University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA)

 - Class of 1889

Page 1 of 284

 

University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1889 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1889 Edition, University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1889 Edition, University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1889 Edition, University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1889 Edition, University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1889 Edition, University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1889 Edition, University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1889 Edition, University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1889 Edition, University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1889 Edition, University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1889 Edition, University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1889 Edition, University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1889 Edition, University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 284 of the 1889 volume:

1 'T CL '1 , -l u '5 1, CQ' Q K '- Q, f R4 4 1 I .Q 2 '1 x. V 4 M, V x If ! ,1 1 1 1 5 1 N ls K 'J ,ag I I , V-A , ij 1 4 . , J 1 . , I, I ' I If F VI 4 r U1 1' 6 1g1E'.i'K4 - mf: 1- , ' VJ,-l 3: ff- - V "f'7P"4 5'1"-f'-i' "lf-'ff'--f'-flf'-13' 1'-1'f1-Tlflf-'fi' 2-'Q"1':1"9i5f5':fflf!' :f1',Ej1fi'v'Fffv3-5-"f:-1i"t'2'.7'f- 1322 'rilff' 5-v.FE,jX'i"2'l'xJiT'i."7 -Q - 7ff?3fTSTfJiE'?.':T27:1-L'Li:'Q5l:'. AF!J".Q-D173-' 7-L:f"TC1I'I'3""fAi'i5x.'f l:11fN'.':'.J-1l'i-'F?-,QE1? T:l,fxf:f'f'!:Y-5,f 'Allin 'J-. '.-3-i Jkfflf 53: -'ri' 5- J , - ,- -. " ' "1- , W" 1.2 -Q, " v ' v ' ' ' 1 - - , A '. k Q QP W x g... .- an-. 5 -L 27 .- 'fg.F'.j. -........ .II '- ---' -. .- . .1 . nm- 1-1.-1 -1- .- s . U . g. xg-' V rf Q' f.-.J ' 19:6-:jsgz U. Ni' ' A 'V .Vff V. ' 1 -ii"j'j"r' 'rf 5 ' 'V- -131,3 -Fiji -5 -:--' 1: -ff:-f-A' . -A-1-. 'L...'.: . iff...-5 ' 'e , ' 4 if-TX - 1... .,. - 1 ' '- :M . ' ig.. - A51--. xc--fwrfgh .- ' J .a..ig:f:' '?Q.Q:..,-,fa-'Q 5 Q - . Pa AAA..-.,'f.-.Egg A-5132- -. . .- ' AAN ' ' A .. --1,-' .31 -'-V,-.,-. : :.V.,- . -V3.g,:- A. -V 5:-'---" -- pw- V: -' . A f . .1 - .. V 1'v-.gr-S'--sgyf ' 'wx flu. :'1'. b.. I.. -1 '- V, ,. JVIII V, '- . -2 -25.aQ.-4 -- -.. -V XNLNXI 15 A. 1 V I' ' "'1IA' IFF' "A ' " F " QI" Aj 'JPL L-ij . .--. .v Lgzztgj C -.2'I"'- - -- - . 'A - A ,L ' "5 "- An: W' .- '55-.-' Gigi". X53 ' 5- ffl .25 ' . . , V ,,.. -- N:L g:.,.?-A. ,.- I 1 V If 5 - ,,- V.. I V 13. --.V.. ,TV .- I ,- .x rg -5, , - V. -M. -L..s-.sv -V-1:Q:-f -. . .- m --- 'i-rf'-' ms- . rf . X f-.5-.'.'i,a -5, ' I-nf ,L-'I 5 Q35 -gg-.gr gui.. .V.V,. I 1 ' - - - 3 , X J' f Q VII- MOV N- ,.n,,, Y ,YA-,gt b f :QNSIE-?E: -- ' T-5 S-1Lf5WPLl' ' iff ? , VZ: ' Ag fff'-xg Vi' 1 J 1 'K . rs I r x 'A ' '- A 'lf'-'.-.jf - 5 E -LL- -.:-'- x .:-J. V- 3. f ' C ,r . -. 3 1 V ,. I .'.'., I, V f. F ff.. . , ' . I. -.1 ,Il AA .V . '. - 1- fl-Jil 41 :nf--: W UTY-ix A V. V V' , V :pf 1 .IIIVV III. . . ,. -1. .. V,...4.- II ,nllziy gn-.gxa gh- . -. H- .-I rf- ,VK U. M'-7 ,Vi f Q?-x if -iw-A1 'A A ' 'Sf "6'ff5'f'1 X' 1. sa ' .5 wing '-' . , . 'Z I 'Z M2355 Y'-Pk. El:-"'.f'Af'1i - -ii-:i1f,iQ.-75:-5 - E+ :-775?Z-- 5... . . , .. V ':- ,,: , I V-LV.-.A'1H...a, I II I V 1 , 1- V, cr .. 4 . , ' . . . .4-127.3--.--J' r. -.-Q -1 -" "4"f 'V L -, X .' ..-.-'f- ..- , J, 3 1 1' , ,. Q.. .1 ' . I . . , -"---.-ff-ff' 1 - . -XI., -X-r. Ve ' . - X-- .I-+9 N- '- - x" H f 3 JA 'w'-Q.. 'Q .. ., . f-- -,.,, .- N ,.-. - f.. 4, 4' in , X . ' "- -:-5. A f J.-.'. 'HQ '- " -.., -- T.. "- - 4 -,771 . X "Wh ,1 .f f 1 - 9 x A f ,Q . '.-3 ..1fjV .Q -- --1' -:. ' ..-'K nn' "fy 1 mf x QLCVV-.VN ...Sluts 2'i.--!-.--- .g--633, V ---,vw -,,, .g - V9 " -- -- Wy- " , VT-if Y' A If fi ,V ' ASQ . ff ' -2.21-'g-35.2--rar? A .V- - V.-sf V ' , 1 Cr 2 ef ' ,P M' ,f f W. f, :I V IIVV: I E I, I f. .'.. iff N K' ' ofa, --.. -f 'Q-fic?-Q ' 'W'-" .J 003 . X V 5-ET A9 . ,M T57 .-:N .I III' If V "1- ...ffm - . . . I f I' 'Vi-" N' '-Kr, .. ..-.,. , - .. 1 I f , , ' :ii',-.ig-f II I , VVS.-.. A ' '- 'i .:i,.L,--" iv- .2 .2 1 45.3. 5-:rf-af ' " E 2 K A . wi'--.25-Sf" 'Vi - - 6 A--3' 4 :ij- f " - --Raw ' - I f' J ww- ,ggi 'Hb' - -'Wav . f -cr -M .fu-'Sf-Q . . . . ,. , " 1444551211-Ti-1' -: ' 11- ' ' ', - . "'rf' Ffh-: Lf, "-'JY K V4' f - ' -b,I,-..1.fy-fn-I .- -V. -- ,yw.+.,, - :VII - - I II I -V,.,I..- :Aff .Ir .IU 4 11 .3 4 f 1, -- .. I. , uf., , , IE:-Hgg?ft.:V T. ' SII I, V ' - ,,3 ' E 1 . --exif-Qg.!.f E-1. --2--f 1. -5H.Z:' Jef ...-xx' 717. "'7i15' A 'fi' 1- ':, . . " I . 1:41. F2715-Z-5.5245 R. 'IJGTZ T f -W., ff -ff 5" . , 1 ii -N... . . X:-:f ' - 14507 V ' -fr gp.. s -z." 1::7:1' ..,,- .. ff-4-1 -' -AAAf-:g-ziV--- - ... - gal ' III.I , .I I I ' 1 . . A.. - -. TL .3 MSA. "-fi x . . , .,...-,. x ,V -f ,V 5' Xvi' N x ,'X IL. .. V.,.. ' xx '. R-' Z. 3- I f ,Q- . . . r'ff..zL V . .- . . 554 ..- V. . . ,A . T, ..l.f ', .. .A -4 ,-Ji.-J . ... vw- I ,I .. ,V,c.,y ,Q-,PV , ., I: .sa a5i3'f3 ,-,CK -x S' 'fff -f1"' - --Qs.-Q ,- .. 11 . .Y .J-fr-':' Emi- -.,. -fl. " , v -" I 1. If 4, P' 1 N11 I... 3? N xu --KN.-. x H1 . -5- 12. .1-Fligif -5 - ..-..- N f '.p,..'- 1-...NN : f. -1 -f. ,QI - -f-H " : x ,.,V 4. r-'K N QQ X V, . . VJ.- 'F 1 N u. , -'er1.4b5'v N- I -. 5 - mc- M f A N owe Q ' I.,..gK-A3 ' -1-AQ! A-'x f I XVV4' uV 5 --. N: '--'-- :'2t.... .' 21-if - ' - -'X " wwf.-. . 1. III t'1N 52. ,. .. -. fy ' 1 .V -g,'g-VV.-' . N I 'N' f ' f -'. A L. . .- ...y a- Adwgg . ,i" ' jx 'gif i., .I . . .I ' I 9' II 'L-VVV:VVI1-X. .V " -4 1 . .. ., , ' ? ik:- N- ' 'HR .L- 4 f , Mfg, ,.,iEIg7,.eg, I 'S "Q-A"'f1,',:,ffXf . ,fbi '-7'N"fm-A ' .'N.,i1.fJ-.Auf 1 . f, :I ,-.qu PI ,. ,A A f " 'm.xXI .I .. . Ixx u . 12 VVkX,j'2rL Nu. ff...-, V, f -fX.VVVVIJ , S, 1 'QT' ark L f 6 fx n ' r Q: ., .,...I wisp.-1-. - --. - - II. 1 -.. c. .-.' 6'-f . -. . -XT, --.,. - . -.14 '.i g.,, Q... MA' , v . fi: AF ... - -- -. H- ...Q L"c'I'T"' 4 I -vi. I-,IIIL fr-,-2545. -. -s' . .f-. - ' ' Y .-4,51 J va! . -A x"44'h. X .. 'V ',..ff-Wx '4- 7 V X ,. ff' ,... ,JK A " .jim-if "5-. - ' W- ' Q-Elie ""'-, --. - .... ,- Y ,IW-fr! I , III f-F595 ' r dry" I X .33 ' '..i".4"...'. xp 11-.. f- 1-. fl VV., ,A VV VV .,.- Av1'7?5'i ' 'Z A ,ww-.s..-V. ,- ., .fgw -- A 1 --49,1 . V' - -QW- 9 L , 's x ni '7 J f ' M? 'Y' ' uf - ww x' A-2 - id 32 ' .. 'I 'Q' x r ,' 7 mf ,Q XXL ,I N. W. QV A " . gf f A 'MKI r 1 Ve V , xv .. V I if . IV I I ag , ,fin A, I If -.Y 1 : ff H. 1 .Q - . N. N- 'Ss 1 'f f- f., f 'f N ff 4 1 . -x. -. 1 f I ' H+ V f F' ' f. . x Q. f. 'E I f - 'M S f 9 ,f V f 9x "-',- 2 Nl Q,-' fy 4' V Ag, -.4 A ,f V .- V V . , ff . xx V .J f x . - V V ,, L 1 . , -3 ff ,. .1 ff: X f .. Q 1. M, N ' , ff Q-Q2 ' f ' 1- -' 4 ip A P . x Q 1 N e . X . 4 K u- Q X J pb l ' 1 1 v. . Q la H ' Q ' , P fx 7 5' 5 1+ I I - -1- 'Q f -.4 ff , -f ' 4 ff- .. "f - .- . 1' I ' X Q .1.:- 35 'WZ jf' ' ' X N g? F' - " 2 V. f X.. .,, - 4? 9 ., .. . - . -f f. - . -.f X .M-1.2.-.--.,f ,f 1 if . ' - . -f iw.. ' - v I 1 V A I, ,, :WI I 1' 1 2 Q, I 4 K V4 7 , 1 III 4 , C 1 11 ,U F 1 . 1 . J I 'yx+- f ' -,V I' gf ' " 5' fx K0 I f 13' U. f f' " 4 .v i 1 . - f x - I A f 1 ' W 1 v pw - w- f f- 4 .- 1 - 44 f . ,f lv-r l I I X . '1 IJ gf Y f A' 1 f It ' P 1' XXI' nt j L, ,If ' If fl' ' I -MN x f' ja V11 I V .v .II Ii, .A Ifk , K ,V N- VV' 0 VV! . 1 ,Q . v M lx Q Q f V V11 -f V .sm I I V - J-R I - ,K 4, .G 1 1 V, 2 , f A X ' I W f ,IMI ,. V, f J, X5 x I , F ' I ji, A 'L f D q,4 , . . , , 1 . f . , 9 J 1 r ' Eg ff nz , A , f, x -NX' l 4 'y ' . 1 'K f" 5 H ff 'V Q f 'X sl 1' PL R3 X -1' 'Q 'J .uf Wig? ' ' f 'AS Of Ai 1 -1 4 -gs. 'f Lx! , ' JU gf A' -4. ,-- R- '-- N Q .' g- , f- -X .1 '- '--.a.-31-. 5 NX X .- I 4' V' , ,' V ff- 4 -Y... 'K 4 VUVV ,MJF ..V, , , 4.15 -X f'k,X?? ' ...- , N .. V f f f V T +2 .v V f" y R'-ff I 'fx 5' . .--.. .. fl '7 1 -,fi .P . -- -Q2 . "",'7' Wi xlfigiyg '15 N 'Q.."i YQ' - . , ' , '. . , " ,gi":f-'ff KQV ? .QI - - -- -A 1 3- if "' A'-'J-' 1--LW' I ' ' ' ' ' ' : - .2 if -A A' - ff'-K: ' 1 ,Ei 'if . x 12 f" - . 1. . - " . - A - A "gf .L-Zi? 'VL' ' - -112 ' ' ' J- ZX- '?':5i-',"7' 7 X 4 , f 5' 2,2--' ' '. -'Vjypjf-V219 . AQX A,-125 'Iwi'-'.-.. - 'ell fguzgzr .fJ?"1f.fa..g'1. -aff" Q -'21-A. .,- V5-3. 1 J 2- . v ' x V fe1e.'iv4- 1- ,gvzr-. xg -X -'Q - QW .--1' .- ' "Ruth II?ff,'.- ' -Q ,- 5.1.-?'ff'L'--sf: . 1 ' f - - N . A1-f ,- - - .,... -.. in - A ,fn - , T- .--.g':-,.-.- 14. ' . - -. .- 'WET' -0-I.-ff'-S f 94 ya? ' A 4 f- ' ' 1 . . "V--f-A, .- 'SV A. .,-. A- 'W V, -.-. 1--...X 'V ,, - - -. ff --W' f-1-. - . -. ."- znfif, -.,V."! C " '. 7 4- XC-. "fi f ' ' X . - X- A ' .5 - -- 122 - - -..-id -. '52 1 -5,41-2. 5 T, f 'E' M V :Ag ff' 31 , ,V I . "? .' '5 ' , "':? :V""'l "'4' 'A ff' "' " ' ' A .- . U' " I ' ' f. .HF" iid? 1 IV 1 X xl f ' f , 'QV KT.. QV. .7 f xgw ,W V Sli 1, -- .. ' ' A , ' md5g'3.4? V ' ai I . vii, Z f J-.1 H:--M ,. fp- , 5 - 1. 3. 2-"f -V-11? 'V' ,'-," fig- .Vw ' . - -'H ' ' . -. 4-?fQi..22:2'-1. -.:'A:'EiT1'1-:-ffifff ' -. , - . " ' ".' '?ff- - - ., 3' .. 545' .' - 2-'y-1 -.4 - '.: -. -:Aa-: H .. - . J ' W - - .X '-M-'.., -.-' i--fu., ' -:'-3 Pau- , . 1- nf .. 1'. . ' -if -1' ' 'AJ-11:-' .' f :V ' IIS!" ' f-QE' .ia '-Lfftiifliia-.,'. ,sk A .. ,., 15-'A' Vw'--- . . if V., , ' l 5--f ,- Q75 'ii ' 'Q 'QV -2. ' . .. f n. '---:A- ' . ,ii Q-"f - -- 'S 'fx - . -- -w:f.:f""-""-a.-.- - --.-55 - -V - sag. , -, - - by V ,. V- -,Q -- -. f' f ' ' - - . f ' ' - - .- f 5 I: K 4 A iq' Ixf ' .V:Ig,Q Ijf5V .Z-'V 4352. , ' A A' LI.,,Qgg ' '31xV V yy.. ' V I .X -VCQQ5 V-fx" ' ' '- -' -' V " 4 Q ' j...1'gfAfj -'.P1fEjf.7:VQQ 4415 1 -2- vi ' V 1 5 3- 1:51 i.:V. 4' Az" LM: Q. V, 15-'fr -..--j - gy . . I x -1-.--f:.4,.4,:gV f. xx I- f - '-- gt:,'.:V ' --3 13'-'f jj '7E'I.3'.51x., I?jVfy f - 33- 1' X I .. -- .a.,.-:-f- - fi--,rfew - ---f ., --fb-.-.mg---f - -- - .. L- I., .. av --4.:-'v-f:-f-.- 'sn- f. -V .ff ,V. . .,-f' Q V.: '- -- - ' A 1 V - X , if -V, '- fi---e--4 -v 1 w - - - - -x .LV f. ---- . - -L 3-.fx - -- ' - V . u1 '..-,- " -.Q,:,. .L-.:' 44- -..-' ,, '.- . a-L -15,1 V, J 1' ' f 'X . IJ-H -X V' iw -. -- ' X f T ,C Ny ' A '31 'QQ--'f1Y'9A::f-ff -'.-4:-- 1 .. A -' V,,, q' ' l ' X ' ' ' , x .1 - 'ff'-' 'V ..' K Y' . .. . , 1 "QQ V 1' '. "',.'f' f V ' "'. ' Y ' f' ' f f '-.'f1lE7L-'.-- WCM? 'f 1 ,J ff , 1 fl. P" if -' ' 'E j' ' H- ' M- fx 4-g Af' 'iV.gi?Z"if' f --- --. .1f'-2- .... - - f . - -W. ..-.. . - - . . ,4 -- . . - K I. . 1 X, ., " III Q xx f f- "4-gm ' V9 -. .5 - 9'3" ." I .,,- . - 11 - 1-.fx-. 3-5-NV V- If--1'-L - I X " 'W X ' ' W W F ' ' ' :tiki-'4 , '.-vm. , - , - .p ' Q--J' ' - " Q , . 'K . - ,' - AgP'?,,'1 W,'.,X ' ., ' i' 3 , f f ,K ' X: , , -- N -1, 5. T? ff' 4 M? 'SX 'f'.'A'-if -. A VT-. ' . 4... j -j . 4, 5 'LPI 7 C",f"2lA."f- ' ' ' fx S. f 1 ix . ,f ' A - a- N . . -- , V mn- - Q -- .- - . . -2 - -- fo - - ,--W mil- -H.-. .,--.G .. Q 'U ' ' 1 f "" - 1.2 - -rw-. .-1f:1':ff-.V ff -1. .- , - ff- -' f ,X f ni .5 J..-1..:-541--..-'1. .- ',f, 1 , 3 x X , - . . ,.-1 ,gf 1 0. , I.-'V ,LV--. .x N ., 1. ,. ,- ' --r , . f , 1 . .,. V -rV.X...:.. V.. f...-,xr-4-.,-. ,1 Tw 1 - f Q, , - . -... - - - , V fix N 'J-A'-.je-f.'f-pg 'f ra" A' f -V -:-5. V xp- vc'-'-swf' If fy! A QV, V1 ,' 7- 9---.2 . f ' -g F153-QE V, .- I4 If-gI7,4-J . " '--- f-- Q ' cf f'-1-1, R N -. y.,:iJ.fz?s1iffL 1. ' . W ' y :fr ' f X I . 75144 - Z 1 'A .VFLAV 2- I, .TU -Q-15"'.. !.: " VF f'V' f, 1,1 -5?-. A L .f 'Z 'Q-, ' 1 7150 :z'iq-ui.-f"'vV'-'33, ' J f , Pg 1 , Q V, w , .-, L., - r. . - -he V. 2. V- . f, . - .5 ...V .-. Vg +.. M. V ..- ...-,,.:.f,-NM. f 1 gf VIVV ,. - J - - . A R N Q -ff 1:..','f.-e.e,-f,f-, .3-f .- '-gf-1.',5-'yr gg. . - gf f,:'g-ia.-aw f , K K -41 , 1 r' J IZ' f ' X ' V . -, .. , 'Fw ?.f!5t7'? if' G?.'.f.:'f,'-, 1- I A 1... --. ' t -' -,H 5, -A-A-25-1 ' I". 2 f'j 1,55 1 f - - F 'H . .... ' -1 - ,.-yu' I-V+ - ,. .4 'fjax--4, A .,.f' -.,'-'im' Y ' I f -. '?3". "r .f,f'f.l3gg-- ,. - f' "J W' A . 1 .W 'Q 'S u . f -"1 'fna-Q. A'-L W -5421.-R: 35121. .f.'1Wxj'.'- .vi 2 R,-.'W115fA"W'2 S- W' ff ' f 'Q 1 " fl' AP I - --fl A A . --. f -.- - -' TT.,-' - .L .- W' - I-'39 --Z PI- .ff-'i 1' - - vw' -- Pj 'H--.nn-:KH7 ,I Af l 1' 1 '3 ff- . If . A 'NV ' X Q, . 'V -. 'Lf ,' TV' . fl:--VL-4 if-1,1 - 1- 3A-7 .'Vv.a-2 -I.-1 ' 5-V..-. - 'V' X-'55 'gpjiig' , ' '. 1. ' 'mx ' x If f ,fn V. f Vi - . f V, 13 -.fV gg i VI I KF' Eg-'V . -QI!! - ji '4-9 'ik'-.'..V.. f' 'C H- 'gt g f X' 'J 9' ig X , , V . si p 1. V ,Un 'Pink 'f A , ,ay ,,,-, -,J A,-' .51 , --mg ' E- -9-':V-f-QLVV, 'I 91 H A , ' H. f . v . . . . f - . - --,f-,f .V r ,,'V. V. -9 1 V2..I -1 V -',, - V- 5 '. ig - w . 1 f 1 . I v 4' II!-O x .WXVIIII I II, M W .I I-IIZ. 5-V VVQII .- .I V. IVV I-L -I:ggV-5 , Im , fat. .4 VI QI Nik GRI.. . AIIIZIIIII II Es: g Wi .Ii ff!! VI II NNI " " - ' 'E E "' -' - -- "1.. xi" ' 1 , 11.1 . 1' -"JV 1. ' -' '12, 7 ' 3' 1 ' H , 'X JE 1 51' f " - X .fzf mit. ,WA V ' .- . " film Q75 '-' - 'g 5.. 2 as-55-' V.V:V1 .- f I K , ' 1' - -.1 J' f I f N .S . f .,. ., 1 , .1 .. .V.. A ,. .- S I f' 1 IGI!! v .V Q5 IQ f 6 :I N X x - -.I ,V-w-5 ,. -- . . .,. -V : -VA VL: I VV4,-it 5IV-... L mxl. V.-2-.ex XXI. kwa I fx If " -I, , 1 1 . - ' :-. V - - .- - . - - '- V- . ,J :V '-1. 1 7 f f J . + fp 4 r. ,VV 4 - . . -f fm -..,. - -3- -f . ,,- . . .-.19 .ma -,, .-.-... . - f I ,Q 1 f -Q , 3 ' , 4 1 1 , . K V --11.5 --jg 'c?.. f- -V . Vx.,Vwf, ' V ,fIV .1 W V f .,1!gIVgIIV:V:5gI .,' Vx '--V-QV A, , 4 1 ,, , f , i 'V f ff: ' : - fx! flifw if A--' I .A "W "Hx if -Vw ,J12-L-F 1 AW? Y 1 t dw' I V 7,1 x t- A ' .V " ---1 ' 2-'fu . N 1 . Rs P ' ,v ' A , X L 'X J! X fha .. I 1 I '4 1' 1'-ff' f- H- V X . xx - 'A f x 5 Y V, sq L f -f f -'1 M -. N at v - -. - - ' ff . -+- -s , , . is , 12- -. - - f 4 f 1 , , '- fr. X 12 1 'HIE-I u If I , A I AM ' V 1 wh .Vx -'ENI 3 ,, ,Q -4 , f f T . -. If ' -X '-2-'yi -- if I ' .ff 1' 'f L V3 1 M , " 1 -zz 2 v i ji, 9 N, P 5,..' 2 A5 '51 , ,1 X x. X ,9 It IX I ra' -X23 1 V ,x,.'f'2g, f , fffff W, 2 ' X ft'-s. 1 . -Q Y V . K , Q f 1 4 Q mm, .r 1. f ' 1. ,. 1 5 I X V x X X . V V . f 1 . Q , I - .f - . "' L. ' 11" - f " ' ' . .. 'A VV - .,. ,-.-2, '- -...y - . 1-r, f I VIIIV, I VII II I?-4 .-I,.V.,VI ., I., I 2, ,IN .- . - I V A 1 -QI . i5.I.,.4.VVV,, .- Q -..- V.. . --- .f- Q-.. . VV .5 I I - ,...',- My .... V .,,."- f .' .- 2. '.-'.:T1.'Af'f'1'.:- ' , 1' ' Y. A -' -5 E ' A' ' A "" 1' " M x"' " Q .' 'Fifi-ZZL--' -'ff--NAA' --. -56. '-ff-N" " ' , , -- - - w .. V, .ff Y' -- ' - .- f Q?-ff yr- V rp V- '- . ' A211 --IC - .qi ' fi' - Ve-6 ,T 1 . - ' -5- - -. -A ' fe . f v . 3- 1"5'fl"1'. s.AEt.:. ff? '- '.'f7VV,.' .,":-' 'I V - . I X AN" -f 5-ju" ' ,f "5 f' 1 .iA:5y!"5 I AC? V '1.'. 'tn vfggv- -. in -f f Q7'-"V-57, .li-Lff":. T A' 'S .'A'.i--'-".--'L . -' - A '-.si ' -1. - . . - , . -vw . . . .M-N .- ,. rf , . .v w. T . '. 4 fl' ff , -'SA'-ttf.-1?S. -2 2. - -fy 1" --f -- - - . ' --- -' FN 4, nf' , .1 .- f , -- -1 f' ,,.f..:'.-- 51-Ms--.f. :'--'-:- . Q- 1- L , .. f : ' '- ' 1. L V I ' ""' ' H ' . . ' ' ' I -fe---'r -: E Q..-,' - f-'12-'2 .,. - '11, - .- zr, - ' Y. W:-gl -' -. ' 1- .,. -M.. H4 11,1 5-'Ze ,-. M., 1. .CA--,-',:' - " wi- 'I3'r'?f3 if .-A' -. - ' -' ' " A ' - ' .- 'ff 'flffw if- I -65' :Af f-Y?-7 ' ' N. - ' f'xQi-Rf:-'ff1- ,. ... ., ,. 'f -N ' " -' ' "-XOR n -"XM ., I'-E -'W' -' -. 'Af " 'A iff' -- A-feife sai-if. 'A . -. "- X .A XTX?-5 '. .A -5' '-I - 5'-31? 'T'fA.-:AA A ,--4 " -2-nf - 2 . - " . LFWF' . , ' . Vxfzffx'--5.-?z"' A'f"',-.---"""'? gf - M x .. -1-f Ji' ' 5-A'A"'4--Q ff- 'A'V'.-' -" -fi E ' " Qz i ' --'J ' . . ' "-12.5-- , if- XX ?.f'.ff L I ' ' 'X - I IA'-1 . ' - X Z ' A Q-11,51-A:?'fi? f 1 V ' .- l- xff- A- -- - . -1-'f.'-nf'-:,' '-1...-'f-59523111 -:-P--,W-. '-T.-.---'i . - - 1 :.-.fz.2f+?5'- - - - 13.1-.'. . ,-wf-.-.:r,,. V V - 5: - 1 ,V ng -V ' ' f Vi. '-'. Ji-Q-,--"W .. ' L. - r-'fr MYER. "'7mf.,.--"f' T' . f -. '-:..1-' J' - "V, -.2 ,1:"R-.:'-- , :,,,:'. - 5- 91-5"fyJE' 'XX 43- - '51f'- .'-Lt. : -.Egf"' 'VWQE'-.' .. - 4 'Qi-1 :Aff A. 'K-1.2" ' is - ' 'A . E' ' "1-ali' --'1.'.- f X'-Ei.--1-sfffi'-3512 ' -'wi'-. '- A113145-Lqf 2435- - A- vga:-. 2.1 '-ff- . V f 'j- . '-,VV ---5,5-'.'Vg' - La,f5f5.:sg.V ' A' 2.4"-A ..q,'Vf.:- .- ,..- ',.1f..In-.?, --vugsfa-V --.V-fa-.V' .VV-V:Vy,VV,.--fr.,-1114, ': --11.1-V V -a .V -' -' f '. -- - - ' VCFQ.-K 'Z -'j-A'-fu 'P -- f5'.,2J' -:"f ': .A fif qffz- Y xQT"xf:'k':'N'- - ' 755.152 ' ifxtfffifg. 4251 -. -51 . . -' - A - -V. ' ' I f 3ff'27Ff- '..,' ' - . . 9 ' 1.-.' i:1"',.?7j,.:9" "' fn'-A'.:A3,L.rt' ' "ETF .3 -,,' "gi-'f.' fx. 1 " A, '.-A' A , 3.-s, 1--:"!:7Q'SE:2V, .- R.-J' -'fa ,A ""-. ., . 'Ya ' 'A ?-5 . ' .- '-12,4-K 'A '?:f1:f'Z.- 'f - R f.,l'5F5ij-.ililqi - 1 X 2-1 Es.. J ' - ' A - ,. 7 -,VV '- ' - f '-fs.-.z,' - '- -- , . fx .1 'v,'- V' ,-.ini-'ZLL IV , 1, .. ' - . . "1 f ' f .:' 31" N 5 Q-. -' I-V.'V -1' ,N--,"-.,,--V '., ul Ji. w- -. ffyf -Z'1p..': ' 9-1:22. H. .-.IQ -fix V V I,:' 'I ' ' ' 4 T 'ff ' QZPP3 - -Vp ,g -- ' - . - JC ' ,-Hg V 'A --gain-xg .1 - f - A . '- -4--III .'J 1 ' " 'V , f. VI-4 " :Vg-5 ,:' V,-' I '--.-V I ,5Vj-- VI I ' . ww,-..qi..f' V 1 VP' g LII- NQVA ,f,gg-if .fu 0 . I fII 1.5.2 -. -r-V V I,g- IIIIII '. L- , .1 - . ' A . -'ww , .-:' V V ,42f5'-'- A .:"21'h' '1-1' ' -' 1 - 3-3 . -'19-L.V2'f,57,A - '- V- .V.3-v- ., - 'f . " ' X' -,gl-'.' ""' Q13 41,--.s PM - - .rr ' ' .'!.1V " X -'Q-'k '-Q aj ' L ,K F77 fifi, ' I 'E'F4-xi 3-will ind!! . '- -z"TsZ2L?75QLQ' ,fr QVQJYT-525' If -' 'A f4 JMU - " -- .2 '.':f.'-' 1 A S f ' '--' . 'ff -. . ,..i.f f' - '-2.1.15-. "3lf'I'-.:Y"W5 'lA'-L. . 2 "Af7T1:EZ-'-J, . .v..'- 1 ,,'f':.L '4'- 1-1 f - - ' ' ,' FWZ' V? .af .1 A ' F?X..,Q5'AA .-? ff! V WX V-V "'22V"11iigi'-.A1:V ,V-""6EQLZg5'2T54V .43-4'-115. r tj I,-w -' K..-..1f"' V - V , Agar . I .Vis , I EXc:f'glgE2V .QV 'VVaV-,gg ,F . ,,'5,fee...fga:f-.VV V, Vyx V. - ' 'fa '-fifljg'-lf iii.--. - 91' . 'Q ' 524' D va.-fffi I - .. 4fW?f.Hg?'i"'Qj':?.-A43 -?X'-'T-i'iJ'5"i'-'TM' -. -. ' V --Qfq.----,. g VD -- --Q-:-.f52g5V-.ge-..--1f7.,...f-,.cg:f4-mfg ..-.Vs-fav... ' .. up -1, -374-5.51.11-. -5.1.--:ff -w V -- L If -,- . -- - - .- Efwvff- " 'CA-V f '- . -- I A iffiig.-L -1 3---:ff -. QQ' . Pin' 'Q -F-s. .-.ry-1-mg-'-if 'f . ----f' ,-,1 . . -:ff-. -.fPQ-2.2.-'refs4-?z1f'-.'-2-W nf.-5-w f- -V2--:J-A' -ifiz , af- .FJ - -'-:f - ' 1""F'1::-Til'-'L -'n' ' -1 Vi' '-', .-'.Aiwff"'4'L.'.f-m..?. Af-.M N 'w- TP ff- Yf.-iAf.f."'-in-'Vfffi-X -1:9-J . -. .- y- N if-5 5-:f?'5'j'4'b"4ff"5QK'4.-:L'VAfl - E5-1A"Lf' 7 "-fQf',1??'f-.5 729-' -5?f?T1f" .-""Vf"7?m5f1"'---9-vii. i'N'-'T-ff" -- VV V. 3. - I.' , .VZ1 1-. MV . 'V-VLI I-I I I-VI --555ygj:.I g. -I-451-f -.Ivj - I XVQKIVQIV, I,3--IIf-"- V51-I.nVq:I V. 5 V. I V -Ny,g3q,VI.-g, 7.I".I . IVgg:VV I .Vg V .Vx-.jf -I-Q .f V mug -V ,, .I,.f-I VV T -- Af 'X-11. Q -7 V - -' 1-31, VW"-'A' 4.1-.lVf" ,fy 'Til 'L iff-Q57 -V "iff . fi ,IQ . -1 -may - 1 - 4,-P 3'. ' "Yr A -2-C. - 1. we- ,' I . .-fr Li' J-i qgrii' -jzgsqgg-Vw-5 . -4-,V ..-.1 '-f,,. f -' 41- .4 S---ff -.-3. hd A ', :.f.q: A .- , , .-2?-' ef' -- -.X-N' , 1. .1 I-Tr ,- , 934:-.r 5"'-. fuk. ..ff.:r:2f' S , .:, -' ,f H:--ww'-Q af.V,-3.- 19" fi '1-ff.: -'fag'-.,,s. -5. .-" 5 ft '- ' Q-' -7-f --7-ie-.2 -- -. . -. -'M Hifi - p -r . 5 ? ff, - "' -Q fbkgg. .V - -' Q -.1 5 " f A . 'v- -11 f- f, -' -if '-+5 Lf H-f'--f':ff2i.':-' -1-Tsar :f - ' --Q: R-fl-ff. --1-uf. ' 1- -1 ' . -1- -, fw- :-f--':f.g.42- ,'-, 4 -- -.3 V "XX, w'-1. i.- - 3 fffkfef' .4 f lg If X- -,QV--.-:N -qg5g31.,1:'aeVa .' V, -.2 ww- si,-M-.5-2 -- ,ig . -- mfg' A ,Lf ,- ,P -V -fe' ,--'rilf-ff' - .- , .- J- -Q -4 n ff-' --f'-,.-L--"A --'Ziff 2' ' ' . ik- X-'.1f-725: f 'r f . W 9519? ff' ' '5ii?,.-.41 57-'f?'2T' . 5- " -if-'x2S'7'Q A ' Xl'-A if ff' fi AH 4 ,- V '-T-lhgfj ?Ei',S'5'j124fefFg.f1-. - Wk -'KQV ' . ,ff ' ,- "E-f"'j .7 'Q ..-ffm 1.2! Rf- -..-2l'.A.A v.-ggi, ' .NYE -'2ff'J'V' .ii'f5f.i,1-.f's?f - f- . -. x-Vi1-:3f-x1yx1.-.:if1-'-1 . '.-, F-11-u - f , ., 5Jg,:A .Vx may .-A I-.fi iF.4E'geW'. Y- Q-'ivan' a-I. . .Q --3. -fm! f'5-f.:1a-'fA:-W '-iff. - ,V ,R"'f-1'--V". - -V 4,-.VJ V- - 5V - . - , , , . ' f ' -' :V - .... - . . , V mg- -ps' f mf. . 1- f .. JE. -lj' A . fi- '. .- f 'Q lb!!! .' - .ff I Beg! - A. , .1---Leif A' .- . YI. 2. ', 'A ' -2:- ,I 4' X, Jf4"',,5i5i.-5-.g':l:.i'f' 'Q-'35-3 ,ii . - f C' - ri .- rf Jwfffx-'V,g N' . -' - .f if-:-rj , -. V' -294151. ',w'..'f1..V.V-Q., V513 .-3-,-,if-jg.:-Q'-2: t-,--qw . -VVg'A-gig'-'Tx,.f?."V. 5 -' 'A' 'IRA V - 'A ---53' 5.4-.5 -V 1-4 2.11 '- -A - H ', N W -' .f3'-'72-"'zgf1i I" . '.- .,' .-.- - f,.-1.9415 hAA'g'5'iAj . 1- ., 2 -- -. ,L .. . . ' - 1- -A VA "- 2--1-CV -gf - -- -:fr-'. A '.-.F -.15 fn- 'L - - ' :ff -. I .,.ii' -V.f'f-'if-F f . . f1T".'f.. - . Q' f V' -F232 -V , ,QGLZ5 . '- - 4-f.1:2X1:ilf.1bTV .aff rf". 'AFA-.V-f.f I - ' -ggi.-Qf - :fy-gVfgVgZ15'-Vx ,I,.-QV -, 'fx ' f". -.' 'WJ ' A .J - - '.fm4,f.g-' A V V- - , . .'f-'ff' fi' 51 N AV gif----Y - .'2.- -A K' .f,.f7.- V . , V457 Air.-'f.-iw-1 - ' ur f - . V-. ' .V '--I . 'L F r-. XJ 'QQQI ' -'1.- -ty f. 1- ,xmv A.. . - . -..-:..:-.uyff 1,' Q, -- - .4-,--".,'.- . 3-sg . wi- . ,c. f.- . ,v-.. .- ffza---'V' . .' .V VL ., --11 . - 1 li H715-A . ,Z1'-'- iw.-:H - XT? 4" rf Ml'-' ' - V+ -' ff:-4:-W? "' - P " V -- I -Z7 -'r"i ff. if? f'A"':-2-1-H--' 6 '- '. 1' ' '.'-. .J Y' I ' - '-1-+Y-6-- . ' 1211 'A 7f?.f:f.gf 1 . - 2- A- - --' '-z-lf. -Wife. 'A - f yyfkf' .71-. ig: 'L-5 :fi--Q -3- I . I . -.QII .IIIVIII.:rA.. fjaiifzyf . I I-QVVA-B.xIVII .IM If N bi:-IL f-,m,I.iI,,3X I,IIIvII, - -IITIJEV.-I7IV,f I - If .VII .V-.fy-, .IV III I, VIIVVIIIII . - .- -- -. -. ..: -w .f - - -..- -:gf-Vs. ,V 4 ff, ..s.... . V . F. - V --, M '. - . V -.VJV 3- ' '- -' -- . . . . -.N ,- .-.:. - ,-7: ..- , - --,. , . . - -- - -- , - 5. - V ,- V -ig.: Q AV.. --x-,. ff - -.p ,i .5 - ,1 V M - - - fi. . - f NH-7f"'-Qi?-5 A X' " Tdzifb-ff. .. -AW"-f:.?55-6Z??r.-. 1"s,.1'-2 .suv 5:-I .1-f.F?3.r '.T-5.513-'fl - N -V - V, - - -. V N.-.V -- -XXV-.V-.Vbi 1- -S..-5fr.,y-A. V,.,V V -. xr-Q1f,X,gw -- E? yaIlIk-,..'.1.ff'U-.,.- Vw, - f. - 'ff-ww 'WX - ' -' --T' A- A N . '-W' AQ"-.-Nf-:."'---c QM-1-U'-1.-v'7?:-'si-'f,: .1-'Iwi x. 2' A-rnfff, -- 91 -A U ,f - . , '-.K -L--X , - - fq. -,-1.. .ff - ZA. NPN-. 5.-111.1-Lf.-g.,4rf-,V Qjffv'-:NV 9.-' f .1 -,ng-V-Q. X.,-V .3 - -V,' .V!-4V.V-f- , 14'-V-Pwr. X .- 1 F. X .i - X .:f . -- ..--f- X, - 113 gg f . -f.-2--..:--'-SAV 9,3 af- ---- -'I 'Nb'-'5-L:-,L eip-Q..---w'w -'--.W-1-:Ma -' - . 1 gm--9 - - -.:A Q--TQ..-..:.y' -1- .-- - -:LN-1 --:-'lx .W -. -if . . -. - --.. r -- ,:' .. M1-..,.-gr?-Lf. Tr 'WP-M311 . - .-----vi.-1 A 'A' - 1?-' 'W ..fP-an-.34:f...-----' . 1 . -- - -- - -..Z-4.14,-gffxa A ffm, f - ' -..-:if-... 1 ... 1 b2fA5'5jfX - ' .' ,- T. . -".-Ci . .--'1 .- 'A ' " ff, g ' .- - -- L ' vff. - .' . -- -- - S'---5---Vw. '- - 1133 --5.1.-1-wg-fAri'i'5Sr:i2-G- 'rf-1:---. A . ' "fb --2f.I'::."-Agp - Q.. - - . -' Eg.. V. V. QI-:,f,.jij?a'15A..:.e-sae,-.A1""1'-.' .11'1'-iQe..Q- 'ri-. V, V4-506' FT -g.""'f"" 4'-Ai",-"N-"ff N' ----vi .f ,, .- ' 1.5. .iijzi Naf.15,41- ' --sg nr.-1 ,AN-1,1-asti 1-'f-u, -V ' 594-3315-f .fr-pg .,-,--2 - -V -5--P...-. wx A - . iii-.-1-.V -Vg - - .VAV V V ,. . '- + if- ..:e.--:":gr.:f.-V f- , 3:-S-:.'f, 1 "'.-,Jem-.',V fffxv -.fy Qu.. V,!,", V - If -XVQal'm-iii Q . 52.-?' V f-.-44.--g.'5a1-:..gs,'- ' 1, - - .r-. . ' , J -1-:M -1 -V41-:X 21-,J-..-V -. ..-A.-.0 . ' V. :J . ' J V 13551:-...:, IJQ- : .:-1. 'f 1-5 - -gba H --1.-,371-5-JV.-.VVV 1- 31- V Vu.-I-'.: V-digg' -7. :I-12' ia:-QI . V --- ngfgsfuii.. fi4..-kgV4aj--gm-.-5?fr.- 2' -L1 Q1 .5:1'- I V K- - MJ- -'g.,VV.',-.T-V. .- , 1-V .5g.3,- --'gl ' 'f - ,.-- --G n- -. -. . -. 5,-145' 'E'-FW "Wi T'I-1-if' 5 'AA 5 ---- "1-'-if? A '-lg-E3-Wif-. 17.--lf? PTS? If A- ' . ' if-31-""?'5:1A557-YQ.-.15-ff12-ff-'-579-,-U' - Eff--,Af-'ff 'K ' ' 5.57 2iii52i"i-' .f .ng Wffgfiwx , fsviifllfff-5:' " I 53- - -:- ' ' -43f'.M"5'+T5fTT .7-'EQNX 'W.,--l'i'-if--.MSL-. -. -- . - Ya. A .-fr.:-iff R " - 1 . -553 4 5- I' JCI -- LiIIIi:..zlIIVV,v - :gi :i7:QI:5a5IIIzI -v jjilii---I.V,R:II.5 III: if,-IIIVV.-. ' I :Vgf,II', V,- ' II . .fx 'K ,I jvpm ,4.1fg53:F:4II,giIII -I3I:5figVm,I:j?-izggg-'-:V1QL,lgsiigg I, IV:-VII., 7:--'jf .'.5ff?7-KQHQIVI-il I '37, ,NEI I.,-V gV -'5IxG.y.::1I1ffI . V.f,f-4-I:!V53 " . iff- . 'w fi- ,174-"" ' --"W-a. - "CAR '1 fs'-254''M-f--aRxi4..1..f---"--w if -iv-rw--J".2r-1, - 1- Nw-aff' 1.1--4.--NX .. -T . V 1q..:54v,--Q. J. V-. V-..1,-pVf,V.1g'--V- VAJ,"'-1-V .11 V-...Ig .f I v NV, -x'-1 . -"dm .-..1I:'yw14V:f-..gLIk...i,Ai..g-VLV.-3-33-' tulip f' .- 1- 3-my-11.6, fum' ,Vi-,:gg.,..c3 Vfg, I-Q3,X3s,..,fV yyejff Erqgf- ,VI V I i-- .:. . f. 2 aj----'1-.::'-iii-WA!-7: . .if-'---.4 -- --Z-2 -.'--"M : G. -' "at 1--1.-, -. :.-F-'kgw Mr. f A Ail4'136i--'11m,'34f' fnifkv -' I ' f1'--f" .+.-15'-1--a-.:kf'....::e."-1-'1.1.11 -.Cy-'Hai-.-Qgxlv -' ifyyffw '1ff.-:Ny -A 1: ' + r:.f.-:Q:1'ug'- fl. ffl.. -1.15 .1-5. - .f' - f- -1 - "QI-w Ka. A' ff " iJ:1:-.ffl--' f'D2'? .1 .1 - x1f"- -1-.11-1.51-. K '. A:-wg--'FN 2 1...-Xi J- ff' --N. 1 .. 2-.f -- '-' via- PM' "f1',5."3.5 55'-1p..,g:.fg-?1:1-1 1 ,- JV' gy. 4-12:-' wfi-52.zn Y-f'!'.1'I"-Wg? -'f '-,frli3-f.'ff.Q.5x.- V-'il--. UL' . - 'Jn 1' ' .5'?.A' " V-Vi?-4' if .if "F H i'7'-- 'ZYIA-'.,-E K'-5 'wifi'E.ff.i?'V-LFLE?-L-29? --GW" "Vi .'?'2?5.3t-115335lui LL'-Q' fp-Y ' QM- - III .V II II III 1-Vf .45 I? -,-. 5-A142 AH- iq. IIWIII III3g.VI??j3Qc55I,V-VV.. ,VXIV,I..,.. Vg - - 5- L- . V-L.Jg.,:gl,' "L-,W ' wr If-' -'.-A ,IF - W.. V' ', :V 5' .ggi .11 ---3 Wfiffii- Wg. 'ik .1 4,T'i"'f - ..g- fi -'."-"Hi 'ff'I.f' bfiiffwbf 'viii-"n ' A ,. --'NVT-XE-il -A-'PY' 'f?-.-Ui' 5.103-'.i'I.f:,4-.-551 X NU- " 1- . -:gif-" -1 --4:fi7- - . - V ', 1' . P-1 ' 1' 1.-.MJ-Q. ' '- fi .rd 57'17VPF'...'-f11'.?,E"VQ-' .N.-Qf - ,e.,:5l-5 -1 QM:-'-'f -ri '..-q,..-f,1w5xI'.xE.i-l,.- .. W5-24.1 ef", 51.4.4 -.-4-f .wx -f.-ah.. .r-I.:-Jr ..' -- - :- 1 pr- -4.32m 1.1 -: .. -. - -7 - Hr '.-..':QfG'..g2.:55-Hi-f 1-!u,.:41-.4!'+i?'-an-1 mf -Mr" -.1---2:-Je r iw-fry'-Q .+..--.'f-fir:-f'a--w F .' - -.1 : :a'-:'.2a3'.,.:1-'QQ- NAR ' in' '- , -1'-1 12-. aif, f I--1 -:--1 f,"-- if ":- ' A4517 I fi Z ' 46: -3'ff4.1i2'?'7- 57" '. P- "f1f'?:'3f3 l' 'bfi K.-QP' fix?-'Pr ' f1'.'i.I"5'5-1'1If'x'. --ll. 54" ff-5-'i,!f'1IfS.5 'I - iff . if .1 '- F1 '- . . 3 fb, 'Fi 'F -A. ' -4 "Jil 1' 1-5.1" "-T.. -L, K. ' . . 914+-1f.7fZ2a:3. 'if' 55 5' ' 'Ynir'2??'JH3A . a"-"JI . 5535--"'L-.-L ,' -' -. '. -3. Q16 ff 1 fi' .12-1 " .ff f W" s" 5--1 cm:-'U' -f--Nl .' 2 .- '- -,' --v -r' ' M -:rr-15 , x 1 1 fi'---f-f:'1!-"FW -'Z if in , F155-5 --'SV-40 f4"f-'WM' "T MO' Hf. 5 - ' -I :-f1f:11'. 'f-1-' . 2' - - . z .-f- ,:'f - ,172-Ve, 1- V -1 f- s.V 3 . I 1 1 V. . .. ,."- ,f I . if J-ggg'F.f'.C-'1'J:'. 45 .. .a1,...,1.,11f,:'J-2-1 ,'.-917. -- :- G 'Y 51- , mm .4-W, A-5 5.-V 1 1,1 ,Huw ,VAL 4V -1,6 LV . w 'Jn --4 ' '-'j-?x'3xI'f' .'-7:31.-' - . -. 5 f--'A f if - Szy, -xt? ' -' 'lf z gl- ,fvr.:,m'1:4qf:.:q-2-046' aww--'-.-.'a-' --if :-'3.g:..f.f.. Af. ,,.'- hmm H..-.:. ul-sgyir --x ' --1 4 My -,f .1-.f ,ff Q. .A f ' V .' -, '-V.-J.f,-- 'hifi 9' ' - - 5. 1 '- .M .Y V Q -. .pf--frfz' ' 1. --41-1:2159 A-'QV--,uf-N S.-rg! -. V 9,55-79, Va. J .V5-my .Q ' 1 -. A' . . .f1...1,,"-9 -hz. - 3 7 .Cf 4-,, -.. 0 J pf"-5 .f:II,5,v2fg:5fi14:v5 .,f-F'.4..5:.,3g,. ,--- ---.vw - .H -.1 N ,f1..f.'.1L 'QX 17 . -fb-Fx' -1 :why af- -. -gf 17 ' "7 ' 255' A 'S' " X .-in- -.-:- '1 .Luv ' Wiaiiv-"--15 -Q39-v1'3 . - ' - 351 .' 'SEV' 'f 3 ' - -lf!" . A- C".-f - ff J , - ,V .- - - -.aj A - Pa 'qraagf A -' f ' - 7.4.1 ki .-A 1 1 - ,. . ., 1- -- . - -' . :--gag., ie - '-.- 1 :T ', ' ,P-xg-.f-.,1-1'1 .. V H.. .,- . .- V-gg .7...'.- 5 f 'z 'V - Vg. ".- .,. '- N f:-- "nf ,Zi-,pf - - : - 3 4--'1 -f ,4 f -A . X'-, - ff - .,,o5?sa " 'A ifff- ,' A-' .A N.-E2Ef'4 -if -3' '. -1, -7 ,5515 '---.!L?5?55'f:i9f1.WQQ-1765 " ' "'3. "K '5-Pg-V'a5 193 ' QV-jzffff' A , xi iQf.VQ.f,fI - 1' 'Myfj V , 'iviif - f. - ' " , .1--' . -' , .Sf-.fr -, -- .5 A' 2 of-.Q .-e..,'sg - jf rf N. 'Q-.W 1- ffa ,iff .ff -, 'gwizi f--f..-1..,-.- . . -41. .. . --:,f - ,- ...gffjf .4,-- - N. -. ' -if : - -f -.vm 3- -' --..ve'f"wrf,- . ' . wif' -- .M mr... fu lui--4-1 .- 144--WH -3.51. - . - .- - 14.-A.-' .- f -in --' I . f-2. 5- .' 3 V- V, f-'lg' "1 wg, ' -Q 1-"'...--5:-6 .. ..1 ' .'1.Aff' f ' f.',f5-.:' . '- X "5-'91 . - --.'-XVNSKX-r1L-V1-: "1 T-25. 15,1-'w'-. ,sp-sz 5-K4--: VI' -z JA P - ' -. .. - 5- ' F ff ' , ' JA ' . . ' -'.-11.51 J - -- fi-. --a g:F'sS'-:ki..V' Vq.Eff'...f . - vain, gy- ' ' - -- - 1121-5 '- -J - V fi:-.af-'51-.'.r'-'q.Q. '- 'Ain-.V 'gk-. 25.--C-g ga-5.9 . -- - ' - -1- - i -' a A - -. V. 5 --em-wi-:Q:z.,.:.e.v., ,. ' - MV' -- wh- '-' - - K QQ A keg. ' 'QQ-f., Ac' ".-.-.ML - .Lim kg .I . I , .. a .I Vp 'fn-. ,-V. 4. V-.V ' IELVI . .-.. I N-Ii: II. 'N IIVN VV. VV V 5 3,I -QV. pk V Vjwtil. V. . 'VI.-Lf' -. V, ,I-VI3 .V'-I-.I5 3-.VIL-IVgfV,,,.IT Ig? :WXQI I 7ff'ET'S5ff"f- . QQ. ----15 ' 7- 52? f- -1 .' .p'f"'AfE -- .' -4' -F I " - - ' 'fx'?E3FFc .g... - W ' 55" 5 T--..'.l". . 31?-Y... 517 1: '- Af,1.i"ET2-Z"5'l::f3' 'AR 2-fyszv-affff . f5gTA' ?1"'2P1 ' . ' ' - - 4 .f-Q '- - 7' . - . -' ., F-.1-..a..,. . - 'XJ -1 ' :.- 1- ,, 5- V..:-- , . ,:.,:,.,-Q: - V .- f Q .:j'.Lg-ff-a44f'?fS1.L -zmfzf ,- .5315-:'-,-.gG'VV -'T-e:f:::V...,,.:N, -rg ., -ia V - VV,,,g-:v -:S-'fa-. H:- .. -- 4. - ' . 'M 1- --fA'f'fL . ' .F 1-:. -. es. 0 V Ve. :SSL-.1g7',5V - -'G-vii-"ki,-- mf-Q, A'-ffl,--4?-.fi'v'g5sZ:--1 --1.. 5 -QL mai. - .X - Q-g4,V-.-Sf:-W -. gy- Q . -:.V,'V:q-- 2-.1 ,V, -- ff. - -ff -if . . f- -- V- -J ifxgb---im, 1 - -far.-5 .3.4. ,,, . -- .. f- - -fS:.y,..:L,-- -.-. --' ---433-V -guy:--QI - - -A-5 71-was . ut-fy. . N- - -- V:. V' jf 1 , 21V 1- - ---- " - ' ff -f--4.5-.5y V V- w V '- .457 gg -- fu, --4-.V,-Vgfg.-,V ' - . , - -. .- - - '5 ' '.--Q, - X9 f ' ' -5 . V yf - g5V':L.. '- ' eg..-3 .5Q I,4gfV - ' Vjff:-QE --.wf -: 2' , . V "' f-'-' grin---.. -1 -- . . f- - ' r- gg .. -- V.--1.4:-e '..r ' V, ..f-1. . 1 , .-V,-V. -. - V V V- .- ', :-. Vw- f.. V ,s--V. " .- A 4-.2 - - - .,---f:.- . 4 , -- .., ., .- 4. -ha. 4. W-. 5 4 vm- V- H- 4 .- . -x.-.fi --,411 Ur ...fi -. V . - fs. Q- ,Q , . -:54.w-..-- - ,. . - - . 1 -, - -. . - ..V:..,V..,,V V. . I . V Ay-V., .V,VVs ., 395415.-g If V, V - --1-gg 3- 4- -' . . V. V . V.-3, -pw V . .VA-'W V, ,V, .IV VV , -, IV . . F -- X - -- ' - wi -1 - .- Fffliwi . .L - . -, VT' 1 '- -- EQTQQQVX -3, fi-V V -'51, - 4 I ..,5,gr , I..V?II I I I. I I . II V I -- -I . IIII. .EEII -.V I,7II.l.I- .jf TV-V I V- I VI f.:- -- A' A' 'Gif'--. f 5 41-. . , fe' . .. -' aw '12-.' env -a..f'i1:ii1--- 1 -- 1.. '- - . . - P -V 12-" W V ' ci. , ' ii' J 'Vc iiff' if ,I,,,515f153- ' -7 ' L"'5'E?5l3Ei:' Hqg:ZJ .f1VVi -' - 7 AV .-44-31. V - ' - V, gi'-Q , -- J . VF -f-1.-fV.-"-I J ' ,V5,,I,1 '-I?Vfgegg3?e. ' -- A.-,bw -Q.. ' ,fp ,V ".-Q3 ,.,-31, 1J5gQ-'IVV,jQqg'm1:' V. gggsfj'-' .1 . J ' -' f f . .4 - . - ,.. U . . . ' ' -iw "'a'!1 " mai A- .,"" Q"' ,V JJ' ,n 'vx ' V' . f" ' ' ' ' 1' ' ' ' - A. '-' " ' . Ji. ,v -'.. .LL '- ,lv '!- ""' '-.43 . .V 5 -' -V - ' 'f .. :ii fefp -1 ---' --C'-:W-' j " ' '11 -- "T ff-WNV -K? --5 if QW-1-f 1---'gf' 5 Y - f i V , .-. -. 'iffy - A- -V A -1' -'fr -- V - 31 ' -Q-ff ,,f.bE1A .'-f:---'sf f -if-.ff- .fi-4 V. - f A-fi .- WEEK 'f . .Malik af . - Eg--' ' ' ,I V 71 r. V V 1,5-. V ---, ff -1...-.-V -I .- A VVVV - I .- V I,I.-.-V..-QVIIV .V4--. ,VV-.g, -V ,V,, -A 1 II I . - f V . - V.Ig.,- --:V- HI-1V-3. :.,p,IVV.I - , . f Vq.I "- -l -- .Y-5 .f 1' N ,"1'-"' . --': ' ""n'?T' 2552--'7-"-ff ' 'AA-C ff-' 5 ,-2'-H9 !- 'X ? -iff!!! "Sin f Yi' FH -" A " . -- -fi : .-.I i I. .I - IIS - IV ISEZQ-.-.w-gijff A -I 1 . A I QI- VI VI.II.,56,.' V1 , VV .V VI V33--.1 V II -If VV I Q V I III IIIIII I- .. -e -ww -'-.g1V.,Vn-r.1r.fa5Q1' ' 'mV -,, A. 1 . Vi., -7d:.ff2:f1a..- ,-i- ,L-.--A fi - - 1- x V Q-,V -'-.j.5g.1- - -- - V I. -, - '. J fiQ".5J-' L-ff 4. ' - .425 Q' EWS51- - - '4' H q f !! 1:-.-1' A""'g Ar.,.Y 4'-A I .-F .52-3i21f4f+'Zgz.-gfQ'fj.f.gf.A-' H' ff - -' '.V,? ".Vn -' ff. "-In L., V43 3 .' 5431- . ' , -' ii,-3' V ,- Y , :" " """ "--. -1 "2" :.- V A ,1 - ' :.V ,' -055-v ,QV " 11. -7.3 V 5-V:f',"-E1 - . V f -S L" f- -. I .,.. f, V: - -V.- .. V V -.gk V .V-.vi a . :V, VV- V - . . f,-LV 4--. . ..Vgg. - - f p"' r'7" LI -- ,ff-.3!!f5,,i' 7. 2 519'-25, l'7...,gQ'4-XI . V. -GTV... . 11411 - f-. g'..' " 4 - '-SQVJLQL - QV 1 ,-.A ' Je' 1 , - ' D' . I .'f' . - ay- V.,-L 1. V, ' 1,',.V. .. 32 - - ,-zap .V 25-, -' ET.. 'A .V V- li --'11 , -- -- -, , 'm J -. V ' A . A 1' .::, - - , ,'-.- -' . - . .-fbffv ' -7.1-.,--1.f4.S'Q'-fix 12-11. . -1 - 'Wig-A' ff? .N-15 -fi: N -5'--.--f T 'PK J' if ' ff '-..f'-'ew---1-41' - -EG-.f.'.:f:.' - .1-ff' ff. . 'Ma 77 If- ' ' '7pf."'V2y,L ,J1.ifi-SHI IVIQT-tj II A.I?I-12.-1,3132 1 -V31'.fI.V.- .,'Z,gIg,,.,sI'I WQEIVEIVI 'V 'L ll, uiggtfgfcifg-.-,if . , I I?'IZ'Vf:IVIEiIII II- II fxfgi, 1- . -'A " -. "-,- A 'H .--. - --' . A - IA' - +A-7----'A - '-- " A -. --.15--..i.-.115-V1'. -, Qf giff,-ie-V'-.'-r f- ' ,zf .V.,'.1.'s"y'.Q: 5g?,.g-fV., . .' ,ff ' ' 2 .V M191-1 1, fag. -4'-11. . , 45-TC.-ir fvfisf,-fa-Wf-..'?:f2ff1' "1-- -fhgv Q'----I-if' .fQ"'-fgi.. ' -' fig f ...ff . '. - -- .---L aww - M' - " -f - ae """f-551 : .Nw ' .. v.. v---1.-fa'-1::..f.s-L. -f . .ff - -w 'W I f- H " -.1---A--.. -V ' q w' -' - -- " M' ,,.-- V . ! II.. A , , Vg .-.I. ' fi Y'-x 1 V' i ff E I 5 i 1 V 1 1 V I Q K. E . X E 3 V 5 5 E2 I. 17 1. l 4 1 1 il-1 .Iwi li Q 'A fl A 11 I .I ,fy N , - i il Q 3 L i 'il 2 3. e 5, 72 5 3 3 WW 16 1 , f--Y '. -.. -- .. . . f 1 f 1 Y I L , ig 3. x l .gl 5' ' - F, L E. is .3- 5 x S6 I I V 1 1 . 1 -Q , M We I ,E VSAM, yx - .- W C W' RX W ' 1 1 xxmxwx 1 pg . 1, A-2 H - KK A I, , ,,,f K? "Jfi1fCf:"Vf'f4 L aw.L,Q ff? gym fgfmp 5IfLe,cJ ,iifefiu mWwmv"iWW'rv3mGT,, 'V A . f w,m"U'Q+ ' ' A .V Www, AX f 'frrznwg ' 'img' Msfiig :lE'MT'iI ' 2 'faWfiTP'W5fXf? -f ve iff if , wfffhf xxx gvlsflffgglx f. J HX 5 N- 11 nm: -" L 1QiQsLg 1gm W' - 'YH Mlyufiff 'jr-f5i!3f+r::.2ggx..:,.-wfff' ' ,f ,- N 1 ,AIOM 75,115,170 no g THE RECGRD IASS GF 78 9 UNIVERSITY GF PENNSYLVANIA Pzfblfsbed by' The Gr2IdII2ItiIIg Class of the College Department JUNE, 1889 edieaifion. kj ' iflina 99Zafer's no5Hesz' daizgfifer, gkrious Signfg-l2ine, fo flieeg ' 12061 we dedicafe fHis ,Qeeord cyf iffy sfryfe and vicfofy. Way ifs fak of four years' frizzrnjal-is 5e a jnresage 5rigfif B and frae, Q fC5'fiaf, arnidsf ine greaf worfrfs baffks, ffiou sHaH aff ffiy foes 1 Sllgdllej i may, in affer years fwfien, pausing, fnozz sfiaaf izzrn fHese pages o'erj K-Cgne fond memories fnzzs awalfened fiff zffiy Hearf 5T1iz'H J sfrengfli once more, ' ' Zfrencqfn fo gain in ma greaf cofkcge, fJTe1Hicfi is cafkd 4 "ine wlorld" 5g rnen, 8'en a 5rigHfer, no5ler ,Ziecord fnan fnozz 'Hadsf af dear ofd fSDenr1. ' Q V ' -' 3 ' - 4 ' ' e af V M' 02211 1nlfHlll'Hlf mul" ' I M, Xxx gj 'H 1: l -QAM Ill! 5-9,4 tn, 1 N X' Il, 'lib 5 .,aq. V wr: ., -QM-1 141 fm 1916 ' ' MW 4 , A , V ,"afgqM - my H Q Inf - I ' THE 0 'Y we-. 75 -1 ..w- ,:1,l, , f f K -- kx uf A 1 1' E5 1 I J, L XNJ ' 1fl.3c'4 1-ub f' jf: A Q . K eo f f LZPQ GWZQCZ TX GCP G'?6'pf K pf4,?W 67fA9iQ1gCZQ?gj5?2?,? kr! EWS . e 924 0 Qnjsf ?Zf' -,, 15? CQQ J Qfffjw C? lffghf AK 55,16 ,MQ WMS f Wffff' jp W D Q j W X 4 , 'Ho , fk QV-Chg M19 ? Q LTXQX eg The Committee hope that the above names will be found 16011316 without the aid of a translatioll in a foot note? 221 Vide 88's Record. 4 X I Q J 5 PREFATGRY. VERY author is popularly supposed to have some reason or excuse for thrusting the " children of his brain H upon an unoffending world. Although, the Committee feel assured that the contents of the following pages are reason enough for their existence and need no apology, yet they think that some account of the manner in which they came to be compiled would be of interest. v' 'Some time ago a certain worthy, if voluble, Professor in this great University Qwho has, unfortunately, a greater reputation for conviviality and profanity than for his works as a compiler and foot-note editorj, condescended to shake down his trousers and enter into conversation with some members of the Senior class. In the course of the short QQ three hours' monologue the gentleman remarked : ' " One of the chief difficulties which Professor Thompson and other careful students of history have to encounter is the almost impenetrable darkness which too often surrounds the earliest days of great men and great movements. Homer and the Greeks, Romulus and the Romans, Shamus O'Brien and Fenians, Pomp and the Glee Club--who can discover whence they sprang or how their youthful forms were nourished? In vain do we question the ages, in vain do we send great expeditions to disinter the monu- ments of the dead and the Winged Goats of pre-historic univer- sitiesl Greece and Rome, County Donegal and Lombard Street guard well their secrets and defy us to wrest them away." How much longer he kept up this strain of unwonted eloquence we cannot say, for, seized with a sudden inspiration, we slipped 5 115-L-7 if K 'f 1 f" .W1, f , , K . ffvryiffll .13- V fi fi?- 02 f j f" ff T T ff , 7 f1' wZ'.4 . N-:L-'-if-??E,LLiL4::g-- 'T-'EF , ,fi-' eiff' li ' QQTQEQ -' - 2.12 - agigfnfi-,L ,gf SENIORS. P7fesz'fZe7zz'.' Edward Wa1'loelc Mumford. Fivfsi Vz'5e-P1feSz'de7zz'.- Charles Barton Keen. ' Second Vzke-P1fesz'de1zf.' Oscar Pearl Chamberlain C'07f76Sf07ZlZ7Z.7Zg' Seaffeztzfga- Thomas Willis Fleming. R66'07'lZ7Z'7Zg Sec1fe!a1jf.- Frederic Robeson Baker. T1feaszz1fe1f.' Edward Christman Knight. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: Samuel MeCune Lindsay, C7ZCZZ'7f77Z6Z7Z, Clinton Rogers Woodrtiff, Oscar Pearl Chamberlain, John Lammey Stewart, Frederic Robeson Baker. 7 MEMBERS OF THE CLASS- Williaiii Clarence Arrisonfi Arts' F' st Honor both Terms Sopho- Second Honor, both Terms, Freshinan Year, lf i 1 more Year. Left Class end Sophomore X ear. . . . , -f Arts. Williaiii VVayne Ashui st? Class Corresponding Secretary, Sophomore Year. Left Class end 50Ph0mOfe Year. Franklin Bache, QK2, Science H' ' ass wiinmin Race Committee, Sophomore, junior and Senior Yearsg Creiiizmfgr? bCE5nSinittE,e,'So1uho1giore Year, Rowing Committee, Sophomore El11dCT1ii11O1' Yearsg junior and Ivy Ball Committees, "Powell Cup H Comtlllflfeey. mira CTPO eg? Boat Clubg Undergraduate member " New Boat House Committee, E 1 or ennsiy - vanzkzn, Senior Yearg member Class Football Team, Freshman, Sophomore, .Tum-or and Senior Yearsg Class Crew, Freshman and Sophomore Years, and Stroke same, Sophomore Year. Frederick Robeson Baker, AW, A115- Class President, Sophomore Year, Recording Secretary, Senior Year, member Executive Committee, Senior Year, junior Ball Committee, and Class Sports Committee, Sophomore Year: member College Boat Club: member Class Crew, Freshman Year, Grand Inquisitor at Cremation. Third Honor, Second Term, Junior Year, both Terms, Senior Year. joseph Price Ball, Science I. Entered Class beginning Junior Yearq member Scientiiic Society, University Camera Club. Rodman Barker, Biology. Entered Class beginning junior Year: member journal Club. First Honor, both Terms, junior and First Term, Senior Years. Samuel Haydock Barker, I , Biology. Q Entered Class b.eginning junior Yearg member journal Club. First Honor, Both Terms, junior and First Term, Senior Year. Nlfilliam Alexander Bellft ' ' A1-ts. Member Class Baseball Team, Freshman and Sophomore Years, member Chorus, Greek Play, all Performances, member Glee Club. Left Class beginning Senior Year. Timothy Raymond Beyer, AB., Science III. Third Honor, Second Term, Freshm ' b th T S h Junior and First Term, Senior Years. any O erms' Op Omorei both Terms' Charles Sterling Bonsall, 'S p Whaltono Year.ESgcirE2rCll,zf1ss beginning Junior Yearg member Class Football Committee, Senior , , V 1 0, University Chess Club and Dele ate to Inter- Jugior Year: member Wharton School Congress, menigber Class Focfiltigigilagetz-fi1i'isO31i111itig,f glattgellgbqr Yciarsg member College Tug of War Team, junior and Senior Years' won Runigig E1-Sjagtk its Sgcond in Running Broad jump, Fall Sports, junior Years won St te I t -C H , P, N Pflllg Sports, junior Year, Second in Running Broad jump Hgnlmgl-elm? geilsltg 513035, J 1111101' Yer, won Putting the Shot and Throwing the Year. , l 1 in loo-Yards Dash and Runmng High jump, Fall Sports, Senior if Quondam member. S 1 n l 1 I i V I , l ' I X ' 1 c Herbert Hart Boyd, ' Wharton, u Class Second Vice-President, Freshman Year, member Class Constitution Com- mittee, Freshman Year, Class Executive Committee, Freshman and Sophomore Years, and.Cha1rman same, junior Year, member Tennis Committee, Freshman Year, Chairman Supper Committee, Sophomore Year, member Bowl Fight Committee, Sophomore Year, member Wharton School Congress, College Boat Club, University Gun Club, Cricket Association. George Brooke, jr., Whanon, I Member Ivy Ball. Committee, College Boat Club, and Vice-President same, Uni- versity Gun Club, University Chess Club, Wharton School Congress, Founder and Editor Red and Blue, member University Cricket Association. A Charles Newton Clement Brown, Arts. Member Class Constitution Committee, Chairman K' Class Yell" Committee, Freshman Year, member HB. R. Milnes" Committee, Freshman Year, Chairman Class Executive Committee, Freshman and'Sophomore Years, Speaker at Cremation, member Mock Programme Committee, Chairman RECORD Committee, member Philo, Secretary, Treasurer, First and Second Censor, Moderator and Recorder same, mem- ber Philo Seventy-iifth Anniversary Committee and Chairman and Treasurer same, member Greek, Psycho-Physic and Philosophic Seminars, Pvfesbeis and Lamaclzus Cunderstudyj, Greek Play, all Performances, Anchor Class Tug of War Team, Fresh- man Year. First Prize, English Essay, Freshman Year, First Prize, Oratorical Con- test, and Second Prize, Quarternions, junior Year, Third Honor, both Terms, Fresh- man and Sophomore, Second Term, junior and both Terms, Senior Year. john Eugene Curbutt, . M Science I. Entered Class beginning junior Year, member Class Crew, junior Year, Class Tug of War Team, jumorrand Senior Years, Class Football Team, Senior Year, mem- ber College Boat Club, University Camera Club, and Vice-President same. Oscar Pearl Chamberlain, V Science III. Second Vice-President Class, Senior Year, member Executive Committee, Senior Year, Speaker at Cremation, member Scientific Society, Delegate to Inter-Collegiate Athletic Association, Senior Year, member University Orchestra, member Class Crew, Freshman and junior Years, Honorable Mention junior Oratorical Contest, won Mile Walk at Spring Sports, Sophomore Year, Second in Mile Walk State Inter-Collegiate Sports, Sophomore Year, won Mile Walk fChampionsh1p of Penn-sylvaniaj and Mile Run, Fall Sports, junior Year, won Mile Walk, State Inter-Collegiate Sports, junior Year, won Half-Mile Run, Second in Mile Run, Fall S.ports, 'Senior Year, member Inter-Collegiate Team, Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years. Third Honor, both Terms, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years. Jacob Orie Clarke, Science Ill. Entered Class beginning Junior Year. Gurney Fairfax Coleman, Science I. Entered Class beginning junior Year, member Scientific Society. joseph Warren Coulstonft AHS- Left Class end First Term, Freshman Year. Howard Crawley? 5661109- Member Chess'Club. Left Class end Freshman Year. Francis Macomb Cresson, SCiG11CC IV- Member Philo, Third Honor, Second Term, Freshman, both Terms, Sophomore First Term, Junior Year. C ' 9 , . 92 lCl'lCG. Georofe Dana Boardman Darby, 1103, SC 33 . . -' , 'tt , F :hman Year, Football Committee, Member Class Executixe Commi ee resG em1Ath1et1CS Sophomore Year, F h A d So homore Years, Committee on en y D Sti'?kcintill2is2s1CreW,pFreshman Yearg member Class 'lg-uilofVVagdT531nibPIgs1Sg1gI132111-Year, Captain Class Football Team, Sophomore Year. Le t ass e p Beni amin Markley Davis, tt Science .L J Entered Class beginning junior Year: member Class Baseball Team, junior Year. Left Class end First Term, Senior Year. Alexander Heron Davisson, 1310103 5'- Entered Class beginning Junior Yearg member Scientific Society, and Treasurer and First Vice-President same, member journal Club and Third Vice-President same. Leon Symonety Dexter, AWS- Member University Gun Club. john Conway Cowan Dillingham, A1115- Member Alumni Hall Cominittee, Senior Year, member Class Football Team, Sophomore and junior Yearsg member Philo and First Censor sameg.member Philo-. sophie. Psycho-Physical and Greek Seminars, Class Tennis Clnbg University Camera Club: Cricket Association: Moiety Greek Prize, junior Year, Third Honor, both Terms, Freshman, and Second Term, junior Year, Second Honor, both Terms, Sophomore and Senior Years. Sherborne VVilliam Dougherty, Arts. Member ofCremation Committee, Class Baseball Committee: Muhlenberg Memo- rial Committee, Sophomore Year, junior Ball Committeeg member Executive Com- mittee University Baseball Association, Juniors Yearg member Philosophic Seminar, member Class Baseball Team, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years: Class Football Team, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years: Class Cricket Team, Freshman and Sophomore Years, Class Gun Team, Junior and Senior Years- Univer- sity Baseball Team, junior and Senior Years, and Assistant Manager same, sobhomore ggagriiieeiiglbei' ll niversity Football Team, Senior Year, President University Banjo Club, Norton Downsftd QP, Science t Member Class Cricket Team: Class F tb ll T - Y ' ' ' - University Football Team, Freshman Year. 0IC3ef?.Clas22ie-nxid et, Team, Rev. William Hamel, AHS Entered Class beginning Senior Year. Christian Frederic Fisher, Science III Thoigji Zlgillis Pgleiiigng, . Science IH' rrespon 1- ' . - , Junior and Seniol-AYQ :ng Ccbctary, Senior Year, membei Class Baseball Committee Years: C1 H F b a 'sg mem er Class Baseball Team, Sophomore, Junior and Seniof ' ass oot all 1 , 5 11 Feam, Sophomore and Jgiligr Yf?3lgLrSo'111ore, junior and Semor Years, College Baseball Lawrence Brown Fonda? Left Class end Freshman Year. - Sclence' X . Williaiii Innes Forbes, ZW, Arts, Corresponding Secretary, Freshman Year, First Vice-President, Sophomore, Second,Vice-President, junior Year, member Supper Committee, Rowing Committee, Freshman'Year,' Chairman Baseball Committee, member Supper Committee, Rowing Committee, Sophomore Year, member junior Ball Committee, Supper Committee, Baseball Committee, junior Year, member Ivy Ball Committee, Supper Committee, Sen1orYear, member Class Crew, Freshman, Sophomore and junior Years, Class Tug of War Team, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years, Class Baseball Team, Freshman and Sophomore Years, Football Team, Sophomore Year, Cricket Team, Freshman and Sophomore Years, Vice-President Football Association, junior Year, Numplzeutffia, in Greek Play, all Performances. ' Charles Harrison Frazier, A IF, ' Arts. Class Treasurer, Freshman Year, Second Vice-President, Sophomore Year, Re- cording Secretary, junior Year, member Supper Committee, Freshman, Sophomore and junior Years, and Chairman same, Senior Year, member Class Yell Committee, Freshman Year, Chairman junior Ball Committee, member of Mock Programme Committee, junior Year, member Ivy Ball Committee and Treasurer same, RECORD Committee and Treasurer same, member Class Football Team, Freshman, Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years, and Captain same, Senior Year, member Class Cricket Team. Freshman, Sophomore and Junior Years, Manager Class Baseball Team, junior and Senior Years, President University Athletic Association, Senior Year, member Inter- Collegiate A. A. of Pennsylvania, junior 'and Senior Years, and Chairman same, junior Year, member Standing Committee on Track Athletics, University A. A., Senior Year, member Mask and Wig Club, Daughter of the MegaVz'a11, in Greek Play, all Performances, won Half-Mile Run, College Sports, Sophomore Year, won 440-Yards Dash, Midwinter Sports, Senior Year. Dallet Fuguet, Arts. Member Scientific Society, and President and Secretary same, Founder and Editor Red and Blue, member University Camera Club, and President same, member Class Tug of War Team, Sophomore Year, Class Crew, Sophomore Year, State Inter- Collegiate Team, Sophomore Year, won Mile Walk, Fall Sports, Sophomore Year, Second in Fall Sports, junior Year, Third Honor, First Term, Sophomore Year, and both Terms, Senior Year. WilliamtEdwin Gauntji , , SCiC11CG. Third Honor, Second Term, Freshman Year, both Terms, Sophomore Year. Left Class end Sophomore Year. I . john White Gearyfi ' AIJCS- Won Swimming Race, Sophomore Year-. Left Class end Sophomore Year. john Harper Girvin, AY, Biology-' Entered Class beginning junior Year, member Washington Birthday Committee, Senior Year, member Philo, journal Club, First and Second Vice-President same, Second Honor, First Term, and First Honor, Second Term, junior Year. Milton Jay Greenman, Philosophy. Entered Class beginning Senior Year, Third Honor, First Term, Senior Year.- Rodman Ellison Griscom, Z QV, WhHft0H- Entered Class beginning Junior Year, member Committee on Marking System, Senior Year, member Cricket Association, Wharton School Congress. A ' I I x Thomas Willzins Hulme, Adi, 1 Science III, . Member Class Football Committee a11d Class Sports Committee, Sophomore Year, Chairman Class Football Committee, junior Year, Chairman Class Football and General Sports Committees, Senior Year, member Supper Committee, Senior Year, member Class Baseball Team, Sophomore and junior Years, Class Football Team, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years, and Captain same, Sophomore and Junior Years, member College Football Team, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years, and Captain same, Senior Year, Manager Midwinter Football Game, Senior Year, Delegate Foot- ball Convention, junior and Senior Years, Won Half-Mile and Mile Run, Class Sports, Freshman Year, 220 and 440-Yards Dash and 120-Yards Hurdle, Class Sports, Sopho- more Year, Half-Mile Run and I2O-YafdS Hurdle, Spring Sports, Sophomore Year. Matthew james Hyndman, Arts, Honorable Mention, Greek Prose Composition Prize, Freshman Year, Third Honor, Second Term, junior Year, Second Honor, First Term and Third Honor, Sec- ond Term, Senior Year. Edwin Isaac Hyneman, Arts. Chairman Class Baseball Committee, Freshman, Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years, member Class Football Committee, Junior and Senior Years, member General Athletics Committee, junior Year, Chairman Supper Committee, junior Year, member Executive Committee, Baseball Association, Junior Year, Captain Class Baseball Team, Freshman, Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years, member Class Tug of War Team, Freshman Year, Class Football Team, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years, Class Cricket Team, Sophomore and Junior Years, member College Baseball Team, Freshman, Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years, College Football Team, junior and Senior Years, Vice-President University Baseball Association, Sophomore Year, member Class Banjo Club. james Edmund Ives, Biology. Entered Class beginning Junior Year. A Joseph Sommers Jaffa, Wharton. Entered Class beginning junior Year, member Wharton School Congress. Charles Peter Beauchamp jefferys, Jr., i Whartoii. Class President, Freshman Year, Class Historian, Sophomore Year, Historian at Class Day,'member Class Constitution Committee, Freshman Year, Class Executive Committee, Supper Committee, Sophomore Year, Mock Programme Committee, RECORD Committee, Class Song Committee, Senior Year, member Committee to Nominate Candidates for First Editorial Board of the Pfnnsyl'vam'an,: Committee of 25 to draw up Constitution of Pennsylzfcznian and arrange details, Wash1ngton's Birthday Committee, Sophomore and junior Years, and Chairman same, Senior Year, Editor Pennsylvanian, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior'Years, Delegate to the Central Inter-Collegiate Press Association and member Executive Committee saine, Senior Year, member Philo, Political Economy and Philosophic Seminars, Matriculate and Alumni Catalogue Committee of the Society of the Alumni, Senior Year, Pazs Dzleazo- jaolidos, Greek Play, all Performances, member Class Chess Club and President same, Freshman Year, member University Chess Club, President same, and Delegate to Inter-Collegiate Chess Tournament, Senior Year, member University Gun .Club and President same, Senior Year, Chapel Organist, Junior and Senior Years, Violoncello in University Instrumental Club, Freshman Year, member Univers1ty.BanJo Club, Reissiger Quartette Club, Sophomore Year, University Orchestra and President Univer- sity Orchestral Association, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years, member Whartozi School Congress. Third Honor, First Term, Sophomore and both Terms, Freshman, junior and Senior Years. Henry Martin Justi, Science' I. Entered Class beginning Junior Year, member Scientiiic Society and Curator same, member University Gun Club, University Cricket Association, University Camera Club. I3 ' 1 ' nce I. Clarence Sears Kates, .Al , ' Sue . . - , -. - ' ' '1 Committee Entered Class beginning junioi Year, membei Class Swiniml lg, , 1 junior Year: member College Boat Club: University G1111 Clubs 5C1Cnt15C 50C1etY- Charles Barton Keen, ' Science V' - :' 1' - -yident Senior Year, member Football Committee., Freshman and Yexaiiliiineivllgilfht Committee, Soph0n1Or6 YCQTQ General Athletlcs Commlt' tee 'Senior Yearf RECORD and Ivy Ball Committees, member Class .Football Team, Sophomore. junior a11d Senior Years, Class Crew, Freshman and junio-r Years, Inter- Collecfiate Athletic Team, Freshman, Sophomore and junior Years, and First Lieutenant samea Sophomore Year, member College Football Team, junior Year, member Uni- vemifv Beat Club, University Bicycle Club, and President same, Delegate to Inter- Collegiate A. A. Meeting, Senior Year, member Standing Committee on Track Athletics, University A. A., Senior Year, Th1'acz'a1z, Greek. Play, all Performances, won Bicycle Race, Class Sports, Freshman Year, Second Bicycle Race, Spring Sports, Freshman Year, won Bicycle Race, State Inter-Collegiate Sports and Inter-Collegiate A. A. -Sports, Freshman Year, College Fall Sports, Sophomore Year, won 25-Mile Road Race, U111- versity Bicycle Club, Second in Bicycle Race, Spring Sports, Sophomore Year, Second State Inter-Collegiate Sports, Sophomore Year, won .Spring Sports, State Inter-Collegiate Sports, Second, Inter-Collegiate A. A. Sports, junior Year, Third Honor, both 'lerms, Senior Year. Henry Stevens Kiersted, Biology. Entered Class beginning Junior Year, member Class BaseBall Committee, junior and Senior Years, member Class Baseball Team, junior and Senior Years, President University Baseball Association, Editor Pemzsylzfanzkuz, Senior Year, member Scien- tific Society and Secretary same, member journal Club and Secretary, Second and Third Vice-President same, First Honor, both Terms, junior Year, Seco11d Honor, First Term, Senior Year. Rudolph Howard Klauder, Science IV, Member Philo and Second Censor same, member University Gun Club, Third Honor, Sophomore Year. Edward Christman Knight, dllff, Science II, Class First Vice-President junior Year, Treasurer S h Y - - Chairman Powell Cup Committee, and Rowing Coinmitteegpmgiiigei' Eiilciigixvbe Egiil mittee, Bowl Committee, Football Committee, Sophomore Year' Tennis Committee .lltngor Elgar, member Alumni Hall Committee, White Cup Committee' Ivy Ball Com' mi - ' . + ' J ee, D EQORD Committee Senior Year, Secretar and Tr I 1 ' y '- Associationz Captain Class, Crews, Freshman and, Sophoiiaoigrigegrilxsfsssb Ecglcitgglcl ,fC8.lll, Freshman Year, Class Cricket Team, Freshman Sophomore junior a11d S ' Years, member Philo' Glee Club' University Cricket Aissoc' t' C7 ' enlor all Performances. Woii Runnin1f-Broad- u C1 S la Oni Zmfus' Greek P145' Ejartli1SLpgigsgiSE6ecgnd gguagte1EMile Riiinfggriiigi Secgsdriiraigilgleflxilhe iv- -- .pors,,c-0 Y -5 ' - .' Honor, both Terms, Freshman aliid gbcglioiiigiie Qlefaiislng Prize, Freshman Year' Third Edmund Theophilus Kuendigi Arts Left Class end Sophomore Year. l Benjamin Franklin Lacy, Entered Class beginning 5 ' ' 1 Arts' s 5 . CIIIOT Year, Second Honor both Terms, Senior Year. Jeremiah Berrill Larzalere jf 4 I Wh . 