University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA)

 - Class of 1962

Page 1 of 336

 

University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 336 of the 1962 volume:

' 1 i MH- Y Y- A x- -AV - 744. The year is gone, but it remains to be recaptured in the flash of remembering. . . gray gothic stone . . . a familiar face. THE 1962 0 L I UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH PITTSBURGH 13, PENNSYLVANIA -M - wg", -- V- f' ' xr e Editor Eg in Gle . Manager I '41 TABLE OF CONTENTS The Year Vrana Photography Owlettes Organizations Fraternities Sororities H onoraries Activities Fraternity Sweethearts Athletics A Cadem ics A dministratiou Schools Seniors Hall of Fame Senior Il1C1'l'.X' Ac1vel'tiSi11g General I1m'c'.x' A Ck1I0W16'Cl1g1'I1C'11TS 6 80 82 88 92 110 124 134 104 158 202 204 208 242 244 284 298 324 326 This is Pitt .... its people, its places, its expressions wa,-W f-JHWL uk Z . gf-.Ea H, 2353 W W Q i ' GV. I asv V, x ' L I -S vi' n- ! n a 1 M .V 1 ' -4 . 4 ,W i 5., is r , A b 36 .VI ' -E n og A K wx ' 7- . grlriw fn Q' R 'J .. ,, N 1 -L K ,ff , PE , . . , , - 4 ,. Q o , il ya ,- m-'- ,.- .4, s , my -., 1 , 9. + gg, if nw"!" -.vw .H X Kal- 1 X- 1 -Cx' ,rj I f. ! O9 gg- A 3 .J ' I 1 uw' R " v - 4 I 4 . . ff vsxx 2' f A W1 I 6 1 U Niiiw N Q 1 mx km X 1 I ' A '5 is GY fr ff- 1 -u' 4 M U fm 3- if , , J, 9 15 :J X 1- '? X J ,, s . AK -J 1 'YN s 1 5 W 5' 3 'X 1 A V., i -XX X Q ' N . NX 'Q , . 5 ,A I -5 N. s W 1 S xii' .X ,fi Y, N, g, A . , gms , ,I sv-,,, X X. X, X an I , Q HI I i- 'iv' lvl wtf. if , 4 , ! 'O e. I f , l I i , ""itl.1-,V Inf.-f. ey! L f..-45 ,I-Q is oi -.x'x 1 , X". if .4.! With freshmen getting smarter and upperelassmen getting tireder, there was some question about who was being oriented. U pperelass women in trench coats and open-toe sneakers felt frumpy in the presence of freshman wardrobes and made promises to themselves to shape up just as soon as everything was organized for Kiski Day, the hrst Mentor meetings, and the Freshman Mixer. Upperelass men led herds of freshmen through the hills ofthe campus, taught them songs and Cheers, and shouted at them in meetings. In the dorms, senior assistants and Counsellors wondered if they had ever had energy enough to make that much noise. "I 've been standing in line for three hours and I'll be damned if I'll go back and start again!" Such was the story of Registration. The nightmare was upon us with its shroud of secrecy and its shouts of delirium. Women fainted and strong men cried. The skritch of long unused pens on narrow cards gave students an opportunity to practice agility in penmanship, which was needed to write around the perforations which peppered each card. For two days, students were no longer human beingsg they were a pattern of holes punched in a square of cardboard. A , XX f G11 The students were back before anyone actually realized they were gone and the ritual of moving-in began. Sorne brought their own on-campus transportation while others were to bi-ped it for another year. E3-L The first day of class brought the questions that required an entire semester to answer. Studying the face of the professor, questions haunted the student mind. Will he count cuts? Will there be a paper? Can we smoke? Looking over the rows of upturned faces, the professor wonders also. Why do they all sit in the back of the room? Why didn't Student Records tell me that there'd be 180 in this seminar? Are they just going to sit there looking blank for the entire semester? P ,iw , F A bubbling test tube, a simmering retort, and the smell of guinea pigs were burned into the senses ofthe researcher. In the daylight hours, he worked as a graduate assistant. He answered the questions that had long since become an integral part of his life, showed the students the simple tricks of procedure that kept them from maiming themselves, and consoled his class on the day after a hairy lecture examination. His nights were spent in the buildings on the HiIl,' he knew the laboratories of Alumni Hall better than the wrinkles on his sweethearfs forehead. And during the long days and nights, he wondered if it was possible to jinish his project before his grant ran out. 'mr---1 A :W qw 3' 12:54 ,. I .1 QU 'Wx Learning became an everyday task. Almost automatically, students aimed themselves for the classroom and the morning's first lecture. Once settled, the student created a challenge for himself. He decided not to look at his watch until the professor had cleared his throat twenty-Eve times. Still, time dragged and it remained twenty minutes past the hour for at least forty-five minutes. At last the chimes rang, notebooks snapped shut, and there was a rush for the Tuck Shop before the next chime and another droning lecture. The monotony of note-taking was regularly broken by exams. Crowds gathered early around the door to the classroom. Discussion centered around what the questions might possibly be and how much each student didn't get a chance to read. In this time of crisis, students who sat whole aisles apart were driven to speak to each other. The concensus of opinion was that no one knew anything and that the professor was impossible. The long day of classes finished, students bent over books in the library, silent except for the librarian's explosive Shhhhhhhhhh. , ,. . fl," r T 5 'Q :f f 'sv ' ,,.,,,, 'I vivlaik- C f"' v-- 1, ..,, V7 L4 .G .5 .5 xi 'A 34" Q ili- ..,,....-.-n- A---'lib . ,.,,, , -. .,.........-.-- A dark-skinned woman seemed to float across Fifth Avenue as her orange sari billowed in the wind. A quiet, dark man sat in the Tuck Shop, glancing over documents from the business research department, while a perpetually smiling Chinese boy crossed Forbes on the way to his chemistry lab. The freshman English major from Lower Turkey Foot quickly became friendly with the Laotian boy who sat next to him in lecture, and undergraduates soon became accustomed to having their laboratory sections supervised by an Egyptian girl or a young South African. They are an accepted part of University life, and when local students pass them on the street, there is no glare of resentment-only a look of recognition. 5 ! 1 if 4 AQ' A Q . - :fi ARM A y , , gc"'-in-'-"N ,,....-n-- Washing machines and driers which worked only when there wasn't a quarter to be found and elevators which always broke down in pairs filled life with interest and exercise for the resident student. They ran to Yohe's for all the things that would have been in the medicine chest or kitchen cupboard at home. But the discomforts of living in a dormitory were made worthwhile by shared care-packages of kolbassi, bull sessions and shared problems, a friend from India, and being able to borrow clothes for every occasion. eq.,-L A, ? A. alg-adam vb F I ,X . r We An alarm clock rang and the commuter's day had begun. As he took his books from the desk, the problems of traveling several miles to the University occupied his mind. "Wonder if the battery's still got enough juice to start the car?" "I suppose that stinkin' bus will be late again today." "Will I make my eight o'clock?" These were the pitfalls that everyone who didn't live on campus had to face. Traveling was bad enough under clear skies, but became horrendous when the snow fell. There were no parking places whatsoever, trolleys were hours late, and the commuter arrived at his class only to discover that it had been cancelled because not enough dorm students had shown up to make teaching worthwhile. 1 -4-,1 f --,I, 1 l W Gregarious by nature, the Greek never travels alone. He eats with his friends, sleeps in the House, and drinks with them at the Luna. He seldom studies without company, instead of going to the library or the Commons Room, he saves his assignments for the evening, when he can have a study session with either his brothers or a co-ed. His daytime hours, except forthe classes that he occasionally attends, are spent in the Tuck Shop. This symbol of Greek unity becomes, during the noon hour, a crowded sweatbox full of shouting, loudly laughing men and giggling co-eds. But the Tuck Shop is not only a place to congregate with one's friendsg it is a place to decide important questions and discuss serious problems. "Who are you bringing to the Formal?" "How was your trip to Europe?" "Can you make the party Saturday night? Itls B. Y.O." "Well, after we left the Tender Trap we went to the Pink Cloud. . Shu cfs of fear ran through the Grccks on the 191 st das of 1 ash scason Thev knew that forthe next tc n das s thex would hat e to keep the best s1a'c of than 01861171 atzon turned towald the rushees. And they were not mistaken. Rush was tan dax s of lunches at the House ten nlghts of stavzn, up until three IH the mornzng phonlng rnshcc s and makzng par ty arrangements and tc n days and nzghts when ever v conselons moment was spent smiling, smiling, smiling. The rushccs welcomed the V I P treatment Some were 1172171 essed and pzeked up thezr bzds whzlc other s deczded to remazn lll the dorms ',,.w .. 1 .,, ., , . V ,, . . . . Y , ' 1 1 v, I rv '11 , y,, 1 , , , V' , ,'. .I '., . 1 A Q. 1 v' I -f .K , , U . . .' K y . , ,,v ' . . . . f , I vv ,' ,- . ' 1 . ,,,, 1v1'1' ' ' ' , , , , , 7 1 ,1-' - f , , , , , . w 1 os, I, Q., O9 W1 1. "LETS GO PITT, LET'S G0 PITT!" These sounds reverberated every Friday evening before a football game, as the cheerleaders, the Varsity Marching Band, a handful of disinterested dorm students and tons of bathroom tissue filled the Quadrangle and attempted to spur our team to victory. Most were content to remain in their rooms and observe the spectacle from above. Along with weekly lessons on tumbling and stumbling by the Pitt Panther, these rallies were highlighted by a huge bonjire in nearby Bubbles Field and by a surprise appearance and pep talk by the Chancellor. In the fall, student conversation centered around football. Our chances of winning under the circumstances, what mixes well with coke, and Johnny Michelosen were the primary points of interest. At the games, the student section took an active interest in the band, the coke vendor, the Sammies' latest trick, happenings in the Chance!lor's booth, and sometimes they even watched the game. .qv -4,- Q. 1.-- It was November and it was cold. Dipping newspaper strips into basins of lumpy paste and then smoothing the strips on the chicken-wire figures in front of the fraternity houses kept Greeks out of bed and classes days before the house-front judging. Recent alums begged students to get tickets or ID's for them the day before the game. Queen candidates prayed that the wind would stop blowing for just a few minutes as their sorority sisters sprayed one last can of spray net on their lovely coiffures. Alums and students shivered in wool coats and muttered about planners who set Homecoming for November. But all discom forts were forgotten in the wild cheering for the Homecoming victory. ,.., Q.-M... A ,. . ,M-.--n i f . ,,..4 .,.f..-- ,4,. - 1 five It -J-sw"1 NW D 1433? 8 Q. Jia If y wr- ' Y f if' ""l'. i L--,-,.,.... 'fig K "I viz -A-X5 . The two-party system on the campus broke into three parts this year. Always there had been two kinds: dancing parties and talking parties. This year a third type came into being. The twist took over. Couples no longer talked. They couldn't make themselves heard above Chubby Checker. Togetherness on the dance floor was "out" as couples swung their arms like windmills in front of them to be sure a maximum of space was kept Constantly between them. 1. I EEF' ' :rn 1 Q. lrdmhy- v . .1 Wa vp- ,- 4. 5 no-nz., .MA-Q. is QSQYE gli kwa. 61 .J Wfigfli, T 'W 1 scar-- 1-ivllovw Ii Y 'wu- 'suing There did come a time when classes were over for the day. To relieve the strain and monotony of daily studying, the bleary-eyed undergraduate turned to recreation. The process of soothing the edges roughened by strain and rebuilding the shattered nervous system took many forms. The more cultural-minded bought tickets to the Pittsburgh Symphony or the Playhouse, the athletes picked up a softball game at the Oval, and the socially-oriented students hoped that their troubles could not swim. But not all the time outside of class was spent in recreation, for a chance had to be found to renew and strengthen friendships, and to ask the question, "What does it all mean? Where do I fit?" Often, hfteen minutes spent over a cup of coffee with an instructor helped a student renew his faith in himself far more than any softball game. And an hour spent alone in a quiet corner, contemplating and sifting personal values and dreams, was sometimes a greater aid in forming a decision that would affect the position and career of the future than an evening spent in the local pub. Even the simple act of meeting friends between classes or for lunch served to freshen life by adding a new opinion, a new bit of knowledge, a new perspective. - - .adn - . wtilfwift ' ff an 8 I . - 'i . ' 3 Q' !.- nj 82,5 - gg 2 5"'f'4'+13hgs,'f' .11 A: l , ,: v E R N 1 Q X pail ff af' - '-1' ' - -Y .. f '. 'M uf g . x -g.,,.l LT PARKQSG 'EFF M. UNH iw Pnllnlgnrgl l'n-up GIA! mm ns rin Liu Mlllll Ibn. hh lady A-Eff' ,1,.f"'-I' ,ff The Pirate fans arrived in Oakland again, taking peace and parking places away from the irritated student. He was unable to walk from class to class without tramping on the toes of baseball fans carrying cushions, coolers, and cans of beer. He also had to keep a wary eye on the policeman gazing at his car in the N0 Parking zone. 1 .A l 1 F 'Q -ff' I Q T tg t c ' usurp i lls d r 7 ' lk ' . l A X' ,fr rg?" el f Fu, -fiflg 7 f A fel l 5 ' 'F -4 i ,e -- yn... . Y Ii 2 Silently the day slips away as lights gleam on down the avenue and lonely men desert their solitary seats in the park. The shelter of night hides these men as they seek the companionship of other lonely ones in the corner bar and plight their problems. Hands intertwined, couples stroll to the theater and sit for a few hours in forgetful trances. Later they may share a pizza, but above all, they have something to shareg they have each otherg the lonelies have nothing save a sandwich and an empty glass. I .-'L "s 'M , , . J Q7 X t 5. il x Q 5-4.",'R' ' A in Fw? fi' '. , QL I - 5 .214 ,r ., '. ' 5' V -il -.. int, 'I W ' I xp- ' In L' ,- '.- K x - 1,41 : '-- - 1 . Q ,MK , 5 1 I .'-I' .14 it x " 4 71 . ' 1 y "' I. Q vs "" ' ' A. ,V ,K 2 'I W L fqv ' -' 1, 'Lx 4.5, v -'V ' ' ' ' .:,7'1.'Ag. -4 -'5Q"'Afixn- 1 . 1 ..'. . R, Q ' 1 ,. A 1 4 - ' . v u4..' : -t, K-TNG gjw ' . N .rv In J . .Q " , - ,Q ve. ,f' 5, x , I vq, 1 . 9 Q . sivu O ' .'l 1. .I .qw ' ' r' .. ,Q Z 'Q X .M if 9,13 " 'Ss-r" """x+Q.l"""" il-Ji BURLIQRS The Oakland eating places were as diversihed as the students themselves. Across Forbes A venue, a Swank restaurant charged four dollars plus tip for a meager, but well-cooked lunch. A few blocks away, a price war made it possible to buy a hamburger for twelve cents. The Tuck Shop was the place to pull a sandwich out of a brown bag or buy an underdone hot dot in the turtle's-pace Speed Line, andthe cafeteria offered appealing menus, soothing music, and quantity, not quality. For the students with smaller appetites, liquid lunch provided all necessary nourishment. It was Metrecal bought at the grocery or Miller's High Life bought in Frankie's. 6 It was an unusually mild winter, but the high-spirited students managed to take advantage of every snowflake. They pelted each other, passers-by, co-eds, and an occasional policeman. They smiled when a girl lifted her skirt to step over a drift, and laughed out loud when an instructor made a one- point landing on the icy sidewalk. A few forlorn snowmen were rolled together on the lawns, but they soon melted into sooty lumps under the warm sun that quickly followed the snow. Then came the slush. It formed deep pools at the corner of Fifth and Bigelow, spattered clothes, and dripped from damp shoes onto classroom floors. -91.- .I ,, ,, v ' ' 37'1u::?T wr Lv'--"W .3p.:v-,,..v 'S W I, Q -W.. . Q . - 1 A 7? i 1 4-iii' p IRR 'N ,..nt.:::Y ,N ,.,gk,. , ,L 9 'Y'-4,'yJn Sw, . 5. Dc: ww! ' WN M.-, . my X4 1 --, . -4 ll- 'Aw - Reclining in the hard wooden seats of the Field House, watching a close basketball game or two straining wrestlers students found a way to shake the occupational disease of the college student-middle-of-the-week jitters. The climb up the Hill in the chill evening air provided a pleasant break for those who could spare the time. At the Field House, there was companionship and a friendly atmosphere whether the team won or lost. And afterward, there was the second- guessing or the walk down the Hill with the girl from Brackenridge. I I i i 5 N 2 i x N up . . L ., is ,xxx . .5 P -., .' - K ' L Km .. g' if Y V , ' '94- Q , Y X a Y X X I ff 1 Q ' n . Q 1 , cl The continuous flow of students from the Cathedral to the Student Union on Wednesdays at noon stopped all trafic on Bigelow Boulevard. Most of the students were hurrying to the ballroom to spend their luneh hour listening to a lecture. Vereours's "The A esthetics of Revolt" and The Fine Arts Quartet appealed to some. Scriven's "There is No God" and Ogden Nash appealed to many. In the evenings speakers lost their appeal and musie won the masses. Mournful folksongs about lemon trees and Chain gangs brought students Close to the earth. The lobby ofthe Student Union was a convenient spot ta lounge and listen to the music floating in on the loudspeakers But the Union was like a duck: calm and unruffled on the surface, but paddling like the devil underneath. There were reservations made for riverboat cruises and room schedules drawn up for the innumerable organizations that use the Student Union as a meeting place. For many people, the Union was homey they lived on its upper floors, ate in its cafeteria, and socialized in the Hunt Room. 4,8 I l A 1 I Q -11 3 5, ll I 1 k,'3w'.gf Nl f -sx . 5 pf 'is Anything that looked like fun and was like work qualifed as an activity. Those people on the stage seemed to be having such fun Debaters made glamorous trips. The whole stadium cheered when the band marched in their immaculate uniforms. Only those who were in a Player's production remembered the 2 a.m. technicals, memoriging scripts, and the discouragement of a bad characterization. Hours of detailed research and 5 a.m. departures made Debate trips something less than glamorous. Mud was splattered over the .smart band uniforms on rainy days. Being in activities was worth it, of course, not for the glamour, but for the close friendships that were the result of working together. ?.., d. X 3, -.I I ki The slogan of the year on the publications floor was, "Let's play Scrabble with the floor directory." No one ever confessed to the crime, but somehow a letter was always missing from "Rothman," Aside from this single joint activity, the diferent publications kept their separate characters. The Pitt News formed a Glee Club, the Skyscraper "slipped its stick," and the Owl never slept. -xlv XX M-an Q' - I a . ,L yu f i 3? 12:34 3 ' f wr? x :ug , ' .ea 1 1 2: 2 1 f kj. Wx, N NR ww: W' .Q 4 Li 3523 0 'JE ' ,:. f, xl i 'Q I f . ,, ,.,..,.,I- -- K .5 ,. -4-s,. ,,.. P ""f'w-K .4452 a W Ps it 6 M653 'iw ,H Q 2, ' , , gm fp, xv,-A ' ff J A ,A J , , W, f, ' t u r e I 1 ,V X 4, I! ,, T r 1 s w 1 I KM, i N., . 3 e L 1+ 3 ? xg,.,, ' 1, ' . ' if 3 'fs ...L ,Qu in ff 5 5.2 1 'Q 4 54:1 P 1 Q . ff 'fi I V 5 - , ,A ., A E, 'G .1 ' J, ,, if ,V 1 E315 1 , 'fi 2 k . J" fi 5 -'gp gf, 1 .:' : ,. ,. ,F M A IV Y ,Q , iii 9 , ff --if . X , mf: 'E r efsggf 1, ' an i 1 iiws . X 'X-S xxx t 4 ,....4"' Q N Q., . -M A , 1 , Wm . M ,, I 1, J... , Af rv J-gli :xl Fw , ,,,. M. F. i 3 . li fe L Q' . , li A-3,1 'fl At Tap Day, Nate Firestone spoke about pin-polishing and the role of the student leader on the campus. The honored ones and a few hopefuls nodded their heads and clapped in agreement. For some, the challenge of being an intellectual, responsible leader came too late. For others, a long summer would wash from the memory the words that fired their minds that March evening. Perhaps a few heard the call, remembered it, and when September rolls around, some real intellectual leaders may step forward, ready to take on the responsibility that awaits them. More likely, there will come another Tap Day and perhaps another student speaker who will see and express the problem, and another group of pin-polishers who will hear and forget. W' 'Q- uik AMO!! ,fp-lo-up DIFEMF6' ll-5-fl! CUJPIINFNIIS OA' 1163 Nehru nn-ff :prof 6'0040POA' 1,2 72-iin. ' ' "Wifi St. Paddy's Day drew near, and the engineers dusted off their green derbies. On the first day of Engineer's Week, the man in the green suit arrived on an air car that whooshed down Bigelow Boulevard like an oversized vacuum cleaner. Patrick, the patron saint of the engineers, was there and the ancient rites got underway. There was the gimmick-an art contest. There were the displays-missiles, rockets, missiles. The displays contained the annual bugs-some exploded and some refused to respond to the demonstrator's controls. The week flew by as classes were cut and assignments neglected, culminating in the Shamrock Ball. ... l' f ,P Qi , 4 ,fin il i 4 l I M 2 4 11? em 5' ew? gfli' "W" K F " 'v p' 'cf rv. . M gli? aj? if "'. ,Mfg ' u A 1 . ' , Q ' M' ., 4 . g Z Q ' 5 , K ,i x"Ni' 'A I fi 1' ,Q . " ,f ? , ,Wa 1 , vm. . . 1 5 I if Q 'Rl 'Q :'. :Qs P, n Q y ,R 4 6 swat N For some, Convocation reawakened awareness of the past, pride in the University and its faculty, and presented an opportunity to hear Dr. Litchfield and see Gladys Schmidt get an honorary degree. The long line of black-robed men and women with their colorful hoods was a tradition which somehow was always newly exciting for those students who took time to watch. Many could not take the time for this procession of tradition. For thenz, Convocation was a morning without classes. I v ,n ,.,, .', --gf, 52.5. , i,, . 'Q --vf 1' 35155 V ' ,, , 1 I Gguhih' 'Q ,, fr ,, - , .O 'p' .api 1' f 1 0 Eb., mth 1 -. v " - 'Q 5 Cn,' . Aff? ,SA 4 ' N, 1 . "' af - G' - . ' , A 4' A--" 5 ' 1' , W' ' A-I ' -Q . , vq ' nf f' A A5 wp P 'v N 3" rf A 3? ' I A ff, 'K ' .rf 5 The Cathedral was the center of University activity. During the day, it was the place to meet friends, to pick up a book from the library, and a place for little boys to lose themselves in imagination. At night, it was a mecca for students seeking more stimulating experiences. Two days every week, the lawn was turned into a parade ground for a display of military power. Each Wednesday was Air Force day, and the grounds were studded with blue formations chanting their cadences. The following days, the Army arrived in Thursday green. The only spectators to the weekly drills were a few ROTC students who had forgotten their uniforms and those who enjoyed sitting outside. The drills themselves were a never-ending show of polished brass, sparkling shoes, and occasional out-of- step marchers. I' Y' A cigarette gripped nervously in a shaking hand, a hastily gulped cup of coHee, and an empty box of No-Doz symbolized finals week. There was the ever-present gasp of panic whenever an instructor scribbled on a blackboard, 'Five minutes to go." As exam hours ended, the halls were jammedg a few of the students flipped through textbooks to check their answers, but most wore a blank, stunned face. il xx if an 1 War' , 1- ' A 'f. -mx ' ' ' ' r v- +12 W an , , g 4, -,. . - A v. .,L.Jff1: 'zkff ' 3. Eg 7 5" , - Q , . 'YTMMW '- f.'i'Fff,'w45'i:"'- . ' '1"i"'-"t' I , --. , " " ,v - X ' 'W - , -wzwgii, , X X 'fdzlvfu-vhzvkil ' . 'Y' TW: .l'lai5Ii'.1:'2?f3'.n.fY 431.1 -, -- , N- 4. 'W-.x -' R Finals were over and it was time to leave. The Quadrangle was jammed with cars, a Hfteen hundred dormitory residents all tried to leave at the same time. A place had to be found in the trunk for a giant teddy bear, the bicycle had to be lashed to the roof top where it would scratch the paint, and books were fitted in where- ever there was a cubic inch to spare, as students took home double the amount they had brought with them. HY! ,-.0 X -N. Finally it was over. Instructors compiled final grades and students packed away their textbooks. The mental weariness was washed away by a week-ena' of sleep, as those with a season of relaxation before them thought of the coming parties and days at the beach. At the same time, one- fourth of the students thought, "Why did I register for the summer trimester?" .., C E 53-'4 ' t A 1 7 tw C1 .7 'fi ' , 5 , may 4 4117! X1 ff"E'i Ji .SQ -'ii' X 'L gffiiffflifil Y A N' Q if 14. ' We tr Q ' Q.. -cw 4- K1 NF: -:hw Z t . 5' 2 ,.-'Q' , . ,, Y if 1 ' 1' wiwsyit 5515154 35135 Quay 4- jr Q, L,i.,,, -, f ' 32,3 ' U- A A 3 0 if my 't A, f 4: W p 'JM 't w f -f . J Qi w.. 1 I ,gy , of M xkk A, A U 1 . is ' - ' f" if .u M, f1,,e'a': ' 4 ,Rl w Wa 13 'T e .f.-:Milf f' '. 1' The sun grew hot and the air became humid early in the third-trimester. The asphalt on Bigelow turned soft underfoot, and the sight of students sunbathing as they studied became commonplace. The general atmosphere metamorphosed into a more casual classroom relationship, but not so casual that it was possible to turn in a paper a week late because of a picnic. 'in I S an For the graduating senior the end had come. The bright, triangular bunting and the folding chairs on the lawn were there for him. Those proud faces and eager photographers were his relatives and friends. Somehow, it didn't seem possible that he had done it-he had graduated. Nor did he quite believe that life on the campus would be the same without him and his classmates. But this chapter of his life had ended and the time had Come to go on. lig w--s-.....5, :X ibiiyf 'Sisa- f i W H . l 2 FNQ'-1 as 'Y V ' vw ' 55:4 3- ' 'A'-m"f .v x Y 71 J ' ' .. 'lm " Q, A - -' ' 4 QQ ' .. K in k'jv2f:7 -M --1:1 E n 7 f- 43:2 ,V ' iv f , 1 5 Y 3 , i L.. . 1 Q4 . ......-- A F' - uns-....-. ..,., -- 1 K 1 w Ur 5-4 f-it .L .. -7k 'K Ml 5 ' I I 'F V fx 4:- , l vrhx gg 5-, i. x.,4., sf, .wifi J. Qf -ry' . 1 Q., . o ',-Q15 X v 1 if 4 1 W -4: W 4 9' ga! Q A 0 ---f--P -uw f'-f' -- - , ....,-..,u-we """' vrana photography award Amid the masses of exposed film, proof sheets, and nega- tive envelopes on the clut- tered desks in' the fourth floor publication offices, a proof or negative sheet occa- sionally turns up circled in red and marked "Print." Some of these photographs are entered in the Thomas C. Vrana Memorial Photogra- phy Award contest. All the entries are outstanding ex- amples of the combination of craftsmanship and art that is necessary to. produce an excellent photograph. But the judges must pick the best of the best, and the photog- raphy you see on these pages was chosen as the work most worthy of the Vrana Award won this year by William H. Schneider III. -. Aw v arinwffrqgyf 1 A , 4' .. .. - .J A A-r,, 5 A-1 J.. . . J 1 miss owlette jeanne abele The lot of the male members of the OWL staff would be a sad one indeed if it were not for the Owlettes. When a staff-member comes straggling into the office, his mind heavy with academic problems, he receives a welcome lift at the sight of a pretty face bent over a typewriter or busily counting OWL sales slips. During the long evenings, the Owl- ettes provide pleasant conversation as they type out copy and listen to the Brothers Four or Rachmaninoff on the hi-li. Whether selling ads, preparing a patron list, running down to the Hunt Room for ten cherry cokes and a Lemon Blennd, or cleaning off Billas desk for Publica- tion's Day, the Owlettes make the job of putting out a yearbook as painless as possible. An Owlettc is the girl who con- tributes Johnny Mathis records to the office collection, who laughs at Glenn's joke no matter how often she's heard it, who sympathizes with Jerry's academic struggles and who admires all of Stan's photos. The Owlettes are helpmates, part of the staff yet something more, something special. r 7 X . I A A-fs f v , I X ' , . 2 . , Y . 6, -,1'-A V I u 1 'J .lr Lf , X . ,Av ' " N. x ' . E, ie, ., , . 1 'fri Z , ' 4 'ht 2 14- , f --+ Mff'1r, fa ' ',. ' V J A H 'Q A I in 1 , I uv :L A .11 5 as "' 4 ,I V' f I l 4 . f 'K V112 ' .. ku ' f' 2 K Y ' 1 . - J' 122 'Q 'fl-if I , 4 ,a KN ' I nf, . "1 1 "f J' l"fZf?, ,f .4 , ,V lg, fa: . .L - 2 'L ' k Y, f, w fgf ,Q Ii Q 5 , J, A ' 1 R L , .1 N xv 'lg' 'yy E f ' .L ' if yi swat f ,lg 3,4 Q ,, Z LN, if 5, ' as Q' 17 ra I f 1 I 1 ggi' 5A vw ,AIX , V 1 Q.. fy 'f 5 . K V92-v 1 V 1 Z , VL- -xt. IR QA, 441 L ,rkr , sf' if P' M7 xr ' 4' W , 1 ,, fm,xt - 1.1 A f J Qxe 4. , , I A. , ,zffMff4 fl 3 ' ', Q ' , ' ' -Y L , f 1 U K t 4vA -, 4 My ' Q-.3 44, Ywf-. lynne hand owlettes barbara iohnston FA X. f J f-fs Iaviniu wafers , ,ff ' if ' 87 .3 Y GRGANIZATICDNS organizations Any organization has something to offer the mem- ber. For the Greek, there is a sense of sharing and brotherhood, and for the professional there is a constant learning and renewing of that which was known but lost. In belonging to an organiza- tion one accepts the responsibilities and the duties of that grouping. There is work to be done before any of the pleasures can be indulged in. Even after the fun there exists the unpleasant task of cleaning up. But this can be made enjoyable due to the companionship that exists between mem- bers. There is a sense of pride that comes from know- ing that it was your group that scheduled the best speaker for the year and an equal sense of pride in winning the trophy or prize in a rough compe- tition. Each man and woman in the group is a part of this pride and shares in it, for a good organization comes from each member doing and sharing in more than the pride. It comes from each member sharing in the work to earn the prize. This may involve friction and sweat, but Organizations teach the student to cope with the friction and to learn that there is no shame in honest sweat. Arguments late at night over coffee and decisions made on the spur of the moment are all a part of the smooth functioning of an organ- ization. They are a part of the long range plan- ning that must be the base of any organizational activity. To accept the responsibility and work of a group and to know that you have given your best may be the best rewards of the organizational set-up on the Pitt campus. I 1 A 5 HI' Wm , greeks N. X-x 7 .uv- 4. The Pitt Greek is a man under pressure. Each fall, on his return to school, he is urged by the of- ficers of his chapter and the alumni of his frater- nity to rush, rush, rush. It means nights of tele- phoning rushees, smiling, inviting them to the house for lunch and a tour, smiling, arranging dates, smiling, and making sure that they enjoy themselves at the weekend parties. When the rush season is finally over, all the fraternity man can do is sink into a chair and wearily await the pledge lists, published by the Deants oflice, that will mean life or death for his chapter. The Greek at Pitt shares a camaraderie known to few other students. He belongs, he is a member of a group. He has a place to go in the Tuck Shop and a group to study with in the library. Forming friendships that will last a lifetime, he realizes that there is something more to being a Greek than just wearing a pin and repeating an oath at meet- ings. His organization will not be just a campus inter- lude, but will come to pervade all aspects of his life. Years after his graduation, when someone asks about his college life, he will not answer, "I was a. . ." but UI am a.. ." t 't't fraternities FIRST ROW: R. Green, A. John- ston, B. Jinks, R. Lovelace. SEC- OND ROW: W. Pierce, W Hitchcock, L. Golden, L. Robin- son, G. Harley, J. Fountain. THIRD ROW: S. Daniels, G. Hutchinson, H. Parker. ALPHA PHI ALPHA t'We Meet Again Tonightw to polish our trophies was the Alpha's theme song this year. At Greek Week they kept asking, "Are we the only fraternity on this campus or what?,' as they kept hauling in those big trophies. At the end of Greek Week, the scholarship trophy, the improvement trophy, and the sing cup were in the Alphas, hands. Then, the Alphas developed a passion for the twist. They werentt satisfied when Big Daddy won the Greek Twist Contest. Everybody did the twist and the slop at the parties at the Hall, lubricated by 190 proof punch. The parties were wildly novel, especially that swinger at the funeral parlor. The Alphas and Jinxy Baby . . . letters from Ohio . . . the Babies making the run down Route 19 . . . George and Lovelle discussing the merits of student teaching at Schenley and Westinghouse . . . Hitchcock still high at the Pitt Preview . . . those shades cover road map eyes . . . one pledge taking on the whole fraternity at the Field House . . . budget problems . . . Clavin and Bill and the trip to Na- tional at Louisville on 15 cents . . . "Don't hawk my girlx Satur- day nightu . . . the letter from the Foreign Students Association . . . green sandwiches for lunch . . . basketball is fun . . . 'tIn the evening come the brothersi' to the football practice held they once called home. , DELTA SIGMA PHI It was quite a year for the Delta Sigs. John Newell wielded the gavel, singing '6Moonlight Over Fox Chapel? With Homecoming, the ping-pong table traveled from the cellar to the world of Mr. Magoo-love those Kappas and that third place trophy! Chaos reigned with the outbreak of a Leper colony on the second lloor! "Unclean!" yelled 'LHot Dog? Honors! Honors! everywhere. Delta Sig led in campus membership and copped first place in IF basketball. John Jenkins, famed receiver of two touchdowns, rated high on the Dean's List. One illustrious member of the chapter swiped West Virginia's trophies and sighed, "Guess you A , win the Turkey? 5' "' The Delta Sig's new location gave them a chance to ex- ft? change pleasantries with their new neighbor. Don't worry, ima: t'tu I " 'u'i N J N fellows, you'll get used to him. How many windows were 5, .'., N 5 .'.,' , broken in the Big Snowball Fight? It's a good thing the pg pledges were throwing from the porch roof. Hale's cam- ' 7 5TT?..ff.3-Q5 I paign for government and paper . . . Tony's back . . . I is P X 1 .A qlxp ,NM . what party? . . . going where? . . . Army! . . . dinner at X1 X! I P A-ff?" 1 I N.ie ,gr the Greeks . . . life is never dull . . . is it? FIRST ROW: W. Hale, R. Pingatore, T. Linsenmayer, J. Phelps, In. Griffith, R. Cunningham. SECOND ROW: M. Hecklinger, D. Helsel, L. Samonsky, J. Pignetti, R. Williams, W. Henry, J. Newell, J. Kuharcik, H. Houser- man, F. Petrich. THIRD ROW: J. Moffitt, J. Kuznewki, R. Dodson, Wm. McIntyre, D. Sauer, R. Petterson, R. Cappy, D. King, C. Fox, M. Lebo, T. Roantree, J. Fatta, E. Adamchik, E. Miller, W.'Thompson, T. Sophovich, D. Mitshell, A. Alex. FOURTH ROW: T. Reese, S. Zacharias, B. Mitchell, B. Beckwith, D. Kankel, J. Broderick, N. Cerimele, P. Abaray, W. Whitehead. W. Martin, H. Bomberger. fraternities FIRST ROW: F. Hembert, J. Koury, D. Capone, T. Pugliano. SECOND ROW: F. Buck, D. Mc- Hugh, G. Stewart. THIRD ROW: D. Balmer, D. Fraley, J. Leh- mann. FOURTH ROW: C. Hil- mer, J. Scott, C. Beaudet. FIFTH ROW: J. Kinney, W. Haser, G. Montgomery, D. Warner, W. Jef- fords, B. Butler, B. Hughes, B. Knight, N. Antonuccio, B. Daugherty, B. Ribisl, D. Faull. DELTA TAU DELTA In Delta Hall, in Delta Hall where every man is Kingj, the Delts whip through campus activities with their tradi- tional rebel spirit. There are nights of test sweat . . . Byrnes is back! . . . more brick and marble! What good is it we re dry . . . Beau-ti-ful! . . . Kinney's vocabulary think it's warm enough to go to Madison yet? . . . any- one going down to the Holiday? the Cloud? . . . the truckis coming . . . another tea dance, who with? . . . dates for the Sweetheart Party . . . Joe, are you going to St. James this week-end? . . . Is Bear there? . . . Hughes at swim- ming practice . . . who's at the house? . . . time for a partyg always time for a party . . . who's Jim Benson?. . . thatls our boy Tarasi! He made Sigma Delta Psi . . . wake me at seven, pledge . . . PLEDGE! ! . . . Elston is at the Fox again Doesn't he own that place yet? . . . C'mon Scott, one beer at the Stardust . . . Heywood ain't no animal . . Clean up your room, Pig Pen! . . . Study Hours 7 to ll! .,1T My mr f PHI GAMMA DELTA In front of the Fiji house a Renault is parked on the sidewalk side of the big tree. It's a trial to get it off the sidewalk. Many of the brothers have been getting married. The extra money from the renting of the in- famous third iloor is welcome to the treasury. There was a new 'tbrotheri' at the house: a black kitten caused problems. He sleeps on Swick's pool table, walks on the piano keys, and curls on the steps in the middle of the dinner rush. For fun there's Fiji week-end . . . Chapis and "Champ" . . . Son of a Gun . . . Breakfast Club . . . Fickle Pickle . . . Fox, the lady trainer . . . Hold your cig right! . . . Mattls party at Ligonier . . . Ellen and bridge, please donlt play! . . . get-togethers at the Holiday and the quiet doings at the House. mam: ' t FIRST ROW: R. Thompson, R. Quinlan, F. Callanet, L. Kopsa, J. Hampton, S. Schmeisser, E. Buelock. SECOND ROW: R. Furst, H. Wallace, F. Schumacher, R. Baloh, R. Os- mond, E. Williamson. THIRD ROW: K. Rowles, B. McGough, R. Mildren, W. Bonesteel, T. Foster, D. Reese, N. North, A. Van Nort, N. Reynolds, P. Miller, J. Cercone. R. Affinito, J. Wallace. fraternities PI KAPPA ALPHA It's been another lucky year for the PiKA,s. Bru- tus, arm didn't fall oil until the judges had turned their backs. Brac picked it up before the show was over, but as far as the judges were concerned, Brutus and Brac did well enough to win a third place trophy. All went well at the house. It took a lot of cooking to satisfy the appetites of the animals on the third floor. "Rock and Roll" Marie fed them tasty meals with a minimum of worms in the soup. Dart game made Nu a big hit. Punching-door con- tests were lots of fun. BYO parties! Rege played the genial host as Buddy did the Pony and Russ played the guitar. It's too bad J ag and the Darling never got to see the entertainment. They preferred the Pi room. Through it all they were brothers. Who but a brother would walk the tloor all night with Bob before his date with Emily? FIRST ROW: D. Hocevar, B. Bryan, B Kovacs B Cobun A Sejias J Cherry M Graham R Oldakowski T Ransick. SECOND ROW: G. Gary, B Mastrian J McKean D Sweeney A Brackllly J Pisula B Heyman R Havelak, C. Pepine, J. Davis, J. Barkovic G Sobeleski J Guttenburg R Popp X E . if ' . A IZ1 E T, i v .fr -' .i ja, ..x.... Pl LAMBDA PHI Pi Lam determination never dies. Though they were un- successful in their attempt this year to string a "Pep,' ban- ner from one end-zone to the next, they are already work- ing on plans to paper the entire stadium with Pi Lam posters. Under the inspiration of Marty, a man who is de- voting his career to promoting spirit at Pitt, came such up- and-comers as Larry Sherman who is always searching for new places to find spirits. At Winter Week End, Warren miraculously rescued Len- ny on the ski slopes to the disappointment of all who were thinking of sending Lenny to the Olympics. Winter Week End definitely took the prize for the greatest affair of the social season, but the most exciting event of the year for the brothers was Greek Sing. The honor of it all seems to have gone to their heads. Coming from 25th to 3rd place in Greek Sing is certainly an accomplishment. But it was carrying things too far when they tried to stage grand op- era in the Tuck Shop. FRONT ROW: B. Smizak, R. Minker. S. Patz. C. Lebovitz. SECOND ROW: J. Pachter, M. Kahn, M. Abes, D. Spott. THIRD ROW: R. Rosensweig, F, Archer, M. Gerber, W. Cohen, P. Jacobs, A. Muchniek. E. Brumberger, H. Mash, M. Oringer, A. Resnick, R. Davis. M. Lebowitz, L. Sherman, L. Fox, H. Drucher. J. Fingeret. L. Levy, B. Cardin. , 'P f 3 """"':.. '.:' ra 4 . 