 'xii' Sarimwb e' I 1'-- NPD H Il 8 'N M e 1 'V' e I ' if P1 1 as CONGRATULATIONS ' A ' ON HEADQUARTERS.. l75TH ANNIVERSARY .Q ua. U. s. nr. on. C O R PO RATI ON 401 WASHINGTON STREET NEW 2 N J L i I I The art of being a non-contormist or why many perceptive yearbook staffs prefer a very distinguished publishing house Retaining one's individuality is not easy in these days of mass production and stand- ardization. This is especially true of year- book publishing, in which mass production methods have the tendency to force one to buy just what the other fellow buys. Making of soap or soup or salad dress- ing by mass methods is one thing. But it is quite another to attempt to produce a creative yearbook by trying to squeeze it into some pre-conceived mold. It just can't be done that way. The Wm. J. Keller firm brings together highly trained craftsmen, the very finest papers and ink of superlative quality. Add to these a unique service plan built around the individual school, and, finally, produc- tion by the Velvatone process, which Keller perfected especially for the printing of yearbooks, and you have a truly distin- guished performance. Q a yearbook with singular character and individuality . . . we call it "THE LOOK OF THE BOOK." The yearbook you are presently leafing through is the product of the Keller custom program. If you would care to see other examples of "THE LOOK OF THE BOOK" as produced by Wm. J. Keller, get in touch with us now. WM. J. KELLER INC. Publishers of Finer Yearbooks Buffalo 15, N, Y. Donald J. Messinger RFD itl-Vermont Hill Road Holland, New York Phone: LF 7-2562 Area Code: 716 PENN CAMERA 8: PHOTO SUPPLY CO. Everything Photographic 643 Smithfield St. 261-0488 Pittsburgh 22, Pa. 261-0489 C ourfesy of AMERICAN LINEN SERVICE IIII Lincoln Avenue Pittsburgh 6, Penna. 361-4606 Q gg , . Z I n X t Q I tt . t tummy , 9 I N, ' II G W ' I f x lk K . . , I' fx' I ,IQ . I 5 I e r-,X 0 AA u e -1 ,mail e " givin:-s-il N:f+.fff:-1I- .J u Q ' Q ll - 4? 0 n Q N' lg-. M A Q t G 'll D A 1 D ,Z I 4 . 0 ' 1 il! ,lu s X 4 'f.i?-i- -sg CONGRATULATIONS - You graduated Hope you get a job! jay's bookstall llifbiflfl fifeillf 683-2644 rl' int! -5-M at wlst xx Follow the lead of the nearly 2,000,000 residents of Western Pennsylvania who have wisely chosen Blue Cross and Blue Shield protection against the cost of hos- pital and doctor bills. Yes, be wise and give yourself the best. And Blue Cross and Blue Shield are best because they are the only professionally- sponsored protection plans-the only plans ollicially approved by the hospitals and doctors themselves. HOSPITAL SERVICE ASSOCIATION 'MJ One Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh 22, Pe. End 'E Telephone: 3 Blue Crossw and Blue Shieldfv in Western Pennsylvania E592 Pl ' C73 91-0500 '1 T The DEQ News One of AmericalsfI72reat Szudent Newspapers CAMPUS EVENTS UNIVERSITY POLICY SPORTS NEWS HUMCDR WANT-ADS l M nf- ,S dl , 1 Pitt News SUBSCRIPTIONS available for University alumni ADVERTISING space available . Bi-weekly readership of l5,000 reaches the entire University community and alumni P' Contact the Pitt News business office for information Phone: 62l-3500 Ext. 3I8 T OAKLAN D'S CU LTU RAL CENTER boasts one of the world's leading- symphony orchestras- the PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with WILLIAM STEINBERG directing 77-wdaele OF "THE HOUSE CF METALS" AI inum Non-Corrosive Fat ' d Br A 9 Bm' Fam 9 d v I Copp Safety Eq p I Mfmel Seamless St I T b g Nuke' welded se IT b g "' ' Boiler T b M l Cl d Refrige tio d N If I C' ff Air-condino g I I CI d Supplies St I St I Welding Machines P y N k I Welding Wire F All y Welding Supplies WILLIAMS and COMPANY, Inc. General Oltice and Main Warehouse 901 P yl A . N. S., CEdar I-8600, Pittsburgh 33 P PITT CLASS RINGS OFFICIAL DESIGN 3" Xe I . ,li , v an , , I als W 'l jfn This design has been traditional for more than 45 years and is approved by University authorities and the Student Ring Committee. L. G. BALF OUR CO. Physician's Building 121 University Place Pittsburgh 15, Penna THE STATE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Doing business professionally in Pittsburgh since l898- BRYAN 81 BRYAN AGENCY 4343 Murray Avenue Pittsburgh 17, Pennsylvania Michael Waykin, College Plan Representative 421-9044 BI:-?.!v!E.'