3 ' 3 Entered Class b ' ' - , arton' Class end First Term,eggggigiigzgaipiior Year, member Wharton School Cong1'ess. Left 14 X' Charles King Lennigf dJA'E, - Arts, Member Class Tug of War Team and'Captain and Anchor same, Sophomore and junior Years,.member Class Crew, Junior Year, member University Gun Club. Left Class end Junior Year. Thomas Montgomery Lightfoot, B.S., Biology. C1 b Entered Class beginning junior Year, member Scientific Society and journal u . Samuel McCune Lindsay, - Wharton. Chairman Executive Committee, Senior Year, member Whartoii School Congress, member Philo and Secretary same, Chairman Philo Seventy-iifth Anniversary Com- mittee, Editor Pen1zsyZva1zz'an, Junior Year, and Managing Editor same, Senior Year, member Class Chess Club, University Cricket Association, Chorus, Greek Play, Philadelphia Performances, Honorable Mention, H. Labarre Jayne Prize, Freshman Year, Third Honor, both Terms, Freshman, Sophomore and junior Years. joseph Reynolds McCance, Arts. Entered Class junior Year, Third Honor, both Terms, junior Year, and both Terms, Senior Year. ' ' George Washington McCaffery, jr., Biology. Entered Class beginning junior Year, member journal Club, and Secretary same. George Hummel McNeely,9t - Science I. Entered Class beginning junior Year. Left Class end junior Year. Howard Mellor, Philosophy. Entered Class beginning junior Year. William McClellan Menahft Science. Left Class end Sophomore Year. August Appleton Miller, Science I. Member University Bicycle Club. Dickinson Sergeant Millerfi ' AHS. Member Cremation Committee, member Philo, First Censor, Moderator, Recorder same, Second Prize, Latin Prose Composition, Freshman Year. Left Class end Sopho- more Year. George Whitiield Taylor Miller, A.B., Science HI. Member "Dean Kendall Resolutionsn Committee, Prize for Highest General Scholarship, junior Year, Third Honor, both Terms, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years. Benjamin Rowland Milnes, SCiC11C9- Died beginning Freshman Year. 15 james Clayton Mitchell, Arts' A . t A: cl C ass , . . Member RECORD Con11111t ec d t Recorder Same, member Philo - - 1 Mo era or 1 mittee. Member Philo and Second Censor, v , 1 , seventy-fifth Anniversarv Committee, 111e111ber L-niversity-Glee Club, and' Treasurer ' , ., ' 1, Pla f, all Performances, Editor Pemzsylzfamavz, Senioi I us, G-ree ' 1 , . ifgegigi .gsisegtaiii-t gligpel Organist, 3Honorary Mention Aeschznes Greek Prize, JLIIIIOI' Year, member Psycho-Physio, Philosophic a11d Greek' Seminars, Tslgiirdn Iglecggolii both 'l'ern1s, Freshman and Sophomore S. ears, alld Second Fei m, junioi ear, . Honor, both Terms, Senior Year. l Memorial" Coznmittee' " Class Songw C0111- Arthur Richard Harcourt Morrow? A115- R First Prizes, Latin and Greek Prose Composition, Freshman Year. Left Class end Freshman Year. George Douglas Morton, BiO1Og3'- Entered Class beginning junior Year, member journal Club, Second Ho11or, First Term. Senior Year. Eclizvard VVarloch Mumford, XlVh2l1'tO1l. Class Recording Secretary, Freshman Year, Fresident, Senior Year, Bowl-Man: member Cremation Committee, 1nen1ber Class Executive Committee, junior Year, 1l16l1'1bCl' Philo, Treasurer, First and Second Censor same, inember Philo Seventy-fifth Anniversary Committee, Editor Penfzsylzfavzzlzvz, Sophomore and junior Years, Editor- in-Chief, Senior Year, member Glee Club, alld Secretary same, member C'lz01'1cs, Greek Play, all Performances, n1e111ber Class Crew, Freshman Year, won Mile Walk, Class Sports, Sophomore Year, Third Honor, 'both Terms, Freshman and junior Years, and First Term, Sophomore Year. Delfancey Yerplanck Newlin,t.:lQ, Arts, Left Class end Freshman Year. Ellis Paxson Gberholtzer, Nvhm-ton, Class POM: Nlember " Class Memorial" Coinmittee- 111e111ber Clee Club- XVI t School Conffrcss, Third Honor, both Terms. F . h h I " - limi Second Hoiior, botl1 Terms. Senior Year. res man, Op Omore and 'mmol Xedrb' ame: ' f '1 I s Hall Olix erf I Arts. and S1g'fJ6EgRi351.gEiis1g3aseball Team, Class Football Team, Freshman Year. Left Class Francis Randolph Packard, AW, Biology ' Rr.-dei..-' '- - f-. , , ' Presidegtegaine. 355 139317-llllllg junior Xeai, member journal Club, and First Vice- Rufus Palenit Member Tug of VVar Team Freshm Y . 1 Arts' 111811 Year. Left Class end Fresl1in1aniYea?i1n ear, Second Htmori both TQTUIS, FFCSH- Vfilliam Albert Parisft i ' ' S . Member Class C ' 5 f , , . Clence' and Hammer ThroWi:,z.vY!C13gShgg81r-ES-3Sir,dvyon Standing Broad a11d High Jumps standing High jump, Gglleqe Spring glgoli-:gl 1l3road Jump, College Fall Sports, more Year. S S 1 5 mall 362122 Left Class end Sophg- Edward Asa Partridge, S , T1 - d I 1. ., Q c1e11ce I. 11r Ionor, bieshnian, Sophomore and Senior Years. 16 A X.. S. m- ilo fer lor ior or, nd ts. HSS IY- or, ill. au, :ar, ifth tor- eek lass and ts. DI1. 'ton ars, its. lass EL' rts. . gh- Ce. ips l ITS ho I Charles Peabody, ' Arts, Member Class Tennis Committee, " Class Memorial" Committee, " Class Song" Committee, member Philo, and Secretary same, Undergraduate member, Greek Play Committee, member University Orchestra, and Treasurer same, Moiety Greek Prose Composition Prize, Freshman Year, First Quarternions Prize, and Moiety Aeschines Greek Prize, Junior Year, Third Honor, First Term, junior Year, Second Honor, both Terms, Freshman Year, First Honor, both Terms, Sophomore and Senior Years. William Irvine Penningtonf? S Science. Y Third Honor, First Term, Freshman Year. Left Class end First Term, Freshman ear. - Elliston Joseph Perot, QKZ, A Arts. Class Secretary, Sophomore Year, member Cremation Committee, " Dean Ken- dall's Resolutions " Committee, member Philo, First Censor, Moderator and Recorder same, Editor Penn.gflvanz'an, Sophomore Year, English Essay Prize, Junior Year, Third Honor, both Terms, Freshman and Sophomore Years, Second Term, junior Year, and both Terms, Senior Year. ' Walter Phillips, Science IV. Member Philo, Third Honor, both Terms, Freshman and Sophomore Years. Thomas Robinson Reaneyf Science. Member Class Baseball Team, Class Cricket Team, Freshman Year. Left Class end Freshman Year. - Addison. May Rothrock, A Biology. Member journal Club, Secretary same, First Honor, Second Term, junior Year. William Morrill Rumneyfi Arts. Class Athletic Director, Freshman Year, member Football Team, Freshman Year. Left Class end Freshman Year. ' David Bowen Salter, P A Science, III. Member RECORD Committee, 'K Class Memorial " Committee, Tennis Committee, Senior Year, member Class Crew, Sophomore Year, member University Bicycle Club, and Secretary and Treasurer same, member Philosophic Seminar, University Orchestra, Moiety Greek Prose Composition Prize, Freshman Year, Third Honor, both Terms, Freshman, Sophomore, Second Term, Junior, and both Terms,tSenior Years. Lloyd Mifflin scott, Arts. Member College Boat Club, member First State Inter-Collegiate Athletic Team, Second Presbeis,,Greek Play, both Performances, won loo-Yards, 220-Yards, 440-Yards Dash, Class Sports, ,Freshman Year, Second 220-Yards Dash, Spring Sports, Freshman Year, Second 440-Yards Dash, Fall Sports, Sophomore Year. Walter Scott, Z W' , Wharton School. P Class Historian, Freshman Year, Recording Secretary, Sophomore Year, member " B. R. Mi1nes" Committee, Executive Committee, Supper Committee, and Chairman same, Freshman Year, Chairman Cremation Committee, member junior Ball Com- mittee, Chairman Ivy Ball Committee, n1ember Executive Committee, University Cricket and Tennis Associations, member Class Baseball and Cricket Teams, and Class Tennis Pair, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years, member Class Football Team, Freshman Year, Pais of Eu1fz,bz'des, Greek Play. all Performances, member University Cricket Team, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years, Second Prize Greek Prose Composition, Freshman Year, Third Honor, both Terms, Freshman and Sophomore, Senior Years.. 17, I Science I. Alfred Nexxilin Seal, b W h' t ' B' thda Com 1 2 1 ' ' lomore Year- mem er as mfr ons 11' Y 1 itteslggffikggii.Jfgggiiigi-gPl3loi member journal Club, ll1Cl11?36I' Class Chess Club, 1ge,,,bgf Univey5ity7Chess Club, Third Honor, both Terms, Sophomore Year, Second Term, junior Year, and both Terms, Senior Year. Daniel Bussier Shnmway, A1155- a . - - - . - - ber Committee E tered Llass beginning Sophomoie Year, Mantle Orator, mem I 2 on Marliinff Svstem: nmmber Philo, Plnlosophic Seminar, Moicty DCCl3l1l3t101l.?flL6, SophomoreoYe'ar' Third Honor. First Term, junior Year, Second Honorg both lernis, i 7 ' - " ' unior Year and Second Term, Senior Year, First Sophomore Year, Second lei m, I Honor, First Term, Senior Year. Albert Haseltine Smith, KDKE, VVh21Tt011- Chairman Bowl Committee, Sophomore ea 'Q - . . . Freshman and Sophomore Years, and Chairman same, Junior Year, member junior ' A - h ' n Class Shooting Committee, junior Year, member Iyy Ball Ball Committee, C airma D Committee, member University Gun Club, Treasurer same, junior Year, and Director same, Senior Year: member Cricket Association, Tennis Association, Political Econ- omy Seminar, Xvharton School Congress, member Class Football and Cricket Teams, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years, Captain Shooting Team, Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years, member College Shooting Team, Sophomore, junior and Y 1 member Class Football Committee, Senior Years. Isaac Starr, jr., AU", Science IV, Entered Class beginning Senior Year. Andrew Frazier Stevens, jrji A1-tg, Member Class Baseball Team, Freshman Year. Left Class end Freshman Year. J01111 Lamm-GY SteW31'l?, i Whaitoii. K 1 u I n I I . Y -'B11tered-Classbeginning junior Year, member Class Executive Committee, Senior 631, Hlifflllbel P0l1l1cal Economy and Philosoplnc Seminars, Vvharton School Congress, and President of Senate same, member Philo, Third Honor, both Terms Senior ifear . , , Williain Thomas Stewart, ' Biology Entered Class beginning junior Year, member journal Club. b i Franklin N l f ' +P e son Strader, Arts. Member Class Football Committee F h - - gE3r1,SCl?ss Tennis goinqmittee, Senior Yea-E-S 11i1Siiio2ieaCHaEs?VFI'iJS'3J1i1iLll1ifiLhEif,'1Sii'g1?y?127i7Jgi 1 , wres man, . op omore and junior Years' Cl Q U . Years, member College Football Team F h w 355 TCW, Sophomore and junior -War Team, Sophomoge and Junior Y , 'YES man and Senior Years, College Tug of shot, Throwing the H . A earg' Durga Crew, Jumof Yer' W011 Puttillg the Left Class beginning Sagiiigs Standmg Bload Jump, C1355 5P01'f5i, F1'CS11111an Year. Robert Stulb, . A t Memb Ph'l ' ' ' . - . I S' er 1 050Ph1C 5613111313 M01ety Declamation Prize, Sophomore Year. Joseph Fithian Tatem, P ' Vvh t Entered Class betfi ' - I ar On- Clcgiigiiittegtgellior yea?nfhlghgbgflwgaiiif,gg111g1gi'DS11i'Dea1i Kendall Resolutions" esen ' - ' - - gr P a ives same, Phird Honor, Both Ter1nS, Senior Difgziiii and Speaker Home of 1:8 l X'. ence 1, lal' Com. F55 Club, , SEC0lld Arts, . blllmittee 911 Prize, il Terms, haf? First harton, funnittee, ir junior ' Ivy Ball Director 281 Econ- rt Teams, phomore, nior and nce IV. Arts. nan Year. haiton. ee, Senior Congress, iior Year. Biology. Arts. Dphomore lg of War ld junior e Tug of tting the nan Year. Arts. 762,11 hart011- 01utio11S'l. House 0 Edmund Carter Taylorf JJKZ, Arts. Member Class Cricket Team, Freshman and Sophomore Years, won Mile Run, Class Sports, Sophomore Year, and College Fall and Spring Sports, Sophomore Year,- Third Honor, Second Term, Freshman Year, and both Terms, Sophomore Year. Left Class end Sophomore Year. Solomon Teller? Science, Left Class end Sophomore Year. Archibald Grahm Thomson, A GP, Philosophy. Class President, junior Year, Chairman Bowl Committee, Freshman Year, member Class Football Committee, Freshman Year, Tennis Committee, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years, Chairman Cricket Committee, Sophomore and junior Years, member junior and Ivy Ball Committees, member Class Banjo Club, member Class Baseball and Cricket Teams and Class Tennis Pair, Freshman, Sopho- more, junior and Senior Years, and Captain Cricket Team, Freshman and Sophomore Years, member Class Football Team, Freshman, junior and Senior Years, member University Cricket Team, Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years, University Tennis Pair, Sophomore, junior and Senior Years. Thomas Mellor Tysonft Arts. ' Left Class end Freshman Year. Frederick William Van Buskirkf Science. Left Class endlFresh1nan Year, Washington Van Dusenft Arts. - Entered Class beginning Senior Year. Left Class end First Term, Senior Year. Selden Lord Walkleyjt Science. Third Honor, both Terms, Freshman Year. Left Class end Sophomore Year. Clarence Burns White, Y Wharton. Entered Class beginning junior Year, member Wharton School Congress, Third Honor, both Terms, junior Year, and First Term, Senior Year, Second Honor, Second Term, Senior Year. William Macpherson Wiltbank, WQKZ, . Arts. Member junior Ball Committee. Third Honor, both Terms, Freshman Year. Left Class end First Term, Senior Year. - I Clinton Rogers Woodruff, ' Wharton. Entered Class beginning junior Year, Class Prophet, member Class Executive Committee, Class Supper Committee, Senior Year, member Political Economy and Philosophic Seminars, member Cricket Association, member Wharton School Congress , Editor and Founder of the Red and Blue, Second Honor, both Terms, junior Year, and both Terms, Senior Year. Nathan Young Worrall, Wharton. Class Treasurer, Junior Year, member Class Cricket Team, Sophomore Year. Second Honor, both Terms, Freshman Year, Third Honor, both Terms, Sophomore Year. . I9 A Science I. Archibald Wright, Entered Class beginning Sophomore Yearg member College Boat Clubg member Class Tug of War Team and Class Crew, Sophomore and junior Yearsg Class Football Team, junior and Senior Yearsg member College Crew, junior and Senior Yearsg College Football Team, Senior Year. lfVil1iam Moodie Yeomans? Aftg, Member Philo. Left Class end Sophomore Year. -U ,.,f,,,.,, ,,f N ,x- Walesa l,-+1 fflf Q. F- "i-Pjsgf I! bu? Z f '-A J .. fy-f"xf.-.vbf Yi -"' 'Q -r wife ,fffiffhix A -Qsiwengix S 51 XVNN ,- ' 4 ' N f L -J X Z' ,, -1- -Anil - as . 5-iF? '?. idii- ' . mei- ' S YN' :C -I - -- - JL ...sea,,. io,1i i,,i:f5fm1'f " S lf - - am: X . H106 1. member Footbau ' Yearsg Arts. OFFICERS OF THE CLASS OF '89, FRESHMAN YEAR. Presideni, Charles Peter Beauchamp jefferys, Jr. First Vice-P1'esz'den1f, Robert Carmer Hill. Second Vice-Presz'dent, Herbert Hart Boyd Sccrelavfy, Edward Warloch Mumford. Ywasurer, Charles Harrison Frazier EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. ' Charles Newton Clement Brown, Clzaiwnan. Archibald Graham Thomson. Herbert Hart Boyd. George Dana Boardman Darby. Walter Scott. SOPHOMORE YEAR. P1fesz'a'enzf, Frederic Robeson Baker. First Vice-P1fesz'a'enZ, William Innes Forbes. Second Vz'ce-Pzfesident, Charles Harrison Frazier Recording Secretary, Walter Scott. 4 C'or1fespondz'ng Secreiary, William Wayne Ashhurst. Treasmfer, Edward Christman Knight. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. Charles Newton Clement,Brown, Chaz'1fman. Herbert Hart Boyd. ' Rufus Palen. Edward Warlock Mumford. Charles Peter Beauchamp jeiferys, Jr. JUNIOR YEAR. President, Archibald Graham Thomson. First VZ'C6-PF6SZ'Ci6Hf, Edward Christman Knight. Second Vice-P1fcsz'a'ent, Edward Warloch Mumford. Rccowling Secreiary, Elliston joseph Perot. I C01'1'esp0ndz'ng Sccretaagf, Thomas Willis Fleming. i T reasurer, Nathan Young Worrall. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. Charles Peter Beauchamp jefferys, jr., Chazbfman. Frederic Robeson Baker. ' Charles Newton Clement Brown. Charles Barton Keen. Charles Harrison Frazier. 2I ida. MEMBERS OF THE CLASS. john Antrobus. John Hill Brinton. William Herbert Burk. Robert Bealle Burke. Joseph Warren Coulston, Jr. George Herbert Dennison. james Whalley Diggles. Robert Isaac Gamon. William Goodwin. ARTS. Benjamin Lease Crozier Griiiith. ' Henry Riley Gummey, jr. Henry Leopold jefferys. WHARTON. Lewis Audenreid. Jiro Itami. Manzo Kushida. Francis Bazley Lee. Arthur McGeorge. Charles Getz Peocock. . SCIENCE. David Guy Anderson. john joseph Borie. Charles Shimer Boyer. Robert Hart Bradbury. Clarence Chew Burger. Evaristo Andrew Calves. John Allen Capp. William Wilson Chambers. Henry Howard Cressman. Bernard Alphonsus Cullen, A.B. james Francis Cullen, A.B. Richard Griffith Develin. Henry Yale Dolan. Chester Nye Farr, jr. S Maurice Mayer Feustmann. Edwin Stanton Field. Hermann Fleck. Frank Richards Ford. George Washington Gist, jr. William Oglesby Griffith. Henry Warren Kilburn Hale. Frederic Valerius Hetzel. Samuel David Hopkins. Philip Eugene Howard. 23 Henry Ashton Little. William Henry Loyd, jr. james Hartley Merrick. joseph MacGregor Mitcheson. Frederick Brooke Neilson. De Lancey Verplanck Newlin. Hugh Walker Ogden. William Hahn Patterson. Josiah Harmar Penniman. Robert McClellan Ramsey. Horace Andrews Walton. Peter Silas Zimmermann. Leo Stanton Rowe. Holden Bovee Schermerhorn. john oiibert stoddart. ' Richard SaundersStoyle. William Henry Trotter, jr. Richard Lewis Humphrey. james Clark Irwin. john George Klemm, jr. Benjamin Brentnall Lathbury. Harrison Wainwright Latta. William Simpson Lorimer. Arthur William McCauley. Charles jackson Mcllvain, jr. Nelson Baum Mayer. William Sieger Miller. Leighton Nealle Davis Mixsell Charles Phillips Nassau. Frederick Shaw Nelson. Henry Van Buren Osbourn. George David Rosengarten, jr John Francis Rowland, jr. Adolph William Schramm. Harrison Souder. Morton Stevens. John Franklin Stevens. Howard Hungerford Sypher. Benjamin Schell Walters. joseph Frank Wheeler. Thomas Brown Whitney. D 1 I f I w i -fi L27 fi rC'??j 5 XTEJ. -, 'J 1. 16" 1 I ' 1 .. za, ' 'f-rx,-. - M ' ,sr W 9 - 'f ix T , . 1 1 X ,Z . ,zz '12 ' -:gf 'K 1 ff ,-1? ' 5 f .5 ' A i 1 yrs? . ' . 61 ' Q' -fi f ' ' 71 il 1 1 XD' Y Q 1 xx aff? ' ' 7' " if X 1 S ff ff ' I 2. g I, -Vik, ." 6 T ' . L QV iq 'EEE5":L?E5, ff? . lr 1-W f.- 1 2 ...A ..,. , ..-1,133.2-,. ' f ffxl' -,gg g 4413-1 'Z 244 ' + ...e H- 1 --ei-Z Xi-"L '-.-:-" i A ,,,,-7,-,QL -H j -if' Qi.. - Q i soPHoMoREs. Sr P1'esz'dem'.- john Hernion Terry. 5 I"'z'fc-Presz'a'wzi.- George Peterson Deacon. Sefkfefamfs Alexander Wilson Norris, jr. jw7'L'LTA'?I7'I'l',' George Hughes Smith. Hz'.9f01'z'a72.- Francis Churchill Williams. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 5 I+ john Hermon Terry, Ch6ZZ.7f712fZ7Z, George Peterson Deacon, Edgar Moore Church, 5 Alexander NVilson Norris, jr., Samuel Rakestraw Colladay, George Hughes Smith, Edward Prime Goodell, Henry lngersol Brown, Horatio Curtis YVood. 24 l ls, jr. iams. ldayr MEMBERS OF THE William Henry Ashhurst. Henry Ingersol Brown. Samuel Rakestraw Colladay. Erskine Hazard Dickson. Jas. MacIntosh Longstreth Eckard. Charles Gibson Grosholz. Thomas Powers Harris. Albert Hill. Herbert Rutherford Hogg. Thomas Pawling Holloway. Philip Eugene Howard. Frederick Lennig. George Francis Levan. Alfred Meyer Liveright. john Pilling Armstrong. Scott Beggs. james Lord Bernard. James Manderson Castle. Daniel Bell Cummins Catherwood. Edgar Moore Church. Trevanion Border Dallas. Edwin Adams Damon. George' Peterson Deacon. Henry Delaplaine. A John joseph Elcock. Abram Myer Feldman. Richard Field. B Sparta Fritz, jr. Edward Prime Goodell. Lloyd Carpenter Griscom. Francis Head. john jay Lafayette Houston. Thomas Wallis Huidekoper. Hisaya Iwasaki. Topliff Johnson. Chester Hughes Kirk. William Gray Knowles. CLASS. William MacAdoo, jr. Thomas McKean, jr. Alexander Wilson Norris, jr james De Wolf Perry, jr. Wilmer Hershey Righter. Sidney Wheaton Smith. joseph Baylis Thomas. Louis DePui Vail. john Reed Valentine. Cornelius Weygandt. John Robert White, jr. . Francis Churchill Williams. Francis Yarnall. Burnet Landreth, jr. Charles Ridgely Lee. Frederick Leser, jr. George 'Ingels MacLeod, jr. Clayton Fotteral McMichael. john Maurer. Frederick Kollner Mears. Frederick Rogers Meigs. john Chatlin Ogden. Harvey E. Platt. Wilson Worrell Pile. William Beni Rosskam., A Edward Koons Rowland. ' Edward Adams Shumway. George Hughes Smith. james Starr. John Hermon Terry. Robert Allen Trenwith. Marcel Alphonse Viti. James Mortimer West, Jr. Biddle Wood. Horatio Curtis Wood. james Charles Ziegler. V 1 is Ll l :lf ,1 'I L, J, "1 I J, .L 21 . i, l A . A T fr., xx LE -M uf- - -- -Q' ' " ' - R " Q , ,L f- ,, -f' Q--at ' 'ev L' ,Z i W I 5 5 . V -C 34 , . "1 ' ' ' ,W fff ,,. R ' T it --fl ' ' --. -- -.np . ful-. ' ff 1:1 t if-1'1'3'?+' -ff? , ?iQ',Q11QfQ, f't, ' fit: -' " +252 ,f .1324 Tyr 'ills' 21:35-'2T'a5s TQ? ' Y Ip" mfg, if -1 1' r A " . Ev 'FPA' L H fi mi 15.11. 1 ' ,fi f fa f..-L A A 2431, , ., --77t5,Q 1. ' 'EEQT 1521 I ' D, --I. ,gi I .-4:5 rf:--l-:av 'iii f Qs- 1- -3 Q7 , '-Q, f' -y "T iki ' - 'f ' 1 f f' 'i' 'N MT: , aa., 'i -f' ' ' ' ' V 44,-L4 , bf? 4 -' V f 7? -ff, - FRESHMAN. !'1'a5z'cz'c'7zt.- Clifford Lewis, jr. 1''rZ'.t'c'niJI'C'5l'IfCllf.' Henry Vollmer Register. S661fez'm3f.- Abram Sharpless Valentine .'4lS51'Sf0lZf Sccffefnzgfx joseph Roberts Carpenter, jr. T1feaszc1'e1f.- Ryland NVarri11er Greene. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: Charles Louis Borie, jr., C7zczz'1fma1z, Edwin Stauffer Gault, Henry Chapman Thayer, Albert Bartrani Kelley, Charles Nieoll Bancker Camac. 26 Il C. MEMBERS OF THE CLASS. ARTS. Walter Barclay. john Harold Brockie. Charles Nicoll Bancker Camac. joseph Roberts Carpenter, jr. Fletcher Cornelius Clay. Thomas Luther Coley. Harry Warren Cook. Robert Morris Darrach. William Duane. Samuel Rulon Earl. . joseph Williams Fell. Rev. William Alexander Ferguson. Edwin Stauffer Gault. Ryland Warriner Greene. Carl -Friedrich Haussmann, jr. Albert Bartram Kelley. George Washington Kendrick, 3d. , SCIENCE. Eugene Beauharnais Beaumont, Jr., Charles Louis Borie, jr. Frank Bern-adou Bower. William Lund Clampifer. Harry Grantham Colesberry, Edward William Coon. Francis Thibault Cross. Charles james Dougherty. john Warner Grigg Dunn. Charles Bower Early. Homer Watton Edwards. Albert Egbert. ' Samuel Fleisher. ' Percival Vaisey French. Edward Robert Green. Frank Tracy Griswold. Frank Thomson Gucker. Arthur Hagen, jr. Frank Bacon Hancock. Albert Lawrence Harris. Clinton Gardner Harris. Wilmer Worthington Hoopes. William Stewart Jamison. Harry Elwood Keller. Augustus Otto Koenig. Addison Farwell Lansing. ' George Edmunds Lawrence. Charles Trumbull Lee. joseph Hunter Lewis. jay Bucknell Lippincott. Clifford Lewis, Jr. William Weaver Lukens. Clifton Maloney. Archibald McCullagh, Jr. William Stuart Morris. Charles Thornton Murphy, jr. Matthew Patton. Harry Vollmer Register. Ulysses Simpson Schaul. Francis Steenbergen Schmucker William Reese Scott, jr. Harry Bismarck Sobernheimer. Arthur Conover Thomson. William Budd Trites, jr. Ernest Macdowel Vail. Clarence Russell Williams. Thomas Luke. Clayton McElroy. Howard Ware Middleton, jr. john Kaufman Mohr. Charles Francis Morton. Frank Muhr. Willis McCall Myers. Richard Marshall N ewlin. William K. Orton. Samuel Davis Parry. Franklin Peale Patterson. Faustino Apolonio Perez. Alonzo Willoughby Platt. Samuel Kingsley Probasco. john Barclay Stevenson Rex. Henry Hansell Ritter. Adolph George Rosengarten. Walter Rowland. Louis Raymond Shellenberger. Henry Simons Shillingford. Owen Louis Shinn. William Emil Snyder. james Alexander Stewart. Harry Chapman Thayer. Adam Clarke Thompson. Abram Sharpless Valentine. joseph Wood Wagner. Karl Albert Walraven. Olin Leslie West. Samuel Bowman Wheeler. -.-:--'-"' 'i! V-Y-'r,g,,,4,--f1fA 'W IV Benjamin ivtutnlauli Wilma, t Died October 29th, 1885. i i WHEREAS, It has pleased Almighty God, in His infinite Wisdom, suddenly to Withdraw from our midst our beloved classmate, 2 i BENJAMIN ROXVLAND MILNES, 1 . i' Whose sterling uprightness and manly character rendered him esteemed and respected by allg therefore be it ' Resolved, That the class of ,89 deeply deplores the loss of one of gl 1 1 1 i its best members, whose many excellent qualities of heart and mind have endeared him to all of his associates even in the short i time God has permitted him to be with us. Resolved, That these resolutions' be printed in the P67Z7ZSjll7!6Z7ZZ'LZ7Z and a copy sent to the bereaved parents, with our sincere sympathy. s i A EDWARD WARLOCH MUMFoRD,' I CHARLES NEWTON CLEMENT BROWN, Commzitee. 2 WALTER Scorr, i 28 nm, lim - of md .oft iam ny. ee. -'ffff-'-Mun ' , ,f -ef- . 'A , I .Q f-,, X x N :I J ll' - thx? -15-: -I - , Z: jo 12:1 I-X1 I.--'V , i :-'- -, ,,v rl, H11 Ii ' M I A , .,--. Huw v i 2 X -:- Ao.. f - , . - ' Clqesinut S1 Qpera house X .V ' . : "'U , H--Illt"" hmyrlllll I Ll: WW HM: II HH' I tv.-ef' , ' X 1 I I 1 L' A :Q E f I H HMM' .Z ff I 2 -5: 'Ei ' -fn 'n HF !' '1' 'Ji J' N ,f .JP Q, W, - ' ' ' ' lip-, ' I , 1, nf, -Y-3' ,, , i- IJWW Jsffyq -A...Jw ,,, f , ' 'W'-4 A - ,.-,uf - , fn ---- . .1 'JA E 'Mff-ww .1 '1 . ,,,f W" , mr . f - ff X 2:- 5 3' If ,f ' F I.. 1' II In X b 'lv 4 "' " ff ,!'f f' X P' 'f 1 li" If I yu: lfll- gl Ig N , .. , 11 X A I 1159 f I ..- I X I 1 ' ' N I y IIX 1 I f ff 5 4 H' June 4th, 1889. '-, E Q ' f Class Q Dug G xemses . 17, . , dj vxormnnma , 4 if if OVERTURE, H -. I-1ass1e11's Orrehestrfa' 3 q I ' E ENTRANCE OF THE CLASS I., PRESIDE1S1'I"S sHmJ'rn'roRY, E I W . 'Edward Ulanloeh TCDUITITQFG gf! f H jvluslc 3 , HIE I-IISTORY, Chas. Peter Beauchamp Jeiieuys, J11. 'WH MUSIC X ll POECI1, H -- Ellis Paxson Obetfholtlzev f .IVIUSIC . . I 5 vm' 4- ,Nl 37: I!" IW PROP!-IECY, ' -1 Clinton Rogers Uloodrfuff Music PRESENTATIONS, Rudolph I-locuarfd Klauderf CDHNTDE ORHTIOISI, Daniel Bussierf Shumway MUSIC A : nl . Il l Q' 1 Q 9 l I1 I out AM if hu -I Eff A , .I IQ? E X Q in m um aiu 1 my gm! x W lu! W ,,ua!lHf -, : . -E: --t-- Yugrm--,, f-- , :.m:k,,,p..-J.2,.,- --, f - ,f ' ' 2'-11? - V .-. -'E-2-mm-.Ea-ii, "Tf.T.a5---5-iff.,i'1:,T L---fa M . , ..., .,. .. .. .,,. -:-jf- 1' 1,15 f Hy- - 5,. . In ,. , e u gm ,yl 'xl N V w -I C J M ' 2' fi he . , T ,, :ff 4:f:f:f,4-wg,-,f . . .-,,:.,,, ", ' ff 4,45f " ' '55, 1 I X ff NY ,f H' WT' E- .X X iff Xx X" E WM M To T T E T an E X 1 - e I" V X X ffl: K- ,ly 555. X- -nj fi. fl ' 5'- - 4 Ill , - , fe A ' g !,, 4- ff?N :LI .3 L -.x ju!g-- ,!1gxk.VN,,-fY..- --if , S in ' 4.7 5 T' T I R-sh ' - ak Qs, A iff" mi X .4 Ealing 'Q r Wh. yx , X P+-. -. T- X E 1 , . 7 N x. I s f:-T I f X 1 ' .,, f 1 , I f W ' ' ' , 'A ' 1 ,- 16212- frzf w mtl he -A N A ,ID N- ---. r M, lu - M ! 29 elec- in the position. Woody, you see, got Stewart, Henderson and a few other politician f ' ' U s o the Class to secure his appointment on the -Executive Committee in order that he might brin h' ' I g is influence to bear in maintaining the Prophecy upon the programme of our Class D . . ay exercises. He intended, of course, eventually to fill the posi- tion himself. Things worked tohis entire satisfaction and Woody " got there," as you are shortly to be made painfull awar - - y e. - There were two nominations at that Class meeting for Historian. Mumford tried to smooth the way for his partner in the dr ug, essay, political history and McMaster business, by creating the new office f M o antle-Orator, and then endeavoring to persuade me that it was. a much more desirable office, and much more in my line than that f Cl i o ass Historian. Now, although Ihave a great res ect for V P my president's opinions in general, I beg to differ with him both in his opinion of the importance of McMaster and of this new office wh' h ic his fancy has created. Being a Philadelphian, and living, like A h' T ' ' rc 16 homson, on the south side of Walnut Street, and -a half square nearer to Walnut Street than Chick Frazier, I am naturally cons t' ' ' erva ive, and hold to the opinion that " all that's old is beauti- ful " CFrazier, Thomson and I all make an exception in favor of the f . . air sexj. The History had more charms for me than the Mantle- Oratorship. Other considerations also influenced me I talked ith T d w e dy Mumford concerning his ideas of the oflice of Mantle- Orator. I am very fond of pretending to take a great interest in his t h ' ' ' pe sc emes , it makes him feel so very " Warlochyf' QThat is a word which we have coined out of Teddy's middle name, which name h ' e is very proud of.j I soon came to the conclusion that I was not suniciently athletic to be the Class Mantle-Orator. Accord- ing to Tedd 's t' ' ' ' ' y no ions, which you will observe- Danielo Bussier Shumway Qwho is Rennert's modern pol 'lot et d h h ' yg p ,an wo asthe three languages of his descent, Italian, French and German repre- sented in his three namesj has not carried out the Mantle Orat , - or would be expected -to bring over from the University and present h . ere to you for your notice one of the chapel benches, the corner-' stone of the new Library Building, Jackson, Pomp and Mumford h' I imself. Only those who have turned the chapel benches around 'I . A ticles for an orchestra concert know what one of those lumbersome ar h wei hs. As I have said, I did not consider myself eligible to SUC g , . an athletic undertaking as was involved in the new office of Mantle- Orator. I resolved therefore to accept the nomination of Historian and to run against Sam Lindsay for the office. Although I had 'EO encounter the fierce opposition of Mumford's influence and do with- out his moral support, the result of the election brings me here to-day to try and acquaint you with the Hz'5!01gf M Zhe People of Ezghzjv-jVz'1ze. I have used this title advisedly, for since MV. Green, Iliff. McMaster and Professor Francis Newton Thorpe, Ph.D., Lecturer on Civil Government in the University of Pennsylvania, etc., etc., have written their great histories, adopting such titles as the H History of the English People," the " History of the People of the United States," and the "Government of the People of the United States," one no longer hopes to gain the popular ear by writing histories of kings, of battles and of events. Were I writ- ing a history based upon such an old-fashioned plan, I should only have to speak of the noble deeds of Mumford, Lindsay and Frazier, and to tell you of how they have always ruled the Classg and of the less noble but none the less heroic deeds of Thomson, Forbes and Scott, how they attempted to but did not rule the Class. There are a few other men in the Class besides these six worthies, whose careers present points of interest, and as I am writing of the People Wt flze Class cyf '89, I shall have occasion to refer incidentally to one or two other less shining lights than the noble six Qhundred, in their own estimationj. I shall doubtless have occasion to men- if tyvoc battles, such as a bowl-iight which we had with a H o o cllows in our Freshman Year and our cremation 3 ,with another tough lot. But on the whole I promise you that I shall have to do more especially with the individualmembers of the Class of l89, ' chance to foroiet it" ,A - p ease .put lt In early and give you 3 l ,D while recounting the doughty deeds of others. NOW' Just note the PfiCkiI1gS Of a guilty conscience in this request. 'W l', I . - -, - . . . e 1 do not nnnd beginning with Lindsay, to please him, but I - 32 do not promise not to allude to the Chinese Historian again before I get through. You will remember that I have just told you that there were two candidates for the office of Class Historian. Lindsay was the other fellow, and perhaps you will regret that he was not the successful candidate before I get through QI am quite sure that he will regret it if you do notj. The only objection to our champion of Chinese immigration Qyou have only to look at Sam's sallow visage to know why he advocates the importation of Chinese labor, he expects to go to work himself some dayj is the peculiarity which induced Klauder not to vote for him for Historian. Klauder says that when Sam talks to you he rolls his mouth and tongue around to such an alarming extent as to make his hearers positively dizzy. Sam never closes his mouth, even when he is asleep listen- ing to McMaster lectureg he always looks as if he-were trying to hear with his mouth, and they do say he can hear what is going on around him when he is fast asleep. Sam is the most enthusiastic advocate of the dormitory system, but he has his own views on the subject. He thinks that hammocks might be swung in every lecture room and thus avoid the expense of putting up new build- ings. It is Sam's peculiar way of rolling his mouth and tongue around in speaking which Klauder thinks reminds one ,of the Rankine valve-gearing. His mouth is the socket of the elbow- joint and his tongue the ball of the joint. Klauder, whom our Prophet will tell you is to be the rising mechanical ,engineer of Philadelphia, has gotten many ideas for new forms of gearing from the motions of Lindsay's mouth. If Sam would only roll the two .parts of his oratorical valve-gear according to ,true mechanical principles, that is, if he would move his tongue and his lips in the same direction, theresult of listening to him would not be so try- ing to one's nervous sensibilities. But he rolls his mouth around in one direction and his tongue in another, then his animated nose has a sort of little intermediary twist upon it, and all this complicated piece of oratorical mechanism makes the listener feel as if he were trying to do U pigs in clover." So Klauder and others declined to vote for Lindsay, and he was not the successful candidate, although, like Woodruff, he was on the Executive Committee. I shall try to 33 .d- ln- nu .ot er- lot of ar- see gh l of iat ble atc. sor in 2 of he Q ,ten the 1 fi ass, the We :ted are ee'S llily CCY on- ain the e SC' sad f ' ' N MW Mx . ps: 447 tn J V9-.I wh I, , - 0 fr, flll ', i f - ii, wig :,'l1.liIrnL'Q .3 n 'li r -f Wfllillhl ' 'ff Ili fl it li 4 lil ., .illi il -:. 7 . .2 1 fllhfim 1f ff1..T5'-L l -ma' De Lancey's hands were soft and white , His face was smooth and fair 5 ' His manners were the most polite, He never learned to swear. ' ' In short, he was not cut out for a baseball player. Lancey had a warm friend in the Class who took the deepest interest in his welfare. His mentor would often remonstrate with the wayward boy and represent to him that while he might, if he chose, be an ornament to the class-room, hecould never hope to shine as a base- ball diamond. But Lancey never felt prouder than when he had donned his baseball uniform with the insignia of his Class on the left breast and his own monogram on the right. Week by week he fell back in his classes, and daily his mentor chid him, but all to no purpose. Then his friend appealed to his class feeling. H How would he like it if the figures on his breast should vanish and in their places should appear the figures '9o? This idea seemed to touch him. A mist came over his eyes, and he seemed to see the baleful ligures suggested by his friend before his eyes. But the glittering baseball diamond. lured him on, like the " bracelet of Lilith." He rushed headlong adown the path of destruction until he fell into .the jaws of-990. Lancey was always very popular with us and is altogether a capital fellow. He is at present one of the 35 careering in a manner most unbecoming in a person of his years. Most of us, however, did nothing especially brilliant until we went to school. When we came out to the University in june, 188 5, it was evident that most of us were possessed of considerable knowledge and that we had come in order to acquire more. '89 has always been - a studious Class. Jack Geary and Davy Pacheco, whose careers commenced and ended within the same year, were notable exceptions. The only things that Davy ever did in college were to get dropped from ,88 into ,89 and to try to teach "jake," Sadtler's assistant, how to pronounce his name. "jake" was not especially bright. Sadtlerv seldom entrusted him with any more exacting work than the calling of the roll. During the early part of Sopho- more Year Davy did not appear in Sadtler's room, but entrusted the answering of his name to some of his most particular friends. One day "jake" called Pacheco's name and Barklie Henry answered briskly, " Here! " "jake H looked up inquiringly and said " Mr. Pachiquioe, do I pronounce your name correctly? " There was an appalling stillness, and then it came out that Davy had not been to Sadtler's lectures for a month. Of course the 'matter was investi- gated, and the next day Davy surprised us by appearing in the room with the rest of the Class. When Sadtler expressed his surprise and satisfaction at seeing Davy, the latter said that he had under- stood that the authorities wished to know how to pronounce his name and that he had come to tell them. So to"'Jake's 'I inquiry as the whether " Pachiquioe " was the proper way to pronounce it, Davy replied, "No, sir, I call it "Pakayho.', For a week Davy corrected "Jake H every day and gave him each time a new pronun- ciation. Finally it began to dawn on "Jake's " dull mind that Davy was having a good' time at his expense, even if he was not learning anything by coming regularly to Sadtler's lectures for a wholepweek. So one Monday morning " Jake H said solemnly and with much offended dignity, " Mr. --, ahem, I shall take the liberty of using my own judgment hereafter and shall call you Pa- dzeek-oh. If this be not the correct way to pronounce your name, it certainly suits you admirably." Davy's feelings were so hurt that he never appeared in Sadtler's room again. Of course we all -took 37 11' Iwi All ids. 1 if all ill' lt! '1 l , V ii i 'x ,zi l ,i V+, I 1 .,1 1 ill ,il Hill gfiil ii Jf fl 1, Q .V F lf 3212 IP is .l gi 1 , ii 4 l V :H i. if all Qi 24, n , H 1 , in ' i V, 'lv 'fini V: ,w il ,' nil' 165 41 HQ 351, r . all 1.1 M. ,-il HQ, lil ii" ig if A1, i, if P 1 5 fl! I. .W ,Ill lj' ,. 1 5.l 'i I ii 1 ff I iii' 31 ,W I i.l 'g G d Dav f was ever thereafter called f'Pa-cheek-oh." The it up' an 5 L ' ' ounced so mortification of having his name continually m1sprO11 worked upon his mind that he fled from the University and haS never been heard of since. A A d. There were one or two minor exceptions to the general stu 1C1lS- ness of the Class, and these choice spirits were the ones who revived for a short time the custom, inaugurated by '87 and perpetuated by '88, of importing live-stock into chapel for the amusement of the Class of '88 and of a few Freshmen. I do not suppose there has ever been written a class history which has not contained some account of disgraceful disturbances in chapel. The better element in '89 frowned upon the two or three disturbances of our Freshman Year, since which time there has been but one repetition of them. A ,Q2 man brought a dog into chapel this 'year which it was hoped would afford no inconsiderable amusement. But the dog ran con- fidingly up to jackson, and he picked it up in his arms and carried it out as if it had been his own pet lap-dog. The class of '88 took such an interest in the chicken affair of our Freshman Year and deported themselves so childishly that they quite turned the tide of suspicion upon themselves. VVhen Ab Smith found that the sentiment of the Class of '89 was opposed to further inportations of live-stock into chapel he laid a deep plot for creating a disturbance in chapel all upon his own hook. He never said aword to any member of the Class about what he intended to do, but went around collecting ten cent sub- scriptions in the Class, sa.ying that he was going to do something for the honor of the Class. W' e did not know Ab then as well as we know him now, and so we shelled out our dimes with remarkable Lngenuousness. weeks went by, and that was the last we ever eard of Ab Smith s scheme. It finally leaked out that Ab had Changed -his mind. Guy Fawkes had abandoned his plot. His original intention had been to purchase an alarm clock with these funds, and then setting it at ten o'clock to suspend it from the roof In me Chapel 'llhat clock now stands upon the mantle-shelf of the rooms of the Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity. Of Coufse YOHT hiSfOrian is expected to 'chronicle the deeds of 38 the brawn of the Class as well. as of the brains. So we will leave Ab Smith for the present. It would not be wise to dwell too much upon the athletic events of our first year at the University. Not being especially athletic myself, although I have always taken no small interest in this importantbranch of the College curri- culum, I asked Frazier what was the reason our football team made so poor a record in Freshman Year. He attributes it directly and solely to the fact of his not having been elected captain of the team. ' Frazier came to college to be captain of our team, and we, of course, understand his disappointment. But theres were other aspirants for the position. Tommy Hulme was one of them. When we were taking our entrance examination in Eng- lish in june, 188 5, Tommy, who happened to be sitting next to me, said, "Say, do you know anything about the trial of the Seven Bishops? You look pretty old, I guess you have read pretty much everything, haven't you ? " I must say I did not know exactly whether to feel Hattered or not. Remember I was a Freshman. But seeing that it was kindly meant, I told him all I knew about James II, the Declaration of Indulgence and the trial of the Bishops. Then I said, " I guess you will come out all right, as the Bishops did, because McElroy is not quite the old Cerberus that King james was? Tommy seemed n to take heart and to feel considerably encouraged. I told him that I was glad to have been able to help him, because I felt sure that he had put most of his preparation on his other examinations. " Well, to tell the truth," said Tommy, ingenuously, " my strong point is playing football 3 I'1n not much at studying, but I played dandy football up at Mt. Holly, and I ex- pect to get to be captain of the Class team here, and after that cap- tain of the college team, and I am going to teach the fellows here how to play football." But, alas, Tommy " was born 'I and "blushed unseen" for the first year. Our football team for that period must therefore be spoken of only in whispers. The best thing we did in the way of athletics in Freshman Year was to make a draw of the bowl-iight, and then to show sufficient moral courage to declare that the new rules which had been introduced into the fight had made such a farce of the whole affair that it would be far 39 1 good enough for him and went to La Fayette, Palen, Oliver, Tyson and Walkly got tired and left without giving the authorities any satisfactory reason, Bob Reaney left in order to freely mingle in West Philadelphia society, and Van Buskirk went into the Medical Department Z0 stuffy. We had scarcely gotten into harness again at college when our football team was organized and put under the careful supervision of Darby. We played our first game with '88 on the 27th of September, and administered a crushing defeat to the heavier but less. skillful juniors. The Freshmen were defeated 24 to o. Hulme commenced playing for the University a few weeks after this, and has steadily risen through the ranks until he has attained the goal of his sub-Freshman ambition. Tommy has filled the position of captain of the College team most efficiently and satisfactorily. He has proved one of the most popular of our Uni- versity captains abroad, and it is largely owing to his tact and b07Zfl0.77ZZ.8 that our relations with La Fayette are so pleasant, and that the foolish spirit of animosity which existed for so long a time between the two colleges in all their athletic encounters has en- tirely disappeared. '89 has always had lirst-class cricketers in her ranks. There is Walter Scott, who has been on every kind of a championship team, class, University, local club, all-Philadelphia and international, and Walter always does his share of the kind of work that wins the game. Archie Thomson, too, is a U man with a record." Bob and George Hill, Oliver, Knight, Worrall, Guggen- heim, Taylor, Forbes and Frazier have all had a hand in adding to the cricket laurels of the Class. We have had some of the best track athletes in college too. Our runners are innumerable: Baker, Hulme, Frazier, Mumford, Knight and Taylor have all shown their heels for the glory of '89, Pearly Chamberlain is our great foot- pad. He succeeded Tommy Grier of '86 fame, and has never had a peer since '86 was graduated. ' The first representation of the Acharnians was given in May of our Freshman Year. The glories and honors and encomiums which it brought to Alma Mater are now matters of history. Old Penn's praises have been seen in class Records and class histories since those stirring times, and we can add nothing to the testimony of . 41 We 'fl PE i 4 6 1 I z. 5. l E V. .W I ilvi. Qs. is " 4 g-' li .plli 4 MH!! , . 1 r V .i I,- ., ,X , if Q., F- uw Il . -iii ' I .ma i i M .f " .-L nil iQ L , ' 1 2 'L il , . n i. l '4 n I FI i il .iii ' A T ri W - .fl i, .S lf? l if it is -Wi ffl 'iflf I lla I Q, '. vxligli a'i1 X, fialillfi :Ti wa W VW wlm FSH' Lf'l'i Twill-I MW Vi Ll' if :li T 5,3 . W :H 2 T 5-5 lv? ill ' . T l Q l ' T fl i T! fi f i 'il J l . :lil .,.., f ed in both the others, excePt to SSW that ,39 was Wen represent Philadelphia and the New York performances. From '82 thsetllce were in the Greek Play cast Brown, Walter Scott and Lloy, SCO ' Frazier, Knigl1t,jefferys, Dick Miller, Keen, I-fepburn, Wiltbankci Newlin, Forbes, Mumford, Bell, L111dS3Yr Mltcheu' Orem an Gearglir Sophomore Supper was a funny affair, which is as it should be, since Sophs are funny fellows anyhow. It ought to have been called a pic-nic, but it was called a supper, only because it was in a hotel, instead of out of doors, and we all sat around a table, except Frazier, who sat under it. Chick said he thought it was a pic-nic, and he wanted to sit on the ground to make it more realistic. The vzama was fair, and the speeches, all except Bobby Stulb's fwhich was decidedly pic-Qhicj-nic-yj were good. But the waiters were fresh, and their shirt-bosoms and the table linen were decidedly the reverse. The remains of a former pic-nic were visible around the room. I forbear to mention where this supper was held, as the proprietor of the hotel said he would buy a dozen copies of the RECORD if I would keep mum. Sadtler and Schelling were present at the supper to represent the honorable Faculty. Sadtler told us that if he had that table-cloth out at college, he could show us how to bleach it with chlorine. We doubted his ability to do it. Schelling responded to the toast of "Alma Mater", in a neat little speech of forty-five minutes, and told us that it was 'fquite right" that we should enjoy ours-elves on a festive occasion like the present, but that we should never forget the respect we owed to our Alma Mater. A grunt of disapproval coming from Frazier under the table was the only recognition which this sentiment seemed to call forth from the Class. This pet expression of Schelling's " quite right," recalls to mind our efforts SO enliven those .hours of Sophomore Year which we were obliged to Srag out in reciting on McElroy's Sfffzacizwe fyf English Pyfggg, Ab mith used to get up pools on the number of times Schelling would Say "quite right 3' in the course of the hour. Brooke and Smith were the largest takers in these pools, and we used to Watch their expressions with unbounded interest and amusement as these trite ! 42 lhe are rt, 14, nd it to .se a it ure by he are ale 'as .en 118 ty. he iis na us . a get val .ch Jet rts to Ab 1ld ith eir ite expressions would fall one upon the other from the lips of our beloved instructor. One day it came to pass that Smith and Brookie had arranged a pool in which they were alone interested. The stakes were enormous, running up into the hundreds. If Schelling said "quite right" less'than a score of times, Smith would be ruined, if he said it a greater number of times than a score, Smith would rake in the pool and Brookie would appear in Bradstreet's. he excitement was intense. The wonder of the year came to pass that day. Every fellow was well prepared, and Schelling scarcely got a chance to talk at all. Smith grew pale. He tried to ply Schelling with questions. But, alas, Smith was not prepared himself, and everything that he asked Schelling was, as usual, " quite wrong." Only thirteen times did the magic words fall from Schel1ing's lips g every fellow's tally agreed. These were golden words for Brookie. He swept the board. Since that day Brookie has been the monied man of the Class. He has been the back-bone of every college enterprise where wealth and aristocracy were the essentials. It isnot my intention to sing his praises, to tell of his generosity and his readiness to be up andsdoing for his Alma Mater, your Poet has accomplished all this better than I could ,hope to do. As for Ab Smith, he has never retrieved his fallen fortune. To anticipate somewhat-a little incident which occurred in Senior Year will show how the one indiscretion of his Sophomore Year blighted Abts future prospects. When Ab was approached by -the Class Memorial Library Fund Committee for his subscription, he said sadly, " the only way to get anything out of me is toudraw up a petition to my paternal parent." Henderson tells me that this was actually done. - It was in November, 1887, that the University Gun Club was reorganized, officers elected, and everything. done to make it a per- manentand active organization. Ab Smith took an interest in the Gun Club from the start, and his connection with it has been most honorable and creditable, both to his Class and to his Alma Master. He has always held important offices in the club, and has been for two years the crack shot on the team. " Great oaks from little acorns grow," and you will certainly be interested in hearing some- 43 thing about the acorn from , . 1 1 is ,L 7 ff V ' '- fl X1 I f Q E' 57 . ' 5 fflfl. Q If-fi: V' , f - garb .:395.'g51gf51:9.4' . ,za , iq jf. V , ,-- 8' , , ,A N beg f f- ., r'j'5 ,,l .55-.-1 - i - a K 1 " . . ff, . , . A -, . x, PE 1 7? A , al. ' i X Q , yn ,fm H n li' . X 5 -,-- 'I M xrumx l52?vp...,, ve ' Tu 53. - .' v-wigffxgflsiqjg inc l- S I which sprouted Ab Smith's early slzoois. The accompanying illustration, drawn by a pupil of the celebrated artist, M. Nimmo Moran, is almost self-eXplana- tory. The artist has not attempted to reproduce Smithjs classic featuresg to do this would require a Vandyke, but Ab has a striking form, and we recog- nize him at a glance. The story is soon told. Back from Smith's house at Ab- ington stretches a vast moor dotted with- a few clumps of stunted trees. Here are. several rabbit warrens. Smith aspired from his infancy to be a sportsman and could be seen very frequently returning across the moor. He never came back empty-handed. He always brought in one rabbit and sometimes more. He was acquiring an ever-increas- ing reputation as a "crack shot," when in an evil day fthe day after the dreadful affair of the Schelling poolj he told the little darkey who was his cimssemf, and who supplied Smith with the rabbits, that he would thereafter give him only five cents a piece for them, instead of the customary fifteen cents. Sambo immediately struck, and to revenge himself on Smith, he told all Abington how it was he who had done all the shooting. Smith vowed that he would show the world that he could shoot a rabbit if he chose. He came to the city and bought a live rabbit at the fancier's, and taking it home, tied it to a tree. He marked a bullet, that the world might know that he had done the deed, and then took aim at the rabbit. He fired, cut the string with which the rabbit was tied 3 the rabbit made off, and Smith gave up live shooting and took to clay pigeon shooting. Smith could not shoot rabbits, but he can shoot clav pigeons, as Harvard men can testify. J Our .Cremation was held on the sixth of june. It was in the iillilclqf S31 lrzzzfo-rief and was avery effective affair. Dougherty's A . , iathei his want of speech, was particularly effective, it Was, 1.11 ff'-Cf, most affecting. He emphasized his remarks by repeat- mg hw Whole SPeeCh thmugh twice. Dougherty is so used to being Y y Y O 4-4 Skoois, drawn st, M, Plalla. fed '50 TSS to Er, but recog- s soon it Ab- l with :re are v be a as the ght in creasg ie day arkey s, that lstead md to e who W the e city. Lied it tat he d, cut If, and ntillg- is, HS the 1fty'5 eg it peat- eing efzcoffecz' in the Banjo Club that he takes an mcozfe very easily, even when he is making a speech. Dougherty is one of our good foot- ball players. Unlike Frazier and Hulme,Doc. never played the game until he came to college. His first experience in foot-ball was gained under the most trying circumstances, and nearly cost him his life. He went out to Media to see the game between '89 and the Media Academy. We were short of players when we got out there, and Doc. was prevailed upon to put on foot-ball clothes and play dummy in the game. But that kind of thing does not suit him, and he determined to make the opposing team feel his weight, even if he did not know the game. The opposite rush-line was made up of a lot of hoosiers from Wayback, and the way they handled the belligerent but inexperienced Dougherty was most cruel. Doc. spent the remainder ofthe week in bed, but when he returned to college he knew how to play foot-ball. . . In the introductory lecture tothe Science men of the Class in February, 1887, Professor Barker, after speaking of the Course in Physics upon which we were about to enter and of his methods of teaching, told us in very plain but impressive language what we might expect of him and what he expected of us. There was noth- ing really dictatorial or dogmatic in his remarks, and most of the Class were deeply impressed with the force and fairness of all that he said to us, but the irrepressible Menah, at the conclusion of Pro- fessor Barker's solemn and impressive remarks, and amid .the pro- foundest stillness, said, in the most sepulchral voice, "Amen," We did not know whether to applaud or to deprecate his action. I really believe he did not intend to make a disturbance, but was simply giving vent to his feelings. I think there is little doubt but that the Class felt the force of Barker's remarks and adopted his straightforward way of looking at the relations between pro- fessor and student, because I do not think the Department of Physics 'ever had a complaint to make against '89, This is something which cannot be said of most of our predecessors. Why, we never found Barker the Meat-Axe, the Cerberus, that he was pictured to us before we got into his room. Not a bit of it. We used to have our joke there as well as in other rooms, and Barker would often 45 VII f Meiji '1 ,, II Il? 1 I II I - ? 