4 ,S 'rf' . if 4 , l .K - -,,,4, . ..., ' . , M N --.r..,L-K ,L ' J we B: ' it T -,:f,,.-1gNfTS"'i +r,a.. Q K. .ah 'ifli ' ' I ff"1 ' 1 fp-'sn qI:1lllllllxllvlllllaIl l.:.I allllisi-.fr.ra1llll.w . id, if ..'. af: af.. Ham M' .. K '- : ' ' . - H - . 'r fi YF' ff H-ata. .- V ' . 5, ,, I 5 52 4553 -4. i4s,fa,.f.-:. ' i f 2 ...J v - A- aa . :V ,.a..W .ia . - -P if SIGMA CHI '4Excellent," proclaimed Pappy Young, "are the twenty men who chose Sig this fall? Pledge Patrick jolted the actives with his kidnap plan. When it back- fired, the Ferdinand twins, Ed and Ed, asked, "Will he ever return?" At Homecoming, Pogo filled the front porch and Thetas filled the house. Loyal Sigs sang, "Place her in a corner and hold her hand like this." Four Thetas, three Tri Delts, and one Kappa lifted their white crosses. The Sigs marched on West Virginia. "Watch those hubcaps, Dale!" W.V. was definitely a wet safari, but Boo was too snowed to Care. The Sigs were really swingin, out-except for Blanchard who was still working on his Black and White from the Navy game. FIRST ROW: D. Dentler, B. Rowley, D. Johnson, Z. Zabusky, D. Long, P. Davis. SECOND ROW: E. Ferdinand, J. Orr, B. Meier, H. Petley, F. Klingensmith, B. Hunter, B. Andrews, J. Young, T. Olofson. THIRD ROW: J. Hughes, B. Stitt. FOURTH ROW: C. Hughes, A. Sunseri. P. Blanchard, D. Wall. J. Toth. FIFTH ROW: G. Bond, J. Friend, D. Fen- slermicher, R. O'D0nnell. SIXTH ROW: J. Whitford, A. Taylor, J. Linhart, B. Shanahan, A. Schlosser. A. Wakeling, N. Himes. 1. Roberts, D. Dodds, C. Teller, T. Betras. ' 1 FIRST ROW: R. Petrie, K. Miller, W. Gray, N. Andolino. SECOND ROW: D. Stone, B. Hall, T. Neizgoda, P. Crimmins, D. Cook. THIRD ROW: J. Durko, D. Hatala, K. Matthews, E. Masten, F. Ross, D. Harris. caa- THETA CHI The year was marked by competition between the brothers this year at the Theta Chi House. Bets were split for the wrestling play-olfs with half the guys betting on Prado and the others putting their money on Wrigley. There seemed to be some quiet between Jay and Pat. An amicable switch was worked out to the satisfaction of all concerned. The field was clear in the Phi Bet competition-John had it all the way. Parties were many, varied, and fun. The big '6Twist', party swung for everybody but Grimes. He's still hav- ing his back treated. The "Hayride Partyt' was great even if it did take a little effon to get all that hay out of the basement. But the prize for the most hectic party of the year goes to the swinger with the Im- perials. The noise was a bit nerve-racking. Dale, es- pecially upset, put his list through the wall. Remember Hughieis frogman outfit, Spring Week End at Conneaut, Homecoming at Web. Hall and the U.S.C. football team, and the celebrations at the Luna? fraternities FIRST ROW: S. Freeman, E. Faber, J Gardner R Schwlmmer T Booke J Swartz L Stiifman, E. Ganek. SECOND ROW: R Slater P Lebovitz B Cramer L Schwartz B. Sisken, H. Pollack, L. Trommer. THIRD ROW R Parlow A Rosses S Katz P Krugman, H. Kaplus. FOURTH ROW: J Frankel A Finkelstein S Berstein FIFTH ROW E. Teitelbaum, S. Levey, C. Katz, J. Marron M Redlich M Kravs SIXTH ROW R Getz, J. Jaffe, D. Snyder, J. Rubin, R Reisner B Mannheimer SEVENTH ROW H Weil, M. Baumritter, J. Epstein, D. Kritsky O Smith ZETA BETA TAU Not every fraternity can claim to have the ugliest man on campus in their group. ZBT, newly organ- ized on campus, boasts this distinction. It took the make-up artistry and collection ability of all the brothers and a little of Jay,s own talents, but the ZBT Ugly Man won by a landslide. People all over down- town Pittsburgh were startled into contributing to Children's Hospital and J ay's victory. Back at the House, things were as swinging as when ZBT was Kappa Nu. There was the gung-ho circle . . . Triple Alliance Club . . . Jay and Ollie's room . . . tossing Howie round and round . . . live chicks for "live chicksn . . . two weeks of 24 hour West Side Story . . . Snagglepuss, the lion even . . . New York- ese spoken here. LAMBDA CHI V ALPHA 1:1-" It was a good year for nicknames at the Lambda Chi house. There was the Amer- ican Moose . . . Matzoh . . . The Mole Man . . . Social Climber . . . Corvair Cur- ry . . . The Communist . . . The Missing Link . . . The Mongolian Animals . . . Phantom. The Lambda Chi's received honors, too. Semple was Bandsman of the year, Moose was football manager, Ar- cara-Ed's cousin-was treasurer of Men's Council, Chris Sweer was Phi Eta Sigma and Alpha Phi Omega, and the chapter won the fraternity football tro- phy. The parties also turned out pretty well. The Communist Party had too many Khrushchevs, but Tkach was a success as Mao. The Heidelberg Party washed ev- eryone down the drain, and nights at the Luna and the Thompson Club proved to be beneficial. FIRST ROW: R. Plaszino, C. Currey, H. Tkach, J. Ondo, D. Stewart, B. Connelly. L. Magasano. J. Gordon. SECOND ROW: R. Mehok, C. Urban, SIGMA ALPHA MU It took a zoo to do it, but the Sammys won the Pep Trophy this year. Starting oil mildly, they brought a goat to the Pitt- Navy Game. The following week they brought Jackson, a live golden panther, to the Notre Dame Game. As the Notre Dame band marched onto the field, the jungle came back to J acksong he and the Sammys spent the second half locked in the back seat of a police car. At Home- coming, pledges smuggled 25 homing pi- geons under their coats past the guards at the stadium. When Pitt scored its game- winning touchdown, they released the pi- geons above the crowd. What began as an ordinary Monopoly game during finals week at the Sammy House became a national sensation. Ev- ery time someone passed '6GO" more LIFE photographers and TV cameramen crowded around the board. It was the most profitable game the Sammys ever played. K . . . . f s - fl flwllwtiii FIRST ROW: D. Silberman, S. Kessman, R. Ehrlich, D. Shobin, S. Sholin. SECOND ROW: B. Hirschfield, H. Haberman, S. Geishman, A. Paulenoff, M. Greenberg, D. Lewis, S. Gross, M. Goldstein. THIRD ROW: M. Louik, G. Rosenberg, M. Peller, L. Harris, P. Roth, J. Clay, E. Leeds, S. Fogel, D. Menzer. FOURTH ROW: R. Ellsweig, D. Ginsberg, A. Weinstein, E. Finder, G. Miller, L. Solonfan, B. Daniels, J. Penn, A. Fleischner. FIFTH ROW: D. Lyson, R. Platkin, B. Waldman, L. Plack, B. Reitman, G. Rockman. S. Frank, J. Haisheld, M. Weiss. Sweethearts mary walker homecoming queen le, , eeee . 7' lm fi. E 'Lf kitty kifson delta sigma phi Sweethearts nonie o'brien phi gamma delta iudy gebhczrd pi kappa alpha ,,.,W,..,......,,.,..., .-,..,,L.,,,,, Sweethearts linda berger sigma chi iocmn carr theta chi sororities FIRST ROW: H. Mandell, S. Forsythe, B. Gould, E Riley A Mason M Montgomery D Lobaugh B Ulaky SECOND ROW: D. Bell, Sally Golboro, J. Ruey, P. Goldhamer M Bernath S Canter J Tyler M Satenstem PANHELLENIC COUNCIL "Take it back to your sorority and find out what the rest of the girls thinkw was Emilee's favorite expres- sion this year. Opinions brought to the Monday aft- ernoon meetings by representatives of all the soror- ities on campus have been important in deciding Panhellenic policy on campus. Open meetings led by Emilee made every sorority woman aware of the importance of Panhellenic. Seated on folding chairs in the large unfinished room on the 12th floor, sorority girls enthusiastically dis- cussed the problems that concemed their suite and house rules, rush, and the quota system. Raising the quota from thirty members to thirty- live was the subject of the longest discussions within each sorority and at Panhellenic meetings. The com- promise finally reached proved the importance of Panhellenic as a source of inter-sorority harmony. FIRST ROW: J. Tyler, K. Grant, K. Dixon. E. O'Brien. E. Swartz. SECOND ROW: A. Amygdalos, J. Morris, J. Gahring, P. Burgh, M. Zbi- kowski. THIRD ROW: M. F. Cicchino, P. Walsh, C. Hanna, P. Whitman, C. Schissel, M. Stees, C. Bellini. FOURTH ROW: J. Traynor, E Snyder, A. Bilewicz, J. Vannucci, J. Krausche, A. McDowell, S. Girton, J. Rockwell, M. A. Kearney, L. Whitney, C. Burke, M. Hornak, P Watters. ALPHA DELTA PI 6'You can tell an A. D. Pi girl, but you canlt tell her too much" didn't exactly hold true this year. The A. D. Pi's did enough talking in their suite to com- pete with the U. N. General Assembly. Samples: "Let's have a Melting Pot Partyv . . . Stacy the Greek . . . Nancy dressed in an Italian costume . . . How was your summer? We'd better work on this rush program . . . Had a ball at West Point . . . Did your patients give you a rough time today, Linda? . . . loyal Little Sisters of Minerva discussing the SAE pledge class . . . Mrs. Montgomery listens to conversations about the Black and White Formal . . . Fun Day . . . Pledge skits . . . harmonizing rush songs after months of no practice . . . Nonie elected Phi Gam Sweetheart . . . Larry Aiken as Santa Claus . . . the Christmas party for the orphans. me-r mg! :M A , Y-aw ,V ,,:,, V' 'Qui ALPHA EPSILON PHI This is the call of the Alpha Epsilon Phi girls, the second highest scholars on the campus. Judy and Penina keep this tradition going. As we recall, Klev and the twist were great . . . Miller's dungarees . . . Our idols: Audrey Hep- burn and Metrecal . . . How's yours . . . Tea Dances. We recall Dr. Heath: how he helped us . . . Pearl's beard? . . . Fingerls latest novel . . . Two rooms at the Penn Shera- ton . . . Gargantua Davidov and Little Sal. FIRST ROW: J. Klevans, J. Reznick, J. Pearl, C. Marple, R. Roth. SECOND ROW: R. Lebovitz, B. Gould, P. Kessler, J. Goldfinger. M. Davidov. S. Golboro, I. Busch. THIRD ROW: A. Gordon, M. Albert, R. Lempel, S. Melnick, S. Miller, J. Hersh, B. Kimel, J. Simon, C. Block, C. Morse. BETA SIGMA OMICRON Domesticity reigns supreme at the Beta Sigma Omicron apartment. Whether pitching in to help with dusting and scrubbing the apartment or cook- ing dinner, working together has made them a close group. Taking turns each week, two of the girls cook dinner for the others. When the word gets out that Dottie and Dee are cooking, crowds gather. Those kids have a real talent for water- ing the food to feed any number and it still tastes great. Some of the other sisters have a little more trouble getting dinner prepared. It's not the cooking thatis so tough, it's finding a level table to put the food on. Spaghetti sure is slippery. Pledge adventures were the source of long laughs for the whole sorority. Corn kernels caused Inez' trouble. Wonder if that cabby believed Sally went to college. FIRST ROW: S. Forsythe, I. Manion, P. Hart. SECOND ROW: D. Fleming, J. Keil, C. Kuhn, D. Schwarzbach. sororities CHI OMEGA Sharing a booth with the Delts has its trials and tribu- lations, but the Chi O's wouldnlt change it for the world. "When we want to study, they plan parties. When they want to study, we play bridge!" Little things are longest remembered . . . empty coffee cups . . . 51-card decks . . . late afternoon cokes . . . Mary Lou's love life . . . cram at noon . . . suite-mates . . . "are we speaking to the Delts this week?l' . . . Kathy left a shoe in class . . . borrowed notes . . . Friday aft- ernoon classes-usually missed . . . Marlboro packs . . . auction bidding . . . tea dances . . . suite silence at finals . . . windows on the quad . . . lost fraternity pins . . . Jack Kennedy - Richard Nixon battles . . . streetcars at 3 P.M .... Harold Betters. f+a'+'2 if" . 5.52, ae . l'4W1 Nlfviff f fxileeea I I If .1 mtg 'te "A, Qi, A gWl.?'Q 7' l -A .ffl'vi'L'1. It V u Z V I Q 1 A , E i l ,q v 'f A 4. 't 0 H ' Xt if i t 'j l fl l f l g I ' r 3 FIRST ROW: D. Benvenuto, M. Fay, B. Brownfield, M. Natali. SECOND ROW: P. Hunnell, B. Scalise, J. Dinning, M Hanna, B. Float. THIRD ROW: K. Andolina, J. Cutuly, B. Shumaker, G. Brutsky, E. Reilly, G. Parella, T. Saveikis, P Urbanic, B. Kane, M. Yankocy. FOURTH ROW: L. Pidutti, A. Walesky, M. Mokal, J. Meyers, L. Beska, D. Keifer, S Ebersol, S. Wright, S. Love, L. McKinsey, I. Swearingen. DELTA DELTA DELTA From Ocean City, Perkiomenville, and the third tri- mester came the Tri Deltas to begin a term of Miss McCandless and her warm snickerdoodles . . . "Heart and Soul', duets on the new piano . . . Dorothy Delta . . . Staying overnight in the chapter room . . . pin- nings and depinnings . . . the big football party . . . "Everybody Twistlv . . . stuffing napkins in the chick- en wire two minutes before the judging . . . a green polka-dot dinosaur at the SAE house . . . Holding hairdriers on the papiermached, wet Wihna . . . Car- ousel rehearsals . . . then it was time for voting for the girl for the year's most important job-Christ- mas Tree Chairman. There was always Boo and Sue . . . Smile, y'al1 . . . Brenda on the phone . . . Ann clomping in her cast . . . MAP swings! . . . Great Day, somebody think of a song for Greek Week . . . make those costumes short . . . Look, parrot, another trophy . . . JOEL'S A SWEETHEART . . . Stone's almost gray this week . . . Patch-Day . . . purple socks for a toad . . . Mary Alice led the leaders at Tap Day . . . finals . . . and the end of a great year. FIRST ROW: H. Jones, M. Piro, B. McKeever, N. Roland, J. McKeever. SECOND ROW: B. Jamison, M. L. Karges, K. Perna, C. Lyons, D. Bell, J. Fix. THIRD ROW: K. Kras- neski, C. Smith, J. Wolbert, S. Whitehouse, A. Butera, J Benyak, M. A. Clemens. FOURTH ROW: C. Furst, A. Bol- linger, J. Stoner, L. Theofel, C. Polf. M. Buckbee, S. Turlik L. Williams. S. Dorsey. C. Diethorn, J. Milsom. a in 1. fa 5 S . 5 -1 ,fir .sig iii? ii i A ? Qslfs ' . ., . , . . . . . - . 5, Q - .., f-, .- '. i f, V. - is! 3, .i . l " 'L ' '31 .,. i , 17 X 1' 1 if aa, . L si S... .L , . , , X ' . ll i i 351 if ' fi f f l l' Q . J l 1' 5 f' 1 1- 33' 5 5 i 5 Q V, " . i f H , f' yi ,Q , U . it ,.,..i, .i ....f,....s..p4i44IJLii....:- sororities FIRST ROW: P. Rowand, M. Bernath, M. Hill, J. Peters, E. Geisler, K. McClure, J. Rosenzweig, S. Swope. SEC- OND ROW: C. Langadinos, J. Taylor, G. Grimshaw, F. Molesky, B. Moore, A. Zitelli, N. Neiberg, R. Detweiler C. Michael. THIRD ROW: L. Richardson, B. Bittner, J. Hanahan, C. White, K. Tatko, G. Idzkowsky, I. Juber DELTA ZETA Organized in search parties the D.Z.,s were able to iill a bathtub full of Marlboro packs. The Delta Zetaas got so good at collecting cigarette packs for the contest that they decided to try the same thing with fraternity trophies. President Edie Geisler held the bag while her sorority sisters copped trophies from the Theta Chi's sec- ond floor. Certain gentlemen are exclusive DZ. property, through the team ef- fort of Joan and Penny. Betty Co-ed highlighted Greek Sing, sprout- ing every sort of pin from Rainbow to the A. of West Point. s KAPPA ALPHAA TH ETA UYou can tell that she's a Theta!'i She plays bridge . . . attends meetings of Nu's Loser's Club . . . gives her sisters queen lessons . . . gathers to hear Music App. records the night before the exam . . . meets her sisters often at the Holiday, the Pitt Pot, and Frankie Gustine's. There is the continuous Theta conversation. T.G.I.F. anyone? Is Pif really going to Germany? . . . Mrs. Mac hid the key . . . Hey Jag, do a rabbit joke! . . . Bob's a darling Theta . . . Irene "fails to believe itii . . . Macis counting eggs again . . . Leddie's not much of a twister, but you should see her make like a but- terfly! . . . Pass the word, Kitty says wear heels to- night. The Alums are coming . . . Go through line, pledge . . . another Sig pin! Man, they multiply fast . . . the Luna on Monday nights after meeting . , . whois walking up to the house? . . . what's today's "Wudty'i . . . Who's got a recording of Beethoven's Fifth? . . . Mozart's in the closet, let him out, let him out, let him out! FIRST ROW: B. Hattman, L. Lederer, I. McCabe, R. Maguire, M. Montgomery, G. Platt, K. Jameson, L. Hartner, J. Munn. SECOND ROW: J. Gebhard, L. Waters, B. Watson, K. English, J. Descalzi, S. Coen, L. Bendix, G. Reynolds, R. Zaremba, G. Kissell, E. Proudfoot. THIRD ROW: B. Weaver, B. Ossoff, B. Smik, G. Michaliszyn, J. Ruey, M. McWilliams, R. Fedorchak, K. Kitson, S. Burton, P. Gray, C. Dolfi, B. Hodgkinson, N. Heckler, J. Chenoweth, C. Manton, I. Stoehr. sororities KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA The Kappas maintain the steady pace of female confusion that is a part of any habitat where more than three girls are found at the same time. At the Hchateaul' on Belle- field Street many hours are taken up with the ever-pres- ent college problem: "Shall I sacrifice my social life for a college education?,' Studying in the library with a f'Kappa Gamma mani' is a fun way to do both. Female voices sound out day and night . . . Where's Mi- mi? . . . Batch, get off the phone . . . Monday at the Luna . . . Hold dinner tonight, Iill be late . . . the latest on Judy's love life . . . Fiji fights . . . Chip and the Delts . . . Did that bed fall through the floor again? . . . Phone! . . . Duplex . . . raccoon coats . . . BEETLE! . . . Hey, listen kids . . . rows of Holiday glasses . . . l've for a mark for lunch . . . write-up in the Press . . . Have you any cards? . , . fourth for bridge! . . . Twist! . . . Mathis . . . West Side Story . . . Tweed shopping . . . on ad infinitum. FIRST ROW: C. Notopoulos, B. Jacob, S. Switzer, L. O'dessa, J. Stockberger, M. F. Walsh, M. Thomas. SECOND ROW: J. Franz, M. J. Fandozzi, L. Beeman, J. McQuade, N. Moore, C. Zambano. THIRD ROW: A. Saxman, L. Gray, M. L. Ehnot, J. Dennick, A. Fulgumn, J. Blackwood, A. Simon, J. Batchelder, S. Coulter. FOURTH ROW: C. Waltman, L. Divers, B. Durko- vich, J. Eidemiller, M. Lewis, M. P. Thomas. ui 5 -it! a A 3 J' aw w A fi -- Hg 4... .. if PHI SIGMA SIGMA A Care package from a father contained an un- expected surprise for the Phi Sigs-a two-foot baby alligator. They gave him a home in their bathtub. When the ungrateful 'gator bit the hand of a Phi Sig who was feeding him, an emergency meeting was called to discuss finding new housing for the animal. After a very brief discussion, he was packed up and mailed back to Florida. "Borrowed', trophies and signs from other sorori- ties and fraternities decorated the Phi Sig suite. It's a bit difficult to explain how they won the 1960 Inter-Fraternity football trophy. At rush the Phi Sigs were full of good intentions. But there was a small mistake with the refresh- ments. The sisters didnit mind drinking the ice cream that someone had forgotten to put in the freezer-it meant fewer spoons to wash. FIRST ROW: J. Wallach, F. Pearlstein, M. Satinstein. SECOND ROW: F. Belford, R. Binstock, E. Schroeder, C. Berger. THIRD ROW: S. Cantor, J. Falk, G. Shapiro, M. Siegel. E. Prussin, F. Markowitz. .V sororities w I I .... .. r 1 it S 1 x . Q.. I FIRST ROW: S. Saul, S. Silverman, C. Rosenberg, T. Fagin, R. Segall. SECOND ROW: B. Wolkoff, B. Brown, D. Ash, T. Cohn. THIRD ROW: M. Bergstein, P. Goldhammer, H. Mandell, J. Goldman, R. Lyons, S. Kohn, SIGMA DELTA TAU One of the high points of SDT,s year was a Suppressed Desires party. Laughs continued all year . . . the pledges l can't sing . . . Scottyls checks at the Holiday House . . . l the cakes for the pledge party . . . Joanls trip to the South Side through a foot of snow in order to save 50 cents and win a thousand pledge points . . . the complaints result- ing from the Hstompl' contests . . . Greek Sing . . . g'ShoW me the way to go homev . . . candy-striped pajamas and a milk bottle . . . the trophy from the alumni . . . the empty trophy case . . . the new T.V .... Ex-Lax in the choco- late sundaes . . . Thelmals turtle and Mim's chicken . . . 'gBunny" signs in the elevator . . . Joanne's 3 karat ring . . . 'gWhat? another house mother?,' . . . t'Who's getting en- gaged this weekend?,' . . . "There's a seal in Joannels bedroom!" . . . "Meet you under the Clockv . . . "Who's going to Europe this summer?" . . . HRoz backed out', . . . "Hello theref, E SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA "Everybody,s wearing tem, wearing 'em"-pins that is. Though Chuck has the Sweetheart title, Delta Tau Delta is the word for the year. That little golden square is everywhere, Five members of the group, W, under the guidance of Social Butterfly, Bobbi, are wearing extra jewelry. At the pinning party, Carol Mehalko took a different approach. She arrived un- pinned. Doing the unusual was rather commonplace for the Tri Sigs this year. Even for the Tri Sigs, Sue Ellen's ride around the stadium on a white horse was a little wild. Though car washing means soggy tennis shoes and bermudas, the Tri Sigs enjoy it, knowing that the pro- ceeds go to the Robbie Page Memorial Fund. 1 2 00' 'ik 'CK 'M '36, pirkfp It il,,,,..,, --s-My-ff' 1. FRONT ROW: J. Bickel, W. Pizzano, D. Loubaugh, B. Ulaky, R. Cohen, M. Melnik. SECOND ROW: J. Krenicky, E. Darrall, M. Barcic, M. Walkins, S. Fenchak, S. Price. THIRD ROW: J. Emert, L. Punzak, C. Mehalko, R. Schaefer. JS sororities ti: " 5 'wa 4 Ar E lik? 52 fi li Q f I THETA PHI ALPHA Following the great booth switch in the Tuck Shop the Theta Phiis continued with a smashing year. .Ian was University Scholar and sister Linda was president of Alpha Psi Omega. Willy went against a cardinal suite rule and tried to go to bed before twelve. She was promptly given a twice over shower treatment. When the trophies and banners were "lost'l to the Phi Kaps their pledges brought Phi Kap trophies to the girls for "safekeeping." lt's about Gerri-she hasn't quite learned what floor she lives on. There was Nine Sons In A Row. The formal was started by a private cock- tail party. Fridays, the girls were found where- ever everyone else was-Cloud or Holiday. Tish -does life really begin at 80? How many girls practice ballet and play canasta at 3 A.M.--the Theta Phils do! FIRST ROW: H. Carpenter, M. Houk, M. Morrissey, D. Link, R. Tuskan. SECOND ROW: L. Gaughan, M. Marunczak, K. Kohut, M. A. Wildow, N. Semler, M. Kerlavage, E. Kossler. THIRD ROW: J. Lehman, L. Previtt, J. Previtt, G. Peterson, E. Kovach, M. Kuenzig, I. Dekleva. ZETA TAU ALPHA To the joy of Sandy Masimino and the all-night decorators, ten pledges joined the gray and the blue in the fall. Marsha Mellow strung strips of blue crepe paper and talked and talked about last summer's fabulous Erie trip. Monday nights for the Zetas means Frankie Gus- tine's, then over to 801 Amos Hall. '6Moose', Hay- mier wielded the president's gavel this year. Twist queen Kish has taken to doing the Slop. Betsy Hall wants another four-point, but Lois just wants her Lynn. They hear "The Call of Zeta." FIRST ROW: B. Titus, C. Sopher, J. Brazauslas, C. Bur- nett. SECOND ROW: I. Hilinski, M. Callin, L. Hag- meier, M. Wiltman, M. Noble, L. Thompson. THIRD ROW: C. Chambers, A. Logan, L. Kleiner, E. Hall, J. Roach, J. Yost, J. Magis, S. Kish, P. Paul. FOURTH ROW: G. Storc, S. Barris, L. Schmid, P. Chapple, M. Anderson, L. Schmidt, C. Whitehouse. honoraries Being tapped to an honorary or- ganization is supposed to mean more to the individual student than an "extra pin to polishfi The long yellow ribbon worn on Tap Day indicates outstanding accomplishment on the part of the tappec. The accomplishment may be ac- ademic, an outstanding OPA honored. Or the yellow ribbon and little pin may honor a tal- ent: the special ability to con- tribute to a publication, to a theatrical group, or a musical or- ganization. Some few organiza- tions honor only thosc men and women proficient in all areas. High OPA's must be combined with special abilities plus campus leadership. Sometimes the glory and excite- ment of being chosen for an hon- orary organization all but ob- scures how much is yet to be accomplished. honoranes MORTAR BOARD Led by President Ina Amdur, the discussions at Mortar Board meetings made membership in that organization a Worthwhile intellectual experience. The Senior Women who were tapped to this group found time in their schedules of school Work and activities to read the books and articles on the reading lists, to think seriously about them, and to present their considered opinions to other members of Mortar Board. Often, women students from the sophomore and junior classes were invited to join the senior members in the discussions. Re- spect and an appreciation of the intellectual abilities of these younger women was the result. But Mortar Board is more than just a discussion group. To be privileged to wear the gold and black pin, shaped like a tiny mortar board, indicates out- standing achievement on the campus and high intellectual ability. FIRST ROW: F. Scheggia, E. Riley, I Amdur SECOND ROW M Clark B Scalise M Ehnot, P. Burgh. THIRD ROW: J. McQuade R Freeze J All FOURTH ROW B Fatur M. L. Karges, L. Previtt, L. Ackerman FIRST ROW: A. Resnick, R. Slotkin, J. Zetwo, E. Kondis. W. Hosick. T. Chavasta. SECOND ROW: R. Fuseo, R. Grandy. C. Whited, R. Heath, D. Mischelovitch, G. Graham. C. Berocs. THIRD ROW: R. Ziegler, D. Swartz. A. Sarsfield, J, Kolbert, J. Harrison. C. Peterson. FOURTH ROW: W. Schneider. R. Bishop, W. Crafts, I. Rothman, J. Sciulli, W. Singleton. OMICRON DELTA KAPPA The first and third Friday of each rnonth ODK members would await the "pong, pong, pong" of Ed Kondis' tapping his knife against his water glass to call another luncheon-meeting to order. The luncheon-meetings of ODK represented a unique and noteworthy feature of this national honorary fraternity, for at these meetings outstanding men in the upper classes meet with each other and with members of the faculty and administration to discuss student affairs, world affairs, and life in general. Prominent among the many functions of ODK were the selection of the ODK Man of the Year, the regional convention at Grove City College, and the Founderts Day banquet where alumni rejoined the present mem- bers and renewed old acquaintances. ODK membership is not based on a student's ability to eat, however, but rather on a recognition of those upperclassmen who have excelled in three helds-scholarship, leadership, and integrity. As a result, being tapped for membership into this honorary fraternity is one of the highest awards a man at Pitt can receive. honoraries PI DELTA EPSILON Meetings of Pi Delta Epsilon were the epitome of informality, but then, it is not necessary to be staid and formal in order to have a successful and functioning organization. In the relaxed and cordial atmosphere of the Pi Delt meetings, members met to use the organization as a sounding board for their gripes, criticisms and compliments. Membership in this national honorary journalism fraternity is awarded to those upperclass men and women selected for their outstanding contributions to a student publication for a period of more than one year. mf . ... Q.. ,aww " Mfr FIRST ROW: S. Downie, I. Amdur, E. Drexler, J. O'Brien. SECOND ROW: B. Kleper, M. Hyslop, R. Johnston, M. Nehus, J. Thomas. THIRD ROW: J, Falk, W. Rango, R. Fatyol, M. Nesvisky, J. Hufnagel, L. Wagner, D. Ellenberger, G. Graham, I. Rothman, W. Schneider. ALPHA EPSILON DELTA After a chem lab and a hot after- noon up the hill the pre-meds may gather for a meeting of AED. This Pitt honorary not only strives to help the pre-med better understand his profession, but also helps him in identifying the merits of the various schools that offer him his further educa- tion. The members of AED are first and foremost young college students, but above and beyond this, they are the pre-medical students, the future doctors. With this aim in mind, the mem- bers plan their activities around medical topics. The one impor- tant aspect of the medical pro- fession is that it is able to co- operate with its own and it is to this end that the members strive. FIRST ROW: J. Kopelman, C. Hinkes. L. Omasta, G. Stey, P. Kanfer. SECOND ROW: D. Marnell, R. Schwimmer, R. Hepps, G. Merenstein, H. Osttield, E. Morgan, T. Johnson, E. Plutko, R. Hilberg, K. Khalil, F. Scheggia, M. Naponic, J. Mannheimer. THIRD ROW: M. Altman, P. Lebovitz, D. Sharp, A. Resnick, J. Morphy, G. Monchik, G. Corsello. CWENS A wreath of red and gray rib- bons slipped over a freshman's shoulders by an upperclass wom- an begins her career as a Cwen. These Women have proven themselves to be outstanding ac- ademically as Well as prospective campus leaders during their first year at the university. Service to the University and to each other is one aim of this honorary. The members give of themselves by helping to guide new students, serving at dinners and luncheons, and discussing political and philosophical ques- tions under the formal guidance of guest speakers or informally among themselves. s FIRST ROW: B. McKeever, E. Prussin, J. Snoke, G. Michaliszyn M. Natale. SECOND ROW: M. Holstein, B. Durkovich, S. Crafton R. Hoffman, J. Dickerson, L. Whitney, A. Walesky, R. Obenrader. THIRD ROW: M. A. Clemens, G. Shapiro, J. Fix, J. Saul. 7 honoraries All prospective members of Eta Kappa Nu are re- quired to be of unimpeach- able character and have scholastic ability. The pur- pose of the organization is to promote and reward ex- cellent scholarship and to co-operate with other cam- pus honor societies. Its functions include adminis- tering the department's outstanding Senior Award, awarding a prize to the sophomore Electrical En- gineering student with the highest grade average, and an 5 Qiation banquet. FIRST ROW: R. Reed, W. Singleton, M. Mickle, M. Mast- andrea, A. Whithead, J. Sci- ulli, T. Reznik. SECOND ROW: D. Jurenko, H. Koontz, R. Glaser, F. Scallo, A. Fun- ari, J. Hrivnak, R. Gorham, D. Bier, W. Huber, T. Foster, R. Furst, E. Cutuly, R. Bennet, J. Mastandrea. ETA KAPPA NU DRUIDS Intellectual discussion, future plans, and the installation of Chancellor Edward H. Litchfield and Earl Warren, Chief Justice of the United States as honorary mem- bers made Druids a memorable experi- ence for this year's members. These male students have at least a 2.5 QPA and have shown exceptional leadership and service in extra-curricular activities. Some of the campus services of the group are the Leadership Training Program be- gun this year, their Druids Sophomore Man of the Year, and the Druids Award of Merit. These members can hope to grow in the direction of those members who have made and are making line names for themselves in the world. FIRST ROW: D. Weiss, H. Kronenberg, N. Firestone, D. Mishelevich, E. Litchfield, A. Reznick, W. Higgins, B. Adams, R. Bryan, R. Rowley. SECOND ROW: J. Fingeret, R. Rosenzweig, C. Lebowitz, J. Hallal, A. Seigas, S. Johnson. P. Bijur, N. Pease, R. Heath, W. Crafts, B. Hunter. THIRD ROW: L. Catalano, R. Smith, I. Rothman, T. Lohrenz, R. Peery, R. Slotkin, L. Sherman, D. Johnson, D. Martin. FOURTH ROW: W. Schneider, A. Rankin, R. Copeland, D. Woll, F. Carver, A. Louden. W. Singleton. R. Gorham, J. Wertheimer, J. Newell. . .Q 5' LAMBDA KAPPA SIGMA Women are entering the hitherto male Held of pharmacy in in- creasing numbers. While break- ing into what is still considered by many to be a manls world, the woman must be able to adapt herself. This is the aim of the members of Lambda Kappa Sig- ma. Under the leadership of Sue Hill and Mary Ann McLane the members participated in their founder's day activities and in Hygeia Day. These young wom- en must work in close co-ordina- tion with the members of the medical profession and it is im- portant that they have an under- standing not only of themselves, but of the held which is so closely allied with theirs. FIRST ROW: G. Storc, M. McClure, S. Hill. SECOND ROW: G. Schnle, J. Lang, P. Watters, P. Burgh, D. Danton. KAPPA KAPPA PSI It would seem strange to attend a football game without the strutting double-time march of the band. Here at Pitt, as well as elsewhere, therank and file emit a few who excell in their ability to play. These men constitute the members of Kappa Kappa Psi. All is not hot summer days of drill and drizzly marches in the late September rain. This close group of men generates spon- taneous fun. Beer bouts after practice and date blasts after games plus the For- mal Dance provide a swinging band sea- son. There is also the experience of meet- ing members of visiting bands. They are hosted by KKP men as are band parents at their reception. FIRST ROW: M. Dierdorf, F. Santalucia, H. Krier, T. Roshalla, B. Koenemund, G. Espy. SECOND ROW: R. Gratz, J. Boddy, J. Kirk- wood. J. Giglioti, H. Glick, S. Budol. THIRD ROW: J. Furik, D. Phillips, J. Maoli, D. Stewart. B. Pierman, R. Cooley. FOURTH ROW: B. Jones, J. Semple, M. Louick, D. Posich. G. Riffner. honoranes PHI ETA SIGMA Freshman men who have earned the dis- tinction of maintaining over a 3.5 QPA during their first two trimesters at Pitt are duly honored by election to Phi Eta Sigma, National Freshman Scholastic Honorary Society. Upholding the ideals of academic achievement and intellectual and moral strength, Phi Eta Sigma pro- vides for group discussions, led by dis- tinguished speakers from all fields of learning. Not only are the members of Phi Eta Sigma interested in their own scholastic betterment, but they also have an eye out for their fellow students. A tutoring service is provided in many subjects to assist those students who are having academic difficulties. On the social side, Phi Eta Sigma holds a number of smok- ers and dinners each year, at which members, past and present, can reunite and discuss the latest happenings in thermodynamics or Viet Nam. QUAX z iifiiiii I . I i in FIRST ROW: D. Gnarra, R. Haines. J. Herring, R. Pannier, S. Knoll. G. Goldberg, R. Smith W. Primozik. SECOND ROW: R. Malloy. M. De Pamphlis, W. Davis, R. Carroll, R. Mar- shall, W. Lederer, J. Levin, J. Hamel, B. Jacobus, N. Edelstein, I. Rothman. When a group of women with similar interests gather together an organized club often grows out of the situation. So it is with the women's science honorary. Talk is not all labs and studies. Planning the Open House and the Banquet involves discussion and late meetings. The girls do plan around a scientific topic with activities such as a cyclo- tron lab planned for the fall. The matching of lab experiments and the late night-early morning dis- cussions of the sciences of today are peppered with talk of dates and dances. Ouax is a mixture of the female in the scientific world and the female as a fe- male. FIRST ROW: S. Madura, M E. Lipchak, E. Averbach, J Roche, M. Merindino. SEC OND ROW: G. Peterson, P DiNardo, R. Rhoydes, J. Gah ring, M. Winthrop, J. Peters. QUO VADIS The visitor who tries to navigate the vast resources of the Ca- thedral on his own may run into a bit of difficulty. It is for this purpose that the University has its Quo Vadis girls. These are the young ladies who guide the Pitt tourist and serve as the special events hostesses for such events as the Chancellor's receptions and the receptions for the freshman parents. Each month the members have a dinner, with the menu representing a foreign country, as well as a speaker representing that same country. These girls are the same girls that one can hnd twisting at the Holiday, playing on the Cathedral lawn, and saying goodnight at the dorms. Not only are they typical of the co-ed at the Univer- sity, they are serving the public and the school. FIRST ROW: M. Vanderstel, S. Tritsch, E. Marker, J. Abbott, E. Petrie, L. Mansfield. SECOND ROW: B. Larimer, J. Shrewsbury, P. Bayer, R. Rigg, J. McQuade, E. Riley, M. Shak, S. Gross. THIRD ROW: M. Heigley M. Klingensmith, J. Murphy, M. Avery, C. Dundore, E. Zulick, A. Yurick, L. Austin, M. Clark, J. Brennan. FOURTH ROW: K. Johns J. Urda, R. Bayer, F. Knitengale, C. Barton L. Copp. a s s FIRST ROW: S. Schleihauf, D. Walker, R. Spingys, H. Levine, A. Demetrius, N. Ketterle, E. Butler, I. Manion, E. Lee, J. Dickerson. SECOND ROW: A. Vidakovich, M. Natale, D. Benevenuto, I Shapiro, K. Tatko, M. Laver, J. Keil, M. LaRocca, M. Martin, P. Nemeth, R. Maus, S. Morris. SIGMA THETA TAU Sigma Theta Tau, National Honorary Society of Nursing, remains the only national honorary for nurses in the United States. En- couraging high professional standards, Sigma Theta Tau requires members to maintain a 3.0 QPA and to show evidence of leader- ship. These nursing students have a rich liberal arts background in addition to having intensively studied in the various fields of nursing and related health professions. Pitt's Eta chapter pro- vides a full tuition scholarship each year to a worthy student en- rolled in the nursing program. In addition to its fostering of scholarship, Sigma Theta Tau maintains an active social program throughout the year. activities Activities are the all-consuming side lights of the college career. There are official, sponsored activities and the un- oflicial, 'fwew-inspired activities. Activi- ties are the relief from a long week of studying, the build-up to a swinging week-end, or they may be the week it- self, leaving little time for anything but attending meetings and social events. Activities are not segregated to any one time in particular. Bridge in the Tuck Shop is as much an activity as the Christmas Dance. In the yearbook, ac- tivities are those things that some stu- dents have strings of besides their name. The never-ending round of club meet- ings, dinners, and luncheons can, if the personality engaging in them is nimble- footed, take most of the college day. Activities are time-consuming, study- procrastinating, dorm-evading. They are the objects of grumbling. HI have six meetings today? But they are also the source of joy and accomplishment. Ap- plause for a good performance, a lively discussion, a trophy won, or the lesson of power politics satisfy the varying needs of university students. activities ALUMNI BOARD Parties in Miami, meetings to organize scholarship funds, and the annual Smor- gasbord served to bring graduates of the University into close contact with the latest happenings on the campus. Dinners with the new graduates of each school brought to the students' attention that just because they were graduating need not mean the complete severing of their ties with Pitt. As members of the Alumni Association, they can keep in touch with old friends, make new friends, help their school, and keep up with the constantly changing field of education. An elaborate program involving alumni in the activities of the University keep ties strong. Talking at the dance and the parties after the Homecoming game, a chat on the golf course at Wildwood, and small talk while waiting in line for the Smorgasbord, bring together people of varying memories and a common interest. The Alumni Board has much more than a social function. Supporting Pitt finan- cially, through their Council, and by their enthusiasm, the alumni are an im- portant part of the University. FIRST ROW: F. Robie, N. Welfer, M. D'Angelo, J. Heck- el, F. Feree, B. Giffen, L. Young, J. Dunbar. SECOND ROW: E. Petrie, S. Yaksich, V. Braley, L. Manstield, Z. Reno, B. Dimmick, J. Say, S. Rogaliner, T. Ryan, P. Mc- Lain, W. Swanson, Jr., J. Hen- ninger, J. Brown, W. Koegler J. Geist, H. Obcrnauer, H Beggs, R. Coleman, I. Routh s ARMY ROTC "Inspection Todayv are the words which strike fear into the heart of every ROTC student. This announcement means that they will be forced to stand at attention before the tough oilicer or "gung-ho" upperclassman and hope that he does not spot the dirty brass or the imperfect spit shine on his shoes. The freshman soon learns that ROTC is not the easy road to the ofTicer's club. The Thursday soldier marches in formation on the Cathedral lawn, checks the bulletin board, cleans M-lls, shines shoes, salutes officers, and memorizes the ROTC manuals. It soon becomes a tiresome, but necessary, grind. After the freshman struggles through the first two years of basic ROTC, he is ordered to take his physical for the advanced course. He is told to lose weight, gain weight, or raise his fallen arches. If he passes the physical, Battle Group Week-end and Summer Camp await him. FIRST ROW: Lt. Col. Wolff Lt. Col. Banks, Capt. Banks, Capt. Brosky. SECOND ROW: M. Sgt. Bostwick, Sfc. Twigger, M. Sgt. Hayes, S. Sgt. Kelly. activities FIRST ROW: M. Karg-es, J. Batchelder. SECOND ROW: J. Eidemiller, M. Thomas, C. Benintend, P. Kessler, L. Lee, R. Sheps. ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS During twelfth floor meetings of the Executive Board, the problems of the individual committees were discussed. The Social Committee put everyone to work on the huge Parents, Week-End project that began the year. Thou- sands of envelopes were addressed, talent rounded up, hundreds of yellow mum corsages were ordered, brunches and open houses were arranged. With everyone pitching in to help, the week-end was a success. Successful, too, were the language tables organized by the Scholarship Committee. Meeting for lunch several times a week, the members of these groups spoke only in a foreign language during the meal. Luncheon small talk took on a new importance when it was carried on in Spanish or Russian. The Executive Board also discussed problems that fall under the auspices of none of the committees. With Presi- dent Mary Lou Karges attending the monthly luncheons given by Chancellor Litchfield, the Executive Board had an opportunity to learn how the administration felt about certain questions and, through Mary Lou, to express their thinking to Dr. Litchfield. Much discussed was the invitation to the I.A.W.S. Reg- ional Meet and the three hundred industry-representing favors that Pitt was expected to send. The vote split down the middle with half of the membership favoring pickle pins while the rest favored steel ingots. I CANTERBURY CLUB Canterbury Club draws its youthful members into all ac- tivities of church life. Emphasizing worship, study, work, and play, students attending the bi-weekly meetings End that they have much in common. Holy Communion followed by dinner in the Parish Hall begins each evening meeting. Discussion follows, center- ing on the Church, its life and its work. A broad outline of the subjects to be covered in the dis- cussion periods is worked out by members of the Canter- bury Club and the Church of Ascension Chaplain. Sub- jects this year ranged from 'The Christian Sacrament of Marriage" and 'The Theology of Christian Creeds" to "The History of the Reformation of the Church in Eng- land." Every few months a dress-up dance is held by club mem- bers. Between these dances there are Hcokea' parties and informal dances and picnics. FIRST ROW: M. Bale, P Dreyer, B. Eggers, I. Knorr, C Durant, F. Mulesky, E. Swartz SECOND ROW: D. Fleming R. Smith, K. Steiger, D. Ellen- berger, Father Butler. activities E. 8L M. CABINET To the two-thousand-odd engineers who make the daily climb up the Hill to classes, the Engineering and Mines Cabinet is a convenient short-cut. It is a place to go when you need tickets for the Shamrock Ball, somewhere to lodge a complaint when one of the vending machines in the lounge steals your nickel, or an office to locate a ballot box for the Purple Shaft nominees. The members of the cabinet, selected from stu- dents in the various departments, organize every- thing from the judging of displays during Engi- neeris Week to interviews for the Emitt Award. The E8cM ofiice, located strategically just off the main lounge is a continual center of activity dur- ing the day and usually well into the night. The myriad details of arranging social functions such as the Fall Ball or the mixers during Engineer's Week keep the representatives continually phon- ing department offices and arranging for the West View Park Danceland. The student engineers on Pitt's campus take pride in the fact that their form of student government is a much stronger organization than the govern- ment down Hon the campus." The strength of fellowship provided by the E8cM Cabinet should be admired and emulated by other campus organ- izations. FIRST ROW: C. Jones, R. Hatala, C. Shawl, W. Mason, J. Murphy, S Martino, C. 1-losick, W. Hosick, C. McKormick, N. Marino, W. Sharp SECOND ROW: S. Kolbeck, R. Crawford, J. Watt, R. Mildren, L. Tav- larides, E. Stewart, R. Fulton, O. Wright, M. Farraday, W. Singleton. FOTO CLUB On the fourth floor of the Student Union the members of the Pitt Foto Club mer- rily go about developing negatives, run- ning proof sheets, and producing prints which are occasionally sold to those per- sons Whom the club patronizingly calls 'tcustomersf' A visitor to the fourth floor sees Stanley dashing from one room to another wearing rubber gloves and an apron that appears to be refuse from a grease pit, Jerry relaxing on the couch, flipping ashes onto the carpet, noncha- lantly waiting until Irv finishes ruining his negatives in the darkroom, and Mar- gie trying to get Joel to pay his club dues. The club's darkrooms are cluttered with the equipment 'necessary to produce the prize-winning photos which the members continually produce despite all adversity. Enlargers, filters, bottle openers, lenses, and Corkscrews clutter the shelves. The walls are papered with cryptic messages such as PAY YOUR FOTO CLUB DUES and DO NOT LEAVE THIS DARKROOM DIRTY-S2 FINE. When the club members are not busy working in the darkrooms, they diligently Work at their only other activity-learn- ing how to spell Hphotof' FIRST ROW: W. Schneider, M. Nichols. SECOND ROW: J. Filner, E. Ganek, S. Knoll. QOther members are still in the dark.J activities FIRST ROW: L. Meta. G. Corsello, P. Frulas, J. Orr, C. Waite, E. Rubin, S. Levine. SEC- OND ROW: J. Wiland. D. Dalin, A. Reznick, D. Snyder, A. Malaski, K. Sachs, R. Milligan, D. Reese. THIRD ROW: W. Stilley, C. Falk- enham, R. Drosnes, P. Bijur, J. Sieger, J. Weiner, C. Sweer, C. Saladino. FOURTH ROW: R. Vetera. K. Burroughs, L. Grifhth, J. Dunny, R. Davis, R. Davis, W. Silverman. GLEE CLUB The Glee Club will sing anything from Bach to Bernstein. But they are discriminating about their audiences. These men prefer womenis col- leges. This year Elmira and Wilson played hostess to the crew. At Elmira, Wade Silberman roamed the streets accompanied by his guitar. John Will- ard had his chance to serenade at Wilson College. After the group returned to Pittsburgh, they sang a benefit for Sharon Hospital. That memorable evening was highlighted by the dance that fol- lowed with 'fa bevy of young beauties." The Glee Club brings together boys of diverse interests. David Reese, the Girk, wants to be Jose Jimenez. Pat Waite, on the other hand, wants to perpetuate the popularity of wigs. Similarly, the Glee Club does not restrict its activities to singing. From Elmira to Pittsburgh, the members are known as skillful chefs, swingin' singers, and connoisseurs of the finer things in life. .rm 'f'nu Q1 vu HEINZ CHAPEL CHOIR Along with the customary Tuesday noon chapel services, the choir sang for various churches, entertained at the International Christmas Party, and caroled in local hospitals. At the Chancel- lor's Christmas Reception, the choir strolled through the Com- mon's Room and around the second and third floor corridors sing- ing traditional carols. Special activities included a television show, the annual winter banquet, and a buffet with Men's Glee Club and Women's Chorale. The annual choir camp was held at Camp Crestview near Slippery Rock. Between twist and limbo sessions, the choir managed to sing a total of twelve hours that week-end. Even Mr. Colton and Bill Warner enjoyed Joycels Twist lessons. Nobody ever said a word about the dry leaves found in a few beds. As usual, there were several members late to each meal, and the rest of the choir heard a few solo performances of the Seven-fold Amen. FIRST ROW: E. Darrall, M. Wiltman, S Evans, P. Biesecker, G. Grimshaw, V. Olenn A. McParland, N. Heckler, F. Pilzys, N. Kaze- bee, B. Keister. SECOND ROW: R. Clark A. Johnson, D. Hill, L. Richardson, L. Grant C. Poff, J. Peters, H. Lee, J. Fix, K. McClure THIRD ROW: A. Markus, T. Bailey, H Bray, J. Crawford, E. Harper, V. Geisel, W Thompson. FOURTH ROW: R, Heymann, J Diggs, D. Colton, W. Warner, A. Wakelin, A Johnson, R. Krotec. activities IDEAS AND FIGURES Amid -all the rush on the fourth floor of the SU exists the literary mag of the Pitt student. Ideas and Figures offers the student at Pitt an oppor- tunity to have his writings and art work selected for publication. This in itself is no easy task. For the staiT it involves long nights of decision- making and long days of preparations for the publishing of the magazine. For the student who chooses to submit a piece of his work it involves the time and agony that all so often are a prerequisite to a good piece of material. Ideas are not easy to come by and the vast repetition of subjects presents problems for Susanna and the rest of the Ideas and Figures per- sonnel. Even though the magazine is the baby as far as Pitt publications go, it is rapidly becoming one of the most popular among the students. As is the case with any deadline publication, there is the rush at two in the morning and the hurried readings to get the magazine out on time. There are burgers from the White Tower and empty cigarette packs littering the room and sleepy heads nodding, as for another year the Ideas and Figures goes to bed. R. Davis, J. Filner, S. Downie, E. Roberson, W. Bennett OWL Putting together this yearbook has been more than taking pictures, collecting money, and meeting or not meeting deadlines. For the staff it has been a way of life. For us it has been the Library Club and A.U .... New York and the Hotel Manhattan . . . The Alien . . . bloody hockey games in the hall . . . Stanley Freshman . . . "Camelot" . . . Big's mystery woman . . . funny valentines . . . Can- tor's and free meals . . . TR-3 and XKE . . . our Rock Hudson and his violent temper . . . milkshake . . . 'ffor my next spastic movementf' . . . Phft, Phft-Phft, Phft- Phft-Phft . . . the darkroom and other activities. Unification of the Publication Floor meant shared dead- line nights . . . pizza . . . Maaarr-gret . . . 'fline pleasen . . . Christmas party and kosher corned beef . . . organ music . . . Nose Cohen . . . M'Lou let her hair down . . . Tennessee . . . Virginia and Myrtle . . . craveable! . . . Bon Jour . . . Miami . . . Frenchie . . . Sweet Matt . . . D-76 . . . Mike and the rug under the bridge . . . Beano . . . the Casino . . . Senior photos . . . Joel-Boy Special, too, was Dorothy Zass . . . Bill Sharpfs private line . . . St. Theresa and the roses . . . meeting deadlines after the Holiday . . . 'fBreakfast at Tiffany's,' . . . phrlos ophy and photography . . . Ptoe . . . bleed left . . . guitar serenades . . . craveable Huff . . . kangaroos are fun . . . "Larry, pay this!,' . . . 69 Rugby Road . . . peanut butter in the cafeteria . . . manhattans . . . burned spa ghetti . . . Jerry's vocabulary . . . Moses Moses! Moses' . . . Chevas Regal . . . twistin' Jim . . . washing and paint ing the walls . . . venetian blinds . . . prim, proper, pure . . . f'Dear Mr. Filner: Your unconditional dismissal . . . . Publications Institute and Euclid . . . the Playboy Club . . . Ira, Bill, and Jim, our Keystone Kops . . . Lips . . . free Kleenex from 'The Defendersn . . . Nurses' . . . 6'West Side Storyu . . . Little Nell . . . petty cash . . . Bill, call your father!!! . . . It was all GRReat! FIRST ROW: G. Graham, W. Schneider. SECOND ROW: M. Klein, R. Hale, L. Hand, J. Filner, B. Eggers, E. Zatkowsky, S. Knoll, C. Freid. THIRD ROW: J. Grossman, J. Shane, R. Riley, L. Omasta, J. Hines, M. Bisnette, J. Vrana, L. Lee, I. Rothman, J. Leff, D. Ellenberger. activities PITT CAPSULE The Capsule is one of the student publications that not many students realize exists. For those who do, it affords an inner look at the new materials and advances in the field of pharmacy. Once a student is a member of the school of pharmacy, he is then eligible to do the research and sweating that getting a professional publica- tion to press four times a year requires. While others sleep, there is to be found a nucleus of late workers who sit counting words and typing copy at a frantic pace. Photographs have to be linished and layouts are to be done. Only those who know can speak of the work that goes into such an endeavor. While keeping the undergradu- ate informed of the latest advancements in phar- macy, the Pitt Capsule Hnds its way into the hands of many alumni as well. While a knack for writing is not necessary, the stall member of the Capsule must be willing to learn and do research late many a night and early.many a morn, for it is in this manner that such a magazine comes into being. FIRST ROW: J. Delco, R Heiser, J. Wassam, N. Moritz, D. Grimm, D. Hamilton, H Sakulsky, J. Burdman, B Cohn, B. Carson, A. Jones, R Notarianni, F. Bianco, G Johnson, V. Osborn. FIRST ROW: R. Wishnev, S. Weiss, W. Rango, J. Thomas, J. Hufnagel P. Balagur. SECOND ROW: T. Gilbert, M. Eiges, R. Silberman, B. Cramer E. Drexler, R. Minker, F. Marcus, M. Nichols, S. Reznick. THIRD ROW I. Rothman, M. Swetonic. M. Nesvisky. B. Gross, R. Kantrowitz. J. O'Brien R. Smizik, A. Fleischner, J. Steltzer, T. Bryant. Mondays and Thursdays were red-eyed days for PITT NEWS stall members. Twice each week, week after week, they wrote news stories, heads, columns, gathered advertising, a syndicated column and one cartoon. Then on the big dead- line nights, the staff put it all together. The stack of newspapers piled in the Student Union and at the Student Desk gave little indication of what happened on the fourth floor the previous Monday or Thursday to make the paper possible. There was Julie and her birthday . . . TB's imitation of Ida Mae . . . pizza money from Rango . . . Matt's motor scooter . . . 'The High and the Mighty" . . . chair races . . . a letter from a psych major . . . photographers . . . banquet at the Playhouse and The Three Penny Opera . . . letters to the editor . . . Jackie's giggle . . , Miami and the Fountainbleu. Searching for a picture to hll a hole on the front page at four in the morning . . . racing to the printer as the sun came up . . . Barry writing every head . . . cokes and a toasted cheese sandwich for Vijay . . . it was all part of putting out each issue of "One of the Great Student Newspapers." NH fx H 'F q 4 2,941 ti rg, .HI W FIRST ROW: D. Fromm S Levine J Vrana D Stoller W Lupovitz J. Ferrari. SECOND ROW M Klein D Fraley R Reicher S Cartiff THIRD ROW: F. Cohen S Sokolow N Edelsteln POLARIS The portable radio blared baseball, echoing the clamor from Forbes Field, the phone rang, typewriters clattered, but through the confusion of noise, members of the Polaris staff managed to put together a handbook. Each member of the staff concentrated on his own specialty. Every detail of the freshman handbook, the POLARIS, was carefully thought out and worked through. The typists struggled with the copy, somehow a word, a comma, or a period always managed to be left out, added on, or in the wrong place. Getting correct information, then putting it in clear, concise language wor- ried the writers. The business staff concerned itself with keeping finances straight by counting everything from pennies to stationery. The editor's job on this handbook was to worry with all of the staff members and then to worry a little on his own. To the editor, John Vrana, fell all of the detail jobs, from designing the letterhead for the stationery to keeping the freshman pictures in alphabetical order. SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER One Thursday each month, student engi- neers can be seen digging into their pock- ets for a quarter in order to purchase a slick magazine. The casual observer, at first glance, may think that the magazine vendor is eagerly hawking pornographic literature. But as he draws closer, he hears the words, 'LGet your Skyscraper Engineer!" He also sees the buyers of the magazine flipping quickly to the joke section, appropriately called 'LSlips O' the Stick? If curiosity prompts him to get his own copy, he will be able to read one of the finest student engineering maga- zines in the country. Published on the fourth iloor of the Stu- dent Union by students registered in the School of Engineering and Mines, the Skyscraper Engineer features articles covering everything from missile fueling systems to far-out science iiction. Excel- lent management, fine writing, and amus- ing artwork help to make this magazine one of the best in its field. TOP TO BOTTOM: R. Fatyol, W. Hosick, R. Johnston, W. Singleton. C. Hosick, J. Falk, J. Leff, R. Murphy, T. Cook, D. Ellenberger. activities FIRST ROW: R. Sobota M A Polyak J Fmgeret R Reeves N Pease SECOND ROW: R. Slotkm L Lee B Baumgart R McGuire R Rowley THIRD ROW: N. Firestone I McCabe J Sleger D Meyer J Diethorn STUDENT GOVERNMENT "Who Gets What, When, and Howw was an important book of rules for members of Student Government. Most senators worked under the assumption that the stu- dent body should get more as soon as possible by any means within reason. Reasonable means of getting more for the students at Pitt usually involved hours of discussion at Senate meetings, setting-up of committees, investigation reports from the committees, and then more discussion. Occasionally, results could be seen. Library hours were changed, a PEP committee was organized, and a student- run book exchange became a reality. More often, a long time passed before re- turns on Senate Work could be seen. A year passed before the results of the petitions prepared by S.G. and signed by students for the removal of sales tax from text books could be noticed. But the tax was removed, making all the work of the senators worthwhile. STUDENT UNION BOARD With cookies and tea to bolster their energy, the members of the Student Union Board organize and administer one of the countryis largest and finest student union programs. Watching the concerts, the Midday lectures, or the dances, it all seems simple and smooth. Board members know it is not always as easy as it looks. There is always some small problem like getting two grand pianos for a double piano concert, rain in the middle of a summer dance on the patio, or persuading the Union's secretary Irene to wear a pair of white tights and play assistant for the mime show at Stephen Foster Memorial. For Board members their work in the Student Union is more than luncheons and lectures. It means meetings at the Greek's . . . big party at Larry's . . . Doreen . . . music from 4'West Side Story" . . . chandeliers and marble floors . . . Peter, Paul and Mary and their "Lemon Tree" . . . Jean's laugh . . . The Desk . . . good buddies . . and the satisfaction of a year's work well-done. Nardo. FIRST ROW: M. Capous P Tener, M. L. Karges, S. Rmne S. Goldmeier, C. Hemple L Heller. SECOND ROW I Grunt, F. Cross, I. Wertheimer I. Johnson. THIRD ROW S Downie, H. McKnight, D Meyer, G. Levinson, P. D1 activities A.I.E.E. Student engineers who wish to develop professionally and tech- nically in electrical engineering learn that the American Institute of Electrical Engineers is a val- uable aid. The graduate mem- bers of the organization include thousands of engineers and sci- entists from specialties in elec- trical engineering. Membership in the AIEE is not limited to students in the elec- trical engineering department, but is open to any student pre- paring for a career in engineer- ing or science. Some student membership advantages include prize paper contests, Engineers Week activities, and joint ad- ministration of seminar pro- grams with the Institute of Radio Engineers. ALPHA KAPPA PSI Alpha Kappa Psi, the ttBus Adv frater- nity, is one of the more socially-minded 'fr-W professional groups on campus. Evenings spent at the apartment provide fun and relaxation for the members, and the reg- ular week-end parties afford amusement for all concerned. A-K Psi also has its serious side, how- ever. Scholarship keys are annually awarded to outstanding members, im- portant business contacts are formed, and attempts are made to further re- search in the various areas of business. The fifty-year history of Pittls Delta Chapter is lilled with activities toward these ends. FIRST ROW: P. Shapiro, C. Schrock, F. Landgrafl, K. Fuller, D. Sanker, B. Saylor. SECOND ROW: T. Tominac, R. Nosphsker, A. Polinoff, L. Howard, G. Luther, P. Robin- son. THIRD ROW: P. Holtz, S. Gross, A. Goodman, B. Tarlo, R. Craig, B. Nydes. FOURTH ROW: J. Waldman, E. Seegar, J. Tipton, J. Roy, L. Facchini. 'FIRST ROW: S. Leff, L. Agyud, H. Koontz, D. Falce, J. Hrivnak, S. Simpson, R. Gorham, J. Piterski, R. Walters, G. Grimshaw, A. Whitehead, M. Mastandrea, J. Gamble, M. Sebastian, D. Bier, L. Pitts, D. Olivio, L. Fantozzi, R. Furst, P. Varkala, R. Schmid, T. Foster, R. Reed, M. Snyder, J. Mastandrea, R. Feint, P. McNally, A. Gnarra. SECOND ROW: P. Shahin, R. Reynolds, W. Bleakley, M. Mickle, F. Kulon, B. Carey, F. Hays, W. I-Iaeflein, J. Tosatto, R. Barna, R. Brandenstein, G. Mostoller, W. Palmer. FIRST ROW: D. Phillips, M. Hunt, E. Nogal, E. Weinheimer, A. Chatiner. SECOND ROW J. Flanagan, A. Nicola, P. Pasquinelli, R. Petrie, E. Dozzi, R. Chupa, D. Fleming, P. Dargan, S. Richel, B. Stack, A. Weiss, C. Lebder, A. Hussey, R. Merther, R. Weinheimer, P. Duralia, G. Aggy, J. Michlovic, R. DiCicco, R. Stern, C. Hilmer, W. Buch, J. Flack, P. Mahoney, P Peters, G. Moranz, R. Diess, T. Cronin, R. Naeglen, R. Vogol, R. Sheroke, D. DiLucente THIRD ROW: D. Elphinstone, G. Frankovich, J. Semple, B. Pierman, R. Sankey, H Schwartz, D. Kupec, J. Canel, J. Davis, R. Hatala, P. Wilson, T. Dietz. BETA ALPHA PSI The field of accounting having developed far beyond the aba- cus, accountants are required to have a good academic standing and a knowledge of a wide range of business subjects. Beta Alpha Psi, the honorary accounting fra- ternity acts as a liason between professional men, instructors, and students. This group also en- courages cordial relationships between its members and the accounting profession. Joel Hunter, Chairman of the Board of' Crucible Steel Com- pany, was among those to be tapped into honorary member- ship at the initiation banquet. Also included in the fraternity's activities were speakers, field trips, and a Christmas party. A.S.C.E. To better prepare the new engineer for his future work, Pitt's chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers worked to bring its members into close con- tact with the professional men of their field. The din- ners are run in a very busi- nesslike manner, but these men are students as well as future engineers. They can be found in every corner of the campus, participating in the ,student activities. Late beers and early class- es are all a part of forming the man and the ASCE is what fomis the under- standing and comprehen- sive engineer. activities BUS. AD. CABINET One of the newer members of the vast student government groups on Pitt's cam- pus, the Bus Ad Cabinet, was originated with the idea of promoting and helping the programs of the School of Business Administration. After Bryan Saylor has adjourned a meeting, one might find a member of the cabinet planning for the Cabinet picnic or sending his suit to the cleaners for the luncheon the following week. The various seminars scheduled by the group are centered around one major topic of interest: thc problems of the Business major in school and out. The group meets to discuss and hear the Bus Ad person speak of his problems. After the formalities of meetings and luneheons the members can often be found con- tinuing their discussions in the back of Frankie's or over a coke in the Tuck Shop. FIRST ROW: E. Drexler, D. Meyer. P. Tener, J. Zetwo. B. Saylor. SECOND ROW: D. Pruchnic. K. Fuller. D. Sanker. J. Waldman. T. Tominac, W. Morganroth. l HILLEL A brunch of lox and bagels on Sunday mornings ended the week of activities sponsored by the Pitt Chapter of Binai Brith Hillel. The week began every Tues- day and Thursday with lectures given by Dr. Rubenstein. Tuesday's lectures cov- ered many phases of the current topic of discussion-6fExistentialism, Religion, Modern Literature? The lectures given on Thursday presented "An Introduction to Jewish Life and Thought." Many were the Sunday nights when music and laugh- ter eould be heard coming from the Y.M.H.A. There was the Chanukah party which featured folk singer, Vivien Richman. Spontaneous dancing began when she and her two aceompanists rendered the spirited Hava Nagilah. Every Friday night was set aside for Sabbath Services in Heinz Chapel. This year marked the first time Jewish services were held on Pitt's campus. FIRST ROW: Gail l-lenken, G. Davidson SECOND ROW: B. Silvers, J. Epstein, R Rubenstein. I R E The Institute of Radio En- gineers is one of the largest engineering societies in the world. The student engi- neer who is a member of this society will be able to take advantage of field trips, radio code classes, and the annual student night when he may discuss problems with a profes- sional engineer who has had experience in industry. FIRST ROW: A. Whitehead. L. Fantozzi, L. Agyud, S. Hrivnak, R. Schmid, J. Wilson, Professor Revay. SECOND ROW: D. Bier. S. Gamble. P. Carker. P. McNally, W. Single- ton. J. Lesko. THIRD ROW: S. Leif. G. Cunningham. W. Parker. J. Zagrodnik. D. Kent. FOURTH ROW: H. Kuntz. B. Shalin, L. Pitts. R. Glaser. C, Bailey. T. Cook. FIFTH ROW: D. Iurenko. A. Gan- nori, R. Walters. Simpson. R. Kuprock. PHI DELTA CHI The Pitt chapter of Phi Delta Chi has the distinction of being the only campus honorary that owns a house, which is a great advantage to its members. Located on Lothrop Street, conveniently close to the Nurses, Residence, the house be- comes a center of activity for all its men. The monthly meetings usually degenerate into parties, with the treasury providing everything from refreshments to dates. Phi Delta Chi selects its members from pharmacy students having a good pro- fessional grade average and a good moral character. These high qualifica- tions are a fraternity tradition, as is its flower, the carnation, and its colors, which are Old Gold and Dregs of Wine. Another tradition is the custom of sitting on the porch with one bleary eye on the Nurses' Residence, computing the room numbers of promising-looking student nurses. But Phi Delta Chi also has its serious side, with recruitment drives in high schools, setting up National Pharmacy Week displays in drugstores, and organ- izing a tutoring program for freshmen. activities Talking, the sore spot of many groups, is the life blood of the Debating Union. Under the leadership of Pat Gulas, Joe Hallal and Woody Higgins, those students who are adept at this age-old American pastime are coached to know exactly what they are talking about. The trips to those other schools and the television appearances directed by Ray Krotec led to many and varied adventures. Not only do the members talk, they are first and foremost students at a major university. The flat tires that make the team late . . . the victory parties . . . the defeat dirges . . . the trophy room in Schenley . . . preparations for the Cross-Examination Tourney . . . the hot nights readying for the Summer Tournament . . . Joe's HSM Award for the summer in Europe . . . the late discussions t'What is today's biggest controversial issue for debate?,' DEBATERS: Barker, Barton, Brozell, Cazen, Custis, Danielson, Durant, Flanagan, Goorin, Gulas, Hallal, Higgins, Hoffman, Kane, Kro- tec, Kyper, Lebovitz, Mathieson, Mishelevich, Profant, Sherman, Sherman, Sibert, Silver, Smerek. M217 Sim- fff:aax2taIarawr:.::2tQ..g:ssilfx: :fu I fm.. . ,- p .. WM. PITT DEBATING UNION WOMEN'S CHORAL In their white blazers the members of Womenis Choral gather three times a week for several hours of singing. From freshman to senior, they practice inten- sively under the direction of Professor Colton. Their hard work is rewarded by the enthusiastic applause which follows their concerts. The week-end of fall camp means much more to the members of Women's Choral than rehearsals and scales. It means long walks, new music, friends with mutual interests, and informal singing lasting long after formal rehearsals have ended. FIRST ROW: M. Fay, P. Brand, D. Mandell. SECOND ROW: M. Stewart, M. Rex, C. Thompson. THIRD ROW: L. Whitney, J. Morris, C. Roberts. FOURTH ROW: C. Pole- siak, A. Bilewicz, P. Campbell, B. Burger. FIFTH ROW: P. Berkley, C. Burke. SIXTH ROW: C. Denise, J. Denton, Faith Leitzel. W.R.A. The misleading title of this organization may lead people to think that the mem- bers of that other biological group are not included. Although called Women's Recreation Association, the organization is open to the whole undergraduate stu- dent body. While classrooms and text- books take care of the mental stimula- tion of the student and social affairs handle that side of the student, the Wom- en's Recreation Association ohcers a whole range of sports activities. Swim- ming, tennis, riding and hockey are only a few of the activities that one can par- ticipate in by joining the organization. The side benefits are those that seem to branch from any sports group: a sense of fair play and a development of co- operation and team working. FIRST ROW: N. Burton, L. Oklin, C. Roberts J. Rockwell, J. Krausche, C. Whitehouse, M L. DeMay, M. Cobes. SECOND ROW: B. Achilles, C. Schissel, R. Marlowe, C. Polesiak P. Nemeth, D. Colgan, J. Fromeyer. WPGH John Glenn, Chancellor Litch- field, and folk singers, Peter, Paul, and Mary were featured on Pitt's newly organized cam- pus radio station, WPGH. Broadcasting to dormitory stu- dents for sixty hours a week in- volved considerable planning. Setting up taping sessions, getting records, and setting up disc jockey schedules were among the jobs of station managers. Manager Dick Rauh also had the job of selling the Pitt News, Student Government, and the Administration on the idea of in- stalling an expensive cable. Once installed, everyone agreed that it was worth the money to make WPGH a stronger station. FIRST ROW: J. Kleinberg, J. Freed- man, D. Johnson, D. Rauh, N. Gross, N. Firestone. SECOND ROW: J. Spero, J. Herzog, M. Klein, B. Purdy, V. Bhat, D, Mishelevich, J. Trevas. THIRD ROW: D. Crawford, J. Le- vene, B. Lange, J. Malin, R. Staib. W rf ATHLETICS Q...i.,..,....-ff, football ' ""' f ,,,, Season Record 10 Miami 7 1 3 Baylor 1 6 1 7 Washington 22 6 West Virginia 20 6 U.C.L.A. 20 28 Navy 14 9 Syracuse 28 ,Q ,gp ,,, . 20 Notre Dame 26 'i 'W 10 Southern California 9 13 Penn State 43 , .N lf... .Af .gli tm FIRST ROW: E. Clark, J. Price, F. Walton, E. Billy, D. Dobrowolski, J. Chisdak, R. Conrad, R. Roeder, J. Ir- win, E. Ferdinand, S. Colella, J. Ozimek, A. Grigaliunas, J. Telesky, P. Billey. SECOND ROW: P. Martha, J. Traficant, E. Merkovsky, J. Kuprok, S. Jastrzembski, R. Coustillac, A. Kuzneski, H. Haser, F. Cox, L. Vignali, B. Clemens, B. Guzik, J. Yaccino, D. Sanker, R. Leeson, M. Lippincott, J. Zabkar, F. Scrip. THIRD ROW: Coach J. Michelosen, J. Botula, R. Ostrosky, D. Chillinsky, G. Lehner, J. Ware, P. Pulsinelli, D. Picciano, R. Chisdak, C. Ahlborn, P. Cercel, R. Dodson, T. Brdwn, R. Popp, J. Cullen, G. Cherry, R. Marini, Manager B Connelly. FOURTH ROW: R. Long, R. Conway, J. Kuzneski, E. Sobolewski, G. Kaltenbach, E. Borghetti, J. Maczuzak, J. Jenkins, J. Gregg, E. Adamchik, J. Holzbach, L. Slaby, J. Draksler, T. Sopkovich, J. Hunter, M. Goldberg. DISAPPOINTING FOR PANTHER Early December snow marked the end of this year's season. The Pan- thers were a greatly different team from the original squad that had started the season in mid-September. In ten weeks, the Panthers had faced strong opposition from some of the country's toughest football schools. Denounced as bums one week, they were hailed as mighty heroes the next. On the field, cheers and boos followed on each other,s heels, with even John Michelosen coming in for his share of attention. It was a tough season for the coach. He was greeted with yells of g'Take a hike, Mikej' at almost every home game. He even found himself hanging in effigy from a flag pole in front of the Student Union following an upset defeat by West Virginia. But the season was not without its brighter side, the large number of sophomores on the squad gained valuable experience. Rick Leeson, Paul Martha, and Pete Billey were among the several sophomores who proved invaluable. Their running and excellent defensive play- ing sheds a glimmer of hope for next season. Students and sports- writers also acclaimed the fine place-kicking of Fred Cox. Without his field goals against Miami and Southern Califomia, the Panthers might have finished the season with a much poorer record. In the course of the season, the Panthers did win three games, knocking over Miami early in the season, beating a bowl-bound Southern California team, and sinking Navy by a score of 28-14. football Sobolewski nails a Huskie quarterback. Cox tries to spot a hole in the defense The Panthers got oil to a good start as they downed Miami, 10-7. The first half of the game was played under a bright Miami sun, and Pitt was behind by a score of 7-3 at half-time, the three points com- ing by way of a Fred Cox held goal. But the second half was played in pouring rain which drowned Miami spirits and gave the Panthers the sort of weather they were used to. The hero of the game was Paul Martha, who scored Pitt's winning touchdown on an 80-yard run. The Baylor Bears proved that they had the ability to come up with the big play at the big moment. The Panthers led 13-3 at the half, but Baylor came roaring back to score two touchdowns. After the final whistle, the stunned Panthers still could not understand how they had managed to lose the game. Coach Michelosen commented, "We just let them out of the hole when we had their backs to the wallf' Clemens and Kuzneski are about to smear the enemy ball-carrier. football A heart-breaking loss to the Washington University Huskies was the story of the Panthers, third game. Until the last few moments, it apparently was a vic- tory for the Panthers. Then lightning struck as the Huskies scored on a 42-yard pass to make the score 22-17, with the Panthers on the short end. A tired-up West Virginia team came looking for blood in the annual grudge battle, and a tired Pitt squad found themselves in trouble all the way through the game, finally losing by a score of 20-6. The Panthers' blocking and tackling was not up to its best, and their only touchdown proved to be far too little to win over the enraged mounties. Al Grigliunas, one of a long string of fine Pitt ends, is dragged to earth after successfully receiving a pass. Halfback Nat Whitmeyer of Washington State University is snowed under by a wall of Panther tacklers as he attempts to slant off-tackle. Two other Panthers follow the play in the event that Whitmeyer breaks away. ma at football Paul Martha is dragged down from behind. TOUCHDOWN, PITT! as Al Grigliunas scampers across the goal line. Fl Ed Clark barely manages to elude a tackler as he swings around right end. The Panthers traveled to Los Angeles looking for their second win of the season. After winning their opening game with Miami, the Panthers had dropped the next three. They were hungry for a win, and also for venge- ance. In the UCLA game the previous year, the Panthers had been beaten by a crew of olhcials who were all from the West Coast. But it all proved to be useless, as the Panthers returned to Pittsburgh a beaten team. The underdog Panthers put on a show of power as they rolled over the Midshipmen from Annapolis, 28-14. A formidable Navy team, with a 3-2 record, fell easy prey to the fired-up Panthers. Until the final minutes, it looked like a Panther shutout, but the Middies managed to roll up two touchdowns against Pittls "B" unit. Mainz- 1anT: .km 1.9 " , .... . M Fred Cox boots the extra point as the defenders futilely try to block the kick. Wllvhr ,,., gs , Tralicant Hips a pass to Martha after rolling out to his left, with his blockers frantically trying to protect him from onrush- ing tacklers. football Cox attempts to sweep his own right end in the Miami game. Archbold stadium was the scene of one of the Panthers' toughest games. After losing to Syracuse 28-9, the Panthers knew that they had played against one of the countryis best football squads. The Panthers were outplayed by a powerful Syra- cuse backlield, led by All-American Ernie Davis, who scored two touchdowns and set a new Syra- cuse rushing record. A last ditch scoring attempt by the Cats was thwarted by the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame, felling Pitt by the score of 26-20. Fred Cox kept the Panthers out of the hole by booting many long punts and leading the scoring efforts of Pitt with 14 of the 20 points. It was the first Irish victory after three consecutive losses to Pitt Panther teams. Leeson is tripped up as he smashes over his own right guard. V 'f 7 'Y ','f- ' . ", YW . it Q . , at X ff! t 45523 , ' -gg, .Q 5h -1605 Jef. get ff 4 " K7 it e X ft L . ,AS Bc ,QQ .H 4 fig r Sk U , V5 v bt ht.. 