!!,!:.,. EY Pdldmyhi -7.4 .vom S. 6th 81 Bingham Streets Pittsburgh 3, Pa. Phone 481-4710 Greetings From FEDERAL-RICE DRUG CGMPAN Y Service Wholesale Distributors 947-949 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh 22, Pa. H EAT 'n PARK RESTAURANTS Enjoy the Big Boy Hamburger Host to over 10 million people in 1962." THE POLARIS 1963-64 WHERE TO GG WHEN TO GO AND WITH WHCDM TCD GCD BUY THE OWL-GET THE PGLARIS FREE THE S. K. SMITH COMPANY 4 p i ferzfzhg the TY TT and the TH WESTER 0 CHICAGO GUYS 46 1 1 4 ideas and Wgurcs- I Cfiffllfg fbLb A I 'sfiftfflf GIIIZI , Ill Dairy specialists The place to shop for quality dairy products 87 stores in the Greater Pittsburgh area. Everything in Flowers 621-1300 3719 Forbes St 682-1300 Pittsburgh 13, Pa Oglze ggdasliion Storeno Lmlttsourglfs Givlc Center HIlIE'S OF OAKLAND Varied Selections of ' DRESSES ' SPORTSWEAR ' COATS ' LINGERIE ' SUITS ' ACCESSORIES Be "Fashion Wise" at PRICE'S just right .eff'o"fs'iTil.iX'TL41ir-- 1 JMJWIMW if 3619 FORBES AVE. CCORNER FORBES and ATWOODJ 683-3391 KEYSTON E DAIRY Sewing the University with dairy products Finest in Quality Keystone Dairy 661-3020 KI .aCRI I H NCHNHI Q - -I . no -. .- -. - In 1. .u .- .0 u. 1-- 1.1 -. . ...Q-1-......... ...-4...--.......... Q.-..-............ . -..-..-.......... ... n..-....... -.,. ..... .........-. -. -Q.. .. ............. .......... ..........- -.-.. ..... .......-.Q .-........... ........ .............. .... .. ............... .- . ...-.........-... f.. .......-.......... f.. ............-. .... . .............. ...- Q . .........-...- -... -... ..........-..- .... ...-........-...... .-.- .....-.... ........ .... ..-..... .......... .... ..............-...- ... ................... .... ....-...........-.. -Q-Q -........--....... ...u ................-. ...- ..............-... .-. ..--.............. .- ...--.........-... . . ...............-.- .. .............-...Q .-. ...-.............. ...n .-.--na-u.-...... ...Q ................ ...- ............. ...- . .......-...- .non - Q . .......- ...Q .n ......... on.. ...n a.-...-...- .IQ ...-na..-ng.-.-.-Q -. ...--...--.....--n n .-..-.-........-..-- .....-......-....-Q.. -1 Q...--.-......-...Q ... .....-...--..--.... .-. -.--..........--..- -.. ..--.......-.--Q-.. .-. ff...-...Q--..--..- --. -.----............. ... .....-........-Q... nn- ...-.-.......-..... n.. ..-.--..--nf.-.---. ... ................-.- Q.. ..-..-..........-.- ... .........--.--.0-.- -.. ............-...... Q- Q ..............-.- .. ..---..---...-.--. . ...--............ .....- .........- .-.5 - ... -....--.- ... .- . ... ....-.. .. . . ..... ...- .. ...... ... .-...-.....- ... n... Q..-.......... ...... ..-...-.....-.- .... . .........-...... .- . .......-f..-Q-.... ... .,.-...f-.-........ .. ..............-... . I .. w,3 s, W , ,X -,eg-5.1, , N M ,.,.,,., ,W , ,, ,,.A,, VN, W, , , n -Viiaivlg PW ' ., .AWN , . wi"fZ15.'f SwyQ?g3E3Jf'pf N Ln Q ii nk.: ,. '1 1 ,MQ :IM f.gqg2A5z -mggw,- . 1 ,vm-my M wk., , , 4 2 s 3 5 2 i S i -1 ,Vg..,'g' fi f.n. ,..,w fi' Mix W f1ks"X It 1' f' .ggg,s,zff2sgggq5gi's,, ',,'!5, ,L H v :ja 1 1 1,w1g::!1 Wrzgrgrsw:He1g5Q.22.:1g ' 1,fr,,V '1.tf,,1-1. j:gk,59m3Lg,ly J,k3LQ11,,N H -f 'K'SQ5Qi,2vi,gUzLj5jy,,Q'lwQGifs!! 1. , , ' W ,,.. Q, aw' Q, we M ,, X.. I . 'H' .,:1:jIQ, "iQ:QZ1EQEQ ea .......................... ..... .. ........ ............. .. ....... . ........... ............. ......... ......... .......................... ........... ............ un... . .......... ............ ............ r....................... ....... . ........... ........... ............ .......... ..... ..... ......... . ............ .......... ............ .......... .... ... .......... . ............. .... ... ........... ................ .. .......... . . .............. ..... ... ........... H... ... ..... . ........... .-............ ... .... ........... ......... ..... .......... ,A ............. . .... .......-.. ...........n.... ...nn N...-..n N ,........ ....... H.. .... ...... ...nn--. ,........ ...... nn.. un.. UH.. ......... ,.............. ........ ........ U... --N..-.. ........ ..... ......... ......... .... H...-N. ....... U.. .- H..-.N ........... . ...mul , ........ ...... .-..-- -............ U. nu... ,... ... ......... .... ............--. U H.. ....... ............ H. ....-N..-....-.. .. ...4 ,.....- .........-H.. . ..u..........-.U H.-H. ...... .............-. .-..........-H... U-U. ,..... .. ................. U-.......... . -...- ..... ....... ..........-H.. .............. ...- ...- .... ......... .. ......-.H .......... ...nn H., ... ........... U... ...H H... ......... H .. ............. .... -. U..-...... . . .............. . ...nn ........-H. .............. .. ......... .... ..-.........- ............... . ......... ....-.H .-.......---. ............ . ......... .......... ............. . .......... . .............. ............. . ......-.... .. .. ......... . . .......... .. . . ........... ............. . . ......... ... . . .. .......... ............ .... . un.. .... . . ... ......... ............ ........ .. H... ... . . ... ........ . ......... ........... Hu... ... . ... ...... ....... .......... ............ ...... ... . ... ....... ...... ....-. ........... ..... ...... .. . .... .. ...... .......... .... ........ ... , ...U f 1 x w W , ' f x I -' " -.-E1:1:5E1:2:1:1:1''-:1:5:1:1:1:1:'":1:1:E:2: '.1:E32:2:7'i f -' D - 3:g::z3:g::::- '-:-:-:-:5:::::::g::g:5:- .:5:::g:g:,, R' " " .. "Y:3:3:3:3' :-:I:1:1:21211:Q:5:2:2:Ez5:3215:Q:2:2:1:2:2:2:3:215:::-' .g:g1:3:1:1:-. "ii:1:1:1:2:1:f:1:5:?:1:2:2:-. ., "1:2:Q:5:2:E: " "li -A " ,.::::E:5:1:::::::::g:::g:1:::::-1 ,gzgzgzg '-z3:1:g5:Q:1:2:2:2:1:2:2:i:2:E:5:E:2:2:2:Qzfzgcgizzcgz 1:::3:1:3:51:53:::3:::::::::3:::1:g:::::g:::-' '-11:51-3:51315::1:g:::g:g., ,glgigigi5ZgIgZgZ12:Ig1:1:l" '-25:55:15:13112giglgigtglgigiglgiglglgl5131115 -2-2-24-112grgig!1131g11tg111:1:2g2:1:1:1:1- .-:I11:2:2:1:1:2:1:1:2:1:1:1:2:1:5:1:1:1:-:-.g. ' 'fig-1-:g:g:-:1:g:g:g:g:- -15:1:IS:Zz1:?:?:1:S:1-"'.-.-12:2:1:2:1:1:1:5:1:2:!:1:1:-:U:i:-:-zg., '5212gig11111:1:2:1:Z:1:1:2:2:1:1:1:1:1:1:1:7: ,V W, 'N'1' ,,, x , ,, K v12fz,w1 sw " 1 A M Ffa wi. ,JE . 1.1, 1 there is a bright future in foods 287 . . . and this new Heinz Research Center stands as a promise of the growing world leader- ship of H. J. Heinz Company in the field of food processing. Located in Pittsburgh, on the north bank of the Allegheny, it is the hub of the Heinz inter- national operation. ln its ultramodern laboratories, test kitchens and pilot plant, new prod- ucts are born, new packaging ideas conceived, new methods of factory processing formu- lated. Here research in the field of nutrition is carried on-to be translated into more healthful, as well as more flavorful, foods for infants and adults. Here, with scientific exactness, the high standards of the 57 Varieties are rigidly guarded. With facilities of this most modern Research Center-and with its staff of talented, well- trained personnel-pointing the way toward an even more effective production of quality foods, Heinz looks with confidence to the future. H. J. Heinz Company wishes for each of you a bright future filled with challenge, fulfill- ment and iust reward. H. J. HEINZ COMPANY K 'ssl'Hss"f51Z:'-'Q,i.?f' H , Helnz Internatlonal Research Center Congrafulafions fo a Great lnsfifufion The Universify of Pittsburgh on Hs l75 Years of Progress. Rabbifs Our Specialfy No