5 1 ' , I , . .J , 1 I. II i,' j 1 11: f ,1 i 1 ,, . 11 ' I III I, , ' 1 1 I I 1 If I I I . I I 1 - "WL . . ,, 1 w,I .1 Tiillli I IIUI I I"1 L1 4 ,' ily!! 'v V1 I HMI 1.1 'Ij1:I I1 -UI I ,Ili II -11' TTI 21. I' 1' 11 11 I11 , iI 71' ' Ii II IIE II 11' I I I 1, ,O 1 . 1-I 1 . I 'I' . 11, 111 112 MII Ii II M Iii, Ii YI 111' .1 IQ' I 11 .1111 III .-1 I, 3 I1 ISI II: 1 vi 2' 151 11111-1 211 MIII 3' "'l1f VI 131 A' 111 '11 1 1 11' gpg,-,I rig 119 .15 I if IV. II :fr 'II 1I,1 V1-'II 111 I. 2.1 l. 1 II . 1,11 II ' 'fl 3 . :I , iii g LIL Il -"I1 il I IJ 1 ,I 5 1 II' 11 WI 1 , . . I 1 'III 1 1fI , . r,. 11 1 1 I . I , U1 1 .1 . .,, II ,I 1 .1 1 II ' 1 1? . I j zI',I 1 N , I, - 1 1 1 I 1,4 I ' 'I 1. Q flfl I "1 1 ' 1 1 , 1, 1 ',I 11 1 111 ,1 1 I 11. 1 I I I 1 0111 with us. I remember one time g it was a dull, hot CIHY1 and aut, ' s G d' ed was sound we were all feeling pretty stupid. Bven oo spe 1 l in the back part of the room, and Barker was especially . ' ee . iliiduligent. Barker asked Mumford what force was measured 111. Mumford replied, " in units of force," and gave their names : dynei poundals, etc. Then Barker turned to Klauder and asked him if he thought light could be measured, and, if so, how. Klauder did not know anything about the subject, but he is equal to any emer- gency, as you will note in a few minutes, and he replied to Barker's question, " Certainly, there are units of light, and they are meas- ured by gas metersf' We all laughed, and Barker joined heartily in the laugh, too. Barker's terrorism is all a myth. At least, if it exists at all, it is all in the first part of his name, it extends no deeper. His bark is very much worse than his bite. jackson is another Professor who has been misrepresented by hosts of Class historians. jackson has been made the butt of scores of jokes. But just as Barker's bark is worse than his bite, so I have always found that jackson's but! was much worse than his bite. jackson never refused but one request of mine, and that was in connection with my work on the new Matriculate and Alumni Catalogue. He positively declined to tell me his greatJgrandfather's first wife's maiden name. But at the same time he very courteously added that he had no objections to my getting the information from some other quarter. I have always supposed that that lady's name was Smith or jones, but I have forborne to make further inquiries. One day I was in Burk's room trying to get some information about the early history of the Washi1igto11's Birthday Celebration at the University. Mr. Burk could not tell me all I wanted to know, but said that jack- son doubtless knew all about it. Professor Jackson. came into the room while we were speaking, and Mr. Burk said, "Ah, Professor, Xf iSffer5Shw1shesMto ask you a question? To which jackson C, H , es, - . 1 ' . - 33 HZ doubtldss stilltliiiiifliififg Lsfiimat fellow to at qualms' A 1 great-grandfather's first w1fe's maiden name. .Nevertheless like Androcles in the Menagerie Song, I put my head in the lion's mouth, and to depart somewhat ffgfn the simile, the lion told me all he knew. The lion was inogt affable 46 day, and IS Sgund SP9Cially sured in' I dynes, 1 him if uder did 13' Emer- Barkers re meas. healtily ast, if it ends no :kson is of Class f jokes. always Iackson lnection ie. He 1 wifels led that ie other s Smith ine day le early versity. ttjack- nto the wfessof, acks0I1 tions." jWifC'S :Songf r from affflble and communicative, and told me more about the history of the University in an hour's chat than I could have gathered from others in a year. ' ' I will tell you a little incident that happened in Sadtler's room in Sophomore Year. It is really too good not to be repeated. Rudy Klauder was one of the principals and " Our Bobby " was the other. They were talking about the arrangements for a box party which they were going to give. They were discussing what girls to ask. Stulb suggested .Miss T. "Oh, nof' said Klauder, "I know she won't go." " What's the reason she wonlt go ?" replied Bobby, "she'll go 'anywhere with me, why, she's just wild over mek' I always intended to ask Klauder if Miss T. went to that box party, but I have never done so. - George Brooke was always the central attraction in Seiden- sticker's room. I think Seidy enjoyed some of Brooke's inimitable translations, and I know we did immensely, His reading of the German text was a rare treat too. 'Let me give you a specimen: we were reading Minna von Barnhelrn with Seidy, and George got the following passage, which he read as follows : I Suit. CUghD fliieie qehj Igaben Sie Cuh-ughb nocb nicht Cahem,-ughb gebraucbt? fllh-Hgh? Elltein sgerr, mit teh,-Srl biefen fbnnen G5ie Cuh-ughj macfpen ma? Cer-uh-U-ghb Qte mot: Cer-uhh Ien. CST, Qluf maine fer-er-uh- Ughb Elierantmortung Cahemj. I ' I have read this much more rapidly than Brookie is accustomed to read. This particular passage of two and a half lines he took just eight and a quarter minutes to read. When he got through reading, Seidensticker said, with his pleasant smile and soft insinu- ating voice, " Reallee, Meester Brouk, you must. acq-quire a leetle more,-fluency in reading." This recalls to ,my mind another scene which was of almost daily occurrence in Seidensticker's room. Seidensticker got to assigning pretty long lessons before the term was over. He would say, " Gentlemen, you may take the next seven pages." This announcement would be followed by a general exclamation from the members of the class in chorus. Then Cresson would always say, ff Oh, Professor! " To this heart- rending appeal Seidensticker would invariably reply, " Mr. Cresson, you need not study the last page." ' 47 Before I bring my Souvenirs Of Our .IOHY Sophomore Year to a close, I must givs you a couple of scenes from the drama of life as it was played in Schelling's room. There was Wiltbank, who was never known to make a straight recitation in English. He declared that he could not understand the confounded stuff. That he read it over and over again, and that it meant nothing to him. His notes on Scl1elling's lectures he could not get up for reC1tat1011. Schelling told him repeatedly that his marks in English were very low, and that he would certainly be conditioned. Wiltbank was much troubled, and we advised him to try and commit the notes to memory. He took our advice and sat up all night getting his notes by heart. The next day Schelling called him up. He rose with much alacrity and waited to hear the question, his cherubic coun- tenance wreathed with smiles. Y' Mr. Wiltbanlz, what can you tell us about the Teutonic Mood? " Wiltbank, reciting verbatim from memory, began as follows: "To all the Teutonic languages the following parts of the verb were common from the earliest period of their history." At this point he turned pale, his face became an absolute blank g he gasped, flunked and sat down, amid the cheers of the Class. Smith and Knight were not usually much more suc- cessful in mastering Schelling's work. It seemed to be a failing in the Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity, and the Fraternity, realizing that her sons lacked proficiency in their own mother tongue, founded a prize for the best composition work in the Sophomore Class. Its effects have not as yet been visible, but the Phi Kapps are not dis- couraged. They hope that one of their men will take the prize this year. But to return to Ab -Smith and Ed Knight. They were talking a good deal one day, and otherwise interrupting the recita- tion and disturbing Schelling. He stood it as long as he could. NVe could. all see that he was much annoyed by the frequency of his " rluite rights," his frantic lisping and his slips in speaking. iiiaalflcywhillooked up savagely and said: " Gentlemen, if you want ditign just ieiigipbgi miyl absent-mindedness and perturbed con- nurse ,and teach? 6 , W1 y ou, that I am not-here to act as child- - 1 om. I might be a good child-nurse if I fancied the Calling, but I C10 not care to exercise my talents in that direc- i 48 to 3 life who He Phat him. tion. very was as to iotes with :oun- 1 tell from 5 the ,od of ue an heers 3 suc- ng in g that ded a Its t dis- e this were ecita- ould. f his 1 Want con- hild- ncied ireC' tion at presentg although, if I must-Mr. Smith! Mr. Knight! will you please come to order l" The Class returned from Bar Harbor, from Mount Desert, from the Massachusetts coast, from Long Island, and Brooke returned from Birdsboro' in the Fall of 1887, to find themselves smiling and knowing Juniors. Our list of guomiam members had increased in length somewhat and we saw some new faces among us. Arrison, who had fainted in Freshman Year because Syle asked him if he was a Senior and who had ever afterward felt that-he ought to be one, now left us and joined the ranks of '88, QHe stood his affiliations with that Class for just a twelvemonth and then came back to his first love .Q But I anticipate. Billy Ashhurst could not agree with the College Faculty and determined to try his luck with the Faculty of Medicine 3 jack Geary, disgusted with the effects: of the Brooks' High License'Bill in Philadelphia, left us and went up to Cam- bridge, where he could get " what he wanted, " Billy Page and '87 induced Sam Hepburn to leave college, because it was thought that Sammy would beat Page's record inside of a year Qnow, that's a mean kind of a thing to say, because Billy Page taught Sam all he ever knew about jumping! Well, we'll put the blame on '87 in generalj. Dick Miller would not be hampered by the restrictions imposed on him in one class, so he commenced .in Freshman Year to take hours with the Seniors and juniors. It was ia matter of the most supreme indifference to him as to how many hours of his legitimate roster he cut. His hours finally got to be so scattered around that even jackson himself could not have told you which class Dick was in. He eventually decided that he could not learn 'anything even with the upper classmen, and so he gave up all undergraduatetwork and took only post-graduate courses. At the beginning of the present year he came to the conclusion that there was nothing forlhim to learn at the University, that he knew more than all the professors put together and that he must go where his 4' free thought" could expand. .He expects to represent the Uni- versity of Pennsylvania at the inauguration of the monument to Giordano Bruno, the -great Italian pantheist and free-thinker, at Rome, on next Sunday. Gaunt leftlus too. He never recovered 49 M1 l 3 1 1 ' l ' 1 1 1 2 .1 5 l I i i ' f , 1 , L I 7 1 if . .I .. .I 11, ,llii '11-11 1 1 13 l 1. 'I ifuj j 451 1 .11 1' .11 1 l 55.7.52 f1'1!f 2:11 'l11l 1 1.11. . dwg' it f' 111 H211 "UNE 5 -111 fi uf 5, 1 :fill 1- 11K 111!1' . 5111, H111 . ii 1 .,, 1 li!-. . 1 11 1 -1 . 111 1--1 If Y 11 1... 13' 115 .ce 1. 1. ala' 11. l .11 1, ' 1 11. 1 . .yi 1. 11 1 .,i1 11: 11 I. 1 1 1 . 1 1515.23 Split, 11.13 11l. ,111 A1151 11:1,1l HV," '21Lf? i 'il 1.7. .lvl 1? li? 1fl1 li "gif .1 11 11. f1, .111 f 85-11 it 11 W 11 5. 1 1 iif F11 51i1 Q11 9i'1 11: 1 . 1 Y ' V I ilzl Q from the effects of Bull's admonition in Freshman Yeanu, Gaunt d b in 1 corner fight down-stairs and came up to Bu S TOOH1 ha een C " s , . H d very much flushed, with his coat all torn and minus his co ar an 1 t' Bull wlio was an officer in the navy, asked him in sten- nec 1 ie. , 1 1 1 , , torian tones how he dared to muster on deck in such a condition. Gaunt replied that, while he was aware that a man's shoulder-straps made him somebody in the navy, he never k116W that 3' Collar ma 6 a gentleman. Bull advanced on G with still fewer clothes on his back. Little Howard Crawley grew shorter day by day, and as he found that he could not keep his head above the Class, he gradually sank back out of sight. We found a legacy awaiting us from '88 in the shape of a donation of three men, Starr, Williamson and Savage, the latter was only a temporary loan. W'hile he was with us, however, Savage received so much extra polish and was so much improved by his connection with '89, that when he re-entered '88 at the end of the year he was at once elected spoon-man of the class. The Wharton School re- ceived the greatest additions at this time. Bonsall, Hunsicker, Jaffa, Larzelere, McClure, Stewart, Sullivan, T atem, VVhite and Woodruff, a motley crowd indeed, came among us without as much as saying " with your leave or by your leave? We told them that we would take them on probation. We gave four of them their dismissal before the yearwas overand told the rest they might remain. Those who remained had each some little peculiarity which we did not altogether approve of, and introduced some inno- vations in the Class which were never sanctioned by the old con- servative element. Tatem was from New jersey. He couldn't help it, poor fellow, but he might have had his hair cut and made him- self look a little more civilized. Our objection to Bonsall was on iccounf of his 'gambling habits, Many of us had never seen play- ng-cards before Bonsall. came among us. But he never Came to college without a pack of cards in his pocket. He spent most of ?14S1!fHSSGEs hipurs showing.Ab Smith card tricks. Now this had O.. MiMZ.1lT1.TflfifZZ 52512135 12? would have tate? fun Him if it had not been for the evil iiilflueiave proited by hls instruction, ice of Bonsall. Thorpe seemed aunt, and the latter went home 50 lunt oom and sten- tion. :raps nade rome grew Q his We on of nly a :eived action e was .ol re- icker, e and much n that , their might liarity e inno- d con- lt help e him' 35 011 play' me to 0511 of is had 1 noteS cti011, -eeflled to have an inkling of Bonsall's previous career, because he always called him " Bon-saal." Now, we all know what a Saal is abroad. But lest there be some ,Q2 men present, I will not remind you of what they do at the Saals in Monte Carlo and Baden. But Wood- ruff was the hardest pill to swallow, '89 objected to Woodruff and Stulb from the very word go. Ours was not a class to favor co- education in any of its aspects. We thought at first that Clara Woodruff was a pretty decided as-spect. Teddy Mumford rather approved of Woodruff from the start, and when he became president of the Class this year, Teddy determined to take Clara up and make a belle of her, as I once heard an ,84 man say of a girl in West Philadelphia, whom he thought could never have succeeded in society without his patronage. Well, Teddy certainly did bring Clara out wonderfully. Her manners are ever so much improved and she has a good deal of self-possession now, thanks to Teddy's kindly offices. Teddy gave her a great deal to do in the Class, and as Clara has plenty of natural executive ability, she has had an opportunity to show her strong points to advantage. There is a rumor in the Class that Clara is engaged. We are all perfectly in- consolable and entirely at a loss to know who is the fortunate man who has found the key to her heart. Clara once told McMaster that, according to the atomic theory, the only difference between himself and her was a difference of crystallization. I think McMaster was considerably astonished. In the Fall Sports of 1887 '89 acquitted herself most honor- ably: Henderson won the half-mile run, Chamberlain the mile. Bonsall and Fuguettook seconds. '89 pulled '88 four inches in the Tug of War. Our football record was simply magnificent. We won all the games in the series by large scores, and in the iinal game for the championship beat '88 by a score of 26 to 12. The work of Hulme and Frazier in all these games was splendid. . Our baseball record in the Spring was very creditable. In the Spring Sports Keen won the bicycle race, Bonsall the running broad jump. We won the Tug of War, pulling '88 three and a half inches. In the shooting match with Harvard, which took place early in May, Smith's score was 33 out of 40 birds. Only two scores were higher than his. 5I ff", 1 1' , ' 1. l S .. , , Z 1 G li- ' Wifi 1- ' I I 15. 1 1 ,I 1 .1 I, 'fu . 1,11-A J 1 mi '11',r Ali 1,11 -1 1 X1 1 'vwi 1' i.,.1 K. 1 1 1- ' , all J' 1.3 E1 ,Z1 4 'V 'Y 1. 1 '11, 11 I 11.11 .,1 fl .f.:.f 9,51 11 .1 -1 1-1 V1 M., 1 ,1 11 i1 'l I. 1 . 1 1 1 1 r B 1 .AI , 9 , 5, Q 1 1 1 1 5 ,' 5 1 5 F L? ? 1 1 ' El? I 1 i, 1 1 5 ill: Y 1 , .1.. ., 1 ffilf 1 iff' 1 1, El UQS1 Hi' Q ,id p 5. J 5 phi! .fill ' I.I 5 HW E will 6 mir 'I WH 1 3!i5'ii 1.1 ff - :'Wf in 31111. llplis HY! will 1 fig i .1 1 ill , I I 1 .,w L :QA ? , lr is. iii Y 1 f G 1 f Q l1!'1 R 1 1 11. 1 11 -1. 'U -,f that the iirst volun- ' th 1' r art of our junior Year It was m 6 ear le p fr 'zed by Mr Rennert. At iirst there tary class in Italian was organi . - d H were some eighteen or twenty students in fthe clasS, but gm U3 Y C ' ' and the remainder settled down the chaff was sifted from the gr2l1111 . , t 11 d Work. The class resumed work in our Senior Year with the o ar same four men g three '89 men and one 'oo man. The latter drop- ed out before Christmas and '89 Worked OH with MT- Rennen- P ' . The outcome of this voluntary class has been the establishment of an elective course in Italian, which is one of the most popular courses in college. u Doughertyls ball was held on they-27th of january and all Gir- ard Avenue was there. Some evil-minded persons said that the supper was awkwardly served. The truth is that people living on such a wide street as the Avenue cannot be expected to eattheir suppers comfortably in a narrow hallway. The best thing on the table was the Welsh rarebit. It was there by special request of Ab Smith. Barklie Henry was on the Committee, of course. He represented the four classes in college and several classes recently graduated. Henry gives the true 'Varsity iiavor to class com- mittees and is always a welcome acquisition. The Class Supper was held this year at the Bellevue, january goth, and was a great improvement upon the Sophomore Supper. Frazier did not approve of the excessive formalities of the occasion and went home very early. Geary came down from Harvard to attend the supper, and Stulb and he drank their mutual healths in Apollinaris. I The first W'inter-Meeting of the Athletic Association was held in our junior Year. The Orchestra and Glee Club played and sang between the events, and the whole 'affair was a most brilliant success. V the epliixjoxfiri prominent in I?hilo this year, and continued Philols Halls goinjglililin the Society gt this time, until We lift has ever had anne H1012 th ecpiost conscientious Moderators Philo earnestly for Prhilo por t 7 e ass. Perot has worked hard. and very the result of his honestvm years, ang hir present pyestzge IS largely and self-sacriiicing labors. But I tell you 52 .un- iere ally Jwn the rop- ieit it of vular Gir- the g on their L the :st of He ently com- mary pper. asion rd to hs in held sang .lliarlf inued ae left Philo d VCU' Hfgely 1 you whatls a fact, Perot's ia stickler for Philo etiquette. His tilts with one- 4 A Whose name is Conway, Bill And Presquemanque too, And Plagueperot and Polkadot And Fred and john and Lou. lVhose name is also Pete And Philolovingsam, An unconventional bug-a-boo ' This Conway Dillingham- D were among the j olliest incidents ' in Philo Hall. Conway Williairi Presquemanque Plagueperot Polkadot Frederick john Louis Peter Philolovingsam Dillingham was always wanting to do something unconstitutional and unconventional. This was equivalent to shak- ing a red flag in Perot's face. C. B. P. P. P. F.-I. L. P. P. Dillingham would want, for instance, to sit in the Recorder's chair, and he would maintain that he could not be comfortable in any other spot. Perot would say, Mr. Dillingham, I cannot allow such a breach of etiquette. Then Dilway Conningham would ask Perot, in the hum- blest and most respectful tone of voice, if he thought the Constitu- tion of the Society would sustain him in any such opinion. 'This prelude would lead on to a most delightfully animated debate, lasting about an hour and a half. I forbear to say who usually came out ahead. Mitchell and Brown were good -Moderators too. It was through the vigorous and thoughtful action of '89 that Philo came to celebrate her Seventy-fifth Anniversary so gloriously. '89 also revived the custom of having a Commencement and of conferring degrees. , The new Library Building, a magnificent monument of Uni- versity spirit and enterprise and a glory to Alma Mater and to the- city, was commenced in our Junior Year, and is now nearly completed. ' , I feel sure that many an '89er would wish that he might live his junior Year over again. I know that many of us do constantly live it over in our thoughts. . Our last vacation is over, and as we swing into the home- ' 53 Stretch, we are gratified to see that all our men are running together, There are few laggards and fewer absentees. We fnote one or two additions to our ranks, but they are men whOSG HCGS are already familiar to us, and who have 011137 been Waltmg to get 3 favorable opportunity to cast their lots in with ours. We are carry- houlders, as responsible ing the weight of the college on our s H Seniors should do. While the Class has remained remarkably stable, there have been several important changes ill the Faculty. ear has, of course, been a very eventful one for us, but Our Senior Y ' . . it has also been a most important year in the Un1vers1ty's history. Perhaps the event which most affected the whole college, Faculty and students alike, was the resignation of our beloved friend and Dean., Professor E. Otis Kendall. He always took such an interest in the individual welfare of the students, that it is little wonder that he lay very close to our hearts. The dear old Dean had often talked of resigning, but his purpose was overruled as often by those who could not bear to see his place filled by another. But his resignation was tendered again at the beginning of the year, and knowing his own wishes in the matter, it was sorrowfully accepted. Dr. Boardman's series of Sunday afternoon services was one of the very interesting, instructive and important events of the year. Dear old Professor Muhlenberg left us at the beginning of our Senior Year. The action taken on his resignation by the dif- ferent classes shows conclusively how near and dear he was to all of us. Patten, Lamberton, Smith, Montgomery and Falkner all came among us this year to infuse new life in the University and to bring new ideas with them. Everybody knows that the Whaft0n School is clique-y, and the other men in the Class are apt to look with caution, if not with favor, upon opinions and expressions of sentiment coming from this part of the college. But '89,s Wharton men ought to be allowed free speech and free opinions, because they are a large, strong and influential set of -men. Well, we have some pretty decided opinions, and we are usually unanimous in expressing them. And one of them is that we think Professor Patten is Hjust splendid." Patten calls us "his boys," and I donlt think there exists a stronger bond of union and-sympathy in 54 lg te es a y- le ly y. ut y. fy nd est ler en by Lut nd ad. me :he of l if all all . to Lon wok -s of ton use ave in sor d I -f in college circles than between Patten and ,SQ in the Wharton School. Now we all like McMaster a good deal, too-well, that is, I mean, in a 6'87ff6ZZ.7Z way. We admire his talents and his great mind Qhe has a splendid browj but, I am afraid we do not ,exactly-understand him. The Alumni Hall and the Dormitory dreams have received a big boom this year, and are no longer castles in the air. The Mask and Wig Club is one of the creations of this eventful year, and '89 has given birth to a new University publication, the Rad and Blue. The new paper has already a host of friends and is welcomed every- where. Wei hear that a-School of Journalism is talked' of. Well, if Dr. Patten's behind that cat, I warrant she'll jump. Speaking of Patten's powers of feline suasion, we have another adept in that line-the new Dean. I do not mean to insinuate that we are cats, although the Dean makes us jump, if he thinks we need that sort of exercise. Dean Jayne infuses life and vigor into everything that he comes in contact with. He is a power in the University and is mighty popular. He takes an interest in everything in and about college, all the way from getting Jackson's hair cut, down to the baseball team. TEWZQOVQ 77Z24f6Z7Z!fZL7ff Ten years ago U Dean Jayne was where we are now. Whew I Let us hope that in ten years from now some of us will be in positions as responsible as the one he now occupies. When Pomp heard that Jayne was coming over from the Biological Department to be Dean of the College, he said to Fullerton, " Is dat man goin' to come ober heah? Golly, won't he make things hum l" And that's just about what he has been doing since he arrived. Coquelin came all the way over from Paris to lecture to usl It was supposed that he was going to lecture and that the Provost would introduce him. The lecture we heard on the 16th of November last was by the Provost, however, and Mons. Coquelin added a few concluding remarks when the former got through. Wewere very glad to have seen the great French- come- dian. We would have liked to hear a little more from him. The Washington's Birthday Celebration of our Senior Year was the most successful and interesting that has been held under the new zfegzbvze. Engraved invitations were issued by '89's eflicient management, '55 ' -I fi I . , , I I II II I f I-I.. Iv V A I I I I . . 'III -Is I :fi ,j II I Iii ' Iii III. ju 'I I I A I ' IIf .1 II III I I I I , 'II I II '- I II I IQ I -I, It III. . Iixx, WI I.IjI .I IIIIII 1 57,513 "I I I ' .4 II I 5 2-I I '- I II' 4 ,ii -III: II II ,,. .I, Q I II' ' ' ,II RI I Hifi Il ' I II -I I: 'N QI 31. I I- 'A f .3 III I "' ' I? 1'I II I -I -I I II . 'IAIIIC FI 'I '-'II'I I' I "II 3 II I I . , W I I I II I 'O' I' II III I, -- I I I I I ii ' I I.. IIC I! II HIIIII fi II .II-III +I -III ,II 'gl -QIHIXI IISIIIE QI ,I "QI 'Iii I I IIFIVII II I 'I IIIII It I I' .II II III' I I,T Fr I II I:I :II Ii Mg II, ,ggi II ii III. III' 'II I I III LII II MIIIIY III I IMIIIIII I I ISI gI I IIJI If II. I IQIIIIII I I IIJ I I 'I:I 5' I II, I 4 -I II 9' I' l' I. I IIIIII I I Iv 3 I ,III III I II I ,I :LI I I III I' I.. 1, Ii :III-ig IIIQ I IIIII 'l 1 .VV I ,I .I I I I ,- III I ,I II I I ,LI I 'I I':II II II I I II 'I -I I II 'I 'I I 5I I II" I III II I III I ,E 5 If I I I, .T I". I' I ITIL I I IVII , 'II -, IIWII 'I I Iag II and the chapel was crowded from " Pit to amphitheatfe H by 3 brim' ' t audience which was well repaid for coming by having an ex- lan 7 - ceedingly interesting and varied programme presented for its approval and enjoyment. The University renewed its old-time inter- collegiate chess interest this yC211', and H9115-GTSOUI BOPSQH and jefferys were the delegates to New York. Through the mismanage- ment of Columbia, who had charge of the details of the tournament, the University failed to meet the other teams. l ' The Ivy Ball was held at the Union League in the latter part of February. It was attended with a perfect crush of dancers, and everything, from the fair sex down to the decorations, was beautiful and lovely. The athletic record of the Class for this eventful year is a per- fect galaxy of victories. First came the successes of our football team. We scored a total of 54 points in the two games which we played for the championship 5 our game with the Juniors going to us by default. The iinal game between I89 and ,QI was equal in interest and intense excitement to the Rlmous '86-'87 game in the Fall of 188 5. The score was IO to 6 in our favor. Tommy Hulme's picture was published in the Pe1zm3fZ1Janz'a1z and he was the herd of the season. The inter-class shooting matches of june, 1888, resulted in a victory for '89. We scored seven points more than any other class. Our cricket and baseball work was on the whole satisfactory, although we suffered defeat in one or two instances. At the Spring Sports Keen and Bonsall were winners. I think a man does not become thoroughly and entirely identi- fied with his class and his college until Senior Year. We who are about to graduate feel as if our last year had been the shortest of the. four, and yet more work, more pleasure, and a greater number of incidents are crowded into that short year than are represented by the other threetaken together. I feel sorry for a man who leaves pplllcelge in Senior Year. T-Ie never receives those last finishing es which seem to knit the class together in Senior Year, and I0 Stfenglhen 'SIIG Class-feeling among the members, so that nothing in afterlife, neither distance nor varying fortunes nor foreign O 9 interests, can ever estrange a man from his class or make him 56 - ill- EX- its :er- md ge- nt, raft ind iful per- ball we g to . in the ue's 6 of lted ther ory, ring enti- - are t of r of by ves ing and ing ign rim forget her or his Alma Mater. I am glad that '89 has seemed to appreciate this. Only three men have left us this year : Bell, Starr and Guggenheim. We were mighty sorry to lose Billy Bell. He had hosts of friends in the Class and was a jolly, good fellow. According to his own accounts, Billy was too jolly. He told us the day he left that he had done nothing since he came to the college except smoke, drink beer and play cards. Now this is a base slander, and no one but Billy himself would dare to make such a statement in our presence. For did he not sing in the Glee Club, take part in the Greek play, fill several offices in the Class, and even study some? Billy Guggenheim was our Class treasurer in Senior Year Uaffa was first assistant in the treasurer's officej. Now Guggy had never handled more than seventy-five cents at a time, and when he got to fingering the thousands of our Class treasury, he got so fond of the filthy lucre that he could not study any longer or stay at college. He must go out into the busy world and earn some lucre for himself. Ike Starr was never at heart an '89 man. His affections were divided with '88. The aforesaid affections have suffered a fur- ther subdivision. Coming home one brilliant star-light night last winter, and being in a very pensive mood, he observed glittering over the tops of the pine-trees in the west a single star, brighter far than all the rest of the shimmering throng. It was brighter than any star of '88 g brighter than any of fthe stars of '89 g nay, he has acknowledged that it was brighter even than the Huguenot Starrs. His dreams that night were full of that brilliant luminaryg the next day he left college. More 's the pity, because it was rumored that Ike was a promising candidate for the Rumford Medal. How the jolly reminiscences of Senior Year crowd on me thick and fast! Many of them would not have the same interest for you that they have for usg some of them might entertain you. Our last year has been saddened not a little by the illness and con- sequent absence of one of our best friends. What '89 in 'the Wharton School has lost through being deprived of the counsel and help and encouragement of Professor James during our last year will probably never be made good to us. We had just begun to learn to appreciate him and his sterling worth, when he had to leave A 5 7 d t ek to recover the health which he had jeopar- us and go abroa o Se . .- clized by ceaseless and exacting toil and overwork. We have been hoping against hope throughout the year that wehwould tsie a little of him before the year was over, but our hopes ave 110 een realized. i We lost Professor James for a year, but we also gained a new friend and helper in Dr. Pat ought to think more and study less. He would urge us to advance original subjects and ideas in Political Economy for investigation and discussion in the class-room. Walter Scott was the first of us to acquire a reputation as a thinker Qof course I except Dick Miller and other free-thinkersj. One day Walter told Patten that he had a subject to propose for economical investigation and discussion, which he thought would tend to elicit the best thoughts of the Class. Dr. Patten brightened up, looked interested and asked what he had in mind. " Corsetsf, Walter replied. Patten tried to look serious and asked Walter why he considered corsets a suitable sub- ject for economical investigation. " Becausef' said Walter, " they tend to diminish waste " Qwaistj. Patten said that he " was perfectly willin' to admit that," but he would prefer to have us discuss that subject with Professor Thompson. Professor Thompson has since given us his opinion of corsets and with him we heartily disapprove of them. Unfortunately, Walter Scott was absent from T ho1npson's lecture that day. He had been ill with " Wharton School Fever " for a week or ten days. This is a disease which is contracted from having four weeks' work to do in one week, and it isvery prevalent and very contagious inthe Wharton School. Ab Smith and Bob Hill are the only ones who have escaped it g several of us have had severe relapses. The only remedy seems to be to take more exer- cise and less McMaster. NVell, Thompson, knowing that Walter was especially interested in this discussion on corsets, and noting E115 abselnce, ascllced us what kept him away. U Oh, he'S i11 from veiworc " 1 -' - - - - Bob Hin lyvaiagdscr qeiibfgilpjrjt his roll, Tholnpson noticed that worked too?" he asked Alth Oilfurrenceii IS Mr' Hin' Over- terribly overworked th E Ong 'the Whadon School men are , ey have their antidotes for the "blues" ten. Patten would often tell us that we 53 . . rpaf- been ee a been new Lt We ance Ltion ff us Iiller 1 had sion, f the what look sub- they ectly that since rrove son's ver " from alent Bob I: had -exer- Talter 'ting from that VCT' are eg H Mumford and Lindsay are two of these antidotes. Lindsay, how- ever, is more of a cousin-doter. He goes to New York every week or so to marry one of them g that is, to attend the wedding of one of them, and when he is to be " best man,"' which is very frequently the case, he always has to borrow a frock-coat from one of us. Sam never does anything naughty, except when he is in New York. One day he and Mumford were coming down Battery Place at a rather bat-tery pace. When they espied the Statue of Libeity Enlightening the World, Mumford asked Sam if he did not admire the statue very much. 'f Yes, sir," said Sam, ff shels just a splendid girl 5 it's such a damp, raw day, I wonder if she wouldn't come down from there and 'take something' with us." Yes, Teddy and Lindsay are capi- tal antidotes against the " blues. " They nearly lost their sheep-skins through their efforts to cheer us up when we were downhearted from overwork. They used to compound gingerbread pellets, and putting them up just as the apothecary does, they would send them around the Class, labeled as specifics for the various real or sup- posed eccentricities of the members of the- Class. The directions for taking these prescriptions were most amusing. Stewart was to "take one at bedtime, if the symptoms of swelled head had been every marked during the day." Tatem must " take one every hour to arrest the abnormal growth of his hair." Griscom was to " dilute his in water and apply it to the face at night to reduce the intensity of the color of his cheeks." Hayashi was to U take one every hour to increase the action of his salivatory glands, that he might b.low better and larger .soap-bubbles and also to make him grow faster." Oberholtzer was recommended to ff take one on rising in the morn- ing. to furnish him with poetical inspiration." Woodruff was told to " take one as often as was necessary to reduce his bump of con- ceitf' Boyd was told to 'ftake one each Friday evening to help him to keep awake." Boyd would never join Philo, and for a long time we could not learn the reason. Finally we' found out that he had a H Friday Night Girl." He simply gave as a reason for not being able to join Philo H that he had a regular engagement every Friday night." Cresson gave the same reason for not coming more regularly to Philo's meetings. He confided to Mumford one day 59 I I I I mf 'EI fe .-. 1 ' ' I I I -S I I 1 I I I I if jf 1? II xv , I' , IMI I I - tiff' - 157' I 'iii' I ills I I0 I I: 'II II JI ,IL 'i' il V VZ. S QQI 1,1 STIII I if It Sli :EW I.esIiiII ,Mai Il ,. ,.,, ,v I, 'I, ,,' llnui if, if Mill- x Wig, , luiiuwgg., 'Vllfi "ISM riiiif liiiiflfi vga: 'I W? 1' Iyii irliii Iii . in rug ,I I e I III Iliff ,I I ' I :iw ,egg II' Ii ,F III, I",4 T I I .y 1 ,sn :J ,gig . I 'III ,135 ll 4 wi il' 'I IJ II ,fi I :Ii e and " help us out oftener, but that he had to go to dancing-school Friday nights, and so must be ex- cused." 0116 evil day Lindsay, Mumford 85 Co., Pharmacists, com- pounded some pellets for MacMas- ter. They were intended solely for the amusement of the Class, and of course Mac was not to see them. - The very old Nick must have gotten into Henderson, however, for he passed the package of pellets in with his synopsis. As I said above, that he would really like to com .-1174 ll BOYD,S FRIDAY NIGHT GIRL. the supply of pharmaceutical spe- I cialities was cut short, Mumford, Lindsay 81 Co. had their business ruined and came very near losing their diplomas from the College of Pharmacy. Bob Hill was another charming antidote for the " blues." On o11e occasion, when we were reciting with Falkner in Mercantile Law, the latter said to Bob, " Well, Mr. Hill, in such a case would a man be bankrupt or insolvent?" "Bankrupt," said Bob. At the lower end of the room a voice was heard to murmur, "in- solvent," " NVell, Mr. Hill," said Falkner, U you say 'bankruptj and some one else says ' insolvent g' now, which is right ? " With his usual nonchalance Bob replied, "I accept the amendment." At the same recitation Falkner asked Woodruff if there were always two parties to a contract. " No, sir," replied Woody. " Why, Mr. 'Woodruff, I'm surprised," ejaculated Falkner. Woodruff looked somewhat surprised himself, but quickly recovering his composure, he said: "VVell, if I may be allowed to modify my answer some- what, Yes." I would not have you suppose that the other sections of the Class did not have their good times too. I think there is IHOTG ."L1b61'iy, Equality and Fraternity " in the Wharton School than in the other departments, perhaps it is because Wharton School men are always together, and have their own rooms and their own interests apart from the rest of the college. But the 60 I Iii- Q Y if I that ihool e ex- dsay com- :Mas- ly for , and zheni. gotten Jr he :ts in Lbove, l spe- nford, losing ! ' On :antile would 5. At ., CK ln- crup'C,' With nent." alwayS ny, MT. looked posure, SOH19' ections there is School 'hart0I1 5 and ut the other sections have had their "a11tid0teS" too. Papa Brown, Granny Peabody, Sister Stulb, Uncle Edward I-Iyneman and Grand- father Friar Perot, area all enshrined in the hearts of their doting and jovial classmates. Even. the sedate and taciturn Dr. Easton has been known to gibe Papa Brown. Brown, who is usually from a half hour to three quarters of an hour late in coming to Easton's room, arrived the other morning out of breath, but only five minutes late. Easton, at his pulpit, says quietly, "Why, Michter Berr- rrown, I think the thun mutht have thined in at your window thith morning." Brown looked very humble, ashe replied, "I think it did, professor? And so I might go on and tell you of the joys and the work, of the hopes and the disappointments of this eventful year, but I must not run the risk of being called a gar- rulous historian. You have already been very indulgent, and the Class is grateful for the interest you have shown in our happenings, our doings and our sayings. At the close of his last lecture of the year, Dr. Thorpe told us that '89 had for four years been " making facts for a cyclopaedist to put into calf." Let us hope that after you have separated out the amusing from the serious, and the chaff from the wheat, you- will still ind something in these pages to support his statement. '89 has been an actor in the events of four of the most important years of University life. She has taken part in every University enterprise with characteristic vigor and zeal. She has added to the list of athletic victories, and has labored earnestly to bring fresh honors of all kinds to Alma Mater. Now that her race is run she has little to reproach herself for. She feels that her task is accomplished, that her mission is fulfilled. All things must come to an end. QDick Miller and Professor Fullerton are still at variance as to the truth of this statement, but we are willing to accept it.j The History of the Class of '89 and the doings of the People of '89 have been told. It seems almost paradoxical to speak of history in connection with men who are in reality just starting out in'life., What do these pages I ,have written really mean? They indicate only the veriest beginnings of history., I feel the insigniiicance of what is here recorded as compared with what shall 61 I, .4 l 5, 4 . ,241 . H.: an-.gg-u-...1 1 .L . r..:.-:- me-:, ,....,- ,... :..x:n. ' ii li in ff if fs 3, 'E ! 're 'I 1: :- l -2.-.tr,u..... -4 - ,u 9 I 5 I all . X 'sq if iii "1 all 1,1 l 1 -1. -w-4 - - 1'-vw ,P 1 l l. Q l I l i 5 r i G 4 I Y? I 4 1: 1 L ll Qi 3? ! it fl H, P .r fi U, J i 3 lf. ly' P. I l i . ,W E . 1 I 5 f I .J N. I il i 2 if. J ,. ,gr l f P be recorded of us in the future, and must ask you to forgive me for having, nevertheless, attached so great importance to the events of these four years. They will doubtless ever remain for many of us the four happiest years of our lives. We remember that our time of preparation- and probation is over, and that a new life and a very real one begins for us on the morrow. We may, therefore, be par- doned for having paused on the threshold of the new life to look back over the old. iWe thank you for having taken our retro- spective journey with us. And now there is left for us only the sad duty of bidding fare- well to our Alma Mater, who has so lovingly and so kindly guided our footsteps through the four years whose history is completed to-day. lf speak for the Class: ' Sgts FAREWELL TO ALMA MATER. Within thy walls wefve passed Four jolly years together, Through clouds and sunny weather. 'A The end has come at last, Our bark is launched, we sail Forth on Life's unknown sea. Farewell, our Alma Mater ! A long farewell to thee I God bless thee, mother dear I W'e wave our last sad greeting, The while our hearts are beating With mingled hope and fear Q For ah ! we cannot tell - VJ hat fate may have in store 5 How oft we may look back and sigh For that safe, peaceful shore. Th Amid Yet-away with care! T .e skies are glowing O,Q1' us, she great Sea spreads before us, 62 ' 1 16 for ts of of us time very X par- look retro- fare- ided mleted Life opens free and fair, ' Sail on our bark I we go To battle for the right, To do good work, in God's great World Before the coming night. A 1 Thy blessing, ere We part, O, mother, dear! accord us 5 And should the World reward us, With iilial, grateful heart We'll bring our Wreaths and palms y To deck thy honored shrine, And thou shalt own With joyful pride Thy sons of '89. ' JN v if ff I 0 'I 4 2 f ' , j' . -J 6 'E ' . 712 L . za. 2, fp ff! ., ,,.,,. . Q. ,. , , . 'ff C V 1, A , I, .' ' 5.1, Jr - A ' 4' f-'12-" f l , ' :X . ,w fffu ' ,,--' I f 1' ' E ,X 'E Q, '7 4' ' f-X 11 5 , ' up A ,ru 63 IICVCI' Jsurdg But, instead, I shall chant, in measures sublime, A galloping, rollicking, doggerel rhyme. I No tale will it be of Ulysses, the Greek, Or any old codger whose name is antique, Nor do I intend Long hours to expend In wildly invoking the poet's best friend, That wonderful muse Whom many abuse And declare is a muse which can never amuse. Gray Pegasus, flown to the land whence he came, Unbridled shall graze in the far fields of fame. The " Seasons H which Thomson annoyed in the past- I don't mean our Thompson with knowledge amassed, ,But that easy fellow, a century dead- I'll pass by unnoticed, their prayers have been said. My verse shall be true, My statements all new, So newlthat if Franklin was looking this way Vay' I With his spiritual eyes, which are doubtless still gray, He would say to himself, with the " Poor Richard " spice -.-"-"y 2 QL - i , l:LkNi',l'.v . j ,.w,- ,gf A , ..-!1'!Q'fT f WL .MF i wiffiiffm lllli tt' WWI .' ' - f-?2,'Hfpi,1Qg.Zf l ,ta 'fl,.,c L,.:Z4xH .gi -11-W2 " --' ft--4,hJI'w if 151 - ff . 'fl' ,U I 'M wg, H' ,f ' 5' yfsfffflib - .,,,,,4,w ,, -1-sf u-Q-1' . ' - ,,. .'-NW" T , , . ,,4-- -iii 1 QT... ' I , sm-U9-N 6. Lrcvu H Ei. A cat in old gloves, boys, can never catch mice." 55 A very remarkable man was our Ben, As ready with purse as he was with his pen. He lives in his work, a great pile of stone, A monument, which, though enlarged, is his own. It marks the one spot where eternally reigns That monarch so rare, Philadelphia brains, But hold-I incline To believe '89 Has absorbed nearly all of the valuable stock, For the youths who have written the Programme called Mock Can certainly claim but a very small bit Gf that llash of the mind which NVebster calls wit. But McMaster, he, The historic John B., . Could loan these gay mimics enough to exist From the store of his mind, and it wouldn't be missed. That our class is as brilliant as this would appear Might seem to a 'oo man stunningly queer, But any discerner of learning and wealth, VV ith a lively judicious regard for his health, NVould calmly assert that he knew to be true Every fact which is herein presented to you. Four winters ago in the fall of the year ' We began as a class our distinguished career, The morning dawned bright, and the Freshmen and boys Arrived on the campus accompanied with noise. 'We gathered from Arch street, from Spruce street and Vine, From Chestnut and VValnut, Mt. Vernon and Pine, And a youthiof renown Had even come down A . From Birdiboro jujit to agtonigh the town.'. The suburbs, too, sent us some subduing folks From Germantown, Abington, Bryn Mawr and Oaks, 66 There Were foreigners, too, a cute little man fx? E ue, From Tokio, which is, you know, in japan, And four or five jerseymen leaped o'er the sea To the land of the brave and the home of the-free. A grouping of diamonds, unburnished, but iine And ready for polish, was rare '89, f ,xiii I A A F ., 6 V 1 to . l . jfh we E'- . ,K ,T -fr' V " - , f Tig- - ,Q E, A-m 4 -Z.. xxlXlQ'fW7443iff "W'f"""'v?L 'A , N- ' A f' X - ff ,2f" 'f I ' My W "QW W was 4 W ENMGP, NTS gi fr fn -1 . 1-E f - V 4' Pomp " Whispered to jackson, We looked very green But a handsomer medley he never had seen. So Jackson replied, if we'd take on no airs He would be quitedelighted to meet us upstairsg And so we became, it On that day, this same ' Invincible legion of learning and bravvn, The phalanx of genius advancing to dawn, That fronts you this June With a terse farewell tune. As Freshmen our yell to the Sophomores was dire, And they quickly begged leave to in safety retire, 67 Their ranks We assailed, p They everyone quailed, . And We were the victors whose strength never failed As Sophomores and juniors our Way has been clearg VVe quietly sailed into Senior year, With flags flying gayly on masthead and stern, No icebergs, no blizzards or storms to concern. We'd some strange encounters with English and Dutch And other old pilots We didn't like much, But the past is all over, our port now is Wong We've shared in the struggle, We've shared in the fun. No angels are We And yet We can see Where We might have been better and Wiser, but then,- I doubt if we would if vve'd four years again. ' . VVe may be conceitedg they say young men are, But defeats sift it out before they get far. We may be unsuited for practical themes-g The World at a breath will soon chill our day-dreams. If we pace not a poem, we gallop a rhyme, At the end of each race we Will come in on time. Across or around, , On 'tracks made or found We halt not for distance, for boulder or tide. To state, bar and pulpit We rapidly stride, For I freely confess, VVhat many may guess, , That whatever We do or Wherever We stay, From henceforth, ambition demands that it pay. Our pathways diverge as the future portends, And each man to walk off in his ovvn Way intends, But we love Alma Mater, and firmly incline To think there's no class like our own '89, 68 PRGPHECY. CLINTON ROGERS WOODRUFF. The cloud which, intercepting the clear light, Hangs o'er thy eyes and blunts thy mortal sight, I will remove. VIRGIL. N the iifth day of the moon, which, according to the customs of my forefathers, I always keep holy, after having washed myself, I ascended the high hills of Wissahickon, in order to pass the rest of the day in meditation. As I was there airing and musing as to whether marriage -was a failure, I cast my eyes towards the summit of a rock that was not far from me, where I discovered one in the habit of a shepherd, with a little musical instrument in his hand. As I looked upon himvhe applied it to his lips, and began to play upon it. The sound was exceeding sweet, and wrought into a variety of tunes that were inexpressibly melodious, and altogether different from anything I had ever heard. My heart melted away in secret raptures. - ' I had been often told that the rock before me was the haunt of a genius, and that several had been entertainedwith music-who had passed by it, but never heard that the musician had before made himself visible, By the waving of his hand, he directed me to ap- proach the place where he sat. I drew near unto him in reverence, such as is due to a superior nature. He led me to the highest pinnacle of the rock, and,iplacing nie on the top of it, said: " Cast thy eyes eastward and tell me what thou seest." Looking in the direction he bade nie, I saw a bridge, and over it came trooping 69 of to in 1d ale all us be he Phe on as he ub- 3 ch re- or of 6 the seeming wrath of this man. I was informed he was denouncing a prophecy that was- going to be published in a Record, he was edit- ing, for its lack of humor. I listened awhile to the harangue and became 'convinced that he was not far wrong. 1 A sad sight met my eyes as I turned towards the next island, for there was Bobby with his crony, Lloyd Scott, leading Elliston Perot, like unto one that was intoxicated. Alas ! what a mistake Bob and Lloyd had made. Elliston was on his way home from a missionary meeting, where he had been making efforts to win the special' chemists from a life of ease and idleness. On this night Elliston had been particularly successful in winning from these depraved men, and he could not repress the exuberance of spirit he felt at his success. This was what Bobby and his boon com- panion had mistaken for other symptoms. They were themselves returning from a banquet given by George Henderson, who was working for the nomination to- succeed George Washington as Father of his Country. There was, however, one great insurmount- able obstacle in Henny's path. It had been incumbent upon the Father of his Country to tell the truth. This Henny never could do. But Henny had lots of -hope and plenty of assurance, and, as he conidentially told me, he had a sure thing of it this time. Around his board he had gathered all the prominent literary and scientiic men of his day. The toasts they responded to were characteristic. Mr. Cresson responded to The Scientific Outlook of the 2Otl1 Cen- tury, or When will those Pictures be Finished? Mr. Smith, to Rhetorical Style, or the Art of Preparing a Thesis, and Mr. Dilling- ham to, Expression, or the Use of the Face in Expressing Thought. Having become satiated with the learning of these people, I re- embarked and set out for the isle which outshone all the others. Cannot you guess the reason? It was the Island of Japan, and Tamio Hayashi was Premier. Applying the principles learned in my own native island of civil service reform and dirty water, he has made a grand success of his reign. He is not alone, however, in his glory, for behind the throne stands one whom we all have seen before g a diminutive specimen, but withal a shrewd one. First here, then there, pulling one wire, then another, he has re- 71 II II I 1 m 5I Z, II ti I . ,. Ia ilf QI Iii II EI? I I 1 I I I I I II .I M ,1 5 I I I II I EI1 4 I 1 I I I ,157 III ,fi If , I K I I ' I 1 , I I f I 1.1 5 If 'j, I,,. II' IIIWIF. II .,i- ill I, I .I'E1. I we .II If J I1f I I1,I I 'II ',eI, ,If .Iv I I I II r 12 ,I 1 1 I1 III 1, .1 .M I 'II' I 3 I I I I . 