'Q V K I ,, rn Y it ' 1. 2- we 'FW r I 'Qc QT! .4 Q get . . .. ,S lv .. I , A P- 4 XX ' 1 ., x ,425 i ef -fu n t - tr rttee eti T, K. H 1 W,kkk K t t y rrr be h i W, r '1-1 ' ,lz 1.1. Viy' --ifz fu ' '1"L L"L N .- VVL: ' " ,. ,-,,1 " ---' ,.. W'f' ,-" fri. Iif P' . 1 h.-h "hh e N t E .L , 1lLE,,uf4 :la,i Mum 3 Glenn Lehner, Pitt quarterback, tries to drag down a Notre Dame back in the game with the Fighting Irish at the Stadium. football Fred Cox booted a 40-yard field goal to provide the win- ning margin in a battle of defenses over the Trojans of Southern California. Rick Leeson led the way to the 10-9 victory while raising his yards-rushing total to 357, Csur- passing last year's record set by Bob Clemensj. Denny Chillinsky was "Johnny on the Spot," recovering two Tro- jan fumbles at opportune moments in the game. After a disappointing season, the Panthers placed another victory in the win column before a highly partisan Homecoming crowd. The game against Penn State climaxed a long season for the Panthers. They were never in the game, losing 43-13. It was the last appearance in a Pitt uniform for 12 mem- bers of the squad, but there are upcoming sophomores to take their places. Whether or not the sophomores will be able to do the job that their predecessors have remains a problem for next year's coaches. Pitt end John Kuprok strangles an enemy quarterback, partially blocking the pass and preventing a substantial gain. John Telesky bulls his way through the line. ' 'W "H - ' -f -W mf- f H - - V f ,, f ,wx as .mmmzafg W aanxw i " "" u ' ' YYY, Y, , , , , ,W ,,,, 7 7 SOCCBT IMPROVE ON PREVIOUS SEASON Soccer does not attract quite as many spectators as football, but it is just as rough and bruising. A spectator, watching the team play a game with shin guards as their only protection, can ahnost feel the body contact between the players. The soccer team posted a formidable record this year, with six wins, four losses, and one tie. Two of the losses were to St. Louis and West Chester, who battled one another for the National Collegiate Athletic Association Championship this year. Highlights of the season include an upset over a strong Penn State team and a 4-3 win over previously undefeated Akron University. Also, Corky Cuthbert, Pitt's high scorer, scored thirteen goals, an out- standing record for a college player. This year's 6-4-l record was an improvement over last season. Coach Leo Bemis had many promising young players on this year's fresh- man team, and a supplemented varsity should be able to step onto Kennard field next year and pursue a rough, winning soccer season. FIRST ROW: K. McFarland, C. Dunbar, N. Barcs, P. Liberati, S. Daniels, S. Donatelli, R. Tarasi, J. Yospin. SECOND ROW: W. Summers, M. Kahn, B. Schwarz, R. Cuthbert, T. Verlato, K. Rentschler, G. Harley, H. Okuth, G. Georgokakos, T. Staab, R. Venglik, R. Mehock, A. Fenster, E. Weir, L. Bemis. Season Record Frostburg Ohio U. Akron U. Michigan State St. Louis Slippery Rock Howard U. Grove City West Chester Lock Haven Penn State cross country CONDITIO FOR TRACK ONE OF PITT'S FINEST RUNNERS, Steve Waslo, trots in toward the finish line as he ends a workout at the Schenley Park course. FIRST ROW: J. Towne, L. Robinson, R. Tarkany, S. Was- lo, J. Hart, W. Mocnik. During the Fall, Pitt's Cross-Country men invade Schenley Park and change the parkfs summer scene of picnics and relaxation into a cross-country racing+course. Beginning at Flagstaff Hill, Pittis Cross- Country runners race over hills and bushy paths through a four and one-half mile course in cross-country competition, disturbing sun- bathers and catching the attention of the Schenley Park sight-seers. Although this year's record was not impressive, four wins and five losses, the team composed of Sophomores and Juniors gained valu- able experience which will be encouraging to Pitt for the next two years. If you watched a cross-country race this year, you saw one Pitt Sophomore far ahead of the rest racing toward the finish line. This runner, Steve Waslo, came Hhomei, first in competition with regular- ity throughout the season. A strong desire to win, combined with physical fitness that he acquired by running three miles a day dur- ing the summer, moved Steve from the number two man on the Freshman Team to the number one man on the Varsity this year. Steve loves to run and chose Pitt over other schools because of keener competition here. Aside from being a competitive sport on its own, Cross-Country has another purpose. lt prepares and conditions men for Pittis Spring track team. This coordination of athletics is a fine example of the method which Pittls athletic department uses to encourage physical fitness for its athletes throughout the year. Every year the cross-country team must face rugged opponents. When schools such as Navy and Penn State come to Pitt to run on Flagstaff Hill, the team must be in top physical condition. This is the reason for the long, grueling, daily practice sessions. Lungs burn, legs ache, and sweat pours off the runners. But the back-breaking practice finally pays off in the Saturday meets, when the runners can call on the little extra reserve of energy that would not be available without such tough conditions. ,11X, Season Record 40 Slippery Rock 34 Ohio U. 34 Bowling Green 34 Kent State 42 Penn State 20 Navy 30 West Virginia 27 NYU THREE RUNNERS RELAX after finishing a hard meet with an opposing school. Pitt's cross-country men annually face tough competition from some of the country's best teams. basketball Season Record 70 Purdue 79 Ohio State 82 Carnegie Tech 83 Arizonar 70 Duquesner 74 Syracuse 67 Fordham 83 Tennessee? it 89 Evansvilletl' it 66 Kent State 62 Penn State 7 8 Geneva 5 8 Westminster 77 Columbia 7 8 West Virginia 94 Boston College 70 Carnegie Tech 76 West Virginia 70 Bucknell 72 Miami COJ 5 3 Westminster 7 1 Temple 55 Penn State t"Steel Bowl 'F i'Evansville Tournament FIRST ROW: C. Sheffield, T. Larkin, T. Malony, R. Sankey, T. Gurich, Smith. SECOND ROW: R. Roberts, D. Sauer, T. Olofson, T. Schinitzki D. Blysmak, Coach Timmons. THIRD ROW: B. Generalovich, P. Krieger B. Jinks, D. Ginevan, K. Hepworth. -men... j Wt 3 f SEASDN ENDS WITH RESPECTABLE RECDRD On the elevated iioor at the Field House, the Pitt basketball team annually comes up against stiff opposition from some of the country's best basketball colleges. Playing twice a week during the winter months, the Pitt five meets teams from Arizona to West Virginia. This year's season was no exception. Ohio State, Westminster, and Duquesne, which eventually wound up in the National Invitation Tournament in New York, were only a few of the rugged teams that Pitt faced. The Panthers did not come through the season unscarred, but they managed to win more than they lost, posting a final record of l2 wins and ll losses. Included in this record are four tournament games, as the Panthers played two games in each of the Steel Bowl and Evansville Tournaments. While other students were comfortably enjoying their Christmas vacation, the bas- ketball team was sweating its way through the annual Steel Bowl Tourna- ment. The lirst team Pitt had to face was the University of Arizona, whom they trounced by the comfortable margin of 25 points. But in the second round, the Panther hopes faded as they came up against the NIT-bound Duquesne five. Pitt did its best, but the team from downtown was just a little too much for the Panthers as they dropped the game by 3 points. In the Evansville tournament, which took place a few weeks later, the Panthers had to face both Tennessee and Evansville. In the first round game against Ten- nessee, Pitt lost by one point in an overtime period. The team bounced back the following game defeating Evansville 89 to 83. After the tournaments were over, the Panthers split the remaining games on their schedule, losing seven and winning seven. When the season records were compiled, Cal Sheffield came out on top as high scorer for the Panthers. His 375 points were instrumental in the Pitt vic- tories. Brian Generalovich proved to be the best Panther board man as he col- lected 203 rebounds during the season. He also was close behind Cal Sheffield in scoring, with a total of 343 points. Another outstanding Panther was Paul Krieger, who picked 187 rebounds off the boards. The basketball season should provide a glimmer of exciting games to come in the near future as four sophomores were the mainstay of the 1962 team. . W Q 0 ,tiff ?a?ff'3' 33' vi Y DS. BOB SANKEY, one of the team's co-captains drives in for a layup against Penn State. basketball O O O , :t..Q.g err, vw EASILY FLIPPING IN A SHOT, Pitt's Kriger scores in a game against Kent State. 41 -' A ' ' ll' ' fe 'W 3 ? wps-my-4' ' 5-.. X Y v Rv'-1' r "ff Osszs, '9 .. ef X 1 f. . Q f O Q - 'K 4 wp " 3 IQX A -1 V ' 5 Y 5 Y Q Q. l L Q Q elm x., fp xl 3.x A-, 63 T basketball BRIAN GENERALOVICH, the spark behind this year's team, maneuvers for a shot in a hard-fought game against rival West Virginia. His opponents quickly move in to try to stop the big Pitt star. PAUL KRIGER goes up for a jump shot against West Virginia as number 44, Rod Thorne, guards him. Thorne was highly rated by players, writers, and coaches in this year's season. o I 'I M- f . M1 S -gli ,W sm wrestling COACH PEERY anticipates the wrestler's next move. R TED SIXTH IN NATIO Coach Rex Peery must have told his wrestlers to win or else, because when the dust cleared from the Field House mats, the Pitt wrestling team was the proud possessor of a 7-l-1 record. This winning season represents a great improvement over last year, when the Panthers compiled a 6-3 mark. Win- ning only one more game than the previous year and switching one of the losses to the tie column may not appear to be such a magnificent achieve- ment, but it was good enough to win for the team the honor of being second in the East. Pittis wrestlers started off the season with a tie in the match with Michigan State, but from then on it was easy work as the victories followed each other in rapid succession. Syracuse, Army, Northwestern, Cornell, Navy, and Mary- land all bowed to the Panther wrestlers. The wins were not by one or two points, but were by crushing margins. Syracuse and Maryland only scored two points each, but Navy did a little better, as the Middies came through with three. The Panther wrestlers were undefeated until they met with Lehigh in the next to the last match of the season. Lehigh had lost the previous year's match to Pitt, and this loss had been rated as the upset of the year in college wrestling. The Engineers from Bethlehem got their revenge as they handed Pitt a 17-14 loss. The loss must have rattled the team, because they just squeaked by Penn State by a score of 15-14 in the last match of the season. Although the individual Pitt wrestlers did not fare too well in the annual post-season tournaments, the record that they compiled during the regular season seems to be enough evidence of their prowess. The long, sweaty hours of practice in the Field House wrestling room, Rex Peeryis constant insistence of perfection in the calisthenics, the sit-out, the figure-fours, re- verses, take-downs-all came in handy for the Pitt wrestlers when the time came to compete on the mats. Coach Peery, who is one of the countryts out- standing wrestling coaches, is a typical example of the line quality of coaches which the Pitt Athletic Department tries to acquire for all its sports. .-vi--0 LM? A t 2' 9 -. Ai 4 3 . . . V ,,:L ,. .. xi A ,,, . . Tmh A k,mlV . ., ,..L :Vh fi m:?l,, V , 3 mVV mAt h N h U S rr Y IT ' .ril . ? . C Fm" Y ' - Sm gm 1 en- , : . " .N ..1.,' "'1. V 'W ' .K ' .. " ik 'X VV K 1' .. K ,1.W m , I . 3 . if I g' A I 1 , . N. . A r ew L : 1 . s. l 'fm' : 1 ffm' fm? WW? S Qxrf eil? . R. S .W .rs , F . . ,, . ' "" T. T T T . r 5 ::: :? CC L 1 SC t - :w:1:-, ",- f ,., ' - f ':-: 2,1 .V - -- 'a f ' Q-. 2 Z.: "" V t . ' '--. , " U ' , - V x ,V h gi L I Q ' t Q .. 4 . . M . . ., Q: .. '- ,,,, .. fir' ,.. .. - -" T .. wf...N-M ff- - ..,L .. . sf, MM.. ,,.-, . ,, f - 0- f Q., 7... nw. . .-1:2-...gf .. ,,,,,,w, ,1. ,,,A,, fH w.k.,h.....' . ,,,, H In ,,,. .1 ...,, Z V: Vrrkk K kkkr ,.V.., U, .. A . . ,V .. I . ,,.. Vrkkk ..WM,..,r,.. ...WMV I . .. K. , .. ,,,. ,..,...,M,,, ...,.,,. N A V . ,,,, ...,,.xe:-y.....' -- rf" fy f fl- ' . :uL:i:....,...... . .. FIRST ROW: W. Brooks, L. Killian, R. Martin, W. Solominsky, T. Zolikoff, P. Wilson, T. Baily, D. Kelvington, C. Moyer. SECOND ROW: A. Arrigoni, G. Marrison, L. Samonsky, T. Jeffries, J. Telesky, D. Weitzel, A. Silver- man, W. Robb. THIRD ROW: R. Nunn, L. Cumming, T. Gay, K. Barr, L. Brittan, O. Ware, C. Shaffer, D. Osmum. wrestling Season Record Michigan Syracuse Army Northwestern Cornell Navy Maryland Lehigh Penn State vw ' l"""'f s . g f fix "No advantage" signalled by the referee as two straining wrestlers hit the mats at the Field House. DICK MARTIN, the number one wrestler in the East, finished his collegiate career never being defeated in a dual meet. Here he is in a temporary stalemate in an early match. mt '1 -,wwf f A M V Q swlmmmg ANOTHER W NNING SEASO FINISHED WITH HIS PART IN THE MEET, a swimmer fidgets nervously on the bench. His teammates anxiously await the outcome of the event now taking place. FIRST ROW: R. Koch, D. McNugh, R. Rush, A. Sarsfield, J. Sollinger, S. Ganong. SECOND ROW: B. Alexander, R. Levine, W. Pappert, B. Shanahan, W. Hanson, R. Levine. THIRD ROW: B. Grady, E. Coleman, R. Knight, A. Van Nort, R. Petterson, B. Cubun, W. Weisl. In recent years, the Pitt swimming team has been treated like a homeless child. Since Pitt, at present, has no pool of its own, the team has been forced to practice and compete in such places as the Frick School matchbox and the Young Men's and Womenis Hebrew Asso- ciation pool. But the athletic department has taken pity on the swim- mers and has acquired funds for a new pool. It will be located with the rest of the Pitt physical education buildings, on top of the hill across from the Field House. It will be more than large enough for the swimming team, physical education classes in swimming can be held while the team is running through its practices. The new pool will be one of the finest in National Collegiate Athletic Association competition, and if good equipment aids athletes in winning, then Pitt's swimming team should have no trouble coming through with undefeated seasons in the coming years. This year's swimming team did not fare badly, even though it did not have a home pool. The swimmers came through with one of the best records of all the Pitt teams in intercollegiate competition, winning eight of their meets and losing only three. The three meets in which Pitt came out on the short end of the score were with Maryland, Syra- cuse, and North Carolina State. But these losing meets were only momentary setbacks for the swimmers cracked one record after an- other. From the opening meet in which they drowned West Vir- ginia, to the last one, in which they squeaked by Notre Dame, the Pitt swimmers were confident that this would be a successful season. nur. ' "f'f' -,...,, N, - -...U .5 K Qnffif Qfffig 1N,'is if rflfii' -m g imma FHA Si! ,E il :blink Dill Season Record West Virginia 21 Lehigh 20 Maryland 6 1 Penn 30 NYU 40 Bucknell 44 Syracuse 68 W 8a L 32 North Carolina St. 50 Ohio U. 30 Notre Dame 46 4335 '5 '?iZS'xS!5.A gymnastics A FLYING DISMOUNT from the long horse completes a tough routine. FIRST ROW: E. McConnell, J. Franchuk, E. Stein, E. Za- mecnik, R. James, T. Misage. W ? PLIT EA ON After a weary week of practice sessions in the gymnastics room in the basement of the Field House, the Pitt gymnasts drag their mats and equipment up to the basketball floor for the meet. A smattering of spectators, usually consisting mainly of the team's immediate families, watches the team reveal excellent form and coordination as it goes through its exercises. On the horse, the flying rings, or the parallel bars, the Pitt team comes through in fine style. The long hours of practicing routines which include vaults, dis- mounts, and 'slron Crossesw pay off in the Satur- day meets. This season, the Panthers split eight meets, with four wins and four losses. Earl McConnell proved to be an indispensable member of the team as he finished the season with the honor of being rated the number one gymnast in the East. He swept the tournament at West Point, defeating all comers and winning a position on the All American team, the only Eastern gymnast to do so. At the na- tion-wide tournament in Albuquerque, New Mex- ico, he defeated fifty-three others in the free exer- cise event and finished third in the tournament. Season Record 47 Syracuse 49 49 Ohio State 31 5 7 Springfield 39 52 Temple 44 47 Navy 49 43W Perm State 52W 73 West Virginia 23 39 Army 57 squash IN A PRACTICE SESSION, a member of the squash team at- tempts to return a serve which has been dropped into the corner by his opponent. 'T' ' TEAM HIGH IN RATING FIRST ROW: J. Brown, D. O'Loughlin. SECOND ROW: B. Summers, M. Smith, P. Nycum, R. Mason, P. Patton, B. Pope. It is not a difficult task to pick out squash players from the rest of the Pitt athletes. The squash players are the ones with the round black and blue marks all over them. In the matchbox-size squash courts hidden in the end of the Field house, the squash team holds its nightly prac- tices. Their welts are produced by a small black, hard- rubber ball traveling at better than a hundred miles an hour. The sport demands a fantastic amount of coordi- nation, along with great stamina, since the game requires a player to be fast on his feet. The conditioning needed for squash is produced by daily runs on the board track ir1 the Field House. As physical education students pull and pant their way through their twice-weekly half-mile, the members of the squash team easily sprint by them in the daily mile run required by squash coach Bill Summers. Mr. Summers is in his fifth year as a squash coach at Pitt, and the fine job he has done shows up in Pitt's being rated as the number twelve squash team in the nation. In- dividual team members also stand high in the national rankings, such as captain Joe Brown, undefeated this sea- son, who is ranked seventh in the country among college squash players. Season Record Stevens Wagner Army Penn Dickenson Navy Adelphi THC IGH OF RELIEF TSEASO ' E D If the word "Hurrah,, characterizes the showing of the baseball and tennis teams, then the correct Word for the track team's show- ing this year is "Snarff' The competition was tough, and the Panther performance was never up to the occasion. Disastrous defeats by Miami of Ohio, Penn State, Navy and Syracuse were the story of the season, as the trackmen lost every meet. The only happy note during the four meets were an outscoring of West Virginia in a triple meet with the Mountaineers and Syracuse, and the outstanding performance of Joe Friend throughout the season. Friend was the Hman of the hourv for the Panthers as he man- aged to score a high percentage of Pittis points in all the meets. ln the meet with Navy, Pitt had a total of 3792 points-14W of them scored by Friend. He won the broad jump and high hurdles, placed second in the low hurdle competition and ran on the Win- ning mile relay team. Friend was the sparkplug, but the trackmen needed more than a spark to set them on tire this year. i"' ll an an f 9 Qs IE my wig .anti Season Record 5 6 W Miami COhioJ 3 7 W Penn State 47 W Navy 5 3 West Va. Syracuse FIRST ROW: L. Robinson, J. Rice W. Mocnik, R. Tartang, R. Weiers J. Hart, J. Towne, R. Shanafelt SECOND ROW: S. Waslo, S, Mun- ter, G. Meckley, J. Friend, V. Carter, J. Whiteford, R. Clark, M. Slutsky, Mr. Banner. a 1 64W 93W 92W 41 68 rifle Season Record Ohio State Lost Washington 85 Jefferson Lost Penn State Lost Carnegie Tech Lost Washington 84 J eiferson Lost Geneva Lost West Virginia Lost Duquesne Lost Carnegie Tech Lost Grove City Lost West Virginia Lost Geneva Lost FIRST ROW: D. Pucci, M, Tierney, J. Hugye, B. Ziegler, M. Glick SECOND ROW: MSgt. B. Bostnick N. Carbone, A. Schweinsberg, G Dovorznak, J. Culmes, R. Hoelze- 1'1'1al'l . Q A TOUGH SEASO One of the newest of Pitt's varsity sports, the rifle team is in its second year of NCAA competition. Coached by Master Sergeant Bostwick, the team members learn the fine points of marksmanship. The sharpshooters soon discover that it is a lot easier to hit the bull when you are practicing with your own team than when you are in competition with another school. Palms sweat, and hands begin to shake. The coughing and tidgeting of the people behind the firing line does not help a nervous rifleman. Marksmanship requires great concentra- tion and an ability to remain calm under pressure. This ability comes only with ex- perience, which the Pitt rifle squad has managed to gain in its first two years as a varsity sport. Although the team posted a winless record, the experience gained through competition will prove invalu- able in the coming years. . .......... w THE SPOTTERS keep a careful eye on the targets as the match progresses. The use of a spotting scope is a valuable aid in coaching a riile team. Season Record 2M SW Tech West Va. St. Vincent Penn State Georgetown Ohio State Ohio Univ. Duquesne Navy Kent State West Va. 4 6h 4M 7 6 26 16 9h 7 24 6 R. McBride, L. McCoullagh D. Swanson, J. Vesseleny, E Warnick, N. Shorthouse. gl ., ...t . X 8:54 DEFEAT AND DISCOUR GEMENT This season, the golf teamis colors should have been changed from Blue and Gold to Black and White. It was a sad year for the squad as they lost every match on the schedule. The scores ranged from a horrendous 26-1 debacle in the Ohio State match to a 'slightly closer score of 9h-8M against Duquesne. Various reasons were given for the fail- ures on the links, but the one that seemed to have the most truth behind it was the complaint that, at Pitt, golf means about as much as polo or cricket. One of the players complained, "They only had one guy on scholarship-and he was a hacker? The player was referring to himself, but the truth remains nonethe- less. ennis FIRST ROW: P. Patton. J. Brown, R. Glasser. SECOND ROW: D. Solyn, Coach B. Summers. B. Hinkel, R. Mason, D. O'L0ughlin. Season Record 4 Penn State 5 6 Bucknell 3 4 Ohio Univ. 5 4 Kent State 5 5 Cal. St. Tchrs. 4 9 Duquesne 0 1 Navy 0 1 Navy 0 3 West Va. 3 7 W 8a J 2 7 Tech 2 8 West Va. 1 LIGHTI THE DARK ESS The Panther tennis team received a lot of valuable experience in jumping over the net this season, as they won eight of their matches. Dropping only three and tying one, they managed to post one of their better marks. Especially satisfying wins were the three matches in which they shut out their opponents, knocking oh' Duquesne by a score of 9-0 and sinking Navy twice, with the final score being 1-0 each time. Two of the outstanding netters on the squad this season were Dave O'Loughlin and Joe Brown. O,Loughlin hnished the year with a season record of 10 wins and one loss, while Joe Brown wound up with 9 victories and only 2 defeats. The tennis squadis winning mark was one of the few bright lights in a year of darkness for Pitt athletics. baseball WINNING SEASO THE D AMOND me sw WGN 7' X7 -uv FIRST ROW: A. Alex, J. Sylvis, H. Kane, J. Carlisle, L. Carra, R. Shutterly. SECOND ROW: C. Cuthbert, D. Wagner, J. Yedlicka, D. Williamson, J. Cioffl, M. Supsura, B. Fisher. BACK ROW: Coach B. Lewis, A. Ricciuti, B. Wetzal, R. Barton, P. Martha, R. Supansic, T. Brown, J. Giarusso, A. Chotiner-Manager. The place is Forbes Field. The time-a warm spring afternoon. The pitcher squints in toward the catcher for his signal, the gold P on his cap glinting in the sunlight. Two men are out, and the winning runs are on second and third. The pitcher goes through his windup, hesitates a moment, and hres his best fast ball. The batter stares numbly as the ball flashes by him. The umpire screams HYer out!" But there is no roar of victory from the crowd, only the anguished groan of the visiting coach. The reason? This is Forbes Field, but these are not the Pirates who have just won the game, they are the Panther base- ball team, and there is no crowd, only a smattering of half-hearted spectators. It is unfortunate that the Panthers did not have more fans this season, for the baseball team's record was one of the few winning seasons that Pitt athletic teams have achieved this year. The 11-5 mark was produced in great by the hitting of Corky Cuthbert and Al Riccuti, and by the standout pitching of Jim Sylvis. Also standouts on the mound staff were John Carlisle and Andy Alex. The Panthers can look forward to an even better season next year, since only three men will be lost from the team. Drew Williamson, Ralph Shutterly, and Larry Carra are the only members of the Panther nine that will be lost through graduation. The experience gained this year by the rest of the players should prove invaluable when the Panthers take to the field next season. - -...a-4. :Mfr 'f - .. C9 Q . -L wif' ww. jfs to -if s if Kiwi VTX 'K'-va ,, .M Q: -:XA X ,Q Ry' 2 was 'vgtA,m.,,y W . - - Ja N J '-Xxx i-- fY.?,' Sw, K + V , A af ' "s x -up .. ..,:e W , .......,. ,V -nsos.-.,,,.f.a:::1,1,,. . k ,qt wg, I' Q., . 1 i K A eva , ..,f' Q l s,ix,l ' .... it .V rp .1 1. Ji i.. - , , . ' . a-. 'Y ..g-- ff ., W ,Q N Season Record Fort Lee Fort Eustis Fort Lee Bucknell Allegheny Virginia Indiana Colgate Syracuse Syracuse Cal. St. Tchrs West Va. Westminster W 84 J West Va. Duquesne Duquesne Navy Kent State Allegheny ACADEMIC administration -ifezilfftiiiifsr . J r in. R Q .K I A f . k 5? rigs, fr, 3-ffglyf aimszirkwgfpyy. . -. " .Z'7-.'yqL,gg.x1"jLs.gaLiQf . b - . . "Eg ,ff:fi.vi . fry. A A' , ' ' . , i , . .,, 2.145.gdiir's4f53YQviJL,sgsiff.'.i3J . . , , mil. f-A ....,.,w ,,..,, -gms ,V sw. .f W., it- My fs,kt,.a,,,.,. Y. . . -,W..'., :W ' mmgiwwfsf' 'ee ' ee-1 ' ws. -'Vit V 2 .u . '7+'Iz't1w1f,'v Q is .. ...Z '- 1 V 'W rm., .1 I . --2 -- rv W- nf. sw-sf . , . . - , X . . ' ' ' 'as'i34fffgavfsxf'gfw:p.vsf'z:W- 57 ' f . . . vi-iz? . . --5143: xg" .'f5e'1":Yr1ww3'e"i" .- . . ,V,.,,,- M, . ,,.,-.. . - 1 , .. .tx.fs,,,eAn. g A W pg s "....,f.5 I .ff -I i . . . N.. , Lf 'P'f1'sf - Board of Trustees oflicers Gwilym A. Price, Chairman Leon Falk, Jr., First Vice Chairman William H. Rea, Second Vice Chairman Stanton C. Crawford, Secretary Alan C. Rankin, Assistant Secretary G. S. Rupp, Treasurer J. T. Hudson, Jr., Assistant Treasurer Patterson, Crawford, Arensberg, and Dunn, Solicitors Roger S. Ahlbrandt The Honorable Joseph M. Barr, Ex Ofiicio William W. Booth John G. Bowman, Ex Officio Arthur E. Braun, Trustee Emeritus William W. Collin, Trustee Emeritus Leland W. Cook Frank R. Denton Earl A. Dimmick Leon Falk, Jr. Rufus H. Fitzgerald, EX Officio Marcus A. Follansbee Robert R. Gaw Charles W. Herald Harry B. Higgins, Trustee Emeritus Henry L. Hillman The Honorable David L. Lawrence Chancellor Edward H. Litchtield, EX Officio George D. Lockhart George H. Love Norman MacLeod Frank L. Magee The Honorable William D. McClelland Richard K. Mellon Emil E. Narick J. Henery O,Neill Gwilym A. Price William H. Rea A. W. Robertson, Trustee Emeritus Walter J. Rome The Reverend Howard C. Scharfe William P. Snyder, Jr., Trustee Emeritus The Honorable Sara M. Soffel, Trustee Emeritus William A. Steele James M. Symes Edward A. Weeks Edward R. Weidlein, Trustee Emeritus William K. Whiteford Leslie B. Worthington Dr. Jessie Wright Robert A. Young After a touchdown run at a football game, at a groundbreaking ceremony, at Fall Convocation, all eyes turn to Chancellor Litchfield. For the stu- dents, Dr. Litchfield is a source of pride. They point out the Student Union, the dormitories, and science buildings-new on campus since "the Chancellor came." They talk of new faculty mem- bers and the plans for the library. Showing visitors to Pitt the scale model of the campus, they discuss Pitt including the huge swimming pool on top of the hill and the quadrangle to be built on Forbes Street. But it is not only students who are speaking with pride about Dr. Litchfield and the University. With the announcement of the Oakland Corpora- tion all Pittsburgh is talking about the educational and cultural center initiated by Dr. Litchfield. Civ- ic, political, and educational leaders will join forces with Pitt to make Oakland a center of achievement in the arts and sciences. Chancellor Litchfield is the first to explain that these ideas and their accomplishment do not stem from him alone, but are the result of the knowl- edge and interest of the members of the Board of Trustees. Coming as they do from various parts of the country and from a variety of professions, the trustees give to the University the benefit of their experience. Leaders in their own fields, they con- tribute well thought-out decisions. Interplay of forceful leadership and fresh thoughts concerning education characterize Chancellor Ed- ward H. Litchfield and the Board of Trustees at the University of Pittsburgh. Together they have begun to create a new Pitt. Dr. Edward H. Litchfield Chancellor administration ln the vast stone structure of the Cathe- dral, in the empty halls of the dormitory, or in the crowd of the Tuck Shop a stu- dent ean be almost overcome by loneliness or the vastness of his problems. It's at times like this that being able to sit on the sofa in Dean Rush's office and pour out your heart means most. Often she doesn't offer much conversation and gives only a minimum of advice, but there is always plenty of tea and some fresh brownies from Clarais kitchen. Whether it's Clara's cooking or Dean Rush's listening, the world usually seems much brighter to a girl after her talk. The 'Aopen-doorw policy of the adminis- tration ineludes the office of the Vice- Chaneellor of Student Affairs. Dr. Ran- kin, like Dr. Crafts and Miss Rush en- courages students to discuss Pitt with him. Making Pitt a better place for stu- dents is important to Dr. Rankin and student suggestions help him to make the decisions which effect everyone. For men and women alike, Dean Crafts office offers services of every kind. As in Dean Rush's office, the student is no longer a number. He is remembered by everyone, from the secretaries to Dean Crafts. A quick phone call from the Deanis office can straighten out most of the red-tape problems that plague stu- dents in a large university. Dr. Alan C. Rankin Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Dr. William C. Crafts Dean of Men Miss Helen Pool Rush Dean of Women education -sm .fs M3 X K 3 ss, 1 KJ, H 5ZfJfffg3'fsrgi'sf51ff5 35.-'fws,:,ggv' -4- Lifmfli' , LOOK! LOOK! SEE THE TEACHER! The SINGING ALONG WITH TEACHER about the horse which knows its way to teacher reads 3 book about Dick and Jane grandmothers house is the children's favorite way to end the morning. and their dog Spot, I REQ IRES DE OTION AND KILL In the classrooms of the School of Education this year, girls with button-down shirts and boys with white collars barely above the tops of their crew-neck sweaters prepare lesson plans. Here they learn how to make school work interesting for their future students. When these students graduate and stand in front of their own class- rooms, the button down blouses and crew neck sweaters will change to wool dresses and business suits, but their aim of mak- ing school work interesting for their students will be the same. The final step in preparing an education major for teaching is the period when a Senior in the School of Education teaches under the supervision of an experienced teacher in our public school system. This is the opportunity when the student teacher first uses his les- son plans that were written during the early hours of many morn- ings and his teaching skills that were acquired through four tri- mesters of hard work from studying psychology to learning to play a little tin flute. Always under the watchful eyes of students and their parents, the experienced teacher, as well as the student teacher, must be a paragon of virtue to gain the respect of the community. He must not only teach, but must also be a disciplinarian and counselor to his students during the school hours of every day. THE COMING OF THE GREAT PUMPKIN eagerly anticipated by young artists at Halloween. education-department chairmen Dr. J. Birch Dr. G. W. Anderson Dr. G. L. Fahey Dr. G. Gould Special Education Business Education Educational Psychology Secondary Education Dr. M. J. Thomas Dr. W. H. Johnson Dr. C. C. Little Education Administration Foundations of Education Religious Education Dr. P. Masoner Dean ........!1-T. Dr. Don Cleland Dr. K. C. Oermann Dr. C. P. Scott Elementary Education Physical Education Vocational Education , in engineering and mines AFTER A DAY crammed with classes and laboratories, a student engineer wearily returns to his locker in Engineering Hall to select the books and equipment that he will need to prepare tomorrow's assignments. i i BUSY SCHED LES PREDOMINATE The student who is enrolled in the University of Pittsburgh's School of Engineering and Mines soon learns that becoming an engineer is no easy task. He is burdened with endless assignments, intro- duced to the intricacies of the slide rule, spends interminable hours in laboratories, and is expected to have an immediate answer when a thermodynamics instructor snaps at him, "Deiine an adiabatic process as related to Clausius, statement of the Second Lawf' The engineer also learns to utilize every spare moment in the day. He solves physics problems on his lunch hour, works on a difficult question in kinematics during the evening, and finds that the ten minutes between classes is an excellent time to discuss diiferential equations with one of his classmates. To balance the many technical courses in his curriculum, the engi- neer takes courses in the Humanities. Literature, Writing, and po- litical science prepare the engineering student to take his place in the community. Such courses as these have made the Pitt engineer realize that there are other things to be studied besides camshaft design and integral calculus. Although the student engineer may complain at times about the pressure he is under and the addi- tional courses he is required to include in his curriculum, he real- izes that it all is necessary in order to prepare him for his entrance into the modern world. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING STUDENTS attempt to concentrate on a diflicult problem as they perch on the high stools in one of the second-floor design laboratories. engineering and mines-department chairmen Prof. H. J. Botset Petroleum Prof. W. I. Short Civil Prof. M. L. Buck Mechanical Dr. J. F. Calvert Electrical . rf Dr. G. R. Fitterer Dean WK" Dr. J. Coull Dr. J. A. Berger Prof. W. R. Turkes Prof. E. A. Dines Chemical Metallurgical Industrial Mining liberal arts AT A LONG LAB TABLE in a room smelling of formaldehyde, a student piths a frog, then dissects it on a wax-lined tray to study its intestines, heart and liver. W wsaggfi '+I DE STUDY ITH PECIALIZATIO "Liberal education," as defined by the schoolis bulletin, "frees the minds of men and Women from the limitations of the immediatef' However, during his undergraduate years, a student's mind is kept something less than free due to never-ending exams and papers. Freshmen and sophomores taking chemistry mutter memorized formulas as they walk to class. Over their morning coffee students conjugate irregular French verbs. Gazing at diagrams of a dissected frog they try to remember if the instructor said the blue lines were veins or arteries. For an entire evening they struggle with the Eu- clidean theory or search for a subject for this weekis English theme. Juniors in the School of Liberal Arts groan at the length of the re- quired reading lists handed out by their professors. But they read them all including Franny and Zooey before the term is finished. Around the middle of the term juniors all but live at the library as they work on the four term papers that somehow fell due in the same week. Seniors' minds are no less free "from the limitations of the irnme- diatef' They try to cram all they can into this last precious year. Having completed the survey courses, they go on to specialize. It is by this learning in depth that the student Hnds the key to seeing life in perspective. WAVY LINES AND ARROWS on the blackboard illustrate the problems of acceleration, velocity and momentum that are encountered in the study of rockets. Dr. Biondi explains these problems to a physics class. liberal arts-department chairmen Dr. A. B. Martin Dean Dr. S. P. Hayes Dr. A. Issacs Dr. R. A. Patton Dr. W. R. Hovey History Economics Psychology Fine Arts Dr. H. N. Carroll Political Science Dr. R. Brittain History of Religion Dr. A. F. Frederickson Geology Dr. P. Gray Dr. J. Kolbert Dr. E. A. Kennard Biology Modern Languages Anthropology liberal arts-department chairmen Dr. J. C. Knipp Dr. D. Halliday Dr. N. E. Wagman Dr. T. Finney Mathematics Physics Astronomy Music Dr. H. S. Frank Chemistry Dr. W. G. Crouch Dr. O. L. Reiser Dr. V. Wright Dr. H. Kline English Philosophy Sociology Geography Dr. M. Hanig Dr. J. Matthews Dr. A. M Young Biophysics Speech Classics nursing STUDE TS SOO LE 4 .wi .gn-A 'va AN ISOLATED CLASSROOM at the end of a long corridor in Scaife Hall affords the best opportunity for students to find the solution to a technical lab problem. L. . A V xx -'izglg NECESS D TIES Instructors acting as patients observe the bedside manner of the student nurse. But it is her long-suffering lab partner who is on the receiving end of practice hypodermic needles. Administering 'fhypos" to oranges and lab partners is easy compared to the day when the student nurse calmly administers one to a patient. But it isn't long before she is giving shots and carrying pill trays like a professional. Having learned the fundamentals of care for the hospitalized pa- tient, the student nurse begins her work in the hospitals affiliated with Pittls School of Nursing. It is here she learns the aspects of her profession not taught in a classroom. At Children's Hospital she sees the effect of the walls painted with colorful scenes from nursery rhymes. As she wheels the children up and down the cor- ridors of the hospital, she watches their faces brighten as they see tropical birds in their fancy cages along the walls. She also learns to con children into taking shots by telling them that she is a per- sonal acquaintance of Santa Claus. Not all of the nurse's training takes place in the hospital. Classes on the hill at Scaife Hall give the nurse the necessary background in anatomy, chemistry, and psychology. At meals in the Residence, the student nurse discusses her patients, her instructors, and her exams with her fellow students. Evenings are devoted to memorizing formulas, writing up experi- ments, and studying for exams that are a part of almost every day. DID THE DOCTOR SAY one pill or two? I better get three to be on the safe side. be :Qt ,X .. ..