Order foo Large or foo Small. Our Sincere Thanks for All Past Business Down Thru the Years. W. T. Harbison-Phone-486-3 625 Lal: HEATING sf AIR CONDITIONING CCP. 4700 Lorigan Street Pittsburgh 24, Pa. 621-4432 CDay 6r Nightl 563-1626 We install and service all makes of heating and air-conditioning equipment. No job too large or too small Lewis A. Proie Owners Fred Proie TOPS IN PROTECTION 56,000 IN BENEFITS Yours for a few cents a day Enroll in the STUDENT ACCIDENT AND ILLNESS MAJOR MEDICAL PLAN The plan will pay expenses for all medical costs of accidents, illnesses according to Schedule of Bene- lits including: 1. Room and Board 5. Surgery and other 2. Laboratory Work Medical Care 3. X-Rays 6. Ambulance Service 4. Anesthesia 7. All Medicines, etc. Limit of benehts: S1000 coverage is allowed for accidents and sickness on a broad Schedule of benefits, PLUS S5000 under a Major Medical Plan for both accidents and illnesses. Consult your STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES for complete details of this year-round coverage. Higham, Neilson, Whitridge 81 Reid, Inc. 344 North Broad Street, Philadelphia 2, Pa. Atlanta Boston Chicago Los Angeles New York Leading the Nation in School and Camp Insurance msmcru soulrmmr for Physicians - Hospitals Medical Students - Nurses Feick Brothers Company Pitt.rburgb's Leading Surgical Supply House 811 Liberty Ave. 281-3525 Six Finishing Stands with Three Vertical Edgers on the MESTA 44" Four-High Hot Sfrip Mill ROLLING MILLS FOR FERROUS AND NON-FERROUS METALS ' CAST AND FORGED MILL ROLLS ' AUXILIARY MILL AND PROCESSING EQUIPMENT 0 HEAVY DUTY MACHINE TOOLS ' HYDRAULIC FORGING PRESSES IRON AND STEEL CASTINGS GEARS ' FORGINGS Designers and Builders of IWESTA MACHIN PITTSBURGH, EVVKNVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV D A it Y za ig A X it iii . hen you want 01 fine portrait. .. to record forever with charm and dignity the important events of your life-,come to the Photograph Studio of your Official Photographer. . . GIMBELS RAAAAANVVHNMMMANMAAMAAANVMANMAANMAANMAANVMNVMA ANVVU1-E i s t2 f f I dl ' Qs 22, P :film 'b r ze tee, 0 as CONGRATULATIONS Student Union Cafeteria Venetian Room Catering Services Hunt Room Tuck Shop Faculty Club Graduate School of Public Health Scaife Hall Snack Bar Men's Dorm Cafeteria and Snack Bar COMPLIMENTS OF JOSEPH GENSTEIN GRAPHIC ART SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 2001 Fifth Ave. Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GOT AN AD? call 621-6819 ADVERTISING I DEX American Linen Service L. G. Balfour Co. Beighley Hardware 8: Tool Co. Bryan 8: Bryan Agency Eat-N-Park Drive-Ins Federal-Rice Drug Co. Feick Brothers Co. Gidas Flowers, Inc. Gimbels Photo Reflex Studios Graphic Art Supplies and Equipment W. T. Harbison H. I. Heinz Higham, Neilson, Whitridge 8: Reed, Inc. C. H. Henry Printing Co. Hospital Service Association of Western Pennsylvania Ideas 8' Figures Industrial Electronics Corporation Isaly Dairy Co. Iay's Bookstall Wm. I. Keller, Inc. Keystone Dairy L 8: F Heating Sr Air-Conditioning Mesta Machine Co. NASA THE OWL Penn Camera 8: Photo Supply Co. The Pitt News' Pittsburgh Symphony The Polaris Price's of Oakland Saga Food Service, Inc. Scientific Glass Apparatus Co., Inc. The Skyscraper Engineer S. K. Smith Co. University Book Center Williams and Co., Inc. 277 281 281 281 281 281 288 285 290 291 288 287 288 274 277 284 274 285 277 276 285 288 289 272-3 291 277 278-9 280 282 285 291 291 286 283 275 281 General Index Academics Acknowledgments Administration Advertising Air ROTC Alpha Delta Pi Alpha Epsilon Delta Alpha Epsilon Phi Alpha Kappa Psi Alumni Activities Army ROTC Associated Women Students Athletics Beta Alpha Psi Beta Sigma Omicron Chi Omega Cwens Delta Delta Delta Delta Iota Delta Delta Sigma Phi Delta Sigma Phi Sweetheart Delta Zeta Dentistry Druids Education Engineering and Mines Cabinet Engineering