1 I 1 ' if . XV l I: I I I I Ii 'I 1 b 5 1" HI I I i' I ,, 5,I1'?5 It I I' I Ii I 1 Ig, I I, :II-I 2 I 'I 332511 II 1 ' I' I I I In gi I1' 11, I 1 I IJ 1. III f , I MI" ' I'f'57i Iv II 1 1 'I ll . 1 5.1 I .III I 1IfIIIi I QI F- I-UIIII7 ZQIIII I III II H11 III? , ,,1I if I' 'IIIIIII ,II QIIMLI' I! II I..,l I MI: II' I' I ,III l'I1 'I 'II5 IIN . ' II'- II, I , , , .1 ,fII511 I Ii Ii . Iij. I1 , L. ,I I E' ' L. Z II, Ii Ig E' IKE 1 ,II 1 I III . flxg I II I I I I I I I 1 II al 1' 1 :I- 'II i! 4 'I 1' 'I 'I II 1 1 1 I3 if ,I r I If ,II IIT 1-,I Il: I 1 -. ,I H I' If .I I lieved the Premier of all thoughts as to the Political Side of the Government. Tamio gets the glory and 101111 L- the Patffmage- Stewart and Hayashi formed the habit of eating their pie to- gether, and after performing that solemn and serious task so long, they came to the conclusion that they could not'separateg where: upon John laid in a goodly supply of hair tonics, restorers and dyes, took up his baggage and migrated to the lovely isle of the Orient, where he still is. When he reached this beautiful place, perceiving the lack of police superintendence, he succeeded in having Frazier made Chief of Police, acting on the principle that it takes a bad man to catch a bad man. Not that Frazier was a bad man, but Stewart, believing that rum and music did not mix, and remembering, from a certain junior Ball incident, that Frazier did believe in mixing the two, he, therefore, set Frazier to Work to stop the unholy mixture. The Chief was ably seconded by Billy Bell, the first stopping the music, and the latter the -. ' i The most famous island is the one where the Wharton School Senate is situated. To this august body has been delegated the task of running the universe. The day I was there they were con- sidering a bill to pension Eddie Hyneman, for the sad loss he sus- tained when he lost control of the ball in the irst Trinity game. One, tiring of his own land and sighing because there were no more ollices to fill, took up his burden and departed from the home of his youth. Wandering from place to place, like unto Ulysses of old, he finally settled on the island of Titipu, a place famous in history. Teddy, desiring to follow in the footsteps -of its most illustrious celebrity, determined to settle there. And, forsooth, he did. He soon became Chief Cook and Bottle Washer of the Island, Editor-in-Chief of the T Z'l'ZfZL Hem, Grand Master of the Order of Wire Pullers, besides many subordinate positions, as President of the Mutual Admiration Society and Holder of the Capze! fnfiaizmz. It is needless to say that faithful Sammy has accompanied Teddy in all his peregrinations. Now that his worthy master has settled down, Sammy is content with the humble position of Chief Ad- mirer. On one of the islands I just left, I beheld a sight, sad in the extreme, because denotati f 1 ve o a ife spent in wasting the fruits 72 .. X f the fe. le tg. long, 'here- Q and if the place, id in hat it 1 bad 1, and ar did v stop Bell, chool d the : con- : sus- le. e no iiome ses of us in most ch, he land, ,er Of :nt of zium. 'eddy ettled nf Ad- gd in :fruits of early labor., I beheld a goodly crowd, clad in purple and fine linen, kneeling before a Committee of the U. S. Congress. Who do you think these supplicants were, and what do you think they were petitioning for? Perot, Hyndman, Brown and Mitchell were on their knees, begging for the repeal of the duty upon spirits used in the Arts. Oh! what a change. It pained me, and I turned away to a pleasanter scenej A space about twenty-four feet in cir- cumference had been roped off, and within were two worthies. In one corner stood 'Carolus Peabody, the Graeco-Roman Champion, seconded by the Mathematical section, while in the other corner stood Bruiser Shumway, the other Champion, ably seconded by George Miller, the Shouting Methodist. For a long time these two intellectual mastadons had been trying to come together, but by the kindly, intervention of jackson and his goat they had never gone any further than to-make faces at each other, and declare that the other was afraid. Pomp acted as referee, and the Market Street ferry rules governed the mill. The result of this set-to I did not stay to see, as I saw approach- ing me Keen, with the usual petition in his hand, as to the ability and worth of his master, Dole, and not wishing to become a party to such an infamous bargain, I hastily bade my oarsman, Archie Wright, hasten onward. ,VAS I passed a lone barren isle I asked whose abode it was. " That is the home of Freddy Baker, the busiest man in the world," the genius told me. " And what is it that makes him so busy,', I asked. " Oh, he is trying to rival the Irishman, and is reading everything from Tristram Shandy to the Mysteries ,of the Court of London, to keep up his reputation." H Q As President of the Universal Railroad System, Walter Scott has been a glittering success. Starting out in life as a train despatcher at Bowling Green, he has gradually risen, stump by stump, until he has reached the topmost bail of prosperity. I-Ie is ably seconded bya Board of Directors, noted ali-ke for their intel- ligence and prolixity. There is Klauder, who wanted all ladies, that is, the younger ones, to have free passes, and Hulme, who is always trying to prove that Jersey is a part of the Union, and that football teams should be carried free of charge, gratis, for noth- 73 '3 annual WfaPPed roposing ltionists, training, that We reached Again, nrospect, ffi what elf alone lshing to IVY POEM.i READ BY EDWARD CHRISTMAN KNIGHT, i Ivy Day, June 3d, 1889. , IND of Summer, flushed with rose, Through the leaves' play hide and seek, Blow whence rippling Schuylkill flows, Cool- each listeninglmaiden's cheek, Hush the cityls fevered beat, Still to-day's mad rush and roar, W Fill our souls with music sweet Fromthe " stately days of yore." To-day we turn to all the Past would teach, Again we see that group of strong-browedmen Pacing in thoughtful converse to and frog Tom Lawrence, Masters, Allen, Taylor, Leech, Cloud-ruling Franklin and the sons of Penn, Pondering some weighty question as they go. QFor this was in our country's swaddling days, V When sceptered George ruled o'er the sundering foam Ere Freedom's tree shook down its ripening fruit, And these, our fathers, sought the means and ways To foster knowledge in,that New World home, l And teach the " young idea," with grace to shoot.j 75 Then he, whose lightning-chains bind all mankind, Our thunder-quelling love Of later day, With this portentous problem wrestled now, Till, from the birth-throes of his mighty mind, The new-born College in her Quaker gray Sprang forth, Minerva-like, from Franklin's brow. VVind of Summer, soft recall Pictures of the little maid, Hid in Whitfield's churchly hall, Treading Learning's cloistered shade. Firmer grew her trembling feet, - QSturdy Smith, her burdens bore,j " Hopeful youths U she doth complete Ere her years tell half a score. Then sang 'vVar's clarion Voice across the land, Blowing the trumpet-blast of Liberty, While rocking bells took up the clamor wild, Till men, uprising 'neath Oppression's hand, Hurled England backward to her northern sea, And oler th' embattled waves a new Republic smiled. The infant college struggled through the strife, Learning and Liberty together grew g What need the oft-told story to repeat? Now, through a nation's veins, her pulsing life She sends, and moves clear-brained, large-hearted, true, Footing the centuries with her silver feet. Wind of summer, as you' pass Fairer maiden can you show ? Time for her has turned his glass, Changed his scythe to Cupid's bow. Fire-thrilled Egypt's melting glance Could not stir our hearts to-day, As this maid whose shy eyes dance, 'Neath her hood of hodden gray. 76 Oh Alma Mater l here thy towers arise, Here are thy halls, the nursing folds of men. And we, the latest children of thy care, - Trace on thy walls our names with faltering pen Nor shame our manhood with our misty eyes. Yet swift the laughter sweeps away the tears, As we past days of joyous life recall, This mimic world, our crowding hopes and fears, The clustered memories of our College Hall, Our triumphs and our losses-losses? No I There is no word of " loss " for Eighty-Nineg Let Pennsylvania's classes come and go Serenely proud our annals still will shine ! And yet-to ifzee we bring our victories won- To thee, not us, our doughty deeds are done To add new lustre to thy starry name. ! Oh Alma Mater ! round thy fostering knees, Close, close to-day, thy fondling children cling 5 When all june's sweetness scents the summer air, When maiden faces smile beneath the trees 5 Fairer than all thy maiden charms we sing, Bringing our ivy branch to deck thy hair. Accept it-for its peer 'tis vain to seek l 'Tis than a verdant Freshman far more green 5 'Twill pass its rivals with true Sophomore " cheek," Like amorous junior it will bloom serene, Till spreading leaves its Senior triumphs. speak. May no cold Faculty work ill and ruth, No biting Provost nip its tender charms, But may it grow till, like a glowing youth, It clasps the College in its branching arms! But ah! how soon the lightsome jest departs, Through all our laughter steals a tone that grieves 77 :B 1! lf, H :.,. xiii 1 -vf ,V -'-1 ! 1 .5 'r 1 I , 1 ,:, 'nv 1 1 1 I i me -i 5, 7!, Li, af' ii gl "H 1, 4 Lg! Ei, gif 1 i!:! ,lf :"i rel if 1-:yi S! u W ii' ,N EFI .Jil I 11 I Li!! NF ll 4 12 '14 1 ,V v I 413 1 ru r. 1,5 !, 'n I 1, A i . .! if! 'T ! 'fl -, is fi! , Zi a L! ii X! ,lg ,, Jw 9 I , ,Q .N 1 1 f it if :. li ' fl J! , , . J, A I il. g f 3-i Live! cherished Ivy, 'neath thy mother'S eye: Know that thy roots are fastened in our hearts, And all our love goes whispering through thy leaves, And all the sorrow of our sad " good-byef' Vtfind of Summer, cease thy song, Hush thy music to a sigh, L Comes the hour deferred so long, Comes the word, the tear, H good-bye." Tune thy voice to breathing low, 'Mid the Ivy tendrils creep, Stir the soft leaves to and fro, . Grieving, sob thyself to sleep. Good-bye! but not with tears should- it be spoken, With God's blue heaven bending over head, In whose far depths the clouds like white thoughts lie VV hen the june sunshine round us seems the token Of the fair iields before our manhood spread, Life gives us greeting! Then, with purpose high, Let us go forth, though far our paths divide 5 ' If thou, our mother, with thy smiles and tears, WVill bless thy 'sons and hear their parting vow, Back they will ever turn to thy dear smile, Bringing the Laurel of their riper years To mingle with the Ivy on thy brow! 78 I I rl ? " ll 55' , 1' Il i X 1 i i jf -7' of c tw uf I, 4 i ly SMC fit- M7 Elf WE- fit' r- : l ui W i ! l' 2. WN - - 9.-, Ok 1 W!gWr is in WW Flaw Yin I Ili i c , . ll i 5 , N .q."'g-.42 3 ,IN ,jfl,',r 'liqjxvgj i I 7 FW."l.?iEg:5:-,apfyxlg " f Q V . Q 'VG v Nfl V "ld ' '1 1 '1.'i'14'Z'i lf l ll 1'-ln M, 17-GLW .fiillll Lviwilllllfiillliiitilf , ff lm l ' rgzglfif M' wi' 'Im wtlag ' will 7- ,,. V , lui Qllflxll 'Y" ii" 'f!4W'f -lil 'll I lil X-xhwhh! I ll .-nh, ..:J,a"lT7'i'34-nf' E f llw flf,,i.-all' it l t 3 - ' 1' - ,.W ,fff'., f -hifi lil f lf'W'llllfllldfllflizP 2212-aerffigrsiif? '-f R ' ':' "- "'-WT4:" 3 L-f "I f'1f?".f1 'H 'l ' fpggfa-. :WT " F - c ff il 'Wt 1 'f ll' a'11ifW2'1fl"2.i ,e 'fa- -- is?-ff'-" of 'W V lf''Sli-12'-lvlsllvil-U'. 'ff - 1 . -' . 4 A -f -.-L-.1--, l 4' l""'.1-a'h.1l: UIQ., 15-E , - - - j u K i V A" 'ly1:lm.vl,.Hf,1ui'i,.'Wlil! is 1fZ., i'c'.' -F - ' fe-l aniff be in M ,llflhwl':5.f2'-QM-.il A 111- gi 'rf - ., 'S f .UM rl9f','fi"-'g'l1mf'-z-awl:.1'.i-f-,ll fd 1 .3-1:5 f ig-S k i M is A Mlm it T7 -PM 7 no L' 3 Q eil y - :.,-T53--' jun, '- 13 g, or W-yffeia A fp- I. PH1Lo UNDER 789. M ., , A' W' 11 " -if .r :A x V I ,:- . ,V rf ,fc ' ix ...fp if A I my .' gf .- , 5- ...N-... ,lf EVENTY-FIVE years ago Qas you cansee by refering to "Prof, McElroy's Edition of the University Catalogue," which came out on time lj Philo entered upon her learned career, destined in time to pro- duce, as the zaZz'z'ma Mule of classes, that of '89, For a great many years there has been no larger class in Philo than '89, and, as a consequence, since Sophomore Year. Philo has been under its domination. Jimmy Mitchell, our iirst Moderator Qwho has been aptly called " a contradiction in termsnj, reversed the policy of his predecessor, .79 f! 1 sz' fi H"-3 1'l L lil I! 1 1-.v ff: : 1. ,JP fi! .! l h iff 'n ,, If ls! fig ff! - ! fi! fi iv 9 ,! ! 1 K1 ,ll ll Inj ry '11 ,Ip Q.. Z!! B! v . if! 2 S E! 1 r P! J, i 3. 1 n J 1 .AISI "' -?T"'..'!':.1L5f3lZW' ji 'w . Q-5. f. 4 J 4, .f , n I 5, I i i, P. :f !! ii I 3 !i 'Q I, fi! .5 ,Q Y! fr: 4 - u ., H and excluded religious debates from the order of exercises, much to the chagrin of jones Perot, who Qafter the debate for the succeeding meeting had been announcedj would solemnly rise, strike the Ionesian attitude, and in stentorian tones begin: " Mr. Moderator! I have a debate to submit to the Society. Resolved, that Religion " -and down would go the gavel and Mr. Perot. But my! how Jones took his revenge when he became Moderator!! However, the climax of '89's glory was reached in the Celebration of the Seventy-fifth Anniversary, which, as the circulars announced, was celebrated "in a manner becoming the age and dignity of the Society" and Clem Brown. Here Clem, as Moderator, got the chance he had long been awaiting. What Bowery speech flowed from his silvery GQ tongue! How the Freshmen applauded when Brown, more eloquent than ever, finished by saying, "Now the Society will adjourn to the Supper Room! " But Philo could not be suffered to go on in such a career unpunished. Lo! the Fates destine Perot to be the next Moderator! Now, -in the words of Thompson, "after the period of Qthej Free Trade Qof the Celebra- tionj comes the religious reaction," and Philo turns herself Qto the great satisfaction of the Sophomoresj to the Freshmen and religion. CDon't be frightened, ye youthful aspirants to Philo's Hall! every class hath not a Jones Perot.j But all good things have an end, and, after three years of frolic and fun within her halls, '89 bids an affectionate farewell to dear old Philo. 1 80 ' to mg the tor! 11" OW ver, the was the the wed hen the not ates s of bra- n the ion. ve1y end, s an flligiigi- . ' if f l L W' be-E-I 2 Wmllalwf I ' X .iav5"l'?u i-. I-I , Z I , gi I I M' ffl ' I 4 ee I I I if I .I 2. 4' S II II iw ' C ' 1 E 114.1 -' fl uf- II fl , if ,I ,W I e 5 U ' It jiiiii' ' 'H' Q! 'T' WM IL- TI-IE SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY UNDER '89 N the Scientific Society 389 has indeed filled a role of majestic importance. In Freshman year there was the great Howard Crawley, Who has since deprived our University of his noble presence. Many other shoots of great scientific promise have since then blossomed and faded, as if the intellectual atmosphere had been too stimulating in its effect. Some vvilted quickly, others slowly, but Iusti, the third '89 man to join the Society, has always been a most hardy and healthy plant, and now forms one of that sacred band of senior members who are so zealous in their non- attendance. Fuguet Was the next innocent victim roped in by the designing -Society members, and during Sophomore year, thirst- ing for vengeance, he, with most fell intent, read several of his 81 ii 1 if e TV ,. 7. li l I r -1 J U I Q nz i X l ,1 ll 4 l R he fl l . l. fl 1 if ga ,J ft I , A H 5: 2 ii A 11 w ,. ll 1 I 1 :S , 1 J. ? 3. 4, 14 il iii E: TT J' f 'Q la R. 'lm gl. 1 i , r :if 1 1 1 Y i Q In 'i if 43 fn I1 'fl 'J r 1 I 'r i? 1: 1 , 4 2, is 1 . l W Q 1 compositions at the meetings. QN. B.-We here desire to exPfeS5 our sincere obligations to the members of Philo who aided the janitor in carrying the victims over to the hospitalj After this bloody event the Society sentenced Fuguet to hard labor, as secretary, for one year, but, not to be outdone, this unruly member elected himself president for Senior year, and, with half a dozen other lively fellows, who divided the remaining offices, saved the Society from a sudden death. Kiersted seized upon the office of secretary and proceeded to write his name all over the minute book, Coleman 'took good care of the curator's keysg while any member of the Executive Committee who had accidentally strayed into a meeting invariably reported "progress H in the important business entrusted to them. Yes, the Society is truly an aggrega- tion of anomalous party-cles! The unanimity with which these heterogeneous bodies .differ in discussions is, however, very instruc- tive to new members, and the arguments used are so persuasive as to make the participants feel sore the next day. As Bret Harte somewhere says of a Weste1'n debate : " He gave a sickly smile and fell upon the Hoor, And the subsequent proceedings interested hini no more." One of the most difficult questions to decide was as to whether the modern stage was elevating in tendency. So hard was it to 31-five at adecision, in fact, that after several hours, discussion the Society adjourned to the peanut gallery of the Dime Museum to test the case. Tastes differ in essays alsog some prefer to delve in the secret recesses of mother earth, others tosoar in the empyrean vasts of true poetics. The scintillant wit of several of our brilliant members, for instance, has turned its full glare into the darkest depths of paper pulp manufacture and 1 Been' extinguished there, say you? Not so, it has thoroughly illuminated the profundities of Y11-TC 1TlOSti11JCCfGSti11g process. , On the other hand, we have listened to such essays as that entitled 4' Helen: A Tale of Love in the 'Everglades .' ' Mr..Kiersted is very fond of blood-intellectually I mean and he de1igh'fS to talk about " auricular" valves et cetera while Mr S2 press 1 the hard Hlilly half a saved Olhce u linute e any trayed ortant grega- these istruc- sive as Harte 1er the v arrive Society test the 5 secret vasts Of embers, fpths Of ere, SHY mies of iistened 3 in the 33-na and hile MT' Davisson delights us with descriptions of microb , es and bacteria whenever he can spare a few stray moments, during meetings, from the difficult task of making his treasurer's accounts b l a ance. Our reverend president persists in spouting photographical information, and often as the sweet-toned formulae fall from his lips in the deep silence of the hall, their thud as they strike th e floor is answered only by the sympathetic-snores of the-the listenersq There are others, some of whom ar non-attendance at the intellectual banquets given weekly althou h , 8' very ,punctual at the annual graduation feast where more material dishes are provided. And there at '89's graduation banquet as all sing, ' - Q A - H I-Iere's togood old Penn, For she's our mother hen !" e especially noted for their the thought arises'-whether, perchance, there may not be some ugly ducklings among her brood who will in future time grow into mighty swans. . 83 What a motley collection those two cherubs gazed upon, C1056 around the officiating High Priest, and facing the altar upon which they sat, were ranged .those assistants to whom it was given to aid in the sacrifices to their mistress. 'The columns of smoke they sent up floated like a benediction over the heads of the lesser multitude and soon shrouded all the temple in a mystic gloom, through which the voice of the Pontifex Maximus could be heard as he entangled Dave Salter in the meshes of " The Theory of Vision " before slaughtering him as a -votive offering to the demon of Idealism. Close beside the guardian of the temple sits Rudy Klauder, absorbing, with open mouth, those strange ideas and that power of concealing his- meaning which made his graduating essay on the " Mathematical'Theory of the Infinite" ,such a wonderful produc- tion that the faculty were compelled to confess it was beyond them, and to ask him to write another more within the bounds. of an ordinary man's understansding. Close together sit the four saints, Hyndman, Mitchell, Perot and Du Hamel. But, alas I if report be true, Du Hamelhas succumbed to the anarchistic' ten- dencies of his family, and conceals beneath that face, so " child-like and bland," more deadly communistic principles than ever Ah Sin dreamt of. That' horrilied look on Saint Matthew's countenance is due to the fact that james Clayton has just revealed his true nature by affirming that it is often right to tell at lie ! H As the saints shrink away from this abandoned prolligate, the H Genius of Germantown", strides, with befitting dignity, across the temple, and, bringing his double refracting concavo-convex lenses to bear full' upon the Socialist, plunges into a discussion in which we can only distinguish the names of Spinoza, DesCartes, Berkeley, Johann Most, 'F My Uncle George Peabody," and such phrases as "The most perfect being," "Soul of the world," and Hinconceivability of the inlinitef' But Du Hamel is not left to withstand, unassisted, this torrent of eloquence, for a rotund figure rises from the corner in which he has been contemplating with reverential awe the sublime countenance of John Conway Cowan, and, tapping Peabody on the, shoulder, 'Brownie whispers, "SaY, Charlie, did you see that girl ?" and the two move off in close consultation. H sit lly tes A age tin .rb- the -mee. nes illy - to 1111- ces - of the ose ses ise, the om- can ing irls. t is ally ing and, r in to his 5 at iest, 11 of 0 ' '89'S VOLUNTARIES. .ll ROM the 'beginning of her career 389 has been remarkable for the amount of work she could do outside her regular courses. Of 1 course, some detractors have been found base enough to insinuate that this tendency has been indulged at the expense of her 'required studies, but she points triumphantly to her lists of prize and honor men .to refute the libel. One of the first symptoms of this inclination toward voluntaries was shown in Freshman Year, when Dr. Jastrow organized his first Hebrew Class. Clem Brown was very ambitious then, and he immediately seized the opportunity to enlarge his already won- derful attainments as a linguist. But, alas! Clem's enthusiasm for " Aleph," 'f Ayin " and " Schewa H soon began to flag, and Charles Peabody's pernicious influence induced him to-abandon the Talmud for the Tennis Court, the reed of the scribe for the racket of the "server," Clemmie tried Hebrew once again, but of that ffmore anon." W For some time after this sporadic attempt voluntaries lan- guished, until Mr. Rennert announced that he intended to start an Italian course. '89 took up the proposition with her wonted vigor, and soon a class of twelve men was deep in the mysteries of " Le mia p1fzQgz'0fzz'." For some time all went well, and the class was dis- solved in tears at the pathos of jefferys' eloquent rendering of Sil- vio's woeful plaints, or roused to enthusiasm as Shumway's thunder tones rolled forth the fiery denunciations of Italia's foes. But again Clem was' the first to break the mystic chain. He found. the task of keeping the place with one eye and reading the last 1 .-Q-:fav 5. , Q F . 3 A A . ,. '. , -1- -A -'--'fr--f-f-fam-4-gzgf--,-1----f ii. .r- -Arcqaqamaa 1.-1-.-A 1 . - - N A A - Av -lun JL 4. 4 -A 4-A - - '- A- '1""":' 5' C' "'i'i-F!'IK'?f H3191 . A ' 'ii' A ' - :Je..l!w '.:AnefM9"-?-' ' "1!CJ:.:4'i"A:' 'J 1-211.1-grigj -1- g.25:1-k...ii2.: 15' 4.1.5 ' ' ' "A" ' - Si. 1,44 V- " t ttf'--fr""'4"s1-Q 44-444414.-"'....' "' 2-1' '1':4.f'r4 " - 11:31 Tilt", ggi-11,5313 5 -A 4- A- -A A A - - A H 5? 1, li ,b ,. qi AV ll. 1571 if i . xp lg, 5 , .AQ-: 4 ,-4 .:'l nufn l on at si ht with the other was too trying upon his HGTVCS, 21115- CSS g when they reached the most tearful part of 8. VCTY dvleful 130014, Clem could stand it no longer. Jimmy Mitchell, the rolllfl, 3150 gave up in disgust. He said he had joined expecting to read . ll Boccaccio and he "wasn't going to waste his time ploughmg through any such rot as this. ,And so, some for this reason and some for that, they all dropped away until only the immortal quar- tette were left, and they will go down to posterity enshrined on the walls of the Universityls Art Gallery, the Gymnasium. Q"This Photograph was the gift of Mr. C. P. B. jefferys, jr., '89,,' so the inscription reads.j A junior ,Year was signalized by the formation of that dis- tinguished quartette, the Mathematical Section. Not content with forming the "lEschines" Prize Class, and, with some additions, the "Quaternions" Prize Class, these indomitable youths seized upon Dr. Cattell and induced him to form a Psycho-Physic Class for experimental research. A A room was assigned to their use and soon fitted up with all sorts of mysterious apparatus. There the members of the Class could be found any afternoon industriously engaged in jabbing compasses into each other at various points, dissecting bullls eyes, winding up clocks, apparently for the fun of seeing them run down again, and performing various other strange and wonderful feats. Of course, this sort of thing was eminently calculated to awaken the greatest envy and curiosity amongst the. outside public, and one day the most anxious of these 'wonderers approached Mr. Dillingham, and in a beseeching tone asked him what it all meant. In his most urbane manner, john Conway Cowan Dilling- ham replied: My dear sir, I am very sorry, but I must request youto wait until we publish the result of our researches in the Brltlsh journal " Mz'1zd." It may not be amiss to remark that the gentleman is still waiting, only waiting. 1 Clasgtlleliielicgr gf ear came the era of "Seminars.i' Voluntary . ophomorish for us now. Everything must be a "Seminar," Of the most important of these, the Philosophic Seminar, we have spoken in another place. Close pressing it in S8 value of its results was the Chemical Seminar. Here the learned scientific Seniors met to discuss all sorts of chemical and comical subjects, and to listen to dissertations from Guggenheim, Seal and others on the relations and reactions of all the tetra-syllabic bases and poly-syllabic acids in the catalogue. Interesting and impor- tant as these proceedings were to the participants, they were utterly unintelligible to the ordinary layman, and, as for their results, " are they not written in the Book of the Records of the Chemical Seminar? " , In this year '89 carried the fever into the sacred precincts of the Wharton School and induced Prof. Patten to organize a Political Economy Seminar. The essays that were read, the discussions and debates that ensued, no pen can adequately portray. Thompsonian protection was, of course, utterly prostrated, and even trampled on. While the shades of Mill, Malthus, Ricardo and Smith stalked forth again in all their majesty, jefferys grew argumentative and eloquent, Woodruff eloquent, but not argumentative, while john Stewart contented himself with being neither, but managed to get the decision on his side every time. A number of others took prominent parts in the proceedings, and altogether Prof. Patten's Political Economy Seminar was one of the most successful depar- tures of the year. In the Arts the omnipresent Mathematical. Section signalized the new vfegime in the Greek department by organizing a " Demos- thenes H Seminar for the critical study of Demosthenes' Phillipics. Unfortunately, as soon as Perot learned that this Seminar had the use of the room where the assistant librarians were at work, he insisted upon joining, and kept the other members so busy watch- ing his outrageous efforts at flirtation, that the Seminar were unable to publish a critical edition of Demosthenes, as they had hoped to do. V ' Brown and Mitchell also made an effort to do some voluntary work in Hebrew, but the old aversion to " hen tracks " drove Clem away again, and he dragged Jimmy with him. john Conway Cowan and Charles, enraged at their comrades' base desertion of the "Mystic Four," again took up Psycho-Physics, and in the SQ WY, his vord seo. and -6111. for- cita- Well J in vith his one lar s a -'89'S PRIZE MEN. FRESHMAN YEAR. 1. For the best examination by a member of the Freshman Class on Greek Prose Composition, with the accents, equally to Charles Peabody and David Bowen Salter 5 with honorable mention of Matthew james Hyndman. I I 2. The Matriculate Greek Prizes for the best examination' upon the elements of Greek Prose Composition, of the iirst rank to Arthur Richard Harcourt Morrowg of the second rank to Walter Scott. i A 3. The Matriculate Latin Prizes for the best examination upon the elements of Latin Prose Composition 5, of the first rank to Arthur Richard Harcourt Morrow 5 of the second rank to Dickinson Sergeant Miller. Ai ' I 4. The Prize offered by the Board of Trustees to the scientilic CIHSSGS, for.i111p.rQYe1ne11t.i11.drawi11g..a11.d,,fQr..gQnQra1...gQ9.d C0115-uct and application, to Edward Christman Knight, of the Freshman Class. i I i ' 5. The Prize founded by Henry La Barre Jayne for the best English Composition, by a member of the Freshman Class, to Charles Newton Clement Brown, with 'honorable mentionof Samuel McCune Lindsay, for their essays on ffjohn Quincy Adams." SoPHoMoRE YEAR. I. The Sophomore Prize for the best Declamation, equally tO Daniel Bussier Shumway and Robert Stulb 5 with honorable men- tion of Gscar Pearl. Chamberlain. and Rudolpl1..Ho.Ward.-K1-Rude? 915 I JUNIOR YEAR. 1. For the best examination on the U Oration of Eschines against Qtesiphony by members of the junior Class, equally to john Conway Cowan Dillingham and Charles Peabody, with hon- orable mention of james Clayton Mitchell. A 2. For the best examination on the "Lectures on Quater- nions," given to the Voluntary junior Class 5 First Prize to Charles Peabody 5 Second Prize to Charles Newton Clement Brown. 3. For the best essay by a member of the junior Class to Elliston Joseph Perot. Subject : " The By-Ways of English Litera- ture." ' ' 4. For the best Original Oration, by a member of the Junior Class, to Charles Newton Clement Brown, with honorable mention of Oscar Pearl Chamberlain. Q ' A A 5. The D. Van Nostrand Prize, to the member of the junior Class in Civil Engineering wlioattains the highest general average of scholarship, to George Whitlield Taylor Miller. V SEMOR YEAR. , 1. For the best essay in Intellectual and Moral Philosophy by a member of the Senior Class. Subject, " Spinoza," to i2- FOT the best Latin Essay by a member of the Graduating Class, to 4 . 3: The Joseph Vifarner Yardley Prize, founded by the Class of 1877, in memory of their classmates, for the best Thesis in'Political Economy, by 3 Hlember Of the Senior Class. Subject, "Trusts, and the Remedy for Themj' to T Q2 A Vis. ines Y to hon. ater- arles SS to itera. nior tion unior erage Yby ating ass Of litical 5, and i i it E it F t It l i l 1 f I l I. l i il v it I P. i E l I it ll .li a 4 r l . t i F I L I V 1 I A i 4. The Henry Reed Prize, founded by the Alumni of the Uni- versity, for the best English Essay by a member of the Senigy Class. Subject, "The Names of Persons and Places in Thack- eray's Novels," to I 5. For the best Essay in History and English Literature by a member of the Senior Class. 4 Subject, " The Share of Pennsylvania in the Measures that led to the War for Independence," to if sy 1 -.115-f' "7f"QR: FOUR YEARS? HONORS. FIRST TERM, FRQESHMAN YEAR. II. 1. Charles Peabody. 2 2. Rufus Palen. 3 111. 1. D. B. sane-r. 4 II. 1. N. Y. Worrall. 4. III. 1. S. M. Lindsay. 5 - 2. W. J. Pennington. 3. S. A. Hibbs. 7. SECOND II. 1. Charles Peabody. 2. 2. W. C. Arrison. 3 3. Rufus Palen. III. 1. D. B. Salter. ' 5 Walter Scott. J. C. Mitchell. E. J. Perot. Science. E. C. Knight. E. P. Oberholtzer. W. E. Gaunt. F. W. Van Buskirk. TERM, FRESHMAN YEAR. A Vis. J. C. C Dillingham. E. J. Perot. Walter Scott. J. C. Mitchell. 93 5. J. ci C. Dillingham C. N. C. Brown. 6. W. M. Wiltbank. C. P. B. jefferys, jr. George Henderson. Io. E. A. Partridge. E. W. Mumford. C. N. C. Brown. E. C. Taylor. - W. M. Wiltbank. II III. I. II. III. II. III. I. II II. 4 III. III. III. III. II. II. I I. 11 0 4 I 2 I I I I 4 O I. 2. I I I. 2. 3. 4. I. I. I. 2. I. 2. I. N. Y. Xvorrall. W. E. Gaunt. E. P. Oberholtzer. S. M. Lindsay. S. A. Hibbs. FIRST W. C. Arrison. Charles Peabody. J. C. C. Dillingham. D. B. Salter. D. B. Shumway. A. N. Seal. N. Y. Worrall. G. VV. T. Miller. E. P. Oberholtzer. Science. E. C. Knight. 6. F. W. Van Buskirk. -7.c. P. B. Jefferys, Jr. 8. F, W. Cresson. TERM, SOPHOMORE YEAR. Arts. 2. E. J. Perot. 3. Walter Scott. 4. J. C. Mitchell. 5. r-r 1. 8. Science. R. H. Klauder. E. A. Partridge. F. M. Cresson. T. R. Beyer. O. P. Chamberlain. SOPHOMORE A SECOND TERM, NV. C. Arrison. Charles Peabody. J. C. C. Dillingham. D. B. Shumway. A. N. Seal. G. W. T. Miller. E. A. Partridge. O. P. Chamberlain. J. R. McCance. G. VV. T. Miller. J. R. Savage, Jr. III. 1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. FIRST 3. C. P. B. Jefferys, Jr. 3 E. W. Mumford. Arts. D. B. Salter. E. J. Perot. J. C. Mitchell. Science. R. H. Klauder. N-. Y. Worrall. E. P. Oberholtzer. T. R. Beyer. F. M. Cresson. TERIWI, JUNIOR YEAR. A1'z's. Charles Peabody. Sczence. T. Beyer. W7za1'lo1z Sclzoof. S. M. Lindsay. J. L. Stewart. SECOND TERM, JUNIQR YEAR. Arts. Charles Peabody. M, J, Hyndman. D' B' Shumway- J. R. McCance.. J. C. C. Dillingham. 4, F, R, Bake,-I 94 YEAR. E. W. Mumford. T. R. Beyer. O. P. Chamberlain E. A. Partridge. E. C. Taylor. C. N. C. Brown. Dallet Fuguet. E. C. Knight. E. W. Mumford. W. E. Gaunt. Wm. Guggenheim Walter Phillips. Walter Scott. E. C. Taylor. C. N. C. Brown. W. E. Gaunt. Wm. Guggenheim E. C. Knight. S. M. Lindsay, D. B. Shumway. F. M. Cresson. C. B. White. C. N. C. Brown. J. C. Mitchell. E. J. Perot. wrd. iflain. ge. VII. t. nrd. lheim. ps. 11. 1 hellll. ay. I Il. 7 1 G. W. T. Miller. D. B. Salter. C. P. B. Jefferys, Jr. C. B. White. ' Charles Peabody. D. B. Shumway. J. C. C. Dillingham. B. F. Lacey. D. B. Salter. G. W. T. Miller. E. A. Partridge. C. R. Woodruff. J. L. Stewart. E. P. Oberholtzer. Charles Peabody. D. B. Shumwayff B. F. Lacey? J. C.- C. Dillingham. G. W. T. Miller. D. B. Salter. J. L. Stewart. C. R. Woodruff. E. P. Oberholtzer. .S'cz'encc. 3. O. P. Chamberlain. Whczvfton School. 3. S. M. Lindsay. J. L. Stewart. FIRST TERM, SENIOR YEAR Arts. 341. C. Mitchell. 4. M. J. Hyndman. III. 1. C. N. C. Brown. E. J. Perot. Science. 4. O. P. Chamberlain. A. N. Seal. LV1ZCl'1'i07Z School. III. I. J. F. Tatem. C.. B. White. Philosophy. III. 1. M. J. Greenman. SECOND TERM, SENIOR YEAR. Arls. 4. J. C. Mitchell. III. I. M. J. Hyndman. 2. Dallet Fuguet. E. J. Perot. Science. A. N. Seal. 4. C. B. Keen. Wlzarloaz School. 4. C. B. White.. III. 1. Walter Scott. ' Philosophy. III. 1. M. J. Greenman. Receive the Degree, B.S. 95 I T. R. Beyer. Taniio Hayashi. Dallet Fuguet. I. R. McCance. F. R. Baker. C. B. Keen, jr. T. R. Beyer. C. P. B. jefferys, Jr Walter Scott. . F. R. Baker. J. R. McCance. . C. N. C. Brown. . O. P. Chamberlain. . E. A. Partridge. . C. P. B. jefferys, jr QT. F. Tatem. GRADUATION TI-IESES. Franklin Bache.-" Ore Concentration!! F. R. Baker.-" The Decline of the English Drama." T. R. Beyer.-" Drainage of Towns." H. H. Boyd.--" The Evils of Unrestricted Immigration." George Brooke, Jr.-" Iron Industry in Pennsylvania." C. N. C. Brown.-" Two English Satiresf' - O. P. Chamberlain.-" Design for Walnut St. Bridge." J. O. Clarke.-" Design for a Railroad Station, with Details." F. M. Cresson.-"The Location, Construction, and Appurte- ' nances of a Foundry." L. S. Dexter.-" The Advantages of a Protective Tariff." J. C. C. Dillingham.-" Modern Russian Literature." S. W. Dougherty.--" Immigration." Rev. VV1n. Du Hamel.--" Plea for the Unity of Christendom." C. F. Fisher.-" Railroad Sleepers." ' ' W. I. Forbes.--" William Makepeace Thackerayf' C. I-I. Frazier.-" International Copyrightfi Dallet Fuguet.-" Edgar Allan Poe." M. J. Greenman.-" Placenta of the Cat." R. E. Griscom.-4'The Decadence of American Shipping and the Vv'ay to Remedy Same." Tamio Hayashi.-" Relations of United States and Japan." George Henderson.-" Raw Material Questionf' G. H. Hill.-ff Photography as Applied to Engineering." R. C. Hill.-H Co-operation." T. W. Hulme.-" Common Roads." M. J. Hyndman.-"John Ruskin." E. I. I-Iyneman.-K' Shakspere's Tragedy of Macbeth." J. S. Jaffa.--" Trustsf' 96 l I C. P. B. Jefferys, Jr.-"The Historical and Political Status of Prohibition in the States and Territories." H. M.- Justi.-H Composition of Glass for Optical and Scientiic Purposes." C. B. Keen.-" A Set of Building Plans." ' R. H. Klauder.-" Electric Transmission of Power." E. C. Knight.-"Ore Concentration." B. F. Lacey.-" Shakspere and Corneillef' S. M. Lindsay.-"Chinese Exclusionf, 1 J. R. McCance.-"ThelElizabethan Drama." Howard Mellor.-" Actinia of the Bahama Islandsf' 4 G. W. T. Miller.-" A Gravity System of Water Worksf' J. C. Mitchell.-H The Physical and the Metaphysical Ro- mance." V E. W. Mumford.-"The Place of Woman in the Social Or- ganismf' E. P. Oberholtzer.-" Woman's Place in Politics." Charles Peabody.-"The Origin and Use with the Article, of the Greek Iniinitivef' - E. J. Perot.-" The Bible as an English Classicf' Walter Phillips.-" Plans and Estimate for a Pattern Shop for Twelve Students." , D. B. Salter.-" Railroad Bridge Failures." - L. M. Scott.-U The Decay of the American Marineff Walter Scott.-" Regulation of Inter-State Commerce." A. N. Seal.-" Methods for the Extraction of Metallic Sodium, C H Aluminum and Magnesium." A I D. B. Shumway.-5' The Two Faustsf' A. H. Smith.-" Distribution of the Surplus of I837.H J. L. Stewart.-" Administration of Grover Cleveland." Robert Stulb. -' ' Martin Luther. " J. F. Tatem.-'f Reconstruction. " A. G. Thomson.-" Echinoderms of the Bahama Islands." C. B. White.-"Administration of Chester A. Arthur." C. R. Woodruff.-H Factory Legislation." N. Y. Worrall.-" The Samoan Affair." ' 97 Bullen's Old Plays Q4 vols.j. Arberls U Barnabe Googef' Bullen's England's " Heliconf' Bul1en's Lyrics from Elizabethan Song Books. Bu1len's Carols and Poems. . Chap1nan's Iliad and Odyssey. Chapmanls Minor Poems and Translations. Day's Dramatic Works. Fordls Dramatic Works. Cokain's Dramatists of the Restoration. KA portion of the fund has not been expended, as the books especially needed have not been determinedj . ga ll 990331 H9n4eT324'l fi L I NZ Qxeu. tj .,. rms is Qffeftvlt 1. lfflww feifgfw . lil. 43 ,qzfibfjwib fpnbg J , lil it ff'l . h Q C , A? ..a - -M -"-47' I . f 'I' -' -T " -f f f - ,.' ' :lv!!5:i'T?Lii-5-' Jr" ' " ... A 4 I '- le? ' 7 ' l::4ff" iii f 1, ,, 99 I 5' 3 4? if 1 1 1 1 4 ily H. ix lg. il A J il fi 3 S 3 y K IH 5? 5 f, 5 a I A i 2, Q1 I 1 Ve, S 1 3, if i I . . -111. I' .-.. V 1, .. . NH - QQ? rx aff-, A 1 IQ -ig. YQ 0 ng 73 4 N ' E Q, 1 J .M 0 KE X rs' "Q '- :fab N s '-if QJJDUW - -, v f X K 'T ' 'L- xh U J QQQ ,Q . x 'Y'2'rT -1 '!. Egisx gl . ' X FJ if X 3. 11 ' '- - 1 t A 4 65 wx If N "4 - N4 X :- A -KX I X IOO 74 if Q , Ni 1 zailz Ybvilla X x 2 EWS .W b X 6 X x , , X r A , fi' .i 7 Nl , y x Z X. ' 1 K V 1 ' . 1' 3 ,Silk tanthe GREEKS. 4 5 ' I Tm, , -I Mlm 0 W9 S y . HE iirst intimation '89 received of the high estimation in which the Faculty justly held her, Was the re- quest Qearly in Fresh- man Yearj to attend a consultation in Dr. Easton's room, on the proposed Greek Play. When We were as- sembled in those now historic precincts, the Doctor, springing on this desk in order to be -seen, thrust his pencil through his beard and informed us that our " athith- Was the only thing needed to " enthure the thuctheth " ot IOI TI-IIT, ACHARIANS. Our enthusiastic response carried renewed courage to the Doctor's heart, and from that hour the preparations were pushed forward with redoubled vigor. ' just here it is well to define '89's relations to the Greek Play. Three classes have successively claimed the honor of proposing the performance of a Greek drama by students of the University, and '89 is content to let them settle the matter as best they can. But it was the unwavering and zealous support of T89 in Cast, Chorus and Committee, which made the " proposal " a veritable fact. Her generous efforts did more than any other one thing to inspire that enthusiasm amongst the Alumni and generous rivalry amongst the undergraduates which made THE ACEIARIANS the most artistic and successful revival of ancient Greek drama ever given in the modern world. 5 The sudden demand upon ,89 developed resources which even her greatest admirers had not supposed to exist. Before Prof. Clarke held his trial of voices for the chorus, everybody knew that Teddy Mumford had a remarkable voice, but no one ever suspected that he could sing each part of the harmony or all at. once if necessary. He performed 'the latter feat once at a rehearsal, and was immediately put under 15500-bail never to do it again. Of course, 5' Sammy" Lindsay had to follow in Teddy's footsteps, and he soon was able to take both bass parts. Unfortunately, Sammy was so delighted with his newly acquired power that he persisted in its exercise until the happy idea was conceived of letting him, as manager of the Glee Club, use his vocal abilities to melt the hearts of the creditors of that worthy but impecunious organization. - A In the chorus, too, were "jimmy" Mitchell, whose saintlike countenance and sweet clear voice concealed the coarse pugnacity of a professional,"S1ugger,', and Ed. Knight, who never could tell whether he was singing iirst tenor or second bass, but thought he ought to go on the front row, because he " looked so handsome in a chitonf' But we are forgetting our noblest representative, Billy Bell. Besides the many sleepless nights spent in fitting himself for work as a Y. M. C. A. missionary to college students,-by per- sonal inspection of the "Widow,s," gambling dens and other haunts 102 rl 2 'x A of vice and cigarette smoking, this self-sacrificing youth denied himself the pleasure of everipreparing a recitation for-Tackson or Dr. Muhlenberg, in order that, by constant exercise and the consumption of innumerable quarts of " extract of malt " fa liquid, which he ab- horredj he might adequately portray in figure and in voice his ideal of a Greek. 'How well he succeeded any girl who saw him can tell you. Such a magnificent "z'en01fe ffobusiof' such a statuesque pres- ence and Qmay we say itj such legs no human being had ever heard of or seen-before. With such a delegation in the chorus, '89, with her accustomed modesty, felt that she could afford to let the other classes have some of the more important parts in the cast. Clem Brown, with Lloyd Scott as his silent attendant, arrayed his rotund figure in the Phrygian "peacock H dress of the Persian ambassador and spouted his Greek, very much to his own satisfaction and not 715191 much to other people's discomfort. Clem' was, besides this, the understudy for Lamaclzos, and it was simply terrible to see the solicitous air with which, as the performance drew near, he would inquire after his principal's health, and the utter dejection with which he would turn away when told "He,s better than he ever was in his life." "Pop " Jefferys acted as an attendant to Dicaeopolis, and one of the hits of the performance was the awe-struck admiration which Jeff managed to portray by means of his graceful if somewhat attenuated lower extremities as he marched off the stage carrying that wonderful eel. Jeff himself is a good actor, but his legs are inimitable. M But while these and a number of others ably sustained the male characters, it was in the female cast that we shone. What Philadelphia belle has yet ceased' to envy the majestic grace of De Lancey Newlin or the easy abandon of Chick Frazier's dancing in the last act. Many a New York club-man still feels a queer sensation in the cardiac region when he thinks of the coy smile with which Miss Forbes leaned forward to whisper in Dicaeopolis' ear. But alas, in the green-room Newlin could be heard to' swear at 'f these skirts which won't let a fellow take a decent stride," while Chick Frazier sat on the edge of a table, smoking a cigarette and wondering "' how girls ever managed to wear all this harnessf' Let 11O'E YOUT 103 QXSEJIBV 1 w it A-gm Q 32 if' 6 H -5 .1 I' gtk X X3 " Qt , -s 'E -Y: F' - F -- 1 X 1. ., Nm- 2.1. Y "',.5 .1 5 - -A t . ,, 28- 15- fl.. . .f, .- sail- s -N .9 Q XsaZ,6 Kg! lfiiifbi- yay- , is iw 2,1 Qs, pq, fffff - -'ws i- 'pg' -" -5 " I ' pwqggsq 4 , G in 'ag-. J, ' .iii 5271, ' ana 8' it ' 'it 4 i i ' r Q f al is ... ii' . ik 'it vw Q' J A e QWAM XXII fekzf ff-si ff lp fl 1 I' I N'l'k!e76 -' fr! X XZ ff XI if 'f it If L' ' Qbwx If ff ff - ff '. 1 'f 1 S., 1,1 H5 -'4 P- - 1 -.i f :IHS ' -1 'I W A f' f ' 1 ,A ' L. 1 9 M da-5 i ci Y!!,'1,!f-' 14- A4414 - if 'L 7 f : ' 1-X,-Nav: P X - I S ii we if? fi ' f' if 'l 1 . K 9 ,H ,A ' I ll. , f 4 S , I, Q ,W ,ato,lc. B- fgf. fri, ll J- ,4 X f N Y mi 2 "4 ". ,Q'?x'L'3" : gi eww: Q' ' " :ff '-X' .QQW .f::E ?i1i-4NN'f". " . . ' -N ' 'lim 'W 525' WQ4Q":'I --. i-g?,"f-Q uu.:..': ..u-gig, , , ..g.-555 X ,Q W , 'w . M1 .HW A iv-.LLB-"--' ' ff' H .. 'sk'5f"L-Belfkw-,Ng '- 'Y IWW .. QQ 1 '3---' ,,,..:vt X-' wr' N , N . fax, s-af N. - . ., 0+ Q .- --. ,, .xxx-.-m . .e- s- v '89 IN THE BOWLFIGHT. 1 HEN in Freshman Year '89 first loomed upon the college horizon, its threatening appearance filled the Sopho- mores with consternation. They saw that unless they could bring in some foreign interference, they were destined to a series of unavoidable and disastrous defeats. Nor were their fears relieved by the results of the corner fights and cane rushes which acted as preliminary, " breathers " to the great con- test of the bowl fight. Defeated in every one of these skirmishes, they hastened to -bring into play that wonderful power of pulling wool over the eyes of the authorities, which distinguished them throughout their college course and gained for them so many unjust decisions. Now they succeeded in inducing the "powers " to for- bid the bowl ight in its ancient and time-honored form, and to place it under a series of restrictions which made it as quiet and pleasant a game as " I spy " or " Wood-tag," in which '88 was so proficient. '89 naturally objected to this absurd degradation of the good old custom, and did her utmost to prevent the final passage of the rules. But, inding that the Faculty had fully determined on the protection of '88, by making the bowl ight less of a test of manly courage and more of an infantile game, we resolved, out of respect for constituted authority, even when unwisely exercised, to 105 make at least a trial of the new rules. The day appointed dawned cold and blustery, and the three inches of -snow upon the Athletic Grounds made the Sophomores wish they had inserted " no snow " as one of the necessary conditions. But A it was now too late to make any such change, and they were compelled to proceed. After Teddy Mumford, the bowl man, had exhibited his manly form to their envious gaze, the signal was given by Dr. White, the referee, and the contest began. By a clever Hank movement the bowl and its guard were swept away from the vicinity of the bowl man, and at no time after that was '88 able to lessen the distance between them. After fifteen minutes of ineffectual effort to bring about this juxtaposition, Dr. White, in accordance with the " new rules," ordered the bowl man to be released, and Teddy walked off the field, " very little the worse for wear," when compared with his predecessors in previous fights. '89 now turned her attention to the effort to break the bowl, and the new rules began to appear in their true light. Every moment a cry of "rough lighting H would be heard, and some ,88 man would rush up to the referee and appeal to him to sustain the -new rules. The tactics pursued by the Sophomores of simply lying upon the bowl and by dead weight keeping it down also helped to deprive the fight of any possible snap and vigor. After an hour or -more of this sort of tame childls play, '89 was thoroughly disgusted with the constant thwarting, by an appeal to the H new rules," of their efforts to infuse some life and energy into their fighting, and not wishing to deprive '88 of her already-too-few athletic men by the colds resulting from prolonged submersion in the melted snow Qwhich by this time threatened to drown those at the bottom of the struggling heapj, agreed to allow the referee to declare the iight a draw. Thus ended the first and last bowl iight under the " rules," for when '89 left the field, each and every man vowed solemnly that he would never take part again in any such farcial contest. Accord- 111g1Y, When mldyear again found us as Sophomores, there-was evi- dent in the class a widespread disposition to defy the authorities 106 and bring back the bowl fight in its true 'historic -form. But a letter from our respected Provost, setting forth the reasons for the attempted changes, made us think that there 'fmight be Some- thing in it after all.', Animated by this feeling, we appointed 3 committee to consult with the Provost and report upon the advis- ability of dispensing with the bowl fight. 'After a long and patient investigation and study of all the circumstances, the committee reported in favor of abolishing the bowl fight, for this year at least. ' A long and heated debate fol- lowed. Those in favor of a defiant return to the 'Hold timers," in spite of the Faculty, presented their side of the case with all the fine and eloquence of ,a Fourth Ward High School graduate arguing against "the grasping greed of the University," while against them was arrayed the greater portion of that eloquent phalanx which has done so much to help Prof. McMaster to sleep soundly through the sessions of the Whaiton School Congress. Protracted and vigorous as was the debate, better counsels at last prevailed. The calm drawling saturnine eloquence of Pop Jefferys, 'backed by Brownie's 'turgid bombast, carried the day for the abolition of the bowl fight. Feeling that, while the authorities had made a mistake, they had acted in what they considered the best interestsiof the students, and that, therefore, we could not honorably refuse to accept their decision, and also- seeing clearly, from our former experience, that a bowl fight- under "the new rulesn was a "delusion and a farce," we 'resolved that there should be no bowl fight that year. As on many another occasion, '89 showed that highcollege spirit which has been a distinguishing element in her whole career, by sacrificing herself that other classes and the whole college might benefit by it. By refusing to attempt any bowl fight she clearly showed the authorities that the contest could never be carried, on under any such absurd restrictions, while she entered an emphatic protest against lawlessness and misrule by declining to disregard their prohibition of the struggle in any other form. The good results of her self-sacrifice were shown in the following year, when the Facultyhtacitly yielded their position by allowing the fight to be revived in its former glory. N A . . L IO7 l l l 3 I i i 5 i l i i - 1 l 1 l l i ! I '1 . l a Y i l r 1 l I. 1 l he l l I v 1 1 1 s l 1 1 CREMATIQN EXERCISES CLASS OF '89 ,, HF:-, ' .MI rw A. f ,- - fQ9'w52f - fi- ,-mg-'-: ' 1 'A YH? :,':' . :LI '- , 1: -.3 NIONDA'Y JUNL 61 H 1881 fir Class of 'SQ if AU TO-- DA3- F E. Condemnation and Cremation of Lodges ilA'd'h!7lliu'-T. President' ofthe Court and Alcamr General of the K'Inqnisition, . . .I . . . . . . . . .I5llEllliRICK, R. BAKER. Orzlrr .y G'frzfm111?.r. , i lfrpocssirnnnl ljlymn, . . . . . 'Scrmon, . .'. . Efzhortationp . . . . . . . I 'Recanmtion of the Penilcnls, ' Invectivc against Lodge, . . Symphony... . . . . . . . . . .. . flint? . . !5'f1:r fl'n'f. A, . . . Cllazk - "' . .lfnyr-r ry Ihr lnyzlisilifm . . . '. 77'lllIQ1'f!'!'.l Apology. . . . . L-vrfrr. Fanfare, . . ,. . . . . ....,. 77-zlnzprfrrx. Sentence, . . ,F . . . . , x . . Jiffy: gf' 401 IIIQIQLVRIQIE, Delivery to the Secular Arm. 1' The Lightingpf the Fagois SACRA, CONVER 'EUNTUR IN ORGIA. Edward A. Bowser, T. R. Loqnsbury, j. G. R. Mclilroy, Victm von Richtcry Oliver j. Lodge hah sido llamados :S compareccr esta moehe al jnicio del Santo Olicio de la Inquisicion, para contcstar librf: mcnte ai las cargas que contm ellcs se han cchog :i'saber. Por haber introducido doctrines nuevas, rlilidlci e impias cn-1:1 qlnsg 11,31 '39, y de este modo habcr disrurbado la bros. dwsistencia de sus inwolables micm- SiAel inform.: es cierto. de'que cuzutro de los' herejes 'se han arrepen- tido, y sc dcdiccn, el Santo Oficio.Io:i tomari vajo su custodia y disi- plina, y. cspondri al impenitcnte Lodge in que' sufre lm. veng,:1u2a cle . .1515 nucstro' pueblo cristiano, y sea cefnado, pam que de este mndg gepa ' H-.J...i..C ' " ' con anlicipacioh lo que fe cspern. eu el fuegdcterno. ,." ,,, ., A.. . f .1 I . '50, "" .Q :ff '17 ul . . - . ,. - ' I 'gf ..,-1 ,7 ,T . f W'-'f , -'L.-'-ff 522 my . ' A Niall-111 Tfffi fi' ri..-'.f'f'f2, . V 'H' - .. wi'F ?-1' 4 gil"s.-?'I 1- -fu: '- -0 '115 Lilglgfgrx-g-'12:ffl-Zghsiia, -3.5 .3 I fx., - .:- ,-jf,-V -, V' 15, 'zlfnfff Gi". 2:11 1'-' L. T ' , 55.513 .I "le: :':.1-'Qisfrii-i4'?'Y 4. , 1g-4?z'?:: - 'W - it bw 3 1- ,-'-1-.I ,-ZZ, -xii' 1-Q - -qfj -1 Q1'f:.3"5-,ig L X r e a ff' Q ! 1 ' , f f . -X l , , f-9,4 Q' wp - x 'fx If 4 . -jf.S,'-ig,.L'Q1'HQi-,.'Y Smfa-3 -:mai-" -. . -S151 gr.-.acf -mg, - 'if-' 'f':':'2f'o ::g.1n.Ag,-jg,-ffm I 1 'L' - V l r. .7-. 2-:fi ' - Legg firfiz-rrfixvf' .ty - in-., .