-. . ...J AN INSTRUCTOR DISCUSSES in one of the classrooms in Scaife Hall how to prepare a variety of "formulas" for an eleven pound baby that is a patient at Magee Hospital. nursing-department chairmen Miss L. M Ni Dr. I. G. McLenahan Obstetrics Miss L. Young Surgical Dr. L. M. Austin Education Miss J. Holt Pediatiics Miss D. Ney Medical pharmacy P RT ER HIP ALTHOUGH HIS LABORATORY HOURS are rushed and confused, the student still finds time to discuss subjects other than the chemical properties of a given solution. However, concentration is a necessity if he is to finish his experiment in the assigned period. as O ITH EDICINE Classes in the School of Pharmacy are small. Students have the benefit of a close relationship with some of the finest teachers in the fields of pharmacology, pharma- cognosy, and toxicology. The pharmacy student applies the knowledge that he has received from a faculty of academic and professional ex- cellence in the laboratory. Using modern equipment, the student acquires the skill and patience necessary for a member of the modern health team in our society. In the laboratory the student learns to weigh and measure with perfect precision. Through the efforts of the School, the student realizes that his work is a valuable aid to his part- ner-the medical profession. Despite rushed days of memorizing formulas, taking notes in classroom lectures, and sessions with the microscope in the laboratory, the pharmacy student manages to look neat in his white shirt and tie. His white coat may be rumpled at the end of the day, but it has served its purpose of mak- ing the pharmacy student look, as well as feel, professional. To supplement class work the Pharmacy Department plans visits to large drug corporations to observe the man- ufacture of their products on a large scale. For the stu- dent, this is the beginning of a lifetime of keeping pace with the latest products and methods in a constantly changing field. -tain GRADUATED CYLINDERS HELD at eye level allow near- perfection in the measurement of the ingredients that make up prescriptions. Long hours of lab study assure a solid back- ground in the knowledge of pharmaceuticals. .. ' '.'.-'1,,1y:w m . f . ..., t .m,. 'L42 ,,... ..'. . pharmacy-department chairmen Dr. J. A. Bianculli Dean Dr. J. D. McEvi11e Dr. N. Farnsworth Dr. J. P. Buckley Administration Pharmacognosy Pharmacology 55.0 . ' ,,,,...v-'if dentistry WITH A METAL SCRIBE, a student etches the of a waxed dental plate. mold CLINIC PRC IDES EXPERIENCE Although the Dental School is comparatively small, it manages to bustle with the same activity as the other schools of the University. With an added influx of sopho- more students and the television method of instruction, the building on the hill is a world in itself. The size of the school permits the close student contacts necessary to form good professional men. Classroom discussions expand into bull sessions at the Luna. Here the "dents" compare notes on everything from the prosthetics exam to the develop- mental grooves of the gal they met at the dent party the night before. Students of Dentistry spend long hours in classes studying physiology, radiology, and other courses. In laboratories practical experience is gained manipulating the tools and in constructing impressions of the mouth, preparing the student for his future practice. The dental student remembers well his tirst day at the clinic when he assumed an air of professional assurance, yet felt inner qualms as his clinical instructor, expecting perfection, quietly guided and inspected his work. At first, the instructor stayed close to the elbow of the student, al- ways ready to give his advice or assistance if it should be needed. As the student gained confidence, he did more of the clinical work on his own. For though there was always a professional dentist at hand, the dental student came to realize that his patients in the clinic had faith in his ability. To be worthy of this faith he realizes he must put forth his very best work. .,. t. A SAMPLE of oral bacteria is examined by a dental student. ,ri Lf 'Muff l Alhg ,iiii l li ix ,Q dentistry-department chairmen Dr. E. J. Forrest Dean Dr. C. F. Brand Dr. J. C. Thornard Dr. G. C. Co Operative Pathology Research X x"""66f Dr. A. Segal Dr. G. M. Stewart Dr. W. F. Swanson Dr. W. A. George Anatomy Periodontics Histology and Embryology Prosthodontics im... Dr, V, A, Westin Dr. J. C. Eselman Dr. M. D. Foster Operative Radiography Pedodontics TRAINS FUT RE EXECUTI ES Students in the School of Business Administration set up make-believe corporations. As members of the board of directors of a fictitious business, they decide on fiscal and personnel policies. Acquiring skilled employees, dealing with unions, and deciding on an adequate insurance pro- gram are reported in long papers. Floor plans for a busi- ness oiiice on six foot sheets of paper are submitted in classes of personnel management. In the business administration major's notebook of bal- ance sheets and ledger paper, careful records are kept of the imaginary profits and losses of the Acme or Jones Company. Their problems of overhead, interest, debits, and credits, become the problems the students must solve. The business administration major can be seen carrying heavy books on money and banking or reading a copy of THE ORGANIZATION MAN. Real business also comes in for close scrutiny. Dressed in his best grey suit with a white shirt and conservative tie, the business administration major spends several days downtown observing the advertising department at Horne's or the accounting section at U. S. Steel. Interviews are of immense importance to the business ad- ministration major. He soon learns to handle interviews and the battery of employment tests with ease. STUDENTS REALIZE that it is easier to earn blackboard profits than it will be in reality. 'fifties Z E LlT'7' A gfifiu ,snwifudeaxquii ..i.. -nr L I 4 .. ..,, N M w.f,,M,mWw M. K -ff:-V., M ' Dr. M. A. Robinson Dean ui 7 law INDIVIDUAL QUESTIONS concerning taxation often require more time than the hour allotted to a class. E ERCISI GP TIENCI Education requires patience, and no one knows this better than the law student. After completing four years as an undergraduate, he watches his classmates preparing for graduation while he looks for- ward to three years of law school. After the first few months, he becomes accustomed to wearing a collar and tie six days a week. He carries books of tremendous size, musty volumes that he would swear have not been opened in fifty years. While riding the elevators up to his classes or the law library, he bumps the other passengers, legs with a bulging brief- case that threatens to split open at any moment. Because the University of Pittsburgh Law Library is for use at the student's own discretion, the assignments by the faculty are pro- portionately lengthy and difficult. In order to compensate for these increased assignments, the law students divide themselves into groups of three or four men, each member of the team completing one portion of the assignment. Above all, the law student must learn to exercise patience, for since judicial processes, as well as educational processes, require patience, he may one day find it necessary to instill this quality in one of his clients. . A eseee . . ,, ,411 QI I A NECESSITY LIBRARY l 5 aiiwm w Dr. T. M. Cooley Dean 1 ' 5191-AEMHM' h5'i?a:7YQ2?:.? ,N,f.fnv.H,A,5x , W f IN THE LAW LIBRARY, a student diligently prepares tomorrow's as- signment as he leafs through one of the thick reference texts. medicine ORK I DIAGRAMS OF ARTERIAL PATHS, pictures of bone structure, and long articles on disease syndromes keep medical students in the library long after their classes have ended. LOCAL HOSPITALS One of the greatest thrills in a medical student's life comes when someone other than the elevator operator calls him "Doctor." It gives him a feeling of pride and sat- isfaction, along with a sense of responsibility. He knows that his patients are depending on the skill and knowledge that he has acquired in his four years of medical training. During these four years, the medical student learns the principles and techniques that will become burned into his memory. He learns anatomy by dissecting a cadaver, which before long begins to smell like a garbage can. Touring Presbyterian, Childrenis, Magee, and other hospi- tals gives him a chance to learn the practical side of medicine. He is asked to make a diagnosis of a patient in one of the wards and then compare it with the findings of the resident physician. His ego is considerably deflated when he discovers that he has mistaken viral hepatitis for duodenal ulcer. He also learns to diagnose ilhiesses through the use of x-ray pictures, and memorizes the name, position, and function of every bone in the human skeleton. ,wiv 'ui .f X J -'TX W",,, .fv- .3 .K Us fb.-Z' Dr. F. S. Cheever Dean graduate school of social work The Graduate School of Social Work at the Uni- versity ranks high among the schools in its field. Students, who have already received a degree in one of the social sciences, are trained further in the Held of community work. Each student ac- companies professional workers in one of the local health and social agencies, and together they try to solve the problems that place emo- tional strains on the community. On his trips with the professional agent, he receives an insight into a side of life that may be entirely unfamiliar to him. The "Pittsburgh Renaissancen presents a unique challenge to social workers. New housing oppor- tunities are one important result of slum clear- ances. Families to be resettled must be assured that the move will be benelicial. Tactful intro- ductions to new neighbors and a new way of life must be handled carefully by the social worker. Relocating small businesses is particularly difli- cult. The owners of the candy stores, bake shops, and the neighborhood groceries must go into busi- ness in an area where such services are already established. Often the relocated owners must learn a new trade. Finding training and jobs for them often means contacting businessmen and employment agencies throughout the city. Seeing these men and their families settled in a new home adequate to their needs is a great satis- faction to the social worker. 25 5' a Dr. Wilbur I. Newstetter Dean of Graduate School of Social Work ni. ,. i 4 YL IQ .1 2 ,,'-- Q.: if Al". f 'QUITE ll. Y I ki Seniors odk man of the year Usually, the obligations that are placed upon a married man who is attending college prevent his engaging in many University ac- tivities, both academic and extracurricular. But this yearis Senior Awardee, Richard Johnston, is exceptional. In his nine terms at the University, he completed the requirements for two Bachelor of Science degrees-one in mathematics and the other in mechan- ical engineering with the aeronautical option-both with outstand- ing grade averages. In addition to earning two degrees, he was active in the student publications held, serving as president of Pi Delta Epsilon and vice president of the Pitt Foto Club. He also held almost every position on the staff of the Skyscraper Engineer, including the post of managing editor. Though busy with these activities, he also found time to be vice-president of the American Rocket Society. Richard Johnston deserves to be congratulated on the fulfillment of his duties to his family and the University. By means of con- gratulation, he has been given the Universityis highest honor- the Omicron Delta Kappa Senior Award. 1 . . k .I 1" ff' 's . b 2 """"""0 N-m+w.,.,,,-W. ...,,.,,,. W ' K , K ' f V - 1 .MQ2-fvmfif'-,!A,,5.pgs-6-pg A 7 A W- m f Yfw gf ' K Q f . - J", 1 f rw. fgfw k 'W .. , '. W 12. . I V- ., -..M K, A , SJ? 9 Q .1 .f Q. 1 . ' . K 1, -his Ln. 5:9-a1f,S,,a fy ,gm M,,,1,.., ,T sv ks, W : A ' i 'imqkfwzaw-. 41- S., W, - 37 QB- - ' - 7 ,,m!:1r5"f?'1'C z A A f.A. Y 'wi 'W' if-,, Q Wi. ff Qi g 'T :af A, .sf - f will ,V j3p,M?.wfQ.ej7w .M - .M 5- , Y b,X3..',Y'fNk,fs,,,,.y.'-4.1 fqqv,-'W' T53 - L Q,--.,. . .' 1 - , My' ,., -., 4 B -fuqw. ,mf - k Y - . .4 .., iI,afg,?W . fi .,,- was 'QQ' - 5- -' 5 . M .. t x, ', yay, Q65 -'fwp . " ' ' N iz. .- 1, XSS. "A 'ff ' 7 . ,if A K 'Q A5 I E' 5 If . ,-,Q -,,3 f'ff5J?3Q Ms, Af ff 414 AM ww sw 1 ey, V,l:.gjA,?.f.Q f 'nn ag ...S in ik , , , -,. ' ' . g Q' T K ,1iki!Lxb'.,-?,7 st , s7.f x ,a5N, Tn' f-'fi K 5'jff4'w,f f? " W ' :lily ,f,'f',1- Jr? 22 -' , 0 ,V TA .4tl.. l,j.,. , .i R, W ,, i , i r. 1-v . ', ffm" sank Q, ,, Q, WH, . - 21:- -t ff g. . 4 ' z . , W .1 5 ,Y ,nur , ,hx 'gg . .f K , 5 , ,M J 741 7 . fx -1 ,.. , 1-. f - , A , , .. I . ' 'wr , 5 Q I Nj L V ,M A . ..., 4, W i if . f f " ,V ,, . f m"41 .1 h K X K mr. and miss pitt Mister and Miss Pitt are the out- standing members of the gradu- ating class. To be worthy of this honor, the awardees must be more than activities majors and not merely habitues of the li- brary. Mr. Pitt, William Hosick, and Miss Pitt, Ina Amdur, have managed to combine the best of both qualifications. Despite the almost full-time job of being Business Manager for SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER, the monthly engineering maga- zine, Bill also attended meetings of Omicron Delta Kappa, Dru- ids, Pi Delta Epsilon, and Alpha Phi Omega. Equally active, Ina Amdur has also contributed out- standingly to publications. As a PITT NEWS columnist for four years and Associate Editor of IDEAS AND FIGURES, Ina has demonstrated literary ability. But activities alone do not make an individual worthy of being named Mister or Miss Pitt. To this man and woman, the under- graduates look for leadership in academic excellence. In Bill Hos- ick and Ina Amdur this leader- ship has been realized. Not only are they outstanding scholars, both having been named to Phi Beta Kappa, but through their Work in honoraries and the ex- ample they have set in the class- room, they have created a high intellectual standard. MISS PITT Ina Amdur MR. PITT William Hosick 'U' ,-.. ... '53 , .' - .. What makes one student stand head and shoulders above the rest of his class? Call it intelli- gence, drive, ambition, or what you will, it is an intangible qual- ity that cannot be measured in terms of Q.P.A. It is this un- known factor which is repre- sented in the OWL Hall of Fame. These are the students who are not merely members of organiza- tionsg they are the ones who as- sume chairmanships, who take on the not-so-glamorous jobs, who are elected president. Yet, in the midst of all this imposed responsibility, they maintain top grades. You meet these people every day. They pass you in the halls while on their way to an S. G. meeting and ride with you on the Student Union elevators to the publica- tions lloor. It is the hope of the faculty mem- bers and students who selected this year's members that, by hon- oring these people, the Univer- sity community may become aware of the invisible quality that distinguishes one person from the blurred group of faces behind him. -....,...,.. 1 ' I """'N-...Ma 7' . va ,V :Shen Ray Reaves Nate Firestone y" ,S-Lf -. ' nf ,J gi Pat Teeters Mary Lou Ehnot Linda Ackerman F Bill Singleton owl hall of fame Julie Thomas Joan McQuade Dick Martin Dick Johnston Bill Pierce Joe Hallal Ed Kondis Marcia Clark Ruth Ann Freeze A1 Resnick Em1lee Rellly Bob Slotkin Pat Gulag Mercy Klmgensmlth Y - 'vw athletic awards I --neu E 'Ya ":' M . ', :JM iiifliggj fag: sniper rmlxm tony sarsfield Athletic Committee Each year, there is one senior athlete who, in his four years at the University, has compiled the best all-around record. He has excelled in athletic ability, has had the best attitude toward athletics, and has managed to keep a respectable grade average. In the spring, this man is presented the Athletic Committee Award for his outstanding achievement. Anthony Sarslield, this year's winner, justly deserves the most coveted of all athletic awards. In his junior year, he was a standout on the swimming team. As a member of the squad, which was the fastest in the history of the University, he broke records in the 100 and 200-yard butterfly division, and was a member of the freestyle relay team that broke the record by more than three seconds. While a senior, he con- tinued to turn in the fine performances that helped to win for him the Athletic Committee Award. reed Clarke Hartwig Award This year's Hartwig Award went to Reed Clarke. The award is presented annually to the senior athlete who has done the most to promote, sponsor, and create in- terest in athletics, and Mr. Clarke was judged to be the athlete most worthy of this honor. While he was a member of the track team, and excelling in the hammer throw, he also competed on the cross-country squad. During his jun- ior year for the cross-country runners, he was co-captain, and was one of the top runners on the squad. Coach Carl Rees was optimistic about his chances for the future and felt that Mr. Clarke had the ability and ambition to develop into one of Pitt's all-time greats. As a senior, he continued as a member of the track team and helped to keep up the pace. His teammates learned that they could expect his usual all-out effort in the meets, one of the many reasons that Reed Clarke received this year's Hartwig Award. seniors ABELE, J. E ACKERMAN, L. ADAMS, D. AGEY, G. ALEXANDER, R. ALL, J. ALLEN, J. ALLEN, L. ALLEN, L. ALTMAN, M. ALTSHULER, R. AMATANGELO, V. R R B F E. A. H. R. P. H. R. AMDUR, I. S ANDERSON, A. ANDERSON, M. ANDOLINA, K. ANDREWS, K. ANDRYKOVITCH, K. ANTONACCI, B. ARMEN, A. L. P. R. R. R. A. A. ARRIGONI, A. J. ASH, D. ASHBRIDGE, R. AVERBACH, E. BABIC, W. N. BAGNATO, A. R. BAILEY, C. C. BAJR, K. D. BAKJN, R. N. BALAWENDER, M. BALCHUNAS, P. A. BALDWIN, J. R. BALTA, P. A. BARANOWSKI, E. R BARBER, C. G. BATES, M. P. BATHIE, G. K. BAUMAN, R. C. BAYNHAM, J. H. BEAN, R. J. BEEMAN, L. BECK, A. R. BECK, W. A. BEJRNE, V. M. BELINDA, s. J. BELL, D. R. BELL, E. D. BELL, J. A. BELL, R. E. BELLA, J. C. BENDER, G. L. BENDER, v. R BERGER, L. L. BERKEY, N. H. BERMAN, M. BERZONSKY, J. P. BETAR, D. J. BEYER, E. G. BICKEL, R. B. BIEN, E. J. BIER, D. A. BIKULEGE, J. s. BIKULEGE, s. A. BINDER, M. seniors BIRKEN, J. R. BISNETTE, M. B. BITTMAN, B. L. BITZER, H. W. BLAHUT, M. s. BLAZEWICK, R. L. BODNAR, R. L. BORECKY, J. E. BOTHWELL, R. B. BOWEN, K. D. BOWMAN, L. R. BRAZZO, G. A. BREGENSER, J. H. BREMMER, B. W. BRENNAN, J. M. BRIGHT, E. J. BROSKY, G. M. BROUGHER, W. E. BROWN, B. A. BRUNORI, B. J. BRUWELHEIDE, C. E. BUCHER, P. M. BUCK, W. H. BUJAKOWSKI, T. E. BUKOWSKI, D. J. BUMBA, H. R. BURG, R. D. BURGERT, A. L BURGH, P. K BURHENN, K. H. BURKHISER, J. A. BURKHOLDER, R. E. BURNS, J. E. BURROWS, D. L. BUSHMAN, M. BUZZA, C. V CADDY, A. D CAFARO, J. W CAIRNS, J. L CALDWELL, D. B CALMES, J. T CANCILLA, A. s CANCEL, H. J. CANNON, B. J. A 4 CAPLAN, R. J. CARAS, G. G. CAREY, B. J. CARNAHAN, J. A. CARPENTER, E. CARRA, L. D. CARRAUX, G. R. H CARSON, B. R. CASAR, M. s. CASINO, E. A. CASSELL, R. T. CASTELLANI, G. J. CASTG, L. E. CHERK1N, P. A. CHERYBA, L. W. CHISDAK, J. J. CHODER, G. H. CHVASTA, T. E. CITTERBERG, R. G CLARK, E. T. seniors CLARK, M. F. CLAWSON, R. N. CLEARY, F. H. CLEMENS, R. W. CLENDENING, C. P CLEW, H. T. CLIFFORD, W. W. COCHRAN, N. COHEN, R. COHFN, S. S. COHN, B. H. COHN, T. N. COLAIANNI, M. C. COLBECK, S. C. Jr. CONLON, D. A CONNFLLY, W. H. CONTI, F. C. CONWISHFR, M. COOK, D. R. COOK, A. J. CORBFTT, L. R. CORSE, C. C. CORSELLO, G. R. CORSELLO, J. R. COSTFLLO, N. C. COTTINGHAM, C. S COYNE, R. E CRAIG, R. W CRAWFORD, K. F CRIMMINS, P. J CUMMINS, S. H CUNNINGHAM, R. J CUPAK, A. D. CURRY, C. L. CUTULY, F. D. CWIKLIKI, F. CZERNECKA, H. L. DALFONSO, M. F. Jr. DANIELI, D. DANIELS, S. E. DANKI, D. J. DAROSZEWSKI, M. DAVIDSON, G. DAVIES, D. M ' Q . ' 4. ' 5' .. i: . ,,-. . . . DAVIS, DAVIS, DAVIS, DAVIS, R. DAVIS, H. Jr. P. A. J. R. J. T. P. DAWSON, G. C. DEISS, R. A. DEL CORSO, V. DE LEO, J. A. Jr. DE MATT, M. A. DE MAY, M. L, DEMETRIUS, A. A. DEMPSKEY, P. J. DENDTLER, D. B. DENNICK, J. W. DERMITT, R. E. DIAMONDSTONE, DI CICCO, R. W. DIETHORN, C. L. DIGGS, J. E. J seniors DILICK, T. DIMPERIO, M. MUCCIO, R. A. Jr. DI NARDO, P. DINNING, J. Q. DI PERNA, J. DISANTIS, T. A. DIVERS, M. DONALDSON, D. DONOHUE, D. DONOVAN, R. DOWIE, s. DOYLE, s. F DREW, H. D DROGGS, D DUDA, J. J DUNBAR, C DUNBAR, W DUNDORT, C DUNLOP, J. L DURKO, J. DURVALL, J. A. DZIENIS, S. EEERHARDT, E EBERSOLE, S. J. EDLER, D. R. EDWARDS, J. L. EGYUD, L. EHNOT, M. L. EISELE, F. ELLENBERGER ELLIS, R. ELSTON, J. ENGEL, R. J. ERICSSON, T. ERLICH, R. L. FAGAN, A. FAHNESTOCK FAIRCLOUGH, J. FANTOZZI, L. A. F ARRELL, H. FASSINGER, J. J. FATTA, J. FATUR, B. A. FATYOL, R. FAULL, W. R. FAUST, R. G. FAZIO, J. FEHER, Z. FELDMAN, J. R. FELDSTEIN, J. FELS, D. M. FENDINARD, E. FETTER, W. Z. FINIQEL, H. FINKELPEARL, FIRESTONE, N. FISHER, M. FISHMAN, B. FLOAT, B. B. FOLCKE, N. A. FORD, J. FOSTER, B. K. FOSTER, R. C. .F. ,D E. seniors FOSTER, T. P. FRAGOMENI, F. A PRANZ, J. E FREEZE, R. A EROELICH, R. L PROHNE, K FULLER, K. R. FUNA, J. A. FUNARI, A. V. PURST, R. C. PUSCO, R. A. GAHRJNG, J. A. GALETT1, B. J. GALLAGHER, J. P. GALLAGER, P. L. GALLAGHEN, R. J. GAMBERI, A. B. GAMBLE, J. A. GANOE, D. W. GARFINKEL, E. GAUGHAN, L. P. GAWLAS, M. GEBHARD, J. A. GEJNAER, P. J. GEISEL, V. L. GELLY, J. E. GELMAN, J. E. GELMAN, R. s. GEMEL0, E. G. GENSBIGLER, J. A GEORGE, S. M GERA, D. D GERBER, B. L GETZ, R. s GIBSON, M. E GIESLER, E. A GIGLER, D. E GILBERT, s. 1 GILLIS, D. F GINSBERG, R. s GLICK, H. G GLUNT, N. A GNARRA, A. C GOEHRING, R. L GOLDBLATT, R. A. GOLDBERG, E. P. GOLDBERG, R. A. GOLDEN, L. W. GOLDHAMER, P. B GOLDSTEIN, M. GOLDMAN, J. K. GOODMAN, L. A. GORDON, B. H. GORDON, J. P. GRAHAM, G. T. GRAMLING, B. M. GREB, P. E. GREENBARG, G. M GREENBERG, L. GREENFIELD, D. C. GRIFFITH, R. GRIFFITHS, M. GRIMALDI, J. J. GRIMMINS, E. A. seniors GROLL, J. A. GROSS, L. GROSS, S. S. GROSSMAN, J. A. GULAS, P. A. GUNDRY, W. J GUTHRIDGE, R. B GUZJK, R. E HABER, L. F HAGES, H. A HAGMEIER, L. W HALE, R. J HALL, A. M HALL, C. A. HALL, E. L. HALLER, N. P HAMILTON, D. R HAMILTON, S HANDLON, C. H HANNA, M. A jp HARDMAN, W. M. HARITOS, H. HARLEY, G. R. HARPER, R. B. HARRINGTON, G. H HARRIS, M. K. HARTSTEIN, S. HASER, H. A. HATALA, A. R. HAVERLACK, P. G. HAYES, A. E. HAYMAN, R. W. HECKERT, N. J. HEDGES, I. E. HEINLE, N. P. HEPWORTH, K. A. HESS, J. P. HEYL, C. HEYMANN, R. S. HIGGINS, W. E. HILBERG, R. W. HILL, S. R. HILMER, C. HIRSH, E. HIXSON, R. L. HOBAUGH, D. C. HODGKISS, D. W. HOERSTER, L. J. HOFFMAN, M. D. HOLLAND, D. L. HOLOKA, S. E. HOLZBACH, J. G. HORN, G. G. HORCHLER, D. D. HORNE, E. H. HOSICK, W. L. HOUCK, T. N. HOWARD, L. L. HRIVNAK, J. A. HUBER, W. R. HUEY, R. E. HUGHES, A. R. HUGYA, I. A. HUNNELL, M. G. seniors HUTCHJSON, V. S. HYNES, R. D HYSCOP, M. S. HYTE, D. H. JFFT, J. C. JKELER, F. T. IRWIN, O. P. JSKOWJTZ, J. J. JSNER, D. W. ISRAEL, N. M. IVANOVIC, A. JACKSON, D. W. JAMES, H. W. JAMES, W. R. JAMESON, K. W. JASTRZEMBSKJ, S. V. JEFPREYS, J. W. JOHNSON, D. L. JOHNSON, G. B. JOHNSON, J. F. JOHNSON, J. T. JOHNSON, S. W. JOHNSTON, J. JOHNSTON, R. P. JONES, A. C. JONES, C. M. JONES, G. J. JONES, M. S. JONES, M. K. JONES, W. A. KADLECIK, J. KAHL, M. KAISERMAN, E. R KALLQUIST, G. C. KANFER, P. S. KADISAK, E. S. KAPLAN, J. H. KARGES, M. KARLO, M. M. KARN, W. A. KASOWITZ, J. E. KATOFSKY, H. R. KAUPMAN, P. R. KAVIC, M. S. KAVO, M. KEIL, J. E. KELLEY, W. M. KELSO, D. R. KEMPLER, H. R. KENDALL, J. E. KERESTESY, R. W KETTERING, D. C. KING, D. O. KINNEY, J. A. KINTER, T. H. KITAY, M. A. KLAHR, M. KLEBAN, M. B. KLEIN, M. KLEIN, N. E. KLINGENSMITH, F R KLINGENSMITH, M A KLINK, L. J. KOCH, D. seniors KOCH, R. J KOCHER, A. H KOHN, S. B KOHUT, G. B KGHUT, K. L KONDIS, E. P KGGNTZ, H. s KOPELMAN, J. E KORB, H. M KGRMANJS, G. D KOSCHG, J. J KOTULAK, P. M KRAFT, R. M KRIEGER, D. M KRIVAK, T. G KROTEC, R KUFTA, s. J KUHN, C. L KUHNS, D. R KULASA, L. v KULON, P. T KUPROK, J. N KUSHNER, C. J KUZAK, J. E KUZNESKI, A. J KYPER, P. T KYSHAKEBYCH, G LAMISON, P. A LAMPERT, E. J LANCE, J. R LANDAY, N. D LANDGRAFF, F. A LANG, S. A LASKOFF, J. M LASKY, M LASNER, R. P LAVERTY, H. K LEBOVITZ, P. L LEBOVITZ, R. M LECKWART, J. F LEDERER, L. L LEE, L. E LEPP, G. J LEFF, s LEGAL, D. A. LEMERY, M. R. LEPPOLD, G. L. LERACH, R. F. LESHER, D. LESKO, J. G. LEVINE, M. LEVINE, W. T. LEVY, L. E. LEWINTER, H. LEWIS, M. LEWIS, M. K. LIEB, R. J. LINDH, R. R. LIPPERT, T. E. LIPTON, J. s. LITFIN, J. s. LIVO, N. J. LOBAUGH, C. F. LOCHER, D. H. seniors LOCHER, W. E. LODOWSKI, R. N LOGUE, J. J LOMBARDI, A. V. LONG, K. D LONGDON, B. J LONGENECKER, C. W LONGENECKER, D. P LONGPHRE, W. H LOREY, R. A. LOUNDY, J. G LOWE, H. E LOWENTHAL, J LOWENTHAL, L. S LOWRY, R. L LUFRANO, A. A. LYLE, V. D. LYONS, R. L. MacNICHOLAS, H. R. MABUNAY, F. D MACHAK, S. E. MACKEY, W. F. MADDALON, D. V. MADDEN, J. P. MAHONEY, P. A. MALACK, E. A. MALINCHAK, M. MALLINGER, S. MANDELL, H. L. MANNHEIMER, J. MALPELI, J. A. MARINO, M. W. MARINO, R. G. MARLIN, W. F. MARLOW, C. MARNELL, D. J. MARPLE, C. R. MARQUETTE, C. H. MARSHALL, J. R. MARSHALL, J. T. MARTIN, R. D. MASON, R. E. MASON, W. R. MASTANDREA, J. R. MASTANDREA, M. A MATHIESON, C. N. MATTERN, G. MATTHEWS, K. D. MATYUS, R. J. MATZKO, P. J. MAUE, H. W. MAWHINNEY, W. V. MAYER, J. R. MAYL, D. S. LAzzEI, C. S. MCCALLUM, W. E. MCCANDLESS, J. A. MCCARTHY, D. K. MCCAULEY, T. J. MCCORMICK, J. E. MCDONALD, D. E. MCDONOUGH, T. J. MCELHANEY, R. W. MCFERRON, R. D. seniors MCGINNIS, R. A. MCKAVENEY, E. E. MCKECHIE, J. MCKINNON, R. MCLEAN, C. L. MCMILLEN, C. L. MCMULLEN, J. MCNALLY, P. E. MCQUADE, J. MCVERRY, T. MCWILLIAMS, M. MCWILLIAMS, T. R. MEHALKO, C. A. MEISLIK, J. A. MEHOK, R. MERENSTEIN, G. B. MERINAR, J. R. MERRILL, A. MERA, E. W. METCALF, T. A. METRO, J. M. METALER, A. MEYER, D. MICHAEL, C. MICHALEK, B. J. MICHLOVIC, J. MICKLE, M. H. MIKESTIC, T. MILLER, A. A. MILLER, C. J. MILLER, J. MILLER, J. E MILLER, J. MILLER, L. J. MILLER, N. MILLER, s. C. MILSOM, J. MISHELEVICH, D MGBEJUME, J. K. MODENA, L. MONCHIK, G MONDAY, R. MONKELIS, M. A. MONROE, J. R. 1352 Qi ,D fl-5' We ' u ff ik.- RA MONZI, R. MOORE, V. B. MOORE, W. D. MOORHEAD, D MORANZ, G. MORGAN, E. MORITZ, N. MORRIS, S. MOWRY, H. MUELLER, J. MUELLER, N. MULHERN, J. J. MURPHY, G. E. MURPHY, J. MYERS, D. MYERS, E. D. MYERS, O. NAGORSKI, G. NAPIECEK, D. A NAPONIC, M. A seniors NARCISI, E. A. NATHAN, J. NAU, R. NEE, P. NELSON, R. J. NEIBERG, A. D. NEIMAN, J. NESTEL, K. R. NEWBERG, H. NIEDERMEIERM, J . L. NOPHSKER, R. J. NORRIS, S. NOSAL, A. NOTARIANNI, R. M. NUDI, L. A. OAKES, T. OCHES, L. O,DESSA, L. OESTREJCH, R. ONDO, J. O'NEIL, W. ORR, J. OSCHMAN, J. OSTER, FIELD OTT, J. OZKUL, O. PACE, F. H. PAGE, L. PAGONIS, T. PANZER, J. G. PARELLA, G. PARKER, H. PATELLA, R. E. PATRICK, J. PATTERSON, R. A. PATTERSON, S. PAVJAN, C. C. PAYNE, J. PENTEK, J. PEPINE, C. PERONI, C. PERSIN, W. PERZAK, T. F. PETERS, P. G. PETERSON, D. PETRTNA, M. F. PFORDT, C. PH1L1PP, P. . PIERCE, E. PIERCE, W. D. PIERMAN PINCHOK, R. PITERSKI, N. PTTTINATO, G. PITTLER, C. PLUTKO, E. PRAISSMAN, M. PRESCOTT, K. S PREVTTT, J. G. PREVITT, L. PROBST, J. E. PROVOST, R. PRUCHNIC, D. PUCCIARELLI, V PYLE, R. OU1NN,J. K RANGO, W RAUCCI, J RAUH, R RAUSCH, D. D REAVES, R REID, A RIED, J REINSTEIN, W RENNINGER, RESNICK, A. REYNOLDS, R. REZN1K,A. RHODES, R. D. RHODES, T. RICHARDSON, D. A RILEY, E. ROBIN, s. C. ROBINSON, P. D. K. ROCKMAN, G. RODGERS, R. ROEHLICH, F. ROHRMAN, J. A. ROMERO, A. M. ROOSE, J. ROPPOLO, L. ROSEMEYER, C. ROSEN, E. M. ROSENZWEIG, M ROSENZWEIG, R. ROSS, K. M. ROSSI, R. 14. ROTH, R. E. ROWLEY, R. ROY, J. RUBLE, S. R. RUCH, J. R. RUDJN, J. RUPRECHIT, D. RZEZHIK, T. A. SACKS, J. SAKUKSIY, H. SALMON, L. SALEM, B. SAMAY, R. SAMUELS, M. SANRER, R. SANKEY, R. SARSFIELD, A. SAX, H. SAXMAN, A. SAYLOR, B. L. SCALISE, B. K. SCAKZOTT, L. SCHALL, R. L. SCHEGGIA, F. SCHEJN, L. SCHENO, J. SCHMJD, L. SCHMJD, R. SCHNJTZKJ, J. SCHOLZ, P. SCHRIDER, L. SCHROCK, C SCHWARTZ, H SCHWARTZ, L SCHWEITZER, R SCHw1MMER, R. D SCIULLI, W SCRIP, S SEBASTIAN, M SEBYANICS, J SEDER, H SEGALL, R. S. SEIFRIED, J. 1. SEMPLE, J. SENT1PAL, N. SENTNER, R. SERRA, J SHAFFER, L. SHAK, M SHAH1N, B. SHANE, J SHAPIRO, E. SHAPIRO, 1. L. SHAPIRO, P. SHAVER, B. E. SHAWL, C. SHEPS, R SHEPERD, H. L SHILOBOD, D SHOLTZ, D SHONTZ, G SHREFLER, A SHUTTERLU, R. A SINGLETON, w. SIMMS, B. SIMS. B. SKARJU, J. SKIB, 0. S. SKINKISS, R. SKRABITS, L. SLUBIN, N. SLOTKIN, R. SM114, BD. SMITH, D. N. SM1TH, E. Aw mix , SMITH, E. SNIDER, M. SNYDER, M. SOBER, M. N. SOBOTA, R. E. SOKOLOW, G. SOLTZ, B. SOMERHALDER, SORTINO, s. V. SPALLA, A. SPECTER, H. A. SPERLINS, R. SPETZ, S. N. SPIECHA, W. E. SPIELMAN, W. R. SPISAK, J. G. SPOTT, D. STANISH, F. X. STEERMAN, D. B. STELZER, J. R -r-p-rw----f-- --- seniors STEPHENSON, G. STEPP, W. J. STERN, F. R. STEVENSON, A. STEY, G. C. STEWART, S. J STIGER, R. R STONE, D. H STONE, H STRAHL, M STRAKA, D STRAUSS, L. STUTZMAN, J. E. STYSLINGER, G. SURVEC, P. S. SUSSER, K. SUSSER, M. R. SUZJCH, S. SWEARINGEN, 1 SWANSIGER, W. A. 6,- Q?-ff 1' X' JP .I f. FSE ' .... , HCL' 6' -'21 SWANSON, L. SWOPE, S. TARASI, R. TEDESCO, A. M. TENER, P. TEETERS, P. THTMONS, J. THOMAS, J. THOMAS, M. A. THOMAS, R. THOMPSON, D. E. THOMPSON, L. THOMPSON, P. THOMPSON, R. L. THOMPSON, W. D. TIMMENEY, R. J. TIPTON, J. TITLEBAUM, A. R TOMINAC, T. E. TOSATTO, J. O. TOWER, J. D. TRAYNOR, T. TRIKO, E.. TRULLAS, P. TURAK, G. TURNER, V. UNNONE, V. A. URBANTC, P. VALLI, R. E. VAN ASDALE, S. VANMETER, M. VANNOCC1, K. VAN WTE, C. K. VAVREK, A. J. VEHAR, M. VERNON, J. VESELENY, J. VICKERS, R. VIDAKOVICH, A. M VIONALT, L. VOOEL, E. E. VOLIMER, B. VOXTAS, R. VRANKA, R. O. seniors K ig E. .3 Bri: X K .,,,,g.1" J 1- , VUICK, J. A. WAGNER, L. WALDMAN, J. WAKLER, D. D. WALKER, M. M. WALSH, P. WALTERS, R WARNES, M. C WARNES, W. A WARREN, J. W WASSAM, J. WATSON, R. WEBB, J. WEBER, D. WECHUCK, L WEDNER, 1. J WEHNER, H. A WEIN, N. WE1s, B. WEISS, R. WEISS, T. WELLS, J. R. WENZEL, R. P. WESOKY, H. WHETSEL, B. WHITE, C. WHITE, C. W. WHITEHEAD, A. L. WHITMAN, E. B. WICKNICK, E. C. WIESENTHAL, L. A WILKINSON, O. WILLIAMSON, D. WILSON, R. L. WINIKOFF, E. WITROWSKI, R. E. WITT, J. A. WOLESON, H. A. WOLK, E. WOLK, R. G. WRIGHT, M. E. WUKICK, D. J. WYMARD, J. A. WYSE, J. E. YEDLICKA, J. YENICK, R. YOST, J. YOUNG, J. W. YOUNG, J. YOUNG, S. R. YOUSKO, T. YABETAKIS, L. YADRODNICK, J. ZALEWSKI, J. ZAMULEVIC ZECKER, E. ZEIDEN, S. R. ZEIGLER, R. ZETWO, J. ZHELESNIK, J. ZINMAN, E. ZIRKLE, D. ZITELLI, A. ZUNDEL, J. ---v-1-vvy,-lv,-" senior index ABELE, Jeanne F. 254 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts OWL, Newman Club, Block P ACKERMAN, Linda R. 254 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Epsilon Phi, Mortar Board, Polaris, SGA, Panhellenic Council ADAMS, Donald R. 254 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Cross Country, Track AGEY, George B. 254 Oakmont, Pa. Engineering American Road Builders Associa- tion, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Society of Professional Engineers ALEXANDER, Robert F. Jr. 254 Monroeville, Pa. Liberal Arts Swimming, John Marshall Society, International Relations Club ALL, Joyce E. 254 Andes, New York Nursing Mortar Board, Pitt Nurses Basket- ball ALLEN, John A. 254 Jeannette, Pa. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi, American Phar- maceutical Association, Allegheny County Pharmaceutical Associa- tion ALLEN, Lawrence H. 254 Duquesne, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Westminster Foun- dation ALLEN, Linda R. 254 Verona, Pa. Education ALTMAN, Martin P. 254 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Intercultural Relations Pan- el ALTSHULER, Ruth H. 254 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma, Pennsylvania State Educators Association AMATANGELO, Vincent R. 254 'McKeesport, Pa. Engineering P1 Tau Sigma, Sigma Tau, Institute of Aerospace Sciences, American Rocket Society, Pennsylvania So- ciety of Professional Engineers, American Society of Professional Engineers AMDUR, Ina S. 254 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Delta.Epsilon, Mortar Board, Cwens, Pitt News, Ideas and Fig- ures ' ANDERSON, Andrew L. 254 McKeesport, Pa. Liberal Arts ANDERSON, Mary P. 254 Hanlin Station, Pa. Liberal Arts Zeta Tau Alpha, Angel Flight ANDOLINA, Karyl R. 254 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Chi Omega, Women's Choral, Newman Club, Transfer Commit- tee, Pennsylvania State Educators Association ANDREWS, William N. 254 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi, Men's Glee Club, The Huntsmen ANDRYKOVITCH, George E254 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts ANTONACCI, Barbara A. 254 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts ARMEN, Alfred A. 254 Pittsbur h Pa Pliarmac g , - Y Phi Delta Chi, American Pharma- ceutical Association, Allegheny County Pharmaceutical Associa- tion ARRIGONI, August J. 255 Canonsburg, Pa. Engineering dc Mines Phi Kappa Theta, Wrestling, En- gineering 8c Mines Cabinet ASH, Doris 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Sigma Delta Tau, Alpha Beta Gamma, Pennsylvania State Edu- cation Association ASHBRIDGE, Roxanne 255 Johnstown, Pa. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, Basic Student Nurses Association, Student Nurses Association of Pennsyl- vania AVERBACH, Ellen 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Quax BABIC, William N. 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi, Tennis, American Pharmaceutical Association, Al- legheny County Pharmaceutical Association BAGNATO, Anthony R. 255 Aspinwall, Pa. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi, Society for Ad- vancement of Management BAILEY, Charles C. 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Institute of Radio Engineers BAIR, Kenneth D. 255 Rochester, Pa. Engineering Je Mines Delta Sigma Phi BAKIN, Robert N. 255 Braddock, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Institute of Radio Engineers, American Rocket Society, Amer- ican Institute of Electrical Engi- neers BALAWENDER, Marcella 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Phi Mu BALCHUNAS, Patricia A. 255 Matamoras, Pa. Liberal Arts Newman Club, Block P, Traditions Committee BALDWIN, John R. 255 Liberal Arts Pittsburgh, Pa. ' Young Democrats, Student Library Committee BALTA, Paul A. 255 Dentistry Duquesne, Pa. Kappa Kappa Psi, Pitt Band, New- man Club BARANOWSKI, Frank R. 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering JZ Mines Sigma Tau, Pi Tau Sigma, Amer- ican Society of Mechanical Engi- neers BARBER, Charles G. 255 Monaca, Pa. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta, Dental Journal of the University of Pittsburgh, Oral Pathology Study Club, Amer- ican Dental Association, American Society of Dentistry for Children BATES, Michael P. 255 Mars, Pa. Engineering 84 Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Engineering SL Mines Cabinet, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers BATHIE, George K. 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts BAUMAN, Robert C. 255 Tarentum, Pa. Dentistry American Dental Association BAYNHAM, James H. 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education United Campus Christian Fellow- ship BEAN, Ronald J. 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Physical Education Club, Manag- ing Editor Western Pennsylvania NEWSLETTER BEEMAN, Linda 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Kappa Kappa Gamma, Alpha Beta Gamma, Senior Mentor BECK, Alvin R. 255 Verona, Pa. Business Administration Delta Sigma Pi, Evening Students Association BECK, Walter A. Jr. 255 Monroeville, Pa. Engineering di Mines Eta Kappa Nu BEIRNE, Vincent M. 255 McKeesport, Pa. Dentistry Phi Gamma Delta, Psi Omega, University of Pittsburgh Dental Journal BELINDA, Stanley J. 255 Beaverdale, Pa. Pharmacy Kappa Psi BELL, Donna R. 255 McKeesport, Pa. Education Delta Delta Delta, Alpha Beta Gamma, Mentor, Heinz Chapel Choir, Panhellenic Council BELL, Fred D. 255 Monongahela, Pa. Engineering di: Mines Omega Psi Phi, Glee Club BELL, James A. 255 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Theta Kap- pa, Pershing Rifles, Air Force Glee Club BELL, Ralph E. 255 Apollo, Pa. Business Administration BELLA, Joseph C. 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering Institute of Aerospace Sciences BENDER, Gary L. 255 Keating Summit, Pa. Liberal Arts Wrestling BENDER, Velma R. 255 Richmond, Virginia Liberal Arts Senior Mentor BERGER, Linda L. 255 Euclid, Ohio Education Kappa Kappa Gamma, Sweetheart of Sigma Chi, Hospitality Com- mittee of Student Union BERKEY, Newell H. 255 Rockwood, Pa. Education BERMAN, Mincy 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma, Student Gov- ernment, Pennsylvania State Edu- cation Association BERZONSKY, John P. 255 Conemauch, Pa. Liberal Arts BETAR, Donald J. 255 Altoona, Pa. Dentistry Psi Omega, American Dental As- sociation BEYER, F. Gregg 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Chess Club BICKEL, Richard B. 255 Fairmont, W. Virginia . l Liberal Arts Slgma Chl, Basketball, Baseball BIEN, Edward J. 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering American Society of Mechanical Engineers BIER, David A. 255 Meadowlands, Pa. Engineering Phi Eta Sigma, Sigma Tau, Eta Kappa Nu, American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers BIKULEGE, Joseph S. 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration BIKULEGE, Stanley A. 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. BINDER, Martin 255 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy lpha Zeta Omega, American harmaceutical Association, Al- egheny County Pharmaceutical ssociation BIRKEN, Judith R. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Sigma Sigma Sigma, Pitt Players, lBasic Student Nurses Association BISNETTE, Milton B. 256 Port Colborne, Canada l Liberal Arts OWL, American Chemistry So- ciety lBITTMAN, Bonnie L. 256 Johnstown, Pa. Education elta Zeta, Newman Club iBITZER, Howard W. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts BLAHUT, Mary S. 256 Duquesne, Pa. Education tudent Pennsylvania State Edu- ation Association BLAZEWICK, Robert L. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration ODNAR, Raymond L. 256 Kearney, New Jersey I Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Phi Eta Sigma, Arnold Air Society, Phi Alpha Theta, Air Force ROTC News Service, Newman Club, Mar- shall Fund Scholarship BORECKY, James E. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Phi Delta Theta, Pershing Rifles, American Pharmaceutical Associa- tion, Allegheny County Pharma- ceutical Association BOTHWELL, Robert B. 256 l Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts lgma Chi BOWMAN, Leona R. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration BOWEN, Kent D. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. l Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi BOWMAN, Leona R. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts BRAZZO, Gerald A. 256 Beaver Meadows, Pa. I Dentistry si Omega BREGENSER, James H. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Druids BREMMER, F. William, Jr. 256 Allison Park, Pa. Liberal Arts BRENNAN, Jane M. 256 McKeesport, Pa. Nursing Sigma Theta Tau BRIGHT, Edward J. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers BROSKY, Geraldine M. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Education Senior Mentor, Newman Club, Owl, Sigma Sigma Sigma BROUGHER, William E. 256 Aliquippa, Pa. Engineering di Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Sigma Chi BROWN, Barbara Ann 256 Shippensburg, Pa. Nursing Zeta Tau Alpha, Alpha Tau Delta, Women's Recreation Association, Activity Chairman Pitt School of Nursing BRUNORI, Beverly J. 256 McKeesport, Pa. Pltarmacy Sigma Sigma Sigma, Rho Chi BRUWELHEIDE, Charles E. 256 Pitcairn, Pa. Business Administration BUCHEK, Philip M. 256 McKees Rocks, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Pi Tau Sigma, American Rocket Society, Institute of Aerospace Sciences, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, Varsity Marching Band, Concert Band, Intramural Football, Basketball, Volleyball, Bowling BUCK, William H. 256 Pitcairn, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines V a r s i t y Basketball Manager, American Society of Civil Engi- neers BUJAKOWSKI, Thomas E. 256 North Braddock, Pa. Education Scabbard and Blade, Student Penn- sylvania State Education Associa- tion, Baseball, Intramural Foot- ball, Basketball BUKOWSKI, Denis J. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering BUMBA, Harry R. 256 North Braddock, Pa. Business Administration Basketball, Soccer, Newman Club BURG, Robert D. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta BURGERT, A. Leo 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Skyscraper Engineer BURGH, Patricia K. 256 Harmony, Pa. Pharmacy Alpha Delta Pi, Rho Chi, Mortar Board, Lambda Kappa Sigma, Uni- versity Scholar, Pitt Capsule, Al- legheny County Pharmaceutical Association, American Pharma- ceutical Association, Special Fel- lowship Committee, Senior Ment- or BURHENN, Karl H. 256 Erie, Pa. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi BURKHISER, John A. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Kappa Theta, Regional Di- rector of Pittsburgh Area, College Council for United Nations, Mem- ber of International Relations Club BURKHOLDER, Robert E. Lee 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy BURNS, James E. 256 Mose, Pa. Engineering JL Mines Pi Tau Sigma, American Society of Mechanical Engineers BURROWS, David L. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education BUSHMAN, Matthew 256 Brooklyn, N. Y. Dentistry BUZZA, Conrad V. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering di Mines Pi Tau Sigma, Sigma Tau, Penn- sylvania Society of Professional Engineers, Aerospace Science In- stitute CADDY, Amelia D. 256 Johnstown, Pa. Nursing CAFARO, Joseph W. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts CAIRNS, James L. 256 Wexford, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma CALDWELL, Blair 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business A dministration Phi Gamma Delta CALMES, Joseph T. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Theta, Phi Alpha Theta, Pitt Christian Fellowship, Rifle Team CANCILLA, Alfonse S. 256 Saegertown, Pa. Liberal Arts CANEL, Joseph 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines American Road Building Associa- tion, American Society of Civil Engineers CANNON, Barbara J. 256 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Intercollegiate Govemment, High School Relations Committee CAPLAN, Robert J. 257 Pittsburgh, Pa. ' Business Administration Sigma Alpha Mu CARAS, Gus G. 257 Steubenville, Ohio Liberal Arts IDEAS AND FIGURES, Inter- national Relations Club, John Marshall Society CAREY, Bernard J. 257 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering Elections Committee, Tap Day Committee, Upperclass Counselor, Interfraternity Council, Interfra- ternity Council Judicial Commit- tee, Sigma Alpha Epsilon CARNAHAN, Judith A. 257 Latrolie, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma CLIFFORD CARPENTER, Ernestine 257 Pittsburgh, Pa. CARRA, Lawrence D. 257 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Physical Education Club, Varsity Basketball, Baseball CARRAUX, Guy R. 257 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 452 Mines CARSON, Barbara R. 257 Sewickley, Pa. Pharmacy PITT CAPSULE, A m e r i c a n Pharmacy Association CASAR, Marcia S. 257 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma, Pennsylvania State Education Association CASINO, Emil A. 257 Jeannette, Pa. Dentistry CASSELL, Robert T. 257 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Theta, Alpha Phi Omega CASTELLANI, Gerald J. 257 Homer City, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Omega Chi Epsilon, Sigma Tau CASTO, Lawrence E. 257 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration CHERKIN, Patricia A. 257 Monessen, Pa. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS, IDEAS AND FIG- URES CHERYBA, Kenneth W. 257 Pittsburgh, Pa. CHISDAK, John J. 257 Scranton, Pa. Liberal Arts Football CHODER, Gail H. 257 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Beta Beta Beta CHVASTA, Thomas E. 257 Munhall, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Omega Chi Epsilon, Sigma Tau, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Newman Club CITTERBERG, Ronald G. 257 Natrona, Pa. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS, Newman Club CLARK, Edgar T. 257 Washington, Pa. Liberal Arts CLARK, Marica F. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, Mortar Board, Sigma Theta.Tau, Basic Student Nurses' Association CLAWSON, Ronald N. 258 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts CLEARY, Eileen H. 258 Mars, Pa. Nursing CLEMENS, Robert W. 258 West Mifliin, Pa. Business Administration Football CLENDENING, Corinne P. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Russian Cultural Club CLEW, Harry T. 258 .Middletown, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Phi Epsilon, Band, New- man Club CLIFFORD, Walter W. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts . ...,.-f . -. - -----v-7-i 1-' +vvw--f--r COCHRAN COCHRAN, Norman 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dc Mines Pi Kappa Alpha COHEN, Roberta 258 Hyannisport, Mass. Education Sigma Sigma Sigma, Associated Women Students, Emerson Club COHEN, Susan S. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education COHN, Burton H. 258 Altoona, Pa. Pharmacy Pi Lambda Phi, Rho Chi, Pitt Cap- sule COHN, Thelma N. Hollidaysburg, Pa. Sigma Delta Tau, Pennsylvania State Education Association 258 Education COLAIANNI, Marie C. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Sigma Sigma, OWL COLBECK, Samuel C. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Sigma Gamma Epsilon, Sigma Tau, Engineering and Mines Bul- letin, Engineering and Mines Cab- inet CONLON, Dorotha A. 258 North Tarrytown, N. Y. Liberal Arts Beta Sigma Omicron, Dorm Coun- ci CONNELLY, William H. 258 Homestead, Pa. Liberal Arts Lambda Chi Alpha, Football CONTI, Filomena C. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. CONWISHER, Maryl 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Quax, Student Union Committee, Associated Women Students COOK, David R. 258 Central City, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Theta Kappa COOK, Alberta J. 258 Verona, Pa. Liberal Arts CORBETT, Lynn R. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts CORSE, Chester C. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Kappa Theta, Swimming CORSELLO, Guy R. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta, Glee Club CORSELLO, James R. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Student American Dental Associa- tion COSTELLO, Nance C. 258 Cheswick, Pa. Liberal Arts Zeta Tau Alpha, Beta Beta Beta, Freshmen Women's Council COTTINGHAM, Constance L. 258 Ambler, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Kappa Alpha COYNE, Robert E. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Kappa Theta CRAIG, Richard W. 258 Johnstown, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, Society for the Advancement of Management CRAWFORD, Kenneth E. 258 Imperial, Pa. Liberal Arts CRIMMINS, Patrick J. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Theta Chi, Arnold Air Society CUMMINS, Sally A. 258 Washington, Pa. Nursing Kappa Kappa Gamma CUNNINGHAM, Robert J. Jr. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Delta Sigma Phi, Arhold Air So- ciety, OWL, American Institute of Electrical Engineers CUPAK, Andrew D. 258 Turtle Creek, Pa. Engineering 8a Mines Pershing Rifles, Engineering 8L Mines Association, American Road Builders Association, Amer- ican Society of Civil Engineers, Pennsylvania Association of Pro- fessional Engineers CURRY, Charles L. 258 Clearfield, Pa. Liberal Arts CUTULY, Eugene D. 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Delta Sigma Phi, Eta Kappa Nu, American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio Engi- neers, Men's Conference CWIKLIKI, Patricia 258 Leechburg, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Delta Pi, Newman Club, Y W C A CZERNECKA, Helen L. 258 Canonsburg, Pa. Business Administration Pitt Women's Club DALFONSO, Michael F. Jr. 258 Allison Park, Pa. Business. Administration Newman Club DANIELI, Daniel 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. DANIELS, Stephen E. 258 Philadelphia, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Phi Alpha, Soccer, Wesley Foundation, Interfraternity Coun- cil, N.A.A.C.P. DANKO, Donald J. 258 Duquesne, Pa. Business Administration DAROSZEWSKI, Maria 258 Monroeville, Pa. Education Theta Phi Alpha, Alpha Beta Gamma DAVIDSON, Gloriajay 258 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma, B'nai Brith Hillel Foundation, Pennsylvania State Education Association, AWS DAVIES, Denise M. 258 Altoona, Pa. Nursing DAVIS, John H. Jr. 259 Johnstown, Pa. Engineering ri Mines Pi Kappa Alpha, American So- ciety of Civil Engineers, Penn- sylvania Society of Professional Engineers DAVIS, Paul A. 259 Rosemont, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi .ww Y DAVIS, Roger J. 259 Deal, New Jersey Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi DAVIS, Thomas P. 259 Altoona, Pa. Pharmacy Kappa Psi DAWSON, George C. 259 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Iota Lambda Sigma, Evening Stu- dent Association DEISS, Richard A. 259 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dc Mines Sigma Tau, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, Amer- ican Society of Civil Engineers, American Road Builders Associa- tion DELCORSO, Vincent 259 Rankin, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Phi Delta DELEO, Joseph A. Jr. 259 Altoona, Pa. Pharmacy Kappa Psi DEMATT, Mary A. 259 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Kappa Alpha Theta, Alpha Beta Gamma, Senior Mentor, Pennsyl- vania State Education Association DEMAY, Mary L. 259 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Women's Recreation Association, AWS, Women's Choral DEMETRIUS, Alice A. 259 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Quo Vadis, Pi Lambda Theta, Vira Heinz Awardee DEMPSKY, Patricia J. 259 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Chi Omega, Pi Sigma Alpha, International Relations Club, Sen- ior Mentor, Students for Kennedy DENDTLER, Dale B. 259 Evanston, Illinois Liberal Arts Sigma Chi DENNICK, Judith W. 259 North Plainheld, New Jersey Education Kappa Kappa Gamma, Cwens, Senior Mentor, AWS, Physical Education Club DERMITT, Ronald E. 259 Indiana, Pa. Liberal Arts DIAMONDSTONE, Joyce F. Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal DICICCO, Robert W. 259 Coraopolis, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines THE SURVEYOR, American Road Builders Association, Amer- ican Society of Civil Engineers DIETHORN, Carol L. 259 Jeannette, Pa. Liberal Arts Delta Delta Delta, Quo Vadis, American Chemical S o c i e t y, Freshmen Council, Senior Mentor DIGGS, James F. 259 Cumberland, Maryland LiberalArts Heinz Chapel Choir, Student Council of Religious Organiza- tions, Foto Club, Physics Club, Canterbury Club, American Rock- et Society, American Institute of Physics DILICK, Thomas M. 260 Colver, Pa. Engineering di Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers DIMPERIO, Michael J. 260 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Iota Lambda Sigma DI MUCCIO, Ralph A. 260 New Castle, Pa. Pharmacy Kappa Psi DI NARDO, Patricia 260 Cokesburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts DINNING, Judith C. 260 Stoystown, Pa. Education Chi Omega, Student Pennsylvania State Education Association, Sen- ior Mentor DI PERNA, James C. 260 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Intramural Football, Basketball, Softball, Institute of Aerospace Science, Pennsylvania Society for Professional Engineers DI SANTIS, Theodore A. 260 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Psi Omega, Oral Pathology Study Club, Dental School Journal, Den- tal Student Council, Student Amer- ican Dental Association, American Society of Dentistry for Children DIVERS, Lynn M. 260 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business A dministration Kappa Kappa Gamma, Panhel- lenic Council, Associated Women Students, Dolphin Club DONALDSON, David R. 260 Jeannette, Pa. Engineering aft Mines Sigma Tau, American Society for Mechanical Engineers, Society of Automotive Engineers DONOHUE, David J. 260 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering :Q Mines Phi Delta Theta, American So- ciety of Civil Engineers, American Road Builders Association, Penn- sylvania Society of Professional Engineers, Engineering and Mines Association DONOVAN, Richard C. 260 McKees Rocks, Pa. Engineering tic Mines Pi Tau Sigma, American Rocket Society, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, Institute of Aerospace Sciences, National So- ciety of Professional Engineers DOWNIE, Susanna F. 260 Beaver Falls, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Delta Epsilon, IDEAS AND FIGURES CEditorJ, Student Un- ion Board DOYLE, Susan F. 260 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Theta Kappa, University Scholar, Associated Women Stu- dents, Pre-Med Forum, Glee Club DREW, Dennis H. 260 Springdale, Pa. Liberal Arts Chess Team, American Institute of Physics DROGOS, Donald L. 260 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts t 1 DUDA, Jerome J. 260 Ambridge, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Sigma Phi Epsilon, Newman Club, American Institute of Chemical Engineers DUNBAR, Charles R. 260 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Druids, Pi Delta Epsilon, PITT NEWS, Soccer, Wrestling DUNBAR, Walter L. 260 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts DUNDORE, Carolyn A. 260 Hiller, Pa. Nursing Delta Delta Delta, Cwens, Sigma Theta Tau, Women's Choral, Basic S t u d e n t Nurses' Association, Lutheran Student Association DUNLOP, Jerry L. 260 Charleroi, Pa. Liberal Arts Pershing Rifies DURKO, James J. 261 Burgettstown, Pa. Liberal Arts Theta Chi DUVALL, Judy A. 261 Liberal Arts Dravosburg, Pa. Westminster Foundation, Student Council of Religious Organiza- tions, Associated Women Students DZIENIS, Stephanie A. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration EBERHARDT, Edward F. 261 Irwin, Pa. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi EBERSOLE, Suzanne J. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Chi Omega, Mentor, Quo Vadis EDLER, Donald H. 261 McKeesport, Pa. Engineering dt Mines American Institute of Chemical Engineers EDWARDS, Joan L. 261 Ebensburgh, Pa. Education Phi Theta Kappa, Alpha Beta Gamma, OWL, Student Congress, Glee Club, Associated Women Students, Pitt Players EGYUD, Louis J. 261 Aliquippa, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Theta Chi, Institute of Radio Engineers, American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers EHNOT, Mary L. 261 West Mifiiin, Pa. Liberal Arts Kappa Kappa Gamma, Cwens, Mortar Board, Associated Women Students, Math Club, Senior As- sistant, Mentor EISELE, Frederick L. 261 McKeesport, Pa. ELLENBERGER, David L. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Pi Delta Epsilon, OWL, Squash Team, Foto Club ELLIS, Ronald R. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Physical Education Club, Soccer ELSTON, John C. 261 Bloomfield, N. J. Engineering dt Mines Delta Tau Delta, Football ENGEL, Richard J. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education ERICSSON, Thomas E. 261 Brackenridge, Pa. Liberal Arts ERLIC, Robert L. 261 Baltimore, Md. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Ideas and Figures, Pitt Players, Interfraternity Coun- cil FAGAN, Ann E. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts FAHNESTOCK, Howard S. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Beta Alpha Psi, Lutheran Student Association FAIRCLOUGH, John E. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts FANTOZZI, Louis J. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering At Mines Newman Club, Institute of Radio Engineers, American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers FARRELL, Harry T. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration University Catholic Club FASSINGER, John J. 261 New Castle, Pa. Liberal Arts FATFA, Joseph A. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Delta Sigma Phi FATUR, Barbara A. 261 Aliquippa, Pa. Education Chi Omega, Pi Lambda Theta, Quo Vadis, Mortar Board FATYOL, Robert S. 261 North Braddock, Pa. Engineering ti Mines Pi Delta Epsilon, American Rock- et Society, Institute of Aero-Space Sciences, SKYSCRAPER ENGI- NEER tEditorJ FAULL, Walter R. 261 Youngstown, Ohio Engineering Je Mines Delta Tau Delta, Track FAUST, Robert G. 261 Youngstown, Ohio Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi FAZIO, James W. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry FEHER, Zoltan N. 261 McKeesport, Pa. Liberal Arts FELDMAN, Judith R. 261 McKeesport, Pa. Liberal Arts FELDSTEIN, Judith C. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts FELS, Dorothy M. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. . Business Administration Phi Chi Theta, Delta Mu Delta FERDINAND, Edward J. 261 Hazleton, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi, William Pitt Debate Union, Football FETTER, Werner Z. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Psi Omega FINKEL, Howard A. 261 McKeesport, Pa. Business Administration Sigma Alpha Mu, Varsity March- ing Band FINKELPEARL, Eleanor R. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Kappa Phi FIRESTONE, Nathan N. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Druids, PITT NEWS, Student Government, International Rela- tions Club, Young Democrats FISHER, Michael J. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts FISHMAN, Bernard 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Phi Epsilon Pi, Alpha Omega, Stu- dent American Dental Association, American Society for Dentistry for Children, Wrestling, Soccer, Hillel FLOAT, Barbara B. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Chi Omega, Junior Class Council FOLCKE, Nancy A. 261 Oreland, Pa. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS, Dolphin Club, Women's Recreation Association, Volleyball FORD, Joseph L. 261 Wexford, Pa. Business Administration FOSTER, Barbara K. 261 Johnstown, Pa. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, Basic Student Nurses' Association, S t u d e n t Nurses Association of Pennsyl- vania FOSTER, Ronald C. 261 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi, Rho Chi, Gym- nastics FOSTER, Theodore P., Jr. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Phi Gamma Delta, Sigma Tau, Eta Kappa Nu Society, Pershing Rifles, American Institute of Elec- trical Engineers, Institute of Radio Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers FRAGOMENI, Frank A. 262 Munhall, Pa. Engineering :ft Mines FRANZ, Judy E. 262 Jeannette, Pa. Education Kappa Kappa Gamma, Senior Senator, IF Queen FREEZE, Ruth A. 262 Pottsville, Pa. Education Cwens, Mortar Board, Alpha Beta Gamma, Heinz Chapel Choir FROELICH, Raymond L. 262 Carnegie, Pa. Engineering dt Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers FROHNE, Karl-Heinz 262 Glassport, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Pennsylvania Society for Profes- sional Engineers GAWLAS FULLER, Kenneth R. 262 Toronto, Ontario Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, Society for Ad- vancement of Management, Gavel Club, Weightlifting Club FUNA, John A. 262 Munhall, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Track, Society of Automotive Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers FUNARI, Anthony V. 262 Carnegie, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Sigma Tau, Eta Kappa Nu, Insti- tute of Radio Engineers FURST, Robert C. 262 Johnstown, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Phi Gamma Delta, Sigma Tau, Eta Kappa Nu, American Institute of Electrical Engineers FUSCO, Richard A. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Sigma Chi, Sigma Tau, Omega Chi Epsilon, Phi Eta Sigma, Omi- cron Delta Kappa, Engineering 8a M i n e s Cabinet, Co-Chainnan Engineers Week GAHRING, Judith A. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Delta Pi, Quax, AWS GALETTI, Bernard J. 262 Elizabeth, Pa. Liberal Arts GALLAGHER, James P. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Sigma Tau, Phi Theta Kappa, Pennsylvania Society of Profes- sional Engineers, American Insti- tute of Electrical Engineers GALLAGHER, Penny L. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts GALLAGHER, Robert J. 262 Monongahela, Pa. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta GAMBERT, Anthony B. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Iota Lambda Sigma GAMBLE, James A. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio En- gineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers GANOE, David W. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. . Engineering dt Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Alpha Phi Omega, Pennsylvania Society of Profes- sional Engineers GARFINKEL, Esther 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Sweetheart Phi Epsilon Pi GAUGHAN, Letitia Anne F . 262 Ashland, Pa. Nursing Basic Student Nurses Association, Newman Club, Student Nurses As- sociation of Pennsylvania, Pan- hellenic Council GAWLAS, Maurice 262 Johnstown, Pa. Engineering dt Mines GEBHARD GEBHARD, Judith A. 262 Sewickley, Pa. Liberal Arts Kappa Alpha Theta, Student Gov- ernment, Homecoming Executive Committee GEINZER, Paul J. Jr. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Kappa Psi, Newman Club GEISEL, Vernon L. 262 Johnstown, Pa. Business Administration Heinz Chapel Choir GELLY, John E. 262 McDonald, Pa. Business Administration GELMAN, Judith E. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Pitt Players GELMAN, Ruth S. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education GEMELO, Evangelos G. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts GENSBIGLER, Joseph A. 262 New Kensington, Pa. Dentistry Psi Omega, Dentones GEORGE, sara M. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education GERA, Dorothy D. 262 Greensburg, Pa. Nursing Basic Student Nurses Association, Student Nurses Association of Pennsylvania GERBER, Bernard L. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Society for Advancement of Man- agement, Student Union Board, United Campus Ministry GETZ, Ronald S. 262 Altoona, Pa. Pharmacy Kappa Nu GIBSON, Mary E. 262 Cresson, Pa. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta GIESLER, Edie A. 262 Tarentum, Pa. Education Delta Zeta, Heinz Chapel Choir, Scholastic Honors Committee GIGLER, Donald E. 262 Monroeville, Pa. Dentistry Delta Phi Alpha GILBERT, Sheldon I. 262 Beaver Fall, Pa. Dentistry Alpha Omega GILLIS, Daniel F. 262 Bridgeville, Pa. Business Administration Society for the Advancement of Management GINSBURG, Robert S. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Phi Epsilon Pi, Pitt Band GLICK, Hanna G. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma, Pitt Players, Hillel Foundation, Pennsylvania State Education Association GLUNT, Nancy A. 262 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Delta Delta Delta, Basic Student N u r s e s Association, Student Nurses Association of Pennsyl- vania GNARRA, Anthony C. 262 Aliquippa, Pa. Engineering di Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio En- gineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers GOEHRING, Robert L. 262 Irwin, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Institute of Aerospace Science, Pennsylvania Society of Profes- sional Engineers GOLDBLATT, Rosalind A. 263 McKees Rocks, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma, Hillel, Penn- sylvania State Educators Associa- tion, AWS GOLDBERG, Ellen P. 263 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Pennsylvania Student Educational Association GOLDBERG, Richard A. 263 W. Hempstead, New York Liberal Arts Pitt News GOLDEN, Lovelle W. 263 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Phi Alpha, Soccer GOLDHAMER, Phyllis B. 263 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Sigma Delta Tau, Panhellenic Council GOLDMAN, Joanne K. 263 Baltimore, Maryland Liberal Arts AWS, Freshman Council, Student Union Music Committee, Sigma Delta Tau GOLDSTEIN, Marshall 263 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Sigma Alpha Mu, American Phar- maceutical Association, Allegheny County Pharmaceutical Associa- tion GOODMAN, Lyndra A. 263 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts GORDON, Barbara H. 263 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pitt Players, Block "P", High School Relations Committee GORDON, John P. 263 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering :ft Mines Lambda Chi Alpha, Soccer, Track, Swimming, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Road Builders Association, SURVEYOR GRAHAM, Glenn T. 263 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Pi Delta Epsilon tPresidentJ, Omi- cron Delta Kappa, OWL tBusiness Managerj, Pennsylvania State Ed- ucators Association GRAMLING, Bernard M. 263 St. Michael, Pa. Education GREB, Paul E., Jr. Business Administration Society for the Advancement of Management GREENBARG, Gerson M. 263 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Alpha Zeta Omega, Rho Chi, American Pharmaceutical Associa- tion, Allegheny County Pharma- ceutical Association GREENBERG, Linda 263 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Student Union Committee GREENFIELD, Dolores C. 263 Brownsville, Pa. Education Alpha Epsilon Phi, Pi Lambda Theta, Alpha Beta Gamma GRIFFITHS, Mary E. 263 Pottstown, Pa. Education Kappa Kappa Gamma, Alpha Beta Gamma, Block P, Freshman Coun- cil GRIFFITH, Robert 263 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Psi Omega, American Dental As- sociation, Oral Pathology Study Club, American Society of Dentist- ry for Children GRIMALDI, John J. 263 Erie, Pa. Dentistry Psi Omega, Student American Dental Association GRIMMINS, Elizabeth A. 263 St. Guelph, Ontario Nursing GROLL, John A. 264 Pittsburgh, Pa. GROSS, Lester 264 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi GROSS, Seth S. 264 Scranton, Pa. Business Administration Sigma Alpha Mu, Alpha Kappa Psi GROSSMAN, James A. 264 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts GULAS, Patricia A. 264 Bradenville, Pa. Liberal Arts William Pitt Debating Union, Del- ta Sigma Rho, Cwens, Mentor, Inter-cultural Relations Board GUNDRY, William J. 264 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration GUTHRIDGE, Robert B. 264 Pittsburgh, Pa. General Studies GUZIK, Robert E. 264 Lawrence, Pa. Business Administration Football, Wrestling HABER, Lawrence F. 264 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts HAGES, Harry A. 264 Aliquippa, Pa. Liberal Arts HAGMEIER, Leanora W. 264 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Zeta Tau Alpha, Angel Flight, AWS, Heinz Chapel Choir, So- ciety for Advancement of Man- agement HALE, Richey J. 264 Munhall, Pa. Liberal Arts OWL, Women's Choral HALL, Aubrey M. Jr. 264 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Theta Chi, Kappa Phi Kappa, Physical Education Club HALL, Charles A. 264 Murrysville, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma HALL, Elaine L. 264 Ambridge, Pa. Nursing HALLER, Nicholas P. 264 Donora, Pa. Business Administration Society for the Advancement of Management HAMILTON, Donald R. 264 Belle Vernon, Pa. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi, PITT CAPSULE, American Pharmaceutical Asso- ciation, Allegheny County Phar- maceutical Association, Westem Pennsylvania Hospital Pharmacist Society, Student Council of Phar- macy HAMILTON, Sue 264 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts HANDON, Clement H. 264 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Psi.Ornega, American Dental As- sociation HANNA, Maureen A. 264 Buffalo, New York Education Chi Omega, Quo Vadis, Senior Mentor, Newman Club, Alpha Beta Gamma, AWS, Pennsylvania State Education Association HARDMAN, Willard M. 265 Irwin, Pa. Business Administration HARITOS, Helen 265 Duquesne, Pa. Education Alpha Delta Pi, National Educa- tion Association, Pennsylvania State Education Association HARLEY, George R., III 265 Washington, Pa. Education Alpha Phi Alpha, Basketball, Soc- cer, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People JOHNSON, Joanne 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts JOHNSTON, Richard P. 267 Pitcairn, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER, Intramural Football, Softball, Pitt Foto Club JONES, Alice C. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Angel Flight, Far Eastern Affairs, Block "P" JONES, Carol M. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Delta Sigma Theta, Basketball JONES, Gordon J. 267 Johnstown, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines American Society of Civil Engi- neers JONES, Mabel S. 267 McKeesport, Pa. Education Delta Sigma Theta, Quo Vadis, Panhellenic Council HARPER, Robert B. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts HARRINGTON, George H. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering oi Mines HARRIS, Mary K. 265 Rochester, Pa. Nursing Basic Student Nurses Association, Student Nurses Association of Pennsylvania, Women's Recreation Association, Dolphin Club, Basket- ball, Variety Show, Heinz Chapel Choir HARSTEIN, Sigrid-Lori 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma HASER, Heywood A. 265 New Kensington, Pa. Liberal Arts Delta Tau Delta, Omicron Delta Kappa, Football HATALA, A. Richard 265 Munhall, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Theta Chi, Inter-Fraternity Coun- cil, Engineering 84 Mines Cabinet HAVERLACK, Patricia G. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Newman Club HAYES, Albert E. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Newman Club HAYMAN, Robert W. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration HECKERT, Nolan J. 265 Herndon, Pa. Dentistry Psi Omega HEDGES, James E. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Arnold Air Society, Basketball HEINLE, Norbert P. 265 Natrona Heights, Pa. Liberal Arts Newman Club HEPWORTH, Kenneth A. 265 Derry, New Hampshire Liberal Arts Basketball HESS, James P. 265 Munhall, Pa. Engineering cf: Mines Track, Cross-Country HEYL, Cynthia 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Chi Omega HAYMANN, Robert S. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Kappa Alpha, Heinz Chapel Choir HIGGINS, Willis E. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Pi Kappa Alpha, Druids, Delta Sigma Rho, William Pitt Debate Union, American Institute of Chemical Engineers HILBERG, Robert W. 265 Avalon, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Phi Beta Kappa, Omicron Delta Kappa, Student Attrition Research Project HILL, Sue P. 265 East Liverpool, Ohio Pharmacy Sigma Sigma Sigma, Rho Chi, Lambda Kappa Sigma, PITT CAPSULE, American Pharmaceu- tical Association, Allegheny Coun- ty Pharmaceutical Association, Interfraternity Council, Pharmacy HILMER, Carl 265 Amsterdam, Netherlands Engineering di Mines Delta Tau Delta, Sigma Tau, Swimming, American Road Build- ers Association, American Society of Civil Engineers HIRSH, Bernard 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines HIXSON, Robert L. 265 Corry, Pa. Dentistry Psi Omega HOBAUGH, Don C. 265 Murrysville, Pa. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta, Dentones HODGKISS, David w. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines HOERSTER, Leo J. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Scabbard and Blade, Society of Automotive Engineers HOFFMAN, Marshall D. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Kappa Nu, SKYSCRAPER EN- GINEER, ENGINEERING AND MINES BULLETIN, Engineering and Mines Cabinet, Student Union Board, Pitt Players HOLLAND, Donald L. 265 Norfolk, Va. Liberal Arts HOLOKA, Sandra E. 265 Gettysburg, Pa. Liberal Arts Zeta Tau Alpha HOLZBACH, Jack G. 265 Youngstown, Ohio Liberal Arts Football HOM, George G. 265 San Diego, Ca. Dentistry American Dental Association, American Society of Dentistry for Children, University of Pittsburgh Dental Journal, Student American Dental Association, Delta Sigma Delta HORCHLER, David D. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines HORNE, Eileen H. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, Student Senate of Student Government Associa- tion, B'nai Blrith Hillel Founda- tion HOSICK, William L. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Phi Eta Sigma, Phi Beta Kappa, Druids, Omicron Delta Kappa, Pi Delta Epsilon, Engineering and Mines Cabinet, Alpha Phi Omega, Pennsylvania Society for Profes- sional Engineers, SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER tBusiness Managerj, Metallurgy Seminar, 1961 Emitt Award HOUCK, Thomas N. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. 1 Engineering 62 Mines American Society of Civil Engi- neers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, American Road Builders Association HOWARD, Larry L. 265 Johnstown, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, Business Ad- ministration Club, Business Ad- ministration Cabinet HRIVNAK, James A. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Eta Kappa Nu HUBER, William R. 265 Johnstown, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Sigma Tau, Eta Kappa Nu, So- ciety for Conservative Studies, In- stitute of Radio Engineers, Amer- ican Institute of Electrical Engi- neers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, APS HUEY, Ralph E. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Newman Club HUGHES, Allan R. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Alpha Theta, United Christian Fellowship HUGYA, John A. 265 Vintoridale, Pa. Business Administration Society for the Advancement of Management, Varsity Rilie Team HUNNELL, Margaret G. 265 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Chi Omega, Pennsylvania Student Educational Association HUTCHISON, Violet S. 266 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts HYNES, Rita D. 266 Johnstown, Pa. Education Newman Club HYSLOP, Martha S. 266 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Delta Epsilon, Student Govern- ment, OWL HYTE, Donald H. 266 Midland, Pa. Liberal Arts Society of Automotive Engineers, Society for the Advancement of Management IFFT, Judith C. 266 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education IKELER, Fred T. 266 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Delta Tau Delta IRWIN, Gerald P. 266 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Phi Delta, Swimming, Bowl- ing Team ISKOWITZ, Joel J. 266 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Chess Club, Hillel, Math Club ISNER, Dale W. 266 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Math Club ISRAEL, Nancy M. 266 Butler, Pa. Education Student Pennsylvania National Education Association, Alpha Beta Gamma, Pitt Jazz Club IVANOVIC, Angela 266 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Student Pennsylvania State Edu- cational Association JACKSON, Donald W. 266 Turtle Creek, Pa. Liberal Arts JAMES, Harold W. 266 Glenshaw, Pa. Business Administration JAMES, John E. 266 Mt. Lebanon, Pa. Business Administration Delta Sigma Pi KADISAK JAMES, William R. '266 Youngstown, Ohio Dentistry Psi Omega JAMESON, Kathryn, W. 266 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Theta, Kappa Alpha Theta, OWL, Associated Women Students JASTRZEMBSKI, Steve V. 266 Vandergrift, Pa. Liberal Arts Football JEFFREYS, John W. 266 Bethel Park, Pa. Education Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Druids, Physical Education Club JOHNSON, David L. 266 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi, Phi Eta Sigma, Druids, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Swimming, Inter-fraternity wrestling, Concert Band, Inter-fraternity Council JOHNSON, Gary B. 266 Weirton, W. Va. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi ' JOHNSON, Jerry F. 266 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Student Union Board, High School Relations Committee, Block "P" JOHNSON, Timothy J. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta, Beta Beta Beta, Biological Sciences Curri- culum Advisory Committee, Soc- cer, Student Sane JOHNSON, Stuart W. 267 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts Delta Psi Omega JONES, Melvin K. 267 Nanty-Glo, Pa. Liberal Arts Pershing Riiles JONES, Wilbur A. 267 Brownsville, Pa. Pharmacy Alpha Phi Omega, Allegeny Coun- ty Pharmaceutical Association, Pitt Capsule, American Pharmaceuti- cal Association KADLECIK, John 267 Binghamton, N. Y. Engineering dt Mines Surveyor Magazine, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, American Society of Civil Engi- neers, Intramural Football KAHL, Mary L. 267 Blairsville, Pa. Nursing Student Nurses Association of Pennsylvania, B a s i c Student Nurses Association KAISERMAN, Emily R. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma, PITT NEWS, Women's Chorale, Hillel KALLQUIST, Gilbert C. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines American Institute of Mechanical Engineers KANFER, Paul S. 267 Farmingdale, N. Y. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta, Alpha Phi Omega, Biology Department Eval- uation Committee, Pitt Players, Student Union Board KADISAK, Edward S. 267 Irwin, Pa. Business Administration --'vw KAPLAN KAPLAN, Joan H. 267 San Antonio, Texas Education Pennsylvania State Educational Association KARGES, Mary L. 267 Butler, Pa. Education Delta Delta Delta, Cwens, Mor- tarboard, OWL, Associated Wom- en Students, Student Union Board, University P.M. Series KARLO, MiLana M. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma, Eastern Or- thodox Campus Fellowship, Na- tional Educational Association KARN, William A. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Special Fellowship Program KASOWITZ, Jesse E. 267 New Haven, Conn. Liberal Arts Pitt Band, Pitt Players, Interna- tional Relations Club, The Society for Conservative Studies, Jazz Club, John Marshall Society KATOFSKY Harve R , y, . 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Pi Lambda Phi, Baseball KAUFMAN, Paul R. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Baseball KAVIC, Michael S. 267 Aliquippa, Pa. Liberal Arts Pitt Players, PITT NEWS, East- ern Orthodox Fellowship KAYO, Muzak 267 East Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Football, Basketball, Bowling, Pennsylvania Society of Profes- sional Engineers, American Insti- tute of Industrial Engineers KEIL, Joan E. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Beta Sigma Omicron, Hostess KELLY, William M. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering American Institute of Industrial Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers KELSO, David R. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering KEMPLER, Hannah R. 267 West End, N. Y. Education KENDALL, James E. 267 Wexford, Pa. Business Administration KERESTESY, Rodger W. 267 Erie, Pa. Pharmacy Kappa Psi, Pitt Capsule KETTERING, David C. 267 North Braddock, Pa. Liberal Arts Theta Chi, Band KING, David O. 267 Butler, Pa. Liberal Arts KINNEY, James A. 267 Ligonier, Pa. Liberal Arts KINTNER, Thomas H. 267 ENC, PH. Liberal Arts Phi Kappa Theta, University Ra- dio Station WPGH KITAY, Murray A. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. . ' Business Administration Phi Epsilon P1, Swimming KLAHR, Melvin 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Sigma Alpha Mu, Engineering and Mines Bulletin, Society for the Advancement of Management KLEBAN, Marlene B. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Pennsylvania State Educational Association KLEIN, Meyer 267 Sewickley, Pa. Dentistry Student American Dental Asso- ciation, Alpha Omega, American Society of Dentistry for Children KLEIN, Norman E. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Alpha Omega, Pi Lambda Phi, Student American Dental Associa- tion, American Society of Den- tistry for Children, Baseball, Hil- lel KLINGENSMITH, Frank R. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Sigma Chi KLINGENSMITH, Mercy A.267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Kappa Alpha Theta, Cwens, AWS, Basic Student Nurses Association, Sigma Theta Tau, Sophomore Women's Council, Pitt Players, Student Nurses Association of Pennsylvania KLINK, Lawrence J. 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Football KOCH, Daniel 267 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry American Dental Association KOCH, Robert J. 268 Mount Kisco, N. Y. Business Administration Phi Epsilon Pi, Swimming KOCHER, Albert H. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Pi Tau Sigma, Pennsylvania So- ciety of Professional Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers KOHN, Sarilyn B. 268 McKeesport, Pa. Education Sigma Delta Tau, Pi Lambda Theta, Alpha Beta Gamma KOHUT, George B. 268 Homestead, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines American Society of Metals, Intra- mural Football, Basketball, Bowl- ing, Volleyball KOHUT, Karen L. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Theta Phi Alpha KONDIS, Edward F. 268 Munhall, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Eta Sig- ma, Sigma Tau, Omega Chi Ep- silon, Omicron Delta Kappa, Soc- cer, American Institute of Chem- ical Engineers CPresidentJ KOONTZ, Harry S. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering di Mines Eta Kappa Nu, Sigma Tau, Stu- dent Branch Institute of Radio Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, American Institute of Electrical Engineers KOPELMAN, James E. 268 New Kensington, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta, Phi Alpha Theta KORB, Michael H. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Theta Chi, Society of Automotive Engineers KORMANIS, George D. 268 Colver, Pa. Engineering di Mines Pi Tau Sigma, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Penn- sylvania Society of Professional Engineers KOSCHO, John J. 268 Nanty-Glo, Pa. Education Pershing Rifles, Newman Club KOTULAK, Frank M. 268 Greensburg, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines KRAFT, Rebecca M. 268 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts Associated Women S t u d e n t s, Dorm Council, Housing Board, Pitt Players, Jazz Club KRIEGER, Donald M. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education G. 268 Education Phi Theta Kappa, Student Pro- fessional Education Association KRIVAK, Thomas Central City, Pa. KROTEC, Raymond 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Druids, Phi Eta Sigma, Delta Sigma Rho, Omicron Delta Kap- pa, William Pitt Debate Union, Heinz Chapel Choir, International Relations Club KUFTA, Susanne J. 268 Boonton, N. J. Nursing Delta Delta Delta, Student Union Board, Public Relations Commit- tee KUHN, Carole L. 268 Carnegie, Pa. Education Beta Sigma Omicron, Angel Flight KUHNS, Donald R. 268 Greensburg, Pa. Engineering cf: Mines Institute of Aerospace Sciences KULASA, Leon V, 268 McKeesport, Pa, Engineering 62 Mines Pennsylvania Society for Profes- sional Engineers, Intramural Bas- ketball KULON, Francis T. 268 Leetsdale, Pa. Engineering Ji Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio En- gineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers KUPROLT, John N. 268 Duquesne, Pa. Business Administration Football KUSHNER, Charles J. 268 Zelienople, Pa. Business Administration KUZAK, JoAnn E. 268 Conemaugh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Mu, Phi Theta Kappa, Sigma Kappa Phi, Newman Club, Asso- ciated Women Students Honor Committee, Mentor, Block HP", Russian Club KUZNESKI, Andrew J. 268 Indiana, Pa. Business Administration Sigma Chi, Varsity Football KYPER, Peter T. 268 West Brownsville, Pa. LiberalArts Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Druids, Delta Sigma Rho, Student Gov- ernment, William Pitt Debating Union KYSHAKEVYCH, George 268 Milltown, N. J. Dentistry LAMISON, Patricia A. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Phi Mu, Angel Flight, Pitt Players LAMPERT, Edward J. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering di Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers LANCE, Joseph R. 268 Braddock, Pa. Engineering di Mines American Rocket Society, SKY- SCRAPER ENGINEER LANDAY, Norwin D. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Chess Club, B'nai B'rith Hillel LANDGRAFF, Frank A. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, Baseball, New- man Club, Society for the Ad- ligancement of Management, Block LANG, Samuel A. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Alpha Omega, Student American Dentistry Association, American Society of Dentistry for Chil- dren, Oral Pathology Study Club LASKOFF, Jeffrey M. 268 Westbury, N. Y. Liberal Arts Alpha Phi Omega, Baseball, Var- sity Squash LASKY, Mary Ann 268 New Castle, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Sigma Alpha, Heinz Chapel Choir, Associated Women Stu- dents Social Committee, Senior Mentor LASNER, Robert P. 268 Greensburg, Pa. Pharmacy Rho Chi, Alpha Zeta Omega, PITT CAPSULE LAVERTY, Howard K. 268 New Kensington, Pa. Engineering cle Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers LEBOVITZ, Philip L. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Kappa Nu, Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Phi Beta Kappa LEBOVITZ, Ruth M. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Epsilon Phi, Student Un- ion Committee LECKWART, John F. 268 New Castle, Pa. Liberal Arts John Marshall Society LEDERER, Linda L. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Kappa Alpha Theta, Cheerleader, Senior Senator LEE, Linda E. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Psi Omega, Mortar Board, OWL, Pitt Players, Senator Stu- dent Government, Associated Women Students LEFF, Gerald J. 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering Jr Mines Alpha Phi Omega, SKYSCRAP- ER ENGINEER, OWL, Institute of Aeronautical Sciences, Tennis LEFF, Sanford 268 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dr Mines Pennsylvania Society of Profes- sional Engineers, Institute of Ra- dio Engineers LEGAL, Dennis A. 269 Carnegie, Pa. Engineering Jr Mines Theta Chi, American Institute of Electrical Engineers LEMERY, Martha R. 269 Wheeling, W. Va. Nursing LEPPOLD, Gerald L. 269 Verona, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, New- man Club LERACH, Richard F. 269 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Delta Tau Delta, Interfraternity Council LESHER, Deanne 269 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Public Relations of Student Gov- ernment, Social Committee of Associated Women Students LESKO, John G. 269 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering Jr Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio En- gineers LEVINE, Marvin 269 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Basketball LEVINE, William T. 269 Pittsburgh, Pa. LEVY, Lawrence E. 269 Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Squash Team, Debate LE WINTER, Harry S. 269 McKeesport, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Druids LEWIS, Martin 269 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration LEWIS, Mary K. 269 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Student Union Board, Hostess Committee, Fencing Club, Art Club LIEB, Ronald J. 269 Nicktown, Pa. Dentistry Psi Omega LINDH, Rodger B. 269 Monroeville, Pa. Pharmacy Theta Chi, Varsity Marching Band, American Pharmaceutical Association, Allegheny County Pharmaceutical Association LIPPERT, Thomas E. 269 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering Institute of Aero-Space Science, Society of Professional Engineers, Intramural Football, Softball LIPTON, Phyllis G. 269 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Student Union Forum, Associated Women Students Scholarship Com- mittee LITFIN, Jerry S. 269 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Men's Glee Club, Pitt Singers LIVO, Norma J. 269 Tarentum, Pa. Education LOBAUGH, Charles F. 269 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines LOCHER, David H. 269 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines LOCHER Walter E. 270 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration LODOWSKI, Robert N. 270 Natrona Heights, Pa. Education LOGUE, James J. 270 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts LOMBARDI, Arthur V. 270 New Castle, Pa. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta, Oral Pathol- ogy Study Club, DENTAL JOURNAL, Student American .Dental Association CSecretaryJ, American Society of Dentistry for Children LONG, Kenneth D. 270 McKeesport, Pa. I Business Administration Sigma Chi, Basketball CManagerJ, Interfraternity Council LONGDON, Betty J. 270 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts LONGENECKER, Charles W. I , 270 Ossining, N. Y. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta, Student Coun- cil fVice-Presidentj, Dentones LONGENECKER, David P. 270 Ossining, N. Y. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta, Junior Amer- ican Dental Association LONGPHRE, William H. 270 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta LOREY, Richard A. 270 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts American Institute of Physics LOUNDY, Joyce G. 270 Greensburg, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma, Student Pennsylvania Educational Assoc- ciation LOWE, Harry E. 270 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers LOWENTHAL, John 270 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS, IDEAS AND FIG- URES LOWENTHAL, Linda S. 270 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts PITI' NEWS, IDEAS AND FIG- URES tArt Editorl, Block P LOWRY, Ralph L. 270 Derry, Pa. Liberal Arts John Marshall Society, Interna- tional Association of Students in Economics and Commerce CTreas- urerl, Jazz Club LUFRANO, Anthony A. 270 McKees Rocks, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Psi Omega, Pep Commit- tee CChairmanJ, Men's Court Justice, Men's Council, Pitt Play- ers tExecutive Secretaryl, New- man Club, Student Union Board LYLE, Virginia D. 270 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pitt Players fAssistant Stage Managerj, International Rela- tions Club LYONS, Roslyn L. 270 Lancaster, Pa. Education Sigma Delta Tau, OWL, Pennsyl- vania State Educational Associa- tion, Associated Women Students MacNICHOLAS, Henry R. 270 East McKeesport, Pa. Business Administration MABUNAY, Felix D. 270 Chicago, Ill. Liberal Arts MACHAK, Sandra E. 271 Seward, Pa. Nursing MACKEY, William F. 271 Altoona, Pa. Liberal Arts Undergraduate Physics Seminar iVice Presidentj MADDALON, Dal V. 271 McKees Rocks, Pa. Engineering dr Mines Pi Tau Sigma, American Rocket Society, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers MADDEN, Jack P. 271 East McKeesport, Pa. Business Administration MAHONEY, Peter A. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts MALACK, Edward A. 271 Beaver Falls, Pa. Engineering dt Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers MALINCHAK, Mary A. 271 McKeesport, Pa. LiberalArts Newman Club, Women's Recrea- tion Association MASTANDREA MALLINGER, Sheila 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Psi Omega, Student Union Board CChairmanJ, Pitt Players, PITT NEWS, Women's Choral MANDELL, Hinda L. 271 Munhall, Pa. Education Sigma Delta Tau, Cwens, Pan- hellenic Council QVice-Presidentb, Pennsylvania State Education As- sociation, Student Union Commit- tee, Alpha Beta Gamma MANNHEIMER, Jack 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma MALPELI, Joseph A. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Kappa Nu, Phi Alpha Theta MARINO, Michael W. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Newman Club, International Re- lations Club MARINO, Ralph G. 271 Newark, N. J. Liberal Arts Phi Kappa Theta, Student Gov- ernment, Men's Council, Inter- fraternity Council MARLIN, William F. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Glee Club MARLOW, Patricia E. 271 Washington, D. C. Liberal Arts Alpha Kappa Alpha, Phi Sigma Kappa MARNELL, Daniel J. 271 Strong, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta, PITT NEWS MARPLE, Charelle R. 271 Bridgeville, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Phi, Cwens, IDE AS AND FIGURES, William Pitt Debate Union MARQUETTE, Carl H. 271 Mt. Carmel, Pa. Liberal Arts John Marshall Society MARSHALL, James R. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dc Mines Sigma Tau, Phi Eta Sigma, Scab- bard and Blade, Newman Club iPresidentJ, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pennsyl- vania Society of Professional En- gineers MARSHALL, Jean T. 271 Johnstown, Pa. Education Phi Theta Kappa, Student Penn- sylvania State Education Associa- tion, Associated Women Students MARKIN, Richard D. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts MASON, Ralph E. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Squash fCo-Captainl, Tennis, Pan- ther Club MASON, Walter R. 271 Bridgeville, Pa. Liberal Arts MASTANDREA, John R. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Eta Kappa Nu, Sigma Tau, Amer- ican Institute of Electrical Engi- neers, Newman Club, Pennsyl- vania Society of Professional Engineers MASTANDREA MASTANDREA, Mark A. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering J: Mines Sigma Tau, Eta Kappa Nu, Amer- ican Institute of Electrical En- gineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers MATHIESON, Carol A. 271 Summerhill, Pa. Education Associated Women Students MATTERN, Gustav 271 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts MATTHEWS, Kenneth D. 271 Dravosburg, Pa. Engineering 452 Mines Theta Chi, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Interfrater- nity Council CChief-Justiceb MATYUS, Richard J. 271 Cleveland, Ohio Business Administration Football MATZKA, Patty J. 271 Butler, Pa. Liberal Arts Senior Mentor MAUE, Winston H. 271 McKees Rocks, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio En- gineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, National Society of Professional Engineers MAWHINNEY, William V. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts MAYER, John R. 271 Bethel Park, Pa. Business Administration MAYL, David S. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Alpha Zeta Omega MAZZEI, Charles S. 271 New Castle, Pa. Pharmacy Kappa Psi MCCALLUM, Walter E. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Dentones, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People McCANDLESS, Judith A. 271 New Wilmington, Pa. Education Pennsylvania State Educational Association, Housing Board McCARTHY, Dennis K. 271 Collingswood, N. I. Engineering di Mines Lambda Chi Alpha, Alpha Phi Omega, Institute of Aeronautical Sciences, SKYSCRAPER ENGI- NEER MCCAULEY, Thomas J. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration MCCORMICK, John E. 271 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts MCDONALD, Donald E. 271 Erie, Pa. Pharmacy Phi .Delta Chi, Pitt Capsule, American Pharmaceutical Asso- ciation McDONOHUE, Thomas J. 271 Homestead, Pa. Education Newman Club McELHANEY, Ronald W. 271 Imperial, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Delta Tau Delta, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Interfraternity Council MCFERRON, Richard D. 271 Carnegie, Pa. Pharmacy MCGINNIS, Rena A. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education PITT NEWS, Pennsylvania State Education Association, Inquiry Club, Jazz Club MCKAVENEY, Edward F. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts MCKECHNIE, John T. 272 Natrona Heights, Pa. Liberal Arts Young Democrats, International Relations Club McKINNON, Russell J. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering JL Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers McLEAN, Robert S. 272 Turtle Creek, Pa. Liberal Arts MCMILLEN, Charlotte L. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Phi Mu, Pennsylvania State Ed- ucation Association McMULLEN, Ronald J. 272 Oakmont, Pa. Liberal Arts MCNALLY, Paul F. 272 Verona, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Eta Kappa Nu, Sigma Tau, Insti- tute of Radio Engineers CTreas- urerj MCQUADE, Joan H. 272 Natrona Heights, Pa. Nursing Kappa Kappa Gamma, Cwens, Mortar Board, Sigma Theta Tau MCVERRY, Thomas L. 272 Carnegie, Pa. Business Administration Phi Gamma Delta, Society for the Advancement of Management MCWILLIAMS, Marianne 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts MCWILLIAMS, Thomas R. 272 Masontown, Pa. Pharmacy Phi Delta chi MEHALKO, Carol A. 272 North Braddock, Pa. Education Sigma Sigma Sigma CPresidentJ, Pi Delta Epsilon, OWL MEHOK, Ronald G. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Lambda Chi Alpha MEISLIK, Judith A. 272 Farrell, Pa. Education IDEAS AND FIGURES, PITT NEWS, William Pitt Debate Un- ion MERENSTEIN, Gerald B. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta, B'nai B'rith Hillel MERINAR, John R. 272 Oakdale, Pa. Business Administration MERRILL, Alvin S. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Delta Sigma Pi MERZ, Edward W. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts METCALF, Thomas A. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts METRO, Joseph M. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines METZLER, A. Jay 272 Scottdale, Pa. Liberal Arts MEYER, Daniel F. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dc Mines American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers MICHAEL, Constance A. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Delta Zeta, Dolphin Swimming Club, Block P MICHALEK, Bernard J. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Delta Sigma Pi MICHLOVIC, John J. 272 North Braddock, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines MICKLE, Marlin H. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering di Mines Eta Kappa Nu, Sigma Tau, Phi Theta Kappa MIKESIC, Tanya M. 272 Johnstown, Pa. Education MILLER, Arlene A. 272 Canonsburg, Pa. Nursing Newman Club MILLER, Carolyn J. 272 Johnstown, Pa. Education MILLER, J. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts MILLER, James E. 272 Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta MILLER, John C. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Engineering 8L Mines Cabinet, American Institute of Metallurgi- cal Engineers MILLER, Linda J. 272 Erie, Pa. Education Phi Theta Kappa, OWL, Senior Mentor, Housing Board, National Council for Teachers of English MILLER, Nancy C. 272 Carlisle, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma, Pennsylvania State Education Association MILLER, Sarah C. 272 Johnstown, Pa. Nursing Basic Student Nurses Association MILSOM, Joan C. 272 New Castle, Pa. Business Administration Delta Delta Delta MISHELEVICH, David J. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Druids, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Del- ta Sigma Rho, William Pitt De- bate Union, WPGH, Chess Club, Amateur Radio Association, American Institute of Physics, Panel on Intercultural Relations, Phi Beta Kappa MGBEJUME, Joel K. 272 Owa-Agbor, Nigeria Liberal Arts MODENA, Lawrence W. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Alpha Phi Delta MONCHIK, Gerald J. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta MONDAY, Richard D. 272 Conemaugh, Pa. Engineering fi Mines American Institute of Chemical Engineers MONKELIS, Melvin A. 272 Duquesne, Pa. Engineering dl Mines MONROE, James R. 272 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering di Mines MONZI, Ronald 273 Arnold, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Society of Automotive Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Profes- sional Engineers MOORE, Virginia B. 273 Bethel Park, Pa. Education MOORE, W. Donald 273 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi lSecretarYl, In- terfraternity Council tVice Pres- identl MOOREHEAD, David J. 273 Natrona Heights, Pa. Business Administration Pi Kappa Alpha MORANZ, George A. 273 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dl Mines American Society of Civil En- gineers MORGAN, Emanuel R. 273 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta MORITZ, Norman 273 McKeesport, Pa. Pharmacy Alpha Zeta Omega, Pi Delta Ep- silon, PITT CAPSULE CEditorJ MORRIS, Sandra A. 273 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Quo Vadis, Pennsylvania State Education Association MOWRY, Harry R. 273 Ambridge, Pa. Education Pennsylvania State Education As- sociation, National Education Association MUELLER, Judy L. 273 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, Basic Student Nurses Association MUELLER, Norman P. 273 Pittsburgh, Pa. I Engineering dt Mines Sigma Tau, Eta Kappa Nu, Penn- sylvania Society of Professional Engineers, Institute of Radio Engineers MULHERN, John J. 273 Pittsburgh, Pa. ' Engineering di Mines American Institute of Mechanical Engineers, Engineering 8: Mines Cabinet MURPHY, Gerald E. 273 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Scabbard and Blade, Engineering and Mines Cabinet, American In- stitute of Industrial Engineers MURPHY, James E. 273 Springdale, Pa. Liberal Arts MYERS, Donna L. 273 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts MYERS, Eloise D. 273 Coraopolis, Pa. Nursing Basic Student Nurses' Association, Residence Choir MYERS, Oden L. 273 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry NAGORSKI, Gerald P. 273 Erie, Pa. Liberal Arts Newman Club, Russian Cultural Club, Pershing Rifles, Internation- al Relations Club NAPIECEK, Dolores A. 273 Reading, Pa. Education Newman Club NAPONIC, Mearl A. 273 Saltsburg, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Alpha Ep- silon Delta, Phi Eta Sigma NARCISI, Edward A. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta NATHAN, Judith L. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts OWL, POLARIS, Student Gov- ernment, Freshman Council NAU, Robert J. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business A dmin istration Delta Sigma Pi NEE, Peter B. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business A dministration NEESON, Robert J. 274 Verona, Pa. Dentistry Psi Omega, Perodontics Society NEIBERG, Alan D. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts NEIMAN, Joseph 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy American Pharmaceutical Associ- ation, Allegheny County Pharma- i ceutical Association lNESTEL, Kurt R. 274 ' Glenshaw, Pa. 1 Engineering 62 Mines Sigma Tau, Eta Kappa Nu, Phi Eta Sigma NEWBERG, Harriet 274 3 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education ' Pitt Players NEIDERMEIER, Jerome L. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts NOPHSKER, Ronald J. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi NORRIS, Sandra L. 274 Ligonier, Pa. Education Cwens, Alpha Beta Gamma NOSAL, Anthony J. 274 Central City, Pa. Education Tri-State Business Teachers Association NOTARIANNI, RoseMarie 274 Johnsonburg, Pa. Pharmacy Pi Delta Epsilon, PITT CAP- SULE NUDI, Louis A. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Delta Sigma Phi, Inter Fraternity Council OAKES, Thomas R. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi, PITT NEWS, Base- ball OCHS, Jack N. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, International As- sociation of Students in Business and Commerce, Inter-Cultural Re- lations Panel O'DESA, Lois A. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Kappa Kappa Gamma, Block P, Westminster Foundation OESTREICH, Richard A. 274 Kappa Kappa Gamma, Block P, Westminster Foundation OESTREICH, Richard A. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy ONDO, Jerome G. 274 Whitaker, Pa. Liberal Arts Lambda Chi Alpha, Beta Beta Beta, Newman Club O'NEIL, William V. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Psi Omega, American Dental As- sociation ORR, James E. Jr. 274 Johnstown, Pa. Business A dministration Sigma Chi, Society for the Ad- vancement of Management, Busi- ness Administration Cabinet, Glee Club OSCHMAN, James L. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts OSTFIELD, Howard 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Epsilon Pi, Alpha Epsilon Delta, WPGH, Chess Club OTT, John F. 274 Windber, Pa. Liberal Arts Newman Club OZKUL, Osman S. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Wrestling, Alpha Pi Mu, Amer- ican Institute of Industrial En- gineers PACE, Frances H. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Beta Gamma, AWS PAGE, Linda K. 274 Conemaugh, Pa. Education Chi Omega, AWS, Pennsylvania State Education Association PAGONIS, Katherine F. 274 Charleroi, Pa. Liberal Arts American Institute of Physics, Debate PANZER, Judith G. 274 Englewood, New Jersey Education Shoestring Productions Play PARELLA, Gladys L. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Chi Omega, Basic Student Nurses Association, Nurses Christian Fellowship PARKER, Harry K. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Phi Alpha PATELLA, Ralph E. 274 McKeesport, Pa. Business A dministration PATRICK, John W. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts PATTERSON, Robert A. Jr, 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Theta PATTERSON, Samuel R. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business A dministration Society for the Advancement of Management PAVIAN, Christine C. 274 Johnstown, Pa. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, Basic Student Nurses Association, Student Nurses Association of Pennsylvania PAYNE, John H. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration PENTEK, Joanne B. 274 Summerhill, Pa. Liberal Arts PEPINE, Carl J. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Kappa Alpha, Druids, Junior Worthy, Student Government, In- terfraternity Council PERONI, Carl A. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Phi Kappa Theta PERSIN, William J. 274 Clinton, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Pi Tau Sigma, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Penn- sylvania Society of Professional Engineers PERZAK, Theodore F. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Theta Chi, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers PETERS, Pete G. 274 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines American Society of Civil Engi- neers, American Road Builders Association PETERSON, Donald M. 275 Portage, Pa. Education PETRINA, Matthew F. Jr. 275 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering Jr Mines Delta Sigma Phi, SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER, Marching Band, Or- chestra, American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio Engineers PFORDT, Carol A. 275 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Kappa Alpha Theta, Alpha Beta Gamma PHILIPP, Fredrick J. 275 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts PIERCE, Frederic L. 275 Canonsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pitt Players, Alpha Psi Omega, IDEAS 84 FIGURES QUINN PIERCE, William D. 275 Columbus, Ohio Liberal Arts Alpha Phi Alpha, Football, Inter- fraternity Council PIERMAN, Brian C. 275 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering all Mines Sigma Phi Epsilon, Kappa Kappa Psi, Scabbard 8: Blade, Sigma Tau, Concert Band, Marching Band, American Road Builders Association, American Society of Civil Engineers, Pennsylvania So- ciety of Professional Engineers PINCHOK, Robert N. 275 Springdale, Pa. Liberal Arts PITERSKI, Norman J. 275 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers PITTINATO, Gabriel F. 275 McKees Rocks, Pa. Engineering dl Mines PITTLER, Leonard H. 275 Greensburg, Pa. Business Administration Phi Epsilon Pi, Student Govem- ment PLUTKO, Ernest 275 McKeesport, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta, American Chemical Society PRAISSMAN, Melvin 275 Philadelphia, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Mu, Men's Council, Interfraternity Council PRESCOTT, Richard S. 275 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Society for the Advancement of Management PREVITT, Janet C. 275 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Theta Phi Alpha, Pi Lambda Theta, Mortar Board, Newman Club, Alpha Beta Gamma PREVITT, Linda M. 275 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Theta Phi Alpha, Mortar Board, Alpha Psi Omega, Pitt Players, Alpha Beta Gamma, Newman Club, MADEMOISELLE CCol- lege Board Representativej PROBST, Joyce E. 275 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Pennsylvania State Education Association PROVOST, Robert W. 275 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Phi Epsilon, Glee Club PRUCHNIC, Donald D. 275 Windber, Pa. Business Administration Business Administration Cabinet, Society for the Advancement of Management PUCCIARELLI, Victor M. 275 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Psi Omega, ODONTOLOGICAL BULLETIN PYLE, Ronald L. 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. QUINN, James M. 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Track RANGO RANGO, William T. 276 Youngstown, Ohio Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Pi Delta Epsilon, PITT NEWS RAUCCI, John P. 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. - Business Administration RAUH, Richard E. I 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. Llberal AHS PITT NEWS, WPGH, Soccer, Squash RAUSCH, Duane D. 276 McKeesport, Pa. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi REAVES, Raymond L. 276 Kittanning, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi, Druids, Kappa Kappa Psi, Junior Worthy, Student Gov- ernment, Marching Band REID, Alex J. 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration REID, James D. 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines REINSTEIN, William C. 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Pi, Emerson Club RENNINGER, Kenneth R. 276 Uniontown, Pa. Liberal Arts RESNICK, Alvin M. 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Druids, Phi Eta Sigma, Omicron Delta Kappa, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Junior Worthy, PITT NEWS, Student Government, Men's Glee Club REYNOLDS, Robert G. 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines REZNIK, Alan A. 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Phi Sigma Tau, Gymnastic's Team RHODES, Robert D. 276 Dravosburg, Pa. Liberal Arts RHODES, Thelma J. 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts RICHARDSON, Donald A. 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Arnold Air Society, JET BLAST RILEY, Emilee A. 276 Hartsdale, N. Y. Nursing Chi Omega, Alpha Tau Delta, Cwens, Mortar Board, Sigma The- ta Tau, Thyrsa W. Amos Award, AWS, Panhellenic Council tPres- identj, Senior Mentor, Basic Stu- dent Nurses Association ROBIN, Shelia C. 276 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Women's Choral ROBINSON, Paul D. 276 Johnstown, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, Intramural Football, Glee Club, Business Administration Cabinet ROCKMAN, George 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Mu, Chess Club RODGERS, Raymond E. 277 Youngstown, Ohio Pharmacy Kappa Psi, PITT CAPSULE, American Pharmaceutical Associ- ation, Allegheny County Pharma- ceutical Association ROEHLICH, Ferdinard Jr. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts ROHRMAN, John A. 277 Homestead, Pa. Business Administration Lambda Chi Alpha, Football ROMERO, Alvaro M. 277 Bogota, Colombia Engineering dt Mines ROOSE, John W. 277 Leetonia, Ohio Pharmacy Kappa Psi, Rho Chi, American Pharmaceutical Association, Alle- gheny County Pharmaceutical Association ROPPOLO, Maria E. 277 Hyde Park, Pa. Liberal Arts Newman Club, AWS ROSEMEYER, Charles R. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Society for the Advancement of Management ROSEN, Etta M. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education B'nai Brith Hillel, Student Zionist Organization, Pennsylvania State Education Association ROSENZWEIG, Milton 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Chess Club ROSENZWEIG, Richard L. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Druids, Swim- ming, Student Government, Pitt Players ROSS, Karen M. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Epsilon Phi ROSSI, Robert K. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering Jr Mines American Institute of Chemical Engineers ROTH, Rosalind E. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Epsilon Phi, Alpha Beta Gamma, AWS, Pennsylvania State Education Association ROWLEY, Robert D. Jr. 277 Greensburg, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi, Druids, Freshman Camp, Student Government, Inter- fraternity Council, William Pitt Debating Union, Homecoming Committee CBusiness Managerj ROY, James D. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, Squash RUBLE, Susan R. 277 Uniontown, Pa. Education Alpha Delta Pi, Senior Mentor, Little Sister of Minerva, Heinz Chapel Choir, Physical Educa- tion Club, Women's Recreation Association RUCH, James R. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts RUDIN, Judy 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Epsilon Phi, Freshman Council, Pennsylvania State Edu- cation Association RUPRECHT, Dorothy A. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Alpha Delta Pi, United Campus Fellowship, Womenis Choral, Bas- ic Student Nurse's Association RZEZNIK, Theodore A. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Eta Kappa Nu, Institute of Radio Engineers, Swimming SACKS, Jerome M. 277 Evans City, Pa. Liberal Arts SAKULSKY, Hershel T. 277 Monaca, Pa. Pharmacy Alpha Zeta Omega, Pi Delta Ep- silon, PITT CAPSULE tBusiness Managerj SALAMON, Louis R. 277 Monroeville, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Mu, John Marshall Society, Baseball, International Law Society SALEM, Brenda E. 277 Johnstown, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma, Phi Theta Kappa, Glee Club, AWS, Pitt Players SAMAY, Harold J. 277 Natrona Heights, Pa. Liberal Arts SAMUELS, Martin S. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi SANKER, Richard E. 277 Johnstown, Pa. Business A dministration Alpha Kappa Psi, Business Ad- ministration Cabinet, Football, Intramural Basketball SANKEY, Robert C. 277 Sharon, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Basketball, Panther Club, Fellow- ship of Christian Athletes, Amer- ican Society of Civil Engineers, American Road Builders Associa- tion SARSFIELD, Anthony J. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Pi Tau Sigma, Swimming, Pan- ther. Club, Society of Automotive Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers SAX, Harvey D. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Phi Epsilon Pi, Society for the Advancement of Management SAXMAN, Ann L. 277 Greensburg, Pa. Education Kappa Kappa Gamma, Block P SAYLOR, Byron L. 277 Newport, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, Society for the Advancement of Management, Gavel Club, Business Administra- tion Cabinet CPresidentJ SCALISE, Betty Anne 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Chi Omega, Mortar Board, Pi Lambda Theta, Quo Vadis SCALZOTT, Leslie L. 277 Freeport, Pa. Liberal Arts Math Club SCHALL, Richard L. 277 Salina, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Pi Theta SCHEGGIA, Fredricka H. 277 Uniontown, Pa. Liberal Arts Cwens, Mortar Board, Alpha Ep- silon Delta, Dolphin Club, Senior Mentor, Housing Board tSecretaryJ SCHEIN, Linda B. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Pitt Players SCHENO, John M. 277 Carnegie, Pa. Business Administration Poetry Festival Contest-1959 SCHMID, Lois A. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Zeta Tau Alpha, Alpha Tau Del- ta, Basic Student Nurses Associa- tion SCHMID, Ronald L. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering Jr Mines Phi Eta Sigma, ENGINEERING 8a MINES BULLETIN tEditorD, Outstanding Senior Award Com- mittee SCHNITZKI, Joseph M. 277 Wampum, Pa. Business Administration Sigma Chi, Basketball, Society for the Advancement of Management, Greek Week Committee SCHOLZ, Pauline W. 277 Harrison City, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Psi Omega, Angel Flight, Pitt Players SCHRIDER, Leo A. 277 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering Jr Mines Sigma Gamma Epsilon, American Institute of Mechanical Engi- neers 84 Mines Cabinet SCHROCK, Clark T. 278 Somerset, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi SCHWARTZ, Howard S. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering ri Mines American Road Builders Associa- tion, American Society of Civil Engineers SCHWARTZ, Lorry N. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Epsilon Pi, William Pitt De- bate Union SCHWEITZER, Karl 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta, Phi Eta Sig- ma, American Dental Association SCHWIMMER, Robert D. 278 Garlield, N. J. Liberal Arts Alpha Epsilon Delta, PITT NEWS, Interfraternity Council, Zeta Beta Tau SCIULLI, Joseph A. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Eta Kappa Nu, Sigma Tau CPres- identj, Scabbard and Blade, Amer- ican Institute of Electrical Engi- neers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, Special Fellowship Committee SCRIP, Frank M. 278 Roscoe, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Football, Baseball SEBASTIAN, Michael J. 278 Ambridge, Pa. Engineering :Q Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers SEBYANICS, John G. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Inter-Cultural Relations Panel SEDER, Harold B. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Epsilon Pi fTreasurerJ, Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Phi Beta Kappa, American Chem- ical Society, Public Relations Committee SEGALL, Roberta S. 278 -Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Sigma Delta Tau, Pennsylvania Education Association, Kappa Nu Sweetheart, Student Union Pro- grams Committee SEIFRIED, Joseph J. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts SKYSCRAPER E N G I N E E R, Pitt Fencing Club tVice-Presi- dentj, Chess Club SEMPLE, James S. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Lambda Chi Alpha, Pennsylvania Society for Professional Engi- gineers, Kappa Kappa Psi, Amer- lcan Road Builders Association CV1ce-Presidentl, American Soci- ety of Civil Engineers, Band SENTIPAL, Nancy R. 278 Pitcairn, Pa. Liberal Arts SENTNER, Robert M. 278 Carnegie, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Wrestling SERRA, Jack A. 278 Pitcairn, Pa. Liberal Arts SHAFFER, Larry D. 278 East Liverpool, Ohio Pharmacy Lambda Chi Alpha, Kappa Psi, American Pharmaceutical Asso- ciation SHAK, Mariene S. 278 Kennywood, Pa. Nursing Delta Zeta, Alpha Tau Delta, Sig- ma Theta Tau, Basic Student Nurses Association SHAHIN, Boulos T. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering di Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio Engineers SHANE, James W. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Student Union Board, Pitt Play- ers, OWL CAdvertising Managerj SHAPIRO, Edward L. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Pitt Players, Society for the Ad- vancement of Management SHAPIRO, Ilene L. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Quo Vadis, American Chemical Society SHAPIRO, Paul J. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa, Business Administration Pershing Rides, Alpha Kappa Psi SHAVER, Bruce E. 278 Lebanon, Pa. Dentistry American Society of Dentistry for Children, American Dental As- sociation SHAWL, Charles W. 278 West Newton, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Lambda Chi Alpha, Pi Tau Sigma, Student Government Senate, En- gineering 8c Mines Cabinet SHEPHERD, Helen L. 278 Chester, W. Va. Nursing Chairman Handbook Committee, Wesley Foundation SHEPS, Rosalyn J. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Sigma Delta Tau, Mortar Board, Cwens, Alpha Beta Gamma, As- sociated Women Students CVice- Presidentl, Quo Vadis, Senior Mentor, Freshman and Junior Class Council SHILOBOD, Dennis S. 278 Unity, Pa. . Engineering dt Mines Sigma Gamma Epsilon SHOLTZ, David 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Special Fellowship Program, Math Club SHONTZ, George E. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts SHREFLER, Ann L. 278 New Castle, Pa. Nursing Basic Student Nurses Association SHUTTERLY, Ralph A. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Basketball, Baseball SINGLETON, William F. 278 McKeesport, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Phi Eta Sigma, Druids, Eta Kappa Nu, Omicron Delta Kappa, SKY- SCRAPER ENGINEER, ENGI- NEERING AND MINES BUL- LETIN, Engineering and Mines Cabinet CPresidentJ, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers QPresidentJ SIMMS, Barbara A. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Basic Student Nurses Association SIMS, Barry R. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Mu SKARJA, John A. 278 Cheswick, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Rilie Team, American Society of Metals, American Society of Met- allurgical Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers SKIBO, Stanley J. 278 Roscoe, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Baseball SKINKISS, Ralph J. 278 Johnstown, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines SKRAPITS, Louis J. 278 Northampton, Pa. Dentistry SLEVIN, Norma S. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education SLOTKIN, Robert N. 278 Lancaster, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Interfraternity Council CVice-Presidentj, Student Government fSenior Senatorj SMIK, Barbara D, 278 Wheeling, W. Va. Liberal Arts Kappa Alpha Theta SMITH, Darwin N. 278 Columbus, Ohio Pharmacy Basketball SMITH, Edward S. 278 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business A dministration Systems and Procedures Associa- tion, American Association of Accountants SMITH, Emma L. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts SNIDER, Myron 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy SNYDER, Maurice F. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Sigma Tau, Eta Kappa Nu, New- man Club SOBEL, Michael N. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Alpha Omega, DENTAL JOUR- NAL, Student American Dental Association STEERMAN SOBATA, Richard E. 279 Latrobe, Pa. Liberal Arts Delta Sigma Phi, Student Gov- ernment Senate, William Pitt De- bate Union SOKOLOW, Gerald M. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Sigma Alpha Mu, Hillel, William Pitt Debate Union SOLTZ, Besseta F. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Beta Beta Beta fSecretaryJ SOMERHALDER, Robert A. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration SORTINO, Stephen V. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Pennsylvania Society for Profes- sional Engineers, National Society for Professional Engineers, Amer- ican Institute of Chemical Engi- neers, Newman Club, University of Pittsburgh Varsity Marching Band SPALLA, Andrew J. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Delta Sigma Delta, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Student American Dental Association SPECTER, Howard A. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Alpha Epsilon Delta SPERLINS, Rauls 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines American Society of Civil Engi- neers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, American Road Builders Association SPETZ, Steven N. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pershing Rifles tCaptainJ, Pi Sigma Alpha SPIECHA, Walter E. 279 Carnegie, Pa. Engineering dt Mines SPIELMAN, Warren R. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Pi Kappa Alpha, American Dental Association SPISAK, James G. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers SPOTT, David A. 279 Cleveland, Ohio Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi STANISH, Frank X. 279 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Kappa Psi STEERMAN, Donald B. 279 Philadelphia, Pa. Business Administration ggseball, Basketball, Pi Lambda 1 " mr' H mfwrvw STELZER STELZER, Joseph M. 279 Rochester, Pa. Liberal AHS Alpha Phi Omega, PITT NEWS CAssistant Business Managerl, Rodger Williams Fellowship tTreasurerJ STEPHENSON, George Kenneth 280 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Pennsylvania Society of Profes- sional Engineers STEPP, Wildona J. 280 Turtle Creek, Pa. Liberal Arts Westminster Fellowship, Pitkin Club, International Relations Club STERN, Robert F. 280 Butler, Pa. Engineering dt Mines American Society of Civil Engi- neers, American Road Builders Association, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers STEVENSON, Adam Jr. 280 Irwin, Pa. Engineering di Mines American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers STEY, George C. 280 Farrell, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Delta STEWART, Susan J. 280 Wheeling, W. Va. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta STIGER, Robert R. 280 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dk Mines Institute of Aerospace Science, Pennsylvania Society of Profes- sional Engineers STONE, Daniel H. 280 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines Theta Chi, Sigma Gamma Epsi- lon, Engineering 8a Mines Cabinet STONE, Harvey L. 280 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pitt Players STRAHL, Marshall S. 280 Pittsbur h Pa Pharmac 8 , - Y Rho Chi, Alpha Zeta Omega, American Pharmaceutical Asso- ciation, Allegheny County Phar- maceutical Association STRAKA, Daniel C. 280 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Lambda Chi Alpha, Newman Club, Marching Band, Interfra- ternity Council STRAUSS, Linda E. 280 Brooklyn, N. Y. Liberal Arts STUTZMAN, Judith E. 280 Davidsville, Pa. Education Cwens, PITT NEWS, Pennsyl- vania State Education Association STYSLINGER, George R. 280 West Mifflin, Pa. Liberal Arts SUROVEC, Paul S. 280 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration SUSSER, Karen A. 280 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Psi Omega, Pitt Players SUSSER, Murray R. 280 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Alpha Psi Omega, Pitt Players, Poetry Festival SUZICH, Samuel 280 Roscoe, Pa. Engineering Ji Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers SWEARINGEN, Ila L. 280 Shippingport, Pa. Nursing Chi Omega, Basic Student Nurses' Association SWANSIGER, William A. 280 Windber, Pa. Engineering 84 Mines Sigma Tau, Marching Band SWANSON, Linda 281 McKeesport, Pa. Nursing Sigma Sigma Sigma SWOPE, Sara V. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Delta Zeta, AWS TARASI, Raymond J. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Delta Tau Delta, Delta Sigma Up- silon, Football, Soccer TEDESCO, Anthony M. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Kappa Alpha, OWL TEETERS, Patricia A. 281 Glenshaw, Pa. Business Administration Delta Delta Delta, Mortar Board, Student Government tVice Presi- dentj, Senior Mentor TENER, Philip 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration PITT NEWS, Student Union Board, Society of the Advance- ment of Management, Student Government, Business Adminis- tration Cabinet THIMONS, Joseph J. 281 Tarentum, Pa. Engineering dt Mines THOMAS, Julia M. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Delta Epsilon, Cwens, Mortar Board, PITT NEWS CEditorJ, Quo Vadis, Phi Beta Kappa THOMAS, Marlene A. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education THOMAS, Robert C. Jr. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering di Mines Sigma Alpha Epsilon, American Institute of Industrial Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Profes- sional Engineers THOMPSON, David E. 281 New Wilmington, Pa. Pharmacy Phi Delta Chi, Pitt Players THOMPSON, Leah A. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Zeta Tau Alpha, Basic Student Nurses Association, Heinz Chapel Choir, Block P, Tennis Team, Dolphin Club THOMPSON, Patricia A. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Mu, Pennsylvania State Ed- ucation Association THOMPSON, Robert L. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering cf: Mines Pi Tau Sigma, American Society of Professional Engineers, Insti- tute of Aerospace Sciences, Marching Band THOMPSON, William D. 281 Altoona, Pa. Pharmacy Delta Sigma Phi TIMMENEY, Relda J. 281 Johnstown, Pa. Nursing Alpha Tau Delta, Basic Student Nurses Association, S tu d e n t Nurses Association of Pennsyl- vania TIPTON, Jack C. 281 Meyersdale, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, Society for the Advancement of Management, PANTHER TITLEBAUM, Adele H. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education TOMINIC, Thomas E. 281 Rural Ridge, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, Beta Alpha Psi, Society for the Advancement of Management, Business Adminis- tration Cabinet TOSATTO, John O. 281 Freeport, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Newman Club, American Institute of Elec- trical Engineers, Institute of Ra- dio Engineers TOWER, Jean D. 281 Murrysville, Pa. Liberal Arts TRAYNOR, Thomas A. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Soccer, Basketball TRIKO, Boris M. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering di Mines American Institute of Chemical Engineers TRULLAS, Pedro 281 Venezuela Business Administration Society for the Advancement of Management, International Asso- ciation For Students in Economics SL Business, Glee Club, YWCA, Pittsburgh Foreign Policy Associa- tion TURAK, George Jr. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Arnold Air Society TURNER, Vivian S. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Delta Zeta UNNONE, Victor A. 281 McKeesport, Pa. Engineering Ja Mines URBANIC, Patricia C. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Chi Omega, OWL, AWS, Worn- en's Recreation Association VALLI, Robert F. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering 62 Mines VANASDALE, Stephen A. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration VANMETER, Milton C. 281 Cumberland, Maryland Dentistry Psi Omega VANNUCCI, Karen E. 281 Belle Vernon, Pa. Liberal Arts VAN WIE, Christine K. 281 Wheeling, West Virginia Education Pennsylvania State Teachers As- sociation VAVREK, Andrew J. 281 Johnstown, Pa. Pharmacy Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Delta Chi, Newman Club, Allegheny County Pharmaceutical Associa- tion, American Pharmaceutical Association, American Associa- tion of Hospital Pharmacists VEHAR, MaryAnn 281 Monroeville, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma VERNON, John P. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts VESELENY, John D. Jr. 281 McKees Rocks, Pa. Engineering aft Mines Golf, Pennsylvania Society for Professional Engineers, Institute of Aeronautical Sciences, Ameri- can Rocket Society VICKERS, Richard M. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts VIDAKOVICH, Ann M. 281 Pleasant Unity, Pa. Liberal Arts Quo Vadis, Senior Mentor, New- man Club VIGNALI, Larry E. 281 'Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Pi Kappa Alpha, Panther Club, Football VOGEL, Edwin E. 281 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration VOLLMER, Barbara L. 281 Bethel Park, Pa. Liberal Arts VRANKA, Robert G. 281 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts VOYTAS, Robert M. 281 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Theta Kappa, Phi Beta Kap- pa VUICK, Judith A. 282 Duquesne, Pa. Education 'Kappa Alpha Theta, Block P, AWS, Student Government, Penn- sylvania State Education Associa- tion WAGNER, Louis A. 282 Monaca, Pa. Liberal Arts PITT NEWS, Pitt Players, Russian Club WALDMAN, John A. 282 Windber, Pa. Business Administration Alpha Kappa Psi, Society for the Advancement of Management, Business Administration Cabinet WALKER, Darleen D. 282 Erie, Pa. Liberal Arts Quo Vadis WALKER, Mary M. 282 Carnegie, Pa. Education Kappa Alpha Theta, Homecoming Queen, 1961 WALSH, Patricia A. 282 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Delta Pi, Panhellenic Coun- cil, Quo Vadis WALTERS, Robert A. 282 Ben Avon, Pa. ' Engineering dt Mines Institute of Radio Engineers, American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers WARNES, Myron C. 282 Arlington, Virginia Liberal Arts Pi Kappa Alpha, Pitt Players WARNES, William A. 282 Arlington, Virginia Liberal Arts Pitt Players, Sigma Pi lWARREN, Joan W. 282 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts WASSAM, Jack G. 282 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Kappa Psi, PITT CAPSULE WATSON, Raymond E. 282 Murrysville, Pa. Liberal Arts WEBB, Jessie M. 282 Detroit, Mich. Nursing N u r s e s Christian Fellowship, Basic Student Nurses Association, Student Nurses Association of Pittsburgh WEBER, J. Lawrence 282 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Baseball, Society for the Advance- ment of Management WECHUCK, Leon J. 282 Oakmont, Pa. . Engineering di Mines Sigma Tau, American Institute of Mechanical Engineers, Pennsyl- vania Society of Professional En- gineers WEDNER, Irwin J. 282 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry WEHNER, Harriet A. 282 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Delta Epsilon, PITT NEWS, CEditorJ, Block P WEIN, Neal E. 282 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Phi Epsilon Pi, WPGH, Business Administration Cabinet WEIS, Bruce L. 282 Butler, Pa. Business Administration WEISS, Ray J. 282 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts WEISS, Trudy 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Delta Epsilon, PITT NEWS WELLS, Jay R. III 283 Bethel Park, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Heinz Chapel Choir, YMCA, Young Republicans, Society for Con- servative Studies WENZEL, Robert P. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines ENGINEERING :YL MINES BUL- LETIN, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers WESOKY, Howard L. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Sigma Tau, Pi Tau Sigma, SKY- SCRAPER ENGINEER, Alpha Phi Omega, American Rocket So- ciety, Institute of Aerospace Sci- ences, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers WHETSEL, Barbara J. 283 Brownsville, Pa. Liberal Arts WHITE, Charles R. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration WHITE, Charles W. 283 McKees Rocks, Pa. Business Administration Kappa Pi Kappa WHITEHEAD, Albert L. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Eta Kappa Nu, Sigma Tau, Amer- ican Institute of Electrical Engi- neers, Institute of Radio Engineers WHITMAN, Ellen B. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Beta Gamma, PITT NEWS, Hillel WICKNICK, Edwin C. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts WEISENTHAL, Lee A. 283 McKeesport, Pa. Dentistry Pi Lambda Phi, Alpha Omega WILKINSON, Oswald E. 283 Sidman, Pa. Liberal Arts WILLIAMSON, Drew P. 283 McKeesport, Pa. Education Baseball WILSON, Roberta L. 283 Johnstown, Pa. Liberal Arts Delta Psi Omega, OWL, Student Congress, Associated Women Stu- dents CTreasurerJ, Dramatics Club, Glee Club WINIKOFF, Barbara H. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education Alpha Epsilon Phi WITKOWSKI, Robert E. 283 Glassport, Pa. Liberal Arts American Chemical Society WITT, John A. 283 Vandergrift, Pa. Business Administration Society for the Advancement of Management, Pershing Rities, Scabbard and Blade WOLFSON, Howard A. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Alpha Zeta Omega, American Pharmaceutical Association WOLK, Barry J. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Pi Lambda Phi, Squash WOLK, Roberta G. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education WRIGHT, M. Ellen 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education WUKICH, Daniel J. 283 Trafford, Pa. Business Administration WYMARO, James A. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Delta Ep- silon, Newman Club WYSE, Janice E. 283 Pittsbur h Pa Nursin S - - 8 Newman Club, Basic Student Nurses' Association YEDLICKA, John F. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Beta Beta Beta, Baseball YENICK, Richard M. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineering dc Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio En- gineers YOST, Jo Ann C. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Zeta Tau Alpha, Heinz Chapel Choir, Basic Student Nurses As- sociation, Student Nurses Associa- tion of Pennsylvania YOUNG, John W. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts YOUNG, Judy K. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Basic Student Nurses' Association, Student Nurses Association of Pennsylvania, Alpha Tau Delta YOUNG, Stephen R. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Pharmacy Pi Lambda Phi YOUSKO, Thomas J. 283 Duquesne, Pa. Engineering cf: Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio En- gineers ZUNDEL ZABETAKIS, Liberty 283 Burgettstown, Pa. Liberal Arts Angel Flight QCaptainJ ZAGRODNICK, John T. 283 Johnstown, Pa. Engineering di Mines American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio En- gineers, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, National Society of Professional Engineers, WPGH ZALEWSKI, Zigmund W. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Liberal Arts Sigma Chi, Glee Club ZAMULEVIC, Elva C. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Associated Women Students, New- man Club ZECKER, Fred W. 283 Export, Pa. Liberal Arts ZEIDEN, Sharon R. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Education ZEIGLER, Robert W. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business Administration Omicron Delta Kappa, Pi Delta Epsilon, Alpha Phi Omega, SKY- SCRAPER ENGINEER CBusiness Managerj ZETWO, James J. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Business A dministration Society for the Advancement of Management CPresidentJ, Wesley Foundation CPresidentJ, Business Administration Cabinet, Student Council of Religious Organizations ZHELESNIK, Joseph A. 283 Roselle Park, N. J. Engineering 62 Mines Institute for Radio Engineers, Football, Baseball ZINMAN, Edwin J. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Dentistry Pi Lambda Phi, Alpha Omega, Druids, Pi Delta Epsilon, William Pitt Debate Union, PITT NEWS, DENTAL JOURNAL, Interfrater- nity Council ZIRKLE, Delbert J. 283 Duquesne, Pa. Engineering dt Mines Scabbard and Blade, Westminster Foundation, Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers, Insti- tute of Radio Engineers of Amer- ica, National Society of Profes- sional Engineers, American Insti- tute of Electrical Engineers ZITELLI, Agnes L. 283 Monroeville, Pa. Education Delta Zeta, Alpha Beta Gamma, Senior Mentor ZUNDEL, Jennie L. 283 Pittsburgh, Pa. Nursing Basic Student Nurses' Association, Student Nurses Association of Pennsylvania ,,.: - wig, ' , aww- ,.., K. QL1: . -. -- i 'WMNW sm.-fm ,,.g.. I 2 1 ADVERTISING OAKLAND'S CULTURAL CENTER boasts one of the wor1d's leading- symphony orchestras- the PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with WILLIAM ST EINBERG directing 2'-' Go! Lon' . . . In oz Gooo' Book fffom foo Book Cololozf 4000 Fwh A won no Pzfifooufcgb Il Po. I O lgMi4. if ,reams V2 'r I 9? is J 4 I C diff' M 'QI-QA 0 R2 CONGRATULATIONS Student Union Cafeteria Venetian Room Catering Services Hunt Room Tuck Shop Faculty Club Graduate School of Public Health GID In . Everything in Flowers Ma. l-1300 3719 Forbes St. Mu. 2-1300 Pittsburgh 13, Pa there is a bright future in foods . . . and this new Heinz Research Center stands as a promise of the growing world leader- ship of H. J. Heinz Company in the field of food processing. Located in Pittsburgh, on the north bank of the Allegheny, it is the hub of the Heinz inter- national operation. ln its ultramodern laboratories, test kitchens and pilot plant, new prod- ucts are born, new packaging ideas conceived, new methods of factory processing formu- lated. Here research in the field of nutrition is carried on-to be translated into more healthful, as well as more flavorful, foods for infants and adults. Here, with scientific exactness, the high standards of the 57 Varieties are rigidly guarded. With facilities of this most modern Research Center-and with its staff of talented, well- trained personnel-pointing the way toward an even more effective production of quality foods, Heinz looks with confidence to the future. H. J. Heinz Company wishes for each of you a bright future filled with challenge, fulfill- ment and iust reward. H. J. HEINZ COMPANY lx, ,s ,. Helnz lnternatlonal Research Center TIME T0 EQUIP YOURSELF FOR FUTURE SUCCESS the best of everything! S. S. WHITE QUALITY DENTAL PRODUC FILLING M THE S.S. WHITE DENTAL MANUFACTURING CO., Philadel -4-rss... , - ,. .X '-f' Six Finishing Stands with Three Vertical Edgers on the MESTA 44" Four-High Hot Strip Mill ROLLING MILLS FOR FERROUS AND NON-FERROUS METALS ' CAST AND FORGED MILL ROLLS ' AUXILIARY MILL AND PROCESSING EQUIPMENT ' HEAVY DUTY MACHINE TOOLS ' HYDRAULIC FORGING PRESSES ' IRON AND STEEL CASTINGS' GEARS ' FORGINGS Designers and Builders of M ESTA PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANSA ff' ' Q KEYSTGNE DAIRY Sewing the University with dairy products Finest in Quality Keystone Dairy MO 1-3020 Cglze Ggdasfiion Qgitorewo Qzittsrbiicirghis Givlc Genter HIIIH5 OF OAKLAND Varied Selections of ' DRESSES ' SPORTSVVEAR ' COATS ' LINGERIE ' SUITS ' ACCESSORIES Be "Fashion Wise" at PRICE'S just right zs ll li i lu... L25 'gg i ,, JA. 4 415. 42.2 fy 3619 FORBES AVE. CCORNER FORBES ond ATWOODD MUseum 3-3395 s THE OWLFUL PERIL OF "LITTLE NELL" cast of characters LITTLE NELL FEROCIOUS FRITZ REGGIE GOODHEART if N But I don't want to buy an OWL! Oh! Youall buy an OWL Pistols at ten paces or the OWL serves a duel purpose . . . I'll save Little Nell with a 52.00 deposit . . . Reggie :YL Nell live happily ever after with their copy of the '62 OWL. sa UNIVERSITY A S , , or JGYE4 PITTSBURGH f . Q x xx' Official Class TX Rings CID YOUR PITT RING IS MANUFACTURED E l ly by th L G Balfour Company d t d by the w ld fi t ft Th d ign has been tradt l for 43 years and pp d by U ty authorities a d th student ri g mittees. ORDER YOUR RING AND SEE SAMPLES AT: PITT BOOK CENTER L G B If C p y UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE M Branch Phy B ld g H lth P f B h 4000 Fifth A 12l U ty Pl D St t T St t bghl3P Pl!bghl3P Pttb ghl3P TOPS IN PROTECTION 56,000 IN BENEFITS Yours for a few cents a day Enroll in the STUDENT ACCIDENT AND ILLNESS MAJOR MEDICAL PLAN The plan will pay expenses for all medical costs of accidents, illnesses according to Schedule of Bene- flts including: 1. Room and Board 5. Surgery and other 2. Laboratory Work Medical Care 3. X-Rays 6. Ambulance Service 4. Anesthesia 7. All Medicines, etc. Limit of benefits: S1000 blanket coverage is al- lowed for accidents, S1000 for sickness on a broad Schedule of benehts, PLUS S5000 under a Major Medical Plan for both accidents and illnesses. Consult your STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES for complete details of this year-round coverage. Higham, Neilson, Whitridge 81 Reid, Inc. 344 North Broad Street, Philadelphia 2, Pa. Atlanta Boston Chicago Los Angeles New York Leading the Nation in School and Camp Insurance .La ...., A AJ, , - - .. V idea man... the Keller gearbook representative DONALD J. MESSINGER To the casual reader a yearbook is often simply an "album" of pictures with accompanying identi- fications and enough written text to fill up the re- maining holes on the pages. Merely ink on paper . . . though nice to own and enjoy. But to the staff and the adviser the yearbook means much more. For yearbook work comprises a multitude of details: Layout, Art, Photography, Copy, Typography, Covers and Binding Cnot to mention the small detail of money-raisingl. Highly technical and often confusing, these details are at the very least time-consuming and a source of anxiety to a staff unless the publisher's repre- sentative is company-trained to give needed help and suggestions. All representatives for Wm. J. Keller Inc. are skilled in the many facets of yearbook work, hav- ing at their finger-tips the answers to yearbook problems as well as a multitude of ideas for new graphic arts special effects, to enable the staff to produce a yearbook that is different and attractive. Your Keller salesman is more than a technical ad- viser, he is a "clearing-housel' of yearbook ideas. Wm. J. Keller Inc. Publishers of Finer Yearbooks Buffalo 15, New York ul' qualit college radio . . WPGI-I .femfin the Scbenley uadmngle 6 0 on our dial Follow the lead of the nearly 2,000,000 residents of Western Pennsylvania who have wisely chosen non-profit Blue Cross and Blue Shield protection against the cost of hospital and doctor bills. Yes, be wise and give yourself the best. And Blue Cross and Blue Shield are best because they are the only professionally- sponsored protection plans-the only plans officially approved by the hospitals and doctors themselves. ' BE WISE x HOSPITAL SERVICE ASSOCIATION Blue Crossw and Blue Shieldw .,:.w., . . gpg-ygg IH Western Pennsylvania ' Q! 9 Union Trust Bldg. Pittsburgh 19, Pa. EXpress l-0500 NEW FACES AT PITT STUDENT HANDBOOK AND CALENDAR 414 STUDENT UNION THE POLARIS BUY THE OWL - GET THE POLARIS FREE FOR NEWS AND INFORMATION PERTAINING TO UNIVERSITY FUNCTIONS AND AFFAIRS READ '1 T f I C WS X, il- , One of AmericalsffY1reat Student Newspapers PUBLISHED BIWEEKLY 407 - 415 Schenley Hall MA 1-3500 Ext. 318 - 319 ISALY DAIRY COMPANY Dairy specialists The place to shop for quality dairy products 87 stores in the Greater Pittsburgh area. OF Aluminum Brass Bronze Copper Monel Nickel lnconel Monel Clad Nickel Clad lnconel Clad Stainless Steel Primary Nickel Ferro Alloys pftddfldfd UTHE HOUSE OF METALSU Non-Corrosive Fastenings and Accessories Fittings and Valves Safety Equipment Seamless Steel Tubing Welded Steel Tubing Boiler Tubes Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Supplies Welding Machines Welding Wire Welding Supplies WILLIAMS and COMPANY, Inc. General Office and Main Warehouse 901 Pennsylvania Ave. N. S., CEdar I-8600, Pittsburgh 33, Pa. 32:5-h..t -... SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER EQ"V 4 E EE f EEEE W6 xx 3 l,. E! lf! says cnnnn E :nm THE SKYSCRAPER ENGINEER 412 STUDENT UNION I AM SO SMART I MAKE MYSELF SICK C OMPLIMENTS I OF SEALTEST DAIRY PRODUCTS THE S. K. SMITH COMPANY fezfvzhg the TY TT and the NORTH WESTERN A 0 CHICAGO l8,lLL C SQUA GUYS W m? wb 5 he PITT CAPSULE P , UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SCHOOL OF PHARMACY the PITT CAPSULE published four times a year by the STUDENT BRANCH of the AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION Of the UNIVERSITY of PITTSBURGH CAMERAS Q PROJECTORS PENN CAMERA 81 PHOTO SUPPLY CO. Everything Photographic Si? FILM FINISHING O ENLARGING if 643 Smithfield St. Pittsburgh 22, Pa. COurt 1-0488 - 89 MEDICAL EQUIPMENT for Physicians - Hospitals Medical Students - Nurses Feick Brothers Company Pittsburgh? 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" 1 '11 11 111 11 1111' -1. -11 ...::5:,,,-II zzI.,y uf..- 11111 1 1 'I11 ' ...:::........,.33g .I .1-,In 3 1111111::3::g':gg1g112 - I1 1' ',-I'.11' 11111111 1111.111 - --.'.1-- ,, ,,,111.' I 111111111 '-I111.' - -'zsikiittzzkikituzzi V - . 'nv' 1 111'I1.1..1"1111.,g0111 33-1611- 1. . ...111 41.11.1113-111.1ggg , .1 111111u:I,,.gI11s11,Q11g1o1. 1 11111111111 .I1111.!'.l' 111,"' .' '. ..:::::::::::::::QI'-.333'c:::. ...a..,5I' . - 1 """""' 111111111111111I11111 1101 ' 111111.11111v'I,,111111111111-,gp 1 1 ,,, 1 """""' 11111111111 :::::::::::...... I. .l.a'1' II.. ...f I, j.3:q: 'Ir 1 I ffffgz, I.: I:: ."" ll.1. chillin- ,, .... 1 611- . ...:... . - ..I,.... . .1 . I. 0 1.1 V 1 111? .c:1.1.211' 111..ggg111' 111111 1 1 1 1 1 1' . ....., ,, ..... . 111 11.11. . .1311 1 . 11111 1-31132111111 1 I I II-:RQ 3 r ' 1111111 .11 1 1 1 ...:::::.'.. ::.'.':::"'Q-.14113233 .11111:::::'I:-1111111212 qfgiaii' ' ..1mggg:-- 3'-1.I"!:::.':.'::::lik-Q'r::.' 00" 1 - "1,.1111111 1 ' ' ' ",' ...:::::::rfffffQf - 1.111111111111111-5.10, II 1111111 1111111111111111-,1,1,,, 'Ig II l11I1111111. .' . . -33 ma1:!!!:!!:!::"1' 1' .II '-.-::f?:1J.'J!:.' gg --- 11101111 "N, 111111111 I,I.1I-fp -Q::::::::::::::5:QI?rr1-1. -.-.,:::::::' "::::::::s::::2:::f!ff ' ."0k":.: ff'.,Z'.- 11111..J:!::!:::::" ' 1 . 1 1-1: ""::::r::::.?::-'- w 1 rf'-9 nd ZW W " DELMA STUDICS 521 Fifth Avenue New York, N. Y. 2 Official yeatfool photographer M Ojic d L lv y 9 WEST 20TH ST NEW YORK 11, N Y Phone WAtkins 9-1880 DICK CORPORATION GENERAL CONTRACTORS LARGE, PA. jay's bookstall 3802 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh 13, Pa. MU 3-2644 Come see us at our new location. NX fn - R - A LITTLE HIGHER AND TO THE RIGHT, MR. TELL! -a,.1x-.,x Mag- Q., 'K'- ,--.4.w 'ws ' ""' "'oN-. I-s.JQisQ."' s---.-..x-,,..--Q. -.R JVM W--Q-.,.,.. 'I ADVERTISING INDEX AU L. G. Balfour Co. Delma Studios Dick Corporation Feick Brothers Company Gidas, Inc. H. J. Heinz Company Higham, Neilson, Whitridge 8a Reid, Inc. Hospital Service Association Ideas and Figures Isaly Dairy Company J ay's Bookstall Wm. J. Keller Inc. Keystone Dairy Mesta Machine Company The Owl Penn Camera 8L Photo Supply Co. The Pitt Capsule The Pitt News Pittsburgh Symphony The Polaris Price's Saga Service Sealtest Dairy Products The Skyscraper Engineer The S. K. Smith Company University Book Center The S. S. White Dental Mfg. Co. Williams and Company, Inc. WPGH Radio Station 315 308 320 321 318 302 303 308 310 319 313 321 309 306 305 307 318 317 312 300 311 306 302 315 314 316 301 304 313 310 GENER L INDEX Academic Division Page Acknowledgments Activities Essay Administration Advertising Advertising Division Page Alpha Delta Pi Alpha Epsilon Delta Alpha Epsilon Phi Alpha Phi Alpha Alpha Kappa Psi Aliunni Association American Institute of Electrical Engineers American Society of Civil Engineers Army ROTC Associated Women Students Athletic Awards Athletic Division Page Baseball Basketball Beta Alpha Psi Beta Sigma Omicron B'nai B'rith Hillel Business Administration Cabinet Business Administration Essay Canterbury Association Chi Omega Cross Country Cwens Delta Delta Delta Delta Sigma Phi Delta Sigma Phi Sweetheart Delta Tau Delta Delta Zeta Dentistry Department Chairmen Dentistry Essay Druids Education Department Chairmen Education Essay Engineering and Mines Cabinet Engineering and Mines Department Chairmen Engineering and Mines Essay Eta Kappa Nu 202 326 134 204 300 298 111 129 112 94 152 136 152 153 137 138 259 158 200 176 153 113 154 154 234 139 114 174 129 115 95 105 96 116 232 230 130 210 208 140 214 212 130 Football Foto Club Glee Club Golf Greeks Gymnastics Heinz Chapel Choir Honoraries Essay Homecoming Queen Ideas and Figures Institute of Radio Engineers Introduction Kappa Alpha Theta Kappa Kappa Gamma Kappa Kappa Psi Lambda Chi Alpha Lambda Kappa Sigma Law Essay Liberal Arts Department Chairmen Liberal Arts Essay Medicine Essay Miss Owlette Mortar Board Mr. and Miss Pitt Nursing Department Chairmen Nursing Essay Omicron Delta Kappa Omicron Delta Kappa Man of Year Organizations Division Page OWL OWL Hall of Fame Owlettes Panhellenic Council Pharmacy Department Chairmen Pharmacy Department Chairmen Essay Phi Delta Chi Phi Eta Sigma Phi Gamma Delta Phi Gamma Delta Sweetheart Phi Sigma Sigma Pi Delta Epsilon Pi Kappa Alpha Pi Kappa Alpha Sweetheart Pi Lambda Phi Pitt Capsule Pitt News Polaris Publication Information Quax Quo Vadis Riile Seniors Senior Division Page Senior Index Sigma Alpha Mu Sigma Chi Sigma Chi Sweetheart Sigma Delta Tau Sigma Sigma Sigma Sigma Theta Tau Skyscraper Engineer Soccer Social Work Essay Squash Student Government Association Student Union Board Swimming Tennis Theta Chi Theta Chi Sweetheart Theta Phi Alpha Thomas C. Vrana Photography Award Track William Pitt Debating Union Womenis Coral Women's Recreation Association WPGH Wrestling Zeta Beta Tau Zeta Tau Alpha f- ' -r ? Thanks Wwvvnnnsi' , fi 7 .lsili gasxfucsli, i Editor William H. Schneider III Associate Editor Joel B. Filner Associate Editor Michael A. Christopher Photo Editor Gerald J. Leff Literary Editor Linda E. Lee Organizations Editor David L. Ellenberger Sports Editor Stanley M. Knoll Senior Editor Martha Hyslop Typing Jeanne F. Abele, Mary Lou Karges, Ellen Zatkowsky, Carley Fried, Barb Eggers, Lynne Hand, Linda Miller, Bobby Wilson, Marianne McWilliams, Doreen Davis Photo Staff Jerry Leif, Bill Schneider, Joel Filner, Ed Ganek, Stan Knoll, Dave Ellenberger, Bob Cunningham, Irv Leonard, Ron Schmid, Jim Grossman Literary Staff Richie Hale, Jim Hines Business Manager Glenn T. Graham Comptroller Lawrence M. Omasta Sales Manager Milt Bisnette Advertising Manager Jim Shane Organization Manager Dave Stoller Business Staif Mel Kline, Lavinia Waters, Barbara Johnston .alia .s-Qi'a,,, r ugm jg, .rd The 1962 OWL of the Uni- versity of Pittsburgh has been printed in the offset lithographic process by Wm. J. Keller Inc., Buffalo, New York. A special proc- ess, Micro-tone, was used on the iirst 80 pages. The paper is 80 lb. Colophon Text and 80 lb. Cameo Bril- liant Dull. The body copy is set in 10 on 12 Times Ro- man and the captions are 8 on 10 Times Roman. The copy in the first 80 pages is set in 12 on 16 Times Ro- man ltalic. The lead heads are 18 point News Gothic and the essay heads are 24 point Times Roman. Futura Demibold was used on the theme and division pages. All photographs were taken by undergraduate students with the exception of the senior portraits which are the work of Delma Studios, New York, New York. The cover is a Duro-Buckram with an applied Metal-lay process by the S. K. Smith Co., Chicago, lllinois. I v 1.4


Suggestions in the University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) collection:

University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

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University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

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University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

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University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

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University of Pittsburgh - Owl Yearbook (Pittsburgh, PA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
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