University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA)

 - Class of 1909

Page 24 of 178

 

University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1909 Edition, Page 24 of 178
Page 24 of 178



University of the Pacific School of Dentistry - Chips Yearbook (San Francisco, CA) online yearbook collection, 1909 Edition, Page 23
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Page 24 text:

ted that some men are natural teachers, having, in a higher degree than others, those requisites of tact and ability to impart knowledge and inspire interest and application. It is also admitted that students vary greatly in disposition and ability, and that classes formed of heterogeneous materials can never be alike, and that no two classes can be relied upon to act in the same way. Some wise man, although probably not particularly well acquainted with the genus homo as represented by the medical student, has laid down the law that, although one cannot prejudge what any given man will do, one can, with considerable accuracy, prophesy what a number of men in a body under a given set of circumstances will attempt. For that reason, it is safe to say that all classes, medical or otherwise, are assembled for the common purpose of acquiring knowledge, and will act in har- mony with all efforts to further that end. It is therefore natural to suppose that the proper way to maintain the proper relationship between teacher and taught is in a mutual effect to attain the accomplish- ment of the results for which these two are brought together, viz., the acquirement of medical training. This may sound to many like a mere elaboration of the old adage to get in and work, and, after thinking it over, I am of the same opinion. However, the advice is sound, although old, and students may take comfort from the fact that the prescription calls for hard work on the professor's part also. lt is my belief, and I think it is the experience of most teachers, that relations with the classes are, as a rule, of the 1nost pleasant nature. and in this con- nection we ought to remember that those of our faculty whom we look back upon with the fondest remembrances are those very men who kept our noses closest to the proverbial grindstone. Xhfhen all is said and done, and argument tried and laid aside, it is well to remember that the relationship between professor and student should be, and l think usually is, that of two men working wholly 'and agreeablv together, eondoning each other's faults and sharing each other's burdens, keeping- always in view and maintaining ever in their minds that object for which both have given themselves. the addition of more useful members to that most stern of mothers and most worthy of sciences--medicine. 27

Page 23 text:

retrogressing to the stage of the simian anthropoid? I repeat, have you seen this man, the man who never received a satisfactory answer in quiz, who never demeaned himself to praise a diligent student or lend a helping hand to a backward one? I-low many men are there today, registered in the great book of life as failures, who would have been useful men in their profession had it not been for the hopeless discour- agement dealt out to them by professors of this "crabbing," overbearing variety? Truly can they cry out from their positions by the wayside, where they have fallen aside, and say that their ambition was destroyed by him who should have cherished it most. These types, purposely a little overdrawn, show some of the chief causes of failure on the part of the professor to "make good" his relationship with the student. On the part of the student, the reasons for failure to fulfill his part of the contract are unlimited. Many men cannot be taught, having been born Minerva- like, with all the wisdom of the ages carefully stored away in the convolutions of their cerebri, usually remaining there, refusing to come out under any and all circumstances. This type of student is familiar to all of us. Another type, equally self-important, is the chap who, although his head contains almost nothing, is continually producing something there- from in the shape of semi-lurid ideas, and fondly parading them for the edification of an unenlightened world. This is the young man who spends half the night studying up catch questions to ask his pro- fessor the following morning. He is usually an encyclopedia of misinformation, a thorn in the side of his teacher, a waste of time in his class hours, and a source of delight to the more easily amused of his classmates. Many other things go to make up the whole in this lack of eo-operation which may exist between pro- fessor and student, teacher and taught. It is admit- 26



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Nauheim Baths By Sydney R. Dannenbaum, M. D. AD Nauheim is situated in the fertile district of the Wetterati, on the western slope of Hjohannis- bergf' a spur of the Taunus Mountains, and on the river Usa. A shady avenue, bordered on both sides by beautiful villas, leads from the station, east of the town, to thelhot springs CSprudelD and to the baths, half encircling these, and ending on the north at the terrace of the "Kurhaus": on the south it touches the "Parka1lee,', an avenue leading to the foot of the Johannisberg. The large and shady park, covering- an area of more than 300 acres C105 hectaresj, terminates on the north in the big lakeg on the south, east, and west, it runs up to the streets of the town. Records as well as discoveries--for instance, salt pans made during excavations-have proven that Nauheim was a settlement at the very earliest Roman period. On the first of July, 1835, the opening of a new brine bath establishment at Nauheim was announced. Since that time the population has increased wonder- fully, and Bad Nauheim is now a world-renowned health resort. In 1835, there were 1,235 visitors. while they now average over 50,000 each year. The official season lasts from May lst to Septem- ber 30th, but some of the bath houses are open in April and October. The Bath Cure.-Nauheim belongs, as far as its bathing springs are concerned, to the ferruginous, very highly carbonated thermal saline waters. The natural heat is between 86 and 94 degrees lf. Its efficacious properties are due to this and the amount of thermal salt, chloride of calcium, and other chlor- ine salts-2.5 to 3.3 per cent, of which 2.1 to 2.9 per cent is thermal salt: also iron and other numeral 28

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