-rj 3 .Y 'f . .I-x5Yx'W.ff v e Grim tyrant, thine hast been .thc porou- l Through weary months of pain, .But now we hail the happy hour ,Which frees us from thy chain.,' With .flr:.rs'and .rlmifr no'more are we ' Reduced to reasoh's scant edge, To part with Lodge is certainly llkchnuiral ddlfdllfdgf. No claim to mercy thou hast earned: Prepare thy fate to meetg . Our energy of hatc hath turned To mugy qf bmp No weeping moumers crowd- thy hierg Thy vaunted forts f11:unlaI:2'-- Thy I4-ulrr-eoul-4 not mir: hi tear: Each eye is lzydrasmiir. Go! myriad demcns bear thee to gf Thy sulphurous destination g 5 - V Neglcctingfrimbvt, side with-true X ,lnferemed aklirlrrntiah' .And may thy guiltyisoul. rdistressedl, 'Pursued by Furies lrrlzlz, Find in its flight no ,mite zfrrrl. No moment of inrrfial 'Sr in .F 3. .,, -1 I tix m x'.'A, 5 fl .Qi-U57 EW 4 C7 oils' Q, MSF' .ol 2.1 '89'S AUTO-DA-FE. i- 1 OLD rain to right of them, Damp rain to left of them, , Wet rain above them, . Soaked all creation, Dripping they were, 'tis true, Wet were they, through and through, Only more gay they grew, All those glad thousands, who Cheered our Cremation. V How it did -rain on that night of ,89's Cremation! ,It came down in driving sheets, that put seats in the grand stand at a premium and inspired Bobby Stulb with the highly poetic idea that somebody had " turned the sky upside down and dumped all the water out." But despite the weather, a packed grand stand, its roof fringed with overhanging legs, and crowded bleaching boards greeted the imposing procession with which the ceremonies opened. D I ' 4 V ' "With solemn step and sloww the long ranks of musicians, white-robed Choristers, cowled Friars, prisoners in their fatal dress, covered with symbols of the torments they were to endure, and Judge and Grand-Inquisitor in their oilicial robes, swept by to the sad wailings of a dirge. With stately mien the Grand-Inquisitor mounted his throne under a. funeral canopy and bade the judge proceed with theitrial. . ' ' ' ' At a signal from the judge, who was personated by Clem Brown, the stentorian tones of the well-known missionary from Germantown, Friar Perot,,rang out from the pulpit, where, '11'Cl1P ' , 109 At last, a bugle call summoned the procession to its return march, and amidst the applause of the spectators they passed from view. As the last notes died away in the distance, the Wet but happy crowd Hooked out and left the smouldering bones of Lodge as the sole reminder of the most successful Cremation ever seen in college. , I ,Z lf' -,hflmlk x ,y ll' Z- - E jg J E rg 2 1 QM it s wf E XX 'Zigi '-1 54 - ii Q ' A SPECIMEN EROM THE "VETs.,' III bore in mind the antique Shakes being achieved by industry and "perfected by the swift course of time." We don't believe Qand we say this quite modestlyj that there was ever such an amalgamation of " buddin " femi ' g nine radiance and masculine brilliancy as on that occasion, when '89 made her lirst presentation to the annals of social life at the University. The music was above reproach, and the floor was much less undu- lating than it is generally Wont to be 5 the dec p 'triumph of the embellisher's art, and the supper-Well there were a few disparaging remarks made concerning the conspicuousness Qby their absencej of the viands, but such a merry jest was of little im- -port, although the collation was of a sensitive and retiring quality, We must admit. However, nobody Qexcept the thin Freshmanj -came to eat that night. ' pearean adage about experience orations were at Yes, we all look back With. admiration' upon our Junior Ball, which " was only run hardf for first place " in the category of social triumphs by our most elaborate " Ivy. " Well, it is over. f' Reguzkscaz' in pace," and may the memory of it be ever cherished by all. I . ' ' illllill f i t W A' f ' ' tl A lhjlf . ' g . A ' - I ,, - ' :5 , fWf ,.- 'll ,UZ " ' . -,,,H'ZQEfi . 51' , Y . v I 1 " bs A II3 I 1 I ff """":r' THE IVY BALL HE fa1r damsel 1S gone t1s no wx on der at all That bred to the dance she IS fond of a ball What college man does not look back Wltll bhssful mem or1es to the balls glven dur1ng h1s college career and above every other to that crownlng success of all The Ivy Ball? Semor s m1nd happy thoughts Strams of del1c1ous mus1c are heard and 1n the background of "TV 117 f?-ffm. -5 --Z' The very Words call up 1n a memory IS seen the beautlfully decorated ball room iilled vvlth many phantom iigures vvhlch sway 1n the undulat1ng movement of the waltz and pass to and fro t1ll one alone seems to stand out 1n bold rellef the flgure of a g1rl befole Whom 1S seen as 1n a look1ng glass a Sen1or s form plead1ng for one more Waltz The class of 89 can look back Wlth spec1al pleasure and pr1de to the even1ng of the 21st of February when 1ts Ivy Ball was g1ven 1n the annex of the Unlon League It was the most successful ball of the season and many hearts were palp1tat1ng as fa1r forms ascended the long fhofht of sta1rs II 1 . ' , . O' 7 I . 7 ,, J . 2 , I . Q 1 2 - ,N . . f ff N 7 'f ,- 'fz-L v . " ..,. 5-fx " CC 3? ,af--f.:1,--- 9' , , . . , . ' 7 7 . . -5 i 7 J ' ! y A' Q T 3 ' - ' 2 ' cc H 3 y ' 9 ,, ' ' ' ' y . , U . ! A ,L 23 z, "2-1-,..,,,, V - , .MW J, F M' 1. if . s I J +- l ,, +I 4 3 F .item-Q14 . E- il" 4 bordered with palms and ilovvering plants, which even thus early sheltered from the too envious eye many happy couples. Hearts and heads were filled with anticipations of dances with favored Seniors, Whose names would soon be Written on the quaintly decorated programmes. Of course, all went off well! What is there that '89 puts its hand to that does not succeed, especially with so able a committee? It was merely another to be added to the long list of brilliant events. " Can there ever again be such an Ivy Ball, " was Whispered from many lips, as cloaked and hooded iigures waited for carriages in the' small hours of the morning. And now that the " good-byes H have i been said to Alma Mater, it,is sincerely hoped that future classes Will follow in the illustrious footsteps and endeavor to equal the " Ivy Ball of '89." ...P i .-4. -,- - Ir 2- xx 'X "" 1 V - ig I ,, fi I' J u num ' EN' gl ll' Jn' 41 Syria. I i h i I,':e,V Xxx A if ji, 'WF .mmwfd A 116 ' '89'S CQNSPIRATORS. -1-1.. , ' E do not claim to be such, but the Faculty insists that we dia? "conspire together feloniously, etc.," in absenting' ourselves from college on that Friday in Junior Year.. A For a long time there had been a rumor in college that the Christmas holidays were to be cut down. ' As a consequence, there was a deal of falk about ff striking for our rights,', 4' resisting tyranny," and so forthg It was observed that '89 took no part in .this boastful conversation, but when Thursday came and there' was no hope for thef usual F' day-before-Christmas " holiday, these- same undemonstrative Juniors smiled calmly and 'peculiarly to themselves and bided their time. E ' Chapel, Friday morning, found '89 represented by row upon row of empty benches, and the secret was out. '89 had rebelled and " cut " in a body. Stay-I was mistaken. Three misguided Science men and three " Wharts " proved faithless, and, weakening at the last' moment Qpardon, ye shades of H Billy Shake! "D, H crept, like snails, unwillingly to college." QDon't be alarmed, my weak- kneed friends, I will not publish you to the world, but will leave you to the torments of your own consciencesj But the great majority stood to their colors, and the college, deprived of their invigorating presence, relapsed into the slum-W b'rous lassitude which had characterized it for so many' years before their advent. After the holidays the whole college world was in a ferment. of anxiety to discover what course the authorities would take in the premises. The Juniors were apparently most unconcerned, and 117 r A yd 2 k is J l ir 5 went about their work with a " what-are-you-going-to-do-about-it H look that was simply maddening to the rest of the college. At length the Faculty determined to exert itself, and the unabashed malefactors were summoned in a body' before the dread tribunal of the Executive Committee. What a sight that was ! Facing the class, as they entered and took their seats, was a row of professors, the older men grave and awful as if presiding at an execution, the younger ones striving with might and main to keep their "1'isibilitieS" in proper order. After sitting a few moments -in -solemn silence, broken only by a snicker from Bobby Stulb or the professorial representative of l"Der Vaterlandf' the Dean arose and lectured us upon the " hei- nousness of 'cutting' in cz body instead of as z'miz'z1z'a'zLczZs.,' VVe promptly knocked this prop away by assuring the Committee that we did cut as individuals and not as a Class. Dougherty grew so 'eloquent upon this subject that the Committee began to ask ques- tions, and finally McElroy capped the climax by saying, fWVell,' Mr. Dougherty, you say there was no conspiracy, no understanding, no mutual arrangement amongst you? May I ask how, then, you all came to absent yourselves on the same day? In short, Mr. Dougherty " Qgrowing very excited and animatedj, " did cz Ziifle bird sivzg if z'1z fha 6ZZ'7"? H QConsternation of Dougherty and roar of ap- plause from Class and Committee alikej This episode seemed to break the ice and take away the un- pleasant constraint that had existed at first. After the Senior Pro- fessor had sent his younger son to Otto's a few times and Dr. M had been mellowed by a few glasses of " Reunig's Extract of Malt,', we settled down to a. calm and friendly discussion of the whole affair. - Fullerton and Perot soon became involved in an altercation as to the justiication Qof our proceedingsj by Qourj faith Cin our right to a holidayj. Saint Matthew Hyndman, who had " au!" Qmark it, ye powers, had "'cz4z"'j with the rest, took a deep interest in this little scrap and induced the gentlemen to adjourn to the back room where they could have their " mill " uninterrupted. This disturbing element having been removed, the feast of reason Qand pretzelsj 118 i ' I I and the How of soul Qand bock beerj proceeded with the utmost harmony. - A As the time flew by, the fun waxed fast and furious. At length the President oif the Committee, seeing that something .must be done immediately, or the whole Class would be acquitted, called for a vote on the nominal punishment of one hundred demerits per man. The Class Objectlgid naturally, but after the Professor of French, Linguistics, Sanskrit, Russian, Chinese, japanese, etc., etc., sup- porting himself 'between Peabody and the post of "Idealistic" fame, had urged them to agree, in a speech whose impressive mingling of quotations from all the nine hundred and ninty-nine languages at the gentleman's disposal, moved the whole assemblage to tears, they accepted the proposal. 8 VVhen the "mill" in the back room had been ended by the "knocking out" of Perot, the Secretary of the Committee pro- ceeded to indite to H the parent or guardian H of each " conspirator " an epistle like the following : UNIV. on PENNA., Jan. 13th, 1888. DEAR SIR : ' At a meeting of the Executive Committee of the College Faculty, held jan. 11th, your son, john jones, for entering into a combination with others of his Class for the purpose of absenting himself from his college duties on Friday, Dec. 23d, 1887, was, by unanimous vote ofthe Committee, reprimanded, and awarded the usual penalty of one hundred demerits. I I GEO. S. FULLERTON, ' Sadly of ihe Exec. Comm. As a consequence, the honors for the term were 4' few and far betweenf' And yet not one of the " conspirators " has ever said that he regretted his share in '89's cut. 119 I 5 I 1-..f , .r .:r1'7'E-EJ-7: . ,.--.---1' " 'i- " , J .4- 'f-v-EEEQLZE -4 , , , ---' 44--Y +1 f' , . . "AU ff: " ',..5'f ' X-f '- ..-----,g,,-f-- -- -,:-N :,.. ffl: z...,4. XT. gil, -'-' ?"N - -' 73-7 A 10,411 Xl,-33' -wp- - S f' - 'Hi Er F'-Gigi' r :rg-fe, , exif? T . , -f:'gEuf!i0'f -Kmlfi yes . ,-,216 . 'A 2 A ' w" , QQQK OBQ -- ' ' J uf, 4 f iz j -f-E T 1" f A '-fl' ff .,,g 2 -um, ' mi 1' nf ,W ',1W'm!l"'i? .r-,J.:.x. ..L I uf - 1:51555-f2:,-1:1-'Sf ffl- -'-xwlfvvr ft - , ,LW -nw:-ffe.::ai-fa: Aff. Q:f'55.'I'.. '-,QL::Fg. - ,. X74 'V Y fkiluf 'umm '-7,'-.-"1 -' gjjflgf- lv Kr: ' ' ,iii ,L-.911-1" 1 'fiiq rf Qlc.nfqTn 2E'5"2X , qgilnkf' lfixl in .. -N wx-:pv2dg:,-f, Q -L., 132 - ,M A A., . 3i"':f':vf5- fieqpxf i- fmim!! 5:35,-f,j::A X5 x ii ' 4 1 1 " ML-Z Y'QgfHE.:!Jr5 ,,4L,f- 1 , ,Q :, -. .' . .I v""!" 1" -" JV 5 ':,2:!,"' .. r 1, . an .i Af A gi. r K . nnfw . I 9fQ,Lv- I . I ' img 3.0 Zgllullm H,,4g. , - uf 'f-1 l...r..v, 5:5191 X" 2- f eiilff! f- XYZ. 5 '1" " Lynn: 4 irasw' .fgf-my 4- ,-iffaw gf' 5531 an - 'QQ ,3gg,,u, f KK .g5!f5:l' wi ff ws-A f 5 ff an . ' " - -fr , V-I. la? ull? . 3555 -. Qu' F lf?" Jiiff gy' A encfmx ff' ,,J1 i g.r! z., 1 3 1' .,,:' ,i 3 zr.14fg2?3, , +'1 , ' W ?'h- r Uff - X- NL- ..-- ..4 1 ?"'3vf',.n iU.',53j,?Ld ,lm ,-.. . V, 4' 4.,:g,f'f,,11,gl, wg 1 4' -'-3'- a'vi.1 555551535 ,wnijygfx - ,-'jj 1 f 2 5111 nn. 4'7?f5!2'ff:'f?i,3 Q33 " - r L- ' ' 4122 ff?'F:P7-Ffwiiffr-sf f. I ' f ' ry -,fll'i'J?.:"'f:i2':i'f :af-1 1 ,- -'L-S 'M' ' 'fwf A ff" A' E - , 1 ,rar , I- ,- N523 F527 5-fr ' '?2:'?:5?1'. "' .1 5157 ,Es:::LM1,:. ,Q YJ . ' , ."iM'f:'1f'Z-,V P- W AQ' 411' ':Q"'ff'f1f ff 175 I -.- -rj i f F. ,M I I 1 111 x A I ' I 4 : 1 I n wr' I 4 . 4. WI , . ef . ' -Hr W - , , 4 1 ,f -, w rfi XM X W ff. 'V .-.X f f M1,,, 1 , ,,g -X 'Q H 2 51 ' h F , MK 'iixfii fffcgj- , xxx-Km-.. M W T:?, V- 6 . f fy ' X ' , A 'uh 54':,..,?.'fA'fI4 if-, mdn ,Zig - 5, - W-H - " . ,5,,'f ,,1 -,ga y "- H54 WV' jmg gg, ' "g 1 'ir '1'wg3?w - , '-1--f f: :nfs-. 17' T20 r '89 AT SUPPER. HE winter of Freshman Year first saw '89 gathered as a class around the jovial board. What a supper that was! Fifty innocent Freshmen, in their first " swallow tails," gathered ' to do honor-not to Morpheus Qas one of our scientific friends told usj, but to Bacchus. However, notwithstanding the miserably served supper at the St. George, our defects and Freshmanic lack of j ovialty were made up for by a visit from several of our friends from '88, who, after their own supper at Augustine's, came up to show us the effects of a really good feed. And after this performance, '89, went away well pleased with herself and her sober members. Our Sophomore supper was held at the St. George a second time, on the evening of February Ioth, 1887. We only repeated our experience of the former year. As T he Pe7z7z.gfZ1Jam'a7z put it, " The table linen was anything but fresh, the waiters were fresh, but their clothes, and more especially their shirt bosoms, were decidedly the reverse." Prof. Sadtsler responded to the toast of 4' The Faculty," and Mr. Schelling to that of Alma Mater. Bobby Stulb answered the toast to " The Ladies," and in justice to Bobby' we must quote again from that ableipaper, The Pem2.gfZw7zz'a1z, which characterized Mr. Stulb's speech as " above the average." But it is only the Junior who knows how to give a Class Supper, and accordingly our J'uniorSupper, held at the Bellevue on the 3oth of January, 1888, was a great success, both " gastronomically " and oratorically. Prof. McElroy, who was to have responded to " The Faculty," was unavoidably absent Qas he afterward told us, " read- ing proof for a new and enlarged edition of his " D6S'EfL1C'CiO11 Of 121 English Prosenj. Klauder was toast master. Hyneman responded to '-'The Committee," Hulme to "Athletics', and Dougherty to " The Ladiesf, After the supper the Class sang college songs and glees. This year our Senior Class Supper was given up, and there was substituted for it a "Senior Reception," to the friends of the Class, the Faculties and Trustees of the University. This reception, which it is hoped may hereafter be a permanent feature of Coin- mencement NVeek, was held at the Colonnade Hotel on the evening of Friday, May 31st. An interesting programme, consisting of speeches, music and singing by the Glee and Banjo clubs, was successfully carried out. An elaborate collation was served, and the rooms were tastefully decorated with flowers and class and college trophies. Thus did the Class of '89 institute and carry to successful completion the "Senior Reception," which Will ever redound to her praise and glory. aww Ls'-.re---. ,, N, - N A V . QAM, ...is -H " 1: rr :E-'kit ff t , ' ' ' C ff? E 1: 24, C u f:- 5 my in-I ,hx mg g 'V ide ,i , .- .F-2 - --- - iw., Y - - " .rl ' fi- mr" "L i- gl -inf "5 A v f -71 -1 11 " -f - "f---T - ' ' my :f X.,-N ,J - .f - -ive! Y .J Y -X , Q W fa. -: v -H V --,YQYE ff L ,LMA :Ai if fjw -5 - - 7 E - -If f .53 5: . is 3 2 I22 . xl' . ' . V M I W ' ' ,fx -.X ' A . .4 'A ffl: S ! J nn- null' V' .mx pfg f "Vs ,f F ,f Q . -h if 1, . "? ' N i N X Tie .. -eo -gfl----,mf T' ' 'S- o ' ,H - -- c i. ,. -- 1. 7 -Q4 5 - - X' , Q - --M-'uh' ' R-if 4 1 7- -1 739 ON THE TRACK. Y S in every branch of athletics '89 has been at the top, it ' would seem almost superfluous to state that she has been eminently successful in track athletics. Our iirst sig- ' nificant appearance in this held was in the College Sports of our Freshman Year, When Hepburn gave us an opportunity to try our yell, by Winning the standing high jump from Billy Page. This victory so elated Sam that the college couldnlt hold him,,and, ,of course, there Was no alternative for him but to leave. Then there Was that famous mile Walk in our Freshman Class Sports, When Mumford and Strader Were tied together and started round the track. Of course it Was a dead heat all the Way around, but no time was taken, as Sam had to close up the grounds before they iinished. .It was in the spring of Freshman Year also that Keen began to develop into a bicycle rider, and startled the college by Winning -the Intercollegiate race at New York, Which Was supposed to have 123 - 9 89'S ATHLETIC RECORD. no FRESHMAN YEAR. y Spring Sporis--May I0flZ, 1886, I. Standing High jump, S. M. Hepburn' Q4 ft. 82 in.j 2. Two Miles Bicycle Race, C. B. Keen. 2. Running High Jump, S. M. Hepburn. 2. 220 Yards Dash, L. M. Scott. 2. Pole Vault, S., M. Hepburn. FOOTBALL-I885. '89 vs. ' ..... . ..... 2-8. A '89 vs. '86 . . .. ....... 1-32. '89 vs. '87 . . . . 4-16. '89 vs. '88 .......... o-12. . BASEBALL. I 87 '89 vs. '88 ....... . . 9-7. CRICKET. I . Class games not played. State Inieffcollegiazfe Sports-May 22d, 1886. 1. TWO Miles Bicycle Race, C. B. Keen C6 min. 26M sec Intevfcollegiazfe Sports--May 29511, 1886. 1. Two Miles .Bicycle Race, C. B. Keen Q6 min. 39 sec.j. 4 A SOPHOMORE YEAR. 9 1 '89 Won the White Cup for General Athletics. i25 I N Fez!! Sf07fZfS-O6f0b67f 1656, 1886. One Mile Bicycle, J. W. Geary and C. B. Keen Half Mile Run, E. C. Knight Q2 min..15 secj. Standing Broad jump, W. A.. Paris Q9 ft. 8 in.j Mile YValk, Dallet Fuguet Q8 min. 24 sec.j. Mile Run, E. C. Taylor Q5 rnin. 40K sec.j. 440 Yards Dash, E. C. Knight Q63M sec.j. SWIMMING CONTEST. Fez!! 0f'86, HaQ'1ViZe Course. NVon by J. XV. Geary Q21 rnin.j. Spring Sports--May 14191, 1887. Q3 min IOI4 sec 1. Half Mile Run, T. W. I-Inline Q2 min. I2 sec.j I. Mile VValk, O. P. Chamberlain Q7 min. I5 sec I. 120 Yards Hurdle, T. W. Hulnie Q202 sec.D. I. One Mile Run, E. C. Taylor Q5 min. I5 sec.j. I. Standing High jump, NV. A.. Paris Q4 ft. 5 in.j 2 . 440 Yards Dash, E. C. Knight Q555 sec.j. 2 Two Mile Bicycle, C. B. Keen. Tug Qf War. '89 Won the Cup for Tug 0f War. FOOTBALL-1886. '89 vs. '87 ........ .. .. 0-18. '89 vs. '90 . . . . 10- 0, '89 vs. '88 . . . . . . 9- 0. TENNIS. In Zhe Class Contesf. C '89 defeated '90 .......... 6-I, 6-4. 789 " '88 . . ....... 6-3, 6-2. '89 " ,Sy .......... 6--2, 6-5. '89 Won the 'Walker Cup for Tennis. BASEBALL, '89 vs. '88 .......... I7-2, 5 '39 VS. '9O- f . . is--1. '89 VS- ,37 - - . . not played. 126 CLASS BOAT RACES. May 4th, 1887. 1. '89 College Q8'min. 48 sec.j. 2. '89 Medical Q8 min. 58 sec.j. '89 Won the Powell Cup for Rowing. ' ' CR1CKET. Championship not decided. Contests of the Intercollegiate Athletic Association W' Pefifisytvania Saturday, May 2ISf, 1887. 2. Mile Walk, O. P. Chamberlain. 2. Two Mile Bicycle Race, C. B. Keen. 2. 440 Yards Dash, E. C. Knight. JUNIOR YEAR. '89 Won the White Cup for General Athletics. Fatt Sports-Octobei 2ct, 1887. A ' 1. Mile Walk, O. P. Chamberlain. 1. Putting the Shot, C. S. Bonsall Q32 ft. 4 in.j. 1. Half Mile Run, G. Henderson Q2 min. 27 sec.j. 1. Mile Run, O. Pr. Chamberlain Q5 min. II sec.j. 2. Running High jump, C. S. Bonsall. '8 ulled '91 I5 in.j. Tug of War' '83 Eulled '88 Q32 in.j. ' 89 Won the Cup for Tug of War. FALL SH00'1', 1888. Class of '90 killed 40 birds. Class of '89 killed 30 birds. Spying Sports-May 12th, 1888. A 1. Two Miles Bicycle Race, C. B. Keen Q7 m-in. 472 sec.j. 2. 440 Yards Dash, C. H. Frazier Q55 sec.j. . 1. Running Broad jump, C. S. Bonsall Q21 ft. 95 11'1.D. I2 iilfzdwinter Spozfis-Feb: 2302 1889. 1. 440 Yards Dash, C. H. Frazier. TENNIS. '89 vs. '91 ......... 6- 4, 6-2, 9 89 Vs. '92 ......... 6-17, 692. '89 Won the Walker Cup. , FOOTBALL+I8SS. ' '89 vs. '90 ......... Forfeited to '89. '89 vs. '92 . . . , ..... 44-0. '89 vs. '91 . . ,...... 10-6. '89 thus Won the Class championship. CRICKET1 '89 vs. '92 ........ 168-70. '89 vs. '91 ,........ 131-64. '89 vs. '90 ........ A. '89 Won by default. '89 thus Won the Kuhn Cup for Cricket. V . 'Spring Spozffs-May fffh, 1889. 1. Two Miles Bicycle Race, C.-B. Keen Q6 min. I2 sec.j. ' 1. 100 Yards Dash, C. S. Bonsall Hog sec.j. . 1. Running Broad jump, C. S. Bonsall Q19 ft. 7l11Cl'lSSD. ' 1. 440 Yards Dash, C. H. Frazier Q53 sec.j. 1 I I 2. Putting the Shot, C. S. Bonsall. ' ' . Sfoffefoff fha White Cup. ' g '89-538. '91-38. I ' The only event remaining to he contested for is the Swimming Race and if ,QI does not Win it, the White Cup will go to '89 for the thirditime 120 The evenness of the class team's play is shown by the fact that Hulme and Hill are the only members of the class who have ever held regular positions on the College team. Hulme, when once fairly started with the ball, is as hard to manage as pigs in clover, and to his untiring efforts as captain the College team, in great measure, owed its success last fall. Rumor has it that Tommy will shortly publish a book on " The Economic Running of a Training House," which, it is said, will contain valuable suggestions as to the proper position of trunks, baggage, etc. However, as he has bribed us to keep silent on this matter, we will carefully avoid the subject. Among the substitutes which '89 has contributed to the Colf lege team are Frazier, Who could have played regularly as quar- ter-back had not family objections prevented, Keen, who could tackle anything short of a railroad sandwich, and Hyneman, who, as end rush, was worth his weight in -- Keely Motor Stock. Then there was Archie Wright, who often played as a rusher on the College team, but was never satisfied because the captain would not let him play half back, which position Wright thought he could ill to perfection, because of his swiftness in running. In Freshman Year we were beaten by the Sophomores by a very close score. Though this is quite the rule, yet it was a great event for '88, as tliis was the only contest on the Athletic Grounds that they ever won from us. But it was in our Sophomore Year that we began to show the College how the present game of football should be played. After being beaten by the Seniors we turned the tables by winning from '88, by a score of 9 to o, all made 'in the irst half. QThe score would have been much larger, but we were so amused by the antics of the end men, anarchists and wild men on the latter team, that we forgot all about scoring againj '88 have always had the reputation of being great kickers, but evi- dently this was not the kind to which they were accustomed. We only needed something to start us, for since that time '89 has never lost a football match, and has scored 203 points 'CO her opponents 18. In junior Year we won the championship without any trouble, ISI and this year '89 again won the championship after one of the most stubbornly contested games ever witnessed on our grounds. In this game the score stood 6 to o against us at the end of the iirst half, and some of our supporters were very much worried as to the outcome. So, of course, they went to " Sam," who can always tell with certainty just how any athletic event will turn out. " Never you mind now," said he, "Mistah Frazier and the Captain CHulmej, they know what they are about." Of course after Sam had given his opinion there was no use for further play. But as ,QI still desired to continue, we proceeded to fullill Sam's prophecy. A touch-down was soon obtained and the score tied. Then by heavy rushing and excellent team play we scored again, and the championship was won. After three hearty cheers the men left the iield as a class team forever. . I .ill CLASS FOQTBALL TEAMS. FRESHMAN. Fu!!-Bark: Smith. HaMBacks.- Hill Ccaptainj and Thom- son. Q2zrz1fz'e1f-Bczcim Frazier. Rzcsfzeffss Downs, Henry, Gliver Darby, Strader, Hyneman, Keen. A l SoPHoMoRE. Fu!!-Back .- Strader. HaMBac!es.- Hulme Qcaptainj and Flem- ing. Qua1fz'e1f-Back.- Frazier. Ruslzevfs: Hyneman, Oliver, Bache Darby, Dougherty, Forbes, Hillit 7 ' ' JUNIOR. ' ' .' F2411-Back: Bache. HaMBa6ks.- Hulmeif Qcaptainj and Flem- mg. Qucz1ffe1f-Eack.- Frazier. Rushwfs .- Keenjt Thomson, Wright Stfadef, Hynemanff Dougherty, Hill. ! SENIOR. ' Fu!!-Bzzcks: Bache. HaMBa6k.- Hulmeit and Fleming. Quar- leff-Bacfzf Frazier Ccaptainj. Rusheffsx Keen, Thomson, Wright Bonsall, Hyneman? Dougherty, Hillft W 7 at Played on the College Team. I32 '89'S SCORES FOR HER FOUR SEASONS FRESHMAN YEAR. '89 Vs. '86, O--26. " " '87, 4-16 " " '88, O-I2 . Q JUNIOR YEAR. '89 Vsg '88, 26-I2. SOPHOMORE YEAR '89 vs. '87, o KC if i CC if 3 88,9 o 0, 18 SENIOR YEAR '89 vs. '9O,'e 4 CK CK ? F' " '90, 49- 0. 91, 10- Kif CC 791, O- if CK !92, '89's tdtal score . . . . . 197 pomts Opponent's total score .... . h . . ,. Q0 In 1885 '89 Won o lost 3 KC if if 2 CC I cc, cc cc 4 cc - O ' H 1888 , 3 0 -'F Forfeited. 133 sgjs cLAss cR1cKET TEAMS. . . 1886. WA. G. Thomson, Captain, WW. Scott, W. ,B. Henry, QT. R. Reaney, W. Guggenheim, S. A. Hibbs, E. C. Taylor, C. H. Frazier, W. I. Forbes, ' G. H. Hill, S. W. Dougherty, A., H. Smith. . 1887. ' . WW. Scott, Captain, A XA. G. Thomson, E. C. Taylor, W. I. Forbes, J. H. Oliver, G. H. Hill, . C. H. Frazier, R. C. Hill, N. Y. Worrall , E. C. Knight, W. Guggenheim. . - 1888. ' WA. G. Thomson, R. E Griscom, G. H. Hill, R. C. Hill, WW. Scott, ,- C. H Frazier, I. Forbes, N. Y. VVorrall A. H. Smith, W. Guggenheim, E. C. Knight. I ' . , g 1889. +A. G. Thomson, R. E. Griscom, G. H. Hill, -R. C."-Hill, iiW. Scott, C. H Frazier, W. I. Forbes, N. Y. Worrall, A. H. Smith, W. Guggenheim, E. C. Knight. gf Played on University Team. 1,35 1 nr il -Z l ii is ll .5 za L '1 . ii ii , E J 4 1 3 2 I 4 Ei 1 l l f 1 3 r 'E . 1 1 fi Sl illllu Y ,M .. 1: .1 + MM F 1' I' ' AQ l V D J 1 iw '- ,Qx I F -' I I , - , , il . p -I , ,I I . 1 1 1 ' 'yi I . , , , I . .I , A . , V -- X K' I W 'J ' L -uf Jpjj 7 I. W r A I kb K ox ! XRHKA f C ' 1 Q' 4 I ' X X 1x 2' l W R 5' "V A - l ' 7 It l 2 i t I 14 ' ' .nf N 7 ix Q Y l XM 0 5 f X I U1 ,f" if X f I lc , , Q f '- X W ,cgxxw f . J . ,l 'J' M, f, 14-4 .- ' '11, xfmm on 'bf 'fy - f' 6:11, ' 4 ' ff N "l: --Z--- :Fe S ' ,, , , A--1 px .Q wk-A D 2 j-Q-If -22-JM' A- Vasjioek-23113, D i fill W o-?. X ' QV Vaal L M, M fi' U I ' -A -. . X W ,ikawq . f .xv ,,, V wav JL QNNXAXA X-f. -A. 4- Mb Y---v X' '89 ON THE DIAMOND. ., F our "Eighty and Nine " could not, as mathematicians, calculate the base of a triangle,or, as chemists, distinguish a " base 'i I ' from a salt, yet nine from that "Eighty and Nine" have passed many a f'base" on the diamond, and they can With justice boast of a proud career and can claim many a pennant of 136 victory. The remarkable success which We have attained in this particular branchlof athletics is startling, and perhaps many an outsider has been puzzled as to how We could, in so short a time, develop suchmaterial. ,W ' ' Any member of the Class who can remember the infancy of our collegecourse, .Who can call to mind the. pleasant GJ hours passed-during our Freshmen Year in Mr. Syle's',room, Will 'be able to enlighten you'and reveal to you the secret of oursuccess. , In a Word, he will say, our instructorin English was also a baseballist. Syle, deeming it his duty to keep our brains-supplied with Words of wisdom during the Whole hour, When, as was fre- quently the case, he would run dry on his Abbott's "How to Write Clearly," would tickle our ears with valuable maxims concerning successful ball players- W ' . Thus it was that when our junior' Year, arrived we Won the laurels from the Whole college. ' A ' f Our success, let it be said, by no means rested at home. It travelled. Who of the team will ever forget that trip to Pottstown -that hearty receptiong which was tendered us-those elegant boarding-school meals-the uttering of deep sighs, 'when the arrival of the coach told us that a special car Was Waiting to carry our nine home? Yes, and how-but space limits us. With those pleasant recollections in mind, take a glimpse at the record of ' '89 on the College Nine. f ' There was Hyneman, Whom baseball gossip styled a most promising pitcher, " the lightning .twirler," a " first-class spherical manipulator " and many other appropriate epithets. Dougherty, too, who in Senior Year distinguished himself as "the steady right field seWer,"- ffthe' reliable slugger" and "the go-as-you-please base-runner." a But We will boast no more. Enough has been said to bring before the reader's mind visions of our " grand " success. 137 m , N I I 1 -I 2 W ' n l W , is K 1 " I sn, ' U xmqy r., l i' , my 'lWv.,4'gy, , r-',..'- 7 '-JU' . 'w 7 g M ir wil- ,lf X ' we . i 1 X i - I' , g ml' Hfglsm, .U L- .JA-of ,N 1 W Q I Q ' -as L 'Mf-ialffl wr I I:-xx "Wi-Mfg. R' WVZ '89 AT TI-IE QAR. e ' 'r"'1fl',i' :RH V..Jl'g 4149, fqz' QP r 2.-E.5i....'-:' ' L I 'W 'L' 4- ' N ' c .-1. . -ai A, v -.. S' ' . .5 I -3 N Freshman Year, When the time A E, 1 xtfglfl-M came round to be- ? " iXfZ."1 N'-7'f el"l1"' gc.. ' t ' ' f - ""' -ggi? W .f bbmN"'l'lN- glll I'a11'111'lg OI' six , X 'W e g r . . , gih4la W e - positions on the N A Class Eight, what vii -. ??E'fIL Q ':rlrL.Z" E-1 i.iggg2f3?T,:gi A ia motley crowd 5 f:1giikX-1S---?+- , appeared to try . f' ii' ff" H 5.3- for those coveted positions. There were thin men and stout men, tall men and short men, strong men and Weak men, good-looking and ugly, bow-legged, knock-kneed, cross-eyed and short-Winded.. It was an amusing sight to see them going through the motions, which by compliment was called rowing. Some were apparently trying to get the oar over 139 I ig- into a band of ministers, preaching that '89 should show Christian unsellishness and refuse to accept the Cup. It isneedless to add that '89 was selfish and hung on to the Cup. , In junior Year '89 rowed not so much for the sake of winning the Cup, but to humble the pride of '88, who were sure that they had a mortgage on the Powell Cup. The Regatta Committee decided that this year's race should be three miles in length, and accordingly we were compelled to have more heavy weights on our crew. We brought forth from " inocuous desuetude " Bob Hill and Charlie Lennig and were strengthened by the acquisition of john Carbutt to the Class, who, when not focusing his eye on a pleasure boat to see if there were any girls in it, which always resulted in a furious crab, was a good oarsman. These, with the veterans Billy Forbes, Bart Keen, Oscar Chamberlain, Frank Strader and Archie Wright, made up the crew. On account of Guggenheim's swearing propensities, Joe Hecht was put in his place, because he had no voice at all, and could not be heard even if he did swear.. Through some mismanagement the .boats were not rubbed down and oiled on the day of the race as usual, and so it was agreed, as fairest to all, that no boat should be oiled. When the time came for the start, '89, ,9O, ,QI and the Medicals appeared, all the crews except '88. The Referee waited tenminutes, blowing his whistle frequently, but still no '88 appeared. No doubt they thought that the race could not go on without them. But the truth is that if anyone had looked around the bend of the river at the starting time they would have seen '88's crew, members ff llze Class Mal never would lake an unfair aclvafzlage cy'a7z0llLe1f Class, busily engaged rubbing down and oiling their boat. The Referee became tired of waiting and started the race without them. We have the authority of Mr. joel Cook, the trainer of Yale's Crew, who followed the race on horseback, that '88 joined in the race when ahalf a mile of it was over, about two lengths ahead of '89, and only beat them at the finish by three lengths. A Yet '88 claim that they allowed '89 to have two lengths lead before they joined in the race, and that they beat '89 at the 'iinish by over six lengths. This is a specimen of the prac- tices of the Class that preaches Christian unselfishness. '89's time 141 H 5, 4 I in 'w Y ? 4 7 I I ,. as 5 5 K 2 7 ! 5 I1 1 V 1 Q l for the three miles was I7 minutes, 27 seconds. Be it said, in jus- tice to '89's Crew, that they knew that '88 was not in the race, and therefore made no effort to beat her. In Senior Year '89 did not put a crew on the water because she wanted to give some of the other classes a show to win the Powell Cup. Of the men who have held positions on '89's crew, Wright, Hill and Strader have been members of the College Crew. .f " rffa, . -Ll-:Z .... , .., , -N- - , . if-Qffai-r,-2-5.-...ff-e..""h":'. ' f - N' ' ' -"1 x"'f7 ' 4"':Q1'-. -' 1- --rr:-r f-V--.--,.,., ,, ..--L.,, 7111 24-gg-4-.., .ii 3Q ? Ra vi.,-T:iiQ.'Qkg-q iqb-52 . f i r f .aefa i 4 ,Mfr C,-ff-fe VX., ',, ..,- ' cf-L-ee-' C..-1 , 1,5-ff S-af . , -, - 1 : sex ,, 1- -ff.-'an X. if - -gl . ,f - 1,2"': 1- L-a 'T-1"-i 'N-' ' 5 ' Ni '---f"-' N-' . X -.-1 5, C., - S, W.-1 . 'Qi'-. W1i.." if ef-.grpf Q-f ., . -,. N: 3 -Q, , 5' -gg, J, '-L-, -xy i vc? ..-4,L. 7- ' v--v-'f-' ,mf f 2 ' ii'f'-4 i v-f .-Q Staff-' ,sf---f .W -f, -gif' ,,,. C.,f., 3-?'5', T-E: 5115- 444 ?? f-'Q'-"LCi- T,-5-':1 v5ffE-Y 2-e -5 ,, ..,.?N., fm - . C, - . I42 .V ,,,.,y, ,SQ IN THE coumi 9 , ENNIS - Eighty-Nine. From the begin- a fg - ning it was ever so. Early in Freshman 1 Year we showed an intention of winning Qamong other thingsj the Class Champion- gi ship in Tennis, for which a cup had just ,wr 4 V been offered. After a brief canvass of the ,MM nlll H E IH Class it was decided to enter Walter Scott ""' and Archie Thomson as our 'Class pair. M, Af2 f,2' It was indeed a most fortunate selection, for not only did they win that year, but every year since they have been the " wz'1z1zz'1zg c011zbz'mz!z'01z." Soon after the Tournament, Clem Brown and'T eddy Mumford, seeing how easy it was for Freshmen to win Tennis championships, determined to go and do likewise. But where were they to play ? Happy thought-the new Athletic Grounds. .The place for the court was selected, and then the fun began. y ' f After flooding the chosen plot, until it was almost knee-deep in " extract of Schuylkill," the two earnest devotees of the racquet would roll up their trousers and, one between the shafts and the other behind, would shove and drag the horse-roller up and down, back and forth, over what proved to be more of a U hard unyielding earth", than every poet dreamt of, while an admiring audience Qujohn " and various small boysj lay in the shade of the " bleach- ing boards " and wondered at the perspiring enthusiasm of " them college fellersf' By the time the court was in condition to play on, it was nearly Christmas, and it seemed as if their toil had been in vain. But no, Teddy had become so strong that nothing short of a place in the crew would satisfy him. Clem, on the other hand, became so thin that we can hardly recognize him in our rotund and genial friend of Senior Year. John Conway Cowan Dillingham joined the club the next year, but as he thought it rather poor fun to always beat the other members, and as it is more exciting when members of the other sex play, he invited Clara Peabody and Polly Perot to make up the quartette. They accepted with such alacrity that Clem did not have time to object. However, he and Clara soon became fast friends, and then John Conway Cowan Dillingham began to Hwish held never come," or, rather, that he had never asked Clara and Polly to come, for with Clara flirting so out- rageously with Clem, and Polly trying to reform Germantown, poor John Conway Cowan was rather left out in the cold. But his drooping spirits were revived by the appearance of "jimmy" Mitchell, surnamed " the sluggerf' Like his namesake and 'fjohn L.,f' "jimmyjy in private life, is as mild and guileless as a Phila- delphia Postmaster General, and he soon developed a-strong attach- ment for the gentleman with the " poly-verbal H name. Witli the advent of " the Slugger " Polly Perot, always careful of her reputation, withdrew from the club and left that quartette which since has done so much in the way of furnishing amusement to the college., As a class we are very fond of our "Big Four," and many are the games we have enjoyed watching. The deepest sorrow fills our hearts when we think that never more will we see Clara's brilliant serves, or the elephantine grace with which Clem misses "the Slugger's " wonderful twist, or the lightning " smashes " of john Conway Cowanp T44 'r P' I I A l l l , r I 5 k l e 1 i I I I 1 1 5 Cir. J. ' ' +-.-- --N N ' .X "' - - N. p is NX: .-- X, s .X ' . C X . J., f-X I my 'wma'-e"lf it X X- N l. if E 5 --KE? 5 '3 W e- 4 2 , . .. . 2 .g ,,...,,,,ff'g7f in -:. Y Y f 'dh 1 -:CQ lf' fi mr - V -f i Q if ' WNW-r -' fir' 3, 1 ,, a - ,C J- , i f W I ,,' -ff 1 3 ': -'r v -4. -C V. 1 ' - ff iff' E S - l!'lIl1'q"l by lvl '-',- '22, 4.4 --1 -- 1 : lt- i 2 1' fw l :--- 10,4 -5. Wi-'V' ' , 2 - -L ' 'E gl F 3. 'E ,f . llliil 'A ii- 'frilly ,J Z - ,fs I-iq!! In lil If - lilgfv f .r g,1gA'Q1 , S' V ' "" ' 'E 12" - : E fr' E - : : I ..' j fff W- '- f!?.!J..v 'wg ,A if 'H' Mil, NM L.,.- .-- FH' fl ll . 1 W., 1 aff pfgiizwe-,.ff,,7, are-.-5 'lbw l il? : --gS""IL, C il "iff ' V' ill 'V gig.-f 'fl a w . 5 f' an ea Q gl' 1 -l :Qu S41 ily" 13 nil. je 1EE.R.2f- 1 f Wi f," 'QQ gif- full. frff-:?i4iQ'.fa:-:g:,:1g: 1:---gifr-1.-Jw-'.-m-.,q ,qs .f, f,.f,,f,-. ', - 1 T? i T '"''f:.:'fle5'..:.'f5i:5i.'F221lSE?f1E2"iff'6'1i?Q5'.Z4illEL?i2T553'2SPE'5f.ff.l55i3f:55:-565ff'l' ' I' alia ' U!! 113125351-f:egff:11':f:s:a 1g5slg:1vg::sf::seEsgesgigigasaf15sesffff":i 1" ff' Q ' ' I -- .J--AL! ?:. : ' Un I . . .., ?1"f1r,im! 1g1Igh 1 . . slflli-.. ...l Ill..:1 I-fllggliv l llirw 'Iix W.wweWW.gi..l.m53359,55ffl!'??:b2fllQQjL1lu'Z'WK 42' ,. " ,A 1:-' 1 s AM! J"""4 ll .. .X ---e- Pi, --Til? . -fe. - - C" C 1-I 4 " ',...- 1 V vi- 1. , --1 -L-M - ' Y 1 7 ' L i ' -".-T mf -,,' . -v-- , ,41.-1., ,, M , f C 4'- -J X fc Luwrowff? '89 IN THE BICYCLE CLUB. HE University Bicycle Club is one of those organizations that go by fits and startsg at present probably with an' excess of the former. C The last great start of the Club was in the spring of '87, 'When Keen '89 Won the zo-mile Club road race. In fact, Keen took the race so easily that he fell asleep on his machine, and failed to Wake up in time to take' his usual header on the home stretch. 'This Was a great disappointment to the girls from Bryn Mawr College, Who, hearing of Keen's acrobatic feats at the inish, had 'practiced for many weeks to exclaim, " Ch ! " with startling and heartrendin g effect. - 145 w l I g . 1 1 I. r'l w i i 1 E F I 1 l x l l 1 J ls ll .l xl H l Ili 1. fl W' H Mi fs off l iq. .ty lf. 1-' M 5 . Wheii the Club re-assembled in the fall, it was discovered that the Constitution and Treasury had vanished as mysteriously as the " growler " glides into Room --. The Constitution was a most valu- able document, so admirably arranged that whenever a quorum was not present it could be amended to suit the required number, and the meeting proceed. But a treasury is usually considered the most important institution of a club, and its loss greatly impaired our weal. However, as the total amount in the treasury lacked two cents of a ferry ticl-:et to Camden, it is generally supposed that the miscreant has not reached those foreign shores. - The Club runs have always been very select affairs, in fact rivalling the Sanskrit Voluntary in point of .selectness. But what they have lacked in numbers they have made up in good spirits, which the Club considers far more agreeable for a dusty ride. There was a time when, if the captain wished a nice quiet ride by himself, all he had to do was to call a Club meet, and the roads would' be as deserted as a class-room during a corner iight. 'But during the present year, under '89,s administration, there has not been a single run from which any member was absent. Prosperous as the Bicycle Club has been in the past, its trium- phant success awaits those, golden daysof co-education and tandem tricycles. . h aa 1 la ,S s k w x 3 'lk nx I X . X .f Li. N ii 'I lj xxx Q5 1 ll, tug. ss ' 1 ff ill . ' fl ff! it xfq i x , fl. bf f Tv fl X T 3 - 1 pf Z Lisle? , kit! , f in i ' . ' Ngflifi-iiif'--..'5g, ' ff" f-2-25:-5.'e5'z.-ff:-.4t1::-: 146 r 4 QW , ' og - X, E X" . 'X i f . 05 if fs 2 ' ' , ' 6 ' 17 i V . , L ' ff " A ,' N A ' 45166 . ffl , ,N N ' ff . " ' P C gn M ,f N anxious public having intimated its desire to know how . the immense interests, financial and otherwise, of the Gun Club are administered, to assuage its anxiety the following description of a business meeting has been drawn up: Flaming posters, announcing the date and place of the meeting, having been posted for about two weeks on the bulletin-board and other likely places in College Hall, the fateful day and hour arrive to find two enthusiastic members gathered at the rendezvous. In the course of half an hour or more these two members, with the assistance of Otto and Pomp, having procured a quorum, somewhat as the Irishman played the fiddle-by main strength-the meeting enters upon a Star Chamber Session, with locked doors. Some evil-minded persons have been known to hint that the locked portals were intended to keep the members within rather than pry- ing reporters out, but the Club has so far been able to look upon such aspersions with equanimity and in a spirit of tolerationf The minutes of the last meeting having been read and ap- proved, no one daring to object to them while under the scrutiny of ' stern, unbending Secretary G. D. Rosengarten, and other interven- ing business having been gone though with admirable celerity, Mr. Dolan rises to address the meeting, whereupon the following' dialogue takes place: D T47 , P if S 1 Ti ' T T 1 , L, HE Synopsis FIEND WRESTLES WITH A WHARTON SCHOOL SPECIMEN L x 1 1 1 I 1 14'1 i President : " Mr. Dolan, y Mr. Dolan : " Why out of order ? " ou're out of order." i P7ESZ.d67Zf .- " Because the Constitution says so." ' Y The Secretary having left the Constitution at home, the Chair 5 , 2 'd himself sustained, and amid tremendous applause Mr, 1. consi ers ' ' ' " -- l o in the other eye. 4 '4 C Dolan takes his seat with Wrath in his eye a s 5 1 This danger having been averted, with the adoption of the fol- lowing resolution the Club adjourns : . . . . . 1 f 5 . 1 i "Resolved That this Club cordially recognizes the princip e o le 1 " every member of the teami defraying his own travelling expenses, 1 and that it sees no objection Whatever to the members of the said T teamgipursuing their victorious career for any length of time upon ' 1 f the same terms." - 11 1 .,, 35' QI 3113 ,115 'K1 111 - lg f, 'ill All , I V . il I 1 lin 1 il 1, 1, 41 A 11111 -. ' if V Q li ii I 11 P 4. I1'l . 3w ' 'I' 1-"'if- -,fc 11115. gl 11 --up ea- 1 "high W? n 8 J I 'ff' LLQZTZ ,, , 1-ev .ill im-5,,.Ti qi'-Q 11 1717-"Tie-I'--T S 1 1 1 e fis: Q 'Q' gl fill Ei 52? 'llv 'i i1'i , f 12' ' I 4 lp 15' ll" 31 . P8 1 ., ., -1 11 11' .3 1 :,1 141' 1 A11 . 1' l I48 5, fl' ,1 31 l!1 l 1 1 1 it ii 11 1 E1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1' I 1 r V Q JN' f 6 .Q i 39 Q 1 ,ir I I., - - X, LZ, law.-.R . X3 fhjglf ? , ll! ,- - MWY-, ' lfa- nw 'E lwwnlfiif-2: If SN vii fj 1 A.i'm'F"0'ff :ms a iw: ,WSigfr'fff J fzffnf ,ggi-l'l'1f: -f - QBNJLQQ , 'fu--1'.f,M1. Ill Ea, me -1 "I W' 'Ml -1 Jriglim S -f Mi- r " -Q is L 2- . l - QW, i-inf 1:-" ' F1 'VJ gzclyil Zigi! 'li-f ff' H h f ,I . -il 5 4' In 1' - 2 " i n -Q it " Tir '?F. ' Q21 r ef 4 F is-fi" -V Y ----' ':-"- -X ---- Jfns., iii- A e- 4 y -T , T' tw- -it ,-,jr-TL , ?iTkQ r-477 .: f ful-? fi Y V gi 'lu lllfmmlll ww" N lllwwl unww' dull: un-' zltnumvlm - i' e -", W fi 1 H113 "' 'll b-V is K- '89 IN THE GLEE CLUB. ,1.., -.., 1.11 HE prosperity of the Glee Club dates from '89's Freshman year, When Billy Bell, at that time the infant prodigy of a city choir, was induced to ap- pear at the Club's annual chestnut distribution and render his famous soprano andante in C Major. A judi- cious use of Bi1ly's photo- graph in the advertising se- cured a good house, and as, for a Week beforehand, he had consumed lemons and rock-and-rye 149 ' drops alternately, the solo was everything that could be-iexpected. The Club felt so much encouraged that they immediately commenced to practice another song besides " Ben Franklin H and " Maria's Lambkinf' When the Aflzawzzfans had howled their last howl over Jackson, several more l89 men entered the Glee Club, each with his own specialty: Jimmy Mitchell, whose saintly expression caused him to be immediately elected treasurer, Teddy Mumford, who had sung irst tenor in the Brst Greek play performances, second tenor in New York, Hrst bass in the chapel choir, and second bass when he had a cold, Ed. Knight, who didnit sing at all, but was assigned a place in the front row because he was " so nice looking", and Uber- holtzer, whose second tenor was something to remember in night- maresffor a week, but who thought he could get up a good audience if the Club went to his native Norristown-. With such material everybody said it would be a pity if the didnlt give a few concerts outside the accustomed local efforts, and accordingly a trip was planned 'through eastern Pennsylvania, Clem Brown going along in the double role of " tickets " and Father Confessor. That trip was the greatest period of the Club's history, and made a deep impression on those who were supporting it, financially and otherwise. The programme, which was very little altered from night to night, was somewhat as follows: 7.30 P.M.-Qpening of the doors by Clem, with appropriate ceremonies. 7. 31 to 7.59 P.M.-Continuous procession from R. .center to peephole in curtain, and from P. in C. to L. center, mutter- jings and imprecations. 8 P.M.-Arrival of the audience, escorted immediately to the best seat in the orchestra. 8.15 P.M.-Curtain rises, disclosing a scene of barbaric splendor never before equalled .on this or any other stage, etc. Qlook on opposite side of carj. 8.16 P.M.-Entrance of the Club. First song, " Ben Franklin." Ap- plause Qby Clemj. 8.40 P.M.-Audible altercation behind the scenes between jimmy Mitchell and the manager of the house, during which the treasurer is understood to remark that aforesaid M. of H. may " take half that or nothing." M. of H. finally insinuates that under the painful existing circumstances he will accept the former alternative, and jimmy emerges grasping his check-book, flushed, ISO but triumphantg. 8.50 P.M.-Fifth song, "Peanuts!' 8.51 P.M.- Audience goes to sleep. 8.53 P.M.-Violent applause Qby.,Q1Qp9. Audience wakes up. 9 P.M.'4E'T1d of part first. Audience goesfout to' seeja 111311. 9.01 P.M.- tt tt tt Audiencefofgetslfo return.. , 9.,3oHto 9,302 P."ivI.ffCo'unting of the evening's'receipts jimmy and Clem. 9.31 P.M.-The Club, returnstto. the hotel and retires with much heaviness of spirit. .- For some days the boys bore this sort' of thing without a murmur, even after Billy Bell gave up swearing as useless. Teddy Mumford and Ed. Knight kept on writing to their respective best girls daily glowing accounts of p the trip. But iinally there came a dark day when jimmy looked upon a weary check-book and mur- mured " cimffz it ! " Somebody overheard him, and that 'settled it. Early in the gray dawn of the following A.M. a silent company counted the ties on the road to Philadelphia. A I The Glee Club has never entirely recovered fromythe effects of that trip. As one of our modern humorists would say, its enter- .prises have since been enveloped in' a large' gob of gloom, and the ,latest advices state that it has been decided to send the Club next year to Babylonia, where its well-known faculty for bringing to light ancient things will, it is thought, be of great service to the University'S Expedition. . 3, H i? ' Ei il f ,flip rf . x V. ff Min. L x. M l,l,.-413.51 E . :iv . If ,edgy .pq f Al: 1ft7Z'5'i'f ' ,?,,- TEL will fi A I A .- r- 4. .- 11 fp, fat 1 gm fx 1-all A-' y . sf' mu " fv f 55,5 ,gs I ff! I f e- . 1 . - 19. if Qfff I'-- A-Q i '1 e -3 2 fir f ,, :efvzz.?4-51' - jf .LLQ : ' f Q5:": we . -Z--. ..-: -TH- -:L- 7:g..:.:::: I ..-....-4-mms-,--w-.. -.....h.., -- ,.- .1--L?,- an ' 41 :T .." 2--,F-" . 5' .-- - ' ' - J . -21 P- ' -- 7. -.. - gg, . 4. ISI - 1 x nf A ,lf W K' ,P I' . ,- if - 1' s 5 -as A 1193 .Q if W X fi 2, fC .rr uf ,via 'wg,g,,1 1 - - .-' -A, f f xv-1 , -ff E , !,a.1.f, , 41 p Z - " -51-5441 , JI 'ff' 1 f L '5 l el Q he 1 fl 1 .. 3533111 . . ..::::::-" " UT 'fi ' W- ' " N ' v , I i i A T ' s.-..--151-uyX:gXE152:22:1asf--Liazmzrlzausszagmm H: " - f, - v E --- "-'E,"'....-,-""'e---" "':f?I??f:,. O 3 --dna. - "-I5s5:5:.:., "iff '89 IN THE UN1 ERs1TY TQORCHESTRA. HE idea of establishing a Col- lege Orchestra at the Univer- sity originated in the minds of some '89 men in the fall of 1886. One of their num- -4' ber had played for one or two seasons with an amateur instrumental' club of eight or nine pieces, in the city, known as the ffremona Klzzb. The success of this amateur organization suggested much greater possibilities if the member- ship could be increased and a greater variety of instruments intro- duced. The matter was agitated in the columns of The Penvzgflva- vzifm, the iirst editorial appearing in its columns in February, 1886, and a survey was taken of the musical talent in the University. The co-operation of two or three students in the Medical Department was secured, but it seemed at first as if nearly every instrumentalist in college played the same instrument. This was rather discour- 159 aging. It' was then decided to form a more modest organization for the time being, and call it the "University Instrumental Club." It was 'hoped that this would be a nucleus around which an orchestra would eventually grow. This idea was 'carried out, and rehearsals were held occasionally at the houses of the members. At the close of the year a long article appeared in The Pemz.gf!w1zz'an of june 8th, outlining plans for a more complete and more preten- tious organization in the Fall. The opinion was even hazarded that were a repetition of gthe Greek play to be given a University Orchestra might render the music. The repetition came, but too soon for the accomplishment of this bold suggestion. But in a little over a year a University Orchestra was in the pit of the Academy of Music at Commencement. But we anticipate. About Christmas time the leading spirits of the Orchestra movement got their heads together, and Peabody, Jefferys and Sypher, ,QO, were ap- pointed to canvass the College department, and Bell and Brinkmann the Medical. About the-middle of january a meeting of all who were interested was held. Jefferys, '89, was elected President, Pea- body, '89, Treasurer, and Mr. Geo. Bastert, of the Germania Or- chestra, was appointed Instructor. The first rehearsal was held January 14th, 1887. Ball, '87, Jefferys, '89, and Sypher, ,QO,tW3I1gCd. the bows, Peabody was our wood-nymph, and our little "mascotte," Justin Sypher, who was still in school, furnished the Orchestra's entire stock of brass. The Orchestra soon found out that it was sadly lacking in this necessary article, for dissensions and troubles arose very 'early in its history. " Seedy " Bell, who was one of the most energetic "starters," gave up the race before he had at- tended a single rehearsal. He wanted to play second cornet, but unfortunately had no instrument. He had a mouth-piece and a bell in himself, but nothing between them. Well, our Instructor loaned him an instrument on trial. Bell commenced trying it at home and "reported progress" from time to time, but' he never progressed so far as to attend a rehearsal. That cornet is still on probation as far as we know. Neither Mr. Bastert nor any of us ever heard more of " Seedy " Bell or that cornet. That was pretty discouraging too. Troubles fell thick and fast now. Orem became 153 convinced that he would make a much better leader than Bastert, and Peabody backed him up in his opinion. The rest of us con- tinued to pin our faith to Mr. Bastert and backed him down. Orem thenleft college, and things quieted down again. Orem appears on the scene only once more. He asked to be permitted to play viola at one of our concerts g took the music to look over it, left it in the Germantown train, and once more made his exit into oblivion. But the Orchestra survived all these difficulties, and even prospered mightily. Its ranks were gradually increased, V and it soon de- veloped into a permanent and successful organization. Our first appearance in public was on Washington's Birthday, 1887, just five weeks after our first rehearsal. The Orchestra con- tributed no little to the success of the celebration under the " new 1'Egz'1ue." So well were we received that two days afterward we ,appeared again on "the boards," upon the occasion of Philo's Biennial. The march H Red and Blue," composed by Mr. Bastert and dedicated to the Orchestra, was here performed for the first time. ' Our next appearance in public was in conjunction with the Gqlee Club on the 21st of April, in the Chapel of the University. Our little " mascotte " came out of the ranks and showed the audi- ence that the Orchestra could furnish a 'z1z'1f!z40s0 if need be. 