and Mines Eta Kappa Nu 90 294 92 268 129 179 155 180 158 130 132 138 192 159 181 182 155 183 164 166 167 184 114 156 110 139 106 156 Governing Organizations Graduate School of Public and International Affairs Great Professors Greeks Heinz Chapel Choir Honoraries Institute of Aerospace Science Interfraternity Council Kappa Alpha Theta Kappa Kappa Gamma Lambda Kappa Sigma Law Liberal Arts Library Science Medicine Men's Dorm Council Men's Glee Club Mortar Board Mr. 81 Miss. Pitt Newman Club Nursing Omicron Delta Kappa Omicron Delta Kappa Man of the Year Organizations OWL Hall of Fame Pan Hellenic League Pershing Rifle 135 122 96 160 133 152 149 162 185 186 159 120 102 124 118 135 150 152 214 134 116 153 212 126 216 178 150 Pharmacy Phi Eta Sigma Phi Sigma Sigma Pi Kappa Alpha Pi Kappa Alpha Sweetheart Pi Lambda Phi Publications Quax Quo Vadis Senior Division Page Senior Index Seniors Sigma Alpha Epsilon Sigma Alpha Mu Sigma Chi Sigma Chi Sweetheart Sigma Delta Tau Sigma Sigma Sigma Sigma Tau Sigma Theta Tau Student Government Associates Student Union Board Theta Phi Alpha Thomas C. Vrana Photography Award William Pitt Debating Union Women's Choral Zeta Beta Tau Zeta Tau Alpha 112 157 187 168 169 170 140 154 151 210 254 222 171 176 172 173 188 189 157 158 136 147 190 88 148 151 174 191 .4-1 'I F It is an obsession. A drive to present in print an obvious self- centered personality. A book reflects the common interests of all the workers involved. But on the whole represents the in- dividual and his personality to himself. Nothing is more pleasing to a writer than to read himself in print. Nothing is more satisfying to a photographer than to see his photos cov- ering pages in a book. Or for him to compare and to compete for a visual impression with another photographer on the same page. He looks and judges: Criticism or a rare burst of humility, in the form of a compliment, follows. It is our World. We operated haphazardly, each trying to pre- sent more of ourselves. Yet each resisting their egos for a better product. The book becomes a chemical compound, the molecule not resembling the individual atoms but having a set of characteristics of its own. Or else it is defeated. It is full of hate. The conflicts of ideas, ideals, and idiosyn- crasies tear at the book. Much of it was strained through hate. It is not my book. I acknowledge this. j. b. f. The 1963 Owl of the University of Pittsburgh has been printed by the offset lithographic process at Wm. I. Keller Inc., Buffalo, New York, on 80 lb. Warren's Cameo Brilliant Dull. The body copy is set in 10 on 11 Melior and is photo expanded to 18 point with 6 point leading in the 88 page photo essay. The captions are set in 8 on 9 Melior. The heads are set in Fortune light ranging in size from 24 point in the organizations to 36 point for the essays. Photo expanded Fortune Bold is used on the in- troductory essays and pages for the sections. The divi- sion page heads are in 72 point Microgramma, while the page numbers are in 18 point Topic Medium, All photo- graphs in the book were taken by undergraduate stu- dents with the exception of the senior portraits, which are the work of Gimbel's Photo Reflex Studios, Pitts- burgh, Pa. The cover is a Zeppelin cloth by the Holliston Mills, blind stamped with the spine stamped in black. The cover is manufactured by the S. K. Smith Company, Chicago, Illinois.


Suggestions in the University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) collection:

University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

1955

University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

1962

University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

1964

University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Page 1

1966

University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Page 1

1970

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.