'The Orchestra began now to show a marked improvement, both in the character of its selections of music and in their rendition. VVe played again at the " Romeo and Juliet " benefits in Philadelphia and Germantown, on the goth of April and on the 5th of May respectively. A guitar was added to the instrumentation of some of the numbers and with marked effect at both performances. The Orchestra concluded its yearls work by playing at the "junior Exhibition " on the 7th of june and at the Alumni Reception on the 8th, The .results of the first year of the Orchestrais career were most satisfactory to its friends. The first meeting of the season of 1887-1888 was held October 14th. Jefferys and Peabody were re-elected President and Secretary of the Association. The history of the second year's work is a continuous record of progress and success. The Orchestra had by this time become very popular, and no college event was celebrated T54 without its aid. Its membership was considerably increased this year. U Bobby " Salter graduated in 1887, and," Davel' " came in so smoothly on the next bar? that we scarcely knew that any -change had been made in our pianist. The reputation of the Orchestra having extended outside the walls of the college build- ings, we enchanted Philadelphia audiences on many occasions where we were actuated by reasons even more potent than " college feeling." But f'Bobby" sang in the Glee Club, and Brock had prejudiced him against strawberry festivals and- theaters Qno one but Brock ever saw any necessary connection between the twoj. The consequence was that neither Q "Bobby". nor his brother f' Dave " would ever play with us in a theater. On one occasion, therefore, when we were so prolligate as to :invade the Broad Street gOpera House to carry off the musical -honors of "S1z0weci f1z,'l played by the "Amateur Dramatists of Germantown," Clayte Mitchell very kindly consented to be snowed in with us in placeof V" Dave." Mitchell made himself I so popular with the fellows on the two or three occasions which he played with jus that our man- agement offered him the position of Tvfikzngle in the Orchestra. .This was the only other instrument besides the piano upon which iMitchel1 was at all proficient. But Mitchell declined on the score ithat he was not a very good reader. 1 ' Prompted by true University spirit and by a desire to give uipleasure to the patients, the Orchestral Association determined to give an informal rehearsal in one of the large open wards of the 'University Hospital. Dr. Furness, one of the staunchest friends of .the University, and one who has always taken a great deal of interest in the,Orchestra QDr. Furness once told us, in the course of his lectures on Shakespeare, that the Orchestra was a very 'venerable institution, being as old as the plays of the great drama- tistj, furnished the piano for the occasion, and a most enjoyable and successful concert was given on the 29th of December, 1887. ,The patients were immensely pleased and seemedvery appreciative. The following Christmas, inspired by the success of this praise- 'worthy venture of the Orchestral Association, the Board of Mana- gers of the Hospital arranged for an elaborate entertainment in 155 x ,, li 1 1 1, V N 1 I ' I f 4 1 I n I i w i li V i i ix X, 1 l 'l i. E. I li l l M , i ja , s 1 I 5 l I ll xi ii gn F I L l ul -. iii !. all ll F l. ' r 1 l l ni. l ,I ls 1 1 Q l L l l 1 i i a is V fl if w 1 M ,i which the Orchestra, Glee Club and some friends of the institution took part. On the 17th of january, 1888, the Orchestra assisted the Glee Club in a concert at Association Hall. The Association gave its first concert on the 21st of April. It was a very brilliant affair. Absolutely no expense was spared on the profuse floral decorations and the beautiful programmes. On this occasion was heard for the 'irst time in Philadelphia the " G Clef," a quartette of female voices. A pretty set of waltzes, " Cap and Gown," composed for the piano by the President of the Asso- ciation, and scored for orchestra by the composer Harris, of Lowell, Mass., was performed by the Orchestra for the first time in public. The opening strain may be seen on the initial letter of this article. Our " mascotte " and Allen, ' 56, were the soloists at this concert. The Orchestra played at all the customary events of Com- mencement Week, and concluded the triumphs of the second year of its existence by playing the Commencement music in the Academy of Music. " Doon Rea, the drummer of the Orchestra, distinguished himself particularly on this occasion. Although Rea is a jolly, good fellow, one never could H count on him H in an emergency. He would invariably come rushing into a concert at the last minute, and ask if anybody had brought his drum and triangle to the concert. Of course no one had done so, each one having all he could attend to with his own instrument, music-stand, etc. Then Rea would have to go after his things, and he would usually return to be just too late to play in the last number on the programme. The usual thing happened at this Commencement, and Rea had to journey out to the University to get his instruments. He came running into the Academy of Music all out of breath when the affair was about half . .. Q, ' Xxx, w over, and stumbling over the ' X g ",,, ,,. ff" ' Sip, threshold of the orchestra pit, Q" a 4 J he fell headlong into the drum . wx . N MQ, XJ he was carrying, amid the deaf- .. X .W A5 Z ening plaudits of the whole Z - EEZ Academy. Rea was never known H" ' " 3 - to pay his weekly dues into the 156 l treasury of the Association. But he must have expended many dollars in writing to ask the management "how much he owed," and then writing again to say that he "would pay up" on Such and such a day. But that day never came for "Doc " Rea. The last year has been one of unparalleled prosperity for the Association. Its triumphs have been too numerous to admit of more than a passing notice of each. The same officers were re- elected, and E. D. Beale, of Germantown, was appointed leader. Two fashionable and popular concerts were given this year 5 one in Germantown in December and the second in Philadelphia in May. At the former the Orchestra was assisted by the Alumni Glee Club, a club composed largely of alumni of the University resident in Germantown. ' The "Associate Members" of the Association were heard for the first time in public at this concert. These were two mandolins and two guitars, and they were taken into the Orchestral Association late in the Fall. " Tommy " Gallaher played his first guitar solo at this conceit and was encored three times. The 1889 Spring Concert of the Orchestral Association was the crowning triumph of its career. Two hundred and fifty handsomely engraved invitations were issued, andthe chapel was filled with a brilliant and most appreciative audience. The stage, which the Orchestral Association had made expressly for its 1888 Spring Concert, was profusely decorated with palms and flowering shrubs. Handsome lamps were gracefully disposed about the stage, shed- ding a rich, ruddy light over the brilliant foliage. The Orchestra was out in full force and fairly surpassed itself. The programme was a difficult and most exacting one, and was faultlessly rendered. Dressing-rooms, with servants in attendance, were provided for the comfort of the fashionable audience, which came in evening dress. Every fellow's " best girl " was there, and every girl had her pret- tiest gown on. It was a rare sight that the old University Provosts saw on the night of the 17th of May as they lookeddown from their somber frames on the walls of the University Chapel. Many are the jolly incidents connected with our rehearsals up in Easton's room. There have always been more good will and fraternity among the members of the Orchestra than are found in 157, ! n :v -fig -- - Av. .-.. , I I E c 5 1 i I 3 4 5,1 Y .-,V ? .I 'N -.V L I il V . M Q. .l 4 I f. 1, A . 1 i . H, Q T 5 fa ii an I l any other University organization. We cannot say too much in the Way of expressing our appreciation of the uniform kindness of Dr. Easton in permitting us thus to use his room for rehearsals for the last three years. He has always taken an unbounded interest in the success of the Association, and every member of the Orchestra has a very warm place for Easton in his heart. '89 has many things to be very proud of 5 but none have brought more credit and honor to the dear old Class than her active connection for three years with the most flourishing Orchestra ofwhich any college has ever boasted. The Grchestra almost owes its existence to '89, and as she goes out' into theuvvorld she leaves her best Wishes with the organization'- vvhich has for three years been the obj ect of her most tender solicitation. ,sex , F , v if-9 :xp '. B .as - ' A wwf - ' I ff" f x 'l - 5 '1-"Gr-w - it M: , x Q -i. Va KI 4,0 Qi X 5 w ' i , ' 'Mohnl I 5' 2 fq ' ' f'N . - V --' 7" a.-f ' . -. ,I ' ' --1 a n , -r 5 'M ,pf X- tx. f X . ' ' , f -N.: gg. .QI . , 3 r J4' X , l h - :ig L.- lf' 5 I 'xkqilvr H X. - if f ' P-1'-'--i ii-5-...Q mlaigqlg-Q'L-Q r' it 'irafiizf -1:43312-f.. jf, .5-.- 'ffl - ... , T Eff--' : -1 , , Q" A- 'f" ':f ,, . Y' js. -5 N - H 'iff C1 I 1 1 at--:.1 l-'mg' -vm...-.1:1.:aSga " gg f' - ' 7-2 , ,fg, , .' ', , K. Y 'ty' i f: I 1-O ,ta l ,Ti ' .,. A "' ' , 1 flu -1 ' -H-f':'. a i . ' N. -, F- L.-1 --f2.fAfe-554 ' ' -' ' 45.-4 . ' THE ORCHESTRAKS "MAscoTTE." 158 X TI-IE PENNSYLVANIAN UNDER '89, 1. F ever a periodical trembled and turned pale the old Jllagazzbze did so when it became known that the efforts of the"Provost and Trustees hadlbeen successful, and that Eighty-nine had been iinally prevailed upon to enter the Universityg but when the further news was received that Mr. Charles it it tt it Hari 555. V it it it it Jr., laying aside mere personal and sellish motives, had consented sto allow his name to make one volume of the .list of matriculants, the editors were immediately called together, and after a hasty consultation the Board resigned in a body. In vain did Mr. C it it at it it it it it Ir. assure them that there WHS no necessity for such violent action, and that he would be- quite content to retain them as his associates on the paper, at least 159 another point against the Sophs on Tuesday," etc., and this early record, aided by the beard he raised in Junior year, haskept him on the staff ever since. p - Why Teddy Mumford was elected editor-in-chief' a year ago Was, fora long time, a mystery. Nobody could guess, and Teddy himself Wouldnft tell, so it might have been a sealed oracle until this day if it hadn't leaked out that Jackson, enraged at Jeff for making public the fact that he had been seen at the circus, threat- ened to resign if the offender Was elected editor-in-chief, and the Board and the Faculty compromised on Teddy. This, of course, ne- cessitated the choosing of Sam Lindsay as business manager, but Sam has a certain gentle smile which has encountered many a hardened six-dollar delinquent and never yet owned itself vanquished, and under this combined management The Pemz.g1Zwmz'a'7z has pulled through the year very creditably. To be sure, its highly dignified literary tone has at times been almost distressing, but the Board, by making a point of not printing Oberholtzer's poetry, has boomed the subscription list far above allgformer figures, the debt contracted by '88 for beer and pool has beennpaid, and it has even been noticed that the bare, mention of the paper occasions among its recent senior editors a uniformly cheerful cast of features, Which fact has given rise to the suspicion that in parting from The Pe1m.9fZwz7zz'a1z they experienced what on Professor Thompson's native heath would be termed a " fat sorrow." ' - if-xe::x ei ' 27 E1 'lx 'fc' Q- ' T ' '1 - 'F if 0 + c f ,-,A rg if f:i X Q' ii'-5 Vg Y'f"F5f'g"" '7' R , "fv1l.----AT" "' ii:-gs? -'U 'S J niifflg -E NR L7 --.T " f f ,af CEE" - :f:4s- -- '. " W- 4 -, ""? Y dawiqflsv' , cf, - -- 1- P-gr-J ---M 7 vw I 16x THE RED AND BLUE UNDER 789. .-Qi.-1 IGHT Y -NINE'S greatest literary feat-with the single ex- ception of Bobby Stulb's Sophomore compositions-has been the genesis of The Red and Blue. Henderson says so, and he ought to know, for the scheme was due entirely to his disinterested wishes for Alma Materts welfare and advance- ment. At hrst there was some uncertainty as to Whether it really was to be a literary paper or not. It was iirst christened Penh Nezcfs, and everyone expected a deadly rival to The PE7Z7'Z5L1'Z'Z'6Z7ZZ.CZ7Z. Then it leaked out that the name was not to be Perm Nexus, but The Perm Advoezzfe, and popular clamor surrounded Henderson to know whether the threatened civil war had been really given up. Hen- derson, as usual, was Machiavellian. He had always been in favor of making the paper literary, but-to tell the truth-he wasn't quite sure of Woodriiff. In this extremity Woodrriff was appealed to. VVoody's nature was ever frank and open as the day, and his answer was unequivocal. The thought of making the new paper anything but a . literary one filled him with horror, but Qwith a cautious glance around him, and a sepulchral whisperj he was having more difficulty than he expected in bringing Henderson around. The event has proved, much to the common relief, that Henderson finally persuaded XN7oodruff, while Woody's arguments seem also to have had some weight with Henderson. At any rate there is now no. doubt that The Red and Blue is a literary journal. It contains letters from all the prominent colleges Qwritten by Hen- derson' himself, so as to ensure the best stylej, choice bits from Hendersonis theses, articles describing Woodruff's, and verses by Klauder. It has turned out to be a funny paper, too 3 at least no X6 one seems to be able to mention it without a smile 5 and Henderson is said to have remarked recently that " being an editor-in-Chief is great, you can just boss the boys all aroundg andyou get free tickets to all the games, too." ' fThe above was written two months ago. Since then certain changes inthe peffsouuel of the Board of Editors have been brought to the attention of the RECORD Committee, who, after an interview with WVoodruff, decided to add to the article. When it was written the additional paragraph was submitted to Henderson, and the slight modifications- suggested by him are given parentheticallyj Henderson's health being somewhat broken down Cwlzose lzeulih woulziuu' be, wzfiz sueh cz se! ff o'1fz'veZ!z'ug z'fz'z'o!sjozf cz Boom' ?j, about the Ist of April VVoodruff assumed temporary control, and, finally, when it became evident that Henderson's, illness was a severe one fob, yes ! you ehoseyouzf Ziuze well, o'z'eZu'z' you ?j, Woodruff, though with much hesitation Qhesz'fuZz'ou ! Hear him, ye Gods ! After flzvfee uzoufhs cyf .S'L'lZ677Zi7ZgfD, consented to his own election as editor-in- chief Qihey had uo afzlghi fo do if Zi!! I mme bade. Bu! fl! be even wiflz you yet, you slzfpemf, ,QW-Zougueel sfzulae-in-Zlze-grass, you - - - ! -' - tiittitj. Some changes have been made in the policy' of the paper, all for the better Qhuuzplz .f Zhczfs u ffuziieff cy'ojbz'u'z'o1zj, but certain' disturbing iniluences surrounding the paper at .the out-i set Qz'usuZz'z'ug eoxeomo ! how does he dmfe Zffeuz' me like flzis. Ugh-h-h---- -ij. fThe rest of the copy, as re- turned by Henderson, is missing, the feelings of the commentator being evidently too much for him. The Committee, from this, sur4 mises' that all is not well between the houses of Henderson and Woodruff.j 'I - I 163' , L Mn, wa- nf ,. ,pffwx 'f,:,,Z"iE W ft -"'2 2,3-10' , ,,.2:,g'-:sh 1 f cr...-aaa. -f--.Q 3,-- -... "egT'?f Q,'s?f..P'f2l- 5 1 "' jimi-rgiiiff.-,:,-49.: 2..a 'fi '--.1 22"-" sxv.. wc. f nd- 1-N n. . ' J -ff Ji X .J Q 'Z-H -J--Q.f.gff':-4 fi il' fi fi' XJ N M P, ' 1,-L-f ' ""+m-,,X- L I ' - . 3 ' ng : ,ff ', ' ' ,-j':.:Z.y' ab if . -, --1 f.,! ', '--- -xJ Q-za?-"-' , L .-sf? -5' 6 1 . Y . -' F" -. . . N 'Win' - r T ,L - -Q ' ..,..,Q --.-- - J- ' - - '-.... ..--- -----v-:.-.- . 1 - -. ,.5- -,Me-44.,-. -:,:,,-M. , -1:-.-v-- - f gg-' ...-li 6' .4i5':".:f?.4-:T-Lf :T-5' if ,::T.hi:EF. :fi-:11' .. .'1""'-A-4-ar:-:fix-4.-"f'-.gT" ':" V -' fr ' lsiv--1'T""'-nf' 4-z' ' 'ive -----izzxyf - - 5 :.::2:wc.:ff1.,I-:7- ,- - L 4. af -- " 342' -621 fb-4 I, L.f-i...----ZE5,.25..,- it--Z . , ' 'A V ,Q 3 -6 55 ..,.""7:gi:f..2 5'-' ,. , ' - ' ' Q. T,:-':-f,- in . I A M4 dh f ,-2, ,. f 'Lp Mo..- --1-1.42 Szzgfx..-5q1g.4.1, J' g, 1,1 af- . L, I 'ff -- , :gif lf: - ',ss',,,1 1 , Z, '-1 ' 'T '--s .-. -:'f"'-5--"L 4 . f .. ' ' Rath- - -' 'L'-,'-1:-is-'.-. A '. 47 -: "7-M " f ' gg stung?-S 4,31 ,7 gzwff,,-', gf f , 1394 .. 6.25. bug., gw -' 2 -1- -- L mf, -ff f Q, -' -- - r f-is Q ,r 4p .. p., Nt, ,I 5 4. , - 11.2, ...f , 4. '- F. ,I ,Q f x , "" J 9, f f . N rf' 5 is-2' ff -f ' f . I" ff' Q ' 9 xx. ,. 17 -if-"-E.. M L, ' -, 5" f if-3? , 0 ,,f.1.-.- V. 'N' K fr 1. 3-1 - A 'JI ' I ifwz- ' X l 4,114 Q ..:v.R.,,,,. 1' 4 , , ff ull in 2 ,fi . ' 5: --f Af- az' :, f ,i. -f ..f 1. ,Z , Q ' gs ,-5 fry ,' I F 1- f,..1 .1 - W Q J- ,J .lj NJ ., s ,F ,. 'NL 9 ,,. 1, '- slfllx 4:53 -X51 EQ N., , 'vf 1,97 'x "' ML. ' I fn- v, .35 .rl by JI, 133. , rvg' f "'1' f Q 'ff' , ' vga ,ff ., 17 x -f 4 egg, ff x 1 L,w. -J, N, X1 1 -.4-5: NK- 9 ta '-N, CA -X H 1 1 N42 ' .- '-51.7 Y f 4 V 1 , -r-nffsf .L-.r., gi -cn y f I - f :Q A-1' 4 7' I N ' f Sai? X f ,499 ' 9 r qc" ' i , --..,' 4 1 f '53, f u' ,, A A 'ef -Q .V Y' " x F N Nw . '89 WITH THE CAMERA. NEW organization is the Camera Club, formed by the omni- present photographer. Several '89 men had been longing for such a club, and at length, finding other distorters of unoffending nature willing to aid the plot, they perfected their dire plan for instructing and turning loose upon an innocent community a horde of inquisitive " subjectt' seekers. Students are to be trained especially in the use of the detective camera, and a diploma of merit is to be awarded to all securing views of young ladies in peculiar or awkward positions. Five hundred dollars re- ward is also offered for .snap shots at Professor McElroy when not talking, or for Professor Jackson in any state or position whatever. It was charged that the '89 men were the ringleaders in this horri- ble plot, and therefore the Faculty has hastened to present diplo- mas to all members of that class and has dismissed them. In vain, however, for the Club has come to stay, and, as photography 164 - l 2 V 1 I becomes more and more popular, will ever grow. When its found- ers come, as gray-haired men, to revive tender memories of their T growth, they will enter the portals of the stately hall of the Uni- P versity Camera Club and meet its thousand young members in full conclave-on the jimi floor, noi, as now, in the attic. Yes, long i A Will the Camera flourish andthe focusing cloth Wave 'around the it halls of old Penn. '? fZ7?fij T 1114! ' l , u 2- yi l "7 Sif ' Wifi jf e K' i x . p Qgu-r ,iq5U.E.YlNG-- w:'f1LL wonnzmzn WHAT f K' f L l rfezr-rP'rmFF1nr11rL1N -501-0'NGf' I f 111' THETRHH SIT - s . A , y Q 45 Z n - 1. 'B ga , 22, QQ, fy VX , -'lfwlfzf 5 J , tp I lf H 0 U LD T 4 L gf i 3 'Mui ' S41 WH H T me fx 165 R I. ,,, , .l.,....... -,,,..i -. sys oRAToRs. HAT ,SQ was abundantly supplied with "talking-men" Qas Carlyle phrases itj was proven at the very first Class meet- ing, when the sinuous jefferys,,having talked everybody else out of the room, or into a state of coma, nominated and unanimously elected himself President. At the meetings held during the ensuing year every effort of the Class was devoted to talking down jefferys. The good results of the constant practice thus obtained were shown when, in Sophomore Year, the majority of the Class appeared as contestants for the Declamation prize. Appalled by the multitude, the judges calmly resigned themselves to repose until the dulcet tones of Bobby Stulb gently aroused them. Then they awarded the prize to the only two men whom they had heard: Dan Shuniway, who spoke first, and Bobby, who awakened them. But when junior Exhibition came round, the Class determined to restrain the ardor of its members and only allowed a few men to inflict themselves upon the audience Qand judgesj. To select these few from the host of experienced orators was a most difiicult task. Of course Mr. C. P.---ad lib. --- jefferys, jr., was ex- cluded at once, for everyone knew he would prose along intermina- bly if given the slightest opportunity. QSee the length of the 166 historyj Bobby Stulb's ambitious voice, tired of waiting for its diminutive owner to grow, had acquired such a habit of soaring into the empyrean on its own account that he, too, was compelledfto withdraw. In spite of these misfortunes the judges after much labor Qand circulation of coin of the realmj managed to make their selection, and on the fateful evening the chosen seven strode majestically across the chapel platform. QAt least they all tried to stride majes- tically, but john Conway Cowan Dillingham could only toddle, and Brownie could only waddlej - I As was eminently proper, Friar Perot opened the exercises withlQnot prayer, although everybody thought he was going to, and got ready for it, butj a sermon. . With cutting sarcasm and irresistible irony, Josie attacked the High License Law, while pretending to defend it. After his perora- tion, in which he extolledin glowing terms the " palatial hostelry of my friend, Mr. Michael 0'Flynn, of Germantownl' QPeabody's applause was especially vociferous herej, the Friar yielded the rostrum to the noted Irish orator and Fenian, MR. JOHN CONXVAY COWAN DILLINGHAM, who had only been allowed to speak after he had threatened "to dynamite that slippery pavement in front of the residence of the Department of English? I. C. C. D. is a very enthusiastic speaker, andso excited did he become on this occasion that he forgot himself and poured forth such a string of vituperation and profanity that even the'Professor of " di-nably impertinent " memory was " shocked and pained " to hear him. Billy Guggenheim is not very much for size, but the amount of dramatic force and intensity he managed to-throw into his ora- tion was something wonderful. By turns he would be more iiery than Thompsonvon the Irish, more solemn and impressive than PollyPerot in Philo, or more " fetching " and pathetic than Bobby Stulb trying to flirt. In fact so moving was his peroration that almost everybody moved-QNQ, I will spare you that chestnutj. Of course our lady's man, Dan Shumway, had to talk about some female, and as his Sunday girl and two or three of his week- day flames were present, he had to select some defunct specimen 167 for the exercise of his oratorical abilities. Of course his speech was very profound and eloquent, but it is a conundrum why Dan, since heuhad to go into ancient history, did not select Mother Eve, instead of joan of Arc. His oration would have fitted either lady. Fired by ff. C. C. D.'s eloquent praises of Ireland, and fearing that said J. C. C. D. would imitate his fellow countrymen and try to gain possession of our land, Oscar Chamberlain strove to sound the alarm in his "America for Americans." This "backwoods- Fourth-of-july-spread-eagle I' speech strove to show that the intru- sion of Irishmen like I. C. C. D. into the mud-and-ancient-egg- throwing business of politics, of Italians like justi into the monkey and peanut trade, and of Welshmen like Absmith into the alarm- clock supply business was "subversive of all true principles of social liberty," etc., etc. QYou have heard the same now these many years.j ' With the wisdom of a dime museum manager, the committee kept the greatest curiosities until the last. Everybody cheerfully endured the first five speeches in their eagerness to ind out what "Sagesse oblige," and "I-Iunyadi Janos" could possibly mean. Imagine their disgust when Ruddy'Klauder, after exhibiting his manly form and his Black Hill diamond stud, to their enraptured gaze for some half hour or so, finally sat down without having made the faintest allusion to the title of his oration. This feeling of evzfzzziwas deepened a thousand-fold when Brownie waddled slowly forward, and in his fluent and easy fashion began to get off a typical newspaper advertisement of Hunyadi Janos' mineral water. It began in the approved fashion, "lVIr. james Clayton Mitchell, 1899 So. 2o1st Street, is an estimable young man and lives surrounded by a happy wife and family. Some time ago Mr. Mitchell," etc., etc. After Brownie had been monotoning this in the most approved Ritualistic style for an hour, the rest of the contestants, feeling that something must be done to avert the total destruction of the audience, agreed to offer him the prize if he would only stop. This inducement was just what our rotund and schem- ing friend had been waiting for, and in a few minutes the wearied audience were borne away by the hastily summoned ambulances, and 89's junior Exhibition was a thing of the past. I 168 U UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA. , . JUNIOR CONTEST FOR THE 1 ,ALUMNI ORACIIIGN PRIZE. A CHAPEL OF THE UNIVERSITY, ' Tuesdczy'Evehz'1zg, fzme 5, 1888. AT EIGHT OICLOCK. MUSIC BY THE UNIVERSITY ORCTIESTRAI Ovefture, ' 'L usispiel, " Keler-Bela. THE PRESENT OPPORTUNITY ...... ELLISTON JOSEPH PEROT THE IRISH QUESTION .... JOHN CONWAY COWAN DILLINGHAM SINGING BY THE UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB. NAPOLEON IN THE QOTH CENTURY .... WILLIAM GUGGENHEIM JOAN OF ARC ........ . . . DANIEL BUSSIER SHUMWAY AMERICA FOR AMERICANS ' ..... OSCAR PEARL CHAMBERLAIN SINGING BY THE UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB. I SAGESSE OBLIGE .......... RUDOLPH HOWARD KLAUDER HUNYADI JANO3 ...... CHARLES NEWTON CLEMENT BROWN MUSIC BY THE UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA.. Serenade, Titt'l. - A COLLEGE SONGS 'BY THE GLEE CLUB. AWARD OF THE PRIZE BY THE COMMITTEE OF JUDGES- MUSIC BY THE UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA. "Viola GaYOtte," Gerome Hill. "ValSeS," Aus sclzoefzeaf Zeii, Waldteufel. I II 69 V Washington. Putting these two traditions together, may we ngt reasonably infer therefrom that Mr. Miller's oration on Washington was delivered on .the occasion of the iirst celebration of Washing- tonis Birthday by the University? Many of our older Alumni re- member very well that it was customary in their day for the iirst honor man in the Senior Class to be appointed by the Faculty to deliver the ,original oration on Washington's Birthday. Reasoning along this line, we may assume almost beyond Ia doubt 'that the first celebration .of Washington's Birthday, on which occasion Mr. Miller, of the Class of 1784, delivered the oration, took place in his Senior Year. There is little doubt, therefore, that the annual celebration of Washington's Birthday has been an established feature of the University Year since 1784. H . ' It is probable that for many years this celebration was observed with all due solemnity and decorum. ' The " nearness of the times " must have added impressiveness to the occasion. But we know that the celebration afterward developed into a perfunctory farce. A century ago every professor and .every student was present, as a matter of course, at these celebrations, and the orator was the for- tunate man in college. But let us look at Washington's Birthday Celebration of a quarter of a century ago. The students and the Faculty were instructed each year to assemble in the chapel of the old building, on Ninth Street, at IO.3O on the morning 'of the 22d of February. About one-third of the members 'of the Faculty and one-half of the ,students of the college department were usually present., On their way to college most of the students would stop in at some green-grocery store and provide themselves with a pocketful of hard, white beans, and would also invest in a package of giant torpedoes. The platform upon which the Faculty sat was very high, so high that when the honor men stood up in front of it to deliver their speeches, their heads were just on a level with the platform. The exercises were opened by the Provost, who read prayers. As soon as the speaker arose to carry out his part O11 the programme, it was a signal for the students, hitherto so quiet and demure, to begin ilzeiff parts Qwhich were not, however, set down on the programmej. They would Ere a volley of beans at the unlucky I7I speaker and also at the members of the Faculty. Then they would vary the scene by throwing torpedoes up in the air at such an angle as to have them fall on the platform, or, if possible, on the heads of the Faculty. At the celebration in 186o the disorder was so great that the janitor was told to clear the chapel. The students rushed in a body up-stairs, and when pursued by the janitor they overturned a wheel-barrow of coals, which was standing at the head of the stairway, so as to pour its contents upon the luckless pursuer, nearly dashing his brains out. Now all this has been changed. Three years ago the Seniors, with the consent of the Faculty, took the celebration into their own hands, and introduced musical features, which made a light back- ground to the more heavy parts of the programme. The succeed- ing celebration in February, 1888, was even more successful. The last celebration surpassed all others in brilliancy and in-. terest. The Celebration Committee of 1889 spared no pains' to make the CVth celebration of Wasl1i11gton's Birthday rival all former celebrations. The literary part of the programme consisted of the Provost's Address, which has become an established feature of the occasion, the reading of the Declaration of Independence, and an oration on Washington. The three musical organizations of the University, the Glee Club, the Orchestra and the Banjo Club, united their efforts to brighten and lighten the programme. A new feature was introduced in the manner of inviting the general public. Une thousand handsomely engraved invitations were issued and sent out together with the programmes. In his address, the Provost spoke of the early history of the University and of her honorable career 3 he made special mention of the new Library Building, of the need of ,dormitory buildings, of the recent honors bestowed upon University professors, and of the coming celebration of the Restoration of the University Charter. Mr. Buck spoke a few beautiful and thoughtful words upon the subject of the Declaration of Independence, which he read, and Mr. Amram delivered a capital oration, in which history and anec- dote were interspersed with much genuine humor. Eighty-nine has many things to be proud of, but few redound more to her credit than I72 nuld an the Was nts GY the Iless Drs, wwn -ck- ed- I ul. in- to all ed I re nd he b, ew 1c. nd he , of of he r. Il 6 cl C- 21S 11 the events of the morning of the 22d of February, I889, for although the WashingtOn'S Birthday Celebration is a University affair, the Senior Class has always the burden of responsibility in the matter of the arrangements. ' PROGRAMME. I. OVERTURE-" Poet and Peasant," . . . Von Suppe. ' THE UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA.. 2. HYMN-" My Country, 'tis of Thee," QO1fclzeszf1fa1fi0n byD1f. C!6Z7kA65. - GLEE CLUB AND ORCHESEQA. . 3. ADDRESS. ' BY THE PROVOST. 4. ROMANCE - "Awakening of Spring,"- . . . Bach, THE UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA. 5. " RHINE WINE SONG," .... ' . . Zollner. THE UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB. 6. MARCH-"Aurora," ....... Shczizfuck. THE ,UNIVERSITY BANJO CLUB. 7. THE DECLARATION'OF INDEPENDENCE, AUG. W. BUCK, A.B. QWilliamS, '88j. ,QI 'MEDICAL DEPARTMENTL - 8. cz. POLKA-"Laurestine," .... Oelzler. 'by PLANTATION MELODY, .... . Wabalz. THE UNIVERSITY BANJO CLUB. 9. Q. "THE JOLLY OLD CROW," . . . . Dmm. 6. "NURSERY RHYMESQ' .... . Anon. 1 THE UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB. IO. GAVOTTE-" Martha Washington," . . Morse. f THE UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA. U II. cz. "PETER PIPER," ........ jarvis. b. BEN FRANKLINMESQ., "THE FOUNDER OF THE l UNIVERSITEEQ' .... I . . . McC0ZZzn. THE UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB. 12. SOME REMARKS ABOUT G. W. PATER PATRDE, A DAVID WERNER AMRAM, A.B. QColl., '87j. '89 'LAW DEPARTMENT. Q ' LONG, METER DOXOLOGY, . 'CO1fches1f1fa!i0n by Dr. Claifkej. GLEE CLUB AND ORCHESTRA. T73 """A-' Q--WAY. L ....,....Y ' -.Q f,..,. ..- ,.-. ...Q , The fire seems to have been discovered about eight 0'Q10Qk in the morning. Its origin will probably never be known. It has been surmised 'that it originated from a lighted gas-burner in the pathological laboratory. It burned very fiercely, and the fire department were very dilatory, not arriving on the scene until ' ,fa . w A 9 ,f-th if--X .Mix 1 TM f --.ffC!,fi.T,, its tc gf . tti i, Ca, 'th A, gg 54, -I - gdQtpyfZ,-,, I Alf. M -1 l -'ET ,x,:J-S. 'Li' fs-f'5'1 EE EE T 1. f 1, f 2. 'f ,Af ' 2: -- fr: 931 Jl XL-1411511-fig? Y. ' ' , , 3 ff: -rf'--'WE ' " ml t ' 63'-ff"'?f "' -2. yflffl' F' 4 K . f l W I' -Q' Simtniifzfi f 7' f Qu- -J I l 'E , ri - ' - -f ll ' I Ea- ME! - ..... 'lik' - J A A 11 km t 494- -' ' -" U1 fi - -- Ta x I Hn YiZmf'7' vK 741 H If u -v L inn Trfnu rl? Q! li'-r, Nl " 1 H. mv gi vzigg- A 1 6 E 'lm1Hfl,l.,.-l -ff 5- r- T17 tttnif . fig? 9 Qc? T ' '74 is YE tw-'A' 'WZ is a 9 ra ZZ: M ff I -- A f -, - 7 dl ' Cn" .eh T' ' Q ? f' . -1 'ff 4 - I ff' 5 J' ,. if i f I '.b,1,,4 123-7,5 if an ggi- -. 29- 1 .T - -T L., - -- lien Q ' 3-V fy XP?-x ii nearly nine o'clock. The fire was 1 -4! 1 A ' 1 0 u fffggfg I7 i - confined principally to the fourth l?iE2"iffii?Tjf floor. The museum was damaged i 7 WCG b b th fi d t T Th ' 1 f- 3 1 -A Q y o re an wa er. i e ," W f H Hui -lf, 5 F ig-WMQA . if severest loss was sustained by Dr. Formad, whose entire collection of atholo ical s ecimens reo- Y ... resenting the toil of years, was destroyed. Many valuable articles were removed to the adjacent dental laboratories by the careful and active students. I . There was a ludicrous side to lthis otherwise distressing scene. As depicted in our illustrationkwhen the anatomical specimens were, in several instances, thrown from the upper windows, the crowd below groaned and shuddered with horror as they beheld what they Supposed to be the. corpses of professors and students. When the celebrated manikin, "Mrs O'Flaherty,,' such a universal favorite with the students, and made famous by Dr. Penrose, reached the ground, having been hurled from the third fioor, the shrieks of the women in the crowd below were simply appalling. '88 has left Alma's halls, 'fpeace be to their ashes," and the Medical Building has been rebuilt and vastly improved, having ns l g ' Y--------.. ,Y , --V 1 1 Y, in nn, , ,.....:--Er---A - -4-V A-'HW' " " '--" DR-BoARDMANfssUNoAYfuuERNooNif 2 Be f' ix E V 5' in , r ef :E - - fQi1x1n1unnummnn.m.c .E -.... Lu,-,. . " --..- i..- ,-, 5 .lfrg Ei' " ' . 'Lt "" Sl N - E -2' ii :E R' EE 'Q-. . 5. ef' gi zz-. , gf- -2? sf il g i 1.,.,, 5,47 -:L 5 E:: , P 55 .T.:g3'f:q5,A ' Ei gi ,xp '-is ,,,- -f-,, - : L EE. ,111-X Q.-7-.J -"' Q-zs! -..-... kv. jjfllff E i gl. ' I ,S 5 1 'E 5 .E.1"fu: 1 . .- J f 1 i . ,. LECTURES l i BOARDMAN, one of our honorable Board of Trustees and atrue and de- voted friend of the University, is Widely known as an earnest preacher, a brilliant scholar and a successful ethical instructor, it was, therefore, With feelings of sincere pleasure and delightful expectancy that we heard, in the late Fall, that Dr. Boardman was to deliver a series of sermons in the University Chapel during the Winter-term, and that the services were to be especially for the students of the,University,- although the general public would not be excluded. And this is the Waythe matter came about: Early in November the Provost and the Deans of the various departments of the University ad- dressed a letter to Dr. Boardman, in which they said that they felt T77 V plied by a quartette of mixed voices. This quartette took cold, too Qhow could they do otherwise sitting with their -backs to that dread- ful north window in the chapel Pj, but fortunately they took turns in taking the aforesaid undesirable article, and so we were never without some good voices to aid the Chapel Choir in leading the singing. Mitchell and jefferyswere the organists, taking charge of the music on alternate Sundays. Dr. Boardman always chose the hymns, but he left the choice of the tunes to Brock, Mitchell and jefferys, whom he wisely -felt knew the capabilities of the available voices better than he could know them. Gur relation- ships with Dr. Boardman ,throughout these services were most de- lightful, and we felt the influence of his kindly nature'in many ways. Q 4 Dr. Boardman always wrote the order of the choral part of these services ona postal card, and each week posted this informa- tion to the organist for the next Sunday. H His inimitable postals were a source of constant enjoyment and relaxation, amid the toils of Senior Year, to their fortunate recipients. Dr. Boardman's in- sozacicznae in the employment of musical terms was simply delightful. We cannot resist letting others share this pleasure, so we will give the text of one of these postals. - This wasthe last one our beloved chaplain sent to us: 3815 Walnut St., Feb. zoth, 1889. For Sunday afternoon, Feb. 24th, at 4 P.M. precisely. Voluntary, gIz'dz'ng into the Long Meter Doxology. Hymn I- Hymn 89, gliding into the Gloria Patri. Hearty ihanks, G. D. B. 179 iff 4 m ' O- " W ' wg' I5 wr. t l 7 u ag 01 .. .. 1.14 I, p . 'b--' WAS .born of humble parents on E' ffrllf '-4 ff""':', 3 If the first day of April, 185-, and gg those that know me best say that qi I f VH 'fn 'rf Ni , If i H . I was the biggest April fool that V., I at if-TI W .. ,, 0 I - ever was born. Again, I had the - -A '-1"-1"-- misfortune to be endowed with .i...i, ,, a sickly body and a puny mind. All these circumstances combined to make me a most tremen- dous bore, indeed, this wonderful talent which I possess has spread the fame of my name throughout America and Europe. I therefore had to choose some subject with which to bore people, and so de- cided upon our "National Game " as affording the largest number of victims. Because of the sickly condition of my body Iwas never able to participate in a game of baseball, but I never lost an opportunity to study the theory of the game by watching from the window the boys playing in a neighboring lot. Although, as I said, I have never played a game or struck at a ball, yet, by these extended studies, I am now able to teach anyone wishing to play, the secret of never striking out, to show any pitcher how to pitch compound curves, and even to write many volumes of the driest books ever written on all kinds of games that I never have played. Finally, I am a graduate in medicine, as it gives more weight and semblance of truth to my theories, and it enables me the more readily to take people in. p These confessions, "dear friend," I hope you will keep a per- fect secretg that you will immediately destroy this letter, I feel cer- tain. Nevertheless, it all goes to show how much may be done by perseverance and push. Yours truly, A. HORRIBLE PILL LEAF, M-D 181 DIABOUCAL DESIGNATIONS DERIVED T FROM DANTE. THE VICE PR-v-sT. p A " Who went about with footsteps very slow B RK R. " Is 't not enough to clatter with thy jaws But thou must bark? " N. U Now behold This grievous torment, see if any else Be terrible as thisfl ' F LL T-N. " The master of the sapient throng Seated amid the philosophic train, Him all admire, all pay him reverence due MCEL Y. 1 M B-R--N. " Now art thou A it it it that fountain Which spreads abroad so Wide a river of speech H --Who to the college Of miserable hypocrites art come, Do not forget to tell us who thou art." -NB--G. - " I saw an old man standing by 1ny side ' Alone, so worthy of reverence in his look, That ne'er from son to father more was ow ed -ND--L, I-Ks-N AND TH-Ps-N. " Three aged ones are still found there, in Whom The old time chides the newf, V182 PEROT. I 5' Obscure, profound it Was, and nebulous, 'i So that by iixing on its depths my sight, Nothing Whatever I discerned therein. " WOBRALL AND JUSTI. A " Disseminators of scandal and of schism." E. WARLocH MUMFORD. " Still what a royal aspect he retains." ' A BROWN. ' " The face was as the face of a just man, I 1 Its semblance, 02LL'ZU6l7flZ7Qf, was so benign." F STULB. p I ' "Regard my manhood, if it be suHicient.', DEXTER. A " VVho hath forgone the good of intellect." , FIsHER AND CRESSON. A " Let us not speak of them, but look and pass. "SAMMY L." I ' " Of modest mien and graceful in his gait." A FLEMING. i " One' Who seemed to be much Weariedf' I . HYNEMAN. ' " Things saying 'tis becoming to keep silent." K HYNDIVIAN. A , " It Was not clear if he were clerk or layman." 3 HENDERSON. i " I by far too cunning amf' C. P. B. J., JR. . " I Would thou list to me a little " But take heed that thy tongue restrain itself! li OBERHOLTZER. i ' " When, in the World, I Wrote the lofty Verses., BAKER. ' I 1 A I li ff Peradventure, A Thou didst not think that I was a logician! " g 183 I i 9i + I r LLOYD SCOTT. n K' And he who had conceit, but little wit." WOODRUFF. " Behold the wretched one, a fortune-teller! KLAUDER. " Who shows Himself more idle than if laziness Were sister to him." DILLINGHAM. . ' " As restless as an infant in his play, Weeping and laughing in his wayward moods." STEWART. ' ' " Less my deeds bespake The nature of the lion than the fox." SHUMWAY. . . ' " The tormented spirit, Who thought to hide him, bent his Visage down. FUGUET. " VVhat silence hides, that knowest thou." '89. " Peoplewere there with solemn eyes and slow, W Of great authority in their countenance." SQ,UIBS. There was a young fellow named Dexter, Whose mind was most sorely perplexed, sir, Because, when he said, ' Poet Horace was dead ' 'Fore the Flood, we all laughed at poor Dexter. VVe have a young friend, Billy Forbes, NVhom Astronomy wholly absorbs g When the Prof. muttered slow, I " W'hat's the moon, don't you know P H H Its earth's pavffzszlfe !" answered-Young Forbes 184 '89'S MARRIAGE CLUB. "A Supper by ilze Fivfsi Be1zedz'ci." - Walter Scott. Herbert Hart Boyd. Clinton Rogers Woodriiff. Rodman Ellison Grissom. Nathan Young Worrall. George Brooke, jr. .1 'H Z ft' mm Mime: W l N lst B' r X ---A 'Qgf Q2 g Q '1 fi QQ. G :Z-ri, f ut gl i-,,," '14 2' a.. ii i l li- FK . ' Q 1 ,fd vis 1 A , 'M in. 'VI 7 i ' h Ffh, . flag- ' ibn, lm wise' Ji U Ni ,tolli H " If xiim ' jgi iii f K tr it f ' lil-, Z 1 'N ' X f if lil W -it f viz -'FN fr ,E-" - ,an r L11-,ef ,, J if rffff it '-fEv':Z"fif" 1, , , + ' .41 is Fl x i I i SCENES PARIS DURING THE EXPOSITION. HERBY B.: " Goodness, Georgie, what is that coming alo cr GEORGIE B. Qin great consternationj: " I hope it is not a fast Woman P ris is so horrid! H B TH Qin chorusj: " Let us get away 'H 185 x-x ffpw, N .WY L" Q f , 1, l. , mf W Rlililaxw V 'al l ' ,f-g , Q 'Qxflga Af' , lIl wx mms 'W' gr I'Wf'fffWffW f'm. +,,, f 7M 1fJJ1m + "'ffwi RMlm'Q:"vW H1113 J, HH .Y W Wfiiimfw 1 llmumu w ww WV MW WR' W '1 lL,nw? .iml1,i1Uxm 'X-125 1 ' Hl1L!Ull:,N4,J.4du " Uljimn' mmgi i x- Wi N HW H HH. li r!P!lIlllJfIJiH HI I My W ,1 , M g m.wfW " , Wx,WWl,1if WM yo Mmm, W "RIMM V Q if NW ! .i:WVl1" Mxi All ,, 'L E 5 ,,,,.. . 9' f"' 'hfffiilffrfw " WN' MWVIWII -Y f w f 11fW0fJmW1WWWfmJWW- V ' if f N221 A 7Z'1W-F-ci 3.R?i1L1:JEn.1fflv1', lj: sfv 'iw-JCQS l 411113 eufffwm' 5111.9 WF 1 ' ' J via- Iv .,... , , 4,-.--. - , ..4LLEf55L-li-:ii-l"' A F-ROM DERIDER TO DEAN. se Winn . 'Mir-I l lb H MJ! V '1 v V. , ,Mx .1 lu Nun :fill , v! X , J, I XII, , , WE N 'J ' I la- . 1 --- -1 -. ,-. Q: E 4? HBH' I N T l ...Jh- I I l ...LH all I . S, STREPSIADES' FIRST GLIMPSE OF THE " THINKING SHOPIH If 89'S NEW ENGLISH 'VERSION OF "TI-IE CLOUDS" OF . .ARISTOPI-IANES. Wz'Zh fha Following Wondemzl Cczsis Socrates Qkeeper of the Thinking Shopj .... WV. A. Lamberton Strepsiades fthe inqnisitivej ............. E. I. Perot Phiclippides fthe proiligate sonj . . . . . J. C. C. Dillingham . . . M. J. Hyndman Adikos Logos ......... Dikaios Logos . ...... . . . . ...' . . .E. I. Hyneman Chorageus Q leader of the balletj ...... Miss Clara Peabody Messengers, Chorus, ballet, students, etc., by the members of the Greek Section. A 1 187 1 -x - : -al? ' f' f f' xv,.Xs Wi! 51 Xm-5 oi, 'Kgs Ywh-3421"-GM LQ1-lb A :- , 'A ilu x'LV.1'B'Jllj :Lg'ree 'Eh-lk Aw I 'Eh Aix ,ill ,i 'IH' Sxfnx- 05...'HL1S ,I ' come! enigmgiol. xv'iLL.'gwP- NM . . , X. M Qs X lf 1Yaf f7f, fu qw 59143 'S' 'Mal fglo-u7Wf'x km Mk ku? --1-11. W a2'f25W221:1'f1if1feQ.---- xl 4fLUf"fi:P1 Qsgsv-1 IIYN C 1Ef"5i3r ,- 3 M uv . fl " Tn., g'?.!l ,I N In I X f NN- 6,3 MWXXJSX x 1 . . ,ff ak ' -:xii U Y N , -ff V , .55 -M 4' 555 ' "QQ - 74. ' 'N 4 'fffg 4 ,255 1 J N.'5'.' ii X ' W EQ' -J N '31 ' ' 'ET' M' 'Wm 1- Kiw i 3 Qffiif .2 fi -'fi' Sd?-4 " 7,-:gil-lm " Y ef q'fQ'IH , WH. f --- H , in AM 9sv.4 Q5 2'?n59E 4 ni XML 1 -7 . -hc' " zffQ5e ... - 'A ---?:f.:ff'v:'?:"m9"w..M ff' -f ' ' X- M IN., 1-Qc:-.-e tjululn: .gl h ,' , , -F I Sim 1 ,J 9 r U IT- ,323 ...,-.. - , f' ' XL' E. fl ' Q I .A V . - - 41' Wx ngmgenxent ... - -" ' 5 - C1vL,."" 188 'LQ 'bm Q X M li li lr it I X ' fl' N' ll ' l i - .f l ,ff H ll, "Glam E i til l ir I i l .. AND THLUUO11 hr wlu. QPEN p W Q ii 1 fl '11 .'1A ll -nl "tw " X V 7 'c ' 4- T , V "' ' J' iii'-"'f l N 'I' F ii 'I'-M1716 ,illil'i'l .i ' lilH'iV - UllHRmEU EEEB i M , m.uxAnunAaKumcmrHI.l2murBZ1 X A WHlrE"UA'PSV L-L g g a + THE GYMNASIUM. HE University gymnasium is the result of one of the Q greatest discoveries of modern times. For years the E colleges of the country had been discussing the prob- ' leni of how to prevent the great evil of athletics-oven 'X Work. After deep and thorough research, the gentlemen 'R in charge of the University gymnasium made the start- ling discovery that this difficulty could be entirely ,jf obviated by absolutely closing the gymnasium and preventing any work whatever. It was supposed that this great discovery Would agitate the whole country from Jersey to Camden, but for some reason the vibrations failed to connect, But though other colleges may go on in the same old Way, the University glories in the fact that she has abolished the great and only evil connected with athletics, and therefore has a theoreti- cally perfect system. I Accordingly, under this new system, an effort was immediately made to equip the gymnasium with some theoretical apparatus, in order that it might present an attractive appearance to visitors on Washington's Birthday or at some of Philo's semi-annual centen- nials. After great effort, some rowing machines, a punching bag, 189 a bicycle machine and other apparatus of this description were procured. But, alas! some students of too practical a turn of mind climbed over the locked doors of the gymnasium, and, instead of admiring the apparatus from a respectful distance, actually presumed to use it for their own improvement. At the irst touch the rowing machines went to pieces like a Prince Rupert's' Drop, the bicycle machine smashed, Hand the punching bag fell to the floor and collapsed with a sigh. To prevent a repetition of this disaster, wire screen was immediately put up over the gymnasium entrance and another lock put on the door 3 and the students were now left to derive their strength from Mrs. Dougherty's butter. j But, most beautiful as is the theory of our gymnasium, the ungrateful students did not seem to properly appreciate it, and made every effort to injure themselves by openingnthe gymnasium and subjecting themselves to the great peril of overwork. Every device, from a nickle machine to a White Cap notice, was tried in order to melt the hearts of the authorities, and, if possible, raise the siege. In fact, the gymnasium has rivalled necessity as the mother of invention, for it has elicited from the College an ingenuity that would appall a Patent Office official. But even the White Caps were discouraged when, picking up a book entitled " Hygiene for Baseball Players,"' they discovered that the gentleman in charge of the gymnasium had been hit, on the head one day by a pitched ball, which bounded 6of straight up into the air, and did not notice that he had been struck till his attention was called to the fact. That settled the White Cap affair. We had no business with a man like that. But the worst crime of all for which the gymnasium is respon- sible is that it has prompted the faculty to indulge in a joke. For weeks we have tried to devise some means of explaining away the awful fact, but of no avail. And the student who passes day after day before those double-locked doors cannot read in the Catalogue the statement, " Great care is constantly exercised to prevent over- work in this-department," without thinking that the faculty have condescended to indulge in a joke. However, the charge is too terrible for us to make, and we merely allude to the matter. But, though our gymnasium is almost theoretically perfect, yet there is one serious defect, namely, that it is not situated at the North Pole. As the gymnasium isilmrow situated there is a possi- bility that a burglar or an antiquarian might break into 'the gymnasium some night and overwork himself. And we think it due, not only to the students, but to humanity in general, that proper provision be made for their safety. 190 I ll 1 i . J is 0 1 2 11?-Fivffa ' ,W H . ,V, HUW Lf p A DOE-S' YE- ' x AFFEC-rf1u:5i1':'?N. TE - ' 'L a ' vf0M5fEiF:gc:ru?sl?-"" ' " Eu. 'muse Elf N N 7 A THE C-0'-"iGi:x-pg L. 'LXELLS QXJAFNQESJXW 5-:I K QA?-Wlrw I A f, X Q17-'EW-fEL,L,-Ag AE- NL '- f- E15 u ' ' .ET L YELLS ,gcfgq cm-nk L' QQAQIIENZE-QL: QW H E N 'fro L lE9:,Fg':fELLS K, We YA ,A .YMYHE-'ll"L1lu.xui '7 K . I-.kxgeliitq-YTD E.,-.,.., :Hi-i l Ohm! -1' Jr . .1475- , fa, K P - 2' E141-'YM' owvifi - . 5 - ig sins- v'- x". Yavaggakg ABSTRAC 7' , ' ?'0 A . ,EA EsvTER'C -Fcfsfvq 1wEYE.L rf- . Q YELLHVU 2--f--"' .poi '24-if gf - - 1 ' " Y ' fr "' ' Y-"X Y' ' Lfggc N., After deep and laborious research Professor Hilprecht explains to the Class in Semitic, the origin and development of the College Yell. 191 f :lf C H " VZ 1 J- :X J "NX, 75" :WX " 1 , 4 'I ,P J xx '02 L ' x Xb i AN -QT, 5 Q45 --W ,QL -4 - 5 pf 0: jigs, ga L-, 1- -.i:.L:-- .. I .-S-- 4-J --ag - Fl ' r ' K 1 ,L -. 'T'T"-fL-- - . U . ,- -"-- A fi 'X' x ' 5' ,--4' ., X . Lg' 1, "I .. 4i'J-?1--- N' --pf --,i,,,,..a 'N S ? ill' I I, lf, ' fi I I l i , L ,--- 74 " " 'Zn i ff, I' f--""'I2Q-. . rm- ' -.vz ,545 w g I, -A!-1 W, E in--W F. ' Nh g ..-. A . - QM' 1-Qi-u f-n- X-I .Sl f','l.fg ' ,Q l , V ' I rw f " L 74' ,f -'H -1, . 1 . . 4 fl fi. T ff -'4 "-- ffx QM 1? .' lr. i riff df, , ,xr sf "" V+" ' Vlfiv W X 'Q l'f5w 1f"' f 'vi if . ' .- L . "TF" E ' ,fix -'fi 7- VA! Axim 'I mf, :'.'1"y fi, "3-Jfiff 411 -s :wr ' 'ff ,- - V: . ELI ,' KA. ,-if7--gb.-,'?i,.'..-rgifgalii-2:23:13 -I i:'7E':9:,f ' L x I -'Ls 'A-jg N"3"'-Zffj Sff:gfg1S'5'7Q '--:Z M -L-if m..1-"""'VV", .7-1' -rf 56.1-ei j Q-L f ",,,Lfi,' 'Z' " K .J -' ' 3-..+' lug' Y . :fb - -2 '25 ai, g -T :sez ..' .T-5:c?: u- - 1, -. 91,3 GMAT CLUB. NLEMBERS. VV. G. Knowles, A, 42, E. A. Shurnway, E, Q, I. H. Terry, K, W, H. C. Wood, Q, Q, LITTLE ARTIEA GOODSPEEUS 'UDIVERTISSEMENTH CLUB GF TI-IE CLASS OF NINETY. First P7'6SZ'lZ,Z'7Zg' Elder- " VVarrie H Coulston. I Second PV6SZ'dZ.7Zg Elder: J. H. Merrick ABLE-BODIED MEBIBERS. Joe " W'hy?" Mitchesonf "Dinah" Dennison. " Freddie Darling " Neilson. 4' Dtelangois Trueboard " Newlin. Brinton, the Indian Boy T92 X432 I -- IKEEIK LETTER I .. I F IIIIIIIIIIIWMIMIIIII' N 'III IMITERNITIES I I:'IIlIg!I IIIIIIIWI ,QW Q I III',ImII,m "' I , II. . 2 I itll 15'-'l""I F4111 E 'Lf-if ,ff-I -2 if ., -ff' -' ...-F ro g ,. -14'-5"-1 4' 1 . ,i ' fffff w 'I-1 I ki :Qi .. .ff mmm 'Im III If: -1- I RATE NlTY'B-QCJ.Q1 L I , ,A., HI, ,..1 'U' M rf' I M I-IIIIIII II, ,IIIIIII III IIIIII' III III IIIIIII K ILL IIIIIIIII Eff IIMLIIIIIIIMIIUJL. II , IIIIIIIIIIIII I : I VIUIWIIII IIIIIIIII IIIIIIII II f I I IIIII,IIIImIIIII II IIIIII IQIIIIIWIIII I 1 1 - I", I--:III --f-2 I - - --- ',1 ,'?.II'5 - far--H -.L-.-.5-QQ 1. '1'j'Tl I jzjjfwx IIE? ffdIIIizIIi5IIsz::r'IIIII 'aass5Iies:e:iii:iiii:5F--- , -- ----- f- -- -:':i?g,g-A-:Ll if - I. 'I I- " W' ' ' , . ,. I v III 3555, 1 I -' II , 'jiziflr'-2-:mtgxgfggzg:s:zf:q5rf:fe:mrs::::':s:':tmr:mq--W I' T1 . ' I' 71 EI -- I I ' fa" ' If , 'I IIII G- llgiiggfx1'rggggfqffs5235ggg12:f:5ff'::::::::.-:.::ffm::::::::::::: -P+" ' II ' ' x. " I 'I II 'I III ,. I If II 'I 4LIe.f2"I X I ' FL..E-4 N l 1,1 1 - 'ivziiif i I I L- -, III: -' I H j -- I I --- I 1 . -1- I--1 , R - I I . - - - 1'f'I. --la YW Y 1 I I Effwf '-,-' . i -L I IQIILII if Inj - -2.-, II I I , ., - A, .- II' I - 'II III" ? ' ' .wh I II' I I - If I I- I IL:--. I -I II.-IIIIII Nl 1. 'maj 92545, Y Er ,.1'11f:ya65 Al I I Iprnl . TA-ZHT ? mink 71 :14, xl'-...di AI' , I, - -.- - - .. I I I5-:'I" III: X ' R" ' I' -H ' '- -K - ' "'-4 I- 1.12245 V 'K 213:52 I 1 'II I 'III 'IIIIII I 'II ,, f'ImI" oI I -I :III III fl '41 13: I II I I- I - ,II I Iv fe:e2aaI I fs-1 I ,III I I . I . II II ' I II IIII ' I ' I I I W- I ' Il' , I IIE! Q I . , ,.,. "I -III I 1 I I I I ,4 I , I l I-1::::u IW: In--,2- 1 "III'II'5,Im. ,ml I I .H I I'Ilx5":.I' , II I -If-Y" ,,,, , S. I I f :gi E, I . IIIIIIIIIZIIIIIII I I mf" .' III I ,I I" If 'I I , .IIIIII 'I f'-:fi J I I 7 'Z . ihfj- 1,5 N Y M X I I I I : IIIIIIII'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I II ,I III IIIIIIW I I I IIIIII II I II I I I I IIII ,,,,.,,I 'I'f'E5 A I I 'I' ' ,f I f I I I - I ,. X IIIII IIIIII IIIIIIIIf. I UIUI I I III' 1 93 Pennsylvania Chapter of the Delta Upsilon ' Fraternity. Established March 23d, ISSS. COLLEGE DEPARTNIENT. George Hammeken Hill, Clarence Sears Kates. Henry Ashton Little, Howard Hungerford Sypher. Samuel Rakestraw Colladay, Edwin Adams Damon, George Peterson Deacon, Albert Hill, Topliii' Johnson, Frederick Leser, Jr., john Robert White, jr., - Francis Yarnall. Thomas Luther Coley, .Joseph Vlfilliams Fell, VVilliam Stewart Jamison, I john Henry Lalferty, Arthur Conover Thomson. BIOLOGICAL DEPAR'I'MENT. Alexander Heron Davisson, John Harper Girvin. NIEDICAL DEPARTMENT. Guy Hinsdale, A.M., M.D., Arthur L. Benedict, A.B., M.D William J. Burd, Benjamin W. McGalliard, M.S. Arthur L. Smith, A.B. Aug. W. Buck, A.B. George H. Tuttle, A.B. 195 V. I I I I I I I I l I ! I I I ! I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I Eta Chapter of the Delta Phi Fraternity Established, February 17th, 1849. George Dana Boardman, D.D. Roland Post Fallcner, Ph.D. 1 ,Edwin jaquett Sellers, Christopher Magee, jr., Charles Davis Clark, Philip Penrose, John Granville Leach, jr., Horace Howard Furness, Jr., George Dana Boardman Darby, Charles Nathaniel Davis, Charles Baeder Vlfilliams, Walter Rodman Lincoln, Thomas Wilkins Hulme, Samuel Moore Hepburn, DeLancey Ver Planck Newlin, Warren Kilburn Hale, john Joseph Borie, William Henry Ashhurst, Edward Prime Goodell, Thomas S. Kelly, Louis DeP. Vail, Addison F. Lansing, Eugene Beauharnais Beaumont, john H. Mohr. 197 ..-4. E 1 dxf .Z A 3 1 r i uv Fraternity of Delta Psi, Delta Chapter George Tucker Bispham, A.M., 6, Christopher Stuart Patterson, A.M., ,, john P. Crozer Grillith, M.D., ,g Frederick Robeson Baker, xg, L, Charles Harrison Frazier, , Francis Randolph Packard, Isaac Starr, Jr., , Archibald Grahm Thomson, I p, Benjamin Lease Crozer Griilith, Horace Andrews Walton, Thomas Powers Harris, All Clayton Fotteral McMichael, ' Frederick Rogers Meigs, , Walter Barclay, x Charles Nicoll Bancker Camac, Robert Morris Darrach, Frank Tracy Griswold, i Jay Bucknell Lippincott, , S. N audain Duer, F William Paull Howell, Lawrence Savery Smith, I 5 i George Emlen Starr, i I Samnel Megargee Wright, Richard Henry Bayard Bowie, Edward Riou Coleman. George Stuart Patterson. 199 p Zeta Psi Fraternity. Established July 5th, 1850, -l TRUSTEES. W'il1iam Pepper, M.D., LL.D,, Charles C. Harrison, Hon. Henry Reed. - FACULTY. Horace H. Jayne, M.D., Thomas R. Neilson, M.D., Louis Starr, M.D., Howard A. Kelley, M.D., James,Alan Montgomery, A.B. '89. YVillian1 Innes Forbes, Rodman Ellison Griscom, Walter Scott. ,9O. YVilliam Hahn Patterson, William Henry Trotter, Jr. '91. Henry Ingersoll Brown, Trevanion Borda Dallas, Lloyd Carpenter Griscom, Burnet Landreth, Jr., Thomas McKean, Ir., George Ingles MacLeod, jr Alexander Wilson Norris, Sidney Wheaton Smith. '92, Charles Louis Borie, - Albert Bartram Kelley, John Harold Brockie, Franklin Peale Patterson, Samuel Bowman Wheeler. 'R MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. Joseph Allison Scott, joseph Price Tunis. LAw DEPARTMENT. Cortlandt Kimball Bolles, George VV'harton Pepper, A.B Charles Cooper Townsend, A.B. ZOI 1,,. .,: 9',Q::.,1g., a X A X.. ve -1 1- , . , ll Aki. 1 I i--. .,:.f:J: 421, -5 1 -1-' , .. 'X' . ' 1- 1 - 'K T Srl wg? Perma. Zeta Chapter, Phi Delta Theta Fraternity FACULTY. H. C. Deaver, M.D., . S. Potts, M.D., . Oram Ring, M.D., L. E. Schoch, M.D. C G MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. A. H. Cleveland, J. M. -Harnme, C. J. McFadden, O. M. Richards. john Shaw, B. H. Whaley. COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. . J. R. McCance, '89, J. G. Klerr1m,jr., '90, H. R. Hogg, P. E. Howard, '91- J M West Jr 20 - - 7 -2 3. 7ff-xlifr, X171 1 Alpha Chapter of the Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity BOARD OF TRUSTEES. James H. Hutchinson, M.D., Samuel Dickson, A.M., Wharton Barker, A.M., John C. Sims, Jr.,'A.M. FACULTY. Louis A. Duhring, M.D., Barton C. Hirst, M.D., William A. Edwards, M.D., William M. Powell, M.D. Richard L. Haite, M.D., David B. Birney, M.D. UN DERGRADUATES. .il DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. Edmund Canby. . DEPARTMENT OE LAW. A Russell Duane, A.B., Francis Fisher Kane, A.B., I Crawford Dawes Hening, A.B., A Casper Wister Hacker. COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. '89, Franklin Bache, Elliston Joseph Perot, ' Edward Christman Knight, Albert Haseltine Smith. ,QOV. . - A john Hill Brinton, jr., James Hartley Merrick, Frederick Brooke Neilson, George David Rosengarten, Jr., Wfilliam Macpherson Wiltbank, Willian1QOglesby Griffith. '91. ' James MacIntosh Longstreth Eckard, Frederick Lennig, Edward Koons Rowland, JHHIGS Staff- , . ,92,. , U Frank Befnadou Bower, Wilmer Worthington lHoopes, Cliffgfd Lewis, jp, ' William Weaver Lukens, Adolph George Rosengarten, George Thon1psongRow1a11d- 205 ' Gibson Chapter of the Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity. ,1...i.- Conszrl, W. C. Horton. Pffocrmszzl, A. F. Daix, jr. ,Sc1fzff01f, W. M. Montgomery. Tzfibmze, I. W. Bierer. I. SW. Bierer, G. W. Beale, S. B. Beebe, S. S. Bowman, . H. Burkhei . J. Coll, G E P. F. Cope, S. S. Craig, A. F. Daix, jr H. G. Durbin, Jos. R. Fahy, MEMBERS. Ser, -7 T. R. Graham, U. C. Horton, H. C. Halcomb L. L. Jewell, E. F. Lukens, David Lavis, F. L. Laws, 7 W. M. Montgomer M. I. Morley, H. K. Newitt, jr J. M. Shindel, J. W. Simmons. HONORARY MEMBERS, D A G G . B. Conrad . W. Worm 206 ea . H. Mershon, . H. Taylor, ELII. THE PENNSYLVANIAN. - Published Weekly im I throughout the College Year. BOARD OF EDITORS. V From Apri1'1st, 1888, to April 1st, 1889. EDWARD WARLOCH MUMFORD, '89, Editor in Chief Richard Wilson, Medical Department. A 1 Walter R. Lincoln, Medical Department. Nathan IC. Horton, Law Department. Charles P. B. jefferys, Jr., '89. Samuel M Lindsay '89 I Clayton Mitchell 89 Franklin Bache 89 Josiah H Penniman 9 Manzo Kushida '90 Francis B Lee 9 Henry I Brown '91 F C, Williams QI john G Fuller Dental Department Henry S Kiersted Biological Department From April ISt 1889 JOSIAH I-I PENNIMAN Editor in Chief Walter R Lincoln Medical Department Nathan C Horton Law Department Chester N Farr '90 Franc1sB Lee '9 William H Loyd 90 T Hartley Merrick Q0 Hugh W Ogden 9 Henryl Brown QI F C Williams '91 Edwin S Gault 92 john H Brockie Q2 Henry S Kiersted Biological Department john F Belt Dental Department 20 . , . ' A 2 . , , ' 9 , . . . , . , O. , . . , . . , O. . , . , X . . , . . , . . , .. H . , . , , . . , . 0 ' I , , I .. - 1 ' A . . , O. px . . ,, . , . A . , I 9 ,,,- y - i , . , . , 'O. , 2 . 3 1 . , - I o l . J , , I, u ' ' . , P V - x ' . , - , Q , ' . , I A . , TI-IE PI-IILOMATI-I EAN SOCIETY Fonnded 1813 OFFICERS FIRST TERM Q 88 895 Moderoior C N C Brown 89 Fzrs! Censor E I Perot 89 Second Censor H W Ogden Q0 Secretory Charles Peabody 89 T reczsnrer I M L Eckard QI Recorder .' J. C. Mitchell, '89. SECOND TERM C88-1895. Zlfoderoiors E. I. Perot, '89. Firsz' Censor: J. C: C. Dillingham Second Censor: W. H. Loyd, ,9O. Secretory : E. H. Dickson, 791. Treasurer: H. I. Brown, ,9I. Recorder .- C. N. C. Brown, '89, THIRD TERM C88-'89j.' , jlloderdior: H. W. Ogden, ,QO. First Censor: Manzo Kushida, '9 . Second Censor: R. I. Garnon, '9 . Secreicwgfx S. R. Colladay, '91. I T redsnrer .' W.. G. Knowles, '91, R Recorder: E. J, Perot, '89. -20 MEMBERS. C. S. Bonsall. George Brooke, jr. C. N. C. Brown. F. M. Cresson. J. C. C. Dillingham. Rev. Wm. Du Hamel. J. H. Girvin. Tamio Hayashi. C. P. B. jeiferys, Jr. R. H. Klauder. E. C. Knight. W. H. Burk. C. N. Farr. R. I. Gamon. B. L. C. Griiiith. Manzo Kushida. H. I. Brown. S. R. Colladay. E. H. Dickson. J. M. L. Eckard. T. P. Harris. VV. G. Knowles. C. R. Lee. J. R. Carpenter, Jr. y E. S. Gault. Clifton Maloney. C. ,89. ,9O. ! 91. ! 92. S. M. Lindsay. I. C. Mitchell. E. W. Mumford. Charles Peabody E. J. Perot. Walter Phillips. A. N. Seal. D. B. Shumway. J. L. Stewart. Robert Stulb. C. R. Woodruff. W. H. Loyd, Jr. H. W. Ogden. J. H. Penniman. J. G. Stoddart. R. R. Truitt. G. F. Levan. G. I. MacLeod. A. W. Norris, Jr J. D. Perry, jr. W. H. Righter. Cornelius VVeygandt J. R. White, Jr. Archibald McCullagh jr W. S. Morris. U. S. Schaul. R. wniiams. , 210 TI-IE SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY. l-11. ' P7f6SZ'0.767Zl'.'- Dallet Fuguet, '89. .S'ec1fezfa1gf.- J. C. Ziegler, '9I.' . T1feczsu1fe1f.- Alexander H. Dav1sSon EXECUTIVE CoMM1TTEE: H. S. Kiersted, '89: G. F. Coleman. '89, J. McG. Mitcheson 9 MEMBERS : '89. H. M. Justi. D. Fuguet. A. H. Davisson. C. S. Kates. . 390. C. Franklin. I. P. Moore. I 1 G. F. Coleman. Jos. Ball. H. S. Kiersted. T. M. Lightfoot H. Souder. D. J. Pgyllock. ' Jos. .McG. Mitcheson. V ' '9I. P. E.'Howard. J. N. West. H. Delaplaine. ' F. Head. ' ' ' ,92. W. M. Meyers. . ' 211 J. J. Elcock. I J. C. Ziegler. ' H. E. Platt. A. 0. Konig. GENERAL ATHLETIC Assoc1ATIoN A OF THE ' . " 1 , Un1Vers1.ty'of' Pennsylvania. Presicienc, J. William White. Firsc Vz'ce-Preszdeni, H. Laussat Geyelin, 'Second V2'ce-Presicienc, FrederickVMeade Bissell. Secreiofof, Edgar Dudley Faries. Treasurer, Edward G. McCollin. l BQARD OF DIRECTORS. I Thomas G. Hunter, Horace H. Lee, Davidson Kennedy, I J. Allison Scott, ' Alexander J. Gray, I George Pepper. STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE Bonnn. - Ground Conznzzciee-Frederick Meade Bissell, G. W. Pepper, Horace H. Lee. . . H - Conference Conzfnitiee-H. Laussat Geyelin, F. M. Bissell, Edward G. McCollin. . 4. - Membershzf Covnnzzftee-Edward G. McCollin, J. Af Scott, Alexander J. Gray. U Finance Comnniiee-Thomas G. Hunter, Davidson Kennedy, Edgar Dudley Faries. , STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE. ASSOCIATION. Co1nnzz'z'!ee on , Aihlefics-+H. Laussat Geyelin, Horace H. Lee, .C. B. Keen, '89, F. cp Williams, '91, G. D. B. Darby, Dental. ' Co7n1niz'z'ee on Rozozng-H. Abbot Fuller, David, Milne, 'Thomas G. Hunter, Edward EG. McCollin, Edward Dudley Faries. Co1n1niz'z'ee on Crzckez'-Frederick Meade Bissell, J.. Scott, Henry -- I. Brown, '91. S ' ' ' ' S' . Cofnvniifee on Fooioall-Alexander J. Gray, John C. Bell, Thomas W. Hulme, '89, George S. Patterson, Law, Henry B. Robb, Law. Conznzniee' on Baseball-Edgar Dudley Faries, Howard M. Morton, ,9I, Med., Chas. S. Boyer, '9o, William G. HOUSYOI1, P1 Q60- W. Pepper, Law, George S. Patterson, Law, Robert C- H111, 89- Covnnziiiee on Tennis-George W. Pepper, J.. Allison Scott, S. R. Colladay, '91, A. G. Thomson, '89, W. H- Trotter, If., 90-,, 213 I- . . , 1 V 4 - 4 Iv iw 1 . Q . - I .I ' .xg , I I BOARD OF D1REcToRS OF TRACK f ATHLETICS UE THE UNIVERSITY 'OE PENNA. I H. H. Lee. A. J. Bowser, IQO, Med. ' H. L. Geyelin. C. H. Frazier, '89. QH I C. B. Keen, ,89, Capiaia. ,Q is Wm. Innes Forbes, '89, Manager. Mid-Winter Sports QHandicapedj. . ' Academy aj Zllasie, Saimfday Evefzzbzg, Febzfaafgv 3a', 1889. H RUNNING HIGH JUMP. 1. H. A. Little, U. of P. Q5 ing . . . . . .... 5 ft. IOM in. QQQIQ 2.E.M.Church,U.ofP. .. . - I 5, JI A ONE-HALF MILE. 1 1. P. R. Freeman, P. F. 81 S. C. Q35 yardsj . . . 2 min. 185 sec. Wiki 2. E. M. Church, U. of P. Q15 yardsj . . . . . , ill' ' Ig, ' TUG OF WAR. lem . .,. ,j QA: Princeton pulled U. of P. fl If U. of P. " Y. M. C. A., Chambersburg. I. Princeton " Y. M. C. A., 2 ft. E11 1 44o YARDS DASH. 1,1 1. r ,111 .,. LI r 1. C. H. Frazier Q12 yardsj ..... . . . II.: . , 2. N0 second. ,I It 3' 44o YARDS DASH. ff LI- . . . . ' I Qt. Jfzier-Academze Assoezaizon. 1 1 Ili ' 1. J. F. Sinclair, P. C. S. ........ . . 1 min. 7 sec. 2 J 2. W. Brinton, E. A. ......... . hi I lg gig, " . 1 MILE WALK. , . il' ' I I 2. F. Tillistrand, West Side A. C. Q40 Sec.j . . 1 , . I 1 Q 1 MILE RUN. I 1. A. B. George, M. A. C. ...... . . 4 min. 52 Sec. ,IQ 2. LM. West, U. of P. ....... . . . POLE VAULT. 1. A. R.,.GLl-ine, U. of P. Q3 ing ..... . . 9 ft. IO in, ti V1 2. H. M. Morton, U. ofP ..... I . . , 214. .9 I - - I I . .Z 1. I IM I .i!. 9. 9 . I. 'v wl. 'A . , 1. E. D. Lange, M. A. C. QScratchj .... . . 6 min. 53 sec. I l , . Aa ,M -ri Fall Sports. University Athletic Grounds, Sazfmfday, Ociober zozflz, 3 100 YARDS DASH QOpenj. Sweet, Swarthmore College ............,, , Graham, Schuylkill Navy ............ POLE VAULT. G.P.Quinn,Law...... ........... , H. M. Morton, Med. .................. . I Ioo YARDS DASH QFinal Heatj. B. Landreth, '9I .............. ...... . C. S. Bonsall, '89. . ............... . . THROWING THE HAMMER. C. S. Bonsall, '89 Q18 feetj .............. . A. J. Bowser, Med. QSCratchj ........... HALF MILE RUN. O. P. Chamberlain, '89 Q5 yardsb .......... . E. M. Church, ,QI QSCratChj . ........... - 440 YARDS DASH. I. S. Kulp, Med. QSCratChj ............. . S. S. Bowman, Law Q8 yardsy ........... I MILE WALK. E. A. Schofield, Law Q40 SeC.J ........... . J. MCG. Mitcheson, ,QO QScratChj .......... I RUNNING HIGH JUMP. P. E. Howard, ,QI Q3 in.j .............. . C. S. Bonsall, '89 Q3 in.J .............. A . ' RUNNING BROAD JUMP. B. Landreth, '91 QSCratChj ............. . W. Goodwin, '90 QIo in.j .............. I2o YARDS HURDLE. W. R. Stroud, P. G. Q5 yardsj ........... - H. A. Little, '90 QScratChj ............ I MILE BICYCLE. H. H. Cressman, ,QO QSCratChJ ......... - W. W. Pile, ,QI QSCratChj ............ -. PUTTING THE SHOT. C. S. Bonsall, '89 QI ft.j ..............- - A. J. Bowser, Med. QSCratChj ........... . 220 YARDS HURDLE. W. R. Stroud, P. G. Q3 yardsy ........... - . H. A. Little, '90 QSCratChj ........... . I MILE IRUN. J. M. West, ,QI QSCratChj ............. - O. P. Chamberlain, '89 QSCratChj ....... A . . 220 YARDS DASH. . B. Landreth, '91 QSCratChj ............. - S. S. Bowman, Law Q6 yardsj . . . 215-V 1888. IO? sec. 9 ft. 52 in. IO? sec. 96 ft. 2 min. 2053 Sec. 56 Sec. 8 min. 39? Sec 5 ft. M3 in. I9 ft. 5 in. I9 sec. 3 min. ISE Sec 33 ft. 6 in. 34-E sec. 5 min. 3 Sec 25 Sec. Spring Sports. ...1L...-- A Safmfdagf, May nth, 1889. ' 1oo YARDS DASH. A A PUTTING THE SHOT. C. S. Bonsall, '89 ..... IO? Sec. B. Landreth, ,QI . . 2 MILE BICYCLE RACE. I C. B. Keen, '89 ...... 6 min. I2 Sec. H. V. Register, '92 .... ONE MILE RUN. . J. M. West, ,QI ..... 4n1in.35gSec. S. W. Smith, ,QI . . I THROWING THE HAMMER. J. C. Faughnam, '91, Vet. . 94 ft. II 1n. W. E. Van Loon, '91 Med. 220 YARDS DASH. E. M. Church, ,QI .... 23-Q Sec. B. Landreth, Jr., ,QI . .. . RUNNING HIGH JUMP. P. E. Howard, '91 , , L 5 ft. 7M in. E. M. Church, QI . . I A ONE MILE WALH. J. MCG. Mitcheson, '90 . 7 min. 44 see, E. A. Schofield, Law . . . b J. C. Faughnarn, 'QI Vet. . 32 ft. 9 in. CL S. Bonsall, '89 ..... 120 YARDS HURDLE. H. A. Little, '90 ..... 18? Sec. A. L. Harris, ,QI . . . . . 440 YARDS DASH. ' Inter-A caciemic A ssocz'a1fz'0n. Pickering, Rugby Academy . . 59-5 Sec Andrade, Penn Charter School. ' RUNNING BROAD JUMP. C. S. Bonsall, '89 ..... I9 ft. 7111. B. Landreth, Jr., IQI. . . ' 440 YARDS DASH. C. H. Frazier, '89 .... 53 sec. W. H. Warwick, Med. . . 1 n 220 YARDS HURDLE. E. M. Church, 'QI .... 31 Sec. A. L. Harris, '92 . . . . - HALF MILE RUN. , J. M. West, ,QI ..... 2 min. 2 Sec J. H. Terry, '91 . TUGOF WAR Qlffinalj. ' 4Won'by'91. ' ' 2I 4 c 4th Annual Meeting ofthe Intercollegiate Athletic Association of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, May 18191, 1889. - -1 . ' Ioo YARDS DASH. 7 ' I. B. Landreth, U. of P. . . . . . IO? sec. 2. W. Sweet, Swarthmore .A . POLE VAULT. . I. S. D. Warringer, Lehigh . . . 9 ft. I0 in. 2. H. M. Morton, U. of P. . . ., . 9 ft' 8 in ' 2 MILES BICYCLE RACE. . I. C. B. Keen, U. of P. . . . . 6 min. I5 sec. 2. H. B. Huelings, Swarth., 6 min. 172- sec, 120 YARDS HURDLE RACE. , 1. W. A. Roberts, Swarthmore . . 17g sec. 2. H. Vernon, Swarthmore, . ONE-HALF MILE RUN. 1. E. M. Church, U. of P. . . 2 min. 43 sec. 2. Terry, U. of P. . . . 2 min. gy Sec. PUTTING THE SHOT. I. R. Lewis . . . . 34 ft. 8 in. 2. C. H. Detwiler, Lehigh . . . '33 ft. 8 in. 220 YARDS HURDLE RACE. 1. H. Vernon, Swarthmore . '. . . . 28 sec. 2. W. A. Roberts, Swarthmore . 440 YARDS DAS!-L' I. C. I-I. Frazier, U. of P.. . . . 53? sec. 2. W. Warwick, U. of P. . . RUNNING- HIGH JUMP . ' I. E. M. Church, U. of P. . . . 5 ft. 72 in. 2. T. S. March, Lafayette . . . 5 ft. 65 in. ONE MILE WALK. I. E. H. Coates, Lehigh . . . 7 min. 37 sec. 2. O. P. Chamberlain, U. of P. . , 220 YARDS DASH. I. H. Vernon, Swarthmore .... 23g sec. I. B. Landreth, U. of P. . . RUNNING BROAD JUMP. ' 1. C. S. Bonsall, U. of P. . . . 20 ft. IM in. 2. T. S. March, Lafayette . . . I9 ft. 7M in. " THROWING THE HAMMER. , - 1. A. J. Bowser, U. of P .... . 85 ft. II in. 2. C. H. Detwiler, Lehigh . . . . 84 ft. A TUG OF WAR. A i I I. Swarthmore pulled Pennsylvania 4 in. 2. Pennsylvania pulled Lehigh QM In. ' . SUMMARY. Pennsylvania . . . . . . L . .8FirSt,8SeC011dS- Swarthmore . . - - -5 H 3 H ' Lehigh .... . . .2 " 2 H Lafayette . . .... 0 " 2 217 13th Intercollegiate Athletic Meeting. New Y01fla,Safu1fday, May 26171, 1888. ,iii-1 Ioo YARDS DASH. 3 C. H. Sherrill, Yale . . . ............ - - TOE SCC' E. C. Moen, Harvard . ............... . 2 MILE BICYCLE RACE. , 7 mm. 3 sec. R. H. Davis, Harvard ....... ........... . . C. B. Keen, U. of P. ............... A . - T ' RUNNING HIGH JUMP. ' , I. D. Webster, U. ofP ................. . . 5 ft. II In. W, B, Page, U. of P. ..............,... H . - THROWING THE HAMMER. I , A. J. Bowser, U. of P. ........ . ........ . . 88 ft. 65 In. H B. Gibson, Harvard . . ............ . - I MILE WALK. E. C. Wright, Harvard ............. - - 7 min. 29 sec O. P. Chamberlain, U. of P. ............. . I2o YARDS HURDLE. H. Mapes, Columbia ................ - - 175 SCC' H. L. Willialms, Yale . . ....... . . . . M MILE RUN. . H. R. Miles, Harvard . . . . ......... . . 2 min. 25 sec C. P. Cogsvvell, Harvard ............. 220 YARDS DASH. C. H. Sherrill, Yale . . . . . . ....... I. . . 222 sec. F. B. Lund, Harvard ........ . . ...... . PUTTING 'THE SHOT. H. P. Pennypacker, Harvard . . . ....... .. .. . . 37 ft. G. W. Woodruff, Yale . . . . ..... . . . . .... . RUNNING BROAD JUMP. T. G. Shearman, Yale ........ ...... . . . . 20 -ft. 8 in. H. B. Gibson, Harvard . . . . ......... . . . ,V 440 YARDS DASH. S. G. Wells, Harvard . . . . . ......... . . 52? sec. H. M. Banks, Columbia . 4 . ........ . A 1 4 - I MILE RUN. . W. Harmer, Yale ...... E. .... ..... . . 4min. 37? sec C. A. Davenport, Harvard . ......... . ' L POLE VAULT. T. G. Shearman, Yale . . .......... . . 9 ft, 4l1'1. S. D. Warriner, Amherst . . . ........ . . . . 22o YARDS HURDLE. ' G. S. Mundell, Harvard . . ......... . . , . 26g sec, H. Mapes, Columbia . . . . . . . . ....... . ..... . . , , n TUG OF WAR. Harvard pulled Princeton. Columbia, A Bye. Yale " Swarthmore. Harvard pulled Columbia. Harvard pulled Yale 3 inches. SUMMARY. I Harvard- - - - - 7 Firsts, 6 Seconds. 4. Columbia . . . . I First, 2 S'e"E6nds 2 Yale. 1 e . . . Q 1 .5 H 3 H 5. Princeton- I I . .O H O U 3 Pennsylvania . . . . 2 " 3 ff 5. Amherst l . A . O 44 I ' if 218 UNIVERSITY CRICKET ASSOCIATION. A - P1fesz'dm!.- H. I. Brown, '91, l7z'ce-P1fesz'dem'.- S. R. Colladay, IQI. Sec1fe!a1fy.- H. C. Thayer, ,Q2. , ' T1feaszwfe1f.' A. Valentine, '92. 'A EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. W. Scott, '89, ' S. R. Colladay, '91. W. H. Trotter, Jr., IQO. H. C. Thayer, ,Q2. A , UNIVERSITY TEAM FOR THE SEASON OF 1888. ' J. A. Scott, Med., Capiazbz. - G. S. Patterson, '88. S. R. Colladay, IQI. W. Scott, '89, W. B. Henry, '88, - t A. G. Thomson, '89, F. Yarnall, '91, I N. Downs, Med. - 1 W. Goodwin, IQO. H. I. Brown, IQI. I A W. C. Wiedersheim, '88. v SEASON OF 1888. " ' ' Pennsylvania ......... . . . . . 194 Haverford.. 49 IST INNS. 2D INNS. Pennsylvania . ., ....... . . 68 I23 Harvard . . ..... . .- .... . 73 - I6 The University of Pennsylvania thus won the Intercollegiate Cricket Championship. SEASON on 1889. May 22. Pennsylvania . . .' ..... . . 136 Haverford ....... .......- 5 5 IST INNS. 2D INNS. May 25. Pennsylvania . '. . . 130 ' ' ' ls Harvard ........ - 27 102 219 UNIVERSITY BASEBALL ASSOCIATION. . .-1 . P1fesz'den1f.' Henry S. Kiersted, '89, Vice-Pffesidemf: julian H. Dewey, '91, Med. .S'ec1'eZa1fy: J. W. Diggles, ,QO 717'66ZSZL7f67'.' Charles S.. Boyer, IQO. . Ilfafzager: H. M. Morton, '91, Med Adveriising Agem': A. D. Whiting, '91, Med. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE : H. M. Morton, Clzaiefman, . E. D. Far-ies, G. S. Patterson, Law, G. W. Pepper, Law, R. C. Hill, '89, -- UNIVERSITY NINE. . I' E. I, Hynernan. p. E. D. Graves. C. I-I. Kirk. A T. H. Cahill. A ' A. Lansing. ' Ib. -E. P. Swift. 2b. H. C. Bowman. 3b. J. D. Updegrove. Hynernan. l.f. Granes. I Kirk. I I c.f. -J.AM. Harnrne. r.f. S. VV. Dougherty., H 220 CLASS NINES. Season of 1889. - 7 88. G. W. Hyde. NV. Houston. . W. Wiedersheim. -I. R. Savage. M. E. Hibbs. W. Smith. W. R. Stroud. E. D. Cleaver. E. R. Keller. '91. 1 J. P. Armstrong. C. H. Kirk. L. de P. van. H. I. Brown. J. L. Bernard. S. Graham. H. C. Wood. G. P. Deacon. R. Field. '91, Medical. ,9O. J. W. Diggles. J. G. Williams. B. A. Cullen. A. McGeorge. C. S. Boyer. H. Fleck. H. Smith. I. H. Brinton. W. H. Trotter. 92. ! A. F. Lansing. G. W. Kendrick S. R. Earlf H. C. Thayer. A. S. Valentine- E. R. Green. W. W. Hoopes. E. W. Coon. J. H. Brockie. c. H. M. Morton. p. G. H. Tuttle. I. A. Scott. Ib. T. F. Devlin. 2b. T. H. Cahill. 3b. W. R. Wales. F. Nassau. c.f.' C. G. Stivers. s.s. 1.f. C. r.f. A. D. Whiting. Freshmen Win the Class Championship. ' - 221 coL1.EcE Bom CLUB. .iiiv P1fesz'denz'.' David Milne. First Vz'ce-P1fesz2z'em'.- George Brooke. JT- Secomi Vz'6e-P1f6sz'dem'.- W. H. Ashhurst. .S'ec1fe!a1gf.' joseph Head. 717f6'6ZSZL7'67'.' A. McGeorge. Capz'az'1z.- C. S. Potts. First Li67Lf67ZCZ7Zf.' G. P. Deacon Second Lz'eutemmZ.- E. P. Goodell. .l..l..- DELEGATES TO NAVAL BOARD. - H. A. Fuller. J- D- E- Spaeth- ELECTING COMMITTEE. WY H. Ashhurst. George Brooke, jr. J. E. Carbutt. E. P. Goodell. L. H. Alexander. F. Ashhurst. W. H. Ashhurst. F. Bache. F. R. Baker. F. Black. W. Boyd. G. Brooke, Ir. J. E. Carbutt. A. P. Coll. A. R. Cline. B. M. Davis. W. S. Darlington. G. P. Deacon. H. Delaplain. T. D. Finletter. H. A. Fuller. B. W. Fleisher. E. P. Goodell. A. J. Gray. F. E. Green. L. C. Griscorn. G. P. Deacon. A. McGeorge. H. H. Sypher. ACTIVE MEMBERS. F. B. Gurniney. C. H. Harris. F. F. Hallowell. R. L. Hart. YV. D. W. Hall. F. Head. J. Head. S. F. Houston. W. M. Hornor. S. E. Hutchinson. T. G. Hunter. W. S. Jarnisonq C. S. Kates. C. B. Keen. D. Kennedy. T. J. Keely. C. L. Leonard. W. W. Lon gstreth. T. Maris. J. W. McBride. R. McCall. A. McGeorge. 222 G. I. McLeod. D. Milne. W. R. Nicholson. D. Pacheco. D. Pepper. E. Potter. C. S. Potts. P. S. P. Randolph W. W. Roach. G. Ross. L. M. Scott. F. A. Smith. J. D. E. Spaeth. H. R. Stoopes. I. Starr. H. H. Sypher. W. J. White. . D. Whittaker. IP G. W. Wood. A. Wright. E. Vvright. C. B. Zeilin. HONORARY MEMBERS, J. Howard Gibson. William M' Stewart J. Wilkes O,Ne111. Enilen Physick, MUD Thomas H. Edwards. H. H. Loncrgtrethn E. W. Hebeiton. C LIFE MEMBERS. EHingham5B. Morris. John R, peu- Carroil Smythe. Bernard Gilpin. F-,I-,G0Wan. . 'A. W. Biddle, M.D. William R. Ph111er. James Bond. ' W. M. Hornerq . Season of 1888. -ll, UNIVERSITY EIGHT. F. A. Strader . . .... Bow- 'C. G. Diggles E. P. Goodell . ..2 . ..3 E. Church ......... 4 H. Sypher . . . . .5 L. Gray . . . .6 QH111.. ....7 Wright . . . .Stroke . . , AZ New L0'7Zd07Z, fime 23d, 1888. I.Ya1e. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Time2Imin.I9Msec. 2. University of Pennsylvania K. If ff UNIVERSITY FRESHMEN EIGHT. i F. C. Williams ....... Bow F. Head ...... ' - - 5 G. F. Gest .... . . . 2 T. johnson . . . . - - 6 G. H. Smith . . . . . 3 E. P. Goodell . . :L . . . 7 E. M. Church ......... 4 R. L. Gray . . . . . . Stroke AZ New London, fzme 26th, 1888. A ' I. Yale Freshmen ....' ........... T ime II min. 32 sec. 2. University Freshmen . . . . '- H 'U' H 42 U 223 UNIVERSITY FOOBALI, ELEVEN. I y ' 'Full-Back, R. e. Hill, rag. 8 ,HQQEMQ T. W. Huime, ,895 s. izeoiiaday, ,9I, I ' 1 Qzaafier-Back, E. M, Churgh, 4 4 - - Ruslwffs. . 4 E. Wagonhurst, Lavv. A,,,, J, R, Savage, P. S H- Syphef, ,9O- 1 y ' A. Bowser, Vet. J- DSWCY, Med- A 'W. S. Cash,-Law. I. E. Ziegler, Law. i . . . . . 1 . . . THE SCORES. V SEASON on-1888. University of,Pennsylvania Graduates . . ., .. . . University .of Pennsylvania Steven's'Institiite . . University of Pennsylvania Princeton . .... . University of Pennsylvania . .. Yale ......... . . University of Pennsylvania Lafayette ........ University of Pennsylvania Swarthmore . . . . . , 4 - 1 I . University of Pennsylvania Princeton ....... . . u 1 ' University of Pennsylvania . - Tioga . ..... , . . - University of Pennsylvania- .' - - Lehigh .' .... ,I . . . L .University of Pennsylvania . - Yale , .. ..... . ,. -' Championship Game. 223 20,41 6 48 o O 63 O 32 6 I2 44 6. o 38g I2 4 36 o O 544 University of Pennsylvania . O Princeton ......... 496 University of Pennsylvania . 0 Harvard ......... . 462 University of Pennsylvania . 50 Lafayette ......... 0 University of Pennsylvania . 18+ Wesleyan ......... 6 University of Pennsylvania . 24 johns 'Hopkins ...... ' IO University of Pennsylvania . 20 Naval Academy ....... 9 Total Points scored by the University . . . 278 Total Points scored by the Opponents . . , 290 F-B. H-B. Q.-B. R. r ,J Q- ni If -Cid! -? Z-91 an 'ww ,9O. A. McGe0rge. H. Fleck. C. S. Boyer. H. YV. K. Hale. B. S. YValters. C. N. Farr. J. W. Diggles. I. H. Brinton. I. MCG. Mitcheson. ' Ggden. R. J. Gamon. -n aiu QIYQZZ'--Ara .M-2.42. E .F .A-14,,'Ti7.?M5'5.-L-Li'QQjQZfL... y CLASS ELEvENs. y ,QL ,92, H. C. Wooil. S. R. Collaflay. WV. Huidekoper. L. du P. Vail. A C. F. VVilliarns. P. E. Howard. I T. B. Thomas. EJP. Goodell. NV. H. Ashhurst. ' H. Dixon. E. M. Church.. 226 F. S. Schniucker. A. S. Valentine. H. C. Thayer. S. R. Earl. ' H. G. Colesberry. A. L. Harris. S. B. Wheeler. A. B. Kelley. C. LI Borie. B. Beaumont. H..V. Register. SCORES OF THE CLASS CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES. '89 vs. '90 ........ , '89 vs. ,QI . '89 vs. ,92 . .4-0 .10-6 -44-O '90 vs. ,QI . , 0.33, '90 vs. ,92 . , 0220.1 ,QI vs. ,92 . -, 25- O, Won. L0st. 7 89 . . 3 0 290 . . 0 3 '91 . . 2 1 '92 . .1 1 2 ff-Qfgiggxt ff 2, 9 R-,www 4.5 'N' -- : -1-. -1- -1- :tr :ww --:FT Tw- Mui -A -I-W -L ix -zn- T"" "- '11 N- """"" ' 8 --vw --- -N- - W.. ..,, Ni-, -,--A 1.2- - - w------- ' " .T .. - T.. Fl 4"u7'u HIL- V -9 "T f UNIVERSITY TUG OF WAR TEAM. 8 'Anch0r, J. B, Thomas. 3 A1 Hill. - 2' F. C. Williams. 1 J. Johnson. 227 THE GUN CLUB OE THE UNIVERSITY OE PENNSYLVANIA. , l..- ' P1fE5z'de7z!.- C. P. B. Jefferys, Jr, ,89. FWS! Vice-P1fesz'cz'em'.- F. B. Neilson. I Sammi Vz'ce-P1fesz'dem'.- W. H. Trotter, jr .Sec1fem1gf.- G. D. Rosengarten, Jr. , g - T ffeasurer .- J. H. Brinton, Jr - EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. A. H. Smith. W. Huidekoper. J. H. Brintonyjr. R. H. Klauder. C. P. B. Jeiferys, A. H. Smith. Dallet Fnguet. " R. C, Hill. ' jr. S. W. Dougherty. U J. Brinton, Jr. ' Trotter, J. Mcllvaine. J. C. Irwin. F. B. Neilson. G. D. Rosengarte n, jr. MEMBERS. . H. Y. Dolan. A F. Lennig. J. Starr. J. L. Hechtq I . T. H. Farquhar. ' W. Huidekoper. F. C. Wi11iams.l' H. S. Jefferys. Hp A. Little. W. Hoopes. G. D. B. Darby. W. H. - Patterson. CLASS TEAMS. D ,89' 390- I '91. hsfflith- Dolan. Starr. H111- Irwin. Williams. Dougherty- Mcllvaine. ' Johnson. Hecht. Brinton. Lennig. 228 1 f. 9 K I 4 . THE UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB. ' ' J. Spencer Brock, Leader. I Robert B. Salter, Jr., Acc0mpamz'sz'. ' ' 'Q ' . ' Q ' Samuel M. Lindsay, Managg7f ' MEMBERS: A ' , , William A- Bell. ,Edward W. Mumford. i J. Spencer Brock, B I. W. Parry. il Nicholas H. Douty. F. R. Remont. 3 A w William C. Dunn. - T' . ' A. G. Rosengarten. . W. Cflde Lano Eastlake, M.D, Q Alex W. Russel, Jr. - Q , Norman S. Essig. ' ' Robert B. Salter, Jr. f T. Frederick Hartman. f B Arthur L. Wilson. V Charles G. Woolsey. ' -' -G ff ig... . 'iiif rf 2115- fm. .4 1 1-B ' B c B f - pf- f-H f im UID , I-'TIE GWB' cfm UE' GTZ: :HB G35 GZ! A155 QS Z 5' ' THE UNIAVERSITY BANJo CLUB. .+ 5 I George Fetterolf, Leader. . ' ' T Ba1zjeczmfz'7zes.- E' FWS! Banjo: S. W. Dougherty. ' A i P. C. Dougherty. 1 W. Rowland. W. S. Marshall. George Fetterolf. V C , 1 . Sammi Banjo: ' T. W. Huidekoper. I ' A . .C .Guz'z'a1rs.' B - . - T. J. Gallaher. - B- - B- D- Z- Dun-Ott J. M. Hamme. . C. P. B. Jeffefys, Jr- . V I A 229 C 4 1 1 A Orchestral Association ofthe University. ,,,..111- OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION. President and Seevfetary' Charles P. B. jefferys, jr., '89. T1feasu1fe1fs.- Ist Tewvzx Charles Peabody, '89, 2d Term: Oscar P. Chamberlain, '89. Mczmzgefffmf Geafmcmiozwz: Henry R. Gummey, Jr., ,9O. Leader, Edmond D. Beale. MEMBERS OF THE ORCHESTRA. FIRST VIOLINS. SECOND VIOLINS. David T. Berlizheimer, Imo., Horace Castle, '72,Col1.,'75,Law,Im0 Harry P. Ball, '87, George W. McCaffery, '89, Biol. Wm.W. Leech, '86, COl1.,,QO,D67Zf. Milton J. Rosenau, '89, Med. O. L. Kehrvvieder, '84, Arthur P. Summers, '90, Med. julian T. Hammond, '87, Dent. Howard H. Sypher, '90, R. Hand Smith. VIOLA. Adin A. Goldsmith, '89, Devzi. VIOLONCELLOS. A I DOUBLE BASS. C. P. B. jefferys, jr., '89, Imo. Harry E. Applebach, '89, Med, Herman Grebe, ,9O, Mus. Dept. 9 Leonard W. Bacon, Jr., ,QO, Med. I FLUTES. " ' CLARIONETS. Charles Peabody, '89, Ist. Albert Egbert, '92, Ist. A Oscar P. Chamberlain, '89, 2d. George W. Tuttle, '91, filed. PIccoLo. HQRN IN Howard G. Smith. james R. Wotherspoon. J t. R S CSRNETS- TROMBONE. us In . yp er, ISt. W'11' n M-11 , . J0hI1 C.'C. Heins, 2d. v . 1 lam S 1 er' 90' U PIANOFORTE. David B. Salter, '89, ASSOCIATE MEMBERS, MANDOLINS. GUITARS J- L. Gerome Ferris ISt 1 T ' i . . , , , , .j. Gallahe , '8 , jllgiv t, Wllllam W- Luke115, 92, 25, William Beavler, 29d. 6 IS A I ACCOMPANISTS. D 'd , , I avi B Salter, 89, C. P. B. jefferys, jr., '89. 23,0 UNIVERSITY CAMERA CLUB. .T ' President, D. Fuguet, '89, Firsi Vz'ce-President, J. E. Carbutt, '89.' , -- I ' 9 A . -- Second -Vz'ce-President, P. E. Howard, ,9O, Corresponding Secretary, G. H. Hill, '89. , ' ' f Recording Secretary, H. Delaplaine, ,9I, Treasurer, J. M. Mitcheson, .,9O. T . . EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. V J. C.. C.. Di11ingham,4'89, Chuairman. T. R. Beyer, '89. D. Fuguet, '89, Horace Jayne, M.D. 'G. F. Barker, Ph.B S.. TP. Sadtler, Ph.B. J. T. Rothrock, B.S., J. A. Ryder, Ph.D. '88, - H. A. Bonzano. E. D. Cleaver. W. E. Hibbs. H. Mellor. ' W. R. Stroud. ' 1 90. W. Goodwin. W. O. Griffith. J. C. Iriwn. 2 H. Iwasaki. W. H. Loyd, Jr. V A. McGeorge. J. G. Stoddart. ' A. Trenwidth. G..D, Rosengarten, '9o., A. oi Konig, '92, HONORARY MEMBERS. - ' - A . ., M.D. M.D. 4 E. Muybridge. E. F. S1nith,,Pl1.D. C. H. Haupt, BLS., C.E. G. A. Kanig, Ph.B.: - C. S. Dolley,.'M.D'. M.. F.. Pugh. ACTIVE MEMBERS. ' I V , J ,8 9. J. P. Ball. - T. R. Beyer. J. E.-Carbutt. F. M. Cresson. - J. C. C. Dillingham. W. Du Haniel, A.B. ' ' '9I. ' W. H..Ashhurst.' G.'P. Deacon. H. Delaplaine. P. E. Howard. C. R. Lee. - G. I.'MacLeod. ASW. Norris, Jr. J. De W. Perry, Jr. S. W. Smith. '89. ,C. F. Fischer. D. Fuguet. . J. Greenman' G. TH. Hill. , H. M. Justi. E. J. Perot. C. B.. White. ,92. S. Fleisher. A. B. Kelley. ' A. og Kcsnig. ' C. Lewis, Jr. C. F. Morrowp A. C. Thomsonj E G. T. Rowland. G. D. Rosengarten. ' J. R. white, jr. , , , 1 S. M. Lightfoot, Biological. C. F. 'Nassau, Medical. ' 1 231 NIEMBERS QF THE CLUB: Charles Sterling Bonsall, '89. George Brooke, jr., '89. Francis Macomb Cresson, '89. Leon Symonety Dexter, '89. Georffe Henderson, '89. C C. P. B. Iefferys, jr., '89. Edward Asa Partridge, '89. Charles Peabody, '89, I Alfred Newlin Seal, '89, C Joseph MacGregor Mitcheson, ,QO Wm. Rufus Nicholson, Jr., '90, james M. Castle, ,gr - A Edward Adams Damon, '91, Francis Thibault Cross, ,Q2, Alex. Renshaw De Witt, Law. Arthur P. Summers, Med. Aaron M. Billstein, Med. n AAJvvNx Lf' Fw --rf . f' - fd ,mm m . ga U X gli 'xv I .4 1 Tl .k n I -2, i i 5 Z l'L'5n l"E???5. 2 Z .. P .D il '- 'F S L' lain., 7 A ' mul -Je PE, . ' , . Q f . 5 'iii X7 gi 5 P.-gzv ti AL-'il ' as .' -'W Li: R "" I , ai , 2. . l -:T ' 89. ' " W. W. Ashhurst. F. R. Baker. W. I. Forbes. C. H. Frazier. L. Audenreid.. J. H. Brinton, jr. I. W. Coulston, Jr. G. H. Dennison. D. V. Newlin. F. B. Neilson. W. H. Patterson. A W. Scott. A. H. Smith. .-A. G. Thomson. M. Wiltbank. 90. H. R. Grun1ney,Jr. G. D. Rosengarten, Jr. H. W. K. Hale. W. H. Trotter, Jr. J. H. Merrick. '. W. O. Griffith. J. J. Borie. 233 ' Q. 'K State the difference between a contingent remainder and an executive devise? - - . TI-IE GREAT AND GNQLY 'LAW CLJIZ. U V.. f joseph Hill Brinton, jr. A William Wilson Longstretli. Hew Brydon MacLean. Q - 'Charles Percy Willcox. '- I D 'Charles Sturgis Wood. Q . r 1 ' Z -'EATOR 5. V X Neko l exif rf IX Gig? 2'l5M9!?.I!1a 5 Qlaygexgpgri-E 2.wfB4r'e. hfl?5'.3I1'! inn!! 235 xl ,,.... Ill' . J if .5 1 I l X U I X 1 ' xx X X 11 1 ' ff X 'L n- I' I 1 ' 1 1 I ui 1 .W f X 7 .14 NW. .1'-1. ' , 'ff' Q5 ,llggaii !,1W:,4l Q M i"",nZ' 'fgflhff' A img? 5, V -'1'p1'.'h'ia 4. "-',. an ,1 rj X .,- app, . A, A' -' "6-" .75 ' - '.'f.-"."9 1 .. . 1 ,f K M, 1 'C' 'I i 'iv 'ff 44' 1 7 ' " .Li Y fag 3 UYY Q it ' ' 'qv nee N 1 "no YQ I' ' XX W z - , N. 4, i f L 5 f J, '-. A . 1 Zh ff -'-7 z f ,- 1: Af- . f f K' f inane! ' hi-TI't6'llE1f , K-Tlnfrg Y ,S og QQ.. V . ' it .I , 9 -' ' , ' - w X 3 FL A .qz . V9 '-5 Xiu .Q I ff: M . Niki, . ' . .. . 9 F 3 . ra, . -0 Q ' iz 1.6 '- , "nf,'4.0 'iff - '- V 'f.+.'..'.ff'ef ., . - , ,. In WMV ., ,.1.55:.j LJ A ,."'4: A X I 5 W 'f ' 'gum-R W 5 21' ' . A ghneltg -.1 W " - ' ul-1.15, - f A fi, ta' muh al 5? - et 'Z-i'8'v'+ n' Q if' 2 Ti-R If i - '."s's'Q :V 'zfff X-A j' U A -X,.,.'iu ..,, 7 .ax -it N' - VJ:-" - V-',' ' 35,101-155 A ' 0,5 : .ff ' - i ,-ff JZ' NX ff gf ' .,, . 'y r pf 1 . ,I A, -1. W va , M f W WW .W W ' ' 'f 'Q-, f ww 6 V vijfvffilhgg Q , A ap- 1, W 5174, . ' ef 1 13.311 'QC 'ia'-Sm14.Wf'm ...X N -0- 1 IL 1 -J' if i xl- gvgzn ..... l,...5 4, .vi'v- . A ,fl iq K . Ja Lo f?.qf5'fIp- A ' , '- ,J f , 4113 .Antoni - - n 8613! v .ca 2:5 ' ' A ', .Ur Q S 2:3 z mf .Q-.1i"1f51'..,'W fE:2' "H T . .4 - f , lin 'FT'-+ i if wif- 1 ii. as ik., . ""' wi ixfz :ff :gre 4 .F ,.. is ' fm r...-.- ' in-ri:--i,,,,f,j4'! ' . --- " -+i , -21 -4", g ' -E .Q --- .. '. T'-:F , ,-2' 1 if. ' .. QV- ' ,ig - A -H 1" K A4 -Y Y f 'i ' j , 'A l - Y , f 1 7 ' vp- - -1+ Lk ' - WTWUJ mi ' . F. VV. Innes. B. F. Robeson. G. J. White. A. W. Williams.- 236 I I l KEMIKAL SGCIETY OF If I ' I , J -'ip-1' "-:- r 'W' 'r r If ' eff.,-f if-54,9 f ff f, 'f7'1fl2r' F, 1 fr WW! I K I-1 J? 3 r ' 'f ,D ZW! f ff" -' ' '47 ffm' K V 0' MWA ',eef4f7WZ'l" ' fgfd f 'ff ,ff MWWL . ff V. - f H, 1 Qin I K 1 ,V-, I7 GY? Fit 'f Q' " lf' f 1" ' ., ' 'V I " i ,cy -i N is I' -7 1'-f ,"f ff" ' 5 " f V. X f 11: fl? ' .- rw! eddie , 1. 4 I 'II -ff!! q fffff, -ui' li ' ,2 U , 'Q - fmfz, G yi!! I N vi I th J X gl 1 ,lime X lv . .,-qw , QC A' guy-' f 31",f:f F 'E S ' 'f , S f f Q lw iiz- ,' :WW I, Qi E i X V W .wx x 'Qif .R ffl , QQ f , MM A i n a - ,. ' H lul l ' ' K I 'ig i QS ' A u i Eg TUV ! W' lit", f N ji I V . , ef if M I- n 'I m y 1, ,f lt' A fe: eff . ' , ,qi x ,z,. fag Head Kemisi, Edward Asa Partridge, Q Uzzig' ffzoffgarzie Kemisf, Chzlqf Oafgame Kemzld, joseph Lazarus Hecht. Clarence Sears Kates .Head Assayeff, Head Blowpzjbeaf, V John Eugene Carbutt. Edward Christman Knight Cfziqf Mz'neV, K'emz'ka! D7dZUZiYf, Franklin Bache. Alfred Newlin Seal Head Kleaneaf, Head Kvfakevf, August Appleton Miller. Archibald Wright Zl!z'1ze1fa!0gz'sf, Kemikal Kzdfevf, William Guggenheim. Guerney Fairfax Coleman Kasfodiaa fy? Kefaikals, asfodian ff Kaps, Henry Martin justi. .TOSSPI1 Price Ball 237 5- . I VALE! Our task is ended! lo, we bring Our finished work, as is most meet, And lay it humbly at your feet QAn all unworthy offeringj, Dear Eighty-Nine! and now farewell, It has been pleasant toil to trace This RECORD of four happy years, Joys, conflicts, triumphs, hopes and fears, Whose memories time shall ne'er efface, Nor e'er unbind their magic spell. We have fulfilled your high behest, And if, in glancing oler These pages, with a critic's eye, Perchance some faults you should descry Kindly believe We've done our best, Q " Angels could do no more." 238 l 4 Advertisements. 1 Do you suppose that by a mere happen SONVV3.113.1112lkC1',S has grOW11 to be the biggest store in the worldi? 239 V I7 KINTING ' we -if NEW H EA5, H' EIRTHJTHQ YWQLPM if CDDB EFFEQTJ Globe Pffmimg Home II2 Nmfzfb Twewlv 'Plnlafleipbifz Young lVlen's Department, it I 1037 Chestnut Street.. l , Our MR. JOHN H. -MULLER'S Selections for this Department are now in fron1'London. ' Trowsers, j .. . 310.00 and 312.00 ' - Fancy Waistcoats ,..- . V 8400 3 Business'Suits, . . 'B ,V . 35.00 A Black Cutavvay3Coats a1idWaistcoats, 38.00 ' - ,Spring Overcoats, lined silk, A 35.00 H " 'Spring Ulsters, . . ' . . 25.00 A Full Dress Suits of West of England Cloths, or the new Worsteds, lined satin and faced satin or silk, 65.00 ,-..l ,., L -Hughes St Muller, 1 Tailors, 103 5 and QIO37 Chestnut Street. 241 DREKA l Fine Stationery and Engraving House, ll2l Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Commencement, Class Day, Fraternity, Reception and Wedding Invitations, Programmes, Banquet lVlenus,etc. Steel Plate Work for Fraternities and College Annuals. Designs for Annual Covers and Cartoons. Fine Stationery with Fraternity Class Die, Monogram, Address, etc. All work is executed in the establishment, under our personal supervision, and only in the best manner. Unequalled facilities and long practical experience enable us to produce the newest styles and most artistic effects, While our repu- tation is a guarantee of the quality of the productions of this house. Designs, Samples and Prices sent on application. - El neat, clean, Well-made VV Ll X marie up, .ready tn pull un. ' 'f SEE that you are properly fitted. ETEI EERWHLT, f' elllli l-illI:lFJEI1l.ll St. 22 4 i J. E.Caldwel1 st cs. Messrs.Caldwell8zCo. pos- , Communications s 1 t d sess exceptional facilities for O d 0 ICI e designing and.makin g Medals Q O w.hegrO3:,ESZdicggggligdiefd Of CVCTY CICSCYIPUOU- prices will be submitted T , TWO O FLOORS r T V TWO O objects di Aft. The immense jewelry Establishment of Messrs. Caldwell 8z Co. 'is the only one in Philadelphia having Special and Separate Art Galleries and Show Rooms on the Second Floor for the display of Oil Paint- ings, Water Colors, Marble Statuary, Bronzes, Porcelains, Faiences, Decorative French Furniture, Mantel and Cabinet Ornaments and English Hall Clocks. T A TWO O FLOORS T - TWO O The First Floor Contains D A The Precious Gem Department. DIAMONDS, The jewelry Department The Watch Department. . The French Clock Department EMERALDS, L9 The Silver Department. The'Cut Glass Department SAPPHIRESH The Electro Plate Department. . The Fancy Goods Department The Lamp Department., ' p Messrs. Caldwell Xi Go. p Pfam 7-'mer-9' Are Special Agents , Sgoonals For the renowned Ekegren,Aude- Ohyonogyafphg -ll mars and Vacheron and Constan- ' tin Watches, which- stand at ,the I head of the Horologist's Art. J. E. caidweii ss cs., Phiiadeiphia 2 1 43 I. BEDIUHIMER, f, ggmm p V .4 The Lefzdhzg fllnnzgfrzetzuer in I .glzlsfllfilrl lllllllllllllllmll. mf, of , A QQUee,aZ12ff3lG,ffQ Prize end 1-l?lFEf G' Q dlg.'5f'fl:Tll. . -+-.+A vfilil' l lllil . lfilllll'l:sX:l'el' l ll . ' IffllllllAllll , fI'l'l,ll',ll PfeSQHf2ff0W'e l 1 ,ll l llfhx' A lwliiellnlll - , M. l., l ml - .i f lljiliC'l7 F ' . L QW Quill llllllll, lllll3,fl,lllall.w ll, 'l l' 'f I 5 lf..l ff l ll 'lf 5 .' lf i awfegedgegl 6,18 Uheszinuzi ,Si Second Floor. Established 1818. 'I RADE MARK RFGISTFREU. 'THOS lfl MILES " . . ' I I,-I NY' rl' II- If E' Q' - l- 1 iz---i'71lll':fi fl- ffiifli Maker of Fzne Shoes for Men and Q , f 1, Women. rb K ' 2 ff 3 g E Health, Ease and Conlfort. I ,ffl Q ,' xl If W' Our Improved Shoe continues to grcw in l "', f ,' i "Lf popularity and serves the purpose of giving ' i f" If " j the comfort so acceptable in foot-wear. X l , .I l 5' Alligator Shoes are to be worn to a greater N l ' 1 'K : degree than ever. We have a fine assortment l , 7 of specially tanned alligator skins in the popu- - l T Q, l lar colors: Russet, Brown and Tan. I A Q : CRICKET, BASEBALL, l 1 j FOOTBALL, X XR. BICYCLE, TENNIS AND YACHTING ' SHOES. Natural Foot. Waukenphast. Our Improved. A11 Sorts of Sporting Goods. I Patent Leather and Z St., Enameled Leather Jluhst' - - Shoes are popular 23 Phlladelphla' wearersthisseason. 244 V in io, 98, ved. Ind her lar on. The nvestm at , OF PHILADELPHIA, I . .3lO Chestnut GSU-get Capital, S4,000,000, Full Paid, ' Conducts a GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS. Allows INTEREST ON CASH DEPOSITS, 'Subject to Check or on Certificates. T ' ' Accounts of Banks and Bankers, Corporations, Firms and Indi- viduals solicited. , .T Buys and Sells BILLS OF EXCHANGE5 drawing on, BARING BROS. SL CO., London ,I PERIER FRERES I ET CIE., Pai-is, MENDELSSOHN SL CO., Berlin, HOPE 85 CO., Amsterdam, etc. Issues BARING BROS. SL CO.'S CIRCULAR LETTERS OF CREDIT, available in all parts of the World. ' ' ' ' sNeg0IiareS SECURITIES, RAILROAD, STATE, MUNICIPAL, etc. - I ' Undertake-s the REGISTRATION and TRANSFER of'STOCKS and BONDS g Payment and Collection of Dividends, Coupons and Interest, also acts as Financial Agent for Individuals, Municipalities, Railroad 'and other Corporations. Offers for Sale FIRST-CLASS INVESTMENT SECURITIES. WILLIAM BROCKIE, President. HENRY C. GIBSON, Vz'ce-Presidenzf. HENRY M. I-IOYT, JR., 7Ifeczsu1fe1'. ETHELBERT WATTS, Sec1'e1fa1fy. BOARD OF DIRECTORS: WILIJIAM BR0 CIQIE, WHARTON BARKER. GEORGE s. PEPPER. HENRY C. GIBSON. . MORTON MCMICHAEL, T. WISTAR- BROWN, ISAAC H. CLOTHIER. ADVISORY COMMITTEE .OF STOCKHOLDERS: WILLIAM POTTER, GEORGE M. TROUTINIAN, WILLIAM PEPPER, M.D., JOHN G. READING, JOSEPH E. GILLINGHAM, JOHN WANAMAKER, HENRY E. SMITH, CRAIGE LIPPINCOTT1 HAMILTON DIssToN CLAYTON FRENCH. 245 WILLIAM WOOD, WALTER GARRETT, JOHN HARRISON, EDWARD H. COATES CONYERS BUTTON- Headquarters for Strictly First-class Groceries of every description from the leading markets ofthe World SOL-E AGENTS FOR UNITED STATES. The Perfection Perforated and Selfwaste Consuming dorsed by Leaders of Society everywhere. Special attention given to packing and shipping distant orders ff' feel ans. FOR ARTIISITIC6 USE in Hnc drawings, os. 5g'iCr-w- '11, d FOR FINE VJRXTINC: qw i 290 an 291 No. d L d' ' FOR BROAD WRITINEQ3, an a les , 170 4 Nos. 294, 38o and Stub Point 84g FOR GENERAL WRITING, Nos. 404, 332, ggo and 6o4 THE ivrosm PERFECT or :mrsf Gold Medal Paris Exposition, l878. Joseph Gillott gl Sons, gi john St., New York Q46 i 4 if ii, Havre ca, 1026 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA. erfeiiarita Tailors. E -pawn Tennis iizrowsers - ii C H 5056 EDCI EYES hes - Made to order. gricket Vi-ii'ovi7sers : gicpycie Suits : iiiine Readyzmacle Q i-gadies gasket, gacque Q Glotlrming for 50575 and jfiabit Makers. and Young Men. 47 ll 4 l 1 4 I . I 1 l- I l l l iw wt l 1 V. tu 1 tv 1 l 1 J, .:, it 1 W 1 .ft il' F v 1 1 I Q, 9 la I 1 e 5 I 1 2 .1 1 it le li J!- ,I I H 'w ,r ls ,Q 1 I li n 14 1. il 'el 1 4, lt l 1 DARLINGTGN, RUNK 81 CO., Importers and Retailers of ' General tljry Goods. Sole Agents in the United States for thesale of The Most Perfect The Camargo Corset, f.ggggg,,Q0fSet , Darlington, Runk 81 Co., II26 and 1128 Chestnut Street. ,D QLL,-ARD -55 C0-1 eading air ressers, iiQB9EgSiEllEl't,qS1i2 Philadag Pa. Ladies' Hair Dressing, I Ladies, and Children,s Hair Cutting, CTentlemen's Hair Cutting. Gnly practical workmen employed. ' Wigs, Toupees and Ornamental Hair Work of every description. 248 S. FUGUET' fs. SONs, HAVANA. ESL SEIDENBERG'S 'KEY WEST CIGARS Manufacfwfers 0 f Choice Domesfic Cigars. 2.31 Chestnut Street, below Third, PHILADELPHIA. .'!!F.F.F.F!!FTlF!!F.F.F!!!F.F.F!!!F.F.F.F!F.F.F!.!!F.F!!!F.F!!!F!F.F.'F""'"'"""""'llll'l'l"' oun IMPORTED Comprise Leading Havana Brands from 57.00 to 525.00 per IOO. Largest selections. KEY WEST HAVANA, From 57.00 to 511.00 per 100. OUR 'OWN MAKE, From 53.00 to 57.00 per 100, including popular and really very ine styles, at 54.00 to 56.50 per 100. Purity and quality the primary con- siderations. N0 such assortmeuts elsewhere in Philadelphia. Call or send for Cataloglie. iiiiii5imiiiii5.i.i'.i'!!F,F.i'.il!T!i.i'.iO!'iF.F.ifi'!'!.4.6!ifi,iEi!'!'i.' .iE!'E'i.F.i',iO!'F.?!fi'!'F.iii'iiiiiii! S. FUGUET 62 SONS, 231 CHESTNUT ST., BELOW THIRD, PHILADELPHIA- 249 ..-57,--xi ,g ,-'EA :Ei 2 S N:-s..R25sE fsisaifs '-Eta.:-?.'sgi.-ia-S., Q Q ENXQ 5 XX " S 0 'iffsgggsu V--- q EEiiE21?EEEEEijiEEif' bu V-3 """EEEf'-' Lf a s .. - 'Q-A s - "A" 0 , XX!! C7 Xi 6 . ,if S SE SSSSXTQT Sb , ,X X ss if S it Ei 5 S S SW ssassaa sas s X Org X 'xx X ,A iesks -pax ,Dix X S. E corner Fourth and Chestnut Sts. CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED, 52,000,000-00 Paid in cash, - - H 11000-000-00 Surplus and Undivided Profits, - 115,444.72 , , - .. - -. 4,035,941-5.25 Assets, Six per' eent. Debentures , running ten years, secured by special deposit of First Mortgages held in Trust by The American Loan 81 Trust Company of New York, and further secured by the capital and assets of the Equit- able Mortgage Company. The Debentures are issued in denominations of 5200, 5300, 8500, 5I,ooo, 55,000 and 5Io,ooo. Six per' eent. Guaranteed Farm Morvtgz-ages. These are carefully selected First Mortgages in the best agricultural sections of what is known as the " Corn Belt." We make a personal investigation of every Loan we offer and know it to be choice. They are fully guaranteed, principal and interest, by this Company. In- terest Coupons on both Mort av d D annually. g ces an ebentures payable semi- Savings Gerftifieates are issued by this Company in amounts of 525 550 575 5100 or an I , , Y larger amolpnts. Those running three and six months bear 5 per cent. int t ' t ' ' eres , ose running from nine to twenty-four months bear 6 per cent. interest. City, school, Water-Works Railroad and other first class Bonds for sale. I Correspondence invited in the belief that we can serve you as well, if not better, than any other agency. Full information on application. CHARLES BENJAMIN WILK1NsoN, Vim-P1fesz'a'm!. 250 oreter Qoates, faI399KSss 900 Iwestnut treet, IQI1IIc1cIeIpIIic:I. A11 Books at Lowest Prices. Our Stock of Books is now complete in all departments. Our foreign importations are large' and comprise the new as well as rare and handsomely bonnd books. Our assort- ment of current literature is also full, so that We can safely say that we have the largest and best assorted stock in the country. tcltlonerqy epclrtment. VVEDDING TNVITATIONS Engraved in the highest style of the Art, and in the latest and most correctsform. Especial Attention .given to Die Sinking, Monograms and Crests. PORTER St COATES - NINTI-I AND CHESTNUT. 251 li I I I I I I I I I I I I I 'I I I I I I I I I I I I I 'I I I I I I I EI I I II II I II I I! I I I I , I I I I I I II II I I I I I I I I I i I I I I I ll' l hi 'i 4 1 4 x i t ji l i l 5 ? ,1 l g . ti ""'1"""""'i A A A A ' ' - 1 'S A A if"" 1 ' A ,.-. A QQ. 4414! if-"ff f5fjTf"g' ga ii. .eiifa 1 l t v I t ill lc is Z gl l ill .. I fl tl: l if if . ill i J . l -rv lu. .1 I .iq ti 1 M, ll 1 uf, i eystone 2 National E Bank OF PHILADELPHIA, 1326 and 1328 Chestnut Street. CAPITAL, 350,000 'V A W -lSURPLUS, S9O,tJOO. The KQYSYODQ Nafmnal Bank 'iiiliidilfgfl5f25lffi2ancivtfe5i'SEpsf.0f - . 1. are built in the stron est manner, includin The Safe Daposlt valulks all modernxmproveivgnts and devices knowg to the present dayg they contain Nine Hundred. Boxes, to be rented from Five to Fifty Dollars per Annum, according to size and location, the renter alone holding the key. Every convenience in the way of private desks, writing material-, etc., furnished to - safe renters. Ample facilises fgr the safe-gicegping gf silverware, jewelry, efca h I - a as een rovi e , wit a conveniences lor a ies w ie H Dadles Roorn transacting? their Banking business, under the charge ofa competent attendant. The public are cordially invited to exannne our new Banking Room any day during . business hours. Presirienf, GRANVILLE E. HAINES. VYee-P1fesz'a'efzi, HENRY VAN BEIL. Cashier, G. VV. MARSH. DIRECTOFLS: GRANVILLE Fi. Hmraas, C. N. SHELLENBERGER, M.D. SAMUEL LUCAS, Lours DREKA, HENRY VAN Ban., Jos. T. JACKSON, D. P. S NICHOLS, CHARLES MCFADDEN, G, VV, MAR:H, SoZz'rifo'r, JOHN S. BICKINLEY. Established 1837. To the Faculty and Graduates of the University of, Pennsylvania and their army of friends. To you it is only necessary to state a fact to be properly appreeiated. The fact is iwe have and sell 0013! Old and pure LIQUORS which you will all appre- eiale when using them. HUEY a CHRIST, Te1ePh0Ue 2337- y I2o7 Market St., Philada. 2 Mu.- , ., -fvivx-,xx-v,xx-v.1 -VVNNNVXXV-3 X Nw f WHY! , A ,qw 53, Tvkxiiif X- QQKQX ..x' , Eg. 0' , . , , xgfif 1 , 5 :YT " . ' 'If 2410 Q - - 4:clg1L ? , ' K . Lia: "i."sA:2 ' M "'f,.f1a'Z,s:I '7"2 1' -- S 7 2577 YR. H 1 " -gif . . ?S r... 1 ...,. qu. -e:. . -:rr nav.-, 451' . - 'N 141952 5551- ' 5: - 1 I, ,... . I' ' " Q 4' Z::::1:I:- :S V - ...mx 1 Q .- '-::::::::..f ,L :Q - xr. . Anim xg i ..,.,.,. ::c::::::. fr G .,,,.- .,.. -.... ..Nx- -- 5555555555 B.: X X is N w 9 L s, K A ,, Jkgj gf X R XM f f Tx 5: Q N , ff Q' ' Q ' I C . ' 5 , 1 s -gm ull!!! s gs-'::-?iEg2.1iESA .-,ln . .,- V. .X Q3 X .3 "1 L.----..l....-A 4' ,Q X xw Y -.QC a' N 3. Y' " K -1- fi . -' W . la X , 'L EQ -Ja X X X32 . f , o'X Q w s 1 . ,., 1 .24 N , k Q I' X :Q .. y X Qi ,mmf N I I J X ' A xxx J'-" U SN W X -, , P , .x ,N .. Www u X' Fi F ---v . X 'avi 'Q I F , X X .N Ag X x I lx X X X .fvvvvv , ' 'WN 21295, 1-2122- A w rl fizizizr- X ' 155: - ---1 ---. V if NNmm.mT'5 ' ' F e'?YXH! -' 1 ' :avr-alff. I 'fllmxm ll .if -' M. igltzz' . x ,m,W?,,, i- Au 'f'-f' r ' fs 'Qgfyxnwgf-'r.4f7 'CQ 1 9 'JET Li.f'1g.'f.1.:J-ilif I "ful Ill?" ' 3535 H mishEa1856.. JaGo b 'fqufgl Q B,-Q -fhmfri. ,-J,-! JA TE' I 4 -I .fri 3:1 -52: ,lfl T: E E 2 i x " 1 MANUFACTURERS OF '. X SCIKGIQAL, DENTALALQ ' VETERINARY A INSTKQMENTS TRu55Es, EALASTIQ '5TOQKlNC15, 5U17KQ15TER+5f ETC.,Q-TC. 4 , . 4,' J' .,. .ML ' ' ,L WL Al, J. -,L 1, ',!,. I 1 ,:, E 7:7 . V' ' Wi' WK' WI' WI' -WK' WI' I I I l A.. . South U4 'F ,. T'l".f -535543 .,---Q7 LV, 4, , .l ,Ll JJ ', PI? Mai! 'mfg 2 N53 Rugs a Oil Cloths J g Liaaeleylrrasi --'--' Art Squares QV' W if I a , . M2 1 A ' 1 ' i'C3 Q 1? V 1 Q 1 75? McCallum 81 Sloan J 1 Axrninster W ilton a 1012 ab 1014 Chest1iutSt. a Philadelphia N . Mequepte' A Brussels Tapestry L Ingrain ' 55 l 96- Glfge Gene ofthe Geetlp. - - ' rw v-..'n.v-..'-.f'..'n.v-..'-.v'--A ' -.'w.v's."--'--' 'Ii' '- s-.,--.f-..- u...f'u4'l."'u4 H-'Na 'J lu n llllllllllllllllllllllllllll ' tj l if- 'Qiii ' l' ' ,:- : . . t .1 . . ll..:Ef1l 1 I 3, 1, 1"I:I'EE:idil zzlflltii 'ti l N-jig ,ll ll l , , . . l l ff " l 4 mm r 't x' X X Qxxilix .lst txt Qk X v. t ,tgstaiiiilll ll , , ess, H y N a t 'iilllll X" pf lil Q, . 'mtl'- 7 "1lf,l2E?iQ'ltl-t x t t ll :I EEN ' "" m5i:'f'2'f'9l52f:::'-'--22151:--1-:M '-'--i- eu-ugtjnp 1 it . -3' T--W- -4, 'tl .... -. , - ll lm! ll-. l Nail s , I - - - ' , stall tml-4 i.... f' f- -4--- ,. .,...,-- if6iT1fiti1T,.i.... .... s. . . it lil till '?ll'll g' nil ,,u I w 1 t l J Sa l ff..,,. t. t ltlf .f,1:55gg5,,, , llft Sal WAXIOF-I'.. it btw tap.-inf T N l li I 'lt t lwssgf GQ 1 X2J'?::.:,' , f ll 1 ,lil f 'l ll J .hjx Xt .3251 f f ltmmxtxtliWWL i 't ' Q T is assumed that it is not worth while 'Gi ' to occupy space here in arguing the Q K9 necessity of care for the preservation of the health and usefulness of the teeth. Those to whom this volume will come well understand the need of cleanli- ness in this as in other personal matters. But there may he a question as to how the perfect cleanliness which is essential may be secured. Many, even well-tnlormed persons, have mistaken ideas upon the subject. Most persons need a dentifrice, and their use is nearly universal. just here, in the selection of a dentifrice, a serious error is frequently made. Powders, forinstance, are largely sold, which, because of their extreme abrasive power, are in the highest degree injurious. All that should be ex- pected ot a dentifrice is the removal of mucous and calcareous deposits, debris of food, etc. Preparations H warranted to whiten the teeth" may be safely avoided. The only safe course is to purchase on the recommendation of a reputable dentist or procure the preparations of a house which is known to have the confidence of dentists. The mouth specialties of The S. S. White Dental Manufacturing Co. are an example. They have been prescribed to their patients by leading dentists the world over for more than a third of a century. With such an indorsement they may be regarded as safe to use. These Mouth Specialties comprise a line ol tooth powders, mouth washes, tooth pastes, tooth soaps, etc., all guaranteed to be free trom injurious ingredients, from which selections can be made to suit -almost any taste. Illustrated Catalogues 'on application. The leading powders of this house are Rose, Wintergreen and Phenated, and they Carp blp had in decorated tin cans from a quarter pound up to four pounds. The Hask shown, :V IC dis an egccellent holder for the. powder, especially convenient for traveling, as the con- entzuri Igot Slltlivjlt, 1? Soliil, Hxied vtgth either of the powders nanied, at 25 Cents. - 4 - I pecta tes or t e out can be - d t W ' ' ClOthlCf,5, at EvanS', or at our depot. procule a anamaker S, at Straiwprldge gl f , . V . s The S- ,Sy tuipites 'bqqralf manufaeturibg evo., Qbestnut St. Qor. Ttuelftljkm Philadelphia. ,256 QWMW? , 5 - 1 SURS1gC1QE1X1VGARD mia UIIHUWWH CARRIAGE ' '3W1i1RQiiiTHE5TiWiQi'4' --i Ta' -... Qu 3,65 'W ii , Q IIWWIIK ' - ++u mW ' Latest Dew. ,.:: ,, J . 'ff--'-, E mx 1 Mqnufactured bY ilk Hf?l llIHIll! . "E 'b'- W"1""N umr Q ., m1w Q m M . i '.'.V fj:.l' ,,... "'. FM 5 b P NO. 7 uw ill! H 5 w1w1....:f MQ HunNlH'V M , mg WW, W' gp 4 M 'ihi R i am 1, 5 W MQQ VVS Eleventh St., 257 , ' 1'1' P11i1ade115hif?1- , Established 1853- Qold's Improved Seetioryal Low Pressure 362111 EDCI Ulater I-Ieatn7Q Rpparatus. oven 5,ooo IN usa. - ' Nfl? 'QQ . ' Ii to War1:zz'n Prz'z'ate Resi- ee- L'-5'i6e5ZaZ6' affafjfe . gi 6 I S I flences. Conzbznes the oest joznts W' ot 1 tecwlz and lflfhter ffeating. Gives heat and ventzlatzon I , nm. ' '71-K :Z ig . . .,,... fwztlzoutgefteratzng steam. H B If N W' NNY NN ljI'1-- Y muumuuuumml 07" Ho112eCo111 07'f 00 - N Q my WWW jyjlg 11IlI.IfIlWnrr1l1IIII E72 6 LaK117's Automatic Time Damper KMWMN I E E7 IIIIIIIIIIIIIII Nw. I w fi' 1 G,-.. : I . - -s . ' -----1 f- ' I 'I H-'WX IIQKNWNW 'IIIIIIIIWIIII' I 'II wifi' I I I .' I v' IHIZIIIIIIHI Afewcf ww .fe 1 III,!'t"'I,f?""'T'N.txQI'-EI1:-IrI,' , L. NWWM 4 -1 ,L :III-I :Ig .1 " I ' ' Immmmu 'Plea-L 'IIITIL II f dy!-lII,.I'I ,V NXMXWMWMW wh- ,IQ I::-l- II I I I- . P mmmmm IIIIL' ' 'A' 47? XX X-X"!wI .JI wwmmmwww l.su.mW, Ili 'Ffiill 'IV I IL-pIg35.13f mummlm .IIIIQI '."'1'I!'Ia"I, mwsxxxxxxwxxixw' "55I!l'1'- ,I '2sG1fgLqFgI'3lI'I I I ' IIIIHHIIIIIII Saves Fuel, 'Iii ' ' X N "CPF XWMmwuv.musI If .eff e fy' . . i ' muunmui e V - 2 2 "f . ,I I - IiIIIIfIIIIII'IIwI17IIg+.q 'd v',' fl I If ' I I . Hmmuum . " ' -' ' U 'KNMHMWWX -- "'f1'1I, i 1, M eff: I I ' I I.. bor - is A Q- e-" -Mfr I I Iflfi Tune' a ' I- x lib ' I Ig.- I 'ISIII' - I Annoyance. I if .. I 'gf , I Q- s :. ff - - ' f . .' ,.1 lnggag - """' , " ' If - f are t mwtetm' fnwff-Y eww " 'ge IINN WQWFI' f4'71lf'f7'fWfW'e 772 WWW 'f1.I'II.I:I,,5,x a5"Q5If.2.,i ' WNNXN'sxxixxxmIIW Xx'WWMW 11f"'ll' iff" l'l024-Ye- q :III5w'M. M f- .7-'IZ""'fW.w"- ' ewes fhefwmwe v eeA 1 I 1 f Xxwwv I -P4 " fres at all times "Ai In! z'1.v"1s -'4'ifI::l1.3F'.'.-I under control W' the lady fyftfze housefronl Ziff 700771- .B11 turning the wlzeel under the clock the dampers are opened or closed during the day. It holds thefire in cheek during the night. .It opens the danzjbers anrlyour house zs warmed oeyere you rzse in the morning. . JF" , ,Q ff . II l ef W-eel y4.' . .A 'lc' 1' A 'I 'ff , 'X 1 tx I ' I M, .f' ' 'Nt "I I I . X t I IIUYII ' I , 1' .x I F IIII II I I In ' I Ill I J l , f 1 4 , I 1 5, " ' tx 1 , . IIN' xx! " W' I7 1' HI xx -X I I - If r I II P -.4191 -' , I . , " I "H WIS. If II X 1 ,ffl IIIAIII , III, UIIIIIIIIQHIH FP, Q! IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 'I ,NIM In II " J H , ,I1,r'II,l'fI"., .'II,'W "I'I'II'IN:'I II'IM"W" M?1"'h lm WIv',1'II'IIC'IIIIiI',,' I4 ."f7I1"'i" T I Ms I'IIIfIIU,I'fl II' 1 I, X 1 S 0 :urn I I I 1 I1 1" " ' 5' I Iuvdx' 4 I I' I I 6 III' 'I - f y ,. D q m so IIS . 1 Z 1 5 -f " my . viz ?, lg: .I Im V0 FA A Q ,mg 1 I1 N ' I A'f'QEIII,x:': ' -- -x 'I s :ill . II? 1 5"l1I,,FIqI 1 mga, , x No more necessity for rumzing to the basement except to LI.-151 ,pNIIff7.1:- 1 aff' clean and coal the-ire. 'wfaf'-ll' ,, " A dapted to Stermn, Water or Hot Air Furnaces. I :II-IV""I.'1'f A f. Call ut our :Wee and see one in operation. t I I .I V .,,. wi. Sencifor descrfjotion and references. Q'-F 'fe-' ' F -I-be Qrandall - - - TYPQWV' ter. f-nz-1,',"i:2 NWI Lux ' ' m ffwiwrf- The sinql est ji rst-class Typewriter f QLHB LIEI' nzade. Beginners learn easier on tltzs ' -A if nzaclzine than on any other. 4- It zs tlze strongest and least lzkzble .I to get out Q16 order. n It hos onlv 350 parts, 'wkzle other EQ'-v-f' ' znachznes lzavefronz 857 to 2 500 parts itltwwi " i to wear and fret out o order. . ,. .I X IIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I .6 - ' Hlln ef . ' P1-' 1 5. Z IIIHIIIIHIIHIIIHIIIIII 1 1H1WU'1U" "' we qu y sv IIIIIIII .EIIHW I 4 If Call at our ojfee and e.ranzz'ne, or ' a . .---.-.V-.rr --- 0 , J? semijbr descrzftizve circular. THE H. B. ISMITH co., QODUFBGHDQ E17Qi17eer5 and Expertg in Steam Heating, 510 ARCH STREET, BHILA., PA. 258 Leading Photographers O High Class Work at 1 at X f Popular Prices , A Q 3 , ,bo . f P 1 P' .S- . ,-.' O N P P X fb jf K Special Rates to Studeiits. College Groups a Specialty. Esizmazfes Clzeeayfulb Given. Photographs of allthe Faculty for sale at our Studios. 259 Allen HB. Rerke, i H K 'fl PQ e e1ie Gontractor and Builder, W g 5. X Drexel Building. Philadelphina F Professional"Ba4se. Ball- Shoes, 37.50, T g , - College of Amateur Base Ball Shoes, 35.00, Fit like a glove, easy as a stocking. Weight of-shoes according to position of player, Our Amateur Shoes have now been on the market only tive Weeks and the success of same has been marvelous. We refer to Princeton College, University of Pennsyl- vania, Shortledge Academy, Chester Ama- teur Club, Highland, Wynnewood, Young America, Riverton and more than fifty minor clubs. White and Brown Buck Tennis Shoes, Pig Skin Imported Russia Tennis Shoes, White Canvas, trimmed with Pig Skin, in plain and figured rubber soles, from 52.25 to 566.00 per pair. CLAFLI ', 831 chesmuftst., PHILADELPHIA. ol-a N Kota lf , . Gl'fCll'll'E8, JVlGPiDiGtS 5ClllCIiStOl'l6?GT'Ci, l'k'l - V Cut Stone Work of every Description for ' Buildings, Trimmings, inside or outside, ' Q, 6 Housevvork, Marble and Stone. Fronts, ' ' Tiling, Cemetery Work, etc. 1 Estimates Furnished., Jobbing Promptly Attended To. ' W- 'All Wfarietiesyof Stone Constantly on Hand. Twenty-Third Street, below Market, Philadelphia. ' i REFERENCESZ.,A. , . A . Western Saving Fund, S. W. Cor. Tenth and Hahnerna nCo1le e, Broa a o e . ' -- Walnut Stst. ' Mr. J. Betz, Tvlausoleum, West Lanrel Hill 'Girard Estate, Cor. rztli ancglgllirket Sts. : Mr. A. Free, 1919 Green St. . d b v Race St . ,- . . Ch h, t aid Fairmoun , , L. Xgegfisixgmce, 230 S. Third St. ,JVlrEuCollg.if1Sziy's Residence, North Broad St. '- University Club, 1328 Walnut sr. .- Aff ' Ger1En51gaA2:lei'1K112hT Zig Luslfrsggninany, Cor- Kelsey Bath, Ioo4 Walnut St. 261 , H . it , N B Our Repair Shops at 1707 and 1709 Fllbert St ect are full e u d f r d fi t 1 L Wi: also ligep liyereqaiglgg of ?3uckigErds:sCE:ri1s?je:Z?:. i A f alllsizes and styles. ' Y X i A J i PL , ww g A ' g I , ,fi ' ' ' 6 . ,L 7: 4 Aa A f i gg w-'ialf 95 , E ,Jil gif:-:""'f N F .. 1:f""'-a -,,,fE:. 1..- W'e have constantly on hand a full line of First-class Carriages for Physicians or Familgise, made in the best manner and styles, of the very best materials and as low as can be sold for cash. Also Harness, Horse Clothing, Lap Rugs, Blankets, Whips, etc., in great Variety. , A A The Gregg St Bowe Carriage Co., i p Arch and 12th Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. l I l I a l f A t 2 A2 ,I - F the many people who E ky l ' E' buy watch cases, few . X Z, know the difference wtf. i fsfw- between good and "QE "-'-9, .M t, 1, E V A I l I" X Sf NM bad. The jeweler x . K l knows, or ought 4 I li to know, and can li invariably sell a l lux 5 . K ,better make just i hp aseasilyasapoorer 1 ,J ' .,maKe. The cases N M, made by the Key- f of feb, fi , y stoneVVatchCase , ' , 5 xaiiig QD. GW gi L . fi lil: o gtlq., N' n ar C ' K 5 5 In ompa y e on l I . , ' A Qian' structed on proper kizllx principles, they -. A wear better and , last longer than ' any other, and ap- ' proach nearest per- fection in construction, lit and finish. Each and every piece of gold used in a Keystone I4 Karat Solid Gold Case is guar- anteed to be-14. Karat fine United States Mint Assay. CAUTION.--This Company manufactures CASES ONLY, and 11215 NO CONNECTION WHATEVER with any other concern of similar name. To be sure you get OUR CASE, see that it contains this trade mark. O l KEYSTONE WATCH CASE CO., I A Nineteenth and Brown Streets, V ' ,, PHILADELPHIA, PA, 263 l . .. ,- ,- ,..,. ., -, ..,,-,,-....f-.,,. ,--...t,....,.4..:zw.-.f-.+ ' ...,-..,.. - - Vflfakeyf gf Fine jfewelffy. Mgddjy, A n s J 1 Soczdy Badges, 'Q Pens, eic. fi1adf 3IzLsfz'naz W 071272433512 Ulf ' Lowes! Passibfe Pffices. arres 072 57166 J h t C S0liiz'z'eli'. Us NgWnYOR:?e, f- porting was E v-QQSE Our system of ntting insures coni- fort and elegance. Our stock gives you the greatest selection. Always the newest and best offerings in our craft to be had from us at the lowest prices. Day Served Shoe Store, i North EiQl7tl7gStreet:4 I V 264 f' flm2riQ21l7 FlSTQ. l,l'2SUl'2lDQ6 Qo. Offwe, C0mpany's Building, 308 alyd 310 Ulalqut St., Pt7ilac1Qlpt7ia. flmlliisi Slk. ilk Nb Alb Al . fwwim ' 53 iiicszsiifl-' I 5 . . - ...... ..::::.:::::::5EEEEE5::. 'F-",'3Zff' " -' Q' ' 11" mi wiv mr 2.521553 WSWS as 525- -LS? - 325233, , , 'T-ii. . . . . T . . "'. '5 4 -' '5 2f:-if -' -'Sq -Ii'-TQ "',' ff 715 WIN WN 41? 41 I - A A A My up-iam, l2,S!Q!2-QQZM lgzggy, -A-1, --1, J ,Q 1 uf. . 'o A". gjgjxs if? alisiigiggf HV WIV al? 715 als gl Au CASH CAPITAL, ...... Reserve for Reinsurance and all other claims, Surplus over all Liabilities, .... TOTAL ASSETS, JAN. 1, 1889, EB'2,500',9l6.'2lx. S500,000.00 1 ,63l,500.23 369,415.98 THQS. H. MONTGOMERY, Pmidmz. , CHASf' P. PEROT, l7z'ce-P1'e5z'tz'e7zL'. t ' 'RICHARD MARIS, Sekrefavjf. w ' . ' 1 A '1jAMES'B'. YQUNG, Hclzzavgf. -"1 ,' ' ' , ' ,fD1RE,CT0Rs1. 1 ,l THOS. H. MoNTGoM3a:RY,,M A M " W ' 9-1'-A-LE3iANDE11l33fDDisE, JOHN T:-LEWIS., f V l -?E?OT' F MC91iRis" ' Q -f j0sEPH 153. GILLINGHAM, 1-, . ., N, ISRA,L' , , ,N . .W , PEMBERTON s. HUTQHINSQN, l, -J .f :s1frMUEL-WELSH, JR- , 5 -- , ,-.CHA-S. s, WHrsLEN,. , , , kJ,w.y ,A .,l. .,., ,r,.A v avrwfw-.H ...N -I--- "'l.. ' .l1,:',I :LA:.2'.4-Ev' ? .. , 1 'v 1-. ',: .1 4.,, I I7 9 Z1 'I ual- 'J 71 N F 7 0 II 'I I I II II ,fi 72 A s 5. T I I I ' r lt: f wv l MYYQJQWM ,3 - ...xi 1 . I gS2E2g-:E:2:I:-:2:-:-:.:2g2g1::g:" . . . I ":g.5:-:g:g:-mini:-sg"".g.-.-:-:p': . ' 5'w.-4.5'f-'-Z-Z-:-g.g.g.g.g.g.g I if ,552-.-I-If!-Z-'-35.3.9jpg' ag. --...nu ' - N ll., - - 1 5 ... ., ..... Q Q32 QI.: '15:igISgZgI5..,,., , N ,,3.'51.-.':L5.g12Zg.g.'3?gf.S,., , - ESQ: ,pg fS1ZgIg.gI::j3 - I 3"""-"2:"Hf'r"'-'f2-'-'IMS'''Reef'1'3"'Ff"-'3'l:2'111fS'1' .-:-:-:':-' ':-:-:':1:- k1"""'f:':1:fs ' - n , ' n. ' , s ,f an -vo' " 1 I I . :a- 2, ,iss , ' Q f ox t vo 1 n'1 , la 4245" :ss fa f- f' ' " . f 953: ' I 3-1:-. Sfikzrfx 1:-I +2-Z mr .v-- ..-by 4...-f. .,. .,. e.. .-fi'-I ,' '-'4:c- .f-sv ,- J , 23:5 ef: .:.:5:3::1::g s . .. . 52342.33 ,:?s'.-f.. . ..,:,N jx' ea::.a,?,:,:,:,:. V, W - . Q nf , - , Q aio - 1 N ' I V :I , :f:d5:Qx.f!1::.g,fi I ' 53Q2'G,f,f ..f2f,1'i35-Q15 I 'f' , , . ' pf.. '..-:gg . x V ' I QI' .w Qzm '7 , , . F U Q., I 3-3'-ZH .-raw I 1 cr-'sz . I I 1 I , 1 . I PHILADELPHIA ' I ' I II. I I . , . ' 'Bn T I .. I ' BRANCH OF FIF I H AVENUE, NEW YORK. 1 . I , I , , I ' . I I I f I I 5- .fag 'U 267 UEEN Su C0. Q9 P 'g4s , .. lj V' 1 3 A91 'L :PNG cozy K- ff l 'lllwlf 131 it f ea. mix . 1 ,gg-L QQ . -3 1 wa- F35 1 1 .4151 -F 1 ' Yr X 2 T111 Q 1 5 il 11111l11 iw -Ak 3: f it 5 :1 1 1-l . is t ff -1' 93N ' F - f 11511 l C5420 N lp cv X 1 3 it wi ll 41. V 'Q' " ,ill Qi F l 39 111 is 1 'f ' : 1 251 ' at ' Pall 1 3 1 11 E E. i V P n - P gf EIUQKUK - ' 5 f .1 gli 1 E5 1 Photographic Apparatus. 50 :gy A V 'Ll'lIt J 1 X? E 5- v,,:.'.1,., . .-.- E VZZIQ .4 'I Q E300 -,ggi-p i ' ' . y LLh'e1l 1 -' . ,Q 1' X , . fill. , 1 1 t fX Q. ps f ...,., 2' P Q aI a me 1 NJ vita 'V 57 2 1 " TEEZZ? ' + f ' S ectacles and E e-glasses. J L73 -WQEQZ-,,, ?W Thermometer.. IJ Y X'-'-i ' ilulm ,1 - E i l f V Vim" N, 5 fm X in XY. E . . .. ---i- ' 7N'l:1 ll - 13 -1 .'1. L ' liQ 5r,fS55f , L imlllllllll llllllllllllllll ll 1111 ll ll ,l:f f1" 1 1 alle ys? 1 -Q .. - -1 -. -- -' M l11g11lr Mullin 1--trial 1 I5 - 'i :T ' -Qi' ' 11 j,'l','3f ' 5,1 fix-'ill M" MX f'-11 ' 1. , .. 5 Physical, Chemical and Electrical Apparatus. 0 X X E- " M m , l ' pera an ie asses. i ff 1 .xx H1 U- P , . . LD JJ .l l n. We publish af- 1 f 1 ? .. teen priced and . W' 5' 1' 1 " Ellllllllllllll Wm -Q illustrated Cata- 1. 10 ues each dis-, . I son mg, 1' eient ,. . . gym . . 4,1 N it C1-HSSPCS of msfru-5 '1 ET 1' 1 1 ML ments' SEND FOR Microscopes. ! l it P ,Ai Optical Lanterns and Vi EWS. LIST. Mathematical Instruments, Paper, etc. 924. Chestnut St., hiladelphia, Pi '268 11 .Ui E111 limi' ff .Q G s xg . A xiii? 5 J All f -1 , " ,sjj Q? '-?l'N'3 wa' n ,,i "'1,h' 'aeliypf' 1124-1126 market Sttveet Vglllt -S IZ Digi A p 3 iii, fx .- u llf,l A d 1 h' . 1 6' 8 P la .l:1:.eff:.,lZ'3gm Xilhix H x Mrortremzis or px 'Qui' Jai' . . ' 1 N If -21 v ' -r , 1-. Iv . X ' tfs s f 7 v I Iijffaiilf' , ' f I NL. ,, yi I - , -....,q3ggf.f:r5'1:m, 1 -e ' K M'-U lil ary" 9 J' 41' . I L A X, I 4 Ml? Il' f .1 r"' , 1 I - ,li mass Wane Ulfif 1 t l 1 - fa x X ' ' fi, df- .,, "-V i 4 'V ,W- ' 3 ' TA LE WARE TQHLIET WARE HRT WQTTERT fm r.. . 9 s KHQQEIQ IKQIQ, ETQ, . N I ,v , oo no as - C O Our Widely extended trade, long experience, unequaled facilities, and intimate knowledge of the needs ofthe public, place us in a posi- tion to serve you intelligently and well. Local agents and buyers in all the ceramic and art centres of Europe .keep us perfectly in- formed as to the tendency of foreign art, and the beautiful exhibit on our tables and shelves is always a reflection of the best thought of the best makers, both at home and abroad. ' ig? --.T '- ---ISD II 577'-7 'fm' I 31? A A... 'E SPV H W J X I X if-22 ll ff -NX! QQ 'f ' X' -f I if ' i f P. u ll , 2 I if 90 ' l ':,1vv1,i ,, fl W zizgii f I . 5 g k? ix 4 Eg" ' W . ,',. Q? we GM ea , 1 f24',Wg1.Q X, W' ,ffii lix -I I7 l if ,. nl -5, . Vg-, X- '.-,"- .HF id 1 I Ulu " L' I EJ, My Jig .W -4 I ,0i.'JII.,,, ' 1 135' 15,455 i - f--:ll-' -- 1- "-- -1-gg:-gi3L..' 'ii---tel-l-i 0 O 7, L 7.17-.. --- I '+- Eovv. K. Tifwom, JR, do Ii IO AND 12 NORTH SIXTH ST., PHILADELPHIA. , IIIIIIIIIIII,IIIIIIITIIIFIII.I.I.II'!Ii'I'II.IiI.IIII.IIIIIIIII.I.IllIIIii'I.IIIIIIIIII'I.I'i.I.I.I.'.III.FIIIIIHI AEEEEEEEEVX SPO HTING GOODS DEPARTMENT. T i Contains a large and varied stock of I everything pertaining to outdoor and indoor sports. VVe are Philadelphia Agents for wright at oitsows well-known Tennis Goods and A. G. Spalding' CSL Bro.'s Base Ball A Supplies. Our own line of trade-mark goods in the above are equal to any on 5 X the market, being made and finished ,II with the utmost care. Mfg: Cricket, Lacrosse, Croquet, and II things for athletes, in great variety. I Home-exercising machines and Gym- I nasium outiits. t CYCLE DEPARTMENT. g I . If New Mail, Warwick, Singer and Dart. King of the Road .Emil Lamps, Clothing and Sundries. ilIIiIi'Ii'Ii'1'l'IlIlIiIlIiIi'l liiliiIiIiII'Ii'IlIl'I'iI'lIIIii TI I-III-II' IIIII i'liIlI1TITIIIiII'liIil'Il'IiIiIiIIIiI'iIiI'iIiIi'I iIiI'lil'iIIIiIiiiiilililiiliiiiij W GUNS, RIFLES, FISHING TACKLE, DOG- COLLARS AND FURNISHINGS.i - ' I ' Send for Catalogue. - 270 1 A I P Li Q1 .I 5 Y! .ay 'e 2 - r I, 1 I E f 4 1 , r k I I V a. I, 1 E71 I, V- ,WY-F' A Y Y- A ,,,-.. VMYW. -YY - --- 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 I I 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 ' 1 5 1 A 1 . X r I' I 1 1 1 K 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 L E 1 1' 1 , .. 1 1 1 , , , 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 'v 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Y 1, 1 1 1 1 1 L 2 A1 gn?- .f ' ,fi g-:"ff"1F fy.-Pj-Eejg .. fl'-T Qi, ff" Nj W! 25 42. gfifglggflg FW . L. .-fd pw? , ,IHA-: . I' 4' " ', ,I H if- A if? A 27 A -I' 'W , 'rl ' '-, ' :j1L5-I X J :'1"" "f, " , '14 f1yi.LNN !fZ,7 3A3Af, 4:-04 A :if AA , .A . if A ,,.,.I, Q, N A , 3, nf:- F, 'ffm ,,..,,,,Q,,R QI- ,n A W R4 . 5, Q -151. 455-.QF 5 1AjX.fA if-ggefgvrb ,"'f"' ,-S "KSN ffw7gF55 "fp,-. 2152 'F' 2f5.yZ',-:xV'f'AfAf1 of . 75 4 WA I 1,54 A. A Q., N LN- -,ZA , iam A, .5.b:f.? '- U. S3-1 : A U .E A 'A-.flv flr ' A ' r-A ':, -G . A T1 f, ,-11, pri- . A L-.A A . '." L' 3, "jf ' - 554- Asia fff:.'f,3 A,.,.'l 'gQ GA :-fs-,gp - - ,, f ' ' - A f3?,f'3 ,.,,. L ,.-1Q.,f'g,,,'fQ4 -. ':, .- .ff,5.,,5 5, ,7 11 , .A,13.f3fg? , ' 'A def l . Aga. A ' " 'AAA ,1, .L A .A Ani X ,Aga ' ., A 'lv '- 3- 1. 2. ' .- V EQ. " 'Q .f - 'A-if--, 55 " A" nf.-. A A A 1 12"f,L ,,!-pl,x,.N' ,, 'ff 2- ' fix ' ,X L 5 f V . A A A A. 2 ' -- , . ' ff 'Mis l--if f5AVf1-fy A QA .1 -A '.- fax if-v:i'Ll51A.' Af,ff'?f5-1- 1, ff' J-'iijw 'Vie' A A JL.: A'1??' QA , " 'A . '--1' ,f', - LM.. 'ffdtff ,A 513' H: , V -- ' ' A - ff p pf , Ag ,, 1 -gmgy,-.,'f,Z?E,faA fizrsg- , ,f AA K' 'Lib-Ar Fri xh' A , A . 'A gs :A A. mei QV . A A A 7 AAAEAL 4 A , . A A125 G. S . A .A- , . , f, ,v,. W., v .- . ,V - .H-. . A . ,rp jf.: ., 3 ,f ,,.,,.. A. -. H . , 'H ',AfA'AQ. Arm li -'jj 21577 A 1 A NIT '-1-.ff-'3f,,. .' Muff, A 1 WHA- '1',32C,, 951. Aify ' 1 'A J i"3f i"-:,52L1..5A?'.fA47g?:,v-,J351 ,ggff wx. . A gb - P, .. :GR .13 ::5j.-1-.gig-L , , A, . . " ,. A 5i.'g1A1j.EfE9f'i?.f'F2 - F . ' A' gg. 'Q A- ' rv ' AT, -.f+..A1, Av g "af , -ffsqif AAAZF-gif' ...A .- ., 4622124 Eff -131, .' . -.4--3, A-A..-Jw-:fgl'., ff. nf- .f,f,6.,,.:.:fgggQ,A 1, ,A.,,aQ.-..x. ,.. - qv gi ., ai , -A .A . A Avis. -A ' Aa-ff.2.4"', J' Z. -A 'fiifu A. . f .-wri' - A Q, 'Ai' AA A--, uf, , . if ' AA , A 'A : A A. QL . ' f 'SSX - K fg-. QQ 2 Wi ' 1. ' fi"Q:',,543f'Q ' .. 542 ' .9 A' QA! NFS JW if' AAP' I W .A 1. I X G ' xf ffgfii ' ' , 'fmvlmsx' 'zz-, Ay. , ., i ,.w.i: Ai, Arg Affiw ,riff ' 1, .,' 71- ,154-- . :J F24 YAQJQ3 ' 5 - iff A f f . xv rl " '9 ' V ,I "-- 12 ww '- - 3 45.5 W vf'?1a. AA1AAfF3 -W' . f 'A 21 'Y . ff fzi? 1 5A:IA',??':b:fi-A A wE:fi.4J:Qfff.Agf5 ' 5 :Tu g . 'Zvi . Li li-..g, gif , QU- A A AA A i1,'A'f4ff g, -1. - "I19fi.... - A.. .:':,.QA""f-Y., AA?if1A.'f5fj?,?f,.f 4 ' ' J N w . , " A 53.1. iq., 1 gr ,, 1A.Af' -, 3 A 'A. wfA,3AffA:,,Lg.Jp:25? ,, 4 A, 51- If 3... 1.,.,,,.-.Mg ,A A-A, 5 gf, Q 4,13 ' .gy . ...g ra A .A 51- A- Ay J. '. - A-Lv --Jak. 1,14 A , Ag, -. , 5,-,V.l5,.,A,,,-Y WN gjfga A .g.AV, . A M , I 32. , - F A 7,,,,.g,gA,. Y -,fu in f "1-f'-1-A'51j.A:gN A H1iA5:f'v'Jr1.ffa1,4,fNA,4' 1 Us " fix :. afar-fv l-.'5'.?:f?L.-'AE A' WA 1, .5 -,F ' A - ZA. 0, A 'Ak '--A . 1 '.-qf-LN ,f2A',1. ,,? Flkiiv p C4 im , ZQA, A' WEA'-' ig.3Qf 'f,.AZflQ7 . 1 Af ,EFX f"-. 'L " 11, , , . ft , . ' A iii'-'LC 1 ix 'HA -Aff: . 53,1 . V, , 'A.g 'cegff'-A.-.f AA-1 ' A A A A , A 'Ali ' -,sip Ai..i--2-4.2: ','-ffl' A. A1 4: -A fAz3A...E5 126553, . . -'.,. . ASATL 1 . ' A 'Q 'A Ages.. A 15- ,, -gi-',Af"1: wa f A"f A ' A I , lf ' '?,f?ffgK."f -1.,A,..,?tggM5 r 741 ,HLA W- Ag, ' 11. 7 'A Af A . AA I' " AA 'A in A ., ,, . -iL,iggK7x',,e.. , f N, ' . A' , A . " ,Lgvzii X",',:'A-jffl a gf x sy -.51 E A4 ' A Af' 4 LA SDZL1 . ' A 'HA'f...',5?' A . '.2A.'Af..rfU'f-Ah ,Lf .. ffm A 4 ., A-4-,. 5 R ,, - 4. -..- ,l , ,A ,A , , My. , , Aglyzh. . ,A ,- , .- .I Avail. .M , .116 A, ff, ,f ,.,-,-.ggi L - ,, -Fl iggm' A., ,-Aff -A AA A my , -A -' - , A . .-,A"-fgxi x A. ,1,Aff,.-Jyiirur 4 Aki.-T Q?.,E:-.V .JQEJAHN , -'H Hz A- vw - E -5. 4 -M' . irq, It ...Aly .3 'Af 11613, ,?, Af I, , IV:lg,...0. M, :IV Ml- .. rm, , I , Q, E35 Aj' 3-1' .gf . Ai .,. ' x5, .xI x v -.3 A Lg I ' . H x ly ?f??yff- 215.151 I 'A,'f5MA: T' l if 1, figg Ak. -A WA- . wig! ' 'li A if- 1.1. A QA 'Exif-'EA ' ' . 1 , AQ, 'G . pf A535-,S P 4 fi A- A53 ,121 j.fA,7i :ff 2, gk! xi? 1 " if - Iw Q A'-Ur' ' 4.. . ',- 3Q5'ii.J,'-aj A 167 , A' ATE A. ,?'g,,-,f41fA1rf,4f,P:-Ls-Aff- A ' -A 3 - 1 -.?ZfTQAuf3, A J' Q ff' 'V i 'g7q..1,,,A'q.2 ', ,. 5jQgg'iA1f5j '- . L. , .A-1. fy,'-Ajj1.- LE Pi.-'-f-QL-:A A ' A A A. . A , , , . , . A. il . -5, A .: A-. 3. ami- - ,. A A , :xg-4-:.., L Af fm A , - fx .A ,, . I, - Af. A, A. 1- A pg, . . , -, 113' ,. - .. ?'vA L'Q2,1"e.-, 35,,,.ifQ.-,.-2131? kv A' ,J 'ff ' A ' Q 35 ex gigqgk- .1 A .1 4:Lz.i:.v.,,,5y ,W , A -ab. , Zim. ., 1,J gina.. . 5421 :M ,A I , I ,V I Vt X I X5 . .gi . I,g6b.e.?Pu.l . 'I V B.. F. H3-1311.1 .-Q QA! ,I 107. ? Q. A A ' 519, ' A'i,,"4ZX:.., ,fr',,+ fl.- 19 - 45:-1, 33? AA' - iriv-. A. A LY- ffff f. Q6 "-A . . '.-3-'?1'x A - 9-X-N ."'A.mf ' 'Y-f,I9' A QE...-1 5 A . ' A' Afa .51 vjg AA ,. A0 fsgfrv XA- A A- fm., - . 2' fr,,Jf.f.A . A -. . W A yazlffq. .fx . Azljtgf, 5:1199 mi, 'A . A 2.15. .... :fir ,c " j:,f5A:,,g LJAA' Ag -A A ., A AA A il fggj, A A ,, g,:,?g:f,,zqN5-..A- ,K .-A,-51 49, . -Az .9iJiF.,,. ,, ,i,1bg,,4f- 4 '53 ,gg-1 .33 N - QW -,Q :L,.,11, wx - I A J, F miml f ,-. pi AAf.iA.,g,,Ay,g.gmf...-."' iQ,,--fzff,3,,,a- -gg ff 5. -5 1- AA P5155 ,fu-.45 , A--,W A, 5, A A AAq, .,- A-gh A A A, 'Ay 4- 'A .,,'...iE'1,,,fxf'fi,.?:r. I LM,-viygfvlllrr.fA6i7!,n,-, V, , YV gif 5,4 fi. V - V 4 4.59 A xv ,Q54 1 I .Ar h A b , . ,rl I Ha w-4,1-f.v-M fu , Agixefgff. AAQ,y523.,?gf.Ag4,.?f'A ,, , , ,g.,A., A A ,' , 4, , ,A J- M74 . ' A 'AzAg5?A.i -. A -'-if-A IA-3,An.15r-A,A11'.10.. f 5lf.'f5al,gAr, . - iygiafy . .A 1' f- . - ,Q f 'fiA-A.,A4r 3f, F154 ' e fiu"f-Af'fyg: A' .A . A -- 1:55. - 1 .U 1- . ,' ,' fir ? P .I A13 2 -:':. I-igggrffv fglllm ':.A'QAf'AjA'g',aj', .f - . 'o. ':'i1,S ffff '. A 'Diff' A , ,A f ,gj!aQqA,' 5. - gf ' -fix? 191 - s ' g A,l'A.,.'l -A, .yj',- . ..fx ' 1 A f A -A X. ' , '. A H. A. A 4, ,, ' . A- A re- Ae, - , .v Au fiwig, .- . f.gJ.g,prp,sa- Q, 'A V1 .4 6.4. -y-A-.,A:.'l' A+--,, 1.AWi'Af. 'A- -4 yA,.AA' .f .A-A -AA -nl in f Ar' AA ff- J A ig' 501. -,' M1151 f ' , 1 -1 1--.9 A A-'A WA -fi.. Wg- .,J:3,gl'- Jim. ' A. Eg A , 215. A, 'F-J u5Av445,gQ'r:A,.c 1--.,,, wr -" a-2 g-F-9-::. . "AAy,,,1,f, 51ci'..m4J. -N. . M-A, 1, . A-.:K....A AA .vw A. -gf .A -, , 'Af A ff e- A . "Ai A ,v .,-A... , . A,,,.1.. , -- .gfggh Q ' . -. 4- Y' ...ug . . .-.. ,-1 j1g.,4f..,yf,g f- .,,. -4 -1 fn., Q., l..,.,1. Q x,..,,,, .K U uv. ,, , N5 rf, 5 fu, P ,, Y: f , Al, 5 falfwv A aff: Q, MA A . ..A f A .,.. Az A A A .A 4 A- . A ' Vgyfi 1 AAT: Af?-9.fig"f Lg., 4' A" ' 'E 'A 'ka L A " 'u.i,.,,,,f 'F W ' "Ae -iff ' A7 ' 14 Yzuf. .1 LA. HA,-. A' "T Q--l,L:+ . ,f A Aw? A "'gf1 Am' A f q. ' -A.A-'Tw' 'iiifz if If. - if A' 1 'A '. A ' .fi-5 A. W 'A' -A 1 . . 'A A .f M ,. , ,,- 4 .4 - agmfrv ., , ,RL lv- ...A .1 - -. - fy .A x, -, .,x --L A.-31:1 I f., . f 1 .w A, 'Av -1JAfqA.'A 'A'f.. fr, A211499-1 3Qj1e7':L. 1-4:0 -911-' f"" ' A VA' 'H , W A 5 + A A .LA , W.. A' 255.2 " wi'-"iAA':: ,..Q".'f'3A' ' 1 . f . - 2--',,'f!:,"2 4, , . .- .. 3-3, A,:A-N. ,. I 1-sig, Q, .yew ,f..,,e,, , H 3 ., ,A xx ,V A nA AN Q.: .A-' A:. Ap. .'Afg'.A53. A ,.,g.,gg...,ff ,M 44' 1 . 1 - . A FA A-.AA,i.,4fA1AzA52k-,f :Aa A :As AA X-Aw xp, a ' 'A 2. 1A . A- "A"'f A A 'A 'AA'?3'Alf5fffA' V 1 .4 --' :A 1. LAg,A3.ar' ?.5,.,., A A3 wig Al f, A ' .A Ag if . -f - ,g-Mgr., . , Ag., 3 A125 ,A ag., .K A -A A' Q 'fm 417 ,P I 5,31 ic., V fig, 1 L.X5x9M,...I Z ., V43 2 ,A vm. A5529 Fr, i V . 3 f 4 F? ' A . - .s3T,Af,AA -A..1f,- ' - . im Q A75 gf: A3-QA.. 5.15, '. q f i' 'iA A52 ,'-', f' 'w , . HA. A-+1 -fAw'ps1A..f A'-A' jaw 'K ww.. "M . My 24,155 Agxfwg- '13, vf .aa ,Asa . 1 . 'wick ' , -,. VA' if-...A 941 ,A - - A A .Q A A .. . 1 A " ' ,A ' f ffm". Eiflfjm, 515 A ' 5 . Hr.. A QE?-,A 'A-. g,"3ff b..i'f.g:rg?'ff+',5 YEQETP 'iii 33.1 'ir . 19. f" '.A .,,gQ2fA 'ffngg i .A A if- .- ., ri . 'A A ' 7- .3 "rj-iff? - ,fgjfff 'gflyg fijfff -'1-"1fg.3A',. .. 'X 'AL . SWAJI? A- Af: A3643 16 ,y d !'-'A ,aff 'i' A5'fl, i'.1.5'-5:1-e7'f.Aif7 :A A. 'gi -1' ,,jfAf-3 AM' . . 5A A A1-if-A. f Aj- A- -f1'm,,pAHQis?3,Q- gr M, -f A4 'W A AA Qffwl fn-4f,,f'.7.P1 I-ff! ev? A. . A .. -. A - , nf.. ' " AA A ' A A A .'A' I A AA A - - -A 1 ,.- ,, -c, A, ,:f.-,,,. g,,A. V g.A,:.,:,A,1 , . A A . A A A. af. . 5.5, . -.1 gi AAA, M7147 ,V -A , ',j '. ,, , -g ,. A tgp- .- V .1 I- ,Z A911-A I . .gg- A.1:g iV . , - fig. 4. , AA -, kv Af -MW? irg m: xVi,gAkA,j1,,..Z.f,.t? 141 , 1 - . V ,1 ,Q 'A A"A. 'A 1 ' , 'JG A' ' ' Air, , .. HA 1' 'QA A 1 ' 'Aff' - '- 41 ' -. '-,l42A'.tfA- QA-Q-'...?". '. 'A ' 15, 4f'?1L-'1Aj1jJ,Qfi ,f5A','f'-'. ,,'2i,. LEE" - A-L' .. A 5' A. ."' A921 " A ,AEA .74-A11 .A ' F A, A,-.S ' 4 , .f"- 'ffl i' .- jiwv - A 2?-'f AKA-f:.NAcAAf.f M AAAA- -..A A . fag jf Af A izfffffff- -- fs ff W-F' :AI AA A A A X.,-, .7174 ,I-A, 'EAI P: Aip jj'Aj,k -Exw:,5,f5a- , A ,W 5.1, my . .,L. - I-Wim 220, 1 - .r A' AA ly.. I .fri Agp.. , 4 91? Ir L-'ff!,,1,,,' .fy ', 34 . Q jqffl- ' jay .h ff gg, 14, if L,,:'j,1.- . 1-:.I..g:fa5gL",j,'j .AA5A H rx.. , 1- A mfg., . 11: if.. A Zyl A '4 'Af' v i Aa A- A Q yu ,f f ,JA 74.79, A, A A 1 f 'if fl ' Eli mf ' ff .. 35- ERS 'IVA-'7-' A .A 9 ' 1. '1'fA"f.A lg 51" ' 510' 14" ' , ' 5 33 . .A-A'-5 .- 'lf A-gif' 'A 'I HQ:-5-,-', .n . - f55,A:' gi.: gr Ag, A A 5 3 3, ,-.gj I ,' 1 . 5574 - '1 A. A 'gg A .gm 'A-.,, :Hg 1.-.5 QEJVQ7 , A 1, ,j,,.g. . gif . aff, If?" A A-:iff 'A fxd fiff5liZ"viAf ff? A-A ' A. A'.QQ.. A- it Tw I A ME. Aff! 4 A A ' A. .,.1qf'-A113 525 Q ".. ne. .-j, 3,Qs,.A'j' . 5 K., ,I ,.Pg'f,,-Q! gf, 2 -A ,1 ,fr 'Q A g l , I. .5 ,, 15,5 Q.-A5351 A , . 45 if.-5-1 sth.,-K-, ,Q-.5 gh 122352165 -J-,T V - gm ,QA 5- Li: Aj .a ..t3- 75 2 .51: ' X HA . - . A .A ww' A'..rAg1l,g,gvrz,. .fAf.g,' f,fJA A Qin. . ,141 - - AM ' A. . - " lilfffi A i A " f, . :A A - ,',., .':RfL55i' A :K 'A 5545 flyfafgkxg . ' I. 54 , ,ggyf VAL" '-'AMA 15, 5 Afjyzgxfvg, V gl 5.45 git , f , AZ ' A f..,,y:,fj5. ss f it JW ga, A we AAA. -AAAAAX ,AA 5-Yi:-V5 L' 15,3 "Av A .-5 1' . . +5121 f, - F1-'A"" '!3f if-A57 '23, E M' - A-A., . . AA f A Af,:.A34AA,. .Ag A AA . +A, 'vw A - A L., A AQPAQ 1 f 5 -A A -. -,,. I ,w . " -A is-f'fA1-ff,. .v Af if fl, --Z. . .g,f4,7rq'?wf - , ,MJF AA, x .2 .,., fag , f' , Q f, lf, Ah 1-:5 r,YjEb3.j '!.vT?Q .S . ,-.f,'f.3" ,4L 1 X I I ,535 A, 135.11 A A ,V A. : I JH, 'a... 'u ffm?-fy' -?fg3f1iiy ,ww k AjlX' xj1f'lA. A, A. N M AAA-gs : - A. N A.5f,g4f--,,, , 4, 1' lgf. j. A. gil.. 1 LJ.. ',.if.f, iA ,ui 'g,'1' l y- ,X ,.l1,,gA,A A -A 1 -A f 4... 1 AAA Af. XY Aw an A.. -.VV ., fv H Q, A 22 Af-fee. fi A1- A , 3.3 75,55 5 1. .W ,..ii3'h.y.? L4 il, -,isa .33 2: ,A A. b 5 I A.-.AR ff, ,5 ., iv., 1 ,,.,t A.5,V.Q 41 iff, , I ,ff AE.j3,Aj, gf. ,, gggiiffgfa AZ:f1,Qg'f. fig gfii y, .Y '5f',1g"",, . 1 ... IH A ii Q V' .. A - . Ag- in AQ X' ,L . V- ,. - . J'411'f.5 f57gf1A:413A'f. ' :A 1 ,fl AA ff, 'A , ' If-. , ' A3-1: A 3 j'-g Ah 'A A, . :ii f -A A - A4 5 A A- , . , .:'f.'-- '- , A 4: -A -. 5- . -, 55411 JJ, ' . 'ff A5 V .y ,M MELA ' ,,',j'4. A- ' 2:2 3-'U sf f V ' . , '..f'A "" -KT. I '. "' G ' i-1.1 V' AA .. ' 'X-.11 A ,fy A: V' ,jg -3-X, .V f f-f a yy, , :A , il g,',.:,,,.:-- , 5 Aga' :LAI . 1355 .17 Qr- -Z, Qi' - w..- .i f Zig Y , , i ff 'gk A g X fb. ,,g5. mg. A- A. .Av iff, - 5.4 4 W 5 ' A"'A.: 9J5ii- -,Q A ? AA '- 1: -A .. 124' 'ff k' , 'ff 53':Fl X V -' 'PFA TA- ,A ' 'ZW' ,. .FF F Y.-H..f'w f. - "5f.Sff?g3?'N ' 1 ' N 'Aqwffkii " "fAf52A 7 2? . 1-, 'U' A' H- A Qi -?A.Y'f'ff - f . . A. 1 A .A Ai.g,4'A iff-Q . VEEQZQ. Af. 'Q A' - EAA' 9 . 'A ,fA,W1Q,,,2f,wsAy ,,, 'fag A 'j fa 3' Q' 101:-- AA ,GM .W u X .. A ,J-CA , .W my A, Q .QA -,,:.-gtg J, ,, , .,..,,! , ,V U, 1, 41, ,, -,n,,, .M A, ,,., , N, . , , -, , 1-1 - ., , ., A, fu, ,-. .... -. 55,011 ,."L -Pg-aw g 'K AAI, , -.1nAzi:f'A.g, A45-, Q, 5A'ffAA ,f A.,-.v,,,jf, A Ngo P y,e'fAA'A-. Af.f,2fA,4:A,,5 :f fi, '-rf ., A Ag -- , Arg. ,. - .5 .W Ahyirq- A - . f-, .5 A-fm A, ... I A 5 I .I A h V. 5 ' R - 'Av 'Fifa 5. A- TQ we 91 f" ,-. 4. -Q 152- . xl ' ff. . ' .5fg,rff,95' - A1 My Q. -5:5 f.-gf -4 - x- wg fx -Aw X lm. . xefgb, AE- A . Lg ,2A?,vf,-A A., 4 4. Ax LA A-1: . rig? . A .A ' .3 ,L -W. -' wg ,,xk'7:L, wgflll- .A - .fda A 31 ,xref , gn I e i : ,A5,iQ' . g:'.g?-5 my' .5,g11:- , 3 14.3, ' -'gr' ,AA A,.i.E,,-I A-'.A:'.:ya...n,A I,-L-:,fi.'s5:: 75, 'lggff A. ' A . AGA-A.. n,111f5?.iAA.AAA3fAfgf A A ,fp ' .. fA:fA f"Q.7 ,'A'9FfAf 7fiiu., AT'J4... .V 1 L, A- V ,L A' A171- QQ A" t -flliLAf1: .." Af"': AAA., 'r ' Cb.. 5, 3,52 an 'I i n I-,x4?,,g' v ii,-X -VEST.:-.'i z-gl, ,ggi-T l 1,7 2:5511-4 .3 . 55,2-5, pg?-Au ,gf A175 f , TA . ., :RAN -,WA 5, . A 53,1 ,. 53? , " :ff ...VA9?:A.,:zAAf1PiYg,Qg,..g ' gif' .," :jgQ. .,,.g fi? f ,f ". ' .1 - j .. -fx vgl 11"-ggfiifg iff-J .I if-51' '55 ig- f"'1f'k . iffy-I-i'l ",.A l,'fA-F7 Q, f.. Ai'f-,A-, 4-1:3,., '-"',. 'A ,A,,.qf.9g,3:Qi . ' ,- K, A f, A,'j5- '-iv,qf-l1JEg?sfA'1- gn' 1. kj 22' fer-'Afs9Q,'ii:, ' ff . A .A A , Q 1 1 , . . , ,. .M , ...:, ,, .. ,. ., ,xv ,.,., . .,f,, . ,.,., ... . hw.. ,A ,.,,,. 1, ., , .. . .. , ., , . , . .. ,,q,, 4536! ff 1--wh.,-,,. 525, ...ciyT,'-,..4,.IA:..gf-i if - , A.-., ,A -. -45,5 4-wslg , fr X 35... 4314. ,. ff, qv- -j,i5Ah I .pfggh XR H. -,iii , J, :Af 'A . A2 A V - . '?i,3f,.'5L,.A' .L t,-fg,..g,...5g.g., . A .. A .fm Aa AA., AL.: 5,31 ,A,f,,, P" 34" , A:fY,AAww.AN ,,f gi. 2-.AAA.A..-,:, A f ,ff ,..jgf2:, ,.-,.:.A.A,.AAf' ' ., fAAAAf.AgA- 2- - . . fair , .sky 5.-Afufv - -Q A?-iff, A sl1sa'A, ,- A. A .s I . ,-m.f- f.,,.,M.w ,W5,A.-ww' xlwfinx f,f,,,,i fA..5:,gNMx - -,-RNA ,A My 5 ,II ,,f. I, , .Q .- .F NJ.: V . A -. . - A wfffff' . ,i:'3Qff:. Aww .. 1, ,, A, , - A , X A' 5 . 3 - j ' 1 I " ,. ff, . Y, i i ,A uf A .., -, -A , A ,..A.,,,,:, 5, f'55La,z51, ,r ug V K. .HIL ff -35 iv, , I , 'j.-3.-...., .j t 3 A. 5535- A.. 'A:+5n,,Q,.,:4.,5,w g , H 1 gf, .- 'X A 5-.5-H W, ' Af-fy- j f., , fAf'25"A5x"f' AAAI' ' , " ":,.,, 'aTig2lQ?,r" A 25, Lg Ni gggf x-,. L' 4'fi,4,,gs5gi5.pf A A- A 'lgw ,cg figg- . -5,3M' , ' .. ...ff w,,g.g, 1,261.4 1,5 r A ff.. jr-.g,5gg,il . ., 1.4.53 . A, , W - , Ng., A AA Ag ,A gig ,A A I A '-' 'SA QA, riffiif flm-P A, A 'A lilffrsslv g W A'IU:f2fA- "A m 14-A A 'Ax X ...g m WA 4 5 A.fLf2g,'gj3?,' Riiggglcgigfgfgh i K N . 1 hlfu .541 ,:, , I 'fi . ff, fjqfh-.,4 in 5 K 4. ., " - AA - J, A ' -952711. .- ,. ' -Q AEA. ef bn.. ,,, . :AA.',F Eh' A wa' q. ' S-, A A ilffi-Qqfgrlzn A.. A Aifwifj-rc A 'g A-5A!f.F.'," " . H, 5' ' Q 'A:4zAJYrfA:fA-1 A . I Q5 ., 5 K 4 - A 'wp-Q A' ,, ' V 5. ' T.j,J.",f, " . +. .1ff,.9", ,., ' ,Q ., ,VL .iff , .j.fQ-.Mig , , ' 'Y ,.,' ff, , ' . ff. 'A 1f.,',,,.,1 " U A ,j ,,.,.,f,,..f,, ,,,.,, ,ii , ' 3-A ff A A 'rg,Af,. .A AA, aff. 1. 'A 5'??A-lfaw. f'1m5+,1 ,ni -j , .J X. ' 'Ar r W gm Af" fyii' .-ff-:,,.f.1-,,, ' ' in-'X Al- " , , " ,,, , .. ,,.,, . . W. .,,:, ,, . J, ,.,. .-,.,, 4 ,, n , ,L WM.. V E, .V K .A , , A ., ,, .. . ,, ,, ,. A. -L " 4iz6-j'A--"4f':,.L5A :AxA,f1Af1'l:f mf' . ' " ff ' i U - rv 'A-751 . A ' - . . L " A r 52-",-- :ff U 3' ' . , sf sgj' ' A g 1 . A A -A A .fig -5 A., 5-'!'.-iii.-. iff? ?A5A4: 'L Aix? A X 1 ty- - "?ffA5.PfASA': Q AA 5. W wif- Ai H.-.. A f,A,Y.X -. ,Af . A , . , P AA ' A . A - ' A A fi A A. A- A 1 A A AA ,A A v . , .1 1 . -A4 , , Ar., A' A AA .A .4 . . Af.Af.1:AAA A A - A A 7-QA AJ A, A3 fr- -A A. A . 2551? J AA A'f3fA -Alb 'fp A ' ' A .11 iz. '. -. i f iiif iA Q I7 A 'A A F 1?5.'f5ixA'W3-' X 144 -6" -Ali 1" XfS5'f3g"f,-'TL-A-L . A- f.-.-.WM-'F?.:1 'A Qfii -' A A . AA fffif f ' .lf -AA 5' ' "Af A , --:A A . . A A A AA , .gif-E " A . Q ,AA 2.3 ,'A33:,:, '?"5t', A Aiwl. -2-gig.- -.Afjf Q12 Aff? '. , ., . ' ,yfgf-, Af ' A, . ' ' ig S. A .:,.,"',j .A ,,, .f 4-j ,mx A r A144 6,345.5 niifgpl.. , I - A5 553. 'gmk - A A' Af.,,,. . !J- .47 , .-, , qv ,A V i.FFfALA A ,- VA -E fvALj,1f'fx, pr fA'.f.A Q " ' 'j1,?-Q-ig, xr-hgygv if' Aiigggaf., .Vjff,... , I .N 'g-f A.-.MW ' , ' 1 'A 1 , ff" 5 I . .. f . 5 'A " , W ig 'iff ""'zg,, 'A A k Q 'Qf"f9 "' ,.S . I-f' f 1 ' wif A A , V ,zA w ',J.A1 1 ,-,EL 65? ,gag I .2 -1AI A g?5?vg,i.nx-A sfps -.i'.,-15: ,rf , T-,Qt- 3A'..v X -f --vgyi-V? -gi 555, ,-:cl--ji,ql,',w 4. , -A..,L - 9651, ,A A A31 . t. . QA .7 a -- ,H ifi 41. A' 'A Q 1.15-1.Af 1 xiw jfli- Q , A",-Mg V,',s"- if , I ,, 3? Q A 5. if . . A Ji.-gn A .pf .. ,AA AA . -- . -A3 A . Q.. , .fl -P QA m A.3'iwvfq.fy '. M .Af ,J "Wi 6 ' ' - Z, -.'A- if 'W 1 . A:f::: 4' A'1.g' 'A A. N 1 Af' 2' Ag, -5 lbi iffffi' ' 0i" A,, f A . A A- ' .rt L, -' w fi-:fig . . vig, ,Q fy., E Q lk, 'K ,i:. ,gZ,f51,l5g355, ,,g 4g5g1 'i MQW ., 5 zi ,HJ AM- ., J -il A 5 . 4 13-,gf-5,x,x. V-51, was . 11, ix? I, 1 "'iffb.,. 'N . - A -'J eg- , VV , ,ZA a '-" If A mA- ' A 1-.942 x " .. . 'Sy XA-, A '37 .A I ' 'fL "?ffA '-"f'A 'A '3 "A'fAfW5Af9' . A A 1 ' A' A- 91:1 H, S-'f if. 1 ' . "'l",'1 G . MA A .fb gif-'A?'f -" ' X A. 'W' "1 'SA -'fA2if?1 1 . 1 Fi A il.. .72 ' 1 -7 - If . 51 er 4.1 K A T k,L:ji ,g3 h .X Qi :' A --il.. s.-. fl! A A: A . fa --if .Q-5:3521-:..,vV,g, If 3,1 iq b,,:?rh :g3::Y-1 gzyibnk .K . ,A .-I-: rf . ggi. .5 .U n hl-55' . A.wJ35fg,.?i,A 2, . ,-.-an 3- kv 6,-A-VJ:-.J -.siss y . X51 ,,:5,:, ' F14 '. Aga-Mfg, AQA 'Aw A S EE A '53fQ?'.5Ff 'fl A 'A ,lg .gf a?,A-'-5!i'Qff1AZk:g,-' 'i' Q, ' 1 gf ' -fig A . f A 1 qw 'ff , 'A ...f-, XQQ-AfA A AL,'-ff TZ-ll' Affflw rj-A, ' ' -'wg g.f.,ggw 2 g,i,fQ' AAAfgQAAfi'QA - 1 L ' :g f , . Af? H I .nf A- KJV . A + A A " .. A, ig jgj ,w - .A ' -.A- TFA' - ti - "- 3 "AAA, -A KSA, ' Pr' fi fffi . , .. 'lfflgt' Alf P P2 -AA AAL. -. A - . . Ar. A .-A .,. Nr .A 31,-'V - AA: . ,f,, ,.. A M- A-- ,A ' K- A f A X . A A"j.-Q- 17 ' A " w-. 3 '-ii'l A."f'4A ' AAW 'Q' .f-A.-'T' AL . ' A vf' :A A . A515 A, , v igggkflk, - , A g, . - ffizffif' 'A 51' '.!wA.'A, X, is -F ,:.i,,.. E, Q -',.2,? , ,: i .UI-3 Fhihqim .Wx fhirrfnib . If, , ,KIM ., A I. .N , A , '-nj-A-f. .. A , -W , ff Af .f-if I -.:o.-yA.- jp., ,ask , 5iE 'nA: 7g.6 3if?Q, Au , ngvzh., - IA M. A . 53 " QF , 5. - lf' qv A. . ' A v ,,- -,A W ",.,.: : 'gf-wg r" JA Ap "-if - 'if' -L w Cz.. A. " . "y- A, .- A, A 37 .5 A - ' 1 QA , f4,nf'lf L- ,,.Mi 9'f'izsAiJ ' t Y :gary X. ., . g.! .-XII P5 A Y . NA, uw .: , .A-Q,-I ' um' . wig-Y . 1?E-' LJZY ,Fi -. 'N.L f,:i:A , X Xia.-.-, xxx A' I I 3 :igQi.Lji35.',U ..V, I 8 ,V , .X .fi W '51 , f, " g5.Ak LQ, ,535 'fffgf 'fggf a.A1j'."j'g 1'.A- ...,f'- il' Q ff ' J-.,, .f,TW'j'QA,i . 9 . M x " ' g,,. ,ff -,,. ,QL 4'-.fa .A AA+'g ' . '-'A',': -Af' 52 .i",v.Agz1 . 'R , JA -' x "jf ' -' : A' .4-5 5 5 1-.A . ygfffz' 65 A541-if--A WTA -. A ,Bn 3 . Q91 1.-:Q ,. . 4 AA ,- . A 5 af :-A..-, AA .t-ff. , A ,f,.v434A, ,gh--,AA, Af.AAg-u.gx. vg - A .-5. J - ,, Al"-J--. 'i + .SQAMNN .2 A W fl -3:-QA" JA, " ad A . fag A. Egfr: gg 1 'A-ft'-XL.-,',f,,.','.1 -dig. A-, R , ,f f 45, 31 -0 -Az, ' QW, If 4 1-TA. K L K t W In ,Ly -...Nl . V, I V- Y , ,,... , ,5 ir - 5 X :ll-W, .- Aw " .fjt-jf--,, -- tw, KY Qfgffq -Yi . x , Q, , 53,13 ig. -A ,I fl' Z.-.Ag-Q , V, ' A . 1523, ,A IXW -' '-X rig?-, A. A-gf.. A if -A flax AAAfAa': .f fwfr' AQ- - A' AA A 1 - .Ak -fkfffa-AA'2 ' .Ep 1f5"f'AA.. ' ' ,L 2 455' V. A. ifiifl 1 '.-., ' L' Y f "H, A-e Aw A- ,-+51 ,gf A . ' '- :M . 3'31??:gA.x N L' 4. -:LK 5 , I .A,WMIw?L:. l1,..:v. ,D il Q Q .gf E " Al:AAV?Jf .n. AL5'f'5'9E. , ,-AA: v '1-."AE-u-jQ.g'- . -.wily-4, 5 ,f, .xi,,,:A. H if.: Agia " 7 Q figf A. 23 fi ? , -., .-e,.- 'N -- ..-Q..-, . lm -if-x51,.:w -4, , . . K A Y- .1 A , FQ ,lf- XA. ' -I A.. A-, . Aj . . . K A Af Y ,H ., A7l"iL'S, r-42:22-L, , , .,1 . ,E4 . 1 I .',,r.f: 4- ' -,Vr , ':f:.-- - -V V I: '.., 4 V - . z Q , ,. - ,h . , . H..-f zilliklffl 1 f - I 1' f - J 4 1 ' ' V V-- ,. ,, - . - V, -xx V - my f . f , f - L' I ,, M 1 my 535 , pbgm- ' L' 7 Ziff- faaff?7'3g,N ' , a df ' N' "Vu ' . 'LRF-'. a2c 57'-f"5N5 ' 'Qi ' ' ' ' V. I "..,: ". .. ,.U3i"?': ' -- - X wx fair .-fn: J . V A H. ' A ' .. V ' " ' vc V V '4-1f'-"'V- " ' .V , - T L ' ' ' E'x ff- .M M xr afiieer-"YV,-L' 'M .. 14. f Q. , '. . 'if-rm A -V ,' ---' Ns - X' 'V -.1-V--xl'?4-. - A '-, . , ww 'g1v2g1.,- - naflfgylkb ' ,. v, rffffw ,QM .I -,je - .' ,V-.-'xr - ,,, 411- I ."', ' V -U . ,. 1 - ,V 1 1,9 -' 2,-. '- 3' .K X fa ipX.w,3ig:is,SgvCgYJ'v, -V: 4 X it fqiff? ,A . ' 'V L mi" W SF. ,Praha x L I A K, .rl ff id- Q f 4f nf Q 1 3, ISE, g.m2ifi5fa?x,' V A .5f,i5.y.a3,f3i52g4pT V. ZA' .sdzqx eq o n Qf fgfv ,- 5,9 -if . is 53- l V,' Lmsi h .- 1 ,I 3 I, , I ..1',g3aP'Q'S 'Qfillcifiivk ' , ,,4:S,f1+ugi 112111-Q.-f ' vw Q Wag ,::g?,",-uf. ., ..-jf.,4 Y' 'gg 5 I.,--Q 4. '.f,,,1e V, VV - .,g.V-31, - , , -..,,. rf . -V- , , , . X sz r. Vawsffrw -'M-'L -.Ira-f3u:Vm:Rv4-Rx Kwihm 'Q . x-m'1"wr f " ' 'A .A f f".'n.-w :w .X f' vrefl V- -. my if '1'V-'-- - .V af '-Af., ' ' 1 - , f., f , . V Vrig-3gvI'ah??g,:!'55sfv.iH V -.. 13.3-.:'.fg'g: -. , , 'X 4 fc, .rf ',2 f "-9, - ,rv . 1.1 V"'5 ' ' -'jf-iff, .-11.1 'f.. . -4'--Z, '- 1- 01' . -- , - 'Q-VV , iV,fV-x,.,,,,kL V , -q Mh. , ,L--X, V, rl V . HM.. -,..,-we-.V ix 1y.,,z,,4....g, . V .x Ye , -, J- ', qv' V. '- -' ""tT':'ffT-'fK2?:f.3::e3-'if N7-'1I':'fS'e-?JQT:2if' .:,,."4 Qfi'kFN'V,n-r?T5:2T J, , V ,UH QA- T3 ff. -' '94 - W ' '-Ei - Vfaiyi .r'7?"Q 'f""1'vg , - ., :.-- .Aff "L ff1+f'g 4VZi2a,V.w1 6 ' cezlifff' 3 51,11-2: "-- . 4f. J, I Q ' 'V 1:2 3..f fx -'4' :.:1 Un, 'Y , ff- ."' -ff-"U .V 'I 'FE-fi--.155 , ' -lg H1f'i'7-:"., A V P fi 'gqfbi 'Ig-QTEK? 54,9 'K pl 'fbi' 71.'A493fgr3 : A ww U V - " . V12 ,ffl V ' 1 53 -. V i" V'f5mA' 'ww -YJ H, :I VV 2 ' 'Q-eQ:'fMvExfufX ' gp 1' f 'fffviV2f3+ A " " -VNV V1 ' , " 1 ff fg " .2 vi--f "Wax 2' 1 -W Q 'SCU jfii'?p71f?' - 'f'fj,.5 'j-gf-" '?.'YMX115', 5" ' . , ' 5, f ., " ' V 13- J' . ' I L ' ' ' f V1 . , 1. V-' -'5 ,lfgfl-, . , W - Aff . ,"" 'i -I ' . ' 1: 5' ' ar,1i'kftfvN- ' ' MV'-I W' 1 ' I jx 4' . Qi'-A 1 ful' - 'Y 1 ffl' V ' ' :W 'V V:-V., 1 Jafrfw ' U- es- ,z-L:-A-i.::ai'4'-I W ' ' - V"- V '1 5 -gf: 1: , -1 Lp- -' V X , +g V'ff V,Q7'V ',.ZFg' hi' gf mi, Fly l v. Vx, . ,A 32-mf .V gf ' f ' . ' " .. .-ff"f - 'V 'V' ' 1 'ivf"T5EV -A-5 " W". 'T QL ' " mf? 3 :V"'P4.7 ' 'x .'-'f5'Te3-.- " '-S' .- " 'li " ' 'lv ' " 1 'fu .- .'?' 1 -V . ' ' ' ' ' ' lf ," 351 ff -N2 Vliiffzff- .,4'4' 1' ' -f1gQ1,5.,r 1 ' 'Q ' ' - 'ig 1, 3V::igQ'i 'TQf:2,i.-'f? Ufii' 2s i'? 'TL' J L- '55 if .531 i ., 'N 'g -5 E154 . 1" 55' irq -- if ., url V ,214 iq, . fm ., LQ 2- ,, V' -V VV ff Q 5 :.5.:Vq,.: V . -, A . . A ,f . , , 9' '5'seXK .Xq I . , iff, "iff" A "3 . J J' -Lf? ,' 1:35 iii. c V Ls ' me--, f' .i . ' Mr gm-':g:55V - V' Y-f.1q. 'f"::- X f' 41: -1, V ' '- ,,x,,,V '--if - ' - M. 1 V gag V' V 1 5:1,.,,fy.f.f V: .Q X xv . ..,V.,1f.-,, ly -1,1 ,.,, -,, - , Q W, .. ., If - ,, ,.,',., . ff . ,vw ,gr..Q.,-.: - 111-. V .- -V ' - wvll-,.V. .-fr Q .JV-AV V H' ' V' ma W. 3 .w,'VWf' .3 LA' ,ff , ' V L. I . "1 ' ff' .421 ' V 3- ,T-V41 4. -- .V 243- H. -: ' W- . W- . wi, VV . x ' ,yin 1 V ' -Yi-JN-'nz-.:E. . 'af-r-W J- lg? 'H a-., L , V z-fr NW- fl' :.-7,- affg? -.mfg f -, r .-'wb LISP- X ,, ibn- V I-A 'KN '- ff :fi 1- - '-1. V r - - , 1--r',. . .x -In V. V 4--H-aLA.:',Q.:Jp , nw' .. 1'2" ' ia H N .' K --2. "f?'?'qT 92 'J91 , 5 X If . N?:,21-ffm A. ""' I--gifs. , ff." -' ju!" ,W K. f:' -1:1 x1 'VL 47 Hi. - .' . V Y' '- ' Qu 1" . V ' :,. '- M -. we-iw-V" .1 fV?1:..:' fy? 1 VT w k-fe . VL me ' I .. u Afznff' .- .- .. 5- f 'Y 1 . K, fig 25,54 - I2 - f f lj 1 , M ,f ,H,,f , , if-U V1 ., , -.1 '. ,vm - A 44- 1 m- f V:12,-ff Q., Wzf-fV4f. V' f ' ', - ff - V ,Vzz -mt, .- nie, ' -MTN'- M-lag"-f W V ff, -I Q, , -' .V wwbvw-E',f'f' fab-ffq Kp ft, - , - 4" . -' - V g, V z.-VJ" 5!Er"?f1. 1 Jef?" 'Y' V '14 f :VL ?1ff' Fw' ,gf -V 5 aww. W V , .1 , f - .. . . Hs . , , , . . ,, 4 , , , ,, , ,,.A 1 .,g.-,Ms 4 s m f'Qw,. K . . I5 -A.. . 155' " ' ,L 1"V',.f2ga+P-'l :SES W- fi' " . K3 . 1 163'-iff '- 'fi VV 'f-1'.ff - V :'ff'5i-.'- Q L" -' "' "' 35-'ff 'V 551 ' - ' K . 55 'f T"4+gSifbg.gf , P f" V.5'r v", ' H 5 ' ' - - m f A - " 'l-. "'ff".Y-fl,-1, q " ' Vi" -AQW5' .- ,f 1 5 V QA-Vgyjuggfy' H- . V'?g,'V wiy,:4g'mp, I If 34' V J Q, - , ,-5 5zsz3?V. v qlxiflg U ' jxlx.3g11,x15:, K ' T- 1g1g',,. Hgh 2' u.. . - :U , ' ff A ' 55- " 1 'fwzQf, 'V . rj V' ' fy.?aQjV,e4gjS 'Ziyi .Sy V. Q - 'V fi? ,, P A 1 . ,gy - V1 VV':rsj Qefw. '-1112 :-5V,j':- ,, gr" ' "'N' .1 35, ,J- ff I .er fi ' . .1 1 V: Eff - "1 - ' -Pig. ' .E ' , Y-, ,gf X" ., I . ,. 4 f'f:'u5lQ' - ' eV -V ma-441 1-fsvw ff5i?2f if-J-J:'e-:..--,if , - - J. " f fmpzff- ' .f V' " f 'x afflafif . ,inf ., " 4 A 1. V242 -1 H2 FV ' F' 221- .. . ' ,J H ' W, . J -P- ,. '- .'zm2"'- F." 'Wg I ., I n-, - , ,f- 54' . "i""'f'F-2QQ.m5s-AVI?" i '12, H A '-"',I'j5 Q 71552 , V 3155, It "VL.Q'f,x jf" " '-' " X' ,.HfV,.H-1,f'Zg W"-41,41 - Q I' "- ': V, r V, ,. "SVR-'TAHV' '- " 'Hr X - M- .5 ' X -iff-1--1241: -iff" Vi . V. wg V, ,in . '-,fs gif , ' 4 N. H -M '. ' A. 1 4: YLw?5V'f?'S'q.-,--if I . We ' ww..--air.: K V " , "'i1P.r'1f. ,T f -f-'49 ' . 4. -NN-k' -. -1-.-I 'ge f WLM f ,V--V 9 'J " F.,-1y?'-X61 wi: .- -1-- XM' - ' ww" 1 ' fwfr 'V ' , . Vffkrfrki . V "WV "'Mu A- V - -C '1'l'1i.--. V'5wfrfw 11f1..VG 11--::1,,"r-1 . 'Vw 1' 1 ., ,-,av' N' .111 -, f- ., -1-Lzwf-441. 'f--' 'f'- 4, .' 37 li ,3 " .5g', ,'X-E 531 ., , - ' -' 'fi w ' -Vf-'5'fIi.'f! l 5 rx -7. .-ffl, .417 Mhs ff 'W5.f' fr... 'T' . -Ev IO fx: 2 '-- Mm " - ' "1 4 -' 'A 'L ' - X . , "'i:.ZEf2fQ'ifi. ' ' f V 'LA ' 'T 1 5'- . .1'f1a,. I 1-575' iff? 4f2,V -' 'Lf-ff' , . ff 115- ' 1"f',"" . 5 V, Q" 5 "" Lxklx A' 1 ' .,-4' I 'f'?"f,' iI75q"' f" V-'V"A'5x"7 . 15 ' 'V M "1 'V . ii. V - "ff '4f"Jf" - 1" ., G V L. ' ' ' ' ' XFUXNEX V .7.5ff'!f'ik?ff,5iQ M 5551 V:f'4lV 7 I V iv-.lik iQi!n:i'VQ1?'flf 5 YYQW-' xfhiif f 'E . y - 1 I . -. 9 4 3 ws' '- .g:5.-.Jag-iw?-,Vu V ,fu V, fV-.W gx ' fm 5,5 ' 55121 . V ,,V. ,13:s.fw. - vxg, V la-,pf '- I ' W'-:fy iilqyhr .nga . J' -- r y V 'gV'V4.c-V',givg,f V-":':.-" Q., -f . -,J ,: ' ,w-4.4.-" -15", i, ". ,,- f ',,. ' .., 2- J , . 3 ..., 'I M21-gm.-1, 1. '--'w' --. ' + , VV ' . 1 V Y x 1, V , . ,. ' 4' ' Q X?- . -I 1 .P '.e- V . 'V 'f- '- Q." A' " 'HF-Ya-fix ., . ,M V w"'KV, 174- X 4131 2 , ' - ,' '. fb V H. 'W K , . - . 1 ' ' t 'IL N We U5 ' 114 VV.. . V.V.-M" . 'll' fTf"Tff1 K' f' FlI?'5 Jw, . mp ' 5 V: X- ' QW? ' '35, . 4 9559 'f 'V - ' ' M 4 f' xg.- 5 .an A V .3 kr -V - -V1-' WL - Sf- NV ,VVV - ' f,f1:f5 -. 4 QM: ,cTPf?1uVf!uV-- -m-'-Vfac.-pfsnwwf if .v V 317 if 1- 4 41" If f-gg I . 4 . . -1, , .of 2 'Nu' cf . -. Mfffw, "" fi" - X'-uf' . iii " Vr".VT.fr ' fy ,J-'I 'bun . - f A fm A LQ. ,.:, V . , ,., 4, W 3 V, I, 1 -' Vfc,-cg, ,, ,. I 4. , , . Af ., .,l, ,., Q ,, , I A-pi' P3255 E . fi" .K,,. qw- V - ,, ,d f X .qggigv u sf, 113, vi? L: ff,'aV . , , iff 4, .25 Aff ii 1 3 . . ,- V 5 2215? . 'A VVV- 1 fy 'ff' f',ff'f' , ,V .. aj -. wif 1.97, V' " Lp. V X pk YV, H0 . 1' ' ' X lffvif a -.?.,52L?'2?Q2V4,f'fn ,A UH 5' .r ' , fwff' Xf,:2'ffi.LufZ335l f,f2'5,LT' jimi' WSE? 1" ,J Le: 'xiii V Nw 1 J 7 1 2 .. . -, f' : mfs-VwgaVy -5 '- .V -' ' - V if 1115 'V .t 'V -- Fiimhi- -H 'w ifi 'P7"f , f V ' y , - ., .- , 'hz 15,53 if L flaw I 9 ' .- ' '- '3.'5ffa '- 1 " 3f'3'5gQ"'2. 4 . Zi- .V"ii,-l.!"' 'iff ' flvj "a, f,,f ' :',' Vt .,ii,xN3 15, ,g "7 15' , 4 ,ff ' V- ' K V - A 1 W7 .' V 'Vx 'F -, UM- I, - v'1,L wgQ.--5I7::M' Y. 1 V! I ,zjiifm J. ' , -:::,:4::.,?! -in .0 563-7,5 L23-I ri' ' Q - ' 'Butz -5 1 V1 5 'w X A .,.,,'-'QQ s , ,- Z 17 ' V , 5231-' JF- 'f'Y"! -.fV"f" '-125'-4,1-4. ' 9 275412 ,Eg ff "-'f ff fig -V '.V.. ' ' , -'fr'afVf. . .. . Vf"'f,', Nw. IT iii ' -V ff - . - A V ,Ai 'df .fha fmtzmfqm-5 Q .G'-,Qf V" 1 , 1 'P K1 - . ':fQRT:9:QN,- V "MM V- V " " .fx --w'f::2:: ' Lif' . ,. ' ' . - 'X Vw' 2 ' - N.1VV..V.1,fi.1-1-+,.:5:--gfal . V ff -' Q N' ' 4" ','Z"3':f"?e V V .vig ' Qvir' "1 X' N ilsfiwf ff" '- f 'f""' 0 5.-' . fm . 4-fy WW' . X ix VVf"'?f6y? fix if.: ' 1,fwV1.,,V',, '1"'f,Y ! "Lx, , xg, :V-VVv.3gf"7 - 'P 215-" -- V' MV 'f-fy y in is 5 www V , wa . fc, , rm. -29: mm. faq' ' ' . ww-' V- , f .-f-izlfrq ,f A' -- lx 'X . I " X- --V-.. -1- ' . , .zu-21 ,ig ug' 3 .,+xX+. -rw M -"?.?f-7V.'mN 1 . , H f NW' V- f 'f' Vu .1 - UR .- ,I ad! -fl Y L - . vw Nga- -V fV ' ' ,ai if "L , '-4VVf:.z.V,-.5 '- ,r-'CV --V ..f ' I Vf- 2 ,. ,V.,.-"'- .V::vi': ,F S wt:-:.1' fVf ".. --m1faVf,' '21, W V 'f Y SWJ J: : 'mvrf .,. fwm T1 VV. ,. 341 .inf Y- " ' - '- .hz JJ . ' , V,wx'n V V ffS11""'+ ' I ,.f ffiggzmlzft 5 .iffaix rf? F? KY- " A QE ' A7 25", - QKVV. -" P1 ' ' V V V v:1,g,wfff-V- Vgk cf:fV--N, " XX ' lpw Av' -i 'fl-ig V w ., W- N L, wi ,V ,s Y - .-.,,7Q' : ,-,aiilgy V. " . - , ' ,- " '-W ' "Wir: 71' "wg tw, 5 'gy 5112+151-2' Vigx'--1 ,- , LQ 'g .," Tix, -- 1 "-,,- ' 1 . 4 ' --, g :QE-I , 5,,',: '.1..21, 2 3, fs- ' iw 'x' x LF' 4- gtifil- . 'ac , . ',.,y:1 JJ' X In -I . 'a , .' ,'ffm.i1'V' 'I 'm"'QgQ.:ff'ffi9f?'xl"l1'i-ag "9-5 Pnb' ---'xx-V4KE,7'Z' '-' 2- Hxw' , Ln V- -WV H119-N , ' 1. . - V gm' np ., 1"w:w+:f,Wf ,gm -E ,, -, -- ge if 2 - V213 , C0 12 .. , N111 'V V'.-wlrfcx ' , 1: U3 -5.1 . M 31 Aa,-SV Via .1 f -'-ANU Z, fa- :ev lf" ,k4'lfffW'1ff1VLQ --. , ,.9gg1ff " 9 9 ' WEEE -i,?f" '5? V " . ' 2'i"'X"'g. Q T 'P-J ,' ' 5 W. fffi .,.1'1: ii .a ,,.., " 'Ei ' ,eff . 'YY 11 ' E 'W S -.ga Vzfiiif x f. '15' 'i , fl,.B1"lF':?y5"fff5z X A 'W 1 '01'r-'- W- '?ffa'--25' sox ' 1.-if ., QVig?,-5' 4-H'if1E?1'.ig ' 5- 'X' - '-E1 ' if 1' 1 QV g ww.1'1.mx . J" 'f if - f ,V , V V ., f , ' 5' fi??'3'is H-M1 5 Q ,V V ' V -- " if ' A - . - -' Viflgag- ww- , . ii- ""1m'.1 if film: V 'v .- ' '-, 'IA-'f-. . , ' --- V1 -." '22 .rx - 1 f' a ,,-' - ,. jf' Q gi- ,, ,"":' . f . V 33 V. :F v firkfl V L N I f-'fssivy . ..1 K V Q v QL vw If-fig' ,, 1ELj5?j K . ,Al Q A Jcfguff. V r - VV-1 , f 4' , ' 'L Egg V3-1 'iv' " I I ' . X1 . ' QM.. - - 'f'VV ., - ' ""..-ff 'Hx " 311' .g V,KQf Wx 'V Igfc f ffw -i . ,de "E ,, X Q2 ,P-1 , F ' . - - - 5 . 11, fqixiv- X: 'if ' . 'K' ' x1."'?i'42 3 "ff!7'. ' J ' 'A-'51, L-Q.,+5"'f1,' f+"LV'-+91 W gg, ' W Vffi W ,fV:Vn-1512 X ff ' .54 5 , .V -' R-, . .,- ri 'wil' ,V f 2' . WI-r,-,"',f . ' E415 1 ir' '- ' ' " X V 'V,V-mf-' 4' V ., , - 'ea ' . s -V - ' V ,-71 1,1 '--,-- ' - " - Pls ' .EQ'f-!"'- . Y.,': ' ? ?6'i.-.- ' . - wwifsh: --ma . .'- 1fy:'- mg, V '. 4 -.4-. ,E M," Ls' - . - -. ,. -2'x. , K 'kg Vrff. JA ,':.'-lv -' L57 .V Tzzim ' wr ' ffl.:-we Q, .A -V: .ff,',u,f. , V 1' .V:,!'H V xv: ' - K .- V - V ,,gVf . ,fl 1 .' 1 1 V- . 5 A . aff V Q f Ji '- -' If- ' In f 5g'Qf.?-E? T, W-' ,f ' '.-ff," V .xx , '7.3'f:,' v -' V , 9-ffl liz 'Q-JE'-,'-' Lv' ' ,. QAVVQV , if -. rv H' . Lfffvf, A 'Q-V ,. , -. fe 9. V A 'Z' y-,H sf!"131'41'-'--,'f X5 'R - :.'isFf W' ff' - W1 V VS-'15 ,V 1 V- - - -FA--ff ' QW lf- ,- - " '1 ' ' ' ' ' ' N! . -1.5 ,..Z':p,3n. :V h 3 i:?g,,f,..,, 4 gvdiyu- .V J. N :L I h:,:.51Vhfl . . 5 X Q ,QA 5 I A- IMA :gg 941, A f-1,71 R xx I sw M . - .mg ws - ffl , 1 jig r U. : 4. ' ' f: ' " ,-mai V w: N 955. Arm-V.Vf'V, 4 1 H , 'J JV 3 :3 ty ,fa:tg Ve'r,,f ,V -.X Y ,IV , ,- f 'V-ff-"V, V .5 .,f.,, X., . 1 ,. , ,.,,, , ,f,u. , ,. ,.,, ,., My if V ,.. W., E, AVN , ,,,, ,, , A ,, zu. .4 ,. , ,, . .Q , , I, 'M , If Th., x A. , V g .41-V.s'zV, Yffi::Qff'g2'-Wvi R' 11- -fu 'Q e V, f- Vx '- -q, fe Q V' MY - ff V I ,,f ,ff ,127 .i'-ff 2215? V , Y"-VV: ,g5LVigi'.5V?5"" 4' 'iff ix. 1 '-f..Gl'1f5T' 11' 'W'. ," ' Vpp ' 3" '1'?+.'?g'1EV -6' "N El, J' HJ 'Q f.if?'C4 ' f'vf..V ,: , , f ,.-f1- V ' 1-'-sh. ' ,1 26 ' "L"-- ,V A J' V 2 .1 2 ". V' -. -,- 'vi V' .'.' - 34 ,fgVz:f:6i+-TS .,7',V! ' by , ' . V11 V 1Q!ju'1u' . , 'fu ,r "V 'fill -21 ' gg -731-:gVg V- 'Xe-,'f:f'1Lg " 9'-H75 ' Aff S' V LEA-"" "-V2-, ,ifiiifaf -. WTS?-' I - V,",22'f5B"'5-Xi,g., ,Lf V f " ffffx -. "5 - . if ' V if V lil 'flff . '.fr"f'fA3 . . .U ,S gf 5,I7,f.Qg:,- Qi., ,QV R1,E,gVZ 595, ,il -:LZ , -We , K- Q .' 1 'WAV-N 'nu . I' VV 177254-A ' L ',g.I.1i,- -,'l2,,6,j,' f, . ' "1 "ff " ' " , ff ' I -"lF'f:i 1. V! V .. 3' , f'V-:f '- Wi f . 11 -V 'lf " ki ' 'i - -f ' V . ' - '.f Y V - 5 . ffkfixc fef V- ' ff 12 Q V Eli! era u' Va W ' 5 f if -J i'72P'l'i ' V - V 4 ' V' ,f . 'V ' 3' -' . XV: - .r ,, -, ' - A-If VV- . VV 1: ' -'N- "Q at Il' H 'I 's .' - , 1. g ll' , A ,, ,V V V ,,fffffjV f 'ff 4-af' g ' ANQ' - ', v , V6 ff V VV! 5"-f f , ,AI pl V' Q' T , M f?1,,L?.l+ V, I :X . I -, .A-T if if :ir .1-,RJ .4-pf' 45' ' X gig! A iffzwvli-,X , ZA l hiv, :li an ..:..,..V U gJ,,,.J,l,Z 7, .P I 4 fl., , 11,17 ,.v,-:Ll-A fi V- 1 4 1 i f , P ' 59 ' " Y .. --9123- ' .'j"f,'f 'v . 4 fd, f x "' gf: -a,5gz'5fV - V-,V , If 2 . A ffl?" -ff!- f 1 'L ' ' 'lf V, 'js-f,,,,Vgg9" Q, -V 3 ff M V1 9 fl X K6.. ..-vi?-wV' ,f' . ' - h ,Y ,"' fzi':l17 "- Z ' V "'5i'V4J 5' ' I V ' y gviif' 'gZLhf:,5"".2'. 1 J -1 'Lwf s'. ', -1..- 'A ' ' ', -'.'f?12'5 - ' I 1 :ww .1 ' V - 1:1-, F V ' "' .z - , ' ,- 2? . H ,' -,, " .- V' I 'V inf' . 95 .1 'V 1+ ' 'E -pL1i:. , 'V X N .N V-g 7 ' I V. ,- 2 51' V. V 'U -N ,KSREV-4 'K V. Q ff' gig ' -. sl I ff7,'N:2f:5, q i. . , ,T 1 V - ' - '1'1f'J ' ,,f4Q1'f, 1" 3 V 3, 2 f1 4"'!' V?-f:Vf1',ifvV1ff -I L Qi -'lL7i'J5f"f4Q14:-3fJ'-i:.:Qglx' ' R53 'Q " '1' 4 HP'-., " . ".i'1!.i7Q,-li 5 7 , . 'W - 'H'f"-- ' -G: ' ' A ' .fff'1wf':- 1 -- if ,fra il "Wg-' 'aw -5672-N1".' if-..' 1 5' 'fix , - 'V 9 if '13, ' Y. '?f'f5.' " q . ' VV-L ' ' . M. :,v'fFv,i'.-.ITV-: ., - ' :fi-."'V.,,1?:9!i', - -V -- 1' ' A -fVfl'f V 1- f ' V .- ' " ' 'V -Lf ' ' V ' ' Q- - wp... ffifn' N, ,, QQ :Fw 1 .-ax F, -. ' V, V-.-'ff , J 'I ' . V ., V .V f- . . ff V A I-if I ,f5,:f.sQV:1ff',,- K: 1 , L.:-3 1"V.':. . -f 'QV ' " -'H V, . , , 1 ' ' ., ' 'X ,,, "f Q- 4 V . S, 'mf 31,1 Vm:,'tf V 1.5 Q 15.551, - ' Sf? . 51, L -- ' -v '-13 ' . vw N.,' V 7'-V -fy, :,. . ,. .V. 'V EBV Y V N.: Nw. .f. 1 -L' 14- -Vu. --- -. -V -zx .- - .- ., Q .- .e -V -. x .-T-.1-: . w- V, wjf- - L 1 if . 4 -..fr::,1-VL4,4:-H - , M Q- V.: Vx-for: ,V -, 'Legg-M , -fs, 'BX 2, f V . X4 V J." N.,,.,, ,-:wc 515 .. ' V., ,z-V ' m.. , H- 'J,f,f,' ' , 'EH ' - ' 1 q?f?5','!-'fki - lqjfifi 22333 3' A V ' .?'23""'W :1 WL -' V W' V ' 'H , '14,-1'-WV' 'klq " Nigff z V " -. . , ,.V. 1 ,4 iw , V g-Vg: 'Va-, 'fx-Q. 5, -xegim -A -. 1' - - VA. .,-,V if V - 'Vfzv' f J-,-.,.,,..., .b .fV wig. 'EE V' - Pa L 11 ' 59, ' x-'N N? V , Rik B- 1 ,. ., ' . - 'Y' ,:':.1f1- '- ' '- !1"'4 V, , . Q:-:ff 'fvfff-3-f"fPQ' ' A- 2 " "Q VVT , V V---,.f-AJ : ' . '. ' zfff-:T aff' .-' -"'2'5h,. ., ' ' , -'R' , . V: 1 fx- - ,Aff "' . . '-VVV! ' ' 'Ftf'E' M 'V I . f , XV I - x fi 4 152' T271 L, if T V ,Vg WA' . V 'NSF' 21-?Vxx-V ff-'lk Q - I 'E ' V- ' ' 4 ' . 32 5,14 A-H, ILC -.gg , my .A I. ,K .Mil at , J, V. ,A nr, f:3,,.Z. .Zv.iV,?,, nvrm, -.W ,A xv P44 X N 1 -.5 X ml. 11- , ' any . I I ' J' :..! fp. 1 'V I S , ,1,5 f. 'V -. . 'V J, -F' " . :X-, ' N4 -, V A A, Vi" ' - . ,A ' V-- S , Nw 1' . jf, -- my-HL-' . ' 'f Q.,-f -, ,JK 1 ..i:fff 3 V 1- 9:1 5,5 'd ef' . .V , VA' '- ' ' V , 1 ,fa 5 .J pf lx i gf , .X ix . .S V . Wi 1 h, , I ,A gf, 4 Hy. A, ,X V.'i5,- kg I ,, JI ,. :. I lgwfl I f ll., I .AFW515-, V 13 5. ' I if-Q' ' " , ,V . f7"..,-,T 91' F? Q' "9 lf ' . - .1 '35 . :,'f.,Ef,j . ' - Q , 1 9,' ,' f .?.j Y -Q , J , I V M-Q.. 1 V - kfgf- .fd V E N , , ..?g11,,' D , V' f- . V ,- :fp - 5 , ,fqk 4, 1 . A - 4'5" '3 ' Q V , ...W A V V l' ' V: . . -.,..,,jg -g-.1-JW V , p ,Ky ye f ' Qqff' ' -4 ,ff gjfX, J" , 1 . - 'V 'T-.ig - 1 wg, I .V ', , . 2, j V ' - A ,-.Y ' V ' F 5' k' . .' , V , fgif fy g..,,fgqLgg ,,2?2' ' 'Q Q" ' 'V',:'j'V,f21-1 A A-"V V .QM ' vw. -f ' nf-I " ' .- r . Elf ,wi A Q -23,,fV',i4,Q V . rf Y! jf QQHY-M , Vw. c,. va' , hm . Q ,NNW If y .Y B ' M 1. , Rf A f V Q V V'1, L ' F .E .gs-fi if ' ., xi-1 -' 1 . XY I 7A5"'Q W L ' '7 ' ' -- ' ,.V7g,2"f"'g.,.,, K g: -a " 176,-. 1 ' .1.,i:V,, V. ' ,V . ' , -J," ' .V , ' YS ," '. xx - f ' '- fi 'V H' , AR-Cff,E3! , ' " 'V ' N ,. G- -i jffaugfl-5 -f' , 15. j I V3, AS N. ,. ' Li' ' 'f'-1' - i-'Q Q' '- 'wi V Vfii. .' L A .. - , -gf. . -V 41-"" X. a' V1 5- ' ' i"fL - 'Q ' . .. " -V. x I ' '.1'V ,:1XNV x1'. .L I -yd' - " ,,,. J fz:v:..: 4.25 if 1 " 1 ' -Q '4 -V x y 1 .-' X J , - 1 . "1 'V " -V . "f ' V, 2 -' ,- 'iw' ' :!. . -' - 'V . -if ', ,- 'f'.f,- - 1 , 4 Y .- . 5' - X ,av ' V1 . L ff ' V' A , A V - . .wiv Q..- my V - V V Law , -V . - . f . ,- mt A .- V I, U ,, , QQ ,.,,,7 . e,g.,.-,VV , 4. 1.4 . - 1 1 , V-,,f,5, A , V Vu. .- ., ,X . ,X -..w . .V , -' Q'-L,Q,'r4 ,'. - .g, Q", 3 , I,-1jV-'V V. .E'-'A - P N A - ,V ' 3 .159 V 'gt' ---' I ,J ' .Y I ',1'g-mg-u' I 5' 1.,4', .Aqaba ' - :V IV A 1.3, fl X an w,..J I 10, I R Und - Y :N-,IJ 4 ,, 6- - if s ,E A Y-Flxig 3, is A ,CWA .,-,- IA.. ,, - . .I ,, V T., ' ,,-2, ,ng -, iggew,-1 "5,f'y1,, 'x . Y . .. ,HRM ' -L: .- ,, , ,fp A fy V' .51 V, X V-I ,Y 1, Vr wwf A . -N .1-..,-awww H A w A -1 . .av V150 1 yi 1 -49 -1 f 1 x X Vw, - ' J ,ff X rv -I V fgufg-i ' 1 ,-- V :Q-i , I ',Vxi2,Vffv "x":f Vf-gg"Ii , E fs Lf , V 'I , ' ' " , 7 . - 11- 'V ,M wqfiaff :5fI.Q- V f K ' 7 N iVQ.:?1A3'f Vw .. fc A-X. 'N fu: Tfflfff f -H2551 ,ff , V ,, 'V -me N1 1,-..VI.1:. V'i'f ' " rf -ii-:F Jef f f , if , . . X . .-,,,,1,V,V-V. . , , - 9.41 f-fffnf,. V V ,. . , - AE? ., ,J .- '!.-7.""s'1-L-, . , V 4.1 XX ' V V 'J' fi ' , fi V 1 -' ' V' NV x af-1, ww' Yiff, 'pf ' , ,iv I :Tu g: ' '- . 1'f MP1 Q V 1 4, ' . I f' .H r' , A iff' VV V -' 45 ' " 1 1 V " . sa' 1 4- ,wa f 9 4 ,151 ' . ?x11'p,'w., vw . ' J uv .-H 1 .V a- V " 7' ' V X. "' KJ' ' X f , ' V io 5- ' " I ' 1: 'ga' ' , 'A Y. 2' ' Q Vlij-i .7 X f ' Q4 1, as 'L' , +131-2f'V ' V , 'L5giJY'e."i1??1.h ,' "4 -f: ,H , V ' . ' f- ., L -V. X , 1' , r V V 21, f-f 'run -'01, V gif ,, ,- V A .. , x V V , ,J V , . , ,ff - , . -,N . - . V' -LV -L-Vr.'.'-1-VV-A V- .. -' .fx 11.--':V" - fQy1: ,,gfg- .V 1 if. , .V-' " Q riff?-T-5' T" . ' f , if . ' . , 'V Nx of T," 1n7."2'1f.-'f 112+ 5 V"-NSW" P' - 1 ' ' i I' .f A 95 -- . 5 1' - ,-'5 A V 5:3 , A N h N- A E Q, x ftviiv V1 F Swaps' ,iff-',.3:,2gfZ2L1fQ,.' ,-. - . ,- V ,, -. - . 5 '.' V V f- -' Vs, gp fs T N., V, . -wj '1, gal-,...4, , .Q ' g,-3: .Vg -1-, 1 ' I-'n ""f"X- '. L. - L" W '-f"'g.!'5w - ' W wVf1"Ki?f,V4E .VL'f4B"' -9-551 V - V '41 4 ' " . ' 7J""' 741572 V- N1 .zu if .- ' "i ' ,.., , , VQV12-, W 1, - , 5, sp-,J V,V.QV5f.,,? fx "Q SV- , -2:51, ' 59111 ' " . S 'nw 1' ' . V riff-3. .,,":,1?' - A .-. . , ,.,aV.. ,. ,. nga, QQ., ..4. .,,.,.b ,ax , , V, , i,, , .Y Y W , . A 5, , .,f!,..,, wg- F, 1, -'KH ., ,.- Nix. f f- --, . . . 4, . 1 ,- 1 ' .xA-9 , v 'L Y' ,. V A gave, ,-:f'f. .1 fy " 5 ' fijf w . 2V21f1 ' - " V' ' lim? f-V411 ' xc. ' A- QW-.' Nr? . ' A "' :i:' ?1f-:PFI .1 jV -7' .-...EE W Q -I 315 - Wg" "Mm . Na, , .' - 'il iz " 'WEF1 "X, ."i':"'2h?:I1' 'V I , . ' 'N ' " " N 'Inv 153' , ' -f42?L..VsZfLc'K V hx "!5ff6'f"ffF'f ' 5" :"' ' 4' ' ' J IV ' V- ' " F"-V " ' ' J- 'N V-'qw ,Qi-'ap-Vljaif,-P11-fig -' - VM.-, TT-in V. ri-ff 1 ,,,,.,a1, ,.. V V , V . ,. .f,,1:!,,-:' 1 N H -vw .- TQWLZ QM 73- ' , ..,. ,A ,. 5, ,gQf'V1gg.ELg7552534 X ' A wr- if Qi ng 'T 3VV..fLk.' X , , A ' . ' NV gf xl . , , V ,, '1':.r4'-ff '.w1'i-g.i-:1- , V-X w -V.. Fix. ' 'jlfi'-:-'. T ' :P-35,311 ' " 4 , V' 'L -:. Z' ,VJ V ' 152 J -'MKi:Z'5LJ1' " 2 ,. -Y -V " ' , ' V 'f -ff 9- -+ .1 . ,K - .' QQ' ' Qiiiiiffg? ' , 'I V. -V 'tiki V V". '5-2-q" " ' K " 41' r J ' -fn , 1 , '. " 'TI:i'!'ff'x -2311 ' f.',r- 4 I 1' 'V : g' " F Vx I ,,,, vt. 4 ... ., 6 -r Mx, -.M .. A , , 2 1 . k,. , . .,X --Q. -1 I -, 1 , L , .., ' ' '- 51' -3- g'f.-.,Q52,ffg, L' , A X Nlffii, " '. V". f.. ". jb'1""iiL: ' 9' ' ' ' '. -7 ' 1 -:L '21-'52 ' 5 V ' .' 'K V- , "V ff "-'iwei "ai V I ' V ,dun -'X' ' . X ' 97" 4 .,V1?""gV .V V M: X' - V - -- .V 'f V- il, 5 ' 'ff-'I , - V Ag. J. I 1 in-t 12, 1531. - 5 ., I- -,, ,, '-VV .' , , Q- A .012 -.., ,, ,ejrv V, V , , ' ., , "1 . 4" ,' . , - '- s 1-. -,J,,-, ,hw uv w, . 14,12-.-r., - ,, . --JA, .- f e , . s .,, 4. . , -. ,,-. , ,v ,H . I.: f ,, , -n. a Q f I TI fzzf h' -awpaf ,V- ' '-,.f.:f21L:z9m - ' 1r'1-fu., ,f 1' s.fb+.f V V . v 1 f, ' V 1-511'-45--"" A " X x- - ,, ", ,V 3 X571-V11-FV' , th. -w X A Qgg,f ,f,3,.2.VV,?,H ji Ak I, Aff. wg-3, 4x X. V - 9,3 ,Q .Ji 5 5,45 " gf qnflti' 31.fh .4?1f:Zif:?VA5g if " ,V "'f,J"1'1fffi -- menu -' fi ' wif, V' 1 , - E .f- I .V A A V ' -571.-J .. '. 913. ' V 1, ,:PffL'i025:"'-'f2f1Ji'4fVf I -- X21-, 'V . H' W- 19-i, f:,. 3: "' " .-1-:pf ' - ' V fl 9 f '- 4 f', -351 -' I ' f gg, ff 1 V' T"i- '1'yff'Q,fi',W'ff.'zf"?'h" ' -' F?i,i'7". ff' i f V ' -'ag -:A .- , ., we! , VV, V . ' U. . 3 fa " ' . .n 'Q' -V ,"m45iif2 'X fb G34 E . 'V Y ' " " f x' I " " X 'M I " 'Fi N5-ff Vm' J' j, 'T 44, V ' "' f-'ff ffv V -'f'5J,i'4 1 ' , A ,V V V V " . . Q V 'Vi-:V zfr' 1 'Ha V ' -V . ..,, -T " 113-27' 51- 1 -Q ' V -, 'L 1,'f"1J!" ' ' "' V V Vf ' .' V 7' - VV .V' 1? V' . '- I-1-' 1 -. ' - ' ,. J- '1 '!'e..1-1fi'3f:.f,, -V:??V,1'V?:" ' " -' '--1-1-,L:.:. 1 '- ' ' J. V: ' .H V-V. -V 'V 4- ' --W ." f -" . -- - PHX. ', 1- V.L- - P -, ' 2' .- . 1 V. ' V' LY.. " 7-if -2 'AH " " ' - 7-'Vg :'.1?E'---avr V 'L ' if 1 -24 24519 9-fVVV,zV' '. V.f'1,+v1..'Q,. v. 1- fs g.'feV ?w ff. -. lg? '-ff iiqfff Lf- ' 4 'ff "" f fhfffj 4.5! "4 s f- :V ' Levi "1'VV4 gg i' -. 7- .V w L- 2, '4 mg-'k , '. 7 , '-3-1: f -- -' R -- ' 4 ,,..4Vi.-5 fiff-sr 2 :',V1y2-.gf:V4.j4Q:r1:,1.-f-1-f?'af,'-,ffntliigg.-,,..-5-V::1.f,1:iZ.Li:'1-1 1,5-:V,y,,V,-., -1 V' "::'A:"'x'b' -J 9- -,. , , Q-V':f4Q-5FfPi3lCA:IfiTf'32312:-'-If?'s:fi2E- H5571 4-2?'?-:'f7Ei'6'3i?lVZ'1f:'Eff' -L'I':-1332 -5.51-VA'-.T-I-ikii '5i'5-"5 1? 1-35 :S-1' ' .vf4Vf,iii.-ibm., .5 , 1 Q1-fa-41 iff -fgy:-iifffnfVHS3:f2fg,"4?-ifgze,A,,'f2"'f:f::.4,g' "ifis..q1 E-a-wxfsif 525' fl 1 ".g,- 'ifxi'-:IFE 1:55:21fiqC.if'fSf?Lf?Z:?Z-Lf


Suggestions in the University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) collection:

University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1886 Edition, Page 1

1886

University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1887 Edition, Page 1

1887

University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1890 Edition, Page 1

1890

University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1893 Edition, Page 1

1893

University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1894 Edition, Page 1

1894

University of Pennsylvania - Record Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1897 Edition, Page 1

1897

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.